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Full text of "The Chanticleer [serial]"

In Chaucer's "Nun's Priest's Tale," a 
rooster- or chanticleer- outwits a fox. 
The chanticleer proves himself to be intel- 
ligent, good looking, athletic, smooth and 
determined. Much like Duke students. 



"She had a cock, hight Chanticleer. 
In all the land, of crowing n'as his peer; 
His voice was merrier than the merry organ 
On masse-days that in the churche gone. 
Well sikerer was his crowing in his lodge 
Than is a clock or an abbey horologe." 

- Geoffrey Chaucer 



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Prologue 





PROLOGUE 11 




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Marilyn Tycer's silk-screen 
self-portrait was one of the 
student pieces on display 
in the Smith Warehouse. 



Durham faced its worst drought in more than 
a century. Duke was the largest consumer of 
water in Durham county and made significant 
changes in order to help conserve. On-campus 
eateries switched to disposable dishware and 
utensils, saving 800 gallons a day. Residence 
Life installed waterless hand sanitizers, water 
efficient washing machines and new tiolet sys- 
tems. Administrators e-mailed students water 
saving tips. Duke Gardens turned off their 
watering systems and added mulch to reduce 
evaporation. The University Golf Club limited 
water to putting greens, Facilities limited vehi- 
cle washing to windows only and Duke distrib- 
uted low-flow showerheads to employees for 
free. Additionally, the university announced 
a conservation fund of five millions dollars. 



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Campus Life 




dorms, ice ball, greek life, pwild, kville, politics, experiences, joe college, library party, old duke, tailgate, ldoc 




CAMPUS Llf 51 



East Campus 






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CAMPUS LIFE 53 



ice ball 




East Campus is an entity onto itself— with 
its own sense of identity, its own social 
spheres and its own unique experiences. 
East Campus Council's Annual Ice Ball 
brings the freshman class together with 
their own private formal dance. With 
fruit punch cascading from fountains to 
exquisite party favors, the event is sure 
to stay in the memories of those who 
attended. 




CAMPUS LIFE 55 






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CAMPUS LIFE 61 



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Selective Living Groups 




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CAMPUS LIFE 73 




mirecourt 




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roundtable 





wayne manor 





As the year kicked off to an optimistic start, Campus Coun- 
cil invited students to the Endless Summer Welcome Back 
Party. With rock climbing, Slip 'N Slides, minigolf and bas- 
ketball challenges all on the Main Quad, it was hard not to 
notice. There was also free food and t-shirts which always 
draw a crowd. 








Each year, Duke students ven- 
ture up our resident landmark: 
the Chapel. Atop this fantastic 
journey lies the majestic sight 
that makes West Campus so 
unique. 




77 





Two weeks before freshman step on campus, Duke's program PWILD gives students a chance to live it up, 
the way they were meant to survive— in the wild depths of Pisgah National Rainforest. For 14 days, soon- 
to-be freshman and their upperclassmen leaders hike through the mountains, eating only the food they 
brought in their heavy packs and drinking water from natural springs. For most, it will be a shocking and 
enlightening trip—but what a great way to turn a new leaf. 






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Before you even step foot on 
Duke's campus, you hear about 
the Cameron Crazies who tent 
out for months to support the 
legendary basketball team. And 
Kville never fails to meet its rep- 
utation. From drunken nights, 
aka personal checks, to possi- 
bly meeting one of the stars, the 
cold days and nights outside 
Cameron are always worth the 
lowered GPAs. 



CAMPUS LIFE 79 




April 9, 2008--15 students sup- 
porting Tibetan rights rallied 
on the West Campus Quad. In 
response, 400 Chinese students 
from various universities in 
the area, banded together to 
fight for their side of the story. 
Waving Chinese flags, and walk- 
ing from East to West campus, 
it truly was a unique sight at 
Duke University. In the after- 
math, discussions sparked curi- 
osity throughout the campus on 
a much debated issue. 









political voice 



CAMPUS LIFE 81 







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I Devil's Eve 2008— Instead of the usual 
daytime gala, Campus Council and DUU 
joined forces to bring a nighttime alterna- 
tive to the Halloween party. With all the 
essentials set— free food, free booze and a 
costume contest— there was only one thing 
that could make it better: busses to Frank- 
lin Street. 

2. Duke Blue— What a year it was for Duke 
Football! After a sweet win by the beloved 
team, Duke students showed their spirit as 
they lugged the massive goal post to Main 
Quad in celebration. 

3. Hot Air— Keohane Quad Council, along 
with RLHS and Sophomore Class Council, 
brought a novelty available only few could 
boast. As flames lit up the pitch black sky, 
the Keohane Quad was the place to be. 
Afterall, how many times could one really 
see the majestic Gothics from the sky? 



night time. 



CAMPUS LIFE 83 









4. Fall Food Fest— One of the greatest high- 
lights for any elite university is the mul- 
ticultural vision they can instill in their 
students. One of the greatest highlights 
for any university student is. ..well, good 
food. How beautiful then to combine the 
two? From a large collaboration of student 
groups on campus came the International 
Food Fest, complete with exotic foods for 
the daring and mouth-watering desserts 
for the sweet-toothed. Not even the rain 
could ruin this atmosphere. 



. Alternative Spring Break— While most col- 
lege students are tanning on the beach, sip- 
ping on cold cocktails, some students dared 
to challenge the ordinary. During their pre- 
cious week of break, participants had the 
opportunity to tutor children on the Navajo 
reservation in Tuba City, Arizona. How's 
that for a spring break you'll never forget? 



experience 

something new. 






CAMPUS LIFE 85 




ok go! 



Here it goes, here it goes, here it goes again! Flocks of 
students rushed to Kville hoping to witness a redo of the 
whimsical treadmill video that made OK GO! a must see 
on everyones list. There were no skating antics, but the 
boys did not fail to entertain. 





joe college day 

An all day, all out music fest— seriously, what can beat 
that? Hopefully nothing. Replacing Oktoberfest, Joe Col- 
lege Day made a big splash on the university scene as 
DUU brought back a beloved Duke tradition. Keep 'em 
coming. 





CAMPUS LIFE 87 



Followed by the success 
of last year's DukePlays 
party in the library Mi 
Gente (along with vari- 
ous other student organi- 
zations) transformed the 
library in to another semi- 
formal affair. Unlike last 
year, the event brought the 
highlights of latin culture 
to Duke's campus in an 
event that could only be 
described as spectacularly 
enchanting. 




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CAMPUS LIFE 89 





April 11, 2008-Despite the 
drowsy weather, the sun came 
out for the annual Old Duke 
party, hosted by Campus Coun- 
cil during Alumni Weekend. 
This year, Pat McGee Band 
joined Duke students in celebrat- 
ing the tradition in the Keohane 
Amphitheatre. With sundresses 
and beach balls abound, it truly 
was a throwback to the old days 
of kegs on the quad. Afterall, 
tradition never gets old. 







old duke. 



CAMPUS LIFE 91 






tailgate. 



It's the pinnacle of the Fall career, the replace- 
ment in our hearts for LDOC. From being 
freshies on East to almost-graduated seniors, it 
never fails to get old. And this year, Duke Uni- 
versity administration finally decided to lend 
a hand in creating that black-out memory we 
all wish we could remember. After all, noth- 
ing screams football quite like Duke Tailgate. 






CAMPUS LIFE 93 




CAMPUS LIFE 95 








97 





April 23, 2008--LDOC. The word 
rolls so sweetly off every Duke 
student's tongue as they antici- 
pate the largest party of the year 
in celebration of the last day of 
classes. Forget about finals, forget 
about homework, and for one day, 
let freedom reign throughout. 

2008 brought Third Eye Blind and 
The Roots to the Gothic Wonder- 
land. Despite some conroversy 
over who was to play at the most 
important event of the year, the 
evening went down smoother 
than celebratory vodka. 




99 



Sports 







football, volleyball, soccer, field hockey, rowing, cross country, swimming, diving, track, field, basketball, 
cameron crazies, wrestling, fencing, tennis, baseball, lacrosse, golf, cheerleading, dumb, dancing devils 




101 



\ -TOOtDctll The Duke football team endured yet 
another tough year with their 1 3th straight losing season. This 
was their third consecutive year of double-digit losses as the team 
ended its season with a 1-1 1 record. Duke's sole win of the season 
was a 20-14 away victory over Northwestern. The Duke stu- 
dent body celebrated by tearing down a goal post and carrying it 
from Wallace Wade Stadium to the lawn in front of the Chapel. 

At the end of the season former head coachTed Roofwas replaced by 
David Cutcliffe, who left his post asTennessee's assistanthead coach 
and offensive coordinator to lead the Blue Devils. Roof left Duke 
with a cumulative ledger of 6-45 overall and 3-33 in ACC games. 

Duke freshmen Nick Maggio, Bryan Morgan, and Wesley 
Oglesby were awarded ACC All- Freshman honors. Junior wide 
receiver Eron Riley received an All-ACC Second Team nod. 











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{ VOllCVDJUl j" Volleyball ended its season with 
its third consecutive appearance in the second round of the 
NCAA Tournament, where they lost to No. 7 Cal 3-1. The team 
had its fourth straight 20-victory season, with a record of 25- 
7 overall and 19-3 in the ACC. Notably, they had the fourth- 
best assists and kills averages in Division I volleyball, and set 
school records for the most kills and assists in a season while 
tying the record for kills per game averaged over the season. 

Senior Carrie DeMange was named the ACC Player of the Year 
and set school records for single-season and career kills while lead- 
ing the ACC in kills and points per game. She was also in the top 
20 in the nation in kills per game. In addition to other records and 
honors, she was named to the All-East Region First Team. Senior 
libero Jenny Shull, senior Ali Hausfield, and sophomore Rachel 
Moss also received All-East Region recognition. Shull finished 
her career at Duke as the all-time and single-season digs leader, 
and tied the ACC all-tie digs record while becoming the 12th 
player in NCAA Division I history to reach 2,100 career digs. 






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{ JVleilS bOCCer } Mens soccer [rushed the 
season 11-8-1 overall and 4-3- 1 in die ACC. They appeared in the 
NCAA Tournament for the fourth consecutive year, losing 1-0 to 
the Louisville Cardinals in the first round. They were eliminated 
by Carolina 1-0 in the ACC Tournament quarterfinals. Senior 
midfielder Michael Videira and junior forward Mike Grella were 
recognized on the All-ACG and All-South Region First Teams. 
Senior defender Tim Jepson was selected to the All-ACC and 
All-South Region Second Teams, and freshman midfielder Cole 



defender ChristianJbeagha received All-Freshma 
xccuii iu,i_uiades. Senior midfielder Joe Germanese was named to 
the All-South Region Third Team, Grella was also a Second Team 
All-American, and Videira was selected to the All-American Third 
Team. Grossman was named to the All-Rookie First Team and 
Ibeagha to the All-Rookie Second Team. Long-time coach John 
Rennie left Duke after this season, his 29th leading the team. 
He will be replaced by John Kerr, a former Blue Devil soccer 
player. Rennie compiled a career record of 410-161-34 at Duke; 



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{ Women's Soccer } women's soccer 

had a disappointing 8-5-6 regular season, but rallied for 
the NCAA Touranment and were able to reach the quar- 
terfinals. Duke advanced past South Carolina on penalty 
kicks in the first round, and then shut out Georgia 1-0 
and Indiana 2-0. In the quarterfinals, Duke bowed out to 
Notre Dame with a 3-2 loss. The team reached the ACC 
Tournament quarterfinals where they lost 3-2 to Wake 
Forest. They ended their season ranked 15th nationally. 

