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Full text of "Certain comeoverers"

BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




^f^f- 



¥-, 




CERTAIN 
COMEOVERERS 



BY 



HENRY HOWLAND CRAPO 

1 



VOLUME I 




NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

E. ANTHONY & SONS, Incorp., Printers 

1912 



OS 11 



CH<^ < f 



# 



FOR 

WILLIAM WALLACE CRAPO 

THE SECOND OF THE NAME 

THESE MEMORABILIA OF HIS FOREBEARS 
ARE WRIT DOWN 

BY 

HIS PATERNAL UNCLE 

HENRY HOWLAND CRAPO 

MCMXII 



Vita mortuorum in memoria vivorum 
est posita 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Volume I 



Explanatory 

List of Comeoverers 



PAGE 

1 

9 



PART I 
ANCESTORS OF JESSE CRAPO 



Circular Chart 




facing 18 


CHAPTER 


I. Origo Nominis ..... 19 


II. Peter Crapo, the First 






29 


III. Resolved White 






43 


IV. Judith Vassall 






59 


V. Thomas Clark 






69 


VI. Thomas Tobey 






77 


VII. Peter Crapo, the Second 






85 


VIII. Jesse Crapo . 






97 



PART II 
ANCESTORS OF PHEBE HOW LAND 



Circular Chart 


facing 104 


CHAPTER 




I. John Cooke . 


. 105 


II. Richard Warren 


. 123 


III. Arthur Hathaway 


. 129 


IV. Henry and Arthur Howland 


. 135 


V. John Russell 


. 155 



vm 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 





PART II— Continued 








CHAPTER PAGE 


VI. 


John Smith ...... 165 


VII. 


George Allen 








179 


VIII. 


Benjamin Hammond 








187 


IX. 


William Spooner 








197 


X. 


John Briggs 








205 


XI. 


Adam Mott . 








213 


XII. 


Phebe Howland 








225 




PART III 


ANCESTORS OF ANNE ALMY CHASE 


Circular Chart .... facing 232 


CHAPTER 


I. 


Thomas Cornell 233 


II. 


Philip Sherman .... 


243 


III. 


Richard Borden .... 


251 


IV. 


William Chase .... 


261 


V. 


William Almy .... 


269 


VI. 


John Tripp ..... 


281 


VII. 


Anthony Shaw and Peter Tallman . 


289 


VIII. 


Pardon Tillinghast 


297 


IX. 


Philip Tabor .... 


305 


X. 


Stukeley Westcote and Thomas Stafford 


315 


XI. 


Richard Kirby .... 


323 


XII. 


Anne Almy Chase 






. 


327 



PART IV 
ANCESTORS OF WILLIAMS SLOCVM 
Circular Chart .... facing 332 

CHAPTER 

I. Giles Slocum ..... 333 

II. Eliezer Slocum ..... 345 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



IX 





PART IV— Continued 


; 






CHAPTER 


PAGE 


III. 


Richard Scott 


361 


IV. 


Catherine Marbury 








369 


V. 


Christopher Holder 








381 


VI. 


Joseph Nicholson 








395 


VII. 


Ralph Earle 








409 


VIII. 


Edward Dillingham 








419 


IX. 


Williams Slocum 








423 




PART V 




ANCESTORS OF SARAH MORSE SMITH 




Circular Chart .... facing 434 


CHAPTER 




I 


Nicholas Noyes .... 


435 


II. 


Thomas Smith 








447 


in 


John Knight 








459 


IV 


Richard Ingersoll 








463 


v. 


Anthony Mors f e . 








467 


VI 


The Newbury Witch 








477 


VII 


William Moody . 








. 491 


VIII 


. James Ordway 








499 


IX 


John Emery 








. 507 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Volume II 



PART V— Continued 



CHAPTER 


PAGE 


X. 


Aquila Chase .... 


521 


XI. 


George Carr .... 


529 


XII. 


John Perkins .... 


541 


XIII. 


Thomas Bradbury- 


547 


XIV. 


Mary Perkins Bradbury, the Witch 


551 


XV. 


John Bailey .... 


557 


XVI. 


Thomas Newman 


567 


XVII. 


John Spark .... 


571 


XVIII. 


Richard Kimball 


575 


XIX. 


"William Phillips 


583 


XX. 


Robert Long .... 


597 


XXI. 


William Hutchinson 


603 


XXII. 


Anne Marbury Hutchinson . 


613 


XXIII. 


Sarah Morse Smith 

PART VI 


633 


ANCESTORS OF ABNER TOP PAN 




Circular Chart .... facinc 


j 642 


CHAPTER 




I. 


Abraham Toppan 


643 


II. 


Henry Sewall .... 


651 


III. 


Stephen Dummer .... 


665 


IV. 


Jacob and Hannah Toppan 


671 


v. : 


Vlichael Wigglesworth 


687 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 


xi 


PART VI— Continued 




CHAPTER 


PAGE 


VI. The Day of Doom 


. 699 


VII. Tristram Coffin .... 


. 709 


VIII. Edmund Greenleaf 


. 725 


IX. Theodore Atkinson 


. 731 


X. Abner Toppan .... 


. 739 



PART VII 




ANCESTORS OF AARON DAVIS 




Circular Chart .... 


facing 744 


CHAPTER 




I. John Davis .... 


. 745 


II. William Haskell 


. 755 


III. Zaccheus Gould 


. 761 


IV. William Knapp 


. 769 


V. Nathaniel Eaton 


. 775 


VI. Aaron Davis, Third . 


. 791 



PART VIII 
ANCESTORS OF ELIZABETH STANFORD 



795 



PART IX 
TABLES OF DESCENT 

CHAPTER 

I. Descent of William Wallace Crapo from 

his sixteen great great grandparents . 

Circular Chart . . . facing 



821 
822 



XII 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PART IX— Continued 

CHAPTER PAGE 

II. Descent of Jesse Crapo . . . 831 

Circular Chart . . . facing 832 

III. Descent of Phebe Howland . . . 839 
Circular Chart . . . facing 840 

IV. Descent of Williams Slocum . . 861 
Circular Chart . . . facing 862 

V. Descent of Anne Almy Chase . . 869 

Circular Chart . . . facing 870 

VI. Descent of Abner Toppan . . . 885 

Circular Chart . . . facing 886 

VII. Descent of Aaron Davis . . . 899 

Circular Chart . . . facing 900 

VIII. Descent of Sarah Morse Smith . . 909 

Circular Chart . . . facing 910 

IX. Descendants of Jesse Crapo and Phebe 

Howland 929 

X. Descendants of Williams Slocum and 

Anne Almy Chase .... 949 
XI. Descendants of Abner Toppan and Eliza- 
beth Stanford 959 

XII. Descendants of Aaron Davis and Sarah 

Morse Smith 995 



Addenda : Rebecca Bennett 
Index of Names 



1009 
1017 



EXPLANATORY 



EXPLANATORY 

To William Wallace Crapo 

of Detroit, Michigan, 

My dear William: 

At the present lustrum of your life you are, and 
should be, supremely indifferent to your ances- 
tors. They are dead and gone and that's an end 
on't. Your utmost powers of receptivity are 
properly absorbed by vital considerations. "Dead 
uns are nit " — as you would put it. In presenting 
you the following notes I ask not that you con- 
sciously attempt to change your present attitude. 
Inevitably there will come a time when these 
records of your forebears will have for you at 
least a passing interest. To you at that time I 
dedicate them. I hope, indeed, the time will never 
come when the pulse of glorious life will beat so 
slowly that you can afford to devote it to genea- 
logical study. A lonely and a sterile life alone 
can find sufficient satisfaction in the dry-as-dust 
occupation of delving into dreary records to find 
a name, a mere name, the date when the name was 
born and died, the date when the name married 
another name, and the dates of all the other names 
that went before and came after. 



2 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Hoping to save you from so deplorable an 
expenditure of vitality, I, not inappropriately, 
present to you the names of many of the men 
and women who are responsible for your exist- 
ence. Were that all I offer it would be hardly 
worth while for either of us. I seek, however, to 
offer something more. These men and women 
whom I name were all once fellows and girls, as 
much alive as you are now. They were born, and 
had the measles, and loved and lived and died 
much in the same way and to the same purpose, 
as has been and will be your experience. As 
Slender said of Shallow in the Merry Wives of 
Windsor: "All his successors gone before him 
have done 't ; and all his ancestors that come after 
him may." Three hundred years hence there 
will, I trust, be some of your descendants who 
may care a little to realize even vaguely that you 
were alive once upon a time and had a vital his- 
tory which, to you at all events, was filled with 
interest. To call these old fellows and girls back 
— nay forward — as living realities is what I seek 
to offer you. As vital personalities they deserve 
your kindly attention and affection. They are all 
your grandfathers and grandmothers, and had it 
not been for them you would not have been — 
surely not you at all events. They are your own 
people, flesh of your flesh, and blood of your blood. 

In Japan the old Shintoism made the Cult of 
Ancestors the supreme religion. I do not suggest 
your adoption of such a faith. Your ancestors 
were no better than they should have been, if, in- 
deed, in many instances, they reached that stand- 



EXPLANATORY 3 

ard. You at all events are, or should be, im- 
measurably their superior. Yet there is ethical 
value in Shintoism. To keep alive and present 
in one's home and life the memory of those remote 
beings whose existence produced one's own exist- 
ence is a form of human allegiance which tran- 
scends even patriotism. Many millions, to be 
sure, yes billions, and trillions (and whatever 
comes next) of human beings are, in truth, direct- 
ly responsible for your existence. The retro- 
progression is too stupendous for sensible con- 
ception. There is a limit, moreover, to genea- 
logical endeavor. The limit in this case I fix at 
your "comeoverers." Certain men and women 
came to this country which we now call the United 
States of America from the other side of the 
Atlantic Ocean, from England mostly, one, per- 
haps, from France, none so far as I know from 
any other European country, who are your pa- 
ternal ancestors. It so happens that almost all 
of these paternal comeoverers of yours came dur- 
ing the early days of immigration. If the same 
is true of your maternal comeoverers, and I fancy 
it is, you are for the most part of the tenth gen- 
eration of New England descent and consequently 
have two thousand and forty-six ancestors to be 
accounted for, of whom one thousand and twenty- 
four were comeoverers. You may, perhaps, un- 
derstand why I regard it as fortunate that my 
inquiries exclude one-half of them, namely your 
mother's progenitors. The one thousand and 
twenty-three ancestors and the five hundred and 
twelve comeoverers are quite sufficient to appal 



4 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

me, and you, too, doubtless, if you are fearful that 
I mean in these notes to vitalize for you so vast 
a congregation of "dead uns. ' ' It is, indeed, only 
a comparatively few of the one thousand and 
twenty-three ancestors to whom I shall be able 
to give you a personal introduction. In the cir- 
cular charts which I furnish you in connection 
with these notes you will perceive the blanks, 
which in the radiation backwards cause such vast 
hiati. 

These paternal ancestors of yours, with the 
exception of the Stanfords, were of early Massa- 
chusetts stock. They were for the most part of 
the "yeoman" or farmer class; there were some 
"artisans" among them, a few "merchants," a 
few "gentlemen," and a very few "ministers." 
Few of them were of distinguished lineage. Your 
grandfather William Wallace Crapo's progeni- 
tors, without exception, so far as I have been 
able to ascertain, are descended from the early 
settlers of the Plymouth Colony and the Ehode 
Island Colonies, and your grandmother Sarah 
Tappan Crapo's progenitors all, except the Stan- 
fords, spring from the early settlers of the Massa- 
chusetts Bay Colony. In Plymouth and Bristol 
Counties or in Rhode Island on the one side, and 
in Essex and Suffolk Counties on the other they 
dwelt. Few among them were renowned. They 
were almost without exception very decent sort of 
folk, exemplary and mediocre, whose personal 
histories if not of much importance to the world 
at large are none the less worthy of your interest 
and mine. 



EXPLANATORY 5 

Your father, like most people, had four great 
grandfathers and four great grandmothers. They 
were: 

Jesse Crapo 

Phebe Howland 

Williams Slocum 
Anne Almy Chase 

Abner Toppan 
Elizabeth Stanford 

Aaron Davis 
Sarah Morse Smith 

For purely literary reasons I shall present to 
you the ancestors of these eight forebears in the 
following order, in the divisions of these notes : 

Part I. Ancestors of Jesse Crapo. 
Part II. Ancestors of Phebe Howland. 
Part III. Ancestors of Anne Almy Chase. 
Part IV. Ancestors of Williams Slocum. 
Part V. Ancestors of Sarah Morse Smith. 
Part VI. Ancestors of Abner Toppan. 
Part VII. Ancestors of Aaron Davis. 
Part VIII. Ancestors of Elizabeth Stanford. 

It is more especially my purpose to tell the 
stories of some of the comeoverers from whom 
these eight great great grandparents of yours 
descended, and something also about a few of the 
descendants of these comeoverers from whom in 
direct lineage you spring. The temptation to 
stray from the direct line of descent has been 
great. So many interesting people are collat- 



6 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

erally connected with these lineal ancestors of 
yours that it has required much resolution on 
my part not to bring some of them into these 
notes. I have, however, for the most part, stead- 
fastly held to my determination not to be led 
astray from the straight path. 

Necessarily the personal stories of your come- 
overers are intimately connected with certain 
episodes of the early story of New England, and 
in presenting their biographies I have unavoid- 
ably made frequent references to events in the 
history of the founding of New England which 
doubtless assume a more intimate knowledge of 
history than you have any reason to possess. The 
history of the settlement of the Plymouth and 
Massachusetts Bay Colonies is fundamentally the 
basis of the history of your comeoverers. The 
history of the settlement of the towns of New 
Plymouth, Sandwich, Rochester, Dartmouth, 
Salem, Boston, Ipswich, Newbury, Salisbury, 
Gloucester, Providence, R. I., Portsmouth, R. I., 
and Warwick, R. I., and other early New England 
towns is necessarily intimately involved in the 
personal history of their settlers from whom you 
descend. The Pilgrim and the Puritan religious 
faiths, the Antinomian controversy, the Quaker 
persecutions, the Witchcraft delusion, the Indian 
wars, and other burning topics of the early day3 r 
cannot be ignored in telling the stories of your 
ancestors who were closely affected by them. To 
attempt, however, to elucidate in these notes the 
historical conditions which bore directly on the 
fortunes of your forefathers and mothers would 



EXPLANATORY 7 

involve us both in an effort which would be far 
more laborious than satisfactory. Nor do I ex- 
pect my presentation of these biographical notes 
will stimulate your interest to such a pitch that 
you will seek to familiarize yourself with the 
mise-en-scene of the play in which your forebears 
acted their subordinate parts by any attempt to 
assimilate the vast accumulation of literature 
which portrays it. To me, however, the knowl- 
edge of the story of the settlement of New Eng- 
land which I have, perforce, acquired in the wide 
search for facts connected with my inquiries in 
your behalf, has been an ample reward for the 
work. To imitate the delightfully absurd style 
of Cotton Mather, I confess that the first and best 
fruit of my genealogical labors has been a realiza- 
tion of the demonstration through a wondrous 
concatenation of simple testimonies that this New 
England of ours was founded by men and women 
who were dominated by spiritual and not material 
aspirations. By their works we may know them, 
but through their faith were we made. 

These notes make no claim of completeness or 
of unassailable accuracy. They make no pre- 
tense of masquerading as original contributions 
of any importance to genealogical or historical 
lore. They lack, indeed, the essential virtue of 
serious genealogical work — the scrupulous exam- 
ination and analysis of the direct evidence of 
original records. On the contrary they are based 
largely on hearsay. Very little independent 
work in the investigation of original sources of 
information has gone into their construction. The 



g CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

published genealogies of a considerable number 
of the families with whom you are of kin ; the mar- 
vellous compendium known as the New England 
Historical and Genealogical Register; Mr. Aus- 
tin's admirable work on the early settlers of 
Rhode Island; the publications of Historical 
Societies, notably the Old Dartmouth Historical 
Society; town histories; and in general the free 
use of the numerous handy tools of the trade of 
genealogy have, with the assistance of several 
kind helpers, supplied the data which I now pre- 
sent to you. The utmost to which these notes 
may aspire is to give you sometime in the future, 
when you have ceased to see visions and have 
come to dream dreams, a roughly sketched picture 
of that little portion of long ago humanity which 
by the accident of your birth involves your exist- 
ence. The notes may not even achieve that 
aspiration. I keenly appreciate the undeniable 
fact that they contain much dry statistical in- 
formation which may reasonably bore you. After 
all, even if you can not take pleasure in reading 
them all you will, perhaps, be pleased to know 
that they have given me much pleasure in writ- 
ing them. 

Affectionately your uncle, 

Henry H. Crapo. 



A LIST OF 

CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

FROM WHOM YOU DIRECTLY DESCEND 

WHO ARE 

MENTIONED IN THESE NOTES 



LIST OF COMEOVERERS 



NAME 



SHIP 



Tear of 
Immigration 



Alcock, George . 
Alcock, wife of George 
Alcock, John 
Allen, George . 
Allen, Ralph 
Almy, Audrey . 
Almy, Christopher 
Almy, William . 
Atkinson, Abigail 
Atkinson, Theodore 
Bailey, John 
Bailey, John, Jr. 
Bennett, Elizabeth 
Bennett, Rebecca 
Bennett, Robert 
Borden, Joan . 
Borden, Richard 
Bradbury, Thomas 
Briggs, John 
Briggs, wife of John 
Briggs (Taunton) 
Brown, Mary 
Brown, Thomas 
Brown, William 
Brown, Mary . 
Carr, George 
Chase, Aquila . 
Chase, Mary 
Chase, William 
Chase, William, Jr 
Clark, Thomas 



Abigail 
Abigail 
Abigail 



Angel Gabriel 
Angel Gabriel 



James 
James 



Ann 



1630 

1630 

—1637 

1635 

1635 

1635 

1635 

1635 

1634 

1634 

1635 

1635 

—1642 

—1639 

—1639 

—1637 

—1637 

1634 

—1638 

—1638 

1635 

1635 



—1633 
—1636 
1630 
1630 
1630 
1623 



12 



CERTAIN COMEOVBRERS 



Coffin, Dionis . 









1642 


Coffin, Joan 









1642 


Coffin, Tristram 






. 


1642 


Coffin, Tristram, Jr 








1642 


Coker, Robert . 






Mary and John 


1634 


Cook, John 








—1643 


Cook, Mary 








—1643 


Cook, Thomas . 






. 


—1643 


Cook, Thomas . 










Cooke, Francis 






Mayflower 


1620 


Cooke, Hester . 






Ann 


1623 


Cooke, John 






Mayflower 


1620 


Cornell, Rebecca 









—1638 


Cornell, Thomas 








—1638 


Crapo, Peter 









abt. 1680 


Cutting, John . 









—1634 


Davis, John 






. 


—1638 


Day, Anthony 








—1645 


Deacon, Phebe . 








—1638 


Dillingham, Drusilla 






1632 


Dillingham, Edward 






1632 


Dillingham, Henry 







1632 


Dummer, Alice 




Bevis . 


1638 


Dummer, Jane . 






Bevis . 


1638 


Dummer, Stephen 






Bevis . 


1638 


Earle, Ralph 








1634 


Earle, Joan . 








1634 


Eaton, Nathaniel 






Hector 


1637 


Emery, Ann 






James 


1635 


Emery, Eleanor 






James 


1635 


Emery, John 






James 


1635 


Emery, John, Jr. . 






James 


1635 


Emery, Mary 






James 


1635 


Fisher, Edward 






. . 


—1638 


Fisher, Judith . 









—1638 


Fitzgerald, Elephel 









—1680 



LIST OF COMEOVERERS 



13 



Follansbee, Thomas 














—1660 


Godfrey, John . ! 


\Iary and John 


1634 


Godfrey, wife of John . I 


\lary and John 


1634 


Godfrey, Peter '. ] 


tfary and John 


1634 


Gould, Phebe . 






—1638 


Gould, Priscilla 














—1638 


Gould, Zaccheus 














—1638 


Graves, Thomas 














. —1635 


Graves, son of Thomas 












—1635 


Greenleaf, Edmund 












1634 


Greenleaf, Judith . 












1634 


Greenleaf, Sarah . 












1634 


Hammond, Benjamin . . < 


jtriffin 






1634 


Hammond, Elizabeth Penn < 


jriffin 






1634 


Haskell, William . 


. 






1637 


Hathaway, Arthur 








—1643 


Hilton, Mary .... 










Holder, Christopher . . ' 


Speedwell 




1656 


Howland, Arthur . ^ 


lames or Ann 


1621-3 


Howland, Henry . t 


^ames or Ann 


1621-3 


Hutchinson, Anne ( 


jriffin 


1634 


Hutchinson, Bridget . . ( 


Jriffin 






1634 


Hutchinson, Susanna . . ( 


jriffin 






1634 


Hutchinson, William . . ( 


jriffin 






1634 


Ingersoll, Ann . r 


ralbot 






1629 


Ingersoll, Bathsheba . . r . 


ralbot 






1629 


Ingersoll, Richard . r 


ralbot 






1629 


Kimball, Richard 


. . ] 


Elizabeth 




1634 


Kimball, Thomas 


. . ] 


Elizabeth 




1634 


Kimball, Ursula 


. . ] 


Elizabeth 




1634 


Kirby, Richard . 




. 




—1636 


Kirby, Jane . 




. 






—1636 


Knapp, John 




. 






1630 


Knapp, William 










1630 


Knight, John 


i 


r ames 






1635 


Knight, Elizabeth 


t 


r am 


es 








1635 



11 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Knott, George . 
Knott, Martha . 
Long, Robert 
Long, Zachariah 
Lott, Mary . . 
Machett, Susanna 
Marbury, Catherine 
Masters, Jane . 
Masters, John . 
Masters, Lydia . 
Merrick, James 
Moody, William 
Moody, Sarah . 
Morse, Anthony 
Morse, Mary 
Mott, Adam . . 
Mott, Adam, Jr. 
Mott, John . 
Mott, Sarah 
Mudge, Mary . 
Mudge, Thomas 
Newland, Mary 
Newman, Thomas 
Nicholson, Joseph 
Noyes, Nicholas 
Odding, Sarah . 
Oliver, Elizabeth 
Ordway, James 
Paine, Anthony 
Paine, Mary 
Palgrave, Anne 
Palgrave, Richard 
Palgrave, Sarah 
Perkins, John . 
Perkins, Judith 
Perkins, Mary . 



Defense 
Defense 
Defense 



Griffin 



James 

Mary and John 

Mary and John 

James 

James 

Defense 

Defense 



Defense 



Mary and 



Mary and 



Lyon . 
Lyon . 
Lyon . 



abt 



John 



John 



-1637 

-1637 

1635 

1635 

1635 

1649 

1634 

1630 

1630 

1630 

1635 

1634 

1634 

1635 

1635 

1635 

1635 

1639 

1635 

1638 

1638 

-1637 

1634 

-1659 

1634 

-1633 

-1633 

-1648 

-1638 

-1638 

1630 

1630 

1630 

1631 

1631 

1631 



LIST OF COMEOVERERS 15 

Phillips, William . . . Falcon (?) . . ( ?) 1635 

Porter, Margaret — 1633 

Pratt, Bathsheba . . . Ann .... 1623 

Pratt, Joshua .... Ann .... 1623 

Ricketson, William — 1679 

Ring, Mary . 1629 

Ring, Susanna 1629 

Russell, Dorothy —1642 

Russell, John —1642 

Sawyer, Ruth —1643 

Sawyer, William — 1643 

Scott, Martha .... Elizabeth . . ' 1634 

Scott, Richard .... Griffin . . . 1634 

Sears, Thomas — 1638 

Sennet, Walter —1638 

Sewall, Hannah . . . Prudent Mary . 1661 

Sewall, Henry 1634 

Sewall, Henry, Jr. . . Elizabeth and Dorcas 1634 

Shatswell, Mary 

Shaw, Anthony — 1653 

Sherman, Philip 1633 

Sisson, Richard — 1653 

Slocum, Giles — 1638 

Slocum, Joan — 1638 

Smith, Joanna .... James . . . 1635 

Smith, John —1628 

Smith, Rebecca . . . James . . . 1635 

Smith, Thomas . . . James . . . 1635 

Smith, Thomas 

Spark, John 

Spooner, William — 1637 

Sprague, Francis . . Ann .... 1623 

Sprague, wife of Francis . Ann .... 1623 

Stafford, Thomas —1626 

Stanford, John (?) or 1635 

Stanford, Thomas (?) 1684 



16 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Stonard, Alice 
Stonard, John . 
Tabor, Philip . 
Tallman, Peter 
Tibbot, Mary . 
Tibbot, Walter 
Tidd, Joshua 
Tidd, Sarah 
Tillinghast, Pardon 
Tobey, Thomas 
Toppan, Abraham 
Toppan, Susanna 
Tripp, John 
Vassall, Anna . 
Vassall, Judith 
Vassall, "William 
Vincent, John . 
Vincent, Mary . 
Walker, John . 
Walker, Katherine 
Warren, Elizabeth 
Warren, Richard 
Webster, John 
Westcote, Mercy 
Westcote, Stukeley 
Wheeler, John . 
Wheeler, Anne . 
White, Resolved 
White, Susanna 
White, William 
Wigglesworth, Edward 
Wigglesworth, Esther 
Wigglesworth, Michael 
Wilde, John 
Williams, Mary 
Williams, Nathaniel 



Mary Anne 
Mary Anne 

Blessing 
Blessing 
Arabella 



Ann 
Mayflower 



Mary and John 
Mary and John 
Mayflower 
Mayflower 
Mayflower 



—1645 

—1645 

—1633 

—1648 

—1640 

—1640 

—1636 

—1636 

1643 

—1644 

1637 

1637 

—1638 

1635 

1635 

1630 

—1637 

—1637 

—1639 

—1639 

1623 

1620 

—1634 

—1636 

—1636 

1634 

1634 

1620 

1620 

1620 

1638 

1638 

1638 

—1637 

—1639 

—1639 



PART I 
ANCESTORS 

OF 

JESSE CRAPO 



Chapter I 
ORIGO NOMINIS 



ORIGO NOMINIS 



ODE TO AN EXPIRING PROG 

BY MRS. LEO HUNTER 

' ' Can I view thee panting, lying 
On thy stomach, without sighing; 
Can I unmoved see thee dying 
On a log 
Expiring frog ! ' ' 



Beautiful," said Mr. Pickwick. 
'Fine," said Mr. Leo Hunter, "so simple." 
'Very, " said Mr. Pickwick. 
'All point, sir, all point," said Mr. Leo Hunter. 



To me, my dear William, these pathetic verses 
of Mrs. Leo Hunter (wouldn't you have liked to 
hear her spout them at the fete-champetre in the 
character of Minerva?) have indeed a point. 

"Johnny Crapaud" as the generic designation 
of a Frenchman I was told in my callow youth 
was the name which the insular prejudice of per- 
fidious Albion applied to the natives of la belle 
France, because, forsooth, they ate frogs. I used 
to wonder whether the correlative nickname of 
"John Bull" was similarly traceable to a predi- 
lection for the "good roast beef of old England." 
This dogma of the frog-eating Frenchman I obedi- 



22 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

ently accepted until I chanced in turning the pages 
of a French Dictionary to find that the word 
crapaud — was it possible? — meant TOAD? Now 
it may perhaps be a question of taste as to 
whether frogs' legs, skinned, well salted and 
broiled over a quick fire, are entitled to a place 
in the roll of epicurean delights, but it is impos- 
sible to believe that even the perverseness of 
insular bigotry would have charged a Frenchman 
with such a depth of culinary depravity as broiled 
toads. 

Perceiving that the frog-eating theory must be 
abandoned, I set forth in the valley of the shadow 
of philology. In my wanderings I found the expla- 
nation vouchsafed to my youthful inquiries so 
widely entertained and so often reiterated as to 
furnish almost an excuse for the ignorance of the 
French language entertained by my preceptors. 
None the less it is manifest that toads are not 
frogs. Some iconoclast propounded this idea 
under the head of "Notes and Queries." The 
usual result followed. Totally inconsistent and 
equally confident answers were contributed by 
that anonymous group of old-fogies who live and 
breathe and have their being in Notes and Queries. 
The Editors of Notes and Queries having negli- 
gently or maliciously failed to establish a court 
of final appeal to decide the queries mooted under 
their direction, you are at liberty to adopt any 
one of the learned explanations of the origin of 
the name of Crapo which happens to please your 
fancy. I will furnish you with a few specimens 
only from which to make a choice. 



ORIGO NOMINIS 23 

In the edition of Fabyan's Chronicles edited by 
Henry Ellis (1811) there is a good representation 
of "Ye olden armes of France," namely, "a 
shield argent, three toads erect, sable, borne by 
the name of Botereux." Newton's Heraldry 
(London, 1846) thus discourses about this ancient 
emblem: "The toads exhibited in this shield of 
arms are of very ancient appropriation and by 
some heralds are supposed to have been derived 
from services performed by an ancestor in the 
French army as early as the time of Childeric in 
the fifth century, by whom it is said toads were 
borne as the heraldic symbol of the country of 
Tournay in Flanders of which he was king. 
These toads were afterwards changed to fleur-de- 
lis in the royal standard of France. ' ' And to the 
same effect Elliott 's Horse Apocapyticae. 

One naturally wonders by what process of 
trans-substantiation the toads were turned into 
lilies. Surely he was an inept blazoner whose 
toads were mistaken for lilies. That, at least, 
seems more plausible than the explanation of a 
certain Miss Mullington (Heraldry in History, 
Poetry and Romance, London, 1858) who writes 
that the "legend of the noxious toad passing into 
the heaven-descended lily symbolizes respectively 
the gross errors and impure worship of paganism 
and the purity, majesty and dignity of the true 
faith embraced by Clovis at his baptism." The 
romantic and poetical Miss Mullington is, how- 
ever, corroborated by Raone de Presles (Grans 
Croniques de France) who says, "the device of 
Clovis was three toads, but after his baptism the 



24 CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 

Arians greatly hated him and assembled a large 
army under King Candat to put down the Chris- 
tian King. While on his way to meet the heretics 
he saw in the heavens his device miraculously 
change into three lilies or on a banure azure. He 
had such a banner instantly made and called it 
his 'liflamme.' Even before his army came in 
sight of King Candat the host of the heretic lay 
dead, slain like the army of Sennacherib by a 
blast from the God of battles." 

As an illustration of this explanation of the 
use of the sobriquet of Crapaud for a Frenchman 
you will find in Seward 's Anecdotes the following : 
i 'When the French took the city of Aras from 
the Spaniards under Louis XIV it was remem- 
bered that Nostradamus had said 'Les anciens 
crapauds prendront Sara ' — the ancient toads 
shall Sara take. This prophecy of Nostradamus 
(he died in 1566) was applied to this event in a 
somewhat roundabout manner. Sara is Aras 
backwards. By the ancient toads were meant the 
French, 'as that nation formerly had for its 
armorial bearings three of those odious reptiles 
instead of the three fleur-de-lis which it now 
bears.' " 

I will give you only one other explanation of 
our nickname. This is furnished by one W. T. M. 
of Reading, Mass. (1891). He says: "Jean 
Crapaud. The popular notion runs that this term 
was applied to Frenchmen through the idea gen- 
erally entertained that frogs were their favorite 
or national food. It seems, however, that the 
phrase is really associated with the natives of 



ORIGO NOMINIS 25 

Jersey. Moreover, crapaud is a toad and not a 
frog. The number of toads on the Island of Jer- 
sey, says an old magazine article, gave rise to 
the nickname Crapaud, applied to Jersey men. 
This by a sort of nautical ratiocination has been 
transferred to Frenchmen generally." To be 
able to slip off one's pen such a phrase as " nauti- 
cal ratiocination" in itself marks W. T. M. as a 
man of ability, but I found his statements cor- 
roborated by another learned individual, by name, 
"Perez," who says, "The natives of Jersey are 
indeed called Crapauds by Guernsey men, who 
in return are honored by the title of 'Anes.' " A 
neat rejoinder certainly. 

Quite between you and me, my dear William, 
my own opinion is that all this learned discussion 
is beside the mark. "Toad" as a term of con- 
tempt is almost as old as the English language. 
Burton in his Anatomy of Melancholy so uses it. 
Johnson (the great Johnson) so uses it. Char- 
lotte Bronte, whose phrases came from the very 
soil of her north country, says, "If she were a 
nice pretty child one might compassionate her 
forlornness, but one can not really care for such 
a little toad as that." "Toady" — a servile de- 
pendent doing reptile service; "Toad eater," a 
poor devil who is in such a state of dependence 
that he is forced to do the most nauseous things 
imaginable to please the humor of his patron; 
"Toadyism" used by Thackeray as a synonym 
of snobbishness ; — there is, indeed, no end of 
illustrations to be adduced to show the use of toad 
as a general term of contempt. For instance, in 



26 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

our civil war (1861-65) the term "toad-sticker" 
was well nigh universal as the designation of a 
sword. So when an Englishman calls a French- 
man a toad one need not seek a recondite explana- 
tion in coats of arms, or sayings of Nostradamus, 
or local nicknames from Jersey. He calls him a 
toad because he thinks he is a toad. 

You are wondering, perhaps, what this dis- 
coursive rigmarole has to do with you and your 
name. Well, it's just here. The first known 
ancestor of your name was a little French chap 
cast ashore from a wreck on the shore of Cape 
Cod, and whether he didn't know what his name 
really was, or if he did the Cape Codders couldn 't 
pronounce it with comfort, they called him 
Crapaud, for short, — a Frenchman. For myself 
I like to fancy that when the little waif, our 
ancestor, was brought dripping from the sea, and 
dazed and frightened crouched before the hearth 
fire of a fisherman's hut by the shore, the good 
wife, in imitation of her ancestress Eve, said: 
"It looks like a toad, and it squats like a toad, — 
let's call it a toad." 

However it happened, my dear William, you're 
a Toad. Never put on the airs of a Frog. After 
all, there's something to be said for those 
"noxious reptiles." Louis Agassiz, at all events, 
held a brief for us. He says "toads should rank 
higher than frogs because of their more terres- 
trial habits." (I don't see just why, do you?) 
Lyly in his Euphues (a sufficiently long time ago) 
reminds us that "The foule toad hath a faire 
stone in his head." Shakespeare tells us "The 



ORIGO NOMINIS 27 

toad, ugly and venomous, wears yet a precious 
jewel in his head." In Queen Elizabeth's inven- 
tory is a "Crapaud Ring" — a ring set with a 
precious stone supposed to be from the head of a 
toad. After all a jewel in one's head is better 
than mere jumping hind legs, don't you think? 



Chapter II 

PETER CRAPO 

Came over about 1680 



Peter Crapo ? 1670 — 1756 

(Penelope White) 

John Crapo 1711 — 1779+ 

( Sarah Clark) 

Peter Crapo 1743 — 1822 

(Sarah West) 

Jesse Crapo 1781 — 1831 

(Phebe Howland) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



PETER CRAPO 



Possibly the little cast-away, although he had 
forgotten or was denied his surname, did remem- 
ber and attempt to preserve his Christian name — 
Pierre. If so he must have become discouraged 
at the perversity of his neighbors and the scriven- 
ers who have designated him upon the public 
records as Pier, Pero, Peroo, Perez, and other 
ways, so in the end he called himself just plain 
Peter. 

I have two signatures of his which do him 
credit. (Some of your other ancestors who 
doubtless considered themselves very much more 
pumpkins signed thus — "his X mark.") I re- 
produce them here: 



pete^cRef 



o 

o 



petepx:£<?p0 



32 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

One of the signatures is to an instrument in 
which the said Peter Crapoo of Rochester in the 
County of Plymouth in the Province of Massa- 
chusetts Bay, firmly stands bound and obliged to 
one Jabez Delano, yeoman, in the sum of "forty 
pounds good public bills of credit," the condition 
of the obligation being that the said Peter should 
deliver to the said Jabez "one thousand good mer- 
chantable rails at Acushnet landing" before the 
fifteenth day of July 1733-34. The other signature 
evidences his obligation to "iolin perege of sand- 
wick in ye countee of burnstable" to repay 
"twenty pounds five shilens and six pence" 
money borrowed in 1735. Since he called himself 
"Peter" it ought to suffice for us now surely. 
Yet I find in the Plymouth Registry a deed to 
him in 1703 in which he is called "Peroo Crapo," 
another in 1711 "Peter Crapau," another in 
1722-23 "Peir Crapo" and in his marriage record 
he is called "Perez Crapoo." 

The tradition which your great grandfather 
Henry Howland Crapo preserved of his great 
great grandfather Peter the First was that as a 
young lad, the only survivor of a French vessel 
from Bordeaux, he was cast ashore somewhere on 
the coast of Cape Cod. Subsequently, very likely 
through the action of the public authorities, since 
he was clearly a public charge, he was ' ' put out ' ' 
to one Francis Coombs, who brought him up. 
This tradition is corroborated from an independ- 
ent source. Judge Coombs of New Bedford (the 
father of Benjamin F. Coombs, the cashier of the 
Bedford Bank, and the grandfather of George 



PETER CRAPO 33 

Coombs, a schoolmate of mine) was familiar with 
a tradition of his family that they took in a little 
French boy, called him Crapaud, cared for him 
and reared him. 

Another similar tradition preserved by Philip 
M. Crapo of Burlington, Iowa, (a dear friend of 
your grandfather) who derived it from the 
Albany Crapos, who in turn derived it from 
Philip Crapo, a distinguished lawyer of Provi- 
dence in the last century, was to the effect that 
the boy Pierre was left with Francis Coombs by 
his brother, the commander of a French man-of- 
war wrecked on the coast of Cape Cod. The 
brother (he is called Nicholas in this tradition) 
promised that when he returned to France he 
would send for the lad. He was never more 
heard from. 

Similar traditions varying in detail have been 
preserved in several Crapo families in Dartmouth 
and Eochester. They all agree in making our 
common ancestor a young boy, French by nation- 
ality, and the survivor of a wreck. In several of 
these traditions a brother appears, sometimes as 
Nicholas and sometimes as Francis. If there 
was, indeed, such a brother, he must have died or 
disappeared, because all the known Crapos are 
easily traced back to our Pierre. It is fair to 
assume that the date of the wreck was not long 
before 1680. It would be interesting to try to 
discover by the shipping records whether any 
merchant vessel bound for some port in America 
cleared from Bordeaux about that time and was 
never more heard from. It would seem that the 



34 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

loss of a French man-of-war in those days might 
possibly be traced in the archives of the naval 
history of France. It is not inconceivable that 
should you devote the time and labor to look into 
the matter you might discover what your name 
really is, and who were the people that little cast- 
away boy called father and mother. 

Your grandmother, Sarah Tappan Crapo, 
always pretended to claim that Pierre was the 
"lost Dauphin," and consequently that she was 
rightfully Queen of France. Chronology suffi- 
ciently disposes of this fantasy. The poor little 
fellow known as the "lost Dauphin" was Louis 
XVII of France, a son of Marie Antoinette, born 
in 1785 and died (probably) in 1795 in the prison 
from which his father and mother were taken to 
the guillotine. Sa Vie, son Agonie, sa Mort (M. 
A. de Beauchesne, 1853) tells the story of this un- 
fortunate little prince which is even more thrill- 
ing than the somewhat similar history of the two 
princes in the Tower of London. No less than 
twenty persons claimed afterwards to be the lost 
Dauphin, tailors, shoemakers, a Jewish music 
teacher of London, and most distinguished of all, 
the Eev. Eleazer Williams, a missionary to the 
Oneidas, who lived in Hogansburg, New York, 
and who cut a great figure in Paris for a time 
with his pretensions. It is fortunate that we are 
not of these. 

A much more probable theory has been ad- 
vanced by those learned in such matters that our 
cast-away was from one of the numerous bands of 
Huguenots who fled to New England at the end 



PETER CRAPO 35 

of the Seventeenth century. The tradition that 
he came from Bordeaux is partially corrobora- 
tive evidence. It was at Bordeaux that Richelieu 
encountered the most stubborn revolt of heretics 
that vexed his wondrous reign. The Rounsevells 
and the Demoranvilles and the Volottes, all well 
known Rochester and Freetown families, are cur- 
rently supposed to have been of Huguenot origin. 
That Pierre Crapaud, who was subsequently 
closely connected with several of these families 
through the marriages of his children, may have 
originally been in some way associated with the 
Huguenot refugees is not improbable. Mr. 
William T. Davis, the historian of Plymouth, 
some years ago suggested to me that Pierre may 
possibly have been on that somewhat famous ship 
wrecked on the coast of Cape Cod in 1694, on 
which Francis le Baron, the "nameless noble- 
man," was either a passenger or an officer. The 
tradition of Pierre's somewhat dramatic entrance 
on the scene by means of a wreck would make this 
plausible, yet I am inclined to think that if he was 
"a boy" when he was cast ashore 1694 is rather 
too late a date for his advent. Moreover this 
explanation of Pierre's arrival would preclude 
his association with Francis Coombs, as to which 
the tradition is quite as persistent as that he was 
French, a boy, and the survivor of a wreck. 

After all it matters not so much whether this 
little chap was the son of a smug bourgeois of 
Bordeaux, the brother of an aristocratic com- 
mander of a French man-of-war, the persecuted 
companion of a nameless nobleman, or, even, by 



36 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the grace of God eldest son of the King of France y 
Dauphin of Viennois, — as it does matter that he 
was a sturdy, thrifty pioneer of New England 
who "made good." 

Francis Coombs was a son of "Mr. John 
Combe," a Frenchman, who appeared in Ply- 
mouth prior to 1630 and died prior to 1648. He 
married, 1630, Sarah Priest, daughter of Degory 
Priest. Her mother was a sister of Isaac Aller- 
ton of the Mayflower and had first married John 
Vincent. Degory Priest, her second husband, 
died in Leyden and just before crossing in the 
Ann in 1623 his widow married Cuthbert Cuth- 
bertson. Mr. Cuthbertson and his wife brought 
with them a boy, Samuel, and two little girls, the 
children of Mrs. Cuthbertson and her husband 
Degory Priest. The children are afterwards 
erroneously described in the Plymouth records 
as the children of Cuthbert Cuthbertson. One of 
these daughters of Degory Priest married Phineas 
Pratt and the other, Sarah, married "Mr. John 
Combe." John Combe, whose name soon became 
corrupted to Coombs, acquired some little prop- 
erty in Plymouth and is mentioned on the records 
in connection with land grants and minor muni- 
cipal employments. He died prior to 1648 at 
which time his wife went back to the old country, 
deserting her children, who came under the faith- 
ful care of William Spooner, an ancestor of yours, 
whom John Coombs had indentured when he was 
a destitute young lad. One of these children was 
Francis, who took a somewhat prominent part in 
the affairs of Plymouth, acting as officer in vari- 



PETER CRAPO 37 

ous town matters, and being closely associated 
with Thomas Prence in several real estate deals, 
among which was the purchase of "Namassa- 
kett," later known as Middlebury and still later 
as Middleboro. In 1667 Francis Coombs was 
living in Plymouth but probably removed to Mid- 
dleboro soon after its purchase. He was a select- 
man of "Middlebury" in 1674 and 1675. In 1675 
he was associated with Lieutenant Morton in 
settling the estate of Governor Prence. He was 
one of a committee of two who distributed in 
Middleboro the funds sent by devout Christians 
in Ireland to alleviate the distress caused by King 
Philip's War. In 1678 he petitioned the court 
at Plymouth for a minister to be established at 
" Middlebury, ' ' and in the same year he was 
licensed by the Court "to keep an ordinary." 
This ordinary was probably situated at the 
"Green," some miles north of the present main 
village, and for a century and a half it continued 
to dispense hospitality to travellers. It was to 
this public house that little Pierre Crapaud went 
under indenture to Francis Coombs about 1680. 
How old he was at that time we cannot know. 
The traditions from various sources unite in 
designating him as a mere boy. In 1682 Francis 
Coombs died. The ordinary was carried on by 
his widow, who received a license therefor in 1684. 
Francis Coombs had first married Deborah Mor- 
ton, and by her had several daughters, but no son. 
His second wife and widow was Mary Barker 
Pratt, a daughter of Samuel Pratt, his cousin. 
Soon after 1684 Mary Barker Pratt Coombs mar- 



38 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

ried David Wood of Middleboro and continued 
for a time, at least, to carry on the ordinary. 
Whether " Anthony' ' Coombs, who may have been 
a brother of Francis Coombs, was ever associated 
in the management of this inn I have not been 
able to ascertain. There seems to be some tradi- 
tion to that effect. Some seventy-five years ago 
this same tavern was still in existence, kept by 
one Abner Barrows and a portion of the building 
at that time was thought to be a part of the "old 
Coombs ordinary.'' It was here doubtless that 
Pierre Crapaud grew up, working as chore-boy 
and assistant. 

To these kindly people by the name of Coombs 
Peter owed much, but to his own hard persevering 
work and thrift he must have owed his ability to 
purchase from Samuel Hammond "twenty acres 
being part of the one hundred acre division grant 
to my own share and yet unlaid out" of the 
Sippican purchase. This deed runs to Peroo 
Crapau and is dated November 8, 1703, and on 
the following March, as appears by the Rochester 
land records, the twenty acres were set off to 
Peter in the "gore of land next to Dartmouth" 
at the south end of Sniptuit Pond, "a part of 
Samuel Hammond 's share at first. ' ' In the same 
year he recorded the ear mark of his cattle. With 
such an acquirement of land and kine why should 
he not have taken unto himself a wife? "Perez 
Crapoo was married to Penelabe White his wife 
the 31st day of May, 1704," reads the marriage 
record on the first page of the Rochester town 
records. That is the event in the life of Peter 



PETER CRAPO 39 

the Frenchman in which you and I are most inter- 
ested, as doubtless was he also. 

Here by the shore of Sniptuit, near the source 
of the Mattapoisett River, Peter spent his life, 
each year acquiring more land and goods. One 
of his early purchases (he is described in the 
deed as Peter Crapaux) was of thirty acres ad- 
joining his original purchase "and also two 
islands and a half in the Sniptuit Pond which 
half is bounded on the south with Middleboro 
bounds." From 1722 to 1756 hardly a year 
passed that he did not add to his real estate hold- 
ings, and when he died he was possessed of sev- 
eral hundred acres. This land was, of course, 
largely wood-land and it would seem that he 
logged it to some extent. In 1755 he entered into 
an agreement with two neighbors to put a ditch 
through their several properties "to let the ale- 
wives get from Mattapoisett River to Sniptuit 
Pond." This ditch still remains and each spring 
the alewives returning from the south jump the 
weir at Mattapoisett and find their way to the 
Pond, where in the shallow water near Peter 
Crapo 's islands they cast their spawn. His home- 
stead was on the west side of the road which 
skirts Sniptuit on its westerly side. In a deposi- 
tion taken in 1731 this road is described as the 
"way which went from Samuel White's deceased 
his dwelling house to the Beaver Dam where 
Peter Crapoo dweels." Curiously enough a 
Frenchman lives on the place at the present time. 
The old well and some of the foundation stones of 
an early dwelling are the only relics of the original 



40 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

structures. The land slopes somewhat abruptly 
to the shore and the view across the Pond, whose 
shallow water brings varied hues of green and 
blue amid the yellow sedge, makes the site a most 
attractive one. Here were born to Peter and his 
wife Penelope, for the King's service, six sons 
and four daughters. I know not the date of 
Penelope's death, but Peter married a second 
time, as appears by his will. He died in 1756. As 
Peter is, in a sense, your principal namesake 
ancestor, I will venture to quote his last will and 
testament in full, although I promise not to again 
afflict you in these notes with extended copies 
from the Probate records : 

In the name of God Amen — this 20th day of Feb- 
ruary A.D. 1756 I Peter Crapo of Rochester in the 
County of Pli mouth Yeoman do make this my Last Will 
and Testament first I Recommend my Soul to God who 
Gave it, & my body to the Ground to be buried in a 
decent Christian Buriall @ the discretion of my Execr. 
hereafter named, and as Touching such worldly Estate 
wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me, I Give and 
Dispose of the same in the following manner and form. 
Imprs. I give and Bequeath to my Loving wife Ann 
Crapo all the Household Goods and Stuf She brought 
to me @ time of Marrage, and also I give her a Sutable 
maintenance both in Sickness and in helth to be Pro- 
vided for her by my three Sons hereafter Enjoyned to 
the Same and said Meantenance and Support to be what 
may be for her Comfortable Subsistance in every Respect 
according to her age & Quality. 

Item — I Give to my son Frances Crapo and to his 
Heirs and assigns forever, the Dwelling House and Land 
he now lives on being in Rochester aforesd, Being all my 
Lands on the Easterly Side the Ditch or Brook riming 
out of the South West corner Sniptuit Pond having sd. 
Pond on the north, Nicholas and Seth Crapo 's Land on 



PETER CRAPO 41 

the South, the Long Pond So called, and other mens 
Land on the East Together with my Two Islands in said 
Sniptuit pond, he paying so much of the Bond I have 
on him to four of my Daughters Hereafter named as I 
shall assign within twelve Months after my decease. 
Item — I Give to my Three Sons Peter Crapo, Junr. 
John Crapo and Hezekiah Crapo, and to their Heirs 
and assigns forever in Equall Shares all my other Estate 
both Real and Personall not before Disposed off, in this 
my will nor by Deeds Excepting the Bond abovesaid 
on my son Francis, they Paying my Just Debts and 
Funerall charges, and Providing for their said Hond. 
Mother, in Law my Wido, as above Expressed, and after 
my decease Deliver to her the Household Goods and Stuf 
She brought to me @ time of Marrage. 
Item I Give to my son Nicholas Crapo five Shillings 
Money and that with what I have already given him, 
to be his Proportion of my Estate. 
Item I give to my Son Seth Crapo five Shillings money 
and that with what I have already given him, to be his 
portion of my Estate. 

Item I Give to my four Daughters, viz. Susannah Damo- 
ranvill, Mary Spooner, Elizabeth Luke, and Rebecca 
Mathews Twenty Dollars to each of them, to be paid 
them by my said son Francis Six months after my de- 
cease, and it is to be in full discharge of the Bond afore- 
said, and if either of my said four Daughters shall dye 
before Payment then to be Payd to their Heirs — 
Furthermore it is my Will That what I have herein 
given my Son John Crapoo, is to be accounted in full 
Discharge of any and all demands he may make on my 
Estate for anything contracted before the Date hereof, 
Finally I do hereby Constitute and appoint my Son 
Hezekiah Crapoo Sole Executor of this my Last will 
and Testament and I do hereby Revoke and Disanull all 
former Wills by me heretofore made Ratifying and Con- 
firming this and no Other to be my Last Will and Testa- 
ment In Witness whereof I have hereunto Set my hand 
and Seal the day and Year first above writen. 

Peter Crapoo (Seal) 



42 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

It is from John that you descend. He was born 
in 1711. In 1734 he married Sarah Clark, the 
daughter of a neighbor. In 1739 his father Peter 
conveyed to him twenty acres "by the orchard of 
Joseph Ashley" near Peter's Sniptuit holdings. 
It was here perhaps that he lived. In 1743 his 
father deeded to him additional land. In 1744 he 
purchased a large tract in the "gore." The con- 
sideration was £150. He is described in this deed 
as a "husbandman." I am of the impression that 
I somewhere found him described as a "black- 
smith," but I am unable to verify the statement. 
In 1762 he and his brothers, Peter and Hezekiah, 
made a partition of the land which they received 
as residuary legatees under their father's will, 
and to John was given the land which the first 
Peter purchased of Ebenezer Lewis not far from 
the Pond. There are several other records of 
land transfers to and from him. He was living 
as late as 1779 when he conveyed most of his lands 
to his son John, junior, having doubtless given 
his other sons their shares by helping them estab- 
lish the lumber business in Freetown. His son 
Peter, of whom more anon, was the father of 
Jesse Crapo. 



Chapter III 

EESOLVED WHITE 

Came over 1620 
Mayflower 



Resolved White 
(Judith Vassall) 



1614 — 1680+ 



Samuel White 
(Rebecca ) 



1646 — 1694— 



Penelope White 
(Peter Crapo) 



1687 — 17— 



John Crapo 
(Sarah Clark) 



1711 — 1779+ 



Peter Crapo 
(Sarah West) 



1743 — 1822 



Jesse Crapo 
(Phebe Howland) 



1781 — 1831 



Henry H. Crapo 
(Mary Ann Slocum) 



1804 — 1869 



William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 



1830 — 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 — 



RESOLVED WHITE 



The supreme patent of nobility for us Old 
Colony folk is to have "come over on the May- 
flower. ' ' This distinction your seven times great 
grandfather Eesolved White, among others, 
brings you. ' ' This is the one story, ' ' said George 
F. Hoar, "to which for us, or for our children, 
nothing in human annals may be cited for parallel 
or comparison save the story of Bethlehem. 
There is none other told in heaven or among men 
like the story of the Pilgrims. Upon this rock is 
founded our house; it shall not fall. * * * * 
The sons of the Pilgrim have crossed the Missis- 
sippi and possess the shores of the Pacific; the 
tree our fathers set covered at first a little space 
by the seaside. It has planted its banyan branches 
in the ground. * * * * Wherever the son of 
the Pilgrim goes he will carry with him what the 
Pilgrim brought from Leyden — the love of lib- 
erty, reverence for law, trust in God. * * * 
His inherited instinct for the building of states 
will be as sure as that of the bee for building her 
cell or the eagle his nest. * * * * If cow- 
ardice dissuade him from the peril and sacrifice, 
without which nothing can be gained in the great 
crises of national life, let him answer: I am of 
the blood of them who crossed the ocean in the 



46 CERTAIN COMEOVBRERS 

Mayflower and encountered the wilderness and the 
savage in the winter of 1620. If luxury and ease 
come with their seductive whisper, he will reply: 
I am descended from the little company of whom 
more than half died before Spring, and of whom 
none went back to England. ' ' 

In Governor William Bradford's list of ''the 
names of those which came over first in ye year 
1620, and were, by the blessing of God, the first 
beginers and (in a sort) the foundation of all the 
Plantations and Colonies in New England" is the 
following: "Mr. William White and Sussanna 
his wife and one sone caled Resolved, and one 
borne on ship board caled Peregrine, and 2 ser- 
vants William Holbeck and Edward Thomson." 

William White is said to have been the son of 
a Bishop of the Church of England. If this be 
so, which I regard as extremely doubtful, it may 
have been Francis White born at St. Noets, Hunt- 
ingdonshire, educated at Caius College, Cam- 
bridge, and after many preferments made Bishop 
of Carlisle, and Lord Almoner to the King 
(Charles I), then translated to Norwich, and in 
1631 to Ely. In February, 1637-38, he died in 
his palace at Holborn and was buried in Saint 
Paul 's, London. If your ancestor, William White, 
was indeed the son of so distinguished a Church 
of England divine, he must have felt the difficul- 
ties of domestic revolt before he came into conflict 
with the established order of society and was 
forced into exile in Holland. He may well have 
deserved the description which some pious de- 
scendant gives us, to the effect that he "was one 



RESOLVED WHITE 47 

of that little handful of God's own wheat nailed 
by adversity, tossed and winnowed until earthly 
selfishness had been beaten from them and left 
them pure seed fit for the planting of a new 
world." 

William White was one of the original band 
who left England in 1608 and settled in Leyden, 
Holland, in 1609. Of these pilgrims Bradford 
writes: "Being thus constrained to leave their 
native soil and countrie, their lands and livings 
and all their friends and familiar acquaintance, it 
was much, and thought marvelous by many. But 
to go into a countrie they knew not (but by hear- 
say) where they must learn a new language and 
get their livings they knew not how, it being a 
dear place, and subject to the miseries of war, it 
was by many thought an adventure almost desper- 
ate, a case intolerable, and a misery worse than 
death. Especially seeing they were not acquaint- 
ed with trades nor traffic (by which that countrie 
doth subsist) but had only been used to a plain 
countrie life and the innocent trade of husbandry. 
But these things did not dismay them (though 
they did sometimes trouble them) for their de- 
sires were set on the ways of God and to enjoy 
his ordinances." 

William White solved his problem by learning 
the trade of a "wool comber" as appears by the 
following entry on the town records of Leyden, 
translated from the Dutch: "William White, 
wool comber, unmarried man, from England ac- 
companied by William Jepson and Samuel Fuller 
his acquaintances, with Ann Fuller, single woman, 



48 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

also from England, accompanied by Rosamond 
Jepson and Sarah Priest her acquaintances. They 
were married before Jasper van Bauchern and 
William Cornelison Tybault, sheriffs, this eleventh 
day of February 1612." The religious ceremony 
was performed by their beloved minister John 
Robinson. Although the bride's name is given in 
this record as "Ann," and she is named in her 
father's will as "Anna," she was always called 
Susanna in later years in Plymouth. 

Susanna Fuller was the daughter of Robert 
Fuller of Redenhall in the County of Norfolk. He 
was a butcher and as appears by his will which 
was probated May 31, 1614, he was very well off 
as to landed estates and worldly goods. It is 
evident from the provisions of the will that his 
son Samuel and his daughter "Anna," as he calls 
her, were in Holland, and that his wife Frances 
and several children, including a son Edward, 
were living with him in Redenhall. Three of his 
children crossed the Atlantic on the Mayflower: 

"Mr. Samuel Fuller and a servant (his 

wife was behind and a child which came after- 
wards) ; Edward Fuller and his wife and Samuel 
their son;" (Bradford) and Susanna the wife of 
William White. 

William White had a "Breeches Bible" (print- 
ed in 1586-1588) given to him in Amsterdam where 
the Pilgrims tarried awhile, in 1608, and by memo- 
randa on the fly leaves, still well preserved, it 
appears that he went to Leyden in 1609, and sailed 
from Delft Haven for Southampton in 1619, and 
' ' from Plymouth in ye ship Mayflower ye 6th day 



RESOLVED WHITE 49 

of September, Anno Domini 1620." "Nov. ye 
9th came to the harbour called Cape Cod Harbour 
in ye dauntless ship." Under date of November 
19, 1620, is this entry: "Sonne born to Susanna 
White yt six o'clock in the morning." The date 
of Peregrine White's birth as given by Bradford 
was December 10, "new style." And again 
"Landed yt Plymouth Dec. ye 11th 1620." The 
date, "new style," was December 21, since known 
as ' ' Forefathers ' Day. ' ' This was the first land- 
ing at Plymouth by the explorers who left the 
Mayflower at Provincetown Harbor and came up 
along the shore in the shallop. The fly leaves of 
this old Bible are covered with memoranda, and 
it is evident that the children of the family took 
a hand in illustrating it. Perhaps it was your 
ancestor Eesolved who drew a crude likeness of 
an Indian and put under it the name of his 
brother Peregrine. The Bible crossed the ocean 
again to England on the ship Lyon, as appears by 
notations, and then came back to Plymouth into 
the possession of Elder Brewster. 

During that first tragic winter when more than 
half of the Mayflower's company perished, Wil- 
liam White and his two servants died ' ' soon after 
landing. ' ' The exact date of his death was March 
12, 1621. His widow, Susanna, on May 12, 1621, 
married Mr. Edward Winslow, Jr., of Droitwich, 
England, whose wife also had died after landing. 
So it was that your ancestor Resolved and his 
baby brother, Peregrine, went to live with their 
stepfather, Edward Winslow. 



50 CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 

Resolved may have seen that "Chesterfield of 
his people, the whole hearted great souled sav- 
age," Samoset, when on Friday the sixteenth day 
of March, 1621, he presented himself on the hill 
at Plymouth and boldly advancing towards the 
astonished Pilgrims, addressed them in English 
and bade them welcome. Winslow has written 
the story of this wonderful visit of the sagamore 
of a far distant tribe who gave the wondering 
strangers full information about the unknown and 
unseen inhabitants who surrounded them, and 
offered to assist them in establishing friendly 
relations with them. "The wind beginning to 
rise a little we cast a horseman's coat about him, 
for he was stark naked, only a leather about his 
wast, with a fringe about a span long or little 
more; he had a bow and two arrowes, the one 
headed and the other unheaded; he was a tall, 
straight man; the haire of his head blacke, long 
behind, only short before, none on his face at all ; 
lie asked some beere, but we gave him strong 
water and bisket and butter and cheese and pud- 
ding and a peece of a mallerd, all which he liked 
well and had been acquainted with such amongst 
the English. ' ' He stayed two days and then went 
away returning in a few days with five "other 
tall proper men" whom he introduced as friends. 
He came again on the 22nd day of March bringing 
with him Tisquantum, subsequently more often 
called Squanto, who proved a most valuable friend 
to the Pilgrims. Tisquantum had been captured 
and taken to England in 1605 by George "Way- 
mouth and had lived in London, in Cornhill, and 



RESOLVED WHITE 51 

was well versed in the English tongue. Samoset 
and Tisquantum were the messengers who an- 
nounced the approach of the great Sagamore 
Massasoit which Samoset had arranged. With 
this inestimable service Samoset disappears from 
the intimate history of the Plymouth Colony. 
This " chevalier sans peur et sans reproche" 
never again came into close contact with the Pil- 
grims, but his influence among his own people, 
the Pemaquids, and among the Massachusetts was 
later of inestimable value to the settlers of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colonies. 

Resolved may have felt some alarm as his step- 
father-to-be alone and unarmed went to meet the 
"King," as Winslow calls Massasoit, and invite 
him to meet Governor Carver as the representa- 
tive of King James of England. Massasoit, in- 
deed, possessed kingly attributes, and the Pil- 
grims might well have called him "Massasoit the 
Good. ' ' Resolved may have watched the approach 
of King Massasoit and his retinue and the elabo- 
rate formalities of his reception. Resolved, how- 
ever, was probably not present at the memorable 
session at the "common house" where Winslow 
arranged the treaty of friendship and alliance 
which protected the Plymouth Colonists until it 
was broken by Massasoit 's son Philip in 1675. 

Resolved must have listened with wide open 
eyes to his stepfather's story of the journey, in 
July, 1621, of forty miles to Pokanoket to visit 
Massasoit. Winslow had with him only one white 
man, Stephen Hopkins, and the faithful Tisquan- 
tum. Massasoit 's home was at Sowams where 



52 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

now is the village of Warren on Narragansett 
Bay. In Mourt's Relation Edward Winslow has 
graphically set down the adventures of this jour- 
ney and of the subsequent journey in 1623 when 
he cured Massasoit of a serious illness and earned 
his lasting gratitude and affection. These admir- 
ably written " relations" of the early dealings 
with the Indians are intensely interesting. To 
have heard them at first hand as your ancestor 
Resolved doubtless did would have thrilled any 
boy. Indians were very real beings to the boys 
of those days. When Resolved and his brother 
were playing it was not imaginary red-skins who 
might be lurking around every corner. To Ed- 
ward Winslow the native New Englanders were 
a people of absorbing interest. To his carefully 
prepared treatises on the Indian tribes and cus- 
toms we owe much of our knowledge of the 
aborigines whom the Englishmen found in pos- 
session of their land of promise. 

Resolved must also have listened with the keen 
interest of a boy to Edward Winslow 's accounts 
of his voyages across the Atlantic in 1623 and 1624 
and his return to Plymouth on the latter occasion 
on the Charity "with three heifers and a bulh 
the first beginning of any cattle of that kind in 
ye land." He must have plied his stepfather 
with questions about the expedition in 1626 "up 
a river called Kenibeck in a shallop, it being one 
of those two shallops which their carpenter had 
built them ye year before; for bigger vessel had 
they none. They had laid a little deck over her 
midships to keepe ye corne drie, but ye men were 



RESOLVED WHITE 53 

f aine to stand it out all weathers without shelter ; 
and yt time of the year begins to grow tempestu- 
ous. But God preserved them, and gave them 
good success for they brought home 700 lbs. of 
beaver, besides some other furrs, having litle or 
nothing els but this come which themselves had 
raised out of ye earth. This viage was made 
by Mr. Winslow — & some of ye old standards 
for seamen they had none." (Bradford's Manu- 
script.) 

