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Full text of "The Chapin genealogy : containing a very large proportion of the descendants of Dea. Samuel Chapin, who settled in Springfield, Mass. in 1642"

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THE 



CHAPIN GENEALOGY, 



CONTAINING A VERY LARGE PROPORTION OF THE 



DESCENDANTS OF DEA. SAMUEL CHAPIN, 



WHO SETTLED IN SPRINGFIELD, MASS. IN 1642, 



Collected and Compiled by 

ORANGE CHAPIN, 



To which is added h " Centennial Discourse, delivered before the First Congre- 
gational Society in Chicopee, September 26, 1852, by E. B. Clark, 
Pastor of the Church, which was organized Sept. 27, 1752." 

ALSO, 

An Address, delivered at the opening of the Town Hall in Springfield, March 24, 

1828, containing Sketches of the Early History of that Town, and those 

in that vicinity — with an Appendix — by George Bliss. 



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NORTHAMPTON : , \ \ «l ^^" 
I'RIlSrTED BY IVIETC^^JLin & CO]yLI>-A.I>rY. 

1862. 



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Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1862, by 

ORANGE CHAPIN, 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts. 



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CONTENTS. 



PAGE- 

Introduction, v 

PART I. 

Genealogy of Males by the name of Chapin and of their 
Descendants, and also a portion of the Females and those 
with whom they are connected by marriage and their 
Descendants, 1 

PART II. 

Containing those Allied by marriage and their descendants, not 
included in Part I., 73 

PART III. 

Containing a part of the Descendants of Josiah Chapin, son of 
Dea. Samuel Chapin, of Springfield, Mass 223 

PART IV. 
Rev. E. B. Clark's Centennial Discourse, . . . 235 

PART V. 

Hon, George Bliss, Sen.r's Address, at the Opening of the 
Town Hall in Springfield, March 24, 1828, with an Appendix, 257 

Index to Part I., 329 

Index to Part II., 351 

Index to Part III 362 

Appendix " . ^ . 364 

Errata, 367 



INTRODUCTION. 



The compiler of the following work engaged in a kind of business 
with which he was entirely unacquainted, and has pursued it to a 
much greater length than he expected when he commenced. It is 
well known to many persons, that the late Hon. Charles Stearns, of 
Springfield, Mass., collected a large "mass of facts" for the purpose 
of publishing a history of the original town of Springfield, and as it 
was his intention to publish some genealogies in the history, I 
undertook to collect some of the genealogies of the descendants of 
Dea. Samuel Chapin, and had collected quite a large number pre- 
vious to his death. His history of Springfield remains unpublished. 
Many friends were desirous that I should continue the work of col- 
lecting, and I have, with the assistance of friends, continued it until 
the present time. It was the original intention to collect only those 
"who bore the name of Chapin, but in sending in genealogies, several 
sent in the marriages and descendants of females. I could not 
therefore reject them, and they were accordingly arranged with oth- 
ers. But courtesy to those who had returned genealogies of males 
only, required that the descendants of the females of their families 
should be included, as some were very anxious that it should be 
done. I accordingly received and entered such as friends chose to 
send in, with some which I collected myself. But the arrangements 
were so made that they could not be altered without great incon- 
venience. I havt therefore appropriated a particular part to such 
as are not included in Part I. of the work, and I think the arrange- 
ment a very judicious one, under the circumstances, although I 
should have made a different arrangement if I could have had the 
whole work before me at the commencement of the arrangement. 
The name and number of the female is given, and it is stated to 
what family she belongs ; then follows the name of hei* husband, 
and the names of her descendants in succession, so that the descend- 
ants are in one body, and the different generations distinctly shown. 
The work is largely composed of the descendants of Japhet and 
Henry Chapin, sons of Dea. Samuel Chapin. The descendants of 
David Chapin, son of Dea. Samuel, have been included so far as 



VI INTRODUCTION. 

any record of them has l)eeu found ; and I have not found any per- 
son who can give any farther account of his descendants, and per- 
haps they have become extinct. As to Josiah Chapin, another son 
of Dea. Samuel, I have not found any of his descendants who could 
make it convenient to furnish mo with but a small portion of the 
names, &c. of his numerous posterity. A few have sent in partial 
genealogies which are published in a body together,' and may be of 
some use to some persons who may hereafter collect a genealogy of 
his descendants. As the life of Dea. Samuel Chapin is considera- 
bly connected with the early history of Springfield, it is proper that 
some sketches of the early history of that town should appear in the 
work. I had early determined to publish Rev. E. B. Clark's cen- 
tennial discourse. But that did not appear sufficient. I commenced 
writing some sketches, but finally concluded to publish the Address 
of the Hon. G-eorge Bliss, Sen., at the opening of the Town Hall 
in Springfield, March 24, 1828, with the appendix, and it is believed 
that those two publications contain the most complete early history 
of the ancient town of Springfield, ever published. 

I have received assistance from several persons in collecting the 
genealogies, for which they will please receive my thanks. I find 
that if I begin to name those who have rendered valuable services 
in the prosecution of the work, I should not know where to stop. 
Many persons to whom I have written, have readily answered and 
given such information as they possessed ; while others have made 
no return. The greater part of the few first generations have been 
copied from manuscripts, although the ancient records have been a 
guide in part. Later generations have been obtained by the most 
available means, and great care has been taken to have them cor- 
rect ; but it is not expected but that some errors will be found, and 
I should deem it next to impossible for the first edition of a large 
genealogy to be perfectly correct. The town of Springfield was 
divided in 1848, but the north part, which is now Chicopee, has 
been known by that name from time immemorial, and wherever 
Chicopee is mentioned, it is merely to show the part of the town, 
withbut being at the trouble of every time mentioning Springfield. 
The spirit of emigration seized early upon the descendants of 
Japhet and Henry, although there was plenty of good land at home. 
But farmers in those days were not confined to a few acres. But 
mind ye, they did not emigrate to the State of New York, nor to the 
rich lands of the then unknown West, but they went as far as Wil- 



INTRODUCTION. VII 

brabam, Ludlow, South Hadley, Granby, and one grandson of Dea. 
Samuel Chapin ventured as far as " Cold Spring," now Belcher- 
town. But the fifth generation heard of the rich lands in the State 
of Xew York, and 'several families removed to what was then called, 
" Whites Town," and some to other places in the State "of New 
York ; and now many of those families and their descendants are 
scattered over the Western States. 

As the work will probably fall into the hands of many persons 
whose knowledge of genealogies is not very extensive, I have con- 
sidered it of great importance that the work should be as free from 
intricacies as possible. It has therefore been my endeavor to make 
the arrangements such that the work may be readily understood by 
all classes of readers. As to the arrangements. The number of 
the generations is placed at the top of the page. The number of 
the head of a family precedes the name of the head. Then the 
names of the heads of the families ; then follow the remarks if any, 
on the head of the family. Next the names of the children, who 
will of course be the next generation after the one named at the top 
of the page. Then the remarks, if any, (in this place) respecting 
the children. On the left hand of the names of the children, are 
placed their family number in small Arabic figures, (although some 
of them may not be exactly in the order of their births) ; and still 
on the left hand, and at a greater distance, in larger figures, the gen- 
eral number of the persons who are numbered. As several were 
received after the numbering was completed, they are of course 
without numbers, and in the Index are paged. The whole of Parts 
II. and III. are paged in the Index. The children have the family 
numbers. In regard to orthography, the original or family records 
have generally been followed, though in some instances it has led to 
a variation in spelling the same name. It was thought best to 
adhere to the copy, and leave the reader to judge of the correctness. 
In regard to dates, family records have generally been followed, in 
preference to public records. Some abbreviations have been adopt- 
ed. Single figures in parenthesis, thus, (1) (2) (3), indicate the dif- 
ferent marriages of the same individual. Abbreviations are used 
for words of most frequent occurrence, as b. for born ; d. for died ; 
m. for married ; unm. for unmarried ; int. ent., for intention of mar- 
riage entered ; pub. for publishment for marriage ; res. for resides or 
residence ; ae. for age. 



VIII INTRODUCTION. 

In tho following work I have said but little respecting the history 
of the church in Chicopee, or of its religious institutions, or tho 
religious character of the people, as tho llev. E. B. Clark has done 
that in his centennial discourse. Persons who have had no experi- 
ence on the work of a genealogy, can form but a faint idea of the 
labor of collecting, arranging, and carrying through the press a gen- 
ealogical work. But if the following work shall meet the approba- 
tion of the compiler's numerous friends, he will feel highly gratified, 
and will not regret the labor he has bestowed upon it. 

ORANGE CHAPIN. 

Chicopee, (Willimansett,) August, 1862. 



Note. — In Allen's Biographical Dictionary, page 210, it is stated that " Cha- 
pin Seth Dea., an ofScer of the Eevolutionaiy war, died at Mendon, Nov. 15, 
1833. His grandfather, Joshua, came from Lancanshire with a brother Gershom , 
who settled in Springfield. From these have sprung many ministers."' 

I am of the opinion that the foregoing is an error. For 1st, Dea. Seth Chapin 
mentioned above, descended from Dea. Samuel Chapin, (who settled in Spring- 
field, Mass., in 1G42,) through liis son Josiah Chapin. 2d, I have not been able 
to learn that any Chapin bearing the christian name of Gershom, ever settled 
in Springfield. 



GENEALOGY. 



The Opinion of Rev. Samcel Chapin, D.D. of Rockyhill, Ct. 
as to the native place of Dea. Samuel Chapin. 

" Samuel Chapin is believed to be the progenitor of all who 
bear the name in this country. Eespecting the history of the family 
previous to his landing here, or the precise time of his arrival, 
nothing is definitely known. 

The family is probably of Welsh origin. 

His opinion is founded on some obscure traditions recollected by 
Calvin Chapin as current in Chicopee and the prevalence of some 
Welsh phrases and terms among the people of Chicopee, the greater 
part of whom bear this name. Calvin Chapin recollects on one 
occasion a man who was severely run by his mother, retorted by 
calling her Welsh, in the way of reproach. 

On a map of England, in the possession of C. Chapin, there is in 
Derbyshire, the name of Chapin frith, (frith meaning a rough, 
mountainous region of country.) This on another map is written 
Chapelin or Chapalin, and he thinks perhaps, as they were always 
a very religious, conscientious people, they may have been so termed 
from Chapel, and this name with a little modification became 
Chapin. 

Samuel Chapin took the freeman's oath in Boston, in the year 
(June 2,) 1641. He lived probably in Dorchester, and was a Deacon 
in the Church, a man much esteemed and employed in public 
business. He removed to Springfield in 1642." — By Rev. A. L. 
Chapin, D. D., President of Beloit College, Wis. 



FIRST GENERATION. 



FIRST GENERATION. 

1. Dea. Samuel Chapin came with bis iamily to reside in 
Springfield in 1642. It would rather appear that he resided in this 
country considerable time, perhaps eight or ten years before he came 
to Springfield, and perhaps the greater part of his children were 
born in this country, but no record has been found of the birth of 
but one — the youngest, and we do not find any record of but one of 
his sons taking the freeman's oath. David, his son, was made a 
freeman in Springfield, 5th day 2d month, 1649. He is supposed 
to be the progenitor of all who bear the name in this country, and 
I have not found one of the name who could trace their lineage to 
any other source. In 1652, 10th of October, Samuel Chapin was 
appointed one of the magistrates of Springfield, and in 1654 his 
commission was extended indefinitely. He was also much employed 
in other public business — a useful and highly esteemed man. In 
the records of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay in New England," 
the name John Chapin is mentioned in connection with the building 
of a movable fort, March 4, 1633-4, and in July, 1634, mention 
is made of a meadow a part of which " John Chapin hath mown." 
That is all the information I have found respecting him. Whether 
he is a brother of Samuel or not is a matter of mere conjecture. 
Dea. Samuel Chapin died Nov. 11, 1675, age not known. His 
wife's name was Cisily, maiden name not known. Mrs. Cisily Chapin 
died Feb. 8, 1683, age not known. Children — 

2. iJaphet, b. 1642 ; d. Feb. 20, 1712, ae. 70. 

3. ^Henry, d. Aug. 15, 1718. 
- 4. *3Catharine, d. Feb. 4, 1712. 

5. 4David. 

6. sjosiah, d. Sept. 10, 1726. 

7. egarah, d. Aug. 5, 1684. 

8. 'Hannah, b. in Springfield, Dec. 2, 1644. 

It is not supposed that the children of Samuel Chapin are placed 
here exactly in the order of their births. 

The Boston City Records show that Jane, daughter of Shem 
Chapin and Deborah his wife, was born Sept. 16, 1665. He might 
have been a son of Dea. Samuel, and died without leaving any male 
issue. 

*Hon. Oliver B. Morris, Ex- Judge of Probate, is one of Catharine's descendants. 



SECOND GENERATION. 3 

Japhet and Henry had families in the north part of Springfield 
(now Chicopee.) 

David resided for a few years near the centre of the town of 
Springfield, and afterwards removed to Boston. 

Josiah settled in Mendon, Worcester county. He was one of the 
original grantees of said town ; it is said he was from Braintree and 
built the first saw-mill in Mendon. . 

Probably he did not reside for any great length of time in Spring- 
field. Josiah m. Mary. Son Samuel b. Nov. 11, 1659. Spr. 
records, vol. iii., p. 71. For further particulars, see under the head 
of Josiah Chapin's Descendants. /K-- ' 

Sarah m. April 14, 1647, Eowland Thomas, and had 13 children. 

Hannah m. Sept. 27, 1666, to Dea. John Hitchcock, and had 9 chil. 

Deacon Samuel Chapin lived on the home lot next south of the 
Ministry lot in the centre of the then village of Springfield. His 
son Japhet owned one half of said premises, but sold his right 
therein (by deed bearing date November 19, 1667) to Deacon John 
Hitchcock, who had married said Japhet's sister Hannah. 

SECOND GENERATION. 

(2) 

II. Japhet Chapin, of Chicopee, son of Dea. Samuel Chapin, 
b. 1642; m. (1) July 22, 1664, Abileuah Cooley. Mrs. Abilenah 
Chapin d. Nov. 17, 1710. And a small stone in the old burying 
ground in Springfield marks the spot where she was buried, m. (2) 
May 31, 1711, Dorothy Root of Eifield, Ct. He d. Feb. 20, 1712, 
and was buried by the side of his first wife Abilenah. Their remains 
and the stones whi'ch mark their resting places have (probably) been 
removed to the new cemetery in Springfield. 

Japhet probably resided for a time in Milford, Connecticut- 
As the Worshipful Capt. John Pyncheon of Springfield conveyed to 
Japhet Chapin of Milford, in Connecticut Colony, a small strip of 
land near Connecticut River in Springfield, Bounds east on Deacon 
Chapin's land. Deed dated 16th of November, 1669. 

By Deed bearing date March 9th, 1666, John Pyncheon conveyed 
to Samuel Chapin the greater part of the land lying in the Valley 
between Chicopee River and Willimansett Bro(^. And by Deed 
bearing date April 16th, 1673, Samuel conveye^the same premises 
to his son Japhet Chapin. The said Japhet built him a house at 
the upper end of Chicopee street, north-westerly of where the 
dwelling house of Henry Sherman now (1862) stands. 



4 SECOND GENERATION. 

Japhet was at the great fight at Turner's fulls, May iSth, 1676, 
and on the outside leaf of an old account book belonging to said 
Japhet, I find the following, supposed to be in his hand-writing. 
" I went out Volenteare against ingens the 17th of May, 1676 and 
we ingaged batel the 19th of May in the moaning before sunrise 
and made great Spoil upon the enemy and came off the same day 
with the, Los of 37 men and the*Captin Turner, and came home the 
20th^ of May." Tliomas Cbapin, son of Japhet, was one of the 
original grantees of the large tract of land which was granted to 
the officers and soldiers and their descendants in the Falls fight. 
And on another leaf of the same book, I find the following, " my 
father was taken out of this troubelsom world the 11 day of Novem- 
ber about eleven of the clock in the eve, 1675." After the death of 
Japhet Cbapin, the Rev. Mr. Williams of Deerfield wrote a lengthy 
letter to his children, instructing them concerning the improvement 
which they should make of his death, and speaking of him as having 
been a man of great piety. This letter is now (1859) probably in 
the care of Mr. Dormer Chapin. 

Their children found on record are as follows — 

9. ^Samuel, b. July 4, 1665 ; d. Oct. 19, 1729. 

10. 2Sarah, b. March 16, 1668 ; m. March 24, 1690, to Nathan- 
iel Munn. ' 

11. ^Thomas, b. May 10, 1671 ; d. Aug. 27, 1755. 

12. ^John, b. May 14, 1674 j d. June 1, 1759. 

13. ^Ebenezer, b. June 26, 1677; d. Dec. 13, 1772. 

14. ^Hannah, b. June 21, 1679 ; d. July 7, 1679. 

15. 'Hannah, b. July 18, 16^0. 

16. "David, b. Nov. 16, 1682 ; d. July 7, 1772. 

17. ^Jonathan, b. Feb. 20, 1685 ; d. March 1, 1686. 

18. i»Jonathan, b. Sept. 23, 1688; d. Feb. 23, 1761. 

*Hannah was married Dec. 3, 1703, to John Sheldon of Deer- 
field. The town of Deerfield was attacked by the Indians about 
three months after her marriage, and she was taken captive with 
many others, and marched to Canada, and after about two years 
many of the captives were redeemed and, returned home. I have 
reasons for believing that Hannah's husband went to Canada and 
obtained her release before the release of the other prisoners. John, 
son of John and Hannah Sheldon of Deerfield, born in Springfield, 
April 12, 1706. 

* Hannah's friends felt some anxiety in regard to her settling in a frontier town, and aa she 
was making a dress previous to her leaving the paternal home, her mother told her she must 
make the dress so it would do to wear into captivity. 



SECOiXD GENERATION. O 

1720-21, Obadiah Miller and Widow Dorothy Chapin of Enfield 
were joined in marriage. (Probably she was the widow of Japhet.) 

(3) 

Henry Chapin, son of Samuel and Cisily, was m. Dec. 5, 1664, 
to Bethia Cooley, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Cooley of Long- 
meadow. He d. Aug. 15, 1718. Mrs. Bethia Chapin d. Dec. 11, 1711. 

It appears that Henry Chapin did not reside in Springfield in the 
early part of his manhood, but took up his residence there about the 
year 1659. He, as well as his father, was a prominent man in town 
affairs, as appears by the ancient records of the town, and was a 
Representative to the General Court in the year 1689. Tradition 
says of Henry, that he was impressed on board a British man of war 
and served seven years, during which time he was in a severe 
engagement with the Dutch. He afterwards commanded a mer- 
chant ship and made several voyages between London and Boston, 
but at length, tired of a seafaring life, took up his residence in 
Boston, and afterwards in Springfield, where his father and family 
resided. Henry came to the northerly part of Springfield (now 
Chicopee) to reside, built him a house south side of Chicopee River, 
in what is now the village of Chicopee, on Ferry street, facing south 
on West street, near the large elm tree and a few feet east of the 
house formerly owned and occupied by William Chapin, one of his 
descendants. The house took fire and was burned, 1762. He also 
made a contract with John Pyncheon for 200 acres of land on the 
north side of Chicopee River. The following is said to be a copy 
of the contract. 

March 9th, 1659. Sold to Henry Chapin 200 acres of land on 
ye north side of Chickkuppy River to run fro ye hills on ye east 
side, to the Great river on ve West, and on the south it is to be 
boucded by, and to join to Chickkuppy river, onley one 25 acres or 
thirty being by Chickkuppy river about the place which shall be 
judged best for a warehouse is to be taken out and excepted, out of 
the parcel yet so as ye 200 acres is to be made up there together. 
Also Henry is to have half of ye upper Island which is to be as 
equally divided as it can be. and also he is to have five acres of 
mowable meadow at the lower end of the muxy meadow. For all 
which he is to pay and allow me the sum of twenty pounds in Wheat 
at current prices at four several payments, viz., five pounds by the 
first of March next, which will be anno 1660, and five pounds by 
the first of March 1661, and another five pounds in March 1662, and 
ye last five pounds ye first of March 1663. All the payments to be 



b SECOND GENERATION. 

in Wheat at price current at the several times of payment, this is 
the joint agreement betwixt us this 9th day of March 1659 as wit- 
ness our hands. 

Signed Henry Chapin. 

John Pyncheon. 

Memorandum. I promised Henry that if I did part with the 25 
acres or 30 acres or with the Islands, he should have the offer of 
them. (Said premises have been, and tlie greater part are still in 
the possession of the descendants of said Henry.) 

Their children found on record are — 

19. iHenry, b. June 1, 1666; d. April 29, 1667. 

20. ^Sarah, b. March 3, 1670 ; record says Sarah, single woman, 
d. Nov. 6, 1732. 

21. ^Bethia, b. Feb. 19, 1672. 

22. ^Henry, b. March 19, 1679 ; d. Sept. 15, 1754. 

23. ^Benjamin, b. Feb. 2, 1682 ; d. March 27, 1756. 

(4) 
Catharine Chapin, daughter of Samuel and Cisily, m. (1) 
Nov. 20, 1646, to Nathaniel Bliss ; he d. Nov. 8, 1654 : m. (2) 
'June 30, 1655, to Thomas Gilbert; he d. June 5, 1662: m. (3) 
Dec. 8, 1664, to Samuel Marshfield ; he d. May 12, 1692. Catharine 
d. Feb. 4, 1712. Children as follows— 

24. ^Samuel Bliss, b. Nov. 7, 1647 ; lived to be 102 years old. 
Residence, Longmeadow. 

25. 2Margaret, b.Nov.l2, 1649. 26. ^Mary Bliss, b.Sept.24,1651. 

27. -sNathaniel Bliss, b. March 27, 1653. 

28. ^Sarah Gilbert, b. Feb. 19, 1655-6. 

29. *5John Gilbert, b. Oct. 18, 1657. 

30. "Thomas Gilbert, b. March 15, 1658-9. 

31. «Henry Gilbert, b. March 1, 1661. 

32. "Josias Marshfield, b. Sept. 29, 1665. 

33. i"Hester Marshfield, b. Sept. 6, 1667. 

34. ^'Stillborn child, Nov. 17,1669. 35. i^Margaret, b.Dec. 3,1670. 

(5) 
David Chapin, son of Samuel and Cisily, the Springfield records 
say was m. to Lydia Crump, the 29th day of the 6th month, 1654. 
5th day 2d month, 1649, made a freeman in Springfield. Children 
found on record in Springfield are — 

36. 'Lydia, b. 19th day of the 4th month, 1655. 

37. 2Caleb, b. 2d day of the 2d month, 1657. 



THIRD GENERATION. 7 

And the following from the Boston records — 

38. sgarah, b. March 3, 1658. 39. "^Hannah, b. Oct. 23, 1662. 
40. ^Ebenezer, b. April 6, 1664. 41. ^Jouathau, b.reb.12,1665. 
42. ^Union, b. Dec. 23, 1669. 

THIRD GENERATION. 

(9) 

III. Samuel CnAPm, son of Japhet and Abilene, b. July 4, 
1665 ; m. Dec. 24, 1690, to Hannah Sheldon. He d. Oct. 19, 1729. 

His place of residence was at the upper end of Chicopee street, 
on the west side and near the residence of his father Japhet. His 
house stood not far from the place where Ephraim Chapin in after 
years built a house and where he resided and where his grandson 
Briant Chapin now (1862) resides. It was afterwards owned and 
occupied by his son Elisha, and after he was killed by the Indians, 
it passed into the possession of Abel, son of Thomas, and afterwards 
to Ephraim, son of Benjamin, who married Jemima, daughter of Abel, 
and after Ephraim's death to his son Frederick, and after his death 
to his son Briant. Samuel Chapin set out two pear trees on this 
place which bore fruit for the first time the year he died, 1730. One 
of said trees is still alive, (1859) and never failed to bear fruit, 
except one year, up to 1834, and has occasionally borne fruit since 
that time. The above pear tree bore a sweet and most delicious 
fruit, as the compiler of this work can testify, having ate of the fruit 
more than sixty years since, and often since that time. Said tree 
having become much decayed was felled with the woodman's axe, 
December, 1859. 

Mr. Samuel Chapin had been at his daily labor on land which he 
owned on the west side of Conn, river and had just entered a boat 
on his return home at night, when he was fired upon by some Indians 
(and wounded though not dangerously) lying in ambush among the 
willows which grew near the water. 

At the marriage of Samuel Chapin's daughter Abilene, there 
being a large number of guests and a short supply of seats, the 
young Misses were seated upon the sills of the house. The sills in 
those days were very large and placed on the top of the floors, or 
the bottom of the sills were as high as the top of the floors. When 
the dressmaker who made and fitted the bride's dress entered the 
room, and perceiving the large array of young Misses, exclaimed I 



8 TIIIHI) GENERATION. 

wonder if all these little girls will ever become Brides, which remark 
caused quite a tittering among the juvenile portion of the females. 
Children — 

43. ^Hannah, b. July 9, 1692 ; m. Jan. 1, 1722-3, John Morgan. 

44. ^Abilene, b. April 27, 1694; m. May 5, 1715, Joseph 
Colton of West Springfield. 

45. ^Mary, b. Aug. 5, 1696 ; d. July 19, 1704. 

46. '•Samuel, b. May 22, 1699 ; d. 1779, ae. 80 yrs. 

47. •'^Galeb, b. May 29, 1701 ; killed by the Indians at Lake 
George, 1755. 

48. ^Experience, b. July 8, 1703; m. Dec. 14, 1726, David 
Smith of Suffield, Ct. 

49. ^Mary, b. May 12, 1705 ; m. Dec. 28, 1727, John Horton 
of Skipmuck. 

50. '^Elisha, b. July 16, 1707 ; massacred by the Indians at 
Hoosac, July 11, 1756. 

51. ^Lydia, b. May 12, 1709 ; m. 1732-33, Timothy Cooper of 
West Springfield. 

52. ifHenry, d. Aug. 15, 1718. 

(11) 
Thomas Chapin, son of Japhet and Abaliue, b. May 10, 1671 ; 
m. Sarah Wright. He d. Aug. 27, 1755, in the 85th year of his age. 
Mrs. Sarah (Wright) Chapin d. July 26, 1770, aged 98 years. 
Children — 

53. iThomas, b. Jan. 2, 1694 ; d. 1781, ae. 86 yrs. 

54. 2japbet, b. March 16, 1697 ; d. Feb. 8, 1786. 

55. ^Abel, b. Jan. 28, 1700 ; d. May 3, 1772. 

56. 4Shem, b. Feb. 3, 1702. 

57. ^Sarah, b. Feb. IS, 1708; m. May 17, 1753, Luke Parsons 
of Somers, Ct. 

58. ^Nathaniel, b. Aug. 9, 1711 ; d. at Cape Breton, supposed 
in 1745. 

59. ^Bathsheba, b. Dec. 19, 1713; m. (1) April 2, 1745, Jacob 
Hitchcock ; m. (2) to Dr. Lamberton Cooper of Agawam. 

60. ^Jabez, b. April 3, 1716 ; d. April 20, 1716. 

61. ^Deborah, b. Oct. 31, 1719; m. April 30, 1746, Eleazer 
Frary of Hatfield. 

62. loMartha, twin, b. Dec. 5, 1704 ; m. Oct. 20, 1740, Samuel 
Wells of Hatfield ; d. July 8, 1801, ae. 97 yrs. 

63. "Esther, twin, b. Dec. 5, 1704; m. (1) Oct. 22, 1747, Noah 
Cook of Hadley ; (2) Dea. Nathaniel Horton of Somers. 



THIRD GENERATION. » 

(12) 

John Chapin, son of Japliet and Abaline, b. May 14, 1674, 
was m. pub. Jan. 24, 1702, to Sarah Bridgman of Northampton. 
Mr. John Chapin d. June 1, 1759, ae. 85 yrs. Mrs. Sarah Chapin 
d. May 21, 1756, ae. 75 yrs. Children— 

64. iSarah, b. Nov. 23, 1702; m. Jan. 30. 1734-35, Samuel 
Terrey of Lower Canada ; suppose she had issue ; d. Jan. 25, 1773, 
ae. 71. 

65. 2jejQima, b. Jan. 5, 1705; ra. Jan. 6, 1736, Abel Bliss of 
Wilbraham. 

66. 3john, b. Oct. 80, 1706 ; d. unm. 

67. -^Miriam, b. March 5, 1713; m. Jan. 2, 1745, Dea. Nathaniel 
Church. 

68. ^phiueas, b. Sept. 23, 1715 ; d. Oct. 11, 1788. 

69. ^Stephen, b. May 29, 1718. 

70. '^Asahel, b. Dec. 20, 1721 ; d. at Louisburgh, Cape Breton, 
1745-46. 

71. sEleazer, b. Jan. 27, 1725 ; d. Jan. 5, 1788, ae. 63. 

(18) 

Ebenezer Chapin, of Enfield, Ct., son of Japhet and Abaline, 
was m. Dec. 1702, to Ruth Janes of Northampton. Her father 
removed to Lebanon. Mr. Ebenezer Chapin d. Dec, 13, 1772, ae. 95. 
Mrs. Ruth Chapin d. Jan. 18, 1736, ae. 54. 

Children — 

72. iRachel, b. Aug. 27, 1703 ; d. at East Windsor, Ct., ae. 70. 

73. ^Ebenezer, b. Sept. 23, 1705; d. March 1, 1751, ae. 46. 

74. ^Xoah, b. Oct. 25, 1707 ; d. Aug. 27, 1787, ae. 80. 

75. -^Seth, b. Feb. 28, 1709 ; d. Feb. 22, 1807, ae. 98. 

76. •^Catharine, b. Jan. 4, 1711 ; m. Mr. Elsworth of East Wind- 
sor, Ct.; d. ae. 75 yrs. 

77. eposes, b. Aug. 24, 1712 ; d. Nov. 3, 1793, ae. 81. 

78. ^Aaron, b. Sept. 28, 1714; d. April 19, 1808, ae. 94. 

79. sElias, b. Oct. 22, 1716 ; d. Sept. 6, 1791, ae. 75. 

80. sReuben, b. Sept. 13, 1718; d. ae. 70. 

81. "Charles, b. Dec. 26, 1720 ; d. ae. 93. 

82. "David, b. Aug. 13 or 18, 1722 ; d. ae. 40. 

83. i-Elisha, b. April 18, 1725 ; d. in Enfield, Ct., ae. 1. 

84. i^Phineas, b. June 26, 1726 ; d. in Albany, N.Y.,unm., ae.21. 

Reuben and Charles had large families in Salsbury. David had a 
family in New Hartford, Ct. Rev. Mr. Backus of Somers, who 
delivered a sermon at the funeral of Moses Chapin who d. Nov. 3, 
2 



10 TFIIRD GRNEIIATION. 

J 793, says in said sermon, be died in the 82d year of his age, and 
his father died in the 97th year of his age. He had thirteen chil- 
dren, eleven sons and two daughters ; three of the sons are yet 
living. That nine out of thirteen, in one family, should exceed the 
age of three score and ten is very remarkable, even for this healthy 
climate, and has rarely been equaled since the days of the patriarchs. 
A little more than six years ago, five of the brothers were living in 
this town, their farms joined, and there was no neighbor between 
them. With sincere fraternal affection they lived together, pursuing 
the agricultural employment, for more than forty years. On the 
22d of August, 1787, the oldest of that baud of brothers died — the 
youngest, September 6th, 1791. Another breach is now made in 
the brotherhood. 

Ebenezer had eleven sons, six of whom, viz., Ebenezer, Noah, 
Moses, Seth, Elias and Aaron settled on Somers mountain — their 
farms joined ; after a time, Ebenezer went back to Enfield to take 
care of his father, and he died in Enfield. Ebenezer of six genera- 
tions have lived on and occupied the same farm in Enfield. One of 
that name is still living on the same place. The other five who 
went to Somers lived and died there. 

(16) 

David Chapin, son of Japhet and Abaline, b. Nov. 16, 1682, 
was married Nov. 21, 1705, to Sarah Stebbins, daughter of 
Joseph and Sarah Stebbins. He d. July 8, 1772, ae. 90 yrs. Mrs. 
Sarah Chapin d. Feb. 6, 1726. David m. (2) Mindwell Holton of 
Northampton. Mrs. Mindwell Chapin d. Oct. 21, 1758. 

Dea. David Chapin was the first Clerk of Chicopee Parish, filled 
the office for several years, and was one of the first deacons of the 
church in said parish. His place of residence was on Chicopee 
street, a few rods north of where the present meeting-house stands. 
The house which he erected was standing until within a few years. 
The outer door which was very thick and heavy, was filled with 
nails, to prevent the Indians from splitting it open with their 
tomahawks. 

Children — 

85. iSarah, b. Oct. 26, 1706 ; d. Nov. 13, 1790. 

86. 2David, b. Feb. 12, 1707-8 ; d. March 7, 1707-8. 

87. sjoseph, b. Jan. 6, 1708-9 ; d. Feb. 3, 1708-9. 

88. "David, b. March 13, 1709-10 ; d. March 7, 1754. 

89. sjosiah, b. June 23, 1712 ; d. Feb. 1, 1785. 



THIRD GENERATION. 11 

90. ^Mehetable, b. June 26, 1714; d. April 6, 1716. 

91. 'Gideon, b. July 2, 1716 ; d. Oct. 21, 1722. 

92. sjoseph, b. June 11, 1718; d. June 11, 1803, at Wethers- 
field, Vt. 

93. ^Aaron, b. May 5, 1720 ; d. of small pox, Boston Castle, 
March 7, 1752. 

94. lojacob, b. March 14, 1722 ; d. Oct. 21, 1722. 

95. iiEdward, b. Feb. 16, 1724 ; xl. Jan. 6, 1800. 

96. i^Benoni, b. Jan. 24, 1726. 

Sarah, the daughter, was m. Jan. 11, 1739, to Dea. Nathaniel 
Burt of Longmeadow, who was slain in battle near Lake George, 
Sept. 8, 1755. She was m. (2) Sept. 16, 1767, to Rev. Doct. Wil- 
liams of Longmeadow, and d. Nov. 18, 1790, ae. 84. 

(18) 

Jonathan Chapin, son of Japhet and Abaline, b. Sept. 23, 
1688, was m. April 20, 1710, to Elizabeth Burt, daughter of 
Jonathan and Lydia Burt of Longmeadow. He d. Feb. 23, 1760-61, 
ae. 73. Mrs. Elizabeth Chapin d. Jan. 31, 1769, ae. 80. Children — 

97. ^Jonathan, b. July 8, 1711. 

98. ^Elizabeth, b. July 13, 1714 ; m. Mr. Burt of Longmeadow. 

99. ^Daniel, b. March 5, 1717 ; supposed to have been taken 
by the Spaniards. 

100. ''Eunice, b. Feb. 11, 1719; m. David Dorchester; d. in 
North Bolton, now Vernon, Ct., Nov. 1, 1780. 

101. ^Ezekiel, b. March 10, 1721; d. April 1, 1721. 

102. "Zeruiah, b. April 27, 1722 ; m. Sam'l Pease, 3d, of Enfield, 
Ct. Pub. May 19, 1742-43. 

103. 'Gideon, b. Aug. 24, 1726 ; d. Aug. 13, 1726. 

104. "Rebecca, b. Feb. 25, 1728; m. Nov. 8, 1749, Joseph 
Sexton of Somers, Ct. 

105. »Ezra, b. Jan. 12, 1730 ; d. Oct. 12, 1747. 

106. I'Timothy, b. March 8, 1733 ; d. Dec. 30, 1762, ae. 29. 

107. "Lydia, b. Oct. 21, 1734 ; m. June 20, 1765, Isaac Bran- 
craft of Windsor, Ct. 

(22) 

Henry Chapin, son of Henry and Bethia, b. March 19, 1679 ; 
m. Feb. 19, 1702, to Mary Gurnsey of Milford. He d. Sept. 15, 1754, 
ae. 77. Children — 

108. iHenry, b. Oct. 24, 1702 ; d. Sept. 3, 1703. 

109. ^Mary, b. Sept. 4, 1704 ; m. to Mr. Billings of Sunderland. 



12 THIRD GKNERATION. 

110. ^Elizabeth, b. March 12, 1707; m. Feb. 6, 1735, Sam'l 
Bliss of Si)rhigfield. 

111. 'Joseph, b. Oct. 25, 1709 ; drowned June 29, 1723. 
Mary, the mother, d. May 2, 1715. Henry, tlie father, m. (2) 

May 10, 1716, to Esther Bliss, daughter of Samuel Bliss. Children — 

112. ^Esther, b. March 11, 1717; pub. to Jonathan Ely, Jr., 
Oct. 18, 1740. 

113. «Margaret, b. July 8, 1719 ; pub. Sept. 11, 1756, to Amos 
Taylor of West Springfield, 

114. 'Henry, b. June 7, 1721. 

115. "Abner, b. July 25, 1722. 

116. "Seth, b. April 20, 1724. 

117. ^"Joseph, b. Jan. 30, 1726. 

118. ^iWilliam, b. April 19, 1729. 

(23) 

Benjamin Chapin, son of Henry and Bethia, b. Feb. 2, 1682, 
was m. Nov. 9, 1704, to Hannah Colton, daughter of Isaac and 
Mary Colton of Longmeadow. Mrs. Hannah Chapin d. March 5, 
1739. Mr. Benjamin Chapin m. (2) Widow Joanna Warriner who 
had been the wife of Ebenezer Warriner. Deacon Benjamin Chapin 
d. March 22, 1756. Joanna, (2) wife, d. Oct. 13, 1764. 

Mr. Benjamin Chapin was one of the first Deacons of the church 
in Chicopee, he having been elected to that office in 1752. His 
place of residence was on Chicopee street, near the present residence 
of Dea. Giles S. Chapin. 

Children — 

119. ^Hannah, b. Oct. 3, 1706 ; m. Benjamin Sikes. 

120. ^Benjamin, b. July 17, 1708; m. Anna Howard. 

121. sjsaac, b. Aug. 18. 1710. 

122. ^Abner, b. Oct. 16, 1713 ; d. Dec. 16, 1713. . 

123. sjacob, b. April 18, 1716; d. 1717. 

124. ^Bethia, b. June 25, 1718 ; m. Feb. 1, 1739, No. 68, Phineas 
Chapin. 

125. 'Sarah, b. Oct. 13, 1720 ; m. Oct. 31, 1741, Ebenezer 
Warriner. 

126. «George, b. Dec. 13, 1722; d. Dec. 10, 1782. 

127. ^Abigail, b. May 26, 1724. 

128. loEphraim, b. Oct. 29, 1729; d. Oct. 12, 1805. 

129. iiMary, b. Aug. 18, 1727; m. May 28, 1748, Stephen Mor- 
gan of Brimfield. 

130. i^Eunice, b. Oct. 28, 1732 ; m. pub. Oct. 24, 1751, to Aaron 
Ferry of Springfield. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 13 

(37) 
Caleb Chapin, (probably) son of David and Lydia, b. Feb. 2, 
1657 ; m. to Sarah. 
Their children found on Boston Records are — 

131. ^Hannah, b. Jan. 4, 1682. 

132. 'Lydia, b. March 15, 1683 ; m. Aug. 2, 1721, Giles Godard. 

133. ^Caleb, b. April 2, 1686 ; d. Feb. 14, 1693. 

134. ■*David, b. July 2, 1689. 

135. ^Ebenezer, b. Jan. 20, 1693. 

(40) 

Ebenezer Chapin, son of David and Lydia Chapin, of Boston, 
b. April 6, 1664, m. Elizabeth. Elizabeth Chapin, (probably) the 
wife of Ebenezer, d. Jan. 15, 1725, ae. 56. 

Their children found on the Boston Records are — 

136. ^Elizabeth, b. April 5, 1693 ; d. Aug. 23, 1694. 

137. 2Mary, b. July 1, 1694. 

138. ^Elizabeth, b. March 2, 1696. 

139. •iRuth, b. May 28, 1701 ; m. Aug. 15, 1722, Samuel Jackson. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 

(46) 

IV. Samlel Chapin, son of Samuel and Hannah, b. May 22, 
1699 ; m. 1722-23, Anna Horton, daughter of Jeremiah and Mary 
Horton. 

Samuel, the father, died at the residence of his son Reuben in 
Ludlow, 1779, aged 80. The circumstances of his death are well 
remembered by his granddaughter Lois, (daughter of his son Reuben) 
and widow of Justin Alvord, late of South Hadley, where she now 
(1859) resides. She d. May 29, 1860, being 83 years of age ; and 
was 3 years old when her grandfather Samuel died. 

Children — 

140. ^Gad, b. Aug. 11, 1726 ; m. Abigail. 

141. ^Jeremiah, m. Caroline Fowler. 

142. 3Reuben,m.MaryMirick,3d. 143. ^Mary, b.May 22,1727-28. 
144. ^Submit. 145. **'Eunice. 

146. ■'Margaret, m. Ezra Stebbins, Feb. 24, 1757. 



' Eunice was the grandmother of Mrs. Lysander Chapin. 



14 FOURTH OHNRRATION. 

(47) 

Caleb Chapin, son of Samuel and Hannah, b. May 29, 1701, 
m. Dec. 9, 1726, Catharine Dickinson of Hatfield. 

Caleb, the father, removed from Springfield to Bernardston about 
the year 1740. He was killed in battle in the French war, by the 
Indians, at Bloody Pond, near Lake George, Sept. 8, 1755, Two of 
his sons, Joel and Ilozekiah, were with him at the time, and escaped 
unhurt. (He said to them, boys, they are too hard for us, you must 
run, I am wounded and cannot ; — that was the last they saw of him 
alive.) 

Children — 

147. ^Catharine, b. Oct. 27, 1727 ; d. Oct. 22, 1734. 

148. 20aleb, b. Nov. 13, 1729 ; d. Sept. 17, 1734-35. 

149. ^Joel, b. April 22, 1732. 

150. *'Catharine, b. May 2, 1734. 

151. ^Caleb, b. July 2, 1736. 

152. '^Hezekiah, b. Nov. 11, 1738. 

153. ^Daniel, b. Sept. 30, 1741. 

154. «Hannah, b. Sept. 21, 1744. 

155. ^Submit, b. 1747 ; d. 1815. 

156. "'Selah, b. Aug. 18, 1750. 

(50) 

Elisha Chapin, son of Samuel and Hannah, b. July 16, 1707 ; 
m. March 30, 1737-38, Miriam Ely, daughter of Joseph and Mar- 
garet Ely. 

Capt. Elisha Chapin was massacred by the Indians, at Hoosack, 
now Williamstown, July 11, 1756. He was the commander at Fort 
Massachusetts in 1754. 

Children — 

157. iMiriara, b. May 24, 1738-39; m. Dec. 31, 1760, Daniel 
Miller of West Springfield; d. 1801, ae. 64. 

158. 2Enoch, b. Sept. 16, 1740 ; d. Oct. 28, 1802. 

159. ^Levi, b. Nov. 30, 1745. 

160. ■'Samuel, b. June 18, 1750 ; living in Watchitoches, La. in 
1810. Probably d. there. 

161. ^Sewall, b. 1754. 162. ^Leonard. 

* Catharine m. a Mr. Sheldon of Northampton, Mass. Mr. Isaac Sheldon, her son, d. in 
Northampton, April 2, 1862, ae. 88. He was reputed to be one of the wealthiest men in North- 
ampton ; and is grandfather to the " Blind Boy" of that town, the guardianship of whom there 
was so much contention about a few years since. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 15 

163. ^Sophia, b. April 14, 1748 ; m. Russell Dewey of Westfield. 

164. ^Sarah A., m. John Farnham of Westfield, who had been 
one of Paul Jones' men. 165. ^Elisha. 

Sewall graduated at Dartmouth College in 1779. He studied 
Theology, and afterwards engaged as instructor in an Academy in 
the western part of Virginia, where he d. in 1787, in his 33d year. 

(53) 

Thomas Chapin, son of Thomas and Sarah, b. Jan. 2, 1694, 
m. March 19, 1719-20, Jerusha Jones of Sunderland. 

Thomas Chapin removed to Belchertown, (formerly called Cold 
Spring,) about 1748, was a member of the church there at the time 
of the ordination of the Rev. Justus Forward, Feb. 25, 1756, and 
d. in 1781, ae. 86. His wife, Jerusha, d. in 1773, ae. 77. She was 
also a member of the same church with her husband. 

Children — 

166. lElijah, b. March 29, 1721-22. 

167. 2Eliuor, b. March 4, 1722-23. 

168. ^Thomas, 3d, b. May 15, 1728. 169. ^Thankful. 

170. ■^Luther, not found on record, but probably son of Thomas. 

Elinor probably m. Benjamin Jlorgan, as his wife, Eleanor (Cha- 
pin,) d. 1741, ae. 68. She united with the church in Belchertown, 
1774. Thankful was a member of the church previous to the ordi- 
nation of Rev. Justus Forward. 

(54) 

Japhet Chapuv, son of Thomas and Sarah, b. March 16, 
1697 ; was m. pub. April 22, 1726, to Thankful Dickinson of 
Hatfield. Mrs. Thankful Chapin d. March 17, 1773. Japhet m. (2) 
(pub.) Oct. 28, 1778, to wid. Lydia Belding, formerly the wife of tlie 
Rev. Benjamin Doolittle of Northfield, Mass. Mr. Japhet Chapin 
d. Feb. 8, 1786, ae. 89. Mrs. Lydia Chapin d. June 19, 1790, in 
the 92d yr. of her age. 

When Japhet was 82 and his wife Lydia was 80 years of age, 
they made a journey on horseback (on separate horses) from their 
residence on Chicopee street to Northfield. a distance of more than 
40 miles in one day, and it is said they sat as erect upon their horses 
as young people. Japhet was a man of very punctual habits. For 
instance, if any visitors came to see him and had a team with them, 
after passing the usual salutations, he would inquire when they 



IG FOURTH GENERATION. 

would leave ; they might appoint the time when they chose, and at 
the appointed hour, without any further conversation respecting it, 
their team was brought to the door in readiness lor them to start 
for home. 
Children — 

171. *^Thankful, b. Feb.22,1727 ; m. Gardner Kellogg of Hadley. 

172. 2japhct, 1). March 14, 1729 ; d. 1754, ae. 25. 

173. ^iiepzibah, b. March 25, 1731 ; m. John Miller of West 
Springfield. 

174. ''Martha, b. May 12, 1733; m. No. 118, Wm. Chapin of 
Chicopee. 

175. ^Nathan, b. Feb. 3, 1735; d. in Buckland, Feb. 13, 1830, 
in 96th year of his age. 

176. '^Rhoda, b. April 19, 1737 ; m. John Day of W. Springfield. 

177. ^Simeon, b. Aug. 20, 1739 ; d. May 20, 1799, ae. 60. 

178. ''Chloe, b. Dec. 27, 1741 ; d. July 29, 1771. 

179. "Catharine, b. Jan. 22, 1745 ; m. Daniel Sexton of Somers. 
She left one dau. 

180. i''Sarah, b. Jan. 14, 1747 ; m. No. 488, Rev. Peletiah Chapin. 
Res. in Windsor, Vt. Left one dau., Sarah. 

(55) 

Abel Chapin, son of Tiiomas and Sarah, b. Jan. 28, 1700 ; 
m. Jan. 9, 1720.. Hannah Hitchcock, daughter of Luther and Eliza- 
beth Hitchcock. ]\Ir. Abel Chapin d. May 3, 1772. Mrs. Hannah 
Chapin d. April 12, 1778, ae. 76. 

The residence of Abel was first, after being married, in that part 
of Springfield called Williniansett, in a small house easterly of 
where the Connecticut River Rail Road Depot is now located, and 
being at the foot of the hill on the old road to South Hadley, on 
what is now called " the Briggs Lot." He afterwards resided on the 
east side of Chicopee street, and kept a tavern there for several 
years. The same place was afterwards owned and occupied by his 
grandson, Moses Chapin, Esq., and after him by his son Moses, and 
is now (1862) occupied by the widow of the last Moses. 

Children — 

181. iHannah, b. July 22, 1729 ; d. Dec. 1741. 

182. 2Abiah, b. Sept. 3, 1731 ; m. Samuel Smith of Hadley. 

183. ^Abel, b. April 18, 1734 ; d. Dec. 1741. 

184. ■* Jemima, b. Dec. 12, 1735; d. Nov. 1, 1804; m. No. 
128, Capt. Ephraim Chapin. 

185. ^Elizabeth, b. Dec. 27, 1737 ; d. Dec. 1741. 

186. 6Moses, b. Feb. 25, 1739 ; d. May 19, 1771. 

* Grandmother of Moses Smith KeUogg and Mrs. Thaddeiis Chapin of Chicopee. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 17 

Abiali m. Samuel Smith of Haclley, pub. Oct. 21, 1749, and had a 
large family of childreu. Resided in Sandisfield, Berkshire Co., Mass. 

(56) 

Shem Chapin, son of Thomas and Sarah, b. Feb. 3, 1702 ; m, 
pub. Dec. 4, 1752, to Anna Clark of Uxbridge. She was the widow 
of Mr. Clark of Springfield, (Chicopee,) Mass. Shem resided in 
Ludlow, Mass., and d. there. Mrs. Anna Chapin d. in Hadley, ae. 
101 years and 8 months. Children — 

187. lEsther, b. June 17, 1754. 

188. 2job, b. Sept. 19, 1758. 

189. sjoel, b. Jan. 13, 1761. 

(58) 

Nathaniel Chapin, of Enfield, Ct., son of Thomas and Sarah, 
b. Aug. 9, 1711 ; m. Sarah Abbee, dau. of Thomas Abbee of Enfield. 
Mr. Nathaniel Chapin d. at Cape Breton. Mrs. Sarah Chapin m. (2) 
Capt. Hezekiah Parsons of Enfield, Ct. 

Perhaps Nathaniel, the father, went to Cape Breton with the 
Expedition against Louisburg which surrendered to the Americans 
and English, June 16, 1745. Many of the troops in that Expedition 
were from Connecticut and some from other States. He probably 
d. about that time. 

Children, by (1) husband — 

190. iXathaniel, b. Dec. 31, 1738 ; d. Feb. 11, 1831, ae. 91. 

191. ^Eliphalet, b. March 2, 1741. 192. ^^Jabez. 

(68) 

Phineas Chapin, son of John and Sarah, b. Sept. 23, 1715 ; 
m. Feb. 1, 1739, (124) Bethia Chapin, dau. of Benjamin and Hannah. 
Mr. Phineas Chapin d. Oct. 11, 1788, ae. 73. Mrs. Bethia Chapin 
d. May 1, 1793, ae. 75. Children— 

193. ^Bethia, b. 1740; d. Nov. 8,1780, ae. 38— so says her 
gravestone. 

194. 2phares, b. July 23, 1742 ; d. (suppose) Aug. 27, 1755. 

195. ^Phineas, b. March 1, 1747 ; d. March 2, 1821. 

196. -lAsenath, b. May 2, 1750. 

197. 5John, b. May 1, 1753. 

198. ^Silas, b. Sept. 10, 1755. 



18 FOURTH GENERATION, 

liethia m. Ensign Moses Chapin, son of Abel and Hannah, lie d. 
May 19, 1771. After his death, she m. Lieut. Jabez Snow, an ollicer 
in tlie war of the Revolution. She d. Nov. 8, 1780. * Asenath m. 
Dea. Silas Smith of South Iladley. Inten. of m. ent. March 18, 1780. 

1755. Nov. 10. Pompey, a negro and Betty, a negro (servants 
of Phineas Chapin) were joined in marriage. 

(C9) 

Stephen Chapin, son of John and Sarah, h. May 29, 1718 ; 
m. Sept. 26, 1745, Zebia Ely. Stephen lived for a time after his 
marriage in Wilbraham ; two or three of his children were born 
there. He subsequently removed to Granby, and there spent the 
the remainder of his life. Children — 

199. ^Lucy, m. Mr. Coss ; lived in Greenfield. 

200. ^Asahel, b. Feb. 2, 1748 ; d. ae. 80. 

201. sjohn, b. Oct. 29, 1749 ; killed in battle at Fort Stanwix. 

202. ^Dorcas, b. Dec. 3, 1754 ; m. Col. (408) Abel Chapin of 
Chicopee; d. July 13, 1841, ae. 86|. 

203. ■^Pliny, b. July, 1764 ; drowned in Conn. River at Hartford, 
Ct., June 2, 1810. 

204. ^Julius, m. ; lived in Leyden ; had no children. 

205. 'Orlando, b. July 13, 1771. 

206. ^Parmelia, m. (late in life) to William Sn'bw of Granby, 
Mass. No issue. 207. "Erastus. 

(71) 

tELEAZER Chapin, son of John and Sarah, b. Jan. 27, 1725; 
m. Oct. 1748, Eleanor Smith, dau. of David and Experience of Suf- 
field, Ct. Mr. Eleazer Chapin d. Jan. 5, 1788, ae. 63. Mrs. Eleanor 
Chapin d. Dec. 20, 1801. Children— 

208. lEleazer, b. June 3, 1750; d. July 4, 1812, ae. 62. 

209. ^Artimesia, b. July 5, 1757 ; d. 1758. 

210. soynthia, b. Oct. 30, 1760 ; m. Mr. Robinson of Plainfield. 

211. ^Eleanor, b. Oct. 12, 1763 ; m. James Eaton. 

212. ^Artimesia, b. Feb. 20, 1766 ; d. num. 

213. ^Thaddeus, b. Feb. 10, 1770 ; d. July 19, 1794. 

* Asenath was the mother of Hiram Smith, Esq. of South Hadley. 
t Grandparents of Mrs. Sylvester Taylor of Chicopee Falls. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 19 

(73) 

Ebenezer Chapin, son of Ebenezer and Kuth Chapin, of Enfield, 
Ct., b. Sept. 23, 1705 ; m. Elizabeth Pease, dan. of Jonathan Pease. 
Ebenezer, the father, lived in Somers a Avhile, and moved back to 
Enfield, to live with and take care of his father. He was b. Sept. 23, 
1705; d. in Enfield, March 1, 1751, ae. 46. Elizabeth, the mother, 
d. July 6, 1786, ae. 74. Children— 

214. lEbenezer, b. Oct. 4, 1735 ; d. April 23, 1822, ae. 87. 
Mehetable Bartlett, nis wife, d. April 8, 1811, ae. 77. 

215. ^Eliphalet. 

216. ^Eliphalet, m. Abel Allen ; lived in Surry, N. H. 

217. ^Ruth. 218. ^Tabitha. 

Ebenezer, the son, lived in Enfield, on the place where his father 
and grandfather lived before him. He m. Mehetable Bartlett of 
Stafford. They had two sons, Ebenezer and Timothy, and two 
daughters that m. Pease's, and one or two more. Ebenezer of the 
6th Generation now lives on the old homestead in Enfield, six of 
the name of Ebenezer, of as many generations, having occupied the 
same place. Gilbert Chapin d. March 9, 1845, ae. 32. He was the 
father of the present Ebenezer who occupies the old homestead. 
Gilbert Chapin was a brother of Ebenezer of the 5th Generation. 
Joel Chapin d. in Bridgeport, Aug. 27, 1852, ae. 37. He was son 
of Timothy Chapin, 

(74) 

Lieut. Noah Chapin, of Somers, son of Ebenezer and Ruth, 
b. Oct. 25, 1707; m. Mary Wright of Deerfield. Lieut. Noah 
Chapin d. Aug. 23, 1787, ae. 80. Mrs. Mary Chapin d. March 3, 
1795, ae. 86. Children— 

219. iMary, b. Nov. 12, 1734; d. Nov. 20, 1824, ae. 90. 

220. 2Sarah, b. Oct. 19, 1736. 

221. ^Oliver, b. April 9, 1739 ; d. Dec. 1, 1758, ae. 21, 

222. ■'Experience, b. May 15, 1744. 

223. ^Eunice, b. Sept. 10, 1746 ; d. March 25, 1816, ae. 69. 

224. "Noah, b. July 20, 1748 ; d. May 5, 1790, ae. 42. 

225. 'David, b. March 24, 1755 ; d. Oct. 9, 1775, ae. 20. 

Oliver d. at Sheffield, returning from the old French war. Mary 
m. Capt. John Wood of Somers ; had 10 children. Capt. Wood d. 
Aug. 31, 1805, ae. 76. Sarah m. Samuel Sexton of Wilbraham. 



20 FOURTH GENERATION. 

Experience m. Nathaniel Burt of Longineadow, Jan, 22, 17G7 ; had 
7 dauglitors, viz., Sarah, m. Nathaniel Potter of Hartford ; Sylvia, 
m. Daniel Lombard of Springfield ; Milly, m. a Mr. Dunham ; Lucy, 
m. Dr. White of Hatfield ; Experience, m. Dr. Merrick ; Jerusha, 
m. Col. Field of Longmeadow ; d. Oct. 1860, ae. 80 ; Eunice, m. 
Col. Quartus Stcbbins of Springfield. Eunice, dau. of Noah, m. 
Thomas King of Wilbraham ; lived in Derby, Ct., and had 4 chil- 
dren. He d. She m. (2) to Samuel Chapin, son of SethChapin 
of Somers. 

(75) 
Sbth Chapin, of Somers, son of Ebenezer and Ruth Chapin of 
Enfield, b. Feb. 28, 1709; m. (1) Nov. 22, 1739, Elizabeth Bliss, 
dau. of Samuel Bliss of Longmeadow; m. (2) Margaret Pease. 
Mr. Seth Chapin d. Feb. 22, 1807, ae. 98. Mrs. Elizabeth Chapin 
d. April 10, 1751. Mrs. Margaret Chapin d. Oct. 7, 1802, ae. 84. 
Children — 

226. iSamuel, d. April 18, 1833, ae. 91. 

227. ^Elizabeth, d. Feb. 17, 1819, ae. 72. 

228. ^Abigail, b. March 20, 1744; d. June 27, 1830, ae. 86. 

229. ''Catharine, d. unm., Dec. 14, 1774, ae. 25. 

Samuel m. (1) Elizabeth Spencer; (2) Widow Eunice King. 
Abigail m. Daniel Sheldon, son of Charles Sheldon. Mr. Daniel 
Sheldon d. Feb. 1, 1820, ae. 76. Mrs. Abigail Sheldon d. June 27, 
1830, ae. 86. Elizabeth m. Ezekiel Spencer. He d. Feb. 26, 1820, 
ae. 72. 

(77) 

Moses Chapin, of Somers, son of Ebenezer and Kuth Chapin of 
Enfield, b. Aug. 24, 1712 ; m. (1) Jerusha Rockwell of East Wind- 
sor, Ct. They had one child — 

230. iJerusha, b. May, 1749 ; d. July 22, 1829, ae. 80. 

Mrs. Jerusha Chapin d. May 19, 1749, ae. 29. Moses Chapin m. (2) 
Elizabeth Dwight, daughter of Capt. Samuel Dwight of Enfield, Ct. 
Mr. Moses Chapin d. Nov. 3, 1793, ae. 81. Mrs. Elizabeth Chapin 
d. Oct. 11, 1807, ae. 80. Children— 

231. 2Anaa, b. Sept. 15, 1752 ; d. May 6, 1827, ae. 75. 

232. sRuth, b. March 25, 1754; d. Feb. 3, 1838, ae. 84. 

233. ^Phineas, b. Dec. 15, 1755 ; d. Jan. 21, 1849, ae. 93. 

234. ^Daniel, b. Jan. 3, 1758 ; d. Sept. 14, 1831, ae. 73. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 21 

23o. ^Frederick, b. May 12, 1760 ; d. June 12, 1802, ae. 42. 

236. 'Moses Augustus, b. Nov. 8, 1762; d. March 11, 1841, ae. 78. 

237. sjason, b. Aug. 1764; d. Dec. 18, 1800, ae. 36. 

238. ^Elizabeth, b. Nov. 16, 1766 ; d. June 3, 1851, ae. 84. 

239. i^Samuel Dwight, b. Dec. 29, 1768; d. Oct. 26, 1801, ae.33. 

240. iiAbiah, b. June 5, 1771 ; d. May, 1842, ae. 71. 

Ruth m. Dea. Jonathan Porter ; lived in Hatfield ; had 10 children. 
Elizabeth m. John B. Alfred ; lived in Westfield ; had 5 children. 
Jerusha m. Jesse Cady, Esq. ; lived in W. Stafford ; had 9 children. 
Anna and Abiah were unm.; d. and were buried in Westfield. 

(78) 

Aaron Chapin of Somers, son of Ebenezer and Ruth Chapin of 
Enfield, b. Sept. 28, 1714 ; m. Sybel Markham of Enfield. Mr. 
Aaron Chapin d. April 19, ISOS, ae. 94. Mrs. Sybel Chapin d. 
March 11, 1791, ae. 72. Children— 

241. ^Sybel, m. Mr. Gurley of Mansfield ; had 4 children. 

242. ^Hiram, ui. Sarah Bartlett ; lived and d. in Surry, N.H.; 
had 6 children. 

243. ^Azubah, m. Mr. Root ; lived in Vermont ; had 2 children, 
Thomas and Azubah. 

244. •*Aaron, m.Phebe Spencer; lived in Stafford ; had 8 children. 

245. ^Justus, had 2 wives and 13 children. 

247. ^Gideon, d. in the war. 

248. ''Jeremiah, m. Chloe Cooley ; lived in Somers, and had 
2 children, *Chloe and. Cynthia. He d. Nov. 19, 1834, ae. 77 ; his 
wife Chloe d. Jan. 21, 1831, ae. 72. 

249. ^Oliver, m. Elizabeth Allen of Surry, N. H.; lived in 
Somers on his father's farm ; had 8 children. 

250. ^Delight, m. Phineas Jones ; lived and d. in Otis, Mass. 

251. i"Joseph, unm.; d. in Somers, Feb. 15, 1817, ae. 52. 

(79) 

Elias Chapin of Somers, son of Ebenezer and Ruth Chapin of 
Enfield, b. Oct. 22, 1716 ; m. Sarah Pratt. Mr. Elias Chapin d. 
Sept. 6, 1791, ae. 75. Mrs. Sarah Chapin d. Oct. 12, 1755, ae. 50. 



* Chloe, the daughter of Jeremiah Chapin, m. Boaz Terry ; lived in Enfield ; had 4 sons and 
4 daughters. Cynthia d. March 13, 1819, ae. 23. 



22 FOURTH GENKKATION. 

The second wife of Elias Cliapin was tlie widow of Cornelius 
Uavis. She lived with her first husband o)i Somers mountain, nearly 
half a mile south of the Aaron Chapin place. She had 5 Davis 
children. Her maiden name was Submit Dickinson. She had the 
name of and was aunt to the wife of David Dudley Field, D. D. of 
Stockbridge, Mass. , 

Children — 

252. 'Elias, lived a while in Stafford ; removed to Western N. Y. 
where he d. 253. ^David, d. young. 

254. ^Asa, lived and d. in Mansfield, Ct., March 14, 1832, ae. 85. 
Sally Clark was his second wife. She d. Dec. 10, 1822, ae. 73. 

255. '*Sarah, m. Landlord Charles Sheldon lived and d. in Somers. 
He d. March 14, 1832, d. ae. 85. His wife d. Dec. 10, 1822, ae. 73. 

256. ■^Mary, m. Joseph Sexton of Somers. 

257. "Lucy, m. John McGregory, Newport, N. H. where she d. 
May 29, 1834, ae. 73. 

258. ''Lovisa, m. Abel McGregory of Newport, N. H. where 
they lived several years, and removed to the State of Maine. 

(SO) 

Reuben Chapin, son of Ebenezer and Ruth Chapin, b. Sept. 13, 
1718 ; m. and had 7 children — 

259. iJohn. 260. ^garah. 261. ^Eunice. 

262. ^Olive, and 3 others. 

(81) 

Charles Chapin of Salsbury, Ct., son of Ebenezer and Ruth, 
b. Dec. 26, 1720 ; m. Anna Camp of Guilford, Ct. Mr. Charles 
Chapin, d. in East Bloomfield, N. Y., ae. 93. Children — 

263. lAnna, m. Elijah Gates of Lenox. 

264. ^Charles C, m. Theodosia. 

265. ^Phineas, m. Love Hurd of Salsbury. 

266. "^Daniel, m. Parthena Wheeler of Salsbury, Ct. 

267. ■'Ruth, m. Winthrop Valentine of Westfield, Mass. 

268. "^Rhoda, m. Ensign Caanan. 

269. '^Oliver, m. Ellen Adams ; lived in East Bloomfield, N. Y.; 
d. without children. 

270. ^Lucy, m. Mr. Buckley of Salsbury. 

271. ^Phebe, m. Mr. Reed of Salsbury. 

272. i^Chloe, the 2d wife of Mr. Reed. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 23 

273. "Abigail, m. Mr. Lamb of Salsbury. 

274. i^Heman, m. Electa Humplirey ; had 6 daughters and 2 
sons ; lived in East Bloomfield, X. Y. 

275. i^Luther, m. Hannah Ackland. 

(88) 

David Chapin, son of David and Sarah, b. March 13, 1709-10 ; 
m. May 3, 1739, Rachel Lumbard, dau. of Ebenezer Lumbard. 
Mr. David Chapin d. May 16, 1764. Children— 

276. iJathiel, b. March 1, 1740; d. Dec. 8, 1740. 

277. 2Enoch, b. June 1, 1742. 

278. ^Editha, b. March 5, 1743. 

279. ■•Rachel, b. June 14, 1745 ; d. Oct. 6, 1761. 

280. ^Phebe, b. July 2,1748 ; ni. Nov. 12, 1767, Israel Williston. 

281. «David Justus B., b. Jan. 14, 1752. 

282. "Obed, )Twin« 

283. ^Jonathan, i ^'•^"^^' d. Nov. 15, 1754. 

284. sjube, b. July 21, 1754. 

(89) 

JosiAH Chapin, son of David and Sarah, b. June 23, 1712 ; 
m. (1) Dec. 19, 1734, Mindwell Holton ; m. (2) Martha AYoleott. 
Mrs. Mindwell Chapin d. Oct. 8, 1746, and was buried near the 
graves of Japhet and Abaline. Mrs. Martha Chapin d. Jan. 8, 1785, 
ae. 66. Mr. Josiah Chapin d. Feb. 1, 1785. He was a blacksmith. 
Residence for a time, Ludlow, Mass. Children by 1st wife, Mindwell — ' 

285. ^Oliver, d. Oct. 1, 1735. 

286. 2Josiah, b. Dec. 12, 1736 ; d. Feb. 6, 1737. 

287. sjosiah, b. April 11, 1738; d. Dec. 1810. 

288. ^Mindwell, b. April 5, 1740. 

289. ^Oliver, b. Oct. 18, 1742; d. Aug. 31, 1812, ae. 70. 

290. '^Mehetable, b.Sept.4,1746; m. Caleb Stebbinsof Wilbraham. 

