(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Chanticleer [serial]"

EX LIBM 



iWIN-C'KELLAM • EDiTOK. 



>N-G-]POWER— MANAfiER 



V 



YE 



t 



OF 



'j^^ 



W 



w 









PWfiRrrVDO SPIRAVIT 



HA 




f 



IL £ E 




T 



LAMATI O N 



TO CONVEY TO THE READER OF THIS BOOK SOME- 



THING OF THE HISTORY AND TRADITION OF 



GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE AS IT IS ADAPTED AND 



APPLIED IN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES, WITH THE 



HOPE THAT A BETTER UNDERSTANDING MAY BE 



HAD OF THE DESIGN MOTIF OF OUR OWN 



UNIVERSITY, IS THE THEME OF THIS NINETEEN 



HUNDRED AND THIRTY-THREE CHANTICLEER. 







DETAIL OF DOORWAY 
DUKE CHAPEL 



^Li Q Giim't-'—S^ 



1 .^ ;• J 7 



I 



I o 



TO THE MASTER CRAFTSMEN OF OTHER DAYS, 



WHO WITH STONE AND WOOD HAVE BUILDED 



SO BEAUTIFULLY, USEFULLY, AND ENDURINGLY, 



THAT AFTER CENTURIES THEY NOT ONLY LIVE 



IN THEIR OWN CREATIONS, BUT ALSO EXERT 



THEIR INFLUENCE ON ARCHITECTURAL WORKS 



OF TODAY, WE DEDICATE THIS BOOK. 




CONSTRUCTING A CATHEDRAL 



:^Lt n ctoW,^-. 



/T 1 c'-? /I -; 



nTen T 



■^ 

■^ 



ITY 



•^ 

■^ 



QQKJl 

^^ '=", M I 



BOOKM 






^ 

^ 



^K" 



LET 






BOOK I 

UNIVERSITY 




sqa 
Interior View of Rheims 



FRENCH GOTHIC 

The cathedrals of France pre- 
sent the material efforts of 
builders in the spiritual expres- 
sion of the people. With the 
development of the pointed 
arch, concentrated thrust, and 
the flying buttress, they are al- 
most perfect mechanically. 
Characteristics of exteriors are 
the twin towers, the fleche over 
the transept, and the buttress. 
They typically give a distinct 
vertical feeling without excess 
height. Interiors are lofty in 
proportion to width, with vault- 
ed ceilings and group piers. 
The rose window, typical of 
French Gothic, is important in 
composition from the interior 
as well OS from the exterior. 




RHEIMS CATHEDRAL 



:L; Cf i^trmt- 



l-t <nrrf««-l •• 



SOUTH CAMPUS FROM 
THE CHAPEL TOWER 



NORTH TOWER OF 
CRAVEN DORMITORY 




sqq 



CENTRAL TOWER OF 
KILGO DORMITORY 



MAIN ENTRANCE TO 
THE LIBRARY 




SQQ 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 




SQC, 



BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY 
BUILDINGS 




sqq 



SOUTH ENTRANCE 
TO THE CAMPUS 




SqQ 



THE CHAPEL 




sqq 




Shield Taken from 
Front of Medical Building 



WOMAN'S CAMPUS 



'■'"'.i^* 





^^ 



t' \''^^'»i-4 






../vT 



,V*^ V. 



^/^" 







%r'^ 



-.^'4^ 




"r 






'.^z>l 



\, 



.IMt' 






/■ r. Ar .^ 



»>. 



.it' 




1 -^.-i 



"^,H' 



J *-. 



"V^*^ 






..^;?^?%^^ 



¥ 



<^ 



t^. 





m=aB 



■iSii*- 



^.-.1-1 



# » 



^ 



^*ili^-W 



**sr^ 




M li 



JMS:;:-"f;-:..;.>- •.:'■:■:■'• 



■i^K--;^^^ 




XV:V/i..vtMv^« 



Interior Main Hollwoy of Library 



ADMINISTRATION 



CHANTICLEER 




Dr. William Preston Few 



r\R. WILLIAM PRESTON FEW has been president of 
'-^ Trinity College and, Duke University since 1910. 
He received his A.B. degree from Wofford College in 
1889, A.M. at Harvard 1893, Ph.D. at Harvard in 1896, 
his LL.D. from Wofford College 1911, Southwestern 
University 1912, Allegheny College 1915, Syracuse Uni- 
versity 1928, Ohio Wesleyan 1928, and University of 
North Carolina 1932, his Litt.D. from Birmingham 
Southern 1930. 



ADMINISTRATION 



The Business Division 



IN THE development of Duke University the Business 
Division has been charged with increased responsi- 
bility. The Vice President in charge of the Business 
Division is Dr. R. L Flowers who has been Treasurer of 
the University since 1923 and Secretory since 1910 
He is also Secretary of the Faculty and of the Board 
of Trustees and Recording Secretary of the Executive 
Committee of the Board of Trustees. He is a Trustee 
of Duke Endowment. Dr. Flowers is a graduate of the 
United States Naval Academy in class of 1891 He 
resigned from the Navy to come to Trinity College as 
Instructor in Mathematics. He served one year before 
the College was removed to Durham He was elected 
Professor of Mathematics in 1892. He received the 
degree of Master of Arts from Trinity College in 1900, 
and the degree of LL D from Davidson College in 
1927. In addition to his duties at Duke University, 
Dr Flowers is Chairman of the Board of Trustees of 
the North Carolina College for Negroes, and he is 




also a Trustee of Greensboro College, 
the Oxford Orphanage, and the Metho- 
dist Orphanage at Raleigh. 




Robert Lee Flowers 
A.M, LL D. 

Vice President in the Business Division, 
Secretory and Treasurer 

Mr C B. Markham who is Assistant 
Treasurer has had a large part in the 
organization and direction of the Treas- 
urer's Office and in the conduct of the 
business affairs of the University. Mr. 
Charles E. Jordan, Assistant Secretary, 
has direct supervision of the correspond- 
ence with students and prospective 
students. The personnel of the Business 
Division had increased until at the pres- 
ent time a large force is necessary for 
the efficient conduct of the different 
departments. 



The Union 



Thirty-Steven 



CHANTICLEER 



Trinity College 



DERHAPS the greatest tribute that can be 
paid any man, be he statesman, soldier, or 
scholar, is to say he lived his dreams in terms 
^^^^^^ of men. Lived to 

^^^^K^^ 9'v£ ^^^ fellows 

^T ^^^ not an abstract 

r ^ philosophy 

' chained to cir- 

cumstance and 
cool logic, but a 
warm personal 
sympathy that 
will flower long 
after his words 
have ceased to 
echo in our 
hearts. 

Since first he 
came to the Uni- 
versity, thirty- 
four years ago, 
h e has labored 
unceasingly to 
build a College founded on Men. In this, he 
has succeeded. There can be no finer monu- 
ment to his work than the quiet happiness he 
has created. 



William Hone Wannamaker 

A B,, A.M., Litt.D. 

Vice President in the Education 

Division, Dean of the University 



His administrative policies are tempered and 
greatly broadened by membership in the 
general faculty and honorary student organiza- 
tions. In no sense is there anything detached 
or remote, either in his attitude toward the stu- 
dents, or in his treatment of current problems. 
Always one feels controlled energy and deep 
concern. -' ; 

It must be said that his hopes and dreams are 
too big for one lifetime. To those he has 
touched, he will leave a mighty heritage; the 
fulfillment of a Man's philosophy, woven from 
selflessness into a thing of great beauty. 

Dr. Wannamaker was graduated from Wof- 
ford College with an A.B. degree in the class 
of 1895. He came to Trinity College and re- 
ceived his AM there in 1901. He then studied 
at the Harvard Graduate School from 1901 to 
1903 and at the universitys of Berlin, Tubingen, 
Leipzig, and Bonn from 1903 to 1905. The 
A.M. degree was conferred on him by Harvard 
in 1902 and the Litt.D degree by Wofford in 
1917. Dr. Wannamaker taught German at 
Trinity for some time. He was made Dean of 
the college in June 1917 and in 1926 he was 
made a vice president in charge of the Educa- 
tional Division. 




ThIrty-clKhl. 



ADMINISTRATION 




The Eost Duke Building 



The Woman's College 



SINCE 18% women have been admitted on 
equal terms with men, first to Trinity Col- 
lege, and later to Duke University, but it was 
not until 1930 that the Woman's College was 
organized as a separate unit with its own cam- 
pus and administrative offices. 

The Woman's College is, like Trinity College, 
an integral part of the University Freshmen 
and sophomores have their classes on the 
woman's campus and some of the junior and 
senior work is given there also, but qualified 
women are eligible to classes given on the Uni- 
versity campus, the University library and 
laboratories are open to them, and women 
graduates receive University degrees 

During the last three years the number of 
women in the University has increased greatly, 
growing from about three hundred and fifty 
to nearly eight hundred, of which more than 
SIX hundred belong to the undergraduate college 
of arts and sciences. A large majority live in 
dormitories on the campus where they have also 
an auditorium, gymnasium, library, and Union 
of their own, as well as classrooms and labora- 
tories. The women enjoy in consequence the 
opportunity to develop their own college life 
and at the same time to share in the ad- 
vantages of the larger University. Among 
the many changes of the last three years per- 



haps the most notable have been the rapidly 
growing interest in fine arts and the increasing 
initiative of the students in many phases of 
college life and work. 

The Woman's 
College is striv- 
ing to become a 
place of hard 
and honest work, 
of clear and 
fearless think- 
ing, o f friendly 
and gracious liv- 
ing, and of happy 
creative activity, 
a place also 
where faculty 
and students are 
thinking to- 
gether not only 
as members of a 
small college 
community but 
as citizens of a 
hard-p r e ssed 
world which 

must demand of its leaders more knowledge and 
wisdom, a greater personal integrity, ond a far 
deeper sense of social responsibility 




Alice M. Baldwin 

AB, MA., PhD 

Dean of the Woman's College 



Thirty-nliiP 



CHANTICLEER 




William Henry Glasson 

Ph B., Ph.D. 

Dean of the Graduate School of 

Arts and Sciences 

merit. In 1916, President 
him chairman of a new 
Faculty Committee o n 
Graduate Instruction. At 
that time, there were only 
six graduate students in 
the College. The World 
War and its aftermath 
checked the development 
of graduate work for 
several years. By 1922- 
23 however, there were 
thirty graduate students 
representing ten colleges. 
In the decade from 1922 
to 1932, the registration 
has increased from thirty 
to two hundred and 
twenty-three A p p r o x- 
imately seventy per cent 
of the attendance is now 
from states other than 
North Carolina. This 
year there are registered 
holders of degrees from 
one hundred and twenty- 
seven different institu- 
tions. Thus the student 
body of the Duke Grad 
uote School is a group 

Forty 



The Graduate School 



r\EAN William 
■^ H. Glasson, 
of the Graduate 
School is now in 
h I s thirty-first 
year of service 
to Trinity Col- 
lege and Duke 
University. After 
graduating from 
Cornell and tak- 
ing his Ph.D. at 
Columbia, 
Dr Glasson came 
to Trinity Col- 
lege in 1902 as 
Professor of Po- 
litical Economy 
and Social Sci- 
ence and as head 
of the depart- 
Few appointed 



of truly notional character and importance. 

After the Committee on Graduate Instruc- 
tion hod continued for ten years, the Graduate 
School was formally organized in 1926, and 
placed in charge of Dean W. H. Glasson and o 
Council on Graduate Instruction. Since that 
dote, many distinguished investigators and 
teachers have been provided in the sciences, the 
research resources of the Library hove been re- 
markably increased, students have been at- 
tracted from all ports of the United States and 
from foreign countries, and on adequate pro- 
gram of work for the Doctor's degree has been 
provided in many departments. 

Since 1916, the degree of Master of Arts has 
been conferred on four hundred and thirty-five 
persons; the degree of Master of Education on 
thirty-six students. In 1932, eighty- two students 
received the A.M. degree, and eight the Ed M 
degree. Forty-one persons hove had the PhD 
conferred upon them since 1928. 




The Library 



ADMINISTRATION 



The School of Religion 




School of Religion Building 

r^EAN Elbert Russell came to Duke University 
from Swarthmore College in the fall of 1926 
as Professor of Biblical Interpretation in the 
School of Religion, which opened at that time. 
In the fall of 1928, when Dean Edmund D. Soper 
was called to the presidency of Ohio Wesleyan 
University, Dr. Russell was made Dean in his 
place Since then the School of Religion has 
hod a steady and consistent growth along the 
lines on which it was organized. Ten instruc- 
tors have been added to the faculty which now 
consists of seventeen; eight full-time and seven 
port-time instructors 

There has been a steady growth in the en- 
rollment in the School of Religion, and in the 
number of states and religious denominations 
represented by the students In 1927-28, the 
enrollment was fifty and for the year 1931-32 
It was one hundred and forty-three. In 1928, one 
student was given the degree of Bachelor of Di- 



V i n I t y, and in 1932 
twenty-eight In the 
summer of 1928, there 
were 'twenty-one students 
serving under the scholar- 
ship plan of the Duke 
Rural Church Founda- 
tion; in the summer of 
193 2, sixty-seven In 
1931-32, there were fifty- 
seven students serving 
a s pastors i n student 
charges in Durham and 
its vicinity, and two as- 
sistant pastors. 

The Library of the 
School of Religion has a 
very consistent growth 
notably in the addition 
of source materials in the 
Departments of Church 
History and the History 
of Religion and Missions. 
In the New Testament 
Department, there have 
been added facsimiles of 

the principal New Testament manuscripts, some 

early editions of 

the Greek and 

English Bible, 

and the Duke 

G r e e k N e w 

Testament which 

is probably the 

only complete 

Greek manu- 
script of the Ne\'. 

Testament in the 

United States 




Elbert Russell 

AB, AM, PhD. 

Dean of the School of Religion 



Forty-ont; 
/ 



CHANTICLEER 



The School of Medicine and Duke Hospital 




Duke Hospital 

THE Duke University School of Medicine and 
the Duke Hospital were established in 1925, 
through the munificent gift of the late James 
B. Duke. The hospital and public dispensary 
were opened for patients on July 21, 1930, and 

up to January 1, 
1933, twenty-one 
thousand five 
hundred patients 
had been regis- 
tered under the 
unit history sys- 
tem. During 
1932, the aver- 
age hospital cen- 
sus was one hun- 
dred and eighty- 
s I x; sixty-eight 
thousand days of 
hospital care 
were given and 
twenty-six thou- 
sand SIX hundred 
and fifty visits 




vviiDuri Cornell Uoviso" 
AB, BA, B.Sc, AM, MD 
Deon of the Medical School 



were made to the public dispen- 
sary. On October 1, 1930 
seventy students were admitted 
to the School of Medicine, the 
following year there were one 
hundred and forty-five and in 
1932, one hundred and sixty- 
four Seventy-five per cent of 
these students have availed 
themselves of the four quarter 
plan. On June 8, 1932, eight- 
een students, who had been 
admitted to the junior class in 
1930, were graduated. 

The School of Medicine has 
been planned to insure the 
■* greatest correlation between 
the various departments. These 
facilities are available also for 
students, who are studying for degrees 
other than that of medicine. The 
hospital has every modern conveniece for 
the diagnosis, proper care, welfare and comfort 
of patients, both private and chanty, white and 
colored, whether they come from Durham, or 
from a distance. The Duke Hospital Library 
contains thirty thousand volumes of American 
and foreign medical literature and subscribes 
to four hundred and forty-one current Ameri- 
can and foreign medical and other scientific 
journals 

In 1927 Dr. Davison come to Duke University 
as Dean of the Medical School. He is a gradu- 
ate of Princeton University, in the class of 1913. 
From 1913-16 he studied at Oxford University, 
England, as a Rhodes Scholar, and received his 
B.Sc. degree while there. On returning to 
America, he entered Johns Hopkins University 
Medical School and received his MD. degree 
in 1917 Dr Davidson taught at Baltimore 
Medical School from 1919-23 At the expira- 
tion of this time he accepted the assistant dean- 
ship at Johns Hopkins Medical School, and held 
this position until he came to Duke. 



Kiirtvlwn 



ADMINISTRATION 



-i^y^ * VWfc ' fW' ' W!L » ^wWJ 



TOSf 



^ 



The School of Law 



rjURING the school year of 1929-30, the Low 
^ School of Duke University consisted of o 
law faculty of three full-time members and two 
part-time lecturers, a student body of fifty, a 
law library of approximately ten thousand 
volumes, and an offering of twenty-four courses 
In September, 1930, Duke University opened the 
doors of a reorganized College of Law, on the 
recently completed West Campus There were 
seven full-time members on the faculty at that 
time, a student body of seventy-four members, 
a library of approximately fifteen thousand 
volumes, and an offering of twenty-five courses. 

When registration was completed in the fall 
of 1932, there was a faculty of thirteen full- 
time members, a student body of one hundred 
one, a library of approximately forty-five 
thousand volumes, and an offering of fifty-six 
courses. 

During the period mentioned Duke University 
Low School has been placed upon the approved 
lists of the American Bar Association, the As- 
sociation of American Law Schools, and the 
Board of Education of the State of New York. 
In December of 1932 there was granted to the 
Law School a chapter of the Order of the Coif, 
the national lev/ honor organization which 
corresponds to Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma XI 

The members of the present student body 



come from 
twenty-six states 
and from fifty- 
n i n e colleges 
and universities 
Eighty of them 
had bachelors 
degrees before 
entering the Law 
School. Four of 
them already 
possess law de- 
grees and are 
candidates f o r 
advanced 
degrees. 

The present 
members of the 
full-time faculty 
hold sixteen law 
degrees from 

nine of the world's leading law schools and have 
taught in the seventeen of the leading law 
schools of the United States. 

These facts ore convincing to persons who 
a r e accustomed to appraise professional 
schools Of perhaps even greater local interest, 
IS the work which is being done by such depart- 
ments in the Law School as the Legal Aid 
Clinic, the Department of Legislative Research 
and Drafting, and the Duke Bar Association. 




Justin Millci 

A.B , LL.B., J D 

Dean of the School of Law 




Low Building 



Forty-thre«- 



CHANTICLEER 





^njd^^^m. . * session of the 

m^^ ^ ■ Duke Engineer- 

^^ ing School has 

U been marked by 

_ _ national recogni- 

<^i^' tion given the de- 

partment by the 
American insti- 
tute of Electrical 
Engineers, by the 
Society for the 
Promotion 
of Engineering 
Education, and 
by the Ameri- 
can Society of 
Civil Engineers. 
With the admis- 
sion of a class in 
mechanical engi- 
neering to senior 

standing next year, recognition in that field will 

undoubtedly be obtained. 



The Engineering School 

TH E 1932-33 

I 




Harold C. Bird 

Ph.B., C.E. 

Dean of the Engineering School 



rom 



One hundred and fifty-six students 
various sections of the country, representing an 
increase of over fifty per cent within the past 
two years, have constituted the enrollment of 
the department for the past year. The increase 
in enrollment has also been steady since the 
complete revision of the curriculum of the 
engineering department in 1927. This cur- 
riculum revision, in which the Bachelor of 



Science degree was to be conferred for work 
completed in the engineering department, 
came forty years after engineering was first in- 
cluded in the general college curricula. 

At present Duke engineers have for their use o 
three story build- 
ing, a n annex 
space in two 
other buildings, 
well equipped 
laboratories i n 
civil and electri- 
cal engineering, 
with laboratories 
being developed 
i n mechanical 
engineering. 

During the 
past year the 
student or- 
ganizations have 
sponsored engi- 
neering motion 
pictures a n d in- 
spection trips; 
while the Delta 
Epsilon Sigma 
(honorary engi- 
neering) f r a- 

ternity, as well as other departmental clubs have 
aided materially in developing both the practi- 
cal and scholastical attainments of Duke 
engineers. 




Samuel R. Schealer 
EE„ M.S. 

Department of Electrical 
Engineering 




The Engineering Building 



Forty-tour 



ADMINISTRATION 






aVSM^UfcLUUItfiiiiJ 



?5^ 



1^ 



«!'.* W i\4tWl'f.»J 'Vi J| 



'fir.vi '•"■,: W'"T^W^.' 






LUW^V. 'I BL ' .VW ^ "" 



l3}fA>. rwrrr' 



Comptroller 

rvR FRANK C BROWN, who has served as 
Comptroller for some fifteen years, came to 
Trinity College in 1909, as Professor of English. 
With the beginning of the recent building pro- 
gram, the activities of Dr Brown were greatly 
increased by the duties required of him in con- 
nection with the construction of the Greater 
University The officer proved his ability as a 
Comptrolirr in the role which he played in the 

building of the 
East Campus, 
which is now 
operating as the 
Coordinate Col- 
lege for Women. 
The enviable 
record estab- 
lished by him as 
comptroller i n 
the construction 
of the East Cam- 
pus made h i m 
the natural 
choice when the 
question of a 
supervisor f o r 
the immense 
construction task involved in the West Campus 
arose. 

At the beginning of this construction Dr. 
Brown was placed in charge and remained so 
during the entire period covered in its building. 
The duties that fell to his lot in connection with 
this tried out thoroughly his immense versatility 
and his survivol of the strenuous testing is a 
final proof of his courage and ability. 

The entire West Campus layout and the 
magnificent Gothic structures thereon will bear 
witness through the years to come to the intel- 
ligence and integrity of this man. 




Frank C Brown 
AB., AM, Ph D. 



Dean of Curricula 

QR. WALTER KIRKLAND GREENE was gradu- 
ated from Wofford College in Spartanburg, 
South Carolina, in 1903. In 1905, he received 
the AM degree from Vanderbilt University. 
For several years he taught in well-known South- 
ern preparatory 
schools, such as 
Battle Ground 
Academy, 
Franklin, Ten- 
nessee, and 
Bake r-Himel 
School, Knox- 
V i II e, Tennes- 
see. In 1910, 
h e organized 
Greene Univer- 
s i t y School — 
a preparatory 
school for boys 
— in Athens 
Alabama. H e 
w a s H e a d- 
master of this 

school until 1920, in which year he entered 
the graduate school of Harvard University and 
received his MA degree in 1921 In February 
1923, the Ph D degree was conferred on him 
by Harvard. 

For eight years he was Dean and Chairman 
of the department of English in Wesleyan Col- 
lege, Macon, Georgia In 1928 he was elected 
to a professorship in English in Duke University, 
and in 1930 he became Dean of Undergraduate 
Instruction. His work in this particular capa- 
city has to do with the problems of under- 
graduate teaching, curriculum planning, and 
administration of the college instructional pro- 
gram. Under his supervision, the grading sys- 
tem has been altered, the quality-point system 
has been introduced, the group of Honors 
Courses has been established, and the Curricu- 
lum has been reorganized 




Walter K. Greene 
AB. AM, PhD 



Fony-flv? 



CHANTICLEER 



Assistant Dean 

UERBERT J. HERRING received an A.B. de- 
gree from Trinity College in 1922. After 
teaching English in Winston-Salem high school 
for two years, he came back to his Alma Mater 

to accept the po- 
sition of assist- 
ant Dean. Dur- 
ing his connec- 
tion with the 
University in this 
capacity the 
MA degree has 
been conferred 
upon him by 
Columbia Uni- 
versity. The 
chief duty of the 
assistant Dean 
for two years was 
that of acting as 
c u n CI I r of 
freshmen, but 
with t h e rapid 
increase in enrollment, due to Mr Duke's estab- 
lishment of the University, the organization of 
a separate office for freshmen was made neces- 
sary. Since he has been relieved of the fresh- 
men work, his time has been divided between 
conferences with students and the responsibili- 
ties of Registrar. Mr Herring also teaches a 
course in English — Public Speaking — here in the 
University, and for several years has been Chair- 
man of the Board of Directors of the campus 
Y. M C A, 




Herbert J. Herring 
A.B., A.M. 



Dean of Freshmen 

QEAN MOXLEY ARNOLD received his A.B. 
degree from the University of Illinois in 
1921 . He came to Duke University as a full time 
instructor of mathematics in the fall of 1925, 
after having taught in Ohio and at Durham High 
School. He received his MA. degree from Duke 
University in 1926 and during the same year be- 
came Assistant Dean in charge of freshmen. 
From that time the emphasis placed by the Uni- 
versity on freshmen interests has been increased 
gradually until, in 1932, the Freshman Office 
has been enlarged to a fulltime position. 

Of late the freshmen have taken an increased 
interest in class and campus activities; many 
joined the Y M C A. during their first year, 
and aid through the Freshman Friendship Coun- 
cil in creating a friendly spirit among the first 
year men. During the first semester slightly less 
than half of the men are pledged to social fra- 
ternities while still others devote much time and 
effort to extra-curricula activities, and so be- 
come at once an intimate part of the school life. 
Within their own organization the freshmen 
have made rapid progress; last year a chapter 
of the national freshmen scholastic fraternity 
Phi Eta Sigma having been brought to Duke with 
over sixty-five men being eligible for member- 
ship. Numerous Class social functions are 
given, chief 
among which are 
the freshmen 
dances and the 
periodical hikes 
through the 
famous Duke 
forest reserve. 
Through the co- 
operation of the 
University o u t- 
standing lectur- 
ers are invited to 
speak to the 
freshmen at 




their weekly 
chapel meetings. 



Dean Moxley Arnold 
B.S., A.M. 



Porty-six 



ADMINISTRATION 



^^ik:^ 



^ 



^^ 



School of Nursing 

THE formal opening ot the Duke University 
School of Nursing took place in January, 
1931. There were thirty-three students en- 
rolled The plan of the School of Nursing is to 
prepare young women to meet community needs. 
These needs are interpreted to mean nurses pre- 
pored for administration and teaching in hos- 
pitals and in public health work, for nursing care 
of the sick, and for the teaching of health in 
the homes of the community. 

Two general courses are offered, one requir- 
ing three years for graduation and the other 
five. The three-year course gives the student 
the Diploma of Graduate Nurse on graduation 
and prepares her for the classification of Regis- 
tered Nurse by the State boards The five-year 
course is more comprehensive in scope It 
awards the degree of Bachelor of Science in 

Nursing upon 
graduation, in 
addition to the 
Diploma of Grad- 
uate Nurse at 
the end of the 
prescribed 
period Two years 
of this work, or 
sixty semester 
hours, must be 
completed suc- 
cessfully ei ther 
in undergraduate 
departments of 
Duke University 
or in some other 
acceptable col- 
lege or univer- 
sity, the expense 
of which IS borne by the student. This work 
may be taken either prior to or at the conclusion 
of the three years spent in the School of 
Nursing, but the courses are prescribed in either 
case 




Bessie Baker 

B S., R N 

Deon of the School of Nursing 



Summer School 

r^R. HOLTON began his connection with the 
summer school in 1919, as a member of the 
committee in charge, and as special adviser to 
students preparing to teach. Since 1920, he 
has been director of the summer school of the 
university. Last summer there were enrolled 
one thousand 
one hundred and 
seventy - seven 
students in the 
first term, and 
six hundred and 
twenty-one in the 
second term, in 
addition to two 
hundred and six 
at Lake Juna- 
luska and thirty- 
one in the Juna- 
luska School of 
Religion, which 
is also affiliated. 
There have been 
in a I I fourteen 
thousand one 
hundred and 
forty registra- 
tions in the summer school during the fourteen 
years of its operation by a total of five thousand 
nine hundred and sixty-eight students This 
means that the average student has returned 
for at least one additional term. 

The chief purposes of the summer school, as 
stated by Dr. Holland Holton, director, who is 
also head of the department of Education and 
chairman of the faculty committee in charge of 
the various summer school interests of the uni- 
versity, are, first, to utilize the University plant 
the entire year as nearly as possible, second, 
to give to mature and ambitious students oppor- 
tunity for continuous work; and third, to co- 
operate in the teacher-training programs of the 
states from which the University draws its en- 
rollment. A noteworthy feature of last sum- 
mer's first term statistics was the large propwr- 
tion of graduate students, constituting forty- 
five per cent of the total enrollment, drawn from 
twenty-eight different states, and holding 
Bachelor's degrees from one hundred and fifty- 
six colleges and universities 




Holland Holton 

AB, J D 

Director of Summer School 



Forty-seven 



CHANTICLEER 



Department of Music 



A NATIVE of Virginia, J. Foster Barnes grad- 
uated from the University of Richmond, and 
later received his Master's degree from Emory 
University, in Atlanta. Throughout his career, 
both as a concert singer and as a teacher, his 
interest in music has been motivated by a deep 
appreciation of things religious. His inspired 

performance of 

^^^I^^M^ the leading mole 

^^^^^^^^^^ role in "Thais" 

I ^ in Chicago gave 

I I "^^ °'^'^® satis- 

\ -^ ^^ " faction to his 

talents as an art- 
ist, and to this 
certain spiritual 
intuition, which 
has struck such 
a dominant note 
throughout h i s 
life. In the 
Chapel Choir he 
hopes to find a 
plastic medium 
for them both. 

A well-merited 
success has at- 
tended his work here at Duke, both musically 
with the Glee Club, and by the good taste and 
perception evidenced in the Concert bookings. 
Under his tutelage the Glee Club has received 
not only state recognition but in 1928 ranked 
as the first College Glee Club in the South, 
giving concerts at Carnegie Hall and in joint 
program with leading Northern universities. He 
has worked well and hard, perhaps because his 
heart is in it. 



J. Foster Barnes 

A.B., A.M. 

Director of Social and Religious 

Activities 



K^R. APGAR, a member of a musical family, 
was born in Westfield, New Jersey, After 
being graduated from Westfield High School, 
he went to Yale and received an A.B degree in 
1928. Piano lessons were given Mr. Apgor from 
early childhood, and for two years Charles Leech 
Gulick was his teacher, Harry Benjamin Jepson, 
Professor of Music, and Organist to the Uni- 
versity, taught him organ during his Junior and 
Senior years at Yale. 

At the Lake Placid Club, the young artist ap- 
peared with the Boston Symphony Ensemble, as 
piano soloist in the summers of 1926-27 and 
organ soloist in the summer of 1928. Ernest 
Zechiel taught him musical composition while 
he was a student at Curtis Institute, and it is 
to him that Mr. Apgar owes the awakening of 
his creative talents On one occasion, he ap- 
peared as soloist with the Curtis Symphony 
Orchestra at Carnegie Hall in New York City. 
Carillon training was received from Anton Brees 
at the Singing Tower, Mountain Lake, Florida. 

Of the organ, Mr Apgar says: "I find more 
pleasure in playing upon, and listening to the 
organ in the University Chapel, than I have 
experienced with any other instrument. The 
acoustics of the 
building rein- 
force the tone of 
the organ to ex- 
cel lent advan- 
tage. The total 
aesthetic appeal 
of the Chapel it- 
self provides a 
magnificent set- 
ting for the great 
instrument I 
hope to make 
this organ the 
medium by which 
the best in music 
can be given to 

t h e University Lawrence C Apgar 

community." Organist and Carillonneur 




Forty-eight 



ADMINISTRATION 




Interior of Union 



Depart-ment of Public Relations and Alumni Affairs 



UENRY R. DWIRE, A.B '02, AM '03, became 
** Director of the Departnnent of Public Re- 
lations and Alumni Affairs at Duke University 
when the new department was created in Janu- 
ary, 1930. In addition to his other duties in 
connection with that office, he is Managing 
Editor of the South Atlantic Quarterly and 
Editor of the Duke University Alumni Register, 
also having charge of catalogues and other Uni- 
versity publications. During his post-graduate 
work at Duke, Mr. Dwire acted as Assistant in 
English. The year after receiving his AM de- 
gree, he was a member of the faculty of the 
Fishburne Military School at Waynesboro, 
Virginia. For the next twenty-two years, he was 
Editor of the Twin City Sentinel, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina, and for the last eight 
years of that time co-publisher of that after- 
noon daily. During the year 1929-30 he was 
District Governor of Rotary International for the 
Fifty-seventh District. While in Winston-Salem 
he was President of the Rotary Club, Chairman 
of the Winston-Salem chapter of the American 
i Cross, Chairman of the Community Chest 
--Timission, founder and head of the Fine Arts 
Foundation, and for a number of years was 
Chairman of the Winston-Salem City School 
Commission Mr. Dwire is a trustee of Duke 
University, Secretary of the board of directors 



of the State Hospital for the Insane at Raleigh, 
and a member of the State Board of Equali- 
zation. 

Since coming to Duke Mr. Dwire has made 
a host of friends in the college community, 
largely through the pursuit of his duties and his 
management of such an important division in 
t h e University 
administra tion' 
has proven an ex- 
cellent field for 
the play of his 
journalistic 
ability. Mr. 
Dwire has given 
valuable assist- 
ance to the stu- 
d e n t publica- 
tions, because of 
h i s knowledge 
along such lines 




Mr. Henry R. Dwire 

Director of Public Relations ond 

Alumni Affairs 

Forty-nfne 



CHANTICLEER 




Student Government at Duke 




Oliver Wendell Horn 
President 

A SYSTEM of student government was established at 
** Duke in 1922. Since that time, the system has been 
constantly changing, growing, and developing into a 
worthy system of government. 

Our Student Government has taken an active part in 
student affairs and problems, not only on our campus, 
but in North Carolina and throughout the United States. 
Duke University was one of the first to help establish 
the North Carolina Federation of Students. In 1930 we 
became a member of the National Student Federation 
of America, and have offered our support to this or- 
ganization Student government is a comparatively new 
System of government, but it has advanced exceedingly 
far at Duke. 



Fitly 



The purpose and aim of student gov- 
ernment is to "create an effective 
organization for administering student 
self-government, to support athletics, 
to foster literary endeavor, to encourage 
all other worthy student activities, and 
to promote the best interests of the 
University and student body." 

The Student Government has tried to 
live up to the ideals upon which it was 
founded. The students sponsored sev- 
eral large parades this year in order to 
breed a good school spirit and give their 
support to the athletic teams. Pro- 
grams, in which the students took part, 
were arranged for the spectators during 
the different athletic contests. 

There have been several changes in 
the internal workings of the student 
council. All records and cases in the 
past have been brought together in a 
new system of filing. Several by-laws 
have been passed in order to improve 
the internal organization of the council. 

During the fall a large Student Gov- 
ernment dance was given to the whole 
student body. Plans are being made 
for an Inaugural Ball this Spring. 

For the past two years student 
government at Duke has grown enor 
mously in power and prestige. Undei 
the able administration of Martin Greer 
and Wendell Home many changes have 
been made that were necessary tc 
strengthen failing power of this orgo 
of student life. Through wise and jusi 
legislation it has gamed a worthy posi 
tion in the eyes of the University ad 
ministration and exerted potent in 
fluence over the general student body 
It IS laying down and enforcing rule: 
that are to become traditions as the 
University grows in age. 



ADMINISTRATION 



m 



t& 



WBaf^sBsrmBPsm •» ifKwmhiyr' . i ii*--.'. ' i j 






^im^ 



r 



^pS3^ 



-TbtrSt 



^^^^ I^SH^^^^^SI 



Officers and Councilmen 



A LTHOUGH Student Government has been a 
part of student life at Duke since 1922, it 
.s only since 1931 that the bicameral system 
has been employed Previous to this change, 
the Student Council was the sole unit of control, 
having executive, legislative, and judicial func- 
tions The House of Representatives, with the 
Vice President of the Men's Association as 
Speaker, was added to lighten the burden on 
the council and to secure greater efficiency, as 
the House is essentially the legislative branch 
of the association and is the lower house so- 
called, corresponding in a sense with the lower 
or popularly representative branch of many 
national, state, and municipal governments of 
today. 
Originally the membership of the House 

was limited to one 
man from each dor- 
mitory section, said 
student to be a resi- 
dent of the dormi- 
tory electing him. 
However, it was 
found upon trial 
that such a large 
body was too un- 
wieldy for efficient 
performance, and 
further that due to 
the manner of elec- 
tion, the represent- 
atives did not place 
sufficient value on 
their office to induce 



^s1 




Edwin M Caldwell 
Secretary and Treasurer 




C. Raymond Lundgren 
Vice President 



whole-hearted 
effort 

Therefore, in May, 
1932, there was pro- 
posed a system of 
general and popular 
election of six men 
to compose a House 
o f Representatives, 
said men to be from 
any class in the un- 
dergraduate school, 
although juniors and 
seniors may, by cus- 
tom be elected each 
year. This system 
was adopted and its operation to date indicates 
its worth. 

According to the Constitution of the Men's 
Association (Art. IV., Sees. 3, 5 ) which was re- 
vised and adopted by the general student body, 
the House of Representatives shall be empow- 
ered to enact legislation concerning dormitory 
conditions, shall give advice to the council on 
all other legislation, and shall propose to the 
council by-laws for the constitution or any 
changes in the system that shall be deemed for 
the welfare of the general student body. 

During the present year (1932-33) the House 
of Representatives established the quiet period, 
so-called, from 7:30 o'clock continuing through 
until next morning, to be in force every night 
except Saturday and occasions of importance 



Councilmen from the Classes 




Charles Short 
Senior Class 



Davis Williams 
Junior Class 



Williord Roisley 
Sophomore Class 



iNormon jomes 
Junior Class 



Ernest Hildebrandr 
Senior Class 

Flfty-om; 



CHANTICLEER 



House of Representatives 



*K^ ^ l'^ -^* 1^ ^ " 




Deichmann 
Baird 



Werner 
Bray 



McLean 
Otis 



to the students generally. Radios, long a point of 
contention, ore tolerated on the campus at present, 
but with the express understanding that they are not 
to be operated during the quiet period in such a man- 
ner as to disturb others living adjacent. 

At general assemblies held on February 16 and 23 
of this year, the House of Representatives, through its 
Speaker, placed the whole matter of dormitory regu- 
lation before the undergraduate men to ascertain 
student attitude and opinions. During open discus- 
sion from the floor of the assembly, a resolution was 
made and unanimously accepted approving the regu- 
lations and policy of the House of Representatives, 
and greater cooperation by the students was promised 
for the future. It was also agreed to refer to the 
House all cases of flagrant violations of the rules, 
when this body would investigate and take steps to 
secure the full cooperation of those concerned. 

Dormitory supervision, although the greatest single 
contribution of the House of Representatives, is only 
one of the several phases of student life in which it has 
been of service. Almost every matter of interest to 
the students is discussed and referred to proper au- 
thorities to further the welfare of the student body 

Apparently the efforts of the House of Representa- 
tives have justified its institution as a branch of stu- 
dent government at Duke, and in the future greater 
service can logically be expected from it. The bica- 
meral system, no doubt, is here to stay. 




The Council in Executive Session 



Klfty-two 



A DM I N I ST RAT I N 



Woman's College Government 



"TO THE president of Women's Stu- 
dent Government are instrusted 
problems whose solution requires not 
only dexterity, but consummate tact. 
All meetings of the Women's Student 
Government Association ore conducted 
under her personal supervision, presup- 
posing a rather thorough knowledge of 
parliamentary law. 

Too, personal initiative is a requisite 
of great importance. The numerous 
committees which constitute the fabric 
of student government, require, if not 
her actual presence, at least an inti- 
mate knowledge of their recommend- 
ations. 

In a judicial capacity, her attendance 
OS presiding '-^^f'^-pr 




Elizabeth Seliars 
Treasurer 



expected for all 
. cases dealing 
.■. ith inf rac- 
tions of the 
governmental 
code. This is 
a difficult 
s i t I o n, 
jnd particu- 
larly not one 
attended b^ 
popular ac- 
clamation. 

It may be 
said that if 
the gavel carries with it persona 





Miss louiso Hooker 
President 

distinction. It is also the symbol more 
especially of labor, wher- 
ever routine or of that 
more exhilirating variety 
which comes with the ex- 
pression of initiative. 

In each of these re- 
quirements Miss Hooker 
and the others connected 
with her administration 
have measured up in the 
fullest degree. 



Margaret Gibbons 
Secretary 



Mary Porkhurst 
Corresponding Secretary 



Dorothy Douglas 
Assistant Treasurer 



Fill 



CHANTICLEER 



Members of Woman's College Council 




11 



"HE under- 
graduate wo- 
men of the 
Woman's Col- 
lege of Duke 
University con- 
stitute the stu- 
dent body of that 
school, governed 
by their own rep- 
resentatives end 
acting in the 
form of a general 
assembly which 
meets at the dis- 
cretion of the 
Executive Board. 
The purpose of 
this organization 
IS to regulate all 
matters pertain- 
ing to the life of the women, not under the juris- 
diction of the Faculty, to increase a sense of 
individual responsibility, to further a spirit of 
unity among the women of the College, and to 
cooperate with the Faculty in creating and 



Martha Howie 
Vice President 



maintaining high ideals for the women of the 
University. 

The Executive Board, composed of eighteen 
members elected by the entire association, per- 
forms executive and legislative functions. The 
Judicial Board of nine members, tries cases 
which are presented to it by the Executive Board, 
and if necessary acts in conjunction with a 
Faculty Judicial Board. A College Board, con- 
sisting of women who hold major offices on the 
campus, meets regularly once a month to pro- 
vide occasion for the expression of student 
opinion concerning college activities. The 
Executive Board takes the recommendations 
that this board may offer, considers them, end 
presents them to tlie entire association. 

The Women's Student Government Associa- 
tion belongs to and takes an active interest in 
the following organizations: National Students 
Federation of America, Women's Intercollegiate 
Association of Student Government, and the 
Southern Intercollegiate Association of Student 
Government. Delegates are sent to the meet- 
ings of these various groups to broaden contacts 
with other schools and to prepare for revision 
of the form of government in any way which may 
be suggested as a method of improvement. 



y-% J% ft^ T \ 




Robertson 
Moyler 



Dewey 
Sellers 



Walker 
Vance 



McGlone 
Eaton 



Duke 



Firiy 1(111 r 



A DM I N I ST RAT I N 



ir) ^ r i fr' 




C:sc\ 



VVyat; 


McGloiie 


Wooten 


Griffin 


black 


Harris 


Jordan 


Cornett 


Gehmon 


Zimmermon 


Shoemaker 


Green 


Walker 


Knowles 



Social Standards Committee 



"THE Social Standards Committee is o group of 
Duke women, selected for their social leader- 
ship, whose purpose is the guidonce of the activ- 
ities of the Woman's campus. 1 1 aims to develop 
the finest social relationship between student 
men and women. 

Because of varied environments from which 
the students came to Duke, they ore aided in 
becoming assimilated into this college life by 
the Social Standards Committee. 

It is this committee which introduces the 
women into the social life of the University by 
aiding contact between the new women and the 
upperclassmen, as well as relationship between 
the two campuses. This committee encourages 
friendships not only with the members of the 
University community, but also with the resi- 
dents of Durham. 

The major function of the Committee on 
Sociat^tandards is the sponsoring of the tra- 
ditional Co-ed Balls. These gala affairs are 
highlights on the social calendar of the Uni- 
versity and ore noted for their dignity and 
refinement. 

The management and upkeep of the Ark, the 
Co-Ed Club, IS another duty of this Committee. 



In the Ark, Duke students spend many de- 
lightful evenings, with the radio, piano, ping- 
pong tables, and various other forms of amuse- 
ment. 

The Social Standards Committee seeks to 
set a precedent in the building of character. 
This group of women is molding Duke tradition. 



Members 

Elizabeth Cor- 
n e 1 1, Elizabeth 
F I y n n, Mildred 
Gehman, Virginia 
Green, Janet 
Griffin, Lucy Lee 
Harris, Virginia 
Jordan, Ruth 
Knowles,Lorraine 
McGlone, Emmy 
Lou Morton, Mil- 
dred Pollack, 
Lola M a r I e r 
Rogers, Marie 
Shoemaker, 
Embree Slock, 
Carlotto Waters, 
Alice Wooten, 
Helen Wyott. 




Lariotta Waters 
Chairman 



Flfty-flve 



i.-iw-rrV.;.-. •:■.•:.'•■■ 



."•■'.■yWiiS''/? 




Shield Taken from 
Front of Library 



BOOKn 

ACAD EMIC 




Interior of Ulm Cathedral 



sqa 



GERMAN GOTHIC 

The Rhineland and Saxony were 
the first to adopt the new 
Gothic system of architecture 
developed in France. 
The Germans, however, were 
not content to accept the new 
design without alteration. They 
introduced into Gothic design 
the traceried spire, the use of 
brick and terra cotta, and the 
revolution of the Hall church 
plan. 

An example of a national Ger- 
man monument is the Cathe- 
dral of Ulm, with its giant tower, 
the tallest in existence, rising 
to height of more than five 
hundred feet. The plan of the 
cathedral is a five-aisle basilica 
type, without transept. 




P''*<'^f'L 



^i^^^m'-mm 



M 

a, 




'^"1 ^^ % 




ULM CATHEDRAL 



til<.^ C< c<<,T-*^.-,^^ 



iiHffaiWillMfciMK;rfJi»=M'fiai{«^ 




Shield Taken from 
Front of Medico I School 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



CHANTICLEER 



Biin 







Arnold 



Cotter 



Aldine Arnold 

Tarboro, North Carolina 


Gladys 1. Brinkley 

Stem, North Carolina 


Ethel Cotter 

East Spencer, North Carolina 


Elizabeth Evans 

Charlotte, North Carolina 


Christine High 

Middlesex, North Carolina 




Mary Green 

Dunn, North Carolina 


Annie Jo Hawfield 

Fort Mill, South Carolina 



Green 

High 

Hawfield 




Slxly-two 




SCHOOL OF N URSI NG 

;a«tq 



o 



n i 



- / 



^5 




(viunn 



iNorton 



I hrower 



lilleti 



Elizabeth Eugena Mann 

Bynum, North Carolina 



Emma Belle Thrower 

Rockingham, North Carolina 



Annie Reynolds Norton 

Launnburg, North Cuiulmo 



Grace Mangum Tillett 

Timberlake, North Carolina 



Mary Helen Wilson 

High Point, North Carolina 



Jessie Speight Word 

Wilmington, North Carolina 



Pearl Yarbrough 

Winston-Salem, North Carolino 



i 




Word 

Wilson 

Ycrbrcxjgh 



Slxl> thnu 




Shield Taken from 
Front of Hospital Building 



mmamfm :'" "-'hwimmmm 



jUiiiiB 



\\u'-l-;^fi 




mmrmmmMmmiwmmmMmmmm 



Shield Taken from 
Front of House EE 



N 



CHANTICLEER 




Senior Class Officers Trinity College 





Lawson Knott 
President 



Dreams in Reality 

THERE is something about creation al- 
most reverent, something, too, of chal- 
lenge, the challenge of Dragon's Teeth, For 
no one knows, or can ever fully appreciate 
the ultimate destiny of what he builds from 
hope, and fancy, and meditation to clothe 
with the strange garment of 
reality. Hate and self may twist 
it with the strength of a thou- 
sand hands into a gnarled, creep- 
ing thing scuttling through the 
dork passages of a single mind, 
or yet again it may be too gossa- 
mere even for the mind, and so, 
drift, half-formed into the dusk 
of the forgotten Fulfillment of 
any great vision has never lain 
wholly with one man, or even one 
lifetime. 



The Class of 1933 has seen a vision, one to which 
they gave the breath of life, an unselfish vision, 
fragile as the last colors in a twilight sky; and yet, 
they saw it clothed with stone, and girded round with 
towers, and in the soft recesses of the night they 
heard the beating of its heart. Perhaps they knew 
then that some part of them would always be here, 
floating with the leaves in sheltered corners, breath- 
ing life into the shadowed beauties of the chapel, 
drifting with the music of the Bells on a quiet, sum- 
mer evening. They have given much in their gift 
of life, something that will never change. For us 
who remain: the Vision is big enough for All. 

For how long did not battlements much as these 
lift their turrents against a Gaelic sky, and by the 
wounds of siege unsung write the martial music of 
the days of Roland and of Charlemagne, until at last 
they ceased to be mere machines of war, but, mel- 
lowed by the men who went through life within their 
walls, they became of the living, part of the life of 
a great people^ Through your struggles, far from 
the clash of sword on corselet or battlefields weighted 
With the broken dead, you hove begun this life-giving 
within these walls. And, someday, they too shall 
shout the story of race, and of your life, though you 
be gone long behind the setting sun. 




Joseph Skinner 
Vice President 



Kobci 1 Voorhees 
Treasurer 



Porker Hamlin 
Secretary 



SUty-8lx 



SENIORS 



'j'':;v 



Senior Class Officers Woman's College 



\A/!TH Commencement-, the Class of 1933 writes 
finis to a chapter in the life of the University at 
once colorful and distinguished. 

They leave the Publications characterized by a 
certain fullness of taste peculiar to this year, which 
has brought them not only recognition, but brought 
into prominence a new publication, the "Distaff," 
making a great impression in the literary circles of 
the University. 

In Dramatics, members of the Senior Closs have 
played a splendid and sincere part. It has been 
largely through their capable participation that such 
plays as Outward Bound, and The Romantic Young 
Lady were realized. Too, a very creditable pro- 
duction of original one act plays owed its appear- 
ance to their creative efforts, marking the inaugura- 
tion at Duke of a hitherto almost virgin field of 
dramatic endeavor. 

The Y. M. C A. and Student Government, largely 
under the guidance of Seniors have completed quite 
successful years of public service. Particularly in the 
latter, has a change of policy been in evidence with 
the creation of the House of Representatives, a 
popularly elected body treating of Campus problems, 
and drawing its membership almost exclusively from 
the Senior Class. 

Intercollegiate debating, largely because of the 
intelligent participation of Seniors, is fast becoming 
a popular cynosure. The team has not only met an 
impressive schedule embracing colleges of admitted 
forensic distinction, but has been victorious in a 





Dorothy Newsom 
President 



large majority of debates, and even in de- 
feat has maintained splendid morale and 
sportsmanship. Theirs has been a record 
of distinction and gentility. 

In Athletics, the Class has left a splen- 
did record, replete with State Champion- 
ships in Football, Boxing, and has left a 
creditable record in Basketball, 
Cross-County, Swimming. 

Their success they owe to 
themselves and to the sincere 
efforts of their Presidents, 
Dorothy Newsom and Lowson B 
Knott, Jr, who have stood not 
only for harmony within the 
Class, but courtesy, honor, and 
achievement without. 



Martha vun^c 
Treasurer 



Ann Ingles 
Secretory 



Vice President 



Sixty-MTen 



CHANTICLEER 










Kenneth G. Abbott 

New Eagle, Pa. 
Teaching 



Sigma Chi; Freshman Football, Pi 

Varsity Football, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Counci 
Track, 3; Varsity Club; Tombs. 



Frank B. Allen 

Warrenton, N, C. 
Business Administration 

Kappa Phi, Pan-Hellenic 



Abbott 
Allen, F. 
Allen, S. 



Sally Allen 

Charlotte, N. C. 
General 

Alpha Delta Pi. 



Leroy Ralph Alligood 

Washington, N. C. 
Teaching 



William Korber Andrews 

New Haven, Conn. 

General 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Alpha 
Kappa Psi. 



Louis Deming Angell 

New Bern, N. C. 

Pre-Legal 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Belmont 
Abbey, 1, 2; Art Staff Chanticleer, 
3; Football, 3; House of Repre- 
sentatives, 3; Art Editor Chanti- 
cleer, 4. 



Alligood 
Andrews 
Angell 




SIxty-elKht 



SENIORS 



Armfield 
Atkinson 
Boiley 




i-UU.i 



James Hendricks Armfield 


Louise Thereso Atkinson 


Ruth Bailey 


Mount Airy, N. C. 


Lynchburg, Vo. 


Hottiesburg, Miss 


Civil Engineering 


Generol 


General 



Delta Epsilon Sigma; Freshman 
„jtball, Vorsity Football, 2; 1,2 
Freshman Wrestling; Duke Society 
Civil Engineers. 



L. Griffin Ballard 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Generol 



Alpha Delta Pi; Hollins College, Delta Delta Delta; Wesleyon 

College, 1, 2, 3. 



Cora Beasley 

Louisburg, N C 
General 



J. Chester Berry 

Durham, N C 

Business Administration 



Kappa Delta Pi; Louisburg Col- Kappa Alpho; Pan-Hellenic 
lege, 1, 2; French Club. Council. 



<\ 



[^} 




Ballord 








Beasley 




^1 


Berry 




i^H 






Sixty 


-nin 


e 



CHANTICLEER 




Bet-z 

Boesch 
Bradsher 



George Max Betz 

Wildwood, N. J. 
General 

Epsilon; 



Sigma Alpha 
Gamma Pi. 



Lewis C. Branscomb 

Birminghom, Ala. 
General 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 



Branscomb 

Braswell 

Britf 



Betty Boesch Charles K. Bradsher 

Memphis, Tenn. Petersburg, Va 

Pre-Legal Honors 

Iota Alpha Delta Pi, Nereidian Club, Alpha Tau Omega, Omicron 
President, 4; Woman's Athletic Delta Kappa, Sigma Pi Sigma, 
Association; Manager Junior Delta Phi Alpha; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Swimming, 3; Head of Swimming, Freshman Track, Varsity Trock, 
4; Duke Players; Delta Phi Rho 2, 3; Varsity Cross-Country, 2, 3; 
Alpha, President, 4. Varsity Club, Iota Gamma Pi 

President; Peg ram Chemist r 
Club; Tombs; 9019. 



William M. Braswell 

Johnson City, Tenn. 
Generol 



Eula Britt 

Winter Garden, Flo. 
General 



Alpha Tau Omega; Track, 1; Delta Delta Delta; Duke Play- 

Chronicle, 1; Baseball, 1. ers, 4. 



^ *3^ '^'' 



ii Jifaiii 





Seventy 



SENIORS 



Brown 

Brownlee 

Buchanan 



ff jf^ <^ 




Wilson J. C. Brown 

Boltimore, Md. 
Electrical Engineering 

Sigma Pi Sigma; American In- 



John H. Brownlee 

Philadelphia, Pa 

General 



Evelyn Buchonon 

Chilhowie, Vo 



Teaching 

Pi Koppa Phi; Omicron Delta Sigma Kappa; Woman's Ath- 
.,;itute Electrical Engineers, Engi- Kappa; Beta Omega Sigma; letic Association; Marion Junior 
neering Social Committee, 3; St. Tombs; Freshman Track, Varsity College, I, 2. 
John's College, 1. Track, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4; Fresh- 

man Football, Varsity Football, 2 
3, 4; Freshman and Sophomore 
Class President; Beta Omega 
Sigma Honor Medal; Southern 
Conference Champion in High 
Hurdles; House of Representatives. 



Elizabeth Builuck 

Rock'. \Vi;r.- \ C 

Teaching 

Alpha Delta Pi; Hollins Col- 
lege, 1, Co-ed Editor Archive, 3. 



Robert T. Butler 

Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma; Freshman Base- 
ball; Freshman Basketball; Varsity 
Tennis, 3, 4. 



Helen Kendrick Card 

Durhui! , F\ C 

General 

Pi Beta Phi; Delta Phi Alpha, 
White Witch Dramatic Order, 
Secretary, 3, Town Girls' Club; 
Publicity Chairman, 3, Vice Pres- 
ident, 4, Religious Education As- 
sociation, Duke Players, 1; Wo- 
mons College Government. 




Builuck 

Butler 

Cord 



Seventjr-one 



CHANTICLEER 




€Mkj^ 



Frank Garden 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 
General 



Edwin M. Caldwell, Jr. 

Edgewood, R. I. 
Business Administration 



Garden 

Caldwel 

Casali 



Liberty Casali 

Welch, W. Va. 
General 



Pi Kappa Alpha; Theta Alpha Delta Tau Delta; Omicron Delta Theta Chi Delta; Woman's 

Phi; Duke Players, 1, 2, 3, 4, Kappa; Red Friars; Tombs; Varsity Athletic Association; Y. W. C. A; 

President, 4; Freshman Football; Club; Golf, 2, 3, 4, Captain and House Committee, 3; University of 

Varsity Football, 2, 3. Manager, 3; Secretary and Treas- Louisville, 1, 2. 

urer Men's Association, 4; Pan- 
Hellenic Council. 



Dorothy Casey 

Manteo, N. C. 

Religion 

Theta Tau Epsilon; Louisburg 
College, 1, 2. 



Robert Phelps Chalker 

Ozark, Ala. 
Pre-Legal 



David S. Clarke 

New Haven, Conn. 

Honors 



Alpha Tau Omega; Glee Club, Sigma Delta; 9019- Gallatin 
1, 2, 3, 4; Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sym- Club, 
phony, 3, 4 



Casey 

Chalker 

Clorke 



PS 






Seventy-two 



Clark, J. 
Clork, V. 
Cochrane 




James B. Clark 


Virginia Clark 


Archie M. Cochrane 


Durham, N C. 


Louisville, Go. 


Bridgewoter, Mass. 


Teaching 


General 


General 



Sigma lau Alpha; Omicron 
Delta Kappa Sigma Upsilon; Vice 
President Duke Players, 4; Editor 
Archive, 4, Archive Staff, 1, 2, 3; 
Commencement Marshal, 3; Duke 
Players, 1, 2, 3; Publication 
Board, 4. 



Georgia State Woman's Col- 
lege, 1, 2; House Committee, 3 



Phi Delta Theta, Freshman 
Football; Bosketball; Baseball; 
Varsity Basketball, 2, Assistant 
Freshman Baseball Coach, 3, 4, 
Chronicle Staff, 3 



in 
l| 



Clarence Alfred Cole 

Washington, D, C. 

General 

Sigma Nu; Freshman Boxing; 
Wrestling; Varsity Boxing, 2, 3; 
Cheer Leader; Beta Omega Sigma. 



Frederic Mason Cook 

Yonkers, N Y. 
Business Administration 



Elizabeth Cornet-t 

Bluefield. W Va 

General 

Kappa Alpho Theto; Martho 
Washington College, I, 2; Social 
Standards Committee, 4; Moy Day 
Committee, 4. 




Cole 
Cook 
Cornett 



Seventy-tbre« 



CHANTICLEER 



Bom 




Crenshaw 

Cropper 

Curtis 



Claire T. Crenshaw 

Mobile Ala. 

Religion 

Sigma Nu; Freshman Friendship 
Council, Y. M. C A,, 2, 4; Classi- 
cal Club; Wrestling, 1, 2; Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 4. 



Annie Lee Cutchin 

Whitakers, N, C, 

Teaching 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Louisburg 
College, 1,2, Glee Club, 3, 4; Ac- 
companist Women's Orchestra, 3. 



Cutchin 

Dailey 

Dale 



George Bertrand Cropper 

Ocean City, Md, 

Civil Engineering 

Lambda Chi Alpha, Delta Epsi- 
lon Sigma; Iota Gamma Pi; Pres- 
ident Duke University Society of 
Civil Engineers. 



Grace E. Curtis 

Greensboro, N, C. 
Teaching 

Greensboro College, 1. 



Alma Randall Dailey 

Pittsboro, N C. 

Generol 

Sigma Kappa; Greensboro Col- 
lege, 1, 2; Glee Club; Taurians; 
Student Director Woman's Glee 
Club, 3; Cast, "Robin Hood," 3; 
Glee Club, 4. 



William Pratt Dale, II 

Greensboro, Ala. 

General 

Kappa Alpha, Sigma Upsilon; 
9019; Polity Club. 




Bpveiil.v-fiiur 



SENIORS 



Daniel 

Danner 

Darden 




iMihJ. 