Edward Winslow was a man "courtly, learned 
and fit for lofty emprise. ' ' As one of his descend- 
ants, Mr. Winslow Warren, says of him he was 
"more gentle and lovable than most of his con- 
temporaries." He was not strictly a religionist, 
being a tolerant man as is evidenced by his friend- 
ship for Roger Williams. He had a strong sense 
of humor and a gentle cheerfulness which won 
him friends and made him so invaluable to the 
colony in its relations to the Indians. In 1633 
he was chosen Governor of New Plymouth and 
for several years held that office, going to England 
repeatedly as the agent of the struggling colony, 
whose interests were largely doctrinal rather than 
practical. In the visits to England he often also 
represented the Massachusetts Bay Colony. On 
one of these occasions he was imprisoned for 
seventeen weeks by Archbishop Laud. He was 
not only a man of action and affairs, but a stu- 
dent, and a voluminous writer. Next to Brad- 
ford, Winslow is the man to whom Plymouth 
Colony owes most. In 1655 he was appointed by 
Oliver Cromwell a commissioner to superintend 



54 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

an expedition against the Spaniards in the West 
Indies, and sailing from London, died at sea May 
8, 1655, between St. Domingo and Jamaica. 

Edward Winslow and his wife in 1632 removed 
from the settlement at Plymouth and lived in 
what is now Marshfield. The "Governor Wins- 
low Place, " as it is now called, and which Edward 
Winslow himself called * l Careswell, " in memory 
of his English home, is at Green Harbor in the 
southerly part of Marshfield, near the Duxbury 
line. A part of the tract included in Governor 
Winslow 's holdings was, two centuries later, made 
famous as the home of Daniel Webster. 

Your grandmother eight times removed, 
Susanna Fuller (White) who married Edward 
Winslow, had by him two children, a daughter 
Elizabeth and a son Josiah, afterwards Governor 
of Plymouth Colony, 1673 - 1680. Your ances- 
tress, therefore, was the first mother, the first 
widow, the first bride, and the first mother of a 
native born Governor, of New England. She 
died October, 1680, twenty-five years after the 
death of her husband, and was buried in the 
Winslow burial ground at Marshfield, her son 
Peregrine ' ' even at three score years having been 
most attentive and loving to his mother. " 

Eesolved, the older boy, your ancestor, did not 
remain with his stepfather's family at Marsh- 
field when he grew of age. In 1638 he owned 
lands in Scituate a half mile south of the harbor, 
which he afterwards sold to Lieutenant Isaac 
Buck. When he was twenty-six years of age he 
married Judith, daughter of William Vassall of 



RESOLVED WHITE 55 

Scituate (April 8, 1640). In the year of his mar- 
riage the Court at Plymouth set off to him one 
hundred acres of land on " Belle House Neck,' r 
adjoining Mr. Vassall's plantation. In 1646 he 
acquired other adjoining lands from Mr. Vassall. 
In 1662 he sold these properties and removed to 
Marshfield, where he settled near his mother at 
"Careswell" and not far from his brother Pere- 
grine on the South River. It is not known when 
Judith, his wife, died, but on August 5, 1674, he 
married Abigail, widow of William Lord of Salem, 
and removed to Salem, where probably he died. 
There is no record of his death at Plymouth. In 
a deed of certain land to his son Josiah in 1677 
he describes himself as of Salem. In Governor 
Josiah Winslow's will, which was written in 1675, 
there is a bequest to "my brother Resolved 
White." Governor Winslow died December 12, 
1680, and there is a tradition that at his funeral 
Resolved White was present. 

Resolved White and Judith Vassall had eight 
children, of whom the third was your six times 
great grandfather Samuel. With the exception 
of William (who died in Marshfield, 1695,) none 
of these children remained in Scituate or Marsh- 
field. Some of them went to the Barbadoes, 
where their grandfather Vassall's family lived. 
Resolved White had been one of the original 
twenty-six purchasers of the first precinct of Mid- 
dleboro in 1662 from the Indian Chief Wampa- 
tuck, and it is probable that some of his children 
took up these holdings. At all events the Whites 
of Middleboro and of Bristol County are largely 



56 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the descendants of the Mayflower's boy Resolved. 
Samuel White (born March 13, 1646,) your an- 
cestor, "sat down" as the old records often 
phrase it, in Rochester. In 1679 several persons 
proposed to purchase the "lands in Sippican," a 
territory embracing the present towns of Matta- 
poisett, Marion, Rochester and a part of Middle- 
boro. King Philip had drawn a plan of the 
lands which he was willing to part with (the plan 
is still preserved) and certain real estate specu- 
lators thought it might be a "good buy." The 
Court at Plymouth, having had some unfortunate 
experiences with these land speculations, decided 
that they would accede to the requests of the pro- 
moters "provided they procure some more sub- 
stanciall men that are prudent psons and of con- 
siderable estates," who would actually settle with 
their families. Governor Josiah Winslow acted 
for the Colony, and there were found twenty-nine 
persons who met the requirements and were ad- 
mitted to the purchase. Among these was SamueJ 
White, the son of Resolved. On March 16, 1679, 
the proprietors "met at Joseph Burge his house 
at Sandwitch," and ordered that Samuel White 
and four others should view the lands of Sippican 
and determine where the house lots should be 
laid out, forty acres to each lot. The lots were 
subsequently drawn by lot and Samuel White 
drew a house lot in what is now Mattapoisett, 
which he does not appear to have ever taken up. 
The deed of the territory called Sippican was 
given by the Court July 22, 1679, to the pur- 
chasers, who organized the same day at Plymouth. 



RESOLVED WHITE 57 

Samuel White settled in North Rochester, near 
Sniptuit, and after his death his son-in-law, Peter 
Crapo, bought from his grandson his " mansion 
house" there situate. 

The earliest list of freemen in Rochester in 
1684 gives the name of Samuel White. He was 
of the first board of Selectmen in 1690. On Octo- 
ber 15, 1689, he took the oath of fidelity under 
Governor Hinckley. In 1709 he is named in a 
list of seventeen male members of the First 
Church of Rochester. In 1722-23 Samuel White 
and Timothy Ruggles examined one Mr. Josiah 
Marshall and ''did approve of him as a fitt person 
quallified as the law directs" to be a schoolmaster. 
He married Rebecca, who died June 25, 1711, aged 
sixty-five years. You will, I trust, notice that 
this is the first time, although it will be by no 
means the last, that I fail to give you the full 
maiden name of one of your grandmothers, to 
know all of whom alone can constitute your claim 
to be a person of prime genealogical consequence. 

Samuel White and his wife Rebecca had eight 
children of whom your several times great grand- 
mother Penelope was the seventh. She was born 
March 12, 1687, married Peter Crapo May 31, 
1704, and was a great grandmother of Jesse 
Crapo. 



Chapter IV 

JUDITH VASSALL 

Came over 1635 
Blessing 



Judith Vassall 
(Resolved White) 



1619 — 1674— 



Samuel White 
(Rebecca ) 



1646 — 1694— 



Penelope White 
(Peter Crapo) 



1687 — 17— 



John Crapo 
(Sarah Clark) 



1711 — 1779+ 



Peter Crapo 
(Sarah West) 



1743 — 1822 



Jesse Crapo 
(Phebe Howland) 



1781 — 1831 



Henry H. Crapo 
(Mary Ann Slocum) 



1804 — 1869 



William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 



1830 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 



JUDITH VASSALL 



Through the Vassalls you are remotely tinc- 
tured with somewhat aristocratic blood. There 
was a De Vassall of the fifteenth century who was 
the lord of Rinart near Cany in Normandy, who 
sent his son to England "on account of disturb- 
ances at home." This John had a son John, who 
achieved wealth and distinction. He had estates 
in Ratcliffe, and at Stepney, and in his later years 
was of Eastwood in Essex. He was prominent 
in the business world in London. For some years 
he served as an alderman. At the time of the 
attack of the Spanish Armada he fitted out, at his 
own expense, two ships to join the English fleet. 
One was the Samuel of one hundred and forty 
tons, carrying seventy men, and the other the 
Tobey, Jr., of a like tonnage. It is stated that 
he commanded one of these ships in person in 
the memorable engagement with the Spanish fleet. 
He died September 13, 1625. His descendants 
were numerous. Among them were Lady Holland 
(Macaulay's Lady Holland), whose husband, Lord 
Holland, abandoned his own sufficiently distin- 
guished name of Fox and by royal license took 
his wife's name of Vassall. 

John Vassall, by his second wife, Anne Russell, 
had two sons, Samuel and William, who became 



62 CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 

interested in the new lands across the sea. They 
were both among the original patentees in 1628 
of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Samuel never 
came over to New England, but his financial inter- 
ests in the new country were large. He was an 
alderman of London, a member of Parliament, 
and a royal commissioner in the matter of estab- 
lishing peace with Scotland. There is a monu- 
ment erected in his honor, by a grandson, in 
King's Chapel in Boston, which extols him prin- 
cipally as a man who refused to pay his taxes. 
He certainly had the strength of his convictions 
since he was imprisoned sixteen years for his 
failure to pay the same. His descendants in the 
West Indies and in Boston were people of wealth 
and distinction. 

William Vassall, your ancestor, the brother of 
Samuel, was six years younger than Samuel and 
was born at Ratcliffe August 27, 1592. In 1613 
he married Anna King, the daughter of George 
King of Cold Norton in Essex. At a meeting of 
the patentees of Massachusetts Bay Colony held 
in London October 5, 1629, William Vassall, who 
was then acting as an assistant to Governor 
Cradock, was chosen "to go over." He came to 
Boston with Winthrop on his second trip, arriving 
in June, 1630. The ships of the little fleet were 
the Arabella, the Talbot, the Ambrose, and the 
Jewel. The Mayflower and several other ships 
which it was expected would accompany the fleet 
were not ready and were left behind. It is 
altogether probable that William Vassall, who 
was, in a sense, Governor Cradock 's representa- 



JUDITH VASSALL 63 

tive, was on the Arabella, which was the "Ad- 
miral 's Ship. ' ' Governor Winthrop gives a most 
interesting account of the voyage over, which 
lasted some nine weeks. After looking about the 
new settlements for a month or so William Vassall 
returned to England on the ship Lyon, (the same 
ship that took back William White's Breeches 
Bible). What report he carried back to his col- 
leagues we cannot know, but that he was im- 
pressed with the advantages of the new lands 
across the sea is manifest from his own determina- 
tion to come hither and settle in New England. 

William Vassall was too liberal in his religious 
views to please the tyrannical Puritans of 
Boston, men of the stamp of Cotton and Elliot. 
Winthrop called him ' ' a man of busy and factious 
spirit, never at rest but when he was in the fire 
of contention." He came back to New England 
in 1635 on the ship Blessing with his family (Anna 
his wife forty-two years old, and his children, 
Judith sixteen, Francis twelve, John ten, Ann 
six, Margaret two, and Mary one). Soon after 
he proceeded to the Plymouth Colony and sub- 
jected himself to the more liberal government of 
the Pilgrims. 

A differentiation of Puritans and Pilgrims may 
interest you. The misuse of the terms is often 
confusing. The "Puritan" party of England 
was a large body of non-conformists who at one 
time waxed to such heights of power that with 
the aid of Oliver Cromwell they controlled the 
government of England. Very naturally the term 
"Puritanism" was given to all forms of diver- 



64 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

gence from established ecclesiastical order, and 
also became a loose literary designation for per- 
sons of uncompromisingly rigid ideas of conduct. 
When Macaulay says of "Puritans" that they 
"forbade bear-baiting, not that it hurt the bear, 
but because it afforded some slight degree of 
pleasure to the spectators," his gibe applied 
equally to the denizens of Plymouth and of Bos- 
ton. Yet for us New Englanders, who like your- 
self are half and half, there is an essential dis- 
tinction between the "Pilgrims" of the Old 
Colony, and the especial brand of "Puritans" of 
the Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

The designation of Pilgrims is applicable only 
to the little band who came from Leyden on 
the Mayflower and the subsequent immigrants 
who joined them at Plymouth and its vicinity, and 
with them formed a society which was singularly 
detached, both socially and ecclesiastically, from 
any important party in the mother country. They 
were not non-conformists. They were profess- 
edly separatists. They did not assume to repre- 
sent any religious or civic authority, except 
such as they, themselves, from conscientious rea- 
sons, thought to be in accordance with the true 
interpretation of the scriptures. The Puritans, 
who settled first at Salem and at Boston, had an 
essentially different point of view. They did 
not admit that they were separatists. On the 
contrary, they maintained that they, and they 
alone, represented the one and only established 
church of God. They were distinctly not seces- 
sionists. Far from having left the church of 
England they were it. 



JUDITH VASSALL 65 

The influence of these divergent points of view 
in the development of the two early settlements 
in New England is clearly evidenced in their 
history. The strong, positive, dominant asser- 
tion of the Puritans was far more effective 
in the upbuilding of a successful community. The 
equally sincere but less assertive convictions of 
the Pilgrims, although in small degree pro- 
ductive of material success, have proved, perhaps 
in the end, a distinctly more influential contribu- 
tion to the ethical progress of the nation which 
sprang, in part, from these two early settlements. 

It would be difficult, indeed, to find in history 
two men of higher ideals or sweeter natures, or 
more gentle instincts, than John Winthrop, the 
Puritan and Edward Winslow, the Pilgrim. 
Yet the difference of their religious convictions 
and their attitude towards their civic duties, as 
you may appreciate in a vague way, even from 
these genealogical notes, in some degree are 
typical of the difference between the Puritans 
and the Pilgrims. William Vassall was by edu- 
cation, environment, and, so to speak, by nature, 
a Puritan. Perhaps he was too much of a one 
to be able to abide in peace with other Puri- 
tans. He certainly disliked to be dominated 
by others. Boston being intolerable to him, he 
deserted to Plymouth. Yet, by this change of 
residence and jurisdiction, he by no means be- 
came a " Pilgrim.' ' 

William Vassall settled at Scituate and in 1635 
a tract of two hundred acres on a neck of land 
by the North Kiver was laid out to him by the 



66 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Plymouth Court. His plantation was called 
"West Newland," and his house became known 
as ' ' Belle House. " A " beautiful field of planting 
land" on the north side was called "Brook-Hall 
Field." In 1639 he established an oyster bed 
in the North River, near his house, with the 
permission of the court. He joined the first 
church of Scituate and "enjoyed peace therein" 
until in 1642 he entered into a controversy with 
Charles Chauncy, a famous divine, anent the 
baptism of infants by immersion, which resulted 
in a disruption of the church, and Vassall with- 
drawing formed another church. 

In 1642 he was a Counsellor of War of the 
Colonial Government, and for several years was 
active in the military affairs of Plymouth. In 
1646 he sailed for England, taking with him his 
wife and younger children. He went in support 
of a petition of Major Child for redress of wrongs 
and grievances. It happened that at that time 
Edward Winslow was in England as agent for the 
United Colonies. Vassall and Winslow were 
pitted against each other and pleaded their case 
before the Earl of Warwick and Sir Harry Vane. 
Soon after Vassall 's arrival, a pamphlet appeared 
purporting to have been written by Major John 
Child but more probably the product of Vassall's 
own pen. It was entitled "New England's Jonah 
cast up at London." In this pamphlet Governor 
Winslow 's "Hypocrisie Unmasked" is attacked, 
and Winslow is characterized as the "principle 
opposer of the laws of England in New England. ' ' 
Winslow, who held the pen of an able controver- 



JUDITH VASSALL 67 

sialist, was not slow in preparing a keen and 
pungent answer. His pamphlet is called "Eng- 
land's Salamander discovered by an irreligious 
and scornful pamphlet called 'New England's 
Jonah cast up at London,' etc., owned by Major 
John Childs but not probably to be written by 
him." (London, 1647.) 

I wonder whether those two earnest doctrin- 
aires, tilting at each other in public like tourney- 
ing knights, ever met in some tavern on the 
Strand, and laying aside their animosities, talked 
of their son and daughter living together as man 
and wife on the sunlit neck of land washed by the 
Scituate River in sight of "Belle House," and 
only a short journey from the quiet waters of 
"Green Harbor," where at the homestead she 
called ' ' Careswell ' ' Susanna Winslow was quietly 
living near her sons after her troublous life of 
wandering and privation. 

William Vassall was worsted in the contro- 
versy. He found no entertainment for his peti- 
tion. He never returned to New England. Dis- 
gusted with the powers which controlled the des- 
tinies of his adopted country, he left England for 
the Island of Barbadoes, where he and his brother 
had large estates, and there in 1655, the same 
3^ear that Edward Winslow met his death in the 
West Indies, he died. William Vassall is among 
the more interesting of your ancestors. His was 
a positive and interesting personality. His pos- 
terity have been conspicuous in the annals of Bos- 
ton. To his son John and his daughter Judith 
White, who remained in America, he left his 



68 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Scituate estates. It was, I think, a descendant of 
John Vassall, the brother of Judith, known as 
Colonel John Vassall in Colonial days, who built 
the Craigie House in Cambridge, where George 
Washington lived some nine months, and where 
in my day lived Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, a 
descendant of another of your ancestors, Henry 
Sewall of Newbury. 

Judith Vassall, who married Resolved White, 
was a great great great grandmother of Jesse 
Crapo. 



Chapter V 

THOMAS CLARK 
Came over 1623 

Ann 



Thomas Clark 1605 — 1697 

(Susanna Ring) 

John Clark 1640 — 

(Sarah ) 

John Clark — 1760 — 

(Mary Tobey) 

Sarah Clark 1714 — 

(John Crapo) 

Peter Crapo 1743 — 1822 

(Sarah West) 

Jesse Crapo 1781 — 1831 

(Phebe Howland) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



THOMAS CLARK 



The oldest stone on "The Burying Hill" in 
Plymouth, of purple Welsh slate, bears this 
inscription: "Here lies buried ye body of Mr. 
Thomas Clark, aged 98 years. Departed this life 
March 24th, 1697. ' ' If the statement on this stone 
is true he was born in 1599. His own statement 
under oath in an instrument signed by him in 
1664 is that he was then fifty-nine years old, and 
consequently born in 1605. 

In view of the fact that a part of his land in 
Plymouth was called "Saltash," Mr. William T. 
Davis thought it probable that he came from 
Saltash, which is a district of Plymouth in 
England, where the name of Clark has prevailed 
for many generations. He crossed to this side 
on the Ann in 1623, bringing with him property 
and cattle. Thus he is one of the "old comers" 
or "forefathers," titles given only to those who 
came in the first three ships. There is a widely 
entertained tradition that he first crossed the 
Atlantic on the Mayflower as captain. It seems, 
however, to have been convincingly demonstrated 
that the Clark of the Mayflower's crew was not 
this Thomas Clark of the Ann. 

That Thomas Clark was a man of education and 
substance and was held in respect by the com- 



72 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

munity is abundantly shown by the public records. 
In 1632 he was assessed £1 4s. Od. in the tax list, 
being among the ten largest taxpayers. In 1633 
he took the freeman's oath. In 1634 he indeu- 
tured an apprentice, William Shuttle, probably 
to teach him carpentry, since Clark is designated 
as a "carpenter" in the earlier records and later 
as a "yeoman," and a "merchant," and finally 
a "gentleman." About this time, 1634, he mar- 
ried Susanna Ring, a daughter of Mary Ring, 
a widow, who came over to Plymouth in 1629 
with several children. It may be the widow 
Ring came to the new land on the advice of 
Mistress Elizabeth Warren. At all events ia 
Mrs. Ring's will, dated in 1633, she gives to "Mrs. 
Warren as a token of love a woddon cupp. ' ' Her 
son Andrew Ring, the brother of Susan Clark, 
became "a leading citizen." 

In 1637 Thomas Clark headed the list of volun- 
teers to fight in the Pequot war and presumably 
saw service. His real estate transactions were 
numerous, as were his lawsuits. He was not 
altogether a successful litigant. That he was a 
bit too shrewd in a business way is indicated by 
his being fined by the Court thirty shillings in 1639 
for selling a pair of boots and spurs for fifteen 
shillings which he had bought for ten shillings, and 
again in 1655 he was presented to the Court for 
taking £6 for the use of £20 for one year, of which 
usurious act he was, however, acquitted. He was 
also acquitted in 1652 of "staying and drinking 
at James Coles." From 1641 to 1647 he was 
constable and surveyor of highways. At one 



THOMAS CLARK 73 

time he was appointed to audit the accounts of 
the Plymouth Colony. In 1651 and in 1655 he 
was a Representative to the General Court. 

About 1655 he removed to Boston, where possi- 
bly the ideas of a proper rate of interest were 
less restrictive. At all events he seems to have 
prospered here as a merchant. His wife, Susanna, 
had perhaps died before he left Plymouth. In 
1664 he married Alice Nichols, the daughter of 
Richard Hallett, and the widow of Mordecai 
Nichols of Boston. In 1668 he purchased a wharf 
and warehouse property "near the lesser draw- 
bridge near Shelter Creek in Boston." He lived 
in the vicinity of Scottoe's lane. His eldest son, 
Andrew, married in Boston a daughter of Thomas 
Scottoe, and in 1673 Thomas Clark conveyed a 
house and land to his son Andrew on the way 
"that goeth from the mill bridge to Charles 
River" which Thomas had acquired under an 
execution in a suit against the estate of John 
Nichols. 

At what date Thomas Clark returned to Ply- 
mouth does not appear. In 1679 he was one of 
the original purchasers of Sippican (Rochester), 
his sons James and William and his son-in-law, 
Barnabas Lothrop, also joining in the purchase. 
His son John, from whom you descend, was not 
named as an original purchaser, but he evidently 
settled in Rochester soon after the purchase. 
That old Thomas Clark ever lived in Rochester 
would seem doubtful, or that he ever removed to 
Harwich, of which he was an original proprietor 
in 1694, and where his son Andrew settled. He 



74 CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 

died in Plymouth. He had been a deacon of the 
First Church from 1654 until his death in 1697. 

Thomas Clark's descendants are multitudinous, 
and the fact that there were several other con- 
temporary Thomas Clarks who had sons named 
John and James and William and other common 
names, and that all of the sons of Thomas Clark 
of the Ann had sons who were the namesakes of 
their grandfather and uncles renders the task of 
identifying any particular John or Thomas or 
William or James one of great confusion and per- 
plexity. For the fact that you descend from 
John, the son of Thomas Clark of the Ann, I rely 
on Mr. William T. Davis, an unusually reliable 
authority. He states that John, the son of 
Thomas, lived in Rochester and by his wife Sarah 
had a son John, who in 1709 married Mary Tobey. 
Their daughter, Sarah, born in 1714, married 
John Crapo in 1734 and was consequently the 
grandmother of Jesse Crapo. 

Of John the son of Thomas I have learned 
nothing. His son John who married Mary Tobe\ T 
lived near Peter Crapo, hard by Sniptuit Pond. 
The place of Isaac Holmes separated their respec- 
tive homesteads. John did not have far to go 
a-courting Sarah. Thirty-six years after John 
Crapo and Sarah Clark were married they joined 
in a deed dated May 5, 1760, by which the chil- 
dren of John Clark carried out the expressed 
wishes of their father as to the division of his 
estate. His widow, Mary, was then living and 
to her was given the use and improvement of all 
his cleared land and dwelling house and all his 



THOMAS CLARK 75 

movables. After the widow's death one-half of 
the furniture was to go to his daughter, Sarah 
Crapo, and the other half to her sister, Jane 
Haskell, and between his sons Ebenezer and 
William the lands were divided. It may have 
been John, the son of the last named William, 
who was one of a committee of three appointed 
in August, 1769, by the Second Precinct of 
Rochester, to go to the minister and inform him 
that his preaching for a long time past had been 
to the damage of the Precinct and the prejudice 
of good order and peace, and notify him not to 
attempt to preach again at the meeting house. 
This final action was the result of a protracted 
controversy in the church in which it is fair to 
presume the Clarks were active participants. 



Chapter VI 

THOMAS TOBEY 

Came over prior to 1644 



Thomas Tobey 
(Martha Knott) 



-1714 



John Tobey 
(Jane ) 



1660 — 1738 



Mary Tobey 
(John Clark) 



1684-5 — 1760+ 



Sarah Clark 
(John Crapo) 



1714 — 



Peter Crapo 
(Sarah West) 



1743 — 1822 



Jesse Crapo 
(Phebe Howland) 



1781 — 1831 



Henry H. Crapo 
(Mary Ann Slocuni) 



1804 — 1869 



"William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 



1830 — 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 — 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 — 



THOMAS TOBEY 



Your seven times great grandfather Thomas 
Tobey first appears in a record under date of 
June 7, 1644, by which it appears that he sub- 
scribed seven shillings for repairing the meeting- 
house at Sandwich. He was not one of the original 
purchasers of Sandwich, although it seems prob- 
able that he was one of the considerable number 
of people of Saugus (Lynn) who settled Sand- 
wich in 1637-1638. On November 18, 1650, he 
married Martha Knott, a daughter of George 
Knott, who was one of the original ten purchasers. 
Two others of the ten were also your ancestors, 
Edward Dillingham and William Almy. Several 
others of your forebears settled in Sandwich. Iu 
fact, it may be said to be one of the principal 
places of your origin. 

Soon after the settlement of Plymouth the 
advantages of the region between Manomet and 
Nauset for hunting and fishing became apparent. 
Edward Winslow describes this region in his 
Relation "A voyage made by ten of our men to 
the Kingdome of Nauset to Seek a Boy." This 
voyage was in August, 1621. The Boy was John 
Billington. As early as 1627 Captain Myles 
Standish went from Plymouth in a boat up the 
Scusset River and near what is now called Bourne- 



80 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

dale met M. De Razier, the Secretary of the Dutch 
settlement at Manhattan, who had come thence 
through Buzzard's Bay and up the Monument 
River. They exchanged goods and supplies and 
thereafter for a few years a trading route was 
established between the two Colonies. It would 
be interesting to know whether the idea of con- 
necting the streams by a canal occurred to Cap- 
tain Standish. It has taken nearly three hun- 
dred years to accomplish that undertaking, but 
now it seems probable that soon vessels of very 
much greater burden than Standish 's shallop will 
be passing through a waterway by the same 
course he exploited in 1627. 

The immigration from England to the Massa- 
chusetts Bay Colony between 1634 and 1636 was 
so great that Governor Winthrop was quite unable 
to take care of the people and provide them with 
homes and the protection of government. In his 
distress he wrote to his good friend Governor 
Bradford, asking whether the government at 
Plymouth, which was well established, but to 
which no considerable number of immigrants had 
come, would not relieve him by permitting a num- 
ber of men who were in Saugus to take up their 
abode in the Plymouth Colony. Wherefore on 
April 3, 1637, it was determined by the Plymouth 
Court that "ten men of Saugus should have lib- 
erty to view a place and sit down and have suffi- 
cient lands for threescore families upon the con- 
ditions propounded to them by the Governor and 
Mr. Winslow." The place selected was the 
present village of Sandwich on the Scusset River, 



THOMAS TOBEY 81 

and within a short time a considerable number of 
settlers were there established. In 1639 the settle- 
ment was created a town, the fourth in the Colony, 
by the name of Sandwich. 

The Quaker troubles in Sandwich, about which 
you will hear much in these notes, began in 1657 
and for four or five years the little town was in 
a turmoil. Thomas Tobey is distinguished from 
your other Sandwich progenitors in that he was 
not corrupted by Quakerism. In 1658 the town 
paid him four shillings for "having the strangers 
to Plymouth" which is to say that he, acting as 
constable, to which office he had that year been 
elected, escorted some traveling Quakers, your 
ancestor Christopher Holder among them, per- 
haps, under arrest to the Court at Plymouth to be 
there dealt with as heretics. His mother in law, 
Martha Knott, however, was of those who shared 
the persecutions, and perhaps his wife may have 
had some leanings towards the doctrines which 
Christopher Holder so successfully spread in the 
community. Thomas Tobey, however, was faith- 
ful to the ordained church and his name appears 
on the oldest page of the church records now in 
existence as one of the twenty members when Mr. 
Cotton was ordained in 1694. 

Thomas Tobey served in various public capaci- 
ties. In 1652 he was appointed on a committee to 
take care of all the fish taken by the Indians and 
sell them for the benefit of the town and to over- 
see the cutting up of the whales driven ashore 
on the flats. In 1657 he took the oath of fidelity. 
He served on many occasions as a "rater," as 



82 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

surveyor of highways, pound keeper, boundary 
commissioner, excise officer, member of the grand 
inquest, and other public employments. At the 
time of King Philip's War in 1676 he was of the 
council of war to "hire men to goe out upon 
scout for the town, ' ' furnishing them with ammu- 
nition. 

In his will, which is dated in 1710, he describes 
himself as aged and weak of body. It is possible 
that he may have been born on this side of the 
ocean, but it is more probable that he crossed as 
a child with his parents, in the thirties. There 
was a Francis Tobey in the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony, perhaps at Naunqueag or Saugus, in 1634. 
It may be that he was the father of Thomas, 
although I have no evidence that such is the fact. 

His wife Martha died (probably) before 1689 
and soon after he married Hannah the widow of 
Ambrose Fish. He died (probably) in 1714, in 
which year his will was proved. He left eight 
sons and three daughters. His will is a lengthy 
document in which he disposes of a considerable 
estate. To his "loving son John Tobey," from 
whom you descend, he devised "that lott of 
upland which I formerly gave to him lying near 
ye now dwelling house of Joseph Foster in Sand- 
wich. ' ' 

John Tobey, the son of Thomas, was born 
(probably) about 1660, since in 1681 he was 
enrolled as a townsman capable of voting. There 
are few records of his life. He died December 
26, 1738. The surname of his wife, Jane, is not 
known. In his will dated in 1733 he left the per- 



THOMAS TOBEY 83 

sonal property which he gave to his wife 
for her life to be equally divided between his 
two daughters Mary Clark and Reliance Ewer. 
It is from his daughter Mary, born about 1684 or 
1685, who married John Clark of Rochester, that 
you descend through their daughter Sarah who 
married John Crapo the grandfather of Jesse 
Crapo. 



Chapter VII 

PETER CRAPO 

The Second 



PETER CRAPO, SECOND 



Peter Crapo, the second of the name, the son 
of John, the son of Peter, was born in 1743. He 
seems to have been a stirring sort of man of 
strong character, great energy and considerable 
achievement. There are many stories of his 
forceful methods and abounding vitality. When 
fifteen years of age it would appear that he vol- 
unteered from Eochester in the French and 
Indian War. At all events there was a Peter 
Grapo who was one of the company that met at 
Elijah Clapp's in Middleboro on the morning of 
May 29, 1758, and at a little after sunrise com- 
menced its march to and participated in the 
bloody and disastrous battle of Ticonderoga in 
which their General, Lord Howe, was slain. It 
certainly seems more probable that the Peter 
Crapo who went on this expedition was this Peter, 
the son of John, born in 1743, rather than his 
uncle, the only other Peter then existant, who 
was born in 1709 and would consequently have 
been almost fifty years of age. 

With such an experience in his boyhood it is 
not surprising that in the alarm of the nineteenth 
of April, 1775 (the battle of Lexington of which 
Paul Revere gave warning on the evening of the 
eighteenth), Peter Crapo as a private, and his 



88 CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 

brother Consider as Sergeant, marched under 
Captain Levi Rounseville from Freetown to the 
camp at Cambridge, as is set forth in the muster 
rolls at the State House in Boston. How long 
he served at this time I know not. It is possible, 
although not likely perhaps, that with Benedict 
Arnold he again traversed the road to Ticon- 
deroga, leaving Cambridge May 3, and, joining 
Ethan Allen, assisted in the capture of the for- 
tress on May 10. It is somewhat interesting that 
in response to this same alarm of April 19, 1775, 
the muster of the Eochester Company of minute 
men contains these two names in sequence, "Wil- 
liam Crapo, corporal, Caleb Coombs, private." 
In the records of Rochester's quotas throughout 
the war the name of Crapo appears many times. 

Peter again appears on the muster rolls as a 
private, his brother Consider as a sergeant, and 
his brother Joshua as a corporal, in Lieutenant 
Nathaniel Morton's company of militia from 
Freetown belonging to the regiment commanded 
by Edward Pope, Esquire, which marched out on 
the alarm of December 8, 1776, "agreeable to 
the orders of the Honorable Council thereon." 
On this occasion Peter was given twenty days' 
pay, to wit: £2. 10s. 8d. 

It was, however, as an active man of business 
that he has left his footsteps on the sands of 
time. You will remember that the first Peter 
was something of a lumberman, since he bound 
himself to deliver those ' ' one thousand good mer- 
chantable rails at Acushnet landing," and his 
grandson Peter's greatest effort in life was as a 



PETER CRAPO, SECOND 89 

lumberman, logging the cedar and pine trees of 
Dartmouth and Freetown and sawing them at his 
mill at Babbitt's Forge at the head of the Quam- 
panoag River. Afterwards his grandson, Henry 
H. Crapo, by a somewhat curious turn of fortune, 
became a lumberman and logged the pine forests 
of Michigan, sawing the lumber at Flint. You 
and I by our Crapo descent would seem to be 
woodsmen. 

At what date Peter, the second, moved from 
Rochester to Freetown is not certain. I find a 
deed of land in Freetown from Bigford Spooner 
in 1770 to Peter's brother Joshua. This land was 
in the vicinity of the land which Peter later occu- 
pied. Joshua did not remain in Freetown. He 
is said to have emigrated to Maine. Peter and 
his brother Consider were settled in Freetown in 
1773. They were engaged in the lumber business. 
In 1774 and for nearly twenty years thereafter 
Peter and Consider Crapo were actively engaged 
in logging and sawing as appears by the numer- 
ous recorded deeds to them. Their sawmill was 
''partly in Freetown and partly in Dartmouth" 
at the place called "Quampog where a forge 
formerly stood called Babbitt's Forge." At one 
time an Abraham Ashley and a Mereba Hatha- 
way, a widow, were partners in their business. 
John Crapo, their father, conveyed several tracts 
of land to them and seems to have been interested 
with them in their business and may have lived 
with them for a time. He is always described, 
however, as "of Rochester." Some after 1790 
Consider withdrew from the business and moved 



90 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

to Savoy, Massachusetts. The deeds of partition 
between the brothers are dated in 1797. Both 
brothers were owners of considerable tracts in 
Dartmouth, owning salt meadows on Sconticut 
Neck, and lots in Belleville in New Bedford and 
in Troy, now Fall Eiver. In 1793 Consider sold 
his homestead farm to Thomas Cottle of Tisbury, 
Dukes County, who removed thither. This was 
in the immediate vicinity of the sawmill since he 
reserved to his brother Peter a right of flowage 
above "his sawmill." Afterwards Peter Crapo 
appears to have taken in Richard Collins as a 
partner in the business. In 1793 the sawmill 
burned down but it appears to have been rebuilt. 
Down to the time of his death in 1822, Peter 
Crapo, as abundantly appears by the land and 
court records, was actively engaged in business. 

Peter had a large family of children, fourteen 
in all, and it would seem that his manner of 
caring for them was distinctly patriarchal. As 
each child came of age and was about to be mar- 
ried, he summoned all the other children, the 
married and the unmarried, to undertake some 
special work whose profit might be devoted to 
settling the child to be married. In the case of 
a daughter with a dowry, in the case of a son 
with a homestead farm. It was in this way that 
by the united efforts of the whole family your 
great great grandfather Jesse was given his home 
and farm on the Rockadunda Road near the home 
of his wife's father, Henry Howland. 

Peter kept the title of the various farms ac- 
quired for his sons in his own name, and when 



PETER CRAPO, SECOND 91 

he died left them severally by his will, dated 
February 20, 1822, to their occupants, devising 
his own homestead farm, which, as appears by 
the inventory of his estate, was much the most 
valuable, to his youngest son Abiel, the baby of 
the family, on whom he placed the duty of caring 
for his widow. To his widow he also gave fifty 
dollars, one cow, and "the use and improvement 
of the south front room in my dwelling house with 
a privilege to pass and repass through the kitchen 
and porch and to the well to draw water, as well as 
a privilege in the cellar and the use and improve- 
ment of all the household furniture during her 
life. ' ' Considering her somewhat limited domain 
all the furniture may have been too liberal, but 
it is to be hoped that Abiel really did do his 
duty and made his mother comfortable. He gives 
to his ' ' seven daughters ' ' three hundred and fifty 
dollars each, and all of his household furniture 
after his widow's death. His estate was inven- 
toried at something over $10,000, which was in 
those days a considerable estate. 

In 1886 an enterprising reporter of the Boston 
Globe found an interesting subject for a char- 
acter sketch which I happened to glance at. Near 
Jucketram Furnace in East Freetown, on the 
shore of Long Pond, he found an old lady ninety- 
four years old on the twenty-fifth of September, 
1886, named Susanna Howland. According to 
the reporter she was a most remarkable old lady, 
being a tireless worker at all manner of farm 
labor in the fields and woods, and in the farm 
kitchen, hoeing, digging, chopping, berrying in 



92 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the swamp, planting the garden and harvesting. 
In her later years she had, as a pastime, woven 
three thousand yards of homespun cloth. The 
neighbors told queer stories about finding this 
ninety-four year old woman in the woods chop- 
ping wood with an axe, clad in men's attire, 
trousers, vest and blouse, with stout top boots, 
working away for dear life with all the grit and 
abandon of a backwoodsman. Just why I per- 
sisted in reading this long tale of vigorous old 
age I know not, but as I read, I gradually came to 
the realization that this remarkable old woman 
was your great great grandfather Jesse Crapo's 
sister. Alive in 1886, just think of it! And she 
bore the name of her great great great great 
grandmother Susanna White who came over in 
the Mayflower. The reporter describes her as 
saying: "My father's name was Peter Crapo. 
He owned a great deal of property. The Indians 
used to say 'Old Peter Crapo's jacket hung in 
the woods was worth more than all the eel-spear- 
ing in Long Pond at sunrise. ' When I was a girl 
on my father's farm I remember how he would 
go out with the neighbors and search in the old 
fields for the corn the Indians were always steal- 
ing from the settlers. The Red Skins would plant 
it just below the surface of the ground in big 
pits that would hold bushels and bushels and 
then they would turn the ground up all around 
so that no one could tell where the pits were. 
The white men would go out with their horses 
and ploughs and plough these fields until the 
corn pits were found, and sometimes the Indians 



PETER CRAPO, SECOND 93 

would be prowling round in the woods and when 
they saw the corn was found, sometimes there 
would be a skirmish and somebody killed." 
Susanna Howland seems to have been the daugh- 
ter of her father. She may have inherited ail 
the energy and grit which should have been the 
share of her brother Jesse. 

Peter Crapo married Sarah West. The "In- 
tention of Marriage" is recorded in the Rochester 
town records, whereby it appears that Peter 
Crapo of Rochester and Sarah West of Dart- 
mouth were "published" May ye 18th, 1766. 
They were married by Doctor Samuel West on 
November 13, 1766, as appears by Doctor West's 
notes, which were found by the Rev. William J. 
Potter in an old attic in a house in Tiverton be- 
longing to one of the famous old gentleman's 
descendants. It is not probable that Sarah West 
was related to Doctor West. She may have been 
an unrecorded daughter of one Charles West, 
originally of Middleboro, who doubtless descended 
from the Duxbury Wests. He lived in Bristol 
County at one time, and he was to some extent 
connected in business relations with the Crapos. 
Or, she may have belonged to one of the numerous 
Dartmouth families of West, who were for the 
most part descended from Matthew West, who 
was in Lynn in 1636 and was subsequently of 
Portsmouth. The fact that she was married by 
Doctor West leads me to suspect that she lived in 
that part of Dartmouth, now Acushnet, near the 
Rochester line. If so, she may have been a de- 
scendant of Stephen West who married one of 



94 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

John Cooke's daughters. When Sarah died, Peter 
married Content Hathaway of Dartmouth, and 
again the marriage ceremony was performed by 
Doctor West on October 13, 1789. At that time 
Peter was in Freetown and it may be that he 
chose for his second helpmeet a relative or friend 
of the first. Many of the descendants of Stephen 
West and Arthur Hathaway, both sons in law of 
John Cooke, lived in the northeasterly part of 
the town of Dartmouth not far from Eochester 
bounds. Sarah died May 6, 1789, in the forty- 
second year of her age. Her gravestone of grey 
slate with carved cherubims and a scriptural 
verse stands on the right side of Peter's stone. 
He died March 3, 1822, aged seventy-nine years. 
On his left is the stone of Content Hathaway, 
who died October 27, 1826, in the sixty-eighth 
year of her age. All three stones are well pre- 
served and are placed in an old private burial 
ground, where many of Peter's descendants lie 
buried, in North Dartmouth, not far from 
Braley's Station, and near the dwelling house 
formerly of Malachi White. 

That I have failed to trace the lineage of your 
great great great grandmother, Sarah West, has 
been the keenest disappointment which I have 
experienced in this quest for the origin of your 
forebears. The failure has not been due to lack 
of effort. I have expended more time and more 
genuinely pedantic genealogical research in the 
quest of this particular ancestress of yours than 
has gone to make up the sum total of all which I 
have been able to give you in these notes concern- 



PETER CRAPO, SECOND 95 

ing your other forebears. The attempt to dis- 
cover undiscoverable facts concerning a number 
of females from whom you spring, has, as a 
matter of fact, absorbed much more effort than 
has gone to the acquirement of the facts which I 
have discovered about the others. 

Sarah West especially has proved a most 
aggravating ancestress. Being a West of Dart- 
mouth she plainly ought to be discoverable. There 
can, I realize, be no justification in setting down 
in these notes the several plausible theories of 
her origin which I have from time to time ac- 
cepted. I can support none of them with con- 
vincing proofs. What makes the matter deplor- 
able to me is that I feel certain that if I could 
convincingly disclose her lineage I would be able 
to connect you with an interesting company of 
comeoverers who would add substantially to the 
interest of your Plymouth Colony descent. As 
it is, you will note that Sarah West blocks a 
whole half circle in the circular chart of the 
ancestors of Jesse Crapo. I dare say she was 
an estimable lady, but to me she has been the 
most troublesome person from whom you spring, 
and I cannot escape a feeling of resentful griev- 
ance towards her because of her elusiveness. 
From your point of view, I am by no means sure 
that you will not be grateful to her modest self 
effacement, since she cuts out at least thirty-two 
of your comeoverers about whom I might have 
given you tiresome information had I been able. 



Chaptek VIII 
JESSE CRAPO 



JESSE CRAPO 



Your great great grandfather, Jesse Crapo, 
was the sixth child of Peter Crapo and Sarah 
West. He was born May 22, 1781. As a boy he 
doubtless worked in the woods and in the sawmill 
at Babbitt's Forge, and took his turn in working 
for the establishment of his brothers and sisters. 
How he happened to go so far afield for a wife 
I know not. There must, of course, have been 
some propinquity which caused him to woo the 
maid he made his wife. It is a far cry from Bab- 
bitt 's Forge to the Rockadunda Road. One thing 
is sure — he did not meet her ' ' in meeting. ' ' She 
was a Friend, and he, being a Crapo, was a god- 
less man. 

In 1798, Peter Crapo purchased from Thomas 
Russell a farm of ninety acres extending from 
Buzzard's Bay westerly to the Bakertown Road 
half way between the road from Smith's Neck 
to Russell's Mills and Macomber's Corner, near 
the ' ' Gulf Road. ' ' It may be that Jesse was sent 
by his father to cut the hay off the salt meadows 
and perhaps he boarded with Henry Howland. If 
so he must have found the accommodations some- 
what limited in a little farm house with fifteen 
children more or less. However it happened, he 
picked out Phebe Howland as his helpmeet, and 



100 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

she proved, indeed, his better half. I have his 
marriage certificate on a small piece of thin 
yellow paper. "Bristoll S. S. July 10th, 1803. 
Personally appeared Jesse Crapo a resident of 
Dartmouth, and Phebe Howland of the same town, 
and was lawfully joined together in marriage by 
me, Elihu Slocum, Just. Peace." 

After they were married they lived for a time 
with Jesse's father, Peter Crapo, in Freetown 
near the Dartmouth line, or in Dartmouth near 
the Freetown line, I know not which. It was 
there that your great grandfather Henry Howland 
Crapo was born, May 24, 1804. Evidently the 
plan arranged for the newly married pair was 
that they should acquire a farm on the Rocka- 
dunda Eoad not far from the bride's birthplace. 
Soon after the marriage the work on the new home 
must have commenced. It was very soon after 
1804 that Jesse Crapo and his wife with their 
little son Henry Howland moved into the new 
house. The deed of the property from Barnabas 
and William Sherman to Peter Crapo was given 
in 1807, and not recorded until 1826. Perhaps 
Jesse Crapo with the aid of his father and his 
brothers and sisters did not finally pay for his 
property until 1807. It seems clear, however, 
that he was living on the Rockadunda farm soon 
after 1804. In 1822, he purchased of Silas Kirby 
five acres adjoining. In 1830, he purchased of 
Reuben Kelley seven acres adjoining. He also 
owned the "Barbary Mash" purchased of Bar- 
bary Russell, and an undivided fourth part of the 
marsh at the ''Great Meadows" which his father 



JESSE CRAPO 101 

had left to him and his brothers Charles, Reuben, 
and Abiel. 

Jesse Crapo was a kindly, lovable man, whose 
gentle nature and recognized rectitude led him to 
be chosen on several occasions as an arbitrator 
in the disputes of the neighborhood. In him the 
restless ambition which distinguished his father 
and his great grandfather lay dormant, in order, 
perhaps, that he might transmit it in redoubled 
intensity to his eldest son. It is characteristic of 
him that he should have been a private in the 
militia company of which his son, who had not 
reached his majority, was the Captain. Hard, 
unremitting labor brought from the farm a mere 
subsistence. He would not, indeed, have been 
called poor as Dartmouth farmers went. It was 
a good sized farm with considerable land in till- 
age. He had stock, and doubtless a horse and 
chaise. The farm buildings were substantial. 
The dwelling house unusually ample and comfort- 
able for its day. Yet surplus money and the 
opportunities and luxuries which money may 
bring were never within his achievement. He died 
January 11, 1831, in the fiftieth year of his age. 
Just before he passed away he asked to have your 
grandfather, William Wallace Crapo, who was a 
baby of eight months, placed on his bed beside 
him. 



PART II 
ANCESTORS 

OF 

PHEBE HOWLAND 



Chaptek I 

JOHN COOKE 

Came over 1620 
Mayflower 



John Cooke 
(Sarah Warren) 



1610 — 1695 



Sarah Cooke 
(Arthur Hathaway) 



+1634 — 1710+ 



Mary Hathaway 
(Samuel Hammond) 



About 1660 — 



Thomas Hammond 
(Sarah Spooner) 



1687 



Lovina Hammond 
(John Chase) 



1734 — 



Rhoda Chase 
(Henry Howland) 



1759 



Phebe Howland 
(Jesse Crapo) 



1785 — 1870 



Henry H. Crapo 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 



1804 — 1869 



William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 



1830 — 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 — 



JOHN COOKE 



In John Cooke you have a Mayflower ancestor 
who became the foremost settler of the town of 
Dartmouth and its largest landed proprietor. 
The date of his birth in Leyden is unknown, about 
1610, perhaps, since he was not much over ten 
years of age when he sailed with his father, 
Francis, on "ye dauntless ship," and came to 
Plymouth in 1620. He and Resolved White, 
another of your Mayflower ancestors, and Re- 
solved 's cousin, Samuel Fuller, were boys of 
about the same age and must have been thrown 
into close companionship on the long and stormy 
voyage across the ocean. One may venture to 
hope that they were not too intimate with two 
other young boys on the ship, John and Francis 
Billington. Francis nearly blew up the ship by 
playing with gunpowder, and John lost himself in 
the woods at Plymouth and occasioned the mem- 
orable voyage to the Nausets at Eastham to 
recover him. John Cooke was the last male sur- 
vivor of the Mayflower passengers, dying at his 
home in what is now Fairhaven, 1695. In his 
long life he had seen and felt more of the history 
of the Pilgrim Commonwealth than most of his 
contemporaries, not merely as an observer, but 
as an intensely active participator. 



108 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

His father, Francis Cooke, was born about 
1583 in Blythe, Yorkshire. Blythe adjoins Austei*- 
field and doubtless Francis Cooke knew the young 
lad William Bradford and had as neighbors the 
band of yeomen who formed the church of 
Scrooby some years after he, himself, had gone 
to foreign parts and settled in Leyden. What 
took him to Leyden we may not know. He was 
certainly there in 1603, six years before the Pil- 
grims came thither, since the record of his mar- 
riage in Leyden was entered in June, 1603. 
It reads " Francis Cooke, woolcomber, unmarried, 
from England, accompanied by Philip de Vean 
and Raphael Roelandt, his acquaintances, and 
Hester Mahieu, her mother, and Jeannie Mahieu, 
her sister," were married by the civil magis- 
trates. That his sponsors were Dutchmen and 
that he married a Walloon would indicate that 
Francis Cooke was without compatriots in Ley- 
den. When his old neighbors surreptitiously 
left England in 1608 their plan was to settle in 
Amsterdam where a non-conformist English 
church was already established. They went to 
Amsterdam, but becoming dissatisfied with the 
conduct of the church sought a new place of 
refuge. That they went to Leyden may have 
been at Francis Cooke's suggestion. 

Governor Winslow, in his Hypocrisie Unmasked 
says, "also the wife of Francis Cooke being a 
Walloon holds communion with the Church at 
Plymouth as she came from the French. ' ' It may 
be that she had been a member of the Huguenot 
Walloon church at Canterbury in England, the 



JOHN COOKE 109 

name Mahieu being a common name in that parish. 
Through her as well as through Peter Crapo you 
are of French blood. She did not cross on the 
Mayflower with her husband and eldest son, com- 
ing two years later on the Ann with her younger 
children in company with Mistress Warren and 
her children. 

Francis Cooke was one of the sterling char- 
acters among the notable band of Pilgrims who 
signed the famous Compact in Cape Cod Harbor 
on November 11, 1620. He was among those who 
were sent out to seek a suitable landing place, 
and in the cruises of discovery there were found 
several places with which his name has since been 
associated. Soon after the landing was made at 
Plymouth, it is recorded that Francis Cooke was 
at work with Myles Standish in the woods "and 
coming back to the settlement for something to 
eat they left their tooles behind them but before 
they returned their tooles were taken away by 
the savages." This was the first evidence of the 
existence of Indians in the neighborhood of Ply- 
mouth which the Mayflower Pilgrims experienced. 
Through the kindly services of Samoset the tools 
were subsequently returned. Francis Cooke and 
his son John at once began to clear a lot of land 
on the main street of the village, which was called 
Ley den Street, between Edward Winslow's and 
Isaac Allerton's, and there built a log cabin for 
the reception of the rest of the family awaiting 
in Leyden a summons to cross the seas. After- 
ward Francis Cooke lived at "Cook's Hollow" 
on the Jones River, a place later known as Rocky 
Nook, within the present confines of Kingston. 



HO CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

One of the most interesting of the earlier 
records of Plymouth concerns the division of 
cattle in June, 1627. The entire population of 
the little community, even to the last baby of only 
a few months of age, is listed and divided into 
groups of thirteen persons each, and to each 
group is alloted some one or more animals. 
Francis Cooke, his wife Hester, and his son John, 
with ten others drew the first choice, and had 
assigned to them ''one lot, the least of the four 
black heyfers came in the Jacob and two shee 
goats." It is to be hoped that the heifer proved 
to be a good milker in time, and that meanwhile 
the she goats also furnished something for the 
sustenance of their thirteen owners. It seems 
probable that Francis had acquired a somewhat 
larger herd of livestock by 1634, since in that 
year he "presented" certain persons for "abus- 
ing his cattle." In 1633 he was made a freeman, 
and paid a tax of eighteen shillings. He acted 
as surveyor of highways and in other minor 
municipal offices, and was often chosen as an 
arbitrator or referee. There are occasional 
references to Francis Cooke in the records until 
about 1648 when he appears to have ceased to 
be publicly active. William Bradford writes in 
1650: "Francis Cooke is still living, a very old 
man and hath seene his children's children have 
children; after his wife came over (with other of 
his children) he hath three still living by her, all 
married, and have five children ; so their increase 
is eight. And his son John which came over with 
him is married, and hath four children living." 



JOHN COOKE HI 

Bradford gives rather an exaggerated statement 
of the age of Francis Cooke, since he was under 
seventy at the time. He lived for fifteen years 
after the above memorandum was written by 
Bradford, and died April 7, 1665. 

That John Cooke as a lad acquired an educa- 
tion superior to that of most of his contem- 
poraries was his own achievement and indicative 
of the strong and earnest character which dis- 
tinguished him during his long life. Those early 
days of hardship and privation in the struggling 
settlement of Plymouth, when the most constant 
and exacting work yielded the barest sort of a 
subsistence, were not conducive to the acquire- 
ment by the young men of a liberal education. 
There were, indeed, several of the Mayflower's 
band who were men of no mean education, but 
the next generation, for the most part, although 
they inherited some of the sterling qualities of 
their fathers, had little of their * ' book-larning. ' ' 

The most active period of John Cooke's life 
was spent in Plymouth. As a youth he probably 
devoted himself somewhat to study, and possibly 
intended to fit himself for the ministry. If so, 
it would seem probable that his independence of 
thought precluded him from being accepted as a 
true disciple of the ' ' old lights. ' ' Indeed he went 
so far astray from orthodoxy that he was subse- 
quently called an "anabaptist" and as a lay 
preacher spread doctrines not acceptable to the 
"standards." That he never quite disassociated 
himself from allegiance to the true faith which 
the Pilgrims brought across the ocean to form 



112 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the corner-stone of their commonwealth seems 
probable, but that he fell into errors and schisms 
and finally became an "anabaptist preacher" 
would seem to be clear from the traditions which 
have come down to us. His earnest, straight- 
forward, forceful nature seems to have compelled 
him "to speak his mind," and to give forth to 
his friends and neighbors the convictions con- 
cerning religious matters which he had, himself, 
formed. It was not in any established church, 
however, either orthodox or Baptist, that he 
preached in Dartmouth. It was probably among 
his neighbors at their homes, and on occasions 
when they met together in social intercourse. 

Not all his youth was devoted to study. At a 
very early age he must have busily engaged in 
all the work necessary for the welfare of his 
father's family and for the settlement of Ply- 
mouth. With his father he entered into several 
business ventures and in 1634, when he was about 
twenty-four years old, he was taxed equally with 
his father. It was in this year that on March 28 
he married Sarah Warren, the oldest of the 
daughters of Richard Warren, who had come over 
on the Ann with John's sisters. Mistress Warren, 
the mother of Sarah, and the widow of Richard 
Warren, in consideration of the marriage con- 
veyed to John Cooke "of Rocky Nook" certain 
land at Eel River, which in 1637 he exchanged 
for other land with his brother in law, Richard 
Bartlett. 

Three years after his marriage he volunteered 
in Captain Prince's company for service in the 



JOHN COOKE 113 

Pequot War "if provision could be made for his 
family." Doubtless the provision was arranged 
and he went on the campaign. In 1643 he was 
serving in the military company of Plymouth, 
giving points, probably, to his young brother in 
law, Nathaniel Warren, who joined the company 
at the same time. His activities, however, were 
by no means confined to military affairs. He was 
engaged in many enterprises. He was one of the 
owners of the first vessel built in the Colony "the 
forty ton leviathan of the deep, the pride and 
delight of Plymouth." During his residence in 
Plymouth and afterwards in Dartmouth he was 
a constant trader in land. His boundless energy 
and push compelled him to interest himself in 
many private enterprises, but did not divert him 
from generous service to the community. 

From 1638, when he served his first of many 
terms as Deputy for Plymouth to the General 
Court, until he moved to Dartmouth some twenty 
years or so later, he was prominently connected 
with the management of Plymouth affairs. Near- 
ly every year he acted as "rater," generally 
serving with Manasses Kempton or Nathaniel 
Warren. He was repeatedly put on special com- 
mittees at the town meetings to dispose of the 
town's lands, provide for the town's poor, etc. 
In October, 1643, he was appointed by the Gen- 
eral Court one of a committee ' ' for the Court and 
psons to be of the Counsel of Warr." In 1649 
the town appointed its first standing committee 
of "seven men" of whom John Cooke was one. 
A few years later this committee was reduced in 



114 CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 

number and called the "select men" and John 
Cooke was chosen a Selectman and served as such 
during several years. Perhaps no more striking- 
example of John Cooke's ability exists than his 
carefully prepared report to the General Court 
of 1654, of which he was a member, in relation 
to the condition of affairs between the Plymouth 
and Massachusetts Bay Colonies. 

In 1650 I find a record that John Cooke and 
others "have engaged to pay two coats a peece 
to be in reddyness in the hands and custodie of 
John Morton to pay any Indian that shall kill a 
wolfe. " The wolves proved to be much more seri- 
ous enemies than the Indians in the early days of 
the colony. During one year seven wolves were 
killed by one settler who was rewarded as a dis- 
tinguished public benefactor. The residents of 
Sandwich and Eastham and other places on the 
Cape at one time seriously considered the advisa- 
bility of putting a fence across the neck where 
the Cape Cod Canal is now building to keep the 
wolves off the Cape. 

The references to John Cooke in the town 
records of Plymouth and in the notes relating to 
land allotments are very numerous. His father 
and himself appear to have owned much land in 
Plymouth, and even as late as 1695, the year in 
which John Cooke died, he had a meadow in Ply- 
mouth defined. His homestead in Plymouth was 
on North Street. He purchased it in September, 
1646, of Phineas Pratt, and sold it in 1653 to 
Thomas Lettice. At what date he removed to 
Dartmouth is not known. It was probably not 



JOHN COOKE 115 

long after the purchase of the Dartmouth terri- 
tory and before the founding of the town, although 
for some years thereafter he still was actively 
concerned in the affairs of Plymouth. 

Certain inhabitants of the town of Plymouth 
had purchased some lands at "Punckateeset over 
against Rhode Island, ' ' a territory now known as 
Tiverton. This land was alloted to various per- 
sons, among whom were Francis and John Cooke. 
In May, 1662, the town referred "the business 
about our land att Punckateeset and places adja- 
cent concerning the incroachment of some of Road 
Island upon some pt of said land unto the Depu- 
ties of our Town together with the messengers of 
the Towne now sent, viz John Cooke and Na- 
thaniel Warren, to make our addresses to the 
Court in the Towne 's behaf and otherwise to act 
concerning the same as they shall see cause." 
This record does not necessarily indicate that 
John Cooke was living in Plymouth in 1662. For 
ten years or more he had been familiar with the 
territory between Sippican and Narragansett 
Bay. In 1652 he was one of the leading spirits 
in the purchase of Acushena (Dartmouth), and 
had doubtless gone over the ground as a "viewer," 
for the thirty-four land speculators who bought 
that large tract as well as for the purchasers of 
"Punckateeset." He was therefore well fitted 
to be one of the ambassadors in behalf of the 
town of Plymouth to the Rhode Island colonies 
with whom Plymouth was in a constant dispute 
about boundaries and jurisdictional rights. 



116 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

On November 29, 1652, Wesamequen, or Massa- 
soit as lie is more frequently called, and Wam- 
sutta, his son, gave a deed to Mr. William Brad- 
ford, Captain Standish, Thomas Southworth, 
John Winslow, and John Cooke "and their asso- 
ciates, the purchasers or old comers ' ' of the large 
tract of land comprising what is now the towns 
of Fairhaven, Acushnet, Dartmouth and West- 
port, and the city of New Bedford. This deed 
is signed only by Wamsutta on the one part and 
John Winslow and John Cooke of the other part. 
The actual purchase had evidently been made 
some months before the deed was executed, since 
on March 7, 1652, there was a meeting in Ply- 
mouth of the proprietors, thirty-four in number, 
Francis Cooke and John Cooke each being desig- 
nated as owners of one whole share, equivalent 
as the subsequent divisions indicated to more than 
thirty-two hundred acres to a share. Later, in 
1664, King Philip, "Sagamore of Pokannockett, ' ' 
in early times more often called Metacomet, 
another son of Massasoit, definitely fixed the 
bounds of this purchase, and the township of 
Dartmouth was established as follows: "1661 
June. At this Court all that tract of land com- 
monly called and known by the name of Acushena, 
Ponagansett and Coaksett is allowed by the court 
to be a township and the inhabitants thereof have 
liberty to make such orders as may conduce to 
their common good in town concernments and 
that the said town be henceforth called and known 
by the name of Dartmouth." 



JOHN COOKE 117 

It was between 1653 and 1660 that John Cooke 
settled in Dartmouth. He took up holdings in 
the northerly part of Fairhaven in the district 
now known as Oxford. It was about this time 
when, owing to his unorthodox religious ideas he 
was presented to the Court at Plymouth for 
breaking the Sabbath by unnecessary travelling 
thereon and fined ten shillings. It is probable 
that his "unnecessary" travelling was actually 
for the purpose of preaching what he considered 
to be God's word, but which his orthodox brethren 
evidently considered neither a work of charity 
nor necessity. He was certainly settled in Dart- 
mouth prior to 1660. In 1667, he was authorized 
by the Court at Plymouth "to make contracts of 
marriage, administer oaths, issue out warrants 
in His Majestie's name, bind over persons to 
appear at His Majestie's Courts, issue subpoenies, 
warn witnesses," etc., etc. In 1670 he is named 
first in the list of the seven freemen of Dartmouth, 
in which the names of three other of your ances- 
tors also appear; namely, John Russell, Arthur 
Hathaway and William Spooner. In 1668 the 
Court at Plymouth ordered John Cooke to estab- 
lish and maintain a ferry "between Dartmouth 
and Ehode Island." This designation was not 
geographically correct since Dartmouth never 
extended to Narragansett Bay. The ferry estab- 
lished by Cooke under this order may have been 
at "Fogland" between Puncatest and the south- 
erly part of the Island of Rhode Island, or 
possibly the ferry at what is now known as the 
Stone Bridge. Also in 1668 he was appointed by 



118 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the Court to take the testimony of all parties and 
establish the boundaries of the town in reference 
to a dispute with the Indians. In 1672 the town 
of Dartmouth gave John Cooke Earn Island, now 
known as Popes Island, in recompense for his 
former services to the town "and also eleven 
pounds for his services and three pounds for his 
damages and trouble which said fourteen pounds 
shall be paid to him in good merchantable pork, 
beef and corn in equal proportions." Notwith- 
standing his anabaptist faith he was chosen by 
the inhabitants of Dartmouth, who were mostly 
Quakers, to represent them at the General Court 
on many occasions. (1666-1668-1673-1675-1679- 
1686). Daniel Eicketson, in his History of New 
Bedford, describes the journeys which the early 
representatives of the people of Dartmouth made 
on foot by the old Indian paths to a somewhat 
hostile assembly in Plymouth: "The journey in 
the winter season must have been a formidable 
affair, as the snow would be deep in the woods 
and render snow shoes necessary. We can 
imagine one of these sturdy yeomen, warmly 
wrapped up in his home-manufactured wool, per- 
haps with a friendly Indian as his guide, plodding 
his way through the narrow forest path, his mind 
possessed with the importance of his office and 
his mission. ' ' John Cooke also served his fellow 
citizens of Dartmouth as Selectman in the years 
1670, 1672, 1673, 1675, 1679 and 1683. There was, 
indeed, no public service and no public under- 
taking in which John Cooke was not a partici- 
pator, and it would seem that in those earliest 



JOHN COOKE 119 

days he well deserves the designation of "our 
most prominent citizen." 