Children by second wife, Martha — 

291. ■'Abiah, b. Aug. 1,1750 ; m. Joseph Collins ; lived in Somers. 

292. ''Israel, b. Sept. 18, 1751 ; d. April 25, 1810. 

293. ^Anna, b. June 3, 1754 ; d. Nov. 3, 1800, ae. 47. 

294. i"Judah, b. April 17, 1756. 

295. "Abigail, b. July 20, 1758 ; m. Jan. 8, 1783, Pliny Mosely 
of Westfield, being his first wife. Pliny's dau. Sybil by second 
wife, m. Rev. Caleb Bingham, and went as Missionary to the 
Sandwich Islands. 



24 FOURTH GENERATION. 

(92) 

Joseph Chapin, son of David and Sarah, b. June 11, 1718; 
ni. Jane Allen Woolcot, dau. of Henry and Abigail Woolcot. Mr. 
Joseph Chapin removed with all his family from Longmeadow to 
Windsor, Vt., and d. at Weathersfield, Vt., June 11, 1803. Children— 

296. 1 Jane, b. Aug. 17, 1746 ; m. Oliver Lovell of llockingham, Vt. 

297. ^Solomon, b. Aug. 19, 1749. 

298. ^Gideon, b. April 16, 1754 ; m. Lydia Potwine, dau. of 
Rev. Thomas Potwine. 

299. -iTriphena, b.May 19,1756 ; m.Asahel Stiles of E. Windsor,Ct. 

300. ^Joseph, b. Oct. 28, 1758. 

301. "^Abigail, m. Benjamin Potwine. 

302. ^Thankful, d. Oct. 20, 1761. 

(95) 

Dea. Edward Chapin, son of David and Sarah, b. Feb. 16, 
1724 ; m. July 6, 1752, Eunice Colton, dau. of William and Mary 
Colton of Longmeadow. Dea. Edward Chapin d. Jan. 6, 1800, 
ae. 76. 

After the death of Dea. David Chapin in 1772, his son Edward 
was chosen to fill his place as deacon of the church, and filled the 
office for 28 years, until the time of his death in 1800. He was 
also Clerk of the parish for several years ; and was a most devoted, 
pious and useful man. Residence, Chicopee street, nearly opposite 
the present residence of Mr. Marshall Pease. 

Children — 

304. lAaron, b. April 20, 1753. 

305. ^Edward, b. Sept. 3, 1755 ; d. June 22, 1795, ae. 40. 

306. ^Lncretia, b. Sept. 25, 1757 ; d. 1766. 

307. ^Lucius, b. April 25, 1760. 

308. ^Calvin, b. July 22, 1763 ; d. March 17, 1851. 

309. ^Alpheus, b. Nov. 15, 1765; d. Feb. 18, 1826, ae. 60. 

310. ■'Amzi, b. March 2, 1768. 

311. ^EuniceLucretia, b.Julyl2, 1771; m.Rev.(189) Joel Chapin. 

Most of Dea. Edward's children left the paternal home in early 
life. Aaron went to Hartford, Ct.; Edward d. in Chicopee; Lucius 
went South, and it appears by his letters to his father which are 
now by rae, that he was somewhat engaged In school teaching, 
and I suppose finally settled in Virginia. One of his descendants is 
a clergyman, and I have endeavored but in vain to get from him 



FOURTH GENERATION. 25 

some information respecting Lucius' descendants. Calvin was the 
well known Eev. Calvin Chapin, D. D. of Rockyhill, Ct. Alpheus 
(1. in Chicopee, unm. Amzi I suppose settled in Kentucky. 

(96) 

Benoni Chapin, son of David and Sarah, b. Jan. 24, 1726 ; 
m. (1) pub. 1754, to Esther Lewis of Torrington, Ct.; m. (2) Mary 
Sykes of Ludlow. Mrs. Esther Chapin d. Oct. 2, 1760, ae. 30. 
Mr. Benoni Chapin d. Oct. 1799, ae. 74. Mrs. Mary Chapin d. 
Aug. 19, 1819, ae. 81. Children by (1) wife— 

312. iLewis, b. Sept. 30, 1755. 

313. 2Charity, b. Jan. 21, 1757 ; m. Job AYhite of South Had- 
ley;* d. about 1784, ae. 27. 

314. ^Benoni, b. July 9, 1758 ; d. in Vt. at an advanced age, unm. 

315. ^Ichabod, b. Sept. 26, 1760. 
Children by (2) wife— 

316. ^Esther, b. June 25, 1764 ; m. Mr. Day of West Spring- 
field ; went to Canada. 

317. 6David, b. March 2, 1766; graduated at Yale College; 
became insane; d. June 26, 1802, ae. 36. 

318. 'Mary, b. Aug. 25, 1769 ; m. late in life, Mr. Strong of 
Granville, Mass. 

319. ^Mindwell, b. 1771 ; m. Timothy Montague of South Had- 
ley ; removed to Bolton, on Lake George, N.Y., and from thence to 
a I greater distance West. One of her sons graduated at Amherst 
College, and is an ordained clergyman. 

(97) 

Jonathan Chapin, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth, m. pub. 
June 10, 1745, to Sarah Morse of Wallingford. Children — 

320. iMehetable, b. Nov. 22, 1746 ; d. June 5, 1811, unm. 

321. ^Susannah, b. March 12, 1748 ; d. Dec. 11, 1751. 

322. ^Lois, b. Nov. 28, 1749 ; m. Lemuel Hastings of Green- 
field. Left one child. 

323. ^Elizabeth, b. April 7, 1751 ; m. Gad Horton of Skipmuck. 

324. ^Susanna, b. Sept. 28, 1753 ; m. Benjamin Phelps of Som- 
ers. Left no children. 

325. ^Daniel, b. June 10, 1755. 

* He Hved principally in Northampton, where he was for many years keeper of the jail. She 
had four children, — three of them d. in infancy. Her daughter. Charity, b. June 27, 1779 ; m. 
Sept. 16, 1798, Nicholas Goddard of Rutland, Vt., a silversmith and clock-maker. 



26 FOURTH OENEUATION. 

32G. ■'Sarah, b. Oct. 19, 175G ; in. Mr. Tiiik of Greenfield ; had 
6 chikhx'n. 

327. ^Ezekiel, b. June 29, 1758. 

(lOG) 
Timothy Chapin, son of Jonathan and Elizabeth, b. March 8, 
1733 ; m. Martha Wells, dau. of Samuel AVclls of Hatfield. Pub. 
Aug.8,1755. Mr. Timothy Chapind. Dec. 30, 1762, ae.29. Children— 

328. ^Achsa, b. July 5, 1756 ; m. Philip Smith. 

329. 2Ezra, b. Feb. 12, 1758. 

330. .^Timothy, b. Feb. 1760. 
331., ^Jehial, b. Dec. 19, 1761. 

Jlrs. Martha Chapin ni. (2) Nov. 14, 1765, William White. 
William and his wife, after their marriage, spent most of their days 
in Chicopee. He d. in Hadley, Dec. 30, 1810, ae. 78. Cliildreu of 
William and Martha — 

332. ^William, m. and had a family ; lived in Vt. 

333. 'Lydia, m. and had a family ; lived in Vt. 

334. ^Samuel, d. unm.; united with the Shakers, Lebanon, N.Y, 

335. 'Gad, resided in Springfield, (Chicopee,) Mass.; d. about 
1813. He m. Flavia Van Horn of Chicopee, and had — 336. 'Porter 
Welles, b. Dec. 6, 1808 ; d. uum. 337. ^Angeline, b. July 31, 
1811 ; m., and d. when a young woman. 

(114) 

Henry Chapin, son of Henry and Ester, b. June 7, 1721 ; m. 
Marv Butler of Hartford. Children — 

338. 'Mary, d. unm., ae. about 70. 

339. ^Catharine, m, Jan. 11, 1816, to Dea. Moses Stebbins, 
South Wilbraham. No children. 

340. ^Plenry Marshtield. 

341. ■'Margaret, b. March 5; m. In. en. Dec. 2, 1811, to Reuben 
Hitchcock of South Wilbraham. No children. 

342. ^James 0., b. March 5, 1760 ; d. young, unm. 

343. ^Roderick. 344. ''John, d. young, unm, 

(115) 

Abner Chapin, son of Henry and Ester, b. July 25, 1722 ; m. 
(1) Dec. 23, 1742, Abigail Warner. Abner Chapin m. (2) to Tabitha 
Allen of East Windsor, Ct., Feb. or March, 1781. She d. April 29, 
1790. Abner, the father, settled in the south part of Wilbraham, 
near Scantic River, as appears from a deed dated June 8, 1748, 



FOURTH GEMERATIOX. 27 

where some of his descendants of the third and fourth generations 
now reside. Children — 

345. lAbner, b. May 29, 1749 ; d. April 1, 1814. 

346. 2Abigail, b. May 14, 1751. 

347. ^Esther, b. Dec. 7, 1753. 

348. ^Margaret, b. Sept. 14, 1755. 

349. ^Lucy, b. Aug. 19, 1757. 

350. "Maria, b. June 7, 1760. 

351. ^Samuel, b. June 30, 1762 ; d. April 14, 1837. 

352. sTimothy, b. March 5, 1764 ; d. Oct. 5, 1846. 

353. ^Asenath, b. Dec. 6, 1782. 

Abigail m. John Langdon ; had 4 children — Hannah, John, Achsa 
and Martin who lived in Ohio. Esther m. Timothy Brown of Long- 
meadow ; had 5 children — Timothy, Francis, Esther, Cyrus and 
Dorcas, twins. Margaret, m. Stephen Davis of Mouson, Sept. 1787 ; 
had 1 child, Julius who lived in Onondaga Co., N. Y. Lucy, m. Asa 
Bullard of Monson, March, 1780. Maria, m. Abner Cooley of Mon- 
son, Aug. 1783 ; lived in Cattaraugus Co., N.Y.; had 6 children, 
Asher, Aretus, Harmon, Ellas, Mariah and Lorenzo. Asenath, m. 
Crocker Waterhouse of Somers, Ct. ; had 1 child, named Lyman. 

(116) 

Seth Chapin, son of Henry and Ester, b. April 20, 1724 ; m. 
June 8, 1758, Hannah Sikes. Mr. Seth Chapin d. Feb. 13, 1806, 
ae. 81. Mrs. Hannah Chapin d. April 20, 1807, ae. 79 or 81. His 
residence was on Chicopee street, a few rods south of where ]Mr. 
Sidney Chapin now lives. Children — 

354. iSeth, b. Aug. 17, 1758-9. 

355. 2Zenas, b. Jan. 8, 1760. 

356. ^Hannah, b. Sept. 7, 1763 ; d. 1778. 

357. ^Zerah, b. July 31, 1767. 

(117) 

Joseph Chapin, son of Henry and Ester, b. Jan. 30, 1726 ; m. 
pub. Dec. 8, 1748, to Elizabeth Field of Somers. Mr. Joseph 
Chapin d. Feb. 25, 1811, ae. 85. Children— 

358. iJoseph, b. Sept. 8, 1749. 

359. 2Levi, b. Aug. 23, 1751. 

360. ^Beulah, b. Sept. 16, 1753 ; m. pub. Dec. 6, 1779, Capt, 
Luther Hitchcock of Springfield ; d. April 17, 1814, ae. 61. 

361. -iPaul, b. Oct. 23, 1755; d. in Monson, Sept. 13, 1841, ae.86. 



28 FOURTH GKiVERATION. 

362. ^Ithamar, b. Aug. 15, 1757 ; d. Oct. 7, 1758. 

363. '■.ithamar, b. Oct. 15, 1759. 

364. ycsse, b. May 20, 1762. 

365. ^Eli, b. Sept. 21, 1764. 

366. "Elizabeth, ) , * on i nca 

367. i"Mary, ] ^- ^^"^'- ^"' ^'^^- ni. Mr. Burbank ; had issue. 

(118) 
AViLLiAM Chapfn, son of Henry and Ester, b. April 19, 1729 ; 
in. Feb. 21, 1754, to (174) Martha Ohapin, dau. of Japhet and 
Thankful Chapin. Mr. Wm. Chapin d. Nov. 10, 1777, ae. 48. Mrs. 
Martha Chapin d. May 10, 1775, ae. 42. Children — 

368. iMartha, b. May 8, 1755 ; d. 1756. 

369. nVilliam, b. April 26, 1758 ; d. 1826. 

370. 3japhet, b. Aug. 8, 1760. 

371. "iHenry, b. July 22, 1762. 

372. ^Martha, b. Aug. 24, 1764; m. Mr. Sexton, and removed to 
Ohio ; had issue. 

373. BTabitha, b. Oct. 19, 1765 ; d. 1769. 

374. ^Tabitha, b. Aug. 17, 1770 ; m. Mr. Allen, and removed to 
N. Y.; had issue. 

375. "Philana, m. Mr. Buckingham; had issue. One son went to 0. 

(120) 

Benjamin Chapin, son of Benjamin and Hannah, b. July 17, 
1708 ; m. April 3, 1735, Anna Howard of Springfield. Mr. Benja- 
min Chapin d. March 8, 1762. Children— 

376. ifienjamiu, b. May 24, 1736; m. March 4, 1760, to Marga- 
ret Colton ; (suppose he d. in Ludlow.) 

377. 2Annah, b. Oct. 19, 1737 ; d. unm. 

378. ^Editha, b. May 19, 1739 ; d. in Northfield. 

379. 'Charles, b. Aug. 20, 1742. 

380. ^Zadoek, b. July 2, 1745. 

381. "Abigail, b. Dec. 3, 1746 ; m. Israel Mosely of Westfield. 

382. ^Child, d. Nov. 23, 1748. 

383. n'riphcna, b. June 26, 1751 ; m. Mr. Colton of Ludlow. 

384. *"Bathsheba, b. Oct. 18, 1752 ; m. (1) Jonathan Smith of 
South Hadley,— he d. Dec. 19, 1809; m. (2) Reuben Dresser of 
Goshen, Mass., and d. at South Hadley, July 9, 1820, leaving a 
family of children, by her first husband. 

*Mrp. Orange Chapin of Willimansett and tlit' Widow of the late William Hatfield of Spring- 
field are granddaughters of Bathsheba. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 29 

(121) 

Isaac Chapin, sou of Benjamin and Hannah, b. Aug. 18, 1710 ; 
m. June 29, 1734, Experience Warriner. Mr. Isaac Chapin d. 
Nov. 22, 1789, ae. 79. Mrs. Experience Chapin d. Aug. 22, 1777, 
ae. 67. 

Mr. Isaac Chapin was partially insane during a portion of his life. 
He was possessed of some singular ideas. For instance, he supposed 
that he owned nearly or quite all of the pine plains lying east of the 
valley, Chicopee street. He made a practice of measuring his land 
by pacing it, that is, counting five paces or steps for one rod, and ho 
supposed himself so accurate in his measures that he used to remark 
that he could pace it out to the forty-ninth part of a horse hair. 
When I was a boy, I often heard the remark made, when a person 
was very particular, you are as " exact" or as " particular as uncle 
Isaac." 

Children — 

385. ^Isaac, b. March 7, 1735; d. at Lake George, Dec. 3, 1755. 

386. ^Martin, b. Oct. 6, 1738. 

387. nVilliam, b. Aug. 17, 1740 ; d. 1740. 

388. -iZebulon, b. Nov. 11, 1741. 

389. nVilliam, b. Nov. 7, 1743 ; d. Dec. 3, 1823, ae. 80. 

390. ^Experience, b. Dec. 15, 1745 ; m. Reuben Morgan of 
Northfield. 

391. 'Gideon, b. April 13, 1748; d. Aug. 24, 1788, of the lock- 
jaw, occasioned by running a nail into his foot. 

392. ^Mercy, b. Oct. 15, 1750 ; m. pub. May 11, 1775, Joel Day 
of West Springfield ; d. April 9, 1814, ae. 65. 

393. ^Vashti, b. Sept. 6, 1753 ; m. (398) Solomon Chapin ; d. in 
West Springfield, April 8, 1830, ae. 77. 

(126) 

George Chapin, son of Benjamin ahd Hannah, b. Dec. 13, 1722; 
m. May 26, 1743, Thankful Sikes. Mr. George Chapin d. Dec. 10, 
1782, ae. 60. Mrs. Thankful Chapin d. March 6, 1797, ae. 75. 
Children — 

394. ^George, b. March 14, 1744; d. April 16, 1794. 

395. ^Thankful, b. Sept. 29, 1745 ; d. Dec. 20, 1810, ae. 64. 

396. ^Hannah, b. July 24, 1747 ; d. unm. 

397. ^Daniel, b. May 4, 1749 ; d. Dec. 24, 1762. 

398. ^Solomon, b. Feb. 24, 1751. 



30 FOURTH GKNBRATION, 

399. «Abiah, b. March 20, 1753; d. June 4, 1754. 

400. ^Abiah, h. March 9, 1755; d. April 19, 1835. 

401. ^Lovina, 1). March 14, 1757; d. 

402. »Tirzah, b. May 11, 1759 ; d. Aug. 29, 1828. 

403. i"Lovica, b. Nov. 12, 17(31 ; d. April 11, 1786. 

405. 'iRhoda, b. Jan. 6, 1763 ; d. Aug. 2, 1767. 

406. i^iioxanna Salvania, b. March 31, 1765. 

407. ^^Daniel, b. Aug. 1, 1767. 

Thankful, the daughter, m. (387) William Chapin, son of Isaac. 
Abiah m. Moses Bliss, and resided near her father. Lovina m. 
Feb. 26, 1804, Capt. Jonathan Worthington of West Springfield. 
No issue. Tirzah, m. Jonathan Purchase. In. m. ent. Dec. 8, 1788. 
Had no issue. Lovica m. April 4, 1782, Peresh Hitchcock. Had 
issue. Roxanna Salvania, ni. Beriah Howard of Springfield, and 
removed to Winhall, Vt. 

(128) 

Ephraim Chapin, son of Benjamin and Hannah, b. Oct. 29, 1729; 
m. May 1, 1755, (184) Jemima, dau. of Abel and Hannah Chapin. 
Capt. Ephraim Chapin d. Oct. 12, 1805. Mrs. Jemima Chapin d. 
Nov. 1, 1804. 

Capt. Ephraim Chapin built the house where his grandson Briant 
now (1862) resides, and kept a tavern there for a great number of 
years. He was a good farmer, and fatted many cattle for market. 
He was Captain of a military company, and was out with a part or 
all of his company during a portion of the old French war. As the 
documents have been lost I am unable to give the particulars. 

Children — 

408. lAbel, b. April 5, 1756 ; d. Oct. 10, 1831. 

409. ^Ephraim, b. April 3, 1759 ; d. Dec. 26. 

410. ^Jemima, b. Feb. 19, 1762 ; d. 

411. ■^Benjamin, ) , . ' ^„„. d. 1810. 

412. ^Bezaleel, i °- ^"^- ^^' ^ ^^^- d. Sept. 19, 1764, ae. 5 weeks 

and a few days. 

413. ^Kezia, b. July 23, 1766 ; d. Nov. 28, 1822. 

414. ''Bezaleel, b. March 9, 1769 ; d. June 14, 1812. 

415. ^Frederick, b. April 9, 1771 ; d. March, 1848. 

Jemima m. Martin Smith of East Windsor. They removed to 
Ludlow, Mass. and died there, leaving one son and several daugh- 
ters. Kezia m. (520) Moses Chapin, son of Moses and Bethia. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 31 

(134) 

David Chapin, (probably) son of Caleb and Sarah, m. Margaret. 
Had one daughter — 

416. iLydia, b. March 11, 1721. (See City of Boston Records.) 

After the death of Lydia, the descendants of David Chapin, son 
of Samuel, by the name of Chapin, probably became extinct, as 
nothing further respecting them has been found on record. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

(140) 

V. Gad Chapin, son of Samuel and Anna, ni. Abigail. Gad 
removed with his family to Cooperstown, N. Y. Children — 

417. ^Samuel, b. Oct. lo, 17.57 ; d. Dec. 2, 1757. 

418. 2Aun, b. Aug. 18, 1759. 

419. ^Samuel, b. Sept. 24, 1760. 

420. ■^Charlotte, b. Jan. 12, 1763. 

421. ^Gad, b. March 20, 1766. 

422. «Dan, b. June 16, 1768. 

423. '^Israel, b. Feb. 18, 1770. 

(141) 
Jeremiah Chapin, son of Samuel and Anna, m. pub. May 6, 
1769, to Caroline Fowler of Springfield. Jeremiah, the father, 
removed with his family to Whitestown, N. Y., and he d. there. 
Children — 

424. ^Laura. 425. ^Jeremiah. 426. ^Theodore. 
427. ^Clarissa. 428. ^Orphia. 429. cAshbel. 

(142) 

Reuben Chapin, son of Samuel and Anna, m. pub. Jan. 16, 1761, 
to Mary Mirrick, 3d of Springfield. Reuben, the father, d. at the 
residence of his son-in-law, Noah Frost in Wilbraham, being at the 
time of his death about 80 years of age. Mary, the mother, d. in 
West Springfield, Oct. 23, 1800, ae. 64. Children— 

430. ^Lovica, b. July 25, 1765; m. Nathan Colton of Wilbraham. 

431. ^Jeremiah Mirrick, b. Nov. 7, 1761 ; d. when about 16. 

432. ^Mary, b. March 23, 1763; m. Noah Frost of Ludlow; 
spent most of their days in Wilbraham. 

433. ^Eunice, m. Feb. 9, 1797, Aaron Elweil of Boston. 



32 FIFTH GENERATION. 

434. Jonathan, d. Jan. 12, 1844, ae. 75. 

435. ''Reuben. 

436. 'Lois, m. Justin Alvord of South lludley, being his 2d wife ; 
d. May 29, 18G0, ae. S3. 

437. ^Submit, m. Alpheus Corbon of Granville, N. Y. 

(149) 

Joel Chapin of Bernardston, son of Caleb and Catharine, b. 
'April 22, 1732; m. Miss Burke. He was in the old French war — 
was 18 years old — saw his father after he was killed by the Indians. 
Children — 

438. ^Joel, d. of consumption, at Bernardston, Mass. 

439. ^Israel, d. at Bernardston. 

440. ^Eddy, res. at Guilford, Vt.; d. there. 

441. •^Solomon, res. at Guilford, Vt.; d. there. 

442. ^Gratia, res. at Bernardston ; m. Joel Warner ; d. in Ber- 
nardston. 

443. '^Oliver, d. at Thompson, Ct. 

(151) 
Capt. Caleb Chapin of Bernardston, son of Caleb and Catha- 
rine, b. July 2 or 13, 1736; m. Rebecca Bascom of Greenfield. 
Mr. Caleb Chapin's occupation was making mill stones laying stone 
and farming. He was Captain of the Militia Company in Bernard- 
ston, and went with the Hampshire troops under Gen. Shepherd to 
' Springfield in the Shays Rebellion. He had two sons with him. 
Zalmuua went as a soldier and Cyrenius as waiter to his father. 
Capt. C. was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, at Cambridge, Mass. 
He d. Nov. 10, 1815. Children— 

444. iCaleb, b. Aug. 20, 1759 ; d. Nov. 28, 1838, ae. 79. 
^Rebecca, b. Nov. 26, 1761 ; d. May 12, 1766. 

445. ^Zalmuna, b. April 3, 1764 ; d. May 20, 1854, ae. 90. 

446. ■^Consider, b. Aug. 26, 1766 ; res. Elk Creek, Tenn.; d. in 
1860, ae. 94. 

447. ^Cyrenius, b. Feb. 7, 1769 ; lived and d. at Buffalo, N. Y. 

(152) 

Hezekiah Chaplv of Bernardston, son of Caleb and Catharine, 
b. Nov. 11, 1738 ; m. Miss Smith. Children— 

448. ^Catharine, m. Seth Shattuck ; d. in Vermont. 

449. ^Hezekiah, m. widow Elenwood. 

450. "Cynthia, deceased. 451. ''Sally, deceased. 
452. ^Nelly, m. in Guilford, Vt. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 33 

(153) 

Daniel Chapin of Ley den, son of Caleb and Catharine, b. Sept. 
30, 1741 ; m. Susannah Wells. Children— 

453. ^Hepzibah, d. in Mass. 

454. ^i^uth, m. (1) Swift; she d. near Lewistown, N.Y.; m. (2) 
Jacobs ; has 2 sons — are Mormons. 

455. ^Sabra, d. young. 

456. •^Daniel, d. in Leyden, ae. 40 ; m. A. Nichols, his 2d wife's 
sister — was m. 3 times. 

457. ^Ezra, d. in Windenhall, Vt.; his wife's name was Tyler; she 
d. in a snow drift. 

458. ^Susannah, m. Salem Baker, and d. in 1852. 

459. ■'Calvin, m. a Miller. Res. Black River Country, N. Y. 

(156) 

Selah Chapin of Leyden, son of Caleb and Catharine, b. Aug. 29, 
1751 ; m. Oct. 15, 1772, to Jerusha Burnham, b. March 27, 1752. 
Mr. Selah Chapin d. May 30, 1830. Mrs. Jerusha Chapin d. June 
30, 1817. He was in the war of the Revolution two months at 
Cambridge, Mass. Children — 

460. iSelah, b. in Leyden, Mass., Sept. 10, 1773. 

461. 2Abner, b. July 22, 1775; d. in Dryden, N.Y.,Nov.29,1829. 

462. ^Hannah, b. Aug. 29, 1777. -^Jerusha. 

463. ^Elisha, b. May 24, 1782 ; d. June 23, 1835. 

464. "Abigail. 

465. 'Manly, b. 1790; d. April 10, 1800. 

466. ^Sylvia, b. 1787 ; d. Jan. 20, 1794. 

467. ^Lorenzo. 468. ^''Leonard B. 

(158) 

Enoch Chapin, son of Elisha and Miriam, b. Sept. 16, 1740; 
m. Eunice Nash, daughter of Daniel Nash of South Hadley, b. Oct. 8, 
1744; d. Nov. 27, 1794. Mr. Enoch Chapin d. Oct. 28, 1802. 
Children — 

469. ^Cleone, b. Aug. 31, 1768; d. Sept. 12, 1832. 

470. ^ciimene, b. June 10, 1770 ; m. Feb. 16, 1799, Ezekiel 
Day of West Springfield ; d. Feb. 15, 1842. 

471. ^Enoch, b. July 26, 1772 ; d. Aug. 6, 1779. 

472. ^Eunice, b. Dec. 5, 1777 ; d. Aug. 31, 1783. 

473. ^Clarissa, b. Aug. 24, 1779 ; d. Nov. 22, 1812. 

474. '^Son, b. Dec. 16, 1783 ; d. 

5 



34 FIFTH GENERATIOxN. 

475. ■'Enoch, b. Nov. 16, 1784. 

476. ^Sewell, b. May 18. 1788; d. May 9, 1842, at Geneseo.N.Y. 

Cleone m. Capt. William Taylor, Dec. 28, 1798. The said Capt. 
William Taylor was suffocated in a burning house in New York, 
December 16, 1838, ae. 74. 

(162) 

Leonard Chapin, son of Elisha and Miriam, m. pub. Jan. 17, 
1767, to Mary Ely. Children— 

477. ^Leonard, b. Aug. 27, 1767. 

478. ^Coffin, b. April 22, 1769. 

(165) 

Elisha Chapin, sou of Elisha and Miriam, m. Aug. 16, 1764,- 
Eunice Jones. j\Irs. Eunice Chapin d. Oct. 30, 1831, ae.88. Cliildren — 

479. ^Clarissa, b. Dec. 24, 1764 ; m. Erastus Morgan, Dec. 31, 
1789 ; d. Jan. 21, 1841, ae. 76. 

480. ^Tirzah, b. March 21, 1767 ; m. to Abner Ferre, in. ent. 
March 3, 1789. 

481. ^Eunice, b. Feb. 22, 1769; m. Charles Ferre, Feb. 17, 1790. 

482. ■*Huldah, ni. Hezekiah Jones ; d. in Vt. about 1804, 

483. ^Elisha, b. Feb. 29, 1774. 

484. "Mirriam, m. Daniel Littlefield of Essex, Yt., Feb. 8, 1802. 

485. ''Sibyl, b. Aug. 1779 ; m. Enoch Ashley, in. ent. Oct. 13, 1810. 

486. sRiley. 

487. ''Leonard, b. 1778 ; unm.; was Lieut, in army, 1812 ; d. at 
Sacket's Harbor. 

(166) 

Elijah Chapin, son of Thomas and Jerusha, m. Mr. Elijah 
Chapin d. in Windsor, Vt., ae. 87. Children — 

488. iPeletiah, b. 1746. 

489. ^Jerusha, b. Aug. 1748 ; m. Daniel Sexton ; d. in Salsbury, 
Vt., without issue, ae. 92 or 93. -^ ,- ., 

490. ^Elijah, b. June, 1750. 491. ^Pwcy,' b. Sept. 1752. 
492. ^Calvin, b. Jan. 1755. 493. sSilvanus. b. June, 1757. 
494. ''Thomas, b. Sept. 1760. 495. ''Uriel, b. about 1762. 
496. ^Hannah, b.Sept.l765; supposed. in Spencertown,N.Y., unm. 

(168) 
Thomas Chapin, son of Thomas and Jerusha, m. Lydia of 
Sunderland. Mr. Thomas Chapin d. in 1758, ae. about 30. _ Lydia, 



FIFTH GENERATION. 35 

his widow, m. John Amesden of Deerfield, and d. in 1812, ae. 93. 
They had one son — 

497. ^Thomas ; he united with the first Church in Belchertown 
in 1785. 

(170) 

Luther Chapin, (suppose) son of Thomas and Jerusha of Bel- 
chertown, Mass.; m. He removed to what is now Newport, Vt. 
Children — 

498. iThomas. 499. ^Alvin. 

500. 3Eber, d. in 1839. 

501. ^Consider ; if living, is in Topsham, Vt. 

502. ■^John A., b. 1791 ; has a son, John A. 

503. "One other son. 

(175) 

Nathan Chapin, son of Japhet and Thankful Chapin, b. Feb. 3, 
1735 ; m. pub. Dec. 15, 1757, to Mary Smith of Hunterstown, now 
Ashfield. Mr. Nathan Chapin removed from Springfield (Chicopee) 
to Ashfield, and d. at the residence of his son Japhet in Bucklaud, 
Feb. 13, 1830, in the 96th year of his age. 

Serg. Nathan Chapin and several others from Springfield were 
taken prisoners at the battle of Ticonderoga, July 5, 1777. In the 
midst of battle, (he states that) he took shelter behind a tree, the 
bark of which was completely torn off by the balls, but he escaped 
unharmed. He and several other American prisoners were ordered 
to go to Crown Point to mow grass. They were furnished with 
provisions, a bottle of rum, scythes, grindstone, &c. And having 
only one inhabitant in the boat with them, they entertained him so 
generously with the rum that he fell into a very sound sleep : they 
threw the grindstone into the water, rowed the boat to a port of 
their own choosing, and left their overseer to finish his nap, while he 
advanced with a quick step homeward, bringing nine of his compan- 
ions with him, the moss on the trees being in a great measure their 
guide through a trackless wilderness. In due time, they arrived 
home, to the great joy of themselves and anxious friends. The fore- 
going, I state principally from memory, having omitted several 
hours of sleep one night when a boy, to hear the old gentleman 
relate his adventures and hair-breadth escapes. 

Children — 

504. ^Mary, b. Aug. 31, 1759, in Springfield, Mass. 

505. 2japhet, b. Aug. 31, 1762, in Springfield. Mass. 



36 FIFTH GENERATION. 

506. ^Nathan, lived in Pliiladelpliia, Pa., and was a merchant. 
There was a time when he was reputed very wealthy; had two sons, 
names not given — one of them was an artist. 

507. ■^Ilufus, was a joiner by trade; removed to State of N. Y.; 
the Government hired him to teach his trade to the Indians at 
Oneida Castle, N. Y. He d. at the residence of his son-in-law. He 
lived in Marion county, town of Nelson ; had a family of children, 

names not known, except one son, Oren. 508. 'Chloe. 

509. '^Enos, b. July 2, 1774 ; had one daughter by his first wife, 
whose name was Saraii. He lived in St. Lawrence County, and for 
a time his business was jobbing. He with Esq. Broughton built the 
Russel turnpike, and afterwards was engaged largely in jol)s in 
building the canal. He afterwards took large jobs clearing land in 
Pennsylvania ; m. there, and raised up some children, names not 
given ; d. in Pennsylvania, time of death not given. 

(177) 

Simeon Chapin, son of Japhet and Thankful, b. Aug. 20, 1739, 
m. Lucy Doolittle, daughter of Rev. Benjamin Doolittle of North- 
field, Mass., 1765. Mr. Simeon Chapin d. May 20, 1799, ae. 60. 
Mrs. Lucy Chapin d. Sept. 2, 1824, ae. 83. Children— 

510. iRoswell, b. April 16, 1767 ; d. April 5, 1843. 

511. "Lucy, b. Nov. 1768 ; d. March 31, 1844. 

512. ^Melinda, b. Oct. 2, 1770. 

513. "Simeon, b. Aug. 1772 ; d. 1776. 

514. ^Thankful, b. Oct. 12, 1774 ; d. April 15, 1854. 

515. ^Asaph, b. June 1776 ; d. 1777. 

516. ^Sarah, b. June, 1779; d. 1780. 

517. «Lydia, b. March 21, 1778; d. 

518. ^Simeon, b. June 22, 1781 ; d. Feb. 5, 1844. 

519. i"Sarah, b. Dec. 3, 1784. 

Lucy, the daughter, m. Joseph Allen, and resided for the most 
part of the time after their marriage in that part of Springfield 
called Willimansett ; had a large family of children. He was 
drowned on Willimansett Falls in the Connecticut River. Melinda 
m. Mr. John Montague of Granby ; had issue. Thankful m. (1) 
(414) Bezaleel Chapin, son of Ephraim ; bed.: she m. (2) Elijah 
Torrey. She left a family of children by her first husband. Lydia 
m. Robert Wright ; removed to Vermont ; had issue. Sarah m. 
Towers Franklin ; had two sons. He dying, late in life, she m. 
Mr. Pomrov of Ct. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 37 

(186) 

Moses Chapin, son of Abel and Hannah Chapin, b. Feb. 25, 
1739; m. pub. Dec. 17, 1761, to (193) Bethia Chapin, daughter of 
Phineas and Bethia Chapin, b. 1740. Ens. Moses Chapin d. May 
19, 1771, ae. 32. Mrs. Bethia Chapin d. Nov. 10, 1780, ae. (grave- 
stone says) 38. 

Ens. Moses Chapin was taken prisoner with Maj. Rogers, at Lake 
George, Jan. 1757. He had obtained some knowledge of the Latin 
language previous to entering the army. Wliile detained as a pris- 
oner, he became acquainted with a priest (probably Catholic) who 
would converse with him in Latin but no other language. He fared 
for a time rather hardly, and made known his situation to this priest, 
after which he fared better. His Latin books are now in the pos- 
session of his grandson, Titus Chapin. His surveying instruments, 
and his " Love's Surveying," printed in London, 1760, are in the 
possession of the compiler. 

Bethia m. (2) Lieut. Jabez Snow, an officer in the war of the 
Revolution. 

Children — 

520. iMoses, b. July 11, 1762; d. Dec. 30, 1824, ae. 62. 

521. ^Hadassah, d. Aug. 3, 1808. 

522. ^Ashbel, b. Aug. 21, 1765 ; d. July 21, 1840, ae. 75. 

523. ^Editha, b. Aug. 27, 1767 ; d. young. 

524. sRufus, b. Sept. 3, 1770 ; d. Aug. 13, 1777, ae. 7. 

(ISS) 

Job Chapin, son of Shem and Anna, b. Feb. 19, 1758; m. Jan. 
25, 1790, Abiah Gilligan of Ludlow, (see South Hadley Records.) 
Children — 

525. ^Azuba, m. Dea. Colton of Ludlow ; had 3 or 4 children. 

526. ^Sybel, m. (1) Mr. Cox, and had 1 child ; m. (2) Dea. Root 
of Greenwich ; no children. 

527. ^Aaron, b. March 21, 1791. 

(189) 

Joel Chapin, son of Shem and Anna, b. Jan. 13, 1761 ; m. pub. 
Nov. 10, 1789, to (311) Eunice Lucretia, daughter of Dea. Edward 
Chapin of Chicopee ; had three children, names not given. 

Rev. Joel Chapin d. in Bainbridge, N. Y., in 1845, ae. 84. A sol- 
dier of the Revolution : then a graduate of Dartmouth College in 



38 FIFTH GENERATION. 

1791. He settled as a minister in tlie wilderness, on the Susque- 
hannah, and was faithful as a minister of the gospel. — (Miss Lucina 
Chapin's Minutes from New-York Observer of March 27, 1851.) 

(190) 

Nathaniel Chapin, son of Nathaniel and Sarah Chapin, m. (1) 
Sibyl Terry ; (2d) Zeviah Parsons. Mr. Nathaniel Chapin d. in 
Enfield, Ct., Feb. 11, 1831. Children— 

528. ^Nathaniel, m. 529. ^jabez, d. in Ohio. 

530. ^Simeon, d. in Enfield, Ct. 

531. 4giby]^ m. Thomas Metcalf. 

532. ^Esther, m. Moses Allen. 533. ''Betsey, d. unm. 

(191) 

Eltphalet Chapin, son of Nathaniel and Sarah, of Enfield, Ct., 
m. Azuba Pease. Mr. Eliphalet Chapin d. Children — 

534. ^Eliphalet, m. Abigail Pease of Enfield, Ct.; lived at Six- 
teen Acres, Springfield ; had 10 children. 

535. ^Sarah, m. Levi Meacham of Enfield ; had 2 children. She 
d. ae. 84. 

536. ^Polly, m. James W, Talcott of Chicopee ; had 4 children. 
Shed. 

537. ■iPersis, m. Eli Hays ; lived in Chicopee ; bad 7 children, 

538. ^Azuba, m. Ebenezer Collins, for many years a distiller in 
South Hadley, Mass.; had 7 children ; lived first at Warehouse 
Point, Ct. in early life. 

539. "^Thomas, ) , . m. Mary Pease of Enfield ; 10 children. 

540. ''Obadiah, ) ^' m. Lois Rose of Granville; 5 children. 

541. ^Lovica, m. Abel Terry ; lived in Auburn, N.Y.; 5 children, 

542. ^George, ra. Lucy Parsons, dau.of Shubal Parsons of Enfield. 

(195) 

Phineas Chapin, son of Phineas and Bethia Chapin, b. March 7, 
1747 ; m. Sabrina Wright, dau. of George Wright of Springfield, 
Capt. Phineas Chapin d. March 2, 1821. Mrs. Sabrina Chapin d. 
April 4, 1813, ae. 58. Capt. Phineas Chapin was considerably 
engaged in public business, and was quite an influential man. Resi- 
dence on Chicopee street, near where the Conn. River Rail Road 
crosses said street. Children — 

543. iSophronia, b. April 1, 1776; d. Sept. 10, 1804. 

544. ^Aseneth, b. Jan, 5, 1778 ; m. (510) Roswell Chapin ; 
d. Sept. 19, 1830. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 39 

545. ^Sabrina, b. June 13, 1779 ; m. Jesse Pendleton, Esq.; had 
3 children ; d. Sept. 29, 1848. 

546. ■'Dormer, b. Feb. 25, 1781. 

547. ^Bethia, b. Aug. 27, 1782; m. Jossph Pease, Esq.; had a 
large number of children ; d. Oct. 8, 1859, ae. 77. 

548. Gfiridgman, b. June 19, 1784 ; d. Feb. 25, 1833. 

549. ^Ulrica, b. Dec. 16, 1786; m. (1016) Erastus Chapin ; 
d. Oct. 2, 1844. 

550. - sZelotes, b. May 20, 1788 ; drowned May 20, 1795, from 
Chicopee Wharf, near South Hadley Falls. 

551. ^Hannah, b. Dec. 21, 1790 ; m. Col. Harvey Chapin. 

552. loPhineas, b. Oct. 21, 1792 ; d. May 18, 1857. 

553. "Avaline, b. April 21, 1794 ; d. June 15, 1807, of hydro- 
phobia. She was bitten by a strange dog the winter previous, when 
on her way to school. 

554. i^otway, b. Aug. 23, 1797 ; d. March, 1799. 

Hoio a young man saved himself from drowning. — A young man 
of Chicopee, on the east side of Connecticut River, crossed over on 
the ice to the west side, on a very cold winter evening, to visit a 
young lady on the west side of the river, and " got the mitten" 
which young ladies sometimes have to spare, and on his return home, 
(being probably in rather a contemplative mood,) in crossing on the 
ice he went into the water in a place not frozen ; the current in the 
river was so strong that he was unable to get on the ice by any 
ordinary means. Having on a pair of very thick woolen mittens, 
(not the one that he brought from the west side of the river) he laid 
his hands out on the ice, and it being very cold, his mittens froze to 
the ice, and he was thus enabled to draw himself out of the water, 
and reached home with his clothes frozen stiff, a much wetter if not 
a wiser man than when he left. 

(197) 

John Chapin, son of Phineas and Bethia, b. May 1, 1753 ; 

m. Aug. 5, 1775, to Margaret Ely. Mr. John Chapin spent a large 

part of his life in Chicopee, Mass.; removed to the State of N. Y. 
and d. there. Children — 

555. ^Margaret, m. Collins Brown ; removed to Delaware Co., 
N. Y. ; had issue. 

556. ^John, (suppose) had a family ; resided in State of N. Y. 

557. ^Jube, (suppose) had a family ; resided in State of N. Y. 

558. *Mary, m. Mattoon Day of ^yest Springfield ; had issue. 

559. ^Horace, physician, settled in Chesterfield, N. H.; had 
2 children ; received no return. 



40 FIFTH GENERATION. 



(198) 

Silas Ciiapin, sou of Phineas and Betliia, b. Sept. 10, 1755 ; 
m. pub. Dec. 14, 1782, (1) to Anna Eaton who d. April 17, 1800, 
ae. 43 ; m. (2) Lydia Bedortha of West Springfield, who d. Oct. 12, 
1812, ae. 54 ; m. (3) Mrs. Parks of Pittsfield — She and her son by a 
former marriage perished in the flames when his house was burned, 

Feb. 17, 1815 ; m. (4) to who survived him. Col. 

Chapin d. June 19, 1819, ae. 64. 

Col. Chapin was a farmer, quite an active man, and somewhat 
engaged in public affairs. He had quite a military genius but no 
opportunity to display it, except in the militia, llesidence, ou Chic- 
opee street, where Mr. Eber Wright now lives. 

Children — 

560. 'Nancy, m. Elijah Hitchcock of West Springfield ; had 
issue ; d. Nov. 1820, ae. 37, 

561. 2Anna, b. Sept. 21, 1785 ; m. Jael Clark of South Hadley ; 
remov.ed to the West. 

562. 3phena, b. Sept. 18, 1787 ; m. (936) Heman Chapiu. 

563. •'Luna, b. Oct. 29, 1789 ; m. (940) AVhitfield Chapin. 

564. ^Sheldon, b. Sept. 16, 1791. 

565. ''Lyman, b. July 2, 1793. 

566. ^Otis, b. Feb. 17, 1798. 

567. ^Melia, b.Feb.21,1795; m.(940) 2dwifeof Whitfield Chapin. 

(200) 

AsAHEL Chapin, son of Stephen and Zebia, m. June 30, 1777, 
Sarah Frink who was b. Dec. 9, 1756. Mr. Asahel Chapin was a 
farmer, and resided where the village of Holyoke is now located. 
He d. Jan. 29, 1828, ae. SO. Mrs. Sarah Chapin d. Dec. 14, 1828, 
ae. 73. Children — 

568. iPolly, b. June 21, 1778 ; ra. Sept. 30, 1801, Asa Munger 
of Ludlow ; had 6 children. 

569. 2john, b. Aug. 7, 1780. 

570. ^Stephen, b. March 25, 1783. 

571. ''Theodore, b. Feb. 23, 1785. 

572. ^Warren, b. June 26, 1788. 

573. sErastus, b. July 11, 1790. 

574. 'Zerviah, b. June 17, 1792; m. Perley Munger; 6 children. 

(203) 

Pliny Chapin, son of Stephen and Zebia Chapin, b. July, 1764; 
m. March 1, 1798, Naomi Taylor of Granby, Mass. Mr. Pliny 



FIFTH GENERATION. 41 

Chapiu was drowned at Hartford, Ct., June 2, 1810. His widow m. 
March 29, 1827, to Simeon Xash of South Hadley, being his 2d 
wife, and she d. Dec. 1828. Children — 
• 575. ^Clarissa, b. in Granby, Dec. 29, 1798 ; d. March 3, 1853. 

576. 2Therissa, b. Sept. 20, 1800 ; m. Allen Taylor of Rushford, 
X. Y. wliere she now resides ; has 3 children, all living. 

577. sgusan, b. Oct. 27, 1802. 

578. ''Stephen M., b. Sept. 22, 1807 ; d. Feb. 5, 1850. 

579. ^piiny^ I), in Granby, May 12, ISIO ; he m. Emily A- 
Blackmer of Wilbraham, March 26, 1836 ; Armorer, res. Springfield, 
Mass. They have one son — 580. Edward Pliny Chapin, who is 
Clerk in the Western R. R. Office, Springfield. 

Clarissa m, Dec. 3, 1819, to Walter Pease of Ludlow ; d. March 3, 
1853; left 6 children. Susan m. Titus Bartlett of Granby, Mass.; 
she now resides in Rushford, N. Y.; has 2 children, both living. 
Stephen M., m. Lucy Lucore of West Springfield, Dec, 13, 1828 ; 
he is dead, and his family reside in Rushford, N.Y.; he was a farmer. 

(205) 

Orlando Chapin, son of Stephen and Zebia, m. May, 1796, 
Lydia Damon, dau. of Peter Damon of Ludlow. Orlando, the 
father, resided for many years in Granby, Mass. ; was a farmer ; 
removed to Rochester, N. Y. and d. there, suppose in 1848. Mrs. 
Lydia Chapin d. in Newark, in the summer of 1858, while residing 
with her son Lyman. Children — 

581. ^Orlando, b. Aug.9, 1800 ; d. in June, 1857, in Brooklyn, N.Y. 

582. ^Lorenzo, b. Oct. 20, 1803 ; d. in 1828, in Brutus, N. Y. 

583. ^Philo, b. Feb. 10, 1806. 

584. -iHoratio Nelson, b. Feb. 29, 1808. 

585. ^Lymau, b. July 18, 1810. 

586. ^Lucy Lavina, b. May 9, 1813. 
And three others who d. in infancy. 

(208) 
Eleazer Chapin, son of Eleazer and Eleanor, b. June 3, 1750 ; 
m. pub. Nov. 11, 1775, Sarah Eaton. Eleazer, while residiag in 
Boston, was struck with the numb palsy which pretty much disabled 
one side of him ; he was removed to Springfield, (Chicopee Parish,) 
and the town supported him for some years, in private families — he 
was eventually removed to the poor-house, and d. there July 4, 1812, 
ae. 62. They had one dau., — 

587. ^Sarah, who d. 

6 



42 FIFTH GENERATION. 



(224) 

Noah Ciiapin, son of Noah and Mary Wright Chapin, b. July 20, 
1748 ; ni. 1777, Mary Williams, dau. of John and Ame AVilliams 
and granddaughter of Rev. Stephen Williams of Longmeadow. 
Mr. Noah Chapin d. May 5, 1790, ae. 42. Mrs. Mary Chapin d. 
Aug. 25, 1836, ae. 83. Children— 

588. lAnna, b. Dec. 1778 ; d. Dec. 18, 1840, ae. 62. 

589. ^Abigail AVilliams, b. Nov. 17, 1780; d. Dec. 22, 1850, ae. 70. 

590. ^Oliver, b. Sept. 27, 1782 ; d. April 2, 1852, ae. 70. 

591. ^Mary, b. April, 1785 ; d. April 6, 1854, ae. 68. 

592. ^Dorcas, b. Aug. 16, 1787. 

593. ^Submit, b. Oct. 28, 1789. 

Abigail m. David Cady of Stafford. He purchased the farm on 
which her father and grandfather lived in Somers, and spent his 
days there; they had 4 daughters, viz., — 594. Emeline. 595. Eunice. 
596. Harriet N., m. Ralph S. Chapin. 597. Mary W., m. a son of 
Dea. Daniel Davis. Mary, m. Oliver Collins of Somers ; had 4 
sons— 598. Edwin. 599. William. 600. Noah Chapin. 601. Jabez. 
Dorcas m. Dea. James Farrar of Lincoln, Mass. ; had 4 sons — 
602. Samuel, d. 603. George, d. 604. James, now living. 605. John, 
now living. Submit m. Hubbard Arnold, Nov. 30, 1824; lives in 
Somers. 

(219) 

Mary Chapin, daughter of Lieut. Noah and Mary Chapin, of 
Somers, b. Nov. 12, 1734 ; d. Nov. 20, 1824, ae. 90. She m. Capt. 
John Wood of Somers; he d. Aug. 31, 1805, ae. 76. Children— 

606. ^Asa, m. Hannah Dibble ; had 8 children. He d. Jan. 13, 
1846, ae. 84. Farmer. 

607. 2john A. Physician in Somers ; had 5 children. Father 
of Mrs. Dea. Morgan. 

608. ^Noah, m. Asenath Calkins ; moved to Chicago. 

609. ■^Oliver, m. Tabitha Swan; lived in Ringston, Vt.; returned 
to Somers, where he d. 

610. ■^David, m. Olive Allis, daughter of Samuel Allis. A law- 
yer at the South or West. 

611. ''Luke, m. Anna Pease, dau. of Robert Pease. Luke was a 
minister. Their dau. m. Rev. Reuben Hazen of Agawam. 

612. 'Ruth, m. Israel Kibbee ; went West. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 43 

613. ^Mary, m. Stephen Pease ; had 4 children — 616. ^Stephen. 
617. ^Abial. 618. ^Mary, who m. Samuel Chapin, son of Samuel 
Chapin of Somers. 619. ^Lois, who m. Mr. Pinney. 

614. ^Eunice, m. Capt. David Richardson ; lived in Somers. 
Their dau. Eunice m. Mr. Kibbe of Tolland ; went West ; 1 child. 

615. ^"Sarah, m. Andrew Meacham ; lived in Middlefield. 

(226) 
Samuel Chapin of Somers, Ct., son of Seth and Elizabeth 
Chapin, m. Elizabeth Spencer. Mrs. Elizabeth Chapin d. Feb. 4, 
1812, ae. 66. Mr. Samuel Chapin m. (2) Wid. Eunice King, dau. of 
Lieut. Noah Chapin ; she d. March 25, 1816, ae. 69. Mr, Samuel 
Chapin d. April 13, 1833, ae. 91. Children — 

620. ^Margaret, b. April 24, 1773 ; d. April 1, 1839, ae. 66. 

621. 2Seth, b. March 24, 1775 ; d. May 9, 1857, ae. 82. 

622. ^Samuel, b. Oct. 29, 1776 ; d. Dec. 26, 1855, ae. 79. 

623. ^Reuben, b. Sept. 5, 1778. 

624. ^Bliss, b. Sept. 23, 1780 ; d. Aug. 1856, ae. 76. 

625. "Elizabeth, b. Sept. 21, 1782. 

626. 'Lucy, b. Aug. 2, 1785 ; d. 1831. 

Margaret m. Daniel Davis; res. Stafford, Ct,; had 7 sons and 2 
daughters. Seth m, Mary Stacy ; lived in Somers ; had 7 children, 
1 son — all dead but 3 daughters, Samuel m. Mary Pease of Somers ; 
had 8 children ; both parents d, in Springtield, Mass. Reuben m. 
Lovisa Russell of Somers ; had 4 sons and 1 dau. Bliss, m, Eunice 
Benton ; lived in Tolland ; had 5 children. Elizabeth m. Philip 
Davis, brother of Daniel; lived in Greenwich, Mass ; had 5 sous 
and 2 daughters. Lucy m. Daniel Smith of Westfield ; had 3 sons 
and 1 dau. 

(227) 

Elizabeth Chapin, dau. of Seth and Elizabeth Chapin of Som- 
ers, m. Ezekiel Spencer in Somerville. Mrs. Elizabeth C. Spencer 
d. Feb. 17, 1819, ae. 72. Mr. Ezekiel Spencer d. Feb. 26, 1820, 
ae. 72. Children— 

627. ^Ezekiel: m. Miss Sexton ; lived in Somei's ; 10 children. 

628. ^Polly, m. Mr. Coy ; lived in Enfield ; had 1 child. 

629. ^Chester, m, a sister of Dr. Hamilton ; lives in Somerville ; 
had 4 children — Theodore, Spencer and one dau. living. 

630. ■*Betsey, m. Elam Chaffee of Somerville ; bad 5 children. 



44 FIFTH GENERATION. 

(228) 

Abigail Chapin, dau. of Seth and Elizabeth Chapin of Som- 
ers, b. March 20, 1744 ; m. Dauid Tuft, b. 1744. Mrs. Abigail 
Taft d. June 27, 1830, ae. 86. Mr. Daniel Taft d. Feb. 1, 1S20, 
ae. 76. Children— 

631. iDaniel, b. Dec. 1, 1771 ; d. in Marlboro', Vt., ae. 83. 

632. ^Charles, m.RuthHolman; hed.inCanada, June, 1834,ae.61. 

633. Mohn, d. young. 

634. '^Catharine, b. June 7, 1778; m, Mr.Crary ; res. Lebanon, N.Y. 

635. ^David, b. March 8, 1780 ; d. in Springfield, Feb. 24, 1841, 
ae. 61 ; had 4 children. 

636. i^Hannah, b. Feb. 21, 1786; d. in Stafford, Feb. 8, 1834, ae.48. 

637. ^Seth, b. Sept. 9, 1783; m. Prudence Holmes, Oct. 4, 1809 ; 
Prudence d. Oct. 6, 1851, ae. 71. Their children— 638. ^Lucretia. 
639. ^Betsey. 640. ^John. 641. ^Daniel. 642. ''Sanford. 
643. ''Seth Hart, and one other. 

(233) 

Phineas Chapin, son of Moses and Elizabeth Chapin, of Somers, 
b. Dec. 15, 1755 ; ni. ]\Iary Lane, dau. of Robert Lane, Esq. of 
Newport, N. H., Jan. 21, 1785. Mr. Phineas Chapin settled in 
Newport, N. H. in 1780. He d. Jan. 21, 1849, ae. 93. Mary, his 
wife, d. July 20, 1841, ae. 80. Children— 

644. ^Mary Thacher, b. Nov.20, 1785 ; d. unm.Sept.9, 1850,ae.65. 

645. ^Daughter, b. Jan. 8, 1787 ; d. 

646. ^Elizabeth, b. Jan. 8, 1788 ; ui. Reuben Bascom ; had 3 
children ; res. Newport; d. Oct. 3, 1855, ae. 67. 

647. -^Moses, b. April 25, 1790; m. Lydia Hurd ; res. Newport; 
had 8 daughters and 2 sons. 

648. sPhineas, b. Jan. 2. 1792 ; m. Lydia Osgood ; res. New- 
port ; had 8 children ; d. May 3, 1856, ae. 64. 

649. sRuth, b. Oct. 5, 1794 ; d. with fits. 

650. ^Sophia, b. March 29, 1796 ; m. James Baker; had S chil- 
dren ; res. Newport ; d. Dec. 24, 1839, ae. 44. 

651. ''Orlando, b. Nov. 10, 1797 ; m. Pamela Hurd ; had 2 chil- 
dren — Calvin N. and Pamelia Abiah. 

652. ^Henry, b. April 13, 1800 ; m, Catharine Fisher , res. New- 
port ; had 4 children. 

653. i"Infaut, b. Jan. 3, 1803. 

654. "Abiah, b. Aug. 23, 1800 ; m. Rev. Albert Hale ; res. 
Springfield, 111.; had 3 children. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 45 

(234) 

Daniel Chapin, son of Moses and Elizabeth Chapin, of Somers, 
b. Jan. 3, 1758; lived in Newport, N.H,; in, (1) Joanna Arms of 
Deerfield, Mass.; m. (2) Eutb Lane of Newport, Mrs. Joanna Cha- 
pin d, April 17, 1813, ae. 51. Mr, Daniel Chapin d. Sept. 14, 1831, 
ae. 73. Mrs. Ruth Chapin d. Oct. 11, 1841, ae. 66. 

Children, by (1) wife — 

655. ^William Arms, b. Dec, 8, 1790 ; d. Nov. 27, 1850, ae. 60. 

656. ^Philomela, b. May 1, 1792 ; d. Jan. 29, 1824, ae, 34. 

657. ^Elizabeth, b. Feb, 1, 1794. 

658. -iDamel Dwight, b, Jan. 27, 1796. 

659. ^David Beldeu, b. Oct. 23, 1797. 

660. ''Horace, b. June 22, 1799 ; d. Sept. 15, 1858, in Illinois. 

661. 7jason, b. Sept. 1, 1801 ; d. Sept. 11, 1846. 

662. ^Frederick, b. Aug. 7, 1803. 

663. ^Joanna, b. Oct. 28, 1805. 

Children, by (2) wife — 

664. loRuth Louisa, b. Dec. 16, 1814; m. Capt. Thomas Gelden 
of Chesterfield, 111, 

665. "Malvina Jerusha, b. April 30, 1816. 

666. i^Noah Addison, b. June 18, ISIS; d. May 9, 1852, ae. 34. 

(235) 

Frederick Chapin, son of Moses and Elizabeth Chapin of Som- 
ers, b. May 12, 1760 ; m. Lucretia Morton of Hatfield ; she was b. 
Sept. 21, 1764, Mr. Frederick Chapin d, at Cambridge, N, Y,, 
June 12, 1802, after 12 hours sickness, ae. 42, Mrs, Lucretia 
Chapin d. in Hatfield, Dec. 1837. Children— 

667. iCamillus, b. Nov. 21, 1789 ; d. May 19, 1835, ae, 45j, 

668. ^Frederick, b. May 12, 1792 ; d. July, 1838, 

669. sRuth, b, Feb, 22, 1795, 

670. -iCharlotte, b, Jan, 16, 1797, 

Camillus m. Myra Parsons of Conway, May 17, 1815, who was b, 
Nov, 22, 1792 ; they had 4 children, Frederick m, Lockey Teed 
of Livingston, N, J.; had 9 children. Ruth m, Mr, Cook ; lived and 
d, in N,J.; had 1 child— 671, Charlotte Cook ; lived in Hatfield, 
with her grandmother ; she m, Charles Peacock; lives in N. Y, State; 
had 2 children — 672, Lemuel. 673, Stanton, Charlotte m, Horace 
Prior; lived in East Windsor, where she d, April, 1839, ae, 42 ; left 
4 children — 674, Mary Lucretia. 675, Milton Frederick, b, Sept,28, 



46 FIFTH GENERATION. 

1827; m. Ellen Case of Manchester, Ct; lives witli his father 
in E. Windsor, Ct.; had 1 cliild in 1854. 676. Fanny, d. ae. 3. 
677. Charlotte Ann, b. April 4, 1834; m. William 11. Wright, 
May, 1852. 

(23G) 

Moses Augustus Chapin, son of Moses and Elizabeth Cliapin 
of Somers, b. Nov. 8, 1762 ; m. Lncina Graves of Ilatfield, Mass. 
Mr. Moses Chapin resided in West Springfield, Mass., and d. March 
11, 1841, ae. 78. Mrs. Lucina Chapin d. Dec. 6, 1851, ae. 85. 
Children — 

678. iMary, b. Sept. 10, 1788. 

679. 2Moses, b. May 2, 1791. 

680. ^Elizabeth, b. Dec. 22, 1792 ; d. April 4, 1794. 

681. -^Augustus Lyman, b. Jan. 16, 1795. 

682. ^Alpha, b. Oct. 3, 1796. 

683. ^Seth Dwight, b. April 11, 1800; d. 

684. ^Elizabeth, b. March 23, 1802. 

685. «Alonzo, b. Feb. 24, 1805. 

686. ^Lucina, b. March 8, 1806, imm. 

687. loLouis, b. Nov. 3, 1809. 

Seth Dwight, the son, lived in Rochester 10 years, and went to 
New York and lived 2 years, where he d. Feb. 12, 1833, ae. 33. 

(237) 

Jason Chapin, son of Moses and Elizabeth Chapin of Somers, 
b. Aug. 7, 1764 ; d. Dec. 18, 1800, ae. 36. He m. Rachel Holman ; 
lived in Wilbraham. Rachel, the mother, afterwards m. Elijah Work 
of Wilbraham, where she lived and had six children. 

1 child— 

688. iHenry Dwight, He had a public education ; settled in 
Baltimore, Maryland, in the practice of Law ; he afterwards removed 
to New York City, where he now (1859) resides. 

(239) 

Samuel Dwight Chapin, son of Moses and Elizal)eth Chapin 
of Somers, Ct.; b. Dec. 29, 1768; m. to Achsa Morgan of 
West Springfield, (now Holyoke,) Sept. 10, 1800 ; she was dau. 
of Capt. Joseph and Experience Morgan, and great granddaugh- 
ter of Samuel Chapin of Chicopee. Mr. Samuel D. Chapin d. Oct. 
26, 1801, ae. 33 ; he was burned in a distillery. They had 1 child — 

689. iSamuel Dwight, b. Aug. 6, 1801. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 47 

Mrs, Achsa Chapin afterward m. Eev. Nehemiab Beardsley, and 
lives in Somers ; they had 4 children — 690. ^Laurinda. 691. ^Hor- 
ace, d. 692. ^Lucius, d. in West Indies. 693. ^Achsa. 

(242) 
Hiram Chapin, son of Aaron and Sybel Chapin of Somers, m. 
Sarah Bartlett, dau. of Eleazer Eartlett. They lived in Surry, X.H. 
and d. there. Children — 

694. ^Hirara, lived in Granby, Ct. ; d. there Aug. 2, 1855, ae. 83. 

695. 2jaii-us, lived in Langdon, Vt. 

696. ^Samuel is supposed to have d. in the U. S. Army. 

697. ^Alpheus, removed to New Jersey. 

698. ^Sarah, m. Daniel Taft Sheldon; lived in Marlboro', Vt.; 
he d. Sept. 7, 1855, ae. 83, 

699. '^Rebecca, m. John Kussell ; lived in Somers. 

(244) 

Aaron Chapin, son of Aaron and Sybel Chapin of Somers, 
m. Phebe Spencer ; lived in Staiford. Mr. Aaron Chapin d. April 28, 
1824, ae. 72. Mrs. Phebe Chapin d, Aug. 4, 1816, ae. 66. Children— 

700. ^Gideon, m. Miss Sisson ; went to Ohio and d. there. 

701. 2^mbrose, m. Betsey Fuller ; lived in Somers. 

702. ^Elijah, m. Love Davis ; lived at Three Rivers, (Palmer ;) 
had 6 children, She d. July 17, 1860, ae. 71. 

703. *^Aaron, m. Betsey Mixter ; lived in Stoniugton, Ct.; had 
3 children. 

704. ■^Asenath, m. James Fowler ; lived in Bolton ; 4 children. 

705. "Abina, m. Joel West; lived in Tolland; d. in Somers,1859. 

706. 'Chloe, m. Mr. Waterman ; lived in Bolton; had 2 children. 

(245) 

Justus Chapin, son of Aaron and Sybel Chapin of Somers, m. 
(1) Joanna Fuller ; (2) Martha Taylor ; lived in Alstead, N. H. 
Children, by (1) wife — 

710. ^Betsey, m. Ezra Carpenter. 

711. ^Joanna, d. 

Children, by (2) wife— 

712. ^Joanna, m. Benjamin Beckwith ; had several children, 

* Cbil Ji-en of Aaron and Betsey — 707. Otis. 708. Persig, who m. John Olcut. 701). Emily, 
m. Mr. Schripter. 



4b FIFTH CiENF;RATIOi\. 

713. 'Martha, m. Benjamin Waus ; lived in Gilsum, N. H. 

714. '^Justus, in. Annis Willis ; lived in Alstead, N. H. 
•^Silas, 111. Charity Whitney ; went AVest and d. 'Orinda. 
^Vestus, m. Anna Root. "Thomas Taylor m. Frances Crague. 
^"Asa. m. Cornelia Simons. "David, m. Demmis Isham; ho d. 
i^Diantha, m. James Weston. 

i^Joseph Markham, m. Mrs. Demmis Chapin, the widow of 
his 'orother David. 

(249) 
Oliver Chapin, son of Aaron and Sybel, m. Elizabeth Allen of 
Surry, N. H. Cliildreu— 

^Elizabeth, d. young. ^Oliver, d. young. 

^Sybel, living in Somers. Ct. •^David. 

^Persis, m. Jesse Cady of Somers ; not living ; -left 1 dau. 

*^Noa]i, m. Orilla Cady ; no issue. 'Lovica, d. young. 

^Jerre, m. Lovica Davis ; res. Somers, Ct.; no issue. 

(252) 

Elias Chapin, son of Elias and Sarah, m. Elizabeth. Mr. E. 
Chapin d. about 1852. In early life, Mr. Chapin resided in Stafibrd, 
Ct., but removed to Western N. Y. Children — 

lEthan C, b. in Madison Co., N. Y. 

^Norman J., b. in Evans, Erie Co., N. Y. ; res. Cincinnati, 0. 
N. J. Chapin & Co., Real Estate and Note Brokers, Auctioneers, &c.. 
No. 187 Walnut Street, Cincinnati, 0. 

(264) 

Charles C. Chapin, son of Charles and Anna, of Salsbury, Ct., 
m. Theodosia. Children — 

715. 'Moses, ^^aron. ^David. -^Oliver. 

(265) 

Phineas Chapin, son of Charles and Anna, b. Feb. 16, 1757; 
d. Feb. 12, 1816 ; m. May 14, 1783, Love Kurd. Mrs. Love Hurd 
Chapin, b. Sept. 6, 1759 ; d. April 15, 1844. Children— 

716. iLove, b. Sept. 3, 1784 , d. Aug. 10, 1793. 

717. 2Abiel, b. Nov. 16, 1786 ; d. Aug. 18, 1832. 

718. ^Phineas, b. March 7, 1789. 

719. ^Mary, b. Nov. 25, 1791 ; d. Jan. 9, 1860. 

720. ^Andrew, b. April 12, 1795 ; d. Feb. 11, 1826. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 49 

721. ^Graham Ward, b. Feb. 10, 1799 ; d. Sept. 2, 1843. 

722. ^Henry, b. Aug. 21, 1800 ; d. June 4, 1808. 

Mary, the daughter, had 3 husbands — Ezra Sewall, John A. 
Dutcher and Lewis Mills. 

