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Full text of "The Chanticleer [serial]"

DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 
DURHAM. N. C. 







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Copyright: 

J. GORDON TOWNLEY 
CLAIBORNE B. GREGORY 



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TO FITTINGLY HONOR THAT PHASE OF MAN'S 



ACTIVITY THAT HAS CONTRIBUTED SO MUCH 



TO MODERN CIVILIZATION THE STAFF HAS CHOSEN 



FOR THE THEME OF THE 1954 CHANTICLEER THE 



PROFESSION OF ENGINEERING. 



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AS A TRIBUTE TO ENGINEERING, THE ENGINEERING 



SCHOOL AT DUKE UNIVERSITY, AND THEIR 0>X^N 



ATTAINMENTS, THIS, THE 1934 CHANTICLEER, IS 



RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO: 



Samuel Raymond Schealer 



Harold Crusius Bird 



Walter James Seeley 



William Hollland Hall 



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HyMlOLD CRUSIUS BIRO, Ph.B., C.E. 
PROFESSOR OF CIVIL ENGINEER- 
ING, CHAIRMAN OV DEI'ARTMENT 
OF CIVIL AND MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING. 




ENGINEERING IS EXEMPLIFIED BY THE USE OF IRON AND STEEL 
IN OUR DAILY LIFE. FROM THE TIME WE ARISE FROM OUR BED 
WITH ITS STEEL SPRINGS AND WASH IN WATER COMING THROUGH 
STEEL PIPES. UNTIL WE RETURN AT NIGHT TO OUR APARTMENT 
CONSTRUCTED OF STEEL, WE ARE CONTINUALLY USING SOME OF 
THE CONVENIENCES DESIGNED FOR US BY THE ENGINEER. DE- 
MAND FOR ENGINEERS AND UNFILLED ORDERS FOR STEEL SERVE 
AS THE BAROMETER OF PROSPERITY. 




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ADMINISTRATION 




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Dr. W 11,1.1AM Preston Few 



DR. WILLIAM PRESTON FEW has 
served as President of Trinity College 
and 13uke University since 1910. He re- 
ceived his A.B. degree from Wofl'ord College 
in 1889, A.M. from Harvard in 1893, and 
Ph.]). in 1896, his LL.D. from Wofford Col- 
lege in 1911, Southwestern University, 1912, 
.\llcghcnv College, 1915, Syracuse University, 
1928, Oh'io Wcslcyan, 1928, and University of 
Nortli Carolina, 1932, his Litt.D. from Birm- 
ingham Southern College in 1930. In_ 1933 
he was President of the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 



[38] 



The Business Dn isioii 



Till'] (.IcvcKipinent ot Duke University lias 
placed on the Business Division rapidly in- 
creasing responsibilities. Tins office is charged 
with such duties as the maintenance of buildings 
and grounds on the two campuses, the providing 
of adequate classroom, rooming and boarding ac- 
commodations, tlie supervision of loan and schol- 
arship funds, the purchase of supplies, and the 
collection of accounts. A large staff is thus neces- 
sary fc->r the efficient conduct of the different de- 
partments. 

Dr. R. I,. I'lowers has been Vice President in 
charge i>f the Business Division since 1924, Treas- 
urer since 1923, and Secretary since 1910; he is 
also Secretary to the Faculty, and Recording Sec- 
retary to the Board of Trustees and the Executive 
Committee. In addition to his duties at Duke 
University, Dr. Flowers is a Trustee of the Duke 
Kndowment, Greensboro College, the Oxford Or- 
phanage, the Methodist Orphanage, and Chair- 
man of the Board of Trustees of the North Caro- 
lina College for Negroes. 

Dr. Flowers graduated from the United States 
Naval Academy in 1891. He resigned from the 
Navy to come to Trinity College as an instructor 
in Mathematics, serving one year before the col- 
lege was moved to Durham. He was elected Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics in 1892, receiving his A.M. 
degree from Trinity College in 1900, and his LL.D. 
from Davidson College in 1927. 

Mr. C. B. Markham, who is Assistant Treas- 
urer, has had a large part in the organization and 
direction of the Treasurer's Office and in the con- 
duct of the business affairs of the University. 
Mr. Charles E. Jordan, Assistant Secretary, has 
direct supervision of the correspondence with 
prospective students. 




Robert Lee Flowers 
A.M., LL.D. 

\nce President in the Business Division 
Secretary and Treasurer 

The transition from strong little Trinity 
College to the great University of which 
it is now a part, has been a rapid and 
remarkable one, a change which Dr. 
Flowers has seen enacted with a wisely 
conservative policy of expansion to which 
he has dedicated his untiring efforts. 





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139 



Trinity College 




William H. Wannamaker 

A.B., A.M., Litt.D. 
Vice President in the Edu- 
cation Division, Dean of the 

University 

CINCE the founding of Duke University in 
^ 1924 as a result of the Duke Endowment 
provided for in the will of Mr. James B. Duke, 
there has been a very rapid growth in the size 
and field of scope of Trinity College. The 
name of the original college is still retained 
in this unit of the University which conducts 
the undergraduate instruction of men students 
in cooperation with tlie other divisions of the 
University, the Woman's College, the Grad- 
uate School of Arts and Sciences, the School 
of Religion, the School of Law, the School of 



Aledicine, the School of Nursing, and the 
Duke Forest. 

Dating from 1835, when Union Institute 
was founded in Randolph County, N. C, the 
university's lineage passed througli the transi- 
tions of a change to Normal College in 1851 
and in 1859 to Trinity College. In 1892 the 
college was transferred to Durham, and here 
its growth continued until the founding of 
Duke University in 1924. 

During the past thirty years of Trinity's 
growth, Dr. William Hane Wannamaker has 
been actively associated with the institution, 
first as an instructor in German, and later on 
in more important positions. He was grad- 
uated from Wofford College with the A.B. 
degree in 1895. In 1901 he received his AI.A. 
degree from Trinity College. He later studied 
at Harvard Graduate School, where he re- 
ceived the A.A^. degree in 1902, and he did 
further work studying in German universities 
at Berlin, Leipzig, and other places. Joining 
the staff of Trinity College in 1904, Dr. Wan- 
namaker was appointed Dean in 1917. In 
that year he received the degree of Litt.D. 
from Wofford College. Since 1926, Dean 
Wannamaker has been Vice President of the 
Education Division. He still continues his 
instructional duties as professor in the de- 
partment of German. 

During his association with Trinity and 
Duke Lhiiversity Dean Wannamaker has given 
himself unselfishly to the school, maintaining 
throughout that time intimate relationship 
with both student body and faculty in an en- 
deavor to bind the administration more closely 
to the other two branches of the institution. 




140] 



The Woman's College 



r^ L'.AN Alice Al. Baldwin came to I'rin- 
-'-^ ity College in 1924 as an assistant pro- 
fessor in history and Dean of Women. After 
the organization of the Woman's College in 
1930, she became its first Dean. This year 
completes a decade of service to the expand- 
ing institution. 

Dean Baldwin received her A.B. and M.A. 
degrees from Cornell University and the fol- 
lowing year was awarded a fellowship for for- 
eign study the American Association of Uni- 
versity Women. Later she received the de- 
gree of Doctor of Philosophy from the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

Under her leadership, the women students 
have played an increasingly important part in 
the Hfe of the University. Since 1896, women 
have been admitted on equal terms with men, 
first to Trinity College, and later to Duke 
University, but it was not until 1930 that the 
Woman's College was organized as a separate 
unit with its own campus and administrative 
officers. In 1924 there was an enrollment of 
about three hundred women students. South- 
gate Hall was the only dormitory for women. 
Today the enrollment has increased to ap- 
proximately 850. 

Different personalities make ditlcrcnt con- 
tributions to an institution. Dean Baldwin 
attacks her manifold problems with one out- 
standing method — that of justice to all and 
especial favors to none — a practice which 
unites her subordinates into a fusion of loy- 
alty to the institution of which she is head, 
and to the policies upon which, with full con- 
sultation of their opinion, she may decide. 

Not only has there been the sudden expan- 
sion, the growth in numbers and in material 





Alice M. Baldwin 

A.B., iM.A., Ph.D. 

Dean of the Woman's 

College 

equipment, but a tradition is being formed, 
a wholesome social organization is being 
worked out, and this is due in preeminent 
degree to the untiring efforts and unselfish 
spirit of Dean Baldwin. 

It is very hard to carry in parallel two 
units of an organization without there being 
a variation in tlicir progress. We find, how- 
ever, that in the tremendous steps taken in the 
new division, the women have continually 
contributed in every field of activity and 
liavc established themselves as a \ ital part 
of the organization. 




41 



The Graduate School 




William Henry Glasson 
Ph.B., Ph.D. 

Dean of the Graduate 

School of Arts and 

Sciences 

P)EAN WilHam H. Glasson of the Grad- 
'^ uate School of Arts and Sciences has 
been officially connected with this work in 
Trinity College and Duke University since 
1916. In September of that year, he was ap- 
pointed Chairman of the new Faculty Com- 
mittee on Graduate Instruction. There were 
at that time only six such students in the 
College. In 1917, due to the World War, 
the development of this department was 
halted. College men went to training camps 
and to France instead of to graduate schools. 
After the War, academic halls were again filled 



and there were forty-one graduate students 
registered in Trinity College in 1924-25, when 
the Duke Endowment provided for the estab- 
lishment of Duke University. The Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences being formally 
organized in 1926, Dr. Glasson was appointed 
as the first Dean of the new School. 

Dean Glasson has given zealous and unre- 
mitting attention to his job during the past 
eight years and has been rewarded by an in- 
crease in the registration to 266 in the aca- 
demic year 1932-33. The Graduate School 
has also received the official recognition and 
approval of the Association of American Uni- 
versities. At commencement, 1933, eighty 
students received the degree of Master of 
Arts, eleven students the degree of Alaster 
of Education, and twenty-two, the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

Dean Glasson has engaged in many other 
activities. He has been Head of the Depart- 
ment of Economics and Political Science since 
1902 and a member of the Library Committee 
and Library Council continuously since 1906. 
He was Chairman of the Librarv Committee 
from 1910 to 1927. From 1905 to 1919, he 
was joint Editor of the South Atlantic Quar- 
terly and from 1909 to 1919 he was Managing 
Editor of that periodical. He headed the 
committee which secured the Phi Beta Kappa 
Chapter for Trinity College in 1920. He has 
written two books and many articles on the 
military pension system of the Lhiitcd States 
before the World War and is an authority on 
that subject. 

With such a varied background we see that 
Dean Glasson is well adapted to this diversi- 
fied department. 




42 



The School of Rehgion 



A I'lliK seven years of continuous service, 
■^ ^ during the latter five of which his duties 
included those of the Dean of the School, 
Dean I'.lbert Russell availed himself of the 
privilege of a year's leave of absence, which 
lie has spent in tra\eling around the world. 
He has spent a very busy year in lecturing 
and visiting places of historic interest in the 
Orient. During the year the olRce of Dean 
has been tilled by Dr. Gilbert T. Rowe, who 
resigned as Book Editor of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, in 1928 to become 
professor of Christian Doctrine in the Duke 
University School of Religion. 

The School of Religion, like the other pro- 
fessional schools of the University, is engaged 
in preparing young men for service in a voca- 
tion, and it also has close connections with 
the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 
since its aims include study and investigation 
in various fields of religion. The students in 
this school are fortunate in being able to avail 
themselves of the opportunities afforded by a 
great university, especially in the depart- 
ments of Sociology, Psychology, and Philos- 
ophy. 

While the Methodist Conferences of North 
Carolina look to this School for their supply 
of ministers and their claim is being recog- 
nized and met, many of the students are from 
other Conferences, and young men preparing 
for the ministry in other churches find in this 
School practically all they need for service in 
their respective organizations. Seven denom- 
inations have been represented in the student 
body this year. 

The majority of the students are from North 
Carolina, however seventeen states and nearly 
all the Annual Conferences of the Southern 




Elbert Russell 
A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Dean of the School 
of Religion 

Methodist Church are represented in the stu- 
dent body. Some students have come from 
distant points such as California and even 
Korea. The fact that the students this year 
have come with the A.B. degree from thirty- 
eight colleges and universities indicates the 
wide field from which students arc drawn. 

Most of the 116 graduates of the School of 
Religion are now engaged in the ministry as 
members of Methodist Annual Conferences or 
as pastors of churches of other denominations. 

This division of the school ranks well in 
the forefront of religious colleges and uni- 
versities in the country. 




pill 



[43] 



School of Medicine and Duke Hospital 




WiLBERT Cornell Davison 

A.B., B.A., B.Sc, 

A.M., M.D. 

Dean of the Medical School 

A MONG the most recently organized units 
-^*- of Duke University, the School of Med- 
icine and the Duke Hospital were established 
in 1925, but it was not until 1930 that the 
present large and well equipped plant was 
opened for use. 

During the past four years, the medical fac- 
ulty has made every effort to organize Duke 
University Schools of Medicine, Nursing and 
Dietetics, and Duke Hospital, and to estab- 
lish them on such a firm foundation that real 
progress can be made in their triple function 
of instruction, research, and service to the 



community. The School of Medicine and the 
Duke Hospital have during this time climbed 
to a position of prominence in North Carolina 
and the south, a fact indicated by the some 
five thousand applications for admission to 
the School of Aledicine, of which about 300 
have been admitted, and the registration of 
over 33,000 patients in the Hospital under the 
unit history system. 

The medical students represent 112 colleges, 
and 34 states and 10 foreign countries. In 
addition to these students of the School of 
Aledicine, 39 internes, assistant residents, and 
residents are spending from one to five years 
in the wards, laboratories, and operating 
rooms of Duke Hospital. These physicians 
are in every sense graduate students, who are 
receiving instruction as well as gaining e.xper- 
ience. Many studies of medical problems 
have been completed by 'members of the fac- 
ulty and student body of the School of Med- 
icine during 1933, and over fifty articles have 
been published, or are in press. 

During 1933, the average hospital census 
has been 201. The numbers are increasing 
rapidly. Through the cooperation of the 
medical faculty, a course of training for hos- 
pital technicians was started during the past 
year and is providing instruction annually 
for ten students. During the present aca- 
demic year, a complete medical and health 
service for all students of Duke University 
has been operated under the direction of Dr. 
J. A. Speed, involving the policy of providing 
all necessary medical attention to the students. 

A healthy body as well as a healthy mind 
is essential for the success of student activity. 
This phase cannot be exaggerated. 






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[44] 



The School of Lau' 



npillO current school year has found the 
-'■ School of Law rapidly widening its con- 
tacts and extending its influence both locall}' 
and nationally. Locally, the Legal Aid Clinic 
and the Department of Legislative Research 
and Drafting continue to contribute to the 
welfare of the state. Members of the Law- 
School Faculty hold such oflices in the state 
as Chairman of the Committee on Uniform 
State Laws of the State Bar Association, 
Chairman of a Committee of the State Auto- 
mobile Association to draft a drivers' license 
law, i*resident of the State Conference of So- 
cial Service, President of the Council on the 
Emergency in Education, and Chairman of 
the Section of Juvenile Protection of the State 
Parent-Teachers' Association. Nationally, five 
members of the Law Faculty are participating 
in the work of the Federal Administration at 
Washington. 

Members of the faculty are also participat- 
ing in important capacities in the work of 
such organizations as The Association of 
American Law Schools, The American Bar 
Association, and The American Law Institute. 
One of the faculty members is the autiior of 
a survey of legal education in the state of 
California. The program of the Law School 
is so planned and organized as to make such 
contacts and such work a regular function, 
contributing professional service directly to 
the local and national go\ernments, and at the 
same time increasing the prestige and teaching 
capacity of the faculty. 

The student body becomes each year a bet- 
ter prepared group. This year again, a con- 
siderable number of colleges and more than 
half the states are represented in the group, 




Justin AIiller 

A.B., LL.B., J.D. 

Dean of the School of Law 



while at the same time a larger percentage of 
North Carolina students are found therein 
than are to be found in the Trinity College 
student body. An evidence of the quality of 
work done in the Law School is found in the 
successful placement of the members of last 
year's graduating class. 

It is really cjuite remarkable, and a decided 
tribute to the ability and perseverance of the 
Law School heads, that this branch of the 
graduate schools has made such wonderful 
progress in such a short length of time, and 
has taken its recognized place of leadership 
among schools of law. 




[45] 




ENGINEER- 
ING be- 
gan very mod- 
estly at Trinity 
College in 1887 
and has devel- 
oped so that 
instruction in 
this field at 
Duke is nation- 
ally recognized. 
For the first 
forty years en- 
gineering was 
given as a ma- 
jor, and grad- 
uates were 
awarded the 
degree of B.A. 
In 1927 the 
curriculum was 
thoroughly re- 
vised, and the 
degrees of B.S. 
in Civil and 
Electrical Engineering were authorized. Me- 
chanical Engineering was introduced in 1930 
as a part of the Department of Civil Engineer- 
ing and has developed very rapidly under the 
direction of Professors H. C. Bird, W. J. Dana 
(deceased), and R. T. Matthews. The first 
degrees in Mechanical Engineering will be 
conferred this year. 

Engineering at Duke has been recognized 
as being of high standing by the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers and the 
American Society of Civil Engineers. Duke 
University was made an Institutional Mem- 
ber of the Society for the Promotion of Engi- 
neering ]'"ducation in 1933. 



The School of Engineering 

E' 



Harold C. Bird 
Ph.B., C.E. 

Department of Civil and 
Mechanical Engineering 



The engineering equipment is housed in 
two buildings on the East Campus which 
were originally occupied by Trinity Park 
School. These buildings have been completely 
renovated, and an annex has been added. 
The Civil and Electrical Laboratories are on 
a par with any engineering school in the South. 
Mechanical Laboratories, although begun only 
two years ago, are developing into well bal- 
anced laboratories. 

The students of engineering are domiciled 
in Southgate Hall, which is reserved especially 
for them. The student activities have been 
recognized by two national organizations. 
The Student Electrical Society has been a 
Student Branch 
of the Ameri- 
can Institute of 
Electrical En- 
gineers s i 11 c e 
1926, and the 
student Civil 
Society has 
been a member 
of the Ameri- 
can Society of 
Civil Engineers 
since 1932. 
The Duke So- 
ciety of Me- 
chanical Engi- 
neers is peti- 
tion i p. g the 
American Soci- 
ety of Mechan- 
ical Engineers 

and will prob- William Holland Hall 
ably be admit- A.B., A.M., B.C.E. 

ted in the near Department of Civil 

future. Engineering 





46 



Electrical Kn^iiicenn^ 



Each of these three societies meet twice a 
month, at wliich times tlie stiaieiits tliem- 
selves give talks on some new engineering dc- 
\clopmcnt or on some topic of interest on 
whicli they liave done e.\tensi\e reading. Tliese 
meetings give the students an opportiinit\- to 
gain valuable kr.owledge about topics of in- 
terest which otherwise are mn inchided in 
their college curricula and at tlie same time 
atTords them excellent training in public 
speaking. 

Another student organization which takes 
an acti\e and leading part in all engineering 
activities is Delta Mpsilon Sigma, a local hon- 
orary engineering fraternity. This fraternity 

was formed tor 
the purpose of 
re cog n i /. i n g 
leadership and 
scholarship 
among the en- 
gineering stu- 
dents and at 
the same time 
t o p r o m o t e 
w o r thy engi- 
neering activi- 
ties. 

The climax 
ot student ac- 
t i \- i t \' is the 
annual Kngi- 
neers' Show, 
which is an ex- 
hibit of the en- 




W.ALTER ). SeEI.EY 

f..e.;m.s. 

Department of Electrical 
Engineering 



crous special 
demonstrations 
and exhibits of 
e n g i n ee r i n g 
principles. 

Professor 
1 larold C'rusius 
Bird heads the 
combined de- 
partments of 
C"i\il and Me- 
chanical Engi- 
neering. Pro- 
fessor R. S. 
\\ illnir, form- 
erly Associate 
Professor of 
.Mechanical 
Engineering at 
thcU.S. Naval 
Academy, re- 
cently filled 
the post left 




/ 



g 1 n e e r 1 n g 
equipment and 
experiments a- 
long with num- 



Samiei, R. Sciie.m-er 

E.E., M.S. 

Department of Electrical 

Engineering 

\ acant by the death of VV^illiam Jay Dana, 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Pro- 
fcs.sor William Holland 1 fall is Profes.sor of 
Civil Engineering along with Professor Bird. 

Professor Samuel Raymond Schealer is 
Chairman of the Electrical Engineering De- 
partment and has as his colleague Professor 
W alter fames Seele\'. 

Out of these Professors, four of them are 
listed in "W ho's Who in Engineering," one in 
"Who's Who in America," two in "Who's 
Who in Education," four in ".Vmerican Men 
of Science, two are members of Sigma Xi, 
three of Phi Beta Kappa, three of Tau Beta 
Pi, and all have received numerous other 
honors. 



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47 



Comptroller 



Dean of Curricula 





Frank C. Brown 
A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 



Walter Kirkland Greene 
A.M., Ph.D. 



T^HE duties of directing the building pro- 
-^ gram for the East Campus, now occupied 
by the Women's College, and for the newer 
West Campus, occupied by Trinity College 
and the various graduate units of Duke Uni- 
versity, have fallen upon the office of Comp- 
troller. Throughout the construction work 
on both campuses this position has been ably 
filled by Dr. Frank C. Brown. 

Dr. Brown holds the A.B. degree from the 
University of Nashville, and the A.M. and 
Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago. 
He came to Trinity College in 1909 as Pro- 
fessor of English, and in this position he still 
serves. He is head of the Department of 
English in addition to his duties as Comp- 
troller of the University. 

Having acted as Comptroller of Trinity 
College since 1918, and having in this capacity 
directed the expansion of the physical plant 
of the East Campus to its present up to date 
condition, it was quite natural that Dr. Brown 
should have been selected to continue to exer- 
cise the duties of Comptroller in supervising 
the planning and later the actual construc- 
tion of the entirely new West Campus which 
was to house the enlarged Duke University 
which had arisen from Trinity College. 

The completion of this task of const rucling 
a new plant of architectural beauty along 
the lines of the old Gothic structures stands 
as a testimonial of modern efficiency of 
engineering. 



1~^R. Walter Kirkland Greene was graduated 
^^^ from Wofford College in Spartanburg, 
South Carolina, in 1903. In 1905, he received 
the A.M. degree from Vanderbilt University. 
For several years he taught in well-known 
Southern preparatory schools, such as Battle 
Ground Academy, Franklin, Tennessee, and 
Baker-Himcl School, Knox\ille, Tennessee. 
In 1910 he organized Greene University School 
— a preparatory school for boys — in Athens, 
Alabama. He was Headmaster of this school 
until 1920, in which year he entered the grad- 
uate school of Harvard University and re- 
ceived his M.A. degree in 1921. In February, 
1923, the Ph.D. degree was conferred on him 
by Harvard. 

For eight years Dr. Greene was Dean and 
Chairman of the Department of l^nglish in 
Wesleyan College, Macon, Georgia. In I92S 
he was elected to a professorship in English 
in Duke University and in 1930 he became 
Dean of Undergraduate Instruction. His 
work in this particular capacity has to do 
with the i>r(iblcnis of undergraduate teach- 
ing, curriculum planning, and administration 
of the college instructional program. Under 
his supervision, the grading system has been 
altered, the quality-point system has been in- 
troduced, the group of ITcMiors Courses has 
been established, and the Curricuhnn has 
been rc-organized. 



48 



Assistant Dean 



Dean of Freshmen 






Herbert ]. Herrixg 
A.B.: A.M. 



TLJF.RBERTJ. Herring was graduated from 
■*■ ■■• Trinity College in 1922 with a Bachelor 
of Arts degree. In 1929 he received an AI.A. 
in College Administration from Columbia 
University. 

In the Fall of 1924, Mr. Herring returned 
to Duke University after teaching English in 
Winston-Salem High School for two years as 
Assistant Dean in charge of the Freshmen 
and the business of registration of undergrad- 
uate students. The rapid increase in the size 
of the student body made it necessary for a 
separate ofTice to be organized in 1926 to take 
care of the Freshman work, and since then 
Mr. Herring's work has been limited to con- 
trol of registration of students and records of 
upper classmen. 

Besides his administrative duties, he has 
the job of adviser to the Junior class. He 
also conducts a Sunday Morning Bible Class 
and discussion period. He is a member of 
the Board of Directors of the Y. M. C. A. 
and also conducts a course in argumentation 
and public speaking. 

It is the business of Mr. Herring's office to 
keep all of the permanent records for the un- 
dergraduate students and for the Graduate 
School of Arts and Sciences; it also conducts 
the registration of the students each semester. 
The consideration of applications for admis- 
sion to Trinity College is one of Mr. Herring's 
most important duties. His office is known 
as the Admissions and Registrations office. 



/// Memoriam 

Di;.\.\ Moxi.KV Arnoi.o 

1S97-1934 

TX the death of Dean Moxley Arnold on 
■*■ February 13, 1934, the Uni\ersity lost one 
of its most devoted and loyal servants. The 
suddenness of his passing served to intensify 
the profound grief which stirred the entire 
community, students, faculty, administration, 
and friends of the institution. His years of 
unselfish de\otion and unsparing service had 
won for him a unique place in the esteem of 
all who knew him. 

Born in Ironton, Ohio, .\lr. .Vriiold grad- 
uated from the University of Illinois in 1921 
with the A.B. degree. He taught in high 
schools in Ohio and in Durham, and in 1926 
received his M.A. degree from Duke Univer- 
sity. Beginning as instructor in -Mathemat- 
ics in 1925, he became Assistant Dean in 
charge of Freshmen the next year. For al- 
most a decade he exerted ever-growing influ- 
ence over members of successive freshman 
classes, awakening in the minds of generations 
of students ideals of service and purity of 
character and impressing upon them a pro- 
found regard for his own sincerity and loyalty 
to their interests. 

For his tireless energy and unflagging zeal, 
for his valiant combat against the forces of 
evil and his uncompromising belief in the 
essential goodness of things, and for his sin- 
cerity of motive and purity of ideals, Dean 
Moxley Arnold will live on in the memory of 
his hosts of friends. 



I49J 



School of Nursing 



Summer School 




Bessie Baker 

B.S., R.N. 

Dean of School of Nursing 

A/TISS Bessie Baker has been Dean of the 
-'■-'• School of Nursing and Professor of 
Nursing Education since the opening of the 
School in January, 1931. The plan of the 
School is to give a sound basic course in 
Nursing Education which will prepare young 
women to give intelligent nursing care to the 
sick in hospitals and homes. An introduc- 
tion to the problems of community health and 
preventive medicine is also given. 

Two general courses are offered in the 
School. The three-year course gives the stu- 
dent the Diploma of Graduate Nurse on grad- 
uation and prepares her for the classification 
of Registered Nurse by the State boards. 

The five-year course is more comprehensiv^e 
in scope. It awards the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing upon graduation, in ad- 
dition to the Diploma of Graduate Nurse at 
the end of the prescribed period. Two years 
of this work, or sixty semester hours, must be 
completed successfully either in undergrad- 
uate departments of Duke University or in 
some other acceptable college or universit}', 
the expense of which is borne by the student. 
'I'his work may be taken either prior to or at 
the conclusion of the three years spent in the 
School of Nursing, but ihc courses arc pre- 
scribed in either case. 

At the opening of the School of Nursing in 
1931, thirty-three students were enrolled, and 
of these fourteen received their diplomas in 
the three-year course in January, 1934. 




tioLLAND HOLTOX 

A.B., J.D. 

Director of Summer School 

T^R. Holland Piolton has been connected 
^^^ with the Summer School since its found- 
ing in 1919, and since 1920 he has been 
Director. The expansion of the summer 
school has been rapid since its organization, 
and it fills an important function in that it 
enables students to make up work in a brief 
period of time. Its curriculum includes 
courses in many of the subjects offered in 
the regular sessions. A large percentage of 
the summer school students are in the grad- 
uate school, a fact which indicates that teach- 
ers find the Summer School a con\-eniencc in 
adding to their education. Over forty per 
cent of those enrolled last summer were in 
the graduate department. 

Dr. liolton graduated from Trinit}' College 
in 1903 with the A.B. degree. He holds a 
J. D. degree from the University of Chicago. 
After a number of years experience in public 
school administration Dr. Holton became as- 
sociated with Trinit}' College in 1912. From 
that time until 1919 he was instructor in pub- 
lic speaking. At the present time he is a 
Professor in the department of Education in 
addition to his duties as Director of the Sum- 
mer Si'hool. 

In the past session of the Summer School 
964 students were enrolled the lirst term and 
552 the second term. Graduate students en- 
rolled represented 159 colleges and uni\-ersi- 
ties. The total enrollment for the sunimer 
was drawn from thirty-se\en states and ten 
foreign countries. 



[so: 



Department of Music 





[. FnsTKR Barxes 
A.B., A.M. 

Director of Social and 
Religious Activities 

l\/f R. J. Foster Barnes, a native ot \ irginia, 
^ ^ was graduated from Richmond, \'irginia, 
later taking his M.A. degree from Emory 
University, in Atlanta. From that time his 
entire career, both as concert singer and 
teacher, has reflected a primar\' musical in- 
terest deeply permeated with a religious ap- 
preciation. His role as leading male part of 
opera "Thais," given at Chicago, presented 
an ideal situation for the combination of these 
two characteristics. In his entire musical 
career at Duke he has successfully attempted 
to teach his students not only the joy of sing- 
ing, but also an appreciation of the religious 
motif in music. 

Mr. Barnes has every year earned well mer- 
ited praise for his Glee Club. In 1928 the 
Glee Club of that year won not only state 
recognition but was ranked as the first college 
Glee Club of the South. He has announced 
himself even more pleased with the 1933-34 
season than with the memorable season of 
1928. Under his tutelage the Men's Glee 
Club has had a most successful series of con- 
cert engagements, while the combined men's 
and women's glee club gave a special program 
of Christmas music, rendered a part of Han- 
del's "Messiah" at another special concert, 
took an important part in the Sixth Birthday 
Party of the Quadrangle Pictures, and has 
given a complete musical comedy. 



Cii;()RGl, I'.l.Ll.J 1 Ll.l IWICII 

Director of Instrumental 
Music 

/^J',l)Rc;i': Ellell (Jellyl Lettwich came u> 
^^ Duke I'liiversit)' in 1926 as Director of 
Instrumental Music, and since that time he 
has developed an outstanding band and c\)n- 
cert orchestra as well as several orchestras of 
modern music. 

Mr. Leftwich, a native North Carolinian, 
has devoted his entire life to music and its 
dc\clopment in both classical and modern 
fields and in either is at complete ease. Al- 
though quite a young man, he has established 
himself throughout the South and is held in 
high esteem by conductors as well as music 
lovers. 

Being a student of Mrs. J. 1). ]*",dwards of 
Wilmington, he learned the fundamentals of 
violin and piano at an early age and later 
finished courses in music at the \'irtuoso 
School of Buffalo and the University Conserv- 
atory of Chicago. His knowledge of instru- 
ments covers the entire ensemble and is out- 
standing on the violin and trumpet. 

The university band has won high praise 
among the bands of the South and the con- 
cert orchestra has been featured on contin- 
uous tours with the same success. 

The composer of "The Blue and White," 
the University's football song, and co-author 
of "The Whip," a new song dedicated to the 
Univcrsit>' recently, Mr. Leftwich has estab- 
lished himself as a composer, conductor, and 
musician possessing a magnetic personality 
which has won his audiences wherever he has 
appeared. 



151 



Department of Public Relations and Alumni Affairs 




AIr. Henry R. Dwire 

Director of Public Rela- 
tions and Alumni Affairs 



T^HF. variety of responsibilities falling on 
-'- the shoulders of the Director of Public 
Relations and Alumni Affairs require that he 
be an executive of wide experience and ver- 
satile ability, and in Henry R. Dwire, A.B., 
'02, A.M., '03, there is the ideal situation of 
the right man being in the right place. 
Twenty-two years as editor and publisher of 
one of North Carolina's largest dailies have 
admirably fitted him for the editorial duties 
at Duke University connected with the pub- 
lishing of the Alumni Register, The Sotith 
Atlantic Quarterly, and other matters relating 
to the Duke University Press. Likewise his 



years of experience as a leader in educational 
and civic affairs have proved him an executive 
not only of highest efficiency but one whose 
contacts throughout North Carolina and the 
South are invaluable in interpreting the Uni- 
versity and its ideals to alumni and the pub- 
lic. Mr. Dwire formerly was Governor of 
the Fifty-Seventh District of Rotary Inter- 
national. His extensive civic activities are 
indicated in his service in the past as Chair- 
man of the Winston-Salem chapter of the 
American Red Cross, Chairman of the Com- 
munity Chest Commission, and Chairman of 
the Winston-Salem City School Commission. 
He served the state as secretary of the board 
of directors of the State Hospital in Raleigh 
and as a member of the State Board of Equal- 
ization. He is now a member of the State 
School Commission and is Assistant Secretary 
of the Board of Trustees' of Duke University. 
Mr. Dwire was founder and head of the Fine 
Arts Foundation of Winston-Salem which for 
several years was one of the outstanding proj- 
ects of its kind in North Carolina. The broad 
administrative responsibilities of the Director 
of Public Relations and Alumni Affairs include 
the supervision of the issuance of all Univer- 
sity catalogues and other informative publica- 
tions, publicity, and the maintenance of close 
contact with the approximately eight thou- 
sand alumni living in every state of the Union 
and nearly thirty foreign countries. 

In the more modern lines of contact 
between the colleges and the public it is 
evident that a heavy responsibilit}^ rests on 
this department. It is tlirough its eihcient 
conduction thus far that the outside world 
has had a chance to catch a glimpse of the 
iiuicr workings of Duke University. 



>---\ 




[52 



3ooi\ T'jj'j 



A C A I> S M I C 






*■'■ 



-«iAit.^., 



WALTLR JAMES SEEI.EY, E.E., M.S. 

PROFESSOR OF ELECTRICAL 

ENGINEERING. 




THE SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE FORCES AND MATERIAIS OF 
NATURE REMAIN DORMANT. UNRECOGNIZED. AND \X'ITHOUT 
VALUE UNTIL THE IMAGINATIVE GENIUS OF THE ENGINEER, BY 
COORDINATED DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION. AND OPERATION, TRANS- 
FORMS THEM INTO CONVENIENCES WHICH ULTIMATELY BECOME 
NECESSITIES— THEN THESE FORCES AND MATERIALS OF NATURE 
BECOME NATURAL RESOURCES. THE COMFORTS AND CONVEN- 
IENCES OF OUR MODERN CIVILIZATION, MANY OF WHICH HAVE 
BECOME NECESSITIES. WERE DENIED TO US UNTIL THE ENGINEER 
HARNESSED THESE NATURAL RESOURCES AND MADE THEIR 
ENERGIES AVAILABLE. 




SENIORS 



>enior 



CUi 



iss 




Carl Schock 
President 

'T^HE graduating class of 1934 counts among 
-'- its numbers the first group of men to 
advance from Freshmen to Seniors on the 
new Duke Campus. Though this fact de- 
mands notliing in the way of praise, it has 
been truly an experience which these men 
will be slow to forget. 

As is always the case in colleges, a large 
per cent of those who enrolled in the class of 
1934 have left Duke since. Still, many 
remained, and there were notable additions 
to their ranks in the iiitciiin. 



Looking back over the period, we are able 
to recall many impressive brush-marks that 
are still on the canvas, even though now 
indistinguishable in a much more colorful 
panorama. The picture then was b}' no 
means dull, but there has since been much 
change. 

Two weeks before the fall semester opened 
in 1930, construction was being carried on 
here. A'lany of the buildings were covered 
with scaffolding. The teimis courts had but 
recently been laid out. The grounds enclosed 
in the cjuadrangle were then not a grassy 
expanse decorated with shrubbery as now. 
In place of this there was all rough earth, on 
which numerous steamrollers, tractors, cement 
mixers, and the like, were being operated. 
The buildings, however, were firmly planted 
enough at this time to give a new onlooker a 
sense of thrill and the desire to spend four 
college years in their environment. 

Only a few days sufficed for all the building 
devices to be removed from the spot, and the 
classrooms, dormitories, and the athletic 
grounds began to fulfill the purpose for which 
they were intended. The students of "New 
Duke," tramping back and forth for classes 
on planks that formed the only existing walks, 
were noisy observers of the University Chapel 
as it was raised from confinement below the 
level of the green board fence to its present 
state of grandeur. 

It is a source of gratification to Duke's 
Seniors of 1934 that their college lives have 
not been valueless to the progress of a new 
institution; for what is more revealing of that 
fact than a last sight of the stone buildings 
which at first excited so much awe .? The 
University buildings now bear the definite 
marks of personality. 



Officers 

JOIIX I'lXKIIA.M 

Vice President 

George H. Lamar 
Secretary 

John Hamrick 
Treasurer 




[58] 



Women's Senior Class 



THE 1934 trraduating class of the Woman's 
College of Duke University can look back 
with pride and pleasure over the accomplish- 
ments of the past four years of their school 
life, 'i'hese past years have held much for 
them, years packed with the thrills and 
sorrows, the successes and the disappoint- 
ments of college life. Today these Seniors 
awaken to the fact that this is now all beliind 
them, and that the new college of life lies 
ahead of them. 

The women of Duke University, and espe- 
cially the class of 1934, have played an impor- 
tant part in making the semi-co-educational 
system at Duke a great success. Separated 
from the men's campus a distance of two 
miles, the women have succeeded in building 
a life and existence for themselves along. 
Their relation with the West Campus is no 
longer that of dependence, but rather of the 
cooperative relation of a separate and complete 
entity. In the eyes of many an interested 
observer, the East Campus holds not only a 
greater beauty of personnel, but a campus 
which rivals the scenic grandeur of their 
associates to the West. The simplicity of 
architecture and the wide expanse of landscape 
beauty combine to form a picture of unique- 
ness which defies description or reproduction. 

These graduates who go forth from Duke 
University leave behind them a period of their 
life which has been as vital to themselves as to 
their school. They have become as great a 
part of their university as their university 
has become a part of them. The impressions 
that each has left on the other will endure 
forever. Thus the Senior Class of this year 
is fortunate in being able to show a record 
of achievement in every phase of college 
activity that will reflect to the glory of their 




Ja.m:t Cjriffin 
President 

school. In scholarship, athletics, dramatics, 
Y. W. C. A. work, Student Government 
activities, and in sorority work they have so 
worked and striven as to leave behind a 
record that will serve as an idealistic standard 
for many a future Senior Class. At the same 
time the members of the graduating class of 
the Woman's College pass beyond their 
undergraduate days with a deep feeling of 
regret that this phase of their lives now closes, 
but with a feeling of anticipation of the life 
that lies before them. 




Officers 

.\n\ie Kate Rebman 
Vice President 

Ca ROLY .\ McI NTOS II 

Secretary 

Catherine Serfas 
Treasurer 



159J 







Abraham 

Allen 

Andersox 



Apple 

Atkinson 

Baiki) 



James E. Abraham 

Uniontown, Pa. 

(I>A0 

Business Admin i strati o n 

University of Pittsburgh, 1; Swimming, 
3,4. 

Ralph W. Allen, Jr. 

Brewster, Mass. 

nEn, A'M 

General 

Glenn Elwood Anderson 

Ashevillc, N. C. 

Business Administration 

Track, 1; Football, 1; Wrestling, I, 2, .1; 
Tombs; Varsity Club. 



William E. Apple, Jr. 

Greensboro, N. C. 

<tBK, miE 

Electrical Engineering 

Wrestling, 1, 2, 3, 4; 9019; Iota Gamma 

Pi; Delta Epsilon Sigma. 

Hal W. Atkinson 
Wadesboro, N. C. 
»I)BK, nME 
Electrical Engineering 
Wrestling, 1; Freshman Honors; Sopho- 
more Honors; 9019; Iota Gamma Pi; Delta 
Epsilon Sigma; American Institute of E'.lcc- 
trical Engineers. 

Thomas Fredric B.mrd 

Swarthmore, Pa. 

Al^<^, AK^' 

Business Adm inistration 

Assistant Manager Tennis, 2, 3, Manager, 

4; Varsity Club; Columbia Literary Sociei\ ; 

House of Representatives, 3; Trident Club; 

Chairman Senior Class Social Committee, 4. 



60 






Barnes 
Batson 
Beebe 



mor 




OC^. f^ 



Begg 

Beilix 

Bennett 




Samuel I. Barnes 


Kthel Isabel Begg 


Mine Run, Va. 


Charlotte, N. C. 


General 


KA 


Track, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; 


General 


Glee Club, 3. 


Quecns-Chicora College, 1,2; House Com 




mittec, 3. 


Arthur Batson 


William G. Beilin 


Brockton, Mass. 


New York, N. ^'. 


Civil Engineering 


*ZA 


American Society of Civil Engineers. 


General 



David M. Beebe 

New London, Conn. 
General 
Swimming, 1; Band, 1, 2. 



Pan Hellenic Council. 

Elmer S. Bennett 

Crafton, Pa. 

KA 

Business /ldmini.stration 



161] 




Bernardo 
Bird, J. 
Bird, R. 



Black 

Bleuit 

Boone 



James V. Bernardo 


K. E. Black 




New Haven, Conn. 


Landis, N. C. 




niVIE 


General 




Honors 






John Macbeth Bird 


Frederick STORl;^ Ijleuit 




Durham, N. C. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




Civil Engineering 


Electrical Engineering 




Chronicle, 1, 2; Delta Epsilon Sigma; Iota 
Gamma Pi; American Society of Civil En- 
gineers. 


HaVerford College, 1; Delta Epsilon Sig- 
ma; Iota Gamma Pi; American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers. 




Robert M. Ijiri> 






Durham, N. C. 


Sidney (Iraxt Boone 




Religion 


Drum Hill, N. C. 




Track, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4; Cross-Coun- 
try, 1, 2, 3, 4; Classical Club; Cdmnicnce- 
ment Marshal, 3. 


General 

Glee Club, 1; L ni\'crsil\- Choir, 3, 4. 




[«1 







II 



ii()Si.i:v 

HOYO 
HoYI.I.S 







Bralkhii.l 
Brister 
Brooks, C. 




Stewart Bosi.ey 


Al.MKRT LwniS i^RACKlULL 


Marietta, Ohio 


Gap, l*a. 


AT 


Teaching 


(^fiieral 


Baseball, 1. 2, 3, 4. 


Marietta College, 1, 2; Duke Players, 3, 4. 


Wilbur L. Brkster 


|{lizahi;iii Boyd 

Warrcnton, X. C 

KA 


Petersburg, V'a. 
ATA. A'I'A, 'I'i'.K 

Honors 


Teaching 


Freshman Honors; Sophomore Honors. 


Peace Junior College, 1, 2. 


Carolyn Brooks 




Mayfield, Ky. 


Clyde F. Boyles 


ZTA, KAH 


Paducah, Ky. 
AXA 

Honors 


Teaching 

Social Standards Committee; Duke 
Players. 




[63] 








Brooks, M. 

Bryan 

Brvce 



Bunch 

Burling 

Byrn 



Mary Katiierine Brooks 

Durham, N. C. 

<I>BK 

General 
Eko-L; Town (lirls' Club. 

LuciLE Bryan 
Garner, N. C. 

Teaching 

Student VoluiUfcr. 

John Bryce 

Richmond, Va. 

Electrical Engineering 

Delta I'ipsilon Sigma; Track, 2; American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers. 



J'ardue Bunch 

Statesville, N. C. 

OAK, TKA 

Religion 
Chronicle, 1, 2; Debating, 1, 2, 3; Cdiuni- 
bia Literary Society; Ministerial Associa- 
tion; Student Volunteer Group, Leader, 2; 
Beta Omega Sigma; 9019; Y. M. C. A. Cab- 
inet, 2, 3, President, 4; Robert Spencer Bell 
Award, 3; Student Council, 3. 

Edwin Godfrey Burling 
, Washington, D. C. 
General 

San Antonio Junior College, 1; Duke 
Players, 2, 3. 

Emily Catherine Ryrx 

iVIavhcki, K\-. 

AAII, iirxT 

General 

Randolpli-Macdu Woman's College, I, 2; 

Forum Club. 



(64 






Cain 
Car ii:r 
Cash 



ClIASK 
ClIKAIll \M 
C'lIKl'.I.V 




Dorothy Cain 


Helen Chase 


Grecrn illr, S. C 


New Haven, Conn. 


KA'I' 


KKr 


Teaching 


Business Admin istration 


Greenville Woman's College, 1.2. 




Louise Carter 

Gate City, \'a. 

AAA 

Teaching 


Elizabeth Cheatham 

Franklinton, N. C. 

*M, KAIl 

Teaching 
Florida State College, 1, 2; Freshman Ad- 


ROSANELLE CaSH 


viser. 


VVinstoii-Salem, X. C. 


James B. Ciif.ely 


Teaching 

W hite Duchy; Eko-L; V. \V. C. A. Cab- 
inet, 2, 3, 4; Chronicle, 2, 3, 4. 


Williamsbuif:, Ky. 
General 



[65] 




ClIII.DS 
Cl.ARK, M. 

Clarke 



Clement 

COFFMAN 

Cork E 1,1. 



Elaine Childs 


Hanes Clement 


Durham, N. C. 


MocksviUe, N. C. 


KAe 


IvA 


Teaching 


General 


Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Woniaii's College Or- 


Converse College, 1, 2; White Duchy; 


chestra, 2, 3, 4; Music Club, 3, 4. 


Social Standards Committee; Student Coun- 




cil, 4; Senoir Project Committee. 


Marjorie Clark 


Guy M. Coffman 


Berea, Ky. 


Williamson, W. Va. 


General 


Electrical Engineering 


Glee Club, 3, 4; Duke Players, 3, 4. 


American Institute of Electrical iMigi- 




neers. 


Randolph Thornton Clarke 
Hertford, N. C. 
Civil Engineering 


Donovan Stewart Corriw.l 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Religion 


Swimming, 3, 4, 5; American Society of 




Civil Engineers. 


Glee Club, I, 2, 3, 4; Chanticleer, 2, 3. 


[66] 








Cox. II. 
Cox, j. 
Cox, R. 



CkAW roRi) 

n AMI I. 

Df.cker 




Helex May Cox 
Rockingham, N. C. 

AAn 

General 
Converse College, 1,2. 

John Benjamin Cox, Jr. 

Birmingham, Ala. 

SAE 

General 

Birmingham-Southern College, 1 : House 
of Representatives, 4. 

Robert Calvin Cox 

Vernon, Tex. 

SAE 

General 

Wichita Falls Junior College, 1; .Amarillo 
Junior College, 2; Football, 3, 4; Senior Rep- 
resentative to Athletic Council: \'arsitv 
Club. 



Kredericr Eugene Crawford 
Waynesville, N. C. 
<I)A0, (UK 
General 

Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Second 'IVam All- 
Amcrican, 3; All-Anicrican Tackle, 4; Track, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 4; Tombs; X'arsitv 
Club. 

Helen G. Daniel 

Columbia, S. C. 

ZT.\, KAII 

Teaching 

White Duchy; Duke Players, 1, 2, 3; Class 
Vice President, 2; Class President, 3; French 
Club, Secretary, 3; Student Government. 3; 
Nice President, 4. 

Arthur Decker, Jr. 

Tottcnvillc, X. Y. 

STA, AK»r 

General 



[67 







Derrick 

Devereaux 

DiKEMAN 



Dillon 

DiLWORTH 

DORSETT 



Charles Campbell Derrick 


Virginia A1. Dillon 


Stockbridge, Mass. 
SAE 

Pre-Medical 

Pan-Hellenic Council, 4; \. M. C. A. 
Treasurer, 3; Student Council, 4; Beta 
Omega Sigma; Chairman Class Social Com- 
mittee, 2. 


Wilmington, N. C. 

A An 

Teaching 

Chanticleer, 3, 4, Literary Editor, 4; 
Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 4; Social 
Standards Committee, 4; Polity Club; Jun- 
ior Big Sisters. 


Woody Devereaux 


George Franklin Dilwcirth 


Augusta, Ga. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


Teaching 
Y. W. C. A. Secretary, 4. 


Electrical Engineering 

Delta Epsilon Sigma; American Institute 
of Electrical Engineers. 


Helen Grace Dikeman 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

General 


Lewis Howard Dorsett 

Mount Gilead, N. C. 


Nereidian Club; Pegram Ciicmistr\- Club. 


Business ^Administration 


168] 





nil 



Douglas 

OdW I INC 

Drimmom) 



Ul NSION 

I'.w ixc; 








V 



J 



Dorothy Douglas 


Charles Jordan Dunston 




Rocky Mount, N. C. 
KAn 

Teaching 

Woman's College Student Government, 
3, 4, Treasurer, 4; Freshman Adviser, 4; 
French Club. 


Norfolk Va. 

nF.n, AK»r 

Business Administration 
Samuel S. DuI'uy 




Charlixe K. Dow ling 


Becklcy, W. \'a. 




Munfordville, Ky. 


SAE 




KKF 
General 
Ward-Belmont Junior College, 1, 2. 


Pre-Medical 

Virginia Military Institute, 1, 2: Wrest- 
ling, 3; Iota Gamma Pi. 




David Donald Drummond 
Greer, S. C. 


Elinor Crawford Ewing 




KI 


Nashville, Term. 




Civil Engineering 


KAW 




Track, 2; House of Representatives, 4; 
Delta Epsilon Sigma; American Society of 
Civil Engineers. 


General 
Vanderbilt University, 1, 2, 3. 






[69] 





II 







Fi; I.D.MAX 

FlXGEK 

FiSER 




Fleminc; 

Foster 

French 





Clare Weaver Feldman 


Catherine Frances Fleming 




Eastoii, Pa. 


New Bethlehem, Pa. 




KKr 


KA0 




Business Admin istration 
Archive, 1; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 4; Distaff, 


General 

Goucher College, 2; Chanticleer, 1, 3, 
4; Co-Md. Editor, 4; Archive, 1; Chronicle, 1, 




2, 3, 4. 


3, 4; Woman's College Student Gcn-crn- 




Thomas L. Finger 
Maiden, N. C. 


mcnt, 1. 

C. Turner Foster 
Carbondalc, Pa. 




Electrical Engineering 


A I til, 0A«l> 




American Insiiuite of F'.lcctrical Kni;!- 


Prr-.lfrdiral 




iieers. 


l'an-1 lelleiiic Cmineil, 4; Duke Pla_\crs, 1. 
2, 3, 4, President, 4. 




Roii \ i:r.\cjx Fiser 

Adairvillc, Ky. 

Ilk'l'. \k'r 


RoHKKi' {]. I'"ki;xcii 
Oak Park, 111. 




Btisiness J dm i)iis/r/i/ifiii 


/ii(snirss ./dmniislrti/ion 




l''Lirm;ni I'nivcrsit)', 1, 2. 


.\ssislanl Haskethall .Manager, 1, 2, 3. 




[7U| 











nil 



(V\K1)M K 

(Iakris 
CIarkiss 



CiKARIl ART 

Gf.cenok 
Geise 




Gena Gardner 

Aiinistnn. Ala. 

KA 

Teaching 

Doris Garris 

Greenville, N. C. 

KA 

General 
Greensboro College, 1, 2. 

\\ . i'lIOMAS CjARRISS 

MargarettsviJlc, N. C. 
Business Adm in istration 

Track. 2, 3, 4; Cross Country, 3, 4; \'ars- 
itv Club. 



William .\1. CiE.\RU.\Rr 

Cumberland, Md. 

A'lA. A'l-A, 'I'BK 

Honors 

I'aii-IIellenic Council, 4; Krcslinian Hon- 
ors, Sophomore Honors, Junior Honors; 
9019; Pegram Chemistry Club. 

.Morris Gecenok 

Salem, N. J. 
<MA 

General 

Band, 1, 2; .Svmphonv Orchestra, I, 2; 
9019. 

Florence Geise 

Norristown, Pa. 

AAA 

Teaching 

Social Standards Committee. 4. 



(71 




Gerkexs 

g etze \ d a x x e r 

GlBSOX 



GlLES 

Glass 

GORTOX 



Fred W. Gerkens 








K ATiiERixE Clare Giles 




Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 








Marion, N. C. 




Business Administration 








KKr 




Band, 1, 2; Glee Club, 3,4. 








Teaching 




Joseph Winton Getzendanner, Jr. 




Pc; 


lee Junior College, 1, 2. 




Baltimore, Md. 








Mary Jo Glass 




KA, OAK, fl'BK 








Miami, Fla. 




Business Administration 








KA0 




Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Freshman Honors, 


Sopli- 






Business Administration 




omore Honors; 9019; Polity Club; P 
tions Board, 4. 


iblica- 


V 


Morida Stale College for Women, 1, 
. W. C. A. Cabinet, 3, President, 4; Pn 


2; 

it'y 


J. 1'.. Ginsox 




c 


lull 






Columbia, S. C. 








Charles W. Gorton 




<i)Hi: 








Providence, R. 1. 




P re-Medical 








<i>^lS 




Y. Al. C. A. Cabinet, 2. 






_ 


General 





72 



II 



GuLUlK 

Ch<.\\t 
( ; K 1 . 1 : N 







CjREGORY 

{^RIFI-IN 

CilINAN 




Aubrey G. Goudie 

Pen Argyl, ]'a. 

General 



Nicholas W. Grant 
Garysburg, X. C. 
Religion 
Ministerial Association. 



Doris Green 

Durham, N. C. 

KA 

General 



C'i.aihorne B. Gregory 
Durham, N. C. 
-Vm, OAK, TKA 

Pre- Legal 

CiiANTicLiiiiR, 1, 2, 3, 4, Business Man- 
ager, 4; Debating, 3, 4; Polity Club; Publi- 
cations Board, 4. 

Janet CjRiffin 

Baltimore, Md. 

AAM 

Teaching 

Wliilc Duchy; Class President, 4; Delta 
Phi Rho Alpha; Xereidian Club; ScKial 
Standards Committee, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer, 3, President, 4; Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet, 3. 

Clarence J. Guinan, Jr. 

New Haven, Conn. 

General 



73 



II 




Hall 

Hamrick 

Harloff 



Heidelberg 

Hendrickson 

Herbert 



Edgar M. Hall 

Lillington, N. C. 

KK«r 

Pre-MedicaL 

Ni)rth Carolina State College, 1; Glee 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Band, 2, 3, 4; Symphony Or- 
chestra, 2, 3, 4. 

John M. Hamrick 

ClafTiicy, S. C. 

AlJ'l' 

Business Administration 

Manager Football, 4; Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil, 3; Class Treasurer, 4; Beta Omega Sig- 
ma; Tombs; Varsity Club. 

W. B. I Iarloff 
Springfield Gardens, N. Y. 
v;ALi, AfI>A 

Pre-Medical 
Pan-Hellenic Council. 



Dan Hawkins Heidelberg 
Hattiesburg, Miss. 

P re-Legal 
Millsaps College, 1, 2. 

Horace James Hendrickson 

Beaver Falls, I'a. 

(^AB, OAK 

Teaching 

Red Friars; Football, 1, 2. 3, 4; Baskel- 
h;ill, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Beta Omega 
Sigma; Tombs; \'arsit>' Club. 

Russell Conrad Herbert 

Hagerstown, Md. 

<i>Ae 

Religion 

Y. M. C. A., Vice Pn-slJrnl, 4; Musical 
Clubs, President, 4. 



74] 



li;\\ rrr 
Ik Ks 
III ro\ 



I lol.MKS 

I loNKYcin'r 
Hopkins 




Mary Kaiiiryn Hewitt 






Mary Bynum Holmes 


Hackensack, N. J. 






Mount Olixc, \. C. 


SK 






General 


Teaching 






Randolph Macon Woman's CoIIckc, 1, 


Bucknell Inivcrsitv, 1; Chanticleer, 
3,4. 


2, 


2,3. 


KLr/.\nr.Tii ilicKs 

Durham, N. C. 

'I>HK, KATI 






Wilson Honeyci rr 

Lc.xiiifrtoii, N. C. 

A-l'\ 


Teaching 






General 


Glee Club, 1,2; Town Girls' Club. 
Homer Hiltox, Jr. 






Freshman Honors; Chronicle, 2, 3, Assist- 
ant Editor, 3. 


Binghamton, X. Y. 
IN 






John I. Hopkins 


Pre- Legal 

Cornell University, 1. 2; Chronicle, 
Columbia Literarj- Society, Treasurer, 


3, 
4 


4; 


Nokesville, Va. 

II.MK. 11 11 

Honors 








(75] 




HORNE 
HOSEA 

Humphreys 



Ingram 
Ireland 
Jackson, AI. 



Mary Louise Horne 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

ZTA, A<i)A, «I>BK 

General 

Chantici.kf.r, 2, 3, 4; Chronicle, 1, 2, 4; 
Eko-L; Duke Players, 1, 2. 

R. Haywood I Tosea 

Pikevillc, N. C. 

S'i)E 

General 

Manager Baseball, 4; Pegram Chemistry 
Club; Freshman Friendship Council. 

Charles R. Humimireys 
Chestertovvii, Md. 

ATA, a>BK, >:ns 

Freshman Honors; Sophomore Honors; 
Junior Honors; Chronicle, 1, 2; Archive, 2; 
Iota Gamma Pi, Vice President, 4; Pegram 
Chemistry Club, President, 4. 



1''loise Ingram 

High Point, N. C. 

ZTA 

Business Adm inistration 

Class Vice President, 3; Chronicle, 2, 3; 
Nereidian Club; Duke Players, Secretary, 
4; Woman's Athletic Association, Treasurer, 
4; Delta Phi Rho Alpha, Secretary, 3, Presi- 
dent, 4. 

RxTssEi.L S. Ireland 
Cullingswood, N. J. 

Ai:* 

Businrss Administration 

Manager Cross-Countr.\', 4; Duke Players, 
I, 2, 3, 4; House of Representatives, 4; 
Varsity Club. 

Marion Jackson 
Far Rockaway, N. Y. 
'reaching 
PiiK'land liinicir College, 1, 2. 



76 



II 



Jacksdn, 

J AN SEN 

Johnston 



Jones 


rj^ 


JOSTEN 

Kadie 


"^-X^ 

'¥ 




. \>j:. 




Thirston H. Jackson, Jk. 

Oaklyn, N. J. 

Electrical Engineering 

Glee Club, 1; Iota Gamma Pi; Delta Ep- 
silon Sigma; American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers. 

Mary Elizabeth Jansen 
Stamford, Conn. 

General 

Student Council, 3, 4; Nereidian Club, 
President, 2. 

Charlotte K. Johnston 
(]rceneville, Tenii. 
General 
Glee Club, 4; L'niversity Choir, 4. 



Myrtle Ruth Jones 
Chilhowic, Va. 

Business Administration 

Chanticleer, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sorority Pan 
Hellenic Council, 3, 4, Treasurer, 4; Glee 
Club, 1. 

Thomas lfAi)i,i:v Jostkn 

Owatonna, Minn. 

ATA 

Business Administration 

Carleton College, 1,2. 

Frank R. Kadie 

Chew Chase, Md. 

IIK.\ 

Median ical Engineering 

Duke Society of Mechanical Engineers; 
Chief engineer of the boiler test; Sigma Pi 
Rho, President. 



771 




Katz 

Keith 

Kenxedy 



Kent 

Kepxes 

Kerx 



Ann Helen Katz 


Raymond L. Kext 


Portsmouth, Va. 


Cedarhurst, N. Y. 


AE'I> 


AKq^, KKV 


Business Admin istration 


Biisi)iess Adm in istration 


Woman's College Orchestra, 1; House 
Committee, 2, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3. 


Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 4, Business .Manager, 4; 
Hand, 1, 2. 




Harold Arthur Kepnes 


Joux C. Keith 


Chelsea, Mass. 


Wilmington, N. C. 


Pre-Medical 


Pre- Legal 


Assistant Baseball Manager, 3. 




\'iR(jixiA Kern 


MiM)Ri;i) lvi;.\xEi)Y 


Nashville, Tenn. 


Roanoke, Va. 


-I'M 


KAIl 


General 


'reaching 


RanJoljili Maeiin Woman's College, 1, 2. 



[7R1 






nil 



Kkrso.n 

K INTER 

KlKKMAN 



K LAYER 

Kline 
Kxir.iiT 




Nathan A. Kerson 


George V.. K layer 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Kew Gardens, N. Y. 


Business Administration 


IIKA 
Business Administration 


Bernard P. Kinter 
Dayton, Pa. 

AXA. A'I'A. KAII 


Charles Flint Kline 
Ba\- Village, Ohio 


Teaching 


General 


Assistant Manager Basketball, I, 2, 3, 
Manager, 4. 


Miami University; Cross Country; Track. 




Betty Knight 


Dorothy Kirkman 


.Morristown, X. |. 


Higli Point, N. C. 