In 1675 a crushing blow came to the infant 
settlement of Dartmouth, dealt by the infuriated 
Philip, whose savage hordes devastated the town 
with torch and tomahawk. Nearly all the dwell- 
ings of the settlers, with their crops and live stock 
were destroyed and several men and women 
murdered. John Cooke, foreseeing the necessity, 
had converted his homestead into a "garrison 
house. ' ' The main structure stood north of what 
is now the Biverside Cemetery about six hundred 
feet west of Main Street. It was a building of 
sufficient size to shelter a considerable number of 
persons, and was surrounded by a stockade. To 
this haven of safety the inhabitants of that part 
of Dartmouth hastened on the first alarm of the 
Indian uprising in the early spring of 1676. At 
least four were tomahawked on their way, but 
most of them reached Cooke's Garrison House 
and there defended themselves against the attacks 
of the savages. Whether it was the garrison 
house itself, or a separate dwelling of John 
Cooke's, which was burned and sacked at this time 
is not clear. Captain Ben Church in July, 1676, 
made a rendezvous at the ' ' ruins of John Cooke 's 
home. ' ' 

Increase Mather writes: "Dartmouth did they 
burn with fire, and barbarously murdered both 
men and women ; stripping the slain whether men 
or women and leaving them in the open field. 
Such, also, is their inhumanity as that they flay 
off the skin from their faces and heads of those 



120 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

they got into their hands, and go away with the 
hairy scalp of their enemies." On August 11, 
1676, Captain Benjamin Church, a nephew of John 
Cooke's wife, after a long and admirably fought 
campaign captured King Philip, whose head was 
borne in triumph the next day to Captain 
Church's wife, and then sent to Plymouth where 
it remained set up on a pole for twenty years. 
One of his hands was sent to Boston as a trophy 
and the other given to Alderman, the Indian who 
shot him at the last, who exhibited it for money. 
The Indians, it seems, were not the only bar- 
barians involved in the story. 

The suffering and devastation caused in Dart- 
mouth by this overwhelming calamity can hardly 
be realized. That the people could again take 
heart to rebuild their homes and commence anew 
their occupations must have been due to the in- 
domitable leadership of such men as John Cooke. 
It was he, perhaps, who obtained the orders from 
the Plymouth Court which gave relief by exemp- 
tion of taxes and military aid, etc. The Court, 
however, could not refrain from hinting in its 
order that the indifference of the people of Dart- 
mouth to listen to the word of God as proclaimed 
by his ministers "had been a provocation of God 
thus to chastise their contempt of his gospell, 
which we earnestly desire the people of that place 
may seriously consider off, lay to hart, and be 
humbled for, with a sollisitus indeavor after a 
reformation thereof by a vigorous putting forth 
to obtain an able faithful dispenser of the word 
of God amongst them." 



JOHN COOKE 121 

The people of Dartmouth may have been grate- 
ful for the Court's clemency, but they certainly 
did not follow its advice about a minister, con- 
tinuing even more stubbornly than before to 
assert their religious independence; and John 
Cooke, whom the Court certainly would not have 
certified as "an able faithful dispenser of the 
word of God," continued for many years to 
preach an unorthodox faith. He died at the age 
of about eighty-five years, on November 23, 1695. 

At Poverty Point, Fairhaven, there is now a 
large boulder with a bronze inscription which 
reads as follows: 

Sacred to the Memory of 
John Cooke 
who was buried here in 1695. 
The last surviving male Pilgrim of those who 
came over on the Mayflower. First white settler 
of this town. The pioneer in its religious, moral 
and business life. A man of character and in- 
tegrity, and the trusted agent for this part of 
the Commonwealth of the Old Colonial Civil 
Government of Plymouth. 

Mr. Henry B. Worth in a convincing present- 
ment of facts to the Old Dartmouth Historical 
Society has demonstrated that the "old burial 
place" in which John Cooke was probably buried 
was not at Poverty Point where the memorial is 
erected, but a mile or more further up the shore 
of the Acushnet River. 

It is from Sarah, the daughter of John Cooke 
and Sarah Warren, who married Arthur Hatha- 
way, that Phebe Howland descends through the 
Hammonds and Chases. 



Chaptee II 

RICHAED WARREN 

Came over 1620 
Mayflower 



Richard Warren 
(Elizabeth ) 

Sarah Warren 
(John Cooke) 

Sarah Cooke 
(Arthur Hathaway) 

Mary Hathaway 
(Samuel Hammond) 

Thomas Hammond 
(Sarah Spooner) 

Lovina Hammond 
(John Chase) 

Rhoda Chase 
(Henry Howland) 

Phebe Howland 
(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 
(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1580 — 1628 
— 1620 — 1696+ 
+1634 — 1710+ 
About 1660 — 
1687 — 
1734 — 
1759 — 
1785 — 1870 
1804 — 1869 
1830 — 
1865 — 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 — 



RICHARD WARREN 



Eichard Warren is another Mayflower ancestor. 
He was not of the Leyden company, but coming 
from London joined the Pilgrims at Southampton 
whence they originally set sail, afterwards coming 
back and again sailing from Plymouth. Of his 
origin in England nothing definite is known. He 
signed the Compact in Provincetown Harbor, 
November 11, 1620, and was, doubtless, one of the 
company who on the fifteenth of November ven- 
tured ashore by wading through the surf and 
made the first attempt to find a suitable location for 
a settlement. He is expressly named in Mourt's 
Eelation as being one of those who on December 
6 made the memorable expedition which was so 
disastrous to the health of most of the partici- 
pators. After encountering sundry adventures 
the expedition, through stress of weather, landed 
at Clarke's Island at the mouth of Plymouth 
Harbor. This seemed a desirable place and was 
selected as the port to which to bring the ship. 
It was on December 16 that the ship came to the 
harbor and soon after the landing of the com- 
pany was accomplished. In the first allotment of 
house lots Eichard Warren was given a lot on 
the north side, near William White's widow's and 
Edward Winslow's. Later he lived near Eel 
Eiver at a place now called Wellingsley. 



126 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

His wife and five daughters joined him at Ply- 
mouth in 1623, coming over on the Ann. One of 
the daughters was Sarah, who married John 
Cooke. Eichard Warren lived only eight years 
in the new settlement, dying at his home in 1628. 
Nathaniel Morton thus writes of him: " Grave 
Richard Warren, a man of integrity, justice, and 
uprightness ; of piety and serious religion ; a use- 
ful instrument during the short time he lived, 
bearing a deep share of the difficulties and 
troubles of the Plantation. ' ' 

The surname of Richard Warren's wife, Eliza- 
beth, is not known. She outlived her husband 
forty-five years. Unlike most of the widows of 
the early settlers she did not remarry, but herself 
took charge of her family and proved a most 
competent manager. She was most highly re- 
spected in the community and was always de- 
scribed by the honorary title of ''Mistress." 
There is a record in 1635 of her dealing with her 
servant, Thomas Williams, exhorting him to fear 
God and do his duty, which admonition he evi- 
dently did not heed, since he was presented to 
the Court for "Speaking profane and blasphem- 
ous speeches against the majesty of God." As 
an owner of real estate she is constantly men- 
tioned in the records. She was one of the pro- 
prietors of Puncatest, and in 1652 she was an 
original proprietor of one share of the Dartmouth 
purchase. In 1661 she was taxed for a consid- 
erable property, owning seven horses among other 
items. Before her death she divided some of her 
properties among her children. She died October 



RICHARD WARREN 127 

2, 1673, aged ninety years. The record of her 
death and burial reads : ' ' Having lived a godly 
life she came to her grave as a shoke of corn 
ripe." Her son in law, John Cooke, was the 
executor of her will. 



Chapter III 

ARTHUR HATHAWAY 

Came over prior to 1643 



Arthur Hathaway — 1711 

(Sarah Cooke) 

Mary Hathaway About 1660 — 

(Samuel Hammond) 

Thomas Hammond 1687 — 

(Sarah Spooner) 

Lovina Hammond 1734 — 

(John Chase) 

Rhoda Chase 1759 — 

(Henry Howland) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



ARTHUR HATHAWAY 



There was an Arthur Hathaway a resident of 
Marshfield in 1643 and there enrolled as capable 
of bearing arms. There was an Arthur Hathaway 
at town meeting at Plymouth in 1646. In 1651, 
Arthur Hathaway was named as one of the pro- 
prietors of Puncatest. It seems probable that 
this is the same Arthur Hathaway who in 1652, 
in Plymouth, married John Cooke's daughter, 
Sarah, who was named for her mother, Sarah 
Warren. Whence he came in the old country is not 
known. Probably soon after his marriage he fol- 
lowed his father in law, John Cooke, to the new set- 
tlement in Dartmouth. He seems to have been liv- 
ing in Plymouth on February 28, 1655, and he had 
removed to Dartmouth before 1660, where he was 
taxed. He lived in the northerly part of Fair- 
haven, his farm including what in later days has 
been known as the Laura Keene farm, and also 
the Franklyn Howland place. Whether this land 
was a part of John Cooke's land which he gave 
to his son in law I have not ascertained. Arthur 
Hathaway, however, was a considerable owner in 
the Dartmouth purchase in his own right. In 
1661 he purchased from Samuel Cuthbert, one of 
the original thirty-four proprietors, a half share 
in the entire purchase. In 1674 (June 26) he pur- 



132 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

chased of John Cooke another half share, except 
a house lot of two acres which had been set off to 
Benjamin Eaton. This interest was acquired by 
John Cooke March 24, 1660, by purchase from 
Edward Gray, who acted as a real estate broker, 
of Francis Eaton, another of the original pro- 
prietors. Before John Cooke's death, he deeded 
most of his lands to his children, and there are 
several conveyances "to my loving sonne in law 
Arthur Hathaway." In John Cooke's will he 
gives to Arthur Hathaway ' ' and Sarah my daugh- 
ter" "all the land in the point at or near the 
burying place in Dartmouth which I bought of 
John Russell." This point was to the north of 
Arthur Hathaway 's farm, and is probably where 
John Cooke was buried. 

Arthur Hathaway took something of a leading 
position in the newly settled town of Dartmouth. 
In 1662 he acted as one of three arbitrators in a 
dispute between the heirs of Robert Hicks, who 
was one of the original proprietors. The first 
record of the Selectmen of Dartmouth is in 1667 
and Arthur Hathaway was then on the Board. 
His name appears as a Selectman some eight or 
ten times in subsequent years. In 1667, he, with 
Sergeant James Shaw, was appointed to exercise 
the men of Dartmouth in the use of arms. In 
1670, Arthur Hathaway is listed as one of the 
seven freemen of Dartmouth. In 1671, he was 
appointed by the Court at Plymouth as a magis- 
trate to take oaths, etc. In 1684, he took the 
oath of fidelity. In the same year he is named 
as one of the proprietors of the grist mill at the 



ARTHUR HATHAWAY 133 

place since known as Smith Mills, being associated 
with Ralph Allen, John Russell, and Samuel 
Hicks. Thereafter there are no records of his 
public activities, although he lived until 1711. If, 
as I deem altogether probable, he is the Arthur 
Hathaway who in 1643 was able to bear arms in 
Marshfield, he must have been about ninety years 
of age or more when he died. In his will, written 
in February, 1709-10, he describes himself as 
"very weak of body, but of perfect mind and 
memory." His wife, Sarah, who was probably 
some ten years his junior, was living when the will 
was drawn. To his daughter, Mary, who had 
married Samuel Hammond, he left a legacy of 
five shillings. This Mary Hammond was a great 
great grandmother of your great great grand- 
mother, Phebe Howland. 



Chapter IV 

HENRY AND ARTHUR HOWLAND 

Came over 1621 or 1623 



Henry Howl and — 1671 

(Mary Newland) 

Zoeth Howland 1636 — 1676 

(Abigail ) 

Henry Howland 1672 — 1729 

(Deborah Briggs) 

Thomas Howland 1709 — 

(Content Howland) 

David Howland 1734 — 1778 

(Lavinia Russell) 

Henry Howland 1757 — 1817 

(Rhoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Henry Howland — 1671 

(Mary Newland) 

Zoeth Howland 1636 — 1676 

(Abigail ) 

Nathaniel Howland 1657 — 1724 

(Rose Allen) 

Content Howland 1702 — 

(Thomas Howland) 

David Howland 1734 — 1778 

(Lavinia Russell) 

Henry Howland 1757 — 1817 

(Rhoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Henry Howland — 1671 

(Mary Newland) 

Zoeth Howland 1636 — 1676 

(Abigail ) 

Nathaniel Howland 1657 — 1724 

(Rose Allen) 

Rebecca Howland 1685 — 1727 

(James Russell) 

Paul Russell 1710 — 1773 

(Rebecca Ricketson) 

Lavinia Russell 1735 — 1815 

(David Howland) 

Henry Howland 1757 — 1817 

(Rhoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Henry Howland — 1671 

(Mary Newland) 

Zoeth Howland 1636 — 1676 

(Abigail ) 

Benjamin Howland 1659 — 1727 

(Judith Sampson) 

Abigail Howland 1686 — 

(Jonathan Ricketson) 

Rebecca Ricketson 1714 — 1744 

(Paul Russell) 

Lavinia Russell 1735 — 1815 

(David Howland) 

Henry Howland 1757 — 1817 

(Rhoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Sloeum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Arthur Howland — 1675 

(Margaret ) 

Deborah Howland 
(John Smith, Jr.) 

Hasadiah Smith 1650 — 

(Jonathan Russell) 

James Russell 1687 — 1764 

(Rebecca Howland) 

Paul Russell 1710 — 1773 

(Rebecca Ricketson) 

Lavinia Russell 1735 — 1815 

(David Howland) 

Henry Howland 1757 — 1817 

(Rhoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



HENRY AND ARTHUR HOWLAND 



The Old Colony Howlands descend from three 
brothers, — John, Henry, and Arthur. This is 
a case where the traditional i ' three brothers ' ' are 
an indisputable fact. Henry and Arthur, from 
both of whom you descend, from Henry in four 
lines, came in either the Fortune, 1621, or the 
Ann, 1623, and were consequently "old comers" 
or "forefathers." The origin of this Howland 
family was in Essex County, in the old country, 
at Newport, Wicken, or thereabouts. There was 
another brother, Humphrey Howland, a citizeu 
and draper of London, whose will, proved July 
10, 1646, left certain legacies to his three brothers, 
John, Henry, and Arthur, in New England. 
Another brother, George, was of Saint Dunstan's 
parish in the east. 

The three comeoverers probably joined the 
Pilgrims who met at Scrooby, England, and went 
to Amsterdam and later to Leyden, whence they 
came to Plymouth in New England. In Governor 
Bradford's list of the Mayflower passengers John 
Howland is named as one of the "man-servants" 
of Mr. John Carver. In his account of the pas- 
sage across the Atlantic, Bradford tells this 
story: "In sundrie of these stormes ye winds 
were so fierce, and ye seas so high, as they could 



142 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

not beare a knote of saile, but were forced to 
hull, for diverce days togither. And in one of 
them, as they thus lay at hull, in a mighty storm, 
a lustie yonge man, called John Howland, coming 
upon some occasion above ye grattings was with 
a seele of ye ship, throwne into ye sea; but it 
pleased God yt he caught hould of ye top-saile 
halliards which hung overboard, and rane out at 
length; yet he held his hould, though he was 
sundrie fathomes under water, till he was hald 
up by ye same rope to ye brime of ye water, and 
then with a boat hooke and other means got into 
ye ship againe, and his life saved; and though 
he was something ill with it, yet he lived many 
years after, and became a profitable member both 
in church and comonewealth. ' ' 

Of his two brothers, Henry and Arthur, who so 
soon followed him across the ocean, Governor 
Bradford could not have said that they became 
profitable members of the church. They turned 
Quakers. Hardly had the earnest little Pilgrim 
band from Leyden, coming into the unknown 
wilderness that they might be free from the 
tyranny of a church with which they were not in 
accord, established a settled order of society, 
when among them there sprung up heretics. The 
"standards," or, as they are sometimes called, 
"the old lights," turned bitterly against their 
fellows who sought new light, and even in Ply- 
mouth, where the rigor of Puritanism was less 
severe than in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 
Quakers and Baptists, who dared to assert their 
independence of the established church, were per- 



HENRY AND ARTHUR HOWLAND 143 

secuted with severity. Plymouth became an 
undesirable place of residence for these heretics. 
Some of them followed Roger Williams to Rhode 
Island, where there did in fact exist a social order 
"with full liberty of religious concernment.'' 
Some of them settled in Dartmouth near the 
Rhode Island line. Your grandfather, William 
W. Crapo, in the oration which he delivered at 
the bi-centennial celebration of Dartmouth in 
1864, said that one of the chief reasons for the 
removal of the Quakers from Plymouth was, 
"that fully believing in freedom of conscience, 
they had early conceived a strong aversion to the 
arbitrary imposition of taxes by the civil power 
for the support of a ministry with which they 
were not in unison." 

I have said, if you remember, that to give you 
a passing interest, I hoped to vitalize a few of the 
thousand and more men and women who were 
your progenitors, and who have been dead and 
buried for two and a half centuries or more. It 
is impossible to do this without some reference 
to what was, after all, the controlling interest of 
most of them, — namely, doctrinal religion. They 
were, doubtless, men and women whose human 
qualities of personality are reducible to the same 
fundamental motives of life and love and energy 
which govern you today. Yet the motive of 
doctrinal religion which so largely shaped their 
interests and activities is something of which you 
have no experience. To be sure, you are by name 
"a Crapo," and so far as I have been able to 
discover, no man who ever bore that name from 



144 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the first Peter to the last William has had any 
" doctrinal religious concernment" to speak of. 
As a New Englander, however, you are, by 
paternal origin, only two thousandth part "a 
Crapo" after all, and most of the nineteen hun- 
dred and ninety-nine other parts of you were 
infused with an intense "doctrinal concernment." 
The personal history of the lives of your paternal 
forebears, therefore, must perforce be to some 
degree the history of Quakerism in Dartmouth, 
and Congregationalism in Newbury. 

The earliest record concerning Henry Howland, 
the first, is in the allotment of cattle in 1624, by 
which he became the owner, or the custodian, of 
"one black cow." It must have been one of the 
herd of i ' three heifers and a bull ' ' which Edward 
Winslow had brought over in 1623, "the first 
beginning of any cattel of that kind in ye land." 
Henry Howland must have been thrifty indeed to 
be in a position within a year or two after his 
coming to the new plantation to acquire one of 
these desirable animals, or considered exception- 
ally reliable to be given the custody of it. In 

1633 his name appears in the list of "freemen" 
of Plymouth, which means, curiously enough, that 
he had taken a solemn oath to be truly loyal to 
his sovereign Lord King Charles. In the same 
year he indentured a servant, Walter Harris. In 

1634 he was taxed eighteen shillings, which indi- 
cates a considerable ability on his part since the 
tax was comparatively a large one. In 1635 he 
was described as "one of the substantial land- 
holders and freemen of Duxbury ' ' living ' ' by the 



HENRY AND ARTHUR HOWLAND 145 

Bay Side near Love Brewster's." In 1635 he 
was chosen a Constable of Duxbury, an office of 
much dignity in those days. For some years 
thereafter he served in various public capacities 
until in 1657 he was noted as refusing to serve on 
the grand inquest. This means, although you 
might not suspect it, that he had turned Quaker. 
In October, 1657, he was " summonsed to appear 
at the next March Court to answare for inter- 
taining Quakers meetings at his house." He 
was fined ten shillings. In 1659 he was again 
convicted and sentenced by the Court "to be dis- 
franchised of his freedom in the corporation ' ' for 
being an abettor and entertainer of Quakers. In 
1660 he was again convicted and fined for the 
same offence. 

In view of these inconveniences it is not sur- 
prising that Henry Howland, who was among the 
original purchasers of Dartmouth in 1652, advised 
his sons to settle there. He was the owner of 
half a share, i. e., one sixty-eighth of the purchase. 
The land which his sons, for the most part, appear 
to have "sat down" on, was between the Chase 
Road and the Tucker Road, and in the vicinity of 
the Pascamansett River. Here it is possible that 
Henry Howland himself may have built a house 
and lived for a time, returning subsequently to 
Duxbury. In 1659, with twenty-six others, he 
bought of Wamsutta and Pattapanum the land 
known as Assonet, including the present town of 
Freetown, described often as the "lands at Taun- 
ton River." Here his son Samuel settled. In 
1664 he bought a large tract of land at Swansea. 



146 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Henry Howland married Mary Newland, a 
sister of William Newland, who came from Lynn 
in 1637 and settled in Sandwich. She and her 
brother became Quakers, and she suffered with 
her family the persecution of the Court. I have 
noticed in my investigations that it is the woman 
of a household who controls the religious attitude 
of her family. Her husband in most cases sim- 
ply follows suit. Henry Howland died in Dux- 
bury, January 17, 1671, and his widow died also 
in Duxbury, June 17, 1674. 

Zoeth Howland, the second son of Henry How- 
land and Mary Newland, was born in Duxbury 
about 1636. In October, 1656, he was married to 
his wife, Abigail, as appears by the Friends' 
record at Newport, R. I. In 1657 he took the oath 
of Fidelitie at Duxbury. In the same year he, with 
his father, was fined for holding Quaker meet- 
ings at his house. A deposition of one Samuel 
Hunt at this time is as follows: " About a fort- 
night before the date hereof, being att the house 
of Zoeth Howland hee said hee would not goe to 
meeting to hear lyes, and that the divill could 
preach as good a sermon as the ministers." For 
this blasphemous utterance he was arraigned at 
the next term of Court in March, 1657-8, "for 
speaking opprobriously of the minnesters of Gods 
word" and was sentenced "to sitt in the stockes 
for the space of an hour, or during the pleasure 
of the Court ; which accordingly was pf ormed and 
soe released." At the March term of Court, 1659, 
both Zoeth and his wife Abigail were fined, he for 
harboring Quakers, she for not attending the 
ordained meetings. 



HENRY AND ARTHUR HOWLAND 147 

It was probably as early as 1662, possibly a few 
years earlier, that Zoeth moved to Dartmouth and 
settled at "Apponagansett," "taking up" one 
half of his father's holdings. Here he made a 
bare subsistence from farming. At his death his 
estate, as reported to the Plymouth Court June 7, 
1677, consisted of a "quarter share" of land, 
(i. e. of the "Dartmouth purchase") a yoke of 
oxen, three cows, one mare, a brass kettle, a chest, 
a gun, a brass skillet, and several pots and pans. 
He was slain by the Indians at Puncatest near the 
ferry on the twenty-first day of January, 1676, 
when he was about forty years old. It was in 
the midst of King Philip's war. At the date of 
Zoeth 's death the main fighting was in southwest- 
ern Rhode Island, but doubtless some band of red- 
skins overtook him unawares near the ferry and 
killed him. Where the stone bridge was after- 
wards built there was a ferry. This ferry was 
subsequently kept by Zoeth 's son Daniel and 
known for many years as ' ' Howland 's Ferry. ' ' It 
is probable that Zoeth was going to or from meet- 
ing at Portsmouth or Newport when he was slain. 
John Cook, of Portsmouth, another of your an- 
cestors, at a court-martial held on some Indians 
at Newport August 25, 1676, testified that being 
at Puncatest in the middle of July he asked sev- 
eral Indians "Who killed Zoeth Howland?" and 
they said "there were six in the company, and 
that Manasses was the Indian that fetched him 
out of the water. ' ' 

On July 3, 1678, the Court of Plymouth ordered 
^'that in reference unto the estate of Zoeth How- 



148 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

land deceased that his widow Abigail Howland 
shall have all of his Real Estate and we therefore 
by these presents settle it upon her in considera- 
tion that shee hath many male children to bring 
up and the estate but small." It may have been 
the charms of Abigail, or her estate, — it surely 
could not have been her - ' many male children ' ' — 
which caused Richard Kirby to marry the widow 
December 2, 1678. He was the son of the Richard 
Kirby, from whom you descend. 

Nathaniel Howland was the first child of Zoeth 
and Abigail Howland and was born in Duxbury 
August 5, 1657, and died in Dartmouth March 3, 
1724. He married 1684 Rose Allen, daughter of 
Joseph and Sarah Allen. He lived originally on 
the north side of the road leading from New Bed- 
ford to Russell 's Mills on the west bank of a brook 
that crosses the road a few hundred yards east of 
the Slocum Road. The ruins of the cellar of the 
house are still distinguishable. In 1670 he had 
laid out to him a tract on the west side of the 
Apponegansett River, south of the Bridge, which 
his descendants have ever since occupied. In 
1710 he was living in his "new home" on the hill 
overlooking what is now New Bedford, the dwell- 
ing being north of Allen Street, and substantially 
the site of the present Dartmouth almshouse. He 
took a leading part in the affairs of the town of 
Dartmouth, being a selectman in 1699 and during 
several years thereafter. In 1702 he served on 
the grand jury. In 1721 he was Moderator at 
the town meeting. At one time he was chosen 
Tithing-Man, which is to say the overseer of the 



HENRY AND ARTHUR HOWLAND 149 

Indians ' ' for their better regulating and that they 
may be brought to live orderly, soberly and dili- 
gently." The Tithing-Man had associated with 
him one leading Indian, and the two together 
formed a Court for the trial of Indian cases. 
Originally the Tithing-Man was placed in charge 
of ten Indian families, which explains the origin 
of the designation. In 1692 the General Court 
defined the duties of Tithing-Men in addition to 
their care of the Indians as the especial guardians 
of the observance of the Lord's Day, making rigid 
rules for the conduct of all residents and travel- 
lers from sunset on Saturday night to Monday 
morning. 

It was, however, as a devoted Friend that 
Nathaniel Howland was preeminent. Scarcely a 
monthly meeting up to the time of his death he 
failed to attend. At a town meeting held on 
March 28, 1723, he was chosen Minister for the 
town, having fifty-five votes against twelve for 
Samuel Hunt. Samuel Hunt was an orthodox 
minister preaching at the Precinct Meeting House 
in Acushnet Village. The purpose of this strat- 
egical proceeding was that Dartmouth could 
claim that she had a minister, that he served with- 
out pay, and that consequently the town should 
not be called on for church rates. The Court at 
Plymouth, however, did not accept the subterfuge 
and attempted to collect the tax by force. The 
next year the town voted not to raise the tax of 
£100 required for the church rates, but did appro- 
priate £700 for the purpose of resisting the pay- 
ment of the tax and for the payment of a per diem 



150 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

allowance to the Selectmen for the time which 
they might be in jail for refusing to comply with 
the order of the Court. Two of the Selectmen 
were confined in jail for eighteen months, being 
released on an order from the King annulling the 
act of the Court. 

Phebe Howland descended from Eebecca the 
oldest daughter of Nathaniel Howland who mar- 
ried James Russell, and also from Content, his 
youngest daughter, who married Thomas How- 
land, a son of Henry Howland. 

Benjamin Howland, the second son of Zoeth and 
Abigail Howland, was born in Duxbury March 8, 
1659, and died in Dartmouth February 12, 1727. 
He married Judith Sampson, April 23, 1684. He 
owned and lived on the Round Hills Farm at the 
end of Smith's Neck, which passed to his son 
Isaac, and is now in possession of one of his de- 
scendants, Hetty Robinson Green. Benjamin 
Howland, like his brothers, was prominently con- 
nected with the Dartmouth Meeting of Friends, 
and is constantly mentioned on the records of the 
meeting as one entrusted with the care of its 
affairs. He also served the town in various 
capacities, acting as Surveyor of Highways, 
Assessor, Selectman, and Constable. His oldest 
child, Abigail, born in 1686, married Jonathan 
Ricketson, and was a great great grandmother of 
Phebe Howland. 

Henry Howland, the second of the name, from 
whom you descend, and the seventh child of Zoeth 
and Abigail Howland, was born June 30, 1672. 
His twin sister, Abigail, named for her mother, 



HENRY AND ARTHUR HOWLAND 151 

married one Abraham Booth in 1700. They were 
four years old when their father was killed by 
the Indians. As children they grew up at the 
home of their stepfather Richard Kirby. Henry 
learned the trade of a carpenter. The Dartmouth 
records show under date of August 28, 1707, that 
"Henry Howland was agreed with to put a pound 
near the town house, to make it of inch and one 
half oak plank to be well posted and the plank to 
be subpined to these with convenient gate and 
hinges and lock." On June 29, 1707, Henry How- 
land was agreed with by the town to make ' ' a pare 
of stocks and whiping posts." He built many 
houses and did a large business in sawing lumber. 
His homestead was situated a little to the west 
of the Apponegansett Friends ' Meeting House on 
the opposite side of the road. Not far up stream 
from the old stone bridge near the meeting house 
there are still evident the remains of an old dam. 
It may be here that Henry Howland had a saw 
mill. 

Henry Howland occupied a prominent position 
in the Friends ' meeting and was honored on many 
occasions by his fellow citizens with public office. 
He was Town Treasurer in 1716 and 1722, and Se- 
lectman in 1724, 1728 and 1729. He married 
Deborah, daughter of Thomas Briggs, June 3, 
1698. She was born in 1674 and died November 
25, 1712. Of her ancestry you will find some 
account in the notes relating to the ancestors of 
Anne Almy Chase. On the death of Deborah, 
Henry Howland married Elizabeth Northup Feb- 
ruary 12, 1714, with whom he was not happy. 



152 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Of Thomas Howland, the sixth child of Henry 
Howland and Deborah Briggs, born June 6, 1709, 
your ancestor, I can give you little information. 
In 1733 (December 17) he married Content How- 
land, his cousin, the daughter of Nathaniel How- 
land. She had first married one Briggs and gave 
me much trouble in running her down. I am con- 
vinced that for genealogical reasons alone widows 
should never be allowed to re-marry. Thomas 
Howland and his wife Content had but one child, 
David, your ancestor. He was born August 25, 
1734. "He was a cordwainer." His intentions 
of marriage with Lavinia Russell were published 
December 8, 1753. He died in 1778. She died 
October 10, 1815, aged 80 years. 

Henry Howland (the third of the name in your 
succession) was the second child of David How- 
land and Lavinia Russell and was born January 
3, 1757. He learned the trade of a shoemaker, 
and later became a substantial landholder and 
farmer. His farm was on the north side of the 
road leading from Smith's Neck to Russell's Mills 
west of the Bakertown road. Your grandfather 
William W. Crapo, remembers that when a boy 
the home where his great grandfather Henry 
Howland lived was shown to him by his father, 
Henry Howland Crapo. Henry Howland married 
Rhoda Chase of Dartmouth November 16, 1777. 
He had fifteen children, one of whom was Phebe 
Howland, the wife of Jesse Crapo. 

Arthur Howland, who came over with his 
brother Henry, settled in Marshfield. Three hun- 
dred acres of upland in Marshfield were granted 



HENRY AND ARTHUR HOWLAND 153 

July 2, 1638, to Capt. Myles Standish and Mr. 
John Alden, "lying on the north side of South 
River, bounded on the east by Beaver Pond, and 
on the west by a brook," which later for a con- 
sideration of £21 sterling was conveyed to Arthur 
Howland. In 1640, fifty acres additional was 
granted to him. On this, farm he lived and died, 
as did five generations of his descendants. Arthur 
Howland, like his brother Henry Howland, was 
a man of firm and upright character, thrifty, fair 
in all dealings, and highly respected for his per- 
sonal worth, notwithstanding his undesirable 
character as a Quaker. 

In 1657 the authorities, hearing of an intended 
meeting at Arthur Howland 's house, Sunday, 
December 20, to be conducted by Robert Huchin, 
one of "the forraigne Quakers who were goeing 
too and frow in some of the towns of the govern- 
ment, producing great desturbance," dispatched 
a Constable to break up the meeting. His coming 
had evidently been forewarned, since he "found 
no man at the house. ' ' On the next day, Monday, 
December 21, a warrant was issued for the arrest 
of Arthur Howland and the preacher, which was 
vigorously contested, the Constable being "thrust 
out of doors." Arthur, however, on the day fol- 
lowing gave himself up and appeared before the 
Governor's Assistants, by whom he was sentenced 
to give bonds for his appearance at the General 
Court. This he refused to do and was committed 
to jail. In jail he wrote a letter to the General 
Court "full of factious, seditious, slanderous pas- 
sages, to be of dangerous consequence." He was 



154 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

fined by the Court and refusing to pay his fine, 
again committed to jail. In June, 1658, however, 
he retracted some of his contumelious statements 
and was released with an admonition not to 
offend in like manner again. It is to be feared 
that he did not profit by the admonition since he 
and his wife were fined ten shillings in 1658 for 
absenting themselves from public worship. As 
late as 1669 he was fined for not paying "the rate 
to minnestry. " 

Arthur Howland had married the "widow 
Margaret Reed," who outlived him. Arthur died 
and was buried on his farm at Marshfield, October 
30, 1675. His second child was Deborah, who 
married John Smith, Jr., of Plymouth, and from 
whom Phebe Howland, through the Russells, 
descended. 



Chaptek V 

JOHN EUSSELL 

Came over prior to 1642 



John Russell 1608 — 1694-5 

(Dorothy ) 

Jonathan Russell — 1723 

(Hasadiah Smith) 

James Russell 1687 — 1764 

(Rebecca Howland) 

Paul Russell 1710 — 1773 

(Rebecca Ricketson) 

Lavinia Russell 1735 — 1815 

(David Howland) 

Henry Howland 1757 — 1817 

(Rhoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JOHN RUSSELL 



Daniel Kicketson, the historian of New Bed- 
ford, says : ' ' One of the earliest settlers of Dart- 
mouth was Ralph Russell, who came from Ponti- 
pool, England, and had been engaged in the iron 
business with Henry and James Leonard of 
Taunton. He set up an iron forge at 'Russell's 
Mills' which place received its name from him. 
Ralph Russell was the progenitor of the Russell 
families of New Bedford, and the ancestor in the 
fourth remove of Joseph Russell from whom New 
Bedford received its name." And again Mr. 
Ricketson says: "The first settlement of Dart- 
mouth so far as I have been able to ascertain from 
a diligent examination of the old records was 
made at Russell 's Mills by Ralph Russell. * * * 
Ralph Russell was probably an elderly man at 
the time he emigrated from Taunton to Dart- 
mouth, as the name of John Russell, Senior, who 
was undoubtedly his son, appears first in the early 
records of the township as a proprietor." 

In view of these definite statements of our local 
historian the tradition that Ralph Russell, origi- 
nally of Braintree, later of Lynn, was the pro- 
genitor of the Russells of Dartmouth is not to be 
lightly dismissed as incorrect, and yet Mr. Ricket- 
son in his " diligent examination of old records" 



]58 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

must have had access to records no longer in 
existence or available, that could have justified 
him in stating that Ralph was in fact the pro- 
genitor of the Russells of Dartmouth, and that 
John Russell was ' ' undoubtedly his son." 

The identity of Ralph Russell of Taunton is 
easily established. That he was ever in Dart- 
mouth, much less that he had aught to do with 
any iron forge at Russell's Mills during his life- 
time, is highly improbable. The original iron 
forge at the Mills was established in 1787 by Giles 
Slocum. There is no record or evidence that any 
iron industry was carried on in Dartmouth in the 
seventeenth century. That Ralph Russell was 
the father of John Russell, an undoubted original 
settler of Dartmouth, is most unlikely. John 
Russell was born in 1608. His father, therefore, 
must have been born as early as 1585 or there- 
abouts. Since we know that there was no Ralph 
Russell in the early settlement of Plymouth, it is 
evident that if Ralph Russell was the father of 
John Russell he must have been over forty years 
of age when he first left England. We have no 
reason to suppose that there was any considerable 
settlement in Dartmouth prior to 1660 or later. 
If, therefore, Ralph Russell came to Dartmouth 
from Taunton and established an iron industry 
at Russell's Mills, he must have been at least 
seventy-five years of age — certainly an advanced 
age for a promoter to start an industrial plant in 
the wilderness. There is certainly no evidence 
extant that he did so. Nor is there the slightest 
authority for making him the father of John 



JOHN RUSSELL 159 

Russell. If there was any connection of blood be- 
tween Ralph Russell of Braintree and John Rus- 
sell of Marshfield it is certainly more probable 
that they were brothers. 

John Russell of Marshfield and his wife, 
Dorothy, are indisputably the progenitors of the 
Russells of Dartmouth. It is not known when 
John Russell came over or in what part of the 
old country he originated. Russell was by no 
means an uncommon name in many of the 
Counties of England at the close of the sixteenth 
century, and although the titled family of that 
name had Bedford as their ducal designation, 
there is no reason whatever to suppose that John 
Russell came from the old town of Bedford. John 
Russell was certainly living in Marshfield in 1642, 
when he was elected Constable of the town. This 
would indicate that he was not altogether a new- 
comer, and that he had been living in Marshfield 
or in Plymouth for some years at least prior to 
that date. There is, indeed, a tradition that he 
fought in the Pequot War, which would carry 
him back as a settler prior to 1637. In 1643-4 he 
was granted certain land " which lieth between 
the marsh of Josiah Winslow and Kenelm Wins- 
low." There are several other grants of land in 
Marshfield to him recorded at about this time and 
during the next ten years. On June 5, 1644, he 
was made a freeman by the General Court of 
Plymouth and during the next few years served 
in various public capacities. 

John Russell and his wife, Dorothy, were neigh- 
bors of the Howlands and apparently were in- 



160 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

fected with Quakerism at the very origin of that 
"pestilence." To be sure he was of the grand 
jury in 1657, which indicated that he had not then 
been excommunicated. Yet it is not to be won- 
dered that we find him joining with Henry How- 
land in the purchase and original settlement of 
Dartmouth in order to avoid the inconveniences 
of his unpopular faith. In 1661 John Russell 
purchased of Samuel Cuthbert a lot in severalty 
of about five acres on the Acushnet River near 
the Howard Brook. He kept this land, on which 
he may have lived, until 1668, when he sold it to 
John Cooke. It is here that John Cooke is prob- 
ably buried. On March 20, 1661, he purchased of 
Captain Myles Standish a full share in the Dart- 
mouth purchase and paid forty-two pounds for it. 
This was a good turn for Myles Standish. He 
was one of the thirty-four who paid in 1652 to 
Wesamequen and Wamsutta thirty yards of cloth, 
eight mooseskins, fifteen axes, fifteen hoes, fifteen 
pair of breeches, eight blankets, two kettles, one 
cloak, two pounds in wampum, eight pair of 
stockings, eight pair of shoes, one iron pot and 
ten shillings "in another commoditie" (possibly 
rum it has been suggested), in exchange for about 
one hundred thousand acres of land. At any 
reasonable valuation of these various commodi- 
ties Myles Standish 's original cost could not have 
exceeded from five to ten dollars of the money of 
today. After nine years he sold his interest for, 
say, two hundred and ten dollars — taking a fair 
profit. If John Russell and his descendants had 
held the interest of the same thirty-two hundred 



JOHN RUSSELL 161 

acres which he purchased from the date of the pur- 
chase in 1661 to the present date, and charged up 
interest at the rate of six per cent, per annum on 
the purchase price of $210, compounding the 
same, the land would today stand him and his de- 
scendants in $330,301,440. Such is the over- 
whelming effect of that marvellous system of 
reduplication known as compound interest. 

Soon after his removal to Dartmouth, John 
Russell became one of the leaders of the new set- 
tlement. He was the first Deputy from Dart- 
mouth to the Court at Plymouth in 1665 and he 
served as the representative of his community 
many times thereafter, he and John Cooke shar- 
ing the office, turn and turn about, for a long 
period of years. His homestead farm was on 
the east side of the Apponegansett River and 
included nearly the whole of ' ' Ponagansett, ' ' now 
called Padanaram Neck, north of what is now 
Bush Street. His house was near the shore in a 
swampy pasture not far from the head of the 
river, "near his orchards." The cellars are still 
well defined and indicated a structure about 
twenty feet square with an ell about ten feet 
square with an exit leading to the brook near by. 
The entire structure may have been of stone. At 
the outbreak of King Philip's War, John Russell 
took the same precautions for the protection of 
his neighbors as did John Cooke by fortifying 
his house as a "garrison house." It was known 
afterwards as the "old castle." On the opposite 
side of the river, a little further down stream, 
near Heath's Neck (or Heathen's Neck), later 



162 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

known as the "Downs," there was an Indian fort 
and settlement. 

At the beginning of the war in 1675, John 
Russell had been made Constable and was thus 
clothed with the authority of leadership and it 
was to him, and to the shelter which he had pro- 
vided, that his helpless and terror stricken neigh- 
bors turned when the savages initiated the 
massacres and devastations which nearly exter- 
minated the township of Dartmouth. It was 
largely to the military sagacity of Captain Ben- 
jamin Church, of whom you have heard in con- 
nection with John Cooke 's experiences, that Dart- 
mouth was saved from annihilation. On July 21, 
1676, Captain Church led his little army to John 
Russell's garrison house where the defenders 
were under the command of Captain Samuel Eels, 
and "clap'd into a thicket, and there lod'gd the 
rest of the night without any fire. ' ' In the morn- 
ing they encountered a band of Indians and pur- 
sued them in the direction of Smith Mills. The 
huddled occupants of John Russell's house of 
refuge must have felt grateful to the sturdy fel- 
lows who followed Captain Church and drove the 
savages away from their none too secure fortifi- 
cation. After the war John Russell, with the help 
of John Cooke, devoted himself to rehabilitating 
the devastated town. As Selectman, an office 
which he had held and continued to hold for many 
years, he gave his time and his intelligent efforts 
to serve his fellow townsmen. Soon after the war 
he constructed a new house on the hill, where 
were held the town meetings and which also 



JOHN RUSSELL 163 

served as the town school house. One of John 
Russell's descendants was dubbed the "Duke of 
Bedford," yet I venture to say that no Duke of 
Bedford, not even John Plantagenet of Lan- 
caster, by far the greatest of the bearers of that 
title (he, to be sure, was not a Russell), ever 
served "their people" more faithfully or more 
efficiently than did old John Russell of Dartmouth. 
Dorothy had died February 13, 1687, and eight 
years later, February 13, 1694-5, John Russell's 
eighty-six years of useful life came to an end. 
It is from Jonathan, his second son, who married 
Hasadiah Smith, a daughter of John Smith, that 
Phebe Howland descended. 



Chapter VI 

JOHN SMITH 

Came over prior to 1628 



John Smith 1618 — 1692 

(Deborah Howland) 

Hasadiah Smith 1650 — 

(Jonathan Russell) 

James Russell 1687 — 1764 

(Rebecca Howland) 

Paul Russell 1710 — 1773 

(Rebecca Ricketson) 

Lavinia Russell 1735 — 1815 

(David Howland) 

Henry Howland 1757 — 1817 

(Rhoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



John Smith 1618 — 1692 

(Ruhamah Kirby) 

Deliverance Smith — 1729 

(Mary Tripp) 

Deborah Smith 1695 — 

(Eliezer Slocum) 

Ann Slocum 1732 — 

(Job Almy) 

Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JOHN SMITH 



The particular John Smith from whom you 
descend was born either in Holland or in England 
about the year 1618. He was in Plymouth as early 
as 1628 and probably earlier. Who he was, why 
and how and with whom it happened that as a 
mere child he crossed the ocean I know not. He 
may have been a " redemptioner, " a term which 
came into use later to designate a young immi- 
grant who came over on a ship without paying 
the fare, and on his arrival was indentured by the 
Captain to anyone who would pay him the lad's 
passage money. He is designated in the early 
Plymouth records as John Smith "Junior," dis- 
tinguishing him from John Smith " Senior,' ' who 
may possibly have been his father. John Smith 
"Senior" is mentioned occasionally in the records 
as late as 1660. John Smith Junior may have 
been a grandson of Mr. John Smith, "a man of 
able gifts and a good preacher" who, Governor 
Bradford tells us, was in the early days of the 
seventeenth century chosen pastor of a church of 
English Separatists in Lincolnshire or Yorkshire 
"wher they border nearest together. " Later Mr. 
John Smith and his followers were driven from 
England and went to Amsterdam. When the 
exiles from Scrooby, who eventually formed for 



JOHN SMITH 169 

the most part the Mayflower band, went to 
Amsterdam in 1609, they intended to join the 
church there, but finding "Mr. John Smith and 
his companie was already fallen into contention" 
they determined to separate from them and 
removed to Leyden. Referring to Mr. Smith and 
his followers Governor Bradford says that "they 
afterwards falling into some errors in ye Low 
Countries ther (for ye most part) buried them- 
selves and their names." Perhaps your John 
Smith was one who did not bury himself and his 
name in the Netherlands, but crossed the sea and 
perpetuated his name in a conspicuous manner in 
old Dartmouth. However, being a "John 
Smith" it would be well nigh hopeless to attempt 
to identify or differentiate him. 

His troubles in New England began early, as 
appears by the records of the Plymouth Court: 
"Jan. 2d, 1633. That whereas John Smith being 
in great extremity formerly and to be freed of 
the same, bound himself as an apprentice to 
Edward Dowty for the term of ten years; upon 
the petition of the said John the court took the 
matter into hearing, and finding the said Edward 
had disbursed but little for him freed the said 
John from his covenant of ten years and bound 
him to make up the term he had already served 
the said Edward the full term of five years, and 
to the end thereof; the said Edward to give him 
double apparel, and so be free of each other." 
He was about fifteen years old when he became 
free of Edward Doty and went to work for him- 
self. He must have worked to good purpose 



170 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

since he soon became possessed of property and 
held a recognized position in the community. In 
April, 1643, it was agreed by the town that " John 
Smith shall be the Cow Keep for this year to keep 
the Towne's Cowes and shall have fourty bushels 
of Indian corne for his paynes and a pair of shoes 
to be equally levyed upon every man according 
to the number of cowes they shall have kept by 
him, and he is to keep them untill the middle of 
November next. ' ' In August, 1643, he being then 
twenty-five, he is enrolled as "able to bear arms." 
When he was thirty, on January 4, 1648-9, he 
married Deborah Howland, the daughter of 
Arthur Howland of Marshfield. Whether the 
newly married pair at once went to live in the 
house on North Street in Plymouth, on land where 
now stands the house of Nathaniel Morton, or 
whether this abode was a later acquisition the 
records do not disclose. 

The disposition of the scant herd of cattle of 
the young colony was from the start one of the 
serious cares of the General Court, and that on 
June 27, 1650, it was determined that "John 
Smith is to have the cow that is in Goodman 
Pontius hands for this year" is evidence that 
John was considered a deserving and reliable 
citizen. He had evidently made good as Cowe 
Keep. In 1652 the same cow was again by the 
Court's decree continued in the care of John 
Smith, which indicates that he had treated her 
well. It is sad to learn from the records under 
date of August 26, 1655, that i ' the cow which John 
Smith had is dead without any increase." June 



JOHN SMITH 171 

5, 1651, John Smith was admitted as a freeman, 
and was of the grand jury. In 1653 he gave 
evidence that he was not only able but willing ' ' to 
beare arms" since he was an officer on the 
"barque" which was sent from Plymouth to fight 
the Dutch at Manhatoes (New York). What 
service he performed I know not, but whatever it 
was, it doubtless ceased on or before June 23, 
1654, when ' ' happy tidings came of a long desired 
peace betwixt the two nations of England and 
Holland and preparations ceased." 

John Smith, I fancy, was not so straight laced 
an individual as some of your ancestors. To be 
sure, he had married a Howland, and like most 
dutiful husbands he followed her in religious 
tenets and was nominally a Quaker. He did not, 
however, take Quakerism or Separatism or any 
other ism as seriously as did most of your 
ancestors, for instance, Ralph Allen, who refused 
to take the oath of fidelity to King Charles and 
was fined £10. Apparently without a murmur 
John Smith took the oath on June 10, 1658 — and, 
I have no doubt, rather hoped he might have the 
chance to "fight for the King." None the less 
he had become matrimonially involved with the 
Quakers and in March, 1658-9, he together with 
his wife's relations, was fined for "frequently 
absenting himself from the public worship of 
God" — to the amount of ten shillings. In 1660 
his wife involved him in more trouble, but he 
seems to have stood by her as a loyal husband 
should. The record reads as follows: "1660. 
May 1st Prence Gov'r. At this Court John 



172 CERTAIN COMEOVBRERS 

Smith of Plymouth, Jun'r, appeared, being sum- 
moned to answer for permitting that a Quaker 
meeting was suffered to bee at his house, — his 
wife alsoe being summoned to answer for per- 
mitting the same, hee, the said Smith, was 
demanded wither hee would owne and defend 
what his wife had done in that respect, hee 
answered hee would, and did owne it, and did 
approve of it, and soe Convict of the fact." And 
was fined £2. And again in the same year he and 
his wife Deborah were fined for a like offence. 

It would seem that John Smith in some degree 
at least followed the sea, perhaps only to the 
extent of running a ferry to Duxbury, since in 
1663, June 8, the Court ordered that "John Smith 
the boatesman att Plymouth hath liberty this year 
to pick up wood from any of the lands, what hee 
needeth. " It was about this time that John Smith 
appears to have become interested in the lands of 
Acushena, Ponagansett and Coaksett which were 
constituted a township by the name of Dartmouth 
in 1664. By a deed dated October 6, 1665, he 
conveyed to Edward Doty, Jr., the son of his 
former master Edward Doty, who was one of 
the original purchasers of the Dartmouth tract, 
"his house messuage and garden spot on ye north 
side of North Street," Plymouth, in consideration 
of two-sevenths of a whole share in the Dart- 
mouth purchase. In 1664 or 1665 he emigrated 
to the new township. On October 3, 1665, John 
Smith and John Russell "of Dartmouth" were 
appointed by the Court, under Governor Prence, 
to settle a claim which the Indians at Acushena 



JOHN SMITH 173 

had against the English on account of damage 
done by the horses of the Englishmen. During 
the next ten years John Smith was an active citi- 
zen of the new town of Dartmouth. He settled in 
the region since known as Smith's Neck, where 
many of his descendants still live. He was 
prominent in the management of the town's 
affairs, being appointed Surveyor of Highways, 
arbiter of disputes, one of a committee with John 
Cooke and John Russell to distribute a fund 
donated in Ireland for the relief of those im- 
poverished in King Philip's war, and in similar 
capacities. 

It was, however, as the first military commander 
of Dartmouth that he may be said to be especially 
distinguished. In 1673-4 he was appointed by 
Governor Winslow as Lieutenant of the Military 
Company of Dartmouth. A militant Quaker is 
something of an anomaly. I fancy that Deborah, 
his wife, had passed on before John became a 
soldier. I doubt if she would have stood by him 
as loyally as he did by her in the matter of the 
Quaker meetings at Plymouth, nor "defended 
and approved" his acceptance of a military com- 
mission. His second wife, Ruhamah Kirby, was, 
perhaps, less rigid in her Quakerism, or more 
amenable. 

John Smith died in the seventy-fourth year of 
his age on January 15, 1692, and was buried in the 
Hill Meadow burial place on his homestead. By 
his two wives he had thirteen children and his 
descendants are many. It was his first child, 
Hasadiah, a daughter of Deborah Howland, born 



174 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

January 11, 1650, who married Jonathan Russell, 
from whom you descend by way of Phebe How- 
land, and his sixth child, Deliverance Smith, a 
son of Ruhamah Kirby, his second wife, from 
whom also you descend through Anne Alnry 
Chase. 

Deliverance Smith lived on his father's home- 
stead place on Smith's Neck, where his descend- 
ants still live. He was an active member of the 
Friends' Meeting of Dartmouth. In 1702 he had 
charge of building an addition to the first meet- 
ing house at Apponegansett. In 1703 he was 
chosen at a monthly meeting "to enspect into the 
report considering Ebenezer Allen and abusing 
of an Indian called Jeremiah. ' ' And in the same 
year he was chosen by the meeting one of an 
inquisition "to inspect into the lives and con- 
versation of Friends." In 1706 he was a Select- 
man and Assessor and refusing, for conscience 
sake, to assess the sum of sixty pounds annexed 
to the Queen's tax, for the maintenance of a hire- 
ling minister, was arrested by the Sheriff of 
Bristol, under order of the General Court at 
Boston, and committed to the County gaol at 
Bristol. "Friends having unity with him on his 
sufferings do appoint Benjamin Howland and 
Judah Smith to procure a hand to manage the 
said Deliverance Smith's business whilst he is in 
prison on the account of trouble, and friends 
engage him his wages and the monthly meeting 
to reimburse the same. ' ' The committee reported 
at a later meeting that they had employed James 
Russell "to look after Deliverance Smith's busi- 



JOHN SMITH 175 

ness for one month." The meeting agreed to 
appropriate "as much money out of stock as will 
pay the said Russell for this monthly work." At 
subsequent meetings it was provided "that 
Deliverance Smith don 't want a hand to look after 
his business, he being still a prisoner on truth's 
account." John Tucker was appointed by the 
meeting to go to Boston "to see if he can get any 
relief for our friends who now remain prisoners 
with Deliverance Smith in the County Gaol of 
Bristol. ' ' At the meeting held first month, ninth, 
1709, John Tucker reported that he had been to 
Boston and had succeeded in obtaining a release 
for the prisoners on condition that they paid the 
fees of the sheriff "which they could not do, 
therefore they are still continued prisoners." 
The funds were raised, the sheriff satisfied, and 
Deliverance Smith and his imprisoned companions 
were released. "Thomas Taber, Junior, being a 
friendly man and a late prisoner with our friend, 
Deliverance Smith, and he behaving himself as 
becometh the truth, which he suffered for the time 
of his imprisonment, and friends having unity 
with him in his sufferings, do think it their Chris- 
tian duty to contribute something towards the 
support of his family in the time of his late 
imprisonment." 

Only .four months later Deliverance Smith was 
again in conflict with the constituted authorities 
for conscience sake. At some risk of boring you 
I will give in full the communication which he and 
his fellow sufferers addressed to the Dartmouth 
monthly meeting holden the fifteenth day of the 
sixth month, 1709. It is as follows : 



176 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Dear Friends and Brethren: Thinking it our Chris- 
tian duty, and according to the good order of truth to 
give you the following account. Friends, on the ninth 
day of the third month last, in this present year, we, 
whose names are underwritten, three of us being at the 
town house in Dartmouth, were impressed by John 
Akin of the train band, in the Queen's service, to go to 
Canada, and he required us to appear the next day at 
the house of Josiah Allen, to receive further orders. 
Accordingly we went to said Allen's and when we 
came, our further order was to exercise in a warlike 
posture, and we told said Akin that we could not in 
conscience act in any warlike posture, nor use carnal 
weapons to destroy men's lives, who said he took notice 
of our answer and told us we might go home until 
further notice, which we did, and remained at or about 
the house until the eighteenth day of the month, and 
then being ordered to appear before Col. Byfield we 
went with William Soule, who was impressed by the 
above said Akin the 11th of the same month to go to 
Canada in her Majesty's service, and ordered to appear 
at the town house in Bristol on the 18th day of the 
said 3d month. So we went to Joseph Wanton's where 
we met with our friend William Wood who was going 
with his son William Wood to Bristol, for Robert 
Brownell came the 11th day of the 3d month 1709 and 
impressed his son to go to Canada in the Queen's ser- 
vice. Afterwards Nathaniel Soule warned him to 
appear at the town house in Bristol on the 18th day of 
the said 3d month. Then we considered the matter and 
thought it might be best for William Wood to leave his 
son there and go and speak in his son's behalf, which 
he did. 

Then we went to Bristol together and appeared 
before Col. Byfield who asked us some questions, to 
which we answered that we could not for conscience 
sake act in a warlike posture to destroy men's lives, for 
in so doing we should offend God and incur his dis- 
pleasure. And William Wood, junior, was called, his 
father spoke in his behalf, and Col. Byfield asked him 
if his son was a Quaker too, and he said it is against 
his mind to go to war, and he would not kill a man for 
the world. Then one that sat by said Byfield said 



JOHN SMITH 177 

"Take him!" and then he took down William's name 
in his book. Then he put us all under command of 
Capt. Joseph Brown and charged us to march with him 
to Roxbury by the 25th of the said month, which charge 
we could not obey ; but afterwards, he being more mod- 
erate, desired us to go down not in any warlike posture 
but to take our own time, so as to meet Capt. Brown at 
the Governor's at Roxbury, the said 25th of the month, 
which we finding freedom to do accordingly went 
thither and laid our cases before the Governor, Joseph 
Dudley, who was very kind and gave us our liberty to 
go home without demanding money of us, or we paying 
him any, in which liberty, through the goodness of 
God, we still remain your friends : 

John Tucker 
William Wood 
William Soule 
John Lapham, Jr. 
Deliverance Smith 

Governor Dudley doubtless concluded that men 
who refused "to act in a warlike posture" would 
prove but indifferent recruits for her Majesty's 
army. The evident astonishment of the Friends 
that there was no demand for money from them 
indicates that official graft was not unheard of 
even in those early days. 

The date of the birth of Deliverance Smith is 
not known. It must have been subsequent to 
1659, in which year Deborah Howland, the first 
wife of John Smith, was living in Plymouth. 
Deliverance appears to have been the first child 
of John Smith's second marriage to Ruhamah 
Kirby of Sandwich. He died August 30, 1729, be- 
ing probably about seventy years of age. Until 
the year of his death his name appears constantly 
in the records of the monthly meetings as one who 



178 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

was charged with the administration of the affairs 
of the meeting. He married Mary Tripp, the 
daughter of Peleg Tripp and Anne Sisson, of 
Portsmouth. Deborah Smith, the daughter of 
Deliverance and Mary, married Eliezer Slocum, 
a great grandfather of Anne Almy Chase. 



Chapter VII 

GEORGE ALLEN 

Came over 1635 



George Allen _1583 — 1649 

( ) 

Ralph Allen +1600 — 1698 

( ) 

Joseph Allen — 1704 

(Sarah ) 

Rose Allen 1665 — 

(Nathaniel Howland) 

Content Howland 1702 — 

(Thomas Howland) 

David Howland 1734 — 1778 

(Lavinia Russell) 

Henry Howland 1757 — 1817 

(Rhoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



GEORGE ALLEN 



The Aliens of Slocum's Neck were near neigh- 
bors of the Slocums of Barney's Joy. Your 
father used to go gunning along the reaches of 
Allen's Beach with Jim Allen, "Barney's Joy 
Jim." It was pleasant to find that you, too, are 
an Allen, although it is not in connection with the 
Slocums, but through Phebe Howland that you 
can claim kin with the countless descendants of 
Ralph Allen who live in and about Dartmouth. 
George Allen was the first of this family in this 
country. He was born, probably prior to 1583, 
in the County of Somerset, in England. He 
joined the party under the leadership of the Rev. 
Joseph Hull and sailed from Weymouth March 
20, 1635, arriving in Boston May 6, and remaining 
there until July, when with other members of Mr. 
Hull's party he settled at Weymouth. In 1637 
he moved to Sandwich and was a member of the 
first church in 1638. In 1639 he was elected Con- 
stable, an office of great dignity in the early 
colonial days, being clothed with the enforcement 
of all laws. In 1640- '41- '42, he was Deputy to 
the General Court at Plymouth. In 1646 he built 
a house in Sandwich, about a quarter of a mile 
from the Quaker Meeting House on the main road 
to the Cape. It stood until 1882. George Allen 



182 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

died in 1649, his will being probated August 7, 
1649. Ralph Allen, "Jun.," in distinction from 
Ralph Allen, "Sen.," who may have been a 
brother of George Allen, was one of the older 
children of George Allen. His mother's name 
is unknown. He was born in England and prob- 
ably came over with his father. 

In 1657, Christopher Holder, of whom you will 
hear much later, and John Copeland established 
in Sandwich the earliest monthly meeting of 
Friends in America. Even before that date 
travelling Quakers had spread dissent and led 
many away from the established church. Ralph 
Allen was among the leaders in the new move- 
ment. Bowden, in his history of the Quakers, 
says, "There were six brothers and sisters of 

Ralph who joined the Friends They 

were of the family of George Allen who had been 

an Anabaptist The father laid down 

his head in peace before Friends had visited these 
parts." There was no peace for the children. At 
the beginning of the Quaker heresy the authorities 
at Plymouth took vigorous steps to stamp it out 
as has and will so constantly appear in these 
histories of your Quaker forebears. To entertain 
a Quaker "if but a quarter of an hour" subjected 
the entertainer to a fine of five pounds, the 
equivalent of a whole year's wages at that time. 
"If any see a Quaker he is bound if he lives six 
miles or more from the constables, yet he must 
presently go and give notice to the Constable, or 
else is subject to the censure of the Court, which 
may be hanging." They did not really mean the 



GEORGE ALLEN 183 

11 hanging" to be taken seriously. It was some- 
thing of a bluff, I fancy. The Constables, however, 
were directed to whip any Quaker found in their 
precinct and drive him away, and the holding of 
Quaker meetings was a crime severely fined. In 
Sandwich, the ascendency of the Quakers was 
rapid and consequently the adherents to the new 
faith were sorely persecuted. Ralph Allen's 
fines amounted to £18. The excessive sum of 
£660 7s. 6d. worth of property was by a single 
decree of the Court distrained from a compara- 
tively small number of Friends in Sandwich. 
"And so envious were the Persecutors that they 
put three inhabitants in the stocks only for taking 
John Eouse by the hand." 

William Allen, Ralph 's brother, was a still more 
obnoxious Quaker. His fines amounted to £87. 
Mr. Ambrose E. Pratt, at the two hundred and 
fiftieth anniversary of the settlement of Sand- 
wich, writes as follows : ' ' William Allen found a 
good estate gone into his fines. Of all his mov- 
ables, a cow, left out of pity, a little corn remain- 
ing and a bag of meal with a few articles of furni- 
ture were all that remained, and he, himself was 
living on bread and water in Boston jail. The 
heartless Constable came to collect an additional 
fine, this time drunk. He seized the cow and the 
meal. That was not enough. As he seized the 
good wife 's only copper kettle, with mock he said, 
'And now, Priscilla, how will thee cook for thy 
family and finds thee has no kettle?' And the 
Quakeress answered, ' George, that God who hears 
the ravens when they cry will provide for them. 



184 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

I trust in that God and verily believe the time will 
come when thy necessity will be greater than 
mine.' Which in time it was." If any such con- 
versation took place, Priscilla, a daughter of 
Peter Brown of the Mayflower, albeit her provo- 
cation was great, was untrue to the tenets of her 
faith in wishing ill for her enemies. 

It is not strange that Ralph Allen and his 
brother William should have taken the same 
course which Henry Howland and John Russell 
and others of your ancestors took, and removed 
to Dartmouth, which was rapidly becoming a 
Quaker settlement. Ralph purchased large in- 
terests in Dartmouth lands. In 1663, he bought 
from Alice Bradford one-half of her whole share 
in the Dartmouth purchase which came to her 
from her husband, Governor Bradford. In the 
subsequent years he purchased several other in- 
terests and certain specific tracts. There is the 
same uncertainty as to whether Ralph Allen 
actually lived in Dartmouth as there is as to 
whether Henry Howland did. In both cases, it 
is clear that they settled their children on their 
Dartmouth lands, and doubtless visited their 
properties. 

Ralph Allen died in Sandwich in 1698. In his 
will he describes himself as very aged and re- 
quests to be buried in his "friend" William 
Allen's burying ground. The name of his wife I 
have not learned. He left five children, your an- 
cestor, Joseph Allen, being the oldest. He lived 
on a part of the land which his father had pur 
chased from Mistress Sarah Warren of Plymouth 



GEORGE ALLEN 185 

at "Barnes-his-joy," his homestead being at the 
easterly end of Allen's Pond. Joseph Allen was 
prominent in the town's affairs. In 1675, he was 
a grand juryman; in 1682, a rater; in 1687, Con- 
stable; and in 1697, a Deputy to the General 
Court. His name appears often in connection 
with the divisions of Dartmouth lands and the 
controversies which arose concerning them. His 
wife's name was Sarah, her surname I know not. 
It was their daughter, Eose, who married 
Nathaniel Howland, who was Phebe Howland's 
great great grandmother. 