(266) 

Daniel Chapin, son of Charles and Anna, m. Partbena Wheeler 
of Salsbury, Ct. Dr. Daniel Chapin removed to Buffalo, N. Y. about 
the beginning of this century. Children — 

723. ^William W., d. about the year 1855, leaving 2 sons — 
724. William ; and 725 Heman — who are now between 30 and 
40 years of age, live in Buffalo, N. Y. William has been m. about 
10 years. 

726. ^Thomas, had two sons and one dau. 

727. ^James Chapin, d. about 1825, unm. 
The daughters of Daniel Chapin were — 

728. -^Sophia, widow of Walter Norton. 

729. ■'Clarissa, wiffe of Eleazer Stephenson. 

730. "^Eliza, m. David Beard ; both deceased. 

(274) 

Heman Chapin, son of Charles and Anna, m. Electa Humphrey. 
Children — 

731. ^Oliver Colton, b. April 29, 1811. 

732. ^Charles Heman, b. March 22, 1822. 

733. =^Ralph, and 6 daughters — 734. ^Anna. 735. ^Amelia. 
736. 6Ellen. 737. ^Julia. 738. ^Mary. 739. ^Caroline. His place 
of residence, East Bloomfield, N. Y., where he d. 

Residence of daughter Mary at Milwaukie, Wis. 

(275) 
Luther Chapin, son of Charles and Anna, m. Hannah Ackland ; 
had 6 children — 

740. iMinerva. 741. ^Caroline. 742. ^Thomas. 743. ^Jane. 
744. ^Jairus. 745. *^Mary. 
Luther d, in Indiana. 

(277) 

Enoch Chapin, (probably) son of David and Rachel, m. Jan. 24, 
1763, to Miriam Parsons. Children — 

746. iMiriam, b. March 16, 1765. 747. ^Rachel, b. Aug. 7, 
1768 ; both b. in Wilbraham. 

7 



50 FIFTH GENERATION. 

748. ^Eiioch, b. in Wilbraham, July 28, 1771 ; d. Sept. T), 1775. 
74i). ''John, b. Nov. 15, 1772. 

750. ^Phebe, b. April 4. 1774 ; d. Sept. 20, 1775, ae. 17 in., 16 d. 

(289) 

Oliver Chapin, son of Josiah and Mindwell, m. Nov. 17, 17G3, 
Lois Hitchcock. Children — 

^Lois, m. Samuel Burt ; had 8 children. 
^Mindwell, m. Jonathan Burr ; had 3 children. 

751. ^Amy, m. John Peabody of New Lebanon ; had 5 sons. 

752. ■^Cynthia, unm.; d. in New Lebanon. 

753. ■^Celia, m. Mr. Woodworth of New Lebanon. 

754. f^Oliver, ni. Miss Bush. 

755. ''Editha, d. Jan. 27, 1827, ae. 46. 

756. 'Sophia, m. Elihu Brown ; had 7 children. 

(292) 

Israel Chapin, son of Josiah and Mindwell, b. Sept. IS, 1751 ; 
m. (1) June 26, 1788, Chloe Lombard; m. (2) Mary Boothe. Capt. 
Israel Chapin was a farmer and land surveyor ; he was somewhat 
engaged in town affairs ; resided in Springfield, on what is now 
North street, and d. April 5, 1810. Mrs. Chloe Chapin d. Jan. 12, 
1799, ae. 37. Children, by (1) wife— 

757. iHarriet, b. April 25, 1789 ; d. Aug. 28, 1818. 

758. ^Harvey, b. June 25, 1790. Record says Harvey Chapin 
d. May 25, 1813, ae. 23, of spotted fever. 

759. 3james, b. June 22, 1793 ; d. June 9, 1853. 

760. ^Sarah, b. Jan. 13, 1794 ; d. May 5, 1840. 

761. ^Delia, b. June 20, 1795 ; d. Jan. 15, 1855, ae. 59, unm. 

762. "Daniel, b. Jan. 10, 1797 ; d. Jan. 3, 1858, ae. 61. 

763. ''David, b. Dec. 26, 1798 ; d. Feb. 7, 1826, unm. 

Children, by (2) wife — 

764. '^Mary, b. Aug. 31, 1801 ; she m. Simeon Jones ; resides 
in Ludlow. 

765. sAnna, b. Oct. 6, 1809 ; d. Oct. 20, 1809. 

Harriet m. Mr. William Pomroy of Northfield ; had one child — 
Frank, b. Jan. 14, 1818. Sarah m. Mr. Benj. F. Clark of Granby ; 
had seven children. Daniel m. Mercy Cooper of West Springfield ; 
had one child — Emerson. 

1811, September 27, Dea. Stephen Jones and Widow Mary Cha- 
pin were m.; she was the widow of Capt. Israel Chapin. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 51 

(294) 

JuDAH Chapin, son of Josiah and Mindwell, b. April 17, 1756 ; 
m. March 2, 17S6, Miss Lois Stebbins. Mr. Judah Chapin was a 
farmer ; resided in Springfield, on what is now North street, and d. 
Nov. 4, 1S21, ae. 66. Children— 

766. iGiles, b. June 8, 17S7. 

767. ^Abigail, b. Sept. 24, 1791. 

768. schauncey, b. Sept. 26, 1789. 

769. -iLucinda, b. Sept. 29, 1793. 

770. ^Arrabella, b. Dec. 7, 1795 ; d. Aug, 24, 1798. 

Abigail m. April 25,1820, Levi Stillman, and went to New Haven. 
Lucinda m. Rev. Horatio J. Lombard. 

(298) 

Gideon Chapin, son oi Joseph and Jane Allen, b. April 15, 1754 ; 
m. Lydia, dau. of Rev. Thomas Po twine. Children — 

iLydia, b. Nov. 23, 1782. 

771. ^Gideon, b. Ang. 10, 1786. 772. ^Jane, d. young. 

773. -iThomas Potwine, b. Oct. 15, 1790. 

774. ^Wolcott, b. Oct. 5, 1792. 

775. ojane, b. Nov. 20, 1799. 

776. ^Elizabeth, b. Sept. 3, 1803. 

(304) 

Aaron Chapin, son of Edward and Eunice, b. April 20, 1753 ; 
m. Sept. 11, 1777, Mary King, dau. of Zebulon King of East 
Windsor, Ct. Dea. Aaron Chapin d. Dec. 25, 1838, in his 86th yr. 
Mrs. Mary Chapin d. Feb. 21, 1829, in her 73d yr. Aaron was a 
Deacon of the first Congregational Church in Hartford, Ct. where 
he resided ; he was a man of great piety, universally beloved and 
respected. In early life, he was a Cabinet-maker, being quite a 
mechanical genius ; later in life, he cleaned and repaired watches. 
Children — 

777. iLaertes, b. Aug. 21, 1778 ; d. Oct. 30, 1817, in his 70th yr. 

778. 2Mary, b. Nov. 9, 1780 ; d. Aug. 31, 1832. 

Mary, the' daughter, m. April 9, 1799, Gen. Timothy Burr of 
Hartford, Ct., afterwards of Watertown and then of Rochester, N.Y. 
They had seven sons and six daughters, of whom twelve lived to 
mature age, and nine are now (1859) living. Timothy Burr d. at 
Rochester, Aug. 30, 1832 ; Mary, his wife, d. at Rochester, Aug. 31, 
1832, both of Asiatic Cholera. 



52 FIFTH GENERATION. 



(805) 

Edward Chapin, son of Dea. Edward and Eunice Chapin, 
b. Sept. 3, 1755 ; ni. Asenath Allen, dan. of Joseph Allen, Esq. of 
East Windsor, Ct. Mr. Edward Chapin d. June 22, 1795, ae. 40. 

It appears that Edward was in the army which was at and near 
Lake George in 1755. On an ancient paper, I find the following — 

" A Muster Roll of Capt. Luke Hitchcock's Company that came 
to the Lake st. Sacrament, 28th Aug. Capt. Luke Hitchcock. 
Ltt. Nath'l Burt slain in battle, Sept. 8, 1755. Clerk, Edw'd Chapin." 

The roll then mentions the non-commissioned Officers and the 
Soldiers of the Company, also those who were slain in the battle of 
Sept. 8, 1755, and those who came up some days after the battle. 
The above Ltt, Burt was the husband of Edward Chapin's aunt 
Sarah. On another part of the same paper* I find the following — 

" Head Quarters, Sept. 5, 1755. Camp at Lake George, Friday 
Parole, Hallifax. Lieut. Coll. Gilbert, Field Officer of the Day for 
to-morrow — Orders, That no soldier shall play at any Game what- 
ever with any of the Indians. Whosoever' presumes for to do it to 
be Immediately Confined. That all Returned Waggons be searched 
before they leave this place. Peter Wraxall, A. D. C." 

He was also for a time in the war of the Revolution. 

He resided on Chicopee street, and occupied a part of his father's 
house. He erected a barn on the plain about one and a half miles 
east of Chicopee street, on the road to Ludlow, (known for many 
years as Doctor Skeele's barn,) he having owned the place for many 
years, with the expectation of erecting a house there the next season, 
but death came and cut short his earthly plans. Asenath, the widow 
of Edward, m. Jan. 20, 1801, Eldad Parsons, Esq. of Belchertown, 
Mass. Her three youngest children went with her to Belchertow^n. 
Children — 

779. ^Asenath, m. John Burbanks of Granby, Mass. In. ent. 
Nov. 27, 1798. 

780. ^Allen, b. April 30, 1787. 

781. ^philura, b. May 25, 1789. 

782. -^Laura. b. Dec. 25, 1791 ; united with the church in Bel- 
chertown, 1819, and d. years since. 

(308) 
Calvin Chapin, D. D., son of Dea. Edward and Eunice Chapin 
of Springfield, (Chicopee Parish,) b. July 22, 1763. His wife, 
Jerusha, was the dau. of Dr. Edwards of New Haven, afterwards 



FIFTH GENERATION. 53 

President of Union College. Dr. Calvin Chapiu d. at (Rockyhill,) 
Wethersfield, Ct., March 17, 1851, ae. almost 88. Mrs. Jerusha 
Chapin d. Dec. 4, 1847, ae. 71. 

"Dr. Chapiu d. in his chair. He often said of Christ, " I desire to 
see him as he is." He was a most faithful and excellent minister, 
a good scholar, a wise man of incessant industry, a good farmer, a 
good mechanic, a skillful book-binder, of never-failing cheerfulness 
and good humor, enjoying great happiness even in his old age, never 
leaving his beloved home except at the call of public duty. He was 
a founder and promoter of Missionary and other societies ; for 32 
years, he was Recording Secretary of the American Board of Com- 
missioners for Foreign Missions." — (From Extract by Miss Lucina 
Chapin from New-York Observer of March 27, 1851.) 

"He graduated at Yale College, 1788. Previous to entering 
College, he was for a time engaged in the war of the Revolution. 
After graduating, he taught school in Hartford, Ct. about two years ; 
was tutor in Yale College from the Autumn of 1791 to March, 1794. 
He was ordained and settled at (Rockyhill,) Wethersfield, Ct., April, 
1794. He was one of the five eminent men who in 1810 organized 
the A. B. C.F.M." — (Extracts from Dr. Hawes' Sermon of April 30, 
1851.) 

Children — 

783. ^Edward, an eminent lawyer ; lives in Pa. 

784. ^Jerusha, unm.; d. 1858. 

785. ^Daughter, m. Asher Robbins ; had a family of children. 

(312) 

Lewis Chapin, son of Benoni and Esther, b. Sept. 30, 1755 ; 
m. Jan. 31, 1788, Esther Richardson of ]\Ianchester, Vt. Mr. Lewis 
Chapin d. March 26, 1828. He learned the Shoemaker's trade in 
Springfield and worked some years at his trade in Lanesboro', Mass. 
where he first made a profession of religion. In 1786, he purchased, 
in company with his brother Ichabod, a tract of wild land in Jericho, 
Vt., which they began immediately to improve, and lived in Jericho 
until his death, on the same tract which was first taken Ijy the two 
brothers. He was the first Clerk of the town ; gave land to the 
town for a public green and cemetery ; assisted in forming the Con- 
gregational Church, and was ever an active and consistent member. 

Children — 

786. ^Hitty, b. Dec. 10, 1788. 

787. ^Laura, b. June 2, 1791 ; d. Dec. 24, 1815. 



54 FlKTll UJCNEltATION. 

788. "Lewis, b. Nov. 15, 1792 ; d. Oct. 14, 1833. 

789. ''Phehe, b. April 21, 1794. 

790. '^Esther, b. July 27, 1796 ; d. ^ 

791. "Ilumet, b. Oct. 23, 1798; residence, Jericho, Vt.; unm. 

792. ^Sidney, b. Aug. 2, 1800 ; d. Sept. 3, 1819, while fitting 
for College. 

793. «Chauncey, b. March 1, 180G ; d. Jan. 10, 1833, unm. 
^One Infant, d. young. 

Hitty m. April, 1814, Rev. Moses Parmelee of Pittsford, Vt.; had 
2 sons and 2 daughters — one son d. in infancy. Laura Ann m. David 
Perley of Enosburgh, Vt. where she now resides, having 3 children. 
Phebe Aurica is unm. and resides in Groverneur, N. Y. where the 
brother Simeon lives and is a practising physician. The said Hitty 
has been for many years a widow, and is living with her son in 
Groverneuv, N. Y. 

Laura m. Dea. Isaac Higby of Shelburn, Vt.; d. Dec. 24, 1815, 
leaving an infant — Laura Chapin, who m. Chauncey W. Brownell of 
Williston, Vt. where she d., leaving 5 children. 

Phebe ni. Sept. 19, 1821, Simeon Parmelee of Westford, Vt.; had 7 
chil., one of whom d. in infancy — Charlotte Aurica m. Rev. Francis B. 
Wheeler; d. without issue. Adaline Humphrey m.Emerson J.Hamilton, 
Principal of the High School, Orange, N.Y., and has 2 children. 
Sidney Chapin is living in Jericho, farming, unm. Simeon Melanc- 
thon graduated at the University, Vt.; d. when about to enter his 
profession of Law, unm. Wilson Barlow, also a graduate of the 
University of Vt. and of the Auburn Theological Seminary, is 
now Pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Westernville, N. Y., unm. 
Moses Payson, also a graduate of the University of Vt., is now 
(1859) a member of the Union Theological Seminary, N. Y. City. 

Esther, the 4th daughter, m. March, 1823, David Skinner; d. in 
Jericho, leaving 4 children, one having d. in infancy — Chauncey 
Chapin, merchant in Jamestown, Wis.; m. and has 2 children. 
Lewis Chapin, d. while fitting for College. Martin Powell, mer- 
chant in Northfield, Minnesota, m. Myron Winslow, merchant in 
Northfield, Minnesota, unm. 

(315) 

IcHABOD Chapin, son of Benoni and Esther, b. Sept. 26, 1760 ; 
m. Jan. 26, 1785, Asenath Smith of Goshen, Ct. Mr. Ichabod 
Chapin d. May 16, 1843. He learned the Tanner's trade in Goshen, 
Ct. where he was brought up. After he removed to Jericho, Vt. in 



FIFTH GENERATION. 55 

1786, he carried on the tanning business in connection with farming, 
but afterwards left tanning and devoted himself exclusively to farm- 
ing. He united with the Congregational Church in Jericho in 
middle life, and was always regarded as an upright and valuable 
member of society. He had a remarkably retentive memory, even 
to the last of his prolonged life, being able to repeat fifty hymns 
during the last year of his life. 

Children — 

793. ^Charity, b. Dec. 28, 1785. 

794. 2Levi, b. Aug. 12, 1788. 

795. 3]\iyi.on, b. March 6, 1794. 

796. -lAsenath, b. Oct. 23, 1797. 

Charity m. about 1803 or 4, Daniel Shaw of Jericho ; she had 
3 sons and 3 daughters — four of these- are now living. The children 
descended from all six number about ten. Asenath m. Ezra Church ; 
has 8 children, all living. 

(323) 

Elizabeth Chapin, dau. of Jonathan and Sarah Chapin, b. April 7, 
1751 ; inteu. of m. with Gad Horton ent. Dec. 29, 1775. Mr. Gad 
Horton sold his farm in Springfield, (Skipmuck,) to Capt. Ariel 
Cooley, and removed to Westfield, Mass.; lived and d there. Chil- 
dren all b. in Springfield. Children — 

797. iSamuel, b. Jan. 17, 1777 ; d. of small pox in N. Y. 

798. 2Abigail, b. Oct. 19, 1773 ; m. ^h: of Wilbraham. 

799. ^^Betsey, b. Feb. 22, 1781 ; m. Walter Warriner of Wilbra- 
ham ; removed to the West. 

800. -ijeremiah, b. July 8, 1783. 

801. sjerre, b. Dec. 15, 1785, m., and lived and d. in West- 
field, Mass. 

802. «Mary, b. Oct. 31, 1789, unm. 

(325) 
Daxiel Chapin, son of Jonathan and Sarah, b. June 10, 1755; 
m. 1783, Eunice Bartlett of East Windsor, Ct. Children — 

803. ^Jonathan, b. Jan. 15 ; 1785 ; d., ae. 8 months. 

804. 2Huldah, b. 1786 ; d. 1803, ae. 17. 

805. ^Eunice, b. 1788 ; m. Graham Fuller, 1810 ; had 2 chil- 
dren ; d. 1841, ae. 53. 

806. ^Daniel, b. 1791 ; m. (1) Flavey Barber; (2) Achsa Strong 
of Monson, Mass. ; her maiden name was Fuller. 



56 FIFTH GENERATION. 

(327) 
EzEKiEL CiiAi'iN, son of JonathcUi and Sarah, b. June 29, 1758 ; 
m. Abigail Ely of Windsor, Ct. Mr. Ezekiel Chapin d. Aug. 21, 
1825, ae. 67, Residence, Cbicopee. Children — 

807. 'Chester, b. Oct. 8, 1787. 

808. ^Ezekiel, b. April 20, 1790 ; d. 

809. sRedexalana, d. Feb. 10, 1822, ae. 29. 

810. ^Jonathan Ely. 811. ^Austin, b. 1797. 812. ^Jesse, d. 

813. ^Abigail, b. 1801 ; d. Oct. 25, 1802, ae. 1. 

(329) 
Ezra Chapin, son of Timothy and Martha, b. Feb. 12, 1758; 
m. May 24, 1781, Lois Bearaent, dau. of Jonathan Beament. Mr. 
Chapin resided for many years in Springfield, (Chicopee Parish ;) 
he removed to Norwich, Mass. in the Spring of 1800, and d. there 
Nov. 15, 1802, being 44 years old the February previous. His 
family afterwards removed to Eaton, Madison Co., N. Y. Children — 

814. lElihu, b. May 28, 1782. 

815. ^Jonathan, b. Oct. 25, 1783. 

816. ^Ezra, b. Feb. 1, 1785. 

817. ^Elam, b. May 9, 1787 ; d. in Eaton, Madison County, N.Y., 
Sept. 6, 1807, ae. 20. 

818. ^Lois, b. June 24, 1789 ; m. Horatio Eddy ; had 10 chil- 
dren ; d. March 8, 1839. 

819. ^Wells, b. Marcli 14, 1792. 

820. ^Oren, b. Sept. 21, 1795 ; d. in Eaton, Madison County, 
Dec. 4, 1813, ae. 18. 

821. sDescom, b. Dec. 12, 1797. 

822. ^Anson, b. in Norwich, Mass., May 10, 1803. 

823. loAbira, b. in Norwich, Mass., May 1, 1802; d. July 30, 1847. 
Children all b.in Springfield, (Chicopee,) Mass. with the exception of 2. 

(330) 
Timothy Chapin, son of Timothy and Martha, b. Feb. 1760 ; 
m. July 13, 1782, Tiercy Frink. He d. in the town of Howard, 
N. Y., at an advanced age. Children — 

824. iTiercy, b. Oct. 24, 1783; m. Selah Frink; removed to 
Eaton, N, Y. 

825. 2Asa, b. May 12, 1787. 

826. sAnna, b. Sept. 23, 1789. 

827. ^Timothy, b. Nov. 29, 1790 ; d. in Albany, N. Y. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 57 

828. ^Gad, b. May 24, 1793. 

829. ^Asher, b. Jan. 21, 1797. 

830. ^Elizabeth, b. Oct. 30, 1799. 

831. sPerlina, b. Jan. 30, 1805. 
^Amery, b. Jan. 2, 1802. 

Children all born in Springfield, (Chicopee,) Mass. 

(331) 

Jehial Chapix, son of Timothy and Martha, b. Dec. 19, 1761 ; 
m. May 6, 1784, Ursula Beament, dau. of Jonathan Beament. 
Jehial, the father, removed from Springfield (Chicopee) to Eaton, 
N. Y. He was quite a pious and useful man, and was a leader in 
religious meetings for a number of years when the Chicopee Parish 
was destitute of a settled minister. Children — 

832. iTryphena, b. Feb. 2, 1785. 

833. 2Jehial, b. May 28, 1787. 

834. ^Ursula, b. July 15, 1789. 

835. ■iBurt, b. June 25, 1795. 

836. ^Amanda, b. Sept. 8, 1798. 

Children all born in Springfield, (Chicopee,) Mass. 
Jehial, the son, was killed by his horses running away on the 
6th of April, 1839, in the town of Italy, Yates County, N. Y. 

(340) 

Henry Marshfield Chapin, son of Henry and Mary, m. 1785, 
Elizabeth Lilley. Children — 

837. lElizabeth, b. April, 1786 ; m. May 26, 1830, Simeon Nash 
of South Hadley, being his 3d wife. No children. 

838. 2james, b. Oct. 1787. 

839. ^Henry Marshfield, b. 1788 or '89. 

840. -^Martha Gold, b. 1795 ; m. Wait Bartlett of Granby. 

841. ^Clarissa, b. 1796 ; d. Nov. 1858, unm., ae. 62. 

(343) 
Roderick Chapin, son of Henry and Mary, m. Hepsibah Morton 
of Conway. Children — 

842. ^Roderick, m. Sally Clough, dau. of John Clough. 

843. 2john. 844. ^willard. 845. -lOliver. 
846. ^Mary. 847. ^Hepsibah. 848. "Susan. 

8 



58 FIFTH GENERATION. 



(345) 

Abner Chapin, son of Abner and Abigail Chapin, b. May 29, 
1749; m. Rhoda Kibbe of Somers, Sept. 1769; she d. Aug. 18, 
1824, ae. 73. Abner was in the war of the Revolution at Roxbury 
and at the taking of Burgoyne. Children — 

849. lAbner, b. Jan. 12, 1771 ; m. Polly Adams, May 30, 1795. 

850. 'Amariah, b. Jan. 11, 1773; m. Lovina Geluton ; lived in 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

851. ^Oliver, b. Dec. 5, 1774 ; d. Oct. 1776. 

852. "Rhoda, b. Oct. 8, 1776; m. Elijah P. Russell of Springfield. 

853. ^Diadema-, b. Sept. 4, 1778 ; m. Zeno King of Suffield, Ct. 

854. «Bulah, b. Feb. 26, 1785 ; m. Uriel Cone of Middlefield. 

855. ^Daniel Shays, b. Jan. 27, 1787 ; ra. Marinda Hill of Ludlow. 

856. "Mary, b. April 7, 1789 ; m. Cyrus Crane of Wilbraham, 
July, 1809. 

(351) 

Samuel Chapin, son of Abner and Abigail Chapin, b. Jan. 30, 
1762 ; d. April 14, 1837, ae. 75. He m. (1) Huldah Wright of 
Ludlow; (2) Susannah Butts of Springfield, Oct. 11, 1806. Mrs. 
Huldah Chapin d. June 11, 1806. Mrs. Susannah Chapin d. Nov. 4, 
1859, ae. 78. Samuel Chapin was in the war of the Revolution 
7 months. He was 6 months at Rhode Island and 1 month at New 
London, for which he received a pension under the Act of 1831, up 
to the time of his death. 

Children, by (1) wife — 

857. ^Mahala, b. Nov. 26, 1793 ; m. Amisa Switzer of Warren, 
d. May 22, 1851. 

858. 2Maria, b.Nov.5, 1795; m. Harvey B. Pease of Enfield, Ct. 

859. 3Ralph, b. March 27, 1798 ; d. March 12, 1801. 

860. -^Samuel, b. June 25, 1800; m. Sally Butts of Canterbury, Ct. 

Children, by (2) wife — 

861. sRalph Sumner, b. Oct. 13, 1807. 

862. ^Warren Butts, b. Nov. 7, 1810 ; d. Oct. 1836. 

863. 'Susan, b. Nov. 13, 1811 ; d. Sept. 12, 1828, ae. 17. 

864. ^Nathaniel M., b. Feb. 26, 1814. 

865. 9Silas Whitman, b. July 11, 1818. 

866. i«Huldah Wright, b. Oct. 3, 1820. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 59 



(352) 

Timothy Chapin, son of Abner and Abigail Chapin, b. March 3, 
1764 ; m. Martha Cooley, May, 1807, b. Feb. 6, 1778. Mr. Timothy 
Chapin settled in Greenbriar Co., Virginia, and afterwards removed 
to Raysville, Henry Co., Indiana, where he d. Oct. 5, 1846. Martha, 
his wife, d. Feb. 18, 1860, ae. 82. Children— 

867. iJosiah P., b. Dec. 20, 1807 ; d. March 10, 1809. 

868. ^Charles C, b. Dec. 14, 1808. 

869. ^Hadassah ) , . , . o lom 

870. ^Maria, \ *^^^'' ^- ^^^- ^^ l^^O' 

871. ^Cordilah, b. Sept. 11, 1812. 

872. nVilliam W., b. Nov. 13, 1814 ; d. July 20, 1841. 

873. 'Eleanor, b. Sept. 6, 1819 ; d. April 11, 1853. 

Charles C. m. Delilah Deaver ; lives in Saluda, Jeiferson Co., 
Indiana ; had 5 daughters. Hadassah m. three times — 1st husband, 
Isaac Davis ; 2d, James Lenino ; 3d, Joseph Harris. By her 1st 
husband, she had 2 children, and 3 by the 2d. She lives in Rays- 
ville, Henry Co., Indiana. Maria has been m. twice — her 1st hus- 
band, Eli Steel ; 2d, Eskridge Hall. She had 1 child by her 1st 
husband, and 4 by her last. Residence, Elizabeth City, Henry Co., 
Indiana. Cordilah m. Miles Burris ; had 11 children ; 8 now living. 
Residence, Grantown, Howard Co., Indiana. William W. m. Han- 
nah Archer ; lived north of Knightstown ; d. 9 months after mar- 
riage. Eleanor m. Daniel Armstrong ; had 4 children ; 3 living. 
Residence, Lewisville, Henry Co., Indiana. 

(354) 

Seth Chapin, son of Seth and Hannah, b. Aug. 17, 1758-59 ; 
m. (inten. ent.) Jan. 4, 1800, Sybel Lombard of Ludlow. Mr. Seth 
Chapin d. April 13, 1832, ae. 73. Mrs. Sybel Chapin d. April 15, 
1847, ae. 79. Mr. Seth Chapin was a farmer, and resided north of 
Chicopee River, on the same farm on which his sons now reside. 
His death was caused by being overpowered by heat and smoke 
arising from his burning some brush. His body was found partially 
burned. Children — 

874. iBela, b. Dec. 1, 1801. 

875. 2Neri, b. Oct. 8, 1804. 

876. ^Seth, b. Jan. 14, 1807, unm. 

877. ■^Dennis, b. Oct. 6, 1809. 



60 FIFTH GENERATION. 

(355) 

Zenas Chapin, son of Seth and Ilannali, b. Jan. 8, 1760 ; 
m. Nov. 1792, Eleanor Ilunirill. Mrs. Eleanor Chapin d. at. Hart- 
ford, Ct., Nov. 20, 1840, ae. G9. Children— 

888. ^Hannah, b. Jan. 17, 1794'; m. Samuel Chandler. 

889. ^Eleanor, b. April 8, 1796; ni. Mr. Dickinson of Amherst. 

890. ^Adolphus, b. May 17, 1798 ; d. young. 

891. "^Rectus, pub. to Elizabeth Dickinson of Amherst. 

892. ^Maria, b. May 11, 1802; d. 

893. ephilanda, b. July 30, 1805. 

894. ']\Iary, b. June 25, 1806 ; m. Mr. Simons, son of Paul G. 

895. ^Simeon, m. Roxauy Warriner, dau. of Walter Warriner ; 
has issue. 

896. "Elam, b. July 12, 1809 ; m.; has res. in Hartford, Ct. 

897. i"Semantha. 898. ^'Elvira. 

899. ^^One, who d. young. 

(357) 

Zerah Chapin, son of Seth and Hannah, b. July 31, 1767 ; 
m. June 2, 1791, in South Hadley, Abigail Barber of Ludlow, dau. 
of Ebenezer Barber. Zerah, the father, was a joiner as well as a 
farmer ; lived on Chicopee street, in the house where his son Lewis 
now resides, and d. Sept. 9, 1803, ae. 37, Children — 

900. iPersis, b. Jan. 9, 1792 ; m. Julius Chapin. 

901. 2Quartus. 

902. ^Sophia, m. Nov. 18, 1818, John Moody of Granby ; has 
issue. Residence, Ludlow. 903. ^Lewis, 

904. ^Abigail, m. Seth Whiting. 

(358) 

Joseph Chapin, son of Joseph and Elizabeth, b. Sept. 8, 1749 ; 
m, Dec. 2, 1769, Lucy Morgan. He went to the State of New York, 
and subsequently m. another woman and had a large family of children. 

(359) 

Levi Chapin, son of Joseph and Elizabeth, b. Aug. 23, 1751 ; 
m. April, 1777, Sally Richardson. Mr. Levi Chapin resided in what 
is now Chicopee Centre ; d. Aug. 20, 1834. Mrs. Sally Chapin d. 
April 2, 1833. Children— 

905. iJoseph, b. Nov. 20, 1779. 

906. 2Levi, b. April 23, 1787. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 61 

907. "3Iary, b. Jan. 11, 1778 ; m. Josiah Stevens ; 9 children. 

908. ^Phebe, b. May 22, 1781 ; m. Wm. Bliss ; 10 sons, 2 daus. 

909. ^Rebeccah, b. Oct. 22, 17S2 ; m. Shepherd Burgess ; had 
8 sons and 4 daughters ; d. April 9, 1850. 

910. ^Anna, b. Dec. 20, 1785 ; m. Heman Bartlet of Granby ; 
had 3 sons and 2 daughters; d. Dec. 19, 1857. 

911. ^Julius, b. Jan. 14, 1790. 

912. ^Sally, b. Sept. 12, 1792; m. Epaphroditus Allis ; had 
1 son and 2 daughters ; E. Allis d. March 23, 1862, ae. 73. 

913. 9Ruey, b. Feb. 26, 1795 ; d. Oct. 10, 1796. 

914. i"Gilbert, b. Nov. 25,- 1798 ; d. May 9, 1803. 

(361) 
Paul Chapin, son of Joseph and Elizabeth, b. Oct. 23, 1755 ; 
m. June 30, 1784, Clarissa M. Kilburn of West Springfield ; she was 
b. June 26, 1764, and d. July 25, 1823. Mr. Paul Chapin resided 
on where is now the river road from Chicopee to Springfield, and d. 
in Monson, Sept. 13, 1841, ae. 86. Children — 

915. iLucy, b.Dec.31,1784 ; m.Feb. 7,1805, Stephen Hitchcock. 

916. 2Emily, b. Aug. 20, 1786 ; m. Dec. 1, 1814, Russell Loomis. 

917. ^Lebbeus, b. April 29, 1788 ; m. Bardwell ; lived in 

Belchertown; d. April 13, 1820, ae. 32. 

918. Cyrus, b. Jan. 25, 1790 : d. May 15, 1827. 

919. Clarissa, b. Feb. 2, 1792 ; m. July 8, 1813, Sam'l Boylston. 

920. epbilip, b. Sept. 25, 1794; m.; lived in N.Y. 

921. ■'Jonathan, b. Jan. 22, 1797 ; d. March 25, 1820, ae. 23, unro, 

922. sparmenas, b. March 10, 1799 ; d. June 21, 1859, ae. 60. 

923. 9Alva, b. April 13, 1801 ; m.; lives in Enfield, Ct. Plowmaker. 

924. loPatty, b. March 26, 1803 ; m. Jan. 5, 1824, Peter Pease 
of South Hadley. 

925. "Marcus, b.Jan.24, 1806; drowned in Ct. River, June 3, 1809. 

(363) 
Ithamer Chapin, son of Joseph and Elizabeth, b. Oct, 15, 1759. 
m. Children — 

926. iCurtisS. 927. ^^^illiam. 928. ^Luther. 

Ithamer, the father, was subsequently m. to Lucy Van Horn, 
widow of Luther Van Horn. Children — 

929. -^Adolphus, b. Nov. 10, 1798. 

930. Cad, b. July 25, 1800. 

931. '^Edward, b. Sept. 2, 1802. 

932. ■'Merrick, b. Sept. 21, 1805. 

933. 8A child, b. Dec. 4, 1807 ; d. Dec. 14, 1807, ae. 11 days. 



62 FIFTH (iK.XERATlON. 

(365) 

Eli Ciiapin, son of Joseph and Elizabeth, b. Sept. 21, 1764 ; 
m, and had issue. Lived in New York. 

(369) 
William Chapin, son of William and Martha, b. April 26, 1748; 
m. Mary Church. Wm. Chapin, the father, was a farmer ; resided 
in a house now standing in Chicopee Centre, so called, a short dis- 
tance west of where the house built by his ancestor, Henry Chapin, 
stood, and which was burned in 1762. Children — 

934. ^Anna, m. Justin Warriner. 

935. ^WTilliam, m. Lucy Day. 

936. ^Heman, m. (562) Phena Chapin. 

937. ■^Lucina, unm. 

938. ^Alexander, m. Sophia Burt. 

(370) 
Japhet Chapin, son of William and Martha, b. Aug. 8, 1760 ; 
m. pub. Oct. 25, 1783, to Lovina Wright of Wilbraham ; she was 
b. Aug. 6, 1764, and d. Sept. 19, 1834. Mr. Japhet Chapin d. Oct. 6, 
1822, ae. 62 ; he was a lumber manufacturer and dealer, also farmer. 
Eesidence, what is now Chicopee Centre. Children — 

939. iQlive, b. April 17, 1785 ; m. (548) Bridgman Chapin. 

940. ^Whitfield, b. May 4, 1787. 

941. ^'Japhet, b. Aug. 28, 1789. 

942. 'Atlas, b. Dec. 26, 1791. 

943. spiiny, b. Feb. 20, 1794. 

944. "Francis, b. Feb. 26, 1796. 

945. 'Austin, b. May 2, 1798. 

946. ^Verrannus, b. May 21, 1800. 

947. ^Sidney, b. April 18, 1802. 

948. lOMilton, b. Dec. 10, 1804. 

(371) 
Hknry Chapin, son of William and Martha, b. July 22, 1762 ; 
m. March 3, 1791, (1) to Abigail Colton of Wilbraham, dau. of 
Stephen Colton. She was b. June 27, 1767 ; d. Oct. 13, 1818, ae. 
61 yrs. and 8 mos.; m. (2) Lucy Kellogg of Hadley, June 27, 1819 ; 
she was b. Nov. 2, 1769 ; d. Dec. 10, 1843, ae, 79. Mr. Henry 
Chapin d. Dec. 22, 1825, ae. 64. Farmer. Residence, Chicopee. 
Children — 



FIFTH GENERATION. 63 

949. iHenry, b. Jan. 4, 1792. 

950. 2Tbaddeus, b. Aug. 1794. 

951. scyntbia, b. July, 1799; m. Josiah Kellogg of HacUey ; 
had 7 children — 2 d. young. Mr. Kellogg d. in Providence, R. I. 

(379) 

Charles Chapin, son of Benjamin and Anna, b. Aug. 22, 1742 ; 
m. (1) pub. Sept. 26, 1766, to Silence Kellogg of South Hadley ; 
(2) to Mary Smith of Granby. 

Children, by (1) wife — 

952. ^William. 

953. ^Charles, b. April 22, 1772 ; d. in the State of N. Y. 

954. ^Cisera. 
Children, by (2) wife — 

955. 4]\iary, b. Jan. 11, 1777; d. in Greenfield. 

956. ^Elam, b. Oct. IS, 1778 ; m. Jan. 15, 1807, Polly Eddy ; 
removed to and d. (suppose) in Canada. 

957. ^Electa, b. Jan. 1, 1781 ; d.in Springfield, Sept.l7, 1859, ae.76. 

958. ''Tirzah, b. Oct. 4, 1783. 

959. sQordon, b. Jan. 18, 1786 ; d. in Iowa. 

960. ^Benjamin, b. Oct. 4, 1788 ; d. in Hinsdale. 

961. I'^Triphena. 962. iiCamma. 

963. ^^Festus, d. in Hinsdale, unm. 

Charles Chapin, Jr. of Cheshire, Berkshire Co. and Clara Day of 
South Hadley, were m. Feb. 21, 1799. (See So. Hadley Records.) 

(380) 

Zadock Chapin, son of Benjamin and Anna, b. July 2, 1745 ; 
m. pub. Dec. 31, 1768, to Jerusha Hubbard. Children — 

964. ^Jerusha, b. in Springfield, Mass., March 5, 1771. 
Zadock removed to Connecticut and d. there. 965. Rufus, his 

son, resided in Herkimer Co., N.Y., and had 1 son — 966. Theodore, 
who resided at Canajoharrie, Montgomery Co., in 1842. 

(386) 

Martin Chapin, son of Isaac and Experience Chapin, b. Oct. 6, 
1738 ; m. pub. Dec. 3, 1768, to Bathsheba Cooper. Children— 

967. iBathsheba, b. July 8, 1770; m. Jan. 22, 1795, Caleb Street. 

968. 2pamelia, b. Aug. 15, 1772. 

969. ^Martin, b. July 2, 1773. 

970. -^Justin, d. July 14, 1827, ae. 46. 

971. nValler, b. Jan. 15, 1778. 



64 FIFTH GENERATION. 

972. *5Parnel, m. Jan. 30, 1798, Solomon Ferrey of Easthampton. 

973. Tersis, b. May 24, 1784 ; m. Erastus Pease of Auburn. 

974. '^Experience, b. Oct. 13, 1786 ; d. unm. at Auburn. 

975. ''Lucinda, d. unm. 

976. '"Jacob, b. Nov. 9, 1789. 

(388) 
Zebulon Chapin, son of Isaac and Experience, b. Nov. 11, 
1741 ; m. (1) Marcy Cooper, by whom he had 1 son — 

^Zebulon, d. ae. 33. 
His wife Mary d., and he m. (2) Jan. 23, 1777, Lydia Ely. Mr. 
Zebulon Chapin d. Oct. 27, 1823, ae. 82. Zebulon, the father, 
removed from Chicopee early in life and settled on a farm on Wil- 
braham mountain, about one mile east of the church in Wilbraham. 
Children — 
. 977. ilsaac, b. Oct. 30, 1777 ; d. Oct. 8, 1855, ae. 78. 

978. 2Marcy, b. Oct. 4, 1779 ; d. Oct. 1852, ae. 73. 

979. ^Solomon, b. July 4, 1781 ; d. Sept. 18, 1787, ae. 6. 

980. -"Matilda, b. July 5, 1783. 

981. ^Celia, b. Aug. 14, 1785 ; d. May 21, 1789, ae. 4. 

982. "Achsa, b. Aug. 8, 1787 ; d. June 10, 1859, ae. 71. 

983. ^Solomon,), . b. Sept.20, 1789; d. June 17, 1831, ae. 42. 

984. «Celia, ) ^^^"^'^' b. Sept. 20, 1789. 

985. nVilliam, b. Aug. 2, 1791 ; d. June 6, 1824, ae. 33. 
Marcy, the daughter, m. 1807, Elijah Webster, and settled about 

half a mile from her father's ; had a large family ; d. Oct. 1852, 
ae. 73. Matilda m. April 4, 1805, Ezekiel Webster ; settled in 
Hebron, Ct.; has a large family ; is still living. Achsa m. May. 25, 
1813, Isaac L. Gardner; settled in the Black River Country, where 
she d. June 10, 1859, ae. 71, leaving a large family of children. 
Celia (a twin with Solomon) m. May 13, 1813, Elijah L. Webster; 
settled in Greenwich, Mass.; had 4 children. For her 2d husband, 
she m. Mr. Brackenage of Ware, Mass., with whom she still lives. 

(389) 

William Chapin, son of Isaac and Experience, b. Nov. 17, 1743; 
m. (389) Thankful Chapin, dau. of George Chapin. They had no 
children. Lived on Chicopee street, on the homestead occupied by 
his father Isaac. Was a farmer. Mr. William Chapin d. Dec. 3, 
1823, ae. 80. Mrs. Thankful Chapin d. Dec. 10, 1810, ae. 65. He 
made his brother Zebulon's son William heir to his estate. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 65 

(394) 

George Chapin, Jr., son of George and Thankful, b. March 14, 
1744; ra. Jan. 23, 1765, Phebe Sikes. Mr. George Chapin d. 
April 16, 1794. Mrs. Phebe Chapin d. Residence, what is now 
Chicopee Centre. Children — 

986. iPhebe, b. Dec. 17, 1765 ; d. Oct. 21, 1776. 

987. 2G-eorge, b. May 20, 1769. 

988. ^Rhoda, b. Nov. 5, 1770 ; d., unm., Sept. 18, 1805, ae. 35. 

989. 4Liike, b. March 29, 1773. 

990. ^Thankful, b. July 20, 1775 ; d. Oct. 6, 1776. 

991. ''James, b. May 6, 1780 ; was a joiner by trade. 

992. "Phebe, b. Nov. 11, 1782 ; m. Mr. Pond. 

993. «Dan, b. Feb. 16, 1785. 

Luke emigrated to the State of New York when quite a young 
man — James and Dan several years after. 

(398) 

Solomon Chapin, son of George and Thankful, b. Feb. 4, 1751 ; 
m. Feb. 10, 1774, (393) Vashti Chapin, dau. of Isaac Chapin. 
Solomon, the father, d. at the residence of his son-in-law, Thomas 
Howard, in West Springfield. Solomon was a farmer, and resided 
the greater part of his life in what is now Chicopee Centre. Later 
in life, he removed to Norwich, Mass. Mrs. Vashti Chapin d. in 
West Springfield, April 8, 1830, ae. 77. Children— 

994. lAminta, b. March 25, 1775 ; m. Thomas Howard of West 
Springfield. 

995. sRalph. 996. ^Solomon. 

997. •^Vashti, m. Byron Morgan of Springfield. 998. ^Jonas. 

(407) 
Daniel Chapin, son of George and Thankful, b. Aug. 1, 1767 ; 
m. Feb. 4, 1793, Mary Perrey. It is supposed that Daniel Chapin 
and his wife d. in Warwick. Children — 

999. iDaniel. 1000. ^dements. 1001. sBeriah. 
1002. -^Thankful. 1003. ^Hannah. 1004. ^One other dau. 

(408) 

Abel Chapin, son of Ephraim and Jemima, b. April 5, 1756 ; 
m. May 27, 1779, (202) Dorcas, dau. of Stephen and Zebia Chapin, 
pub. April 24, 1779. She b. Dec. 3, 1754. Col. Abel Chapin d. 
9 



CG FIFTH GENERATION. 

Oct. 10, 1831. Mrs. Dorcas Chapin d. July 13, 1841. Col. Abel 
Cliapiii resided in that part of Springfield which is now Chicopee, 
and kept a tavern there for several years in the dwelling-house 
which he built, now occupied by his son, Sumner Cliapin. lie was 
extensively engaged in farming, for which he displayed a great tact ; 
and was noted for raising and fattening large and fine cattle. He 
was a man of excellent judgment, and of great perseverance. Col. 
Cliapin was in the old French w^ar three months, but returned home 
on account of sickness. He commanded a company of Government 
troops in the Shays Rebellion. Children — 

1005. ^Electa, b. Dec. 1779 ; d. Oct. 16, 1858. 

1006. ^Gordon, b. Dec. 6, 1781 ; d. Oct. 6, 1808. 

1007. ^Jemima, b. Oct. 7, 1783 ; d. Jan. 20, 184G. 

1008. -^Oral, b. Oct. 11, 1785 ; d. May, 1849. 

1009. ^Harvey, b. Oct. 1787, 

1010. ^Aldeu, b. Nov. 13, 1789 ; d. April 3, 1828. 

1011. ^Abel, b. Sept. 25, 1791. 

1012. ^Dexter, b. Sept. 19, 1793 ; d. at Montreal, May 31, 1842. 

1013. ^Julius, b. Jan. 9, 1795 ; d. May, 1796. 

1014. i"Sumner, b. March 5, 1798. 

1015. "Dorcas, b. April 11, 1801. 

Abel, unm., resided in California for several years, but has 
returned to Mass. Dexter m. Charlott Blake. He had resided in 
Montreal for a number of years previous to his death, which took 
place May 30, 1842, and left no children. Dorcas m. (1022) Chester 
W. Chapin, Esq. of Springfield. 

(409) 
Ephraim Chapin, son of Ephraim and Jemima, b. April 3, 1759 ; 
ni. Feb. 1782, Mary Smith, who was b. March 30, 1763, dau. of 
Phineas Smitli of Granby, or South Hadley, Capt. Ephraim Chapin 
d. Dec. 26, 1806, ae. 48. Mrs. Mary Chapin d. Jan. 9, 1844, ae. 81. 
Capt. Ephraim Chapin resided for several years in South Hadley 
and Ludlow, but removed to Chicopee, and d. there. Occupation, 
farmer. Children — 

1016. lErastus, b. July 20, 1783 ; d. 

1017. ^Sophia, b. July 21, 1785 ; m. Levi Stedman. 

1018. ^Giies Smith, b. April 19, 1787. 

1019. -^Ephraim, b. March 14, 1789. 

1020. ^Mary S., b. May 20, 1791. 

1021. ^Betsey, b. Aug. 12, 1793. 

1022. ^Chester Williams, b. Jan. 16, 1797. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 67 

Mary S. m. (942) Atlas Chapin, son of Japhet Chapiu ; bad 2 sons 
and 2 daughters. Atlas d., and she m. (2) Mr. Munson ; lives in 
Cazenovia, Madison Co., N.Y. Betsey, late in life, July 1, 1846, 
m. Mr. M. C. Webster of Hartford, Ct. Mr. M. C. Webster d. 
Oct. 24, 1857. 

(411) 
Benjamin Chapin, son of Ephraim and Jemima, b. Aug. 10, 1764; 
m. Sarah Fuller of Ludlow, June, 1786. Mr. Benjamin Chapin d. 
June, 1810. Mrs. Sarah Chapin m. (2) Capt. Chapman of Elling- 
ton, Ct. Mrs. Chapman d. in Hartford, Ct. Children — 

1023. ^Caroline, b. Feb. 15, 1789. 

1024. ^Frances, b. Sept. 1792. 

Caroline m. Seneca Barton Burchard of Granby, Mass., and 
removed to Paris, Oneida Co., N. Y., and afterwards removed to 
Hamilton, Madison Co., N. Y., and has a family of children. Hon. 
S. B. Burchard d. at Hamilton, N. Y., Feb. 3, 1861, ae. 71. Caro- 
line, his wife, d. June 17, 1860, ae. 71. Frances m. Horatio Bur- 
chard of Paris or Sangerfield, Oneida Co., N. Y.; has a large family 
of children. 

(414) 

Bezaleel Chapin, son of Ephraim and Jemima, b. March 9, 
1769 ; m. 1790, (504) Thankful Chapin, dau. of Simeon and Lucy, 
b. Oct. 12, 1774. Mr. Bezaleel Chapin d. June 14, 1812. Mrs. 
Thankful Chapin Torrey d. at Rochester, N.Y., April 15, 1854. 
Bezaleel was a farmer, and resided in Chicopee until 1799, and then 
removed to Ludlow, and resided there until he d. June 14, 1812. 
Thankful m. (2) Dec. 14, 1814, Elijah Torrey of Wilbraham, who 
had been previously married and had 4 children by his 1st wife. 
After he married Widow Thankful Chapin, he with his family resided 
in Ludlow, on the home farm of Bezaleel, during his life time, and 
he d. there. 

Children — 

1025. iQrramel, b. April 5, 1791. 

1020. 2Almeria, b.Jan. 3,1793; d.at Alleghany, N.Y„ July 19,1860. 

1027. ^Alfred, b. Nov. 7, 1795 ; d. at Kaskaskia, Illinois, Oct. 20, 
1823. Chairmaker. 

1028. ^Theodore, b. March 27, 1800 ; n. June 29, 1854. 

1029. sLydia Todd, b. Feb. 12, 1802. 

1030. ^Lucy Doolittle, b. July 19, 1805. 



68 SIXTH GENERATION, 

Almesia m. Cotton Keyes of Ludlow, Oct. 1814, and removed to 
the town of Otto, Cattaraugus Co., in 1832; had 2 sons and 2 daugh- 
ters — one son and one dau. d. young. Lydia Todd m. Jan. 22, 1834, 
Samuel Hayt of Ovid, Seneca Co., N.Y.; have2daus. — 1031. Sarah 
T. 1032. Lucy A. They removed from Ovid to Rochester, N. Y., 
and now (1862) reside in Milwaukie, Wis.; he is a flour dealer. 
Lucy Doolittle m. Aaron Warner Stebbins of Granby, March 7, 1825, 
son of Deacon John Stebbins ; they removed to Weathersfield, Vt., 
Feb. 1827, and removed from there to Mansfield, Cattaraugus Co., 
N. Y-., 1832 ; have a family of 6 children. 

(415) 
Frederick Chapin, son of Ephraim and Jemima, b. April 9, 
1771 ; m. (1) Oct. 1, 1795, Roxalany Lamb, dau. of Daniel Lamb of 
South Hadley Falls; she was b. Feb. 1, 1775. Mr. Chapin m. (2) 
widow Lois Rice of Northboro',Mass.; she d. Sept. 16, 1848, ae. 69; 
was buried in Northboro'. Mrs. Roxalany Chapin d. Mr. Frederick 
Chapin d. March, 1848. Frederick resided on the west side of 
Chicopee street, in the same house occupied by his father, and now 
(1862) by his son Briant. He was a farmer, and fond of fine cattle 
and a general neatness about his farm and buildings. Children — 

1033. ^Sylvester, b. Jime 10, 1797 ; drowned in Conn. River, 
May 28, 1834. 

1034. ^Harriet, b. April 28, 1799. 

1035. ^Briant, b. Aug. 28, 1802. 

1036. "Daniel Monro, b. Aug. 9, 1809. 

Harriet m. Albert Day of Westfield ; they removed from there to 
Hartford, Ct.; he is a successful and wealthy merchant; has a 
family of children ; is Deacon of the Baptist Church, and has been 
Lieut. Grovernor of the State of Connecticut. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 

(434) 

VI. Jonathan Chapin, son of Reuben and Mary, m. Nov. 28, 
1804, Mercy Breck of West Springfield. Mr. Jonathan Chapin d. 
Jan. 12, 1844, ae. 75. Children— 

1037. ^Eveline, b. June 20, 1805. 

1038. 2Mary Merrick, b. Feb. 13, 1807; d. March 16, 1809, ae. 2. 

1039. ^Mary Merrick, b. March 11, 1809. 

1040. ^Jonathan Breck, b. March 25, 1811. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 69 

(435) 

Eeuben Chapin, son of Eeuben and Mary, m, April 21, 1794, 
Luciuda Button. Mr. Reuben Chapin d. at Xorth Providence, about 
1835 or '36. Children— 

1041. iMerrick Warren, b. Nov. 19, 1796, in West Springfield. 

1042. 2Loring Dudley, b. Dec. 2, 1798, in West Springfield ; d. 

1043. ^Chariot Horton, b. Sept. 12, 1800, in " 

1044. -^Lucinda Colton, b. Nov. 27, 1802, " 

1045. 5j„iiannaNewbui-y, b. Nov. 19, 1804," 

1046. GRasselas Moody, b. July 7, 1806, " 
■^Reuben Waterman, b. in Ludlow. 
^Adaline Wells, b. in " 

Merrick Warren, a wealthy merchant ; res. Hartford, Ct. Char- 
lotte H. m. a Coney ; now a widow and living with her sister 
Adaline W. who m. W. H. Ireland, Watertown, Mass. Julianna N. 
m. P. L. Beckwith, Providence, R. I. Rassalas M. res. in Wick- 
ford, R. I. 

(438) 
Israel Chapin, son of Joel, ra. Esther Webster. Children — 

1047. lOtis. 1048. 2Alpha. 1049. ^Eunice. 

(439) 

Joel Chapin, son of Joel, m. Allice Penfield. Children — 

1050. ^William. 1051'. ^Henry. Gone and no further account 
of them. 

(440) 
Eddy Chapin, son of Joel, m. Ruth Parmenter. Children — 
1052. ^Sally. 1053. ^Sophia. 

(441) 

Solomon Chapin, son of Joel, ra. Rebecca Porter. Children — 

1054. ^Solomon. 1055. ^j^^athan P. 

1056. ^Clarissa, m. Silas Tyler. 1057. ^joel. 1058. ^Erie. 

1059. ''Edward. 1060. ^Rufus. 1061. ^Oliver, d. 

1062. ^Nelson. 1063. i^'Hart H., d. "Caroline, d. 

(444) 

Dr. Caleb Chapin, son of Caleb and Rebecca, b. Aug. 20, 1759, 
m. Mary Wright, b. Jan. 28, 1765, dau. of Rev. Joseph Wright of 



70 SIXTH GENERATION. 

Bernardston. Dr. Chapin was a practising physician in Bernardston. 
Dr. Caleb Chapin d. Nov. 28, 1838, ae. 79, in Boston, Mass. Mrs. 
Mary (Wright) Chapin d. July 10, 1827. Children— 

1064. ^Samuel W., b. Dec. 25, 1787 ; d. in Bernardston. 

1065. 2Seth, b. Jan. 26, 1790 ; d. Nov. 12, 1826. 

1066. ^Caleb, b. Aug. 18, 1792. 

1067. -iGorhain, b. March 16, 1795 ; d. Oct. 15, 1841. Lawyer. 
Went to Ohio. 

1068. ^Marshall, b. Feb. 27, 1798; d. Dec. 26, 1838. Physician 
in Detroit. 

1069. ''Dana, b. Aug. 22, 1800 ; moved to Penn. Farmer. 

1070. ^Horatio, b. June 16, 1803. 

1071. «Job W., b. Aug. 12, 1806 ; d. July 12, 1808. 

1072. sjustiu, b. Sept. 16, 1808. 

(445) 

Zalmuna Chapin, son of Caleb and Rebecca, b. April 3, 1764; 
m. Lydia Wallis. Occupation, farming. Children — 

1073. ^Lucius, b. Sept. 23, 1792 ; m. Hannah Barton. 

1074. ^Marcus, b. Aug. 22, 1795 ; -m. Eunice Cushman ; she d. 
Res. Bernardston. Farmer. 

1075. ^Zalmon, b. June 18, 1798 ; m. Clymeue E. Scott. 

1076. '^Isabel, b. June 25, 1801 ; unm.; resides in Bernardston. 

1077. ^Ezekiel B., b. Oct. 21, 1802; d. June 14, 1813. 

1078. ^Margaret, b. March 30, 1805; unm.; res. in Bernardston. 

1079. ^Lydia, b. Nov. 7, 1807; d. June 14, 1818. 

(446) 

Consider Chapin, son of Caleb and Rebecca, b. Aug. 26, 1766 ; 
m. Esther Wallis ; removed to Kingsville, Ashtabula Co., Ohio. 
Mr. Consider Chapin d. 1860, ae. 94. Children — 

1080. ^Rebecca, m. a Mr. Morse from Pennsylvania. 

1081. 2Anna, num. 1082. ^Orrilla, m. 

1083. **Esther,m.Mr.Hardy; lives in Kingsville; farmer. ) i,„„|]-,p„„ 

1084. ^Asenath, m. Mr. Hardy ; lives in " " ) urouiers. 

1085. ''John, m. Miss Hardy, sister of the above ; removed to 
Michigan, 

1086. ■^Cyrenius, last seen in Buffalo. 

1087. "Eliza, m.; lived in Hamburg, N. Y. 

1088. ^Moses. No account of him. 

1089. i"Maria. No account of her. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 71 

(447) 

Dr. Cyreneus Chapin, son of Caleb and Rebecca, b. Feb. 7, 
1769; m. Sylvia Burnham, b. Jan, 13, 176G. Dr. Chapin was a 
Physician and Surgeon in Buffalo, N.Y.; he was Lieut. Col. of 
Volunteers in Western N. Y. in the war of 1812. Dr. Chapin d. 
Feb. 20, 1838. Children— 

1090. iSylvia, b. Feb. 7, 1796 ; m. (1065) Seth Chapin, son of 
Caleb. Sylvia d. Dec. 1, 1832. 

2Eoyal, b. 1798. 

1091. ^Amelia, b. Jan. 13, 1801 ; d. Aug. 18, 1818. 

1092. ^Louisa Mary, b. March 19, 1803 ; m. Thaddeus Reed. 

1093. ^Cyreneus Burnham, b. April 1, 1805; d. April 3, 1811. 

(460) 

Selah Chapin, son of Selah and Jerusha Chapin, b. in Leyden, 
Mass., Sept. 10, 1773 ; m. Nov. 16. 1803, Sally Ward, b. in Grafton, 
Mass., b. July 22, 1778 ; she d. Nov. 18, 1846, at Ridgefield, Ohio. 
Children — 

1094. ^Nathaniel W., b. Jan. 13, 1805 ; d. at Ridgefield, Ohio, 
Nov. 7, 1846. 

1095. ^Saiiy W., b.Oct.17,1806; d. at Venice, N.Y., May 12,1827. 

1096. sgeiahfsd, b. Sept. 2,1808; d. at Tiffin, 0., Sept. 14, 1828. 

1097. -iSylvia, b. Feb. 11, 1811 ; m. (1) May 12, 1842, John P. 
Cornell ; he d. at Cincinnati, 0., July 4, 1849 ; m. (2) Ralph Valentine. 

1098. 5]\ianley, b. Jan.21, 1814 ; d. June 29, 1849, at Cincinnati, 0. 

(461) 

Abner Chapin, son of Selah and Jerusha Chapin, b. July 22, 
1775; d. Nov. 29, 1829; m. (1) Lydia Judd ; (2) Minerva Beard. 
Mr. Abner Chapin d. at Dryden, N.Y., Nov. 29, 1829. 

Children, by (1) wife — 

1099. ^Maria, m. Williams of Buffalo ; d. 

1100. ^Frances, m. Bissel of Penn Yann, N. Y. 

Children, by (2) wife— 

1101. ^Helen, ra. L. Hine of Cincinnati, 0. 

1102. •lAlfred, d. at Fallisburgh, Mich., Dec. 19, 1854. 

(462) 

Hannah Chapin, dau. of Selah and Jerusha Chapin, b. Aug. 29, 
1777 ; m. April 29, 1798, Benjamin Green, b. Oct. 29, 1770, at 
Stonington, Ct. Mr. Green d. Feb. 1834. Children— 



72 SIXTH GENERATION. 

1103. iLaura, b. Feb. 24, 1799, at Leyden, Mass.; d. May, 1859, 
at Hudson, N. Y. 

1104. ^Curlo, b.Aug.16,1800; ra. Hannah Shears at Norristown,Pa. 

1105. "Amanda, b. July 24, 1S02 ; d. Sept. 10, 1840. 

1106. ■^Alonzo, b. April 19, 1805. 

1107. ^Hannah A., b. May 18, 1807. 

Jerusha Chapin, dau. of Selah and Jerusha, m. Levi Sadler, 
Children — 

1108. iManly, m. Sarah Holmes. 

1109. ^Levi Lincoln, m. Lindu Smith; d. at Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Oct. 24, 1857, disease of the throat. 

1110. "E. Brewer, m. Emily Webb; she d. at Sandusky, Ohio, 
of cholera. 

1111. -^Sereneus, m. Porter; d. April 17, 1861, at Philadel- 
phia, of small pox. 

(463) 

Elisha Chapin, son of Selah and Jerusha, b. in Leyden, (then 
included in Bernardston,) May 24, 1782 ; d. June 23, 1835 ; m. 
July 13, 1808, Ann Ward, b. Jan. 28, 1782; d. July 24, 1812. 
Mr. Elisha Chapin was, in April, 1820, elected one of the Selectmen 
and Assessors of Leyden, and was elected thirteeuitimes during his 
life to the same offices. He was a member of the Constitutional 
Convention of 1820. Four times he represented the town of Leyden 
in the State Legislature, and held the office of Justice of the Peace 
for the last 15 years of his life. Children — 

1112. ^Dennis, b. June 10, 1809; m. Annie R. Smith. ; gradu- 
ated at Amherst College, Class of 1837. 

1113. ^Oliver, b. Feb. 12, 1811 ; m. Louisa E. Root ; no issue. 
Elisha m. (2) Abigail Judd. Children — 

1114. ^George, b. at Leyden, April 19, 1817. 

1115. ^Harriet, b. Sept. 25, 1818, at Leyden; m. John E. Shat- 
tuck, March, 1845. 

1116. ^William, b. May 22, 1820, at Leyden. 

Oliver Chapin is the only descendant of Selali Chapin living in 
the vicinity of Bernardston who bears the Chapin name. 

(464) 

Abigail Chapin, dau. of Selah and Jerusha, m. Solomon Allen. 
Mrs. Allen d. 1830. Mr. Allen d. Dec. 28, 1856. Children— 



SIXTH GENERATION. 73 

1117. iJohn, d. Oct. 17,1858, at Patriot, lud. ; m. Elleu Lazarus. 

Ills. 2giQ^gQj2^ m. 1119, ^Jerusha, m. Murphy. 

''James, d. Dec. 1854, at Indianapolis, Ind. 

(467) 

Lorenzo Chapin, son of Selah and Jeruslia, b. in Leyden, Mass., 
Jan. 20, 1793 ; m. Sept. 3, 1812, Maria Kent, b. in Leyden, Mass., 
Feb. 8, 1794. Children— 

1120. iHenry A., b. in Leyden, Oct. 5, 1815. 

1121. ^Leonard M., b.in Mantua.O., June 14,1816 ; d. Sept.2,1818. 

1122. =^Leonard M., b.in Mantua, 0.,June 1,1819; d.Aug.l2, 1820. 

1123. 4]viaria, b. in Mantua, 0., Jan. 7, 1822; d. July 17, 1825. 

1124. ^Charles E., b. iu Mantua, 0., Oct. 2, 1829 ; m. Marcli 8, 
1851, Mary Bard. 

1125. ^Abigail, b. in Mantua, 0., May 6, 1825; m. (1) Oct. 2, 
1844, Peter Griffin, who d. May 14, 1850 ; m. (2) Horace Ladd, 
Jan. 9, 1853, at Mantua, 0. 

1126. 'Harriet Eliza, b. Feb. 16, 1833; m. June, 1853, Rho- 
dolphus Ladd. 

(468) 

Leonard B. Chapin, son of Selah and Jerusha Chapin, b. in 
Leyden, Mass., April 1, 1795 ; m. Nov. 24, 1825, Mary Ann A. 
Skinner, b. at Glen Falls, N. Y., Nov. 24, 1805. Children— 

1127. iLeonidas, b. at Middletown, Vt., June 11, 1827; m. 
Amanda M, H. Rose. 

1128. ^statira, b. at Middletown, Vt., Julv 12, 1828; d. March 22, 
1847. 

1129. ^Leonard B., Jr., b. at Glen Falls, N. Y., Oct. 7, 1833. 

1130. -^Lorenzo, b. at Glen Falls, N. Y., June 3, 1835; m. Nancy 
A. Knight of Troy, N. Y., May 2, 1861. 

(475) 

Enoch Chapin, son of Enoch and Eunice, b. Nov. 16, 1784; 
m. Dec. 19, 1811, Lydia Chapin, widow of Gordon Chapin and a 
dan. of Capt. Ariel Cooley. Mrs. Lydia Chapin d. April 23, 1850. 
Dea. Enoch Chapin res. at South Hadley Falls ; has been for many 
years a highly respectable and useful citizen. Children — 

1131. lEnoch Cooley, b. Nov. 12, 1812 ; d. Nov. 4, 1858. 

1132. 20gden Nash, b. Aug. 4, 1814; d. April 10, 1816. 

1133. sQgden Nash, b. Jan. 5, 1817. 

1134. 4Ariel Cooley, b. June 28, 1830. 

10 



74 SIXTH UKNERATION. 

(483) 

Elisha Chapin, son of Elisha and Eunice, m. July 23, 1803, 
Betsey Morgan, dau. of Aaron and Roxany (Colton) Morgan of 
Springfield, (Cliicopee Parish.) 

About the year 1798, Elisha Chapin entered the service of 
the United States, as a marine, and sailed to the East Indies, 
under Lieut. Dimon Colton, or on the vessel with him, of 
Springfield ; they remained most of the time in the vicinity of the 
Islands of Sumatra, Java, &e., for the protection of American com- 
merce in that region. This was at the time when affairs between 
France and tlie United States wore so threatening an aspect, as may 
be seen by reference to the History of the United States at that 
period. He was in the service at this time about three years ; it is 
presumed that one of the inducements to his entrance npon this 
service was to improve his health which was somewhat impaired, 
but it was his patriotism principally that moved him to it, — he held 
the office of Sargent. Soon after his return from the East Indies, 
he married Miss Betsey Morgan, who was born in Chicopee, on the 
28th of June, 1780, and is now (1860) living in Springfield, at the 
advanced age of 80 yrs. He settled upon the homestead of his 
father in Ireland Parish, (West Springfield,) where he was born and 
where he died. 

In 1812, our country was involved in war with the mother coun- 
try ; and again he felt called upon to engage in the defence of his 
country's rights. He with his brother Leonard enlisted during the 
war ; he first acted as a recruiting officer and reported to Col. Lar- 
nard of Pittsfield, Mass., but he afterward received a Lieutenant's 
commission, and joined the army then at Sackett's Harbor, where 
he remained all or most of the time he was out, and where his 
brother Leonard, who also held a Lieutenant's commission, died. 
He, Elisha, and it is believed both, belonged to the ninth regiment. 
At the close of the war, he was ordered to report at Washington, 
which he did, and there and then received an honorable discharge 
from the service. 