John Howard Daniel 

Warrenton, N C 
General 



James Harvey Danner, Jr. 

Florence, S C. 

Pre-Medicol 

Glee Club, 1 , 2; University 
Quartette, 2 



Eulalia Darden 

Kenly, N. C 

Teoching 

Louisburg College, I, 



Andreas J. Dorlson 


John V. Darwin 


William R. Doughtrey 


Eost Orange, N J. 


Goffney, S C. 


Newport News Va 


General 


Pre-Medicol 


General 


Theta Alpha Phi; Duke Players, 
3,4 


Delta Sigma Phi 


Pi Kappa Phi. 







Dorlson 

Darwin 

Daughfrey 



IMIi 






^r 



Seventjr-flvp 



CHANTICLEER 







Deichmann 

Dein 

Douglas 



Donald Edward Deichmann 

Baltimore, Md. 
Business Administration 

Sigma Phi Epsiion; Football, 



2; Swimming, 1, 2; 
Representatives, 3, 4. 



House of 



Harry Leonard Dein 

Atlantic City, N^ J. 

Pre-Medical 

Phi Sigma Delta, Phi Beta 
Kappa; Swimming, 1, 2, 3; Fresh- 
man Honors; Sophomore Honors; 
Beta Omega Sigma; 9019; Tombs; 
Varsity Club; Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil. 



Anna Gertrude Douglas 

High Point, N C. 

General 

Phi Beta Kappa, Chi Delta Phi; 
Freshman Honors; Sophomore 
Honors; Class Treasurer, 2; 
Chronicle Staff, 3, 4; Women's 
Student Government, 1 ; Eko-L, 
Secretary, 4; Polity Club, Vice 
President, 3, Secretary, 4. 



Lucille Byrd Draughon 

Durham, N C. 

Teaching 

Pi Beta Phi; Sophomore Honors; 
Polity Club; Town Girls' Club. 



Allen Dudley, Jr. 

\iiieland, N J, 
Business Administration 



Wayne Brodford Duttera 

Salisbury, N C. 
Business Administration 



Sigma Delta; Manager Track, Cheer Leader, 2, 3, Head Cheer 
3; Manager Cross Country, 4; Leader, 4; Columbia Literary 
Tombs; House of Representatives, Society. 
3; Freshman Friendship Council; 
Varsity Club. 



Draughon 

Dudley 

Duttera 



r-FBli: 




Sfventy-Hlx 



SENIORS 



Eoton 
Edgerton 
Ellis, H. 




ijmi 



'it 



Dorothy Eaton 


Griffin Gabriel Edgerton 


hierbert Lee Ellis 


Franklin, N. C. 


Kenly, N. C 


Rutherford, N J 


General 


General 


Teaching 


Kappa Alpha Theta; Chi Delta 
Phi; Class President, 3; Treasurer 
Athletic Association, President 
Brown House, Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil, 3, 4, Secretary, 4; Glee Club, 
1; Woman's College Government, 
2, 3, 4; Y W C A Cabinet, 2, 
Secretar\, 3; Polity Club; Debating 
Club, Chanticleer Art Staff, 2; 
Delta Phi Rho Alpha 


Delta Phi Alpha, Columbia 
Literary Society, 9019. 


Polity Club 


Juanita Ellis 


Norman Ray Ellis 


R. Robert Enkema 


Russellville Ark. 


r.,:-.- ■.V-i 


Minneai'Olis. Minn 


General 


Business Administration 


General 


Arkansas Tech, 1, 2; Polity 
Club; Religious Education Associa- 
tion. 




Delta Tou Delta 




Ellis, J. 
Ellis, N. 
Enkema 



S«venty-«evcii 



CHANTICLEER 



'i^ f^ A 



Ershler 

Ewell 

Fanton 



Arthur M. Ershler 

Hudson, N. Y. 

Pre-Medical 

Omicron Delta Kappa; Tombs; 
Football, 1,2,3,4; Boxing, 1,2, 4, 
Social Committee, 3, 4; Athletic 
Council, 4. 



George W. Ewell, Jr. 

Philadelphia, Pa, 

Business Administration 

Phi Delta Theta; Pan-Hellenic 
Council; Swimming, 2, 3; Varsity 
Club, Chronicle Staff, Assistant 
Editor, 3, Sports Editor, 4. 



Helen May Fanton 

Westport, Conn. 

General 

Skidmore College, 1, 2; Junior 
Swimming Team, 3, Manager 
Senior Swimming Team, 4. 



Riley Clifton Fields 

Carthage, N. C. 
Teaching 



A. E. Fischer 

East Orange, N. J. 
Pre-Legal 



Geroldine Fletcher 

McColl, S. C. 

Honors 

Kappa Delta Pi; Orchestra, 3, 
4; Forum Club, Secretary and 
Treasurer, 3, Vice President, 4, 
Pi Mu Epsilon, President, 4; Wo- 
man's Athletic Association Execu- 
tive Board, 4. 



Fields 

Fischer 

Fletcher 




Seventy-etglit 



SENIORS 



Flippo 

Floyd 

Forlines 




F. C. Flippo 

Doswell, Vo 

Business Administration 

Sigma Nu; Virginia Polytechnic 
hnstitute, 1, 2 



Mabel Floyd 

Fairmont, N. C. 
Teaching 



Ruth Forlines 

Durham, N. C. 
Teoching 



Zeta Tou Alpha; Greensboro Pi Beta Phi; Kappa Delta Pi, 
College, 1, 2. Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 

4; Polity Club; Town Girls' Club 



Anne Lois Foster 

Durham. N. C. 

Teaching 



Sam J. Fretwell 

Anderson, S C. 
General 



White Witch Dramatic Order; Sigma Phi Epsilon; Beta Omega 
Forum Club; Town Girls' Club. Sigma; Football, 1; Pan-Hellenic 

Council, 3, 4, President, 4. 



Paul E. Fulford 

Peoria. Ill 

Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma. 




Foster 

Frefwcll 

Fulford 



Seventy-ninv 



CHANTICLEER 




Fulmer 

Fulton 

Futrell 



Henry P. Fulmer 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Business Administration 

Pi Kappa Phi, Omicron Delta 
Kappa; Freshman Track; Varsity 
Track, 2, 3, 4; Tombs; Varsity 
Club, Southern Conference Brood 
Jump Record, 1932. 



Sarah Fulton 

Washington, D, C. 

General 

Delta Delta Delta, University 
of Mississippi, 1, 2. 



Ashley Brown Futrell 

Wilson, N. C. 

General 

Pi Epsilon Pi, Baseball, 3, 4; 
Wrestling, 2, Polity Club. 



Adam Marr Gaddis 

Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Honors 

Phi Beta Koppa; Sigma Pi 
Sigma; Freshman Honors; Sopho- 
more Honors; Pegram Chemistry 
Club; Iota Gamma Pi; 9019. 



Lucille Buchanan Gainey 

Fayetteville, N C. 

Teaching 

Kappa Alpha Theta, Chanti- 
cleer, I; Social Standards Com- 
mittee, 2, 3; Class Secretary, 
3; Forum Club, President, 4; 
Treasurer Y. W. C. A., 4; 
Polity Club; White Duchy; Wo- 
men's Athletic Association Coun- 
cil, 3, 



Joseph Gallia 

Vineland, N J. 
Business Administration 

Alpha Kappa Psi. 



Gaddis 
Goiney 
Gallia 




KlBhly 



SENIORS 



Gantt 

Garrett 

Gartelmann 




ye 



Stough Bryson Gantt 


John J. Garrett, Jr. 


William H. Gartelmann 


Durham, N. C. 


Southport, N. C. 


Savannah, Ga. 


Business Administration 


Teaching 


Business Administration 


Band, 1, 2, 3, 4. 


Sigma Delta. 


Alpl : ^ , a Psi, Glee Club, 1, 
2; Chanticleer, 2, 3, 4, Assistant 
Business Manager, 3, 4. 



Margaret Brevard Gibbons 

Hamlet, N C 

General 

Kappa Delta; Secretary Stu- 
dent Government, 4. 



Fillmore S. Gibson 

Walnut Ridge, Ark. 
Generol 
Arkansas College, 1, 2; Honors, 



Marjorie Glosson 

Durham, N C 

General 

Zeto Tau Alpha; Chi Delta Phi, 
Theto Alpho Phi, Phi Beta Kappa, 
Woman's Student Government 
Council, 2, 3; Women's Athletic 
Association, President, 4; Nerei- 
dion Club, President, 1, Archive, 
Co-ed Editor, 4; Delta Phi Rho 
Alpha; Eko-L; White Duchy. 




Gibbons 

Gibson 

Glosson 



i 



Eighty-one 



CHANTICLEER 




Montgomery John Gray 

Ocean Grove, N. J. 

General 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Manager Musi 
cal Club, 4. 



James Ferrell Green 

Philadelphia, Pa, 

Business Administration 

Pi Epsilon Pi; Swimming, 1, 2; 
Chess Club, 1, 2; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 
Sports Editor, 1, Assistant Editor, 
3; Chanticleer, 2. 



Gray 
Green, J. 
Green. V. 



Virginia Suiter Green 

Weldon, N. C. 

Teaching 

Alpha Delta Pi; Kappa Delta Pi; 
Smith College, 1; Social Stand- 
ards Committee. 



Parker Redman Hamlin 


Gus Hart 


Richard B. Haskell 


Washington, N. J. 


Hartsville, S. C. 


Holyoke, Mass. 


Honors 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 


Sigma Delta; Phi Beta Kappa, 
Freshman and Sophomore Honors; 
9019; Class Secretary, 4; Fresh- 
man Cross Country and Track; 
Chronicle Staff, 3, 4, Assistant 
Sports Editor, 3, 4; University 
Quartet; Glee Club, 2, 3, 4. 


Pi Kappa Phi, 


Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Boston 
University, 1. 



Hamlin 

Hart 

Haskell 



JtM^ .JVN^ .^^^ 

'^ r^ (^ 



>£ 



ikiMkMk^ 



Cltghty-two 



SENIORS 



Hayes, C. 
Hayes, F. 
Haynes 



fTf^ ^ 




C. Marvin Hayes 

Williamsport, Pa. 

Business Administration 

Koppa Alpha; Varsity Basket- 
Hall, 3, 4. 



Fred L. Hayes 

Brookline, Mass. 

Business Administration 

Alpha Tau Omega; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Pan-Hellenic Council. 



John E. Hoynes 

Sportonburg, S C. 

Business Administration 

Kappa Alpha 



Martha Alice Head 

Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Teoching 

Phi Theta Kappa; Bethel Wo- 
men's College, 1, 2; Glee Club, 4. 



Paul C. Henderson 

Freeport, N Y, 

Business Administration 

Sigma Alpha Omega 



Marvin S. Herrington 

Norfolk Va 

Pre-Medical 



r^.e»: 




Head 

Henderson 

Herrington 



Eigbty-tbrM 



CHANTICLEER 




Herzog 

Hicks 

Hickman 



Charles Arthur Herzog 

Baltimore, Md. 

General 

Kappa Alpha, Baseball, 3, 4; 
Johns Hopkins, ] . 



William Bozeman Hicks 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; 
Varsity Club; Freshman Football; 
Varsity Football, 2, 3, 4; Freshman 
Track; Varsity Track, 2, 3, 4, 
Coptoin, 4, 



Harry Stuart Hickman 

Hudson, N. C. 
Pre-Medicoi 

Iota Gamma Pi. 



Ernest Warner Hilderbrandt 

Cctonsville, Md. 

General 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Delta Phi 
Alpho; Assistant Baseball Mana- 
ger, 1, 2, 3, Manager, 4; Student 
Council Representative, 4; Bond, 
1, 2; Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 
Beta Omega Sigma. 



Willie Carlisle Hinds 

Aberdeen, Miss. 

Teaching 

Kappa Delta; Mississippi State 
College for Women, 1, 2, 3. 



William Edward Hoffmann 

Beaver Dam, Wis. 

General 

Delta Tou Delta; Carleton Col- 
lege, 1, 2. 



.W 



Hilderbrandt 

Hinds 

Hoffmann 




Eighty-four 



SENIORS 



Hoggard 

Hooker 

Home 



,r) f^ (^^ 



kJMlJ 






Richard Norfleet Hoggard 

Lewiston, N C. 

Pre-Legal 

Pi Kappa Phi; Kappc Kappa Psi; 
'and, 1, 2, Symphony Orchestra, 
2. 



Louisa Borden Hooker 

Greenville, N C 

Teaching 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Delta Phi 
Alpha; Kappa Delta Pi; Salem 
College, 1; Chronicle Staff, 2, 3, 
Co-ed Business Manager, 3; 
P-'esident Junior Big Sisters; 
Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 
4, Vice President, 4; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, 4, President, 4; Women's 
College Government; Polity Club. 



Oliver Wendell Home 

Vienna, Go 

Pre-Legol 

Phi Delta Theta; Omicron Delta 
Kappa; Freshman Bosketboll, 
Varsity Bosketboll, 2, 3, 4, Stu- 
dent Council, 2, Chanticleer, 2, 
3, Assistant Business Manager, 3; 
Secretory-Treasurer Men's As- 
sociation, 3; Varsity Club, Beta 
Omega Sigma, President Student 
Government, 4. 



Editha Horton 

Winter Haven, Flo. 

Business Administration 



Theta Alpha Phi; Brenou Col- 
lege, 1, Duke Players, 2, 3, 4; 

Secretory, 4, Student Director of 2, 3 4; Varsity Club, Tombs 
' ^ay Day, 3. 



Edward A. Howell 

Goldsboro, N C. 

Teoching 

Freshmon Cross Country; Fresh- 
man Baseball; Varsity Baseball, 



Martha Howie 

Charlotte. N C 

General 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Chi 
Delta Phi; Delta Phi Alpha; 
Polity Club; Class President, 2; 
Eko-L; Duke Players, 1, 2, Wo- 
men's College Government, 3, 4, 
Recording Secretary, 3, Vice 
President, 4; Freshninri Fs«/-ij»ivr> 
Council, I. 




Horton 
Howell 
Howie 



ElKhty-nve 



CHANTICLEER 







Rivera C. Ingle 

East Orange, N. J. 

Honors in English; Pi Beta Phi; 
Chi Delta Phi; Ohio Wesleyon, 1; 
Botes College, 2; Y. W. C. A, 
Cabinet, 3, 4; Chronicle, 3, 4, Co- 
ed Editor, 4, Publications Board, 4. 




Ingle 

Ingles 

Jaffc 



Angelyn Ingles 

Richmond, Va, 

General 

Kappa Alpha Theto; Chi Delta 
Phi, Hollins College, 1, 2; Class 
Secretary, 4, Chronicle, 3, 4, 
Society Editor, 4. 



David Jaffe 

Durham, N. C 

General 

Delta Phi Alpha, Sophomore 
Honors; 9019, Columbia Literary 
Society. 



:•«* 



Winona A. Jeffrey 


George Newton Walters Jones 


Nedra June Jones 


Homer City, Pa. 


Durham, N C 


Norfolk, Va 


Teaching 


Religion 


General 


Alpha Gamma Delta; Kappa 


Ministerial Association, 3, 4, 


Delta Delta Delta; Phi Theto 


Delta Pi; Allegheny College 1, 2' 


Secretary, 3, President, 4; Y. M 


Koppo; Virginia Intermont Col- 


Polity Club. 


C. A. Cabinet, 3, 4. 


lege, 1 ; Duke Players, 2, 3, 4, 
Pegram Chemistry Club, Vice 
President, 4; May Day, 2, 3; 
Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 2, 
3, 4; Class Treasurer, 3; Class 
Vice President, 4. 



Jeffrey 
Jones, G. 
Jones, N. 



fT r^'f^ 




Eighty-Hlx 



SENIORS 



Junkin 
Kosper 
Keiser 






J. Edward Junkin 
Mercer, Pa. 
General 
Kappa Alpha. 



Carl J. Kasper 

Wilkes-Borre, Pa, 

Business Administration 

Sigma Alpha Omega; Student 
Manager Football, 4; Varsity Club 




Richard A. Keiser 

Stroudsburg, Pa 

Pre -Lego I 



Edwin C. Kellam 


Arthur Thomas Kersey 


A. Dean Kesler 


Princess Anne Va 


Somervillc, Mass 


Poanokr. \'n 


Pre- Legal 


General 


Religion 


Kappo Sigma; Omicron Delta 


Freshmen Baseball; Varsity 




■appa; Y M C A. Cobinet, 


Baseboll, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4; 




3, 4, Secretary, 3, Vice Pres- 


Varsity Club 




'ent, 4; Pan-Hellenic Council; 






JIass Secretary, 2 Freshman 






Friendship Council, Chanticleer, 






', 2, 3, 4, Assistant lcJiIui, i, 






litor, 4; Publications Board. 







T: 



rwp 



i 



Kellom 
Kersey 
Kesler 



Eighty-iteven 



CHANTICLEER 



UIMUJ 







King 

Knott 

Knowles 



Margaret Henry King 

Durham, N C 
General 

Alpha Delta Pi. 



Lawson B. Knott, Jr. 

Wendell, N C 

Pre-Legal 

Omicron Delta Kappa; Tau 
Kappa Alpha; Class President, 
4, Class Vice President, 3; Robert 
Spencer Bell Award, 1, 3; Colum- 
bia Literary Society, Secretary, 
3, President, 4; Debate Coun- 
cil, 3; Inter-Society Debate, 2; 
National Oratorical Contest, 1; 
Commencement Marshal, 3; House 
of Representatives, 3. 



Ruth Knowles 

Baltimore, Md. 

General 

Delta Phi Alpha; Phi 
Kappa; Sophomore Honors. 



Beta 



John Royall Kornegay 

Mount Olive, N, C 

Electricol Engineering 

Delta Sigma Phi, Sigma Pi 
Sigma; Pi Mu Epsilon; University 
Symphony Orchestra, 4; American 
Institute Electrical Engineers. 



Donald Austin Kuykendal 

Woodcliff, N. J. 
Business Administration 



John Webb Land 

Hamlet, N. C. 

General 

Pi Koppo Alpha; Assistant 
Manager Wrestling, 1, 2, 3, 
Manoger of Wrestling, 4; Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 4, Secretary, 4. 



^J 



Kornegay 

Kuykendal 

Land 




Eighty-eight 



SENIORS 



Leory 
Levin 
Lewis, H. L. 




, itii 



If 



Dorothy Leory 

East Oranqc, N J. 

General 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y W. 
C A Cobinet, 2, Vice President, 
3, Glee Club, 1, 2, 4; Student 
Government, 1 . 



Jocob Levin 

DurfiQ'-n, N C 

Business Administration 

Phi Beta Kappa; Delta Phi 
Alpho; Freshman Honors; Sopho- 
more Honors; 9019. 



Herbert L. Lewis 

Gr!"(-tisl)orn N r 

Business Administration 

Track, 2, 3, 4. 



Hubert Murry Lewis, Jr. 


John F. Long 


Alma Love 


H._- : ' ■ N C 


Lancaster Pa. 


Hopkin',ville Ky 


General 


General 


Pre-Medicoi 



^ 



Omicron Delta Kappa; Chemis- Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Pan- Pi Beta Phi; Bethel Woman's 
'ry Club; Iota Gamma Pi; Varsity Hellenic Council. College, 1, 2. 

Club; Freshman Track, Varsity 
"rack, 2, 3, 4; Cross-Country, 
.:, 3, 4, Captain, 4; Tombs 




Lewis, H. M. 

Long 

Love 



Elgbtf-DlDC 



CHANTICLEER 



mu». 




Lucas 

Lundgren 

Lyerly 



3. 



Edith Lucas 

Charlotte, N, C. 
General 

Alpha Delta Pi; Sorbonne, Paris, 



Carl Raymond Lundgren 

New Haven Conn. 

Pre-Legol 

Kappa Alpha; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Alpha Kappa Psi; Omicron Delta 
Kappa, Delta Phi Alpha; Red 
Friars; 9019; Vice President Men's 
Association, 4; Student Council, 
3; Vice President Columbia Liter- 
ary Society, 3; Class Treasurer, 1; 
Class Vice President, 2; Cross- 
country, 1, 2; Track, 1; Wrestling, 



Arnold A. Lyerly 

Woodleof, N C. 
Religion 



George Dudley McCeney 

^ Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Civil Engineering 

University of Alabama, 3, Duke 
University Society of Civil Engi- 
neers, 4; Vice Chairman, 4. 



Virginia McCrary 

Lexington, N. C. 

Teaching 

Alpha Delta Pi; Salem College, 
2; Chanticleer, 4. 



Lorraine McGlone 

Pine Bluff, Ark. 

General 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Hollins Col- 
lege, 1, 2; Assistant Co-ed Editor 
Chronicle, 3, 4; Social Standards 
Committee, 4; Alspough House 
President, 4; Woman's Student 
Government Association, 4. 



McCeney 
McCrary 
McGlone 



i*^J I* -) fZ^3 




Ninety 



S E hn R s 



McKenzie 

McLamb 

McLean 




James R. McKenzie 


Howard M. McLamb 


Alexander McLean 


Gibson, N. C. 


Clinton, N C 


Goldsboro, N C 


Teoching 


Religion 


Pre Legol 


Delta Sigma Phi; Glee Club, 1, 
2, 3, 4, Chonticleer, 1, 2; Polity 
Club 


Rutherford College, 1, 2; Minis- 
terial Association 


Phi Delta Theto; House of 
Representatives, 4, Columbia 
Literary Society, President, 4; 
Swimming Teom, I, 2, 3, Polity 
Club 



James Robert Malone 

Durham, N C 

Civil Engineering 

Delta Epsilon Sigma; Duke Uni- 
versity Society of Civil Engineers, 
Executive Committee, 4 



E. Lowell Mason, Jr. 

Charlotte, N C 

Business Administration 

Sigma Chi; Omicron Delta 
Kappa; Freshman Footboil; Fresh- 
man Basketball; Varsity Football, 
2, 3, 4, Captain, 4, Tombs; Varsity 
Club; Red Fnors; Pan-Hellenic 
Council. 



Robert S. Miller 

Clevelond, Ohio 

Civil Engineering 

Delta Epsilon Sigma, Iota 
Gamma Pi, Orchestro, 1, Glee 
Club, 1, Duke University Society 
of Civil Engineers. 




Malone 




r^ 


Mason 




M\ 


Miller 




1 




NInet 


tr-<ilie 



CHANTICLEER 



iUUli 




Minter 
Mixson 
Moore 






John D. Minter 

Laurens, S. C. 

Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma; Omicron Delta 
Kappa; Alpha Kappa Psi; Kappa 
Kappa Psi; Red Friars; Chief 
Marshal, 3; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Business Manager, 3, 4; Publica- 
tions Board, Secretary, 3, 4; Vice 
President North Carolina Col- 
legiate Press Association; Band, 
I, 2, 3; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 4. 



Miriam Mixson 

Valdosta, Go. 
Teaching 

Alpha Delta Pi 



DeArmond Moore 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Pre-Medicol 

Kappa Kappa Psi; Duke Musical 
Clubs, 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President, 
4, Duke Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M^ 
C. A. Cabinet, 3, 4. 



Vince Moseley 

Orangeburg, S. C 
Pre-Medical 

Kappa Alpha, Sigma Psi. 



Helen Calvert Moyler 

Franklin, Va. 

General 

Alpha Delta Pi; Chairman of 
Point System; Student Council; 
Y. W. C. A Cabinet; Chanticleer 
Staff, 1, 2. 



Elbert Jewel! Myers 

Glasgow, Ky, 
Business Administration 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 






Moseley 

Moyler 

Myers 



'1^ (^ ft 





NInetylwo 



SENIORS 



Myers 

Murchison 

Nonce 





John A. Myers 




Alton G. Murchison 


Morion Nonce 


Oxford, N C, 




Favettevillc, N C 


Ashrville, N C 


Pre- Legal 




Business Administration 


Teaching 


Kappa Kappa Psi; Band, 1, 2, 3; 
~ ^iity Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 
■4; Secretary, 4. 


Kappa Sigma; Beta Omega 
Sigma, Freshman Friendship Coun- 
cil; Assistant Sports Editor 
Chronicle, 2, 3; Chronicle Staff, 4; 
Sports Editor Chanticleer, 4; 
Varsity Basketball Manager, 3; 
Varsity Club. 


Glee Club, 4 


Margaret Nelms 




Walter Relfe Newbern 


Dorothy Newsom 


Kingsport, Tenn. 




Durham, N C 


Durham, N C 


General 




Pre-Medical 


General 


Delta Delta Delta; Duke 
ers, 3, 4; Hoi 1 ins College, 1 


Play- 
,2. 




Kappa Delta, White Duchy, 
Eko-L; Glee Club, Business 
Manager, 3, President, 4; Vice 
President Junior Big Sister Or- 
ganization, Delta Phi Rho Alpho, 
Secretary, 3, President, 4; Fresh- 
man Honors; Woman's Associa- 
tion, Council, 4; President Senior 
Class. 



lij 



TT.« 




1^ 



Nelms 

Newbern 

Newsom 



Ninety-three 



CH 



•m< 



)k 







Newton 
Nichols 
O'Keef 



)P,' 



Lillian Newton 


Hazel Nichols 




Fannie Corbett O'Keef 


Rose Hill, N, C 


Durham, N. C. 




Wilmington, N. C. 


Teaching 


Teaching 




Teaching 


Louisburg College, 1, 2. 




Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 
4; House Committee, 2, 3, Secre- 
tary 4; Woman's Athletic As- 
sociation, Vice President, 4, 
Chanticleer Staff, 4. 



r 



George Wells Orr, Jr. 

Garden City, N. Y, 
Pre-Legal 

Kappa Alpha. 



Wilbur S. Ormsby 

New York, N. Y. 

Civil Engineering 

Sigma Phi Epsilon; Freshman 
Basketball; Varsity Basketball, 2; 
Duke University Society of Civil 
Engineers; Cross-Country, 1, 2. 



Williom Allen Pankey, Jr. 

Bluefield, W. Va. 

General 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Washing- 
ton and Lee University, 1, 2. 



Orr 

Ormsby 

Pankey 




Ninety-four 



SENIORS 



Pardue 
Patten 
Patterson, C. 




Mary Pardue 


Lawrence Patten 


Carmen Patterson 


Ho! k,.,y.,il,. Kv 


Fa\etttMllo N C 


Gri'/iTislKjn ' ' . '_ 


General 


General 


General 




Ph. Delta Theta 


Alpha Delto Pi; Chi Delta Phi, 
Chanticleer, 2, 4, Co-ed Editor, 4, 
Chronicle, 2, 3, 4; Polity Club, 3, 
4, Vice President, 4; White Duchy, 
Class Secretary, 2, Class Vice 
President, 3. 


Cora Lillian Patterson 


Julia Perry 


Helen Loroine Phillips 


Albemari-? '■; C 


Orange Va 


Rirhniond Vu 


Teaching 


General 


General 


Sigma Kappa; Holiins College, 
1, 2; Women's Glee Club, 3, 4; 
Forum Club 


Sigma Kappa; Westhampton 
College, 1, 2, Forum Club. 


Zeto Tau Alpha, Hollms Col 
lege, 1, 2. 










t^M. 



Patterson, C. L. 

Perry 

Phillips 



Nlnety-flvf? 



CHANTICLEER 



A. 



m 




Phillips 
Poovey 
Power 



James H. Phillips 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Religion 

Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; University 
Quartet, 3, 4; President University 
Musical Clubs, 4; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet, 3, 4; Undergraduate 
Ministerial Association, Secretary 
and Vice President, 3, Com- 
mencement Marshal, 3. 



Maybelle Poovey 

Mt. Airy, N. C. 

General 

Davenport College, 1, 2; Reli- 
gious Education Association, 3, 4, 
President, 4, 



Bennie Purvis 

Durham, N. C. 

General 

Kappa Delta Theta, Delta Phi 
Alpha, Duke Players. 



Virginia Ragan 

Gastonio, N. C. 

General 

Alpha Delta Pi, Duke Players 
1, 2, 3; Y. W, C. A. Treasurer, 3, 
President, 4; Sorority Pan- Hellenic 
Council, 3, 4; Social Standards 
Committee. 



Gordon Gilbert Power 

Baltimore, Md. 

Business Administration 

Sigma Chi; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Omicron Delta Kappa; Alpha 
Kappa Psi, Delta Phi Alpha; Red 
Friars; Tombs; Beta Omega 
Sigma, Swimming, I, 2; Tennis, 1, 
2; Class Treasurer, 2; Manager 
Boxing, 3; 9019; Men's Associa- 
tion, 3; Varsity Club; Polity Club; 
Chanticleer, 2, 3, 4, Business 
Manager, 4. 



Laura Virginia Ratcliffe 

Durham, N. C. 

Teaching 

East Carolina Teahers College, 
2; Town Girls' Club. 



Purvis 
Ragan 
Ratcliffe 




Nlnety-slx 



SENIORS 



Ripley 

Roberson 

Rodgers 




W 



Wilder H. Ripley 

Winnetka, III. 

General 

Pi Epsilon Pi; Beta Omega 
Sigma, Tombs; Pon-Helienic 
Council; Freshman Track; Varsity 
Track, 2, 3, 4; Freshman Basket- 
ball, Varsity Basketball, 2, 3. 



Nancy Elizabeth Roberson 

Durhom, N C 

General 

Kappa Koppo Gamma; Town 
Girls' Club, Vice President, 3, 
President, 4; Y W. C. A. Cabi- 
net, 4, V^omon's College Govern- 
ment, Executive Committee, 2, 4. 



Eleanor Rodgers 

Northfield, Mass. 

General 

Delta Phi Alpha, House Pres- 
ident, Jarvis, 3, Chi Delta Phi, 
Treasurer, 3, Vice President, 4, 
Y W C A Cabinet, 4; White 
Duchy; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3,4. 



Ralph N. Rohrbaugh 
Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 
Teaching 
Cross-Country, 1, French Club, 



Bruce S. Roxby 

Swarthmore, Pa 

Pre-Medical 

Sigma Tau Alpha, Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Sigma Upsilon; 
Publicotions Board; 9019; Iota 
Gamma Pi, Vice President, 4; 
Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, Assistant 
Editor, 3; Pegram Chemistry Club. 



Rebecca Carroll Royoll 

Smithfield, N. C. 

Teaching 

Sigma Koppo, Y. W C A 
Cabinet, 4, Forum Club, Religious 
Educotion Associofion, President, 
3, Student Volunteer. 



[if! 

m 



Cy O 





Rohrbaugh 
Roxby 
Royall 



Nlnety-n«»en 



CHANTICLEER 







i 



Rush 

Sanner 

Schaidt 



Robert H. Rush 


Harry C. Sanner, Jr. 






Soro Ann Schaidt 


Lumber City, Ga. 


Baltimore, Md, 






Cumberland, Md. 


Business Administration 


Business Administration 






Teaching 


Lambda Chi Al[iha, Alpha 
Koppa Psi. 


Sigma Phi Epsilon, Freshmen 
Swimming ; Chronicle, 1, Polity- 
Club 


Hood College, 1, 2, Sorbonne 
Pans, 3. 



Howard H. Schnure 

Selinsgrove, Pa, 

Business Administration 

Kappa Sigma, Freshman Foot- 
ball; Freshman Baseball; Varsity 
Baseball, 2, 3, 4; House of 
Representatives, 



Marjorie Scruggs 

Asheville, N C, 
General 

Phi Mu, Brenau College, 



Hawley Howard Seiler 

Richmond, Va, 

Pre-Medical 

Freshman Friendship Council 
Band, 1, 2; Iota Gamma Pi 



W- 



Schnure 
Scruggs 
Seller 




Ninety-elKht 



SENIORS 



Sellers, E. 
Seiiars, L. 
Shankic 



L-s ^. ^J[- 1 m^ ^ 



,,tMIJ 




Elizabeth Sellors 


Louise Seiiars 


Martha Catherine Shankic 


Burlington, N. C. 


Mebane, N C 


Mount Gilead, N C 


General 


General 


Teoching 


Kappa Alpha Theta, Chanti- 
cleer, 1, 2, 3, Co-ed Business 
Manager, 3; Co-ed Business 
Manager Archive, 4; White 
Duchy; Publications Board, 4; 
Business Manager Freshman 
Handbook, 2; Student Govern- 
ment, Assistant Treasurer, 3, 
Treasurer, 4; Woman's Athletic 
Association Council. 


Kappa Kappa Gamma, Distaff, 
Advertising Manager, 2, 3, House 
President, 3, 4; Chairman of House 
Presidents Board, 3, 4; Sorority 
Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 4, Treas- 
urer, 4; Polity Club 




R. E. Sherwood 


Charles Short, Jr. 


Joseph L. Skinner 


Charleston, W. Va 


Charlotte, N. C. 


Clearwater, Flo. 



Pre-Legol 

Sigma Delta, Kappa Kappa Psi; 
Beta Omega Sigma; Symphony 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Bond, 1, 2, 3. 



Business Administration 

Lambda Chi Alpha, Omicron 
Delta Kappa; Freshman Football, 
Varsity Football, 2, 3; Beta Omega 
Sigma, Tombs; Varsity Club, Class 
President, 3; Columbia Literary 
Society; Student Council. 



Business Administration 

Pi Kappa Phi, Omicron Delta 
Kappo, Beta Omega Sigma, 
Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 4, Sports Editor, 
3, Managing Editor, 4, Chanticleer 
Sports Editor, 3; Class Treasurer, 
3, Class Vice President, 4, Fresh- 
men Friendship Council, Freshman 
Tennis. 



cr^a 





1 


ftfl' 

Sherwood 


Short 


Skinner wl 


1 


Ninety-nine 



CHANTICLEER 




Smith 

Sneeden 

Snyder 



Mary Frances Smith 




Mary Steele Sneeden 




Ruth W. Snyder 


Valdosta, Go. 




Durham, N, C. 




Bethlehem, Pa, 


General 




Teaching 




Teaching 


Sigma Kappa, Pegrom 
istry Club. 


Chem- 




Alphc 
lege, 1, 


Chi Omega; Brenou Col 
2, Duke Players, 4. 



Curtis Taylor Spence 


R. James Starling 


Thomas Williams States 


Norfolk, Va. 


Goldsboro, N. C. 


Gostonia, N. C. 


General 


Religion 


General 


Pi Kappa Alpha, Omicron Delta 


Ministerial Association, Y. M. 


Delta Tau Delta, Archive Staff, 


Kappa; Freshman Friendship 


C. A Cabinet, 3, 4; Literary Editor 


1, 2, 3; Assistant Manager Basket- 


Council, Secretary, 1; Y. M, C. A. 


of Chanticleer, 4. 


ball, 1, 2; Band, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 


Cabinet, 2, 3, President, 4; Fresh- 




1, 2, 3. 


men Honors; Classical Club; 






Treasurer, 2; Secretary, 3; 






Archive Art Staff, 2, 3; Chonti- 






clee Art Staff, 3. 







Spence 

Starling 

States 






One Uiindrr'd 



SENIORS 



Stevens 

Stevenson 

Stewart 



"Ci e> a 




Arthur Gront Stevens, Jr. 

Greenwood, Miss. 

General 

Phi Delta Theta ; Commence- 
ent Marshal; University of Mis- 
-sippi, 1, 2 



M. Gradley Stevenson 

New York, N Y. 

General 



James Lanius Stewart 

Charlotte, N C 
General 



Theto Alpha Phi; Sigma Pi Pi Kappa Alpha; Omicron 
Sigma; Duke Players, 3, 4; French Delta Koppo; Sigmo Upsilon, 
Club, 4 Chronicle staff, 2, 3, 4, Editor-in- 

Chief, 4; Publications Board, 4, 
Red Friars. 



Chorles Paul Stevick 


Mildred Stites 


Martha Sloan Stringfield 


Southern Pines, N C 


Hopkinsville, Ky. 


Waynesville, N. C. 


Pre-Medicol 


General 


Teaching 


Freshman Honors; Pegrom 
Chemistry Club 


Chi Delta Phi; Phi Beta Kappa; 
Phi Theta Kappa; Bethel Wo- 
man's College, 1, 2; Distaff Editor, 

4; Forum Club, 3, 4 


Delta Delta Delta, Kappa Delta 
Pi, 




Stevick 

Stites 

Stringfield 



One Hnndred One 



CH ANTICLE ER 



iitmi 



^i 




Todd 

Teckwiller 

Turner 



Edward Todd 




William D. Teckwiller 


May Frances Turner 


Spencer, N C, 




Charleston, W Vo 


Wilson N C 


Pre-Legal 




Business Administration 


Teaching 


Columbia Literary Society; 
Players 


Duke 


Delta Tcu Delta, Band, 1, 2; 
Orchestro, 2, 4, Pan-Hellenic 


Distaff, 4. 



Council, 2, Beta Omega Sigma. 



Philip Munyon Unsworth 

Vineland, N J 

Pre-Medical 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Orchestra, 
3, 4; Glee Club, 3, 4; Iota Gamma 
Pi. 



Martha V. Vance 

Chicago, III, 

General 

Kappa Alpha Theta, Carlton 
College, 1; Thornton Junior Col- 
lege, 2; Duke Players, 3, 4; House 
President, 4; Senior Class Treas- 
urer, 4, 



Robert M. Vaughan 

Glasgow, Ky 

General 

Kappa Alpha, Sigma Upsilon, 
Phi Beta Kappa; Omicron Delta 
Kappa; Freshman and Sophomore 
Honors; Polity Club, 3, 4, Pres- 
ident, 4; Publications Board, 4. 



Unsworth 

Vance 

Vaughan 




One Hundred Two 



SENIORS 



Vickers 

Voorhees 

Word 




Lee E. Vickers 


Robert S. Voorhees 


Myrtice Chorlotfe Word 


Durham, N C. 


Atlantic City, N J 


Durham, N C 


General 


Business Administration 


Teaching 



Phi Beta Kappa; Freshman and Pi Epsilon Pi; Tombs; Varsity 

Sophomore Honors; 9019; Duke Boseboli, 2, 3, 4; Senior Closs 
Blue Devil Orchestra Treasurer, 



Pi Beta Phi, Kappo Delta Pi, 
Chi Delta Phi, Freshman Honors, 
Sophomore Honors; Polity Clubi 
Eko-L, President, 4; Town Girls' 
Club 



1 



Coriotto Waters 

Washington, N C. 

Teaching 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Duke Players, 

2, 3, 4; Student Council, 3, 4; 
Social Standards Committee, 2, 3, 
4, Chairman, 4; Duke Players, 4; 
Distaff, 3, May Day Committee, 

3, 4, Delta Phi Rho Alpha. 



Elizabeth Weathers 
Raleigh, N C 

Generol 



Albert Henry Werner 

Lykens, Po 

Electrical Engineering 

Pi Mu Epsilon; Delto Epsilon 
Sigmo; Freshman Football ond 
Baseball, Varsity Football, 2, 3, 4, 
Varsity Baseball, 2, Tombs, House 
of Representatives, Beta Onega 
Sigma 




Waters 

Weathers 

Werner 



li 



i 



One Hundred Threp 



CHANTICLEER 






m 



J^ ^ V f^ "^ f 




lJ 



West 

Weyersberg 

White 



Elizabeth West 


Albert Charles Weyersburg 


Laura White 


\lbemarle, N. C. 


Lyndhurst, N. J. 


Raleigh, N. C. 


Teaching 


Pre-Legal 


General 



Zeta Tau Alpha; Greensboro Sigma Delta; Assistant Track Peace Junior College, 1, 2; Dis- 

College, 1, 2. Manager, 2, 3, Track Manager, 4. taff Staff, 4. 



n 






Helen Wilkerson 


Crockette Williams 


John W. Wood 


Nashville, Tenn. 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Hones, N. C. 


General 


General 


Teaching 


Religious Educational Associa- 
tion, 3, 4, Treasurer, 4; Ward- 
Belmont College, I, 2. 


Kappa Alpha Theta, Chi Delta 
Phi. 


Kappa Delta Pi 



Wilkerson 

Williams 

Wood 




One Hiindrpfl Four 



Wyllie 

Wyman 

Yelverton 




Charles G. Wyllie 
Business Administration 



William H. Wyman 

Business Administration 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Duke Play- 
ers, 1,2, 3, 4, Business Manager, 
4. 



George Elliott Yelverton 
Business Administration 



Elizabeth R. York 


Don M. Garber 


Mory McGhee 


Morris Ploins, N J. 


Washington, D. C. 


Atlanta, Go 


usiness Administration 


Business Administration 


General 



Kappa Deira, Pan-Hellenic Sigma Chi, I omos, beta Omega Zeto Tau Alpha, Nereidian 
Council, 4, Polity Club Sigma; Varsity Club, Basketball, Club 

I, 2, 3; Tennis, I, 2, 3. 





York 

Garber 

McGhee 



One Hundred Five 




Shield Taken from 
Front of Library 



u 



N 



CHANTICLEER 



f^ ,0 f^ 








tii 



I 





James E. Abraham 

Uniontown, Pa. 
Phi Delta Theta, University of Pitts- 
burgh, 1; Swimming, 3 

Evelyn Adams 

McColl, S C 
Sigma Kappa. 

Glenn Elwood Anderson 

Asheville, N C 
Sigma Rho Epsilon; Wrestling, 2, 
Freshman Football and Track 

Benjamin William Angle 

Rocky Mount, Va 
Pi Kappa Phi. 

Hal W. Atkinson 

Wadesboro, N C. 
Delta Epsilon Sigma; Freshman 
Wrestling, Freshman and Sophomore 
Honors; Iota Gamma Pi; Science Medal, 
2; American Institution of Electrical 
Engineers. 

Thomas Baird 

Swarthmore, Pa. 
Delta Sigma Phi; Basketball, 1; As- 
sistant Tennis Manager, 2, 3; Columbia 
Literary Society, Secretary; hlouse of 
Representatives, 3. 

Samuel I. Barnes 

Mine Run, Va. 
Y M, C, A. Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; Glee 
Club, 3; Track, 3. 

Harry W. Beals 

Collingswood, N, J. 

Iota Gamma Pi; University of Pennsyl- 
vania, I 

David M. Beebe 

New London, Conn. 

Ethel Begg 

Charlotte, N. C 
Kappa Delta; Queens College, 1, 2. 

Edward H. Benenson 

New York, N Y. 
Freshman Boxing Manager; Chronicit 
Staff, 1. 

John M. Bird 

Durham, N. C. 
Delta Epsilon Sigma; Duke Universits 
Society of Civil Engineers. 

Robert M. Bird 

Durham, N C 

Classical Club; Chronicle, 1, 2; 
Varsity Track, Varsity Cross-Country 

F. Storey Bleuit 

Philadelphia, Pa 
Haverford College, 1; American In- 
stitute Electrical Engineer'^ 

Eidridge H. Boardman 

Fair Haven, N J. 






Unt! Iliiiiilrcil KUlit 



JUNIORS 



Clyed F. Boyles 

Paducah, K>. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Jerry Broy 

Nortolk, Va. 
Freshman and Varsity Cross-Count r>, 
Freshman and Varsity Track; Tombs, 

Holl'^e of Rt^prt'sentativi^i 

Wilbur L. Brister 
Petersburg, Va. 
Delta Tau Delta; Delta Phi Alpha; 
Freshman Honors; Sophomore Honors 

William J. J. Britt 

Elmhurst, N Y 

Carolyn Brooks 

Muyticld, K\ 

Zeto Tau Alpha; Word Belmont, 1, 2 

Lucille Bryan 

Garner, N C 

Perdue Bunch 

Statesville, N. C. 
Tau Kappa Alpha; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Y M C A Cabinet; Ministerial 
Association; Columbia Literary Society, 
Student Volunteer; Chronicle Staff, 
I 2 

Emily Cafherine Byrn 

Mayfield, Ky. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Randolph -Macon 
Woman's College, 1, 2. 

Gustaf A. Carlson 

East Haven, Conn. 
Kappa Alpha; Wrestling, 1; Beta 
Omega Sigma, Cross Country, 2; 

Columbia Literar\ Society. 

LoDema Carothers 

Asbury Park, N. J. 

Glee Club 

Louise Carter 

Gate City, Va 
Delta Delta Delta; Virginia Inter- 
mont, 1, 2. 

Rosanelle Cash 
Winston-Salem, N. C 
Y. W. C. A Cabinet, 2, 3; Chronicle 
Staff, 2, 3 

Elizabeth Cheatham 
Franklinton, N. C. 
Phi Mu; Florida Stote College for 
Women, 1, 2 

Betty Chipmon 

Baltimore, Ma 
Zeto Tau Alpha, Chronicle Staff, 1; 
Duke Players, 1, 2; Chanticleer, 

Marjorie Clark 

Bereo, K, 
Glee Club; Duke Players. 



o c> 





^(^a 




'JkJS. 




-^ 



One Hundred Nine 



CHANTICLEER 



ua» 




«rv 



I \ 




^ Ciif i^ 




Ibwii 






Randolph Thornton Clarke 

Hertford, N. C. 
Varsity Swimming, 3, 4, Duke Uni- 
versity Society Civil Engineers. 

W. L. Clarke 

West Point, Miss. 
Sigma Chi. 

Guy M. Coffman 

Williamson, W Vc 
American Institute Electrical Engi- 
neers. 

Paul F. Corell 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, 

Helen May Cox 

Rockingham, N. C. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Converse College, 
1, 2. 

John B. Cox, Jr. 

Birmingham, Ala 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Wrestling, 3; 
Honors Student, Birmingham-Southern 
College, I, 2. 

Robert Calvin Cox 

Vernon, Tex 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Varsity Foot- 
ball, 3, 

Polly Crowder 
Jarratt, Va 
Pi Beta Phi; Duke Players, Pan- 
Hellenic Council, 3. 

Max Crabbe 

Birmingham, Ala. 
Alpha Tou Omega 

Helen Daniel 

Columbia, S. C. 
Zeta Tau Alpha, Duke Players; Class 
Vice President, 2, President, 3; French 

Club. 

Laverne Dawson 

Fort Smith, Ark. 

Galloway College, 1, 2. 

Arthur Decker, Jr. 

Staten Island, N Y. 
Alpha Kappa Psi 

Charles C. Derrick 

Stockbridge, Mass 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; 
Treasurer, 3. 

Virginia M. Dillon 

Wilmington, N C 
Alpha Delta Pi; Treasurer Junior Big 
Sisters, Chanticleer, 3 

Dorothy Douglas 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Student Government Association, As- 
sistant Treasurer, 3; French Club. 



One Hundred Ten 



JUNIORS 



Charline Dowling 

Munfordville, Ky 
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Ward- 
Belmont, 1, 2 

Charles Jordan Dunston 

Nortolk, Vu 
Pi Epsilon Pi 

Amy Duke 

Fort Valley, Go 
Kappa Delta, Class President, 2, 
Women's Student Government, 3 

John Eostlake 

Voungstown, Ohio 
Pi Epsilon Pi, Youngstown College, 1; 
Duke Players. 

Margaret S. Edwards 

Durham, N C 

Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

L. Harris Edmondson 

Eatonton, Go 
Exchange Editor, Chronicle, 3, 
Managing Editor, Archive, 3 

Daniel S. Ellis 

Richmond, Va 
Alpha Tau Omega; Beta Omega 
Sigma, House of Representatives, 2; 

Swimming, 1 

William S. Foirchild, Jr. 

Buzzord's Boy, Moss. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Clare Weaver Feldman 

Easton, Pa 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Distaff, 1, 2, 
Chronicle, 1, 2, 3 

Dorris Fish 

Chicago, III 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Y. W C A 
Cabinet, Secretary, 3; Ward-Belmont, 

1 2 

Catherine Frances Fleming 

New Bethlehem, Pa. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Women's Stu- 
dent Government, 1; Chronicle, 1, 3; 
Chanticleer, 1, 3, Goucher College, 2 

Robert G. French 

Oak Park, Ml. 
Koppa Sigmo; Assistant Manager 
Boskettxill. 

Ina Futrell 

Rich Square, N C. 

Mary Goddis 

Upper .'.',„.-. L,„.o, Md 
Sigma Kappa; Delta Phi Alpha 

Doris Gorris 

Greenville, N C 
Kappa Delta; Greensboro College, 
1,2. 




*•=*. <r' f*» * ^ W ^ W 




% ^- •* * w- 



»7c 



.t^-: 




li^ 





One Hundred Eleven 



CHANTICLEER 



A. 




f-^ «.p y^ — * ll^ " 









Pf)0 



te r;Mii 



William M. Georhart 

Cumberland, Md, 
Delta Tau Delta, Pegram Chemistr\ 
Club, Freshman Honors; QOIQ 

Florence Geraldine Geise 

Norristown, Pc 

Delta Delta Delta; Beaver College. 

Fred W. Gerkens 

Atlantic Highlands, N. J 
Band, 1, 2; Glee Club, 3. 

Joseph Winton Getzendanner 

Baltimore, Md 
Kappa Alpha; Freshman and Sopho- 
more Honors; Baseball, 1, 2; 9019. 

Guy Kingsbury Gregg 

Weston, W. Va 
Kappa Alpha 

Claiborne B. Gregory 

Durham, N. C 
Alpha Tau Omega, Assistant Foot- 
ball Manager, 1, 2, Chanticleer, 1, 2, 

3, Tennis, 1 . 

Janet Griffin 

Baltimore, Md. 
Alpha Delta Pi; Delta Phi Rho Alpha; 
Neredian Club, Glee Club, Treasurer, 
3, Y, W. C. A. Cabinet, 3; Junior Big 
Sisters, President, 3; Social Standards 
Committee, 2, 3. 

Edgar Milton Hall, Jr. 

Lillington, N. C. 
Kappa Kappa Psi; Band, 2, 3; 
Symphony Orchestra, 2, 3; Glee Club, 
2, 3; Operetta, 2; North Carolina State 
College, 1. 

John M. Hamrick 

Gaffney, S C 
Delta Sigma Phi; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Assistant Football Manager, 1, 2, 3. 

Lucy Lea Harris 

Rockingham, N C 
Kappa Delta; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Vice 
President, 3; Social Standards Com- 
mittee. 

Don H. Heidelberg 
Hattiesburg, Miss 
Kappa Sigma; Millsaps College, 1, 2 

Horace H. Hendrickson 

Beaver Falls, Pu 
Phi Delta Theta; Varsity Club; 
Tombs, Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball' 
I, 2; Baseball, I, 2, 3; Beta Omega 
Sigma 

Edward French Herrick 

Asheville, N C 

Jessie Hertz 

Harrisburg, Pa. 
Koppa Kappa Gamma 

Mary Kathryn Hewitt 

Hiackensucf, N J 
Sigma Kappa, Chanticleer, 2, 3. 



Due llumlred Twrlve 



JUNIORS 



Robert D. Hicks 
Florence, S C 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Jeanne Mercedes Holt 

Lvtichburg, \'a 

Duke Players, 1, 2, 3, Chronicle, 2, 3 

Mary Louise Home 

Rock\ Moutit N C 

Zeta Tau Alpha, Chonticleer, 2 

Chronirl- ^ " Duk, (^i.^ri, 2 

R. Haywood Hosea 

Pikevilie, N C 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, Assistant Base- 
ball Manager, 1,2, 3; Freshmon Friend- 
ship Council; Freshmon Marshal. 

Frederic Edward Houghton 

Thompson, Conn 
Sigma Delta 

Chorles R. Humphreys 

Chester town, Md 

Delta Tou Delta; Beta Omega 
Sigmo; Chronicle, 1, 2; Pegrom Chem- 
istry Club, Assistant Boxing Manager 
I, 2, 3; 9019. 

Eloise Ingram 

High Point, N C. 
Zeta Tau Alpha, Vice President 
Class, 3; Delta Phi Rho Alpha, Duke 
Players; Chronicle, 1, 2. 

Russell S. Ireland 

Coilingswood, N J. 
Delto Sigma Phi; Assistant Manager 
Track, 3 

Thirston H. Jackson, Jr. 

OakKn, N J 

Football, 2; Glee Club, I; American 
Institute Electrical Engineers 

Henry H. Jagger 

Westhampton, N Y. 
Kappa Delta Pi; Alpha Kappa Psi, 
Colgate, 1; Chronicle, 2, Assistont 
Editor, 3 

Norman James 

Hickory, N. C 
Football, I, 2, 3; Track, i, 2, 3; 
Swimming, I, 2, 3; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Varsity Club; Student Government, 3 

Edward R. Jefferies 

Gaffney, S C 
Delta Sigma Phi; Beta Omega Sigma 

Ralph F. Johnson 

Wilminqton N C 

Franklin C. Jones 
Albany, Ga 
Alpha Tou Omega 

Myrtle Ruth Jones 

Chilhowie, Va 
Sigma Kappa; Chanticleer, 1, 2, 3, 
Glee Club, 1, Sorontv Pan-Hellenic 
Council. 




r^ r^ C" 




. (ill 



Hi 






One Hundred Thirteen 



CHANTICLEER 



<v- 



3i 







F. Rolf Kadie 

Chevy Chase, Md. 
Pi Kappa Alpha, 

Ann Katz 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Mildred Kennedy 

Roanoke, Va. 



Raymond L. Kent 

Cedarhurst, N Y 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Kappa Kappa Psi; 
Band, 1, 2, Chronicle, 1, Circulation 
Manager, 2, Advertising Manager, 3. 

Virginia Kern 

Shanghai, China 
Phi Mu, Rondolph-Mccon Woman's 
College, 1, 2. 

Martha Kindel 

Raleigh, N C 

Kappa Kappa Gamma, Distaff, 2, 3, 
Chronicle, 1, 2; Vice President Junior 
Big Sisters; Taurian, I; May Day Com- 
mittee, I, 2. 



Bernard P. Kinter 

Dayton, Pa, 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Earle H. Kirk 

Beckley, W, Va 

Elizabeth C. Knight 

Morristown, N J 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Chi Delta Phi, 
Distaff, 2, 3, 



Mary Stuart Lackey 

Christiansburg, Va, 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

George H. Lamar, Jr. 

Roc kv I lie, Md 
Alpha Tau Omega; Chronicle, I, 2, 3; 
Chanticleer, 1 

Porter Plummer Lamm 

Wilson, N C 
Alpha Kappa Psi. 

W. Kenneth Lang 

Pittsburgh, Pa 
Phi Delta Theta. 

Anna Brown Lowron 

Erwin, Tenn 

George Truesdell Lawyer 

Greenfield, Ma::s 
Phi Delta Theta; Chronicle. 1, 2, 3, 
Assistant Manager Tennis, 1, 2; Swim- 
ming, 2, 3; Varsity Club. 



I 

I 



One Hnndrcil Fourteen 



JUNIORS 



Martin Lee 

Charlotte, N C 
Alpha Tau Omega 

William Reynolds Lybrook 

Winston-Salem, N C 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Cross-Count ry, 1, 
Boxing, 1, Track, 2 

Fred N. Lloyd 

Durham, N C 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Boxing, 1; Base- 
ball. 1, Varsity Club, Varsity Baseball, 
2, 3, Vorsity Boxing, 2, 3, Captain, 3, 
Tombs. 

Emma Frances Lyon 

Durham N C 

Ralston McLain, Jr. 

Swarthmore, Pa. 
Kappa Sigma, Golf 1 2 ? 

Joseph P. McCrocken 

Durham, N C 
Delta Tau Delta, Archive, 2, 3; 
Pegram Chemistry Club 

Alan C. McCree 

Kearny, N J 

Sigma Delta; Freshman Football; As- 
sistant Manager Boseboll, 1, 2, 3; 
Varsity Swimming, 2, 3; Chronicle, 2, 3, 
Assistant Editor, 3 

Mildred McKinney 

Shelby, N C 

Carl A. Marcks 

Nazareth, Pa 
Bond, I. 



Eleanor Morkham 

Durban-. N C 

Sigma Kappa; Pi Mu Epsilon; World 
Fellowship Group, 1; Physics Club, 2; 
Freshman Honors; Town Girls' Club 

Thomas Carl Markhom, Jr. 

Durham, N C 

John A. Martin 

Lake Forest, III 
Kappa Sigmo; Lake Forest College, 
1; Vorsity Baseball, 3, Chanticleer, 3, 
Junior Pan-Hellenic Representative, 3 

William C. Martin 
Wilmington, N. C 
Phi Delta Theta; Freshman Boxing, 
Assistant Manager Basketball, 1, 2, 3 

Louise Maxwell 

Beckley, W. Vo 
Kappo Delta; Wesleyon College, 1, 2 

Daniel T. Merritt, Jr. 

Newport News, v c 
Pi Kappa Phi, Glee Club, Chanticleer, 
1, 2 



^ C^fH^ 




TT 



I 



W 



One Hundred Fifteen 



CHANTICLEER 





Thomas Groy Midyette 

Jackson, N C 

Jane Dameron Miller 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Kappa Delta; Pan-Hellenic Counci 
3, Class Secretary, 2 

Murray A. Miller 

Portsmouth, Vc. 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



William C. Miller 

Newtonville, Mass 
Zeta Psi; Tufts College, 1, 2; Dons 
Club. 

Alvin 0. Moore 

Murfreesboro, Tenn. 
Kappa Alpha; Vanderbilt University 
I, 2. 

Helen Moral! 

Floral Park, N Y. 



Joseph Collier Morrill 

Charlotte, N C 

Frances Merritt Morton 

Roxboro, N. C 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Kappa Delta Pi, 

Mary Avon Motlow 

Lynchburg, Tenn. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Ward-Belmont 
College, I, 2. 



Mary Jane Mulford 

Washington, D C 

Jean Murdock 

Greenville, S. C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta. 

James A. Mustard 

Montclair, N. J. 
Alpha Tau Omega; Archive, 1, 2, 3, 
Chronicle, 1, 2; Duke Players; Chanti- 
cleer, 1, 2. 



Luther Nose 

Trumbauersville Pa 

M. Eugene Newsom, Jr. 

Durham, N C. 
Kappa Alpha, Alpha Kappa Psi 
Freshman Football, Beta Omega Sigma 
Archive, 1, 2, 3, Business Manager, 3 
Polity Club; Y. M. C, A. Cabinet, 3 
Publications Board, 3. 

0. B. Newton, Jr. 

Cambridge, Md. 
Sigma Delta, Beta Omega Sigma, 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Assistant Manager 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3, Manager, 4; Varsity 
Club, Tombs. 



Ono Hundred SIxtcoii 



JUNIORS 



Elizobeth Norwood 

McBee ^ i 

Dennis L. O'Connor, Jr. 

Mamaroneck, N Y 
Delta Sigmo Phi; Freshman Swim- 
ming; Varsity Swimming, 2, 3 

Vincent John Onisko 

Sag Harbor, N "i , 
Sigma Alpha Omega; Intermural Box 
Kig Champion, Wrestling, 1, 2 

James 0. Otis, Jr. 

Providence, R I 
Delta Tau Delta, Beta Omega Sigma, 
House of Representatives, 3 

William John Porker 

Lalsewood, Ohio 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Beta Omega 
Sigma 

Mory Parkhurst 
Raleigh, N C 
Alpha Delta Pi, Delta Phi Alpha; 
Delta Phi Rho Alpha, Nereidion, 
Archive, 1; Women's Student Govern- 
ment Council, 3 

Hubert C. Patterson 
Albemarle, N C 
Pi Koppa Alpha; Track, 1, 2; Duke 
Players 

S. Roger Peacock 
Silver Spring, Md 
Kappa Alpha; Freshman Golf; Varsity 
Golf, 2, 3, Captain, 3 

Robert T. Pearsoi! 

