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Full text of "Certain comeoverers"

CERTAIN 
COMEOVERERS 



BY 



HENRY HOWLAND CRAPO 



VOLUME II 



t 
t 




NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

E. ANTHONY & SONS, Incorp., Pbintbrs 
1912 



912 






6$7i 

. cm 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



^ 









# 





TABLE OF CONTENTS 






Volume II 






PART V— Continued 




CHAPTER 




PAGE 


X. 


Aquila Chase .... 


521 


XI. 


George Carr .... 


529 


XII. 


John Perkins .... 


541 


XIII. 


Thomas Bradbury- 


547 


XIV. 


Mary Perkins Bradbury, the Witch 


551 


XV. 


John Bailey .... 


557 


XVI. 


Thomas Newman 


567 


XVII. 


John Spark .... 


571 


XVIII. 


Richard Kimball 


575 


XIX. 


William Phillips 


583 


XX. 


Robert Long .... 


597 


XXI. 


William Hutchinson 


603 


XXII. 


Anne Marbury Hutchinson . 


613 


XXIII. 


Sarah Morse Smith 


633 



PART VI 
ANCESTORS OF ABNER TOPPAN 



Circular Chart 


facing 642 


CHAPTER 




I. Abraham Toppan 


. 643 


II. Henry Sewall 


. 651 


III. Stephen Dummer . 


. 665 


IV. Jacob and Hannah Toppan 


. 671 


V. Michael Wigglesworth 


. 687 



VI 



TABLE OP CONTENTS 



PART VI— Continued 

CHAPTER 

VI. The Day of Doom 

VII. Tristram Coffin 

VIII. Edmund Greenleaf 

IX. Theodore Atkinson 

X. Abner Toppan 



PAGE 

699 
709 
725 
731 

739 



PART VII 




ANCESTORS OF AARON DAVIS 




Circular Chart 


facing 744 


CHAPTER 




I. John Davis 


. 745 


II. William Haskell 


. 755 


III. Zaccheus Gould 


. 761 


IV. William Knapp 


. 769 


V. Nathaniel Eaton 


. 775 


VI. Aaron Davis, Third . 


. 791 



PART VIII 
ANCESTORS OF ELIZABETH STANFORD 



795 



PART IX 
TABLES OF DESCENT 

CHAPTER 

I. Descent of William Wallace Crapo from 

his sixteen great great grandparents . 

Circular Chart . . . facing 



821 

822 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



VU 



CHAPTER 






PAGE 


II. 


Descent of Jesse Crapo 




. 


831 




Circular Chart 




facing 


832 


III. 


Descent of Pkebe Howland 




. 


839 




Circular Chart 




facing 


840 


IV. 


Descent of Williams Slocum 






861 




Circular Chart 




facing 


862 


V. 


Descent of Anne Almy Chase 






869 




Circular Chart 




facing 


870 


VI. 


Descent of Abner Toppan 




. 


885 




Circular Chart 




facing 


886 


VII. 


Descent of Aaron Davis 




. 


899 




Circular Chart 




facing 


900 


VIII. 


Descent of Sarah Morse Smith 






909 




Circular Chart 




facing 


910 


IX. 


Descendants of Jesse Crapo 
Howland 


and 


Phebe 


929 


X. 


Descendants of Williams Slocum and 






Anne Almy Chase 




. 


949 


XI. 


Descendants of Abner Toppan and Eliza- 






beth Stanford . 






959 


XII. 


Descendants of Aaron Davis 
Morse Smith 


and 


Sarah 


995 


Addenda : Rebecca Bennett 




• 


1009 


Index of Names . . . . 






1017 



Chaptek X 

AQUILA CHASE 
Came over prior to 1636 



524 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

married Lady Elizabeth Bouchier, the daughter 
of the second Earl of Bath. It is due to the con- 
fusion between this Sir Richard, the son of Sir 
William, and the untitled Richard, possibly the 
grandson of the murdered Thomas, that the wild 
fairy tale of the "Townley Estate" became so 
disturbing an interest to countless Chases of New 
England. Lord Townley lived near Chesham and 
his family intermarried with Sir William Chase's 
family, and it is possible that at some time there 
may have been some disputed case of inheritance 
in connection with the interests of some Chase in 
some Lord Townley 's estate. If so, it was long 
a thing of the past when in 1850 or thereabouts 
the New England Chases became excited about 
it. There is no reason whatever to suppose that 
Aquila Chase of Hampton was even remotely 
concerned in the affairs of Sir William Chase's 
descendants. There seems, however, to be no 
limit to the credulity of many people in this 
country who fancy they may be heirs to those 
mythical estates supposed to be forever accumu- 
lating in the English Court of Chancery. 

Joshua Coffin, the historian of Newbury, states 
that Aquila and Thomas came from Cornwall. 
This tradition may well be true since after the 
record of their father Aquila 's birth in Chesham 
there is no further record of him there. There 
is a record that Aquila was connected with a 
Thomas Chase, of London, probably an uncle, 
who was the owner of vessels. There is a letter 
of marque issued to him in 1626 in connection 
with the ship John and Francis. Your Aquila 



AQUILA CHASE 525 

and his brother Thomas came over prior to 1636. 
They were among the original settlers of Hamp- 
ton, and were both grantees of honse lots there 
in 1639. In 1644 additional land was set off to 
Aquila in Hampton. There he married Anne 
Wheeler, the daughter of John Wheeler, who 
came over from Salisbury, England, on the Mary 
and John in 1634. In 1646 Aquila came to New- 
bury. "Granted to Aquilla Chase, anno 1646, 
four acres of land at the new towne for a house 
lott, and six acres of upland for a planting lott 
where it is to be had, and six acres of marsh 
where it is to be had, also on condition that he 
do go to sea and do service in the towne with a 
boat for four years." The early inhabitants of 
Newbury came from the inland counties of Eng- 
land and were mostly tillers of the soil. Aquila 
Chase, as you have heard, was of maritime origin. 
And yet just how in consideration of his admit- 
tance to Newbury and the grant of land to him 
he could serve the town "with a boat" I do not 
clearly understand. It was not as a deep sea 
fisherman I fancy, since there was little need of 
going to sea for fish in those early days. More 
probably it was as the master and navigator of 
a packet boat to Ipswich and to Boston that his 
services were desired. 

The only other public record of Aquila Chase 
is of the same year in which he removed to New- 
bury. He must have come early in the spring, 
and planted some part of his six acre planting 
lot with peas. "September, 1646. We present 
Aquila Chase and wife and David Wheeler for 



526 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

gathering pease on the Sabbath day." So reads 
the indictment. The Court was lenient, ordering 
them to be admonished and remitting the cus- 
tomary fines. It may be that the application of 
this blue law against the desecration of the Sab- 
bath did not strike Aquila Chase as altogether 
reasonable. At all events he seems to have re- 
frained from joining the church, since he is no- 
where named among the communicants. 

The house lot in the New Towne which was 
originally granted to Aquila Chase was probably 
at the corner of what is now Federal Street and 
Water Street. In 1659 he sold this lot and after- 
wards lived at the corner of what is now North 
Atkinson and Low Streets in Newburyport. 
Whether he continued to act as a navigator in be- 
half of the town after his four years' employ- 
ment I know not. He lived in Newbury until his 
death in 1670. His widow, Anne, survived him 
and two years after his death married Daniel 
Mussiloway. 

Moses Chase, the son of Aquila, was a weaver 
by trade. He also acted as an "Ensign" in the 
militia. In 1700 he was "granted to set in the 
fore seat by the pulpit" in the meeting-house. 
In 1713 he entered the Second Church. And in 
1731 he signed the covenant of the Fourth Church. 
He died September 6, 1743, in the eightieth year 
of his age, and his tombstone, in which he is 
designated as "Ensign," is still preserved in the 
Ferry Lane cemetery. Moses Chase married Ann 
Follansbee in Newbury November 10, 1684. She 
was the daughter of Thomas Follansbee, a joiner. 



AQUILA CHASE 527 

He was born in 1637 and was living in Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire, before 1665 and as late 
as 1670, as the records of Portsmouth disclose. 
He came to Newbury prior to 1677 and took the 
oath of allegiance in 1678, giving his age as forty- 
one. In 1677 he sold to John Tucker a house 
which had been framed, but not completed, on a 
strip of land, ' ' a part of the four acre lot granted 
to William Morse in 1645 on the easterly side 
thereof." This house was later the home of Cap- 
tain Peter Coffin. Thomas Follansbee married 
in Portsmouth one Mary in 1660, who was the 
mother of all his children. Whether it is the 
original Thomas or his son Thomas who settled 
prior to 1696 in West Newbury I am not sure. A 
Thomas Follansbee was living near where is now 
the old Sawyer house on the road from the plains 
to Curzon's Mills at the mouth of the Artichoke 
River. Later, a Thomas Follansbee was inter- 
ested in the Downer Lane lots, subsequently made 
a part of the Indian Hill Farm of Ben Perley 
Poore. There were numerous Follansbee fami- 
lies in later days in West Newbury. Your ances- 
tress, Ann Follansbee, was born in Portsmouth 
in 1668, and died in Newbury April 18, 1708. 

Elizabeth, the daughter of Moses Chase and 
Ann Follansbee, who married John Carr, was a 
great grandmother of Sarah Morse Smith. 



Chapter XI 

GEORGE CARR 

Came over prior to 1633 



George Carr 1599 — 1682 

(Elizabeth Oliver) 

James Carr 1650 — 1740 

(Mary Sears) 

John Carr 1684 — 1753 

(Elizabeth Chase) 

Judith Carr 1730 — 1768 

(James Ordway Morse) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 —1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



GEORGE CARR 



There is a tradition in the Carr family that 
your forebear, George Carr, first came to this 
country in the Mayflower in 1620 as ship's car- 
penter. If so he certainly returned in the ship 
to England. No possible historical doubt can 
exist as to the identity of every individual who 
settled at Plymouth in the eventful winter of 1620. 
There is no evidence that George Carr was on 
board the Mayflower on her initial voyage, and it 
seems probable that the tradition, if justified at 
all, originated from the fact that he came over 
on the Mayflower on one of her subsequent trips. 
She brought immigrants over in 1629 and again 
in 1630, on both occasions landing them at Salem. 

The first knowledge I have of George Carr is 
that he was one of the original settlers of Ipswich. 
In January, 1633, the Court at Salem ordered that 
a plantation be begun at ' ' Agawam. ' ' Under date 
of March, 1633, Governor Winthrop writes : ' ' The 
governor's son, John Winthrop, went with twelve 
men to begin a plantation at Agawam, after called 
Ipswich. ' ' At the April Court it was decreed that 
"no person whatsoever shall go to plant or inhabit 
Agawam without leave from the Court, except 
those that are already gone with Mr. John 
Winthrop, Junior." The order gives the names 



532 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

of nine persons as those who had already gone. 
George Carr's name is not in this list. He may 
have been one of the three unaccounted for if the 
Governor was correct in his statement that there 
were twelve. At all events, early in 1633 George 
Carr was settled at Ipswich, and was among the 
original grantees of land. In 1635 he had a house 
lot and six acres of planting ground where he was 
living, and twenty-five acres by "Labour in vain 
Creek," and six acres more on "Rabbit Hill," 
and in succeeding years he had other allotments 
of land. In 1638 he was living on "Robert 
Andrew's lot." 

In 1639 he, with his wife Elizabeth, removed to 
the newly organized settlement of Colchester, 
afterwards known as Salisbury. Elizabeth is 
thought to have been the daughter of Thomas 
Oliver of Boston, although definite proof is lack- 
ing. At the first meeting of the proprietors under 
a grant from the General Court dated September, 
1638, George Carr was granted a house lot. This 
he seems not to have utilized, settling on an 
island, then known as Ram Island, later 
as Carr's Island, in the Merrimack River, 
lying between Salisbury and Newbury. At 
a meeting of the freemen of the town of Salisbury 
in July, 1640, it was ordered that "George Carr 
shall have the island where he now dwells, as well 
marsh as upland it being the greatest island 
within the town bounds in the River Merrimack. ' ' 
He at once started a ferry between Newbury and 
Salisbury which he was licensed by the town to 
do. He was not at first very well equipped and 



GEORGE CARR 533 

in 1641 he was presented by the Grand Inquest 
"for not keeping the ferry, but suffering people 
to stand waiting at the water side three hours to 
the prejudice of their health; and taking 4d a 
head for cattle swimming over the ferry, he not 
affording them his help." 

Carr's Island, lying midway between old New- 
bury and Salisbury, aff orded a means of breaking 
and shortening the ferriage across the river. The 
ferry at this point was from the earliest days 
until a century and a half ago a part of the prin- 
cipal highway from the Massachusetts Colony to 
New Hampshire and all settlements north of the 
Merrimack. At a Court holden at Ipswich Sep- 
tember 24, 1644, it was ordered that "George Carr 
keppe ye ferrie att Salisbury at the Island where 
he now dwelleth for ye space of three years, pro- 
vided yt hee finds a sufficient horse bote and give 
diligent attendance." The order specified the 
tariff for a man at threepence, a horse at eight- 
pence, and the charge for "great cattle," calves, 
yearlings, goats and hogs. The order also pro- 
vided "If any bee forced to swimme over a horse 
for want of a great boate they shall pay nothing, ' ' 
which was clearly reasonable. If the ferriage 
charges were not paid in cash, but in commodities, 
the ferryman could charge "a penny a peece 
more." 

In May, 1647, before the three years' privilege 
had expired, the General Court of the Colony at 
Boston granted to Tristram Coffin, also your 
ancestor, who had acquired part of Carr's 
Island and there lived, the right to keep "a ferry 



534 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

on Newbury side, over Merrimac, when the inter- 
est of George Carr shall be determined, and 
George Carr shall have liberty to keep his boate 
on Salisbury side. ' ' George Carr was very indig- 
nant at the success of Tristram Coffin in lobbying 
through this grant in the General Court, and 
appealed to the town. The town at once remon- 
strated at the usurpation of jurisdiction on the 
part of the central government. The contro- 
versy, so familiar in later days, hinged on the 
question of whether the islands in the river were 
a part of the territorial possessions of the town 
or remained the property of the Colony. In 1648 
the town appointed a committee to settle the diffi- 
culty about the ferry with the General Court. 
Tristram Coffin, however, had the greater ' ' pull. ' ' 
The General Court affirmed its order. It seems 
to have been characteristic of Coffin to disregard 
town authority and make application directly to 
the Governor and assistants at Boston, as appears 
by his procedure in the matter of his difficulties 
as an innkeeper in Newbury as will be chronicled 
hereafter. 

The controversy grew rather warm, and the 
inhabitants took different sides. On one occasion 
the row was carried on in the meeting-house on 
lecture day and the participants fined at the next 
Ipswich Court. December, 1648, the town, in 
accordance with the recommendations of its com- 
mittee, overrode the order of the General Court 
and ordered that ' ' Mr. Carr should have the ffery 
for fourteene yeares." Carr evidently thought 
it best to apply to the General Court for a con- 



GEORGE CARR 535 

firmation of this order enabling him to ferry pas- 
sengers over the full route from Newbury to 
Salisbury, as he had been accustomed to do. His 
request was not granted. The Court was evi- 
dently opposed in this instance to a monopoly of 
transportation facilities. It ordered May 2, 1649, 
as follows : "In answere to the petition of George 
Carr, the Corte doth conceive it meete that the 
petitioner shall have the free* use of Ram Island 
so long as he doth or shall diligently attend and 
serve the country in keeping of the ferry between 
Salsberry and Newberry. And liberty is granted 
him as occasion shall present to fetch any pas- 
sengers from Newberry side and Mr. Coffin hath 
liberty to fetch any passengers also from Sals- 
berry side, as occasion shall be, that so the country 
may surely be served." 

The action of the General Court was by no 
means satisfactory to George Carr. He pre- 
sented a second petition during the same session 
of the General Court, asking for the exclusive con- 
trol of the ferry. No action seems to have been 
taken at that time, but a year later, April 9, 1650, 
the Court by an elaborate order finally settled this 
troublesome controversy between your ancestors, 
George Carr and Tristram Coffin. The order 
provided that George Carr should build a floating 
bridge from Newbury to Carr's Island and from 
Carr's Island to Salisbury, specifying with great 
minuteness the form of construction of the bridge ; 
and until the bridge was built, Carr was to have 
the exclusive right of ferriage. In this final bout 
the victory was with Carr. He had, however, 



536 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

committed himself to a considerable undertaking. 
The capital and labor necessary to construct such 
a bridge were not to be easily obtained, and it is 
not to be wondered that it was five years later, in 
the early summer of 1655, that the bridge was 
opened to travel. Meanwhile Tristram Coffin, in 
defiance of the Court, was to some extent at least, 
operating a rival ferry. 

Judge Samuel Symonds, under date of May 5, 
1655, after having passed over the bridge on 
horseback and being entertained by Mr. Carr at 
his house on the island, wrote as follows : 

".Upon this day upon my return from the courts of 
Dover and York I came with diverse other horsemen that 
were with me over the float bridge of Merrimack River 
which George Carr hath built and I find it fully suffi- 
cient for passage both for man and horses, so that the 
former order of the Court in reference to the bridge to 
be built by the said George Carr, and the especially the 
last order of the General Court considered, I do clearly 
apprehend that the usual benefit of the ferry on either 
side doth of right hence forth belong to him, and, there- 
fore, the other ferryman," (Tristram Coffin) "is hereby 
required to cease his ferriage usually unless he be em- 
ployed by the said George Carr and for his use. I con- 
ceive it is not amiss that you acquaint the Selectmen of 
Newbury and Salisbury with this, that so they may be 
assistant to the Court order if occasion shall require — 
Samuel Symonds." 

The building of this floating bridge was, indeed, 
an engineering achievement in those early days. 
The bridge was five feet wide with rails on each 
side and was supported on pontoons. It was 
regarded as a marvelous affair, and Mr. Carr's 
success in the fulfillment of his engagement was 
recognized and appreciated by the General Court, 



GEORGE CARR 537 

which confirmed Ram Island to him and his heirs 
forever by an order dated on November 22, 1655. 
In 1660 the bridge was exempted from taxes, and 
in 1661 one hundred and fifty acres of land in 
Salisbury were granted to George Carr as extra 
remuneration. In 1668 a new ferry was estab- 
lished between Newbury and Amesbury by way 
of Deer Island and Eagle Island. George Carr 
petitioned the General Court that he be put in 
control of this ferry in accordance with the agree- 
ment into which he had entered in 1650, by which, 
as he claimed, he was given the exclusive monopoly 
of ferriage across the Merrimack. The Court 
entertained his petition, and later, in 1670, granted 
him the timber and trees on the islands and the 
use thereof. In 1676 the importance of the New- 
bury and Salisbury ferry as a means of transport- 
ing troops during King Philip's War was recog- 
nized by the General Court, which ordered that 
George Carr should be given a garrison of seven 
men for the protection of the ferry ' ' provided the 
said Carr doe maintayn his garrison and the said 
men at his owne proper and peculiar charge, and 
those seven men be constantly kept for the 
security of the ferry." 

George Carr, in addition to his duties as ferry- 
man, was a builder and owner of ships. I found 
the following record in Salem, which, since it con- 
tains several names of persons from whom you 
descend I transcribe in part : "In consideration 
of the quarter vessle ye sd George Carr have 
made over unto William Hilton, as is in writing 
expressed, have delivered unto ye sd George Carr 



538 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

my Indian and all the interest I have in him, to 
him or to his assigns forever, and I ye sd William 
Hilton doe bind myself heirs and assigns to George 
Carr and his assigns to make good ye sale of 
James the Indian wch I have sold unto ye said 
George Carr his servant forever or to whom said 
George Carr shall assign. Witness this 29th 
December 1649." The instrument is signed by 
William Hilton, who was, I am led to conclude, one 
of your ancestors, and also by "James ye Indian, 
his X marke doth manifest his consent. ' ' Two of 
the witnesses who confirmed their signatures by 
oath in 1670 were also your ancestors, namely 
Abraham Toppan and Edmund Greenleaf. 

George Carr continued building small vessels at 
Carr's Island, and was engaged in shipping oak 
staves to the West Indies. The increasing use of 
the bridge brought him a good revenue. His 
active life continued until his death, April 4, 1682. 
He had made a will which was not acceptable to 
some of his heirs, and after an elaborate contest 
it was disallowed and he was declared intestate. 
Your ancestors, John and Eleanor Bailey, among 
others, testified that they did not think George 
Carr "was fit to make a will in his last sickness." 
The litigation connected with his estate continued 
for some years, and the Court records concerning 
it are voluminous. In the final division of George 
Carr's estate "the great ferry on both sides of 
the island and the bridge and privileges thereunto 
belonging" were given to his sons, James Carr, 
your ancestor, and his brother Richard. 



GEORGE CARR 539 

For a few years James Carr and his brother 
maintained the ferry without molestation. The 
growth of Newbury in a direction away from the 
old crossing, leaving it remote from the main line 
of travel, caused Captain John March, who kept 
a tavern opposite Rigg's Island, to request Sir 
Edmund Andros to permit him to maintain a 
ferry. Notwithstanding the vigorous protest of 
James Carr, who relied on the grant to his father 
in 1650, the Governor's Council granted Captain 
March's request and informed James Carr that 
his remedy was by suit at common law. For 
thirty years the matter was litigated in the Courts. 
The records of the various proceedings in the 
trial Court and the General Court are voluminous. 
First one side won and then the other. As late as 
1721 in a proceeding brought by James and 
Richard Carr the Court, presided over by Chief 
Justice Samuel Sewall, of whom you will hear 
much in subsequent notes, found for the defend- 
ant and issued an execution for costs against the 
plaintiff. The Carr's Island ferry continued in 
operation at least as late as 1734, when Richard 
Carr, a grandson of George Carr, was drowned 
"at nine o'clock in the evening while attending 
to his duties as ferryman." He was the second 
member of the family who was drowned at the 
ferry. The growth of Newburyport diverted 
the travel from the old ferry, and finally it was 
abandoned altogether. 

James Carr, your ancestor, was born in 1650 
and died in 1740. He married Mary Sears, who 



540 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

was born October 30, 1657. It is from John Carr, 
the son of James Carr and Mary Sears, that you 
descend. John Carr married Elizabeth Chase, 
and their daughter, Judith Carr, married James 
Ordway Morse. Their daughter, Judith Morse, 
was the mother of Sarah Morse Smith. 



Chapter XII 

JOHN PERKINS 

Came over 1631 
Lyon 



John Perkins 1590 — 1654 

(Judith Gater) 

Mary Perkins 1620 — 1700 

(Thomas Bradbury) 

Judith Bradbury 1638 — 1700 

(Caleb Moody) 

Caleb Moody 1666 — 1741 

(Ruth Morse) 

Judith Moody 1691 — 1775 

(Anthony Morse) 

Caleb Morse 1711 — 1749 

(Sarah Ordway) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 — 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JOHN PERKINS 



John Perkins was born in 1590 in Newent, 
Gloucestershire, England. He sailed from Bristol 
December 1, 1630, in the ship Lyon, William Pierce 
master, with his wife, Judith, and five children. 
Boger Williams was a fellow passenger. After 
a stormy passage of sixty-seven days they arrived 
at Nantasket, February 5, 1631, and anchored 
before Boston the next day. The arrival of this 
ship was indeed welcome to the little settlement 
of Boston. 

As the winter came on provisions are very scarce and 
the people necessitated to feed on clams and muscles and 
ground nuts and acorns; and these got with much diffi- 
culty in the winter season. Upon which people grew 
much tired and discouraged; especially when they hear 
that the governor himself has his last batch of bread in 
the oven. And many are the fears of the people that Mr. 
Pierce, who was sent to Ireland for provisions, is either 
cast away or taken by the pirates. Upon this a day of 
fasting and prayer to god for relief is appointed to be on 
the sixth of February. But God, who delights to appear 
in the greatest straits, works marvellously at this time; 
for on February 5th, the very day before the appointed 
fast, in came the ship Lyon, Mr. William Pierce, Master, 
now arriving at Nantasket, laden with provisions. Upon 
which joyful occasion the day is changed and ordered 
to be kept (on the 22nd) as a day of thanksgiving. 
. . . The governor goes aboard the Lyon riding at 
Long Island . . . where she rides very well, not- 
withstanding the great drifts of ice. And the provisions 
are by the governor distributed to the people proportion- 
able to their necessities. 



544 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

For two years John Perkins and his family 
lived in Boston, his youngest child, Lydia, being 
born, as appears by the records of the First 
Church, on June 3, 1632. On November 7, 1632, 
John Perkins was appointed by the General Court 
one of a committee to "set down the bounds be- 
twixt Rocksbury and Dorchester." On April 3, 
1632, he was granted an exclusive right to "take 
fowle with netts" on Noddle's Island in Boston 
Harbor. He had taken the oath of fidelity, admit- 
ting him to the civil rights of the Colony, on May 
18, 1631. In 1633, probably at the invitation of 
John Winthrop, he removed to the newly founded 
settlement at Agawam, later called Ipswich, and 
became one of the leading men of that interesting 
community. As an illustration of the dangers 
which surrounded the early settlers I will quote 
the following account of what happened to John 
Perkins, Junior, the son of John Perkins : 

Sept., 1633. One Robin, a friendly Indian, came to 
John Perkins, a young man then living in a little hut 
upon his father's island on this side of Jeffrey's Neck, 
and told him that on such a Thursday morning, early, 
there would come four Indians to draw him to goe down 
the Hill to the water side, to truck with them, which if 
he did, he and all neare him would be cut off ; for there 
were forty burchen canoues, would lie out of sight, in 
the brow of the Hill, full of armed Indians for that pur- 
pose. Of this he forthwith acquaints Mr. John Winthrop 
who then lived there in a house near the water, who ad- 
vised him if such Indians came, to carry it ruggedly 
toward them, and threaten to shoot them if they would 
not be gone, and when their backs were turned to strike 
up the drum he had with him beside two muskets, and 
then discharge them, that those six or eight young men, 
who were in the marshes hard by a mowing, having 



JOHN PERKINS 545 

their guns each of them ready charged by them, might 
take the alarme and the Indians would perceive their 
plot was discovered and haste away to sea againe. 
Which was accordingly so acted and took like effect, for 
he told me that presently after he discovered forty such 
canoues sheare off from under the Hill and make as fast 
as they could to sea. And no doubt many godly hearts 
were lifted up to heaven for deliverance. (Rev. Thomas 
Cobbet in a paper entitled New England 's Deliverances. ) 

John Perkins, Senior, seems to have been highly 
respected for his judicial qualities. I have al- 
ready told of his appointment in Boston to fix 
the boundaries betwixt Boxbury and Dorchester, 
and in Ipswich, during all the years of his life, 
he was constantly called on as a lot layer and 
arbitrator. The first record which I have found 
of him in Ipswich is where in 1634 he was ap- 
pointed on a committee to settle a dispute about 
a well between Henry Sewall and Will White. 
This Will White was the Indian, I surmise, be- 
tween whom and Henry Sewall, as you will later 
learn, there was so extended a controversy. In 
1634 he was of the first town committee. In 1636 
also he was of the "Seven Men" or Selectmen, 
of which John Winthrop, the younger, was one. 
He is called "goodman Perkins" in this record 
in distinction to "Mr. John Winthrop." One of 
his associates is called simply "John Gage." 
These distinctions in title very clearly marked 
the three classes of the aristocracy, the middle 
class, and the common people. 

There are various grants of land allotted to 
John Perkins from 1634 to 1650, showing that he 
became a man of substance and engaged largely 



546 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

in farming. His house was at the entrance of 
Jeffrey's Neck on East Street. In 1636 John 
Perkins represented Ipswich as Deputy to the 
General Court in Boston. He served as Con- 
stable, and on the grand juries, and in many ways 
in the service of the town, besides being selected 
often as overseer of estates and in various fidu- 
ciary capacities. 

John Perkins died in 1654. His will is dated 
January 28, 1654. He provides for his six chil- 
dren by name, giving to the sons land, and to the 
daughters money or cattle. For your ancestress 
he provides as follows: "Also I do give to my 
daughter Mary Bradbury one cow and one heyfer 
or a young steere to remain to her and her chil- 
dren in theyr increase or profitts as it shall 
please the Lord to bless them and to be equally 
divided to ye children." "I doe also give unto 
my grandchilde Thomas Bradbury one ewe to be 
sett apart for his use at ye next shearing time." 
The rest and residue he leaves "to my deare wife 
Judith Perkins," appointing her executrix. This 
will was proved July 27, 1654, at Ipswich. The 
estate inventoried at £250 5s. 



Chapter XIII 

THOMAS BRADBURY 

Came over 1634 



Thomas Bradbury 1610 1695 

(Mary Perkins) 

Judith Bradbury 1638 — 1700 

(Caleb Moody) 

Caleb Moody 1666 1741 

(Ruth Morse) 

Judith Moody 1691 1775 

(Anthony Morse) 

Caleb Morse 1711 1749 

(Sarah Ordway) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 



THOMAS BRADBURY 



Thomas Bradbury was born in the Parish of 
Wicken Bonant, Middlesex, and there baptized in 
Saint Margaret's Church, February 28, 1610--11. 
He was doubtless born in the "Brick House" 
which had been built for his father Wymond by 
his father William, who died in 1622. This house 
is a picturesque Elizabethan mansion still used 
as a residence. In the Bradbury Memorial 
by John Merrill Bradbury of Ipswich, published 
in 1890, there is an interesting and carefully pre- 
pared account of the ancestors of Thomas Brad- 
bury. One Robert Bradbury of Ollerset, who 
was born about 1400 and married a daughter of 
Robert Davenport, is the earliest authenticated 
ancestor, but the name seems to have been local- 
ized many years before in Ollerset, a small parish 
in North Derby. The lineal descendants of this 
Robert were men of wealth and distinction. His 
grandson, Sir Thomas Bradbury, was Lord Mayor 
of London in 1509, and Lord of several Manors 
in Hertfordshire, which passed to his nephew, 
William Bradbury, whose son Matthew was Lord 
of the Manor of Wicken Hall, at Wicken Bonant, 
Middlesex. It was his son, William, who built 
the "Brick House" at Wicken Bonant in which 
Thomas, your comeoverer, was born. Thomas 



550 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

was a second son, and it may be for that reason 
that he sought the new lands across the ocean. 

Thomas, when twenty-four years of age, in 
1634, came to Agamenticus, now York, in the 
province of Maine, as the agent of Sir Fernando 
Gorges. Grants in 1636, among the earliest of 
the York County Records, are given by " Thomas 
Bradbury, Gent, now agent for Sir Fernando 

Gorges, Knight " In 1636 he became 

one of the original proprietors, and earliest set- 
tlers of Salisbury, Massachusetts, and in 1636 
married Mary, daughter of John and Judith 
Perkins of Ipswich. 

Thomas Bradbury is recorded as a freeman in 
1640. In 1641 he was appointed First Clerk of 
the Writs. He was chosen many times as Deputy 
to the General Court 1651 to 1660. He acted as 
schoolmaster, Town Clerk, Justice of the Peace, 
County Recorder, Judge, Captain of the military 
company, and in many other capacities. He died 
March 16, 1695. His will is an interesting docu- 
ment in which he provides for his widow and his 
children. He makes no bequest to your grand- 
mother Judith, his second child, but at the close 
of the instrument he writes: "I do ordain and 
appoint my dearly and well beloved wife Mary 
Bradbury and my dearly and well beloved 
daughter Judith Moody my executors." 



Chapter XIV 

MAEY PERKINS BRADBURY 

The Witch 

Came over 1631 

Lyon 



MARY PERKINS BRADBURY 



Possibly you may not regard it as a matter of 
personal pride that your nine times great grand- 
mother, Mary Perkins Bradbury, was tried and 
condemned as a witch in the days of the Salem 
witchcraft delusion. However you may regard 
the matter, the fact certainly lends a distinct 
human interest to this grandmother of yours who 
so unjustly suffered from the insanity of her time. 
The Salem witchcraft craze is one of the most 
preposterous histories of the human race. To 
read the intimate thoughts of a thoroughly hu- 
mane and highly educated lawyer and man of 
affairs such as are contained in the diary of 
Samuel Sewall and then to remember that he sat 
as a Judge in the Court which condemned so 
many harmless old men and women to death as 
witches upon utterly flimsy and hysterical evi- 
dence, suggests as the only physiological explana- 
tion the temporary insanity of the community. 

Mary Perkins was born in 1620, and came over 
with her parents on the ship Lyon in 1631. She 
was seventeen when she married Thomas Brad- 
bury of Salisbury. She was over seventy years 
old when she stood charged with witchcraft before 
the Court at Salem. This is what her husband 
said to the Court : 



554 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Concerning my beloved wife Mary Bradbury this is 
what I have to say: We have been married fifty-five 
years and she hath been a loving and faithful wife unto 
me unto this day. She hath been wonderful laborious, 
diligent and industrious in her place and employment 
about the bringing up of our family which have been 
eleven children of our own and four grandchildren. She 
was both prudent and provident, of a cheerful spirit, 
liberal and charitable. She being now very aged and 
weak, and grieved under afflictions, may not be able to 
speak much for herself, not being so free of speech as 
some others might be. I hope her life and conversation 
among her neighbors has been such as gives a better or 
more real testimony than can be expressed by words. 

The charge on which your grandmother was 
tried was for bewitching John Carr so that he 
became crazed and prematurely died. William 
Carr, a brother of the said John, in his deposition, 
"testifieth and saith that, about thirteen years 
ago, presently after some difference that hap- 
pened between my honored father, Mr. George 
Carr, and Mrs. Bradbury, the prisoner at the bar, 
upon a Sabbath at noon, as we were riding home 
by the house of Captain Thomas Bradbury I saw 
Mrs. Bradbury go into her gate, turn the corner 
of, and immediately there darted out of her gate 
a blue boar, and darted at my father's horse's legs 
which made him stumble; but I saw it no more. 
And my father said 'Boys, what did you see! ' 
And we both said 'A blue boar.' " 

In his testimony at the trial William Carr ad- 
mitted that his brother fell in love with Jemima 
True (she was perhaps Mary Bradbury's grand- 
daughter, her daughter Jane having married 
Henry True in 1668), and that the proposed match 



MARY PERKINS BRADBURY 555 

being opposed and broken off by the father of 
young Carr, on account of his youth, he became 
melancholy, and at times insane. He further 
admitted that he was with his brother and cared 
for him in his last illness, and that his brother 
died peaceably and quietly, and never spoke any- 
thing to the harm of Mrs. Bradbury or anybody 
else. It was on such evidence that Mary Brad- 
bury was actually found guilty by the Court and 
condemned to death as a witch. She was 
defended at her trial by Major Robert Pike. Her 
minister, the Rev. James Allen, testified to her 
unimpeachable good character and life. One 
hundred and eighteen of her friends and neighbors 
testified to the like effect in a memorial which is 
touching in its simplicity. In pleading not 
guilty to the charge, Mary Bradbury said: 

I am wholly innocent of any such wickedness through 
the goodness of God who has kept me hitherto. I am 
the servant of Jesus Christ and have given myself up to 
him as my only Lord and Saviour, and to the diligent 
attendance upon Him in all His holy ordinances, in 
utter contempt and defiance of the devil and all his 
works as horrid and detestable, and have accordingly 
endeavored to frame my life and conversation according 
to the rules of His Holy Word, and in faith and practice, 
resolve by the help and assistance of God to continue to 
my life's end. For the truth of what I say, I humbly 
refer myself to my brethren and neighbors that know 
me, and unto the Searcher of all hearts for the truth 
and uprightness of my heart therein (human frailities 
and unavoidable excepted, of which I bitterly complain 
every day). 

Although convicted with four others who were 
executed September, 1692, Mary Bradbury es- 



556 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

caped punishment, by what means does not ap- 
pear. She lived long enough to experience the 
revulsion of public feeling at the reign of terror 
which had crazed the community. She died 
December 20, 1700. 



Chapter XV 

JOHN BAILEY 

Came over 1635 
Angel Gabriel 



John Bailey — 1651 

( ) 

John Bailey 1613 — 1691 

(Eleanor Emery) 

Isaac Bailey 1654 — 1740 

(Sarah Emery) 

Judith Bailey 1690 — 1775 

(James Ordway) 

Sarah Ordway 1715 — 1815 

(Caleb Morse) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 — 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



John Bailey — 1651 

( ) 

John Bailey 1613 — 1691 

(Eleanor Emery) 

Isaac Bailey 1654 — 1740 

(Sarah Emery) 

Joshua Bailey 1685 — 1760 

(Sarah Coffin) 

Saeah Bailey 1721 — 1811 

(Edward Toppan) 

Abner Toppan 1764 — 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 — 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JOHN BAILEY 



John Bailey was a weaver by trade and came 
from Chippenham, Wilts, England. He, with his 
oldest son, John, came over in 1635 in the ship 
Angel Gabriel, sailing from Bristol, with the ex- 
pectation of making a home in New England and 
then sending for his wife and other children, or 
going back to fetch them over. Unfortunately he 
had a terrible experience in the great storm of 
August 15, 1635, and was shipwrecked off Pema- 
quid, now Bristol, in Maine. This storm was 
probably the worst storm which has ever visited 
the New England coast. It is said that ship 
timbers and other wreckage were washed far up 
the slopes of Old Town Hill in Newbury and could 
be still seen there in the last century. In Narra- 
gansett Bay, the tide rose fourteen feet higher 
than ordinary and whole villages of Indians were 
drowned in their wigwams. That John Bailey 
never again dared to trust himself on the ocean 
may be readily understood. He was, perhaps, 
unwise in writing his family about his misadvent- 
ure, if it was indeed the fear of the passage that 
deterred them from joining him. At all events 
they never came, although constantly urged to do 
so. 



JOHN BAILEY 561 

John Bailey, with his son, John, a youth of 
twenty-two, found their way from the inhospitable 
shore on which they had been cast to Newbury, 
and joined the little settlement at Parker River. 
For only two years did he abide here, and then 
went in 1637 further into the wilderness, taking 
with him one William Schooler as a helper, and 
built a log cabin on the further side of the Merri- 
mack near the mouth of the Powow River. The 
ruins of an old cellar on what is known as Bailey 's 
Hill can still be discerned. The land on which it 
stands, a tract of about fifty acres, triangular in 
shape, running to the Merrimack on the westerly 
side, and to the Powow on the northerly side, is 
clearly traced by recorded deeds back to the soli- 
tary settler who was the pioneer of this section 
of the Merrimack country. 

A serious trouble came to this well meaning and 
honest forebear of yours. On June 6, 1637, lie 
and William Schooler were arrested for murder 
and tried at a Court held at Ipswich. At the trial 
it was demonstrated that John Bailey had naught 
whatever to do with the murder, and he was dis- 
charged. I will give the story of the murder in 
the words of Governor Winthrop: "July 28, 
1637. Two men were hanged at Boston . . . 
William Schooler, was a vintner in London, and 
had been a common adulterer (as himself did 
confess) and had wounded a man in a duel, for 
which he fled into the Low Country, and from 
thence he fled from his captain and came to this 
country, leaving his wife (a handsome, neat 
woman) in England. He lived with another 



562 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

fellow at Merrimack, and there being a poor maid 
at Newbury, one Mary Sholy, who had desired a 
guide to go with her to her master who dwelt at 
Pascataquack ' ' (Portsmouth) "he inquired her 
out and agreed for fifteen shillings to conduct her 
thither. But two days after he returned, and 
being asked why he returned so soon, he answered 
that he had carried her within two or three miles 
of the place and that she would go no further. 
Being examined for this by the magistrates at 
Ipswich and no proof found against him, he was 
let go . . . The body of the maid was found 
by an Indian about half a year after in the midst 
of a thick swamp ten miles short of the place he 
said he left her in . . . Whereupon he was 
committed, arraigned and condemned by due pro- 
ceeding . ." Governor Winthrop reviews the 
evidence, which is hardly sufficient to sustain the 
verdict. 

In 1639 l * the other fellow at Merrimack, ' ' your 
ancestor John Bailey, was again in trouble. He 
was brought before the Court and fined five 
pounds, a very heavy fine, "for buying lands of 
Indians without leave of court, with condition if 
he yield up the lands the fine to be remitted. ' ' I 
have been much impressed with the scrupulous 
care with which at least superficially, the rights 
of the Indians were guarded both in Massachu- 
setts and Plymouth colonies. The history of the 
purchase from the Indians of the territory about 
the mouth of the Merrimack discloses a watchful 
solicitude on the part of the community as a whole 
to treat the aborigine justly if not liberally. 



JOHN BAILEY 563 

In 1639 Colchester, afterwards called Salis- 
bury, was settled and John Bailey was one of the 
proprietors, having lots assigned to him in the 
first division. Probably he and his son resided 
in what is now the village of Salisbury soon after 
1639. He still retained his holdings up the Mer- 
rimack where it would appear he had an exclusive 
right of fishing, since on January 10, 1642, at a 
general meeting of the town of Salisbury, it was 
" Ordered yat ye sole fishing in Powow Eiver 
shall be taken out of the hands of John Bailey, 
Senior, for yt he hath forfeited his right given, in 
not performing ye conditions on which it was 
granted him." The conditions which he had 
broken were doubtless the giving to the town its 
fair share of the fish. In some way Bailey must 
have satisfied the town that he was not to blame, 
since the next year it was ordered that "John 
Bailey is granted sole fishing in ye Powow Eiver 
tow years on condition that he shall not join any 
but townsmen, so that ye fish shall not be carried 
out of towne, and he is not to have more than his 
share of the alewives, and is to use ye wyers to 
ye full height, so that the towne may not suffer 
by the fish escaping." 

About 1650 John Bailey, who was then an old 
man, went to live with his son John Bailey in 
Newbury. Evidently the fact that he was living 
apart from his wife was a scandal in the com- 
munity. In September, 1651, the matter was 
brought before the Court, and John Bailey was 
tried and sentenced as follows: "That he is in- 
joined to return unto his wife by next summer 



564 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

or send for his wife to come over to him." He 
never went, and if he sent she never came. He 
died two months later, on November 2, 1651. 
That he wished his wife to come to him is mani- 
fest by his will, by which he directs his son John 
to pay his wife six pounds "if she comes over." 
To his son Eobert he leaves fifteen pounds, and 
to his daughters ten pounds apiece, "if they come 
over to New England," and five pounds if they 
do not. They evidently preferred the five pounds 
to coming over. In this will he mentions John 
Emery (Senior) as his " brother," which sug- 
gests that his wife may have been a sister of 
John Emery, in which case you are six times an 
Emery. John Bailey is a rather pathetic old 
fellow with whom the world seemed on the whole 
to go somewhat awry. 

John Bailey, the second of the name, was born 
probably at Chippenham about 1613, and came 
over with his father. In the first allotment of 
lands in Salisbury he was granted a homestead. 
He married Eleanor Emery, a daughter (prob- 
ably) of John Emery. He was taxed in Salis- 
bury in 1652, 1653 and 1654, and owned land there 
in 1658. Just when he came over to Newbury 
side to live is uncertain. He was living there 
apparently in 1651 when his father died. He 
settled "on the plain a quarter of a mile from 
Deer Island." In 1652 he had a dwelling-house 
and twenty acres of land, which in 1653 he sold 
to Joanna Huntington. In 1669 he took the oath 
of allegiance, and again in 1678. He was elected 
Constable several times, and was a Selectman in 



JOHN BAILEY 565 

1673 and possibly during other years. He died 
in March, 1691, and his widow Eleanor died in 
1700. 

Isaac Bailey, the son of John Bailey, second, 
and Eleanor Emery, was born July 22, 1654, and 
married Sarah Emery, the daughter of John 
Emery, Junior, June 13, 1683. He died April 25, 
1740. From him you are descended in two ways, 
through his daughter Judith, who married James 
Ordway, and is an ancestor of Sarah Morse 
Smith, and through his son, Joshua, who married 
Sarah Coffin, and is an ancestor of Abner Toppan. 
You are not, I fancy, exceptional in being able to 
trace your descent from Judith Bailey Ordway, 
since when she died in 1775 she left eight children, 
thirty-five grandchildren, and eighty-five great 
grandchildren. 



Chapter XVI 

THOMAS NEWMAN 
Came over 1634 
Mary and John 



Thomas Newman — 1676 

(Sarah ) 

Thomas Newman +1634 — 1702+ 

(Hannah Morse) 

Thomas Newman 1670 — 1715 

(Rose Spark) 

Thomas Newman 1693 — 1729 

(Elizabeth Phillips) 

Sarah Newman 1722 — 

(Thomas Smith) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 — 1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



THOMAS NEWMAN 



Thomas Newman, with his brothers John and 
Robert, came over on the Mary and John with 
the Rev. Thomas Parker and his band of pilgrims. 
It is probable that they all went the same year 
to Ipswich. Robert seems to have joined the 
Newbury settlement, but Thomas and John re- 
mained in Ipswich. The first mention of Thomas 
Newman in the Ipswich records is in 1638, when 
four acres of land beyond Muddy River i * or where 
it may conveniently be found" was granted 
to him. In 1666 he, with John Perkins, another 
ancestor, signed the Loyalist Petition. His will, 
dated January 8, 1675, was probated March 28, 
1676. He left a considerable estate, £538 19s. 
He mentions his wife " Sarah." Beyond these 
bare facts I have no knowledge of this first 
Thomas. 

Thomas Newman, second, was probably born 
in New England, since he married Hannah Morse, 
a daughter (probably) of Anthony Morse of New- 
bury, another ancestor of yours, in 1665, and men 
usually married when they were fairly young in 
those days. In 1675-6 he was a "trooper" in 
King Philip's War under Captain Paige, and 
fought through the Mount Hope campaign. Later 
he served under Lieutenant Floyd and Captain 



John Spark — 1704 — 

(Mary Sennet) 

Rose Spark 1673 — 1743 

(Thomas Newman) 

Thomas Newman 1693 — 1729 

(Elizabeth Phillips) 

Sarah Newman 1722 — 

(Thomas Smith) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 — 1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



JOHN SPARK 



Whether John Spark was a comeoverer or was 
born in Boston, I do not know. I know nothing 
of his origin. He married Mary Sennet Novem- 
ber 26, 1661, Governor John Endicott performing 
the ceremony. She was born in Boston Septem- 
ber 19, 1641. Soon after the marriage John and 
his wife went to Ipswich. He is first described 
in Ipswich as a "biskett baker," an apprentice 
to Obidiah Wood. In 1671 he bought a home from 
William White, where he probably first estab- 
lished a tavern, since he was licensed as an inn- 
keeper in that year. From that time until his 
death he was the tavern keeper of Ipswich and 
became widely known. The old tavern or ordi- 
nary as it was called, which was known as 
"Spark's," was leased from Thomas Bishop and 
stood near where the public library of Ipswich is 
now located. As Ipswich was the shire town the 
tavern was an important institution. The Court 
was held there. The famous witch cases in 1692 
were there tried. Judge Sewall always stopped 
at this tavern on his circuit. In 1689 soldiers 
were quartered there, as appears by the petition 
of John Spark to the General Court for an allow- 
ance of something more than the threepence a 
meal which their commander offered. 



574 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

John Spark died prior to 1704. His widow, 
Mary, your ancestress, continued to keep the 
tavern for some years. She was the daughter 
of Walter Sennet, a fisherman, who was granted 
a lot in Milton in 1638. In 1639 additional land 
was given him, "a great lott at the mount for 
three heads." Later he moved to Boston and 
lived on the east side of Washington Street, not 
far from Essex Street, near what was later called 
the "Liberty Tree." His wife Mary joined the 
church in Boston May 23, 1647. 

It is from Rose Spark, the daughter of John 
Spark and Mary Sennet, who married Thomas 
Newman, that you descend. She was undoubtedly 
born in Ipswich, and as the tavern keeper's 
daughter had a chance to see something more of 
the gayer side of life than most of your grand- 
mothers. 



Chapter XVIII 

RICHARD KIMBALL 

Came over 1634 
Elizabeth 



Richard Kimball 1595 — 1675 

(Ursula Scott) 

Thomas Kimball 1633 — 1676 

(Mary Smith) 

Hannah Kimball 1661 — 1691 

(Joshua Morse) 

Anthony Morse 1688 — 1729 

(Judith Moody) 

Caleb Morse 1711 — 1749 

(Sarah Ordway) 

James Ordway Morse 1733 — 1762 

(Judith Carr) 

Judith Morse 1758 — 1817 

(Nathaniel Smith) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



RICHARD KIMBALL 



Eichard Kimball, wheelwright, was born 1595, 
or earlier, in Suffolk County, England, either at 
Bury St. Edmunds or in one of the near by vil- 
lages. He married Ursula Scott, daughter of 
Henry Scott of Rattlesden, a little parish between 
Bury St. Edmunds and Ipswich, and there for a 
time he lived with his bride. There are numerous 
records of Kimballs in the vicinity of Bury St. 
Edmunds, and the names of Richard and Henry 
and Thomas are of frequent occurrence. 

Your Richard came over in the ship Elizabeth, 
William Andrews, Master, in 1634. With him were 
his wife Ursula and a numerous family of young 
children. Martha Scott, the mother of Ursula ac- 
companied them. There was also one Henry Kim- 
ball, who was probably his brother, and Thomas 
Scott, his brother in law. They all went to Water- 
town, Massachusetts. There Richard Kimball 
had a homestead with six acres of land in what 
is now the city of Cambridge, near the corner of 
Huron Avenue and Appleton Street. He is 
recorded as a freeman of Watertown May 6, 1635. 
There being need of a competent wheelwright in 
the growing settlement of Ipswich he removed 
thither in 1636, his brother in law, Thomas Scott, 
having preceded him. 



578 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

In Ipswich Richard Kimball was given a house 
lot February 23, 1636, at the west end of the town, 
and also forty acres of land beyond the North 
River. He was one of the " seven men" (Select- 
men) in 1645, and in that year is noted as having 
worked on the "Watch House." In 1647 he was 
rewarded for killing foxes. In 1649 he was ex- 
empted from the stringent rules which had been 
adopted in Ipswich in relation to the destruction 
of the timber, and authorized by the Selectmen 
"to fell such white oaks as he hath occasion to 
use about his trade for the town's use." And 
again, in 1660, he was granted the right "to fell 
20 white oak trees to make weels for the towns- 
men their use." He acquired various pieces of 
real estate, being a considerable owner in Plum 
Island. He acted in various fiduciary capacities 
as the Court records disclose. In 1658 he was one 
of the signers of a petition to the Salem Court 
to suppress an objectionable ordinary at Ipswich. 
In 1661 he married Margaret Dow, widow of 
Henry Dow of Hampton. In 1671 he owned what 
is known as the "John Cross Lot" in Ipswich. 
On the twenty-second of June, 1675, he died. His 
will is an interesting document and his inventory 
shows that he was a man of substance since he 
left a property appraised £737 3s. 6d. 

His seventh child, Thomas, was your ancestor. 
He was born in Rattlesden, Suffolk County, Eng- 
land, in 1633, and was one year old when he came 
over with his parents on the ship Elizabeth to 
New England. When a young man he removed 
from Ipswich to Hampton, and in 1653 was the 



RICHARD KIMBALL 579 

owner or manager of a mill there. It would 
seem that he continued to live in Hampton until 
at least as late as 1660. He married Mary Smith, 
daughter of Thomas and Joanna Smith of Ips- 
wich. From Hampton he removed to what is 
now the town of Bradford and lived on a farm 
on the Boxford Road. He followed the trade of 
his father as a wheelwright and mechanic, and 
was also a thrifty farmer, owning some four hun- 
dred acres of land and being possessed of a con- 
siderable amount of personal property. He was 
distinctly one of the "leading citizens," holding 
office continuously as Constable and Selectman, 
etc. 

His tragic death and the captivity of his wife 
and children are vivid illustrations of the dangers 
to which the early pioneers of New England were 
subjected at the hands of the savages. There 
was an Indian named Simon, supposed to be a 
"converted" Indian, who had proved himself a 
very troublesome fellow, and given much alarm 
to the inhabitants about the Merrimack River 
country, who, joining with him two others, "con- 
verted" Indians, Peter and Andrew, plotted to 
kill certain white men on the night of May 2, 
1676. "But for some reason being frustrated in 
their original design and the night being far ad- 
vanced, they wreaked their vengeance on the 
Kimballs. " Thomas Kimball was killed at his 
home by the Indian Simon. His wife, Mary 
Smith, and their five children, of whom the oldest 
was your many times great grandmother Hannah, 
were "carried forty miles into the wilderness." 



580 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

There they remained forty-one days. Twice were 
the fires lit to burn the white squaw and her 
youngest babe, and through some influence of fear 
or kindlier nature their doom delayed. It was 
finally through the good offices of Wonalancet, 
chief of the Pennacooks, that your grandmother 
Mary Kimball and her five children were released 
without ransom and brought back to Ipswich 
June 13, 1676. On the records of the town of 
Ipswich is the following entry: "May 3d, 1676. 
A note is handed in on the Sabbath by the pious 
parents of Goodwife Kimball that she and her 
five children taken at Bradford by Indians who 
killed her husband might be delivered. ' ' Perhaps 
the prayers of the congregation assembled at the 
meeting-house were of some efficacy. At all 
events had not the red men been fearful of the 
vengeance of the white men, and their guns, your 
seven times great grandmother Hannah Kimball, 
a young girl in the bud of womanhood, would not 
have returned to her home and married your 
grandfather, Joshua Morse, and consequently 
you would not have been you. Would you have 
been someone else, or would you have not been 
at all? It is the problem which puzzled Dr. 
Holmes as to what would have happened to him 
if Dorothy Q. had answered No. 

' ' Should I be I or would it be 
One-tenth another, to nine-tenths me?" 

Do you not think that you owe a thought of 
gratitude to Wonalancet, who guided the council 
of the braves as they sat about the camp-fire 
1 ' forty miles in the wilderness, ' ' and advised that 



RICHARD KIMBALL 581 

the white woman and her children be spared? 
To be sure, he was not thinking of you. He was 
a cautious politician, interested in himself no 
doubt. Yet to him, after all, you owe your exist- 
ence and identity. 



Chapter XIX 

WILLIAM PHILLIPS 

Came over 1636 
Falcon 



William Phillips ? 1607 — 1683 

(Bridget Hutchinson) 

William Phillips 1660 — 1705 

(Deborah Long) 

Elizabeth Phillips 1698 — 

(Thomas Newman) 

Sarah Newman 1722 — 

(Thomas Smith) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 — 1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



WILLIAM PHILLIPS 



William Phillips was in Charlestown in 1638. 
He may have been the William Phillips, aged 
twenty-eight years, who sailed in the Falcon, 
December 19, 1635. If so, he was born in 1607. 
His wife, Mary, was admitted as a member of 
the church in Charlestown in 1639. She bore 
him one son and two daughters. He soon re- 
moved to Boston and was admitted a freeman, 
May 13, 1640. His wife, Mary, died in 1646, and 
in 1647 he married Susanna Stanley, the widow 
of Christopher Stanley, a lady of some posses- 
sions, by whom he had one son and two daughters. 
Susanna died April 16, 1655, and within a year 
he married Bridget, daughter of William and 
Anne Hutchinson, and widow of John Sanford, 
by whom he had three sons and one daughter. 
It is from one of these sons, William, born Jan- 
uary 28, 1660, that you descend. 

William Phillips was an active and successful 
man of business. He was a "vintner" and kept 
an ordinary in Boston called the "Ship Taverne." 
An interesting document is preserved in the 
archives of Massachusetts, a contract between the 
General Court, made by a committee thereof, and 
William Phillips, Robert Long, another ancestor 
of yours, and others, granting to Robert Turner 



586 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the exclusive right to sell liquor in Boston and 
Charlestown for a period of five years upon pay- 
ment to the Treasurer of the Colony of £160. 
Between 1645 and 1655 William Phillips' name 
appears as a creditor of many estates and as an 
appraiser, etc., and he is constantly named in 
William Aspinwall's notarial records in connec- 
tion with shipments to and from the Barbacloes 
and as acting as attorney for merchants in Eng- 
land and as witness to sundry business transac- 
tions. One document, made in 1648, tends to 
throw light on his ancestry. It is a bond given 
by Thomas Boylston of Watertown to William 
Phillips of Boston, vintner, to secure the payment 
of three bills of exchange drawn by Thomas 
Boylston, clothmaker, dwelling at the sign of the 
gold ball in Fenchurch Street, London, payable 
to William Phillips, shoemaker, of London. It 
is not expressly stated that the William Phillips 
of London was the father of William Phillips of 
Boston, but the whole document raises the pre- 
sumption that he was. Mr. Aspinwall notes that 
in 1649 one William Tilley appointed an attorney 
to "implead and arrest and prosecute and recover 
of William Phillips of Boston and his wife for 
defaming and slandering my well beloved wife 
Alice Tilley in respect to her calling or other- 
wise." In 1649 William Phillips subscribed for 
one-eighth share of a ship to be built by Richard 
Thurston. In an old diary of one John Bowne of 
Matlock, Derbyshire, who came over in 1648, there 
is this entry: "Jan. 7, 1649. I entered Mr. 
Phillips service." There are several records of 



WILLIAM PHILLIPS 587 

different servants of William Phillips during 
these years. One servant was John Robinson, 
' ' a mariner, ' ' and another, who died in 1659, was 
Stephen Welt, 

In 1649 the town of Boston sold to William 
Phillips a lot which had been given to the town 
by Christopher Stanley, the first husband of 
William Phillips' second wife, for the use of "a 
free schoole." The consideration was "thirteen 
shillings four pence per annum foreever for the 
use of the school." This would hardly go far 
towards the support of a public school of Boston 
today. The land was at the north end of the 
town "near the water." There are various 
records of land transfers both in Charlestown 
and Boston to and from William Phillips. He 
is named as serving on town committees on sev- 
eral occasions. In 1644, when he was probably 
a resident of Charlestown, he joined the famous 
military organization which afterwards became 
known as the Ancient and Honorable Artillery 
Company. In this company he was an Ensign 
in 1655, and Lieutenant in 1657. As "Lieutenant 
Phillips ' ' he was known during the next few years 
in Boston. His later title of Major was acquired 
in Maine. 

It is probable that before 1655 William Phillips 
had accumulated considerable property, and his 
marriage with his third wife in that year added 
to his means. She doubtless had received some 
property from her father, William Hutchinson, 
and by the will of her husband, Governor John 
Sanford, of Rhode Island, she was given addi- 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

tional property. Indeed, in her own will, in which 
she devises a large property to her children, both 
Sanford and Phillips, she says that she brought 
a considerable estate to her husband Phillips, 
which accounts for her sharing so largely in his 
fortune at his death. Richard Hutchinson, the 
uncle of Bridget Phillips, who came over with her 
father, William Hutchinson, returned to England 
after the ostracism of the family occasioned by 
her mother's heresies, and became a wealthy 
merchant of London. He invested largely in the 
lauds of which Sir Fernando Gorges had the title 
between the Piscataqua and Kennebec Rivers. 
Bridget Phillips' uncle, Rev. John Wheelwright, 
and his family were also interested in the lauds 
north of the Massachusetts charter jurisdiction, 
whither they went on their banishment. It is 
probable, owing to his association with his wife's 
relatives, that William Phillips resolved to go to 
Maine, whither he removed about 1660 and settled 
in Saco, where for some fifteen years he lived and 
engaged in business in rather a large way. 