KK1\ .\A'I' 


Teaching 


General 


Glee Club, 3, 4. 


Distaff, 2, 3, 4, Poetry Editor, 3, Kditor, 4. 




|79| 



II 



KOEXIO 



KoULER 






L; 



\CKEY 



Lamar 



Lamm 



Law SON 



Henry A. Koexk; 


George 11. Lamar, |k. 




Baltimore, ALL 


Rockville, Md. 




AK^' 


ATO 




Business Admin istralioii 


Ge7ieral 






Chanticleer, I, 4; Chroiiiclr, 1, . 


, 3: 




Glee Club; Class Sccrctar\-, 4. 




RiCHAKI) 1',. KollI.EK 






York, Pa. 


I'ORTER P. La.MM 




<M;k. III'M 


Wilson, N. C. 




Pre- Legal 


S'I'K, AK4- 




Polity Clul). 


Business Adiii in ist ration 
Polity Club. 




Mary Stuart L\cki:v 






Christianshiir.ti:, \'a. 


Anna P>k()\v\ Lawsox 




AAll, 'l-l-.K 


I'.rwiii, irnii. 




Cencral 


Crnrral 





SO] 



nil 



Law \ i.K 

LlI.I.ASTOX 
I ,I.()VI) 



l.ovi;, A. 
Lovi-, C. 
LovK, M. 




George Truesdkij. Lwvvicr 

Greenfield, Mass. 

4)A(-), AK»r 

Business Administration 

Swimming, 2, 3; Assistant Manager Ten- 
nis, 1, 2; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 4, Managing Ed- 
itor, 4; Polity Club; Tombs; \'arsity Club. 

JoHX Bacon Lili.astox 
Blackstoiie, Va. 
<{>BK, XBcI>, Bne 

Business Admin istration 

B.S., Randolph Macon College. 

Fred N. Llovd 

Durham, X. C 

ZAE 

Business Jdm in istration 

Baseball, 1, 2. 3, 4; Basketball, 1; Boxing, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 3; Conference Champion 
Bantamweight, 2; Tombs; \'arsit>' Club. 



Alma Love 

Hopkinsville, Ky. 

HB'I' 

Tracking 
Bethel Woman's College, 1, 2. 

Cornelia Love 

Raleigh, N. C. 

KAII 

'reaching 
Peace Junior College, 1, 2; CJIce Club, 3, 4. 

Mary 1L\rvey Love 

Raleigh, N. C. 

KAn 

Teaching 
Peace Junior College, 1, 2; Distaff, 3. 



Rl 




Lybrook 

Lyon 

McCracken 



McCoy 
McIntosh 

McKlNNEY 



William Rkv.nolds Lybrook 


ALvRGARET McCoy 


Advance, N. C. 


Charlotte, N. C. 


IIKA 

General 

Track, 2; Boxinj,', 1; Cross-Countiy, 1. 


Teaching 

QuecirK-Cliicora College, 3; Class Secre- 
tary, 2. 


Ealma 1'"raxci:s Lyox 

Durham, N. C. 


Carolyn McIntosii 

Old Fort, N. C. 


Ti-cir/iiiig 


KAt-) 


Town dirls' Club. 


General 


Josi'.iMi 1*. McCrackion 


Class Secretary, 4. 


1 )urham, N. C 
ATA 


Mildred McKinney 


Pre-Mcdical 

Archive, 2, 3; I\'K'r;im Ciicmisiry Club; 
Commencement Marshal, 3. 


Shelby, N. C. 
KAn, <tBK 

Honors 


[82 1 





1111 



At DoNAI I) 
AW 



AXTKR 
ARt'KS 
ARKIIAM, I* 




Ralston McLain, ]r. 

Swarthmorc, I'a. 

K2 

Business Administration 
Golf, 1, 2, 3. 

Harry J. MacI^cjnai.o 
Durham, N. C. 
General 
Iota Gamma Pi. 

Caroline Manx 

Raleigh, X. C". 

AAII 

Social Service 
Saint Mary's Junior College, I, 2. 



Mabel Rhodes Manter 
Taunton, Alass. 

General 

Martha Washington Seminary, 1; P'rani- 
ingham Teachers' College, 2; Disttiff, 4; 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 4. 

Carl A. Marcks 

Nazareth, Pa, 

Mechanical Engineering 

Band, 1; Duke Society of Mechanical En- 
gineers. 

Eleanor Mallory Markiiam 

Durham, N. C. 

I'K, A<l>A, ITMK, ini 

General 
Freshman Honors; Town Girls' Club. 



83 



il 




Markham. T. C 

AIartix 

Maxson 



Means 
Merritt 
Miller, J. 



T. C. Markha.m, Jr. 




Ali;i;rt Bleckley Means, Jr. 


J3m-ham, N. C. 




Wynncwood, Pa. 


Electrical Engineering 




■I'A(-) 


loia Gamma Pi; American Institute 


of 


Business Acl))iinistration 


Electrical Engineers. 




F.H.thall, 1, 2, .1, 4; 'rrack, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Tombs; \arsity Club. 


John A. Martin 






J.akc Forest, III. 




I)anii;i, v. \li;Ki<ri"i', Jr. 


Ki: 




Cliail.itlrsvillc, N. C. 


Business Adm.inistrat.io)i 




IlK'l- 


Lake Forest College, 1; Baseball, 3, 


4; 


CiCiirrcil 


CiiANTiCLiiiiR, 3; Pan-Hellenic Council, 3 


4. 


Jane I)\mi;ron Milli:k 


Joseph !>. .\1axso.\ 




Purt.sinouth, \'a. 


Atlantic Jlighlaiids, N. J. 




KA, KAII 


Mechanical Engineering 




'rc(ifki)ig 


Delta Epsilon Sigma; Duke Society 


of 


Class Secrctar\-, 2, 3; Sororii) P.in-llci- 


Mechanical Engineers. 




lenic Council, 3, 4; Student Council. 


(84] 







nil 



Mii.i.i;k, M. 

MritiiKi.i. 

Mdork 




MoRALl 
MoREFIKI.D 

Morrill 



A (^ P 




MuRRY A. .\Iii,m;r 


Helen M. M<>k \i,i 






Portsniduth, \'a. 


Gloversvillc, N. V. 






AXA 


General 






Pre- Legal 


Ncrcidian Cluh; Swimmiiif; Tcani, 2, 


.\-l. 




Iredell Law Cluh. 








DoYCi: MlTCIIKLL 


Roiii-RT M()Ri;i'ii;m) 






Gadsden, Ala. 


WiiKston-Salem, N. C 






General 


KA 

Busmess Administration 






Al\i.n CJ. .\1(k;ri-; 


Tennis, 2, 3, 4. 






Murfrccsboro, Tenn. 








KA 








Pre- Legal 
Vanderbilt University, 1, 2; Columbia 


Joseph Collier Morrill 
Charlotte, N. C. 






Literary Society; Poiit>- Club. 


General 




^^ 



85 




Morrison 

Morrow 

Morse 



McMiTON 

MOSENSON 

MURCHISOX 



Martjia Morrison 

Hickman, Ky. 

Z'l'A 

General 

Ada \'krn()N Morrow 
Mof>irs\illc, N. C 

K K r 
Teaching 

William Jordan A4or8E 
Attlcboro, Mass. 

Pre-Medical 
Band, 1, 2; Glee Club, 1, 2. 



Frances Mkrrii'i' Morton 

Roxboro, N. C. 

ZTA, KAU 

'rr(ichi)ig 

W ll.LIAM MoSENSON 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
<M5K. A'l<\, lir\l 

l/oiior.s 

Cl;iss Sccrclary-Trcasurcr, 1; IkI.i ( )iiicga 
Sigma.- 

Alton Murciiison 

Fayctteville, N. C. 

Ki], OAK 

Ge7ieral 

Chanticleer, Sports Editor, 3, 4; Chron- 
icle, 2, 3, 4; Manager Basketball, 3; Beta 
Omega Sigma; Fresiimaii Friendship Coun- 
cil; Varsity Club. 



86 






nil 



Mustard 

Naciiamson 

Neu 



Newsom 
Xewton 
Xixox 




James A. Mustard, Jr. 
Montclair, N. [. 

Aiij. eA<^ 

Business Administration 

Tennis, 1; Track, 2, 3; Paii-TIcllt'iiic 

Council, 3, 4, Treasurer, 4; Chanticlkkr, 

1, 2; Archive, 3; Chronicle, 1, 2, 3; Polit\- 

Club, President, 4; Duke Players, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

IviiiKi, Naciiamson 

J^urhain, N. C. 

AE'I> 

Teaching 

Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 2, 4; Town 
Girls' Club; Nereidian Club; Phvsics Club, 
2. 

Frederick W. Xeu 

Leonardo, X. j. 

Civil Engineering 

Trident Club; Cheer Leader, 3, 4; Delta 

Epsilon Sigma; American Society of Civil 

Engineers. 



M. Eugene Newsom, Jr. 

Durham, X. C. 

KA, AK'l', o^K 

business Administration 

Red Friars; Archive, 1, 2, 3, 4, Business 

Manager, 3, 4; Polity Club, Treasurer, 4 

Publications Board, 3, 4; President Nortl 

Carolina Collegiate Press Association, 4 

Vice President Men's Student Ciovornnienl 

4; Beta Omega Sigma; Football, 1; Y. M 

C. A. Cabinet, 3; Chief Marshal, 3. 

Orson Benjamin Newton, |i<. 
Cambridge, Md. 
1"A 
General 
Pan-Hellenic Council, 4; Symphony Or- 
chestra; Band; Assistant Manager Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3, Manager, 4; Beta Omega Sigma; 
Tombs; Varsity Club. 

Edward Adamson Nixon 
Rome, Ga. 
Mechanical Engineering 
Duke Society of Mechanical Engineers. 



87 




Norwood 

NuTT 

O'Connor 



Onisko 

Otis 
Parkhurst 



Beth Norwood 
McBcc, S. C. 

Tracliivg 
Sluilciil \ (ilunlccr. 



j.\.\ii:s 1'". Nui r 

Melrose, Mass. 

General 



Dknms 1,. O'Connor, Jr. 
MaiiiaroiK'ck, N. \'. 

Business A dm in ist ratio n 
Swimming, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4. 



Vincent [oiin Onisko 
Sa- llai-bor, N. Y. 

Business Ad]ninistratio>i 
Wrestling, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, .i ; \'aisit\ 
Club. 

J.\.Mi;s Orin Otis 

Providence, R. I. 

ATA, <I>BK. OAK 

Electrical F.ngi iiren >ig 

Student Council, 4, Social Chairman, 3; 

Managing Editor Chanticleer, 4; House 

of Representatives, 3; Pan-Hellenic Council, 

3; Junior Honors; Beta Omega Sigma; Iota 

Gamma Pi; Delta F.psilon Sigma; American 

Institute of I'^lcctrical Engineers. 

Mary 1 'ark hurst 

Ralcii,'h, N. C. 

AAII, A'hA, XA'i> 

Business Administration 

Archive, 1; Nereidian Club; Delta Phi 

Rho Alpha; Woman's College Student 

Council, 3, 4; House President, 4; Women's 

Athletic Association Council, 4. 



88] 






r.wi.DR 

PlXKllA.M 




Phiums 

PlIll.l.Il'S 

I'liiri's 



i 







Sara Ci.av I'a'i i.dr 

Raleigh, X. C. 

.UII 

Social Sen'ice 
Saint .\lar\'s Junior College, 1,2. 

F.DSox M. I). I'kasi; 

Providence, R. I. 

Median ical Enginrcrin^ 

Iota Gamma Pi; Duke Socict)- of Mecliaii- 
ical Knginccrs. 

John W. Peckiiam 
St. .Mban's, X. \. 

lAu. <i>Ki:, .\K."r 

li II s in rss A dm in ist rat io n 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Class \'icc President, 
4; Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; X'arsity Club. 



A.\URi:\\ Prank Piiiiius 
Grcciisbi)i(), X. C 

Religion 



C". v.. PlIll.l.Il'S, Jr. 

Durham, X. C 

Gi'urral 

\ . M. C. .\. Cabinet, .?, 4; Conimence- 
niciit .Marshal, 2, .'. 



Rl ill PlIllM'S 

Kcw Gardens, N. Y. 
.\ZA 

(General 
JJuke Plavcrs. 



(89J 




Physioc 

Po\\E 

Price 



Rankin 
Rebman 

Revercomb 



Martha Andre Physioc 






Charles W. Rankin 




Stamford, Conn. 






China Grove, N. C. 




General 






Pre- Legal 




I-'reiich Club, 2, j, President, 2; W 
Athletic Association Council, 2. 


omen's 




Appalachian State Teachers College, 1, 2. 




Catherine Tati; I'owe 






Anme Kate Rebmax 




Durham, N. C. 






Courtland, Ala. 




KAH 






KKF 




Teaching 






General 




Town Girls' Club, President, 4; W 
College Student Council, 4; Woman 
le^c Orchestra, 1; Physics Club, 2. 


Oman's 
s Col- 


1' 

4 


Ward-Belnioni College, 1, 2; Class \'icc 
resident, 4; Sororit\ I'aii-IIelleiiic Council, 
Secretary, 4. 




Saka I'Ricr: 










Scarsdale, N. Y. 
AF. 

Oeneral 






I'A i;ri;tt Eugene Ri;\krcomb 








AIcLcan, \'a. 




Glee Club, 3, 4. 






Religion 





90' 



nil 



Rll KS 

Robertson 

RoHlNSON, P. 



Robinson, S. 
Rogers, L. 
Rogers, 1'. 




George Harriss Ricks 

Concord, N. C. 

Pre -Medical 

Glee Club, 1. 2, 3, 4; University Choir, 2, 
3, 4; Pegram Chemistry Club. 

Ann Ki.le Robertson 

Mayficid, Ky. 

ZTA, A<I>A 

General 
Brenau College, 1, 2; Duke Players, 3, 4. 

Pauline Robinson 
Asheville, X. C. 
Social Service 
Biltmore Junior College, 1. 



Sara Sue Rohinson 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

^B<^, (-)A4> 

General 

University of Chattanooga, 1, 2; Duke 
Players. 

Lola Marler Rogers 

Durham, N. C. 
\AII. KAII. Iir.M 

Teaching 

Social Standards Committee, 1, 3; Town 
Girls' Club, Secretary, 3. 

Til O.MAS T. Rogers 

Minton, W. \ a. 

i:\. OAK 

Business Administration 

Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Columbia Literary 
Society, \'ice President, 4; Publications 
Board, 4; Tombs; \'arsity Club. 



[91] 




RosK 
Ross 

ROSSITER 



RoWE 

Saxdell 
Sapp 



II 



Bernice K. Rose 
New York, N. Y. 

:^R 

General 
(.'iiANTici.KKR, 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-1'a1 liusiiiess 
Manager, 3, 4; Ncrcidiaii Club, Vice Presi- 
ilcnt, 3; W'ninen's Athletic Association, 
{'resilient, 4; Senior Project Coinmittee. 

I KA S. Ross 
Ncwa.k, N. |. 

'i>BK. 'i'li:^: 

Pre-Mcdical 
SwiniininK, 1, 2, 4; I'reslunan Honors; 
Sophomore Honors; Pe^jrani Chemistry 
Club; lota (lamma Pi; Parker Ph\sics 
Prize, 3. 

IIakkv Sayen RossnicR, J k. 

Abinpton, I'a. 

«I>A« 

/'re-Medira/ 

Fooil.all, 1,2, 3, 4; Track, 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 

Vice President, 2; Beta {3mega Sigma; 

'I'.nilv ; Varsity Club, 



F. T. RovvE 
Hillsboro, Md. 

0X 

University of Delaware, 1; .Irchivc, 3; 
CiiAN-rici.icKR, 3, 4. I'"calure I'Alitor, 4. 

Stanley C. Sanuell 

Brockton, Mass. 

AXA 

r,r-Mr,liral 

Band, 1, 2, 3; Synii'huny ()n.-hestra, 1, 2; 
Pegram Cheniistr}' Clul>. 

ROMERT VVaI.I. S.\PP 

Albany, (la. 
'Mlk, ll\li;, 'hill'. 1111 

llounrs 

I''resliniaii Honors; Sr)phoinore Hdiiims; 
yU19; Pegram Chemistry Club. 



02 ] 



nil 



S.\R\ i:r 
Say I. OK 

Si. IIOCK 



Scott 

Skariciit 
Serfas 




Virginia Sai<\ i:r 

LewisbuiLT, \V. Va. 

K.\(-) 

Teaching 

Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 4 Vice 
President, 4; V. \V. C. A. Cabinet, 4.' 

E. N. Saylok 
Durham, N. C. 

Business Adm in ist ratio n 

Muskingum College, 1; Duke Music;.! 

w"^'k-' ^' ^' -'^''"••'g'^^'-, 3. 4; Tniversitv 
Male Quartet, 2, 3. 

Carl Fredkrick Schock 

New Rochcllc, N. Y 

HKII. O^K 

Pre- Legal 

Red Friars; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 
4; Class Secretary, 3, President, 4; Pan Hel- 
lenic Council, 3, 4; Tombs; Varsitv Club. 



I lovi.K r. SlOIT 
Diirliaiii, .\I. C 

I'.vf: 

Electrical Engineering 

Bo.xing, 1, 2, 3, 4; Tombs; .American In- 
stitute of Fllectrical Kngineers. 

Alice Searigiit 

Wa.sliiiigUm, X. C 

KAII 

Teaching 

Catiierim-: V . Serfas 

Kastoii, Pa. 

KKP, KAn 

Teaching 

Chronicle, 1, 2; Distaff, 2, 3, 4. Business 
.Manager, 3, 4; Class Treasurer, 4; Publica- 
tions Board, 4, Secretary, 4. 



93 



I I 




Settlkmyer 

Shackford 

Sheppard 



Ci,AUi>K Harold Skttlemykr 

Kannapdlis, N. C. 
■l'A(-) 

Cu'nerdl 

WiiiKalc lunior College-, 1, 2; Glee Club, 
3. 4. 

Joseph T. Shackford 

Charlotte, N. C. 

UK A, OAK 

General 

Red Friars; Track, 2, 3, 4; Class Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, 2, President, 3; President 
Men's Student Government, 4. 

Susan Siii;im'ard 

'I'cxaikaiia, Tex. 

KA0 

General 

Greenbrier College, 1, 2; Social Standards 
Committee, 4; Chronicle, 3, 4, Society Ed- 
itor, 4. 



Sides 

Sink 

Skinner 



Leroy Sides 

Statesville, N. C. 

OAK 

Business yidinlnistrci/iuii 

Red Friars; Boxing, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4; 
Class Treasurer, 3; Tombs; \ arsity Club. 

Mary Sink 
W'iiislon-Saleni, N. C. 

Ti- aching 

Social Standards Committee, 4: Women's 
Athletic Association Council, 4. 

Ai/i'oN Skinner, J k. 
Dmhaiii, N. C. 
Civil Engineering 
American Societ>' of Ci\'il I'.nginecrs. 



94 



nil 



nil 



SNirni, M. 
Smitii. T. 
southeri.am) 



Stahi.kr 

SxARRArr 

Stauffer 




Marik Smi'iii 






Annie Stabler 


Cleveland, Ohio 






Bessemer City, X. C. 


AAII, '1'1;K 






Teaching 


General 






Davenport College, 1, 2; Clce Club, 3, 4; 


Wittenberg College, 1; Eko-L. 






Student \'oluntcer. 


Thornton B. Smith 

Durham, X. C". 

Religion 

Glee Club, 1, 2; University Choir, 
4; Ministerial Association, 1. 


1, 


2,3, 


A. W . SlARRAIT, JK. 

Chevy Chase, Md. 

IIK'I', AKT 

Business Adm in ist ratio n 

Chronicle, 2, 3; Cross-Country, 2. 


OswEi.L Proctor Southeri 


A N D 


Henry Brooke Stauffer 


Durham. X. C. 






Washington, D. C. 


Civil Engineering 






rx 


American Society of Ci\il I'.ngineers 


^^^ 


Pre- Legal 



[95] 



I 



H3^^ 




Stkfi.e 

StRA'I'TOX 

Strowu 



Mary ELi/..\iii;iii Steele 

Rockingham, N. C. 

AMI 

General 

Mary P.;il.hvln Cn]U-i^c, 1, 2. 

Makion 1*',sti:n Straitox 
Newton I Figlilands, Mass. 

Duke Players, .1, 4. 

Peggy Axne Strowd 

Durliani, N. C. 
KAII 

'/'eac/iinf^ 
Duki- Players, 1,2. 



Si.;i,i,i\'AN 

Tali.ey 

Tate 



Jakk W. Sui.i.ivan, Jr. 
Anderson, S. C. 

General 

Pan-IIclleiiic Council, 3, 4, President, 4; 
C]olf, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4; Polity Club; 
Beta Omega Sigma; Tombs; Varsity Club. 

John \i. Tai.i.kv 

Jackson, Ala. 
1 1 K \ 

/iiisi)ii's.\ .III 1)1 in islralion 

Wrestling, 2, .\ 4; Cu \ni'hi.i;i;r, 2, 3; 
'I'oinbs. 

W 11.1,1 AM I low \Ki) Tate 

Soulli lieiuk hill. 

SX 

Pre-Legal 



96 



nil 



'r.wi.oK, M. 

'I'.WI.OR. S. K.. 



Thomas. 1 1. 

'I'iKiM \S, l\. 
'I'llOKMIII.I, 




I'.I.I/AliKTll IjURTON JaTUM 


1 foRAc T. Ct. Thomas 


Hattiesburg, Miss. 


Whit lord. Pa. 


XQ 


:i:x 


General 
Sophie Newcomb C'i)llcge, 1, 2, 3. 


Pre- Legal 
Assistant Manaj^er Wrestling, I, 2, 3, 


Mildred J. Taylor 


Manager, 4. 


irarrishuii:, P;i. 


Rour.RT K. rii().\L\s, Jr. 


XA<1', KAII 


Oak Hill, W. \'a. 


Honors 


I'V, XB«[> 


Sopliomore Honors; Chronicli-, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
News Editor, 4; Distaff, 4. 


Electrical Engineerin};, 




Impedance Club; Band, 1, 2; .Vmcrican 


Sar.\u Katiierink Taylor 


Institute of Klectrical Engineers. 


Gastonia, N. C. 
AAII 

General 

Chanticleer, 3; Chronicle, 4; Archive, 
4; Y. \V. C. A. Cabinet, 4; Glee Club, 3. 


F.DWiN I Talk Tikjrn'uill 

Bluclicld, W. Va. 

AXA 

(jeneral 



[971 



I 




TlI.I.OTSON 

Town LEY 
Troxler 



Tudor 
Tun NELL 
Umstead 



\ IRGIXIA TiLLOTSON 

VVinston-Salcm, N. C. 

Ciowral 

Agnes Scott College, 1, 2; White Duchy; 
V. W. C. A. Cabinet, 3, President, 4; Wom- 
an's College Orchestra, 3, 4; President Wom- 
an's College Music Club, 4. 

Julian (jordon Town ley 

R()ncc\crtc, W. \ a. 

UK \, OAK 

Electrical Engineering 

Red Friars; Chanticlkkr, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
I'lditor-in-Chicf, 4; Manager Boxing, 4; 
I'an-Hellenic Council, 3, 4, Vice President, 
4; Beta Omega Sigma; Publication Board, 
4; American Institute of I'llectrical {•.nginccrs. 

I'.ULYss R. Troxler 
Grcciisbcjio, N. C 

Pre-Medical 
Pcgram Chemistry Club. 



Frances Elizabeth Tudor 

Albemarle, N. C. 

AAA 

General 

Chronicle, 1, 2, 3, 4, Co-Kd Business Man- 
ager, 3, 4; Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 
4; Glee Club, 1, 2; Junior Big Sisters, Secre- 
tary, 3; Publications Board, 4. 

Ross A. Tunnell, Jr. 
Oak Grove, Ala. 

<i>BK, 4)Hi:, mwi 

/Iniinrs 

Freshman Honors; Soplionmrc Hnnors; 
House of Representatives, 2. 

C'li AKLOTTE Umstead 

Durham, N. C. 

ZTA 

Teaching 



[98 



nil 



Upciiirlii 
\'augii.\n 

VoiGT 



Walker 

W'axnamakkr 

Watson 




M. 1 1. I I'CIIURCII 






Augusta Alick Walker 


Durham, N. C. 






Elizabetii Cily, X. C. 


A<I>A 






AAIl. KAli 


Business Adm in istration 

Chronicle, 3, 4, Assistant Editor, 4; 
man Friendship Council. 


Fre-sh- 


\\h 


Teach ing 
tc Duchy; Woman's College Student 






Cjovcrnmcnt, 2, 3, 4, President, 4; Social | 






Stand 


ards Committee, 3; Sorority Pan- 1 


EmU.V \ AL (.llAN 




Hellenic Council, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2; Chron- | 


Jackson, N. C. 




icle, 1 


2; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 


Teaching 






Harriet Wan.na.maker 


Glee Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Delta Phi Rho 


Aipha; 




Durham, \. C . 


Women's Athletic Association Counc 


1. 2. 3. 




AAll 


MaRGIK \'()IGT 






General 


Philadelphia, Pa. 
Business Administration 






George A. Watsox, Jr. 

Cranford, \. j. 
AKM- 


Nereidian Club, President, 4; Woman's 




College Orchestra, 1. 






Busi n ess Adm i n ist rat io n 








(99] 



(^ O f^ 




Weatherspoon 

Weaver 

Welles 



Wells 
Welsh 
White, A. 



AI.\R^ \'iRCi\L\ Weatherspoon 


Warner Lee Wells 


J^urhani, N. C". 


RaleiKh, N. C. 


Teaching 


r,r-Mrclical 


Town Girls' C'luh; Physics Club, 2; Glee 
Club, 2, 3, 4. 


IV'grani Chcniisiry Club. 




Barnard Welsh 


I'liiLii' jouNSON Weaver 


kockvillc, i\Id. 


Wiiislon-Sak'in, N. C. 


R5: 


'I) AH, OAR 
General 


I 'n- Legal 


Biiskctbali, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4, 


Tennis, 1. 2, 3, 1; l'..lli\ Club; Tombs; 


Captain, 4; I'Vcslinian Lcaclcrsliip Medal; 


\'arsily Club. 


liii.i Omega Sigma; Tombs; Varsity Club. 


Allen Stori:v White 


Doris Alden Wei.i.i:s 


Spfiiiirlickl, .Mass. 


Pensacola, Ma. 


<I>AW 


RRl' 


lii<siiii'ss ./(I mini si rati oil 


Teaching 


Cii AN rici,i;i;i<, 1, 2, 3, 1; Paii-ilclk-iiic 


Forum Club. 


Ciiuncil, 4. 


1 if)0] 

1 








W^IITI. C. 
\\ I KINCiS IAD 
\\ 11.111. l.M 



Williams 
WiLLINCn \\i 
\\ ILLIS 




C\K()I.V.N C'.XRTKR \\ IIITE 

Mcbanc, X. C 
KA. III^M 

Teaching 

Converse College, 1,2; I'rciicli Club. 

W. K. \\ IKINGSTAD 

Cri.'^tobal, Canal 7f>nc 
AKT 

liusnifss Adw ituslralwn 

C. Leo W ilhklm 
Salisbury, \. C. 

rr\, 'Mil; 

General 
Chronicle, 1; Beta Omega Sigma. 



CJ. Da\ IS W ILLIA.MS 

Fayettcville, Pcmi. 

'I'AH. 'M!K. OAK 

Pn-lA-gal 

Class Vice President, 1, President, 2; 
Student Council, 3; Columbia Literary Si>- 
cicty. President, 4; Polity Club 

l'.\l Ll\ L 1 ). W 1 I.LI Nt.llA.M 

Maci m, ( la. 
\A1I 

('jcmial 
Holliiis College, 1; W'esleyan College, 2. 

II. C-. Willis 

Wilson, N. C. 

IlK'l' 

GtHcral 



lUl 









WiLSOX 

WiNSLOW 

WOXSIDLER 




WOOTEN 

Wright 
Wyatt 



Bess Wilson 






Alice Wooten 


Montrcat, N. C. 
A* A 

Teaching 






Fayctteville, N. C. 

KKr 

Teaching 


I'cacc jmiinr College, 1,2; Glee Ck 


■b, 


3,4. 


Joiix D. Wright 
Blackstone, Va. 


l'j.r/..\i!i;iii WiNSLOw 






nK* 


Greenville, N. C. 






Business Adi)i in istratwii 


KA 






Paii-1 Icllcnic Cmiticil, 4. 


General 






IIelex LocKwtioi) \\'\.\rr 


Wii.i.is R. \\'o\sii)1,i;r 






West Medford, Mass. 
ZTA, XA'I> 


'rruinbaiicrsvillc, Pa. 






General 


Electrical Engineering 

lr)ia (jamma Pi; Delta l'>psilon 
Anicricaii liislilulc of ]*'lectricai I'.n 


Sigma; 
gincers. 


Social Staiulard.s Commiuec, .), 4, Chair- 
man, 4; Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 3, 4, 
President, 4; Disltiff, 2; Chrouic/r, 2; Nereid- 
ian Club. 



102 




JUNIORS 



vT^Tf, k«rf L.«Ji 








James Guy Abli.l. Smitlifickl, \. C 

Iri.iAN M. Ai,i)KiiJ(.E, Durlinni, X. C. 
kA 

|ami:s Ai.i, \ki)I(.i., MiMiiikiiii Lakes, N. f. 

Track, 1, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2, 3; Syniph(in\- 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3. 

XoRMAN 1,. AsDiiRsoN, Durluuii, X. C. 
dice Club. 2, 3; L'ni\crsily Choir, 2, 3. 

Ronald Arciibold, Cleveland, Ohio 
rAt.>, <l>Ki:, (-)A<I> 

Duke l'la\ers, 1, 2, 3; Chronic/,-, 2, 3, 
Society I'.dilor, 3. 

Clarence Armstrong, \\'ashington, D. C. 
ATA 

Chantideir, 3. 
James H. Armstrong, Surgoins\ ille, Tenn. 

\\ arren Armstrong, Fort Bragg. X. C. 

'I'AH, <i>Hi;, iiml: 

(!hriiiiic/,\ 1, 2, 3; Columbia Lilerar)' So- 
cict\ ; American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers. 

John Leslie Atkins, Jr., Durli.mi, X. C. 
Ke\s Club. 

|osEi"HiNE .\tkinson, L\ iichburt'. \ a. 
A AH 
Jrcliive. 

RituARi) L ArKiNsoN, Elkiii, \ a. 

Track, "1, 2. 
George J. Baer, J larrisburg, Pa. 

L\RR^ ISagw i:ll, Raleigh, N. C. 
Tridi-iil Chib. 

ll'Nl-; l>,\iLi;v, Tliomasx ille, (!a. 
AAII, KAll 

Saiulals; Class Treasurer, 2; .Xi-reitliau 
Club; Drll.i I'hi Rh. .Alpha; Duke Players. 

I'A'El.YN BaKI:R, 'l'hiini.is\ ille, X. C. 
AAII 

l''.s-rili:R It'DsoN' I5\LL, Lowell. Mass. 
AAA, A'I'A 

Wellesle.N College. I, 2. 

\\ \rri;n E. Uandi.l. P>;iIi iniore, Md. 
Band, 1. 2; Cheerle;uler. 2, 3. 

I''. \\ . Down Bangle, Ch.irloiie, X. C. 
A<I'A 

^ . M. C. A. Cabiiui. 2, Secretary, 3; 
Ministerial Association, Secretary, 2; 
Chronicle, 2, 3, Columbia Literary Society, 
President, 3; I'"rieiulsliip Council, 3. 



1U4 



\\ . I . llvRwicK, Ba\ Shore, N. \'. 

Maruakkt Xanly I^ATKiS, Klktoii. Mil. 
KKl' 
Glee Club, 1. 2, K riii\iTsii\ C'lmir, 3; 
Dhtatf. .V 

P\i 1. I'. 1>. l?\XTrR, SonuT\illi-, N. J. 

Kc\ s C'lub 

Cilcf Club, 2, 3, Assisiaiu Mana^'cr, 2, 3; 
V. M. C. A. Cabinet, 2, 3; Fresliinan 
Friendship Council. 

CiiARi.i;.-; Dwiii Ui \ir\. l'in;-buri.'li. Pa. 
,\.\.\, -I'lir. KK'I- 

.■/r.Aiir, 1, 2. 3; \'. .M. C. .\. Cabinet, 2, 

Treasurer, 3; Duke Players. 

Samuel Bell, Charlotte, N. C. 

Basketball. 1. 2. 3; iiaseball. 1: liela 
Omega Sigma; Tombs; \ arsitx Club. 

Sara Berensox, Bogalusa, La. 

SororitN l'an-1 loUenic Council, 2, 3. 

Robert M. ISinui.i:. Parkersburu. W . \ a. 
Northwestern Lniversitw 1, 2; Cilee Club, 
3. 

William Cib.son Bird, Swarthmorc, Pa. 
ATA 

Class President, 2. 

Nellie I5ishop, Durham, N. C. 
K.AI1 
Town Girls' Club. 

Klma Jeanette Black, Bamberg, S. C. 
AAA 

Freshman Honors; Sophomore Honors. 

Theodore Boepple, New '\'ork, N. ^'. 
I'A, A'I'A 
Wrestling, 2. 

James F'r.vnklix Bostock. .\rlington. .N. ). 

Swimming. 
Carey Bell Bowex, Ridgewood, N. J. 

Cawtmox Bowex, Nashville, Tcnn. 
l.\ 

Pan-Hellenic Council, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 
3; Chronicle, 1, 2; Beta Omega Sigma. 

Leoxa \ irgixia Bow.max, Timbervillc, \ a. 
Mary Baldwin College, 1, 2; Glee Club; 
3; University Choir, 3. 

-Mary Louise Bradley, Lima, Ohio 

KAe 

J. \L\x Braxdox. Jr., Catawba, N. C. 
James J. Brexxax, Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 








€rMtk 












\d 



105 



' ■'Hi- 



O h~j ^^ 




Co p, 




Jessie Brewer, Clarksville. Teiin. 

Tennessee \\"oman's College. 1.2; Junior 
Council. 

l'".\ ERKTT Roland Brid(;ers, Wilson, .\. C. 
Tennis, 1. 

Louise Brown, Arlington. N. |. 
ZIA 

\\ ii,i,i.\.\i Thomas Buice. Ik. 
Charlotte, X. C. 

Beta Omega Sigma. 

Lawrence Burke, Forest Hills, X. \ . 
Swimming. 1. 2, 3. 

William Miller Burke, Meridcn, Conn. 
Baseball, L 2; Chronicif: Class President, 
2. y. Beta Omega Sigma. 

l',i,\iR\ BiRLEiGH, Rutherford. N. j. 

Women's Athletic Association Cnuncil. 

Kathleen Cameron. Hattiesburg, Miss. 
AAA 

Jane Carlton, Greensboro, X. C. 
KA0 
William and Mary College, 1; .Irchnr, 2; 
Chronicle, 3; Chanticleer, .>. 

Blaine Carman. Bloomtickl. X. ]. 
i;a 

Track, L 2; American Suciet) of Ci\il 
I'.ngineers. 

Be'itv Jo Cassidy. Bhu'lieKl. W. \ a. 
AAA 

1Ii;len Gray Chandler, liroaduay, X. C. 
Louisburg College. 1. 2. 

Ori'ah Clements, Durham. X. C. 
AAII 

|\CK CoAN, W inslim-.Salem, .X. C. 

IIarrii I' Conn, Durhiin. X. C. 
AAII 

Cc>n\ rrse C'ullege. I . 

|i I I \ \1 \Kii: CoMits, |)uili,ini. X. (. . 
K K I • 

Glee Chib. 2, 3; i'uvMi Girls' Club. \ ice 
President, 3. 

W . !•.. Conrad. |k.. I.e.xinglon, X. C. 
cMll- 

I'"reshman lionurs; Sc>|iliom(ire Honors; 
Columbia Literary Sociely; I''rcslnnan 
l''rieiulship Cnuncil. 

I ,. \, Coo\ I.. Marion. N. C. 
I'.and, 1. 2. 3. 



1106 



Makv I'aison Covington 

rii(>mas\ illc, N. L". 
ZIA 
Kresliman Honors; Chronuli-. -i; Woman's 
College Orclu-stra, Busini-ss Manager, 1. 
2; Women's Musical Club, Secretary- 
Treasurer, 3. 

C'llARl.oi'l i; C"rautri;i:, C'lialtaniMii.M. Tcnn. 
AAIl 

Bertram) R. Crist, Alioona, I'a. 
IX 

Track, 1, 2. .'; Tombs; \ arsitx Cliilv 

Rl Til HiNoir C Rosin , ( ireen\ illc. Miss. 
Sophie .Newcomb Ci>lle);e, 1. 2. 

Hei-kn Rkkdkr Cross, Isabella, Tciim. 
ZIA 
I'niversity of Tennessee, 1. 2; Woman's 
College Orchestra, 3. 

Fred Dixon Daii.ky, Sussex, N. J. 
Baseball. 1.2; Beta Omega Sigma. 

C. Shelby Dai.i:, Portsmouth, Ohio 
KK'I- 
Baiul, 1. 2, .1; .Symphony Orchestr;i, 1,2,3. 

W. B. Dw IS. |r.. (ireensboro, N. C. 
IIK'I' 

Morris Di.in. .\iI nil ic Cii\ , X. [. 
•MA 
Swimming, I. 2. 3; junior Council; Bctii 
Omega Sigm;i. 

Robert F.. Di-.m.me, Rockville Centre. N. ^ . 
Kc>-; Club, AKM' 

.Mary .\i.ki; Dii.i.ky. Ocean Cit\ . \. J. 

Roy a. Doty, Jr., Rogers\ illc, Tcnn. 

Trident Club, President, 3; Cheerleader, 
2, 3, Head Cheerleader, 3; Jrchitr. 3; 
Duke PUiNcrs. 

Charles S. I)o\k'i. 1r., PliihKlcl[iliia. Pa. 
i:AU. 'I-Kl 
'Frack, 1. 2. 3; Cross-Count ry. 1, 2; As- 
sistant .Manager l*'o<)tball, 3; Chanti- 
cleer, 1, 2, 3. 

i;. B. I)i NLAP. I.awton. Okla. 
<I'AH 
Football. 1. 2. 3; (;iee Club. I, 2. 3; 
I'ombs; \arsit\ Club. 

JACK l)t Ni.AP. I.awton. Okla. 
'I'AH 
Football, 1, 2, 3; 'Fombs; \ arsity Club. 

FoRRE.ST \ .\l;i,ll\N DlNSTAN 

Kliz;ibeth Citv. .\. C. 
IX 
Assistant .Manager Cross-Count r>, 1. 2; 
Chanticleer, 1, 2; \. .M. C. .\. Cabinet, 
2; P'reshman Friendship Council. 

!.. Harris I-'.dmondson, Fatonton, Oa. 
A TA, TKA 
Chronicle, 2, F^ditor, 3; Archivf, 2. .Man- 
aging F.ditor. 3; Debating. 2; Duke Pla\- 
crs. 2, 3; Publications Board, 3. 

Marian I-.ly, Dovlestown, Pa. 
Disiti/r. I, 2, 3:'Duke Plavers. 




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107) 



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k 



Hazel D. Emery, Jacksonville, Fla. 
AAn 
Nereidian Club; Chanticleer; Chronicle; 
Archive: Junior Big Sisters, Treasurer. 

Allex Kxu.m, Snow Hill, N. C. 

Ki; 

Albert Royal Fairchild, Glcnside, Pa. 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Beta Omega Sigma. 

CJer.vld Ferguson, Brewster, N. Y. 
American Society of Civil Engineers. 

Launce J. Flemister, Atlanta, Ga. 
ATA, <I>Hi: 
Symphon}' Orchestra, 1, 2; Assistant 
.Manager Tennis, 2; Sophomore \ Cabinet; 
Freshman Friendship Council; Chem. 
Club. 

Dorothy Orrell Forbes, Trenton, N. J. 
KAn 

Forum Club, Secretary-Treasurer, 2, 3; 
Chanticleer, 3. 

Frederick D. Gabel, \\ hite Plains, N. ^ . 
AXA, AKI' 

Tennis. 

Ethel G.vrrett, Swarthmore, Pa. 

KKr 

Sandals; Class Treasurer, 1, President, 2; 
Delta Phi Rho Alpha; Women's Athletic 
Association, Secretary, 3. 

Mary Loiuse Gillis, Arlington, N. J. 

Alvin J. GoLDBERc, Augusta, Ga. 

'M:a 

Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. 
Marvin D. Goodrich, Jr., Pctersburi;, \ a. 

nF.n 

Track, 1, 2; Junior Council; Duke Players. 

Clements Gouldm.\n, W est Point, \ a. 
KA 

Archive. 

Charles F. Grae, Jr., Baltimore, Md. 

Keys Club 
Cilec Club, I, 2, 3; rni\ersit\ Choir. 2, 3; 
Cheerleader, 2, 3. 

Frances CjRaney, Ashland, lv\ . 
AAA 

Marshall College, 1, 2. 

M\R^ ( iR wi'A", .\shlaud, Rw 
AAA 

.Marshall Cnllege. 1, 2. 

Tom \\ . (ikwis. \\ ilsdii, \. C. 

k:i; 

Wreslllng, 1; Baseball, 1. 

I'REDivRicK 1' LOW i;rs 11\c;ue 
Columbus, Ohio 
Keys Cli.b, (-)A<I> 
Duke Phners, Business Manager, 3; 
.\ssistanl .Manager Intramural Sports, 3; 
Chronicle, 3; Beta Omega Sigma. 

\\ iM \Rii I 1 \i,i 1 . l'uii.\sula\\no\-, Pa. 
.\.\A 



106 



McCarthy Hanger, Jr.. Bala. Pa. 
Ki, «i>Hi: 

Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2. 
3; Archive, 1, 2, 3, Aih-frlisim; Manancr, 
2.3. 

l''.Tni:i. H Ai'i'Ki.. Blue Rii.lj;e Sumniii. Pa. 

Al.l RID j. 11 ARDINi;. Now "\"(>lk. .\ . \. 

Leoxard IIvrdv. llighlaiKls. X. |. 
A<I>.\ 
Junior Council. 

Bl.AINE R. H ARKNESS, Oxfdfd, Pa. 

IIMK 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Freshman Friendship 
Council; Iota Gamma Pi; .American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers. 

Ethel M.\i. Harriso.n, 'riiomasviile, .\. C. 
Woman's College Orchestra, 1, 2, 3. 



RiTH Hart. Bloomington. I! 
KKl' 



Davis Hatch, Jr., Xeedham. Mass. 
AXA, AKT 



Homer H. IIavdock, .Salem, Mass. 



Virginia Axn Haynes, Shre\cport, La. 
ZTA 



Alm.\ Hedrick, Salisbury, N. C. 
KAB 



Robbie Hedrick, Lexington, N. C. 

Robert Heeeelfixger, Scranton, Pa. 
Chanticleer. 3. 

Florence Heixley, Amitvville, .\. W 
Class Treasurer, 3; Junior Council. 

James P. Helm HI, Louisville, Kv. 
KA 

David H. Hexdersox, Charlotte. X. C. 
nK«l> 

-Assistant .Manager Baseball, 1. 2, 3; 
W resiling, 2; Junior Council. 

Jack J. Heritage, Winston-Salem. N. C. 
Track, 1, 2, 3; Cross-Country, 1. 2. 3: 
Tombs; X'arsity Club. 

Dorothv M. Herov. Cranford, X. J. 
Oberlin College, 1; Distaff, 2; Junior 
Council. 




[109 




John- Newman Herov, While Plains, N. Y. 
Junior Council; Beta Omega Sigma. 

Charles Ashi.ev Hiccnxs, Beckle}', \\ . \ a. 
Drum Major, 3. 

JOHN P. Hk;gins, Red Bank, X. |. 
KA 
Tennis, 1, 2, 3; Class Treasurer, 3; Junior 
Council; Tombs; \ arsity Club. 

Dorothy Bvrd Hines, Greensboro, X. C. 



W. S. iloDDE, riighlanJ Park, Mich. 

\\'\i,i'i:R Addis Howi.and, Montclair, N. ]. 
IIMK 

Robert 1'. Hoyle, Durham, X. C. 
Classical Club. 

M AROARET Ik'MBERT 

Hasbrouck Heiuhls, X. J. 
1 1 \','l> 

Syiata Hunsicker, ;\llento\\ii. Pa. 
IIB<I' 
House President, 3. 

loiix S. Hunter, ReadiiiL', i'a. 



Berxice E. Irwin, liradk-N Beach, X. J. 
KA 



Piaa^Y Isaac, Norfolk, \'a. 
AZ 

Raiidii]ph-MaC( 111 Wnnian's Collctre, I. 2. 



|oE .\1. hlE, Leaksvillr, X, C. 
\\\ 



|osi:i'ii R. I i-STER, Ah'.xandria, \ a. 
Keys Club 
Ho.xini:, 1, 2, 3; Cross-Count r\-, 1, 2, 3; 
Track, i ; Ti ■ndis; \ arsil \ C'lub. 

1,ai:r\ Si.oo |oii\son, W ashinL;lon, D. C. 
IIIM. 
Xatinnal C.ilhrdral ScIhhiI, 1; \mciican 
I 'ni\ crsil \-, 2. 

r.KooKs |i)m:s, \l,i\tiihl, 1\ \ . 
l.andH-lh C..llr,i;e,' 1, 2. 

Run\Rii AiiMK Io\i;s, l''ounlaln lnn..S. C. 

Ill'.ll 
|[ l''oolb;dl, 1, 2, 3; House of Representa- 
tives, 3. 

\m<(;i\i\ foKDW, 1)11 M ikl\ n. X. ^ . 
7:\\ 
.Social Stamlards Committee, 2, 3; San- 
tlais; .■lrchk'i\ 2; (Uiruni(li\ 1, 2, 3; Duke 
Pla\ers, 1, 2, 3. 



110 



Thomas W'oodfin Kkkskk, Hi'lt-na, Ark. 

CiiANTiL'i.KKK, 1, 2, .'; Krcshmaii lldtmrs; 
Soplioiiuire Honors. 

Albert Frekd Ki;i.i.i;r, Norfolk, \ a. 

Football. 1, 2. 3: Track, 1; Coif, 1; Hcia 
Omega Sigma; Tombs; \'arsit\ Club. 

Robert M. Kkown, Harrisbiirj;. Pa. 
rx, <l>Hi; 
Basketball. 1, 2. 3; Track, 1, 2, 3; junior 
Council. 

KmHR-iN KlKIK, Rciils\ illf. \. C. 
\AI1 
Hrcnau College, 1, 2. 

\rtiu K If. Kii.i.i:\, Jr.. Flusliintr. \. ^ . 
r-l'l-. 

John H. Ki\c:, Cristobal. Canal Zone 

Philip .\1. Kirk. .Mocksvillc. X. C. 
■I'lll' 
Pegram Clienii>lr> Club; Iota (laninia Pi. 

Robert F. Knkipp. Washington. 1). C". 
Kl', 'Mil', AK'r 

Harold L. I.amu, Bluctiekl. W. \a. 
Bluetield College. I, 2. 

Georgi.vxna La.mson, Maplcwood, \. |. 
K.\(-» 
Wells College, 1; .Vn7n;r, 3; Distaff. 2, 3. 

Rodman Laxdox, Clinton, X. C. 
UK* 
Baseball, I; Track, 2, 3. 

Denzil Langsto.v, Orlando, Fla. 
nB'I> 
Sororitv Pan-Hellenic Council. 3; Duke 
Players. 

Kermit Laxdls Leitxkr. Harrisburg, Pa. 
AXA, <1>I11. A'I'.V 
Freshman Honors; Sophomore Honors; 
Chronicle, 3; Pegram Chemislr\- Club; 
9019. 

loiiN Charles Lexxox, Sa\annali, Cia. 
lIMi:, 'I'Hl' 
Freshman Honors; Sophomore Honors; 
Iota Gamma Pi. 

Ruth Lightbowx, Palm Beach, Fla. 
IIB-l- 
-American I nivcrsity. 1. 2. 

Sheril M. Lixeberger. Shelb\ . .X. C. 
IIK.\ 
Manager Wrestling. 3; Archive, 3; Trident 
Club. 

Xormax B. I.i\engood, Durham. .X. C. 
I'X 
Chanticleer. 1, 2, 3; Assistant Manager 
Bo.xing. 1, 2. 3; Beta Omega Sigma. 

John Arthur Long, Newell. .X. C. 

Symphony Orchestra. 1. 2, 3; Band. I. 2. 
3; Columbia Literary Society, 1. 




^ ^ l*S 




111 




W. 11. Long, Somerville, X. j. 
STA 
Chronicle, 1, 2, 3; Archive, 1. 2, 3; Junior 
Council; Beta Omega Sigma. 

M AR'i L. MtCoi.i.LM, Jacksoii\illc. I'hi. 
AAA 

Frances McKinley, \onkers, X. ^ . 
AE 

DoN.M.n G. McXeil, Bradle\- Beach, X. J. 
KA, 4>Hi; 
Tennis, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club; House of Rep- 
resentatives, 3; Beta Omega Sigma. 

Su.SAN G. McNeill, Jackson\ille, Fla. 
A An 

Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 3; Chron- 
icle, 3 ; House Committee. 

Samuel G. McQuade, Morristown, \. |. 

Freshman Friendship Council 

Graham M \ciarl.\ne, Ashevillc, .\. C. 
Golf, 1, 2; Chronicle: 2. 

]. R. Marion, Jr., Siloam, X. C. 
OK* 
Assistant Baseball Manager, 2, 3. 

Morris S. Marks, .Vugusta, Ga. 

Edna .Martin, Brooklyn, X. ^'. 
ZTA 
Parker Collegiate Institute, 1, 2. 

Edward L. Mason, Durham, X. C. 
IIKA 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 

Robert Kennon Matthews 

Kwansei (lakuin, Kobe, Japan 
I1K.\ 
Davidson College, 1, 2. 

Reynolds \1 \v. Dothan, Ala. 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Jun- 
ior Pan-Ilellenic Council, 3; Chronicle, 1. 

Mnr-i Mi.iKLi-.joiiN, Cheraw, S. C. 
KA 
(;iee Club, 1, 2; Class \'ice President, 3; 
Junior Council. 

Louise .Merkel, Milw aukci\ Wis. 
■/:\\ 

Student Council, 3; l^uke Pla_\ers. 

1I\rrv 1.. Mii.i.i'R. Chattanooga, Temi. 
Ilk \ 

I ).irliiiMulli Cillrgr. 1. 

Stuari V . Mii.i,i:r, Newark, N. L 
Ki-ys CInb 
(jlee Club, 1. 2, 3; Cniversitx Quartet, I, 
2, 3. 

Jane Eli/ahetii .Minor. Bata\ia, N. \'. 
KKT 
Xational I'ark Seminar\', L 2. 



LI] 



A B. Montgomery, Klizabcthtown, Kv. 
KA 

ToiiN II. MooRiii; Ai), Suiibur\, Pa. 

Paii-Iicllcnic Couiicil, .n C.hronicU, I, 2, 3. 



Henry (I. Morton, Sarasota, Fla. 
IIKA 

.M\RV I \Ni: .Mill oRi), Washington, D. C 
KAll 
Duke l'la\crs, 2, 3: Polit\ Club; Ncrcidiaii 
Club, Secretary, 3. 

Hi:\ryTi;n Kyckk Mi'nson, Detroit, Midi. 
l.N. O'Hi; 
Basketball, 1. 

Anita Murray, Marietta, Ga. 
W'esleyan Collepe, 1, 2. 

C.\Ri. B. Nkim.w, Mcridcn, Conn. 

P'ootball, 1; Basketball, 1; Student Coun- 
cil, 3; Beta Omega Sigma. 



James Long Newsom, Durham, X. C. 
KA. -l-lli:. i;v 



Beta Omega Sigma. 



EvEi.vN v.. Nkwton, Durham, N. C. 



Robert P. Nixon, Rome, Cja. 
■l>Hl\.\K'r 

Tennis, 1, 2, 3; Freshman Honors; Soph- 
omore Honors; Chronicle. 1, 2, 3; Trident 
Club, Treasurer, 3; \'. .M. C. .\. Cabinet, 3. 

J. Belton O'Connell, Fort Bragg, N. C. 
Boston University, 1; Cross-Countrv, 2, 3. 



Janet Or.mond, Durham, X. C. 
KA 



J K. Or.mond, Durham, X. C. 
KA 



James L. Oswald, Jr., Allendale, S. C. 



Elisabeth Owens, Bennettsville, S. C. 
IK 

Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 3. 

David I'.xl.mer, Wheeling, W. \ a. 
Track. 

Helen P.vrker, Seaboard, .N. C. 



George .A. Pearson, Jr., Chicago. III. 
Al* 




113 




o t*^ r^i 



Sic RID H. Pkderson, New York, N. Y. 
KA0 
Sororit}- Pan-Hellenic Council, 3; Social 
Standards Committee, 3; Forum Club. 
President, 3; Delta Phi Rho Alpha; ^'. W . 
C. A. Cabinet, 1; Duke Players, 2. 

Elizabeth Pkcram, Hamlet. X. C. 
KA 
Sandals; Delta Phi Rho Alpha; Woman's 
Athletic Association, Secretar\-. 2, \"ice 
President, 3; Distaff, 3. 

Ethel V. Perry, Rock\- .Mount. \. C. 
KA' 
Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 3. 

Caroline Phillips, Lexington, X. C. 
KA 

Robert S. Phillips, York. Pa. 
A* A 
Pegram Chemistr\" Club. 

Rov M. Phipps, Rockv Mount. X, C. 

nKA 

Football, 1, 2, 3; \'arsit.\- Club. 

E. H. PoLACK, York, Pa. 
lAK 
Basketball, 1,2; Track, 1,2; Golf, 1; Jun- 
ior Pan-Hellenic Council, 3; Junior Coun- 
cil. 

AsENATH Powell, I'nion Springs, Ala. 
KA 
Judson College, 1, 2. 

.\1.VRV Elizabeth Powell 

Grand Rapids, JVIich. 
(jrand Rapids Junior College, 1, 2. 

Xel.sox Powell, Edentmi, X. C. 
A All 
Social Standards Committee, 1 ; Glee Club, 
1, 2, 3, Secretary, 3; Woman's Athletic As- 
sociation Council, 2, 3; Woman's College 
Alusical Club, 3; Archive, Co-Ed Business 
Manager, 3; Chroniclt-, 3; Deha Phi Rho 
Alpha. 

RoHER'r C. Powi:li,, l.enoir, X. C. 
Ai;<I>, A'I'A 
.■\ssislant Boxing Manager, 1, 2, 3; I'resh- 
man i'Viendship Council. 

Sue I'owEi.L, Gastonia, X. C. 
KKT 
Sandals; Sludent Council, 3; Class Secre- 
tary, 2. 

IIakoi.d \\ . Prcniir, Liulilu-ld, Ccmn. 

Is \hi;llk ( iwvNN Pucii, 1 luntinglcm, W .\'a. 
AAA 

Iami;s T. R\i;ri:, (Jueens \ illage, .X. ^ . 
I'ALJ 

Wii.i.xRn A. Raisli;\', Sharcni llill. Pa. 
1 1 1. 1 1 
Chiss Secretary- Treasurer. 1; Stui.leut 
Council, 2; Junior Ciuincil; lieia Omega 
Sigma. 

[oHN RaN(.i;r, JAiin, Mass. 
Glee Club. 1, 2, 3. 

I \Mi -< \\ . R \NKi \, Gastonia, X. C. 
Arov <MI1' 



114 



Ai.iRKO A. Rkiciim.w, \\'asliin>;t()n, D. C 
IIK<I> 
Track, 1, 2, 3; [iiiiior C'lnincil, Prosidciii ; 
Beta Oiucira Sii;ma; 'roiiilis; \ arsit\ C'liili. 

Ai.i'ii<)\/.() C. Rkynoi.ds, Ashcvilk-, X. C. 

Charles S. Riiym;, l)i-ii\or. Col. 

F(K)tball, 2; Track, 1; lioxin^;, 1; Cri>ss- 
Ci)untr\', 1. 

Carolyn Rikfle, Baltimore, MJ. 
AAA 
Sorority Pan-Hcllciiic Council, .?; Clec 
Club, 1, 2, 3; Junior Council. 

Robert L. Ricshy, Washington, 1). C. 
IIK'I', <l>lir. IINIK 
.\ssistant Bo.xinj; Manaj,'cr, 1, 2; (.'dluinhia 
Literary Society, 1. 

James E. Rink. W'inston-Saleni. \. C. 
A*.\ 
Baseball, 1, 2; Ministerial Association; 
Student \(ilunteer; ^ . .\I.C. .A. Cabinet, .1. 

Jane de !•". Ritter, Collingswood, N. |. 
KKP 
I'oruni Club; French Club; Distaff: WOm- 
an"s College Orchestra, 1, 2. 

Katiillln Roberson, Durham, \. C. 
KKI" 
Junior Bijj Sisters, President, }. 

Geori;e Berry Roberts, Krankfori. 1\\ . 
ATA 
Glee Club, 1; l'ni\ersit\- Choir, 1; Chant- 
icleer, 1. 

Maur.\ce K. Roeblck, Hot Springs, .\rk. 
riMK 
Band, 1, 2, 3; American Institute of Klec- 
trical F.ngineers. 

Sam Ro(;ol, W'illiston. S. C. 

i'.hrnniflt'. 1, 2, 3. 

Mor<;an D. Rosser, Berwick, Pa. 

\\ n.LiAM D. RoisE, W'illiamsport, Pa. 
Ai;-I>. A*.\ 
Junior Pan-Hellenic Council, 3; vVssistant 
Manager Swimming: Cilee Club: Chroniclf: 
Beta Omega Sigma. 

F.LLisoN .\. Ri by, Jenkintown, Pa. 
lAK 

Carl Riff, W'oodmcre, \. \. 

Keys Club 
Bo.xing, 1, 2, 3; Junior Cf)uncil, Secretar)'; 
Beta Omega Sigma: X'arsity Club. 

Ja.mes W'n.BtR Sachs. Hancock, .\ld. 

C. T. St. Clair, [r., Pun.\sutawrR'\ , Pa. 
lA.<l'lfl, KAII 
French Club. 

James E. Sapi>, Jr.. .\lbanv, Ga. 
" Al'l«, <1>H1' 
^. M. C. A. Cabinet, 2, 3; Freshman 
Friendship Council. 













il 



y 



D f^ Ta 



•^dlk^M 




115 I 




IP> f^ f^\ 





Joe Scales, Monroe. X. C. 
Football. 1. 

1'ail .ScuANHER, Jr.. Mouiit Clemens. Mich. 

Chronicle. 1. 2, 3. 

JcsEPH ScHiEFERLY, Jr., Bloomfield. N. J. 

Assistant Manager Cross-Country, 1, 2, 3; 
Assistant Manager Track, 1, 2, 3; Class 
Secretary, 3. 

RuT» Louise Schiller, St. Petersburg. Fla. 

Lena Sear, Hampton, \'a. 
A<1).\, KAn 
Freshman Honors; Sophomore Honors. 

Harry \\ . Sever.4nce, Lake Citv, S. C. 
AS<I> 
Baseball, 1; Glee Club, L 2; Columbia 
Literary Societ}', L 2. 

NLariax Shephardson, Asheville. X. C. 

Elizabeth Sherron, Durham, X. C. 

Town Girls' Club; Duke Players, 1, 2, 3. 

William C. Siceloff, High Point, X. C. 

Junior Pan-Hellenic Council, 3; Trident 
Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 2, 3; Freshman 
Friendship Council. 

Je.anette Sidenberg, Richmond, \ a. 
Sorority Pan-Hellenic Council, 2. 

Edwin W . Smith, Xorwav, Me. 
i:A 

Fred George Smith, Xew York, X. Y. 
A TA, .\K4* 
Baseball, L 2; Junior Pan-Hellenic Coun- 
cil, 3; Chronicle. L 2, 3; Beta Omega 
Sigma. 

I'kisiilla Smiiii. C.itnnsvillc, \Id. 
11B<1> 
Raruliilph-Macon Woman"s College, L 2; 
^ . W. C. A. Cabinet, 3. 

Rkiiard Austin Smith, \\'ashington. D. C. 

Archive. 1, 2. 3. F.diinr. 3; Publications 
Board, 3. 

\'i\i\N' L SMirn, Red Lion, I'a. 
KA 

lli:i.i:\ Snooks. Ailey, (>a. 

l.i:\in<\ C. SxvDi.K, Rii.lgeheld P.irk, N. |. 
ZIA, A<1)A 
Duke Players, 1, 2, 3. 