Westfield, N. J. 
Pi Kappa Alpha 

John W. Peckham 

St. Albans, N. Y. 
Sigma Alpha Omega; Freshman Base- 
ball; Varsity Baseball, 2; Beta Omega 
Sigma. 

Ruth Phipps 
Kew Gordens, Long Island, N Y. 
Alpha Xi Delta 

Mortho Andre Physioc 
Stamford, Conn. 

Catherine Powe 

Durham, N C. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Physics Club, 2; 
Woman's College Orchestra, 1; Town 
Girls' Club 

Sara Price 

Mayfield, Ky 
Murray State Teachers College, Glee 
Club 

Charles Wesley Rankin 

China Grove, N C 
Appalachian State Teachers College, 
1, 2; Glee Club 











^^^ 



L 




I 



<v 



t < 



One Hundred Seventeen 



CHANTICLEER 



> x^ 






A. 




HMd^A 




James S. Raper 

Lexington, N, C. 
Kappa Sigma; Sigma Upsilon; Foot- 
ball, 1, 2. 

Annie Kate Rebman 

Courtland, Ala. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Howard L. Reed 

Livonia, N. Y. 
Theta Chi; Varsity Wrestling, 2. 

Rufus Marion Riddick 

Hertford, N C 
Kappa Sigma. 

Ann Elle Robertson 

Mayfield, Ky. 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Brenau College, 1, 2. 

Bernice E. Rose 

New York, N. Y. 
Sigma Kappa; Chi Delta Phi, Chanti- 
cleer, 1, 2, 3; Co-ed Business Manager, 
3; Nereidion Club; Distaff, 1, 2; May 
Day Pageant, 2. 

Harry Sayen Rossiter, Jr. 

Abington, Pa. 
Phi Delta Theta; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Football, 1, 2, 3: Track, 1, 2, 3; Class 
Vice President, 2 

Ralph Raymond Roth 

Jacksonville, Flo 

Francis Turner Rowe 

Hillsboro, Md 
Theta Chi, Archive, 3; Dons Club; 
Delaware University, 1; Chanticleer, 3 

Robert Woll Sapp 

Albany, Co 
Phi Eta Sigma; Freshman and Sopho- 
more Honors; Chemistry Club. 

Virginia Lee Sarver 

Lewisburg, W Va. 
Kappa Alpha Theta; Greenbrier Col- 
lege, I, ? 

Catherine Serfas 

Boston, Pa. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Distaff, 1, 2, 
Business Manager, 3; Chronicle, 1, 2. 

Joseph T. Shackford 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Pi Kappa Alpha; Freshman Vv'restlinq; 
Varsity Track, 2, 3; Secretary Closs, 2; 
President Junior Class 

Hoyle U. Scott 

Duiham, N C. 
Boxing, 1, 2, 3 

Claude Settlemyer 

Kanna|»lis, N C, 
Phi Delta Theta; Wingate Junior Col- 
lege, 1, 2, 



One IliiiulrirU Eighteen 



JUNIORS 



Suson Sheppord 

Texarkana, Tex. 
Kappa Alpha Theto; Greenbrier Col- 
lege, I, 2, Chronicle. 3 

Leroy Sides 

Statesville, N C 
Junior Class Treasurer; Boxing, 2, 3, 
arsity Club. 

Mary Isabel Sink 

Winston-Saloni, N C. 



John Parker Sippel 

Baltimore, Md 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Swimming, 1, f" 
3; Beta Omega Sigma; Polity Club. 

Embree Slack 

Bristol, Tenn, 
Social Standards Committee. 2. 3 

Marie Smith 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Alpha Delta Pi. 

S. E. Spicher 

Indiana, Pa 
American Institute Electrical Engi- 
neers. 

Annie Stabler 
Welcome, N. C. 
Davenport College, 1, 2; Glee Club 

A. W. Storrott 

Chevy Chase, Md. 
Pi Kappa Phi; Alpha Kappa Psi; 
Chronicle, 2, 3. Assistant Editor, 3; 
Cross -Country, 2. 

Melvin Davis Stevens 

Brockton, Mass 
Lambda Chi Alpha; Freshman Foot- 
ball and Track; Varsity Football, 2, 
Varsity Track, 2, 3; Tombs 

Marion Strotton 

Newton Highlands, Mass. 
Colby Junior College ' ^ 

Jake W. Sullivan, Jr. 

Anderson, S C 
Sigma Phi Epsilon; Freshman Golf; 
Varsity Golf, 2, 3; Beta Omega Sigma, 
Pan-Hellenic Representative, 3. 

John R. Talley 

Jackson, Ala 

Pi Kappa Alpha; Chanticleer, I, 2, 3; 
Glee Club 

William Howard Tote 

South Bend, Ind 
Sigma Chi; Freshman Football and 
Basketball; Duke Players, 1, 2. 

Elaine Jenny 

West Orange, N J. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Chi Delta Phi. 




O o n" 



4 



i;^." 



til. 



W 






One Hundred Nineteen 



CHANTICLEER 



k5 




Oc%i 




C'^Ci 







Mildred J. Taylor 

Horrisburg, Pa 

Sophomore Honors; Chronicle Staff, 
2, 3, 



Sarah Katherine Taylor 

Gastonia, N C 
Alpha Delta Pi; Chanticleer, 3; 
man's Glee Club, 3 



Wo- 



Horace G. Thomas 

Whitford, Pa 
Sigma Chi; Assistant Manager Wrest- 
ling, I, 2, 3. 

Robert R. Thomas 

Oak Hill, W Va 

C. Henry Thompson 

Gastonia, N. C 
Delta Sigma Phi; Freshman Football 
and Track; Varsity Football, 2; Varsity 
Track, 2; Tombs; Varsity Club, 

C. Elizabeth Thomson 

Lillington, N C. 
Sigma Kappa, 

Edwin Hale Thornhill 

Bluefield, W. Vc. 
Lambda Chi Alpha 

Virginia Tillotson 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Agnes Scott College, 1, 2, Y, W. 
C A Cabinet. 

Julian Gordon Townley 

Ronceverte, W. Va 
Pi Kappa Alpha, Assistant Boxing 
Manager, 1, 2, 3, Chanticleer, 1, 2, 3; 
Pan-Hellenic, 3; Assistant Manager- 
Baseball, 1; Beta Omega Sigma; Ameri- 
can Institute Electrical Engineers. 

Eulyss Robert Troxler 

Greensboro, N C 
Chemistry Club. 

Frances Tudor 

Albemarle, N C 
Delta Delta Delta; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3; 
Co-ed Business Manager, 3; Glee'Cl'ub. 

Ross A. Tunnell, Jr. 

Oak Grove, Ala. 
Phi Eta Sigma; Freshman and Sopho- 
more Honors; House of Representatives 
2. 

John N. Turner, Jr. 

Creedmoor, N. C. 

Murray Holmes Upchurch 

Durham, N. C, 
Freshman Friendship Council; 
Chronicle, 3 

Theda Elaine Upchurch 

Apex, N C 
Glee Club, I, 2, 3. 



One Hundreil Twenty 



JUNIORS 



Richard E. Von Antwerp 

Williamsport, Pa 
Chronicle, 1, 2, 3 

Emily Vaughan 

Jackson, N C 
Delta Phi Rho Alpha; Glee Club, 1, 
3, Athletic Association Council, 3 

Margie Voigt 

Philadelphiu, Pa 
Pi Beta Phi; Neredian Club 

Augusta Alice Walker 

Elizabeth City, N C 
Alpha Delta Pi; Student Government 
Council, 2, 3; Chronicle, 2; Social Stand- 
ards Committee, 3; Glee Club, !, 2. 

Mack Wallace 

Buie's Creek, N C 

Carolyn L. Watkins 

HciideriOii, N C 
Kappa Delta 

Philip Johnson Weaver 

Winston-Salem, N C 

Phi Delta Theta; Freshman Football, 
basketball. Baseball, Varsity Basketball, 

3; Varsity Baseball, 2, Beta Omega 
iigma; Student Council, 2; Varsity 
Club; Tombs 

Joseph Weaver 

St Petersburg, Fla 

Doris Welles 

Pensacola, Fla 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Nationol 
Pork Seminary, I, 2. 

Barnard Welsh 

Rockville, Md 
Kappa Sigma; Tennis, I, 2, 3; Polity 
Club 

Allen Storey White 
Springfield, Mass 
Phi Delta Theta; Chanticleer, 1, 2, 3, 
Assistant Editor, 3 

Carolyn White 

Mebone, N C 
Kappa Delta; Converse College, I, 2. 

Walter K. Wikingstod 

Cristobal, C -.■ -.■■■- 

Davis Williams 

Fayetteville, Tenn 
Phi Delta Theta, Closs Vice Pres- 
ident, I; President, 2; Student Council, 
3; Columbia Literary Society, Polity 
Club 

Paul R. Winn 

Seoul, Korea 
Glee Club; Ministerial Associotion. 




ili 







One iiuiiilreil Twenty-one 



CHANTICLEER 



^? 



'T\^ J 1 "^, ) ^Z" .^ 




s 








Elizabeth Winslow 

Greenville, N. C. 
Kappa Delta. 

Frances Winston 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Kappa Alpha Theta. 

John D. Wright 

Blockstone, Va. 
Pi Kappa Phi; Junior Member Pan- 
Hellenic Council. 

Alice Wooten 

Fayetteville, N. C. 
Kappa Kappa Gamma; Social Stand- 
ards Committee, 2, 3. 

Helen Wyatt 

Medford, Mass. 
Zeta Tau Alpha; Neredian Club; 
Pan-Hellenic; Social Standards; 
Chronicle, 2, 3 

Don Correll 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. 



Junior Class Activities 



THE deplorable economic situation hod 
its effects on the Duke junior doss, and 
consequently the number of social func- 
tions was at a minimum. One dance was 
given, on December 3, and this was carried 
on in an unique fashion. The social com- 
mittee, composed of Jack Owen, chairman; 
Gordon Townley; and Lou Ganz, carried out 
the diversity of opinion in the class, as to 
the type of dance to be given, satisfactory 
to everyone. They made it a break-donee 
"with reservations." The reservations were 
printed on a dance program of six no- 
breoks, along with the name and tempo of 
each special number. The orchestra play- 
ing for the affair was the Blue Devils, which 
is primarily a junior organization, since 
practically every member enrolled with the 
present rising senior class. The Blue Devils 
have been headed throughout the past 
twelve months by Nick Laney. Chosen from 
a field of about one hundred orchestras, 
the Blue Devils played last New Year's Eve 

Joe Shackford President 

Nick Pine Vice President 



at the Roosevelt Grille in New York City on 
a joint dance program with Guy Lombardo. 

Prominent juniors will be counted upon 
to fill the most important campus positions 
for the coming year. On the football field, 
Laney, Crawford, Rossiter, Shock, Hendrick- 
son. Means, Cox, Belue, and Rogers will 
form a nucleus of size and strength for the 
coming grid season. Phil Weaver, Jim and 
Herb Thompson in basketball; Jack Peck- 
ham in baseball; Leroy Sides in boxing; 
Barney Welsh in tennis; Roger Peacock in 
golf; Shackford and Bray on the track 
team; and others unmentioned in this write- 
up but capable in sports and in other lines 
of activity; will lead the next Duke under- 
graduate session in all the extra-curricula 
fields. 

The officers named below were elected 
in the spring a year ago for junior class 
positions. Mr. Shackford has ably presided 
throughout the year over meetings of the 
class. 

Carl Shock Secretary 

Leroy Sides Treasurer 



Omi' lliiTHlri'd Twcnly-lwi) 




Shield Taken from 
Front of Library 



H 



M 



CHANTICLEER 

I9UM9 










fc*^ r.-/ -f**^- C— t 




4^ ^^^rA 

O f^ 9 

O. i!^ (f^ 





J, C. Adams, Richmond, Va. 
Sigma Pi Sigma 

Elmer S. Anderson, Jr, Norfolk, Va, 

Pi Epsilon Pi 
Frances Anderson, Lynchburg, Va. 

Koppo Kappa Gamma 
Norman L, Anderson, Durham, N. C. 

Ronald Archbold, Shakes Heights, Ohio 

Sigma Alpha Omega 
C W Armstrong, Washington, D C 
Warren P, Armstrong, Fort Bragg, N, C 

Phi Delta Theta; Phi Eta Sigma 
Will Artley, Jr., Savannah, Ga. 

Delta Sigma Phi 

John Leslie Atkins, Jr., Durham, N. C. 
Josephine Atkinson, Lynchburg, Va. 

Alpha Delta Pi 
Robert N. Atwater, Burlington, N C 

Sigma Delta 
Lorry E. Bagwell, Raleigh, N. C. 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

Evelyn Baker, Thomasville, N C 

Alpha Delta Pi 
William B Baker, Waynesboro, Pa. 

Phi Delta Theta 
Roberto Ballard, Newton, N. C. 
F. W. Dowd Bangle, Charlotte, N, C 

Dorothy Barger, Columbia, Ky. 

Sigma Kappa 
Margaret Nancy Bates, Elkton, Md. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Paul P. B. Baxter, Somerville, N J 

Keys Club 
Charles David Beatty, Pittsburgh, Pa 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Phi Eta Sigma 

Samuel Bell, Charlotte, N C. 

Phi Delta Theta 
Curtis E. Berry, Boston, Mass. 

Sigma Delta 
Stuart McGuire Beville, Blackstone, Va. 

Sigma Nu 
William G. Bird, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Delta Tau Delta 

Nellie Bishop, Durham, N. C. 
Elmo Block, Bamberg, S. C. 
J Reese Bloir, Troy, N. C. 

Phi Eta Sigma 
Albert Blumenthal, Winston-Salem, NC. 

Phi Eta Sigma 

Theodore Boepple, New York City 

Sigma Delta 
James F. Bostock, Arlington, N. J 

Delta Sigma Phi 
Walker Bottorf, Owensboro, Ky. 

Phi Delta Theta 
Cawthon Bowen, Nashville, Tenn. 

Sigma Chi 



One Hundrod Twenty-four 



SOPHOMORES 



Robert A Boyd, Beckley, W Va 

Kappa Kappa Psi 
Vincent Bradford, Collmgswood, N J 
J Rufus Bratton, York, S. C 
C. Britton, Durham, N C. 

Kappa Kappa Psi 



seph Groff Brillinger, York, Pa. 
.v.beph Edward Broody, Spencer, N C 
Gordon F. Brown, Belleville, N J 

Keys Club 
Julio Estelle Brown, Greenville, N C 



Louise Brown, Arlington, N J 

Zeto Tau Alpha 
William T Buice, Jr , Charlotte, N C 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
William Miller Burke, Meriden, Conn 
Elvira Burleigh, Rutherford, N J. 

Pi Beta Phi 

Betty Cassidy, Erwin, Tenn 

Delta Delta Delta 
Skinner Chalk, Morehead City, N C 

Pi Koppo Phi 
William Chalkley, Washington, D C 

Sigma Nu 
Howard Root Chase, Jr , Providence, R. I. 

Delta Tau Delta 

Pauline Chase, Brockton, Moss 

Alpha Delta Pi 
D H Clarke, Jr , Southbridge, Moss 

Kappa Sigma 
Orpoh Clements, Durham, N C 

Alpha Delta Pi 
Arthur L Cline, McLean, Vo 

Charles Roy Cline, Jr , Waynesboro, Pa 
Roland H Cline, Haines City, Fla 
John Coon, Winston-Salem, N C 

Sigma Chi 
Hornet Cobb, Durham, N C 

Alpha Delta Pi 



Julio Marie Combs, Durham, N C 

Koppo Kappa Gamma 
Walter E Conrad, Lexington, N C 

Phi Eto Sigma 
Wm Von Vorhiss Cook, Yonkers, N Y 
L A Coone, Morion, N C 



Allen Corson, Jr, Ocean City, N J 

Delta Sigma Phi 
Mary F. Covington, Thomosville, N C 
Raymond C Crawford, Adena, Ohio 
Bertrond R Crist, Altoono, Po 



iT^ IfJi f^ 

iif^ f^ (^ 








if ^'.b 
^^^^« kk 



1 1 



i 



li- 



^ 



One Hundred Twenty-five 



CHANTICLEER 









^ C) f*^"> 





o es rs f^ 




^ \\ 



*^'^* \^-]r £-.♦' }'^-'4m 




John C. Curry, Jr, Oak Park, III. 
Shelby Dale, Portsmouth, Ohio 
F. Dixon Dailey, Sussex, N. J. 
Bill Dameron, Warrenton, N. C 
Pi Kappa Phi 



Morris Dein, Atlantic City, N. J. 

Phi Sigma Delta 
Robert E. Demme, Oceanside, L I,, N. Y. 

Keys Club 
Jack Devlin, Longhorne, Pa. 

Phi Delta Theta 
Mary Alice Dewey, Goldsboro, N. C. 

Kappa Delta 

Robert H. Dick, Canton, Go. 

Pi Kappa Phi; Pi Eta Sigma 
Mary Dilley, Ocean City, N, J. 
Sidney Dodd, Rome, Go. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
P. Paul Dosch, Somerset, Pa. 



Charles S. Dovey, Jr., Atlantic City, N. J, 
Robert Downing, Kennebunk, Maine 

Phi Eta Sigma 
E. B. Dunlap, Jr., Lawton, Okla. 

Phi Delta Theta 
Jack Dunlap, Lawton, Okla. 

Forrest V, Dunston, Elizabeth City, N. J. 

Sigma Chi 
Marian Ely, Doylestown, Pa. 
Hazel D. Emery, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Alpha Delta Pi 
W, C. Ethndge, Kinston, N C 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 



S Watson Ewing, Greenwich, N. J. 
Emma Fanton, Westport, Conn. 
Robt. F. Feierabend, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Gerald Ferguson, Brewster, N. Y. 



Lyne Few, Durham, N, C 

Phi Delta Theta; Phi Eta Sigma 

Robert Paul Fleischer, Hartford, Conn. 

S, S. Fleming, Columbia, Tenn. 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Dorothy Forbes, Trenton, N. J, 

Frederick D, Gabel, White Plains, N. Y. 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Alpha Kappa Psi 
Edmundo Garcia, Norwalk, Ohio 

Sigma Delta 
Ethel Varrell Garrett, Swarthmore, Pa. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Frederick W. Gates, Great Bend, N Y. 

Sigma Delta 



One HuiHlrfil TweiUy-sIx 



SOPHOMORES 



Mildred R Gehman, Lancaster, Pa 

Sigma Kappa 
James E Gibson, Columbia, S C 

Phi Eta Sigma 
A J. Gill, Okmulgee, Oklo. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, Phi Eta Sigma 
Pearl Gillette, Wilmington, N. C. 



Mary Louise Gillis, Arlington, N. J. 
Charles F. Graf, Jr , Boltimore, Md 
J. B Grant, Andrews, S C. 
Tom W. Graves, Wilson, N. C 
Kappa Sigma 

Joke Gray, Gastonia, N. C. 

Alpha Tau Omega 
Mary Greig, River Forest, III. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Thomas A Griffin, Flushing, N Y. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Frederick Hague, Columbia, Ohio 

Keys Club 

George Hairston, Wenonda, Vo 
Rufus Hairston, Wenonda, Vo 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
Willard Haley, Punxsutawney, Pa. 

Lambda Chi Alpha 
Henry K Handy, Plymouth, Mass. 

Lambda Chi Alpha 

McCarthy Hanger, Jr., Bala, Pa. 

Kappa Sigma 
Leonard Hardy, Highlands, N. J. 
Blaine R. Horkess, Oxford, Pa. 
Kennedy R. Harris, Newport, Ark. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Ethel Mae Harrison, Thomasville, N. C. 
Harriet Louise Haskins, Ashfield, Mass 
Walter D. Hastings, Jr , Columbia, Tenn. 

Alpha Tau Omega 
Davis Hatch, Jr., Needham, Mass. 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Alpha Kappa Psi 

Velva Hoyden, High Point, N C. 
Homer H. Haydock, Salem, Mass. 

Sigma Delta 
Alma Hedrick, Salisbury, N. C. 

Kappa Alpha Theta 
Robbie Hedrick, Lexington, N. C. 



Florence E. Heinley, Amityville, N. Y. 

Sigma Kappa 
Jack J. Heritage, Winston-Solem, N. C. 
Dorothy M. Heroy, Cranford, N. J. 
John N Heroy, White Plains, N. Y. 






nc) 




O :^ If) f^ 










One Hundred Twenty-Beveu 



CHANTICLEER 



MfV' 










ft p p 

- UTmim£Miti 






^ er) <^ if».| 




John P. Higgins, Red Bank, N. J. 

Kappa Alpha 
Dorothy Mines, Greensboro, N C. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Sylvia Hunsicker, Allentown Pa 

Pi Bete Phi 
John S. Hunter, Reading, Pa, 

Sally Lynn Hunter, York, Pa. 

Kappa Delta 
W. B. Jennings, South Norwalk, Conn, 
Joseph Jester, Alexandria, Va, 

Keys Club 
Elizabeth Jerome, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

R, A, Jones, Fountain Inn, S, C. 

Pi Epsilon Pi 
Virginia Jordan, Brooklyn, N, Y, 

Zeta Tau Alpha 
I M Josephs, Durham, N, C, 
Woodfin Keesee, Helena, Ark. 

Sigma Chi; Phi Eta Sigma 

Albert Freed Keller, Norfolk, Va, 

Kappa Sigma 
John Keller, China Grove, N, C. 
Robert M. Keown, Harrisburg, Pa, 

Sigma Chi 
Sue Kernolde, Durham, N, C. 

Arthur Houghton Killen, Flushing, N, Y. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Marjorie King, Taunton, Mass. 
D C. Kirby, Trappe, Md, 
Philip M, Kirk, Mocksville, N C 

Phi Eta Sigma 

Robert F. Kneipp, Washington, D. C. 
Kappa Sigma; Phi Eta Sigma; Alpha 
Kappa Psi 

Abrom B Kreider, Manheim, Pa. 
Henry Lamar, Macon, Ga 
Phi Delta Theta 

Georgianna Lamson, Maplewood, N J, 
Kaipa Alpha Theta 

Denzil Langston, Orlando, Flo 

Pi Beta Phi 
Lee Slauter Leoke, Chicago, III, 

Phi Delta Theta 
Kermit Leitner, Harrisburg, Pa 

Lambda Chi Alpha 
Edward William Letson, Roslyn, N, Y. 

Sigma Nu 

Sherrill M, Lineberger, Shelby, N. C. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
Norman B. Livengood, Durham, N, C 

Sigma Chi 
R, Horace Lynch, Elizabeth City, N, C, 
Pauline MocFayden, Concord, N C 

Kappa Alpha Theta 



One llniHlrrd Tuflil \ -crulK 



I 



SOPHOMORES 



Graham Mocfarlcne, Asheville, N. C. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Eloise Malone, New Orleans, La 
Mabel R Manter, Tounton, Moss 
J R Marion, Jr., Siloam, N C 



Henry Wade Morsholl, Asheville, N C 
Hovid W Martin, West Polm Beach, Flo 

Phi Delta Theta 
hdword L Mason, Durham, N C 

Pi Koppo Alpha 
Reynolds May, Dothon, Ala 

Koppo Sigma 

Frances Moywald, Orlondo, Flo 

Delta Delto Delta 
Jomes C. McDonald, Durham, N C 

Koppo Alpha 
Donold G McNeil, Brodley Beoch, N J 

Koppo Alpha, Phi Eto Sigma 
Suson McNeill, Jacksonville, Flo. 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Somuel G McQuoge, Morristown, N. J 
Mory Meikleiohn, Cherow, S C. 

Koppo Delta 
Louise Merkel, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Zeto Tou Alpho 
D A. Michael, Nozoreth, Po. 







r\ r r\ ,■«>. 




Fronk J Miller, Jr , Augusto, Go 
Horry L Miller, Jr , Chottonoogo, Tenn 

Pi Koppo Alpha 
Henry D. Miller, Conondoiguo, N Y 
Stuart F. Miller, Caldwell N J 

Keys Club 

A. C. Monk, Jr, Formville, N C. 

Delto Tau Delta 
John Moorheod, Sunbury, Pa 

Lombdo Chi Alpha 
William H. Moorheod, Goldville, S C ^ v •- - k^ 

Phi Delto Theto, Phi Eto Sigma ■ V^ ^^ ^W~" V^l^ 

Henry George Morton, Sorosoto, Flo. B a^ 

Pi Koppo Alpha 

Doniel E. Mullen, Cambridge, Moss 
James L Newson, Durhom, N. C. 

Koppo Alpha; Phi Eto Sigma 
Tempe Gorrett Newsom, Durhom, N. C. 

Koppa Delta 
Rolond Niednogei, Evonsville, Ind 

Pi Koppo Phi 

Richord Nitschke, Rye, N Y. 

Sigmo Phi Epsilon 
Robert T Nixon, Rome, Go 

Phi Eto Sigmo 
Janet Ormond, Durhom, N C 

Koppo Delta 
John Kern Ormond, Durhom, N C 

Koppo Alpho 





k 




i 



C^ ©OP 

p (^ r?v (^ 



.O P f> C. '"^ 
£) D <^ ^ 






One Hundred Twenty-nine 



CHANTICLEER 



A. 






p O O Q 





(*• fS r> (*f 



iiLltoi 






f\ f "^^ fv! 




James L. Oswald, Jr., Allendale, S- C 

Phi Eta Sigma 
Elizabeth Owens, Bennettsville, S. C 

Sigma Kappa 
William H. Pace, Jr., Chevy Chase, Md. 

Sigma Chi 
David Palmer, Wheeling, W, Vo. 

Margaret Parker, Burlington, N. J, 

Kappa Delta 
Angela Patterson, Greensboro, N. C 

Alpha Delta Pi 
George A. Pearson, Jr., Chicago, 111. 

Delta Sigma Phi 
Sigrid Pederson, New York, N. Y. 

Kappa Alpha Theto 

Elizabeth Pegrom, Hamlet, N. C. 

Kappa Delta 
Caroline Phillips, Lexington, N. C. 

Kappa Delta 
Theodore D. Pimper, Chevy Chase, Md 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
Paul Flankin Platt, Trenton, N. J. 

Ernest H, Polack, York, Pa 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Mary Elizabeth Poole, Gray, N. C. 
Nicholas Porreca, Gardner, Mass. 

Phi Delta Theta 
Edward L. Port ley, Trenton, N. J. 

Pi Epsilon Pi 

Nelson Powell, Edenton, N. C 

Alpha Delta Pi 
Robert C. Powell, Lenoir, N C. 
Sue Powell, Gastonia, N. C. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 
James H. Prentice, Englewood, N. J. 

Sigma Delta 

Harold W. Pruner, Litchfield, Conn. 
N. J. Rahall, Beckley, W. Va 
Willard A. Raisley, Ridley Park, Pa. 

Pi Epsilon Pi 
J. Stuart Ramsey, Rocky Mount, Va. 

Pi Kappa Phi 

John Ranger, Lynn, Mass. 

Mary Emma Reed, Newark, N. J. 

Pi Beta Phi 
Alfred A. Reichman, Washington, D. C 

Pi Kappa Phi 
Robert W. Reid, Montcloir, N. J. 

Delta Sigma Phi 

Frederick Phillips Rich, Providence, R. I. 

Delta Tau Delta 
Carolin Riefle, Baltimore, Md. 

Delta Delta Delta 
Robert L. Rigsby, Asheville, N C. 

Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Eta Sigma 
Jane Ritter, Collingswood, N. J. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 



One HiiiKlred Thirty 



SOPHOMORES 



(P- n P n 





i 

I 

f^ C) f^' ^ 

Q .'^ f^ j?!^ 










t 



I 



3: 



Maurace E. Roebuck, Nashville, Ark 
Sam Rogol, Williston, S C. 
Ira S Ross, Newark, N J. 

Phi Eta Sigma 
Norman F. Ross, Albany, N. Y. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

W Dorlond Rouse, Williamsport, Pa 

Delta Sigma Phi 
Ellison A Ruby, Jenkintown, Pa. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
C T. St Clair, Jr., Punxsutowney, Pa. 

Phi Eta Sigma 
John William Sanders, Bristol, Va. 

James Everett Sapp, Albany, Ga. 

Delta Sigma Phi; Phi Eta Sigma 
Logan Everett Sawyer, South Mills, N C 
Roy Edward Sawyer, Coinjock, N, C. 
Evalyn Schoffle, Asheville, N C 

P W. Schanher, Jr , Mt Clemens, Mich 

Sigma Nu 
Joseph S. Schieferly, Jr., Bloomfield, N J 

Sigma Delta 
Mane Schomaker, Pearl River, N Y 

Delta Delta Delta 
Horry W Severance, Loke City, S C 

Elizabeth Shands, Gainesville, Fla. 

Chi Omega 
Morion Shepardson, Asheville, N C , ^ ^ 

Philip L Shore, Charlotte, N C. ^P*" 

Robert Shulmon, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Stuart H. Simpson, Hightstown, N J 

Keys Club 
Earl Sinclair, Peekskill, N Y 
C Stuart Smith, Newport, Pa. 

Phi Delta Theta; Phi Eta Sigma 
Fred George Smith, New York, N Y. 

Delta Tau Delta 

Margaret Smith, Durham, N. C. 
Richard A Smith, Clorkesburg, W. Va 

Phi Eta Sigma 
T W. Smith, Rio de Janeiro, Brozil 

Kappa Alpha 

.ion J. Smith, Red Lion, Pa 

Kappa Delta ^^^-^-=^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^ 

James W. Snipes, Dunn, N. C. ^^^^ ^^9^ ^^VW ^^^'^W nM 

Pi Kappa Phi 
Lenora C Snyder, Ridgefield Park, N. J 

Zeta Tau Alpha 
Mary Stanter, Peekskill, N. Y. 

Pi Beta Phi 

Henry B Sfauffer, Washington, D C 
Sigma Chi 



TT 



One Hundred Thiriy-one 



CHANTICLEER 



i^sm 



d(MJ: 
^ ^« O 

5/' 












Donald A. Stewart, Elizabeth, N, J. 
John S. Stewart, Warren, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha; Phi Eta Sigma 
John H. Stillman, Troy, N Y, 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Clifton Stoneburner, Rosslyn, Va. 



Bayard H. Storm, Charlotte, N C 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
R, Edward Storms, Oradell, N. J. 

Pi Epsilon Pi 
James H, Styers, Winston-Solem, N C 
Dons Surles, Dunn, N C, 



Lawson Tate, Banner Elk, N, C- 

Phi Delta Theta 
Edward C. Taylor, Dante, Va. 

Sigma Alpha Omega 
Herbert Gilfry Toylor, Oxford, N C. 

Sigma Chi 
Rives Taylor, Elizabeth City, N. C 



Ada Grace Tedder, Lakeland, Fla. 
Trixie Tennis, Norfolk, Va. 

Zeta Tau Alpha 
Harry K. Thomas, Lancaster, Ohio 
Wm Thompson, Jr , New Bedford, Mass. 



Sarah Thompson, Shelby, N. C. 

Kappa Alpha Theta 
William H. Thorne, Airlie, N. C. 
Joe Timberlake, Columbia, S C. 

Pi Kappa Phi 
Hazel Tipping, Mandarin, Fla. 

Kathryn H Tollev, New Rochelle, N Y. 

Pi Beta Phi 
Eleanor Tompkins, White Plains, N. Y. 

Kappa Alpha Theta 
Curtis W, Townsend, Saten Island, N, Y. 
Joe C. Trent, Okmulgee, Okla. 

Kappa Sigma 

Jane Triplett, Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Zeta Tau Alpha 
Larry Turner, Rocky Mount, N C. 
Carlos F. Vales, Yucatan, Mexico 

Pi Kappa Phi 
Joe M Vanhoy, Charlotte, N C. 

Pi Kappa Phi; Phi Eta Sigma 

Robert C. Varela. Washington, D. C. 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Marvin Vick, Kinston, N. C. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Jackson McChesney Vial, Orange, N, J. 

Alpha Kappa Psi; Phi Eta Sigma 
Gladys Voorhies, New Orleans, La. 

Sigma Kappa 



One Hundred Thirty-two 



SOPHOMORES 



Mary Voorhies, New Orleans, La 
Robert Clark Wade, East Orange, N J 

Sigma Delta 
B A Wagner, New Oxford, Pa 

Keys Club, Phi Eta Sigma 
Benjamin Carver Wagner, Hanover, Pa 

Sigma Nu 

Sally Walker, Ridley Park, Pa 

Wm, T. Walker, Jr, Moorestown, N J 

Keys Club 
Charles H Walsh, Jr , Burlington, Iowa 
Dorothy Walton, Jacksonville, Flo 

Alpha Delta Pi 

George W Ward, Bradenton, Flo 

Keys Club 
George P Watkins, New Rochelle, N Y 

Sigma Nu 
Harriet Way, Orangeburg, S C 
Henry Lee Weathers, Shelby, N C 

Pi Kappa Alpha 



Earle Wayne Webb, Jr , Yonkers, N Y 

Sigma Chi 
Benjamin Burch Weems, Durham, N C. 
Warner Lee Wells, Raleigh, N C 
Walter 8 West, Jr, Albemarle, N C 

Phi Eta Sigma 



G W Wharton, Jr, Belleville N J. 
Keys Club 

Ethel Louise White, Baltimore, Md. 

Kappa Alpha Theta 
James Russell White, Cohoes, N Y. 
Mory Nosh White, Richmond, Va. 

Zeta Tau Alpha 



Ethel Whittemore, Miami, Fla. 
Dorothy Wikoff, Kansas City, Mo 

Sigma Kappa 
Leo Wilhelm, Solisbury, N C 

Sigma Tau Alpha; Phi Eta Sigma 
Annie Louise Wilkerson, Raleigh, N C 

Cecil Williams, Morganfield, Ky. 

Pi Kappo Alpha 
Luther Williams, Durham, N C 
Martin B. Williams, Petersburg, Va 

Delta Tau Delta; Phi Eta Sigma 
Edna Erie Wilson, Block Mountain, N C 

Alpha Phi Sigma 

Luther Winstead, Washington, D C 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
Samuel C Wisdom, Jr, Swarthmore, Po 

Theta Alpha Phi 
John Burwell Woodall, Middleburg, N C 

Phi Eta Sigma 
Harry B Wright, Jr, Preston, Md. 



r- f> *% 

C^ 1^ O 

V^ /^ o o 

d'hk\'^d-ut^A 




f^ P O 

P p o o. 




1T 



n 



One Hundred Tblrty-thre« 



CHANTICLEER 






or 





^ ■© ^ 



Beatrice Wynne, Norfolk, Va. 

Zeto Tou Alpha 
Mary E. Yarbrough, Durham, N C 

Kappa Delta 
B. C. Young, Jr, Lexington, N. C. 

Sigma Chi 
Charles Holt Young, Raleigh, N C 

Phi Eta Sigma 

Charles Zehnder, Jr., Bellevue, Pa. 

Sigma Delta 
Rowland Zeigler, Florence, S. C. 

Pi Kappa Alpha 
Gretchen Zimmerman, Shamokin, Pa. 

Kappa Alpha Theta 



Sophomore Class Activities 



"THE fall of 1931 ushered into Duke Uni- 
versity the largest freshman class ever to 
matriculate in this famed southern school. 
Students from approximately every state in 
the union composed this yearling class and 
once organized it proceeded to win athletic 
honors together with scholastic achievement. 
The freshman teams were outstanding in 
every department and their stellar showing 
won for their class the Intermural Athletic 
Trophy, an award given to the class having 
the best athletic record. 

However, athletics did not play the major 
role during the freshman year. The scholastic 
average for the class as a whole was ex- 
tremely high and Dean Arnold, with the whole- 
hearted cooperation of the freshman class, 
was able to initiate on the campus the nation- 



ally famous freshman honor society. Phi Eta 
Sigma. 

As second year men their excellent record 
has been kept up. The varsity football team 
used much sophomore material, and each en- 
suing sport recognized the ability of sopho- 
more men. Scholastically the class has kept a 
highly creditable position. Debating and 
literary talent has also been exceptional 
among the sophomore class. 

Aside from athletics and scholarship the 
sophomore class has enjoyed a full social pro- 
gram. A series of fall and spring dances were 
held, and the Duke Collegians, a group of 
talented sophomore musicians, played for 
these dance series. 

The class has enjoyed in the past two years 
exceptional all-around success. May the 
future hold as much. 



Oiif Hiuulroil Thill vlcmi' 



yjjH(|i;t>i.1j[t:?i: 



W 



"HrVHl|M|)iii,.i!.i'.';;.;f ^ffn,^i(fi^.iii|,|j;iav 



LjiliUi/ ->' 



T 













Sculpture Taken from 
Chimney of House A-A 



R 



H M 



N 



CHANTICLEER 



^ 



I* 








ii if i^rA V I'M 









kJhi^M 









Edwin B. Abbott 
Jennie Belle Abernethy 
Inez Abernethy 
Henry V. Ackerman 
Charles W. Ackley 



Florence Adair 
Katherine Ahalt 
Edmund Albritton 
Jack Alexander 

Calhoun Ancrum, Jr. 



Marcia Anderson 

Ida Shaw Applewhite 
David H. Arp 
George T. Atchley 
Charles L. Atherton 



Martha Bailey 

James G. Baldwin, Jr 
Charles P Ballenger, Jr 
Perry M, Ballenger 
Ernest D. Barnham 



Eleanor Barrett 
R B. Barton 
Dorothy Bartlett 
Sherwood Beattie 
Irving W. Bearse 



Robert P. Beasley 
G Holmes Bell 
William G. Bell 
Richard P Bellaire 
Norfleet P. Belvin 



Horry S. Bender 
George F. Beneke 
Marianne Beneker 
Robert Benner 
Vol C. Bernhardt 



E B Bernstein 
Jess Bernstein 
Frederick Bicking 
Earl M. Biehl 
J. Riley Black 



Constance Blackwood 
Robert S Bloke 
Edwin H. Blessing 
Evelyn Board 
James K. Boling 



Welch M. Bostick 
Ruth Bowman 

Edward H. Bradley 
Fred E, Bratzel 
Alfred H. Brauer 



One Hunilifd Tliirl.v-.six 



John M Brest 
C Herbert Brettell 
J. P. Brewster 
Christian S Briel 
John R Brooks 



J G Brothers 
Lester R Brown 
William K Brumbach 
John J. Bruns, Jr 
Eleanor Bruton 



FRESHMEN 

, IHI 



Frances Carlton 
Elizabeth Corr 
John W Carver 
William D Caton 
Elizabeth Cavender 



J R Chandlee 
Michael Chornock 
Clyde M Clapp 
J Albert Ciopton 
Morion Coffey 



John T. Cole 
Lillian Collins 
Lawrence H. Collins 
Morguerite Collins 
Howard L Colyer 



Gilbert R. Combs 
Howard S Congdon 
Eleanor Congdon 
Catherine Conger 
Richard J Conradi 



f) on net 

IT- f^* e^f!> 





TTi 






William C Bryan 

William W Bryan Is. 1 T "^ f_ f IL ^ M^ ^ \^ 

Walter P. Budd " 

Kathlyn Buice 
Myrcelle Bunn 

William Bunton 

JeanBurd ^L^ J W¥ ^ J fT ^ W } l^ .^ k^^ 

Albert L Burford 
Robert Burge 
Jomes M Burke 

George Bury 

William D Byrne 
William A Code 
Frederick C Cody 
Dorothy Caldwell 

Ross B Cameron 

Howell H Campbell, Jr 
Truman Campbell 
William C Campbell 
Virginia Campbell 



One Hundred Tbiny-seven 



CHANTICLEER 



pMia 




■■■iS^ 





Stj 



4?^ f^j f^ ^ 

f ' fj P ^ 7?"* 

^ P '^ C? ^^'' 

p C) ^ f^ P 








Edward W Cooey 
Robert W. Cook 
G R. Cooper 
Harry L. Cooper 
Marion Coote 



Irene Cordray 
Jerome S Cossman 
Paul W. Courtnell 
Boyce Covington 

E. Randolph Covington 



Arlis Cowan 

William G. Crawford 
Marjorie Crouthamel 
Ernest Cruikshank 
Margaret Cuninggim 



William K. Cunningham 
Madalene Dabbs 
C. 0. Dailey 
Barbara Daniel 
James M. Daniel 



Alyce Danniger 
Roy Donzer 

Lora Frances Davis 
James A. Dearborn 
Alexander Deemer 



Horace A. Demarest 
John M. Dempsey 
Remer L. Denmark 
E. David Dodd 
Robert K^ Dodd 



Robert K. Doerk 
Lawrence 0. Dortch 
Dorothy Dosch 
Robert Drake 
Betty Dunlap 



Augustus J, Durner 
Josephine Eaby 
Yvonne Eaby 
James K. Eosley 
Charles E. Eaton 



C. C Eberly 
Alfred Eckles 

Charles W, Edwards 
Malcolm Edwards 
Dorothy Edwards 



Jessie Elizabeth Edwards 
Benjamin W. Elliott 
Gilbert English 
Jack C. Ervin 
Frances Estes 



oiiL lliiiKlitd Thirty-eight 



FRESHMEN 



Wilson C Everhort 
George B Everitt 
Julian J Ewell 
Saro Falls 
Leonora Fanning 



Robert E Farrell 
Ellen Farnum 
Annie Frances Farthing 
James G Ferguson 
Claude D Fisher 



Dorothy Flebbe 
Launce T. Flemister 
Betty Flowers 
Rubye Fogel 
William H Foglemon 



Joseph B Ford 
Blades Foreman 
Russell J Forrest 
Elinor Fountain 
Margaret Fronck 



Frederick M Franco 
E T Franklin 

Jennings W. French 
J. Lee Friedman 
Betty Friemel 



Walton Fulcher 

Lewis O Funkhouser 
Darwin C Gallup 
Lawrence L Gent 
Charles Garney 



Eloise Garrison 
Evelyn Garrison 
Lewis W Gerhart 
J. R Gerow 

Howard R Getz 



John A Gibbons 
Jone Gibson 
Henry C. Gillies 
Stephen A Ginn 
David W. Goddard 



Carolyn Goldberg 
J. Roland Goode 

Mary Kathryn Goodman 
Fronces Goodwin 
Robert W. Goodwin 



Harold Gordon 
Jane Gorham 
Marta Grabiel 
Page D. Gravett 
David G. Gray 



O'E^ 






^ f O ^j 

^ p ^ 




LWI^ 






irr 



iH 






One Hundred Thirty-nine 



CHANTICLEER 



mm 



m 






k./ )» 



fe^\ dA 



f ^ a f^ £> 




^^Cl 






(^ .^> 'P P |!?_ 



jr- 



^iv. 







P P ^ 'P' 




Edward L Gray 
Dorothy Gray 
Helen Gray 
Tempe Greene 
Chris Greutker 



James A, Griffin, Jr 
R P Griffin 

Richard A. Griffis 
DeWitt M. Griffith 
George Gnscom 



John B. Gugelman 
Paul R. Habbart 
Jane Haislip 
Irwin R. Hale 
Helen Haisema 



James L, Hamilton 
George W. Hangen 
Henry Grady Hardin 
Virginia Harden 

Johnnie N Hargrove 



William F Harmon 
Marjorie Harper 
Grayson Harrolson 
Charles R. Harris 
Henry L. Harris 



Frank L Hascall 
James M, Hatch 
John R. Hothorn 
Elmer C Haver 
Byron L. Hawks 



Woodrow W. Hayes 
Carter Hoyward 
W. C. Hazelbeck 
Ben D. Heath 
Herbert Hecht 



T J Buchanan Heiss 
Jack Heitman 
Adrian E. Hemby 
Mary Henderson 
J. E. Henry 



Thomas Herb 
Claude Nosh Herndon 
Joseph S, Hiatt 
Allan Hibbard 
Edward J Hicks 



Frank Delmar Hill 
Seth B, Hinshaw 

Vincent P Hippolitus 
Judith Hodges 

Edward H Hoffman 



One Hundred Forty 



FRESHMEN 



Catherine Hollidoy 
William L Holler 
Willard Hollingsworth 
William C Holman 
Y Rozeiie Holman 



Murroy Honeycutt 
John H. Hood 
Constance Hoppen 
Jesse R Home 
Richord E Horton 



E T. Howard 
Sara H owe r ton 
Nancy Hudson 
Williom L Huiskomp 
Porter B Huling 



John Hulme 

Marshall Hunt 
Frances Hunter 
Adeiyn Ingram 
Mory Frances Ivey 



Margoret Izard 
Hortense Jacobus 
Sara Lou James 

Richard M Jameson 
Charles J. Johnson 



J Leonard Johnson 
Rolf E. Johnson 
Amelia Johnson 
Hyacinth Johnson 
Virginia Johnson 



James H. Johnston 
Herbert Jones 
Alice Jones 
Helen Jones 
Sally Jordan 



Sara Louise Jordan 
Joseph R. Kopp 
Frederic R Keotor 
Gilbert Keith 

Fred N. Kellmeyer 



Bela G. Kerekes 
Harold B. Kernodle 
Isham Kimball 
Roy C Kimmerle 
Malvern King 



Philip H. Kirkland 
Theodore Klebon 
Evelyn Kleinmons 
Robert M Kleinfelter 
William N Klove 







i'^ 















■f! 



One Hundred Forty-one 



CHANTICLEER 



\S4 



'in 



i^ 



b^ 




P €i f «?• <^ 








imt 



o (ft |!^ n 







Elizabeth D. Knight 
John H. Knowlton 
Harvey A. Kolb 
Alexander Konopka 
Donald M. Kramer 



Lloyd Kraushaar 
Charles W. Kunkle 
R. W. Laird 
L, C. Lawrence 
William S. Leake 



A Carl Lee 
Nancy Lietch 
Charles L. Lemperly 
Welter D. Leonard 
William Allen Lewis 



Helen Lieb 
Walter F. Lindhe 
R. Odell Lindsay 
Mrs. R, 0. Lindsay 
Gretchen Little 



Robert Anderson Little 
George W. Long 
Robert S. Long 
Llewellyn W. Lord 
James Russell Lowe 



Paul Lucas 
William 0. Luly 
Stephen S. Lush 
Catherine Hill Lyon 
Jimmy McColl 



George H. McCarthy 
Samuel G. McCaskill 
Marian McClenaghan 
Adele McCraney 
John R McCrary 



Cornelius A, McGillicuddy 
M. F, McGrail 
John R, McLain 
Marie McLain 

Baxter Childs McLean 



J N McNaughton 
Alan N, MacQuorrie 
Warren K Macurdy 
Ruth Madden 

Howard J. Maldeis 



John J. Maher 
Hazel Mangum 
Margaret Mangum 
John Mann 

Oliver DeWitt Mann 



One Hundred Forty-two 



FRESHMEN 



Sarah Markhom 
Herbert Alexondna Mason 
George Montgomery Mothues 
Mary Fronklin Maxwell 
Frank E. Mazuy 



Frank Meacham 
Rachel Meetze 
Robert Meiklejohn 
Harry F. Mellon 
Margaret Meriam 



Robert C Mervine 
J B Messick 
Leiand E. Metcalf 
Annie Lucile Michael 
Robert P. Miller 



Schuyler R Mills 
G Luke Mizzell 
Morgoret C. Moore 
James Ira Moore 
John Shelby Moore 



Poul Morefield 
George Leslie Morelock 
Lindsay P. Morris 
Robert Moon Morris 
Emma Lou Morton 



Romulus F. Moser 
John E Moss 

Eugene Hyatt Mossburg 
Thomas Jones Murray 
David M Myers 



Peter Ernest Noktenis 
Leonard Nanzetta 
Norman Nathonson 
Malcolm Newbold 
Glenn C. Newman 



Annie Laurie Newsom 
Herbert N Nixon 
Richard J. Noble 
Dorothy Noble 

Hertsert S Nusbaum 



Horry C Nyce 
J. W. Ogburn 
Fred Nash Oliver 
Calvin Ourand 
J. W Outz 



Marjory Pace 
Hugh A Page 
Jack Ward Page 
John B. Paist 
Elmo Pamplin 



'Sl^S,'^^ 






SC) r^ P p 




iili 



r 



-♦^H, 



One Hundred Forty-thre* 



CHANTICLEER 

mm 






m 



oj 








^kd'M^M^^ 










J R. Pankey 
Lottie Parker 
Elizabeth Parks 
Thomas C. Parsons 
Helen Parsons 



Ben M. Patrick 
Ruth Patterson 
Ernestine Paul 
Douglas Paulsen 
Walter Payne 



Nell Peake 

Robert Lawrence Peck 
Cecil Mcintosh Peek 
Marie Pelgrin 
W. C. Pemberton 



Clary Webb Peoples 
William Owens Perdue 
Clifford Webster Perry 
Robert W, Philips 
Ruth Philips 



Don Alfred Picaso 
William B Piersol 
Nettie Pinnix 
Richard C. Piper 
John H. Plump 



Mern Plyler 

Elisha Lindsay Potter 
Joseph Gilpin Powell 
Rufus H. Powell 
Alan Christian Puryear 



Kathryn Queen 
Ned Quinn 

Doyne E, Rardon 

Ranson Pratt Rathbun 
Julius A. Royneri 



W F, Reavis 
John F. Reed 
Louise Relyea 
Francis Remmey 
Mary Louise Remont 



Mary Alice Rhodes 
G Douglas Richardson 
James L. Richmond 
William P. Ricks 
Helen Rigg 



James W. Rigsby 
Jean Rinehimer 
B. V. Roberts 
G. B. Roberts 
Henry S. Robinson 



One HundreU Kuity-foiir 



R L. Rockett 
Marion Roe 

Florence Rosenstein 
J S Ross 
Harry Roush 



Williom Rue 
Eorle I Runner 
Robert H Rushmer 
Normo Russell 
Phihp M Russell 



Thornton Rutherford 
William A Soger 
Hilda Sally 
Frank G Satterfield 
E Robert Scattergood 



Joseph Scelza 
E H Schaeffer 
D B. Schafer 
Herbert Theo Schmmke 
Corl H Schneeweiss 



Emil Lee Schuermon 
Horry C Schuhr, Jr 
F T Scott 
Mary Corolyn Seed 
Garfield Shafer 



C O'Neal Shanks 
John W Shields 
J J. Shorten 

Bliss C. Shrapnel 
Isabel Shriner 



George A. Shwab, Jr 

Eleanor Silleck 

Pattie Sills 

Paul E Simpson 
C T Sinclair 



Rachel Sink 
William Sippel 

Stanley J. Sittenfield 
Frank Sizemore 
Elizabeth Slocomb 



Caleb V Smith, Jr 
Homer D. Smith 
Lewis L Smith 
Lucile Smith 
Travis Smithdeal 



Fronk C Somers 
Gladys Souder 
Audrey Speicher 
Hilda Spence 

John Franklin Spivy 



FRESHMEN 



, IWI J 




SSM, 








(^ P P Ci 



fcK 






i¥ 



One Hundred Forty-flve 




•r 



:*^. 











f^^> f^) i^s 




■<!^ a ^ « 








ra «> p <r* c^, 




John B. Stanbury 
G. L. Stephan 

Berkeley M. Stephens 
Ray W. Stephenson 
J. Q. Stigler, Jr. 



Harris Stone 
T. L. Stritzinger 
G. M, Stroud 
Elizabeth Sutton 

Mark Truman Swartz 



Eileen Sweet 

Ernest Cullimore Swiger 
Horace E. Tabb 
Florence Taylor 
Frank S. Taylor 



Hugh Taylor 
Mary Martha Taylor 
Ralph A. Taylor 
Harold K. Terry 
J. F. Thomas 



Roy Z. Thomas 
Howard Tousley 
Osmond A. Towne 
Joseph A. Trainor, Jr. 
Sam A. Trakas 



Albro S. Travis 
Lee G. Tucker 
Dorothy Tudor 
William Turner 
W. James Turpit 



Jane Tyson 
Robert Vann 

Morton D. Voughon 
Carl E. Vaughan, Jr. 
William L. Venning 



Elizabeth Voegtion 
Leroy L Walker 
R P. Walker 
Jean Wallouer 
R, E. Walsh 



Thurman Word 
Charles R. Warren 
George L. Warren 
Chandler Washer 
Anne Michoux Watkins 



Virginia Watkins 
John C. Watson 
Kenneth D, Weagley 
John W. Weotherby 
H M. Webb 



f)iiH llundii'il Forty-six 



FRESHMEN 



John M. Webb 
Nathan I Weinstein 
Ida Welsh 
Willard Wentz 
C. R Wesselhoft 



Charles S Whi taker 
Charles Edgar White 
Paul W Whitener 
Herbert G Whiting 
R S Wiggins 



Walter W. Wilcox 
Fred A. Wildnauer 
L S. Wilks 

Franklin Williams 
George H Williams 



J H. Williams 
Melvin J. Williams 
William Anderson Williams, Jr. 
Dorothy Williams 
Alexander G. Wilson 



R. W. Wilson 
Elaine Wilson 
Virginia Winfree 
Ernest A Winton 
Frances Wise 



Gordon B Witherill 
Rolph A Wollett 
Sidney Woltz 
W. K. Woltz 
Ernest H. Wood 



Thomas R Woodbndge 
Fred Woodcock 
William E Woodruff 
James Woods 

Herbert M Woolf 



F M Woolsey 
Margery Woolsey 
Julia Wooten 

Truman H. Wormon 
A. Lyman Wright 



Fred C Wright 
Robert H. Wyatt 
W W. Wyatt 
Edna Zimmerman 
Esther Zuckermon 




r.- o p h 
? /f?* o ^ f? 

jp p f^ .f^ O 







■^ 



One Hundred Forty-aeven 



BOOlLm 

FE AT VRE S 




Milan Interior 



SQQ 



ITALIAN GOTHIC 

The Italian people were slow to 
discard old methods and make 
use of the new in structural 
systems. The round arch and 
wooden roof were long adhered 
to, while the principles of bal- 
ance and thrust were never un- 
derstood in Italy as in France. 
Milan is built on a Latin cross 
plan, with short polygonal choir 
and a five-aisle body. The ex- 
terior has no predominating 
tower, but presents a huge bulk 
of lace-like stone work with a 
dominant effect of high side 
aisles and balustrade parapets. 
Milan, on the whole is intricate 
and complicated, being typical 
of the aesthetically inclined 
Italian. 




MILAN CATHEDRAL 



5U.t^ Ufo^-^" 







IS."; . '. :' , , . ' . :■ 



Sculpture Taken From 
Arch Entering Fraternity Court 



SPONSORS AND FAVORITES 




f 



I 



I 



Mrs. A. E. Kellam 



I T R 



SPONSOR 




H 







/ 





Mrs. 0. W. Dieffenbach 



BUSINESS MANAGER'S SPONSOR 




:£Lk. 



.■:4^i^ 




r 



1^ 



I- 
f 





Ruth Leake Myers 



EDITOR'S FAVORITE 




I 



Ethel Varrell Garrett 



BUSINESS MANAGER'S FAVORITE 




^' 



^ 






Miss Elizabeth Ethridge 





Miss Sue White Messenburg 




•^ ^ 





Miss Sarah Kotherine Taylor 

STAFF 
FAVORITES 



Miss Jane Miller 



STAFF 
FAVORITES 




Miss Constance Patton 






Miss Dorothy Walton 




Miss Mary Nash White 



Miss Margaret Lewis 




Shield Taken From 
Doorway of Auditorium 



l'!'l|''0'fiJftl 



'illi 








IliitilifiirirKi 



jihield Taken from 
Back of House of M 



B 



U 







Miss Sue Sheppard 

Member of Kappa Alpha Theto 

Sorority 








"H 






.^^^^^^^^p" 
^^^ 



Miss Orpha Clements 
Member of Alpha Delta Pi 
Sorority 





r 





Miss Virginia Kern 
Member of Phi Mu 
Sorority 




Miss Annie Kate Rebman 
Member of Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Sorority 







Miss Vivian Smith 
Member of Kappa Delta 
Sorority 




Miss Betty Wrenshall 
Member of Alpha Delta Pi 
Sorority 





Miss Cane Lucas 

Member of Delta Delta Delta 

Sorority 




^ 









"^v. 



Miss Jane Triplett 
Member of Zeta Tau Alpha 
Sorority 




Shield Taken From 
Back of House 




Shield Taken from 
Doorway of Auditorium 



S N 



H 



^ 




The May Court 

Miss Dorothy Newsom May Queei 
933, Scenes from the 1932 pageant ', 
ng maid of honor, the court, flower 
etc. 






^ 



le of fhe Fair Visitors to Our Campus 

Mss Ruth Myers, Sweet Brier; Miss 

I 

abeth Ethridge, Farmville; Miss Mary 

dsher, Richmond; Miss Kay Rouz, 

owbo; Miss Nona Roper, Lexington; 

ses Dot Ford, Mary Abbott, Elsie Mer- 

I Carrie Baldwin, William and Mary; 

> Margaret Fentress, Maury; Miss Mary 

,- Efird, Martha Washington Seminary. 



^ 



■W ^^^^^ 







1* «* 



if**^ • 





The U. N. C. and Duke Bands perform di. 
the half of that memorable game; The FroshI 
an exhibition; Beautiful aren't they— Horse 
Course; Carolina is buried; The Band 1 
Columbia; Snow time is everybody's time on 
campus. 





The girls swimming team poses for the 
camera; Ye ole swimmin' hole and a group 
of picnickers; Tombs initiotes as per 
custom; It is nice to get up in the morn- 
ing as sung by Maxwell; One of the numer- 
ous dances given in the Union Ballroom 










1 



A line of Kappas, A lesson in 
writing^ or crithmeticr' !1 ; Son 
boys caught before our well-kno\ 
day assembly; Kappa win stunt i 
a take off on "Julius Caesar"; 
neither of the three they are 
you know; The Duke Chapel Cf 




l^^^l^^^^^^^^^^^ 








Imagine celebrities of the 
seeking assistance; Mac and 
playing again; Figure this out 
yourself; Phi Delta Theta int 
mural football champions; Q 
ninggim, McNeil and Higg 
handball champions; Kappa Sig 
championship basketball tea 






m^: 



Solving a difficult problem; Arnold end 
Coombs talk it over; Lazy "daze"; The 
lawyers have an outing; Only a bunch of 
high-minded girls; Just two tricky co-eds; 
Between classes; On with the stein song 3.2 
is now available; What a distinguished 
looking bunch of horses. 




BOOILAT 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Interior of Tarragona 



ftGG 



SPANISH GOTHIC 

In Spain, Gothic is handled in a 
notably heavy and militant fash- 
ion, showing strongly the influ- 
ence of Moorish design. Wide 
in proportion to height, compo- 
sitions are kept simple. Broad 
expanses of flat wall surface 
emphasize concentrated detail. 
Probably the most original con- 
tribution to design by Spanish 
architects is the octagonal 
tower rising from the square 
base. 

The Cathedral of Tarragona is 
one of the most impressive ex- 
amples of Spanish Gothic It 
retains much of the Roman- 
esque simplicity, while the elab- 
orately carved portal and rose 
window show French influence. 