In 1630 the Council of Plymouth granted to 
Richard Vines and John Oldham a tract of land 
on the west side of the Saco River, four miles 
along the coast and eight miles inland. This is 
the territory now of the town of Biddeford, oppo- 
site the city of Saco. A few settlers came be- 
tween 163S and 1640. In 1645 Vines, who had 
acquired the whole interest, sold his charter to 
Robert Childs. who in turn sold to John Box & 
Co. of London, who in 165S-9 sold to William 
Phillips. In what is now Biddeford he settled 



WILLIAM PHILLIPS 589 

in 1660, on the west side of the river below 
Saco Falls, near where the bridge crossed the 
river from the city of Saco. He built a large 
saw-mill and shipped lumber to England. He 
also owned other mills, one known as "Spen- 
cer's." In 1662 he employed his son in law, John 
Alden, the son of John Alden and Priscilla Mul- 
lins of Plymouth, to whom you may thus be said 
to be avuncularly related, to build another mill 
and subsequently deeded him a half interest in 
the same. In 1661 he purchased of the Sagamore 
Fluellen a tract eight miles square where is now 
the town of Sanford, named after his wife's son, 
Governor Peleg Sanford of Ehode Island. He 
made other extensive purchases from Indian 
chiefs, one from "Mugg Heagon," another from 
" Hombinowitt, " and another from "Captain Sun- 
day." These tracts contained some sixty-four 
thousand acres. The titles were subsequently con- 
firmed by Sir Fernando Gorges, who had acquired 
the territory of Maine in 1639, and in the settle- 
ment which was finally made in 1677 between the 
grandson of Sir Fernando Gorges and the Massa- 
chusetts Colony, whereby the Colony acquired the 
rights to this much disputed territory, the con- 
veyance is made to the Colony of the whole terri- 
tory "excepting all leases and conveyances made 
by the original proprietor — especially all grants 
to William Phillips." 

In the grant of the Sagamore "Captain Sun- 
day ' ' there were three ' ' hills of rock ' ' forty miles 
back from the sea. These hills were thought by 
William Phillips to contain silver mines and he 



590 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

sold shares in them to his friends in Boston, 
among whom your ancestor Theodore Atkinson 
was probably one. Unfortunately, the silver 
turned out to be mica. It is probable that William 
Phillips was an innocent promoter of this fake 
mining enterprise, yet the story has a modern 
flavor. It was not, however, as a mining pro- 
moter, but as a lumber dealer that William Phil- 
lips was principally engaged. He made large 
contracts for the delivery of lumber in England, 
his wife's uncle, Richard Hutchinson, being one 
of his principal customers. In the region of Saco 
in those early days trees seem to have been to 
some extent a medium of exchange. When in 
1667 William Phillips sold to his neighbor across 
the river, Captain John Bonython, one-half of 
Factory Island, the consideration was eight hun- 
dred pine trees suitable for merchantable boards. 
Merchantable boards in those days called for 
trees of much greater diameter than the modern 
market furnishes. 

William Phillips was a leader in his community. 
He was a magistrate, and in 1665 was made a 
Lieutenant and later a Major by Royal Commis- 
sion. He was forceful and outspoken. There is 
a tradition that he once made a man smart for 
saying that Phillips' horse was as "lean as an 
Indian dog. ' ' The main settlement in the vicinity 
was at Winter Harbor, near the mouth of the 
Saco River. Here in the first meeting-house 
"Mistress Phillips" had the front bench. Per- 
haps she had not as yet become corrupted by 
Quakerism, for which she afterwards suffered in 



WILLIAM PHILLIPS 591 

Boston. The homestead where the Phillipses 
lived was a substantial dwelling afterwards 
known as the " garrison house." It was here 
that a somewhat memorable engagement in the 
Indian war of 1675 took place. Hubbard in his 
History of the Indian Wars, tells the story with 
much picturesque detail and portrays Major Phil- 
lips as something of a hero, even quoting the re- 
marks made in the garrison house during the 
Indian attack, for which he must have relied on 
his imagination. Fortunately we have Major 
Phillips' own account of the affair in a letter 
from Major Waldron to his commander, General 
Denison, September 25, 1675, wherein he says : 

I had advise of the enemies marching westward and 
falling upon Scarboro and Saeo killing and burning. 
On Saturday and Sabbath day last at Scarboro they 
killed an old man and woman and burnt their house, 
and at Mr. Foxwell's two young men were killed being 
at the barn about the cattle. The enemy then advanced 
towards Saco River and there fell to burning of homes. 
The people, before having intelligence from an Indian 
called Scossaway of the time which they would come, 
most of them repairing to Major Pendleton's, but Mr. 
Bonython and some other families to Major Phillips. 
On Saturday morning the Indians rifled and burned 
several homes and while said homes were burning a 
party of them, judged about thirty-six Indians came 
over the river in English canoes, and when came ashore 
cut holes in them and turned them adrift, but all this 
time finding no men they went to Major Phillips' saw- 
mill and set it going then on fire and burnt it and after- 
wards did the like to his corn mill, it being judged to be 
their design to draw them out of the house and so to 
surprise both them and it, but Major Phillips being fore- 
warned of their coming made some small defence about 
his house, having with him of his own family and neigh- 
bors to the number of fifteen men besides women and 



592 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

children in all about fifty. The bushes being thick 
within shot of his house, could not at first see an Indian, 
but one of the men perceiving a stirring among the 
leaves Major Phillips looked out of his chamber window 
that way and from thence was immediately shot at 
and slightly wounded in the shoulder (two more were 
also wounded afterwards) after which the shot came 
thick which was accordingly answered from within, but 
no Indians as yet appeared but only creeping decked 
with ferns and boughs, till some time after they got a 
pair of old truck wheels and fitted them up with boards 
and slabs for a barricade to safeguard the driver thereby 
endeavoring to burn the house, having prepared com- 
bustible matter as birch and rinds and pitch wood tur- 
pentine and powder for this end; but they in the house 
perceiving the intention, plyed their shot against it and 
found afterwards their shot went through. Afterwards 
they endeavored to get it out of the dirt by turning a 
little on one side, thereby laying themselves open to 
them in the house, which opportunity they improved 
and made them quit their work and fly but they con- 
tinued firing at the house all night and then marched 
away. Since which Major Phillips is removed down 
to Winter Harbor to Major Pendleton's where I found 
him. 

Hubbard says that within a few days the sav- 
ages burned a mill near Berwick belonging to 
"Mr. Hutchinson, a merchant of Boston." This 
refers, probably, to Edward Hutchinson, a son of 
William and Anne Hutchinson, and a brother of 
Bridget Phillips. He came over with his Uncle 
Edward the year before William Hutchinson 
brought the rest of the family, and afterwards 
acted as agent for his uncle Richard in England 
and was doubtless very closely connected with 
his brother in law, William Phillips. This Ed- 
ward, the brother of Bridget, was known as " Cap- 
tain, " and he was killed in King Philip's War. 



WILLIAM PHILLIPS 593 

Within a year or two after the Indian attack, 
William Phillips and his wife returned to Boston, 
where he lived some seven or eight years before 
his death in 1683. His will, dated September 28, 
1683, was proved Nov. 13, 1683. He devised a 
large portion of his estate to his wife, Bridget, 
and remembered her children as well as his own. 
He named his son Nathaniel, who was a son by 
his second wife, and his sons Samuel and William, 
who were Bridget's children. His son William 
by his first wife had doubtless died. 

Bridget Hutchinson was the fifth of the four- 
teen children of William and Anne Hutchinson. 
She was named after her grandmother, Bridget 
Dryden of Canons Ashby. She was born in Al- 
ford January 15, 1618, and came over with her 
parents in 1634. She was about eighteen when 
she married John Sanford, a widower, of Boston. 
In 1638 she and her husband shared in the general 
banishment of the family and went to Portsmouth. 
Afterwards John Sanford and his wife Bridget 
lived in Newport. John Sanford was at one time 
the chief magistrate of Rhode Island. They had 
several children, one of whom, Peleg, was after- 
wards a somewhat famous Governor of Rhode 
Island. After her husband's death in Newport 
in 1653, Bridget returned to Boston, to which 
still somewhat hostile town various members of 
the Hutchinson family had returned, and she was 
admitted an inhabitant July 31, 1654. Less than 
two years afterward she married William Phillips 
and with him went to Maine, returning to Boston 
not long after 1675. She became converted to 



594 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the Quaker faith. In 1677 Margaret Brewster 
came to Boston from the Barbadoes and made 
herself obnoxious to the authorities by her mili- 
tant Friendliness. One Sabbath day she went 
into the South Church "in sackcloth with ashes 
on her head, barefooted, and her face blackened" 
and warned the people of Boston in the name of 
God and with the threat of the "Black Pox" 
not to put into effect a wicked law of theirs about 
swearing. She was naturally arrested, whipped 
and imprisoned. At the same time Bridget Phil- 
lips, and her stepdaughter, Elephal Stratton, 
whom she had practically adopted as her own 
daughter, were also whipped, and on the next 
Sabbath, as they persisted in disturbing the 
peace, they were again whipped through the 
streets of Boston. Evidently Bridget was her 
mother's daughter. She was at this time about 
sixty years old and one of the wealthy dames of 
Boston, but she was quite ready to be publicly 
whipped in testimony of her dissent from the 
fashionable religious faith. She lived to be 
eighty years old and in her will, proved in August, 
1698, made elaborate provision for the division 
of her estate, a part of which she had received 
from her husband, William Phillips. She dis- 
posed of large territories in Maine to her Sanford 
children and her Phillips children. She left each 
of her grandchildren books and a gold ring, and to 
many of her relatives and friends silver pitchers 
and tankards, and other articles. She named as 
her residuary legatees her children, William Phil- 
lips, your ancestor, Samuel Phillips and Elephal 
Stratton. 



WILLIAM PHILLIPS 595 

William Phillips, the second, was doubtless with 
his parents in Maine during his youth. It is 
doubtful whether he was in Saco at the time of 
the Indian attack on Major Phillips' house, since 
I find that he served under Captain Moseley in 
King Philip's War, being paid for his service in 
December, 1675, and in April and June, 1676. In 
1676 he was enrolled in the Ancient and Honor- 
able Artillery Company. At the time of his 
father's death, he was "a captive among the 
Spaniards." I found somewhere the statement 
that he was kept a captive for four years. It 
would be interesting to know more of the experi- 
ences of this ancestor. He died in Boston in 
1705 when forty-five years old and lies buried 
in the church-yard of King's Chapel. 

Elizabeth, the daughter of William Phillips, 
the second, and Deborah Long, his wife, was born 
in Boston June 3, 1698, and was only seven years 
old when her father died. As her mother soon 
after married William Skinner of Boston, it is 
quite natural that she and her young brother 
John should have come under the care of their 
uncle, Nathaniel Phillips, who was living in Ips- 
wich. It was in 1714 that she married Thomas 
Newman of Ipswich, and some years after his 
death she married John Smith, Junior, of Ipswich. 
Her daughter, Sarah Newman, married Thomas 
Smith of Newbury, a grandfather of Sarah Morse 
Smith. 



Chaptee XX 

EOBERT LONG 

Came over 1635 
Defense 



Robert Long 1590 — 1664 

(Sarah Taylor) 

Zach ariah Long 1630 — 1688 

(Sarah Tidd) 

Deborah Long 1670 — 

(William Phillips) 

Elizabeth Phillips 1698 — 

(Thomas Newman) 

Sarah Newman 1722 — 

(Thomas Smith) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 —1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



ROBERT LONG 



Robert Long, an ' ' innkeeper, ' ' embarked on the 
Defense from London in 1635 with his wife and 
ten children, the oldest of whom was twenty, and 
also one servant. He was born in 1590. He lived 
in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, and there in 1614 
married Sarah Taylor, daughter of John and 
Margaret (Willmote) Taylor, who was five years 
younger than himself. The records are in the 
Abbey Register. Most of the children were born 
in St. Albans, but prior to 1630, Robert Long re- 
moved to Dunstable, Bedfordshire, where on 
October 20, 1630, Zachariah, your ancestor, was 
baptized. Soon after Sarah died and Robert 
married Elizabeth Roberts, who came over with 
him in 1635. 

Robert Long settled in Charlestown, where he 
was admitted a freeman in 1635. Here he fol- 
lowed his business as an innkeeper. He must 
have brought some capital with him, for within a 
year he purchased the " Great House." This 
house was built by the original mercantile com- 
pany of Oldham as a general house for the ad- 
venturers and their wares. It was near the site 
of the present City Hall in what was later "The 
Square" at the foot of the hill. Here Governor 
Endicott stayed in 1631, and it was in this build- 



600 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

ing that the settlement of Boston was decided on. 
In 1632 the structure was purchased from the 
company for ten pounds and used as the first 
meeting-house until 1635-6, when, as the record 
states, "Mr. Long was granted to have the Great 
House wholly when we shall be provided of an- 
other meeting-house, and to pay £30, and for the 
present to have the south end and so much of the 
chamber as the deacons can spare, and when the 
congregation leaveth the house, the deacons are 
to have the planks and the boards which lie over 
the chamber with all the forms below and the 
benchs. ' ' 

This tavern was known as "The Two Cranes," 
and was kept as a public house by Robert Long 
and his sons for more than three-quarters of a 
century. One of the earliest of the many English 
travellers to this country who have printed their 
impressions on their return home was Josslyn, 
who describes the inn as kept by Robert Long in 
1638, and notes as somewhat remarkable that he 
met a rattlesnake in crossing the square to the 
tavern. There is a description of the building in 
1683 giving the number and size of the rooms. 
Later a brew house was added. In 1712 it is re- 
ferred to as "the old tavern." It was burned 
by the British soldiers in 1775. 

Robert Long was a highly respected citizen of 
Charlestown. He was admitted to the church 
February 17, 1636. He evidently prospered, as 
he is recorded as the owner of some thirteen tracts 
of land in the Charlestown Book of Possessions. 
Most of the land was "on Mystic side" and some 



ROBERT LONG 601 

in "Lynnfield. " He acted in behalf of one of 
the creditors of Governor Winthrop to whom the 
Governor made an assignment to secure their 
claims. In 1639 he was enrolled among the very 
earliest of that roll of honor, the Ancient and 
Honorable Artillery Company. 

Robert Long died in 1664, leaving a will in 
which he disposed of a considerable property. 
One of his older sons, Robert, removed at an 
early date, probably between 1637 and 1642, to 
Newbury, where he married Alice Stevens in 1647, 
and died in 1690, leaving several children. He 
was known in Newbury as "Deacon" Long, and 
for some time during my researches in connection 
with this family I assumed that Deacon Robert 
Long was your ancestor. Further inquiry, how- 
ever, clearly demonstrated that he was the 
brother and not the father of Zachariah. 

Zachariah, who was born in Dunstable, was 
some several years younger than his brother 
Robert. He lived in Charlestown. He did not 
succeed to his father's business as innholder, but 
became a mariner. In 1663 he was the Captain 
of the ship John and Sarah, of which he owned 
one-eighth. He was possessed of considerable 
property, and owned wharves and warehouses, 
as appears by the inventory of his estate. On 
September 24, 1656, he married Sarah Tidd, who 
was the mother of Deborah Long, who married 
William Phillips, the second. Sarah died in 1674 
and Zachariah married Mary Burr in 1681, who 
died soon after, when he married Sarah More, 
who outlived him. In his will, proved in June, 



602 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

1688, he names his daughter Deborah as one of 
his residuary legatees. He doubtless left his 
widow fairly well off, as is indicated by a church 
record in 1689, whereby it appears that " Judith 
Wooder (aged 22), a Narragansett Indian, ser- 
vant to the widdow of Mr. Zachary Long, de- 
ceased," was baptized seventh month twenty- 
second. 

Sarah Tidd, the first wife of Zachariah Long, 
your ancestress, was the daughter of Joshua Tidd, 
a shopkeeper of Charlestown, who was given the 
title of Lieutenant. He was in Charlestown as 
early as 1637 and was admitted to the church in 
1639. He lived on Mill Hill. His wife's name 
was Sarah. He died in 1678 aged seventy-one. 
His daughter Sarah was born in 1636, presumably 
on this side of the water, and was baptized in 
1639. 



Chapter XXI 

WILLIAM HUTCHINSON 

Came over 1634 
Griffin 



William Hutchinson 1586 — 1642 

(Anne Marbury) 

Bridget Hutchinson 1618 — 1698 

(William Phillips) 

William Phillips 1660 — 1705 

(Deborah Long) 

Elizabeth Phillips 1698 — 

(Thomas Newman) 

Sarah Newman 1722 — 

(Thomas Smith) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 —1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1869 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



WILLIAM HUTCHINSON 



Your ancestor William Hutchinson inevitably 
takes his place in history as his wife's husband. 
Yet in these notes, surely, he deserves individual 
mention. His grandfather, John Hutchinson, 
born about 1515, was apprenticed in 1529 to Ed- 
ward Atkinson of Lincoln, a glover. He must 
have been a faithful apprentice, since he prospered 
when he became his own master. At the age of 
thirty-two he was Sheriff of Lincolnshire, and in 
1556 and again in 1564 he was the mayor of the 
old Roman city over which the incomparable 
Cathedral dominated in his time as it does now. 
It was not at the Cathedral, however, that he 
worshipped, but at the Church of Saint Mary le 
Bigford, where he was buried in 1565. His 
youngest son, a baby when he died, and for 
whose bringing up his widow was charged by his 
will, was Edward, born in 1564. Edward was 
apprenticed in Lincoln when he was thirteen 
years old. Soon after the expiration of his 
apprenticeship he went to Alford a town some 
thirty miles from Lincoln, in the "fens" near the 
North Sea. Here he married his wife Susanna 
and had eight children, among whom was your 
ancestor, William, who was baptized at Alford, 
August 14, 1586. William Hutchinson became a 



GOG CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

successful business man in Alford, and when he 
was twenty-six years of age, in 1612, married 
Anne Marbury, the daughter of Francis Marbury, 
the Rector of the Parish of Alford. He and his 
wife were doubtless faithful members of her 
father's church. In 1620 he was one of the 
wardens. 

One of William Hutchinson's sisters married 
the Rev. John Wheelwright, a man of much bril- 
liancy, who dissented from the tenets of the estab- 
lished church. Anne Hutchinson's sympathy 
with Mr. Wheelwright's religious views, and the 
influence of Mr. John Cotton of the neighboring 
town of Boston, caused William Hutchinson to 
become involved in their dissent. Governor 
Winthrop, later in New England, said of him that 
he was "a man of very mild temper and weak 
parts, and wholly guided by his wife." It may 
be that he was a man of mild temper, and that he 
admired and loved the brilliant woman who was 
his wife is beyond question, but that he was in 
any way weak is not borne out by his life's his- 
tory. As a man of business and a clear headed, 
conscientious worker for the public weal he 
showed no weakness. Doubtless his decision to 
go to New England was in part induced by the 
association of himself and his wife with Mr. 
Wheelwright and Mr. Cotton. Yet when he arrived 
in Boston, in September, 1634, he was welcomed as 
a distinct addition to the community in view of 
his means and character. 

It was not altogether the urging of his wife, 
perhaps, which caused him to come to New Eng- 



WILLIAM HUTCHINSON 607 

land. His brothers, who were all prosperous 
men at Alford, joined with him in the enterprise 
to make their fortunes in the new land. His 
brother Edward and his son Edward came over 
first in the Griffin in 1633. On the next trip of 
the Griffin, William Hutchinson and his wife and 
children and his brothers, Eichard and Samuel, 
and their mother, Susanna, came. He was 
admitted a freeman of Boston March 4, 1635, and 
admitted to the church August 26. There was 
some question about admitting Anne, his wife, 
because on the voyage over the Rev. Zachariah 
Symmes had cause to entertain some doubts of 
her complete orthodoxy, yet she was formally 
admitted on September 2, 1635. 

William Hutchinson at once took a leading part 
in the affairs of the Colony. He was a member 
of the General Court in 1635 and 1636. He was 
appointed by the Court as an auditor of the Treas- 
urer 's accounts, and was delegated to assist in 
the settlement of the complicated matters con- 
nected with the estate of John Oldham. It was, 
however, only a very brief period in which 
William Hutchinson was a persona grata in the 
little commonwealth. His wife caused such an 
upheaval in the community that as early as 1636-7 
he was formally discharged "from assisting at 
the particular Courts upon the Church's request." 

William Hutchinson acquired considerable 
property in the Colony. In 1635, Taylor's Island 
was granted to him, and in 1636 he was allotted 
six hundred acres at Mount Wollaston "betwixt 
Dorchester bounds and the Mount Wollaston 



608 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

river." His brother in law, John Wheelwright, 
also had a grant of two hundred and fifty acres 
at the ''Mount." The cataclysmic result of his 
wife's transcendental propaganda necessarily put 
him under the ban and he was, perforce, com- 
pelled to seek another domicile. With William 
Coddington, his wife's staunch supporter, he 
joined in the purchase of the Island of Aquidneck 
and subscribed to the original compact made in 
Boston. 

When the company had removed to the island 
they organized a form of government, and Mr. 
Coddington was made chief magistrate under the 
title of "Judge," William Hutchinson being 
elected the Treasurer of the company. For some 
reason the affairs of the settlement did not go 
smoothly, and of course Mrs. Hutchinson's 
enemies, who after all are our main informants 
about her, attributed the trouble to her. At all 
events, Mr. Coddington within a year removed 
to the south end of the island and started an inde- 
pendent settlement, afterwards called Newport. 
William Hutchinson was then chosen chief magis- 
trate of the Portsmouth settlement, and his name 
heads the list of signers of that memorable agree- 
ment on the records of the town of Portsmouth, 
to which so many of your ancestors subscribed. 
Shortly afterwards the two settlements of Ports- 
mouth and Newport got together and Mr. 
Coddington was elected "Governor" and William 
Hutchinson one of the "Assistants." He served 
in this capacity for about a year, when his wife 
conceived a new idea that a "Christian" could 



WILLIAM HUTCHINSON 609 

not be a "magistrate," and so William, being a 
dutiful husband, resigned. 

William Hutchinson was allotted six house lots 
for himself and his family in the original assign- 
ment of lots at the north end of the island. Very 
likely one of these lots was for his daughter 
Bridget, your many times great grandmother, 
who had married John Sanford in Boston. 
Sanford was staunchly loyal to Anne Hutchinson, 
as, indeed, were all her large family connection, 
and was named in the disarmament order in 1637, 
which was virtually an order of banishment. 
William Hutchinson also had other grants of land 
on the island, one of four hundred acres near 
Newport. 

When the committee from Boston came in 
February, 1640, "to require the inhabitants of 
Portsmouth and Newport to give account to the 
Church of their unwarrantable practice in com- 
municating with excommunicated persons," mean- 
ing, of course, Anne Hutchinson, her husband 
was among those called to account. The com- 
mittee subsequently reported that he said "he 
was more nearly tied to his wife than to his 
Church and that he thought her to be a dear Saint 
and Servant of God. ' ' In 1642 he died at Ports- 
mouth. The death of her loyal lover and sup- 
porter was, I fancy, the most grievous blow which 
Anne Hutchinson sustained in her tragic life in 
New England. 

William Hutchinson, quite aside from his wife 's 
notoriety, was an important founder of New Eng- 
land. He was the head of a family which exer- 



610 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

oised much influence in the development and his- 
tory of the country. His brother Richard, after 
the banishment of the family from Boston, 
returned to England and became a wealthy mer- 
chant of London. His loss by the Great Fire in 
1663 was £60,000. He acted as the Agent of the 
Massachusetts Colony in England for many years. 
William Hutchinson's brother Samuel remained 
in Boston until his death in 1667. He was a 
bachelor and something of a scholar. His will is 
a most interesting document in which he remem- 
bers all his relatives, the Hutchinsons, the Wheel- 
wrights, the Phillipses, and many others, afford- 
ing one of those valuable testamentary sources of 
information so invaluable to the genealogists. 
Although William Hutchinson's brother Edward 
returned to England, his descendants lived in 
New England and became prominent and influ- 
ential people. The descendants of William 
Hutchinson 's sister and her husband, John Wheel- 
wright, were leaders in New England. William 
Hutchinson's mother, Susanna, went with her 
daughter, Mrs. Wheelwright, into exile at Exeter. 
Afterwards they removed to Wells, Maine, where 
Susanna died in 1642, the same year in which 
her son William died in Portsmouth. William 
Hutchinson's own descendants became identified 
with Boston. His son William was a much hon- 
ored citizen of Boston, and his grandson, Thomas 
Hutchinson, the last Royal Governor of Massa- 
chusetts, not only was a principal actor in the 
latter days of the Colony, but was an admirable 
historian of its earlier days. His treatment of the 



WILLIAM HUTCHINSON qh 

important episode in the history of Massachusetts 
in which his grandmother, to whom he refers only 
as "one Mrs. Hutchinson," is on the whole fair 
and judicial. He, in his turn, was forced into 
exile and went to Canada. That Boston twice 
banished the Hutchinson family was clearly Bos- 
ton's loss. 



Chaptek XXII 

ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 

Came over 1634 

Griffin 



Anne Marbury 1591 — 1643 

(William Hutchinson) 

Bridget Hutchinson 1618 — 1698 

(William Phillips) 

William Phillips 1660 — 1705 

(Deborah Long) 

Elizabeth Phillips 1698 — 

(Thomas Newman) 

Sarah Newman 1722 — 

(Thomas Smith) 

Nathaniel Smith 1752 — 1790 

(Judith Morse) 

Sarah Morse Smith 1780 — 1809 

(Aaron Davis) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) II 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 



Anne Marbury Hutchinson is incomparably 
your most famous comeoverer. In many books 
and innumerable treatises the story has been told 
of how she caused the great Antinomian contro- 
versy which whirled the little town of Boston 
about amid the conflicting doctrines of theology 
and psychology with such a mighty impetus it has 
never, even unto this day, ceased whirling. So 
fully has her public career been presented that I 
shall not undertake in this note to elucidate the 
causes or the results of the political turmoil for 
which she was responsible. Charles Francis 
Adams in his Three Episodes of Massachusetts 
History has told the story graphically and 
exhaustively, although by no means sympathetic- 
ally. The calcium light which he throws on Anne 
Hutchinson as she occupies the centre of the 
stage necessarily results in a theatrical falsity of 
portraiture. In this note I prefer to picture her 
as a gifted and brilliant woman who was both 
kind and motherly, a portrayal which the facts 
and records of her personal life fully justify. 

Anne Marbury, the daughter of the Rev. Francis 
Marbury and Bridget Dryden, his wife, was born 
in Alford and there baptized in her father's 
church on July 20, 1591. Of her gentle blood and 



616 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the social position of her parents and kin you 
have already learned in the note on her sister, 
Catherine Scott. Anne was much older than 
Catherine. It is altogether probable that as a 
girl with her mother she sometimes visited her 
cousins at Canons Ashby and came in touch with 
a side of social life which helped to fit her to 
become the guiding spirit of the Salon which she 
instituted later in Boston in New England. Her 
intellectual brilliancy and social charm were con- 
ceded by her most bitter enemies. As a magnetic 
hostess and social leader Anne Hutchinson un- 
questionably deserved renown, yet the upheaval 
which she caused in the state and church of Massa- 
chusetts in 1636 and 1637 was somewhat fortui- 
tous. As it happened, I fancy that none of her 
noble progenitors, not even Sir William Cope, a 
distinct power, not altogether for good, in the 
reign of Henry VII, were comparable with Anne 
Hutchinson in the impress which she made upon 
her time and generation during her brief career 
in New England. That she directly as well as 
indirectly affected the lives of a considerable num- 
ber of your ancestors is therefore not surprising. 
When Anne Marbury was twenty-one years old 
she married a prosperous young merchant of 
Alford, William Hutchinson. It was on August 
9, 1612, that they were joined in matrimony in the 
village church, doubtless by the bride's father. 
During the next twenty years her energies were 
probably sufficiently absorbed in bringing into 
the world and nurturing a family of fourteen 
children. That she altogether ceased from social 



ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 617 

activity during this period is hardly conceivable. 
That she became intensely interested in the 
religious ideas of her brother in law, John Wheel- 
wright, cannot be doubted. That she was in some 
degree an inspiration to him is probable. That 
she sometimes journeyed to Boston, in Lincoln- 
shire, not far from her home in Alford, and lis- 
tened with enthusiasm to John Cotton 's exposition 
of the word of God is altogether probable. That 
it was this keen religious interest which caused 
her to persuade her husband to leave his home 
and business and seek a new abiding place, where 
the doctrines in which she so ardently believed 
were ascendant, is beyond question. 

It was on the ship Griffin, which brought two 
hundred immigrants to Boston in September, 
1634, that Anne Hutchinson and her husband came 
over with all their children, the oldest twenty-one 
years of age and the youngest a baby little more 
than a year and a half old, with other members of 
the Hutchinson family. Mr. Wheelwright and 
his wife came over two years later. Soon after 
the Hutchinsons arrived in Boston they settled in 
the house which William Hutchinson had either 
caused to be built for him, or purchased from its 
original builder, at the northwest corner of what 
is now Washington Street and School Street. 
This house stood on a half acre lot, and when 
William Hutchinson was forced to sell it four 
years later because of the excommunication and 
banishment of his wife, the property was described 
as "bounded easterly by the Road to Roxbury; 
southerly by the lane leading to the Common; 



618 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

westerly by land of Thomas Scottos" (subse- 
quently sold to the town and now the site of 
the City Hall); and ''northerly by Major G. 
Sedwiek. ' * 

Here stood in my day the "Old Corner Book- 
store," a spot dear to the hearts of Bostonians. 
From that particular corner of the universe have 
been distributed many startling and compelling 
ideas. It has, indeed, furnished the local starting 
place of most of Boston's intellectual propaganda. 
It seems altogether appropriate that Anne Hutch- 
inson should have here instituted the transcend- 
ental movement which more distinctively than 
any other influence has since dominated the intel- 
lectual life of Boston. To this same corner, two 
and a half centuries after Anne Hutchinson's day, 
Mary Baker Eddy first brought for sale her incom- 
prehensible book on Science and Health and 
inaugurated a new epoch in Xew England tran- 
scendentalism. That this Bostonian phase of 
spiritualized metaphysics which found its orig- 
inator in Anne Hutchinson, and its highest 
prototype in Margaret Fuller, has as its latest 
prophetess Mary Baker Eddy is no more ironical 
than that the Old Corner Bookstore is now a cigar 
shop. 

The house which stood on the old corner in 
Anne Hutchinson's day was doubtless not a pala- 
tial dwelling, although probably among the better 
class of houses in the little town of some three 
thousand inhabitants which had been in existence 
only a few years. Xearly opposite, on the "road 
to Roxbury" lived John Winthrop, who was thus 



ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 619 

in a position to watch the goings on of the 
Hutchinson family. Without doubt he shared in 
the general estimate of Mistress Hutchinson as a 
kind and singularly charitable woman. She 
especially endeared herself in the community by 
her readiness to assist in cases of childbirth and 
illness, in which, as an older daughter of a family 
of twenty and herself the mother of a family of 
fourteen, she may well have been expert. There 
can be no doubt that during the first year or two 
of her residence in Boston she was held in high 
esteem in the church and community on account 
of her kind and charitable thoughtfulness of 
others in distress. 

Governor Winthrop, across the way, must have 
fully sympathized with the active and busy life of 
the clan of Hutchinsons who came to live opposite 
him. Nor would he have viewed with alarm the 
occasional meetings of the women of Boston at 
Mistress Hutchinson's house at which the sermons 
of the ministers, and especially of Mr. John 
Cotton, the assistant or curate, so to speak, of Mr. 
Wilson, the minister of the First Church of Bos- 
ton, were discussed and dilated on. These meet- 
ings soon came to be held twice a week and in the 
dearth of other social distractions became very 
much the vogue, so that finally the men of the 
community dropped in and joined in the discus- 
sions. Anne Hutchinson was unquestionably a 
clever hostess, and her enthusiasm for the meta- 
physical aspect of religion, the important current 
topic of the day, together with her brilliant con- 
versational powers, inevitably made her the chief 



620 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

expositor. She was a woman of strong personal 
likes and dislikes. Unfortunately she had con- 
ceived a prejudice against her ordained minister, 
Mr. Wilson, doubtless a worthy man, but narrow 
minded and an ultra conventional theologian, and, 
perhaps, without deliberate intent, she unduly 
championed the somewhat broader views of his 
assistant, Mr. Cotton, and the distinctly more 
radical ideas of her brother in law, Mr. Wheel- 
wright. In her enthusiasm and the self confidence 
which comes with exceptional mental power uncon- 
trolled by adequate knowledge, she soon began to 
authoritatively put forth doctrines which were not 
reconcilable with orthodoxy, and in the end she 
became convinced that she was an inspired 
prophetess. Mr. Wheelwright, indeed, stood by 
her loyally to the bitter end, but Mr. Cotton was 
finally forced by reasons of policy to repudiate 
her interpretations of his doctrines in a way 
which Mr. Adams says ''was simply pitiable, — 
the ignominious page in an otherwise worthy 
life." Cotton was the adored idol of Anne 
Hutchinson and her avowed admirer and ally dur- 
ing her period of ascendancy. He wrote of her 
that she "was well beloved and all the faithful 
embraced her conference and blessed God for her 
fruitful discourses." When the tide turned 
against her and "he made haste to walk in the 
Covenant of Works, — the walk was a dirty one," 
says Mr. Adams. 

There was a time during her brilliant assump- 
tion of the role of prophetess when she seemed to 
have practically the whole community of Boston 



ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 621 

under the sway of her magnetic influence. Sir 
Harry Vane, the "Boy Governor," was completely 
captivated by this middle aged woman and enthu- 
siastically espoused her cause to his own political 
undoing, resulting in his ignominious return to 
England. This brilliant boy of highly sensitive 
and aristocratic impulses, with his generous whole 
souled championship of liberty of conscience, by 
his devotion to Anne Hutchinson bore a remark- 
able testimony to the unusual charm and power 
of the woman. 

Although Anne Hutchinson succeeded in cap- 
tivating most of the clergy as well as the laity of 
Boston, the suburban ministers, who did not come 
within reach of her personal charm, began to 
revolt against the manifest heresies which she was 
promulgating, and the magistrates began to per- 
ceive that she was in fact undermining the founda- 
tions on which their clerical government rested. 
There can be no question that Mr. Wilson, the 
minister of Boston, was thoroughly right in the 
advice he gave the magistrates that Anne Hutch- 
inson must be curbed or the whole state would 
fall asunder. And so it is not surprising that 
Governor Winthrop, who so thoroughly believed 
in the divine guidance of the clergy as assistants 
to the magistrates, wrote in his diary under date 
of August 21, 1636: "One Mrs. Hutchinson, a 
member of the Church of Boston, a woman of 
ready wit and bold spirit, brought over with her 
two dangerous errors; (1) that the person of the 
Holy Ghost dwells in justified persons; (2) that 
no sanctification can help to evidence to us our 



622 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

justification. From these two grew many 
branches." It was not long before the branches 
had grown to such an alarming extent that they 
threatened to fall and crush the Boston hierarchy, 
and Governor Winthrop was perforce obliged to 
take a firm stand on the side of established cleri- 
cal authority, and in the end to become Anne 
Hutchinson's judge and executioner. And yet, 
with that sweet naivete which characterizes 
Winthrop, he confesses that "as to the precise 
difference" between the views of Mrs. Hutchinson 
and her opponents "no man could tell except some 
few who knew the bottom of the matter where the 
difference lay." It certainly is difficult for us 
now to tell the difference. It seems to have been 
metaphysical rather than theological. At all 
events, the difference finally came to the issue 
between a "Covenant of Grace" and a "Covenant 
of Works." Some unsympathetic critic of Anne 
Hutchinson has said that the whole controversy 
was, after all, based on her personal attitude 
towards the several ministers of the Colony; 
those whom she liked she asserted were under a 
Covenant of Grace ; those whom she disliked were 
under a Covenant of Works. When Mr. Wilson 
stood up to preach at lecture time, Mrs. Hutchin- 
son left the church; when Mr. Cotton spoke, she 
stayed and listened; when Mr. Wheelwright dis- 
coursed, she hung upon his words and going home 
gave forth his teachings, with emendations of her 
own, to her admiring following. 

"The town and country were distracted with 
these subtleties," says Governor Hutchinson, her 



ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 623 

grandson. The whole community was disturbed. 
The schism in the church became necessarily a 
political upheaval, which threatened the disrup- 
tion of the government. The crisis came when 
Winthrop displaced Sir Harry Vane in the elec- 
tion for Governor held in Cambridge, May 17, 
1637. This election, of which you will hear fur- 
ther in these notes, has probably never been 
paralleled in the intensity of excitement of the 
voters of Massachusetts. As a result the orthodox 
clerical party came into full power and the short 
lived ascendancy of the Antinomians ceased. Mr. 
Wheelwright was the first object of the govern- 
ment 's attack. He was tried and banished. Then 
Anne Hutchinson "the breeder and nourisher of 
all these distempers" was brought before the 
Court on an indictment of "traducing the min- 
isters and their ministry in this country." On 
this indictment there can be no question that she 
was guilty. 

The trial took place in Cambridge in the rude 
frame building which was used as the meeting- 
house. It was at what is now the corner of 
Mount Auburn and Dunster Streets. "The sea- 
son" writes Mr. Adams, "was one of unusual 
severity and the days the shortest of the year. 
No pretence was made of warming the barrack- 
like edifice. All told the Court consisted of some 
forty members, nine of whom were magistrates, 
but the building was thronged, almost every per- 
son of note in the province being there. Indeed, 
nothing in the history of Massachusetts, up to 
this time, had ever excited so great an interest." 



624 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Mr. Adams describes the scene with much vivid- 
ness. When he comes to speak of the culprit he 
calls her "a woman of thirty-six or seven years 
of age." In this error I have found all the his- 
torians of Anne Hutchinson share. She was, as a 
matter of fact, forty-six years old and a grand- 
mother when she faced that tribunal. Another 
narrator of this dramatic scene says "She was 
calm and respectful. The hard, determined faces 
of her judges were in striking contrast to her 
slight, delicate frame and sensitive face. Yet, as 
she stood before the Court, Anne Hutchinson was 
not afraid. She recalled the story of Daniel and 
how 'the princes and presidents sought matter 
against him concerning the law of God and cast 
him into the lions ' den from which the Lord deliv- 
ered him' as he assuredly would deliver her." 

Although the Court itself of its own motion had 
proceeded against her, and had determined in 
advance to find her guilty, the affair was carried 
on with a seemly observance of judicial form. 
Governor Winthrop proclaimed the sentence, 
which was thus entered on the Colony Records: 
1 'Mrs. Hutchinson (the wife of Mr. William 
Hutchinson) being convented for traducing the 
ministers, and their ministry in this country, she 
declared voluntarily her revelations for her 
ground, and that she should be delivered, and the 
Court ruined, with their posterity ; and thereupon 
was banished, and, the meanwhile, was committed 
to Mr. Joseph Welde until the Court shall dispose 
of her." 



ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 625 

Anne Hutchinson might well have chosen the 
lions' den had the alternative been offered her. 
Mr. Welde was her most venomous enemy. He 
called her, among other pretty epithets, a "para- 
mour of Satan" and the "American Jezebel. " 
Her enforced residence for many months in his 
house at Roxbury was vastly more severe a sen- 
tence than solitary confinement in a prison cell. 
She was allowed to see neither her husband nor 
children without special leave of the Court. She 
was, however, frequently visited by "holy inquisi- 
tors." As Winthrop sagely observed, "it could 
not be expected that Satan would lose the oppor- 
tunity of making choice of so fit an instrument so 
long as any hope remained to attain his mis- 
chievous end in darkening the saving truth of the 
Lord Jesus and disturbing the peace of his 
churches. ' ' Consequently, the clergy of the Colony 
were valiant in the fight against the Devil in the 
person of Mrs. Hutchinson and they continually 
and vigorously labored with her. In these assaults 
she showed a marvellous ability as a controver- 
sialist, but it was inevitable that she should in her 
unlearned enthusiasm lay herself open to a much 
more heinous charge than "traducing the min- 
isters," namely, the charge of absolute heresy to 
the fundamental doctrines of the church of God. 
On this charge she was brought before the church 
in Boston one Thursday Lecture Day after ser- 
mon in March, 1638. Mr. Adams remarks that 
"the scene that ensued, though sufficiently inter- 
esting, was, from the religious point of view far 
from edifying." She was subjected to a verbal 



626 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

inquisition which must have called on her utmost 
powers of mental and physical capacity. "It 
was," writes Mr. Adams, "eight o'clock of the 
March evening when the hungry and wearied con- 
gregation at last broke up. Through ten con- 
secutive hours those composing it had sat on hard 
and crowded benches." It was found that Mrs. 
Hutchinson's courage "was giving way under the 
tremendous pressure to which she had been sub- 
jected" and she was consequently given over to 
the care of Mr. Cotton and Mr. Davenport, who 
•labored with her to such an extent that she 
agreed to publicly recant. But it was too late, 
the church would accept no recantation. Anne 
Hutchinson must be excommunicated. John 
Wilson, the man whom she most despised, pro- 
claimed the sentence. "Therefore in the name 
of the Lord Jesus Christ and in the name of the 
church I do not only pronounce you worthy to be 
cast out, but I do cast you out; and in the name 
of Christ I do deliver you up to Satan .... 
And I do account you from this time forth to be a 
Heathen and a Publican .... therefore I 
command you in the name of Christ Jesus and of 
this church as a leper to withdraw yourself out of 
the congregation." 

She went. What else could she do? Fore- 
seeing the inevitable result she had planned to 
follow Mr. Wheelwright to the regions beyond 
the Piscataqua. On the twenty-eighth day of 
March in the year 1638 she left her home in Bos- 
ton, and going to the harbor, took a boat across 
the bay to her husband's farm at Mount Wollas- 



ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 627 

ton. There she found that her husband and her 
staunch supporter, Mr. William Coddington, after 
a vain attempt to find an abiding place under the 
jurisdiction of the Plymouth Colony authorities, 
had arranged, through Roger Williams, to pur- 
chase the Island of Aquidneck. Thither she and 
her husband and her family and many of her 
adherents went. The number of her loyal sup- 
porters was large, and they were all in effect 
exiled with her. Many of them went to Aquid- 
neck, to the place called Portsmouth, where she 
and her husband settled. 

Of the life of Anne Hutchinson at Portsmouth 
you have learned in the note on William Hutchin- 
son. When the church in Boston sent its formal 
delegation in 1640 to require her companions "to 
explain their unwarrantable practice in com- 
municating with excommunicated persons," she 
repudiated the commission and refused to 
acknowledge the Boston church as any church of 
Christ. The subtlety of her answers to the 
inquisitors, reported by them at length, make it 
evident that there was no member of the commis- 
sion in the least capable of coping with so experi- 
enced a controversialist. 

In 1642 William Hutchinson died, and his loving 
wife was indeed bereft. At this time the govern- 
ment of Massachusetts was actively seeking to 
obtain jurisdiction over the unauthorized Colonies 
of Rhode Island. To Anne Hutchinson this meant 
further persecution. Once again within the 
jurisdiction of Massachusetts, the magistrates 
would have proceeded against her, for they were 



628 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

by no means satisfied with having banished her, 
and she was an ever present cause of anxiety to 
them, since the seeds of freedom of religious 
thought which she had sown were generating in 
countless ways and places to their discomfiture. 
As Mr. Richman, in his admirable History of 
Rhode Island, says: "They, one and all from 
the sagacious Winthrop to the narrow minded 
Welde, regarded her with a feeling of mingled 
horror and amazement. She had been pro- 
nounced anathema maranatha by the church, 
and the wonder of all was that as such she was 
not visited by God's lightnings, or in some other 
way equally summary and unmistakable, made 
the example of supernatural vengeance. Welde, 
indeed, was disposed openly to take the Deity to 
task for permitting Mistress Hutchinson to live 
untortured even by remorse. ' ' In the event, even 
Mr. Welde must have been fully satisfied with the 
vengeance of the Lord on this brilliant and kindly 
woman. Pending that final evidence of the Lord's 
displeasure, Governor Winthrop found some 
satisfaction in the rumor that with the ministra- 
tions of a midwife, Mrs. Hawkins, "notorious for 
familiarity with the Devill," Anne Hutchinson 
was delivered at Aquidneck of a monstrous birth. 
Mr. Welde, however, says it was thirty monstrous 
births, a number, curiously enough, corresponding 
with that of the erroneous opinions for which she 
had been excommunicated. 

It is not to be wondered that Anne Hutchinson 
deemed it wise to remove beyond the possible 
limits of the jurisdiction of Massachusetts. 



ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 629 

Welde, to be sure, in explaining her departure 
from Portsmouth, says that ' ' she being weary of 
the Island, or rather the Island being weary of 
her, removed to the Dutch Plantations." That 
Mr. Adams preferred this manifestly ill natured 
explanation to the perfectly evident and justifi- 
able reason for Anne Hutchinson's withdrawal 
from the Rhode Island settlement, is the least 
defensible example of his unchivalrous treatment 
of this gifted and sincere woman. "It was the 
woman's nature to crave excitement and notori- 
ety. She could not be happy without it. As 
soon, therefore, as she found herself a sensation 
of yesterday she grew restless and felt a call to 
go elsewhere." When Mr. Adams intends to be 
"nasty" he succeeds admirably. 

Anne Hutchinson was now fifty-one years of 
age. She had only four years earlier been rudely 
torn from her comfortable home in Boston, and 
fleeing to Wollaston, from thence on foot had 
made the journey into the wilderness of which 
Coddington wrote to Winthrop "what myself and 
wife and family did endure in that removal I wish 
neither you nor yours ever be put unto." No 
house awaited her at Aquidneck. She must have 
lived in the open until a rough log cabin was built 
to shelter her and her large family. The diffi- 
culties and privations of a pioneer's life in a wild 
and unprotected place, far removed from any 
source of supplies, necessarily must have taxed 
the strength of her resolute womanliness. Then 
her husband, who had been her main support and 
comforter, died and her grief must have been 



630 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

heavy. That she once again had the strength 
and spirit to go forth into the wilderness and find 
a spot where she might in peace spend her declin- 
ing years, shows the undaunted courage of this 
hardly tried woman. 

And so, for the second time, fleeing from the 
wrath of the magistrates of Boston, Anne Hutch- 
inson, with her son in law, the Rev. Mr. Collins, 
and his family, and her daughter Susanna, 
together with some of her intimate adherents, 
among whom you will remember was your ances- 
tor, Thomas Cornell, left Portsmouth and went 
to the Dutch Plantations of New York. The place 
where she located was at Pelham 's Neck, opposite 
Stamford, at a place which Mr. Welde noted as 
peculiarly appropriate since it was "called by 
Seamen, and on the map, Hell-Gate." Near by 
were her friends, John Throckmorton and Thomas 
Cornell. The names of all these settlers are still 
preserved in the designations of various places in 
the adjacent country. 

The tiny settlement was hardly under way when, 
within a year from its commencement, the Indians 
attacked it. They appeared at Anne Hutchin- 
son's house "after their customed manner, out- 
wardly friendly, but a moment later, once they 
had gained the inner threshold, the tomahawk was 
bespattered with the blood of this unfortunate 
woman." After that the massacre became gen- 
eral. Her son in law and all his family and some 
of the neighbors, some seventeen in all, were mur- 
dered, and the buildings sacked and burned. Her 
daughter, Susanna, then about eleven years old, 



ANNE MARBURY HUTCHINSON 631 

was taken away a captive by the savages, but 
afterward restored to her relatives in Massachu- 
setts. In Welde's Rise, Reign and Ruin of the 
Antinomians is this pious and charitable refer- 
ence to Anne Hutchinson 's murder : ' ' The Indians 
set upon them and slew them and slew her, and 
all her family, her daughter and her daughter's 
husband, and their children save one that 
escaped — a dreadful blow. Some write that 
the Indians did burn her to death by fire, her 
house, and all the rest named that belonged to 
her; but I am unable to affirm by what kind of 
death they slew her, but slain it seems she is, 
according to all report. I never heard that the 
Indians in those parts did ever before commit the 
like outrage upon any family or families. There- 
fore God's hand is the more apparently seen 
herein, to pick out this woful woman, to make her 
and those belonging to her an unheard of heavy 
example of their cruelty above others." 

' ' When the news of this terrible ending reached 
Boston," writes Charles Francis Adams, "the 
people there were deeply moved. They called 
to mind the defiant words in which the would-be 
prophetess had told the Court that the Lord would 
surely deliver her from her impending calamity, 
and would ruin them and their posterity and their 
whole estate ; and so bade them take heed how they 
proceeded against her. And now the clergy of 
Massachusetts Bay grimly pointed out to all their 
congregations that the Lord God of Israel — the 
God of Abraham and Isaac — had indeed and in 
his own good way shown himself to his chosen 



6 32 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

people. He had smote the American Jezebel a 
dreadful blow. Thus the Lord heard his servants ! 
groans to heaven and freed them from this great 
and sore affliction." 



Chapter XXIII 
SAKAH MOESE SMITH 



SARAH MORSE SMITH 



I recall your great great grandmother Sarah 
Morse Smith Davis Lancaster, distinctly. She 
was a bright, jolly little woman and lived in the 
old home on Middle Street in Newburyport. I 
can recall the rooms in the house and the furni- 
ture in the rooms, some of which, to be sure, has 
since been to me a daily reminder of her during 
all my life. There was, of course, a best room in 
the front of which I have only vague recollections, 
but the room behind, on the other side of the hall, 
(the entrance was at the side of the house) I 
recall clearly. It was the "dining-room" when 
there was company, but on ordinary occasion it 
was the " sitting-room. " My recollection of 
"Grandma Lancaster" as we called her, is of one 
who was always flitting about and cheerily chirp- 
ing like a bird. I have no mental picture of her 
sitting quietly in a chair as I have of most old 
people whom I recall. I picture her as moving 
briskly about and pausing now and then to make 
love to me, and to whisper some tale of what a 
naughty girl my mother used to be and how she 
loved her. I remember, too, how curious it 
seemed for her to speak of my Grandmother 
Tappan as if she too were a girl. "Well, I'd like 
to know what Serena means by sending you way 



636 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

down here alone. The child ought to know 
better!" 

One of her granddaughters, our Cousin Caroline 
Carter, has given me for you her recollections of 
this dear little old lady : 

"Although never much with my Grandmother 
Sarah Lancaster, I remember her vividly from 
the time I was four years old. I spent that year 
in Newburyport with my Grandmother Carter. 
Grandmother Carter was a tall, stately woman, 
and had Puritanical notions of what was ' best for 
a child,' and of her I stood in great awe. When 
I was taken to visit my sprightly little 'Grand- 
mother Lancaster' I quite relaxed. She gave me 
mince pie and tea and let me wear stockings to 
bed o' cold nights. I was also much petted by 
her husband, 'Grandfather Lancaster,' and I 
thought his queue, which grandmother braided 
and tied with a black ribbon every morning, a 
thing of beauty. With pride and terror I once 
saw this queue waving in the air from the top of 
the Federal Street Church steeple, over the bones 
of George Whitefield in the crypt, as the valiant 
old gentleman repaired the weather-cock. 

"I remember Grandma Lancaster as very viva- 
cious, quick tempered, and outspoken. Never 
sullen or stern. She was always busy and during 
her later years knitted so incessantly making 
great bed quilts that when she was daguerreo- 
typed she had her knitting in her hands 'so that 
people will know me, ' she said. She told me once 
that her husband, our Grandfather Davis, our 
'real grandfather,' was afraid 'it wasn't right 



SARAH MORSE SMITH 637 

for apothecaries to make such large profits. ' Evi- 
dently his profits were none too large for his 
family of eight children, for there was little left at 
his death but the roomy old house on Middle 
Street. Yet on her very small income the frugal 
old lady, his widow, seemed to live comfortably 
and still have 'four pence ha' penny' for her 
grandchildren. 

"When she discoursed on matrimony, as she 
was fond of doing, she would say of her second 
husband: 'Mr. Lancaster is a very good, 
religious, honest man, and a good husband to me, 
but you know, child, that my real husband was 
your Grandfather Davis?' One of her favorite 
reminiscences was of three pairs of lovers syn- 
chronically: 'Charles Smith and your Aunt 
Harriet on the roof platform reading Lalla 
Rookh ; George Tappan and your Aunt Serena in 
the front parlor ; and Anson Bailey and your Aunt 
Martha in the sitting-room.' I remember being 
thrilled at Grandmother's story of Aunt Harriet 
appearing one moonlight night 'like a ghost at the 
foot of my bed to ask me, for the last time, to con- 
sent to her going out to the Sandwich Islands to 
marry Charles. She looked at me so solemn with 
her great eyes and said that if I didn't give my 
consent she would go without it, so of course I 
said she might go. But it was very improper — 
her going alone to the far off place to marry him. 
All the young men said that Harriet was the best 
talker, and Sarie-Ann, your mother, the best 
walker in Newburyport. Harriet talked like a 
book, and your mother walked like a little queen. 



638 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

That is what your father used to call her, you 
know. ' 

' * Grandmother always had a pet cat who had 
her own cushioned chair by the fire and no grand- 
child could approach that seat without risk of 
being both scratched and reprimanded. When 
one of these pets died her fond mistress buried 
her in the garden with her head above ground and 
covered with a large glass tumbler 'so that I 
could see her pretty face.' Another was told in 
a moment of impatience, to 'get out and never 
bother me again ; ' and, do you know, she just went 
out of the kitchen door and never came back! 

"Grandma and all of her daughters fainted at 
the slightest provocation, especially if they saw 
anyone else faint. One day one of my aunts 
heard someone fall and running to the room 
whence the sound came found a sister unconscious 
on the floor, whereupon she promptly flopped, 
and was followed by a third in the like manner, 
when Grandma came and with great presence of 
mind rapped on the partition to call someone be- 
fore she too fell unconscious on the floor. One day 
Grandma's sister, Mrs. Alfred Osgood, put her 
empty pewter teapot on the stove, and Grandma 
seeing it tried to gradually move it to one side as 
it melted, fainting as she did so, and saying 'Oh, 
my head!' Aunt Osgood, snatching the teapot 
boldly, said 'Oh, my teapot!' 

"Grandma could be caustic on occasion. I re- 
member one day when I and my brother, George 
Tappan Carter, called on grandma a neighbor 
came in evidently from inquisitive motives, seek- 



SARAH MORSE SMITH 639 

ing to find out who we were and all about us. 
Grandma endured the interruption for a few 
moments and then said : 'Isn't it a very cold day, 
Mrs. B.?' 'Oh, yes, Mrs. Lancaster.' 'And 
haven't you a good fire at home?' 'Oh, yes, Mrs. 
Lancaster.' 'Well, I don't see how you could bear 
to leave it and come over here;' and as soon as 
she gracefully could, Mrs. B. retired." 

When my mother, Sarah Tappan Crapo, heard 
Of her grandmother's death she made prepara- 
tions to go to Newburyport. I remember the day 
of the funeral with great distinctness. I was 
seven years old. On my way home from Mrs. 
Knight's school on North Street I was taken 
seriously ill. The most horribly lonely and miser- 
able experience of my life was a half hour or so 
which I spent on the curbing on Foster Street in 
front of a church, unable to move, and abandoned 
by all the world. When at last I managed to 
crawl home I was a very sick boy with a mysteri- 
ous failure of heart action which seriously 
alarmed my mother. So she did not go to Grand- 
mother Lancaster's funeral, and somehow I have 
always felt very guilty about it. My unfortunate 
illness, for which I felt responsible, ma^e me 
keenly alive to all the news which came to my 
bedside about Grandmother Lancaster's death 
and all the details about her funeral and the dis- 
tribution of her property. It may be due to this 
rather tense experience of my youth that I feel 
more intimately acquainted with this particular 
great grandmother. I had rather more than the 
average chance to know my great grandmothers. 



640 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

There were three out of the four living when I 
was a child. And of these I knew Sarah Morse 
Smith much the most intimately. It may be, per- 
haps, that for that reason I have known her de- 
scendants more intimately than the descendants 
of my other great grandparents. This, however, 
will not be your experience. You are too remote 
by birth and circumstance to feel as I do that you 
are more closely associated with the old town of 
Newbury and its people than with any other 
source of your origin. 



PART VI 
ANCESTORS 

OF 

ABNER TOPPAN 



Chapter I 

ABRAHAM TOPPAN 

Came over 1637 
Mary Anne 



Abraham Toppan 1606 — 1672 

(Susanna Taylor) 

Jacob Toppan 1645 — 1717 

(Hannah Sewall) 

Abraham Toppan 1684 — 

(Esther Wigglesworth) 

Edward Toppan 1715 — 1795 

(Sarah Bailey) 

Abner Toppan 1764 — 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 — 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



ABRAHAM TOPPAN 



"Abraham Toppan, Cooper, aged 31, Susanna 
his wife aged 30, with their children Peter and 
Elizabeth, and one mayd servant Anne Goodin 
aged 18 years, sailed from Yarmouth, May, 1637, 
in the ship Mary Anne of Yarmouth, William 
Goose, Master." This entry appears in an Eng- 
lish register of names of "such persons who are 
21. years and upwards and have license to passe 
into forraigne parts from Mar. 1637 to Sep. 29th, 
1637." 

There exists some confusion in the surname of 
this ancestor of yours. About the end of the 
tenth century, the custom was established in Eng- 
land of taking the name of localities to designate 
certain families. John of the top, or upper, ham- 
let or hanie, appears to be explanation of the 
name Topham. A family of this name was resi- 
dent in Yorkshire about the time of the French 
conquest. The earliest trace of the branch of 
this family from which you are descended, which 
has come to my knowledge, is found in the will 
of John Topham of Pately Bridge, in the west 
riding of Yorkshire. It is dated 1403, and was 
proved on the thirteenth of June following. It 
seems fairly well established that it is from this 
man that you are descended. Robert Topham, 



646 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

who appears to have been the son of the said 
John Topham, is undoubtedly your ancestor. He 
lived at Linton near Pately Bridge. He died in 
1550 leaving a will which was proved in the Arch- 
bishop 's Court at York. He left four sons and 
one daughter. Thomas Topham, the second son, 
was unquestionably your ancestor. He is de- 
scribed as of Arncliffe, in the neighborhood of 
Linton, and he died in 1589 and was buried in 
the parish church of Linton. In his will he men- 
tions his wife Isabel and his sons Edward, An- 
thony, Laurence, Henry and William, and a 
daughter Isabella. 

It is from Edward that you descend. He was 
the oldest son, and his pedigree is recorded in 
the College of Arms with armorial bearings. He 
lived in Aglethorpe, and had seven children. His 
wife was named Margaret, but of her I have no 
knowledge. His fourth child was William, who is 
your ancestor. William lived in Calbridge in 
the parish of Caverham. It is his son Abraham, 
baptized at Calbridge April 10, 1606, who came 
to New England in 1637 on the ship Mary Anne. 
The immigrant called himself "Toppan," and in 
all the records relating to him and his immediate 
descendants the name is so spelled. Your great 
grandfather George "Tappan" deliberately 
changed the spelling to conform with the spelling 
of many branches of the same family who at some 
previous time had assumed the "a" instead of 
the "o." That there was some reason for this 
change I am led to believe from the way in which 
Judge Sewall spells the surname of Abraham, 



ABRAHAM TOPPAN 647 

the comeoverer, and Jacob his son, who was Judge 
Sewall's brother in law. Judge Sewall distinctly 
belonged to the onomatopoetic school orthog- 
raphy, and I find that in his almost numberless 
references to his brother in law's family he never 
once spells the name as the records clearly show 
it should have been spelt, but gives it with many 
variations as Tapan, Tapin, Tappin, Tapping, 
Tappan, etc., which leads me to conclude that 
whereas the name was formally spelt "Toppan," 
it was currently pronounced "Tappan." 

In the plat of the lots at the original Newbury 
settlement at Parker River, the third lot from 
the river by the "east gutter" is designated as 
Abraham Toppan 's. On October 18, 1637, Abra- 
ham Toppan was licensed by John Endicott, 
Esquire, "to live in this jurisdiction and received 
into the town of Newbury as an inhabitant there- 
of, and hath promised under his hand to be sub- 
ject to any lawful order that shall be made by 
the towne." On May 2, 1638, Abraham Toppan 
was admitted as a freeman. In 1639, he acquired 
twenty acres of land at the "Great River," prob- 
ably meaning the Merrimack. During the follow- 
ing years there are numerous records of his 
acquirement of lands. In 1638 he was one of the 
five men deputed to manage the town's affairs, 
and thereafter he served the town as Selectman 
many times. He served as such in 1647, 1650, 
1664, 1667 and in several other years of which I 
have not the record. 