The team received the ACC 2007 Fall Sportsmanship 
Award. Individual honors included a Soccer Buzz All- 
American Freshman Third Team nod to Gretchen Miller, 
who started all 23 matches this season. Junior Lorraine 
Quinn earned Fourth Team All-American and First Team 
All-Region accolades from Soccer Buzz. Sophomore Elisa- 
beth Redmond was named to the Second All-Region Soccer 
Buzz Team, senior Allison Lipsher to the Third Team, 
and freshman Rebecca Allen and Gretchen Miller to the 
All-Freshman Team. Quinn also received a Second Team 
MVP Award from Soccer America. Lipsher and Quinn also 
earned NSCAA/adidias All-Southeast Region Second Team 
honors, while Redmond was selected to the Third Team. 
Several Blue Devils also were named to the All-ACC Teams. 



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{ Field Hockey } Field hockey ended its 
season 11-9-0 overall and 1-4-0 in the ACC, and were 
ranked 12th nationally at the end of the season. The team 
received its sixth straight NCAA Tournament bid, but 
bowed out in the first round of the Tournament with a 
close 5-4 loss to seventh-ranked James Madison. Duke lost 
3-2 to third-ranked Wake Forest in the ACC Tournament. 



Senior Caitlin Williams, juniors Marian Dickinson and 
Laura Suchoski, and sophomore Lauren Miller were rec- 
ognized on the All-South Region First Team. Sophomore 
Brooke Patterson and freshman Susan Ferger were named 
to the Second Team. Senior Shayna McGeehan was recog- 
nized on the ACC Championship All-Tournament Team. 



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\ IvO^Vinff J In its 10th season, rowing finished third at the 
ACC Championships, the team's seventh straight top-three finish in 
this tournament. They competed in the ACC-Big 10 Challenge, and 
Duke's first varsity fours team upset a lOth-ranked Michigan team. 
The team finished 17th at the Aramark Central/South Region Sprints. 



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{ CrOSS Country } Mens cross coun- 
try ended the season with a second place finish at the 
IC4A Championships. The top finisher was freshman 
Bo Waggoner, who placed third with a 25:22 time on the 
five-mile course. Senior Chris Spooner finished fourth, 
junior Kevin McDermott placed eighth, and freshmen 
Cory Nanni and Joshua Lund placed 25th and 35th. 
Waggoner, Spooner, McDermott, and Nanni earned 
All-East honors by finishing in the top 25 in this race. 
In the ACC Championships the team took sixth place, 
and at the NCAA Southeast Regional they finished 1 1th. 

The women's team placed 24th overall in the NCAA 
Championships in their final meet of the season. 
Duke's top finish came from junior Maddie McK- 
eever who placed 21st. This finish qualified her for 
All-American honors. Other top finishes included 
those of sophomore Kate Van who placed 67th, soph- 
omore Shelley Forbes who placed 160th, and sopho- 
more Emily Sherrard who placed 164th. This is the 
women's eighth trip to the NCAA Championships 
in the last nine years. The team took second place 
at the NCAA Southeast Regional. They also sent six 
runners to the ECAC's as a "B" team, with the top 
finish coming from junior Jessica Davlin (22nd). 






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ming finished the season with a 4-6 record overall (0-5 in the 
ACQ, and matched last seasons performance at the ACC Cham- 
pionships with a ninth place finish. Multiple school records 
were set at the tournament, including those by sophomore 
Andrew Clark in the 1000 free during the 1650 free, and sopho- 
more Miifillo Adrados in the 200 back, a record subsequently 
broken by freshman Spencer Booth. Records also were set in 
xeestyle relays, and in the 200 medley relay. 

inished 8-4 overall and 2-3 in the ACC, and 

i the conference. The team finished sixth at 

implonships, two spots better than their finish in 



__ment last season. Freshman Ashley Twitchell placec 
second in the 500 freestyle and set a new school record in th 
race, qualifying her for the "A" cut of the NCAA Champion 
ships, in addition to severaI""B" cut qualifications. At the NCA/ 
Championships, her best finish was 16th in the 1650 freesryl 
event, earning her Ail-American honors. Sophomores Shan 
non Beall and Meredith Bannon also achieved NCAA "B" cut 
in multiple events. Additionally, numerous school records wer 
set at the ACC Tournament, and Twitchell was recognized wit! 
All-ACC honors in the 500 and 1650 freestyle events. Junio 
divers Lauren Gonzalez and Julie Brummond both appearc 
in the ACC Tournament and at the NCAA Zone B Divin 
Championships, where Brummond placed 11th in the three 
meter. Brummond was also recognized on the All-ACC tean 






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{ Track & Field } Mens outdoor 
track wrapped up their season with an 18th place 
finish at the IC4A's. Five Blue Devils qualified for 
the NCAA East Regional, and redshirt freshman 
John Austin qualified for the NCAA Champion- 
ships, eventually finishing 1 1th in javelin. During the 
indoor season, the men tied for 4 1st at the IC4A's. 
They finished 11th at the ACC Championships. 

Women's outdoor track finished 16th at the ECAC's. 
Three women qualified for the NCAA East Regional, 
and the team tied for 38 th at that competition led by a 
sixth place finish by junior Molly Lehman. In indoor 
track, the women tied for an impressive seventh at the 
ECAC's. They also finished 1 1th at the ACC Cham- 
pionships. Junior Maddie McKeever qualified for 
the NCAA Indoor Championships in the 5,000m. 





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{ Men's Basketball } Mens , 

basketball had a successful season, finishing 
28-6 overall and 13-3 in the ACC. Duke was 
upset by Clemson the second round of the 
ACC Tournament, but entered the NCAA L 

Tournament as a second seed. After a close \ 

71-70 victory against Belmont in the first 
round of the Tournament, the men were upset 
by West Virginia 73-67. 

Perhaps the most notable event of the season was 
the team's 87-86 win against N.C. State, giving 
Head Coach Mike Krzyzewski his 800th career 
win. Also memorable was Duke's 89-78 away vic- 
tory against UNC, who played without injured point 
guard Ty Lawson. The men were unable win again 
against Carolina at home, suffering a 76-68 loss in 
Carrferon Indoor-Stadium. 



mbers received a fynmber of individ- 
nior DeMarcus Nelson was namecypfthe 
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the Year, and placed on the ACC 
First Team, All-Defensive Team and^ 
the Fan's Guide Coaches' All-Defen- 
sive Team. He also was recognized as a 



mention. 



the CollegeHoops.net Freshman All-America Third 
Team, selected as ACC Freshman of the Year, and 
was named to the All-ACC Third Team along 
with junior Greg Paul us. 

Freshman Taylor King opted not 
to return to Duke for his sopho- 
^ more year, instead transferring 
to Villanova. King and Nelson 
will be the only players not 
returning for the 2008- 




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SPORTS 129 




{ Wbllieil's Basketball } Women's basketball finished its first year under 
the leadership of Joanne P. McCallie with a 25-10 overall record and a 10-4 record in the ACC. 
The team reached the NCAA Tournament Sweet 16 before falling 77-63 to No. 8 Texas A&M. 
Duke's ACC Tournament run was ended by No. 2 North Carolina 86-73. Perhaps the low point 
of the season was a 82-5 1 loss to Carolina in Cameron Indoor Stadium during the regular season. 

Junior Chante Black received Oklahoma City Regional All-Tournament Team recogni- 
tion. Black and junior Abby Waner received Honorable Mention All-American honors. 
Freshman Jasmine Thomas was recognized as an All-ACC Freshman Honorable Mention. 










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SPORTS 135 



1 \y fCStllUff J, The wrestling team recorded their 
best overall season record since 2004-05, finishing 12-9 overall 
and 0^5 in the ACC. They also matched last season's perfor- 
mance in the AGG tournament with a sixth place finish and 
three fourth-place finishes by senior Kellan McKeon (at 125 
pounds), sophomore VorisTejada (at 157 pounds), and sopho- 
more Addison Nuding (165 pounds). Duke sent five wrestlers 
to the 2008 Asics University & Fila Cadet National Cham- 



pionships, including sophomore John Barone, freshmen A.J. 
Guardado, Colby Johnson, Willy Mello, and redshirt freshman 
Robert Holbrook. Konrad Dudziak, who is taking a redshirt 
year from Duke to train for the Olympics, also competed in 
this tournament and finished a true second as a heavyweight. 

During the ACC Tournament, redshirt sophomore John Barone 
notched his 35th win of the season to became Duke's all-time 
single-season wins record holder holder. Earlier in the season, he 

alsobroketherecordforthefastestpininDukewrestlinghistory 
when he pinned a Limestone College wrestler in 1 1 seconds. 

Duke wrestlingwas again recognized as having the highest team 
GPA in the nation at 3.335, a tie with American University. 





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\ -TenClllg J The fencing team finished 11th out of a field of 27 teams 
at the 2008 NCAA Championships. Top finishes included freshman Dorian 
Cohens sixth place in men's foil, junior Peter Truszkowski's eighth place in men's 
saber, senior Ben Hendricks' 10th place in men's foil, and freshman Allison Put- 
terman's 19th place in women's foil. Cohen, Truszkowski, and Hendricks received 
Ail-American accolades. Overall, the men finished 19-4 and the women 16-12. 



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{ Meil S TeniliS } Mens tennis ended the regu- 
lar season 7-12 overall and 4-5 in the ACC, and was ranked 
43rd. They beat Boston College 4-0 in the first round of the 
ACC Tournament, but lost to Florida State in the quarterfi- 
nals. In their 17th consecutive NCAA Tournament appear- 
ance, they defeated Arizona State 4-2 in the first round, but 
lost to 12th-ranked North Carolina in the second round. 



Senior David Goulet (ranked 55th) competed in the NCAA 
Singles Championships, but lost in the first round to No. 
6 Robert Farah of Southern California. Goulet and fresh- 
man Reid Carleton were selected for the All-ACC Team. 



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SPORTS 141 



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{ Women's Tennis } women's tennis 

ended the season with a 20-5 overall record and a 9-2 record 
in the ACC. Their victories included two victories over top- 
10 ranked teams (No. 6 Florida and No. 2 Georgia Tech). 
Duke made it to the finals of the ACC Tournament before 
falling 4-3 to Clemson. In the NCAA Tournament, the 
team made it to the Round of 16 before bowing out 4-3 to 
No. 8 California, the eventual runner-up in the tournament. 
The Blue Devils finished the season ranked ninth as a team. 

Several team members saw action in the individual NCAA 
Tournament. Junior Melissa Mang and sophomore Amanda 
Granson made it to the NCAA Doubles Championship 



quarterfinals and were ranked No. 7 nationally. No. 24 
freshman Reka Zsilinszka competed in the NCAA Singles 
Round of 16, bowing out to No. 18 Lenka Broosova. Fresh- 
man Ellah Nze also appeared in the tournament, losing in 
the first round. Sophomore Elizabeth Plotkin was selected 
for the tournament, but was unavailable for post-season play. 

Individual honors included All-American doubles honors 
for junior Melissa Mang and sophomore Amanda Gran- 
son, and singles honors for freshman Reka Zsilinszka. 



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\ DdScDoll J The baseball team ended its season with a 
37-18-1 overall record and a 1 0- 1 8- 1 record in the ACC, notch- 
ing more wins in the season than any other Duke baseball team in 
the past decade. As a team, Duke batted .299. Sophomore Alex 
Hassan received an All-ACC SecondTeam nod as a utility player. 