After this war was over, his health was so poor that he was unable 
to engage in any manual or other labor to any considerable extent, 
but busied himself in his garden and with his books, and became 
very well versed in Astronomy and Botany, and a very well informed 
man generally. In a year or two after his return from Sackett's 
Harbor, Mr.. Henry Ludington, a neighbor having in his possession 
three rattlesnakes, proposed to Mr. Chapin to take and exhibit them 



SIXTH GENERATION. 75 

to the people of that region, which he did, as Mr. Ludiugton had 
done before him. It was supposed that the teeth of these snakes 
had been previously extracted, but one morning, Mr. Chapin, in 
attempting to take one of them up, as he had done many times 
before, was bitten on the first finger of his right hand ; his brother 
Eiley very soon after applied his mouth to the wound, for the pur- 
pose of extracting the virus by sucking. Meanwhile, the arm was 
tightly corded above the elbow, and a noted snake doctor, as he was 
called, was sent for ; the arm to the elbow became much swollen, 
and when the doctor arrived, had taken on the hue of the serpent — 
he ordered the arm and hand bathed in a decoction of lobelia, and a 
strong tea of rattlesnakes' violet given the patient freely : these 
directions were followed perseveringly and successfully. In the 
course of three or four hours after this course of treatment was 
commenced, the discoloration on the hand and arm disappeared, and 
the cord was removed — soon the swelling subsided and the patient 
became comfortable ; but it was several months before he was 
restored to his usual health, indeed it is probable that this gave a 
shock to his system from which it never fully recovered. 

About two years before his death, Mr. Chapin and his wife made 
a puhlic profession of religion, and united with the Baptist church in 
Ireland Parish. He dated his experience back to 1812, at the time 
he was in the army. The disease which had fastened upon him in 
early life, and clung to him with such tenacity through all his days 
was asthma, of which he d. on the 16th of July, 1837, ae. 63 yrs., 
4 mos. and 17 days. 

Children — 

1135. iMaria, b. Dec. 8, 1804 ; d. in Chicopee, at the residence 
of her brother-in-law, D. B. Rice, ae. 36. 

1136. ^Thomas Jefferson, b. Nov. 22, 1806; has a family; 
resides in Dalton, Mass. 

1137. ^Euuice, b. Nov. 23, 1809 ; m. Diodate B. Rice. 

1138. ^Miriam, b. Dec. 23, 1812 ; m. John Wilson. 

1139. ^Elizabeth, b. July 22, 1816; m. Noah D. White of 
Granby; d. Oct. 11, 1831. 

1140. sNancy Colton, b. May 8, 1819 ; m, Mr. J. R. Pepper. 
'Maiy Souly, b. March 20, 1825 ; d. Aug. 28, 1842, ae. 17. 

(486) 
Riley Chapin, son of Elisha and Eunice, m. (1) Persis Cole ; 
(2) Oct. 12, 1818, Polly Price. They had one child— 

1141. ^Polly, who d. young. 



76 SIXTH (JU.NKRATION. 

(488) 

Uev. Peletiaii Chai'in, son of Elijah Cliapin, h. 1.740 ; m. pub. 
Jan. 16, 177G, to Sarah Chapiu of Spnngfiekl, (Chicopee Parish,) 
dau. of Japhet Chapin. Ilev, Pelctiali Chapin was a preacher of the 
Gospel for a great number of years. At the time of his publish- 
ment, the record says he was of Chesterfield, (probably N. II.) He 
d. (suppose) in New Hampshire, about 90 years old. 

They had several children — all d. young but 

1142. Sarah, who lived to be about 70 yrs. of age. 

(490) 

Elijah Chapin, son of Elijah Chapin, b. June, 1750; m. widow 
Thomas Hovey Moody of Granby. Her name was * Eunice ; she 
was dau. of Samuel Chapin (of the 4th generation) of Chicopee ; 
she had 4 children by Mr. Moody and 4 by Mr. Chapin. Mr. Elijah 
Chapin d. in Belchertown, MS,ss., 183G, ae. 86. 

The Chapin children as follows — 

1143. ^Anna, d. in Belchertown, ae. 81, unm. 

1144. ^Sophia, m. Enoch Burnett ; now (1860) living in Bel- 
chertown. 

1145. ^Elijah, d. young. '*One other, who d. young. 

(491) 
Dr. Perez Chapin, son of Elijah Chapin, b. Sept. 1752 ; m. 
May 3, 1776, Elizabeth Smith of South Hadley or Granby. Dr. 
Perez Chapin graduated at Middlebury College, Vt. ; became a phy- 
sician ; practised for a time in Granby, Mass. Removed to Benson, 
Vt., and d. there, ae. 86. Children — 

1146. iRoxana, b. Oct. 9, 1778. 

1147. ^Giles, b. April 2, 1781. 

1148. si^ei-ez, b. April 29, 1783. 

1149. "Sophia, b. Sept. 28, 1785; unm.; d. ae. 35. 

1150. ^Alpheus, b. Oct. 24, 1787. 

1151. ^Horace B., b. Dec. 3, 1791. 

1152. ^Elizabeth S., b. May 22, 1796. 

Roxany m. Rev. C. Burge ; had 3 daughters, who are living. 
Mrs. Burge d. in Guildhall, Vt., ae. 35. Elizabeth m. Mr. Bogar. 
dus ; resides at Messina Springs, N.Y.; has no children ; two of her 
daughters-in-law were educated at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, 
South Hadley, Mass. 

* Grandmother of Mrs. Lysander Chapin of Chicopee. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 77 

(492) 

Oalviiv Chapin, son of Elijah Chapin, b. Jan. 1755 ; m. Hnldah 
Whitney. iMr. Calvin Chapin d. in Windsor, Vt., ae. 70. Children — 
1153. ^Thankful, unm. 1154. ^Hannah. 

1155. ^Hepsibah, m. in Windsor ; had several children. 

1156. "^Rhoda, no further knowledge respecting her. 

1157. ^Sylvanus, " " " " him. 

1158. "^Calvin Aretus, " " •' 

Hannah, the daughter, m.; her eldest son graduated at Amherst 
College ; taught Manlius Academy, N. Y. many years, and is now 
(ISGO) teaching in Ripon, Wisconsin. 

(493) 

SiLVANus Chapin, son of Elijah Chapin, b. June, 1757; m. Martha 
Hollister. Rev. Silvanus Chapin was a preacher of the Gospel for 
many years ; d. in Addison, Vt., ae. over 90. Children — 

1159. ^Aretus, unm. 1160. -Mehetable, m.; has 3 children. 

(494) 

Thomas Chapin, son of Elijah Chapin, b. Sept. 1760 ; m. Rachel 
Clark. Mr. Thomas Chapin d. at Janesville, Wis., ae. 96 yrs. and 
1 month. Children — 

1161. ^Lucina. 1162. ^Uriel, d., some 30 yrs. old ; left 3 daus. 

1163. ^Alansou, living at Janesville, Wis. 

(495) 

Uriel Chapin, son of Elijah Chapin, b. about 1762 ; m. Lydia 
Beach. Uriel was a graduate of Dartmouth College, and d. in Bath, 
N. Y., ae. 48. Children— 

1164. iHenry. 1165. m&li^h. 1166. ^Mary. 1167. ^Laura, 

(500) 

Eber Chapin, son of Luther, m. Sarah Putnam of Bradford, Vt., 
dau. of Adjt. John Putnam, who served in the war of the Revolu- 
tion ; also in the war of 1812, when he was appointed Adjutant. 
Eber removed from Belchertown to what is now Newport, Vt. ; in 
about 1805, removed to Topsham, Vt., and in 1818, to Newbury, Vt., 
and d. there in 1839. Children — 

1168. iJohn P., b. in Newport. Res., Chicago. 

1169. 2Eber, Jr. Res., Chicago. 



78 SIXTH (iKNERATION. 

1170. ^^Paschal P. lies, iu Rock Co., Wis.; unm. 

1171. 'Sarali 0., ni. Jolm Cuiniuins, Jr.; has a dau., ae. 17, and 
bad 4 others who are deceased. 

f 

(502) 
JoHi\ A. Chapin, son of Luther, ni. Children — 

1172. ^Prentice, m. Maria Le Barron ; has issue. 

1173. 'John A., m. 

(505) 

Japhet Chapin, son of Nathan and Mary, b. Aug. 31, 1759; 
m. Dec. 16, 1784, Lucy Ware, b. Nov. 1, 1766. Dea. Japhet Cha- 
pin was b. in Springfield, Mass., from which place his father removed 
when Japhet was young; he resided many years in Buckland, Mass.; 
was Deacon of tbe Baptist Church in Buckland, and held a Justice 
of Peace Commission for about twenty years ; d. April 22, 1833. 
Mrs. Lucy Chapin d. June 14, 1852. Children — 

1174. iLucina, b. Sept. 3, 1785. 

1175. ^Darius, b. July 3, 1787; d. April 17, 1813. 

1176. sMary, b. Aug. 21, 1789. 

1177. 4japhet, b. Dec. 18, 1791 ; d. June 16, 1794. 
117S. ^Cynthia, b. March 16, 1794 ; d. Jan. 8, 1795. 

1179. "Japhet, b. July 20, 1796. 

1180. ■'Orlando, b. Dec. 27, 1798. 

1181. ^Cynthia, b. May 9, 1801. 

1182. »Stillman, b. Jan. 24, 1805; d. April, 1832. 

1183. i"Luther, b. May 29, 1809. 

Lucina m. Enos Smith ; has a large family ; lives in Sheboygan, 
Wis. Mary m. John Porter ; lived iu Buckland until two years 
since, when they removed to Cedar Falls, Black Hawk, Iowa ; never 
had any children. Mr. Porter has several times represented the 
town iu the Legislature, has been a member of the Governor's Coun- 
cil, Justice of the Peace, Dea. of the Congregational Church, Choris- 
ter, and Sabbath School Teacher. The Sabbath previous to his leav- 
ing, the school presented him with an elegant Bible. Cynthia m. 
Levi Sprague ; is a widow, and lives in Buckland ; has 3 children. 

(510) 

RoswELL Chapin, son of Simeon and Lucy, b. April 16, 1767 ; 
m. (544) Asenath Chapin, dau. of Phineas and Sabrina Chapin, 
b. Jan. 5, 1778. Mr. Roswell Chapin d. Mrs. Asenath Chapin d. 
Sept. 19, 1830. Children— 



SIXTH GENERATION. 79 

1184. ^Asapb, was a sailor: it is not known here what became 
of him — probably d, at sea or in a foreign country. 

1185. ^Sophronia, m. Horace Allen — he d. yrs. since in Buffalo, 
N. Y.; left children. 

1186. ^Eoswell, ra. Miss Byers ; has issue. Res. in Canada. 

1187. ^Asenath, m. (1) Mr. Bidsey— he d.; m. (2) Mr. Allen. 
She has since d. and left a family of children. 

1188. ■^Charles, m. Miss Eice; (suppose) res. in Penn.; 2 children. 

1189. ^James 0., m. Miss Rice ; d. in Penn.; 8 children. 

1190. 'Sabrina "W., m. (1) Wm. Look; had issue; bed.; she 
m. (2) Clapp of Montague. Res. there. 

1191. ^Janette E.., m. Mr. Potter ; has issue. Res., Greenfield. 

1192. ^Jesse S., m. Miss Rice ; (suppose) res. in Michigan. 

Four others wbo d. young. 

(518) 

Simeon Ohapin, son of Simeon and Lucy, b. June 22, 1781 ; 
m. Dorcas Strong of Westhampton. Oapt. Chapin was a farmer, 
and something of a military genius ; he with his family removed 
from Chicopee to the county of Oswego, village of Phoenix, N. Y, 
He and his wife both d. there. Children — 

1193. ^Simeon Strong, b. July 2, 1808; m. 

1194. ^ElviraM., b. Nov. 3, 1810; m. 

1195. ^Eliphaz S., b. July 28, 1813 ; m. 

1196. •igherman S., b. Sept. 6, 1814; m. 

1197. ^Dorcas Doolittle, b. June 25, 1818 ; d. young. 

(520) 

Moses Chapin, son of Moses and Bethia, b. July 11, 17G2 ; 
m. Nov. 17, 1785, to (413) Kezia Chapin, dau. of Capt. Ephraim 
and Jemima Chapin, b. July 23, 1766. Moses Chapin, Esq. d. 
Dec. 30, 1824, ae. 62. Mrs. Kezia Chapin d. Nov. 28, 1822, ae. oG. 
Maj. Moses Chapin was a farmer as well as practical land surveyor. 
He had a commission of Justice of the Peace, was a Representative 
from the town of Springfield to the General Court two or three 
years. Clerk and Treasurer of the 2d Parish in Springfield for about 
twenty-five years, and for many years Selectman and Assessor for 
the town of Springfield. He was a member of the Constitutional 
Convention in 1820 ; and was a man of good judgment and great 
perseverance. Children — 

1198. iRuhema, b. March 1, 1788; d. Dec. 22, 1811, unm. 

1199. ^Orange, b. Jan. 9, 1790. 



80 SIXTH GRNEUATIO.M. 

1200. ^vezia, b. Aug.' 1, 1791 ; d. Dec. 21, 1848. 

1201. 'Moses, 1). April 9, 1793; d. March 14, 1857. 

1202. sHoit, b. March 3, 1799 ; d. March 2, 1822, unm. 

1203. ''Laura, b. June 21, 1801 ; d. i\rarch 30, 1861. 

1204. 'Edwin, b. March 17, ISOG ; d. Aug. 10, 1830, unm. 

1205. ^Whitman, b. March 7, 1808 ; d. Aug. 28, 1842. 

Kezia ni. Otis Skeele ; left 2 sons and 3 daughters. Laura ni. 
John Kellogg of South Hadley ; had 2 sons and 8 daughters. 

(522) 

Ash BEL Chapin, son of Moses and Bethia, b. Aug. 21, 17.65 ; 
m. Feb, 8, 1794, Eleanor Van Horn, dau. of Abraham Van Horn. 
Capt. Ashbel Chapin d. July 21, 1840, ae. 75. Eleanor Chapin d. 
Nov. 22, 1833, ae. 68. Capt. Ashbel Chapin was a farmer; resided 
on Chicopee street, in the house which he built and is now occupied 
by his son Titus. He was a very athletic, smart man when young — 
Captain of a military company and a farmer ; but for many years 
was a cripple and confined to his house. Children — 

1206. iQrythia, b. Oct. 1794; d. April 22, 1855. 

1207. 2Alvin, b. March 11, 1796. 

1208. ^Louisa, b. Aug. 1797; d. March 11, 1850. 

1209. -lAshbel, b. July, 1799; d. June 18, 1801. 

1210. ^Titus, b. May, 1801. 

1211. ''Lysander, b. Jan. 5, 1804. 

Orythia m. William Colton of Longmeadow ; she died in Chico- 
pee ; left 1 son and 2 daughters — ^Horatio Colton, m. Julia Parsons, 
dau. of Seth Parsons of West Springfield ; has 2 daughters. ^Louisa 
Colton, after years of suffering, d. Feb. 18, 1861, ae. 42. ^Marsia 
Colton, m. 

Louisa m. Adolphus G. Parker ; resided in Chicopee ; d., leaving 
1 son — Josiah A. Parker, who m. Miss Mary Allen of the State of N.Y. 

(52S) 

Nathaniel Chapin, son^of Nathaniel and Sibyl, m. (1) Cynthia 
Perkins ; (2) Lovisa Sexton. Mr. Nathaniel Chapin was a Metho- 
dist clergyman. Their children — 

1212. ^Harry, d. at 2 yrs. of age. 1213. ^Lovisa, d. num. 

1214. ^Henry, m.; lives in Springfield, Mass. 

1215. ^Qharlotte, m. Samuel Corbin, Union, Ct. 

1216. ^Sibyl, m. Levi Moody. Res., Windsor, Ct. 

1217. "Charles, d. at 3 yrs. of age. 1218. 'Miranda. 



SIXTH GENERATION, 81 

1219. 'Charles, m.; has no issue, 

1220. sEIiza, m. Col. Harvey Holkins, Windsor, (Warehouse 
Point, Ct.; has issue. 

1221. ^Nathaniel, m. Olive Van Horn. 

(529) 

Jabez Chapin, son of Nathaniel and Sibyl, m. Miss D wight of 
Longmeadow, Mass. Mr. Jabez Chapin d. in Ohio. Children — 

1222. lEoswell, residing at Buffalo, N. Y. in 1861. 

1223. 2Lucy. 1224. ^Mary. 1225. nVilliam. 1226. ^Horatio N. 

(534) 

Eliphalet Chapin, son of Eliphalet and Azuba, m. Abigail Pease, 
daughter of Sharon Pease. Mr. Eliphalet Chapin d. Feb. 26, 1848, 
ae. 82 yrs. 7 mos. Mrs. Abigail Chapin d. May 11, 1830, Children — 

1227. iPamelia, d. 1816, 

1228. 2Eiip]iii]et, m. Asenath Phelps ; wife d. Jan. 6, 1832, ae, 41, 

1229. ^Abigail, m. Jacob Felt, Aug. 7, 1811. 

1230. ^Betsey, m. Mr. Marvin Foster, Feb. 6, 1816. 

1231. ^Lucy, num.; lives in Thompsonville, Ct, 

1232. ^Horace, went to the West when young. 

1233. 'Mary, d. 1827. 

1234. ^Clarinda, unm.; lives at Sixteen Acre Village. 

1235. ^Charles, m. Cassambre Bennett. 

1236. ^"Sharon Pease, m. Huldah Loomis. 

1237. "George Washington, m. Mary J. Jones. 

Children of Betsey and Marvin Foster — 

1238. iLyna P., d. 1845. 

1239. ^Caroline E., m, Noah B, Clark ; has 1 child, 

(539) • 

Thomas Chapin, son of Eliphalet and Azuba, m. Anna Pease of 
Enfield, Ct. Thomas, the father, with his family, resided for many 
years in Springfield, now Chicopee Centre, Mass., but removed to 
Hartland,Vt., and d. at the residence of his sou Harvey. Children — 

.1240. ^Anna, num.; d. ae. about 50. 

1241. ^Thomas, d. ae. about 11. 1242. ^Harvey. 

1243. '^Eunice, m. Harvey Langdou. 1244. ■^Dennis. 

1245. ''Sophronia, m. Luman Allen. 

1246. 'Thomas, d. ae. about 13. 

11 



82 SIXTH GENKRATION. 

1247. "Eveline, m. William llatlibuii. 

1248. "Edgar, m.; no issue, lies., State of N, Y. 

1249. ^"Lovica, drowned. 

(540) 

Obadiah Chapin, son of Eliphalet and Azuba, ni. Lois Rose of 
Granville. Children — 

1250. ^Obadiah, ni., and has a family of children. Res., N. H. 

1251. ^Laura, unm. 

1252. ^Harriet, m. Cole of Westfield. 

1253. ''Eliza, m. Lee of Northampton. 

1254. ^Cyuthiaett, m. Dea. Alfred Worthington of Agawam. 

(542) 

George Chapin, of Enfield, Ct., son of Eliphalet and Azuba, 
m. Lucy Parsons, dau. of Shubal Parsons. Mr. George Chapin d. 
at Ogden, Monroe Co., N. Y., June 6, 1856, ae. 85. Mrs. Lucy 
Chapin d. at Enfield. Ct., Aug. 27, 1829. Children— 

1255. iPhilena, b. July 27, 1795 ; m. Samuel E. Stearns ; lived 
in Buffalo ; 3 children. 

1256. ^Clarissa, b. Dec. 21, 1797 ; m. Alpha Chapin, and resided 
in Ogden, Monroe Co., N. Y.; 3 children. 

1257. sG-eorge, b. March 7, 1800; d. Sept. 11, 1802, ae. 2j yrs. 

1258. ^Lucy, b. Dec. 6, 1802 ; unm. 

1259. ^Azuba, b. Feb. 24, 1808; m. Ebenezer Metcalf; d. in 
Enfield ; 2 children. 

1260. "Mary Ann, b. Nov. 12, 1810; m. Mr. Bush; lives in 
Chicago ; 3 children. 

1261. ^Lovica, b. May 24, 1814; 2d wife of E. Metcalf ; lives 
in Ohio ; 8 children. 

1262. ^Catharine, b. March 21, 1817 ; m. Dea. Theodore Pease 
of Enfield, Ct., (ThompsonvUle ;) 3 children. 

(546) 

Dormer Chapin, son of Phineas and Sabrina, b. Feb. 25, 1781 ; 
m. Oct. 2, 1803, Lucretia Smith, dau. of Philip Smith. Mrs. Lucre- 
tia Chapin d. Oct. 13, 1828. Mr. Dormer Chapin resides on what is 
called the Meadow road between Chicopee street and Willimansett ; 
he has held the ofiices of Selectmen, Surveyor of Highways, &c. 
A Farmer. Children — 

1263. ^Delia, b. Nov. 10, 1804 ; m. Erasmus Rood ; she res. in 
California. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 83 

1264. 2N-euman S., b. Aug. 7, 1806. 

1265. ^Lncretia, b. Sept. 27, 1808; m.CIeaveland Ellis; 3 children. 

1266. ^Dolphin Dormer, b. Sept. 13, 1810. 

1267. ■^Avaline, b.Oct.2, 1812; m. Arthur G. Sparhawk ; no issue. 

1268. 6Bethia, b. Sept. 26, 1814; m.Dr. Stephen Winas; 5 children. 

1269. 'Lucas B., b. Jan. 28, 1817. 

1270. ^Samuel M., b. Nov. 6, 1818 ; unm.; resides in California. 

1271. ^Caroline, b. Nov. 25, 1820 ; d. March 14, 1846. 

1272. ^"Pamelia, b. Feb. 28, 1823 ; in. Sept. 9, 1852, Pomroy 
White ; 3 children. 

1273. "Artemas W., b. Sept. 30. 1825. 

1274. '^Flsivel P. b. Sept. 22, 1827. 

(548) 

Bridgman Chapin, son of Phineas and Sabrina, b. June 19, 
1784 ; m. (1) Nov. 10, 1808, (939) Olive Chapin, dau. of Japhet 
Chapin, b. April 17, 1785 ; m. (2) Eunice Burns. Mr. Bridgman 
Chapin d. Feb. 25,- 1833. Mrs. Olive Chapin d. Mr. Bridgman 
Chapin was a farmer, and resided on Chicopee street, near where the 
Rail Road now crosses the street ; he kept a tavern there for a few 
years, — has been Selectman of Springfield. Had 3 chil. by (2) wife. 

One dau. by (1) wife — 

1275. ^Charlotte R., b. Dec. 3, 1811 ; m. Elisha K. Root, for 
several years foreman in Col. Colt's Pistol Factory, Hartford, Ct.; 
since the death of Col. Colt, has been elected President of the 
Corporation. They have one son — Bridgman. 

(552) 

Phineas Chapin, son of Phineas and Sabrina, b. Oct. 21, 1792 ; 
m. (1) Emily Pindel ; m. (2.) Phineas Chapin, Esq. d. May 18, 
1857, ae. 64. Mrs. Emily Chapin d. Phineas graduated at Wil- 
liams College, and studied Law ; emigrated to Virginia in early life ; 
resided at Clarksburgh, Va.; was Clerk of the Courts for several 
years ; was a Ruling Elder in the Presbyterian Church. 

Had 8 children, by (1) wife — two of them d. young. 

(564) 

Shelden Chapin, son of Col. Silas and Anna, b. Sept. 16, 1791 ; 
m. Jan. 31, 1822, Marcy Skeele, dau. of Dr. Amos Skeele of Chic- 
opee ; she was b. April 3, 1794. Shelden, in early life, was a mer- 
chant in Buffalo, but for several years past has resided on a farm at 
Seneca Falls, N. Y. Children— 



84 SIXTH GENERATION. 

1276. lEliza A., b. Dec. 24, 1822, 

1277. ^George, 1). Oct. 17, 1824. 

1278. ^^Lyinaii E., 1j. Sept. 20, 1826 ; d. July 20, 1827. 

1279. nVilliam S., b. Oct. 19, 1S31 ; d. Aug. 11, 1840, ac. 9. 

1280. ^James Otis, b. April 4, 1834. 

1281. ci^^ances Mary, b. May 8, 1838. 

Eliza A. m. Oct. 8, 1850, E. Judson Blake ; has 2 children living. 
Children — 

1282. 1 William S. Blake, b. Dec. 1851 , d. Jan. 1852. 
1253. ^Harriet Chapin Blake, b. April, 1853. 

1284. ^Alice Blake, b. June, 1855. 

1285. -iJulia Blake, b. June, 1858 ; d. June, 1858. 

(565) 
Lyman Chapin, son of Col. Silas and Anna Chapin, b. July 2, 
1793 ; ni. July, 1826, Harriet Sheldon of Albany, N. Y., dau. of 
William and Hannah Sheldon of Providence, R. I. where she was b. 
July, 1804. Lyman Chapin, Esq. resides in Albany, N. Y. 

After the death of Mr. Sheldon, Mrs. Chapin's father, and while 
she was quite a child, her widowed mother removed to Albany, N.Y. 
where the daughter spent the residue of her life. Mrs. Chapin left 
home on the 7th of June, 1854, to visit her daughter, Mrs. Brown, 
at Chicago, and remained with her until Tuesday, the 18th of July, 
when she set out with her son-in-law and his wife, to return home. 
When they reached Buffalo on Wednesday evening, she was in her 
usual health, and in full expectation of being with her family in 
Albany the next day. A lady who had accompanied them from 
Chicago was taken ill on their arrival at Buffalo, and Mrs. Chapin 
kind-ly volunteered to occupy the same chamber with her, and 
administer to her wants during the night. About five o'clock in the 
morning, she found herself seriously ill, and it was quickly ascer- 
tained that her disease was the cholera. Medical aid was immedi- 
ately called, but it soon became apparent that her cure was hope- 
less. While the terrible malady was doing its work, she was com- 
posed and submissive, and occupied alternately in supplicating God's 
sustaining grace, and leaving affectionate messages for her friends. 
She died at seven o'clock, on Thursday evening, before her husband 
or any of her absent friends were able to reach her. 

For many years, she was exercised with doubts in regard to the 
divine authority of the Scriptures ; but she set herself at length to 
an earnest and diligent examination of the subject, the result of 



SIXTH GENERATION, 8o 

which was a full conviction that Christianity had a diTine origin. 
This conviction gradually worked itself into the heart ; and her 
views and atfectious from that time had evidently an upward ten- 
dency. She made a public profession of religion in May, 1840. 
She had much more than ordinary strength of mind, and had thought 
and read much on theological subjects, but she was too quiet and 
and unostentatious to make any display of either her talents or her 
knowledge. Her heart and hand were open to every good work. — 
(Extracts fron note to Dr. Sprague's Sermon.) 
Children — 

^Cornelia, m. Mr. Lockwood Brown ; lives in Chicago. 

'Hannah, m. Mr. Moses Moody ; lives in Brooklyn, N. Y. ; 
have 2 children. 

^Maria. ^Henrietta. 

(566) 

Otis Chapin, son of Col. Silas and Anna Chapin, b. Feb. 17, 
1798 ; m. Miss Strong ; she d. They had 4 children — 2 sons and 
2 daughters. He d, either in Hartford or Willimantic, Ct. He 
learned the trade of goldsmith in Springfield, Mass.; but later in life 
was engaged in the Spectacle business in Hartford, Ct. 

(569) 

John Chapin, son of Asahel and Sarah, b. Aug. 7, 1780; m. 
Sally Curtis, dau. of Abel Curtis of Vermont. John, the father, d., 
ae. 75. Sally, the mother, d. Jan. 3, 1835, ae. 52. Children — 

1286. ijohn Madison, b. Sept. 5, 1806. 

1287. ^Warren Dexter, d. 

1288. sAbel Curtis, b. Oct. 19, 1809 ; d. 

1289. -^xVdaline, b. Dec. 14, 1810 ; m. in. ent. Oct. 15, 1825, to 
Seth Bliss, Jr. 

1290. ^Lucy, b. 1813 ; d. Dec. 3, 1833, ae. 20 ; her death was 
caused by being burned from her clothes taking fire. 

1291. ^Charles, b. 1823 ; d. Jan. 17, 1860. 

(570) 

Stephen Chapin, son of Asahel and Sarah, b. March 25, 1783 ; 
m. in. ent. Xov. 25, 1802, to Lovina Hummiston, Stephen, the 
father, spent the greater part of his life thus far in West Springfield, 
(Ireland Parish,) now Holyoke, but removed with his family a few 
years since, and now resides in Vinton, Indiana. Children — 



86 SIXTH OENKRATION, 

1292. lAsaliel. 1293. ^Qaleb. 1294. ^David. 

1295. 'Hummiston. 129G. -'Stophen. 1297. ^James. 

1298. ^Phebe, m. Alonzo Lamb, Esq. of South Hadley Falls. 

(571) 
Theodore Chapin, son of Asahel and Sarah, b. Feb. 23, 1785 ; 
m. in. ent. May 1, 1810, to Aurelia Ely, dau. of Enoch Ely. Mr. 
Theodore Chapin d. in 1852, ae. C7. Children — 

1299. ^Theodore, d. when about 28 yrs. old. 

1300. 'Barnabas Bidwell, m., and has 4 children. 

1301. ^Jane, m. Mr. Beebe. 

(572) 

Warren Chapin, son of Asahel and Sarah, b, June 26, 1788 ; 
m. (1) June 5, 1823, Mareb Ball, dau. of Charles Ball, Esq.; Mareb 
was b. Jan. 31, 1797 ; m. (2) Elizabeth Ball, Dec. 5, 1833, dau. of 
Capt. Eli Ball. Mrs. Mareb Chapin d. Feb. 5, 1832, ae. 36. Mr. 
Chapin is a very respectable and useful man. Justice of the Peace, 
has been a member of the Legislature — bred a farmer ; b. and res. 
in what is now Holyoke village. 

Children, by (1) wife — 

1302. iMary, b. April 14, 1824; d. July 6, 1859, ae. 35. 

1303. 2jane, b. Aug. 25, 1825. 

1304. ^Asahel, b. Sept. 13, 1827. 

1305. ^Warren, b. Dec. 25, 1829. 
Child, by (2) wife— 

1306. ^Henry Judson, b.Oct. 14, 1834; unm.; resides in Holyoke. 

(573) 
Erastus Chapin, son of Asahel and Sarah, m. Miss Stuart of 
Coleraine, Mass. Children — 

1307. ^Eliza, m. Joseph Green ; 8 children. 

1308. ^Mary, m. William Stewart. 

1309. ^Sarah, m. Mr. Darling ; 3 children. 

1310. ■^David, m., and has 3 children. 1311. ■^Miriam, unm. 

1312. "Julius, m., and has 1 child. 

(576) 
Thbressa Chapin, daughter of Pliny and Naomi Chapin of 
Granby, Mass., b. Sept. 20, 1800 ; m. March 21, 1824, Allen Tay- 
lor ; reside in Rushford, N. Y. Children — 

1313. lEuieline A., b. Jan. 25, 1825. 

1314. ^piiny A., b. Dec. 17, 1834. 

1315. ^iiowlaud L., b. Jan. 20, 1838. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 87 

(577) 

Susan Chapin, daugliter of Pliny and Naomi Chapin of Granby, 
Mass., b. Oct. 27, 1802 ; m. Titus Bartlett, Nov. 17, 1829 ; reside 
in Rushford, N. Y. Children— 

1316. lEdwin A., b. Jan. 5, 1840. 

1317. 2juliet T., b. April 26, 1845. 

(578) 
Stephen M. Chapin, son of Pliny and Naomi Chapin of Granby, 
b. Sept. 22, 1807 ; m. Lucy Lucore of West Springfield, Dec. 30, 
1828. He d. Feb. 5, 1850. Children— 

1318. iLucius T., b. Feb. 11, 1830 ; m. June 1, 1857, Lucy 
Capen of Rushford, N. Y. Reside in Grassoit, Mich. 

1319. 2>^aomi, b. April 7, 1831 ; m. June 5, 1850, N. B. McCrea 
of New Hudson, N. Y.; resides in Havre, N. Y. 

1320. ^Stephen M., b. Dec. 4, 1833. 

1321. "Titus, b. March 18, 1834. 

1322. ^Susan A., b. Dec. 31, 1835. 

1323. ^Lovisa C, b. Sept. 5, 1837. 

1324. ^Vinela L., b. June 18, 1840 ; d. Oct. 27, 1855. 

(581) 
Orlando Chapin, son of Orlando and Lydia, b. Aug. 9, 1800 ; 
m. (suppose) in 1826, Maria Dickinson. Orlando, the father, d. in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., June, 1857. Children— 

1325. ^Lucy, m. Mr. of Rochester, N. Y. 

1326. 2Maria. 1327. ^Ellen. 

Ellen m. a Mr. Beals of Brooklyn, N. Y.; has 4 children— 
1328. ^Elizabeth. 1329. ^Harriet. 1330. "George. 

1331. -^Louisa, uum. 

(583) 
Philo Chapin, son of Orlando and Lydia, b. Feb. 10, 1806 ; 
m. Nov. 27, 1827, Laura Ferry. Philo Chapin resides in Granby, 
Mass.; is Town Clerk and Postmaster. Children— 

1332. iLyman A., b. Nov. 4, 1839. 

1333. ^Eliza S., b. Sept. 18, 1842. 
And others who d. in infancy. 

(584) 
Horatio N. Chapin, son of Orlando and Lydia, b. Feb. 29, 1808 ; 
m. Miss Hall in Gaston, Alabama ; she went from Springfield, Mass. 
to Alabama, teaching. They have children— names or number 
not known. 



88 SIXTH GK\ERATIO\. 



(585) 

Lyman Chapin, son of Orlando and Lydia, h. July 18, 1810 ; 
m. Amelia Symms, by whom he had 4 children. Amelia d. in 1857, 
and in the summer of 1858 he m. Helen Symms, sister of Amelia, 
They were daughters of Josiah Symms, Esq. of Ludlow City, 
(so called) Mass. 

(590) 

Oliver Chapin, son of Noah and Mary "W. Chapin, b. Sept. 7, 
1782; m. (1) May, 1816, Anna Pierce of Cornwall, Ct.; (2) Mrs. 
Sophronia Hyde of Enfield, Ct., and dau. of Jabez Collins of Somers. 
Mrs. Anna Chapin d. Dec. 12, 1834, ae. 48. Mr. Oliver Ciiapin was 
killed in a saw-mill in 1852, ae. 70. 

Children, by (1) wife — 

1334. ^Seth Pierce, b. Jan. 4, 1818. 

1335. 2Mary Williams, b. June 29, 1820. 

1336. ^Martha Ramsey, b. April 9, 1822. 

1337. ^Henry Martin, b. Feb. 19, 1824 ; d. May 31, 182G. 

1338. ^Amy Hart, b.Feb. 1826 ; d. Aug. 20, 1830, ae. 3 yrs. 6 mos. 

1339. ejohn Hart Pierce, b. Sept. 27, 1828. 

Child, by (2) wife— 

1340. ^William Wilberforce, b. Dec. 2, 1836 ; graduate of Wil- 
liams College, 1860. 

Seth Pierce m. Athea Sears ; lives in New York. 

John H. Pierce m. Charlotte L. Grover of Somers, May 8, 1855 ; 
she d. April 12, 1860, of scarlet fever ; 2 children; m. (2) at Phil- 
lipston, Sept. 5, 1861, Abbie C. Knowitou. He is steward at 
Mt. Holyoke Female Seminary, South Hadley, Mass. 

Mary W. has been for some years, and now is, Principal of Mt. 
Holyoke Female Seminary, South Hadley, Mass. 

Martha R. m. Rev. Allen Hazeu, Sept. 1846 ; they went to India, 
as missionaries of the American Board ; they returned to this coun- 
try in the Spring of 1858 ; had 6 children — 4 of them living, viz., 
1341. iHenry. 1342. ^Edward. 1343. ^Mary. 1344. "JFanny. 

(621) 

Seth Chapin, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Chapin of Somers, 
b. March 24, .1775 ; d. May 8, 1857. ae. 82. He m. Mary Stacy of 
Wilbraham, July 1, 1802; she was b. March 1, 1781. Children— 



SIXTH GENERATION. 89 

1345. iJVIary, b. March 24, 1803 ; m. James Davis ; lived at 
Stafford Springs. 

1346. ^Elizabeth, b. Dec. 14, 1804. 

1347. ^Electa, b. Dec. 13, 1806 ; d. Sept. 7, 1826, ae. 20. 

1348. ^Hannah Mardelia, b. Feb. 14, 1812 ; d. Jan. 12, 1838, ae.26. 

1349. ^Achsa, b. March 18, 1816 ; m. Charles Ladd ; lived in 
Somers. 

1350. "Sally Ann, b. May 8, 1820; m. Daniel Sanford Sheldon 
of West Stafford. 

1351. 'Seth Stacy, b. March 16, 1823 ; d. Aug. 7, 1842, ae. 19. 

(622) 

Samuel Chapin, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Chapin of Somers, 
b. Oct. 29, 1776; d. Dec. 29, 1855, ae. 79. He m.*May 31, 1804, 
Mary Pease, dau. of Stephen Pease of Somers. Mary, the mother, 
b. Sept. 7, 1777 ; d. March 19, 1857, ae. 79. Samuel, the father, 
and his wife resided for some years in Springfield, Mass., and d. there. 
Children — 

1352. ^Marsha, b. April 10, 1805 ; d. May 28, 1820, ae. 15. 

1353. 2]\iarvin, b. July 5, 1806. 

1354. ^Roxana, b. June 14, 1808 ; unm. 

1355. ^Amelia, b. Aug. 18, 1810. 

1356. ^Elizabeth S., b. March 29, 1812 ; d. Dec. 16, 1852, ae. 40. 

1357. ^Ethan Samuel, b. July, 1814. 

1358. ^Albert Pease,' b. Nov. 12, 1816. 

1359. ^Horace J., b. June 5, 1819. 

(623) 
Rev. Reuben Chapin, son of Samuel and Elizabeth, of Somers, 
b, Sept. 5, 1778; m. March 3, 1806, Lovisa Russell of Somers. 
Rev. Reuben Chapin d. July 17, 1834. Rev. Reuben Chapin 
prepared for a Congregational minister, but did not preach much. 
" He was a licentiate among the Congregationalists, but never 
became a settled pastor, owing to a sudden injury to his lungs which 
deprived him of good health for the remainder of his life. — Calendar 
(Hartford paper,) July 17, 1858.) Children — 

1360. iRev. Alonzo Bowen, b. March 10, 1808 ; d. July 9, 1858. 

1361. ^Infant, b. Feb. 3, 1810 ; d. Feb. 4, 1810. 

1362. sDr. John Russell, b. April 27, 1811 ; d. June 25, 1852. 

1363. 4Lovisa Cooley, b. Nov. 4, 1813 ; d. May 15, 1822. 

1364. ^Reuben Spencer, b. Oct. 14, 1818. 

12 



90 SIXTH GENERATION. 

1365. «Seth Smith, b. Oct. 10, 1821. 

1366. ''Lovisa Cooley, b. April 27, 1826, m. Lyman R. Chapin, son 
of David, and great grandson of Aaron Chapin of Somers. His 
mother lives with them in Chicago. 

Rev. Alonzo B. was an Episcopal minister, — settled in Glasten- 
bury, and d. in Hartford, Ct. Dr. John Russell was a practising 
physician in New York, where he d.; had 2 wives and 6 children. 
Dr. Reuben Spencer, a practising physician, lives in New York. Seth, 
an Episcopal minister, lives in Marshall, Mich. 

(624) 

Bliss Chapin, son of Samuel and Elizabeth Chapin of Somers, 
b. Sept. 23, 1780; m. Feb. 5, 1807, Eunice Benton. He lived in 
Tolland, Ct.; d. Aug. 1856, ae. 76. Children— 

1367. ^Elisha B., b. Jan. 26, 1808 ; practising physician in 
Granby, Mass.; d. there, Oct. 20, 1842, ae. 34. 

1368. ^Fidelia, b. Nov. 9, 1809 ; m. Capt. Wm. C. Hunt, April 28, 
1833 ; lives in North Coventry, Ct.; 5 children. 

1369. ^Eunice C, b. April 7, 1812. 

1370. 4Agnes, b. June 22, 1818; d. in Tolland, unni., April 4, 1848. 

1371. ^Theodore Bliss, b. Aug. 5, 1820 ; m. Miss Amelia 
MacClure of Somers; lives in Tolland where his father lived; 
4 children. 

G^dolphus P., b. July 26, 1828 ; d.'jan. 10, 1829. 

Eunice G. m. Dec. 27, 1836, William L. Bemis, Esq. ; lived in 
Chicopee, where she d. March 20, 1846, ae. 34, — buried in the 
burying ground, Chicopee street ; had no children. 

(646) 

Elizabeth Chapin, dau. of Phineas and Mary Chapin, b. Jan. 8, 
1788 ; ni. Reuben Bascom, May 16, 1826. He was b. April 17, 
1790. She d. Oct. 3, 1855, ae. 67. Children— 

1372. ^Elizabeth Chapin, b. July 19, 1828. 

1373. 2\villiam, b. Dec. 24, 1830. 

1374. =^Mary Lauretta, b. Feb. 9, 1833. 

(647) 

Moses Chapin, son of Phineas and Mary Chapin, b. April 25, 
1790; m. Lydia Hurd, March 7, 1815; she was b. Oct. 15, 1795. 
Mrs. Lydia Chapin d. Feb. 23, 1837. Children— 



SIXTH GENERATION. 91 

1375. iMariann, b. May 9, 1816. 

1376. ^Charlotte Harriet, b. March 17, 1818 ; m. Res., West 
Brattleboro', Vt. 

1377. ^Samuel Hurd, b. Feb. 6, 1820. Res., Dover, N. H. 

1378. mhua, b. Feb. 4, 1822. 

1379. ^Lucy, b. Dec. 25, 1823. Res., Springfield, 111. 

1380. «Sophronia, b. July 24, 1825. 

1381. ■'Justina Melross, b. March 5, 1828 ; m. Mr. Stearns. 
Res., Lebanon, N. H. 

1382. ^Sophia, b. March 10, 1830. 

1383. ^Augusta P., b. May 9, 1832. 

1384. i»Arlington Moses, b. Nov. 2, 1834. 

(648) 

Phineas Chapin, son of Phineas and Mary Chapin, of Newport, 

b. Jan. 2, 1792 ; m. May 22, 1817, Lydia Osgood of Newport ; she 

was b. Jan. 15, 1798. Mr. Phineas Chapin d. of consumption, 

June 3,1856, ae. 64. Mrs. Lydia Chapin d. Jan. 7,1858. Children— 

1385. iPhineas Lyman, b. July 5, 1818 ; d. Sept. 22, 1843. 

1386. 2priscilla, b. March 16, 1821. 

1387. ^William Osgood, b. Feb. 2o, 1824 ; m. Oct. 16, 1853, 
Lucina D. Powers. 

1388. -igeth Dwight, b. Feb. 28, 1826 ; m. April 6, 1854, Row- 
ena C. Whitney. 

1389. ^Bela, b. Feb. 19, 1829 ; m. March 3, 1858, Sarah C. 
Malendy. Res., Claremont, N. H. 

1390. ^Oliver, b. Feb. 21, 1831. 

1391. ^Mary, b. Dec. 28, 1834. 

1392. sA son, b. May 10, 1840 ; d. May 13. 

(650) 

Sophia Chapin, dau. of Phineas and Mary Chapin, of Newport, 
N.H., b. March 29, 1796 ; m. James Baker, Oct. 17, 1820, b. Feb. 28, 
1795. Children— 

1393. ^Elizabeth, b. Jan. 20, 1822. 

1394. 2Emily, b. April 27,1823; m.AbijahW.Tenney of Newport. 

1395. ^Pamela, b. Feb. 28, 1825; m. Mr. Barber of Unity, N.H.; 
1 child. 

1396. 4james, b. March 3, 1827 ; lives in Roxbury ; 1 child. 

1397. ^Mary, b. Feb. 12, 1829 ; d. 1833, ae. 4. 

1398. ^Abiah C, b. March 12, 1831. 

1399. 'Martin, b. April 27, 1833. 

1400. ^'Charles, b. Dec. 26, 1837. 



92 SIXTH OENERATIOX. 

(651) 
Orlando Chaimn, son of I'bineas and Mary Chapin, of Newport, 
N.H., b. Nov. 10, 1797; m. March 22, 1822, Pamela llurd, b. 
Dec. 17, 1802. Cliildren— 

1401. iCalvih Nelson, b. Oct. 18, 1825. 

1402. ^Pamela Abiali, b. Feb. 27, 1831; m. Mr. Sibley; lives 
in Claremont, and her parents live with her. 

Calvin N. lives in Boston, and is a Clerk in the Missionary Rooms 
of the A. B. C. F. M. 

(652) 

Henry Chapin, son of Phineas and Mary Chapin, of Newport, 
N. H., b. April 13, 1800 ; m. Catharine Fisher, Nov. 7, 1822 ; she 
was b. Jan. 15, 1801. Children— 

1403. iCharles Henry, b. Sept. 22, 1823. 

1404. ^Daughter, b. March 5, 1825 ; d. 

1405. ^Nathaniel Fisher, b. Jan. 4, 1830. 

1406. ^Eunice Catharine, b. Dec. 21, 1833. 

. Eunice C. m. Mr. George Fairbanks of Newport, where she d., of 
consumption. 

(654) 

Abiah Chapin, dau. of Phineas and Mary Chapin, of Newport, 
N. H., b. Aug. 23, 1806 ; m. Eev. Albert Hale of Springfield, 111., 
April, 1839. Children— 

1407. ^Catharine, b. Aug. 4, 1840. 

1408. ^Sophia, b. April 9, 1843. 
•''Albert, b. Oct. 2, 1844. 

(655) 

Rev. William Arms Chapin, son of Daniel and Joanna A. 
Chapin, of Newport, N.H., b. Dec. 8, 1790 ; ni. (1) Sept. 16, 1823, 
Lucy Curtis, dau. of Dea. Curtis of Hanover, N.H.; ni. (2) March 23, 
1833, Sarah Orr of New Bedford, N. H. Mrs. Lucy Chapin d. Rev. 
William A Chapin graduated at Dartmouth College, studied The- 
ology at Andover, and was settled in the Ministry in Greensboro', 
Vt., where he d. Nov. 27, 1850, of consumption, ae. 60. 

Children, by (1) wife — 

1409. ^William Arms, b. July 26, 1824. 

1410. ^Joseph Curtis, b. Feb. 22, 1826 ; d. Feb. 24, 1827. 

1411. ^Sarah Curtis, b. Sept. 24, 1827 ; d. Feb. 4, 1852. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 93 

1412. ^Lucy Joanna, b. Nov. 8, 1829. 

1413. ^Daniel Dwight, b. March 13, 1832 ; d. July 15, 1832. 
Children, by (2) wife — 

1414. ejohn Orr, b. June 15, 1834. 

1415. ■'Jane Eliza, b. May 18, 1836. 

William A., Jr. lives in St. Johnsbury, Yt. Sarah C. m. Rev. 
Henry Melville, Dec. 5, 1850 ; they had 1 dau. — Mary ; she d. 
Jan. 4, 1852. Mrs. Sarah C. Melville d. Feb. 4, 1852, of consumption. 

Mrs. Sarah 0. Chapin, with Lucy J. Chapin, John 0. Chapin, and 
Jane E. Chapin removed to Waverly, Morgan Co., 111. Mrs. Sarah 
0. Chapin d. Aug. 29, 1858, ae. 54. 

(656) 

Philomela Chapin, dau. of Daniel and Joanna A. Chapin, m. 
Reuben Bascom, Sept. 1, 1819. Children — 

1416. ^Carlos Lyman, b. July 2, 1820 ; lived at Rock River, 
111.; had 3 children in 1853. 

1417. ^Henry Martin, b. Sept. 24, 1821 ; d. Nov. 25, 1842, in 111. 

1418. ^Philomela Chapin", b. Sept. 1, 1823; m. Rev. Glen Wood, . 
Nov. 1851 ; lives in Keokuk, Iowa. 

(657) 

Elizabeth Chapin, dau. of Daniel and Joanna A. Chapin, m. 
Moses Haven, son of Rev. Jacob Haven of Croyden, N. H.; res. in 
Meriden, N. H. ; had one child — 1423. Elizabeth. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Haven d. Sept. 18, 1861. 

(658) 

Daniel Dwight Chapin, son of Daniel and Joanna A. Chapin, 
of Newport, N. H., b. Jan. 27, 1796 ; m. Oct. 29, 1828, to Sophia 
Wyman of Cornish, N. H.; she was b. Feb. 5, 1799. Children — 

1419. iHelen Sophia, b. Dec. 6, 1830 ; d. Feb. 20, 1834. 

1420. ^pheba Elizabeth, b. Nov. 24, 1832 ; d. Feb. 15, 1852. 

1421. ^Miriam Maria, b. Jan. 9. 1835. 

1422. -lEdward Dwight, b. Nov. 12, 1837. 

(659) 

David Belden Chapl\, son of Daniel and Joanna A. Chapin, 
of Newport, N. H., b. Oct. 23, 1797 ; m. Nov. 12, 1828, Zeruiah 
Hatch Farnsworth ; she was b. at Alstead, N. H., Jan. 20, 1804. 
David B., the father, lives in Newport, and fills the office of Deacon 
in the Congregational Church. Children — 



94 SIXTH (JKNERATION. 

1424. 'Martha Ann, b. Aug. 10, 18;J2 ; m. Daniel W. Wilcox ; 
3 daughters. Res., Melrose, Mass. 

1425. ^Qeorge Farnsworth, b. May 26, 183G ; graduated at 
Amherst College, 18G0. 

1426. 3 Joseph Augustus, b. April 25, 1839. 

1427. ''Ellen Elizabeth, b. Feb. 4, 1842 ; teacher of music. 

(G61) 

Rev. Jason Chaplv, son of Daniel and Joanna A, Chapin, of 
Newport, N. H., b. Sept. 7, 1801 ; m. Oct. 4, 1831, Caroline Snow, 
dau. of Dea. Snow of Ware, Mass. Jason Chapin graduated at 
Amherst College, 1828; studied Theology at Andover ; settled in 
Geneseo, Henry Co., 111., where he d. Sept. 11, 1846. His widow 
m. Rev. William Allen, and lives on the same place where Jason 
Chapin, her first husband, lived, in Geneseo. Children — 

1428. iFlorilla N., b. July 16, 1834. 

1429. 2Emily Malvina, b. Feb. 3, 1837. 

1430. ^Albert Jason, b. March 21, 1842 ; d. Dec. 5, 1842. 

1431. -"Alice C, b. Nov. 26, 1845. , 

■ (662) 

Frederick Chapin, son of Daniel and Joanna A. Chapin, of 
Newport, N.H., b. Aug. 7, 1803 ; m. Oct. 19, 1829, Pamela Wyman 
of Cornish, N. H.; she was b. May 3, 1807, Frederick lives in 
Newport, on a part of the farm owned and occupied by his father. 
Children — 

1432. iDaniel Frederick, b. Nov. 19, 1831 ; d. Jan. 6, 1846, ae. 14. 

1433. ^William Arms, b. April 26, 1842 ; d. May, 1859. 

(663) 

Joanna Chapin, dau. of Daniel and Joanna A. Chapin, b. 
Oct. 28. 1805 ; m. Samuel Allis, great grandson of Rev. Samuel 
Allis who was the first minister in Somers, Ct. They live in 
Waverly, Morgan Co., Illinois ; have had children, but all have d. 

(665) 

Malvina J. Chapin, daughter of Daniel and Ruth Chapin, of 
Newport, N. H., b. April 30, 1816; m. Rev. George Rowell in 1842; 
are missionaries of the American Board at the Sandwich Islands. 
Children — 

1434. iWilliam Edwards, b. June, 1845. 

1435. 2Clara Maria, b. Feb. 1847. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 95 

1436. ^Mariann Eliza, b. Aug. 1848. 

1437. ^George Addison, b. April, 1850. 

1438. ^Ellen Louisa, b. March, 1852. 

1439. ^Mary Adelaide, b. Sept. 1853. 

1440. "One, (name not known.) 

(666) 

Noah Addison Chapin, son of Daniel and Ruth Chapin, of 
Newport, N. H., b. June 18, 1818. He graduated at Dartmouth 
College ; settled as a practising physician in Winchester, jST. H., 
where he d. May 9, 1854, ae. 34. He d. the day previous to the one 
which had been appointed for his marriage to Miss Wellraan of 
Cornish, N. H. 

(667) 

Camillus Chapin, sou of Frederick and Lucretia Chapin of 
Hatfield, Mass., b. Nov. 21, 1789 ; m. May 17, 1815, to Myra 
Parsons of Conway, who was b. Nov. 22, 1792 ; they lived in Hat- 
field. Camillus, the father, d. May 19, 1835, ae. 45i. Children — 

1441. ^Charles, b. Feb. 23, 1816 ; m. in Rome, N.Y.; 3 children. 

1442. ^Camillus M., b. March 19, 1825. 

1443. ^Louisa Parsons, b. March 16,1818; d. Oct. 12, 1837, ae.29. 

1444. "Frederick S., b. Feb. 8, 1827. 

Louisa P. m. William D. Clapp of Northampton ; their daughter 
d, Oct. 9, 1837. Camillus M. m. Eliza McGregory, dan. of Dea. 
McGregory of Melville, Shelby town, Orleans Co., N. Y., Jan. 1859, 
where they now live. Frederick S. has been in California 8 years ; 
unm.; returned in 1860. 

(668) 

Frederick Chapin, son of Frederick and Lucretia Chapin, of 
Hatfield, Mass., b. May 12, 1792 ; m. Locky Teed of Livingston, 
N. J. Mr. Frederick Chapin d. July, 1838 ; buried in Hatfield. 
Children — 

1445. ^Lucretia, m. Mr. Squires ; lives in Squiretown, N. J. 

1446. ^Mary, m. Levi Post ; d. in Patterson, N. J.; 1 child. 

1447. ^Lockey, lives in N. Y. City, with her mother. 

1448. "Ruth, m. Alexander Harris ; lives in N. J. 

1449. ^Huma, lives with her mother. 

1450. ^Frederick Augustus, m. Sarah Moore; lives in N. Y. ; 
have a son 14 yrs. old. 

1451. "Benjamin Moreton, lives with his mother. 



96 SIXTH UENEUATION. 

14.'>2. ^Parker Teed, lives with his mother. 

1453. "Sarah, b. 1S34; lives in New York, with her mother. 

(67S) 

Mary Chaimn, dau. of Moses A, and Lucina Chapin, of West 
Springfield, b. Sept. 10, 1788 ; m. June 6, 1812, Avery Herrick of 
Worthington ; he d. July 12, 1860, ae, 75. Children— 

1454. ^A son, d. 

1455. 2Moses Chapin, b. Aug. 23, 1817. 

1456. nVilliam Augustus, b. March 2, 1820. 

1457. ■»Lucina, b. Jan. 29, 1822. 

1458. ^Henry Dwight, b. Dec. 13,. 1823. 

1459. «George, b. Nov. 24, 1825. 

1460. 'Edward Mercer, b. Jan. 19, 1828. 

1461. ^Esther Maria, b. April 10, 1830. 

1462. ^Alonzo Chapin, b. 1832 ; d. Aug. 1833. 

(679) 

Moses Chapiiv, son of Moses A. and Lucina Chapin, of West 
Springfield, b. May 2, 1791; m. (1) Esther Maria Ward, Sept. 1818, 
dau. of Dr. Levi Ward of Rochester, N. Y.; she was b. Dec. 11, 
1798. Mrs. Esther M. Chapin d. Oct. 9, 1823, ae. 24. Judge Moses 
Chapin m. (2) Mrs. Lucy Terrey Kibbe of Canandaigua ; she was 
widow of Simeon T. Kibbe and dau. of William Barton of Enfield, 
Ct. ; she was b. Oct. 18, 1797. Hon. Moses Chapin graduated at 
Yale College in 1811 ; he settled in the practice of Law at Roches- 
ter, N.Y., in 1817. He is a Judge; also Elder in first Pres. 
Church, Rochester, N. Y. 

Children, by (1) wife — 

1463. iMaria Ward, b. May 31, 1819 ; d. May 27, 1842, ae. 24. 

1464. ^Edward Mercer, b. Nov. 10, 1820 ; d. Feb. 21, 1821. 

1465. ^Caroline Elizabeth, b. April 27, 1822. 

Chiklren, by (2) wife — 

1466. -^Henry Barton, b. Sept. 14, 1827. 

1467. "Charles Hall, b. Jan. 6, 1830. 

1468. "Harriet Ward, b. March 1, 1832. 

Maria W. m. Rev. Eli Smith, March 9, 1841 ; they went to Bei- 
rut, Syria, as missionaries of the A. B. C. F. M.; she d. May 27, 
1842, ae. 24, and left 1 child— Charles Henry, b. May 14, 1842. 

Caroline m. Rev. D. Chisester ; settled in Corning, N.Y.; have 
removed to Wolcott, Wayne Co., N. Y. ; have 4 children. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 97 

Rev. Henry B. Chapin graduated at Yale College, studied The- 
ology at Union Theo. Seni., and settled in Trenton, N. J. He m. 
Harriet A. Smith of New York City ; have 2 children. 

Charles H. m. Elizabeth Kidd of Rochester, N, Y., where they 
reside ; had 4 children. He is a partner in Iron works for manu- 
facturing Car Wheels, &c., in Rochester. 

Harriet W. m. Rev. C. W. Higgins; lives in Newfield, near Ithaca, 
N. Y.; have 3 children. 

(681) 

Rev. Augustus L. Chapin, son of Moses A. and Lucina 
Chapin, of West Springfield, b. Jan. 16, 1795 ; m. May 12, 1831, 
Abby Hayes of Newark, X. J. Augustus L., the father, graduated 
at Yale College in 1817. He studied Theology at Princeton, and 
settled at Lexington, N. Y. They now live in Amsterdam, N. Y. 
Children — 

1469. lEdward Payson, b. Aug. 28, 1832 ; d. June 4, 1838. 

1470. ^Theodore Dwight, b. Aug. 29, 1834 ; d. April 23, 1835. 

1471. ^Lyman Dwight, b. Sept. 18, 1836. 

1472. -iHarriet Lucina, b. Aug. 28, 1838. 

Lyman D. graduated at Amherst College in 1858 ; is now (1859) 
at Union Theo. Sem,, expecting to complete his course in 1861. 

(682) 
Alpha Chapin, son of Moses A. and Lucina Chapin, of West 
Springfield, b. Oct. 2, 1796 ; m. Clarissa Chapin, dau. of George 
Chapin of Enfield, Ct., Nov. 24, 1831; she was b. Dec. 21, 1797.' 
Alpha Chapin res. in Rochester, N. Y. 20 yrs. ; now res. in Ogden, 
N. Y.; is Deacon of the Presbyterian Church in Ogden, Children — 

1473. ^Dwight Stearns, b. Nov. 4, 1833; d. Dec. 25, 1834. 

1474. ^Catharine Lovisa, b. Jan. 12, 1836. 

1475. ^Seth Dwight, b. Jan. 21, 1838 ; d. April 29, 1838. 

(684) 

Elizabeth Chapin, daughter of Moses A. and Lucina Chapin, of 
West Springfield, b. March 23, 1802 ; m. Sept. 12, 1824, Henry M. 
W^ard, son of Dr. Levi Ward of Rochester, N. Y. Children — 

1476. iHenry Chapin, b. July 20, 1825; d. Oct. 22, 1826. 

1477. ^Elizabeth Dwight, b. Feb. 26, 1828. 

1478. ^Marian, b. Jan. 18, 1831 ; m, March 17, 1859, Daniel W. 
Ingersoll of St. Paul, Minnesota. 

1479. -^Henry Augustus, b. March 9, 1834. 

13 



98 SIXTH GEMERATIOrV. 

(685) 

Dr. Alonzo Chapin, son of Moses A. and Lucina Chapin, of 
West Springfield, b. Fob. 24, 1805 ; m. Mary Ann Tenny, dau. of 
Dea. Samuel Tenny of Boston, Oct. 26, 1831 ; she was b. May, 
1804. Alonzo Chapin graduated at Amherst College in 1S2G; ho 
studied medicine in Philadelphia ; went to the Sandwich Islands, 
1831, as Missionary Physician under the A. B. C. F. M., and returned 
in 1836, on account of the feeble health of Mrs. Chapin. They now 
live in Winchester, Mass., where he is practising medicine. Child — 

1480. ^Elizabeth Dwight, b. March 1, 1835. 

(G87) 

Louis Chapin, son of Moses A. and Lucina Chapin, of West 
Springfield, b. Nov. 3, 1809; m. Jan. 28, 1836. Mary H. Smith, 
dau. of Dr. James W. and Elizabeth Smith of Rochester, N. Y.; she 
was b. Aug. 13, 1813, and d. Dec. 13, 1837. Louis Chapin m. (2) 
Rachel L. Shepherd, b. Nov. 9, 1818, of Rochester, N, Y., Sept. 1, 
1840, dau. of Erastus and Eliza M. Shepherd. Mr. Chapin went to 
Rochester in 1827, and still lives there, manfacturing and selling 
flour ; is an Elder in the 2d Pres. Church in Rochester. Children — 

1481. ^Edward Dwight, b. Dec. 14, 1842. 

1482. ^Louis Shepherd, b. April 11, 1846. 

1483. ^Mary Smith, b. July 3, 1848 ; d. Nov. 23, 1849. 

1484. nVilliam Wisner, b. March 13, 1851. 

1485. ^Alice Elizabeth, b. Aug. 15, 1853. 

(689) 

Samuel Dwight Chapin, son of Samuel Dwight and Achsa 
Chapin of Somers, Ct., b. Aug. 6, 1801 ; m. May 28, 1829, Sarah 
Wilcox Phelps of Norfolk, Ct.; she was b. Sept. 10, 1810. Children— 

1486. ^Sarah Elizabeth, b. Jan. 26, 1833; m. 1859, Mr. Pease. 
Res. in Albany, 111. 

1487. ^Ellen Augusta, b. Jan. 13, 1835 ; d. Oct. 3, 1844. 

1488. ^Horace Dwight, b. Feb. 14, 1840. 

(694) 
Hiram Chapin, son of Hiram and Sarah Chapin of Surry, N. H., 
m. Hiram, the father, lived in Granby, Ct., and d. there Aug. 2, 
1855, ae. 83. Children— 

1489. ^Hiram, m. Miss Cannon ; 4 children — 3 living. 

1490. 2Sybel, d. num. 1491. ^Clarissa, d. unm. 

1492. "^Angeline, m.; 2 children. 1493. ■^One other daughter. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 99 

(714) 

Justus Chapin, son of Justus and Martha Chapin, of Alstead, 
X. H., and grandson of Aaron and Sybel Chapin, of Somers, m. 
Annis Willis. They live in New Alstead, N. H. Children — 

1494. ^Martha Taylor, m. Ephraim Pratt in Enoston; had 1 
daughter — 1500. Mary Ann. 1495. ^Mary Wilder. 

1496. ^Fanny Willis. 1497. ^Ezra Carpenter. 

1498. •'Rebecca Webster, m. William Brown — had 1 daughter — 
1501. Zuah Rebecca. 

1499. ^Eliza Ann. 

David Chapin, son of Oliver and Elizabeth, m. Sarah Powell of 
Surry, N. H. Mr. David Chapin d. 1840. Mrs. Sarah Chapin d. 
July, 1857. Children— 

^Maria, b. May, 1818; m. Sylvanus Moody; res., Lyme, 
Ct. ; 3 children. 

^Oliver, b. Jan. 1820 ; m. 1849, Julia Allen ; res., Hart- 
ford, Ct.; 2 children. 

^Arrilla, b. Feb. 1822 ; d. Jan. 1843. 

^Sarah Ann, b. June, 1823 ; d. Sept. 1844. 

^Lyman Rockwood, b. Aug. 10, 1825 ; m. June 22, 1856. 

f'Densmore David, b. Jan. 19, 1833 ; now, 1862, at Nash- 
otah Theological Seminary, Wis., preparing for the ministry. 

(715) 
Moses Chapin, son of Charles and Theodosia, m. Miss Sparks ; 
had 1 daughter. 

Aaron Chapin, son of Charles and Theodosia, m. Patty Brain- 
bridge ; had 8 daughters and no sons. Aaron m. at Salsbury, and 
removed to Pompey, Onondaga Co., N. Y. forty or fifty years since. 

David Chapin, son of Charles and Theodosia, m. Miss Sparks ; 
had a son, Martin who d. without issue, and had 1 daughter. 

(717) 

Ariel Chapin, son of Phineas and Love Chapin, m. Harriet 
Sterling ; had 4 children ; she d.; he m. (2) Frances M. Bush; had 
3 children. Children — 

1502. ^Henry, m. Caroline T. Child. 

1503. ^Elisha S., m. Almira Bn-ant. 



100 SIXTH GENERATION. 

1504. ^ITarriet A., m. rjill)ert G. Granger; live in Chicago. 
Children — llenry C. and William. 

1505. ^Avis M., d. in infancy. 

1506. ^Andrew A., m. Sarah E. Hart ; his widow resides in 
Utica. Cl)ild's name — 1509. Alexander A. 

1507. ''Frances M.. m. Philyer Look ; have 3 children. 

1508. '^Velona H., m. William L. Ward ; is deceased ; having 
no children. 

(71S) 

PniNEAS CiiAPiN, son of Phineas and Love Cliapin, ni. Lucinda 
Martin. Phineas Chapin, Esq. resides in the village of Vandeusen- 
ville, Berkshire Co., Mass. Children — 

1510. ^Love. 1511. ^Ruth. 

1512. ^Frederick, d. ^Yithout issue. 

1513. '•Lucinda. 1514. ^Mary. 

1515. '^Theodore, m. Frances Rice of Wilbraham ; no issue. 

1516. 'Maria. 1517. ^Elizabeth. 

(720) 

Andrew Chapin, son of Phineas and Love Chapin, b. April 12, 
1795, m. Maria Farnam of Salsbury, Ct. Mr. Andrew Chapin d. 
Feb. 11, 1826. They have a son— 

1518. ^Edward, who is unra.; a resident Physician, Kings Co. 
Lunatic Asylum, New York. 

(721) 

Graham Ward Chapin, son of Phineas and Love Chapin, m. 
Caroline E. Holley ; he d. at Rochester, N . Y., Sept. 2, 1843. 
Graham Ward Chapin graduated at Yale College ; studied and 
commenced the practice of Law at Lyons, Wayne Co., N. Y.; was a 
Lawyer of good practice, and held some of the important offices of 
that district, such as State's Attorney, &c., and was Representative 
in Congress from that district for one term. He afterwards removed, 
and established a law office at Rochester. His wife was the daugh- 
ter of the Hon. Myron Holley, who was the active Commissioner for 
the building of the Erie Canal. Children — 

1519. ^Caroline. 

1520. ^Graham, lives in Adrian, Mich. 

1521. ^Hollev, is m., and lives in N. Y. 