It is hardly likely that he heard of the death of 
his cousin Henry Topham on July 2, 1644, who 



048 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

as a Lieutenant Colonel of the Royalist Army, 
under the command of Prince Rupert, partici- 
pated in the epoch making battle of Marston 
Moor. Indeed, if he had heard of it, he would 
doubtless have rejoiced in the victory of the Par- 
liamentarians. He was a rigid Puritan, an ad- 
mirer of Oliver Cromwell, and a stanch supporter 
of the government of the church and by the church 
and for the church. 

There are many references in the public records 
which indicate that Abraham Toppan was an 
active and enterprising man of affairs. In 1659 
he was one of the original proprietors of Penne- 
cooke and Contocooke, now Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, and in 1664 he went to New Jersey and 
laid out and settled the town of Woodbridge, 
where he lived for some time. 

A transcript from the County Court files in 
Salem, in 1671, is as follows: "I Ann Hills 
sometime servant to Abraham Toppan testify 
that Abraham Toppan did make sundry voyages 
to the Barbadoes of which one or two were profit- 
able, the produce being brought home in sugars, 
cotton wool, and mollases, which were then com- 
modities rendering great profit, wool then being 
at twelve pence, sugar at six or eight pence per 
pound profit, of which he brought great quanti- 
ties." Jacob Toppan, the son of Abraham, and 
your ancestor, also testified in the same cause 
that "on the last voyage from Barbadoes above 
mentioned he brought home eight barrels and one 
hogshead of sugar and two or three thousand 
pounds of cotton wool. ' ' Although • Jacob Top- 



ABRAHAM TOPPAN 649 

pan does not say so, it is extremely likely that 
in the cargo were some negro slaves. Governor 
Bradstreet about this time was complaining to 
the Privy Council about the importation of slaves 
from the Barbadoes. 

For many years and until his death Abraham 
Toppan lived near the Old Town Green, then 
called the "Trayening Green," directly opposite 
Tristram Coffin's house, and not far from Henry 
Sewall's house on Parker's Lane. It was "on a 
knowle up upland by Goodman Toppan 's barne" 
that the "new meeting-house," which caused so 
much heart burning as you have and will abun- 
dantly learn from these notes, was built. Abra- 
ham Toppan died in 1672. His wife was Susanna 
Taylor. Of her descent I have learned nothing. 
Her mother's maiden name was Elizabeth, and 
after the death of Susanna's father she married 
a Mr. Goodale of Yarmouth, England, who died 
in 1625. The widow came to Newbury and was 
living there as late as 1647. 

I find among my papers the copy of an interest- 
ing letter, written October 23, 1849, by your great 
grandfather, George Tappan, to the Rev. Mr. 
Morrison, who was the minister of the First 
Congregational Society in New Bedford. The 
letter was written during the period when some 
of the Congregational churches, under suggestion 
of Ralph Waldo Emerson and others, were dis- 
senting from the doctrine of the divinity of Jesus. 
George Tappan sent to Mr. Morrison a copy of 
his great great great grandfather Abraham Top- 
pan 's will, to show that one hundred and seventy- 



650 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

seven years before Jesus was designated as a 
"man. " I am afraid that the old Abraham 
would hardly have supported the inference of his 
descendant, or tolerated his radical religious 
ideas. You may, possibly, be interested in the 
quotation from the preamble of the will, probated 
March 25, 1673, on which George Tappan based 
his statement: 

"In the name of God, I, Abraham Toppan of 
Newbury in the County of Essex being at present 
through mercy in good health and of sound mem- 
ory and understanding, Blessed be God, do make 
this my last will and testament in manner follow- 
ing. First I commit my soul both in life and 
death into the hands of the Almighty God my 
most merciful creator through the merits and 
mediation of Jesus Christ my alone Saviour and 
ever blessed redeemer through the power and 
presence of his holy and good Spirit, and my body 
to the earth whence its original was taken to be 
buried by my executor hereafter named, in hope 
of a happy resurrection in the great day of the 
Man Christ Jesus to whom be glory forever." 



Chaptek II 

HENRY SEWALL 

Came over 1634 



Henry Sewall 1576 — 1657 

(Anne Hunt) 

Henry Sewall, Jr. 1614 — 1700 

(Jane Dummer) 

Hannah Sewall 1649 — 1699 

(Jacob Toppan) 

Abraham Toppan 1684 — 

(Esther Wiggles worth) 

Edward Toppan 1715 — 1795 

(Sarah Bailey) 

Abner Toppan 1764 — 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 — 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



HENRY SEWALL 



New England's Pepys, Samuel Sewall, the 
Chief Justice, in a letter to his son Samuel, says : 
1 ' Mr. Henry Sewall, my great Grandfather, was a 
Linen Draper in the City of Coventry in Great 
Britain. He acquired a great Estate, was a 
prudent Man, and was more than once chosen 
Mayor of the City." This Henry Sewall was 
born about 1544. He was Mayor of Coventry in 
1589 and 1606. He died April 16, 1628, aged 
eighty-four, and was buried in Saint Michael's 
Church. He married Margaret, eldest daughter 
of Avery Grazebrook of Middleton, in the County 
of Warwick, in 1575. Judge Sewall continues as 
follows: "Mr. Henry Sewall, my Grandfather, 
was his eldest son, who out of dislike to the 
English Hierarchy sent over his onely Son, my 
Father, Mr. Henry Sewall, to New England in the 
year 1634 with Net Cattel and Provisions suitable 
for a new Plantation. Mr. Cotton would have 
had my Father settle in Boston ; but in regard of 
his Cattel he chose to go to Newbury, whither my 
Grandfather soon followed him." 

Henry Sewall, the grandfather of Judge 
Sewall and Hannah Toppan, was born in Coventry 
and baptized in Saint Michael's Church, April 8, 
1576. He married Anne Hunt. In his venture 



054 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

in New England, he was associated with Sir 
Richard Saltonstall and Richard Dunmier. Soon 
after he sent his son over with the cattle he, him- 
self, arrived, and in 1634 went to Ipswich. Under 
date of November IS, 1634. Governor TTinthrop 
writes, "'an open pinnace of Mr. Henry Sewall 
of Ipswich going deeply laden for Boston was cast 
away on the rocks at the head of Cape Ann in a 
north east storm; but the men were saved." He 
owned a house in Ipswich in 1635. and in 1637 he 
bought a house from Samuel Symonds. Henry 
Sewall and Richard Dimmer were evidently 
regarded as the rich men of Ipswich and Xew- 
bury. Henry Sewall's son Henry was from the 
first doubtless settled at Newbury. Henry Sewall, 
the senior, moved thither within a few years. 

In the original allotment of lands at Newbury, 
there was set off to Henry Sewall (Senior), "in 
proportion to his contributions towards the new 
settlement," six hundred and thirty acres of land, 
by far the largest allotment except that of Mr. 
Richard Dummer. Four acres was the allotment 
made to most of the settlers. Subsequently Henry 
Sewall acquired more land, and was a large owner 
of cattle and sheep, as appears by the town 
records relating to commons and pasturage. 
Henry Sewall, the senior, was evidently a man of 
strong convictions, and had a way of asserting 
them in an inconvenient manner. On March 3, 
1639, "for his contemptuous speech and carriage 
to Mr. Saltonstall he was enjoyned to acknowledge 
his fault publickly at Ipswich Court and bee of 
good behavior and was enjoyned to appear at the 



HENRY SEWALL 655 

next Quarter Court .... He bound him- 
self in £66 13s. 4d for his appearance and good 
behavior." When the inhabitants of Newbury 
determined to remove the meeting-house to the 
"New Town" in 1646 which was the occasion of 
much contention and ill feeling, Henry Sewall 
(Senior), being vigorously opposed to the 
removal, became so much incensed that he left 
Newbury and went to Eowley, where he lived 
until he died in March, 1657. That he was not 
altogether at peace in his new church relations 
appears from the records of the Court before 
which he was several times brought for unseemly 
behavior. For instance, in December, 1650, he 
was before the Court, and the following testimony 
was given: 

Mr. Showell was walking in the foremost seat in the 
meeting house near the pulpit and Mr. Rogers being 
present and ready to step into the place to begin prayer 
said, "Mr. Showell, cease your walking." Mr. S. 
answered, "You should have come sooner," with more 
words to that purpose. But he did not cease his walk- 
ing. Presently our pastor added these words : ' ' Remem- 
ber where you are, this is the house of God." To which 
Mr. S. answered with a lowd voyee, "I know how to 
behave in the house of God as well as you." Then our 
pastour said rather than that he disturb the congrega- 
tion, "putt him out," to which Mr. S. replyed, "lett us 
see who dare ! ' ' 

Henry Sewall, Junior, was born in Coventry in 
1614. In 1634 he came over with his father's 
"net cartel." He at once became a leader in the 
settlement of Newbury. He was in the first boat 
load which came from Ipswich in the spring of 
1635 and landed on the shore of the Parker River. 



656 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Always thereafter he took a prominent part in 
the affairs of the settlement. In order that they 
might vote in the exciting election for Governor 
in May 1637, Henry Sewall, Junior, Nicholas 
Noyes, and other Newbury men walked to Cam- 
bridge, were made freemen, and cast their votes 
for John Winthrop. This election was the cul- 
mination of the trouble which Anne Hutchinson 
had wrought in the Commonwealth. Charles 
Francis Adams in his Three Episodes of Massa- 
chusetts History says: "As the election day 
drew near Winthrop and Vane were put forward 
as opposing candidates and the adherents of 
neither neglected any precaution likely to influ- 
ence the result ; while the deep interest felt in that 
result of itself insured not only a full vote, but a 

large personal attendance The day 

was clear and warm when at one o'clock the free- 
men gathered in groups about a large oak tree 
which stood on the north side of what is now 
Cambridge Common, where Governor Vane, in 
English fashion and beneath the open sky, 
announced the purpose of the meeting, the annual 
charter election. Most of the notabilities of the 
Province, whether magistrates or clergy, were 
among the large number present." Sir Harry 
Vane as presiding officer was desirous of at once 
entertaining a petition of many inhabitants of 
Boston which was in effect an appeal from the 
magistrates to the people in regard to pending 
proceedings against Mr. Wheelwright and Mrs. 
Hutchinson. Winthrop objected that the election 
of officers was the special business of the day and 



HENRY SEWALL 657 

should be first disposed of. Sir Harry Vane was 
firm and an angry debate ensued. "The position 
assumed by the youthful Governor was striking 
and dramatic enough;" says Mr. Adams, "it was 
suggestive of memories connected with that 
greater and more turbulent forum in which Grac- 
chus and Sulpicius appealed directly from the 
Senate to the People of Rome. That under the 
strain to which the eager and too zealous patri- 
cian now subjected it, the meeting did not break 
into riot, was due only to the self control and 
respect for law and form, the inherited political 
habit, of those who composed it." 

Of his father's connection with this memorable 
scene Judge Sewall writes, in a letter preserved 
in his letter-book: 

May 17 1637 — the election was held at Cambridge 
upon the Plain in the open Air. Govr. Vane was there, 
and had the Mortification to see the excellent John 
Winthrop preferd before him and chosen Governour 
(who had been Gouvernour 1630-1-2-3.) Indeed Mr. 
Vane seemed to stand so hard for being chosen again, 
as to endeavor to confound and frustrat the whole busi- 
ness of the Election, rather than that he himself should 
fail of being chosen. There was a great struggle, he 
being the principal magistrate, for managing the Elec- 
tion. My father has told me many a time that he and 
others went on foot from Newby to Cambridge, fourty 
miles, on purpose to be made free and help to strengthen 
Govr. "Winthrop 's party. And I find his name in the 
Kecord accordingly. 

Although both of your ancestors, Henry Sewall 
and Nicholas Noyes, manifested unusual public 
spirit on this occasion, it seems that they did not 
always fully attend to their duties as citizens. 



658 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

In 1638, Nicholas Noyes was fined 2s. 6d. "for 
being absent from town meeting. ' ' April 8, 1646, 
Mr. Henry Sewall and three others were fined 
12d. apiece for the same offense, "to be gathered 
within ten dayes. " This was the occasion when 
the town had some doubts as to the activity of the 
Constable and turned to another of your ancestors 
for assistance. They provided "in case the con- 
stable bring it not in by that time Anthony Morse 
is appointed to distrayne on him, the constable, 
for all the fynes. " 

In 1636 the first mill in Newbury was built at 
the falls of Parker River by Mr. Richard Dummer 
and Mr. John Spencer. It would seem that soon 
after Henry Sewall acquired Mr. Spencer's inter- 
est, and it would also appear that later he acquired 
Mr. Dummer 's. For some mysterious reason, the 
land to which the mill privilege appertained had 
been excepted from the general grant which the 
settlers obtained from the Indians. In 1661, the 
claim of "Old Will," the Indian, against Henry 
Sewall, became a matter of concernment before 
the Great and General Court at Boston. The 
Court decreed and ordered "that if it shall 
appeare unto the said Henry Sewall that the said 
Indians, or any other, have any legall right unto 
any part of the said land, the said Henry Sewall 
shall heerby have liberty to purchase the same of 
the said Indians." Apparently it did not so 
appear to Henry Sewall, because in 1679 a grand- 
son of "Old "Will" brought a suit to recover the 
land against him. Eventually a settlement was 
effected, Henry Sewall paying the various grand- 



HENRY SEWALL 659 

children of ' ' Old Will ' ' the sum of twenty pounds 
in all, if I remember correctly. 

On March 25, 1646, Henry Sewall married Jane 
Dummer, the daughter of Stephen Dummer. He 
was thirty-two years of age and she was about 
nineteen. The marriage ceremony was performed 
by Sir Richard Saltonstall. In 1647, Henry Sewall 
and his wife went back to England with the 
Dummer s. After his return to England, he and 
his wife dwelt awhile at Warwick, and afterwards 
removed to Hampshire. It was at Tunworth, a 
little place in the northern part of Hampshire that 
their eldest child, Hannah Sewall (Toppan) your 
ancestress, was born May 10, 1649. She was 
baptized by a Mr. Haskins. The family then 
moved to Bishopstoke, half way between South- 
ampton and Winchester, the home of the Dum- 
mers, where their next child, Samuel, the famous 
diarist, was born March 28, 1652. Thereafter, 
the family moved to Badesly, near by Romsey, 
where three more children were born. 

Henry Sewall made one voyage to New Eng- 
land to see his father. In 1657 his father died 
"and in 1659 he went thither again, his rents 
at Newbury coming to very little when remitted 
to England." This time he concluded to remain 
and sent for his family. Judge Sewall writes: 
"My father sent for my mother to come to him in 
New England. I remember being at Bishopstoke 
and Badesly April 23, 1661, the day of the corona- 
tion of King Charles the Second, the Thunder and 
Lightning of it. Quickly after my mother went 
to Winchester with 5 small children, Hannah, 



(]60 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Samuel, John, Stephen, and Jane, and John Nash 
and Mary Hobs, her servants, there to be in readi- 
ness for the Pool wagons. At this place her near 
relations, especially my very worthy and pious 
uncle, Mr. Stephen Dummer, took leave with 
tears. Capt. Dummer of Swathling treated us 
with Raisins and Almonds. My mother lodged 
in Pumpyard, London, waiting for the going of 
the ship, the Prudent Mary, Capt. Isaac Wood- 
green, Comander. " 

Hannah, your many times great grandmother, 
was then twelve years old and her brother Samuel 
nine. The journey must have seemed long to 
these young travellers. Samuel says, "we were 
about eight weeks at Sea, where we had nothing 
to see but Water and Sky ; so that I began to fear 
I should never get to Shoar again, only I thought 
the Captain and Mariners would not have ven- 
tured themselves if they had not hopes of getting 
to Land again." They entered the Narrows of 
Boston Harbor, July* 6, 1661. "My father 
hastened to Boston and carried his Family to 
Newbury by Water. Brother Tapan has told me 
our arrival there was upon Lecture-Day which 
was Wednesday. Mr. Ordway carried me ashore 
in his canoe." This was James Ordway from 
whom also are you descended. 

Three more daughters were born to Henry 
Sewall and his wife, in New England, making 
eight children in all, and as Hannah was the oldest 
she must have been her mother's helpmeet in the 
difficulties of domestic life presented by the crude 
conditions of the new settlement. Although Henry 



HENRY SEWALL 661 

Sewall was deemed a man of wealth by his neigh- 
bors, yet the life which his family led in the earlier 
days of the settlement was doubtless one of hard- 
ship, discomfort, privation and danger. Before 
his family joined him in New England, he had 
purchased a house near the Trayneing Green, 
1 ' at the old town upon the little hill ' ' not far from 
"Mr. Toppan's Meeting House," as the new 
meeting-house was called. The lot had originally 
been granted to Henry Travers in 1645, and by 
him sold to John Browne in 1659. Henry Sewall 
purchased this lot November 7, 1660. There was 
a dwelling house on the land "and also shop and 
new shop lately built and floored." It was 
opposite the home of the Rev. James Noyes, with 
whom the Rev. Thomas Parker lived, on a lane 
called "Noyes Lane" which led off the Main Road, 
now High Street. Next by was Tristram Coffin's 
house, and across the Main Road the dwelling of 
Abraham Toppan, and in the immediate vicinity 
was the John Spencer farm, where now stands the 
old "Pettingill House," as I was taught to call 
it, the most interesting bit of architecture of the 
seventeenth century in New England. An ' ' Aunt 
Pettingill ' ' lived there when I was a boy but who 
she was, and why she was "Aunt" I have only a 
vague idea. 

It was in Henry Sewall 's house in Noyes Lane 
that your grandmother Hannah and her brother 
Samuel lived after their arrival in New England. 
It was here that Samuel pursued his studies under 
the Rev. Thomas Parker, who lived in the Noyes 
house opposite, and it was here doubtless that 



662 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Jacob Toppan, the son of Abraham, courted 
Hannah. Afterwards Henry Sewall built a new 
house in the same vicinity, on what is now Parker 
Street, which still exists, and there he and his 
wife lived for many years. 

Samuel Sewall, in his diary under date of May 
14, 1700, writes, "Get to Newbury a little before 
sunset, visit my sick father in bed, call in Major 
Gen 1 whom father salutes. Kiss'd my hand and 
I his again. Mr. Tapan" (the Rev. Christopher 
Toppan) "came in and pray'd with him and us. 
.May 15th Walks into the west end of the house 
with his staff and breakfasts there. I read the 
17th Luke and went to prayer. My father would 
have stood up, but I pursuaded him to sit still in 
his chair. Took leave and went on to Ports- 
mouth." "May 17th, 1700 — Benj. Moss Jun. is 
sent to me to acquaint me that my dear father 
died the evening before — May 18th — ride to 
Newbury in the Bain; when breaks up Bro r and 
Sister come from Salem. Bury my father. Bear- 
ers Col. Peirce, Mr. Nicholas Noyes, Mr. Sam. 
Plummer, Mr. Tristram Coffin, Maj. Danl. 
Davison, Major Thomas Noyes, — had 8 under- 
bearers. Sabath May 19th Mr. Tapan in the 
afternoon preach 'd a funeral sermon from Prov. 
19 : 20. Said my father was a true Nathaniel. ' ' 

The inscription on Henry Sewall 's gravestone 
in the Lower Green, evidently written by his son 
Samuel, is as follows : " ' Mr. Henry Sewall, sent 
by Henry Sewall his father in ye ship Elizabeth 
& Dorcas Cap 1 Watts, commander, arrived at 
Boston 1634, winter 'd at Ipswich, helped begin 



HENRY SEWALL 663 

this plantation 1635, furnishing English Servants, 
neat cattel and provisions. Married M rs Jane 
Dummer March ye 25, 1646. Died May ye 16, 
1700 Aetat 86. His fruitful vine being thus dis- 
joined fell to ye ground January ye 13 foiling. 
Aetat 74. Psal. 27:10." Henry Sewall's will, 
dated August 17, 1678, and probated May 24, 1700, 
at Salem, is an interesting document of great 
length. He disposes of many pieces of real estate 
in Coventry, Warwickshire, Bishopstoke, Hamp- 
shire, Romsey, Hants, in England, and also of his 
numerous farms and estates in Newbury and 
Salisbury in New England. 



Chapter III 

STEPHEN DUMMER 

Came over 1638 
Bevis 



Stephen Dummer 1609 — 1670 

(Alice Archer) 

Jane Dummer 1628 — 1701 

(Henry Sewall) 

Hannah Sewall 1649 — 1699 

(Jacob Toppan) 

Abraham Toppan 1684 — 

(Esther Wigglesworth ) 

Edward Toppan 1715 — 1795 

(Sarah Bailey) 

Abner Toppan 1764 — 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 — 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



STEPHEN DIMMER 



There is a strange history connected with the 
surname of this ancestor of yours. A certain 
Eichard Pyldryn of Owslebury in Hampshire, 
who was living in 1523 and died before 1540, mar- 
ried a Maude Dummer, the daughter of John 
Dummer of Overton. The family of Dummer was 
of gentle lineage, tracing back to a Henry de 
Dummera in the time of Henry I. Why it was 
that the descendants of Richard Pyldryn and 
Maude Dummer preferred to assume their 
mother's surname rather than their father's is 
not explained. John, the son of Richard Pyldryn 
and Maude Dummer, who lived at Overton and 
later at Darley, not far from Owslebury, is 
recorded as "John Pyldryn alias Dummer." His 
will, dated and proved in 1574, in the seventeenth 
year of the reign of his Sovereign Lady Elizabeth, 
discloses the fact that his wife's name was Alice 
and that he had two sons, John and Thomas. 

It is from Thomas that you descend. He kept 
the two names of Pyldryn and Dummer in con- 
junction. He lived in the vicinity of Bishop- 
stoke, Hants. In 1608 he was the lessee of 
Swathley Farm in North Stoneham near Bishop- 
stoke. His wife's name was Joan. He died in 
1625 and Judge Sewall says "he lyeth interred 



668 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

in Bishopstoke Church." Two sons of this 
Thomas, namely Richard and Stephen, went to 
New England. In New England both dropped 
the Pyldryn from their names. In England, how- 
ever, your ancestor Stephen, in 1625, at the Manor 
Court of Bishopstoke was "admitted to the 
Middle Street and Hole farms," as Stephen 
Pyldryn alias Dummer, youngest son of Thomas 
Pyldryn alias Dummer. 

Stephen Dummer was born in Bishopstoke in 
1609. In May, 1638, he came to New England in 
. the ship Bevis, sailing from Southampton. With 
him were his wife, Alice Archer, and his children, 
Jane, aged ten, Dorothy six, Richard four, and 
Thomas two. In New England there was born a 
daughter, Mehitable, January 1, 1640. In 1645, 
three hundred acres were granted to Stephen 
Dummer at "Turkey Hill" in Newbury. 

"But the climat being not agreeable to my 
Grandfather and Grandmother Dummer (whose 
maiden name was Archer,) " writes Judge Sewall, 
1 ' they returned to England the winter following ' ' 
(1647,) "and my father" (Henry Sewall) "with 
them." All of Stephen Dummer 's family returned 
with him to England, and none, except your grand- 
mother, Jane, ever returned. Stephen Dummer 's 
brother Richard, who came over in 1634, remained 
in Newbury. He and his descendants were men 
of great distinction in the Province, concerning 
whom there is much of interest in the history of 
Massachusetts. But of Stephen and his family 
I know no more. Judge Sewall, his grandson, in 
1689 visited his relatives in England and makes 



STEPHEN DUMMER 669 

notes of various facts about his Duinrner connec- 
tions, but nowhere mentions his grandfather or 
grandmother, who were presumably both dead at 
that date.* 

Of his mother, Jane Dummer, the wife of Henry 
Sewall, Judge Sewall always writes with deep 
affection. The Judge often visited her and his 
father in Newbury and noted his visits in his 
diary. For instance, under date of May 20, 1697, 
he writes : ' ' Ride to Rowley, Newbury, lodge at 
my Father's, who is indisposed by a Rheum in 
his eyes; much rain at Newbury: Little or none 
at Salem : May 22d I lead my dear mother to meet- 
ing to hear Mr. Tapan preach. ' ' (The Rev. Chris- 
topher Toppan, a grandson of Abraham Toppan, 
the comeoverer.) Under date of July 13, 1700, 
Judge Sewall writes, "My dear mother comes 
hither" (to Boston) "by water from Newbury in 
one of the Poors. Set sail on Thursday morn- 
ing and lodged aboard two nights at Marble- 
head Harbour. Capt. Norden and others would 
have had her come ashoar; but the wind was 
high and she chose to keep on board. Jona- 
than Woodman Junr. waited on her at my 
house about five p. mer in . Saw her not till just 
night when brought in Mr. Cooke, Mr. Sergeant, 
Ed w Hutchinson to drink as they came from the 
Neck." Judge Sewall 's account of his mother's 
death I quote in full : 

Jan. 14th, 1701. Having been certified last night 
about 10 o'clock of the death of my dear mother at 
Newbury, Sam and I set out with John Sewall the 

*Stephen Dummer was buried at Bishopstoke September 6, 1670. 



670 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

messenger, for that place. Hired horses at Charles- 
town; set out about 10 o'clock in a great Fogg. Dined 
at Lewis's with Mr. Gushing of Salisbury. Sam and I 
kept on the Ipswich Rode, John went to accompany 
Bror from Salem. About Mr. Hubbard's in Ipswich 
farms, they overtook us. Sam and I lodged at Comp- 
ton's in Ipswich. Bro r and John stood for Newbury 
by Moonshine. Jan. 15th. Sam and I set forward 
. . . . we find the day appointed for the funeral; 
'twas a very pleasant comfortable day. Bearers, Jno. 
Kent of the Island. Lt Cutting Xoyes, Deacon William 
Xoyes. Mr. Peter Tappan. Capt. Henry Somersby, Mr. 
Joseph "Woodbridge. I followed the Bier single. Then 
Bro r Sewall and Sister Jane Bro r Short and his wife, 
Bro r Moody and his wife, Bro r Xorthend and his wife, 
Bro r Tapan and Sister Sewall. Sam. and cousin Hannah 
Tapan, Mr. Payson of Rowley .... went about 
4 p. m. Xathan 1 Brickett taking in hand to fill the 
Grave, I said: 

"Forbear a little, and suffer me to say that amidst 
our bereaving sorrows we have the Comfort of behold- 
ing this Saint put into rightful possession of that Hap- 
piness of Living Desir'd and dying Lamented. She 
liv'd commendably four and fifty years with her dear 
Husband, and my dear Father: And she could not 
well brook the being divided from him at her death; 
which is the cause of our taking leave of her in this 
place. She was a true and Constant Lover of Gods 
Word. Worship, and Saints : and she always with a 
cheerful patient cheerfulness submitted to the Divine 
Decree of providing Bread for herself and others in the 
Sweat of her Brows. And now her infinitely Gracious 
and Bountiful Master has promoted her to the Honor 
of higher Employments, fully and absolutely discharged 
from all maner of Toil and Sweat. My honored and 
beloved Friends and neighbors ! My dear Mother never 
thought much of doing the most frequent and homely 
offices of Love for me: and lavished away many thou- 
sands of Words upon me before I could return one word 
in answer ; And therefore I ask and hope that none will 
offend that I have now ventured to speak one word in 
her behalf: when shee herself is become speechless." 
Made a motion with my hand for filling the Grave. 
Note I could hardly speak for Passion and Tears. 



Chapter IV 

JACOB AND HANNAH 
TOPPAN 



JACOB AND HANNAH TOPPAN 

Jacob Toppan was the fourth child of Abraham 
and Susanna Toppan. He was born at Newbury 
in the year 1645. During his early manhood he 
was actively engaged in his father's business, and 
in later years he continued an energetic man of 
affairs, highly respected by his fellow townsmen. 
He served as Selectman during several years, and 
in other positions of trust. In 1669 he took the 
oath of allegiance. It is possible that in 1675 he 
accompanied his brother John on a military expe- 
dition in aid of Plymouth, at the opening of King 
Philip's War. and was present at the battle with 
the Indians at Narragansett. December 19, I 
Soon after, at all events, he became much inter- 
ested in military matters. In 1690. as Ensign in 
the company commanded by Captain Daniel 
Pierce, he joined in the following order: ll A - 
7th. 1690. These are in his Majesty's name — to 
require all the soldiers belonging to this - wne to 
bring their arms and ammunition to ye meeting 
house every Sabbath Day. and at all other public 
meetings, and also they are required to carry their 
arms and ammunition with them into the meadows 
and places where they work, and if any man doe 
refuse or neglect his dewty as above expressed he 
shall pay five shillings for every such neglect." 



674 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

During the Indian wars, the people of Newbury 
were kept in a constant state of alarm yet with the 
exception of one or two stealthy murders by the 
redskins, the inhabitants were not attacked. New- 
bury men went to the assistance of their brethren 
at Haverhill once or twice and at one time in 1690 
a considerable expedition was undertaken towards 
the north in which Jacob Toppan doubtless par- 
ticipated. His name appears in the town records 
for many years as " Ensign Toppan" and in all 
matters pertaining to the public safety he seems 
to have interested himself. 

Concerning Jacob Toppan 's marriage to Hannah 
Sewall, and the preliminaries pertaining thereto, 
there is a singularly full disclosure upon the pub- 
lic records. The matter seems to have been one 
of deep concern to both the groom's father and 
the bride 's father. It is evident that the old folks 
had an extended negotiation as to the " setting 
up " of the young people. Abraham Toppan was 
himself evidently rather "set up" because his son 
was to marry a daughter of ' ' Mr. ' ' Henry Sewall, 
' l a lady of considerable estate, ' ' and he doubtless 
wished to make it appear that his boy had some 
claims to be considered a person of "means." 

On June 20, 1670, Abraham Toppan made his 
will and provided "Yet forasmuch as my son 
Jacob is shortly by God's permission to enter into 
marriage with Hannah, the daughter of Mr. 
Henry and Jane Sewall, and to live in the house 
with myself and wife etc. as long as my wife and 
self live, my full mind and desire is that my son 
Peter be content to let fall his clayme unto the 



JACOB AND HANNAH TOPPAN 675 

other half part of the housing, lands, and other 
premises before expressed, covenant to the end 
my son Jacob may inherit the same." And on 
June 21, 1670, "in ye twenty second yeare of our 
Sovereign Lord Charles ye II, by ye grace of God, 
of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, King, 
Defender of the Faith, etc.," Abraham Toppan 
executed a deed to his son Jacob of ' ' one half part 
or moity of my house lot, consisting of 26 acres 
of orchard, plow-ground and pasture land, wt ye 
one half of all my other lands dividend, meadow and 
marsh; in Newbury, wt ye cleared half of all ye 
liberties, privileges and appertinances to ye same 
belonging, wt one half of ye barn & out houses 
which were in my possession ye 30 day of July 
1661." Together also with other property de- 
scribed in detail, "as expressed in my will signed 
and sealed in the presence of Mary Lunt, Joseph 
Hills and Henry Sewall bearing date ye 20 day of 
June 1670 as in my said will is more at large 
expressed." And to this deed Henry Sewall was 
a witness. It was acknowledged June 22, 1670, 
and recorded July 5, 1670, at Ipswich. 

Abraham Toppan was evidently doing his best 
to make his son Jacob the equal of his fiancee in 
worldly goods. The difficulty, however, with yeo- 
man Toppan 's good intentions was that nine years 
earlier, in 1661, he had given a deed to his eldest 
son, Peter, known afterwards as Doctor Peter, of 
one half of his homestead place near the Trayne- 
ing Green, which, indeed, by his subsequent pro- 
vision for Jacob he did not attempt to annul, but 
in the deed to Peter he had provided that after 



$76 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

his death and the death of his wife, Susanna, the 
other half should become the property of the said 
Peter. It is this other half which in 1670 he 
wished to give to Jacob and by his will asked that 
his son Peter "be content to let fall his clayme." 
Peter, however, did not see fit to "let fall his 
clayme" and when subsequently in 1673 the will 
was offered for probate Peter filed a caveat recit- 
ing the prior deed, and it would appear that his 
contention prevailed. Jacob and Hannah were 
married August 24, 1670. Undoubtedly Jacob 
took his bride to live in his father Abraham's 
house by the Trayneing Green. Possibly Peter 
at the same time was living in his half of the 
house. After the old man's death the relations 
between the brothers were evidently strained. 
Peter continued to live in the old homestead, and 
Jacob and Hannah moved out. 

Mr. Henry Sewall was more successful in the 
outcome of his arrangements for the bridal couple. 
On the twenty-first day of June, 1670, Henry Sewall 
entered into an indenture with Jacob Toppan "in 
consideration of a mariage (by God's grace) 
intended and shortly to be had and solemnized 
between the said Jacob Toppan and Hannah, the 
daughter of Henry and Jane Sewall" whereby 
Henry Sewall granted to Jacob Toppan sixteen 
acres of land on Woodman's Lane "as this day 
staked out by Abraham Toppan and the said 
Jacob." The indenture as recorded has only the 
signature of Jacob Toppan. Perhaps Henry 
Sewall had some doubts about the efficacy of 
Abraham Toppan 's contribution to the marriage 
settlement and refused to sign. 



JACOB AND HANNAH TOPPAN 677 

In 1650 Mr. Henry Sewall had purchased from 
Edward Woodman forty acres of upland on the 
northerly side of what was then known as Wood- 
man's Lane, but which for the last two centuries 
and more has been called Toppan's Lane. It is 
in the northerly part of what is now the city of 
Newburyport. Mr. Woodman had a dwelling in 
this locality which he and his descendants long 
occupied. It seems probable that Henry Sewall 
occupied a house on Woodman's Lane while his 
family was in England, and before he purchased 
his homestead on Noyes Lane in Oldtown. 

It was on this sixteen acre piece on what became 
known as Toppan's Lane, that Jacob Toppan 
built the "Toppan House," which today is one of 
the distinguished antiquities of Newburyport. In 
his will, dated August 17, 1678, Henry Sewall 
made good his failure to sign the indenture con- 
veying the property to his prospective son in law, 
by devising "to my sonne in law Jacob Toppan 
and my daughter Hannah Toppan, sixteen acres 
of land be it more or less whereon his house now 
standeth." It would therefore seem clear that 
the "Toppan House," built by Jacob Toppan and 
now standing, was erected between 1673 and 1678. 
The house as it exists today is sufficiently quaint 
and venerable in appearance, yet, in the course of 
the centuries, it has been somewhat altered and 
renovated, and perhaps Jacob and Hannah 
Toppan might not today feel completely at home 
within its walls. And yet the old house stands 
substantially as it was built. The glaciers had 
left rocks scattered over the ground, from which 



678 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the cellar was constructed ; clay from the pastures, 
with an abundance of fuel from the woodland, 
made the bricks; clam shells furnished the mor- 
tar and whitewash; primeval oak trees for the 
frame, and giant white pines for the interior 
finish were on the spot ; the iron for the nails and 
the hinges and locks and the crane in the fireplace 
were probably imported from England ; most cer- 
tainly the little panes of glass inserted in the nar- 
row windows came from across the sea. The 
frame, mortised and pinned together, is clumsy, 
but of great strength. It is difficult to under- 
stand how the boards were obtained. There were 
two grist mills, operated by small water power, in 
Newbury, but no mill capable of sawing timber 
into boards. The boards must have come from 
some town to the south, nearer Salem or Boston. 
The great chimney in the centre of the building 
was laid in clay, except above the roof where it 
was "topped out" with clam shell mortar. In 
the chimney were four large fireplaces, into which 
six foot logs could easily be placed on the iron 
fire dogs which came from the old country. In 
one of the fireplaces was the brick oven in which 
the baking was done. Between the outside board- 
ing and the matched boards which formed the 
interior finish there was a course of bricks plas- 
tered with a mortar made of sand and clay held 
together by chopped salt hay. The interior walls 
were of wood. Plastering was difficult, and the 
lime obtained from shells was a laborious achieve- 
ment and very sparsely used. The house as orig- 
inally built was a four-room house, two main 



JACOB AND HANNAH TOPPAN 679 

rooms on each floor from eighteen to twenty feet 
in size. Later the whole house was widened, and 
the work of the later carpenters is apparent. The 
only attempt at decoration was in connection with 
the fireplace in the living room. It seems prob- 
able that the woodwork about the fireplace was 
imported from England, since it is rather superior 
to anything which New England could have fur- 
nished at that time. 

In this house Jacob and Hannah Toppan spent 
their days. To be permitted to enter into their 
life in this primitive New England home is a 
privilege which in some ways is unique. Hannah 
Toppan 's brother, Samuel Sewall, has furnished 
us the picture of that domestic life. Jacob and 
Hannah Toppan, your ancestors, were of the best 
type of early New England stock. They were 
intelligent and cultivated people. They were, 
doubtless, sincere in their religious convictions 
and observances, yet it is clear that they were 
normal, healthy, merry people, who lived their 
lives with a broader view of human opportunities 
than came within the purview of your Quaker 
forebears. 

There were eight children in the family, of 
whom your ancestor, Abraham, was the seventh. 
Abraham was born in 1684, and in the earlier 
notes of the family history, as Judge Sewall pre- 
sents it to us, he was a mere child and is not often 
mentioned. The second child was Samuel, born 
September 30, 1672. He must have been a sin- 
gularly attractive youth. His grandfather, 
Henry Sewall, was very fond of him, and men- 



(380 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

tions him in his will with much affection. He was 
stricken with small-pox in 1691, when he was nine- 
teen years of age. In his diary Judge Sewall 
writes, under date of August 19, 1691, "Sent Jane 
to Newbury by Tim° Burbank to help tend her 
brother Sam. Toppan, who is there taken ill of 
the Small Pocks." On Friday, August 28, he 
writes "Fast at Charlestown where I am. After 
my coming home when it was almost dark Jane 
Toppan comes in from Newbury and brings the 
very sorrowful news of the death of cousin Sam 
Toppan last Tuesday night about nine of the 
clock ; buried Wednesday because of the heat. No 
minister with him. Mr. Shove prays not with 
him at all; went not to him till was just dying; 
suppose might be afraid 's school." Mr. Shove, 
whose family originated in Taunton, was a pro- 
tege of the Judge, who had taken him into his 
family as a lad and educated him. He was at this 
time a minister and a school teacher in Newbury. 
It is quite evident that the Judge thought him 
delinquent in not attending the sick boy. Judge 
Sewall considered that small pox was simply a 
dispensation of God. Modern parents would per- 
haps be more charitable towards the school teacher 
who refrained from exposing himself and his 
pupils to contagion. 

The references in Judge Sewall 's diary to 
"Brother Tapin" and "Sister Tapin" and their 
home life in the house on Toppan 's Lane are 
many. These contemporary notes portray a 
domestic history which is interesting because it 
is normal. They lived in a remote part of a 



JACOB AND HANNAH TOPPAN 681 

sparsely settled township. Except for the occa- 
sional visits of the Chief Justice, who was, indeed, 
a great man in those days, a man of vast wealth, 
as wealth was measured then, a Privy Councillor, 
the intimate of all the nabobs of Boston, dis- 
tinctly a considerable person, — these quiet coun- 
try people, living in Toppan's Lane, had little 
opportunity to come in touch with the history of 
New England which was forming. Yet after all 
it was such as they who formed it. They were 
intelligent and alive. I will not weary you with 
too many extracts from the voluminous reliques 
of the Judge, but his comments on the death of 
your grandmother, Hannah, surely you may read 
without being bored : 

" Seventh day, Nov r 11th (1699) about the mid- 
dle of the night following, my dear sister Hanah 
Tappan dies of a Fever. Mr. Addington told me 
of it first Nov r 13 in the Council-Chamber, from 
Mr. Gerrish of Wenham. At 7 at night I receive 
a letter from Bro r Sewall of it, and that the 
Funeral is to be the 14. Our notice is so lame 
and late, that I persuade Jane to stay at home, 
it being almost impossible to get thither time 
enough. Besides all this, the Court at Salem 
keeps me there and Bro r Sewall also." ''We 
had liv'd eight of us together thirty years; and 
were wont to speak of it (it may be too vainly). 
But now God begins to part us apace. Two are 
taken away in about a quarter of a year's time; 
and methinks now my dear Bro r and Sister are 
laid in their Grave, I am, as it were, laid there by 
Proxy. The Lord help me to carry it more suit- 



(J32 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

ably, more fruitfully, toward the Five remaining; 
and put me in a preparedness for my own Disso- 
lution. And help me to live upon Him alone. ' ' 

John Sewall, a brother of Judge Sewall and 
Hannah Toppan, lived near the Toppan house on 
Toppan 's Lane, on a part of the original Wood- 
man purchase. He died August 8, 1699. Jacob 
Toppan soon after married his widow, Hannah 
Fessenden Sewall. And so to the household were 
added a number of Sewall cousins, and thereafter 
when Judge Sewall speaks of " Sister Tapin" he 
refers to the second Hannah, his brother 's widow. 

The interchange of visits between Judge 
Sewall 's family in Boston and Jacob Toppan 's 
family in Newbury was frequent. As an instance, 
I will cite the following characteristic entries in 
the Judge's diary: ''May 22, 1707. Went to 
Cons. Pierce and there eat sturgeon with Mr. Pike, 
Abr. Adams, and cousin Jno. Tapin's wife. Went 
to Bro r Tappin's visited Cousin Sweet, — they 
have a lovely son. Went to Joshua Bailey" 
(another ancestor of yours by the way) "dis- 
coursed him about his brothers debt, staid a long 
time there, then went to Byfield across the woods. 
Bro r Tapin left me." 

"Feria quinta Octo 2 1707. John Sewall, Sam 
Moodey, and Abrah Tapin" (your ancestor) 
"brought home Hanah Sewall, Mary Sewall, and 
Jane Tapin from Newbury. 'Tis a fortnight since 
they went. Had a good passage thither by water. 
Laus deo. " That must have been a rather jolly 
excursion for this group of cousins. Jane Toppan 
seems to have been a frequent inmate of her 



JACOB AND HANNAH TOPPAN 683 

uncle's house in Boston. Her younger brother 
Abraham, your many times great grandfather, is 
also often mentioned as a guest by his uncle, the 
Judge. 

Jacob Toppan died December 30, 1717, and his 
widow, Hannah Fessenden Sewall Toppan, on 
April 4, 1723. Abraham Toppan, the second of 
the name, was the seventh child of Jacob Toppan 
and Hannah Sewall. He was born on June 29, 
1684. He inherited the homestead on Toppan 's 
Lane. In 1705, his name appears among those 
who were equipped with snow shoes and moc- 
casins, a list which the Governor had required in 
order to know on whom he could call to march 
against the Indians. In 1707, Abraham Toppan 
was serving under Sergeant James Jackson in 
Colonel Thomas Noyes' regiment. In a letter 
written by Judge Sewall from Boston January 
15, 1725, to his cousin, Henry Sewall, at New- 
bury, he says: " 'Tis a great thing to be a 
Foundation Stone in such a spiritual building 
as is now to be erected at Newbury .... 
My love to you and to Cousin Abraham Toppan 
and his family. Pray for me that God would not 
forsake me now that I am old and grey headed. 
Your loving uncle Samuel Sewall." The letter 
refers to the establishment of the ' ' Third ' ' Parish 
in Newbury, of which Abraham Toppan was one 
of the founders, and afterwards an ardent sup- 
porter. 

Abraham Toppan, on October 21, 1713, mar- 
ried Esther Wigglesworth, the widow of his 
cousin, John Sewall. In 1700, Samuel Toppan, a 



GS4 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

cousin of Abraham, had married Esther's older 
sister, Abigail Wigglesworth. The Wigglesworths 
lived in Maiden, and the usual explanation of pro- 
pinquity hardly explains how these Sewalls and 
Toppans became so tangled in marriage relations 
with the Wigglesworths. I am inclined to think 
that Judge Sewall, who was an inveterate match 
maker, was at the bottom of it. He was an 
admirer of the Rev. Michael Wigglesworth of 
Maiden and often visited him, on his constant 
journeys from Boston on the Court circuit. When 
Mr. Wigglesworth preached in Boston he always 
went to hear him. Under date of May 24, 1697, 
the Judge writes : "I persuade Father to make 
a settlement of land and marsh on Brother Sewall. 
I take the acknowledgment and Brother Stephen 
Sewall records it. Mr. Noyes and I dispute about 
the Fifth Seal. Come to the Blew Bell" (tavern 
famous for the heroic deeds of Hannah Dustan) 
1 i refresh there ; visit Mr. Wigglesworth ; meet Mr. 
Tapan" (doubtless the Reverend Christopher 
Toppan) "from Reading and ride with him to 
Charlestown. " It may be that the Judge, on his 
visits to Mr. Wigglesworth noted the fair daugh- 
ters of the household, and may have suggested to 
his young nephews that there was quarry worth 
their beating down Maiden way. 

Edward Toppan was the oldest son of Abraham 
Toppan and Esther Wigglesworth. He was born 
September 7, 1715, and married Sarah Bailey 
September 7, 1743. He was one of the minute 
men who responded to the alarm of April 19, 1775, 
serving in Captain Moses Norwell's company. In 



JACOB AND HANNAH TOPPAN 685 

1778, he was in Major Thomas's Artillery Com- 
pany in the l ' recent expedition to Rhode Island. ' ' 
Very probably he served as a soldier in the Revo- 
lutionary Army in other ways of which I have 
found no public record. He lived in the old home- 
stead on Toppan's Lane. He died in 1795. It was 
his eleventh child, Abner Toppan, born April 6, 
1764, who is one of your father's great grand- 
fathers. 



Chaptee V 

MICHAEL WIGGLESWORTH 

Came over 1638 



Michael Wigglesworth 1631 — 1705 

(Martha Mudge) 

Esther Wigglesworth 1685 — 

(Abraham Toppan) 

Edward Toppan 1715 — 1795 

(Sarah Bailey) 

Abner Toppan 1764 — 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 — 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



MICHAEL WIGGLESWORTH 



To my thinking Michael Wigglesworth is, on 
the whole, the most interesting of your ancestors. 
He was born in Yorkshire, England, October 18, 
1631. He says the place of his birth was "an 
ungodly place" which was consumed with fire, 
in a great part of it, after God had brought his 
parents out of it. His father was Edward 
Wigglesworth, who with his wife "meeting with 
opposition and persecution for religion because 
they went from their own Parish Church to hear 
ye word & Receiv ye L s supper" "took up resolu- 
tions to pluck up their stakes & remove to New 
England. ' ' They landed at Charlestown in 1638. 
After seven weeks' stay the family removed by 
sea to New Haven, Connecticut, in the month of 
October. "Here," Michael says in his short 
autobiography, "Winter approaching, we dwelt 
in a Cellar partly under ground covered with 
earth the first winter. ' ' 

The next summer Michael was sent to school 
to Ezekiel Cheever, the most celebrated pedagogue 
of New England. Cheever later left New Haven 
and came to Boston, where he founded the "Free 
Schoole," now the Boys' Latin School, and where 
he died in the ninety-fourth year of his age, and 
was eulogized by Cotton Mather in his inimitable 



690 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

flamboyant style of oratory. Judge Sewall says 
of Cheever that he was a ' ' rare instance of Piety, 
Health, Strength, and Serviceableness. The well- 
fare of the Province was much upon his Spirit. 
He abominated Perriwigs." With Ezekiel 
Cheever, Michael "began to make Latin and to 
get forward apace," as he tells us, when his father 
was stricken with paralysis. "He, wanting help, 
was fain to take me off from school to follow other 
employments for ye space of three or four years 
until I had lost all that I had gained of the Latine 
Tongue." When Michael was fourteen he was 
again sent to school. "At that time I had little 
or no disposition for it," he says, and yet he must 
have been diligent in his studies, because in less 
than three years he was entered at Harvard Col- 
lege. Of his college life he writes "God in his 
mercy & pitty kept me from scandalous sins before 
I came thither & after I came there, but alas I 
had a naughty vile heart and was acted by corrupt 
nature & therefore could propound no Right and 
noble ends to myself, but acted from self and for 
self. I was indeed studious & strove to outdo my 
compeers, but it was for honor and applause, 
and preferm* & such Beggarly ends." He had 
intended to study the "Practise of Physick," but 
experiencing a "great change in heart and life" 
resolved "to serve Christ in ye work of ye min- 
istry if he would please to fit me for it & to accept 
my service in that great work." 

He graduated August 12, 1651, at the head of 
his class of ten. His Commencement part, in his 
own handwriting, is preserved. It is headed 



MICHAEL WIGGLESWORTH 691 

"Omnis Natura Inconstans est Porosa," a senti- 
ment characteristic of most young graduates, but 
hardly so of Michael Wigglesworth. He became 
a Fellow of the College and his "flaming zeal" to 
make his pupils not only good scholars, but good 
Christians made him afraid, says Cotton Mather, 
"lest his cares for their good, and his affection 
for them, should so drink up his very spirit, as to 
steal his heart from God." This "flaming zeal" 
was pent up in a most frail body. Michael 
Wigglesworth 's life history is a record of disease 
and illness which made of him a "weary wight" 
and life a "bitter cup" which he drank to the 
dregs. Neurasthenic, morbid, his "cases of con- 
science" as given in his diary indicate for the 
most part cases of nerves. His weight of physi- 
cal ills and the weakness of a distempered body 
doubtless were in large degree responsible for the 
spiritual viewpoint which found expression in the 
grim poems which made him famous. 

He preached his first sermon at Pequot (New 
London) in 1652-3, while on a journey to see his 
father in New Haven. On his return by water, 
he was weatherbound at Marthas Vineyard "six 
days by a strong north east wind," and there 
preached "with one day's preparation." It was 
in 1655, after leaving Cambridge, and when living 
in Rowley, where ' ' after considerable deliberation 
and seeking of advice" he had married his cousin, 
Mary Rayner, that he received his call to the 
church at Maiden. With some misgivings, he 
accepted the call, and was "settled" in 1656 or 
1657. As minister of this church he continued 



692 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

until his death in 1705. Or, as Cotton Mather, in 
his characteristic style, says, "From Cambridge 
the Star made his Remove, till he comes to dis- 
pense his Sweet Influences upon thee Oh Maiden ! 
And he was thy Faithful One for about a Jubilee 
of Years together." 

The parsonage to which Michael brought his 
little family was on the easterly side of the "Great 
Road" leading to Penny Ferry, for nearly two 
centuries afterwards the home of the ministers 
of the First Parish of Maiden. The difficulties 
of this pastorate would have taxed the strength 
of a well man. His predecessor, Marmaduke 
Matthews, "that much afflicted and persecuted 
man of God," had had a stormy time of it, and 
owing to his "inconvenient words" had been 
deposed and driven from the Province. The 
increasing infirmity of Michael naturally created 
dissatisfaction, especially as his malady was 
largely a nervous one, which was then popularly 
known as ' ' hypo. ' ' That Michael keenly felt the 
unsympathetic attitude of many of his parish- 
ioners towards his infirmity is evidenced by the 
verses he prefixed to the Day of Doom : 

Yet some (I know) do judge 

My inability 

To come abroad and do Christ's work 

To be Melancholy; 

And that I'm not so weak 

As I my self conceit, 

Bnt who in other things have found 

Me so conceited yet? 

Soon his troubles increased to a "heart-cut- 
ting ' ' extent. ' ' Difficulties from within and with- 



MICHAEL WIGGLESWORTH 693 

out thickened around him. The quakings of con- 
science matched the weakness and pain of his 
body; a sick wife added to his cares, and the 
troubles of the church increased. ' ' On December 
21, 1659, his wife died. His health became such 
that for several years he could not preach. It 
was at this time that "Affliction turn'd his Pen 
to Poetry" and he wrote the dismal and cele- 
brated Day of Doom, published in 1662. In 1663 
he took a voyage to Bermuda, in the hopes of 
receiving "ye benefit of that sweet and temperate 
air." The result was unfavorable. For many 
years he continued in this discouraging state of 
health as the nominal minister of the church, the 
active service being performed by an assistant. 
Cotton Mather speaks of him as one "that had 
been for near twenty years almost Buried Alive. ' ' 
Out of his experiences with his own infirmities, 
and from his knowledge of "ye Study and Prac- 
tise of Pysich," which engrossed him at one time 
at college, he became an able physician. It may 
be that he received some compensation for the 
practice of medicine and that this, with the income 
he may have derived from his poems, supplied 
him during his long period of illness. 

He had removed from the parsonage, and lived 
in a little house which he built on land that "was 
sometime part of the proper lot of Mr. John 
Allen" not far from the meeting-house. After 
the marriage of his daughter Mercy, being then 
in his forty-eighth year, he resolved "to change 
his manner of living" and for that purpose to 
marry his youthful "servant niavd" of seventeen 



694 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

summers. This was a cause of much scandal, 
and called forth a long epistle from Increase 
Mather and many other admonitory and exhorta- 
tory epistles and advices. But the stubborn 
singer of the Day of Doom, although doubtless 
much concerned, was not deterred by the elo- 
quence of Mather, the displeasures of his relatives, 
or the disfavor of the people of Maiden. He 
married (1679) Martha Mudge, notwithstanding 
her "obscure parentage, her youth, and her being 
no church member." 

She was your many times great grandmother, 
of whom you have no occasion to be ashamed. 
Nor was her parentage in the least obscure. She 
was the daughter of Thomas Mudge, of Maiden, 
and his wife Mary, whose position in the com- 
munity was certainly as well established as that 
of most of your ancestors, and whose descendants 
in various lines have done them conspicuous 
honor. Thomas Mudge was born in 1624, and 
probably came over with his brother Jarvis from 
Devonshire, sailing from Plymouth about 1638. 
Jarvis settled in Boston, and Thomas probably 
lived with him. At what date Thomas moved to 
Maiden is not determinable, but he was there in 
1657, and the records of the town contain fre- 
quent mention of him. His wife Mary was born 
about 1628, and consequently must have been 
married in this country. They had six sons and 
two daughters, of whom Martha was the youngest, 
being born in 1662. One of the brothers, James, 
was killed in the massacre of Bloody Brook, 
September 18, 1675, with Sergeant Thomas Smith, 



MICHAEL WIGGLESWORTH 695 

another of your ancestors, and another brother, 
John, fought in King Philip's War in the Narra- 
gansett country. 

Michael Wigglesworth's judgment of Martha 
Mudge was well warranted. She made him a 
faithful and efficient wife. She cured him of his 
distemper, and restored him to health and to the 
active performance of his ministry, as he testified 
later in eulogizing her to his third wife. She 
bore him five daughters and one son. Notwith- 
standing the antagonistic attitude of her hus- 
band's friends, she bore herself with such pro- 
priety that she conquered the place in the public 
regard to which she was entitled. She proved 
in all ways a blessing and a help to her husband, 
and when September 4, 1690, being only twenty- 
eight years of age, she died, he was indeed bereft. 
The Eev. Michael was then nearly sixty, but "the 
happy experiences of his second marriage and 
the care of six young children, of whom the eldest 
was not yet ten years old .... led him to 
cast about for another helpmeet." The lady who 
was honored this time was Sybil Sparhawk, the 
widow of Dr. Jonathan Avery of Boston. The 
remarkable correspondence of Mr. TVigglesworth 
in which he proposed marriage has been pre- 
served. In one of his letters he encloses certain 
"considerations which possibly may help to clear 
up your way before you return an answer unto 
ye motion which I have made you. ' ' The consid- 
erations are itemized and set forth with much 
force. "1st I have a great perswasion that ye 
motion is of God for diverse reasons" — stating 



696 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

the reasons at length. He then sets forth ten 
''main" reasons with subdivisions, which are suf- 
ficiently quaint. It is, however, when he takes 
up certain "objections" such as his age and the 
like that he shows himself the true lover. For 
instance, "Ob. And for ye other objection from 
ye number of my children & difficulty of guiding 
such a family. 1st The number may be lessened 
if there be need of it. 2nd — etc." Surely this 
is as gruesome a thought as any in the Day of 
Doom. It is fortunate for you that the lady did 
not deem it necessary or else Esther, your grand- 
mother, might have been one of the sacrifices. 
The able presentation of so many convincing con- 
siderations won the lady, and they were married 
June 23, 1691, at Braintree, and had one son, Pro- 
fessor Edward Wigglesworth, D. D., of Harvard 
College, who died in 1765, a man of much note, 
whose descendants for many generations were 
connected with the Harvard Faculty. 

For the remaining years of his life the Rev. 
Michael Wigglesworth was enabled satisfactorily 
to perform the duties of the minister of a very 
troublesome parish, and to alleviate much sick- 
ness and suffering through his ministrations as 
a physician. His great fame as New England's 
poet, and the high regard in which he was held 
by the Boston Hierarchy, may have consoled him 
for his long years of suffering. This "poor 
feeble shadow of a man," as Cotton Mather called 
him, had, indeed, despite his handicap, accom- 
plished much. The Presidency of Harvard Col- 
lege was offered to him. The praise and love of 



MICHAEL WIGGLESWORTH 697 

his cantankerous parishioners was, in the end, 
vouchsafed to him. And although the Day of 
Doom has not, as Cotton Mather prophesied, 
proved a composure which will find our children 
till the Day itself arrive, it has established its 
author as a gifted as well as faithful portrayer 
of the awful tenets of orthodoxy. 

He died June 10, 1705, in the seventy-fourth 
year of his age. Among his manuscripts was 
found this verse : 

Welcome, Sweet Rest, by me so long Desired, 
Who have with Sins and Griefs, so long been tired, 
And Welcome, Death, my Father's Messenger, 
Of my Felicity the Hastener. 
Welcome, Good Angels, who for me Distrest, 
Are come to Guard me to Eternal Rest. 
Welcome, Christ, who hast my Soul Redeemed; 
Whose Favour I have more than Life Esteemed. 

Cotton Mather preached his funeral sermon, 
and wrote a punning epitaph which is appended 
to latter editions of the Day of Doom, but the 
couplet on the "mossy stone at the dead teacher's 
head" in the Maiden graveyard, says Deloraine 
Pendre Corey, the historian of Maiden, from 
whom I have largely borrowed this account of 
your ancestor, is better known and more often 
quoted : 

Here Lies Inter 'd 

In Silent Grave Below 

Maulden's Physician 

For Soul and Body Two. 



Chapter VI 
THE DAY OF DOOM 



THE DAY OF DOOM 



Michael Wigglesworth is described by Profes- 
sor Moses Coit Tyler as "a suffering little man 
with an intensity of spirit that triumphed over 
all physical ills and a tenderness of sympathy 
that made him 'a man of the beatitudes' and a 
comforter to all who, like himself, knew the touch 
of grief" and yet whose creed forced him "to 
chant the chant of Christian fatalism, the moan 
of vanity and sorrow, the physical bliss of the 
saved, the physical tortures of the damned." 
The Day of Doom, or a Description of the Great 
and Last Judgment. With a short discourse about 
Eternity, was first published in 1662. This 
"grim utterance of the past" passed through 
many editions. With the exception of the New 
England Primer, no book of its time approached 
its popularity. In proportion to the population 
of the land, its sale far exceeded that of Uncle 
Tom's Cabin or the best sellers of today. It was 
hawked about the country printed on sheets like 
common ballads. The Day of Doom has been 
called "that blazing and sulphurous poem, the 
true embodiment of all that was terrible in the 
theology of the seventeenth century." It was 
taught to the children with their catechisms. It 
is appalling to think of a sensitive and imagina- 



702 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

live child devouring its horrors, and shuddering 
at its frightful imagery. And yet, after all, it 
was the spiritual food on which our fathers were 
nourished, and which in time gave us our Chan- 
nings and our Emersons. 

Cotton Mather, in explaining Wigglesworth's 
"turning to poetry," says "that he might yet 
more faithfully set himself to do Good, when he 
could not Preach, he Wrote several Composures, 
wherein he proposed the Edification of such Read- 
ers as are for Truths dressed up in a Plain 
Meeter. " The metre, indeed, is often plain 
enough, with cheap and clattering rhymes, yet the 
poem in its way achieves an artistic triumph. 

His introduction to the reader is not lacking in 
humor. He says : 

Reader, I am a fool, 

And have adventured 

To play the fool this once for Christ, 

The more his Fame to spread. 