Chapter VIII 

BENJAMIN HAMMOND 

Came over 1634 
Griffin 



Benjamin Hammond 
(Mary Vincent) 



1621 — 1703 



Samuel Hammond 
(Mary Hathaway) 



1655 — 1728+ 



Thomas Hammond 
(Sarah Spooner) 



1687 — 17 



Lovina Hammond 
(John Chase) 



1734 — 



Rhoda Chase 
(Henry Howland) 



1759 — 



Phebe Howland 
(Jesse Crapo) 



1785 — 1870 



Henry H. Crapo 
(Mary Ann Slocum) 



1804 — 1869 



William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 



1830 — 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 — 



"William Wallace Crapo 



1895 — 



BENJAMIN HAMMOND 



In 1840, your great grandfather, Henry H. 
Crapo, became interested in the local history of 
Dartmouth. Among his papers were certain 
memoranda concerning the British raid in 1778 
and a list of the dwelling houses then in the village 
of New Bedford. One of the witnesses whom he 
examined in obtaining this information was John 
Gilbert. In the list of houses there is a descrip- 
tion of a house on Ray and North Streets built by 
Jabez Hammond. The memorandum referring to 
Jabez Hammond says, "He was father to John 
Gilbert's wife and came from Mattapoisett. Old 
John Chase's wife was this man's sister, making 
John Gilbert's wife own cousin to my grand- 
mother. " It is from this casual note that, through 
the prompting of Mr. William A. Wing, the 
Secretary of the Old Dartmouth Historical So- 
ciety, the connection of Phebe Howland with the 
Hammonds, Spooners, Warrens and Cookes came 
within the purview of my genealogical inquiries. 
These notes written in 1840 were preserved in an 
old black leather portfolio for seventy years by 
your grandfather and were published in 1909 
under the editorship of Mr. Henry B. Worth. The 
finding of this little slip of casual genealogical 
memorandum is one of the many rebukes which I 



190 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

have received for my lack of sympathy with your 
grandfather's mania for accumulating and pre- 
serving papers. At my instigation, your grand- 
father and I have during these later years de- 
stroyed and burned what seems to me tons of 
manuscript which to my irreverent mind appeared 
unworthy of preservation. I now realize that in 
some of that mass of writing which I consigned 
to the furnace there may have been data which, 
had they been preserved, would have given some 
genealogical or historical crank like myself a 
source of gratification equal to the discovery 
which came to me through the little note about 
John Gilbert, and opened up the story of your 
descent from Benjamin Hammond, which led to 
so many more interesting comeoverers. 

Benjamin Hammond was the oldest son of Wil- 
liam Hammond and Elizabeth Penn and was born 
in London in 1621. William Hammond died 
prior to 1634. He was probably descended from 
the Hammonds of St. Albans Court, County 
Kent. Elizabeth Penn, as claimed by one of her 
early descendants and as accepted by the Ham- 
mond genealogists, was the sister of Sir William 
Penn. If so, she must have been very much his 
senior, since Sir William Penn was born in 1621, 
the same year in which her son Benjamin was 
born. This, however, does not necessarily dis- 
prove the relationship of brother and sister, since 
Sir William Penn had an older brother George 
who, it would seem, was of age in 1591 as he is 
named as the executor of his grandfather William 
Penn's will of that date. Yet the family history 



BENJAMIN HAMMOND 191 

of Sir William Penn and his son William Penn, 
the Quaker, has been exhaustively treated and the 
genealogies of the family thoroughly exploited 
and nowhere is there the slightest evidence that 
Sir William Penn had a sister Elizabeth who 
married a William Hammond. Sir William 
Penn's grandfather was William Penn, who died 
before the death of his father William Penn in 
1591. In the will of the elder William Penn he 
provides for all his grandchildren, naming them, 
and there is no Elizabeth among them, so that 
your Elizabeth Penn was probably not the 
sister of Sir William Penn. Indeed, there is no 
evidence whatever that she belonged to this par- 
ticular branch of the Penn family. The name 
was by no means uncommon in England in the 
seventeenth century. 

It is with much reluctance that I dissent from 
the Hammond genealogists and refuse you near 
kinship with Sir William Penn. That old rascal 
is one of my most intimate cronies of the seven- 
teenth century. Samuel Pepys introduced him to 
me long ago with a vividness of portraiture which 
makes him as familiar as any of my contempo- 
raries. Under date of September 8, 1660, soon 
after his first acquaintance with Sir William, 
Pepys writes, "Drinking a glass of wine late and 
discoursing with Sir W. Penn, I find him a very 
sociable man, and an able man, and very cun- 
ning." Pepys and Penn continued to be "very 
sociable" for some years. Sir William confided 
to Pepys his troubles with that milksop of a 
youth, his son William, who was so ridiculously 



192 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

seriously minded, and finally, to the scandal of 
the family, turned Quaker, and later became, per- 
haps, on the whole, the most important person 
connected with the settlement and organization of 
the Colonies across the sea which a century later 
became the United States of America. Sir Wil- 
liam Penn was born in Bristol in 1621. He was 
a captain in the Navy when he was twenty-one, 
a rear admiral of Ireland at twenty-three, a gen- 
eral at the taking of Jamaica at thirty-one, a vice 
admiral of England in the Dutch. War at thirty- 
two, knighted when he was thirty-nine by Charles 
II on the Royal Charles as he came from Holland 
at his restoration, Governor of Kingsdale at 
forty, and Commissioner of the Navy at forty- 
four. He served with Edward Winslow in the 
expedition against Hispaniola in 1655. He died 
September 16, 1670, aged forty-nine. He was 
indeed a charming old grafter, who was with equal 
facility a pious Puritan with Cromwell and an all 
around sport with Charles — anything, so long 
as he could fatten from the public purse. 

The only evidence that Elizabeth Hammond 
was the sister of Sir William Penn, and the aunt 
of William Penn, the Quaker, is from "A Short 
Record of our Family by Elnathan Hammond, 
copied from a Family Record of my Father 's, Mr. 
John Hammond, of Rochester, 1737," by Captain 
Elnathan Hammond of Newport, R. I., who died 
in 1793. In this record is the following: ''Wil- 
liam Hammond, born in the city of London, and 
there married Elizabeth Penn, sister of Sir Wil- 
liam Penn, had children, Benjamin their son born 



BENJAMIN HAMMOND 193 

1621, Elizabeth, Martha, and Rachel, their 
daughters, all born in London. William Ham- 
mond died there and was buried. Elizabeth Ham- 
mond, widow of William Hammond, with her son 
Benjamin and three daughters, all young, left a 
good estate in London, and with several godly 
people came over to New England in the trouble- 
some times in 1634, out of a conscious desire to 
have the liberty to serve God in the way of his 
appointment .... settled in Boston and 
there died in 1640; had an honorable burial and 
the character of a very godly woman." 

Elizabeth Penn Hammond, with her son Ben- 
jamin, your many times grandfather, then about 
thirteen years old, unquestionably came across 
the ocean in the ship Griffin and landed at Boston, 
September 18, 1634. This ship is an important 
one so far as your comeoverers are concerned. 
Among the two hundred immigrants on board 
were Anne Hutchinson and Richard Scott and 
many others of whom you will hear later. Eliza- 
beth Hammond was of the party of religious 
enthusiasts who accompanied the Rev. John 
Lothrop. Elizabeth Hammond lived in Boston 
and Watertown until 1638 when she followed Mr. 
Lothrop to Scituate, and was admitted a member 
of the Scituate church, April 16, 1638. When Mr. 
Lothrop moved to Barnstable (in 1639), Eliza- 
beth Hammond returned to Boston and there died 
in 1640. Benjamin, her son, had doubtless accom- 
panied her to Scituate, and probably accompanied 
Mr. Lothrop to Barnstable. At all events, he re- 
mained an inhabitant of Plymouth Colony until 



194 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

his death. He was in Yarmouth in 1643 enrolled 
among the men "able to bear arms." In 1652, 
he was Constable of Yarmouth and seems to have 
been living there as late as 1655. In 1650, he 
married Mary, daughter of Mr. John Vincent of 
Sandwich, and in Sandwich he seems to have ' i sat 
down," yet when he was sixty- three years old in 
1684 he followed his sons to Eochester and died 
(probably) in Eochester in 1703. It is rather an 
interesting coincidence that whereas the Ply- 
mouth Court January 22, 1638-9, had offered the 
"plantation of Seppekaun" to eight men of 
Scituate for the benefit of the Eev. John Lothrop 's 
congregation "who had fled from London to 
escape the persecution of Archbishop Laud and 
tarried awhile at Scituate," in which congrega- 
tion was the faithful Elizabeth Penn Hammond, 
forty years later two grandsons of John Lothrop, 
and two grandsons of Elizabeth Hammond, were 
among the original proprietors of the Sippican 
purchase of 1679, and among the founders of the 
town of Eochester. 

Samuel Hammond, the oldest son of Benjamin 
Hammond and Mary Vincent, was born in Sand- 
wich in 1655. He came to that part of Eochester 
which is now called Mattapoisett very soon after 
1679 with his brother John. Samuel Hammond, 
in the original allotment of lands, had set off to 
him a homestead in the southwesterly part of the 
new town. Later, he purchased of Hugh Cole 
one hundred and twenty acres on what is now 
called Mattapoisett Neck "between the Matta- 
poisett Eiver and Acushena." Cole had pur- 



BENJAMIN HAMMOND 195 

chased this land in 1671 directly from King Philip. 
Samuel Hammond with Samuel White, another of 
your Rochester grandfathers, were of the first 
recorded Board of Selectmen in 1690. In 1684 
Samuel Hammond was a freeman of Rochester. 
He was one of the founders of the first Congre- 
gational Church, now within the confines of 
Marion. He was an extensive land owner and 
his eleven children, seven of whom were sons, for 
the most part settled in his neighborhood with the 
result that the name of Hammond is conspicu- 
ously pervasive in the history of Rochester and 
Mattapoisett. Samuel Hammond died after 1728. 
Thomas Hammond, your ancestor, was the fifth 
child of Samuel Hammond and Mary Hathaway, 
the daughter of Arthur Hathaway and Sarah 
Cooke. He was born September 16, 1687. He 
removed to Dartmouth and lived in that portion 
of the town now called New Bedford. His father, 
Samuel Hammond, had purchased a share in the 
undivided lands of Dartmouth and deeded to his 
son Thomas an interest. By his will Samuel also 
left to his son Thomas fifty acres of land (pre- 
sumably in Dartmouth) and the third part of 
"ten acres of meadow I have in Wells and twenty 
acres of land in Rochester not yet laid out." 
Thomas Hammond married April 6, 1721, Sarali 
Spooner, daughter of William Spooner. It is 
from their sixth child, Lovina, born February 9, 
1734, who married John Chase, that you descend 
through Phebe Howland. 



Chapter IX 

WILLIAM SPOONER 

Came over prior to 1637 



William Spooner — 1684 

(Hannah Pratt) 

William Spooner About 1657 — 1735+ 

( ) 

Sarah Spooner 1700 — 1742+ 

(Thomas Hammond) 

Lovina Hammond 1734 — 

(John Chase) 

Rhoda Chase 1759 — 

(Henry Howl and) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



William Spooner — 1684 

(Hannah Prat!) 

Sarah Spooner 1653 — 1720+ 

(John Sherman) 

Abigail Sherman 1680 — 1748 

(Nathaniel Chase) 

John Chase 1722 — 

(Lovina Hammond) 

Rhoda Chase 1759 — 

(Henry Howland) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Sloeum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



WILLIAM SPOONER 



There was a John Spooner living in Leyden in 
1616, the head of a family. His widow, Ann 
Spooner, was still in Leyden in 1630. In 1637 
there was an Ann Spooner in Salem who prob- 
ably was the same person. She may have come 
over with her sons, Thomas and William, prior 
to that date. Thomas Spooner was in Salem in 
1637. It is not unlikely that soon after 1634-5 
this Ann Spooner with her two boys settled for a 
time at Colchester, " beyond the Merrimack," 
afterwards known as Salisbury, in the County of 
Essex, where so many of your ancestors settled 
and lived. At all events, your ancestor, William 
Spooner, of Dartmouth, came to Plymouth from 
Salisbury. Perhaps his mother came with him. 
She would have wished, very naturally, to be 
near her old Leyden friends. 

It is a somewhat singular coincidence that this 
ancestor of yours, a poor boy without means of 
support, should have been taken into the family 
of John Coombs of Plymouth, the father of the 
Francis Coombs who took charge of that other 
helpless lad, your ancestor, Peter Crapo. The 
record reads as follows : 

Bradford Gov r . a R. R. Caroli XIII 1637. Whereas 
William Spooner of Colchester in the County of Essex 



WILLIAM SPOONER 201 

by this Indenture, bearing date the twenty seaventh day 
of March Anno Domi 1637 in the thirteenth year of his 
ma tres Raigne, hath put himself apprentice with John 
Holmes of New Plymouth in America, gent, from the 
first day of May next after the date of the said Inden- 
ture unto thend terme of six years thence ensuing wi th 
divers other covenants both pts to be pformed eich to 
other by the Indent it doth more plainly appear. Now 
the said John Holmes with the consent and likeinge of 
the said William Spooner hath the first day of July 
assigned and set over the said William Spooner unto 
John Coombs of New Plymouth aforesed, gent., for all 
the residue of his terme unexpired to serve the sd John 
Coomes, and the said John Coomes in thend of his said 
terme shall give the said William Spooner one comely 
suit of apparel for holy days, and one suite for working 
days, and twelve bushels of Indian Wheate, and a good 
serviceable muskett, bandaliers and sword fitt for 
service. 

William Spooner must have been a useful and 
trusted apprentice, serving Ms master with zeal 
and fidelity. In 1643, he is listed as ''able to bear 
arms." In 1645, John Coombs died and his 
widow went back to England, leaving her children 
and property in the care and custody of the young 
man who could not have been much over twenty 
years of age. On October 16, 1646, "William 
Spooner came before the Gov'r and undertake to 
save the towne harmless from any charge that 
might befall of a child of Mrs. Coombs left with 
him when she went to England and which he 
undertakes to keep and provide for." William 
Spooner had married Elizabeth Partridge, who 
died April 28, 1648. Later, in August, 1648, the 
Court "further ordered concerning the children 
of the said Mrs. Coombs now being with William 
Spooner that the said Spooner keep them for the 



202 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

psent and not dispose of them for the future 
without further orders from the Court." 

It may have been the recollection of the care 
which this indentured lad of his father's had 
given him when he was an orphan and deserted 
by his mother which caused Francis Coombs many 
years after to undertake the upbringing of the 
little shipwrecked waif, Peter Crapo. As his 
father had done by William Spooner, and William 
Spooner had done by him, so did he do by Peter 
Crapo. 

On March 18, 1652, William Spooner married 
Hannah Pratt, the daughter of Joshua and Bath- 
sheba Pratt. Joshua Pratt had come over in the 
Ann in 1623, and was alloted land as an ''old 
comer." He was one of the original thirty-four 
purchasers of Dartmouth, who organized at Ply- 
mouth in March, 1652. Joshua Pratt's name fre- 
quently occurs in the early records of Plymouth, 
although he took no prominent part in public 
affairs. William Spooner became a freeman 
June 7, 1653. He was made Surveyor of High- 
ways in 1654. He served on the Grand Inquest in 
1657 and in 1666. December 26, 1657, Benajah 
Pratt, doubtless a son of Joshua Pratt, sold to 
William Spooner "for the consideration of a 
cow" one-half of his land, called "Purchase 
Land" (i. e. Dartmouth purchase) "at Coaksett 
alias Acoakus and places adjacent." On June 
30, 1662, William Spooner sold fifteen acres of 
the lower South Meadow in the town of Plymouth, 
and with the purchase money on the same day 
purchased of Robert Ransome "twenty acres of 
upland at Acushena." 



WILLIAM SPOONER 203 

It is probable that it was not long after 1660, 
when he removed from Plymouth to his home in 
Dartmouth. His homestead farm included what 
is now the "Dana Farm" and Riverside Ceme- 
tery, and lay to the south of John Cooke's farm. 
He later held a considerable amount of land in 
what is now Acushnet, and on Sconticut Neck, 
and at Nasquatucket, and a large undivided in- 
terest in the Dartmouth purchase, which was 
laid out and alloted after his death to his sons. 
It is a matter of tradition unconfirmed by any 
record that he and his sons built a mill near what 
is now the village of Acushnet. The first mill in 
Dartmouth of which there is any record was at 
Smith Mills in 1664. 

William Spooner was described as "sober and 
peaceable in conversation and orthodox in the 
fundamentals of religion." He died between 
March 8, 1683-4, the date of his will, and March 
14, 1683-4, the date of the inventory of his estate. 
His will, of which Seth Pope and Thomas Taber 
were the "overseers," disposed of his property 
among his several children. To his son William, 
from whom you descend, he gives both land and 
cattle, and to his daughter, Sarah Sherman, from 
whom also you descend, he gives a cow, and to 
her husband, John Sherman, his "great coat." 
His inventory shows £201 — a fair estate for a 
farmer of those early days. 

William, the fifth child of William Spooner and 
Hannah Pratt, was born between 1650 and 1660. 
He lived in the northerly part of what is now the 
village of Acushnet. He served in the militia 



204 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

with the rank of Lieutenant and was frequently 
elected to town offices. It is stated by Thomas 
Spooner, the genealogist of the family, that this 
William Spooner married Alice, the daughter of 
Nathaniel Warren, and the widow of John Black- 
well. There is evidently an error in this state- 
ment. Nathaniel Warren had a daughter Alice 
who married Thomas Gibbs and both she and her 
husband signed papers in connection with the 
settlement of the estate of Nathaniel Warren 
prior to the date of the birth of Sarah, William 
Spooner 's daughter, who married Thomas Ham- 
mond. Nathaniel Warren had a daughter Sarah 
who married a Blackwell, and it is possible that 
it was she who married William Spooner, al- 
though in the same papers relating to the estate 
of Nathaniel Warren she signs her name as Sarah 
Blackwell. This is a difficulty in your genealogi- 
cal history which I have not solved. I am inclined 
to think it quite possible that through Saraii 
Spooner, the daughter of William, the second, you 
can again trace your descent from Richard 
Warren of the Mayflower, but the conclusive evi- 
dence is lacking. William Spooner left an estate 
of £1,525. In his will he provided for his daugh- 
ters Sarah, Mary, and Alice. He makes no pro- 
vision for his wife, which indicates that she died 
before he made the will. 

Sarah Spooner, the fourth child of William 
Spooner, the second, born October 6, 1700, who 
married Thomas Hammond, was a great grand- 
mother of Phebe Howland. 



Chapter X 

JOHN BRIGGS 

Came over prior to 1638 



John Briggs 1609 — 1690 

( ) 

Thomas Briggs — 1720 

(Mary Fisher) 

Deborah Briggs 1674 — 1712 

(Henry Howland) 

Thomas Howland 1709 — 

(Content Howland) 

David Howland 1734 — 1778 

(Lavinia Russell) 

Henry Howland 1757 — 1817 

(Khoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Arm Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JOHN BRIGGS 



Your ancestor John Briggs of Portsmouth, was 
a Boston Hutchinsonite and a brother in law of 
another ancestor, Thomas Cornell, whose story 
will come later. For the purposes of a coherent 
narrative it is not convenient to introduce him to 
you here among the ancestors of Phebe Howland 
who were, for the most part, disassociated with 
the settlement at Portsmouth, yet since it is 
through Phebe Howland that he is your forebear 
there seems no proper way to escape bringing 
him to your attention as such. It is among the 
ancestors of Anne Almy Chase (Part III of these 
notes) that you will learn about the settlement of 
Portsmouth for which your ancestress, Anne 
Hutchinson, was responsible. That "prophetess 
of doleful heresies," however, is related by kin 
to you through Sarah Morse Smith (Part V of 
these notes). She was a very troublesome person 
in her day, and that she should upset an orderly 
and coherent presentation on my part of your 
forebears is altogether characteristic of her. In 
view of the controlling influence which she exer- 
cised over the lives of so many of your ancestors 
she has a claim to be considered the heroine of 
this book. It is unfortunate to postpone intro- 
ducing one 's heroine, yet the scheme which I have 



208 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

adopted compels her entrance on the scene to be 
held in suspense. 

John Briggs is one of the signers, by his mark, 
of the compact of the settlement of Aquidneck, 
which is contained in the first page of the Ports- 
mouth town records. In March, 1639, he was 
admitted as a freeman of the town, and took the 
oath of allegiance to King Charles. In March, 
1642, he was suspended in his vote till he had 
given satisfaction for his offences, a ban which 
was removed by the town in September of the 
same year. What his offences were I know not, 
but that he was thoroughly purged of them is 
clear from the conspicuous part which he there- 
after took during his life in the town government. 
His name appears on nearly every page of the 
town records. He served constantly and in every 
capacity, as Juryman, Constable, Town Councillor, 
Surveyor of Lands, Special Commissioner, and 
Deputy to the General Assembly of the Colony. 
This latter office he held continuously for many 
years. He was evidently a man of some property 
since the town on several occasions was indebted 
to him for moneys which he had advanced for the 
town's benefit. In the early days there was no 
military organization in the town, but John 
Briggs seems to have been charged with seeing 
that the inhabitants were armed and kept their 
arms in good condition, and when the town was 
ordered by the Colony to procure powder and shot 
it was John Briggs who was directed to obtain it 
from Mr. Eoger Williams. At one of the town 
meetings in 1657 a committee was appointed con- 



JOHN BRIGGS 209 

sisting of Mr. William Baulston, Mr. Philip Sher- 
man and Mr. John Briggs, who might appro- 
priately have been styled "our three leading citi- 
zens" "to speake with Shreef s wife and William 
Charles and George Lawton's wife and to give 
them the best advice and warning for their own 
peace and the peace of the place." Fancy my 
raking up such an old scandal as that! I do it 
only to convince you that John Briggs was a sober 
and respected citizen. But then he was over fifty. 
He may have needed advice himself when he was 
younger. 

John Briggs lived on the "highway that leadeth 
to the windmill, ' ' and at his house the town meet- 
ings were frequently held, and sometimes he was 
the moderator of the meetings. At one of these 
meetings held in 1675, about the time of King 
Philip's War, the following vote was adopted: 
"Whereas severall persons in this Towneshipp 
have made purchass of Indians which were latly 
taken and brought to the Island which appears s 
troublesome to most of the inhabitants, and the 
suiferinge such Indians to abide amongs us may 
prove very prejuditiall, — It is therefore ordered 
that all those persons whoe have any Indian man 
or woman in this Towne have one month's time 
liberty from this meeting to sell and send them 
off from this Towne, and that noe inhabitant in 
this Towne-shipp after that time shall for the 
future buy or keep any Indian or Indians soe 
brought or to be brought upon the penalty or 
forfiture of five pounds sterll for every month 
they shall keep any such Indian." 



210 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

On October 6, 1662, John Dunham, one of the 
original thirty-four purchasers of Dartmouth, 
conveyed for £42 his whole share to John Briggs, 
describing it as "all my lot or portion of land at 
Acushna, Cookset and places adjacent in New 
Plymouth." You may recall that £42 was the 
amount which John Russell paid Capt. Myles 
Standish for his share. It seems to have been the 
going price at that time. It was at the rate of 
about six and one-half cents per acre. In 1678-79, 
John Briggs conveyed to his son John one-half 
a share and to his son Thomas, your ancestor, 
one-quarter of a share. The consideration pro- 
claimed in these deeds is "love and affection." 
To Thomas he deeded a tract of thirty-five acres 
which was part of a tract which had been set off 
to John Briggs from his undivided interest, which 
is described as at "Ponagansett," bounded north 
by John Briggs second, east by a cove or creek, 
south by land "of me," and west by land in 
common. These lands were west of Apponegan- 
sett River and south of the Gulf Road. 

Of John Briggs 's wife nothing is known. He 
died in 1690, his will dated April 19, 1690, being 
proved September 17, of the same year. Not- 
withstanding the records unquestionably pro- 
claim him a man of some ability, I confess that 
to me he appears to have been an old fool. It was 
his silly dream, caused, no doubt, by his having 
eaten too much supper, and his absurd testimony 
about it, which was the cause of his nephew 
being hanged for the murder of his sister, Rebecca 
Cornell, all about which you will learn in con- 



JOHN BRIGGS 211 

nection with the Cornells. The apologists for this 
blot on the judicial history of Rhode Island de- 
scribe John Briggs, the narrator of the vision, as 
"an old man of eighty or thereabouts and in his 
dotage." That this is not so you may perceive 
from the dates I have furnished you. As a matter 
of fact he was only sixty-four years old when he 
told his nonsensical yarn, and that he was not in 
his dotage is certainly indicated by the fact that 
seven or eight years later he was still serving as 
a Deputy from Portsmouth to the General Assem- 
bly at Newport and that he lived some seventeen 
years after the trial, and died in full possession 
of his faculties. 

Thomas Briggs, the second son of John Briggs, 
was born in Portsmouth and there married Mary 
Fisher, the daughter of Edward. His brother 
John, Junior, married Hannah, the sister of Mary 
Fisher, and both brothers removed to Dartmouth 
about 1679. Thomas was a member of Captain 
Peleg Sanford's horse troop in 1667 and was 
doubtless engaged in the Indian War. He was 
admitted as a freeman of Portsmouth in 1673, 
which would indicate that he was probably born 
about 1650. He died in Dartmouth in 1720 leav- 
ing a large estate inventoried at £1,001 4s. 9d. 

Edward Fisher was an original settler of Ports- 
mouth. He had a house lot allotted to him in 
1639, next to Thomas Wait's, and various allot- 
ments of land in subsequent years. From 1650, 
for twenty-five years he is constantly named in 
the town records, serving as Constable, member 
of the town council, Deputy to the General Assem- 



212 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

bly, and in various minor capacities. In 1660, a 
committee was appointed to "signifie to Edward 
Fisher that the inhabitants of this town are 
offended for that he hath taken in some land be- 
longing to the Common and require him to lay it 
downe againe to the Common." That he did so 
would seem probable since at the next town meet- 
ing he was chosen on the town council. Edward 
Fisher died in 1677, his wife, Judith, outliving 
him for some years. His will, dated September 
19, 1665, appoints John Briggs, Senior, the over- 
seer of his estate and makes a bequest to his 
daughter Mary "Fisher." A receipt for this 
legacy in 1682 is signed by Mary "Briggs" and 
her husband, Thomas. 

Deborah Briggs, born in 1674, the daughter of 
Thomas Briggs and Mary Fisher, married Henry 
Howland, and was a great great grandmother of 
Phebe Howland. 



Chapter XI 

ADAM MOTT 

Came over 1635 
Defense 



Adam Mott 1596 _ 1661 

( ) 

Adam Mott 1623 1673 4- 

(Mary Lott) 

Elizabeth Mott 1659 17234- 

( William Rieketson) 

Jonathan Ricketson 1688 1768 

(Abigail Howland) 

Rebecca Ricketson 1714 1744 

(Paul Russell) 

Lavinia Russell 1735 1815 

(David Howland) 

Henry Howland 1757 1817 

(Rhoda Chase) 

Phebe Howland 1785 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Sloeum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



ADAM MOTT 



Adam Mott, a tailor, of Cambridge, England, 
aged thirty-nine, together with his second wife 
Sarah, aged thirty-one, with four children of 
Adam by a former wife, and one daughter of his 
wife Sarah by a former husband, whose name, 
singularly enough was Lott, came over in the ship 
Defense in July, 1635. Thomas Bostock, the 
master of the vessel, produced testimony before 
the Justices and ministers of Cambridge that 
Adam conformed to the orders and discipline of 
the Church of England and had taken the oaths 
of allegiance and supremacy. One of the children 
of Adam Mott was named Adam, and it is from 
him that you descend. He was twelve years old 
when he crossed the ocean in the Defense. With 
him was his stepmother's daughter, Mary Lott, 
aged four. It is hardly likely that they conceived 
any fondness on the voyage which justified their 
subsequent marriage and would tend to excuse 
the confusion between the Motts and the Lotts 
which has been a matter of some solicitude on my 
part. 

Adam Mott and his family landed in Boston 
and there in May, 1636, he filed an application to 
be admitted as a freeman. During the same year 
an Adam Mott was in Hingham and land was 



216 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

granted to him in that town. This was probably 
your Adam Mott. An Adam Mott, also a tailor, 
aged nineteen, came over in the Bevis. From him 
descend the Long Island and New Jersey Motts, 
who were famous in Quakerdom. What caused 
your Adam Mott to go to Portsmouth, Rhode 
Island, at the origin of that settlement in 1638, 
I do not know. It may be that he, too, had been 
brought under the all pervading influence of Anne 
Hutchinson's heretical ideas. Your Adam's 
father was named John. It is clear that he did 
not come over with his son on the Defense. There 
was a John Mott, the son of Adam, aged fourteen, 
in the party, and subsequently there were count- 
less Johns and Adams in the country who tend to 
mix things up sadly. Perhaps Adam, your origi- 
nal immigrant, sent for his father, John, within 
a year or two after reaching America. If so, it 
was a sad mistake. The story of "ould John 
Mott" as disclosed in the Portsmouth records 
does not justify his immigration. If the present 
restrictive laws had then been in effect, "ould 
John" would have been sent back to England as 
' f undesirable. ' ' 

However it happened, Adam Mott and his 
father John were in Portsmouth almost from the 
start of the settlement, and to both of them land 
was allotted. To Adam there were given four 
score acres in 1639. Doubtless Adam tried to 
provide for his wife and his children and his 
little stepdaughter, Mary Lott, but for some years 
he evidently did not make much of a success of 
it and was quite unable to provide for his old 



ADAM MOTT 217 

father, who became a public charge and the con- 
stant object of comment at town meetings for 
many years. 

At a meeting in 1644 it was "further ordered 
that Mr. Baulston have nine pound a year for 
John Mott and diet and what bedding and cloth- 
ing he shall wante shall be furnished by the 
towne." In January, 1648, "it is voated and 
concluded that ould John Mott shall be provided 
for of meate drinke and lodging & washing by 
George Parker at his howse and George Parker 
shall have 5s. a weeke payd him monthly out of 
the tresurie by Mr. Baulston so farr as the 
tresurie will goe." 

The next year, at the May meeting in 1649, 
there is this record: "Adam Mott haveing 
offered a Cowe for ever and 5 bushels of corne 
by the yeare so long as the ould man shall live 
towards his mayntenance that so he might be dis- 
charged from any further charge; the towne, 
every man that was free thereto, settinge downe 
what corne thay would give for this present yeare 
made up that 5 bushels to 40 bushels and so it 
was concluded that Mr. William Balston should 
have the 40 bushels of corn and the use of the 
aforenamed cowe this present yeare for which 
Mr. Balston undertake to keep ould father Mott 
this present yeare and alowe him house roome 
dyate lodging and washinge. ' ' Note ' ' Mr. Balston 
received the Cowe above named the 13th of 
June. ' ' 

Poor "ould John Mott" was a matter of con- 
cern thereafter for many years and nearly every 



218 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

year he was imposed upon another patient pro- 
vider who undertook to "dyat cloath wash and 
lodge" him. He certainly enjoyed the excitement 
of constant change in his place of abode and 
doubtless would have been able to pronounce with 
some exactness on the relative merits of the Ports- 
mouth good wives as culinary and laundry ex- 
perts. At one time the situation became so 
desperate that "it is agreed that the towne wil 
bee at the charge to pay ould John Motts passage 
to the Barbadoes Island and back again, if he can- 
not be received there, if he live to it, if the ship 
owners will carry him." Apparently no ship 
owner was courageous enough to undertake the 
job and ould John continued to remain in Ports- 
mouth. The last entry which I find concerning 
him in the town records is in 1656 : " It is ordered 
that John Teft shall have £13 6s. 8d. peage pr 
penny, or black 3 pr penny, to keep ould John 
Mott this yeare for dyat lodging washing and 
looking to besyde the Cowe and the corn that the 
ould man's son Adam is ingaged to give." At 
the same meeting Mr. Baulstone was authorized to 
pay John Teft what the town owed him for the 
former year's keep of the old man and he was 
ordered "to by ould John Mott Cloathing out of 
the tresury money that come to his hands accord- 
ing as Mr. Balston seeth fit. ' ' 

I trust you do not take it amiss that this 
ancestor of yours was a town pauper. He was 
distinguished, at least, by being the only one. 
That his neighbors and fellow townsmen gave of 
their little to his support is certainly to the credit 



ADAM MOTT 219 

of the town. Whether his son Adam, even in view 
of the "Cowe for ever" and the "five bushels of 
corn," really did his full share towards the 
support of the old man, I have my doubts. At all 
events, Adam finally succeeded in establishing 
himself as a well to do citizen and died compara- 
tively rich. 

Adam Mott not only succeeded in acquiring 
some property but he acted in many public capaci- 
ties, being chosen many times on the grand jury, 
of which he was often foreman, and being ap- 
pointed at nearly every town meeting on some 
committee to settle boundary lines or other dis- 
putes. In 1658 he was one of three commis- 
sioners to meet the commissioners of Warwick, 
then a pseudo independent colony, and arrange an 
alliance. He often acted as Constable and was 
always diligent in Court affairs. His name often 
appears in the records of land transfers, and in 
a deed which he gave in 1652 to John Sanford 
there is a somewhat interesting provision concern- 
ing the consideration of the deed. ' ' I say that in 
consideration of ten pounds of current pay yt is 
to say five pounds of current silver current money 
with the marchant; and five pound in current 
wampom well strunge and good such as is current 
with the marchant and the peage to be payd at 8 
peags pr penny or else my wife to receive a ewe 
lamb that she shall better acsept or as well as 
peage 8 per penny; which if she doe I am content 
to receave the five pounds of wampon at six peags 
per penny and fully concluded a full and free 
bargain. ' ' 



220 CERTAIN COMEOVBRERS 

On August 31, 1661, there is the following 
record: "For as much as Sarah Mott widow to 
the late deceased Adam Mott of ye towne of Ports- 
mouth hath brought hir late husband's will in to 
ye office of to be proved and hath exhibited the 
same to the towne counsill thay findinge the said 
will some thinge dewbeious in not declaring the 
said Sarah his wife to be his Execktrix yet the 
scope of the same makinge hir one in powar there- 
fore the Counsill of the towne of Portsmouth doe 
unanimously apoint the said Sarah Mott and 
widow to be sole Execetrix during the terme of 
hir life accordinge to whot we undarstand the 
meaning of ye will to be beinge the magior part of 
the Counsil." 

No more remarkable decision was ever made by 
a Rhode Island town council which still, even unto 
this day, exercises probate jurisdiction. The will 
is given in full in the records of the town, and the 
testator explicitly appoints Edward Thurston 
(his son in law) and Richard Tew, both of New- 
port, as the executors of his will. The will is 
dated on "ye 2 day of the 2 month 1661" and 
states that it is "writen with my owne hand." 
There are several "dewbeious" passages in it, 
but nothing could be more clearly and explicitly 
stated than the testator's desire that the two 
executors whom he names should carry out his 
wishes, and the whole content of the will precludes 
his widow Sarah from acting as executrix. For 
instance, he writes "Also I give power to my 
Executors, full power, to give to all and every of 
my children then" (at the death of his wife) "liv- 



ADAM MOTT 221 

ing some gift of ye moveables, either of what is in 
ye house or abroad as they can move or parswad 
hir accordinge to there and hir discretion, if she 
be not willinge to give it with discretion as thay 
desarve, I then give full power to my aforesaid 
executors Edward Thurston and Richard Tew to 
devide so much and as they see meet among them 
all; further if my children should be Crosse to 
there mother so yt it should force her to marey 
againe, I give full power to my executors to take 
good and full securitie for the makinge good of 
the estate so longe as she lives." By the terms 
of this will, the testator says of his son Adam, 
your ancestor, "I gave his share all redey and 
part longe since which he hath lived on whos sum 
was twelve acres." None the less, he provides 
that his executors shall give his son Adam a ewe 
lamb within twelve months of his mother's de- 
cease. The inventory of the estate is most in- 
teresting in its valuations of live stock, clothing, 
utensils, etc. The sum total is £371 6s. 

Adam Mott, the son of Adam, who married 
Mary Lott, the daughter of his stepmother, and 
is your ancestor, lived in Portsmouth during his 
whole life. He was born in England in 1623, and 
probably married Mary Lott in Portsmouth about 
1645. He was somewhat prominent in the affairs 
of Portsmouth, serving in many capacities, as 
Constable, etc. In 1673 he was the Deputy for 
Portsmouth to the General Assembly. 

Elizabeth, the daughter of Adam Mott, second, 
and his wife, Mary Lott, married William Ricket- 
son. Whether William Ricketson was a come- 



222 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

overer I am not certain. It is probable that he 
was and that he had been in New England previ- 
ous to the first record of his presence in Ports- 
mouth. In Giles Slocum's will, dated 1681, he 
devises to his son Giles his homestead farm in 
Portsmouth, which as you will afterwards learn, 
was on the easterly side of the island opposite 
Fogland, "to my son Giles excepting foure accors 
of land with one small teniment . . . now 
in the occupation of Will Rickinson, house car- 
penter." In 1682 there appears on the town 
records the following entry: "Whereas William 
Ricketson hath petitioned this meeting for liberty 
to erect and set up a water mill for public use 
between the place where John Tyler's mill stood 
or near there unto ; and to that end to have liberty 
to make a dam or dams and also to make such 
trench or trenches as may be suitable in this re- 
spect; and also grant him one acre of land neare 
there unto for his accomodation so long as he 
shall keepe and maintain or cause to be kept and 
maintained a mill there. This town do so far 
condescend to his request that they are willing 
he shall be accomodated if conveniently it may 
be, and refer the matter to the judgment and 
determination of a committee by this meeting to 
be chosen to view the place and personally con- 
sider the matter." 

Whether the committee looked upon the matter 
favorably does not appear, or whether William 
Ricketson actually built his mill, which was doubt- 
less intended for a saw mill. If he did indeed 
erect a mill he operated it for a short time only, 



ADAM MOTT 223 

since in 1684 he purchased five hundred acres of 
land in Dartmouth on the east side of the road 
leading from Head of Westport to Horse Neck 
Beach and thither removed with his wife, Eliza- 
beth Mott, whom he had lately married in Ports- 
mouth. Here he built a dwelling house which is 
still standing. Of this interesting old dwelling 
Mr. Henry B. Worth says: "It was a palace 
for those days. It was built according to the later 
Rhode Island type which seems to have been first 
adopted in Connecticut." The chamber chimney- 
piece, now in the rooms of the Old Dartmouth 
Historical Society, is an interesting example of 
the best type of carpentry of two or more cen- 
turies ago. 

William Ricketson afterwards acquired other 
interests in Dartmouth, purchasing a part of 
Governor William Bradford's original share, and 
also acquiring some of the Slocum interest. He 
also owned and operated a saw mill not far from 
his homestead and apparently prospered in 
worldly affairs. He died in 1691 and later his 
widow Elizabeth married Matthew Wing. 

It is from Jonathan Ricketson, born in 1688, 
the son of William Ricketson and Elizabeth Mott, 
that Phebe Howland descended through her 
grandmother, Lavinia Russell. 



Chapter XII 
PHEBE HOWLAND 



PHEBE HOWLAND 



Pliebe Howland was the fourth child of Henry 
Howland and Rhoda Chase, and was born March 
29, 1785. As the oldest daughter of a very large 
family, she was doubtless busily employed in help- 
ing in the housework and the care of the children. 
Her two eldest brothers died at sea. Her young- 
est brother was born nine years after the birth 
of her own first born. In so stirring a household 
as Henry Howland 's must have been, and with 
only the meagre advantages of a country school, 
it is a matter of marvel that Phebe Howland was 
enabled to acquire the liberal education which she 
unquestionably possessed. 

She was a woman of great energy and of noble 
character, always seeking and planning to add to 
her knowledge and to find the ways and means to 
advance her children. Her husband, Jesse, was 
a good man, gentle and kindly, hard working and 
frugal, but lacking a desire for the knowledge 
which education brings and without the capacity 
for pushing himself in a material way in the 
world. She was a great reader of books when 
she could by chance acquire them. To her your 
great grandfather, Henry Howland Crapo, was 
indebted for all the stimulus and help which 
enabled him to obtain the knowledge which his 



228 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

omnivorous mind sought and acquired. She was 
well poised, capable of energy where energy was 
demanded, and capable of patience and resigna- 
tion when it came her turn to serve by waiting. 
She was nineteen when her eldest son was born. 
She was forty-six when she was left a widow, and 
she was over eighty-five when she died. One of 
the great events of her life was the journey she 
took in 1833 to visit her son David, who had 
settled in the town of Republic, Seneca County, 
Ohio, not far from Sandusky. With her young 
daughter she undertook this journey, by no means 
a simple undertaking for an inexperienced woman. 
She went by sailing vessel to New York, thence 
by a sloop up the Hudson to Albany, and thence 
by canal boat to Lake Erie. Near the log-cabin 
where her son lived was a locust tree, one of the 
seeds from which she brought home to the Rocka- 
dunda house and planted by the roadside. To- 
day, the tree which sprang from that seed is a 
magnificent specimen, being much the largest 
locust I have ever seen. It towers above the 
house, just at the turn of the road, on the hill 
overlooking the Apponegansett River, with the 
mill chimneys of New Bedford in the distance. 
To me it always seems a fitting monument to a 
noble woman to whom all of her descendants are 
singularly indebted. 

On the death of her husband there was set off 
in 1831 to her as dower, in addition to certain 
land, "the east half of the house and also a privi- 
lege to pass and repass through the porch and to 
the oven for the purpose of baking as often as 



PHEBE HOWLAND 229 

occasion may require, and one-half of the corn 
house, and a privilege for her loom to stand in 
the west chamber, and the said Phebe to have a 
privilege to use the said loom in said chamber." 
Your grandfather remembers as a little boy sit- 
ting on the bench before the loom and watching 
with the fascination of a child his grandmother's 
deft manipulation of the shuttle. During the boy- 
hood of your grandfather he and his sisters often 
stayed with their grandmother at the Rockadunda 
farm. Your grandfather remembers walking 
with his father from New Bedford to Padanaram 
and thence through the woods to the homestead. 
With his grandmother he went blueberrying in 
the woods of Spontick, which must have been 
familiar territory to her in her youth. 

I remember her well. As we drove up to the 
door of the homestead, she would be sitting by 
the west window of the east room, clad in a plain 
black dress with a knit shoulder shawl and over 
her white hair a white cap, almost like a night- 
cap, and always with a book in her lap, even 
though her spectacles were raised to her fore- 
head and she read not but looked into the shadows 
of the room with the clairvoyant eyes of old age, 
seeing the things we could not see, living the 
memories we could not share. I remember her 
gentle manner towards me, the namesake of her 
boy of whom she was so proud, and how she al- 
ways offered me a glass of milk from the glass 
pitcher. It is possible that she may have come 
to our house in New Bedford, but I remember her 
only in the living room of the Rockadunda house 



230 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

placidly waiting for the release of death. She 
outlived her eldest son and died December 22, 
1870. She and her husband, Jesse Crapo, are 
buried in the burial ground on the old farm near 
the Bakertown Eoad, from which runs a right of 
way to a small enclosed plot where are the graves 
of several of her descendants. 



PART III 
ANCESTORS 

OF 

ANNE ALMY CHASE 



Chapter I 

THOMAS CORNELL 

Came over prior to 1638 



Thomas Cornell 1595 — 1656 

(Rebecca Briggs) 

Elizabeth Cornell — 1708+ 

( Christopher Almy) 

William Almy 1665 — 1747 

(Deborah Cook) 

Job Almy 1696 — 1771 

(Lydia Tillinghast) 

Job Almy 1730 — 1816 

(Ann Slocum) 

Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



THOMAS CORNELL 



In what year Thomas Cornell came from Eng- 
land is not known. It would seem that he lived in 
Essex County in the old country and came over 
with his wife, Rebecca Briggs, and several of his 
children prior to 1638. It seems probable that 
your ancestress, Elizabeth, his ninth child, who 
married Christopher Almy, was born in this 
country. On August 20, 1638, it was voted at 
town meeting in Boston that Thomas Cornell be 
permitted "to buy William Baulstone's house, 
yard and garden, backside of Mr. Coddington, 
and to become an inhabitant ; ' ' and on September 
6 of the same year Thomas Cornell was "licensed 
upon tryal to keepe an inn in the room of Will 
Bauldston till the next General Court." Evi- 
dently he did not prove satisfactory upon trial, 
since on June 4, 1639, he was fined £30 "for sev- 
eral offences, selling wine without license and beer 
at two pence a quart." Thomas explained that 
"in the winter time he had much loss by his small 
beer which he was at cost to preserve from frost 
by fire," which was the reason presumably why 
he put more alcohol in it and sold it at double 
the lawful price. He also pleaded ignorance of 
the law, said he was sorry for his offences, and 
asked for a remission of the fine. He was, two 



236 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

days later, abated £10 of his fine and given a 
month to close up his business and " cease from 
keeping entertainment. ' ' 

It would seem that he continued for several 
years to live in the house which he had purchased. 
It was located on the east side of Washington 
Street, about half way between Summer Street 
and Milk Street. It may have been at his neigh- 
bor William Coddington's fine brick mansion that 
he became impregnated with the distemper of 
Antinomianism. Mr. Coddington, who was a dis- 
tinguished and highly respected leader in the 
earlier days of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, was 
one of the central figures of the dramatic history 
of the controversy. Baulstone, who was Thomas 
Cornell's predecessor as an innkeeper, was also 
an obnoxious person to the orthodox church. 
Cornell's brother in law, John Briggs, another 
ancestor of yours, was a somewhat prominent 
Hutchinsonite. Cornell himself was evidently of 
the coterie. 

Your ancestress, Anne Hutchinson, "the breed- 
er and nourisher of all these distempers," was 
indicted, solemnly tried, excommunicated and 
exiled, as you will more fully learn if you per- 
severe with these notes. She and her followers 
applied to the Plymouth authorities for a place 
of refuge, but were refused. It was Roger Wil- 
liams who suggested that they come to Rhode 
Island. Mr. Coddington and other prominent 
members of the Antinomians purchased in 1637 
from Canonicus and Miantonomi, Indian chiefs, 
the island of Aquidneck. The consideration paid 



THOMAS CORNELL 237 

was forty fathoms of white peag (wampum) and 
ten coats and twenty hoes. On this island was 
started the settlement called Portsmouth, where 
so many of your ancestors lived. The compact 
which served as a basis of their future government 
was signed March 7, 1638, probably in Boston. 
"Whether Thomas Cornell went with the exiles 
from Massachusetts at their first removal is not 
clear. He was living in Portsmouth in 1640, and 
in that year admitted as a freeman. It was not 
until three years later that he sold his Boston 
house. It is probable that his experience in being 
practically driven from his home was similar to 
that of his friend William Coddington, who left 
his ' ' brick house, ' ' the first brick house ever built 
in Boston, and went into the wilderness. Cod- 
dington wrote to John Winthrop "what myself 
and wife and family did endure in that removal 
I wish neither you nor yours may ever be put 
unto." 

Thomas Cornell with his family probably lived 
for a year or two near the newly started settle- 
ment of Portsmouth, at the upper end of the 
island. In 1641, "a piece of meadow" was 
granted him there. He acted as Constable during 
the same year, and also as "Ensign." He was 
doubtless one of those who were visited by a dele- 
gation of the Boston Church to require them to 
explain "their unwarrantable practice in com- 
municating with excommunicated persons," mean- 
ing, of course, your ancestress, Anne Hutchinson. 
There can be no question that he was loyal to the 
distinguished exile, since after the death of her 



238 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

husband in 1642 he and his family went with her 
to Manhattan and there again attempted to start 
a settlement. It was in the autumn of 1642 that 
Anne Hutchinson, Thomas Cornell, John Throck- 
morton, and others with their families, removed 
to Manhattan "neare a place called by seamen 
Hell Gate," a designation which seemed most 
appropriate to the Boston divines. Governor 
Winthrop was evidently interested in following 
their fortunes since in 1642 he notes, "Mr. 
Throckmorton and Mr. Cornell, established with 
buildings, etc., in neighboring plantations under 
the Dutch." The Dutch government, in fact, 
granted Thomas Cornell and his associates some 
thirty-five families in all, permission to settle 
"within the limits of the jurisdiction of their High 
Mightinesses to reside there in peace. ' ' In 1643, 
Cornell and Throckmorton procured a survey and 
map of the country they had taken up which was 
about eleven miles from New Amsterdam. This 
new settlement was rudely shattered by the 
Indians during the same year. Governor 
Winthrop writes, June, 1643, "The Indians set 
upon the English who dwelt under the Dutch. 
They came to Mrs. Hutchinson in a way of 
friendly neighborhood as they had been accus- 
tomed, and taking their opportunity, killed her 
and Mr. Collins, her son in law, and all of her 
family and such of Mr. Throckmorton's and Mr. 
Cornell's families as were at home, in all sixteen, 
and put their cattle into their barns and burned 
them." 



THOMAS CORNELL 239 

The terrible experience of this Indian massacre, 
and the death of Mrs. Hutchinson very naturally 
caused some of her co-settlers to return to Rhode 
Island. Thomas Cornell was one of these. He 
went back to Portsmouth. In 1644, he secured 
a grant of land from the town ''butting on Mr. 
Porter's round meadow." In 1646 he received a 
grant of one hundred acres on the Narragansett 
Bay side of the island, near the farm occupied in 
later years by the illustrious Ward McAllister of 
the ' ' four hundred. ' ' This tract has always been 
in the possession of the Cornell family and is now 
the property of the Rev. John Cornell, to whose 
admirably prepared genealogical notes on the 
Cornell family I am indebted for much of the 
information which I here set down. 

Notwithstanding this grant of a hundred acres 
in Portsmouth, in 1646 Thomas Cornell returned 
to New Amsterdam. He did not attempt to rebuild 
his property on Throgg's Neck, near Hell Gate, 
which the Indians had burned, but procured a 
grant near his friend Throckmorton, at a place 
which has since been called Cornell 's Neck. Here 
he settled, and several of his descendants "sat 
down" at Rockaway and other places in Long 
Island and in Westchester County, and were the 
ancestors of the many Cornells who have helped 
in the upbuilding of the state of New York, among 
whom is Ezra Cornell, the founder of Cornell 
University. That your ancestress, Elizabeth 
Almy, had followed the fortunes of her father in 
his changes of residence is only conjectural. The 
date of her birth is not determined. Since her 



240 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

eldest child was born in 1662, it is perhaps rea- 
sonable to suppose that she was born about 1642, 
when her father first went to New Amsterdam. 
She would naturally have been with him, a child 
of four or five years of age, when he again lived 
in what is now Westchester County. She was, 
perhaps, fourteen years old when the Indians for 
the second time drove her father back to his old 
home at Portsmouth, and she doubtless went with 
him and later met young Christopher Almy and 
married him. Thomas Cornell, when he came 
back to Portsmouth the second time, took up the 
life of a public spirited citizen, his name appear- 
ing upon the records of Portsmouth as serving in 
various capacities. He died, about the year 1656, 
at the age of sixty. 

Your many times great grandmother, Rebecca, 
lived eighteen years longer, and the story of her 
death is one of the marvellous records of the cre- 
dulity of her time. "Feb. 8, 1673. Rebecca Cornell, 
widow, was killed strangely at Portsmouth, in her 
own dwelling house; was twice viewed by the 
Coroner's inquest, digged up and buried again 
by her husband's grave in their own land" 
(Newport Friends Records). It seems that the 
old lady was sitting by the fire smoking a pipe, 
half asleep probably, and a coal fell from the fire 
and she was burned to death. After her death, 
her brother, John Briggs, also your ancestor, had 
a vision in which his sister appeared at his bed- 
side, "whereat he was much affrighted and cryed 
out, 'in the name of God, what art thou?' The 
apparition answered 'I am your sister Cornell' 



THOMAS CORNELL 241 

and twice said ' See how I was burnt with fire ! ' " 
It was inferred from this that she had been set 
fire to, and as her eldest son, Thomas Cornell, had 
unquestionably had the opportunity of setting her 
on fire he was arrested, tried on the charge of 
murder, condemned and executed. There was 
practically no evidence of his guilt except the 
vision. This is by far the most shocking family 
scandal which I shall be able to furnish you. I 
am, however, satisfied that the only crime rests 
on the heads of the credulous old fools who sat as 
a court and condemned a man on such ridiculous 
evidence. I fondly trust that had his sister 
Elizabeth, your ancestress, not been living in 
New Jersey at this time, she would have stood 
staunchly by her brother and refused to believe 
him the murderer of her mother. The story is 
grotesque in its stupidity. 

Elizabeth Cornell, the daughter of Thomas and 
Rebecca (Briggs) Cornell, married Christopher 
Almy, and was a grandmother of Job Almy, who 
was a great grandfather of Anne Almy Chase. 



Chapter II 

PHILIP SHERMAN 

Came over 1633 



Philip Sherman 1610 — 1687 

(Sarah Odding) 

John Sherman 1644 — 1734 

(Sarah Spooner) 

Abigail Sherman 1680 — 1748 

(Nathaniel Chase) 

John Chase 1722 — 

(Lovina Hammond) 

Rhoda Chase 1759 — 

(Henry Howland) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Philip Sherman 1610 — 1687 

(Sarah Odding) 

Hannah Sherman 1647 — 

(William Chase) 

Benjamin Chase 
(Amey Borden) 

Nathan Chase 1704 — 

(Elizabeth Shaw) 

Benjamln Chase 1747 — 

(Mary Almy) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Philip Sherman 1610 — 1687 

(Sarah Odding) 

Hannah Sherman 1647 — 

(William Chase) 

Nathaniel Chase 1679 — 1760 

(Abigail Sherman) 

John Chase 1722 — 

(Lovina Hammond) 

Rhoda Chase 1759 — 

( Henry Howland ) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



PHILIP SHERMAN 



Philip Sherman, from whom you descend in 
several lines, was born in Dedham, Essex County, 
England, in 1610. His father, who died in Ded- 
ham in 1615, had married a "Phillippia," and 
Philip Sherman gave his mother's name to one of 
his daughters, who married a Benjamin Chase of 
Portsmouth. His grandfather, Henry Sherman, 
who died in 1610, was a clothier in Dedham. His 
great grandfather, Henry Sherman, lived in Col- 
chester, where he died in 1589. 

Philip Sherman was a man somewhat superior 
in education and social standing to most of your 
numerous Portsmouth comeovering ancestors. 
He came over in 1633 and settled in Roxbury, 
being admitted as a freeman there in 1634. He 
soon became involved in that cataclysmic con- 
troversy anent the covenant of grace versus the 
covenant of works, being a believer in the doc- 
trines of his minister, the Rev. John "Wheelwright 
the brother in law and follower of Anne Hutchin- 
son. He was one of that "host of hell" which 
the Boston hierarchy put down with relentless 
righteousness. On November 20, 1637, he with 
others of your ancestors, was ordered to give up 
"all such guns, pistols, swords, powder, shot and 
matches" as he might have "because the opinions 



248 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

and revelations of Mr. Wheelwright and Mrs. 
Hutchinson have seduced and led into dangerous 
errors many of the people here in New England. ' ' 

He joined with Mr. Coddington in arranging, 
through Eoger Williams, the purchase of Aquid- 
neck from the Indians and is named as a grantee 
in the deed which is dated March 24, 1638. He, 
with eighteen others, signed the preliminary com- 
pact in Boston establishing the new government. 
The compact read in part as follows: "We 
whose names are underwritten do hereby solemnly 
in the presence of Jehovah incorporate ourselves 
into a Bodie Politick and as He shall help will sub- 
mit our persons lives and estates unto our Lord 
Jesus Christ, the King of Kings, and Lord of 
Lords, and to all those perfect and most absolute 
laws of his given us in his holy word of truth to 
be guided and judged thereby. ' ' 

The newly formed Colony which was at first 
independent of the Colony established by Roger 
Williams at Providence, was formally established 
in 1639, Mr. Coddington being the Governor and 
Philip Sherman the Secretary. Coddington set- 
tled in Newport, Philip Sherman in Portsmouth. 
Two hundred acres of land was allotted to him in 
1639 and he was of the first town council. There- 
after he acted constantly for the public weal. 
Scarcely a town meeting was held in which he was 
not chosen to perform some service for the town, 
especially those services which required a certain 
degree of education. He was the Town Recorder 
or Clerk for many years. His salary in this 
office was about one pound per annum. He was 



PHILIP SHERMAN 249 

generally appointed to audit the town accounts 
and to assess the taxes and to settle disputes as a 
magistrate. He served constantly on the town 
council and as a Commissioner and Deputy to the 
General Assembly. He acquired considerable 
wealth, and was looked up to by the community 
as one to be respected and consulted. 

Philip Sherman married, in England, Sarah 
Odding, a daughter of the wife of John Porter. 
John Porter was one of the original settlers of 
Portsmouth, who probably came over with Sher- 
man. Philip and his wife had thirteen children 
and their descendants are extremely numerous. 
He died in 1687. His seventh child, John, was 
born in 1644, in Portsmouth. He removed to 
Dartmouth, taking up an interest in the Dart- 
mouth purchase which his father had acquired. 
There he married Sarah Spooner, the daughter 
of William Spooner and Hannah Pratt. He is 
recognized in the confirmatory deed of Governor 
Bradford as a proprietor of Dartmouth. His 
homestead farm was on the north side of the road 
leading by the head of Apponegansett Eiver, the 
brook which forms its source dividing the farm 
in two equal sections. In 1668 he with his neigh- 
bors, Ralph Earle and John Briggs, your ances- 
tors, took the oath of fidelity. He died in 1734, 
aged ninety, leaving an estate of £735. His 
daughter, Abigail, whom he remembered in his 
will, married Nathaniel Chase and was a great 
grandmother of Phebe Howland. 

Hannah Sherman, a daughter of Philip Sher- 
man, born in 1647, married William Chase, and 



250 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

their son, Nathaniel, who married his first cousin, 
Abigail, as above, was a great grandfather of 
Phebe Howland. Another son of Hannah Sher- 
man and William Chase, named Benjamin Chase, 
who married Amey Borden, was the great grand- 
father of Anne Almy Chase. Thns are you three 
times a descendant of Philip Sherman, whom some 
of his biographers delight to call i * The Honorable 
Philip Sherman," a title which he doubtless 
deserved, but which his contemporaries in all 
probability did not bestow upon him. 



Chaptek III 

RICHARD BORDEN 

Came over 1635-6(f) 



Richard Borden 1595 — 1671 

(Joan Fowle) 

John Borden 1640 — 1716 

(Mary Earle) 

Amey Borden 1678 — 1716 

(Benjamin Chase) 

Nathan Chase 1704 — 

(Elizabeth Shaw) 

Benjamin Chase 1747 — 

(Mary Almy) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Richard Borden 1595 — 1671 

(Joan Fowle) 

Mary Borden 1636 — 1691— 

(John Cook) 

Deborah Cook 
(William Almy) 

Job Almy 1696 — 1771 

(Lydia Tillinghast) 

Job Almy 1730 — 1816 

(Ann Slocum) 

Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Sloeum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



RICHARD BORDEN 



Richard Borden was born in Hedcorn, County 
Kent, and baptized February 22, 1595-6. His 
ancestry has been most admirably presented by 
Thomas Allen Glenn in an unusually good genea- 
logical book edited in 1901. He was the son of 
Matthew Borden of Hedcorn, who left a consid- 
erable estate. Matthew was the son of Thomas 
Borden, who died in 1592, and Joan, his wife, who 
lived until 1620. Thomas was the son of William 
Borden, who died in 1557, and his wife, Joan. 
William was the son of Edmund Borden, who died 
in 1539, and Margaret, his wife. Edmund was 
the son of William Borden, who died in 1531, and 
Joan, his wife. William was the son of John 
Borden, who died in 1469. John was the son 
of Thomas, who also died in 1469. Thomas was 
the son of Henry Borden, who was born about 
1370 and died in 1480. It is probable that he was 
of the family of Bordens of Borden, a parish 
some twelve miles distant from Hedcorn, where 
he lived. 

Richard Borden, the immigrant, was married 
September 28, 1625, in the parish church at Hed- 
corn to Joan Fowle. Afterwards he removed 
to the parish of Cranbrook, where he was living 
in 1628. In what year he came to New England 



RICHARD BORDEN 255 

is not known. He had a younger brother John, 
who was born in 1606, who came over in the Eliza- 
beth and Ann in 1635. It is not probable that 
Richard came with his brother, but whether he 
preceded him or came afterwards is problematical. 
Both Richard and John were in Boston during the 
Anne Hutchinson excitement. Whether they were 
adherents of hers does not appear. In the early 
spring of 1638 Richard settled in Portsmouth, 
near the landing place of what has since been 
known as the Bristol Ferry. Here his son 
Matthew was born in May, 1638, the first child of 
English parentage born on the island of Aquid- 
neck. Richard was admitted as an inhabitant of 
the new settlement May 20, 1638, and was 
allotted a house lot of five acres. In October, 
1638, he signed the civil compact and took the 
freeman's oath. Later he removed with most of 
the first settlers to a location half way down the 
island which was then called Newtown — the 
present village of Portsmouth. 

Richard Borden from the start took a leading 
part in the activities of the new settlement. Dur- 
ing his life he acted for the town in many capaci- 
ties, especially in the matter of laying out lands 
and settling land disputes. He was first chosen 
to the town council in 1649, and served many 
times thereafter. In 1654 he was chosen General 
Treasurer of the Colony. In 1656 and from 1667 
to 1670, he was a Deputy to the General Assembly. 
He seems to have had the business sagacity which 
he handed on to his namesake and descendant, 
who was so largely the founder of the prosperity 



256 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

of the city of Fall River, which sprang up on 
Mount Hope Bay on land which was acquired by 
the early Bordens. Richard, himself, was a large 
landed proprietor, owning lands in Massachusetts 
and New Jersey. His dwelling house at Ports- 
mouth was of more than usual amplitude for those 
times. He died May 25, 1671. His widow, Joan, 
survived him for seventeen years, dying July 15, 
1688. The records of the Friends' monthly meet- 
ing at Newport say of Joan that "she lived long 
enough to see all her children confirmed in what 
she believed to be the truth, and in dying she must 
have had a happy consciousness that they would 
do honor to their parental training." 

The fourth son of Richard and Joan Borden 
was John, born September, 1640. He certainly 
redeemed his mother's fondest hopes. He became 
widely known throughout the colonies as a lead- 
ing light in the Society of Friends. His earnest 
and persistent service to Quakerism is chronicled 
in many entries on the records not only of Rhode 
Island, but of New Jersey, and he was revered 
by the Friends of many meetings. In 1660, when 
twenty years of age, he became associated with 
John Tripp, another of your ancestors, in operat- 
ing the Bristol Ferry. The wharf on the island 
side appears to have been his property. Like his 
father he was thrifty and accumulated land and 
goods. His holdings were large in Rhode Island, 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware. He 
had tracts in Tiverton and Freetown, and he left 
a goodly heritage to his children. 



RICHARD BORDEN 257 

Aside from his distinguished record as an 
apostle of Quakerism, John Borden is especially 
interesting as the warm friend and adviser of 
King Philip, with whom he had many personal 
dealings. Philip once said, "John Borden is the 
most honest white man I have ever known." It 
was owing to this well known friendship that John 
Borden was employed by the government of Ply- 
mouth Colony to act as peacemaker and attempt 
to deter Philip from waging war on the English 
settlers. He was unsuccessful in his mission. 
Philip received him as a friend and listened 
courteously to what he had to say, but the wrongs 
which the English had inflicted upon the Indians 
were too grievous and the Sachem felt that war 
was inevitable. 