\iM N I'.. Si'AXLEY, (jrecnsboro, N. C. 
Keys Club 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Svinphoin' Orchestra, L 2, 
3; (]icc Club, L 2, 3; llniversity Choir, 2, 
3: Wrestling, 1; .Musical Club. 



I \\h 



DoNAi.n A. Stewart, Klizabcili, .\. |. 
ChronicU. 1, 2, ,v 

John 11. Stu.i.man, Trov, .\. \ . 
lM>i;, ARM- 
ChronicU: Swiinniiiij;. 

Ci.iKTox J. Stonebi!Rner, Rossi) 11, V'a. 
Track, 1, 2, 3; P'ootball, 1; American Soci- 
ct\ iif Ci\ il Knv'iiicers. 

Ha\\ki) 11. Storm, Charlotte, N. C. 
I1K..\ 
Golf, 1, 2. 3; ^^ .\1. C. A. Cabinet, 2; 
Beta Omej;a Siiinia; Tombs; \arsity Club. 

Tki Ki.i \ ii:\K Strickland. Durham, N. C. 
IIB'I' 
Randolpli-.Macon Woman's College, 1, 2. 

Doris Surles, Dunn, N. C. 

Class Secretary, 3; Junior Council. 

Elmer Tarrai.l, Norfolk, \ a. 
IIKII 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Track, 1. 2. 3; Beta 
Omega Sigma; \ arsit\' Club. 

I*.tn\ ARl> C. Taylor. Dante. \ a. 

Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Chronicle. 

Herbert (mlfrey Taylor. O.xford. N. C. 

M.\RG.\RF.T Taylor, Dehuui, Fla. 
KA 

2. 

Rives Taylor, Elizabeth Cit\-, N. C. 

S.VRAii Tho.mpson, Shelb\-, X. C. 
R.VW ■ 
women's Student Council, Assistant 
Treasurer, 3; \. W'. C. A. Cabinet, 3; 
Chronicle, 2, 3. 

W I LLL\M Thompson, Jr., New Bedford, Mass. 

Joe E. TimberlaivE, Columbia, S. C. 
riK<l> 



Hazel Tipping, Mandarin, Fla. 
Duke Players. 

Eleanor Tompkins, White Plains, N. V. 
KAe 
Class President, 3; Women's Student 
Council, 3; Junior Council; Social Stand- 
ards Committee, 3; Chronicle, 2, 3; Glee 
Club. 1. 2; Duke Players, 1, 2, 3. 

Rose Toney', Morristown, Tenn. 
KKP 
Ward-Belmont College, 1, 2; .-/rchive, 3; 
Distaff, 3. 



Joe C. Trent, Okmulgee, Okla. 
Chronicle, 1, 2. 




[117J 






.r-. A 9 




C5% «? 



V 




Jane Triplp:tt, I^inc Bluff, Ark. 
ZlA 

Junior Council. 

Tkixh-; Texnis, Norfolk, \'a. 

zr.\ 

Chanticleer, 1, 2; Junior Hii; Sisters, 
\ ice President, .v 

S, (Iw AiiiMEY TvLER, Roanoke, \ a. 

'1'rii.lent Club. 

Carlos !•'. \ ales, .Meridi, Yucatan, Mexico 
IIK'I' 
l:>cta ()mcj,'a Siijnia. 

M-\l I'LOURNOV \ AN DkREN 

Cxnthiana, K\-. 
KKl' 
Ward-Belmont College, 1, 2; Jrchivt-, 3; 
Distaff, 3. 

lot; M. \ AMioY, Charlotte, N. C. 

nK.'i>, <i>Hi: 

Freshman Honors; Manager Swimming, 
3; Iota Gamma Pi. 

Jackson \ iol. South Orange, X. }. 
i-WK, -I'Hi:, AK'l- 
Track, 1, 2, 3; Freshman Honors; So]ih- 
omore Honors; Beta Omega Sigma. 

Robert Clark W ade, F>ast Orange, X. J. 
I'A, <MIi: 

r>. A. \\ a<;ner, Xew O.xford, Pa. 
Kevs Chib, 4>h:l: 
Boxing, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1; Wrestling, 1; 
Class Secretar\', 2; Student Council, 3;Tri- 
dent Club, Secretary, 3. 

Bin C. W a(;ner, Hano\er, Pa. 

I'vRt's 1r\in \\ Ai.NKR. West Fair\ie\\, Pa. 
:;:<I'K 
Football, 1; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Student 
Council, 3; Beta Omega Sigma. 

W II, LI \M T. W Ai.Kt.R, .Moorestow n, \. J. 
Kcvs Chib 
ISand, 1, 2, 3. 

CiixRi.is 11. W Ai.Mi. |k., Burliiiuioji, Iowa 
ATA 

l)oRoiii> W Ai.rox, laiksom ille. I'la. 
AAII 
Cij \\iici,i;i:R, 3. 

(ii:oR<;i; \\ . \\ \ki), Bradt'iiloii, l'"la. 
lAh, 

(Iloroe I'. \\ \ikiNS, Xew Rochrlle. X. ^ . 

lunior I'an-I lellenic Council, 3; Junior 
Council. 



ll\KKii:r W \\, ()rangeburg, S. C. 

Bi;njamin liuRtii W'ekms, W'onson, Korea 
'I'rack, 1, 2, 3; Cross-Count rv, 2, 3; filee 
Club, 1, 2, 3; l!,ind. I; ^'. \1. C. A. 
Cabinet, 2. 



[118] 



Jack \\ i;iMii;iMLK, Sea BriKlit, N. J. 

Earle J. W'kntz, Sclioolticlil, \'a. 
I'N 
Football, 1,2,.?; Baseball, 1.2; 'riMck. 1: 
House of Representatives, 1; Beta ()me>;a 
Sigma; Tombs; \ arsiiy Club. 

Walter B. West, [r., .Mbemarle, N. (.". 

Glee Club. 1. 2. ,?; Columbia l,itcrar> 
Sociel)'; Stuileiu Council, 3; W restliiii:, .i; 

CllANTICI.EKR, .V 

l5\Rr \\ iini . MurlVeesliorn. 'I'cnii. 
K A 

Ktiiel I.OLISE WlliTi:, B;illinuire, .\K1. 
KAH 
Di. fluff: C.h runic It': Junior Council. 

.^1\K^ .\ Asii \\ iiiTE, Atlanta, Cja. 
Zl'\ 
Sororit) I'an-I Icllcnic Cnuncil, .i; Social 
Standards Conimitice, .i; Sandals; Wo- 
men's Student Council, I. 

{•'..Mil.Y W ii.ioRi), Ma\ticki, 1n.\ . 
A I'. 
Georgetown College, I; Shorter Ccillcge, 
2; Sororit>' Pan-Hellenic Council. }. 

C. A. Wll.i.lAMs, MiirKantield. Rw 
IIKA 
Football. 1. 2. 

Georce W 11. mams. Petersburg. \ a. 
III'II 

J.\NE \\ ii.l.i.VMS. St. Paul, .Minn. 
K.\(-) 

.M.\RTi.\ B. \\ ii.i.i.wis, Richmond, \'a. 
W^, 'Mil, A'I'A 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Cii.\ntici.eer, 1, 2, .\s- 
sistant Kdiior, 3; Polit\' Club; Junior 
Council; House of Representatives, 3; 
Track 3. 

Fdwix Sherwood Wilson, Roscland. \ a. 
lAti 

Baseball, 1; .Assistant .Manager Football, 
1, 2. 3; Glee Club, 1, 2. 

Lii..\ \\c).MULE, Winston-Salcm, .\. C. 
AAII 
Salem College, 1, 2. 

.Marve Prick WOodroi;, .NDrfolk. \ a. 

zi-.\ 

Duke Players. 
George F. WooDRtFK, Orange, Conn. 
H.\RRY B. WRKiHT, [r., Preston, .Md. 

'I'rident Club. 

.Maky F.i.iz.vbetii \'arhroi'(;ii 
Durham, X. C. 
KA 
Town Girls" Club. 

Charles H. Voung, Raleigh, N. C. 
<i>Hi; 

GoRMAX \'ouxG, New ^'ork. N. V. 

Swimming. 
Charles W. Zehxder, Jr., Bellevue. Pa. 

Beta Omega Sigma. 



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1119] 




SOPHOMORES 



^^ ^m M^L, >I^ ^^r >^ Charles W. Ackley, \inclaiul, N. J. 



Edwin B. Abbott, Birmingham, Ala. 
ATQ 

Inez, Abernethy, Durham, N. C. 
AAA 

Henry Ackerman, Ridgcwood, N. J. 
nME 



C\, O.. Cs ty 






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James E. Albritton, Hopkiiis\ille, Kv. 
nKA 

Calhoun Ancrum, Jr., Quant ico, Va. 
Keys Club 

Ida Shaw Applewhite, Halifax, N. C. 

Joseph AI. Arnold, Jr., (ilen Rock, N. J. 

David Hayden Arp, Ellija\', Ga. 

Charles L. Atherton, Pcekskill, X. |. 

Martha Bailey, Thomasville, Ga. 
AAn 

Ch.\s. p. Ballenger, Jr., Greenville, S. C. 
KA 

Ernest Barnham, Jr., Newark, N. J. 

Eleanor A. Barrett, Stamford, Conn. 
KA0 

Othmar Bart, East Orange, N. J. 

Irving W. Bearse, Hyannis, Mass. 
<l>Hi; 

Margaret Becker, Upper Darb\', Pa. 
ZTA 

Holmes Bell, Dillon, S. C. 
AS* 



'V ^Wi^ Henry S. Bender, Philadelphia, Pa. 



€\ 



/ ' / V ft ^^ ^^HsHi^B George F. Beneke, Wheeliiit;, W. \'a. 

^^^^^^■^■^ AXA 

Robert Benner, Bronxville, N. Y. 

Ki: 

I-'.. B. Bernstein, Burlington, .\. C. 
AIIl 

Jess I^ernstkin, l>a\iinn(.', W |. 
J. R. l)l.\(.K, IjanilHTLT, S. C. 
Constance ISlackwood, (jreonshoro, N. C. 



f"! 



W- I w *' I"",DWARi) II. ISradley, TauniiMi, Mass. 



I'RIU) E. Brat/.kl, IIa\ana, Cuba 

Am Rill II. r>K\i I K, W'ashinglcm, 1). C. 

C II i.kiii:ri' I')Ri; ri'ii.i., Mrlnisc, .Mass. 

(.iikisiiAN S. Urikl, )k., Sutuiii, Mass. 
A.\A 

Sak\ IJrinn, Hertford, N. C\ 

|. R. Brooks, Jr., Richmond, Va. 

\\ iLLiAM Brumbacii, Bcllcville, N. J. 
A'l'A 

Eleanor 1?riiton, Candor, \'. C. 
KA 

W. I>. I'.in.h, |r., Durham, N. C. 
Kr 

Kathlyn BuiCE, Charlotte, N. C. 

AAn 



122 ] 



Myrcelle I'"i.r/..\BET» Bu.NN, Zcbulon, N. C. 

Jean M. Bird, IVttsville. Pa. 

Albert Lee Biriukii, Ik., 'I'ix;irk;tiKi, Ti-x. 

Robert Bir(;e, |r., \\'csttii-kl, N. |. 
\K'|- 

\\ll.ll\M 1). llVRNE. XfW RdcIr'Hi', N. \. 

Ai (."aim , HiirliiiKioii, X. C. 
IIK'I' 

1'"ri;i) C'adv, Syracuse, N. Y. 

Dorothy Cai.dwei.i., Mansficiti, Ohio 
ZT.\ 

Ross Cameron, Risinj; Sun, MJ. 
I'X 

Frances Lowe Carlton, Durham, N. C. 

Kli/.abetii Carr, (ircciu illo. \. C. 
AAII 

Lawreni i; Carlso, Brooklyn, X. Y. 
|oiiN \\ . Carver, I^r<>okl\n, N. Y. 

Mary Ann Cates, Xew York, X. \. 

Iames R. Cii andlee, (laithcrsburg, Md. 
Kl 

I'ratt Cheek, Gainesville, Ga. 

Clyde M. Clapp, Baltimore, Md. 
IIKA 

Theron Cleveland, Jr., Greenville, S. C. 
nK* 

Reynolds Combs, Durham, N. C. 

Eleanor Congdon, Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Howard S. Congdon, Providence, R. I. 

R. J. Conradi, Irvington. X. f. 

Low ari) W. Cooey, Wheeling, W. \'a. 
AX^\, <Mli: 

CJerai.d R. Cooper, Durham, .X. C. 

Irene Cordray, Point Marion, Pa. 

L Boyce Covington, Jr.. \\'adesboro, N. C. 
ATA 

W iLLiAM CJ. Cr.xwkord, Dciroii, Mich. 

iw, arm- 
Rose Crosby, Citra, Fla. 
ZlA 

Krnest Cruikshank, Raleigh, .X. C. 

xra, 'I'Hi' 

John C. Cl.m-mings, Detroit, .Midi. 

NLvrgaret Cuxinggim, Nashville, Tcnn. 
K.\e 

W . K. Cunningham, Jr., Richmond, \ a. 

C. (). Dailey, Sussex, X. J. 

James Daniel, Columbia, S. C. 
riK* 

LoRA Frances Davis, Quincy, Fla. 

.\lex. D. Deemer H, Saranac Lake, X. Y. 
2X 




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123] 




J««t«r. I--*''"' 






A fl". -fl C 

ftp P p 




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^i.^ 



E. David Dodd, Avden, N. C. 
■ SX 

R. K. Dodd, Alk-ntovvn, Pa. 
AXA 

C). Lawrence Dortch, Jr., Columbia, Tenn. 
A'lQ 

Dorothy Dosch, Somerset, Pa. 

S. Barkley Douglass, Ambler, Pa. 

Josephine Eaby, Lancaster, Pa. 
UK 

Charles C. Eberly, Jr., Chester, Pa. 
SAQ 

f. Arnold Edmunds, Youngstown, Ohio 

nEn 

Jessie E. Edwards, Kingston, N. C. 

MALCOLM Edw.-vrds, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Eliene Sidney Ev.'VNS, Morehead, Ky. 

Wilson C. Everhart, Lemoyne, Pa. 
<i>A0 

George Bain Everitt, Winnetka, 111. 
ATA 

Julian J. Ewell, \\'ashington. D. C. 
<I>A(-), 'I'Hr 

George R. Failini;, Luke, Md. 

Ellen Farnum, Ashevillc, X. C. 
AK 

Robert E. Farrell, Boston, Mass. 

Frances Farthing, Raleigh, N. C. 

Claude D. Fisher, Oneonta, N. Y. 

Betty Flowers, San .Antonio, Tex. 

RuBYE FoGEL, Georgetown, S. C. 
NB<I> 

W. FL Fugleman, Jr., Portsmouth, Ohio 

Blades Foreman, Elizabeth Citv, N. C. 
.VIQ 

Russell Forrest, Bloomfiekl, X.J. 
i:A 

Elinor Fountain, Easton, Md. 
AAA 

M \R(;.\rkt I'RANCK, Durluini, X. C. 
KA 

l,i;\\is Flnkhouser, Hagerstown, .\ld. 

Dakwin C. (I.\i.i,i!i>, Pittstield, ALtss. 

Lawrence L. (jENT, Cold Springs, X. \. 
I'A, KK>r 

lluwAKi) R. Cjet/., Xazareth, Pa. 
lA 

11. C. (hllii:s, Jr., .Mclrc^st-, Mass. 
AX'I" 

Stei'IIKn .\i<\(im> ( Ji NX, Ro\-ston, Ga. 

C.VRoi.YN Li:iim,\nCk)ldber(;, l)urliam,X.C. 

|. Roland Goodi:, Jr., .Me.xandria, \ a. 
"lAI''. 



R. W. ( 



Xor\va\', Me. 



.Mary K.w Goodman, ;\shland, K\'. 
AAA 



124 



Hal Gordon, Brooklyn, X. \'. 

Page D. Gravett, Alton, \ ;i. 

Dorothy Gray, Summit, X. [. 
KKr 

Helen Gray, RUrcwooi,!, N. |. 
KA 

Johnnie Greene, Uurliani, X. C. 

James A. Griffin, Jr., Baltimore, MJ. 

RiciiARo P. Griffin, Swarthmore, Pa. 
AX.\ 

Dick A. Griffis, Lake Forest, 111. 
K2 

George Griscom, Trenton, X. J. 
KS 

.\1arv Rebecca Groves, Charleston, W. \"a. 

Jane Haislip, Lumberport, W . \ a. 
KAe 

Irwin Rkad Hale, Greenfield, Mass. 

iiEn, "I'm 

Betty Halsema, Baguio, Philippine, Is. 

H. Gr^vdy Hardin, Greensboro, X. C. 
I'X 

\ iRGiNiA Hardin, Upper .Montclair, X. }. 

KAe 

Marjorie Harper, Betiilehcm, Pa. 
KKr 

Mary Frances Harrill, Forest City, N. C. 

Henry L. Harris, Albemarle, X. C. 
nKA 

James M. Hatch, Charlotte, X. C. 

R. John Hathorn, Ballston, Spa, X. Y. 
S<I>E 

Jack Heitman, Wiimctte, 111. 
ATA 

E. Adrian He.mby, Rock\' Mount, X. C. 

nK<i> ■ 

Mary Ki.i.ioit Henderson, Hickorv, X. C. 
AAII 

James E. Henry, Nazareth, Pa. 

Thomas W. Herb, W'vomissing, Pa. 
Ai;<I>,'<I>Hi; 

C. Xash Herndon, Greensboro, X. C. 
ATA 

Joseph S. Hiatt, Gastonia, X. C. 
AS* 

R. Allan Hibbard, Clearwater, Fla. 

Jack Hicks, Kenilworth, ill. 
<i>Ae 

Vincent Hippolitus, New Haven, Conn. 

nEn 

John Holco.mb, Memphis, Tenn. 

William L. Holler, Columbia, S. C. 

William C. Holman, Albanv, Ga. 
ATQ 

Mlrr.\y Hoxevcutt, Lexington, X. C. 

John H. Hood, Charlotte, X. C. 

Richard E. Horton, Peekskill. X. Y. 
nK* 











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125] 





O <1 ■'^. 

m :^ m 

p\.- f^. .p). 

.4 a. fb n 








Edward T. Howard, Lexington, Mass. 
\\'. L. HuiSKAMP, Keokuk, Iowa. 

Porter B. Huling, Willianisport, Pa. 

.\my Hull, Harrisburg, Pa. 

John W. Hulme, Jackson Heights, N. Y. 
i;<I>E 

\'iRGiNL\ .\nne Imlay, Clie\\" Cliase, Md. 

Adelyn Ingram, Mt. Gilead, X. C. 

Mary Frances Ivey, Durham, N. C. 
nB<I> 

Hortense Jacobus, Caldwell, X. J. 

George Arthur Johnson, Baltimore, Md. 

Rolf E. Johnson, Harrisburg, Pa. 
AXA 

\ irginl\ Johnson, Lexington, X. C. 

Alice V. Jones, Petersburg, Va. 
ZT.\ 

Sally B. Jordan, Kinston, X. C. 

Sara Louise Jordan, York, Pa. 
KA 

Frederic Keator, Wayne, Pa. 
SX 

Gilbert L. Keith, Wilmette, III. 
<I)A0 

Fred X. Kellmeyer, Wheeling, \\ . \ a. 
AXA 

Claire Kennedy, Big Stone Gap, Va. 

Robert J. Kennedy, Hollis, L. I., X. Y. 

Bela G. Kerekes, Jackson Hgts., L.I., X.Y. 

Harold B. Kernodle, Elon College, X. C. 

Roy C. Kim.merle, Buffalo, X. \'. 
nK<J> 

Pmi.ii' Kirki.and, Durham, X. C. 
i:rA 

KoBKRT .\I. KLEINrELIlK, IllWndd, X. Y. 

IIKII 

W n.LL\M X. Klove, Oak Park, 111. 
2AK 

.'\l, KoNOPKA, Camden, X. I. 
IIK'I' 

DoNM.i) Kr\mi.r, Reading, Vi\. 
Ai;-l> 

I, I. (I'll) l\K\i'sn\\R, kdcheslcr, \. ^. 
1IK<1' 

Cii\ri.i:s Ki'N'KLi;, Ik.. Idhnslnw n, Pa. 

R.w.MoNU W . l.AiRD, Guliporl, .\li,<s. 
i:AE 

A. Carl I.r.r.. Charlotte, X. C. 
Alii 

Charles L. Lemi'i;rlv, l.akeudoj, Ohio 

ilr.i.KX l.iKn, I'.lizabeih, N. |. 
AA.i 

\\ \iri K l.iNDHi:, .\lontclair, X. f. 
Al'I- 

.\1 \R\ I'kancks Linnev, iioone, \. C. 
AAII 



\2h 



John Francis I.irrLi:, Washington, Pa. 

Gretciien Little, Iligli Hriilgc, N. J. 

Robert A. Little, Lincolntoii, N. C 

Robert S. Long, KrankforJ, Del. 
IN 

.1. R. l.owE, Elt>n College, N. C. 

Paul W. Lucas, Durham, N. C. 

William O. Luly, \'ero Reach, l"la. 
nK* 

John R. McCi.ain, Philadelphia, Pa. 

.Marian McClenauhan, Raleigh, X. C. 
KKF 

Adele McCraney, ^'oiikers, \. Y. 
AE 

John Rai'mond McCrary, Lexington, X. C 
ATLl 

C. McGillicuddy, [r., Pliiladelphia, Pa. 
"'^Ae 

Myles Francis McGrail, Brookline, Mass. 

:s>i>E 

\l. G. H. McPharlin, Belmont, Mass. 
B0n 

W. Bion AIcWhirter, Charlotte, X. C. 

.\lan M. MacQuarrie, Montclair, N. J. 
AS* 

Paul .\Laness, Snow Hill, N. C. 
Hazel .\Langum, Rougemont, N. C. 
John K. Mann, Greenwood, Miss. 

Oliver DeWitt ALann H, Whitakers, X. C. 
.\XA 

Sarah Markiia.m, Duriiam, X. C. 

Herbert \L\son, Durham, X. C. 

George M. \L\thues, Media, Pa. 
K2 

Rachel Meetze, Charlotte, X. C. 
AE 

Robert Meiklejohn, Westfield, X. J. 

Robert C. Mervine, East Orange, X. J. 
AS* 

James B. Messick, Smvrna, Del. 
S*E 

I.Ki.AND E. Metcalf, Plainfield, X. J. 
AXA 

Robert Plato NFiller. Lincolnton, X. C. 
l.\, KK'P 

S. R. Mills, Sussex, X. J. 

James T. Morris, Jr.. \\ hitc Plains, X. Y. 

Robert Moon Morris, Philadelphia, Pa. 

John S. Moore, Clarksburg, W. \'a. 

::x 

Margaret \\ . .Moore, Clarendon, \ a. 
AAA 

George Morelock, Xashvillc, Tenn. 
KS 

Lm.\iy Lou Morton, Charleston, W. Va. 
ZTA 



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R. F. MosER, Zebulon, X. C. 
|()iix K. Moss. Mobile, Ala. 

EuGEXE H. -MossBURG, Chevv Chase. AKl. 

nKA 

Thom.as Jones Murray, Philadelphia, Pa. 

nEn 

Ele.vnor Mvers. Bvhalia, Aliss. 
AAA 

P. E. N.-VKTENis, Hartford, Conn. 
Ai:*, <t>H2 

George Nance, Asheville, X. C. 

Leonard Nanzett.^, New York, X. "\ . 

Malcolm Xewbold, Manhasset, X. Y. 

Glenn C. Newman, Clinton, N. C. 

Annie Laurie Newsom, Durham, X. C. 
AAn 

Dorothy Noble, Glen Rock, X. L 

Herbert S. Xusbaum, Clarksburg, \\'. \'a. 
.^ns, <I>Hi; 

Harry C. Xyce, Chester, Pa. 
ATA 

Jean W. Ogburn, Dover, Del. 

E. J. Oliver, Jr., Savannah, Ga. 

James W. Ouzts, Marion, N. C. 
.\TQ 

Hugh Page, Jr., Clavton, N. C. 
Ai;* 

Jack Ward Page, Rowland, N. C. 

Frances Paist, W'avne, Pa. 
ZT.\ 

JACK Paist, Upper Darb\-, Pa. 

1^L^L\ Pamplin, Rcidsx ille, X. C. 
JOHN R. Pankey, Bluefield, W. \'a. 

iM.r/.ABRTii |ane Parks, Kew-Gardens, X.^', 
RKP 

ni;i,i:N Parsons, Altoona, Pa. 
KKF 

Thomas C. Parsons, .'Mtdmia, Pa. 
IW 

Constance Patten, Favetlex ille, N. C. 

raw' 

Ruth Patterson, Durham, X. C. 

Erne.stine Paul, Col mar. Pa. 

\\ ALri.K p. PwNi:, .Millnrti, Cmin. 

Xell Peake, Xorfolk, \'a. 
/;iA 

R. 1,. Peck, Binj;hamton, X. ^'. 

Keys Club 

Ckcu. .\1. I'l.i.iv, West Palm Beach, Fla. 
<I'l 11' 

Makii; Pim.crim, ChimI Cables, Fla. 
K k r 

Ci.ii iciKi) l'l;l(l<^, W iiislcui-Salem, X. C. 

•I'AH 

Ri III Pun. MI'S. \\ lieelinu. \N . \ a. 
KK.I' 



128] 



Richard Ci.ay Pii'iiR, Ridgcwood, \. J. 
AX A 

In. IN II. I'l.iMl-. Pearl River, \. ^^ 
A lA, A«I>A 

.\Ii;r\ Pi.yler, Durham, X. C. 
KA 



i I AKRiK'ni: Pui.LAKn, Washingtun, D. C. ^^| ^^^B^^l ^ ^^^^H ^^^^^ll '^ 

E. Lindsay Potter, jr., W ilmingtoii, N. C". 



Q f^' P ^ 





Joseph G. Powell, Moorestown, N. J. 
AXA 

RuFUS II. Powell, Diirhaiii, N. C. 
Ai:<l' 

-\l.AN C. PlRYE.VR, W'asllillgtdM, 1). C 

i;AE 

Katiiryn Qlee.n, Waynesville, N. C. 

R.wsox P. Rathbl'x, South Orange, N. |. 
lA 

WiLLi.vM !•'. Rk.wis, |r., \\ avcross, Ga. 

a>A«-) 

LofisE Relye.\, Newark, X. J. 

Louise Remoxt, Movlan-Rose \'allev. Pa. 
Zt.\ 

Mary- Alice Rhodes, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
KAB 

DouGL.vs Rich.\rdsox, Ashland, Kv. 
nKA 

\\'iLLi.\M P. Ricks, Rockv Mount, X. C. 
<I'Ae ' 

Ralph Leon Rockeit, Gastonia, X. C. 
AS* 

Marion Roe, Clermont, Fla. S^ =« ^ 

AE 

loiiN S. Ross, Queens Village, X. Y. 
lA 

Harry- Roush, Winston-Salem, X. C. 

Margaret Rudisill, Cherr\ ville, X. C. 
KA 

W. II. Rue, Brvn Mawr, Pa. 
I'X 

K. I. Runner 1 1, Wheeling, W. Va. 
.\XA 

Robert H. Rushmer, Johnson City, X. Y. 

XoRM.\ Jane Russell, Hamden, Conn. 

Phillip M. Russell, Durham, X. C. 
KA 

William A. Sager, Hagerstown, Md. 
S<l>E 

Frank G. Satterfield. Durham, X. C. 
nK<I' 

Joseph Scelza, Elmont, X. Y. 

Daniel Birch Sciiafer. I'ort Wavne, Ind. 
*AH 

Herbert T. Schminke, Glen Rock, X. J. 

Carl Schneeweiss, Clifton, X. J. 

Emil Schuerman, Leonardo, .\. J. 

Harry C. Schuhr, Buffalo, N. V. 
HK* 

Fr.vnk T. Scott, Live Oak, Fla. 'F- ^ •— - .' ", ^ ^*^ 

nKA \ . ^ ^^ . - . 

Mary Carolyn Seed, L'pper Montclair, X. J. 
KAe 




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129 




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Garfiki.d Shafer, Norfolk, Va. 
KS 

O'Neal Shanks, Dothan, Ala. 
KA 

John J. Siiortki.i,, Hartford, Conn. 

IsoBEL SiiRiXKR, York, Pa. 
AAA 

Eleanor L. Silleck, Peekskill, N. Y. 

Pattie Sills, Nashville, N. C. 
AAA 

Paul Simpson, Glen Rock, N. J. 

C. T. Sinclair, Jr., Carthage, N. C. 

Rachael Sink, Lexington, N. C. 

Frank Sizemore, High Point, N. C. 
4>A0 

Elizabeth Slocomb, Winthrop, Mass. 
ZTA 

Caleb V. Smith, Jr., Rockville Centre, N.Y. 

2A 

William T. Smithde.a.l, Jr., Richmond, Va. 
AS*' 

Gladys Estelle Souder, Alacon, Ga. 

AAA 

John Stanbury, Greensboro, N. C. 
ATQ, nME 

Edgar Robert Stallings, Augusta, Ga. 

Oscar Grant Stallings, Augusta, Ga. 

Berkley Stephens, Semora, N. C. 

Eleanor D. Stevenson, New Bern, N. C. 
ZTA 

Jess Stigler, Greenwood, Miss. 
SX 

Harris Robert Stone, \\'ilmington, N. C. 

Ted L. Stritzinger, Norristown, Pa. 
AS* 

George M. Stroi d, Chester, Pa. 
ATA 

Ernest C. Swigkr, Clarksburg, W. Vd. 

Horace E. Tahu, h'.lizabcthtown, Kv. 

SN 

Florence Taylor, Ashland, Pa. 

lii;NRV 1,. T\>i.()R, Slatesboro, Ga. 

Rov Z. Thomas, Rock Hill, S. C. 
S'I'I': 

J. .\. '{"kai.nor, High Bridge, N. J. 
<MIS 

1)1 1 I. A. 'I'rakas, Cuistonia, N. C. 

Sam a. Trakas, Gastonia, N. C. 

Alhro S. Travks, Brewster, N. ^'. 
DA 

KA'rninuNi: Tkofsdai.e, l'"lorence, Ala. 
SK 

Wii.i.iwi W. 'I'uRNKR, |r., Moiilclair, \. J. 

Ai''i> 

\\ . I \Mi,s 'i'lRprr, Hastings, Neb. 

Robert V^\nn, Waycross, Ga. 
nK<I> 



1.K) 



Martha \'an \'actor, Marion, Inci. 

Cari. Xaicun, Park R'tdac 111. 
•I' AH 

William 1.. \ inninc, (In-ciisburi', N. C". 
I'X 

Jane \'onokrlii;th, C^lcii Rock, X. ). 

I-EROY L. Walker, Jr., PliilaLlclpliia, Pa. 

Jean'Wallai'er, \^'hite Plains, N. V. 
KAH 

Robert K. \\'alsii, Mlniira. N. Y. 

Charles R. W.\rren, Chatham, Va. 

MiciiAix Watkixs, Midlothian, \'a. 
KAe 

Virginia \\ atkixs, Midlothian, \'a. 
AAA 

John C. W.atsox, Jr., Charlotte, \'. C. 
^K<^ 

Kenneth D. \\'eagly, Wa\ nesboro, Pa. 

Harmon M. Webb. Philadelphia, Pa. 
riK'l' 

John AI. Webb, Durham, X. C. 
ATQ 

Xathan I. Weinstein, St. Augustine, Fla. 

Walter H. Weintz, Austinville, \'a. 

Ida Welsh, Deal, X. Y. 

Carl R. Wesselhoft, Bavshore, N. Y. 
nK4> 

Charles S. Whitaker, Brooklvn, N. Y. 

Charles Edgar White, Hertford, N. C. 
AXA 

11. (i. WiiiriNi;, Mountain Lakes, X. J. 
AX^\ 

FRi'n .\. Wii.dxauer, East Orange, X. J. 
Keys Club, AKM" 

(JEORGE H. Williams, Baltimore, .\Id. 

A. Gray Wilson, Indiana, Pa. 

\ IRGINIA \\ iXFREE, Lviichburg, \'a. 

Ernest .\. Winton, Miami Beach, Fla. 
Keys Club 

Frances Wrsi.. Hillsdale, X. [. 
IIB'I- 

.SiDNh^ WOi.T/, \\ eehawkeri. X. I. 
AIll, 'Mil, KKT 

K. II. Wnoij, Xew Bern, X. C. 
AXA, 'Mli; 

\\ . E. Woodruff, W inston-Salem, X. C. 

<i>Ae 

Herbert M. Woolf, Providence. R. E 
Frank .\I. Woolsey, Hancock, X. \. 

Madge Woolsey, Glen Rock, X. J. 
ZTA 

Fred C. Wri(;ht, Jr., Hagerstown, Md. 
i;<Mi 

J. Malclom Wright. Westfield, X. J. 

Robert H. Wyatt, Gastonia, X. C. 

Edn.a Zimmerman, Welcome, X. C. 

Esther Zuckerman, Durham, N. C. 



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131 




FRESHMEN 












irj^^ f^^ 







Emily Abel, Scarsdale, \. Y. 
Bette Adams, \\'. Hartford, Conn. 
Dorothy Anna Adams, WIlkes-Barrc, P.i. 
Ellen O'Neal Adams. Macon, Ga. 
Randall B. Adams, Washington, D. C. 

Ruth Adams, Esterly, Pa. 
Willis Adams, Clarksville, \'a. 
Elizabeth Akin, S. Orange, X. J. 
John C. Alberts, Hoboken, N. J. 
Winifred Alcorn, Hershey, Pa. 

Faith Alexander, Miami, Fla. 
Wendell W. Alexander, Rosemont, Pa. 
\iviEN Edith Allen, Elmsford, N. Y. 
C. Clair Althoff, Hanover, Pa. 
Wayne H. Ambler, Abington, Pa. 

Robert R. Anders, Charlotte, N. C. 
Fred Andrus, Akron, Ohio 
Marie Anderson, Jacksonville, Fla. 
James Anderton, Oil City, Pa. 
Vernon Andrews, Mount Gilead, N. C. 

Joseph C. Antrim, W'orthlngton, Ohio 
Leonard A. Appel, Rutland, Vt. 
George B. Appleford, S. Lancaster, Mass. 
John C. Ardolina, Metuchen, N. J. 
Gary Armstrong, Selma, Ala. 

I, he Arnold, Chicago, 111. 
H. Nicholson Ashby, Durham, N. C. 
Marie Assenheimer, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Aihkkt (i. Atkins, Durham, N. C. 
James M. Atkins, Asheville, N. C. 

Jdiix \ . Atkinson, Pueblo, Colo. 
Sarah Atkinson, Doj'lestovvn, Pa. 
Abe Alterman, Atlanta, Ga. 
Mary Aim), Ciiarleston, W. \a. 
Ri(.ii\Ki) E. .Austin, Dclinar, N. Y. 

I'kEDERICK \. l>Ai;l)ER, .\uik> , X. J. 

Rkhard F. Baer, Reading, Pa. 

\1 \Ri w \ i?\GLEY, Norfolk, Va. 

C. R. Bailey HI, Rockvillc Centre, X. Y. 

C'li AKi.KS Baker, South Orange, N. J. 

Wiiiiwi P). P>\KKR. Aberdeen, Md. 
WiiJiwi R. r>sKi;K, Bnin.wille, X. Y. 
LvNWooi) l!\i,i)\\i\, Durham, X. C 
M \R<; \Ri:r l.ouisi. Baldwin, Durham, N.C. 
Carkoll CiiAinvicK Ballard, E.xmore, Va. 



lij'l J 



Horace Barber. Glens Falls, N. V. 
William Barber, Pliillipshurj;, \. J. 
Charles Pinkston, Ashcvillc, N. C 
(Jeorce W. Barley, l.ynbrook, N. ^ . 
JmiN Ik\i\i. Barms, jr., C"l;i\li>ii, \. (J. 

Charms A. ii arriti', (ilcn While, W . \ a. 
\\ ii.i.i AM R. Baskervill, W arroiilon. N. C. 
1)oii;las Basore, Kciiniorc, N. \'. 
I'lnr.AR R. Bassett. Scarsilale, N. Y. 
Paii.a Bassi it. New ^Ork, X. ^'. 

RoDERRK I'.. Bassett, l)aiiluir\. Ciniii. 
Alice Batemax, York, Pa. 
Robert Beax, Louisville, Ky. 
Francis Beard, Durham, X. C. 
George L. Beatty, Brooklyn, X. Y. 

Richard Beazley, South Orange, X. J. 
Sperring Beck, Beverl\-, X. J. 
Jean Beebe, Lewes, Del. 
Paul NL Beich, Bloomington, 111. 
Larry' G. Bell, Paris, Ky. 

Albert Edward Bennett, Brooklx n. .\. ^ . 
Floyd S. Bennett, Richmond, Va. 
Lois Berkey, Ridley Park, Pa. 
W. G. Birmingham, Jr., Liberty, X. Y. 
J.\mes E. Bishop, Greensboro, X. C. 

James A. Bistline, Cumberland, Md. 
George C. Blevins, Cenlrevillc, Md. 
Helmut Bode, Weehawken, X. J. 
Robert O. Boeker, Seymour, Conn. 
William .\. Boeppi.e, Xcw York, X. "\'. 

Wallace Bolland, Ridgewood, N. J. 
Arthur L. Bolton, Pelham, N. Y. 
Roger W. Bone, Xashville, N. C. 
John W. Books, Haddon Heights, X. J. 
Thomas Borland, Durham, X. C. 

Walton Bowen, .Macon, (la. 
Stanley F. Boyce, Baltimore, .\ld. 
Anna Boyd, Jacksonville, Fla. 
James C. Boyd, Huntington, W. Va. 
Jean Boyd, Belleville, III. 

Murphy R. Boyd, Duriiani, N. C. 
Kenneth Monroe Boyle. Arlington, X. J. 
E.ARL TiLTON Brach, Baltimore, .Md. 
D. Carroll Brown, .Anderson, S. C. 
Franklin Brown, Charlotte, X. C. 







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[135] 






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James Walter Brown, Gatesville, N. C. 
Jess Brundage, Upland, Pa. 
Jerome Brun'er, Forest Hills, \. Y. 
Elaine Buchanan, Peekskill, N. \. 
Robert E. Buck, Fort Washington, Pa. 

IjUcille Buehler, Cleveland, Ohio 
James Burd, Pottsville, Pa. 
Josephine Burger, Baltimore, Md. 
Woodrow Burgess, Royal Oak, Mich. 
George Allen Burwell, Warrenton, N. C. 

Wilsie Bussell, Durham, N. C. 
William Butler, Millersburg, Ky. 
Charles Bynum, Great Falls, S. C. 
Thomas Bynum, Great Falls, S. C. 
Chad. Callahan, Center Moriches, N. Y. 

Hannah Campbell, Sunburg, Pa. 
R. Campbell Garden, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Margaret H. Carrigan, Jersey City, N. J. 
Eleanor Carver, Easthampton, Mass. 
Paul Castor, Haddonfield, N. J. 

William Chalk, Morehead City, N. C. 
Annie Laura Chalker, Durham, N. C. 
John D. Champion, Fuquay Springs, N. C. 
.Mary Chapman, Durham, N. C. 
IIkrbert Cheek, Durham, N. C. 

Robert Chervanik, Shamokin, Pa. 
Frances Childs, Durham, N. C. 
Ashby a. Chouteau, Huntington, N. Y. 
Frederick Clark, Maplewood, N. J. 
Gwendolyn Clark, Berea, Ky. 

Ci.AiRK Clarke, New York, N. Y. 
.\rthur Thomas Clay, Ridgcwood, X. J. 
Charles S. Clay, Beckle\', W. \'a. 
I'ri:i)i:rick Cleaveland, Short Hills, N. J. 
( i\\i;M)()i,YN Ci.iNE, Haines Cit\-, Fla. 

Cm \ri.i:s COuh, ( ireeuv ille, .\. C. 
Thomas S. Coble, Durham, i\. C. 
(III. BERT F. Cohen, .Vtlanta, Ga. 
l)nKOTiiv Cole, Durham, N. C. 

I I \K(ii,i) Ri'.EVES Collins, S. Sea\ ille, N. J. 

\lbi;rt N. Condit, E. Orange, N. J. 
\rthur R. Cone, Buffalo, N. Y. 

I I \RRY Cane Conklin, Mansfield, Ohio 

\\ 1 1, MAM Conklin, Jr., West Ha\oii, Conn. 
KoBERT W. Connor, Utica, N. \. 



[136] 



Ai.ix \M)i:k CDpki.am), C'luirKitic, X. C. 
W Horace Corbett. Wilmington, N. C. 
\\ .\i>DELL A. CoRBKTr, Wilniiii^'ton, X. C 
Baros CoRNE'iT. Bluctiokl, \\ . \;i. 
I)n\\i.i) (."oRMsii, Xi-w Rdchi'lio, X. \. 

Dovc,L.\'> CoRRiiiKR, CiiarloHo, X. C 
Francis W. Corwin, Ck'ncva, X. ^ . 
Walter A. Cosr.Ro\E, Soutiianipton, \. ^ 
W'. Thomas Cottingham, Douj;las, C>a. 
Robert Los Coli.son, Hanover, Pa. 

Robert L. Cowan, Xowport. Tenn. 
Headi.ey M. Cox, Mount Olive, X. C. 
Isabel Crwen, Lexington, X. C. 
RwMoM) R. Crawford, Gerniantown. X.^ 
Esther Crosby, Citra, Fla. 

Guy Cross, Lynbrook, X. V. 
Richard W'. Cross, Upper Darb\ , Pa. 
Harold H. Cruger, Pecksvillc, X. Y. 
F'.milie Cru.m, Orangeburg, S. C. 
Martha Culbertson, Norwood, Ohio 



Richard S. Cutchix, W'hitakers, N. C. 
Rhea D.\na, Durham, X. C. 



Carroll Danforth, Swampscott, Mass. 
Robert Daniels, F.Iizabeth Cit\-, X. C. 
Frank W'. Dator, Mahwah, X. J. 
Dorothy Davis, V'anceboro, N. C. 
George Davis, McKeesport, Pa. 

William C. Davis, Collingswood, .X. J. 
Donna Day, Bradenton, Fla. 
Doris Day, Rradcnton, Fla. 
Kdna Decker, Haworth, X. J. 
Irving Dein, Atlantic City, X. j. 



f :-. p A C^** r> 

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W'inthroi' CfMMiNGS, L\nbrook, \. Y. ^^^^^ C ~^ 7 ^ r ^ ^ m 

Jack B. Cirry, -Atlanta, Ga. S«« ^ i^ t£ ' h*- r^ ^ I** **" P 

Pail M. Curtis, Greensboro, X. C. . . 4~ . V./ . ► 




ir-fv* 



M 



V 

w > 



Janet Deininger, Philadelphia, Pa. f '<^ f ^ T """^ "^*> 

\ ICTOR J. de Jolrno, .Mlentown, Pa. K? ^B^^ H""" ^' 

Allan Charles Deming, Huntington, .X. V 
Russell Deneen, Bakersville, X. C. 
Eugene Desvernine, Havana, Cuba 





Henry H. Dils, Parkersburg, W. \a. 
Xelson H. Drake, Stamford, Conn. 
C. H. Dressing, .\spinwall. Pa. 
Sara Duckett, Charlotte, X. C. 
William F. Dudley, \ineland, X. [. 






137 




"^ O f^ 








f^ o r^ '^') ^ 



















Elinor Dunham, Durham, N. C. 
William Blrwell Dunn, Durham, N. C. 
W. H. Dunn, Jr., Collingsworth, N. J. 
Robert F. Dunstan, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Flossie Dunton, Miami, Fla. 

Howard Eastwood, Jr., Burlington, N. J. 
Margery Edwards, Greensboro, N. C. 
Elizabeth Ellerson, Hot Springs, N. C. 
Margaret Ellis, Rutherford, N. J. 
Alfred T. England, Jr., Haddonficld, N. J. 

John G. Erixon, Jr., White Plains, X. \. 
Harry S. Etter, Shippensburg, Pa. 
Drew Evans, Jr., Morehead, Ky. 
James W. Everett, Mahanoy City, Pa. 
Helen Everett, Mahanoy Cit>-, Pa. 

Nathaniel Ewer, Svvarthmore, Pa. 
Helen Jane Ewing, West Grove, Pa. 
Richard F. Eager, Camp Hill, Pa. 
Ethel E. Faires, Dre.xel Hill, Pa. 
\\ iLLis G. Farmer, Bailey, N. C. 

Barbara Fawcett, Canton, Ohio 
G. \^'. Fennell, Jr., Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
Faustina Ferrante, Hackensack, N. J. 
Douglas W. Ferris, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Betty Findlay, Bethlehem, Pa. 

Monroe C. Fischer, Scranton, Pa. 
Walter L. Fischer, Elizabeth, N. J. 
John L. Fisher, Lakewood, Ohio 
William H. Fisher, Jr., Centreville, Md. 
Louise Fitzgerald, Erwin, N. C. 

RuHY Flanagan, I,\nchlnir,i,', \ a. 
Albert W. Fletcher, Scarsdalc, N. Y. 
Curtis Flowers, San .Xntonio, Tex. 
Kenneth Folsom, Washington, D. C. 
El.wooi) J. I''()Ri>. nctroit, Mich. 

CiiARij;s T. l'"oRi), .Mctlia, Pa. 

I'.Dw ARi) I'Orman, Tykens, Pa. 

.\t)R.\L\N W. Fort, Jr., Philadi-lphia, Pa. 

Nancy Fowler, Durham, N. C. 

i,\i avi:tti: P. Fox, I larrisburi;, i*a. 

1. 1. WIS i''(n , Johnsluu n. Pa. 

I\AN DeRoy Frantz, ClarkslnnK. \\ • \ a. 

|osi;i'M J. 1'"ret\\ ii.r. Ill, Miami Beach Fla. 

IIklkn Fridy, Ridle\ Park, Pa. 

Ik\in Friedlander, Miiuhric, Ga. 



138 



Ai.i RID I'l i.i.iiR, Hartford, Conn. 
Stephen Fuller, Chevy Chase, Md. 
William Fulmer, Savannali. Cla. 
Amy Cjamblk, McKeesporl, I'a. 
Hazel (Ian'it, Durham. N. C. 

Ui-WAINL I,. tJEU.NEV, S>racuse, .\. \ . 
Walter G. Gellert, Abington, Pa. 
A. JuDSON Georcje, I.aurcns, S. C. 
J. Joyce CJibbons. Jr., Wilson, N. C. 
Margaretta Gibbs, Wheeling, W. \'a. 

Gordon Gibson, Chatham, X. J. 
Charles Howard Gill, Newport, R. 1. 
Robert C. (Jillander, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Stuart CJillespie, Stamford, Conn. 
Willard Merritt (jIllies, Melrose, Mass. 

Richard Gilpin, Maplewood, N. J. 
H. Mel\in Gingrich, Pottsdown, Pa. 
Harold Ginsberg, Daytona Beach, Fla. 
Hazel Gladstein, Durham, \'. C. 
Marjorie Godd.vri), i5rookh n. X. V. 



Sa.muel Cjoldstein, Salcni, X. J. 
James X. Gorringe, East Orange, X. J. 
Seymor (jOstin, White Plains, X. Y. 
Marjorie Gould, Chatham, Pa. 
Robert Gourley, New York, X. ^ . 

Annadale Graeter, Richmond, \'a. 
James S. Granger, Buskirk, X. Y. 
C.VTHERiNE Gray, Cressona, Pa. 
Dolly Green, Pleasantville, Pa. 
Ernest L. Green, Jr., Media, Pa. 

\\.\rren T. Green, Louisville, K)'. 
Porter C. Greenwood, Wa\-nesville. X. C. 
RoLiK (jREGORV, Petersburg, \'a. 
Er.m.\ Griffith, Lebanon, \"a. 
Frederick L. Guerin, South Orange, X. J. 

RiSLEY Frith Haines, Bayamo, Cuba 
Amos H. Hall, Hollywood, Fla. 
Ch.vrles Edward Hall, Ashland, Ky. 
Ralph Hall, Drc.xcl Hill, Pa. 
Robert 1'. Hall, Charleston. \\ . \ a. 

Charles B. Hallock., .Xunda, X. '\'. 
Alan W. Ham, Jr., E. .Milton. .Mass 
John Hammer. Tampa, Fla. 
Xewton Hanes, Winston-Salem, X. C. 
P. HuBER Hanes, Winston-Salem, X. C. 





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Albert B. Happel, Blue Ridge Summit, Pa. 
James C. Hardin, Jr., Rock Hill, S. C. 
Paul Harmon, Charlotte, N. C. 
Sheldon Robert Harte, New York. X. Y. 
John P. Haske, Washington Grove, .\kl. 

William J. Healey, Jr., Bradford, Pa. 
Frank Heilman, Middlebranch, Ohio 
Gayle Hermann, Clexeland Heights, Ohio 
Nannie Mae Herndon, Durham, N. C. 
Albert Louis Herrick, Asheville, N. C. 

Mary L. Herrold, Durham. X. C. 
Elizabeth Hess, Dallas, Pa. 
D.vviD Alan Hill, Westiield, X. J. 
J.\MES Chapman Hilton, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Robert Hinck, Millburn. X. J. 

Dorothy Hindes, Mcrideu, Conn. 
\\illiam Hinnant, Raleigh, N. C. 
Richard Hintermeister, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Donald Vincent Hirst, Seoul, Korea 
John E. Hokeman, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Oscar Kyle Hogan, Montgomer\ , Ala. 
Ashley Hogewood, Charlotte, N. C. 
Jean Holliday, Staunton, \ a. 
Gilbert R. Hollinger, Jr., .Mobile, .Via. 
Howard Holt, Nashville, .'\rk. 

Edward Hooks, .'\yden, N. C. 
Ch.vrles E. Hooten, Bloomtield, N. J. 
Elizabeth Hooten, District Heights, Md. 
Addison ^\ . Hopper, Maplcwood, N. J. 
C.\LVERT Hopson, W a\nc. Pa. 

Grant Horneffek, Summit, X. J. 
Ruth Horton, .'\shland, Ky. 
WiLLi.\M Hoi'ciiiNS, Keystone, \\ . \ a. 
Robert G. I low vrd. Washinulon, 1). C. 
Richard Dian 11o\\i;i,l, Miama, I'la. 



DoKoriiv Hudson, Slamtord, Conn. 
|oiiN R. IIuey, West Chester, Pa. 
Ai.MA Hull, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Iames E. HuNEvcu'rr, Chaiidttt', .\. C. 
Robert Hunter, I.ansdmvne, Pa. 



liiiiN ilo\iA III KMU r, Oak Park, HI. 
XoRMAN llvMANS. Si. Paul, .Miiui. 
Marion Iehle. Moiil flair, X. J. 
I)\NIEL h;o, Wanainie, Pa. 
( iioROK DoRAN Ingram, Ervvin, Tenii, 



140 



Anne Izard, Durliam, N. L'. 
Frederick Jackson, Charlotte, X. C. 
Ai.BKRT C>. Jacobs, Pliiladclphia, Pa. 
.MaR(;arkt Jau-e, South Boston, \'a. 
Nelson Jaxtzen, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Freoerick U . Jasper, C^lcn Jean, W. \'a. 

Richard Jexki.nson, Bclleviie, Pa. 

W ii.i.iAM C\ Jennings, WestfielJ, \. J. 

Anx Jero.mk. Pine Level, X. C 

C. C. JoHXSox, Plymouth Meeting, Pa. 

Claude W. Johnson, Jr., Ft. Thomas, K\ . 
Maybelle Johnson, New York, N. Y. 
.Morris J. Johnson, Hammond, Ind. 
Roy R. Johnson, Jr., Upton, Mass. 
W'lLLiA.M Richard Johnson, Baltimore, .\Id. 

Betty .\nne Johnston, Doylesttnvn, Pa. 
Dan.v Johnston, Ulster, Pa. 
James H. Johnston, Riplej', Tenn. 
Frederick Johntz, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Chester G. Jones, Br\ n Maur, Pa. 

DuARD Jones, Elizabeth Cii\', .X. C. 
Hope Jones, Chilhowie, \'a. 
Jane Lee Jones, Belleville, 111. 
John Benjamin Jones, T\rone, Pa. 
\\ . .\IiRRAY Jones, Durham, N. C. 

Walter Jistin. Scranton, Pa. 
Robert Kamp, Ridley Park, Pa. 
Louis Kay, Watseka, III. 
Robert Kay, \\"ildwood, N. J. 
Dorothy Keene, .Miami, Fla. 

Mitchell Kellogg, New Canaan, Conn. 
Douclas Kennedy, Camden, S. C. 
Josephine Kessi.er, Warrington, Pa. 
Frederick Ketch am. Fish kill. X. V. 
Paul F. Ketchim. Washington, D. C. 



[ 



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Michael Kevolic, Coaldale, Pa. /^^^^k JH^** x 



CS ^ O C Ps 

IS © ID O O 



Ruth Kimberly, New Haven, Conn 
John C. King, Jr., Charleston, W. \a. 
R. W. KiNG.MAN, East Bridgewatcr, Mass. 
George Kirkland, Ik.. Durham. X. C. 









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Catherine Kirkpatrick, Salisbury, X. C. 

John D. Klack, Walker, N. V. 

James Edward Knapp, Irasburg, \ t. 

John A. Kneipp, Washington, D. C. ^f"* r _ .^ i f^ ^ "^ 

Estelle Knight. Durham, N. C. 



141] 




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John E. Koonce, Jr., Cliadbourn, N. C. 
Kenneth Korstian, Durham, N. C. 
Isabel Krampf, Allegheny, X. V. 
Clarence W. Kreider, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Morton D. Kritzer, BrookKn, N. Y. 

Kenneth W. Krum, Lynbrook, X. Y. 
Charlotte Kueffner, Durham, X. C. 
Harold Kuhn, Charleston, W. \ a. 
Archer E. Lackey, Christiansburg, \ a. 
Bess Laing, Charleston, \^^ \ a. 

James E. Lambeth, Jr., Thomas\ille, X. C. 
AvA Lance, Elon College, X. C. 
Eleanor Lane, Staten Island, X. Y. 
Robert Lapham, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Helen Larzelere, Jacksonville, Fla. 

Frederick L.vuther, Lebanon. Pa. 
Jennie Phipps Lawson, South Boston, \a. 
Dorothy Leach, New York, X. ^ . 
E. R. Lee, Jr., White Plains, N. Y. 
Joseph Leidy, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Roderic S. Leland, New Canaan, Conn. 
Robert E. Lengler, Scranton, Pa. 
Beth Lentz, Albemarle, N. C. 
Joseph P. Leonard, t'tica, X. Y. 
Dorothy Lewis, Little Rock, .Vrk. 

1'"rances Lewis, Xorfolk, \ a. 
\\ iLLiAM F. Lewis, Pro\idencc, R. 1. 
Robert F. Lexow, Brookhn, X. Y. 
Frank Lian.\, Brooklyn, X. \. 
.Mi;i,\i\ Lii.i.ER, Hershey, Pa. 

I1\i<rii;t Lins, W'esi i'alm Beach, Fla. 
J'.Li/.ABKTii LiiM'rrr, Coopcrstown, X. Y. 
Ernestine Littell, Cooperstown, N. Y. 
Harry B. Litterst, .Vrlington, X. J. 
C'\Koi. LrrTi.K, W'ashiiigiiiii, D. C. 

C. Crowell LriTLE, .\shi\ illc. X. C. 
RiTii Jean I.owery, .\lt. \ erium, X. ^ . 
Rohi:rt H. l.i'ii'. Philadelphia, Pa. 
l.AURA LuNsioRD, Durham, X. C. 
1m)(;ar W. McCallister, Edgewood, Pa. 

Ri-^s: 1 1. P. McCai.i.um, W. Ro.xboro, Mass. 
Ika.nk McCann, Petersburg, \'a. 
Rebecca Jane McCarrell, Harrisburg, Pa. 
l)(i\\M> I''. MtC'i.MX, Rnck\ille, Conn. 
|i:a.\ .McCowan, .\e\v ^ ork, X. Y. 



I 142 



JOSKI'II Ml. DkRMOIT, l'"l\-l-lliild. N. j. 

Brooks McKlwrath, Maytioki, K\ , 
Oscar L. McFadyen, I'':i>cttf\ illc, N. (.'. 
Allan R. McHenry, SaganKiri-, Pa. 
KvELYN MiI\ivRii, Crotoii, N. V. 

Sterling K. McKee. Bessemer, Pa. 
1)a\k B. .McKibben, Indianapolis, liul. 
CiERAli) T. Mc.Master. Balliniore, Mtl. 
J.S. .\lAtCMLi,i\ r AY, Port Wasliingtoii, N.^ 
John L. .\I ackw, .\1(iii1u'(iiiut\ , Ala. 

JosKl'tl R. Mackie, Pliiladelpliia. P.i. 
DoN.vLD W . MacMill.vn, Pro\ idence, R. I 
Doris MacNutt, Ridgefield Park, N. J. 
George Maier, Jr., Bridgeton, X. J. 
George M. Maltby, Ogdensburg, X. Y. 

Edward J. M.vnikoi.d, Jr.. ^'()rk. Pa. 
Alphonso Manx, Jr., Durham, X. C". 
Marion Mantell, .XUendale, X. J. 
Norma Marcis. Brookline, Mass. 
Cn.\Ri,()iTi: Markiiam, Durliaiii. X. C". 

S. Wade Marr, Jr., Raleigh. X. C. 
Charlotte Marshall, Ashland, Pa. 
J.\MES M. Martin, Whiteville, X. C. 
Robert D. Martin, Wesitield, X. J. 
K. Frank Mart/.. Jr., Plymouth, Pa. 

Andrew H. Masset, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 
Eleanor Mayes, Oxford, N. C. 
Jerome Menaker, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Walter Meng, North Middletown, Ky. 
Frances Merrill, Charleston, W. \'a. 

Frank L. Messick, Bloxon, \'a. 
Joseph W. Meyer, East Orange, N. J. 
Amy Meyers, Goldsboro, N. C. 
RtTH MicHLER, Easton, Pa. 
.Mary .Mill.vr, F'lushiiig, X. Y. 

Edmund S. L. .Miller, Hamburg, Pa. 
Jean Miller, Durham, N. C. 
John C. .Miller, .Mlentown, Pa. 
Virginia Miller, Caldwell, .X. J. 
Walters Miller. Deland, Fla. 

William J. .Miller, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Evelyn Mills, Atlanta, Ga. 
Francis Minter, Laurens, S. C. 
Eleanor Mitchell, Washington, D. C. 
Walton D. Mofhtt. Greensboro, X. C. 




m^ 



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143 1 













;:?. cp. o p 



Kathryn- Moxtague, Durham, N. C. 
Frederick P. Moore, East Gardner, Mass. 
HuBER H. Moore, Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Marion Moore, Charleston, W. Va. 
Mary Moore, Delray Beach, I'la. 

C. \eal Morgan, Atlanta, Ga. 
L. Harry Morris, Chester, Pa. 
Sar.-v Bill Morris, Marietta, Ga. 
William A. Morse, Lakemont, Ga. 
Carvelle Motley, Charleston, \\'. \a.. 

William B. Murphy, Greensboro, X. C. 

Jesse P. Muse, Savannah, Ga. 

Dennis Myers, Charlotte, N. C. 

B. HiLLMAN Myres, West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Bernard C. Nance, EUerbe, N. C. 

Paul S. Nelson, Granite Fails, Minn. 
Charles Neuburger, Maplewood, N. J. 
Arch Nevvbold, Raleigh, N. C. 
\'iRGiNiA Newcomb, Hilton, N. Y. 
Holmes E. Newton, Summit, N. J. 

Donald Nicholas, Scranton, Pa. 
John D. Nichols, Durham, N. C. 
Robert L. Nicks, Roxboro, N. C. 
Douglass S. Nisbet, Philadelphia, Pa. 
.'\lthea Nolde, New Orleans, La. 

William H. Northdurft, Salamanca, N. Y . 
James O'Brien, Rochester, N. Y. 
LuRLlNE Olsen, Poughkeepskie, X. \ . 
John Ondek, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
\\ n.i.iAM F. 0\'ERMAN, Wilson, X. C. 

Richard 11. ()\\ i;x 111, ClarksviJIc. \ a. 
I'l.oRENCE Paist, Laiisdovvnc, Pa. 
Walter Palmer, Maplewood, .\. J. 
Clarence Parker, Portsmouth, \ a. 
Orlwi) .\I. Parkf.r, Jr.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Tekla Parker, Pliihuiclpliia, Pa. 
Vincent J. Parzick, .Millers I'alls. .Mass. 
Nancy Lee Pate, Raleigh, X. C. 
Eleanora Patterson, Durham, .\. C. 
George Patterson, Macon, Ga. 