If this, my foolishness, 

Help thee to be more wise, 

I have attained what I seek 

And what I only prize. 

The poem opens with a description of the 
1 ' Security of the world before Christ 's coming to 
Judgment — Luke 12:19," then comes the "Sud- 
denness, Majesty and Terror of Christ's appear- 
ance—Mat. 25:6, 2 Pet. 3:10." "Ye dead arise 
and unto judgment come ! " is the call. 

No heart so bold, but now grows cold, 

And almost dead with fear, 
No eye so dry but now can cry 

And pour out many a tear. 



THE DAY OF DOOM 703 

Earth's Potentates and pow'ful States, 

Captains and Men of Might, 
Are quite abasht; their courage dasht, 

At this most awful sight. 

Christ's flock of lambs, " whose faith was 
weak, yet true, all sound believers (Gospel Re- 
ceivers) " fare excellently well under the decisions 
of the Judge, who expounds the marvellous doc- 
trine of Election which to the modern mind is im- 
possible of comprehension — even as a theorem. 
The goats fared quite otherwise. They are. how- 
ever, given an opportunity to plead their causes, 
which they do with much ingenuity and, for the 
most part, in a manner which would seem to estab- 
lish at least a legitimate claim for mercy. The 
Judge is not impressed with their arguments and 
condemns them one and all to fiery and eternal 
torment. Perhaps the most famous passages in 
the poem are those in which the subject of the 
unbaptized and unelected infants is treated: 

Then to the Bar all they drew near 

Who died in Infancy, 
And never had or good or bad 

Affected pers'nally; 

But from the Womb unto the Tomb 

Were straightaway carried, 
(or at least ere they transgressed) 

Who thus began to plead: 

Their plea is overwhelming in its cogency. 
They admit that if their own transgressions or 
disobedience had put them among the goats they 
would have no case, but "Adam's guilt our souls 
hath split, his fault is charged upon us and 
utterly undone us. ' ' 



704 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Not We, but He ate of the Tree 

Whose fruit was interdicted; 
Yet on us all of his sad Fall 

The punishment's inflicted. 

How could we sin that had not been 

Or how is his sin our 
Without consent, which to prevent 

We never had the pow'r? 

Jehovah, the judge, however, explains that 
Adam's fall was theirs as well as his own, since 
he was designed as their representative, and they 
are obliged to accept his agency. 

He stood and fell, did ill or well, 

Not for himself alone, 
But for you all, who now his Fall 

And trespass would disown. 

In conclusion, Jehovah pronounces the final 
judgment as follows: 

You Sinners are, and such a share 

As sinners may expect; 
Such you shall have, for I do Save 

None by mine own Elect. 

Yet to compare your sin with their 

Who liv'd a longer time, 
I do confess yours is much less 

Though every sin's a crime. 

A crime it is, therefore in Bliss 

You may not hope to dwell; 
But unto you I shall allow 

The Easiest Room in Hell. 

The poet adds that : 

The Glorious King thus answering, 
They cease and plead no longer; 

Their Consciences must needs confess 
His Reasons are the Stronger. 



THE DAY OF DOOM 705 

The judgment as rendered in individual cases 
under the doctrine of preordained election causes 
some rather heart rending situations, which the 
poet treats as follows : 

One natural Brother beholds another 

In his astonished Fit, 
Yet sorrows not thereat a jot, 

Nor pities him a Whit. 
The godly wife conceives no Grief, 

Nor can she shed a tear 
For the sad State of her dear Mate 

When she his doom doth hear. 

He that was erst a Husband pierc'd 

With sense of Wife's distress, 
Whose tender heart did bear a part 

of all her grievances, 
Shall mourn no more as heretofore, 

because of her ill plight, 
Although he see her now to be 

A dam'd forsaken wight. 

The various classes of goats having been dealt 
with and severally condemned to dwell eternally 
in Hell, the author vividly and at length de- 
scribes the conditions which will surround that 
abode, and thus closes the description : 

Thus shall they lie and wail and cry 

tormented and tormenting; 
Their gall'd Hearts with poison 'd Darts 

but now, too late, repenting. 
There let them dwell in th ' Flames of Hell, 

there leave we them to burn, 
And back again unto the men 

Whom Christ acquits, return. 

Unfortunately, the Rev. Michael had spent the 
resources of his imagination in delineating the 



706 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

horrors of Hell, and in attempting to picture the 
tame felicities of Heaven he fails to make them 
attractive. The reader of his poem can have no 
doubt that Hell is an undesirable abode, yet little 
enthusiasm for the alternative is induced. 

Appended to the Day of Doom is A Short Dis- 
course on Eternity which rubs in the conception 
of the everlasting nature of the torments of Hell. 
It concludes as follows: 

"When they remind what's still behind 

And ponder this word NEVER, 
That they must there be made to bear 

God's Vengeance for E V E R : 
The thought more bitter is 

than all they feel beside ; 
Yet what they feel, nor heart of steel 

Nor flesh of brass can bide. 

To lie in woe and undergo 

the Direful Pains of Hell, 
And know withal, that there they shall 

for aye and ever dwell; 
And that they are from rest as far 

When fifty thousand year, 
Twice told, are spent in punishment, 

As when they first came there; 

This, Oh! this makes Hell's fiery flakes 

much more intolerable; 
This makes frail wights and damned sprites 

to bear their plagues unable. 
This makes men bite, for fell despite, 

their very tongues in twain; 
This makes them roar for great horror, 

And trebleth all their pain. 

There were seven editions of the Day of Doom 
before 1751. Since then two or three editions 



THE DAY OF DOOM 707 

have been issued, the last of which I have knowl- 
edge being in 1867. Besides the Day of Doom, 
Michael Wigglesworth published in 1669 Meat out 
of the Eater ; or Meditations concerning the Neces- 
sity and Usefulness of Afflictions unto Gods Chil- 
dren, which also ran through many editions. It 
is to this popular ''composure" that the bom- 
bastic punster, Cotton Mather, refers in his 
Epitaph on the "Excellent Wigglesworth." 

His Pen did once Meat from the Eater fetch; 
And now he's gone beyond the Eater's reach. 
His Body once so Thin, was next to None; 
From hence he's to Unbodied Spirits flown. 
Once his rare skill did all Diseases heal; 
And he does nothing now Uneasy feel. 
He to his Paradise is joyful come, 
And waits with joy to see his Day of Doom. 

Mr. Wigglesworth 's best literary effort was 
unpublished, and remained unknown until 1850. 
The manuscript is now in the possession of the 
Massachusetts Historical Society. It is entitled 
God's Controversy with New England, written in 
the time of the Great Drought Anno 1662 by a 
Lover of New England's Prosperity. In this 
poem the poet had full scope to describe the ills 
which God was visiting upon an unregenerate 
people. 

This, Oh, New England hast thou got 

By riot and excess: 
This hast thou brought upon thyself 
By pride and wantonness. 

Thus must thy worldyness be whipt, 

They that too much do crave, 
Provoke the Lord to take away 

Such blessings as they have. 



708 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

So far removed in sympathy are we to-day from 
the viewpoint of our Puritan forefathers that we 
may easily err in treating their doctrines with 
derision. Sincerity may not be derided. Michael 
Wigglesworth had a clear vision, and he had 
the courage of his convictions. He had, more- 
over, the literary ability to present his ideas in 
a form popularly acceptable to his contemporaries. 



Chaptee VII 

TRISTRAM COFFIN 

Came over 1642 



Tristram Coffin 1605 — 1681 

(Dionis Stevens) 

Tristram Coffin 1632 — 1704 

(Judith Greenleaf) 

Stephen Coffin 1665 — 1725 

(Sarah Atkinson) 

Sarah Coffin 1686 — 1768 

(Joshua Bailey) 

Sarah Bailey 1721 — 1811 

(Edward Toppan) 

Abner Toppan 1764 — 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 — 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



TRISTRAM COFFIN 



Tristram Coffin belonged to an ancient family 
of gentry in Devonshire. Mary Elizabeth Sinnott, 
of Philadelphia, in a carefully edited and elabo- 
rately printed account of the annals of her family, 
says: "During the thirteenth century one 
Richard Coffyn was granted free warren in the 
manor of Alurington by King Henry III, and early 
in the next century the manor was settled upon 
another Richard Coffyn, from whose day, until 
the present time the lordship of the manor has 
remained in the Coffin family. It is one of the 
rare instances of an English estate being re- 
tained for a period of nearly eight hundred years 
in one family and continuing the original name. 
The grounds belonging to the manor comprise 
most of the parish of Alurington, about three 
thousand seven hundred acres, near the borough 
of Bidef ord in North Devon, which Charles Kings- 
ley so graphically describes in his Westward Ho. 
The manor house is called Portledge and its 
present owner is Major Pine Coffin of the Eng- 
lish Army. His youngest brother, Tristram Pine 
Coffin, Esq., bears his Christian name in honor 
of his remote kinsman Tristram Coffin of New 
England. ' ' 



712 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Nicholas Coffin, the grandfather of Tristram, 
lived at Butlers, Brixton Parish, Devonshire. He 
was born about 1550, and died October 8, 1613. 
His will, dated September 12, 1613, in the eleventh 
year of King James's reign, gives to his eldest 
son, Peter Coffin, "my greatest brasse pan and 
my mind is that my wife shall have the use thereof 
during her life." He devises sundry estates to 
his son Peter, and mentions his grandson Tris- 
tram, giving him "one yearling bullock." 

Peter Coffin, the son of Nicholas, was born in 
the reign of Queen Elizabeth, about 1580, and 
died in Brixton Parish in 1628. He married circa 
1609 Joan Kember, daughter of Robert and Anna 
Kember of Brixton Parish. In his will, which 
was proved March 13, 1629, he left to his son 
Tristram Coffin "my best brassen panne and best 
brassen crocke." Evidently this ancestral brass 
pan was deemed very precious. One wonders 
whether Tristram brought it over to New Eng- 
land, and where it is now. By his will, Peter 
Coffin gave to his widow Joan a life estate in all 
his lands, tenements, and hereditaments in Brix- 
ton Parish, she yielding and paying therefor fifty 
shillings per year to his son Tristram "at ye 
four most usual feasts of ye year" and "also 
sufficient meat, drink and clothes and convenient 
lodgings unto ye sayd Tristram according to his 
degree and calling during her widowhood." 
After the death of the widow, the remainder was 
devised to Tristram. There were many other 
provisions in the will, including money bequests 
to his son John, and to his four daughters, "and 
unto ye child my wife goeth with. ' ' 



TRISTRAM COFFIN 713 

Tristram was twenty-three years old when his 
father died in the reign of James the First. He 
was thirty-seven when he came to New England 
at the beginning of Cromwell 's ascendancy. Dur- 
ing these fourteen years, he doubtless lived the 
life of an English farmer of the gentry class. 
By education and environment he was a royalist 
and high churchman, being, indeed, Warden of 
Brixton Parish in 1639. In Mrs. Hinchman's ad- 
mirable book on the Early Settlers of Nantucket 
there is a copy of the diagram of the Parish 
Church, made by the Vicar, Eichard Lane, in 
1638, clearly showing the distribution of the pews. 
Tristram Coffin had the pew at the right of the 
chancel under the pulpit. Directly opposite in 
the front row was the pew of his mother in law, 
Dionis Stevens. On the left aisle was the pew 
of John Kember, doubtless a cousin, since Tris- 
tram Coffin's mother was a Kember. Families 
of Coffin, Stevens and Worth occupied numerous 
pews in the old church. This old diagram is an 
extremely interesting document. Unlike most of 
your Essex forebears, who were driven by the 
persecutors of the established church to seek a 
new home in the troublous year of 1634, Tristram 
Coffin, eight years later, would seem to have been 
impelled to leave England because of the growing 
ascendancy of Puritanism. The long contest be- 
tween the King and Parliament had demoralized 
the country. In Devon, the Parliamentary forces 
were early in control. Plymouth was seized by 
the Roundheads at the first of the struggle, and 
although repeatedly besieged by the King's 



714 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

forces, remained in the possession of Cromwell. 
It was in one of these encounters, at Plymouth 
Castle, that John Coffin, Tristram's only brother, 
was killed. "It was," writes Allen Coffin of Nan- 
tucket, "his utter want of faith in the institutions 
of England that sent him across the ocean with 
a wife and five small children, a widowed mother, 
and two unmarried, dependent sisters, to found 
a new home among the barren hills of New Eng- 
land. " In the year 1642 he sailed away from 
Devon never to return. The ships which came 
•over during that year were the Hector, Griffin, 
Job Clement, and Margaret Clement, on one of 
which, probably, was this family of courageous 
seekers after new fortunes. It is supposed that 
he came in the ship with Eobert Clement, and 
with him went first to Salisbury. 

Tristram had married about 1629 Dionis, 
daughter of Robert Stevens of Forde, within the 
parish of Brixton, and Dionis his wife. Dionis 
Coffin was baptized at Brixton, March 4, 1610. 
Among the five children who were born to Tris- 
tram and Dionis Coffin in England, and who 
crossed the ocean with their parents, was Tris- 
tram Coffin, Junior, your ancestor, born 1632, the 
second child. 

The family stayed but a brief time in Salisbury, 
and then removed with Robert Clement to Haver- 
hill. Tradition says that Tristram Coffin was the 
first person who ploughed land in the town of 
Haverhill, constructing his own plough. The fol- 
lowing year he settled at "The Rocks." On a 
deed written November 15, 1642, his signature 



TRISTRAM COFFIN 715 

appears. It was a deed from Passaguo and 
Saggahew, with the consent of Passaconaway, to 
the inhabitants of Pentuckett of a tract six miles 
by fourteen miles in extent. Tristram Coffin and 
his family lived in Haverhill for a few years, and 
then removed to Newbury. During his residence 
of some ten years in Newbury, he was prominent 
in the town's affairs and history, demonstrating 
the activity and strength which so conspicuously 
characterized him in his later life. 

In 1644, Tristram Coffin was licensed by the 
town of Newbury "to keep an ordinary and sell 
wine." He seems to have had some doubt as to 
the jurisdiction of the town, because in 1647 he 
petitioned the General Court at Boston for the 
same privilege. It was granted May 26, 1647, 
and on the same day the General Court voted that 
henceforth "such as are to keep houses of com- 
mon intertainment and to retail wine, beere, etc. ' ' 
shall apply to the Courts of the shire in which 
they live "in order that the time of the deputies 
may be devoted to matters of more importance." 
September, 1653, Tristram Coffin's wife, Dionis, 
was presented by the grand jury to the Court for 
selling beer at three pence a quart. The law pro- 
vided that "all such as put beere to sale shall be 
able to prove that they put into every hogshead 
of beere that they sell for three pence the quart, 
into the brewing thereof six bushells of good 
barley mault, and into every hogshead of beere 
sold at two pence a quart f ower bushells of mault ; 
and into every hogshead of beere sold at a penny 
a quart two bushells of like good mault, and so 



716 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

proportion in greater or smaller quantities." It 
is rather satisfactory to be able to record that 
your grandmother Dionis was adjudged not 
guilty of breaking the law relating to the sale of 
intoxicating liquors. Having proved by the tes- 
timony of Samuel Moores that she put six bushels 
of malt into the hogshead she was discharged. 

In 1644, Tristram Coffin was licensed "to keep 
the ferry on Newbury side and George Carr on 
Salisbury side of Carr's island," a license which 
was subsequently confirmed December 26, 1647. 
The history of this ferry and of the trouble 
between Tristram Coffin and George Carr, you 
have already learned in connection with George 
Carr, another comeoverer of yours. About 1654, 
Tristram Coffin moved to Salisbury and was there 
a magistrate, signing his name "Commissioner of 
Salisbury. ' ' In the year 1654, Thomas Macy, who 
was a Deputy to the General Court from Salis- 
bury, met Thomas Mayhew, a Deputy from Water- 
town. Mayhew had purchased the island of Nan- 
tucket in 1641. Mayhew offered the island to 
Macy as an excellent place for stock raising. 
Macy interested Tristram Coffin and others of his 
fellow townsmen of Salisbury in the scheme of 
starting a new settlement on the island. 

Early in 1659, Tristram Coffin proceeded upon a 
voyage of inquiry and observation, first to 
Marthas Vineyard, where Thomas Mayhew was 
living and with whom he discussed the terms of 
the purchase, and then, taking with him Peter 
Folger as an interpreter of the Indian language, 
he sailed over to Nantucket. He was well satis- 



TRISTRAM COFFIN 717 

fied with conditions at the island, and with the 
peaceable attitude of the Indians, and on his 
return to Salisbury so reported to his associates. 
A company was formally organized for the pur- 
chase of the island, the records of which are still 
preserved. There were ten original shares, of 
which Tristram Coffin, Senior, and his son, Peter 
Coffin, each held one, and his sons, Tristram 
Coffin, Junior, and James Coffin, each held one 
half. The deed was dated July 2, 1659, the con- 
sideration being thirty pounds and two beaver 
hats. In 1659, Tristram Coffin, Sen., Peter, Tris- 
tram, Jun., and James, purchased the island of 
Tuckanuckett from Mr. Mayhew. 

James Coffin was one of the earliest of the set- 
tlers to arrive on the island. Tristram, Senior, 
soon after followed him. Tristram's mother, 
Joan Kember, your ancestress, had probably lived 
with him in Haverhill and Newbury and Salis- 
bury, but she seems not to have accompanied him 
to Nantucket. She died in Boston, May, 1661, at 
the age of seventy-seven years. 

Although a house lot near his father's at 
Capaum Pond was laid out to Tristram Coffin, 
Junior, your ancestor, it does not appear that he 
ever moved to Nantucket, living all his life in 
Newbury. Peter Coffin, the oldest son, did live 
at Nantucket at one time, but later moved to New 
Hampshire, where he was a member of the Assem- 
bly, a Privy Councillor, and for many years a 
Justice of the Supreme Court. With Tristram 
Coffin, Senior, and his wife, however, several of 
their children became inhabitants of Nantucket; 



718 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

James, who married Mary Severance; John, who 
married Deborah Austin; Stephen, who married 
Mary Bunker, and Mary, who married Nathaniel 
Starbuck. 

Nantucket was claimed as a dependency of the 
Province of New York, soon after its settlement. 
There was, however, no established government, 
except such as the settlers informally agreed upon 
for their mutual convenience. It was not long 
before trouble and dissension arose between the 
inhabitants, due for the most part to rum drinking 
on the part of the Indians, and Tristram Coffin 
and Thomas Macy were impelled to appeal to 
Governor Lovelace in New York to establish an 
authorized government. In compliance with this 
appeal, the Governor commissioned Tristram 
Coffin as the first Chief Magistrate of Nantucket, 
June 29, 1671. Tristram Coffin had a positive 
and forceful personality. He found himself a 
leader in his little island community and his con- 
ception of leadership was kingship. He was, in 
fact, in a small way, the King of the Island, and 
he dealt out justice in a truly regal way. At no 
time, probably, were all his subjects entirely sub- 
servient, yet it was not until John Gardner came 
from Salem, a "half share man," that open rebel- 
lion against Tristram Coffin and his adherents 
began in good earnest. The bitter controversy 
which stirred the island for the next few years 
had as its basis the essentially American motive of 
refusal on the part of democracy to submit to 
the government of an aristocracy. Coffin as the 
aristocratic leader had the prestige of official 



TRISTRAM COFFIN 719 

authority ; Gardner had the popular favor ; in the 
end, as always, the People won. The insurgents 
were able to avail themselves of that useful tacti- 
cal procedure of denying the jurisdiction of the 
Court. The legal title of the Island of Nantucket, 
to which in the conception of all good Nantucket- 
ers, even to this day, the continent of America is 
accidentally contiguous, afforded much oppor- 
tunity for controversy. Coffin and Macy and 
their associates purchased the island of Thomas 
May hew, who, in 1641, had purchased it from the 
Earl of Sterling. The Earl of Sterling's grant 
included Long Island "and the islands adjacent." 
It is not to be wondered at that Sir Fernando 
Gorges with his inclusive grant of the territory 
now known as Maine, claimed Nantucket as his. 
Mayhew, in fact, conceded both claims by paying 
taxes to both proprietors. In 1664 King Charles, 
who naturally was not very well informed geo- 
graphically about his New England possessions, 
granted to his brother, the Duke of York, the 
lately acquired territory of the "New Nether- 
lands" and expressly included "the small island 
called or known by the name of Nantukes or Nan- 
tucket." This confusion of ownership and juris- 
diction naturally afforded the rebels an excellent 
opportunity to complicate the situation. Their 
purpose, in which they finally succeeded, was to 
have the island included within the Massachusetts 
Bay Colony jurisdiction. 

Tristram Coffin's original commission as Chief 
Magistrate from Governor Lovelace expired by 
limitation, and Thomas Macy acted as Chief 



720 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Magistrate under very unsettled conditions. In 
1677 Governor Andros of New York again com- 
missioned Tristram Coffin as the responsible 
representative of the King on Nantucket. There 
can be no question that the community over which 
Tristram Coffin was then called to rule was a re- 
bellious one whose jealousies and intense partisan- 
ship kept the inhabitants in constant turmoil. Cof- 
fin, quite properly in view of his employment, and 
quite naturally in view of his temperament, 
attempted to rule with an iron hand and to sup- 
press the insurrection. The People, under the 
leadership of John Gardner, would not be sup- 
pressed. When at length the imprisonment of 
Peter Folger, together with other high handed 
proceedings, were referred to Governor Andros, 
to the great grief and chagrin of Tristram Coffin 
he was not sustained. He was an old man with 
the traditions of ' ' upper class ' ' and it must have 
been a cruel blow to him to find himself supplanted 
by plebeian John Gardner. The last public 
record of Tristram Coffin is one in 1680, when he 
was compelled by order of the Governor of New 
York to pay £343 as a fine for having, as Chief 
Magistrate, wrongfully disposed of a cargo of 
hides from the wreck of a French vessel. 

You have few more interesting or picturesque 
ancestors than Tristram Coffin. In the annals of 
Nantucket he is supreme. I fancy that in Brix- 
ton, Devonshire, he made himself felt. Certainly 
in Newbury and in Salisbury he was a distinct 
power. In whatever locality fortune might have 
placed him he would have been a leader. He was 



TRISTRAM COFFIN 721 

seventy-six years old when he died, October 2, 
1681. His wife, Dionis, survived him for some 
years. They were the progenitors of an aston- 
ishingly prolific family. In 1728, according to a 
computation made by Stephen Greenleaf, the old- 
est grandchild of Tristram and Dionis Coffin, they 
had 1582 lineal descendants, of whom 1128 were 
then living. If the same rate of increase in the 
family had been maintained to the present time, 
which doubtless it has not, Tristram Coffin's 
descendants would be something like three million 
persons. 

Tristram Coffin, Junior, was the second son of 
Tristram and Dionis Coffin, born at Brixton in 
1632. He was ten years old when he came over 
with his father to New England. He learned the 
trade of a tailor in his youth. When he was 
twenty-one years of age he married Judith 
Somerby, the widow of Henry Somerby, a daugh- 
ter of Edmund Greenleaf, March 2, 1653, by whom 
he had ten children. They resided in what is 
now known as the old Coffin house, near Training 
Green, opposite Abraham Toppan's and near 
Henry Sewall's. Henry Somerby had built a 
small house at this place to which Tristram Coffin 
succeeded in his marriage with Somerby 's widow. 
His increasing family made it necessary to add to 
the house what is now the main structure. It is 
even older than the Toppan house in Toppan's 
Lane, and much more picturesque. Around the 
fireplace in the living room and in the chamber 
above are some remarkable Dutch tiles, and in 
the kitchen still stands the old dresser, with its 



722 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

stock of pewter plates and platters, as it has stood 
for more than two centuries. 

Tristram Coffin, Junior, was a Deacon of the 
first church and prominent in its affairs, being 
deeply interested in the controversy to which I 
referred in connection with another of your 
ancestors, Nicholas Noyes. In 1667, being then 
thirty-five years old, he acted as Selectman, and 
in various years thereafter. He was constantly 
appointed by the town meetings on committees for 
laying out and dividing lands, settling quarrels, 
acting as overseer of the poor, and performing 
other services requiring tact and a judicial 
capacity. He represented Newbury at the Gen- 
eral Court in Boston in 1695, 1700, 1701 and 1702. 
In 1678, he took the oath of allegiance, and soon 
after became interested in military affairs. In 
1682, he was a Sergeant, and in 1686 a Lieutenant. 
In the frequent mentions of him in the town 
records, he is sometimes designated as "Deacon 
Coffin" and sometimes as " Lieutenant Coffin." 

He died in 1704 and was buried in the grave- 
yard of the First Parish, where on his gravestone 
still can be read the following inscription: 

To the Memory of 

Tristram Coffin Esq r . 

who having served the first church of Newbury 

in the office of Deacon 20 years died 

Feb. 4, 1703/4 aged 72 years. 

On earth he pur-chas-ed a good degree 
Great boldness in the faith and liberty 
And now possesses im-mor-tality. 



TRISTRAM COFFIN 723 

His widow, Judith Greenleaf (Somerby) out- 
lived him only a year or two. Under date of 
December 21, 1705, Judge Sewall writes "Cousin 
Noyes brings the news of Mrs. Coffin's death the 
15th instant to be buried the 19th. Went away 
suddenly and easily. A very good woman of 
Newbury." She is buried beside her husband, 
her tombstone reading : 

To the Memory of 

Mrs. Judith late virtuous wife of 

Deacon Tristram Coffin Esq 1- ., 

who having lived to see 177 of her children and 

children's children to the 3d generation, 

Died Dec. 15, 1705, aged 80. 

Grave, sober, faithful, fruitful vine was she 
A rare example of true piety 
Widow 'd awhile she wayted wisht-for rest 
With her dear husband in her Saviour's Breast. 



Chapter VIII 

EDMUND GREENLEAF 

Came over prior to 1635 



Edmund Greenleaf 1600 — 1671 

(Sarah Dole) 

Judith Greenleaf 1626 — 1705 

(Tristram Coffin) 

Stephen Coffin 1665 — 1725 

(Sarah Atkinson) 

Sarah Coffin 1686 — 1768 

(Joshua Bailey) 

Sarah Bailey 1721 — 1811 

(Edward Toppan) 

Abner Toppan 1764 — 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 — 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



EDMUND GREENLEAF 



Edmund Greenleaf was born in the Parish of 
Brixham, County of Devon, on Tor Bay, about 
1600. It is supposed that he was of Huguenot 
origin. It is possible that he knew Tristram 
Coffin in the old country. It is probable that he 
came over in 1634. He is said to have come over 
from Ipswich, County Suffolk. He was granted a 
house lot in Newbury in 1635, and in the first allot- 
ment of lands he was given one hundred and 
twenty- two acres. He is styled a "dyer." He 
was admitted as a freeman of Newbury, March 
13, 1638/9. 

Edmund Greenleaf was pre-eminently a soldier. 
I am under the impression that I had some good 
reason to believe that he was one of the eight 
Newbury men who took part in the Pequot war 
in 1637, joining an expedition against Sassacus 
and pursuing the savages to Fairfield, where they 
fought the conclusive battle of the war. I think 
it probable that John Emery was also one of New- 
bury's quota. It is recorded that on the march of 
these troops through Connecticut in hot pursuit of 
the Indians, it being a Sabbath Day, they halted 
and at length discussed Anne Hutchinson *s conun- 
drum as to whether they were acting under a 
Covenant of Grace or of Works. Edmund Green- 



728 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

leaf was one of a committee of four, (of which two 
others of your ancestors were members, William 
Moody and Abraham Toppan) appointed in 1638 
by the town to oversee the "bringing of armes 
to church and see that all inhabitants bring their 
armes compleat one Sabbath day in the month 
and the Lecture day following" and to report if 
the arms were defective, and if found unfit, to 
collect and distrain twelve pence for every default. 
In 1639, Edmund Greenleaf was ordered to be 
Ensign for Newbury. On May 22 of the same 
year, he was licensed "to keepe a house of inter- 
tainment. ' ' His house was near Old Town Bridge. 
When Greenleaf left Newbury in 1650, his son in 
law, Henry Somerby, continued to keep the ordi- 
nary. On October 7, 1641, he was appointed "to 
end small businesses," i. e., to act as a magistrate 
in civil cases. In 1642, under a requirement of 
the General Court, he was appointed by the Select- 
men of Newbury as Superintendent of "breeding 
of salt peeter in some out house for poultry or 
the like," i. e., of the making of gunpowder, the 
product to be delivered to the agents of the colony. 
In 1642, Edmund Greenleaf was "the ancient and 
experienced lieutenant under Captain Gerrish. " 
Governor Winthrop had ordered that Passacon- 
away "the great sachem of all the tribes that 
dwelt in the valley of the Merrimack" be dis- 
armed. Lieutenant Greenleaf, with forty men, 
made an attempt to execute the order. "They 
could not go to his wigwam but they came to his 
son's and took him, which they had warrant for, 
and a squaw and her child, which they had no 



EDMUND GREENLEAF 729 

warrant for." On September 28, 1642, the Gen- 
eral Court at Boston ordered Lieutenant Green- 
leaf to "send home the Indian woman and child 
from Newbury, and to send them to Passaconaway 
for satisfaction. ' ' 

In 1647, Edmund Greenleaf was allotted a house 
lot in the "New Town" on Greenleaf 's Lane, now 
State Street, in Newburyport, and in 1648 licensed 
to keep an "ordinary" in Newbury. It was at 
this time that occurred the great division in the 
church about removing it to the new town. 
Edmund Greenleaf was bitterly opposed to the 
removal, and after trying every possible means, 
by petition to the General Court, and otherwise, 
being defeated, left the town of Newbury in dis- 
gust and removed to Boston. 

He had married Sarah Dole in England, and it 
was in England that their child, Judith, was born 
at Ipswich, and baptized September 29, 1626. She 
was your many times great grandmother, who 
married Tristram Coffin. Sarah Dole died Janu- 
ary 18, 1663, and Edmund Greenleaf then married 
Sarah Jordain Wilson Hill. She appears to have 
been a much married lady with several sets of 
children and grandchildren. Edmund Greenleaf 
died in Boston in 1671. His will, dated December, 
1668, and proved in 1671, contains the following: 

"When I married my wife I kept her grandchild as 
best I remember 3 years to scooling dyet and apparel 
and William Hill her son had a bond of six pound a 
year whereof I received no more than a barrell of 
porke of 3 lb. 0-0 of that 6-0-0 a year he was to pay 
me and I sent to her son Ignatius Hill to the Barbados 
in Mackerell Sider, Bread and Peace, as much as come 



730 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

to twenty pound — I never received one penny off it; 
his aunt gave to the three brothers 50£ a piece I know 
not whether they received it or no, but I have not re- 
ceived any part of it. Beside when I married my wife 
she brought me a silver boule, a silver porringer, a 
silver spoon. She lent or gave them to her son James 
Hill without my consent. 

Evidently the financial result of Edmund's 
second marriage was not pleasing to the old 
gentleman. In this same will he remembers his 
daughter "Judah" Coffin with twenty shillings, 
and names Tristram Coffin as one of the execu- 
tors. Judith Greenleaf Somerby Coffin's son, 
Stephen Coffin, who married Sarah Atkinson, was 
a great grandfather of Abner Toppan. It may 
interest you to know that the poet John Green- 
leaf Whittier was descended in two lines from 
both Tristram Coffin and Edmund Greenleaf. 



Chaptee IX 

THEODORE ATKINSON 

Came over 1634 



Theodore Atkinson 1611 — 1701 

(Abigail ) 

John Atkinson 1636 — 

(Sarah Merrick) 

Sarah Atkinson 1665 — 1724 

(Stephen Coffin) 

Sarah Coffin 1686 — 1768 

(Joshua Bailey) 

Sarah Bailey 1721 — 1811 

(Edward Toppan) 

Abner Toppan 1764 — 1836 

(Elizabeth Stanford) 

George Tappan 1807 — 1857 

(Serena Davis) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



THEODORE ATKINSON 



Theodore Atkinson came over with his wife 
Abigail in 1634. He was in the employment of 
John Newgate, felt maker. He came from Bury 
in the Connty of Lancaster. Soon after his 
arrival, on November 11, 1634, he joined the first 
church of Boston, and was made a freeman in 
1642. In 1644 he became a member of the military 
organization since known as the Ancient and Hon- 
orable Artillery Company. He lived in Boston 
and became a prosperous man of affairs. In 
1649 he was a Constable; in 1655 "Clerk of the 
market." His name appears constantly in the 
records as an appraiser of estates, a witness to 
wills, and in such like capacities. Pretty nearly 
everybody who died in Boston in the last half 
of the seventeenth century, it would seem, was 
indebted at death to Theodore Atkinson, his name 
appearing as a creditor of countless estates. In 
1645 he purchased a house on Court Street, the 
second lot from Washington Street, and in 1652 
he moved to a house on what is now Bromfield 
Street, which some years later he sold to Edward 
Rawson, the Secretary of the Colony. His pas- 
ture was east of what is now Pearl Street. His 
name appears in connection with various real 
estate transactions. In 1662, with Job Lane, 



734 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

"Theodore Atkinson, of Boston, forger, agreed 
to build a drawbridge." This Theodore may 
have been his son. In 1663, Theodore Atkinson 
was allowed his costs in a probate account for 
repairing a house for a widow, Rachel Wood- 
ward. In 1669, he was one of the original found- 
ers of the Old South Church, with which he con- 
tinued as a member until his death. At what 
date his wife Abigail died is not of record, but 
in 1667 he married Mary Lyde, the widow of 
Edward Lyde, a daughter of the Eev. John 
Wheelwright, Anne Hutchinson's brother in law. 
Referring to the death of this Mary Atkinson, who 
outlived her husband Theodore some ten years, 
Judge Sewall writes : ' ' This sixth day Jany 4th 
(1711) Major Walley's foot is opened under- 
neath and found to be very hollow and spongy. 
Mr. Pemberton told me of it at the funeral of 
Mrs. M. Atkinson, born in New England, aged 
73 years, buried in a Tomb in the new burying 
place from her son Mr. Lyde's house. Bearers 
Col. Elisha Hutchinson, Sewall, Addington, Stod- 
dard, Dummer, Col. Checkley. ' ' The Judge never 
missed a funeral if he could help it. 

In 1678, Theodore Atkinson and his wife Mary 
testified in a proceeding relating to an adventurer 
by the name of Hailes, who succeeded in imposing 
upon the daughter of Mr. Edward Rawson. Theo- 
dore Atkinson deposed that one who called him- 
self Thomas Rumsey, among other names, came 
to work for him "for to attend my business, keep 
my books of acount, and gether in my debts." 
Rumsey told a very good story of gentle birth 



THEODORE ATKINSON 735 

and hard luck, and pretended to have come to 
New England for religion's sake. He was use- 
less as an assistant and peculiarly deficient in 
religion, and the various and highly inconsistent 
yarns he told about his noble ancestry at length 
made Theodore Atkinson very wrought with him. 
Hailes succeeded better with the young daughter 
of Edward Kawson to her subsequent undoing 
and regret. 

Theodore Atkinson died in 1701 aged eighty- 
nine. His descendants are man} T . Several have 
been distinguished, notably his grandson Theo- 
dore, a famous soldier and Chief Justice of New 
Hampshire. The family has been prominent in 
Boston for many generations. 

John Atkinson, from whom you descend, was 
one of the older sons of Theodore and Abigail 
Atkinson. He was born in Boston in 1636. He 
did not have the opportunity of a college educa- 
tion which his father's growing prosperity fur- 
nished the younger sons. He learned his father 's 
trade of a "hatter." It was doubtless when he 
was a young lad about town that he met Sarah 
Merrick (or Mirick as it is sometimes written) of 
Charlestown, and courted her. Four brothers, it 
would seem, of the name of Merrick, came over 
on the ship James from Bristol, landing at 
Charlestown in the spring of 1636. One of the 
brothers, James, remained for some years in 
Charlestown. I have been unable to ascertain the 
parentage of Sarah, but think it is altogether 
probable that she was the daughter of James. If 
she had been a sister, as the Merrick genealogists 



736 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

declare, she would have been altogether too old 
for John Atkinson's bride. At all events, when 
James Merrick removed to Newbury in 1657, 
Sarah was a member of his family. John Atkin- 
son evidently could not bear to be parted from 
his lady love and soon followed her to Newbury, 
and married her. In 1662 there was granted to 
him as a townsman half an acre of land "by the 
spring near Anthony Morse, Jr.'s house." The 
Atkinson house on this lot was standing not many 
years ago. 

There is some doubt as to the origin of the four 
Merricks who came over on the James, but it 
seems probable that they were the children of 
John Merrick, born about 1579 at St. David, Pem- 
brokeshire, where his father was rector. The 
father was the Rev. William Merrick, a native 
of Llaleschid in Wales, born about 1546, the son 
of the Rev. John Merrick, born about 1513, who 
was the fifth son of Merrick of Llewellyn, a Cap- 
tain of the Guard at the coronation of Henry VIII 
in 1509. If this is, indeed, so, it gives you your 
only strain of Welsh blood. 

I have found little recorded about John Atkin- 
son, except that in 1668 and again in 1678 he took 
the "oath of allegiance." I so often mention the 
taking of the oath of allegiance by these early 
ancestors of yours that you may like to know 
what it meant. The settlement in New England 
had been made by dissenters from the established 
church in England. They came over, for the most 
part, during the later part of the reign of Charles 
I, when Archbishop Laud was especially active 



THEODORE ATKINSON 737 

against them. Later, in England, the Puritan 
party obtained the upper hand and Oliver Crom- 
well ruled the kingdom. He died in 1658, and 
Charles II was proclaimed king, May 8, 1660. 
The restoration of the Stuarts was a great blow 
to the colonists in America, and they were re- 
luctant to recognize and accept the new govern- 
ment at home. This situation was evident to the 
King's ministers, and a pointed intimation was 
conveyed to the General Court of Massachusetts 
that public acknowledgment of the King's author- 
ity be no longer delayed. Consequently, the Gen- 
eral Court, under direction of the Governor, issued 
a proclamation August 7, 1661, requiring all the 
freemen to appear before certain magistrates 
and make oath that they acknowledged King 
Charles as their rightful sovereign. In Plymouth 
Colony, and especially among the Quakers of what 
was subsequently Bristol County, there was much 
opposition to this requirement. In Newbury, a 
great turmoil was excited, and few of the inhabi- 
tants obeyed the order. Several attempts were 
made by the authorities to enforce the taking of 
the oath. In 1668, under pressure, several New- 
bury men, among whom was John Atkinson, suc- 
cumbed to the pressure. About ten years later, 
a more vigorous attempt was made to round up 
the inhabitants, and John Atkinson, to be on the 
safe side, took the oath a second time. 

I find in the records of the trial of one Susannah 
Martin, a widow, as a witch, at the Court in Salem, 
July 27, 1692, that John Atkinson and his wife 
Sarah testified. John testified that he ' ' exchanged 



738 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

a cow with a son of Susannah Martin whereat 
she muttered and was unwilling he should have 
it. Going to receive his cow, though he ham- 
stringed her, and haltered her, she of a tame 
creature grew so mad that they scare get her 
away. She broke all the ropes that were fastened 
to her; and though she was tied fast to a tree, 
yet she made her escape, and gave them such 
further trouble, as they could ascribe to no cause 
but witchcraft." Sarah Atkinson, wife of John, 
testified that "Sussanah Martin came from Ames- 
bury to their house in Newbury in an extraordi- 
nary season when it was not fit for any one to 
travel. She came all that long way on foot. She 
bragged and showed how dry she was ; nor could 
it be perceived that so much as the soles of her 
feet were wet. She, Sarah Atkinson, was amazed 
at it and professed that she should herself have 
been wet up to her knees if she had come so far; 
but Sussanah Martin replied 'She scorned to 
be drabbled. ' ' ' Fortunately for Susannah Martin 
the witchcraft craze was waning, and the above 
testimony, which would doubtless have been 
accepted by the Court a few years earlier as 
conclusive of the devilish crime of witchcraft, 
was not deemed sufficient to send the old woman 
to death, and she was subsequently acquitted. 

Sarah Atkinson, the daughter of John and 
Sarah Atkinson, who married Stephen Coffin, a 
son of Tristram Coffin, was a great grandmother 
of Abner Toppan. 



Chapter X 
ABNER TOPPAN 



ABNER TOPPAN 



Abner Toppan, the eleventh child of Edward 
Toppan and Sarah Bailey, was born in the Top- 
pan house April 6, 1764. He was a cabinet maker. 
With his brother Edward, who was ten years his 
senior, he engaged in the business of making 
furniture. They had a shop on High Street, not 
far from Toppan 's Lane, where they carried on 
an extensive business. The carved mahogany 
four post bedstead, with bureau and washstand 
and other pieces, which your Aunt Carolina Car- 
men Crapo gave to your mother on her marriage, 
and which had been for many years in the pos- 
session of the Wills family in Newburyport, from 
whom your Aunt Carolina inherited it, was made 
by Abner Toppan. 

It was on a journey to the south perhaps in 
search of mahogany that Abner Toppan met and 
fell in love with Elizabeth Stanford, an "eastern 
shore Maryland" maiden, and wooed her against 
the protests of her family, and finally eloped with 
her and brought her to his New England home. 
His dwelling house was on the east side of High 
Street near the head of Toppan 's Lane. It is a 
substantial, comfortable old house. Here your 
grandmother, Sarah Tappan Crapo, spent many 
happy vacations with her Grandmother Toppan, 



742 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

To give you a feeling of the reality of these people 
of a bygone age, I quote from the Reminiscences 
of a Nonagenarian, by Sarah Anna Emery, writ- 
ten in 1879. She writes in reference to a serious 
illness which she had in September, 1817, as fol- 
lows : ' ' The tedium of a slow convalescence was 
enlivened by a bevy of youthful neighbors. Mr. 
Abner Toppan 'a oldest daughter Sophia had mar- 
ried Mr. Oliver Crocker and gone to New Bed- 
ford. Betsey and Arianna were unmarried. Abner 
and Stanford were lads in their teens. Harriet 
and George were mere children. ' ' It was George, 
born January 6, 1807, who was your father's 
grandfather. He came to New Bedford later, 
and it so happened that all his sisters lived in or 
near New Bedford. 

Abner Toppan died in 1836 at too early a date 
for your grandmother, Sarah Tappan Crapo, to 
remember him, and I have no means of learning 
anything of his personal life and characteristics. 
His portrait, which hangs in your grandfather's 
dining room, shows a kindly face with cheeks like 
red apples. Near by is the portrait of his wife, 
Elizabeth Stanford. She has a sweet strong face. 
I have looked on these two faces three times a 
day for many, many years, and I am quite sure 
that she was his better half. 



PART VII 
ANCESTORS 

OF 

AARON DAVIS 



Chapter I 

JOHN DAVIS 

Came over prior to 1635 



John Davis 

(Alice 



1687+ 



Jacob Davis 
(Elizabeth Bennett) 



1685 



Jacob Davis 
(Mary Haskell) 



1662 — 1716 



Aaron Davis 
(Phebe Day) 



About 1700 — 1743 



Aaron Davis 
(Mary Knapp^ 



1737 — 1812 



Aaron Davis 
(Sarah Morse Smith) 



1777 _ 1829 



Serena Davis 
(George Tappan) 



1808 — 1896 



Sarah Davis Tappan 
(William W. Crapo) 



1831 — 1893 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 — 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 — 



JOHN DAVIS 



Through your great great grandfather Davis 
you are descended from a considerable number 
of the early settlers of Gloucester. Cape Ann 
was visited in 1605 and 1606 by the Chevalier 
Champlain, who made an elaborate map and 
dnbbed the place "Le Beauport." He found a 
large and prosperous Indian settlement estab- 
lished. In 1623, a company of Dorchester, Eng- 
land, men set up a fishing stage at Cape Ann. 
This settlement was for the most part abandoned 
in 1626. In 1630, a band of Pilgrims, under the 
leadership of a son of the Rev. John Robinson, 
the Pilgrims' pastor at Leyden, engaged in fish- 
ing on the Annisquam side of the cape, and some 
of this band, with others who came from Ply- 
mouth in New England, became settlers. In 1639, 
the General Court of Massachusetts established 
a "fishing plantation at Cape Ann," which in 
1642 was formally made the town of Gloucester. 
Most of the early settlers lived on the cape along 
the Squam river, although the later development 
of the settlement was at the head of the harbor, 
where is now the city of Gloucester. Among the 
early settlers was John Davis, many of whose 
numerous descendants have been identified with 
Cape Ann. 



748 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

John Davis was in Ipswich in 1638, when he 
took the freeman's oath, and probably earlier. 
He is described as a * ' shoemaker. ' ' Whence he 
came, where and when he was born, and who was 
his wife, I have been unable to ascertain. In 
1641 he is listed as having ' ' right to commonage. ' ' 
In a deed made later his wife is named as Alice. 
On April 15, 1642, the town agreed with him to 
"keepe the Cows Herd on the north side of the 
Eiver. " The agreement, to which his signature 
is appended, is an interesting document setting 
forth his duties. He was to take such sufficient 
helpers as he might select, subject to the approval 
"from tyme to tyme of the Seven Men." He 
was to act as herdsman for twenty-five weeks and 
to receive twenty shillings a week, from which, I 
gather, he was to pay his helpers. One of the 
provisions of the agreement was that at least 
one of the herdsmen should attend church every 
Sabbath. 

In 1648 he conveyed certain land in Ipswich 
describing himself as of "Jabaque within the 
bounds and limits of Ipswich." In 1648 he was 
one of the subscribers, to the amount of two shill- 
ings yearly, for the support of Major Dennison. 
A large number of subscribers agreed to con- 
tribute a total of £24 17s. yearly to Major Denni- 
son "so long as he shall be their leader, in way 
of gratuity to encourage him in his military help- 
fulness to them." And, it being evident, as the 
signers of the subscription paper state, that the 
collection of the various amounts would be dif- 
ficult and burdensome, they requested the Select- 



JOHN DAVIS 74.9 

men to add the amounts to their tax levies. Mr. 
Richard Saltonstall led the list with a contribution 
of £4. One of your ancestors, Richard Kimball, 
was not far behind him with £3. John Davis 
and Thomas Newman, however, were among the 
large majority who subscribed two shillings 
apiece. 

In 1656, John Davis removed to Gloucester and 
bought of Richard Windon his house, barn, and 
cleared land. He lived in Gloucester for several 
years, and his two sons, Captain James Davis who 
was conspicuous in the military annals of the 
town and Jacob Davis, your ancestor, continued 
to reside in Gloucester, and are the ancestors of 
the Davis families of that place. John Davis, the 
father, evidently returned to Ipswich. In 1671, he 
was a Selectman of Gloucester. In a deed of land 
in Gloucester in 1682, he described himself as of 
that town, but it would seem clear that he was 
then living in Ipswich. He was a Selectman of 
Ipswich in 1685. The last record I have found of 
him, in Ipswich, is in 1687. 

Jacob Davis, the son of John, may have come 
over with his father, although not having the date 
of his birth or his age when he died in 1685, I am 
not certain whether he was born in England or 
in New England. He went to Gloucester with his 
father. On January 20, 1661, he married Eliza- 
beth Bennett, who was probably a sister of An- 
thony Bennett, although she may have been his 
daughter. Anthony Bennett, who was a carpen- 
ter by trade, is thought to have come from 
Beverly. The statement that "He came to an 



750 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

untimely end" rather excites one's curiosity. He 
lived at Goose Cove, and had a saw-mill near the 
outlet of Cape Pond Brook where for many years 
thereafter was a grist mill. In 1662, Jacob Davis 
had a grant of land at the head of Long Cove. In 
1682, he with others had the grant of the stream 
at the head of Little River "to set up a saw mill 
on. ' ' Here he lived near by his brother, Captain 
James Davis, one of whose descendants was Chief 
Justice Theophilus Parsons. Jacob was a mari- 
ner as well as a miller, and owned one half of a 
sloop and four canoes worth £12 10s. He died 
September 2, 1685, and left a very considerable 
estate for those times, to wit, £298 17s. The fact 
that his inventory showed him possessed of a 
"gun, court-les, and belt" indicated that he had 
seen service in the militia, and, indeed, he was 
drafted in 1675 to go to Narragansett in King 
Philip's war. The draft says: "They doe want 
warm clothing and must have new coates." 

Jacob, the oldest son of Jacob and Elizabeth 
Davis, was born in Gloucester, February 26, 1662. 
He succeeded his father as a miller, and later 
built a fulling mill. In 1708, land was granted 
him in West Gloucester, near the head of Little 
River, where he built a house, still standing, which 
is one of the landmarks of Gloucester. As a 
specimen of the type of ancient New England ar- 
chitecture, it has great interest. On September 
14, 1687, he married Mary Haskell, and had a 
large family of children. He died in Gloucester, 
February 1, 1716. 






JOHN DAVIS 751 

Aaron, the third son of Jacob and Mary Has- 
kell, was born between 1698 and 1700. In 1725, 
he married Phebe Day, and soon after removed 
to Attleboro in Massachusetts. What caused this 
change of residence, we may not know. He was a 
mechanic and it is, perhaps, likely that he found 
a job in the town of Attleboro where relatives of 
his mother were living. In Attleboro his children 
were born, the fourth, Aaron Davis, born May 
19, 1737, being your ancestor. Aaron, the father, 
died in Attleboro in 1743. His widow, Phebe, 
soon after married Benjamin Hobben. In 1752, 
Aaron Davis, the son, then aged fourteen, with 
others of the children, were placed under the 
guardianship of David Day of Gloucester, their 
uncle. Most of the children returned to Essex 
County. Timothy went to West Gloucester, Zebu- 
Ion to Gloucester and later to New Gloucester, 
Maine, and Eliphalet to Gloucester. Whether 
Aaron first went to Gloucester and subsequently 
removed to Newburyport is not clear, but several 
years before his marriage to Mary Knapp in 1761, 
he is recorded in Newburyport as a laborer. He 
died in Newburyport on January 5, 1812, aged 74, 
his funeral being held at his son Aaron's house 
on Middle Street. His gravestone, in excellent 
preservation, is near the front of the New Hill 
Burying Ground and is decorated by the bronze 
marker of the Sons of the Revolution. His son 
Aaron, was your great great grandfather who 
married Sarah Morse Smith. 

The only interesting event in the life of Aaron 
Davis, the father of your great great grandfather 



752 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Aaron, of which I have knowledge, is that he par- 
ticipated in the Battle of Bunker Hill. Captain 
Benjamin Perkins of Newbury received his com- 
mission from Joseph Warren, May 19, 1775, al- 
though his company had been enlisted some ten 
days before. In this company, as a private, was 
Aaron Davis. They reached Charlestown Neck 
early on the morning of June 17. The passage 
was covered by the guns of the Glasgow, British 
man-of-war, and two floating batteries, which kept 
up a heavy cross fire on the American troops who 
attempted to cross. Captain Perkins determined 
to go over, and throwing away his wig, he or- 
dered his men to follow him in single file, and 
succeeded in making the passage without loss. 
The company were stationed "by the rail fence" 
near the breastworks and were in the thick of the 
fight all day. Seven of the company were killed 
and some twenty-three wounded. In the report 
to Congress by the Committee of Massachusetts 
is the following : ' ' The artillery advanced towards 
the open space between the breastwork and the 
rail fence; this ground was defended by some 
brave Essex troops covered only by scattering 
trees. With resolution and deadly aim they 
poured the most destructive volleys on the enemy. 
The enemy's cannon, however, turned the breast- 
work, enfiladed the line, and sent the balls through 
the open gate way or sallyport directly into the 
redoubt under cover of which the troops at the 
breastworks were compelled to retire." Another 
ancestor of yours, Nathaniel Smith, in Captain 
Ezra Lund's company, did valiant service in cov- 



JOHN DAVIS 753 

ering this retreat and preventing the British 
troops from slaughtering the brave men who had 
held the hill all day. 

Several of the members of Captain Perkins' 
company afterwards testified in an inquiry as to 
the conduct of General Putnam during the battle, 
and the record of the testimony gives a vivid 
picture of the position and actions of the com- 
pany during the engagement. One Philip John- 
son of Newburyport, for instance, says that while 
they were at the rail fence, just before the action 
began, General Putnam came up on horseback and 
said "Men, you know you are all good marksmen, 
you can take a squirrel from the tallest tree. 
Don't fire till you see the whites of their eyes." 
And after the first retreat of the British, General 
Putnam again rode up and said "Men, you have 
done well, but next time you will do better. Aim 
at the officers." Johnson adds "the balls were 
flying thick as peas." Many of Captain Perkins' 
company reenlisted after the battle and served 
with "Washington's army at Long Island and 
"White Plains during the ensuing season, but 
whether Aaron Davis was among them I have 
not ascertained. 



Chapter II 

WILLIAM HASKELL 

Came over 1637 



William Haskell 1617 — 1693 

(Mary Tibbot) 

William Haskell 1644 — 1708 

(Mary Brown) 

Maey Haskell 1668 — 

(Jacob Davis) 

Aaron Davis About 1700 — 1743 

(Phebe Day) 

Aaron Davis 1737 — 1812 

(Mary Knapp) 

Aaron Davis 1777 — 1829 

(Sarah Morse Smith) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



WILLIAM HASKELL 



Your ancestor, William Haskell, who was one of 
the more prominent of the early settlers of 
Gloucester, was born in England in 1617. He 
came over, probably, in 1637, and settled in that 
part of Salem now called Beverly. Here he lived 
some years. In 1643 and in 1645 his name 
appears as a grantee of lands at Planter's Neck 
in Gloucester, but it does not appear clearly that 
he actually settled in Gloucester until a few years 
prior to 1656, when he was permanently living on 
Cape Ann, on the west side of the Annisquam 
Eiver. He is described as a ' 'mariner," and was 
doubtless engaged in fishing, as were most of the 
early settlers of Gloucester. He took a leading 
part in the affairs of the town, serving as Select- 
man for many years, and representing the town 
at the General Court at Boston at many sessions. 
In 1661, he was appointed by the General Court 
as "Lieutenant of the trayned band of Glouces- 
ter." Afterwards he became the Captain of the 
band, and he is usually referred to in the early 
records of Gloucester as "Captain Haskell." He 
was one of the earliest recorded Deacons of the 
First Church of Gloucester. In 1681, he joined 
in a petition to the King asking his Majesty "to 
interpose to prevent the disturbance of titles to 



758 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

real estate in Gloucester by Robert Mason, who 
made claims thereto." In 1688, as one of the 
Selectmen of the town, he resented the imposition 
of taxes by Governor Andros. With his col- 
leagues in office and a few of his fellow townsmen 
he refused to submit to what he regarded as un- 
just taxation. One of the items in the assessment 
to which he objected was "the shott for said jus- 
tices by their order at the tavern. The totall for 
the first bout was three pounds fifteen shillings 
money." It seems that the "Justices" when they 
bound over the recalcitrant officers of Gloucester, 
made merry at the tavern and charged the cost 
to the town. The remonstrance of the outraged 
citizens of Gloucester was not regarded, and Wil- 
liam Haskell, with some others, was indicted and 
severely fined for refusal to assess the amount 
demanded by the government. 

There was no great wealth among these early 
Gloucester fishermen, but William Haskell seems 
to have been the richest man in town, at least he 
paid the largest tax, and when he died he left an 
estate of £548. In a marginal note on the town 
records, under date of 1693, there is the follow- 
ing: "Capt. Haskell hath been sick almost this 
half year and still remains. ' ' He did not remain 
long, dying in the latter part of the same year. 

On November 6, 1643, Captain Haskell had mar- 
ried Mary Tibbot. She was the daughter of 
Walter Tibbot, who was one of the leading men 
of Gloucester in the earliest days, being appointed 
by the General Court one of the Commissioners 
"to manage the settlement of Gloucester" in 1642 



WILLIAM HASKELL 759 

when it was incorporated as a town. He served 
as Selectman continuously until his death in 1651. 
William Haskell, the son of Captain William 
Haskell and Mary Tibbot, was born August 26, 
1644, and died June 5, 1708. He owned a grist 
mill and a saw mill in that part of Gloucester 
which was later made the town of Rockport. He 
evidently prospered as a miller, since his estate 
at his death was valued at nearly £700. He mar- 
ried July 3, 1667, Mary Brown. She was called 
Mary "Walker" in her marriage record, having 
been adopted in a sense by her stepfather, Henry 
Walker. Her own father was William Brown, an 
early settler of Gloucester, who died in 1662. Her 
mother was Mary, the widow of Abraham Robin- 
son, a most interesting personality of whom there 
is much known. He is supposed to have been 
a son of the Rev. John Robinson of Leyden. 
Who Mary was I do not know, but she managed 
to marry several distinctly interesting old settlers 
of Gloucester. Her last husband, Henry Walker, 
was very much identified with the early history 
of his town. He had no children, and at his death 
he made his wife's children the principal legatees 
under his will. His wife 's daughter, Mary Brown, 
who married William Haskell, the second, had a 
daughter Mary who married Jacob Davis, and 
was a great grandmother of Aaron Davis. 



Chaptee III 

ZACCHEUS GOULD 

Came over prior to 1638 



Zaccheus Gould 1589 — 1668 

(Phebe Deacon) 

Priscilla Gould 1625 — 1663 

(John Wilde) 

Phebe Wilde 1657 — 1727 

(Timothy Day) 

Timothy Day 1679 — 1757 

(Jane ) 

Phebe Day 1706 — 

(Aaron Davis) 

Aaron Davis 1737 — 1812 

(Mary Knapp) 

Aaron Davis 1777 — 1829 

(Sarah Morse Smith) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



ZACCHEUS GOULD 

In the admirably prepared history of the family 
of Zaccheus Gould of Topsfield, by Benjamin A. 
Gould, there is an interesting account of his 
descent, apparently well authenticated in detail, 
from Thomas Goold of Bovington, Hertfordshire, 
in the parish of Hemel Hempstead, who was born 
about 1455. The wills and other records relating 
to these successive generations of prosperous 
Hertfordshire yeomen are most interesting. I 
will quote only from the will of your very great 
grandfather (of a greatness, in fact, of the thir- 
teenth power). The will is dated August 29, 1520, 
and was proved September 28, 1520 : 

First. I bequeth my sowle to almyghty god and to 
our blissed lady saint Mary and to all the holy company 
of Hevyn, my body to buryyd in the church yard of 
Saint Lawrence at Bovyngton. 

Item. I bequeth to the high aulter Is. 

Item, to the moder church at Lincoln V d. 

Item, to the rood light XI d. 

Item, to our lady's light XI d 

Item, to Saint Lawrence light XI d 

Item, to Saint Lenards light VII d 

Item, to Saint Nicholas light VII d 

Item, to the mayntayning of the torches V s VII d 

Item, to the gilding of Saint Lawrence tabernacle 

V mks. 
I will have a prest syngyng for my sowle 11 yers. 



764 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

To his son Richard, your ancestor, he gives a 
"gray horse, a long cart, a muk cart, a gt whet, 
a cow. VI shepe, 11 acre of wood in Langley wood, 
VC tymber at the howse wherein I dwelt some- 
time myself, VC spoks, a plough, and the gerys 
that longith thereto." He makes similar bequests 
to six other children, two brothers, and five ser- 
vants. He contributes twenty shillings "to the 
mendyng of the highway betwixt Bovington and 
Chepfeld. " He makes detailed provision for his 
widow, and makes his oldest son, Thomas, the 
residuary legatee, and heir to all his land. 

At the time of the large immigration to Massa- 
chusetts Bay in 1634 and for a few years there- 
after, several members of the Bovington family 
of Goulds came over. The date when Zaccheus 
Gould, your comeoverer, crossed is not known. 
It was prior to 163S. He was first in Weymouth, 
but soon went to Lynn, where he lived some four 
or five years. In 1640, he owned a mill on the 
Saugus Eiver. It is evident that he came over 
with some capital, since his operations are on a 
somewhat larger scale than those of most of your 
comeoverers. For instance, he hired a farm in 
Salem for which he agreed to pay an annual 
rental of £160 for the first and £200 after the 
second year, payable in wheat and rye at five 
shillings and barley at four shillings the bushel. 
"Whether he entered into possession of this par- 
ticular farm is not clear. In this year he peti- 
tioned the General Court to exempt husbandmen 
from ordinary trainings in seed-time, hay-time, 
and harvest. He complained that his servants. 