John Borden had unquestionably done his ut- 
most to serve the Plymouth Court in his negotia- 
tions with King Philip, and it is, therefore, re- 
grettable that he so soon after was treated by 
Plymouth in a way which to him and his fellow 
townsmen seemed most outrageous. He was the 
owner, at least in part, of "Hog Island," which 
had been regarded as a part of the town of Ports- 
mouth, to which in fact it paid taxes. The town 
of Bristol, a Plymouth Colony community, claimed 
jurisdiction, and was supported by the Plymoutii 
Court, under whose sanction John Borden was 
arrested and imprisoned in Bristol, having been 
induced to go thither by a very underhanded pro- 
ceeding. His fellow colonists applied to the gov- 
ernment of Rhode Island for support and redress, 
and the government espoused their cause and 



258 CERTAIN COMBOVERERS 

entered into a vigorous contest with Plymouth 
and its supporter, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 
for the possession of the islands in Narragansett 
Bay. It was largely due to another ancestor of 
yours, Christopher Almy, who went to England 
and laid the matter of the Massachusetts en- 
croachments before the British government, that 
the islands were finally assured to Ehode Island. 
The town of Portsmouth recompensed John 
Borden for his expenses in this controversy and 
apparently stood behind him loyally in every way. 
His fellow townsmen continued to rely on him 
during his life, electing him from time to time as 
one of the Town Council, and as their Deputy to 
the General Assembly, and employing him in 
various other offices. 

John Borden died June 4, 1716, and in his will 
he remembered the children of his daughter Amey, 
who had married Benjamin Chase and died prior 
to his death. Amey Chase was a great grand- 
mother of Anne Almy Chase. 

John Borden's sister Mary married John Cook, 
the son of Thomas Cook of Portsmouth, who was 
a butcher. In 1643 Thomas Cook was received as 
an inhabitant of Portsmouth and "ingaged with 
the government" at the same time * ' propounding 
for a toll." Whence he came I know not. He 
must have been fully thirty-five years old when 
he came to Portsmouth, since his son John was 
then twelve years old. His wife 's name was Mary. 
In 1649, William Brenton conveyed to Thomas 
Cook a plot of ground on which Cook had already 
erected a dwelling house, and also a tract of land 



RICHARD BORDEN 259 

which adjoined the farm of Giles Slocum. Several 
subsequent conveyances between Giles Slocum 
and Thomas Cook are recorded. In Thomas 
Cook's will he describes a piece of land which he 
devises to his grandson John, the son of Captain 
Thomas Cook, as bounded by "brother Giles 
Slocum." This raises the query as to whether 
Thomas Cook may have married Giles Slocum 's 
sister, or whether Cook and Slocum married sis- 
ters in the old country. Thomas Cook took no 
active part in the town's affairs, although in 1664 
he was elected a Deputy to the General Assembly. 
In 1674 he died leaving a will which is informative 
as to his descendants. 

John Cook, the son of Thomas, was also a 
butcher. He is said to have been born in 1631. 
In 1655 he was admitted as a freeman. In 1668 
he and Daniel Wilcox were authorized to run the 
ferry. In 1670 he was a Deputy to the General 
Assembly. He lived at Puncatest, and it was he 
who testified in 1676 at the court martial held at 
Newport about the Indians supposed to have 
killed Zoeth Howland. He was more or less active 
in the town's affairs and served frequently in 
minor offices, his name appearing often on the 
town's records. He died in 1691, and in his will, 
which is dated the same year, he calls himself 
"aged," and "considering the sore visitation of 
small-pox wherewith many are now visited and 
many have been taken away" deems it wise to 
arrange his. worldly affairs. He seems to have 
had considerable property and an unusual number 
of negro slaves and several ' ' Indian boys ' ' which 



260 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

he bequeathes to various members of his family. 
To his daughter, Deborah Almy, wife of William 
Almy, he leaves only one shilling, thinking per- 
haps that she was well provided for by her mar- 
riage. Deborah was a great great grandmother 
of Anne Almy Chase. 



Chapter IV 

WILLIAM CHASE 

Came over 1630 



William Chase — 1659 

(Mary ) 

William Chase 1622 — 1685 

( ) 

William Chase 1645 — 1737 

(Hannah Sherman) 

Benjamin Chase 
(Amey Borden) 

Nathan Chase 1704 — 

(Elizabeth Shaw) 

Benjamin Chase 1747 — 

(Mary Almy) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



William Chase — 1659 

(Mary ) 

William Chase 1622 — 1685 

( ) 

William Chase 1645 — 1737 

(Hannah Sherman) 

Nathaniel Chase 1679 — 1760 

(Abigail Sherman) 

John Chase 1722 — 

(Lovina Hammond) 

Rhoda Chase 1759 — 

(Henry Howland) 

Phebe Howland 1785 — 1870 

(Jesse Crapo) 

Henry H. Crapo 1804 — 1869 

(Mary Ann Slocum) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



WILLIAM CHASE 

Something more than half a century ago the 
newspapers of this country freely circulated a 
fake story which at once stirred up nearly every- 
body by the name of Chase (or Chace) to trace 
their ancestry. The story was that large landed 
estates in England, with centuries of accumula- 
tions, awaited a decision of the Chancery Court 
in favor of the descendants of three brothers by 
the name of Chase who early immigrated to 
America. The three brothers were said to be 
William of Yarmouth, Aquila of Newbury and 
Thomas of Hampton. The stories of the "Chase 
Inheritance," sometimes referred to as "Lord 
Townley's Estate," persisted for many years and 
stimulated the dreams of avarice of countless good 
people who took them seriously. As a matter of 
fact, there was absolutely no foundation what- 
ever for the yarn. 

There is no evidence that William Chase of 
Yarmouth, from whom you descend, was a brother 
of Aquila Chase of Newbury, from whom you also 
descend. Aquila Chase, of whom you will learn 
in the notes relating to the ancestors of Sarah 
Morse Smith, came from Chesham, Buckingham- 
shire. There is no reason whatever to suppose 
that William Chase came from the same place or 
was in any way related to Aquila. 



WILLIAM CHASE 265 

The Rev. John Eliot, "the apostle to the 
Indians," in a record of the members of the first 
church at Roxbury, writes as follows, viz.: "Wil- 
liam Chase. He came with the first company 
(that is to say with Winthrop April 1630) ; he 
brought one child, his son William, a child of ill 
qualities and a sore affliction to his parents ; he 
was much afflicted by the long and tedious afflic- 
tion of his wife ; after his wife 's recovery she bore 
him a daughter which they named Mary, born 
about the middle of third month 1637. ' ' Mr. Eliot 
further explains about the "sore affliction" of 
Mary, the wife of William Chase. He writes, 
"She had a paralitick humor which fell into her 
back bone so that she could not stir her body but 
as she was lifted and filled her with great torture 
and caused her back bone to goe out of joynt and 
bunch out, from the beginning to the end of which 
infirmity she lay four years and a half and a great 
part of the time a sad spectacle of misery. ' ' 

Two hundred and fifty years after this clearly 
stated clerical diagnosis Dr. Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, at a banquet of the Massachusetts Medi- 
cal Association in Boston, in 1881, submitted a 
humorous opinion on the case of your many times 
great grandmother Mary Chase. His conclusion 
was that she did not have a curvature of the spine 
but a case of "mimoses," as Marshall Hall called 
a certain form of hysteria. Dr. Holmes says, "I 
do not want to say anything against Mary Chase, 
but I suspect that getting tired and nervous and 
hysteric, she got into bed, which she found rather 
agreeable after too much housework and perhaps 



266 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

too much going to meeting, liked it better and 
better, curled herself np into a bunch which made 
her look as if her back was really distorted, found 
she was cosseted and posseted and prayed over 
and made much of, and so lay quiet until a false 
paralysis caught hold of her legs and held her 
there. If some one had 'hollered' Fire! it is not 
unlikely that she would have jumped out of bed 
as many another such paralytic has done under 
such circumstances. She could have moved, prob- 
ably enough, if anyone could have made her be- 
lieve that she had the power of doing it. Possumus 
quia posse videmur. She had played possum so 
long that at last it became non possum." 

After Mary recovered the family joined Mr. 
Stephen Bachelor's company "intending for 
Scituate," but eventually going to Yarmouth 
where in much discomfort they spent the winter of 
1638. Most, if not all, of the other members of 
this company who went to Yarmouth from Rox- 
bury as a result of Anne Hutchinson's Anti- 
nomian disturbance scattered, but William Chase 
' ' sat down. ' ' He was admitted a freeman of Yar- 
mouth and in 1639 made Constable of the town, 
an office of dignity and responsibility. He was, 
to some degree at least, a carpenter and builder. 
In 1654 he was presented in Court for driving a 
pair of oxen in yoke on the Lord's day in time of 
service. In 1659 he made his will, providing for 
his sons William and Benjamin, and giving his 
dwelling house and other real estate to his wife 
Mary, directing her at her death to give at least 
two thirds of it to their son Benjamin. This, 



WILLIAM CHASE 267 

however, is no reflection on William, since it is 
stated "lie hath had of me already a good por- 
tion." There really seems to have been some- 
thing uncanny about Mary Chase. An inquest 
was held over "her body which was found dead" 
a few months after her husband's demise. The 
jury, however, found that she "came to her death 
naturally through inward sickness." 

You are descended in two quite distinct lines 
from William, that "child of ill qualities." He 
evidently turned out much better than Mr. Eliot 
would have prophesied. He lived in Yarmouth 
near the Herring River, in the vicinity of what is 
now known as Dennis or Harwich. In 1643 he is 
enrolled as able to bear arms, and in 1645 saw 
service, not, to be sure, bearing arms but a drum 
in Myles Standish's company "that went to the 
banks opposite Providence. " It is not known who 
was the wife of William Chase, second. He had 
a large family of children who, as they grew up, 
became converted to Quakerism, and most of them 
removed to Portsmouth or to Swansea. It may 
not be unlikely that this removal was due in some 
part to the advice of Philip Sherman, so many 
times your ancestor. Sherman was a member of 
the first church of Roxbury and doubtless associ- 
ated with William Chase, since they were both 
of the Anne Hutchinson party. Sherman went to 
Portsmouth, which later became strongly Quaker 
in religion. At all events, several of the children 
of William Chase, the second, married children of 
Philip Sherman, and their descendants intermar- 
ried with the result that it is not always easy to 



268 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

disentangle them all from the confused records. 

William Chase, the third, the son of William, 
the son of William, was a great great grandfather 
of Phebe Howland, and Benjamin, his son, was 
a great grandfather of Anne Almy Chase. 



Chapter V 

WILLIAM ALMY 

Came over 1635 
Abigail 



William Almy 1601 — 1676 

(Audrey ) 

Christopher Almy 1632 — 1713 

(Elizabeth Cornell) 

William Almy 1665 — 1747 

(Deborah Cook) 

Job Almy 1696 — 1771 

(Lydia Tillinghast) 

Job Almy 1730 — 1816 

(Ann Sloeum) 

Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Sloeum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



WILLIAM ALMY 



There is a tradition, which I have been unable 
to verify, that William Almy, subsequently of 
Portsmouth, first crossed the ocean with Winthrop 
in 1630 as a seaman and remained on this side 
for a few years. There was, indeed, a William 
Almy who in 1631 was fined by the Court at 
Boston eleven shillings for "taking away Mr. 
Glover's canoe without leave." This same Wil- 
liam Almy in 1634 was fined ten shillings for not 
obeying a summons to appear in Court and make 
explanation as to what he had done with certain 
goods of Edward Johnson. If this William Almy 
who came under suspicion of the Court is indeed 
your ancestor he must have returned to England, 
because there is no doubt that the William Almy 
who is unquestionably your ancestor came over in 
the ship Abigail in 1635. He was thirty-four 
years of age at that time, and he brought with him 
his wife, Audrey, and a daughter, Ann, aged eight, 
and Christopher, your ancestor, aged three. In 
1636 there was a William Almy of Lynn who was 
a successful litigant in two civil suits. This Wil- 
liam Almy was probably the William Almy, your 
ancestor, who joined the small association who 
were granted by Governor Bradford of Plymouth 
liberty "to view a place and have sufficient land 



272 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

for three score families" at a place which was 
subsequently called Sandwich. In 1638, in Sand- 
wich, he was fined eleven shillings for keeping 
swine unringed. It is rather a pity that most of 
the records I have discovered deal with William 
Almy's criminal record. In 1640 he was granted 
land in Sandwich, which in 1642 he sold, and there 
is no further record of him in Sandwich. In 1643 
the William Almy, who is unquestionably yours, 
was in Portsmouth, Ehode Island. He had land 
allotted to him that year, and in 1644 he was 
granted additional land at Wading Brook. From 
that date until his death in 1676 he was promi- 
nently connected with the civic affairs of Ports- 
mouth. He was a Deputy to the General Court 
at Newport in 1650, and in 1654 he was a Commis- 
sioner in relation to the purchase of Cumnequisett 
and Dutch Islands. He served the town as Grand 
Juryman, Moderator at town meetings, Commis- 
sioner to the General Assembly, and in various 
capacities. His name appears many times in the 
Portsmouth records. He became a Quaker, and 
in his later years was one of the "assistants" of 
Governor Coddington in the general administra- 
tion of the affairs of the Rhode Island Colonies. 
He was doubtless a farmer for the most part, yet 
I find a record that in 1652 he shipped from 
Pardon Tillinghast 's wharf in Providence a ton 
of tobacco for New Foundland. One wonders how 
a farmer of Portsmouth, in 1652, came possessed 
of a ton of tobacco. He must have been some- 
thing of a merchant, it seems. In 1659 he was 
living on a farm next to Richard Borden's and 



WILLIAM ALMY 273 

deeded to his son John about fifty acres, entailing 
the same in favor of his son Christopher. 

The records of the town of Portsmouth disclose 
somewhat in full a bitter controversy between 
your ancestor William Almy and your ancestor 
Philip Sherman. They owned adjoining tracts 
of land, and between their respective holdings 
there was a lane-way which led to a spring. It 
would seem that the inhabitants of the town had 
had free use of this spring for some years when 
William Almy fenced it off on account of some 
dispute with Philip Sherman as to its ownership. 
The dispute was that of a boundary line, the most 
prolific cause of bad blood between neighbors from 
the days of the first settlement of the country unto 
this day. The trouble had doubtless been brew- 
ing for some years before 1669. In October of 
that year it was represented in town meeting that 
William Almy had fenced in a way between his 
house and Philip Sherman's "which highway 
doth lead to one of the most principal watteringe 
places for cattle in this towne whereof severall of 
the inhabitants are much wronged and have com- 
plained and desired said Almy to throw said way 
open and he refuseing so to do" it was ordered 
that proceedings be brought by the town, at the 
town's expense, to "try the title" and Philip 
Sherman was authorized "to prosecute in all law- 
ful ways to carry the same." In November of 
the same year Richard Borden, another of your 
ancestors, was appointed by the town, with two 
constables to assist him "to forthwith repair 
unto William Almy's and lay open a highway 



274 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

which was laid out for the town's use lying be- 
tween the land of William Almy and Philip Sher- 
man down to the spring and also all other land 
taken out of the common and not legally granted. ' ' 
William Almy was stubborn. He vigorously 
asserted the characteristically English attitude of 
resistance when what he deemed his rights to his 
land were encroached on. He retaliated in April, 
1670, by suing the town in his own behalf, and 
John Sanford was appointed to look after the 
town 's defence, Mr. William Hall being the attor- 
ney to plead and manage the case. In October, 
1670, a Mr. John Green suggested in town meeting 
that the dispute between Mr. Almy and the town 
be referred to arbitrators, but the meeting unani- 
mously refused any compromise and voted more 
money to carry on the fight. At the town meeting 
in July, 1671, it was ordered that "Mr. Philip 
Sherman is continued the town's agent and attor- 
ney and Mr. William Hall is now joyned unto him 
to prosecute and finish the laying open the high- 
way and spring fenced off by Mr. Almy, for which 
he was the last court of tryalls found guilty, until 
it be laid open according to the true bounds 
thereof. ' ' 

It is not at all probable that William Almy 
accepted the determination of this controversy as 
a just one, nor is it to be wondered at that I fail 
to find his name for the seven remaining years 
of his life as one whom the town honored with 
office. His will, dated February 28, 1676, was pro- 
bated April 23, 1677. In it he disposes of a con- 
siderable estate and his son Christopher was one 
of the executors. 



WILLIAM ALMY 275 

Christopher Aliny was born in England in 1632, 
and was about ten years old when his father first 
settled in Portsmouth. He was twenty-nine years 
old when he married in 1661, Elizabeth Cornell, 
the daughter of Thomas Cornell and Eebecca 
Briggs of Portsmouth. In the same year the 
town ordered that he should be recompensed for 
a vessel which he had purchased of William Dyer 
and which had been wrongfully seized in Massa- 
chusetts. It may be that this personal experience 
of the usurpations of Massachusetts caused him 
to become in later years the chief champion or 
Rhode Island against the claims of her more pow- 
erful neighbor. In 1658 he was admitted, of 
record, a freeman of Portsmouth, and served the 
town in various public capacities. In 1667, with 
several others, he bought from the Indians large 
tracts of land at Monmouth in New Jersey, re- 
moving thither and there remaining some thirteen 
years. Prior to 1680 he returned to Portsmouth. 
In that year he, with seven others, purchased from 
Governor Josiah Winslow the territory known as 
Puncatest, later known as Tiverton and Little 
Compton. He had three and three-quarters 
shares of a total of thirty shares, the full purchase 
price being £1,100. 

It is evident that his contemporaries regarded 
him as especially capable as a diplomat. In 1688 
he, with John Borden, that other eminently diplo- 
matic ancestor of yours, was appointed by the 
Assembly to go to Boston and "make our claims 
and rights appear unto the aforesaid lands before 
his Excellency the Governor in Boston." For 



276 CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 

this service he received £4. In 1689 and 1690 
Christopher Almy was a Deputy to the General 
Assembly. The affairs of the several quasi 
independent Ehode Island settlements, Ports- 
mouth, Newport, Providence and Warwick, were 
in a most confused state. There were in all of 
them two warring factions, royalist and republi- 
can. Francis Brierly, a merchant of Newport, 
was the leader of the royalists. Christopher Almy 
became the leader of the republicans and the ally 
of Andros, the Governor of Massachusetts, who 
favored the independence of Ehode Island. The 
General Assembly of the united Colonies had been 
unable to organize for four years. The royalist 
governor, who was elected by a portion of the 
Assembly, refused to act. Christopher Almy was 
elected in his place, but also refused "for reasons 
satisfactory to the assembly." He consented, 
however, to act as an assistant, and as such virtu- 
ally exercised the powers of Governor. In 1692, 
Christopher Almy was sent by the General Assem- 
bly to England to present to their majesties a 
complaint on behalf of Ehode Island against the 
encroachments of Massachusetts. At that time, the 
English Government was engrossed in a war with 
France and paid little heed to Almy. Being some- 
what discouraged, he memorialized Queen Mary, 
saying that he had come four thousand miles to 
lay the grievances of his neighbors before her 
and praying her to grant such encouragement as 
she might deem fit. His persistency at length was 
rewarded, and in his presentation of his case be- 
fore the royal Council he obtained a decision in 



WILLIAM ALMY 277 

favor of Rhode Island on every point at issue. 
He remained in London as the representative of 
Rhode Island for some four years. In 1694 he 
was actively engaged in the matter of boundary 
disputes not only on the east with Massachusetts, 
but on the west with Connecticut. In 1696 
he returned to Portsmouth and was granted by 
the Assembly the sum of £135 for his expenses, 
which, if it was his sole remuneration, was cer- 
tainly not excessive for a four years sojourn in 
a foreign capital by a Minister Plenipotentiary 
and Envoy-Extraordinary. 

When he returned from England, Christopher 
Almy was sixty-four years of age, and it is not, 
perhaps, surprising that thereafter there are few 
records of his public activities. He died in 1713, 
and by his will left to his oldest son William, who 
was your ancestor, his extensive holdings at 
Puncatest Neck (Tiverton). One negro named 
Arthur also fell to William's lot. 

William Almy lived at Puncatest Neck. He 
married Deborah Cook, daughter of John and 
Mary (Borden) Cook, from whom you descend. 
It is evident that he prospered greatly, since at his 
death in 1747 he left an estate appraised at up- 
ward of £7,500, including six negro slaves valued 
at £660. His second wife, Hope Borden, outlived 
him and when she died left an unusually large 
estate for a widow, which she disposed of in an 
elaborate will. A certain silver spoon she left 
to Hope Almy, the daughter of her stepson, Job. 
Many years afterward Hope Almy gave the spoon 
to her niece, Mary Almy, the mother of Anne 



278 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Almy Chase (Slocum) and it is now in the posses- 
sion of one of your numerous Slocum cousins. 

William Almy had acquired "the right of the 
eight hundred acre division qualified by Abraham 
Tucker's homestead in Dartmouth," between 
Horse Neck Beach and Allen's Beach, including 
Gooseberry Neck. This region was called Nutta- 
quansett. In his will William Almy devised his 
farm in Dartmouth to his son Job Almy, who was 
probably living there at the time in the first of 
the three mansion houses which he built. After 
Job's marriage with Lydia Tillinghast, a scion 
of the merchant princes of that ilk, he built the 
third and grandest mansion, now known as 
"Quanset," a splendid example of colonial archi- 
tecture which has been perfectly preserved and 
is now in the possession of a lineal descendant. 
Young Job did not have to make a long journey 
when he went a-courting Ann Slocum, who lived 
in the northerly house on the old Barney's Joy 
place. The two places were in sight of each other. 
The course of true love seems to have run smooth, 
and Job and Ann were married and were grand- 
parents of Anne Almy Chase. 

Job Almy, the older, died in 1771. His will, 
dated April, 1771, after providing for his widow 
and daughters and disposing of money and 
negroes, devises his real estate among his four 
sons, Samuel, Joseph, Job and Christopher. In 
1778 the sons made a division, Joseph and Chris- 
topher taking the portion east of the highway, 
Quanset, and Samuel and Job taking the westerly 
portion, including Gooseberry Neck, which had 



WILLIAM ALMY 279 

been laid out to William Almy in 1712 by order 
of the court. In 1779 Samuel conveyed all his 
interest, except a half of Gooseberry Neck which 
he had sold to Joseph Russell, to his brother Job. 
It was on this farm, in more modern times known 
as the Richard Almy farm, that Job Almy and 
Ann Slocum lived. The mansion, although not 
so fine as Quanset across the way, is a substantial 
and commodious dwelling with a fine outlook to 
the sea. ' 

When Job Almy was eighty-four years old, he 
became infirm and his only son, Tillinghast Almy, 
acted as his guardian. He died in 1816, and by 
his will gave various bequests to his children and 
grandchildren. As he does not mention his 
daughter Mary, who married Benjamin Chase, I 
conclude she died prior to his death. Her chil- 
dren are remembered, Anne Almy Chase (Slo- 
cum) being given $500. 



Chapter VI 

JOHN TRIPP 

Came over prior to 1638 



John Tripp 1610 — 1678 

(Mary Paine) 

Peleg Tripp 1642 — 1714 

(Anne Sisson) 

Mary Tripp — 1776 

(Deliverance Smith) 

Deborah Smith 1695 — 

(Eliezer Slocum) 

Ann Slocum 1732 — 

(Job Almy) 

Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JOHN TRIPP 



John Tripp was born about 1610. He was an 
original settler of Portsmouth in 1638 and one of 
the signers of the civil compact which formed the 
organization of the town. He was a carpenter 
by trade, having come over, it is thought, as an 
apprentice of one Holden. He also engaged in 
farming and must have been a good judge of 
cattle, since for many years he was annually 
chosen the "Surveyor of Cattel." He was evi- 
dently not a man of any education, but none the 
less he served the town in numerous capacities, 
serving many years on the Town Council, as 
moderator of the town meetings, and during the 
latter part of his life as Deputy to the General 
Assembly for some six years. 

John Tripp in 1643 purchased land next to 
Thomas Gorton. Later he lived next door to 
Ealph Earle in Portsmouth, and they had some 
controversy about their lines and fences and their 
cattle, which was finally adjusted by an elaborate 
agreement between them, dated August 25, 1651. 
This agreement was witnessed by Benedict 
Arnold and Thomas Newton, and is carefully set 
forth in the records of the town by the Recorder, 
Philip Sherman. In 1657 John Tripp had plant- 
ing land at Hogg Island. His will, dated Decern- 



284 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

ber 16, 1677, and probated October 28, 1678, is a 
carefully prepared document. Among other pro- 
visions he gives ' ' to each of my grandchildren five 
shillings to buy bibles for them. ' ' 

John Tripp married Mary Paine, the daughter 
of Anthony Paine, with whom and her mother 
she must have crossed the ocean when a young 
woman. It is not probable that the Paines crossed 
many years before 1638, and Mary must have 
been married to John Tripp soon after the settle- 
ment of Portsmouth, as her son Peleg was born in 
1642. Anthony Paine was one of the signers, by 
his mark, of the compact under which Portsmouth 
was settled. He does not appear to have taken 
any interest in the town's affairs, as his name 
seldom appears upon the records. He died in 
1649. His will is as follows : 

I Anthony Paine in my perfect memory due mani- 
fest my minde and last will is to give and bequeath unto 
my daughter Alice one cow shee or her husband painge 
unto my daughter Mary Tripp so much as ye cow is 
judged to be more worth than the heffer and to be made 
up equall out of ye cow. And further my minde and will 
is to make my wife Rose Paine wholl and soull executrix 
to see my ye former Covinant and my last will per- 
formed, and my debts paide, and Mr. Porter and Wil- 
liam Baulston to see my estate equally divided witness 
my hand this 5th day of May 1649. 

The marke of Anthony 

Paine (X) 

Thomas Wait 
William Baulston. 

On March 18, 1650, John Tripp and Mary Tripp 
executed a release to Rose Paine stating that they 
had received the legacy in full. Alice Paine, who 



JOHN TRIPP 285 

had meanwhile married Lot Strange, also ex- 
pressed herself as satisfied. It is regrettable that 
the receipts do not disclose just how the balance 
between the cow and the heffer was arrived at. 

John Tripp had purchased about 1662 a one- 
quarter share of the Dartmouth purchase from 
John Alden. In 1665 he conveyed this interest 
to his son Peleg, who, however, did not "take up" 
his lands for some years. Peleg was made the 
Constable of the town of Portsmouth when he 
was twenty-five years of age, and for more than 
twenty years thereafter he was constantly holding 
public office as Surveyor of Highways, member of 
the Town Council, and Deputy to the General 
Assembly at Newport, which latter office he held 
for some ten years consecutively. The last entry 
in the Portsmouth records concerning him is in 
1690, when he was elected a Deputy. As his name 
appears so frequently before this date, and not 
at all thereafter, it seems likely that he left Ports- 
mouth soon after and went to Dartmouth, taking 
up holdings in what is now the township of West- 
port, east of Devoll's Pond. He died in 1714. 
He had married Anne Sisson, the daughter of 
Eichard and Mary Sisson of Portsmouth and 
Dartmouth. 

At a town meeting held in Portsmouth June 16, 
1651, "Richard Sisson is received inhabitant 
amongst us and hath given his ingagement. ' ? 
"Whence he came I know not. He was then about 
forty-three years old, which tends to the supposi- 
tion that he had been in New England some years 
before, since most of the early immigrants were 



286 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

between twenty and thirty years of age when they 
undertook the voyage across the ocean. In 1653 
"Goodman Sisson" was chosen Constable, an 
office in which he must have been efficient, since 
he was repeatedly re-elected. Otherwise, he does 
not seem to have been at all prominent in the 
town affairs. In 1658 he bought a part of Conani- 
cut and Dutch Islands, where perhaps he lived 
for two years when he sold them. Just when he 
came to Dartmouth I do not know. He was in 
Dartmouth in 1667 when he was chosen on the 
Grand Jury, and thereafter his name appears 
occasionally on the Dartmouth records, although 
he held no office. Eichard Sisson had a large 
farm on the west bank of the Coakset Eiver at 
the "Head." His house was probably near what 
is now the corner of the road leading southerly 
from the Head of Westport to South Westport, 
and the ' ' Rhode Island Way ' ' leading westerly be- 
tween Sandy Point and Stafford Pond to the 
Sakonnet River. The locality was known as 
" Sisson 's," and Richard Sisson, his son, kept a 
tavern in the old homestead, which was so used 
for nearly two centuries, John Avery Parker, a 
prominent merchant of New Bedford, at one time 
being its proprietor. Richard Sisson, the first, 
died in 1684 leaving an estate of £600, in which 
there was "1 negro servant £28, and 1 Indian ser- 
vant £10." In his will he leaves to his daughter 
Anne, the wife of Peleg Tripp, a tract of land 
near "Pogansett Pond and all those sheep he is 
keeping. ' ' 



JOHN TRIPP 287 

The daughter of Peleg Tripp and Anne Sisson, 
whose name was Mary, married Deliverance 
Smith, a son of old John Smith, and was a great 
great grandmother of Anne Almy Chase. 



Chapter VII 

ANTHONY SHAW 

Came over prior to 1653 

AND 

PETER TALLMAN 

Came over 1648 
Golden Dolphin 



Anthony Shaw — 1705 

(Alice Stonard) 

Israel Shaw 1660 — 1710+ 

( Tallman) 

Elizabeth Shaw 1706 — 

(Nathan Chase) 

Benjamin Chase 1747 — 

(Mary Almy) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Peter Tallman — 1708 

(Joan Briggs) 

Tallman 



(Israel Shaw) 

Elizabeth Shaw 1706 — 

(Nathan Chase) 

Benjamin Chase 1747 — 

(Mary Almy) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



ANTHONY SHAW AND PETER TALLMAN 



I have not succeeded in learning much about 
your forebear Anthony Shaw. I am not even cer- 
tain that he was a comeoverer since the date and 
place of his birth are unknown to me. He prob- 
ably came from Ovenden, Yorkshire. It is 
altogether probable, that he was a comeoverer, 
since he was married in 1653 in Boston to 
Alice Stonard, daughter of John Stonard. They 
were married by the Eev. Increase Nowell. 
John Stonard was in Roxbury prior to 1645, and 
died in 1649. His widow was named Margaret. 
Anthony Shaw continued to live in Boston for 
some years after his marriage and his son, Israel, 
from whom you descend, was probably born there 
in 1660. When he left Boston and came to Ports- 
mouth is not a matter of record, but he was ad- 
mitted as a freeman of Portsmouth in 1669. I 
find few records concerning him in Portsmouth, 
save as he served from time to time on the grand 
and petit juries. I find his name attached to the 
report of a Coroner's verdict, Giles Slocum and 
John Cook, two others of your ancestors, joining 
with him, which I quote as a specimen of anti- 
quated spelling: 

You being of this Corroners Inquest for our 
Soverryn Lord and Kinge you shall well and truly 



ANTHONY SHAW AND PETER TALLMAN 293 

make dillegent Inquirie how and in what manner a 
Indian hoo is found deead in the Towne of Portsmouth 
on Rodch Island came to his death and make A true 
Retiurn of your vardit thereon unto the Corrone, and 
this inqorement you make and give upon the penalty 
of perjury Aug. ye 16th 1684. . . . Upon Indian 
lad of Widow Fish he being found dead in ye woods 
of Portsmouth ye Juries verdict is wee find according 
to the best of our Judgments that he murdered him 
selfe being found upon the ground with a walnut 
pealling hanging over him upon A lim of A tree. 

Anthony Shaw bought his home in Portsmouth 
of Philip Tabor and paid "£40 and 300 good 
boards" for it. How he acquired the three hun- 
dred good boards is not evident. He may have 
been engaged in the lumber business. His name 
is mentioned in connection with several civil suits 
in which he was a party. In 1680 he was taxed 
9s. 6d. In 1688 he was fined 3s. 4d. for breaking 
the peace. He died August 21, 1705, and his in- 
ventory discloses that he was very well to do. 
He had of personal property £213 12s. 2d., includ- 
ing a "negro man £30." 

Israel Shaw, the son of Anthony Shaw and 
Alice Stonard, was born in 1660. He was alive in 
1710, and how long after that date he lived I 
know not. He lived in Little Compton. In 1689 
he married a daughter of Peter Tallman. They 
had a daughter, Elizabeth, born in 1706. I have 
found no record that clearly proves that this 
Elizabeth Shaw was the same Elizabeth Shaw who 
married Nathan Chase and was the grandmother 
of Anne Almy Chase. The date of her birth and 
the absence of a record of any other Elizabeth 
Shaw of a corresponding age would seem to indi- 



294 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

cate that she and none other was the bride of 
Nathan Chase. If so, yon descend from Peter 
Tallman. It has been stated, on what authority 
I know not, that Peter Tallman was Dutch and 
that he came over in 1648 in the ship Golden 
Dolphin to New York, bringing with him three 
negroes. His name first appears in Newport. He 
was made a freeman in 1655. He was in Ports- 
mouth in 1658 when several tracts of land were 
deeded to him. In 1660 a highway was laid out 
by land which "Peter Tallman bought of Daniel 
Wilcox." In 1661 he was on a coroner's jury 
which found that "he, the said Richard Eels, wos 
drounded by stres of wethar axeclentually. " In 
1661 it is stated that he was "Solicitor General" 
of the Colony. In 1662 he was a Commissioner 
for Portsmouth to the federated government of 
Portsmouth, Newport and Warwick. Afterwards 
he served as Deputy to the General Assembly on 
several occasions. In 1671 Ensign Lot Strange 
complained to the town that Peter Tallman would 
not do the fair thing about maintaining a division 
fence. The town sympathized with the Ensign 
and advised him to sue Peter. In 1673 Peter was 
"behind in rates." He claimed an offset against 
the town which was allowed in settlement. In 
1674 he was "presented" and imprisoned for 
taking a deed of land from an Indian, and on 
surrender of the deed was released. In 1675 he 
was indicted for failure to maintain the fence 
that Ensign Strange had complained about. In 
this same year he brought suit against Rebecca 
Sadler, wife of Thomas, for breach of the peace 



ANTHONY SHAW AND PETER TALLMAN 295 

and threatening his family. Thereafter there are 
records of his serving on juries and in other 
capacities until about 1683 when he seems to have 
ceased to live an active life. He lived, however, 
until 1708. 

Peter Tallman's married career was varied. 
From his first wife, Ann, he was granted a divorce 
by the General Assembly. In 1665 he married 
Joan Briggs of Taunton. The antenuptial agree- 
ment between Peter and Joan and the deeds by 
which it was confirmed are set forth in full in the 
Portsmouth town records. The documents are 
elaborately and excellently written, and indicate 
a very liberal settlement on the bride. She bore 
him several children, of whom your ancestress is 
listed as the twelfth, and there were still others. 
Joan died in 1685 and in 1686 Peter married for 
the third time one Esther. 

Elizabeth Shaw, the granddaughter of Anthony 
Shaw and Peter Tallman, who married Nathan 
Chase, was a grandmother of Anne Almy Chase. 



Chapter VIII 

PARDON TILLINGHAST 

Came over 1643 



Pardon Tillinghast 1622 — 1718 

(Lydia Tabor) 

Joseph Tillinghast 1677 — 1763 

(Freelove Stafford) 

Lydia Tillinghast 1700 — 1774 

(Job Almy) 

Job Almy 1730 — 1816 

(Ann Sloeum) 

Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Sloeum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



PARDON TILLINGHAST 



Pardon Tillinghast was born in 1622 at Severn 
Cliffs, Beechy Head, in the County of Sussex on 
the southeast coast of England. He was a free- 
holder and started life as a shop-keeper. "Non- 
conformist heart and soul, tradition has it that on 
the outbreak of the civil war he joined the army 
of Cromwell, in which case he may have taken 
part in the battles of Edgehill and Marston 
Moor." (From A Little Journey to the Home 
of Elder Pardon Tillinghast, by John A. and 
Frederick W. Tillinghast, 1908). Although he 
would seem to have been with the then prevailing 
party, yet that part of England where he dwelt 
was still loyal to the King and Pardon's out- 
spoken insurgency may have involved him in 
trouble. At all events, he left his home and came 
to New England in 1643, about the same time as 
did that other ancestor of yours, Tristram Coffin, 
and probably for a similar reason, although their 
situations as Roundhead and Royalist were 
reversed. 

Pardon Tillinghast settled in Providence, which 
had been founded some seven years before by 
Roger Williams. He was a "Quarter Shares 
Man." In the division of "Home Lots" made 
soon after his coming, he was allotted a plot of 



300 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

five acres on the "Towne Street" near what is 
now the corner of South Main and Transit 
Streets. "All of the Home Lot proprietors built 
their houses back from the Towne Street so as to 
give each house a strip of greensward around it. 
An orchard was generally built in the rear of the 
house on the west slope of the hill, and narrow 
lanes were laid out between the lots allowing 
passage for cattle going back on the hill for 
pasture ... At the rear of the houses, where 
Benefit Street now runs, each proprietor, inde- 
pendent to the last, laid out a separate graveyard 
for the use of his family and his descendants. 
Upon his home lot Pardon Tillinghast built his 
house which, like those of his neighbors, was small 
and built of rough woodwork that was wrought 
chiefly with an axe, and following the example of 
his neighbors he also located a graveyard in the 
rear of his lot. There he is now buried, together 
with about thirty of his descendants." 

Pardon Tillinghast is best known as a Baptist 
preacher, but he was also a man of many activities. 
His business ventures were considerable and 
formed the origin of the great mercantile wealth 
of his descendants. He built the first wharf in 
Providence, opposite his house lot, and carried on 
various commercial enterprises in which his sons 
later joined. He also was prominent in the 
political life of the town, being a member of the 
Town Council for nineteen years, Town Treasurer 
for four years, and a Representative from Provi- 
dence to the Colonial Assembly for six years. 



PARDON TILLINGHAST 301 

In 1681, Pardon Tillinghast became the minister 
of the First Baptist Church, being the sixth suc- 
cessor to Roger Williams, who founded the church 
in 1636. The church had no meeting-house for 
many years, and in 1670 Pardon Tillinghast built 
a church building on a lot owned by him ' ' between 
the Towne Street and salt water" — on the west 
side of what is now South Main Street. The 
consideration stated in the deed is "Christian 
love, good will and affection which I bear to the 
Church of Christ in Providence, the which I am in 
fellowship with and have the care of as being the 
Elder of said Church." The following memo- 
randum is appended to the deed: 

Memo. — before the ensealing hereof I do declare 
that whereas it is above mentioned, to wit, to the 
church and their successors in the same faith and 
order, I do intend by the words "same faith and order" 
such as do truly believe and practice the six principles 
of the doctrine of Christ mentioned Heb. — 6 — 2, such 
as after their manifestation of repentance and faith are 
baptized in water and have hands laid on them. 

A sermon by Pardon Tillinghast preached in 
1689, doubtless in this church, where he probably 
continued to act as minister until his death in 
1718, has been preserved. The sermon was 
printed in a pamphlet entitled "Water Baptism 
Plainly proved by Scripture to be a Gospel Pre- 
cept — By Pardon Tillinghast, a servant of Jesus 
Christ. Printed in the year 1689. " It is an ably 
written controversial document. It reminds one 
of a lawyer's brief with its citations from the 
Bible to prove its points. It is logical and in- 
tensely partisan. It was written in answer to a 



302 CERTAIN COMBOVERERS 

Quaker, whose name was Kent, who had asserted 
that it was the "Baptism of the Spirit" which the 
holy writ meant. Tillinghast demolishes this 
"spiritual" doctrine. He shows to his own com- 
plete satisfaction that it is water, (H 2 0), that was 
clearly prescribed. One can fancy what his in- 
dignation would have been with the later develop- 
ment of New England transcendentalism which 
spiritualized away all the material and historical 
stand-bys of religion. Listen for a moment to 
his indignant outburst: 

But those boasters of the spirit, being as clouds 
without water, carried about by the wind, make it their 
work as canker, as Hymeneus and Philetus did, to the 
fault of the gospel and ordinances of the Lord Jesus, 
wresting the Scriptures as Peter by the spirit did fore- 
tell their own destruction. . . . Although he (the 
Quaker) grant there may be such a state of childhood 
as may use such things for a time as outward ordi- 
nances, and wait thereon for the inward and spiritual 
appearance of Christ's kingdom, yet their ministry and 
dispensation are above it, and are born monsters, and 
not babes to be fed with milk, as the Saints heretofore ; 
the least of these babes despising outward ordinances 
— pretending to inward revelations. 

By his will, dated December 15, 1715, Pardon 
Tillinghast bequeaths "my life and spirit unto the 
hands of the Fountain of Life and Father of 
Spirits from whom I have received it." He died 
January 29, 1718, aged ninety-six years. He had 

been twice married, first to Butterworth, 

by whom he had three children, and second to 
Lydia, daughter of Philip Tabor and Lydia 
(Masters), by whom he had nine children, of 
whom the fourth was Joseph, born August 11, 



PARDON TILLINGHAST 303 

1677, from whom you descend. Joseph was a suc- 
cessful merchant living in Providence and associ- 
ated with his brothers in Newport, where also he 
lived during part of his life. It was his daughter 
Lydia, named after Grandmother Tabor, who 
married Job Almy, a great grandfather of Anne 
Almv Chase. 



Chapteb IX 

PHILIP TABOR 

Came over prior to 1633 



Philip Tabor 
(Lydia Masters) 



1605 — 1672+ 



Lydia Tabor 
(Pardon Tillinghast) 



— 1718+ 



Joseph Tillinghast 
(Freelove Stafford) 



1677 — 1763 



Lydia Tillinghast 
(Job Almy) 



1700 — 1774 



Job Almy 
(Ann Slocum) 



1730 — 1816 



Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 



Anne Almy Chase 
(Williams Slocum) 



1775 — 1864 



Mary Ann Slocum 
(Henry H. Crapo) 



1805 — 1875 



William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 



1830 — 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 



PHILIP TABOR 



Philip Tabor may be designated as your 
" migratory comeoverer." Most of your come- 
overers, after a brief period of vacillation "sat 
down ' ' and stayed put. It was not so with Philip 
Tabor. Whence he came I know not. He was 
probably born in England about 1605. He may 
have come over with Winthrop in 1630, and settled 
first at Boston. His was evidently a nature which 
could permit no "pent up Utica" to contract his 
powers, even if he did not go to the extreme of 
making the ' ' whole boundless continent his. ' ' Yet 
his was not a "vaulting ambition which o'erleaps 
itself," since he appears to have always landed 
on his feet. Wherever he went he at once became 
a "person of mark." Surely there must have 
been something about his personality which im- 
pressed itself with an exceptional force on the 
various communities in which he sojourned. 
There can be no doubt of Philip Tabor's vitality. 
I confess that in trying to vitalize for you many 
of your ancestors, I have been constrained to 
"back to its mansion call the fleeting breath," 
having, in truth, nothing to call but "the shadow 
of a shade." In the case of Philip Tabor, how- 
ever, there is nothing shady about him except his 
conduct. So far as his personality is concerned, 



308 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

it is singularly distinct. He was in no sense an 
important individual in the early history of New 
England, and yet he succeeded in projecting his 
personality rather more vividly than most of your 
ancestors. 

Philip Tabor was admitted a freeman of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony October 19, 1630. On 
May 14, 1634, he was admitted a freeman of 
Watertown. He was a carpenter and builder, and 
must have come to New England with some capital 
as well as skill in his trade. He was one of the 
original contributors to a floating fort to protect 
Boston in 1633-4. ''Upon consideration of the 
usefulness of a moving fort to be built forty feet 
long and twenty-one wide, for defense of this 
colony, and upon the free offer of some gentlemen 
lately come over to us of some large sums of 
money to be employed that way ' ' the Court asked 
for further subscriptions. The record shows that 
Philip Tabor was among the gentlemen who had 
already subscribed by offering to give two hun- 
dred four inch planks, a substantial and useful 
donation. 

In Watertown he was the proprietor of five lots 
which he sold to John Wolcot. Here he married 
Lydia, the daughter of John Masters, with whom 
very probably he was associated in construction 
work. What caused him to remove to Yarmouth 
we cannot know. It is quite likely that there was 
an opportunity there for him as a builder. He 
was propounded as a freeman of Plymouth Colony 
January 7, 1638-9, and was admitted June 4, 1639. 
That he should have served the same year as a 



PHILIP TABOR 309 

Deputy for Yarmouth to the first General Court 
at Plymouth is a striking example of his force - 
fulness in impressing others with his ability. In 
March, 1639, he was one of a committee to make 
division of the planting lands at Yarmouth. In 
1640, he again represented Yarmouth at the Gen- 
eral Court. On October 4, 1640, as appears by 
the church records of Barnstable, the Rev. Mr. 
Lothrop baptized "John, son of Phillipp Tabor 
dwelling at Yarmouth, a member of the church at 
Watertown. ' ' 

Philip Tabor remained in Yarmouth a few 
years only and then removed to Great Harbor, 
later known as Edgartown, on the island of 
Martha's Vineyard. Thomas Mayhew of Water- 
town had bought this island in 1641, and in 1642 
"divers families including some of Watertown" 
made the first settlement. It is quite probable 
that Philip Tabor and his wife knew some of 
these people as former neighbors in Watertown, 
and it is evident that the newly started settlement 
was in need of a builder. Just when Philip Tabor 
first came to the Vineyard is uncertain. He was 
living there before 1647, when he sold to John 
Bland his interest in a tract of land "lying 
against Mr. Bland's house at Mattakeekset. " 
Philip Tabor, himself, lived at Pease 's Point. He 
was evidently one of the "proprietors" of the 
island, as he shared in all the divisions of lands 
as long as he was a resident of the island. That 
he was somewhat closely associated with Thomas 
Mayhew is evidenced by his witnessing a docu- 
ment relating to Mr. Mayhew 's ward, Thomas 
Paine, in 1647. 



310 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

It is evident that he left the island occasionally 
to undertake some new work of construction on 
the continent. In 1651 he was in New London 
working with his brother in law, Nathaniel Mas- 
ters, on the Mill Dam. It is, indeed, possible that 
after leaving Yarmouth and before going to the 
Vineyard, he was in New London in 1642, or soon 
after. It was then that the settlement was made 
by the followers of the Rev. Mr. Blynman, from 
Gloucester. Philip Tabor is named as one of the 
early settlers, and seems to have had property 
there. Very likely he assisted in building the 
habitations of the original settlers. His wife's 
sister, Elizabeth, the wife of Carey Latham, was 
an early resident of New London. After leaving 
the Vineyard, he still had some interests in New 
London and in Connecticut, and several of his 
descendants were afterwards there settled. 

In 1653, Philip Tabor was back on the island, 
when with Thomas Mayhew he was chosen one of 
the four who acted as town 's committee, or Select- 
men. In May, 1653, Thomas Mayhew, Thomas 
Burchard, and Philip Tabor were chosen "to 
divide to the inhabitants out of all the Necks so 
much land as they in the best judgment shall see 
meet." To Philip Tabor, himself, was set off 
"The neck called Ashakomaksett from the bridge 
that is at the East side of the head of the swamp." 
The modern name of this locality is Mahachet. 
Philip Tabor, in the same year, shared in the 
division of the planting lands. During this and 
the next year or two he made several conveyances 
of land. 



PHILIP TABOR 311 

A year or two after, Philip Tabor was guilty 
of certain indiscretions, which made it desirable 
for him to remove from the island. He went to 
Portsmouth. Under date of January 3, 1655, the 
town records of Portsmouth say " Philip Tabor 
is received an inhabitant and taken his ingage- 
raent to the State of England and government of 
this place and hath equal right of commonage 
with the rest of the inhabitants of this towne. " 
It was probably after his final departure from 
Edgartown that the following entry was made in 
that town's records: "May 15, 1655. Itt is 
agreed by ye 5 men yt Philip Tabor is proved to 
be a man that hath been an attempter of women 's 
chastities in a high degree. This is proved by 
Mary Butler and Mary Foulger, as divers more 
remote testimonies by others, and words testified 
from his own mouth with an horrible abuse of 
scripture to accomplish his wicked end." In 
August of the same year, Philip Tabor conveyed 
his house and lot at Mahachet to Thomas Lawton, 
a son in law of Peter Tallman, another ancestor 
of yours, and thereafter he had no further his- 
tory on the Vineyard. 

Evidently the story of Philip Tabor's indis- 
cretions on the Vineyard in no way prevented 
him from taking a leading part in the affairs of 
his new place of residence. In 1656 he acted on 
the jury at the Court at Newport. In 1660, 1661, 
and 1663, he represented Portsmouth as a com- 
missioner to the General Court of the Union of 
the Rhode Island Colonies, in the latter year being 
on a committee to devise means of raising money 



312 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

to pay Mr. John Clarke for his services as the 
agent of the Colonies in England. During his 
residence of about ten years in Portsmouth, he 
constantly served the town as Rater, Tax Col- 
lector, Constable, etc. In 1664 he described him- 
self as "of Newport." In 1665 he sold his house 
in Portsmouth, which was on the Newport road, 
to Anthony Shaw, another of your comeoverers, 
for £40 and three hundred good boards. In 1667 
he was living in Providence, where he witnessed 
certain deeds of real estate to his son in law, 
Pardon Tillinghast, who had married his daughter 
Lydia, April 16, 1664. 

It is evident that Philip Tabor had a position 
of some distinction in Providence. His daughter's 
marriage to the leading minister and wealthiest 
merchant of the town would have accomplished 
that. In a deposition made in June, 1669, in which 
he says that he is sixty-four years old, he describes 
the events connected with the drowning of a young 
boy, "the widow Ballou's lad," and tells how he 
"went down to the river which runneth by his 
house." Where this house was I have not dis- 
covered. In 1671, "at his Majestie's Court of 
Justices sitting at Newport for the Colony of 
Rhode Island and Providence Plantations ' ' Philip 
Tabor and Roger Williams gave evidence against 
one William Harris for "speaking and writing 
against his Majestie's gracious Charter to his 
Colony," which treasonable conduct was evidently 
regarded very seriously by the Court. 

There is no further record of Philip Tabor. He 
probably died in Providence soon after 1672. At 



PHILIP TABOR 313 

what date his wife, Lydia Masters, died does not 
appear, but he evidently married a second time 
one Jane, who joined in the deposition above 
referred to. His son Philip came to Dartmouth 
and married Mary Cooke, the daughter of John 
Cooke, and was the ancestor of the numerous 
Taber families of Dartmouth. The Tabers set- 
tled on the west branch of the Coakset River and 
there built a mill, the locality being then known 
as Taber 's Mills, and now known as Adamsville. 
It was probably a grandson, Philip, who was a 
well known Baptist minister of Coakset. He lived 
at the south end of Sawdy Pond in Tiverton and 
had many descendants. It is possible that the 
first Philip may have spent his last days in Tiver- 
ton, as there seems to be some tradition to that 
effect. 

John Masters, the father of Philip Tabor's wife 
Lydia, and your ancestor, undoubtedly came over 
with Winthrop in 1630. Winthrop writes under 
date of January 27, 1631: "The governor and 
some company with him went up by Charles River 
about eight miles above Watertown, and named 
the fish brook on the north side of the river . . . 
Beaver Brook because the beavers had shorn 
down divers great trees there and made divers 
dams across the brook. Thence they went to a 
great rock, upon which stood a high stone, cleft 
in sunder, that four men might go through, which 
they called Adam's Chair, because the youngest 
of their company was Adam Winthrop. Thence 
they came to another brook, greater than the 
former, which they called Masters ' Brook, because 



314 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the eldest of their company was one John 
Masters. ' ' This brook was later known as Stony 
Brook and now forms the boundary, in part, divid- 
ing Waltham and Weston. 

On May 18, 1631, John Masters was made a 
freeman of Watertown. In June of the same 
year he undertook the first engineering feat of its 
kind in the Colony. It was the original intention 
of the magistrates to locate the seat of govern- 
ment at Newtown, later called Cambridge, and 
with this in view, perhaps, it is recorded that: 
"Mr. John Maisters hath undertaken to make 
a passage from Charles River to the New Town, 
twelve foot broad and seven foot deep, for which 
the Court promiseth him satisfaction, according 
as the charges thereof shall amount unto." The 
cost was thirty pounds. 

In 1631 John Masters was one of those who pro- 
tested against the admission of unworthy mem- 
bers to the church at Watertown. In 1632 he and 
John Oldham were a committee from Watertown 
to advise with the Governor and assistants re- 
specting the raising of the public funds. In 1633 
John Masters removed to the New Town. At 
first it would seem that he lived on the highway 
to Windmill Hill. He had other properties. In 
1635 he owned a house and seven acres of land on 
the west side of Ash Street, near Brattle Street. 
In the same year he was licensed to keep an ordi- 
nary and discharged from his duty as innkeeper 
shortly before his death in 1639. He died in Cam- 
bridge December 2, 1639, and his wife, Jane, died 
on December 20 of the same year. In his will he 
provides for his daughter, Lydia Tabor. 



Chapter X 

STUKELEY WESTCOTE 

Came over prior to 1636 

AND 

THOMAS STAFFORD 

Came over prior to 1626 



Stukeley Westcote 

( ) 



1592 — 1677 



Mercy "Westcote 
(Samuel Stafford) 



—1700 



Freelove Stafford 
(Joseph Tillinghast) 



1711+ 



Lydia Tillinghast 
(Job Almy) 



1700 — 1774 



Job Almy 
(Ann Slocum) 



1730 — 1816 



Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 



Anne Almy Chase 
(Williams Slocum) 



1775 — 1864 



Mary Ann Slocum 
(Henry H. Crapo) 



1805 — 1875 



William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 



1830 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 



STUKELEY WESTCOTE 



The parentage of Stukeley Westcote is un- 
known. Doubtless he was in some way a descend- 
ant of a St. Ledger Westcot, who in 1300 married 
a daughter of the line of Stukeleys of Affeton. 
The combination of somewhat unusual names cer- 
tainly indicates this origin. He was born about 
1592, probably in County Devon. When about 
forty-four years of age he came to this country 
with his family, and was received as an inhabitant 
and freeman of Salem as early as 1636. A house 
lot of one acre near the harbor was granted to 
him in 1637. A short time only was he allowed 
to enjoy it. He was the warm friend and sup- 
porter of Eoger Williams, the minister, for a 
time, of the first church at Salem. ' ' Mr. Williams 
did lay his axe at the very root of the magistrati- 
cal powers in matters of the first table, which he 
drove on at such a rate so as many agitations 
were occasioned thereby that pulled ruin upon 
himself, friends, and his poor family. ' ' On March 
12, 1638, the General Court passed upon Stukeley 
Westcote the "great censure" for heresy and 
banished him with other adherents of Williams, 
from the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony. Westcote followed his leader, Roger 
Williams, to Providence, and was one of the 



318 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

twelve "loving friends and neighbors" whom 
Williams admitted as co-owners of the tracts of 
land which he had acquired from Canonicus. He 
was one of the signers of the remarkable agree- 
ment for civil government at Providence. In the 
division of the "Home Lots" at Providence, of 
which mention is made in the notes on Pardon 
Tillinghast, Westcote was given a lot extending 
from what is now North Main Street to Hope 
Street, half way between College Street and 
Waterman Street. For the next ten years and 
more his name is frequently found in the records 
of the sales of the undivided lands of Providence, 
and in connection with various real estate trans- 
actions. Stukeley Westcote was one of the found- 
ers in 1638 of the first Baptist Church in Provi- 
dence and remained faithful to the tenets of the 
church during his life, although he differed with 
many of the members of the church about infant 
baptism. 

In 1642 Samuel Gorton and some others, who 
had found difficulty in abiding in peace under 
several jurisdictions, purchased of the Sachem 
Miantonomi a tract of land called Shawomet "be- 
yond the limits of Providence where English 
charter or civilized claim could legally pursue 
them no longer." Here was started the settle- 
ment afterwards known as Old Warwick. The 
government of Massachusetts Bay Colony at- 
tempted to assert jurisdiction over the would-be 
independent settlement. In a sworn statement 
made in 1644, Stukeley Westcote, who, although 
not then as yet an inhabitant of Shawomet, 



STUKELEY WESTCOTE 319 

showed that he was familiar with the conditions 
of the settlement, and describes the depredations 
and outrages committed upon the settlers by the 
Massachusetts Bay authorities. Their homes, he 
says, were burned, their cattle killed, their fami- 
lies compelled to flee, and all of the able-bodied 
male settlers were arrested and taken by force 
to Boston as traitors in failing to acknowledge 
the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts government. 
The trial of these poor men, who had been 
dragged from their devastated homes to Boston, 
is one of the most outrageous examples of " in- 
spired Puritanism." They were originally pro- 
ceeded against as insurgents against the King's 
authority, yet it was not for disloyalty to civic 
allegiance, but for heterodoxy in religion that 
they were condemned and suffered. Governor 
Winthrop, whose diary has been to me a source 
of inexhaustible interest and admiration, gives a 
naive account of his own indefensible action as 
chief magistrate. The Magistrates thought the 
heretics should be put to death, but the Deputies 
of the people dissented, and the final judgment 
of the Court was "that they should be dispersed 
into seven several towns, and there kept to work 
for their living, and wear irons on one leg, and 
not depart the limits of the town, nor by word or 
writing maintain any of their blasphemous or 
wicked errors upon pain of death . . . and 
this censure to continue during the pleasure of 
the court. ... At the next court they were 
all sent away because we found they did corrupt 
some of our people especially the women by their 
heresies." 



320 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Four months later, under date of January 7, 
1643, Governor Winthrop writes: "The court 
finding that Gorton and his company did harm in 
the towns where they were confined and not know- 
ing what to do with them, at length agreed to set 
them at liberty, and gave them fourteen days to 
depart out of our jurisdiction in all parts, and 
no more to come into it under pain of death. 
This censure was thought too light and favorable, 
but we knew not how in justice we could inflict 
any punishment upon them, the sentence of the 
court being already passed." This banishment 
from the jurisdiction of Massachusetts meant, of 
course, in the theory of the Court, a banishment 
from their own homes in Warwick. Some of the 
exiles went to Portsmouth on Aquidneck, which 
had never submitted, although hard pressed, to 
Massachusetts rule, and some gradually collected 
their scattered families and found their way back 
to Warwick, which was soon afterward estab- 
lished an independent jurisdiction under charter 
from the Earl of Warwick, and subsequently 
joined in a federation with Portsmouth and New- 
port, and still later came under the jurisdiction 
of the general Rhode Island charter. 

It was five years after the persecutions of the 
original settlers of Warwick, in the spring of 
1648, that Stukeley Westcote, being then fifty-six 
years old, removed with his family from Provi- 
dence to Warwick, in the undivided lands of 
which he had acquired a considerable interest. 
From his first advent in this little community, 
until his death in 1677, Stukeley Westcote was 



STUKELEY WESTCOTE 321 

prominently identified with the history of the 
settlement. He was on many occasions chosen a 
Deputy to the Colonial Assembly and at least 
twice he served as one of the Governor's Council, 
as well as constantly serving the town in many 
capacities, among which may be mentioned that 
of innkeeper to entertain when the King's Com- 
missioners held Court at Warwick, which implies 
that he had a commodious dwelling. His house 
was about a mile and a half from the modern 
" Rocky Point." His name often appears on the 
town and Court records in ways which clearly 
show him to have been a man of activity and 
probity. 

King Philip's War brought disaster to the 
town. In March, 1676, the Indians sacked the 
settlement, burning every house in it but one. 
Stukeley Westcote's oldest son, Robert, was 
killed, and he, himself, then eighty-four years old, 
sought refuge with his daughter, Damaris Arnold, 
the wife of Caleb Arnold, a son of Governor Bene- 
dict Arnold, who lived in Portsmouth. There, in 
January, 1677, he died. "His remains, borne by 
his sons across the Bay to its western shore, near 
to which the last thirty years of his life had been 
passed, were laid at rest beside those of his wife, 
in the first public burial ground of Warwick ad- 
joining his home lot and former residence." (J. 
Russell Bullock, Life and Times of Stukeley West- 
cote, 1886). 

His will, written in 1676, was not executed, but 
was, with some changes, confirmed by the Town 
Council, resulting in subsequent litigation among 



322 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the heirs. In this will he mentions his daughter 
Mercy, who in 1660 had married Samuel Stafford. 

Samuel Stafford was the son of Thomas Staf- 
ford, who was born about 1605. He is thought 
to have come from Warwickshire. He was in 
Plymouth in 1626 and is said to have built there 
the first grist mill run by water power. In 163 S 
he was admitted an inhabitant of Newport. Sub- 
sequently he lived in Providence, where he erected 
a grist mill at the north end of the town near the 
mill bridge. In 1652 he removed to Old Warwick, 
settling at the head of Mill Cove, where he erected 
another grist mill. His homestead was on the 
north side of the mill stream. He died in 1677, 
and in his will names his wife as Elizabeth. His 
eldest son Samuel, born in 1636, possibly in Ply- 
mouth, succeeded to his father's business at War- 
wick as a mill wright, and took a prominent part 
in public affairs. He filled many town offices and 
was a Deputy from Warwick many times. He 
was elected an assistant of the Governor in 1674, 
but declined to serve. He died March 20, 1718, 
aged eighty-two. 

Freelove Stafford, the daughter of Samuel Staf- 
ford and Mercy Westcote, was the mother of 
Lydia Tillinghast, who married Job Almy and 
was a great grandmother of Anne Almy Chase. 



Chapter XI 

RICHARD KIRBY 

Came over prior to 1636 



RlCHARD KlRBY 

(Jane ) 



1686+ 



RUHAMAH KlRBY 

(John Smith) 



— 1707+ 



Deliverance Smith 
(Mary Tripp) 



— 1729 



Deborah Smith 
(Eliezer Slocum) 



1695 — 



Ann Slocum 
(Job Almy) 



1732 



Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 



Anne Almy Chase 
(Williams Slocum) 



1775 _ 1864 



Mary Ann Slocum 
(Henry H. Crapo) 



1805 — 1875 



William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 



1830 — 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 — 



RICHARD KIRBY 



Richard Kirby takes us away from Rhode 
Island back to Plymouth Colony. He is thought 
to have come from Warwickshire in England. He 
was an inhabitant of Lynn in New England as 
early as 1636. He was one of the company of 
Lynn men who went to Sandwich in 1637 and 
started the settlement there. He is named as an 
executor of a will made in Sandwich in March, 
1637. He appears first on the records of Sand- 
wich in 1638. He was granted land in 1641. In 
1651 he was " presented" (to the Court) for non- 
attendance at public worship. This was before 
the advent of Quakerism, and seems to indicate 
only some negligence on the part of Richard 
towards the established church, or, possibly, some 
"anabaptist" tendencies. As soon, however, as 
the Quaker influence reached Sandwich in 1656, 
Richard Kirby was at once involved in the schism. 
He suffered in the same way as did so conspicu- 
ously that other ancestor of yours, George Allen. 
The fines which Richard Kirby and his son were 
made to pay for religion's sake amounted to £57 
12s. — an excessive amount in view of their re- 
sources. Like so many other of your ancestors, 
Richard Kirby took advantage of the new Quaker 
settlement at Dartmouth to escape the rigor of 



326 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the law. In 1670 he purchased of Sarah Warren 
one-half of Thomas Morton's full share in the 
Dartmouth purchase, and afterwards acquired 
other interests in the Dartmouth lands. In 1683 
he purchased of Zachariah Jenkins of Plymouth, 
a tract of land on the Coakset River, lying on 
the westerly side of the road leading to Horse 
Neck, near Akin's Corner, and it was here that 
he dwelt. It is probable that he removed from 
Sandwich to Dartmouth soon after 1670. He evi- 
dently did not take any prominent part in the 
affairs of the town as his name seldom appears 
upon the records, except as having taken the oath 
of fidelity in 1684 and again in 1686. He died 
some time after May, 1686, and before July, 1688. 
It was from his daughter Ruhamah, who mar- 
ried John Smith, that you descend through their 
son, Deliverance, who was a great great grand- 
father of Anne Almy Chase. Of Deliverance 
Smith you have already had tidings in the notes 
on the ancestors of Phebe Howland. 