Richard PArrKRSoN, Glens l'"alls, X. \'. 
Edward'!'. Pkahodv, H\dc Park, .Mass. 
I1\r<)|.|) PiAii;, 1 lopkins\ille, Ky. 
Bkn 1. Pearlstone, Dallas, Tex. 
Charles B. Peck, Washington, D. C. 



144 



Clayton S. Pi;i;i,i:r, I,\ ticlibur>;, \ a. 
Everett G. Ferine, Kast Oraiijic \. j. 
Arthur M. Petersen, Ljiihrook, \. ^ . 
N.wcY Peterson, \\\H)dbur\', N. |. 
V. W. PE-rriNcai.i.. Rlclimnnd IlilK X. ^ . 

1»AL 1. II. Pkitit, Ocean City, N. J. 
C. C. PiiiNNKY, Newtonville, Mass. 
Helen Phillips, Le.\iii);iiin, N. C. 
David Prkard, Charlotte, .\. C. 
Claude Pierce, Hallsboro, \. C. 

Harry H. Pierson, Chester, Pa. 
K.MORY \\ . Plaster, Lcesburg, \'a. 
Charles S. Plumb, Kdgewood, R. I. 
Kenneth Podger, Kenmore, X. V. 
Robert Poggi, Tenafl\-, X. J. 

Herbert Pohl, Lyndhurst, X. J. 
Betty Pollard, Durham, X. C. 
Helen Poole, Troy, X. C. 
.\lline Porter, Wilmington, X. C. 
John T. Port/., Pottsville, Pa. 

I'.DWXRI) Post, Jr.. Shelb\-, X. C. 
David M. Powell, Baltimore. .\ld. 
Thomas W. Power, Rosemont. Pa. 
William Price, .Meyersdale, Pa. 
William M. Prindii:. \\ . Barrinuion, R. 

K.1NION Proctor, Oxford, X. C. 
Charles Pruitt, Frederick, Md. 
Thomas E. Purcell, Lakewood, X. Y. 
William H. Ramsey H, Bryn Mawr. Pa. 
Alma L. Ranson, Charlotte, N. C. 

Lucy Rauschenberg, Atlanta, (la. 
AsHBURN L. Rawls, South Xorfolk. \'a. 
Rosalyn Ray', W'aynesville, N. C. 
RiTH Rea, London, Ohio 
.\L\RioN Reade, Durham, X. C. 

Sam Reams, Kingsport, Tenn. 
W1LLIA.M W. Reel. Pittsbur^rh. Pa. 
Doris Rees, Xanticoke, Pa. 
Virginia Reeves, Canton, X. C. 
King Reid, Cheraw, .S. C. 

-Anne Louise Reist, Lanca.ster, Pa. 
Betty Rettew, Harrisburg, Pa. 
Theodore Reyes, Costa Rica. C. \. 
JuDsox Rhode, Reading, Pa. 
Leaming Rice, Jr.. Wijdwcxid, X. ]. 



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Barbara Rich, South Orange, N. J. 

\\ ALTON Rich, Port Henry, N. Y. 

1"",. RiDDLEBERGER, Jaclcson Heights. \. \ . 

Elizabeth Riley, Durham, N. C. 

Joseph W. Riley, Collingsdale, Pa. 

Camill.\ Ritchie, Binghamton, X. Y. 
Thomas Ritter, Belvidere, N. J. 
Helen Roberson, Durham, N. C. 
Winston Roberts, Birmingham, Ahi. 
Ki'RT RoEiiRs. \\'>xkoff. N. J. 

Philip Roesch, West New Brighton, N. Y. 
Edna Rogan, Baltimore, Md. 
Edwin Rogers, Marlton, N. J. 
Vida Rogers, Harrington Park, X. J. 
I'.Dw ARD F. RoRKE, Xcw York, X. Y. 

\\ ii.i.i AM j. Ross, Jr., Wadesboro, X. C. 
Benjamin B. Roush, Louisville, Ky. 
Xancy Rowe, Coral Gables, Fla. 
Winifred Sachs, Hancock, Md. 
George Salmon, Jr., Maplewood, N. J. 

Everett G. Soltman, New Rochelle, N. Y. 
James R. Sanders, Smithfield, N. C. 
Clarence Sapp, Albany, Ga. 
I''li7.abeth Sasscer, Chevy Chase, Md. 
\\ ALTER Sawyer, Elizabeth City, X. C. 

Hknrv B. Scarborough, Mt. Gilead, N. C. 
Berkley \ . Schaub, Westfield, N. J. 
Donald Schmitt, White Plains, N. Y. 
|ean Scott, Montclair, X. J. 
|()IIN Scott, Jr., Tamaqua, Pa. 

(j. Rylam) Scott, Norfolk, \"a. 
Thomas R. Sclu.l, Somers Point, N. J. 
Dorothy Seymoi'r, Plainville, Conn. 
Martin '/.. Shapiro, New York, N. Y. 
Norman Sharkey, l.\-iibrook, X. Y. 

|\MKS II. Sn\Ri', I'airchcina, Pa. 
Pill I.I p Shaw, .\rlington, .Mass. 
\\ . .Mason Siiehan, Jr., Easton, .Md. 
H.\ROLi) H. SiiELNin-p, Tr\on, X. C. 
-Xi.exander Siii-.Mi;r, Jamaica, N. ^ . 

Asiiiiv I,i-.i-. Shepherd, Jr., Bristol, .Md. 
Insi:pii B. SiiKRRii.i., Cornelius, N. C. 
Rk II \Ri> ,\. Siii I ins, I R., l.cwcs, Del. 
I'RWK R. Shilling, Philadelphia, Pa. 
I'm 1. S. Siiii'i.EY, Stamford, Cnnii. 



1-U. I 



Dii.i.ARi) M. Siioi.Ks, Jr., Diiiliam, N. C. 
Culver Shore. Greensboro, \. C. 
Charlotte Siehi.er. lialtlninri-. Mil. 
Helen Sill, \\a\ iu-, l*a. 
\\ ILLLVM P. Simmons. Uaiiihriil^'i-, (la. 

John Simonds, '\'ork Harlior, .\li-. 
Laurine Skinner, Greciuilli-, N. C. 
\'iRGiNL\ Skinner, Durham, \. C. 
Richard Skofiei.d, Hainpinn, \ a. 
Helen Slater, Detroit, Midi. 

Dora Slaughter, Mount Air\ , N. C. 

James Slay, Greenville, N. C. 

Edith Slayton, Durham, N. C. 

H. Slixglufe, Jr.. Upper Montclair. \, 

Klizabeth Small. Wyominj;, N. J. 

W iiirNEi.i. B. Small, W ashinirinn, N. C 
C. Manning Smith, Charlestciii. \\ . \ a. 
Frances Smith, Easton, Pa. 
Haddox H. Smith, Maplewood, X. J. 
Helen Smith. Thomas\iile. (]a. 

Henry C. Smith, Jr., CiwiniR'ii. (ja. 
June Smith, Kearney, N. J. 
Kirby S.mith. Jr., Washington, D. C. 
Robert L. S.mith, .\shcville, X. C. 
Susanna Smith, Leonia, X. J. 

William Reed Smith, .Ashcviilc, X. C. 
W illiam I. S.moot, Scaford, Del. 
Xancy Snead, Petersburg, V'a. 
Charles D. Snipes, Sanford, \. C. 
Edith Snook, Summit, X. J. 

George P. Snyder, Ridgefield P.irk, .\. J. 

To.M Fuller Southg.vte, Durham. X. C. 

Irene Sparks, Ashland, Ky. 

Ross Speir, Birmingham. Ala. 

Carl M. Spencer. Fayette\illc. .X. V. 

Harold Spire. Madison, X. C. 
Helen Stackhouse, Easton, Pa. 
Harold S. Standish, Canandaigua, X. V 
Marion Sted.man, .Asheboro. X. C. 
Robert Steenrod, Liberty. X. Y. 

Ruth Steinbrenner. I.akcwood. Ohio 
Robert P. Stevens, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Robert Stevenson. Clearfield, Pa. 
Jack Stewart. Palestine. Texas. 
Robert P. Stewart, Charlotte, X. C. 





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Edward Stockwell, Newburgh, X. Y. 
Phyllis Stofflet, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Harry Stone, Durham, X. C. 
Mary K. Stone, ^^ orcester, Mass. 
I'^DiTH Strother, Durham, X. C. 

Joy Stube, Xiagara Fails, X. Y. 
William Stube, Xiagara Falls, X. Y. 
'I'homas Suddath, Savannah, Ga. 
Beatrice Sugar, St. Pauls, X. C. 
H. Glenn Sullivan, Anderson, S. C. 

Ross Sullivan, Pleasantville, X. J. 
Ruth Suplee, Xarbeth, Pa. 
Charles W. Swan, Stonewall, X. C. 
DiANTHA Swazey, Forcst Hills, X. Y. 
Robert M. Swiceuood, Asheville. X. C 

\ iRoixiA SwiiT, W ayne. Pa. 
Richard M. Taliaferro, Columbia, S. C. 
Evelyn Taylor, Glenbrook, Conn. 
Shirley Teed, Brooklyn, X. Y. 
Jeannette Teselle, Gainesville, Fla. 

Hayden E. Thomas, Munhall, Pa. 
John G. Thomas, Decatur, Ga. 
Benjamin W. Thompson, Milbrook, III. 
I'RANCES Thompson, Greensboro, X. C. 
Lucia Thompson, Memphis, Tenn. 

W iLFRKD Thornton, Jackson, Ga. 
John Tim.mons, Columbia, S. C. 
Mary Elizabeth Tolar, Sanford, Fla. 
AiMKK Toner, Xew Haven, Cunii. 
.\h:Mi()Ri) ToppiNo, Xew \'iirk, X. Y. 

Ri(.ii\Ri) 1',. Tri: \ r, I lanulcii, Coiiii. 
Ca iiiKRiNi: Trmi.k, I'.ric, Pa. 
Charloj"ie Truitt, Bridge\ille, Del. 
1)a\ID J. TuRLINOTON, CliiUon, N. C. 
|(iliN S. IiTiLK, iiayonne, .\. J. 

I'.DcjAR L'den, Jr., Charloiie, .\'. C. 
David II. B. I'lmer, Jr., .Moorestown, X. J. 
Ruth Ulmer, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Herbert Upchurch, Durham, X. C. 
K ATiiERiNE I'pciiuRcii, Durham, X. C. 

Charles \ ail, Ocean City, X. J. 
OswALDO E. X'ales, Meritia. Vucalan, Me.x. 
X. W. Van Nostrand, Bnidklvn, .\. ^ . 
S. \ AN WiEMOKi.KY, Morristowii, \. J. 
Giles \ erstratiin. New York, .\. V. 



14S 



f^^4^ 



M \RV \'iCKERS, Oxfortl, N. C. 

Charlks B. Wade. Jr., MorchcaJ City. \. C . 

Helen Wade, Pliocni.willc. Pa. 

Anna Wagner, lamaicn, X. ^ . .- ». «. 

Jo.sEPiilNE Wacntr, Wi-st Clusior, l\l. ' ^f I ^ _^ ^^ ^^ 

LiciA Walker. 'I'ampa. l"la. 
Richard I.. Walker. Phihuklphia. Pa. 
Cl.vrk W.vlter, Jr., Wasliiiij;t()n. D. C. 
HAS.>iiE L. \\ arren, Durham, X. C. 
Loi'iSE C". Warren, Chat ham, \ a. 



M.\RY Loi i.sE Warren. RichmoiKl, \ a. 
Margaret W.vshburn, Hcnip.stcad, .X. Y. 
Jack Washington, Alexandria, \'a. 
Mi.i.A Waters, Washington, N. C 
.Mn.ToN \\ EINSTEIN. -Atlanta, Ga. 

1,ANL\R \\ eleare. Winston-Salem, X. C. 
Franklin W ells. Greensboro, X. C 
Charles D. Wknricii. Washington, 1). C. 
HoR.\CE \\ ESTCOTT, Branford, Conn. 
Robert Lewis W eston, Kensington, Md. 

G. .M. WHeeler, Pressmen's Home. Tenii 
Arnold K. White, Kast Rocka\va\ , X. ^'. 
George \\ . \\ hite, Baltimore. Md. 
Gibson B. \\ mite, Lexington, K\. 
Katharine \\ hite, Klizaheth, X. J. 

NLvRGERY White, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ruth Whitesell, Low Moor, \'a. 

Carl Whitley. Cla\ton, X. C. 

Ad.\ Whit.more, Durham, X. C. 

K.xth. Whittemore, Ft. Washington, X. '\' 

Carol Wilkinson, Jamaica, X. Y. 
Robert \\ ii.kinson, Millburn, .X. J. 
Mildred Williams, Greenville, Ky. 
Robert W illiams, Laurel, Del. 
Sarah W ii.liams, Elizabeth City, X. C. 

W . A. Willi.\mson, Coconut Grove, Fla. 
Noble S. Willis, Wilmington, Del. 
Don.\ld Ross Wilson, Greenlawn, X. Y. 
Gladys Winans, Ridgewood, X. J. 
Rebecca M. W itmer, Lancaster, Pa. 

ALxrtin \'. Wolf, Mansfield, Ohio 
William F. Womble. Winston-Salem. X. C. 
Doris Wood, Mount Morris, X. Y. 
Robert C. Wood, Lewisburg, W. \ a. 
W. C. \\'right, Jr., Wenonah, X. J. 

Clarence Wunder, Jr., Ardmorc, Pa. 
Constance Wvatt, W est .Medford. .Mass. 
Conrad Wyvell, Washington, D. C. 
Joseph H. Zambone, Vineland. X. J. 
Margaret Zecher. Lebanon, Pa. 







i 2m - rki 



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P fi r' t T) 



[149 




WILLIAM STATES LEE, C.E., Sc.D. 
PRESIDENT OF W. S. LEE EN- 
GINEERING CORPORATION, VICE- 
PRESIDENT AND CHIEF 
ENGINEER OF DUKE POWER COM- 
PANY, VICE-CHAIRMAN OF 
DUKE ENDOWMENT. 




THE DESIGN OF A MODERN COMPLICATED PROJECT REPRESENTS 
THE COMPOSITE THOUGHT AND COMBINED EXPERIENCE OF MANY 
MINDS SO CAREFULLY BLENDED. SO WELL BALANCED. AND SO 
THOROUGHLY INTERLOCKED, THAT EACH PART WILL FUNCTION 
AND WORK IN UNISON WITH EVERY OTHER PART. THE MANY 
KINDS OF ENGINEERING MUST BE SO SYNCHRONIZED THAT THE 
FINISHED PRODUCT SHALL BE PERFECT IN DESIGN, CONSTRUC- 
TION, AND OPERATION. THE ULTIMATE AIM IN EVERY PROJECT IS 
A PERFECT PRODUCT RATHER THAN A PERFECT DESIGN. 



SPONSORS AND 



FAVORITES 



MRS. J. J. TOWN LEY 

Editor's Sponsor 



MRS. J. M. M. GRb:(K)RV 

Manager's Sponsor 




MISS DOROTHY ADAMS WALTON 

Editor s Favorite 



MISS MARGARET DICKKRMAX 

Ma n ager 's Fa v orite 



STAFF 




Miss Rith C'i.xrk 



Miss Bf;ttv I'aires 







/ 



Miss 
Ririi I'hii.i.h's 




Miss Sugar Woodrdi'. 



Miss Aima Kii.iiiiKNER 



FAVORITES 




Miss Fritz Raley 



Miss Jane Miller 






VANITY FAIR 



MISS JANE CARLTON 



MISS SUE POWELL 



MISS KIJZABKTH SLOCOMB 



MISS CAROLINE MANN 





I 



MISS ELIZABETH WINSLOW 



MISS SARAH KATHKRINE TAYLOR 



MISS HANES CLEMENT 



MISS MARIE ASSENHEIMER 




SNAPSHOTS 



These scenes are located in the 
open air theatre on the East 
Campus. Tiie renowned nat- 
ural beaut\- and splendor of 
Duke L ni\'ersity is, as in many 
places, very pronounced here. 
Does it seem a wonder to you 
that one could become attached 
to such a localit)' especially with 
the added attraction of such 
feminine allure. 




1«4 



The girls have a liaiicf r 'I'lio 
Co-ed Ball; Between classes — 
with ever)' word a reputation 
dies. The girls again, they take 
a workout in the da\' time. The 
page is full of girls — the ages 
also — this next is a fashion show 
of Progress — Oh My! ^\'e catch 
the sororities.' The Mngineers 
forget their work in a niglit of 
revelr\' . . . ladies, music. 




185] 



The annual bon-tirc — a creator 
of school spirit. A part of the 
cheering section. The Carolina 
game — the traditional goal posts 
to the winner — its ours for the 
second time. The bo\-s of '&7 — 
that was another championship 
team. \\'hen wc come to the 
end of a perfect day — }'ear — col- 
lege career — graduation day — 
then what.' 




186] 



The riders are liere. tlie horses 

are on page ; if >ou arc supcr- 

stitiously incHned Tennessee did- 
n't have a chance — even hung in 
effigy; freshman week; sonic of 
the girls left holding the bag; the 
Zeta's advertise the pledges don't 
they? Then the renowned \ ic- 
tory Bell, is this what you see in 
the picture? "Clark Gable" Kel- 
ler introduces his friends. 








187 



Not too close mister, that's m\- 
nosc you're dri\-ing from; Otis 
puts the pressure on them; bot- 
tom's up and its freshman week; 
waiting for a ride — a truck? 
Seven of THK BOYS. The En- 
gineers — aren't they industrious. 
"Come up some time." "So 
boys, I shot that nigger. The 
staff discusses the problems of 
the day. The might\" odor club. 




188] 



Here arc tlie horses we were 
looking for, wliere are the riders? 
Alpha Sigma Sigma- -please get 
;i iiumhIht to pull this wagon 
awa>'. Bagging big game. An 
apple a day -Oh doctor! Who 
took this picture? Majestic 
beauty bat lies the chapel tower. 
The answer to a dream, a career, 
a prayer, its (1 D K tapping. 




189] 



What would \'olstead say — 
what would prexy say — what 
would you say? A prehistoric 

which is the monster: Three 
Phi Betes in a formal pose; nuts 
— and seriously now, we think 
this is the best football still of 
the year — a few minutes — all 
keyed for one of the big games. 
A student — he must be — we 
caught him twice. W elcome 
Grads anyway. Athletes — mil- 
ions of them, and all S A E's. 




190 



Look at the girls tirst ;uk1 iIkmi 
at the Cliapcl tower aiul sec if 
the latter doesn't look off bal- 
ance — it did to us! Another stu- 
dent, my how the public is fooled ! 
A game of golf at Hope \ alley. 
Last miiuite instructions I'd say 
the're ready to go. What a fin- 
ish for this section — what a 
finish. 




3ooK ro'Jif 



QRGAMiVATJOMS 






PROFESSOR OI- ELECTRICAL EN- 
GINEERING, CHAIRMAN OF DE- 
PARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL 
ENGINEERING. 




AN EFFICIENT MEANS OF TRANSPORTATION IS A TRIBUTE TO THE 
GENIUS OF ENGINEERING. GOODS AND PEOPLE MAY BE MOVED 
FROM PLACE TO PLACE RAPIDLY, SAFELY. AND ECONOMICALLY. 
EITHER SINGLY OR IN BULK. THE UNIFYING INFLUENCE OF THE 
TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS IS A NATIONAL ASSET. BY UTILIZING 
THE FUEL FROM THE BOWELS OF THE EARTH AND THE TUMBLING 
WATERS OF THE SURFACE OF THE EARTH, THE ENGINEER HAS 
MADE POSSIBLE METHODS OF TRANSPORTATION WHICH, IN INTER- 
CHANGING GOODS AND PEOPLE. HAVE MADE US A NATION 
INDEED. 




NON-SECRET 




Duke Student Government 



Joseph T. Shackford 
President 

Council 

Charles Derrick 
Senior Class 

James Otis 
Senior Class 

Carl Neuman 
Junior Class 

Bernard Wagner 

Junior Class 

I^DWiN B. Abbott 

Sophomore Class 



There have been several changes in the in- 
ternal workings of the student council. All 
records and cases in the past have been 
brought together in a new system of filing. 
Several by-laws have been passed in order to 
improve the internal organization of the coun- 
cil. 

The purpose and aim of Student Govern- 
ment is to "create an effective organization 
for administering student self-government, to 
support athletics, to foster literary endeavor, 
to encourage all other worthy student activ- 
ities, and to promote the best interests of the 
University and student body." 

During the fall a large Student Government 
dance was given for the whole student body. 
The Inaugural Spring Ball has become a tra- 
dition. 

For the past three years student govern- 
ment at Duke has grown enormouslj'^ in power 
and prestige. Under the able administration 
of Martin Green, Wendell Home, and Joseph 
Shackford many changes have been made 
that were necessary to strengthen failing 



A system of Student Government was estab- 
■^^ lislicd at Duke in 1922. Since that time, 
the system has been constantly changing, 
growing, and developing into a worthy sys- 
tem of government. 

Our Student Government has taken an ac- 
tive part in student affairs and problems, not 
only on our campus, but in North Carolina 
and throughout the I'liitcd States. Duke 
University was one of the first to help estab- 
lish the North Carolina Federation of Stu- 
dents. In 1930 we became a member of the 
National Student Federation of America, and 
have oifercd our support to this organization. 
Student government is a comparatively new 
system of government, but it has ad\'anccd 
exceedingly far at Duke. 

The Student Government has tried to live 
up to the ideals upon which it was founded. 
The students sponsored several large parades 
this year in order to breed a good school spirit 
and give their support to the athletic teams. 
Programs, in which the students took part, 
were arranged for the spectators during the 
different athletic contests. 

1198 1 



^^J ^•^* m^r. 




'I'. \\ ACNKK 
i\ HUMAN 



Otis 

AHHOT'I- 



Derrick 
li. Wagnhr 



House of Representatnes 



power of this organ of student life. Througli 
wise and just legislation it has gained a worthy 
position in the eyes of the University admin- 
istration and exerted potent influence over 
the general student body. It is laying down 
and enforcing rules that are to become tradi- 
tions as the University grows in age. 



ALTllOlC^ll Student Government has been 
^ a part of student life at Duke since 1922, 
it is only since 1931 that the bicameral system 
has been employed. Previous to this change, 
the Student Council was the sole unit of con- 
trol, having executive, legislative, and judicial 
functions. The House of Representatives, 
with the Vice President of the Men's Associ- 
ation as Speaker, was added to lighten the 
burden on the council and to secure greater 
efficiency, as the House is essentially the leg- 
islative branch of the association and is the 
lower house so-called, corresponding in a sense 
with the lower or popularly representative 
branch of many national, state, and municipal 




M. Eugene Newsom, Jr. 
Vice President, Speaker of House 

Membership 

Russell Ireland 
Senior Class 

John B. Co,\ 
Senior Class 

Earle J. Wentz 
Junior Class 

.Martin B. Williams 
Junior Class 

Donald McNeil 
Junior Class 

R. A. Jones 
Junior Class 






Ireland .\I. B. Willia.ms Jones 

McNeil Wentz Cox 



governments of the twentieth century. 

Originally the membership of the House was 
limited to one man from each dormitory sec- 
tion, said student to be a resident of the dorm- 
itory electing him. However, it was found 
upon trial that such a large body was too un- 
wieldy for efficient performance, and further 
that due to the manner of election, the rep- 
resentatives did not place sufficient value on 
their office to induce whole-hearted effort. 

Therefore, in May, 19.^2, there was pro- 
posed a system of general and pf)pular elec- 
tion of six men to compose a House of Rep- 
resentati\es, these men to be from any class 
in the undergraduate school, although juniors 
and seniors may, by custom be elected each 
year. This system was adopted and its oper- 
ation to date indicates its worth. 

According to the Constitution of the Men's 
As.sociation (Art. I\', Sec. 3, 5.) which was 
revised and ad(jpted by the general student- 
body, the House of Representatives shall be 
empowered to enact legislation concerning 
dormitory conditions, shall give advice to the 
council on all other legislation, and shall pro- 

[1991 




Student Council 



Tyrus Wagner 
Secretary-Treasurer 



pose to the council by-laws for the constitu- 
tion or any changes in the system that shall 
be deemed for the welfare of the general stu- 
dent body. 

During last year, the House of Representa- 
tives established the quiet period, so-called, 
from 7:30 o'clock continuing through until 
next morning, to be in force every night ex- 
cept Saturday and occasions of importance to 
the students generally. Radios, long a point 
of contention, are tolerated on the campus at 
present, but with the express understanding 
that they are not to be operated during the 
quiet period in such a manner as to disturb 
others living adjacent. 

At general assemblies the House of Repre- 



sentatives, through its Speaker, places the 
whole matter of dormitory regulation before 
the undergraduate men to ascertain student 
attitude and opinions. During open discus- 
sion from the floor of the assembly, a resolu- 
tion was made and unanimously accepted ap- 
proving the regulations and policy of the 
House of Representatives, and greater coop- 
eration by the students was promised for the 
future. It was also agreed to refer to the 
House all cases of flagrant violations of the 
rules, when this body would investigate and 
take steps to secure the full cooperation of 
those concerned. 



Dormitory supervision, although the great- 
est single contribution of the House of Rep- 
resentatives, is only one of the several phases 
of student life in which it has been of service. 
Almost every matter of interest to the stu- 
dents is discussed and referred to proper au- 
thorities to further the welfare of the student 
body. 

Apparently the efi"orts of the House of Rep- 
resentatives have justified its institution as a 
branch of student government at Duke, and 
in the future greater service can logically be 
expected from it. The bicameral system, no 
doubt, is here to stay. 




Abbott 



I). \\'agm:r 



Otis 



Shacki-oki) 



\\ ACNKR DiKKICK 



We.st 



200] 



Woman's Student Gen ernment 



'T^l II'". purpose of tlic Woman's College Gov- 
-*• criiinenl is to guide student affairs by de- 
veloping a sense of unity among the women. 
It alst) aims to increase the spirit of indi\idual 
leadership througii the cooperation of the fac- 
ulty. 

The president, who is elected by a majority 
vote of the student body, presides over all 
Association meetings called at her discretion. 
It is her duty to oversee the work of the eight- 
een officers and committees of the Student 
Government. It is to her that the students 
look for leadership in the expression of their 
desires. Not only is she responsible for the 
execution of campus affairs by the aid of the 
Government's constitution, but also she must 
be present at the judicial trials. 

Under the term of Miss Walker and by her 
initiative, the Student Government Associa- 
tion of 1933-1934 has progressed in internal 
as well as external reform and improvement. 
The definite advances made by this year's ad- 
ministration include: the gaining of riding 
privileges, the establishment of a definite 
warning system, and the organization of a 
uniform House go\ernment. Radios have 
been placed in the parlor of each house b>' 
the Council. 

Another special project has been the organ- 
ization of an entireh' new svstem of elections. 



A 

td 



Augusta Walker 
President 

Ogicers 

Eleanor Tompkins 
Corresponding Sccrctar}' 

Dorothy Douglas 
Treasurer 

Sarah Thompson 
Assistant Treasurer 



This system is comparable to the Civil Service 
System of the National Government. Any 
success of this system is due to the laborious 
work and concentration of the Council and 
the members of the Examiner's Board. A 
political rally was planned and sponsored by 
the Student Council for the first time in the 
History of the Woman's College. 




Daniels 



Douglas 



Tompkins 



Thompson 



[201 




Woman's College Council 



Helen Damels 
\ ice President 

Council 

Chairman of Social Standards 

Helen Wyatt 

President of Giles House 

Hanes Clements 

President of Alspaugh House 

Louise Merkel 
President of Pegram House 

Sylvia Hunsicker 
President of Basset House 

Mary Parkhurst 
President of Brown House 

Jane Miller 
President of Aycock House 

Mary Jaxsen 

Town Girls Representative 

Catherine Powe 

Junior Representative 

Sue Powell 

Sophomore Representative 

Kay Goodman 



nPHE Student Council of the Woman's Stu- 
dent Government is bicameral in structure. 
It is composed of the Executive and Judicial 
Boards. 

The Executive Board represents the organi- 
zation and has the power to make regulations 
necessary to perform the functions of the organ- 
ization and to enforce the constitution and by- 
laws. The weekly meetings are held with the 
purpose of executing legislation. Committees 
are appointed by the president, and are the 
means of transacting minute business. The Ex- 
ecutive Board takes recommendations that the 
Judicial Board may offer, considers them, and 
presents them to the entire association or to 
the staff. By this process certain privileges are 
extended to the students. 

The Judicial Board deals with major offenses 
and matters referred to it by the Executive 
Board. This year a system of warnings was 
established for House Government. Violations 
of House regulations are dealt with by the re- 
spective House Committees. A repeated viola- 
tion of the same offense is brought before the 
Judicial Board and dealt with accordingly. This 
board is composed of the HcTuse Presidents, one 
non-partisan member, and is presided o\er by 
the vice president. It is a student's board, 
operating free from faculty jurisdiction. 




Gf)ODMAN 


Powell 


Parkhurst 


Clement 


Wyai T 


PfJWK 


Jansen 


Mkrki;l 


Hunsicker 


Miller 



202 



The Social Standards 
Committee 



''I'^lll''. Social Standards Ciminiiucc is com- 
-*- jH.scd of a group of Duke woiikmi, selected 
for their social leadership, whose purpose is to 
guide the activities of the Woman's campus. 
Its aim is to develop the finest social relation- 
ship between men and women students. 

The major function of the Committee on So- 
cial Standards is the sponsoring of the tradi- 
tional Co-ed Balls. These gala affairs are high- 
lights on the social calendar of the University 
and are most eagerly anticipated by both men 
and women. The management and upkeep of 
the Ark is another duty of the Committee. In 
the Ark Duke students spend many delightful 
evenings with the radio, piano, ping-pong tables, 
and various other forms of amusement. 

Because of varied environments from which 
the students come to Duke, they are aided in 
becoming assimilated into the life of this college 
by the Social Standards Committee. It is this 
committee which first introduces the women 
into the social life of the University by aiding 
contact between the new women and the upper- 
classmen, and by introducing them to Duke 
men in a desirable manner. Friendships, not 
only with the members of the University com- 
munity, but also with the residents of Durham, 
arc encouraged. 




Helen \\ vatt 
Chairman 

Membership 

Janet Griffin, \'irginia Jordan, 
X'irginia Dillon, Jean Molyneaux, 
Ruth Bennett, Mary Nash 
White, Ethel Garrett, Mary Sink, 
Carolyn Brooks, KIcanor Tomp- 
kins, Hancs Clement, Helen 
Gray, Kay Goodman, Florence 
Geise, Mar>- Frances he\-, Dallas 
Knight, Sigrid Pederson, .Xnnic 
Kate Rebman, Susan Sheppard. 



pf^q^g^r^g 




Goodman- 


Brooks 


Sheppard 


IVEY 


Geise 


White 


Sink 


Rebmar 


Jordan 


Gray 


Pf.derson 


Dll.I.ON 


Garrktt 


Ct.KMENT 


Tf).Ml>KINS 


Griffin 



203 




Young Men's Christian 
Association 



Pardue Bunch 

President 

Officers 

Russell C. Herbert 

Vice President 

DowD Bangle 

Secretary 

Charles Beatty 

Treasurer 

Board of Directors 

C. E. Jordan 

Chairman 

Dr. \\'. K. Greene 

Vice Chairman 

Dean D. M. Arnold 

Coach J. M. Coombs 

Dr. AIason Crum 

Prok. Malcolm McDermott 

Prof. H. E. Spence 

W. M. Upchurch, Jr. 

J. Foster Barnes 



' I ^HE Duke University Young Men's Christian 
-'■ Association was organized in 1887 and soon 
after that time became affiUated with the Na- 
tional Council of Student Christian Associations 
which is a part of the World Student Christian 
Federation. 

The four most outstanding projects the Y. M. 
C. A. has sponsored this. year are: 

Freshman Week, during which thirty "Y" men 
were present on the campus to assist Freshmen 
in becoming adjusted to college life. 

Jim Hardzvick Week, which came in October 
and was devoted to group meetings, discussions, 
and hikes arranged by the Discussion Committee 
and led by Jim Hardwick, "Y" travelling secre- 
tary. 

Religious Emphasis Week, or more appropri- 
ately, Dr. Crane Week, which came early in 
December. Dr. Henry Crane of Scranton, Pa., 
was brought to this campus by the University 
and the Y. M. C. A. as visiting preacher. A 
thousand students were out to hear him each 
time he spoke and hundreds had personal inter- 
views with him. 

Student Expression JVeek, which came the lat- 
ter part of March and during which all meetings 
and services were given over to student expres- 
sion in various fields, including Religion, Stu- 
dent Affairs, Music, and Drama. This was a 
new project but was quite worthwhile and can 
be improved upon in years to come. 




I Ikrukri 



Bangle 



Beatty 



204 



Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 




T^lie work of the World Fellowship Coiiiinittcc 
_-■• among the foreign students on the campus, 
its social service, inter-racial, and boy's work is 
worthy of note. This committee brought Mr. 
Kirby Page, Mr. Herman l.um, and Dr. Ciiarles 
Hurry to the campus as speakers on interna- 
tional topics. Mr. Paul Derring, from V. P. I., 
and Mr. Claud Nelson, from the Y. M. C. a! 
Graduate School, have been brought to the cam- 
pus this year by the Y. M. C. A. 

The Social Committee has sponsored Open 
Houses on Thursday nights and two "Y" Re- 
treats. The Recitals Committee has presented 
four Thursday evening recitals to the Univer- 
sity Community free of charge. The Employ- 
ment Committee has served as a clearing house 
in securing employment for students in Durham. 
The Library Committee has provided periodicals 
and books for the Y. M. C. A. Reading Room. 
The Freshmen Friendship Committee has done 
effective work through the friendship Council. 
The \ . \[. C. A. sends delegates to various 
Student Christian conferences and besides rend- 
ering miscellaneous services to the student body, 
sponsors the Open Forum Bible Class, Organ 
Meditation Periods, and Discussion Groups. 
It spon.sors Quadrangle Pictures, and publishes 
the Duke Handbook and the Student Dircct()r\-. 



YMCA 



y 



* Vii 



C.hairmfH of the President's 
Cabinet 

Ii\ I.RITT Sawykr 

Robert Kinchelok 

C. v.. Phillips, Jr. 

Paul Baxter 

James Sapp 

<1. W. Wharton 

j. v.. Gibson 

Robert P. Nixon 

De.\rmond .\Foork 

James E. Rink 

Billy Siceloff 

Paul \\'inn 






Siceloff 



Ri.nk 
Upchurch 



B.vxter 
Xixox 



Gibson 
Brumbach 



Sa 



205 



Sophomore Council 




'T^HE Sophomore Council of the Duke Uni- 
-'■ versity Y. JM. C. A. was organized last Fall 
as a new project of the "Y." It is composed of 
the men who were active in last years Freshman 
Friendship Council and other Sophomores in- 
terested in "Y" work. Its members serve as 
assistants to the Committee Chairman on the 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet which is made up of Jun- 
iors and Seniors. 

The Sophomore Council took an active part 

in Freshman Week, assisting the Freshmen in 

Officers getting acquainted with their new environs and 

\ViLLi\M Brumb\ch helping the administration in its orientation 

President program for the Freshmen. During Jim- Hard- 

AIvLcoLM Wright wick Week, the Council assisted in promoting 

Vice President discussions, and worked with the "Y" in the 

Fred C\dy arrangements for Dr. Crane's services. The 

Secretary-Treasurer Council assisted in sponsoring Student h'.xprcs- 

RozELLE HoLMAN s>c)" Wcck in March. 

Chaplain 

f^ f^ f^ t\ C) ^ ^ 

a .o c o p o 3 



^' f^. fn^ a p: g -o 




Foreman 


BuRKORD 


FVERITT 


MacQuarrii; 


PiXK 


I.KH 


I'l.EMISTER 


NUSBAUM 


Man ESS 


Hood 


Wright, M. 


PoW El.l. 


Pn-KR 


Cruikshank 


WiLDNAUER 


ACKERMAN 


Cady 


CjRII KIN 


Cordon 


Hatch 


Hardin 



206 



Freshman Friendship Council 



'T^lil*, I'lL'shman I-'riciidsliip CduikH is a social 
-■- organization for the purpose of promoting 
friendships among the Freshmen and training 
the future leaders of the V. M. C A. Many 
different types of meetings ha\e been held. 
I likes, smokers, retreats, informal discussions, 
student programs, talks b\- the faculty and out- 
side speakers, and socials ha\e composed the 
year's program. 

The council conducted se\cral acti\ities for 
the entire Freshman Class. This group con- 
ducted a successful hike to which the whole 
class was invited. The council also sponsored 
the Freshman Oratorical Contest in which a 
number of Freshmen participated. The winner 
was presented with a sihcr cup upon which his 
name was engraved. The council started a 
movement for the construction of a Y. M. C. A. 
cabin in the Duke forest for retreats, meetings, 
and social functions. 




'I"H0.M.\S CoTTI.\"t;ilA.M 

President 

Officers 

Richard Citchin 
\'ice President 

Herbert L'pchurcii 
Secretar\'-Treasurer 

Eari. Bracii 

Cliaphiiii 




dMkkkk 











^r< 



*,£. 






BiSTLINE 

Jenxixgs 
Upchurch 



W'enrich 

McCallister 

Skofield 



TiMMONS 

Bone 
Hyams 



CUTCHIN 

Herrick 
P'erris 



Harte 

GOSTIX 

Cor next 



Lengler 
Ketciii'm 

SoLT.MAX 



NiSBIT 
.MfRPHY 

Snvder 



(207; 




Young Women's Christian 
Association 



Josephine Glass 
President 



Officers 

\ IRGINTA TiLLOTSON 

Vice President 

A. Woods Devereaux 
Secretary 

Helen Grey 
Treasurer 



T^HE Young Women's Christian Association 
-*■ of Duke University, a member of the Young 
Women's Christian Association of tlie United 
States of America, and a participant in tlie 
World's Student Christian Federation, declares 
its purpose to be: 

"We, the members of the Young Women's 
Christian Association of Duke University, unite 
in the desire to realize full and creative life 
through a growing knowledge of God. 

"We, determine to have a part in making this 
life possible for all people. 

"In this task we seek to understand Jesus and 
follow Him." 

The officers, comprising the executive board, 
are President, Vice President, Secretary, and 
Treasurer. 

There is an Advisory Board composed of mem- 
bers of the faculty and from women of the com- 
munity. In addition there is a cabinet, whose 
duty it is to initiate and promote a program of 
activities that will best carry out the purpose of 
the organization. 

Particularly outstanding has been the work of 
the Social Service Committee in securing con- 
tributions of clothes and offering other services 
for local welfare agencies; in enlisting the vol- 
unteer services of the students for play ground 
work at Wright's Refuge; and in connection 
with the Duke Hospital and Legal Aid Clinic. 
The Social Committee has attempted to provide 






TiLLOTSON 



Gray 



Devereaux 



[208 



\'. W. C. A. Cabinet 



i 



an adequate social life including a novelty series 
«>t '•chann-sclioor' programs. ^I'lic Industrial 
and Interracial committees have sought to sup- 
plant ignorance and prejudice by an intelligent, 
understanding attitude toward peoples and 
problems. 

T^lll'! primar\- reason for the existence of the 
\. W . C A. on the over-organized, acli\it\- 
minded campuses of today is that it is a xoluii- 
tary religious movement. We are reminded 
that our lives, which we would live fully, are 
not very simple any more. We live in a com- 
plex world and wc are a real part of the whole 
process of continual change which is llic life of 
the world. 

It is onh- in a religious movement llial we 
are able to look at life in its entirety. It is not 
possible for us to escape the complexities of our 
age, not even when we are students. We are 
forced to li\e affected by and affecting the lives 
of millions of men and women daily. Is it pos- 
sible to live creatively except as we sense in a 
real way our relation to these complex patterns 
and currents and put ourselves in tune with the 
rhythm of life.' The primary functions, then, 
of the Christian Association is to discover 
through study and insight the values inherent 
in religion and to make them effective in all our 
human relationships. 




Membership 

\ IRUIXIA Sarver 

.\Iar(;ery Ki.vg 

.\Iariax Shepardson 

-Mabel .Maxter 

Dorothy Flebbe 

Klizabeth Carr 

Rosanelle Cash 

Sarah Thompson 

C.vtherixe Powe 

-Augusta Walker 





PovvE 




Manter 
Cash 



Shepardson 
Thompson 



Sarver 
Walker 



Carr 



209 




Nereidian Club 



Margie Voigt 
President 



Officers 

Mary Alice Dewey 
\"ice President 

Jean Molyreaux 

Secretary 

Dorothy Flebbe 
Treasurer 



'T^HE Nereidian Club was founded in the 
-'■ spring of 1930 for the promotion of better 
swimming among the women of Duke Univer- 
sity. This is an honorary organization and 
membership is based on abiUty in swimming, 
which is determined by various tests of strokes, 
dives and speed. The members of the club are 
the sole participants . in the swimming meets 
given in cooperation with the Women's Athletic 
Association. In the spring and fall of each 
year, the Nereidians sponsor a traditional water 
pageant to which all the student body is invited. 
This year the club was honored by an exhibition 
given by Miss Helen Wainright Stellings, the 
national Olympic star. In order to determine 
those worthy of membership, various tryouts 
are given in the spring and fall of each year. 
Each potential member is judged by ten or more 
members of the club and two faculty members. 
Then grades are averaged and the new Nereid 
is voted upon by the club in regard to ability 
in swimming and personal factors. The pageant 
of 1934 was based on an Hawaiian Theme with 
corresponding music and singing. The club 
afterwards held an open swim for the boys' 
swimming team and other friends. 

The colors of the club, red, gold and blue, are 
embodied in the head of a Devilfish, which is 
the emblem worn on the suit of each member. 



r^ \-^A %^^ Kr^^^ 

C) O (^ f^ 





Rose 
Seed 



Emery 
Jansen 



Parkiiurst 
Morali 



Caldwell 
Dikeman 



Bailey \\ ii.lingiiam Clark 

Ingram AIulkord Nachamson 



[210] 



^^^ome^'s Athletic Association 



nplll'". Wniiicii's Athletic Association was 
-*■ founded in the Spring of 1929. Its mem- 
bership has increased, during these five years, 
to such an extent that it is now one of the lead- 
ing campus organizations. The Association 
now has over three hundred members. 

The three greatest incentives in promoting in- 
terest in athletics arc the field days which arc 
held in the Fall, Winter, and Spring, the award- 
ing of letters, numerals, and sweaters, and the 
athletic cabin. 

In the Fall Field Day, events in hockey, soc- 
cer, swimming, and riding are held; basketball 
and volleyball tournaments are held during the 
Winter; and the final athletic events, tennis, 
archery, baseball, and track, are held in the 
Spring. 

A point system tor gi\ing awards has been 
established. To the fifteen girls who have the 
most points in each class, class numerals are 
awarded. A block "D" goes to each of the ten 
girls who have tlie most points, regardless of 
class. Old English "D's" are given to the six 
Junior girls having the most points at the end 
of the year. These girls comprise the All-Duke 
Honorary Team. The class having the largest 
total of points for the year have their numerals 
placed on the banner which hangs in the gym- 
nasium. 




Bernice Rose 
President 



Officers 

Ki.izabetii Pegram 
\'icc President 

Ethel Garrett 
Secretary 

Eloise Ingram 
Treasurer 




Powell 


Parkhlrst 


Pegram 


Garrett 


Incra.m 


\ AUGHN 


Caldwell 


Emery 


CUXINGGIM 


Jones 


Burleigh 


Gray 



211 




Trident Club 



B. A. Wagner 

Secretary 

Officers 

Leslie A. Squires 
President 

Joseph Brii.linger 

Vice President 

Robert Nixon 
Treasurer 



npHE Trident Club was organized on the Duke 
-'- campus in May of last year, for the purpose 
of entertaining visiting athletic teams and fos- 
tering student spirit on the campus. 

The membership consists of the head cheer- 
leader, one representative from each of the fra- 
ternities, and two representatives elected from 
among the non-fraternity men of the three up- 
per-classes. 

Its first year of existence has been outstand- 
ingly successful. The school spirit on the cam- 
pus showed notable improvement this year, es- 
pecially during the football season, during which 
the team had the strongest student backing ever 
shown at Duke. 

The outstanding events with which it was 
connected this year were Homecoming Day — 
with unusual preparations for the Tennessee 
game which did much to make it a big success, 
and the Victory Ball, given early in December 
in honor of the football team, and which is to 
be continued as an annual event. 

The club has received a great deal of favor- 
able criticism on its first years work, particu- 
larly on the introduction of card stunts and other 
activities at football games, which add much to 
the spirit of the game and interest in it, among 
visitors as well as students. 



Top rinv: .Xixo.N, .Murray, \\ ri(;iit, Baird, l,iNKHi:R(;hR, .Athkrton, i\yck, Moriu.ock, Hyrn 
Bottom row: Siceloff, Bagwell, Mervine, Kleinkelter, Doty, Fisher, Daniels, Ricks,'Deemer 

[212] 





Pi Mu Epsilon 



pi Ml' I-'.PSILON is a national honorary niath- 
•*■ cnialics i"ratcrnit\' whicii was founded at S\-ra- 
cusc University in 1914. Since that time num- 
erous other chapiters have been installed in uni- 
versities tliroughout the count r\-. The Duke 
chapter. North Carolina Alpha, was established 
in 1932. 

The purpose of Pi Mu J']psik)n is to stimulate 
and further acti\e interest in mathematics and 
the mathematical sciences. Its members are 
those among the graduates and undergraduates 
who have shown interest and abilities in the 
study ()f mathematics, and those among the fac- 
ulty who ha\e shown an active, sympathetic in- 
terest in that study. 

Each year the local chapter brings to the cam- 
pus a noted mathematics lecturer. Also, the 
chapter sponsors a series of lectures by its under- 
graduate members. At the end of the year a 
prize is awarded to the student who is adjudged 
to have presented the best discussion. 




|. \ . UliRNARDO 

President 

Officers 

Blai.n'e R. Harkness 

Vice President 

John Lennox 
Secrctar>' 

Eleanor .Markham 
Treasurer 

Lloyd P. Julian 
Librarian 



ac(i^Aoor)f?o 




p r? o o cs r? if> ^o o 

Top row: Hopkins. .Ackerman, Hai.se.ma, (Jrav. Lennox. .\L\rkiia.m, Black. Stanblrv, .\tkinson 

Bottom ro:v: Ri-siimer. Riosby, .Armstroxc, Kdmondso.n, Bearse, Bernardo, ILvrkness, Roebuck, Howland 



213 




Town Girls' Club 



Catherine Powe 

President 

Officers 

Margaret Smith 

Vice President 

Jennie Sue Kernodle 

Corresponding Secretary 

Laura Hill Thrift 

Recording Secretary 

Inez Abernethy 

Treasurer 

Janet Ormond 

Program Committee 

Eleanor Markham 

Publicity Committee 



TN the Fall of 1927 a group of women town 
-*- students met with Mrs. Hazen Smith to con- 
sider an organization of those students who re- 
sided outside Southgate. Town students, out- 
numbering the approximately one hundred and 
forty resident students, were represented on the 
student council by one of their own number 
elected by the women's student body. Due to 
this unsatisfactory representation and the desire 
for a room on the campus, this group organized 
the Town Girls' Club. The president became 
the agent for town students on the council. 
There were monthly luncheons; the annual 
party honoring the May Court to which all the 
women were invited; participation and winning 
in stunt night. In 1928 the present club room 
in Carr Building was obtained. 

Though custom plays a part, this organiza- 
tion of one-seventh of the women students fol- 
lows no set program. Each May the high school 
seniors are entertained. Meetings held once a 
month often close with informal socials. Dur- 
ing 1933-'34, the cabinet has executed a program 
of activities on the basis that friendliness evokes 
interest and action in a common cause, helping 
unify town students through loyalty and frienci- 
ship and striving to institute a closer relation- 
ship between all women of the university. 






Markham 



Ormonh 



Abernethy 



214 



Forum Club 



T^TIl'". Forum Club was established at the 
-■■ Woman's College of Duke University in 
1927, with the purpose in view being the furth- 
erance of interest in classical studies. The 
name of the club is significant in that the ancient 
forum or market place was a place for discus- 
sions. 

Meetings of_ ilic club arc held bimonthly for 
the consideration of topics pertaining to Greek 
and Latin. Informal talks are presented by 
members of the faculty and by students, fol- 
lowed by an open forum. 

Those women students of Duke University 
who average a "B" for one year on a course in 
Greek or Latin are eligible to membership in 
the club, elections being made twice a year on 
this basis, at the beginning of each semester. 

According to tradition, once a year the Forum 
Club entertains the Classical Club, the men's 
organization of a similar purpose, at a banquet. 
Here at an informal gathering the discussion is 
lively between members ot the organizations. 




SlGRM) I'kDKRSON 

Prciiiiciii 

Officers 

Doris Welles 

Vice President 

Dorothy Forbes 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Jane Ritter 

Ciiairmaii Prni.'r.nii Coiimiittcc 





RlTTI 



Welles 



Forbes 



215 




Polity Club 



James A. Mustard 
President 

Officers 

Josephine Glass 
Vice President 

\ IRGINIA Dn.i.ox 

Secretary 

Eugene Newsom 
Treasurer 



nPHE Polity Club is an organization whose 
purposes and objectives are to create a 
greater interest in political, social, and economic 
life; to promote a better understanding of these 
divisions of human activity and the principles 
underlying them; and to encourage the de\'elop- 
ment of a higher type of citizenship. In pur- 
suance of the studies and activities of the club 
its members devote their attentions to current 
problems and conditions in both national, and 
international affairs. The club is affiliated with 
the International Relations Club, an organiza- 
tion sponsored by the Carnegie Endowment, 
which supplies these clubs with speakers, and 
literature dealing with the various current top- 
ics of importance. 

Membership in the Polity Club is open only 
to Juniors and Seniors who have made a high 
scholastic average in courses in political scieiijce 
and history. The club was founded in 1928, 
and under the able guidance of its faculty mem- 
bers; namely, Dr. Robert S. Rankin, Dr. R. R. 
Wilson, Dr. J. Fred Rippy, and Mr. William 
Simpson; it has accomplished much during its 
period of existence on the campus. 




Taylor 


I,avvvi;r 


Sullivan 


Ki 


■;i;sK 


("iRI-CORV 


W ILl.lAMs 


, \1. 1! 


Sink 


1 Ii.rita(;e 


.McNeill 


Newsom, I''. 


. Ci 


■:r/.ENI)ANNKR 


\ lOL 


Newsom, 


\. 1. 


1 . WIM 


C'akr 


I'.MERY 


KiKKR 


Gi 


,ASS 


1 )| LLON 


SMnii 




Mm. 1 OKI) 



216 



Cokiinhian Literary Society 



T^OIR score and eight years ago, in June 
-*■ 1S46. a few students of L'nion Institute, llie 
forerunner of Duke University, assembled to 
form a st)eiety wiiosc purpose was to promote 
the interest of Hterary training, especially elocu- 
tion, poetry, and fine arts, 'i'his action re- 
sulted in the birth of the Columbian Literary 
Societ\-. A few \ears later, in 1N51, the Hes- 
perian Literary Society was organized. During 
the ensuing years, the life of literary work was 
stimulated enthusiastically by the rivalry be- 
tween these two groups in debates and in ora- 
torical contests. 

Since the founding of the society, it is found 
that several of the early functions of the society 
have been taken over by other organizations 
which Columbia had started. Of primary im- 
portance is the part that the society, in con- 
junction with the Hesperian Society, pla^'ed in 
establishing and supporting various publica- 
tions. In 1881, The College Herald was begun 
by a group of the society. Later this was called 
in succession: The Trinity Chronicle and The 
Duke Chronicle. The Trinity Magazine, which 
was founded in the same year, became known 
as the Archive in 1887. Besides founding two 
publications, the society had its own distinct 
library of some thirty-five volumes in 1850. 
These books have been absorbed by the college 
library, and today one occasionally runs across 
an old book marked "Donated by the Colum- 
bian Literary Society." 

Due to the disbandmcnt of Hesperia in 1931, 
Columbia now is chiefly concerned with inter- 
collegiate debating, parliamentary meetings, 
and oratorical contests. A Senator Simmons 
Medal has been awarded during the last few 
years. The \\ ile>' Gray Medal was established 
at Trinity College in 1879 b>- Robert T. (jray, 
an able young lawyer and Methodist of Raleigh, 
X. C. It is a memorial in honor of his brother, 
Captain Samuel Wiley Gray, who was killed in 
Battle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 2, 
1863. In accordance with the wish of the donor, 
the medal has been given to the member of the 
Senior Class who made the best oratif)n during 
the commencement of his graduation. During 
this period twenty-six winners have been Col- 
umbians, twenty-seven Hesperians. 




Dams \\ ii.mams 
I'rcsidfiii First 'IVrm 

Officers 

Thomas Rojjcrs, Vice Presi- 
dent; Romulus .\Ioser, Secretary; 
Homer Hihon, Treasurer; Fred 
Cady, Marshal; I)ou>;las Cor- 
riher, Chaplain; Dr. Nelson .\I. 
Blake, Critic. 





DowD Ba.nc;le 
President Second Term 

Officers 

Fred Cady, \'icc President; 
William Holler, Secretary; Henry 
lat'u'ar. Treasurer; Robert Kay, 
Marshal; Douglas Cor ri her, 
Chaplain; Dr. Nelson M. Blake, 
Critic. 



217 




HONORARY AND 



PROFESSIONAL 




SllACKl'ORD 

Town LEY 

SCHOCK 



Bray 



Newsom 

Sides 

Hendrickson 



220 





M^iU Ijutlttj 



SW*ll k lAYiBH 



Grifun 

Cash 

Daniels 



U'alker 
Clement 

TiLLOTSON 



221 1 



c^ 



Omicron Delta Kappa 




Leroy Sides 
President 

Officers 

James O. Otis 
Vice President 

Dr. a. K. Manchester 
Secretary 

Claiborne Gregory 

Treasurer 



OMICRON DFXTA KAPPA, a national col- 
legiate honorary fraternity, was founded at 
Washington and Lee University, December 3, 
1914. Since that date the organization has ad- 
vanced until today there are ?>7 established cir- 
cles in Universities throughout the I nited 
States. 

The Rho Circle at Duke University was estab- 
lished in 1926, the initiates today numbering 
216. Since its introduction on the campus, this 
organization has made tremendous strides; its 
qualifications of membership, being of the high- 
est, has led it to a place of predominance in its 
particular field. The fact that it is a permanent 
custom of the organization to invite into mem- 
bership prominent individuals in world affairs 
has brought added renown to the order. The 
membership today includes leaders in nearly 
every profession and business field, and the stu- 
dent leaders of the campus for the past seven 
years. 

Built on a successful past, the future of all 
O. D. K. organizations, and especially of Rho 
Circle, is c^uite optimistic and the high standards 
to which it aspires can work to only one end. 



Top row: TowNLEY, Gregory, Otis, Murchison, Newsom, Shackiord, Bray, Bunch 
Bottom row: Getzendanner, Sciiock, Crawford, Rogers, Williams, Weaver, Hendrickson 

[222] 



C"l,\II!ORNK (jRKGORV 

Leroy Sides 

GURUOX roW.NLKV 

Joe SirACKKORD 

C'ari, Siioc k 

J'ardhk Bunch 

I'liii. Weaver 



Joe Get/.exdanner 



Alton Mukciiison 
Jerry Rrav 

James Otis 

Gene NTewson 



Fred Crawiord 

I FoRACE MeNDRICKSON 

D.W IS W'lI.I.IAMS 

'J'oM Rogers 




Delta Phi Alpha 



J. L. Newsom - 
President 

Officers 

Martin B. Williams 
\'icc President 

Len'ora Snyder 
Secretary 

\\ ILLIAM MOSENSON 

Treasurer 



T^ELTA PHI ALPHA has completed its sec- 
^-^ ond year of existence on the Duke campus. 
Having developed from the local German Club, 
which in the spring of 1931 lost its identity, it 
has attempted to perpetuate and to extend the 
ideals of that body. The organization is hon- 
orary, its membership comprising those students 
who have earned a minimum average of "B" 
through the second year of German or its equiv- 
alent, and who evidence an interest in the Ger- 
man language and particularly in German liter- 
ature and culture. The basic purpose of the 
organization is precisely: to bring together such 
students, and, by providing them, through so- 
cial means, with advantages denied them as in- 
dividuals, to help them sustain and broaden 
their interest. 

The colors of the organization are red, black, 
and gold. The key, bearing the coat-of-arms 
in three colors, is the complete emblem of the 
fraternity. The German eagle in gold is raised 
on a black background. In the center of the 
eagle's breast is a shield upon which the three 
Greek letters, Acl>A, are engraved. 




^: o. o, A ?> t:^ o a ri c» 




t-M^u5hti 





€,^,^t^ijjx 



first row: Ui'chukcii, Bkyax, J'owkll, Plumi-, Ball. Watkins, Snyulr, L., Bristi.r, IIoxeycutt, Leitner, 

Williams, M. B. 
Second rozv: Rink, Bangle, Phillips, Marcus, Bode, Snyder, C, Boepple, Kinter, Sear, Horne 
Third ro:v: Wilson, .Mosenson, Merkle, Markham, Hardy, West, Robertson, Berenson, Harloef, Forbes 

1224] 



Kappa Delta Pi 



l/'AI'l'A DKLTA IM, national honorary edu- 
-'■*' cation tratcruit}-, was founded at tlic Uni- 
versity of Illinois in 1909. 

Tlie Illinois Mducation Club rcsohcd to spon- 
sor the foundini,' of a national societ}- with local 
chapters similar to its own organization. 'I'he 
club was successful in its endeavor, and today 
it is an international (-)rgani/'.ation. Among the 
prominent names on its membership roll are 
those of John Dewcv, \V. C. Baule\-, Dorothv 
Canticld, Alfred Wall-Quest, Ricliard l\. Hyrd, 
and many others. 

The purpose of Kappa Delta Pi is to encour- 
age in its members a higher degree of devotion 
to social service by maintaining the highest edu- 
cational ideals, and by fostering fellowship, 
scholarship, and achie\ement in educational 
work. It attempts to maintain high standards 
of preparation for teaching, and to invite as 
members those who have attained excellence of 
scholarship and distinction of achievement as 
students and servants of education. 

Alpha Tau chapter of Duke University was 
established May 28, 1927, growing out of a local 
education club known as Braxton Cra\cn F<'du- 
cational Association. 




.\lice Searight 
Vice President 



Officers 

-Margaret Reid 
President 

Elizabeth Hicks 
Secretary 

Dorothy .McElduff 
Treasurer 




Miller 
Love, M. 
Welles 



Rogers 

DoiGLAS 

Bishop 



Brooks 

Kennedy 

Strowd 



Love, C. 

Kixter 

Mllford 



Griffin 

Hicks 

Sear 



Black 

Serfas 

Morton 



Walker 

Taylor 

Forbes 



225 




Alpha Kappa Psi 



Jackson Viol 

President 



Officers 

Raymond L. Kent 
\'ice President 

Walter Wikingstad 
Secretary 

George Watson 
Treasurer 



A LPHA KAPPA PSI, a national professional 

-^ ^ commercial fraternity, was founded at New 
York University In 1905. At present there are 
fifty chapters installed in leading universities 
throughout the countr)'. The aims of the fra- 
ternity are not only to further the individual 
welfare of its members but to encourage interest 
In the fields of commerce, accounts, and finance. 
The Diary of Alpha Kappa Psi is the official pe- 
riodical, which devotes itself to fraternity, com- 
merce, and college interests. This publication, 
which Is Issued four times during the school year, 
contains many educational items concerning cur- 
rent business problems written by both active 
and alumni members. 

Beta Eta chapter was established at Duke 
University In December of the year 1927, to 
establish at Duke a recognized national com- 
mercial fraternity. 

Each year Alpha Kappa Psi extends a mem- 
bership to those students of the upper three 
classes pursuing studies in Business Adminis- 
tration who have shown their ability in this 
field, and who have proven their right to a rec- 
ognition through business activities on the 
campus. 




V 



P 9 f^4 ,P- P 9 g p. 

Q o ^ no a p. a ci^ 

n e: O O P r^ r^ o 



First row: Newsom, Wright, Hatch, (Iahli,, Kini, Kniiim', Onisko, Stillman, Exum 

Second row: Peckham, Burge, Nixon, Dkckkr, Dunston, Uemmk, Wikingstad, Fiser, Koenig 

Third row: Lawyer, Wildnauer, Crawford, Schieferly, Pruner, Starratt, Watson, Smith 

1226] 



Delta Phi Rho Alpha 



rjl.l.lA nil KIK) Al.niA is a local lionur- 
'^ ary athletic sororit>- which was created as 
a sister oiKaiiization to Tombs, the athletic fra- 
ternity for men. This sorority was fouiuled at 
old Trinit\- C\)llcgc in 1921, and has become one 
of the traditions of the campus. 'I'he purpose 
of the organization is the fostering of school 
spirit, leadership, clean sportsmanship, and the 
promotion of interest in athletics on the campus. 