ZACCHEUS GOULD 765 

and those of others, were oftentimes drawn from 
their work to train in seed-time and harvest, and 
that he, himself, "for one day's training was 
much damnified in his hay." The Court granted 
the petition and fixed the training days at more 
convenient times. 

Prior to 1644, Zaccheus Gould removed to Ips- 
wich and took up extensive land holdings, one 
purchase from William Paine of Watertown 
being of three hundred acres, and one from Gover- 
nor Endicott of five hundred and fifty acres. 
These holdings were in the northerly part of the 
territory originally within Ipswich bounds, north 
of the Ipswich River and on both sides of Fishing 
Brook. In 1644, Zaccheus Gould petitioned the 
General Court to have this territory set off as 
a separate town. The General Court at first was 
somewhat reluctant, but after much urging, in 
1650 established a separate town, by the name 
of Topsfield, although Mr. Gould had suggested 
Hempstead as a good name, in memory of his 
ancient home in England. 

From this time until his death in 1668, Zaccheus 
Gould is prominently connected with the early 
history of Topsfield, being manifestly its leading 
citizen. The records of the Courts and land 
offices, and the proceedings of the town make con- 
stant mention of him. He was evidently highly 
respected, but rather too independent in his views 
to suit the prevailing Puritan standards. He 
took the "oath of fidelity," but he never became 
a "freeman" of the Colony, to become which it 
was necessary to be a member of the church. 



766 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

His relations with the church at Topsfield were 
somewhat strained to say the least, as appears 
by his trial at Ipswich Court in March, 1659, for 
disturbing the peace in public worship. "He sat 
down on the end of the table about which the 
minister and scribe sit, with his hat full on his 
head and his back toward all the rest. Although 
spoken to by the minister and others he altered 
not his posture. He spoke audibly when the 
minister was preaching. ' ' He was ' ' admonished ' ' 
by the Court. In November of the same year, 
Zaccheus Gould was indicted and fined three 
pounds for entertaining Quakers. In May, 1661, 
this fine was remitted, "in consequence of his 
great loss lately sustained by fire." On the other 
hand, Zaccheus Gould was most liberal in his 
donations of land and buildings and money to the 
church at Topsfield. He was the largest land 
owner of his neighborhood, and when he died, be- 
tween March 30, 1668, and November 13, 1668, 
he had not less than three thousand acres. His 
son, Captain John Gould, who succeeded to his 
father's landed estates, became a man of much 
note and distinction in Essex County. 

Priscilla, the daughter of Zaccheus and Phebe 
(Deacon) Gould, was born in 1625, in Great Mis- 
senden in England. She married John Wilde, 
who was born in England in 1618 and with his 
brother William had settled in Ipswich prior to 
1637. John Wilde served in the Pequot War in 
1637, and in 1639 he was allowed three shillings 
for this service. In 1643, it was "agreed that 
each soldier for his service to the Indians shall 



ZACCHEUS GOULD 767 

be allowed twelve shillings a day," John Wilde 
being mentioned as one of these soldiers. About 
1645, he moved to Topsfield, where he married 
Priscilla. He was somewhat prominent in the 
town's affairs, serving in many minor municipal 
employments. Priscilla died in April, 1663, and 
in November of the same year John Wilde mar- 
ried Sarah Averill. When the witchcraft delu- 
sion swept Essex County, John Wilde's family 
were among the greatest sufferers. His wife, two 
daughters and a son in law were imprisoned and 
tried. His wife was convicted and executed. The 
story of this trial is given in detail in the Collec- 
tions of the Essex Institute. John Wilde married 
a third time, Mary Jacobs of Salem, in 1693, and 
died in Topsfield May 14, 1705, aged over eighty- 
five years. He was a large landed proprietor. 
It is not surprising that among your numerous 
Essex County forebears there were several who 
suffered during the witchcraft days, but surely 
the experience of your ancestor John Wilde was 
the most cruel. 

Phebe, the daughter of John Wilde and Pris- 
cilla Gould, named after her grandmother Gould, 
was born in Topsfield in 1657, and in 1679 married 
Timothy Day of Gloucester. In 1692, she was 
accused of witchcraft, and imprisoned in Ipswich 
gaol, where she remained for some months, until 
released on bonds for her reappearance, together 
with Mary Eose and Rachel Vinton. These three 
Gloucester witches were accused of bewitching a 
sister of Lieutenant Stephens. It was fortunate 
that they happened to be taken to Ipswich and 



768 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

kept in prison there during the excitement at 
Salem. The Court was so busy trying the numer- 
ous cases before it, which the coterie of young 
Salem girls were responsible for, that it had no 
time to take up numerous other cases pending 
in the County, and before the other cases could 
be reached a most fortunate return to sanity 
stopped the absurd craze. 

Timothy Day, whom Phebe Wilde married, was 
born in Gloucester in 1653, and died in 1723. He 
lived on the west side of the Annisquam River. 
He was a soldier in King Philip's War. His 
father was Anthony Day, a comeoverer, born in 
1616, and died in Gloucester in 1707. Anthony 
Day at first settled at Ipswich, but came to 
Gloucester prior to 1645. He lived at the "Neck 
of Houselots" between Annisquam River and 
Mill River. In 1650, he married Susanna Machett, 
"servant to William Vinson," whose good name 
and fame he had vindicated before the Quarterly 
Court at Salem in 1649 against the aspersions oC 
her master. 

Timothy Day, second, the son of Timothy Day 
and Phebe Wilde, was born in 1679 and died in 
1757. He married one Jane, whose surname I 
have not discovered. Their daughter, Phebe Day, 
born in 1706, married Aaron Davis, the grand- 
father of your great great grandfather, Aaron 
Davis. 



Chapter IV 

WILLIAM KNAPP 

Came over 1630 



William Knapp 1578 — 1658 

( ) 

John Knapp 1624 — 1696 

(Sarah Young) 

Isaac Knapp 1672 — 1744 

(Ann Eaton) 

Samuel Knapp 1717 — 1745 

(Mary Robinson) 

Mary Knapp 1739 — 1815 

(Aaron Davis) 

Aaron Davis 1777 — 1829 

(Sarah Morse Smith) 

Serena Davis 1808 — 1896 

(George Tappan) 

Sarah Davis Tappan 1831 — 1893 

(William W. Crapo) 

Stanford T. Crapo 1865 — 

(Emma Morley) 

William Wallace Crapo 1895 — 



WILLIAM KNAPP 



William Knapp, styled "a carpenter," came 
over with Sir Richard Saltonstall in 1630 and 
settled at Watertown. He lived on the Cambridge 
Road. His first wife, who was your ancestress, 
died in England. Her name I know not. Later, 
he married Priscilla Akers, the widow of Thomas 
Akers of Watertown. He died in 1658 aged eighty 
years. When he came over he brought several 
children, among whom was your ancestor John 
Knapp, who was born probably about 1624. On 
May 25, 1660, John married Sarah Young. She 
was probably a sister of Henry Young of Water- 
town, but whether she was born on this side of 
the water, and who were her parents, I have not 
discovered. There was a widow Young of Cam- 
bridge who had a grant of land in 1638. John 
Knapp was evidently not a prosperous man. In 
1683 he was made sexton of the first church of 
Watertown at a salary of £4 10s per annum. 
There are many references to him during the 
next ten years in the church records. He died in 
1696 leaving an estate of £65. 

Isaac Knapp, the son of John and Sarah 
(Young) Knapp, born about 1672, became a ship- 
wright. During his life he lived in Watertown, 
Charlestown, Salem and Marblehead and Boston. 



772 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

In 1690, when he was eighteen years old, he and 
his brother James went on the expedition to 
Quebec, and in 1735 he received a grant of land 
in Canada in recompense for his military service. 
He probably removed to Salem about 1703, and 
for some years thereafter he was actively engaged 
in ship building. He died in 1744 and is buried 
in the old Granary Burying Ground in Boston. 

Samuel Knapp, the son of Isaac and Ann 
(Eaton) Knapp, was born June 6, 1717, in Salem. 
What caused him to move to Newburyport I know 
not. On April 1, 1739, when he was twenty-two 
years of age, as appears by the church records of 
Newburyport, he ' * acknowledged himself guilty 
of breach of the seventh commandment before mar- 
riage, gave satisfaction by a profession of repent- 
ance, was restored to charity and obtained baptism 
of his first child." This child was Mary Knapp, 
the mother of your great great grandfather, 
Aaron Davis. She was born on the same day he 
made his confession, although out of courtesy, I 
suppose, she has been given a birthday one year 
later in the family records. The church records, 
however, leave no doubt about the facts. Her 
mother, whom Samuel Knapp married January 
17, 1739, three months before her advent in the 
world, was one Mary Robinson, a granddaughter 
of Robert Robinson of Newbury. A very ex- 
tended search has failed to discover the origin 
of Mary or of Robert Robinson. The name 
appears in the early history of Newbury and of 
Gloucester, but I have been quite unable to trace 
the lineage of this Mary Robinson, who makes a 



WILLIAM KNAPP 773 

rather deplorable gap, as you may notice, in the 
circular chart of the ancestors of Aaron Davis. 

Samuel Knapp joined in the expedition against 
Louisburg, and was killed May 26, 1745, at the 
head of the volunteers who stormed the island 
battery. He was twenty-eight years old at the 
time of his cutting off. 



Chapter V 

NATHANIEL EATON 

Came over 1637 
Hector 



Nathaniel Eaton 
( Graves) 



1609 — 1640+ 



Benoni Eaton 

(Rebecca ) 



About 1639 — 1690 



Ann Eaton 
(Isaac Knapp) 



1736+ 



Samuel Knapp 
(Mary Robinson) 



1717 — 1745 



Mary Knapp 
(Aaron Davis) 



1739 — 1815 



Aaron Davis 
(Sarah Morse Smith) 



1777 _ 1829 



Serena Davis 
(George Tappan) 



1808 — 1896 



Sarah Davis Tappan 
(William W. Crapo) 



1831 — 1893 



Stanford T. Crapo 
(Emma Morley) 



1865 — 



William Wallace Crapo 



1895 — 



NATHANIEL EATON 



Cotton Mather thus describes the founding of 
Harvard College : "A General Court held at Bos- 
ton Sep. 8th 1636 advanced a small sum (it was 
then a day of small things), namely, four hundred 
pounds, by way of essay towards the building of 
something to begin a Colledge; and New-Town 
being the Kiriath Sepher" (the city of books) 
"appointed for the seat of it, the name of the 
town was . . . changed to Cambridge. But 
that which laid the most significant stone in the 
foundation was the last will of Mr. John Har- 
vard . . . While these things were a doing, 
a society of scholars, to lodge in the new nests, 
were forming under the conduct of one Mr. 
Nathaniel Eaton, or, if thou wilt, reader, Orbilius 
Eaton, a blade who marvellously deceived the 
expectations of good men concerning him; for he 
was one fitter to be master of a Bridewell than 
a Colledge ; and though his avarice was notorious 
enough to get the name of a Philagyrius fixed 
upon him, yet his cruelty was more scandalous 
than his avarice. He was a rare scholar him- 
self, and he made many more such, but their edu- 
cation truly was 'in the School of Tyrannus.' 
Among many other instances of his cruelty he 
gave one in causing two men to hold a young 



778 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

gentleman, while he so unmercifully beat him 
with a cudgel, that upon complaint of it to the 
court in September 1639 he was fined an hundred 
marks, besides a convenient sum to be paid unto 
the young gentleman; . . . and for his in- 
human severities towards the scholars he was 
removed from his trust." 

This blade, Orbilius Eaton, if thou wilt, I regret 
to say was your ancestor. It doubtless would 
have pleased you better to trace your descent from 
his brother (Mather quite ignores the relation- 
ship), "the most excellent Theophilus, our Eaton, 
in whom the shine of every virtue was particularly 
set off with a more than ordinary degree of 
humility." Mather is quite as exuberant in his 
praise as he is in his condemnation, and he further 
eulogizes Theophilus as follows : "He was affable, 
courteous and generally pleasant but grave per- 
petually; and so cautious and circumspect in his 
discources and so modest in his expressions, that 
it became a proverb for incontestable truth; 
* Governor Eaton said it!' He was the glory 
and the pillar of the New Haven Colony!" 

What makes the matter still more deplorable 
is that I fully realize you will not consider it so 
high an honor as I do to be descended from the 
first principal of Harvard College, blade though 
he was. And if it had only happened to be his 
brother Theophilus, you could have claimed re- 
lationship, by marriage at least, with the founder 
of Yale College, since Theophilus, just before he 
came over, married Ann, the daughter of Thomas 
Morton, Bishop of Chester, and widow of David 



NATHANIEL EATON 779 

Yale. Her two sons, David and Thomas Yale, 
came over with their stepfather, your avuncular 
ancestor, and it was Elihu, the son of Thomas, 
who founded Yale College. Of course, I'm sorry 
it was Nathaniel, "the blade," and not Theophi- 
lus "the pillar," who is responsible for you, but 
as for me, I don't mind being distinguished as 
such a very primeval "son of Harvard." 

"Unhappy Nathaniel Eaton," your ancestor, 
was born at Stony Stratford in the County of 
Bucks, in 1609. He was the son of Richard Eaton, 
who afterwards was rector of Great Budworth in 
Cheshire, where Nathaniel and his brothers grew 
up, having as one of their boyhood companions 
John Davenport, who became the life long friend 
of Theophilus and the famous divine who joined 
with him in the settlement of Connecticut at New 
Haven. Another brother was Samuel, who, like 
Nathaniel, became a minister. It is not clear 
whether Nathaniel was an Oxford or a Cambridge 
man. Samuel matriculated at Magdalene College, 
Cambridge, 1624-1628, and it is not unlikely that 
his brother Nathaniel went to the same college, 
although Cotton Mather, who as to matters of 
fact is seldom to be depended upon, makes them 
both Oxford men. Of Nathaniel's earlier life I 
know little. He is said to have studied under 
Doctor William Ames at Franeber, in the Nether- 
lands, and that he studied for the ministry is 
probable, and that he was more interested in 
scholastic than in religious matters is also prob- 
able. One can hardly believe that he would have 
taken the deeply conscientious position which 



780 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

brought his brother Samuel to prison as a non- 
conformist in 1635. Samuel was one of the 
''lights" in the puritanical galaxy of martyrs. 

Theophilus, who was evidently the flower of 
the family, also doubtless had a college education 
and was designed for the church. His ambition 
took another turn, and going to London he became 
a merchant of renown. He was associated with 
the Fellowship of Eastland Merchants, of which 
he was at one time Governor. He was sent as 
Governor to oversee the interests of the mercan- 
tile establishment on the Baltic. Afterwards he 
was employed by King Charles as his agent at 
the Court of Denmark, and became the warm 
friend of the King of Denmark. He was one of 
the original partners in the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony enterprise, and acted as Assistant in its 
earliest days. It seems probable that he may have 
come over with Winthrop in 1628 or 1630 and re- 
turned soon after. Some years after, in coopera- 
tion with his dear friend John Davenport, he 
organized the company who settled at New 
Haven. "Eaton in all respects was the natural 
and proper leader of the enterprise considered 
as a commercial or as a political experiment." 
His personal contribution to the enterprise in 
money was £3,000. He came over in 1637 on the 
Hector with his company, landing in Boston and 
conferring with Governor Winthrop, who was his 
loyal friend and admirer, and soon after went 
to Connecticut and established the settlement 
at New Haven. Of him James Savage, the 
historian par excellence of New England, says: 



NATHANIEL EATON 781 

"No character in the annals of New England 
is of purer fame than that of Theophilus Eaton, 
governor of the colony of New Haven from its 
settlement to his death, by twenty annual elec- 
tions, the only instance of such an honour ever 
conferred. ' ' 

It seems altogether probable that Theophilus 
Eaton's two brothers, Samuel and Nathaniel, 
came over with him in the Hector in 1637. 
Samuel, who is the recipient of Cotton Mather's 
extravagant praise, went to New Haven for a 
time, but within three years returned to England. 
Nathaniel, your ancestor, was admitted as a free- 
man in Boston, June 9, 1638. Winthrop terms 
him a "schoolmaster," but it seems to be clearly 
evident that he was entitled to the highest title 
of honor, that of "minister." 

Your ancestor Nathaniel Eaton's career in New 
England was certainly not commendable, and he 
has not left a pleasant memory. A few months 
after his arrival, in November, 1637, the town of 
Newtown (later Cambridge) granted to "The 
Professor" (Nathaniel Eaton) two and two- 
thirds acres of land in the ' ' Oxe Pasture. ' ' This 
land is now the site of Holworthy, Stoughton and 
Hollis Halls within the College yard. In May, 
1638, the town granted a further allotment of 
land of five hundred acres "to the towne's use 
forever for a public school or college; and to the 
use of Mr. Nathaniel Eaton as long as he shall 
be employed in that work; so that at his death 
or ceasing from that work he or his shall be 
allowed according to the charges he hath been 
at in building and fencing." 



782 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Nathaniel Eaton built a house for himself 
within what is now "the yard," and there, in the 
' ' School of Tyrannus ' ' for a year or more, being 
a "rare scholar himself," "he made many more 
such." It seems he did not make much of a 
scholar of one Nathaniel Rowe, a letter from 
whom to Governor Winthrop I found, curiously 
enough, in a history of the settlement of New 
Haven. As the letter, beside throwing a side- 
light on the delinquencies of your ancestor, por- 
trays the familiar predicament of a young chap 
who is "strapped" and seeks to borrow money 
' ' to get home, ' ' I will venture to quote it in part : 

Nathaniel Rowe to John Winthrop: Most loving 
and kinde sir, my humblest service remembered to you, 
I now with much consideration (and thinking of all 
things and bussinesses) doe now write to you. First 
of all my father sent me to this countrie verie hastelie 
(& overmuch inconsiderately), — indeed it is a sore 
grief to me that I should charge my prudent and most 
deare father with the evil of rash doing of things ; but 
yet being compelled in this time of straightness I must 
say it. My father sent with me provisions enough for 
to serve me a yeare or two, as meale, flour, buttar, 
beefe. I having lost my meale and flour was com- 
pelled to sell the rest of my provisions and, indeed, 
being counselled so to do, I immediately did it. Then 
Mr. Eaton and Mr. Davenport, having no direct order 
what to do wished me and sent me unto Mr. Eaton, 
the marchant's brother, to be instructed in the rudi- 
ments of the Lattine tongue, (in which with practice 
I shall be pretty skillful). I lived with him about a 
month, and verily in that time he spake not one word 
to me, scilicet, about my learning, and after he went 
away I lived an idle life because I had no instructor. 

The young man at some length explains that he 
had better instruction afterwards, but that he has 



NATHANIEL EATON 783 

no money and wants to get home to his father. 
He confesses that he is very doubtful about the 
reception he may receive at home, but still he 
wants to try it, and please won't the Governor 
help him to pay his fare back to England. 

Nathaniel Eaton's day of reckoning was near. 
I can do no better in telling the tale than to quote 
my greatly admired guide, Governor John Win- 
throp. Under date of July, 1639, Winthrop 
writes : 

At the General Court at Boston one Mr. Nathaniel 
Eaton, brother of the merchant at Tuilipiach, was con- 
vented and censured. The occasion was this: He 
was a schoolmaster and had many scholars, the sons 
of gentlemen and others of best note in the country, 
and had entertained one Nathaniel Briscoe, a gentle- 
man born, to be his usher, and. to do some other things 
for him which might not be unfit for a scholar. He 
had not been with him above three days but he fell 
out with him for a very small occasion, and with 
reproachful terms, discharged him and turned him out 
of his doors ; but it being then about eight of the clock 
after the Sabbath, he told him he should stay till next 
morning, and, some words growing between them, he 
struck him and pulled him into his house. Briscoe de- 
fended himself and closed with him, and being parted, 
he came in and went up to his chamber to lodge there. 
Mr. Eaton sent for the constable, who advised him first 
to admonish him, and if he could not, by the power of 
a master, reform him, then he should complain to the 
magistrate. But he caused his man to fetch him a 
cudgel, which was a walnut tree plant, big enough to 
have killed a horse, and a yard in length, and taking 
his two men with him, he went up to Briscoe, and 
caused his men to hold him till he had given him two 
hundred stripes about the head and shoulders. In this 
distress Briscoe gate out his knife and struck at the 
man that held him but hurt him not. He also fell to 
prayer, supposing he should have been murdered, and 



784 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

then Mr. Eaton beat him for taking the name of God 
in vain. After this Mr. Eaton . . . came to the 
governour (that is to say the narrator) complaining 
of Briscoe for his insolent speeches and for crying out 
murder and drawing his knife, and desired that he be 
enjoined to a publick acknowlegment. The magis- 
trates answered that they must first hear him speak. 
Mr. Eaton was displeased at this and went away dis- 
contented. Being after called into the court to make 
answer to the information which had been given by 
some who knew the truth of the case, and also to 
answer for his neglect and cruelty and other ill usage 
towards his scholars, these things were laid to his 
charge in open court. His answers were full of pride 
and disdain . . . Being asked why he used such 
cruelty to Briscoe his usher, and to other of his scholars 
(for it was testified by another of his ushers and divers 
of his scholars that he would give them between twenty 
and thirty stripes at time, and would not leave till 
they had confessed what he required) his answer was 
that he had this rule, that he would not give over cor- 
recting till he had subdued the party to his will. 
Being also questioned about the ill and scant diet of 
his boarders (for, though their friends gave large 
allowance, yet their diet was ordinarily nothing but 
porridge and pudding, and that very homely) he put 
it off on his wife. 

It seems necessary to break in on the Gover- 
nor's narrative to say a word about this ances- 
tress of yours on whom her husband laid the 
blame for the poor food furnished the first 
scholars of Harvard College. Two hundred and 
fifty years later I, myself, can remember some 
grumbling about the "grub," but we never went 
so far as to bring the matter to the attention of 
the Great and General Court. It seems the lady 
was a daughter of "one Mr. Thomas Graves, a 
member of Dorchester, and a very understanding 






NATHANIEL EATON 785 

man, who needs leave the church and go to 
Virginia against all counsel. He and his wife and 
divers of his children died and his whole family 
was ruined about a year after. Only one daugh- 
ter escaped who, being left a maid with good 
estate, married to that apostate Nathaniel Eaton, 
who having spent all she had fled away and left 
her miserable." This excerpt anticipates the 
climax. 

Your many times great grandmother Eaton was 
summoned before the Court and made a confession 
which was written down, evidently not by her, in 
great detail, and is now in the archives of the 
State House in Boston where, says Savage, "it is 
not probable that any document more minute or 
entertaining can be preserved. ' ' It reads in part 
as follows : 

For their breakfast, that it was not so well ordered, 
the flower not so fine as it might, nor so well boiled or 
stirred, at all times that it was so, it was my sin of 
neglect and want of that care that ought to have been 
in one that the Lord had intrusted with such a work 
. . . And that they sent down for more, when they 
had not enough, and the maid should answer if they 
had not they should not, I must confess that I have 
denied them cheese when they have sent for it and 
it have been in the house, for which I shall humbly 
beg pardon of them and own the shame and confess 
my sin . . . And for bad fish that they had it 
brought to the table I am sorry there was that cause 
of offence given them. I acknowledge my sin in it. 
And for their mackerel brought to them with guts in 
them, ... its utterly unknown to me, but I am 
much ashamed it should be in the family — and not 
prevented by me . . . For the Moor his lying in 
Sam Hough's sheet and pillow-bier, it hath truth in 
it; he did so one time and it gave Sam Hough just 



786 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

cause of offence, and that it was not prevented by my 
care and watchfulness, I desire to take the shame and 
sorrow of it . . . And for their pudding being 
given the last of the week without butter or suet, and 
that I said it was milk of Manchester in Old England, 
it 's true that I did say so, and am sorry. And for their 
wanting beer betwixt brewings a week or half a week 
together I am sorry that it was so at any time, and 
should tremble to have it so, were it in my hands to 
do again. 

I doubt very much if the Goodwife Eaton was 
in the least responsible for this humble confes- 
sion, although she may have been brow-beaten 
into acknowledging it. Her husband, at all events, 
was not so easily humbled, yet he too succumbed 
to the severity of his judges. Winthrop thus con- 
tinues his narrative: 

So the court dismissed him at present and com- 
manded him to attend again the next day, when, 
being called, he was commanded to the lower end of 
the table (where all offenders do usually stand) and 
being openly convict of all the former offences by the 
oaths of four or five witnesses, he yet continued to 
justify himself; so it being near night he was com- 
mitted to the marshall till the next day. When the 
court was set in the morning . . . after the elders 
were departed, the court consulted about him and sent 
for him, and there in open court, before a great assem- 
bly, he made a very solid, wise, eloquent and serious 
(seeming) confession, condemning himself in all the 
particulars. Whereupon, being put aside, the court 
consulted privately about his sentence . . . and 
they agreed to censure him and put him from that em- 
ployment . . . and debar him from teaching chil- 
dren within our jurisdiction . . . 

The church at Cambridge then took the matter 
up and found more evidence against the unfortu- 



NATHANIEL EATON 787 

nate school teacher, "but ere the Church could 
come to deal with him he fled to Pascataquack and 
being pursued and apprehended by the Governor 
there, he again acknowledged his great sin in 
flying and promised as he was a Christian man 
he would return with the messengers. But be- 
cause his things he carried with him were aboard 
a bark there, bound for Virginia, he desiredd 
leave to go fetch them, which they assented unto, 
and went with him, three of them, aboard with 
him. So he took his truss and came away with 
them in a boat, but being come to shore, and two 
of them going out of the boat, he caused the boats 
men to put off the boat, and because the third 
man would not go out, he turned him into the 
water, where he had been drowned, if he had not 
saved himself by swimming. So he returned to 
the bark and presently they set sail and went out 
of the harbour." 

Winthrop then describes how he was found to 
be badly in debt, and to have drawn drafts which 
he was not authorized to do, and how his creditors 
seized all his goods "allowing somewhat for the 
maintenance of his wife and children." "And 
being thus gone the church proceeded and cast 
him out." About a year after these occurrences 
Governor Winthrop writes: "10 mo. 1640. Mr. 
Nathaniel Eaton of whom mention is made before 
being come to Virginia took upon him to be a 
minister, but was given up to God to extreme 
pride and sensuality, being usually drunken as is 
the custom there. He sent for his wife and chil- 
dren. Her friends persuaded her to stay a while, 



788 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

but she went notwithstanding and the vessel was 
never heard of after." 

To complete the narrative of Nathaniel Eaton's 
life I must again call on Cotton Mather's more 
picturesque form of narrative. "After thus being 
first excommunicated by the church of Cambridge 
he did himself excommunicate all our churches, 
going first into Virginia, then to England, where 
he lived privately until the restoration of King 
Charles II. Then conforming to the ceremonies 
of the Church of England he was fixed at Bidde- 
ford where he became (as apostata est osor sui 
ordinis) a bitter persecutor of the Christians that 
kept faith to the true worship from which he was 
himself an apostate, until he who had cast so many 
into prison for conscience was himself cast into 
prison for debt where he did at length pay one 
debt, namely that unto nature, by death. ' ' Cotton 
Mather probably had slight acquaintance with 
the works of Mr. William Shakespeare or he 
might have quoted from the Tempest: "He that 
dies pays all debts." 

When Mrs. Eaton and her family departed on 
the ill fated journey in search of her husband in 
Virginia, she left one son, Benoni, in Cambridge. 
He was brought up in the family of Deacon Ches- 
holme, and the Church which had cast his father 
out contributed from time to time for the boy's 
bringing up. I have not been able to learn much 
of his history. He was born about 1639. I find 
his name "Benony Eaton" signed to a petition in 
support of a petition of citizens in Cambridge 
upholding the government, dated August 17, 1664. 



NATHANIEL EATON 789 

Benoni Eaton was a malster and apparently suc- 
ceeded in living down the memory of Ms unfor- 
tunate father, becoming a man of some substance 
and reputation in the community. His dwelling 
house was at what is now the southwest corner of 
Dunster and Winthrop Streets in Cambridge. In 
1683 he was granted fifteen acres by the town and 
had rights in the Cow Commons. In 1689 he 
shared in several divisions of "The Rocks," a ter- 
ritory north of Cambridge. He married about 
1667 one Rebecca, whose surname I have not dis- 
covered. He died December 20, 1690. Ann, 
daughter of Benoni and Rebecca Eaton, who mar- 
ried Isaac Knapp, was a great grandmother of 
Aaron Davis. 



Chapter VI 

AARON DAVIS 

Third 



AARON DAVIS, THIRD 



Aaron Davis, your great great grandfather, was 
born in 1777 and died in 1829. His twin brother, 
William, died in Havana, August, 1799, when 
twenty-two years old. There were eleven chil- 
dren in the family and two sets of twins. Of the 
personal history and character of Aaron Davis, 
the third of the name in your descent, I have no 
information. He was an apothecary of the old 
school and was dubbed "Doctor." A somewhat 
lengthy obituary published in a Newburyport 
newspaper, although very laudatory, is deficient 
in facts that can help to make his life 's history at 
all vital. To quote from the obituary : 

By the death of Doctor Davis the community has lost 
one of its most valuable members. Though moving in 
a private sphere he was known, beloved and honored by 
all his fellow citizens and they will long cherish the 
remembrance of his virtues. Such was the amiable 
disposition which characterized this estimable man, that 
his was the peculiar good fortune to make friends of all 
with whom he had intercourse and to pass through all 
the vicissitudes of this life without, for a moment, it is 
believed, having a single enemy. Tender and sympa- 
thizing towards those in distress around him; kind and 
affable to the numerous individuals with whom the busi- 
ness of his profession brought him into intercourse, he 
won the esteem of all ; and the feeling of deep concern 
which pervaded the community on the annunciation of 
the melancholy tidings that he no longer lived on earth 
gave evidence that his loss was severely lamented, and 
that he will not easily nor suddenly be forgotten. 



794 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

It is pleasant, certainly, to believe that your 
great great grandfather, Aaron Davis, was of so 
gentle and estimable a character and that his life 
was so sweetly exemplary. I venture, however, 
to surmise that his wife, Sarah Morse Smith, put 
some spice into it. 



PAET VIII 
ANCESTOES 

OF 

ELIZABETH STANFOED 



ANCESTORS OF ELIZABETH STANFORD 



Were it not that these voluminous genealogical 
notes have, doubtless, already exceeded the limits 
of your patience, I should lament my inability to 
authoritatively present to you the ancestors of 
Elizabeth Stanford. After reading about so 
many early Yankees it might, perhaps, interest 
you to learn something of your forebears below 
Mason and Dixon's line. To follow the history 
of the Palatinate of Maryland on the shores of 
Chesapeake Bay under the charter given by 
Charles the First to Cecilius Calvert, Lord Balti- 
more, in 1632, in connection with the personal his- 
tories of your one hundred and twenty-seven 
ancestors, or thereabout, who made a part of it, 
would be at least as interesting as to have followed 
through similar humble channels the history of 
the two Colonies which the same lovable and 
tragic king created along the shores of Massa- 
chusetts Bay. Whether to your disappointment 
or relief, I am unable to do this. "Maryland, my 
Maryland," is not mine so far as the acquire- 
ment of knowledge about your ancestors is con- 
cerned. Doubtless in Baltimore there is an His- 
torical and Genealogical Library comparable, to 
some extent at least, with that in the old house on 
Somerset Street in Boston, but, if so, it is too far 



798 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

away for me to drop in now and again and study 
its records. So of your Maryland origin I can 
tell you little. 

Elizabeth Stanford, your great great grand- 
mother, was the daughter of Richard Stanford of 
Vienna, Dorchester County, Maryland. Vienna 
is a little town on the Nauticoke River in the east- 
erly part of the county. Strangely enough, near 
by, on the Bay Side, is now a village named Crapo. 
This is a curious coincidence the explanation of 
which I have not investigated. Crapo is an 
unusually uncommon name, and although it is not 
unlikely that there may be a post office in 
Michigan called Crapo, to find one in Maryland 
is surprising. 

Dorchester County is on the eastern shore of 
the Bay. If you ever go to Maryland and come 
to know its people, you will soon perceive the 
importance of your origin from the eastern shore. 
To come from the "Eastern Sho' " gives one a 
certain social standing at once. Why the unfor- 
tunate people who dwell on the "Western Sho' " 
are so inferior I know not, but there is an unmis- 
takable prestige in coming from the "Eastern 
Sho'." It is a subtle distinction which no mere 
Yankee can comprehend. Out of my ignorance 
I hazard the explanation that the distinction may 
be due to the fact that the immigrants of the 
Romanist faith who followed Lord Baltimore to 
Maryland settled, for the most part, on the west- 
ern shore of the Bay, and the Cavaliers of the 
Established Church of England settled on the 
eastern shore. These Cavaliers were of rather 



ELIZABETH STANFORD 799 

more "gentle" blood than flowed in the veins of 
the great bulk of the immigrants who came across 
the Atlantic Ocean and settled on its western 
shore. And so, even to-day, to trace one's origin 
to the Eastern Shore of Chesapeake Bay, joins 
one with the jolly, dashing, high-spirited gentry 
of old England. 

In Dorchester County, in the early days of its 
settlement, the name of Stanford was well estab- 
lished. The destruction by fire of both church 
and County records renders the attempt of defi- 
nitely tracing the descent and relationship of 
various Stanford families and the families with 
whom they were connected by marriage, one of 
insurmountable difficulty, at least for a New Eng- 
lander who, like myself, cannot absorb the facts 
through local investigation and tradition. You 
may possibly descend from a certain Richard 
Stanford, who in 1635, then being twenty-five 
years of age, as appears by the records of the 
port of London, was among "the underwritten 
names to be transported to Virginia. Imbarqued 
in the Primrose Capt. Douglas Mst. Certificate 
under ye Minister's hand at Gravesend, being 
examined by him touching their conformities to 
the Church Discipline of England. The men have 
taken the oaths of Allegiance and Supremacie. 
Fetched off by Mr. Secretary Windebank's war- 
rant July 27th, 1635." I have no evidence that 
this Richard Stanford settled in Dorchester 
County, Maryland. I am inclined to think that 
he did not do so. 



800 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Or you may descend from one John Stanford, 
aged twenty-four, who in much the same way, on 
May 2, 1635, embarked on the Alexander, Captain 
Burche, master, "to be transported to the Bar- 
badoes." He, also, took the oaths of allegiance 
and supremacy and was certified to by a minister 
as to his orthodoxy. It was a customary route 
for immigrants to America, especially to Virginia 
and Maryland, to go by way of the Barbadoes. 
There was at least one Stanford family who 
remained in the Barbadoes as late as 1680, of 
whom there are several mentions in the parish 
records of Christ Church parish on the Islands. 
I have an unwarrantable conviction that these 
Stanf ords were of kin to you. Whether this John 
Stanford came to Dorchester County, Maryland, 
I know not. John being so common a Christian 
name, the subsequent prevalence of the name of 
John Stanford in Dorchester County affords little 
corroborative evidence. There was a John Stan- 
ford in the County in 1678, who was recompensed 
as one of those who served in the campaign 
against the Nauticoke Indians. He was paid 
three hundred pounds of tobacco for his service. 
He could hardly have been the same John who left 
London in 1635. He may have been his son. 

Or you may descend from a certain Thomas 
Stanford who came over in 1684/5. The earliest 
recorded instrument containing the name of 
Stanford which is preserved in Cambridge, the 
County seat of Dorchester County, is an indenture 
dated August 27, 1684, executed in Liverpool, 
England, between Thomas Stanford of Liverpool 



ELIZABETH STANFORD SOI 

and one JenefT Pooton, whereby the said Pooton 
covenanted to serve the said Stanford from the 
date of the instrument ''until the date of his 
arrival in Virginia or Maryland in America and 
afterwards" for a term to be adjusted in Court. 
The consideration was that the said Stanford 
should pay the said Pooton 's passage money. On 
this instrument Thomas Stanford endorsed, before 
recording it, "We arrived ye 9th Day of January 
1685/4." 

It appears altogether probable, although not 
demonstrable by satisfactory proof, that you do 
in fact descend from a John Stanford, born prob- 
ably between 1680 and 1690, who may have been 
a son or grandson of the John who came over in 
1635, or a son of the Thomas who came over in 
16S4. This John Stanford from whom you prob- 
ably descend was possessed, as the records 
abundantly disclose, of several large tracts of 
land in Dorchester County, among which was a 
property described as "London" and another 
as "Benjamin's Mess." The records also dis- 
close the existence of various other contemporary 
Stanfords, Thomas, Joseph, Charles, Samuel and 
William, some of whom may have been brothers, 
and others, perhaps, cousins of John. They all 
were possessed of large plantations and the 
records of their real estate transactions indicate 
that as a family they were distinctly of the local 
gentry. 

The reason for my belief that you descend from 
John Stanford is as follows: In his will, made 
in 1725, he names his wife, Elizabeth, his two sons. 



802 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

John and William, and two daughters, Elizabeth 
and Margaret. He describes his lands as "Lon- 
don," "Benjamin's Mess," "Stanford's Addi- 
tion," "Western," and by other designations. 
To his son William he devises a part of these 
various tracts. It would seem that William was 
a minor at the time of his father's death. In 
1738, his guardian, William Stanford, possibly an 
uncle, petitioned the Court for instructions as to 
how he should manage the several estates of his 
ward, especially in regard to repairing the dwell- 
ing houses and barns thereon, and in this descrip- 
tion he describes the properties by the same 
designations used in John Stanford's will. In 
1744 and 1745 this William Stanford, then, of 
course, of age, made several conveyances of parts 
of these same lands, some of which were on the 
Bay. In these conveyances his wife Elizabeth 
joins. I was rather interested in the way the con- 
veyancers described the dates. For instance, 
"The sixteenth day of July in the Third Year of 
the Dominion of Charles, Absolute Lord and Pro- 
prietor of the Province of Maryland, and Baron 
of Baltimore and Avalon. " The references in 
these deeds make it evident that the grantor was 
the son of John Stanford. 

William Stanford died prior to 1759, since in 
that year Elizabeth Stanford, a widow, whom I 
feel sure was his widow, made her will in which 
she gave to her well-beloved son, Richard Stan- 
ford four negroes, Jenny, Sam, Lyl, and Jack; a 
yoke of oxen called Bum and Brandy; together 
with a long list of articles useful on the plantation, 



ELIZABETH STANFORD 803 

among others "a piece of cloth at the weaver's, 
and a small parcel of feathers." Richard, who 
was an only son, had doubtless succeeded to the 
real estate on his father's death. This will of 
Elizabeth Stanford, whom I believe to be your 
ancestress, is most interesting. To her daughter, 
Rebecca Waters, she gives two negroes, Cauke and 
Tom. To her daughter, Sarah Staplefoot, she 
gives her riding horse and saddle. She also 
makes specific bequests to her daughters. Chebed 
Pritchett and Rhody Waters. The rest and resi- 
due of her estate, which I assume was personal 
property, she bequeathed to her son Richard and 
his four sisters. From subsequent records con- 
necting these children of Elizabeth Stanford I am 
fully satisfied that the Richard named in the will 
was the father of your great great grandmother, 
Elizabeth Stanford. I also think it practically 
certain that the Elizabeth Stanford who made the 
will was the wife of William Stanford who was 
the son of John Stanford. At all events "Lon- 
don" and "Benjamin's Mess" were in the posses- 
sion of John, William, and Richard successively, 
which certainly tends to corroborate my theory. 

Richard Stanford, who was unquestionably 
your great great great grandfather, was born 
January 18, 1743, and was consequently sixteen 
years old when his mother died, and he under- 
took the management of his estates. Whether 
the town of Vienna, where he lived for most of his 
life included, or was adjacent to, the lands which 
came to him from his grandfather John, I have 
no means of knowing. The date of the creation 



804 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

of the town of Vienna by the Colonial Assembly 
of Maryland is not known, but it is probable that 
it was about 1700. The town was of some import- 
ance in its earlier days. In 1762 it was made a 
port of entry. In 1776 it was sufficiently import- 
ant to be attacked by a British gun-boat which 
ascended the river and shelled the town. Again 
in 1781 two British ships attacked the town and 
burned ships ' ' on the stocks. ' ' Richard Stanford 
was unquestionably a leading citizen of this com- 
munity. I have not discovered that he held any 
public office, but his numerous recorded convey- 
ances of land in Dorchester County, and the 
recorded bills of sale to him of negroes, cattle, and 
other commodities, clearly indicate that he was a 
man possessed of considerable property. 

Richard Stanford married one Elizabeth whose 
maiden name I have been unable to ascertain. It 
is humiliating to be unable to furnish you with 
the surname of so comparatively a modern grand- 
mother. In a letter written in 1882 to your grand- 
mother, Sarah Tappan Crapo, from her cousin, 
Elizabeth Stanford Toppan, the daughter of Ab- 
ner Toppan of Lowell, who was the eldest son of 
Elizabeth Stanford of Maryland, Cousin Lizzie 
wrote : ' ' Mother does not remember ever hearing 
the maiden name of Grandmother. . . . There 
was a family in East Newmarket, Maryland or Vir- 
ginia, I don't know which, that my mother wrote 
to sometimes for Grandma by the name of Med- 
ford. " Newmarket is in Dorchester County, not 
far from Vienna. I find in the records at Cam- 
bridge a receipt given on February 28, 1791, by 



ELIZABETH STANFORD 805 

Richard Stanford, Celia Stanford and Elizabeth 
Stanford, the children of Richard and Elizabeth 
Stanford, for a legacy under the will of William 
Medford. Abner Toppan witnessed this instru- 
ment. Medf ord is a name which is still prominent 
in Dorchester County. I think it probable that 
your ancestress Elizabeth, the wife of Richard 
Stanford, was a Medford, but I have no evidence 
that such is the fact. 

Richard and Elizabeth Stanford had several 
children ; Robert and William, both of whom were 
lost at sea, leaving no descendants; Celia, who 
signed the above receipt; Arianna, who died 
unmarried; Elizabeth, who married Abner Top- 
pan; and Richard, of whom more anon. After 
the death of his wife, Elizabeth, Richard married 
Esther, a widow Russum, with four children, and 
by her had several children, Clement Stanford, 
Algernon Sydney Stanford, and Henrietta Stan- 
ford, who married William MacDonald. The 
widow of Richard Stanford married for the third 
time a Mr. Holland of Delaware. Prom the in- 
vestigations of your grandmother, Sarah Tappan 
Crapo, and from manuscript notes of the Rever- 
end Henry MacDonald, a grandson of Richard 
Stanford, and of Doctor Stanford E. Chaille, a 
great grandson, I am able to give you some 
knowledge of the home life of your great great 
great grandfather Richard. The plantation was 
at the upper end of the present town of Vienna. 
"The house was a two and a half story frame 
house with many rooms," writes Mr. MacDonald, 
who for some years lived there in Dr. Clement 



806 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Stanford's time. ''The furniture was costly and 
the table was furnished with solid silver and fine 
china ware. The house fronted on the banks of 
the beautiful Nauticoke River. Sailing craft 
were almost constantly in sight. The river fur- 
nished abundance of fish and oysters." In a 
letter written to your grandmother by Mr. Hooper 
C. Hicks of Baltimore in 1882 I find the following : 
"The house, when Doctor Stanford lived in it, 
was a magnificent mansion surrounded by a para- 
dise of flowers. The garden was truly a beautiful 
place. I remember distinctly, being a boy, having 
just moved in town from the country, taking a 
stroll with Clement through this delightful place. 
I thought I was in the Garden of Eden. The 
flowers now are dead, even the tall lilacs and 
fragrant roses have given way for long rows of 
corn and hills of potatoes." 

Mr. MacDonald writes, "On the farm of my 
uncle Dr. Clement Stanford in a field joining the 
town of Vienna, surrounded by beautiful native 
forest trees, was an old brick church. When I 
was a boy it was deserted and fallen into decay, 
but was regarded by my uncle as sacred. Beneath 
the beautiful trees the rude forefathers of the 
hamlet sleep. In that old house my forefathers 
worshipped and many of their loved ones sweetly 
sleep beneath those old trees." This little church 
made of bricks brought from England was one of 
the "Chapels of Ease" which were established in 
the large Episcopal parishes on the Eastern 
Shore. The parish was that of Great Choptauke, 
some fifty miles square, now represented by 



ELIZABETH STANFORD 807 

Christ Church, Cambridge. Instead of sub- 
dividing the territory into separate parishes as 
the population grew, it was the custom in Mary- 
land to retain the original parish and establish 
Chapels of Ease. I find in the archives of Mary- 
land the record of a petition of the people of 
Vienna which recites : ' ' That your petitioners 
in regard to the great distance to the Parish 
Church aforesaid, did on or about the year 1709, 
by the assistance of their Vestry, and their own 
contributions, obtain a Chapel of Ease situated 
in Vienna Town, by the Nauticoke River, on the 
other side of the Parish aforesaid." Mr. Mac- 
Donald as a boy pictured this old church as the 
scene of Gray's Elegy. He writes: " Another 
circumstance indelibly impressed my mind with 
these associations. My uncle, Dr. Stanford, had 
a son William, between Clement and Arianna. 
He was a beautiful boy, gentle and lovely, and of 
precocious intellect, a universal favorite, whom 
we all intensely loved. When about seven years 
old he sickened and withered away. His death 
caused us all great distress. He was laid to rest 
in the old Church yard beside other loved ones 
gone before. Our teacher, Mr. Baker, applied 
to him most appropriately and beautifully the 
epitaph in Gray 's Elegy : 

"Here rests his head upon the lap of Earth 
A youth to fortune, and to fame unknown ; 

Fair science frown 'd not on his humble birth, 
And Melancholy mark'd him for her own." 

That his name was William corroborates my 
theory of his descent. If I am correct in that lie 
was doubtless named after his great grandfather. 



808 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

It was a large family who lived on the Planta- 
tion in Richard Stanford's day. There were 
seven children of his own and four Russum chil- 
dren of his wife's, and many slaves. It is evident 
from the notes of his grandson that the family 
was a loyally united one in which kinship and 
kindness were synonymous. It was when Eliza- 
beth, your great great grandmother, was about 
fifteen, and her brother Richard some two or three 
years older, that their father Richard died in 
1785. It was and still is the custom for the plant- 
ers along the many inlets of Chesapeake Bay to 
load vessels owned by them with the produce of 
their plantations and once or twice a year journey 
to Baltimore to market. It was the great event 
of the year, this voyage to the metropolis. In 
the autumn of 1785 Richard Stanford made this 
journey. He was far from well when he started. 
With him were his young sons Clement and 
Algernon Sydney. During the voyage a severe 
storm arose and Richard Stanford died while 
striving to save his vessel. It was carried to sea 
and stranded near Norfolk, Virginia, where 
Richard Stanford was buried. It is a strange 
coincidence that two of your ancestors, so widely 
separated as Richard Stanford and Nathaniel 
Smith of Newburyport, should have met similar 
deaths and should lie buried so near together. 
The skipper of the vessel was a rascal. He 
appropriated the cargo and left the two young 
lads destitute. There in Norfolk they were found 
by their elder brother Richard, who brought them 
back to the Plantation. 



ELIZABETH STANFORD 809 

It was a few years after the tragedy of Richard 
Stanford's death that Abner Toppan, the New- 
buryport Yankee, appeared on the scene. What 
brought him to Maryland and to Vienna I know 
not. He and his brother were cabinet makers and 
doubtless had to go in search of good mahogany. 
The Eastern Shore of Maryland, however, was 
certainly not a good place to look for mahogany. 
Possibly he voyaged to Maryland with a cargo of 
furniture to sell. From the record of the receipt 
in the matter of William Medford's will, it is 
evident that he was in Dorchester County as early 
as 1791. The tradition is very distinct that the 
Stanfords as a family had no use for the Yankee 
Toppan, and that he ran away with his sweet- 
heart. The young couple must have lived in 
Maryland for a year or more at least, since their 
oldest child Sophia, who subsequently married 
Oliver Crocker of New Bedford, was born in 
Easton, Maryland, not far from Vienna. 

Abner Toppan and his wife, Elizabeth Stanford, 
were in Newburyport when their second child was 
born in 1795. There they lived during the 
remainder of their lives in a comfortable old 
colonial house on the east side of High Street, 
near the head of Toppan 's Lane. The house is 
very familiar to me, and it was there that your 
grandmother, Sarah Tappan Crapo, spent much 
time in her childhood with her grandmother 
Elizabeth, of whom she was extremely fond. The 
life in a New England town was at first not an 
easy one for the Southern bride. She had not 
been brought up to do housework and the cooking 



810 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

at her home in Maryland had been done by negro 
mammies. I have heard one of her granddaugh- 
ters, Arianna Graves Duryee, tell of her grand- 
mother's confession that when she was confronted 
with the necessity of cooking "baked beans," a 
dish of which, naturally, she had never even heard, 
she went into the kitchen and locked the doors and 
threw herself on the floor and wept bitter tears. 
She was, however, a woman of much determina- 
tion, and baked beans being manifestly a part of 
her duty as a New England housewife, she mas- 
tered the beans as she did every other duty which 
came to her, and she served her husband and her 
children and her grandchildren in New England 
with an adaptive capacity which was only equaled 
by her devoted love. Your grandmother Crapo, 
my mother, told me much of her grandmother 
Toppan, who had deeply impressed her as a 
woman singularly gentle yet firm, lovable yet 
reserved, gracious yet proud. I fancy her as 
rather a Grande Dame who was infinitely sweet 
and gentle with those she loved. 

One episode in the life of this transplanted 
grandmother of yours I am able to give you from 
the notes of her nephew, Henry MacDonald : 

In 1824, when I was a boy, one day considerable 
company was at our house. A letter was handed to 
my mother from the Post-Office which she hastily 
opened and read standing in the parlor surrounded by 
the company. She became suddenly excited, screamed, 
dropped the letter and ran out of the room in agita- 
tion and tears. The company became very solicitous 
but it soon appeared that her agitation was not dis- 
tress but joy. The letter was from her brother Doctor 



ELIZABETH STANFORD 811 

Stanford and announced that he had an addition to his 
family of another daughter whom he had named 
Arianna, and also that his sister Elizabeth whom he 
had not seen since her marriage many years before 
had just arrived on a visit from Massachusetts, and he 
added "The lost is found, and the prodigal has come 
home, let us kill the fatted calf and eat and be merry." 
He requested the whole family to come immediately to 
his house. The next day my mother, father and family 
all went. It was a joyous assemblage. I distinctly 
remember the whole scene. My aunt Elizabeth re- 
turned home with us. She remained several months 
visiting various relatives. Cousin Esther Ann returned 
with her to Massachusetts and remained several months. 
After my father's death my mother made a visit to 
her sister at Newburyport. 

Although it is not the scheme of these notes to 
burden you with information about your innu- 
merable great great uncles and aunts, perhaps, 
in view of the paucity of my information about 
your earlier direct Maryland descent, you will 
not take it amiss if I tell you something of your 
Southern cousins with some of whom I have been 
more closely intimate than with many of those of 
the North. 

Richard Stanford, the son of Richard, a full 
brother of Elizabeth Toppan, was a few years 
older than his sister. He was born about 1768. 
If he indeed resembled the portrait of him which 
I possess he was an exceptionally beautiful per- 
son. The portrait of his sister, which has faced 
me three times a day at meals these many years, 
discloses no such evidence of beauty to me, 
although a day or two before I am writing these 
words an artist who saw the picture said, "How 
beautiful she was ! I wish I might paint a portrait 



S12 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

of such a woman." Richard went to college and 
afterwards became a teacher in a small college in 
North Carolina, and subsequently he studied and 
practiced law. He was most kind to his younger 
brothers, Clement and Algernon Sydney, giving 
them a classical education which otherwise they 
would hardly have achieved. He also furnished 
a home for his unmarried sister Arianna. He 
married, in North Carolina, the daughter of a dis- 
tinguished General of the Revolutionary War, 
whom he succeeded as a member of the fifth Con- 
gress, being elected in 1797, when he was twenty- 
nine years old. I find among my mother's papers 
a carefully prepared statement by Benjamin 
Perley Poore, an old Newburyport friend, and a 
famous newspaper correspondent in Washington 
in his day, in which Mr. Poore has noted every 
speech which Richard Stanford made during his 
long service in Congress. The subjects cover a 
wide range, although questions of foreign rela- 
tions seem to have more frequently engaged his 
attention than others. He was an intimate friend 
and staunch admirer of John Randolph of 
Roanoke. Although he was only forty-eight years 
old when he died, April 8, 1816, he was the oldest 
member in service of the House of Representa- 
tives. "Mr. Gaston announced the decease of 
the Honorable Richard Stanford of North Caro- 
lina, a member of this house; whereupon it was 
Resolved, unanimously that a committee be ap- 
pointed to take order for superintending the 
funeral. Messrs. Gaston, Yancey, Culpepper, 
Forney, Pickens, Clarke and Edwards were 



ELIZABETH STANFORD 813 

appointed the said committee. . . . Resolved : 
that the members of this House will testify their 
respect for the memory of Richard Stanford by 
wearing crepe on the left arm for one month." 
He was buried in the Congressional Cemetery in 
Washington. 

Richard Stanford by his first wife, whose name 
was Mabane, had a daughter who married a Mr. 
Stith, and whose descendants are now living in 
Mississippi, and another daughter, Arianna, who 
married a Mr. Graves, and whose oldest son was 
the notorious Richard Stanford Graves, who as 
Treasurer of the State of Mississippi defaulted 
and absconded. By his second wife, a Miss Moore, 
he had a number of children, whose descendants 
live in North Carolina and are known to some of 
the Stanford cousins whom I know. 

Clement Stanford, the brother of Elizabeth 
Stanford Toppan, with his brother, Algernon 
Sydney Stanford, lived on the old plantation in 
Maryland. Clement was a physician and in his 
family Henry MacDonald lived for some years 
and has left in his manuscript notes a most enter- 
taining and pleasant impression of this Southern 
home. For his uncle, Clement Stanford, he had 
an unbounded admiration. He describes him as 
tall and slender, always immaculately dressed, 
and with the finished manners of a high bred gen- 
tleman of the old school, scrupulously punctilious 
in matters of " honor" and of conduct, and 
respected and loved in the community. "His 
presence diffused perpetual cheerfulness and 
sunshine. His almost uniform habit was after 



814 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

supper to collect all his family around him and 
play on the violin or read some interesting book 
either history, or a novel, or poetry. ... I 
was never in a household where the laugh rang so 
merrily. This was particularly the case with 
Cousin Henrietta. Aunt Anna had a parrot who 
was quite a character. Among other accomplish- 
ments it learned to imitate Cousin Henrietta's 
laugh so that it was hard to tell which was laugh- 
ing." 

Algernon Sydney Stanford has always in my 
imagination resembled Harry Warrington in 
Thackeray's Virginians. In the Cambridge 
records I find his deposition taken in 1801, when 
he was about twenty years old, wherein he sub- 
scribes to a statement "that they were present at 
the house of Mr. Denwood Hicks in Newmarket 
on the seventh day of March, 1801, when a re- 
incounter took place between William Harding of 
Dorchester County and State of Maryland, and 
Henry C. Kennedy, in which reincounter the said 
Henry Kennedy bit off the lower part of said 
William Harding's right ear. And further the 
above deponent saith not." It is a pity that the 
deponent was so briefly matter of fact in his 
account, but the affair suggests some of the scenes 
of Harry Warrington's early life which Thack- 
eray has given us in less meagre style. Algernon 
as a young man was active in public affairs. In 
1805 he was Collector of the port of Vienna. On 
a journey to Cambridge, having in his possession 
a large amount of public money, he was waylaid 
and murdered. Clement Stanford, his brother, 



ELIZABETH STANFORD 815 

and William Russum, his half-brother, although 
under no legal obligation, made good the money 
stolen to the government, at an expense which 
seriously crippled their financial resources. 
Algernon Sydney had two daughters, Henrietta 
Elizabeth, who died when a young lady, and Sarah 
Ann, who must have been a singularly charming 
woman. She married her cousin, William P. 
Russum, and went with practically all of the 
Stanford family, including the MacDonalds, to 
Port Gibson, Claibourne County, Mississippi. 

Clement Stanford died in 1831. Soon after his 
death his widow, whose maiden name was Anna 
D'Shiell, and all his children went to Mississippi. 
His oldest child, Esther Ann, she who went to 
Newburyport with her aunt, Elizabeth Toppan, 
never married and died at her sister Mary 's home 
in Natchez, in 1834. Clement Stanford's daugh- 
ter, Mary Eunice Stanford, married William H. 
Chaille of Natchez. Clement Stanford 's daughter 
Henrietta, she of the ringing laugh, married 
George Watson of Claibourne County, Mississippi, 
leaving descendants. One of her sons, Clement 
Stanford Watson, (born 1831, died 1867), was a 
schoolmate of your grandfather, William W. 
Crapo, at Phillips Andover. He fought all 
through the War of the Rebellion as Captain of a 
Louisiana regiment. 

Doctor Clement Stanford's son Clement was a 
brilliant man whose dissipated habits and reck- 
less business ventures brought disaster upon all 
his kin. In a letter to your grandmother from 
Charles Lake, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of 



Slti CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Dorchester County. Maryland, written in 1882, 
be writes of this Clement Stanford: "He was a 
handsome little man, very dainty and particular 
about his dress, and very popular with his 
acquaintance. He was at one time employed as a 
clerk in Cambridge by a merchant, M. Le Compte. ' ' 
Of his history Doctor Stanford Chaille has left 
some interesting, although bitter, notes. He went 
with the family to Mississippi and induced his 
sister. Mary Eunice Chaille, after her husband's 
death, to take up a large plantation in Louisiana, 
and by his mismanagement of the same wasted 
her property. He joined Lopez in his expedi- 
tion for the emancipation of Cuba. In the war 
which ensued he behaved with conspicuous gal- 
lantry, was wounded, captured, tried by courtmar- 
tial and shot at the fort of Atares near Havana. 

Clement Stanford married Mary Patterson, 
widow of Osbourn Claibourne. He left no de- 
scendants. I have a very clear recollection of 
"Aunt Mary Stanford," the widow of Clement 
Stanford. She was a typical Southern woman, 
proud of her relation to all the ''first families" 
of the South. She was a woman of brilliant mind 
broadened by a long residence in Europe. Yet she 
had an almost venomous hatred of the Yankees. 
She was living in Washington when your grand- 
father Crapo was in Congress, and I remember 
calling on her with your grandfather and grand- 
mother and meeting her grandnephew Ralph 
Walsh, a boy several years younger than myself, 
who was then much interested in martial history. 
He told vour grandfather that the srreatest Gen- 



ELIZABETH STANFORD gjj 

eral in the history of the world was Robert E. 
Lee. Your grandfather tentatively suggested 
Caesar and Hannibal and Napoleon and Welling- 
ton and some others as possible competitors, but 
Aunt Mary abetted the boy in his loyalty to the 
hero of the South. To your grandfather's ques- 
tion as to whether young Walsh considered the 
President of the United States, at that time 
Ulysses S. Grant, a great General, Walsh admitted 
that he was a "lucky" General, but vehemently 
added that he was a ' ' bad man, ' ' which naturally 
pleased Aunt Mary immensely. 

Doctor Clement Stanford's daughter, Arianna 
Stanford, whose advent in this world in 1824, you 
may remember, was coincident with the arrival 
of her aunt Elizabeth Toppan at the old home in 
Vienna, married William Patterson of Claibourne 
County, Mississippi, a brother of her brother 
Clement's wife. They left descendants, one of 
whom, Jeannie Patterson, who married Doctor 
Ralph Walsh of Washington, was the mother of 
Ralph, the admirer of General Lee. Another, 
Mary Patterson, accompanied your grandmother 
on a memorable expedition to Vienna, the interest- 
ing record of which, written by this cousin Mary, 
I deeply regret I have mislaid. It contained much 
information about the Stanford family which 
would have been of invaluable assistance to me 
in preparing this note. It is doubtless in the 
house where I am writing, but an exhaustive 
search has failed to disclose its whereabouts. 