SPORTS 145 



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enS J^aCrOSSe J Men's lacrosse was 
thwarted again by Johns Hopkins in its quest for its first NCAA 
Championship. After beating Virgina 11-9 for the ACC Cham- 
pionship, Duke advanced to the semifinals of the NCAA Tour- 
nament with a 2 1 - 1 win over Ohio State. Duke was then bested 
by Hopkins 10-9. The team finished its season 18-2-0 overall 
and 3-0-0 in the ACC. They were ranked No. 1 in the country. 

The Duke sqad included some of the best collegiate lacrosse 
players; in the country Senior Matt Danowski was one of the 
top an .it in :>')^ nationally leading in total points and assists, 
i c a II, pie NCAA scoring record with 353 career 
4§o hbriored with the USILA's Lt. Raymond J. 
the National Player of the Year. Senior teammate 
pie. the NCAA record holder for career goals and 



as the nations top attackman with the Lt. Col. 
rnbull Award. Senior Nick O'Hara received the William 
F. Schmeisser Award, given to the nations best defenseman. 

t 

Nine team members received Ail-American Honors. Dan- 
owski, Greer, and O'Hara were selected to the First Team. 
Senior Tony McDevitt and junior Ned Crotty were recog- 
nized with Second Team honors. Senior Dan Loftus and 
Brad Ross, along with sophomore Max Quinzani, received 
Third Team accolades. Sophomore Parker McKee was recog- 
nized with an honorable mention. Team members received 
numerous other awards. This season concludes the colle- 
giate careers of many of the 33 team members given a fifth 
year of eligibility by the NCAA in the wake of the so-called 
lacrosse scandal and the subsequently canceled season in 2006. 






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{ Women's Lacrosse } women's lacrosse 

finished the season 13-8 overall and 3-2 in the ACC. They 
reached the semifinals of the NCAA Tournament for the fourth 
consecutive season, their 11th consecutive appearance in the 
tournament. Duke reached the ACC Tournament semifinals 
before falling 10-9 to Virginia, the eventual ACC Champi- 
ons. The team was ranked as high as No. 1 1 during the season. 

A highlight of the season was Duke's 17-11 regular-season vic- 
tory over Dartmouth. In this game, the Blue Devils scored four 
goals in only 26 seconds, setting an NCAA record for quickness. 

Team members received numerous individual honors, including 
ACC and national Rookie of the Year recognition of midfielder 
Emma Hamm; Ail-American honors for senior defender Aiyana 
Newton and junior attackers Carolyn Davis and Megan Del Monte; 
and All-Rookie accolades for freshman midfielder Sarah Bullard. 



SPORTS 153 



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\ VlOlX J The men's golf team had a successful season, finishing in the 
top five in six of the 1 1 tournaments it appeared in. They entered the NCAA 
East Regional ranked 1 3th and finished 1 9th in their ninth straight appear- 
ance in that tournament, and placed second in the ACC Championship. 
Senior Michael Schachner and junior Clark Klaasen were selected for All- 
ACCTeam. The men had two regular season tournament wins, at the Coca- 
Cola Duke Golf Classic and the River Landing Intercollegiate tournaments. 

Top-ranked women's golf had another stellar season, though the team fell 
just short of its fourth consecutive NCAA Championship with a third 
place finish. Junior Amanda Blumenherst led the team, finishing tied 
for fifth in the tournament, along with junior Jennie Lee (T15), fresh- 
man Kim Donovan (T41), senior Jennifer Pandolfi (T54), and sopho- 
more Alison Whitaker (T68). The team also won its 13th straight ACC 
Championship and was recognized with numerous individual awards. 
Blumenherst was named Ping NGCA Player of the Year, became the 
first player to receive back-to-back Nancy Lopez Awards (given to the 
world's most outstanding amateur female golfer), and received First 
Team NGCA All-American and NGCA All-East accolades. Blumen- 
herst also became the first three-time ACC Champion with her indi- 
vidual win and placed second at the NCAA East Regional. Lee was 
selected as a Second Team NGCA All-American and earned All-ACC 
honors along with teammates Blumenherst, Pandolfi, and Whitaker. 



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{ Dancing Devils } 



Events 




Stella, DefMo, Grease, Pajama Game, Awaaz, A Capella, Speakers, Homecoming, LNY, Chelsea Clinton, Rocky Horror, 
Fashion Show, Sabrosura, Dance Expo, DUI, Augustana, Boys Like Girls, Kurama, Paul Farmer, Dance Showcase, Ron Paul 




163 



- 




Stella has played at the library, at the Nasher 
and in Kville. The band then played for 
Durham when they performed at Brightleaf 
Square during the venue's concert series. 
Located in the historic tobacco district of 
downtown Durham, Brightleaf houses a 
good mix of shops, restaurants and outdoor 
seating. Smooch & The Big Hug, another 
Duke band, also played at Brightleaf . Stella 
filmed a music video at Brightleaf Square, as 
well as one in Perkins Library and at Shoot- 
ers II. Stella was selected from a group of 
1,700 bands as "The Best Music on Campus" 
by MTVu for the Woody Award. The 
band toured after graduation, even open- 
ing for Metro Station and Boys Like Girls. 




STELLA BY STARLIGHT 




DUKE @ BRIGHTLEAF SQUARE 



EVENTS 165 



DEFMO SHOWCASE 




DEFINING MOVEMENT 



For the fifth year running, Defining Move- 
ment continued to dance to thunderous 
applause. Affectionately called DefMo, 
the group displayed their talents in Page 
Auditorium where they lived up to their 
name and broke down preconceived ideas 
about dance. The group performed at 
other events throughout the year, includ- 
ing ASA's Lunar New Year production. 




EVENTS 



167 




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Hoof 'n' Horn, the second oldest stu- 
dent-run musical theater group in the 
nation, produced three diverse shows 
this year. The group put on 'The 
Pajama Game' with great energy, fol- 
lowing the employees of the Sleep- 
Tite Pajama Factory as they try to get 
a seven and a half cent raise. Next, 
the group performed 'Rocky Horror 



HOOF 'N' HORN 



Picture Show' featuring an extremely 
sexualized transvestite scientist. 
Depicting the sexual revolution of the 
1 950s, many Duke students got caught 
up in the fun, arriving to the show in 
costume and drag. The group ended 
the year with 'Grease', the popular 
Broadway hit about Rydell High's 
class of 1959. 



See Also: Rocky Horror Picture Show, p. 188 and The Pajama Game, p. 170 / 



EVENTS 169 




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See Also: Grease, p. 168, & Rocky Horror Picture Show, p. 188 




171 




AWAAZ 



DUKE DIYA 



Meaning "voice" in Hindi, 
Awaaz continued to amaze 
with their 2-night cultural show. 
The largest student-run event 
on campus, Awaaz had more 
than two hundred performers 
and sold out the 1200-seat Page 



Auditorium both nights. Spon- 
sored by Duke Diya, the group 
provided a catered dinner before 
the show in the Great Hall. 
Awaaz managed to combine 
song, dance, skits and videos 
into one great showcase. 





173 




175 




A CAPELLA JAM 



ORIENTATION 



Though a relatively small school, 
Duke boasts amazing a capella 
groups who continually wow 
their audiences with creative song 
choices, routines and - of course - 
incredible vocals. Duke's a capella 



groups include The Pitchforks, 
Speak of the Devil, Out of the Blue, 
Lady Blue, Deja Blue, Sapphire, 
Rhythm & Blue, Something Bor- 
rowed Something Blue, and a new 
group started this year, Kol Kachol. 



EVENTS 177 




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Karl Rove 



Tucker Max 






GUEST SPEAKERS 




Elliot Chang 



Pablo Francisco 



DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 



EVENTS 179 



HOMECOMING 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 




Homecoming weekend brought alums of all ages back to the 
Gothic Wonderland in October. Some of the younger alums 
jumped right back into costumed tailgate festivities, others 
toured the new Bell Tower dorm on East campus, or enjoyed 
a fish fry on the Plaza. Even with all the speakers, tours and 
pep rallies - the highlight of the weekend is the always the 
President's Homecoming Dance. The Wilson Gym basket- 
ball courts were unrecognizable with all the great decora- 
tions, formally dressed guests and the free food and drinks. 





EVENTS 181 




LUNAR NEW YEAR 



ASIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION 



This year's Lunar New Year, titled 
"This is Asia!", brought together 
modern and traditional acts from 
Asia. Show and dinner tickets were 
given to students for free and the 
event showcased a number of vocal 
and dance performances, includ- 



ing those by Defining Movement, 
The Lanterns, Da Cru and Chinese 
Folk Dance. MC favorites Andrew 
Hsiao, Lawrence Chen, and Paul Yen 
returned to the stage and provided 
comedic commentary. 



Continued 



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EVENTS 183 




EVENTS 185 



GUEST SPEAKERS 




CHELSEA CLINTON 




DUKE DEMOCRATS 



EVENTS 1 87 



ROCKY HORROR 




HOOF 'N' HORN 




See Also: Grease, p. 168, The Pajama Game, p. 170 



189 





FASHION SHOW 



BLACK STUDENT ALLIANCE 



Hoping to depict the undergradu- 
ate experience through clothing, the 
event was a highlight of the BSA's 
admitted students weekend. Using 
clothing borrowed from local stores, 
models auditioned for the show and 
were coached to help their cat-walk- 
ing skills. On-campus advertising 



was limited so that there would be 
enough space for the prospective stu- 
dents. However, the Fashion Show, 
as well as the National Pan-Hellenic 
Step Show for prospective students, 
are always popular events and require 
little advertising or introduction. 



'TRUE LIFE: I'M A BLUE DEVIL' 



EVENTS 191 




RITMO 



SABROSURA 



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EVENTS 193 









DANCE EXPO 



HOSTED BY DANCE BLACK 



Performances by Sabrosura, Defmo, On Tap, Dance Slam, Lasya, Momentum, UP Dance, and Dance Black 



195 





BIG SHOW 11 



DUKE UNIVERSITY IMPROV 



Duke University Improv opened its 
eleventh Big Show with a video spoof 
of Ocean's 11, and poked fun at reality 
television with its "To Catch a Stapler 
Predator". True to form, the aptly 
named performance was their big- 
gest of the year and featured campus 
celebrities, such as basketball player 
Jon Scheyer, President Richard Brod- 
head and VP of Student Affairs, Larry 



Moneta. The group released a video 
advertisement for the event of Kyle 
Singler, who looked as if he was del- 
caring for the NBA draft. At the last 
mintue, Singler declared he would be 
attending the DUI Big Show. All pro- 
ceeds from the DUI events, often over 
$10,000, go to the Scott Carter Foun- 
dation for Pediatric Cancer Research. 



EVENTS 197 



AUGUSTANA 




BOYS LIKE GIRLS 




DUKE UNIVERSITY UNION 



EVENTS 199 




FABULATION 



KARAMU 

Karamu Drama Group reaches 
out to the Duke community by 
inciting discussions about issues in 
the African American community. 
Through dramatic performances, the 
members of Karamu hope to involve 
the audience members in a way that 
allows them to experience these 
issues for themselves. 

Fabulation is a darkly comic rags- 
to-riches-to-rags story about a 
successful publicist who one day 
finds herself pregnant and broke. She 
must confront drug addicts, welfare 
mothers, and the family she left 
behind. 