Every year, seven new members are chosen 
after consideration of leadership and atiiletic 
ability. Annually, these pledges appear in the 
traditional "goat'' costume, a middy blouse, cot- 
ton hose, and tennis shoes, and carrying the 
s\-mbolic rolling pin with the Greek inscription 
A4)PA. 

This year, the sorority has sponsored a tennis 
tournament, presenting a silver cup to the win- 
ner. Each year, also, the sorority sponsors an 
interclass basketball tournament. A banner 
with the numerals of the winning team is the 
award. 




Kloise Incram 
Presidciii 



Officers 

P'thel Garrett 
Sccretar\' 

Mary .Alice Dewey 
Treasurer 








Griffin 



Parkiicrst 
X'aughn 



I'egram 
Peterson 



G.vrreti 
Bailey 



Powell 



227] 




Tombs 



Officers 

Phil Weaver 

President 

Al. Reichman 
Vice President 

Jerry Bray 
Secretary-Treasurer 



'TOOMBS, a local honorary athletic fraternity, 
-■- was founded at Trinity College in 1905. Es- 
tablished primarily as an honorar}" athletic or- 
ganization, Tombs has evolved into one of the 
most outstanding brotherhoods on the campus 
of Duke. In addition to fostering better rela- 
tionship in sport between Duke and other uni- 
versities, Tombs also endeavors to implant more 
firmly the traditions of old Trinity College and 
to create new ones for the rapidly growing Duke 
University. Each year the fraternity attempts 
to instill in the hearts of incoming Freshmen a 
certain reverence for all traditions of the past. 
Though there are on its rolls inscribed the names 
of many celebrities of Southern sports, the men 
who are invited to membership in Tombs are 
those who have not only been most skillful on 
the athletic field but also those who have ex- 
emplified the highest characteristics of leader- 
ship and sportsmanship. 

It is with a feeling of pride that Tombs can 
answer to the ciy of "overemphasis in sport" 
by pointing to the fact that among its members 
there are not only stellar athletes but men who 
lead the campus in government and scholarship 
as well. 



c. c .^ n o a D Q p ^ 

C-p O ^ P 9 P D p. g. 
.^, ,f : C ,^ p O O. ^ .^ P 

First row: Crawiord, Ireland, Wagner, Welsh, Reichman, Cox, W eavkr, Schock, Went/,, IIamrkk 
Second roiv: Heritage, Keller, Sides, IIendrickson, Rossiter, Tallev, Hell, Storm, Dunlai-, 1'.. B., Dinlai-, 
Third row: L.wvver, Sullivan, Peckham, Jester, Higgins, Bird, Crist, Scorr, Newton, Onisko 



[228 



Eko-L 



j^KO-T. was fouiulcd at Trinity College in 
1914 for the purpose of encouraging and 
rewarding women of the college who had at- 
tained a marked degree of scholastic achieve- 
ment. Its establishment came as an answer to 
the demand for recognition of those who had 
reached a mark of excellence in their under- 
graduate work. It served supreme in this ca- 
pacity for six years, at which time it was parti- 
ally supplanted by the establishment of Phi 
Ikna Kappa. Then KkoT^ assumed a position 
similar to that of 9019 on the men's campus, in 
that both are local societies drawing their mem- 
bership from the two upper classes. 

The membership of Eko-L is quite selective, 
and it is recognized as a great honor to become 
a part of this society. Since the year of its 
founding it has maintained a high standard of 
leadership as well as scholarship on the Duke 
woman's campus, and it is duly proud of the 
record which has been made by those who have 
been deemed worthy of membership. 

In past years this society has sponsored in- 
teresting and worthwhile contests throughout 
the schools of the state in the writing of short 
stories and poetry. These contests not only 
served as means of scholastic recognition, but 
they thereby advanced the interests of Trinity 
College and Duke University among the people 
of the state. 




ROSANELLE CaSH 

President 



Members 

Katherine Brooks 
Lucille Draughon 

Amy Duke 

Mary Louise Horxe 

AL\RY Parkhurst 

Margaret Reid 

Marie Smith 

Mildred Stites 

-Mildred Taylor 

Ethel Williams 




Parkhurst 



Smith 



Pay lor 



Horne 



229 




Sandals 



Helen Gray 

Presidfiii 

Officers 

Jean Burd 
Secretary 

Miss Evelyn Barnes 

Faculty Adviser 



CANDALS is an honorary Sophomore organi- 
^ zation which was first instituted in 1932 by 
the Student Council of the Woman's College 
Government. The twenty members who com- 
prise it are selected at the end of their Fresh- 
man year on the basis of scholarship, leadership, 
and general attitude. It was created for the 
primary purpose of assisting the Student Gov- 
ernment in carrying out its various activities. 
During Freshman Orientation Week, the mem- 
bers were especially helpful, and since then they 
have cooperated with the Social Standards Com- 
mittee in keeping the Ark a recreational center 
on the East Campus. Their main project for 
this year was to further the improvement of the 
Ark and create an active interest in it. Under 
the leadership of the president, Helen Gray, the 
Sandals have created an important place for 
this group among the other organizations of the 
campus. 




Caldwell 


I'.liKI) 


I.IITI.K 


Gray, D. 


11aisi.ii' 


CuNINGGIM 


Pill 1,1,11'S 


1 Iakdin 


Morton 


Meetze 


Goodman 


Parks 


BuiCE 


Abi:rn'i:tiiy 


Newsom 



I 230 



Beta Ome^a Si^ma 



gKTA OMF.CA STCMA was founded at Trin- 
ity College with a twofold purpose, the first 
being to honor those Freshmen who succeed in 
extra-curricula activities, and the second to aid 
in furthering better school spirit. Part of the 
effort to create this spirit, which led to organ- 
izing the fraternity, included f^lacing the respon- 
sibility of acquainting the Freshmen with cam- 
pus traditions definitely upon some organization. 

Beta Omega Sigma of the class of '36 feels 
that it has done the work expected of it. The 
fraternity did not attempt to coerce the Fresh- 
men as has been its tendency in former years. 
Instead, the class of '}7 was handled with con- 
sideration and tact, a policy which has brought 
much respect to Beta Omega Sigma. 

Beta Omega Sigma greatly felt the loss of 
their fraternity adviser, Dean Arnold. 




Officers 

Gilbert Kkitii, President 
IsiiA.M KiMBKLL, Vice President 

George Everitt, Secretary 

Phil Russell, Treasurer 

Jack Hicks, Serj;eant-at-.\rms 



C5C^ 




Ip ^' ^t f^ j^ 

" ft a ff p O £., p p ;^ 

First ro:c: .Siiortki.i., \ \i (.iin. Mi rry, Iiiomas, Kkitii. Karrell. Kwei.l. I'i\ kriiart, Ciianulee, Abbott 
Second rou\- Perry, Naktems, Crawford, Hicks, .McCIrail, Parsons, Si/.emore, Russell, Reavis, Powell 
Third rotv: Conradi, Dailey, Burford, Woolsey, Whiting, Hathorx, Kraushaak, Mossburg, Shanks, Carver 
Fourth rozv: McGillici ddy, F1\i.i.enger, Gent, Everitt. .Miller, Huiscamp, Konopka, Brumbach, Morris, 
Harris 




p p r^ p 

-^ m r^ ^ 



231 




9019 



Davis Williams 
President 



Officers 

William E. Apple 
Vice President 

Burke Smith 
Secretary 

Hal Atkinson 

Treasurer 



nnOWARD the close of the last century, or to 
-■- be exact, during the first of that decade 
termed "The Gay Nineties," a group of men at 
old Trinity wrote the Constitution and Ritual 
which are still the inspiration of the present 
members of the 9019 Society. At the time of 
its founding, 9019 was the only honor society 
on the campus, and in its club rooms in "The 
Old Inn" a number of men were initiated who 
later brought glory to Trinity through outstand- 
ing successes in many fields. 

The pin of the fraternity is a gold circle, with 
a chalice and an arrow of gold superimposed. 
The figures of 9019, in black, are on the goblet. 
The colors of the organization are red and white. 
In keeping with the tradition established many 
years ago, only those men are considered to be 
eligible for election who are of excellent char- 
acter and who have achieved distinction in 
scholarship during two years of study in Trinity 
College. The elections are held in the Fall and 
Spring of each year. 

Washington's Birthda}- is celebrated as "9019 
Day." This is a time when all old and new 
members come together for their annual ban- 
quet. 



<P5 T- ^ O .<^. P- ^' ^ ^ 

C5 o a, o o A a p fs 




Top row: Conrad, Sapp, R., (Jktzkndanner, Keeski:, Sapp, J., Humphreys, Atkinson, Aimmi , (n \kii xrt 
Bottom row: (iec tnok. McNkii,, Kirk, St. Clair, Wacjner, Ross, I^unch, V'loi,, I,i:itnkr 

[232 1 



Iota Gamma Pi 



TO'I'A C;AMMA 1M was foundca in October, 
-'■ l'^22, by a group of students in the scientilie 
departments of Trinity College. Previous to 
this time there was no organization of any kind 
devoted primarily to the interests of students 
in the different scientific fields, and there was a 
feeling among a few interested students that 
there should be some society or group which 
would promote fraternal interests between men 
in the fields of science. They also desired to 
recognize scholarship and leadership in this work. 
This fraternity is composed of about twenty 
or twenty-five men from the Junior and Senior 
classes of Trinity College who hav^e excelled in 
scholarship and leadership and who arc pri- 
marily interested in some branch of scientific 
study. At the bi-monthly meetings of the fra- 
ternity the students give talks and discuss the 
latest developments in their own fields of study. 
Through these meetings the members of the 
fraternity gain valuable knowledge concerning 
what is going on in other lines of work, and at 
the same time each student has an opportunity 
to discuss his own findings. 




1 l.\i. \\ . .Vtkinson 
President 



Officers 

Charles Humphreys 
\ ice President 

John M. Bird 
Secretary 

William E. Apple 
Treasurer 



d^^9k 



f^^ j^j ;CV^ f>--y U*^ ^^f .^ 

C: n o o o o o o ^ 




,Vi. t 



^ '^ ^ 



IS^i 




Top row: Ri(;.sBv, M arkh \.\i. Bird, J., Ross, Harkness. Otis, Hi-.mphreys, Uonsidler. Di Prv 
Bottom row: Bleuit, Kirk, .\r.mstroxg, Coone, .\lAcI)f)NALi), Jacksox, \ anhov, I'ease, .Apple 



233 




Sigma Upsilon 



Richard A. Smith 
\'ice President 



Officers 

Leslie A. Squires 
President 

Lyne Few 
Secretary 

James Newsom 
Treasurer 



CIGMA UPSILON can hardly be called a se- 
^ cret organization. It is, in fact, a national 
literary fraternity which has for its aim the bind- 
ing together of the college literary clubs and 
fraternities of the United States for the sake of 
mutual helpfulness. The membership is limited 
to twelve active undergraduate members in each 
chapter. 

The primary motive of providing a recipro- 
cating helpfulness is clearly discernible through- 
out all the phases of its organization and in its 
manner of birth. 

On November 30, 1906, delegates from liter- 
ary clubs already active on the campuses of four 
colleges, Sewanee, A'anderbilt University, Ran- 
dolph-Macon, and the University of Georgia, 
met at Vanderbilt University. This meeting 
resulted in the foundation of the national liter- 
ary fraternity which was given the Greek name 
Sigma Upsilon. 

In 1913, The Fortnightly Club of Trinity 
College was given its charter as a chapter of 
Sigma Upsilon. The name Fortnightly was re- 
tained as the name of the chapter, and it is under 
this name that Sigma Upsilon exists on the cam- 
pus of Duke University today. 




'I'lKJMAS, R. 



Kiw 



Smith 



Newsom 



234 1 



Chi Delta Phi 



/"^lll Dl^LTA I'lll, national honorary literal)- 
^^ sorority, was founded in 1919 at the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee. The purpose of the sor- 
ority is to bring together representative college 
women who, by their literary interest and cre- 
ative ability, may uphold the higher ideals of a 
liberal education. The membership is unlim- 
ited in number, but restricted to upperclassmen. 

There are at present thirty-eight chapters of 
Chi Delta Phi. The chapter at Duke was es- 
tablished in 1922, upon petition of its members. 
The publication of the sorority is the Litteratt'ur, 
issued quarterly. The badge is a five-pointed 
star in blue, bearing on its face a lamp and the 
three Greek letters of the name in gold, the 
whole being surrounded by a gold or pearl 
circle, with a pair of quills across the pin be- 
neath the star. The national colors arc blue 
and gold; the flower is the pansy. 

The national organization holds annual prose 
and poetry contests, entries being received from 
its own chapters and from those of Sigma Up- 
silon, a fraternity of purposes similar to those 
of Chi Delta Phi. The local chapter has en- 
deavored to stimulate literary interest on the 
campus, honorary members of the sorority hav- 
ing addressed the organization. During the 
spring semester the chapter sponsored a poetry 
contest. 




Hkttv Kni(;iit 
I'rcsidc-iii 



Officers 

DoRRis Fish 

\ ice I'rcsiilc-iit 

Mii.DRKD Taylor 
Sfcrctary 

Doris \\'i;i,i.i:s 
Treasurer 




Welles 



I'aRKHL RST 



'I'x^ I.OK 



U'vA'rr 



Rose 



I 235 I 



American Institute of Electrical Engineers 




•--— ■!►■ 



first ro-iC: W'onsidler, Dilworth, Kirby, Dameron, Cline, Scott, Thomas 
Second row: Michael, Otis, Jackson, Apple, Atkinson, Pettigrew 
Third row: Finger, Bryce, Coffman, Bleuit, Givens, Prof. Schealer 
Fourth row: Prof. Seeley 



Duke Society of Mechanical Engineers 




First row: Mouse, VVauters, Trainor, Pease, Cronk 

Second rotv: Turner, Kdwards, Schuerman 

Third row: Nixon, Maxson, Sharpi.kss, Marks, Kadie 



236] 



American Society of Ci\ il Kn^ineers 




First row: Southerlaxd, Storms, Drl'mmoxd, Lewis, Batson, Proi-. Bird, Skinner 
Si-cond ro'x: Bird, Artley, Stoneburxer, Ballenger, Ferguson, Bearse, Xeu 
Third ro:c: Shaeffer, Carman, Mieklejohx, Moorey, Ki.eban, Kaufman 



Delta Epsilion Sigma 

(HONORARY ENGINEERING ORDER) 




First rote: Maxson, Prof. Mathews, Prof. Wilbur, Prof. Seeley 

Second row: .Atkinson, .Apple, Bryce, Dilworth. Jackson 

Third rote: Prof. Schealer, Bleuit, Neu, Drummond, Wonsidler, Otis 



237 J 






Phi Eta Sigma 




Frank Woolsey 

President 



Officers 

Launce Flemister 
\'ice President 

J. R. Black 

Secretary 

Ernest Wood 
Treasurer 



1\/TEMBERSHIP in Phi Eta Sigma is a re- 
^^'- ward for those first-year men who show 
bv their scholastic accompHshments that they 
have unusual intellectual ability. The aim of 
this fraternitj' is to stimulate in Freshmen an 
immediate desire to strive toward superior in- 
tellectual advancement. 

Phi Eta Sigma was founded in 1923 by the 
late Doctor Arkle Clark, who was then Dean of 
the University of Illinois. It is the only national 
Freshman honorar}' fraternity, and now consists 
of thirty-four chapters situated in various uni- 
versities of the United States. Every second 
year delegates from these chapters meet in a 
national convention at which reports are made 
and necessary business transacted. 

The Duke chapter of Phi Eta Sigma was in- 
stalled in 1932 through the efforts of the late 
Dean M. Arnold. Dean Arnold was the faculty 
adviser and an honorary member of Phi Eta 
Sigma. He was deeply interested in the fra- 
ternity and did everything possible to further 
its influence on the campus. The members of 
Phi Eta Sigma feel a great loss in the untimely 
death of their respected brother. 






mmmm- Jc^-c' J/s^i. ^' It^my^y 1«^ * - y^^-w^f ^^ 7^ '^«^*" 







i\i;sbai:m 


Stroud 


Naktenis 


Rous 11 


'I'rainor 


Peek 


I^LAt K 


C'ri'ikshank 


Hale 


Wood, K. 


F.WELL 


Hatch 


Bearse 


COOEY 


Herb 


\\ OLTZ 



238 



Tail Kappa Alpha 



q^AL kAPI'A ALl'llA. nalional honorary 
forensic fraternity, was founded at Jntiian- 
apolis, Indiana, in the year 1908. Experiencing 
a consistent growth, the fraternity rapidl\- be- 
came popular. 

With the installation of a chapter at Duke 
University, men outstanding in debating began 
to receive suitable recognition for tlicir work. 
Tau Kappa Alpha, through the unquestioned 
merit of its limited membership, has come to 
ln)id a position of respect on the campus, and 
membership in the fratcrnil\- has become an 
ideal for which to stri\e. 

Particularly, by their participation in inter- 
collegiate debating some of the members of Tau 
Kappa Alpha have distinguished the school, the 
fraternity, and themselves. Tau Kappa Alpha 
is largely responsible for the attractive debating 
schedules which have been arranged from vear 
to year. For the scholastic year 1933-34, the 
following schedule was arranged: 

Home Debates: Universit\- of Alabama, Uni- 
versity of Richmond, Emory and Henry, Yale 
University. 

Trip Debates: University of Mar\land, Wash- 
ington and Lee Universit\-, Georgia School of 
Technology, Emory and ilenr}-. 

Although Tau Kappa Alpha has in tlie past 
years been more of a recognition order than 
anything else, it is the expressed purpose of this 
year's organization to make the society's status 
a more active one. A closer relationship with 
debating activity is planned through the exec- 
utive control of a subsidiary in the process of 
formation. It is the hope that this will be the 
means of achieving that end so necessary and 
desired on this campus — the re-awakening of the 
somewhat latent interest in debate that was so 
ali\e a few years ago. 





Ci.AiBORXE Gregory 
Presideiil 



Class o] 1934 

I'ardue Bunch 
Ci.AiBORNK Gregory 

W AKRKN SCOVILLE 

Class of 1935 

1.. II. I'.UMONDSON 

F rat res in Facilitate 

James Cannon, III, B. G 

Chiids, R. L. Flowers, P. N 
Garbcr, G. .\[. Gregory, H. J 

Herring, Holland Hollon, (.'. I'. 

Jordan. J. '1'. l/inninvr. \\ . A 

Mabry. N. R. McKw^-n. 11. K 

.Myers, .\. j. Nicli..], .\. .\l 

Prf>ctor, R. .S. Rankin, i:. B 
U'eatherspoon. 



239 



Phi Beta Kappa 



OFFICERS 

R. L. Flowers, President; J. Fred Rippy, \'Ice Pres- 
ident; James Cannon, III, Secretary-Treasurer; W. H. 
Glasson, Alice M. Baldwin, Members Executive Com- 
mittee. 



MKMBERS-IN-COURSE 



On Junior Standing 

\\'arren Candler Scoville, Ross Augustus Tunnel!, 
Jr., Wilbur Lee Brister, Harold Witherspoon Atkinson, 
William Elisha Apple, Joseph Winton Getzendanner, 
Jr., Rosanelle Cash, Alildred Josephine Taylor, Cicely 
Berlin, Mary Louise Home, William Mellinger Gear- 
hart, Charles Raymond Humphreys, Robert Wall Sapp, 
Mildred McKinney, Amy Duke, Mary Katherine 
Brooks, Margaret Lucille Reid, William Mosenson, 
Glenn Davis Williams. 



On Senior Standing 

Ira Stanley Ross, J. J. Zeren, Celestine Marie Beamer, 
Dorothy B. Wyvell, James Orin Otis, R. E. Kohler, 
Edna Marie Smith, Burke McGuire Smith, Elizabeth 
Hugh Hicks, Mary Stuart Lackey. 



(^RAi)L'.\TE Students 

Margaret Glass Altvater, William Pratt Dale, Sam- 
uel Paul Garner, James Maynard Keech, Carl Raj- 
mond Lundgren, Jeanne Logan Manget, Mary Eliz- 
abeth Poole, Joseph Gaither Pratt, \\'alter A. Stanbury, 
Jr., Mildred Gant Stites, James Nardiu Truesdale, 
Mary Lipscombc Walker. 



F,\Cl'LT^' ME.MBERS 



Ruth M. .\dd(,ms, F. S. Aldridge, I',. P. Alyea, .\. R. 
Anderson, Alice AL Baldwin, P. F. Baum, W . 15. Bolich. 

B. H. Branscomb, J. P. Breedlove, F. A. Bridgers, 
Frances Brown, F. C. Brown, W. A. Brownell, R. M. 
Caldcr, James Cannon, ill, J. W. C.irr, Jr., F. .\I. 
Carroll, F. W. Constani, 1'. \. (i. Ciiu|ur. W . I. 
Cranford, Leslie Craven, Cjifford Davis, W . C. I)a\i- 
son, H. G. Dressel, H. R. Dwirc, C. W. Edwards, W. P. 
Few, R. L. Flowers, W. D. Forbus, C. F. Gardner, 
A. M. Gates, A. H. Gilbert, Katherine Gilbert, W . II. 
Glasson, W. K. (Jreene, W . II. I bill, I'. M. I lanes, 
(.). C. E. Hansen-Pruss, G. 1'. llargitl, Deiyl Hart, 

C. C. Hatley, D. C. Flctherington, F. S. Hickman, 
W. H. Hollinshead, Holland Flolton, IT. C. Ilorack, 



J. r>. Ilubbcll, C. I!. l|(Mi\rr, Clirislopher Johnson, 
R. R. Jones, J. M. Keech, J. T. Lanning, W. T. Lap- 
rade, Anne I/awton, S. T. McCloy, Wm. AIcDougall, 
W. A. Mabry, I). B. Maggs. C. B. Markham, W. C. 
.\la.xwell, Justin .Miller, II. I''.. Myers, J. M. Ormcnd, 
,\. S. PeaVse, C. W. Peppier, E. L. Persons. .V. .\l. 
Proctor, W. R. Quynn, B. U. Ratchford, Alary 1,. 
Raj'mond, J. !•'. Ripp\', Christopher Roberts, G. T. 
Rowe, Julian Ruffin, Elbert Russell, S. R. Schealer, 
J. H. Shields, Fred Sington, II. E. Spence, F. H. Swett, 
J. N. Truesdale, Herman Walker, Jr., \\ . II. \\'anna- 
maker, A. Al. Webb, Alarie V. White, .\. I. White, 
R. N. Wilson, Carl Zener, L. B. Ziv. 



[240] 




FRATERNITIES 




Fraternity Pan-Hellenic Council 



Jake W. Sullivan 
President 

Officers 

J. G. TOWNLEY 

Vice President 

George Speicher 
Secretary 

J. A. Mustard 
Treasurer 



"T^^HE belief that the best interests of Greek- 
-"- letter fraternities at Duke University, with 
respect both to our individual chapters and to 
our general organizations, would be fostered by 
the organization and functioning of a body of 
duly constituted representatives from the var- 
ious active chapters in Duke, was the basis for 
the organization of the Pan-Hellenic Council. 

The Pan-Hellenic Council, the governing body 
of inter-fraternity activities, which promotes in- 
terfraternity relations on a wholesome basis of 
unity and agreement, is composed of one rep- 
resentative from each of the national fraternities 
and one representative from each local fraternity. 
These men are selected by their various groups 
at the beginning of their Junior year, and serve 
as associates. The following year they auto- 
matically succeed their Senior representatives. 

This year the council inaugurated the deferred 
rushing of the freshmen, and this system will in 
all probability be continued. 

The Pan-Hellenic Council serves as a com- 
mon meeting ground on which the various prob- 
lems of the different fraternities are brought up 
and discussed. The council makes and enforces 
rules concerning rushing, pledging, and initi- 
ation of all men. 



/^ jc& ^ f^ ^ f^ r . 

O.**'' Jp*' -ic-^f ^'^J- »-r" I'**'. I •*••■'• 



4-fti!4i 



Foster 


Bowen 


Mustard 


'I'OWNLEY 


Marti.x 


J3eilin 


\\ right 


White 


Harloff 


Newsom 


Derrick 


Gearhart 


Newton 


MOORHEAD 



[242 



Sorority Paii-Ilcllcnic Council 



T^lll'. Paii-1 Iclloiiic Council, llic j,H>\ciniiij,' 
■'■ body of intcrsorority activities, is composed 
of two representatives fn^ii each of tlic ten 
sororities. These pirls are selected by their re- 
spective groups. OlHccrs on the council rotate 
from year to year thus a\oidinp unnecessary 
rivah\'. The Council makes and enforces rules 
concerning rushing, pledging, antl initiation of 
all girls. 

At the end ol last year the Council torinulalcd 
new rushing rules which were put into practice 
this vfixr. A few changes were made in the old 
Constitution and new Constitutions were printed. 

A scholarship cup is awarded semi-annually to 
the sorority having the highest a\'erage for the 
preceding semester. 

As a project for the year the Council has been 
working on a plan whereby a scholarship shall 
be awarded each year to a girl for outstanding 
scholarship. 

A new sorority, Delta Mpsilon, has joined the 
Council this year, and Nu Beta Phi, a local 
sorority, has become affiliated with Alpha Ep- 
silon Phi, a national sororitv. 




Helen Wyatp 
President 

Officers 

Virginia Sarver 
\'ice President 

Annie Kate Rebman 
Secretary 

Ruth Jones 
Treasurer 




k lk.1 



AiAi. l^itAt^A 





V k^li'AV a"^ 



Top row: Xacha.mson, Wilford, Dillon, Jones, Sarver, Rebman, Miller, Tcdor, Langston 
Bottom ro'.v: Owens, Wise, Riefle, Perry, Pederson, Meetze, Berenson, White, McNeill 



[243 



(!5 



n 




JkJt 




IH ^*^ 



a. 



u 



k 






i^:;;l 




First row: Mustakd, Lamar, (jrkgorv, Holman 
Second row: Sicklofk, Foreman, Fi.kming 
7'lnrd ro:r: DoKiiii, \\'i:nn, .\nnoii-, C'riik.sii \nk 
Fourth row: Staniur'i. McC'rarv. I,i:i:. Ouzts 



244 



ATQ 



IRATRES IN FACULTATE 

E. B. Craven, Jr., Clifford Davis, H. R. Dwirc, 
R. L. Flowers, Douirlass Mapps, J. A. Speed, R. A. 
Ross. 

FRATRES IX l\I\ ERSITATE 
Graduate School 

\V. A. Stanbury, Jr., R. P. Chalker. 

Law School 
Joe Whitson. 

Class of 1934 

Claiborne Gregor\', Durliam, N. C; Manin 
Lee, Charlotte, N. C; George H. Lamar, Rock- 
ville, Md.; Nicholas 0. Laney, Charlotte, N. C; 
James A. Mustard, Jr., Montciair, N. J. 

Class of 1935 

Stuart Swope Fleming, Columbia. Tenn.; Walter 
D. Hastings, Columbia, Tenn.; William C. Sice- 
loff, High Point, N. C. 

Class of 1936 

Edwin B. Abbott, Birmingham, Ala.; Ernest 
Cruikshank, Raleigh, N. C; Lawrence Dortch, 
Columbia, Tenn.; Blades Foreman, Elizabeth 
City, N. C; William C. Holman, .Albany, Ga.; 
A. Carl Lee, Jr., Charlotte. N. C; John Mc- 
Crary, Lexington, N. C; James Ouzts, Marion, 
N. C; John Stanburv, Greensboro, N. C; [ohn 
Webb, Durham, N. C. 

Pledges 

Nicholson .\shby, Durham. N. C; W'. Thornton 
Green. Jr., Louisville, K.y.; William Jennings, 
W'estfield, N. J.; Murray Jones, Durham, N. C; 
George Maltb\-, Ogdensburg, N. Y.; Charles 
Pruitt, Frederick, .\Id.; Thomas Southgate, Dur- 
ham, N. C; Jack Washington, Alexandria, \'a.; 
Robert Williams, Laurel, Del.; Robert C. Wood. 
Lewisburg. W. \ a. 




Alpha Tau Omega 

Number of active chapters 94 

Number of alumni associations 71 

Total membership 30,060 

A. T. O. founded. . .September II, 1865 

Xi at Duke March 2, 1872 

Colors Sky-blue and gold 

Flower White tea rose 

Publication The Palm 



A I.PHA TAU OMKGA was the first fra- 
-^ *■ tcrnity established after the Civil War. 
Founded at Richmond, \'irginia, by three 
younp Confederate soldiers, it was projected 
as a national organization which should 
know no sectional bounds, and the first 
chapter placed at V'ireinia Military Insti- 
tute. 

The fraternity now extends among col- 
lege groups in forty-four states, and was 
the first to maintain successfully chapters 
in the North. 

The first fraternity to become incorpo- 
rated, it was granted a charter in 1879 by 
the Supreme Court of Maryland, at the 
instance of the fraternity members assem- 
bled in Congress at Baltimore. A. T. O. 
has been a member of the Inter-fraternity 
Conference since the initial 1909 meeting of 
that body. 

Xi chapter is the oldest fraternity on 
Duke campus. It was the ninth Alpha 
Tau Omega chapter to be established, and 
is now fourth oldest in the order of existing 
ones. Originally North Carolina Alpha 
chapter, the name was changed to Xi in 
1890, at the end of the anti-fraternity pe- 
riod at Trinity. 



245 



o o o o 




n 






l;h;;-:l 




/"/Vj« row; W'la.sii, Frkxcii, ^^.\RTIN, AFcT.aix, Mriuiii- 

SON 

Second ro:c: (Jr.whs, Kki.lkr. Hangar, Kni:ii>i> 
Third ro:v: May, Bridukrs, Morklock, Budd, Paist 
Fourth ro:c': Grifi'is, Burkori), IIuiskamp, Sciiaker, 



( 2V. J 



KL 



IRATRKS IN 1 \e I l.i ATK 
A. R. Anderson, F. N. Bridgcrs, A. K. Maiiclu-stor. 

IRATRKS IX IXRKRSrrATK 
Graduate School 
E. I. Bugg. 

School of Medicine 
W. E. Sharpe. 

Law School 

H. L. Bomar, M. G. Perrow. 

Class of 1934 

R. G. French, Oak Park, 111.; J. A. Martin, Lake 
Forest, 111.; Ralston McLain, Swarthmore, Pa.; 
A. G. Murchison, Favettcville, N. C; B. T. 
Welsh, Rockville, Md. ' 

Class of 1935 

N. L. Anderson, Durham, N. C; F.. R. Bridgers, 
Wilson, \'. C; T. ^^'. Graves, Wilson, N. C; 
McCarthy Hanger, Bala, Pa.; A. I*". Keller, Nor- 
folk, \'a.; R. E. Kneipp, Washington, D. C; 
Reynolds May, Dothan, Ala. 

Class of 1936 

R. \". A. Benner, Bronxville, X. Y.: W . P. Hudd, 
Durham, N. C; A. L. Burford, Texarkana, 
Texas; D. A. Griffis, Lake Forest, 111.; W. L. 
Huiskamp, Keokuk, Iowa; G. L. Morelock, 
Xashville, Tenn.; J. B. Paist, Lansdowne, Pa.; 
Garfield Shafer, Norfolk, Va. 

Pledges 

Wendell .Vlexander, Rosemoiit, Pa.; Wayne Am- 
bler, Abington, Pa.; Richard Bair, Reading, Pa. 
George Barley, Lynbrook, N. V.; F'loyd Bennett 
Richmond, \'a.; Kenneth Boyle, .Arlington, X. J. 
L R. Chandlee, Gaithersburg, Md.; Robert Dun- 
stan, Pittsburgh, Pa.; George Failing, Luke, Md. 
Judson George, Laurens, S. C; Joyce Gibbons 
Wilson, X. C; G. E. Griscom, Trenton, N. J. 
Grant Horneffer, Summit, X. J.; Carl Huiskamp 
Keokuk, la.; Morris Johnson, Hammond, Ind. 
John Kneipp, Washington, D. C; Francis Little 
Washington. Pa.; Harry Litterst, -Vrlington, 
N. J.; G. M. Matheus, NIedia, Pa.; Oscar Mc- 
Fayden, Fayetteville, X. C; Harry Morris, Ches- 
ter. Pa.; L. J. Sandlin, Fayetteville, X. C; Rob- 
ert Stewart, Charlotte, X. C. 




Kappa Slg^ma 

Xumber of active chapters 108 

Number of alumni chap. .None officially 

Total membership 35,000 

Kappa Sigma founded. . . .Dec. 10, 1869 

Eta Prime at Duke 1873 

Colors: Scarlet, white, and emerald green 

Flower Lily-of-thc-valley 

Publication The Caduceus 



npHE University of Virginia campus was 
-*■ the scene for the founding of Kappa 
Sigma. The founders are known in its lit- 
erature and traditions as "the five friends 
and brothers." During the first years the 
members were noted for high social status 
in the South. Kappa Sigma was tiic first 
southern fraternity to attempt northern ex- 
pansion. There are now chapters in forty- 
five states and one in Canada. 

Kappa Sigma at first followed a policy 
of direct establishment of chapters, and it 
was nearly fourteen years before a chapter 
was established from a local society. 

The fraternity maintains funds for keep- 
ing in close touch with individuals and chap- 
ters. Scholarship is stressed. The patri- 
otic sense is embodied in the fraternal order, 
and each chapter displays an .-Xmcrican flag. 

Eta Prime of Kappa Sigma ranks second 
on the campus in point of age. It also has 
the distinction of being the third Kappa 
Sigma chapter. Since the establishment of 
an intramural sports department here, the 
Duke Kappa Sigs have been outstanding. 



(247; 



8 




'"A^kiMjk. 



8 



■'%■•■ 



t 

^ 
\ 




First ro:v: Crawkord, Aukaiia.m, 1 1 kndrickson, Rossi- 

TER, White, Herbert 
Second row: Lawver, Means, Setti.emkyer, \\ eaver, 

Williams 
Third rozv: Armstrong, Bei.i., Duni.ai', 1',, II.. I)i ni.ai'. 

Jack, Ricks 
Fourth rozv: Perry, \ augiian, W Oodrim i \ Schaeer, 

Mc(iii.i.icui)v 
Fifth r(i:v: Kiirii, l'.\ i:Kin: \i<i'. 1*a\ i;i.i.. Sr/.iaioRi;, Rea- 

vis 



248 



OA© 



v\< \iRi:s IN 1 \e ri.iATK 

C. R. Aiulcrsoi,. M. 1.. Black, F. C. Brown, W. A. 
Browiioll, B. C. C'lilkls. 

1 RAi'RKs i.\ rM\ i;R.srr\i'i-; 

(Graduate School 

M. C. Cobi'w 1.. C. Rt'lnrt-;, Robert 'riiomason, 
K. S. Wallace. 

Law School 

C. II. .Miller, K. H. Taft. 

Medical School 

H. M. Horack, D. W . .Martin. 

Class of 1934 

J. I'-. -Abraham, Uniontown, Pa.; Fred E. Craw- 
ford, W'aynesville, N. C; H. J. Hendrickson, 
Beaver Falls, Pa.; Russell Herbert, Hagerstown, 
Md.; \V. H. Lang, Pittsburgh, Pa.; G. T. Law- 
yer, Greenfield, .\Liss.; W. C. Martin, Wil- 
mington, N. C; A. B. Means, Wynnewood, Pa.; 
Harr\- Rossiter, Abington, Pa.; Claude Settle- 
meyer. Kannapolis, N. C; P. J. Weaver, Ashe- 
ville, N. C; A. S. Wiiite, Springfield, Mass.; 
G. D. Williams, Fayetteville, Tenn. 

Class of 1935 

W. P. Armstrong, Fort Bragg, X. C: J. Sam 
Bell, Charlotte, X. C; E. B. Dunlap, Lawton, 
Okla.; Jack Dunlap, Lawton, Okla.; D. H. Ed- 
wards, Durham, X. C; L. S. Few, Durham, 
X. C; Richard Herbert, Harrisburg. Pa.; X. O. 
Porreca, (Jardner, .Mass. 

Class of 1936 

C. W. Edwards, Durham, X. C; J. J. Ewcll, 
Washington, D. C; E. S. Everhart, Lemoyne, 
Pa.; W. C. Everhart, Lemoyne, Pa.; F. L. Has- 
call, Goshen, Ind.; Ciilbert L. Keith. Wilmette, 
111.; C. A. .McGillicuddv, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
C. W. Perry, Winston-Salem, X. C; W. F. 
Reavis, Waycross, Ga.; W. P. Ricks, Rock\- 
Mount, X. C.; D. B. Schafcr, Fort Wayne, Ind.; 
Frank Sizemore, High Point. X. C; Carl \ aughn. 
Park Ridge. 111.; William E. Woodruff. Winston- 
Salem, X. C. 

Pledges 

Joseph Antrim, Wf)rthington, Ohio; Horace Bar- 
ber, Glen Falls, X. Y.; Robert Bocker, Seymour, 
Conn.; Harry Etter, Shippcnsburg, Pa.; Charles 
Hallock, Xunda, X. Y.: .Albert Happel, Blue 
Ridge Summit, Pa.; Jack Hicks, Kenilworth, 
111.; Albert Jacobs, Philadelphia. Pa.; Roy R. 
Johnson. Jr., L'ptoii, Mass.; James Lambeth, 
Jr., Thomasville, X. C; K.enneth Podger, Ken- 
more, X. Y.: William Smoot, Seaford. Del.; Wil- 
liam F. Womble, Winston-Salem, X. C. 




Phi Delta Theta 

Xumber of active chapters 104 

Xumber of alumni clubs 146 

Total membership 40,000 

Phi Delta Theta founded, Dec. 26, 1848 
N. C. Alpha at Duke. . 1878; May, 1926 

Colors Azure and argent 

Flower W'hite carnation 

Publication The Scroll 



'T^l \K fcniiidintr of I'hi Delta 'I'hcta was at 
-*- Miami University, O.\ford, Ohio, the 
fraternity being one of the members of the 
celebrated "Triad." At present Phi Delta 
Theta lias about the largest number of ini- 
tiates and the widest Canadian expansion 
of any fraternity. 

It was intended in the beginning that the 
fraternity was to extend to other institu- 
tions, and this policy was entered upon 
forthwith. Before the opening of the Civil 
War a sound foundation for growth had 
been laid, although the hostilities checked 
further development. 

In the history of Phi Delta Theta is the 
only instance of bicameral fraternity chap- 
ters. This was an exigency of the sub rosa 
nature of the chapters at anti-fraternity 
institutions. 

North Carolina Alpha chapter, the third 
oldest national fraternity at Duke, has had 
two periods of existence. The first ended 
in 1S79 when all fraternities were banned 
at Trinity. The second period began when 
the local body, Kpsilon Alpha Sigma, was 
granted a charter and the original name. 



[2491 



O V 



% 




:^kU% 



m 




First ro-.v: Newsom, Moore, Getzendanner, Bennett 

Second roue: McNeii., Tyler, Ormand, Aldridge 

Third row: Helm, Miggins, Russell, Newsom 

Fourth row: Gouldman, Montgomery, Morefield, 
Shanks 



;^ 



2';o 



KA 



FRATRKS l.\ FACn.lAII'. 

W. B. Ri.licli, J. P. BrccJlove. W. K. Crccnc, 
\V. H. Hall, F. K. Mitchell, ]. M. Ormond, I. FrcJ 
Rippy, M. T. Spears, \\\ T. Towc. 

FRATRKS IN L .\i\ i;rsi ivri': 

Graduate School 

A\'i!liam Pratt Dale. II, John Lovejov, Marvin M. 
Mann, Jr., \ iiicc Moseley, W illiani McGavock, 
John Cason, W. O. Daniel. 

Law School 

C. Raymond Lundgren, Alvin Moore. 

Cl^vss of 1934 

Elmer S. Bennett, Crafton, Pa.; (nistaf A. Carl- 
son, \e\v Haven, Conn.; Joseph W. Cetzendan- 
ner, Baltimore, Md.; Guy K. Gregg, \\'eston, 
\y. \a.; Robert L. Morefield, Winston-Salem, 
X. C; M. Eugene Xeusom, Jr., Durham, \. C: 
David E. Wikeoff, Atlanta, Ga, 

Class of 1935 

Julian Aidridge, Durham, X. C; fames P. Helm, 
111. Louisville, Ky.; John P. Higgins, Red Bank, 
X. J.: Donald G. .McXeiil, Bradley Beach, X. J.; 
Brooks -Montgomery, Louisville, Kv.; James L. 
Xewsom. Durham, X. C; J. Kern Ormond, 
Durham. X. C; Bart White, Murfreesboro, X. C. 

Class of 1936 

C. Clements Gouldman, West Point, Va.; Jim 
McCall, Oklahoma City, Okla.; Harrv Mellon, 
Wilmington, Del.; Philip M. Russell,' Durham, 
X. C; O'Xeal Shanks, Dothan. Ala. 

Pledges 

Charles Ballenger, Greenville, S. C; James Fer- 
guson, Spartanburg, S. C; Stewart Ken von, 
-Miami Beach, Fla.; .Archer Lackev, Christians- 
burg, \a.; Owens Purdue, Savannah, Ga.; Her- 
bert Upchurch, Durham, X. C. 




^. 



Kappa Alfilia 

-Number of active'chaptcrs 68 

Xumber of alumni chapters 87 

Total membership 25,000 

Kappa .\lpiia founded. . . .Dec. 21, 1865 

Alpha Phi at Duke October 18, 1901 

Colors Crimson and old gold 

Flowers -Magnolia and red rose 

Publication. . Tlif Kappa Alpha Journal 



npiIK Southern Order of Kappa Alplia, in 
-*• contradistinction to the smaller frater- 
nity of that name wiiicli e.xist.s principally in 
the North, was founded at Washington Col- 
lege, before that institution became Wash- 
ington and Lee University. 

The aim of the founders was to preserve 
the basic southern characteristics, other 
than sectional, in a fratcrnit)' confined to 
the southern states. The three chapters in 
California form the main e.xccption to tliis 
principle. As far as individual member- 
ship is concerned, statehood is not a re- 
striction. Indeed, the alumni associations 
are nation-wide in scope. 

Kappa Alpha was not .so fortunate in its 
infancy as some other fraternal organiza- 
tions; for at many institutions where chap- 
ters were placed, anti-fraternity legislation 
shortly went into effect. Thus, it was left 
to a small nucleus of chapters working to- 
gether to effect its permanent organization. 

Alpha Phi chapter is the fourth oldest 
fraternity group on Duke campus. It was 
organized soon after the edict against fra- 
ternities here was repealed by the Trinity 
College board of trustees. 



(251) 



o ^ 





D ry f^ '^ 

.'-->«' fw**--' *«»*»' -"--^ 




* =» « t«"4 




i 









It 

m 



First ro:c: Ki.aykr, Kadii;, Lvbrocik, \l\irii i:\vs, 

Tovvm.i;y 
Strand row: Williams, Storm, I'hiim's, Harris 
Third rote: Mason, Linf.b?:r(;kr, Morion, Richardson 
Fourth ro:i\- Dotld, .Mii.i.i:r, Mossburg, Tai.i.ev 



252 



UK A 



I R \rKi:s i\ I M\ i-.Rsri vi'K 

Graduate Scmooi- 

Francis I'ulp. IIciir\ Owiu-s. 

Law School 

Robert Finlcx-, Martin (.Srccii. William B. Mc- 
Guire, Jr.. \\ . M. rpcluirch. 

Class of 1034 

Frank R. Kadic, Clic\y Chase, .\kl.: George 
Klayer, Forest Hills, N. ^ .; William L\ brook, 
W'inston-Salcm, N. C; John TalleN-, Jackson, 
Alabama; Gordon Townley, Roncevcrie, W . \ a. 

Class of 193.^ 

Sidney Dodd, Rome, Ga.; Sherrill l.incbcrgcr, 
Shelby, N. C; Edward Mason, Durham, N. C; 
Robert Matthews, Kobe, Japan; Harr\- Miller, 
Chattanooga, Tenn.; Henry Morton, Sarasota, 
Fla.; Roy Phipps, Durham, N. C; Theodore 
Pimper, Che\>' Chase, Md.; Bayard Storm, 
Charlotte, N. C; Henr\' Lee Weathers, Shelbv', 
N. C; Cecil \\ illiams, Morgantield, Ky.; Luther 
Winstead, Chev\- Chase, Md. 

Class of 1936 

Henry Harris, Albemarle, N. C; H\att Moss- 
burg, Chevy Chase, Md.; Douglas Richardson, 
Ashland, Kv.; Thornton Rutherford, Charlotte, 
X. C. 

Pledges 

Campbell Garden, Chattanooga, Tenn.; Clyde 
Clapp, Baltimore, Md.; Richard Cross, L'pper 
Darb\-, Pa.; Brooks Jones, Maytield, K\-.; Thom- 
as Purcell, Lakewood, N. Y.; Ned Quinn, Beck- 
ley, W'. \"a.; .Mason Rose, Sarasota, Fla.; Frank 
Scott, Live Oak, Fla.; Joe Shackford, Charlotte, 
N. C; John Simonds, York Harbor, .Maine. 




Pi Kappa .Alpha 

Number of active chapters . 78 

.\umbcr of alumni chapters 82 

Total membership 20,000 

Pi Kappa Alpha founded, .NLirch I, 1868 

Alpha Alpha at Duke Nov. 26, 1901 

Colors Garnet and old gold 

Flower Lily-of-thc-valley 

Publication .... Tin- Shield and Diamond 



pi k.API'.A Al-PII.A fraternity, founded 
-*■ at the University of \'irginia, was the 
outcome of the close friendship of five men 
who served together in the Confederate 
Army, notably in the battle of New Market. 
I'he initial chapter was the governing au- 
thority for some years, granting charters, 
installing chapters, and determining poli- 
cies. The Pi Kappa .'Xlpha convention of 
1889 limited expansion to the southern 
states, so as to further a concentrated de- 
velopment. Later the field was opened to 
include the southwestern states, and has 
since been broadened to permit growth 
throughout the United States. 

One of the chapters possesses a unique 
meeting place. It is a replica of a Pueblo 
Indian council chamber and is located on 
the Lniversity f)f New .Me.xico campus, 
only initiates being permitted entrance. 

Pi Kappa .'\lpha has an intricate f)rgan- 
ization which extands even to the individ- 
ual member and pledge, including a uniform 
pledging ceremony, a form examination, 
and numerous awards. Alpha Alpha chap- 
ter is fifth in age among fraternities at Duke. 



[253 



o< 











J^J 



^ 



C!^ CS 






r 







H 




First rozc: Sui.i.iv.w. W'acnkr. Morsi;, Lamm. IIoska 
Srcond rozc: BuiCK, Kii.i.i;n, 'riioMi'sox, Stii.lman, 

MacFarei.and 
Third row: Sacer, Thomas, Wii rr \m k, \\ i m.im, \iii- 

ERTON 

Fourth ruu': l'"uNKiiArsi:i<, W Kn.iir. Miisskk. IIaiiiokn, 
1 lui.ME 



^>-^ 

i 



_ I 



[254: 



L^E 



FRATRF.S IX I ACULTATE 

V. W Altvatcr. Cliarlcs E. Landon, James Trucs- 
dalc, R. E. Whitford. 

FRATRF.S IN r\I\ llRSriWI'l'. 

Cjr.\diate School 

Frank Clninn, James A. Ciill, George T. Harrell, 
James Mullen, Richard Xitschkc. 

Class of 1934 

Paul F. Corell, Shaker Heiphts, Ohio; Moritz 
Flohr, Conisteo, X. Y.; Rufus H. Hosea, Pike- 
ville, X. C; P. Piuninier Lamm, Wilson, X. C; 
\\'illiam J. Morse, Attleboro, \Iass.; John P. 
Sipple, Baltimore, Md.; Jake W. Sulli\an, An- 
derson, S. C. 

Class of 1935 

William J. Buice, Ciiarlotte, X. C: W. C. Eth- 
ridge, Kinston, X. C; John H. Keller, China 
Grove, N. C; A. H. Killen, Flushing, N. Y.; 
Graham Macfarlanc, Asiicville, X. C; John H. 
Stillman, Troy, X. Y.; William Thompson, Jr., 
New Bedford, Mass.; Tyrus I. Wagner, W'est 
Fairview, Pa. 

Class of 1936 

C. Lawrence Atherton, Peekskill, N. Y.; John 
W. Carver, Brooklyn, X. Y.; Lewis O. Funk- 
houser, Hagerstown, Md.; Jack R. Hathorn, 
Ballston, Spa, X. Y.; B. Lovejoy Hawks, Xcw 
York, N. Y.: Jack W. Hulmc, Jackson Heights, 
N. Y.; Frank I"".. Mazuy, Xewton, X. J.; James 
B. Messick, Smyrna, Del.; William A. Sager, 
Hagerstown, Md.; Roy Z. Thomas, Rock Hill, 
S. C; Kenneth D. Wcagley, Waynesboro, Pa.; 
Charles S. Whitaker, Brooklyn, X. Y.; F. Chris- 
tian \\'right, Hagerstown, Md. 

Pledges 

Fred Clark, Maplewood, X. J.; Richard Conradi, 
Irvington, X. J.; Robert Cowan, Xcwpnrt, Tenn.; 
Charles Ha\es, , X. J.; Stephen S. 

Lush, Mahwah, X. J.; Myles McGrail, Bn.ok- 
line, .Mass.; .Morgan D. Rosser, Berwick, Pa.; 
Haddon Smith, Maplewood, X. J.; Glenn Sulli- 
van, Anderson, S. C; Robert Weston, Kensing- 
ton, Md. 




^^^^ 



Sigma Phi Ep.silon 

Xumber of active chapters 68 

Xumber of alumni chapters 18 

Total membership 13,6(X) 

Sigma Phi Epsilon founded. . .Xov., 1901 

iX. C. Gamma at Duke 1909 

Colors Red and \iolet 

Flowers. .American Beauty rose and violet 
Publication. . TheSigmaPhi Epsilon Journal 



CIGAL\ I'ill l;;i\SIL()N fraternity was 
^ founded at Richmond College, now the 
University of Richmond, from a local soci- 
ety called the Saturday Nipht Club. Dur- 
ing its first two years the parent chapter 
encountered a great deal of opposition, 
both sarcastic and even directly hostile in 
character, from members of the college 
comnuinity. The fraternity, however, has 
managed to survive and to grow rapidl\', 
until now its scope is nation-wide. 

The early chapters were formed for the 
express purpose of joining S. P. E. The 
granting of charters to local petitioning 
bodies has been the most frequent method 
of inception for the later chapters. 

A remarkable innovation is the "Sigma 
Phi Kpsilon Plan of Finance." Under this 
system tlic financial affairs of all the chap- 
ters are administered by their alumni. It 
has relieved the undergraduate of a con- 
siderable burden and has proved profitable 
in cases where there had previously been 
loss. 

North Carolina (jamma chapter, si.xth in 
age of nationals here, was installed from the 
local group. Beta Nu. 



255 ] 



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V- 



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3 



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i 






iiii;:;t 




First ro:c: Coan, StaufI'ER, Bovven, 'I'xii:, I'iiomas 
Second rozc: lyivENfioon, Kokwn, Iveksek, Dunstan, 

Taylor 
Third ra-.c: RiK. ( Ikii'I' I N, C'ris r, KrxKi.i:. M ann 
Fourth row: C'amkron, \ knninc;, Parsons, Dkkmer, 

Keator 



256 



LX 



I'R.VIRKS 1\ I \Cl l.TATK 

J. Kiistcr BariK's. llcrsclicl (.'aklwcll, James Can- 
non, 111, l)a\t(in Dean, Herbert J. Herring, James 
C". Mi'u/.on. A. \l. i'rocior. 




IRATRIS IN IM\ I.RSllAir. 

CiRADlATE ScilOOl, 

TrDjiler Adkins, Marcus liolihs, l''.i.i\\in |}. San- 
ger, Irvinj; M. Sieirel. 

Law School 

William Fartliin^r. William Tate. 

Class of 1934 

K. (j. Abbott, Henr\' Stauffer, Horace G. 
Thomas. 

Class of 1935 

C. A. Bowen, Xasinille, Tenii.; J. (). Coaii, 
Winston-Salem, N. C; B. R. Crist, Altoona, Pa.; 
Forrest \'. Dunstan, Klizabctli City, N. C; J. .'\. 
Griffin, Baltimore, .Nkl.; T. W'. Keesee, Helena, 
.'\rk.; R. M. Keown, Harrisburg, Pa.; \". B. 
Livengood, Durham, N. C; J. S. Moore, Clarks- 
burjj, W". \a.; W". H. Pace, Chew Chase. Md.; 
T. V. Slaughter, Jr., Washington, D. C; H. G. 
Taylor, Oxford, X. C. 

Class of 1936 

R. B. Cameron, Rising Sun. .Md.; .\. D. Deemer, 
Brookville, Pa.; 1'". R. Keator, W'a\ne, Pa.; 
Charles Kunkle, Johnstown, Pa.; J. K. Mann, 
Cjreenwood, .Miss.; T. C. Parsons, .Altoona, Pa.; 
W'. H. Rue, Bryn Mawr. Pa.; William \'enninp. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

Pledges 

J. C. Ardolino, .Mctuciien. X. J.; R. .\1. Biddle, 
Parkcrsburg, W. \'a.; W. H. Crawford, Detroit, 
Mich.; H. (;. Hardin, \'an Wyck, S. C; A. L. 
Herrick, .Xshcville, X. C; D. \. Hirst, Seoul. 
Korea; [. I'",. Hoffman, Fort W'avne, Ind.; (. D. 
Klock, Walker. X. Y.; C. D. l.lewelh n, Durham, 
\. C; W. W Reel. Pittsburgh. Pa.; W". .Mason 
Shehan, Faston, Md.; J. Q. Stigler, Greenwood, 
Miss.; Clarence W'undcr, .\rdmore. Pa. 



Si^ma Chi 

.Number of acti\e chapters 94 

Number of alumni chapters 12S 

Total membership 30.(XH) 

Sigma Chi founded June 28, lH.v5 

Beta Lamba at Duke .March, 1912 

Colors Blue and old gold 

I'lowcr White rose 

Publication. . The Magcnine of Sigma C.hi 



CI(i.M.\ CI II is a nicinhcr of llic ".Miami 
^ IViad" of national .social fraternities 
that found origin at Miami ITnivcrsity, 0.\- 
ford, Ohio. Within six months after the 
mother chapter was first orj^'ani'/.ed, a sec- 
ond chapter of Sigma Chi was brought into 
being at Ohio W'eslcyan. The fraternity 
was incorporated in 1S99 under the laws of 
Illinois as "The Cirand Council of the Sigma 
Chi Fraternity." Its expansion through- 
out the I'nited States has been effected 
mostly tlirough the granting of charters to 
petitioning groups. 

The Magazitir of Si'gwo Chi has gradually 
developed from a local journal (KSSl) into 
the publication of all the chapters, edited 
several times a year. 

Phenomenal in fraternity histories was 
the "Constantine chapter," composed of 
Sigma Chis scr\ing in the .Xrmy of the 
Tennessee, having for institution the Con- 
federate Army and for fraternal meeting- 
place the battlefield. 

Beta Lambda is se\ enth in age among the 
chapters of national fraternities at Duke. 
It was the sixty-eighth group to be chart- 
ered bv Sigma Chi. 



257] 




tf 






jy^ yk 








I 













First rox: MiKRirr, W ku.ht. Starratt, Uuac khii.i., 

\\ II.I.IS 

Srcond rozv: Ruisby, Rkichman, ^^\^■ll()^•. \I\rio\ 
'I'liird rozc: HiiNDERSON, Vales, Daniels, Timhkrlake 
foiirih row: Sattereield, Kimmerle, I-uly, Sciiuiir 
I'ljlh ro-:c: W i:sskliioi t, C'i.ia i:l and, \ ann, IIorton 



258] 



nK$ 



FRATRKS IN I VCTl.l'.VrK 
William M. Blacklnirii. 

FR ATR FS L\ T N I \ I •, R S H \ II 

Graduate School 

\V. H. Bridgers. Ben Miller. 

Law School 

T. C. Bowie, Jr.. CIrccn Clevoiaiul, W . W . Sey- 
mour. 

Class of 1934 

Frank B. Allen, Warrenton, .\. C; William 
Saughtre\', Newport News, \'a.; Daniel T. .\Ier- 
ritt, Charlottesville, \'a.; John A. Ryan, .Milan, 
Mich.; W ilbur Starratt, Washington, D. C; Joe 
M. \anhoy, Charlotte. N. C; Harry \\illis, Wil- 
son, N. C; John I). W right, Blackstone, \'a. 

Class of 193? 

O. C. Britton. Durham, N. C; William Dameron, 
Warrenton, N. C; Bonn A. Gilbert, Washington, 
D. C; David H. Henderson. Charlotte. N. C; 
Jerry Marion, Siloam, N. C; Alfred A. Reich- 
man, Washington, D. C; Robert I,. Rigsb\'. 
Washington, D. C; Joe Timberlake, Columbia, 
S. C; Carlos F. \'a!es, Merida, ^ ucatan, .\Ie.\ico. 

Class of 1936 

Theron Cleveland, Columbia, S. C; James Dan- 
iel, Columbia, S. C; Adrian Hemby, Rocky 
Mount, N. C; Richard F. Horton, PeekskiH, 
N. v.; Roy Kimmerle, Buffalo, N. Y.; William 
Luly, \'ero Beach, Fla.; Frank Satterfield, Dur- 
ham, N. C; Harry Schuhr, Buffalo, N. Y.; 
Robert X'ann, Waycross, Ga.; John Watson, 
Charlotte, N. C; Carl Wesselhoft, Bav Shore, 
N. V. 

Pledges 

A. Landis Brackbill, Gap, Pa.; George Burwcll 
Warrenton, N. C; Albert Cade, Burlington 
N. C; Skinner Chalk. .Morehcad City, N. C; 
Harold Collins, Ocean City, N. J.; Fugene Des- 
vernine. Havana, Cuba; J. B. Ford, Savannah, 
Ga.; William Fulmer, Savannah, Ga.; Nelson 
Jantzen, Philadelphia, Pa.; John C. King, Jr.; 
Charleston, W. \'a.; Alexander Konopka. Cam- 
den, N. J.; Lloyd Kraushaar, Rochester, N. Y.; 
Rodman Landon, Clinton, .\. C; Joe Leidy, 
Philadelphia. Pa.; Fdgar R. Stallings, .Augusta, 
Ga.; John Timmons, Columbia, S. C; Fulyss 
Tro.xler, Greensboro, N. C; Oswaldo \'ales. 
Merida, Yucatan, Mexico; Harmon Webb, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.; Donald Wilson, Greenlawn, N. Y. 




Pi Kappa Phi 

Number of active chapters. . 12 

Number of alumni chapters 19 

Total membership 6,000 

Pi Kappa Phi founded. . Dec. 10, 1904 

Mu at Duke 191.=; 

Colors Cjold and white 

Flower Red rose 

Official Publication. . The- Star and Lamp 



'T^llK only national ever founded in the 
-'- State of South Carolina, Pi Kappa Phi 
began its existence at the College of Charles- 
ton. Up to 1927, when anti-fraternity stat- 
utes were stricken from the body of state 
legislation. Pi Kappa Phi was faced with 
the stern opposition to fraternities which 
was the feeling among the educational in- 
stitutions in South Carolina for about 
thirty years. 

Now, with the changed attitude. Pi 
Kappa Phi has made rapid headway in its 
mother state. It has had a steady and 
consistent growth outside. This has been 
more pronounced in the South, though not 
by intention. .Membership in Pi Kappa 
Phi is limited to initiates, there being no 
honorary members. 

It is interesting to note tlial its three 
founders were all warm friends from ear- 
liest school years in old Charleston. Their 
desire was to clothe their friendship in 
permanence, and so thereupon established 
this fraternity. 

Mu chapter at Duke ranks eighth in age 
among the national groups on the campus. 



259 



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^^ — ^ r^ ^ -^ F^ 




IN 

181 






^ 

I 
ll~, 




First ro:r: I ri:i.,\ni), I''(isii:r, I'.mkh, ( )"C"<>n ndk. II wi- 

RICK 

Second row: I'karson, Bostock, Rankin, West, Sapp 
Third row: Rouse, Powell, R. C; Stritzinger, Mer- 

viNE, MacQuarrie 
Fourth row: Page, Turni;r, I'owii.i.. R, 11.; Hell, 

ROCKETT 



260 



AL<1> 



iR.viRi.s i.\ lAeri.i'.vrK 

Paul N. Garber, Robert T. Matthews, Furnian 
(;. Mcl.arty. A. T. West, Robert R. Wilson. 