1522. ^Cornelia. 1523. ^Harriet. 

1524. ^Beaumont, d. at Rochester. 

1525. ■^Eusjuene, lives in Adrian, Mich. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 101 

(731) 

Oliver Colton Chapin, son of Heman and Electa, b. April 29, 
1811 ; m. Feb. 24, 1842, Frances Mary Smith. Ees., East Bloom- 
field, K. Y. Children— 

1526. iFrank Smith, b. April 21, 1843. 

1527. 2Harry Griswold, b. July 18, 1849. 

1528. sjulia Electa, b. Jan. 12, 1852. 

1529. Charles, b. Sept. 24, 1856. 

(732) 

Charles Heman Chapin, son of Heman and Electa, b. March 22, 
1822 ; m, Dec. 15, 1842, Abby W. Clark. One child, b. 1849. It 
is supposed Charles H. has gone to Kansas. 

(754) 

Oliver Chapin, son of Oliver and Lois Chapin, m. Olive Bush 
of Enfield, Ct. Mr. Oliver Chapin was a farmer, and d.Feb. 9, 1852, 
ae. 76. Children— 

1530. Chloe, m. Eli Stephenson; have 4 sons; reside in Canada 
or Ohio. 

1531. ^Oral, m. Mather Keyes, by whom she had 2 children ; he 
dying, she m. Dr. Otis Goodman of South Hadley Falls. 

1532. ^Bathsheba, m. Henry B. Rogers ; 2 children. 

1533. -^Caleb Strong, m. Sarah A. Ingalls ; 6 children — 4 living. 

1534. ^Harriet, m, Edwin Bartlett ; 2 children. 

1535. ''Mary, m. Mr. Shepherd ; 3 children ; he dying, she m. 
Mr. Brown ; 2 children. 

1536. ■'Eliza, m. Mr. Peabody ; afterwards, m. Mr. Castle. 

1537. ^Emeline, ra. Samuel Perrey of New Haven ; 6 children. 

1538. 9]\[aria, m. David Butterfield ; 3 children living, 3 died. 
Reside at Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

1539. ^"Oliver, suppose unm.; when last heard from was at New 
Orleans ; is or has been Agent of a Steamboat on the Mississippi 
River. 

Several of Mr. Chapin's daughters reside in Ohio. 

(759) 
James Chapin, son of Capt. Israel and Chloe, b. June 22, 1793 ; 
had 3 wives. His 3d wife was Caroline, daughter of Stephen Hitch- 
cock and granddaughter of Paul Chapio. Mr. James Chapin d. 
Jan. 9, 1853. Res., Springfield ; farmer. . Widow Caroline Chapin 
m. Feb. 20, 1856, Rev. Dargo B. Jones. 



102 SIXTH GENERATION. 

(7G2) 

Daniel Chapin, son of Capt. Israel and Chloe, b. Jan. 10, 1797 ; 
m. Mercy Cooper of West Springfield. Res., Springfield ; farmer. 
Mr. Chapin d. Jan. 3, 1851. One child — 

1540. ^Emerson. 

(766) 

Giles Chapin, son of Judah and Abigail, ni. June 19, 1815, 
(pub. April 13, 1815,) to Abigail Vinton, dau. of Capt. Abiether 
Vinton of South Hadley. Giles followed the business of tanning a 
few years in South Hadley ; had no issue while he resided in South 
Hadley. He emigrated to the West, probably Ohio. 

(768) 

Chauncey Chapin, son of Judah and Abigail, m. Dec. 2, 1819, 
Nancy Lombard. Mr. Chauncey Chapin was a farmer, and resided 
on the old homestead in Springfield; he d. May 6. 1851, ae. 61 yrs. 
7 mos. Children — 

1541. Ttoswell Lombard, b.Oct.25, 1820; d. June 16, 1846,ae.25. 

1542. ^Hervey, b. March 1, 1824 ; d. March 22, 1824. 

1543. ^Mary Bliss, b. Dec. 22, 1825. 

1544. ■*Julia Ann, b. Nov. 22, 1827. 

1545. ^Charles Chauncy, b. Dec. 20, 1830; d. Jan.16,1832, ae.l. 

1546. GChild, b. May 18, 1833 ; suppose d. young. 

1547. ^Susan Lombard, b. Aug. 20, 1834; d. Aug. 7, 1839, ae. 5. 

1548. ^Son, b. Sept. 24, 1831 ; d. Oct. 2, 1836. 

1549. ^George Frost, b. Aug. 27, 1838 ; d. May 1, 1840, ae. 2. 

Mary Bliss m. Sept. 8, 1852, Rev. Pliny B. Day, son of Pliny 
Day formerly of South Hadley Falls and also of West Springfield. 

Julia Ann m. Feb. 5, 1852, Rev. Josiah B. Grinuell. Resides in 
the town of Grinnell, Iowa; town' named after himself ; very wealthy. 

(777) 

Laertes Chapin, son of Aaron and Mary, b. Aug. 21, 1778 ; 
m. (1) Nov. 12, 1809, Susanna Merrick, dau. of Gad Merrick of 
Franklin, N. Y. ; m. (2) Laura Colton, dau. of Dea. Aaron Colton of 
Hartford, Ct. Mrs. Susanna Chapin d. Sept. 9, 1811. Mr. Laertes 
Chapin d. Oct. 30, 1847, ae. 69. Mrs. Laura Chapin d. Sept. IS, 
1854, ae. 66. Laertes followed the business of Cabinet making, and 
resided iu Hartford until about two years before his death, when 



SIXTH GENERATION. 103 

he retired from active business, and removed to East Hartford. He 
"was an honest, industrious man, and a faithful, consistent Chris- 
tian ; he was respected by all who knew him. 

One child, by (1) wife — 

1550. iSusan Merrick. 

Children, by (2) wife — 

1551. ^Edward Colton, b. April 20, 1814. 

1552. ^Elizabeth Omsted, b. Sept. 20, 1S15 ; d. Sept. 29, 1816. 

1553. ^Aaron Lucius, b. Feb. 6, 1817. 

1554. ^Henry Laertes, b. March 7, 1S19. 

1555. ''Mary Elizabeth, b. Sept. 19, 1820. 

1556. 'Nathan Colton, b. Sept. 20, 1823. 

1557. ''Laura Jane, b. Jan. 27, 1827. 

1558. ^Cornelius King, b. July 10, 1828. 

1559. i"Ellen Gertrude, b. March 15, 1831. 

Susan M. m. Sept. 24, 1835, Calvin Colton, son of Dea. Walter 
Colton of Georgia; Vt.; they had 3 sons and 3 daughters, of whom, 
two sons and two daughters are now (1859) living. Calvin Colton 
was a book-binder, and resided in the City of New York, where he d. 
Aug. 23, 1849, ae. 38 ; his widow with her family now resides in 
New Haven, Ct. 

Mary E. m. Aug. 20, 1850, Richard Hall, son of Rev. Richard 
Hall of New Ipswich, N. H.; they have had 2 sons, both of whom 
d. in infancy — they have an adopted son who bears their name. 
Mr. Hall is a graduate of Dartmouth College and of Union Theo- 
logical Seminary ; went as a Home Missionary to Minnesota in 
1850 ; became Agent of the American Home Missionary Society 
for Minnesota in 1856, and resides at Point Douglas, Min. 

Laura J. m. Nov. 6. 1850, James Farr, Jr., son of James Farr, of 
Fort Ann, N. Y.; they have had 1 son who d. in infancy, and 2 
daughters who are now living, and one daughter b. since Sept. 22, 
1859. Mr. Farr is a lumber dealer in Beloit, Wis. where his family 
reside. 

Ellen G. m. July 13, 1854, AYilliam Porter, son of William Porter 
of Lee, Mass.; they have two sons. Mr. Porter graduated at Wil- 
liams College in 1839 ; studied in Union Theological Seminary ; 
was ordained in, and became Professor in, Beloit College in 1854, 
which office he still holds. 



J 01 SIXTH GENERATION. 

(788) 

Lewis Chapin, son of Lewis and Esther, of Vt., b. Nov. 15, 1792 ; 
m. Sept. 1816, Sophia Iluteliinson of Jericho, Vt. Lewis, the fatlier, 
was a farmer, and lived on and occupied the homestead in Jericho 
until his death, which occurred Oct. 14, 1833. Children — 

15G0. iMilo Iloyt, b. May 29, 1823. 

15G1. ^Laura Sophia, b. May 28, 1827 ; d. June 30, 1854, unra. 

1562. ^George Freeman, b. Oct. 24, 1829. 

And 5 others who d. in infancy or youth. 

(794) 

Levi Chapin, son of Ichabod and Asenath, of Vt., b. Aug. 12, 
1788 ; m. about 1813, Minerva Lee of Jericho, Vt. Mr. Levi Chapin 
d. March 14, 1837, Children— 

. 1563. lEmma, b. about Feb. 1816. 

1564. ^Joseph Emerson, d. while a member of the University of Vt. 

1565. ^Albert, was a Botanic physician ; d. unm. 
■^A daughter, who d. in childhood. 

Emma m. Joseph Goodhue, and is living at La Cross«, Wis. ; has 
no children. 

(795) 

Myron Chapin, son of Ichabod and Asenath, of Vt., b. March 6, 
1794 ; m. Ruth Currier. Mr. Myron Chapin d. July 26, 1851. 
Children — 

15G6. ^Juliett, b. 1823 ; m. Heman Putnam ; 9 children. 

1567. ^Albert Franklin, b. Dec. 29, 1825. 

1568. ^Herbert Smith, b. Aug. 31, 1829. 

1569. ''Sidney, b. Feb. 7, 1842 ; is yet with his widowed mother. 

1570. ^One d. in childhood. 

(807) 

Chester Chapin, son of Ezekiel and Abigail, b. Oct. 8, 1787 ; 
m. Mary Ely. Rev. Chester Chapin graduated at Brown Univer- 
sity, Providence, R. I., about 1803 ; studied Divinity ; and settled 
in Granby, Mass., 1822 ; dismissed 1829. Res., Brecksville, Ohio. 
Children — 

1571. ^Chester. 1572. ^Mary. 

(808) 

Ezekiel Chapin, son of Ezekiel and Abigail, b. April 20, 1790; 
m. Betsey Frost, dau. of Samuel Frost of Ludlow. Mr. Ezekiel 



SIXTH GENERATlOiN. 105 

Chapin res. the latter part of his life in the south part of Springfield, 
Mass., and d. Oct. 8, 1845, ae. 56. Children — 

1573. ^Elias Frost, b. Jan. 27, 1815, in Chicopee. 

1574. ^Elizabeth Nash, b. May 10, 1817, unm. 

1575. ^Abigail Ely, b. April 3, 1819 ; d. Dec. 23, 1845. 

1576. "^Kedexa, b. Aug. 16, 1821 ; d. Feb. 23, 1852, ae. 30. 

1577. ^Samuel W., b. Feb. 23, 1824 ; m. 

1578. 6Edwin E., b. July 16, 1826 ; d. May 7, 1855. 

1579. ■'Newman A., b. Sept.- 12, 1829 ; suppose he m. April 30, 
1862, Sarah A. Porter. 

"Ophelia C, b. Feb. 7, 1833. 

(810) 
Jonathan Ely Chapin, son of Ezekiel and Abigail Chapin, 
m. Mary Warren of Ashfield. Children — 

1580. 1 Warren. 1581. ^Chester, d. Oct. 18, 1837, ae. 3. 

1582. ^Thomas, and others. 
Res., Ohio. 

(811) 
Austin Chapin, son of Ezekiel and Abigail, m. Amelia W. Loomis 
of East Windsor, Ct. Mrs. Amelia W. Chapin d. June 10, 1840, 
ae. 28 ; m. (2) Mary, widow of William McKinstry and daughter of 
Luther Frink, Esq. of West Springfield. Austin was a farmer ; 
resided in the same house, for a time, and occupied the farm that 
bis father did in Chicopee — built a new house, but removed to the 
State of N. Y. They reside in Forrestville, N. Y. Children— 

1583. ^Francis Austin. 1584. ^Luther Frink. 

(812) 
Jesse Chapin, son of Ezekiel and Abigail, b. 1801 ; m. Cynthia 
Bennett. Jesse d., and left no children. Cynthia, his widow, m. (2) 
Walter Palmer, and has a family of children by her last husband. 
Res., Chicopee. 

(814) 
Elihu Chapin, son of Ezra and Lois, b. May 28, 1782 ; m. Sept. 
1805, Sally Adams of Norwich, Mass. Elihu was called upon, with 
others of the Militia, to defend Sackett's Harbor, N.Y. from the 
threatened attack of the British, and was taken sick, and d. there 
Nov. 2, 1814, ae. 32. His widow still lives with her son Elihu, at 
China, Wyoming Co., N. Y. Children — 

1585. iMinerva, b. July 5, 1806 ; m. May 29, 1856, Alstead 
Ambler, a farmer. 

14 



106 SIXTH UEN'ERATION. 

1586. 2rascal P., b. May 8, 1808; d. April 9, 1842. 

1587. aiihodolpliiis, 1). Dec. 11, 1809 ; d. at Eaton, 1838. 

1588. ''Elilm, b. Dec. 8, 1811 ; farmer. 

1589. ■''Sally, b. Sept. 15, 1814. 

The children were all b. in Eaton, Madison Co., N. Y. 

(815) 
Jonathan Chapin, son of Ezra and Lois Chapin, b. in Spring- 
field, Mass., Oct. 25, 1783; m. April 11, 1808, Phebe Gaston, b. 
May 28, 1788. Mr. Jonathan Chapin d. Nov. 18, 1856, ae. 73. 
Mrs. Phebe Chapin d. June 11, 1853, ae. 64. lies., Macomb, Mich. 
Children — 

1590. iZelotes, b. March 13, 1809 ; d. Jan. 16, 1852, ae. 42. 

1591. 2Elam, b. Feb. 18, 1811. 

1592. ^Elmira, twin, b. Dec. 26, 1812; d. March 18, 1813,ae.2mos. 

1593. ^Elvira, twin, b. Dec. 26, 1812; d. Oct. 1, 1846, ae. 33 yrs. 

1594. ^Electa C, b. March 24, 1815 ; d. May 11, 1854, ae. 39. 

1595. ''Orren, b. July 14, 1817. 

1596. 'Lydia, b. April 26, 1819 ; d. March 11, 1837, ae. 17. 

1597. nVilliam, b. Aug. 14, 1821 ; d. Dec. 1, 1854, ae. 33. 

1598. ^Truman D., b. June 26, 1823 ; d. Nov. 10, 1844, ae. 21. 

1599. i"Eliza Ann, b. Oct. 26, 1825 ; d. June 12, 1844, ae. 18. 

1600. "Ezra, b. Feb. 7, 1828 ; d. April 7, 1828, ae. 2 mos. 

(816) 

Ezra Chapin, son of Ezra and Lois, b. in Springfield, (Chicopee,) 
Mass., May 1, 1785; m. March 14, 1809, Rachel Darrow, b. Sept. 23, 
1788. Hon. Ezra Chapin d. Dec. 10, 1851, ae. 66. Mrs. Rachel, 
his widow, d. Sept. 24, 1856. In early life he was a school teacher. 
Soon after the death of Judge Chapin, the following Obituary notice 
was published. 

" Died, in Prattsburgh, on the 10th inst., Hon. Ezra Chapin, 
lately one of the Judges of Steuben Co., ae. 66 years. The decease 
of Judge Chapin is not only a severe aifliction to his immediate 
relatives and personal friends, but a heavy public loss. He was a 
man of good education, of general intelligence, of sound sense, and 
of stern integrity. In the discharge of the various and important 
public trusts committed to him, from time to time, through the long 
period of his residence in the County, as well as in more private 
transactions of life, he was governed by such an evident and inflexi- 
ble regard to moral principle, as to have secured the entire confi- 
dence and respect of his fellow citizens. In his domestic and social 
relations, he exemplified some of the rarest and most estimable qualities. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 107 

His bearing was at once commanding and kind, firm and familiar, 
intolerant and indulgent, just and generous — all that could be desired 
in a husband, father and friend. In the early part of the summer 
he began to decline, under an affection of the liver, and went grad- 
ually down to the grave, sustained in sickness and death by the 
blessed hope of the gospel." 
Children — 

1601. iDorcas Darrow, b. June 16, 1810 ; d. Nov. 5, 1846. 

1602. 2Ezra, b. July 27, 1812 ; d. Nov. 11, 1813. 

1603. ^Pulaski, b. Sept. 23, 1814 ; d. July 4, 1846. 

1604. ''Addison, b. June 8, 1817. 

1605. ^Laura, b. April 15, 1819. 

1606. ^Rachel, b. June 4, 1822. 

(819) 
Wells Chaplx, son of Ezra and Lois Chapin, b. in Chicopee, 
Mass., March 14, 1792 ; m. Feb. 13, 1817, Hannah Jones, b. Sept.21, 
1792. Res., Scott, Wis.; farmer; has been Postmaster. Children^ 

1607. lEzra, b. Aug. 7, 1818. 

1608. 2Arvilla, b. Oct. 30, 1820. 

1609. ^Lois Melissa, b. Sept. 19, 1823 ; d. July 25, 1836. 

1610. "Ely Wells, b. Sept. 10, 1825. 

1611. ^Ahira P., b. Sept. 11, 1828. 

1612. ^Harriet Sophia, b. Jan. 29, 1831 ; m. Nov. 15, 1854, 
Achillis Brazetton ; 1 son — Burdett Wells, b. 1858. 

1613. 'Hannah Maria, b. June 21, 1833. 

1614. ^Emerilla E. A., b. April 22, 1836. 

Hannah Maria m. Jan. 29, 1858, James H. Chase, who d. Aug. 15, 
1853, and she m. (2) Jan. 18, 1855, Edward Chase, b. Jan. 29, 1821. 
Emerilla E. A. m. Dec. S, 1858, Josiah H. Platte, b. in 1832. 

(821) 

Descom Chapin, son of Ezra and Lois, b. in Chicopee, Mass., 
Dec. 12, 1797 ; m. April, 1823, Susan Giddings, daughter of Daniel 
Giddings of Granby, Mass. Dr. Descom Chapin d. at Rockport, 
Ohio, Dec. 2, 1836, ae. 39. Physican the latter part of his life. 
Mrs. Susan Chapin d. at Lynn, Mass., July 15, 1860, ae. 59 ; her 
funeral was attended at the 3d Congregational Church, Chicopee, 
July 17, 1860. Children— 

1615. lAmelia Smith, b. March 30, 1824; d. Dec. 20, 1858. 

1616. ^Lourissa Bement, b. April 1, 1826 ; m. 1848, Charles F. 
Colton ; no issue. 



108 SIXTH QBNERATION. 

1617. ^Rosaline Azalin, b. April, 1828. 

1618. ^Charles Lovonski, b. 1830. 

1619. *Susan Racilla, b. 1833. 

1620. 6|,]ijas Cornelia, b. 1835; m. I'anny Breed, 18.07 ; no issue. 

(822) 

Anson Chapin, son of Ezra and Lois, b. in Norwich, Mass., 
May 1, 1802 ; m. Sept. 4, 1825, Harriet Flowers, b. Dec. 1, 1805. 
Mr. Anson Chapin d. July 30,1847, in Manchester, Oneida Co., N.Y. 
Mrs, Harriet Chapin d. Jnne2, 184G, in Manchester, OneidaCo.,N.Y. 
Children — 

1621. iMaria Milvina, b. April 6, 1830 ; d. Oct. 25, 1850, in 
Prattsburgh, Steuben Co., N. Y. 

1622. ^Harriet Amelia, b. July 30, 1831 ; d. March 30, 1847, in 
Manchester, Oneida Co., N.Y. 

1623. ^Horatio Eddy, b. Sept. 19, 1833. 

1624. -irrancis Marshall, b. Aug. 23, 1835. 

1625. ^Claudius Pembroke, b. Jan. 19, 1838. 

1626. '^Lois Emerilla, b. April 27, 1840 ; resides in Smithfield, 
Madison Co., N. Y, 

1627. ''Mary Thudelinda, b. Aug. 28, 1842 ; d. Nov. 19, 1850, 
in Prattsburgh, N. Y. 

1628. ^Charles Henry, b. March 23, 1846 ; d. June 24, 1846, in 
Manchester, N. Y. 

The children were all b. in Eaton, Madison Co., N. Y. except the 

youngest, who was b. in Manchester, Oneida Co., N. Y. 

Horatio Eddy resides in Morrisville, Madison Co., N.Y.; is a 
farmer. Francis M. resides in Smithfield, Madison Co., N.Y. ; m. in 
1857, to Miss Fowler; is a farmer. Claudius P. resides in Pratts- 
burgh, Steuben Co. ; farmer. 

(823) 

Ahira Chapin, son of Ezra and Lois, b. May 10, 1803, in Nor- 
wich, Mass. Residence, Huntisford, Dodge Co., Wis.; farmer. 
Caroline Allerton, b. Sept. 20, 1810, in Albany Co., N. Y. ; they 
were m.Nov.24, 1831, in Prattsburgh, Steuben Co., N.Y. Children — 

1629. ^Rosamond, b. Aug. 30, 1832, in Prattsburgh, Steuben 
Co., N.Y. 

1630. 2Edwin, b. May 29, 1834, in Prattsburgh, N. Y. 

1631. ^Delanson, b. Nov. 19, 1836, in Prattsburgh; resides in 
Forrest City, Meeker Co., Minn. 

1632. -^Isade Allerton, b. Jan. 6, 1839, in Gorham, Ontario Co., 
N. Y. ; resides in Huntisford, Dodge Co., Wis. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 109 

1633. ^Ahira, Jr., b. July 28,1842, in Jerusalem, YatesCcN.Y.; 
resides in Huntisford, Dodge Co., Wis. 

1634. '^Egbert Wells, b. Sept. 16, 1844, in Gorham, Ontario Co., 
N. Y.; resides in Huntisford, Dodge Co., Wis. 

1635. ■'Caroline A. E. Jane, b. July 1, 1853, in Huntisford. 
Sons all farmers so far as established in business. 

(825) 

Asa Chapin, son of Timothy and Tiercy, m. April 12, 1810, 
Lucy Van Horn, dau. of Luther Van Horn. Mr. Asa Chapin removed 
from Chicopee to the State of New York; bad several other children. 
Mrs. Chapin d. some years since. Child — 

1636. lAdaline Melia, b. Dec. 5, 1810. 

(83S) 

James Chapin, son of Henry M. and Elizabeth, b. Oct. 1787 ; 
m. Chloe Hitchcock of Wilbraham. Res., Ludlow ; farmer. Mr. 
James Chapin d. Sept. 12, 1859. Children — 

1637. ^Harriet, m. Mr. Nicholson; he d. in Philadelphia; she 
keeps a boarding house in Chicopee ; 4 children. 

1638. ^Henry, unm. 1639. ^james, d. about 1 yr. old. 
1640. ''Mary, unm. 1641. ■^Caroline, unm. 

1642. '^Reuben, m. 1643. Uames, unm. 
1644. ^Hannah, unm. 1645. '^Martha Ann, unm. 

(839) 

Henry Marshfield Chapin, son of Henry M. and Elizabeth, 

of Ludlow, Mass., b. 1788 or '89 ; m. Elsie . Mr. Henry M. 

Chapin, a mechanic, res. the latter part of his life in Watervliet, 
N.Y., and d. there about 1825 or '26. Children— 

1646. iMaria. 

1647. ^Henry Dearbon, when about 20 months old, his clothes 
caught fire, and he was so severely burned, he d. in a few hours. 

1648. ^Susan. 1649. ''Henry. 

(849) 

Abner Chapin, son of Abner and Rhoda Chapin, of Wilbraham, 

b. Jan. 12, 1771 ; m. May 30, 1795, Polly Adams. The wife of 
Abner Chapin d. Jan. 10, 1841, ae. 66. Children — 

1650. iPolly, d. March 15, 1823, ae. 29. 1651. ^Austin. 

1652. ^Lucy Edson, b. March 29, 1798. 1653. "Oliver. 

1654. ^Minerva. 1655. ''Caroline. 1656. ''Lavinia. 



110 SIXTH GENERATION. 

1657. ^Leander Z., ) , • , * ^^ lor.^ 
1659. "'David, ) , . , . •, .„ ioi« 

1661. I'Munro, b. March 11, 1815. 

1662. i^Charlotte, b. Sept. 9, 1821. 

(860) 

Samuel Chapin, son of Samuel and Huldah Cbapin, b. June 25, 
1800 ; m. Sally Butts of Canterbury, Ct. Mr. Samuel Chapin d. 
Aug. 1836. Children— 

1663. ^Abigail Dyer, b. Oct. 10, 1827; m. Henry B. Sawyer of 
Hartford, Ct. 

1664. ^David Butts, b. Sept. 21, 1829 ; m. Jane C. Couse, 
Columbia Co., N. Y., Oct. 1856. One child— 1666. Mary Emily, 
b. Sept. 22, 1857. 

1665. ^Carlos, b. Dec. 14, 1832. 

(861) 

Ralph Sumner Chapin, son of Samuel and Susan Chapin, and 
grandson of Abner Chapin, b. Oct. 13, 1807 ; m. (1) Jan. 31, 1840, 
Harriet Newell Cady, dau. of Dea. David Cady of Somers, Ct.; she 
was b. July 6, 1814; m. (2) Jan. 30, 1855, Sophia Louisa Storrs of 
Mansfield, Ct. Mrs. Harriet N. Chapin d. Nov. 28, 1850, ae. 35. 
Children — 

1667. ^Samuel, b. Jan. 31, 1841. 

1668. 2Ellen Augusta, b. April 4, 1844. 

1669. ^Henry W., b. Oct. 28, 1846 ; d. Oct. 28, 1851. 

1670. nVillis, b. April 12, 1848; d. Sept. 16, 1851. 

1671. ^Arthur, b. April 15, 1850 ; d. Sept. 18, 1850. 

(864) 

Nathaniel Mason Chapin, son of Samuel and Susan Chapin 
and grandson of Abner Chapin, b. Feb, 6, 1814 ; m. Nov. 7, 1837, 
Maria Shepherd of East Windsor, Ct. Children — 

1672. iSusan M., b. Feb. 19, 1838; m. Emery Stanton; lives 
(1860) in Willimansett, Mass. 

1673. nVarner, b. Dec. 1, 1840. 

1674. ^Sidney P., b. March 20, 1844. 

1675. "Charles D., b. March 13, 1846. 

1676. ^Francis M., b. May 4, 1848 ; d. April 30, 1859. 

1677. ^Mary, b. Jan. 24, 1851. 

1678. ^George H., b. Jan. 22, 1853 ; d. May 21, 1858. 



SIXTH GENERATION. Ill 

1679. nVillis K., b. Feb. 14, 1855 ; d. Sept. 26, 1855. 

1680. 8Julia C, b. Aug. 7, 1856. 

1681. i"Nellie, b. Dec. 8, 1859. 

(874) 

Bela Chapin, son of Seth and Sybel, b. Dec. 1, 1801 ; ra. 
Dec. 27, 1827, Roxany Warner, b. Nov, 8, 1804. Bela is a farmer ; 
resides North of Chicopee River, near where bis father formerly 
resided. Children — 

1682. iSybel L., b. Nov. 2, 1828. 

1683. 2iiiahala J., b. Dec. 11, 1830. 

1684. ^Edward E., b. March 16, 1833. 

1685. ^Laura S., b. April 7, 1840 ; m. Jan. 30, 1861, Henry M. 
Loring of Norridgewock, Me. 

1686. ^Charles E., b. Oct. 26, 1842. 

(875) 

Neri Chapin, son of Seth and Sybel, b. Oct. 8, 1804 ; m. (1) 
Nov. 26, 1829, Abigail AYarner, b. July 3, 1813 ; m. (2) Abigail C. 
Andrews, b. Jan. 13, 1812. Mrs. Abigail (Warner) Chapin d. 
Jan. 22, 1843. Neri is a farmer, and resides on a portion of the old 
homestead formerly occupied by his father. 

Children, by (1) wife — 

1687. lElmer, b. March 4, 1831. 

1688. 2Seth, b. Sept. 8, 1833. 

1689. 3:\iarcus, b. Dec. 7, 1835. 

1690. -sGeorge C, b. Nov. 26, 1837 ; m. Oct. 16, 1861, Sophia 
A. C. Page. 

1691. sjulia E., b. Nov. 5, 1839 ; d. July 31, 1841. 

1692. e^Iartha J., b. June 20, 1842. 
Children, by (2) wife— 

1693. 'Abbie M., b. Aug. 9, 1846. 

1694. nVille N., b. March 31, 1849. 

1695. 9Emma M., b. Sept. 27, 1851. 

(8T7) 
Dennis Chapin, son of Seth and Sybel, b. Oct. 6, 1809 ; m. 
Nov. 1831, Susan Crosby. They had one child — 

1696. iMary L., b. Jan. 6, 1833. 

Susan C, the wife, d. Jan. 1836. Dennis, the father, now resides 
at Urbanna, Champaign Co., 111. He ra. (2) Lucinda D. Children— 



112 SIXTH OENEUATION. 

1G97. 2Marcbia. b. 1838. 

1698. ^Lewis D., b. 1840; d. July 30, 1844. 

1G99. -^Oscar, b. 1842. 

1700. ''llarmab L., b. 1844. 

1701. "Dennis, b. Dec. IG, 1850. 

Mary L., the eldest daughter, ni. Jan. 1, 1851, Thomas Burt of 
Coshocton, Ohio, where they now reside. It is supposed they have 
two children. 

(901) 

QuARTus Chapin, son of Zerah and Abigail, m. 1823, Ruby 
Sexton, dau. of Freegrace Sexton of Somers. Quartus, the father, 
was a afarmer ; he removed from Chicopee to Concord, Illinois, in 
1853, and d. there, March 7, 1858, ae. 64. Children— 

1702. ^Lyman, b. Oct. 27, 1825. 

1703. ^Horace, b. Dec. 29, 182G. 

1704. ^Cornelia L., b. April 17, 1831. 

1705. ^Lucy A., b. Nov. 10, 1833 ; m. Henry E. Skeele. 

1706. ^Cornelius 0., b. Sept. 18, 1840. 

1707. cQuartus H., b. July 1, 1844. 

Cornelia L. m. Oct. 11, 1856, George S. Chapin, son of Sidney 
Chapin of Chicopee, Mass. 

(903) 

Lewis Chapin, son of Zerah and Abigail, ni. (1) Feb. 24, 1829, 
at Granville, Rhoda Webster ; m. (2) Nov. 8, 1836, Clarissa A. 
"Welch of Enfield, Ct. Mrs. Rhoda Chapin d. Nov. 22, 1834. Mr. 
Chapin is a farmer on Chicopee street, and occupies the same house 
that his father did. 

Children, by (1) wife, Rhoda — 

1708. ^Frances D. 

1709. ^Sarah J., m. Augustus H. Case of Canton, Ct. 

1710. ^Angeline. 

Children, by (2) wife, Clarissa A. — 

1711. ^Theodore L. 1712. ^Thomas W. 
1713. «Lucas E. 1714. ''C. Amelia. 

(905) 

Joseph Chapin, son of Levi and Sally, b. Nov. 20, 1779 ; m. 
Dec. 15, 1803, Miss Martha Bartlett of Granby, Mass., who was b. 
Jan. 12, 1780. Joseph d. Oct. 14, 1839. Martha d. Aug. 25, 1855. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 113 

Joseph was an enterprising and active man. Lumber manufacturer 
and dealer, and farmer. Residence, what is now Chicopee Centre. 
Children — 

1715. ijVIelissa, b. Dec. 28, 1804; m. May 2, 1832, Seth Stebbins 
of Springfield, 

.1716. 2Wealtha, b. March 3, 1806 ; m. Nov. 30, 1826, Jesse 
Dillebur of Woodstock, Ct. 

1717. ^Joseph, b. Feb. 10, 1808; m. Jan. 4, 1837, Sophronia 
Jenks of New Salem, Mass. 

1718. ^Malina, b. Feb. 10, 1810 ; m. Jan. 1830, Gaylor M. 
Charter of Springfield, Mass. 

1719. ^Martha A., b. July 19, 1812 ; m. Dec. 1, 1836, Joel K. 
Bliss of Somers, Ct. 

1720. ^Josephus, b. Jan. 1, 1815 ; twice m. 

1721. ^Jacob N., b. May 30, 1817 ; d. Feb. 5, 1825. 

1722. ^Jaman, b. March 6, 1819 ; d. June 3, 1858, unm. 

1723. ^Levi, b. Nov. 10, 1821 ; d. March 5, 1856 ; m. Martha Pease. 

1724. i^Infant, b. Aug. 11, 1826 ; d. same day. 

(906) 

Levi Chapin, son of Levi and Sally, b. in Chicopee, April 3, 
1787; m. Achsa Smith, dau. of Philip Smith. Has res. in West 
Springfield, Mass. and in the State of N. Y. Mrs. Achsa Chapin d. 
a few years since. Mr. Chapin m. (2) in Hawley, N. Y., in 1859 or 
1860. Children by (1) wife— 

1725. ^Morris. 1726. ^Levi. 1727. ^Achsa. 

One child d. in Chicopee ; suppose he had other children. 

(911) 

Julius Chapin, son of Levi and Sally, b. Jan. 14, 1791 ; m. 
Nov. 30, 1815, (900) Persis Chapin, dau. of Zerah Chapin, b. June 9, 
1792. Mr. Chapin was b. and resided until a few years since in 
what is now Chicopee Centre, when he removed to Wethersfield, 
Henry Co., 111. Children— 

1728. iPersis, b. June 29, 1816; m. April 3, 1850, Reuben 
Hatfield of South Hadley— his 2d wife. Mrs. Persis Hatfield d. 
Nov. 9, 1852. • 

1729. 2julius, b. Nov. 20, 1818 ; drowned in the Conn. River at 
Chicopee, July 19, 1835. 

1730. ^Charlotte, b. Dec. 3, 1820. 

1731. -^Abigail, b. June 10, 1823. 

1732. ^Zerah, b. July 4, 1825. 

15 



114 SIXTH GENERATION. 

1733. «Jacob R., b. Sept. 2, 1827 ; m. Sept. 12, 1855, Mary G. 
Willard of Wethersfiekl, 111. 

1734. 'Cornelius, b. Dec. 25, 1829 ; d. Feb. 4, 1830. 

1735. 8Elijah, ) , . , -p, -,, .ao, d. Feb. 15, 1832. 

1736. ^Elisha, ] ^^^"'' ^- ^•^'- 1*' ^^^^' d. Feb. 9, 1832. 

1737. "'Emeretta R., b. July 30, 1833; m. July 30, 1S5G, Geo. 
Kellogg of Providence, II. I. 

1738. 11 Julia M., b. Feb. 6, 1836; d. Nov. 17, 1838. 

(918) 

Cyrus Chapin, son of Paul and Clarissa, m. Jan. 31, 1815, 
Sally Gridley of Southampton, Mass.; she was b. Sept. 6, 1797. 
Cyrus, the father, d. May 15, 1827. Sally, the mother, d. June 5, 
1820, ae. 23. Children— 

1739. iHenry L., b. May 16, 1817. 1740. ^Cyrus. 

(922) 

Parmenus Chapin, son of Paul and Clarissa, m. Jan. 5, 1822, 
Clarissa Griswold. Parmenus spent several of the last years of his 
life in Southwick, Hampden Co., Mass., and d. there June 21, 1859, 
ae. 60. Children— 

1741. iCharles, b. Feb. 6, 1823. 

1742. ^Clarissa Maria, b. Oct. 17, 1824. 

1743. sEdwin. 1744. ''John. 1745. sQyrus. 

(935) 

William Chapin, son of William and Mary, m. Lucy Day. 
Mr. William Chapin d. Jan. 18, 1862. Mrs. Lucy Chapin d. June 17, 
1861. William Chapin was a farmer ; he was b. and res. for many 
years in the house erected near where his ancestor Henry Chapin, 
son of Dea. Samuel res., in what is now Chicopee Centre. But the 
march of improvement, in the building of that village, disturbed him ; 
he sold out, and bought the farm formerly owned by Capt. Phineas 
Chapin, on Chicopee street ; but his quiet was again disturbed by 
the location of a portion of the Conn. River Rail Road through a part 
of his house, and he removed the house some rods Northerly, where 
it still remains. Children — 

1746. iNorman, m. Nancy Williams. 

1747. ^Harriet, m. (1) Luke Day of West Springfield ; (2) John 
Hunt of Vernon, Ct. 

1748. ^Elvira, m. Charles P. L. Warner. 

1749. "Aldus M., b. Dec. 27, 1811 ; m. Catharine F. Sawin. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 115 

1750. ^jfgrcy, choked to death with a bean. 

1751. 6:\xercy H., b. Aug. 17, 1816 ; m. Martin L. Childs. 

1752. ^Lucy D., m. Josiah Whitney. 

1753. sXewton, b. July 2, 1826 ; m. Caroline B. Sawin. 

1754. s^illiam D., b. Oct. 31, 1823; m. Emily Chapin. 

1755. i^Aminta, b. Aug. 7, 1826 ; m. Eli Ferrey. 

1756. "Orlando, b. April 30, 1830 ; m. Martha J. Bush. 

(936) 

Hemax Chapin, son of William and Mary, m. Phena Chapin, 
daughter of Col. Silas Chapin of Springfield, (Chicopee Parish.) 
Mr. Chapin resided for several years at South Hadley Falls, and 
worked at the business of paper making. Children — 

1757. iSilas, b. in Springfield, Feb. 24, 1811. 

1758. ^Alexander, b. in " April 18, 1813. 

1759. ^David Matthew, b.in " Feb. 20. 1815. 

1760. ^Clarissa Amelia, b.in" April 16, 1817 ; m. Courtland 
Babcock of Windham, Ct. 

1761. ^Horace Eaton, b. April 19, 1819 ; m. Sarah D. Green. 

1762. ^Xancy, b. in South Hadley, April 6, 1823, unm. 

1763. Thena Eliza, b. in " Aug. 21, 1827 ; m. Daniel 
Green of Coventry, Ct., Sept. 8, 1859 ; no issue. 

1764. ^Heman, b. in South Hadley, Oct. 29, 1829. 

1765. 3E(jward, b. in " Aug. 15, 1832. 

(93S) 

Alexander Chapin, son of William and Mary, m. Dec. 2, 1814, 
Sophia Burt, daughter of Samuel Burt. Mr. A. Chapin was a 
joiner by trade ; he d. of small pox, Aug. 8, 1850. Mrs. S. Chapin 
d. Aug. 12, 1861, ae. 68. Children— 

1766. ^Alexander Hamilton, b. April 1, 1817 ; 4 sons and 3 daus. 

1767. ^Samuel Burt, b. Aug. 1, 1822 ; had 1 son and 2 daus. 

1768. ^Edwin, has 2 sons. 

1769. ^Andrew Jackson, has 1 son and 1 dau. 

1770. ^Chauncey, unm.; in California. 

1771. ^Neuman, d. of small pox, Aug. 19, 1850, ae. 15. 

Two daughters, who d. young. 

(940) 

Whitfield Chapin, son of Japhet and Lovina, b. May 4, 1787 ; 
m. (1) Nov. 31, 1809, Luna Chapin ; (2) Melia Chapin ; they were 



116 SIXTH GENEIIATION. 

daughters of Col. Silas Chapin. Mrs. Luna Chapin d. March 6, 
1819, ae. 29. Mr. Whitfield Cliapin d. May 11, 1S33. Mrs. Melia 
Chapin d. May 5, 1849, ae. 54. Res., Springfield ; he was a lumber 
dealer and inspector. 

Children by (1) wife — 

1772. ^Frances Julia Ann, b.Nov.7,1810; d. May 25,1843, ae. 32. 

1773. ^George Whitfield, b. Aug. 29, 1813 ; m., and res. in Wis. 

1774. ^Samuel Lyman, b.May 19,1814; m.,and res. in N.Y.City. 

Children by (2) wife— 

1775. ^Elizabeth Luna, b. July 3, 1823. 

1776. ^Charles Otis, b. April 19, 1825. 

1777. '^Henry Sheldon, \. ■ , T.r i i -, 1o^o 

1778. ^Sarah Jane, \ *^^"^'' ^'- ^^^''^' ^''' ^^''^- 

1779. ^Amelia, m. Mr. May; reside in Cleaveland,0.; have 1 dau. 

Sarah Jane m. (1) Oct. 1, 1819, Otis A. Knight; had 1 child. 
He d., and she m. (2) Mr. Woodruff. 

(941) 

Japhet Chapin, son of Japhet and Lovina, b. Aug. 28, 1789 ; 
m. Eunice Brooks of West Springfield. Farmer and lumber manu- 
facturer. Res., Chicopee. Mr. Japhet Chapin d. Jiine 26, 1828. 
His widow m. Mr. Joel Clark of N. Y., formerly of South Hadley. 
Japhet had 1 son — 

1780. ^Japhet, who d. when about 17 yrs. of age. 

(942) 

Atlas Chapin, son of Japhet and Lovina, b. Dec. 26, 1791 ; 
m. Dec. 21, 1815, Mary S. Chapin, daughter of Ephraim and Mary 
Chapin. Res., Chicopee. Joiner by trade. Mr. Atlas Chapin d. 
Dec. 1, 1824, ae. 33. Children— 

1781. iLovina. 1782. ^Ephraim A. 

1783. 3Mary J., d. April 9, 1849, ae. 28. 

1784. "^Baxter, d. in Springfield, Aug. 9, 1851, ae. 28. 

(943) 

Pliny Chapin, son of Japhet and Lovina, b. Feb. 20, 1794; 
m. (1) 1821, Lydia Chapman of Ellington, Ct.; (2) Bathsheba 
Van Horn, dau. of Gad Van Horn. Mrs. Lydia Chapin d. Feb. 1830. 
Pliny, the father, is a farmer, and resides on the homestead formerly 
occupied by his father ; he has served in the oflfice of Selectman. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 117 

Children by (1) ■wife — 

1785. iNancy, b, March 22, 1822. 

1786. 2Alonzo C, b. March 8, 1824. 

1787. ^Sidney M., b. Feb. 7, 1826. 
17SS. milia C, b. July 30, 1827. 

1789. ^Lydia J., b. Jan. 31, 1830. 

One son by (2) wife — 

1790. ^John, b. June 4, 1838 ; unm. 

Nancy m. Timothy Marther of Hartford, Ct.; has a large family 
of children. Julia 0. m. Frank F. Merrick, son of the late Dea. 
Merrick of West Springfield ; has 1 daughter living. Lydia J. m. 
Horace Wheeler of Springfield, May 17, 1854 ; she d. Oct. 1855 ; 
left 1 child. 

(944) 

Francis Chapin, son of Japhet and Lovina, b. Feb. 26, 1796 ; 
m. Feb. 20, 1821, Sophia Allen. By trade, a harness maker. Mr. 
Francis Chapin d. Oct. 22, 1841. Children— 

1791. ^Benjamin F., b. Nov. 11, 1824 ; m.; had issue and d. 

1792. ^Clarissa Sophia, b. June 8, 1823; m. Mr. Smith, engineer 
on Rail Road at the West ; no issue. 

1793. 3Loan Allen, b. Oct. 15, 1824. 

1794. -"Cornelia, b. Dec. 6, 1825. 

1795. ^George, res., Hartford, Ct. 

1796. ^Maria, m. Mr. Bean. Res., Hartford, Ct. 

1797. ^Mahala, m. Mr. Etherton. 

(945) 
Austin Chapin, son of Japhet and Lovina, b. May 2, 1798 ; 
m. Dec. 9, 1824, IMary Monro of jSTorthboro', Mass. Austin kept a 
tavern for several years, in the house formerly occupied by his father 
and where he now resides. Of late years he has given his attention 
to farming ; has filled important town ofiices, and has been a Repre- 
sentative in the Massachusetts Legislature ; also Justice of the 
Peace. Children — 

1798. ^Maria A., b. Sept. 21, 1825 ; d. when about 14 yrs. of age. 

1799. 2Mary Margaret, b. May 15, 1827 ; m. 

1800. ^Henry W., b. Oct. 21, 1829. 

1801. •iLouisa P., b. May 17, 1831. 

1802. ^Maria A., b. Feb. 11, 1841. ) Graduates of the State Xor- 

1803. ^Lizzie M., b. Dec. 23, 1842. | mal School, Westfield, 1860. 



118 SIXTH GKNKRATION. 

Mary Margaret m. 1859, John F. Nealey of Concord, N. 11.; has 
1 cliiUl — Mary Margaret. 

Louisa P. in. May 15, 1855, Hiram F. Morse of Holliston. She 
(1. Nov. 1859, and left 2 children. 

The other chiklren unm. 

(946) 

Verrannus Chapin, son of Japhet and Lovina, b. May 21, 1800 ; 
m. Louisa Monro of Northboro', Mass.; had no children ; d. Jan. 21, 
1857. Farmer, lumber dealer and inspector. lies., Cliicopee. 

(947) 

Sidney Chapin, son of Japhet and Lovina, b. April 18, 1802 ; 
m. Pamelia Pendleton, b. April 26, 1805, dau. of Jesse Pendle- 
ton, Esq. Sidney, the father, was brought up a farmer, but went to 
Albany, N. Y. and kept a hotel for several years. He returned to 
Chicopee, and is a Broom manufacturer and dealer ; has been 
Selectman, and is one of the Directors of the Cabot Bank, Chicopee. 
Quite an influential man. Children — 

1804. iJuliet, b. Feb. 2, 1829 ; d. Jan. 25, 1833. 

1805. ^George S., b. July 23, 1832 ; d. Jan. 6, 1860. 

1806. ^Horatio P., b. Jan. 29, 1835 ; m. Dec. 24, 1860, H. Jane 
Dennison of Chicopee ; dau. b. Feb. 23, 1862. 

1807. 4japhet, b. July 10, 1839 ; Clerk in Cabot Bank, Chicopee. 
George S. m. Cornelia L. Chapin, daughter of Quartus Chapin of 

Bethel, HI., formerly of Chicopee, Mass.; he resided for a time in 
Illinois, but returned to Chicopee, and d. at the residence of his 
father, on Chicopee street, Jan. 6, 1860. Left no children. 

(948) 

Milton Chapin, son of Japhet and Lovina, b. Dec. 10, 1804 ; 
m. Sarah Merrick. Kes., Springfield. Machinist. Children — 

1808. iJames, m. Miss Colton of Longmeadow ; no issue. He 
is a merchant in New York City. 

1809. 2ElIen G., m. Edward Flagg ; 1 child. Res., Springfield. 
He is Clerk in the American Machine Works. 

1810. ^Charlotte. 

(949) 

Henry Chapin, son of Henry and Abigail, b. Jan. 4, 1792 ; m. 
Nov. 16, 1815, Experience Clark, dau. of Solomon Clark of North- 
ampton. Farmer. Residence, Chicopee, Willimansett district. 
Children — 



SIXTH GENERATION. 119 

1811. iFranklin C, b. Feb. 11, 1817. 

1812. ^Eleanor M., b. Aug. 1823. 

1813. 3Henry Ogden, b. Oct. 1826. 

1814. 4Mary E., b. Feb. 11, 1829; m. Kiley Smith of West 
Spriugfielcl ; he d. Jan. 10, 1862, ae. 52. 

1815. ^Emiiy E., b. Nov. 1831. 

1816. ^One child, who d. young. 

(950) 

Thaddeus Chapin, son of Henry and Abigail, b. Aug. 1794 ; 
m. June 20, 1822, Naomi Kellogg, dau. of Josiah Kellogg of Had- 
ley; she was b. Jan. 2G, 1S03. Thaddeus is a farmer, and resides 
on the old homestead formerly occupied by his father. Children — 

1817. iNaomi, b. April 27, 1823 ; m. March, 1861. 

1818. ^Martha, b. Oct. 1, 1824 ; d. Sept. 22, 1839, ae. 15. 

1819. ^Cynthia, b. June 10, 1827 ; d. Feb. 26, 1847, ae. 19. 

1820. ^Henry Gardiner, b.July 15,1829; d. Nov. 8, 1858, ae.29. 

1821. ^Elsey Elvira, b. Sept. 27, 1831 ; m. March 9, 1859, 
Milton Town; 1 child — Maria Louisa, b. Jan. 15, 1860. Res., 
Hadley, Mass. 

1822. ^Edwin, b. Nov. 6, 1833 ; unm.; lives in Hadley, Mass. 

1823. 'Priscilla, b. May 10, 1835 ; d. Aug. 18, 1838, ae. 2 yrs., 3 mos. 

1824. sjosiah, b. March 5, 1839 ; d. Feb. 26, 1840, ae. 11 mos. 

1825. 9Rosina, b. May 9, 1844; d. June 5, 1858, ae. 14. 

(969) 

Martin Chapin, son of Martin and Bathsheba Chapin, m. 
Jan. 27, 1799, Zeruiah Todd of West Springfield. Mrs. Zeruiah 
Chapin d. Dec. 7, 1842, ae. 65. Children — 

1826. iZeruiah, d. April 14 or 24, 1860, ae. 58. 

1827. 2Hervey. 1828. ^Martin. 1829. ^Lysander. 

(970) 

Justin Chapin, son of Martin and Bathsheba, m. Nov. 7, 1805, 
Luranda Rodgers. Children — 

1830. iSemantha, b. Jan. 10, 1807 ; d. April 2, 1826, ae. 19. 

1831. 2Elenora, m. Stephen Ball ; d. July 22, 1836, ae. 24 ; he 
was drowned. 

1832. ^Elizabeth, unm.; d. 1860. 

1833. ^Diana, m. (1) Mr. Wolcott ; (2) Martin Ashley. 

1834. ^Warren, m. Mabel Holmes. He was drowned, and left 
3 children. 



120 SIXTH OKNEKATIUN. 

(97]) 

Rev. Walter Ciimmn, sun uf JMurtin and JJatlislieba, m. in 1812, 
Ilannali Muslier, at llollis, N. II.; she was b. at Peppcrell, Mass., 
178G. Walter, the father, d. at Woodstock, Vt., 1827, ae. 48. 
Rev. Walter Chapin, A. M. was graduated in 1803, at Middlebury 
College, where he was afterwards tutor. He was constituted minis- 
ter of the first Congregational Society in the North parish in Wood- 
stock, Vt., April 25, 1810. (See Appendix to Dr. Sprague's His- 
torical Discourse.) Children — 

1835. iNancy P., b. in 1813; m. L. B. Spencer, 1830. 

1836. ^Hannah M., b. 1815 ; m. Rev. Thomas Gordon, 1841. 

1837. sgarah M., b. 1817; m. N. A. Balch, Esq., 1839; d. in 
Kalamazoo, Mich, 1848. 

1838. "Susan C, b. 1819; m. 1842. 

1839. ^Elizabeth, b. 1821 ; d. 1838. 

1840. ^Walter Edward, b. Feb. 18, 1823. 

1841. 'Henry M., b. April 21, 1825. 

1842. ^Robert M., b. 1827; d. 1850. 

(976) 

Jacob Chapin, son of Martin and Bathsheba, b. Nov. 9, 1789 ; 
m. Miss Morgan of Hinsdale, N.H. Res., Hartford, Ct. Children — 

1843. 1 William, has resided in Hartford, Ct. 

1844. ^George. 1845. "Pamelia. 

(977) 

Isaac Chapin, son of Zebulon and Lydia, b, Oct. 30, 1777 ; 
m. Jan. 13, 1800, Nancy Sibley of Monson, dau. of Ezra and Anna 
Sibley. Isaac settled on a part of his father's farm in Wilbraham, 
and d. there Oct. 8, 1855, ae. 78. Children — 

1846. ^Orramel S., I). June 17, 1801. 

1847. 2Zebulon, b. Oct. 10, 1803; d. childless, Aug. 10, 1855, ae.52. 

1848. ^Juliana, b. Sept. 12, 1805; d. at South Wilbraham, 
April 22, 1850, ae. 45. 

1849. •* Alfred E., b. Dec. 1, 1807; d. at Royalston, N. Y., 
Nov. 22, 1857, ae. 50. 

1850. '^Daniel F., b. Sept. 1, 1812 ; d. Aug. 15, 1813, ae. 11 mos. 

1851. «Daniel E., b. July 12, 1814. 

1852. ■'William, b. June 15,1817; d. unm., Sept. 10, 1847, ae.30. 

1853. ^Lydia Ann, b. Jan. 9, 1820 ; d. Sept. 4, 1840, ae. 20. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 121 

1854. "John M., b. Oct. 15, 1821. 

1855. I'^Isaac N., b. April 18, 1826 ; d. June 2, 1859, ae. 33. 

1856. "Solomon, b. June 2, 1831. 

Julia, the daughter, m. April 11, 1826, Marcus Webster, by whom 
she had 3 sons. She subsequently m. Edwin Adams, by whom she 
had 1 son, and d. at South Wilbraham, April 22, 1850, ae. 45. 

(979) 

Solomon Chapin, son of Zebulon and Lydia, b. Sept. 20, 1789 ; 
m. Oct. 26, 1814, Betsey Van Horn, dau. of Calvin Van Horn of 
Chicopee. Solomon was a farmer ; settled in Wilbraham, and d. 
without issue, June 17, 1831, ae. 42. 

(985) 

William Chapin, son of Zebulon and Lydia, b. Aug. 2, 1791 ; 
m. Jan. 30, 1812, Kezia Bridges, dau. of John and Eunice Bridges, 
of Chicopee. His uncle William who lived in Chicopee, had no 
children ; he went to live with his uncle when a boy, was brought 
up there, and after the decease of his uncle, had his property. Wil- 
liam was a farmer, and occupied the homestead of his late uncle. 
He d. June 6, 1824, ae. 33 ; left 1 son— 

1857. iJohn Bridges, b. March 1, 1822. 

The widow of William is living with her son, on the old homestead 
on Chicopee street. 

(987) 
George Chapin, son of George and Phebe Chapin, b. May 20, 
1769; m. July 22, 1792, Martha Day of West Springfield. Children— 

1858. ^Martha, b. Nov. 18, 1792 ; m. Mr. Wolcott of West 
Springfield, (Ireland Parish ;) has issue. 

1859. 2Anna, b. Feb. 4, 1795. 

1860. ^George. 

1861. ^One who d. young. 

(995) 

Ealph Chapin, son of Solomon and Vashtia, m. Oct. 7, 1808, 
Betsey Otis of Norwich, Mass. Ralph removed from Chicopee to 
Norwich, Mass., and from thence to Holland's Purchase, N. Y. 
Child— 

1862. iRosina, b. July 23, 1809. 

16 



122 SIXTH GENEnATION. 

(9'JG) 

Solomon Chapin, son of Solomon and Vashtia, m. Miss Otis ; 
removed to Holland's Purchase, N. Y. 

(998) 

Jonas Chapin, son of Solomon and Vaslitia, m.; resided in 
Middletown, Ct.; bad issue, and d. there, 

(lOOG) 

Gordon Chapin, son of Col. Abel and Dorcas Chapin, b. Dec, 6, 
1781 ; m. Aug. 21, 1804, Lydia Cooley, dau. of Capt. Ariel and 
Lydia Cooley. Mr, Gordon Chapin d. Oct, 7, 1808, of lock-jaw, 
occasioned by running a nail into his heel. Mrs. Lydia Chapin m. 
(2) Dea. Enoch Chapin of South Hadley Falls, Mrs. Lydia Chapin 
d. April 23, 1850. Children— 

1863. iMary Ann, b. Oct. 18, 1805 ; m. Theodore Chapin. 

1864. ^Gordon Mather, b. Oct, 19, 1806 ; d. Oct. 21, 1840, unm. 

(1009) 

Harvey Chapin, son of Col. Abel and Dorcas Chapin, b. Oct. 
1787 ; m. Nov. 29, 1810, Hannah Chapin, dau. of Capt. Phineas 
and Sabrina Chapin. Col. Chapin, in early life, was a farmer. He 
was Commandant of the 1st regiment 4th division of Massachusetts 
Militia ; was appointed Deputy Jailer for Hampden Co., (removed 
to Springfield,) and performed the duties of said office, to general 
acceptance, for many years. He has filled many offices in the 
town and city of Springfield, such as Selectman, Assessor, Surveyor 
of Highways, &c.; has represented the County of Hampden in the 
Massachusetts Senate ; was Postmaster at Springfield, about 4 yrs., 
under Tyler and Polk ; and Justice of the Peace. They celebrated 
their golden wedding Nov. 29, 1860. Children — 

1865. ^Ann Jeannette, b. April 27, 1812 ; m. Aug. 12, 1849, 
James W. Crooks, Esq., lawyer. Res., Springfield ; no issue. 

1866. ^Edmund Dwight, b. Dec. 9, 1813. 

1867. ^Harvey Dexter, b. Oct. 14, 1816. 

1868. "JJosiah Bridgman, b. April 6, 1818. 

1869. ^Charles Wells, b. May 16, 1820. 

1870. «Abijah White, b. April 20, 1822. 

1871. "^Charlotte Blake, b. May 6, 1824. 

1872. «John Phelps, b. Jan. 30, 1826 ; d. Aug. 25, 1826. 

1873. ^George Ashmun, b. April 25, 1832; m, June 4, 1860, 
Jennie M. Corbett of Hannibal, Mo. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 123 

(1010) 

Alden Chapin, son of Col. Abel and Dorcas Chapin, b. ISTov. 13, 
1789 ; m. Oct. 1816, Hannah W. Mnnn of Springfield. Capt. 
Alden Chapin d. April 10, 1828, ae. 38. Children — 

1874. iJohn Munn, b. Sept. 19, 1820 ; d. unm. 

1875. 2Adaline A., b. June, 1827 ; d. 

Adaline m. Charles Ferrey, and d. in Springfield ; left no children. 

Mrs. Hannah W. Chapin m. (2) Ely Parsons of West Springfield, 
and d. Ely Parsons d. in Shutesbury, Mass., 1861, and was buried 
in the burying ground, Chicopee street. 

(1014) 

Sumner Chapin, son of Col. Abel and Dorcas Chapin, b. March 5, 
1798 ; m. Sept. 4, 1822, Mary Rice of Northboro', b. Jan. 9, 1804. 
Sumner is a farmer, and resides in the house erected and occupied 
by his father. He follows in the track of his father in regard to 
large, fine cattle. Children — 

1876. ^Benjamin M., b. Jan. 9, 1828. 

1877. -George, b. April 11, 1832. 

Mary Chapin, grandmother of Mrs. Sumner Chapin, was sister to 
Gen. Israel Chapin of Hatfield ; his son, Capt. Israel Chapin, 
removed to Canandaigua, N. Y., in June, 1791, where he spent the 
remainder of his days. His wife's name was Abigail Nash. (For 
particulars, see descendants of Josiah Chapin.) 

(1016) 

Erastus Chapin, son of Ephraim and Mary Chapin, b. July 21, 
1783 ; m. May 18, 1810, Ulrica Chapin, dau. of Capt. Phineas and 
Sabrina Chapin, b. Dec. 16, 1780 ; d. Oct. 2, 1844. Capt. Erastus 
Chapin m. (2.) He d. at St. Louis, Aug. 11, 1852. Erastus, the 
father, resided for a time in that part of Springfield called Williman- 
sett. Removed to Springfield Centre ; built the Hampden House, 
(which was destroyed by fire after he left,) kept a tavern there for 
several years ; removed to Albany, N. Y., where he kept the City 
tavern for a number of years, after which, he removed to St. Louis, 
and was a Flour dealer there. Children — 

1878. ^Isabella, m. Sylvester Ball. 

1879. ^Francis Newton, drowned in Conn. River, at Springfield, 
Aug. 5, 1820. 1880. ^Samuel Watson. 

1881. "iJosiah, d. in St. Louis. 



124 SIXTH OENERATION. 

1882. ^Jane, m. Mr. Matlock of St. Louis. 1883. "Augusta. 

1884. 'John, d. in St. Louis. 1885. ^William. 

1S8C. "Erastus S., cL iu Springfield, Mass., of consumption, 
May 1, 1840, ae. 21. 

(1018) 

Giles Smith Chapin, son of Ephraim and Mary, b. April 19, 

1787 ; m. May 29, 1816, Betsey Chapman, dau. of Chapman 

of Ellington, Ct. She was b. May 10, 1787. Giles S., the father, 
a farmer on Chicopeo street, fatted many cattle for market. He 
was several times Selectman of Springfield and Chicopee ; member 
of the Legislature, 1851 ; deacon of the Church, Chicopee street, 
more than thirty years. A man of good judgment, he has been 
called upon many times to assist in appraising and dividing estates 
of deceased persons. Children — 

1887. ^Mariett, m. Dr. Daniel Pearson ; no issue. 

1888. ^Giles S., m. Sarah Z. Severance. 

1889. ^Harriet, m. Marshall Pease, Chicopee. 

1890. 4jane, d. Dec. 16, 1842, while a member of Mt. Holyoke 
Female Seminary. 

1891. ^Juliann, unm. 1892. ''Wells Mather, unm. 

1893. 'Seymour, d. Oct. 1853. 

(1019) 

Ephraim Chapin, son of Ephraim and Mary, b. March 14, 1789 ; 
m. June, 1817, Eliza Maltby, dau. of Gen. Maltby of Hatfield. 
Ephraim, the father, graduated at Williams College in 1812 ; stud- 
ied Theology ; preached for a time, but was never settled over any 
church ; has for several years resided on a farm at Waterloo, N. Y. 
Children — 

1894. ^Ephraim, ra.; wife d. 

1895. ^Eiiza, m. Alvan Tobey ; 4 children ; left 1 child. 

1896. ^Maria M., d. 

1897. ''Louisa, m. Mr. Coates of Waukegan; 1 dau. 

1898. ^Charles. 

1899. ''Edward P., lawyer in Bufi'alo. 

(1022) 

Chester Williams Chapin, son of Ephraim and Mary, b. Jan. 16, 
1797 ; m. June 1, Dorcas Chapin, dau. of Col. Abel and Dorcas 
Chapin, b. April 11, 1801. Chester W. Chapin, Esq. is a very 
prominent man ; resides iu Springfield ; Justice of the Peace ; 



SIXTH GENERATION. 125 

has been Candidate for Representative to Congress ; was a member 
of the Constitutional Convention of 1853 ; held various town offices ; 
was for a few years President of the Connecticut River Rail Road 
Corporation, and has been for a few years past President of the 
Western Rail Road Corporation. He is a man of great worldly 
possessions ; and was for a few years President of the Agawam 
Bank. Before the opening of the Connecticut River Rail Road, he 
was Stage Proprietor and Mail Carrier for several years. Children — 

1900. lAbel Dexter. 

1901. ^Margaret, m. Mr. William Bliss, son of the late William 
Bliss, Esq. of Springfield. 

1902. ^Anna C, m.May 22, 1861, James A.Rumrill of Springfield. 

1903. ^Chester W. 

(1025) 

Orramel Chapin, son of Bezaleel and Thankful, b. April 5, 
1791 ; m. Sept. 1815, Susan Rood, dau. of Joseph Rood, formerly of 
Ludlow, Mass. Has resided in Milwaukie ; removed to Lyons, 
Iowa, Oct. 1861. Children— 

1904. iQrson, b. Sept. 20, 1816 ; d. Aug. 1839, in Chicago, 111. 

1905. -Susan Arville, b. June 10, 1819 ; m. James M. Adsit of 
Chicago. 

1906. 3jane Eliza, b. Jan. 1821 ; m. March 4, 1841, Horace H. 
Harrison of Chicago. 

1907. ^Alfred. 

1908. ^Alfred Rose, b. July 30, 1825 ; Col. of 10th Reg't of 
Wis. Volunteers. 

1909. ^Helen, b. Jan. 1837 ; d. Nov. 8, 1840, at Chicago. 

(1028) 

Theodore Chapin, son of Bezaleel and Thankful, b. March 27, 
1800 ; m. Feb. 2, 1829, Mary Ann Chapin, dau. of Gordon and 
Lydia Chapin, b. Oct. 18, 1805. Mr. Theodore Chapin d. in Buff'alo, 
of cholera, June 29, 1854. He was quite an enterprising man — for 
several years was forwarding agent on the Erie Canal ; was a farmer 
upon a large scale, at or near Rochester, N. Y., where he resided for 
a time. Children — 

1910. iGeorge Gordon, b. Sept. 20, 1830 ; d. May 30, 1831. 

1911. 2Mary Ann, b. Dec. 5, 1831 ; d. Sept. 16, 1832. 

1912. ^Ann Eliza, b. Feb. 22, 1834 ; d. Aug. 15, 1836. 

1913. -"Isabella, b. May 3, 1837 ; m., and res. in Buffalo, N. Y. 

1914. ^Theodore Bezaleel, b. Feb. 19, 1840 ; d. July 24, 1841. 



12G SIXTH GEMERATION. 

1915. "Samuel, b. May G, 1842. 
19 IG. 'Georgiana, b. Dec. 23, 1845. 

1917. »Mary Jane, b. April 29, 1847 ; d. June 1, 1848. 

(1033) 

Sylvester Chapin, son of Frederick and Roxalana, b. June 10, 
1797 ; m. Dec. 2, 1827, Lucy Newbury of Windsor, Ct. Mrs. Lucy 
Chapin d. Sylvester, the father, was drowned in Connecticut River, 
between Springfield and Enfield Falls, May 28, 1834, by falling or 
being knocked overboard of a steamboat. Children — 

1918. ^Lucy Ann, b. Jan. 1, 1829 ; d. Dec. 17, 1830. 

1919. ^Frederick Newbury, b. April 23, 1832; d. Feb. 1851. 

(1035) 

Briant Chapin, son of Frederick and Roxalana, b. Aug. 28, 
1802 ; m. Sept. 2, 1829, Lucinda Jones of West Springfield, dau. of 
Ebenezer Jones. Briant is a 'farmer; resides on Chicopee street, 
in the house formerly occupied by his father and built and occupied 
by his grandfather, Ephraim Chapin. Children — 

1920. iLovira, b. May 2, 1830 ; m. Thomas Brown. 

1921. 2^nn Judson m. Austin Goodyear. 

1922. ^Harriet Day. 

1923. •* Albert Briant. 

Lovira m. Thomas Brown ; has 2 children ; resides in New York 
City ; he is a goldsmith. 

Ann Judson m. Austin Goodyear of Holyoke ; has 1 daughter. 

Aug. 28th, 1858, Harriet Day, 3d daughter, while descending 
Mt. Holyoke, was thrown from the car and precipitated considerable 
distance down the mountain, and very greatly injured, and has been 
in a very critical condition ever since, and probably will be a cripple 
for life. 

(1036) 

Daniel Monroe Chapin, son of Frederick and Roxalana, b. 
Aug. 9, 1809 ; m. Nov. 20, 1838, Mary Jane Bracket, dau. of Ithica 
Bracket of Blanford, Mass. Mr. Daniel M. Chapin was killed by 
falling from the high river bank on some rocks, in Enfield, Ct. 
Children — 

1924. iMary R. D., b. Jan. 30, 1843. 