To conclude this note without reference to Stan- 
ford Emerson Chaille of New Orleans, the son 



818 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

of William H. Chaille and Mary Eunice Stanford, 
and the great grandson of Richard Stanford of 
Vienna, would be like presenting the play of 
Hamlet with Hamlet left out. He was a very im- 
portant person in your genealogical history. If 
he had not happened to be sent North when a boy 
to a Massachusetts guardian and by him sent to 
Phillips Andover Academy, he would not have 
been a chum of your grandfather William W. 
Crapo, and it would not have happened when he 
came with your grandfather to New Bedford one 
winter vacation that he looked up a distant cousin 
who was living there, Sarah Tappan, a grand- 
daughter of Elizabeth Stanford, and found her a 
very jolly sort of cousin and introduced your 
grandfather to her. And if that had not hap- 
pened where would you have been? Of "Cousin 
Stan" I shall hope to tell you more when, some 
day, I come to write the stories of your grand- 
father and grandmother Crapo. That will be a 
story of long ago to you I suppose, but to me it 
seems a very modern story and certainly not 
appropriately included in the history of your 
Comeoverers. 



PART IX 
TABLES OF DESCENT 



NOTE 

The following tables present the genealogical data on 
which the foregoing notes have been based. The sources 
from which the facts given were derived are many and 
various. Family bibles, memoranda made by my mother, 
correspondence with many persons, published genealogies 
of certain families, genealogical works of reference, pub- 
lie records, and all the various sources of information 
within the reach of an amateur who. like myself, is 
necessarily confined to a limited amount of leisure from 
other activities and unable to go far afield in the search. 
ft ■ evident that there are many omissions which a more 
extensive and painstaking research would have supplied. 
Ther- -7 doubtless, many, some probably serious, 
errors which a more expert investigator would have 
avoided. Therefore, in presenting the foregoing notes 
and the following tables. I do so with the cautious caveat 
which the old time bookkeeper invariably placed at the 
foot of his accounts— "a d- Q." errors and omis- 
sions excepts 

For many valuable suggestions leading to untraveled 
paths of research within the possible limits of my per- 
sonal exploration. I am indebted to Mr. William A. Wing, 
the Secretary of the Old Dartmouth Historical Society. 
To Mr. Luther Atwood of Salem. Mr. Lawrence Brainerd 
of Boston, Miss Jane Griffiths Keys of Baltimore, and 
some others. I am indebted for investigations in coverts 
difficult for me to beat in person. I am especially in- 
debted to Mr. William M. Emery, of New Bedford, for 
his unflagging zeal in assisting me both in the genealogi- 
cal research, wherein he achieved several important dis- 
coveries, and in the careful preparation of my notes for 
publication, as well as in the superintendence of the 
actual work of publication. 



Chapter I 
DESCENT 

OF 

WILLIAM WALLACE CEAPO 

OF DETROIT. MICHIGAN 
FROM 

HIS SIXTEEN 
GREAT GREAT GRANDPARENTS 



WILLIAM W. CRAPO, SECOND 393 



JESSE CRAPO, born Freetown May 22, 1781; died 
Dartmouth Jan. 11, 1831 ; married July 10, 1803, 

PHEBE HOWLAND, born Dartmouth, Mar. 29, 1785: 
died Dartmouth Dec. 22, 1870 ; had son 

Henry Howland Crapo, born Freetown May 24, 1804; 
Governor State of Michigan, 1864-1868 ; died Flint 
Mich., July 22, 1869; married Dartmouth June 9. 
1825, Mary Ann Slocum; had son 

William Wallace Crapo, born Dartmouth May 16, 1830 ; 
Member of Congress from Massachusetts, 1875-1883 ; 
married New Bedford Jan. 22, 1857, Sarah Davis 
Tappan; had son 

Stanford Tappan Crapo, born New Bedford June 13. 
1865; married Painesville, Ohio, Oct. 10, 1894, 
Emma Morley; had son 

William Wallace Crapo, born Saginaw, Mich., Aug. 2, 
1895. 



824 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



WILLIAMS SLOCUM. born Dartmouth July 23, 1761; 
died Dartmouth Feb. 23. 1S34: married Dartmouth 
Feb. 3. 1803, 

ANNE ALMY CHASE, born Dartmouth Sept. 6, 1775: 
died Dartmouth Mar. 22. 1S64: had daughter 

Mary Ann Sloeum. born Dartmouth May 21. 1S05 : died 
Flint. Mieh.. Feb. 21. 1S75 : married Henry How- 
land Crapo. ($€t pagt Si 



WILLIAM W. CRAPO, SECOND 



ABNER TOPPAX, born Xewburyport Apr. 6, 1764: 
died Xewburyport Dec. 31, 1836; married Jan. 30, 
1792, 

ELIZABETH STANFORD, born Vienna. Dorchester 
Co., Md., Mar. 1, 1770; died Xewburyport Apr. 12. 
1844; had son 

George Tappan, born Xewburyport Jan. 6, 1807 ; died 
New Bedford Aug. 15, 1857 ; married Xewburyport 
Xov. 10, 1829, Serena Davis; had daughter 

Sarah Davis Tappan, born Xewburyport Oct. 6, 1831 ; 
died Xew Bedford Dec. 13, 1893 ; married William 
Wallace Crapo. (See page S23) 



826 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



AARON DAVIS, born Newburyport Apr. 18, 1777 ; died 
Newburyport Aug. 25, 1829 ; married Dec. 20, 1801, 

SARAH MORSE SMITH, born Newburyport Mar. 11, 
1780 ; died Newburyport Oct. 24, 1869 ; had daughter 

Serena Davis, born Newburyport Jan. 17, 1808 ; died 
Hyde Park, Mass., Feb. 5, 1896; married George 
Tappan. (See page 825) 



WILLIAM W. CRAPO, SECOND 827 



THOMAS MORLEY, of Sennett, N. Y., born Mar. 20, 
1763 ; died Mar. 2, 1813 ; married Mar. 17, 1793, 

NELLY REMINGTON, born Aug. 16, 1775 ; died Sept. 
13, 1863 ; had son 

Albert Morley, of Brutus and Brockport, N. Y., and 
Painesville, Ohio, born Oct. 21, 1797 ; died July 12, 
1883 ; married Jan. 29, 1818, Esther Healey ; had son 

John Rufus Morley, born Mar. 10, 1829 ; lived Paines- 
ville, Ohio, Fort Scott, Kan., and Saginaw, Mich.; 
died Saginaw Feb. 14, 1912 ; married Sept. 14, 1853, 
Catherine Bidwell McVay; had daughter 

Emma Morley, born Jan. 6, 1872 ; married Oct. 10, 1894, 
Stanford Tappan Crapo. (See page 823) 



828 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



JESSE HE ALE Y, of Charlestown, N. H., born Nov. 3, 
1769 ; died June 1, 1853 ; married Apr. 26, 1792, 

DOLLY GLE ASON, a widow, born Mar. 18, 1755 ; died 
Sept. 25, 1837; had daughter 

Esther Healey, born Feb. 14, 1798 ; died Apr. 22, 1889 ; 
married Albert Morley. (See page 827) 



WILLIAM W. CRAPO, SECOND 829 



JACOB McVA Y, born 1779 ; died May 20, 1830 ; married 

MARY TAYLOR, born Apr. 15, 1791; died Sept. 23, 
1855; had son 

James Taylor McVay, of Pittsburg, Penn., born Apr. 9, 
1809; died Oct. 2, 1842; married Mar. 17, 1829, 
Catherine Williams Bidwell; had daughter 

Catherine Bidwell McVay, born Apr. 20, 1830; married 
John Rufus Morley, (See page 827) 



830 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



CHESTER BIDWELL, of Hartford, Conn., and War- 
ren, Ohio, born Apr. 18, 1790 ; died Mar. 12, 1865 ; 
married May 5, 1811, 

CATHERINE ENSIGN, of Hartford, Conn., born Oct. 
23, 1790 ; died June 17, 1865 ; had daughter 

Catherine Williams Bidwell, born Feb. 5, 1812; died 
July 27, 1842 ; married James Taylor McVay. (See 
page 829) 



Chapter II 
DESCENT 

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PHEBE HOWLAND 



843 



Phebe Howland 
Henry Howland 
David Howland 
Thomas Howland 
Henry Howland 
(from page 842) 



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844 



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Phebe Howland 
Rhoda Chase 
John Chase 
(from page 841) 







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PHEBE HOWLAND 



845 



Phebe Howland 
Rhoda Chase 
John Chase 
Nathaniel Chase 
"William Chase 
(from page 844) 



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Phebe Howland 
Henry Howland 
Lavinia Russell 
(from page 841) 



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PHEBE HOWLAND 



847 



Phebe Howland 
Henry Howland 
Lavinia Russell 
Paul Russell 
James Russell 
(from page 846) 



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Phebe Howland 
Rhoda Chase 
Lovina Hammond 
(from page 841) 







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PHEBE HOWLAND 



849 



Phebe Howland 
Rhoda Chase 
Lovina Hammond 
Thomas Hammond 
Samuel Hammond 
(from page 848) 









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850 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Phebe Howland 
Henry Howland 
David Howland 
Content Howland 
Nathaniel Howland 
(from page 842) 



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PHEBE HOWLAND 



851 



Phebe Howland 
Henry Howland 
David Howland 
Thomas Howland 
Deborah Briggs 
(from page 842) 









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852 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Phebe Howl and 
Henry Howl and 
David Howland 
Content Howland 
Rose Allen 
(from page 842) 



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PHEBE HOWLAND 



853 



Phebe Howland 
Rhoda Chase 
John Chase 
Abigail Sherman 
John Sherman 
(from page 844) 





1644 
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854 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Phebe Howland 
Rhoda Chase 
John Chase 
Abigail Sherman 
Sarah Spooner 
(from page 844) 



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PHEBE HOWLAND 



855 



Phebe Howland 
Henry Howland 
Lavinia Russell 
Paul Russell 
Rebecca Howland 
(from page 846) 







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Phebe Howland 
Henry Howland 
Lavinia Russell 
Rebecca Ricketson 
Jonathan Ricketson 
(from page 846) 



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PHEBB HOWLAND 



857 



Phebe Howland 
Henry Howland 
Lavinia Russell 
Eebecea Ricketson 
Abigail Howland 
(from page 846) 



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858 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Phebe Howland 
Rhoda Chase 
Lovina Hammond 
Thomas Hammond 
Mary Hathaway 
(from page 848) 



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PHEBE HOWLAND 



859 



Phebe Howland 
Henry Howland 
Lavinia Russell 
Rebecca Rieketson 
Jonathan Rieketson 
Elizabeth Mott 
Adam Mott 
(from page 856) 





co co ie 


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•-3 



Chapter IV 
DESCENT 

OF 

WILLIAMS SLOCUM 



WILLIAMS SLOCUM 



863 



T— I T— I OS 

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<M 00 

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864 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Williams Slocum 
Peleg Slocum 
Peleg Slocum 
(from page 863) 



T3 









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WILLIAMS SLOCUM 



865 



Williams Slocum 
Peleg Slocum 
Peleg Slocum 
Mary Holder 
Mary Scott 
(from page 864) 



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Oct. 17, 1 
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866 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Williams Slocum 
Elizabeth Brown 
William Brown 
(from page 863) 









OS 








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WILLIAMS SLOCUM 



867 



Williams Slocum 
Peleg Slocum 
Rebecca Bennett 
(from page 863) 



Eh 
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868 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Williams Slocum 
Elizabeth Brown 
Hannah Earle 
(from page 863) 



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^ 



Chapter V 
DESCENT 

OF 

ANNE ALMY CHASE 



ANNE ALMY CHASE 



871 




CXI o 




CO 


ua 




1- 


r>- 


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872 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Anne Almy Chase 
Benjamin Chase 
Nathan Chase 
(from page 871) 



3* 
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Si 

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of 



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t- Ph 

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th 


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r© "8 



ANNE ALMY CHASE 



873 



Anne Almy Chase 
Mary Almy 
Job Almy 
(from page 871) 



re 



o 



t- 

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>> 


CC 
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to) n 



-o *S 



874 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Anne Almy Chase 
Benjamin Chase 
Elizabeth Shaw 
(from page 871) 



to to 

GO CO 
CO CO 



en 

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CO 



SI 






— 



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1=1 

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ANNE ALMY CHASE 



875 



Anne Almy Chase 
Mary Almy 
Ann Slocum 
(from page 871) 



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wOQ 



876 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Anne Almy Chase 
Benjamin Chase 
Nathan Chase 
Amey Borden 
John Borden 
(from page 872) 











O 










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co 










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ANNE ALMY CHASE 



877 



Anne Alray Chase 
Benjamin Chase 
Nathan Chase 
Amey Borden 
Mary Earle 
(from page 872) 



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878 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Anne Almy Chase 
Mary Almy 
Job Almy 
Job Almy 
William Almy 
(from page 873) 




d 



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ANNE ALMY CHASE 



879 



Anne Almy Chase 
Mary Almy 
Job Almy 
Job Almy 
Deborah Cook 
(from page 873) 



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880 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Anne Almy Chase 
Mary Almy 
Job Almy 
Lydia Tillinghast 
Joseph Tillinghast 
(from page 873) 



o 
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ANNE ALMY CHASE 



881 



Anne Almy Chase 
Mary Almy 
Job Almy 
Lydia Tillinghast 
Freelove Stafford 
(from page 873) 



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Is . . 



882 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Anne Almy Chase 
Mary Almy 
Ann Sloeum 
Deborah Smith 
Deliverance Smith 
(from page 875) 



i 

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ANNE ALMY CHASE 



883 



Anne Almy Chase 
Mary Almy 
Ann Slocum 
Deborah Smith 
Mary Tripp 
(from page 875) 



CO 



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rO^S 



Chapter VI 
DESCENT 

OF 

ABNER TOPPAN 



ABNER TOPPAN 



887 



CM 

OS 



H 






15, 1721 
2, 1811 
7, 1743 


o3 S 

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t/2 


Feb. 
Nov. 
Sept. 



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co oo c- 




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U 
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. 05 


, 1685 
, 1713 

890) 


5tD § 

si 


Apr. 16 
Oct. 21 
to page 



-21 

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888 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Abner Toppan 
Edward Toppan 
Abraham Toppan 
(from page 887) 



CO 

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ABNER TOPPAN 



889 



Abner Toppan 
Sarah Bailey 
Joshua Bailey 
(from page 887) 



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890 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Abner Toppan 
Edward Toppan 
Esther Wigglesworth 
(from page 887) 



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ABNER TOPPAN 



891 



Abner Toppan 
Sarah Bailey 
Sarah Coffin 
(from page 887) 









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892 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Abner Toppan 
Edward Toppan 
Abraham Toppan 
Hannah Sewall 
Henry Sewall 
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893 



Abner Toppan 
Edward Toppan 
Abraham Toppan 
Hannah Sewall 
Jane Dunimer 
(from page 888) 



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894 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Abner Toppan 
Sarah Bailey 
Joshua Bailey 
Sarah Emery 
John Emery 
(from page 889) 









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ABNER TOPPAN 



895 



Abner Toppan 
Sarah Bailey 
Joshua Bailey- 
Sarah Emery- 
Mary Webster 
(from page 889) 






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896 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Aimer Toppan 
Sarah Bailey 
Sarah Coffin 
Stephen Coffin 
Tristram Coffin 
(from page 891) 



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ABNER TOPPAN 



897 



Abner Toppan 
Sarah Bailey 
Sarah Coffin 
Stephen Coffin 
Judith Greenleaf 
(from page 891) 



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898 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Abner Toppan 
Sarah Bailey 
Sarah Coffin 
Sarah Atkinson 
John Atkinson 
(from page 891) 



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•o *« 



Chapter VII 
DESCENT 

OF 

AARON DAVIS 



AARON DAVIS 



901 



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902 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Aaron Davis 
Aaron Davis 
Aaron Davis 
(from page 901) 



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G, O _ & 



AARON DAVIS 



903 



Aaron Davis 
Mary Knapp 
Samuel Knapp 
(from page 901) 



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904 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Aaron Davis 
Aaron Davis 
Phebe Day 
(from page 901) 



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905 



Aaron Davis 
Aaron Davis 
Aaron Davis 
Mary Haskell 
William Haskell 
(from page 902) 



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906 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Aaron Davis 
Aaron Davis 
Aaron Davis 
Mary Haskell 
Mary Brown 
(from page 902) 







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AARON DAVIS 



907 



Aaron Davis 
Mary Knapp 
Samuel Knapp 
Ann Eaton 
Benoni Eaton 
(from page 903} 



> 



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908 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Aaron Davis 
Aaron Davis 
Phebe Day- 
Timothy Day 
Phebe Wilde 
(from page 904) 



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a-^^s 



Chaptee VIII 
DESCENT 

OF 

SARAH MORSE SMITH 



SARAH MORSE SMITH 



911 





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July 

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912 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Nathaniel Smith 
Thomas Smith 
(from page 911) 



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SARAH MORSE SMITH 



913 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Judith Morse 
James Ord way Morse 
(from page 911) 



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914 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Nathaniel Smith 
Sarah Newman 
(from page 911) 



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SARAH MORSE SMITH 



915 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Judith Morse 
Judith Carr 
(from page 911) 



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if Tho 
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6. Apr. 

d. June 

s. of Geor 

1599, d. A 

and wife 

Oliver (d. ] 



916 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Nathaniel Smith 
Thomas Smith 
Martha Noyes 
Timothy Noyes 
(from page 912) 



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SARAH MORSE SMITH 



917 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Nathaniel Smith 
Thomas Smith 
Martha Noyes 
Mary Knight 
(from page 912) 






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918 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Judith Morse 
James Ordvvay Morse 
Caleh Morse 
Anthony Morse 
(from page 913) 



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SARAH MORSE SMITH 



010 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Judith Morse 
James Ordway Morse 
Sarah Ordway 
James Ordway 
(from page 913) 




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920 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Judith Morse 
James Ordway Morse 
Caleb Morse 
Judith Moody 
(from page 913) 



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SARAH MORSE SMITH 



921 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Judith Morse 
James Ordway Morse 
Sarah Ordway 
Judith Bailey 
(from page 913) 






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922 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Nathaniel Smith 
Sarali Newman 
Thomas Newman 
Thomas Newman 
(from page 914) 



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SARAH MORSE SMITH 



923 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Nathaniel Smith 
Sarah Newman 
Thomas Newman 
Rose Spark 
(from page 914) 



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Nov. 




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924 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Nathaniel Smith 
Sarali Newman 
Elizabeth Phillips 
William Phillips 
(from page 914) 



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SARAH MORSE SMITH 



925 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Nathaniel Smith 
Sarah Newman 
Elizabeth Phillips 
Deborah Long 
(from page 914) 






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926 



CERTAIN COMEOVERBRS 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Judith Morse 
Judith Carr 
Elizabeth Chase 
Moses Chase 
(from page 915) 



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SARAH MORSE SMITH 



927 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Judith Morse 
James Ordway Morse 
Caleb Morse 
Anthony Morse 
Hannah Kimball 
Thomas Kimball 
(from page 918) 



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CO CD CO 



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928 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Sarah Morse Smith 
Judith Morse 
James Ordway Morse 
Caleb Morse 
Judith Moody 
Caleb Moody 
Judith Bradbury 
(from page 920) 



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<M O CO 
CO t~ CO 



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P 
ft 

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ft;s 

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1574 
1650 


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Tymond Bra 
Vicken Bonant, 

ap. May 16, 

I. 







Chapter IX 
DESCENDANTS 

OF 

JESSE CRAPO 

AND 

PHEBE HOWLAND 



NOTE 

The following tables of the descendants of 

Jesse Crapo and Phebe Howland, 
Williams Slocum and Anne Almy Chase, 
Abner Toppan and Elizabeth Stanford, 
Aaron Davis and Sarah Morse Smith, 

do not purport even to approach completeness. Many 
branches are totally lacking and in the branches given 
there are many omissions and, doubtless, many errors. 
The tables are here given simply to preserve such data 
as I have in my possession. 



CRAPO DESCENDANTS 931 

Children of 
Jesse Crapo and Phebe Howland 

HENRY HOWLAND CRAPO, born Freetown, May 24, 
1804; married June 9, 1825, Mary Ann Slocum; 
died Flint, Mich., July 22, 1869. Issue. (See page 
932.) 

DAVID CRAPO, born Dartmouth Sept. 16, 1808 ; mar- 
ried Oct. 9, 1831, Marcia Sowle of Westport Har- 
bor; removed to Ohio, later to Michigan; died 
Odessa, Mich., Jan. 1879. Issue. (See page 946.) 

JOSEPH CRAPO, born Dartmouth Apr. 12, 1812; mar- 
ried Nov. 29, 1832, Sarah Sisson (daughter of Allen 
and Elizabeth Sisson) ; lived in Dartmouth and 
there died Oct. 7, 1892. Issue. (See page 947.) 

PHEBE ANN CRAPO, born Dartmouth Mar. 6, 1817 ; 
married Feb. 3, 1842, Sylvester Snow of New Bed- 
ford (born Aug. 10, 1815, died Oct. 10, 1884) ; died 
June 13, 1894. Issue. (See page 948.) 



932 CERTAIN COMBOVERERS 

Children of 

Henry Howland Crapo and Mary Ann Slocum 

(From page 931) 

MARY ANN CRAPO, born Dartmouth Nov. 6, 1827; 
married April 23, 1857, Rev. John Orrell (died 
Aug. 4, 1876) ; died Flint, Mich., Dee. 15, 1903. 
Issue. (See page 934.) 

WILLIAM WALLACE CRAPO, born Dartmouth May 
16, 1830 ; married New Bedford Jan. 22, 1857, Sarah 
Davis Tappan (died Dec. 13, 1893) ; living in New 
Bedford. Issue. (See page 935.) 

REBECCA FOLGER CRAPO, born New Bedford Mar. 
26, 1833 ; married Nov. 29, 1855, William C. Durant; 
living in Flint, Mich. Issue. (See page 936.) 

SARAH BUSH CRAPO, born New Bedford Jan. 14, 
1835; married Oct. 4, 1860, Alphonso Ross; living 
in Boston. Issue. (See page 937.) 

LUCY ANNA CRAPO, born New Bedford Nov. 8, 1836 ; 
married Dec. 15, 1858, Humphrey Henry Howland 
Crapo Smith; living in Detroit, Mich. Issue. 
(See page 938.) 

RHODA MACOMBER CRAPO, born New Bedford 
July 29, 1838 ; married May 18, 1865, Dr. James C. 
Willson ; died May 8, 1907. Issue. (See page 939.) 

HENRIETTA PELL CRAPO, born New Bedford July 
19, 1840; married June 19, 1865, Ferris F. Hyatt; 
died Hyattville, N. Y., April 29, 1866. No issue. 






CRAPO DESCENDANTS 933 



LYDIA SHERMAN CRAPO, born New Bedford June 
19, 1843; died Flint, Mich., Sept. 14, 1861. Un- 
married. 

EMMA ELIZA CHASE CRAPO, born New Bedford 
June 1, 1845; married Nov. 29, 1866, Harlan Page 
Cristy; died Detroit, Mich., Apr. 11, 1897. Issue. 
(See page 940.) 

WILHELMINA HELENA CRAPO, born New Bedford 
Apr. 6, 1849; married Mar. 15, 1876, Charles 
Warren Clifford, son of Governor John Henry 
Clifford of Massachusetts; died New Bedford Aug. 
23, 1909. No issue. 



934 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

Mary Ann Crapo and John Orrell 

(From page 932) 

MARY FLORENCE ORRELL, born Sandwich, Mass., 
May 12, 1858 ; married Aug. 29, 1877, Frank Eberly 
Willett of Flint, Mich.; living in Flint. Issue. 
(See page 941.) 

ESTHER MORRIS ORRELL, born Sandwich, Mass., 
Sept. 14, 1860; married Oct. 12, 1892, David 
Mackenzie of Muskegon, Mich. ; living in Detroit, 
Mich. No issue. 

JOHN WALLACE ORRELL, born Sandwich, Mass., 
Dec. 14, 1861 ; died Aug. 5, 1862. 

LUCY CRAPO ORRELL, born Flint, Mich., Sept. 16, 
1863 ; married June 3, 1890, Arthur Jerome Eddy 
of Flint; living in Pasadena, Cal. Issue. (See 
page 941.) 

LIZZIE FRENCH ORRELL, born Flint, Mich., Aug. 
18, 1865 ; died Aug. 7, 1867. 

WILLIAM CRAPO ORRELL, born Flint, Mich., Dec. 
30, 1868; married Oct. 29, 1895, Florence Whaley 
of Flint; living in Detroit, Mich. Issue. (See 
page 941.) 



CRAPO DESCENDANTS 935 

Children op 

William Wallace Crapo and Sarah Davis Tappan 

(From page 932) 

HENRY HOWLAND CRAPO, born New Bedford Jan. 
31, 1862 ; married Nov. 20, 1894, Carolina Maria del 
Carmen Caldwell (born Valparaiso, Chili, Nov. 28, 
1863; died Aiken, S. C, Mar. 5, 1901) ; living in 
New Bedford. No issue. 

GEORGE TAPPAN CRAPO, born New Bedford Mar. 
16, 1864; died Sept. 12, 1865. 

STANFORD TAPPAN CRAPO, born New Bedford 
June 13, 1865 ; married Oct. 10, 1894, Emma Morley 
of Painesville, Ohio ; living in Detroit. Issue. (See 
page 942.) 

ANNA ALMY CRAPO, born New Bedford Nov. 10, 
1866 ; died Apr. 27, 1867. 



936 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Rebecca Folger Crapo and William C. Durant 

(From page 932) 

REBECCA CRAPO DURANT, born Boston Nov. 24, 
1857 ; married Dec. 14, 1876, John Leverett Willett 
of Flint, Mich.; died May 9, 1903. Issue. (See 
page 943.) 

WILLIAM CRAPO DURANT, born Boston Dec. 8, 
1861; married June 17, 1885, Clara Pitt of Flint, 
Mich. ; living in Flint. Issue. ( See page 943.) 



CRAPO DESCENDANTS 937 

Children of 

Sarah Bush Crapo and Alphonso Ross 

(From page 932) 

MARY CRAPO ROSS, born Boston Aug. 28, 1861; 
died Nov. 13, 1882. Unmarried. 

SARAH CRAPO ROSS, born Boston Dee. 16, 1867; 
married Apr. 28, 1892, Charles Woodbury Whittier 
of Boston; living in Milton, Mass. Issue. (See 
page 944.) 



938 CERTAIN COMEOVBRERS 

Children of 

Lucy Anna Crapo and H. H. H. C. Smith 

(From page 932) 

HENRIETTA CRAPO SMITH, born Detroit, Mich., 
July 4, 1862; living in Detroit. Unmarried. 

CRAPO CORNELL SMITH, born Detroit May 22, 
1868; living in Detroit. Unmarried. 



CRAPO DESCENDANTS 939 

Child of 

Rhoda Macomber Crapo and James C. Willson 

(From page 932) 

GEORGE WILLSON, born Flint, Mich., Mar. 28, 1871 ; 
married Sept. 4, 1894, Frances A. Spencer of Flint ; 
living in Flint. Issue. (See page 944.) 



940 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Emma Eliza Chase Crapo and Harlan P. Cristy 

From page 933) 

BERTHA CRISTY. born Flint. Mich.. Dec. 3. 1869; 
married (1 Sept. 21. 1594. Martin S. Smith of De- 
troit .died July 9. 1901 : 2 Apr. 25. 1904. Baron 
Alexde Freederieksz of Russia : living in Paris. 
France. Issue. >-:•: page 94.5.) 

JAMES CRAPO CRISTY. horn Flint. Mich.. Feb. B f 
1574: married Feb. 12. 1903. Laura Hart: living 
in Detroit. Mich. Issue. (See page 9= ' 

BONNIE CRAPO CRISTY. born Flint. Mich.. Aug. 22. 
1576: married Oct. 21. 1898. Thomas Henry West. 
Jr.. of St. Louis. Mo. ; living in Clayton. Mo. Issue. 
9 t page 94 5 J 






CRAPO DESCENDANTS 941 

Children of 

Mary Florence Orrell and Frank E. Willett 

(From page 934) 

MARY KUYKENDALL WILLETT, born Flint, Mich., 
Apr. 15, 1886; married Oct. 1, 1908, Jabez Guy 
Blackington of Flint; living in Flint. Daughter, 
Esther Willett, born Oct. 31, 1911. 

GRETCHEN WILLETT, born Flint, Mich., Dec. 12, 
1888 ; died Nov. 22, 1905. 

Child of 

Lucy Crapo Orrell and Arthur J. Eddy 

(From page 934) 

JEROME ORRELL EDDY, born May 12, 1891 ; living 
in Pasadena, Cal. 

Child of 

William Crapo Orrell and Florence Whaley 

(From page 934) 

ROBERT WHALEY ORRELL, born Flint, Mich., Aug. 
24, 1898 ; living in Detroit, Mich. 



942 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

Stanford Tappan Crapo and Emma Morlby 

(From page 935) 

WILLIAM WALLACE CRAPO, born Saginaw, Mich., 
Aug. 2, 1895 ; living in Detroit, Mich. 

CATHERINE CRAPO, born Saginaw, Mich., July 23, 
1897 ; living in Detroit, Mich. 



CRAPO DESCENDANTS 943 

Children of 

Rebecca Crapo Durant and John L. Willett 

(From page 936) 

EMMA CRISTY WILLETT, born Flint, Mich., Apr. 10, 
1878 ; married May 29, 1901, Samuel Sidney Stewart 
of Flint; living in Flint. Son, Samuel Sidney 
Stewart, born Aug. 12, 1902. 

WALLACE ROSS WILLETT, born Flint, Mich., Sept. 
12, 1880; married Sept. 30, 1909, Elizabeth May 
Kennedey; living in Detroit, Mich. 

ANNA WILLSON WILLETT, born Flint, Mich., Dec. 2, 
1883; married Nov. 16, 1905, Hal. Wesley Alger; 
living in Winnipeg, Canada. Daughter, Elizabeth 
Jane Alger, born Chicago, Nov. 20, 1909. 



Children of 

William Crapo Durant and Clara Pitt 

(From page 936) 

MARGERY PITT DURANT, born Flint, Mich., May 24, 
1887; married Apr. 18, 1906, Dr. Edwin R. 
Campbell; living in Flint. Children, William 
Durant Campbell, born Mar. 18, 1907 ; Margery 
Edwina Campbell, born Nov. 12, 1909. 

RUSSELL CLIFFORD DURANT, born Flint, Mich., 
Nov. 26, 1890 ; living in Flint. 



944 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

Sarah Crapo Ross and Charles W. Whittier 

(From page 937) 

ROSS WHITTIER, born Aug. 12, 1893. 

RUTH WHITTIER, born Sept. 21, 1895. 

CATHERINE WHITTIER, born Apr. 8, 1897. 

CHARLES W. WHITTIER, born July 12, 1898. 

NATHANIEL WHITTIER, born Jan. 26, 1904. 
All living in Milton, Mass. 

Children of 

George Willson and Frances A. Spencer 

(From page 939) 

FRANCES SPENCER WILLSON, born Dec. 13, 1895. 

JAMES CURTIS WILLSON, born Nov. 2, 1900. 

RODERICK WILLSON, born May 8, 1907. 
All living in Flint, Mich. 



CRAPO DESCENDANTS 945 

Child of 

Bertha Cristy and Baron Alexde Freedericksz 

(From page 940) 

ALEXANDER HARLAN FREEDERICKSZ, born 
Paris June 15, 1906 ; died Dec. 4, 1906. 

Children of 

James Crapo Cristy and Laura Hart 

(From page 940) 

MARY HART' CRISTY, born Aug. 29, 1906. 

HARLAN PAGE CRISTY, born Dec. 4, 1907. 

DAVID CRISTY, born Sept. 22, 1911. 
All living in Detroit. 

Children of 

Minnie Crapo Cristy and Thomas H. West, Jr. 

(From page 940) 

THOMAS HENRY WEST, born Mar. 6, 1900. 

WILHELMINA CRAPO WEST, born Mar. 15, 1902. 

JOHN CRISTY WEST, born Jan. 12, 1908. 

MARY ANN WEST, born Aug. 26, 1909. 
All living in St. Louis. 



946 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 
David Crapo and Marcia Sowle 

[Compiled by George L. Randall] 
(From page 931) 

SOPHIA CRAPO, born May 25, 1834; married (1) Oct. 
28, 1855, James Swigart; (2) Sept. 28, 1865, Rev. 
Myron Tupper; died Mar. 26, 1909. Issue. 

ANN M. CRAPO, born May 23, 1835 ; married Dec. 30, 
1855, Andrew M. Ralston ; died June 7, 1863. Issue. 

HANNAH CRAPO, born Nov. 14, 1836 ; married Jan. 8, 
1854, Daniel Unger; died Jan. 15, 1893. Issue. 

JANE CRAPO, born Dec. 28, 1839; married Aug. 10, 
1862, Wallace Lovewell ; died July 13, 1901. Issue. 

MARY CRAPO, born May 4, 1842; married Aug. 1863, 
William C. Miilison; died Aug. 18, 1868. Issue. 

JESSE CRAPO, born Apr. 19, 1844; died Fair Oaks, 
Va., June 10, 1863. Unmarried. 

EGARA CRAPO, born Aug. 14, 1846 ; married Feb. 27, 
1861, John Shafer. Issue. 

THOMAS CRAPO, born Oct. 8, 1848 ; married Sept. 28, 
1867, Mrs. Anna C. Klise of Sandusky, Ohio (died 
July 20, 1886). Issue. 

ALMA CRAPO, born June 30, 1850; married Feb. 27, 
1867, Hugh J. Potts. Issue. 

MARTHA CRAPO, born Mar. 28, 1852; married Jan. 
20, 1870, Henry Van Houten. Issue. 



CRAPO DESCENDANTS 947 

Children of 
Joseph Crapo and Sarah Sisson 

[Compiled by George L. Randall] 
(From page 931) 

ELIZABETH CRAPO, born Sept. 29, 1833; married 
Dartmouth Aug. 16, 1853, Peleg C. Wilcox; died 
New Bedford Oct. 4, 1906. Issue. 

SARAH CRAPO, born Mar. 1, 1835; married Oct. 17, 
1853, Isaac W. Grinnell of New Bedford ; died New 
Bedford Aug. 5, 1908. 

WILLIAM H. CRAPO, born Jan. 21, 1837; married (1) 
1S65, Phebe A. Carlysle of Portland, Ore. ; (2) Sept., 
1867, Celia A. Warren of Flint, Mich.; (3) Dec. 8, 
1883, Helen Webster Ellis of New Bedford; (4) Jan. 
15, 1894, Sarah Reynolds of Boston. Issue. 

JESSE CRAPO, born Sept. 15, 1841; married 1865, 
Anne Lamb of San Francisco, Cal. ; died San Jose, 
Cal., July 2, 1895. Issue. 

PHEBE CRAPO, born Sept. 10, 1843; married Dart- 
mouth Feb. 16, 1865, Joseph Lobo; living in New 
Bedford. Issue. 

ALBERT ALLEN CRAPO, born Oct. 25, 1846 ; married 
July 30, 1874, Emma F. McCrary of Dartmouth. 



948 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Children of 

Phebe Ann Crapo and Sylvester Snow 

(From page 931) 

DAVID SYLVESTER SNOW, born New Bedford July 
30, 1843 ; married Jan. 1, 1892, Ellen M. Rilley of 
New Bedford ; died Mar. 21, 1908. Daughter, Mary 
A. H. Snow, born Dec. 6, 1892. 

EMMA ADELAIDE SNOW, born New Bedford, June 

28, 1846 ; living in New Bedford. Unmarried. 

CHARLES HENRY SNOW, born New Bedford, Aug. 

29, 1849 ; living in New Bedford. Unmarried. 



Chapter X 
DESCENDANTS 

OF 

WILLIAMS SLOCUM 

AND 

ANNE ALMY CHASE 



SLOCUM DESCENDANTS 951 

Children of 
Williams Slocum and Anne Almy Chase 

MARY ANN SLOCUM, born Dartmouth May 21, 1805 ; 
married June 9, 1825, Henry Howland Crapo of 
Dartmouth ; died Flint, Mich., Feb. 21, 1875. Issue. 
(See page 932.) 

GEORGE FOLGER SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Oct. 1, 
1806 ; married June 18, 1825, Jane Nicholson Ward 
of Newport (daughter of Nicholson Ward and 
Elizabeth, daughter of John Sanf ord ; born July 28, 
1798; died Mar. 6, 1863) ; died Dartmouth Dec. 10, 
1887. Issue. (See page 952.) 

BENJAMIN CHASE SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Aug. 
18, 1809 ; died Dartmouth Dec. 28, 1880. Unmarried. 

JANE BROWN SLOCUM, born Dartmouth July 20, 
1811 ; died Dartmouth Feb. 9, 1902. Unmarried. 



952 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

George Folger Slocum and Jane Nicholson Ward 

(From page 951) 

ANN ELIZABETH SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Dec. 
13, 1829 ; married Apr. 3, 1849, Christopher Slocum 
(son of Abner Slocum and Deborah, daughter of 
Ephraim and Susan Wilcox Gifford of Westport; 
born Chilmark, Marthas Vineyard, Nov. 4, 1823; 
died Dartmouth Aug. 10, 1902) ; died Dartmouth 
Mar. 14, 1905. Issue. (See page 953.) 

AERIA SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Dec. 14, 1833; 
married (1) Feb. 4, 1856, Giles S. Almy (son of 
Pardon and Abby Almy; born Oct. 30, 1827; died 
Feb. 5, 1857) ; (2) Apr. 13, 1866, Daniel Baker 
of Dartmouth (son of Daniel and Sarah Baker; 
born Dec. 16, 1802; died June 3, 1875) ; died Dart- 
mouth Mar. 11, 1904. Issue. (See page 954.) 

HENRY HOWLAND SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Feb. 
22, 1835; married Sept. 11, 1860, Sarah Francis 
Manchester of Dartmouth (daughter of Allen Tripp 
Manchester and Sarah Bosworth Barstow of West- 
port; born Feb. 11, 1837; died March 21, 1910); 
living in Scituate, R. I. Issue. (See page 955.) 

SILAS PERRY SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Feb. 15, 
1837; married Oct. 25, 1869, Helen Eggleston of 
Seneca Falls, N. Y. (daughter of James Eggleston; 
born June 14, 1850) ; living in Flint, Mich. Issue. 
(See page 955.) 

WILLIAMS SLOCUM, born Dartmouth June 4, 1839; 
died Sept. 17, 1854. 



SLOCUM DESCENDANTS 953 

Children of 

Ann Elizabeth Slocum and Christopher Slocum 

(From page 952) 

ABNER GEORGE SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Dec. 13, 
1849 ; married Sept., 1873, Maria Louise Jencks 
(daughter of Charles Jencks and Ann, daughter of 
Weston Gifford) ; died July 27, 1886. No issue. 

SYLVIA ANN SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Aug. 20, 
1852 ; died July 13, 1855. 

JABEZ HOWLAND SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Sept. 
21, I860; married Sept. 21, 1903, Sarah Jane Read 
(daughter of Samuel D. Read of Newport, R. I., the 
son of Samuel M. Read and Elizabeth Dickinson, 
and of Jane Grey Allen, the daughter of Thomas 
J. Allen of Buckfield, Maine, and Nancy Cole of 
Plymouth, Mass.; born Nov. 26, 1872); living in 
Dartmouth. Issue. (See page 956.) 



954 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Aeria Slocum and Giles S. Almy and Daniel Baker 

(From page 952) 

GILES PARDON ALMY, born Dec. 14, 1856 ; living in 
Dartmouth. 

DANIEL WEBSTER BAKER, born Dartmouth Aug. 
7, 1867 ; married Nov. 15, 1892, Grace Covill Gifford 
(daughter of James Gifford and Adaline H. Beetle 
of New Bedford, born May 18, 1869 ; died Apr. 6, 
1901) ; living in New Bedford. Issue. (See 
page 957.) 

EDWARD YOUNG BAKER, born Dartmouth Mar. 28, 
1869; married Oct. 27, 1895, Marcia Clifton Davis 
(daughter of Jethro C. Davis and Emma C. Holmes ; 
born Dec. 24, 1873) ; living in New Bedford. Issue. 
(See page 957.) 



SLOCUM DESCENDANTS 955 

Children of 

Henry Howland Slocum and Sarah F. Manchester 

(From page 952) 

JENNIE FRANCIS SLOCUM, born Warwick, R. I., 
Mar. 11, 1868; married Oct. 22, 1888, Albert F. 
Leach (son of George W. Leach and Abby Ann 
Chappee Fisher; born Jan. 26, 1863); living in 
Rhode Island. Issue. (See page 958.) 

SARAH ISABELLE SLOCUM, born Warwick, R. I., 
Nov. 22, 1872. 

Children op 

Silas Perry Slocum and Helen Eggleston 

(From page 952) 

JESSIE HARRIET SLOCUM, bom Flint, Mich., Aug. 
15, 1873. 

ROY WILLIAM SLOCUM, born Flint, Mich., Jan. 6, 
1884 ; died Aug. 20, 1884. 

JAMES RAY SLOCUM, born Flint, Mich., July 15, 

1887. 



956 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Jabez Howland Slocum and Sarah Jane Read 

(From page 953) 

MABELLE GREY SLOCUM, born Dartmouth June 
15, 1904. 

HENRY HOWLAND SLOCUM, born Dartmouth July 
27, 1905. 

RUTH ANN SLOCUM, born Dartmouth Aug. 15, 1908. 



SLOCUM DESCENDANTS 957 

Children of 

Daniel Webster Baker and Grace C. Gifford 

(From page 954) 

ERLAND WEBSTER BAKER, born New Bedford 
Aug. 22, 1893 ; died Feb., 1894. 

STANLEY GIFFORD BAKER, born New Bedford 
July 6, 1895. 

ELIZABETH HOWLAND BAKER, born New Bed- 
ford, Jan. 1, 1901. 

Children of 
Edward Young Baker and Marcia C. Davis 

(From page 954) 

GILMAN E. BAKER, born New Bedford Nov. 15, 1898 ; 
died Dec. 25, 1898. 

EDITH MAY BAKER, born New Bedford Sept. 28, 
1900. 



958 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Jennie Francis Slocum and Albert F. Leach 

(From page 955) 

MARY BARSTOW LEACH, born July 25, 1889. 

ELSIE ANNIE LEACH, born Dec. 9, 1894. 

ETHEL FRANCIS LEACH, born Feb. 25, 1896. 

SARAH MANCHESTER LEACH, born Apr. 2, 1900. 






Chapter XI 
DESCENDANTS 

OP 

ABNER TOPPAN 

AND 

ELIZABETH STANFORD 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 961 

Children of 
Abner Toppan and Elizabeth Stanford 

SOPHIA TOPPAN, born Easton, Md., Feb. 6, 1792; 
married Mar. 29, 1810, Oliver Crocker of New Bed- 
ford (born Aug. 3, 1788; died May 23, 1878) ; died 
New Bedford July 17, 1840. Issue. (See page 
962.) 

WILLIAM TOPPAN, born Newburyport July 15, 1795 ; 
died young. 

ABNER TOPPAN, born Newburyport June 21, 1797; 
married June 2, 1828, Ann C. Nestor; died Lowell, 
Mass., May 1, 1883. Issue. (See page 964.) 

RICHARD STANFORD TOPPAN, born Newburyport 
Sept. 19, 1799 ; died at sea 1817. 

ELIZABETH TOPPAN, born Newburyport Mar. 4, 
1802; married Aug. 31, 1820, James Ruggles of 
Rochester, Mass.; died Feb. 18, 1874. Issue. (See 
page 965.) 

ARIANNA TOPPAN, born Newburyport Mar. 27, 1804 ; 
married July 16, 1823, Samuel W. Thompson of 
Newburyport (later of Marion, Mass.) ; died Marion 
Dec. 21, 1881. Issue. (See page 967.) 

GEORGE TAPPAN, born Newburyport Jan. 6, 1807; 
married Nov. 10, 1829, Serena Davis of Newbury- 
port; died New Bedford Aug. 15, 1857. Issue. 
(See page 969.) 

HARRIET MARIA TOPPAN, born Newburyport Jan. 
11, 1810; married Nov. 16, 1832, John Paul T. 
Haskell of Rochester, Mass. (born Aug. 19, 1805; 
died Aug. 19, 1873) ; died Lowell Oct. 19, 1886. 
Issue. (See page 970.) 



962 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Sophia Toppan and Oliver Crocker 

(From page 961) 

ELIZABETH CROCKER, born Apr. 10, 1812; died 
July 14, 1869. Unmarried. 

GEORGE OLIVER CROCKER, born Jan. 17, 1814; 
died May 24, 1887. Unmarried. 

WILLIAM STANFORD CROCKER, born Aug. 31, 
1815 ; died Mar. 11, 1839. Unmarried. 

CAROLINE CROCKER, born Nov. 26, 1816; died June 
24, 1829. 

SOPHIA TOPPAN CROCKER, born Oct. 11, 1818; 
married June 14, 1854, Dr. Calvin Stevens; died 
Mar. 27, 1866. Issue. (See page 971.) 

ANN MARIA CROCKER, born Mar. 18, 1821 ; married 
May 18, 1859, Rev. Amos E. Lawrence; died Aug. 
20, 1865. Issue. (See page 972.) 

ABNER TOPPAN CROCKER, born Nov. 24, 1823; 
died Sept. 13, 1825. 

ABNER TOPPAN CROCKER, born Dec. 25, 1826 ; died 
July 20, 1861. Unmarried. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 963 



JOHN FRANKLIN EMERSON CROCKER, born Apr. 
27, 1829 ; died Oct. 22, 1830. 

CAROLINE CROCKER, born Apr. 30, 1831 ; died Dec. 
5, 1833. 

MARY HALE CROCKER, born Jan. 29, 1834; married 
Dec. 3, 1856, Dr. Charles Dickinson Stickney ; living 
in New York. Issue. (See page 972.) 



964 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Abner Toppan and Ann C. Nestor 

(From page 961) 

RICHARD STANFORD TOPPAN, born Mar. 10, 1829 ; 
married Hannah Kittredge. No issue. 

ELIZABETH STANFORD TOPPAN, born July 4, 
1830; married June 18, 1862, Oramel A. Brigham 
of Lowell, Mass. ; died Cataumet, Mass., Aug. 29, 
1900, murdered by Jane "Toppan." No issue. 

OLIVER CROCKER TOPPAN, born Aug. 12, 1832; 
died 1835. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 965 

Children of 

Elizabeth Toppan and James Ruggles 

(From page 961) 

MARY ELIZABETH CLAPP RUGGLES, born Nov. 
15, 1821 ; died Oct. 21, 1824. 

LUCY RUGGLES, born May 4, 1823; died May 6, 1823. 

WILLIAM RUGGLES, born Apr. 25, 1825; died Nov. 

6, 1850. 

HENRY RUGGLES, born Feb. 18, 1827 ; died July 18, 

1828. 

HARRIET M. T. RUGGLES, born Aug. 22, 1828; mar- 
ried (1) Jan. 19, 1847, Eben P. Haskell; (2) Nov. 

7, 1866, Noah T. Mendell; died Acushnet June 11, 
1904. Issue. (See page 973.) 

ELIZABETH CROCKER RUGGLES, born Oct. 17, 
1830; married Oct. 17, 1853, Daniel T. Robbins of 
Plymouth. Issue. (See page 974.) 

CATHERINE BONNE Y RUGGLES, born Sept. 21, 
1832; married Apr. 4, 1859, John G. Dexter of 
Rochester; died Jan. 8, 1898. Issue. (See page 
975.) 

MARY PHILLIPS RUGGLES, born Sept. 9, 1834; mar- 
ried Aug. 10, 1857, Charles Parks Rugg of New Bed- 
ford; living in New Bedford. Issue. (See page 
976.) 



966 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



SUSAN TABER RUGGLES, born Dec. 15, 1836; mar- 
ried Nov. 8, 1860, Judge Calvin E. Pratt of Brook- 
lyn (died Aug. 3, 1896) ; living in Rochester, Mass. 
Issue. (See page 977.) 

LUCY TOPPAN RUGGLES, born Feb. 13, 1839 ; mar- 
ried Mar. 4, 1863, A. S. Stothof of Brooklyn; died 
July 26, 1902. No issue. 

ELIZA THOMPSON RUGGLES, born July 15, 1841; 
married (1) Sept. 28, 1863, Hassan Wheeler of 
Brooklyn; (2) James E. Powers; died Sept. 13, 
1906. Issue. (See page 978.) 

ARIANNA GRAVES RUGGLES, born Feb. 25, 1844; 
married June 20, 1866, J. Augustus Duryee ; died 
Jan. 26, 1911. Issue. (See page 979.) 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 967 

Children op 

Arianna Toppan and Samuel W. Thompson 

(From page 961) 

MARY N. THOMPSON, born Jan. 2, 1824; married 
Apr. 10, 1849, Garrett P. Bergen of Brooklyn; died 
Mar. 30, 1860. Issue. (See page 980.) 

HENRIETTA THOMPSON, born May 26, 1825 ; mar- 
ried Oct. 14, 1861, Garrett P. Bergen; died Oct. 7, 
1907. Issue. (See page 980.) 

ELIZABETH E. THOMPSON, born May 26, 1827; 
married Nov. 15, 1848, Gookin Baker ; died Sept. 30, 
1901. Issue. (See page 981.) 

ARIANNA THOMPSON, born Feb. 12, 1829; married 
Jan. 7, 1852, David C. Smith of Rockland, Maine 
(died Sept. 7, 1911) ; living. No issue. 

SOPHIA C. THOMPSON, born July 1, 1831 ; married 
Oct. 22, 1856, Zacheus Bergen of Brooklyn (died 
Oct. 11, 1898) ; living. Issue. (See page 981.) 

THOMAS W. THOMPSON, born Dec. 6, 1834; married 
Nov. 11, 1862, Fannie Bease of Brooklyn ; died Sept. 
30, 1908. No issue. 

SAMUEL W. THOMPSON, born Newburyport Dec. 7, 
1836; married Brooklyn Oct. 16, 1862, Mary Ford 
Tooker (daughter of J. Alfred Tooker and Susan 
Hinchman Tooker) ; died Birmingham, Mich., May 
7, 1909. Issue. (See page 982.) 



968 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



ABNER TOPPAN THOMPSON, born Aug. 5, 1838; 
died Sept. 9, 1838. 

ANN MARIA C. THOMPSON, born Oct. 31, 1840; 
died Nov. 30, 1841. 

ANN MARIA THOMPSON, born Aug. 16, 1842; mar- 
ried Feb. 6, 1867, Boerum C. Peterson; living. 
Issue. (See page 983.) 

GEORGIANA THOMPSON, born Sept. 4, 1845; died 
Sept. 4, 1846. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 969 

Children of 

George Tappan and Serena Davis 

(From page 961) 

GEORGE A. TAPPAN, born Nov. 1, 1830; died Nov. 
17, 1830. 

SARAH ANN DAVIS TAPPAN, born Newburyport 
Oct. 6, 1831; married Jan. 22, 1857, William W. 
Crapo of New Bedford ; died New Bedford Dec. 13, 
1893. Issue. (See page 935.) 

GEORGE A. TAPPAN, born Aug. 29, 1832; died May 
13, 1835. 

SERENA DAVIS TAPPAN, born June 18, 1834; died 
May 11, 1838. 

CHARLES A. TAPPAN, born Nov. 13, 1838; died 
Sept. 26, 1839. 

WILLIAM CROCKER TAPPAN, born Apr. 17, 1842; 
married Sept. 16, 1868, Adelina T. Baker (born 
Aug. 19, 1846) ; died Hyde Park Sept. 20, 1909. 
Issue. (See page 983.) 



970 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Harriet Maria Toppan and John Paul T. Haskell 

(From page 961) 

LUCY MARIA HASKELL, born Nov. 25, 1833; mar- 
ried Sept. 1852, Asaph Whittlesey; died Apr. 30, 
1901. Issue. 

NATHANIEL HASKELL, born May 11, 1838 ; married 
Mrs. E. Waterman ; died 1862. 

GEORGE TAPPAN HASKELL, born Jan. 12, 1840; 
died 1855. 

WILLIAM HENRY HASKELL, born Nov. 9, 1842; 
married Minnie Malve ; living. 

JOHN WILLIAM CLAGHORN HASKELL, born July 
4, 1844 ; married Sept. 5, 1873, Ella Rhoda Mann of 
Aurora, 111. ; living in Chicago. Issue. (See page 
984.) 

JOSEPH ELNATHAN HASKELL, born Feb. 27, 1846 ; 
married Aug. 2, 1873, Myra Balcomb ; living. 

JULIA HARRIET HASKELL, born Feb. 7, 1850 ; mar- 
ried Feb. 6, 1873, Moses Little of Lowell, Mass. ; liv- 
ing in Lowell. Issue. (See page 984.) 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 971 

Children of 

Sophia Toppan Crocker and Calvin Stevens 

(From page 962) 

OLIVER CROCKER STEVENS, born Boston June 3, 
1855; married St. Albans, Vt., June 10, 1885, Julia 
Burnett Smith (daughter of Ex-Governor John 
Gregory Smith of Vermont and Ann Eliza Brain- 
erd) ; died Pasadena, Cal., Mar. 25, 1911. No issue. 

WILLIAM STANFORD STEVENS, born Boston June 
13, 1859; married St. Albans, Vt., Dec. 11, 1895, 
Emily Huntington Lewis (daughter of Silas Hunt- 
ington Lewis and Harriet Safford) ; living in St. 
Albans. Issue. (See page 985.) 



972 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

Ann Maria Crocker and Amos E. Lawrence 

(From page 962) 

GEORGE OLIVER CROCKER LAWRENCE, born 
Lancaster, Mass., May 10, I860; living. Daughter, 
Gladys Lawrence. 

ELIZABETH CROCKER LAWRENCE, born Lancas- 
ter, Mass., Nov. 11, 1861 ; married Professor Samuel 
Fessenden Clarke of Williams College (born Geneva, 
111., June 4, 1851) ; living. Daughter, Elizabeth 
Lawrence Clarke, born Williamstown Sept. 3, 1893. 

AMOS EDWARD LAWRENCE, born Lancaster, Mass., 
Mar. 14, 1863 ; living. Unmarried. 

Child of 

Mary Hale Crocker and Charles D. Stickney 

(From page 963) 

CHARLES DICKINSON STICKNEY, born New Bed- 
ford Sept. 28, 1858 ; married 1890, Helen Hamersley 
of New York (died Feb. 23, 1911) ; living in New 
York. No issue. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 973 

Children of 

Harriet M. T. Ruggles and Eben P. Haskell 

(From page 965) 

JAMES RUGGLES HASKELL, born Apr. 11, 1851; 
married Apr. 15, 1875, Amelia Jane Dougherty; 
died July 26, 1909. No issue. 

WILLIAM H. HASKELL, born Apr. 12, 1853; died 
Sept. 6, 1896. Unmarried. 

EDWARD S. HASKELL, born Fairhaven, Apr. 24, 
1857; married (1) Dec. 1883, Clara Lin wood Roe 
(born Aug. 18, 1861, died June 5, 1897) ; (2) Oct. 
26, 1899, Edith Tobey Eldred (born Fairhaven Dec. 
3, 1877) ; living in Fairhaven. Issue. (See page 
986.) 



974 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

Elizabeth Crocker Ruggles and Daniel T. Robbins 

(From page 965) 

CHARLES S. ROBBINS, born Jan. 9, 1859 ; died Oct. 
2, 1859. 

CATHERINE RUGGLES ROBBINS, born July 3, 
1854; married Sept 1, 1874, James Warren of Ply- 
mouth ; died June 17, 1887. Issue. (See page 987.) 



toppan descendants 975 

Children of 

Catherine Bonney Ruggles and John G. Dexter 

(From page 965) 

JOHN WHEELER DEXTER, born Oct. 21, 1866 ; mar- 
ried Jan. 3, 1894, Mary S. Schrilling; living in 
Atalissa, Iowa. Issue. (See page 988.) 

FRANK GIBBS DEXTER, born July 14, 1868; died 
June 9, 1896. 

ELEANOR RICHARDSON DEXTER, born Oct. 18, 
1869 ; married June 6, 1888, William Logan Rodman 
Gifford ; living in St. Louis, Mo. Issue. (See page 
■) 



HARRIET MARIA DEXTER, born Jan. 22, 1871; died 
Oct. 8, 1871. 

LUCY RUGGLES DEXTER, born Feb. 9, 1872; mar- 
ried July 25, 1894, James P. Porter. Son, Llewel- 
lyn P. Porter, born Oct. 18, 1901. 

CHARLES RUGG DEXTER, born May 30, 1877 ; mar- 
ried Mar. 30, 1898, Josephine M. Snell. No issue. 

MARY STANFORD DEXTER, born July 16, 1879; 
married Sept. 9, 1905, Samuel Usher ; living in Som- 
erville, Mass. One daughter born May 18, 1907. 



976 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Children of 

Mary Phillips Ruggles and Charles P. Rugg 

(From page 965) 

CHARLES PARKS RUGG, born June 13, 1860; died 
May 4, 1861. 

GEORGE RUGG, born Rochester, Mass., July 2, 1862; 
married Brockton, Mass., July 20, 1887, Grace Agnes 
Rogers (born Mar. 5, 1865) ; living. Issue. (See 
page 989.) 

ELIZABETH STANFORD RUGG, born New Bedford 
Sept. 26, 1867; married New Bedford, June 19, 
1900, Albert Wood Holmes (born Mattapoisett Aug. 
17, 1852; died New Bedford Feb. 26, 1912) ; living 
in New Bedford. Issue. (See page 989.) 



toppan descendants 977 

Children of 

Susan Taber Ruggles and Calvin E. Pratt 

(From page 966) 

ALBERT H. PRATT, born Brooklyn Sept. 3, 1861 ; liv- 
ing. Unmarried. 

EDWARD LEE PRATT, born Brooklyn May 14, 1863 ; 
died July 27, 1865. 

CALVIN E. PRATT, born Brooklyn July 17, 1865 ; died 
Apr. 19, 1866. 

SUSAN RUGGLES PRATT, born Brooklyn Dec. 14, 
1866 ; married Jan. 19, 1892, William Norris Church, 
Jr., of New Bedford (died Chestertown, N. Y., Mar. 
9, 1899) ; living in Rochester, Mass. No issue. 

POLLY CLAPP PRATT, born Brooklyn Feb. 12, 1868 ; 
married June 6, 1894, Livingston Emery (born May 
7, 1864) ; living in Norwood, N. J. Issue. (See 
page 990.) 

ANNA STANFORD PRATT, born Brooklyn Mar. 10, 
1870; married Mar. 3, 1897, Charles Lincoln 
Holmes; living in Fall River. Issue. (See page 
990.) 

JANE STRATTON PRATT, born Brooklyn Mar. 10, 
1870; married Apr. 30, 1895, Stanley Alden Al- 
drich ; living in Fall River. Issue. (See page 990.) 



978 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Eliza Thompson Ruggles and Hassan Wheeler 

(From, page 966) 

CHARLES WHEELER, born July 17, 1864 ; died 
No issue. 

JOHN N. WHEELER, born July 20, 1865 ; married Ida 
Pranet ; living. Daughters, Helen and Ruth Wheeler. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 979 

Children op 

Abianna Graves Ruggles and J. Augustus Duryee 

(From page 966) 

PHILIP DURYEE, born Mar. 14, 1867 ; married Grace 
Oliver ; died May 23, 1906. 

AUGUSTUS DURYEE, born Apr. 28, 1868; married 
Oct. 20, 1902, Effie Weyant ; living in Brooklyn. No 
issue. 