EVENTS 201 




PAUL FARMER 

GLOBAL HEALTH INSTITUTE 



Considered to be a global health 
expert, Dr. Paul Farmer (T 82) 
returned to his alma mater to address 
the inequities in healthcare. Farmer 
founded the charitable organiza- 
tion, Partners in Health, to provide 
healthcare to resource-deprived 
areas. Speaking to a packed Page 
Auditorium, Farmer advised the 
audience to think of health care as a 
fundamental human right and not as 



an economic concern. Farmer told 
the story of Joseph, an emaciated 26 
year old Haitian man, who regained 
his health after receiving AIDS and 
TB medication. Farmer stressed 
that it is the responsibility of future 
generations to help health care be 
available to all. Farmers work was 
documented in Tracy Kidder's 
"Mountains Beyond Mountains," the 
summer reading for the Class of 2008. 




203 



DANCE SHOWCASE 



CHINESE DANCE & LASYA 






205 



GUEST SPEAKERS 







RON PA1JI 




POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 



E N T S 207 



Academics 







study venues, thesis, labs, chemerinksy, smart home, toni morrison, robin blackburn, spotlights, study abroad 




ACADEMICS 209 




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After four years at Duke University, Alston & Bird Professor of law and professor of political science Erwin Chemerinsky 
is leaving Duke to become the founding dean of the Donald Bren School of Law at the University of California-Irvine. 
During his tune at Duke, Professor Chemerinsky taught courses on Constitutional Law, Federal Courts, Federal Practices 
of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, and Appellate Litigation. He was dubbed University Scholar/Teacher of the Year at 
Duke in 2006 Students praise his passion for what he teaches and ability to generate discussion in large classrooms, 
citing his Constitutional Law class as one of their favorites at Duke. 



ACADEMICS 215 



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Smart Home 






The Home Depot Smart Home was completed and opened to student habita- 
tion in the Fall of 2007. A $2.5 million, two-story, 6,000 square foot dorm and research 
laboratory, the Smart Home exhibits a focus on energy efficiency and using the latest 
technology in it's construction and appliances. As a co-ed dorm, it houses 10 students 
each semester, but as a key component of the Pratt School of Engineering Duke Smart 
Home Program it provides a hands on way for students from all academic disciplines 
to discover new "smarter" ways to use technology in a home. 

"Smart" in this case means finding the best solution for a particular problem. 
Although the Smart Home is chock full of technological wonders (like fiber optic 
internet wiring), it has been designed with a focus on minimizing environmental 
impact and to meet at least Gold LEED (the national standard for green construction) 
certifications. A green roof houses native plants that insulate the house during the 
winter by accumulating snow and cool the house during the summer through evapo- 
ration- .--.-Large rain barrels catch water that is then recycled for non-potable uses, such 
as laundry washing and toilets. High efficiency laundry machines help this water 
recycling reach its fullest environmentally protective potential. Solar panels, recycled 
blue-jean wall insulation, solar water heating, and artwork made from recycled materi- 
als are just a few more of the many ways the Duke Smart Home is trying to minimize 
it's impact on the environment. 



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Duke's Native American Student Alli- 
ance celebrated Native American 
Heritage Month by bringing members 
of North Carolina's Waccamaw Sioux, 
Lumbee and Haliwa-Saponi tribes to the 
Great Hall to sing, dance, and exhibit 
traditional foods and handicrafts of their 
tribes. The event was also linked to a 
freshman writing 20 course. 






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Toni Morrison 



Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winning author Toni Morrison visited Duke and during a public conversation 
with Reynolds Price, held in the Duke chapel, read an extended excerpt from her currently unpub- 
lished novel. 



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Robin Blackburn 



Slavery. Educated at Oxford and the London School of Economics, Blackburn was the former editor 
of the New Left Review. Blackburn came to speak to students in the Rare Book Room. 



ACADEMICS 227 



Faculty & Staff Spotlights 






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Kenneth Rogerson 



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Professor Kenneth Rogerson is Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Public 
Policy, and former Research Director of the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy at 
Duke University. He also serves as chair of the American Political Science Association's Informa- 
tion Technology and Politics Section. Students love his sense of humor and accessibility as well as 
his openness to student input in his classes. 



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Wesley Kort 






A Professor in Duke's Department of Religion and a member of the Gradu- 
ate Faculty of Religion, Wesley Kort specializes in religion and modern and 
contemporary culture with emphasis on the convergence of religion and 
literary studies. Since joining the Duke faculty in 1965, he's received the 
Outstanding Professor Award and the Richard K. Lublin Teaching Award in 
addition to teaching graduate and undergraduate classes and writing nine 
books. Professor Kort's teaching style is characterized by an interactive, 
intimate environment regardless of lecture size. Students praise him for his 
approachability and passion for what he is teaching. 



ACADEMICS 229 




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Jim Wulforst, Dining Director 



Jim Wulforst has brought about a lot of changes in his 13 years as Director of Dining Services at 
Duke University. Twinnies, Quenchers, Blue Express, Armadillo Grill, McDonalds, and Chik-fil-A 
are just a few of the food services that have come to campus during his time here. He's won the 
Inaugural Nan Keohane Award and the Dean Sue Award for doing unique things in the Duke com- 
munity and "looking out for the best interest of students". But he's not here for the awards. He 
loves the students he gets to interact with and feels he serves a purpose in the Duke community. 






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The Bella Union and Dolce Vita Dudes 



Sam Clowney and Rob Clay work hard to bring students the best coffee and snacks on campus. 
Always upbeat and welcoming, they remember regular's orders and strive to make every cus- 
tomer interaction a positive one. Originally solely located in the Well, Rob and Sam have branched 
out into a small coffee shop in the French Science Center where they serve organic and vegan fair 
and continue to deliver the same generous helping of friendliness with every cup of coffee. 



ACADEMICS 231 



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As both an employee in Faculty Commons and a GA House Mother, Ms. O has a reputation for friendliness and 
always having a smile on her face. Through her many years working at Duke, Ms. O says her favorite thing about her 





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ACADEMICS 239 



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SENIORS 241 






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SENIORS 245 



Amanda Abbott Margaret Abernathy David Adams Thomas Adelman Aaina Aganval Senvaah Agyapong 




Atinuke Ajiboye Kelley Akhiemokhali Stylianos Alatsis Blayne Alexander 



Max Alexander Suzanne Alila 




Jonelle Allen 



Sarah Allen 



ShemaneAmin Stephanie Amoako Brittney Anderson Christopher Anderson 




Collin Anderson Aleksandr Andreev Douglas Ansel 



Andrew Antila 



Meghan Antol 



Laura Anzaldi 




e Applegarth Benjamin Arendt Ashley Arlow 



Scott Arnone 



Thomas Aten Rebecca Auerbach 



Jacqueline August Thomas Austin Elena Bachvarova 



Jennifer Bahk Gurlal Baidwan 



Megan Bailey 




Scott Bailey 



Alexandra Balaban Alixandra Barasch 



Emily Barnes 



Lauren Barnett 



Melissa Barr 




Adam Barrer 



Tomas Barreto 



Jeffrey Barry 



Brett Bartles 



Nathalie Basile 



Geoffrey Bass 




Joy Basu 



Joseph Bataille,jr 



Michael Bauer Rita Baumgartner Roberto Bazzani 



Gregory Beaton 




Sabrina Bedward 



Jacob Bender 



Leah Benjamin 



Sarah Bennett 



Joanna Bersin 



Kshipra Bhawalkar 



SENIORS 247 



Syreena Bibbs 



David Bieber 



Hannah Biederman Anthony Bishopric Brenton Blakesley Catherine Blanchard 




Angela Bleggi 



Tasha Bollerslev 



Julia Blessing 



Jeffrey Blickman 



Jason Blum 



Mary Clare Bohrett Danial Bokhari 




Mia Boiling 



Leah Bonaparte 



Lisa Bonnifield 



Stephen Borba 




Rebecca Boms 



Ryan Bott 



Kristen Bova 



Margot Bowen 






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Megan Braley 



Kimberly Branch 



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Ana Boza 


Matea Bozja 


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Brennen Britton 


Lacey Broadland 



1^— J 

John Brockardt Samuel Broder-Fingert Melissa Bromley Laura Brookhiser 



Jason Brown 



Rachel Brown 




William Brown 



Elizabeth Bruns 



Marjorie Bryan 



Jeffrey Buchan 



Ross Buckley 



Hans Buder 




Jessica Burchell 



Blair Burke 



Kimberly Burke 



Matthew Burke 



Andrew Burns 



Corey Butler 




Madison Byrd 



Patrick Byrnes 



Alexis Cabrera Christopher Callaway Alexander Campbell Kamaria Campbell 




Matthew Campbell Shelley Capito 



Holly Cardoso 



Spencer Cargill 



Sarah Carlson Halley Carmack 



SENIORS 249 



Allison Carpenter Marilyn Carter James Carter, III Brent Cash 



Reid Cater Fay Cathles-Hagen 




Ron Causey Sung-Rok Cha Rebecca Chalif Scott Champagne Marc Champalous Carolyn Chang 




Denise Chang Heidi Chang Samuel Chapin Lesley Chapman Tomasz Charowski Sandili Chauncey 