CATHEDRAL OF TARRAGONA 



5lu6' C<<r»V« 




Sculpture Token from 
Above Doorway of Union 



N N 



CHANTICLEER 







Young Men's Christian Association 

OFFICERS 

^^ Curtis T. Spence President 

' J^^^^ Edwin C. Kellam Vice President 

^ |J(^^ John A. Myers Secretary 

^^^ Charles C. Derrick Treasurer 

CABINET 
Committee Chairmen 

» Jfc^ vKb^ ^ ^ Tctum Campus Service 

* •^ V!^ J H. Phillips Chapel 

-j^ Walters Jones Conference 

/ ^^ DeArmond Moore Discussions 

^"l^^ " :■ M. E Newsom, Jr Employment 

^_ .' Clcire Crenshaw Freshmen 

Samuel I. Barnes Library 

Everett Sawyer Publicity 

Montgomery J. Gray Recitals 

Pardue Bunch Religious Emphasis 

Eugene Campbell Church Cooperation 

Russell C. Herbert Social 

James Starling World Fellowship 

i?;i^-'iM Jq)-ip q Minter Publications 

Assistant Chairmen 

Curtis T. Spence Paul Baxter, Charles D, Beatty, Forrest Dunstan, Dowd 

President Bangle, James Sapp, W. G. Wharton, William J. Patter- 

son, W. C. Siceloff, Bayard H. Storm, C. E. Phillips, Jr., 
., , , ^ , Ben B, Weems. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Directors 

T" HE Duke University Young Men's Christian ^ean H. J. Herring, Chairman; Dr. W. K, Green, Vice 

' Association has proven itself to be one of the Chairman; Dean D, M, Arnold; Coach J. W. Cooms; Dr. 

most valuable organizations on the campus. It Mason Crum; Charles E. Jordan; Dr. A. K. Manchester, 

IS an integral part of the National Council of W. M. Upchurch; J. Foster Barnes, Ex Officio, 

the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association and of ^^^ ^^^^ .^M^^fe^^ 
the World Student JF % ^PJ^^i^ JRZS« 
Christian Federation. As f^ ^» T m T' " ^*^ft 
an organization at Duke ! * ' ^ ^ ™H 
the "Y" hopes to be of ^^to| ^ f*^ "^ ' |^ ^ ^ 
service not only to its own BBfCS 

members but to the en- 1?F^^^fcl^ "W - 

tire University commun- ^pT' V ^^ 

ity — to students, to ^^^ ^^^ i^*^ 

faculty members and 
their families, and 
to members of the ad- 
ministration. The "Y" 
has for its mam objective 
the balancing of the 

material life of the Stu- IdwmC. Kellam John A Myers Charles Derrick 

dent with the wholesome Vice President Secretary Treasurer 

social and spiritual sides 




One lluiuli'iil NiiiclyciKhl 



Z AT I N S 



-zi-Lh— 




r^ f^ ,p p n o f*^ 




^^■ff i^^htt^^kkJ k 



1 



■O j?!) (f?i (^ ^ 



Gray 
Jones 



Y. M. C. A. CABINET 

Starlings Minter Beatty Barnes Crenshaw 

Baxter Dunstan Storm Sawyer Bangle 

Weems Moore Bunch Wharton Phillips 



Newsom 
Sopp 



of the campus life. To occonnplish this objec- 
tive, the "Y" has entered many lines of activities 
on the campus. 

During Freshman Week, this year, the entire 
cabinet — thirty-two men — assisted in the orien- 
tation of the new students. A "smoker," a free 
moving picture show, and a tennis tournament 
were provided for the entertainment of the 
freshmen. 

The campus service committee provides the 
reading room in the Union with a supply of books, 
periodicals, and daily newspapers. A music 
room, also in the Union, is provided with a piano, 
o radio, a phonograph, and games. The social 
committee sponsors an Open House in club 
rooms in the Union, on Thursday nights, at which 
time an Orchestra is provided. The Tuesday 
Evening Recitals, which won such favorable 
comment last year, are being continued this 
year. Once a month outstanding musicians 
in the state are invited to give a concert in Page 
Auditorium. The Association pays the expenses 
of these recitals and charges no admission fee 

The "Y" Employment Bureau acts as a clear- 
ing house in securing employment for students 



in Durham The campus service committee 
makes public reports daily as to the students in 
the infirmary, carries reading matter to students 
who are ill, and maintains a bulletin board in 
the lobby of the Union. In providing for a good 
religious environment on the campus, the Y M. 
C. A has cooperated with the University in spon- 
soring a Religious Emphasis Week, and also an 
Open Forum Bible Class conducted by Dean 
Herring in York Chapel. 

The Freshman Friendship Council is composed 
of men of the Freshman Class who ore porticu- 
larly interested in the work of the "Y" on the 
campus The Council elects its own officers and 
carries out a program of its own cooperating 
with the regular program of the "Y" If has 
been especially valuable in providing training 
for future cabinet members ond officers of the 
Association and in arranging social and spiritual 
gatherings for freshmen. 

Besides numerous other octivities and projects, 
the Association sponsors, Quadrangle pictures 
and publishes the Duke Handbook and the Direc- 
tory of Students, Faculty, and Administration 



Oqp Hun<lrp<l Ninety mti.- 



CHANTICLEER 




Young Women's Christian Association 




Miss Virginia Ragon 
President 



OFFICERS 

Virginia Ragon President 

Rosanelle Cash Vice President 

Virginia Geddes Secretary 

Lucille Gainey Treasurer 

Cabinet 

Choirman, industrial Committee, Elizobeth 
Jerome; Choirman, Publicity Committee, Jo 
Glass; Chairman, Worship Committee, Rebecca 
Royal, Choirman, Progrom Committee, Rivera 
Ingle; Chairman, Social Committee, Helen 
Moyler; Choirmon, Social Service, Virginia 
Tillotson, Chairman, World Fellowship, Eleanor 
Rogers; Chairman, Inter-Rocial Committee, 
Jonet Griffin. 

Advisory Board 

Mrs Hazen Smith, Mrs. B. G Childs, Mrs 
R D Baker, Miss Mary Grace Wilson. 



AS WE have watched Duke University growing from 
year to year, assuming a more conspicuous po- 
sition among educational institutions than ever be- 
fore, a natural desire has grown up among those 
most active in Y. W. C. A. circles to see this or- 
ganization keep step with the school. We want it 
to be an integral part of school life, and to develop 
our organization into broader and more beneficial 
fields. We want to make it possible for every stu- 
dent to be interested and active in some phase of our 
work. The Y. W. C. A. can fill a real need in student 
life appealing as it does to that inherent side of a well 
rounded existence not satisfied in intellectual and 
social pursuits. 

Though we want to make ours an efficient, positive 
and active institution, it might be an easier task to 
do this with a small and vitally interested group, but 
this is not our real aim. It is to the student body as 
a whole that we make our appeal. This appeal 
comes, not as a desire to enlarge the roll of the Y. W. 
C. A,, but as a result of our aim to make ourorganiza- 
tion one that will offer a field of service and a source 
of help and inspiration to each individual student. 
We are looking forward to the day that will see every 
member an active one, and every student a member. 




Miss Lucille Gainey 
Treasurer 



Miss Rosanell Cash 
Vice President 



Two II II ml red 



ORGANIZATIONS 











Rodgers 
Tillitson 



Y. W. C. A. CABINET 

Jerome Ingle 

Robertson Hooker 



Y. W. C. A. 



Yorbrough 
Moyler 



Griffin 
Royoll 



THE Young Wonnen's Christian Association of 

Duke University, a mennber of the Young 
Women's Christian Association of the United 
States of America, and a participant in the 
World's Student Christian Federation, declares 
Its purpose to be: 

"We, the members of the Young Women's 
Christian Association of Duke University, unite 
in the desire to realize full and creative life 
through a growing knowledge of God. 

"We determine to have a part in making this 
life possible for all people. 

"In this task we seek to understand Jesus and 
follow him." 

The officers, comprising the Executive Board, 
are President, Vice President, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

There is an Advisory Board composed of mem- 
bers of the faculty and from women of the com- 



munity. In addition there is a Cabinet, whose 
duty it is to initiate and promote a program of 
activities that will best accomplish the purpose 
of the organization. 

Particularly outstanding has been the work of 
the Social Service Committee in securing con- 
tributions of food for local welfare agencies 
and in enlisting the volunteer services of stu- 
dents for playground work at Wright Refuge; 
the Christmas pageant directed by the World 
Fellowship Committee; the activities of the 
Social Committee in trying to provide an 
adequate sociol life; and the work of the In- 
dustrial and Interracial committees in seeking 
to supplant ignorace and prejudice by an intel- 
ligent, understanding attitude toward peoples 
and problems. 



Two Hundred One 



CHANTICLEER 



FRESHMAN FRIENDSHIP COUNCIL 




William Brumbach 
President 



THE Freshman 
Friendship Council 
IS the organization 
through which the 
Duke Y. M. C. A. con- 
ducts its work in the 
freshman class. It has' 
concluded a year which 
through its meetings, 
informal discussions, 
and entertainments 
has promoted great 
friendships among the 
freshmen and has also acquainted them with 
different members of the faculty on various 
occasions. 

Among the several contests sponsored were 
the fall tennis tournament and the freshman 
oratorical contest. Both of these affairs are 
annual events. A trophy was given the tennis 
champion; and a silver cup, to the best orator. 
Coach Gregory supervised the fall event with 
the assistance of Mr. Dick Piper while Mr. Fred 
Cody successfully conducted the oratorical con- 
test before an audience of the entire freshman 
class, in Pogc Auditorium. 

Besides a Camp Sacarusa Trip under the di- 



rection of Mr, Rozzelle Holman, the group 
heard various lectures and discussions by lead- 
ing members of the faculty and of the student 
body. These discussions were held both in the 
club room and in the homes of the faculty. 

Every active member of this council becomes 
a candidate for the Y. M, C A, Cabinet at the 
discretion of the president of the "Y" and the 
freshman committee. 

In the same manner in which the Y. M C, A 
has for many years promoted interest in uni- 
versity affairs among the whole student body, 
the Freshman Friendship Council acts in a like 
capacity as regards the freshmen class. Their 
work in the past has been deserving of a great 
amount of credit and it is felt and hoped that 
this work will be continued in the future on the 
same high level upon which it has been con- 
ducted in the past. 

MEMBERS 

Henry Ackerman, John Black, Bill Brumback, Edwin 
Blessing, Albert Burford, Ernest Cruikshank, James 
Claudlee, Fred Cady, George Everitt, Gordon Foreman, 
Blades Foreman, Rozelle Holman, James Hatch, Henry 
Hobb, Henry Hoff, Bert Jones, John McClain, George 
McCarthy, Dick Piper, Robert Peck, Herbert Schminke, 
Malcolm Wright, W, A Williams, A L Wright 




Cady I „;..:,..,:. .'.'.. '._,v.,i;, _,i.iiiiiiiike Kolbo Everitt Jones 

Blessing Cruikshank Piper ... ght Burford McCarthy Peck 

Ackerman Hollman Hatch Williams Chandlee Black 



Twii lliiiiilrcil Two 



ORGANIZATIONS 




(^ C\ (T^ (^ (TS fT!)^. 

Perry Byrn Pedersen Ritter Wells Forbes Buchanan 

Fletcher Royall Parker Patterson Heod Fish 

FORUM CLUB 

r^lD you ever readings are given on topics of interest by stu- 

w I s h to dents and visitors. These discussions usually 

know more center around topics of ancient Greece and 

jrtp^j about and un- Rome, and old myths and legends seem to live 

'^^ derstand more anew. Once a year the gala affairs of old are 

f-^;;^ ^H^^H , .1 . ^ reproduced when the Classical Club is enter- 

^1 . I tained at a Roman banquet. Everyone enters 

^ _ -^^H ^^° 9^^^^ civil- j^^Q ^Pig gpi^i^ Q^ ^^^ occasion, and it is truly an 

^ X ^^m izations, Greece experience. 

and Rome^ Have The name of this organization is significant 

you ever desired — Forum meaning originally a place of discus- 

to turn back to sion All women students of Duke University 

pages of history who hove token or are taking one year of college 

and take part in Latin or Greek, and who have averaaed or are 

the life of averaging a B on the course are eligible for 

peoples of the membership. Elections are made twice a year 

past?' Such — of fhe beginning of each semester, at which 

ideas were in the fi^ne fhe names of the eligible candidates are 

Lucille Gair.^, minds of the presented to the club 

President founders of the ^cr.^coc 

Forum Clubwhen officers 

they established this society at Duke m 1927 ^uncille Gomey^ .President 

-r, £ .1 c /~i L .. .. Geraldine Fletcher Vice President 

The aim of the Forum Club is to promote a Dorothy Forbes Secretory and Treosurer 

greater interest in the study of classical Marggaret Porker Progrom Chorrmon 

languages It has therefore confined its mem- 
bership to those who have studied, or at Members 
the present are studying, Greek or Latin ^ ^^elyn Buchanan, Emily C Byrn, Sara Elizabeth Clork, 
l,s interest reaches forther then the doss- g°- r^i*; mSo^^^ "tl ,^.V%'„,'S2 
room, however. I he society holds meetings Pa^ker, Cora Patterson, Signd Pedersen, Julio Perry 
once a month at which times debates, talks, and Jane Ritter, Rebecca Royall, Dons Wells. ' 




Two Hundred Three 



CHANTICLEER 



TOWN GIRLS' CLUB 




I\ancy Roberson 
President First Term 



girls; to cooperate as a body 
ties, and to voice an influence 



THE Town 
' Girls' Club of 
Duke University 
functions as on 
integral part of 
t h e Woman's 
Student Govern- 
ment. The club 
aims to keep 
girls living off 
the campus in 
close contact 
with university 
life; to promote 
a spirit f good 
will among i t s 
members and 
with dormitory 
in student activi- 
in school govern- 




Newsom 
Forlines 



Edwards 
Bishop 



ment through its representative on the student 
council. The organization holds monthly meet- 
ings, and Its plans are outlined in advance by 
the cabinet. Several of its social activities have 
become traditional; namely, the annual party 
for the May Queen and court; the tea for Dur- 
ham High School seniors and teachers, and 
participation in the May Day Tea Garden. A 
room in Carr building is furnished for the 
convenience of the town girls. Membership of 
the club this 
year numbered 
one hundred and 
thirteen. 

The town girls 
have a room all 
their own in Carr 
building, with 
day beds and 
easy chairs, for 
their use and 
convenience. 
This room has 
been of much 
service to 
those girls who 
have no place 
to gather be- 
tween classes or a place to leave their belong- 
ings. Aside from the service of this room 
for the convenience of the students it has 
aided much in bringing together the town 
girls and establishing more intimate relations 
between them. 

Membership in the club is extended to all 
women who are undergraduate matriculates 
of Duke University and who reside off the 
campus Membership of the club this year 
numbered about one hundred and thirteen. 

OFFICERS 

Nancy Roberson President 

Helen Card Vice President 

Margaret Edwards Treasurer 

Nellie Bishop Corresponding Secretary 

Lola Marler Rogers Recording Secretary 




Helen Card 
President Second Term 



Two Iliimlrcd Four 



RGAN I Z AT I N S 



■vo r^ o (^ f> if>.«f^ 









f^ rb f^^ p D p jr:^ D 



Broswell Ellis 

Jeffrey Sippel 

Dudley O'Keef 

Lucas McKenzie 



Sonner Howie Ellis Forlmes 

Hooker Mustord Word Moore 

Boyles Dillon Newsom York 

Sella rs VanAntwerp Welsh Williams 

THE POLITY CLUB 



Myers 
Goiney 
Power 
Phillips 



Patterson 
Futreii 
Droughon 
McLean 



Dole 

Douglas 

Hamlin 



T"HE Polity Club is an organization whose pur- 
poses and objectives are to create a greater 
interest in political, social, and economic life; to 
promote a better understanding of these divi- 
sions of human activity and the principles under- 
lying them; and to encourage the development 
of higher type of citizenship In pursuance of 
the studies and activities of the club its members 
devote their attentions to current problems and 
conditions in both national and international af- 
fairs. The club is affiliated with the Inter- 
national Relations Club, an organiaztion spon- 
sored by the Carnegie Endowment, which supplies 
these clubs with speakers, and literature dealing 
with the various current topics of importance. 

Membership in the Polity Club is open only to 
Juniors and Seniors who have made a high 



scholastic aver- 
age in courses in 
political science 
and history. The 
club was founded 
in 1928, and 
under the able 
guidance of its 
faculty members; 
namely, Dr 
Robert S Rankin, 
Dr. R R Wilson, 
Dr J Fred Rippy, 
and Mr. William 
Simpson It has 
accomplished 
much during its 
period of exist- 
ence on the cam- 
pus. 




KoC/ert Voughon 
President 

Two Hundred Five 



CHANTICLEER 



NEREIDIAN CLUB 



THE Nereidian Club was founded in the spring 
of 1930 in order to promote better swimming 
among the women of Duke University. Mem- 
bership in the club is honorary and is based on 
ability in swimming, determined by tests given 
in the spring and fall of each year. The mem- 
bers of the club 
officiate at and 
participate 
in swimming 
meets in co- 
operation with 
the Women's 
Athletic As- 
sociation. In the 
spring of every 
year the Nerei- 
dian sponsors a 
traditional water 
pageant in which 
they invite all 
Duke women in- 
terested in swim- 
ming to partici- 
pate and to which the entire student body is 
welcome. 




W 



t 




L 



Betty Boesch 
President 



The colors of the club, red, gold, and blue, 
are embodied in the head of a Devil Fish which 
is the emblem of the club. There are three 
higher degrees recognition for which is achieved 
through the completion of advanced tests and 
rewarded by the red, gold and blue bars. 



Members 

Margaret Burns, Pauline Chase, Virginia 
Geddes, Marjorie Glasson, Janet Griffin, Mary 
Jansen, Mary McGhee, Mary Parkhurst, Marjorie 
Voigt, Helen Wyatt. 

Pledges 

Marion Coote, Dorothy Flebbe, Catherine 
Fleming, Eloise Ingram, Mono Jenkins, May D. 
Marion, Helen Morali, Jean Rineheimer, Mary 
Carolyn Seed, Ethel Whittemore, Gretchen 
Zimmerman. 

OFFICERS 

Betty Boesch President 

Bernice Rose Vice President 

Mary Alice Dewey Secretary 

June Bailey Treasurer 



rt 






iiW'-o':*^ 



I 



w~y 





i^kUm'-i 






, r II I ir-rtiijr ti" 

Wyatt 



vuigi 
Glasson 



Porkhurst 
Zimmerman 



Fleming 
Dewey 



Rose 
Chase 



Griffin 
Ingram 



Two Iliinrtrefl Six 



ORGANIZATIONS 




Newsom 
O'Keef 



Garrett 
Fletcher 



Voughan 
Eaton 



Ma lone 
Peg ram 



Sellars 
Boesch 



WOMAN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



THE Wonnan's Athletic Association was found- 
ed in the spring of 1929. During the past 
four years it has increased in nnennbership to 
such an extent that it is now one of the leading 
campus organizations. 

Probably the three greatest incentives to in- 
terest are the field days which are held in the 
fall, the winter, and the spring; the awarding 
of letters, nunnerals, and sweaters; and the 
Athletic Cabin. 

In the fall field day, hockey, swinnnning, tennis, 
soccer, and riding events are presented Basket- 
ball and volley ball are the leading sports in the 
winter. Spring field day tops the athletic 
events with tennis, archery, baseball, riding, 
and swinnming. 

A point systenn has been established through 
which awards are given. To the fifteen qirls 
having the most points in each class, class 
numerals are awarded To the ten girls havina 
the most points during the year, regardless of 
class, a block "D" is awarded. To the six girls 
having the most points at the end of the junior 
year, a sweater with an Old Enalish "D" is 
awarded These girls comprise the All Duke 
Honorary Team. 
The Athletic Cabin, located eight miles from 



the campus, is a 
place for good 
times for all the 
girls of Duke. It 
i s a splendid 
place for picnics 
and week-end 
parties Only 
girls are allowed 
to go to the 
cabin. 

At present, the 
Woman's Ath- 
letic Association 
has a member- 
ship of approxi- 
mately 175 wo- 
men. 





Marjorie Glasson 
President 



OFFICERS 
Marjorie Glasson, President; Fanny O'Keef, Vice Pres- 
ident, Elizabeth Pegrom, Secretory, Dorothy Eaton, 
Treasurer, Dorothy WyveM, Chairman of Cabin Com- 
mittee; Geroldme Fletcher, Chairman of Point System; 
Betty Boesch, Head of Swimming; Elizabeth Sellars, Head 
of Tennis; Dorothy Newsom, Head of BasketboM; Emily 
Vaughn, Head of Track; Ethel Hoffman, Head of 
Archery; Ethel Garrett, Head of Hockey; Eloise Malone, 
Head of Ridmg; Ruth Madden, Representative of Fresh- 
man Class; Julio Grout, Faculty Adviser. 



Two Hundred Seven 



CHANTICLEER 



COLUMBIA LITERARY SOCIETY 



"THE history of 
Columbia 




Lawson Knott 
President First Term 



^HJPBPhI^^ Literary Society 

■ ^H IS one of which 

Y ^m if <^0Y at its 

• 99k ^^ ^ pleasure boast. 

Founded in 1846, 
it still clings to 
the ideal of of- 
fering t those 
students, who 
wish it, an op- 
portunity to en- 
gage in forensic 
activities. Even 
though it is sur- 
passed in num- 
bers and seemingly importance by other or- 
ganizations, Columbia has become so inherently 
founded in the traditions of the University that 
it will take more than this flood of modern 
materialism tc uproot it. It is true that we no 
longer find time to transport ourselves to the 
realm o^ unreal and debate for hours on "The 
ruling passion of man," Think of the resource- 
fullness and consummate ability which must 
have been the portion of those men who could 
find common ground for discussion as to "which 
has more influence on society, female virtue or 
classical education." 

Turning now to the practical achievement of 
Columbia we find that she established a college 
library with four hundred fifty volumes. Later 
she assumed the difficult task of founding a 
newspaper and a monthly publication under 
practically the same regulations as they are con- 
ducted today Now she stands as the lone or- 
ganization devoted to the task of offering an 
outlet to the smothered eloquence which prevails 
on every college campus. Even though her flag 
does not fly so high as in days gone by, she is 



just as dear to the hearts of her loyal members 
as she was when the masterful voices of former 
senators Overman, Simmons, and other il- 
lustrious alumni rang through her halls. 

FIRST TERM OFFICERS 

Lawson B. Knott, Jr, President; Alexander McLean, 
Vice President; Thomas Baird, Secretary; Charles M. 
Short, Treasurer; Pardue Bunch, Chairman of the 
Executive Committee; William J. Patterson, Marshal; 
N. M. Blake and G. M. Gregory, Faculty Advisers. 



SECOND TERM 
OFFICERS 

Alexander Mc- 
L e a n, President; 
Jerry Bray, Vice 
President; Davis 
Williams, Secretary; 
Thurman Troxler, 
Treasurer; Andrew 
Berry, Chairman of 
the Executive 
Committee; H J. 
Herring and 
E W Weather- 
spoon, Faculty Ad- 
visers. 




Alexander McLean 
President Second Term 



Members 

W. P. Armstrong, F. W. Bangle, Clyde Boyles, Thomas 
Baird, Andrew Berry, Jerry Bray, Pardue Bunch, Gus 
Carlson, David Caton, Randolph Covington, Ernest 
Cruikshank, Richard Griffin, James L. Hamilton, Henry 
Jogger, Lawson. B. Knott, Jr., Alexander McLean, Alvin 
Moore, Robert M. Morris, Malcolm Newbold, Jr , William 
J. Patterson, George Pearson, Joseph Powell, Rufus 
Powell, John W. Russell, Robert Scattergood, Charles M 
Short, John Spivey, James Stiles, Hoover Toft, Thurman 
Troxler, Robert Venning, Leroy Walker, Robert Walker, 
John Webb, Walter West, Robert Wiggins, Davis Wil- 
liams, Gregory Wilson, Ernest Wood, William Woodruff. 



Two HiinrliPfl KlRht 



^ijifi^tna&t^W&ttiffillilttfflllifflWIiillli 




Shield Taken from 
front of the Medical School 



HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL 



CHANTICLEER 






uf 



mi 



jt-! v ■ ! i.ij — --tt; ;>-; 1 ui'j-'-,u4!jja^iv^ii!: 



m 



rz P^'J-v; '." . ^ Kf . ■ ' v'.T-' 



t.^; 



tT!f I^ ^^.IIL^"I^ JjyA!U^ 



;rfl't-'.i>f' - ■-■■-uv."'i r 




Raymond Lundgren 
John Minter 
l.owell Mason 



Secret Order of the Senior Class 

Founded at Trinity College, 1913 

John Brownlee 



Edwin Caldwell 
Gordon Power 
James Stewart 



Twri IIllllilri-il Ten 



ORGANIZATIONS 



P 




y 






e^ 



\^ 



') 



\ 



Morjorie Glosson 
Eleanor Rodgers 
Carmen Patterson 





(rtto ^ucktj 



Women's Honorary Senior Order 

Founded at Duke University 1925 



-vQvrKrKfm 



Dorothy Newsom 
Elizabeth Sellors 
Lucille Goiney 



Two Hundred Eleven 



CHANTICLEER 



DELTA PHI ALPHA 



C70R Q number 
of years 
there existed on 
the Duke campus 
a so-called Ger- 
man Club which 
had been or- 
ganized to bring 
together those 
students in the 
u n d e r g r a d- 
uote school who 
had distinguish- 
ed themselves in 
the study of the 
German lan- 
guage, and who 
evidenced a de- 
sire to become more familiar with things Ger- 
man, This organization, after definitely estab- 
lishing itself as one of the extra-curricular 
activities on the campus, was chartered as a 
chapter of the Delta Phi Alpha national honorary 
fraternity in the spring of 1931. 

At the time of its installation as a unit of the 
notional organization, the requirements for 
eligibility were raised. At present only those 




Raymond Lundgren 
President 



students are considered for membership who 
have earned an average of "B" as a minimum 
through the second year of college German or 
its equivalent, and who indicate a continued in- 
terest in the German language, literature, and 
civilization. 

The colors of Delta Phi Alpha are black, red, 
and gold. The key, which bears the coat-of- 
arms in three colors, is the complete emblem 
of the fraternity. The German eagle in gold is 
raised on a block background In the center 
of the eagle's breast is a shield upon which the 
three Greek letters, a * a ore engraved. 

Members 

Calhoun Ancrum, Jr., Ralph Allen, Martha Ballay, 
Cicely Berlin, Theodore Boepple, Charles K. Bradsher, 
Wilbur Brister, Helen Card, Gustaf A. Carlson, Milton 
Cullen, Lucile Droughon, G. G. Edgerton, Sidney Eigner, 
Grace Elgar, Frank Engle, W. P. Farthing, William M, 
Gearhart, Ernest Hilderbrandt, Mrs. Lillian Hime, Louisa 
Hooker, Martha Howie, Bernard Kinter, Ruth Knowies, 
Jacob Levin, Raymond Lundgren, William Miller, William 
Mosenson, Jack Owen, Mary Parkhurst, John Plump, 
Gordon G Power, Bennie Purvis, Ann Elle Robertson, 
Eleanor Rodgers, Dorothy Rodham, William Rouse, J. T. 
Sanders, Marie Schomaker, Lenora Snyder, Mary Tag- 
gart. Hazel Taylor, Adeline Weinstock, 






(^ A A O 

C^ f^., (T> 1^ p O 

v£kdM^M.dMdA 

Power Knowies Cord Rodgers Sanders Shankle Hooker Bradsher 

Howie Levin Parkhurst Carlson Snyder Miller Shomaker Purvis 

Brister Boepple Rouse Gearhart Robertson Kinter Hilderbrandt 




Two Hiindrpd Twelve 



ORGANIZATIONS 



^^ fefei^'^ j:^^^ 




bullock 
Miller 



^orllnes 
Jeffrey 



Hooker 
Ward 



Green 
Fletcher 



KAPPA DELTA PI 



KAPPA DELTA PI originated at the University 
of Illinois, not as Kappa Delta Pi, but as the 
"Illinois Education Club," in 1909. 

The Illinois Education Club resolved to sponsor 
the founding of a national society, with local 
chapters similar to its own organization, thereby 
aiming to foster high standards of preparation 
for teaching and to invite as members those who 
have attained excellence of scholarship and dis- 
tinction of achievement as students and servants 
of Education. 

Successful in its endeavor, the Illinois Educa- 
tion Club was reorganized March 18, 1911, incor- 
porated June 8, 1911, under laws of State of 
Illinois as the honorary educational fraternity. 
Kappa Delta Pi, and re-incorporated as Kappa 
Delta Pi, an Honor Society in Education. 

The purpose of Kappa Delta Pi is to encourage 
in its members a higher degree of devotion to 
social service, by maintaining the highest educa- 
tional ideals and fostering fellowship, scholar- 
ship, and achievement in educational work. 

The Society is an international organization, 
composed of an Executive Council, Laureate 
Chapter, local chapters, and alumni chapters 

Alpha Tau Chapter of Duke University was 
established May 28, 1927, growing out of a local 
educational club known as Braxton Craven 
Educational Association 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 
Donald Agnew, Sara Elizabeth Clarke, James Edward 
Hamilton, B. L. Harton, E. V Pullias. 



ierros 
Morton 



Class of 1933 



vvGiK.er 
Kennedy 



Martha Elizabeth Bulluck, Grace Elgar, Geraldine 
Fletcher, Ruth Forlines, Virginia Green, Louise Hooker, 
Winona Jeffrey, Gretho Oakley, Myrtice Word. 

Class of 1934 

Elizabeth Hicks, Dorothy Holt, Mildred Kennedy, 
Mildred McKinney, Jane Miller, Frances Morton, 
Margaret Reid, Catherine Serfas, Augusta Wolker. 

Pledges 

Carolyn Brooks, Evelyn buchonan, Mrs. E J Cannon, 
Liberty Casali, Lucile Droughon, Herbert Lee Ellis, 
Helen Fonton, 

Jeanne Holt, B P ^^ 

Kinter, Mrs M E 
Newsom, Lola Mor- 
ter Rogers, Alice 
Searight, Catherine 
Shonkle, Mildred 
Taylor. 

Officers 
Sara Elizobeth 
Clarke, President, 
Donald Agnew, Vice 
President; Eunice 
Keen, Secretary; 
John W Wood, 
Treasurer; Ge r a I- 
dine Fletcher, Re- 
porter; Dr. A. M 
Proctor, Counselor 




V^yrtice Ward 



Two Hundred Thirteen 



CH ANTICLE ER 



OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 



THE Omicron Delta Kappa fraternity, a na- 
tional collegiate honorary fraternity, was 
founded at Washington and Lee University, on 
Decembers, 1914. At present it includes Circles 
in thirty-seven representative colleges and uni- 
_ ._ .. versifies i n the 

United States. 
There are four 
types of member- 
ship in this fra- 
ternity: active 
membershi p, 
which is drawn 
from leaders in 
the various 
recognized u n- 
dergraduate ac- 
tivities; faculty 
membership, t o 
which outstand- 
ing members of 
the faculty may 
be invited; 

Edwin Caldwell alumnae m e m- 

President b e r s h i p, to 




which successful or prominent alumni may be 
invited; and honorary membership, which may 
be offered to leaders in world affairs who do not 
have any collegiate relationship with the Circle 
inviting their interest. 

The Rho Circle, at Duke University, was es- 
tablished in 1926; its membership numbers 216, 
many of whom are maintaining close interest 
in the activities of the University. The member- 
ship includes leaders in nearly every profession 
and business field, and the student leaders of 
the campus for the past seven years 
FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 

John Gamble, Poul Garner, Marcus Hobbs, D, K. 
Jackson, Gaither Pratt, Elbert Wallace, George Harrell, 
Low School 

W. P. Farthing, Chisman Hones, Edward Heefner, 
James Mullen, Nicholas Orem, W. M. Upchurch, Jr. 
Active Chapter 

Charles Bradsher, John Browniee, E. M. Caldwell, J. B. 
Clarke, Raymond Coombs, Arthur Ershler, Henry Fulmer, 
William Hicks, Wendell Home, Edwin Kellam, Lawson 
Knott, Jr., Hubert Lewis, Raymond Lundgren, Lowell 
Mason, John Minter, Preston Moses, Gordon Power, Bruce 
Roxby, Charles Short, Joseph Skinner, Curtis Spence, 
James L, Stewart, Robert Voughan 




'ti C^ f^ C^ 1^ fs, ^ 

p Q- o o r^ n cy 

^ O o (^ r*-» ^ 




Skinner Bradsher Mason Minter Stewart Power Kellam 

Roxby Lewis Clark Lundgren Browniee Garner Short 

Ershler Fulmer Vaughah Home Spence Hicks 



Two lluiiUrbd Fuurleeu 



ORGANIZATIONS 



DELTA PHI RHO ALPHA 



QELTA PHI RHO ALPHA is a local honorary 
athletic sorority for women, parallel with 
Tombs, fraternity for men. It was established 
at old Trinity College in 1921. The purpose of 
the organization is the fostering of school spirit, 
leadership, and sportsmanship, and the promo- 
tion of the interest in athletics on the campus. 
Members are chosen after consideration of 
leadership and athletic prowess. Annually, the 
pledges or "goats" appear in the traditional 
costume of a white middy blouse and black 
skirts and carrying the symbolic rolling-pin bear- 
ing the Greek inscription a * p a 

Each year the sorority sponsors an inter-class 
basketball tournament. A banner with the 
numerals of the winning team is the trophy. In 
the spring, it sponsors a tennis tournament of- 
fering a trophy in the form of a silver loving cup. 



OFFICERS 

Dorothy Newsom, 
President; Janet 
Griffin, Vice Pres- 
ident; Eloise Ing- 
ram, Secretary, 
Betty Boesch, 
Treasurer. 

Members 

Dorothy Eaton, 
Marjorie Glosson, 
Mary Porkhurst, 
Mary To g g a r t, 
Emily Vaughn, Car 
lotto Waters. 




Dorothy Newson 
President 



Pledges 

June Boiley, Ethel Garrett, Virginia Lytle, Sara 
Meadows, Sigrid Pederson, Elizabeth Pegrom 



Advisory Boord 

Mrs Chotneuff, Peggy Harrell, Alma Wyche. 

Julia Grout. 



Miss 



^TT(? 








Glosson 
Eaton 



Waters 
Griffin 



Voughon 
Boesch 



ltk£^ 



Pederson 
Pegrom 





Garrett 
Ingram 



Porkhurst 



Two Hundred Fifteen 



CHANTICLEER 



TOMBS 



pOUNDED at Trinity College in 1905, the his- 
tory of Tombs has been a long and honorable 
one. On its rolls are inscribed the names of 
many of the past and present celebrities of 
southern sport. Tombs is primarily an athletic 
organizotion and yet its purposes are even nobler 
than the rewarding of outstanding achievement 
in sport. The hallowed traditions of old Trinity 
are carefully cherished and added to by all 
Tombs members. From year to year the fra- 
ternity endeavors to instill in the hearts of in- 
coming freshmen a certain reverence for these 
traditions of the past. 

One of the primary purposes of Tombs is to 
foster better relations between ours and other 
colleges through the medium of sport, and it 
has been successful to no small degree. The 
men who are invited to membership in Tombs 
are those who have not only been most skillful 
on the athletic field but also have exemplified 
the highest characteristics of leadership and 
sportsmanship. It is with a feeling of pride that 
Tombs can, in answer to the cry of "over- 
emphasis in sport," point to the fact that it num- 
bers among its sons not only stellar athletes but 
men who lead the campus in government and 



scholarship. And so from year to year, to the 
members of this order is passed a precious heri- 
tage — to strive to win and yet, whichever way 
the tide of battle turns, to be generous in victory 
and noble in defeat. 



Class of 1933 

Kenneth G. Abbott, Charles K Bradsher, John H. 
Brownlee, E. M Caldwell, Raymond F. Coombs, Harry 
L. Dein, R. A. Dudley, Arthur Ershler, George W. Ewell, 
Henry Fulmer, Edward A. Howell, Carl J. Kasper, Herbert 
Lewis, Hubert M. Lewis, Lowell Mason, Gordon G. Power, 
Charles Short, Robert S. Voorhees, A. H. Werner. 



Class of 1934 

Jerry Bray, Fred Crawford, Moritz H. Flohr, H. 



J. 



Hendrickson, Ernest W. Hildebrandt, Norman James, 
Henry Lewis, Fred N. Lloyd, Albert B. Means, Donald 
W. Mitchell, 0. B, Newton, Carlisle Norwood, Roger S 
Peacock, John W, Peckham, Thomas Rogers, Harry S 
Rossiter, Carl F. Schock, Leroy Sides, Melvin D. Stevens, 
Henry Thompson, Herbert Thompson, James Thompson, 
Phil Weaver, Barnard Welsh. 







P ^ a .e p p o o r^ a 
o c c n f^ a c ^ f^ 



i^M^lt^fPithH ii\m^dMiM 



'^aso'i -i"'' • Kobsiter Hildebrandt H M Lewis Power Dudley H L Lewis Dein Short 

Fulrner ErslJ. r Weaver Ewell Werner Caldwell Welsh Abbott Howell Peacock 

Thompson Hendrickson Peckham Bradsher Voorhees Newton Stevens Bray Brownlee 



Two Hiiiiclrfd Sixteen 



ORGANIZATIONS 














Storm 


McNeil 


Heroy 


Voles 


Bowen 


Raisley 


Livengood 


Newsom 


Smith 


Rouse 


Keller 


Berry 


Williams 


Wilhelm 


Viol 


Hague 


Dein 


Porreco 


Nitschke 


Fleischer 


Clarke 


Burke 


Reichmon 


Cholkley 


Bell 


Buice 





BETA OMEGA SIGMA 



DETA OMEGA SIGMA was organized as an 
honorary Sophomore fraternity at Trinity 
College in 1917. The founders were: M. A. 
Braswell, K. M. Brim, S T Carson, Charles 
Hackney, F. S. Hale, E S. Hale, E. S. Toms, and 
W T. Whitesides. It successfully lived through 
the struggles for existence that all new or- 
ganizations have, and now has a definite place 
in the life of the University. For the first several 
years of its life the fraternity was merely an 
honorary order, but it gradually developed a 
program and a policy. In the spring of 1926 
steps were taken to set up a constructive plan 
of activity and to earn for the order a worthy 
and useful place in the community Among the 
numerous commendable activities now under- 
taken by Beta Omega Sigma are: Freshman 
Smokers, the annual award of three medals for 
activity, scholarship and athletic ability, the 
award of Fraternity Freshman Scholarship Cup, 
Fraternity stunt night, and specific duties 
governing student activity. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

D. M. Arnold, Paul Garber, W. K. Greene, C E. 
Jordan, Alexander Woite, W H Wannamakcr 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

E T Andrews, Sam Bell, Curtis Berry, 
Cawthon Bowen, W J Bryan, William Buice, 
William Burke, Beverley Carter, William Chalk- 
ley, Dudley Clarke, Morris Dein, Albert Fair- 
child, Robert Fleischer, Fred Hague, John 
Heroy, Charles Hicks, Scott Houston, Albert 
Keller, Norman Livengood, William Long, Don 
McNeil, Maurice Miley, James Newsom, Robert 
Nitschke, 0. B. Nordstrom, Roy Phipps, Nicholas 
Porreca, Willard Raisley, A A Reichman, W. D 
Rouse, Carl Ruff, Robert Russell, William Silver, 
Fred G Smith, John E Smith, George Speicher, 
Bayard Storm, Elmer Tarrall, Carlos Vales, J M 
Viol, T. I. Wagner, C. H Walsh, Kenneth 
Weafer, Earl Wentz, Leo Wilhelm, Luther 
Williams. 

Two Hundred Se\'enteen 



CHANTICLEER 



SIGMA UPSILON 





Vince Moseley 
President 



SIGMA UPSI- 
L N IS 
practically 
a non-secret or- 
ganization. It is 
_ a national liter- 

E,^ *^ W^ a f y fraternity 

U « which has for its 

_ ^.^ _ aim the binding 

M ^ together of the 

^^L 'mm college literary 

-^^^^ y clubs and fra- 

ternities of the 
I Initpd States 
for the sake of 
mutual helpful- 
ness. The mem- 
bership is limited 
to twelve active 
undergraduate 
members in each 
chapter. 
The primary motive of providing a reciprocat- 
ing helpfulness is clearly discernible throughout 
oil the phases of its organization and in its man- 
ner of birth. 

On November 30, 1906, delegates from liter- 
ary clubs already active on the campuses of four 
colleges — Sewanee, V a n d e r b i I t University, 
Randolph-Macon and the University of 
Georgia — met together 
t Vanderbilt U n i- 
versity. This meeting 
resulted in the found- 
ing of a notional liter- 
ary fraternity which 
was to be known by two 
Greek letters, Sigma 
Upsilon. 

In 1913, Fortnightly 
Club of Trinity College 
was given its charter 
OS a chapter of Sigma 
Upsilon The name 
Fortnightly was re- 
tained as the name of 
the Chapter, and it is 
under this name that 
Sigma Upsilon exists 
on the campus of Duke 
University today. 



Sigma Upsilon has shown much progress since 
Its founding. At the time when Fortnightly be- 
came a part of the Fraternity there were eleven 
chapters in seven states; today there are forty- 
one active chapters in twenty states. They ore 
located in all regions of the nation from New 
York State to the State of Washington. 

The aims and policies of the organization 
have contributed no small part in broadening 
and stimulating the intellectual endeavors of 
students wherever active chapters of Sigma 
Upsilon make their influence felt. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

P. F. Bourn, William Blackburn, Furman Bridgers, F. C. 
Brown Jomes Cannon, III, F. A. G. Cooper, A. H. Gil- 
bert, H J Herring, J. B. Hubbell, W. T Loprade, F. K. 
Mitchell, Lewis Potton, H. E. Spence. J. N. Truesdale, 
Clement Vollmer, W. H. Wannamoker, A. M. Webb, 
N I White, T. A. Wilkerson. 

Charles Anderson, Graduate School; William Farth- 
ing, Law School; George C. Harwell, Graduate School; 
D. K. Jackson, Graduate School; Albert Stonbury, 
Graduate School, 

Class of 1933 

William Brazwell, J, B Clark, Louis Clark, William 
P, Dale, Ernest Lynch, Vince Moseley, Marshall Pritchett, 
Bruce Roxby, James L, Stewart, Robert Vaughan, 
Class of 1934 

Paul Dillworth, James Paper, Leslie Squires. 
Officers 

Vince Moseley, President; J. L, Stewart, Vice President; 
J B Clark, Secretary; Robert Vaughan, Treasurer. 




Braswell 
Clark 



Stewart 
Roxby 



Raper 
Dale 



Two HiiiicliTil FClKhteen 



ORGAN I ZATIONS 








Ingles 
Rogers 



Knight 
Stites 



Ward 
Eaton 



Ingle 
Tenney 



Wyatt 
Glasson 



Douglas 
Nelms 



Duke 
Fish 



White 
Howie 



Patterson 



CHI DELTA PHI 



^Hl DELTA PHI, national honorary literary 
sorority, was founded in 1919 at the Uni- 
\ersity of Tennessee. The purpose of the 
sorority is to bring together representative col- 
lege wonnen who, by their literary interest and 
creative ability, shall uphold the highest ideals 
of a liberal education. 

There are at present thirty-eight chapters of 
Chi Delta Phi, the Duke chapter having been es- 
tablished in 1922. The publication of the 
sorority is the "Litterateur," issued quarterly; the 
badge, a five-pointed star in blue, bearing on 
its face a lonnp and the three Greek letters of 
the name, in gold, the whole being surrounded 
by a gold or pearl circle, with a pair of quills 
across the pin beneath the star. The notional 
colors are blue and gold; the flower is the pansy. 

The national organization holds annual 
poetry and prose contests, entries being received 
from its own chapters and from those of Sigma 
Upsilon, a similar literary organization for men. 

In an effort to stimulate literary interest on 
the campus, the Duke chapter has held a series 
of open meetings at which authorities in dif- 



ferent phases of literary activity have spoken 
before the group. Honorary members of Chi 
Delta Phi have addressed the organization, and 
during the fall semester the sorority sponsored 
an exhibit of children's books in connection with 
Notional Children's Book Week. 



OFFICERS 

Crockene W i I- 
Moms, President; 
Eleanor Rogers, 
Vice President; Mil- 
dred Stites, Secre- 
tary; Myrtice Ward, 
Treasurer. 

Members 

Dorothy Eaton, 
Mar|orie Glasson, 
Martha Howie, 
Rivera Ingle, Ann 
Ingles, Betty 
Knight, Carmen 
Patterson, Laura 
White 

Pledges 

Nan Douglas, 
Amy Duke, Dons 
Fish, Margaret 
Nelms, Mory Pork- 
hurst, Elaine Tenny, 
Helen Wyatt. 




Crockette Williams 
President 



Two Hundred Nineteen 



CHANTICLEER 



9019 



TOWARD the close of the last century, or to 
be more exoct, during the first of that decade 
termed "the Gay Nineties," a group of men at 
Old Trinity wrote the Constitution and the 
Ritual which are still the inspiration of the 
present members of the 9019 Society At the 
time of its founding, 9019 was the only honor 
society on the campus and in its club rooms in 
"the Old Inn" a number of men were initiated 
who later brought glory to Trinity through out- 
standing s u c- 
cesses i n many 
fields The high 
ideals and ac- 
complishmentsof 
its members i n 
the life after col- 
lege speak 
eloquently of the 
success of this 
organization. 

The pin of the 
fraternity is a 
gold circle, with 
a chalice and an 
arrow o f gold 
super I mposed. 
The figures of 
9019, in black, 
Raymond Lundgren are on the gob- 

President let. The colors 




of the organization are red and white. 

In keeping with the tradition established 
many years ago, only those men are considered 
to be eligible for election who are of excellent 
character and who have achieved distinction in 
scholarship during two years of study in Trinity 
College. 

Washington's Birthday is celebrated as "9019 
Day," This is a time when all old and new 
members come together for their annual 
banquet. 

The elections are held in the fall and spring 
of each year. 

GRADUATE MEMBERS 

Ernest B. Brooks, School of Medicine; Paul Garner, 
Graduate School; Samuel Margolin, School of Medicine; 
Nicholas Orem, Low School; Charles Stewart, Graduate 
School, 

Class of 1933 

Charles Bradsher, David S, Clarke, William Dale, 
Harry L, Dein, Adam M, Gaddis, Parker R, Hamlin, David 
Jaffe, William Karpinsky, Jacob Levin, Ray Lundgren, 
Gordon G, Power, Bruce Roxby, Lee Vickers, Henry Wynn. 

Class of 1934 

William E, Apple, Harold Atkinson, Louis Ganz, 
William Gearhart, Joseph Getzendanner, Charles 
Humphreys, Raymond Klein, Harold S, Rafner, Ralph 
Roth, Robert Sopp, Charles Stevick, Davis Williams, 




Brodsher 
Roxby 



Sapp 

Humphrys 

Stevick 



Levin 

Williams 
Hamlin 



Power 

Aktinson 

Jaffe 



Getzendanner 
Gearhart 
Gaddis 



Roth 
Clarke 
Vickers 



Dole 
Dein 



Two Humlri'il Twciily 



ORGAN I ZAT IONS 



EKO-L 



CKO-L was founded at Trinity College in 191 1 
for the purpose of encouraging and reward- 
ing women of the college who had attained a 
marked degree of scholastic achievement. Its 
stablishment came as an answer to the demand 
for recognition of those who had reached a 
mark of excellence in their undergraduate work. 
It served supreme in this capacity for six years, 
at which time it was partially supplanted by the 
establishment of a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. 
Then Eko-L assumed a position similar to that 
of 9019 on the men's campus, in that both are 
local societies drawing their membership from 
the two upper classes. 

The membership of Eko-L is quite selective, 
and it is recognized as a great honor to become 
a part of this society. Since the year of its 
founding it has maintained a high standard of 
leadership as well as scholarship on the Duke 
woman's campus, and it is duly proud of the 
record which has been made by those who have 
been deemed worthy of membership. 

One of the most worth while and interesting 
activities of this society is its sponsoring in post 
years of Short Story contests throughout the 
state; in this same line of endeavor Poetry Con- 
tests have been sponsored not only throughout 
the state but also contests restricted to the Duke 



University student body. As these competitive 
effors aroused much interest in the past, it is 
hoped that they will be continued by future 
Eko-L's By these activities the society has 
served not only as a means of scholastic recog- 
nition but also as a promoter of student 
interests 

Members 

Anna Gerturde Douglass, Morjorie Glosson, Martha 
Howie, Ann Ingles, Myrtice Ward 




Myrtice Ward 
President 




Ingles 



Glosson 



Howie 



Two Hundred Twenty-one 



CHANTICLEER 




Dewey 
Jerome 



Powell 
Jordan 



Parker 
Garrett 



Zimmerman 
Gehman 



Schaffle 
Merkel 



Peg ram 
Newsom 



SANDALS 



CANDALS, an 
honorary 
Sophomore order, 
was created in 
1932 by the Stu- 
dent Council of 
t h e Woman's 
College Govern- 
ment, Its mem- 
bership each 
year is to be 
comprised o f 
twenty students 
who have been 
outstanding i n 
t h e Freshman 
class for scholar- 
ship, leadership, and campus attitude. The 
duty of this organization is to assist Student 
Government in various tasks. This year the 
Sandols were helpful in orientation of the in- 
coming Freshman women and since then they 
have been rnoperativp in many campus ac- 
tivities. 




Mory Nobh White 
President 



This year marks the first trial of a club of 
this sort in the Woman's College but it is hoped 
that Sandals shall become a tradition at Duke, 
individual to this campus and an honorary 
organization worthy of respect. 



Members 

June Bailey, Solly Clark, Mary Alice Dewey, 
Ethel Garrett, Virginia Geddes, Mildred 
Gehman, Mary Cooke Green, Clover Holly, Eliza- 
beth Jerome, Virginia Jordan, Sara Meadows, 
Louise Merkel, Tempe Newson, Margaret 
Parker, Elizabeth Pegram, Sue Powell, Evelyn 
Schaffle, Mary Nash White, Dorothy Wyvell, 
Gretchen Zimmerman. 



Two flundred Twenty-two 



ORGANIZATIONS 



.-Al 5(T> 



IOTA GAMMA PI 



IOTA GAMMA PI is a local honorary scientific 
fraternity founded at Trinity College in 1923. 
It IS composed of juniors and seniors outstand- 
ing in the chemistry, physics, biology, zoology, 
and engineering courses. Membership is limited 
to those who have received grades above the 
average in these departments Twice a year 
members are selected and are initiated This 
year the order has twenty-seven members and 
expects to take in more in the spring. 

The purpose of the order is to further and 
abet interest in science by bringing together 
the leaders of the respective fields and by pool- 
ing this knowledge to give each man at least a 
fundamental knowledge of each of the above 
mentioned sciences The order also helps bring 
the campus outstanding scientists of the 

untry so that every student may have the 
i'Mvilege of listening to these learned men. 

Iota Gamma Pi also strives to increase in- 
!• rest in the fields of sciences by offering each 
jr a gold medal and honorary membership 
the sophomore showing the greatest advance- 
ment in any field of science. 







Members 

W C Apple, Hal Atkinson, W H Beals, 
G M Betz, J M Bird, Charles Bradsher, R A 
Broberg, Leonard Capling, D E Cook, Bert 
Cropper, S S, Dupuy, A M Gaddis, T J Garrett, 
H S Hickman, C R Humphreys, K T Knight, 
Hubert Lewis, H. J. MacDonold, Jr , J C Mark- 
ham, R S Miller, 
J. Otis, Jr, 

E. M. Pease, 
Bruce Roxby, Pro- 
fessor S e e I e y, 
Hawley Seller, 

F. F. Smith, 
Philip Unsworth, 
H A Wynn. 




Bruce Roxbv 
President 











Markham Lewis Bradsher Unsworth Ackerson Betz 

Hickman Humphreys Bird Seller Cropper Otis 



Miller 
Gaddis 



Beals 



Two Hundred Twenty-three 



CHANTICLEER 




K^ L»*T f2*^' 



k^ -f--^ f^ ♦^ ■ C^ CT^ *-^- 





^. 



Henderson Andrews 

Wikinngstad Garner 




Rush 
Kent 



Minter 
Gabel 



Gallia 
Kneipp 



Viol Starratt Gartlemann 

Nixon Decher Lamm 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI 



ALPHA KAPPA 
PSI F r a- 
ternity, profes- 
sional in com- 
m e r c e, was 
founded at New 
York University 
i n 1 9 5. At 
present there are 
fifty chapters 
installed in lead- 
ing institutions 
throughout the 
country^ The 
aims of the fra- 
ternity are not 
only 1 further 
the individual 
welfare of its 
members but to 
encourage 
interest in the fields of commerce, accounts, 
and finance. The "Diary of Alpha Kappa Psi" is 
the official magazine, which devotes itself to 
fraternity, commerce, and college interests 
This publication, which is issued four times dur- 
ing the school year, contains many educational 
items concerning current business problems 
written by both active and alumni members. 




Gordon Power 
President 



Beta Etc chapter was established at Duke 
University in December, 1929. The installa- 
tion of our chapter was the culmination of the 
efforts of Its predecessor, Psi Kappa Alpha, a 
local economic order founded in 1927, to estab- 
lish at Duke a recognized national commercial 
fraternity. 

Each year Alpha Kappa Psi confers its mem- 
berhip upon those students of the upper three 
classes pursuing studies in Business Administra- 
tion who have shown their ability in this field, 
and who have proven their right to a recogni- 
tion through business activities on the campus. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Edward Cameron, C. E. London, B. F. Lemert, B. U. 
Ratchford, William Rosseau, J H Shields 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 

Thomas B. Dorsey, John Gamble, Samuel Paul Garner. 

Class of 1933 

W. K, Andrews, Arthur S, Decker, Joseph Gallia, 
William Gortelmann, Paul Henderson, John D. Minter, 
Gordon Power, Robert Rush, David Wikoff. 

Class of 1934 

Albert Gallo, Raymond Kent, Porter Lamm, Wilbur 
Starratt, Jr., George Watson, Jr., Walter Wikinngstad, 

Class of 1935 

Robert Demmie, Robert DeWilt, Frederick Gabel, 
Davis Hatch, Jr., Robert Kneippe, Robert Nixon, Jackson 
Viol. 



Twfi llnri'lrirl Twr-ntv-foiir 



ORGANIZATIONS 



■ »W«!JaWi l L tw5p^4 ?^ p^ ^=^^_J IIHWI P J^i^l-i TOTr-j jp> 



TAU KAPPA ALPHA 



THIS national honorary forensic fraternity was 
* founded at Indianapolis in the year 1908, 
Experiencing a consistent growth, the fraternity 
rapidly became popular. 

With the installation of a chapter at Duke 
University, outstanding men in this activity be- 
gan to receive suitable recognition for their 
work. Tau Kappa Alpha, through the unques- 
tioned merit of its limited membership, has come 
to hold a position of respect on the campus. 
Membership in the fraternity has come to be 
something to aspire to. 

Particularly, by their participation in inter- 
collegiate debating have some of the members 
of Tau Kappa Alpha distinguished the school, 
the fraternity and themselves. Tau Kappa 
Alpha is largely responsible for the attractive 
debating schedules that have been arranged 



tiorn ycur to year For the scholastic year 1932- 
1933, the following schedule was arranged 

The following debates were held at Duke, 
without formal decision; 

On February 27, 1933 against Tulane. 
On March 20, 1933 against Ohio Wesleyan. 
On April 5, 1933 against Princeton. 
On April 12, 1933 against Georgia Tech. 

The following debates were held at the re- 
spective schools, with formal decision: 

On April 25, 1933 against Randolph-Macon 
On April 27, 1933 against Princeton. 

Those taking part in these debates are: 
Pardue Bunch, Maurice Duttera, L. H. Edmund- 
son, Claiborne Gregory, Lawson Knott, Alex- 
ander McLean, Hoover Taft, and Davis 
Williams. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

James Cannon, III, B G Childs, R. L Flowers, P. N. 
Garber, G. M Gregory, H. J. Herring, Holland Holton, 
C E. Jordan, J T. Lonning, W. A Mabry, N. R. McEwen, 
H E Myers, A J. Nichoi, A. M Proctor, R S Rankin, 
E B Weatherspoon. 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 
Nelson M. Blake, J b Pratt 

Law School 

Crowford Carson, W. P. Farthing, Chesman Hones, 
W F Howland, T S Thornton, Joseph W Whitson 



School of Religion 

Thomas Corriger, iom (jonald, J t ihewbert, Edward 
E Wiley. 

Class of 1933 

Lowson B Knott, Jr. 

Class of 1934 
Pardue Bunch, Warren Scoville. 



Two Hundred Twenty-five 



CHANTICLEER 



PHI BETA KAPPA 



OFFICERS 

Alice M. Baldwin, President; F. A. G Cowper, Vice 
President; James Cannon, III, Secretary-Treasurer; 
W. H. Glasson, J B. Hubbell, Members Executive 
Committee. 



MEMBERS-IN-COURSE 

On Junior Standing 

Moriorie Glasson, Anno G Douglas, Henry A Wynn, 
Adam M Gaddis, Harry L. Dein, Jacob Levin, Robert 
M, Voughan, Gordon G. Power, Parker Hamlin, David 
S Clarke, Dorothy Newsom, Myrtice C. Ward, William 
Karpinsky, Carl R Lundgren, Geraldine Fletcher, Henry 
E Kolbe, Lee E, Vickers. 



On Senior Standing 

Harold S- Rafner, Helen Ruth Knowles, Charles Brad- 
sher, David Jaffe, Lucille B. Draughon, 

Graduate Students 

Margaret G, Altvater, Sara Elizabeth Clark, Samuel 
Paul Garner, Argyle Glenn, Margaret Harrell, David K. 
Jackson, Jr, Jeanne Manget, Anna K. Moses, Nicholas 
Orem, Sara Owenby, Walter A, Stonbury, Jr., Charles 
T Thrift, Jr, Mary L Walker. 



FACULTY MEMBERS 



Ruth M. Addoms, F S Aldridge, E P. Alyea, A R, 
Anderson, Alice M. Baldwin, P F Boum, W B. Bolich, 
B H Branscomb, J P. Breedlove, F. A Bridgers, Frances 
Brown, F C Brown, W A. Brownell, R. M Colder; 
J. W Corr, Jr , E M Carroll, R. W. Constant, F A G. 
Cowper, W I Cronford, Leslie Craven, Gifford Davis, 
W C Dovison, H R Dwire, C W Edwards, W P. Few, 
R L Flowers, W D Forbus, C E Gardner, A M. Gates, 
A H Gilbert, Kotherine Gilbert, W. H, Glasson, W. H 
Hall, F M. Hones, 0. C. E. Honsen-Pruss, G. T. Hargitt, 
Deryl Hort, C. C Motley, D. C. Hetherington, F S 
Hickman, W H Hollingsheod, Holland Holton, H C. 