IRAIRI'S I\ I \I\ lRS!|-\'n': 

CiRADlATK SfllOOl. 

i'.mmett K. Mcl.arty, Jr.; Robert G. Tuttle, Jr. 

Law School 

Charles S. .Murpin . 

Class of 1934 

Thomas F. Baird, .Swartlimore, Pa.; C. I'unier 
Foster, Carbondale, Pa.; John M. Hamrick, 
Gaffney, S. C; Edward A. Howell, Goldsboro, 
N. C; Russell S. Ireland, Collingswood, N. J.; 
Dennis L. O'Connor, Jr.. Maniaroneck, X. Y. 

Class of 1935 

J. Franklin Bostock, .\rlinj»ton, X. J.; George A. 
Pearson, Jr., Chicago, III.; Robert C. Powell, 
Lenoir, X. C; James W . Rankin, Gastonia, 
X. C; W. Dorland Rouse, Williamsport, Pa.; 
James K. Sapp, Jr., .Albany, Ga.; Walter B. West, 
Jr.. .Mbemarle, X. C. 

Class of 1936 

Charles W. .\ckley, \ineland, X. J.; G. Holmes 
Bell, Jr., Dillon, S. C; Joseph S. Hiatt, Jr., 
Gastonia, X. C; Walter F. Lindhe, .\Iontclair, 
N. J.; Alan M. .MacQuarrie, Montclair, X. J.; 
Robert C. Mervine, East Orange, X. J.; Hugh 
A. Page, Jr.; Clayton, X. C; Rufus H. Powell, 
HI, Durham, X. C.; Ralph L. Rockett, Gastonia, 
X. C; Theodore L. Strilzinger, Xorristown, Pa.; 
William W. Turner, Jr., .Montclair, X. J. 

Pledgks 

Edward Bradle\-, Taunton, Mass.; Hcnr\ (Jil- 
lies, Jr., Melrose, Mass.; H. Melvin Gingrich, 
Pottstown, Pa.; James Gorringe, East Orange, 
N. J.; l'>nest Green, Media, Pa.; Lackey Hark- 
rader, .Mount Air>-, X. C; Thomas W. Herb. 
Wyomissing, Pa.; Donald .\I. Kramer, Reading, 
Pa.; Peter E. Xaktenis, Hartford, Conn.; Judson 
Rhodes, Reading, Pa.; Harr>' W. Severance, 
Lake Citv, S. C.; Bradlev Welfare, Jr., Winston- 
Salem, X. C. 




Delta Si^nia Phi 

.\ limber of active chapters 48 

.Xumbcr of alumni chapters 20 

Total membership 12,500 

Delta Sigma Phi founded. .Dec. 10, 1X99 

.Alpha Epsilon at Duke Jan. 24, 1920 

^"•^'"rs Xile green and white 

J'"'"«cr White carnation 

Publication. Thr Carnation 



T^IIM College of the City of New York 
-•■ was tiic founding-place of Delta Sigma 
Phi fraternity, an order of not yet thirty- 
five years' existence. The fraternity has 
had a substantial development, although 
its policy of expansion has been conserva- 
tive. 

Since 1906 Delta Sigma Phi lias been ex- 
tended for the most part through the ad- 
mittance of local groups by charter. Some 
of these had been well established organiza- 
tions even before giving up their local iden- 
titv. It is noteworthy that the Alfred 
rni\ersity group had been started in VH)] 
as the Ku Klux Klan. 

Though place names were given the chap- 
ters as they were admitted up to 19()6, the 
(Ireek letter nomenclature was adopted 
then with one exception. 'I'his is the Hil- 
gard chapter at the Iniversity of California, 
.s(j designated because of the profound re- 
spect in which its chief patron's name is 
held. 

Alpha Epsilon of ]3uke is the ninth old- 
est national on the campus. It has as fac- 
ulty adviser the director of dramatics, A. T. 
West. 



261 



o\ 



j-«i%*». f ^ ^ J^^. ^-^T U*^' 3.^*-* 











}Cf* *6^ 



^hdM 




Q O p O f^ 





u 

^1 










I'lrsi ro:c: Sandki.i.. Imivlks, \1ii.i.i;r, IJkattv, Thorn- 

im.I., KlNTKR 

Sfcond ro:v: li\<;\vi;i.i„ XIooriik ad, I\ik, (rxnia., I.kit- 

NER 

Third ro:r: Powki.i., Hatch, Hai.kv, Mktcalk, Cooey 

Fourth row: Wmitinc, Wood, Benkke, CIriffin, John- 
son 

/•■//'/' ro'.c: Maw, Runnfr, I'ipkr. l^niin, K 1:1,1, mivvkr 



2r,2 



AXA 



IRATRI'S l.\ 1- \Cl I.I'AIK 
j. M. Kecch, W. C". \\.sluiri.'li. \. Cumpbcll. 

IR AIRI-.S l.\ I \1\ l-.R.sllAII'; 

Graduatk Sciiooi. 
R. n. W ynne. 

School of Medicixk 

G. K. Masscngill, I. C. K\ans. 

Class of 1934 

Clyde F. Boyles, Paducah, Ky.; Henry K. 
Handy, Plymouth, Mass.; Robert D. Hicks, 
Florence, S. C; Bernard P. Kintcr, Dayton, Pa.; 
Murry A. Miller, Portsmouth, \ a.; Melvin D. 
Stevins, Brockton, Mass.; Stanley C. Sandell, 
Brockton. Mass.; Edwin Halo 'riiornhill. IjIuc- 
tield, W". \a. 

Class of 1935 

Larry E. Bagwell, Raleigh, X. C; Charles D. 
Beatty, Pittsburgh, Pa.; \Villard Haley, Punxen- 
tawney. Pa.; Davis Hatch, Jr., Needham, Mass.; 
Joseph McK. Ivie, Leaks\ille, X. C; Kermit L. 
Leitner, Harrisburg, Pa.; fohn L. Moorhead, 
Sunbury, Pa.; Fred D. Gabef. White Plains, X. V. 

Class of 1936 

George F. Beneke, Wheeling, \\ . \a.; Christian 
S. Briel, Sutton, XIass.; John T. Cole, Warren, 
Ohio; Edward W. Cooey, Wheeling, W . \"a.; 
Roberts K. Dodd, Allentown, Pa.; Richard P. 
Griffin, Swarthmore, Pa.; Rolf 1"",. Johnson, Har- 
risburg, Pa.; Fred X. Kellnie\er, Wheeling, 
W. Va.; Oliver DeWitt .Mann, Whitakers, X. C; 
Leland Metcalf, Plaintield, X. J.; Richard C. 
Piper, Ridgewood, X. J.; Joseph (J. Powell, 
Moorestown, X. J.; Earle I. Runner, Wheeling, 
W. \'a.; Ralph .V. Taylor. Summit, .\. J.; Charles 
Edgar \\'hite. Hertford, X. C; Herbert (i. Whit- 
ing, Mountain Lakes, X. J.; Ernest II. Wood, 
Xew Bern, X. C. 

Pledges 

Roderick Bassett, Danbury, Conn.; Paul Beich, 
Bloomington, 111.; Helmut Bode, W eehawken, 
X. J.; Charles Clay, Ashland, Ky.; Richard Ea- 
ger, Camp Hill, Pa.; L. Palmer Fox, Harrisburg, 
Pa.; Robert E. Kay. Wildwood. X. J.; .Man Ham, 
Jr., East Milton, Mass.; Howard Holt, Xash- 
ville. Ark.; William J. Miller, Jr., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 




Lambda Chi Alpha 

Xumber of active chapters. .84 

Xumber of alumni chapters 41 

Total membership 20,000 

Lambda Chi Alpha founded Xov. 2, 1909 
(JammaTheta Zeta at Duke .Mar. 3, 1924 

Colors Purple, green, and gold 

Flower The violet 

Publications Cross and Crescent 

and Delta Pi 

COMFAVHAT unu.sual was the origin of 
^ Lambda Clii Alpha fraternity. It was 
founded at Boston I iiivcrsit}', growing out 
of the Cosmopohtan Law Club, which had 
been active there for several years. It was 
made a Greek-letter society with a view to 
national expansion. 

The fraternity did not establish further 
chapters, however, for more than two years, 
and when expansion did take place a great 
many of the new chapters were formed from 
existing clubs. The former clubs were aug- 
mented by the granting of Lambda Chi 
Alplia charters to petitioning groups. 

Lambda Chi has had a remarkable 
growth, no chapter, up tt) 1930 at least, 
having become permanently inactive. 
There are chapters now in thirty-eight 
states of the Union, and with the estab- 
lishment of a Toronto chapter in 1927, the 
fraternity became international. Lambda 
Chi is a charter member of the Inter-fra- 
ternity Conference. 

Gamma Theta Zeta chapter is tenth in 
age among Duke fraternities. Before 1924 
it was the local fraternitv bv name Beta Pi, 



[263 



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I "^fc^ fc ■ I • (m 




gtMA 



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f 






U!--\-::t 




First r(i:c: |()Sti;n, \1cC"r.\cki:n, I 1 1 m ni ki \ s, r>Risri;R, 
Otis 

Srrond ro:r: ISird, W'ai.sii, (Ikariiari', \\ ii.li wis 

Third rmc: Xm.i;, Stroud, Hkitman, Smith 

/■'iiiirlli n>:r: l'',\ i;ritt, IiRumbmii, IIi:rni)()\, l<i)ui;Rrs 



2C4 



ATA 



l-RATRKS IN 1 \Ll l.'IVll'. 

1). M. Arnold, W. Alexander Mabry, R. H. Shry- 
ock. Charles K. Ward, I'.vcrett H. \\"eathersp()on, 
\V. Tate W'liitnian. 



'//A, 



^ 




FRA'iRi:S IN rNI\ I RSI l\ 11, 

CiRADl'ATE SciIOOI. 

Dwijjht Billinjjs, David K. .\lcC"ariell. 

1. \\\ Sciiooi. 

Nicholas Oreni. 

Class ok 1934 

Wilbur L. Brister, Petersburg, \a.; William X. 
Gearhart, Cumberland, Md.; Charles R. Hum- 
phreys, Chcstertown, Md.; Thomas \\. josten, 
Owatoreno, Minn.; Joseph P. McCracken, Dur- 
ham, N. C; James (). Otis, Durham, N. C, 
Providence, R. 1. 

Class of 1935 

Clarence .Armstrong, Washington, 1). C; Wil- 
liam G. Bird, Swarlhniore, Pa.; Jack K. Heit- 
man, Wilmeite, 111.; Fred George Smith, New 
York, N. v.; Charles H. Walsii, Burlington, 
Iowa; Martin B. Williams, Richmond, \'a. 

Class or 1936 

William K. Brumbach, Belleville, N. J.; George 
B. Everitt, Winnetka, 111.; C. Nash Hcrndon, 
Greensboro, N. C; Harr\- C. Nyce, Chester, Pa.; 
George B. Roberts, Lexington, Ky.; George .M. 
Stroud, Chester, Pa. 

Pledges 

Fred Andrus, Akron, Ohio; iiurton .\pplcford, 
South Lancaster, Mass.; Richard .Austin, Del- 
mar, N. \ .; Carroll Ballard, ivxmore, \a.; Wil- 
liam Birmingham, Liberty, N. \ .\ George Blc\- 
ins, Centervillc, .\Id.; Woodrow Burgess, Ro\al 
Oak, Mich.; Read Cone, Buffalo, N. \' .\ (iuy 
Cross, Lynbrook, N. ^'.; Kenneth Krum, Lyn- 
brook, N. \ .; Harold Kuhii, Ctiarleston, W . \'a.: 
Joseph .Mackie, Piiiladelphia, i^a.; .Andrew .Mas- 
set, Jesse .Muse, Savannah, (ia.; Charles Neu- 
bcrger, Maplewood, N. J.; Holmes Newton, 
Summit, N. J.; Paul Pettit, Ocean City, N. J.; 
Charles Plumb, I'.dgewood, R. I.; Thomas ,Scull, 
Somcrs Point, N. J.; Ncjrman Sharkey, L\ nbrook, 
N. v.; Franklin Wells, (jrcensboro, N. C.; Robert 
Wilkinson, .Millburn, N. J. 



Delta Tail Delta 

Number of active chapters 7.5 

Number of alumni chapters 59 

Total membership 27,000 

Delta Tau Delta founded 1K58-59 

Delta Kappa at Duke, December 7, 1928 

Colors Purple, white, and gold 

F'lower Pansy 

Publication The Rainbow 



T^lfK Rainbow or W. \\ . W. society wa.s 
-^ fouiuicd in 184S al llic L'nivcrsity of 
Mississippi. It was about ten years later 
that the parent chapter of Delta Tau Delta 
was organized at Bethany College, within 
the present limits of West \'irginia. After 
lengthy negotiations the Rainbow fraternity 
in LSS6 united with Delta Tau Delta. By 
this union the Rainbow chapters were en- 
titled to membership in the (jreek-lctter 
order, though there is a distinctif)n between 
these and the duly in\ested Delt chapters. 

riiis merging of national groups is unique 
in fraternity annals. The Rainbow, be- 
cause of greater age and different charac- 
teristics, was a valuable initiate into the 
conventional fraternity, and in truth mem- 
bers of the latter may well trace their fra- 
ternal lineage from both sources. 

Delta Tau l^ella exists in all parts of the 
country and has expanded into Canada. 

The Duke chapter, Delta Kappa, is be- 
tween five and six years old. In all of the 
Delt chapters a periodical is published at 
least once a vear. 



265) 



Ill 




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,^«r^ "^ 





First row: Lloyd, Cox, R. C; Di'I'iiy, ni:RRiCK 
St'cond row: Young, Vioi,, Cox, J. 15. 
Third row: Ward, (!. \\.; Ri^v, Poi.ack 
Fourth row: (Ioodi:, I\i,<)\i:, l'rk\i;.\R 



2r,r, ] 



LAE 



\l< VIRIS l\ !■ \n I.IMI' 
15. II. l'>r;inscomb, J. C. .\lcui/..in, W . S. Persons. 

FRATRES IN INK 1;RS11 A TK 
Gr.vdiwtk School 
S. P. CjariuT. 

School or Medkim; 
P. -M. rnsworth. 

L.wv School 
P. W. Peteet. 

Class of 1934 

John B. Cox, Birmingliam, Ala.; Robtrt Cox, 
Vernon, Texas; Charles C. Derrick, Stockbridge, 
Mass.; Robert Duncan, FreeJonia, N. Y.; S. S. 
DuPuv, Bccklev, \V. \a.; Fred X. Llovd, Dur- 
ham, N. C; Allen Pankey, Bluefield, W. Va.; 
Hoyle U. Scott, Durham, N. C. 

Class of 193.i 

J. Hennemicr, Savannah, Ga.; Ernest H. Poiach, 
II. York, Pa.; Ellison A. Ruby, Jenkinsiown, 
Pa.; J. \ iol. South Orange, N. J.; George Ward, 
Bradentown, Fla.; G. Young, Eureka, N. C. 

Cl.vss of 1936 

J. Boling, Siler City, X. C; L. II. Collins, Macon 
Ga.; J. A. Dearborn, Warren, Ohio; J. R. Goode, 
Jr., Alexandria, \"a.; Isham Kimbcll, Xorth Port, 
L. I.; William X. Klove, Oak Park, 111.; R. Laird, 
Gulfport, Miss.; John H. Knowlton, Philadel- 
phia, Pa.; Alan C. Puryear. Washington, D. C; 
Lewis Smith, Smithtown, X. Y. 

Pledges 

J. Alexander, Ashcville, X. C; Fredrick Cleve- 
land, Short Hills, X. J.; B. O. Cornelius, Winston- 
Salem, X. C; John Fischer, Cleveland, Ohio; 
W. A. Kelly, Moultrie, Ga.; H. Maldeis, Balti- 
more, Md.; Robert Xicks, Roxboro, X. C; 
George Patterson, Macon, CJa.; Winston Roberts, 
Birmingham, Ala.; John Pankey, Blueticld, 
W. Va.; Leroy Sides, Statesville, X. C; Kirby 
Smith, Washington, D. C; Ross Speir, Birm- 
ingham, Ala.; Tom Suddath, Savannah, Ga.; 
Thurman Ward, Galax, \a.; G. W. White, Balti- 
more, .Md. 




Si^ma Alpha Kpsilon 

.Number of acti\e chapters. . 108 

Number of alumni chapters 110 

Total membership 39,021 

S. A. E. founded March 9, 1856 

X. C. Xu at Duke. . February 20, 1931 

Colors Royal, purple, and old gold 

Flower Violet 

Publication.. Th,- Record 



T^ K.I 11' Students at the University of 
■"-^ Alabama were the founders of Sigma 
Alpha Mpsilon fraternity. From this first 
chapter, which was given the name .Mu, 
the fraternity has had rapid and constant 
growth. S. A. E. now exists in lorty-si.x 
states. 

The wartime liistory of Sigma .Alpha I'lp- 
silon is of absorbing interest. Wlien tiie 
Civil War came, whole chapters, and parts 
of others, went into service, there being 
members in both armies. A Kentucky girl 
who kept intact the documents of one of 
the chapters during the war period, was 
rewarded with membership and the dis- 
tinction of being the fraternity's only 
woman member. 

The World War battlefield was the scene 
of two S. A. K. initiation ceremonies, one 
in a German castle and another in a French 
chateau; and alumni associations were also 
formed on the Continent. 

North Carolina Nu chapter, when it came 
into existence three years ago, was formed 
from the local club, Psi Delta Sigma. The 
S. A. E.'s won the intramural plaque in 
1932 and in 1933. 



[267] 




fr 







first row: Rockrs, I.oni;, J. A.; linw, C'iii;i:i.i:y 

Si'cond r(K(': Wacjnkr, Munson, Bahr 

ThiriJ riKv: Siianiii-.k, W'aikins, '1'auh 

/■'(iiirlh ni:r: \Iii,m;k, ^>^l<^■l., I I \'rcii, l.oNc, R. S. 



268 1 



LN 



ruATRKs IN i\ci i.ivn-. 

RowlaiiJ '1'. Bellows, W . Car\ M.ixucil. Ben. l''.. 
Powell. Alfred R. ShaiiJs. 

FRATRKS IN I Nl\ i-.RSriVlI'. 

CjRadiate School 

Donald Fcigc Mari<iii, Robert I'"ri>;ate 

Law School 
Jerry Bray. 

Class of 1934 

James B. Cheely, Williamsburg, Ky.; Homer 
Hilton, Jr., Binpiiamton, N. '\'.; John C. Long, 
Jr., A\ . New Brighton, X. Y.; Thomas T. Rogers, 
Hinton, W. \'a. 

Class of 1935 

Charles A. Aiulersoii, Winchester, \a.; George 
J. Baer, Harrisburg, Pa.; Stuart M. Beville, 
Blackstone, \'a.; John A. Long, Durham, N. C; 
Henn.' T. Munson, Detroit, Mich.; Paul W. 
Shanher, Jr., Mt. Clemens, Mich.; George F. 
Speicher, Jr., RockwooJ, Pa.; Ben C. U'agncr, 
Hanoxer, Pa.; (icorge P. W atkins. New Rochelle, 
X. Y. 

Class of 1936 

William D. Byrne, Xcw Rociielle, X. Y.: James 
M. Hatch, Jr., Charlotte, X. C; Robert S. Long, 
Frankfort, Del.; Robert P. Miller, Lincolnton, 
X. C; Horace E. Tabb, Elizabethtown, Ky. 

Pledges 

James H. Armstrong, Surgoinsville, Tenn.; 
Robert Cook, Vicksburg, Pa.; Douglas Corrier, 
Charlotte, X. C; George Davis, McKcesport, 
Pa.; Alfreil Fuller, Hartford, Conn.; Russell 
Hollinger, Mobile, .Ma.; Robert Howard, Wash- 
ington, D. C; Paul Ketchum, Washington, 
D. C; John E. Moss, Mobile, Ala.; Earle Wentz, 
Schoolfield, Va.; Robert P. Xi.xon, Rome, Ga.; 
Everet Soltman, Xew Rochelle, X. Y.; Berkley 
Schaub, Westfield, N. J.; William Simmons, 
Bainbridge, Ga.; James Slay, Greenville, X. C. 




Si^ma Nu 



Xumber of active chajners. 1(H) 

Xumbcr of alumni chapters 7.5 

Total membership 32,000 

Sigma Xu founded Januar\- 1, lHf)9 

Gamma at Duke. . . November 21, 1931 

Colors Gold, black ,and white 

Flower White rose 

Publication 7'/i,- n,h,i 

CIGMA NU fiatcrnity grew out of a secret 
^ society established at \'irgiiiia Militarv 
Institute in 1868, called the Legion of 
Honor. The Greek letter designated and 
other college fraternity characteristics were 
adopted on January 1st of the very ne.xt 
year, tlic oHicial date of founding of Sigma 
Nu by three western men, but without sec- 
tional discrimination. 

The Delta was so named because of the 
triangular relationship between the Alpha, 
Kappa, and Lambda chapters who collab- 
orated in publishing it first in 1883. The 
ofHcial fraternity song is the rccenll)' writ- 
ten "\\ hitc Star of Sigma Nu." 

Sigma Nil has active chapters in all the 
forty-eight states. Larly in its history 
growth was stimulated in the West, and the 
East was later exploited. 

The original (lamma chapter having 
ceased to exist, the Duke group, formerly 
the local "Goblins," were formally installed 
as (]amma chapter of Sigma Nu. Bearing 
the name of the third oldest chapter of their 
fraternity, the Sigma Nus are the newest 
national on Duke campus. 



269 J 



a 










^ 




I 



^^ 






A 



/'/w/ TOiT.- Al.LlON, DuNSTAN, JoNliS, ScllOCK 

Second rotv: Williams, Goodrich, Tarrai.l 

Third r(r:c: I'Idmun'DS, Mirr.w, IIam;, R \isi,:a 



27U 



nEn 



^^ 



^ssss^^s^ 



FRATl-R 1\ I- \n 1 I \ll. 
W . j. Scclcy. 

FRATRKS IN IM\ I RSII' \l'l': 
Ci RADIATE School 

Frederick Turner, George I. I'hde. 

Class of 1934 

Ralph W. Allen, Jr., Brewsicr, Mass.; Charles 
I. Duiiston, Norfolk, \'a.; Carl F. Schock, New 
Rochelle, N. Y. 

Class of 1935 

Marvin D. Goodrich, jr., IV'torshurg, \ a.; Ricii- 
ard A. Jones, Fountain Inn, S. C; W illard R. 
Raisley, Sharon Hill, Pa.; Flmer Tarrall, Nor- 
folk, \'a.; George H. Williams, Petersburg, \"a. 

Class of 1936 

N. Piper Bchin. Durham, N. C; J. Arnold lui- 
munds, "\'oungsto\vn, Ohio; Irwin R. Hale, Green- 
field, Mass.; Thomas f. Murra\", Pliilndclphia, 
Pa. 

Pledges 

Othmar Bart, F'.ast Orange, N. J.; Aubrc\' Gou- 
die. Pen Argyl, Pa.; W'oodrow \\'. Hayes, Dur- 
ham, N. C; \ incent Hippolitus, New Haven, 
Conn.; Frederick Jackson, Charlotte, N. C; 
Robert Kleinfeltcr, Inwood, N. Y.; Edgar Oliver, 
Savannah, Ga.; N. \V. \'an Nostrand, Brooklyn, 
N. v.; Walter Wright, Wenonah, N. J. 




Pi Kpsilon Pi 

Number of initiates 125 

Pi Kpsilon Pi founded Spring, 1926 

Flower The rose 



pi I-:i\Sll.()\ |>| fralcniily was cstab- 
-■■ lishcd here in the sprinp of 1926. It is 
a local organization, but will in all prob- 



ability' form part of a national social fra- 
tcrnit}- before much time has elapsed. The 
members iiave been directing their attention 
to petitioning Phi Gamma Delta. 

As a group on the campus, the members 
of Pi Kpsilon Pi ha\e always stood well, 
both in strength of organization and in the 
accomplishment of individuals. It may 
well be said that this fraternity has con- 
tributed a worthwhile share to the life of 
the University. 

In the course of the eight years during 
which Pi Kpsilon Pi has existed at Duke, 
there have been 125 men initiated into the 
group. The fraternity has remained rela- 
ti\ely small and compact, though its mem- 
bers ha\e participated in \aried campus 
activities. 

The main phases of campus life in which 
Pi Kpsilon Pi has had leaders have been 
athletics, publications, and student go\ern- 
mcnt. 

The fraternit>- adviser from the faculty 
is Dr. Bert Cunningham. 



271 




'•3* «^1 f* -^^^ ^j 






a a .f^. a. a 





•^% ^> 






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? 



First r(i:c: W'adi;, Niiwm.w, Xiwiox, Sii:\\\ki'. I 1 \v- 
DocK, Sciii:ii'i:ri-y 

Si-c())id ro:c: W kic;iit, lioiri'i.i. /inxiiik, SMirii, 
Al.LARUlCl-: 

Third rozc: St. C'i.air, Cakmax, 1''()rri:,st, l\\i'iinrN, 

CjKTZ 

Fourth ro:t': Smiiii, C". \ .; (IivNT, Ross, Travis, IIknry 



272 



LA 



1-R\1RI:S 1\ rM\ KRSITATE 
School or Mi;i>iti\i; 

Leslie \". nm. n.n.T, ixi. 

Class ok 1934 

Orscn B. W-wioii, jr., Cambridge, Md. 

Class ok 1935 

James B. Allardicc, MouiUaiii Lakes, X. }.; 
Theodore F. H. Bocpple, New \'ork, N. Y.; IL 
Blaine Carman, Blonmticld, N. L; Shelby Dale, 
Portsmouth. Ohio; Homer IL Ilaydock, Salem, 
Mass.; Car! B. Neuman, Meridcn, Conn.; Charles 
St. Clair, Pun.\suta\vnc\\ I'a.; Joe Shieferl\", Jr., 
Bloomtield, N. J.; Kdwin Smith, Norway, .Me.; 
Donald Stewart, Klizabeth, N. J.; Robert C. 
Wade. Kast Orange, N. J.; Harry B. Wright, 
Jr., Preston, Md.; Charles W. Zehndcr, Jr., 
Beilevue, Pa. 

Class ok 1936 

Richard Bcllaire, Da\tona Beach, Fia.; J. Russell 
Forrest, Bloomfield, N. J.; Lawrence L. Gent. 
Cold Springs, N. Y.; Howard R. Getz, .Nazareth. 
Pa.; David W. Goddard. Portsmoutii. Ohio; 
James K. Hcnr\'. Nazareth. Pa.; Ranson P. 
Rathbun, South Orange, N. J.; John S. Ross, 
Queens \'illage, N. "\'.; Caleb \'. Smith, Jr., Rock- 
ville Centre, X. Y.; Albro S. Travis, Brewster, 
X. V. 

Pledges 

Charles H. Baker, South Orange, N. J.; George 
Robert Baile\-, Rf)ckville Centre, N. Y.; Richard 
L. Beazley, South Orange, N. J.; William A. 
Boepple. New ^'ork. X. ^'.; Howard Kastwood, 
Jr., Burlingtf)n, X. J.; Richard D. Jcnkinson. Jr., 
Bclle\ue. Pa.; Frederick R. Lautiier, Lebanon, 
Pa.; Edward W . L. Manifold, Jr.. ^Ork, Pa. 




Sigma Delta 

Xumber of initiates. . . .68 

Xumbcr of alumni ."JO 

Colors Gold and purple 

Flower Flcur-dc-lis 

Publication Sigma Delta Shield 

Xumber of states represented by men, 14 
Sigma Delta founded. . . .Spring of 1928 



npllJ"; oif-'aiiizatioii of Sipma Delta fra- 
-'■ tcniity was effected in the spring of the 
year 192S. The men who founded the so- 
ciety had for purpose the moldinp of a strong 
local group that would later become part of 
a national social fraternity. 

Toward this end an infornia! petition was 
presented, July, 1932, to Phi Kappa Psi 
fraternity. The meeting of the Grand 
Arch Council of Phi Kappa Psi is set for 
July of this year. At that time Sigma 
Delta will engage in a formal petitioning. 

The policy of Sigma Delta has been con- 
servatism in numbers, in the belief that a 
small group ha\ ing the character of con- 
geniality may go farther in beneficial de- 
velopment than can a large unwieldy body. 
During its existence the fraternity has 
maintained a creditable standing in the 
life of the University, having contributed 
its share of outstanding men. 

In the si.x years of its existence Sigma 
I3elta has initiated approximately seventy 
men. The fraternity has as faculty ad- 
viser Dr. Robert S. Rankin. 



273 



i 







J^^^' 









oo 




i 

8 







First row: Peckham, 1 1 arioff, Onisko, Arciihold 
Second row: Wilson, Taylor, Dovey 
Third row: Fisiii r, IlmnARn, F.mivRly 



274 



LAQ 



KR \1RI-: l.V FACULTATE 
II. K. Myers. 

FRATRKS IN UNIVKRSITATR 
Class of 1934 

Werner Harloff, Springfield Canliiis, I.. I.; \ in- 
cent Onisko, Sag Harbor. N. "\'.; Jolin W. Peck- 
ham, St. .Albans, X. \'. 

Class of 1935 

Ronakl Archbold, ClevelanJ, Ohio; Chas. S. 
Dovcy, Jr., Overbrook, Philadelphia, Pa.; James 
T. Rague, Queens \illage, X. Y.; Sherwood \\il- 
son, Roseland, \'a.; E. C. Taylor, Jr., Dante. \ a. 

Class of 1936 

J. J. Bruns, Uniontown, Pa.; Charles l.lHrly, Jr., 
Chester, Pa.; Claude D. Fisher, Oneonta, X. Y.; 
.Mian Hibbard, Clearwater, Fla. 

Pledges 

.Mbert Bennett, Brooklyn. X. Y.; John Brooks, 
Haddon Heights, X. Y.: .Azby Chouteau, Hunt- 
ington, X. Y.; Robert Hunter, Lansdowne, Pa.; 
Robert Kennedy, Hollis, L. I.; Branch Lawson, 
Erwin, Tenn. 




Sigma Alpha Omega 

XuiiihcT nf initiales . . 4{, 

.Number of alumni 35 

Colors Buff and blue 

Flower White carnation 

.Xumber of states represented by men, 12 
S. A. (). founded September, 1928 



TNthc fall of 192S the local fraternity, 
-■■ Sigma Alpha Omega, was established 
here. The tliirteen original members found- 
ed the organization witii the intent of join- 
ing ultimately a national group. 

The first idea which the S. A. O.'s had in 
mind was a petition for a charter. There 
ensued informal dealings with several na- 
tional fraternities before it was decided 
finally to petition directly to Phi Kappa 
Sigma. 

Phi Kappa Sigma has responded with in- 
terest, and a rather unusual plan is being 
followed — that of colonization. Coloniza- 
tion is a conservative and gradual process, 
but there is a strong basis for the belief that 
Sigina Alpha Omega will become a chapter 
of Phi Kappa Sigma before very long. 
Through the cooperation of Lambda chap- 
ter, at the University of North Carolina, 
already eight members of S. A. O. have been 
initiated into the national society. 

Sigma Alpha Omega has made a very 
commendable showing on the campus since 
its beginning. During this time forty-si.x 
men have been initiated into the local order. 



275 



n 




k 

n 



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First ro:v: JhisTicR, Atkins, IIai.ti:, \\.\(;.\|':k 
Second row: Baxter, W'alkicr, Graf 
Third ro-w: Miller, Dkmme, Ruff, Stanley 
Fourth row: W'ildnauer, Winton, Peck, Ancrum 



276 



FRATRKS I\ r\I\ KRSl'r.VIK 
Class of 1935 

Leslie Atkins, Durliaiii, .\. C; Paul Baxter, 
Somerville, N". ).; Robert Demme, Oceaiiside, 
L. I.; Charles Graf, Baltimore, Md.; Frederick 
Hague, Columbus, Ohio; Joseph Jester, Alexan- 
dria, \a.; Stuart Miller, Caldwell". X. |.; Ilarrv 
Prindle. Washington, D. C; Carl Ruff, Wood- 
mere, X. Y.; Allen Stanley, Greensboro, X. C; 
Jacques \oris, Hempstead, X. Y.; Wm. T. 
Walker, Moorestown, X. J.; B. A. Wagner, Xevv 
Oxford, Pa.; C. W. Wharton, Belleville, X. J.; 
Wood row Wilson, Durham, X. C. 

Class of 1936 

Calhoun Ancrum, Boston Mass.; Roselle Hol- 
man, Memphis, Tenn.; Robert Peck, Bingham- 
ton, X. v.; Frederick Wiednauer, Fast Orange, 
N. J.; Ernest Winton, Lakcwood, Ohio. 

Pledges 

Earl Brach, Baltimore, Md.; Curtis Flowers, San 
Antonio, Texas; Joseph Fretwell, .Miami Beach, 
Fla.; Charles Hooten, Bloomheld, X. }.; William 
McCallister. Kdgewood, Pa.; Edwin Rogers, 
Marlton, X. J. 



Keys Club 



Xumber of initiates 4() 

Colors Gold and black 

Xumber of states represented by men, 12 
Keys Club founded. . . February 15, 1932 
Number of pledges. . .6 



T^^lll'. Kc\s Club i.s tlic youngest social 

■*- hndy on the campus. 'I"hc .society was 
orj;ani/.(.\l in 1932 by a group of first-year 
me;i with tlie assistance of the late Dean 
.Moxley Arnold. Almost immediately the 
organization swung into proinincnce 
through its members, who have been quite 
ir.dustrious and outstanding in life on the 
campus. 

Taking up their tjuarlers on the first floor 
of H dormitory, where were also located 
Dean Arnold's rooms, the Keys Club mem- 
bers spent their first year in close relation- 
ship with the late dean of freshmen par- 
alleled only by his own fraternity connect- 
ion. 

'I"he Keys Club is not a fraternity in ilie 
stricth- accepted sense, for it does not bear 
a (]reck-letter designation and the other 
characteristics which mark the distinction 
between a fraternal order and a society of 
whicli Ke>'s is exemplar)-. 

The first step, however, has been made 
toward founding another fraternity on the 
campus. The Keys members are already 
directing their efforts toward securing chap- 
terhood in Beta Theta Pi. 



277 




SORORITIES 



8 





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First ro:f: Mann, I..\cki:v. Dii.i.on, (iRiriiN, W mkik, 

\\ ANNAMAKIiR 

Si-iond rozv: W'ii.i.incii \m. Sii;i:i,k, '^\^ i.dR, 1' \KMirRST, 

I'a"! i.oR, Smiiii 
'I'hircl nr:r: W Ai.i'nx, k(i(:i:i<s, Kim;r, Baii.kv, J ., I5am;r 
Fdiirth nix: 1'',mi r\, .\K\i;ii.i„ I^yrn, C'i.kmknts, I'dw- 

KI.L, Conn 

Fifth nxv: Atkinson, i\ic\vsom, Carr, 1 1 i.nui-rson, 
Baii.i.y M., Buicic 



[280] 



AAn 



SORORKS IN 1 \C ri/l\ll'. 
Klizabcth Anderson. 

SORORKS IN I .\i\ KRsrr.vri-: 

Class of 193+ 

Kmil_\- Byrn, Mayficltl, K\-.; Helen Cnx, Rock- 
ingham, N. C: \ irgiiiia Dillon, Wilmington, 
N. C; Janet (IriHin. Baltimore, Md.; Mary 
Stuart Lacke\-, Christ iansburg, \'a.; Caroline 
Mann, Raleigh. X. C; Marv Parkhurst, Raleigh, 
N. C; Sara Clay Paylor. Raleigh, N. C; Lola 
Marler Rogers, Durham, \. C; Marie Smith, 
Cleveland, Ohio; Klizabcth Steele, Rockingham, 
N. C; Mary Taggart, Tidioute, Pa.; Sara Kath- 
erine Ta\lor, Gastonia, N. C; .Augusta Walker, 
Klizabcth City, N. C; Harriet Wannamaker, 
Durham, N. C.; Pdh W illingham, Macon, Ca. 

Class of 1935 

Josephine .Atkinson, Lynchburg, \a.; June 
Bailey, Thomasvillc, Ga.; Orpah Clements, 
Durham, X. C; Harriet Cobb, Durham, N. C; 
Hazel Kmery, Jacksonville, Kla.; Jane Steele 
Hannon, Charlotte, X. C; Kitty Kiker, Reids- 
ville, X. C; Susan .\IcXeill, Jacksonville, Fla.; 
Xelson Powell, Kdenton, .\. C; Dorothy Wal- 
ton, Jacksonville, Kla. 

Class of 1936 

Martha Bailey, Thomas\ille, Ga.; Kathlyn 
Buicc, Charlotte, X. C; Klizabcth Carr, Green- 
ville, X. C; .Mary I'21liott Henderson, Hickory, 
X. C; .Annie Laurie Xcwsom, Durham, X. C. 

Pledges 

Kllen .Adams, Macon, Ga.; Dorothy Barrow, 
Zebulon, X. C; Walton Bowen, .Macon, Ga.; 
Jean Boyd, Belleville, 111.; Charlotte Crabtree, 
Chattanooga, Tenn.; I'lmilie Crum, Orangeburg, 
S. C; Mildred Drowne, .Asheville. X. C; .Mar- 
gery Kdwards, {>rcensboro, X. C; .Annadale 
Graetor, Richmond, \ a.; .Mary Frances Linney, 
Boone, X. C; Katherine Maynard, Richmond, 
\'a.; Jean Miller, Durham, X. C; .Miriam .Mix- 
son, Valdosta, Ga.; .Mary Moore, Delray Beach, 
Fla.; Betty Pollard, Durham, X. C; .Marion 
Reade, Durham. X. C; Ruth L'lnier, Jackson- 
ville, Fla.; Hope W'hisnant, Charlotte, X. C; 
Lila Womble, W'inston-Salcm, X. C; I'.lizabeth 
W'renshall, .Asheville, X. C. 




Alpha i:)elra Pi 

Xumber of active chapters. 49 

Xumber of alumni chapters 61 

Total membership 8,500 

.Alpha Delta Pi founded. . .May 15. 1S51 

Omicron at Duke 1911 

Colors Pale blue and white 

Flower. . . Purple N'iolet 

Publication Adrlphean 



ALIMLI 01.i;r.\ I'l, one of the largest 
-^*- and oldest national sororities, was orig- 
inalK' tlic .'\delplican Society, founded Ma\' 
15, 1851, at \Vesle\'an College, Macon, 
Georgia. The Adclphean .Society, being 
the first secret society for women, founded 
at the first college for women, holds an im- 
portant place in the early development of 
national sororities. The members of .Alpha 
Chapter applied for a charter and the So- 
ciety became nationally known as Alpha 
Delta Phi. This name was later changed 
to avoid any misunderstanding regarding a 
fraternity existing under the same name. 
As .Alpha Delta Pi it has grown and ex- 
panded throughout the United States, and 
it became international with the installa- 
tion ot se\eral chapters in Canada. 

The Jdflpliran, the national publication, 
is issued quarterly. 

Omicron chapter of Alpha Delta Pi has 
the distinction of being the first sorority on 
the Duke campus. It was installed in 1911 
when Duke was known as Trinity College 
and has developed and expanded with the 
school. Since its installation approximately 
two hundred girls have been initiated into 
Alpha Delta Pi by Omicron. 



281 












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^k^lk Ilk kr^ 



I 




First row. Gardnkr, Ci.kmknt, Mii.i.kr, Winslow, 
Green, Garris 

Srionil ro'u-: Boyd, Irwin, Pi;c;ram, Mi;iki.ejohn, Begg 

Third rozv: White, Phillips, Ormond, Perry, Smith 

Fourth row: Pi.yi.er, Gray, Hruton, Jordan, Yar- 

UROUGII 



282 



KA 



SORORKS 1\ INU KRSri VI 1 
(Iraduate School 

Margaret Ilarrcll. l.ila Cross Perkins. 

Law School 

Louise NLixwcll, Lee Smith. 

Class of 1934 

Ethel Begg, Charlotte, N. C; Elizabeth Boy J, 
Warrenton, X. C; Hanes Clement, \Iocks\iile, 
\. C; Amy Duke, Fort \'alley, Ga.; Gena Gard- 
ner, Anniston, Ala.; Doris Garris, Greenville, 
N. C. ; Doris Green, Durham, N. C. ; Jane Miller. 
Portsmouth, \ a.; Carolyn White, Mebanc, X. C; 
Elizabeth \\'inslow, Greensille, X. C. 

Class of 1935 

Marguerite Collins, Anniston, Ala.; Alarj' Alice 
Dewey, Goldsboro, N. C. ; Bernice Irwin, Brad- 
ley Beach, N. J.; Mary Meiklejoiin, Cheraw, 
S. C; Janet Ormond, Durham, X. C; Elizabeth 
Pegram, Hamlet, X. C; Ethel Perry, Rocky 
Mount, X. C; Carolyn Phillips, Lexington, 
X. C; \ ivian Smith, Red Lion, Pa.; Mary 
Yarbrough, Durham, N. C. 

Class of 1936 

Eleanor Bruton, Candor, X. C; Sarah Louise 
Falls, Shelby, N. C; Helen Gray, Ridgewood, 
X. J.; Sarah Jordan, York, Pa.; Catherine Lyons, 
Charlotte, X. C; Alern Plyler, Durham, X. C. 

Pledges 

Gary .\rmstrong, Selma, Ala.; Mariette Birm- 
ingham, Liberty, X. Y.; Jessica Bradley, Swains- 
boro, Ga.; Josephine Burger, Baltimore, Md.; 
Martha Jane Culbertson, Xorwood, Ohio; Mar- 
garet Franck. Durham, X. C; Beth Lentz, Albe- 
marle, X. C; Eleanor Ma)-cs, Oxford, X. C; 
Helen Phillips, Lexington, X. C; Asenath Pow- 
ell, L'nion Springs, .Ala.; Alma Lloyd Ranson, 
Charlotte, X. C; Rosalyn Ray, \\'aynesville, 
X. C; Eleanor Riddleberger, Jackson Heights, 
N. Y.; Frances Riddleberger, Jackson Heights, 
X. Y.; Margaret Rudisill, Cherryville, X. C; 
Lorraine Skinner, Greenville, X. C; Irene Sparks, 
Ashland, Ky.; Margaret Taylor, Deland, Fla.; 
JeanetteTeSelle, Gainesville, Fla.; Lucia Thomp- 
son, Memphis, Tenn.; Mary \'ickers, Oxford, 
X. C; Margaret Washburn, Hempstead, X. Y.; 
Estelle Young, Columbus, Ga. 




Kappa Delti 



I 



Number of acti\e chapters 64 

Xumber of Alumni chapters 66 

Total membership 9,188 

Kappa Delta founded Oct. 23, 1897 

Sigma Delta at Duke April 19. 1912 

Colors Olive green and pearl white 

Flower White rose 

Publication Ingelos 



KAIM'A DEL'l'A Sorority was founded 
by four girls at Virginia State Normal, 
Farmvillc, Mrginia, on October 23, 1897. 
Through tiie personal friendships of these 
girls with girls in other colleges, new chap- 
ters were added to the organization very 
rapidly. The first convention was held in 
Richmond, Virginia, in 1904, at which six 
chapters were represented. Since that time 
the Society has established chapters through- 
out the United States. 

The journal of Kappa Delta is the An- 
gelas, which was first publislied in 1904. 

Virginia is the center of Kappa Delta 
philanthropic projects because it is the 
state of the sorority's founding. In Rich- 
mond, V^irginia, the national organization 
maintains a ward, a dental room, and a 
gymnasium in the Richmond Crippletl 
Children's Hospital. Aside from this, in- 
dividual chapters of Kappa Delta carry on 
community charitable work. 

Sigma Delta of Kappa Delta was in- 
stalled at Trinity College, now Duke Uni- 
versity, on April 19, 1912, by two members 
of the National Council, Misses Cora 
\'aughn and Jean Coltrone. Kappa Delta 
was the second sorority to be installed on 
the Trinity College campus, and since that 
time the chapter has remained active and 
has grown steadily. 



[283] 



^ 

^ 






fy ^ fe"? v^ r^ 

f -;-/ Cv^ C?^ ^ C^ ^3 



Ik k% Ik h ^Aa 

O O O Q -^ 




a 



k 







First row: I'ms'I'kad, Im.kwi. \\ \ \ i'I', IIokni:, Morton, 
Hrooks 

Sriond ro:c: Jordan, I)ami:i.s, Sn-idiir, 'I'knn'ks, Rob- 
ertson, Covington 

Third roiv: Brown, Cross, 'I'riim.i: it, 1Iavni:s, .\Ii;rkei, 

Fourth row: Si.ocomh, Rkmont, Hkckkr, .\[orton, 
Jones, Wiini: 

/';///( rozv: Morrison, Pkaki;, Paist, I'.; Ckoshv, R.; 
Caldwell, Woosi.i;v 



284 



ZTA 



SORORl.S I\ I \1\ I:RSI 1VI1-, 

Class of 1934 

Carolyn Brooks. Maytickl, K\.; Helen Daniels, 
Columbia, S. C; .Mar\' Louise Home, Rocky 
Mount, \. C; F.loise Inj;rani, High Point, X. C; 
Frances Morton, Roxboro, \. C; Ann Flic Rob- 
ertson, Ma\tieM, K\ .; Charlotte I'msteatl, Dur- 
ham, N. C; Helen \\ _\att. West Medford, Mass. 

Class ok 1935 

Louise Brown, Arlinj;ton, X. L; Mar\' Faison 
Covington, 'rhomasvillc, X. C; Helen Reedcr 
Cross, Isabella, Tenn.; Virginia Ann Haynes, 
Shreveport, La.; Virginia Jordan, BrcKiklyn, 
N. v.; Louise Merkel, Milwaukee, Wis.; Lenora 
Snvder, Ridgefield Park, X. J.; Trixie Tennes, 
Xorfolk, \a.; Jane Triplett, Pine Bluff, Ark.; 
.Mary .Xash White, Atlanta, Ga. 

Class or 1936 

Dorothy Caldwell, Mansfield, Oiiio; Rose Cros- 
b\-, Citra, Fla.; Alice \'. Jones, Petersburg, \"a.; 
Fmmy Lou .Morton, Charleston, W. \a.; Xell 
Peake, Xorfolk, \'a.; Xettie Pinnix, New Bern, 
N. C; Louise Remont, Moylan-Rosc \'alley. Pa.; 
Betty Slocomb, Winthrop, Mass.; Margery 
Woolsey, Glen Rock, X. J. 

Pledges 

Mary Auld, Charleston, \\". \'a.; Margaret Louise 
Baldwin. Durham, X. C; Dorothy Bartlett, 
F.aston. .Md.; Margaret Becker. L'pper Darb\-, 
Pa.; Fsther Crosby, Citra, Fla.; Charlotte Kueff- 
ner, Durham, N. C; Fdna Martin, Brookhii, 
X. Y.; Martha Morrison. Hickman, Ky.; Flor- 
ence Paist. Lansdowne, Pa.; Frances Paist, 
Wayne, Pa.; Flizabeth Riley, Durham, N. C; 
Helen Slater, Detroit, Mich.; Flizabeth Small, 
Wyoming, X. J.; Xancy Snead, Petersburg. \'a.; 
F.lcanor Stevenson. New Bern, N. C; Aimee 
Toner, Xew Ha\en. Conn.; Catherine Tritle, 
F^ric, Pa.; Flla Waters, Washington, N. C; 
Kathryn Whittemorc, Fort Washington, N. Y.; 
Marye Price Woodroe, Xorfolk, Va.; Constance 
Wyatt, West Medford, Mass. 




Zeta Tau Alplii 



I 



Xuniber of active chapters 61 

.Xumber of alumni chapters ."iS 

Total membership 7,141 

Zeta Tau Alpha founded. .Oct. l.\ 1898 

Phi at Duke June 4, 191.5 

Colors. . . Turquoise blue and steel gray 

Flower White violet 

Publication Themis 

yV:Vi\ VW alpha was founded at \ir- 
^^ giiiia State Normal School, Farnivillc, 
\irginia, on October 15, 1898. For se\eral 
months after its founding it was known as 
the ?.^.'' (The Three Question Mark Girls). 
Before April, 1899, the Cireek name was 
adopted, and on March 15, 1902, Zeta Tau 
Alpha was chartered as a legal corporation 
by the legislature of Virginia. Thus it was 
not only the first women's fraternity to be 
chartered in the state of X'^irginia, but the 
first chartered by a special act of the legis- 
lature. 

Northern sororities had, by the end of 
the nineteenth century, become well estab- 
lished, but the southern field was left prac- 
tically open. Zeta Tau .Alpha was one of 
the first .sororities to fill this need of organ- 
ization in the Soutii, and for several years 
continued its expansion in the Southern 
States. The first northern chapter was 
started at Boston University, February 22, 
1912. Zeta Tau Alpha became interna- 
tional in 1929 with the installation of Beta 
Rho Chapter at the l'ni\crsity of Manito- 
ba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 

The magazine of Zeta Tau .Alpha, Themis, 
is published quarterly, and was first issued 
in 1903. 



285 



MtrAAM£A£ A 








^ '-^ 




^ O ^ f^ 












d\Mt AA A 



First row: 1'',\ving, Glass, Siieim'ard, AIcIntosh, Powe, 

Sarver 
Second rozv: Patton, Bradley, Carlton, Fleming, 

Childs 
'J'hird row: Williams, Pldersen, Lamson, White, 

Tompkins 
Fourth rozv: Wai.laiier, Hardin, Rhodes, Thompson, 

Hedrick 
Fifth rozr: Cuninggim, Haislii', Si:i:i), 1^>arrett, 

\V ATKINS 



[286] 



KA0 



SORORKS IX rNl\ KRSITATK 

Cuvss OK 1934 

Celcstine Bcamcr, Burlcj', Klalio; l'!hiinc Cliilds, 
Durham, N. C. ; Eleanor Ewing, Nashville, 
Tenii.; Catherine Fleming, New Bethlehem, Pa.; 
Josephine Glass, Miami, Fla.; Carohii Mcin- 
tosh. Old Fort, N. C; Catherine Powe, Durliam, 
N. C; \irgiiiia Sarver, Lewisburg, \\ . \ a.; Susan 
Sheppard, \\'ashington, D. C. 

Class of 1935 

Mary Louise Bradley, Lima, Ohio; Jane Carlton, 
Greensboro, N. C; Alma Hedrick, Salisbury, 
N. C; Pauline McF'adyen, Concord, N. C; Sig- 
rid Pedersen, New "\'ork, N. Y.; Sarali Thomp- 
son, Shelbv, N. C; F.leanor Tompkins, White 
Plains, N. v.; Kthel White, Baltimore. Md. 

Class of 1936 

Eleanor Barrett, Stamford, Conn.; Margaret 
Cuninggim, Nashville, Tenn.; Lenora Fanning, 
.\sheville, N. C; Jane Haislip. Lumbcrport, 
W. \'a.; \'irginia Hardin, Montclair. N. J.; Nancy 
Lcitch, Stamford. Conn.; .Mary .Mice Rhodes, 
Chattanooga, Tenn.; .Mary Carolyn Seed, Mont- 
clair, N. J.; Audrey Speicher, Rockwood, Pa.; 
Jean Wallauer, White Plains, N. Y.; Michau.x 
Watkins, Midlothian, V'a. 

Pledges 

Emily .'\bel, Scarsdale, N. Y. ; Marie Assen- 
heimer, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Eleanor Carver, East- 
hampton, Mass.; I'llaine Childs, Durham, N. C; 
Betty Faires. Drexel Hill, Pa.; Kathcrinc Kirk- 
patrick, Salisbury, N. C; Dorothy Leach, New 
York, N. Y.; Carol Little, Washington, D. C. ; 
Georgianna Lamson, Maplewood, N. J.; Char- 
lotte Marshall, .\shiand, Pa.; Eleanor Mitchell, 
Washington, D. C. ; Nancy Pate, Raleigh, N. C; 
Constance Patton, Fayetteville, N. C; Lucy 
Rauchenberg, .Atlanta, Ga.; Annie Louise Reist, 
Lancaster, Pa.; Elizabeth Sasscer, Washington, 
D. C; Shirley Teed, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Jane 
Williams, St. Paul, Minn.; Sarah Williams, 
Elizabeth City, N. C; Katherinc Upchurch, 
Durham, X. C. 




Kappa Alpha 'Ilieta 

Number of active chapters 58 

Total membership 20.000 

K. A. T. founded Jan. 27, 1870 

Beta Rho at Duke 192S 

Colors Black and gold 

Flower Black and gold pansy 

Publication Kappa Alpha Theta 

IZAPPA ALI'I LA II IK TA, the first Greek 
-^^ letter fraternity known among \v(jmen, 
was founded at DcPauw University, then 
Asbury College, at (jrcencastic, Indiana, 
1870. Although at that time there were 
three other women's fraternities in exist- 
ence, these did not adopt (Jreck letter 
names until somewhat later. Kappa Alpha 
Theta was founded in a co-educational in- 
stitution where the same needs which led to 
the establishment of Greek letter societies 
among men were felt by the women; there- 
fore, Theta was the first society for women 
organized with principles and methods 
akin to those of the Greek letter fraternities. 

The magazine, the Kappa Alpha Theta, 
is published quarterly, the first issue being 
in LSS5. 

In 1925 a local, Sigma Tau, was formed, 
which petitioned Kappa Alpha Theta. In 
1928, the petition was accepted and Sigma 
Tau was installed as Beta Rho chapter of 
Kappa .Alpha Theta. Since 1928 Beta Rho 
has initiated approximately one hundred 
girls into Kappa Alpha Theta, and has 
always maintained a high standard both 
scholastically and socially on the Duke 
University Campus. 



1287: 



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ir J>^k i 



i 



i 










First r<i:r: Rv.umw. Skkias, C'iiasi;, (Iii.ks. .M(irkii\\, 
\\ <>()ri;N. A. 

S,-ron(I r(i:-r: Kuwi.ixi;, \\'i;i.i.i,s. I''i:i,i)M w. Kxicnr, 
( ; \i<Ri:ir 

'I'liird row: Rittiir, Kobkrson, Hart, 1*i;i.(:rim, Powiii.i, 

Fourth ro:c: \'.\s Dkrkn, II[\i:s, (iray. Combs, '1'oney 

Fifth rov: I'liii.i.ii's, .\kC"i.i:N \i;ii an, I'arsons, I^ates, 

P \KKS 



2881 



KKT 



SORORKS IN" rNi\i;Rsrivn-. 

Gradiatt. Schdoi. 

Rebecca Scaiilon, Mor>;aiitii\vn, W. \ a. 

Class of 1934 

Frances Aiulcrson, I,yi)cliburn, \ a.; Jean Avers, 
Indiana, Pa.; Helen Cliase, New Haven, Conn.; 
Charlinc Dowling, .Munfordxille, Ky.; .Margaret 
Edwards. Durham, N. C; Clare Feldman, Eas- 
ton. Pa.; Katherine Giles, Marion, X. C; Betty 
Knight, .Morristown, \. J.; .Ada Morrow, 
Mooresville, X. C; Annie Kate Rebman, Court- 
land, .Ma.; Catlierinc Serfas, l*".aston, Pa.; Doris 
W elles, Pensacola, Fla.; Alice \\"ooten, F^avettc- 
vilie, X. C. 

Class ok 193.^ 

Margaret Bates, Fllkimi, .\ld.; Julia Conibs. Dur- 
ham, X. C; F'.ve Davis, X'anceboro, X. C; .Mar- 
gery Lee F^ichin, Butler, X. J.; F^thel Garrett, 
Swarthmorc, Pa.; Ruth Hart, Bliximington, 111.; 
Dorothy Hines, Greensboro, X. C; Sue Powell, 
Gastonia, X. C; Jane Ritter, Collingswood, 
X. J.; Kathleen Roberson, Durham, X. C. 

Class of 1936 

Dorothy Gray, Sunmiit, X. J.; Marjorie Harper, 
Bethlehem, Pa.; Marian .McClenaghan, Raleigh, 
X. C; Betty Parks, Kew Gardens, .Xew York; 
X. ^'.; Helen Parsons, .Altoona, Pa.; Marie Pel- 
grim, Coral Gables, Fla.; Ruth Phillips, Wheel- 
ing, W. V'a. 

Pledges 

Faith Alexander, .Miami, Fla.; Paula Basscli, 
Xew "\^ork, X. V.; Jessie Brewer, Clarksvillc, 
Tenn.; Isabel Craven, Lexington, X. C; Bar- 
bara Daniel, Claxton, Ga.; Dorothy Davis, 
\'anceboro, X. C; FJinor Dunham, Durham, 
X. C. ; Flossie Dunton, Dorothy Hudson, Stam- 
ford, Conn.; Isabelle Krampf, .Allegheny, X. Y.; 
Bess Laing, Charleston, W . \ a.; Elizabeth Lifv 
pitt, Cooperstown, X. Y.; F^nestine Littell, 
Cooperstown, X. Y.; Xorma Marcus, Brookiinc, 
Mass.; Frances Merrill, Charleston, W. \'a.; 
Jane .Minor, Batavia, X. Y.; .Althea Xolde, Xew 
Orleans, La.; Tckla Parker, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
Xancy Peterson, \\"rK)dbury, X. J.; Helen Rob- 
erson, Durham, X. C; Diantha Swazey, Forest 
Hills, X. Y.; Ro.^e Tone\', Morristown, Tenn.; 
.Mai F. \ an Dcrcn, Cynthiana, K\'.; .Anna Wag- 
ner, Jamaica, X. Y.; Hassie Warren, Durham, 
X. C; Julia W'oiiten. Fayettevillc, X. C. 




^^"^^ 



Kappa Kappa (lamma 

Xuniber of active chapters. . 03 

Xumbcr of alumni chapters 95 

Total membership 17,376 

K. K. G. founded October 13, 1870 

Delta Beta at Duke. . October 2.i, 1930 

Colors Light and dark blue 

F'lowcr . . I*"leur-de-lis 

Publication AVv 



17'.\ri'A k.\l'l'.\ C;.\.\I.\1.\ is one of the 
-**■ oldest of tlic ( J reck letter sororities. 
It was founded at Moninouth Collepe, 
Monmouth, Illin(jis, in 1,S7(J. Kappa was 
the first sorority to call a Pan-Hellenic Con- 
press, to hold a national convention, to insti- 
tute a central form of government, to pub- 
lish a sorority magazine, to form a uniform 
budget system, and to send co-organix.ers 
to assist new chapters. A complete history 
of Kappa Kappa Gamma was presented to 
the national convention <>f 19.^0. 

The AVy, a quarterl\' publication, con- 
tains news-letters from all active chapters, 
and discussions of sorority problems and 
events, both natif)nal and local. 

Kappa maintains two funds — one set 
aside to assist need\' Kappas; the other, to 
give deserving students an opportunity to 
complete their education. 

In 192.S a local sorority. Sigma Beta, was 
organized on the Duke I'nivcrsity campus 
with the express purpose of petitioning 
Kappa Kappa Ciamma. The official peti- 
tion was submitted in March, 19.S0, and in 
October 25, of the same year, Sigma Beta 
became Delta Beta Chapter of Kappa 
Kappa (Jamma. 



289 



O V 



i 












Sll 










/"/rji /•Oft'.- JoNiiS, Markiiam, I*"..; Rosi:, 111 witt 

Second fozc: Heini.ey, Owens, \\'i\iri;i; 

Third row: Eaby, Schiller, Markiiam, S.; Troisdale 



[290] 



LK 



SORORES 1\ I \I\ 
Graduate School 

Sara Owciibx- Zcrklc. 



kSllVVI'l-. 



Class of 1934 

l-lvcKn Aiiams. McColl, S. C: Mar\- GaJJis, 
I'pper Marlboro. Md.; Mary Katliryn Hewitt, 
Ilackensack. N. j.; Rutli Jones, Cliilhowic, \ a.; 
Kleanor Markluuii. Durliani, N. C; Bernice E. 
Rose, New York, N. Y. 

Class of 1935 

Martha Ballay, Ambriiipc, Pa.; Florence Hcinle\\ 
Aniitvville, X. Y.; Klizabeth Owens, Bennctts- 
ville,'S. C; Sara Walker, RiJlcy Park, Pa.; 
Dorothy W'ikoff, Kansas City, Mo. 

CLi\ss OK 1936 

Josephine Eaby, Lancaster, Pa.: Dallas Knight, 
.\nibler. Pa.; Sarah Markhani, Durham, N. C; 
\irginia W'infrec, Lynchburg, Va. 