Carol Chen Cheng Chen Dennis Chen 



Jane Chen 



Lihua Chen 



Lily Chen 




Li Ada Chen 



Lisa Chen 



Megan Chen 



Sheryl Chen Cindy Cheng Dean Chiang 



CHRIS SANDERS 

1986 - 2007 




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SENIORS 251 



Christopher Chin 



Farai Chiwocha 



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Hyunwoo Cho 



Joon Hahn Cho 



Youngeun Cho 



Nam Young Choo 




Adam Chopko 



Soo-Jung Choy 



Kelley Chuang Kemi Chukwuka Seungwon Chung 



Priscilla Chyn 





Devon Clarke 



Tyler Clarke 



Lucy Coassin 




Lauren Cohen Courtney Cole-Lovelace Stephanie Coleman 




Andrew Collins 



Danna Conboy 



Gregory Condos 



Gregory Conforti William Connor 



Erin Conway 



Andrew Cook 



Caitlin Cooper Derensky Cooper 




Michael Cooper 



Daniel Coral 



Liliana Costa 



Nicolas Cottely 



Etienne Coulon Thomas Cournoyer 




Joshua Coveleski Lera Covington Elizabeth Crabtree 



Andrea Crane 



Alison Crawford Elizabeth Crawford 




Alexander Crean 



Melissa Crowe 



John Crowell 



Trisha Cubb 



Stephen Cummings Charles Cuneo 




ndrew Cunningham Brandon Curl 



Meliss Dackis Pamela Daher Tobia Lindsay Dancy 



Matthew Danforth 



SENIORS 253 











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Andrew Dang 



Riva Das 



Mirels Davila 



Andrew Davis 



Lauren Davis 



Valarie Davis 




James Deal 



Ruben De Alba 



Sofija Degesys 



Joshua Deiches Matthew Dekow Carlos De La Vega 




Mark Dellavolpe 



Isel Delvalle 



Carrie Demange 



Felix Descamps Christopher Destasio 




Jonathan Detzel Vasavi Devireddy Christine Devore 



Rahul Dewal 



Julie Dexheimer 



Laura Dickey 




Ryan Dobbertien Stephanie Dobos 



Stesha Doku 



Thomas Donaho 



Huan Dong 



Katelyn Donnelly 



SENIORS 255 




L { M 




Amanda Dorsey 



Laura Douglas Veronica Dragalin Amanda Drucker 



Daniel Dubale 



Timothy Ducey 




Anna Dudenhoeffer Elizabeth Duggins Elizabeth Duke 



Denis Dupee 



Sarah Eagle 



Adam Eaglin 




Keith Edelman 



Tayo Edun 



April Edwards Katharine Eggleston Lucia Ehimika 



Patrick Eibl 




Viktoria Elkis 



Courtney Elliott Marguerite Elmore Zoe Englander 



Kelly Ennis 



Charles Entman 




eth Erickson Lynne Evans 



Adrienne Everett 




Jordan Everson 



Yu-Ting Fan 



Nona Farahnik 




SENIORS 257 



Michele Farber 



Kamil Faridi Margaret Farquharson Judd Fastenberg 



Molly Fausch 



Thomas Feehan 




Jonathan Feinberg Robert Fenequito 



Jing Feng 



Daniel Fenjves Katya Fernandez Jesse Ferrantella 




Edward Fife 



Thomas Figgatt 



David Fiocco 



David Fiorillo 



Aaron Fisher 



Annie Fleishman 





Ashley Flucas 



Daniel Fox 




Andrey Fradkin Alexander Frank 



Daniel Freedman Maura Freedman 



Daniel Friedman 



Julie Friedman 



Rebecca Friedman Margaret Froneberger 




lichard Frothingham Chong-Min Fu 



Catherine Fuentes Melissa Fundora 



Brandon Fuqua 



Brian Gaffey 




Ryan Gallant 



Alfredo Garcia 



David Garver 



Audrey Gaskins 



Lauren Genvert 



Andrew George 




Jason Ghodasra Odelia Ghodsizadeh M Allison Gianino 



Bryan Gibson 



Jakenna Gilbert 



John Gilbert 




Sarah Gilleskie 



Kenzel Gilliam Kaitlyn Gionsiewski Meredith Glacken 



Brayden Glad 



Michael Gleicher 



SENIORS 259 



Emily Glenn 



Pearce Godwin 



Cameron Goldberg Danielle Goldman Spencer Goldstein Kaitlyn Gonsiewski 




Werapong Goo 



Katherine Good 



Jamie Gordon 



Philip Gorman 



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Andrew Gosden 



Caroline Gould 




Peter Grape 



Joseph Gray 



Meagan Gray 



Jacinta Green 



Ricky Green 



Ketih Greenberg 




m II 




Kenneth Greenleaf 



Bonnie Gregory 



Louisa Griggs 



Julie Grimley 



Joanna Grundstrom 



Shuo Guan 




■ L>uerrero 



Matthew Guisinger 



Jeffrey Gullo 



Liheng Guo 



Xiaoxiao Guo 



Mrinalini Gupta 




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SENIORS 261 



Matthew Guttentag Gareth Guvanasen Holly Hackman 



Taylor Halbert 



Casey Hales 



Michael Haley 




Robyn-Ashley Hall Heather Hamilton Regina Hamilton 



David Hankla 



Kerrigan Hanna Christopher Hanowitz 




Elizabeth Harden Elizabeth Hardwick Elizabeth Harper Josclyn Harrington Samantha Harrington Michael Harris 




Sarah Haseltine 



Davis Hast}' 



Allison Hauser 



Alexis Hausfeld 



Lindsey Havko 



Brendan Hayes 




Benjamin Haynes Tameka Haynes 



Elizabeth He 



Qinxian He 



Kirsten Heenan 



Laura Heeter Jennifer Heffernan Anna Heinrichs Sonja Hellstrom Benjamin Hendricks Jennifer Herring 




Brian Hertzberg 



Danubia Hester Nadia Hidayatallah Kristin High 



Makiko Hiromi 




Cheryl Ho 



Jiang Hai Ho 



Tammy Ho 



MM 
William Hoffman 



Sarah Holcomb Gelareh Homayounfar 




Sung Hong 



Matthew Hoover Alexander Hope Christopher Hopper Andrea Houghtling 



Bridgette Howard 




Katherine Howe 



Kristen Howell Marguerite Hoyler 



Boyu Hu 



Wendy Hu 



Yuxuan Hu 



SENIORS 263 



Alicia Huang 



Andy Huang 



Kimberly Hubbard William Hudson Christian Hughes 



Tiffany Hui 




Madeline Hurst Elizabeth Hussey Katherine Hutcheson Alexander Hwang 



Priscilla Hwang 



Sam Hwu 




Maanasa Indaram 



Alexandra Issa Elizabeth Jameson 



Brooke Jandl 



Taylor Jardno 



Mark Jelley 




Kevin Jeng 



Brandon Jenkins 



Kristen Jenkins 



John Jennison 



Timothy Jepson Kimberly Jerdan 




Colleen Jeske 



Monica Jimenez 



Jeptha Johnson Matthew Johnson 



Renee Johnson 



Emily Jones 



SENIORS 265 



Harry Jones 



Molly Jones 



Samantha Jones 



Shawn Jones Carla Jordart-Detamore Shivam Joshi 




Nicole Joy 



Manisha Kak 



Burcu Kamci Waruntorn Kanitpanyacharo Jodi Kanter 



Ngozi Kami 




Valerie Kaplan 



Daniel Kapnick 



Audrey Karman 



Scott Kasper 



Alexander Kaufman Justin Kaviar 




Randall Kaw 



Jordan Kaylor 



Joshua Kazdin 



Syed Kazmi 



John Kearney 



Michael Keel 




~>n Kelley 



James Kelly 



Lindsey Kennedy 



Allison Kenriey 



Alexandra Kern Tirasan Khandhawit 




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SENIORS 267 



Peter Kiehart 



Christine Kim 



Emily Kim 



Eugene Kim 



Gene Kim 



Narae Kim 





Puxeum Kim Young Jin Kim Camalla Kimbrough Kelsey Kingsbery Aashna Kircher Leslie Kirkman 




Kedar Kirtane Worata Klinsawat William Knechtle 



Kyle Knight 



Peter Knowlton 



Lauren Kobylarz 





Amy Kohler 



John Kooistra Jordan Kornberg 



Lee Kornfeld 



Sejal Kothadia Robert Koutsoyannis 




'. nacki Elizabeth Kramer 



Neha Krishnamohan Anita Krishnarao David Kuritsky 






Michael Kuritzky Katrina Kurnit 



Will Kurtz 



Ashley Kustu 



Maria Kuznetsoua Shawn Kwatra 




Ashley Kwon 



Pik Yee Lai 



Gregory Laird 



Erin Lamb 



Madeleine Lambert Olivia Lamberth 




Michael Landerer 



Diana Lane 



Lindsey Lapin 



Daniel Larrea 



Wren Larson 



Sara Lau 




Patrick Lawler 



Alyson Laynas 



Cassandra Lea 



Jeongin Lee 



Katherine Lee 



Minjae Lee 




Timothy Lee 



Brittany Lees 



Sarah Leggin Stephanie Leimgruber Varun Leila 



Brian Lemister 



SENIORS 269 










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SENIORS 271 



Hilary Lenz Daniel Lerman Elissa Lerner Rebecca Leshin Jay Levin Melissa Levy 




Orlando Liles Maggie Lin 



Alissa Link Sebastian Liska Cristian Liu 



Mingyang Liu 




die Lotker Tianyi Lu Steven Lubin Eric Luebchow Kenesha Luney Chris Luth 



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atherine Macilwaine Chaitu Madamanchi Arjun Madan-Mohan Ryan Magee 



Nick Maginot 



Boris Maguire 





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Justin Mahood Amin Makhani Justin Maletsky Tara Mandalaywala Matthew Manocherian Neal Manor 




Brinton Markle 



Sarah Marlay 



Basile Maroulis Janelle Marshall John Masselink 



Rachael Massell 




leredith McAdams Kim McCallum Stephanie McCalmon Daniel McCartney Jackson McClam John McClendon 



SENIORS 273 



Darby McEvoy 



Ryan McFadyen Molly McGarrett Shayna McGeehan 



Morgan McGhee 



Sean McGuire 




Kerry Mcintosh Alexander McKinnon Caitlin McLaughlin Michael McLaughlin Rachel McLaughlin Matthew McNeill 




Chiara McPhee Caitlin McPhelimy 



James Melton 



Arnav Menta 



Kaywe Mentore Elizabeth Metzler 




Hayley Meyer 



Gregory Meyers Sydni Meyrowitz Whitney Mickens Cameron Miller 



Felix Miller 







Minshew Daniel Mintzer Caroline Miranda Prabhat Mishra 



Caroline Mix 



Daniel Moadel 




SENIORS 275 



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Maximilian Moehlmann Mariya Mogilevich 



Meron Mogos 



Nader Mohyuddin Lilia Montealegre Amanda Moodie 




Cyril Moody 



Hyojung Moon 



Jeffrey Moore 



Laura Moore 



Nitya Moothathu Margaret Morales 




David Morgestern Jennifer Morris 



Travis Morrison 



Caroline Morrow 



Anne Morton 




Matthew Moschner Megan Moskop 



Derrick Mosley 



Zachary Moss 



Arthur Mui 



Sean Murnane 




Murphy Maureen Murphy-Ryan Istvan Nadas 



Alexa Namba 



Joshua Napora 



Jessica Nasser 



Mariam Nassiri Abirami Natarajan 



Uri Nazryan 



John Nelson 



Christopher Neufeld Sandra Newmeyer 




Huy Ngo 



Jessica Ngo 



Dennis Nguyen 



Duy Nguyen 



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Ngoc-Lien Nguyen 



Diana Ni 




Emmett Nicholas 



Charles Nichols 



Jonathan Nicola 



Keith Nimene 



Bolin Niu 



Christopher Nold 





Ciara Nugent Sharon Obialo Megan O'Connell 





Andrew Ofstad 



Jonathan Oh 



SENIORS 277 



STELLA BY STARLIGHT 







Eric Ojerholm 



Eunice Ok 



Kayleigh O'Keefe 



Chinyere Okoli 



Diane Okpala 



Candis Oneal 




Albert Osueke Fiona O'Sullivan Meghan OToole 



Brian Ovalle 



John Overcash 



Joshua Oyster 




Diana Ozemebhoya Tucker Page 



Anita Pai Michael Palmer Jennifer Pandolfi Alexandra Papadopoulos 




Katherine Pappas Ashlie Parekh 



Daniel Park 



Elizabeth Park 



Sang In Park 




Dylan Parkes 



Lisa Pataky 



Christina Patsiokas Caroline Patterson Yasin Patterson 



SENIORS 279 



Brian Pearson 



Lee Pearson 



Brandon Peck 



Laura Peet 



Andrew Pelehach 



Erica Perez 




John Perkins 



Alison Perlberg 



Brence Pernell 



Ryan Perry 



Siava Petrova 



Kristin Pfeiffer 




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Quang Pham Daniel Phan Lindsey Phillips Edward Philpot Matthew Piehl Anthony Pilnik 




Sebastian Pirog Christopher Plasencia Emily Pontzer 





Jordan Preiss 



Noah Prince Samantha Prouty 



Samuel Pryor 



Daina Pucurs 



John Andrew Pura Cynthia Rabinovitz David Radmeyer 



Harish Raja 




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Junaid Raja 



Archana Ramireddy Yanelli Ramos 



Simone Randolph 



Ashley Rawls 



Stephen Raymond 



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Ashley Reed 



Michael Reed Christiane Regelbrugge Guy Regev 



Katherine Reid 



Serge Reshetnikov 




SENIORS 281 



Sara Reynolds Teresa Rice Lisa Richards James Richman Daniel Riley Drew Rindner 




Giannina Robalino Cleland Robertson Julia Robertson Summer Robins Brian Robinson Edward Robinson 




Laura Robinson Robert Rodrigez Mabel Rodriguez Rachel Rodriguez Allison Rogers Anna Rogers 




Frederick Roland Blake Rose Alyx Rosen Dana Rosenberg Clark Rosengarten Stephen Rosenzweig 




Tadina Ross Natalia Rossiter-Thornt Lura Rudisill Matthew Rumsey Andrea Rush Jordan Rush 