Chapter XII 
ANNE ALMY CHASE 



ANNE ALMY CHASE 



Of your great great grandmother, Anne Almy 
Chase Slocum, I can give you little definite in- 
formation. I have been told that I visited her on 
several occasions at the Barney's Joy house, but 
my personal recollection of these visits is ex- 
tremely vague, since I was only a few months 
more than two years of age when she died. I 
have, however, heard many pleasant things 
about her from her granddaughters, your grand- 
father's sisters, who used to visit her when they 
were girls. In the notice of her death in some 
record which was cherished by her grandchildren 
she is designated as "the amiable Anne Chase 
Slocum. ' ' She is said to have been beautiful and 
to have transmitted the distinctive form of alert 
gracefulness which distinguished her daughter, 
your great grandmother Crapo, and several of 
her granddaughters, your great aunts. She was 
very fond of your grandfather, William W. 
Crapo, and used to coddle him when she lived 
with his parents in New Bedford during several 
winters. 

She was always loyal to her own family, and 
throughout her life kept in close touch with her 
Chase and Almy relatives, many of whom lived 
in Tiverton, Portsmouth, and Newport. Your 



330 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

grandfather and his sisters often visited their 
Rhode Island cousins. Her sister, Deborah Chase, 
married her cousin, Abner Chase, and they lived 
in Portsmouth. "Aunt Deborah" and "Uncle 
Abner" were important members of the family. 
Another sister, Content Chase, who never mar- 
ried, was a useful "maiden aunt." On the way 
down to "Uncle Abner 's" the children always 
stopped with "Cousin William Almy," who lived 
in Portsmouth in the fine old house at the end of 
the Stone Bridge. There were several intermar- 
riages between Chases and Almys and the family 
connection was a large one. This loyalty to all 
her kin and the various ramifications of cousins 
distinguishes her from the three other of your 
grandfather's grandparents. I have never heard 
of any especial or sustained interest or intimacy 
between Jesse Crapo, Phebe Howland, or Wil- 
liams Slocum and their relatives. With Anne 
Almy Chase it was quite otherwise. I have in 
my possession her writing box of black enamel 
with her name in large letters painted in yellow 
on the under side of the lid. I fancy the box has 
held many letters and papers in its day which, 
were they now at my disposal, would enable me 
to give you a more complete picture of your great 
great grandmother Slocum, and her immediate 
family and relatives. From the little which I 
have been able to learn about her, she has im- 
pressed me as a singularly sweet and lovable per- 
sonality. 



PAET IV 
ANCESTORS 

OF 

WILLIAMS SLOCUM 



Chapter I 

GILES SLOCUM 

Came over prior to 1638 



Giles Slocum — 1682 

(Joan ) 

Peleg Slocum 1654 — 1733 

(Mary Holder) 

Peleg Slocum 1692 — 1728 

(Rebecca Bennett) 

Peleg Slocum 1727 — 1810 

(Elizabeth Brown) 

Williams Slocum 1761 — 1834 

(Anne Almy Chase) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



GILES SLOCUM 



Anthony Slocum was one of the forty-six origi- 
nal purchasers from Massasoit of Cohannet, later 
called Taunton, in 1637. In 1643 he was listed as 
"able to beare arms." In 1654 and again in 1662 
he was Surveyor of Highways. In 1657 he was 
admitted as a freeman of the Colony. In 1659 he 
was of the grand jury, and in the same year land 
in Taunton was set off to him. In 1662 he dis- 
posed of his holdings to Richard Williams and 
his name does not thereafter appear on the 
records of Taunton. Iron ore had been discovered 
in Taunton at an early date, and in 1652 a com- 
pany was formed to mine and smelt it at "Two 
Mile River." Henry Leonard was the leader in 
the enterprise and Anthony Slocum had an in- 
terest in the company. In 1660 a new company 
was formed, of which Anthony Slocum appears 
to have been a third owner. It is a matter of 
tradition that Anthony Slocum was associated 
with Ralph Russell in establishing the iron forge 
at Russell's Mills and that he lived in Dartmouth 
and was the father of Giles Slocum. This tradi- 
tion, which has been accepted by historians, may 
not be dismissed lightly. There is, however, no 
recorded evidence that Anthony Slocum ever 
lived in Dartmouth. There is, moreover, no satis- 



336 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

factory evidence that Giles Slocum, who was liv- 
ing in Portsmouth, Ehode Island, in 1638, and 
there died in 1682, and from whom you are de- 
scended, was the son of Anthony Slocum of Taun 
ton. 

In 1670, at all events, Anthony Slocum was in 
Albemarle County, North Carolina, where he 
petitioned the Court, presided over by the Hon- 
orable Peter Carteret, Esquire, Governor and 
Commander in Chief, for the return of his hat 
which he had lost, perhaps, on the voyage from 
New England to his new home. It was ordered 
on September 27, 1670, by the Court that "he have 
his hatt delivered by yd fisherman at Eoanok, he 
paying the fee. ' ' In 1679 he appears as Anthony 
Slocum, "Esquire," a member of the "Palatine 
Court" for the County of Albemarle, North Caro- 
lina. In 1680 "Anthony Slocumb, Esqr. one of ye 
Ld s Prop rs Deputies aged ninety years or there- 
abouts" made a deposition in regard to some 
"rotten tobacco," signing the instrument by "his 
X mark." His name appears several times in 
1680, 1682, 1683, and 1684 as a member of the 
Court. In several instances he is designated as 
the ' ' Honorable Anthony Slocum Esqr. ' ' In May, 
1684, he received a patent to six hundred acres of 
land "on the north side of Mattacomack Creek by 
the mouth of a swamp called by ye name of Miry 
Swamp. ' ' 

His will, dated November 26, 1688, was pro- 
bated in January, 1689, making him almost a cen- 
tenarian. In this document he describes himself 
as a "gentleman." This will proves beyond ques- 



GILES SLOCUM 337 

tion that the Honorable Anthony of Albemarle 
County, North Carolina, was the Anthony Slo- 
cum who was Surveyor of Highways in Taunton, 
in 1662, since he provides for certain grandchil- 
dren by the name of Gilbert, about whom he had 
written to William Harvey in Taunton, his brother 
in law. In his will, signed "Anthony A. Slockum, 
his X mark," he provides for his sons John and 
Joseph and their families. The will is a rather 
lengthy document, reciting his family relations, 
and it is certainly strange, indeed, that if he had 
a son Giles living in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, 
he should not have even mentioned him. More- 
over, the dates relating to Anthony Slocuin and 
to Giles Slocum, although they do not prohibit 
the relation of father and son, make it unlikely. 
In this conclusion I differ from Charles Elihu 
Slocum, of Defiance, Ohio, the author of an elabo- 
rate and excellently prepared genealogical his- 
tory of the Slocums of America. He asserts that 
Giles Slocum of Portsmouth was a son of Anthony 
Slocum of Taunton. If, indeed, it is so, you may 
pride yourself on being descended from an "Hon- 
orable Esquire," a member of a "Palatine 
Court," who could not write his own name. 

There is, at all events, no question about your 
descent from Giles Slocum. He was born, it is 
thought, in Somersetshire, England, and came to 
America prior to 1638, at which date he was 
settled in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. In 1648 he 
was allotted thirty acres of land in Portsmouth. 
In the subsequent years he acquired more land 
by various recorded conveyances. His home- 



338 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

stead farm, which he purchased of William Bren- 
ton, prior to 1649, adjoined that of John Cook, 
his ' ' brother in law. ' ' Whether being a ' ' brother 
in law" means that Joan, Giles Slocum's wife, 
was a sister of John Cook, or whether both John 
and Giles married sisters is not clear. The home- 
stead farm was on the easterly side of the island, 
about half way between the present villages of 
Portsmouth and Middletown, nearly opposite Fog- 
land Point. It is a beautiful tract of land and is 
now known as the "Glen Farm," being one of 
the many estates on the island occupied by 
wealthy New Yorkers. In 1655 Giles Slocum was 
in the roll of freemen. In 1668 his "ear mark" 
was recorded as "a crope in the right eare and 
a hapenny under the same, one the same eare, 
with a slitt in the left eare and ahapeny under, 
of thirty years standinge. " He acquired con- 
siderable real estate in Ehode Island, and in New 
Jersey, and was evidently a man of some means. 
It was in 1659 that he purchased of Nathaniel 
Brewster and his brothers of Plymouth a one half 
share in the Dartmouth purchase "which was a 
gift from our dear mother Mistress SaraJi 
Brewster." Ralph Earle is named in the deed, 
which runs to Giles Slocum, as having paid the 
consideration of thirty-five pounds. He evidently 
acquired an additional quarter share in the Dart- 
mouth purchase, although I have not discovered 
the record of the conveyance. 

Giles Slocum and his wife Joan were early 
members of the Society of Friends. He died in 
1682. His will is a most interesting documenr, 



GILES SLOCUM 339 

probated March 12, 1682. He describes himself 
as " Gyles Slocuni, now of the towne of Ports- 
mouth in Road Island and ye Kings Providence 
Plantation of New England in America, sinner." 
In this will he gives to his son Peleg Slocum, 
your ancestor, "half a sheare of land lying and 
being in the towne of Dartmouth," and unto his 
son Eliezer, also your ancestor, one quarter of a 
share. He provides for all his eleven children 
and several grandchildren, and then gives "unto 
my loving friends the peple of God called Quakers 
foure pounds lawful moneys of New England." 

Peleg Slocum was the sixth child of Giles and 
Joan Slocum, born in Portsmouth August 17, 
1654. He took up his interest in the Dartmouth 
purchase on the neck of land at the confluence 
of the Pascamansett River with Buzzards Bay, 
which has since been known as Slocum 's Neck. 
His "mansion house" stood near the home of 
the late Paul Barker on Slocum 's Neck, and after 
its demolition was long known as the "old 
chimney place." Peleg Slocum, in 1684, is named 
as one of the proprietors of Dartmouth in a list 
by certain new comers, who complained that the 
said proprietors refused to permit an equitable 
division of the lands. In 1694 he, as well as his 
brother Eliezer, is named as one of the proprietors 
in the confirmatory deed of Governor Bradford. 
His share equalled sixteen hundred acres and he 
acquired other lands by purchase. When he died 
his homestead farm consisted of one thousand 
acres, and in addition he held a large interest in 
the still undivided lands, and several specific par- 



340 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

eels, and an interest in the islands of "Nashawina, 
Pennykest, and Cuttahunka. " He seems to have 
owned most of the latter island, which became 
known as Slocum's Island and for many genera- 
tions remained in the Slocum family. 

Peleg Slocum and his wife, Mary Holder, were 
zealous members of the Society of Friends. The 
monthly meetings were for a number of years, 
and until the completion of the meeting-house in 
1703, often held at Peleg Slocum's house. There, 
too, the women's meetings were held. At a 
"man's meeting" held at the house of John 
Lapham on the sixth day of the eleventh month, 
1698, Peleg Slocum, Jacob Mott, Abraham 
Tucker and John Tucker undertook "to build a 
meeting house for the people of God in scorn 
called Quakers (35 foot long 30 foot wide and 14 
foot stud) to worship and serve the true and liv- 
ing God in according as they are persuaded iu 
conscience they ought to do and for no other use, 
intent, or purpose." Then, in the record, follows 
the list of eleven subscribers giving in all £63. 
Much the largest individual subscription, £15, was 
given by Peleg Slocum, who also gave the six 
acres of land on which the meeting-house, called 
the Apponegansett meeting-house, was built, and 
where the burying ground was located. Peleg 
Slocum was one of the first approved ministers 
of the society. 

In John Richardson's Journal, under date of 
1701, is the following: "Peleg Slocum, an honest 
publick Friend, carried us in his sloop to Nan- 
tucket. We landed safe and saw a great many 



GILES SLOCUM 341 

people looking towards the sea for great fear had 
possessed them that our sloop was a French sloop, 
and they had intended to have alarmed the Island, 
it being a time of war. I told the good-like people 
that Peleg Slocum near Rhode Island was master 
of the sloop, and we came to visit them in the love 
of God, if they would be willing to let us have 
some meetings amongst them." Richardson 
describes the meeting at Mary Starbuck's house. 
He then says: "I remember Peleg Slocum said 
after this meeting that ' the like he was never at — 
for he thought the inhabitants of the island were 
shaken and most of the people convinced of the 
truth.' " Thomas Story, another of the shining 
lights among the early Quakers, was entertained 
several times at the home of Peleg Slocum. In 
his journal he writes : ''On the thirteenth day of 
the fifth month (1704) about the tenth hour of the 
morning I set sail for the island of Nantucket in 
a shallop belonging to our Friend Peleg Slocum, 
which under divine Providence, he himself chiefly 
conducted, and landed there the next morning 
about six." Peleg Slocum remained steadfast to 
his faith and in 1724 eighty of his sheep were 
seized because of his refusal to contribute toward 
building a Presbyterian church at Chilmark. He 
died in 1732-3 in the fifth year of his Majesty's 
Reign, George the Second. Like his father, he 
remembered the monthly meeting of Friends by a 
bequest of £10. 

Peleg Slocum married Mary Holder, of whom 
you will hear in connection with her father, 
Christopher Holder. Their son Peleg married 



342 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Rebecca Bennett, who was born in Newport about 
1698-9. She was the daughter of Jonathan 
Bennett and his wife Anna. Jonathan Bennett 
was born in Newport in 1659. He died July 11 
and was buried Aug. 13, 1708. His will, pro- 
bated in September, 1708, made his wife Anna 
executrix and left his real estate to his sons, John 
and Jonathan, and to his daughters, Rebecca and 
Anna, £50 each when they became of age. That 
he was well to do is indicated by his legacies of 
silver spoons, a silver tankard, cup and porringer 
and other articles. He mentions the goods in his 
shop, but does not indicate of what nature they 
were. The fact that the daughter Rebecca named 
in the will married Peleg Slocum is conclusively 
shown by a record in the probate files at Newport 
under date of 1724-5 as follows : t ' Peleg Slocum 
of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, filed a receipt for 
sixty pounds in full settlement of the claim his 
wife had against the estate of her late father, 
Jonathan Bennett." Jonathan Bennett was the 
son of Robert Bennett, the comeoverer, and his 
wife Rebecca. Robert was in Newport in 1639, 
when a homestead lot of ten acres was granted to 
him. He was a tailor by trade, and was in the 
employ of Governor Coddington. He was admitted 
a freeman in 1655. 

The discovery of the parentage of Rebecca, the 
wife of Peleg Slocum, the second, was the most 
pleasureable achievement which I experienced in 
my labors to identify your multitudinous grand- 
mothers. The Slocum Genealogy, an unusually 
good one, states that she was a Rebecca Williams. 



GILES SLOCUM 343 

Since her grandson, your great great grandfather, 
was named Williams Slocum, I was firmly con- 
vinced she was a Williams. Much time and effort 
were expended in the attempt to identify her as 
such. The descendants of Roger Williams of 
Providence and Richard Williams of Taunton, 
and of other original immigrants of the name of 
Williams were exhaustively investigated without 
result. I abandoned her as impossible when, 
because of the happy suggestion of a friend, I 
made certain inquiries which gave the hint that 
her maiden name was not Williams at all, but 
Bennett. Acting on this hint I was able to com- 
pletely identify her as Rebecca Bennett.* 

Peleg Slocum and Rebecca Bennett had four 
children. Two of them bore Slocum names, Giles 
and Peleg. It is from Peleg, the third of the 
name, who married Elizabeth Brown, that you de- 
scend. Two of the children bore Bennett names, 
Jonathan and Catherine. In 1729 Peleg Slocum 
died, and fifth month 5, 1733, his widow, Rebecca, 
married Edward Wing of Scorton Neck in Sand- 
wich. There were four children, also, by this mar- 
riage, and one of Rebecca's grandchildren was 
named Bennett Wing. Rebecca Bennett Slocum 
Wing died first month 22, 1781, in the eighty-third 
year of her age. Of her it was said that "she was 
remarkable for her quick apprehension, her clear 
and sound judgment, and the universal respect 
which she commanded." 

*See page 1009, Volume II. 



Chapter II 
ELIEZER SLOCUM 



Giles Slocum — 1682 

(Joan ) 

Eliezer Slocum 1664 — 1727 

(Elephel Fitzgerald) 

Eliezer Slocum 1693 — 1738 

(Deborah Smith) 

Ann Slocum 1732 — 

(Job Almy) 

Mary Almy 
(Benjamin Chase) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



ELIEZER SLOCUM 



Giles Slocum's youngest son was Eliezer. He 
was ten years younger than his brother Peleg, 
being born the twenty-fifth day of tenth month 
(December) 1664. As a boy Eliezer grew up in 
his father's home at Portsmouth. The older 
brothers and sisters had married and left the 
homestead. There came to the household a 
maiden ycleped Elephel Fitzgerald, the daughter, 
so the story goes, of The Fitzgerald, Earl of Kit- 
dare. It is a pretty story, so we may as well 
believe it. This story explains the presence of 
this blossom from so stately a tree in the rougli 
home of a Quaker pioneer of Rhode Island in the 
following fashion : Once upon a time, which since 
nobody can dispute us we might as well say was 
the year 1666, or thereabouts, an English army 
officer fell in love with a fair Geraldine. The 
Geraldines as a race had no love for the English, 
remembering how Lord Thomas, the son of the 
great Earl, known as "Silken Thomas," with his 
five uncles, on February 3, 1536, were hung at 
Tyburn as traitors of the deepest dye, because of 
their fierce resentment of the English domination 
of Erin. To be sure, Queen Elizabeth afterwards 
repealed the attainder and restored the title and 
family estates, but the Fitzgeralds, descendants 



348 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

of kings (like most Irishmen), never forgave. 

And so the Earl, for the time being acting the part 

of "heavy father," forbade the marriage. He 

probably stamped around the stage thumping his 

cane. They always do. Whereupon, quite in 

accord with the conventions of such tales, the 

young people eloped. They crossed the Atlantic 

to America, bringing with them a young sister of 

the bride, our Lady Elephel. 

Perhaps the Earl, in the manner of Lord Ullin, 

stood on the shore of the Emerald Isle, and ' ' sore 

dismayed through storm and shade his child he 

did discover" as she embarked to cross the raging 

ocean. 

"Come back! Come back!" he may have cried 
"Across the stormy water, 
And I'll forego my Irish pride 

My daughter! Oh! my daughter!" 

The Ullin girl only tried to cross a ferry with 
her Highland Chief, if you remember, yet of the 
noble father's piercing cries Tom Campbell says: 

'Twas vain. The loud waves lashed the shore, 

Return or aid preventing, 
The waters wild went o'er his child 

And he was left lamenting. 

Fortunately, our grandmother Elephel and her 
sister set forth in more favorable weather, and 
although she may possibly have left her noble sire 
lamenting, the waters of the Atlantic did not go 
"o'er her," and she made a safe landing on the 
other side. 

In what manner our little Irish lady was sepa- 
rated from her sister, and came to find a home in 



ELIEZER SLOCUM 349 

the simple household of Giles Slocum in Ports- 
mouth, the tradition sayeth not. " Irish maids" 
were not commonly employed in those early days, 
and even in later times "Irish maids" were sel- 
dom Earls ' daughters. None the less, it is prob- 
able that the Lady Elephel did in fact serve in a 
"domestic capacity" in the household of the old 
people whose daughters had married and gone 
away. 

That the youthful Eliezer should fall in love 
with the stranger maiden was, of course, a fore- 
gone conclusion. That the Quaker parents should 
be scandalized at the thought of an alliance so 
unequivocally "out of meeting," the little lady 
doubtless being a Romanist, was equally to be 
foreseen. The young people were sternly chided 
and forbidden to foregather. There are stories 
of this Portsmouth courtship, which have found 
their way down through more than two centuries, 
which hint at the incarceration of the maiden in 
the smoke-house, — not at the time, let us hope, 
in operation for the curing of hams or herrings, — 
and of the daring Quaker Romeo scaling the roof 
by night and prating down the chimney of love 
and plans to hoodwink the old folks. Possibly 
he did not say: 

She speaks ! 
Ah ! speak again, bright angel ! for thou art 
As glorious to this night, being o'er my head 
As is a winged messenger of Heaven 
Unto the white upturned wondering eyes 
Of mortals, that fall back to gaze on him, 
When he bestrides the lazy-paeing clouds, 
And sails upon the bosom of the air ! 



350 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Probably he did not use those precise words, yet 
doubtless he felt them in much the same way as 
did the inspired Montague. Indeed, such glowing 
panegyrics of the free vault of the heavens might 
have proved a bit irritating to the fair one im- 
prisoned in her sepulchral and ashy dungeon. 
And yet, if she did not say "Eliezer, Oh! where- 
fore art thou, Eliezer Slocum, the Quaker!" her 
sentiments were unquestionably identical with 
those of the fair Capulet. Eliezer appears to 
have inherited a more practical turn of mind than 
the love-sick Montague, since he crawled down 
the chimney and rescued the maiden. Just how 
he managed it is not explained. The door was 
manifestly locked. Perhaps he boosted her up 
the chimney. At all events these Portsmouth 
lovers succeeded in arranging matters far more 
satisfactorily than did their prototypes of Verona. 
And so they were married before they were 
twenty and came to Dartmouth and lived happily 
ever afterwards. 

The quarter share which Eliezer derived from 
old Giles he took up near his brother Peleg, 
farther down the Neck at a place called "Barne's 
Joy. ' ' He and Elephel were living there, it would 
seem, prior to 1684. In 1694 Eliezer and his 
brother Peleg are named as proprietors of Dart- 
mouth in the confirmatory deed of Governor Brad- 
ford. Eliezer 's share would have amounted to 
something like four hundred acres. The title to 
his homestead farm, however, was not confirmed 
to him until November 11, 1710, by the "com- 
mittee appoynted by her Majestie's Justices of ye 



ELIEZER SLOCUM 351 

Quarter Sessions," William Manchester, Samuel 
Hammond and Benjamin Crane. The farm in the 
layout is described as the farm on which "the 
said Eliezer is now living." It contained two 
hundred and sixty-nine acres. It is described as 
being "on ye west side of Paskamansett river on 
ye eastward side of Barnsess Joy." It seems 
that in addition to the rights Eliezer derived from 
his father he was entitled by purchase to sixty 
acres in the right of Edward Doty and nine acres 
in the right of William Bradford, old Plymouth 
worthies. 

In what year he built the mansion house I know 
not. It seems probable that it was built about 
1700. Subsequently, not long before Eliezer 's 
death in 1727, he built "a new addition," an ell 
to the west of the main structure. By what 
means Eliezer acquired so ample a store of 
worldly goods is not readily comprehended. It 
is evident, however, that among the very simple 
Friends of his acquaintance he was considered 
remarkably "well to do." His house was a 
"mansion." He doubtless had a few silver spoons, 
possibly a silver tankard, and he had cash. When 
he died in 1727 his estate was appraised at £5790, 
18s. lid., of which £665 was personal, and this is 
said to have been exclusive of the gifts he made 
to his children before his death. This is a large 
sum for those days. It may be that this appraisal 
was in "old tenor," a somewhat inflated currency 
in Massachusetts prior to 1737, yet, even so, it still 
indicates a marvellous accumulation of wealth for 
a "yeoman." I regret to say that one of the 



352 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

learned historians of the Old Dartmouth Histori- 
cal Society is inclined to believe that your honored 
ancestor, Pel eg Slocum, that conspicuously " hon- 
est public friend," was not only a farmer but a 
merchant ' ' on the wrong side of the law, ' ' in fact, 
a smuggler, and that his famous shallop was not 
always used for errands of "religious concern- 
ment," but in a very profitable contraband trade. 
His inventory certainly indicates that he was 
somewhat mysteriously a "trader." His brother 
Eliezer very likely may have joined in these mer- 
cantile enterprises. Indeed, there has always 
clung about the old farm at Barney's Joy a flavor 
of slaves and smuggling. 

The Lady Elephel, whose hard labor and frugal- 
ity had doubtless contributed to this store of 
wealth, comparing herself with her neighbors may 
have been justified in feeling that she was "well 
set up. ' ' Yet there was one crisis in her life when 
her plain home and country fare must have 
seemed humble indeed in her eyes. It was all a 
wonderful romance, the coming of that sister who 
took her from her father's castle and leaving her 
with Giles Slocum went away to New Amsterdam 
with her English husband, prospered and became 
a lady of high fashion and degree. So remark- 
able in the annals of Slocum 's Neck is the entry 
of this great lady in her coach and four, with 
postillions maybe, that unto this day the tale is 
told by the great great grandchildren of the 
Neckers. The progress of the coach through the 
sandy roads was probably sufficiently slow and 
majestic to permit of all the neighbors getting a 



ELIEZER SLOCUM 353 

glimpse of the great personage in her silks and 
flounces, with bepowdered hair, and, I fondly 
trust, patches upon her fair cheeks, and jewels 
in her ears. When the ponderous coach bumped 
down the narrow lane and drew up before the 
door of the Barney's Joy house the excitement of 
its inmates must have been intense. As the Lady 
Elephel in her severely demure garb welcomed 
her gorgeous sister to her simple home, and they 
"fell into each other's arms" (at least I hope they 
did), I wonder did their thoughts hie back to Kil- 
dare and their father's castle in the green island 
of their birth? The little granddaughter Ann, 
who afterwards married Job Almy and was the 
grandmother of Anne Almy Chase, your great 
great grandmother, may have stood entranced by 
the doorstep as the gloriously bedecked lady en- 
tered and was escorted to the i ' great low room. ' ' 
Perhaps it was she, this little Ann, who told the 
story to her granddaughter, who in turn told it 
to her daughter Mary Ann Slocum, your grand- 
father's mother. 

Eliezer Slocum died on the "eleventh day of 
the first month, called March, in the thirteenth 
year of His Majestie's King George His Reign 
1726/7." By his will he gave to his beloved wife 
Elephel, twenty pounds per annum and all his 
household goods and furniture, and "one mear 
wch now she commonly rides together with her 
furniture," also "two cows wch shall be kept at 
the proper cost and charge of my executors, ' ' also 
' ' an Indian girl named Dorcas, ' ' under indenture, 



354 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

and various other items. The will then provides 
as follows : 

Item. I give and bequeath to Elepliel, my beloved 
wife, the great low room in my dwelling house, with the 
two bedrooms belonging, together with the chamber 
over it and the bedrooms belonging thereto, and the 
garett, and also what part of the new addition she 
shall choose and one-half of the cellar during her 
natural life. I will that my executors procure and 
supply Elephel, my wife, with fire wood sufficient dur- 
ing her natural life and whatsoever provisions and corn 
shall be left after my decease I give to Elephel, my 
wife, for her support, and also hay for support of her 
cattle. 

He divides his farm into three parts, giving 
the northerly part of about one hundred acres to 
his son Eliezer, your ancestor, "where his dwell- 
ing house stands." This tract in more modern 
times has been known as the Henry Allen farm. 
It was there, doubtless, that the little Ann was 
born, and there was married to Job Almy. To 
his son Ebenezer he gave "that southerly part of 
my homestead farm on which my dwelling house 
now stands." This, of course, refers to the old 
house. The ' ' middle part, ' ' between the northerly 
and southerly parts, together with stock and 
money and gear he gave to both sons to be equally 
divided. Naturally Ebenezer took the southerly 
portion of this middle part. 

To a grandson, Benjamin Slocum, Eliezer gives 
£100 and a salt marsh and a fresh meadow. ' ' And 
whereas Maribah Slocum, the widow of my son 
Benjamin, being with child, if the same prove a 
male child, I then give and bequeath to the same 
male child (as yet not born) a tract of land lying 



ELIEZER SLOCUM 355 

near John Kerby's with a dwelling house and 
orchard thereon, and also a tract of land lying in 
Aarons Countrey, so called, and also one tract of 
land lying on the side and joining Coaksett River, 
and also two acres of meadow lying near Guinny 
Island, and also two acres of cedar swamp in 
Quanpoge Swamp, he the said male child paying 
unto his brother Benjamin £250. But if the child 
which is not yet born should prove a female child 
all the inheritance I have here given to it, being a 
male child, shall be given to Benjamin Slocum, 
the said Benjamin paying his sister £50 when she 
becomes eighteen years of age." He also gives 
£200 for "the bringing up" of these two grand- 
children. You may be interested to learn that 
""it" proved to be a male child. The father had 
died about six months before Eliezer's death. In 
his will he made a similar provision for his un- 
born child. The child was born May 22, 1727, and 
was named John. He married Martha Tilling- 
hast and was a highly respected and prosperous 
citizen of Newport, Rhode Island, leaving many 
descendants. 

The widow Elephel lived with her son Ebenezer 
in the homestead for twenty-one years after her 
husband's death, dying in 1748, and disposing by 
her will of a considerable estate. A year or two 
later Ebenezer, desiring to remove back to Ports- 
mouth, possibly that he might be nearer the 
"meetings," his wife Bathsheba (Hull) joining, 
conveyed his farm at Barney's Joy of two hun- 
dred and twenty acres to his cousin Peleg Slocum, 
the father of Williams Slocum, your great great 



356 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

grandfather. The date of the deed is March 20, 
1750. The consideration is two thousand pounds. 
This seems an amazing price to pay for a farm 
on Slocum's Neck. It is also much to be won- 
dered how Peleg Slocum, who was but twenty- 
three years of age, was able to put up the price. 
To be sure he was one of three sons of his father 
Peleg, who was one of four sons of his father 
Peleg, whose estate measured in acres of land 
was considerable, yet two thousand pounds was 
"a terrible sight of money" in those days. It is 
hardly likely, indeed, that the transaction was on 
a "cash basis." 

No doubt the farm at Barney's Joy was an 
immensely profitable one. The ground had been 
cleared and cultivated for nearly three-quarters 
of a century. The fish at the mouth of the Pasca- 
mansett were plentiful. They were caught in 
great quantities, landed at Deep Water Point, 
and placed thickly on the soil. It was a case of 
what is now called "intensified fertilization." 
The crops were doubtless many times as abundant 
as the cleverest Portuguese of today could raise. 
Then, too, the island of Cuttyhunk, at one time 
known as Slocum's Island, afforded good grazing 
for the cattle in the summer. The cattle were 
taken over in boats each spring, and in the 
autumn brought home and the increase sold. Yet 
admitting the advantages of this farm of two hun- 
dred acres, much of which after all was ledge, 
salt marsh, and sand, it is difficult to understand 
how Peleg Slocum had the courage to pay two 
thousand pounds for it in the year 1750. Its pres- 



ELIEZER SLOCUM 357 

ent value is predicated solely upon its exceptional 
beauty of location and its charming scenic variety. 
It has been a favorite place of sojourn of Robert 
Swain Gitford, the artist, who has pictured its 
autumn glories on many a canvas. It is not to be 
supposed, however, that Peleg Slocum purchased 
the farm for esthetic reasons. He proved, at all 
events, that he knew what he was about, for he 
prospered abundantly and lived for many years 
on the old place keeping up its traditions of 
opulence. 

Two years before Peleg purchased the Barney's 
Joy farm, when he was twenty-one, he married 
Elizabeth Brown, and they lived together in the 
old house forty-nine years, she dying in 1797. 
He lived thirteen years longer and died in 1810, 
aged eighty-three. They had seven children, of 
whom the fifth, Williams, born in 1761, was your 
great great grandfather. 

It was in the mansion house on this farm built 
by Eliezer Slocum for his bride, the Lady Elephel, 
that your grandfather, William Wallace Crapo, 
was born. He remembers the old house well and 
his grandfather's family who dwelt there. It was 
substantially the same without doubt at the time 
when he recalls it as it was when the marvellous 
coach drew up before it and the two noble Fitz- 
geralds were reunited. It was a picturesque and 
pleasing structure well set. A sheltered meadow 
sloped downward from its southern front to the 
salt pond and the winding inlets of the river. 
From the windows one looked out over the 
meadow to the white sands of Deep Water Point, 



358 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

and the long stretch of Allen 's Beach, and, beyond,, 
to the waters of Buzzards Bay as they merge with 
the ocean. The main portion of the house was of 
two stories with an ample garret above, the gables 
facing east and west. The front door, plain in 
design but with a certain dignity, was at what was 
the west end of the southern front of the original 
structure, but after the "new addition" in 1720 
it was about a third of the way along the long 
facade with two windows to the west and three 
to the east. The entrance hall was small, with a 
narrow winding stairway leading to the chambers 
above, the huge stack chimney behind taking up 
far more room than the hall. To the right as one 
entered was the ' ' great low room ' ' from which led 
two chambers. To the left was a good sized room 
which in your grandfather's time was used as a 
"parlor" by certain members of the family. 
Behind the "great low room" was a still larger 
room, the kitchen and living room, the most inter- 
esting of the apartments. The logs in the long 
fireplace were always burning, since here all the 
family cooking was done on the coals and by pots 
hung to the cranes, and in the brick oven by the 
side. Above the fireplace was a panel some six 
feet by four, hewn from a single board, which 
today is the only relic of the structure which has 
been preserved. On this panel your grandfather 
remembers the musket and the powder horns hung 
ready to be seized at alarm. On the west side of 
the room was a huge meal chest. In the north- 
west corner stood the old black oak high clock 
with Chinese lacquer panels, which now stands in 



ELIBZER SLOCUM 359 

your grandfather's house in New Bedford, and 
will, I trust, some day stand in yours. This clock 
was buried in the barn meadow with the silver and 
valuables packed in its ample case, when the Brit- 
ish man-of-war Nimrod was cruising along the 
shore in the War of 1812. In the northeast corner 
was an ample pantry closet, where your grand- 
father and his sisters found cookies. Near the 
fireplace was a trap door leading to the cellar, 
down which your great aunt Lucy fell on a mem- 
orable occasion when she was romping about the 
house. Off from the kitchen was a good-sized 
bedroom. Behind was the covered stoop with the 
cheese press. Behind this there were several low 
shed-like additions, which gave a feeling of con- 
siderable size to the whole structure. Above 
there were a number of chambers, in one of which 
your great grandfather, Henry Howland Crapo, 
and his bride, a daughter of the house, lived after 
their marriage. 

After the death of Williams Slocum, the house 
and part of the farm came into the possession of 
his son, George Slocum, who was far from carry- 
ing on the traditions of prosperity of his family, 
and the place quickly fell into decay. It was 
almost a ruin in 1887, when I visited it and made 
a little sketch, which you may see. In 1900 the 
house was torn down, and now only the cellar 
remains to mark the spot where Eliezer Slocum, 
the Quaker, and the Lady Elephel lived their lives 
of love and happiness two centuries ago. 



Chapter III 

RICHARD SCOTT 

Came over 1634 

Griffin 



Eichard Scott 
(Catherine Marbury) 



1607 — 1680 About 



Mary Scott 
(Christopher Holder) 



About 1640 — 1665 



Mary Holder 
(Peleg Slocum) 



1661 — 1737 



Peleg Slocum 
(Rebecca Bennett) 



1692 — 1728 



Peleg Slocum 
(Elizabeth Brown) 



1727 — 1810 



Williams Slocum 
(Anne Almy Chase) 



1761 — 1834 



Mary Ann Slocum 
(Henry H. Crapo) 



1805 — 1875 



William W. Crapo 
(Sarah Davis Tappan) 



1830 — 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 — 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 



RICHARD SCOTT 



Richard Scott and his wife, Catherine Marbury, 
are among the more interesting of your come- 
overers. Richard was the son of Edward and 
Sarah (Carter) Scott; and was born at Glensford, 
England, in 1607. Edward Scott was of the Scotts 
of Scott's Hall in Kent, who traced their lineage 
through John Baliol to the early Kings of Scot- 
land. I quote from an article by Stephen F. Peck- 
ham in the New England Historical and Genea- 
logical Register, which has furnished me with 
much of the information which I present to you 
about this comeoverer. 

Richard Scott, who is designated as a " shoe- 
maker, ' ' probably came over in the Griffin in 1634, 
the same ship in which came Anne Hutchinson 
and her sister, Catherine Marbury. It was, per- 
haps, on the voyage that Richard and Catherine 
became lovers. Governor Winthrop writes under 
date of November 24, 1634: "One Scott and 
Eliot of Ipswich was lost in their way homewards 
and wandered up and down six days and eat 
nothing. At length they were found by an Indian, 
being almost senseless for want of rest. ' ' Richard 
Scott had been admitted as a member of the Bos- 
ton Church in August, 1634. He was probably a 
resident of Boston during the early days of the 



364 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

tumultuous upheaval of that little town by his 
iconoclastic sister in law to be. Perhaps he was 
not altogether in sympathy with Anne Hutchin- 
son's goings on. At all events, it would seem that 
he removed about 1636 to Rhode Island at a place 
called Moshasuch, near what was later Providence, 
in the vicinity of what has since been called Scott's 
Pond in Lonsdale. This was before Roger 
Williams organized his settlement at Providence. 

The so-called "Providence Compact" was writ- 
ten by Richard Scott and his is the first signature 
to it. The other signatures are those of other 
neighbors at Moshasuch, most of whom subse- 
quently became Quakers and were not included 
among the original proprietors of the town of 
Providence under Roger Williams. It was after- 
wards that Roger Williams obtained a grant of 
the lands pre-empted by Richard Scott and his 
friends which caused an acrimonious feud between 
Williams and his "loving friends and neighbors" 
of Moshasuch. None the less Richard Scott was 
admitted to the Providence purchase and was 
allotted a home lot next north of Roger Williams, 
with whom, however, he did not always live in 
friendly neighborliness. In 1640 the differences 
between the so-called "loving friends and neigh- 
bors" were patched up by an agreement arrived 
at by arbitration, to which Richard Scott was a 
party, which was known as the ' ' Combination. ' ' 

In 1637 he returned to Boston and there married 
Catherine Marbury. Things were getting very 
hot for Catherine 's sister Anne and it may be that 
Richard felt that he should stand by his sister in 



RICHARD SCOTT 365 

law in her trouble. He was present at her mem- 
orable trial and on March 22, 1638, testified in 
part as follows : ' ' I desire to propound this one 
scruple, which keeps me that I cannot so freely in 
my spirit give way to excommunication, whether 
it was not better to give her a little time to con- 
sider of things that is devised against her, because 
she is not yet convinced of her lye, and so things 
is with her in distraction, and she can not 
recollect her thoughts." Immediately after the 
trial he returned to Rhode Island either volun- 
tarily or because he was banished from the Colony 
with all Anne Hutchinson's friends. In 1650 
Richard Scott was taxed in Providence £3 6s. 8d., 
a very large assessment, the largest assessment 
of £5 being levied on Benedict Arnold. About 
this time he gave up his town residence in Provi- 
dence and removed to his lands at Moshasuch. 
He had evidently acquired a liberal competency 
and his holdings of real estate were considerable. 
It was probably during Christopher Holder's 
first visit to Providence that Richard Scott and 
his wife were converted to Quakerism, in which 
faith they remained true through many disturb- 
ing experiences, as will be narrated in connection 
with the notes on Catherine Marbury. In 1655 
Richard Scott was made a freeman. In 1666 he 
was a Deputy for Providence to the General Assem- 
bly. From December, 1675, to August, 1676, he 
and his son Richard fought in King Philip 's War, 
he being described as a "Cornet." The son 
Richard was doubtless slain in battle. Another 
son, John, who also served, came home at the close 



366 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

of the war, but soon after was shot and killed by 
an Indian as he was standing on his own doorstep. 
I qnote the following from Mr. Peckham's arti- 
cle: "In 1672 George Fox visited New England 
and preached in Newport with great acceptance, 
which greatly disturbed Roger Williams. In 1676 
Williams published in Boston a book entitled 
' George Fox digg'd out of his Burrowes, ' which for 
scurrilous abuse has few equals, and which, when 
considered as the production of an apostle of lib- 
erty of conscience, is one of the most extraordi- 
nary books ever printed. In 1678 George Fox pub- 
lished in London 'A New England Fire-Brand 
Quenched, Being Something in Answer unto a 
Lying, Slanderous Book, Entitled George Fox 
Digged out of his Burrows,' " etc. George Fox 
had written to Richard Scott to know what 
manner of man Roger Williams was and Scott's 
reply is given in full by Fox. It is as follows : 

Friend, concerning the Conservation and Carriage of 
this Man Roger Williams I have been his Neighbor these 
38 years : I have only been Absent in the time of the 
Wars with the Indians, till this present. I walked with 
him in the Baptist Way about 3 or 4 months, but in that 
short time of his Standing I discerned that he must have 
the Ordering of all their affairs, or else there would be 
no Quiet Agreement amongst them. In which time he 
brake off from his Society. . . . That which took 
most with him, and was his Life, was, to get Honor 
amongst Men, especially amongst the Great Ones. For 
after his Society and he, in a Church-Way, were parted, 
he went to England and there he got a charter; and 
coming from Boston to Providence at Seaconk the 
Neighbors of Providence met him with fourteen Cannoes, 
and carried him to Providence. And the Man being 
hemmed in in the middle of the Cannoes, was so Elevated 



RICHARD SCOTT 367 

and Transported out of himself, that I was condemned 
in my self that amongst the Rest I had been an Instru- 
ment to set him up in his Pride and Folly. And he 
that beforce could reprove my Wife for asking her Two 
Sons, why they did not pull off their Hats to him. And 
told her She might as well bid them pull off their Shoos 
as their Hats. (Though afterward She took him in the 
same Act, and turned his reproof upon his own Head.) 
And he that could not put off his Cap at Prayer in his 
Worship, can now put it off to every Man or Boy that 

pulls off his hat to him One particular 

more I shall mention, which I find written in his Book 
concerning an Answer to John Throckmorton in this 
manner : To which saith he, I will not answer as George 
Fox answered Henry Wright's Paper with a scornful 
and Shameful Silence, — I am a Witness for George 
Fox, that I Received his Answer to it, and delivered it 
into Henry Wright's own hands. Yet R. W. has pub- 
lisht this Lie so that to his former Lie he hath added 
another scornful and shameful Lie .... 

(Signed) Richard Scott. 

Eichard Scott died late in 1680 or early in 1681. 
His oldest daughter Mary, born about 1640, mar- 
ried Christopher Holder, whose daughter, Mary 
Holder, married Peleg Slocum, a great grand- 
father of Williams Slocum. 



Chapter IV 

CATHERINE MARBURY 

Came over 1634 
Griffin 



Catherine Marbury 1617 — 1687 

(Richard Scott) 

Mary Scott About 1640 — 1665 

(Christopher Holder) 

Mary Holder 1661 — 1737 

(Peleg Slocum) 

Peleg Slocum 1692 — 1728 

(Rebecca Bennett) 

Peleg Slocum 1727 — 1810 

(Elizabeth Brown) 

Williams Slocum 1761 — 1834 

(Anne Almy Chase) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



CATHERINE MARBURY 



There are few of your ancestors whose lineage 
can be definitely traced in the Peerage of Eng- 
land. Catherine and Anne Marbury are such. 
They were children of the Rev. Francis and 
Bridget (Dryden) Marbury. Francis Marbury 
was born at Grisby in the parish of Burgh-upon- 
Bain, in the County of Lincoln, England. He was 
the son of William Marbury, Esq., and Agnes, 
daughter of John Lenton, Esq., of Old Wynkill. 
An elder brother, Edward, was knighted in 1603 
and served as High Sheriff of the County of 
Lincoln. In 1589 Francis Marbury married 
Bridget Dryden, the daughter of John Dryden, 
Esq., of Canons Ashby, Northampton, by his 
wife Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Cope. 

Francis Marbury was the great grandson of 
William Marbury and Anne Blount. Anne Blount 
was the sister and co-heir of Robert Blount of 
Grisby, and was a niece of Walter Blount, first 
Lord Mount joy, by his wife Agnes, a granddaugh- 
ter of Sir Thomas Hawley. Your ancestor, Sir 
Walter Blount, whose granddaughter Anne was 
the grandmother of Francis Marbury, is an an- 
cestor worth knowing about. In 1367 he went 
with the Black Prince and John of Gaunt into 
Spain. There he married Donna Sancha de 



372 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Ayola, daughter of Diego Gomez de Toledo — so 
you see you descend also from the Grandees of 
Spain. There is much that is recorded in history 
about this ancestor of yours which I might tell 
you, but I prefer to present him through Mr. 
William Shakespeare. In the first scene of the 
first act of Henry IV he is introduced by the King 
as follows: 

Here is a dear and true industrious friend, 
Sir Walter Blount, new lighted from his horse, 
Stain 'd with the variation of each soil 
Betwixt that Holmedon and this seat of ours ; 
And he hath brought us smooth and welcome news ; 
The Earl of Douglas is discomfited : 
Ten thousand bold Scots, two and twenty knights, 
Bath'd in their own blood, did Sir Walter see 
On Holmedon 's plains. 

Throughout the play Sir Walter appears as an 
honorable and trusted friend of the King. Yet 
what to me distinguishes him more than his 
loyalty to the King is his acquaintance with Fal- 
staff. It doesn't in the least matter to us now 
that Falstaff was a creature of imagination and 
Blount a creature of fact. Sir John Falstaff is 
just as real a person to you and me to-day as Sir 
Walter Blount. And although Shakespeare 
created the one and God the other, Shakespeare's 
creation is much the more important from our 
present point of view. If not so picturesque as 
Sir John, none the less, your forebear Sir Walter, 
as portrayed both in history and fiction, was typi- 
cal of the sturdy honesty of purpose which has 
distinguished the aristocracy of England as its 
highest exemplars of manhood. He was killed in 



CATHERINE MARBURY 373 

the battle of Shrewsbury in 1403, being mistaken 
for his King. 

The family of Catherine Marbury's mother, 
Bridget Dryden, is even more interesting. She 
was the sister of Sir Erasmus Dryden and conse- 
quently a great aunt of the poet, John Dryden. 
She was born and lived in her grandfather Sir 
John Cope's place of Canons Ashby. It is a fine 
old Elizabethan manor house still standing. 
Through her grandfather Sir John Cope you are 
connected by direct descent with many noble 
families of England. His great grandfather, Sir 
William Cope, was one of the most powerful 
rulers of the destinies of England in the reign of 
Henry VII. His mother, Jane Spencer, a grand- 
daughter of Sir Richard Empson, chief justice in 
Henry VII 's reign, descended through many noble 
alliances from Robert de Despenser, who "came 
over" to England with William the Conqueror in 
1066. The poet Spencer lived with his cousins at 
Canons Ashby, and it was there his love for 
some damsel by the unpoetic name of Cope in- 
spired his lyrics. 

Bridget Dryden 's grandmother was Bridget 
Raleigh, the daughter of Edward Raleigh, the 
son of Sir Edward Raleigh, Lord of Farnborough, 
and Margaret, the daughter of Sir Ralph Verney. 
To be even collaterally related to Sir Walter 
Raleigh is perhaps a more satisfactory distinc- 
tion than to trace one's descent through Sir 
Edward Raleigh's mother, Lady Jane de Grey, 
whose lineage makes you, to ignore your royal 
ancestors of England, a descendant of Clotaire I, 



374 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

King of the Soissuns in 511 and of Pharaman, first 
Christian King of the West Franks in Gaul. This 
you must admit is going some. Indeed, were it 
worth while, which certainly it isn't, I might, 
doubtless, by sufficient study, connect you by kin- 
ship through Catherine and Anne Marbury with 
half the noble families of England, and a few 
royal families to boot. As a matter of fact, the 
chances are that should sufficient study be de- 
voted to the lineage of certain other of your come- 
overing ancestors a like result would be obtained. 
When one gets so far back among the multitude 
of your English grandfathers and grandmothers 
there are bound to be some few among the count- 
less many who were of noble standing. You, like 
most of the descendants of the early New Eng- 
land immigrants, descend from a vast number of 
the common people of old England, and likewise 
from some few who in one way or another de- 
scended from the gentle folks. I haven't a doubt 
that you have the blood of earls and dukes and 
princes and kings in your veins. No more have I 
a doubt that you have also the blood of a multi- 
tude of country bumpkins, a goodly number of 
poachers, a respectable number of highwaymen, 
and a few thieves and murderers. Many good 
commonplace men and women, a few exceptionally 
fine men and women, a few distinctly degenerate 
men and women, a few nobles and a few of the 
scum of the earth, are doubtless responsible for 
your existence. You are necessarily an average 
product of humanity. That the better tendencies 
of human development have happened to com- 



CATHERINE MARBURY 375 

bine in your immediate ancestry is your good for- 
tune and not your birthright. 

The Rev. Francis Marbury and his wife, 
Bridget Dryden, had a large family of children — 
twenty in fact. Francis was the rector of the 
parish of Alford in Lincolnshire. Here, also, 
lived the Hutchinsons. William Hutchinson mar- 
ried Anne Marbury, and John Wheelwright, the 
adherent of Anne Hutchinson in later days in 
Boston, married a sister of William Hutchinson. 
Nearby lived Mr. Cotton, the imperial minister 
of Boston in New England. Francis Marbury 
later removed to London and had various prefer- 
ments. It is probable that your ancestress Cath- 
erine, who was much younger than Anne, was 
born in London, since her birth is not recorded 
at Alford. There are several interesting facts 
known about Francis Marbury, who was a strict 
Church of England adherent. To repeat them 
here, I fear, will stretch your forebearing atten- 
tion to the breaking point. 

Anne Marbury Hutchinson became deeply in- 
volved with the Puritanical doctrines of her 
brother in law, and it is not to be wondered that 
the family determined to come to New England. 
Why they brought with them the young Catherine 
we may not know. The Hutchinsons, Catherine 
with them, came over in the Griffin, which reached 
Boston late in the year 1634. What is of more 
interest to you, Richard Scott was also a pas- 
senger. During the long passage over he came 
to know Catherine Marbury, and later he wooed 
and married her. 



376 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Catherine Marbury doubtless lived with her 
sister Anne, and necessarily became intimately 
connected with all the phases of the Antinomian 
controversy. Whether she was a loyal sympa- 
thizer with her sister we cannot know. If so, she 
was unquestionably a valiant partisan, since in 
later years she proved that she had the fire of 
enthusiasm as a champion for conscience's sake. 
It may be, however, that Catherine Marbury was 
not altogether in sympathy with her intellectually 
more ambitious sister. Her character and her 
temperament certainly were far different from 
Anne's. In later years, when they were both liv- 
ing in Rhode Island, there seems to have been 
little association between them. Anne Hutchin- 
son, I fancy, even from a sister's point of view, 
may have been a somewhat impossible sort of 
person to agree with. 

Catherine's absorbing interest in the last days 
of the tragic trial of her sister was very probably 
centered in her lover, Richard Scott, to whom she 
was married in 1637. As soon as the awful sen- 
tence of excommunication and banishment against 
Anne Hutchinson had been dramatically pro- 
nounced by Governor Winthrop in November, 
1637, Catherine and her husband went to their 
future home at Moshasuch, near Providence. On 
January 16, 1638, Winthrop writes: "At Provi- 
dence things grow still worse, for a sister of Mrs. 
Hutchinson, the wife of one Scott, being infected 
with anabaptistry, and going last year to live in 
Providence, Mr. Williams was taken, or rather 
emboldened, by her to make open profession 



CATHERINE MARBURY 377 

thereof, and accordingly was rebaptized by one 
Holyman, a poor man late of Salem." Probably 
Governor Wintkrop was misinformed about 
Catherine Scott's influence over Roger Williams. 
As Mr. Peckham, in his admirable article on 
Richard Scott, remarks, Catherine Scott and 
Roger Williams never could get along together 
in peace. Williams on two occasions had her 
arrested with other wives of his neighbors for 
conduct of which he did not approve. There is no 
doubt, however, that Catherine Scott was un- 
settled in her religious convictions and might be 
properly designated by Winthrop as infected 
with "Anabaptistry. " Whether she was ever con- 
verted to the "Baptist" doctrines of Roger Wil- 
liams, a very different matter, may be questioned. 
It was in 1656, when she was about thirty-nine 
years old, that Catherine Scott received the true 
light from George Fox through Christopher 
Holder, of which she ever afterwards was a 
valiant torch-bearer. Two years later she, with 
her daughters, journeyed to Boston, to comfort 
Holder at the time of his trial. Bishop in his 
"New England Judged by the Spirit of the Lord," 
thus tells the story : 

And Katherine Scott of the Town of Providence, iu 
the jurisdiction of Rhode Island, a mother of many 
children, one that hath lived with her Husband, of 
Unblameable Conversation, and a Grave, Sober An- 
cient Woman, and of Good Breeding, as to the Out- 
ward as Men account, coming to see the Execution of 
said Three as aforesaid (Christopher Holder, John Cope- 
land, and John Rouse) all single young men, their ears 
cut off the 7th of the 7th month 1658 by order of John 



378 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Endicott, Gov. ; and she saying upon their doing it 
privately that it was evident they were going to act 
the Works of Darkness, or else they would have 
brought them forth Publickly, and have declared their 
offence, that others may hear and fear, ye committed 
her to Prison and gave her Ten Cruel Stripes with a 
three fold corded knotted whip, with that Cruelty in 
the Execution, as to others, on the second Day of the 
8th month 1658. Tho' ye confessed when ye had her 
before you, that for ought ye knew, she had been of 
Unblameable Conversation ; and tho ' some of you knew 
her Father, and called him "Mr." Marbury, and that 
she had been well bred (as among Men) and had so 
lived, and that was the mother of many children, yet 
ye whipp'd her for all that, and moreover told her 
that ye were likely to have a law to Hang her, if she 
came thither again. To which she answered: "If God 
call us, Wo be to us if we come not. And I question 
not but he whom we love, will make us not to count 
our Lives dear unto ourselves for the sake of his 
Name." To which your Governor, John Endicott, re- 
plied, — ' ' And we shall be as ready to take away from 
you your lives as ye shall be to lay them down ! ' ' How 
wicked the Expression let the Reader judge. 

Catherine Scott was in no way chastened by 
her whipping with the triple knotted cord and 
returned to Providence with her daughters still 
championing Christopher Holder. In the spring 
of 1660 she, with her daughter Mary, went to Eng- 
land with Holder, where the young people were 
married. In the fall she returned. In a letter 
written September 8, 1660, from Roger Williams 
to Governor John Winthrop, the Second, of Con- 
necticut, he says: "Sir, my neighbor, Mrs. Scott 
is come from England and what the whip at 
Boston could not do, converse with friends in 
England, and their arguments have in a great 
measure drawn her from the Quakers and wholly 



CATHERINE MARBURY 379 

from their meetings. ' ' This was doubtless one of 
those "scornful and shameful Lies" of Roger 
Williams which Richard Scott so scathingly de- 
nounced to George Fox. Williams had doubtless 
heard the gossip about Catherine Scott's visits to 
her aristocratic relatives in England who were, of 
course, orthodox Church of England people, and 
fabricated from his own imagination the story of 
her back-sliding from Quakerism. There is no 
reason whatever to suppose that Catherine Scott 
ever receded one jot from her strong adherence 
to the views of George Fox. After her husband's 
death in 1680, she went to Newport to the home 
of her son in law, Christopher Holder. She was 
probably present at the wedding in Newport of 
her granddaughter Mary Holder to Peleg Slocum, 
about 1680. She died in Newport May 2, 1687, as 
is recorded in the records of the monthly meet- 
ings of Friends. She was a "veray parfit gentel 
lady," to paraphrase Chaucer, and her descend- 
ants may well be far more proud of her earnest, 
upright, loyal character than of her heraldic 
lineage. 



Chapter V 

CHRISTOPHER HOLDER 

Came over 1656 
Speedwell 



Christopher Holder 1631 — 1688 

(Mary Scott) 

Mary Holder 1661 — 1737 

(Peleg Slocum) 

Peleg Slocum ' 1692 — 1728 

(Rebecca Bennett) 

Peleg Slocum 1727 — 1810 

(Elizabeth Brown) 

Williams Slocum 1761 — 1834 

(Anne Almy Chase) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



CHRISTOPHER HOLDER 



Christopher Holder is, next to Anne Hutchin- 
son, your most distinguished comeovering ances- 
tor. This is no mean distinction. Most of the 
comeoverers from whom you paternally descend 
were martyrs for conscience sake. There is 
hardly an adventurer, save for the work of Christ, 
to whom you can hark back. There were few for- 
tune seekers among your forebears. They were 
not pioneers intent on bettering their material cir- 
cumstances, but seekers after religious freedom. 
To be sure, for the most part, their idea of re- 
ligious freedom was simply the escape from inter- 
ference on the part of established authority with 
their peculiar doctrinal notions. As soon as they 
established communities across the seas in which 
their notions became ascendant, they became more 
intolerant in enforcing compliance to their espe- 
cial brand of "ism" than the most intolerant of 
their former oppressors. Such, however, was not 
the case of the followers of George Fox in deri- 
sion called Quakers. No class of heretics were 
ever more persistently down-trodden, yet, when, 
after much patient sufferings of outrageous ills, 
they obtained the freedom which they sought and 
became a leading sect in several New England com- 
munities, they persecuted not in their turn- The 



384 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

founder, and in some way the leading martyr of 
the Friends in this country, was Christopher 
Holder. Whether he ever grasped the idea of full 
religious freedom may be doubted. That he was 
one of the foremost champions of that idea can- 
not be doubted. 

Christopher Holder was born in Winterbourne, 
Gloucestershire, about nine miles from Bristol, in 
1631. His ancestry has not been definitely deter- 
mined. He was doubtless of the Holders of 
Holderness. He was unquestionably a man of 
high education and refinement and of independent 
fortune. It is possible that he was a younger 
brother of William Holder, a churchman and 
author of much celebrity in his day, who married 
a sister of Sir Christopher Wren. It has even 
been suggested that Christopher Holder may 
have received his Christian name from his con- 
nection with the Wrens. Like William Penn, a 
young man of education, wealth, and distin- 
guished family, Christopher Holder became deep- 
ly interested in the teachings of George Fox and 
devoted his life and his fortune to spreading the 
doctrines of the Friends. 

In 1656, with eight other Friends, he sailed on 
the Speedwell from London, arriving in Boston 
on the twenty-seventh of June. The company 
was arrested before they could land. A special 
council was called by the Governor, and the boxes 
and chests of the "Quakers" were ordered 
searched for "erroneous books and hellish pam- 
phlets. " As a result of the personal examination 
of these heretical prisoners, they were banished 



CHRISTOPHER HOLDER 385 

from the Colony and committed to prison pending 
their departure. For eleven weeks Christopher 
Holder and his friends were kept in a fonl prison, 
their personal belongings being appropriated by 
the gaoler for his fees, and at length in August 
they were forcibly put on board the Speedwell and 
deported to England. To their grief they had 
enjoyed no opportunity to spread the light in New 
England. None the less, they were determined 
to do so. With the assistance of Robert Fowler 
of Holderness, who for the purpose built a ship 
which be called the Woodhouse, Christopher 
Holder and other Friends sailed again for Amer- 
ica in August, 1657. 

The log of the voyage of the Woodhouse, writ- 
ten by Robert Fowler and endorsed by George 
Fox, has been preserved- It is certainly a curious 
log from a navigator's point of view. The mari- 
ners depended on special divine messages, in mov- 
ings of the Spirit, and in visions, to set their 
course. On the last day of the fifth month, 1657, 
they made land at Long Island "for contrary to 
the expectations of the pilot," the daily "draw- 
ing," that is to say, the advice of the Lord given 
at the daily meetings, had been to keep to the 
southward "until the evening before we made 
land and then the word was 'There is a lion in 
the way' unto which we gave obedience, and soon 
after the middle of the day there was a drawing 
to meet together before our usual time, and it 
was said that we may look abroad in the evening, 
and as we sat waiting on the Lord they discovered 
land . . . Espying a creek our advice was to 



386 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

enter there, but the will of man (in the pilot) re- 
sisted, but in that state we had learned to be con- 
tent." "And the word came to Christopher 
Holder 'You are in the road to Long Island.' " 

Some of the Friends went ashore at New 
Amsterdam to spread the faith, but Christopher 
Holder and his faithful co-worker, John Cope- 
land, determined to continue in the Woodhouse 
towards Boston. They stopped at Providence 
and thence went to Marthas Vineyard. Bishop 
thus tells the story: "For they having been at 
Martius Vineyard (a place between Rhode Island 
and Plimouth Colony) and speaking there a few 
words after their Priest Maho had ended in their 
meeting House, they were both thrust out by the 
constable, and delivered the next day by the 
Governor and Constable to an Indian, to be car- 
ried in a small cannoo to the main Land, over a 
sea nine miles broad (dangerous to pass over) 
having first took the Money from them to pay the 
Indian, who taking the custody of them, showed 
himself more Huspitable (as did the rest of the 
Indians) and supplied them freely with all neces- 
sities according to what the Indians had during 
the space of those three days they stayed there 
waiting for a calm season, and refused to take any 
consideration; he who had them in custody, say- 
ing, 'That they were Strangers and Jehovah 
taught him to love Strangers.' (Learn of the 
Heathen, Ye, who pretend yourselves Christians.) 
An opportunity presenting they set them on shore 
on the mainland, where they were soon set upon." 
On foot through the pathless woods they made 



CHRISTOPHER HOLDER 387 

their way to Sandwich, where they found recep- 
tive listeners. To avoid the surveillance of the 
authorities their meetings were held in a pic- 
turesque glen in the woods which has since been 
known as "Christopher's Hollow." Here was 
organized the first Friends ' Meeting in New Eng- 
land. Soon Christopher and his companions 
aspired to carry their tidings to Plymouth, but 
were met with vigorous resistance by the govern- 
ment and arrested as "ranters and dangerous 
persons." They were banished from the Colony 
on threat of being "whipped as vagabonds" if 
they returned. Rhode Island gave them a refuge 
for a time, and the report of their successful 
proselyting there was a subject of much disturb- 
ance to Governor Endicott of Massachusetts. 

In the early summer of 1657 Christopher Holder 
started for the Massachusetts Bay Colony, mak- 
ing converts at each stopping place, and reached 
Salem on the fifteenth of July. It was the cus- 
tom of the orthodox churches after the minister 
had done preaching to permit any member of the 
congregation, or any gifted person present, to 
speak for the edification of those who were gath- 
ered together for worship. It was this custom 
which enabled Christopher Holder during his 
proselyting work to get the ears of the people. 
It was in the first church of Salem, on July 21, 
that Holder attempting to speak was furiously 
attacked, seized by the hair and a glove forced 
into his mouth. He was arrested and the next 
day, in Boston, was examined by Deputy Governor 
Bellingham, and afterwards brought before Gov- 



388 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

ernor Endicott, who ordered that Holder and 
Samuel Shattuck, who had befriended him, receive 
thirty lashes each. The sentence was executed 
on Boston Common by the common hangman, who 
used a three corded knotted whip, and to make 
sure of his blows * 'measured the ground and 
fetched his strokes with great strength and advan- 
tage. " Judge Sewall says that so horrible was 
the sight of the streaming blood that ' ' one woman 
fell as dead." Holder and Shattuck were then 
taken to the jail and for three days were denied 
food or drink. They remained in jail without 
bedding, in a dismal damp cell for some nine 
weeks. It was during this incarceration that 
Christopher Holder and John Copeland, who was 
with him, composed their famous " Declaration of 
Faith. ' ' This and another pamphlet which Holder 
succeeded in issuing aroused the Governor to the 
utmost fury, and summoning them before him he 
told them they deserved to be hanged, and that 
he wished the law permitted him to hang them. 
He ordered that they be whipped twice a week in 
jail, thirty lashes at first and then by a successive 
progression each week. On this occasion Chris- 
topher Holder received three hundred and fifty- 
seven lashes, each drawing blood. This excessive 
persecution aroused sentiments of repugnance 
among the more liberal Puritans and Governor 
Endicott found it advisable to cease the torture 
and, if possible, get rid of the "dangerous villains, 
devil-driven creatures" as Cotton Mather called 
them. On September 24 the Governor ordered 
their release, summoning them before him and 



CHRISTOPHER HOLDER 389 

sentencing them to banishment after reading to 
them a law which had been passed during their 
imprisonment providing that any person who pro- 
claimed the doctrines of the Quakers should have 
"their tongues bored through with a hot iron and 
be kept at the house of correction close to work till 
they be sent away at their own charge." 