Horack, J, B. Hubbell, C, B. Hoover, Christopher Johnson 
R, R, Jones, J. M. Keech, J. T, Lanning, W T. Laprade, 
Anne Lawton, S. T. McCloy, Wm. McDougall, W. A, 
Mabry, D. B, Maggs, C. B. Markham, W. C. Maxwell, 
Justin Miller, J. M. Ormond, C. W. Peppier, E. L. Persons, 
A M Proctor, W. R Quynn, B. U, Ratchford, Mary L 
Raymond, J, F. Rippy, Christopher Roberts, G. T. Rowe, 
Julian Ruffin, Elbert Russell, S. R. Schealer, J H 
Shields, Fred Sington, H, E. Spence, F. H, Swett, J. N 
Truesdole, Herman Walker, Jr, W. H. Wannamaker, 
A M Webb, Mane U. White, N I White, R N Wilson, 
Carl Zener, L. B Zir. 



Twii lliliiili 1(1 Twciilvsix 




Shield Taken from 
Above Door of House L 



F R A T E R N I 



I E S 



CHANTICLEER 



FRATERNITY PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 




THE Pan Hel- 
* lenic Council, 
the governing 
body of the inter- 
fraternity activi- 
ties, is composed 
of one repre- 
sentative from 
each national 
fraternity, and 
one representa- 
tive for the four 
local fraterni- 
ties. These men 
ore selected by 
their respective 
groups a t the 
beginning 
f their Junior 
year, and serve 
a s assistants. 

The following year they automatically succeed 

their Senior representatives. 
The Pan-Hellenic council serves as a common 

meeting ground on which the various problems 

of the different fraternities are brought up and 



Sam Fretwel 
President 



discussed. In this way a better spirit of friend- 
ship and understanding has been created and 
an insight into the different groups has been 
made possible that would hove been achieved 
in no other way. 

As the sponsor of the augmented seasonal 
dances the council takes the lead in the social 
life of the campus. On these occasions it has 
been made possible for the students to dance 
to the melodies of local talented musicians as 
well OS visiting artists. 

Members 

Fred Hayes, Alpha Tau Omega; Edwin C. Kellam, 
Kappa Sigma, George Ewell, Phi Delta Theta; Chester 
Berry, Kappa Alpha; Jack Land, Pi Kappa Alpha; Sam 
Fretwell, Sigma Phi Epsilon; Lowell Mason, Sigma Chi; 
Frank Allen, Pi Kappa Phi; John Hamerick, Delta Sigma 
Phi; Frank Barnett, Lambda Chi Alpha; Edwin Caldwell, 
Delta Tau Delta; John Long, Sigma Alpha Epsilon; 
Claire Crenshaw, Sigma Nu; W. H. Ripley, Pi Epsilon Pi; 
Harry Dean, Phi Sigma Delta. 

OFFICERS 

Sam J. Fretwell, President, Frank Barnett, Vice Pres- 
ident; John Land, Secretary; John Long, Treasurer. 



f!) O C> O f.^, 




Hayes Kellam Lwvll 

Barnett Caldwell Dein 



belly Land Allen 

Long Crenshaw 



Two llundrt'il Twenty-elghl 



FRATERNITIES 



SORORITY PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 



A COUNCIL, composed of two represento- 
tives from each of the eight sororities of 
the Womens College, constitutes the governing 
body of sorority activities at Duke This Pan- 
Hellenic Council makes and enforces rules 
concerning rushing, pledging and initiation of 
jII girls At the beginning of each school year 
the President of the Council explains the mean- 
ing of sororities — their desires and aims, the 
pros and cons of joining one — makes each stu- 
dent acquainted with the rules and endeavors 
to help the new girls enter into two weeks of 
"rushing" in the right spirit. 

A scholarship cup is awarded semi-annually 
to the sorority having the highest scholastic 
average for the preceeding semester. 

Officers on the council rotate from year to 
year and are held by right of seniority thus avoid- 
ing unnecessary rivalry and putting each sorority 
on on equal basis locally. 



OFFICERS 

Elizabeth York, Ptciident, Louiio Hooker, Vice Pres- 
ident, Dorothy Eaton, Secretary; Louise Sellers, 
Treasurer 

Members 

Kappo Delto Jane Miller, Elizabeth York 

Delta Delta Delta Nedro Jones, Fronces Tudor 

Sigmo Kappa. 
Rebecca Royall, 
Mary Frances 
Smith 

Alpha Delta Pi: 
Helen Moyler, Mary 
Taggort. 

Zeta Tau Alpha 
Louisa Hooker, 
Helen Wyatt. 

Kappa Kappa 
Gamma : Jessie 
Hertz, Louise Sel- 
lars. 

Kappa Alpha 
Theto : Dorothy 
Eoton, Frances 
Winston. 

Pi Beta Phi; Polly 
Crowder, Ruth 
Forlines. 

Nu Beta Phi: 
Sara Berenson, 
Jeanette Sidenberg. 




Elizobeth York 
President 









T-« 



« 



Berenson 


Sidenberg 


Hertz 


Eaton 


Tudor 


fTijjver 


Forlines 


Wiiiblon 


Royall 


Wyatt 


Smith 


Moyler 


Miller 


Jones 


Sellers 


Crowder 



Two Hundred Twenty-nine 



CHANTICLEER 






\'^ 



K§i 






»- 




Bradsher 
Braswell 
Hayes 
Gray 



Hastings 

Chalker 

Lee 



Crabbe 

Mustard 

Lamar 



(Df^f^.^. 




Jones 
Ellis 

Gregory 
Fleming 



i 



to.i [m'.'-"-/.t<!-wi'f.v'',",- 



'^'.^-V.^v^'.■».'w<M;: 



iMi 



Twd llmiiliiil Thlrtv 



-y 



FRATERNITIES 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

E 8 Craven, Gifford Davis, H R Dwire, R L Flowers, 
Douglas Maggs, R A Ross, J A Speed 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 
Edward F. Parker, W A Stanbury, Jr. 

Law School 

Coming B Gibbs, Joseph M Whitson. 

Class of 1933 

Charles K Bradsher, Petersburg, Vo ; William M A 
Brazwell, Johnson City, Tenn ; Robert P Chalker, Ozark 
Ala, Phil V. Hohn, Toledo, Ohio; Fred L Hayes, Jr' 
Brookline, Mass 

Class of 1934 

Maxwell Crabbe, Birmingham, Ala , Cameron J 
Crowley, White Plains, N Y ; Dan S. Ellis, Richmond, Va , 
Claiborne B Gregory, Durham, N C ; F Chandler Jones, 
Albany, Go ; George H Lamar, Rockville, Md , Nicholas 
Loney, Charlotte, N C , Martin Lee, Charlotte, N C , 
James A Mustard, Montcloir, N J ; Earl M Stokes, 
Louisville, Ky 

Class of 1935 

Stuart S. Fleming, Columbia, Tenn; J. Lander Gray, 
Gastonia, N C; Walter D Hastings, Columbia Tenn , 
Wilham C Siceloff, High Point, N C 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA 

A I PHA TAU OMEGA was the first Greek 
letter college fraternity organized after the 
Civil War It was founded at Richmond, Va , 
on September II, 1865, and its first chapter 
established at the Virginia Military Institute 
Its founders were three young Confederate 
soldiers, Otis Allan Glazebrook, Alfred Marshall, 
and Erskine Mayo Ross Their prime object 
was to restore the Union, to unite fraternally the 
young men of the South with those of the North, 
and to foster a Christian brotherhood dedicated 
to the task of achieving and cherishing perma- 
nent peace. 

Today the Fraternity has 94 chapters, ap- 
proximately 30,000 members, initiates about 
1,100 a year, and has an average of about 2,400 
undergraduate members each year 

North Carolina XI Chapter of A T was 
established March 2, 1872, by Joseph R. Ander- 
son, V M I., and Moses Wicks, Virginia, at old 
Trinity College, then located in Randolph 
County. Trinity was the ninth college or uni- 
versity entered by A. T. All fraternities were 
barred by college officials in 1879, but XI 
Chapter remained active until 1883 and was 
revived seven years later just before the college 
was transferred to Durham. It was the first 
chapter formed following the lifting of the ban 
and has been the oldest existant social frater- 
nity on the Trinity and newer Duke campuses 
ever since 



Pledges 

Edwin B. Abbott, Birmingham, Ala; Charles P. Bal- 
lenger, Greenville, S. C; Perry Ballenger, Greenville, 
S C ; Lawrence Dortch, Columbia, Tenn ; Alfred Eckles, 
Hopkinsville, Ky.; Roger Edwards, High Point, N C; 
Blades Foreman, Elizabeth City, N C; David G Gray, 
Gastonia, N C, Grayson Harrelson, Princeton, Ky.; 
William C Holmon, Albany, Ga ; David Hoover, North 
Canton, Ohio; Jack Ladson, Moultrie, Ga ; Carl Lee, Jr, 
Durham, N C ; John McCrary, Lexington, N C ; James 
Ouzts, Marion, N C ; Don Picoso, Brooklyn, N Y.; John 
Stanbury, Durham, N C ; John Webb, Durham, N C 




Two lliinilrpfl Thirty-onp 



CHANTICLEER 



C .r*> C^ :f ^ 




. f^^ ^"l^ /^'^^'^ 



^^N 



^ ^*i, ^% 




,D O f!^ {^ 



y' 



Schnure 
Riddick 
Kellam 
Murchison 



Clark 
Minter 
Martin 
Heidelberg 



French 
Fulford 
Hanger 
Kneipp 



Keller 
Peoke 
McLain 
Butler 



Welsh 
Graves 
May 
Trent 



li 



y . yyvi _U'.:i3=JW-f I . -T. ■ !■- ■■ ■ -^ 



||'^aVl'w^^M>v,^,va^■A'J 



■ouuir 



^»/ 



ii.w^.t:ii!i';iti'.vJ'TnMg 



Hi 



Two Hundred Thirty-two 



FRATERNITIES 



'9 -v-^^^ a » ,ju ■■ 'r>?'»y»iTTT<M 



-r-T- 



t''^ 



li'.>''. ^JHfHT'i'-" 



«; 

^ 



KAPPA SIGMA 



vCfflav 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

A R Anderson, F. N Bridgers, A. K Manchester 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Graduate School 

Charles Galloway, Henry Johnson, Thomas Lassiter, 
Walton Owings, Walter Sharpe 

Law School 

James Peoke, Mosby Perrow 

Class of 1933 

Robert Butler, Norfolk, Va , bdwin Kellam, Princess 
Anne, Va ; John Minter, Laurens, S C ; Alton Murchison, 
Fayetteville, N C, Howard Schnure, Selingsgrove, Pa ; 
Paul Fulford, Peoria, III 

Class of 1934 

Robert French, Oak Park, III, John Martin, Lake 
Forest, III, Ralston McLoin, Swarthmore, Pa; James 
Raper, Lexington, N C , R Marion Riddick, Hertford, 
N C ; Barnard Welsh Rockville Md 

Class of 1935 

James Booher, Bristol, Tenn ; Everett Bugg, Durham, 
N C; Dudley Clarke, Southbridge, Mass.; Thomas 
Graves, Wilson, N. C ; McCarthy Hanger, Swarthmore, 
Pa ; Albert Keller, Norfolk, Va ; Reynolds May, Dothan, 
Ala ; Joseph Trent, Okmulgee, Okia , Daniel Heidleberg, 
Hottiesburg, Miss. 



Pledges 

Norman Anderson, Durham, N C ; Robert Beasley, 
Nashville, Tenn; Albert Burford, Texarkona, Tex.; 
James Chandlee, Gaithsburg, Md , Richard Gnffis, Lake 
Forest, III ; William Huiskamp, Keokuk, la ; Len Johnson, 
Oak Park, III ; Robert Kneipp. Washington, D C ; George 
Mathues, Philadelphia, Pa ; George Morelock, Noshville, 
Tenn ; Jack Paist, Philadelphia, Pa ; Garfield Shafer, 
Norfolk, Va ; Anderson Williams, Rockville, Md 



KAPPA SIGMA fraternity, established in that 
stronghold of Jeffersonian democracy — 
the University of Virginia, in 1869 has come 
down through the years making its influence 
felt upon a gradually increasing number of col- 
lege campuses; the complete roll-call of chap- 
ters now numbering 108 with the total number 
of initiates being nearly thirty-five thousand 
This expansion has been evenly spread over 
sixty-four years and represents a conservative 
growth. 

The history of Eta Prime chapter has been 
closely linked with the National organization 
from its beginning, Eta chapter being the sec- 
ond to be installed The original chapter at 
Virginia granted and installed Eta at Trinity, 
then at High Point, N. C , in 1 873. This chapter 
existed under the name of Eta chapter until all 
fraternities were disbanded from Trinity in 
1878. The fraternity existed sub-rosa, however, 
and was restored in 1892 as Eta Prime, the name 
it now holds. 

Etc Prime has always striven to hold a posi- 
tion of leadership on the Trinity and Duke 
compus and the local chapter, now, prides itself 
in being well rounded fraternal organization. 
We have always been represented in athletics 
and all varsity and intramural sports At the 
present time we are represented on every varsity 
team except boxing and track. Intramural 
sport records will show that we have always 
been a strong contender for first place, and 
this year we have won one fraternity champion- 
ship cup and several division winner cups. Out- 
side of the realm of sports, we are represented 
in all campus activities with the exception of 
Student Government and debating. This year 
we are comparatively strong in publications 
The fraternity has always main- 
tained a sound condition in 
scholarship and this year finds 
us well up toward the top in 
this most important phase of 
college fraternity life 





Two Hundred Thirty-three 



CHANTICLEER 




pi (h. i!^ o 



Ewe 1 1 

McLean 

Ricks 

Smith 

Few 

Abraham 

Armstrong 

Martin 

Tate 

Leake 

Lawver 
Rossiter 
Horack 
Porreca 

Home 

Cochrane 

Weaver 

Lang 

Stevens 

Fairchild 

Patten 

Williams 

Hendrickson 

Dunlop 

Moreheod 

Martin 

White 

Bell 

Lamar 

Bottorf 



'.'■in_7] . -^aC. . r\\' 






>^«i^4ijm!g.cn?g 



■•■-r ■■ 



Vrrr- 






BHMieJBas!»JMa,JMj ^ 



Two Ihiiulml Tlilrlyl'oiir 



FRATERNITIES 



I L 







FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

C- R Andersoii, '.' ^ lm^v..-,, t- C Brown, W A 
Brownell, B. G. Childs, J P Troxell 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 

J H Blakemore, M C Cube^, Hensley Fuqua, G W 
Holmes, J W Moffit, L C Roberts, Robert Thomoson, 
E S Wallace, Watson Wharton 

Law School 

Poul Cone, Chisman Haines, C. H. Miller, R. H Ricks 
Class of 1933 

A M Cochrone, Bndgewater, Moss, R F Coombs, 
Kennebunk, Maine; G. W Ewell, Philadelphia, Pa , O W 
Home, Vienna, Go; J A McLean, Goldsboro, N C, 
Lawrence Patten, Fayetteville, N. C ; A. G Stevens, 
Greenwood, Miss; F. A Smith, Winston-Salem, N. C 

Class of 1934 

J. E, Abraham, Uniontown, Pa.; Fred E Crawford, 
Woynesville, N. C; W. S. Fairchild, Buzzard's Boy, 
Mass; W. A. Fulford, Durham, N. C; Russell Herbert, 
Hagerstown, Md ; H. J. Hendrickson, Beaver Falls, Pa , 
H. M. Horack, Durham, N. C ; W. K Long, Pittsburgh, 
i'a ; G. T. Lawver, Greenfield, Moss ; W. C. Martin, Wil- 
mington, N C; A. B. Means, Wynnewood, Pa.; Harry 
Rossiter, Abington, Pa; E. H. Taft, Greenville, N C; 
P J. Weaver, Winston-Solem, N C ; A. S. White, Spring- 
field, Mass ; G D Williams, Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Class of 1935 

W. P. Armstrong, Fort Bragg, N C, J S. Bell, 
Charlotte, N. C; H W. Bottorf, Owensboro, Ky ; E. B. 
Dunlop, Lawton, Okia ; D. K Edwards, Durham, N C; 
L S. Few, Durham, N C ; Richard Herbert, Harnsburg, 
Pa ; H J. Lamar, Macon, Go ; L. S. Leake, Chicago, III.; 
D W. Martin, West Palm Beach, Flo ; W H Moorheod, 
Goldville, S. C.; N O Porreca, Gardiner, Mass.; C S 
Smith, Newport, Pa ; Lowson Tote, Banner Elk, N C 

Pledges 

J J Devlin, Jack Dunlap, C W Edwards, J J Ewell, 
E S Everhart, W C Everhart, R S Fackler, Charles 
Harris, F. L Hoscoll, J R Home, Matt Howell, C. A Mc- 
Gillicuddy, L. P Morns, D. M. Myers, C F Perry, W F 
Reavis. W P Ricks, M S Rickards, D B Schafer, Claude 
Settlemeyer, Frank Sizemore, Carl Vaughn, Robert Wig- 
gins, Walter Wilcox, William Woodruff 



PHI DELTA THETA 

pHI DELTA THETA was founded at Miami 
* University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1848 It shares 
Its birthplace with Beta Theta Pi and Sigma 
Chi, the three fraternities together constituting 
what is called the "Miami Triad " 

Phi Delta Theta's expansion has been con- 
servative and, at the same time, swift At the 
present time its roll of chapters numbers 103 
and embraces 43 states of the Union and 5 
provinces of Canada It is very strongly repre- 
sented in the South 

North Carolina Alpha Chapter of Phi Delta 
Theta wos chartered by the General Council 
in 1878 as the third notional social fraternity 
to enter Trinity College. In 1879 the chapter 
passed out of existence as a result of action of 
the trustees of the college in prohibiting 
fraternities. 

In January 1925 Epsilon Alpha Sigma, a local 
group, was founded and began to petition Phi 
Delta Theta In May 1926 this petition was 
granted by the national fraternity, and North 
Carolina Alpha was reestablished The quick 
acceptance of the petition is largely to be at- 
tributed to the efforts of Messrs M L. Black, 
Ralph Biggerstoff, L E Rock, Charles Clegg, 
who were among the new charter members 

Since 1926, North Carolina Alpha has striven 
for growth and development. Efforts toward 
this end hove been materially aided by the in- 
valuable service and assistance of Prof B G 
Childs who, as Chapter Adviser, has been the 
chapter's greatest asset. 




Two Hundred Thirtv-flve 



CHANTICLEER 



O jft /?Mf^ ^ 




f*» o n ^ 



ii 

P O ff> 





e j© !f^ ri a 



Gregg 

Carlson 

Vaughan 

Junkin 

Moore 



Higgins 
Getzendanner 
Peacock 
Herzog 



McNeill 
Ormond 
McDonald 
Newsom, M. E. 



Orr 

Haynes 
Dale 
Berry 



Smifh 
Lundgren 
Moseley 
Stewart 
Newsom, J. L. 




Two lliififlrfrl Thlrty-sIx 



FRATERNITIES 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

W. B. Bolich, J P Breedlove, G D Collins, W K 
Greene, W H Hall, F K Mitchell, J M Ormond, J. 
Fred Rippy, M. T Spears, W T Towe. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Graduate School 

John Cason, W D Darnel, John Loveioy, William 
McGovock, Marvin M Mann 

Medical School 

Austin Joyner, Ray N Joyner. 

Class of 1933 

J Chester Berry, Durham, N C, William Pratt Dale, 
II, Greensboro, Ala, John Haynes, Spartanburg, S C ; 
J Edward Junkin, Mercer, Penna ; Raymond Lundgren, 
New Hoven, Conn ; Vince Moseley, Orangeburg, S C; 
Fred Mangus, Roanoke, Va ; Geo W. Orr, Jr., Garden 
City, N. Y., Thomas H Ryon, Washington, D. C; 
Robert M. Vaughn, Glasgow, Ky.; George H. Walter, Jr., 
Orangeburg, S. C 

Class of 1934 

E S. Bennett, Crafton, Penna.; Gustaf A Carlson, New 
Haven, Conn ; Joseph W Getzendonner, Baltimore, Md ; 
Guy K. Greg, Weston, W Vo , C A Herzog, Baltimore, 
Md.; Alvin 0. Moore, Murfreesboro, Tenn ; M. Eugene 
Newsom, Jr., Durhom, N. C; Roger S Peacock, Silver 
Springs, Md ; David E Wikoff, Atlanta, Go. 

Class of 1935 

Julian Aldridge, Durham, N C, James P. Helm, III, 
Louisville, Ky ; John P. Higgins, Red Bank, N. J ; James 
A. Long, Jr , Roxboro, N. C ; Robert E Morefield, Red 
Bank, N J ; Donold G. McNeill, Brodley Beach, N. J.; 
James McDonald, Durham, N. C; James L Newsom, 
Durham, N. C ; J Kern Ormond, Durham, N C ; William 
G Polk, Franklin. Tenn ; Thomas W Smith, Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil; John S Stewart, Worren, Pa ; S 
Gwothmey Tyler, Louisville K\ 

Pledges 

Horper A Barrett, Glasgow, Ky , James Ferguson, 
Spartanburg, S. C; Clements Gouldmon, West Point, 
Vo.; Harry Mellon, Wilmington, Del ; James Moore, New 
York, N. Y; Jim McCall, Oklahoma City, Okia ; Calvin 
Ourand, Silver Springs, Md ; Owens Perdue, Sovonnoh, 
Go ; Phil M Russell, Durham, N C ; George A. Shwab, 
Jr, Nashville, Tenn; Fred E Stouffer, York, Penna. 



KAPPA ALPHA 

pORN at Washington and Lee University in 
'"' the year 1865, and nurtured under the 
paternal guidance of Robert E. Lee, Kappa 
Alpha has sought through the years to maintain 
and cherish those lofty ideals and traditions 
which epitomized the "Old South." I ts chapters 
are confined to colleges located in states south 
of the Mason-Dixon line, but its membership in- 
cludes men from all states and sections of the 
country. 

Alpha Phi chapter was organized in the Old 
Inn on the East Campus, October 18, 1901, 
shortly after Dr John C. Kilgo, then president 
of Trinity College, succeeded in having the 
trustees of the institution repeal their edict 
against fraternities. Since its founding the 
members of Alpha Phi have token on active part 
in the life of both Duke University and Durham. 
J. P. Breedlove, J. M. Ormond, and D. W. 
Newsom, all charter members of the chapter, 
ore well known throughout the community for 
their many attainments and services in aca- 
demic and civic activities. M. E Newsom, 
former president of Rotary International, and 
prominent Durham business man, is another 
alumnus of which Alpha Phi may be justly 
proud Bryan Bolich, professor of low at Duke, 
and former Rhodes Scholar from Trinity, is Chief 
Alumnus of the Kappa Alpha Order. 

In later years Alpha Phi has also had her 
share of leaders on the campus During the lost 
three years such prominent students as James 
Heizer, Byron Grimes, Phil Bolich, Ovid Pierce, 
and Ray Lundgren have done much toward 
maintaining the chapter in the high position in 
which it was placed by their worthy predecessors 

Following in the footsteps of such outstand- 
ing leaders, and having such high ideals and 
colorful traditions for a background. Alpha Phi 
of Kappa Alpha should be found in the vanguard 
of fraternities at Duke for many years to come. 




Two Hundred Thirty-seven 



CHANTICLEER 



^ 



im 
«? 




"•ifli 



Sr: 







^i 



it^^^Md'.k 



O ^ ^ r3 

1 Jr. ^ ' ^ ' 




f^ n O O 



O ^ (f^, O 




Williams 
Zeigler 
Garden 
Weathers 



Pimper 
Lineberger 
Spence 
Morton 



Storm 
Hairston 
Gray 
Land 



Stewart 
Mason 
To I ley 
Lybrook 



Pearsall 
Town ley 
Kadie 
Patterson 



1^ 



TTJ^^yy]-^ - - 1^- ' 



l(!'.*V/AJim!l'l'.».W<J 



l « VtWftV f > ' ''t T .,Vjgni; 



Hl.^'\tlll.lll. l!iiy'W>«!"y 



Mm^V)LW_; V P4UMM! ^\ I 



Two Hiinrlrpfl Thlrty-plRht 



FRATERNITIES 




FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 
John Acres, Henry Owens. 

Law School 

Robert Finley, Martin Green, William B. McGuire, Jr , 
Zeb V Long, Jr, Walter M Upchurch, Jr. 

Closs of 1933 

Frank S Garden, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Montgomery 
Gray, East Orange, N. J.; John Land, Homlet, N. C.; 
Curtis Spence, Norfolk, Va.; James L Stewart, Char- 
lotte, N C 

Closs of 1934 

Richard Hardy, Trenton, N J ; Frank R. Kadie, Chevy 
Chose, Md ; George Kloyer, Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y.; 
William Lybrock, Winston-Salem, N. C ; Hubert Patter- 
son, Jr, Albemarle, N C, Robert Peorsoll, Westfield, 
N J ; John Tally, Jackson, Ala; Gordon Townley, 
Ronceverte, W. Va 

Class of 1935 

Sydney Dodd, Rome, Ga ; Rufus Hoirston, Danville, 
Va ; Shernll Lineberger, Shelby, N. C; Edward Mason, 
Durham, N C; Henry Morton, Sarasota, Flo, Roy 
Phipps, Durham, N C , Theodore Pimper, Chevy Chose, 
Md , Bayard Storm, Chorlotte, N C ; Henry Lee Weath- 
ers, Shelby, N C; Cecil Willioms, Morganfield, Ky.; 
Luther Wmsteod, Chevy Chose, Md ; Roland Zeigler, 
Florence, S. C. 



Pledges 

Edward Albritton, Hopkinsville, Ky ; Clyde Clopp, 
Baltimore, Md ; Henry Horns, Albemarle, N. C; Harry 
L Miller, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Hyatt Mossburg, Chevy 
Chase, Md ; Ned Qumn, Beckley, W. Va ; Douglas 
Richardson, Ashland, Ky., Fronk Scott, Townsend, Go ; 
William Woltz, Gostonio, N. C. 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 

pi KAPPA ALPHA was founded March 1, 1868 
at the University of Virginia, Charlottes- 
ville, Virginia Because of the confused condi- 
tion of southern colleges after the Civil War, 
growth was slow, but the fraternity now has a 
membership of approximately sixteen thousand 
During the World War nearly twenty per cent 
of the living members were in the services Pi 
Kappa Alpha has seventy-nine active chapters 
and eighty-two alumnae chapters; the publica- 
tions are the Shield and Diamond and the secret 
Dagger and Key The badge is a shield of white 
surmounted by a diamond in black with " k a 
in gold on it. In the four corners of the shield 
ore the Greek letters * * n a. The colors are 
garnet and old gold and the flower is lily-of-the- 
valley. 

Alpha Alpha chapter was established at 
Trinity in 1901 by a group of transfers from 
other chapters. Pi Kappa Alpha is outstanding 
in the field of activities on the Duke campus, 
having among its members: the president, Y. M. 
C. A.; the Editor, Chronicle; the president, Duke 
Players; president of the Junior Class; the 
manager of the Musical Clubs; the secretary of 
the Pan-Hellenic Council; and others. 




Two Hundred Thirty-nine 



CHANTICLEER 






if?. 1^ P\ 

f) f^ f^ 

,o D P 



^M 





f^ ..c r^ r? o, 




Gill 

Hosea 
Sanner 
Vick 
MacFarlane 



Anderson 
Harris 
Etheridge 
Fretwell 



Killen 
Stiliman 
Griffin 
Hicks 



Ross 
Sullivan 
Deichmann 
Hildebrandt 



Corell 

Sipple 

Ormsby 

Nitschke 

Buice 



•J»Vr!S!-l')iWJ»M«.'.l*Ul •»• *»!»■ 



^ST 






m 



imgi'.^!iLim'|i\ii»!m' 



l i B ygj,U!U'_/-a i . ' Ma«!«J fcj ! 



Two lluiulred Forty 



FRATERNITIES 



aw.'anjBH' .• 



3±P 







FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class of 1933 

D. E. Deichmann, Baltimore, Md , Som J Fretwell, 
Anderson, S C ; Ernest W Hildebrandt, Cotonsville, 
Md ; Wilbur S Ormsby, New York, N Y ; H C Sanner, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Class of 1934 

G E. Anderson, Asheville, N. C; Paul F. Corell, Shaker 
Heights, Ohio; R. H Hosea, Pikeville, N. C ; A K Mc- 
Intyre, Erwin, Tenn.; W J Morse, Attleboro, Mass; 
J. P. Sipple, Baltimore, Md ; J. W Sullivan, Anderson, 

s c. 

Class of 1935 

W. T. Buice, Charlotte, N C; A J Gill, Okmulgee, 
Okia; T. A. Griffin, Flushing, N Y.; R. K Harris, 
Newport, Ark.; J H Keller, China Grove, N. C; Graham 
MacFarlane, Asheville, N C; R. E Nitschke, Clinton, 
N Y; John H Stillman, Troy, N Y 



Pledges 

Louis H Asbury, Jr., Charlotte, N C; Charles 
Atherton, Peekskill, N. Y.; John W Carver, Brooklyn, 
N. Y,; Roy Donzer, Hagerstown, Md ; William C. 
Ethridge, Kinston, N C ; Moritz Flohr, Conisteo, N. Y.; 
Lewis Funkhouser, Hagerstown, Md ; John R. Hathorn, 
Ballston Spa, N Y; Byron Hawks, New York, N. Y.; 
Charles Hicks, Charlotte, N. C; William B Hicks, 
Charlotte, N C ; John Hulme, Jackson Heights, N. Y.; 
Arthur Killen, Flushing, N. Y.; Stephen Lush, Mohwah, 
N. J.; Frank Mazuy, Newton, N J.; Norman Ross, 
Auburn, N. Y.; William Soger, Hagerstown, Md ; Wil- 
liam Sipple, Baltimore, Md ; Roy Z Thomas, Jr , Rock 
Hill, S C ; Marvin Vick, Kinston, N. C; T I Wagner, 
West Foirview, Pa ; Kenneth D Weogley, Waynesboro, 
Pa., Charles Whittcker, Brooklyn, N. Y; Ned Wiley, 
Abingdon, Va ; Fred Wright, Hagerstown, Md 



SIGMA PHI EPSILON 

"THE Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity was founded 
at Richmond College, now the University of 
Richmond, at Richmond, Virginia, in November, 
1901, the basis of the organizotion being a so- 
ciety called the Saturday Night Club When 
the members of this Saturday Night Club an- 
nounced their intention of forming the Sigma 
Phi Epsilon Fraternity, they met a lot of opposi- 
tion from the school but their plans were re- 
ceived with great enthusiasm when presented 
to the authorities. 

In 1909 the Beta Nu fraternity of Trinity Col- 
lege was installed as the North Carolina Gamma 
chapter of Sigma Phi Epsilon. The charter 
members were John Downie Cooper, Jr , Hender- 
son, N. C; Avriett McLean, Jr., Richmond, Va ; 
Edward Clayton Ashby, Mt. Airy, N C; James 
Madison Currin, Jr., Durham, N. C ; Paul Swin- 
dell Ashby, Roberdell, N. C; Randolph Currin, 
Durham, N. C; Henderson Wescott Tuttle, 
Rocky Mount, N C ; and Henry Grady Harris 
of Oxford, N. C. 

The Fraternity has grown rapidly and is now 
represented in all sections of the country by 
sixty-nine active chapters. The Journal, the fra- 
ternity magazine, was established at an early 
date, and is published quarterly by the fraternity. 





Two Hundred Forty-one 



CHANTICLEER 



— t^r>^ 



1^ 



1 



a ' j ' - X TFy . T - ' i-.jM ' ' . ' .v-yy ' J^ ^ ■■ • 






gr <jgLbgigw^j.'j- ' j;g ?^ 



a. 



JMJJ ' J-'i- l L^-JJ^-.-'-'.-m-.i!'-'-' 




if^ o ^ 



Tate 
Mason 
Abbott 
Bowen 




Pace 
Coan 
Stauffer 







ic 



Webb 
Livengood 
Thomas 
Taylor 




Of\CS- 



M 




Dunston 
Keesee 
Power 
Keown 



rrrn ijf <««"WU*^'.".ll'-'-:i'.'-.'H s /n ; 



liMJ 



Two Ilmiilnd Foily-lwo 



FRATERNITIES 



SIGMA CHI 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

J Foster Barnes, A H Caldwell, James Cannon, III, 
Dayton Dean, Charles Hagan, Herbert J. Herring, James 

C Mouzon, A M Proctor J A Roberts 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Graduate School 

Marcus Hobbs, M C Munvon, C L. Ould, C. L. 
Riley 

Low School 

W P. Forthing, R K Perkins, T S Thornton. 

Class of 1933 

Kenneth Abbott, New Eagle, Pa; Ralph H. Cook, 
Greensboro, N C ; John Lougee, Durham, N C ; Lowell 
Mason, Chorlotte, N C ; Gordon G. Power, Baltimore, 
Md 

Closs of 1934 

Dallas Clark, West Point, Miss.; William H. Tate, 
South Bend, Ind , Horace Thomas, Whitford, Pa. 

Class of 1935 

C. A. Bowen, Nashville, Tenn , John 0. Coan, Winston- 
Salem, N C , B R Crist, Altoono, Pa ; Forrest Dunstan, 
Elizabeth City, N C ; T W. Keesee, Helena, Ark ; R E. 
Keown, Harnsburg, Pa ; N B. Livengood, Durham, N C ; 
W H Pace, Chevy Chose, Md ; H B Stouffer, Wash- 
ington, D C ; Herbert G. Taylor, Oxford, N. C; Melvin 
Worner, Durham, N. C; Earle Webb, Yonkers, N. Y.; 
B C Young, Lexington, N. C. 



Pledges 

Ross B Cameron, Rising Sun, Md , Howell H. Camp- 
bell, Jr, Nashville, Tenn; William Crawford, Detroit, 
Mich ; A. D Deemer, Brookville, Pa ; James Griffin, 
Baltimore, Md ; Grady Hardm, Greensboro, N C; 
Frederic Keotor, Wayne, Pa ; Charlie Kunkle, Johnstown, 
Pa ; Clarence Llewellyn, Durham, N C ; John E Mann, 
Greenwood, Miss ; John S Moore, Clarksburg, W. Va ; 
Paul Moorefield, Mount Airy, N. C; Thomas Parsons, 
Altoona, Pa ; Williom Rue, Byrn Mowr, Po ; Louis Russell, 
Portsmouth, Ohio, Jesse Stigler, Greenwood, Miss ; 
William Venning, Greensboro, N C. 



IT WAS on June 28, 1855 that the Sigma Chi 
' Fraternity came into existence. Miami Uni- 
versity at Oxford, Ohio was the school of its 
origin The integrity of ideals prompted its 
founding some seventy-eight years ago, and this 
same moral courage has exerted a profound in- 
fluence upon the growth of Sigma Chi since that 
date. 

Sigma Chi's expansion has been far-reaching, 
but at the same time a policy of conservatism 
and critical selection has prevailed Its active 
chapters, ninety-three in number, cover forty- 
five of the forty-eight states and Canada Since 
its origin, more than twenty-eight thousand five 
hundred men have been initiated into Sigma Chi. 

Beta Lambda chapter was founded at Trinity 
College in March, 1912, being the seventh na- 
tional social fraternity to be established on the 
campus. Just as the national organization of 
Sigma Chi has contributed its share of leaders 
and outstanding figures to our country, so has 
Beta Lambda attempted to hold a similar posi- 
tion of respect on the Duke campus Participat- 
ing in the various fields of endeavor, members of 
Beta Lambda have in the past and in the present 
risen to positions of importance in their chosen 
fields of extra-curricular activities. In athletics, 
journalism, social leadership ond honorary or- 
ganizations members of Sigma Chi hove dis- 
tinguished themselves and the fraternity. This 
year, the captain of football and the manager- 
ship of the Chanticleer are two of the campus 
offices held by members of Beta Lambda Two 
members of Red Friars ore Sigma Chi's, and the 
fraternity is also represented m Tombs, Omicron 
Delta Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa. Taking an 
active part in intra-mural athletic competition, 
Beta Lambdas have turned in creditable 
performances. 




Two Hundred Port>Mhree 



CHANTICLEER 



IX 



i£: 



lt^- 7 p < - ^4:^rV!-^ U^--/J;,'J ? 






la 







1>> *<- tT "Ilk 4(L 




f!) a r^ cr^ 



V 



i^i^ii 



Snipes 
Hart 

Dameron 
Brown lee 



Fulmar 
Merritt 
Reichman 
Wright 



Niednagel 
Timberlake 
Allen 
Daughtry 



Skinner 
Vales 
Rigsby 
Dick 



-^ 






V,}*!Mka.'lilv„VSJkl}i 



■Mjr 



Wl; ^ 



Two lliiiKlrcd Kipily-I'diir 



FRATERNITIES 



W^^ 



y^ 






J=7?C 



3^3r 




FRATER IN FACULTATE 

William M. Blackburn. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Groduote School 
Milan Boyle, W ^ hoolt- 

Law School 

T C Bowie, G H Cleveland, T C Pierce. 
Medical School 

William H Bndgers, John Burwell, Robert F. Mikel, 
Ben N. Miller. 

Closs of 1933 

Frank B Allen, Warrenton, N. C; John Brownlee, 
Philadelphia, Pa, William Daughtrey, Newport News, 
Va , Henry Fulmer, Philadelphia, Pa ; Gus Hart, Harts- 
ville, S C; Joe L. Skinner, Clearwater, Fla ; Eddie Tolson, 
Washington, D. C. 

Class of 1934 

Ben Angle, Rocky Mount, Va , W P Burwell, Warren- 
ton, N. C; Dan T Merrit, Newport News, Va ; Wilbur 
B Starrott, Washington, D C, Horry Willis, Wilson, 
N C ; John D. Wright, Blockstone, Va. 

Class of 1935 

William Dameron, Warrenton, N C, Robert Dick, 
Canton, Ga.; Bonn A Gilbert, Washington, D C ; David 
H Henderson, Charlotte, N. C; Roland E Niednagel, 
Evonsville, Ind, Al A. Reichman, Washington, D C ; 
Robert L Rigsby, Asheville, N C ; John A. Ryan, Ft. 
Bragg, N. C ; William Search, Philadelphia, Pa.; James 
Snipes, Dunn, N C , Joe Timberloke, Columbia, S. C ; 
Carlos F Vales, Merido, Yucatan, Mexico, Joe M. 
Vanhoy, Charlotte, N C 

Pledges 

Hal Atkinson, Wadesboro, N C; James Baldwin, 
Durham, N. C ; Albert Cade, Burlington, N. C ; Skinner 
Chalk, Moreheod City, N C ; Albert Clopton, Decatur, 
Ala ; James Daniels, Columbia, S C ; Graham Grady, 
Clinton, N. C, Adrian Hemby, Rocky Mount, N C; 
Rov Kimmerlee, Buffalo, N. Y, Alexander Konopko, 
Camden, N. J , Rodman London, Clinton, N C ; William 
Luly, Vero Beach, Flo ; W W Phillips, Black Mountain, 
N C.; Stuart Ramsey, Rocky Mount, Va , Jack Softer- 
field, Durham, N C; Harry Schuhr, Buffolo, N. Y.; 
Robert Vann, Woycross, Go ; John Wofson, Charlotte, 
N C; Harmon Webb, Philadelphia, Pa ; O. H Welborn, 
Statesville, N C ; Tyler Woodley, Fox Hill, Vo 



PI KAPPA PHI 

p KAPPA PHI was founded at the College of 
' Charleston at the turn of the century and 
has ever since exemplified the spirit of youth 
and conquest of the present day Realizing that 
the real strength of a fraternity lies not in the 
mere number of chapters, but in the spirit be- 
tween its members and the unity between the 
various chapters, Pi Kappa Phi has not added 
chapters in haphazard fashion 

Conservatively, however, it has spread until 
the network of chapters includes active units in 
over forty of the outstanding universities and 
colleges of the country. In the three decades 
of its growth the fraternity has under the guid- 
ance of its founders and perpetuotors risen to a 
respected position among notional fraternities. 

Mu chapter was chartered at Trinity College 
in 1915 through the efforts of members attend- 
ing the University of North Carolina Since 
that time the fraternity has held a high place 
on the campus, its members being well repre- 
sented in all forms of collegiate activity, as 
evidenced by such men as John Brownlee, Henry 
Fulmer, and Joe Skinner. Brownlee was class 
president his freshman and sophomore year as 
well as being an outstanding football and track 
man Fulmer has been one of the south's out- 
standing broad jumpers and quarter milers 
Skinner has been active on the student publica- 
tions, holding editorial positions on both the 
Chronicle and Chanticleer. He has also held 
class offices for itie lubi two years All three 
of these men are members of D. K 




Two Hundred Porty-flve 



CHANTICLEER 



t^^y-?7j,y^ n'TJ ■T^w.y r.iri 



1^ 



'DJ^ 




Rouse 
McKenzie 
Ireland 
Hamrick 



Bostock 

Darwin 

Baird 



Pearson 

Artley 

Jeffreys 



it>t:)P>m 





4Mm 



Reid 
Corson 
Sapp 
O'Connor 



31 ' -JC ' K 



;"»rTTO -at m'.wtiHwtTr'T'TTi 



1^ 



ni'.-t'tt.v^mm^gA'iii^'j 



m 



HJ*V^>'V I '.'l* 



l8BM!a.^;ueUi.EJ!AIJa!fl6) f-.-^ ! 



Twii Mil II (I red Forty-sIx 



FRATERNITIES 







2==-:t: 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Paul Garber, R T. Matthews, Robert G. Tuttle, A T. 
West, R R Wilson 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 

Emmett McLarty, Jr , Robert Tuttle. 

Low School 
Charles S Murphy, James bmathers. 

Class of 1933 

J V Darwin, Gaffney, S C., Waite C. Hamrick, 
Gaffney, S. C; J. Royall Kornegay, Mount Olive, N. C.; 
James R McKenzie, Gibson, N. C. 

Class of 1934 

Thomas F Baird, Swarthmore, Pa ; C Turner Foster, 
Carbondoie, Pa., Harold M. Gibson, Laurinburg, N C ; 
John M Hamrick, Gaffney, S C.; Russell S. Ireland, 
Collingswood, N. J.; Dennis O'Connor, Mamaroneck, 
N Y ; Henry Thompson, Raleigh, N C. 

Class of 1935 

Ernest A. Andrews, Hartford, Conn; William Artley, 
Savannah, Go.; James F. Bostock, Arlington, N. J.; Allen 
Corson, Ocean City, N. J ; George A. Pearson, Chicago, 
III.; James W. Rankin, Gostonio, N C; Robert W Reid, 
Montcloir, N. J.; W. D. Rouse, Williamsport, Pa ; James 
E Sapp, Albany, Ga. 

Pledges 

Howard Andrews, Asheville, N. C; G. Holmes Bell, 
Dillon, S. C; Lawrence Z Burke, Forest Hills, N. Y.; 
William C Campbell, Swarthmore, Pa; William F 
Harmon, Tazewell, Vo.; J W Hendon, Greensboro, 
N C ; Walter F Lindhe, Montcloir, N. J.; Llewellyn W. 
Lord, New Haven, Conn ; Joseph R Kapp, Jr , Montcloir, 
N J ; Alan N. MocQuarne, Montcloir, N J ; Robert C 
Mervine, East Orange, N. J.; Hugh Page, Clayton, N. C 
Robert W. Phillips, Oaklyn, N J , Rufus H Powell, Dur- 
hom, N C; Ralph L Rockett, Gostoma, N C; Travis 
Smithdeal, Richmond, Vo.; T L Stritzinger, Nornstown, 
Pa ; William Turner, Montcloir, N. J.; Alton Watson, 
Jamaica, N Y ; Edwin W West, Asheville, N C 



DELTA SIGMA PHI 

A CLUB known as the Stag Club was started 
** on this campus by Messers Wm. F Murphy, 
Alexander Wilkins, Richard Thigpin and Ray 
Cunningham on October 26, 1919 Through the 
aid of the North Carolina State chapter of Delta 
Sigma Pi this group of men petitioned Delta 
Sigma Phi and were initiated on January 24, 
1920. From this time on there has been a steady 
growth of a financially and socially prosperous 
fraternity. 

Delta Sigma Phi has always ranked high 
scholastically, and have been particularly fortu- 
nate in developing men that have done the fra- 
ternity credit after they have left Duke One 
graduate that the fraternity is particularly proud 
of IS Coach Tuttle During his school days he 
carried off nearly all the honors that it is (Xis- 
sible for a man to make. He has continued his 
good work in coaching the Cross-Country team 
(which won the Southern Conference this year) 
and the Freshman Track Team Richard E. 
Thigpin is another Alumnus that Delta Sig. is 
very proud of. After he graduated from Duke 
he was head of the Alumni Association of Duke 
for three years, and ever since has taken an 
active interest in the fraternity There are 
numerous other Alumni who have made just such 
a success and are still backing the chapter. 
For a faculty adviser we feel that we could hove 
none better than Mr. A. T. West who is head of 
Dramatics on the campus. We are also very 
proud of our other members in the Faculty, Dr 
P N Garber, Professor R. R Wilson, and Robert 
G. Tuttle. 




Two Hundred Forty-seven 



CHANTICLEER 






r^ ^ f^ ^ 




^^^^». ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 






Handy 
Wyman 
Boyles 
Hicks 



Moorhead 

Hatch 

Short 



Rush 

Haley 

Beotty 



Thornhil 
Bagwell 
Go be I 



Miller 
Stevens 
Leitner 
Kinter 



\m 



nLilC 



""« ■' • - "J - 



\bi>! 



mufjLi^'giiils rrvrrr^ ^W B!Bit!i.Vjjj^'-.:j!HV..'.'W M J 



STTi; 



Two Iliiiulti'il Porty-elght 



FRATERNITIES 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

J M. Keech W C Vosburgt 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Graduate School 

G. K. Mossengill. 

Law School 

Albert H Cotton, Charles F. Hinternhoff 

Class of 1933 

Frank E. Barnett, Painesville, Ohio, John S. Chose, 
Brockton, Moss., Marshall Pntchett, Charlotte, N. C; 
Robert H. Rush, Lumber City, Go.; Charles M Short, 
Charlotte, N C, William Wymon, PoJnesville, Ohio. 

Class of 1934 

Clyde F. Boyles, Poducoh, Ky , Henry K Handy, Ply- 
mouth, Mass , Robert D Hicks, Florence, S C ; Bernard 
P. Kinter, Dayton, Pa , Murray A Miller, Norfolk, Va.; 
William J. Parker, Lokewood, Ohio; Stanley C Sondell, 
Brockton, Moss; Melvin D Stevens, Brockton, Mass.; 
Hole Thornhill, Bluefield, W Va ; Thomos Waller, 
Leoksvllle, N C. 

Class of 1935 

Lorry E. Bagwell, Raleigh, N. C ; Charles D Beatty, 
Pittsburgh, Po , Frederick Gabel, White Plains, N. Y; 
Willord Holey, Punxsutowney, Pa ; Davis Hotch, Need- 
ham, Moss; Kermit Leitner, Harrisburg, Pa; John 
Moorheod Sonbury, Pa ; John E Smith, Cooleemee, 
N C 

Pledges 

George F. Beneke, Wheeling, W Va ; Christian S 
Bnel, Sutton, Moss; Edward W. Cooey, Wheeling, 
W Va; Roberts K Dodd, Allentown, Po , Richard P. 
Griffin, Sworthmore, Po ; George W Hangen, Torrytown, 
N Y ; Buchanan Heiss, Gulfport, Miss ; Richard M. 
Jameson, Portsmouth, N H ; Rolf E Johnson, Harrisburg, 
Po ; Herbert Jones, Wilmington, N C; Fred N. 
Kellmeyer, Wheeling, W. Va ; Ernest Lynch, Natick, 
Mass ; DeWitt Monn, Whitokers, N. C ; Leiand E Met- 
cclf, Ploinfield, N J ; Richard C Piper, Ridgewood, N. J.; 
Joseph G Powell, Moorestown, N. J ; Eorle Runner, 
Wheeling, W. Va , Mark Swortz, Eoston, Va ; Ralph A. 
Taylor, Summit, N J , Edgar White, Hertford, N C; 
Herbert G Whiting, Mountoin Lokes N J Ernest Wood 
New Bern, N C 



LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 

I AMBDA CHI ALPHA fraternity was found- 
ed on November 2, 1909, at Boston Uni- 
versity Since that time it has expanded 
judiciously until at the present time it comprises 
eighty-two chapters representing thirty-seven of 
the United States and one province of Canada 
with G membership of approximately 15,200 
There are also ninety-one alumni chapters, in- 
cluding three in foreign nations The fra- 
ternity's flower is the violet and its colors purple, 
green, and gold The national esoteric maga- 
zine of Lambda Chi Alpha is the Cross and 
Crescent published seven times yearly. 

The local fraternity, Beta Pi, became Gamma 
Theta Zeta of Lambda Chi Alpha on March 3, 
1924, the same year that Trinity College become 
Duke University. 




Two Hundred Forty-nine 



CHANTICLEER 



i 









w, 












f^k f% '^ 




Caldwell 
Tuckwiller 
Williams 
Smith 



Brister 

Enkema 

McCracken 



Humphreys 
Bird 
Otis 
Gearhart 



Hoffman 
Monk 
States 
Rich 



"HI -at., 5c^»~ 






C • • J ll. lVgu,H,iLilLV'".'ij'f* ^ 



wpag-v.^ ^R ^^iiMiMiiJ M 



Two Hiindrrrl Fifty 



FRATERNITIES 



DELTA TAU DELTA 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Dean M Arnold, Alex Mabry, Richard Shryock, 
Charles E Ward,. Everett B Weatherspoon, W. Tate 
Whitman 



Low School 



Nicholas Orem, Jr. 



Closs of 1933 

Edwin M Caldwell, Jr., Edgewood, R I ; Robert R. 
Enkema, Minneapolis, Minn ; William E. Hoffmann, St. 
Louis, Mo; R Howard Lackey, Hamlet, N. C; Robert 
H Mann, Cumberland, Md , T William States, Gastonia, 
N. C, William D. Tuckwiller, Charleston, W. Va. 



Class of 1934 

Wilbur L Brister, Petersburg, Va , William M Geor- 
hort, Cumberlond, Md , Charles R Humphreys, Chester- 
town, Md , Joseph P McCracken, Durham, N C ; James 
Otis, Jr, Providence, R I 



Class of 1935 

William G Bird, Sworthmore, Pa ; A Coy Monk, Jr, 
FormviHe, N C; John W Murphy, Meadville, Pa; 
Frederick P. Rich, Providence, R I ; Frederick G Smith, 
New York, N Y; Martin B Williams, Petersburg, Va 



rjELTA TAU DELTA was founded at Bethany 
*^ College, now West Virginia, in 1858 Since 
that time it has grown into a strong organization 
of seventy-four chapters, extending from coast 
to coast 

The local chapter, Delta Kappa, has been 
active in Duke University for the last five years 
There are at the present time seventeen active 
members, and sixteen pledges From the very 
beginning it has consisted of conscientious and 
industrious workers, who are not only proud of 
its national standing as a social fraternity, but 
also of the activities of its members 

While not primarily athletic in its make-up, 
it hos had letter men in all sports Scholastic 
development has been encouraged to a high de- 
gree, as evidenced by the position of third place 
among fraternities on this campus. 

However, there has not been omitted the so- 
cial side of college life As the host of the 
Southern Conference in the Spring of 1931, 
Delta Kappa had the pleasure of introducing 
Delts from the whole southland to the students 
of Duke 

A few specific examples will serve to show 
the type of men the Delts strive to produce: 

June Caldwell, Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Men's Student Government, Red Friar, Omicron 
Delta Kappa, Captain and Manager of the Golf 
Team 

"Nick" Orem, of Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron 
Delta Kappa, and Manager of Swimming 

"Buddy" Humphreys, Boxing Managerial 
Staff, Freshman and Sophomore Honors 

Wilbur Brister, Freshman and Sophomore 
Honors 

Williard Bird, President of Sophomore Class. 



Pledges 

William K Brumboch, Belleville, N J; George B. 
Everitt, Jr, Wmnetko, III; Nosh Herndon, Greensboro, 
N C ; Clarence Armstrong, Washington, D C , Thomas 
H Josten, Owatonna, Minn ; Harry Nyce, Chester, Po.; 
George Roberts, Fronkford, Ky , George Stroud, Chester, 
Po; Willard Wentz, Donville, Vo , Robert K Doerk, 
Chicogo, III.; John J Maher, Washington, D C 




11 



Two Hundred Fifty-one 



CHANTICLEER 



i 



'3r-f 



rV v?ty_ '; j " -ty^ftj guuii,j.m ^ 






^^^ 





Branscombe 
Pan key 
Betz 






Andrews 

DuPuy 

Haskell 





Myers 

Unsworth 

Garner 



f> f3 P 



Cox 

Polack 
Long 



;^^ 



T ■ T*- 45W^T. 



(=1 J 'J! ' .*u, ' A4 ! >l!|il ' .Vt>.'.'-!t ? 



•■•?- '^ -"-i^^a^ 



vAVjf-yV'gj^'iW-.i': 



5 ix^fBW 



L'i'j's^^jmjaLVJT.'jja 



i »pj«v>t ' '-J' '■J^M^^«^^■' 



Two Hundred Fifty-two 



FRATERNITIES 



n 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

B Harvie Branscomb, Samuel Tipton. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 

S P Garner, G M Sadli 



Norman Herring 



Low School 



Class of 1933 



William K Andrews, New Haven, Conn; G M Betz, 
Wildwood, N J ; Lewis C Branscomb, Birmmghom, Ala , 
W R. Gordon, Elizabeth City, N. C; Richord B Haskell, 
Holyoke, Mass, John F. Long, III, Lancaster, Pa; 
Elbert J. Myers, Glasgow, Ky.; A. Benjamin Narbeth, 
Swarthmore, Pa ; W A Ponkey, Bluefield, W. Vo ; Philip 
M Unsworth, Vineland, N J ; R. B Walker, Mount 
Vernon, Va.; John J Zimmerman, Meodville, Pa. 

Class of 1934 

John B Cox, Birmingham, Ala ; Charles C Derrick, 
Stockbridge, Moss ; Robert P Duncan, Fredonia, N. Y.; 
S S DuPuy, Beckley, W Va , William J McAnally, High 
Point, N. C 

Closs of 1935 

Marion R Brumbach, Nashville, Tenn ; Ernest H 
Polock, York, Pa , George A. Smith, Gadsden, Ala 



Pledges 

Jock Alexander, Ashevilie, N. C; John Brest, New 
York, N Y; Henry Collins, Macon, Go ; Robert Cox, 
Vernon, Tex; James Dearborn, Warren, Ohio; John 
Dempsey, Lewisburg, W Va ; Mitchell Diggs, La Plata, 
Md , Robert Droke, Hopkinsville, Ky ; J R Good, 
Alexandria, Va ; John Hennemier, Savannah, Go, 
Delmor Hill, Birmingham, Ale.; Isham Kimball, Alex- 
andria, La; William Klove, Oak Park, III.; Fred Lloyd, 
Durham, N C ; Luke Mizell, Atlanta, Go ; John Ponkey, 
Bluefield, W Va ; Alan Puryeor, Washington, D C, 
Ellison Ruby, Jenkintown, Pa ; Lewis Smith, Smithtown, 
N. Y. 



SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON wus formed at ti,. 
University of Alabama on March 9, Ibjo 
The fraternity was designed to be national and 
there were fifteen chapters when the Civil War 
began. Although the war diminished the mem- 
bership, the fraternity was reorganized Since 
the Civil War there has been a steady growth 
and there are at present one hundred and eight 
chapters evenly spread over the entire country. 

An interesting fact in the history of the fra- 
ternity is that there was a woman member The 
chapter at Kentucky Military Institute left its 
ritual in the care of Miss Lucy Pattie when its 
members went to war Miss Pattie guarded the 
papers carefully and was initiated by the chap- 
ter when the war was over. 

Over eight thousand S A E 's were overseas 
during the World War. Alumni associations 
were formed and many meetings were held 
Two pledges were initiated, one in a castle on 
the Rhine and another at Tours, France. 

The national headquarters ore at Evanston, 
Illinois. A temple has recently been completed 
there, serving as a memorial to S. A E war 
dead and to William C Levere, a great S A E 
worker who has been called the Greatest Greek 

North Carolina Nu Chapter of Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon was installed at Duke in February, 1931. 
The chapter was formed from a local, Psi 
Delta Sigma, which was admitted into the fra- 
ternity at the Evanston Convention of 1930 
Despite its comparative youthfulness, the chap- 
ter has taken its place with the leading fraterni- 
ties on the campus The chapter won the intro- 
mural plaque in 1932. 

Members prominent on the Duke Campus in- 
clude , John Long, Pan-Hellenic Treasurer; 
Charles Derrick, Y M C A Treasurer; Robert 
Varela and William McAnally, Swimming, 
Robert Cox, Football; Ernest Polock, Basketball, 
and Fred Lloyd, Boxing 




Two Hundred Fifty-three 



CHANTICLEER 





Schanher 
Crenshaw 
Watkins 



Chalkley 

Cole 

Wagner 



Letson 
Flippo 
Beville 



:^^: 



'Kw.j-<')^waH«'imi '■)»• »WfWu%;A.jj hlj-^'j^ 



7f^ 



7r ",'■-■— 3^1 



^ 



^^1 



Two Hiinflred Fifty-four 



FRATERNITIES 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Rowland T Bellows, W Cory Maxwell, Ben E. Powell, 
Alfred R Shands 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Medical School 

Phil L Franklin, Don F Marion. 

Class of 1933 

Clarence A Cole, West Haven, Conn, Claire T 
Crenshaw, Asheville, N C , Carter Flippo, Doswell, Vo ; 
John C Long, New Brighton, N Y. 

Class of 1934 

Richard A Broberg, Torrington, Conn. 

Class of 1935 

Charles A Anderson, Winchester, Vo ; George J. Boer, 
Horrisburg, Pa; Stewart M Beviile, Blackstone, Va.; 
William Cholkley, Washington, D C , Edward W Leston 
Roslyn, N Y.; John A Long, Newell, N C ; Paul W. 
Schanher, Mt Clemens, Mich , George F Speicher, Rock- 
wood, Pa , Ben C Wagner, Hanover, Pa ; George P 
Wotkins, New Rochelle, N Y 



SIGMA NU 

OIGMA NU originated from the Legion of 
Honor, o secret society organized in 1868 
at Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Vir- 
ginia The Legion of Honor was an association 
of students drawn together around James F. 
Hopkins, the leader in a movement which op- 
posed the overbearing control of another secret 
society The Greek-letter designation and 
other characteristics of college fraternities were 
adopted January 1, 1869, regarded as the date 
of the founding of Sigma Nu Associated with 
Hopkins as founders were Greenfield Quarles 
and James M Riley 

The Journal, The Delta, was first published 
in April, 1883, and the first history of the fra- 
ternity. The Story of Sigma Nu, was published 
in 1927. Alumni chapters have been established 
in many of the principal cities The fraternity 
has Q permanent endowment fund for the help 
of chapters and in aiding worthy students to 
complete their education The Sunday in 
November immediately preceding Armistice 
Day each year is observed as Memorial Day. 

Gamma Chapter of Sigma Nu was installed 
at Duke University November 21, 1931, making 
97 active chapters of the fraternity. The 
chapter's Greek-letter designation Gamma was 
inherited from the original charter given to 
Bailey Low School, at Asheville, North Caro- 
lina, in 1871. 