Jonathan Russell Sepehr Sadighpour Chelsea Salyer Arturo Sanchez Alyssa Sankin Rachel Saperstein 




Brett Sauers 



Bryan Sayler Michael Schachner Michael Schaper Robert Schirmann Diana Schiro 




Peter Schlendorf Christina Schmelzer Melissa Schneiderman Robert Schroeder Christopher Schubert Eric Schuchman 




Jeffrey Schwane Eric Schwartz 



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Kristen Seemann 



Kristen Seiler Cyndie Serapin Marissa Seuc 




Aalok Shah Rayhaneh Shanf-Askany Cheng Shao Sophie Shay Seth Sheldon Alexandra Sherertz 



SENIORS 283 



Robert Sheridan Shaanan Shetty 



Grace Shih 



Christina Shin 



Jungwon Shin 




Madison Shoop 



Matthew Short Ankit Shrivastava 



Jenny Shull 



Charlotte Sibley 



Jessica Silver 




Craig Silverman Alexandra Silverton Reid Simpson Olivia Singelmann Jazmyn Singleton Tutanon Sinthuprasith 




Katie Skeehan 



Eric Sliva 



Tyler Sloss 



Michael Sloyer 



Cameron Smith 



Grant Smith 




Jeff Smith 



Reed Smith 



Sabrina Smith 



James Smyth 



Andrew Sobel 



Joshua Solano 



SENIORS 285 



A.J. Somers 



Michael Sori 



Benjamin Sosnaud Christian Sotomayor Jennifer Soung Ashlev Southerland 




Geoffrey Southmayd Danielle Spearman Matthew Sperber 



Karli Spetzler 



Jacob Spinner 



Kyle Squillario 




Cara Stalzer 



Allison Stankavage Alexander Stapleton 



Jesse Starkev 



Jennifer Staton 



David Staub 




Matthew Sternberg Kevin Stevenson 



Evan Stewart 



Carolyn Stoner 



Matthew Stoner 



Mary Strong 




Mariel Strouse 



Nicole Stump 



Maura Stvczvnski Marianne Suarez 



Brvce Suber 



Julia Sun 




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Kristine Sun 



Stephaine Sutton 



Jayne Swank 




Steven Sunmonu Sarah Sutherland 




Jeffrey Swartz 




Rick Szcodronski 



Brad Tabak 



John Taddei 





Nick Talwar 



Jennifer Tanaka 



Jack Tao 



George Tarakhovski Christopher Taussig Adrienne Taylor 




Jessica Taylor 



Kelly Teagarden 



Claire Teigland 



Christine Teng 



Yonas Tewodros 



Michael Thomson 



SENIORS 287 




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SENIORS 289 



Michael Tikili 



Jason Tofsky 



Megan Tooley 



Caitlyn Toombs 



Julia Torti 



Elizabeth Tramm 




Elisabeth- Anne Treseder Melissa Tsuboyama 



Seth Tulman 



Andrew Tunnard Caroline Turner 



Marilyn Tycer 




Adam Udasin Norman Underwood 



Orcun Urdu 



Jonathan Urgell 



Galen Vaisman Mary Van Voorhis 




Alfredo Vasquez Yevgeniy Vayntrub 



Luis Velez 



Analise Vendittelli Paul Verheggen 



Michael Videira 




:-.'nt Kristian Von Rickenbach Leslie Voorhees 



Phillip Vu 



Clara Waard 



Jessica Wade 







Spencer Wadsworth David Wagner Shaina Wahl Ashlee Walker Omari Wallace Sarah Wallace 






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Terence Wallace Susan Wallingford Karl Wang 




Yuan Wang Jonathan Warr 




Andrew Waterman Nicole Weathers Boyoung Wee Ramsey Wehbe Charles Wehr 



Juan Wei 




Eric Weinstein Laura Welch Owen Wendland Tyson Wepprich Donna Werling Victoria Weston 




Caroline Wheeler Caroline Whistler Jennifer Whitley John Whitman Winston Wilde Alexandra Will 



SENIORS 291 



Cameron Williams Elizabeth Williams Tyler Williams Jennifer Williamson Joseph Williamson Benjamin Williford 




Kirk Willmarth 



Daniel Wilson 



Aaron Wise 



Frederick Woelfel 



Sarah Wohl 



Philip Wolfe 




Ho Yuen Frank Wong Kevin Wong 



Garrett Wood 



Victoria Woodbury Megan Woodford Renita Woolford 




v Wu 



Lindsay Wyatt 



Emily Wygod 



David Wynn 



Sophia Xia 



Lola Xie 




SENIORS 293 



Andrew Yaffe 



Murat Yahya 



Yvonne Yamanaka Christabel Yamoah 



Jin Yan 



Daniel Yans 




Eui Yang 



Shi-Fan Sophia Yang 



Felix Yap 



Andrew Yeh 



Pei Yen 



Bo-Young Yeum 




Wailan Yip Mekdes Yohannes Jessica Young Michael Young Zapporah Young Matthew Yung 




Danna Zabrovsky Matthew Zafirovski 



Hasnain Zaidi 



Alicia Zelek 



Edison Zhang 



Lingren Zhang 




T> 3ul Zhao 



Jian Zheng 



Ning-Yi Zheng 



Meng Zhou 



Brittany Zick 



Kolea Zimmerman 



Alice Zimmermann 



Jessica Zinck 



Benjamin Zisk 



Peter Zolides 



Timothy Zpee 



Bryan Zupon 




Megan Zweig 



Carolyn Zwiener 



Laura Zwiener 



Allison Zwirn 



DURHAM, NC — Members of the Class of 2008, 1 have a bond with you that I will have with no other class. As several of you have remarked, you and I started Duke together four years back. I remember my long summer of anticipation. I remember the promising messages I 
started getting in this, the first summer of Facebook. ("DeMarcus wants to be your friend. Do you want to be DeMarcus's friend?") I remember the cool iPods we readied to make you the nation's most technologically savvy students. Then 1 remember meeting the first handful 
of you to arrive, the savages of Project Wild, and wondering if man can really live by cheese and trail mix alone. Then one blazing August day you were all here, East Campus was crawling with you, and I was given a hug by a FAC car unloader that imprinted his whole body in 
perspiration on my suit — my primal scene of Duke welcome. Then I got to greet you from this pulpit and tell your parents to go home. 

And then? Then it all flew by in a whirl. Doesn't today's ceremony underline the point? It's as if every hour you spent here had been annihilated, collapsing you back into the very scene where things started — except this time instead of welcoming vou, Duke is pressing the button 
marked Eject. And me? Only apparently your classmate, I am staying right where I am. See ya! Thanks for the memories. Have a nice life. 



But the uncanny likeness of this event to your freshman convocation reminds me that another big part of my life before you came was thinking how to make you realize the meaning of what lav ahead of you. I spent a ridiculous amount of time that summer brooding on my first 
address to a new Duke class. I wanted you to feel the force of two points. First, your entry into college marked one of the rare examples life would ever offer of an absolutely fresh start. "This is like the earliest days of creation," I said. "You have not yet marred a single hour or 
messed up in a single way." I also wanted to insist that Duke wasn't some fixed or finished thing you had come to "fit into." You would be making this place through the way you engaged it: More than you might realize, the Duke you inhabited would be a function of choices you 
made. So as you entered a new world, I urged you to mold it in the image of your own best hopes. 



Now that you're done, I'll admit that not everything in education comes through choice. This winter I met a Duke grad from Atlanta who introduced me to the legal concept called "frolic and detour." If I hire you to do a task for me and you have an accident in the performance 
of the task, then I am liable for the damage. But if you set off on frolics and detours of your own while supposedly doing what we contracted for, the harm you cause would be your responsibility, not mine. 

Invoking this wonderfully named concept, this alum told me that in retrospect, his most valuable education at Duke had come not (in his word) transactionally, by following fixed means toward predetermined ends, but through frolics and detours, by succumbing to fresh interests 
laround him each day. I'm sure you know what he meant. Part of what you gained from Duke came from things we required of you, and part from goals you consciously devised. But an immense further part came through the chances that introduced you to friends you never 
knew the likes of, questions you had never been aware of, interests you had never felt the pull of. 

AHof the ingredients of your Duke experience, the stimulus of a thousand miscellaneous factors interacting in unanalyzeable ways, produced the growth that we celebrate today And since openness to new stimuli will always be the door to continuing education, 1 hope your days 
of frolic and detour are not done. But what is going to become of those highly developed powers now that school days are past? I have two hopes: that you'll have the courage to keep pursuing your interests as they evolve; and that you'll use your powers to make a difference 
in the world. 

At this point I could produce a litany of problems your generation is going to need to solve. Instead I will tell a little story. This February I went to Washington to speak with members of congress and cabinet secretaries about funding advanced research. Research in universities 
has produced almost all the discoveries that have driven new fields like information technology and biotechnology, with all they have meant for economic development and quality of life. If we expect to benefit from future cycles of discovery, then we need lo make the research 
investment now. The president made this a high priority last year when he signed the America Competes Act, which passed both houses of Congress with wide bipartisan support. But then a problem arose, Because of budget stringencies, funds for this measure were not actually 
appropriated after the bill was approved. 

It was interesting trooping around Capitol Hill hammering away at this inconsistency. But after lunch, I had an abrupt change of scene. I had learned that the Duke Club of Washington had completed a project in a local elementary school and I'd agreed to take part in the dedica- 
ion. So off I rode far out into the District of Columbia to a big old-fashioned schoolhouse recently recreated as the Amos I campus of Community Academy, a K through 5 charter school within the public school system. 

This school had been transformed into a vibrant and bustling learning center and was crowned, to my eyes, by the new reading room Duke workers had created from an old supply closet. This place was great. What had been a dark and scary room was now bright, spacious, 
:olorful, and inviting, stocked with books and strewn with beanbag chairs, with schonlkids sprawling in happy possession of the place, (One filth grader informed me of his intention to come to Duke.) 



jvVhen I saw this sight, I had several thoughts. First, in building the room, someone had recognized a fundamental human need. Not a single one of us would have gotten where v 
ported. In this room, a primal base of good beginnings had been supplied for kids not over-rich in opportunity or support. 



! are had we not had access, in early life, to a space where reading and learning were i 



nly sup- 



urther, though the act was local, a larger issue was at stake. This is the 25th anniversary of the "Nation at Risk" report, the report that gave currency to the notion that American public education has profound deficiencies and that failures in early schooling jeopardize both personal 
development and national competitiveness down the road. This is everyone's problem. People with elite educations can often exempt their children from highly challenged public schools, but if large portions of the public aren't equipped to live up to their potential, then we all 
will pay the price. But instead of whining that "The System is Broken" while doing nothing to fix it, here people were working to make a change. 

rlow did they come to be doing this project? It wasn't their job; they were not working under any obligation; they had not been specially trained in the work they were doing; they were not professional humanitarians or career school reformers. They were just some group of 
pie who had an idea of a good thing they could do. The project involved a lawyer, Duke'93, who had been a JAG officer in the Navy; an '03 alum who had been Director of Community Involvement at the school (she was the point of contact); a Duke '75 architect, parent of a 
'raduating senior, who helped draw up the plans; a head of a construction company that specializes in monuments (he has worked on the Lincoln and Jefferson memorials), Duke 74, who supplied the building knowhow; and others who contributed their other gifts. In short, 
his was a miscellaneous group doing all the different things people do in the world who came together as a self-motivated, self-mobilized team, for the good they could accomplish together. 



s a school reading room the biggest difference you could aspire to make? We could all name Dukies who have had a broader transformative effect— I think of Paul Farmer, a world leader in addressing global health care inequalities (you read about him in your assigned freshman 
jook), who sat where you are sitting in 1982; or Melinda Gates, co-director of the world's largest philanthropic foundation and a major force in global health and public education reform, who attended her Duke baccalaureate in 1986. Maybe yours will be the name my successor 
vill single out 25 years from now! Maybe you will be the one who figures out how to solve the global energy challenge, or how to assure clean water to people around the world. The fact that you don't seem the type today proves absolutely nothing about what you might go on 
o do. The future is a story of mysterious unfoldings. Paul Farmer was not a celebrated doctor on the day of his baccalaureate but the former social chair of his Duke fraternity. 