Holder returned to England and thence went to 
the Barbadoes, where Quakerism was making con- 
siderable headway. From there, as he wrote 
George Fox, he embarked for Rhode Island in 
1658 by way of Bermuda. John Copeland, who 
had remained in America, joined him at Newport, 
and together they again went to Sandwich, where 
they were promptly arrested and carried to 
Barnstable, where "being tied to an old Post they 
had Thirty Three cruel stripes laid upon them 
with a new tormenting whip, with three cords and 
knots at the ends, made by the marshal." 
(Barlow.) The marshal then "had them back to 
Sandwich," and the next day they were deported 
to Rhode Island, where Christopher sought refuge 
with his staunch friends, Richard and Catherine 
Scott. After recovering from his scourging in 
June, 1658, Holder with Copeland set forth once 
again to carry their gospel to Boston. They were 
arrested in Dedham and brought to Boston, and 
at once carried to the house of Governor Endicott, 
who issued an order that their ears be cut off. 
This order the Court of Assistants confirmed. 
The sentence was executed on July 17, Chris- 
topher Holder, John Copeland and John Rouse 
each having their right ears amputated by the 



390 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

hangman and being confined in jail for nine weeks, 
being beaten twice a week with the knotted cord. 
During this imprisonment a law was passed for 
the banishment of Quakers upon pain of death. 

After his release Christopher Holder carried 
the gospel into Virginia and Maryland and early 
in 1658 returned to Rhode Island and prepared 
again to testify in Boston. He well knew that 
this meant death. On this pilgrimage he had 
William Robinson as a companion, and with them 
went Patience Scott, the eleven year old daughter 
of Richard and Catherine Scott. Holder was 
arrested in Boston and jailed, as also was his 
young protege, Patience Scott. George Bishop 
afterwards wrote about the examination by the 
magistrates of the little daughter of Richard 
Scott: "And some of you confessed that ye had 
many children and that they had been educated, 
and that it were well if they could say half as 
much for God as she could for the Devil." The 
Court hesitated to enforce the death penalty and 
sentenced Holder again to banishment under pain 
of death. He refused to go and travelled for some 
time in Northern Massachusetts, until in August 
he was again arrested in Boston. There were 
some seventeen Friends together in Boston jail 
at this time and their adherents flocked to Boston 
to render such support as might be possible. 

It was during this confinement that Christopher 
Holder experienced the romance of his life. Three 
young women came from Rhode Island "under a 
feeling of religious constraint" to give succor and 
sympathy to the imprisoned Friends. One was 



CHRISTOPHER HOLDER 391 

Mary Dyer, who was afterwards hung on Boston 
Common. One was Hope Clifton, who afterwards 
became Christopher Holder's second wife. The 
other was Mary Scott, the daughter of Richard 
Scott and Catherine Marbury. These girls suc- 
ceeded in getting into the prison and visiting 
Christopher Holder. For this offence they were 
apprehended and cast into the same prison, which 
was probably exactly what they planned. It was 
doubtless during this joint imprisonment of two 
months that Christopher Holder and Mary Scott 
found that they loved each other. 

When they were released the men prisoners 
were given fifteen stripes each and the older 
women ten, for which they were stripped in the 
public street and beaten before the mob. Both 
Hope Clifton and Mary Scott were only admon- 
ished by the Governor. Christopher Holder was 
again relieved from the death penalty and ban- 
ished from the Colony. He went to England to 
appeal to Cromwell that the laws of England be 
observed in New England. Several friends 
accompanied him and among them his betrothed, 
Mary Scott, and her mother. They were married 
at Olveston, near Bristol, in England, on the 
twelfth day of the sixth month, called August, in 
the year 1660. The register of their marriage is 
in Somerset House, London. Without question 
they lived, as they promised in their compact, "in 
mutual love and fellowship in the faith till by 
death they were separated." 

Christopher Holder and his friend George Fox 
soon obtained from Charles II on his restoration 



392 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

full pardons for their persecuted friends in Amer- 
ica, and a total change of policy in the treatment 
of Quakers. This was a bitter pill to swallow for 
Governor Endicott and the Boston hierarchy. 
When Christopher and his wife returned to 
America, which they soon did, they found a very 
different condition of life awaiting them. They 
lived in Providence and later in Newport. During 
the five years of their married life Christopher 
travelled about the country preaching the gospel 
of the Friends. He evidently was possessed of 
estates in England which yielded him an ample 
income, and in Newport he was taxed £2 6s. Id. in 
1680, a large tax. It is probable that his wife 
Mary when she did not accompany him on his 
missions had a comfortable home in Newport 
where she nursed the babies and enjoyed the com- 
panionship of congenial neighbors, free from any 
manner of persecution for her religious beliefs. 
She died October 17, 1665, and the following year 
Christopher Holder married Hope Clifton, her 
companion in the escapade in Boston when the 
two girls were jailed for visiting him. 

During the remainder of his life Christopher 
Holder, "The Mutilated," as he was called, unre- 
mittingly pursued his calling of an evangel. In 
1672 he was with George Fox in New York. In 
1676 he with George Fox was with Nathaniel 
Sylvester at his manor house on Shelter Island 
and conducted meetings on Long Island. In 1682 
he was in England, where he was imprisoned for 
refusing to take the oath of allegiance. For more 
than four years he was confined in prison, being 



CHRISTOPHER HOLDER 393 

at length pardoned on the accession of James II. 
He did not return to America again. He lived at 
Puddimore in the County of Somerset, and died 
at his old home at Ircott in the parish of Almonds- 
bury June 13, 1688, and lies buried at Hazewell. 

Mary Holder, the daughter of Christopher 
Holder and Mary Scott, was born September 16, 
1661, in Newport. She married Peleg Slocum of 
Portsmouth, later of Dartmouth, that "honest 
publick Friend ' ' when she was nineteen years old, 
before her father went on his last voyage across 
the Atlantic. She brought to her husband as her 
dowry the island of Patience in Narragansett Bay. 
Her grandfather, Richard Scott, had presented 
this island to his daughter Mary when she mar- 
ried Christopher Holder, and in 1675 gave a con- 
firmatory deed to her heirs Mary and Elizabeth. 
At the request of Peleg Slocum, Roger Williams 
on January 6, 1682, further confirmed the title 
to Mary Slocum and her sister Elizabeth. Eliza- 
beth subsequently died without issue. 

Mary Holder was a profitable helpmeet to her 
husband, and at her home the women's meetings 
of Dartmouth began in 1699. She bore her hus- 
band ten children, of whom the fifth, Peleg, was a 
grandfather of Williams Slocum. She died in 
1737 in Newport at the home of her daughter, 
Content Easton, and was buried in the Friends' 
new burying place at Newport by the side of her 
son Giles Slocum. 



Chapter VI 

JOSEPH NICHOLSON 

Came over prior to 1658 



Joseph Nicholson — 1693 

(Jane ) 

Jane Nicholson 1669 — 1723 

( ) 

William Brown 1696 — 1739 

(Hannah Earle) 

Elizabeth Brown 1727 — 1797 

(Peleg Slocum) 

Williams Slocum 1761 — 1834 

(Anne Almy Chase) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JOSEPH NICHOLSON 

The story of your ancestor Joseph Nicholson 
is a continuation of the tale of the persecutions 
of the Quakers. Mr. Austin, in his admirable 
book on Rhode Island families, states that Joseph 
Nicholson was the son of Edmund Nicholson of 
Marblehead. I am somewhat doubtful as to 
whether this is so, and yet I have no evidence 
which warrants me in denying the statement. If 
it be true, your ancestor began his life of persecu- 
tion at an early age. Bishop in his New England 
Judged, tells this story, which he addresses to the 
magistrates of Boston: "And to this, let me add 
a cruel Tragedy of a Woman of Marblehead near 
Salem and her two sons, Elizabeth Nicholson and 
Christopher and Joseph, whom you without 
ground charged with the Death of Edmund Nichol- 
son her Hushand and their Father, who was found 
dead in the Sea ; you having received Information 
from some wicked Spirits (like yourselves) that 
the People did shew Love sometimes to the People 
of the Lord, whom you call Cursed Quakers, your 
Eage soon grew high against them, and unto 
your Butcher's Cub at Boston you soon had them 
all three; and from Prison you had them to the 
Bar to try them for their Lives; but notwith- 
standing all your cunning and subtile Malice, to 



398 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

destroy the Mother and her Children at once, yet 
ye were not able; notwithstanding you fined her 
a great Sum (which, in behalf of the Court, your 
Secretary, Rawson, was willing to take in good 
fish, and Salter for Dyet and Lodging in Barrels 
of Mackerel, so devouring the Widow's house) 
and her two sons to stand under the Gallows cer- 
tain hours with Ropes about their necks and to 
be whipped in your market place which was per- 
formed with many bloody lashes; at which the 
young men being not appaled, old Wilson stand- 
ing by, said 'Ah! Cursed Generation!' And at 
Salem they were ordered to be whipped also, 
where Michelson, the marshal (a bloody spirited 
Man) came to see it executed, where it was so 
mercilessly done that one of the young men sunk 
down, or dyed away under the Torture of his 
cruel suffering, whose body they raised up again 
and Life came to him. This was near about the 
time of your Murthering William Leddra. ' ' This 
fixes the date as in the early part of 1658. 

The bloody spirited minions of the "Butcher's 
Cub" evidently also came near "murthering" 
Joseph Nicholson, and it may well be that he 
deemed it wise to leave the jurisdiction of Massa- 
chusetts soon after. There is one record of him 
in 1659 at Salem, when he "protested" about 
something. I find in Besse's Collection of the 
Sufferings of the People called Quakers in Eng- 
land that in 1659 a Joseph Nicholson was im- 
prisoned in Newgate with one hundred and eighty 
other Friends by Richard Brown, Lord Mayor of 
London. If this is your ancestor, he must have 



JOSEPH NICHOLSON 399 

soon returned to New England with his wife Jane, 
whom he perhaps married in England, in the 
latter part of the same year. In a letter which 
he wrote from prison in Boston, in February, 
1660, he says, "upon the 7th of the First month, 
I was called forth before the court at Boston, and 
when I came, John Endicott bade me take off my 
hat, and after some words about that, he asked me 
what I came into the country for. . . . He 
then asked me where I came from. I told him 
from Cumberland where I formerly lived." It 
is this statement of your ancestor's that he 
formerly lived in Cumberland which has caused 
me to doubt his identity with the Joseph who was 
the son of Edmund Nicholson of Marblehead, and 
yet the facts are not irreconcilable. In his letter 
Joseph Nicholson further describes the examina- 
tion of Governor Endicott: "The Governor said 
What would I follow when I had my liberty? I 
told him labor with my hands the thing that was 
honest as formerly I had done if the Lord called 
me thereto. He said, would I not go a-preaching? 
I told him if I had a word from the Lord to speak 
wherever I came I might speak it." 

The account of his imprisonment and experi- 
ences in Boston in 1660, as told by himself, is a 
soberly written narrative. Bishop makes rather 
more of a story out of it in his indictment of the 
magistrates of Boston. He says "Joseph Nichol- 
son and his "Wife came to sojourn amongst ye, as 
they in right might, on as good Terms as you 
came hither first to inhabit; but instead thereof 
were committed to Prison and banished upon Pain 



400 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

of Death against whom you had nothing, yet so 
ye did unto them, though she was great with 
child, that she could not go forth of Prison till 
the last day limited by you. After which day ye 
sent for them and apprehended them at Salem, 
whither they went, and his wife there fell in 
Travel and he was not suffered to stay to see 
how it might happen to his wife but had to Boston. 
On the way he was met with an Order, sent by 
your Deputy Governor Richard Bellington; and 
thither he was had and Committed and his wife 
with him, after she was delivered, and after ye 
had Condemned Mary Dyer the second time to 
death, even that very day in which she was Exe- 
cuted, ye had them both before you again to see 
if the Terror thereof could have frightened them. 
But the Power of the Lord in them was above 
you all, and they feared not you, nor your threats 
of putting them to death." 

Joseph Nicholson, in his letter to Margaret Fell, 
fully confirms this story. In reference to the 
second arrest at Salem, he says "then came two 
constables and took us both and carried us to 
prison. As we passed along the street we met 
the gaoler who said I was come again to see if 
the gallows would hold me." From a letter writ- 
ten in September, 1660, from one of the Quakers 
in jail, it appears that Joseph Nicholson was very 
desirous of returning to England and that the 
Court was quite willing he should do so. "A boat 
was pressed to carry him on board the ship at 
Nantasket but the Master of the ship refused to 
carry him, and he came to Boston again and went 



JOSEPH NICHOLSON 401 

before the Governor and desired to have prison 
room or some other private house to be in till 
there was another opportunity to go." It was, 
doubtless, during this somewhat voluntary resi- 
dence in prison that he wrote The Standard of 
the Lord lifted up in New England. The only 
extract from this treatise which I have read is 
one of rather un-Quaker-like vituperation against 
the magistrates. Bishop cites it as a " prophecy" 
which was fulfilled- The quotation is too long to 
introduce here, but I will give a few sentences 
that you may appreciate the ability of your an- 
cestor in dealing with the English language: 
"When they that caused them to be put to Death 
shall howle and lament ; for their Day of Sorrows 
is coming on, for the Innocent Blood cries aloud 
for Vengeance upon them who put them to Death. 
Your Enchantments and Laws which you have 
hatched out of Hell shall be broken. And the 
People in scorn by you called Cursed Quakers 
shall inhabit amongst you, and you shall be broken 
to pieces. The Lord hath said it and he will 
shortly bring it to pass." After all you may 
pardon your ancestor for these very un-Friendly 
utterances, since surely his provocation was 
heavy. 

Not being able to find a ship which would take 
them home, Joseph Nicholson and his wife and 
young baby sought refuge in the Plymouth Col- 
ony. Let Bishop tell the story: "So ye set 
them at liberty who departed your jurisdiction in 
the Will of God; and to Plimouth Patent they 
went . . . (another Habitation of Cruelty) 



402 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

and demanded to sojourn in that jurisdiction, but 
there they could not be admitted, the same Spirit 
ruling in Plimouth as in Boston, and so the Magis- 
trates told them that if they had turned them 
away at Boston they would have nothing to do 
with them. (How exactly do they write after 
your Copy!) And his wife they threatened to 
whip. So they passed away in the Moving of 
the Lord to Rhode Island. ' ' 

A letter from Joseph Nicholson to Margaret 
Fell "from Rhode Island the 10th of the fifth 
month 1660" is as follows: 

M. F. — We have found the Lord a God at hand 
and although our lives were not dear unto us, yet He 
hath delivered us out of the hands of bloodthirsty men. 
We put our lives in our hands for the honor of the 
truth, and through the power of God we have them 
as yet. Although we pressed much to have our liberty 
to go as we came, yet could not, but are banished again. 
How it will be ordered afterward, if they let not their 
law fall, as it is broken, we know not ; for if the Lord 
call us again to go, there we must go, and whether we 
live or die it will be well. His powerful presence was 
much with us in Boston. We found much favor in the 
sight of most people of that town. The Power of God 
sounded aloud many times into their streets, which 
made some of them leave their meetings and come 
about the prison which was a sore torment to some of 
them. I think I shall pass towards Shelter Island ere 
long and some places that way where I have not yet 
been, and for ought we know at present, Jane may 
remain here awhile. Boston people were glad at our 
departure, for there were not many, I believe, would 
have had us to have been put to death. We are well 
in the Lord. I was a prisoner in Boston about six 
months and my wife a prisoner eighteen weeks. Thy 
friend in the Truth, Joseph Nicholson. 



JOSEPH NICHOLSON 403 

From Rhode Island Joseph Nicholson and his 
family went to Connecticut. Bishop says "And 
Joseph Nicholson and his wife (who went thither 
from Ehode Island, being moved of the Lord, to 
place their sojourning upon all the colonies) and 
the Commissioners of the Four United Colonies 
were also there, and Dan Denison in particular, 
who denied them." Joseph and his wife and the 
baby at length succeeded in re-crossing the At- 
lantic, but it was for them a case of falling out 
of the frying pan into the fire. I find in Besse's 
Sufferings in the County of Kent in 1660 a list 
of the Quaker prisoners at Dover Castle, among 
whom was "Joseph Nicholson who was just 
landed at Deal from New England and was im- 
prisoned there for refusing to swear." The 
account which Besse gives of this imprisonment 
is truly harrowing. He calls it ' ' barbarous ; " he 
might have called it "filthy." Your ancestor, writ- 
ing from Dover Castle, says "If the Lord make 
way for my liberty from these bonds shortly, I 
shall pass to Virginia in the Friends ' ship and so 
to New England again, but which way Jane will 
go, or how it is with her, I can not say. ' ' 

It would seem that it was by way of Virginia 
that Joseph Nicholson and his wife next came to 
New England. On the "tenth day of the last 
month 1663" he wrote the following letter to 
George Fox from the Barbadoes : 

G. F. Dearly and well beloved in the Lord my 
love is to thee. I should be glad to hear from thee if 
it might be. I received a letter from thee in New Eng- 
land, written to Christopher Holder and me, wherein 



404 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

I was refreshed. I wrote to thee from Virginia about 
the last first month, and since then I have been in New 
England about eight months. I passed through most 
parts of the English inhabitants and also the Dutch. 
I sounded the mighty day of the Lord which is coming 
upon them, through most towns, and also was at many 
of their public worship houses. I was prisoner one 
night amongst the Dutch at New Amsterdam. I have 
been prisoner several times at Boston, but it was not 
long, but I was whipt away. I have received eighty 
stripes at Boston, and some other of the towns; their 
cruelty was very great towards me and others. But 
over all we were carried with courage and boldness, 
thanks be to God ! We gave our backs to the smiter, 
and walked after the cart with boldness, and were 
glad in our hearts in their greatest rage. ... I 
came to this Island about twenty days ago from Rhode 
Island . . . 

It was during the next year, 1664, that Joseph 
Nicholson and his wife Jane with others were 
"cruelly whipped through Salem, Boston and 
Dedham." "Thus ran your cruelty from Dover 
to Salem, and from Salem to Boston, and that 
way; and now it thwarts the Country again and 
to Piscataqua River it posteth from Boston, as it 
had from thence to Piscataqua, almost the two 
ends of your jurisdiction. On the great Island 
in the River aforesaid, it seems, Joseph Nichol- 
son and John Liddal, crying out against the 
Drunkards and the Swearers, they were almost 
struck down with a piece of Wood by Pembleton's 
Man, the Ruler of that place .... who 
ordered them whipped at a Cart's-tail at Straw- 
berrybank by John Pickering the Constable." 

It is evident that from time to time during these 
stirring experiences Joseph Nicholson and his 
wife Jane had some quiet intervals at Ports- 



JOSEPH NICHOLSON 405 

mouth in Rhode Island. I find mention of him 
in the Portsmouth records as early as 1664, when 
he is associated with Christopher Holder as an 
executor of the will of Alice Courtland. Bishop 
tells of Jane coming from Rhode Island in March, 
1665, in company with some Quakers "to your 
bloody Boston," where they were arrested. It is 
probable that at least as early as 1669 Joseph and 
Jane were settled in Portsmouth in their own 
home. In that year their daughter Jane, your 
many times great grandmother, was born. It is 
probable that thereafter they often went forth to 
the southern colonies and the Barbadoes, and now 
and again to England, to carry the word of George 
Pox. From 1675, however, for a period of about 
ten years, Joseph Nicholson and his wife seem to 
have been quite constantly in Newport and in 
Portsmouth. He was "propounded" to be a free- 
man in 1675, and was actually admitted in 1677. 
In 1680 he went to the Barbadoes. In 1682, 1684, 
and 1685 he was a Deputy for Portsmouth to the 
Colonial Assembly. There are various records 
of his civic activities during this period. It would 
seem that Jane Nicholson, his wife, was in Eng- 
land in 1684, as there is a record of her persecu- 
tion there in Westmoreland County. Joseph 
Nicholson died on the ship Elizabeth, going from 
the Barbadoes to London, in June, 1693. His 
will, dated in April, 1693, and proved in Ports- 
mouth, September 29, 1693, names his daughter 
Jane, who was then twenty-four years old, his 
executrix, and leaves to her £100, and one-half 
of the rest and residue of his property. James 



406 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Bowden, in his History of the Society of Friends 
in America, says that Jane Nicholson, the wife 
of Joseph, died in Settle, Yorkshire, England, in 
1712. In view of several inaccuracies in Bowden 's 
account of the Nicholsons, I am not at all certain 
that he is correct about the time and place of 
Jane's death. 

There can be no doubt that Joseph and Jane 
Nicholson were earnest and persistent purveyors 
of the l ' Truth. ' ' Perhaps, however, had they not 
been " moved of the Lord to place their sojourn- 
ing upon all the colonies" and had devoted them- 
selves somewhat more to the care and upbringing 
of their children, your ancestress, Jane, their 
daughter, would not have committed the indiscre- 
tion of placing the only bar sinister on your 
escutcheon. To be sure, it was after her father's 
death and when she was twenty-seven years old, 
presumably an age of discretion, that, being un- 
married, she gave birth, in April, 1696, to a son, 
your several times great grandfather, who was 
called "William Brown. Naturally the records are 
silent as to the paternity of this ancestor of yours. 
It may have been one Tobias Brown, the grand- 
son of old Nicholas Brown, one of the original 
settlers of Portsmouth in 1639. At all events, 
Tobias was the only young man by the name of 
Brown whom I discovered as living at Portsmouth 
about the time of Jane's mishap. 

Jane Nicholson lived always in Portsmouth. 
She died December 14, 1723, aged fifty-four. In 
her will she describes herself as a " spinster" and 
bequeaths her property "to my son William 



JOSEPH NICHOLSON 407 

Brown, so called. " William Brown lived in Ports- 
mouth and prospered. He was a mariner and a 
merchant, and had interests in Newport, where 
he may have lived for a time. He was honored 
with the title of " Esquire." In 1719 he married 
Hannah Earle of Dartmouth, who died May 2, 
1731, and on December 10, 1734, he married Re- 
beckah Lawton of Portsmouth. He had seven 
children, one of whom he named Nicholson Brown. 
His fourth child, Elizabeth, born April 19, 1727, 
who married Peleg Slocum, was the mother of 
Williams Slocum. William Brown's will was 
executed January 27, 1738, he being then " in- 
tended with God's permission on a voyage to sea." 
He left a large estate valued at £3,325 6s. 7d., 
including numerous slaves. To his daughter 
Elizabeth, your great great great grandmother, 
he left "£300 in current bills of public credit of 
the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plan- 
tations, my silver beaker marked J N, with my 
negro girl Peg." Elizabeth's uncle, Barnabas 
Earle of Dartmouth, was appointed her guardian 
after her father's death, and she came to Dart- 
mouth to live, and met Peleg Slocum "in meet- 
ing." 



Chapter VII 

RALPH EARLE 

Came over 1634 



Ralph Earle 1606 — 1678 

(Joan Savage) 

Ralph Earle — 1716 

(Dorcas Sprague) 

Ralph Earle 1660 — 1718 

(Dorcas Dillingham) 

Hannah Earle 1701 — 1731 

(William Brown) 

Elizabeth Brown 1727 — 1797 

(Peleg Slocum) 

Williams Slocum 1761 — 1834 

(Anne Almy Chase) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Ralph Earle 1606 — 1678 

(Joan Savage) 

William Earle — 1715 

(Mary Walker) 

Mary Earle 1655 — 1734 

(John Borden) 

Amey Borden 1678 — 1716 

(Benjamin Chase) 

Nathan Chase 1704 — 

(Elizabeth Shaw) 

Benjamin Chase 1747 — 

(Mary Almy) 

Anne Almy Chase 1775 — 1864 

(Williams Slocum) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



RALPH EARLE 



Ralph Earle was born in 1606. He is thought 
to have come from Exeter and crossed in 1634. 
He was an original settler of Portsmouth, ad- 
mitted as an inhabitant of Aquidneck in 1638. He 
was a signer of the compact on the first page of 
the Portsmouth town records. He took the free- 
man's oath in 1639. In 1640 he agreed to sell the 
town "sawn boards," which indicates perhaps 
that he had a mill. In August, 1647, "Ralph Erie 
is Chosen to Ceepe an Inne to sell beer & wine & 
to intertayn strangers." In July, 1650, this 
liquor license was transferred to a new location 
to which Ralph Earle had moved. It may be that 
this new location was one which Henry Peran 
conveyed to him in March, 1650. It was "upon 
the south side of the head of the Mill Swamp and 
bounded upon Newport path." If so, the inn was 
not long established there, since Ralph sold this 
estate to Thomas Lawton in 1653. Yet in 1655 
he was again licensed to keep a house of enter- 
tainment and to set out a "convenient" sign in a 
"perspicuous" place. 

Ralph Earle was the town's Treasurer in 1649 
and for several years subsequently. He served 
the town in several other capacities and his name 
is of frequent occurrence in the records. He died 



RALPH EARLE 413 

in 1678. His will, of which his friend John Tripp 
was the overseer, after providing for his widow, 
leaves two-thirds of his real estate to his son 
Ralph, and one-third to his grandson Ralph, the 
son of his son William. That his son William, 
being alive, was cut off with a shilling is probably 
due to the fact that he had already provided for 
him. Indeed, in April, 1655, he conveyed to him 
a homestead in Portsmouth near John Tripp's. 

Ralph Earle had married in England Joan Sav- 
age, who outlived him. Concerning her we learn 
something from that delightful diarist, Judge 
Samuel Sewall, of whom you will hear much in 
connection with your Newbury ancestry. Judge 
Sewall had been holding court in Bristol, and on 
adjournment took an excursion to Point Judith. 
He writes under date of September 14, 1699, 
"The wind was so high that could not get over 
the ferry" (Bristol Ferry). "Dined at How- 
land's. Lodged at Mr. Wilkins. Friday 15th Mr. 
Newton and I rode to Newport. See aged Joan 
Savage (now Earl) by the way. Her husband 
Ralph Earl was born 1606 and his wife was ten 
or eleven years older than he. So she is esteemed 
to be one hundred and five years old. Pass over 
the ferry to Narragansett," etc. 

Ralph Earle, the second, was probably born 
before his father came to Portsmouth, i. e. prior 
to 1638. He was admitted as a freeman of the 
town in 1658. About this time he married Dorcas, 
the daughter of Francis Sprague of Duxbury. 
Francis Sprague was one of the original thirty- 
four purchasers of Dartmouth, and in 1659 he 



414 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

conveyed to his "son in law Ralph Earl of Rhode 
Island one-half of his share, ' ' and in the confirma- 
tory deed of Governor Bradford, Ralph Earle 
is named as a proprietor of Dartmouth. I think, 
however, that it is not likely that he removed to 
Dartmouth for some years. In 1667 Ralph Earle 
of Portsmouth, joined Captain Sanford's troop 
of horse, and afterwards himself became the Cap- 
tain. It is surely more likely that this warlike 
Ralph was Ralph, the second, who would have 
been about thirty years old, rather than Ralph, 
the first, who was over sixty. 

Francis Sprague, the father of Dorcas who 
married Ralph Earle, came over in the Ann in 
1623 with his wife Lydia and one child. It was 
of this ship's company that Morton tells us that 
the new comers "Seeing the low and poor condi- 
tion of those that were before them, were much 
daunted and discouraged." Governor Bradford 
says "the best dish we could present them with 
is a lobster or a piece of fish without bread or 
anything else but a cup of fair spring water; and 
the long continuance of this diet, with our labors 
abroad has somewhat abated the freshness of our 
complexion; but God gives us health." Francis 
Sprague may have been daunted and discouraged, 
yet none the less he took hold of the problem of 
self support in good earnest, and in 1633 was 
taxed eighteen shillings, a considerable tax. In 
the division of the cattle in 1627 Francis Sprague 
shared in the sixth lot. "To this lot fell the 
lesser of the black cowes came at first in the Anne 
which they must keep the biggest of the two steers. 



RALPH EARLE 415 

Also this lot has two shee goats." It is to be 
hoped that the little Dorcas obtained at least her 
father's thirteenth share of the milk of the lesser 
cowe and the two shee goats. 

Francis Sprague removed to Duxbury prior to 
1637. He lived by the shore between Captains 
Hill and Bluefish River. It is said of him that he 
was of an "ardent temperament and great in- 
dependence of mind." That he was a "grave and 
sober" person is clearly indicated since he was 
permitted to sell spirituous liquors, since it was 
to "grave and sober" persons only that this 
privilege was granted. None the less, in 1641 
he was before the Court for selling wine contrary 
to the orders of the Court. He was living in Dux- 
bury in 1666, and died probably a few years 
thereafter when his son took up his business of 
keeping an ordinary. One wonders how Ralph 
Earle of Portsmouth, who so far as we may know 
had no relation with the Pilgrims at Plymouth, 
happened to meet and woo and win a Duxbury 
girl. To be sure they were both "ordinary" chil- 
dren. 

At least as early as 1688 Ralph Earle and his 
wife Dorcas Sprague were living in Dartmouth, 
since in that year and the years following he so 
describes himself in conveyances of land in Dart- 
mouth to his sons. His homestead farm of some 
four hundred acres was on the westerly side of 
the Apponegansett River, extending westerly be- 
yond the Tucker Road on both sides of the road 
from the head of Apponegansett to Macomber's 
Corner, or Slocum's Corner as it was known in 



416 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

earlier days. He evidently had allotted to him 
as a part of his share of Dartmouth the island 
of Cuttyhnnk. In conveying one half of this 
island to his son Ralph in 1688 he describes it as 
' ' the westernmost island called Elizabeth Island. ' ' 
In 1693 in conveying a quarter of the island to 
his son William he describes it as the island 
called by the Indians "Pocatahunka being the 
westernmost island." We hear of him in con- 
nection with his neighbor John Russell in the 
troublous times of the Indian war. 

Ralph the third, the son of Ralph, the son of 
Ralph, was born about 1660 and died in 1718 
leaving an estate of £1,862. At one time he lived 
on the island of Cuttyhunk, afterwards selling his 
interest to his brother William. He married 
Dorcas Dillingham, who outlived him twenty-four 
years. Hannah, the daughter of this third Ralph 
and his wife Dorcas, married William Brown and 
was the grandmother of Williams Slocum. 

William Earle the son of the first Ralph was 
probably younger than his brother Ralph. He 
remained in Portsmouth. He was admitted a 
freeman on the same day in 1658 as his brother 
Ralph. In 1665 he became associated with Wil- 
liam Cory in erecting and operating a wind-mill 
for the town's use. As an "inducement" the 
town offered to give the partners certain land. 
The mill was built and operated by Earle and 
Cory for some years. The history of this quasi- 
public enterprise is rather complicated and occu- 
pies considerable space in the town records. 
Numerous transfers and retransfers of land be- 



RALPH EARLE 417 

tween the town and Earle and Cory and Cory's 
widow were necessary to straighten out the in- 
volvements, but in the end it seems to have been 
satisfactorily adjusted. 

William Earle had interests in Dartmouth in- 
dependent of those of his son Ralph who had 
settled there. That this William Earle ever lived 
in Dartmouth I think unlikely. Since Ralph the 
second had a son Ralph and a son William, and 
William the son of the first Ralph had a son Ralph 
and a son William, and since all of these Ralphs 
and Williams had sons named Ralph and William, 
it is not easy to distinguish their identity from 
the records. It seems clear, at all events, that 
William the son of the first Ralph was living in 
Portsmouth in 1691, in which year the town meet- 
ing was held at his dwelling house. In 1704 and 
1706 he was a Deputy from Portsmouth to the 
General Assembly. In 1715 he died. 

William Earle had married Mary, the daughter 
of John and Katherine Walker. John Walker's 
name is not appended to the civic compact of 
Portsmouth, but at the meeting at which it was 
executed on April 30, 1639, "for the helpe and 
ease of publique business and affaires," he was 
chosen one of a committee of five to act as the 
town government. In 1639 he was allotted one 
hundred acres of land. His name appears in the 
town records in 1644 in reference to a grant of 
land to his son in law, James Sand. His will is 
dated March 18, 1647, and it would seem likely 
that he died soon afterwards, although the will 
was not recorded until 1671 in connection with 



418 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

his widow's will. Both wills make it evident that 
there were but two children, a daughter Sarah, 
who married James Sands, and a daughter Mary 
who subsequently married William Earle. 

It is from Mary Earle, the daughter of William 
Earle and Mary Walker, who married John 
Borden, that you trace your descent through Anne 
Almy Chase. 



Chapter VIII 

EDWARD DILLINGHAM 

Came over 1632 (?) 



Edward Dillingham — 1667 

(Drusilla ) 

Henry Dillingham 1627 — 

(Hannah Perry) 

Dorcas Dillingham 1662 — 1742 

(Ralph Earle) 

Hannah Earle 1701 — 1731 

(William Brown) 

Elizabeth Brown 1727 — 1797 

(Peleg Slocum) 

Williams Slocum 1761 — 1834 

(Anne Almy Chase) 

Mary Ann Slocum 1805 — 1875 

(Henry H. Crapo) 

William W. Crapo 1830 — 

(Sarah Davis Tappan) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



EDWARD DILLINGHAM 



It seems reasonably well established that Ed- 
ward Dillingham was the son of Henry Dilling- 
ham, Rector for many years in Queen Elizabeth's 
time of the parish of Caftesbach, Leicestershire. 
That Henry Dillingham was of the gentry is indi- 
cated by the fact that he was the patron of the 
benefice and in 1626 presented a priest. Edward 
Dillingham, who is always described as a "gen- 
tleman," and who also "bore arms," lived at 
Bittesby, Leicestershire, on "Watling Street." 
He probably came over soon after the establish- 
ment of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He had 
some capital and brought money entrusted to him 
by friends to invest. The first record of him 
which I have found is in 1636, when he was a 
witness in a civil case in Salem. He lived in 
Saugus (Lynn) and was one of the ten original 
purchasers of Sandwich in 1637 and doubtless 
went thither at the origin of the settlement. His 
wife died in 1656. He was among those who em- 
braced the teachings of Christopher Holder and 
in 1657 he was arrested and fined for entertaining 
Quakers. He died in 1667. His descendants have 
always been people of some distinction on the 
Cape. His son, Henry, born in England in 1627, 
married Hannah Perry. He lived in Sandwich. 



422 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Dorcas, the daughter of Henry Dillingham and 
Hannah Perry, who married Ealph Earle, was a 
great grandmother of Williams Slocum. 



Chapter IX 
WILLIAMS SLOCUM 



WILLIAMS SLOCUM 



Peleg Slocuni, the son of Peleg, the son of Peleg, 
the son of Giles, at the time of his death in 1810 
left two sons and three daughters. One daughter, 
Rebecca, had married George Folger of Nan- 
tucket, and it was for her that her brother Wil- 
liams Slocum asked that his granddaughter, your 
great aunt Rebecca Folger Crapo (Durant) be 
named. One son Caleb was married and probably 
was not then living at home. All the others lived 
together in the Barney's Joy homestead. At the 
time of his father's death Williams Slocum was 
forty-nine years old. He had married rather late 
in life some seven years before and had three 
children then alive of whom your great grand- 
mother, Mary Ann Crapo, was the oldest. It 
was thus a large household that occupied the old 
house of which I have told you. Hannah Slocum, 
the oldest sister of Williams, then about fifty-six 
years old, was an invalid, and her father in his 
will, written in 1801, after bequeathing to her his 
"great bible and one feather bed, bedstead, cord, 
and furniture that she commonly sleeps upon free 
and clear at her own disposal," provided as fol- 
lows : "And my will is that my two sons, Williams 
and Caleb shall provide for my said daughter 
Hannah all things necessary for her comfortable 



426 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

support in sickness and health at all times and 
also to provide for her all suitable apparel doc- 
tors and nurses when needed and to carefully 
help her to meetings when and where it shall 
appear reasonable." Towards his daughters, 
Mehitable, who died before her father, and 
Deborah, who was the widow of Philip Howland, 
he was equally thoughtful. In addition to con- 
siderable bequests of money, horses, cows, stab- 
ling, etc., he provides that they shall have "the 
great room and the two bedrooms adjoining it 
and the chamber rooms above them . . . also 
the privilege of the kitchen to do their work and 
oven to bake in . . . one-sixth of the orchard 
or profits . . . one-half of the garden . . . 
one-quarter of the cellar ... a privilege to 
the wells," etc., etc. "I also order my sons to 
provide and bring to the door firewood of suit- 
able length sufficient for one fire yearly; also to 
keep one hog for them with their own hogs the 
year round ; and that my two said daughters have 
the privilege of riding the chaise when convenient 
and to be helped to it by my said sons and that 
it be kept in good repair." Deborah alone was 
left to ride in the chaise. 

To Williams, his son, he gave "my house clock 
a free and clear gift to him." This is the tall 
clock which two years later was buried in the 
meadow with the silver and valuables and is now 
in the possession of your grandfather. In the 
clock was doubtless buried a silver tankard which 
he gave his daughter Mehitable, providing that 
' ' if my son or sons shall lay any claim or right to 



WILLIAMS SLOCUM 427 

the silver tankard by virtue of Hannah Slocum, 
then they shall pay unto their sister Mehitable 
seventy dollars equally between them in lieu 
thereof." I know not what has become of the 
silver tankard, but as Mehitable died before her 
father, doubtless it came into possession of one of 
the brothers. To each of his grandsons, Peleg 
Slocum Folger and Peleg Slocum Howland, he left 
a "two year colt of a midling value." To his 
sons Williams and Caleb he left his farm and the 
rest and residue of his estate, which was an ample 
one. 

Caleb was a man of some prominence in the 
community. He represented Dartmouth in the 
Great and General Court of Massachusetts in 
1809. He engaged quite extensively in shipping 
and at one time was successful. Soon after his 
father's death, however, he became financially em- 
barrassed and finally insolvent, involving his 
brother Williams through indorsements in the loss 
of much of his inheritance. In 1812 Caleb re- 
leased to Williams all his interest in the home- 
stead farm and moved to LeRoysville in New York 
State. 

Williams Slocum was somewhat handicapped 
by the financial losses sustained through his 
brother, yet he managed to carry on the old farm 
at Barney's Joy and live in the comfortable way 
in which his predecessors had lived. Two negro 
slaves, then free, were his faithful servitors, about 
whom your great aunts had an interesting story 
which I regret I have not preserved. In 1774 the 
Friends meeting of Dartmouth had required Peleg 



428 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Slocum and several others to free their slaves. 
In Williams Slocum 's time the family still had a 
coach, and doubtless also the chaise in which 
Deborah was to be permitted to ride. Williams 
Slocum had many dealings with his neighbors and 
with merchants in New Bedford. I had at one 
time a mass of documents relating to his affairs, 
which came into the possession of your great 
grandfather, Henry H. Crapo, who settled his 
estate. The considerable number of promissory 
notes for small amounts which he took and gave 
indicate how largely business was done without 
the use of cash by an interchange of evidences of 
credit in the form of notes. There must still be, 
in a package in my desk, a hundred or more of 
these notes ranging from one hundred dollars to 
one or two dollars. The promissory notes given 
and the memoranda of notes received represented 
deferred payments for sheep, hogs, firewood and 
other farm products, and purchases of household 
supplies, etc. Williams Slocum 's estate amounted 
to nearly fifteen thousand dollars according to 
the inventory. The elaborate and careful work 
of your great grandfather Henry H. Crapo, as 
evidenced by the papers preserved in connection 
with this estate, furnishes one among a thousand 
other instances of his painstaking exactness. 

The only personal recollection of Williams 
Slocum which I can give you is that of your 
grandfather who when a child about four years 
old was taken by his mother down to Barney's 
Joy to visit the old folks. He remembers his 
grandfather as a short, stout little gentleman, 



WILLIAMS SLOCUM 429 

very asthmatic, with knee breeches and silver shoe 
buckles, who took him by the hand and toddled 
down with him into the vegetable garden and 
showed him a gigantic squash which was evidently 
a keen delight to the old gentleman. A few 
months after this visit of his grandson Williams 
Slocum died, January 23, 1834. He is buried in 
the little enclosed graveyard by the road-side as 
you drive down from Tucker Allen's place, and 
when last I was there the purple blooms of the 
myrtle carpeted the ground. If you should stand 
by the iron gate of this enclosed plot, which is 
now or will be in part your real estate in fee, 
you would view the wonderfully beautiful scene 
in which your Slocum ancestors lived from the 
time of Eliezer and the Lady Elephel until, not 
many years ago, the race on the old farm went 
ignominiously out. 

Of Williams Slocum 's youngest daughter, Jane 
Brown Slocum, I would like to tell you, if you 
can bear with the reminiscences of a still not very 
aged old fellow. "Aunt Jane" was a distinct 
feature in the youthful lives of your father and 
myself. She was not more than sixty years old, 
probably, when first I remember her, and yet she 
seemed to me then a very old lady, quite as old as 
she did thirty years later when I used to call on 
her and hear her tell again the tales of her girl- 
hood at Barney's Joy. Aunt Jane had a way of 
turning up at our house with her goatskin trunk 
(it had a convex top studded with brass nails and 
she promised to give it to me, but I never got it) 
at inconvenient times. Her idea of making a 



430 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

visit to one's relatives was to do so when one felt 
like it. I think she must have been a little "nut 
brown maid" when she was young, she was cer- 
tainly a little nut brown old maid when I knew 
her. She looked amazingly like her older sister, 
my grandmother, but as I recall the sisters, Aunt 
Jane had much more vivacity. In fact she told 
me so many yarns about the lively days of her 
youth that I looked upon her as distinctly a sporty 
person. She used to tell me about the mare she 
rode when she was a girl, and it was a very 
wonderful mare indeed and she had many hair 
raising escapades with her. She used to tell me 
of the dances she went to, and yet she never 
explained why one of the young sparks did not 
mate her as she most surely deserved. 

My mother used to have Aunt Jane on her mind 
to some extent, and so we frequently drove out to 
Bakertown where she lived. She possessed a 
little white telescope of a house on the east side 
of the road, half way between the Gulf Road 
and Holder BrownelPs Corner. Sometimes we 
carried her a bonnet. She was rather keen on 
gay bonnets although she professed to be a 
Friend. She lived quite alone and fended for her- 
self. On one occasion when we called on her we 
heard a mysterious muffled wailing in the sitting- 
room, and seeking the explanation were informed 
that the cat had fallen between the studding and 
couldn 't get out — but would probably soon be 
dead. The situation seemed to my mother to 
demand action of some kind, but Aunt Jane said 
that to get the cat out was a man's work and she 



WILLIAMS SLOCUM 431 

hadn't any man and didn't propose to call one in. 
If you could have had the privilege of knowing 
your grandmother, you could have no doubt that 
the cat was extricated before she left the house. 
When Aunt Jane became rather too old to fend 
for herself, she went to live with her niece, iVeria 
Baker, the daughter of George Slocum, in 
Russell's Mills, where her brother Benjamin, an 
old bachelor who hunted rabbits all his life, also 
lived. The little house stood behind dense spruce 
trees, which have long since disappeared, on the 
road near the turning which leads to the old forge. 
Here your father's faithful old nurse, Margaret 
Sullivan, herself an old woman then, undertook 
the care of his great aunt. It was no easy job I 
fancy. Aunt Jane was never a docile person. In 
this dwelling at Russell's Mills I used to call oc- 
casionally on Aunt Jane after my mother's death. 
She was nearly ninety then, yet she always re- 
sponded to the understanding between us that she 
was a true sport. She died after several days of 
unconsciousness. A few hours before her death, 
however, she called in a clear voice the signal to 
her girlhood's friend across the Pascamansett 
River at Barney 's Joy. She had told me the story 
of how when a young girl she used to slip away 
from home in the evening and row across the 
river to see her bosom friend. This friend of hers 
had been dead for more than three quarters of a 
century. Do you suppose she heard the call? 
That singularly clear and youthful call as it was 
described to me, could it have found the receptive 
intelligence which unconsciously it sought? 



PART V 
ANCESTORS 

OF 

SARAH MORSE SMITH 



Chapter I 

NICHOLAS NOYES 
Came over 1634 
Mary and John 



Nicholas Noyes 1615 — 1701 

(Mary Cutting) 

Timothy Noyes 1655 — 1718 

(Mary Knight) 

Martha Noyes 1697 — 

(Thomas Smith) 

Thomas Smith 1723 — 1758 

(Sarah Newman) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 — 1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



NICHOLAS NOYES 



Nicholas Noyes was a younger son of the Rev. 
William Noyes, rector of Cholderton, Wilts, a 
little hamlet about eleven miles from Salisbury. 
The father of the Rev. William Noyes was proba- 
bly Robert Noyes. The name Noyes, originally 
Noye, is Norman. There was a William Noyes 
of Erchfort who was assessed for a subsidy of 
£80 in the fourteenth year of Henry VIII. He 
died in 1557. One of his sons was a member of 
Parliament from Lain, the township in which 
Cholderton is located. Another son, Robert, pur- 
chased the manor of Kings Hatherdene, Berks. 
Whether the Rev. William Noyes of Cholderton 
was of kin to these people of his name and locality 
is merely a matter of speculation. 

William Noyes was born in 1568. He matric- 
ulated at Oxford November 15, 1588, and gradu- 
ated B. A. May 31, 1592. He was instituted as 
rector of Cholderton in 1602. He died intestate 
before April 30, 1622, at which date an inventory 
of his estate was taken. He had married in 1595 
Anne Parker, a sister (probably) of the Rev. 
Robert Parker, whom Cotton Mather calls "one 
of the greatest scholars in the English nation, 
and in some sort the father of all non-conformists 
of our day." Anne Parker Noyes died 1657, 



438 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

being buried at Cholderton. In her will she men- 
tions her sons James and Nicholas "now in New 
England." 

The eldest son of William and Anne Parker 
Noyes was Ephraim, born in 1596. He married 
a Parnell and lived at Orcheston, Saint Mary, 
dying in 1659. Their second son was the Rev. 
Nathan Noyes, who matriculated at Lincoln Col- 
lege, Oxford, May, 1615, and graduated B. A. 
October, 1616. In 1622 he succeeded his father 
as the rector of Cholderton. Their third son, the 
Rev. James Noyes, was born in 1608. He matricu- 
lated at Brasenose College, Oxford, August 22, 
1627, but seems not to have graduated. "With his 
cousin, the Rev. Thomas Parker, he taught school 
at Newbury, England. Nicholas, the fourth son, 
was your ancestor. He was born in 1615-16, and 
was therefore only eighteen years old when with 
his brother James, and cousin Thomas Parker, 
and several other of your ancestors, he sailed on 
the ship Mary and John for New England. 

The ship was detained in the River Thames by 
an order of the Privy Council, February 14, 
1633-4, and all the passengers were required to 
take the following oath, which I quote in full as a 
specimen of pure and vigorous English : 

I do swear before the Almighty and ever living God, 
that I will beare all faithful allegiance to my true 
and undoubted Soveraigne Lord King Charles, who 
is Lawful King of this Island and all other of his 
dominions by sea and by land, by the law of God and 
man and by lawful succession, and that I will most con- 
stantly and cheerfully even to the utmost hazard of my 
life and fortune, oppose all seditions, rebellions, con- 



NICHOLAS NOYES 439 

spiracies, covenants, and treasons whatsoever against 
his Majesties Crowne and Dignity or Person raysed or 
sett up under what pretence of religion or colour soever, 
and if it shall come veyled under pretence of religion I 
hould it most abominable before God and Man. And 
this oath I take voluntarily, under the faith of a good 
Christian and loyall subject, without any equivocation 
or mental reservation whatsoever, from which I hold 
no power on earth can absolve me in any part. 

So far as this oath related to the allegiance of 
a subject to his King it is probable that this band 
of non-conformists could at that time take it with- 
out "equivocation or mental reservation," al- 
though I fancy had these men tarried in England 
for the space of ten years longer they would have 
been found at Marston Moor and Naseby under 
the leadership of Oliver Cromwell. To the further 
order of the Council, however, to the effect that 
"prayers as contained in the Book of Common 
Prayer, established by the Church of England, be 
said daily at the usual hours of morning and even- 
ing prayers, and that all persons on board be 
caused to be present at the same," I doubt if 
they submitted with good grace. The motive 
which caused these zealous seekers of freedom to 
leave their comfortable homes in England and 
embark on the hazardous voyage across the seas, 
and the still more hazardous life in the wilderness, 
was a spiritual one. They sought simply the op- 
portunity to worship God in the manner which 
they firmly believed was His holy ordinance. 
Thomas Parker, their leader, and his beloved 
friend and co-worker, James Noyes, were con- 
spicuous exemplars of that high zeal for religious 



440 CERTAIN COMEOVBRERS 

freedom which was the fundamental cause of the 
settlement of New England. Your ancestor, 
Nicholas Noyes, was a sturdy, healthy, active 
lad, to whom probably the questions at issue be- 
tween the established church and the non-conform- 
ists were not of vital personal importance, yet 
as a loyal comrade of his brother and his cousin 
he followed them to the new country and was 
ever their earnest friend and warm supporter. 

The company who came on the Mary and John 
landed at the mouth of the Mystic River and 
stopped a while at Medford, and thence removed 
to Ipswich, which was then called Agawam. There 
they abode until the spring of 1635, and albeit 
they had doubtless achieved their desire to wor- 
ship God according to the dictates of their con- 
sciences, they suffered the appalling hardships 
and privations of ill equipped pioneers in a wild 
and practically uninhabited wilderness. It is for- 
tunate that among the religious enthusiasts who 
immigrated to New England there were some 
practical men of affairs who had the commercial 
instinct. There was a small society of gentlemen 
of non-conformist views in Wiltshire, England, 
among whom were Sir Richard Saltonstall, Henry 
Sewall, Richard and Stephen Dummer and others, 
who organized a company for the purpose of stock 
raising in New England. After looking over the 
ground they determined to start a plantation not 
far from Agawam at a place on the Quascacum- 
quem River, or, as it has been called since, the 
Parker River. They induced many of the come- 
overers by the Mary and John to join in this 



NICHOLAS NOYES 441 

settlement under the spiritual leadership of 
Thomas Parker and James Noyes. The first boat 
load of these pioneers who came from Agawam 
through Plum Island Sound landed on the north 
shore of Parker River, a little below where the 
bridge crosses the river, in May, 1635. It was 
your lusty ancestor, Nicholas Noyes, who first 
leaped ashore from the boats and entered the 
territory of Newbury as a settler. 

The difficulties and dangers of this little settle- 
ment by the Parker River were many, but the 
settlers were undaunted. "Here and there along 
the winding river they appropriated the few clear 
spots where the Indians had formerly planted 
corn, and took possession of the neighboring salt 
marshes where the growing crop of salt grass 
promised an abundant harvest. ' ' The infant set- 
tlement was named Newbury in compliment to 
Thomas Parker, their "minister," and James 
Noyes, their "teacher," because it was at New- 
bury in England that these two men formed the 
strong friendship which ever held them together 
as loyal and affectionate brothers. Thomas Par- 
ker never married and always lived with James 
Noyes, who later built the "old Noyes house" 
which still stands and is still occupied by his 
descendants. 

The place of the settlement was at what is now 
known as the "lower green." Here they built a 
meeting-house and at first the dwellings were 
clustered about it. As the community increased in 
numbers the available farming lands were taken 
up and the settlement became scattered. About 



442 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

1642 the question of moving the meeting-house 
began to be agitated and was the subject of a pro- 
longed and bitter controversy in the community 
and church. Indeed the history of the commu- 
nity is the history of the church. In this con- 
troversy all of your Newbury ancestors took an 
active part. Nicholas Noyes was naturally on 
the side of the ministry in favor of moving. Ed- 
mund Greenleaf and Henry Sewall were bitterly 
opposed and petitioned the General Court to put 
a stop to the proceedings. Their application was 
not successful and they removed in high dudgeon 
from the town, Greenleaf to Boston, and Sewall 
to Rowley. After much discussion and dissension 
it was finally determined at "a town meeting of 
the eight men, ' ' January 2, 1646, that in order to 
"settle the disturbances that yet remayne about 
the planting and settling the meeting house, and 
that all men may cheerfully goe on to improve 
their lands at the new towne" the meeting-house 
be located and set up before October next "in or 
upon the knowle of upland by Abraham Toppan's 
barn. ' ' 

The removal of the meeting-house to the "new 
towne," which in the whirligig of time is now 
known as "Oldtown," may have tended to the 
formation of two opposing factions in the church 
which took opposite sides in the protracted eccle- 
siastical controversy for which the church of 
Newbury was famous in the history of New Eng- 
land Congregationalism. The question was one of 
church government rather than of doctrine. It 
was, moreover, a theoretical question rather than 



NICHOLAS NOYES 443 

a practical one. As a matter of fact the deeply- 
respected minister of the church, Thomas Parker, 
and his friend, James Noyes, the teacher, Johnson 
in his Wonder Working Providence tells ns, "car- 
ried it very lovingly toward their people, per- 
mitting them to assist in admitting of persons 
into the church society, and in church censure, so 
long as they acted regularly, but in case of mal- 
administration they assumed the power wholly to 
themselves. ' ' A large number of the members of 
the congregation, however, demanded as a right 
what the pastor and teacher "lovingly permitted" 
as a favor, and asserted that the church in its 
corporate capacity had a right, and was conse- 
quently under a sacred obligation, to manage its 
own affairs, and not be under the domination of 
the clergy. 

This controversy which was based on no actual 
grievance, being simply a question of theoretic 
government, reached a crisis in 1669. The civil 
authorities were appealed to. A series of pre- 
sentments were made to the Courts at Ipswich 
and Salem. Petitions to the General Court at Bos- 
ton, and a most violent rumpus all round ensued. 
The records of these legal proceedings and of the 
lengthy petitions and counter petitions to the Gen- 
eral Court give the history of this controversy 
with great fullness. Most of your Newbury an- 
cestors were on one side or the other of the dis- 
pute. The General Court in 1671 rendered a 
decision which was intended to be final in favor 
of the clerical party, and the revolutionists in 
the church were fined. At this time there were 



444 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

exactly forty-one male church members enrolled 
on each side of the question, so that the congrega- 
tion of the church was evenly divided. Such was 
not the case, however, in regard to your ancestors, 
the large majority of whom were of the revolu- 
tionary party. The following of your ancestors 
were of the clerical party : Nicholas Noyes, John 
Knight, Tristram Coffin, Henry Sewall and 
James Smith, five in all. The following were of 
the revolutionary party : John Emery, Sen., John 
Emery, Jr., Thomas Brown, Anthony Morse, 
Abraham Toppan, William Moody, Caleb Moody, 
James Ordway, John Bailey and Eobert Coker, 
ten in all. The controversy was not in fact settled 
by the decision of the Court and continued with 
more or less acrimony during the life of Mr. Par- 
ker, after whose death it was gradually dropped 
since the growing democratic spirit of the times 
made it evident that it was the People, with a big 
P, who were destined to rule both in Church and 
State. 

Nicholas Noyes became one of the influential 
men of the settlement at Newbury. In 1638 ' ' Dea- 
con Nicholas Noyes and Deacon Tristram Coffin" 
were chosen Overseers of the Poor. In 1645 he 
was granted a house lot at the "new towne," 
where he built a house. In 1646 he was one of 
the "town-men." In 1652 he was the School Com- 
mittee. Between 1654 and 1681 he was nearly 
every year chosen as the civil Magistrate "to end 
small causes." He represented Newbury as 
Deputy to the General Court at Boston in 1660, 
1679, 1680, 1681. He died November 23, 1701, 



NICHOLAS NOYES 445 

aged eighty-six years. He left a considerable 
estate for those days, his personal property being 
inventoried at £1531 and his real estate at £1160. 

Nicholas Noyes married Mary Cutting, a daugh- 
ter (probably) of Captain John Cutting, who 
came from London and at first settled in Charles- 
town, later removing to Newbury about 1642, 
where in 1648 he bought a house of John Allen. 
He was a ship master, sailing from Boston, and 
is said to have crossed the Atlantic thirteen times. 
He was a man of much humor and many stories 
are told of his peculiarities which afforded much 
diversion to himself and others. Governor Win- 
throp in 1637 mentions Captain Cutting's ship 
and tells of a Pequod whom the Governor had 
given to him to take to England. In 1651 he was 
directed by the town of Charlestown to carry 
"Harry's" wife to London and "if her friends do 
not pay, the town to pay, if Harry pays him not. ' ' 

Mary Cutting Noyes, the wife of Nicholas, was 
on September 27, 1653, presented to the court for 
wearing a silk hood and scarf, which was a crime 
under the sumptuary laws of the time which regu- 
lated female costume, but upon proof that her 
husband was worth above two hundred pounds she 
was cleared of her presentment. These laws regu- 
lating the details of costume are often very amus- 
ing, but on the subject of periwigs it is evident 
that our ancestors became seriously in earnest. 
The subject of periwigs was at one time a burn- 
ing one. One distinguished anti-periwigger went 
so far to say that the affliction of the second 
Indian war was brought upon the people of New 



446 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

England "as a judgment and testimony of God 
against the wearing of periwigs." 

Nicholas Noyes and Mary Cutting had thirteen 
children, of whom the eighth, Timothy, who is 
your ancestor, was born June 23, 1655. When he 
was twenty-one years old, in 1676, he served in 
King Philip's War, and "helped drive the enemy 
out of the Narragansett country." He does not 
appear to have held public office and his name 
does not often appear in the records. He must, 
however, have been a prudent man of affairs since 
when he died his estate inventoried £510 of per- 
sonal and £809 of realty, and he had already pro- 
vided for his children during his lifetime. Tim- 
othy Noyes married in 1681 Mary Knight, the 
daughter of John Knight, and had several chil- 
dren, of whom Martha, your ancestress, married 
Thomas Smith, the great grandfather of Sarah 
Morse Smith. 

In the old town graveyard his tombstone with 
its quaint inscription still stands: 

Mr. Timothy Noyes 

Died August ye 21 

1718 & in ye 63d yeare 

of his age 

Good Timothy in 
His Youthful Days 
He lived much 
Unto God Prays 
When Age came one 
He and his wife 
They lived a holy 
& A Pious life 
Therefor you children 
Whos nams are Noyes 
Make Jesus Christ 
Your ondly Choyes. 



Chapter II 

THOMAS SMITH 

Came over 1635 
James 



Thomas Smith —1666 

(Rebecca ) 

Lieut. James Smith 1645 — 1690 

(Sarah Coker) 

Thomas Smith 1673 — 1760 

(Martha Noyes) 

Thomas Smith 1723 — 1758 

(Sarah Newman) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 — 1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



THOMAS SMITH 



Thomas Smith came from Romsey in Ham- 
shire, whence came several of your Newbury an- 
cestors. He came over in 1635 in the ship 
James. He went first to Ipswich in 1635 and 
lived there three years, removing to Newbury in 
1638. In the first layout of lots in the original 
settlement at Parker's River in 1635 he was as- 
signed lot number five "by the east gutter." 
Whether he ever availed himself of this lot for a 
dwelling I know not. He settled on Crane Neck 
where the farm which he started has remained in 
the possession of his descendants to this day. In 
1639 he joined the Rev. Stephen Bachelor and 
founded Winicowett, now Hampton, but remained 
there only a short time, returning to Newbury. 
His wife Rebecca came over with him. It would 
seem that they were young people and without 
children when they first came across the seas. 
Their oldest son, Thomas, was born in 1636, and 
was drowned by falling into a clay-pit on his way 
to school, December 6, 1648, as more fully appears 
in the note on your ancestor Anthony Morse, who 
was held responsible for the accident. Their 
youngest son, Thomas, was born July 7, 1654, and 
was killed by the Indians in 1675 at Bloody Brook. 
This was the second Indian war, due, if you re- 



450 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

member, to the wearing of periwigs. A consider- 
able company of the young men of Essex County 
under Captain Lathrop volunteered to go to the 
assistance of the English forces in the Connecticut 
River Valley to protect the wheat being threshed 
at Deerfield and convoy its carriage to Hadley. 
Journeying with the wheat they stopped to gather 
grapes which hung in clusters by the side of the 
narrow road and were surprised by a band of 
Indians in ambush who poured upon them a mur- 
derous fire. Of the eighty men in the company not 
more than seven or eight escaped. John Toppan, 
the son of Jacob and the brother of Abraham, 
your ancestors, was wounded in the shoulder, but 
succeeded in concealing himself in a dry water 
course by drawing grass and weeds over his body, 
and although the Indians on several occasions 
stepped almost over him he was not discovered. 
Mrs. Emery in her Recollections of a Nonagena- 
rian tells us that John Toppan brought home to 
Newbury the sword of Thomas Smith, who was a 
Sergeant, and two hundred years later, in 1875, 
this sword was borne by a descendant, Edward 
Smith, of Newburyport, at the duo-centennial 
celebration of the Massacre at Bloody Brook, it 
being the sole memento of that cruel fray. 

Thomas Smith, Senior, is often mentioned in 
the early records of Newbury. He was a pros- 
perous farmer and had a large family. He died 
April 26, 1666. It is from James, the fourth child 
of Thomas and Rebecca Smith, that you are de- 
scended. James was born September 10, 1645. 
When he was twenty-one on July 26, 1667, he mar- 



THOMAS SMITH 451 

ried Sarah Coker, the daughter of Robert Coker. 
Robert Coker was one of the company who came 
over with Mr. Parker and Mr. Noyes in the ship 
Mary and John in 1633-4. The records of the 
Court at Ipswich in 1641 indicate that he was 
rather a gay young man. He seems to have finally 
settled down and taken unto himself a wife by the 
name of Catherine. He held various offices in 
Newbury and died Nov. 19, 1690. His son, Joseph, 
married Sarah Hawthorne of Salem, a daughter 
of William Hawthorne, the ancestor of Nathaniel 
Hawthorne. 

James Smith probably served in the Indian 
wars. He was a Lieutenant in the disastrous 
attack on Quebec in 1690. He was in command 
of one of the companies which left Nantasket 
August 9, 1690, under the generalship of Sir 
William Phips. Winsor in his Narrative and 
Critical History of America says : "With a bluff 
and coarse adventurer for a general, with a Cape 
Cod militiaman in John Walley as his lieutenant, 
with a motley force of twenty- two hundred men 
crowded in thirty-two extemporized war-ships, 
and with a scant supply of ammunition" they 
sailed. Frontenac was well prepared for the 
attack. After some ineffectual bombarding, and 
some rather futile fighting on land, Phips with- 
drew his fleet from Quebec and ignominiously 
sailed back to Boston. At the mouth of the Saint 
Lawrence the fleet encountered a storm and the 
vessel on which was your many times great grand- 
father, Lieutenant James Smith, was wrecked, 
and he was drowned off Cape Breton, near Anti- 



452 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

costi, on "Friday night the last of October, 1690." 
The Smiths of Newbury seem to have been war- 
like people, since several of the descendants of 
Thomas the first, and of Lieutenant James, were 
renowned for military prowess. With reference 
to Thomas, the third son of Lieutenant James 
Smith and Sarah Coker, I find no military refer- 
ence. It is from him that you descend. He was 
born March 9, 1673, and married Martha Noyes, 
daughter of Mr. Timothy Noyes. Of his personal 
history I know nothing save that he was a com- 
municant of Saint Paul's Church in Newburyport 
and was buried in the church-yard. 

Thomas Smith, Junior, the son of Thomas 
Smith and Martha Noyes, was born in 1723. He 
was a sailmaker. It would seem that he did 
other odd jobs, since I find that he was paid £12 
18s. in 1746 for work on the bell at Saint Paul's 
Church, which Lord Timothy Dexter gave. He 
married Sarah Newman, the daughter of Thomas 
Newman. Of his personal history I know little. 
It is probable that he had no especial success in 
his short life of thirty-five years. He died Sep- 
tember 28, 1758, and was buried in Saint Paul's 
church-yard, and when the present Saint Anne's 
Chapel was built, his tombstone being in the way, 
the Wardens ruthlessly disposed of it and erected 
over his bones the incongruous Gothic edifice 
which swears at the dignified colonial church of 
Bishop Bass. 