1925. ^Charles M., b. Dec. 25, 1845. 

Mrs. Mary J. Chapin m. (2) Mr. Geo. W. Payne ; lives in Union- 
ville, Ct., and has issue. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 127 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1042) 

VII. Hon. Loring Dudley Chapin, son of Reuben and Lucinda, 
b. at West Springfield, Dec. 2, 1798 ; m. Emeline Aurelia Thurber, 
at Providence, dau. of John and Freelove Thurber. 

Mr. Chapin took great interest in the Chapin Genealogy, and 
spent considerable time and means in gathering material for a com- 
plete genealogy of the Chapin family, and -when be died, left the 
task to his son. He corresponded ^Yith Judge Morris of Springfield, 
who gave him many important facts in regard to the family, among 
others he traced his lineage to Dea. Samuel of Springfield, from 
whom he was the seventh generation. His father was Reuben who 
d, at North Providence, somewhere about 1835 or '36. Loring D. 
was sent to Philadelphia, where he was educated among the Quakers 
and where he remained from 12 to 20, when he returned to Hart- 
ford, and served an apprenticeship to the trade of a musical instru- 
ment maker. He subsequently removed to Providence, (where he 
m. Emeline Aurelia Thurber, daughter of John and Freelove 
Thurber.) He followed the business of musical instrument maker 
until 1829, when he removed with his family to New York. He 
established a handsome business (for those times,) but retired from 
it in 1832 or '33. In 1836, he established with others the Native 
American party, in whose cause he spent all his time and much of 
his means. He edited several newspapers, among which were the 
N. Y. Sun, the National Banner and the American Advocate. In 
1838, he was elected a member of the N. Y. State Legislature, by 
the American and Whig parties. He originated the bill authorizing 
the appointment of a Commissioner to proceed to Europe to seek 
for the records concerning the Colonial history of the State, and the 
following year was the most prominent candidate for the office, but 
his opposition to Seward on the School question lost him the appoint- 
ment. He entered into the book business and continued therein 
until just previous to his death in 1846. He met with an accident 
by which he broke two ribs on the left side, just previous to taking 
his seat in the Assembly, and never being re-set, they pressed upon 
and prevented the due action of the heart, causing his death by 
ossification of the valves. He had been nominated the evening on 
which he died, by both the Whig and American parties as one of 
the Judges to revise the State Constitution. He was in some 
respects a remarkable man, and was eminent for his many virtues 
both of head and heart. 



128 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Children — 

1926. iHenry Albert, b. in Providence, Dec. 14, 1820; res., 
N. y. ; unm. 

1927. 2john Reuben, b. in Providence, Jan. 2, 1823 ; res., Rail- 
way, N.J. 

1928. ^Loring Dudley, b. in Providence; d. in N. Y., Aug. 6, 
1832, ae. 6. 

1929. ''An infant, b. in Providence ; d. when a few days old. 

1930. ^Charles Loring, b. in Providence, Nov. 25, 1828; res., 
N. Y.; m. Matilda F. Quinn. 

1931. "^Emma Lucinda, b. in N.Y., March, 1835; now living, unm. 

1932. '^George Dudley, b. in " 1833 ; d. in a few mos. 

1933. ^Loring Dudley, b. in Hartford, Aug. 28, 1838; now in 
the army at Port Royal, S. C; unm. 

1934. ^An infant, b. 1840 ; d. in one or two days after birth. 

(1054) 

Solomon Chapin, son of Solomon and Rebecca, m. Miss Spangle. 
Children — 

1935. iWilliam. 1936. ^Xelson. 
1937. ^Alonzo. 1938. ''Caroline. 

(1055) 

Nathan P. Chapin, son of Solomon and Rebecca, m. Abigail 
Hubbard. Children — 

1939. lAnvelia. 1940. ^Catharine J. 1941. ^Laura A. 

1942. -iSolomon E. D. 1943. ^Sarah J. 

(1057) 

Joel Chapin, son of Solomon and Rebecca, m. Adaline Foster. 
One child — 

1944. iMary Ann. 

(1058) 

Erie Chapin, son of Solomon and Rebecca, m. Chloe Root. 
Children — 

1945. lAmanda. 1946. ^garah. 

(1059) 

Edward Chapin, son of Solomon and Rebecca, m. Roene "Weeks. 
Children — 

1947. ^Charles E. 1948. ^Caroline S. 
1949. ^William. 1950. ^Clarissa. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 129 

(1063) 

Hart H. Chapin, son of Solomon and Rebecca, m. Julia John- 
son. Mr. H. H. Chapin d. Children— 

1951. iMilton. 1952. ^Hart. 

(1064) 
Samuel W. Chapin, son of Dr. Caleb and Mary, b.Dec. 5, 1787 ; 
m. April 10, 1816, Melinda Smith of Hadley, b. Jiily 15, 1794. 
Trade,. Stone Cutter. Mr. S. W. Chapin d. Nov. 4, 1851. He held 
the office of Deacon in the Orthodox Congregational Church, Ber- 
nardston. Children — 

1953. ^Samuel W., b. Dec. 30, 1816 ; unm. 

1954. ^Curtis, b. April 14, 1818; m. Jennett H. Nelson. 

1955. 3E]iza M., b. Aug. 22, 1833 ; d. Nov. 19, 1833. 

(1065) 
Seth Chapin, son of Dr. Caleb and Mary, b. Jan. 16, 1790 ; 
m. Sylvia, dan. of Dr. Cyreneus Chapin of Buffalo, N.Y. Trade, 
Stone Cutter. Res., Buffalo, N. Y. Mr. Seth Chapin d. Nov. 12, 
1826. Children— 

1956. ^Amelia Louisa, b. June 29, 1821. 

1957. ^Catharine Mary, b. Aug. 25, 1824. 

1958. ^Cyreneus, b. 1826 ; d. 

(1066) 
Caleb Chapin, son of Dr. Caleb and Mary, b. Aug. 18, 1792 ; 
m. Dec. 5, 1816, Roxany Allen. Trade, Stone Cutter. Res., Green- 
field, Mass. Dea. of the Unitarian Congregational Church in Ber- 
nardston. Children — 

1959. ^Eunice, b. Sept. 30, 1817 ; m. June 16, 1857, Stephen P. 
riagg. Lawyer, Wilmington, Vt. 

1960. 2john, b. May 28, 1820. 

1961. ^Dr. Horace, b. Aug. 28, 1822 ; school teacher. 

1962. ^Frederick, b. Oct. 6, 1824 ; unm. 

1963. ^Mary, b. July 25, 1827 ; unm. 

1964. ^George, b. Aug. 28, 1830 ; school teacher. 

(1068) 

Dr. Marshall Chapin, son of Dr. Caleb and Mary, b. Feb. 27, 
1798 ; m. May 3, 1823, Mary Crosby. Dr. M. Chapin, a Physician, 

17 



130 SEVENTH GRNERATION. 

res., Detroit, d. Dec. 26, 1838. Mrs. Mary Cbapiu d. June 9, 1841. 

Children — 

1965. ^Louisa, b. Sept. 8, 1824 ; m. Sept. 8, 1842, Theodore 
Henry Iliuchman. 

1966. ^ilelen Mary, b. Nov. 6, 1826 ; m. April 6, 1847, Heman 
Norton Strong. 

1967. ^Charles H., b. Sept. 6, 1828 ; d. Oct. 7, 1839. 

1968. ^Marshall Wright, b. June 4, 1831 ; ni. Dec. 31, 1S52, 
Louisa Freoland. 

(1069) 

Dana Chapin, son of Dr. Caleb and Mary, b. Aug. 22, 1800 ; 
m. May 29, 1829, Thankful , who was b. Dec. 18, 1807. Far- 
mer. Children — 

1969. iSeth, b. March 12, 1830. 

1970. ^Franklin Dana, b. June 29, 1831. 

1971. ^Gilbert, b. Feb. 4, 1832. 

1972. '•Jane, b. March 6, 1833 ; d. Nov. 26, 1835. 

1973. ^Sylvia Maria, b. Dec. 9, 1835 ; d. March 12, 1855. 

1974. «Albert, b. Feb. 4, 1837. 

1975. 'Mary Ann, b. July 7, 1839. 

1976. sEnoch, b. Feb. 1, 1841. 

1977. "Nancy Ellen, b. Dec. 3, 1842. 

1978. I'^Thankful Amelia, b. Sept. 28, 1844. 

1979. "James Thaddeus, b. Jan. 23, 1847 ; d. May 20, 1857. 

1980. i^charles Justin, b. Sept. 18, 1850 ; d. March 25, 1852. 

(1070) 

Horatio Chapin, 7th son of Dr. Caleb and Mary, b. June 16, 
1803 ; m. (1) Dec. 24, 1835, Martha E. Strong ; (2) Lucy C. Mer- 
ritt; (3) Phebe A. Kibby, who was b. Dec. 4, 1808. Res. on the 
St. Joseph's River, Ind. Is Cashier of the South Bend branch of 
the State Bank, Ind. Mrs. Martha E. Chapin d. Feb. 13, 1846, 
ae. 37. Mrs. Lucy C. Chapin d. May 3, 1858. Children— 

1981. ^Mary E., b. Oct. 6, 1836 ; m. Andrew Anderson, Jr. 

1982. ^Martha B.. b. April 30, 1840. 

1983. ^Edward P., b. May 6, 1842. 

1984. "Sarah, b. May 3, 1844. 

(1072) 

Justin Chapin, son of Dr. Caleb and Mary, b. Sept. 16, 1808; 
m. Lurana Kenney. Res., Greenfield, Mass. Farmer. Children — 



SEVENTH GENERATIOIV. 131 

1985. iMarshall P., b. May 22, 1834. 

1986. ^Harriet A., b. March 29, 1836. 

1987. sjiary J., b. Oct. 20, 1838. 

1988. "Alice H., b. July 22, 1841. 

(1073) 

Lucius Chapin, son of Zalmuna and Lyclia, b. Sept. 23, 1792 ; 
m. Hannah Barton. Occupation, work on Mills, and a Machinist. 
Residence, Bernardston, Mass. Children — 

1989. ^Lucius P., b. July 19, 1820 ; m. Martha Rythen. Occu- 
pation, Carpenter and Joiner. Residence, Bernardston. Has one 
child — George D., b. June 15, 1856. 

1990. m. Adaline, b. Dec. 23, 1821 ; m. Richard Hoyt ; res., 
Bernardston. Harness maker. 

1991. ^Harriet L., b. Oct. 15, 1823. 

1992. "Martha A., b. Aug. 3, 1826 ; m. Ezra Holton ; res., 
Northtield, Mass. Farmer. 

1993. ^Xorman, twin, b. Nov. 7, 1828 ; m. Eugana Messenger. 
Res., Penn.; works for Coal Co.; 1 child — Hattie J., b. Feb. 1855. 

1994. ^Harmon, twin, b. Nov. 7, 1828 ; d. Sept. 27, 1848. 

1995. 'Louisa J., b. Dec. 18, 1831 ; m. Edward K. Smith; res., 
N. Brookfield, Mass. Harness maker. 

1996. ^Isabel G., b. March 7, 1834; d. Sept. 20, 1835. 

1997. 9 ) Infant son and daughter, b. Feb. 7, 1836 ; d. ae. 

1998. 10/6 hours. 

1999. iilsaac W., b. Feb. 7, 1838 ; d. Sept. 27, 1842. 

(1092) 

Louisa Mary, dau. of Dr. Cyreneus Chapin, b. March 19, 1803 ; 
m. Tbaddeus Reed. Children — 

2000. iDeWitt Chapin, b. Sept. 16, 1824. 

2001. ^George Thaddeus, b. June 28 ; d. March, 1829. 

2002. ^Sylvia Louisa, b. Oct. 13, 1836. 

2003. "Walter Irving, b. 1838. 

2004. ^Hobart, b. Jan., 1841. 

(1097) 

Sylvia Chapix, dau. of Selah and Sally, b. Feb. 11, 1811 ; m. 

(1) May 12, 1842, John P. Cornell of Tiffin, 0.; he d. at Cincinnati, 

0., July 4, 1849 ; m. (2) Dec. 1, 1850, Ralph Valentine of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 



132 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Children by (1) husband — 

^Sylvia, b. Feb. 22, 1843. 
2Henry Selah, b. Dec. 9, 1844. 
3John P., b. Dec. 17, 1847. 

Children by (2) husband — 

''Lewis Selah, b. Sept. 25, 1851. 
^Ralph, b. Oct. 9, 1853. 

Mr. Ralph Valentine d. Oct. 22, 1858, at llidgefield, 0., of typhoid 
fever. 

(1112) 

Rev. Dennis Chapin, son of Elisha and Anuie, graduated at 
Amherst College, in Class of 1837 ; m. Anna K. Smith of Weston, 
Vt. He is considered a man of superior abilities ; resides in Vt. 
and preaches in Canada. Children — 

2005. iManfred. 2006. ^Frances M. 2007. ^Clara A. 
2008. '»Adela. 2009. '^Ader. 

(1127) 

Leonidas Chapin, son of Leonard B. and Mary Ann A., b. at 
Middletown, Vt., June 11, 1827 ; m. April 25, 1855, at Troy, Miami 
Co., 0., Amanda M. H. Rose. One child — 

lEstella S., b. April 26, 1858, at Troy, 0. 

(1131) 

Enoch Cooley Chapin, son of Enoch and Lydia, b. Nov. 12, 
1812 ; m. Nov. 3, 1842, Harriet Jenks Abbee, dau. of John S. and 
Electa Abbee. Res., South Hadley Falls. Mr. Enoch C. Chapin 
d. Nov. 4, 1858. Children— 

2010. ^Edmund Cooley, b. Dec. 21, 1846. 

2011. ^Arthur Nash, b. Jan. 28, 1850. 

2012. ^Charles Frederick, b. Aug. 3, 1852. 

2013. •'Theodore, b. Aug. 20, 1854. 

(1133) 

Ogden Nash Chapin, son of Enoch and Lydia, b. Jan. 5, 1817 ; 
m. Dec. 15, 1838, Jane Campbell. Res., Albany, N. Y.; forwarding 
agent on the Canal. Children — 

2014. 'Robert Hunter, b. April 1, 1840. 

2015. ^Jessie, b. July 2, 1849. 

2016. ^Ogden, b. Nov. 25, 1850. 

2017. ''Campbell, b. Feb. 10, 1852. 



SEVENTH GEXERATION. 133 

(1136) 

Thomas Jefferson Chapin, son of Elishaand Betsey, b.Nov,22, 
1806 ; m. May 28, 1828, Harriet. Allen, dau. of Oliver Allen of 
Springfield, b. Aug. 31, 1807. Res., Dalton. Paper maker. 
Children — 

2018. ^Harriet Emeret, b. in Springfield, April 17, 1829. 

2019. 2Sarab Jane, b. in Chatham, N. Y.. Dec. 2, 1838. 

2020. ^Thomas Elisha, b. in Norwich, Ct., May 16, 1842. 

Harriet Emeret m. Washington Hubbard, son of Enoch Hubbard 
of Pittsfield, July 26, 1851 ; he d. Nov. 27, same year ; she m. (2) 
Asahel W. Potter, son of John Potter of Ballston Spa, Saratoga 
Co., N. Y., Oct. 25, 1853. They have had but one child— 
2021. ^Frederick, b. March 16, 1855 ; d. Sept. 10, 1857. They 
reside at Ballston Spa. 

Sarah Jane m. Samuel H. Hubbard, son of Oliver Hubbard of 
Pittsfield, Sept. 25, 1858. They have one child— 2022. ^Frederick 
Oliver, b. Oct. 5, 1859, at Dalton. They now reside in Dalton. 

(1137) 

Eunice Chapin, dau. of Elisha and Betsey (Morgan) Chapin, 
b. Nov. 23, 1809 ; m. Nov. 26, 1832, Diodate B. Rice, son of Orange 
and Lois (Dutton) Rice of Ludlow, Mass. Children — 

2023. lElisha, b. in Springfield, Jan. 31, 1834. 

2024. ^chauncey Dutton, b. in " May 1, 1836. 

2025. ^Lois Dutton, b. in " June 17,1838; d. Sept. 19, 
1850, ae. 12. 

2026. ^Charles Edgar, b. in " Nov. 27, 1840 ; lives with 
his parents in Springfield. 

2027. ^Laura Maria, b. in Ludlow, Dec. 3, 1844 ; lives with her 
parents in Springfield. 

Their residence is Springfield, Mass.; he is a Tool maker. 

(1138) 

Miriam Chapin, dau. of Elisha and Betsej*, b. Dec. 23, 1812 ; 
m. Oct. 23, 1831, John Wilson, son of Alexander and Elizabeth 
Wilson of Dalbeattie, Stewartry of Kirkeadbright, Scotland. He is 
a paper maker, and resides in Lee, Mass. Children — 

2028. ^Elizabeth Maria, b. March 6, 1834, in Tyringham. 

2029. ^Alexander, b. May 7, 1836, in Lee. 

2030. ^Nancy Jane, b. Feb. 8, 1838, 



134 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

2031. 'Mary Grace, b. Feb. 25, 1841, in Weslfield. 

2032. •'^Isabella Miriam, b. Sept. 30, 1844, in New Marlboro'. 

2033. «John Thompson, b. Nov. 18, 184G, in Lee. 

2034. 'George William, b. April 13, 1850, in Lee. 
Elizabeth Maria, dan. of John and Miriam (Chapin) Wilson, m. 

Aug. 8, 1858, John P. Philips of Norwich, Ct.; he is now in Califor- 
nia. Alexander Wilson, son of John and Miriam, m. March 17, 1858, 
Sarah A. Rathbun of Lee. The other children are unm., and live 
with their parents in Lee. 

(1139) 

Elizabeth Chapin, dau. of Elisha and Betsey, b. July 22, 181G ; 
ra. July, 1837, Noah D. White. She d. Oct. 9, 1840, ae. 24, leav- 
ing an infant child which survived her but a few months. 

(1140) 

Nancy Colton Chapin, dau. of Elisha and Betsey, b. May 8, 
1819 ; m. June 7, 1842, Joseph Ruggles Pepper, son of Abner 
Pepper of Enfield. Res., Springfield. Paper maker. Children — 

2035. ^Joseph Ruggles, b. Jan. 18, 1847, at Norwich, Ct. 

2036. 'Benjamin Manning, b. Aug. 1, 1852, at Norwich, Ct.; 
d. May 27, 1853. 

2037. ^Herbert Marshall, b. July 11, 1854, at Norwich, Ct. 

2038. -^Lizzie Chapin, b. Nov. 15, 1859, at Springfield; d. 
Feb. 13, 1860. 

(1147) 

Giles Chapin, son of Dr. Perez and Elizabeth, b. April 2, 1781 ; 
m. Mr. Giles Chapin d. at Rushford, N.Y., ae. 71. Children — 

2039. 'Perez. 2040. sHollister. 2041. ^Horace. 
2042. ''Charles. 2043. ^Maria, m.; has 7 children. 
2044. '^Sophia, unm. 2045. 'Maryette, unm. 

(1148) 

Rev. Perez Chapin, son of Dr. Perez and Elizabeth, b. 
April 29, 1783 ; m. Rev. Perez Chapin graduated at Middlebury, 
Vt., and preached nearly thirty years in Pownal, where he now lies, 
side by side with many of his children. Rev. Perez Chapin d. in 
Pownal, Maine, ae. 56. Children — 

2046. iRoxany, unm. 2047. ^Edward, unm. 2048. ^Henry. 

2049. "^Perez, unm, 2050. ^Mary, m. 

2051. «Huldah, unm. * 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 135 

(1150) 

Alpheus Chapin. son of Dr. Perez aud Elizabeth, b. Oct. 24, 
1787 ; m., and res. in Boston. Portrait Painter. Children — 

2052. lEdwin H. 

2053. ^Eiien^ ni., and has 5 children. 2054. ^Martha. 

(1151) 

Rev. Horace B. Chapin, son of Dr. Perez and Elizabeth, b. 
Dec. 3, 1791 ; m.; no issue. Rev. Horace B. graduated at Bangor 
Seminary, Maine ; was a preacher of the Gospel, for a time at South 
Amherst, Mass. ; and d. at Levaston Falls, Maine, where he was 
Pastor, ae. 49. 

(116S) 
John P. Chapin, son of Eber Chapin and grandson of Luther, 
b. in what is now Newport, Vt.; m. in 1843, Harriet L. "White of 
Lancaster, N. H., dan. of Samuel White. Went to Chicago, 111. 
in 1834, when the Indians were more numerous than the whites. 
Population now, 120,000. Has been and is still a very prominent 
man. In 1844, he was elected to the Common Council, and served 
one year as Alderman ; was elected Mayor of the city in 1846 ; and 
has been engaged in extensive business of various kinds during the 
whole time he has resided there — Forwarding and Commission 
business. Real Estate, also in the wholesale business, Packing Beef 
and Pork, and is now engaged in running a line of boats on the 111. 
and Mich. Canal and Illinois River, to St. Louis. Children — 

2055. iHenry C, ae. ]6. 

2056. 2john P., Jr., ae. 14. 

2057. ^Louisa W., ae 12. 

2058. ^Ella, ae 10. 

2059. ^Fanny, ae. 3. 

(1169) 

Eber Chapin, Jr., son of Eber, has resided in Chicago 18 years; 
has been largely engaged in the lumber business during the whole 
time, as one of the firm of Chapin, Marsh & Foss ; they manufac- 
ture and sell six million feet a year. He m. Miss Julia Leonard in 
1849., whose father came from j\Iass. and settled in 111. in 1835. 
Children, 3 daughters — 

2060. iLizzy, ae. 8. 2061. -Mary, ae. 3. ^^nd a babe. 



13G SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1179) 

Japhet Chapin, son of Japhot and Lucy, b. July 20, 179G ; 
in. Oct. 16, 18 L7, to Betsey Sprague. Res., village of Antwerp, 
N. Y. Dea. of Congregational Church, and Justice of the Peace. 
Children — 

2062. ^Darius, b. July 6, 1819. 

20G3. 2Emily, b. Feb. 12, 1821. 

2064. =^Alonso, b. Jan. 25, 1823. 

2065. -^Maria, b. Jan. 20, 1826. 

2066. ^Luther, b. Aug. 23, 1830. 
2007. ''Lawson, b. Dec. 17, 1833. 

2068. "^Antoinette, b. Oct. 13, 1836. 

2069. "Sylvester, b. Oct. 16, 1839. 

Emily m. Oct. 1840, H. H. Dewey; has 1 daughter. 

Darius is m., and has 5 children — 1 sou and 4 daughters ; lives in 
Russell, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y. ; is a Carpenter and Joiner. 

Alonso, m., and has 2 daus. Res. in Antwerp, N. Y. Merchant. 

Maria m. John W. Green ; has 2 daughters. He is a Merchant 
and Dept. Sheriff; res. in Antwerp, N.Y. 

Luther res. in the same village, unm. Tin Smith and Dealer in 
Stoves. 

Lawsou res. in the same village. Merchant. Dealer in Dry Goods 
and Groceries. 

Antoinette, teacher of Music on Piano ; now in Russell. 

Sylvester is Clerk in Alonso's Store. 

(1183) 

Luther Chapin, son of Japhet and Lucy, b. May 29, 1809 ; 
m. (1) Jan. 2, 1833, Lydia Elmore, b. April 29, 1814 ; m. (2) Dec. 4, 
1845, Malvira M. Swan. Mrs. Lydia Chapin d. April 9, 1845. 
Luther, the father, is a Carpenter and Turner by trade, having 
worked at the business for thirty years. He served as first Lieuten- 
ant of the Company of Artillery in Buckland, was elected Captain 
in 1841, served two years, and received an honorable discharge. 
The son, Norris E., is learning the Carpenter's trade. Luther, the 
father, at present resides in Ashfield, Franklin Co., Mass. 

Children by (1) wife — 

2070. ^Eunice M., b. Oct. 23, 1833 ; m. Dec. 22, 1860, Cyrus 
Proctor. 

2071. ^Luther D., b. Aug. 2, 1836. 

2072. ^Lydia S., b. Feb. 1, 1840; m. May, 1860, Theophilus 
Graves. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 137 

2073. ^Xorris E.. b. March 19, 1842. 

2074. ^Edward M., b. Nov. 24, 1844. 

2075. ^Arthur Japhet, b. Aug. 16, 1860. 
Children by (2) wife — 

2076. ■'Mary E., b. July 3, 1848. 

2077. «George H., b. July 17, 1850. 

(1199) 

Orange Chapin, son of Moses and Kezia, b. Jan. 9, 1790 ; 
m. May 6, 1819, Julia Rumrill of South Hadley, daughter of Asa 
and Rhoda Rumrill ; she was b. Oct. 8, 1799. 

It is with great diffidence that the compiler has anything to say 
respecting himself; but as he has requested information from others, 
perhaps it will be but justice to them to state some facts in regard 
to himself. 

Orange resided with his father, on Chicopee street, until the death 
of his father, excepting occasional absences, one or two winters or 
parts of winters attending school, and five winters teaching school. 
After the death of his father, he removed to Willimansett village, 
Springfield, now Chicopee. Farmer, and practical Land Surveyor 
or Engineer. He has many years served on the board of Selectmen 
in Springfield, before the division of the town, and one year in Chic- 
opee. Has served as Assessor in the town of Springfield some 
15 or 16 years in succession ; Represented the town of Springfield 
in the General Court of Massachusetts in the years 1835, 1836 and 
1839 ; has settled the estates of many deceased persons, and been 
guardian to many minor children. Has been Clerk of the Parish, 
Chicopee street, now first Congregational Society in the town of 
Chicopee, from 1821 to the present time, 1862, and Treasurer most 
of that time ; has been Deacon of the Churcb, Cbicopee street, since 
1840. Has had three Military commissions ; also has been Justice 
of the Peace for more than 30 years. 

With what fidelity he has discharged his various duties, it is for 
his cotemporaries and the people of his acquaintance to decide. 

Children adopted by Orange and Julia Chapin — 

2077. ^Orange Chapin Towne, son of Jonathan and Delia 
(Rumrill) Towne, of Belchertown, b. March 20, 1823. 

2078. ^Julia Chapin Rumrill, dau. of Asa Rumrill, Jr. and 

Rebecca (Goodell) Rumrill, of South Hadley, b. Oct. 1839, is known 

by and bears the name of Julia R. Chapin. 

(See Allied families.) 
18 



138 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1201) 

Moses Chapin, son of Moses and Kezia, b. April 9, 1793 ; ni. 
Iloxany Skeelo, daughter of Dr. Amos Skeele of Chicopee. Moses 
was a practical farmer, and was considered an excellent judge of 
cattle ; he lived for a few years after his marriage in the village of 
Willimansett. After the death of his father, Moses Chapin, Esq., 
he removed on to the old homestead on Chicopee street, where his 
father had resided, and into the house built by his great grandfather 
Abel. He was quite averse to serving in public offices. Mr. Moses 
Chapin d. March 14, 1857, ae. nearly 64. His widow res. on the 
old homestead. 

(1205) 

Whitman Chapin, son of Moses and Kezia, b. March 7, 1808 ; 
m. Dec. 10, 1829, Theodosia McKinstry, daughter of Perseius and 
Grace McKinstry. Mr. Whitman Chapin d. Aug. 28, 1842, ae. 34. 
Children — 

2079. ^Moses Whitman, b. April 10, 1831. 

2080. ^Harriet, b. March 28, 1836 ; d. April 26, 1837, ae. 1. 

2081. ^Edward Whitman, b. Aug. 23, 1840. 

Moses Whitman's name was at first simply Moses, Whitman being 
added by the authority of the Probate Court. Edward W. is now 
(1862) a member of the Junior Class in Amherst College, Mass. 

(1207) 

Alvin Chapin, son of Ashbel and Eleanor, b. March 11, 1796; 
m. May 7, 1829, Eunice Parsons, dau. of Luke Parsons, Esq. of 
West Springfield. Mrs. Eunice Chapin d. Dec. 16, 1853. Alvin 
was b. in Chicopee, and has resided there until recently ; has gone 
to reside with his son in Ludlow. Children — 

2082. 1 Ashbel Parsons, b. July 11, 1830. 

2083. 2juiia Maria, b. July 4, 1832. 

2084. ^Andrew Jackson, b. Oct. 1835. 

2085. ^Lester Van Horn, b. Feb. 25, 1840. 

(1210) 

Titus Chapin, son of Ashbel and Eleanor, b. May, 1801 ; m. (1) 
Emily McKinstry, dau. of Perseius and Grace McKinstry ; m. (2) 
widow Sarah Cass. Mrs. Emily Chapin d. 1842. Mr. Titus Chapin 
is a farmer and vegetable raiser ; res. on Chicopee street, in the 
house erected by his father. Has been Selectman of Chicopee, and 
this year Assessor. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 139 

Children by (1) wife — 

2086. ^Titus, b. Oct. 22, 1831 ; drowned in Kansas River, Kan- 
sas Territory, Aug. 4, 1858. 

2087. 2Roxany Emily, b. April 3, 1833 ; graduated at Mount 
Holyoke Female Seminary. 

2088. ^Emily, b. April 1, 1835 ; m^. Wm. D. Chapin. 

2089. ^Luey, b. Aug. 27, 1838 ; graduated at Mount Holyoke 
Female Seminary. Has been teaching at the South. 

2090. ^Eleanor, b. Aug. 19, 1841 ; d. March 7, 1844, ae. 2^. 
One son by (2) wife — 

2091. ^Edward Cass., b. Sept. 30, 1845. 

Eoxany Emily m. March 8, 1858, General William G^dine of 
Athens, Georgia; son, b. Jan. 1859; daughter, b. in Chicopee, June, 
1860. Have removed to Columbus, Miss.; he is an officer in the 
rebel army. 

(1211) 

Lysander Chapin, son of Ashbel and Eleanor, b. Jan. 1804 ; 
m. April 29, 1841, Mary Ferre, dau. of Charles Ferre of Granby, 
Mass. Res., Chicopee street. Has served as Assessor in the town 
of Chicopee. Children — 

2092. lEleanor Van Horn, b. Dec. 12, 1843. 

2093. 2Adolphus Ferre, b. June 7, 1846. 

2094. ^Mary D. Ette, b. Jan. 20, 1849. 

(1214) 

Henry Chapin, son of Nathaniel Chapin, m. Elizabeth Wilson. 
Res., Springfield, Mass. Bea. of Methodist Pyncheon St. Church. 
Children — 

2095. ^Elizabeth, b. Jan. 30, 1821 ; m. 

2096. ^Lovisa, b. Aug. 21, 1824. 

2097. ^Henry Augustus, b. Aug. 29, 1826. 

2098. ■'Ellen, b. Oct. 18, 1828; d. Oct. 12, 1846. 

2099. ^Lucy A., b. Oct. 23, 1830; m. 

2100. ''Miranda, b. April 9, 1835. 
^Susan C, b. July 5, 1839. 

(1221) 

Nathaniel Chapin, son of Nathaniel and Lovisa, m. Olive Van 
Horn, dau. of Gad Van Horn of Chicopee, Mass. Nathaniel Chapin, 
Esq. was some years since Clerk of the Manufacturing Corporation 



140 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

at Jencksvillo, Mass., and was Justice of the Peace. He removed 
some years since, and now res. in Springfield, 111. Children — 

2101. 'Charles L. 2102. ^Maria. 
2103. ^Charlotte. 2104. ''Mary. 
2105. ^Henry. 210G. cj^anny. 

(1228) 

Eliphalet Chapin, Jr., son of Eliphalet and Abigail, m. 
Nov. 14, 1815, Asenath Phelps. Mrs. Asenath Chapin d. Jan. 6, 
1832, ae. 41. Children— 

2107. iPloyd P. 

2108. ^Francis, m. Luciuda Brown; one child. He d. Feb. 28, 
1862, ae. 42. 

2109. ^Rodney. 

2110. ''Edwin P., m. Oct. 29, 1850, Martha J. Cooley ; 1 child. 

2111. ^Milo, m. Thirzah Ufford ; 2 children. 

2112. nVilliam W.,. d., ae. 1. 

2113. 'Mary A., m. Orrin Parker; 1 child. 

2114. ''Julia A., m. March 27, 1854, Frederick S. Jewell. Chil. 

2115. ^William, killed on the Rail Road, near New Haven, Ct., 
in the spring or fore part of the summer, 1860. 

(1236) 

Sharon P. Chapin, son of Eliphalet and Abigail, m. Huldah 
Loomis. Children — 

2116. 'Sharon W., d. April 17, 1861, ae. 26. 

2117. ^Charles. 2118. ^'Leila. 
Three others, who d. young. 

(1240) 

Harvey Chapin, son of Thomas and Anna, m. Sarah Stocking. 
Harvey, the father, was b. in Enfield, Ct.; he moved with his father 
to (Chicopee,) Springfield, when he was about 4 yrs. old. Children — 

2119. 'Lorenzo B. 2120. ^Alonzo B. 

2121. ^Sarah, m. Daniel M. Leonard. 

2122. ^Emeline, m. Tinkham. 

2123. ^Amanda, unm. 

2124. ''Jenette, m. Russell. 

2125. ■'Eleanor D., m. William P. Elliott ; lives in Chicopee. 

2126. ^Harriet, unm. 

2127. "Albert Thomas. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 141 

(1244) 

Dennis Chapin, son of Thomas and Anna, m. Diana Burt, dau, 
of Samuel Burt of Chicopee. Res., 111. Children — 

2128. ^George, not m. ; works for Ames Co., Chicopee. 

2129. ^Charles, m. Lois Gridley ; resides in Illinois. 

2130. ^Lois Ann, m. Mr. Rice of Vt, ; lives in Missouri. 

2131. ^Rosaline, unm.; res. in Holyoke. 
^Josephine, unm.; res. in Illinois. 

(1264) 

Neuman S. Chapin, son of Dormer and Lucretia, b. Aug. 7, 
1806 ; m. Sarah Fowler of Westfield, Mass, Res., Chicopee. 
Children — 

2132. ^Verus, m.; d., leaving no issue. ^Ellen L. 

(1266) 

Dolphin Dormer Chapin, son of Dormer and Lucretia, b. 
Sept. 13, 1810 ; m. Achsa Ferrey, dau. of Amos Ferrey of Granby, 
Mass. They have 8 children living, and 3 have d. Res. in Granby, 
Mass. Farmer. 

(1269) 

Lucas B. Chapin, son of Dormer and Lucretia, b. Jan. 28, 
1817 ; m. Salome B. Goudy ; have no children. Res. on the home- 
stead with his father. Selectman of Chicopee, 1860, '61 and '62. 

(1273) 

Artemas W. Chapin, son of Dormer and Lucretia, b. Sept. 10, 
1825 ; m. Mary ; have 2 children ; live in Michigan. 

(1274) 
Flavel p. Chapin, son of Dormer and Lucretia, b. Sept. 22, 
1827 ; m. Susan Bannon ; have 2 children ; res. in Michigan. 

(1286) 
John Madison Chapin, son of John and Sally (Curtis) Chapin, 
b. Sept. 5, 1806 ; m. int. ent. March 10, 1831, Pamelia Day of 
South Hadley, dau. of Justin Day. Children — 

2133. ^Justin D., unm. 

2134. ^Therissa P., unm. 



142 SKVENTH (JKNKRATION. 

(1289) 

Adaline Chapin, (]au. of John and Sally (Curtis) Chapin, b. 
Dec. 14, 1810; ni. int. ent. Oct. 15, 1825, Seth Bliss, Jr. of West 
Springfield. Children — 

2135. ^Curtis, m. a lady in Ohio ; have 1 child. 

2136. ^Lucy, m. Curtis Newell of Wilbraham ; have 3 children. 

(1291) 

Charles Chapin, son of John and Sally (Curtis) Chapin, 
b. 1823 ; m. Mary Underwood of Auburn, N. Y. Charles d. Jan. 17, 
1860. Children— 

2137. iFlorence E. 2138. ^Qne other child. 

(1292) 

AsAHEL Chapin, son of Stephen and Lovina, m. Miss Hummis- 
ton. Rev. Asahel Chapin graduated at Amherst College ; studied 
Theology at Newton. He has been Pastor of the Baptist Church in 
Holyoke ; is now settled in Vinton, Ind. Children — 

2139. iRuth. 2140. ^Judson. 2141. ^Asahel. 
2142. "James. 2143. ^Edward. 

(1293) 

Caleb Chapin, son of Stephen and Lovina, m. int. ent. Sept. 17, 
1828, Corinthia Winchell. Children— 

2144. iLovina. 2145. ^james. 2146. ^Asahel. 

(1294) 

David Chapin, son of Stephen and Lovina, m. Miss Strong of 
Chicopee ; have 2 children. 

(1295) 

HuMMiSTON Chapin, son of Stephen and Lovina, m. Miss Wing; 
have 3 sons and 1 daughter ; res. in New York City. 

(1296) 

Stephen Chapin, son of Stephen and Lovina, m. Lucy Elder of 
Chester. Children — 

2147. lEdnah. 2148. ^Stephen. 2149. ^James. 

(1304) 

Asahel Chapin, son of Warren and Mareb, b. Sept. 13, 1827 ; 
m. Miss Horton : have 1 child. Res. in N. Y. Lumber dealer. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 143 

(1305) 

Warren Chapin, son of Warren and Mareb, b. Dec. 25, 1S29 ; 
m. Miss Sisson ; have no children. Res. in N. Y. Lumber dealer. 

(131S) 

Lucius T. Chapin, son of Stephen M. and Lucy Chapin, and 
grandson of Pliny Chapin, b. Feb. 11, 1830 ; m. June 1, 1857, Lucy 
Capen. Children — 

2150. lAdaline, b. Aug. 18, 1858. 

2151. ^Wallace W., b. July 27, 1860. 

(1319) 

Naomi Chapin, dau. of Stephen M. and Lucy Chapin, and grand- 
daughter of Pliny Chapin of Granby, Mass., b. April 7, 1831 ; m, 
June 5, W. B. McCrea. Children — 

2152. 'Oriett, b. Sept. 29, 1850. 

2153. 2D. L., b. Xov. 15, 1859. 

(1332) 

Lyman A. Chapin, son of Philo and Laura, b. Xov. 9, 1839 ; 
m. Oct. 1858, Elizabeth Wilson, at Ellington, Ct. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Chapin d. Sept. 25, 1861, ae. 23. 

(1353) 

Marvin Chapin, son of Samuel and Mary Chapin, b. in Somers, 
Ct., July 5, 1806 ; m. Oct. 12, 1836, Rebecca Stow of AVestiield, 
b. April 1, 1809. Marvin is one of the proprietors and keepers of 
the Massasoit House, Springfield, Mass.; has been a Representative 
in the General Court, and held other important offices in the city of 
Springfield. Has recently been elected President of Agawam Bank. 
Children — 

2154. ^Harriet Stow, b. Feb. 8, 1838. 

2155. 2Mary D., b. Sept. 30, 1839. 

2156. 3john M., b. May 15, 1844. 

2157. ^Grati R., b. Feb. 4, 1851. 

(1355) 

Amelia Chapin, dau. of Samuel and Mary, b. Aug. 18, 1810 ; 
m. March 19, 1837, Jonathan Smith Robinson. Res., Springfield. 
He has been Captain of the Springfield Horse Guards. Children — 



144 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

^Ethan Chapin, h. May 6, 1839. 

201ive Amelia, b. July 6, 1841 ; m. Nov. 27, 1861, Royal 
Cornwall. 

^Ilenry Smith, b. July 4, 1843. 
nVatson, b. Oct. 28, 1845 ; d. 
^Marvin Pease, b. Aug. 15, 1848. 

(1357) 

Ethan Samuel Chapin, son of Samuel and Mary, b. 1814 ; 
m. 1839, Louisa Burns of West Springfield, b. 1814. Ethan S. is 
one of the proprietors and keepers of the Massasoit House, Spring- 
field, Mass. Children — 

2158. ^Amelia L., b. 1840; m. 1861, Wm. Henry Haile of 
Boston, Mass. 

2159. 2Henry W., b. 1843. 

2160. ^Ernma F., b. 1847. 

2161. "Annie P., b. 1850; d. 1851. 

2162. ^Alice S., b. 1852. 

(1358) 

Albert P. Chaplv, son of Samuel and Elizabeth, b. Nov. 12, 
1816 ; m. Olive Moreton of Monson. Farmer. Res., Granby, Mass.; 
have 1 child. 

(1359) 
Horace J. Chapin, son of Samuel and Mary, b. June 8, 1819 ; 
m. Lydia Sherwin of Newfane, Vt. Children — 

2163. lElla S., b. 1845. 

2164. 2Marcia W., b. 1848. 

2165. ^Engine H., b. 1850 ; d. 1851. 

2166. -^Emily A., b. 1853. 

2167. nVilliam H., b. 1855. 

2168. ^Carrie L., b. 1859. 

(1360) 

Rev. Alonzo B. Chapin, son of Reuben and Lovisa Chapin, of 
Somers, Ct., b. March 10, 1808; m. Sept. 17, 1832, Miss Hannah 
B. Waldo. 

*' He commenced reading law with Loren P. Waldo of Tolland, 
during his minority, and was admitted to practice in the Courts in 
the State of Connecticut, in the year 1831. He first located in the 
town of Wallingford, in the county of New Haven, and for several 
years obtained a fair practice, and " was justly esteemed as a lawyer 



SEVENTH (SENERATIOx\. 145 

of considerable promise." He relinquished his professional employ- 
ment, and turned his whole attention to the study of Theology. In 
1838, he took Deacon's orders, and was admitted to the Priesthood 
in 1839. He was for many years Editor and Publisher of the 
Chronicle of the Church ; was Rector of the Episcopal Church at 
West Haven, eleven years, and Rector of St. Luke's Church, South 
Glastenbury, for about five years, which oflBce he resigned in 1855. 
Soon after his resignation of that place, he removed to Hartford, 
and has been engaged as Editor of the Calendar to the day of his 
death." He d. July 9, 1858. He left a widow, the sister of the 
Hon. Judge Waldo of the Supreme Court, and one son." 

(See " the Calendar" of July 17, 1858.) 
Children — 

2169. lAlonzo Bowen, Jr., b. Nov. 20, 1834 ; d. Jan. 24, 1835. 

2170. ^Charles Waldo, b. Aug. 27, 1839 ; d. Oct. 7, 1839. 

2171. ^Joseph Bosworth, b. June 5, 1843 ; res., Hartford, Ct. 

(1362) 

Dr. John Russell Chapin, son of Rev. Reuben and Lovisa 
Chapin, b. April 21, 1811 ; m. (1) Oct. 10, 1836, Eliza A. Abbott; 
(2) April 16, 1841, Amelia A. Cowperthwaite of New York City. 
Mrs. Eliza A. Chapin d. March 3, 1840. Dr. J. R. Chapin d. July 25,1852. 

Children by (1) wife — 

2172. ^Susan Louisa, b. Aug. 31, 1837 ; now living in Chicago. 

2173. 2John Russell, b. Sept. 5, 1839 ; res. near Chicago. 

Children by (2) wife — 

2175. 3Ann Elizabeth, b. Feb. 8, 1842. 

2176. ■'Amelia C, b. July 5, 1843. 

2177. ^Emily Collins, b. Dec. 4, 1845 ; d. Sept. 16, 1860. 

2178. eWillard Parker, b. Jan. 2, 1848. 

(1364) 

Dr. Reuben S. Chapin, M.D.,son of Rev. Reuben and Lovisa, b. 
Oct. 14, 1818 ; m. in New York City, June 19, 1850, Sophia Jack- 
son Orton. Dr. Chapin is a practising physician. New York City 
Children — 

2179. iJulia A., b. Oct. 9, 1852. 

2180. 2Lovisa Russell, b. March 11, 1854; d. July 18, 1856. 

2181. ^Cornelius W., b. Jan. 20, 1857 ; d. March 14, 1860. 

19 



I4(i SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1365) 

Rev. Seth Smith Ohapin, sun (jf Rev. Reuben and Lovisa, 
1). ill Somers, Ct., Oct. 10, 1820 ; m. Nov. 25, 1841, Julia A. Coan. 
Rev. Setli Smith Cliapin, Episcopal Clergyman, Marshall, Mich. 
Children — 

2182. ^Edward Cornelius, b. June 3, 1844. 

2183. 2Mary Louisa, b. July 8, 1846. 

2184. ^Charles E., b. April 19, 1848. 

2185. -iJohu Bromham, b. Oct. 21, 1851. 

2186. nVilliam Alonzo, b. Aug. 8, 1854. 

2187. ^Robert A. Hallam, b. Nov. 8, 1857. 

(13G7) 

Dr. Elisha B. Chapin, M. D., son of Bliss and Eunice Chapin, of 
Tolland, b. Jan. 26, 1808; m. Sept. 1835, Sophia Stedman, b. 
May 1, 1810 ; she is daughter of Levi and Sophia Stedman of Chic- 
opee, and granddau. of Ephraim Chapin, Jr. of Chicopee. Elisha B. 
Chapin, M. D. was a practising physician in Granhy, Mass. where he 
d. Oct. 20, 1842, ae. 34. He was buried in burying yard, Chicopee 
street. His widow, with her daughters, res. in Chicopee. Children — 

2188. iJulia Sophia, b. Feb. 19, 1838. 

2189. 2Helen Amelia, b. July 17, 1840. 

(1368) 

Fidela Chapin, dau. of Bliss and Eunice Chapin, b. Nov. 5, 
1809 ; m. April 28, 1833, William C. Hunt of North Coventry, Ct. 
Children — 

2190. ^Eunice S„ b. June 26, 1835. 

2191. ^Caroline M., b. Feb. 24, 1837. 

2192. ^William Chapin, b. April 22, 1839. 

2193. ^Lottie F., b. June 1, 1842. 

2194. ^Asahel A., b. Oct. 28, 1845. 

(1371) 

Theodore B. Chapin, son of Bliss and Eunice, b. Aug. 5, 1820; 
m. Oct.26,1847, Amelia McClure of Somers, Ct. Res., Tolland, Ct. 
Children — 

2195. lElisha Adelbert, b. in Tolland, Ct., Dec. 20, 1848. 

2196. ^Agnes Amelia, b. in " June 25, 1851. 

2197. ^Albertis Benolli, b. in " March 7, 1854. 

2198. ^Theodore Bliss, Jr., b. in " June 26, 1857; d. 
Oct. 18, 1858, 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 147 



(1403) 

Charles Henry Chapin, son of Henry and Catharine Chapin, 
of Newport, X. H., b. Sept. 22, 1823; m. Nov. 10, 1858, Sarah 
Nettleton of Claremont. He graduated at Dartmouth College, and 
is settled at Charlestown, N. H. in practice of Law. 

(1405) 

Nathaniel Fisher Chapin, son of Henry and Catharine Chapin, 
of Newport, N. H., b. Jan. 4, 1830 ; m. Nov. 1854, Miss Fletcher 
of N.H.; have 2 children. 

(1489) 

Hiram Chapin, son of Hiram Chapin, of Granby, Ct.; m. 
Children — 

2199. lEmerett, m. 2200. ^Angeline. 2201. =^Clark, d. 

2202. -^Burdett, m. 2203. ^Carlo. 

Lyman R. Chapin, son of David and Elizabeth, b, Aug. 10, 
1825 ; m. June 22, 1856, (1366) Lovisa Cooley Chapin, dau. of 
Reuben and Lovisa. Res., Chicago, 111. Children — 

2204. iCarrie Eliza, b. Nov. 7, 1857. 

2205. 2Alonzo Russell, b. Oct. 29, 1859. 

(1502) 

Henry Chapin, son of Abiel and Harriet, m. Caroline T, 
Child. Res., New York City. Dealer in Groceries. Children — 

2208. ^Charles. 



2206. 


^Harriet. 


2207. 


^Henry. 


2209. 


•*Mary. 


2210. 


^Gilbert, 


2211. 


^Elisha. 







(1503) 

Elisha S, Chapin, son of Abiel and Harriet, m. Almyra Bryant. 
Res., New York City. Children — 

^Arthur Graham. ^Caroline. ^Andrew. 

(1504) 

Harriet A. Chapin, dau. of Abiel Chapin, m. Gilbert G. Gran- 
ger. Res., Chicago, 111. Children — 
^Henry C. ^ William. 



148 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1533) 

Caleb Strong Chapin, son of Oliver and Olive Cliapin, m. 
Sarah A. Ingalls. Farmer, llesides North side of the lliver, 
Chicopee Falls. Has been Selectman and Surveyor of Highways 
in Chicopee. Children — 

^Sally A., d. 

^Henry S., m. Henrietta M. Crocket ; no issue. 

^Andrew P., m. ''Chester 1. 

^Elizabeth, d. «Arrabella B. 

(1551) 
Edward Colton Chapin, son of Laertes and Laura, b. April 20, 
1814 ; m. April 23, 1839, Nancy Ann Reed, dau. of Elijah F. Reed 
of Hartford, Ct. Edward C, the father, is a Merchant in New 
York City. Children— 

2212. lAnna Maria, b. Sept. 25, 1840. 

2213. 2Ella Jane, b. July 11, 1845 ; d. April 30, 1847. 

2214. ^Edward Lucius, b. Aug. 10, 1847. 

2215. -"Helen, b. Nov. 17, 1856. 

(1553) 

Aaron Lucius Chapin, son of Laertes and Laura, b. Feb. 6, 
1817 ; m. (1) Aug. 23, 1843, Martha Colton, daughter of Rodolphus 
Colton of Lenox, Mass. ; (2) Fanny L. Coit of New London, Ct., 
Aug. 26, 1861. Mrs. Martha Chapin d. Dec. 18, 1859. Aaron L. 
Chapin, D. D. graduated at Yale College in 1837, at Union Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1842, became Pastor of the tirst Presbyterian 
Church in Milwaukie, Wis. in 1843, and has been President of 
Beloit College since 1850. Children — 

2216. iWells Colton, b. Sept. 20, 1845 ; d. Oct. 24, 1845. 

2217. 2pi,iiip, b. Jan. 14, 1847; d. Feb. 6, 1847. 

2218. ^Frauk Walker, b. Jan. 30, 1847 ; adopted Feb. 14, 1847, 
(bears the name.) 

2219. •^Elizabeth Colton, b. Nov. 27, 1848. 

(1554) 
Henry Laertes Chapin, son of Laertes and Laura, b. March 7, 
1819 ; m. Dec. 31, 1856, Mary L. Bassett, dau. of Elijah Bassett of 
New York City ; have no children. He is a book-binder, and resides 
in New York City. 

(1556) 
Rev. Nathan Colton Chapin, son of Laertes and Laura, 
b. Sept. 20, 1823 ; m. Sept. 28, 1854, Mary A. Fountain, dau. of 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 149 

John Fountain of Washington, Delaware Co. Nathan C. Chapin 
graduated at Yale College in 1844, at Union Theological 
Seminary in 1849, came to "Wisconsin in 1849, and is now (1859) 
preaching to the first Congregational Church of La Crosse, Wis. 
Children — 

2220. i:\rary Fountain, b. June 19, 1856. 

2221. ^Gertrude Emelie, b. Sept. 5, 1858. 

2222. ^Edward Fountain, b. Sept. 22, 1861. 

(1558) 
Cornelius K. Chapin, son of Laertes and Laura, b. July 10, 
1848 ; m. Aug. 29, 1854, Virginia Esther Evans. Cornelius K. 
Chapin is a Jeweler, and res. in Richmond, Va. Children — 

2223. lEllora Estelle, b. June 26, 1855. 

2224. 2^Villiam Evans, b. Aug. 1856. 

2225. ^A daughter, b. since Sept. 22, 1859. 

(1560) 
MiLO HoYT Chapin, son of Lewis and Sophia Chapin, of Vt., 
b. May 29, 1823 ; m. Mrs. Emily S. Reed of Jericho, July 2, 1859, 
and lives with his widowed mother on the old homestead. 

(1562) 

George Freeman Chapin, son of Lewis and Sophia Chapin, of 
Vt., b. Oct. 29, 1829 ; m. Feb. 17, 1853, Cynthia Maria Pierce of 
Jericho, Vt., where they now reside. He is a farmer. Children — 

2226. iMary Sophia, b. March 15, 1854. 

2227. 2Lewis, b. April 9, 1859. 

(1567) 
Albert Franklin Chapin, son of Myron and Ruth Chapin, 
b. Dec. 29, 1825 ; m. Nov. 25, 1853, Sarah Palmer. Farmer ; res., 
Jericho, Vt. They have 1 child — 

2228. ^Willie Fremont, b. Oct. 23, 1857. 

(156S) 
Herbert Smith Chapin, son of Myron and Ruth Chapin, b. 
Aug. 31, 1829 ; m. May 2, 1854, Malvira Whittier; have 1 child — 

2229. iLucina, b. Feb. 2, 1857. 

(1573) 

Elias F. Chapin, son of Ezekiel and Betsey, m. March 7, 1845, 
Sophronia A. Mills, dan. of Samuel Mills of Chicopee. Res., Bel- 
chertown, Mass. Children — 



150 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

2230, 1 Wilbur T. 2231. ^Orpholia S. 

2232. 3jano E., d. March 23, 1846. 

2233. ■^Harriet I., d. Dec. 4, 1846. 

2234. 5Abba Jane H. 

2235. ^George E. 2236. ^Edwin M. 

2237. sElla S., d. Aug. 26, 1859. 2238. »Ella S. 

2239. Rochester W. 

(1577) 

Samuel W. Chapin, son of Ezekiel and Betsey, b. in Long- 
meadow, Feb. 24, 1824; m. June 12, 1851, Maria M.Damon, b. 
July 17, 1826, in Monson. Children— 

^Albert R., b. June 19, 1852, in Chicopee ; d. Aug. 30, 
1853, at Bridgeport. 

2Emma R., b. July 26, 1856, in Wallingford. 

^Henry E., b. May 9, 1859. 

"Cora E., b. June 6, 1861 ; d. Feb. 10, 1862, in Chicopee. 

(15S6) 

Pascal P. Chapin, son of Elihu and Sally (Adams) Chapin, 
b. May 8, 1808; m. Feb. 1, 1837, Delilah Koon, b. Feb. 13, 1812. 
Mr. Pascal P. Chapin was a farmer ; he d. Sept, 9, 1842, at China, 
Wyoming Co., N. Y. Children — 

2240. iMary M., b. Oct. 13, 1837, in Prattsburgh, Steuben Co.,N.Y. 

2241. ^Pascal P., b. Dec. 18, 1842, 

(1589) 

Sally Chapin, daughter of Elihu and Sally Chapin, b. Sept. 15, 
1814 ; m. in China, May 14, 1832, William Bennett, a Clothier. 
Res., Shelby, Orleans Co., N.Y. Children — 

2242. iSarah Minerva, b. Aug. 24, 1834. 

2243. ^Gteorge Austin, b. Aug. 30, 1838. 

2244. ^Elihu Chapin, b. Dec. 26, 1841. 

(1590) 

Zelotes Chapin, son of Jonathan and Phebe, b. March 13, 1809; 
m. April 4, 1833, Mary A. Marvin. Res., Troy, Mich. Shoemaker. 
Mr. Zelotes Chapin d. Jan. 16, 1852, ae. 42. Children— 

2245. ^Ezra E., b. Jan. 4, 1834. Shoemaker. Res. in Oregon. 

2246. 2Sarah D., b. March 31, 1836. Res. at Grand Rapids, 
Michigan. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 151 

2247. ^Caroline G., b. March 13, 1838. Res. at Shelby, Mich. 

2248. ^Martha E., b. April 23, 1840. Res. in Kent Co. Mich. 

2249. ^Mary Julia, b. June 24, 1843 ; d. July 1, 1844, at Troy, 
Michigan. 

2250. ''Mary Eliza Ann, b. March 5, 1846. Res. at Kent, Mich. 

Sarah D. m. Oct. 18, 1857, David Tower. They have 1 child- 
Alice M., b. in the Autumn of 1859. 

(1591) 

Elam Chapin, son of Jonathan and Phebe, b. Feb. 18, 1811 ; 
m. May 7, 1838, Lavancha Davis. Farmer. Res., Shelby, Mich. 
They have 1 child — 

2251. ^Andrew B., b. April 5, 1839; he is studying Medicine; 
now (1860) attending lectures at Ann Arbor, Mich. 

(1595) 

Orren Chapin, son of Jonathan and Phebe, b. July 14, 1817 ; 
m, Nov. 18, 1856, Sarah Fesler. Orren Chapin is a Carpenter and 
Joiner, and resides at Humboldt Bay, California ; have 1 child — 

2252. ^Ida Elvira, b. Dec. 7, 1857. 

(1597) 

William Chapin, son of Jonathan and Phebe, b. Aug. 14, 1821 ; 
m. Dec. 5, 1850, Betsey Grover. Mr. William Chapin was a farmer, 
resided in Shelby, Michigan, and d. Dec. 1, 1854, ae. 33. They 
have 1 child — 

2253. iPhebe Alberti, b. §ept. 1, 1853. 

(1607) 

Ezra Chapin, son of Wells and Hannah, b. Aug. 7, 1818 ; m. 
Aug. 24, 1842, Mary Ann Davis, b. Aug. 1817. Farmer. Res., 
Brookfield, Wis. Children— 

2254. iHelen Elizabeth, 11 years old 1860. 

2255. 2Alice Deeble, 9 " 

2256. sEthan Davis, 7 " " " 

(1608) 

Arvilla Chapin, dau. of Wells and Hannah, b. Oct. 30, 1820 ; 
m. July 1, 1849, Ira P. Misner. Children — i 

2257. lUdelmer Chapin, b. 1852. ^jjarvey Chase, b. 1854. 

2258. ^Charles Ezra, b. 1859. 



152 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1610) 

Ely Wells Ciiapin, son of Wells and Hannah, b. Sept. 20, 
1825 ; m. Sept. 30, 1856, Ellen E. Skinner, b. June, 1832. Reside 
in Prattsburgli, N. Y. Farming ; he has been Notary Public. 

(1611) 

Afiira p. Chaplm, son of Wells and Hannah, b. Sept. 11, 1828 ; 
m. Nov. IG, 1853, Margaret A. Wilson, b. 1834. Farmer. Res., 
Scott, Wis. Children— 

2259. ^Selwyn Jackson, 4 yrs. old 1860. 

2260. ^Samuel Bion, 10 mouths old " 

(1617) 

Rosaline Azalin Chapin, daughter of Descom and Susan, 
b. April, 1828 ; m. 1850, Myron S. Pease. Mr. Pease is a Dentist. 
Res., Chicopee Center. Children — 

lEdward Lincoln, b. 1853. 
2Emma Cornelia, b. 1856 ; d. 1857. 
^Nelly Colton, b. 1859 ; d. Oct. 18, 1860. 

(1618) 

Charles Levonski Chapin, son of Descom and Susan, b. 1830, 
ra. 1851, Cate Ryan. Children — 

2261. lElias, b. 1852 ; d. 1855. 

2262. 2Mary Ann, b. 1853. 

2263. ^Susan Rosaline, b. 1859. 

(1619) 

Susan Racilla Chapin, dau. of Descom and Susan, b. 1833 ; 
m. 1851, Franklin Burnham. Children — 

1 Willis Descom, b. 1854. 
^Lizzie Lucilla, b. 1859. 

(1642) 

Reuben Chapin, son of James and Chloe, m. Almyra Bigelow of 
Chicopee. 1 child. 

(1657) 

Leander Z. Chapin, son of Abner and Polly Chapin and grand- 
sou of Abner and Rhoda Chapin, b. Aug. 25, 1809 ; m. Naomi 
Bradway. Children — , 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 153 

2264. lAbel Leander, b. Feb. 24, 1830. 

2265. ^Elvira Naomi, b. Dec. 31, 1831. 

2266. sDavid Corey, b. March 31, 1833. 

2267. -iWilliam Harrison, b. Nov. 6, 1834. 

(1660) 

Vashni Chapin, son of Abner and Polly Chapin and grandson 
of Abner and Rhoda Chapin, b. April 17, 1812 ; m. Aug. 27, 1835, 
Orpha Z. Kabbee. Children — 

2268. iSabrina 0., b. Dec. 24, 1835. 

2269. 2Sarah 0., b. Dec. 22, 1837. 

2270. ^Kibbee V., b. Dec. 23, 1839. 

2271. -iNovatus N., b. July 2, 1842. 

2272. ^Adolphus G., b. Sept. 4, 1844. 

2273. ^Emma J., b. Nov. 13, 1846. 

2274. ■'Albert H., b. Jan. 21, 1854. 

(1682) 

Sibyl Chapin, dau. of Bela and Roxana, b. Nov. 2, 1828 ; 
m. July 4, 1852, Isaac E. Easton. Res. near her father's, in Chico- 
pee. Children — 

2275. lArthur E., b. July 26, 1854. 

2276. ^Herbert L., b. Oct. 25, 1855. 

2277. 3iaa Mary, b. Nov. 16, 1856. 

2278. ^Edward C, b. Oct. 8, 1858. 

(16S3) 

Mahala J. Chapin, b. Dec. 17, 1830; m. Nov. 30, 1851, Abiezer 
Jameson. 1 child — 

^Francis A., b. Feb. 3, 1854. 

(16S7) 

Elmer Chapin, son of Neri and Abigail, m. Esther Rice. Res., 
in 1860, Indian Orchard, Mass.; have 3 children. 

(1689) 

Marcus Chapin, son of Neri and Abigail, m. Aug. 22, 1858, 
Betsey Philips. Res. in Chicopee, Mass.; have 1 child. 

(1702) 

Lyman Chapin, son of Quartus and Ruby, b. Oct. 27, 1825; 
m. April 3, 1849, Julia M. Wetherbee, widow of "William Wether- 
20 



154 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

bee, ileceased, and daughter of Enoch Doan of Southwick, Mass. 
Reside in the town of Chapin, Morgan Co., 111. Children — 

2279. lEIla, b. Ai)ril 3, 1853. 

2280. 2Edward D., b. April 31, 1858. 

(1703) 

Horace Chapin, son of Quartus and Ruby, b. Dec. 29, 1826 ; 
m. Jan. 8, 1859, Augusta Swasey, dau. of Charles A. Swasey of 
St. Anthony, Minnesota. Reside in the town of Chapin, Morgan 
Co., 111. He is Captain in the Federal Army. 

Ltjther Chapin, son of Curtis S. Chapin and grandson of Itha- 
mer, m. July 3, 1834, Maria Hawks, daughter of Oliver Hawks. 
Children — 

2281. ^Dwight, b. July 21, 1835. Druggist in Philadelphia. 

2282. 2Maria M., b. March 20, 1839. 

2283. ^Edwin W., b. June 12, 1841. 

2284. ^William. 

(1715) 

Melissa Chapin, dau. of Joseph and Martha, b. Dec. 28, 1804; 

m. Seth Stebbins of Springfield, May 2, 1832. Res., Chicopee. 

FarEQer. Children — 

2285. ^Infant son, b. Sept. 16, 1836 ; d. same day. 

2286. ^Joseph 0., b. Jan. 27, 1840. 

2287. ^Cynthia, b. March 23, 1844. 

2288. 4Emma, b. July 20, 1846 ; d. Aug. 31, 1848. 

2289. ^Frederic, b. Oct. 15, 1848; d. Aug. 21, 1861. 

(1716) 

Weltha Chapin, dau. of Joseph and Martha, b. March 3, 1806 ; 
m. Nov. 30, 1826, Jesse Dilleber of Woodstock, Ct. Res., Chico- 
pee, Mass. Children — 

2290. iNelson C, b. Jan. 20, 1828. 

2291. ^Gilbert M., b. Dec. 8, 1829. 

2292. ^Henry, b. Nov. 11, 1833; m. March 31, 1856, Mary J. 
Brooks of Springfield. 

2293. •isanford, b. May 29, 1836; d. Nov. 11, 1837. 

2294. ^Caroline, b. Dec. 23, 1839 ; d. April, 17, 1843. 

2295. ^Adaline, b. Nov. 7, 1842 ; d. July 30, 1843, 

2296. 'William, b. Aug. 1, 1844. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 155 

(1717) 

Joseph Chapin, son of Joseph and Martha, b. Feb. 10, 1808 ; 
m. Jan, 4, 1837, Sophronia Jenks of New Salem, Mass. Kesidence, 
(now Chicopee Centre.) Joseph d. Sept. 20, 1839 ; had 1 child — 

2297. ijosephine E., b. Oct. 5, 1837 ; m. July 23, 1861, Luther 
A. Brighara of Ware, Mass. 

Joseph's widow m. Judd of South Hadley. Res., Chicopee. 

(1718) 
Malina Chapin, dau. of Joseph and Martha, b. Feb. 10, 1810 ; 
m. 1830, Gaylor M. Charter of Springfield, Mass. She d. May 14, 
1834. Children— 

2298. iMary L, b. June 6, 1831 ; m. July 19, 1858, John G. 
Powers of New Haven, Ct.; have 1 child— 2299. Emma E., b. 
Dec. 21, 1859. 

2300. 2Norris L., b. July 13, 1833 ; m. Nov. 25, 1855, Adaline 
Loomis of Agawam, Mass.; had 2 children — 

2301. iFranklin M., b. Nov. 5, 1856 ; d. Nov. 12, 1857. 

2302. ^George W., b. March 20, 1858. 

(1719) 

Martha A. Chapin, dau. of Joseph and Martha, b. July 19, 
1812 ; m. Dec. 1, 1836, Joel K. Bliss of Somers, Ct. Children— 

2303. lEverette J., b. July 6, 1838. 

2304. 2S, Eugene, b. Sept. 21, 1841 ; d. April 27, 1861. 

2305. ^Adelaide L., b. Feb. 29, 1844. 

2306. ■'Josephine A., b. Aug. 29, 1847. 

2307. sjuiia M., b. Feb. 12, 1850. 

2308. ^Lizzie L., b. Feb. 16, 1854 ; d. Oct. 10, 1855. 

(1720) 

JosEPHus Chapin, son of Joseph and Martha, b. Jan. 15, 1815; 
m. (1) Sept. 20, 1838, L. Jane Taylor of Colbrook, Ct., who d. 
May 10, 1848, ae. 32; m. (2) April 21, 1853, Mary A. Burney of 
"Webster, Mass. Res. (now Chicopee Centre.) Farmer, and Lum- 
ber manufacturer. 

Children by (1) wife — 

2309. ^Martha J., b. Aug. 4, 1839. 

2310. ^Joseph, b. Oct. 1841 ; d. July 11, 1842. 
Children by (2) wife — 

2311. ^Frederic J., b. April 16, 1854. 