Pledges 

Winifred Alcorn, Hersiiey, Pa.; Louise Boicc, 
Pittsburgh, Pa.; Hope Jones, Chilhowie, \'a.; 
Ruth Jean Lowery, Mt. Vernon, N. Y.; Rebecca 
McCarroll, Harrisburg, Pa.; Charlotte Mark- 
ham, Durham, X. C; Betty Rettew, Harrisburg, 
Pa.; Ruth Schiller, St. Petersburg, Fla.; Ruth 
Supplee, Xarbcth, Pa.; Catherine Trousdale, 
Florence, Ala.; Helen Wade, Phoenixvillc, Pa. 




Si^ma Kappa 

Xuniber of active chapters 41 

Total membership 6,207 

Sigma Kappa foumied 1874 

.\ipha Psi at Duke January 4, 1931 

Colors Maroon and lavender 

Flower Violet 

Publication The Triangle 



CiCiALY KAl'J'A stands among the pio- 
^ iicer Greek letter societies for women. 
It was founded in 1874 at Colby Collepc, 
W'atcrvilic, Maine, by the first five women 
enrolled there, and became a member of 
National Pan-Hcllcnic Congress in 1904. 
Since that time, Sigma Kappa has become 
international, having chapters located in 
Canada. 

The chief publication of the sorority is 
the Triangle, a quarterly magazine issued 
first in 1907, giving a full account of 
Sigma Kappa activities and interesting 
personalities. 

In 191 S Sigma Kappa adopted as its 
national philanthropy the educational work 
of the Maine Sea Coast Missionary Society. 
This work is centered among the fisherfolk 
on the many small islands off the New 
England coast. 

In 1922 a scholarship fund was established 
for the purpose of aiding members of 
Sigma Kappa to complete college courses. 
As an incentive to encourage high scholar- 
ship, a national committee makes an annual 
award of a scholarship cup to the chapter 
having the best record. 

The local sorority, Delta Psi, was organ- 
ized in February, 1929, with the purpose 
of petitioning Sigma Kappa for a charter. 
The petition was accepted in December, 
1930, and on January 4, 1931, Delta Psi 
was installed as Alpha Psi Chapter of 
Sigma Kappa. 

[291] 




First rozc: (jkisic, 'I'uuor, Cartkr, lSocdior, I^'ountain 

Second ro'u-: SiiRiNiiR, Ki:i:nk, Goodman, RiiiFLii, Cas- 
sinv 

Third ro'.c: Mouri;, Ui.ai. k, I.ii:h, I'ruii, XrcCoi.i.i'M 

Fourth ro'w: J5ai,i., Carlton, Sii.i., C'amkron, \\ aikins 






292 



AAA 



SORORKS 1\ rNi\ irshaik 
Graduate School 

Thelma Appcll, Luisita Dye 
Class of 1934 

Louise Carter. Gate Citv, \a.; Florence Geise. 

Nornstown, Pa.; Frances Tudor, Albemarle, 

Class of 1935 

Elma Black, Bamberg, S. C; Marv McCnllum 
Jacksonville, Fla.; Caroline Ricfle. Baltimore 
Md.; Dorothy Warren, Bel Air. .Md. 

Class of 1936 

Inez Aberncthy, Durham. X. C; Betty Cassidy 
Bluetield, W. \a.; Elinor Fountain, Easton, Aid.' 
Kathryn Goodman, Ashland, Kv.; Dorothy 
Keenc, .Miami, Fla.; Helen Lieb, Elizabeth, N. j'- 
-Margaret .Moore, Clarendon, \a.; .Margerv Pace 
Suffern, X. V.; Isobel Shriner, ^'ork. Pa.; Pat 
Sills, Xashville, N. C; Gladvs Souder, .Macon 
Ga.; \irginia Watkins, .Midlothian, \'a. 

Pledges 

Elizabeth Aiken, South Orange, X. |.; Marie 
Anderson, Jacksonville, Fla.; Esther Ball, Louell 
Mass.; Alice Batcman, York, Pa.; Kathleen 
Cameron, Hattiesburg. Miss.; Frances Carlton 
Durham, X. C; .Mary Westbrook Chapman,' 
Durham, X. C; Donna Dav, Bradenton, Fla.; 
Dons Day, Bradenton, Fla.; Barbara Fawcett, 
Canton, Ohio; Betty Findlav, Bethlehem, Pa • 
I- ranees Graney, .'\shland, Kv.; .Marv (Jranev, 
Ashland, Ky.; .Anne Jerome, Pine Level .X C • 
Eleanor .Myers, Byhalia. .Miss.; Lurline o'lsen,' 
Poughkccpsie, X. v.; Clary Webb Peoples, Ashe- 
ville, X. C; Isrbellc Pugh, Huntington, W \a • 
Barbara Rich, South Orange, X. J.; Edna Rogan! 
Ba timore, Md.; Charlotte Siehler, Baltimore 
Md ; Susanna Smith, Leonia, X. J.; \irginia 
^wift, Wayne, Pa.; .Margaret Zechcr, Lebanon. 
Pa. 




Delta Delta Delta 

.Xumber of active chapters "](, 

Total membership 15,642 

Delta Delta Delta founded. . Xov., 1888 

Alpha Omicron at Duke .\ov., 1931 

Colors Silver, gold and blue 

F'""'^'- Pan,sv 

^'"^''^•"'"" Tridnit 



r)i-:i;rA i;i:i;ia D].;lta was f.,uMcicJ 

at Boston University on ThankseiviiiL' 
I'.ve, 1899. Tri Delta has never been a 
•sectional organization. Founded in the 
Kast, Its first charters were distributed 
over all sections of this country and three 
chapters were established in Canada. Tri 
Delta has alumnae chapters in all of the 
larger cities. 

Delia Delta l^elta was one of the six 
sororities represented at the first Pan- 
Hellenic Congress, which was held in 1891. 
In the first history of the sororilv, published 
111 1907, there was a chapter 'devoted to 
the first development of the Pan-Hellenic 
mf)vement. 

The other publications of Delta Delta 
Delta include the quarterlv magazine, the 
Tndnu, published since' 1891. A 'song 
book and various secret publications are 
al.so issuctl. 

Delta Delta Delta accepted the petition 
of a local Delta Ipsilon, formed on 
the i)uke I niversity campu.s, and Alpha 
Omicron was installed November 7, 1931 
Since that time the sorority has grown in 
membership and prestige. The excellent 
\vork of the chapter in the past bespeaks 
of a successful future. 



293) 









I 






A-; 



^ 
K 



\mi 



^ 



first roa:- Burlkiuii, Love, Voigt, Langston 
Second row: Smith, Humbert, Strickland 
Third ro;v: Newton, Hunsicker, Johnson 
fourth rotv: Lightbown, Imlay, Ivey, Wise 



[294] 



UB^ 



SORORKS 1\- r.\l\ KRSITVI'I'. 

Graduate School 

Marjic Bright, Fort \\'ortli, Tex.; I.iicili- Puctte, 
RichinoiKi, \'a. 

Class or 1934 

Alma Love, Hopkinsvillc, Ky.; Margie V'oigt, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Class of 1935 

Klvira Burleigh, Rutherford, N. J.; Margaret 
Humbert, Hasbrouck Heights, N. J.; Sylvia 
Hunsicker, Allentowii, Pa.; Dcnzil Langston, 
Orlando, Fla.; Evelyn Newton, Durham, N. C; 
Priscilla Smith, Baltimore, Md.; Trulu Strick- 
land, Durham, N. C; Ethel W'hittemore, Miami, 
Fla. 

Class of 1936 

Lilliam Collins, Durham, N. C; \'irginia Imlay, 
Chevy Chase, Aid.; Mary Frances Ivey, Dur- 
ham, X. C; Frances Wise, Hillsdale, N. J. 

Pledges 

Anna Boyd, Jacksonville, Fla.; Rhea Dana, Dur- 
ham, N. C; Laura Johnson, Washington, D. C; 
Helen Larzelere, Jacksonville, Fla.; Ruth Light- 
bown, West Palm Beach, Fla.; Ruth Michlcr, 
Easton, Pa.; Nancy Rowe, Coral Gables, Fla.; 
Frances Smith, Easton, Pa.; Helen Stackhouse, 
Easton, Pa.; Evelyn Taylor, Glen l^rook, Conn. 




Pi Beta Phi 

Number of active chapters 7S 

Total membership 20 220 

Pi Beta Phi founded April 28, 1867 

Beta at Duke February 17, 1933 

Colors Wine red and silver blue 

Slower White Carnation 

Publication Arrow 



pi BETA PHI, the oldest national fra- 
•■• ternit\- for women, was founded April 28, 
1867,_at Monmouth College, Monmouth^ 
Illinois, under the name I. C. Sorosis. In 
1883 the Greek name was adopted as a 
sub-title. Five years later, the name I. C. 
Sorosis was discontinued, and in 1889 the 
fraternity was incorporated under the state 
laws of Illinois as Pi Beta Phi. 

The journal of Pi Beta Phi, the Arrow, 
which was first printed in 1885, is published 
quarterly. As an encouragement for high 
scholarship, the fraternity maintains a 
number of scholarships and fellowships for 
its members. 

North Carolina Beta of Pi Beta Phi had 
its origin in the local sorority, \Iu Lambda, 
founded April 22, 1929. The purpose of 
the founders of Mu Lambda was to obtain 
a charter of Pi Beta Phi, and to this end 
they persevered, refusing unsolicited offers 
of charters from other national fraternities. 
A formal petition was presented to Pi 
Beta Phi on January 14, 1933. On Feb- 
ruary 17, 1933, Miss Amy Burnham Onken, 
National Grand President of Pi Beta Phi, 
formally installed Mu Lambda as North 
Carolina Beta. 



295 



Alpha Epsilon Phi 




ALPHA EPSILON PHI was ;founded at 
- Barnard College on October 24, 1909. 
It has the distinction of being the oldest 
and largest Jewish sorority in existence, 
having chapters in both the United States 
and Canada. Scholarship, citizenship, and 
service are among the ideals stressed in 
chapter life by Alpha Epsilon Phi. 

The chief publication of the sorority is 
the Columns of Alpha Epsilon Phi. 

The national organization has several 
philanthropic endeavors, and also has sev- 
eral diversified scholarships for members 
on campuses where chapters are located. 

Alpha Epsilon Phi accepted the petition 
of the local sorority, Nu Beta Phi, and 
Alpha Epsilon Chapter was installed in 
1934 on the Duke campus. 



SORORES IN UNIVERSITATE 

Class of 1934 

Ann Helen Katz, Norfolk, \'a.; Ethel Nachani- 
son, Durham, N. C. 

Class of 1935 

Sara Berenson, Bogalusa. La.; Jeannette Sidcn- 
berg, Richmond, \ a. 

Class of 1936 

Rub}'e Fogel, Georgetown, S. C. 

Pledge 

Harriet Jane Lins, West Palm Beach, Fla. 




First row: Katz, .Naciiamson, Lins 

Second ro:v: .Myers, Sidenberc;, K()(;el, I5i;i<i;nson 



20r. 



Delta Epsilon 



f 



StJRORKS l.\ I .\1\ l.R.sriAl'l': 
Class of 1934 

Sara Price, Scarsdalc, \. ^ .; I-",mil\ \\'i!ford, 
i\la\ tield, Ky. 

Class of 1935 

Frances .McKinlc\-, ^'oiikcrs, X. "\'. 

Class of 1936 

AdeleMcCraney, "\otikers, X. "^".; Rachel Mectzc, 
Charlotte, X. C; Marion Roe, Clermont, Fla. 

Class of 1937 

Claire Belle Clarke, Xew \'ork, X. \.: Jean Mc- 
Cowan, Xew York, X. Y .; Evelyn Mclntyre, 
Xew ^ ork, X. \ . 

Pledges 

Ellen Farnum, Ashevillc, X. C; Marjoric Cod- 
dard, Brnoklyn, X. ^'.; Virginia Johnson, Lex- 
ington, X. C; Rachel Sink, Lexington, X. C. 







First rozi-: W'ilford, Price, Roe, Meetze, McCraney 

Second ro:v: Clarke, McCowan, Cioddard, McIntvre, Farnum 



297 



Book r'l'f-t 




I "l" 




WILLIAM HOLLAND HALL. A.B., 
A.M., B.C.E., M.S.C.E. 

PKOILSSOR 0\- LNGINLLRLNG. 



»7-; ■«|»»i<»,o' 





A ROUTE THAT SHORTENED THE DISTANCE BETWEEN TWO GREAT 
OCEANS BY THOUSANDS OF MILES IS THE FULFILLMENT OF AN 
AGE-OLD DREAM. IT WAS THE DESIDERATUM NOT ONLY OF THE 
MILITARIST AND OF THE POLITICIAN BUT OF THE NATION AS A 
WHOLE. THIS HERCULEAN TASK WELL DONE IS A PERMANENT 
MONUMENT NOT ONLY TO THE ENGINEERING PROFESSION BUT 
ALSO TO SCIENCE, TO CAPITAL. AND TO LABOR. 




PUBLICATIONS 




The Chanticleer 



J. Gordon Towxley 

Editor 

Staff Officers 

James O. Otis 

Managing Editor 

Alton Murchison 

Sports Editor 

F. T. RowE 

Art Editor 

Martin Williams 

Assistant Editor 

Ernest Cruiksmaxk 

Copy Editor 

Catherine Fleming 

Co-ed Editor 



npill'', Chanticleer has been published an- 
-'■ nually for a great many years. It was first 
the attempt of the editorial staff to portray the 
student life of old Trinity College between its 
covers. With the transition from Trinity Col- 
lege into Duke University a new demand was 
placed upon the Chanticleer, if it was to ade- 
quately depict the greatly expended life of the 
Duke campus. To fit this demand, a larger 
book was needed. The staff of nineteen hun- 
dred and thirty-three met this need. It has 
been the attempt of the present staff to use 
that size as a basis of work and create a book 
that would catch and present the beaut)" and 
symmetry of our surroundings, one that would 
be a suitable monument to the class of nineteen 
hundred and thirty-four. 

This book is primarily attempting to please 
the present Senior class, for it is the annual of 
their graduating year. As the dreams of com- 
pleting their undergraduate college career ap- 
proach reality, their attention will be focused 
more and more on the business life that lies 
ahead — in the future. Slowly will they forget 
the joys and sorrows, some of the friendships 
formed, and the acti\'ities engaged in while at 
Duke. 



'i^& 



^j ^Zi ,-,-.)■ »-■* C^T-^ "^ -^^ 







^l^ 



Y A ' 



% 



WooDRUii Dillon .Murchison Oris 

(Ient Wallauer Newbold West 



I'LLMiNc; C'ARi.'roN C'rlukshwk \\ii.ll\ms 
.Morris IIowakd Walton Haislii' 



304 



1 he Chanticleer 



■T^l II''. business slafV this year lias accomplished 
-'■ a splendid and enornious task. It has 
al\va\s been a difficult job to obtain advertisc- 
nienls to sustain the hnancial end of an annual 
and a likewise painful task to carry out collec- 
tions of the various student fees. Their task 
was however increaseci this year by the enlarge- 
ment of the book with the corresponding increase 
of space to fill, in regard to advertisements and 
a greater responsibility of student collection. 
With the cooperation of the Fast campus 
ciivision of the staff, it has been carried to a 
successful conclusion. 

Back of this machine there must be princi[iles 
which will bear mention at this point. We 
have worked to catch the spirit of beaut\', of 
silent strength, of subdued power, of consolida- 
tion of lofty ideas — all inherent in the walls of 
our university buildings. Things can be beauti- 
ful and shallow; shallowness can exist without 
beauty. Both of these arc easily portrayed, 
but to do justice to a rich and meaning beauty 
is a difficult task. Simplicity, minuteness of 
design, good taste, and attention to details 
have made possible the presentation of the book 
to the students in this form. If the majority 
are pleased with the outcome of the staffs' 
endeavors, that is all cjiie can ask. 



f^. 



it 



^Mr 



/ 



/i 



Cl.AIHORNK H. CjREGORV 

Business .Manager 

SlaJJ Officers 

Bkrnice Rosk 
Coed Busincs.s .Manager 

XORMAX LiVENGOOD 

Clarence .Ar.mstrong 

Hy.att .Mossburg 

Assistant Business Managers 






it^M^ 






^^ 



Heffelfinger 


Emery 


Eaby 


LiVEXGOOD 


Jones 


Rose 


-Armstrong 


.\bbott 


Pfttit 


Sapp 


Hanes 


Mossburg 


PnWEI.L 


SoiTHGATE 


Cone 


Austin 



305] 




The Duke Chronicle 



L. H. Edmondson 
Editor 



Slaff Officers 

George Lawyer 
Managing Editor 

John Moorhead 

Ronald Archbold 

Leslie Squires 

W. H. Long 

\\'arren Armstrong 

Assistant Editors 

Annie Laurie Newsom 
Co-ed Editor 



T^HE Duke Chronicle, the University weekly 
-^ newspaper, is now in its twenty-eighth year. 
The editorial policy for 1933-34 has centered 
around four major points: (1) Development of 
University Atmosphere, (2) Betterment of Stu- 
dent-Faculty Relationships, (3) Creation of 
Duke Spirit, (4) Cooperation Amonp Organ- 
izations. 

In an attempt to prepare for the long-hoped- 
for change from weekly to semi-weekly publica- 
tions, the editor has enlarged the editorial staff 
and created new departments. The West and 
East campus staffs report news from Trinity 
College and the Women's College respectively. 

The Duke Chronicle has increased its circula- 
tion in accordance with the increased enrollment 
of the University through the close cooperation 
of the editorial and business staffs. We should 
feel quite proud of the fine record they have 
made, not only in their increased circulation, 
but also in the splendid weekly papers they 
have been publishing. 




i.^ i>i Ti *« 



Of 9^ 



^ n o <^» 




^kL 







Lavvver 


SlIEl'l'ARO 


MOORIIKAI) 


N i:\vsoM 


Akmstrong 


Jordan 


MuRCHISON 


McNeill 


Long 


Bailey 


Hilton 


Pederson 


Archbold 


Taylor 



306 



The Duke Chronicle 



T\ keeping with the continual growth of Duke 
-*- University, the business staff of the Duke 
Chronicle has greatly increased the number of 
workers who by consistent application have 
built up one of the best papers in the school's 
history. The business staff should be proud 
of the showing they have made this year. 

The staff has built up a paid circulation of 
over three thousand copies and can boast of 
complete Duke University co\ erage. The adver- 
tisements, which are the principal source of 
income, have been increased this year by over 
thirt}--five per cent of last year's fine record. 
By the great efficiency of the staff in regard to 
procuring ads, the jiumber of pages has been 
increased to between ten and twchc. 

With the increasing number of workers, 
competition has been keener for positions on 
the staff and this has caused greater interest 
and more efficiency among the staff' members 
which has resulted in the publication of an 
excellent paper. 




Raymond I,. Kknt 
Business Manager 

S/fl/ Officers 

Robert Nixon 
Office Manager 

John Stii.i-man 
Advcrlising Manager 

William Reavis 
Circulation Manager 

Frances Tudor 
Co-ed Business Manager 



^cs T^ rs p cs 




Tudor 
Cr.\wford 



Nixon 

\\ ATKINS 



Feldman 

ROGOL 



Smith 
Souder 



ki 



Jordan 
Stewart 






Stillman 
Moore 



Reavis 
Gillies 



[307] 




The Archive 



Richard Austin Smith 
Editor 

Stotf Officers 

Leslie A. Squires 
Book Review Editor 

Amy Duke 

Co-ed Editor 

Lyne Few 

Managing Editor 

Harry Willis 
Art Editor 



AT the end of its forty-sixth year of continuous 
^ pubhcation, the Archive is far from the large, 
voluminous product which once served sintul- 
taneously as newspaper, literary magazine, and 
annual. Corresponding with the increase in 
the size of the school, there has ensued a new 
and better Archive, published monthly by the 
students and devoted primarily to a soliciting 
and printing of the best literary creation of the 
entire student body. There are no restrictions 
in regard to the class status of the contributions, 
every member of the college community being 
extended an opportunity to have his work 
published. 

Recent editors have done much to obtain the 
writings of many of the nation's outstanding 
literary figures. Reversing this policy, we find 
the 1934 magazine the culmination of the idea 
of elimination of all outside contribution. By 
enacting this change, it is felt that the Archive 
is now a truly student publication. One cannot 
help but feel an increased interest in contribu- 
tions when they are of friend or acquaintance. 
The policy adopted has worked efficiently, and 
so far has in no way lowered the standard of 
the magazine. The students thus acting as 
their own patterns have stimulated creative 
cibilitv. 



fTi t). C D O 







▲Jf^J^ 



Lawyer Nusbaum IIi:i.m I.om. Runm:i< Ancrum Wim.is 

Baldwin Skomicld I lmer Asiibv .\Iixti:r Smiiii, H. 



308 



I he Archn c 



'T^lll-: fact that the Jrc/iivr has been au aided 
-■■ first place for the last four years over all 
other collegiate niagax.iiies represented in the 
North Carolina Press Association is adequate 
proof that the work of the staff has not been in 
vain. This is an unparalleled achievement and 
should be regarded as significant in the decided 
advance which the publication has made since 
its founding in ISSS. 

This year there has been closer cooperation 
between the business and editorial staffs. Con- 
tributions have been entered from both cam- 
puses; however, more than one-half of this 
year's material has been submitted by women. 
This has been the result of encouragement and 
a greater chance for advancement of women 
wlio wish to try out for staff positions and are 
literally inclined. Coordination with Sigma 
Upsilon, national literary fraternity, has also 
served to make the working of the magazine 
function more smoothly. 

To the future editors, the exceptional record 
of the Archive should be kept in mind, not only 
because of the acknowledged recognition that 
it brings both to the University and to them- 
selves, but because it is a true indication of 
student work and student management. 




M. v.. Xewso.m, Jr. 
Business .Manager 



Staif Officers 

.\i;i.SON' PoWliLL 

Co-ed Business Manager 

.\kC\RTIIV llASfiAR 

Cle.ments Goulu.max 
Advertising .Managers 

CiiARi.Ks Bkaitv 
Circulation Manager 




n ^ o .,o ft p 




-ACKERMAN FoWEl.I 



■'^'■'- '^"TV GouLDMAX Baxgi-e Haxgar Beattv 

Maxx Foi.so.m Wmitixg .\cki.ey Llmer 



Re 



SSKLI. 



309 




The Distaff 



Betty Knight 
Editor 

Staff 

Eleanor Douglas 

Ethel White 

Amy Duke 

Mildred Taylor 

Doris Welles 

Helen Wyatt 

rubye fogel 

Katherine Sawyer 

Elizabeth Pegram 



npHE Distaff, only publication of the Woman's 
-'■ College, has successfully completed its third 
year of activity. It was founded entirely 
through the interests and efforts of the women 
students who desired a magazine of their own. 
Through the efficiency of the students, the 
publication has been increased in size and quality 
of work. The main purposes of the paper is to 
promote interest in creative writing on the 
campus and to encourage literary efforts among 
the students. 

Since it is a representative student publica- 
tion, students are allowed to voice their own 
opinions. Any student is eligible for the staff 
who is willing to work diligently. Future 
members of the Distaff will have to work extra 
hard in order to keep up with the fine record 
made by this year's staff. 

The Distaff came as an answer to the desire 
to achieve likewise leadership and indi\iduality 
in publications: it was felt that promotion was 
not achieved in accordance with the effort 
expended and the urge to be their own directors 
in a strictly woman's publication, made up of 
strictly women workers and strictly women 
contributors, has been the stimulus which has 
kept this publication in the forefront paralleling 
the Archive in its scope of literary material. 




22 




Pegram 



[310 



Welles 



Fogel 



White 



Taylor 



Wyatt 



The Distaff 



T^lIE Business Department of the Distaff, in 
-■■ the third year of its existence, has so well 
wrought and achieved that the continuance 
of the periodical is not only assured for the 
present but is guaranteed for the future as an 
integral part of Duke student publications. 
That their activities have been widespread and 
efficient is proven by the number and variety of 
advertisements carried this year. The leading 
merchants of Durham, through the untiring 
efforts of members of the Business Staff, have 
seen fit to patronize the book — a sure sign of 
the worth of the Distaff, not only as an encour- 
agement for student creative writing but also 
as a good advertising medium. 

This work has been an important part of the 
trend towards a field of independence and 
creative literary effort by the women as an 
equivalent to the publications of the men of 
Duke University. The results of the activities 
of the Business Staff have as effectively proven 
the business and administrative ability of the 
women as the efforts of the Editorial Staff have 
established their literary talents. No literary 
publication may exist without the foundation 
of a good business staff; thus the only publica- 
tion of the Women's College is made possible 
by their efforts. The staff is due a great deal 
of credit for its work in the past and present, 
for it has strictly adhered to the general polic\- 
of the Distaff — it is entirely a product of womcii 
student effort; written, financed and published 
by them^alone. 







C'athkrixi: Skri-as 
Business Manager 

Staf 

I. OKA I'"ra\ci;s Dams 
Marian F.lv 

Clare Fkldmax 
-Anita Kno.x 
Jane Ritter 

-Margaret Bates 
Rose Toney 

Mai Van Deren 
Betty Parks 



9 ^^ e o m 



Ely 



Bates 



Feldmax 



Parks 



Davis 



Ritter 



[311 




DRAMATICS 




Duke Players 



A. T. West 
Director 

Membership 

Vivian Allen, Calhoun An- 
crum, Ronald Archbold, Paul 
Baughman, Nellie Bishop, Rob- 
ert Boeker, William Boepple, 
Stuart Bosley, J. Franklin Bos- 
tock, Louise Carter, Robert 
Cook, Helen Daniels, George 
Fennell, Betty Flowers, C. Tur- 
ner Foster, Margaret Franck, 
Fred Hague, William Hendrix, 
Nancy Hudson, Eloise Ingram, 
Virginia Jordan, Anita Knox, 
Morton Kritzer, Danzil Langston. 



npHREE years ago Taurian Players became 
-*■ Duke Players, and since that time the 
organization has made remarkable advance- 
ment in both the quantity and quality of their 
endeavors. Following last year's highly suc- 
cessful program, this year the Players continued 
their policy of three major and two minor 
productions. George Bernard Shaw's Great 
Catherine, with Anita Knox playing the title 
role, was presented on November third as the 
first major production. Lavish of costume and 
setting, this play was enthusiastically received 
by the largest audience ever to witness a Duke 
Players' production. Shortly before the Christ- 
mas holidays a unique feature of this year's 
program was presented in the form of a bill of 
original one-acts which included Stewart Bos- 
ley's Alternative, Gordon Clouser's Homecoming, 
A. T. West's adaption of Yereniev's Tragedy of 
the Soul, and Richard Austin Smith's Forgotten 
Temples. This feature has popularized play- 
writing on our campus, and it is hoped that even 
more interest in this literary form will be shown 
next year. For the Quadrangle Pictures Birth- 
day Party the Players aided in scenery creation 
and technical production and presented Harry 
Willis' prize-winning skit, Author, Save My Child. 
On March twenty-third the second major pro- 
duction, Dangerous Corner — a modern mystery 
play by J. B. Priestley — ^was acclaimed as sue- 










Top row: Mustard, Flowers, Nusbaum, Shriner, Jordan, Pederson, Ancri'm, Ai.i.kn, Haguic 
Bottom row: Bishop, Foster, Daniels, Ti;i:d, Bostock, Roni:RTsoN, Ti;\nis, i,i;i;, Miii.iord 



314 



Duke Players 



cessful as Great Catherine. Dracula as adaplcd 
by John Boldersoii from the novel of Bram 
Stoker produced by the CaroHna Mummers of 
Chapel Hill, was sponsored by the Players as 
their fourth presentation, on April 20. I'Mther 
Noel Conward's uproarous comedy Ilay fever 
or Philip Barry's Hotel Universe is to be given 
for the Player's traditional May Day offering. 
Both are in rehearsal at the present time, and 
the one that is not produced in May will be 
presented next year. 

Tentative plans for the coming year are 
equally as enthusiastic as they were for this 
year's fruitful season. Among the plays being 
considered are: Cyrano de Bergerac by Rostand, 
Ah Wilderness by Eugene O'Neill, Ajter Dark 
by Dion Boucicault and Androcles and the Lion 
by George Bernard Shaw. 

Although many members of the club have 
done creditable work this year, there are three 
whose efforts are noteworthy — Mr. A. T. West, 
our director, Fred Hague, our business mana- 
ger — and Harry Willis, who has proved more 
than once that his work in scenery designing 
and play-writing will be missed, 
t The increasing interest with which Duke 
students are entering into the field of dramatic 
art and the evidence of much real talent among 
this year's new members promise even greater 
success to the Players in the future. 




Fred Hague 
Business Manager 

Membership — Continued 

Carl Lee, Michael McPharlin, 
Jerome Menaker, Louise Merkel, 
Mary Jane Mulford, James A. 
Mustard, Herbert Nusbaum, Sig- 
rid Pcderson, Nettie Pinnix, 
Florence Pes, Anne Elle Robert- 
son, Sara Sue Robinson, Eliza- 
beth Sherron, Isobel Shriner, 
Gladys Souder, Leslie A. Squires, 
Marian Stratton, Shirley Teed, 
Trixie Tennis, Ethel Williams, 
Harry Willis. 










Top ro'u-: Kritzer, Fennell, Robinson, Souder, Franck, Bosley, Ingram, .McPharlin, Archbold 
Bouom row: Merkel, Wagner, Boepple, Menaker, Langston, Boeker, Willis, Carter, Sherron 



315 



r 



) 




C. Turner Foster 
\"ice President 



Officers 

Paul Baughman 
President 

Eloise Incram 
Secretar\' 

R. W. Archbold 
Treasurer 



Theta Alpha Phi 



q^HETA ALPHA PHI, National Honoraiy 
-^ Dfamatic Fraternity, is an organization of 
lliirt}--six chapters representing twenty-nine 
states and one territory. It was organized 
at a meeting of the National Association of the 
Teachers of Speech held in Chicago, December, 
1919. The purpose of the fraternity is to 
increase interest, stimulate creativeness, and 
foster artistic achievement in all or the allied 
crafts of the theatre. Membership is gained 
by meritorious work done in the field of the 
drama. On this campus, as well as on a greater 
majorit}' of the other campuses where chapters 
are located, Theta Alpha Phi is a means of 
acknowledging the individual's faithful suf'iport 
of the dramatic organization and in some manner 
showing his superiority in one of the many 
phases of the theatre. 

The official badge is a comico-tragic mask of 
gold crowned with four rubies bearing the black 
enameled letters "(-)A<I>" on the left eye, nose, 
and right eye, respectively. The official publi- 
cation is The Cue, of which Mr. A. T. West is an 
assistant editor and a very valuable contributor 
to the great success which this publication has 
enjoyed. 



D n r\ o ^4i 

.1 i*«, «rT.- ^^M.T' f^'^B i»'^T^ v»«~T^ 




Mustard Mi;kki;i, Axcrum AKuiiiuij) Siukron 

Tii'PiNc. ]'"osti:r Robinson I1,\(;uk Bosi.ey 



!i \i'ty C'i, \rk 



316 




MUSIC 




Men's Glee Club 



Edwin N. Saylor 
Business Manager 

Officers 

Russell Herbert 
President 

J. P'osTER Barnes 
Director 

DeArmond Moore 

Student Director 

John A. Long 
Vice President 

Paul Baxter 
Assistant Business Manager 

Phil W. Casper 
Secretary-Treasurer 



'T^HE Men's Glee Club is fast becoming one 
-'■ of the prominent organizations in the field 
of student activities at the University. The pro- 
gram for this year has suffered no curtailment. 
Starting tlie 1933-34 session with many of last 
year's accomplished singers, the squad was 
closely contested in all departments. Upon 
close examination one finds that even the 
seasoned veterans were hard pushed and often 
replaced by fresh talent. 

During the week of March 5, the Duke 
University Musical Clubs, composed of the 
Men's Glee Club, the Concert Orchestra, Jelly 
Leftwich's University Club Orchestra, and Mrs. 
J. Foster Barnes as guest artist, made a tour 
of four cities in North Carolina, namely, 
Charlotte, Greensboro, Winston-Salem and High 
Point. 

A similiar trip, on a somewhat smaller scale, 
was carried out in the fall. Under the capable 
leadership of J. Foster Barnes these trips have 
proven a success both to the club itself and to 
the school which they represent. The news- 
paper comments were quite favorable and the 
critics were unanimous in their praise of the 
balanced strength of the Club. 

The Club, under its president. Turner Foster, 
has been active between its tours in aiding at 
gatherings, giving social functions and preparing 
short excursions. 



f* -IK /A 'X^ 



^ 



SYmHT. 



.^ "yt W • ^ 4y * •*. 



iiTirai y-^^T*' 



318 



Min's (li.i.K C'l.rH 



Women's (ilec (^lub 



npill' Women's Glee Club, a part of the 
-*■ nuisical division of Trinity Collcpc, has con- 
tinued to grow under tlie capable direction of 
Mrs. J. Foster Barnes until its membership has 
reached nearly one hundred. 

This group has increased not only in size but 
also in activities. For the past several years the 
C^lcc Club has appeared in a musical concert 
on tiie East campus, and each spring has joined 
the Men's Glee Club in presenting an operetta 
in Page Auditorium. The Woman's Glee Club 
is also important in the Chapel Choir, which 
furnishes music for the Sunday services. This 
year the Glee Club, in collaboration with the 
other women's musical organizations, has gained 
further recognition by bringing the well-known 
Richard Halliburton to the campus in the fall, 
and the Carolina Salon Ensemble in the spring. 

The formation of this club has given the 
women a chance to apply their musical talent 
and to progress accordingly with the growth 
of the musical organizations on the men's 
campus. 

It is hard to carry out a well-rounded edu- 
cation without denoting a substantial proportion 
of one's time to the study or participation in 
the field of music. 'I'oday, as in the past, it 
adds color to work and play. 




Janet Grim- in 
President 

Officers 

Nelson Poweli, 
Secretary 

JOROTHY KiRKMAN 

Treasurer 

Susan Singleton 
Business Manager 




women's CJLEi; Club 



319] 



Johnny Long's Duke Collegians 



JOHNNY LONG and his Duke Collegians 
'^ Orchestra is one of the Few successful 
cooperative orchestras in the countr}'. Since 
its organization in the fall of 1931, this group 
of eleven musicians has progressed to such a 
position that it is making a definite bid for 
the title, "The South's Leading Collegian 
Orchestra." 

Li the past three years the orchestra has 
played many engagements at mid-southern 
L^niversities, among them being Washington 
and Lee, North Carolina State, Duke L^ni- 
versity, North Carolina University, Randolph- 
Macon and Hampton-Sidney; they ha\-e also 
played extensively throughout the Carolinas 
and Virginia, and have spent two successful 
seasons at White Lake Beach, popular North 
Carolina summer resort. 

Let us glance back to find the history of this 
organization. The orchestra was organized 
in the fall of 1931 ar.d has been fortunate in 
keeping the same personnel since that time. 
A constitution was drawn up which governs 
the conduct of the members; heavy fines for 
drinking and disorderly conduct are inflicted, 
and all personal disputes must be settled 
within twenty-four hours. At the time of 
organization, officers were elected, Maurice 
Miley being selected as manager of the 
orchestra, having in charge all business affairs 
and booking engagements throughout the 
school year. 

From the beginning of Freshman week, in 
their Sophomore year, the band has been 
entertaining nightly in the Aden's Union. 



They have continued to furnish music 
throughout the year, alternating each month 
between the East and West campuses. In 
their continued stages of progress, they have 
won innumerable supporters and the hearts 
of all the University students. 

The Duke Collegians, because they have 
combined good music with showmanship 
without cheapening either, because their spirit 
of cooperation has carried them through 
consecutive years with but a single change, 
because they are not only fine musicians, but 
frequently take up the composer's pen with 
ability, because they have a fine spirit of 
fraternalism in their group, are worthy of 
distinction. 

The Collegians pride themselves on their 
sweet music, their spirit of fraternalism, and 
on the fact that in their personnel there are 
si.\ arrangers and six composers who have 
written and presented ten songs. The entire 
personnel consists of: John Long, James 
Allardicc, Edwin Butner, Shelby Dale, Ogdcn 
Davies, David Goddard, McCarthy Hangar, 
Charles Hicks, Maurice Miley, Henry Miller 
and Irving Nielsen. 

With such a unit to work with it does not 
require much imagination nor do we have to 
look far into the future to see Johnny Long 
and his orchestra follow the path of success 
which some of the more prominent dance 
orchestras of the country have traveled. We 
may with interest watch these boys graduate 
in the class of thirty-five. May the outside 
world from that point on welcome them and 
enjo}' the same sweet music we hear. 




3201 



Nick Lanc\ and His Blue Dcs ils 



'T^lll'. naim- "liliK- Devils" has not been 
-*■ coiilincd ill its iiatioiiwidc scope to the 
athletic teams repiesenliiijr Duke L niveisit\-; 
the name also tabs an orchestra that has 
become known throughout the South and 
Middle Atlantic States as one of the college 
world's most distinctive contributions to tiir 
ranks of dance bands. Duke students and 
alumni are proud of Nick Lancy and his 
Blue Devil Orchestra. 

The beginning of the banci's rapid rise to 
fame began one evening back in I'^.il when 
someone suggested that Nick Laney, then 
best known for his football placing, sing a 
few songs with the orcliestra playing in the 
men's union after supper. The crowd liked 
his singing. The tirchestra received national 
publicity when newspapers carried feature 
stories on the "croonin' halfback." The 
climax to the organixation's early history 
arrived when it was selected from ISO college 
bands to play with (luy Lombardo in the 
Roosevelt Hotel, New Vt>rk, during the 
Christmas vacation of 1932-3.1. 

That engagement in the (lolham Cit\- 
marked the change from just another college 
orchestra to one of the finest in the country. 
Last year they placed at the smart Mayview 
Manor, Blowing Rock, N. C. During the 
present academic year they have played for 
major social events at practically every large 
southern college. Among the campus events 
staged last semester, the Blue Devils were 
selected to play for the Pan-Hellenic Dance 
and the Co-ed Ball. 

The personnel of the band is as follows: 



Bob Boyd, first sa.\; Les Brown, second sax 
and arranger; Paul Ilarwon, third sax; Bill 
Couch, fourth sax; Bob Thorne, first trumpet; 
Ciiarles lliggins, second trumpet; Walton 
MofTet, trombone; Pete Laudeman, jiiano; 
Marry Ingle, drums; I'lrnest Baridiain, guitar; 
Ra>' Couch, bass; Larry Turner, first violin; 
jack Tanncnbaum, second \Ioliii; aiul Nick 
i,aney, leader. 

It requires no stretch of imagination to 
predict a brilliant future for the Blue Devils 
and their versatile leader. They have as 
their model Fred Waring and his Pennsyl- 
\ anians, a top-rating orchestra that began in 
student days at Penn State. Nick plans to 
add four or five more musicians and develop 
the orchestra along the lines of the Waring 
unit. This summer their bookings will be 
handled by the Dixie Orchestra Service, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

But no matter how high they climb in the 
music world we shall always remember them 
as "Nick and tlie boys" who set our feet 
beating time to a hot Casa Loma number or 
our minds wandering with the glide of a 
beautiful waltz. 

Nick Lane}', during his sta\' in the I'ni- 
\ersity, was very outstanding in the field of 
sports. It seems that on the basis of his 
progress thus far that success in the field of 
music is likewise assured. It is apparent that 
his untireing efforts will soon put him, as well 
as the boys, in a worthwhile position. They 
have made their bid for fame and it seems 
certain that opportunit}- will be continually 
knocking at their door. 




[321 



wkS\ 


M|[j[| 




^9^|H^^^^^H^^^\^^^H 



ATHLETICS 




Director of Athletics 
Wallace Wade 



Department of Athletics 



two years of operation, a great percentage of 
Duke students have taken in some sort of 
athletic program. 

His career as a coach is studded with bril- 
Hancy, beginning when he became head coach 
at a small school in Tennessee, where he 
attracted Dan McGugin's attention as an 
able handler of men, and consequently went 
to Vanderbilt as assistant to the latter. Two 
years later he went to Alabama and remained 
there through the 1930 season. 

Wallace Wade was graduated from Brown 
University in the spring of 1917. Soon after 
his service in the World War he began that 
climb in the athletic world which has brought 
him to his present predominant position. 

Up to the present Alabama has been the 
subject of his most successful efforts. Gaining 
Southern Conference championships in 1924, 
1925 and 1926, in these last two years the 
Crimson Tide was also one of the contenders 
in the Rose Bowl classic. In 1930 the 
invitation was again extended, and Wade, 
with his greatest team of all seasons, journeyed 
to Pasadena and won a decisive victory from 
Washington State. 

Continuing his successful tactics of his 
former years, Wallace Wade at Duke Uni- 
versity is painting the picture of football in 
a new light. 



Y)17"A1,LACK WADE, who assumed com- 
' '^ plete charge of athletics at Duke Uni- 
versity in January, 1931, brought with him 
from Alabama one of the greatest records of 
American football coaches. And he has con- 
tinued that record at Duke. His football 
teams of the past three seasons have added 
glory to his already prominent reccMxi in the 
football world. 

Nineteen hundred and thirty-lhree added 
world renown to the name of Wallace Wade 
and to the Duke Blue Devils. This year's 
aggregation came through a tough ten-game 
schedule with flying colors. Outstanding as 
Southern Conference champions, they nar- 
rowly missed a trip to the elusive Rose B(nvl 
through a heart-breaking upset at the hands 
(if tjie Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets at Atlanta. 
In addition to his duties as head football 
coach at Duke, Mr. Wade, as Athletic 
Director, has installed a greatly enlarged 
physical education program that includes a 
department of intramural athletics designed 
to furnish athletics for all students. In its 




\\ Ai.i.Ae 1. \\ ADi; 



324 



Athletics at Duke 

Till'". Diiko Blue Dl'x ils were cxcct'tlinu'h' 
tnrtunate lliis year in liaviiij,' as tlioir 
leaeliT a most efficient aiul eapalile \eteran. 
Carl SeluK-k, for three years tlie brilliant 
mainsta}- of the Duke forward wall, has made 
a name for himself as a cool and dependable 
mainsprinjr of the Duke machine. 

Modest and unassuming'. Captain Schock 
has broujrht to the Blue Dc\il eleven that 
characteristic which is so necessary for an 
efhcient and smooth-work ins,' team; never 
cnnvdint; into the spotlight, but always the 
essential element in exery offensive play, and 
ever and ever the life of the defense, Carl has 
proved his superior abilitv' throuirii three 
years of fine performance. 

I'he 19.1 3 eleven has established a record 
for future teams to challenge. Their un- 
broken line of \ictories have brought them 
natii>nal recognition and establishet,! the name 
of Duke University in the football world. 
Their achievements this year have furnished 
that publicity and impetus which will con- 
tribute much to the continuation of the 
triumphs of 1933. 

This year's accomplishments seem to fore- 
shadow^ a new era in football history at Duke 
University. While the grow th of the school 
itself has undoubtedly suggested the idea of 






Fred Crawford 
Ail-American 



C.\I'T.\1.\ C.\RI. .ScilOCK 



greater athletic teams at Duke, the sudden 
and successive victories of the 1933 Blue 
Devils far surpassed the hopes of the most 
optimistic. Perhaps future years will sec 
further glories for school and team. 

The 1933 football season saw Duke not 
only putting her best team in history on the 
field, but also of producing her first All- 
American player. When the experts of the 
great fall pastime drew up their "perfect" 
teams, Fred Crawford, Blue Devil tackle, was 
an unanimous choice for the mythical elevens. 

It was inevitable that the big Wav'iiesville, 
X. C., lad would receive the highest honor 
accorded a football player. For three years 
Crawford was a main contributor to Duke's 
football success. In his first year of varsity 
competition he starred at an end pcjsilion and 
in his last two years, plaving tackle, provcil 
to be the South's outstanding lineman. 

Combining brawn and brain, Crawford 
was in the words of Coach Wallace Wade, 
"the greatest lineman I have ever seen." 
Fast and powerful, he was uncanny in his 
quick charging and in covering punts. I lis 
remarkable performance in the memorial 10-2 
victory over Tennessee will go down in the 
annals of Duke athletics as one of the greatest 
exhibitions ever turned in by a representative 
of the Universitv. 



325 





'r^ A 



Wade \'oyles Cameron Hagler Caldwell Baker 



W'aite Singtox 



Coaching Staff 



"TNUKE takes great pride in the fact that 
■'--' she has one of the best coaching staffs in 
tlie entire country to guide the destinies of 
her athletic teams. That each man on the 
staff is deserving of the department which 
he heads is bolstered by the meritable records 
which are credited to their respective careers. 

Jack Coombs, "The wonder man of base- 
ball" came to Duke as coach in 1929 after 
a brilliant career of professional ball. In his 
five years here he has turned out one Southern 
Conference team and three state champion- 
ship teams. Aside from being an excellent 
coach he is very popular with the whole 
student body. 

Carl Voyles, first assistant to Wade and 
head track coach, comes here highly recom- 
mended by the University of Illinois author- 
ities. His record at the latter school has 
been continued at Duke as his track teams 
are rapidly becoming of championship calibre. 

Eddie Cameron, from point of service in 
the Blue Devil fold, is a veteran of the staff. 
Once a great athlete at Washington and Lee, 
he is now regarded as one of the best athletic 
tutors in the South. His duties are divided 
between instructing the backfield of the foot- 
ball team and being head coach of basketball. 
Four consecutive court championships have 
been annexed during his regime. 

Dumpy Hagler, former pupil of Wade at 
Alabama, is an assistant football coach. He 



drills the linemen and from some of the stars 
he has developed it is apparent that he is 
doing his job well. 

Herscpiel Caldwell, a teammate of Hag- 
ler's, has the important duty of acclimating 
the freshmen to college athletics. Yearling 
squads under his direction have done excep- 
tionally well. 

Lenox Baker, although he had no actual 
coaching job, contributed greatly to the suc- 
cess of the Blue Devil sports through his 
unusual ability as a trainer. 

Alex Waite, was added to the staff by 
Coach Wade in view of his excellent record at 
Ashcvillc high. He has developed some good 
material for the varsity in his work with the 
reserve squads. 

Freddie Sington, All-American at Ala- 
bama, instructs the linemen on both the 
varsity and the freshman football squads. 

K. C. (Ikrari), who was transferred from 
l!ic Ihiiversity of Illinois athletic staff, has 
made intramural sports an extensive part of 
the undergraduate program at Duke. 

Add Warren, Marshall Criciiton, Boh 
Tuttle and Jack Persons have shown 
marked success and ability in boxing and 
wrestling, golf, cross country and swimming 
respectively. 



[326] 




FOOTBALL 




ScHOCK 




I'., l;. DlM.M' 



3 



Burner 



328] 




Football 

^^ZHILE performances of past gridiron 
^ ^ machines at Duke had ranked them 
among the better "football teams of the 
nation, the record and play of the Blue 
Devils of 1933 reformed the severest of 
critics into the most enthusiastic of 
admirers for the Wade-coached eleven 
and established Duke as one of the few 
great football teams of the nation. 

Not since the millionaire tobacco mag- 
nate and philanthropist endowed Trinity 
College with a large portion of his fortune 
has Duke gained as much recognition. 
Papers all over the country ran weekly 
stories of the Blue Devils march to the 
peak, and millions of people followed 
with intense interest the upward struggle 
of a mighty aggregation that swooped 
down like a cyclone on everything in its 
patli wreaking havoc and devastation. 

l>iinging praise to the school, to the 
state, aiul to the South, this gallant 
Duke clc\en, exhibiting an indominablc 
lighting spirit, marched courageously 
through the first nine games without a 
single reverse. With the Rose Bowl in 
immediate sight they prepared them- 
sel\"es for the tenth and last contest with 
Georgia Tech. Huge crowds of alumni 
and students followed their team to 
Atlanta to witness the final. . . . Tlic 
score of that game indicated a xictory 
lor the Engineers, but there was some- 
ililng bigger than a score iii\ol\c'd -it 
was the sheer determinatitjn and grit 
nianifesl h\- that courageous fighting 
spirit of ele\-en blue-clad warriors. Not 
a single soul who went to Grant field on 
that dismal December afternoon doubted 
I he true greatness of the Blue Devils. 

Besides winning the State and Southern 
Conference championships, the Devils 
jijaced fi\'e men on the all-conference 



k'"^1 











selection in Cox, llcndrickson, Rogers, 
Crawford and Schock. Crawford was 
chosen Ail-American tackle. 

1)1 KK 37~y. M. I. 6 

Making their debut at Memorial Sta- 
dium in Greensboro, before a crowd of 
about fifteen thousand people, Wallace 
Wade's untried Blue Devils went into 
action. There was a question in the 
mind of every Duke follower, hope in 
the heart of every student and alumnus, 
and perhaps a prayer upon the lips of 
each coach. 

Amidst all the fever and excitement 
Coach Wade surprised everyone by 
calmly starting his second team. The 
game started slowly with \'. .\I. I. 
drawing first blood by blocking a f)unt 
and recovering for a touchdown. How- 
ever it only stimulated the De\ils into 
action, for two plays later Rossiter 
passed to McAninch who raced thirty 
yards for the initial Duke touchdown of 
the season. Wade at the end of the first 
quarter sent in a first team that was 
raring to go. The crowded stands were 
to see a spectacle of terrific dri\c and 
power not equalled before in Duke 
history. With Cox ripping the line wide 
open and Cornelius and Laney slashing 
the tackles and racing the ends, they 
presented a machine that was unstop- 
pable. The work of the line showed 
drive and power too good to be true. 
The game on the whole was more than 
promising despite the fact that it was the 
first, and every one on the squad saw 
action. 

DUKE 22— WAKE FORES T 

Playing their first home game, and 
with the annual home-coming game with 
the mighty \ ols from Tennessee but a 





■?^^--i.- 





Belue 



week away, the Devils did not tend to 
exert themselves to any great degree 
with a not-too-powerful outfit from Wake 
Forest. The game at first was rather 
listless with Wade again starting the 
second team, which proceeded to stop 
everything the Deacons had to throw. 
Real power was again shown when the 
first team went into action. The high- 
light of the game was a heave from Laney 
to Rogers with the little Duke end making 
a sensational one-handed catch over the 



DUKE 10— TENNESSEE 2 

The game of games — one that will be 
a continual thrill in the hearts of Duke 
supporters for }-ears to come. Vov a 
week the campus was in a steady up- 
heaval of excitement: bonfires, placards 
of "Beat Tennessee" were plastered all 
over the city, and to top it all a large 
body of returning alumni came to see a 
great Blue Devil machine in action. 

All dope pointed to a win for Tennessee; 
the Blue Devils had yet to face strong 
competition, and they were stacked up 
against a team that was rocking the 
country with victories — a team rated one 
of the best in the nation. 'I'here were 
perhaps thirty thousand people in the 
stadium when the opening whistle blew 
and nian_\- more filing in that were to see 
a determined bunch oi Blue l)e\ils blast 
the might}' \'ols into submission. 

Led b\' the mighty Crawford, uh 
undoubtl>- phn-ed the greatest game 
his career, and the flashy little end, 
Rogers, a super Duke line proceeded to 
uproot a hea\-ier I'ennessee forward wall 
and stop the mighty Feathers and Jirac- 
kett dead in their tracks. Meanwhile 
"Corky" Cornelius, in person, was slash- 
ing the Vol tackles like a cyclone. 



o 
of 



330 




Ill tlie first period Cornelius booted a 
field goal from the thirty-yard line which 
gave the Devils a 3-0 lead at half time. 
It was a sweet field goal to the Dexils for 
it oflf-set the goal that gave them such a 
heart-breaking defeat last year. In the 
second half Durner probably saved the 
game when he recovered a blocked punt 
with no less than half the Vols having 
their hands on it at one time or another. 

With the score 3-2 and the sound of 
the final gun drawing near, Mc.Aninch 
took a punt on the run and returned it 
sixty yards to the Vol fifteen-yard line. 
Four plays later Cornelius drove over the 
weak side of the line for fourteen yards 
to sew up the greatest victory in Duke 
football histor\'. 



ULKK 19 UA\ IDSON 7 

Traveling over to Davidson the follow- 
ing Saturday the Devils slowed up a bit 
and were forced to put on pressure to 
defeat a fighting bunch of Wildcats. It 
was more or less a breathing spell with 
such games as Kentucky and Auburn 
approaching. Alexander and Ward play- 
ing most of the game carried the fire- 
works of a slow attack. 



DUKK 14— KENTl'CKY 7 

One of the hardest games of the season 
was played in Lexington with the boys 
from the "blue grass." It was not until 
the last quarter that Cox plunged over 
the center of the Big Kentucky line to 
give the Devils the final seven points 
that won the game. Duke scored first 
when continual thrusts at the line by 
Cornelius, Cox and Laney carried the 
ball to a position for Cox to carry it over. 
A big thorn in the side of the Devils 
throughout the entire game was Ker- 



QuiNN 




Saleeby 



331 




i/% 





cheval, whose line plunging and punting 
kept them on the defense a great part 
of the game. Incidently it was Kercheval 
that passed to Darby for the touchdown 
that tied the game up at half time. 

DUKE 13— AUBURN 7 

Returning home the Blue Devils came 
through with another great victory when 
they sent the Plainsmen home with a 
crushing defeat. The score does not 
show the marked superiority of the Duke 
team, as they missed no less than three 
other touchdowns by inches or costly 
fumbles. Hendrickson was instrumental 
in the first touchdown when he took a 
long heave from Rossiter and ran to the 
one-yard line where Cox carried it over. 
Incidently Hendrickson was at this time 
approaching the point of being recognized 
as the cleverest field general in the 
Southern Conference. 

DUKE 38— MARYLAND 7 

With the second team supplying tlie 
punch, the Blue Devils completely tram- 
pled Maryland into submission. Alex- 
ander anci Ward ripped the Maryland 
line to pieces, and it ga\e the first team 
a niucli needed rest. 

DUKE 21— CAROLINA 



II last years victory was not cikui.ltIi 
)i- Duke supporters, this year's \ictor\- 
lould put satisfaction in the hearts nf 
1 Dukcites, for the Devils proceeded 
1 wipe up the lield with a lighting bunch 
I' Tarheels. Hendrickson taking over 
all-carrying duties thrilled the crowd 
itli a brilliant exhibition of leather 
)tiii,ir that jiroduied two touchdowns in 
lie \ery lirst i]uarler. To show the 
larked superiorit}' of the Blue Devils, 



ti 



Means 



332 




•JSI^ 






Wade played the second team about half 
the game. Throughout the game the 
team worked hke a well-oiled machine 
and looked equal to the national recogni- 
tion it was beginning to get. 

DUKK 6— STATE 

Always one of the toughest games — 
the State jinx was finally broken in the 
roughest game ever seen here. It was 
Jack Alexander who stimulated tlic Duke 
team into a last period touchdown drive, 
finally carrying the ball over on the heels 
of the mighty Crawford. It was the 
injuries received in this game that helped 
in the heart-breaking defeat at Georgia 
Tech the following Saturday. 

GE0RC;1A TKCll 6 DlKl'. 

With the Rose Bowl staring them in 
the face, Wallace Wade's untied, un- 
defeated Blue Devils journeyecl down to 
Atlanta, Georgia, to battle Georgia Tech's 
wrecking crew in the final game of the 
1933 season. Despite the fact that they 
were in the worst physical condition that 
they had been in at any time during the 
season as a result of their bitter struggle 
with State the preceding Saturday, the 
Wade men were favored to win their 
tenth straight victory. That game at 
(jrant Held will always be remembered 
by Duke supporters. After a very unspec- 
tacular first period, in which both teams 
played careful defensive football, the 
Engineers drew first blocjd at the begin- 
ning of the second quarter. By a series 
of beautifull}' executed reverses and end 
runs they succeeded in marching the ball 
down to the Devils six-yard line. The 
Duke line held for two downs, but a 
beautifully executed double reverse to 
tlie left side produced a touchdown for 
them in their third attempt. They failed 





Tarrall 







xr. ,v ''j; waririiiaaga g^ 



j^ - 



Alexander 





to convert, however, and the Blue Devils 
left the field at half time trailing 6 to 0. 
A telegram from the Rose Bowl Com- 
mittee inviting them as the East's repre- 
sentative in the New Year's classic in 
case they defeated- Georgia Tech was 
read to them by Coach Wade at the lialf, 
and the effect upon the entire squad was 
almost electrical. They returned to the 
field at the beginning of the second half 
a new team, and immediately proceeded 
a touchdown march. With Cox and 
[Icndrickson alternating in carrying the 
ball, they marched from their own forty- 
yard line to their opponent's two. It 
was first down for Duke on the two-yard 
line, and on the first play Cox cracked 
the center of the line for what looked like 
a sure touchdown, but the referee put the 
ball in play inches from the goal. On 
the next play Hendrickson did go over 
and Duke supporters let loose all of the 
yells and roars that they had been holding 
back, but their j'clls were doomed to 
disappointment because the headlines- 
man ruled Freddie Crawford, Duke's 
All-America n tackle, oft'-sides on the play, 
and the ball was set back five yards. 
On fourth down Rossiter passed over the 
goal line to Went/., but this touchdown 
was also ruled illegal because the ball had 
touched Cornelius' hand before Went/, 
received it. The Blue Devils threatened 
to score on several other occasions before 
the game ended, but the final gun saw 
them on the short end of a 6 to count. 
Despite this heart-breaking defeat, the 
l'^.i3 season was the most successful one 
ill Duke history and nuich credit should 
be given to the coaches and players for 
their splendid achievement. Their 193.i 
performance definitely put Duke in the 
national spotlight, and focused the eyes 
of the football world on them for 1934. 




BASKETBALL 




Coach Eddie Cameron 



Basketball 

T^ORMING a well balanced outfit from a 
-*■ nucleus of three seasoned veterans in Jim 
Thompson, forward, and Herb Thompson and 
Phil Weaver, guards, Coach Eddie Cameron 
carried his charges through a very successful 
season during the 1934 cage schedule. 

In a twenty-two game schedule which 
included the best available opposition in the 
South in addition to the two northern teams. 
Army and Navy, the Duke five dropped but 



five encounters. The greatest margin of 
defeat was five points, proving that wlicn 
losing they suffered no special humiliation. 

At the close of the tournament the Thomp- 
son brothers, Jim and Herb, were named by 
sports writers on the mythical All-Southern 
team at forward and guard respectiveh'. 
Some were convinced that these two boys 
were the best ever to don a Duke uniform. 
Phil Weaver received great praise for his 
work in the tourney also. 

Starting the year off with a pre-Christmas 
trip, the Devils handed the Richmond Rotary 
quint a 34 to 22 defeat in their opener while 
Coach Cameron experimented with several 
prospects. The only loss of this jaunt was 
experienced on the following night when 
Catholic University came from behind during 
the closing minutes to gain a 33-31 win over 
Duke; Jim Thompson accounted for 20 points 
in this game. Baltimore was taken into 
camp by a 33-25 score to end the trip. 

Making their debut before a home crowd 
after the holidays, the Duke quint downed 
Clemson 36-23. Narrowing down to com- 
petition within the Big Five, both Wake 
Forest and Davidson were defeated, the 
former, 38-29, and the latter, 40-35. The 
guarding of Weaver and Herb Thompson 
featured these victories. 

Swinging into the North again, the Dc\ ils 
advanced on Army. The big guns of the 
West Pointers were silenced and Duke's Big 
Bertha, Jim Thompson, hit the target with 
amazing regularity to ring up another win for 
his team, 27-25. It was a bit of revenge for 
the Blue and White, which lost to the Cadets 
two years back by a two-point margin. 
Maryland rallied in the late stages to defeat 






^ 




P. Weaver 
Co-C.'iptain 



II. I IIOMPSON 

Co-Caplaiii 



Henurkkson 

I'liru ard 



Mack 
Center 



^.^r, 



the l)c\ils ^7-^^ on the following niKlil- 
Na\\-, with an iimisually stroni? outlit, was 
topped In' the Duke five in probably their 
best >;anie of the entire season. I'.verv' man 
on the team >:a\e a superb performance, but 
|im Thompson stood out in the attack on the 
Middies sct)ring 16 pi)ints. I'he Duke flash 
was praised by the sports writers present as 
"the best basketball pla\er who ever pla\'ed 
in the Xa\y gym." The linal score was 29-23. 

Hack on native soil, \\\v Devils gained a 
41-20 \erdict o\er \ . .M. 1. and followed up 
with wins over State, 33-29; \ irginia, 26-17; 
and Washington and Lee, 41-37. During the 
week-end of examinations the Duke five 
renewed an age-old ri\ airy with the Unixcrsity 
of North Carolina. The Tar Heels won 25-21, 
but both teams played excellent ball. Jim 
Thompson rang the hoop fi\e times from the 
center of the floor, and with his 11 points led 
the scorers for the night. 