Pledges 

Wiiliom Byrne, New Rochelle, N Y, James Cheely, 
Williomsburg, Ky ; Robert W Cook, Cooperstown, N Y.; 
Charles Eaton. Winston-Solem, N C; James Hatch, 
Charlotte, N. C ; Robert S Long, Fronkford Del ; Robert 
P Miller, Lincolnton, N C, John E Moss. Mobile, Ale- 
Tom Rogers, Hmton, W. Va., Horoce Tabb, Elizabeth- 
town, Ky 




Two Hundred Flfty-flvc 



CHANTICLEER 




Eastlake 

Anderson 

Raisley 



Voorhees 

Ripley 

Dunston 



McDowell 

Futrell 

Green 



1^ 



i >! \i-v} r ^jfm mB Tj^ ^v'rMi'v/iiu < v. ■■■. '>» » c /n j 'ii ' .^v^msmuiMa ? ! 






rrrr; 



anaaft^w-j 






^[ 



Two llundrffl Flfty-sIx 



FRATERNITIES 



PI EPSILON PI 




FRATRES IN FACULTATE 



VV. J. Seely. 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Medical School 
Fred Turner, George Uhde. 

Class of 1933 

Rolph Allen, Brewster, Mass; Ashley G. Futrell, 
Wilson, N. C ; James F. Green, Philadelphia, Pa ; Wil- 
liam McDowell, Kershaw, S C ; W. H. Ripley, Winnetka, 
III ; Robert Voorhees, Atlantic City, N J ; Hubert Woods, 
Durham, N. C. 

Class of 1934 

Charles Dunston, Norfolk, Va ; John Eastlake, Youngs- 
town, Ohio, Carlisle Norwood, IV, New York, N Y; 
William Rawls, Durham, N. C.; Carl F Schock, New 
Rochelle, N Y 

Closs of 1935 

Elmer Anderson, Norfolk, Va ; Roy Crone, Trenton, 
N J ; Marvin Goodrich, Petersburg, Va.; Abner Jones, 
Fountain Inn, S C; Willord Paisley, Easton, Pa ; Edward 
Storms, Oradell, N, J ; Elmer Tarrell, Norfolk, Va.; 
George H Williams, Petersburg, Va 



pi EPSILON PI Fraternity was founded at 
' Duke University in the Spring of 1926. The 
following were charter members: George Ash- 
ford, J. A Price, J. 0. Sutton, Harold Hayes, 
S N Wrenn, A J, Hughes, William Hamlin, J, 
Wilbur Futrell. 

This IS the seventh year of its existence, and 
up to now, around one hundred men have been 
token into the organization Evere since its 
beginning, the club has held on inevitable and 
admirable position among similar social or- 
ganizations on the campus The club has been 
very successful in all its undertakings, and it has 
manifested a keen interest in upholding the 
social standards of the school. The organiza- 
tion has as its objectives high social standards, 
scholastic attainment, athletic ability, and 
participation in as many extra-curricular activi- 
ties as possible. Dr. Bert Cunningham is its 
faculty adviser, and has been a great help in the 
internal organization of the club 

This Fraternity, during its seven years, has 
had twenty-six men awarded athletic letters, six 
captains of teams, and four managers. Two 
athletes have been all southern; William Murray 
in football, and Bill Applewhite in wrestling. 
Two members hove been president of the stu- 
dent body; Joe Savage and William Murray, and 
SIX have served on the Student Council. Three 
have been Red Friars, and seven have been 
D K.'s Four hove been Phi Beta Koppa 
men The club has hod one Editor of the 
Chanticleer, and one Editor of the Chronicle. 
It Cum Ul- bOid that all along, the club has been 
very well-balanced and it is with a great deal 
of optimism that it looks toward the future 



Pledges 

Richard Arnold, Oradell, N J , Piper Belvin, Durham, 
N C; Carl Burton, Wilson, N C, Woodrow Hayes, 
Durham, N C; Thomos Murray, Philadelphia, Pa, 
Herbert Nixon, Hertford, N. C; Edward L. Portley, 
Atlontic City, N J ; Merwin Riblett, Youngstown, Ohio. 




Two Handred Plfty-seven 



CHANTICLE ER 



EfS^ 



^ J -T-.vf- .^■-. ' v.utJ p j ^r 



^^ 






TY.- 



i?3T 



y«? 



H» M E 



iiifi 




Clark 
Roxby 
Pine 



Parsons 

Wilhelm 

Weil 



Mann 

Kirkland 

Long 



-r- ■■■ 



~^I'- 



iJIV^'l^Ui^SJWy^Ai'Jf-Lj ^v^ yr-ff.yiv^tin^'i.'-T-^T&^.Mj 



Twd Hundred Plfty-elght 



FRATERNITIES 



"1 ' .'^. ^■» ; n.i"j' ' ^ ' J 



g-T 




FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 

David K Jackson 

Low School 

William L. Howiand, Rufus Reynolds. 



Medical School 



Philip B Parsons 



Class of 1933 



J B. Clark, Durham, N C, Bruce S Roxby, Swarth- 
more, Pa 

Class of 1934 

Nicholson L Pine, New York, N Y, Corlos Weil, 
Aldan, Pa 

Class of 1935 

William H Long, Somerville, N J , C Leo Wilhelm, 
Salisbury, N C 



SIGMA TAU ALPHA 

UAVING been established in April, 1926, 
Sigma Tau Alpha has completed its seventh 
year as a social fraternity on the Duke campus 
The chapter was founded by six men, all close 
friends, who were desirous of perpetuating their 
friendship and furthering the common interests 
of their group Their policy of conservative de- 
velopment, which has been followed ever since, 
was based on the belief that a small group, 
working harmoniously, could accomplish more 
for the common good than a large, unwieldy 
chapter. 

As for physical membership, Sigma Alpha now 
numbers fifty-five members since its inception 
seven years ago. This group has endeavored to 
maintain a judicious balance between scholar- 
ship and participation in extra-curricular activi- 
ties, in conformity with the principles of Delta 
Upslon, which fraternity the local is petitioning 
for the grant of a charter. 

The distribution of Sigma Tau Alpha men in 
various major campus activities has been as 
follows: Red Friars, two; Editors of The 
Chronicle, two; Editor of The Archive, one; 
President of North Carolina Collegiate Press 
Association, one; Phi Beta Kappa, three; 
Omicron Delta Kappa, seven; Sigma Upsilon, 
seven; 9019, five. 



Pledges 

Philip Kirkland, Durham, N C , James Mann, Dur- 
ham, N C 




Two Hundred Plfty-nlne 



CH ANTICLE ER 



'?r^ 



^^^^'A 






mi 








SI 



iA 




% 




f^J K*!- t^'^ 



O ^ O- ^ 

f^^ 





v^ W^'TJt^f, 




3^ar5 r* y 



Berry 
Dudley 
Atwater 
Schieferly 



Newton 

Haydock 

Boepple 



McCree 
Wade 
Zehnder 
Hamlin 



Houghton 
Prentice 
Weyersberg 
Gates 



Sherwood 
Garrett 
Clark 
Garcia 



rl'ifr I'p:— — — 7- 



m"vu^' ' ;! nw'.'. ' -5 



?«^ 



HWI.I.I-.11I cVri J 



»! \*V, ' .M tl WJ.>. ' 'V.'Ji 



t ■ 



. - ;U2. 



" IV, 4. ViiV.JII^f J] ' Vr^VMiy 






lIH'JiJtm .' HWJ ' .VJig ' J l Ma ^jHrf EJBirg.Vj'-JJJj lakbJJ .'4 P»,< 



Two Ilunclrrrl Sixty 



FRATERNITIES 



3=^^ 



Jh^L 



-J^r^ 




FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 
Robert T. Dickerson, Leslie V. Dill. 



SIGMA DELTA 

OIGMA DELTA Fraternity was founded in the 
Spring of 1928 with the purpose of organiz- 
ing a group of fellows into a Local Fraternity 
that would later become a part of a National 
Organization Since that time, Sigma Delta 
has been directing its efforts towards Phi Kappa 
Psi Fraternity. In July of 1932 on informal peti- 
tion was presented to Phi Kappa Psi, and the 
intentions are to present a formal petition at 
the next National Convention which takes place 
July 1934. 



Class of 1933 

David S Clarke, New Haven, Conn ; R. Allen Dudley, 
Jr., Vinelond, N. J , John J. Garrett, Jr , Southport, N. C ; 
Parker R. Hamlin, Washington, N. J.; Charles M. 
Keefer, Leonardo, N. J.; Ruel E Sherwood, Jr., Charles- 
ton, W Va ; Albert C. Weyersberg, Jr , Lyndhurst, N. J.; 
Charles H. Winslow, Dayton, Pa 



Class of 1934 

Frederic E Houghton, Thompson, Conn.; Alan C 
McCree, Kearny, N J.; O B. Newton, Jr; Cambridqe, 
Md. 

Class of 1935 

James B Allardice, Mountain Lakes, N. J ; Robert 
N Atwoter, Burlington, N C; Curtis E. Berry, Boston, 
Moss ; Theodore F H. Boepple, New York, N. Y.; John 
W. Eriksen, Bloomfield, N J.; Frederic W. Gates, Great 
Bend, N Y ; Homer H Haydock, Salem, Moss , Carl B. 
Neuman, Meriden, Conn.; James H Prentice, II, Engle- 
wood, N. J.; Joseph S Schieferly, Jr, Bloomfield, N. J.; 
Robert B Wade, East Orange, N J.; Charles W. 
Zehnder, Jr , Bellevue, Pa. 




Pledges 

Robert S Blake, Brooklme, Mass; Russell Forrest, 
Bloomfield, N J.; Blame Carman, Bloomfield, N J.; 
Edmundo Garcia, Norwalk, Ohio, Ranson P. Rothbun, 
South Orange, N J.; Caleb V. Smith, Rockville Center, 
N. Y; Homer D. Smith, Jr., Roseland, N. J.; Albro S. 
Travis, Brewster, N. Y. 




Two Hundred Sixty-one 



CHANTICLEER 



FyyTtTjy^VTCTr 



mi 



•1 ^-^ ^ W^^ 4 w^ ^- ' 




Peckham 

Henderson 

Archbold 



Grant 
Onisko 

Campbel 



Kasper 
Harloff 
Taylor 



."•'.•I'Ul -jit. SVHMI/IW' :'. 111"'.'. '/.Ill 



]^ 



E^ 



ul\i1l,lMT-Wli!.'.».'i.'.'.'.i' , 






i'eaaiVtiw.uyr.MWi' 



'i.MM^ ' ".' i wr CTnBi?iiw ijWj; HaHs.vi.x-ij'.j.- la^j^>i;■^! 



Two Hundred Sixty-two 



FRATERNITIES 



Jh-^'L 



SIGMA ALPHA OMEGA 




FRATER IN FACULTATE 



H. E Myers. 



FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Graduate School 

Lloyd E Griffith 

Class of 1933 

Willis Campbell, Stoneville, N. C , Paul C Henderson, 
Freeport, L I , N. Y; Carl J Kosper, Wilkes-Barre, Pa 

Class of 1934 

Werner B Harloff, Springfield Gardens, L I , N Y; 
Vincent J Onisko, Sag Harbor, L. I , N Y ; John W 
Heckham, St Albans, L I , N Y ; Edward C Taylor, 
Dante, Va 

Class of 1935 

Ronald Archibold, Cleveland, Ohio, James A Grant, 
New York, N Y ; Maurice Miley, Savannah, Go , William 
J Patterson, Sovonnoh, Go, Thomas J Turnback, West 
Pittston, Pa ; E Sherwood Wilson, Roseland, Va 



IN THE foil of 1928 Sigma Alpha Omega was 
' organized on what is now the East Campus of 
Duke University with the idea of petitioning a 
National Fraternity in the near future Some of 
the charter members were L E Midgette, 
Harry Davis, Earl Silver, B E Stevenson, Thomas 
Walters, Jack Oliver, Cecil Hauss, Harold 
Walters, Ralph Fonville. 

The fraternity after dealing informally with 
several national fraternities, finally decided to 
petition Phi Kappa Sigma, in the fall of 1931. 
As Phi Kappa Sigma is a very conservative fra- 
ternity, the colonization plan was used from the 
start. 

Two members of Sigma Alpha Omega have al- 
ready been initiated into Phi Kappa Sigma 
through the cooperation of the Lambda Chapter 
at the University of North Carolina. These men 
are Lloyd Gnffity and Ronald Archbold. 

During the life of the Sigma Alpha Omega 
fraternity it has given the campus two Pres- 
idents of Duke Players, on Art Editor for the 
Chanticleer and Chronicle, Student Managers 
or rooiDoll, Swimming, and Wrestling, an All- 
State Wrestling Champion, Members of the 
Football Squad; Varsity Baseball man; a mem- 
ber of Omicron Delta Kappa, several members 
of Tombs; three intra-mural boxing champions, 
and members in several other honorary 
fraternities 

Since Its establishment Sigma Alpha Omega 
has taken active parts in all social activities 
It has lent its support to all organizations 
sponsored by the university for the benefit of the 
college community. 



Pledges 

Robert E Farrell, Boston, Mass, Claude D Fisher, 
Oneonta, N Y , DeWitt M. Griffith, Albemarle, N C ; 
Howord J Maldeis, Baltimore, Md ; Doyne E Raredon, 
Columbus, Ohio 




Two Hundred Slxty-thr«' 



CHANTICLE ER 




Members 

J. C. Adams, Richmond, Vo., John L, Atkins, Durham, 
N. C; Paul P. B. Baxter, Somerville, N. J.; Gordon E. 
Brown, Belleville, N. J.; Robert E, Demme, Oceanside, 
L. I., N. Y.; Frederick F. Hague, Columbus, Ohio; Joseph 
Jester, Alexandria, Va.; Stuart Miller, Caldwell, N. J ; 
Harrison Prindle, Washington, D. C; M. P. Reutershan, 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y.; Carl Ruff, Woodmere, N. Y.; C. L 
Sievers, Somersboro, Ky.; Stuart H. Simpson, Hightown, 
N. J.; B. A. Wagner, New Oxford, Pa.; William T. 
Walker, Moorestown, N. J; G. W, Wharton, Belleville, 
N. J.; James G. Whildin, Lonsford, Pa; J. Woodrow 
Wilson, Durham, N. O 

Pledges 

Calhoun Ancrum, Boston, Mass.; David H. Arp, Ellijoy 
Go.; Welch M. Bostick, Oxford, N. C; William W. Bryan' 
Detroit, Mich,; James K. Easley, Somerville, N, J,; y! 
Rozelle Holman, Memphis, Tenn.; Ernest A, Winton, 
Lakewood, Ohio 



KEYS CLUB 

TTHE Keys Club, a I oca I social society, was 
founded in 1932 by a group of first year men 
with the assistance of Dean D. M, Arnold, The 
purpose of the organization was to bind more 
closely the ties of fellowship. With this aim 
of unity in view the industrious group of workers 
have attained remarkable success in a year's 
time. 

The society is already recognized as a unit 
of the campus through its representative mem- 
bers in various activities. The Keys are now 
petitioning Beta Theta Pi, 



.fTS Cj i^A •'^-^ CT- 




Baxter 
Winton 



Miller 
Atkins 



Sinclair 
Demmie 



Wagner 
Hague 



Walker 
Wharton 



Smith 
Brown 



Jester 
Bryan 



Two Hundrfd Sixty-four 




JfiltfiU 1 0^t"f 1 r full I 

Rear of House 



CH ANTICLE ER 






0O 






r. 



Walton 

Burns 

Patterson 

Smith 

Baker 

Mixson 
Parkhurst 
Atkinson, J. 
Walker 
Emery 



Lackey 
Griffin 
Regan 
Dillon 



Atkinson, L. 
Allen 
Boesch 
King 



Patterson 

Clements 

Green 

Chose 

McCrory 

Moyler 

McNeill 

Bulluck 

Taylor 

Lucas 



'.■■'^■:M'IV^J^'i'.li^iJI . jJU aviMU^/VJi H!J-.i, i ,)lj <• 



iiJJii: 



IHI'J.'.Vl.W-J 



'i^ffifyrf-jivtivfiji} 



lH<lli'Allflt«l!)i.iM!.«!Ja! 



'SBHSM ■'J'- '--I'-M^iUA 



Two Hundred Slxty-slx 



SORORITIES 




SORORES IN FACULTATE 

Elizabeth Anderson, Anna VVyche, 

SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class of 1933 

Sally Allen, Charlotte, N, C, Louise Atkinson, 
Lynchburg, Va ; Betty Boesch, Memphis, Tenn ; Eliza- 
beth Bulluck, Goldsboro, N C ; Virginia Green, Weldon, 
N C ; Margaret H King, Durhom, N C ; Edith Lucos, 
Charlotte, N. C; Virgimo McCrary, Lexington, N. C ; 
Helen Moyler, Franklin, Va , Carmen Patterson, Greens- 
boro, N. C ; Virginia Ragan, Gostonia, N C 

Class of 1934 

Virginia Dillon, Wilmington, N C, Janet Gnffin, 
Baltimore, Md ; Mary S Lackey, Christiansburg, Va ; 
Mary Porkhurst, Raleigh, N C; Lola M Rogers, Dur- 
ham, N C; Nilla Shields, LoFayette, Go, Mane Smith, 
Cleveland, Ohio; Mary Tagart, Tidionte, Pa.; Augusta 
Walker, Elizabeth City, N C , Hornet Wonnamoker, 
Durham, N C 

Class of 1935 

Josephine Atkinson, Lynchburg, Va , June Bailey 
Thomasville, Go; Evelyn Baker, Thomasville, N. C 
Emily Burns, Mayfield, Ky ; Polly Chase, Brockton, Mass , 
Orpah Clements, Durham, N. C; Hazel Emery, Jack- 
sonville, Flo , Mary C. Green, Weldon, N C , Jane S. 
Hannon, Charlotte, N C; Susan McNeill, Jacksonville, 
Flo; Angela Patterson, Greensboro, N C; Sarah K 
Taylor Gastoma, N C ; Dorothy Walton, Jacksonville, 
Flo. 



ALPHA DELTA PI 

A LPHA DELTA PI, formerly Alpha Delta Phi, 
'* was founded May 15, 1851, at Wesleyan 
College, Macon, Georgia Wesleyan wos the 
first womans college in the world, and with such 
wealth of tradition was ideal for the foster- 
ing of a society Sixteen girls were enrolled as 
charter members, and Eugenia Tucker Fitz- 
gerald was its first president The sorority was 
not destroyed when the college was closed dur- 
ing the Civil War, and as the oldest collegiate 
sorority continued at Wesleyan College for 
fifty-three years under the name of the 
Adelphean Society Then members of Alpha 
chapter applied for a charter, and the society 
became national under the name of Alpha Delta 
Phi. This name was retained until it became 
expedient, to ovoid any misunderstanding re- 
sulting from the existence of a fraternity of the 
same name, to change to Alpha Delta Pi The 
sorority continued to expand rapidly, especially 
in the south, since the first chapters were 
founded there. 

Omicron chapter at Duke University was in- 
stalled in 1911, when the school was known as 
Trinity College. Though the only national 
sorority on the campus, it had only six chorter 
members, for Trinity was "o man's school to 
which women had been admitted," and the 
sorority idea hod, at first, a struggle for ex- 
istence But the chapter, like the school, began 
to grow, and continued in its expansion 

Alpha Delta Pi became international when 
Beta Zeta was installed in the University of 
Toronto. 



Pledges 

Martha Bailey, Thomosville, Go; Kathlyn Buice, 
Charlotte, N C; Elizabeth Corr, Greenville, N. C; 
Helen Cox, Rockingham, N. C; Charlotte Crabtree, 
Chattanooga, Tenn ; Harriet Cobb, Durham, N C ; 
Tempe Green, Weldon, N C ; Mary Elliott Henderson, 
Hickory, N C , Caroline Mann, Raleigh, N C , Miriam 
Mixson, Voldosto, Ga.; Annie Loune Newsom. Durham, 
N. C; Lottie Parker, Gostonia, N C ; Sarah Cloy Paylor, 
Raleigh, N C, Nelson Powell, Edenton, N C; Solly 
Scheldt, Cumberland, Md ; Elizabeth Steele, Rockmg- 
hom, N. C ; Mary Martha Taylor, Gostonia, N C ; Hope 
Whisnant, Charlotte, N C ; Dorothy Williams, Jackson- 
ville, Flo.; Pauline Willingham, Macon, Go ; Madeline 
Thompson, Lexington, N C. 




Two Hundred Sixty-seven 



CHANTICLEER 




L' aJ^A 



f 8 




L 1 


£!2 






€^^ 

\ ^ 


n 

^ 

^ » 





Hunter 
York 
Peg ram 
Smith 



Hinds 

Newsom, T. 
Yarbrough 



Newsom, D, 
Ormond 
Parker 
Phillips 



Meiklejohn 
Duke 
Harris 
Gibbons 



Winslow 
Miller 
Dewey 
Maxwell 



-V 



.— 7?^ 



^ 



UI'.*u-.'A4MUI'!.'.t.'ll."!'4 

V ■■-!■■■ ■• - 






m 



Two Hundred Sixty-eight 



SORORITIES 




SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 

Margaret Horrell 



Lee Smith 



Low School 



Class of 1933 



Alice Burwell, Warrenton, N. C , Margaret Gibbons, 
Hamlet, N. C ; Dorothy Newsom, Durham, N. C; Lila 
Cross Perkins, Durham, N C; Elizabeth York, Morris 
Pioins, N J 

Class of 1934 

Amy Duke, Fort Valley, Ga.; Doris Green, Durham, 
N C, Lucy Harris, Rockingham, N C ; Jane Miller, 
Portsmouth, Va ; Julia Stinson, Charlotte, N. C; Carolyn 
Wotkins, Henderson, N. C; Elizabeth Winslow, Green- 
ville, N C. 

Class of 1935 

Mary Alice Dewey, Goldsboro, N C ; Sara Hunter, 
Stony Creek Mills, Pa; Bernice Irwin, Bradley Beach, 
N J ; Mory Meiklejohn, Cheraw, S C ; Tempe Newsom, 
Durham, N C ; Janet Ormond, Durham, N. C ; Margaret 
Parker, Burlington, N, J; Elizabeth Pegram, Hamlet, 
N C ; Ethel Perry, Rocky Mount, N C ; Caroline Phillips, 
Lexington, N C ; Vivian Smith, Red Lion, Pa ; Pauline 
Sullivan, Anderson, S C ; Mary Yarbrough, Durham, 
N C^ 

Pledges 

Ethel Begg, Charlotte, N C , Elizabeth Boyd, Warren- 
ton, N C ; Eleanor Bruton, Candor, N C ; Hones 
Clement, Mocksville, N. C; Marguerite Collins, Anniston, 
Ala; Sara Louise Falls, Shelby, N C; Eugenia Gardner, 
Anniston, Ala ; Doris Gorris, Greenville, N C; Helen 
Gray, Ridgewood, N J ; Willie Hmes, Aberdeen, Miss.; 
Helen Jones, Richmond, Va ; Sara Jordan, York, Pa.; 
Catherine Lyon, Charlotte, N C; Mary D Marion, 
Charlotte, N C , Louise Maxwell, Beckley, W. Vo ; Mem 
Plyler, Durham, N C , Minnie Weaver, Rich Square, 
N C ; Carolyn White Mebane, N C 



KAPPA DELTA 

l/APPA DELTA Sorority was founded at Vir- 
'^ ginio State Nornnal School, Farmville, Vir- 
ginia, on October 23, 1897 by four girls— Julia 
Tyler, Lenore Ashmore, Mary Sparks, and Sara 
Turner. Through the personal friendships of 
these girls with girls in other schools and col- 
leges, new chapters were added to the organiza- 
tion very rapidly By the time the first conven- 
tion was called m Richmond, six chapters had 
come under the Kappa Delta banner 

Virginia was chosen as the center of Kappa 
Delta philanthropic projects because it is the 
state of the Sorority's founding Kappa Delta 
maintains a word in the Crippled Children's 
Hospital in Richmond, Virginia and, in addition 
to establishing a dental room and equipping a 
gymnasium for the children there, has con- 
tributed wheel chairs, a radio, and other gifts 

Pearl Buck, author of, 'The Good Earth and 
Sons," and winner of the Pultizer Prize in 1931, 
IS a member of the Theta Chapter of Kappa 
Delta at Randolph-Macon Woman's College, 
Lynchburg, Virginia 

On April 10, 1912 the local Sigma Delta 
Sorority received a telegram from Edith Knox 
saying that a Kappa Delta charter had been 
granted On April 19, 1912 Sigma Delta 
chapter of Kappa Delta was installed Misses 
Cora Vaughn and Jean Coltrane of the National 
Council of Kappa Delta were present to conduct 
the installation. 




Ti.K.f 



^'-'ir^ 



!lL_iE 



Two Hnndred Sixty-nine 



CHANTICLEER 







i^iLd 



hJ 





k 1 ^ 1/ 



Tyj f^J) ^j4 (-^, J 




Triplett 

Brooks 

Glosson 

Floyd 
Brown 



Morton 
Chipman 
Cutchin 
Snyder 



Ingram 
Merkel 
Home 
Robertson 



Wyott 

Daniel 

Hooker 

McGlone 

Phillips 



White 

Waters 

Tennis 

West 

Jordan 



Two Unnilri'd Sfvpnty 






SKi 



—I l>fc' w^ 



SORORITIES 



jLUej 




SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class of 1933 

Annie Lee Cutchin, Whitakers, N C ; Mabel Floyd, 
Fairmont, N. C; Marjorie Glosson, Durham, N. C; 
Louisa Hooker, Greenville, N C ; Loroine McGlone, Pine 
Bluff, Ark; Helen Phillips, Richmond, Va ; Carlotto 
Waters Washington, N C ; Betty West, Albemarle, 
N C 

Class of 1934 

Betty Chipman, Baltimore, Md ; Helen Daniel, Colum- 
bia, S C ; Mary Louise Home, Rocky Mount, N C; 
Eloise Ingram, High Point, N C; Frances Morton, Rox- 
boro, N. C; Anne Elle Robertson, Moyfield, Ky.; 
Charlotte Umstead, Durham, N C; Dorothy Umstead, 
Durhom, N C; Helen Wyatt, Boston, Mass 

Class of 1935 

Mary Ada Heard, St. Petersburg, Fla ; Virginia 
Jordan, Brooklyn, N Y ; Virginia Lytle, Jacksonville, Fla ; 
Louise Merkel, Milwaukee, Wis ; Mary Olson, St Augus- 
tine, Fla; Lenora Snyder, Ridgefield Park, N. J ; Trixie 
Tennis, Norfolk, Vo ; Mary N White, Richmond, Va 



Pledges 

Karhenne Aholt, Alexandria, Va ; Margaret Becker, 
Upper Darby, Pa ; Carolyn Brooks, Moyfield, Ky ; Louise 
Brown, Arlington, N J ; Dorothy Caldwell, Mansfield, 
Ohio, Morion Coffey, Tarrytown, N Y; Mory Foison 
Covington, Thomasville, N C ; Margaret Hossell, Green- 
ville, N C ; Alice V Jones, Petersburg, Va ; Emmy Lou 
Morton, Charleston, W. Va ; Nell Peake, Norfolk, Va ; 
Frances Pearson, Sanford, Fla ; Nettie Pinnix, New Bern, 
N C; Louise Remont, Moylan, Pa; Jean Rinehimer, 
Kingston, Pa.; Betty Slocomb, Winthrop, Moss ; Jane 
Triplett, Pine Bluff, Ark.; Morye Price Woodroe, Smith- 
field, Va ; Marjorie Woolsey, Glenrock, N. J ; Beatrice 
Wynne, Norfolk, Vo. 



ZETATAU ALPHA 

/^N November 13, 1913, seven Trinity women 
^^ met in the Archive office to form o local 
sorority; and so Theto Delta came into exist- 
ence In January 1915, Theta Delta decided 
to petition Zeta Tau Alpha Recommendations 
were sent in and inspection passed. The instal- 
lation took place June 4 and 5. 

Zeta Tau Alpha was founded October 15, 
1 898 at Virginia State Normal School, Farmville, 
Virginia. While northern nationals had suc- 
cessfully passed experimental and trial stages 
by the end of the nineteenth century, they had 
practically left the southern field to its own re- 
sources Thus in helping fill the organization 
needs in that part of the country, a southern- 
born sorority came into existence which for 
many years was to continue its expansion to the 
southern states. For several months after the 
date of founding, while the founders were select- 
ing the Greek name, the fraternity was known 
as the '^^^ (the Three Question Mark Girls) 
The Greek name was adopted before April 1899 
and the fraternity was chartered as a legal cor- 
poration by the Virginia legislature on Morch 
15, 1902. It was not only the first women's fra- 
ternity to be chartered in the state of Virginia, 
but the first to be chartered by a special act of 
the legislature. 

Zeta Tau Alpha became an international 
sorority in 1929 with the establishment of 
Beta Rho chapter at the University of Manitoba. 
The first northern chapter was installed Febru- 
ary 22, 1912 at Boston University 

The colors of Zeta Tau Alpha are turquoise 
blue and steel grey The flower is the white 
violet. 





Two Hundred Seventy-one 



CHANTICLEER 




T) P. (^i 




P5 <f * rt n 



t t 



y 




k^v 



Cornett 
Eaton 
Tompkins 
Williams 



Gciney 
Murdock 
Powe 
Sellars 



Purvis 
Lamson 
Pederson 
Ingles 



Thomson 
Macfadyen 
Vance 
Winston 



Fleming 
Hedrick 
White 
Sarver 



k -^/ 




Two Hundred Seventy-two 



SORORITIES 



KAPPA ALPHA THETA 




Class of 1933 

Elizabeth Cornett, Bluefieid, W Va ; Dorothy Eaton 
Franklin, N C ; Lucille Gainey, Fayetteville, N. C 
Ann Ingles, Richmond, Va.; Edna Love, Cliffside, N C 
Bennie Purvis, Durham, N. C; Elizabeth Sellers, Bur- 
lington, N C ; Martha Vance, Chicago, III, Crockett 
Williams, Wilmington, N. C. 

Class of 1934 

Celestine Beamer, Burley, Idaho; Elaine Childs, Dur- 
ham, N C; Catherine Fleming, New Bethlehem, Pa ; 
Josephine Glass, Miami, Flo.; Carolyn Mcintosh, Old 
Fort, N. C ; Jeon Murdock, Greenville, S. C ; Catherine 
Powe, Durham, N C; Frances Winston, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 

Class of 1935 

Loroine Green, New Haven, Conn, Alma Hedrick, 
Solisbury, N. C; Pauline MocFodyen, Concord, N. C; 
Signd Pederson, New York, N. Y; Sara Thompsor^, 
Shelby, N C; Eleanor Tompkins, White Plains, N. Y.; 
Gretchen Zimmerman, Shamokin, Pa. 



Pledges 

Eleanor Barrett, Stamford, Conn.; Mary Louise Brad- 
ley, Lima Ohio; Jane Carlton, Greensboro, N. C 
Margaret Cuninggim, Nashville, Tenn ; Marion Coote, 
White Plains, N. Y.; Leonora Fanning, Asheville, N. C 
Jane Haislip, Lumberport, W Va.; Virginia Hardin 
Upper Montclair, N J ; Nancy Leitch, Stamford, Conn 
Gorgionna Lomson, Maplewood, N. J.; Mary Alice 
Rhodes, Chattanooga, Tenn ; Virginia Server, Lewisburg, 
W. Va.; Mary Carolyn Seed, Upper Montclair, N. J.; 
Susan Sheppard, Washington, D. C; Audry Sp>eicher, 
Rockwood, Pa; Jean Wallaner, White Plains, N. J; 
Micheoux Watkins, Midlothian, Va.; Ethel White, Balti- 
more, Md. 



l^APPA ALPHA THETA, the first Greek letter 
■^ fraternity known among women was 
founded at DePauw University, then Asbury 
College, at Greencastle, Indiana, in 1870 At 
the time, three other women's fraternities were 
in existence, but thy did not adopt Greek letter 
names until somewhat later Many prominent 
women are listed among the members of the fra- 
ternity, among them being the first two women 
to become members of Phi Beta Kappa There 
are now sixty-three active chapters and fifty- 
eight alumnae chapters, with a total member- 
ship of about 20,000 The magazine is the 
"Kappa Alpha Theta."The badge is kite-shaped, 
having a gold foundation with a raised center 
of block enamel on which to small diamonds 
stand out vividly above a white chevron bearing 
the letters k a ©. The colors of the fraternity 
are black and gold; the flower is the gold and 
black pansy Beta Rho chapter was installed at 
Duke in 1928 Ever since its installation it has 
maintained a high scholastic standard on the 
campus Among the outstanding positions of 
honor held by Thetos this year are: Treasurer 
of; Student Government Association, Y W 
C A., and Women's Athletic Assocation, Pres- 
ident of; Forum Club and Chi Delta Phi; Co-ed 
Business Manager of Archive; and Society 
Editor of Chronicle; Secretory and Treasurer of 
Senior Class; Secretary of Pan-Hellenic; House 
President of; Brown and Giles houses Two of 
the six members of White Duchy are also mem- 
bers of Kappa Alpha Theto, and thus have at- 
tained one of the highest honors a girl may win 
at Duke 




Jhyyt 



-F:T^=r 



^^ 



Two Hundred Seventy-three 



CHANTICLEER 



3-<' 



EZ!S3SSS^a3??r^ 



)^. 



1^ 



"^:- 



m 






gT ^-y.^ i .i i mutvu ' .'giiM ^jfirf Baj^b'^^--'JJ!t.^A! f.^ ! 




Powell 

Wooten 

Hertz 

Edwards 

Leary 






Tenney 
Sellers 
Ritter 
Combs 




Roberson 

Winston 

Howie 

Motlow 



Bates 

Garrett 
Rebman 
Hines 



Anderson 

Serfas 

Knight 

Kindel 

Fish 



m 



•^fP!.V'/<'>.'l."'V*J'.''^'' 






^ 



Two Hiinrlrfd Seventy-four 



SORORITIES 



KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 




SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 
Alexina Anderson Demouy 

Class of 1933 

Martha Howie, Charlotte, N C; Dorothy Leary, East 
Orange, N J ; Nancy Roberson, Durham, N C ; Louise 
Sellers, Mebone, N C. 

Class of 1934 

Helen Chose, New Haven, Conn ; Margaret Edwards, 
Durham, N. C ; Clare Feldmon, Boston, Po ; Jessie Hertz, 
Horrisburg, Po ; Martha Kindel, Raleigh, N. C ; Betty 
Knight, Morristown, N. J ; Catherine Serfos, Boston, Po.; 
Elaine Tenney, West Orange, N J ; Alice Wooten, 
Fayetteville, N C. 

Class of 1935 

Fronces Anderson, Lynchburg, Vo ; Jeon Ayers, 
Indiana, Po ; Margaret Bates, Elkton, Md ; Evelyn Davis, 
Vonceboro, N. C ; Ethel Garrett, Swarthmore, Po ; 
Dorothy Hines, Greensboro, N. C; Sue Powell, Gostomo, 
N. C; Jane Ritter, Collmgswood, N. J.; Kathleen Rober- 
son, Durham, N. C. 



l^APPA KAPPA GAMMA is one of the oldest 
■^ Greek letter sororities for women in ex- 
istence It was founded at Monmouth College, 
Monmouth, Illinois, in 1870 It has 68 chapters, 
located in 34 states and in Canada, and 116 
alumnae associations, in the United States, 
London, Hawaii, and the Philippines Among its 
nationally prominent members are Helen Wills 
Moody, Mrs. Herbert Hoover, Mrs Owen D. 
Young, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, Alice Duer 
Miller, Jessie Rittenhouse Porter, Mary E. 
Wooley, and Dean Gildersleeve of Barnard. 
Kappa has been prominent initiating customs 
for other sororities to follow She was the first 
to have a central form of government, called the 
first Pan-Hellenic Congress, held the first Na- 
tional Convention, published the first sorority 
magazine, founded a uniform budget system 
and initiated the custom of sending Co- 
organizers to assist new chapters. The follow- 
ing important offices on the Duke campus were 
filled by Kappas this year: Vice President of the 
Woman's College Government, Secretary of the 
Y. W. C. A, President and Treasurer of the 
Town Girls' Club, House President of Pegrom, 
Poetry Editor, Business Manager, and Circula- 
tion Manager of the Distaff, President and 
Secretary of the Sophomore Class, Freshman 
Vice President, and Vice President of Junior Big 
Sisters. 



Julio Combs, 
Bronxville, N Y, 
Daniel, Cloxton, 



Pledges 

Durham, N C , Catherine Conger, 
Arlis Cowan, Posodeno, Col ; Barbara 
Go, Charline Dowling, Mumfordville, 
Ky.; Dorris Fish, Chicago, III; Dorothy Gray, Summit, 
N. J ; Mary Greig, River Forest, III.; Morjorie Harper, 
Bethlehem, Pa ; Mane McLoin, Los Angeles, Col.; Mary 
Avon Motlow, Lynchburg, Tenn.; Betty Porks, Kew 
Gardens, L. I., N. Y; Helen Persons, Altoona, Pa; Ruth 
Phillips, Wheeling, W. Vo ; Annie Kate Rebman, Court- 
land, Alo ; Julia Wooten, Fayetteville, N. C. 




Two Hundred Seventy-five 



CHANTICLEER 




r^ Q f? ^^ 



Barger 
Heinley 
Perry 
Hewitt 



Thompson 
Morkham 
Smith 



Adams 

Gehman 

Voorhies 



Dai ley 
Foster 
Royal 



Rose 
Gaddis 
Jones 
Owens 



m 



vt-txi 



?^T7C 






»f'.'-^»'A*«t'iNn';'.T. ' 






'l'i!li'iH-''.'JIWi!Ji:/'J-J8.Ba 



Two HunUrt'd Seventy-six 



SORORITIES 



l-n^l 



irrqr 



M 




SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduote School 
Ruth Jenkins, Gay Johnson, Sara Ownbey 

Class of 1933 

Julia Perry, Orange, Va , Kebecca Royall, Smithfield, 
N. C ; Mor>' Frances Smith, Valdosta, Go. 

Class of 1934 

Evelyn Adams, McColl, S. C ; Alma Doiley, Pittsboro, 
N. C; Mary Gaddis, Upper Marlboro, Md.; Mary 
Kotherine Hewitt, Hackensack, N. J; Ruth Jones, 
Chilhowie, Va.; Eleanor Markham, Durham, N. C; Ber- 
nice E. Rose, New York, N. Y ; Elizabeth Thomson, Lil- 
lington, N C. 

Class of 1935 

Mildred Gehman, Loncaster, Pa.; Elizabeth Owens, 
Bennettsville, S. C. 



SIGMA KAPPA 

SIGMA KAPPA stands among the pioneer 
Greek-letter societies for women It was 
founded in 1874 at Colby College, Woterville, 
Maine, by the first five women enrolled there, 
and became a member of National Pan-Hellenic 
Congress in 1904. Since that time it has be- 
come international and now includes forty-five 
active college chapters and fifty-four alumnae 
chapters in various cities throughout the United 
States and Canada The chief publication of 
the sorority is the "Triangle," a quarterly maga- 
zine issued first in 1907, giving a full account 
of Sigma Kappa activities and interesting 
personalities. 

The pin is a maroon triangle bearing the gold 
letters - ^, and edged with crown-set pearls, 
while the pledges wear a gold K entwined with 
a serpent in the form of a Sigma. The colors 
are lavender and maroon, the flower, the violet, 
and the open motto, "One heart, one way " 

National philanthropy is carried on by Sigma 
Kappa through its attachment to the Maine Sea 
Coast mission, whose work is centered among 
the fisherfolk on the many small islands off the 
New England coast. 

The local chapter was installed on January 3, 
1931, when the local sorority Delta Psi became 
Alpha Psi of Sigma Kappa 



Pledges 

Martha Balloy, Ambridge, Pa.; Dorothy Borger, 
Columbia, Ky.; Evelyn Buchanan, Chilhowie, Va.; Jose- 
phine Eaby, Lancaster, Pa.; Dorothy Flebbe, New York, 
N. Y.; Lois Foster, Durham, N C; Florence Heinley, 
Amityville, N. Y.; Frances Hunter, Morlinton, W. Vo ; 
Dal Knight, Ambler, Pa; Sarah Markham, Durham, 
N. C; Margaret Meriam, Rutherford, N. J ; Cora Pat- 
terson, Albemarle, N C; Mary Lee Sykes, Thomasvilie, 
N. C; Gladys Voorhies, New Orleans, La.; Dorothy 
Wikoff, Kansas City, Mo ; Virginia Winfree, Lynchburg, 
Va. 




Two Hundred Seventy-seven 



CHANTICLEER 





hAdA 




McLean 
Maywald 
Riefle 
Geise 



Carter 
Fulton 
Lucas 
Jones 



Schomaker 
Stringfield 
Dye 
Cassidy 



Nelms 
Tudor 
Bailey 
Britt 



Tw<i Hundred Seventy-eight 



SORORITIES 




SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 
Luisita Dye, Cane Lucas, Virginia Graham McLean. 

Closs of 1933 

Sarah Fulton, Washington, D. C ; Nedra Jones, Nor- 
folk, Va ; Morgaret Nelms, Kingsport, Tenn ; Martha 
Stringfield Wavnesville, N. C, Ola Whitehead, Weldon, 
N C 

Class of 1934 

Frances Tudor, Albemarle, N. C. 

Class of 1935 

Frances Maywold, Orlando, Flo , Caroline Riefle, Balti- 
more, Md ; Mane Schomaker, Pearl River, N Y ; Dorothy 
Warren, Beloir, Md 



Pledges 

Inez Abernethy, Durhom, N. C , Ruth Bailey, Haties- 
burg. Miss; Eula Britt, Winter Garden, Flo ; Frances 
Carlton, Durham, N. C; Louise Carter, Gate City, Va ; 
Betty Cassidy, Erwin, Tenn.; Betty Jane Dunlap, Dayton, 
Ohio; Elinor Fountain, Eoston, Md.; Florence Geise, Nor- 
ristown, Pa ; Kathryn Goodman, Ashland, Ky ; Helen 
Lieb, Elizabeth, N J ; Ruth Madden, Central Park, L. I., 
N Y; Margaret Moore, Clarendon, Va ; Clary Webb 
Peoples, Asheville, N. C; Florence Rothwell, Lewisburg, 
W. Va.; Isabel Shnner, York, Pa; Pat Sills, Nashville, 
N. C ; Gladys Souder, Macon, Go ; Dorothy Tudor, Albe- 
marle, N. C ; Virginia Wotkins, Midlothian, Va ; Elaine 
Wilson, Central Park, L. I , N. Y. 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 

IN THE years since the founding of Delta 
' Delta Delta at Boston University in 1888, the 
purpose and ideal of the sorority has been 
revealed to approximately twenty thousand 
members The eighty-three chapters to which 
they belong were chosen to insure an unusually 
even regional distribution throughout the uni- 
versities and colleges of the United States and 
Canada In one hundred cities and towns from 
coast to coast there are alumnae alliances, 
actively interested in helping the collegiate 
chapters, as well as constituting a means of 
social reunion and sorority advancement for 
members in the years after commencement. 

In addition to the services and privileges 
rendered its members by the collegiate chapters 
and alumnae groups, the national organization 
maintains numerous scholarship funds and 
sponsors a number of notional altruistic 
endeavors 

Delta Delta Delta was one of the six sororities 
represented m the first Pan-Hellenic Convention 
in 1891 and was privileged to be the one to col- 
lect, compile, and publish the first history of the 
Pan-Hellenic movement as a chapter in its own 
first notional history of 1907. 

The latest history, published last year, in- 
cludes in its role of chapters the account of the 
installation of Alpha Omicron chapter at Duke 
University on November 7, 1931. The new 
chapter IS now ending its second year with an 
unusual record of chapter growth and organiza- 
tion and individual campus achievement which 
ore eloquent of the work and vision of its 
charter members and augur well for its rapid 
development and continued success in the 
future. 




Two Hundred Seventy-nine 



CH ANTICLE ER 




kHA 




(^ f? O 




Draughon 
Ingle 
Forlines 
Crowder 



Love 

Hunsicker 

Stanter 



Voigt 
Ward 
Longston 



Reed 
Card 
Burleigh 
Whittemore 



l)l'.*'H/t'UlHiv'i'l'.*.''',?.jj 



l^ 



- .'.1^ 



"% VKViTfc-TfT^ ■fJVa'jWtg! 



Ife 



Two Huinlted Eighty 



FRATERN ITI ES 



m 



M 






SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Closs of 1933 

Helen Card, Durham, N C; Lucille Darughon, Dur- 
ham, N C ; Ruth Forlines, Durham, N C, Rivera 
Ingle, East Oronge, N. J.; Myrtice Wart, Durham, N. C ; 
Alma Love, Hopkinsville, Ky. 



Closs of 1934 
Courtney Crowder, Jarratt, Va 



Margie Voigt, 



Philadelphia, Pa 



Class of 1935 



Elvira Burleigh, Rutherford, N. J., Sylvia Hunsicker, 
Allentown, Pa; Denzil Langston, Orlando, Flo; Mary 
E Reed, Newark, N J ; Mary Stonter, Peekskill, N. Y.; 
Ethel Whittemore, Hoboken, N. J 



PI BETA PHI 

MORTH Carolina Beta of Pi Beta Phi had its 
• ' origin in the local sorority Mu Lambda, 
founded April 22, 1929 The purpose of the 
founders of Mu Lannbda was to obtain a charter 
of Pi Beta Phi, and to this end they persevered 
refusing unsolicited offers of charters from 
other national fraternities A formal petition 
was presented to Pi Beta Phi on January 14, 
1933 On February 17, 1933 Miss Amy Burn- 
ham Onken, notional grand president of Pi Beta 
Phi, formally installed Mu Lambdo as North 
Carolina Beta. 

Pi Beta Phi, the oldest national fraternity for 
women, was founded April 28, 1867 at Mon- 
mouth College, Monmouth Illinois, under the 
name I C Sorosis In 1883 the Greek name 
was adopted as a subtitle Five years later the 
name I. C Sorosis was discontinued In 1889 
the fraternity was incorporated, under the state 
laws of Illinois, as Pi Beta Phi 

North Carolina Beta is the eightieth chapter 
of Pi Beta Phi The total membership of the fra- 
ternity numbers over twenty thousand, and in 
forty-three colleges the fraternity own houses 
There are one hundred fifty-one chartered 
alumnae groups The colors of Pi Beta Phi are 
wine and silver blue; the flower the wine carna- 
tion, the publication, the "Arrow" published 
quarterly. The bodge of the fraternity is the 
arrow with Greek letters n B * transversely on 
the feather, the pledge pin is the arrow head 
inscriped with the letter Beta. 

As an encouragement for high scholarship, 
the fraternity maintains a number of scholar- 
ships and fellowships for its members. 



Pledges 

Lillian Collins, Durham, In C , Mary Francis 
Durham, N. C , Francis Wise, Hillsdale, N. J. 



Ivey, 




Two Hundred Eighty-one 



CHANTICLEER 




NU BETA PHI 



SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Closs of 1933 

Grace Nachamson, Durham, N. C. 



Class of 1934 

Ethel Nachomson, Durhom, N C. 



Class of 1935 



Saro Berenson, Bogalusa, La.; Jeanette Goldstein, 
Roanoke, Va.; Mildred Pollock, Asheville, N. C; 
Jeannette Sidenberg, Richmond, Va. 

Pledges 

Rubye Fogel, Georgetown, S. C. 




Pollock Berenson hogel 

G. Nachamson E. Nachamson Goldstein Sidenberg 




iHJ'j''H.'i'.<m"n Ji r^r^ 



H^ mtum^iii&Lms^fsa' (^ j 



Two Hundred Eighty-two 



BOOK.Y 

ATHLETI c s 



ilM 




Salisbury Interior 



i=^4 



ENGLISH GOTHIC 

The important characteristics 
of English Gothic are the very 
pointed arch, square ending 
apse, dominant central tower, 
and the corner buttress. Lines 
of the exterior are horizontal 
emphasizing the central spire. 
Salisbury is a particularly good 
example of English Gothic, fea- 
turing the use of two transepts, 
one crossing the nave at the 
point where the tower rises, and 
one to the east flanking the 
choir. Large tracery windows, 
are kept simple and in strong 
vertical lines. Clearstory win- 
dows on side aisles, give extra 
light. Pinnacles, particularly 
noticeable in silhouette, rise 
from each corner buttress. 




SALISBURY CATHEDRAL 




Shield Taken from 
Doorway of Page Auditorium 



PUBLICATIONS 



CHANTICLEER 



THE CHANTICLEER 




Edwin C. Kellam 
Editor-in-Chief 

THE 1933 CHANTICLEER 

"THE Chanticleer has been published annually 

' for a great nnany years. The student life of 

old Trinity College was first portrayed between 

its covers. With the transition from Trinity 



College into Duke University a new demand was 
placed upon the Chanticleer, if it was to ade- 
quately depict the greatly expanded life of the 
Duke campus, A larger book was needed; one 
that possessed a more universal appeal, one 
that would catch and present the beauty and 
symmetry of our surroundings, one that would 
be a suitable monument to the class of nineteen 
hundred and thirty-three. Such o book has the 
present staff attempted to create. 

Primarily this book is attempting to please 
the members of the class of nineteen hundred 
and thirty-three, for it is the annual of their 
graduating year. As their dreams of complet- 
ing their undergraduate college career ap- 
proach reality, more and more will their atten- 
tion be focused on the business lives that lie 
before them. Slowly will they forget the joys 
and sorrows, the friendships formed, the activi- 
ties engaged in while they were at Duke, The 
Chanficleer has placed on its pages reminders 
and accounts of the history of the past year, 
so that in later years the former students may 
refresh their retrospective minds on the events 
of their student life. It will recall by word and 
picture their happiest years. 

To catch the spirit of beauty, of silent 
strength, of subdued power, of consolation, of 
lofty ideals — all inherent in the walls of our uni- 



f^ p) f^ O t) Ci 






(P. 


C% .0 f^ if>. 


.\ V Q^ ^^ 


tl 


iMm^ 


Editoriol Staff 

Fleming McCrary O'Keef Jones Murchison Dillon Tennis Patterson Taylor 


Bloir Peoke Angel Martin Rowe White Starlings Williams 


Twi) Hunrlred KIghlyeight 







PUBLICATIONS 






mk^M h. 







Business Staff 






Town ley 
Livengood 


Keesee 

Hewitt 


Chipmon 
Chase 


Hastings 
Rose 


Gcrtelmonn 
Gregory 



THE CHANTICLEER 



versity buildings, has, too, been the aim of the 
staff of the Chanticleer. Things can be beauti- 
ful and shallow. Shallowness can exist without 
beauty. Both of these are easily portrayed, but 
to do justice to a rich and nneaningful beauty 
IS a difficult task. Simplicity, minuteness of 
design, good taste, and attention to details have 
made possible the presentotion of the book to 
the students in this form If the majority are 
pleased with this outcome of the staff's en- 
deavors, that IS all that one may ask 

THE EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edwin C Kellam, Editor, James R Peake, Managing 
Editor; Carmen Patterson, Co-ed Editor, James Star- 
lings, Literary Editor; Alton Murchison, Athletic Editor 

Assistont Editors Allen White, Catherine Fleming, 
Mortin Williams Reese Blair, Ruth Jones. 

Art Staff Lou Angel, Art Editor; Assistants, Sarah 
Katherine Taylor, Frances Rowe, Curtis Spence 

Staff: Robert Beosley, Earnest Cruikshank, Virginia 
Dillon, Dorothy Hines, Mary Louise Home, Virginia Mc- 
Crary, George Morelock, Fannie O'Keef, Rufus Powell, 
Trixie Tennis, Frank Tovlor 

THE BUSINESS STAFF 

Gordon G. Power, Business Manoger, Bernice Rose, 
Co-ed Business Manager. 

Assistant Business Managers Katherine Hewitt, 
Claiborne Gregory, Gordon Townley. 



Staff: Martha Balloy, Betty Chipmon, Howard Chase, 
Charles Dovey, William Gortelmann, Robert Goodwin, 
Walter Hostings, Woodfin Keesee, Dal Knight, Norman 
Livengood, Hyatt Mossburg, Sam Trakas, Jean Woiloner 





(jOfdon G Power 
Business Manager 



Two Hundred Eighty-nine 



CH ANTICLE ER 



THE DUKE CHRONICLE 




w: 



ITH the 
close of the 
1932-33 school 
year, the Duke 
Chronicle is con- 
eluding its 
twenty - seventh 
year of publica- 
tion. During 
the year, while 
several minor 
changes were 
undertaken b y 
the editor and 
editorial staff, 
the general 
make-up of the 
paper has re- 
m a i n e d u n- 
chonged. In the fall, possibilities of converting 
the weekly into a semi-weekly, with the enlarg- 
ing of each page from seven to eight columns, 
were discussed, but these changes were found 
impracticable. 
The main efforts of the editor have been 



James Stewart 
Editor 



directed towards making the Duke Chronicle the 
medium by which undergraduate students not 
only may, but do express their candid opinions, 
and by which a better unity of students in 
Trinity college may be effected. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

James L. Stewart, Editor; Joseph L. Skinner, 
Managing Editor; Rivera Ingle, Co-ed Editor; 
George W. Ewell, Sports Editor; Ann Ingles, 
Society Editor. 

Assistant Editors: L A Ganz, P. R Hamlin, 
A W, Honeycutt, Jeanne Holt, F. C. Jones, 
G H Lamar, A. C McCree, J. L. Moorhead, 
A G. Murchison, Margaret Nelms, A. W. Star- 
ratt, Mildred Taylor, Sara Walker. 




f^iPi^f!^. 




f^ '* j«* *^^- u «^* 




Editorial Staff 

McCree Pace Jordan Morehead Walker Edmundson Ingle Upchurch Hamlin 

Blair Taylor Ewell Skinner Ingles Armstrong Lamar Holt Murchison 



Two Hunflrpd Ninety 



PUBLICATIONS 




lb 



ia 



THE DUKE 

IN keeping with the continued growth of Duke 
University, the business staff of the Duke 
Chronicle in close cooperation with the editorial 
staff has been striving to give the students of 
Trinity College and the college community as a 
whole a good weekly paper. 

Since college newspapers are usually rated 
occording to volume and frequency of circula- 
tion, the business staff of the Duke Chronicle 
has a right to feel justly proud of the showing 
they have made The staff has built up a paid 
circulation of nearly three thousand copies and 
can boast of complete Duke community cover- 
age Advertising lineage, the principal source 
of income, has been increased this year over 
that of last year by nearly 35 per cent; and 
last year showed on increase of 30 per cent 
over the year previous This additional income 
has been reflected in the increased number of 
eight and ten page papers appearing this year 
These facts prove that the business staff has 
been very well managed and that the staff as 
a whole is an energetic one The manager has 
stated "anybody not minding hard work, 
possessing on inborn tendency to sell, and 
having a desire for some practical business to 



CHRONICLE 

mix with textbook theory, should come out for 
the staff; but remember," he odded, "people do 
not give you ads, you have to sell them " 
BUSINESS STAFF 

John D Minter, Business Manager, Frances 
Tudor, Co-ed Business Manager, Robert Nixon, 
Circulation Manager; Raymond L Kent, Adver- 
tising Manager. 

Assistont Monagers 

Richard Van 
Antwerp, Stuart 
S Fleming, Clare 
Feldman, Loroine 
Green, Graham 
Mc F a r I a n e , 
Louise Merkel, 
Willard Raisley, 
Sam Rogol, Paul 
Schanner, Fred 
Smith, Leonora 
Snyder, John 
S t I II man, Joe 
Trent, Margaret 
Touchstone, 
George Watson, 

Helen Wyatt. 

John D Minter 
Business Manager 




W^^^^^^^ 




1 LiKiilii Jl id^ 



r^ C) fs ^ f^ 

, ,T-m4«-f t}^'*^ W<r" ^^^ U-« 



?:> 



*w 




Stillmon 
Rogol 



Fleming 
Kent 



Feldman 
Nixon 



Business Staff 

Tudor 
Schanher 



Tompkins Ingram 

Trent Von Antwerp 



Smith 



Two Hundred Ninety-one 



CHANTICLEER 






> ^• 





Mustard 



Editorial Staff 

Jordan Few 

Markham Edmundson 

THE ARCHIVE 



Glasson 
Simpson 



Smith 




J B Clork 
Editor 



pNDING i t s 
^ forty - fifth 
year of uninter- 
rupted publica- 
tion the Archive 
of today is a far 
cry from the 
voluminous 
product of t h e 
late '90's, at 
which time it was 
forced t o serve 
simultaneously 
a s newspaper, 
literary m a g a- 
zine, and annual. 
With thechanges 
that musf ac- 
Time has come 
an Archive pub- 



compony the march of 
a new and better Archive 
lished monthly by the students and devoted 
primarily to o soliciting and printing of the best 
literary creations of the entire student body. 
There are no restrictions in regard to the class 
status of the contributors, every member of the 
college community is extended an opportunity 
to publish his work Recent editors have done 



much to obtain the writings of many of the 
nations outstanding literary figures, and by so 
doing, have aided materially in elevating the 
standard of the magazine and in providing its 
student contributors with excellent patterns for 
their own efforts. At the same time, these 
editors have as the policys of recent years show, 
strived more earnestly than ever before to devote 
most of the space to student authors, hoping 
in this way to maintain the magazine as a purely 
campus institution. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

J B Clark, Editor-in-Chief, Marjorie Glasson, 
Co-ed Editor; L. G. Edmondson, Managing 
Editor; Louis J. Clark, Book Review Editor; Vir- 
ginia Jordan, Correspondence Secretary, James 
Mustard, Richard Smith, Associate Editors; A T. 
West, Jay B. Hubbell, Archibald Henderson, 
Contributing Editors, Paul Dilworth, W. F. Eaker, 
Clinton Farris, Lynn Few, W. L Holler, William 
Long, Earle Runner, Leslie Squires, Robert Wood, 
Editorial Assistants 

Art Staff 

Preston Moses, Art Editor; Thomas Mark- 
ham, Stewart H Simpson, Ermengarde Wegener, 
Harry Willis, Assistants. 



Twn Hundrpfl Ninety-two 



PUBLICATIONS 



ft\"VUTj< ■i'vy-a.".i4 t .-a 



■■- vcs 



'V r"M>it«!Hi" 






TPr r^ f' . 'w tvrr ' 



THE ARCHIVE 



"TTHAT this work has not been in vain is proved 
by the eminence which the Archive has at- 
tained in having been awarded for the last four 
years first place over all other collegiate maga- 
zines in the state by the North Carolina Col- 
legiate Press Association. This is on un- 
paralleled achievement and should be regarded 
as significant in the decided advance which the 
publication has made since its founding in 1888. 
To the editors of tomorrow this fact should be 
kept in mind, not only for the acknowledged 
recognition that it brings both to the University 
and themselves, but for the indication of true 
merit in student work and student management. 
The years of the future should see even a 
greater and more commended Archive Tradi- 
tion will promote its greatness. Student loyalty 
and interest will assure its continued praise. 