2312. ■'Willie Joseph, b. Jan. 31, 1859. r 



156 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1723) 

Levi Chapin, son of Joseph and Martha, b. Nov. 10, 1821 ; 
m. May 18, 1843, Martha D. Tease of Hadley, Mass. Levi d. 
March 5, 1859. Children— 

2313. lAdallne M., b. Jan. 24, 1844. 

2314. ^Joseph L., b. Sept. 5, 1845 ; d. Feb. 25, 1846. 

2315. =^Emma J., b. June 19, 1848 ; d. Nov. 20, 1848. 

(1731) 

Abigail Chapin, dau. of Julius and Persis, b. June 10, 1823 ; 
m. Nov. 25, 1847, William Eno of South Hadley Falls. Children— 

2316. iJane Maria, b. June 11, 1850; d. June 29, 1856. 

2317. 2juiius Alva, b. Feb. 8, 1853. 

(1732) 

Zbrah Chapin, son of Julius and Persis, b. July 14, 1825; 
m. (1) Oct. 1851, Elizabeth Burnett of Belchertown, Mass.; m. (2) 
May 7, 1857, Lucy Starkweather of Erie Co., N. Y. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Chapin d. in Wethersfield, 111., May 16, 1856. 

Children by (1) wife — 

2318. lEdward B., b. in New Haven, Ct., Sept. 20, 1853 ; d. in 
Wethersfield, HI., Oct. 9, 1859. 

2319. ^Lizzie S., b. Aug. 12, 1855. 
Children by (2) wife — 

2320. ^Loomis E., b. May 7, 1858. 

2321. ^Lottie C, b. Oct. 18, 1859 ; d. Jan. 4, 1860. 

2322. ^Clarence E., b. July 11, 1861. 

(1746) 
Norman Chapin, son of William and Lucy Chapin, m. Nancy 
Williams. Children — 

2323. ^Chalmers, b. Aug. 10, 1827 ; m. Amelia R. Stedman. 

2324. ^Ellsworth, b. Feb. 15, 1829 ; m. Mary Dowd ; no issue. 

2325. 3;j^. Augusta, b. March 15, 1831 ; m. Moses W. Chapin, Esq. 

2326. ■*Irvin, b. June 4, 1834 ; unm. 

2327. ^Lydia J., b. Oct. 31, 1842; unm. 

(1749) 
Aldus M. Chapin, son of William and Lucy Chapin, b. in Chic- 
opee, Mass., Dec. 27, 1811; m. Catharine Fisher Sawin, b. in 
Natick, Mass., May 3, 1819. They were m. May 13, 1840. Res., 
Manchester, N.H. Children — 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 157 

2328. iFlora Marilla, b. May 21, 1841, at Marshall, Clark Co., 
111. She d. at Manchester, N. H., Oct. 5, 1860 ; was a faithful 
Sabbath School teacher, and an active, lovely Christian. " Lord 
Jesus, receive my spirit" were her last words. 

2329. ^William Marutius, b. May 11, 1845, at Fall River, Mass. 
He d. at Manchester, N. H., April 13, 1846. 

2330. ^Catharine Elizabeth, b. Dec. 11, 1847, Manchester, N.H. 

Two others, stillborn. 

(1751) 

Mercy H. Chapin, dau. of William and Lucy, b. Aug. 17, 1816; 
m. Jan. 16, 1840, Martin L. Childs, b. June 2, 1811. Children— 

^Augustus L., b. Oct. 28, 1840. 

2Henry M., b. June 11, 1845; d. Sept. 17, 1845. 

sjulia E. R., b. Nov. 24, 1846. 

^j^rederic L., b. Oct. 22, 1851. ^Albert. 

(1752) 

Lucy D. Chapin, dau. of William and Lucy, m. Dec. 5, 1842, 
Josiah Whitney. Children — 

^Lucy Jane, b. June 13, 1844. 
2Edwin Davis, b. April 4, 1856. 

(1753) 

Nev^^ton Chapin, son of William and Lucy, b. April 17, 1821 ; 
Caroline Barber Sawin, b. July 2, 1821. They were m. April 22, 
1847. Res., Chicago, 111. Children— 

iWm. Newton, b. Oct. 7, 1848 ; d. Feb. 21, 1851, ae. 
2 yrs. 4 mos. 14 days. 

2Mary Caroline, b. Dec. 7, 1850 ; d. May 4, 1851, ae. 
4 mos. 27 days. 

^Wm. Newton, b. April 26, 1853. 

-•Charles Orlando, b. Oct. 29, 1858 ; d. May 20, 1859, ae. 
10 mos. 21 days. 

^Charles Orlando, b. March 16, 1860. 

(1754) 

William D. Chapin, son of William and Lucy, b. Oct. 31, 
1823 ; m. Dec. 8, 1859, Emily Chapin, dau. of Titus Chapin. She 
was b. April 1, 1835. One son — 

2331. 1 Willie McKinstry, b. Oct. 25, 1861. 



158 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1755) 

Aminta Chapin, dau. of William and Lucy, b. Aug. 7, 1826 ; 
m. June 2, 1852, Eli Ferry of Chicopee. Children — 

lAda E., b. March 11, 1855; d. Sept. 10, 1855. 
2Louis W., b. Dec. 17, 185G. 
3Alice E., b. Jan. 3, 1858. 

(1756) 

Orlando Chapin, son of William and Lucy, b. April 30, 1830 ; 
m. Sept. 28, 1853, Martha Judd Bush, b. Oct. 29, 1828. Children— 

iMyron Emerson, b. Feb. 19, 1859. 

^Nellie Bush, b. Feb. 19, 1859 ; d. July 13, 1859. 

^Wilber Bush, b. July 22, 1861. 

(1757) 

Silas Chapin, son of Heman and Phena, b. in Springfield, Mass., 
Feb. 24, 1811 ; m. Julia Strong of Northampton, dau. of Joseph 
Strong. 

(1758) 

Alexander Chapin, son of Heman and Phena, b. in Spring- 
field, Mass., April 18, 1813; m. Emily Gordon, dau. of Samuel Wait 
Gordon of Sterling. Ct. Children — 

2332. iPrances Emily, b. March 29, 1839, in Lisbon, Ct. 

2333. ^Margaret Dorrance, b. July 6, 1843, in Plainfield, Ct. 

2334. ^phena Eliza, b. March 27, 1847, in Hartford, Ct. 

2335. ^Sarah Wait, b. Jan. 9, 1855, in Plainfield, Ct. 

(1759) 

David Matthew Chapin, son of Heman and Phena, b. in 
Springfield, Mass., Feb. 20, 1815; m. Rhoda Earl Thurston, dau. of 
George Thurston, Charlestown, R. L, in 1841. Child — 

2336. iCarrie Bard, b. Aug. 9, 1858, in Brooklyn, Ct. 

(1760) 

Clarissa Amelia Chapin, dau. of Heman and Phena, b. in 
Springfield, April 16,1817; m. Courtland Babcock of Windham, Ct., 
son of Hezekiah Babcock. Children — 

2337. iHenry Halliston, b. April 9, 1841. 

2338. ^Courtland Chapin, b. April 13, 1844. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 159 

2339. 3Heman Chapin, b. Oct. 6, 1853. 

2340. ''Brainerd Clark, b. April 9, 1856. 
All b. in Windham, Ct. 

(1761) 

Horace Eaton Chapin, son of Heman and Phena, b. in 
Springfield. April 19, 1819 ; m. Sarah D, Greene of Richmond, Va. 
One child — 

2341. ^Lodie, b. in Mobile, L. A. 

(1763) 

Phena Eliza Chapin, dau. of Heman and Phena, b. in South 
Hadley, Mass., Aug. 21, 1827 ; m. Sept. 8, 1859, Daniel Greene of 
Coventry, Ct. 

(1764) 
Heman Chapin, son of Heman and Phena, b. in South Hadley, 
Oct. 29, 1829 ; m. June 28, 1854, Mary Gerrold, dau. of Thomas 
Gerrold of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

2342. iTheir only child, b. Oct. 1858, in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

(1765) 

Edward Chapin, son of Heman and Phena, b. in South Hadley, 
Aug. 15, 1832 ; m. Mary Severance of Greenfield, Mass., in 1856. 
Their only dau. — 

2343. iMaria, b. in Bridgeport, Ct., Aug. 1859. 

(1767) 

Samuel B. Chapin, son of Alexander and Sophia, b. Aug. 1, 
1822 ; m. Res., Chicopee. Children — 

2344. ^Annette Eliza. 2345. ^Qeorgie Jerome. 
2346. ^Lizzie Jane. 

(1773) 

George W. Chapin, son of Whitfield and Luna, b. in Chicopee, 
Aug. 29, 1813 ; m. Oct. 1841, Catharine Long, b. in Albany Co., 
N. Y. Res., Wis. 

(1775) 

Elizabeth Luna Chapin, dau. of Whitfield and Luna Chapin, 
b. July 3, 1823 ; m. Oct. 7, 1845, Dr. Josiah Gilbert Holland of 
Springfield, Mass., the well known author of several valuable publi- 
cations and one of the editors of the Springfield Republican, (the 
" Timothy Titcomb.") He has also become quite a noted lecturer. 
Children — 



iCO SEVENTH GENERATION. 

2347. 'Arthur Gilbert, b. Aug. 14, 1S49 ; d. Aug. 29, 1850. 

2348. 2Annio Elizabeth, b. Sept. 15, 1851. 

2349. =^Kato Melia, b. Nov. 1, 1853. 

2350. ^Theodore, b. Dec. 7, 1859. 

(1776) 
Charles 0. Chapin, son of Whitfield and Melia, b. April 19, 
1825 ; m. Mrs. Annie Peck, b. in New York City. Res., Spring- 
field, Mass. He was for several years connected in trade in a Book- 
store, as one of the firm of Merriam, Chapin & Co. and also of 
Chapin, Bridgman & Co., and is now concerned in the paper manu- 
facturing business. 

(1777) 
Henry Sheldon Chapin, son of Whitfield and Melia, m. Has 
1 child. Resides in New York. 

(1781) 
Lovina Chapin, dau. of Atlas and Mary S., m. Dec. 18, 1844, 
David Chandler of South Hadley. She is now a widow. 1 child— 

2351. ^Arthur. 

(1782) 
Ephraim a. Chapin, son of Atlas and Mary S., m. Dec. 25, 
1845, Jerusha Josephine Clark of South Hadley. Superintendent 
of the Cheshire Rail Road, N. H. Children— 

2352. 'Alfred. 2353. ^A daughter. 

(1783) 
Mary J. Chapin, dau. of Atlas and Mary S., m. Reuben Nichols 
of Brimfield, Mass. Had 1 dau. — 

2354. 'Lovina, d. Sept. 20, 1847, ae. 2 yrs., 1 month, 9 days. 
Mrs. Mary J. Nichols d. April 9, 1849, ae. 28. 

(1786) 
Alonzo C. Chapin, son of Pliny and Lydia, m. Rosanna Fair- 
banks. They have 1 son — 

2355. 'Adan, b. 1849. 

(1787) 
Sidney M. Chapin, son of Pliny and Lydia, m. Anna B. Cronk. 
They have 1 child — 

2356. 'Caty C. 



SEVENTH OENERATION. 161 

(1811) 

Fraxklin 0. Chapix, son of Henry and Experience, b. Feb. 11, 
1S16 ; m. Priscilla Kellogg, dau. of Josiah Kellogg of Hadley. He 
emigrated to and resides in Otisco, Onondaga Co., N. Y. Farmer. 
Children — 

23.57. lEmma P., b. Aug. 31, 1848. 

2358. 2Etta A., b. Sept. 1851. 

2359. ^Charles H., b. Jan. 1853. 

2360. ^Ellis W., b. Oct. 1855. 

2361. scyrus F., b. Oct. 1858. 

(1812) 
Eleanor M. Chapin, dau. of Henry and Experience, b. Aug. 
1823 ; m. Moses Smith Kellogg of Hadley. Kes., Chicopee. 
Farmer. Children — 

2362. lEllen, b. Aug. 23, 1844. 

2363. sEUis, b. Feb. 9, 1846. 

2364. sjosiah Henry, b. June 19, 1853. 

2365. ^Olive Maria, b. Sept. 25, 1856 ; d. June 27, 1857. 

2366. ^Arthur, b. Nov. 2, 1858. 

(1813) 
Henry 0. Chapin, son of Henry and Experience, b. Oct. 1826, 
m. Lydia Kent of Scituate, R. I. Mr. Chapin is a farmer, and res. 
on the homestead with his father. Child — 

2367. lAllen Kent, b. Jan. 15, 1858. 

(1827) 

Hervey Chapin, son of Martin and Zeruiah, m. Persis Clark 
Parsons of Northampton. Res., Holyoke. Justice of the Peace. 
Children — 

2368. iPersis. 

2369. 2Sarah Jano, d. Feb. 15, 1841, ae 5. 2370. ^Aurelia. 
2371. ^Hervey, d. 1848, ae. 7. 2372. ^Sarah Jane. 

(1828) 

Martin Chapin, son of Martin and Zeruiah, m. Sarah Eliza 
Cross, They have no children, 

(1829) 

Lysander Chapin, son of Martin and Zeruiah, m. Sept, 18, 
1842, Mary Ann Cronk, Children— 

21 



162 SEVENTH GENERATION. 

2373. 'Henry Lysander, b. Aug. 9, 1845. 

2374. ^George Martin, b. May, 1852. 

(1840) 
"Walter E. Chapin, son of Rev. Walter and Hannah Chapin, of 
Woodstock, Vt., b. Feb. 18, 1823 ; m. in Springfield, Mass., Oct. 14, 
1847, Julia Foster, b. in Springfield, Mass., Nov. 8, 1825, and dau. 
of William Foster of Springfield, lies., Springfield, Mass. Pattern 
maker. Children — 

2375. 'Edward R. Chapin, b. in Windsor, Vt., Oct. 7, 1850. 

2376. nValter H., b. in Springfield, Mass., March 6, 1859. 

(1841) 
Henry M. Chapin, son of Rev. Walter and Hannah Chapin, of 
Woodstock, Vt., b. April 21, 1825 ; m. March, 1851, Mary A. Leon- 
ard, dau. of Mr. Leonard of Sharon, Vt. Rev. Henry M. Chapin 
graduated at Dartmouth College, N. H. in 1850, and studied Theol- 
ogy in Andover, Mass. In 1855, he was settled as pastor of a 
Congregational Church in Ripon, Wis. At the present time, (1860) 
be is preaching in Markelean, Marquette Co., Wis. Have 1 child — 

2377. 'Mary E., b. in Ripon, Wis., July, 1857. 

(1846) 

Orramel S. Chapin, son of Isaac and Nancy, m. (1) May 25, 
1824, Jemima Smith of Haddam, Ct., dau. of Israel Smith, and 
settled as a farmer in Royalston, N. Y.; m. (2) Jan. 28, 1838, Amy 
Welch, dau. of Daniel and Maruna Welch. Jemima d.Sept. 1, 1837. 

Children by (1) wife — 

2378. 'Josiah S., b. Aug. 2, 1825. 

2379. ^Horace B., b. Dec. 12, 1828. 

2380. sQ-eorge F., b. May 26, 1833. 

2381. ''{2) wife had 1 child. 

(1847) 

Zebulon Chapin, son of Isaac and Nancy, b. Oct. 10, 1803 ; 
m. May 5, 1826, Polly Bardwell of Simsbury, Ct., dau. of James 
and Susanna. She was killed by lightning. He then m. Elvira 
Fuller, dau. of Reuben and Abigail, and d. childless at Simsbury, 
Aug. 10, 1855, ae. 52. He was a wire drawer by occupation. 

(1849) 

Alfred E. Chapin, son of Isaac and Nancy, b. Dec. 1, 1807; 
m. April, 1831, Cynthia Spencer, dau. of Jehial and Elenor. Set- 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 163 

tied as a farmer in Royalston, N. Y., but subsequently engaged in 
the Lumbering business, Mr. Alfred E. Chapin d. at Royalston, 
Nov. 22, 1857, ae. 50. Children — 

2382. ^Spencer A., b. March 11, 1832. 

2383. ^Cornelia, b. Sept. 17, 1834; m. Oct. 4, 1858, John Dickey. 

2384. ^Jemima, b. March 7, 1837. 

2385. ''William Henry, b. Jan. 8, 1839 ; d. Jan. 18, 1839. 

2386. ^William H., b. May 4, 1840. 

238"7. 6:\iary, b. May 22, 1843 ; d. Dec. 27, 1857. 

2388. •'Daniel, b. July 8, 1847. 

(1851) 
Rev. Daniel E. Chapin, son of Isaac and Nancy, b. July 12, 
1814; m. May 19, 1834, Betsey Hancock of Wilbraham, dau. of 
Eliphalet and Lucy Hancock. Rev. Daniel E. Chapin entered the 
itinerant Methodist Ministry, July, 1843 ; was stationed as a local 
preacher at Coleraine, Mass.; in the Spring of 1844, he joined the 
New England Conference and on trial was ordained at Boston, 
May 3, 1846, by Bishop "Waugh. His stations have been as fol- 
lows : — Coleraine, Jenksville, Palmer, Blandford Centre, Webster, 
Worcester, Park street Church, Lowell, St. Paul's Church, Boston, 
Meridan St. Church, Westfield, all of which stations he has served 
two years, with the exception of Lowell. He represented Webster 
in the Convention of 1853 to revise the Constitution, and Worcester 
in the Legislature of 1855. Children — 

2389. iBetsey, b. Sept. 15, 1835 ; m. Aug. 4, 1859, Willard W. 
Fay of Warren, Mass. 

2390. 2Lura Savilla, b. May 23, 1837; m. April 14, 1858, 
Charles W. Alden of Ludlow, Mass. 

2391. ^Lucius D., b. Nov. 11, 1841. 

2392. -^Albert W., b. Jan. 13, 1844. 

2393. ^Charles Sumner, b. Oct. 19, 1859. 

(1854) 

John M. Chapin, son of Isaac and Nancy, b. Oct. 15, 1821 ; 
m. Oct. 20, 1841, Amanda L. Dutton of Monson, dau. of Diodate, 
and is now settled on a farm in Laclede, Mo.; has had 5 children — 

2394. ^A son, b. Nov. 25, 1842 ; d. same day. 

2395. ^Francis U., b. June 16, 1844. 

2396. ^A son, b. Aug. 26, 1846 ; d. same day. 

2397. ^Eugene R., b. Feb. 28, 1848. 

2398. ^Lovincia M., b. Aug. 31, 1850. 



1G4 SRVENTM GENERATION. 

(1.855) 

Isaac N. Ciiapin, son of Isaac and Nancy, b. April 18, 1826; 
m. May G, 1846, Almira liitcbcock, clau. of Simeon 0. and Almira. 
Farmer. Mr. Isaac N. Chapin d. on the old homestead in Wilbra- 
ham, June 2, 18/J9, ae. 33. Children — 

2399. iWilliam U., b. March 4, 1847; d. March 18, 1848. 

2400. ^William, b. Dec. 15, 1848. 

2401. ^Julia M., b. April 21, 1851. 

2402. 'Emigene, b. March 31, 1853. 

(1856) 
Solomon Chapin, son of Isaac and Nancy, b. June 2, 1831 ; 
m. Oct. 30, 1859, Harriet L. Smith of Haverhill, dau. of Joseph and 
Mary. He graduated at the Wesleyan University, in the Class of 
1857, with the highest honors of his Class. He joined the New- 
England Conference, April, 1859, and is now (1859) stationed at 
Cliftondale. 

(1857) 
John Bridges Chapin, son of William and Kezia, b. March 1, 
1822 ; m. Aug. 15, 1855, Fanny L. Henry, widow of James Henry 
and dau. of John Lilley. They have 1 child — 

2403. iQlive Lilley, b. Oct. 28, 1858. 

John B. is a Machinist ; lives on Chicopee street, on the old 
homestead formerly occupied by his great-grandfather Isaac, having 
demolished the old house and erected a new one. John B. leads the 
singing in the choir of the 1st Congregational Church, Chicopee. 

(1866) 
Edmund Dwight Chapin, son of Col. Harvey and Hannah, 
b. Dec. 9, 1813 ; m. Oct. 27, 1840, Mary C. Bliss, dau. of Theodore 
Bliss of Springfield. Cashier of John Hancock Bank, Springfield. 
They have no children. 

(1867) 
Harvey Dexter Chapin, son of Col. Harvey and Hannah, 
b. Oct. 14, 1816 ; m. Nov.lO, 1841, Louisa D.Wilcox ; have 1 son— 

2404. iWilliam Henry Dexter, b. June 14, 1847. 

(1868) 
Josiah Bridgman Chapin, son of Col. Harvey and Hannah, 
b. April 6, 1818 ; m. April 26, 1841, Caroline B. Peck. Children — 

2405. iJosiah Dexter, b. June 12, 1842. 

2406. 2icia Emily, b. July 15, 1848. 



SEVENTH GE. DERATION. 165 

(1S69) 

Charles Wells Chapin, son of Col. Harvey and Hannah, 
b. May 16, 1820 ; m. Dec. 4, 18-53, Emily A. Kidder; have 1 son— 

2407. iCharles Kidder, b. Sept. 3, 1854. 

(1870) 

Abijah White Chapix, son of Col. Harvey and Hannah, b. 
April 20, 1822; m. (1) Oct. 18, 1847, Sarah M.Wilcox; m. (2) 
(wife's name not given.) Mrs. Sarah M. Chapin d. July 7, 1857. 
Has been Postmaster at Springfield, Mass. Children — 

2408. ^Frederick Wilcox, b. Xov. 17, 1849. 

2409. ^Edmund Dudley, b. Oct. 9, 1852. 

2410. sSarah Yale, b. Sept. 21, 1856 ; d. Sept. 4, 1858. 

(1871) 
Charlotte Blake Chafix, dau. of Col. Harvev and Hannah, 
b. May 6, 1824; ni. Jan. 11, 1S4S, William B. Brinsmade, Superin- 
tendent of the Conn. River Rail Road. Children — 

2411. ijohn Chapin, b. April 24, 1852. 

2412. "Anna Louisa, b. Dec. 26, 1854. 

2413. ^William Gold, b. Jan. 21, 1858. 

(1873) 

George Ashmun Chaflv, son of Col. Harvey and Hannah, 
b. April 25, 1832; m. June 4, 1860, Jennie M. Corbett of Hannibal, 
Mo. He is engaged on the Hannibal and St. Joseph Rail Road. 
Child— 

2414. iLottie, ae. 3 months, d. at St. Joseph, Mo., Sept. 1, 1861, 
and on the 6th of the same month his wife Jennie M. d. ae. 20. 

(1888) 

Giles S. Chapin, son of Giles S. and Betsey, m. Sarah Z. Sev- 
erance of Chicopee. Farmer. Res., Granby, Mass. ; have 1 son — 

2415. iGiles S. 3d. 

(1900) 
Abel Dexter Chapin, son of Chester W. and Dorcas Chapin, 
m. Julia Clark of Springfield. Res., Springfield, Mass. President 
of Hadley Falls Bank. Children— 

2416. ^Francis S., d. in infancy. 2417. ^Liudley HoflFman. 
2418. ^Robert. 2419. -^Harry B. 

2420. ^Gertrude, d. Dec. 4, 1860, ae. 19 months. 



IGV) F.Kill'I'll (iKNKRA'I'IOX. 



EIGHTH genp:ration. 



(1927) 

John Reuben Chapin, son of Lorin D. and Emeline Aurelia, 
b. ill Providence, Jan. 22, 1823 ; ni. Martha C. Shannon. Res., 
Rahway, N. J. Children — 

2421. illenry Albert, b. in N. Y., Dec. 15, 1849 ; d. in Rahway, 
N. J., ae. 7. 

2422. ^Harriet Elizabeth, b. in Campton, N. J., Oct. 1, 1851. 

2423. ^Freelove Thurston, b. in Newark, N. J., Jan. 17, 1853. 

2424. ^Isabella W., b. in Rahway, July 15, 1855 ; d. ae. 2J yrs. 

2425. nVillie Emerson, b.in Rahway, May 25, 1857. 

2426. ^Charles Pierson, b. in Rahway, March 26, 1860. 

(1930) 

Charles Loring Chapin, son of Lorin D. and Emeline A., 
b. in Providence, Nov. 25, 1828 ; m. Matilda F. Quinn. Res., N. Y. 
Children — 

2427. ^Fauny Amelia, b. inN.Y., 185 ; date blank. 

2428. ^Charles E., b. inN.Y., 185 ; do. 

(1954) 

Curtis Chapin, son of Samuel W. and Melinda Chapin, b. 
April 14, 1818 ; m. Jennette H. Nelson. Dea. Curtis Chapin is 
Deacon of the Orthodox Congregational Church in Bernardston, 
Mass.; have 1 child — 

2429. ^Homer Curtis, b. Nov. 4, 1858. 

(1956) 

Amelia Louisa Chapin, dau. of Seth and Sylvia, of Detroit, 
Mich., b. June 29, 1821 ; m. (1) July 10, 1839, James Reed ; m. (2) 
July 3, 1855, Edgar Pickering. Mr. Reed d. Jan. 30, 1846. 

Children by (1) husband — 

2430. lAlsop, b. April 29, 1840. 

2431. 2janies Marshall, b. Jan. 26, 1845. 

Children by (2) husband — 

2432. ^Mary Louisa, b. Nov. 22, 1855. 

2433. ■^Amelia, b. May 12, 1857. 



EIGHTH GENERATIOX. 167 

(1957) 

Catharine Mary Chapin, dau. of Seth and Sylvia, of Detroit, 
Mich., b. Aug. 25, 1824; m. June 14, 1843, Charles Pickering. 
Children — 

2434. ^Charles Edgar, b. May 26, 1844. 

2435. 2john Donovan, b. Oct. 30, 1846. 

2436. ^Cyreneus Chapin, b. Nov. 30, 1848. 

2437. ^Frank Berwick, b. June 17, 1851. 

(1960) 

John Chapin, son of Caleb and Roxany, b. May 28, 1820; m. (1) 
Oct. 6, 1845, Charlotte V. Harmon ; m. (2) Sept. 5, 1854, Julia E. 
Pierce. Mrs. Charlotte V. Chapin d. Aug. 31, 1850. 

Children by (1) wife — 

2438. ^Charles E., b. Dec. 1, 1847. 

2439. 2Ralph H., b. Aug. 10, 1850. 
Children by (2) wife — 

2440. ^Infant dau., b. Sept. 1, 1856 ; d. Sept. 9, 1856. 

2441. ^Joseph A., b. Aug. 31, 1857. 

(1961) 

Dr. Horace Chapin, son of Caleb and Roxany, b. Aug. 28, 
1822 ; m. Aug. 23, 1849, Laura E. Wilder. Dr. H. Chapin is a 
school teacher in or near Cambridge, Mass. Children — 

2442. ^Herbert A , b. June 6, 1851. 

2443. 2Heber W., b. March 9, 1854. 

2444. ^Alice, b. Nov. 3, 1856. 

2445. ^Walter F., b. Nov. 30, 1861. 

(1965) 

Louisa Chapin, dau. of Marshall and Mary Chapin, of Detroit, 
Mich., b. Sept. 8, 1824 ; m. Sept. 8, 1842, Theodore Henry Hinch- 
man. Children — 

^John Marshall, b. Aug. 14, 1845. 

2Ford D. Camp, b. Sept. 3, 1847. 

^Charles Chapin, b. Dec. 2, 1849. 

•iMary, b. Oct. 28, 1852. 

*Lewis, b. June 26 ; d. May 12, 1855. 

"Louisa Reed, b. May 30, 1856. 

"Theodore Henry, b. June 20, 1858. 

^Lesbia, b. May 19 ; d. July 2, 1860. 

^Franklin, b. Jan. 16, 1862. 



168 I'.Kill'lll (Ji:.\fiRATI()\. 

(19GG) 

Helen Mary Chapin, dau. of Marshall and Mary Chapin, of 
Detroit, Midi., b. Nov. G, 182G ; in. April G, 1847, lieman Norton 
Strong. Children — 

lAllVed Hunter, b. Feb. 9, 1848; d. Feb. 11, 1849. 

^Louisa, b. Oct. 8, 1849. 

^Norton, b. Dec. 18, 1851. 

"•Marshall Chapin, 1). June 20, 1854. 

sEmily, b. March 25, 1857. 

•^John Warham, b. Aug. 5, 1859 ; d. Jan. 20, 18G1. 

(1968) 

Marshall Wright Chapin, son of Dr. Marshall and Mary, of 
Detroit, Mich., b. June 14, 1831 ; in. Dec. 31, 1852, Louisa Free- 
land. He is a Captain in 4th Michigan Eegiment, army of the 
Potomac. Children — 

iCharles, b. Oct. 24, 1853 ; d. April 5, 1854. 

^Helen Louisa, b. Nov. 28, 1858. 

^Mary, b. Dec. 8, 18G0. 

(1969) 

Seth Chapin, sou of Dana and Thankful, b. March 12, 1830 ; 
m. March 16, 1850 ; (name of wife not given.) Children — 

2446. iMaria Almira, b. Dec. 16, 1850. 

2447. 2philetta, b. April 6, 1854; d. April 1, 185G. 

2448. ^Chandler Comfort, b. Nov. 1856. 

(1981) 

Mary E. Chapin, dau. of Horatio and Martha E., b. Oct. G, 
1836 ; m. Andrew Anderson, Jr., b. Oct. 6, 1830. Children — 

2449. lEmma, b. Feb. 5, 1858. 

2450. ^Edward, b. June IS, 1861. 

(2023) 

Elisha Chapin Rice, son of Diodate B. and Eunice (Chapin) 
Rice, b. in Springfield, Mass., Jan. 31, 1834 ; m. Sept. 5, 1855, 
Eliza Ann Comstock, dau. of William A. Comstock of Montville, 
New London Co., Ct. Their residence, Norwich, Ct.; his occupa- 
tion. Clerk in the office of the Norwich Courier. 

(2024) 

Chauncry Dutton Rice, son of Diodate B. and Eunice (Chapin) 
Rice, b. May 1, 1836 ; m. Feb. 14, 1861, Lizzie E. Stanton, dau. of 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 169 

Capt. Andrew P. Stanton of Stonington, Gt. Residence, Mystic 
Bridge, (Groton,) Ct. Occupation, Editor and Publisher of Mystic 
Pioneer. 

(2039) 

Perez Chapin, son of Giles Chapin. They had 10 children, 
(names not given.) 

(2040) 

HoLLisTER Chapin, son of Giles Chapin, m. Children — 

2451. iHenry H. 2452. ^Theodore. 

(2041) 
Horace Chapin, son of Giles Chapin, m. Children — 
2453. iCharles. 2454. ^Qne other son. 

(2042) 
Charles Chapin, dau. of Giles Chapin, m. Children — 
2455. lAurura. 2456. ^Estullah. 

(2048) 
Henry Chapin, son of Rev. Perez Chapin, m. Children — 
2457. iPrank. 2458. ^Ella. 

(2052) 

Rev. Edwin H. Chapin, son of Alpheus Chapin, m. Rev. 
E. H. Chapin is the well known Universalist preacher, and lecturer. 
Res., N. Y. City. Children— 

2459. iPrederic. 2460. ^Marion. 2401. ^Sidney. 

(2071) 

Luther D. Chapin, son of Capt. Luther and Lydia Chapin, of 
Ashfield, Mass., b. Aug. 2, 1S36; m. Uay 1, 1860, Nancy Graves; 
have 1 child — 

2462. iRilana 0., b. Sept. 2, 1861. 

(2079) 

Moses W. Chapin, son of Whitman and Theodosia, b. March 10, 
1831 ; m. Oct. 26, 1853, N. Augusta Chapin, dau. of Norman and 
Nancy Chapin. Moses W. Chapin is a Justice of the Peace, and is 
established in successful business as a lawyer, in Chicopee Centre, 
Mass. Children — 

99 



170 EIGHTH GENERATION. 

2463. 'Orange Whitman, b. March 9, 1855. 

2464. 2]\ioscs Seward, b. Nov. 2, 1857. 

2465. ^liiehard Clinton, b. March 1, 1859. 

(20S2) 

AsHBEL Parsons Chapin, son of Alvin and Eunice, b. July 11, 
1830 ; m. Susannah Fuller, dau. of Edmund Fuller of Ludlow, Mass. 
Children — 

24GG. 'Frederick, b. March 12, 1855 ; d. Nov. 8, 18G0. 

2467. 2i>ankie Clifford, d. Jan. 14, 1862, ae. 2 months. 

(2095) 

Elizabeth Chapin, dau. of Heniy and Elizaljeth, 1). Jan. 30, 
1821 ; m. Dec. 7, 1843, Barton M. Douglas. Children— 

2468. 'Simon, b. Nov. 22, 1844. 

2469. 2Henry C, b. Sept. 5, 1846. 

2470. ^Ellen M., b. April 26, 1851. 

2471. ^Freddie, b. Feb. 1853. 

2472. ^John B., b. June 30, 1858. 

(2097) 

Henry Augustus Chapin, son of Henry and Elizabeth Chapin, 
b. Aug. 29, 1826 ; m. Nov. 21, 1850, Sarah E. Stephens, dau. of 
Isaac Stephens. Mr. Henry A. Chapin has recently removed from 
Springfield, Mass. to Bridgeport, Ct.; he is interested in the George 
Dwight & Co. Gas Works. Children— 

2473. 'Eliza Maria, b. July 17, 1854. 

2474. 2\villiam Henry, b. June 6, 1856. 

2475. ^Emma S., b. Oct. 13, 1858. 

(2099) 

Lucy A. Chapin, dau. of Henry and Elizabeth Chapin, b. Oct. 23, 
1830 ; m. Oct. 17, 1850, Charles W. Eice. Children— 

2476. 'Charles, b. Oct. 22, 1851. 

2477. 2Frank C, b. March 12, 1853. 

2478. ^Arthur W., b. Sept. 30, 1856. 

2479. ■'Anna L., b. June 20, 1858. 

(2111) 

Mild Chapin, son of Eliphalet and Asenath, m. Thirzah Ufford. 
Children — 

2480. 'Lucy M., b. Nov. 7, 1846. 

2481. ^Abba Rolla, b. Sept. 21, 1850. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 171 

(2323) 

Chalmers Chapin, son of Norman and Nancy Chapin, m. 
March 31, 1849, Amelia R. Stedman, dau. of Levi Stedman of 
Chicopee. Children — 

2482. lEdwln Chalmers, b. Dec. 26, 1849. 

2483. 2Catie Taylor, b. Sept. 7, 1856. 

2484. shrank Norman, b. May 30, 1858. 

2485. ^Lizzie Howard, b. Feb. 1, 1861. 

(2378) 

JosiAH S. Chapin, son of Orramel S. and Jemima, b. Aug. 2, 
1825 ; m. April 30, 1851, Sarah E. Sybrandt, dau. of John and 
Laura Sybrandt. Res., Royalston, N. Y. Farmer. Children — 

2486. iMary Uretta, b. Nov. 11, 1852. 

2487. ^Chester A., b. Nov. 20, 1856. 

(2379) 

Horace B. Chapin, son of Orramel S. and Jemima, b. Dec. 12, 
1828 ; m. March 4, 1858, Harriet Bouk, daughter of Abraham and 
Betsey. Settled as a farmer in Royalston, N. Y. 

(2380) 

George F. Chapin, son of Orramel S. and Jemima, b. May 26, 
1833 ; m. Dec. 4, 1856, Emeline Bouk, dau. of Abraham and Betsey 
Bouk. Farmer. Have 1 child — 

2488. ilda, b. June 4, 1859. 

Andrew P. Chapin, son of Caleb S. and Sarah A. Chapin, 
m. Harriet A. Thayre. Children — 

2489. iFrederick C. 2490. ^Charles N. 



PART II. 



ALLIED FA.]Sd:iLIES, 



BEING THOSE CONNECTED BY MARRIAGE AND THEIR DESCENDANTS, 



NOT INCLUDED IN PART I. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 

(48) 

*EXPERIENCE CHAPIN, dau.of Samuel Chapin of Chicopee, 
of the 3d Generation, b. Feb. 8, 1702-3 ; m. David Smith of Suffield, 
Ct., Dec. 14, 1726. David Smith was youngest twin son of Edward 
and Sarah (Allen) Smith of Suffield and grandson of Hugh Smith 
of Rowley, Mass. He was b. Oct. 18, 1699. His mother d. the day 
of his birth. David d. in 1753, leaving a widow, 1 son and 
7 daughters. Children — 

1. Eleanor, b. Aug. 1729; m. (71) Eleazer Chapin of Chicopee; 
d. Dec. 20, 1801, ae. 72. 

2. Agnes, b. Dec. 26, 1731 ; d., unm., Feb. 24, 1805, ae. 72. 

3. Eunice, b. April 3, 1734; m. Rev. John McKinstry of Chico- 
pee; d. Sept. 4, 1820, ae. 86. 

'4, David, baptized March 21, 1735-6. 

5. Marv, b. Aug. 4, 1738 ; m. Dea. Joseph Bedorthy of West 
Springfield ; d. Jan. 23, 1806. 

6. Experience, b. Nov. 13, 1741 ; m. Sept. 9, 1756, Joseph Morgan 
of West Springfield ; d. March 21, 1821, ae. 79. 

7. Tryphenv, b. April 22, 1745 ; m. Dec. 21, 1768, Lucas Mor- 
gan, Esq. of West Springfield ; d. Feb. 20, 1793, ae. 48. 

8. Catharine, b. Feb. 14, 1748 ; d., unm.. May 14, 1834, ae. 86. 
She was a famous nurse. 

This David Smith owned a farm of more than 150 acres in what 
is now the town, of Agawam. He left most of his estate to his son 
David. Experience, his widow, lived several years after the death 
of her husband, for her name is on a deed bearing date in 1772. 
David Smith, Jr. lived in Agawam until 1771, when he sold his 
estate there (as appears by his deed) and removed to Rutland, Mass. 
It appears that he had two wives — one's name was Anna. By one 
wife, he had 2 children — Lewis and Isabel, and by the other, one 
son — Orson. 

The residence of Lewis was Northampton, (South Harbor,) now 
Smith's Ferry Depot village, several rods south of the depot. 
Mr. Smith d. several years since. 

*The great grandmotlier of Cyrus Frink, Esq. of Holyoke. 



176 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

■ Lewis Smith m. Had children — 

1. Polly, deceased. 

2. David, ra. two wives ; had issue ; was a farmer, and resided in 
the foregoing village ;' d. several years since. His 2d wife survives 
him ; his 1st wife was Miss Allen of West Springfield, (now Hol- 
yoke,) dau. of Bishop Allen; 2d wife. Miss Cargill of Northampton. 

3. Chester m. and had issue ; some arrived at mature age. His 
children all d. After that, his wife also d.; subsequently, he ra. a 
2d wife. He was a farmer, and resided in the above mentioned 
village. Sold his farm a short time previous to the death of his 
1st wife, and d. at Holyoke, July 28, 1861. 

4. Asenath m. Cyrus Alvord of South Hadley. 

5. Lewis, deceased. 

6. Hervey m., and' has issue. Has been Station Agent of the 
Conn. River Rail Road at Smith's Ferry Depot, from the opening of 
said Road. 

7. Hiram m., and had issue. Was a Cabinet maker at South 
Hadley Falls ; d. several years since. 

8. Eunice. 

9. Sophia, deceased. 

10. Milo J. m. Miss Street of West Springfield, (now Holyoke ;) 
has issue, and resides in the above mentioned village. He is a 
farmer. Justice of the Peace, and has represented the town of North- 
ampton in the Massachusetts Legislature. 

11. Charles H. m. Miss Day, dau. of Justin Day of South Hadley ; 
has issue ; is a farmer, and resides on the homestead where his 
father lived. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

(211) 

ELEANOR CHAPIN, daughter of Eleazer and Eleanor and 
granddaughter of Samuel Chapin of Chicopee, b. Oct. 12, 1763; 
m. Jan. 22, 1782, James Eaton. Mrs. Eleanor Eaton d. at Chico- 
pee Falls, April 16, 1839. Children— 

1. Walter, b. Feb. 27, 1784 ; d. April 25, 1784. 

2. Justus, b. July 25, 1790 ; d. Jan. 1857. 

3. Sarah, b. July 25, 1793 ; m. Sylvester Taylor. 

4. Anna, b. Aug. 7, 1798; d. Sept. 19, 1800. 

5. James, b. Dec. 28, 1800 ; d. 1857. 

6. Thaddeus Chapin, b. June 27, 1803 ; d. 1837. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 177 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Justus Eaton m. Abigail Farnliara. Children — 

1. Bridgman Nott, b. 1820 ; d. 1855 ; no children. 

2. Clarissa Amelia, b. 1822. 

3. Charlotte Sophia, b. 1825. 

4. Leonard Nott, b. 1827 ; d. 1855, ae. 56. 

Clarissa Amelia m, Lucius Dickinson ; now lives in Charlestown, 
]\Iass,; they have 2 daughters — 1. Sarah and 2. Ellen. 

Charlotte Sophia m. E. T. Smith, and now lives with him in 
Washington ; have no children. 

Sarah Eaton, dau. of James and Eleanor, m. Sept. 12, 1815, 
Sylvester Taylor of South Hadley, Mass. Mr. Taylor removed 
many years since to Chicopee Falls, and kept the market there for 
many years. He has now given up the market business to his sons 
and turned his attention to farming. A very highly respected and 
useful citizen ; has been a Representative in the Massachusetts 
Legislature. Children — 

1. Ann Sophia, b. July 22, 1816. 

2. Harriet Maria, b. Jan. 11, 1818 ; d. May 2, 1819. 

3. Anson Chapin, b. Jan. 28, 1820. 

4. George Sylvester, b. March 2, 1822. 

5. Varnum Nash, b. April 6, 1824. 

6. Charles Andrews, b. Sept. 4, 1826. 

7. James Eaton, b. Jan. 18, 1829. 

8. William Oliver, b. April 6, 1831. 

9. Sarah Jane, b. July 18, 1833 ; d. March 6, 1860. 

10. David Eaton, b. Oct. 30, 1835. Is salesman in the Crockery 
house of Clark, Adams & Clark, Boston ; unra. 

James Eaton, son of James and Eleanor Eaton, m. about 1823, 
Huldah Johnson of New Haven, Ct. where he resided until his 
death. He was a Saddler by trade. Children — 

1. Ellen, m. John Down, about 1855. She d. some four or five 
years since, leaving no children. 

2. Frances, m. a Mr. McFarland, and now lives in Chicago, 111. 

Thaddeus Chapin Eaton, son of James and Eleanor, m. Se- 
lemna, in Springfield, where he resided until his death in 1837 ; he 
was employed in the U. S. Ai-mory. 

23 



178 Al.LlKl) 1 \.MiLit;s. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Ann Sophia, dan. of Sylvester and Sarah Taylor, ni. April 30 
1839, Eailey West of Chicopce Falls, and they still reside there- 
Mr. West is engaj^ed in the Flouring business. Children — 

1. Arthur Bailey, b. Oct. 1, 1843. 

2. James Henry, b. Aug. 27, 1847. 

Anson Chapin Taylor, son of Sylvester and Sarah, m. Sept. 28, 
1842, Louisa Buckland. He is engaged in the Provision business, 
firm i)f A. C. Taylor & Co., Chicopee Falls. Children — 

1. Mary Louisa, b. Jan. 4, 1844, 

2. Willard Buckland, b. Sept. 30, 1845 ; d. April IG, 18G2. 

3. Frank Chapin, b. Dec. 26, 1846. 

4. Fred Anson, b. June 5, 1849. 

5. Harriet Buckland, b. Ang. 31, lSo6. 

Gborge Sylvester Taylor, son of Sylvester and Sarah, m. 
Nov. 25, 1845, Asenath B.Cobb. Merchant at Chicopee Falls, firm 
of Shackford & Taylor ; a Justice of the Peace ; has represented 
the district composed of the towns of Chicopee and LudluVv' in the 
Massachusetts Legislature. Children — 

1. Ella Sophia, b. April 12, 1847. 

2. Sarah Rebecca, b. April 29, 1849 ; d. Oct. 30, 1852. 

3. George Emerson, b. June 9, 1853 ; d. July 19, 1860. 

4. William Bradford, b. ]\[ay 7, 1855 ; d. May 24, 1859. 

5. Edward Sylvester, b. June 11, 1857. 

6. William Cobb, b. June 16, 1859. 

Varnum Nash Taylor, son of Sylvester and Sarah, m. June 6, 
1848, Elizabeth Curtis, in Woodstock, Ct. He is a Merchant, firm 
of V. N. & J. E. Taylor, Chicopee Falls. Children— 

1. Henry Curtis, b. April 9, 1849; d. March 30, 1851. 

2. Edward Marion, b. May 3, 1851 ; d. Oct. 30, 1855. 

3. Arthur Bailey, b. March 22, 1853. 

4. William Clinton, b. Dec. 27, 1857. 

Charles Andrew Taylor, son of Sylvester and Sarah, ni. 
Sept. 15, 1852, Jane Davenport. Res., Chicopee Falls ; a member 
of the firm of A. C. Taylor & Co., Provision dealers. Children — 

1. Charles Davenport, b. April 13, 1855 ; d. Aug. 15, 1856. 

2. Carrie Mabell, b. Sept. 30, 1857. 



ALLIED FA.MILIE8. 17'J 

James Eato.x Taylor, son of Sylvester and Sarah, m. Nov. 22, 

1855, Electa Buckland at Manchester, Ct. He is a ^lerchant of 
the firm of V. N. & J. E. Taylor, Chicopee Falls. Children— 

1. Henry Buckland, b. May 1, 1S5S. 

2. Sarah Jane, b. Sept. 12, 1861. 

WiLLiA.M Oliver Taylor, son of Sylvester and Sarah, m. July 2, 

1856, Mary Baker of Boston. Res., Boston; is a member of the 
firm of Converse, Harding & Co. No children. 

Sarah Jane Taylor, dau. of Sylvester and Sarah, m. George 
H. Nettleton of Hannibal, Mo., where she res. until her death in 
1860. No children. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

EuMCE, dau. of David and Experience Smith of SuflReld, Ct. 
and granddaughter of Samuel Chapin of Chicopee, m. Feb. 20, 
1760, Hev. John McKinstry of Chicopee. Children — 

1. John Alexander, b. Nov. 15, 1760 ; d. April 26, 1840, ae. 79. 

2. Eunice Theodosia, b. Dec. 20, 1762; d. Feb. 19, 1844, ae. 81. 

3. Elizabeth Lucy, b. May 23, 1765 ; d. May 19, 1826, ae. 61. 

4. Archibald, b. Sept. 14, 1767 ; d. Sept. 11, 1800, ae. 33. 

5. Roger Augustus, b. Dec. 28, 1769; d. Feb. 19, 1842, ae. 72. 

6. Perseus, b. March 20, 1772 ; d. Aug. 23, 1829, ae. 57. 

7. Candace, b. July 1, 1774 ; d. Aug. 26, 1859, ae. 85. 

8. An infant daughter, May 1, 1778. 

Eunice, the mother, was b. April 3, 1734; d. Sept. 4, 1820, ae.S6. 
Rev. John McKinstry was b. in Sutton, Mass., Dec. 31, 1723 ; d. 
Nov. 9, 1813, ae. 90. The cliildren all d. num. with the exception 
of Roger Augustus and Perseus. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Roger Augustus m. Chloe Elmer of Ashfield, who d. about 
1838. Children— 

1. Augustus, b. in Ashfield. 

2. Orrin, b. in Ashfield, April 1, 1796 ; d. Oct. 20, 1847, ae. 51. 

3. Eunice m. Nahum Daniels of Plainfield. She d. !March 26, 
1826, ae. 28. 

4. Lucina m. the same Daniels ; he was drowned Sept. 21, 1840. 



ISO ALLIED FAMILIKS. 

5. Arcliil)alcl m. Mary Silver Thorn ; lives in Geneva, Oliio ; she 
(1. in 1854, and left 6 children. 

6. Lucy m. first Furd, ))y wliuni she had 3 children— one 

daughter and two sons. He dying, she ni. Nathaniel Millard, and 
has a family. They were living in Michigan in 1854. 

7. Lyman d. in Plainfield, 1821 or '22, ae about 10. 

Orrin m. in 1843, Marcia Cook; she d. Nov. 8, 1849, ae. 42. 
They d. without issue. Orrin, the second son, lived from the age of 
four years to the time of his death with his grandfather's family in 
Chicopee. 

About 1825, Roger A., the father, removed to Geneva, Ohio, and 
d. there, Feb. 19, 1842. He m. a second wife who survived him. 

Prrseus McKinstry, son of Rev. John and Eunice, m. Oct. 24, 
1803, Grace Williams, dau. of Daniel Williams of Norwich, Mass. 
She was b. July 8, 1783, and d. Dec. 24, 1854, ae. 71. Children— 

1. Eliza, b. Sept. 25, 1804 ; unm. 

2. Emily, b. April 8, 1806; m. (1210) Titus Chapin; she d. Oct. 14, 
1842. 

3. Theodosia, b. Aug. 23, 1807 ; m. (1205) Whitman Chapin. 

4. William, b. June 8, 1809; d. Feb. 24, 1845. 

5. John Alexander, b. April 19, 1811. 

6. Willard, b. April 9, 1813; d. May 27, 1814. 

7. Willard, b. May 9, 1815. 

8. Mary, b. Nov. 2, 1817. 

9. Alfred, b. May 14, 1821 ; d. July 16, 1823, ae. 2. 

10. Alfred Lyman, b. April 20, 1823. 

11. Archibald Winthrop, b. March 19, 1828. 
Perseus, the father, d. Aug. 23, 1829, ae. 57. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

William McKinstry, son of Perseus and Grace, m. April, 1836, 
Mary Theodosia Frink, dau. of Luther Frink, Esq. of West Spring- 
field, (now Holyoke.) Children — 

1. Laura Jane, b. Dec. 16, 1837 ; m.John White of Forrestville, N.Y. 

2. Arthur, b. Nov. 2, 1839 ; he was in the United States Volunteer 
Army, and was killed in 1862, in the battle at Williamsburg. 

William, the father, d. Feb. 24, 1845. His widow again m. to 
Austin Chapin of Chicopee, and now (1859) resides in Forrest- 
ville, N.Y. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 181 

John Alexander McKinstry, son of Perseus and Grace, ra. 
Aug. 23, 1843, Mary E. Morton of Hatfield, Mass. Children— 

1. John Morton, b. Nov. 17, 1844. 

2. William Alexander, b. Nov. 12, 1849. 

3. Harriet Elvira, b. Jan. 4, 1858. 

John Alexander, the father, graduated at Amherst College in 
1838 ; studied his profession at East Windsor Seminary ; settled as 
a Congregational minister in Torrington, Ct. in 1842 ; dismissed, 
and settled at Harwinton, Ct. in 1857. 

Willard McKinstry, son of Perseus and Grace, m. 1843, 
Maria A. Durbin of Fredonia, N. Y. Children — 

1. Louis, b. Nov. 18, 1844. 

2. Grace, d. Oct. 19, 1852, ae. 4. 

3. Willard. 

4. Anna, b. June, 1853. 

Willard McKinstry is the publisher of the " Fredonia Censor," 
Chatauque County, New York, and recently appointed Postmaster at 
Fredonia, N.Y. 

Mary McKinstry, dau. of Perseus and Grace, m. June 21, 
1843, James Bishop Finch of Southampton, Mass. Children — 

1. Eunice Maria. 

2. Abigail Rebecca. 

3. Emily Theodosia. 

4. Eli Richards, d. Dec. 1856, ae. 6. 

5. Jesse Foot. 

6. Willard Winthrop. 

Alfred Lyman McKinstry, son of Perseus and Grace, m. 
June 2, 1852, Almira Jane Granger who was b. July 15', 1827. 
Children — 

1. Alfred Williams, b. March 11, 1854. 

2. Edgar Granger, b. April 27, 1857. 

Alfred L. is a farmer, and lives on the old homestead, Chicopee. 

Archibald Winthrop, son of Perseus and Grace McKinstry, 
ni. Sept. 3, 1857, Helen E. Putnan, dau. of N. B. Putnam of Fre- 
donia, N. Y. Child— 

1. Grace, b. Feb. 10, 1859. 



182 ' AlJ.II'.n FAMII.IKS. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 
(145) 

Descendants of EUNICE (CIIAPIN) MOODY. She was 

the (laii. (if Samuel Chapin, (of the 4th Generation) of Chicopee. 
She m. (1) Thomas liovey Moody of Granby, Mass, Chihh-en — 

1. Gideon, b. March 15, 1765 ; d. in 1829. 

2. Mary, b. A])ril 2S, 1767; d. in ]S46. 

3. Eunice, b. April 6, 1761) ; d. in 1851. 

4. Martha, b. Feb. 1772 ; d. in 1847. 

Thomas II., the father, d. in 1772. Eunice, the widow m. (2) 
Elijah Chapin of Belchertown. Children — 

5. xVnna, b. Aug. 1775 ; d. in Belchertown, April, 1856, ae. 81. 

6. Sophia, b. Aug. 1785; m. Enoch Burnett; now living in 
Belchertown. 

7. Elijah, d. young. 

8. A daughter, who d. young. 

Elijah, the father, d. in Belchertown, 1836, ae. 86. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Gideon, the son, m. Mary Ferry of Granby. Children — 

1. Rhoda, b. 1789; m. Russell Hayes of Brattleboro', Vt.; d. 
June, 1828. 

2. A son, who d. young. 

3. Thomas H., b. Aug. 1795. 
Two others, who d. young. 

4. Lowman A., b. Sept. 1, 1803. 

5. Mary Ann, b. Feb. 2, 1810. . 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Thomas H. Moody, son of Gideon and Mary, m. Hannah Ferry 
of Granby, May, 1817, Children— 

1. Thomas H., b. Feb. 1823. 

2. Mary, b. May, 1825. 

3. William F., b. 1827. 

4. Rhoda, b. 1829 ; d. 1840. 

5. Zenas M., b. May, 1832. 

6. Gideon. 

Lowman A. Moody, son of Gideon and Mary, m. Louisa Patrick 
of Warren. Res., Chicopee. Has been a Representative in the 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 183 

General Court of Massachusetts ; Post-master ; and is now (1SG2) 
Express Agent. Children — 

1. Gideon, b. Oct. 1S29 ; d. 1841. 

2. Malcom, b. June, 1831. 

3. Mary. 

4. Hattie. 

5. Annie, b. Sept. 1844. 

Mary Ann 3Ioodv, dau. of Gideon and Mary, ni. Dr. Timothy 
Dimmock of Coventry, Ct. Children — 

1. Mary Ann. 

2. Daniel. 

Mary Ann, the motlier, d. July, 1838. 

« 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Mary Moody, dau. of Eunice (Chapin) and Thomas H. Moody, 
ra. Charles Ferry of Granby. Mrs. Moody d. 1846. Children — 

1. Elijah Chapin, b. June 30, 1790 ; d. July, 1S5G. 

2. Justus, b. May 3, 1793 ; d. July 28, 1858. 

3. Archimedes, b. May -5, 1795 ; d. Nov. 1, 1828. 

4. Adolphus, b. Sept. 2, 1797 ; d. April, 1832. 

5. Mary, 1st, b. Sept. 20, 1799 ; d. Sept. 5, 1802. 

6. Lucy Ruggles, b. Feb. 24, 1802 ; d. Dec. 1850. 

7. Charles, b. Sept. 25, 1804. 

8. Mary, 2d, b. March 15, 1807. 

9. Thomas M., b. Aug. 21, 1810. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Elijah Chapin Ferry, son of Charles and Mary Ferry, m. 
(1) Spedy Taylor of Granby, Mass., May, 1817 ; she d. May, 1818. 
He m. (2) Amanda Homer of Brimfield, Sept. 1820 ; she d. May, 
1855. Elijah C. d. July, 1856. 

Justus Ferry, son of Charles and Mary Ferry, m. Rebecca 
Crafts of Whately, Jan. 1831. Children— 
1 Joan, 1st, b. Jan. 1832; d. July, 1838. 

2. Pamela, b. Oct. 1835 ; d. April, 1837. 

3. Joan, 2d, b. Aug. 1838. 

Rebecca, the mother, d. July, 1842. Justus m. (2) June, 1843, 
Mary Ann Morgan of West Springfield ; she d. Dec. 15, 1858. 
Justus, the father, d. July 28, 1858. 



184 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

Archimeues Fekky, son of Charles and Mary Ferry, m. Ann 
Eastman of Amherst, Nov. 1821. Children — 

1. Sarah P., b. Dec. 29, 1823. 

2. Mary Ann, d. young. 
Archimedes d. Nov. 1, 1828. 

Adolphus Ferry, son of Charles and Mary Ferry, m. Aug. 
1825, Orpha Benham of Hartland, Ct. Children — 

1. Mary Ann E., b. Jan. 1828 ; d. June, 1834. 

2. Charles B., b. Aug. 1829. 

3. Orpha D., b. Jan. 1832. 

Adolphus, the father, d. April, 1832. 
* 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Charlp:s B. Ferry, son of Adolphus and Orpha Ferry, m. 

Emily of Chester Factories. One child — 

1. Gideon Lewis. Res., Becket. 

Orpha D. Ferry, dau. of Adolphus and Orpha Ferry, m. David 
McElwain of Becket. Res., Becket. Children — 

1. Reuben. 2, Cornelia V. 3. Charles Henry. 

4. David. 5. Herbert. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Lucy Ruggles Ferry, dau. of Charles and Mary Ferry, m. 
Oct. 1826, Erastus Clark of Granby. Mrs. Clark d. Dec. 1850. 
Children — 

1. Charles F., b. June, 1828. 

2. Sarah C, b. Nov. 1831. 

3. William B., b. Jan. 1838. 

Charles Ferry, son of Charles and Mary Ferry, m. (1) May, 
1830, Catharine Preston of Granby. Res., Granby. Children — 

1. Rosamond E., b. June, 1832. 

2. Catharine P., b. July, 1834; d. April, 1836. 

Catharine, the mother, d. Aug. 1834. Charles m. (2) Caroline 
Preston, Nov. 1836. One child— 

3. Elliot P., b. June, 1838 ; d. at Annapolis, Md., Jan. 5, 1862, 
of typhoid fever ; he was a member of the 27th Mass. Regiment. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 185 

Mary Ferry, dau. of Charles and Mary Ferry, m. April, 1841, 
Lysander Chapin of Chicopee. Children — 

1. Eleanor V., b. Dec. 1843. 

2. Adolpbus F., b. June, 1846. 

3. Mary D. Ette, b. Jan. 1849. 

Thomas M. Ferry, son of Charles and Mary Ferry, m. March, 
1836, Catharine Smith of Belchertown. Children — 

1. Adolphus, b. Feb. 1837 ; d. Jan. 1838. 

2. Mary, b. Nov. 1838. 

3. Arthur E., b. May, 1843. 

4. Lucy U., b. Aug. 1845. 

5. Theron, b. Feb. 1849 ; d. Sept. 1850. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Charles F. Clark, son of Lucy K. and Erastus Clark, m. Oct. 
1852, Sarah A. Barton. Children— 

1. Charles R., b. Aug. 1854. 

2. Lucy A., b. Aug. 1856. 

3. Marion B., b. Aug. 1858. 

4. Emma, b. Nov. 1860. 

Sarah C. Clark, dau. of Lucy R. and Erastus Clark, m. Andrew 
Moody of Granby. Res., Chicago ; had 2 children ; both d. young. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

Eunice Moody, dau. of Thomas H. and Eunice C. Moody, m. 
John Preston of Granby. Children — 

1. Asaph, b. Oct. 28, 1791. 

2. Homer, b. Feb. 28, 1793. 

3. Gad C, b. Oct. 17, 1794. 

4. John, 1st, b. Sept. 8, 1796 ; d. Oct, 27, 1803. 

5. Eunice C, b. Sept. 17, 1798. 

6. Portia, b. Feb. 1801. 

7. Jabez, b. Dec. 1802. 

8. Caroline, ) . ^^ j^^ ^^^^_ 

9. Catharme, ) ■^ 

10. John, 2d, b. July, 1806. 

11. Gideon M., b. June, 1808. 

12. Sophia, b. April, 1810; m. Sept. 19, 1861, Alfred Judd of 
South Hadley, being his 2d wife. 

24 



186 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

13. Rachel, b. April, 1812. 

14. Simeon E., b. Dec. 1813; d. April, 1834. 
Eunice 0. m. Phineas Barton of Granby. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Asaph Preston, son of John and Eunice Preston, b. Oct. 28, 
1791; d.May 29,1847; m.AureliaButts of So. Hadley. Children— 

1. Amanda. 2. Frances. 3. Eliza. 4. Asaph. 5. Louisa. 

Homer Preston, son of John and Eunice Preston, b. Feb. 28, 
1793 ; d. April 1, 1836 ; m. Eliza Sacket of Springfield. Children— 
1. Elvira. 2. Edward. 3. Caroline, 

4. Jeuette. 5. Henry Clay. 6. Martha. 

Gad C. Preston, son of John and Eunice Preston, b. Oct. 17, 
1794; ra. 6 wives — (1) Electa Barton; (2) Theodosia Church; 
(3) Mary Wood ; (4) Lucy Alden ; (5) Olive Arnold ; (G) Mary 
Dimock. Children — 

1. Joseph S. 2. John Henry. 3. Electa. 

4. Lowel. 5. Julius. 6. Simeon. 

7. Catharine. 8. Clarissa. 9. Epbraim. 

Joseph S. m. a dau. of Alfred Judd of South Hadley. 

Eunice C. Preston, dau. of John and Eunice Preston, b. 
Sept. 17, 1798 ; m. Phineas D. Barton of Granby. Children — 

1. William. 2. James H. 3. Asaph. 
4. Alvin. 5. Walter. 6. Clara. 

7. Homer. 8. Olive. 

Portia Preston, dau. of John and Eunice Preston, b. Feb. 
1801 ; m. David Kellogg of Granby. Res., Granby. She d. 1849. 
Children — 

Chester. 

Mary. 

Jane, 2d. 

Jabez Preston, son of John and Eunice Preston, b. Dec. 1802 ; 
m. Lydia Gray of Belchertown, Mass. Res., Belchertown. 

Caroline and Catharine Preston, (twins,) daughters of John 
and Eunice Preston, b. July, 1804. They were both m. to Charles 
Ferry of Granby. Catharine m. 1st; had 2 children. Caroline m. 
2d ; had 1 child. 



1. 


Norris P. 


2. Ellen. 3 


4. 


Simeon. 


5. Henry. 6 


7. 


Eliza. 


8. Jane, 1st. 9 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 187 

John Prestox, son of John and Eunice Preston, b. July, 1806 ; 
ni. Phebe Betts. Res., Bridgeport, Ct. Children — 

1. Warren. 2. Harriet E. 3. Catharine. 
4. Alice. 5. Marietta. G. Jenette. 

Gideon M. Preston, son of John and Eunice Preston, b. June, 
1808 ; d. Nov. 1842 ; to whom m. is unknown ; he d. One child — 

1. Augusta. 

Rachel Preston, dau. of John and Eunice Preston, b. April, 
1812; m. Daniel Fay. Children— 

1. Eugene. 2. Helen. 3. Arthur. 

Martha Moody, dau. of Thomas H. Moody and Eunice (Chapin) 
]\[oody, m. William Pease of Ludlow, Mass. Children — 

1. Jerusha m. Joel Clark of Ludlow; she d. 

2. Walter, m. Clarissa Chapin, dau.of Pliny Chapin of Granby,Mass. 

3. William, m. Mary Barton of Granby, Mass. ; he d. 

4. Warren m. Fanny Crafts of Whately, Mass. 

5. Christopher H. m. Jerusha Willy of Ludlow ; he d. 

6. Pliny, m. Martha Bagg. Res. in Belchertown. 

7. Simeon, d. 

• Sophia Chapin, dau. of Elijah and Eunice Chapin, m. Enoch 
Burnett ; he d. She res. in Belchertown. Children — 

1. Philetus W., b. March 8, 1807. 

2. Rodney, b. Sept. 6, 1811. 

3. Sophia, b. Oct. 3, 1813. 

4. Diantha, b. Feb. 15, 1816 ; d. 

5. Enoch, 1st, b. Oct. 26, 1817; d. 

6. Lyman A., b. Feb. 20, 1819. 

7. Ann C, b. May 28, 1821. 

8. Elizabeth, 1st, b. May 20, 1823. 

9. Elizabeth, 2d, b. Nov. 29, 1824. 

10. Enoch, 2d, b.July30,1826 ; m. Harrlette Stacy, June 17, 1851. 

11. William, b. Nov. 21, 1828; m. Eliza J.Hannum, Oct. 10, 1850. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Philetus W. Burnett, b. March 8, 1807 ; m. Abigail Burr. 
Residence, California ; has had 9 children — 4 are living — 

1. Henry A. 2. Diantha E. 3. George W. 4. Charles. 



188 Ai,LiKi) familip:.s. 

Rodnp:v Burnett, son of Sophia (Cliapin) Burnett and Enoch 
Burnett, b. Sept. 6, 1811; m. Melintha Coggins of Springville, N.Y.; 
have 3 children living — 

1. Ann E. 2. Mary. 3. Charles. 

Sophia Burnett, dau. of Sophia (Chapin) Burnett and Enoch 
Burnett, b. Oct. 3, 1813; m. Oct. 15, 1833, George C. Sanford. 
She d. April 10, 1852. Res., Bclchertown. Children — 

1. Samuel M., b. Nov. 7, 1834. 

2. Horatio G., b. Sept. 6, 1836. 

3. Harriet S., b. Oct. 9, 1838. 

4. Nancy H., b. March 10, 1841. 

5. Sophia B., b. Nov. 9, 1842. 

6. Geo. C, b. May 5, 1844 ; d. March 10, 1846. 

7. Charles W., b. June 16, 1846. 

8. Enoch B., b. June 20, 1849. 

9. George E., b. March 1, 1854. 
10. Charles W., d. Sept. 22, 1858. 

LoMAN A. Burnett, son of Sophia (Chapin) Burnett and Enoch 
Burnett, b. Feb. 20, 1819 ; m. March 4, 1847, Harriet Strong. 
Res., Belchertown. Children — 

1. Lyman M., b. Feb. 27, 1848 ; d. Aug. 16, 1849. 

2. Ella, b. July 4, 1850; d. Aug. 29, 1850. 

3. Harriette Preston, b. July 4, 1850 ; d. Aug. 9. 1854. 

4. Freddie S., b. Sept. 19, 1852 ; d. Jan. 13, 1854. 

5. George S., b. Aug. 22, 1856. 

6. Harriette L., b. Oct. 24, 1859. 

Ann C. Burnett, dau. of Sophia (Chapin) Burnett and Enoch 
Burnett, b. May 28, 1821 ; m. Jan. 6, 1847, Daniel G. Rice. Res., 
Belchertown. Children — 

1. William B., b. April 17, 1848. 

2. Enoch B., b. May 30, 1850 ; d. Aug. 21, 1852. 

3. Lyman H., b. Dec. 10, 1851. 

4. Emma S., b. July 6, 1853. 

5. Clara E., b. Aug. 29, 1854. 

6. Anna Y., b. April 19, 1856. 

7. Frank G., b. Nov. 29, 1857. 

8. Mary Ann D., b. Jan. 6, 1859. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 189 

Elizabeth Burnett, dau. of Sophia (Chapin) Burnett and 
Enoch Burnett, b. Nov. 29, 1824; m. Nov. 4, 1851, (1732) Zerah 
Chapin, son of Julius Chapin. Mrs. Elizabeth Chapin d. Nov. 1856. 
Children — 

1. Edward B., b. Sept. 1853 ; d. Sept. 1859. 

2. Elizabeth S., b. Aug. 12, 1855. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

(182). 