3ut on any day when you don't see the possibility of big difference-making available to you, you might remember the Duke Club of Washington's reading room as an image of something that is in your power. It will always be in your power to see the public good as something 
ve' re all responsible for and can all have an effect on. (One moral of my story is that it's not only "Washington" that can make things happen in Washington.) It will always be in your power to have an eye out for actual differences you can make in the place where you are, as Dukies 
pied a possible literacy center in a disused storeroom. It will always be in your power to spend some of your "dead" or "down" time in a more constructive way: our alums' choice to give time to this project was the first condition for its eventual success. And it will always be in 
'our power to multiply your force through collaboration: in sport and in earnest, you've shown amazing skill in functioning as a team. Through the years it will make a world of difference how you choose to use these powers, in terms of good things done or left undone. 

Ilass of 2008, 1 have loved your company, and it grieves me to see you go. But I rejoice in what you are equipped to do thanks to your time at Duke. I once heard the founder of Engineers Without Borders, a group with a strong Duke presence and a brilliant promoter of the making 
)f local difference, quote a line attributed to Einstein: "The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them." We need you to forge the understandings that will lift your time past the world you inherit. You have the 
ntelligence for it — if Duke students don't, who does? So what you really need is the will, and the recognition that it is in your power. I said something to you four years ago that I'll repeat with one variation as you go. Download these words into your iPod and let me croon them 
o you as you go to sleep. Men and women of the Class of 2008, you will love the world that comes after Duke — but you'll love it more if you help make it the place you believe it should be. 

President Richard H. Brodhead. Friday May 9, 2008. "Make the World the Place You Believe It Should Be" ~ ** *"* 



SENIOR SPOTLIGHTS 




Hasnain Zaidi 



Class of 2008, President 

Duke International Council, President 

Campus Council, Facilities and Services Chair 

Duke Alumni Association, Board of Directors 

Senior Gift Committee, Outreach Chair 

Teaching Assistant, Introduction to Public Policy 

Pi Kappa Phi, Founding Father 

Duke University Greek Advisory Council 

Order of Omega 
Duke Arab Students Organization 

Duke EMS 



"What you tell me about in the nights. That is not 
love. That is only passion and lust. When you love 
you wish to do things for. You wish to sacrifice for. 
You wish to serve." - Ernest Hemingway 




Alfredo Garcia 



Teaching Assistant, Duke Paleoanthropology Field School 

Teach For America, Campus Campaign Manager 

Resident Advisor 

Academic Advising Center, Peer Tutor 

Bike and Build, two month cross-country cycling trip for charity 

Dukes and Duchesses 

Duke Men's Crew 

Colet Fellow, St. Paul's School, London 

"Listen to the MUSTN'TS, child. Listen to the DON'TS. Listen to 
the SHOULDN'TS, the IMPOSSIBLES, the WON'TS. Listen to the 
NEVER HAVES, then listen close to me - Anything can happen, 
child. Anything can be." - Shel Silverstein 



"I'd rather be a could-be if I cannot be an are; because a could-be 
is a maybe who is reaching for a star. I'd rather be a has-been than 
a might-have-been, by far; for a might have-been has never been, 
but a has was once an are." - Milton Berle 



SENIORS 297 




Tina Hoang 



Class of 2008, Vice President 

International Justice Mission, President 

InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, Vice President 

Duke Student Government, Senator 

Duke Student Government, Subcommittee Head 

Senior Gift Committee 
PWILD 

'All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good 
men [and women] to do nothing." - Edmund Burke 




Fredo Vasquez 



Duke Debating Society 



"Maturity is a bitter disappointment for which no 
remedy exists, unless laughter can be said to remedy 
anything." - Kurt Vonnegut 

"What matters in life is not what happens to you but 
what you remember and how you remember it." 
- Gabriel Garcia Marquez 



SENIORS 299 



Retrospective 




1928.1938.1948.1958.1968.1978.1988.1998 




RETROSPECTIVE 301 






-Amelia Earhart 

flies across the 

Atlantic 

-Steamboat 

Willie, starring 

Mickey and 

Minnie Mouse 

-First color 

television 

broadcast 

-Soviet Union 

introduces its 

Five- Year Plan 

-Opus Dei 

founded 

-Iron Lung 

respirator 

-President 

Hoover 







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-Bette Davis 

-March of Dimes 

-Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs 

-NBC begins regular 

television broadcasts 

-Bugs Bunny 

-Orson Welles broadcasts his radio 

play of H.G. Wells's "The War of the 

Worlds", causing nationwide panic. 





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-The Ed Sullivan 

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-Candid Camera 

-Honda Motor 

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-President 

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-T.S. Eliot wins 

the Nobel Prize 

in Literature 

-The play "Kiss 

Me, Kate" opens 





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-MLK assassinated 

-JFK assassinated 

-Andy Warhol 

assassination 

attempt 

-Planet of the Apes 

-The Beatles 
release 'The White 

Album' 

-Basketball Hall of 

Fame opens 

-Movie rating 

system adopted 

-President Nixon 




RETROSPECTIVE311 





-Grease 
-Johnny Rotten 
quits the Sex Pistols 
-The Blues Broth- 
ers make their first 
appearance on SNL 
-Garfield is created 
-ABC World News 
Tonight premieres 
-First Test-Tube 
Baby is born, 
Louise Brown 
-Muhammad Ali 
wins the world 
heavyweight 
boxing title 
-Susan B. Anthony 
dollar minted 
-Stayin' Alive 
-Pope John Paul II 
-Jonestown mass 
suicide 
















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-Russians leave 

Afghanistan 

-Bull Durham 

-Iran Contra 

-Hypodermics on 

the shores 

-Pan Am Flight 103, 

Lockerbie, Scotland 

-Mikhail Gorbachev 

-Die Hard 
-George H. W. Bush 



-US Embassies 

Bombed 

-Saving Private 

Ryan 

-Mozilla 

Foundation 

Created 

-Mark McGwire 

breaks home run 

record 

-Lunar 

Prospector 

spacecraft launched 

-Citigroup, the 

largest financial 

services 

conglomerate in the 

world, is formed 

-Monica Lewinsky 

scandal 

-Google 

is established 











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-$168 Billion Stimulus Package 

-Kosovo declares independence 

-Castro resigns as President of Cuba 

-Writer's Guild of America strike ends 

-Supreme Court decides in favor of 

Guantanamo detainees 



-Danica Patrick becomes the first 

woman to win an IndyCar race 

-Severe floods in the Midwest 

-Actor Heath Ledger, 28, dies 

-Sex and the City Movie 

-California begins performing 

same-sex marriages 



Epilogue 






EPILOGUE 319 



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EPILOGUE 347 



CHANTICLEER 2008 STAFF 




I 

kelly ennis 



» editor in chief 




pete kiehart 

» managing editor, pro/epi 







jutagir 

» managing editor 




michelle lotKer 

» academics editor 




» events 




max masnicJ 

» managing editor, sports 





taylor martyn 



» events editor, design 



halley hu 
» photography editor 




- •*?; # V' — ■•»- ji«fc<» 




campbell 

» photographer 




kelly jones 



» dorm pictures 




Caroline kim 



» seniors editor 



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crystan dowds 

» office manager 



not pictured: 

chase olivieri 
)) photographer 

jeff hu 

)) photographer 

kathryn hudak 
)> academics 

lawson kurtz 
)) photographer 

pai klinsawat 
)\ photographer 

piarget Johnson 



rget johnson 
\\ public relations 



tina del carpio 
» sports 



STAFF 349 



- 



DITS 



Clockv 

c - contributed by 

PROLOGUE 
Layout: Pete, Kelly 
Text: Kelly 

1: Kelly 

2: Pete 

4: Jeff 

6: Pete 

8: Kelly J, Fei, Max, M@ 

9: Devika, Max, Previous 

Chanticleer Staff, M@ 

10: (L-R) M@, Pete, Pete, 

Max, Kelly, c. Alissa Link, 

Max, M@, M@, Max, c. 

Dan Piech, Pete, MA, 

Max, Kelly J, M@ 

11: (L-R) M@, M@, 

Pete, Carol, Fei, M@, 

M@, Chase, M@, Kelly, 

Fei, Pete, Jeff, c. Laura 

Anzaldi, M@ 

12: c. Dan Piech 

14: Michelle 

16: Kelly Jones 

18: Kelly 

20: c. Marilyn Tycer 

22: Michelle 

24: Kelly, Summer, 





Foreman, M@, 

Carol, Carol, Carol, 

Carol, Fei 

51: (L-R) Kelly, M@, 

Max, c. Kathryn 

Wooten, Kelly, 

Max, Carol, Kelly, 

Carol, Max, Carol, 

Max, Fei, Kelly, 

M@, Fei 

52: M@ 

53: Kelly, Max 

54: Carol 

55: Carol 

56: PJ, PJ, Kelly J 



76: Fei, M@, M@ 

77: Fei, M@ 

78: c. Katfvryn 

Wooten 

79: M@ 

80: Kelly, Zach 

Tracer (Chronicle) 

81: Kelly 

82: M@, M@, Max, 

M@ 

83: Fei 

84: Fei 

85: c. Jennifer 

O'Connor 

86: Max, M@ 




Summer 

25: Summer, Summer, 

Michelle 

26: Pete 

28: Pete 

30: Fei 

32: Chase 

34: M@ 

36: M@ 

38: Kelly 

40: Max 

42: Pete 

44: Kelly 

46: Max 

48: M@ 

CAMPUS LIFE 
Layout: Andrea 
Text: Andrea 

50: (L-R) Fei, M@, Fei, 
Halley, Jeff, Fei, Courtney 
Taylor, Max, c. Violeta 



57: Kelly, Kelly, PJ 
58: Max, Kelly, PJ 
59: PJ, PJ, Kelly J 
60-63: c. Joel Fried- 
man (Photospecial- 
ties) 

64: c. ATO, Kelly J 
65: c. DKE, Kelly J, 
Kelly J 

66: c. PKA, Kelly, 
Kelly J 

67: Kelly J, c. SN, 
Kelly J 



68 
69 
70 
71 



: M@, Max 
: Kelly J, Kelly 
: Max, Kelly J 
: Kelly, Kelly, 

Kelly J 

72: Kelly J 

73: Kelly J 

74: Max, Kelly J 

75: Kelly J 



Max, M@, M@ 

M@ 

89: Halley, M@, 
M@, Halley 
90: Max 
91: Max 
92: Kelly, Max, 
Kelly 
93: Fei 

94: Kelly, Fei, Kelly, 
Kelly, Kelly 
95-99: Fei 

SPORTS 
Layout: Max 
Text: Max 

100: (L-R) Max, 
Max, Max, 
Glen Gutterson 
(Chronicle), Max, 
Pete, Max, Laura 



Beth Douglas 
(Chronicle), Max, 
Max, Max, Max, 
Lawson, Ian Soi- 
leau (Chronicle), 
Max 