BUSINESS STAFF 



M E Newson, Jr , Business Manager, Eliza- 
beth Sellers, Co-ed Business Manager, Mc- 
Carthy Hanger, Advertising Manager; Howard 
Chose, Circulation Manager, Charles Ackley, 
Charles Beatty, William Brumbach, C C Gould- 
man, Grady Hardin, Kern Ormond, Phillip 
Russel, Dave Wykoff, Assistant Managers 




M Eugeiie Newsom 
Business Manager 




'J V» <. 




^ fe 





(f?f ff^ 




Hanger 



Ormond 



Business Staff 
Sellors 



Beafty 



Chose 



Two Hundred Ninety-three 



CH ANTICLE ER 



THE DISTAFF 



TH E Distaff, 
' the only pub- 
lication of the 
Woman's C o I- 
lege, was estab- 
lished two years 
ago, the first 
year the women 
occupied the 
East Campus. It 
was founded en- 
tirely through 
the efforts of the 
women students, 
who desired a 
magazine of 
their own. The 
active interest in 
it maintained by 
the students has 
succeeded in placing it on a firm foundation in 
a very short time. Its purpose is to promote in- 
terest in creative writing on the campus, and 
to encourage literary efforts among the students 
by giving them an incentive to work. The Dis- 
taff maintains a high standard of quality in its 
material. It is a representative student publica- 
tion, the mouthpiece of student opinion. All 
members of the Woman's College, under- 
graduate and graduate, and all members of the 




Mildred Stites 
Editor 



Woman's College faculty are eligible to 
contribute. 

Editorial Staff 

Mildred Stites, Editor; Laura White, Associate 
Editor, Betty Knight, Poetry Editor, Rubye 
Fogel, Mary Harvey Love, Louise Newland, May 
Frances Turner, Assistant Editors. 

Business Staff 

Catherine Serfas, Business Manager; Martha 
Louise Kindel, 
Circulation Man- 
ager; Sara Fran- 
ces Davis, Char- 
line D w I i n g, 
Clare Feldman, 
Mary G r e i g , 
Dorothy Heroy, 
Sarah Howerton, 
Clara Kennedy, 
G e r g I a n n a 
Lamson, G r e t - 
chenLittle,Marie 
McLain, Bett> 
Parks, Annie 
Kate Rebman, 
Jane Ritter, As- 
sistant Business 
Managers, 

Catherine Serfas 
Business Manager 




p f^ (^ ^ Q f^ 

^ O ^ (? ^ 




Knight 
Dowling 



Heroy 
Feldman 



Staff 

Lomson Turner 

Rebman Ritter 



Kindel 
Greig 



White 



Two liiiiiclr<-<l Nlnety-roui' 



fi:;' 



mmiiiiwimmmmi 



mil 




Shield Taken from 
Doorway of Page Auditorium 



R 



M 



CHANTICLE ER 



DUKE PLAYERS 



OFFICERS 

Frank Garden, 
President, J, B. 
Clark, Vice Presi- 
dent; E d i t h a 
Norton, Secre- 
tary; George 
Pearson, Treas- 
u r e r ; William 
Wymann, Busi- 
ness Manager; 
Garlotta Waters, 
Girls' Business 
Manager. 

Members 

Calhoun An- 
c r u m , R . W . 
Archbold, Paul 
Baughman, Louise Carter, Bob Cook, Courtney 
Crowder, Helen Daniel, Andreas Darlson, John 
Eostlake, Turner Foster, Marjorie Glasson, Mont- 
gomery Gray, Carter Haywood, Jeanne Holt, 
Edward Huberman, Nancy Hudson, Sally Hunter, 
Eloise Ingram, Virginia Jordan, Anita Knox, 
Denzel Langston, Carl Lee, Edna Love, Ernest 
Lynch, Louise Merkel, Benjamin Narbeth, Mary 




A, T. West 
Director 



Jane Mulford, James Mustard, Margaret Nelms, 
Hubert Patterson, Florence Pos, Marshall Pritch- 
ett, Evely Schaffle, M. Bradley Stevenson, Eliza- 
beth Sherron, Isabel Shriner, Stanley Sittenfield, 
Leslie Squires, Marion Stratton, Trixie Tennis, 
Ethel Williams, Harry Willis, Samuel Wisdom. 




f^ 



i ML>t^ 





iL^jfrnfi^m^m 



Mulford 
Wisdom 



I emus 
Jordan 



Nelms 
C^ray 



Stevens 
Tompkins 



Langston 
Mustard 



Merkel 
Stratton 



Crowder 
Archibold 



Two Hiiiidri'd NIncl.VHix 



DRAMATICS 



'-T: 



h-n 



DUKE PLAYERS 



THE Duke Players have set up an enviable 

record for themselves during the past year 
Martiney Sierra's "Romantic Young Lady," a 
modern Spanish Comedy, was their first produc- 
tion of the year, and was soon followed by a 
bill of one-act plays. This second production 
marked the innovation of the presentation of 
Original one-act plays during the season, and 
proved very successful. It is the desire of the 
Organization to encourage in every way possible 
original play writing as a form of creative 
writing. 

In collaboration with the Quadrangle Pictures, 
the Players at one time presented "Overtones," 
and at the Birthday Party, "Four on a Heath." 
They also assisted in the technical work of the 
Birthday Party Production as well as making the 
scenery for it. 

Perhaps their most outstanding success was 
Sutton Vane's "Outward Bound" — Presented on 
March 10. In fact, it met with such acclaim 
that they were asked to repeat it, which they did 
a week later. 

At the Dramatic Tournament in Chapel Hill 



the Players upheld their high standards by win- 
ning the much-coveted first place plaques with 
both of the plays entered — George Kelly's 
"Finders Keepers" in the Production contest, ond 
Harry Willis's original play "Oasis" in the 
Original Play Contest 

In the Easter exercises on Sunday, April '^ 
Charles Rann 
Kennedy's "Ter- 
rible Meek" was 
presented, and 
on May 6 Percy 
MacKay's Poetic 
Chinese Ro- 
m a n c e — "A 
Thousand Years 
Ago" was given 
as a fitting cli- 
max to the May 
Day exercises 
and a most un- 
usually success- 
ful dramatic 
season. 




William Wyman 
Business Manager 








Pearson 
Darlson 



Holt 



Daniel 



Clarke 



Ingram 



Snyder 
Burleigh 



.!?5 



Patterson 
Eastlake 



Two Hun(lre<I Nliiety-seven 



CHANTICLEER 



DUKE PLAYERS 



"THREE years 
ago the Duke 
Players, then the 
Tourian Players, 
entered the Dra- 
matic Festival in 
Chapel Hill for 
the first time. 
That was the 
first year i n 
which there was 
any organized 
dramatic activity 
on the Duke 
Campus. Eugene 
O'Neill's "Bound 
East for Corcliff" was entered in the Play Pro- 
duction group and took first place among the 
Senior Colleges of the state. The second year 
The Duke Players became more ambitious and 
besides winning first place in the Play Produc- 
tion group with Susan Gaspell's "Suppressed 
Desires," they entered the scene design division 
and took first, second, and third places, as well 




Frank Garden 
President 



as first place in Costume designing and first 
place in Make-up. 

This year in the Play Production group George 
Kelley's "Finders Keepers" took first place and 
in the Original Play Group, Harry Willis's "Oasis" 
took first place from the standpoint of merit 
and in the manner of Production, The first place 
in scene design was won by Ann Ella Robertson, 
The Duke Players for three years have won first 
place in the Festival over the other Dramatic 
groups of the state. This goes to show that 
there is considerable interest in dramatic art 
on the Duke Campus, and that a high standard 
of dramatic art is being maintained 




Scene from Sutton Vane's "Outward Bound" 



Two Mundreil Nlnely-eiKliI 



ifi^iiilwJliMMifli|lii 

III 




Shield Taken from 
Front of Page Auditorium 



M 



U 



CHANTICLEER 




The Men's Glee Club 



MEN'S GLEE CLUB 



THE program for the Men's Glee Club 
* fortunately suffered no curtailment through- 
out the school year. Twenty-eight men under 
the direction of Mr. J. Foster Barnes, with Carlos 
Moseley as accompanist, were selected from a 
squad of over a hundred singers to make the fall 
tour. Concerts were given in Charlotte, 
Winston-Salem, Greensboro, Raleigh, and other 
leading cities in this state. Newspaper com- 

ments were 
favorable, if not 
even flattering, 
and the critics 
were unanimous 
in their praise of 
t h e balanced 
strength of the 
club 

The group 
made a short 
tour through 
Virginia i n the 
spring, after 
which the annual 
musical comedy 
was presented 
with the coopera- 
tion of the other 
musical units of 
the college. 




The Club, under its president, Mr. James 
Phillips, has been active between its tours in aid- 
ing at gatherings, giving social functions, and 
preparing for short excursions. Should funds 
prove adequate, a quartet or octet is expected 
to represent Duke at the World's Fair this 
summer. 



Montgomery Gray 

Business Manager of the 

Musical Clubs 



GLEE CLUB 

J. B. Allardice, Norman L. Anderson, Charles Beatty, 
Albert Blumenthol, Gordon Brown, G. E. Butner, Phil 
Casper, R. P. Chclker, John Cole, Don Correll, Ogden 
Davies, Frank Engle, E. S Everhart, Launce Flemister, 
Lawrence Gent, Fred Gerkins, Charles Graf, Edgar Hall, 
Parker Hamlin, McCarthy Hanger, William Hozleback, 
Russell Herbert, Nash Herndon, Charles Hicks, Horry 
Ingle, Arthur Jester, Royal Kornegoy, John Long, 
Maurice Miley, Robert Miller, Henry Miller, Stuart 
Miller, DeArmond Moore, Ira Moore, Carlos Moseley, 
Leonard Nonzetta, Derwood Ncwhort, Herbert Nus- 
baum, Robert Peck, J, Phillips, George Ricks, Harry 
Rouse, Ed Soylor, Eddie Scoffer, John Smith, Allen 
Stanley, Roy Thomas, J. P. Waggoner, Henry Lee 
Weathers, Beniamin Weems, Nathan Weinstein, Walter 
West, Ross Woodbridge, Roland Zeigler. 



Thret! Hundred 



MUSIC 



".■'.'jw.i-'-'ji ^\^ wv".' /^^' ." i v"-."M >'!ri 



TS^ 



WOMEN'S GLEE CLUB 



AS THE Woman's College of Duke University 
has expanded, the Women's Glee Club, 
under the direction of Mrs J. Foster Barnes, has 
increased proportionally. At the present time 
the group consists of ninety members. 

The functions of this group are varied Once 
annually the club appears in a concert on the 
East Campus In the spring of each year an 
operetta is given jointly by the Men's and the 
Women's Glee clubs in the auditorium on the 
West Campus Not one of the least of the 
functions of the Club is the part it plays in the 
Chapel Choir, which furnishes the music for the 
services every Sunday morning. 

The_club contributes programs for the Friday 
morning Musicals on the Woman's Campus, 
teas, banquets, and other social events. 

A music study and appreciation club has been 
formed which serves a vital need in the study 
and appreciation of music as well as furnishing 
an opportunity for the girls to perform and ex- 
press their musical talents. 

OFFICERS 

Director: Mrs J Foster Bornes; Assistant Director: 
Dorothy Newsom, Librarian Nelson Powell; President: 
Dorothy Newsom, Vice President : Lucy Harris; Treasurer: 
Janet Griffin; Business Manager: Tempe Newsom; 
Secretary Fannie O'Keef 

Members 

Evelyn Adams, Ida Shaw Applewhite, Ruth Baker, 
Dorothy Barger, Marguerite Brittian, "Eleanor Brutan, 
Helen Blalock, Elizabeth Boyd, Kathryn Buice, 
Elvira Burleigh, Dorothv Caldwell, Elaine Childs, 



Marguerite Collins, 

Julio Combs, 

Eleonor Congdon, 

Catherine Conger 

Adeline Cooper 

Ruth Crutchfield 

Annie Lee Cutchinb, 

Dorothy D o s c h, 

Grace Elgar, Dorothy 

F I e b b e, Betty 

F r i e m a e, Marta 

Grabiel, Janet Grif- 
fin, Jane Hoislip, 

Lucy Harris, Martha 

Alice Heard, 

Hannah Heptinstail, 

Margaret Herman, 

Margaret H i n e s, 

Emmie H o r t o n, 

Nancy Hudson, 

Adalyn Ingram, 
Helen Morris Jones, 
Dorothy Kirkmon, 
Denzie Longston, 
Dorothy Leory, 

Nancy Leitch, Edith Lucas, Janet McAfee, Gladys Mc- 
Bain, Mary Meiklejohn, Margaret Meriam, Thelma 
Mewborn, Marian Nonce, Dorothy Newsom, Tempe 
Newsom, Dorothy Noble, Fannie O'Keef, Elmo Cole Pomp- 
lin, Lottie Parker, Elizabeth Porks, Verdo Porks, Angelo 
Patterson, Coro Paterson, Ruth Patterson, Marie 
Pelgrim, Moybell Poovey, Nelson Powell, Sara Price, 
Louise Relyea, Caroline Reifle, Helen Rigg, Eleanor 
Rodgers, Marion Roe, Isobel Shnner, Susan Singleton, 
Betty Slocumb, Margaret Smith, Audrey Speicher, Annie 
Stabler, Eleanor Thompkms, Thedo Upchurch, Emily 
Vaughn, Elizabeth Voegtien, Sara Walker, Virginio 
Weotherspoon, Ermengarde Wegener, Bessie Wilson, 
Dorothy Withom, Edna E Wilson, Madge Woolsey, Ednc 
Zimmerman 




Mrs 



J. Foster Barnes 
Director 




The Women's 



Three Hundred One 



CHANTICLEER 



"JELLY" LEFTWICH AND HIS ORCHESTRA 



PROBABLY tne most popular organization of 
the combined Musical Clubs is the Uni- 
versity Club Jazz Orchestra This unit has ex- 
perienced, along with the other musical or- 
ganizations, a gradual development, and today 
it has reached the point where it is recognized 
as probably the finest college dance ensemble 
in the entire southland. 

Although there had been jazz orchestras on 
the compus several years before, the coming of 

"Jelly" Leftwich 
to Duke as Di- 
rector of Instru- 
mental Music 
was the begin- 
ning of a more 
thorough de- 
velopment of this 
modernistic type 
of music The 
origin of the Uni- 
V e r s I t y Club 
Orchestra was in 
1926, when under 
the name of the 
"Blue Devils," its 
first appearance 
was made in con- 
nection with a 
band concert in 
Since that date, no 




George E. Leftwich 
Director 

Craven Memorial Hall 



social function of any importance has been en- 
tirely complete without the presence of this 
orchestra. In 1928, the name of the orchestra 
was changed to the name under which it now 
functions. 

Besides taking a part in the concerts given 
by the Musical Clubs and giving its services at 
social functions on the campus, the University 
Club is in great demand as a dance band all 
over this state, as well as in other states in the 
south. For two summers, the orchestra played 
at the Carolina Terrace Hotel and Laurel Park 
at Hendersonville, N. C, and for the post 
three years has played at Wrightsville Beach, 
N. C, where they will also return this summer. 

The University Club, during its entire life as 
an orchestra, has been composed very largely 
of self-help students. In furnishing employment 
for such students and at the some time develop- 
ing musical organization of the highest stand- 
ards of excellence in the field of popular music, 
it has been a great addition to the university 
campus. 



MEMBERS 

G. E. Leftwich, Director; G E. Lynch, Piano; J W 
Lupton, Drums; J. A. Booher, Banjo; H. M. Gibson, 
Saxophone; W. D. Scribner, Saxophone; Hugo Germino, 
Saxophone.' J W. Woodward, Trumpet; W. G. Lassiter, 
Trumpet; T J. Lassiter, Trombone; Grant Byerly, Bass; 
J. Long, Violin; A J Blumenthal, Violin; L. Turner, 
Violin; and Miss Annie Lee Cutchin, Solist 




Jelly Leftwich's Orchestra 



Threp Hunrlrpfl Two 



MUSIC 






??5 



>»<tr->v>'*^j!tn>iKU 



"^ 






v ' ir^LJ i hf ' n ny-.'. i -. < j 






J^H 







The Symphony Orchestra 



THE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



THE Symphony Orchestra, in the American 
' college of today, is very rare, especially in the 
south where classical music has not developed 
so rapidly as in other sections of the country. 
Duke University hos made a great step of ad- 
vancement in this field of music, and today Duke 
has a symphony which, although comparatively 
young, is recognized' as one of the most out- 
standing musical organizations of its type in 
the south. 

As early as 1905, Trinity College hod a con- 
cert orchestra, but this organization was small, 
with poor instrumentation, and did not prove 
permanent. Until 1919, it might be said that 
Trinity experienced a "dark age" in so for as 
orchestral music was concerned However, in 
1919, a period of development began which 
finally led to the organization of the Symphony 
Orchestra In that year. Professor K B Patter- 
son, as director, organized a concert orchestra 
of eleven pieces Professor Patterson worked 
very faithfully and mode much progress. In 
1926, G E Leftwich came to Duke, and in a 
very short time after his coming, the orchestra 
developed by Professor Patterson was organized 
into the Duke Symphony The membership of 
this organization numbered twenty-five, which 
was almost twice the number of any previous 
orchestra on this campus. 

Under the direction of Mr. Leftwich, the 



Symphony Orchestra has mode wonderful 
progress In size, it has a membership of over 
fifty with full 
instrumentation 

MEMBERS 

Violins t a a I 
Schcffer, Royal 
Lornegay, L a r r \ 
Turner, R. F Zeig- 
ler, Herbert Nus- 
baum, L u n c e 
Flemister, Albert 
Blumenthol, John 
Long, Nathan 
Weinstein, H e n t 
Weathers Robe- 
Walsh, Ernes 
Wood, Iro Moor' 
Jock Tonnonbaun 

Viola H a r r 
Rush Bass Shell. 
Dole, W 1 1 11 m 
Hazelbeck, Sidney 
Wo! tz. Piano 
Carlos M s I e y, 
Maurice Miley Oboe Leonard Nonzetto 




President Musical Clubs 



Horn 



Lawrence Gent Basson R A Boyd Cornets J B 
Allordice, John Smith, Robert Miller, Rozelle Holmon 
Flutes Allen Stanley, Henry Miller, Burke Smith Trom- 
bones: G E Butner, DeArmond Moore. T j Lossiter 
Clannets Edgar Hall, Jr, Robert P Cholker, Charles 
Hicks, McCarthy Hanger Drums Horry Ingle, 
Charles Beotty. Conductor G E Leftwich, jr. 



Three Hundred Three 



CHANTICLEER 



THE DUKE UNIVERSITY BAND 



"TH E Duke 
' Band, is prob- 
ably the most 
outstanding 
musical or- 
ganization n 
the campus 
However, the 
band has at- 
tained its place 
f importance 
only very recent- 
ly In truth, It 
m I g h t b e said 
that the band 
has developed 
literally over 
night. 

Between the 
years 1915 and 
1925 the band received very little attention, 
but with the creation of Duke University from 
Trinity College and with the movement which 
followed to enlarge the scope and activities of 
the institution, a demand came from both stu- 
dent body and alumni for a real band. At the 
beginning of school in 1926, G. E. Leftwich, Jr., 
successor to S. A. Bracton who had been em- 
ployed by the college for the year previous, came 
to Duke OS full-time Director of Instrumental 
Music. The coming of Mr. Leftwich marks the 




V"- 



The Blue Devil 
The Fighting Symbol of Duke 



beginning of a period of, unheard of advance- 
ment for the band. In a very short time the first 
"real" band in the history of this institution was 
ready to appear publicly, and its first appear- 
ance was made at the opening football game of 
that season. 

Since 1926 the bond hod developed with 
rapidity and thoroughness, and today it stands 
out as one of the best college bands in the south. 
The band today is composed of 80 pieces being 
selected from a group of over one hundred and 
fifty men competing for membership. 

MEMBERS 

G. E Leftwich, Jr., Director 

J. B. Allardice, N R. Beachem, C. D. Beatty, E. B 
Bernstein, Jess Bernstein, J. R, Blair, J. A. Booher, R. A. 
Boyd, R. H. Briggs, G. B. Butner, R. P. Chalker, L, A 
Coone, E. B. Craven, R. C. Crawford, Shelby Dale, Ogburg 
Davis, Alfred Eckles, Stough Gantt, C. Garney, Lawrence 
Gent, Hugh Germino, H. M. Gibson, J. E. Gibson, J W. 
Goodard, E. M. Hall, Jr., McCarthy Hanger, J. M, Hatch, 
William Hazlebeck, T. W. Herb, Charles Hicks, Rozelle 
Holmon, P. B. Huling, Harry Ingle, Arthur Kenncn, T. J 
Lassiter, W. G, Lassiter, R. A. Little, John Long, W, 
Luly, John W. Lupton, J. C. McDonald, A. K. Mclntyre, 
Maurice Miley, Henry Miller, Robert Miller, DeArmond 
Moore, Paul Moorefield, Leonard Manzetta, Ed Newmark, 
R. E. Niedncgei, I. W. Nielsen, Hugh Page, M. E Roe- 
buck, Thornton Rutherford, W. D. Scnbner, Robert 
Shulman, Stanley Sittenfield, Burke, Smith, John Smith, 
Allen Stanley, Jess Stigler, George Streud, Hoover Taft, 
J. F. Thomas, W. T. Walker, J. C. Watson, Charles 
Whitaker, W. K. Wilkinstad, A. G. Wilson, Sidney Woltz, 
J R Woods, J W. Woodward. 




The Band 



Three lliiiidrotl Four 



I 









P 











'if^ 



:;-;^-^:/-v:;;-;:V^^'fll<:?J|M>^ 



Sculpture Taken from 
Doorway of House K 



H 



CHANTICLEER 




DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS 




Wallace Wade 
Director of Athletics and Head Football Coach 



\A/ALLACE WADE, who assumed com- 
"■ plete charge of athletics at Duke 
University in January, 1931, brought with 
him from Alabama one of the greatest 
records of American football coaches. And 
he has continued that record at Duke. His 
football teams of the past two seasons 
have been beat only six times in twenty 
games. They have been scored on in only 
those six games they lost. 

The 1932 team finished the season rated 
as just under conference championship 
calibre, but turned in the North Carolina 
title In. the southern conference it was 
beaten only by Auburn and Tennessee, the 
two leading teams, and by N C. State in 
an upset. Auburn was victorious, 18-7; 
Tennessee by a 16-13 score. 

In addition to his duties as head foot- 
ball coach at Duke, Mr. Wade, as athletic 
director, has installed a greatly enlarged 
physical education program that includes 
a department of intramural athletics de- 
signed to furnish athletics for all students. 
In its two years of operation, a great per- 



centage of Duke students have taken part in some 
sort of athletic program. 

His career as a coach is studded with brilliancy, 
beginning when he became head coach at a small 
school in Tennessee, where he attracted Dan 
McGugin's attention as an able handler of men, and 
consequently went to Vandy as assistant to McGugin. 
Two years later he went to Alabama, and remained 
there through the 1930 season. 

Wallace Wade was graduated from Brown with 
an A, B. degree in the spring of 1917. He saw serv- 
ice in the World War, receiving his discharge in 
1919 The some year Wade became head coach at 
the Fitzgerald and Clarke school at Tullahoma, 
Tennessee, where until 1921 he put out state cham- 
pionship teams in football, basketball and baseball. 

In 1921, Wade went to Vanderbilt as assistant 
to Dan McGugin, Through his coaching during the 
two years he was there, Vandy won the Southern Con- 
ference titles each year. In 1922 they played a tie 
gome with Michigan. 

In his first year at Alabama his team won seven 
gomes out of nine played. In 1924, 1925, and 1926 
the Alabama teams were Southern Conference 
champions In 1925 the Tide defeated the Uni- 
varsity of Washington in the 
Rose Bowl, 20 to 19. In 1926, 
Stanford invited Wade's team 
to the Tournament of Roses and 
the two teams tied, 7 to 7. 

In 1927, his team won five 
games, lost four and tied one. In 
1928, they won six out of nine 
played and had the same record 
for the following year. 

His team in 1930 is said to 
have been his greatest. Rolling 
up a great record for the season, 
they accepted Washington 
State's invitation to the Rose 
Bowl and won decisively. 

In twelve years of college 
coaching he has produced, or had 
a hand in producing, six Southern 
Conference championship teams.. 
His record at Alabama credits his 
teams with 61 victories, 13 losses, 
and 3 ties. 




Three Hiindrorl Six 



ATHLETICS 



ATHLETICS AT DUKE 



/^APTAIN Lowell Mason, as field general for 
Duke's 1932 football team, played no little 
part in the success of that aggregation. Smart, 
quick-witted, crafty and always cool under fire, 
he possessed all the qualifications of a first-rate 
quarterback. His ability to detect weak spots 
in the opponent's lines and to direct plays ac- 
cordingly brought many victories to the Blue 
Devils as the season progressed. The little 
signal-caller encouraged and inspired his mates 
when the breaks were against them, thus in- 
stilling into the players a determination that, in 
victory, carried them onward, and, in defeat, 
kept them fighting doggedly until the end. 

A spirit, unequalled in past gridiron machines 
at Duke, prevailed on the club throughout the 
fall The boys had many long and arduous prac- 



tices, even before the first contest of the season, 
but when games roiled around they went onto 
the field and gave the best they had What 
more could be asked^ 

The team functioned as a unit There were 
no attempts at individuality, but instead, each 
man contributed his part for the good of the 
whole. Cooperation and team-work made this 
year the most successful in Duke gridiron history. 

Spirit like this is fast becoming a tradition 
with Duke athletic teams as they mount into 
prominence in the south and even in the nation. 
Some day, and that is not for off, Duke will come 
into her own in the field of athletics and the 
spotlight of the nation will be turned on her in 
glorified brilliance. 



a 






Lowell Moson 
Captain of Footboll 



Three Hundred Seven 



CHANTICLEER 




Voyles Cani' 



Hagler Caldwell Baker 



Waite Sington 



COACHING STAFF 



pVUKE takes great pride in the fact that she 
has one of the best coaching staffs in the 
entire country to guide the destinies of her 
othletic teams. That each man on the staff is 
deservino of the department which he heads is 
bolstered by the meritable records which are 
credited to their respective careers. 

Jack Coombs, "the wonder man of baseball" 
came to Duke as coach in 1929 after a brilliant 
career of professional ball. In his four years 
here he has turned out one southern conference 
team and three state championship teams 
Aside from being an excellent coach he is very 
popular with the whole student body. 

Carl Voyles, first assistant to Wade and head 
track coach, comes here highly recommended 
by the University of Illinois authorities. His 
record at the latter school has been continued 
at Duke as his track teams are rapidly becom- 
ing of championship calibre 

Eddie Cameron, from point of service in the 
Blue Devil fold, is a veteran of the staff Once 
great athlete at Washington and Lee, he is 
now regarded os one of the best athletic tutors 
in the south. His duties are divided between 
instructing the bockfield of the football team 
and being head coach of basketball Four con- 
secutive court championships have been an- 
nexed during his regime. 



Dumpy Hagler, former pupil of Wade at 
Alabama, is an assistant football coach He 
drills the linemen and from some of the stars he 
has developed it is apparent that he is doing his 
job well 

Herschel Caldwell, a teammate of Hagler's 
has the important duty of acclimating the fresh- 
men to college athletics. Yearling squads under 
his direction have done exceptionally well. 

Lenox Baker, although he had no actual 
coaching job, contributed greatly to the success 
of the Blue Devil sports through his unusual 
ability as a trainer. 

Alex Waite, was added to the staff by Coach 
Wade in view of his excellent record at Asheville 
high. He has developed some good material 
for the varsity in his work with the reserve 
squads. 

Freddie Sington, All-Amencan at Alabama, 
instructs the linemen on both the varsity and the 
freshman football squads. 

K. C. Gerard, who was transferred from the 
University of Illinois athletic staff, has made 
intramural sports an extensive part of the under- 
graduate prnqrom at Duke 

Add Warren, Marshall Crichton, Bob Tuttle, 
and Jock Persons have shown marked success 
and ability in boxing and wrestling, golf, cross 
country and swimming respectively. 



Three Hundrod Right 



ATHLETICS 



INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS 



^OACH Carl Voyles, former mentor at the 
University of Illinois, come to Duke two 
years ago and brought with him the system of 
intramural athletics which proved most suc- 
cessful at that institution He also brought with 
him Mr Kenneth C. Gerard to take charge of 
the program at Duke. These men took action at 
once and have now built up one of the most use- 
ful sports programs here on the campus. 

The primary use of intramural athletics is 
to allow those men who have not the ability to 
moke a varsity team the chance to engage in 
competitive sport. The consequence is to build 
up a spirit of team play, the sacrifice of self to 
the good of the whole team, and above all, that 
spirit of fair play which is the cardinal principle 
of competition in life itself. 

To date, over fourteen hundred students have 
availed themselves of the benefits, both recrea- 
tional and mental, which the intramural pro- 
gram has offered here. The following table 
gives a very good conception of the enthusiasm 
and support which has been received: 

Fall Tennis, one hundred forty-five. Fall 
Trock, four hundred eighty-two; Touch Football, 
five hundred seven; Basketball, six hundred 
twelve; Wrestling, one 
hundred eighteen; Box- 
ing, fifty-seven; Swim- 
ming, sixty; Handball, 
forty; Playground Ball, 
two hundred forty; Golf, 
thirty-six; Spring Tennis, 
one hundred fifty; Spring 
Track, one hundred ten 
Total to date, two thou- 
sand five hundred fifty- 
seven. 

To date two thousand 
five hundred fifty-seven 
boys have competed in 
intramural activities. 
This figure was deter- 
mined by the number of 
entries in each sport re- 
ceived by the department. 



Some, however, competed in two or more sports, 
so that our original figure of over one thousand 
four hundred is correct. 

The interest in this phase of athletics has 
grown more and more every year, and this year, 
to prevent another runaway with the title by 
any one fraternity, as was the case lost year, 
the fraternities have manifested the finest spirit 
ever shown on the campus in ony activity 

1932-33 has been a banner year for the intra- 
mural department, and Coach Voyles has been 
loud in the praise of the student body He has 
but one more wish, aside from a Southern con- 
ference championship in football and track, and 
that is that the intramural program will be even 
more successful from now on than it hos been 
in the past. 



VARSITY MANAGERS 




o c^. 




Caldwell 
Golf 



Kasper 

Football 

Newton 

Basketball 



Hilderbrortdt 
Baseball 

F • ' 
T 



Land 
Wrestling 



Throe lliinilre<) Nine 



CHANTICLEER 




SCHOOL SPIRIT 



CCHOOL spirit is, perhaps, one of the most 
intongible, yet certainly one of the most im- 
portant elements that go to mould a great uni- 
versity. It IS born in an atmosphere of good- 
fellowship, of contentment and well-being. There 
IS a certain serenity about it, and yet it is at 
once vibrant, strangely alive. People sense it 
immediately, and worm to its glow. Like kind 
words coming from nowhere, it fills the heart, 
and binds men together into one great family, 
proud of brotherhood and honor. 

We have it here, and its growth is measured 
in generous sportsmanship. It come first with 
self-respect, was strengthened by generosity. 



and finally blossomed under idealism. 

A college may be accurately measured by its 
spirit, be It chivalrous, then that college is 
pledged to chivalry, be it selfish or apathetic, 
then these personal characteristics are to be 
found in the majonty of its students. In short. 
It is a living thing, a creature shaped from the 
personalities of men. It represents to the world 
at large what we are, we who are creating some- 
thing now, both for our college and for ourselves. 

Though we return fifty years from now, yet 
shall we find a part of ourselves still within 
these walls — that part of us which now goes to 
build school spirit. Let us build well! 



The Cheer Leaders 




Dui iinyL-i 



Nt 



Doty 



Bandle M, Duttera W. Duttera 



Three Hundred Ten 






Cf^^^:^" ■''' 




Sculpture Taken from the 
Tower of the Gym 



B 



CHANTICLEER 





Cox 
Halfback 



Abbott 

t-lnlfhnrk 



Ershler 
Fullback 




FOOTBALL 1932 

THE 1932 Duke football team gained 
more recognition in the sports world than 
any of its predecessors. Coach Wallace 
Wade, in his second year with the Blue 
Devils, overthrew two distinct disadvantages 
which faced him at the beginning of the 
season in the form of green material and 
lack of weight, to turn out a club that im- 
proved steadily as the season progressed. 
Playing o difficult schedule of ten games, 
the Devils finished the season with seven 
victories and three losses to capture the Big 
Five title, and finish near the top in South- 
ern Conference standings. In the scoring 
column they showed marked superiority 
over their opponents, who could account for 
only 40 points in comparison to the 140 
amassed by the Duke grid machine. All 
enemy counters were registered in the three 
setbacks handed the Blue and White 

National recognition was received by 
Freddie Crawford, Duke tackle, who was 
placed on tfie Ail-American second team. 
In addition to this honor, he was unani- 
mously chosen for a berth on the mythical 
All-Southern, Crawford's play brought dis- 



'I'liKM- IIuiiiIj I'll Twelve 



ATHLETICS 




tinctions to Duke which never before hod 
been realized when he was named on these 
all-star aggregations. Other players re- 
ceiving special merit for their work were 
Captain Lowell Mason and Horry Rossi ter, 
quarterback and end, who were given places 
on the second All-Southern. 

Special credit must be given this team 
for another thing. They filled the order 
that Duke followers had been awaiting so 
long when they defeated our traditional 
rivals, the University of North Carolina, 
marking the first time that Duke had 
achieved this feat since the two schools re- 
sumed athletic relations in 1922. 

The first game of the season was staged 
in the Duke stadium with the scrappy 
Davidson Wildcats slated to test the mettle 
of on unknown array of Blue Devil gridders 
In a somewhat listless game that revealed 
the ability of two sophomore backs. Cox 
and Cornelius, and the unquestionable fit- 
ness of Fred Crawford in his new position at 
left tackle, the Devils rang up a 13 to 
victory However a damper was cast on 
the victory when it was learned that Joe 




Mason 
Quarterback 



Tlinc Huriilr«'<l Ti.in.-.-ii 



CHANTICLEER 



Brown lee 
Halfback 





Hendrickson 
Quarterback 



Sink 
Center 



Brumbach 
Halfback 



Sink, veteran center, was compelled to give 
up football on account of his health, and 
adding to this, Cornelius sustained an ankle 
injury in the following practice that was to 
keep him out of the game for several weeks. 

Despite the injuries, however, the Blue 
Devils journeyed to Lexington, Virginia the 
next week-end to trample the weak V. M. I. 
team in a 44 to slaughter. The team, as 
a whole, appeared to be much improved 
over their first encounter as they blocked 
and tackled much better than on the pre- 
vious occasion Nick Laney gave a remark- 
able exhibition of ball carrying to score two 
Duke touchdowns. 

Travelling down to Birmingham for their 
next contest, the Devils met a powerful grid- 
iron machine in Auburn, losing to them 
after a valiant struggle, 18 to 7. The 
Plainsmen counted their first two touch- 
downs immediately after two "heaven-sent" 
breaks had placed them in any easy scoring 
position on the Duke five yard stripe. It 
was enough to demoralize any ordinary 
team, but the Wade-coached eleven re- 
turned the second quarter to put Auburn 



Three Hundrpfl Fourteen 



ATHLETICS 




••f>U- -^»^ «X'"" ''^ 




on the defensive. Bob Cox and Lowell 
Mason concerted in totin' the ball for the 
longest sustoined drive of the day, which 
was climaxed by Duke's only touchdown 
A pass from Mason to James was the count- 
ing play. This unparalleled exhibition of 
fighting spirit drew the praise of many 
enemy rooters. 

Returning home the Devils swamped 
Maryland by a 34 to score before a large 
crowd of home-coming alumni. Combining a 
strong offense with an almost impregnable 
defense, Duke outclassed the Old Liners by 
a wide margin. In addition to counting five 
touchdowns and four extra points, they 
completely crushed Maryland's running 
attack. 

Wake Forest, who had been unscored on 
previously, was the next invader to fall be- 
fore the unleashed attack of the Blue Devils, 
9 to 0. Although we marched deep into their 
territory three times, the Deacons soon 
punted out of danger when Duke lost the 
ball perilously near the goal line. Laney 
scored the only touchdown of the day when 
he broke loose for a 65 yard dash off-tackle. 




Dunlop, E B. 
Center 



Crawford 
Tockle 



Thre« Hundred Fifteen 



CHANTICLEER 




§,^mf. 




Cornelius 
Halfback 





Shock 
Guard 



Phipps 
Tackle 



Torre 
End 



Cradford broke through to smear a Wake 
Forest kicker behind his goal and add a 
safety. 

Tennessee defeated Duke 16 to 13 in one 
of the most exciting games ever played on 
their field. A field goal in the last minute 
of play was the bare margin of victorv for 
the Vols, who had been literally swept from 
their feet by a typical Duke comeback that 
saw the score tied at 13-13 until that fatal 
kick reversed the situation. One of the 
Blue Devil counters was registered by Fred- 
die Crawford, who intercepted a pass and 
ran 80 yards for the score. Mason ac- 
counted for the last tolly on a line plunge 
after a march down the field that put the 
ball in scoring position. The Blue Devils 
had improved steadily since the Aiiburn 
game and gave proof of it against 

Tennessee. 

Home again on, the Saturday following 
that exciting tilt played in Knoxville, Duke 
proceeded to put the skids under the huge 
aggregation from Kentucky to the tune of 
13 to 0. The game was, up to that time, 
the worst defeat suffered by the Blue Grass 
lads. The visitors ran well in the midfield 
but were always stopped by our great de- 
fensive play when they neared our goal line. 



TInHf Uiiiidrcd Sixteen 



ATHLETICS 




Hetidrickson, entering the fray as a substi- 
tute, pulled off a beautiful 67 yard run to 
aid tremendously in the making of Duke's 
first touchdown. Crawford again stood out 
as a powerful linesman. 

Upsets will come now and then, but it was 
the second time in succession that the same 
outfit turned the trick, when N C State 
surprised followers of the sport by eking 
out a one touchdown margin over our Blue 
Devils the next Saturday. The 6 to score 
did not over-emphasize the Wolfpack's 
superiority in that particular contest, but it 
also did not prove the Duke eleven to be 
the same team of the previous week. The 
players tried hard but the spark was 
missing. 

"Beat Carolina'" — that little slogan hod 
been around the Duke campus for a number 
of years, but it never seemed to do much 
good to shout it and dream it However, 
on November 19, 1932, a Duke team went 
into Kenan stadium and did beat Carolina. 
The score was 7 to 0, but tnval things ore 
incidental when a goal is reached, but 



Werner 
Guard 



Andrews 
Guard 



Dunlap J 

Guard 



Thrc«> Hundred Serente«n 



CHANTICLEER 



Belue 
Back 





James 
End 



Rossi ter 
End 



Porreca 
Tackle 




even then the result does not reveal the 
true light on the game, for those Blue Devils 
showed stuff to delight the most pessimistic 
Duke fan as they ran, through, over, and 
around, the whole Carolina team. Laney 
scored the all important touchdown on a 
dive over center. Cornelius added the extra 
point from placement to make it 7 to 
The Blue Devils of 1932 had accomplished 
what no other modern Duke eleven had 
done — and what a sweet victory! 

Five members of this team hung up their 
football togs for the last time following the 
Carolina game. These seniors were instru- 
mental in the remarkable record made by 
the Blue Devils during the past season, and 
Captain Lowell Mason, Artie Ershler, Ken 
Abbott, John Brownlee, and Pop Werner 
will be keenly missed when the task of as- 
sembling future football teams at Duke 
takes place. 

At the close of the season letters were 
awarded to the following men as a reword 
for service during the season: Captain 
Mason, Ershler, Brownlee, Abbott, Werner, 
Andrews, Belue, Cornelius, Cox, Crawford, 
E. Dunlap, J. Dunlap, Hendrickson, James, 
Keller, Means, Porreca, Rogers, Rossi ter, 
Shock, and Manager Kasper. 



Three Hundred KIghteen 



iiPiiii 




llliillillsr^ 






Shield Taken from 
Rear of House L 



BASK 



B 



CHANTICLEER 



BASKETBALL 

the fourth con- 




Coach Eddie Cameron 



t 



pOR 

secutive year Duke 
captured the state 
basketball crown. The 
1933 cagers, built 
around a group of last 
year's star sophomores, 
showed surprising 
strength as the season 
progressed and finished 
the year with a most 
enviable record. Ploy- 
ing nineteen scheduled 
games the Blue Devil 
basketeers emerged the 
victor in fifteen, while 
dropping but four. 
Statistics show that 
Duke amassed a total of 664 
— ^ points to her opponents' 536. 

f{ Opening the season with 

•i' the annual northern trip, five 

veterans stepped on the 
1 floor OS Duke met Baltimore 

university in the initial game. 
Hayes and Home at for- 
wards, Jim Thompson at 
center, and Weaver and 
Herb Thompson at guards 
composed the starting outfit 
which defeated the Orioles 
38-32. At Georgetown the 
following night, Jim Thomp- 
son counted 17 points to 
lead his mates to a 35-30 
victory. Concluding the tour 
against a highly favored 
George Washington five, the 
Devils surprised the experts 
OS they eked out another win, 35-34. 

After the Christmas holidays Duke met Fur- 
man in the first home gome of the season In 



I 



h 



V. 



Porgoe 
Center 

J Thompson 
Center 



an exciting tilt which kept the spectators on 
edge the Blue Devils finally won, 31-28. 
Pargoe, at center, scored 12 points to lead 
the home team. Moving over to Charlotte, 
the Devils ran rough-shod through Davidson in 
the most one-sided contest of the entire 
season, 58-14. Jim Thompson set a scor- 
ing record for other players to shoot at as he 
registered 24 counters. Woke Forest next in- 
vaded the Devils' lair, but were turned away with 
a 33-24 defeat. 

Then followed another 9 

northern excursion with f 

Maryland as the first foe. 

Duke held a 15-13 lead at 

the half, but slumped during 

the final period as the Old 

Liners forged ahead to take 

the gome 30-28. A wild 

exhibition of goal shooting 

OS the Devils were badly off 

form brought Duke a drub- 
bing at the hands of the 

U. S. Naval Academy, 44-28. 
Playing Wake Forest for 

the second time, the Devils 

returned to the win column 

by virtue of a 34-16 victory. 

Home and Jim Thompson 

were the big guns for Duke. 

Another Big Five opponent 

took the floor as N C State 

was met in the next contest. 

Throwing off examination 

worries, the Blue Devils took 

the measure of the Wolf- 

pack in well-ployed exhi- 
bition, 36-29. In another 

contest which clearly marked 

the superiority of the local 

cagers, V. M. I. was token 

into camp by a 41-20 score. 




i 



n 



Hayes 
Forward 

Clark 
Guard 

Weaver 
Guard 



Tlirci' Ihnidrpfl Twenty 



ATHLETICS 



An overflow crowd witnessed the renewal of 
basketball rivalry between the University of 
North Carolina and Duke The Devils accrued 
a tremendous lead at the out-set, but the Tar 
Heels gradually cut it down until the closing 
minutes of the game saw a nip and tuck affair, 
the contest not being a safe issue until the 
final gun sounded with Duke leading, 36-32 
Jim Thompson again led the way with 14 points 
At Lynchburg the team defeated Washington 
and Lee 49-25 in a dazzling exhibition of court 
play. V. M I. and V. P. I. both bowed to the 
Devils, the former, 31-15; the latter, 31-25, thus 
rounding out a successful three day tour of 
Virginia. 

Continuing this latest streak, Cameron's boys 
returned home to defeat Davidson again, 44-28. 
Then came the crucial game with Carolina 
which was to decide the state championship. 
Another banner crowd saw the Devils safely 
tuck away the game and the Big Five crown, but 
not until the final minutes did they gather the 
margin which clinched a 
31-24 victory. Home and 
Jim Thompson contributed 
freely toward the scoring, 
while Phil Weaver, depend- 
able guard, played a great 
floor game. 

In the last home game of 

the season, Duke lost to 

N. C. State, 28-40. With 

the exception of Phil 

Weaver, who counted on 

even dozen tallies, the whole 

team appeared to be in a 

|L slump. However, the out- 

.^2^ come meant little as Big Five 

Bowen Standings remained unalter- 

Forward g^ Ending the regular 

Fonvard schedule, the Devils lost to a 




9 







powerful aggregation from 
the University of South Coro 
I ma, 23-46. 

A challenge from the sen- 
sational Duke team of 1930 
having been accepted bv the 
present wearers of the Blue 
and White, the two teams 
met in a much advertised 
contest The "old school," 
led by such famed perform 
ers as Councillor, Croson, 
Farley, Rogers, and Werber, 
gave an amazing account of 
themselves during the first 
period to lead the "new 
school" 18-10 at intermis- 
sion. Coming back strong in 
the final period the younger 
players showed new deter- 
mination to win in a whirl- 
wind finish, 35-33, thus prov- 
ing the athletic axiom, "they 
don't come back." 

Going into the S I C 
tourney, staged in the Ra- 
leigh Auditorium, Duke was 
named as one of the four 
seeded teams The first 
round of play saw the Devils 
dispose of Virginia with com- 
parative ease, 38-24. Their 
next opponent, in the second 
round, was Washington and 
Lee, and Duke won the right 
to meet South Carolina in 
the finals with a 41-32 vic- 
tory over the Generals After 
holding a 15-13 edge at intermission, the Devils 
saw the leod vanish eorly in the second half 
as the Gamecocks swished fh*^ npt with ap- 




F Lewis 
Forward 

Mo son 
ForwnrH 

N L..S 
Forword 

Bell 
Forword 



Three Hundred Twenty-one 



CHANTICLEER 



m 



parent ease. The final score 
was 33-21 in favor of the 
out-of-state team, marking 

^the third time in five years 
of conference history that a 
Duke team was eliminated 
in the final set-to of tourna- 
^' / ment ploy. Sports writers 

"^^ awarded Jim Thompson, cen- 

Jter, a place on the mythical 
'■~~^^ all-southern quint, while 

Home and Hayes also drew 
special credit for their out- 
standing play. 

Prospects f o r another 
championship quint next 
yeararebright. Onlyoneman, 
Home, has seen three years 
of varsity competition, thus 
leaving Coach Cameron a 
wealth of experienced ma- 
terial to draw from when 
practice rolls around next fall. Lewis and 
Hayes, forwards, were seniors last season but, 
should they return, will be eligible for another 
year of play. In addition to these men the for- 
ward ranks will remain open for Bell, Polock, 




Keown 
Guard 

Home 
Forward 



and May, varsity reserves from the past season, 
and Kunkle and Huiskamp, stars up from the 
freshman team. Two more capable guards than 
Weaver and Herb Thompson are not to be found 
anywhere in the Conference. Clarke and 
Keown, who saw considerable 
action during the past sea- 
son, and Ferguson and 
Wentz, rising sophomores, 
will lend considerably to the 
strength of this department. 
At center, Jim Thompson 
seems to be a fixture; but 
even this star will have com- 
petition in the form of the 
elongated Connie Mack, 
mainstay of the champion- 
ship yearling team. 

Coach Eddie Cameron 

gave varsity letters to the 

following men at the close 

of the season : Home, 

Hayes, Lewis, Thompson, J. 

Thompson, H., Weaver, May 

Clarke, Bell, and student ^"°^^ 

K I , H Lewis 

manager Newton. Guard 



n 



VJU. 





Keown , i Ihompson Home Pargoc Weaver Liurl. 

Bell May Bowen Hayes H Thompson F. Lewis 



Polack Manager Newton 
N. Lewis 



Three Umidrcfl Twenty-two 



iSiiP 




Shield Taken from 
Tower of the Gym 



B 



B 



CHANTICLEER 



BASEBALL 1932 



f/^<^ 



m»< 




• pOR the first time in 

four years the Blue 
Devil nine failed to take 
the coveted Big Five title, 
but Coach Jack Coombs 
did remarkably well with 
his proteges to clinch 
second place honors. Al- 
though extremely weak in 
the hitting department, 
the salvation of the team 
proved to be in the fine 
fielding and superb pitch- 
ing exhibited during the 
course of the season. 

In the schedule of 
twenty-two games with 
college opponents, Duke 
won a total of fifteen con- 
tests, dropping seven 
Four of the losses were ex- 

rperienced during a dis- 
^ astrous northern trip. 
The Devils officially 
opened the 1932 season 
With Jersey City of the 
International League. The 
collegians lost to the pro- 
fessional outfit 14 to 7, 
but the contest was merely 
scheduled to test the 
mettle of several rookies 
and the defeat meant 
little. 

Two days later they met 
their first college op- 
ponent in Marshall Col- 
lege with Q double header 
on tab. The Devils had 
little trouble in annexing 
both of these tilts; the first game was won 9 to 5 
with Tim M'Keithan pitching, while the night- 



Jack Coombs 
Coach 










% '4f. 



Howell 
Catcher 

Kersey 
Second Base 



cap saw Roy Alpert make his debut with a 9 to 4 
victory. 

Maryland's vaunted club was the next enemy 
to invade the camp of the Blue Devils, but the 
latter acted as a poor host and sent the visitors 
away on the short end of a 5 to 3 count. Bobby 
Coombs, chosen All-Amencan in 1931, was in 
great form on the mound and the Old Liner 
batsmen found him invincible through the 
greater portion of the contest. 

Continuing their winning streak, the Duke 
nine hung up victories over Elon, Delaware, and 
Guilford with comparatively no exertion. Meet- 
ing Davidson in the first ma|or game with state 
teams, Duke completely out-classed the Wild- 
cats to gam a 7 to win. Something of a 
defensive record was^claimed when V. M I. was 
swamped 1 1 to for the Devils' third shutout 
victory in a row. Mort Flohr, sophomore south- 
paw, indicated a great future for himself from 
the excellent job of hurling he did in this game. 
Duke next journeyed to Raleigh 
where N. C. State handed them 
their first defeat of the season, 
3 to 1 . It was a beautiful 
pitcher's duel between Lanning 
and Coombs, the latter losing 
his first game of his college 
career. However, the Devils re- 
taliated with a win over V. P. I. 
a 7 to 5 score. 

The following contest was 
with our traditional rivals, Caro- 
lina, on their home field During 
this exciting tilt Bobby Coombs, 
Duke's star hurlcr, injured his 
arm while delivering a pitch and 
was taken from the game, but 
Flohr rushed into the game and 
held the Tar Heels in check for 
the remainder of the fray as 
the Devils rang up another 




Schollenberger 
Out Field 




Harnngtoii 
Out Field 



'I'lirci Ihiiidrril TwHiity-fimr 



ATHLETICS 






« -tff 






Voorhees 
Catcher 

Getzendonner 
Third Base 

Futrell 
Third Base 

Godd 
Out Field 



victory, 6 to 2. Coach Coombs 
had changed the line-up pre- 
vious to this game to fill the 
vacancy caused by Nelson 
Colley, who left school 
Hendrickson was shifted to 
short and Shore returned to his 
old post at third base 

Wake Forest emerged the 
victor in a heartbreaking 
thriller on the Devils' home 
grounds, 6 to 5 Both M'Keithan 
and Flohr saw duty on the 
mound, but were unable to stop 
the strong Deacon outfit. 

Swinging into their annual 
northern tour the following 
week, the Duke nine first met 
Princeton and lost o hair- 
raiser with Alpert hurling. The 
final score was 4 to 3. Moving 
over to Fordham, the Devils 
dropped another tilt, 13 to 5, 
in near freezing weather. 
M'Keithan and Flohr were 
badly off. At College Park, 
Maryland, Bobby Coombs, 
pitching the first game after 
his injury, was good enough to 
check the Old Liners for nine 
innings while his mates came 
through in the extra frame to 
hang up a 7 to 4 win. Wash- 
ington and Lee gave the Devils 
their third reverse of the trip 
and the fifth of the season on 
the next day to gain a 4 to 1 
decision Flohr twirled a great 
game at V. M I but lost the 
extra inning contest by o 5 to 4 



margin The southpaw 
clouted two homers to odd 
to the irony of his defeat. 

Home again, Duke met 
and defeated Davidson 10 
to 4 in a markedly one- 
sided tilt with M'Keithan 
pitching Another trounc- 
ing took place at the ex- 
pense of V P I Alpert held 
the visitors to a lone tally, 
while the Devils let loose 
barrage of hits to count 
seventeen runs 

The most exciting tilt 
of the season was staged 
when Carolina come to 
Duke for a return engage- 
ment. When the Devils 
come to bat in their turn 
of the ninth inning the 
score was 1-0 against 
them, but a great roily 
put three runs over the 
plate and the locals were 
on top of a 3-1 score. Art 
Kersey, who knocked in the 
winning counters was the 
hero of the game The 
final engagement of the 
year saw Woke Forest 
fully establish their claim 
to the State championship 
with a 3-1 win over the 
Devils 

As usual t h e major 
league scouts kept their 
eyes on possible prospects 
from the Duke nine, and 
at the end of the season 



I 

i 




Mitchell 
CXif Field 

Shore 
Third Bose 

Hendrickson 
Short Stop 

Alpert 
Pitcher 



Three Hundred Twenty-live 



CHANTICLEER 




■ilk! J' 




M'Keithan, P 
Peckom, C 
Coombs. P 



the Philadelphia Athletics 
handed Tim M'Keithan a 
neat contract. The star 
Devil right-hander was 
farmed out to Albany of 
the Eastern League and 
made such an excellent 
showing that he was called 
to the major league front 
where he saw service in 
two or three games. 

As a matter of fact, 
M'Keithan is only one of a 
number of stars who have 
traded their Duke uniform 
for that of professional 
regalia. Bill Werber, spec- 
tacular Blue Devil short- 
stop in 1929, is now draw- 
ing his pay check from Col. 
Ruppert's New York 
Yankees; while across 
town, the Giants are bear- 
ing the expenses of Roy 
Alpert, star twirler on last 
season's nine. Lefty Jenk- 
ins, a team-mate of Wer- 



ber's, is the property of At- 
lanta in the Southern As- 
sociation, and Don Robert- 
show is in the same league 
with Memphis, the latter 
played the shortfield for 
Duke only two years back. 

The following men received 
letters: M'Keithan, Harring- 
ton , Shore, Hendrickson, 
Coombs, Flohr, Alpert Voor- 
hees, Peckam, Howell, Weav- 
er, Kersey, Mitchell, Gadd, 
Schollenberger, and Mana- 
ger Garrison. 

When the call was issued 
for practice this spring eight 
lettermen reported for duty: 
Coombs and Flohr, pitchers; 
Peckam and V o o r h e e s , 
catchers; Weaver, Kersey, 
and Hendrickson, infielders; 
and Mitchell, outfielder. 
However, the camp was bol- 
stered appreciably by several 
of last year's freshmen 
stars. 





'W ^- # ««- 





^VU, 




\^ 






Schnure P 

Weaver, FB 

Flohr, P 









Coach Coombs Weover M'Keithan Brackbill Peckam Getzendonner Marsden Godd Wallace Voorhees 
Schnure Hendrickson Schollenberger Harkrader Mitchell Flohr Ott Kuittinen 

Shaw Kersey Howell Shore Harrington Herzog Coombs Futrell 



Three Hundred Twenty-six 



I'lliyiiS 



i"'iiirii'ii( 



*"frii i M' i i»tiMn',v';'i;,i"V"V"V"""T w 




Shield Taken from Below 
Window Facing of House K 



R 



CHANTICLEER 



^^^^^-^"•* 








1 / 




BiHC 


ul 



CoQch Voyles 
Coach of Track 



THAT great performance of winning 27 
of the 30 points possible for them to win 
in the Conference meet climaxed the most 
successful season ever experienced by a 
Duke track team. The Blue Devil entry, 
by virtue of this feat, claimed second place 
in the Conference championship. 



TRACK 

Of the five dual meets carded for the Devils they 
lost but one, to Carolina. The four victories were 
established with decisive scores over Wake Forest, 
Virginia Military Institute, Davidson, and Washing- 
ton and Lee. 

The 1932 tracksters started the year off by finish- 
ing fifth in the annual SIC indoor meet held at 
Chapel Hill. Brownlee captured the only first place 
made by a Duke entrant when he won the 70-yard 
low hurdles. 

Encountering Wake Forest in the first dual meet, 
the Devils ran wild as they accounted for a 1 10 to 16 
victory. Taking all first places and 10 of the 14 
second places, Duke clearly outclassed the Deacons. 

V. M. I, was the next opponent to go down before 
the Blue Devil track and field aggregation. John 
Brownlee tied the standing school record in the 
century and broke it in the 220-yard dash, besides 
winning the low hurdles to ring up 15 points as the 
Blue Devils won 82 1-2 to 43 1-2. 

Continuing their good record Duke next defeated 
Davidson, 81 1 -2 to 44 1 -2. By making a clean sweep 
of the last five events, the Devils converted a close 
scoring contest into a one-sided win. Brownlee, with 
three firsts, led the individual scorers, followed by 
Fulmer, with two firsts and a second. 

Washington and Lee joined the list of victims as 
the Voyles-coached men ran up a 76 2-3 — 49 1-3 




Thrt-e iliiiiilri'ij Twuiily-flghl 



ATHLETICS 



i 




Brown lee 

mm 

7U 



Hicks 



conquest. Again Brownlee 
made it a grand slam by 
taking first in all three of his 
events. He ran the century 
in 9.6 to set a new southern 
record. Fulmer led the field 
in the 4-40 and the broad 
jump. 

Four state records were 
bettered as Duke lost their 
first dual meet of the season 
to the University of North 
Carolina. Although out- 
clossing our rivals in the 
track events, the Tar Heels 
showed marked superiority in 
the field contests to defeat 
the Devils 77 1-6 to 48 5-6. 
The feature races of the 
afternoon were between 
Brownlee and Farmer. The 
former barely nosed out a 
victory in the 100-yard dash, 
while the latter reversed the 
circumstances to win the 
220-yard dash. Fulmer ran 
the 440 in 50 seconds flat to 




,©. 



ii' 



\JA 



\>««^ 



beat the state record 
Brownlee and Fulmer also 
took firsts in the low hurdles 
and brood jump respectively 
Bradsher won the 880 and 
Sharpe took the pole vault 
to complete Duke's list of 
first places. 

The state meet was an- 
nexed by Carolina for the 
twelfth successive time. 
Duke was second Brownlee 
broke the old state record 
for the 220-yard low hurdles 
by a full second, but the 
count was disallowed be- 
cause officials claimed that 
the Devil star hod the wind 
to his back. Bradsher and 
Lewis came in first in the 
880 and two-mile runs, while 
Sharpe won the pole-vaulting 
honors. A relay composed 
of Brownlee, Fulmer, Hicks, 
ond Bradsher clipped nearly 
three seconds off the old 
record. 