RUGGLES DURYEE, died in infancy. 

WILLIAM and EDWARD DURYEE, twins, died in 
infancy. 

PETER STANFORD DURYEE, born Dec. 2, 1874; 
married Nov. 8, 1900, Pauline J. Clephane; living 
in Englewood, N. J. Issue. (See page 991.) 



certain comeoverers 

Children of 

Mary N. Thompson and Garrett P. Bergen 

(From page 967) 

LAURA BERGEN, born Somerville, N. J., Dec. 30, 
1849; married Howard W. Clark of Rockland, 
Maine; died Dec. 30, 1892. 

EMMA STANFORD BERGEN, born Brooklyn, Aug. 
30, 1855 ; married Henry Faber of Brooklyn. 

Children of 

Henrietta Thompson and Garrett P. Bergen 

(From page 967) 

SAMUEL WHITE BERGEN, born Brooklyn, Aug. 26, 
1862; married Mar. 8, 1893, Lena Boynton. Issue. 
(See page 991.) 

CHARLES COLE BERGEN, born Brooklyn Sept. 24, 
1864; died Sept. 23, 1900. Unmarried. 

HENRIETTA STANFORD BERGEN, born Brooklyn 
July 2, 1866. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 981 

Children of 

Elizabeth E. Thompson and Gookin Baker 

(From page 967) 

VIRGINIA BAKER, died in infancy. 

HAROLD G. BAKER, born May 10, 1855; married 
Somerville, Mass., Aug. 2, 1878, Carrie L. Smith 
(died Apr. 1, 1885) ; living in Detroit. Issue. (See 
page 991.) 

WILLIAM STANFORD BAKER, born Aug. 4, 1859; 
living in Detroit. Unmarried. 

ELIZABETH BAKER, died young. 



Children of 

Sophia C. Thompson and Zacheus Bergen 

(From page 967) 

GEORGE CLIFFORD BERGEN, born Brooklyn, Aug. 
8, 1859; married Sept. 3, 1890, Edith Trumball; 
living in South Orange, N. J. Issue. (See page 
992.) 

FREDERIC ROBERTSON BERGEN, born Brooklyn 
Feb. 16, 1864; died Sept. 12, 1906. 

MARY THOMPSON BERGEN, born Brooklyn Aug. 19, 
1869; married Apr. 15, 1891, Albert Lincoln Salt; 
living in Summit, N. J. Son, Lloyd Bergen Salt, 
born Mar. 18, 1893. 



982 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

Samuel W. Thompson and Mary F. Tooker 

(From page 967) 

SUSAN DeCAMP THOMPSON, born Brooklyn Oct. 24, 
1863 ; died Detroit Jan. 27, 1867. 

J. ALFRED THOMPSON, born Brooklyn June 5, 1865 ; 
married St. Louis, Mo., Jan. 1890, Frances A. 
Borgess; living. Issue. (See page 992.) 

FRANK BERGEN THOMPSON, born Detroit June 12, 
1867; married Detroit Oct. 17, 1895, Hattie Burk; 
living. No issue. 

ROBERT AUGUSTUS THOMPSON, born Detroit Nov. 
3, 1871 ; married Brooklyn Apr. 1895, Lucy Wanzor ; 
living. Issue. (See page 992.) 

LOUIS SONER THOMPSON, born Detroit Mar. 15, 
1875; married Phoenix, Ariz., Oct. 18, 1905, Louise 
Vaughn; living. Issue. (See page 993.) 

FORD DeCAMP THOMPSON, born Detroit Mar. 1, 
1878; married Brooklyn Oct. 1, 1902, Minnie 
Gerken ; living. No issue. 

MARY FORD THOMPSON, born Detroit Mar. 1, 1878 ; 
living. Unmarried. 

SAMUEL CALLAWAY THOMPSON, born Detroit 
Jan. 13, 1880; married Brooklyn June 22, 1904, 
Mary A. Wells ; living. Son, Arthur Porter Thomp- 
son, born July 31, 1905. 



toppan descendants 983 

Child of 

Ann Maria Thompson and Boerum C. Peterson 

(From page 968) 

SUSAN THOMPSON PETERSON, born Oct. 7, 1869 ; 
married Dec. 4, 1894, Rev. Frank Leonard Luce of 
Marion, Mass., later of Dorchester, Mass. (born June 
15, 1866). Issue. (See page 993.) 

Children op 

William Crocker Tappan and Adelina T. Baker 

(From page 969) 

GEORGE TAPPAN, born July 26, 1870 ; died Nov. 5, 
1870. 

SARAH CRAPO TAPPAN, born June 27, 1873 ; mar- 
ried (1) Oct. 9, 1895, Guy B. Carter (died Sept. 11, 
1896) ; (2) Mar. 30, 1907, Richard Coe of Durham, 
N. H. ; living in Hyde Park. Daughter, Serena 
Tappan Coe, born Jan. 9, 1911. 

HAROLD HARDING TAPPAN, born Feb. 19, 1883; 
died July 14, 1883. 

STANFORD DAVIS TAPPAN, born Aug. 12, 1885; 
living. 



984 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

John W. C. Haskell and Ella R. Mann 

(From page 970) 

HARRIET ELIZABETH HASKELL, born Nov. 6, 
1874; married John Christbiel Curtiss of Chicago. 
Issue. (See page 994.) 

LOUISE HASKELL, born Mar. 25, 1879 ; died July 24, 
1879. 

GEORGE AUSTIN HASKELL, born Jan. 17, 1886; 
married June 14, 1904, Harriet Keith. Daughter, 
Jean Haskell, born May 22, 1906. 

JOHN PAUL HASKELL, born Jan. 17, 1886 ; married 
July 19, 1909, Mary Bertha Paterson. Daughter, 
Mary Page Haskell, born Aug. 26, 1910. 

Children of 

Julia Harriet Haskell and Moses Little 

(From page 970) 

EDMUND COOK LITTLE, born Apr. 17, 1874; mar- 
ried Oct. 18, 1905, Maude Greenslit of Hampton, 
Conn ; living. 

HARRY WEBB LITTLE, born Nov. 3, 1877 ; died Apr, 
9, 1879. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 985 

Children of 

William Stanford Stevens and Emily H. Lewis 

(From page 971) 

WILLIAM STANFORD STEVENS, bom Oct. 21, 1896 ; 
died Oct. 31, 1896. 

STANFORD HUNTINGTON STEVENS, born Oct. 5, 
1897. 

PHILIP GREELEY STEVENS, born Aug. 16, 1902. 



986 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

Edward S. Haskell and Clara L. Roe 

(From page 973) 

ELIZA WHEELER HASKELL, born June 16, 1884; 
died June 19, 1884. 

AMELIA RUGGLES HASKELL, born May 20, 1885; 
married Oct. 2, 1909, Walter S. Johnston; living in 
Roslindale, Mass. Son, Walter S. Johnston, born 
Feb. 3, 1911. 

STANFORD LINWOOD HASKELL, born Oct. 23, 
1887 ; now in Philippine Islands. 

EDNA WINIFRED HASKELL, born Aug. 2, 1890. 

ALICE LOUISE HASKELL, born Oct. 16, 1892 ; died 
Aug. 27, 1894. 

Child of 

Edward S. Haskell and Edith T. Eldred 

(From page 973) 

HELEN STOTHOF HASKELL, born Dec. 12, 1901. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 987 

Children of 

Catherine Ruggles Robbins and James Warren 

(From page 974) 

KATHLEEN WARREN, born Nov. 25, 1875; married 
May 12, 1896, Harry Brewer Harding. Issue. 
(See page 994.) 

ANNA WARREN, born Jan. 3, 1878. 

ALICE BRADFORD WARREN, born Aug. 15, 1879. 

IDA WARREN, born July 6, 1881; married Apr. 6, 
1904, John Robertson Maltbie. 

ELIZABETH RUGGLES WARREN, born Apr. 29, 
1887 ; married Apr. 16, 1910, Offley Tatum Brown. 



988 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

John Wheeler Dexter and Mary S. Schrilling 

(From page 975) 

JOHN P. DEXTER, born Oct. 1, 1895. 

LOUIS P. DEXTER, born Dec. 2, 1897. 

FRANK G. DEXTER, born Mar. 25, 1899. 

HAROLD A. DEXTER, born Feb. 22, 1902. 

Children of 

Eleanor Richardson Dexter and William L. R. Gifpord 

(From page 975) 

CATHERINE GIFFORD, born 1889 ; died 1903. 

HUMPHREY A. GIFFORD, born Nov. 15, 1890. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 989 

Children of 

George Rugg and Grace A. Rogers 

(From page 976) 

GERTRUDE ROGERS RUGG, born Brattleboro. Vt, 
Sept. 18, 1888. 

CHARLES PARKS RUGG, born Ipswich, Mass., July 
13, 1891. 

Children of 

Elizabeth Stanford Rugg and Albert W. Holmes 

(From page 976) 

ALBERT WOOD HOLMES, born Nov. 17, 1901. 

GORDON HOLMES, born Oct. 29, 1905. 



990 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 
Polly Clapp Pratt and Livingston Emery 
(From page 977) 
CALVIN EMERY, born Apr. 15, 1895. 

CHARLES EDWARD EMERY, born Apr. 8, 1897. 

KATHERINE EMERY, born Nov. 19, 1902 ; died Feb. 
4, 1903. 

ALBERT LIVINGSTON EMERY, born Sept. 14, 1904 ; 
died Feb. 9, 1905. 

PAULINE EMERY, born Apr. 25, 1906. 

Children of 
Anna Stanford Pratt and Charles L. Holmes 
(From page 977) 
CHARLES CALVIN HOLMES, born Dec. 4, 1897. 
STANFORD HOLMES, born Oct. 2, 1900. 
LINCOLN PRATT HOLMES, born Dec. 21, 1906. 

Children of 
Jane Stratton Pratt and Stanley A. Aldrich 
(From page 977) 
STANLEY ALDEN ALDRICH, born Nov. 30, 1897. 
MALCOLM PRATT ALDRICH, born Oct. 1, 1900. 
HULBERT STRATTON ALDRICH, born Apr. 3, 1907. 
DUNCAN EARLE ALDRICH, born July 9, 1910. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 991 

Children of 

Peter Stanford Duryee and Pauline J. Clephane 

(From page 979) 

PAULINE CLEPHANE DURYEE, born June 30, 1903. 

MARGARET RUGGLES DURYEE, born Oct. 28, 1904. 

Children of 

Samuel White Bergen and Lena Boynton 

(From page 980) 

HAROLD BOYNTON BERGEN, born Brooklyn Dec. 
28, 1893. 

GARRETT LAWRENCE BERGEN, born Brooklyn 
Apr. 28, 1904. 

Child of 

Harold G. Baker and Carrie L. Smith 

(From page 981) 

MILDRED BAKER, born Sept. 21, 1879 ; married Apr. 
12, 1904, J. W. White of New York. Son, John J. 
White, born Feb. 27, 1906. 



992 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

George Clifford Bergen and Edith Trumball 

(From page 981) 

ARNOLD TRUMBALL BERGEN, born 1891. 

ELLIOT CLIFFORD BERGEN, born 1893. 

Children of 

J. Alfred Thompson and Frances A. Borgess 

(From page 982) 

CHARLOTTE M. THOMPSON, born Oct. 27, 1891. 

J. ALFRED THOMPSON, born July 31, 1893. 

RALPH F. THOMPSON, born Sept. 2, 1895. 

MARRIE F. THOMPSON, born Aug. 16, 1897. 

EMILY LUCILLE THOMPSON, born Oct. 20, 1898. 

LOUIS F. THOMPSON, born Jan. 27, 1904. 



Children of 

Robert Augustus Thompson and Lucy Wanzor 

(From page 982) 

ROBERT WESTFIELD THOMPSON, born May 5, 
1896. 

WARREN HINCHMAN THOMPSON, born Oct. 7, 
1906. 



TOPPAN DESCENDANTS 993 

Children of 

Louis Soner Thompson and Louise Vaughn 

(From page 982) 

STEWART VAUGHN THOMPSON, born Sept. 25, 
1906. 

MARY TOOKER THOMPSON, born June 16, 1908. 

CAROLYN PIERSON THOMPSON, born Mar. 22, 
1910. 

Children of 

Susan Thompson Peterson and Frank L. Luce 

(From page 983) 

STANFORD LEONARD LUCE, born Sept. 28, 1896. 

VIRGINIA LUCE, born Oct. 2, 1901. 

DOROTHEA DELANO LUCE, born Feb. 6, 1905. 

FRANK LEONARD LUCE, born June 4, 1907. 



994 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Harriet Elizabeth Haskell and John C. Curtiss 

(From page 984) 

PAULINE VIRGINIA CURTISS, born July 9, 1901. 

HARRIET EUGENIA CURTISS, born July 9, 1904. 

Children of 

Kathleen Warren and Harry B. Harding 

(From page 987) 

JOHN CAPEN HARDING, born May 13, 1898; died 
Dec, 30, 1898. 

PRISCILLA HARDING, born May 22, 1900. 



Chapter XII 
DESCENDANTS 

OF 

AARON DAVIS 

AND 

SARAH MORSE SMITH 



DAVIS DESCENDANTS 997 

Children op 
Aaron Davis and Sarah Morse Smith 

HARRIET MARIA DAVIS, born Newburyport Oct. 5, 
1802; married Honolulu, Oahu, Pacific Ocean, Feb. 
26, 1833, Charles Rand Smith; died St. Louis, Mo., 
July 4, 1849. Issue. (See page 999.) 

SARAH ANN DAVIS, born Newburyport Jan. 25, 1805 ; 
died Jan. 28, 1805, "of a consumption." 

SARAH ANN DAVIS, born Newburyport Mar. 11, 
1806; died June 8, 1807, "of the canker." 

SERENA DAVIS, born Newburyport Jan. 17, 1808; 
married Nov. 10, 1829, George Tappan of Newbury- 
port; died Hyde Park, Mass., Feb. 5, 1896. Issue. 
(See page 969.) 

SARAH ANN DAVIS, born Newburyport July 10, 
1810 ; married May 23, 1836, Thomas Charles Carter, 
Newburyport; died Newburyport Mar. 23, 1869. 
Issue. (See page 1000.) 

MARTHA WILLS DAVIS, born Newburyport Aug. 9, 
1812 ; married May 23, 1836, Anson Whelpley Bay- 
ley, Newburyport; died Aug. 7, 1845. One son, 
Frederick Bayley. 

AARON CHARLES DAVIS, born Newburyport Mar. 3, 
1815 ; died Aug. 8, 1816, "of a watery head, together 
with other complaints." 

AARON CHARLES DAVIS, born Newburyport Dec. 7, 
1816; died Cincinnati, Ohio, Oct. 27, 1852. Un- 
married. 



998 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



JOHN WILLS DAVIS, born Newburyport Apr. 23, 
1819; died Sacramento, Cal., Feb. 24, 1897. Un- 
married. 

ELEANOR TRACY DAVIS, born Newburyport May 
5, 1821 ; married 1841, Thomas Russell Colcord, 
Newburyport; died Santa Barbara, Cal., Feb. 9, 
1907. Issue living in Missouri and California. 

MARY KNAP DAVIS, born Newburyport May 10, 
1824; died Feb. 17, 1826, "of convulsion fits." 



DAVIS DESCENDANTS 999 

Children op 

Harriet Maria Davis and Charles R. Smith 

(From page 997) 

WILLIAM CHARLES SMITH, born Honolulu 1833; 
married Newburyport 1857, Elizabeth A. Knapp of 
Newburyport ; died at sea. Issue. (See page 1002.) 

CHARLOTTE HINCKLEY SMITH, born at sea, on the 
Pacific Ocean, Nov. 24, 1839 ; married New Bedford 
June 13, 1861, Charles Henry Peirce (died Mar. 3, 
1904) ; living in Brookline, Mass. Issue. (See page 
1001.) 

SARAH MORSE SMITH, born in Mobile, Ala., 1841 ; 
died St. Louis, Mo., 1844. 

CHARLES AUGUSTUS SMITH, born St. Louis, Mo., 
Oct. 1, 1846; married Amesbury, Mass., July 12, 
1871, Emily Binney; died Newburyport Feb. 2, 
1882. Issue. (See page 1002.) 



1000 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

Sarah Ann Davis and Thomas C. Carter 

(From page 997) 

THOMAS CARTER, born Newburyport June 30, 1838 ; 
married Berne, Albany Co., N. Y., Sept. 15, 1859, 
Sarah Hochstrasser ; died Colioes, N. Y., July 10, 
1875. Issue. (See page 1003.) 

ISAAC SMITH CARTER, born Cohoes, JN. Y., Sept. 6, 
1839; married New Bedford Nov. 22, 1861, Eliza- 
beth Howland; died Flint, Mich., Feb. 24, 1868. 
Issue. (See page 1004.) 

ELIZABETH HOWE CARTER, born Cohoes, N. Y., 
June 4, 1841 ; died Aug. 8, 1841. 

CAROLINE CARTER, born New Bedford Aug. 7, 1842; 
living in Haverhill, Mass. Unmarried. 

SARAH MEHITABLE CARTER, born Waterford, N. 
Y., Nov. 25, 1844; died Flint, Mich., Feb. 2, 1865. 
Unmarried. 

GEORGE TAPPAN CARTER, born Cohoes, N. Y., July 
13, 1849; married Newburyport Apr. 17, 1884, 
Charlotte Osgood (daughter of Nathaniel S. Os- 
good) ; died Cohoes June 27, 1902. Issue. (See 
page 1003.) 



DAVIS DESCENDANTS 1001 

Children of 

Charlotte Hinckley Smith and Charles H. Peirce 

(From page 999) 

WILLIAM TAPPAN PEIRCE, born New Bedford Mar. 

16, 1862; living in Colorado. Unmarried. 

ARTHUR PEIRCE, born New Bedford May 31, 1863 ; 
died Aug. 5, 1863. 

HARRIET DAVIS PEIRCE, born New Bedford Mar. 

17, 1866 ; married New Bedford Sept. 25, 1888, Ben- 
jamin Harris Anthony; living in New Bedford. 
Issue. (See page 1005.) 

MARGARET SERENA PEIRCE, born New Bedford 
Aug. 14, 1867 ; living in Brookline, Mass. Un- 
married. 

CHARLOTTE PEIRCE, born New Bedford Nov. 24, 
1872; living in Brookline, Mass. Unmarried. 



1002 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

William Charles Smith and Elizabeth A. Knapp 

(From page 999) 

WILLIAM ALFRED SMITH, born Newburyport 1855 ; 
died Oct. 23, 1881. Unmarried. 

CHARLES OTIS SMITH, born Newburyport 1855 
(twin) ; died Sept. 11, 1858. 

Children op 

Charles Augustus Smith and Emily Binney 

(From page 999) 

GERTRUDE BINNEY SMITH, born St. Louis Dec. 6, 

1872 ; living in Amesbury, Mass. Unmarried. 

WILLIAM BINNEY SMITH, born St. Louis Apr. 8, 
1874; living. 

EMILY HOPE SMITH, born St. Louis Feb. 22, 1876; 
died Amesbury July 9, 1896. 



DAVIS DESCENDANTS 1003 

Children of 

Thomas Carter and Sarah Hochstrasser 

(From page 1000) 

MARY LOUISE CARTER, born Cohoes, N. Y., Dec. 8, 
1860 ; died Cohoes Mar. 10, 1875. 

VINCENT CARTER, born Cohoes, N. Y., Nov. 26, 1862 ; 
living in Troy, N. Y. Unmarried. 

Child of 

George Tappan Carter and Charlotte Osgood 

(From page 1000) 

CAROLINE LEE CARTER, born Cohoes, N. Y., May 
8, 1885 ; living in Haverhill, Mass. Unmarried. 



1004 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children op 

Isaac Smith Carter and Elizabeth Howland 

(From page 1000) 

MARY ESTHER CARTER, horn New Bedford Jan. 2, 
1862 ; married Amesbury Sept. 13, 1882, Stephen C. 
Lowe of New Bedford; living in "West Newton, 
Mass. Issue. (See page 1006.) 

EDWARD HOWLAND CARTER, born Flint, Mich., 
Sept. 22, 1863 ; married Louise Whiting ; living in 
New Bedford. No issue. 

FANNY CANNON CARTER, born Flint, Mich., Sept. 
7, 1864; married New Bedford Apr. 6, 1885, James 
William Hindle; living in New Bedford. Issue. 
(See page 1006.) 

NELLIE CARTER, born Flint, Mich., Aug. 14, 1866; 
died young. 



DAVIS DESCENDANTS 1005 

Children op 

Harriet Davis Peirce and Benjamin H. Anthony 

(From page 1001) 

EDMUND ANTHONY, SECOND, born New Bedford 
Sept. 28, 1889. 

MARGARET ANTHONY, born New Bedford Feb. 18, 
1891. 

BENJAMIN ANTHONY, SECOND, born New Bedford 
Feb. 24, 1892 ; died Feb. 25, 1892. 

CATHERINE CHANDLER ANTHONY, born New 
Bedford Sept. 20, 1896. 



1006 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

Children of 

Mary Esthee Carter and Stephen C. Lowe 

(From page 1004) 

PHILIP CARTER LOWE, born New Bedford Apr. 11, 
1884; living in West Newton, Mass. Unmarried. 

ESTHER SCHOFIELD LOWE, born New Bedford 
Apr. 8, 1886 ; married West Newton June 20, 1911, 
Barton Leonard; living in Boston. 

STEPHEN CLIFFORD LOWE, born New Bedford 
Oct. 16, 1888 ; married Oct. 4, 1911, Marion Hutch- 
inson Seavey; living in Mattapoisett, Mass. 

ELEANOR DAVIS LOWE, born New Bedford Dec. 14, 

1898. 

Children of 

Fanny Cannon Carter and James W. Hindle 
(From page 1004) 

EDWARD ISAAC HINDLE, born New Bedford May 
8, 1888. Unmarried. 

MARGARET CARTER HINDLE, born New Bedford 
June 6, 1904. 



ADDENDA 

Part IV 
ANCESTORS OF WILLIAMS SLOCUM 

Chapter I 



REBECCA BENNETT 



It seems that Rebecca Bennett Slocum Wing 
was a Williams, after all, — maternally. After 
the text of these notes was in final form for the 
printer I received the well authenticated informa- 
tion, through Mr. Lawrence Brainerd of Boston, 
that Anna Bennett, the mother of Rebecca, was a 
Williams. Anna, the wife of Jonathan Bennett 
of Newport, was born in Boston, November 4, 
1674, being a twin daughter of John Williams and 
Anna Alcock. This discovery adds a number of 
interesting persons to your list of comeoverers. 

Nathaniel Williams, your comeovering ancestor, 
was admitted to the church of Boston May 26, 
1639, and made a freeman in the same month. 
He was a ''glover" and prominent as a business 
man, as appears by the great frequency of his 
name as a witness to wills, an appraiser of estates, 
etc. He lived on Court Street, and later by the 
harbor near the foot of State Street. He was 
elected a member of the Ancient and Honorable 
Artillery Company in 1644 and became a Lieu- 
tenant of the Massachusetts militia. He was 
Clerk of the Market in 1651, Constable 1656-7, and 
a Selectman of Boston from 1659 until his death 
in 1661. His wife Mary, who came with him from 
England, and was admitted to the church in 1640, 



1010 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

after his death married Peter Brackett. His 
will, dated February 22, 1661, was witnessed by 
Theodore Atkinson, another comeoverer of yours. 
His inventory disclosed an estate of £994. His 
descendants have been prominent for many gen- 
erations in Boston. His son, John Williams, your 
ancestor, was born in Boston, August 15, 1644, 
and there in 1670 married Anna, the daughter of 
Doctor John Alcock, and the granddaughter of 
George Alcock of Roxbury. 

George Alcock came over with Governor 
Winthrop in 1630. With him came his wife, who 
died shortly afterwards. She was a sister of the 
Reverend Thomas Hooker, "grave, godly, and 
judicious Hooker," who became one of the lead- 
ing lights of the settlement of Hartford in Con- 
necticut. There is a conjectural account of the 
ancestry of this many times great grandmother 
Hooker in the New England Historical and 
Genealogical Register, Vol. 47, p. 189. George 
Alcock and his wife had a son John, born in 1626 
or 1627, in England, who did not come over with 
his parents. George Alcock on his arrival in the 
colony was made a Deacon of the Dorchester 
church, but soon after, in 1632, founded the first 
church of Roxbury, of which he remained a Dea- 
con during the few remaining years of his life. 
He lived in Roxbury, near the "Bull Pasture," 
next to Governor Dudley, on what is now Bartlett 
Street, and had land of several hundred acres in 
extent allotted to him. He acted as a physician 
and is sometimes designated as "Doctor Alcock," 
a title which his son afterwards bore with much 



REBECCA BENNETT 10H 

distinction. He was a member of the first Gen- 
eral Court of the Colony in 1634. 

In Reverend John Eliot's Record he says of 
Deacon George Alcock: "He made two voyages 
to England, upon just calling thereunto; wherein 
he had much experience of God 's preservation and 
blessings. He brought over his son John Alcock. 
He also brought over a wife by whom he had his 
second son Samuel . . . He lived in a good 
and godly sort and dyed in the end of the tenth 
month Anno 1640 and left a good savor behind 
him; the Poore of the church much bewailing his 
losse." In his will, dated December 22, 1640, 
George Alcock makes careful provision for the 
education of his son John, who was then about 
thirteen years old. 

John Alcock came over with his father prob- 
ably in 1636 on one of the journeys which Mr. Eliot 
chronicles. His father's care for his education 
was well rewarded. He entered Harvard College 
and graduated with a Master's degree in 1646. 
During the next few years he taught school in 
Hartford, doubtless under the advice of his uncle, 
the Reverend Thomas Hooker. He studied medi- 
cine and probably received a degree from some 
European University, since he is given the title 
on the records of "M. D.," a title which he could 
not have received from any institution in this 
country at that time. Most of the physicians of 
his day were designated simply "Doctor." He 
settled in Roxbury, being admitted to the church 
there in May, 1650, and in 1652 was admitted a 
freeman of the Colony. He took a leading posi- 



1012 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

tion not only as a physician, but as a public spirited 
citizen. Later lie removed to Boston, doubtless for 
the convenience of his medical practice. He had 
large estates of land in Dorchester, Eoxbury, 
Scituate, Stow and other places. In 1655 the Gen- 
eral Court granted him about one thousand acres 
of land in the town of Marlborough, known as 
"The Farm," about which there is much of inter- 
est in the public records. John Alcock died in 
Boston March 27, 1667, aged forty years, and was 
buried in Eoxbury. He provides in his will for his 
eight children, all minors, and especially provides 
for his daughter Anna, who was your ancestress. 
He leaves "£3 to the Church of X 1 in Roxbury to 
buy them a good wine bowl. ' ' The descendants of 
John and Samuel Alcock were numerous. In 
some branches the name has been corrupted to 
Alcott. A. Bronson Alcott of Concord was one 
of these descendants. John Alcock in 1648 mar- 
ried Sarah Palgrave (six years his senior), the 
daughter of Doctor Richard Palgrave of Charles- 
town. 

Richard Palgrave of Stepney, Middlesex County, 
England, came over with Governor Winthrop in 

1630, and settled in Charlestown, applying as a 
freeman October 19, 1630, and being admitted in 

1631. He and his wife united with the first 
church of Boston and maintained their member- 
ship in this church, and their children, although 
born in Charlestown, were baptized in Boston. 
He was a physician, in fact, the first "Doctor" 
of the Colony, and it is not strange that Doctor 
John Alcock should have married into the pro- 



REBECCA BENNETT 1013 

fession. He died in Charlestown in 1656. His 
widow Anne survived him some twelve years. 
She returned to England, but subsequently came 
back to New England and died in Koxbury March 
17, 1668, aged 75. In her will she says that her 
son, John Alcock, took into his possession the two 
hundred acre grant of land to her husband, 
Richard, and she devises the same to the children 
of John Alcock. She gives to your ancestress, 
Anna Alcock, eldest daughter of John Alcock, her 
dwelling house in Boston and all her movables. 
Sarah Palgrave, who married Doctor John 
Alcock, died in 1665, two years before her hus- 
band 's death, and three years before her mother 's 
death. The Reverend Samuel Danforth says 
"Mrs. Sarah Alcock dyed, a vertous woman, of 
unstained life, very skilful in physick and 
chiurgery, exceeding active, yea, unwearied, in 
ministering to ye necessities of others. Her works 
praise her in ye gates. ' ' 



Block Island, called by the Indians Manisses, 
an island about eight miles south of what is now 
the state of Rhode Island, was first visited in 1524 
by Verrazzano, who reported to Francis I of 
France that "it was full of hills, covered with 
trees, well peopled, for we saw fires all along the 
coast." In 1614 a Dutch navigator, Adrian Bloc, 
visited the island and gave it its name. In 1636, 
John Oldham, the man whom the Plymouth 
Colony repudiated, and who gave so much trouble 
to the Massachusetts Colony, went to Bloc Island 



1014 CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 

to trade with the Indians and was by them mur- 
dered. To avenge this murder, Governor Win- 
throp sent an expedition to the island under the 
command of Col. John Endicott. There is much 
of interest in the history of this expedition. As 
a result the Colony of Massachusetts claimed the 
island by right of conquest, although it was mani- 
festly within the Dutch possessions. In 1658 the 
General Court of Massachusetts granted the 
island to John Endicott, Richard Bellingham, 
Daniel Dennison and William Hawthorne. In 
1660 these four proprietors sold the island to 
Doctor John Alcock of Roxbury for £400. Doctor 
Alcock associated with himself some sixteen part- 
ners, who settled the island which was, not long 
after, joined with the Rhode Island Colony, and 
organized as the town of New Shoreham. 

John Williams of Boston, the son of the come- 
overer, Nathaniel Williams, and the son in law of 
Doctor John Alcock, went to Block Island with his 
bride soon after 1670, and there settled. In 1679 
and 1680 and subsequently he was a Deputy from 
New Shoreham to the General Assembly of Rhode 
Island. He acted on several important commit- 
tees in relation to affairs connected with the 
mother country. In 1686 he was made Attorney 
General of Rhode Island and wrote a remonstrance 
to the King against an objectionable writ of quo 
warranto. He probably removed his residence 
from Block Island to Newport about 1685. It was 
in Newport in 1687 that he died. He was only 
forty-three years of age at the time of his death. 
His history indicates that had he lived longer he 



REBECCA BENNETT 1015 

might have had an important influence in the 
development of the Rhode Island Colonies. His 
will, recorded in Boston, provides for his numer- 
ous children, of whom Anna, who married 
Jonathan Bennett, was your ancestress. 

Anna Alcock, your ancestress, the widow of 
John Williams, married in Newport in 1689, 
Eobert Guthrie of Block Island. She died in 
Newport in 1723. Her will, dated September 11, 
1714, is the source from which all this information 
about your Williams, Palgrave, Alcock ancestry 
was derived. She writes "I, Anna Guthrie, late 
of Block Island, relict of Robert Guthrie of Block 
Island, and administratrix on the will of my for- 
mer husband John Williams, of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts . . . give to Ann Bennett, my daughter, 
widow of Jonathan Bennett of Newport" a certain 
lot of land in Newport, and other property. It 
was undoubtedly the financial means of his wife 
as a daughter of John Williams which set 
Jonathan Bennett up in business and enabled him 
to leave a silver tankard to his daughter Rebecca, 
who married Peleg Slocum. So, perhaps, it is 
not strange that she was remembered as a 
"Williams" to my great discomfiture for many 
months, but finally to my great satisfaction in 
solving the riddle of her descent. 



INDEX OF NAMES 



INDEX OF NAMES 

[Compiled by William M. and Margaret C. Emery.] 

This index contains names used only in a genealogical 
sense. The names on the circular charts, in the alphabetical 
List of Comeoverers at page 11, and in the tables preceding 
the respective chapters are not indexed. Women are indexed 
under their maiden names, except when such are not known, 
the form in that case being the wife's Christian name and the 
husband's surname; e. g, "Nicholson, Mrs. Jane," wife of 
Joseph Nicholson. 



Akers, Mrs. Priscilla, 771. 
Akers, Thomas, 771. 
Alcock, Anna, 867, 1009, 

1010, 1012, 1013, 1014, 
1015. 

Alcock, George, 1010, 1011. 
Alcock, Mrs. George, 1010. 
Alcock, John, 867, 1010, 

1011, 1012, 1013, 1014. 
Alcock, Samuel, 1011, 1012. 
Alcott, A. Bronson, 1012. 
Alden, John, 589. 
Aldrich, Duncan Earle, 990. 
Aldrich, Hulbert Stratton, 

990. 
Aldrich, Malcolm Pratt, 990. 
Aldrich, Stanley Alden, 977, 

990. 
Aldrich, Stanley Alden, Jr., 

990. 
Alger, Elizabeth Jane, 943. 
Alger, Hal. Wesley, 943. 
Allen, George, 179 — 185, 

325, 852. 
Allen, James, 181. 
Allen, Jane Grey, 953. 
Allen, Joseph, 148, 184, 185, 

852, 855. 
Allen, Ralph, 171, 181, 182, 

183, 184, 852. 
Allen, Rose, 148, 185, 842, 

850, 852, 855. 
Allen, Mrs. Sarah, 148, 185, 

852, 855. 



Allen, Thomas J., 953. 
Allen, William, 183, 184. 
Allerton, Isaac, 36. 
Almy, Mrs. Abby, 952. 
Almy, Ann, 271. 
Almy, Mrs. Audrey, 271, 878. 
Almy, Christopher, 235, 240, 

241, 258, 271, 273, 274. 

275, 276, 277, 878. 
Almy, Christopher, Second, 

278. 
Almy, Giles Pardon, 954. 
Almy, Giles S., 952, 954. 
Almy, Hope, 277. 
Almy, Job (1696-1771), 

241, 277, 278, 303, 322, 

873 
Almy, Job (1730-1816), 

278, 279, 353, 354, 871, 

873, 875. 
Almy, John, 273. 
Almy, Joseph, 278. 
Almy, Mary, 277, 279, 871. 
Almy, Pardon, 952. 
Almy, Richard, 279. 
Almy, Samuel, 278, 279. 
Almy, Tillinghast, 279. 
Almy, William (1601-1676), 

269 — 279, 79, 878. 
Almy, William (1665-1747), 

260, 277, 278, 279, 873, 

878, 879. 
Almy, "Cousin William," 

330. 



[Volume II oegins at page 521] 



1020 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Anthony, Benjamin, Second, 

1005. 
Anthony, Benjamin Harris, 

1001, 1005. 
Anthony, Catharine Chandler, 

1005. 
Anthony, Edmund, Second, 

1005. 
Anthony, Margaret, 1005. 
Archer, Alice, 668, 669, 893. 
Arnold, Caleb, 321. 
Arnold, Gov. Benedict, 321, 

365. 
Atkinson, Mrs. Abigail, 733, 

734, 735, 898. 
Atkinson, John, 735, 736, 

737, 738, 891, 898. 
Atkinson, Sarah, 730, 738, 

891. 
Atkinson, Theodore, 731 — 

738, 590, 898, 1010. 
Atkinson, Theodore, Jr., 734. 
Atkinson, Theodore, Chief 

Justice, 735. 
Austin, Deborah, 718. 
Aver ill, Sarah, 767. 
Avery, Dr. Jonathan, 69 5. 



Bailey, 

921. 
Bailey, 

565, 
Bailey, 

513, 

564, 
Bailey, 

887, 
Bailey, 

919, 
Bailey, 
Bailey, 
Baker, 
Baker, 
Baker, 
Baker, 

957. 
Baker, 

957. 
Baker, 
Baker, 

957. 



Isaac, 518, 565, 889, 

John (d. 1651), 557, 
444, 889, 921. 

John (1613-1691), 
516, 538, 560, 563, 
889, 921. 

Joshua, 565, 682, 
889, 891. 

Judith, 519, 565, 913, 
921. 

Robert, 564. 
Sarah, 684, 741, 887. 
Adelina T., 969, 983. 
Daniel, 952. 
Daniel, Jr., 952, 954. 
Daniel Webster, 954, 

Edward Young, 954, 

Edith May, 957. 
Elizabeth Howland, 



Baker, Elizabeth, 981. 
Baker, Erland Webster, 957. 
Baker, Gilman E., 957. 
Baker, Gookin, 967, 981. 
Baker, Harold G., 981, 991. 
Baker, Mildred, 991. 
Baker, Mrs. Sarah, 9 52. 
Baker, Stanley Gifford, 957. 
Baker, Virginia, 981. 
Baker, William Stanford, 

981. 
Balcomb, Myra, 970. 
Baliol, John, 363. 
Barstow, Sarah Bosworth, 

952. 
Bartlett, Richard, 112. 
Bath, Earl of, 524. 
Bayley, Anson Whelpley, 

637, 997. 
Bayley, Frederick, 997. 
Bease, Fannie, 967. 
Bedford, Duke of, 159, 163. 
Beetle, Adeline H., 954. 
Bennett, Anna, 342. 
Bennett, Anthony, 749, 750, 

902. 
Bennett, Elizabeth, 749, 750, 

902. 
Bennett, John, 342. 
Bennett, Jonathan, 342, 867, 

1009, 1015. 
Bennett, Jonathan, Jr., 342. 
Bennett, Mrs. Rebecca, 342, 

867. 
Bennett, Rebecca, 342, 343, 

863, 864, 867, 1009 — 1015 

(ancestors). 
Bennett, Robert, 342, 867. 
Bergen, Arnold Trumball, 

992. 
Bergen, Charles Cole, 980. 
Bergen, Elliot Clifford, 992. 
Bergen, Emma Stanford, 

980. 
Bergen, Frederick Robert- 
son, 981. 
Bergen, Garrett Lawrence, 

991. 
Bergen, Garrett P., 967, 

980. 
Bergen, George Clifford, 981, 

992. 



[Volume II begins at page 521~\ 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1021 



Bergen, Harold Boynton, 

991. 
Bergen, Henrietta Stanford, 

980. 
Bergen, Laura, 9 80. 
Bergen, Mary Thompson, 

981. 
Bergen, Samuel White, 980, 

991. 
Bergen, Zacheus, 967, 981. 
Bidwell, Catherine Williams, 

829, 830. 
Bidwell, Chester, 830. 
Binney, Emily, 999, 1002. 
Blackington, Jabez Guy, 941. 
Blackwell, John, 204. 
Blackwell, Mrs. Sarah, 204. 
Blount, Anne, 371. 
Blount, Robert, 371. 
Blount, Walter, Lord Mount- 
joy, 371. 
Blount, Sir Walter, 371, 372. 
Booth, Abraham, 151. 
Borden family, English an- 
cestry of, 251. 
Borden, Amey, 250, 258, 872. 
Borden, Hope, 2 77. 
Borden, Mrs. Joan, 876. 
Borden, John (b. 1606), 255. 
Borden, John (1640-1716), 

256, 257, 258, 275, 418, 

872, 876, 877. 
Borden, Mary, 258, 277, 879. 
Borden, Matthew, 254, 876. 
Borden, Matthew, Second, 

255. 
Borden, Richard, 251 — 260, 

272, 273, 876, 879. 
Borgess, Frances A., 982, 

992. 
Bouchier, Lady Elizabeth, 

524. 
Boynton, Lena, 980, 991. 
Brackett, Peter, 1010. 
Bradbury, Jane, 554. 
Bradbury, Judith, 484, 485, 

494, 497, 550, 920, 928. 
Bradbury, Mary Perkins, The 

Witch, 551 — 556. 
Bradbury, Matthew, 549. 
Bradbury, Robert, 549. 



Bradbury, Thomas, 547 — 

550, 494, 546, 553, 554, 

928. 
Bradbury, Sir Thomas, 549. 
Bradbury, William, 549. 
Bradbury, William, Jr., 549. 
Bradbury, Wymond, 549, 

928. 
Brainerd, Ann Eliza, 971. 
Briggs, Mrs. Content. See 

Content Howland. 
Briggs, Deborah, 151, 152, 

212, 842, 843, 851. 
Briggs, Joan, 295, 874. 
Briggs, John, 205 — 212, 236. 

240, 241, 249, 851, 878. 
Briggs, John, Jr., 210, 211. 
Briggs, Rebecca, 210, 235, 

240, 275, 878. 
Briggs, Thomas, 151, 210, 

211, 212, 851. 
Brigham, Oramel A., 964. 
Brown, Elizabeth, 343, 357, 

407, 863. 
Brown, Mrs. Mary (d. 1655), 

506, 919. 
Brown, Mrs. Mary (d. 1690), 

759. 
Brown, Mary (1635-1716), 

505, 919. 
Brown, Mary (1649-1715), 

759, 902, 905. 
Brown, Nicholas, 406. 
Brown, Nicholson, 407. 
Brown, Offley Tatum, 987. 
Brown, Peter, 184. 
Brown, Priscilla, 184. 
Brown, Thomas, 444, 506, 

919. 
Brown, Tobias, 406. 
Brown, William (d. 1662), 

759, 906. 
Brown, William ( 1696-1739), 

406, 407, 416, 863, 866, 

868. 
Bunker, Mary, 718. 
Burk, Hattie, 9 82. 
Burr, Mary, 601. 
Buswell, Amos, 458. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



1022 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Caldwell, Carolina Maria del 

Carmen, 454, 741, 935. 
Caldwell, Henry M., 454. 
Carlysle, Phebe A., 947. 
Campbell, Dr. Edwin R., 943. 
Campbell, Margery Edwina, 

943. 
Campbell, William Durant, 

943. 
Carr, George, 529 — 540, 554, 

555, 716, 915. 
Carr, James, 538, 539, 540, 

915. 
Carr, John, 554, 555. 
Carr, John, Second, 527, 540, 

915. 
Carr, Judith, 456, 475, 540, 

911, 913, 915. 
Carr, Richard, 538, 539. 
Carr, Richard, Second, 539. 
Carr, William, 554, 555. 
Carter, Caroline, 636, 1000. 
Carter, Caroline Lee, 457, 

1003. 
Carter, Edward Howland, 

1004. 
Carter, Elizabeth Howe, 

1000. 
Carter, Fanny Cannon, 1004. 
Carter, George Tappan, 457, 

638, 1000, 1003. 
Carter, Guy B., 983. 
Carter, Isaac Smith, 1000, 

1004. 
Carter. Mary Esther, 100 4, 

1006. 
Carter, Mary Louise, 1003. 
Carter, Nellie, 1004. 
Carter, Sarah, 363, 865. 
Carter, Sarah Mehitable, 

1000. 
Carter, Thomas, 1000, 1003. 
Carter, Thomas Charles, 997, 

1000. 
Carter, Vincent, 1003. 
Chaille, Dr. Stanford Emer- 
son, 805, 816, 817, 818. 
Chaille, William H., 815, 818. 
Chase, Abner, 330. 
Chase, Anne Almy, 327 — 

330, 5, 151, 174, 207, 231, 

241, 250, 258, 260, 268, 



278, 279, 287, 293, 295, 
303, 322, 326, 353, 418, 
824, 863, 869, 871, 930, 
949, 951. 

Chase, Anne Almy, ancestors 

of, circular charts facing 

pages 232, 870. 
Chase, Aquila (b. 1580), 

523, 524, 926. 
Chase, Aquila (1618-1670), 

521 — 527, 264, 926. 
Chase, Benjamin, 247. 
Chase, Benjamin, Second, 

266. 
Chase, Benjamin, Third, 250, 

258, 268, 872. 
Chase, Benjamin (b. 1747), 

279, 871. 
Chase, Content, 330. 
Chase, Deborah, 330. 
Chase, Elizabeth, 527, 540, 

915. 
Chase, James, 458. 
Chase, John, 189, 195, 841, 

844, 848. 
Chase, Mrs. Mary, 265, 266, 

267, 845. 
Chase, Moses, 526, 527, 915, 

926. 
Chase, Nathan, 293, 294, 

295, 871, 872, 874. 
Chase, Nathaniel, 249, 250, 

844. 
Chase, Rhoda, 152, 227, 841. 
Chase, Sir Richard (b. 1537), 

523, 524. 
Chase, Richard (b. 1542), 

523, 524. 
Chase, Mrs. Sarah, 926. 
Chase, Thomas, 523, 524. 
Chase, Thomas, Second, 524. 
Chase, Thomas, Third, 264, 

523, 524, 525. 
Chase, Sir William, 523, 524. 
Chase, William (d. 1659), 

261 — 268, 845. 
Chase, William (1622-1685), 

265, 266, 267, 268, 845. 
Chase, William (1645-1737), 

249, 250, 268, 844, 845, 

872. 



[Volume II 'begins at page 521~\ 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1023 



Church, Capt. Benjamin, 119, 

120, 162. 
Church, William Norris, Jr., 

977. 
Claibourne, Osbourn, 816. 
Clark, Andrew, 73. 
Clark, Ebenezer, 75. 
Clark, Howard W., 980. 
Clark, James, 73. 
Clark, Jane, 75. 
Clark, John (b. abt. 1640), 

73, 74, 835, 836. 

Clark, John (d. 1760 — ), 

74, 75, 83, 835. 
Clark, John, Third, 75. 
Clark, Mrs. Sarah, 74, 835, 

836. 
Clark, Sarah, 42, 74, 75, 83, 

833, 834, 835. 
Clark, Thomas, 69 — 75, 836. 
Clark, William, 73. 
Clark, William, Second, 75. 
Clarke, Elizabeth Lawrence, 

972. 
Clarke, Prof. Samuel Fessen- 

den, 972. 
Clephane, Pauline J., 979, 

991. 
Clifford, Charles Warren, 

933. 
Clifford, Gov. John Henry, 

933. 
Clifton, Hope. 391, 392. 
Clotaire I, 373, 374. 
Coe, Richard, 9 83. 
Coe, Serena Tappan, 983. 
Coffin, James, 717, 718. 
Coffin, John, 712, 714. 
Coffin, John, Second, 718. 
Coffin, Mary, 718. 
Coffin, Nicholas, 712. 
Coffin, Peter, 712, 713, 896. 
Coffin, Peter, Second, 717. 
Coffin, Major Pine, 711. 
Coffin, Richard, 711. 
Coffin, Sarah, 565, 887, 889, 

891. 
Coffin, Stephen, 718. 
Coffin, Stephen (1665-1725), 

730, 738, 891. 
Coffin, Tristram (1605- 

1681), 709 — 723, 299, 



444, 461, 474, 533, 534, 

535, 536, 649, 661, 662, 

727, 896. 
Coffin, Tristram (1632- 

1704), 714, 717, 721, 722, 

723, 729, 730, 738, 891, 

896, 897. 
Coffin, Tristram Pine, 711. 
Coker, Mrs. Catherine, 451, 

912. 
Coker, Joseph, 451. 
Coker, Robert, 444, 451, 912. 
Coker, Sarah, 451, 452, 912. 
Colcord, Thomas Russell, 

998. 
Cole, Nancy, 953. 
Collins, Rev. William, 630, 

631. 
Cook, Deborah, 260, 277, 

873, 878, 879. 
Cook, John (1631-1691), 

147, 258, 259, 277, 292, 

338, 879. 
Cook, John, Second, 259, 
Cook, Mrs. Mary, 258, 8 79. 
Cook, Thomas, 258, 259, 879. 
Cook, Thomas, Jr., 259. 
Cooke, Francis, 107, 108, 

109, 110, 111, 112, 114, 

115, 116, 858. 
Cooke, John, 105 — 121, 94, 

127, 131, 132, 160, 161, 

162, 173, 203, 313, 858. 
Cooke, Mary, 313. 
Cooke, Sarah, 121, 131, 132, 

133, 195, 858. 
Coombs, Anthony, 3 8. 
Coombs, Caleb, 88. 
Coombs, Francis, 32, 33, 35, 

36, 37, 38, 200, 202. 
Coombs, John, 36, 200, 201. 
Coombs, Mrs. John, 201. See 

Sarah Priest. 
Cope, Elizabeth, 371. 
Cope, Sir John, 371, 373. 
Cope, Sir William, 373, 616. 
Cornell, Elizabeth, 235, 239, 

240, 241, 275, 878. 
Cornell, Thomas, 233 — 241, 

207, 275, 630, 878. 
Cornell, Thomas, Jr., 210, 

241. 



[Volume II begins at page 521~\ 



1024 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Crapo, origin and meaning of 
the name, 19 — 27. 

Crapo, Abiel, 91, 101. 

Crapo, Albert Allen, 947. 

Crapo, Alma, 946. 

Crapo, Mrs. Ann, 40, 41. 

Crapo, Ann M., 946. 

Crapo, Anna Almy, 935. 

Crapo, Mrs. Carolina C. See 
Carolina Maria del Car- 
men Caldwell. 

Crapo, Catherine, 942. 

Crapo, Charles, 101. 

Crapo, Consider, 88, 89, 90. 

Crapo, David, 228. 

Crapo, David, Second, 931, 
946. 

Crapo, Egara, 946. 

Crapo, Elizabeth (b. abt. 
1715), 41. 

Crapo, Elizabeth (1833- 
1906), 947. 

Crapo, Emma Eliza Chase, 
933, 940. 

Crapo, Mrs. Emma M. See 
Emma Morley. 

Crapo, Francis, 33. 

Crapo, Francis (b. 1705), 
40, 41. 

Crapo, George Tappan, 935. 

Crapo, Hannah, 946. 

Crapo, Henrietta Pell, 932. 

Crapo, Gov. Henry Howland, 
32, 89, 100, 101, 152, 189, 
227, 229, 359, 428, 823, 
824. 

Crapo, Henry Howland, Sec- 
ond, 639, 931, 932, 935, 
951. 

Crapo, Hezekiah, 41, 42. 

Crapo, Jane, 946. 

Crapo, Jesse (1781-1831), 
97 — 101, 5, 17, 42, 57, 
68, 74, 83, 90, 93, 95, 
152, 227, 230, 330, 823, 
831, 833, 841, 929, 930, 
931, 946. 
Crapo, Jesse, ancestors of, 
circular charts facing 
pages 18, 832. 
Crapo, Jesse (1841-1895), 
947. 



Crapo, John (1711-1779), 

41, 42, 74, 83, 87, 89, 
833, 834, 835. 

Crapo, John, Jr., 42. 
Crapo, Joseph, 931, 947. 
Crapo, Joshua, 88, 89. 
Crapo, Lucy Anna, 359, 932, 

938. 
Crapo, Lydia Sherman, 933. 
Crapo, Martha, 946. 
Crapo, Mary (b. 1713), 41. 
Crapo, Mary (1842-1868), 

946. 
Crapo, Mary Ann, 932, 934. 
Crapo, Mrs. Mary A. See 

Mary Ann Slocum. 
Crapo, Nicholas, 33. 
Crapo, Nicholas (b. 1721), 

40, 41. 
Crapo, Peter (1670-1756), 

29 — 42, 26, 57, 74, 87, 88, 

101, 144, 200, 202, 834. 
Crapo, Peter, The Second, 

(1743-1822), 85 — 95, 42, 

99, 100, 101, 833. 
Crapo, Peter, (b. 1709), 41, 

42, 87. 

Crapo, Phebe, 947. 

Crapo, Phebe Ann, 931, 948. 

Crapo, Rebecca, 41. 

Crapo, Rebecca Folger, 425, 

932, 936. 
Crapo, Reuben, 101. 
Crapo, Rhoda Macomber, 

932, 939. 
Crapo, Sarah, 947. 
Crapo, Sarah Bush, 9 32, 937. 
Crapo, Mrs. Sarah T. See 

Sarah Davis Tappan. 
Crapo, Seth, 40, 41. 
Crapo, Sophia, 946. 
Crapo, Stanford Tappan, 

181, 685, 742, 823, 827, 

935, 942. 
Crapo, Susanna (b. 1707), 

41. 
Crapo, Susanna (b. 1792), 

91, 92, 93. 
Crapo, Thomas, 946. 
Crapo, Wilhelmina Helena, 

933. 
Crapo, William, 88. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



INDEX OP NAMES 



1025 



Crapo, William H., 947. 

Crapo, William Wallace, 4, 
101, 143, 152, 190, 229, 
329, 330, 353, 357, 358, 
359, 426, 428, 638, 742, 
815, 816, 817, 818, 823, 
825, 932, 935, 969. 

Crapo, William Wallace, 
Second, 1, 821, 823, 942. 

Crapo, William Wallace, 
Second, descent from his 
sixteen great great grand- 
parents, circular chart 
facing page 822. 

Crapo, Maryland village of, 
798. 

Crapo, Michigan village of, 
798. 

Cristy, Bertha, 940, 945. 

Cristy, David, 945. 

Cristy, Harlan Page, 933, 
940. 

Cristy, Harlan Page, Second, 
945. 

Cristy, James Crapo, 940, 
945. 

Cristy, Mary Hunt, 945. 

Cristy, Minnie Crapo, 940, 
945. 

Crocker, Abner Toppan, 962. 

Crocker, Ann Maria, 962, 
972. 

Crocker, Caroline (1816- 
1829), 962. 

Crocker, Caroline (1831- 
1833), 963. 

Crocker, Elizabeth, 962. 

Crocker, George Oliver, 962. 

Crocker, John Franklin Em- 
erson, 963. 

Crocker, Mary Hale, 963, 
972. 

Crocker, Oliver, 742, 809, 
961, 962. 

Crocker, Sophia Toppan, 962, 
971. 

Crocker, William Stanford, 
962. 

Curtiss, Harriet Eugenia, 
994. 

Curtiss, John Christbiel, 
984, 994. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



Curtiss, Pauline Virginia, 

994. 
Cuthbertson, Cuthbert, 36. 
Cutting, John, 445, 916. 
Cutting, Mary, 445, 446, 916. 



D'Amery, Gilbert, 513. 
Davenport, Robert, 549. 
Davis, Aaron (d. 1743), 751, 

768, 901, 902, 904. 
Davis, Aaron (1737-1812), 

751, 752, 753, 901. 
Davis, Aaron (1777-1829), 

791 — 794, 5, 636, 637, 

743, 747, 751, 759, 768, 

772, 773, 789, 826, 899, 

901, 911, 930, 995, 997. 
Davis, Aaron, ancestors of, 

circular charts facing 

pages 744, 900. 
Davis, Aaron Charles (b. 

1815), 997. 
Davis, Aaron Charles (b. 

1816), 997. 
Davis, Mrs. Alice, 748, 902. 
Davis, Eleanor Tracy, 998. 
Davis, Eliphalet, 751. 
Davis, Harriet Maria, 637, 

997, 999. 
Davis, Jacob (d. 1685), 749, 

750, 902. 
Davis, Jacob (1662-1716), 

750, 759, 902. 
Davis, Capt. James, 749, 750. 
Davis, Jethro C, 954. 
Davis, John, 745 — 753, 902. 
Davis, John Wills, 99 8. 
Davis, Marcia Clifton, 954, 

957. 
Davis, Martha Wills, 637, 

997. 
Davis, Mary Knap, 998. 
Davis, Sarah Ann (b. 1805), 

997. 
Davis, Sarah Ann (b. 1806), 

997. 
Davis, Sarah Ann (1810- 

1869), 997, 1000. 
Davis, Serena, 635, 637, 825, 

826, 961, 969, 997. 
Davis, Timothy, 751. 



1026 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Davis, William, 793. 
Davis, Zebulon, 751. 
Davis, Zechariah, 483. 
Day, Anthony, 768, 904. 
Day, David, 751. 
Day, Mrs. Jane, 768, 904. 
Day, Phebe, 751, 768, 901, 

902, 904. 
Day, Timothy (1653-1723), 

767, 768, 904, 908. 

Day, Timothy (1679-1757), 

768, 904. 

Deacon, Mrs. Martha, 908. 
Deacon, Phebe, 766, 767, 

908. 
Deacon, Thomas, 908. 
De Ayola, Donna Sancha, 

371, 372. 
De Grey, Lady Jane, 373. 
Demoranville, Mrs. Susanna, 

41. 
Despenser, Robert de, 373. 
De Toledo, Diego Gomez, 

372. 
De Vassall, Lord, 61. 
Dexter, Charles Rugg, 975. 
Dexter, Eleanor Richardson, 

975, 988. 
Dexter, Frank Gibbs, 975. 
Dexter, Frank G., 988. 
Dexter, Harold A., 988. 
Dexter, Harriet Maria, 975. 
Dexter, John G., 965, 975. 
Dexter John P., 988. 
Dexter, John Wheeler, 975, 

988. 
Dexter, Louis P., 988. 
Dexter, Lucy Ruggles, 975. 
Dexter, Mary Stanford, 975. 
Dickinson, Elizabeth, 953. 
Dillingham, Dorcas, 416, 

422, 868. 
Dillingham, Mrs. Drusilla, 

421, 868. 

Dillingham, Edward, 419 — 

422, 79, 868. 
Dillingham, Rev. Henry, 421. 
Dillingham, Henry (b. 1627), 

421, 422, 868. 
Dole, Sarah, 729, 897. 
Dougherty, Amelia Jane, 973. 
Dow, Henry, 578. 



Dow, Margaret, 578. 
Dryden, Bridget, 371, 373, 

375, 593, 615, 865, 924. 
Dryden, Sir Erasmus, 373. 
Dryden, John, 371. 
Dryden, John, the poet, 373. 
D'Shiell, Anna, 814, 815. 
Dummer, Capt., 660. 
Dummer, Mrs. Alice, 667. 
Dummer, Dorothy, 66 8. 
Dummer, Jane, 659, 663, 

668, 669, 670, 674, 676, 

888, 892, 893. 
Dummer, Mrs. Joan, 667. 
Dummer, John, 667. 
Dummer, John, Second, 667. 
Dummer, John, Third, 667. 
Dummer, Maude, 667. 
Dummer, Mehitable, 668. 
Dummer, Richard, 440, 654, 

658, 668. 
Dummer, Stephen, 665 — 670 

440, 506, 659, 660, 893. 
Dummer, Thomas, 667, 668, 

893. 
Dummer, Thomas, Second, 

668. 
Dummera, Henry de, 667. 
Durant, Margery Pitt, 943. 
Durant, Rebecca Crapo, 936, 

943. 
Durant, Russell Clifford, 

943. 
Durant, William C, 932, 

936. 
Durant, William Crapo, 936, 

943. 
Duryee, Arianna Graves, 810. 
Duryee, Augustus, 979. 
Duryee, Edward, 979. 
Duryee, J. Augustus, 966, 

979. 
Duryee, Margaret Ruggles, 

991. 
Duryee, Pauline Clephane, 

991. 
Duryee, Peter Stanford, 979, 

991. 
Duryee, Philip, 979. 
Duryee, Ruggles, 979. 
Duryee, William, 979. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1027 



Earle, Barnabas, 407. 
Earle, Hannah, 407, 416, 

863, 866, 868. 
Earle, Mary, 418, 872, 876, 

877. 
Earle, Ralph (1606-1678), 

409 — 418, 249, 283, 338, 

868, 877. 
Earle, Ralph (d. 1716), 413, 

414, 415, 416, 868. 
Earle, Ralph (1660-1718), 

416, 422, 868. 
Earle, Ralph, Fourth, 413, 

417. 
Earle, William (b. 1715), 

413, 416, 417, 418, 877. 
Earle, William, Second, 416. 
Easton, Mrs. Content (Slo- 

cum), 393. 
Eaton, Ann, 772, 789, 903. 
Eaton, Benoni, 788, 789, 

903, 907. 
Eaton, Nathaniel, 775 — 789, 

907. 
Eaton, Mrs. Nathaniel 

(Graves), 784, 785, 786, 

787, 788, 907. 
Eaton, Mrs. Rebecca, 789, 

903, 907. 
Eaton, Richard, 779, 907. 
Eaton, Samuel, 779, 780, 

781. 
Eaton, Theophilus, 778, 779, 

780, 781, 782, 783. 
Eddy, Arthur Jerome, 934, 

941. 
Eddy, Jerome Orrell, 941. 
Eggleston, Helen, 952, 955. 
Eggleston, James, 9 52. 
Eldred, Edith Tobey, 973, 

986. 
Ellis, Helen Webster, 947. 
Emery, Albert Livingston, 

990. 
Emery, Agnes, 513. 
Emery, Ann, 501, 504, 513, 

919. 
Emery, Anthony, 513. 
Emery, Calvin, 990. 
Emery, Charles Edward, 990. 
Emery, Eleanor, 513, 538, 

564, 565, 889, 921. 