101: (L-R) Max, 
Max, Max, 
Max, Pete, Max, 
Glen Gutterson 
(Chronicle), Max, 
Lawson, Max, 
Max, Max, Max, 
Glen Gutterson 
(Chronicle), Max, 
Max 
102: Max 



(Chronicle), Max, Pete 


161: Max 


120: Max 




121: Lawson, Max 


EVENTS 


122: Max 


Layout: Taylor, 


123: Max 


Kelly 


124: Max 


Text: Kelly, 


125: Pete 


Michelle 


126: Max 




127: Max, Chase, Max 


162: (L-R) Carol, 


Max 


Fei, Carol, Halley, 


128: Max 


Halley, M@, Max, 


129: Max 


Max, Lawson, 


130: Max 


M@, Fei, Max, Fei 


131: Max 


Carol, Pete, Pete 


132: Max 


163: (L-R) M@, 


133: Max 


Pai, M@, Lawson, 


134: Max 


Pai, Halley, M@, 


135: Max 


Halley, Jeff, Kelly, 


136: Pete 


Kelly, Fei, M@, 


137: Pete, Max 


Max, Max, Fei 


138: Max 


164: Kelly 


139: Max, Devika, Max 166: M@, 




198: Fei 
200: Michelle 
202: Max 
204: Halley 
206: Max 

ACADEMICS 
Layout: Michelle, Kelly 
Text: Michelle, Kelly 

208: (L-R) Devika, Max, c. Seth 
Sheldon, Carol, Michelle, PJ, 
Michelle, Max, c. Daniel Piech, 
Fei, Michelle, Kelly, Seth Shel- 
don, Max, PJ 

209: (L-R) c. Alissa Link, Fei, c. 
Daniel Piech, Michelle, Michelle, 




103: Max 
104: Fei, Max, 
Max 

105: Max 
106: Max 
107: Tina 
108: Max 
109: Max 
110: Max 
111: Max 
112: Max 
113: Max 
114: Pete 
115: Pete 
116: Laura 
Beth Douglas 
(Chronicle) 
117: Laura 
Beth Douglas 
(Chronicle) 
118: Max & Pete 
119: Max & Pete, 
Glen Gutterson 



140: Max 
141: Max 
142: Max 
143: Max 
144: Ian Soileau 
(Chronicle) 
145: Ian Soileau 
(Chronicle) 
146: Pete 
147: Lawson 
148: Lawson 
149: Lawson 
150: Lawson 
151: Lawson 
152: Max 
153: Max 
154: Max 

155: Max, Glen Gut- 
terson (Chronicle) 
156: Max 
157: Max 
158: Max 
159: Chase, Max 
160: Max 



Michelle, 

Michelle 

167: Michelle, 

Michelle, 

Michelle, 

Michelle, Halley 

168: Max 

170: Pai 

172: Carol 

174: Halley 

175: Carol 

176: Jeff 

178: Pete, Max, 

Pete 

179: Jeff, Halley 

180: M@ 

182: Jeff 

184: Jeff 

186: Fei 

188: Halley 

190: Fei 

192: Carol 

194: Halley 

196: Lawson 




■ 




Kelly, Fei, Fei, Devika, Max, 

Carol, c. Madeline Lambert, PJ, 

Kelly, c. Seth Sheldon, Michelle 

210: Devika 

211: Kelly 

212: c. Madeleine Lambert 

213: PJ, Fei 

214: Kelly 

215: Max 

216: Devika 

217: Fei, Courtney Taylor, c. Seth 

Sheldon 

218: Michelle 

220: Michelle 

221: Michelle, M@ 

222: Devika 

223:Fei 

224: Devika 

225: Carol 

226: Fei 

227: Fei 

228: Pete 

229: Jim Wallace c. Wesley Kort 

230: Michelle 






231: Pete 

232: Michelle 

233: c. Phi Beta Kappa Honor 

society 

234: Devika, PJ 

235: Devika 

236: c. Anne Vanderschueren, 

Edmund Finley, Alissa Link, John 

vlishler, Seth Sheldon, Andrea 

Irane, Meredith Olson, Daniel 

r'iech 

237: c. Laura Anzaldi, Anne Rhett, 

ennifer Pandolfi, Sarah Doyle, 

Sophie Lehman, Daniel Piech, 

Virginia Rieck, Laura Anzaldi, 

late Sadler 

238: c. Sophie Lehman, Anne 

3hett, Alissa Link, John Mishler 

239: c. Daniel Piech, Seth Sheldon, 

ohn Mishler, Alissa Link, Anne 

Xhett 



251: c. Sanders Family, c. 

Lauren Gonzalez 

252: Max 

254: Kelly, c. Alex Papadopou- 

los, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, 

Kelly, Kelly, M@, Alex Papado- 

poulos, Kelly 

257: M@, Kelly, M@, M@, c. 

Taylor Halbert, M@, c. Victoria 

Woodbury, c. Erin Conway, 

M@, Kelly, Kelly 

258: c. Emily Jones 

261: c. Christine Gihyon Kim, 

Kelly, M@, M@, Kelly, c. Kath- 

ryn Minshew, c. Grace Shih, 

Kelly, Grace Shih, M@, Grace 

Shih, M@ 

264:M@, c. Alex Papadopoulos, 

c. Megan Tooley, M@, M@, M@, 




277: c. Samantha Har- 
rington 
278: M@ 
281: Kelly, M@ 
284: Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, 
Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, c. Elissa 
Lerner, Kelly, c. Mary Kath- 
erine Strong, c. Tina Liang, 
Tina Liang, Mary Katherine 
Strong, c. Kathryn Minshew, 
c. Samantha Herrington 
287: c. Leslie Voorhees 
288: Kelly, c. Tina Liang, 
Tina Liang, c. Alex Papado- 
poulos, Kelly, Kelly, c. Kath- 
ryn Wooten, Kelly, Kelly, 
c. Mary Katherine Strong, 
Kelly, c. Elissa Lerner, Mary 
Katherine Strong, c. Ashley 
Wright, Mary Katherine 
Strong 
289: c. Samantha Her- 



3ENIORS 
^ayout: Kelly 
rext: Kelly 

240: (L-R) Max, c. Arturo Sanchez, 
vlax, Kelly, c. Megan Tooley, M@, 
\rturo Sanchez, Max, Max, c. 
Ashley Wright, Lawson, c. Sand- 
ers Family, Ashley Wright, M@, 
\rturo Sanchez, Max 
241: (L-R) Kelly, Arturo Sanchez, 
Arturo Sanchez, Lawson, Lawson, 
:. Kathryn Minshew, M@, Arturo 
Sanchez, M@, Max, Arturo San- 
:hez, M@, Max, Arturo Sanchez, 
vlax 

242: Max 

243: Max, Max, Lawson, Max, 
Lawson, Lawson, Lawson, Max, 
vlax, Lawson 

244:Lawson, Lawson, Max, Max, 
vlax, Max, Max, Max, Lawson, 
vlax 
245: Max, Max, Lawson, Lawson 



c. Kathryn Wooten, M@, c. Erin 
Conway 

267: M@, c. Seth Sheldon, c. 
Christine Gihyon Kim, M@, 
Kelly, c. Grace Shih, c. Jayne 
Swank, Christine Gihyon Kim 
270: c. Grace Shih, Kelly, c. 
Daniel Harvey, Kelly, Kelly, 
Kelly, Kelly, c. Tina Liang, 
c. Alex Papadopoulos, c. 
Shannon Kelly, Kelly, c. Mary 
Katherine Strong 
271: Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, 
M@, Kelly, c. Victoria Wood- 
bury, Kelly, c. Grristine Gihyon 
Kim, c. Sarah Gilleskie, Victoria 
Woodbury, Kelly 
275: Kelly, Kelly, Michelle, 
Kelly, c. Sarah Gilleskie, 
c. Christine Gihyon Kim, 
Michelle, M@, M@, c. Ashley 
Wright 



318: (L-R) c. Marilyn Tycer, 

M@, Max, Jeff, M@, Pete, 

M@, Max, M@, M@, Jeff, M@, 

Lawson, Max, Fei, c. Brenda 

Neece 

319: (L-R) c. Seth Sheldon, 

Lawson, Pete, Pete, Max, M@, 

Carol, c. Alissa Link, Max, 

Max, Fei, c. Marilyn Tycer, 

Max, Pete, M@ 

320: Lawson 

322: Pete 

324: Jeff 

325: Jeff 

326: Fei 

328: Max 

329: Max 

330: M@ 

332: M@ 

333: c. Brenda Neece 

334: Lawson 




rington, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, 
Kelly, c. Elissa Lerner, Kelly, 
c. Kathryn Wooten, Kelly, c. 
Tina Liang, Kelly, c. Mary 
Katherine Strong, Mary 
Katherine Strong, Kathryn 
Wooten 

293: Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, c. 
Victoria Woodbury, Kelly, 
Kelly, c. Christine Gihyon 
Kim, Kelly, c. Tina Liang, c. 
Kathryn Wooten, c. Shan- 
non Kelly 
296-299: Pete 

RETROSPECTIVE 
Layout: Kelly 
Text; Kelly 

300-317: Past Chanticleer 
Staff, University Archives 

EPILOGUE 
Layout: Pete, Kelly 



335: M@ 

336: Kelly 

337: Kelly 

338: M@ 

340: M@ 

341: M@ 

342: Max 

344: Pete 

345: Pete 

346: M@ 

347: Max 

348: Max, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, 

Kelly, Kelly, Kelly, Kelly 

349: Kelly, Fei, M@, Max, 

Caroline, Kelly, Crystan 

350: Row 1: Michelle, Row 

2: Kelly, Row 3: Kelly, Kelly, 

Michelle, Kelly, Kelly 

351: Row 1: Kelly, Kelly, 

Kelly, Max, Row 2: Kelly, 

Max, Kelly, Row 3: Kelly 

352: c. Aalok Modi 

the end. 





BY THE NUMBERS: 

Number of Lawsuits: 1 
Court appearances: 
Amount in the Beer 
Money Jar: $1.75, €1.50 
Frantic "I can't fix tech- 
nology" calls to Max: 17 
Percentage of above 
calls placed after 10:00 
p.m.: 73% 

Chanticest Couples: 2.5 
Floppy disks lost in 
extreme disk throwing: 6 
Generously donated 
Combo bags we refused 
to eat: 18 

Photographs taken at 
Holiday Party: 1,174 
Less than 3: Unlimited 

Many thanks to: Brian Crews, 
Kim Trezona, the Prestige Pho- 
tographers, Angie Bowes, the 
Undergraduate Publications 

Board, the Office of Student 
Affairs and Facilities, the Office 
of Information Technology, the 
Chronicle, Joel Friedman and Pho- 
tospecialties, the makers of low 
rent vodka, Billy Joel's "We Didn't 
Start the Fire," and my parents. 

All the opinions expressed in 
the 2008 Chanticleer are those 
of the authors and do not neces- 
sarily reflect the feelings of the 
Chanticleer staff, the Duke Uni- 
versity Undergraduate Publica- 
tions Board or Duke University. 

Copyright © 2008. Duke Univer- 
sity Undergraduate Publications 
Board. No part of this book may 
be reproduced without the writ- 
ten consent of the Chanticleer. 
All correspondence regarding the 
2008 Chanticleer should be sent 
to chanticleer@duke.edu or Chan- 
ticleer, Box 90834, 101-3 Bryan 
Center, Durham, North Carolina, 
27708. Telephone (919) 684-2856. 



■ *'•, - • 



Aalok S. Modi 

October 28, 1986 - February 14, 2008 



"As long as there is suffering in this world, I know my purpose in life." - Aalok S. Modi