1 



OUJt^ 



m 




Lewis 



i 



^ 



aM 



Fulmer 




Southern Conference Chompionship Reloy Team 



Fulmer 



Hicks 

Threp Hundred Twenly-nlne 



CHANTICLEER 



§ 



*.»<w— t/ 



Then came that astound- 
ing achievement by the five 
representatives who carried 
the Duke colors in the South- 
ern Conference meet in At- 
lanta. Conceded only an out- 
side chance of even placing 
within the first five, the track 
quintet proceeded to take 
four first places in the six 
events which they entered 
to cop second place honors in 
the big meet. Whether it 
Bradsher was the climate or not, some- 

thing was instilled into those 
Devils that made them scamper around like 
rabbits. Brownlee, failing to qualify in the 100- 
yard dash due to a bad start, stepped the 
hurdles in 24 seconds to tie the mark he set the 
year before. Fulmer ran the 440 in 49.2 
seconds to win that event, while he took third 



3^^ 



in the broad jump. Lewis, with a great finish, 
broke the tape ahead of the field in the two- 
mile run to sew up another event. Bradsher 
placed second in the 880. As a grand climax 
the Duke relay team, Fulmer, Bradsher, Brown- 
lee, and Hicks, streaked the mile relay in 3.23.2, 
just nine-tenths of a second 
better than the old confer- 
ence record. The Devils took 
as many first places as the 
champions, L. 5, U., but the 
latter entered twenty-five 
men. 

At the close of the season 
letters were given to Co- 
Captains Brewer and Hicks, 
Brownlee, Fulmer, Sharpe, 
Crawford, Thompson, Lewis, 
Bradsher, Ripley, Stevens, 
Smith, Bird, and student 
manager Allan Dudley. 



Mi 



T 



T 



Sharpe 




'■ Ug l l i P . %riw»«gi^3^'7<is^-»i«w*gi^^!j"' 



Manager Dudley Lewis Atkinson 

Nichols Kanipe Stevens 

Thompson Ripley Smith Brownlee 



Track Team 

Thompson Miles 
Rossiter Means 
Hicks Brewer 



Garris Bray Weyersberg 

Sharpe Bird Abbott 

Shackford Lewis Bradsher Fulmer 



Three lliindnil Tlilrly 



il',"''»V»('--v ■■•••■■■.• ■■■■■■.■..•■,,iSBr»>v'<.- k'.'-' 




■mmm'mi 



•jHlr'.iv'.'jij i.n^i.j -.ii.n'' ' • 



Shield Token from 
Tower of Gym 



MINOR 



SPORTS 



CHANTICLEER 



A SUCCESSFUL YEAR 



CONDUCTING a vigorous campaign to make 
this a banner year in Duke University 
athletic history, the Blue Devils' athletics teams 
came through in fine style to assemble numer- 
ous sports titles. 

The highlight of this year's athletic contests 
was the making of history by the gridiron repre- 
sentatives, when they submerged the Carolina 
Tor Heels for the first time in modern history. 
And in this process of submerging, they also an- 
nexed a state title in football. The season as 
a whole was very successful and predicted 
greater things for Duke football. 

Not long thereafter the cross-country team 
went out and got itself a Southern conference 
championship. The members of this outfit, led 
by Hubert "Red" Lewis, beat the cream of the 
South's harriers over one of the most difficult 
courses in this part of the country. And while 
on the subject of running, the indoor track 
squad, led by the able Johnny Brownlee, did a 
fine job in leaving Carolina and several others 
behind to win the conference championship. 

Coach Eddie Cameron's basketeers did them- 
selves proud by cleaning up throughout the 
state, winning two gomes from the traditional 

CAPTAINS Ml 



rivals and losing out only to South Carolina in 
the finals of the annual tournament at Raleigh. 
The team loses many of its outstanding players, 
but Eddie still has fine material from which he 
should be able to build up a fine team. 

Although Add Warren's grapple and grunt 
men did not retain their laurels, they did rather 
well, but they left it up to the members of the 
cauliflower industry, the boxers, to bring home 
the bacon. And this was again done at the 
expense of our neighbors from Chapel Hill, 
albeit the match was very close, with Captain 
Lloyd getting a draw with the renowned 
Levenson. 

This has truly been a wonderful year for Duke 
teams, including, of course, the wonderful show- 
ing made by the swimmers who cleaned up in 
the state and were runners-up in the conference 
meet. 

The marks created by our boys this year will 
be something for future generations of Duke 
teams to shoot at, but it seems to be a general 
opinion that it will be a long time yet before five 
state championships, two southern conference 
championships, and runners-up position in two 
others will be attained here. 



NOR SPORTS 




C5 




Peake 
Captain Tennis 



Peacock 
Captain Golf 



Lloyd 
Captain Boxing 



Onisko 
Captain Wrestling 



Three Hundred Thlrly-lwo 



ATHLETICS 






iFt'T: 



ttt: 




nager Wycoff 


Winslow 


Ruff 


Ross 


Coach Warren 


Copt. Lloyd 


Riddick 


Parish 


Scott 


Sides 



BOXING 



^OACH Add Warren's ringmen brought the 
^ state boxing title to Duke for the first time, 
when they defeated a hiohly favored team from 
the University of North Carolina. 

Gaps made vacant by the graduation of 
Bolich and Bryan, were filled handily by Ross and 
Ruff, up and coming sophomores who exhibited 
plenty of power in their punches. Captain 
Lloyd, 1 1 5-pound Conference champion of last 
year, continued his good record by being un- 
defeated in match competition. He reached 
the finals of the Conference tournament at the 
end of the season but was forced to forfeit on 
account of an injured hand. 

Starting off by meeting the title-holding 
University of Virginia boxers, the Devils lost 
5-3. Lloyd scored a knockout, while Sides ond 
Jester won the other fights by decisions 

The match with N. C State ended m a tie, 
4-4. Sides beat Garner in the feature setto of 
the card; Lloyd. Ross, and Winslow won the 
other bouts for Duke 

At Maryland, the Devils fought to another 



draw Riddick and Ross did some great fight- 
ing to kayo their opponents, while Sides and 
Captain Lloyd were awarded decisions. 
Nearly 3,500 people witnessed the match with 
Carolina which was to determine the 1933 state 
champions Conceded but little chance to win, 
the Devils went into the ring full of determina- 
tion and surprised the huoe oathennq by oaininq 
a thrilling upset victory, 4 1-2 — 3 1-2 Riddick 
(D) won from Glover (C) Then Lloyd ond 
Levinson, opposing captams, mixed in a no de- 
cision bout Quarles, powerful Tar Heel boxer, 
defeated Scott by a surprisingly close decision 
and Lumpkin beat Sides to make it two in a row 
for Carolina The next two fights token by Ross 
and Ruff, Duke, mode the match even (the un- 
limited division hovinq been forfeited to Coro- 
lino). Winslow clinched o Duke victory when 
he knocked out Parsons m the fmol event 

Letters were awarded to the following men: 
Riddick, Captain Lloyd, Scott, Sides, Ross, Ruff, 
Winslow, Jester, ond student manager Wykoff 



Three Hundred TBIrty-thre* 



CHANTICLEER 



WRESTLING 



UANDICAPPED by the loss of three outstand- 
ing performers from lost year in Gamble, 
Bryan, and Joyce, the wrestlers presented a 
rather unimpressive record for the year just past. 

Although dropping each of the three 
scheduled meets, the matmen presented o few 
vindicating features in spite of this poor show- 
ing. Two Devil wrestlers, being undefeated 
during the season, were named state champions. 
They were Troxler, 135 pound class; and Keefer, 
175 pound class. 

The opening match was at Davidson. In a 
fierce engagement the Cats finally emerged 
victorious over the Devils by a 15-13 count. 
Captain Onisko won a time decision, while 
Troxler and Keefer secured falls to complete 
Duke's scoring. 

Playing hosts to the Tar Heel matmen, the 
Devils dropped a 20-8 encounter. Keefer took 



on extra period time decision end Troxler threw 
his opponent for the only Duke victories. Reed, 
Duke, and Hiller, Carolina, fought for two extra 
rounds before the former yielded to the Tar 
Heel on time advantage. 

The last match of the season with N C State 
was the most thrilling, Talley, Reed, and 
Keefer defeated their opponents and Troxler 
drew, but State clinched victory by winning the 
unlimited event. The score: State 14 1-2; 
Duke, 13 1-2. 

Only Troxler represented the Blue Devil con- 
tingent in the annual Southern Conference 
tournament, but he advanced to the finals be- 
fore he was ousted. 

Coach Add Warren recommended letters for 
the following men: Captain Onisko, Reed, Apple, 
Anderson, Troxler, Talley, Keefer, Boepple, and 
student manager Jack Land, 




.'.'.onager Land 



Apple 
Onisko 



I'UtlJpIt' 

Talley 



Anderson 
Troxler 



Keetcr 
Reed 



iwOQch VVurrcn 



Tlirt'c IliiiulrtMl 'riihly-rour 



- >"\vr^-V! Wi' j!^.i.mii 



:=^: 



a 3^ 2 



ft\'ivt/Mr!r 



_-— -I^ ^^/j^ 



:f=y"E 



t^t: 



ATHLETICS 



XT\: 




Co-Manager Baird Welsh Hardy 



Peoke McNeill Butler 
Coach Gregory 



Martin Higgms Co-Manager Taft 



TENNIS 



I 051 NG only three out of thirteen matches 
*" the Blue Devils racquet wielders had an ex- 
cellent year. This record was even more re- 
markable inasmuch as four members of the team 
played in the varsity line-up for the first time 
Garber and Peake were the only regulars back 
when the call was issued for spring practice, but 
exceptional talent exhibited by Welch, Nor- 
wood, Martin, and Butler won for them places on 
the team 

Wake Forest came over here for the opening 
court exhibition of the season. The Devils de- 
feated them, 8-1 . The netmen followed up with 
three shut-out victories; two of them over N. C 
State and the third at the expense of Wake 
Forest, in a return engagement, 9-0 Then a 
championship outfit from Carolina retarded 
Duke's winning streak, 8-1. Norwood took his 
singles play to count the lone jxiint for his 
mates. 

Venturing into the north, the courtmen white- 
washed Hampden Sidney, 9-0. Welch humilia- 
ted the Virginia inter-collegiate champion by 
turning him back in straight love sets. Mov- 
ing over to Charlottesville, the Devils took the 
measure of a University of Virginia team, also 



9-0. This stinginess on the part of the Duke 
courtmen persisted as they blanketed George 
Washington on the next day However, o snog 
presented itself at Annapolis and the Middies 
pasted a 6-3 defeat on the southerners Nor- 
wood won the only singles event of the contest 
Homeward bound, the Devils stopped off at 
Richmond University to hang up another shut- 
out conquest, 9-0, and the successful tour was 
concluded with the habitual 9-0 count over 
Hermitage Country Club at the Virginia capital 

Back on the local court, one of the most -. 
citing matches of the year took place os C . 
lino came over for a return engagement This 
time the Tar Heels found plenty of opposition 
from the Devils until they finally emerged with 
a 6-3 victory Garber and Hines staged a thrill- 
ing singles duel before the latter eked 
victory. 

In the state tournament, Welch reached the 
semi-finals in singles play, while two doubles 
teams, Welch- Norwood and Peake-Gorber, od- 
vanced to the semi-finals of doubles play 

The six men on the team played position^ m 
the following order Welch, Garber, Peake, Nor- 
wood, Martin and Butler 



Three Hundred Thirtjr-flre 



CHANTICLEER 



SWIMMING 



THE Duke University swimming team emerged 
this year with c more successful season than 
any prior team has experienced. In the first meet 
with State College the Devilfish started off the 
season with a decisive score of 56 to 28. Lorry 
Burke set a new pool record in this meet by 
eclipsing the old 440 freestyle record with a new 
time of 5.55 minutes. 

Hitting the road for meets in Virginia, the 
Duke natators sank Richmond Y. M. C A. 
easily by taking all first places, and scalped the 
William and Mary Indians by a score of 36-28. 

Meeting their first strongest opponents, 
Washington and Lee, in the Duke pool, the 
Devilfish showed real strength in spite of their 
recent losses of two star members, to send the 
General swimmers home on the tail end of o 39- 
27 count. In a return meet with State, Duke 
marked up its fifth consecutive win of the 
season. 

Climaxing a most successful year, the Duke 
swimming team won its sixth end seventh dual 
meets by defeating Randolph-Macon and 
George Washington University. The Devilfish 
captured all except one of the first places 
against Randolph-Macon for a 49-17 decision. 



The score of the Washington meet was 32-32, 
but the victory was awarded to the Blue Devils 
because they won the relay. 

The Duke team suffered its first loss at the 
Southern Conference meet, when the Virginia 
Cavaliers nosed out the Devilfish by five points 
in the last events. Captain McAnally furnished 
an upset in the 200-yard breaststroke when he 
defeated his teammate, Tennant, who had 
beaten him in every previous meet. McAnnally 
won this event in faster time than he has ever 
turned in before and set a new pool record for 
a time of 2.45.8 minutes. Carter won by a scant 
inch the 440-yard free style event to furnish the 
most exciting race of the finals. His time of 
5.28.4 minutes also set a new Virginia pool 
record. Final score of meet, Virginia, 40, Duke, 
35. 

Returning home, the Devilfish annexed the Big 
Five championship crown for the second con- 
secutive time. Out of six records broken, the 
Duke tank team carried off five of them. 

Lettermen were Captain McAnally, Carter, 
Varella, Tennant, William and Tom Losee, 
O'Connor, Bostock, Clark, Fischel, and manager 
Wright. 





li'liifliMi 




I I 



The Swimming Team 



Three IliiiKlrccI 'riili Iv-.six 



ATHLETICS 



:4-Lizr 



^-m^ 



\y » 



GOLF 



\A/ITH the aid of three sophomores, Captain 
Caldwell led the Blue Devil golfers 
through an unusually good year Peacock, Mc- 
Canless, and Stokes were the threesome who 
broke into the varsity lineup for the first time. 

In the seven matches played the Duke golfers 
breezed on to easy victories in six, while the de- 
feat was at the hands of a North Carolina team. 
Tournament play seemed to be their specialty 
as they captured the Big Five crown and were 
runners-up in the conference. Roger Peacock 
copped the individual title with an excellent 
card during the state tourney. 

The season opener with William and Mary 
saw the Devil foursome completely shut out 
the visitors by ringing up an 18 to score. The 
golfers next took Washington and Lee into 
camp, 15 1-2 to 2 1-2. Peacock defeated the 
famed Billy Howell to feature the singles play. 

Coming from the far north, a Boston College 
foursome got a bitter taste of southern hospi- 
tality as the Blue Devils continued their winning 
ways to paste an 18 to defeat on them, their 
second white-wash conquest of the current sea- 



bon All four Blue Devils were in great form 
and the fairways were kept hot with their wood 
and iron shots. 

In closely played and exciting match Duke 
lost their first tilt to Carolina The issue wos 
not decided until the lost green wos reached 
An almost super-human putt by o Tor Heel 
golfer gave the visitors that last hole and the 
match, 8 1-2 to 9 I -2 Four doys loter N C 
State was handed a drubbing, 15 1-2 to 2 1-2 

Concluding the regularly scheduled duel 
meets, the Duke team defeated Davidson, 13 to 
5; and Carolina, 14 to 4. The latter score was 
sweet revenge for the earlier meeting between 
the two schools, but this time Carnlmn wns 
clearly outclassed 

Following the state tournament ployed in 
Greensboro, which the Devil golfers won with 
Q team score of 609, they entered the S I C. 
play-off in Athens. Only one stroke seporated 
them from the leaders, but the Duke entry hod 
to be satisfied with the runner position 
Roger Peacock reaped more laurels by turning 
in the second lowest score of tonrnpy ploy 




btorm 



McLain 



Caldwell Copt Peacock Stokes 



v_nase 



Three Hundred Thirty-seven 



CHANTICLEER 



CROSS COUNTRY 



THE southern conference championship was 
the reward for last fall's Cross Country team 
which led by Captain Lewis and coached by Bob 
Tuttle turned out to be the best distance club 
seen at Duke in many years 

The season was opened with the Davidson 
meet in which the Duke boys practically white- 
washed the opposing runners, five Duke men, 
Bird, Bray, Lewis, Heritage, and Jester finish- 
ing as one for a five man tie for first place. In 
the St. John's meet Bird and Bray were in a 
tie for first place with Heritage pulling in third 
to give the Devils an easy win. Carolina, last 
year's conference champions, were likewise 
easily vanquished when Bray, Bird, and Lewis 
finished in a tripple tie for first place. Each of 
these dual runs were made on the Duke course 
In the southern conference meet at Chapel 
Hill Bray and Bird ran splendid races in spite 
of heavy rain and bad footing and tied for 
first honors, setting a time only a few seconds 
slower than the conference record Duke placed 
five men in the first fifteen places to clinch 
the title. 



In the final run of the year the Duke har- 
riers lost a close meet to the Navy on the An- 
napolis course. In this race Bray lost first place 
by a narrow margin to Hordman of Navy who is 
ranked as one of the outstanding distance men 
in the east. 

Coach Tuttle deserves much credit for fine 
work he has done in turning out a conference 
winner in his second season at Duke. Pros- 
pects seem excellent that the Devils will con- 
tinue their championship from next season, for 
the only member of the team who will be lost 
by graduation is Captain Lewis. Jerry Bray was 
elected captain for next year. 

At the close of the season letters were 
awarded to Bird, Bray, Captain Lewis, Jester 
and Heritage. 



TV 




Coach Tuttle Bray Bird Lewis Jester Heritage Garrett Nitschl<e Erickson Manager Dudley 



Thr.T HiiihIiimI Thlrlyclght 




p^mi,^mimny-^' 



Sculpture Token from 
Window Facing of House D 



FRESHMAN SPORTS 



CHANTICLEER 



FROSH FOOTBALL 1932 



•«a» 



"iote 



priVE victories 
for the Imps 
gave them a 
valid claim f o r 
the state fresh- 
man football 
^^^^^^ ._ title. The young 

y'_^^^^^r devils tasted 

*i:^^WH~= first blood when 

- ^B^^" - theylocked 

horns with N. C, 
State and came 
out victors 13-0. 
Ward and Alex- 
ander eoch 
scored once with 
Alexander mak- 
ing good the drop kick for the extra point. 
In the Wake Forest game Russell and Ward 
each scored touchdowns and Alexander ac- 
counted for the extra point to give the "Imps" 
Q 13-7 win. Davidson was the next team to fall 
before the rush of the Duke yearlings, taking it 
on the nose 13-6, with Whitner and Alexander 
scoring for Duke. The Oak Ridge cadets offered 

the greatest offensive the "Imps" encountered 
during the season but they also were subdued 




Coach Hagler 



18-13. In this game Ward, Mizell, and Alex- 
ander were the scoring guns for Duke, marking 
up six points each. 

The Carolina frosh were the last victims for 
the Blue Imps and were smothered under by a 
19-0 score. All of the five games were played 
at Duke and the spectators really got an eyeful 
of heavy charging linesmen and tricky backs, 
evidence that next year's big team will have a 
powerful supplement of rookies. 

Coaches Caldwell and Sington did an excel- 
lent |ob of molding the "Imps" into a hard 
fighting team, giving them experience which 
will make them a valuable addition to next year's 
varsity, even to the point of making it necessary 
for several of the veterans to step lively to hold 
down their positions. 




Freshman Football Squad 



'I liri'c Ihiiicliid Iciilv 



ATHLETICS 







Freshman Basketball Squad 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 



I IKE their varsity brothers, the yearlings also 
won a state basketball crown. Although 
the freshmen were erratic and loose in their play 
at the first part of the season, Coach Caldwell 
finally produced a fast, smooth clicking com- 
bination which was at its peak when the season 
ended. 

A pair of victories over the N. C State fresh- 
men and one each over Carolina and Wake 
Forest clinched the Big Five freshmen title 
The crucial game which decided the champion- 
ship was staged as the Blue Imp cagers defeated 
the North Carolina frosh 40-30. Playing a ten 
game schedule, the frosh won seven while drop- 
ping but three Victories, other than already 
mentioned, were at the expense of Oak Ridge, 
Central High (Washington, D C ) and 
Massanutten. 

From the ranks of this squad Coach Cameron 
will probably find plenty of material when he 
builds his next year's varsity outfit. Cornelius 
McGillicuddy, at center, and Bill Huiskamp, a 



forward, showed excellent prospects of becom- 
ing future stars as they flashed about the court 
in veteran style. Kunkle, Ferguson, and Wentz 
finished out the starting five 







Coach Caldwell 



Three Hundred Forty-ono 



CHANTICLEER 



FRESHMAN BASEBALL 1932 




■- "THE Blue Imp 
baseball sea- 



son was well 
under way with 
still the question 
of definite posi- 
t I n s unan- 
swered. With a 
large number of 
versatile players 
It was soon 
obvious that a 
winning team 
could be de- 
veloped through 
various combina- 
tions. 

Under the effective tutelage of Coaches 
Caldwell and Cochrane, impressive showing was 
made as evidenced by a record of ten wins and 
two defeats. 

The season began with a series of one-sided 
victories over Danville Military Academy, N. C 
State, Wake Forest, Davidson, and others. In 
the game with Danville Military Academy the 
entire team proved its ability with the stick and 
especially Ty Wagner, with his long hit over 
left field fence which is said by Coach Jack 



Coombs to be the longest in the park thus far. 

The Imps journeyed to Oak Ridge and in then- 
engagement there though unsuccessful in score, 
played heads up ball in spite of the adversity of 
breaks. The next game was with the Carolina 
"Tar Babies" in which the "Imps" were again 
defeated by a score of 10 to 8. Though there 
was a reversal in form on the part of some of the 
players as the season progressed, others proved 
themselves to be excellent varsity material for 
next year. 

Bell, Porreco, and Michaels led in hitting, 
while Walsh, Weafer, and May bore the burden 
of the hurling staff to a great degree. 



Add Warren 




Freshman Baseball Squad 



Ttiiff IIuiiiIiimI Kdilylwo 



ATHLETICS 




Clf'DODO 



« ^ 



.c? j^ ^ <*) a P ^ 



i 



"^ K t. 



't 



^Ak\MMl 



4^ r^r^f^ 1*^ 

M^^ 2^-^ :^^ '"^ ^-^ 



,r? r* ir5 c r^ e. o .-^^ 

^ C D <!^ P if^ ^ ^ 

Power, Peckam, Ripley, Hendnckson, H. N. Lewis, Jester, Horn, Abtwtt VARSITY 

Peake, Weover, Caldwell, Onisko, Welch, Sides, E B. Dunlop CLUB 

Keller, Voorhees, Rossiter, Cox, Peacock, Werner, Butler. v-lud 

Ewell, Sippel, Fulmer, Howell, Bray, Murchison, J. Dunlap 

Newton, Kersey, Mason, James, Brodshaw, Lloyd, Dein, Porreco 

Ershler, H M Lewis, Hayes, O'Connor, Hildebrandt, Brownlee, Short, Hicks 



Three Hundred Forty-three 




Shield Taken from 
Rear Wall of House M 




Shield Token from 
Front of Crowell Tower 



ADVERTISEMENTS 






The original binding from which the 
covers of this annual were copied, encloses 
one of the most important printed versions 
of the Greek New Testament, familiarly 
referred to as the "Third Stephanus," 
being the third (1550) edition of the 
Testament published by Robert Stephanus. 
This French scholar whose real name was 
Estienne, was characterized by Richard 
Bentley as the Protestant Pope, since his 
text IS so meticulously correct and could 
not have claimed greater authority had it 
been in the autograph of one of the 
apostles. 

Of the binding itself, its great virtue is 
the almost marvelous preservation. Had 
It not been for this unusual condition, the 
volume would in all probability have 
passed into the Duke University Library 
unnoticed. That it has been refurbished 
and gilt lettering added to the back of 
the book in recent years does not in the 



least detract from the appearance. The 
general characteristics which lent belief 
to the theory of English craftsmanship 
were fully borne out by biographical refer- 
ence, when a facsimile of an almost identi- 
cal volume was discovered, which proved 
beyond any doubt that it is the work of an 
Oxford binder, probably Robert Way, and 
was executed about the time 1600-1610. 

For the benefit of those interested a 
full and technical description is given 
below. 

Material, calf; boards paper pulp; cover 
design; A, two bands ( 1 ) forming a border 
within three line fillets and inclosing four 
bands placed to form a lozenge; B. two 
bonds ( 1 ) forming a border with on inner 
border formed by a single band; (2) the 
whole inclosed and borders separated by 
three line fillets; the back formed with six 
panels, the head and tail half-bond carry- 
ing the traditional Oxford "hatching." 




W liile we stop to rest and I 
admire the beautiful out yonder 
lets enjoy a (chesterfield 






the Class of '33 we extend our best wishes 
and heartiest congratulations ! 

And to the classes of future years we extend 
our invitation to make the 

THOMAS-QUICKELCO. 



Your headquarters in Durham for 

Books - Student Supplies - Stationery - Gifts 
Pictures - Framing - Typewriters 



r 



Sporting ^•a.y* Goods 



We Appreciate 

the Patronage 
of Our 

University Students 

We want you to feel "at home" 
in our Studio 

Prices Remarkably Reasonable 

for First Class Service 

and Quality 

ELLIS STONE and CO. 

Porrish Street Entrance 
Ground Floor 








Only trying to get the east campus on Sunday night 



D. P. Blend 



Coffee 



The Best That Money Can Buy! 



It will please the most discriminating 
coffee drinker. 

One of the many famous products 
on sale at all 



Pender's Stores 



SINCE 1885 



This company has been serving a vast 
clientele in North Carolina, and this 
ripe experience, coupled with 
complete modern equip- 
ment is at your 
command 



THE SEEMAN 
P R I NTE R Y 

Incorporated 
Durham, North Carolina 



Of Interest-- 



We have made an arrangement with the purchasing 
agent of Duke University to supply fraternities, clubs, 
and individuals connected with Duke University 
officially, all varieties of wool rugs, carpetsand novelty 
effects in floor coverings. Our service is complete in 
these lines. Samples sent on request. A visit to our 
High Point show rooms with a letter from Mr. Tyree 
will prove profitable and educational 

GEO. T. WOOD & SONS, INC. 



Manufacturers' Agents and Jobbers of Floor Coverings 



To Our Many Duke Friends: 

Your patronage in the past has been 
appreciated and valued, and we 
trust that we shall have the oppor- 
tunity of taking care of your motor- 
ing needs in the future 

TIRE DIVISION 



ALEXANDER MOTOR CO. 



Two Stations With "Sure 'Nuf Service' 



STATION No. 1 

Peobody and Queen 
Streets 

PHONE N-126 



24-hour Service at 

STATION No. 2 

Main and Gregson 

Streets 

PHONE N-125 




Many a ship has been wrecked by this song 



CLEANERS 



PRESSERS 



QUIPMENT 
XPERIENCE 
FFICIENCY 



ERVICE 

KILL 

PEED 




HAPPY 

SNAPPY 

SERVICE 



Cash and Carry Offices at 

424 W. MAIN STREET PHONE r6451 
1106 BROAD STREET PHONE r5451 



OUR TRUCKS COVER THE CITY 



Fancy Ices Sherberts 



PHONE L-963 
Ice Cream Specialists 



Durham Ice Cream Company 

Incorporated 



Fast Frozen 

"Blue Ribbon" Ice Cream 



Made with Pure Cream "Good to Eat at all Hours' 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 



Blocks Punches 




NATIONAL OFFICERS 

Andrew Beck, Grand Alpha; Harold Mann, Vice Grand 
Sigma; James W. Bradley, Exalted Sigma; Ed Toal, Chief 
Finigler; Kenneth Whitsett, Worthy Matron; Frost 
Walker, Honey-Fuggler; Loree Cagle, Sponsor. 

Local Officers 

Billy Wyman, President; Roy Lundgren, Vice President; 
Jim Mustard, Secretary; Sam Fretwell, Treasurer; Jim 
Green, Alumni Secretary; Bill Tate, Sergeant-in-Arms. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

All Qualified Without Help. 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE 
Graduate School 

Poul Garner, Marcus Hobbs, Chorles Galloway. 

Law School 

Hove Mercy Bynum, Morns Adeison, Bob Finley. 

Medical School 

Don Marion, "Nurmi" Shears, J, S, Forbes, Jr. 

School of Religion 

Carl "Red" Adkins, "Sam" Donald, "Bob" Hardy, 
Mosby Perrow. 

Class of 1933 

Ken Abbott, Tom Dorsey, Len Johnson, "Horse" 
Hendrickson, Bob Keown, Allen Dudley, Jim Stewart, Bob 
Vaughn, Joe Shockford, Ward Wilcox, Bill Ponkey, John 
Minter. 

Closs of 1934 

June Caldwell, Paul Fulford, Nick Porreca, Edward 
Abbott, John Brownlee, Fred Hayes, Marshall Pritchett, 
Jerry Bray, Phil Franklin, Willord Raisely, Carl Shock, 
Bob Varela, Don McNpiII, Rill Joyner. 

Class of 1935 

Woyne Duttcra, f-ronk bornett, J. B, Clark, Alton 
Murchison, Chalres Derrick, Dick Hardy, George Lamar, 
John Long, Jake Gray, Barney Welsh, Bill Tuckwiller, 
Fred Cook, Al White, H. B Ingle, Bob Murvine, J. C. 
Adams, A E. Fischer. 

Closs of 1944 

Pardue Bunch, Lou Ganz, Merrimon Cunniggim, 
Wolter Winchell, Robert Nixon, Andrew Rockybilt, 
Spruill Thornton, Bill Price, Mayor O'Brien 

Pledges 

"Doc" Baker, Deon Arnold, Coach Gregory, W. E. 
Whifford, Jerry Gerord, Harvey Frick, Chorles Lindbergh, 
Ben Turpin, Will Rogers, Al Copone. 



ALPHA SIGMA SIGMA 

A LPHA SIGMA SIGMA, national fraternity of 
"Outstanding" nnen, founded at North Caro- 
lina State College in 1926. The place of its 
founding was ideal for the establishment of such 
an order. Amid the surroundings of farm life, 
and with a majority of the students just fresh 
from some of the best farms in the state they 
are well capable of recognizing and selecting 
men for an order of this type. 

State College having set the precedent and 
other schools feeling the need for a like order 
and feeling that they could not establish it with 
the same insight and first-hand information as 
possessed by the "Outstanding" men in this field 
at State, petitioned the State chapter and other 
chapers were installed at different institutions. 

Delta chapter was established at Duke in 
1931, and has accepted into its membership 
many men worthy of this distinguished honor. 

There are at present five active chapters es- 
tablished at the most outstanding institutions 
in the country. The colors of the fraternity are 
green and greener, the flower Self-Rising, and 
the publication Itcha Palm. 



FRATRES IN GRAND OPERA 

John McCormick Loney, Kate Smith, Roger Peacock, 
Betty Boop, Bosco, Mickey Mouse 

FRATRES IN LOVE 

Vince Moseley, Barney Welsh, Bob "Gray Taxi" 
Keown, Garfield Shafer, John Barrymore, Jimmy 
Durante, Don Ellis, Wendell Home, Gordon Power, John 
Barleycorn, J. B. Clark, "Suitcase" Simpson, Chris 
Roberts, Buster Keoton. 

HONORARY DEGREES CONFERRED 

Royal Pookups 

Albon G Widgery, Ben F. Lemert, H. Shelton Smith, 
Howard Lackey, The President's Council, The Form Loon 
Fund, Prohibition Repeal 

Petit Panzys 

L. C Apgar, A. T. West, A C, Jordan, Martin Lee, 
Howard Andrews, Corlos Moseley, Brown House, "Blue 
Devil" Orchestra, John Harmon, Jr. 



EDGEWORTH 

SMOKING TOBACCO 




The Smoker's Diploma' 

SINCE 1877 



LARUS & BRO. CO. 



RICHMOND, VA. 



J. A. MURDOCK 
COMPANY, INC. 



ICE, COAL 

and 

FUEL OIL 



TELEPHONE J-0341 

Morgan Street 

Durham, North Carolina 



We Supply 
DURHAM 



A first-class electrical dis- 
tributing system, a modern 
city bus transporation sys- 
tem and a year 'round ice 
delivery 

DURHAM PUBLIC 
SERVICE CO. 

Durham, North Carolina 



The Young Men's Shop 

126-128 East Main Street 
Durham, North Caroline 


Rhodes-Collins 
Furniture Company 

Complete House Furnishers 

209-211 East Chapel Hill Street 
Durham, N. C. 


Style Quality Value 


SMITH-ALBRIGHT 

Milliners 

Welcome to Duke Girls 
103 East Main Street — Durham 


H 1 B B E R D 


FLORIST 

WENDELL HORNE, Duke Representative 
Durham, North Carolina 


Compliments of 

BlacknalTs Drug Store 

Durham, North Corolina 


Belk-Leggett Company 


A most pleasant and profitable 
place to shop 

Main through to Chapel Hill Street 


Hotel 
Melbourne 

Durham, North Corolina 


Paschall Bakery 

MALLIEJ PASCHALL, Proprietor 

Bread Cakes Pies 

Be Sure That it is PoschoH's Pride 

New Plant: Corner Duke ond Morgan Streets 
Durham, North Corolino 




10-»25"~ STORE 



A NATIONAL INSTITUTION 



,lf:,l 



QUALITY ||f I 

111"" 



I 



!lll 



u iiiii n 

U IIIII II SEIVICE 




SCIENTIFIC 
MERCHANDISING 

A Hearty Welcome to All Duke Patronage 



Main Street 



Durham, N. C. 



ZOOM- 

the trails 

of cigarette 

enjoyment 

with 




Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. 

Louisville, Kentucky 



INSIST ON- 



CHRISTIAN 
PRINTI NG 
COMPANY 



Bookmaking 

Publications 

Advertising 



Thirty Years of Printing Service 
to Durham and Vicinity 



124 West Parrish Street 
Durham, North Carolina 



DURHAM 

DAIRY 

PRODUCTS 

INC. 



DAI RY PRODUCTS 
Durham's Standard of Quality 

Durham Dairy Products 

Incorporated 
DURHAM and CHAPEL HILL 



After the Dance . . . 
Get a Bite . . . 

— AT — 

Reeves' American Inn 

We offer special induce- 
ment to Duke Students. 
We carry specialized 
steaks. Come down and 
sample one. Night and day 
our doors are open 

GOOD FOOD 

GOOD SERVICE 

Chapel Hill Street 



DRINK 




IN BOTTLES 

9,000,000 Coca-Colas 
Sold Daily 

DURHAM 
COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 







L/urham's Largest 
Oldest and 
Strongest Bank 



RESOURCES OVER 

$10,000,000 



Fidelity 

Bank 

Durham, North Carolina 







3^ 



'Nationally 
Known" 




"Justly 
Famous' 



A MARK TO REMEMBER 

The trade mark of STETSON "D" has appeared in the clothes 
of well-dressed college men in practically every university in 
the country. It is a familiar symbol to the men of Duke — 
years of faithful service has made it a popular symbol 

Carry this thought with you — wherever 
you may be — "the same high quality 
Stetson 'D' Clothes are always avail- 
able" Your measurements are always 
kept on file — all you need do is to drop us 
a card and you will receive samples of our 
fabrics immediately 



THE WELL DRESSED MAN PROGRESSES! 



THE STETSON "D" TAILORS CO. 

BALTIMORE .'. /. MARYLAND 



/ / / / 



WHAT DO YOU THINK? 

by 
Jojo 



ICONOCLASTS and cynics, scandal mongers 
and religious fanatics without doubt ought to 
be cast from the ranks of society and yet with- 
out their check there would be no limit for 
human perversions and conceit. 




President of the Student Body — 

Going to get something accomplished this 
year. If I ploy around and talk nice to the ad- 
ministration they ought to give me a good 
recommendation when I leave here. It's nice 
to be independent but if my ideas happen to 
coincide with those of the dean there is no 
reason why I should change mine. If I play my 
cards right I'll be okeh. Some of the boys may 
think I should be independent, but as long as I 
know I am in right with the office there is no 
need to do anything radical I sure am glad we 
don't have much campus meanness in politics 
around here . , . whenever a fellow is elected he 
is able to feel that he has been chosen as the 
best man and not just because he was in with 
the strongest machine. 



Below are some of the thought waves which 
have been picked up by the campus mental tele- 
pathist. Perhaps his findings only reveal the 
baseness of his own mind rather than real 
thoughts intercepted . . . who can tell . . . not 
even these characters themselves can be sure 
of their motives . . . such is the power of rational- 
izing. . . . Anyway, here they are. 

The Newspaper Editor — 

The administration has been pulling the wool 
over the eyes of the boys long enough now Old 

didn't have nerve enough last 

year to buck up to them, but I'll sure tell 'em 
though I wonder if anybody reads my editorials 
— I'm sure they do though because after all 
they have some pretty good ideas in them. I 
know one thing that I am going to do this year 
and that is cut out all those sappy stories they 
used to run obout Sunday school classes and 
class meetings where nobody says anything but 
the dean who uses some nice platitudes about 
high ideals , . . think maybe I can work in 
some hot columns this time too . . . time we had 
something like that to stir this place out of its 
sleep . . , that will show I'm not afraid of the 
administration. 




Young Gentlemen 



The Dean — 



I can't understand those students. ... I treat 
them like little gentlemen, explained the value 
of studying and right living to them, both of 
which I know they have never heard before, as 
well as explain what the various visiting speak- 
ers mean by their talks and yet they don't seem 
to appreciate me . . . looks as if they just tried 
to make life miserable for me when I try so 



hard to do what is best for them . . . can't be 
that they resent my paternal air, but of course 
I can't talk to them like men . . . they are still 
so young and undeveloped . . . just wish they 
appreciated me more. 




The Crooning Halfback — 

Boy but that stationery is a knock out . 
so are those posters, the only trouble is that 
the picture of me isn't quite big enough and 
doesn't stand out like it ought to . . . guess it 
will have to do for a starter though . . . that 
bunch of mine sure are lucky to be able to use 
my name for advertising . . . hotdam . . . bet 
there isn't a girl on the other campus who 
wouldn't be tickled to death to be called my 
girl . . . wonder how I can stand when I am 
leading the boys so I can show off my profile and 
shoulders at the same time . . . maybe if I 
keep turning every little while people can see 
them both ... if the rest of them could only 
play as well as I can sing there wouldn't be 
any telling where we could get booked 

The Literary Editor — 

Sure have been getting nice write-ups in the 
paper this year . . one article said one issue 
was lovely . . . good, intelligent reviewer . . . but 
they are not any better than I deserve for I 
really have made a readable magazine out of 
the old thing . . . perhaps the hoi polloi can't 
appreciate my talent but what do I care for their 
opinion . . . what I want is literary works for 
literary sake and not just to please the stu- 
dents . . . besides I give them an opportunity to 
read some real literature as against the ordinary 



o.up of that newspaper . one thing though, I 
haven't put enough of my own work in there this 
year . . if I only had five names insteod of just 
three two more articles in each issue 

oh boy. 

The Campus Players — 

Editor's note— our writer complained that due 
to the fact that all of these players have the 
same characteristics he couldn't tune in on any 
particular person, but that a description of the 
ideas of one would fit all the rest so nlikp 
have they become. . . . 

That dumb student body . they have about 
as much appreciation for art and beauty as 
a wet hen we intelligencia are creative and 
can build beautiful scenery, build masks, and 
put on plays with all the skill of genuine actors 
. . . what can they do . . nothing but think 
about books and such tripe besides we get a 
chance to become satihtes of our beloved di- 
rector . . what more could anyone ask . . what 
does it matter if the rest of the world calls us 
queer the others ore the uneducated and 

we the true culturists. 

The Campus Dirt Columnist — 

That stuff ought to knock their eyes out . 
just hope nobody ever finds out that I am 
writing it up always did have a flare for 

literature and now I am in my glory wish I 

had nerve to hang my name on the column so 
I could get credit for it . . thought those 
sororities had my number once but they couldn't 
catch me . . . had 'em foxed . . wish some week 
I could get my stuff by without having ye editor 
cut all the lively ports out . . . sure would like 
to put in what I sow over that transom in the 
bachelors' apartments that night and a few 
such . . . guess I'll have to just file them for 
future blackmail 

Man who Designed Campus Sidewalks and 
driveways — 

Won't ever have to walk around the campus 
in bad weather so why should I worry . . . have 
to admit they are nice and rustic looking . . . 
artistic . students ought to be willing to stand 
wet feet on the few bad days we have in the 
beautiful state m return for getting such an 



attractive campus ... as for the roads there 
is no sense in wasting more land than necessary 
wouldn't be in keeping with the architecture 
to have modern and useful roads . . . must make 
'em narrow so everybody will have to park in 
inconvenient places . . . can't let the beauty of 
the quadrangle be despoiled by having parked 
cars all over the place. 

Chief- 
Wonder why my rubber heels wear out so fast 
. . . must be from padding around so much , . , 
that the only way I can sneak up on the boys 
though. ... I'd feel mean about slipping up 
on them if I didn't think it was for their own 
good . . . hate to see young fellows ruining their 
insides with alcohol . . guess its my duty to 
mankind to help them back from the ways of 
evil ... so bod too for them to get into the 
habit of gambling . must be more careful in 
the future I'm sure a couple of fellows took a 
drink the other night and I didn't cotch them 
one or two card games got by too . . just 
for the good of mankind I'll get some rubber 
soles OS well as heels and see if I can keep a 
few more boys from traveling the wrong road. 

Librarian — 

Won't be long before we have the largest 
library in the south . . . more books than any 
other plant . . more books . . . must be careful 
not to get too many books that will be read 
often . . . those will wear out fast and we would 
have to replace them without increasing our 
total . okeh in theory that a library should 
furnish books for reading and not just to collect 
dust but we can't ever build up a big library 
if we have to keep buying books that get worn 
out in no time by too much reading. 

Doc— 

Should think those crazy students would get 
tired of their )okes on us up here I'd just 



like to see anybody else handle as many cases 
as expeditiously and skillfully as we do . . . love 
to hear of a better record than ours , . . they 
think just because we work fast and don't get 
hysterics everytime somebody gets colic that we 
don't know our business. . . . 

Dean Snoozle — 

Slipping a little now, getting so I forget some 
of the boys' middle names and even in some cases 
It takes me a second or two to remember their 
home towns . , , oh well this is a big school and 
what do I care anyway . . . fiddlesticks, I mustn't 
forget to clean my car up ... I saw a couple of 
spots of dust on the fender yesterday . . . some- 
times It makes me feel badly to see the way 
those kids go for the stuff I hand them . . . but 
It's the only way to make an impression . . . 
hand 'em a bunch of stuff that I can't even be- 
lieve myself . . . feel hypocritical but gee 
whilikins that's my job . . . got to be careful 
that makes twice I've had cuss words on my 
mind . . . one of them might slip out some- 
time . . . 

Miss Co-ed — 

Gosh I can't figure out the best policy . . . 
if I don't neck and spoon with the boys they don't 
ever come bock to see me anymore and think 
I'm a heck of a sport ... 'n if I do let them play 
the "wandering hand" they tell all their friends 
and expect everything and then throw me over 
. . . what a problem . . . dam boys anyway. . . . 

John College — 

I've got a date tonighl and I'm duined 
if I know how to start off ... if I begin mon- 
keying around too fast she'll think I'm fresh 
maybe . . . then maybe perhaps if I act too 
much like a gentleman she'll think I'm a hell 
of a date. ... I never can figure out these blame 
girls . . . well Steve Broody took a chance! 

Static getting bad now, so adios. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY STORE 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 
HAB ERDASH ER Y 

and 

WOMAN'S COLLEGE STORE 



These Stores are Owned and Operated by 
DUKE UNIVERSITY 



X5. 



'here is a recognized BEST 
in every line 

The officially adopted and now standard graduate 
ring brings to another outstanding American Campus 

DUKE UNIVERSITY AT DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

an individual Josten creation and a lasting memorial 
to Dr. Frank C Brown, his Faculty and Student 
Committee 

J O S T E N ' S 

Treasure-Craft Jewelers 
720 Union Trust Building, Cleveland, Ohio 

INDIVIDUALITY QUALITY SERVICE 

Sole official and only authorized representative Graduate and Alumnus Rings 
0. G. SAWYER, Duke University Store 



m^^ 




You might think he'd taken a correspondence course 
in "How to Add Inches to Your Chest." But no — 
he's wearing a HANES Undershirt! 

There's something about a HANES — the way it 
springs across your chest, that makes you want to 
stick it out! You feel like a million. And does it wear? 
It seems as though Wonderwear never wears out! 

25c . . . and you get all the length you need — 
enough to tuck deep inside your shorts so there'll be 
no rolling and bunching at your belt. If you don't 
know a HANES dealer, please write P. H. Hanes 
Knitting Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



A super-soft, combed- 
yarn shirt 



25' 



Lisle, Durene, or Rayon . . . 
only 35c and 50c 

HANES Shortshaveaclutchless 
crotch. Guaranteed fast colors. 

25c • 35c • 50c 

HANES Union Suits, 50c. 
SAMSONBAK Sanfor- TPq 
ized (pre-shrunk) only / J 




Wonderwear 




FOR MEN AND BOYS 



FOR EVERY SEASON 



On Sale at 

THE DUKE UNIVERSITY HABERDASHERY 



Carolina's Largest 

Photographic 

Concern 

SIDDELL STUDIO 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

f o r 

CHANTICLEER 



Duke University 
Barber Shop 

A "University" Shop for 
University Men 

Manager: W. M. Erwin 



Duke University 
Beauty Shop 



COURTESY 

SERVICE 

ARTISTRY 



Manager: W. 0. Flowers 




I am a member of 
the Sorority 




The Northwestern 
Mutual Life 

75 Years Old 


AT THE SERVICE OF 
DUKE UNIVERSITY 


L. WATTS NORTON, General Agent 
Mezzanine Floor, Trust Building 






Durham, North Carolina 


DURHAM 




LAU NDRY 






COMPANY 


Compliments of — 

Carolina-Paramount-Rialto 






Theatres 


Gregson and Peabody Streets 


Durham, North Carolina 


PHONE J-0951 




E. H. Clement Company 



CONTRACTORS 




Contractors for Stone Work 
on the New Duke University Campus 

High Grade Business and Residence 
Construction 



iiiniiiT^nii''' 



CHARLOTTE, N. C 



DURHAM, N. C. 



Liberty, Equality, and 



Time: Rush week for the Sewing Circles. The 
goldenrod is blooming. Not so the freshmen. 
The campus is fairly green with them. 

Place: If you don't know, well — 

Characters: Guess. 

It is the chapter room of the Blessourhome 
Sewing Circle. Shades of dormitories and night 
have fallen, the former, much to the disappoint- 
ment of Western neighbors. All of the Biessour- 
homes, in sweetly simple gowns of plain white 
muslin, are gathered in a strangely intense 
group. They are seated in choirs as upright as 
themselves — dresses well over their ankles (not 
the chairs, of course). A tall, quiet, but un- 
mistakably scrupulous, maiden is speaking. But, 
hist ! let us around behind yon cosy love seat and 
listen. The tones of her well-modulated voice 
float to us in silvern liquidity. 

, "Dearly beloved sisters in Blessourhome, to- 
night as you know is the last night of formal 
rushing. Knowing all of you as I do, and loving 
you fully and completely according to the laws 
as set forth in our ritual, I feel sure that most 
of my words shall be unnecessary However, a 
few admonitions will not be amiss. 

"In the first place, as you know full well, we 
shall follow the custom of our campus. No dis- 
paraging word shall be said tonight of other 
sewing circles. Of course, our love for these is 
second only to our devotion for each other, ac- 
cording to the laws of our ritual In spite of 
this regard, we sometimes let hasty words fall 
which are not intended. Such little inter-cir- 
cular misunderstandings have been fully cleared 
in the past when they have unavoidably arisen. 
Let them not occur again. (Confer, Pan-Circle 
Constitution, Article I, Section 1.) Moreover, 
in our zeal to impress rushees, let us not be 
boastful of our own good qualities Rather, be- 
loveds, let them shine forth as unmistakable 
merit will ever do. After all, there are enough 
prospects for eoch circle to pledge its full quota 
of darling girls from lovely families. All our 
competing circles have excellent points, and 
since all the rushees have equal merit, why 
should wc be unseemly in attempting to hold our 



light of love, perfect harmony, unrivaled popu- 
larity, and friendship above that of our school- 
mates — simply because they happen to have dif- 
ferent ideas on embroidery?^ Never, gentle sis- 
ters, let it be said that a Blessourhome was 
guilty of reprehensible conduct in this or any 
other inter-circular matter. 

'The facts about the other circles are of 
course too well known to bear repetition. Since 
the freshmen hove been here for two weeks, and 
also know them by this time, it will not be a 
violation of our policy to mention them in con- 
versations. In case you have forgotten any of 
the harmless little bits of scandal which will 
happen in the best-regulated sewing circles, you 
may find information on political difficulties 
and other slight irregularities which you may 
mention to rushees without the slightest danger 
of injuring the chances of other circles. These, 
I feel sure, will prove an invaluable aid in en- 
livening conversation when you have exhausted 
the weather, 'How do you like the place?*', 'Oh, 
you're the girl from Possum Hollow,' and 'Do 
you know the Smiths, aren't they lovely?' 

"One more word, and I shall have finished. 
Will those of you who have friends in the dif- 
ferent Men's Uplift Societies please find out any 
information you can about their progress with 
our rusheesr* Needless to say, we do not ask 
men to rush for us — none of the sewing circles 
do, for that matter. However, some of our 
friends have fortunately been dating the fresh- 
men we hope to pledge. We cannot blame our 
best friends among the men, even our lovers, 
for wanting to meet and date freshmen. Natur- 
ally, the conversation will turn to the Blessour- 
homes. We are glad of such unsolicited aid, 
and we must show the men our appreciation by 
seeming interested about these dotes. Please 
do not fail to question them at once. Those 
who have already done so, please report im- 
mediately. 

"With these few parting ideals, dearly loved, 

I declare the meeting of Blessourhome Sewing 

Circle adjourned." 
— M. J. N. 

* This has nothing to do with the French Revolution. 



OFFERING 
TO THE STUDENT BODY 

BALANCED DIET and WHOLESOME FOOD 



On the East Campus 

THE WOMAN'S COLLEGE 
UNION 



On the West Campus 

THE DUKE UNIVERSITY 
MEN'S UNION 



THE COFFEE SHOP 

Service — A La Carte 



^. #toen ponabJit, inc. 

22 MIfSt I5tl) ^ricft 
iicuj |)orU Citp 

designers; anb makers; of tlje sitaiiteb glasis; 
luinboujs; for tfjc BuUe i^lcmorial Cfjapcl, 
IDuUe ^nil)er£iitp,Burf)am, Jiortf) Carolina 




Delicious Food — 

Bright and Cheerful Surroundings 

Let's Go: 

To 

ERWIN COFFEE SHOPPE 

"Where Friends Meet Friends" 

Breakfast - Luncheon - Dinner 
Steaks - Oysters 

OPEN ALL DAY 
7:30 a.m.— 8:00 p.m. 

Trinity Avenue and Buchanan Boulevard 
Just Off the East Campus 


— i 






W 


\ 

\ 


Time: Donee intcrnifssion. 
Plocc: Dope Shop, 
Wanted: A dope. 




Aerial View of Duke University 



Duke University 

Curricula, equipment and expense information 
may be obtained from 



The General Bulletin 

The Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction 

The Bulletin of the Graduate School 

The Bulletin of the Departments of Engineering 

The Bulletin of the School of Religion 

The Bulletin of the School of Law 

The Bulletin of the School of Medicine 

The Bulletin of the School of Nursing 

The Bulletin of the Summer Schools 



Address applications and inquiries to 

R. L. FLOWERS, Secretary 
DUKE UNIVERSITY DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 




N 



X/ISIONS created by the imagination 
precede the achievement of any really 
great occomplishment. The ability to 
weave the threads of imagination into 
the finished fabric is equally important. 

It has been the privilege of the 
EDWARDS & BROUGHTON COMPANY 
to cooperote with the Chanticleer staff 
in creating their vision into material form. 

Such cooperation is one of the "visions" 
which precede the building of o successful 
business, and is a part of the working 
policy of the EDWARDS & BROUGHTON 
COMPANY. 

To those Staffs desiring complete co- 
operation, we offer unexcelled service. 

You, too, may be proud of your annual. 

Correspondence is Invited 

EDWARDS & BROUGHTON COMPANY 
Raleigh, North Caroli 



i'' i .1 1 
























■^k^JC^ 





ANOTHER 

Personality 
YEARBOOK 



DESIGNED AND 
ENGRAVED THE 
PERSONALITY 
W A Y - - - - BY 



^^ SOUTHWESTERN ^ 

Photo Process Co 

.. SPRING Ai LUCKY- ATLANTA- 



"UPHOLDING THE TRADITION OF YEARS" 

CrOR twelve successive years the Chanticleer 
has been cased in a Molloy Made Cover, repre- 
senting the utmost in durable material, and in 
exquisite workmanship. 

The 1933 Chanticleer, no less than its predeces- 
sors, represents the very finest in cover creation 
and production. A far cry from the ancient hand 
tooled leather binding produced by the monks in 
their efforts to save for posterity the written rec- 
ords of that day and age, yet the 1 933 Chanticleer 
cover represents the same desire to create and 
produce something beautiful, something perman- 
ent, and something worth passing on to the next 
generation. This cover was created to carry on 
these traditions in the complete cover plant of 

THE DAVID J. MOLLOY PLANT 

2857 NORTH WESTERN AVENUE 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



This and That 

By Poliyuima 
"Honi soit qui mol y pense." 



lUST to show you, my cohorts, that my versatil- 
ity is really amazing, I am even year-booking 
for your entertainment and delectation For 
over six months my little red book has been filled 
to overflowing with choice universitidbits, and 
I want to tell you that all I am and ever hope 
to be I owe to a couple of ultra ultra keyholes 
of my own invention. . . . Through my urging you 
have foiled the oilio-gobelus, the moto-munchus, 
the karbo-noccus, and the zero-doccus; you have 
built up your resistance against pet peeves. . . . 
And you have become pillared, or pilloried, as 
you will, to your heart's content. , . . My sunkist 
friends hove furnished us with amusing incidents, 
but I owe a lot to a certain crooner who could 
take it, but I do wish he hadn't taken up cro- 
cheting. ... To get back to the present, are you 
sick of threepointwoing yet^ . . . And what co-eds, 
stranded on the campus during Easter, thrce- 
pointwoed out at Bragtownr' ... Do you remem- 
ber!' . . . And do you remember the little co-ed 
who returned to her dorm weeping because of 
a broken romancer' . . . She got over it, I hope. . . 
All year a certain couple foiled me by making 
up every time I said they had phphpht . . Thank 
goodness the thing finally has gone over the 
falls. . . . And the prize for this year goes to the 
young co-ed who thinks that Gastonio is a for- 
eign country. ... I got my biggest kick of the 
past semester from the gal who came back from 
our short holiday with a blackened eye. . . . And 
she wouldn't talk. . . , "Bring 'Em Back Alive" 
Schackner was foiled by a bootlegger, and was 
his face redr* . . . There really were five secret 
marriages on the campus, but I shall not tell 
even now, in my swan song. ... I have a berry 
for the little Pegramammy who called six guys 



to take her to a dance even at this late date 
Pet peeve: Co-eds who knew but who wouldn't 
talk, but how they squawked when I got some- 
thing on them' .1 have also reserved a nice 
buzzy berry for the grad studes who squealed on 
that waiter . . That horticultural club I spoke 
about at one time stirred up plenty of comment 
among the so-called righteous . . . Lot of guys 
and gals have complained to me all year about 
a certain catty sob-sister who otherwise ap- 
peared so darned sanctimonious, but who could 
dish it out. ... I wonder if she can take it 
They are not stool-pigeons; they are stooges 
We have not yet located the East campus chief's 
box . . Just one of those unsolved mysteries 
I congratulate those campus cowboys for the 
persistence despite the fact that it rapidly be- 
came "offback" riding every Sundee AM ... I 
still maintain that if we had three hundred guys 
as crooked as our politicians in a box, they would 
make a swell jig-saw puzzle. , . . 

Well, the year is over! ... I am happy that my 
many readers (colossal conceit) considered my 
opus in the right spirit, knowing that I was 
merely having fun and not being malicious. To 
recapitulate, I was only threatened with a one- 
way ride just once, and those gentlemen of Sot- 
gate Hall are really tough, but thank heavens 
they were only kidding ! . . . Thus let me wish you 
all a very happy, busy summer vacation, unless 
your quality points deficit forces you to remain 
at your books. . . . And to those who are about to 
start out avoiding the well-known wolf, one word 
of counsel, don't try to be a columnist, you can't 

all be good! 

Yours, 

Pollyanna. 



AUTOGRAPHS 



Index to Advertisers 

Alexander Motor Company 350 

Belk-Leggett Company 354 

Blacknall's Drug Store 354 

Brown and Williamson Tobacco Corp 356 

Carolina-Poramount-Rialto Theaters _ _ 366 

Christian Printing Co. 356 

David J. Molloy Co 374 

Durham Coca-Cola Bottling Co _ _ _ 357 

Durham Dairy Products, Inc — 356 

Durham Ice Cream Company, Inc 351 

Durham Laundry Company _ 366 

Durham Public Service Co 353 

Duke University 371 

Duke University Barber Shop 365 

Duke University Beauty Shop 365 

Duke University Store 363 

Duke University Union 369 

Edwards & Broughton Co 372 

E. H. Clement Company 367 

Ellis Stone and Company 348 

Erwin Coffee Shoppe 370 

Fidelity Bank 357 

G. Owen Bonowit, Inc 370 

Geo. T. Wood & Sons 349 

Hibberd 354 

J A. Murdock Company, Inc 353 

Johnson-Prevost 350 

Josten's 363 

Kress Store 355 

Larus & Bro. Co 353 

Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company 347 

Melbourne Hotel 354 

North Western Mutual Life Insurance Co 366 

Paschal! Bakery 354 

Pender's Stores 349 

P H. Hones Knitting Company 364 

Reeves' American Inn 357 

Rhodes-Collins Furniture Co 354 

Seemon Printery 349 

Siddell Studio 365 

Smifh-Albright 354 

Southwestern Photo-Process Company__ . 373 

Stetson "D" Tailors Company . . 359 

Thomas-Quickel Company 348 

Young Men's Shop 354 



HAVING now completed the work on the Nineteen 
Hundred and thirty-three Chonticleer and before tak- 
ing our final leave from this edition we do not wish to 
let escape this opportunity of expressing our sincere 
gratitude to those people who have so materially aided us 
by their advice and cooperation 

To Mr. Henry R Dwire, Mrs B U Ratchford, Mr. A. A 
Wilkerson, Miss Elizabeth Aldrich, Mr Ted Mann, and 
Mr. Charles Dukes of the department of Public Relations 
and Alumni Affairs; Dr W K Greene of the department 
of English; Miss Helen Morgan, Mr. James W Bradley 
and Mr Shi Goodwyne of The Southwestern Photo Process 
Co.— Photo Engravers; Mr. and Mrs. H. A Siddell of 
Siddell's Studio; Mr. J H Hardison and Mr. Charles Lee 
Smith, Jr. of the Edwards & Broughton Company; and our 
many friends, we express our appreciation. 

This acknowledgment would not be complete without 
calling to mind the deep interest and careful attention 
given by Mr. Charles E. Jordan, our faculty adviser. 

We have attempted to interpret the desires of the stu- 
dent body in so far as that was possible and we trust that 
this book Will meet with their approval. 
Edwin C. Kellam, Editor. 
Gordon G Power, Business Manager. 



D02604525O