Emery, John (b. 15 — ), 513. 
Emery, John (1598-1683), 

507 — 519, 444, 501, 564, 

727, 889, 894, 895, 919, 

921. 
Emery, John (1628-1693), 

444, 513, 515, 518, 565, 

889, 894, 895, 921. 
Emery, John (1656-1730), 

519. 
Emery, Katherine, 990. 
Emery, Livingston, 977, 990. 
Emery, Mrs. Mary, 513, 518, 

889, 894, 919, 921. 
Emery, Pauline, 990. 
Emery, Sarah, 518, 565, 889, 

921. 
Empson, Sir Richard, 373. 
Ensign, Catherine, 830. 
Ewer, Mrs. Reliance, 83. 



Faber, Henry, 980. 
Fish, Ambrose, 82. 
Fish, Mrs. Hannah, 82. 
Fisher, Abby Ann Chappee, 

955. 
Fisher, Edward, 211, 212, 

851. 
Fisher, Hannah, 211. 
Fisher, Mrs. Judith, 212, 

851. 
Fisher, Mary, 211, 212, 851. 
Fitzgerald, Elephel, 347, 

348, 349, 350, 352, 353, 

354, 355, 357, 359, 429, 

875. 
Fitzgerald, The, Earl of Kil- 

dare, 347, 348. 
Fitzgerald, Lord Thomas, 

347. 
Folger, George, 425. 
Folger, Peleg Slocum, 427. 
Follansbee, Ann, 526, 527, 

915, 926. 
Follansbee, Mrs. Mary, 527, 

915. 
Follansbee, Thomas, 526, 

527, 915. 
Fowle, Joan, 254, 256, 876, 

879. 



[Volume II begins at page 581] 



1028 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Freedericksz, Baron Alexde, 
940, 945. 

Freedericksz, Alexander Har- 
lan, 945. 

Fuller, Edward 48. 

Fuller, Mrs. Frances, 48. 

Fuller, Robert, 48. 

Fuller, Samuel, 47, 48, 107. 

Fuller, Susanna, 46, 47, 48, 
49, 54, 55, 67, 125, 838. 



Gater, Judith, 497, 543, 546, 
550, 928. 

Gerken, Minnie, 982. 

Gibbs, Thomas, 204. 

Gifford, Ann, 953. 

Gifford, Catherine, 98 8. 

Gifford, Deborah, 952. 

Gifford, Ephraim, 952. 

Gifford, Grace Covill, 954, 
957. 

Gifford, Humphrey A., 988. 

Gifford, James, 954. 

Gifford, Weston, 953. 

Gifford, William Logan Rod- 
man, 975, 988. 

Gilbert, John, 189, 190. 

Gilbert, Mrs. John (Ham- 
mond), 189. 

Gleason, Dolly, 828. 

Godfrey, John, 505, 919. 

Godfrey, Mary, 505, 506, 
919. 

Godfrey, Peter, 501, 505, 
919. 

Goodale, Mrs. Elizabeth, 
649. 

Gould, Capt. John, 766. 

Gould, Priscilla, 766, 767, 
908. 

Gould, Richard, 764, 908. 

Gould, Thomas, 763. 

Gould, Thomas, Jr., 764. 

Gould, Zaccheus, 761 — 768, 
908. 

Graves, Mr., 813. 

Graves, Richard Stanford, 
813. 

Graves, Thomas, 784, 785, 
907. 

Grazebrook, Avery, 653. 



Grazebrook, Margaret, 653, 
892. 

Green, Mrs. Hetty Robin- 
son, 150. 

Greenleaf, Edmund, 725 — 
730, 442, 538, 721, 897. 

Greenleaf, Judith, 721, 723, 
729, 730, 891, 896, 897. 

Greenslit, Maude, 984. 

Grinnell, Isaac W., 947. 

Guthrie, Robert, 1015. 



Hallett, Alice, 73. 
Hallett, Richard 73. 
Hamersley, Helen, 972. 
Hammond, Benjamin, 187 — 

195, 849. 
Hammond, Elizabeth, 193. 
Hammond, Jabez, 189. 
Hammond, John, 194. 
Hammond, Lovina, 195, 841, 

844, 848. 
Hammond, Martha, 193. 
Hammond, Rachel, 193. 
Hammond, Samuel, 38, 133, 

194, 195, 848, 849, 858. 
Hammond, Thomas, 195, 

204, 848. 
Hammond, William, 190, 

191, 192, 193, 849. 
Harding, Harry Brewer, 987, 

994. 
Harding, John Capen, 994. 
Harding, Priscilla, 994. 
Hart, Laura, 940, 945. 
Harvey, William, 337. 
Haskell, Alice Louise, 986. 
Haskell, Amelia Ruggles, 

986. 
Haskell, Eben P., 965, 973. 
Haskell, Edna Winifred, 986. 
Haskell, Edward S., 973, 

986. 
Haskell, Eliza Wheeler, 

986. 
Haskell, George Austin, 984. 
Haskell, George Tappan, 

970. 
Haskell, Harriet Elizabeth, 

984 994. 
Haskell, Helen Stothof, 986. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1029 



Haskell, James Ruggles, 973. 
Haskell, Mrs. Jane, 75. 
Haskell, Jean, 984. 
Haskell, John Paul T., 961, 

970. 
Haskell, John Paul, 984. 
Haskell, John William Clag- 

horn, 970, 984. 
Haskell, Joseph Elnathan, 

970. 
Haskell, Julia Harriet, 970, 

984. 
Haskell, Louise, 984. 
Haskell, Lucy Maria, 970. 
Haskell, Mary, 750, 751, 

759, 902. 
Haskell, Mary Page, 9 84. 
Haskell, Nathaniel, 9 70. 
Haskell, Stanford Linwood, 

986. 
Haskell, William (1617- 

1693), 755 — 759, 905. 
Haskell, William (1644- 

1708), 759, 902, 905, 906. 
Haskell, William H., 973. 
Haskell, William Henry, 970. 
Hathaway. Arthur, 129 — 

133, 94, 117, 121, 195, 

858. 
Hathaway, Content, 91, 94. 
Hathaway, Mary, 133, 195, 

848, 849, 858. 
Haley, Agnes, 371. 
Hawley, Sir Thomas, 371. 
Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 451, 

466. 
Hawthorne, Sarah, 451. 
Hawthorne, William, 451. 
Healey, Esther, 827, 828. 
Healey, Jesse, 828. 
Hill, James. 730. 
Hill, Ignatius, 729. 
Hill, Mrs. Sarah Jordan Wil- 
son. 729, 730. 
Hill, William, 729. 
Hilton, Mary, 915. 
Hilton, William, 537, 538. 
Hindle, Edward Isaac, 1006. 
Hindle, James William, 

1004. 
Hindle, Margaret Carter, 

1006. 



Hobben, Benjamin, 751. 
Hochstrasser, Sarah, 1000, 

1003. 
Holder, Christopher, 381 — 

393, 81, 182, 341, 365, 

367, 377, 378, 379, 403, 

405, 421, 864, 865. 
Holder, Elizabeth, 393. 
Holder, Mary, 340, 341, 367, 

379, 393, 864. 
Holder, William, 384. 
Holland, Lady, 61. 
Holland, Lord, 61. 
Holland, Mr., 805. 
Holmes, Albert Wood, 976, 

989. 
Holmes, Albert Wood, Jr., 

989. 
Holmes, Charles Calvin, 990. 
Holmes, Charles Lincoln, 

977, 990. 
Holmes, Emma C, 954. 
Holmes, Gordon, 989. 
Holmes, Lincoln Pratt, 990. 
Holmes, Stanford, 990. 
Hooker, Thomas, 1010, 1011. 
Howland, Abigail (b. 1672), 

150, 151. 
Howland, Abigail (d. 1686), 

150, 846, 856, 857. 
Howland, Mrs. Abigail 

(d. 1708), 146, 148, 150, 

843, 850, 855, 857. 
Howland, Arthur, 135 — 154, 

170, 847. 

Howland, Benjamin, 150, 

174, 857. 
Howland, Content, 150, 152, 

842. 
Howland, Daniel, 146. 
Howland, David, 152, 841, 

842, 846. 
Howland, Deborah, 154, 170, 

171, 172, 173, 177, 847. 
Howland, Elizabeth, 1000, 

1004. 
Howland, George, 141. 
Howland, Henry (d. 1671), 

135 — 154, 160, 184, 843, 

850. 



[Volume II begins at page 521~\ 



1030 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Howland, Henry (1672- 
1729), 150, 151, 152, 
212, 842, 843, 851. 

Howland, Henry (1757- 
1817), 90, 99, 152, 227, 
841. 

Howland, Humphrey, 141. 

Howland, Isaac, 150. 

Howland, John, 141, 142. 

Howland, Mrs. Margaret, 
154. 

Howland, Nathaniel. 148, 

149, 150, 152, 185, 842, 
850, 852, 855. 

Howland, Peleg Slocum, 427. 

Howland, Phebe, 225 — 230, 

5, 99, 100, 103, 121, 133, 

150, 152, 154. 163, 174, 
181, 185, 189, 195, 204, 
207, 212, 223, 249, 250, 
268, 326, 330, 823, 833, 
839, 841, 929, 930, 931. 

Howland, Phebe, ancestors 
of, circular charts facing 
pages 104, 840. 

Howland, Philip, 426. 

Howland, Rebecca, 150. 846, 
847, 855. 

Howland, Samuel, 145. 

Howland, Mrs. Susanna, 91, 
92, 93. 

Howland, Thomas, 150, 152, 
842. 

Howland, Zoeth, 146, 147, 
148, 150, 151, 843, 850, 
855, 857. 

Hull, Bathsheba, 355. 

Hunt, Anne, 653, 892. 

Hunt, William, 570. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. Anne, 613 
— 632. 193. 207, 216, 236, 
237, 238, 239, 247, 248, 
255, 266, 267, 363, 364, 
365, 371, 374, 375, 376, 
383, 585, 588, 592, 593, 
605, 606, 607, 608, 609, 
656, 727, 734, 924. 

Hutchinson, Bridget, 585, 
587, 588, 590, 592, 593, 
594, 607, 609, 924. 

Hutchinson, Edward (b. 
1564), 605. 



Hutchinson, Edward, Sec- 
ond, 592, 607, 610. 

Hutchinson, Edward, Third, 
592, 607. 

Hutchinson, John (b. 1515), 
605. 

Hutchinson, Mary, 610, 617. 

Hutchinson, Richard, 588, 
590, 592, 607, 610. 

Hutchinson, Samuel, 607, 
610. 

Hutchinson, Mrs. Susanna, 
605, 607, 610. 

Hutchinson, Susanna, 630, 
631. 

Hutchinson, Gov. Thomas, 

610, 611, 622. 
Hutchinson, William, 603 — 

611, 238, 375, 585, 587, 
588, 592, 593, 616, 617, 
624, 626, 627, 629, 924. 

Hutchinson, William, Jr., 

610. 
Hyatt, Ferris F., 932. 



Ingersoll, Bathsheba, 462, 

465, 466, 917. 
Ingersoll, Richard, 463 — 

466, 462, 917. 
Ingersoll, Samuel, 466. 



Jacobs, Mary, 767. 
Jencks, Charles, 953. 
Jencks, Maria Louise, 953. 
Johnston, Walter S., 986. 
Johnston, Walter S., Jr., 
986. 



Keith, Harriet, 984. 
Kember, Anna, 712. 
Kember, Joan, 712, 714, 717, 

896. 
Kember, John, 713. 
Kember, Robert, 712. 
Kennedy, Elizabeth May, 

943. 
Kimball, Hannah, 474, 579, 

580, 918. 
Kimball, Henry, 577. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1031 



58 



Kimball, Richard, 575 

749, 927. 
Kimball, Thomas, 578, 5 

580, 918, 927. 
King, Anna, 62, 63, 66, 8 
King, George, 62. 
Kirby, Mrs. Jane, 882. 
Kirby, Richard, 323 — 3 

148, 882. 
Kirby, Richard, Jr., 1 

151, 325. 
Kirby, Ruhamah, 173, 1 

177, 326, 847, 882. 
Kittredge, Hannah, 964. 
Klise, Mrs. Anna C, 946. 
Knapp, Elizabeth A., 9 

1002. 
Knapp, Isaac, 771, 7 

789, 903. 
Knapp, James, 772. 
Knapp, John, 771, 903. 
Knapp, Mary, 751, 772, 9 
Knapp, Samuel, 772, 7 

901, 903. 
Knapp, William, 769 — 7 

903. 
Knight, Mrs. Elizabeth, 4 

462, 917. 
Knight, John (d. 167 

459 — 462, 444, 516, 9 
Knight, John (1622-167 

446, 462, 917. 
Knight, Mary, 446, 4 

912, 916, 917. 
Knight, Richard, 461. 
Knott, George, 79, 837. 
Knott, Martha, 79, 81, 

837. 
Knott, Mrs. Martha, 81, 8 



1, 
79, 
38. 

26, 
48, 
74, 

99, 

72, 



01. 
73, 

73. 

61. 

0), 

17. 
S). 

62. 



82, 
37. 



Lamb, Anne. 947. 
Lancaster, "Grandma." See 

Sarah Morse Smith. 
Lancaster, Thomas, 636, 

637. 
Langley, Ann, 462, 465, 917. 
Latham, Carey, 310. 
Lawrence, Rev. Amos E., 

962, 972. 
Lawrence, Amos Edward, 

Jr., 972. 



Lawrence, Elizabeth Crocker, 

972. 
Lawrence, George Oliver 

Crocker, 972. 
Lawrence, Gladys, 972. 
Lawton, Rebecca, 407. 
Lawton, Thomas, 311. 
Leach, Albert P., 955, 958. 
Leach, Elsie Annie, 958. 
Leach, Ethel Francis, 958. 
Leach, George W., 955. 
Leach, Mary Barstow, 958. 
Leach, Sarah Manchester, 

958. 
Lenton, Agnes, 371. 
Lenton, John, 371. 
Leonard, Barton, 1006. 
Lewis, Emily Huntington, 

971, 985. 
Lewis, Silas Huntington, 971. 
Little, Edmund Cook, 984. 
Little, Harry Webb, 984. 
Little, Moses, 9 70, 984. 
Lobo, Joseph, 947. 
Long, Deborah, 595, 601, 

602, 914, 924, 925. 
Long, John, 595. 
Long, Robert, 597 — 602, 

585, 925. 
Long, Robert, Jr., 601. 
Long, Zachariah, 599, 601, 

602, 925. 
Lord, Mrs. Abigail, 55. 
Lothrop, Barnabas, 73. 
Lott, Mary, 215, 216, 221. 

856, 859. 
Lott, Mrs. Sarah, 215, 856. 
Lovewell, Wallace, 946. 
Lowe, Eleanor Davis, 1006. 
Lowe, Esther Schofield, 1006. 
Lowe, Philip Carter, 1006. 
Lowe, Stephen C, 1004, 

1006. 
Lowe, Stephen Clifford, Jr., 

1006. 
Lowell, Abner, 457. 
Lowell, Abner, Jr., 457. 
Lowell, Alfred Osgood, 457. 
Lowell, Ezra G., 456. 
Lowell, James Morse, 457. 
Lowell, John Davis, 457. 
Luce, Dorothea Delano, 993. 



[Volume II begins at page 521~\ 



1032 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Luce, Rev. Frank Leonard, 

983, 993. 
Luce, Frank Leonard, Jr.. 

993. 
Luce, Stanford Leonard, 

993. 
Luce, Virginia, 993. 
Luke, Mrs. Elizabeth, 41. 
Lyde, Edward, 734. 



Mabane, Miss, 813. 
MacDonald, Rev. Henry, 

805, 806, 807, 810, 813. 
MacDonald, William, 805, 

811. 
Machett, Susanna, 768, 904. 
Mackenzie, David, 934. 
Maltbie, John Robertson, 
' 987. 

Malve, Minnie, 970. 
Manchester, Allen Tripp, 

952. 
Manchester, Sarah Francis, 

952, 955. 
Mann, Ella Rhoda, 970, 

984. 
Marbury, Anne. See Mrs. 

Anne Hutchinson. 
Marbury, Catherine, 369 — 

379, 363, 364, 365, 367, 

389, 390, 391, 616, 865. 
Marbury, Sir Edward, 371. 
Marbury, Francis, 371, 375, 

378, 606, 615, 616, 865, 

924. 
Marbury, William, 371. 
Marbury, William, Second, 

371. 
Masters, Elizabeth, 310. 
Masters, Mrs. Jane, 314, 880. 
Masters, John, 308, 313, 

314, 880. 
Masters. Lydia, 302, 308, 

313, 314, 880. 
Masters. Nathaniel. 310. 
Mathews, Mrs. Rebecca, 41. 
Mayhew (Mahieu), Hester. 

108, 109, 110. 
Mayhew, Jeanne, 108. 
McCrary, Emma F., 947. 
McVay, Jacob, 829. 



McVay, James Taylor, 829, 
830. 

McVay, Catherine Bidwell, 
827, 829. 

Medford family, 804. 

Medford, William, 805, 809. 

Mendell, Noah T., 965. 

Merrill, Thomas, 453. 

Merrick, Captain, of Llewel- 
lyn, 736. 

Merrick, James, 735, 736, 



891. 
Merrick, 

736. 
Merrick, 

736. 
Merrick, 



John (b. 
John (b. 



1513), 
1579), 
736, 



Sarah, 735, 
737, 738, 891, 898. 
Merrick, William, 736. 
Miller, Mary, 916. 
Millison, William C, 946. 
Moody, Caleb (1637-1698), 

444, 484, 493, 494, 495, 

496, 497, 920, 928. 
Moody, Caleb (1666-1741), 

474, 496, 497, 505, 920. 
Moody, Joshua, 497. 
Moody, Judith (1669-1679) 

497. 
Moody, Judith (b. 1683). 

497. 
Moody, Judith, (1691-1775), 

474, 497, 913, 918, 920. 
Moody, Rev. Samuel, 497. 
Moody, Mrs. Sarah, 493, 920. 
Moody, William, 491 — 497, 

444, 728, 920. 
Moody, William, Second, 

497. 
Moore, Miss, 813. 
More, Sarah, 601. 
Morley, Albert, 827, 828. 
Morlev, Emma, 741, 823, 

827, 935, 942. 
Morley, John Rufus, 827, 

829. 
Morley, Thomas, 827. 
Morse, Anthony (1606- 

1686), 467—475, 444, 

449, 479, 480, 482, 483, 

496, 569, 658, 918, 920, 

922. 



[Volume II oegins at page 521] 



INDEX OP NAMES 



1033 



Morse, Anthony (1688- 

1729), 474, 497, 913, 

918, 920. 
Morse, Benjamin, 473, 496, 

920. 
Morse, Caleb, 475, 913. 
Morse, Mrs. Elizabeth (The 

Newbury Witch), 477 — 

489. 
Morse, Hannah, 473, 569, 

922. 
Morse, James Ordway, 456, 

475, 540, 911, 913, 915. 
Morse, Joshua, 473, 474, 

580, 918. 
Morse, Judith, 454, 456, 457, 

497, 540, 911. 
Morse, Mrs. Mary, 471, 918, 

922. 
Morse, Ruth, 496, 497, 920. 
Morse, Stephen, 475. 
Morse, William, 471, 479 

480, 481, 482, 483, 484, 

485, 486, 487, 488. 
Morton, Ann, 778. 
Morton, Deborah, 37. 
Morton, Thomas, 778. 
Mott, Adam (1596-1661). 

213 — 223, 859. 
Mott, Adam (1623-1673 + ) , 

215, 221, 856, 859. 
Mott, Adam (Bevis), 216. 
Mott, Elizabeth, 221, 223, 

856. 
Mott, John, 216, 217, 218, 

219 859 
Mott, John (b. 1621), 216. 



Nestor, Ann C, 961, 964. 
Newland, Mary, 146, 843, 

850. 
Newland, William, 146. 
Newman, John, 569. 
Newman, Robert, 569. 
Newman, Mrs. Sarah, 569, 

922. 
Newman, Sarah (b. 1722) 

452, 454, 570, 595, 911, 

912, 914. 
Newman, Sarah, Second, 454. 
Newman, Thomas ( + 1634- 

1702 + ), 569, 570, 922. 
Newman, Thomas (d. 1676), 

567 — 570, 749, 922. 
Newman, Thomas (1670- 

1715), 570, 574, 914, 

922, 923. 
Newman, Thomas (1693- 

1729), 452, 570, 595, 914. 
Nichols, Mordecai, 73. 
Nicholson, Christopher, 397, 

398. 
Nicholson, Edmund, 397, 

399. 
Nicholson, Mrs. Elizabeth, 

397, 398. 
Nicholson, Mrs. Jane, 399, 

401, 402, 403, 404, 405, 

406, 866. 

Nicholson, Jane, 405, 406, 

866. 
Nicholson, Joseph, 395 — 

407, 866. 

Northup, Elizabeth, 151. 
Noyes, Ephraim, 438. 



M °oJ a ^ S or. r * ah ' 215, 216 ' Noyes, James, 438, 439, 441 
220, 221, 856. 443 451 661 

A/In Ho-n To m rw *-. U A '__'_ .._ . 



Mudge, James, 694 
Mudge, Jarvis, 694 
Mudge, John, 695. 
Mudge, Martha, 693, 694, 

695, 890. 
Mudge, Mrs. Mary, 694, 890. 
Mudge, Thomas, 694, 890 
Mussey, Harriet, 458. 
Mussey, John, 453, 454, 458. 
Mussey, John, Jr., 454, 458. 
Mussey, Margaret, 458. 
Mussiloway, Daniel, 526. 

[Volume II begins at page 521\ 



Noyes, Martha, 446, 452, 

912. 
Noyes, Nathan, 438. 
Noyes, Nicholas, 435 — 446, 

516, 656, 657, 658, 662, 

722, 916. 
Noyes, Robert, 537. 
Noyes, Timothy, 446, 452, 

462, 912, 916, 917. 
Noyes, Thomas, 474. 
Noyes, William, 437, 438, 

916. 



1034 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Odding, Mrs. Margaret. See 

Mrs. Margaret Porter. 
Odding, Sarah, 249, 844, 

853, 872. 
Oliver, Elizabeth, 532, 915. 
Oliver, Grace, 979. 
Oliver, Thomas, 532. 
Ordway, James (1620- 

1704 + ), 499 — 506, 444, 

516, 519, 660, 919. 
Ordway, James (b. 1687 — ), 

506, 519, 565, 913, 919, 

921 
Ordway, John, 504, 505, 506, 

919. 
Ordway, Sarah, 475, 913. 
Orrell, Esther Morris, 934. 
Orrell, Rev. John, 932, 934. 
Orrell, John Wallace, 934. 
Orrell, Lizzie French, 9 34. 
Orrell, Lucy Crapo, 934, 941. 
Orrell, Mary Florence, 934, 

941. 
Orrell, Robert Whaley, 941. 
Orrell, William Crapo, 934, 

941. 
Osgood, Alfred, 457. 
Osgood, Alfred, Jr., 457. 
Osgood, Mrs. Alfred, 638. 
Osgood, Charlotte, 457. 
Osgood, Charlotte, Second, 

457, 1000, 1003. 
Osgood, Florence, 457. 
Osgood, John, 457. 
Osgood, Mary Ann, 457, 458. 
Osgood, Nathaniel Smith. 

457, 1000. 
Osgood, William Henry, 457. 



Paine, Alice, 284. 

Paine, Anthony, 284, 883. 

Paine, Mary, 284, 883. 

Paine, Rose, 284. 

Palgrave, Mrs. Anne, 1013. 

Palgrave, Richard, 1012, 

1013. 
Palgrave, Sarah, 867, 1012, 

1013. 
Parker, Anne, 437, 438, 916. 



Parker, Rev. Thomas, 438, 

439, 441, 443, 444, 451, 

493, 569, 661. 
Parker, Robert, 437. 
Parsons, Sarah, 45 8. 
Parsons, Chief Justice Theo- 

philus, 750. 
Partridge, Elizabeth, 201. 
Paterson, Mary Bertha, 984. 
Patterson, Jeannie, 817. 
Patterson, Mary, 816, 817. 
Patterson, Mary, Second, 

817. 
Patterson, William, 817. 
Peabody, George, 453. 
Peabody, John, 453, 456. 
Peabody, Mrs. John, 453. 
Peabody, Sarah, 453. 
Peabody, Sophronia, 453. 
Peirce, Arthur, 1001. 
Peirce, Charles Henry, 999, 

1001. 
Peirce, Charlotte, 1001. 
Peirce, Harriet Davis, 1001, 

1005. 

Margaret Serena, 



William Tappan, 



Peirce, 

1001. 
Peirce, 

1001. 
Penn, Elizabeth, 190, 191. 

192, 193, 194, 849. 
Penn, George, 190. 
Penn, William, 190, 191, 
Penn, Sir William, 190, 191. 

192. 
Penn, William, Third, 191, 

192, 384. 
Perkins, Mary. See Mary 

Perkins Bradbury. 
Perkins, John, 541 — 546, 

550, 569, 928. 
Perkins, John, Jr., 544. 
Perkins, Lydia, 544. 
Perkins, Mary, 551 — 556, 

484, 494, 546, 550, 928. 
Perry, Hannah, 421, 422, 

868. 
Peterson, Boerum C, 968, 

983. 
Peterson, Susan Thompson, 

983, 993. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1035 



Pettingill, John, 454. 
Pharaman, King of West 

Franks in Gaul, 374. 
Phillips, Elizabeth, 570, 

595, 914. 
Phillips, Mrs. Mary, 585. 
Phillips, Nathaniel, 593, 

595. 
Phillips, Samuel, 593, 594. 
Phillips, William, First, 

586. 
Phillips, Major William 

(1607-1683), 583 — 595, 

924. 
Phillips, William (1660- 

1705), 585, 593, 594, 

595, 601, 914, 924, 925. 
Pierce, Daniel, 493. 
Pierce, Sara, 493. 
Pike, Jacob, 45 8. 
Pitt, Clara, 936, 943. 
Porter, James P., 975. 
Porter, John, 249. 
Porter, Llewellyn P., 975. 
Porter, Mrs. Margaret, 249, 

853. 
Potts, Hugh J., 946. 
Powell, Caleb, 481, 482, 

487, 488. 
Powers, James E., 966. 
Pranet, Ida, 978. 
Pratt, Albert H., 977. 
Pratt, Anna Stanford, 977, 

990. 
Pratt, Mrs. Bathsheba, 202, 

854. 
Pratt, Benajah, 202. 
Pratt, Judge Calvin E., 966, 

977. 
Pratt, Calvin E., Jr., 977. 
Pratt, Edward Lee, 977. 
Pratt, Hannah, 202, 203, 

249, 854. 
Pratt, Jane Stratton, 977, 

990. 
Pratt, Joshua, 202, 854. 
Pratt, Mary Barker, 37. 
Pratt, Phineas, 36. 
Pratt, Polly Clapp, 977, 990. 
Pratt, Samuel, 37. 
Pratt, Susan Ruggles, 977. 
Preble, Mrs. Harriet, 458. 



Priest, Degory, 36. 
Priest, Sarah, 36, 201. 
Priest, Samuel, 36. 
Pritchett, Mrs. Chebed, 803. 
Pyldryn. See Dummer. 



Raleigh, Bridget, 373. 
Raleigh, Edward, 373. 
Raleigh, Sir Edward, Lord of 

Farnborough, 373. 
Raleigh, Sir Walter, 373. 
Ralston, Andrew M., 946. 
Rands, 454. 
Rand, John, 458. 
Rand, John, Jr., 458. 
Rayner, Mary, 691, 693. 
Read, Samuel D., 953. 
Read, Samuel M., 953. 
Reed, Mrs. Margaret. See 

Mrs. Arthur Howland. 
Reed, Sarah Jane, 953, 956. 
Remington, Nelly, 827. 
Reynolds, Sarah, 947. 
Ricketson, Jonathan, 150, 

223, 846, 856, 857. 
Ricketson, .Rebecca, 214, 846. 
Ricketson, William, 221, 

222, 223, 856. 
Rilley, Ellen M., 948. 
Ring, Andrew, 72. 
Ring, Mrs. Mary, 72, 836. 
Ring, Susanna, 72, 73, 836. 
Robbins, Catherine Ruggles, 

974, 987. 
Robbins, Charles S., 974. 
Robbins, Daniel T., 965, 974. 
Roberts, Elizabeth, 599. 
Robinson, Abraham, 759, 

906. 
Robinson, Rev. John, 759. 
Robinson, Mrs. Mary, 759, 

906. 
Robinson, Mary, 772, 901. 

903. 
Robinson, Robert, 772, 901. 
Roe, Clara Linwood, 973, 

986. 
Rogers, Grace Agnes, 976, 

989. 
Ross, Alphonso, 932, 937. 
Ross, Mary Crapo, 93 7. 



[Volume II begins at page 521~\ 



1036 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Ross, Sarah Crapo, 937, 944. 
Rugg, Charles Parks, 965, 

976. 
Rugg, Charles Parks, Jr., 

976. 
Rugg, Charles Parks, Third, 

989. 
Rugg, Elizabeth Stanford, 

976, 989. 
Rugg, George, 976, 989. 
Rugg, Gertrude Rogers, 989. 
Ruggles, Arianna Graves, 

966, 979. 
Ruggles, Catherine Bonney. 

965, 975. 

Ruggles, Eliza Thompson, 

966, 978. 

Ruggles, Elizabeth Crocker, 

965, 974. 
Ruggles, Harriet M. T., 965, 

973. 
Ruggles, Henry, 965. 
Ruggles, James, 961, 965. 
Ruggles, Lucy, 96 5. 
Ruggles, Lucy Toppan, 966. 
Ruggles, Mary Elizabeth 

Clapp, 965. 
Ruggles, Mary Phillips, 965, 

976. 
Ruggles, Susan Taber, 966, 

977. 
Ruggles, William, 965. 
Russell, Anne, 61. 
Russell, Mrs. Dorothy, 159, 

163, 847. 
Russell, James, 150, 174, 

175, 846, 847, 855. 
Russell, Jonathan, 163, 174, 

847. 
Russell, John, 155 — 163, 

117, 132, 172, 173, 184, 

210, 416, 847. 
Russell, Joseph, 157. 
Russell, Lavinia, 152, 223, 

841, 842, 846. 
Russell, Paul, 214, 846. 
Russell, Ralph, 157, 158, 

159, 325. 
Russum children, 805, 808. 
Russum, Mrs. Esther, 805. 
Russum, William, 815. 
Russum, William P., 815. 



Safford, Harriet, 971. 
Salt, Albert Lincoln, 981. 
Salt, Lloyd Bergen, 981. 
Sampson, Judith, 150, 857. 
Sands, James, 417, 418. 
Sanford, Elizabeth, 951. 
Sanford, Gov. John, 585, 

587, 593, 609. 
Sanford, John, 951. 
Sanford, Gov. Peleg, 589. 

593. 
Savage, Joan, 413, 868, 877. 
Sawyer, Mrs. Ruth, 496, 920. 
Sawyer, Ruth, 496, 920. 
Sawyer, William, 496, 497, 

920. 
Schrilling, Mary S., 975, 988. 
Scott, Edward, 363, 865. 
Scott, Henry, 577, 927. 
Scott, John, 365. 
Scott, Mrs. Martha, 577, 927. 
Scott, Mary, 367, 378, 391, 

392, 393, 864, 865. 
Scott, Patience, 390. 
Scott, Richard 361 — 367, 

193, 375, 376, 377, 379, 

389, 390, 391, 393, 865. 
Scott, Richard, Jr., 365. 
Scott, Thomas, 577. 
Scott, Ursula, 577, 927. 
Scottoe, Thomas. 73, 618. 
Sears, Mary, 539, 540, 915. 
Sears, Thomas, 915. 
Seavey, Marion Hutchinson, 

1006. 
Sennet, Mrs. Mary, 574, 923. 
Sennet, Mary, 570, 573, 574, 

923. 
Sennet, Walter, 574, 923. 
Severance, Mary, 718. 
Sewall, Hannah, 671 — 685, 

659, 660, 661, 662, 888. 
Sewall, Mrs. Hannah Fessen- 

den, 682, 683. 
Sewall, Henry (1544-1628), 

653, 892. 
Sewall, Henry (1576-1657), 

651 — 663, 68, 440, 442, 

444, 649, 721, 892. 



[Vohime II begins at page 521] 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1037 



Sewall, Henry (1614-1700). 

472, 497, 545, 653, 654, 

655, 656, 657, 658, 659, 

660, 661, 662, 663, 668, 

669, 670, 674, 675, 676, 

677, 679, 680, 684, 888, 

892, 893. 
Sewall, Jane, 660. 
Sewall, John, 660, 669, 682, 

684. 
Sewall, John, Second, 683. 
Sewall, Mehitable, 497. 
Sewall, Judge Samuel, 388, 

413, 486, 497, 519, 539. 

553, 573, 646, 647, 653, 

657, 659, 660, 661, 662, 

667, 668, 669, 670, 679. 

680, 681, 682, 683, 684, 

690, 723, 734. 
Sewall, Samuel, Jr., 653, 

669. 
Sewall, Stephen, 660, 684. 
Shafer, John, 946. 
Shatswell, John, 519, 895. 
Shatswell, Mary, 518, 519. 

895. 
Shaw, Anthony, 289 — 295, 

312, 874. 
Shaw, Elizabeth, 293, 294, 

295, 871, 872, 874. 
Shaw, Israel, 292, 293, 874. 
Shaw, Mrs. Israel (Tall- 
man), 293, 295, 874. 
Sherman, Abigail, 249, 250, 

844. 
Sherman, Hannah, 249, 250, 

844, 845, 872. 
Sherman, Henry, 247. 
Sherman, Henry, Jr., 247. 
Sherman, John, 203, 249, 

844, 853, 854, 
Sherman, Philip, 243 — 250, 

209, 267, 273, 274, 283, 

844, 853, 872. 
Sherman, Mrs. Philippa, 247, 

853. 
Sherman, Philippa, 247. 
Sherman, Samuel, 2 47, 853. 
Sisson, Allen, 931. 
Sisson, Anne, 178, 285, 286, 

287, 883. 
Sisson, Mrs. Elizabeth, 931. 



Sisson, Mrs. Mary, 285, 883. 
Sisson, Richard, 285, 286, 

883. 
Sisson, Richard, Jr., 286. 
Sisson, Sarah, 931, 947. 
Skinner, William, 595. 
Slocums, of Barney's Joy, 

181. 
Slocum, Abner, 952. 
Slocum, Abner George, 953. 
Slocum, Aeria, 431, 952, 954. 
Slocum, Ann, 278, 279, 353, 

354, 871, 873, 875. 
Slocum, Ann Elizabeth, 9 52, 

953. 
Slocum, Anthony, 335, 336, 

337. 
Slocum, Benjamin, 354, 355. 
Slocum, Benjamin, Second, 

354, 355. 
Slocum, Benjamin Chase, 

431, 951. 
Slocum, Caleb, 425, 427. 
Slocum, Catherine, 343. 
Slocum, Christopher, 952, 

953. 
Slocum, Deborah, 426, 428. 
Slocum, Ebenezer, 354, 355. 
Slocum, Eliezer (1644-1727), 

345 — 359, 339, 429, 875. 
Slocum, Eliezer (1693-1738), 

178, 354, 357, 875. 
Slocum, George Folger, 359, 

431, 951, 952. 
Slocum, Giles, 333 — 343, 

158, 222, 259, 292, 347, 

349, 350, 352, 425, 864, 

875. 
Slocum, Giles, Jr., 222. 
Slocum, Giles, Third, 343. 
Slocum, Giles, Fourth, 393. 
Slocum, Hannah, 425, 427. 
Slocum, Henry Howland. 

952, 955. 
Slocum, Henry Howland, 

Second, 956. 
Slocum, Jabez Howland, 953, 

956. 
Slocum, James Ray, 955. 
Slocum, Jane Brown, 429, 

430, 431, 951. 



[Volume II begins at page 5%1] 



1038 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Slocum, Jennie Francis, 955, 

958. 
Slocum, Jessie Harriet, 955. 
Slocum, Mrs. Joan, 338, 339, 

864, 875. 
Slocum, John, 337. 
Slocum, John, Second, 354, 

355. 
Slocum, Jonathan, 343. 
Slocum, Joseph, 337. 
Slocum, Mabelle Grey, 9 56. 
Slocum, Mrs. Maribah, 354. 
Slocum, Mary Ann, 329, 353, 

359, 425, 430, 823, 824, 

931, 932, 951. 
Slocum, Mehitable, 426, 427. 
Slocum, Peleg (1654-1733), 

339, 340, 341, 347, 350, 

352, 356, 367, 379, 393, 

425, 864. 
Slocum, Peleg (1692-1728), 

341, 342, 343, 356, 393, 

425, 863, 864, 867. 
Slocum, Peleg (1727-1810), 

343, 355, 356, 357, 407, 

425, 427, 863. 
Slocum, Rebecca, 42 5. 
Slocum, Roy William, 955. 
Slocum, Ruth Ann, 956. 
Slocum, Sarah Isabelle, 955. 
Slocum, Silas Perry, 952, 

955. 
Slocum, Sylvia Ann, 953. 
Slocum, Williams (1761- 

1834), 423 — 431, 5, 330, 

331, 343, 355, 357, 359, 

367, 393, 407, 416, 422, 

824, 861, 863, 871, 930, 

949, 951, 1007. 
Slocum, Williams, ancestors 

of, circular charts facing 

pages 332, 862. 
Slocum, Williams (1839- 

1854), 952. 
Smith, Carrie L., 981, 991. 
Smith, Charles Augustus, 

999 1002. 
Smith,' Charles Otis, 1002. 
Smith, Charles Rand, 637, 

997, 999. 
Smith, Charlotte Hinckley, 

999, 1001. 



Smith, Crapo Cornell, 938. 
Smith, David C, 967. 
Smith, Deborah, 178, 875. 
Smith, Deliverance, 174, 175, 

176, 177, 178, 287, 326, 

875, 882, 883. 
Smith, Emily Hope, 1002. 
Smith, Gertrude Binney, 

1002. 
Smith, Harriet, 457, 458. 
Smith, Hasadiah, 163, 173, 

847. 
Smith, Henrietta Crapo, 938. 
Smith, Humphrey Henry 

Howland Crapo, 932, 938. 
Smith, James, 444, 450, 451. 

452, 471, 912. 
Smith, Mrs. Joanna, 579, 

918 
Smith, John, Sr., 168. 
Smith, John, Jr., 165 — 178, 

154, 163, 287, 326, 347, 

882. 
Smith, Rev. John, 168, 169. 
Smith, John, of Ipswich, 

595. 
Smith, John Pettingill, 457, 

458. 
Smith, Gov. John Gregory. 

971. 
Smith, Judah, 174. 
Smith, Judith, 456, 457. 
Smith, Julia Burnett, 971. 
Smith, Leonard, 452, 453, 

455, 456, 458. 
Smith, Martha, 452, 454. 
Smith, Martha Wills, 457, 

458. 
Smith, Martin S., 940. 
Smith, Mary (d. 1686 + ), 

579, 580, 918, 927. 
Smith, Mary, Second, 452, 

453. 
Smith, Mary, Third, 457, 

638. 
Smith, Mehitable, 457, 458. 
Smith, Nathaniel, 452, 453, 

454, 455, 456, 457, 752, 

808, 911. 
Smith, Mrs. Rebecca, 449, 

450, 912. 
Smith, Sarah, 452, 454. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1039 



Smith, Sarah Morse (1780- 
1869), 633 — 640, 5, 207, 
264, 433, 446, 453, 456, 
457, 458, 462, 475, 497, 
506, 527, 540, 565, 570, 
595, 751, 794, 826, 901. 
909, 930, 995, 997. 

Smith, Sarah Morse, ances- 
tors of, circular charts 
facing pages 434, 910. 

Smith, Sarah Morse (1841- 
1844), 999. 

Smith, Sophia, 453. 

Smith, Thomas (d. 1666), 
447 — 458, 471, 912. 

Smith, Thomas (1639-1648), 
449, 471. 

Smith, Thomas (1654-1675), 
449 450 694. 

Smith,' Thomas (1673-1760), 
446, 452, 912. 

Smith, Thomas (1723-1758), 
452, 454, 570, 595, 911, 
912, 914. 

Smith, Thomas, of Ipswich. 
579 918. 

Smith,' William Alfred, 1002. 

Smith, William Binney, 1002. 

Smith, William Charles, 999, 
1002. 

Snell, Josephine M., 975. 

Snow, Charles Henry, 948. 

Snow, David Sylvester, 948. 

Snow, Emma Adelaide, 948. 

Snow, Mary A. H., 948. 

Snow, Sylvester, 931, 948. 

Somerby, Henry, 721, 728. 

Sowle, Marcia, 931, 946. 

Sparhawk, Sybil, 695, 696. 

Spark, John, 571—574, 570, 
923. 

Spark, Rose, 570, 574, 914, 

• 922, 923. 

Spencer, Frances A., 939, 
944. 

Spencer, Jane, 373. 

Spenser, Edmund, 373. 

Spooner, Alice, 204. 

Spooner, Mrs. Ann, 200. 

Spooner, John, 200. 

Spooner, Mary, 204. 



Spooner, Sarah (1653- 

1720 + ), 203, 249, 844, 

853, 854. 
Spooner, Sarah (1700- 

1724 + ), 195, 204, 848. 
Spooner, Thomas, 200. 
Spooner, William (d. 1684), 

197—204, 36, 117, 195, 

249, 854. 
Spooner, William (abt. 1657- 

1735 + ), 203, 204, 848. 
Spooner, Mrs. Mary, 41. 
Sprague, Dorcas, 413, 414, 

415, 868. 
Sprague, Francis, 413, 414, 

415, 868. 
Sprague, Mrs. Lydia, 414, 

868. 
Stafford, Mrs. Elizabeth, 322 

881. 
Stafford, Freelove, 322, 873, 

880, 881. 
Stafford, Samuel, 322, 881. 
Stafford, Thomas, 315 — 322 

881. 
Stanford, Algernon Sydney, 

805, 808, 812, 813, 814, 
815. 

Stanford, Arianna, 805, 812. 
Stanford, Arianna, Second, 

813. 
Stanford, Arianna, Third, 

807, 811, 817. 
Stanford, Celia, 805. 
Stanford, Charles, 801. 
Stanford, Chebed, 803. 
Stanford, Dr. Clement, 805, 

806, 807, 808, 810, 811, 
812, 813, 814, 815, 817. 

Stanford, Clement, Jr., 806, 

807, 815, 816. 
Stanford, Elizabeth, 802. 
Stanford, Mrs. Elizabeth, 

wife of John, 801. 

Stanford, Mrs. Elizabeth, 
wife of William, 802, 803. 

Stanford, Mrs. Elizabeth, 
wife of Richard, 804, 805! 

Stanford, Elizabeth (1770- 
1844), 795 — 818 (and an- 
cestors), 5, 741, 742, 825, 
887, 930, 959, 961. 



[Volume II begins at page 5S1] 



1040 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Stanford, Esther Ann, 811, 

815. 
Stanford, Henrietta, 805, 

811. 
Stanford, Henrietta, Second, 

814, 815. 
Stanford, Henrietta Eliza- 
beth, 815. 
Stanford, John, 800, 801. 
Stanford, John, Second, 800. 
Stanford John, Third, 801, 

802 803 
Stanford, John, Fourth, 802. 
Stanford, Joseph, 801. 
Stanford, Margaret, 802. 
Stanford, Mary Eunice, 815, 

816, 818. 
Stanford, Rebecca, 803. 
Stanford, Richard (b. 1610). 

799. 
Stanford, Richard (1743- 

1785), 798, 802, 803, 804, 

805, 808, 809, 818. 
Stanford, Richard (176 8- 

1816), 805, 808, 811, 812, 

813 
Stanford, Rhody, 803. 
Stanford, Robert, 805. 
Stanford, Samuel, 801. 
Stanford, Sarah, 803. 
Stanford, Sarah Ann, 815. 
Stanford, Thomas, 800, 801. 
Stanford, William, 801. 
Stanford, William, Second, 

802. 
Stanford, William, Third, 

802, 803, 807. 
Stanford, William, Fourth, 

805. 
Stanford, William, Fifth, 

807. 
Stanley, Christopher, 585, 

587. 
Stanley, Mrs. Susanna (Phil- 
lips), 585, 586, 587. 
Staplefoot, Mrs. Sarah, 803. 
Starbuck, Nathaniel, 718. 
Stevens, Alice, 601. 
Stevens, Dr. Calvin, 962, 

971. 
Stevens, Mrs. Dionis, 713, 

714, 896. 



Stevens, Dionis, 714, 715, 
716, 721, 896. 

Stevens, Oliver Crocker, 9 71. 

Stevens, Philip Greeley, 985. 

Stevens, Robert, 714, 896. 

Stevens, Stanford Hunting- 
ton, 9 85. 

Stevens, William Stanford, 
971, 985. 

Stevens, William Stanford, 
Jr., 985. 

Stewart, Samuel Sidney, 943. 

Stewart, Samuel Sidney, Jr., 
943. 

Stickney, Dr. Charles Dick- 
inson, 963, 972. 

Stickney, Charles Dickinson. 
Jr. 972. 

Stith' Mr.,' 813. 

Stonard, Alice, 292, 293, 
874. 

Stonard, John, 292, 874. 

Stonard, Margaret, 292, 874. 

Stothof, A. S., 966. 

Strange, Lot, 285, 294. 

Stratton, Elephal, 594. 

Sweat, Mrs. Margaret, 458. 

Swigart, James, 946. 



Taber, Mrs. Jane, 313. 
Tabor, John, 309. 
Tabor, Lydia, 302, 312, 880. 
Tabor, Philip, 305 — 314, 

293, 302, 880. 
Tabor, Philip, Jr., 313. 
Tabor, Rev. Philip, 313. 
Tallman, Mrs. Ann, 295. 
Tallman, Peter, 289 — 295, 

311, 874. 
Tallman, Mrs. Esther, 29 5. 
Tappan, Charles A., 969. 
Tappan, George (1807- 

1857), 637, 646, 649, 650. 

742, 825, 826, 961, 969, 

997. 
Tappan, George (b. 1870), 

983. 
Tappan, George A., (b. 

1830), 969. 
Tappan, George A., (b. 

1832), 969. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1041 



Tappan, Harold Harding, 

983. 
Tappan, Sarah Crapo, 983. 
Tappan, Sarah Davis, 4, 3 4, 

430, 431, 458, 635, 637, 

638, 639, 741, 742, 804, 

805, 809, 810, 812, 815, 

816, 817, 818, 823, 825, 

932, 935, 969. 
Tappan, Mrs. Serena D. See 

Serena Davis. 
Tappan, Serena Davis (1834- 

1838), 969. 
Tappan, Stanford Davis, 9 83. 
Tappan, William Crocker, 

969, 983. 
Taylor, Mrs. Elizabeth, 649. 
Taylor, John, 599, 925. 
Taylor, Mary, 829. 
Taylor, Sarah, 599, 925. 
Taylor, Susanna, 649, 673, 

674, 676, 888. 
Thompson, Abner Toppan, 

968. 
Thompson, Ann Maria, 96 8, 

983. 
Thompson, Ann Maria C, 

968. 
Thompson, Arianna, 967. 
Thompson, Arthur Porter, 

982. 
Thompson, Carolyn Pierson, 

993. 
Thompson, Charlotte M., 

992. 
Thompson, Elizabeth E., 967, 

981. 
Thompson, Emily Lucille, 

992. 
Thompson, Ford De Camp, 

982. 
Thompson, Frank Bergen, 

982. 
Thompson, Georgiana, 968. 
Thompson, Henrietta, 967, 

980. 
Thompson, J. Alfred, 982, 

992. 
Thompson, J. Alfred, Jr., 

992. 
Thompson, Louis F., 992. 



Thompson, Louis Soner, 982, 

993. 
Thompson, Marrie F., 992. 
Thompson, Mary Ford, 982. 
Thompson, Mary N., 967, 

980. 
Thompson, Mary Tooker, 

993. 
Thompson, Ralph F., 992. 
Thompson, Robert Augustus, 

982, 992. 
Thompson, Robert Westfield, 

992. 
Thompson, Samuel Callaway, 

982. 
Thompson, Samuel W., 961, 

967. 
Thompson, Samuel W., Jr., 

967, 982. 
Thompson, Sophia C, 967, 

981. 
Thompson, Stewart Vaughn, 

993. 
Thompson, Susan De Camp, 

982. 
Thompson, Thomas W., 967. 
Thompson, Warren Hinch- 

man, 992. 
Thurston, Edward, 220, 221. 
Tibbot (Tibbets), Mary, 758, 

759, 905. 
Tibbot (Tibbets), Walter, 

758, 905. 
Tidd, Joshua, 602, 925. 
Tidd, Mrs. Sarah, 602, 925. 
Tidd, Sarah, 601, 602, 925. 
Tillinghast, Joseph, 302, 303, 

873, 880, 881. 
Tillinghast, Lydia, 278, 303, 

322, 873. 
Tillinghast, Martha, 355. 
Tillinghast, Pardon, 297 — 

303, 272, 312, 318, 880. 
Tillinghast, Mrs. Pardon 

(Butterworth), 302. 
Tobey, Francis, 82, 83. 
Tobey, Mrs. Jane, 82, 835, 

83 7 
Tobey, John, 82, 835, 837. 
Tobey, Mary, 74, 75, 835. 
Tobey, Reliance, 83. 
Tobey, Thomas, 77 — 83, 837. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 



1042 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



Tooker, J. Alfred, 967. 
Tooker, Mary Ford, 967, 982. 
Tooker, Mrs. Susan Hinch- 

man, 967. 
Topham (Toppan) , Anthony, 

646. 
Topham, Edward, 646. 
Topham, Henry, 646. 
Topham, Lieut. Col. Henry, 

647, 648. 
Topham, Mrs. Isabel, 646. 
Topham, Isabella, 646. 
Topham, John, 645, 646. 
Topham, Lawrence, 646. 
Topham, Mrs. Margaret, 646. 
Topham, Robert, 645, 646. 
Topham, Thomas, 646. 
Topham, William, 646. 
Topham, William, Second, 

646. 
Toppan. See also Tappan 

and Topham. 
Toppan, Abner (1764-1792), 

739—742, 5, 565, 641, 

685, 730, 738, 805, 809, 

825, 884, 887, 930, 959, 

961. 
Toppan, Abner, ancestors of, 

circular charts facing 

pages 642, 886. 
Toppan, Abner (1797-1883), 

742, 804, 961, 964. 
Toppan, Abraham (1606- 

1672), 643 — 650, 442, 

444, 502, 516, 538, 661, 

662, 669, 673, 674, 675, 

676, 721, 728, 888. 
Toppan, Abraham (b. 1684), 

450, 679, 682, 683, 684, 

887, 888, 890. 
Toppan, Arianna, 742, 961, 

967. 
Toppan, Rev. Christopher, 

662, 669, 684. 
Toppan, Edward, 684, 685, 

741, 887. 

Toppan, Edward, Jr., 741. 
Toppan, Elizabeth, 645. 
Toppan, Elizabeth, Second. 

742, 961, 965. 

Toppan, Elizabeth Stanford, 
804, 964. 



Toppan, Mrs. Hannah. See 

Hannah Sewall. 
Toppan, Harriet, 742. 
Toppan, Harriet Maria, 961, 

970. 
Toppan, Jacob, 671 — 685, 

450, 497, 502, 519, 647, 

648, 649, 660, 662, 888. 
Toppan, Jane, 680, 682, 683. 
"Toppan," Jane, 964. 
Toppan, John, 673. 
Toppan, John, Second, 450, 

497. 
Toppan, Oliver Crocker, 964. 
Toppan, Peter, 502, 645, 

670, 674, 675, 676. 
Toppan, Richard Stanford 

(1799-1817), 961. 
Toppan, Richard Stanford 

(b. 1829), 964. 
Toppan, Samuel, 679, 680. 
Toppan, Samuel, Second, 

684. 
Toppan, Sophia, 742, 809, 

961, 962. 
Toppan, Stanford, 742. 
Toppan, Susanna, 645. 
Toppan, William, 809, 961. 
Townley, Lord, 264, 524. 
Tripp, John, 281 — 287, 256, 

413, 883. 
Tripp, Mary, 178, 287, 875, 

882, 883. 
Tripp, Peleg, 178, 284, 285, 

286, 287, 883. 
True, Jemima, 554. 
True, Henry, 554. 
Trumball, Edith, 981, 992. 
Tupper, Rev. Myron, 946. 
Turner, John, 466. 



Unger, Daniel, 946. 
Usher, Samuel, 975. 



Van Houten, Henry, 9 46. 
Vassall, Ann, 63. 
Vassall, Francis, 63. 
Vassall, John, 61. 
Vassall, John, Jr., 61, 62. 



[Volume II begins at page 521~\ 



INDEX OF NAMES 



1043 



Vassall, John, Third, 63, 67, 

68. 
Vassall, Col. John, 68. 
Vassall, Judith, 59 — 68, 54, 

55, 838. 
Vassall, Margaret, 63. 
Vassall, Mary, 63. 
Vassall, Samuel, 61, 62, 67. 
Vassall, William, 54, 55, 61, 

62, 63, 65, 66, 67, 838. 
Vaughn, Louise, 982, 993. 
Verney, Margaret, 373. 
Verney, Sir Ralph, 373. 
Vincent, John, 36. 
Vincent, John, Second, 194. 
Vincent, Mary, 194, 849. 



Walker, Henry, 759, 906. 
Walker, John, 417, 877. 
Walker, Mrs. Katherine, 417, 

418, 877. 
Walker, Mary, 417, 418, 877. 
Walker, Mary, 759, 906. See 

Mary Brown. 
Walker, Sarah, 418. 
Walsh, Dr. Ralph, 817. 
Walsh, Ralph, Jr., 816, 817. 
Wanzor, Lucy, 982, 992. 
Ward, Jane Nicholson, 951, 

952. 
Ward, Nicholson, 951. 
Warren, Alice, 204. 
Warren, Alice Bradford, 987. 
Warren, Anna, 9 87. 
Warren, Celia A., 947. 
Warren, Mrs. Elizabeth, 72, 

109, 112, 126, 127. 
Warren, Elizabeth Ruggles, 

987. 
Warren, Ida, 987. 
Warren, James, 974, 987. 
Warren, Kathleen, 987, 994. 
Wardwell, Lydia, 503, 504. 
Warren, Nathaniel, 113, 115, 

204. 
Warren, Richard, 123 — 127, 

112, 204, 858. 
Warren, Sarah, 112, 121, 

126, 131, 858. 
Warren, Sarah, Second, 204. 
Waterman, Mrs. E., 970. 



Waters, Mrs. Rebecca, 803. 
Waters, Mrs. Rhody, 803. 
Watson, Clement Stanford, 

815. 
Watson, George, 815. 
Webster, John, 515, 518, 

895. 
Webster, Mary, 518, 889. 

894, 895, 921. 
Wells, Mary A., 982. 
West, Charles, 93. 
West, John Cristy, 945. 
West, Mary Ann, 945. 
West, Matthew, 93. 
West, Dr. Samuel, 93, 94. 
West, Sarah, 93, 94, 95, 99. 

833. 
West, Stephen, 93, 94. 
West, Thomas Henry, Jr., 

940, 945. 
West, Thomas Henry, Third, 

945. 
West, Wilhelmina Crapo, 

945. 
Westcot, St. Ledger, 317. 
Westcote, Damaris, 321. 
Westcote, Mercy, 322, 881. 
Westcote, Robert, 321. 
Westcote, Stukeley, 315 — 

322, 881. 
Weyant, Erne, 9 79. 
Whaley, Florence, 934, 941. 
Wheeler, Anne, 525, 526, 

926. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Anne, 926. 
Wheeler, Charles, 978. 
Wheeler, David, 525. 
Wheeler, Hassan, 966, 978. 
Wheeler, Helen, 978. 
Wheeler, John, 525, 926. 
Wheeler, John N., 978. 
Wheeler, Ruth, 978. 
Wheelwright, Rev. John, 

375, 588, 606, 608, 610, 

617, 620, 622, 623, 626, 

656, 734. 
Wheelwright, Mary, 734. 
White, Francis, 46. 
White, J. W., 991. 
White, John J., 991. 
White, Josiah, 55. 



[Volume II begins at page 521] 






1044 



CERTAIN COMEOVERERS 



White, Penelope, 38, 40, 57, 

834. 
White, Peregrine, 46, 49, 54, 

55. 
White, Mrs. Rebecca, 57, 

834, 838. 
White, Resolved, 43 — 57, 68, 

107, 838. 
White, Samuel, 39, 55, 56, 

57, 195, 834, 838. 
White, William (d. 1621). 

46, 47, 48, 49, 63, 838. 
White, William (d. 1695), 

55. 
Whitgift, Elizabeth, 928. 
Whiting, Louise, 1004. 
Whittier, Catherine, 944. 
Whittier, Charles Woodbury, 

937, 944. 
Whittier, Charles W., Jr., 

944. 
Whittier, John Greenleaf, 

730. 
Whittier, Nathaniel, 944. 
Whittier, Ross, 944. 
Whittier, Ruth, 944. 
Whittlesey, Asaph, 970. 
Wigglesworth, Abigail, 684. 
Wigglesworth, Edward, 689, 

690, 691, 890. 
Wigglesworth, Prof. Ed- 
ward, 696. 
Wigglesworth, Esther (b. 

1685), 683, 684, 887, 888, 

890. 
Wigglesworth, Mrs. Esther, 

689, 890. 
Wigglesworth, Michael, 687 

— 697, 699 — 708, 684, 

890. 
Wilcox, Peleg C, 947. 
Wilcox, Susan, 952. 
Wilde, John, 766, 767, 908. 
Wilde, Phebe, 767, 768, 904, 

908. 
Wilde, William, 766. 
Willett, Anna Willson, 9 43. 
Willett, Emma Cristy, 943. 
Willett, Esther, 941. 



Willett, Frank Eberly, 934, 

941. 
Willett, Gretchen, 941. 
Willett, John Leverett, 936, 

943. 
Willett, Mary Kuykendall, 

941. 
Willett, Wallace Ross, 9 43. 
Williams, Anna, 342, 867, 

1009, 1015. 

Williams, John, 867, 1009, 

1010, 1014, 1015. 
Williams, Mrs. Mary, 867, 

1009, 1010. 
Williams, Nathaniel, 867, 

1009, 1010, 1014. 
Williams, Rebecca, 342, 343. 
Willmote, Margaret, 599, 

925. 
Wills, Caroline, 454. 
Wills, John, 454. 
Wills, John, Jr., 454. 
Willson, Frances Spencer, 

944. 
Willson, George, 939, 944. 
Willson, Dr. James C, 932, 

939. 
Willson, James Curtis, 944. 
Willson, Roderick, 944. 
Wing, Bennett, 343. 
Wing, Edward, 343. 
Wing, Matthew, 223. 
Winslow, Gov. Edward, Jr., 

49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 65, 

66, 67, 79, 80, 109, 125, 

144, 192. 
Winslow, Elizabeth, 54. 
Winslow, Gov. Josiah, 54, 

55, 56, 159, 275. 
Wood, David, 38. 
Wren, Sir Christopher, 384. 



Yale, David, 778, 779. 
Yale, David, Jr., 779. 
Yale, Elihu, 779. 
Yale, Thomas, 779. 
Young, Henry, 771. 
Young, Sarah, 771, 903. 



[Volume II begins at page 521~\ 



Ce*±-<o.<xv CptneoveretA 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Zo id 

3 9999 04852 996 8