The children of Thomas Smith, Junior, and 
Sarah Newman were Leonard, Nathaniel, Mary, 
Sarah, and Martha, As I shall have occasion to 



THOMAS SMITH 453 

speak of the descendants of several of their chil- 
dren in connection with your great great grand- 
mother, Sarah, who was a daughter of Nathaniel, 
I will here give a brief account of them. 

Leonard, the eldest, was successful in business 
and became "one of the merchant princes" of 
Newburyport. He married Sarah Peabody, of 
an old Essex family. She was the aunt of George 
Peabody, the London banker and philanthropist. 
Mrs. Emery in her Reminiscences has much to say 
about the Peabodys and their connections. The 
following extract may perhaps interest you: 
"Sophronia Peabody accompanied her Uncle 
Leonard Smith to the dedication" of the Old 
South Church. "Mr. Smith had purchased the 
upper corner pew on the side towards Green 
Street and to accommodate his large family" (he 
had twelve children) "two pews had been let into 
one. Yet this double pew was so crowded that 
Fronie and her cousin Sophy Smith were perched 
on the window seat where they vastly enjoyed the 
scene." At least seven of Leonard Smith's chil- 
dren were baptized at Saint Paul's, and I am 
therefore led to suppose that it must have been 
his wife, Sarah, who joined her sister in law, 
Mrs. General Peabody, in being "inclined to the 
more Calvinistic preaching at the Old South," 
which led to the double pew. 

Mary was adopted by General John Peabody, 
an uncle of George Peabody, and the father of 
"Fronie." He was a man of great wealth at one 
time. Mary married, first Thomas Merrill of 
Portland, Maine, and second John Mussey, of 



454 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Portland, the father of "Old Uncle Mussey," 
whom I remember, and of whom you will learn 
later. 

Sarah married John Pettingill, and had four 
daughters, two of whom married Rands. Subse- 
quently other Rands married Smiths, and you 
have many Rand cousins. 

Martha married John Wills March 6, 1781. 
This was old Captain Wills. He was a master 
mariner. His ship was once captured by a Bar- 
bary corsair and he was sold into slavery. His 
eldest son, John Wills, married a Sarah Newman, 
the same name as his grandmother's, and had 
twelve children, of whom one of the youngest, 
Caroline, married Henry M. Caldwell, United 
States consul at Valparaiso, where they adopted 
a little Spanish girl, Maria del Carmen, who 
became my wife. 

The descendants of all of these people have 
been known to me as cousins, but as the genera- 
tions increase the kinship widens and it is, per- 
haps, hardly likely that you will care to further 
trace your relationship with them. 

Nathaniel Smith, your direct ancestor, the sec- 
ond son of Thomas Smith, Jr., and Sarah New- 
man, was born September 11, 1752, and baptized 
at Saint Paul's October 15 following. His life, 
like his father's, was a short one, yet it had at 
least two striking incidents. When he was 
twenty-three years old, a year and a half after he 
had married Judith Morse, he volunteered in Cap- 
tain Moses Nowell's company of minutemen and 
marched to Lexington on the alarm of April 19, 



THOMAS SMITH 455 

1775. Although he was not an "embattled 
farmer," only a trader in fact, he joined in firing 
' ' the shot heard round the world. ' ' Two months 
later he volunteered in Captain Ezra Lunt's com- 
pany, and on June 17, 1775, marched to Charles- 
town, reaching Bunker Hill towards evening as 
the British charged in their third assault. The 
company did good service in covering the retreat 
of their exhausted co-patriots, whose ammunition 
was well-nigh expended. Captain Lunt's com- 
pany, with other troops, by a sustained fire held 
the enemy back and prevented them from com- 
pletely annihilating the fleeing Yankees. It may 
be that Nathaniel Smith saw Warren fall, shot 
through the head, as the retreat commenced, and 
revenged his death with a well directed shot at 
some one of the red coats. With Prescott he sor- 
rowfully marched to Cambridge, filled with mor- 
tification, no doubt, at the failure of his company 
to arrive in time to be in the thick of the fray, and 
discouraged at what seemed the total failure of 
the first important engagement of the Continental 
army. ' ' Neither he nor his contemporaries under- 
stood at the time how a physical defeat might be 
a moral victory." (Justin Winsor, speaking of 
Prescott.) How long he served in the Eevolu- 
tionary War, and whether he was present at any 
other battles, I know not. Yet to have fired a 
musket at Lexington and at Bunker Hill was well 
worth while. 

Nathaniel Smith, like his brother Leonard, was 
a "trader," but in a different way and with a 
very different result. Leonard, as you remem- 



456 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

ber, in part, perhaps, by means of his Peabody 
connections, became "a merchant prince," but 
Nathaniel was little more than an unsuccessful 
peddler. He tried his fortune in Amesbury, and 
West Newbury and along the shore. No two of 
his seven children were born in the same house. 
It was in West Newbury, in January, 1774, that 
he married Judith Morse, the daughter of James 
Ordway Morse and Judith Carr. Her married 
life must have been one of hardship from the start. 
His efforts to support his family achieved little 
success, and when in 1790, being then only thirty- 
eight years old, he undertook his last venture, his 
wife must have had some misgivings as she bade 
him farewell. Some little money of her own he 
had invested in furniture, and chartering a vessel 
for Virginia, he sailed from Newburyport. On 
the voyage he was taken ill with a fever and died, 
being buried at Old Point Comfort. His widow 
was left in desperate circumstances and several of 
the children were taken care of by friends of the 
family. She, with the aid of her daughters, Judith 
and Sarah, your great great grandmother, man- 
aged to support herself and some of the children 
by sewing and dressmaking. There must, indeed, 
have been a striking contrast between the lives of 
those of the children who remained with their 
mother, and those who with their cousins were 
members of the families of Leonard Smith and 
General Peabody. One cannot but feel grateful 
that Judith Morse, after she had married off her 
daughters, she being then in the forty-fifth year 
of her age, herself married Ezra G. Lowell, Febru- 



THOMAS SMITH 457 

ary 20, 1803, and had a comfortable home in 
Poplin, New Hampshire, until her death July 15, 
1817. 

The children of Nathaniel and Judith Morse 
Smith were: 

Judith. Mehitable. 

Mary. Harriet. 

Sarah Morse. John Pettingill. 

Martha Wills. 

Judith married Abner Lowell and had four chil- 
dren, Abner, Alfred Osgood, James Morse, and 
John Davis. 

Mary married Alfred Osgood and had six chil- 
dren, Nathaniel Smith, John Osgood, Charlotte, 
Alfred, William Henry, and Mary Ann. "Cap- 
tain Nat" was a bluff old fellow whose memory 
I cherish since he was very kind to me when I 
was a boy. He had three daughters, the young- 
est of whom, Charlotte, married your cousin 
George Tappan Carter, and their daughter, Caro- 
line Lee Carter, is not so old now that you may 
not sometime come to know her. John Osgood, a 
quiet, precise sort of man, quite unlike his brother, 
Nat, I remember well. He lived on High Street, 
not far from the Wills house. His daughter, 
Florence Osgood, is one of the cousins whom I 
have always known. She has lived much abroad 
since her father's death. Alfred Osgood and his 
family of sons I was always glad to visit when I 
went to Newburyport. He was a clever crafts- 
man, interested in natural history, and brim-full 
of information of interest to a child. "Aunt 



458 CERTAIN COMEOVBRERS 

Mary Ann Osgood" was one of the familiar fig- 
ures of my youth. She was a fine specimen of 
the New England maiden lady. Your grand- 
mother, Sarah Tappan Crapo, was very fond of 
her. 

Sarah Morse, your great great grandmother, of 
whom I will write in another place. 

Mehitable was adopted by her uncle, Leonard 
Smith, the " merchant prince." She was the 
"Aunt Mussey" of my youth, of whom many 
whimsical stories were told. She married first 
John Rand of Portland, and had a son, John Rand 
She married second John Mussey of Portland, the 
son of John Mussey, who had married her aunt. 
She had two daughters, Margaret Sweat, and 
Harriet Preble. "Uncle Mussey" lived to be a 
very old man. I remember him well as a "gentle- 
man of the old school." The beautiful colonial 
house in Portland where he lived is now an art 
museum, a gift to the city by his daughter 
Margaret. 

Harriet was adopted by a family in Epping, 
New Hampshire, and married James Chase of 
Epping. Of her children I know nothing save 
their names, which surely will not interest you. 

John Pettingill followed the sea. He was in 
the United States navy in the War of 1812, and 
afterwards Sergeant of Marines in the Ports- 
mouth Navy Yard. He was subsequently the 
master of a Mississippi River steamboat, on which 
he died. He married Sarah Parsons. 

Martha married first Amos Buswell and second 
Jacob Pike. Of her descendants I know little. 



Chapter III 

JOHN KNIGHT 

Came over 1635 
James 



John Knight — 1670 

(Elizabeth ) 

John Knight 1622 — 1678 

(Bathsheba Ingersoll) 

Mary Knight 1657 — 

(Timothy Noyes) 

Martha Noyes 1697 — 

(Thomas Smith) 

Thomas Smith 1723 — 1758 

(Sarah Newman) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 — 1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JOHN KNIGHT 



John Knight came from Romsey. Eomsey is 
in Hampshire, near Wiltshire, half way between 
Southampton and Salisbury, from which general 
locality the majority of the Newbury immigrants 
came. Romsey is an extremely interesting 
medieval town, beautifully situated on the River 
Test, flowing into Southampton Water. It boasts 
a fine early Norman abbey church, Saint Mary's, 
in whose church-yard lie buried the bones of a 
multitude of your ancestors, Knights, Emerys, 
Smiths and others. John Knight came over in the 
James with his wife Elizabeth in 1635. They 
sailed from Southampton in April and reached 
Boston in June. He settled at Newbury. In the 
same ship was his brother, Richard Knight, who 
subsequently was known in Newbury as "Deacon 
Knight," and took a prominent part in town 
affairs. Both brothers were merchant tailors. 

In 1637 John Knight was licensed by the Gen- 
eral Court at Boston to "keep an ordinary and 
give entertainment to such as neede. " He was 
the predecessor of Tristram Coffin, another ances- 
tor of whom you will hear later, as the innkeeper 
of the town. Although John Knight was not so 
prominent in public affairs as his brother Richard, 
he served as Selectman and as Constable in 1638, 



462 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

and in both capacities several times in later years. 
In 1639 lie was granted a lot "on condition that 
he follow fishing. ' ' In 1645 he had a house lot in 
the "new town" joining South Street. 

John Knight's wife, Elizabeth, died March 20, 
1645, and not long after he married Ann Langley, 
the widow of Richard Ingersoll of Salem. John 
Knight 's son John, your ancestor, in 1647 married 
Bathsheba Ingersoll, the daughter of his step 
mother. John Knight, the first, died in May, 1670. 
His son John Knight, the second, was born in 
1622. He was admitted a freeman in 1650. He 
acted as Selectman in 1668. It is from Mary, a 
daughter of John Knight, second, and his wife, 
Bathsheba Ingersoll, who married Timothy Noyes, 
that you descend. This Mary was a great great 
grandmother of your great great grandmother, 
Sarah Morse Smith. 



Chapter IV 

RICHARD INGERSOLL 

Came over 1629 
Talbot 



Richard Ingersoll — 1644 

(Ann Langley) 

Bathsheba Ingersoll — 1629 — 1705 

(John Knight) 

Mary Knight 1657 — 

(Timothy Noyes) 

Martha Noyes 1697 — 

(Thomas Smith) 

Thomas Smith 1723 — 1758 

(Sarah Newman) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 — 1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William W. Crapo 1895 — 



RICHARD INGERSOLL 



Eichard Ingersoll probably lived in Sands, Bed- 
fordshire. There at all events he was married to 
Ann Langley October 20, 1616. She is said to 
have been a cousin of Mr. John Spencer, one of 
the original settlers of Newbury, who built the 
old stone mansion which I knew as "Aunt 
Pettingill's." In May, 1629, the Governor of the 
New England Colony in England wrote to the 
Governor in Salem in regard to the passengers 
who came over with the Rev. Francis Higginson : 
"There is also one Richard Howard and Richard 
Ingersoll, both Bedfordshire men, who we pray 
you may be well accommodated not doubting but 
they will well and orderly demean themselves." 
Richard Ingersoll brought with him his wife and 
two sons and four daughters. One of the daugh- 
ters was Bathsheba, your ancestress. In 1636 he 
had laid out to him in Salem a house lot with two 
acres and eighty acres of plantation. In the next 
year more land by Frost Fish Brook was given 
him and in 1639 thirty acres in the Great Meadow. 
He seems to have lived near Leach's Hill, now 
known as Brown's Folly. 

In the handwriting of Governor John Endicott 
is this memorandum: "The XVIth of the 11th 
month called January 1636 it is agreed that Ric'd 



466 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Inkersall shall hence forward have one penny for 
every p'son hee doth ferry over the North River 
during the town 's pleasure. " It is probable that 
the town was pleased to continue this franchise 
as long as Richard lived, since he is usually desig- 
nated as ' ' ferryman. ' ' 

At a Salem town meeting held the seventh day 
of the fifth month, 1644, it was: "Ordered that 
two be appointed every Lord's day to walk forth 
in time of God 's worship to take notice of such as 
either lye about the meeting house, or that lye at 
home or in the fields, without giving good account 
thereof, and to take the names of persons and to 
present them to the magistrate, whereby they may 
be proceeded against." Richard Ingersoll was 
named for the "sixth Lord's Day." Whether he 
performed this monitor's duty I know not. He 
died soon after in 1644. His will, dated July 21, 
1644, was proved October 4, 1644. In it he gives 
to his daughter, Bathsheba, two cows. Governor 
Endicott read the will to him and he signed it by 
his mark. 

The tradition that Richard Ingersoll built the 
House of the Seven Gables immortalized by Haw- 
thorne is incorrect. It was probably built by 
John Turner between 1664 and 1680. In 1782 it 
came into the possession of Captain Samuel 
Ingersoll. It remained in the Ingersoll family 
until 1880. 



Chapter V 

ANTHONY MORSE 

Came over 1635 

James 



Anthony Morse 1606 1686 

(Mary ) 

Joshua Morse 1653 1691 

(Hannah Kimball) 

Anthony Morse 1688 1729 

(Judith Moody) 

Caleb Morse 1711 1749 

(Sarah Ordway) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 



Anthony Morse 1606 — 1686 

(Mary ) 

Hannah Morse 1642 — 

(Thomas Newman) 

Thomas Newman 1670 — 1715 

(Rose Spark) 

Thomas Newman 1693 — 1729 

(Elizabeth Phillips) 

Sarah Newman 1722 — 

(Thomas Smith, Jr.) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 — 1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



Anthony Morse 1606 — 1686 

(Mary ) 

Benjamin Morse 1640 — 

(Ruth Sawyer) 

Ruth Morse 1669 — 1748 

(Caleb Moody) 

Judith Moody 1691 — 1775 

(Anthony Morse) 

Caleb Morse 1711 — 1749 

(Sarah Ordway) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 — 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



ANTHONY MORSE 



Anthony Morse of Marlborough, England, was 
a shoemaker. He was born May 9, 1606. He 
came over in 1635 with his brother William in the 
ship James, sailing from Southampton, which 
brought so many of your Essex County ancestors. 
His wife's name was Mary. He settled in New- 
bury. He was admitted as a freeman in 1636. 
His homestead was about one and a half miles 
northeasterly of the Parker River landing place 
and its ruins can still be distinguished. In 1647 
he was allotted a lot in the "new town." In 1649 
he was presented by the grand jury, and on March 
26, 1650, fined by the Court £5 "for digging a pit 
and not filling it up whereby a child was drowned. ' ' 
In the town records of Newbury under date 
December, 1648 is the following: "Thomas 
Smith, aged twelve years, fell into a pit on his 
way to school and was drowned." Although the 
modern remedy would doubtless be sought on the 
civil rather than the criminal side of the court, 
the legal responsibility for one's actions even 
upon one's own territory seems to be properly 
exemplified by the court 's decision. The boy who 
was drowned was a son of your ancestor, Thomas 
Smith of Romsey, whose son, Lieutenant James 
Smith, from whom you are descended, was also 
drowned, but not in a pit, at Anticosti in 1690. 



472 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Notwithstanding the pitfall Anthony Morse 
seems to have been regarded as a man to be 
depended upon. On April 8, 1646, Mr. Henry 
Sewall (the second of the name, I assume,) with 
several others was fined twelve pence for " being 
absent from town meeting." The Constable was 
ordered "to collect the fines within ten days and 
bring them to the town officers. ' ' The Selectmen 
seem to have had some doubts about the Constable 
since they further provide: "In case he bring 
them not in by that time Anthony Mors is 
appointed to Distraine on ye constable for all ye 
fines." This seems to be an early illustration of 
our democratic method of electing officers to 
enforce the law, and then striving to appoint some 
superlegal authority to compel them to actually 
attend to their duties. ' ' Civic Clubs ' ' and ' ' Com- 
mittees of Twenty" and that sort of thing, attempt 
this duty nowadays on the apparent assumption 
that a man considered worthy of the public's con- 
fidence once elected to office for the purpose of 
carrying out the public's will, needs watching and 
encouragement. 

December 25, 1665, the Selectmen ordered that : 
"Anthony Morse, Senior, is to keep the meeting- 
house and ring the bell, see that the house be 
cleane, swept, and glasse of the windows to be 
carefully look't unto, if any should happen to be 
loosened with the wind and be nailed close again." 
He must have proved faithful in his office of sex- 
ton, since he was still acting in that capacity 
August 18, 1680, under which date appears the fol- 
lowing in the town records: "The Selectmen 



ANTHONY MORSE 473 

ordered that Anthony Morse should every Sab- 
bath day go or send his boy to Mr. Richardson 
and tell him when he is going to ring the last bell 
every meeting and for that service is to have ten 
shillings a year added to his former annuity. ' ' 

In 1678 he took the oath of allegiance. On 
October 12, 1686, he died, his will dated April 29, 
1680, being proved April 23, 1687. It is some- 
what unusual that he made Joshua Morse, your 
ancestor, his twelfth and youngest child, his heir, 
or "aire" as he calls him in his will. To him he 
gave all his lands and freeholds. "Allso I give 
to my son Joshua Morse all my cattell an horsis 
and sheep swine and all my toules for the shu- 
making trade as allso my carte wheles, dung pot, 
plow, harrow, youke's chains, axis, hones, forkes, 
shovel, spad, grindstone, yk as allso on father bed 
which he lieth on with a bouster and pilo and a 
pair of blinkets and coverlit and tou par of shetes 
a bedsted and mat, a pot and brass ceteel, the best 
of the tou ceteels, and a scillet and tou platars and 
a poringer and a drinking pot and tou spoons and 
the water pails and barils and tobes." To all 
his other children except to Benjamin he gave 
money legacies which Joshua was to pay. "To 
my dafter Newman children I geve £12." She 
also was your ancestress. To Benjamin he gave 
an interest in the undivided lands above the Arti- 
choke River, which rather involved the will and 
evidently put him to much trouble to express him- 
self clearly. The original will is in the Salem 
Court. It is a quaint document probably written 
by Anthony Morse himself. It certainly lacks the 



474 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

stereotyped phraseology of the legal scrivener. It 
is "Sined, selid and onid in the presence of uss — 
James Coffin — Mary Brown." Captain Daniel 
Peirce, Tristram Coffin and Thomas Noyes, his 
"loving and crisian friend" were named as the 
"overseers" of the will. The estate as returned 
by Joshua Morse, the executor, was £348 6s. 7d. 

Of Joshua Morse, the "aire," I have learned 
nothing save that he was a blacksmith and mar- 
ried Hannah Kimball and died March 28, 1691. 
The third child of Joshua was Anthony Morse, 
second, from whom you descend. He was born 
April 15, 1688. His name often appears in the 
town records and he appears to have been active 
and successful in business. He married April 
19, 1710, Judith Moody, daughter of Deacon Caleb 
Moody. 

The following letter addressed to Anthony 
Morse, second, may serve to bring him before you 
as a living personality : 

Mr. Morse 

This is to desire ye favour of you to gett me one, 
two, or three or more of ye first sammon yt can be had 
this year. I am willing to give a good price rather 
than not have it and will pay a man and horse for 
bringing it to content, but observe he do'nt bring for 
any body else at ye same time. If there be but one 
single sammon send away forthwith. If more then it 
will help the extraordinary charge, but do'nt let them 
be kept till almost spoiled in hopes of more. Pray 
give my service to your father Moody and I desire his 
help in this affair. If you have success let ye bearer 
call at Mr. Woodbridge's and at Captain Corney's in 
his way to me, for they may happen at ye same time 
to have some. I shall take it very kindly if you will 
be mindful. jj Whitton 

Boston, March 21st, 1728. 



ANTHONY MORSE 475 

One hopes that Mr. Whitton obtained his salmon 
that spring from the Merrimack, and that nobody 
else had any as early. Perhaps he wished to sur- 
prise his cronies up in Boston by inviting them to 
a feast and setting forth the very first salmon of 
the season. If so we may hope the Madeira wine 
was not forgotten. 

Anthony Morse's oldest son was Caleb, your 
ancestor. He lived in Hampton for awhile and in 
1734 was given a letter to the Second Church of 
Newbury. He married Sarah Ordway, of whom 
I have learned nothing save that she lived one 
hundred years and three months. One of their 
children, James Ordway Morse, who married 
Judith Carr, the widow of his cousin Stephen 
Morse, was the grandfather of Sarah Morse 
Smith, your great great grandmother. 



Chapter VI 
THE NEWBURY WITCH 



THE NEWBURY WITCH 



Although collateral, your connection with the 
witch of Newbury may warrant my telling the 
story here. The witch was remotely your great 
aunt by marriage, so to speak, yet her story doubt- 
less nearly touched your many times great grand- 
father Anthony, her brother in law. 

On High Street, at the corner of Market Street, 
opposite Saint Paul's Church, in Newburyport, 
stood in my boyhood what was known as the 
"Witch House." Joshua Coffin says it was built 
soon after 1645 by William Morse, the brother of 
your ancestor Anthony. John J. Currier, how- 
ever, disputes this generally accepted tradition 
and places the William Morse house in Market 
Square. Wherever it was located, the old house 
has been well chronicled in the annals of the mar- 
vellous. Cotton Mather, whose credulous pre- 
dilection for the uncanny was equalled only by his 
intemperate picturesqueness in stating it, tells us 
that this house "was so infested with demons that 
before the Devil was chained up, the invisible 
hand did begin to put forth an astonishing visi- 
bility." His circumstantial account of the dia- 
bolical happenings which occurred here is, as 
Mr. Joshua Coffin avers, perverted and amplified 
to a "prodigious and nefandous extent." The 



480 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Court records, however, have preserved much of 
the story and it is from these rather than from 
the decorated statements of Mather that I set 
it forth. 

Listen to the testimony of your own many times 
great grandfather : 

I Anthony Mors ocationely being att my brother 
Morse's hous, my brother showed me a pece of a brik, 
which had several times come down the chimne. I sit- 
ting in the cornar towck the pece of brik in my hand. 
Within a littell spas of tiem the pece of brik came down 
the chimne. Also in the chimny cornar I saw a hamar 
on the ground. Their being no person near the hamar 
it was sodenly gone; by what means I know not, but 
within a littell spas after, the hamar came down the 
chimny, and within a littell spas of tiem after that, 
came a pece woud, about a fute loung, and within 
a littell after that came down a fiar brend, the fiar 
being out. This was about ten deays agoo. 

Newbury December Eighth 1679. 
Taken on oath December eighth 1679 before me 
John Woodbridge, Commissioner. 

These happenings, however, were tame com- 
pared with the experiences of the Goodman Wil- 
liam Morse. In addition to accounts of still more 
remarkable exploits of the eccentric chimney he 
tells of "great noyes against the ruf with stekes 
and stones;" at midnight "a hog in the house 
running about, the door being shut;" "pots hang- 
ing over the fire dashing against the other ; " "an 
andiron danced up and dune many times and into 
a pot and out again up atop of a tabal, the pot 
turning over and speling all in it;" "two spoons 
throwed off the table and presently the table 
thro wed downe;" "a shoo which we saw in the 



THE NEWBURY WITCH 481 

chamber before come downe the chimney, the dore 
being shut, and strnk me a blow in the hed, which 
ded much hurts;" "I being at prayer, my hed 
being cuf red with a cloth, a chaire did often times 
bow to me and then strike me on the side ; " " the 
cat thrown at my wife and thrown at us five times, 
the lampe standing by us on a chest was beaten 
downe ; ' ' and many other unquestionably disturb- 
ing misadventures which very naturally were the 
talk of the town. 

The neighbors seem to have had some suspicion 
that the Goodwife herself was not above suspicion 
as the diabolical cause of these troubles. Not so 
one Caleb Powell, "the mate of a vessel in the 
harbor." He would seem to have been a friend 
of William Morse and his wife, and was inclined 
to believe that the so-called supernatural occur- 
rences were the result of human agency. More- 
over, he seems from the first to have entertained 
a shrewd guess as to the identity of the culprit. 
At any rate, he volunteered to clear up the whole 
mystery. In view of the credulous temper of the 
community and the evident senility of Goodman 
Morse, he pretended that he would unravel the 
mystery by means of "astrologie and astrono- 
mic," under certain conditions of assistance 
which he named. This proved a most unfor- 
tunately false step which involved him in much 
trouble. He at once came under suspicion of 
witchcraft and dealing in the black art. On 
December 3, 1679, he was arrested, and on Decem- 
ber 8 brought before the Court at Salem charged 
with "suspicion of working with the devil to the 



482 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

molesting of William Morse and his family. ' ' It 
was at this trial that the testimony of William 
Morse and Anthony Morse was given. 

The learned Court, after weighing all the evi- 
dence that could be produced against Caleb 
Powell, rendered the following remarkable de- 
cision, as appears by the Court records at Salem : 

Upon hearing the complaint brought to this court 
against Caleb Powell for suspicion of working by the 
devil to the molesting of the family of William Morse 
of Newbury, though this court cannot find any evident 
ground of proceeding farther against the sayd Powell, 
yett we determine that he hath given such ground of 
suspicion of his so dealing that we cannot so acquit 
him but that he justly deserves to beare his own shame 
and costs of prosecution of the complaint. It is 
referred to Mr. Woodbridge to hear and determine the 
charges. 

Mr. Joshua Coffin well points out the profound 
wisdom and accurate discrimination of this Court. 
The determination was : First, That the defend- 
ant was just guilty enough to pay the expense of 
being suspected; Secondly, That he should "bear 
his own shame ; ' ' and, Thirdly, That they had no 
reason to believe he was guilty at all. The more 
logical community, however, were not satisfied 
with this equivocal decision. If Caleb Powell 
was not guilty of being in league with the devil, 
then some other person must be, since it was 
patent that the experiences at the Morse house 
were susceptible of no other explanation than 
witchcraft. Accordingly they selected Elizabeth 
Morse, the wife of William Morse, she being then 
sixty-five years of age, as the guilty person. 



THE NEWBURY WITCH 483 

As William Morse, aided by your great grand- 
father Anthony, had been the prosecutor in the 
first trial, he was now placed in the embarrassing 
position of modifying his testimony as to the dia- 
bolical doings at his house in order to protect his 
wife from this grave charge. Other witnesses, 
however, proved beyond a reasonable doubt that 
"Goody Morse" was indeed a witch. Some 
seventeen of her friends and neighbors gave their 
testimonies "why they verily believed Goody 
Morse to be a witch, and ought to be hung, accord- 
ing to the Old Mosaic law, which says : 'thou shalt 
not suffer a witch to live.' " The only "testi- 
monie" which is found in the files of the General 
Court in Boston, to which the case was finally 
taken, is that of Zechariah Davis. At the risk 
of being tedious I will give it in full as a specimen 
of the kind of evidence on which a court con- 
demned a harmless old woman to death: 

Zechariah Davis : "When I lived at Salisbury "William 
Morse's wife asked of me whether I could let her have 
a small passell of winges and I told her I woode, so she 
would have me bring them over for her the next time 
I came over, but I came over and did not think of the 
winges, but met Goody Morse, she asked me whether 
I had brought over her winges, and I tel her no I did 
not think of it, so I came 3 ore 4 times and had them in 
my mind a litel before I came over but still forgot them 
at my coming away, so meeting with her every time 
that I came over without them aftar I had promised 
her the winges, soe she tel me she wonder at it that my 
memory should be soe bad, but when I came home 1 
went to the barne and there was 3 cafes in a pen. One 
of them fel a dancing and roreing and was in such a 
condition as I never saw on cafe before, but being 
almost night the catle come home and we putt him to 



484 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

his dam and he sucke and was well 3 or 4 dayes, and 
one of them was my brother's then come over from New- 
bury, but we did not thinke to send the winges, but 
when he came home and went to the barne this cafe fel 
a danceing and roreing so we putt him to the cowe but 
he would not sucke but rane roreing away so we gate 
him again with much adoe and put him into the barne 
and we heard him rore several times in the night and in 
the morning I went to the barne and there he was set- 
ing upon his taile like a doge, and I never see no cafe 
set aftar that manner before and so he remained ia 
these fits while he died. 

Taken on oath June seventh, 1679. 

I regret to be obliged to state that your many 
times great grandfather, Caleb Moody, Senior, 
was one of the seventeen or more unfriendly 
neighbors on whose ridiculous tales this poor 
woman was condemned as a witch. It is at least 
a source of satisfaction that his wife, your great 
grandmother, Judith Bradbury, was possessed of 
a saner judgment. She did not, it is true, know 
at this time that her own mother, your ancestress, 
was to be tried as a witch several years after- 
wards in the height of the Salem witchcraft delu- 
sion, yet it would almost seem as if she realized 
the awful consequences of accusing an innocent 
old woman of co-partnership with the devil. Her 
generous and sane point of view is disclosed in 
the record of the distracted William Morse 's peti- 
tion to the General Court of the Colony in 1681, 
in which at great length he makes answer to the 
various testimonies offered in the lower court, 
taking them up seriatim. 

To Caleb Moody: As to what befell him in and 
about his not seeing my wife, yt his cow making no 



THE NEWBURY WITCH 485 

hast to hir calfe, wch wee are ignorant of, it being 
so long since, and being in church communion with us, 
should have spoken of it like a Christian and you pro- 
ceeded so as wee might have given an answer in less 
time yn tenn yeares. Wee are ignorant yt he had a 
shepe so dyed. And his wife knowne to be a pretious 
godly whoman, yt hath oftne spoken to hir husband 
not to be so uncharitable and have and doe carry it 
like a Christian with a due respect in hir carriage 
towards my wife all along. 

The answers of William Morse to the various 
testimonies indicate that they were all of equal 
irrelevancy, and yet they were deemed sufficient 
to support a judgment of a Court of law which 
would be unbelievable were it not set forth in 
the official records as follows : 

At a court of assistants on adjournment held at Bos- 
ton May twentieth, 1680. The grand Jury presenting 
Elizabeth, wife of William Morse, senior. She was 
indicted by the name of Elizabeth Morse for that she, 
not having the fear of God before her eyes, being 
instigated by the Divil and had familiarity with the 
Divil, contrary to the peace of our Sovereign Lord the 
King, his Crown and Dignity, the laws of God, and of 
this jurisdiction; after the prisoner was at the bar 
and pleaded not guilty, and put herself on God and the 
country for triall, the evidences being produced were 
read and committed to the jury. The jury brought in 
their verdict. They found Elizabeth Morse, the pris- 
oner at the bar, guilty according to indictment. The 
Governor on the twenty seventh of May after ye lec- 
ture pronounced sentence. 'Elizabeth Morse, you are 
to goe from hence to the place from whence you came 
and thence to the place of execution and there be 
hanged by the neck, till you be dead, and the Lord have 
mercy on your soul.' The court was adjourned diem 
per diem and on the first of June 1680 the governor and 
magistrates voted the reprieving of Elizabeth Morse 
condemned to the next session of the Court in October, 

as attests Edward Rawson, Secretary. 



486 CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 

The Deputies to the General Court were much 
incensed at the action of the Governor and magis- 
trates in delaying the execution, and adopted a 
resolution in November, 1680, requesting the 
magistrates to proceed. On the 18th of May, 1681, 
was presented the following petition in the hand- 
writing of Robert Pike : 

To the honored governor, deputy governor, magis- 
trates and deputies now assembled in Court May the 
eighteenth 1681. 

The most humble petition and request of William 
Morse in behalf of his wif (now a condemned prisoner) 
to this honored court is that they would be pleased so 
far to hearken to the cry of your poor prisoner, who 
am a condemned person, upon the charge of witch- 
craft and for a wich, to which charge your poor pris- 
oner have pleaded not guilty, and by the mercy of God 
and the goodness of the honored governor, I am 
reprieved and brought to this honored court, at the 
foot of which tribunal I now stand humbly praying 
your justic in hearing of my case and to determine 
therein as the Lord shall direct. I do not understand 
law, nor do I know how to lay my case before you as 
I ought for want of which I humbly beg of your honrs 
that my request may not be rejected but may find 
acceptance with you it being no more but your sentence 
upon my triall whether I shall live or dy, to which I 
shall humbly submit unto the Lord and you. 

William Morse in behalf of his wife 
Elizabeth Morse. 

To the good sense and firmness of Governor 
Bradstreet Elizabeth Morse owed her life. The 
frenzy which soon after seized Essex County and 
found its expression in the appalling action of 
the Court at Salem at which my dear old friend 
and kindly diarist, Samuel Sewall, actually 



THE NEWBURY WITCH 487 

assisted and abetted as a presiding magistrate, 
had not as yet completely demented the com- 
munity. Governor Bradstreet was able by means 
of diplomatic firmness to save this old woman 
from the penalty of death, and see that she did 
not "go to the place whence she came and thence 
to the place of execution. ' ' She was, indeed, sent 
back to Newbury, the place whence she came, yet 
allowed to abide there "provided she goe not 
above sixteen rods from her owne house and land 
at any time except to the meeting house in New- 
bury nor remove from the place appointed her by 
the minister and selectmen to sitt in whilst there. ' ' 
How long after her release from prison she lived 
I know not, or whether she lived to hear of those 
other helpless old women who a few years later 
were actually executed on the charge of witchcraft. 
The most marvelous part of the story is that the 
official records of the trials, still in existence, giv- 
ing the evidence considered by two Courts of law 
and in review by the General Court and the magis- 
trates, disclose beyond a shadow of a doubt the 
true explanation of the queer happenings at the 
Morse house on which the whole fabric of witch- 
craft was built. In the original testimony of 
William Morse, when he was in effect prosecuting 
Caleb Powell as the Devil's agent, is the follow- 
ing: "A mate of a ship" (Caleb Powell) "com- 
ing often to me said he much grefed for me and 
said the boye was the case of all my truble and 
my wife was much ronged and was no wich, and 
if I would let him have the boye but one day he 
would warrant me no more truble. I being per- 



488 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

suaded to it he cum the nex day at the brek of 
day, and the boy was with him until night and I 
had not any truble since." The deposition of 
Mary Tucker, aged twenty, is to the following 
effect: "She remembered that Caleb Powell 
came into their house and says to this purpose, 
that he coming to William Morse his house and 
the old man being at prayer he thought fit not to 
go in but looked in at the window and he says he 
had broken the inchantment, for he saw the boy 
play tricks while he was at prayer and mentioned 
some and among the rest that he saw him to fling 
a shoe at the old man's head." After the pre- 
sentment of his wife William Morse gave the fol- 
lowing testimony. He said that Caleb Powell 
told him "this boy is the occasion of your grief e, 
for he does these things and hath caused his good 
old grandmother to be counted a witch. Then 
said I, how can all these things be done by him? 
Then sayd 'although he may not have done all, 
yet most of them, for this boy is a young rogue, 
a vile rogue ; I have watched him and see him do 
things as to come up and down. Goodman Morse 
if you are willing to let mee have the boy, I will 
undertake you shall be freed from any trouble of 
this kind while he is with me. ' I was very unwill- 
ing at the first and my wife, but by often urging 
me to, and when he told me whither and in what 
employment and company he should goe, I did con- 
sent to it, and we have been freed from any 
trouble of this kind ever since that promise made 
on Monday night last till this time being Friday 
afternoon. ' ' 



THE NEWBURY WITCH 489 

If ever a boy deserved a vigorous spanking f of 
cutting up antics that grandson of Elizabeth 
Morse most assuredly did. 



Chapter VII 

WILLIAM MOODY 
Came over 1634 
Mary and John 



William Moody — 1673 

(Sarah ) 

Caleb Moody 1637 — 1698 

(Judith Bradbury) 

Caleb Moody 1666 — 1741 

(Ruth Morse) 

Judith Moody 1691 — 1775 

(Anthony Morse) 

Caleb Morse 1711 — 1749 

(Sarah Ordway) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 — 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W- Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



WILLIAM MOODY 



William Moody, thought to be of Welsh origin, 
lived in Ipswich, England. He was a saddler by 
trade. He came over with Mr. Parker's company 
on the Mary and John, arriving in Boston May, 
1634, and at once went to Ipswich, where on De- 
cember 29, 1634, he had a house lot of ''four acres 
of meadow and marsh by the landside, northward 
the towne. " From thence with the first settlers 
he went to Newbury. In the original allotment 
of lands he was granted ninety-two acres, which 
being a much larger allotment than most, indi- 
cated that he had been able to contribute substan- 
tially to the founding of the Parker Eiver settle- 
ment. He settled on a farm near Oldtown Hill, 
which is still in the possession of his descendants 
of the tenth generation. 

William Moody was admitted as a freeman of 
the Colony May 6, 1635. In 1637 and 1638 he 
was chosen Selectman. He is often mentioned in 
the early town records of Newbury. He seems 
to have acted as the village blacksmith, and in- 
vented a method of shoeing oxen with iron so 
that they might travel over the ice. He died Octo- 
ber 25, 1673. His wife's name was Sarah. His son 
Caleb Moody, your ancestor, was born probably 
in 1637 in Newbury. He married first Sara Pierce, 



494 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

a sister of Captain Daniel Pierce, August 24, 1659. 
She died May 25, 1665, and on November 9, 1665, 
he married Judith Bradbury, the daughter of 
Thomas and Mary (Perkins) Bradbury. Caleb 
Moody was a man of strong character and took 
a leading part in the affairs of Newbury. In 
1666 he took the freeman's oath, and later, 
1678, the oath of allegiance. In 1669, 1670, 
1671 and 1672, and probably in other years, 
he was of the Selectmen of Newbury. In a 
deed to him in 1672 of a house lot near Watts Cel- 
lar, the first rude dwelling in the locality where 
later was the Market Square of Newburyport, he 
is designated as a "malster." In 1677 and 1678 
he represented Newbury at the General Court in 
Boston and made a vigorous and plucky resistance 
to the usurpations of the " Tyrant" Andros. In 
1682 I find him designated as ''Sergeant," indi- 
cating some military service. There are several 
records of his ownership in vessels and it is not 
surprising to find his name at the top of the list 
of subscribers to the petition made in May, 1683, 
to the General Court for the establishment of 
Newbury as a port of entry. The phraseology of 
this petition, which may have been written by 
Caleb Moody, is rather quaint. It begins as fol- 
lows: "Humbly craving the favour that your 
Honors would be pleased to consider our little 
Zebulon and to ease us of that charge which at 
present we are forced unto by our going to Salem 
to enter our vessels, and thereby are forced to 
stay at least two days, before we can unload, be- 
sides other charges of going and coming." "Re- 



WILLIAM MOODY 495 

f erred to the next General Court," is the famil- 
iarly discouraging endorsement on this petition. 
In 1684 Caleb Moody was licensed to "boil stur- 
geon in order to market." There were many 
sturgeon in the Merrimack, very big ones indeed, 
from twelve to eighteen feet long, if we may be- 
lieve the fish stories of these ancient times. The 
town gave to one or more persons the exclusive 
right to catch and prepare them for market. 
They were pickled and sent to England and the 
business for a time was very profitable. 

Caleb Moody had shown himself a fearless and 
outspoken critic of Governor Andros, and he was 
probably an instigator of rebellion in Newbury 
and highly objectionable to the Colonial govern- 
ment. In 1688 he was arrested and imprisoned 
for sedition. In his subsequent petition for re- 
dress he says that one Joseph Bailey gave him a 
paper in January, 1688, which he had picked up 
in the King's Highway. The title of this paper 
was: 

' ' New England alarmed 
To rise and be armed, 
Let no papist you charme, 
I mean you no harme, " etc. 

The purpose of the paper, writes Caleb Moody, was 
to give notice to the people of the danger they were in 
being under the sad circumstances of an arbitrary 
government, Sir Edmund Andros having about one thou- 
sand of our soldiers, as I was informed, prest out of the 
Massachusetts Colony and carried eastward under pre- 
tence of destroying our enemy Indians (although not one 
Indian killed by them that I heard of at that time.) 

Both Caleb Moody and Joseph Bailey, who 
gave him the paper, were summoned to Court, 



496 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Joseph being held and Caleb allowed to go. Later 
in the year, however, Caleb was arrested on a 
justice's warrant and, as he writes, "they com- 
mitted me to Salem prison (though I proffered 
them bayles) but I was to be safely kept to answer 
what should be charged against me upon the 
King's account for publishing a scandalous and 
seditious lybell. " He was kept in prison five 
weeks awaiting trial. In his narrative he says: 
' ' Afterwards there came news of ye happy arrival 
and good success of ye Prince of Orange, now 
King of England, and then, by petitioning, I got 
bayle. ' ' He made a claim January, 1689, for £40 
damages for false imprisonment. Whether he 
collected his damages, or whether he was ever 
tried on the charge of sedition, I know not. He 
died August 25, 1698. 

Caleb Moody's oldest son Caleb, from whom 
you descend, is designated usually as "Deacon 
Moody," although he is sometimes given the title 
of "Lieutenant." He was born in 1666 and died 
in 1741. He was prominent in the affairs of 
Newbury, holding various town offices. In 1690 
he married Ruth Morse, a daughter of Benjamin 
Morse and Ruth Sawyer. Benjamin Morse was 
a son of Anthony Morse, the comeoverer, and 
his wife, Ruth Sawyer, was a daughter of William 
Sawyer and his wife Ruth. William Sawyer was 
in Salem in 1643 and afterwards in Wenham. He 
came to Newbury about 1645 and settled on Saw- 
yer's Hill, in West Newbury. He took an active 
part in the town's affairs. When he subscribed 
to the oath of allegiance in 1678 he said he was 



WILLIAM MOODY 497 

sixty-five years old and was consequently born in 
the old country in 1613. Judith Moody, the 
daughter of Deacon Caleb Moody and Ruth Morse, 
born in 1691, married Anthony Morse, her cousin,' 
in 1710, and was a great grandmother of Judith 
Morse, the mother of Sarah Morse Smith. 

Caleb Moody, Senior, and his wife, Judith Brad- 
bury, had many children. One was Samuel, a 
somewhat famous divine and ancestor of a long 
list of New England clergymen, one of whom, a 
whimsical character, was for many years the 
Master of Dummer Academy. Another son, 
Joshua, was also the progenitor of numerous min- 
isters. Another son, William, married Mehitable, 
a daughter of Henry Sewall, and is the "Brother 
Moody" so often mentioned in Judge Sewall 's 
diary. A daughter Judith, born in 1669, died in 
1679. Another daughter Judith, born February 
2, 1682-3, caused me much trouble in the prepara- 
tion of these notes. She has been accepted by 
various genealogists as the Judith Moody who 
married Anthony Morse, in which case she would 
be your ancestress and as such, indeed, I consid- 
ered her until the discovery that she married John 
Toppan, a son of Jacob Toppan, and nephew of 
Judge Sewall, which disqualified her. Your 
Judith, born in 1691, and named for her grand- 
mother, Judith Bradbury, and her great grand- 
mother, Judith Perkins, was the niece of the 
Judith who was born in 1682-3, although there 
was only nine years' difference in the dates of 
their births. 



Chapter VIII 

JAMES ORDWAY 

Came over prior to 1648 



James Ordway 1620 — 1704+ 

(Ann Emery) 

John Ordway 1658 — 1717 

(Mary Godfrey) 

James Ordway 1687 — 

(Judith Bailey) 

Sarah Ordway 1715 — 1815 

(Caleb Morse) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 — 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

"William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JAMES ORDWAY 



James Ordway was of Welsh extraction. In 
what year he came over I have been unable to 
discover. He was born about 1620. He was in 
Newbury at an early date, having become well 
established there before November 23, 1648, when 
he married Ann Emery, a daughter of John 
Emery, the first. He took no part in civic affairs, 
and his name seldom appears in the town records 
save as attending town meeting occasionally. He 
was, perhaps, of a quiet peaceable disposition, dis- 
inclined for controversy of any kind. This is indi- 
cated by the fact that he was among the first to 
obey the royal mandate to take the oath of 
allegiance in 1668, which was so stubbornly con- 
tested by many of your Newbury ancestors, and 
then, again, to be doubly sure that he was in the 
royal grace he took the oath again in 1678, on 
which later occasion he gave his age as "about 
sixty. ' ' 

Almost the only detail of his life which I have 
uncovered was a scrape in which he figured in 
June, 1662. On that date he, with Peter Godfrey, 
another of your forebears, and some others were 
before the bar of the Court, under indictment, be- 
cause they had wrongfully occupied seats in the 
meeting-house at service which had not been duly 



502 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

assigned to them by the Selectmen of the town. 
The records of the Court, now at Salem, preserve 
their signed acknowledgment that they pleaded 
guilty to their wrong doing and solemnly agreed 
"that we will keep our own seats and not disturb 
any man in their seats any more." 

The distribution of seats in the meeting-house 
must have been a delicate duty of the Selectmen. 
There was always much dissatisfaction and jeal- 
ousy among those who were told to go way back 
and sit down. In 1669, for instance, it appears 
from the Court records that there was much indig- 
nation on the part of certain good people at the 
way in which the Selectmen of Newbury had seen 
fit to seat them in the meeting-house. The in- 
surgents took matters into their own hands, and 
made a redistribution according to their own ideas 
which they proceeded to put into operation vi et 
armis. Peter Toppan, the oldest son of Abraham 
Toppan, who was notoriously cantankerous and 
who afterward had a protracted litigation with 
his brother, your ancestor Jacob, was at this time 
fined heavily by the court for "setting in a seat 
belonging to others." 

It would seem that the meetings for divine 
worship in those early days were not always con- 
ducted with that decorum which one has since 
been taught to deem seemly. I have found numer- 
ous references to distinctly disorderly and tumult- 
uous scenes "at meeting." One rather wonders, 
for instance, what caused the Court at Hampton 
in 1661 to order that any person who discharged 
a gun in the meeting-house should forfeit five 



JAMES ORDWAY 503 

shillings for every such offence, and moreover 
prohibited, under penalty, any person from riding 
or leading a horse into the meeting-house. There 
is an interesting account of the trouble in 1677 
about seats in the Newbury meeting-house. The 
Selectmen granted formal permission to several 
young women to "build a new seat in the south 
corner of the woman's gallery." For some rea- 
son this seems to have aroused the indignation 
of certain young men, among whom, without 
doubt, were some of your progenitors. Do you 
suppose that the young women actually had the 
self-denial to place themselves where the young 
men could not flirt with them during service? 
There surely must have been some grave cause 
of resentment, because the young men broke into 
the meeting-house on a week day and demolished 
the new seat. For this crime they were indicted 
and tried at the County Court at Salem, and each 
was condemned to be severely whipped and pay 
a fine of ten pounds. The record of the testimony 
is most amusing. It is evident that the young 
men, for some inexplicable reason, had the sym- 
pathy of a large part of the community. 

A strange story in connection with the Newbury 
meeting-house is disclosed on the records of the 
Court at Salem. "May 5th 1663. Lydia Ward- 
well on her presentment for coming naked into 
Newbury meeting-house. The sentence of the 
court is that she shall be severely whipped and 
pay the costs and fees to the Marshal of Hampton 
for bringing her. Costs 10s. fees 2s, 6d." There 
has been preserved also an unofficial account of 



504 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

this remarkable occurrence written by a sympa- 
thizer of the lady. It seems that she had formerly 
been connected with the Newbury church but had 
removed to Hampton without asking for her dis- 
charge papers, being indignant at the way the 
church had treated her husband. 

Being a young and tender chaste woman, seeing the 
■wickedness of your priests and rulers to her husband, 
was not at all offended with the truth, but as your wick- 
edness abounded, so she withdrew and separated from 
your church at Newbury, of which she was some time a 
member; and being given up to the leading of the Lord, 
after she had often been sent for to come thither to give 
reason for such separation, it being at length upon her 
in the consideration of their miserable condition, who 
were thus blinded with ignorance and persecution, to go 
to them, and as a sign to them she went in (though it 
was exceeding hard to her modest and shamefaced dis- 
position) naked amongst them, which put them in such 
a rage, instead of consideration, they laid hands on her, 
and to the next court at Ipswich had her, where without 
law they condemned her to be tied to the fence post of the 
tavern where they sat, and there sorely lashed her with 
twenty or thirty cruel stripes. And this is the discipline 
of the Church of Newbury in New England, and this 
their religion, and their usage of the handmaiden of the 
Lord! 

James Ordway was still alive in 1704, an old 
man over eighty years old. His wife, Ann, had 
died in 1687. Their son, John Ordway, your an- 
cestor, who was born in 1658, was just twenty 
when, under his father's advice, doubtless, he 
took the oath of allegiance. He did not, however, 
inherit the non-combative qualities of his father, 
and yet, save that he is sometimes designated as 
' ' Sergeant ' ' Ordway, which indicates military ser- 
vice, the scope of his activities so far as the 



JAMES ORDWAY 505 

records disclose, was confined to the affairs of 
the church. From 1685 to 1712 there was a bitter 
feud between two parties at West Newbury about 
the location of a meeting-house. It resulted final- 
ly in two meeting-houses, one "in the plains," and 
the other on Pipe Stave Hill. John Ordway and 
Caleb Moody were both prominent in this con- 
troversy, both being of the Pipe Stave Hill con- 
tingent. The General Court at Boston was 
applied to by both parties on several occasions, and 
the civil Courts were involved. The Pipe Stave 
Hillers deliberately disregarded the order of the 
General Court, and John Ordway with others was 
solemnly enjoined from proceeding with the meet- 
ing-house in defiance of the Court. None the less, 
the work on the meeting-house proceeded, and 
before John Ordway 's death, in 1717, it was finally 
recognized as a regular precinct, much to the 
indignation of those who worshipped in the 
Plains. There is on file in the State House at 
Boston a statement of certain phases of this con- 
troversy written by John Ordway which shows 
that he had a concise and peppery style. 

John Ordway in 1681 married Mary Godfrey, 
the daughter of Peter Godfrey and Mary Brown. 
Concerning Peter Godfrey I have been unable to 
ascertain any facts. In 1678 he took the oath of 
allegiance, stating that he was then forty-eight 
years old. He was probably the son of John God- 
frey, who came over in the Mary and John 1634. 
He died in 1697. In 1656 he married Mary 
Brown, who had the disputed distinction of being 
the first child of English parents born in Newbury 



506 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

in 1635. She was the daughter of Thomas Brown 
and his wife Mary. Thomas Brown was a weaver 
of Malford in England. Malford is between 
Malmsbury and Chippenham, County Wilts. In 
Malford he worked for Thomas Antram. When 
he was twenty-eight he came over with his wife 
on the ship James. They sailed from Southamp- 
ton April 3, 1635, and arrived in Boston June 3. 
He went at once to Newbury and settled on 
a farm in the vicinity of Turkey Hill. On May 
22, 1639, he was admitted to the rights of a free- 
man of the Colony. He acted as the agent of 
Stephen Dummer, another ancestor of yours who 
went back to England, in regard to Mr. Dummer 's 
lands at Turkey Hill and the " Birchen Meadow." 
In 1645 he was granted a house lot in the New 
Town near Cross Street. He died in 1687. 

James Ordway, who was born in 1687, the son 
of John Ordway and Mary Godfrey, was a great 
great grandfather of Sarah Morse Smith. 



Chapter IX 

JOHN EMERY 

Came over 1635 
James 



John Emery 1598 — 1683 

(Mary ) 

John Emery 1628 — 1693 

(Mary Webster) 

Sarah Emery 1660 — 1694 

(Isaac Bailey) 

Joshua Bailey 1685 — 1760 

(Sarah Coffin) 

Sarah Bailey 1721 — 1811 

(Edward Toppan)) 

Abner Toppan 1764 — 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 — 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



John Emery 1598 — 1683 

(Mary ) 

Ann Emery 1631 — 1687 

(James Ordway) 

John Ordway 1658 — 1717 

(Mary Godfrey) 

James Ordway 1687 — 

(Judith Bailey) 

Sarah Ordway 1715 — 1815 

(Caleb Morse) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 — 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W- Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



John Emery 1598 — 1683 

(Mary ) 

John Emery 1628 — 1693 

(Mary Webster) 

Sarah Emery 1660 — 1694 

(Isaac Bailey) 

Judith Bailey 1690 — 1775 

(James Ordway) 

Sarah Ordway 1715 — 1815 

(Caleb Morse) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 — 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



John Emery 1598 — 1683 

(Mary ) 

Eleanor Emery — 1700 

(John Bailey) 

Isaac Bailey 1654 — 1740 

(Sarah Emery) 

Judith Bailey 1690 — 1775 

(James Ordway) 

Sarah Ordway 1715 — 1815 

(Caleb Morse) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 — 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



John Emery 1598 _ 1683 

(Mary ) 

Eleanor Emery 1700 

(John Bailey) 

Isaac Bailey 1654 1740 

(Sarah Emery) 

Joshua Bailey 1685 1760 

(Sarah Coffin) 

Sarah Bailey 1721 1811 

(Edward Toppan) 

Abner Toppan 1764 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 



JOHN EMERY 



As you will perceive, you are several times an 
Emery. John Emery was an interesting char- 
acter. He was a carpenter by trade and was born 
in Eomsey in 1598. The surname Emery, or 
Ainery, or D 'Emery, is one of ancient origin in 
England. Gilbert D'Amery, a Norman Knight 
of Tours, was with William the Conqueror in 1066 
at the battle of Hastings. It may be that from 
him sprung the numerous families of Amery and 
Emery. But of John Emery's antecedents I know 
little. He was the son of John and Agnes Emery, 
and with his brother Anthony and several others 
of your ancestors sailed from Southampton April 
3, 1635, in the ship James and landed in Boston 
June 3, 1635. With John was his wife, Mary, 
whose surname I know not, and his son John, your 
ancestor, who was born at Eomsey about 1628, 
and a daughter Ann born in 1631, from whom also 
are you descended. Perhaps with them also was 
Eleanor Emery, who married John Bailey. Coffin, 
in his history, and Mrs. Emery in her Recollec- 
tions, state that Eleanor was a sister of John 
Emery, Senior. Hoyt, however, states that she 
was a sister of John Emery, Junior. I have 
adopted the latter view as more nearly comport- 
ing with the probable dates of her marriage and 
death. 



514 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

John Emery settled at Newbury soon after 
landing in this country. He was given a grant of 
land on the southerly side of the main road lead- 
ing to what is now the bridge over Parker River, 
a short distance above the Lower Green of Old- 
town. He soon became one of the leading spirits 
of the young community. It is certainly char- 
acteristic that the first record I find of him is that 
on December 22, 1637, he was fined twenty shill- 
ings for inclosing ground not laid out or owned 
by the town, contrary to the town's order. He 
undoubtedly considered that he had a right to 
enclose that particular piece of ground, and such 
being the case the town's order would not have 
feazed him in the least. 

In February, 1638, the Selectmen determined 
that "John Emery shall make a sufficient Pound 
for the use of the Towne, two rod and a halfe 
square by the last of the present month if he 
cann. " Either he couldn't or he wouldn't, since 
in the following April Richard Brown, the Con- 
stable, was ordered to do it. In 1641 he was ad- 
mitted as a freeman. In 1642 he was one of a 
committee to make a valuation in reference to 
the removal of the inhabitants to "the new 
towne." In 1645 he was assigned a lot in the 
new towne "joyning Cross Street," which, how- 
ever, apparently he never occupied. 

On December 18, 1645, a committee of seven 
was appointed by the town at a public meeting 
"for to procure a water mill for to be built and 
set up in said towne of Newbury to grind theyr 
corne," and John Emery and Samuel Scullard 



JOHN EMERY 515 

were given twenty pounds in merchantable pay 
and ten acres of upland and six acres of meadow, 
free of all rates for the first seven years, "they 
on their part agreeing to sett up said mill ready 
for the towns use to grind the town's grists, at 
or before the twenty ninth of September, 1646." 
The mill appears to have been built at "the little 
River" and operated by John Emery, whose son 
John followed him as miller on the Artichoke. 

John Emery was a self-assertive man, and as 
he was often in scrapes from which he was obliged 
to extricate himself, the town evidently considered 
him a good person to answer at the Court at 
Ipswich in the spring of 1654 in behalf of the 
town for failure to make and care for a road to 
Andover. On May 26, 1658, the General Court at 
Boston ordered John Emery and others to appear 
at the next October Court. On October 19, 1658, 
the General Court "having heard the case relat- 
ing to the military company petition of Newbury 
preferred by John Emery, Senior, who with his 
sonnes John Emery, Junr., John Webster and 
Solomon Keyes, have been so busy and forward 
to disturb the peace .... judge it meete 
to order that the said John Emery, Senior, John 
Emery, Junior, John Webster, and Solomon 
Keyes be severally admonished to beware of like 
sinful practizes for time to come which this Court 
will not beare; and that they pay the several 
chardges of their neighbors at the last Court and 
this in coming." Among the neighbors who had 
been obliged to travel to Boston to testify as to 
the cantankerous conduct of John Emerv was 



516 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

your many times great grandfather, Nicholas 
Noyes. 

John Emery was always in trouble. Indeed he 
seemed to rather like it. In the early part of 
1663 he was presented to the Court at Ipswich 
' ' on suspicion of breaking ye law in entertainging 
Mr. Greenleaf, a stranger, not having a legal resi- 
dence in the town of Newbury, for foure months. " 
To entertain a "stranger" it seems was a crime. 
Indeed the laws to protect a community from out- 
side influence were as ironclad as the rules of a 
modern Labor Union. Greenleaf was a physician 
and as such useful in the community, but to the 
goodly people of Newbury he seemed shockingly 
unusual. Indeed his subsequent career was a 
stormy one and may to some degree have justified 
the desire of the community to exclude him. Yet 
it was rather rough on John Emery to be fined 
by the Court four pounds and costs amounting to 
ten shillings for entertaining this stranger. It 
was a heavy fine for those days. The Selectmen 
of the town, and many of Emery 's friends, among 
whom were at least four of your ancestors, Abra- 
ham Toppan, James Ordway, John Knight and 
John Bailey, petitioned the General Court at 
Boston in deliciously quaint phraseology for the 
remission of the fine. Endorsed on this petition 
is the following: "The Mag ts have considered 
the grounds of this Pet n & consent not to any 
revision of the Com. Court's sentence. Tho. Dan- 
forth Jr. E. E. S." A further endorsement is to 
this effect: "Consented to by the Deputies pro- 
vided they may have ye ten shillings agayne. 



JOHN EMERY 517 

William Torrey, Clerk." The last endorsement 
is "The Magists Consentyes. Edw. Rawson, 
Secry. " So, after all, this scrape cost John 
Emery only ten shillings. 

During the same year John Emery became in- 
volved in a much more heinous crime — that of 
entertaining Quakers. He seems to have been 
hospitably inclined. One of the witnesses who 
testified in this case said that he even "took the 
strangers by the hand and bade them welcome." 
I do not suppose that John Emery had any 
especial leaning to Quakerism, but he was of an 
independent nature and he did not propose to 
have his freedom of action curtailed by the absurd 
regulations of a narrow minded community. In- 
deed, on several occasions he took pains to assert 
his right to entertain in his own house whom he 
chose, and insisted on "the lawfulness of it." He 
even went so far as to invite his neighbors to 
come to his house to listen to two Quaker women 
preach. This naturally created a tremendous 
scandal, and was made a subject of presentment 
to the County Court. The records do not disclose 
the disposition of the case, but it is likely that on 
this occasion John did not get off for a mere ten 
shillings, since the offence was clearly very seri- 
ous. 

As might be expected, John Emery appears 
prominently in the case of Lieutenant Eobert 
Pike, who refused to recognize the authority of 
the General Court to deprive him and his neigh- 
bors of the right of petition. It is, indeed, rather 
difficult to understand why in 1678 he took the 



518 CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 

oath of allegiance about which so many of his 
neighbors were very stubborn. Probably he 
wanted to take it, and that 's why he took it. Five 
years after, in November, 1683, he died. I have no 
knowledge of the maiden name of Mary, the wife 
of John Emery, who was, of course, your ances- 
tress. She came with him from England, and 
lived to see her son John grow up. After her 
death John, Senior, married Mary Shatswell, 
the widow of John Webster of Ipswich, whose 
daughter was the wife of his son John. 

John Emery, Junior, was active in the town's 
affairs. He was an "Ensign" of the military 
company, and served as Constable, as Selectman, 
and in various capacities. On April 10, 1644, 
"four-score akers of upland joining the Merri- 
mack River on the north, and running from the 
mouth of Artichoke Eiver unto a marked tree" 
was laid out to him. In 1679 more land by the 
Artichoke was granted to him "provided he 
build and maintain a corn mill to grind the town 's 
corn." This mill still grinds the town's corn. 
John Emery (second) died in 1693. He had 
married Mary Webster October 2, 1648, by whom 
he had several children, among them a daughter, 
Sarah, born February 26, 1660-1, who married 
Isaac Bailey June 13, 1683, from whom you de- 
scend. 

Mary Webster was the daughter of John Web- 
ster, who was in Ipswich in 1634. He had land 
granted him in 1637, and in 1640 he is called ' i the 
Old Clerk of the Bonds. ' ' In 1643 he was elected 
a "commoner." The year before he had been 



JOHN EMERY 519 

fined thirty shillings for ''felling and converting 
certain trees in common." In 1644 the fine had 
not been paid, and he asserted an offset. He 
married Mary Shatswell, a sister of John Shats- 
well. John Shatswell was one of the earliest 
settlers of Ipswich. He did not begin his career 
very well, since in September, 1633, he was fined 
eleven shillings "for distempering himself with 
drink at Agawam." As he was afterwards a 
"deacon" of the first church, and often a Select- 
man, and accumulated a considerable property, 
he doubtless reformed. In his will, dated Feb- 
ruary 11, 1646, he bequeaths to "Sister Webster 
about seven yards of stuff to make her a sute." 

The third John Emery, from whom you do not 
descend, apparently inherited some of his grand- 
father's cantankerous disposition. In 1694 he 
was "bound over and admonished for opposing 
his ordained minister, Mr. John Eichardson." 
Under date of May 19, 1704, Judge Sewall writes : 
"Lodge at Bro. Tapings . . . after dinner 
the aged Ordway" (James Ordway, born 1620) 
"conies to see me; complains bitterly of his 
cousin John Emery's carriage to his wife which 
makes her leave him and go to her sister Bayley. " 
In what way the "aged Ordway," (who, by the 
way, had rowed Judge Sewall ashore in his canoe 
when as a boy he first came to Parker's River), 
was a cousin of this younger Emery I have not 
investigated, but Judith, the daughter of a "sister 
Bayley," married the "aged Ordway 's" grand- 
son, James Ordway, from whom you descend. 



3 9999 O w ' 



SLOI