Touring the Old Dominion State, the Devils 
first encountered Washington and Lee in 
Lynchburg. The Generals were no match 
for the Duke cagers as the latter triumphed 
easily, 41-27. Following this \ictory the 
Devils added two more conquests in rapid 
succession as both \ . P. I. and V. M. I. went 
down in defeat before tlic Cameron-coached 
outfit; the former 45-15 and the latter 45-32. 

The Devils met Wake Forest again and 
downed the Deacons 37-21. Davidson suc- 
cumbed by the top-heavy score of 57-25 as Jim 
Thomp.son went on another rampage and with 
his brother. Herb, accounted for a majority of 
points scored. In another court classic that 
drew fans from all over the state, the Tar 
Heels invaded the Duke gymnasium and again 
eked out victorv, this time 30-25. From the 




Co-C.\l'l\IN" 
|lM 'riloMI'SON 



spectators point ot \ lew the contest was almost 
perfect and for the Duke supporters the only 
thing wanting was the score. A few days 
later St)Uth Carolina's highly touted Came- 
cocks invaded the locals' lair and barely 
nosed out a 26-23 verdict. Herb Thompson 
and Connie Mack, Jr., giant pivot man, 
turned in some good defensive work against 
great scoring threats. Coming to the final 
game of the season the De\ils played host 
to N. C. State and turned the Wolfpack away 
Uv a 41-34 score. 





Bell 
Forward 



KUXKLE 

Forward 





Ferguson 
Guard 



1337 







Sandlin 
Center 



POLACK 

Forward 



^^ RIGHT 

Center 



HuiSCAMP 

Forward 



Entering the Southern Conference Tourna- 
ment in Raleigh as one of the four seeded 
teams Duke drew V. M. I. as her first round 
opponent. The Devils disposed of the Cadets 
by a 37-14 score. For the third time Duke 
was scheduled to meet the Tar Heels who 
had twice been their conquerors and who 
were favored to repeat. However, the Devils 
refused to make it three in a row and put up 
a fight that was too much for the Tar Heels 
in a battle that even surpassed the two 
previous classics. With little more than a 
minute left to play and the Tar Heels staging 
a "freeze," Herb Thompson cleverly stole 
the ball from Weathers, Carolina forward, 
and dribbled down the floor for a two-pointer 
that put the Devils in the lead for the first 



time. Only an instant later Brother Jim 
put the game on ice as he swished the net for 
another goal to give his team the final margin 
of victory, 21-18. Against Washington and 
Lee in the finals Duke suffered a heart-break- 
ing defeat from a team over which they had 
shown convincing superiority during the reg- 
ular season. It was the fourth time that 
Coach Eddie Cameron carried a team into 
the championship battle and the fourth time 
that he had witnessed his own outfit defeated 
in the titular setto. The Generals cut down 
what seemed to be a comfortable lead at half- 
time in fa^■or of the Devils and grabbed a 
one-point advantage twenty seconds before 
the game ended. The final score was 30-29 
in favor of the Generals. 




KuNKLE Wea\ i;r J. Thompson Mack Sandlin 
Ferguson Huiscamp Hicnorickson Hfll 



Wright II. Thompson AIgr. Kinter 
May Polack 



338 




BASEBALL 



f 



^^^y^ 



I. 



n 



II 



f 



'* '■*'V' * -f*"^' 



Coach Jack Coombs 



Baseball 1933 

/COMPOSED of five veterans and four 
^-^ Sophomores, the 1933 Blue Devil nine 
enjoyed a very successful season despite the 
fact that they failed to win the state cham- 
pionship. Under the capable tutelage of 
Coach Jack Coombs, who has been turning 
out winning teams during the six years that 
he has been here, the 1933 team turned in 



twelve victories as stacked up against seven 
defeats. 

The season ofHcially got under way by the 
Devils playing host to the strong Michigan 
State nine. Although the game was a very 
uninteresting affair from the spectator's view- 
point, due to the many errors by both teams, 
the invaders were beaten 8 to 7. 

Little Elon came to Duke for the next game 
and was easily defeated 6 to 3. The two 
veteran hurlers, Bobby Coombs and Mort 
Flohr, took care of the pitching assignment 
and did a very good job of it. Playing their 
first Southern Conference game against the 
\'. P. I. Gobblers, from Blacksburg, Mrginia, 
the Blue Devils came out on the long end of 
a 6 to 2 score. In this game Earl Wentz, 
Duke left fielder, hit a home run over the left 
field fence, the only ball that has ever been 
hit out of the Duke park during a varsity 
contest. What was supposed to be a warm- 
up affair with Guilford College was turned into 
the biggest upset of the year when the 
Quakers beat the Blue Devils 8 to 7. The 
Durham Bulls were next in line, and a double- 
header was played against the professional 
team during the Easter holidays. The pro- 
fessionals pounded three Duke pitchers all 
over the lot to take a one-sided 14 to 4 
victory in the first game, but they were shut 
out in the second 7 to 0. 

The annual Easter-Monday double-header 
was played against the University of Mary- 
land and resulted in two victories for the 
Coombs team, and Flohr turned in two 




f f f f f r f f f f f 



^^ 




'fop row: Coach Coombs, Wagnkr, WiiAricR, Fi.oHEt, Dailey, Wkntz, Smith, Pixkham, Schnure, Rink, Wkavkr 
Center rozv: Brazwkll, Hradfori), I'avinc, Sawykr, Taylor, Brackbill, .\hciiAEL, Hkndrickson, Mitchell, 

Mgr. Hildebrant 
Bottom row: Mascot, May, M. 15. W'ii.m wis, \I\rti\, Frktwell, Kersey, Coombs, Williams 

[340 1 



masterful performances. Coombs wiiiniiig the 
first game 8 to 0, and Klohr lakinp the night- 
cap 5 to 2. North Carolina State was the 
next victim of Coombs' cur\es, and the AU- 
American pitcher turned in his second con- 
secutive shut out. TIk' iinal score was 5 to 
in Duke's fa\or. 

Duke's first defeat u ithin the Big Five came 
at the hands of Wake Forest, last year's state 
champions. Journeying over to the latter's 
home grounds, the Blue De\ils dtopptil a 
.>-0 decision to the Deact^is. Two brilliant 
southpaws, Flohr, of Duke, and Barnes, of 
Wake Forest, hooked up in a spectacular 
pitcher's battle, with the Deacon hurlcr 
gaining the decision o\er his rival as a result ol 
the inability of Duke batmen to hit with men 
on bases. 

The next game with State at Raleigh 
resulted in another defeat. Bobby Coombs 
suffered his first defeat of the season, due 
largely to Jim Thompson's costly error in 
the first inning. The brilliant Duke right 
fielder allowed a ground ball to go between 
his legs in the first iiming and four runs scored 
as a result of it. It is doubtful though 
whether Duke would have won even if this 
had not happened because the boys were 
sadly oflF on their batting. 

The high light of the entire season was the 
annual trip north where the Blue Devils 
defeated three of the strongest teams in the 
East without suflFering a defeat. Princeton 
was the first victim and fell 8-7. The most 
spectacular part of the contest was Flohr's 
terrific home run smash into the right field 
bleachers. 




Cai'taix Kr.RSEY 



In New York City the next day, with no less 
than five big league scouts looking on, Bobby 
Coombs turned in the greatest pitching 
performance of his college career, lie let 
the strong Fordham nine down with three well- 
scattered hits, all of them singles, while his 
teammates batted out a 3-0 victory over what 
was supposed to be the best college team in 
the East. It was the first time in four years 
that Fordham had been shut out on their own 
field. The next day in New York, Manhattan 



> V 

Mr 



'■•.^^^^ 



Weaver 
First Base 



f 



I * 



1 1 




Herzog 

Infield 




—ST 



Coombs 
Pitcher 



9 



me 



I I 




May 
Pitcher 



9 







Wagner 
Catcher 



[341] 




M. B. \\'lLLIAMS 

Pitclier 



Harkrader 
Pitcher 




Peckham 
Catcher 




Hexdrickson 
Third Base 



% 




a^ 



■j\ 




Getzendanner 

Shortstop 



College was defeated 5-2. Lakey Harkrader 
was on the mound for the De\nls and pitched 
a good game. The games with Marjdand 
and George Washington were rained out. 

Returning home, the Blue Devils received 
a 9-3 set-back at the hands of the Davidson 
Wildcats. The first Carolina game also went 
against the Blue Devils. Big Joe Griffith 
for the Tar Heels had a slight edge on Bobby 
Coombs and pitched his mates to a well- 
earned 2-1 victory. Duke broke back into 
the win column by taking a 7 to 4 decision 
from Davidson, and by gaining a 4-3 decision 
the next day against their old nemesis, Julie 



Barnes, of Wake Forest. The final game of 
the season was dropped to Carolina 2-1. It 
was almost an exact duplicate of the first 
contest between the two teams, Griffith again 
getting the better of Coombs in a great 
pitchers' battle. 

At the close of the season letters were given 
to the following men: Schnure, Brackbill, 
Flohr and Harkrader, pitchers; Henderson, 
Kersey, Michael, Peckham, Wagner and 
Weaver, infielders; and Wentz, Mitchell and 
Thompson, outfielders. Bobby Coombs went 
straight to the Philadelphia Athletics after 
receiving his diploma last spring. 






yfl^a^^F. 




Flohr 
Pitcher 



Weafer 

Pitclier 



Michael 
Second Base 



AhrCHELL 

Oiitlield 



Went/. 
Outfield 



342 




TRACK 



t 




Coach \ oyles 



Track 1933 



npHE Four Flying Seniors, Bradsher, Brown- 
-'- lee, Fulmer and Lewis, composing the 
greatest quartet of trackmen ever assembled 
at Duke, supplied the punch that carried the 
Blue Devil cinder-men through a highly 
successful season. 

Competing in four dual meets the Devils 
emerged victorious in three, while in the state 



and conference events they captured the 
runner-up position. Carolina was the only 
thorn in the path, as the dual meet reverse 
and the second place gained in both tourna- 
ments was due directly to a more versatile 
Tar Heel outfit. 

In the field events the Devils were rather 
weak. Thus the point-making foursome ac- 
counted for the margin of victory in the 
contests won. Brownlee, who entered three 
events, the 100-yard dash, the 200-yard dash, 
and the 220-yard low hurdles, took three firsts 
in every dual meet and the state tournament 
to make a personal donation of 15 points for 
the team on each of these occasions. Henry 
Fulmer added 10 points in every scheduled 
contest and the state tournament with honors 
for the broad jump and 440-yard dash. 
Charlie Bradsher and Red Lewis consistently 
broke the tape ahead of the field in the 880- 
yard and one-mile run respectively. Li other 
words, Duke was virtually conceded seven 
first places by her opponents before the meet 
began. The final score depended upon the 
success of Devil's field events. 

William and Mary, the first meet on the 
schedule, was held at Williamsburg. Led by 
the four speed merchants, Duke piled up a 
comparatively easy 72 3-2 to 53} 9 victory. 
Bird, in the two-mile run, Ripley, in the pole 
vault, and Reichman, in the 440-yard dash, 
were also features of the day. 

Playing host to Washington and Lee's 
Generals on their home grounds, the Duke 
tracksters added another one-sided win, 85-41. 
Rather than being pushed by the General 
cindermen in the running events, the Devil 




Fulmer 



Brownlee 



]jEWIS 



Bradsher 



3441 



foursome barely swept across the finish' line 
in front of sonic of their teammates who 
pressed them closely. Shackford won second 
place to Brownlee in the 220-yard low hurdles, 
and Tarrall extended the same Brownlee in 
the dashes. l'"or the lalter reason and some 
good work in the held b\- Stevens, who tossed 
the slu>t, Ripley, in the pole \ault, and 11. 
Lewis, in the high jump, the score was 
considerably higher than in the lirst meet. 

Duke was considered as ha\ing the best 
chance e\er to defeat the Tar Heels, who had 
the advantage of years of track supremacy 
behind them, but, although the Devils gained 
more first places, Carolina contributed a 
substantial amount of seconds and thirds to 
keep their marvelous record intact and downed 
the Blue Devils 66-60. It was a thrilling 
spectacle throughout and not until the last 
event was it possible to choose the winner. 
Brownlee, Bradsher, Fulmcr and Red Lewis 
again furnished the fireworks for Duke. 

After the Davidson meet which was won 
handily, 78}j-47!.>, the Devils prepared for 
the state meet on the following week-end. 
Carolina again copped the state title, but 
only after experiencing some stiff oppiosition 
from Duke. Red Lewis won the mile-run, 
Henry Fulmer took first in both the 440-yard 
dash and the broad jump, Charlie Bradsher 
set a new record in the 880-yard run, and 
Brownlee annexed new state records for both 
the low hurdles and 220-yard dash in addition 
to winning the lOO-yard dash. 

At the Southern Conference meet, also held 
in the Duke stadium, the Devils again placed 
second to Carolina. The large crowd present, 
manv of whom attended to witness the 










Captain Brownlee 



achievements of Duke's great stars, were well 
repaid for coming. A'lanj- felt that they 
received more than their money's worth in 
the thrilling one-mile run that ended with the 
sensational spurt by Red Lewis for a w&w 
conference record in the remarkable time of 
4:15.7. In addition to the exciting race 
between Lauck and Lewis was Brownlee's 
fast pace in the 220-yard dash and 220-yard 
low hurdles, the latter setting a new conference 
record. Coming as a climax to the brilliant 
exhibition was the fast mile relay which the 
Devil speed merchants took in the amazing 




[ 345 ] 









V 




i^. 



i 




Bradsiier 



Lewis 



time of 3:18.8 for another new record. The 
relay team was composed of P'uhner, Bradsher, 
Reichman and Brownlee. Although they 
failed to win the championship, the Devils 
gloriously redeemed themselves in these spark- 
ling individual performances. 



Letters were awarded to: Andrews, Bird, 
Bradsher, Bray, Brownlee (capt.). Carman, 
Clarke, Crawford, Crist, Fulmer, Garris, Her- 
itage, Red Lewis, H. Lewis, Reichman, Nit- 
schke, Ripley, Stevens, Tarrall and Student 
Manager Weyersburg. 




Top row: Gallis, Palmer, Stevens, Ci.ark, Mians, Poi.ack, I^rav, liiRo 

Center rotv: Dodd, Kanipe, Crist, Reichman, .Miles, Stoneih'Rnf.r, Heritage, Tarrall 

Botiom rote: Coach Voyles, Lewis, Ripley, Hradsiier, Lewis, liRowNLi;!:, ]'"i;lmer, (jArris, Mck, \\ i;vi;kshur(; 



346 




MINOR SPORTS 




Sullivan 



CAPTAINS OF MINOR SPORTS 
Bray Sides Welsh 



O'Cof 



A Successful Year 



/'CONDUCTING a vigorous campaign to 
^-^ make this a banner year in Duke Uni- 
versity athletic history, the Bkie Devils' 
athletics teams came through in line style to 
assemble numerous sports titles. 

The highlight of this year's athletic contests 
was the making of history by the gridiron 
representatives in their sensational wins 
against all comers but Georgia Tech. And 
in this process of submerging, they also 
annexed a state and Southern Conference 
title. The season as a whole was very suc- 
cessful and predicted even greater things for 
Duke football. 

Not long thereafter the cross-country team 
went out and got itself a Southern Conference 
championship. The members of this outfit, 
led by Capt. Jerry Bray, beat the cream of the 
South's harriers over one of the most difficult 
courses in this part of the country. And while 
on the subject of running, the indoor track 
squad, led by the able Johnny Brownlcc, did a 
fine job in leaving Carolina and several others 
behind to win the conference championshiii. 

Coach Eddie Cameron's basketeers did 
themselves proud by their showing throughout 
the state, winning from traditional rivals and 



losing out only to Washington and Lee in the 
finals of the annual tournament at Raleigh. 
The team loses many of its outstanding 
players, but Eddie still has fine material from 
which he should be able to build up a fine 
team. 

Although Add Warren's grapple and grunt 
men did not retain their laurels, they did 
rather well, but they left it up to the members 
of the cauliflower iiidustr}', the boxers, to 
bring home the bacon. The boxers, tlnuigh 
hampered by lack of material, came through 
handsomely. Freshman proteges show prom- 
ise of adding weight and strength to the 
varsity ringmen. 

This has truly been a wonderful year for 
Duke teams, including, of course, the wonder- 
ful showing made by the swimmers who 
cleaned up in the state and were nmncrs-up 
in the conference meet. 

The marks created by our boys this year 
will be something for future generations of 
Duke teams to shoot at, but it si'cnis to he a 
general o|iiin"on that it will he a long lime 
yet before live state championships, two 
Southern Conference championships, and run- 
ners-up position in two others will be attained. 



[348 




Mi.K. TowNi.F.v St 1.1./.. \ Jester 



Sides 



ScoiT Onisko C'()\tll \\ \KK|;\ 



Boxing 



T TNLIKK the record made by other Duke 
athletic teams, that of the 1934 boxing 
team was a rather disastrous one. The mitt- 
men, led by Leroy Sides, failed to annex a 
single victory during their abbreviated sched- 
ule. Coach Addison Warren, handicapped by 
lack of material in the heavier weights, was 
forced to forfeit matches in these events, 
thereby losing points which might have spelt 
victor)^ for the Blue Devils had they not been 
defaulted. 

The Blue Devils opened their season against 
Clemson in the home ring. The Tigers, 
while being considered as strong opponents, 
were not thought to be able to triumph over 
the Devils, despite their advantage in the 
heavier weights. However, the Clemson lads 
displayed a high brand of boxing and upset 
the Devils by a 4 '2 to 3 '2 count. 

The next opponent for the Duke pugilists 
was N. C. State, 1933 state champions. The 
Wolfpack earned a draw with the Devils in 



actual fighting, each team registering three 
victories, but the decision was awarded to 
the champions when Duke forfeited three 
matches. 

.Maryland and Carolina also outpointed the 
Blue Devils in matches and brought about the 
closing of one of the most disastrous seasons 
ever experienced by a Duke boxing squad. 

\'inccnt Onisko, fighting in the bantam- 
weight division, made his way to the semi- 
final round of the Southern Conference tour- 
ney at Charlottesville, as did Joe Scel/.a, 
featherweight; Joe Jester, middleweight; and 
Sides, welterweight. Only Sides, however, 
reached the finals. The diminutive captain 
successfully made his way through two fights 
but was badly injured in his sem-final match 
and had to forfeit his right tf) box in the finals. 
Fred Lloyd and Joe Jester were elected 
co-captains of the 1935 team. Lloyd was 
unable to box during the past season because 
of an appendix operation early in the winter. 



[349 




Doui) Kii.i.EN Troxi.f.r Chaxdlee Apple Bexner McGraii. Coach Warren 



Wrestling 



TOSING the services of five men from last 
year's wrestling team, Coach Warren and 
Captain Troxler faced the task of shaping a 
formidable squad from a group consisting of 
only three veterans and many recruits willing 
to try the grunt and groan racket. The men 
worked hard and when the season was over it 
was clear that "old man experience" had 
tripped a hard fighting bunch of Devils. 

Although the wrestlers won onl}^ one of 
their three meets, all three were closely 
fought and many cheerful and gainful results 
can be remembered. 

The first match was at Chapel Hill against 
the strong Carolina team. Duke was defeated 
17-9, but we remember the victories gained 
by Captain Troxler, Reed and Apple; Killen's 
heart-breaking loss to Carolina's Captain 
Matthewson; and Chandlee's game struggle 
with the experienced Heller. 

The next match found the grapplers on an 
exciting trip to Appahicliian Stale Teachers' 
College wluTf they dropped a close decision 



of 16-14. Here we remember Killen gaining 
a fall, Captain Troxler, Chandler and Apple 
winning by time advantages, and Benner's 
close loss to Captain Moore, of Appalachian. 

The final match found Duke defeating 
Davidson 19-11. Many Duke fans enjoyed 
this home victory and remember Captain 
Troxler and Chandler pinning their foes, also 
time advantages gained by Killen, Dodd and 
Apple. 

In preparation for their meet with State, 
the season was brought to a disastrous close. 
Devil supporters were looking forward to a 
Duke victory when an attack of impitigo 
forced cancellation of all remaining contests 
including a trip to Florida, and entries in the 
Southern Conference tournament. 

Next year's team should be a credit to 
Duke. The loss of only two men. Captain 
Troxler and Apple, incidently both unde- 
defeated, should be overcome with the ex- 
perience gained b_\' Chaiidlec, killni and 
McCirail. 



350 



y£4n^v'->^^ 




McR. H\iRn, \\ Ki.sii, Hardy, I'laki., Coach Grix.ory, McXtiL, Blti.kr, Martin, Ihucixs, Co-Mgr. Tait 



Tennis 



T^HK Duke tennis team, playing under 
adverse weather conditions much of the 
time and forced to postpone some of their 
matches, turned in a fairly good season 
during 1933. 

Captain Barney Welsh and several other 
lettermen from last year welcomed into their 
ranks Johnny Higgins, brilliant freshman 
netter of 1932, as fall practice began an inten- 
sive training grind for the spring campaign. 

Large crowds turned out for all the matches 
played here, especially for the Carolina match. 
The latter court exhibition was featured by 
the hard-fought battle between Welsh and 
Hines, the Carolina star finally winning 
after coming perilously close to defeat. The 
Tar Heels annexed team pla\' honors, 8-1. 

On the northern trip the Devils lost to 
Navy and \'irginia, but defeated Temple, 
Lehigh and Johns Hopkins. In the Navy 
match Welsh lost another hard-fought contest 
to Loughlin in extra-game sets. Back home 



from their venture into the North, the home 
netmen made a clean sweep of all matches 
played with Wake Forest and State, but lost 
to Carolina, 7-2. 

In the Southern conference tournament 
lliggins was defeated by Weight in the scmi- 
Rnals of singles-play, but Welsh advanced no 
further than the first round when he suffered 
a humiliating upset defeat from Willis, Caro- 
lina. The doubles-play of Higgins and Welsh 
took the ranking Devil partners to the final 
round where they were ousted by Hines and 
Wright. 

.\t the North-South amateur tourney in 
Pinchurst, Welsh made a remarkably good 
showing before bowing to Cjcorge Lott, mem- 
ber of the United States Davis Cup team. 
On one occasion the Duke representative was 
within six points of the match. 

Letters were awarded to Captain Welsh, 
lliggins, Butler, Peake, .\Iorefield, Nixon, 
McNeil and Student Manager Baird. 



351] 




Mgr. \ anhoy, Ross, Smithdeal, Ewell, Dailev, O'Connor, Burke, Ross, Johnson, Whiting, Abrams, Stillman 



twimming 



OOUTHERN conference laurels were 
awarded to the 1934 Duke swimming 
team on the heels of a most successful season. 
The Devilfish, coached by Jack Persons, lost 
two dual meets during the season, but 
managed to chalk up victories where they 
were needed. 

The first opponent of the season was State 
which was met in an early meet prior to the 
Christmas holidays. State managed to pull 
out a 49 to 35 victory over the Devils in a 
meet featured by several close races. In the 
return meet, the Wolfpack was defeated by a 
more decisive count, 54 to 29. On the annual 
northern trip through the old Dominion, the 
Devilfish dropped a meet with the Shoreham 
Nations club of Washington by the score of 
49 to 29, but went on to defeat Virginia. 
The meet with Virginia was as close a meet as 



could be. At the end of the meet the score 
was 42-all, but the decision was awarded to 
the Duke natators because of their victory 
in the relay races. 

Returning to Charlottesville later In Feb- 
ruary, the swimmers chalked up 43 points to 
cop the Southern conference title. In the 
conference meet two records were broken by 
Duke men. Carroll Dailey turned in one 
record-breaking performance in the 200-yard 
breast stroke, being clocked in the fast time 
of 2:58.6. The 400-yard relay team also 
shattered a conference record when Kraushaar, 
Burke, O'Conner and Whiting covered the 
distance in 3 :59.2. 

The team was captained during the season 
by Dennis O'Connor, wlio played a large part 
in the success of the team by his brilliant 
jicrformances in tlu' free style events. 



352 



m/ 



»J*^ ^^.w . ' ^ "^ ' " 



T^**. 







Powell McLain Sl;lli\a.\ IIamkkk Ri.a\is 



1'kkky 



Golf 



T^IVE victories and one loss, coupled with 
the Southern conference and state titles, 
comprise the brilliant record of the 1933 Duke 
golf team. The Blue Devil linksmen, led 
by Roger I'eacock, astonished southern sports 
critics by their brilliant and consistent play 
throughout the season and wound up their 
season with a one-sided victory over Carolina 
for the Southern conference championship. 

Captain Peacock, Bayard Storm, June 
Caldwell and Jake Sullivan made up the 
foursome which represented Duke on the 
fairways and were among the finest golfers in 
southern collegiate circles. 

Rollins College was the first victim of the 
Devil foursome, falling by a 16 to 2 count on 
the Hope Valley course. Carolina was the 
second opponent and was subdued decisively 
by a 12 to 6 score. Following this match the 
Duke foursome departed for \^irginia where 
they met their first and only defeat of the 
season at the hands of the University of 
Richmond by a count of 11 Jo to 6^2- In the 
morning round of this match Peacock for the 
first time of his three years of varsity com- 



petition was defeated. Victories over Wash- 
ington-Lee and William and Mary followed 
and the team returned to Carolina soil to 
take the state title by seven strokes with 
Carolina, Davidson and State following in 
the order named. 

A few days after they had been crowned 
state champions, the Devils defeated Carolina 
in their return match, 11 to 7, in the final dual 
match of the year. The Sedgefield Country 
Club course of Greensboro was the scene of 
the conference tournament and the climax 
of a highly successful season. But two teams 
were entered in the tournament — Duke and 
Carolina and the Blue Devils wound up their 
play with a 26 stroke margin over their 
neighborly rivals. Peacock, Storm and Kr- 
win Lexton, of Carolina, tied for the medal 
score with cards of 149 for 36 holes. 

At the close of the season Jake Sullivan 
was elected to captain the 1934 squad which 
will have to display a high type of golf in 
order to better the record made by the finest 
team ever to represent Duke — the 1933 golf 
team. 



I 353 J 




Bra 



Bird 



Heritage 



Jester 



Ford 



Cross Country 



T^UKE'S cross country team turned in the 
best record in years during tlie past 
season. By annexing both the state and 
Southern conference titles the long distance 
men accomplished all that was possible in 
their somewhat limited schedule which in- 
cluded four dual meets and the two tour- 
naments. 

The high spot of the season was the triumph 
over the strong Navy harriers at Annapolis. 
Indicative of their marked superiority in this 
meet was the decisive 23-32 score piled up h\- 
the Duke I'unncrs. 

V. M. I. was taken with considerable ease 
as the veteran Blue ami \\ liitc joggers finished 
well to the fore with a one-sided 19-36 score. 

The Blue Dc\ils next faced llieir arch 
rivals from Carolina. The 'I'ar I Icels offered 



some keen competition but the Duke pacers 
won by a six-point margin, 26-32. 

Davidson was the only team which realh' 
put a scare into the Devils, 'llic \\ ildcats 
surprised by holding the Duke harriers to a 
tie score, 27-27. 

In the annual Southern conference meet, 
held over the Carolina course, tlu' l)e\ils 
placed five out of the first seven men to 
break the tape to capture their second con- 
secuti\'e conference crown. 

Leading the scorers on the Duke team were 
Bird and Bray who finished all their races 
well up in the front ol tlie Held. 

At the end of the season lettt-rs were 
awarded to: Cajitain I>ird, IJray, llcrltage, 
jcstci-, l''iird and Manager Ireland. 



354 




\ ARSrrV MANAGERS 



'I'oWXLEY 



n.MRl) 



Irelaxi) 



SroKM 



KiNTiiR IIamrick Thomas 

WwHOY Tayi.ou 



Intranuiral Athletics 



/'^OACH Carl \'oylcs, former mentor at the 
^■'^ University of Illinois, came to Duke two 
years ago and brought with him the system 
of intramural athletics which proved most 
successful at the institution. He also brought 
with him Mi'. Kenneth C. Gerard to take 
charge of the programs here at Duke. These 
men took action at once and have now built 
up one of the most useful sports programs 
here on the campus. 

The primary use of intramural athletics is 
to allow those men who have not the ability 
to make a varsity team the chance to engage 
in competitive sport. The consequence is to 
build up a spirit of team play, the sacrifice 
of self to the good of the whole team, and, 
above all, that spirit of fair play which is the 
cardinal principle of competition in life itself. 

To date, over fourteen hundred students 
have availed themselves of the benefits, both 
recreational and mental, which the intramural 
program has oflFered here. The following 
table gives a very good conception of the 
enthusiasm and support which has been 
received : 

Fall Tennis, 145; Fall Track, 4S2: Touch 
Football, 507; Basketball, 612; Wrestling, 1 18; 



Boxing, 57; Swimming 60; Handball, 40; 
Playground Ball, 240; Golf, 36; Spring Ten- 
nis, 150; Spring Track, 110. Total to date, 
2,557. 

To date 2,557 boys have competed in 
intramural acti\ilies. This figure was de- 
termined by the number of entries in each 
sport received by the department. Some, 
howev^er, competed in two or more sports, 
so that our original figure of over fourteen 
hundred is correct. 

The interest in this phase of athletics has 
grown more and more every year, and this 
year, to prevent another runaway with the 
title by any one fraternity as was the case 
last year, the fraternities have manifested the 
finest spirit ever shf)wn on the campus in 
any activity. 

Nineteen hundred and thirty-three and 
thirty-four has been a banner year for the 
intramural department, and Coach \ oyles 
has been loud in the praise of the student 
body. He has but one more wish aside from 
a Southern conference championship in foot- 
ball and track, and that is that the intramural 
program will be even more successful from 
now on than it has been in the past. 



1355] 



mf*'"'' 




Bandel 



CHEER LEADERS 

SOLTMAN AIeRVINE GrAK 



Atkins 



School Spirit 



CCHOOL spirit is, perhaps, one of the most 
intangible, yet certainly one of the most 
important, elements that go to mould a great 
university. It is born in an atmosphere of 
good-fellowship, of contentment and well- 
being. There is a certain serenity about it, 
and yet it is at once vibrant, strangely alive. 
People sense it immediately and warm to its 
glow. Like kind words coming from nowhere, 
it fills the heart, and binds men together into 
one great family, proud c^f brotherhood and 
honor. 

We have it here, and its growth is measured 
in generous sportsmanship. It came first with 
self-respect, was strengthened by generosity, 
and finall}- blossomed under idealism. 

To enlarge on this scope of discussion in 
regard to creating enthusiasm and school 
spirit, there was organized this \ear the 
Trident Club. Its chid purpose was to 
stimulate interest in athletic teams aiul lo 
act as a foundation for a thus far futiU' c-n'oil 
toward organix.ed cheering. 'I'he club itself 
was made up of one representati\e from each 
fraternity on the campus and \\\c imn- 
fratcrnity men. The result was a greater 
stimulus in cheering, a colorful display which 
will rival almost any school in appearance, and 
a. backing of our athletic teams to a j)oint 



which is evidenced by the respecti\-e successful 
campaigns in all sports. 

We may go further in the field and see that 
another contribution grew out of the system 
of unification of the Freshmen dormitories. 
This enabled boys with a common interest to 
begin their college life with tliose who were 
willing to coincide the idea and create an 
opening through which they could express 
their enthusiasm to a fuller degree than under 
previous conditions. This system has been 
c]uite recently inaugurated, but we expect 
this class to carry forward with them the 
spirit which they have built up among 
themselves. 

A college may be accurateh' measured by 
its spirit, be il chixalrous, then that college 
is pledged to chi\alrv; be it selfish or apathetic, 
then these personal characteristics are to be 
louinl m the majority ol its stULlcnts. In 
short, it is a li\ing thing, a creature shaped 
lidin the personalities ol men. It represents 
to the world at large what we are, we who are 
creating something now, both for our college 
and lor ourseKes. 

Tli(jugh we ri'tuni fifty years from now, yet 
shall we find a part ol ourselves still within 
these walls — that part ol us which now goes 
to build school spirit. Let iis build well! 



[356 




FRESHMAN SPORTS 




First row: Bullock, R. Hall, Kennedy, Rorke, Copeland, Leven, Parker, Boyd, C. Hall 

Second row: Taliaferro, Baldwin, Greenwood, Power, Cardwell, Roehrs, Swicegood, Hooks, Dator 

Third row: Gillander, Evans, Menc, Leonard, Pinkston, Moore 



Freshman Football 



T TNDER the capable tutelage of Coach 
Herschel Caldwell and his assistants, 
Waite and Sington, the Blue Imp gridders 
gained some valuable experience in their 
brief five-game schedule. 

The loss of two Big Five tilts cost the Duke 
yearlings the state championship which had 
been in their possession for two years. A. 
fumble early in the game accounted for the 
lone touchdown scored in tlic game with the 




Coach Caldwell 



Wolflets providing for their margin of victory, 
6-0. On "Herschel Caldwell Day," staged 
in honor of the freshman coach, the Baby 
Deacs refused to enter into the spirit of 
the occasion and eventually drubbed their 
hosts 12-6. 

Recovering from their losing habit, the 
Duke frosh scored a 12-0 win over the Caro- 
lina Freshmen in a game that featured the 
running and kicking of Clarence Parker, star 
Blue Imp quarterback. Continuing their 
improved form the Imps took on the Cadets 
from Oak Ridge and won a one-sided tilt, 
33-0. The Wildkittens from Da\idson proved 
the last \-ictim as the Duke Freshmen ran up 
an lS-6 win. 

Unusually big and rugged, the inenibcrs ol 
the Freshman squad should offer many poten- 
tial linemen and backs for next year's \arsity 
eleven. I'arker, a triple threat back, prom- 
ises to be an mitstanding contender lor the 
1934 backfield witli liis exceptional all-rouml 
;iliilil\-; wliili' Sniathers, a speedy halfback; 
Evans, a fast aggressive end; and big Joe 
CartUvell, a tackle, are excellent prospects. 

'I'hus it seems that the noteworthy record 
of Coach Wallace Wade's Blue Devils tlu's 
season has a good chance of being continued. 



[358: 




a*» 









Mgr. Mossburg Huiskamp Barley 

Cheek Podcer 



Rii.KY Hoffman Atkins 

Ambmir Pai.mir Wolf 



Hell 



Freshman Basketball 



r^ROlMMXC; but three contests out of the 
twelve on schedule, the Blue Imp cagers 
compiled an impressive record during the last 
season. 

State, Davidson and Carolina were the 
yearling quints to defeat the Duke Freshmen. 
The Wolflets and Baby Tar Heels eked out 
victories by the narrow one-point margin, 
while the Wildkittcns set the locals back by a 
mere four point margin. 

In other games during the season the Imps 
toppled Carolina's frosh, 26-21; and the 
Wolriets, 36-27, to avenge for two of the 
reverses which they suffered. Thus the Wild- 
kittens were the only ones not to experience 
defeat at the hands of the Duke Freshmen 
cagers. 

Wake Forest, the remaining Big I'ive 
opponent, was twice the victim of tlie Blue 
Imp sharpshooters by scores of 37-21 and 
23-21. Other victories were chalked up over 
preparatory schools: Oak Ridge, Massanuttcn, 
Darlington, Campbell and Asheville. 

Outstanding members of the Freshman five 
were: Riley, fonvard, who was leading 
scorer; Bell, center; Hoffman, forward; and 
Barley, guard. In addition to these four men 
several reserves, including Huiskamp, Podger, 
Ambler and Cheek, bid fair to make serious 



the competition tor places on the varsity 
next year. 

With the loss of some of its greatest stars 
from the varsity, such as the Thompson 
brothers and I'hil Weaver, Coach Eddie 
Cameron's varsity basketball team is suffering 
a misfortune which will have to be overcome 
by the developing of new stars from those 
now on the \arsity and from the Freshman 
squad of the present season. The PVeshman 
sijuad will aid greatly in filling the vacancies. 




Coach Hagler 



359) 



^ik 



»f3BW~ 



•i V , ff ..f:^ 




First rozv: Brettell, A\'eintz, P'ulcher, Morris, Moore, Konopka, Xakte.ms, Bell, Conradi, Hood, Mc;r., 

Kepnes 
Second rozv: Corbitt, Alexander, Schuhr, Gillies, Towne, Shortell, Bender, Huiskamp, Kerekes, Wright, 

Carver 



Freshman Baseball 



T^HE 1933 Freshman baseball team had a 
\cry sucxessful season under the able 
tutelage of Coach Caldwell. The team won 
the state championship by defeating Wake 
Forest twice, North Carolina once and split- 
ting two games with N. C. State. The 
Implets were even more successful in their 
games outside the league. Louisburg College 
opened up the Freshman baseball scliedule 
and the Imps showed some gooci baseball in 
turning them back. Pete Naktenis was on 




Coach W 



the mound for the frosh and showed the class 
that had been expected. Coach Coombs 
promises a great future for this big boy. 
The team went through the preliminary 
schedule defeating, after Louisburg, a good 
Oak Ridge Academy team twice. A game 
with Danville High School was rained out. 

The Freshmen had a good mound staff 
headed by Pete Naktenis along with Herb 
Bi-cttcll ami ()US j-jcll. Al Konopka showed 
good form in his catching duties and knew 
how to handle a bat. John Shortell and Jack 
Alexander both showed good promise of 
becoming \-arsity men. Huiskamp was the 
only outlicKU'r to hit his weight. 

'\'\\v team showed up well, and there is 
ho()e thatthe\' will lake the place iA the 
Seniors who ha\e linished their baseball 
careers at Duke. 

Freshman baseball, though naturally a 
minor attraction in the ivahn of athletics at 
Duke I 'ni\ersity, has nnule notable strides 
and unloix'seeii interest has been aroused in 
the student body. Looking upon these men 
as proteges lor ni'Xt year's \arsit\' squad, we 
ghully recognize their ability and welcome 
the zeal which they have exhibited in their 
hrst )'ear ol uni\ersit}' conipetitixe s[-)ort. 



360] 




/^ p O 1^ O- 



{ 



p. a D 

^ C f^ P , ,, 

1^ .© f? ..C Jf^ O 




\ arsit\ Club 



/"irj-; ro:r; Crawford, \[k.\\s. Sides, F.. B. Drsi-AP. Cox, Sciiock 
Sfcond ro:c: W F.1.S11, Hu;(;iNs, Bird, J. I)i ni.ai-, I'hii'I's. W'knt/ 
Third row: Kei.ler, Peckiiam, Ciarris, Bell, Newton, Rikk 
Fourth ro'.c: IIeritace, \\'a(,ner. Jester, Anderson. Storm. Kinter 
Fifth rotv: Lawver, SfixiVAN, Crist, Reiciiman, Tarrai., \\ eaver 
Sixth row: Ireland, Baird, Townley, Mirchison, Oxisko, Hamrick 



[361] 




ADVERTISEMENTS 



m 









the cigarette that's MILDER • the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 



© l9J-t. Licf.rTT & MvPHS Tobacco Co. 




It's a 
LONG STORY! ^>^ 

It's not a bedtime story, either! There's so much length 
to a Hanes shirt tail that it can't inch up and bulge over 
the belt. Which proves you can keep a good shirt down! 

But that's only part of the story. Hanes Shirts are 
plenty pliant! They snap and cling coolly into place . . . 
without a wrinkle or droop. And washing won't weaken the 
stretchy knit! 

Now . . . here's the Hanes short story. When you climb 
into a pair of Hanes Shorts, you won't be double-crossed 
at the crotch! You can bend and stretch as much as you 
want — nothing pinches or clinches. Colors guaranteed fast. 
Gentlemen — that is Wonderwear! See your Hanes dealer 
today. P. H. Hanes Knitting Co., Winston-Salem, N. C. 



39*^ EACH 

for Shirts and Shorts 
Others, 50c and 75c ea. 



SAMSONBAK 
(Sanforized) 
1 \^ Union-Suits 
1^ Others ... 





WONDERWEAR 



FOR MEN AND BOYS 



FOR EVERY SEASON 



...THE... 

Depositors National Bank 
of Durham 

Durham, N. C. 



CAPITAL $400,000.00 SURPLUS $100,000.00 

Member Federal Reserve System 



OFFICERS 

Robert H. Sykes, President Scovill Wannamaker, Cashier 
M. A. Briggs, Vice President C. J. Miller, Assistant Cashier 



<7>> QCNEBALQW 




— goes a long nay 
to make friends 



General's Blowout-Proof Tire Adver- 
tising is rudely imitated but not the 
tire itself— IT'S PATENTED. 



Granite Service Stations 

Exclusive Distributors in 
Durham . 



No. 1 

Main and Ninth Sts. 
Plume J1341 



No. 2 

Nintli and HHIsImu,, Rd. 
Plu.ne N-279 



WEST DURHAM, N. C. 



GOOD MORNING! 



PLEASANT EVENING! 




Au Revoir 

AND AS YOU GO, MAY WE SAY: 

'Let the Deeds of Your Life Reflect Glory 
Upon Your Alma Mater" 



STYLE ANALYSTS 

THE TAI LORED MAN 

Your Clothes Artistically Tailored 




Up.stairs Opposite Kress' 



C. C. Ross, Duke '28 



Uial N-2.(6l — .Xppnintnienls 







ENJOY NEW YORK 
AT TH E ST. REGIS 

Project yourself immediately into the Monhottan 
Midst of It All — at the St. Regis — during your 
stay in New York. Lose no precious minutes won- 
dering whot to do or where to go. Find it all de- 
lightfully solved in this pleosant Oosis of Gayetv 
and Splendor. Attune your steps to the merry 
tempo of Vincent Lopez and his famous Orchestra. 

Dinner S3. 00 or o la corte. Minimum charge 
after 9:30 p.m. per person 'including supper 
SI. 50. Soturdays S2.50. 

Rotes are in agreeable accord with the times. 
Rooms from S4.00. Meet your friends in New York 
"ot the St. Regis" — add prestige to pleasure. 

EAST 55th STREET AT 5th AVENUE 



Best food . . . 
Best drink . . . 
Best service . 



AT 



THE GRILL AND 
FOUNTAIN 

A particular 
welcome to Duke 
Students. 

Di.sioii lit, il Ml III liddli.'i 
111 East Main Street 



HOTEL GAS AND 
STORAGE COMPANY 



STORAGE WASHING 

GAS POLISHING 

OIL GREASING 



318 Eost Chapel Hill Street 



O'Brient's Music Store 

We are particularly anxious to 

serve the students and fraternities 

of Duke in supplying Records, 

Musical Instruments and Sheet Music 




Costumes, Scenic and 
Lighting Effects 

Everything for the Stage 
From One House 

Write for our Catalogue "A" 



The Hooker-Howe Costume Company 

46-52 South Main St., Haverhill, Mass. 



Duke University Beauty Shop 



Courtesy Service Artistry 




Manager: W. 0. Flowers 



G and T Cafeteria 

GOOD MEALS 
GOOD SERVICE 

We Cater to Duke Students 

119 East Main Street 



Greetings to 

the Faculty, Students and the 
many friends of 

DUKE UNIVERSITY 



It has been our distinct pleasure 
to supply much of the beautiful 
furniture in the Union Building, 
the Hospital and several of the 
other new buildings as well as 
installations for several of the 
Fraternities and Faculty homes. 



TOMLINSON of High Point 

HIGH POINT, NORTH CAROLINA 



Duke University Laundry 



Speciahsts in the care 
of College Men's Clothes 



Collection and Delivery Daily 

in All Dormitories by Student 

Representatives 



J. H. JUDD, JR., 74, Manoger 




the Class of 34 we extend our best wishes 
and heartiest congratulations! 



And to the classes of future years we extend 
our invitation to make the 

THOMAS-QUICKELCO. 

Your headquarters in Durham for 
Books - Student Supplies - Stationery - Gifts 



Pictures 



Framing 



Underwood Typewriters 



Sporting Goods 



Rubber Stamps 



FANCY ICES 



SHERBETS 



Phone L-963 
'Ice Cream Specialists" 



DURHAM ICE CREAM COMPANY 



Incorporated 



// 



FAST FROZ E N 
Blue Ribbon" Ice Cream 



Made with Pure Cream 



"Good to Eat at all Hours" 



BLOCKS 



PUNCHES 



J. Southgate and Son 



and 



Home Insurance Agency 



Insurers for 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 



Insist on 



DURHAM 

DAIRY 

PRODUCTS 

INC. 



Dairy Products 

Durham's Standard of Quality 

Durham Dairy Products, Inc. 

Durham and Chapel Hill 



CHRISTIAN 

PRINTING 

COMPANY 



A.^VS^Vn/S/v./S^ 



A COMPLETE PRINTING 
SERVICE IN DURHAM FOR 
MORE THAN THIRTY YEARS 



BOOKMAKING 
ADVERTISING 
PUBLICATIONS 
ENGRAVING 



rfSfs/S#s/s/sAvrV 



124 West Porrish Street 
Durham, N. C. 



CYCLONE FENCE COMPANY 

Subsidiary of I niti-<t Stalea StffI (.nrporalion 



General Offices 
WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS 



WORKS 

FORT WORTH. TEXAS OAKLAND. CAI.IK. r<i|Ml \M>. oRK. 

NORTH CHICAGO. ILL. CI.FA Kl \\1>. OHIO NKWARK. NEW .JERSEY 

GREENSHIRC;, IMJ. IK(.l \ISKH. MICH. 

DEKALB. IM. 



THE TURF IN DUKE STADIUM HAS BEEN 

FED ON LAWNO EXCLUSIVELY 

A GREAT TRIBUTE TO 

LAWNO 

A SCIENTIFIC FERTILIZER FOR LAWNS 

MANUFACTURED BY 

FARMERS COTTON OIL COMPANY 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 




THE YOUNG MEN'S SHOP 



Style 



126-128 East Main Street 
Durham, North Carolina 



Quality 



Value 



SMITH-ALBRIGHT 

Milliners 



Welcome to Duke Girls 



103 East Moin Street — Durham 



^^here is a recognized BEST 
in every line 

The officially adopted and now standard graduate 
ring brings to another outstanding American Campus 

DUKE UNIVERSITY AT DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

an individual Josten creation and a lasting memorial 
to Dr. Frank C Brown, his Faculty and Student 
Committee. 

J O S T E N ' S 



INDIVIDUALITY 



TREASURE CRAFT JEWELERS 
Main Factory, Owatonna, Minnesota 

QUALITY 



SERVICE 



Sole official and only authorized representotive Groduote and Alumnus Rings 
0. G. SAWYER, Duke University Store 

OkkKks: Ck'Vi'lJind. ritlsliui i,'li. ('liiriii;(i. Uofticslfr, Mintu-apdlis. h'ar^'o. Sun KranriM-n, Wirliita, Dallas 



Breakfast 
Luncheon 
Dinner 

— AT — 

THE R AND M CAFETERIA 

SPECIAL RATES TO DUKE STUDENTS 

Meet ond Dine Here With 
Your Friends 

• 

Corner of Cha|jel Hill and 
Corcoran Streets 


Compliments of 

D. C. MAY COMPANY 


BALDWIN'S 

Durham's Leoding Department Store 

Where Quality and Style Are Accepted by the 

Most Discriminating 

• 

"Ihslintliiiti ill Dirss 
III 1! \i iiwin's"' 

R. L. BALDWIN COMPANY 

Durham, N. C. 


RHODES-COLLINS 

FURNITURE COMPANY 

Complete House Furnishers 

L'n<).21l Ka-t (Iw.prl Hill virrrt 

Durham, N. C. 


Phone F 8151 
— Popular Hecniisi- of Style ami 1 nltte — 

Betty Lou Shoppe 

WOMEN'S APPAREL AND MILLINERY 

122 Wot Main Sin-.-t 
l)i liii \\i. \. C. 


PASCHALL BAKERY 

\| \\\ II .1. I'N^c ll\l 1 . I'p.|„,.|„r 

Bread Cakes Pies 

Be Sure That it is Poschall's Pride 

New I'l.trU : * "ftrnrr hiikr ;Tn<l Ninruan Slr^'^l- 

Durham, North Carolina 


Hotel 
Malbourne 


Durhom, North Corolino 



We Supply 




Durham 


W Laknc'ood Diiirtj milk; 




M the standard of qiifdity 




N in IJnrltam for a (jcurr- 




g ation. 


A first-class electrical dis- 


1 


tributing system, a modern 




city bus transportation sys- 




tem and a year 'round ice 




delivery. 




DURHAM PUBLIC 
SERVICE CO. 


LAKEWOOD DAIRY 

Phone F-9801 


Durham, North Carolina 




J.A. MURDOCK COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 


D. P. BLEND 


• 


Coffee 


ICE, COAL 


The Best That Money Can Buy! 


and 




FUEL OIL 


If- will please the most discriminating 
coffee drinker. 


• 


One of the many famous products 


TELEPHONE J 0341 


ON SALE AT ALL 


Morgan Street 




Durham, North Carolina 


Pender's Stores 




DRINK 




IN BOTTLES 

9,000,000 Coca-Colas 
Sold Daily 

DURHAM 
COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. 

DURHAM, N. C. 



Always call for 

WAVERLY ICE CREAM 
and you'll get the best 



'Made its way by the way it's made" 



Manufactured by 

WAVERLY ICE CREAM CO., INC. 

320 Hollond Street 
Durham, N. C. 



BELK-LEGGETT 
COMPAN Y 



A most pleasant and profitable 
place to shop 



Moln through to Chopcl Hill Street 



-i ukc ^ ♦.Hc^O vAcUcIcyS'oU^ ,|ol vX.4 



o^Qt:> Q 



; (J) I ^ C I 



l^asty Sea Food a Specialty, 

mchuling oysters, clams, 
scallops, shrimp, lobsters 



Delightfully reminiscent 

Of the Old South 

Quaint of fixture, furnishing and 

Costume, 

Food deliciously prepared 

And graciously served, 

Combining everything you've 

Dreamed of to make an eating 

Place alluring. 

Drop in today 

Bring your friends, or 

Sweetheart. 

Enjoy a rare mood 

And a meal you'll never forget. 

Priced to help you come often! 



WASHINGTON DUKE TAVERN 

EVERY DELIQHT A MEAL AFFORDS 

A la Carte Service Blue Plate Lunch 45c 



TO YOU 



THE MARTHA WASHINGTON 



Extends a cordial invitation. 



We are particularly inter- 
ested in the Duke students, 
and believe you will enjoy 
dining with us. 



LUNCHEON 



DINNER 



NEON SIGN COMPANY 






W. C. LYON COMPANY 

213 East Chopel Hill Street 


Signs for All Purposes 




PHONES L-947 and L-948 


Guaranteed Efficient 










Building Materials 
Builders and Household Hardware 






Sporting Goods 


321 Chapel Hill Street 




Equipped to serve you — 


SINCE 1885 


FOSTER'S 
G ARAG E 


This company has been serving a vast 

clientele in North Carolina, and this 

ripe experience, coupled with 




complete modern equip- 


Quick Efficient 


ment is at your 


Service Mechanics 


command 


SERVICE ALL MAKES 




OF CARS 


THE S E E M A N 




P R 1 NT E R Y 


318 East Chapel Hill Street 


Incorporated 




Durham, North Carolina 



Good Luck and SUCCESS 



—in whatever path you may follow after graduation. May we wish 
you also the companionship and inspiration of a pipe and good 
tobacco. Successful men prefer a pipe and mild, flavorful tobacco 
to any other form of smoking. A pipe is a calm, deliberate smoke— 
the kind of smoke that makes for concentration and clear thinking. 
Edgeworth has been a leading favorite among pipe smokers for 
more than 30 years. No finer quality tobacco is available. It is a 
blend of only the tenderest leaves of the burley plant, what tobac- 
conists call the "mildest pipe tobacco that grows." The blend and 
treatment of these leaves is a priceless Edgeworth secret. . 



EDGEWORTH 



SMOKING TOBACCO 



MADE FROM THE 

MILDEST PIPE TOBACCO 

THAT GROWS 



Auk fur Edgeivortli RciHlij-RKbbed 
or Edyeworth in Slice /(iriii. All 
Kizes- friiiii ;.3c pocket package la 
pound humidor tins. Kdijeu-orth 
is also KoJd in vacuum packed tins 
in wliicit the tobacco remains in 
perfect condition in any climate. 
Larus <Sr Bro. Co., Riclimond, Va. 





Sales and Service 

GOODRICH TIRES TIRE ACCESSORIES 

100 PER CENT SERVICE ON ALL 
MAKES OF CARS 



Prompt ond Cordial Service 
To All Duke Students 



JOHNSON MOTOR COMPANY 



A place for those who 


We invite the patronage 


appreciate good food 


of Duke University students, 




organizations and faculty 


ERWI N 
COFFEE SHOPPE 


HOME SAVINGS BANK 


Delightful Food -^ Real Service 
Delightful Surroundings 

TRY OUR CHINESE DINNERS 




Efficient and Capable Service 




ON SUNDAY NITES 


RESOURCES OVER 


Steaks : ask the man who has tried one 


$1,800,000 


Trinity Avenue Just Off East Campus 
Dorothy M. Holl, Manager Phone J-4541 


JOHN SPRUNT HILL, President 

Wm W, SLEDGE, Vice President 

T. C. WORTH, Cashier 


KINTON'S INC. 




DIAMONDS WATCHES 


Compliments of 


JEWELRY 






Carolina- Para mount- Rial to 




Theatres 


REPAIR WORK 


Durham, North Carolina 


108 Moin Street 





MERCHANDISE OF VALUE! 
PRICES THAT ARE LOW! 
SERVICE THAT COUNTS! 

Offering a Complete Line of 

STATIONERY ITEMS, BOOK, AND 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



G 
I 
F 
T 

S 



EXCLUSIVE GIFT SHOP— SECOND FLOOR 



DURHAM BOOK & STATIONERY CO. 

Durham's Stationer Since 1907 
Typewriter Repairing Picture Framing 



After the Dance . . . 
Get a Bite . . . 

— AT — 

REEVES' AMERICAN INN 

25 Per Cent Discount on Meol Tickets 

We offer special induce- 
ment to Duke Students. 
We carry specialized 
steaks. Come down and 
sample one. Night and 
day our doors are open. 



GOOD FOOD 

GOOD SERVICE 

Chapel Hill Street, Near Five Points 



F & F SHOE COMPANY 



Exclusive Dealers in 

NUNN-BUSH SHOES 

All Styles in Sport Models for Spring 
Priced Moderately 



113 

EAST 
MAIN 
STREET 



The University Unions 

A DISTINGUISHED SERVICE 
AT THE CENTER OF CAMPUS ACTIVITIES 



D 

1 

s 


in 


Dining Rooms 




Among the most beautiful in America. 


T 
1 


in 


Food 


N 
C 

T 
1 




The best food tastefully prepared. 


in 


Service 




N 




The dining room personnel is limited to courteous and 
efficient student service. 


The 


Wor 


nen's Union The Men's Union 
on on 


The East Campus The West Campus 



The Coffee Shoppe 

WEST CAMPUS' 
Continuous a la Carte Service 



Both Unions Provide Unusual Facilities for 

Special Luncheons and Dinners 

of Any Size 

"Union Service is the Best Service" 



Claude M. May 

PAINTING 

PAPERING 

DECORATING 



411 JV. Main St. - Durham, N. C. - Phone L0381 




^Mm 



Ex r I u s iv e A gts. 



Benjamin Moore & Co. 

Paints - Far/iishes - Enamels 



AUTHENTIC FASHIONS 






MACHINERY 


// IS the purpose of this shop, at all times, 
to co-operate in on intelligent, helpful, 
and cordial manner with gentlemen who 
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Alpha Si^iiKi Si^ma 




r,OC:AL OFI-ICKRS 



At a recent mass meeting' of tlic student 
bod\' a wealth dI new and worthy material 
for that ancient and venerable order of Alpha 
Sigma Sigma came to publie attention for 
the first time. 

Contrary to the usual, the griexancc com- 
mittee did not monopolize the field in this 
instance, but many wtirthy brethren were 
to be found among both committeemen and 
ordinary students. 

It is uMth pleasure that we present a roster 
of those most worthy qualifiers herewith: 



C'luii lii;i.K (Ji'/./.i;i.i.R 
Horse's (Censored). . 
C'lMKr t)i \\ \i< \I \m;i)\i;k^ 
(Jknkrai. .Mistake 
(lEXERAi. Dizziness 
Cjenerai. Objection 
(Iknerai. IIowi. 
(lENERAi, Disuse 

Pro.m Queen "^ our l.iMiicr" Ivdmoiidson 

.\iTE\D.\NTS. . D<iii Picaso, Slew Kc-ii\<)ii, l.ulu Hoover 
NuRSE.MAii) TO I'l K\i>i'\ I'liis ...\aiicy Peterson 

The Brooklyn Flash Marie .\sscnlieimer 

Advocate oe Free Love ..\iiita Knox 



Dean \\ aniiy 

A. (.'. Jordan 

Shackner 

Ra> l.undKrcn 

Richard .Austin Sniitli 

I.OU (lanz 

Allen Staniej- 
I'red Ha^'ue 



W F.ST C.VMPUS 



Joe Summers 

F^OB RiGSBV 

James Ouzts 
W. E. Whitford 
George Roberts 
E. N. Savlor 
Artie Ershler 
Tom Dorsey 
Jake Sullivan 
Gil Keith 



fr.atres in engineering 

F. Storey, "Baldy," Bleuit 

Thirston Jackson and His Organ 

\y. H. Hall 

To.M, "Weak Eyes," Finger 

A. B. Wigley 

Ralph T. Matthews 

R. H. \V.\dsworth 

Robert Meiklejohn 

Guy Coffman 

LoN A. COONE 



EAST CA.MPUS 

RiTH Phillips 
Nancy Hudson 
Mary Nash White 
Chip Harper 
Sue Sheppard 
SiGRID Pederson 
.Augusta Walker 
Mary Parkhurst 
Ethel White 
Mary Louise Horne 



Came the Re\ olution 



Editor's Note: This poem is 
reprinted from the May Archive in 
the belief that many students will 
not have discovered it within the 
pages of that popular publication 
and that it should be preser\"ed for 
posterity. 



The\- gathered in the stateh' hall, 

This vast and motley crew, 

A common gric\ance called them all, 

And that is all they knew. 

"Treat us like men!" the leaders 

cried 
"\\ e'rc bold and big and strong. 
We will commit no homicide 
And perpetrate no wrong." 

The chairman was a comely lad 

\\ horn friends call "Princlcy Joe," 

He thought this rabid stufl" was bad 

But didn't let it show. 

The football captain took the floor, 

He called for concentration 

To turn administration o'er 

(A major operation). 

A letter was dispatched in haste 

To that far-distant board 

Which Mr. Duke set up with taste 

To rule, to spend, to hoard. 

In chape! on a Thursday morn 
The students voiced their plea 
To have a reign of freedom born 
For you and you and me. 
"Now, make no noise," said Princely 

Joe, 
"And try and be restrained 
For noise and strife will bring us 

woe — 
1 like my hearers trained." 
He read his list from stem to stern, 
It wasn't very long. 
'I'he hearers couldn't quite iliscern 
just wild hail dune them wrong. 
"Our food is very poor," he said 
"For what we have to pa\'. 
They won't serve ca\iar in bed 
For ninety cents a day." 
To be speciiic is not smart, 



As most of you can see. 
For politics is just the art of 
ambiguity. 

Up marched a student editor 

Complete with black mustache 

He ga\e his views, who knows what 

for.? 
For the\' were almost rash. 
Our dean sat quiet in his seat, 
He \entured not a word 
For, as is needless to repeat. 
He feared a gentle "bird." 
Wltcn questioned as to what he 

thought. 
He did not flinch or run. 
There was one thing for which he 

sought 
"I hope you ha\e some fun." 

Old W'allace Wade did hold his 

tongue 
But feared the worst, 'tis said. 
And thought it bad for man, when 

young. 
To try and use his head. 

The stor\' spread from lip to lip. 

It even got in Time (advt.) 

And stodgy I did lose my grip 

And set it forth in rhyme. 

But through it all there stalked a 

man 
As sinister as death, 
A bomb in cither pocket and 
Blue fire for his breath. 
Black \illains alwa\s start these 

t hings 
In tict inn, song and m\ I h, 
.■\nd angels duck to sa\i- their wings 
l''i( un Richard Ausl in Smith. 

Our story dies a natural c.leath 

I'm sorry, as you see. 

Our revolution lost its breath 

Just like Technocrac)'. 

For students come and rant ainl 

ra\ e 
To sa\e us from oppression. 
But what at sight appears so bra\'e 
Is youthful self-e.xpression. 

• — Don. \ 1.1) .Ml .\ 1.1 1,