Descendants of ABIAH (CHAPIN) SMITH. She was the 
dau. of Abel and Hannah Chapin, b. Sept. 3, 1731 ; m. pub. Oct. 21, 
1749, Samuel Smith of Hadley. Children— 

1. Abel. 2. Samuel. 3. Perez. 4. Aaron. 

5. Hannah. 6. Martha. 7. Abiah. 

A part of the family resided in Sandisfield, Berkshire Co., Mass. 
Hannah m. a Mr. Bosworth. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Abiah m. (1) Mr, Field ; (2) Mr. Reed, a blacksmith, she being 

his second wife. They lived for a time in Springfield, (Chicopee 

Parish,) and then in Hartland, Ct.; bad several children. The sons 
removed to different parts of the country. 

Martha m. Joseph Ely of West Springfield, (now Holyoke.) 
Children — 

1. Sophia, b. Sept. 1787 ; unm. 

2. Lovica, b. April, 1789 ; unm. 

3. ^lartha, b. 1793; m. Jonathan Smith. 

4. Cynthia, b. 1796 ; unm. 

5. Joseph, b. July, 1804. 

6. Samuel, b. Oct. 1806. 

7. Austin, b. Feb. 1809. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Joseph m. (1) Sarah Goodman, dau. of Capt. Calvin Goodman of 
South Hadley, and had — 

1. Mariann, b. March,' 1833. 

2. Charles, d. ae. about lA- yrs. 



190 ALLIKD FAMILIES. 

Joseph m. {:>) Ruth Attleton of Springfield. Children — 

3. Sarah, b. Sept. 1840. 

4. Charles, b. Oct. 1842. 

5. Emma, b. Dec. 1844. 

G. Joseph, b. Sept. 10, 1846. 

Samuel Ely, sou of Martha and Joseph, b. Oct. 1806 ; m. Sarah 
Chase. She d., leaving 1 child — 
1. Helen Amanda, b. Sept. 1853. 

AusTL\ Ely, son of Martha and Joseph, b. Feb. J 809; m. 
Elimena Graves, dau. of Roswell Graves of So. Hadley. J child — 

1. Amanda Graves, b. Oct. 1837. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

(196) 

ASENATH CHAPIN, dau. of Phineas and Bethiah, b. May 13, 
1750 ; m. Dea. Silas Smith of South Hadley, Mass., int. ent. 
March 18, 1780. He was b. Nov. 30, 1754 ; d. March 23, 1813. 
Dea. Smith was a farmer. Deacon of the Congregational Church for 
many years, — a man of influence and much respected. Asenath was 
a woman of great natural abilities — one of the strong-minded women 
of the age, — not of the strong-minded women of 1860. She d. 
Nov. 31, 1835, ae. 85. 

The parents of Dea. Smith were Silas, b. Feb. 13, 1721; d. 

May 12, 1809. Sarah, his (1) wife, b. June 27, 1724; d. July 3, 

1774 ; (2) wife, Rebeckah, b. Feb. 19, 1731 ; d. July 24, 1804. 
Their children were — Perez, Philip, Silas and Sarah. 

The children of Dea. Silas and Asenath were as follows — 

1. Horace, b. Feb. 16, 1781. 

2. Rufus, b. March 2, 1782. 

3. Allen, b. Dec. 8, 1783 ; d. Sept. 2, 1848. 

4. A child, b. Aug. 29, 1785 ; d. same day. 
5.* Asenath, b. March 3, 1787. 

6. Laura, b. March 10, 1789. 

7. Warren, b. Sept. 25, 1790 ; d. April 2, 1820. 

8. Hiram, b. Sept. 23, 1793. 

* Asenath Smith ra. Jan. 2, 1833, Col. Samuel Seymour of Hadley. He d. Jan. 9, 1854. She 
had no children. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 191 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Horace Smith, son of Asenath (Ghapin) Smith and Dea. Silas 
Smith, b. Feb. 16, 1781 ; m. (1) March 5, 1805, Rebecca Moody, 
who was b. March 28, 1783, and d. Nov. 30, 1821, ae. 38 ; in. (2) 
Miss King of Sufifield, Ct. Residence, Amherst, Mass. Children — 

1. Mary Berintha, b. Dec. 2, 1806 ; d. Aug. 10, 1841. 

2. Cordelia, b. Aug. 15, 1808. 

3. Silas Moody, b. May 8, 1810. 

4. Asenath, b. July 8, 1812 ; unm. 

5. Josiah White, b. June 3, 1819. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Mary B., m. Dec. 2, 1824, (by Rev. Rufus Pomroy of Chester,) 
James B. Wood, and d. Aug. 10, 1841. Mr. Wood was a wood 
dealer and farmer. She left 2 children — 

1. Harriet Newell, b. at Chester, Mass., Feb. 24, 1826. 

2. Sarah, b. at Albany, April 13, 1832 ; unm.; is a teacher. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Harriet N. Wood, m. Dec. 27, 1843, Dr. Norton S. Townshend 
of Avon, Loraine Co., Ohio. Mrs. Townshend d. in Avon, June 24, 
1854. Children— 

1. Arthur Smith, b. at Elyria, 0., Oct. 29, 1844 ; d. May 11, 1849. 

2. James Haughton, b. at Elyria, 0., Sept. 28, 1846. Residing 
in Avon, 0., Aug. 1860. 

3. Mary Rebecca, b. at Elyria, 0., Dec. 21, 1849. Residing in 
Avon, 0.,'^Aug. 1860. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Cordelia Smith, dau. of Horace Smith, m. May 25, 1830, (by 
Rev. Royal Washburn of A.) to Joseph Fuller. Children — 

1. Reuben Tinker, b. July 20, 1831 ; d. Sept. 8, 1831. 

2. Caroline Rebecca, b. Sept. 14, 1832. 

3. Horace Smith, b. April 10, 1835. Graduated at Amherst 
College, 1858 ; teaching in Kentucky in 1860. 

4. Dwight, b. Oct. 5, 1837 ; he is on a farm at present. 

5. Sarah Jane, b. Feb. 17, 1841. 

6. Frank, b. May 13, 1844 ; d. July 7, 1847. 

7. Mary, b, April 16, 1849. 

Children all b. in Suffield ; not any of them m. July 15, 1861. 



192 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

Silas Moody Smith, son of Horace Smith, ra. Jan, G, 1832, 
(by llev. Solomon Williams,) Theodosia Hunt of Northampton, 
Mass. He is engaged In the Cabinet business. Their children all 
b, in Northampton — 

1. Watson Loud, b. July 28, 1834, 

2. Thomas Hunt, b. Aug, 21, 1836 ; d, Dec. 3, 1836. 

3. Harriet Louisa, b. March 16, 1838 ; d. Sept. 8, 1839, 

4. Louisa Helen, b, March 25, 1841. 

5. George Hunt, b. Oct. 25, 1844. 

6. Mary Jane, b. Sept. 16, 1850. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Watson Loud Smith, son of Silas M. and Theodosia Smith, 
m. Oct. 28, 1856, Eunice A. Brewster of Cummington. Children — 

1. Arthur Watson, b. Dec. 2, 1858 ; d. Aug. 11, 1859. 

2. Nellie Hunt, b. Dec. 2, 1860. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

JosiAH White Smith, son of Horace Smith, m. May 27, 1841, 
(by Rev. Dr. W. of Northampton,) Jane S. Damon of Northampton, 
Mass., and he d. May 1, 1854. He published the "Northampton 
Courier" for several years ; was afterwards (and at the time of his 
death) a Clerk in the Superintendent's Office, (C, W, Chapin,) of 
the Conn, River Rail Road Co. He left 2 children, both b, in N, — 

1, Isaac Damon, b, Aug. 6, 1845, 

2, Jane Damon, b, April 13, 1853. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

RuFus Smith, son of Dea. Silas and Asenath, b. March 2, 1782 ; 
m. Jan. 31, 1808, to Saloma Clark, who was b. Sept. 17, 1786, 
Children — 

1. Philetus, b. Nov. 10, 1808; d. Nov. 21, 1853, ae. 45. 

2. Almena, b. Oct, 3, 1810. 

3. Bethia Chapin, b. July 10, 1814. 

4. Phineas Clark, b.Oct.17,1816; d.Aug.14,1853, ae.36yrs. 10 m. 

5. Paulina, b. Sept. 14, 1819, 

6. Warren, b. Aug, 13, 1822 ; d, Sept. 4, 1823, ae, 13 months. 

7. Minerva, b. Jan. 17, 1825. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 193 

SEVENTH GENEEATION. 

Philetus Smith, son of Rufus and Saloma, m. Sept, 29, 1836, 
Mary E. Bates, of Springfield. Place of residence, Twinsburg, 
Summit Co., Ohio. Children — 

1. Mary Elizabeth, b. Sept. IS, 1837. 

2. Rufus Clark, b. Aug. 14, 1839. 

3. Minerva A., b. Aug. 25, 1842. 

Almena Smith, dau. of Rufus and Saloma, m. Oct. 7, 1847, 
Daniel F. Lyman, of Easthampton. Children — 

1. Horace Smith, b. Oct. 1848. 

2. Eunice Almena, b. Oct. 3, 1850. 

3. Amelia Sophia, b. Nov. 21, 1853 ; d. May, 1859. 

Bethia Chapix Smith, dau. of Rufus and Saloma, m. at Wor- 
thiugton, June 6, 1843, Franklin Buck. Res., Chesterfield. Chil. — 

1. Selina Aurista, b. June 6, 1844. 

2. Edson Allen, b. Sept. 27, 1847. 

3. Otis Henry, b. Sept. 11, 1850. 

4. Semantha Jane, b. Oct. 20, 1852. 

5. Charles Elliot, b. Aug. 21, 1856. 

Phineas Clark Smith, son of Rufus and Saloma, m. May 24, 
1848, in Ludlow, Amanda Sadler, of Ludlow. He d. Aug. 14, 1853, 
ae. 36 yrs. 10 mos. Children — 

1. Albion Leroy, b. June 22, 1849 ; d. July 20, 1853, ae. 4. 

2. Amelia Elizabeth, b. April 12, 1851; d.Aug.5,1853, ae. 2 yrs. 4 m. 

3. Phineas Leroy, b. Sept. 4, 1853 ; d. Sept. 18, 1853. 

Paulina Smith, dau. of Rufus and Saloma, m. at Worthington, 
Nov. 6, 1847, Ezra H. Corning, of Chicopee Falls. He died Aug, 
14, 1853, ae. 39. 

Minerva A, Smith, dau. of Rufus and Saloma, m. at Wor- 
thington, Oct. 7, 1858, Elbridge Hazen. One child — 
1. Ellen Leora, b. March 4, 1860. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Allen Smith, son of Asenath (Chapin) Smith and Dea. Silas 
Smith, of South Hadley, b. Dec. 8, 1783. Polly Bartlett, b. Oct. 1, 
1786. They were m. at Granby, (by Rev. Mr. Gridley,) Jan. 1811. 
Capt. Smith d. Sept. 2, 1848. His widow d. May 8, 1850. Capt. 
Smith was a man of good natural abilities, and for many years was 

25 



194 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

looked to as one of the leadinj,' men of the town. lie was possessed 
of quite a military genius, but bad no opportunity of displaying it, 
except in the nnlitia. Children — 
. 1. Silas Allen, b. Dec. 11. 18i:i. 

2. Mary Bartlett, b. July 30, 1816 ; d. Dec. 30, 183G. 

3. Luna Chapin, b. April 21, 1819. 

4. Clarissa Delphia, b. April 3, 1822. 

5. Frances Eliza, b. Jan. 3, 1825. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Silas A., m. Olive :Moody at South Hadley, (by Rev Joseph 
Condit,) Nov. 5, 1835. Children— 
1. Silas Andre, b. Aug. 26, 1836. 

I- Martha Louisa, ) . ^ ^^ ^ ^g^Q^ 

3. Mary Eliza, ) ^ 

4. Eliphaz Moody, b. April 5, 1844. 

Luna Chapin, m. Horatio Rice, Jr., at South Hadley Falls, (by 
Rev. Leander Thompson,) Dec. 30, 1846. They are engaged in the 
Millinery business, Chicopee Centre. Children — 

1. Arthur Allen, b. Dec. 12, 1851. 

2. Nellie Louisa, b. Aug. 20, 1855. 

Clarissa D., m. John Beckwith at South Hadley Falls, (by 
Rev. Leander Thompson,) Oct. 1, 1848. No children. 

Frances Eliza, m. Elisha Pomroy, Jr., at South Hadley Falls, 
(by Rev. Leander Thompson,) Dec. 15, 1848. No children. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Hiram Smith, son of Dea. Silas and Asenath, b. Sept. 23, 1793 ; 
m. June 2, 1817, Mary Moody, dau. of Col. Eliphaz Moody of South 
Hadley. She was b. Aug. 13. 1796. Mr. Hiram Smith, the father, 
is a valuable and useful citizen ; has served in various town offices ; 
has represented the town of South Hadley in the General Court of 
Massachusetts ; is frequently called upon to set off widows' dowers, 
divide estates of deceased persons, and to public services generally. 
He is a man of excellent judgment. Was engaged for many years 
in the boating business, but for several years past has been a farmer. 
Children — 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 195 

f 

1. Rebeckah Allen, b. April 7, 1819. 

2. Child, b. Jan. 7, 1821 ; d. young. 

3. Edwin, b. June 26, 1822. 

4. Hiram, b. July 24, 1824. 

5. Mary Jane, b, Dec. 26, 1826. 

6. Julia Avis, b. Feb. 7, 1831. 

7. Eliza Augusta, b. Dec. 8, 1832. 

8. Emily Wright, b. June 8, 1834 ; unm. 

9. Josiah Moody, b. Nov. 21, 1837; d. Sept. 8, 1839. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Rebeckah Allen Smith, dau. of Hiram and Mary, b. April 7, 
1819 ; m. Oct. 6, 1842, (by Rev. Joseph D. Condit,) Moses Gaylord, 
who was b. Feb. 26, 1815. Children— 

1. James W., b. July 17, 1844. 

2. Henry E., b. June 5, 1846. 

3. Lewis M., b. July 27, 1849. 

4. Josiah S., b. May 19, 1852 ; d. March 15, 1858. 

5. Freddie A., b. June 26, 1859. 

Edwipc Smith, son of Hiram and Mary, b. June 26, 1822 ; m, 
Feb. 26, 1851, (by Rev. D. D. Davis of Westfield.) Sarah Jane 
Wright, dau. of Dr. Lucius. Wright. She was b. Feb. 24, 1824. 
Mr. Smith is a farmer, and resides in South Hadley. 

Hiram Smith, Jr., son of Hiram and Mary, b. July 24, 1824; 
m. Jan. 19, 1848, (by Rev. L. Thompson,) Harriet Sophia Coney. 
Mr. Smith is a merchant and Postmaster at So. Hadley Falls. Chil. — 

1. Ellis Dwight, b. July 10, 1849 ; d. April 22, 1851. 

2. Hattie Victoria Ann, b. July 11, 1850 ; d. Oct. 10, 1852. 

3. Jennie Belle, b. Nov. 22, 1858. 

Mary Jane Smith, dau. of Hiram and Mary, b. Dec. 26, 1826 ; 
m. Feb. 23, 1848, (by Rev. L. Thompson,) William Stacy, who was 
b. April 4, 1820. Children— 

1. William Charles, b. April 10, J 849. 

2. Clara Jane, b, June 12, 1851. 

3. Henry Edgar, b. March 21, 1854; d. Aug. 1, 1855. 

4. George Gay, b. Oct. 9, 1856. 

5. Hiram Smith, b. Oct. 10, 1858. 



196 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

Julia Avis Smith, dan. of lliram and Mary, b. Feb. 7, 1831 ; 
m. (by Rev. Thomas Laurie,) Sept. 5, 1850, John Lyman of Am- 
herst, Mass., who was b. April 17, J 822. Mr. Lyman d. March 1, 
1859. Chiklren— 

1. Mary Isabella, b. Oct. 19, 1852. 

2. Willie Elliott, b. Sept. 4, 1855 ; d. Sept. 29, 1855. 

3. Nellie Emily, b. Nov. 18, 1856. 

4. John Elliott, b. July 1, 1859. 

Eliza Augusta Smith, dau. of Hiram and ]\Iary, b. Dec. 8, 
1832 ; m. (by Rev. E. Y. Swift,) Dec. 15, 1853, Jotham Graves, Jr. 
who was b. Dec. 11, 1827. Children — 

1. Sarah Louisa, b. March 22, 1856. 

2. Mary Sophia, b. April 2, 1859. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Laura Smith, dau. of Asenath and Dea. Silas Smith, of South 
Hadley, b. March 10, 1789; m. Nov. 23, 1812, Zebina Judd, of 
So.Hadley. He was b. Sept. 24, 1787; d. Feb. 26, 1860. Children— 

1. Zebina, Jr., b. Feb. 23, 1814; m, Eliza Turner of Fredonia, N.T. 

2. Warren S., b. March 27, 1816 ; d. Oct. 17, 1817. 

3. Warren S., b. Sept. 6, 1820 ; m. Jerusha Dickinson of Hadley, 
Nov. 25, 1847. 

4. Henry H., b. Oct. 30, 1822 ; m. Mary Bonney of Hadley, July 
9, 1851. She died Oct. 27, 1852. He m. (2) Jane Roat, of West 
Springfield, April 27, 1854. 

5. Lucy A., b. March 30, 1826 ; m. Oliver E. Bonney of Hadley, 
March 5, 1850. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Children of Zebina Jr. and Eliza — 

1. Clarence E., b. July 10, 1845. 

2. Charlie, b. June 26, 1851. 

3. Henry, b. Feb. 1854. 

4. Edward W., b. Nov. 1857. 

Children of Warren S. and Jerusha — 

1. Myron H., b. Oct. 19, 1848. 

2. Emeline A., b. June 16, 1851. 

3. Clara L., b. June 15, 1854. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 197 

Child of Henry H. and Mary — 

1. Mary, bom Oct. 5, 1852 ; d. Dec. 1852. 

Children of Lucy A. and Oliver E. Boxnev — 

1. Edmund I., b. Jan. 16, 1851. 

2. Joseph P., b. Oct. 19, 1852 ; d. Feb. 1854. 

3. Joseph P., b. July 18, 1855. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

(32S) 

ACHSA CHAPIX m. Phillip Smith. She was the dau. of 
Timothy and Martha Chapin, b. July 5, 1756. Children — 

1. Chester, m., had issue ; d. in Philadelphia, many years since. 
Printer by trade. 

2. Chauncey, ni. Miss Buxton; had issue; lives in Michigan. 
Blacksmith. 

3. Lucretia, m. Dormer Chapin. 

4. Lydia, m. Wm. Buxton; lives in State of N. Y. ; have 4 sons, 
2 daughters, and perhaps more. 

5. Achsa, m. Levi Chapin. 

6. Phillip, m. (1) Huldah Van Horn, dau. of Gad Van Horn, of 
Chicopee ; had 1 dau. — Laura. Phillip m. (2) Diedema Griswold, 
of Feeding Hills, West Springfield ; had issue, and d. there. 

7. Martha, m. Calvin White, of South Hadley. 

8. Sarah, m. McMaster ; lives in Palmer ; has one dau. 

9. Solima, m. Henry Graves ; lives in Ludlow; 3 sons, 1 dau. 

10. Preston, m., and d. many years since, in Poughkeepsie, N. J. 
Left 3 sons. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

(384) 

BATHSHEBA CHAPIN, dau. of Benjamin and Anna Chapin, 
b. Oct. 18, 1752; m. Jonathan Smith of South Hadley ; he was 
b. Oct. 16, 1749, and d. Dec. 19, 1809, ae. 60. She m. (2) Reuben 
Dresser of Goshen, Mass. She d. in South Hadley, Mass., July 9, 
1820, ae. nearly 68. She had children by Mr. Smith, as follows — 

1. 3[ary, b. March 21, 1773. 

2. Sophronia, b. March 1, 1775. 

3. Rhoda, b. Nov. 5, 1777. 

4. Chauncey, b. June 23, 1779. 

5. Otis, b. Jan. 13, 1788. 

6. Jonathan, b. Aug. 27, 1790. 



198 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

7. Quartus, b. July 31, 1792. 

8. Justus, b. Oct. 21, 1794. 

9. Carlo, b. April 20, 1800. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Chauncev m. Miriam Eddy ; had a family of children ; was a 
cooper by trade ; tended the Springfield bridge, Slass., for several 
years ; removed to Canada, and d. there. Dec. 24, 1814. 

Mary, m. Levi Graves, Esq. of Hatfield, Mass. She d., ae. 83. 
He d. Children— 

1. Harvey. 2. Mary. 3. Levi. 4. Jonathan. 

SoPHROMA, m. Morton of Whately. Children — 

1. Erastus. 2. Mary. 3. Julia. 4. Justus. 
a. Abraham, m., and had 2 or 3 children. 
6. Sophronia. 7. Isaac. 

Otis Smith, son of Bathsheba and Jonathan, b. Jan. 13, 1788 ; 
m. Anna Eno of Enfield, Ct. They resided at South Hadley Falls ; 
he d. there, July 30, 1830, ae. 42. He was very useful in piloting 
boats and rafts over Willimansett Falls. Children — 

1. Otis, b. Dec. 1810. 

2. William, b. July 1, 1812. 

3. Sarah Bathsheba, b. Jan. 1814. 

4. Chauncey, b. Nov. 1815. 

5. Sumner, b. Sept. 1818. 

6. Benj. Franklin, b. Oct. 1824. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Otis S.-mTH, son of Otis and Anna Smith of South Hadley Falls, 
and grandson of Bathsheba (Chapin) Smith and Jonathan Smith, b. 
Dec. 1810 ; m. Sarah Margaret Mercellus of Schenectady, N. Y. 
Carries on the broom business upon a large scale. The greater part 
of his buildings were destroyed by fire, in the summer of 1861. 
Loss about 822,000. Insurance about $8,000. Mr. Otis Smith d. 
of consumption, April 1862. Children — 

1. Edward Weld, b. Feb. 1838. 

2. Morse R., b. Oct. 1841. 

3. Catharine R., b. Jan. 1844. 

4. James R., b. Nov. 1851. 

5. Amelia Leber, b. Mav, 1858. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 199 

Sarah B, Smith, dau. of Otis and Anna Smith of South Hadley 
Falls, b. Jan. 1814 ; m. Edward C. Weld of Holland, Mass. Mr. 
Weld d. Jan. 1859. One child— 

1. Clara Anna, b. March 1S58, in Janesville, Wis. 

William Smith, son of Otis and Anna Smith of South Hadley 
Falls, b. July 1, 1812 ; m. Ann Wilkins of Springtield, Ohio. Mr. 
William Smith d. in Springfield, O., June 1851. They had 8 chil- 
dren — 4 are living. 

1. Mildred Ann. 2. William. 3. Emma. 4. Chauncey. 

Chau.xcey Smith, son of Otis and Anna Smith of South Hadley 
Falls, b. Nov. 1815 ; m. Rachel Pomroy of South Hadley Falls. 
Chauncey Smith died in Cincinnati, Oct. 1853 ; left no children. 
His widow m. Dr. Elisha Barber ; lives in Brooklyn, N. Y. The 
Dr. d. in South Hadley Falls Village, Sept. 25, 1860. 

Sumner Smith, son of Otis and Anna, of South Hadley Falls, 
b. Sept. 1818; m. Mary Hayes, dau. of Joel Hayes of South Had- 
ley, and granddaughter of Rev. Joel Hayes. Mr. Sumner Smith 
lives at Taylor's Falls, Minn., on the St. Croix River. Children — 

1. Howard Foster, b. 1849 or 1850. 

2. Anna Mills, b. Nov. 1852. 

3. Clara Whiting, b. Aug. 1857. 

4. Harriet Hayes, b. March 1860. 

Benjamin Franklin Smith, son of Otis and Anna Smith of 
South Hadley Falls, b. Oct. 25, 1824 ; m. in Adams, Jefferson Co., 
N. y., Sarah Ann Soper, of Adams. Children — 

1. Anna Eliza, b. Cape Vincent, N. Y., Dec. 31, 1846. 

2. Mary Ella, b. Schenectady, N. Y., April 8, 1849. 

3. Celia Augusta, b. Janesville, AVis., Dec. 7, 1852. 

4. William Chauncey, b. Janesville, Wis., Dec. 29, 1854. 

5. Hattie Eno, b. Janesville, Wis., Jan. 11, 1857. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Jonathan Smith, son of Bathsheba and Jonathan, b. Aug. 27, 

1790; m. Feb. 27, 1816, Martha Ely, dau. of Joseph and Martha 

Ely of West Springfield. Mr. Jonathan Smith d. Feb. 27, 1843. 
Children — 

1. Jonathan Mosely, b. March 20, 1817. 

2. Martha Asenath, b. March 5, 1819. 

3. Juba Ely, b. May 25, 1821. 

4. Hiram Miron, b. Oct. 18, 1828. 



200 ALLIED FAMILIES. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Jonathan Mosely Smith, son of Jonathan and Martha Smith, 
b. March 20. 1817 ; m. Lucinda Warriner of West Springfield, now 
Holyoke. Children — 

1. Emily Maria, 2. Ellen. 3. Sophia. 

4. Charles Fayette. 5. Herbert. G. Mosely. 

Martha Asenath, dau. of Jonathan and Martha Smith, b. 

March 5, 1819; m. Moses Cutler. He d. Aug. 26, 1860; left no 
children. 

JuBA Ely Smith, son of Jonathan and Martha, b. May 25, 1821; 
m. Lydia Butterfield. Children — 

1. Fanny Cutler. 2. Austin Ely. 3. Frank Arthur. 
A child b. Sept. 17, 1860. 

HiRAM MiRON, son of Martha and Jonathan Smith, b. Oct. 18, 
1828 ; m. Martha Loomis ; have 1 daughter — 
1. Lizzie Jane. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Quartus Smith, son of Bathsheba and Jonathan Smith, b. 
July 31, 1792; m. (1) Sept. 1, 1814, Emeline White of Durham, 
Ct.; she d. in Westfield, Mass., Sept. 6, 1816. He m. (2) Rhoda 
White of Durham, Ct., April 1, 1817. Mrs. Rhoda Smith d. in 
Durham, Feb. 23, 1849. He m. (3) Mrs. Catharine Lathrop of 
Durham, Ct., July 18, 1849 ; she d. March, 1858, without issue. 
A Mechanic. 

Children by (1) wife — 

1. Emma W., b. in Westfield, Mass., June 25, 1815. 

2. Seymour W., b. in Westfield, Mass., Sept. 2, 1816. 
Children by (2) wife— 

3. William Q,, b. in Durham, Ct., Oct. 23, 1817. 

4. Phebe A., b. in Durham, Ct., Sept. 1818. 

5. John W., b. in Durham, Ct., June 8, 1822. 

6. Chauncey H., b. in Durham, Ct., Oct. 8, 1827. 

7. Hellen A. or R., b. in Durham, Ct., Jan. 1,1830; d.July 3,1830. 

8. Ellen W., b. in Durham, Ct., May 27, 1832. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 201 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Emma W. Smith, dau. of Quartus and Emeline Smith, b. in 
Westfiekl, Mass., June 25, 1815 ; m Dec. 2, 1S45, Oliver Johnson 
of Middletown, Ct. Farmer. Children — 

1. Sarah P.. b. in Middletown, Ct., Sept. 11, 1S46. 

2. Marian E., b. in " March 7, 1848 ; d. in Middle- 
town, Dec. 24, 1850. 

3. Harriet E., b. in " July 27, 1850. 

4. Mary E., b. in " Jan. 28, 1855. 

Seymour W. Smith, son of Quartus and Emeline Smith, b. in 
Westfiekl, Mass., Sept. 2, 1816. A Mechanic. He m. Jan. 1, 1840, 
Mrs. Eliza Wait of Willimantic, Ct. One child — 

1. Chauncey, b. in Willimantic, Ct., Jan. 2, 1841. 

William Q. Smith, son of Quartus and Rhoda Smith, b. in 
Durham, Ct., Oct. 23, 1817. Teacher of Music. He m. May 1, 
1849, Mary S. Thomas of Philadelphia. Children — 

1. Emma R., b. in Charlotte, North Carolina, July 7, 1850. 

2. Laura A., b. in " " April 6, 1852. 

3. Oliver S. b. in Went, " April 4, 1854. 

4. Frank G., b. in Middletown, Ct., Feb. 16, 1857. 

5. Mary Louisa, b.in Scotland Neck, " June 10, 1859. 

Phebe a Smith, dau. of Quartus and Rhoda Smith, b. in 
Durham, Ct., Sept. IS, 1818*; m. J. W. Johnson (Physician) of 
Haddam, Ct., Dec. 25, 1838. Children— 

1. Francis Asburv, b. in Waterbury, Ct., Oct. 11, 1839 ; d. in 
Hartford, Ct., Sept/l2, 1841. 

2. Francis E., b. in Hartford, Ct., Feb. 15, 1843. 

3. Alice L., b. in Hartford, Ct., Aug. 19, 1844. 

John W. Smith, son of Quartus and Rhoda Smith, b.in Durham, 
Ct., June 8, 1822. Teacher of Music. He m. July 4, 1848, 
Elizabeth J. Bates of South Glastenbury, Ct. Children — 

1. Eliza B., b. in South Glastenbury, July 29, 1851. 

2. William Frisbie, b.in" May 5, 1856; d. Aug. 8, 1856. 

Chauncey H. Smith, son of Quartus and Rhoda Smith, b. in 
Durham, Ct., Oct. 8, 1827. Teacher of Music. He m. Feb. 6, 
1853, Ellen A. Watrous of Hartford, Ct. Childi-en— 

26 



i). m 



202 ALLlliD FAMILIES. 

1. Ilattie Louisa, b. in Ilarlford, Ct., Nov. 5, 1853. 

2. Julia Ellen, b. in Bristol, Ct., March 19, 1855. 

Ellen M. Smith, dau. of Quartus and Ilhoda Smith, 

Durham, Ct., May 27, 1832 ; m. Aug. 1, 1854, Thomas D. 

of Orange, N. J. A Mechanic. Children — 

1. Eliza S., b. in Wadesboro', N. C, Jan. 1, 1855 : d. in Wades- 
boro', N. C, Dec. 11, 185G. 

2. Kate E., b. in Wadesboro', N.C., May 1, 1856; d. Dec. 25, 1856. 

3. Walter Davenport, b. in Scotland Neck, N. C, Dec. 17, 1859. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Justus Smith, son of Bathsheba and Jonathan Smith, b. Oct. 21, 
1794 ; m.; removed to Canada, and has a family of children. 

Carlo Smith, sou of Bathsheba and Jonathan Smith, b. April 20, 
1800 ; m. Miriana Lloyd of Springfield, Mass. Mr. Carlo Smith 
was a painter by trade, and lived in Springfield, JMass. He d. 
Dec. 19, 1839. Children— 

1. Asenath. 2. Maria. 3. Lucy. 4. James. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Asenath Smith, dau. of Carlo and Miriana Smith, m. George 
King of Springfield. Mrs. Asenath Smith d. in St. Louis, Mo., in 
the summer of 1860. Children — 

1. Henry. 2. George. 3. Ffank. 

Maria Smith, dau. of Carlo and Miriana Smith, m. Riley Bart- 
lett. Reside in Wisconsin. Children — 
1. Leroy. 2. Winthrop. 3. Indianna. 

Lucy Smith, m. Major Sanborn. She d. in Springfield, about 
1847. Children— 

1. Henry. 2. Lucy. 

James Smith, son of Carlo and Miriana Smith, m. Agnes Win- 
chell ; have 4 children. Reside in Cleveland, Ohio. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Harvey Graves, son of Mary and Levi Graves of Hatfield, 
m. Eliza Bardwell. Res., Beloit, Wis. Children — 

1. Esther. 2. Lathrop. 3. Edward. 4. Ann Eliza. 
5. Lewis. 6. Almira. 7. Frank. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 203 

Mary Graves, dau. of Mary and Levi Graves of Hatfield ; m. 
Silas Billings of Hatfield. He d. 1850. Children— 

1. Abby. 2. Mary. 3. Jane. 4. Cornelia. 5. Samuel. 

Levi Graves, son of Mary and Levi Graves of Hatfield, Mass., 
m. Tabitha Field of Conway. Children — 

1. Louisa, d. 1850, ae. 12. 

2. Miron C. 



2. Mn-on C. ) , . , ,o.i 

3. Maria C. } *^^^'^^' ^- ^^^^- 

4. Louisa, b. 1856. Res., Springfield, Mass. 



Jonathan Graves, son of Mary and Levi Graves of Hatfield, 
m. Caroline Smith. Children — 

1. Alpha. 2. Abby. 3. Louisa. 4. Carrie. 

Erastus Morton, son of Sophronia and Morton, and 

grandson of Bathsheba (Chapin) Smith and Jonathan Smith, m., and 
has 2 daughters. 

Mary Morton, dau. of Sophronia and Morton of Whately, 

m. Russell Wait of Whately. Children — 

1. Chauncey. 2. Albert; 3. Mirana. 
4. Julia. 5. Delia. 6. Lyman. 

7. Mary, d. when about 2 yrs. old. 

8. Mary, d. in 1853. 9. Emily. 

Delia m. John Smith ; they have 2 children — Albert, and 1 other. 

Julia Morton, dau. of Sophronia and Morton of Whately, 

m. Sanford Perry, No children living. She d. about 1840, in Va. 

Justus Morton, had 2 wives, and 2 daughters. He d. in Canada 
West, about 1858. 

Sophronia Morton, dau. of Sophronia and " Morton, m. 

Col. Caleb Crafts of Whately. He d. in 1853. Children— 

1. Harriet, m. Dexter Daniel of Portland, Maine ; 1 dau. living, 
about 10 or 12 yrs. old. 

2. Maria, m. (1) Gayton Bowers; he d., and left 1 child ; m. (2) 
Dwight Kellogg of Hadley ; 1 child. 

3. Charles, m. Miss Bowers ; have 1 child. 

4. Edward, m. Martha Harwood ; have 2 children. 

5. Thomas. 6. George. 7. Sophronia. 



204 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

Isaac Morton, son of Sophronia and Morton, m. Wil- 

mena ; had 2 sons wlio d. and 2 daughters — 

1. Anna. 2. Wilmena. 
And other children living. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Rhoda Smith, dan. of Bathsheba and Jonathan Smith, b. Nov, 5, 
1777 ; m. Asa Rumrill of South Hadlcy. He d. in Chicopee Falls 
Village, Jan. 29, 1840, ae. 76. She d. in the same village, Dec. 29, 
1848, ae. 72. Children— 

1. Susan, b. March 11, 1798. 

?• '^^\!^' \ twins, b. Oct. 8, 1799. 

3. Delia, ) 

4. Lucy, b. Oct. 29, 1802. 5. Alice, b. Sept. 29, 1804. 
6. Asa, b. Nov. 1806. 7. Rhoda, b. March 4, 1809. 

8. George, b. Sept. 1811. 9. Jonathan Smith, b. Feb. 1814. 

10. Clarissa L., b. Feb. 1816. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Asa Rumrill, son of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill of South Hadley, 
b. Nov. 1806; m. Nov. 20, 1831, Rebecca Goodell of Amherst. 
She was b. Nov. 24,1805. Asa d. Nov. 26, 1839, ae. 33. Children— 

1. Eliza, b. Sept. 7, 1832. 

2. Angeline, b. June 8, 1835, 

3. Julia Chapin, b. Oct. 16, 1839. 

Eliza m. Reuben Temple. Reside at Chicopee Falls; lost 1 
child, and have 1 child — Benjamin Chapin — living. 

Angeline m. Newton H. Morley, Feb. 28, 1859. Reside in Hart- 
ford, Ct. 

George Rumrill, b. Sept. 1811, son of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill, 
of South Hadley ; m. (1) Sophronia Spellman. Had two children ; 
both died young. Mrs. Sophronia Rumrill died. George m. (2) 
Drucilla Bennett. Mr. George Rumrill is a Mason by trade; 
resides in the village of Chicopee Falls ; owns a large number of 
tenements ; has been Assessor in Chicopee. Children — 

1. Frances, ) , . 

^ twms. 



2. George 



to 



!S, ) 



3. James. 4. Mary Louisa. 5. Melville Chapin, d. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 205 

Jonathan Smith Kumrill, son of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill of 
South Hadley, b. Feb. 1814; m. (1) Phila Ann Williams, Phila 
Ann, the mother, d. Children — 

1. John Asa. 2. One d. young. 

Jonathan S. m. (2) Sarah Ann Chamberlain. Children — 

3. One d. young. 4. Mary. 5. William Buchanan. 

Jonathan S. is a Painter by trade ; lives in Chicopee Centre. 

Susan Rumrill, dau. of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill, of South Had- 
ley, and granddaughter of Bathsheba (Chapin) Smith and Jonathan 
Smith, b. March 11, 179S ; m. Luther Smith of South Hadley, Jan. 
1828. They removed to Willimansett (Chicopee;) he died there 
April 1858. Children — 

1. Quartus Judd, b. April 1829. 

2. Delia S., b. Aug. 1831. 

3. Luther, b. Nov. 1833 ; d. in Kansas, Oct. 1855, ac. 22. 

4. George R., b. Dec. 1835 ; m. Sept. 12, 1860, Eunice A. Day, 
dau. of Dea. Newton Day, of Willimansett, (Chicopee) Mass., being 
her 21st birth-day. 

Julia Rumrill, dau. of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill, and granddau. of 
Bathsheba (Chapin) Smith and Jonathan Smith of South Hadley, b. 
Oct. 8, 1799 ; m. May 6, 1819, (1199) Orange Chapin of (Chico- 
pee) Springfield. 

Delia Rumrill, dau. of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill of South Had- 
ley, b. Oct. 8, 1799 ; m. Jonathan Towne of Belchertown. Mr, 
Jonathan Towne d. in California. Delia m. (2) Ebenezer Bartlett 
of Chicopee Falls, where they now reside. No children. 

Children by first husband — 

1. Orange Chapin, b. in Belchertown, March 20, 1823. 

2. Henry Edwards, b. in South Hadley, April 1, 1826. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Orange Chapin Towne, m. Eugenia Sophia Tenney. They 
have one dau. — 

1. Florence Eugenia, b. May 18, 1859. 

Henry E., if living, is probably in the Navy, as he has followed 
the seas for several years. 



206 AI.I.IKD FAMILIES. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Lucy Eumrill, dan. of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill of South Hadley, 
b. Oct. 29, 1802 ; m. Oton Goodman of Bolton, Warren Co., N. Y., 
on the west side of Lake George, lie removed with his father's 
family from South Iladley, Mass. to that place, when about four 
years old. Mrs. Lucy Goodman d. June, 1849. Children — 

1. Julia Ann Chapiu, b. July 27, 1822 ; m. (1) Edwin Burt; he 
was drowned ; left 1 son, now about 13 yrs. old ; m. (2) Stephen 
Bently. 

2. Thomas Truxton, b. March 24, 1824. 

3. Harriet Alice, b. Feb. 16, 1824 ; m. a Mr. Streeter, 1861. 

4. Eldad White, b. Aug. 23, 1830 ; ra. Martha Cooledge. 

5. Lucy, b. May 6, 1834 ; d. June 19, 1837. 

6. Lucy Caroline, b. June 19, 1837 ; d. Aug. 30, 1841. 

7. Oton, b. Juno 9, 1845. 

Alice Rumrill, dau. of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill of South Ilad- 
ley, b. Sept. 29, 1804 ; m. April 1829, William Hatfield of Granby. 
They afterwards lived in Amherst, and then iu Springfield. In the 
last place, he kept a clothing store, and then a crockery store ; was 
an auctioneer, and has been Crier of the Courts for Hampden Coun- 
ty, for a time. He d. April 6, 1858. Children — 

1. Lucy A., b. Sept 12, 1832. 

2. William, b. Sept. 1834; m. 1861, Roxana Charter of Chico- 
pee. Residence, Chicopee Falls. 

3. Franklin S., b. Feb. 1845. 
Three others, who d. yonng. 

Rhoda Rumrill, dau. of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill of South Had- 
ley, b. March 4, 1809 ; m. Clark Albro of Chicopee Centre, being 
his third wife. They have 1 son — 

1. Francis Truman, b. Sept. 13, 1850. 

Clarissa L., b. Feb. 1816, dau. of Rhoda and Asa Rumrill of 
South Hadley ; m. William Mace ; lives in Lynn, Mass. 1 dau. — 
1. Abby L., b. June 25, 1847. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

(400) 

ABIAH CHAPIN, dau. of George and Thankful (Sikes) Chapin, 
m. Jan. 16, 1777, Moses Bliss. Dea. Bliss resided near the centre 
of what is now the village of Chicopee. Children — 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 207 

1. Joseph Talcott, b. Jan. 14, 177S; d. Jau. 16, 1778. 

2. William Chapin, b. Sept. 11, 1779 ; still living, 1862. 

3. Esther, b. July 6, 1782; d. Feb. 22, 1836. 
4.*Lois, b. May 11, 1784; d. Nov. 2, 1814. 

5. Moses, b. Sept. 17, 1788 ; d. Nov. 30, 1825. 

6. Horace, b. May 21, 1791 ; d. Oct. 7, 1814. 

7. Francis, b. Aug. 19, 1793; living in Minn, in 1859. 

8. Abiah, b. Nov. 5, 1795; d. Sept. 19, 1801. 

Esther m. James W. Talcott. Lois m. Mr. Sykes of Suffield, Ct.; 
had issue. Moses, the son, was a sailor. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Henry Alexander Sykes, of Suffield, Ct., grandson of Abiah 
(Chapin) Bliss, of Springfield, Mass., now Chicopee Centre. 

" Died Dec. 13, 1860, ae. 50, of diptheria. During the preva- 
lence in Suffield of the disease to which Dea. Sykes was a victim, 
the family of which he was the head, has been sadly afflicted. On 
the 5th of Dec, a daughter, its pride and flower, was taken. She 
came from the school at South Hadley, where she was a pupil, to 
her home to spend Thanksgiving. She was attacked by the disease, 
and after an illness of only five days, she died ; followed quickly, 
and after an equally brief illness, by her father. He was by pro- 
fession, an architect ; and many handsome buildings, both public 
and private, in Springfield and adjoining towns, attest his skill. Six 
years ago, the degree of A. M. was conferred upon him by Amherst 
College. He was a zealous student of history, and the results of 
his research into the early times of his own town, are referred to 
with pride by his townsmen. On the ] 0th of September, 1858, he 
delivered an interesting Historical Address at Suffield, on occasion 
of the 150th anniversary of the decease of the Rev. Benjamin 
Ruggles, first pastor of the first Congregational church there. This 
address, with the proceedings of the day, has been published. His 
sound judgment, united to a kind and afi'able demeanor, made him 
respected and beloved, as a townsman and as a friend. For several 
years he was a Deacon of the Congi-egational Church." — Relig. 
Herald, Hartford, Dec. 27, 1860, and The New England His. and 
Genealogical Register, April 1861. 

* The mother of Henry A. Sykes, Esq. of Suffield, Ct. 



208 ALLIED l''A All LIES. 

FIFTH GENERATION. 

(410) 

Descendants of JEMIMA (CHAPIN) SMITH and MARTIN 
SMITH. She was b. Feb. 19, 1762 ; was dau. of Ephraim and 
Jemima Cliapin. Martin Smith Ijelonged in East Windsor, Ct. 
where they resided for many years, but after the death of her 
parents, they removed to Ludlow, Mass. and spent the remainder of 
their days. Children — 

1. Oliva, unni.; deaf and dumb. 

2. Jemima, m. (1) Mr. Lord ; m. (2.) 

3. Martin, m. (1 ;) had Caroline, and others; m. (2;) had issue. 

4. Betsey, m. Jesse Bellows of South Hadley ; had issue. 

5. Lucinda, m. Mr. Ainsworth ; had issue ; removed to the West. 

6. Luciua, m. 

7. Almena, m. Mr. Burr of Ludlow ; had issue. 

8. Eunice, m. (1) Sumner Adkins ; had 1 daughter; she m. 
Mr. Bugbee. Eunice m. (2) Horace Adkins ; had no issue ; she 
m. (3) Mr. Bugbee. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(521) 

Descendants of HADASSAH (CHAPIN) ELY and ELIHU 
ELY. Hadassah Chapin, dau. of Moses and Bethia Chapin, b. 
Aug. 2, 1767 ; d. Aug. 3, 1808. Elihu Ely was b. July 13, 1765 ; 
d. April 13, 1822. They were m. May 28, 1785. Children— 

1. Horatio, b. March 13, 1786 ; d. May, 1852. 

2. Abel C, b. Sept. 8, 1788. 

3. Livia, b, Oct. 7, 1790 ; d. March 26, 1844. 

4. Asaph, b. Nov. 25, 1792. 

5. Elihu, b. March 31, 1794 ; d. April 3, 1794. 

6. Herrett, b. April 10, 1798. 

7. Kezia, b. March 31, 1800. 

8. Eunice, b. Oct. 19, 1801 ; d. Nov. 4, 1855. 

9. Mahala, b. Jan. 17, 1804. 

10. Lois, b. May 18, 1805. 

11. Hadassah, b. Jan. 6, 1808. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Horatio Ely, m. Frances Mann of Boston. Mr. Ely spent 
most of his days in Boston, after he arrived at his majority. For 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 209 

several years he' drove a market wagon, and for several years was 
engaged in the trucking business. Children — 

1. Frances. 2. Harriet. 3. Horatio. 4. Elihu. 

Abel C. Ely, m. Tamer Leonard of West Springfield, Mass. 
Farmer. Resides in Ohio. Children — 

1. Alexis. 2. Asaph. 3. Harriet. 4. Lucy. 5. Mary. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(543) 
SOPHRONIA CHAPIX, dau. of Capt. Phineas Chapin, m. 
Rev. Stephen Bemis of Harvard, Mass.; had 2 children — 

1. Stephen Chapin Bemis, b. Nov. 28, 1802. 

2. Sophronia Bemis, b. July 29, 1804. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Stephen C. Bemis, m. Dec. 25, 1828, Julia E. Skeele, dau. of 
Otis and Kezia Skeele. Hon. S. C. Bemis has been a member of 
the Massachusetts Legislature ; has also held important offices in 
the city of Springfield, — was Mayor in 1861 and '62. Quite an 
active and influential man. Largely engaged in the Iron and Coal 
trade. Children — 

1. Stephen Augustus, b. Sept. 27, 1830. 

2. William Chaplin, b. Oct. 16. 1832. 

3. Arthur Irvin, b. Jan. 18, 1835. 

4. Julia Emeline, b. Feb. 27, 1838; m. Mr. Sturtevant; 1 child. 

5. Thoi^ias Otis, b. Aug. 1, 1840. 

6. Kate Chapin, b. May 30, 1846. 

7. Henry Skeele, b. Oct. 27, 1850. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

S. AuGusTLS Bemis, m. Feb. 1855, Frances A. Burdick. One 
child— 

1. Lillie, b. April 7, 1859. 

William C, m. Dec. 25, 1856, Emma 0. Rogers. One child — 
1. Edwin Leonard, b. Nov. 15, 1858. 

Arthur Irvin, m. Anna E. Parker, Oct. 1857. 
27 



210 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 
SoPHRONiA Bemis, m. Sept. 1831, Dea. John Pendleton of Willi- 
mansett. Mrs. Sophronia B. Pendleton d. Mureh 27, 1842, ae. 37. 
Children — 

1. Susan S., b. May, 1832. 

2. John, b. Aug. 1839. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(555) 
MARGARET CHAPIN, daughter of John Chapin, m. Collins 
Brown; they removed to Masonville, Delaware Co., N.Y. Children — 

1. Patty, m. Ichabod P. AVhitman ; had 3 children— ^Mary. 
^Elizabeth Ann. ^Roswell. 

Elizabeth Ann m. Joshua Willis, and has — ^Prentice, ^john. 

2. Quartus.t m. Thirza Smith. Children— ^Quartus S., d. in 
infancy, ^j^jartha. ^jjarvey, (lawyer in California.) "iPhineas.* 
^Semantha. ''Edgar, '^Orlina. ^Alonzo.* 

Martha m. Amos Montgomery ; had — 'Quartus.* ^Thirza. 

^Harvey, and a daughter not named. 
Harvey m. Louisa Flowers ; had 4 or 5 chiL, (names not known. 
Edgar m. Hannah Rector ; 1 child, named — ^Frank. 
Semantha m. Ebenezer Ferry ; 4 children, (names not known.) 

3. Ara, m. Silas Kneeland, and had — 

iMary Ann, b. Jan. 6, 1826 ; d. Feb. 12, ae. 37 days. 

2Levi B., b. July 12, 1827 ; m. Harriet P. Neff ; has— ^Leander. 
^Lenwick. ^Eudera, and a ^abe, b. May, 1860. 

sSarah, b. Jan. 13, 1832 ; m. Warren Stilson ; had 1 child- 
Florence C. 

^Samuel 0., b. Jan. J, 1830 ; d. June 23, 1831. 

^Quartus, b. Dec. 13, 1834 ; d. May 19, 1840. 

sHorace P., b. Sept. 6, 1837 ; d. Jan. 19, 1840. 

•'Martha A., b. April 7, 1840. 

^Harriet U., b. Aug. 29, 1842. 

^Semantha A., b. Jan. 17, 1845. 

4. Ann Brown,* unm. 

5. Pollyt was scalded to death by falling into some hot tallow, 
when she was a small child. 



* Those marked with a * are unmarried. t Those marked with a t are dead. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 211 

6. Collins J., m. (1) Sarah Griswold ; had 1 son-.-^Simeon, who 
m. Lucia Evarts, by whom he had one dau. He is a Baptist 
preacher ; his mother d. when he was about 4 months old. Collins 
m. (2) Mary Neif, by whom he had one dau. — -Louisa, who m. 
Francis Wood. When she was about 3 or 4 years old, her mother 
died. Collins m. (3) Sarah Wood, and has by her, 4 children, — 
2 sons and 2 daughters. 

7. Unevilda m. David Teed, and had — ^Margaret, who d. when 

about 10 or 12 yrs. old. ^Horace, m. Lawson. ^Mary E. 

■*Alonzo. ^Wallis. ^Emagene. 

8. Mary Ann, m. Stephen Whitman, and has — ^Maria. ^Louisa. 
^Sarah Ann. **James. ^Rufus. ^Harvey. '^Birtha. ^Semantha. 
"Emma. 

Maria ra. Porter Broad ; has 2 children. 
Louisa m. Peter Tiifany ; has I child. 
Sarah Ann m. Woodmancy. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(760) 

SARAH CHAPIN, dau. of Capt. Israel and Chloe (Lombard) 
Chapin, b. Jan. 13, 1794 ; d. May 5, 1840 ; m. Benjamin F. Clark 
of Granby, Mass. Children — 

1. Harriet Pomroy, b. ; d. , 185 — . 

2. Sarah Delia, b. Oct. 7, 1828. 

3. Samuel Worcester, b. 1830. 

4. Catharine Lombard, b. Jan. 31, 1831 ; d. April 27, 1856. 

5. James Franklin, b. Jan. 31, 1833. Missionary in Turkey, 
Bulgarian Mission. 

6. Henry Lyman, b. 1835 ; d. 185 — . 

7. Daniel Chapin, b. 1837. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(764) 

MARY CHAPIN, dau. of Capt. Israel and Mary (Boothe) 
Chapin, b. Aug. 31, 1801 ; m. Nov. 8, 1821, Simeon Jones of Lud- 
low. Children — 

1. Hannah, b. Oct. 13, 1822 ; d. Sept. 27, 1855. 

2. Delia, b. June 22, 1824 ; d. April 7, 1855. 

3. David Chapin, b. Sept. 23, 1826. 



212 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

4. Henry Sipieon, b. Oct. 31, 182S. 

5. Danu'l, h. June 4, 1S;U ; d. Jan. 10, 1832. 
G. Daniel, b. July 17, 1833 ; d. Jan. 24, 1859. 

7. Mary Eliza, b. July 5, 1835. 

8. Pamelia, b. Feb. 5, 1838. 

9. Infant dan., b. June 3, 1841 ; d. June 4, 1841. 

10. Sarah Annette, b. Feb. 26, 1843 ; d. Aug. 3, 1858. 

11. Irene Tuck, b. March 10, 1845. 

12. Charles Parsons, b. July 8, 1848 ; d. Dec. 2, 1848. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Hannah, ni. Sept. 25, 1851, Quartus Sikes of Hatfield, i\Iass, 
Children — 

1. Frankie, b. Oct. 17, 1852. 

2. Delia Jones, b. Sept. 20, 1855 ; d. Oct. 11, 1855. 

David Chapin, m. .May 7, 1848, Harriet A. Miller. Children — 

1. Frederick David, b. Dec.l, 1850; d. Nov. 15, 1851. 

2. Willie Merrit, b. July 1, 1853; d. July 21, 1859. 

3. Alfred Tuck, b. Oct. 21, 1859. 

Henry Simeon, m. Oct. 28, 1852, S. Elizabeth Parsons. Child — 
1. Charles Parsons, b. Sept. 14, 1856. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(840) 

MARTHA GOLD CHAPIN, dau. of Henry Chapin of Ludlow, 
b. May 19, 1793 ; m. in Granby, Jan. 21, 1808, Wait Bartletl, b. 
Feb. 28, 1786. Children— 

1. Henry E., b. in Granby, .June 23, 1809 ; m. Harriet, dau. of 
Oliver Chapin ; had 2 children. 

2. Benjamin F., b. in Springfield, April 31, 1811 ; m. Fanny 
Childs ; 3 children. 

3. Elizabeth, b. in Granby, May 8, 1813; ni. James Kussell, of 
Lowell ; 4 children. 

4. Hannah S., b. March 15, 1815 ; m. Fitz Henry Warren. 
Present residence, Burlington, Iowa. He has been 2d Assistant 
Postmaster General ; is now Col. in the cavalry, Volunteer Union 
Army ; 4 children. Their oldest son — Edward Bartlett — d. at Bur- 
lington, Iowa, May 28, 1862, ae. 14 yrs. 5 mos. 

5. Asher, b. Jan. 26, 1817 ; m. Ellen F. Mills, of New Hartford; 
3 children. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 213 

6. Pliny, b. Oct. 7, 1819 ; m. Susan Merrow ; 2 children. 

7. Harry E., b. Nov. 3, 1821 ; ni. Mary Campbell of Philadel- 
phia ; no issue. 

8. Clarissa C, b. May 11, 1824; m. Rev. Lewis Greene; 3 
children. 

9. Martha C, b. Dec. 28,1826; m. Rev. Charles Shackford of 
Lynn, Mass; 5 children. 

10. Catharine E., b. Jan. 24, 1828 ; d. Aug. 3, 1828. 

11. William E., b. April 18, 1830. 

12. Lucy A., b. March 21, 1833 ; d. Sept. 9, 1856. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(904) 

ABIGAIL CHAPIN, dau. of Zerah and Abigail Chapiu, b. 

April 29, 1803; m. April 13, 1831, Seth Whiting, b. Jan. 1, 1803. 
Children — 

1. 3Iary Eliza, b. Feb. 29, 1832 ; m. Oct. 19, 1853, C. D. 
Crackbon, of New Haven, Ct. She d. in Wether.sfield, III, April 
2, 1858. Mr. Crackbon d. at Paducah, Ky., April 26, 1862, member of 
the 42d Illinois Reg't Volunteers. 

2. Elizabeth, b. June 8, 1834. 

3. Nancy T„ b. Jan. 3, 1837 ; d. Oct. 20, 1853. 

4. Abigail B., b. Feb. 26, 1839. 

5. Emeline, b. May 20, 1841. 

6. Edward S., b. June 14, 1843. 

Children all b. in Chicopee, Mass. The family resided in Chico- 
pee until a few years since, when they removed to Wethersfield, 111. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(907) 

MARY CHAPIN, dau. of Levi Chapin, m. Josiah Stephens, 
Nov. 14, 1805. Children— 

1. Mary, b. Aug. 26, 1806; d. June 17, 1808. 

2. Levi, b. Nov. 9, 1809 ; d. April 28, 1841. 

3. Josiah, b. July 26, 1811. 

4. Benjamin, b. Oct. 4, 1813. 

5. Mary Ann, b. Oct. 3, 1815. 

6. Phebe, b. Dec. 3, 1817. 

7. Sophia, b. Oct. 8, 1819. 

8. Eliza, b. Feb. 26, 1822. 

9. Edmund, b. Feb. 18, 1824. 



214 ALLIED FAMILIES. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

Descendants of the DAuoiiTEns of Col. ABEL CIIAPIN 
AND Mrs. DORCAS CIIAPIN. 

(1005) 

ELECTA CIIAPIN, their dau., was b. Dec. 18, 1779 ; m. Jan. 10, 
1799, to Dr. Pearly Warner of Norwich, Mass. He was b. in 
Braintree, Mass. Dr. Warner d. Nov. 10, 1807, ae. 37. Electa 
m. (2) John S. Abbee of Springfield, (Willimansett.) She d. Oct. 20, 
1857, ae. nearly 78. Mr. J. S. Abbee d. May 9, 18G2. 

Children by (1) husband — 

1. Dorcas Lima, b. in Essex, Vt., June 3, J 800. 

2. Electa, b. in Essex, Vt., May 24, 1803. 

3. Sophia, b. in Montgomery, Mass., March 8, 1805. 

4. Charles Pyncheon Lyman, b. in Montgomery, March 5, 1807. 
Children by (2) husband — 

5. Julia Ann, m. Charles Curtis. 

G. Harriet, m. Enoch C. Chapin of South Hadley. 
7 Isabella, d. unm. 

8. John, m. Caroline Pease of Wilbraham. Children — ^Ann C. 
-Edgar. ^Jane. "^Oster. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Dorcas Lima, m. Roswell Van Horn of Springfield ; had one 
dau. — Nancy ; she m. John Cooley of Springfield. No issue. 
Parents both deceased. 

Electa, m. Capt. Joseph Griswold, Dec. 2, 1824. Children — 

1. Frederick, b. Oct. 27, 1825 ; unm. 

2. Lucy Ann, b. Sept. 21, 1828 ; m. Feb. 2, 1860, Elijah F. 
Paige ; resides at Chicopee. 

3. Joseph, b. June 18, 1831; d. Sept. 2, 1833. 

4. Sophia Warner, b. June 13, 1835. Assistant in Register of 
Deeds Office, Northampton, Mass. 

5. Frances J., b.Jan.3 1,1 839; has been school teacher in Northamp- 
ton, Mass.; is now (1862) in Register of Deeds Office, Northampton. 

Sophia Warner, dau. of Electa and Dr. Pearly Warner, becauie 
the second wife of Abner Miller of West Springfield, Ireland Parish, 
(now Holyoke.) Reside at present in Easthamptou, Mass. They 
were m. Dec. 1, 1824. Children — 

1. Charlotte. 2. Jane. 3. Ann. 

4. Dorcas. 5. Charles. 6. Sophia. 



ALLIED families! 215 

Charles P. L. Warner, son of Electa and Dr. Pearly Warner, 
m. Elvira Cbapin, dau. of William Chapin of (Chicopee,) Spring- 
field. Children — 

1. Charlotte, d. 

2. Emma Louisa, d. June 12, 1862, ae. 18. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(1007) 

JEMIMA CHAPIN, dau. of Col. Abel and Mrs. Dorcas Chapin, 
b. Oct. 7, 1783 ; m. (1) Samuel Lyman of Springfield ; he d. with- 
out issue. Jemima m. (2) Dr. Samuel Kingsbury of Springfield ; 
he was a native of Ellington, Ct. Dr. Kingsbury d. Mrs. Kings- 
bury d. Jan. 20, 1846. Children— 

1. Margaret. 2. Charles, d. in N. Y. 3. Betsey. 

4. Hannah Worthington. 5. Abel Chapin. 6. One other son. 

Margaret, m. Hon. William B. Calhoun of Springfield. Hon. 
Wm. B. Calhoun studied Law, but never engaged very much in its 
practice. He has many times represented Springfield in the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature ; has been for many years a Representative to 
Congress ; has been Mayor of the city of Springfield, and held other 
important offices. He is a very highly esteemed and useful citizen. 
Children — 

1. Martha. 2. William B. 3. Charles. 



Betsey Kingsbury, dau. of Jemima and Dr. Samuel, m. 



Lee, son of the late Col. Roswell Lee, formerly Superintendent of 
the United States Armory, Springfield. Children — 
1. Roswell. 2. One other son. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(lOOS) 

ORAL CHAPIN, dau. of Col. Abel and Mrs. Dorcas Chapin, 
b. Oct. 11, 1785 ; m. (1) to Daniel Pyncheon of Springfield. He 
d. ; left no children. She m. (2) Eber Wright of Springfield, 
(Willimansett.) They lived and also kept the Hotel at South Had- 
ley Falls ; also lived in Granby, Mass., and then in Chicopee, 
where she d. May, 1849. Children — 

1. Lucy, m. Phineas Stedman. 

2. Julius, m. (1 ;) had issue. 3. Henry, m.; d. and left 6 chil. 
4. Mary, m. King, of Suffield, Ct. ; had 3 children, 1 d. 



216 :ALLIKD FAMILIKS. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(10] 5) 

DORCAS CIIAPIN, dau. of Col. Abel and Mrs. Dorcas Chapin, 
b. April 11, 1801 ; m. (1022) Chester W. Chapin. 

SXITH GENERATION. 

"(1017) 
SOPHIA CHAPIN, dau. of Ephraim and Mary Chapin, m. 
June 10, 1807, Levi Stedman. A fanner. Mr. Levi Stedman d. 
April 4, 18G2, ae. 81. Children— 

1. Mary Ann, who m. Ellas Gates of Albany, and had — ^William. 
2Levi. '"^George. ^Betsey C. ^Isabella Cor. f^Sophia. \Tulia. ^Helen. 

2. Sophia C, m. Dr. Elisha Chapin of Tolland, Ct., and had — 
iJulia Sophia. ^Helen Amelia. 

3. Sarah H., m. Reuben Goodman of South Iladley, and had — 
^Alexander. ^Jaue. ^Martha. '^Eliza. ^Samuel. **Mary. '^Juliet. 
^Sydney. Alexander d. yrs. since. 

4. Catharine, d. at 11 months. 

5. Phineas, m. Lucy Wright of Chicopee, and had — 'Mary Ann, 
^Edward. Mary Ann m. Oct. 15, 1861, Edward E. Belding of 
Northfield, Mass. He is now station agent on the C.R.R.at Chicopee. 

6. William S., m. Rebecca Hibben of Northampton ; 4 children. 

7. Levi Lyman, m. Caroline Ferrey of Granby, and had — 'Mary. 
^Ella. '^A son. 

8. Catharine, m. Edwin Taylor of Cabotville. 

9. Amelia R., m. Chalmers Chapin of Chicopee ; had 4 children. 
10. Benjamin H., m. Ellen Strong of Easthampton. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(1020) 

MARY S. CHAPIN, dau. of Ephraim and Mary, m. Atlas 
Chapin, Dec, 21, 1815 ; 4 children. (See (942) Atlas Chapin.) 
Atlas d. Nov. 1825. She m. (2) Mr. Munson ; lives in Cazenovia, 
Madison Co., N. Y. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(1021) 
BETSEY CHAPIN, dau. of Ephraim and Mary, was late in 
life m. to M. C. Webster, of Hartford, Ct. M. C. Webster d. Oct. 
24, 1857. 



ALLIED FAiMILIES. 217 

SIXTH GENERATION. 
(1023) 

CAROLINE CHAPIN, dau. of Benjamin and Sarah, b. in Chic- 
■ opee, Feb. 15, 1789 ; m. Sept. 21, 1812, Seneca Barton Burchard, 
formerly of Granby, Mass. They finally settled in Hamilton, Madi- 
son Co., N. Y. Mr. Burchard was a highly respected and useful 
man. Hon. S. B. Burchard d. Feb. 3, 1861, in the 72d year of his 
age. Mrs. Caroline Burchard d. June 17, 1860, in the 72d year of 
her age. Children — 

1. Alma F., b. in Chicopee, Mass., Aug. 30, 1813; m. Aug. 19, 
1835, Charles Eldred ; have 4 children. 

2. John, b. May 24, 1815 ; d. Jan. 8, 1831. 

3. A babe, b. Feb. 4, 1816. 

4. Benjamin Chapin, b. Dec 5, 1817 ; d. Sept. 10. 1840. 

5. Caroline, b. March 6, 1820 ; m. Spencer Day, and d. Jan. 8, 
1854 ; left 4 children. 

6. Cynthia, b. May 23, 1822 ; m. Oct. 28, 1840, Wm. R. Storrs ; 
has 1 child. 

7. Patrick Henry, b. Aug. 2, 1825 ; m. (1) Sept. 5, 1849, Mary 
Moseley. Mrs, Mary Chapin d. July 15, 1853 ; left 2 children. 
Patrick Henry m. (2) Feb. 27, 1855, Celestia L. Muzzy ; 1 child. 

8. Seneca B., b. May 13, 1826 ; m. March 13, 1853, Irene B. 
Dunham ; have 1 child. 

9. William Chaffee, b. Sept. 2, 1829 ; m. Frances Bustillo ; have 
3 children. 

10. Horace, b. Feb. 6, 1831 ; d. April 16, 1832. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(1030) 

LUCY DOOLITTLE CHAPIN, dau. of Bezaleel and Thankful 
Chapin, b. in Ludlow, Mass., July 19, 1805 ; m. March 3, 1825, 
Aaron Warner Stebbins, b. in Granby, Mass., Aug. 11, 1797, son of 
Dea. John Stebbins. They lived in Granby two years ; then moved 
to Wethersfield, Vt. After living there five years, they emigrated 
to western New York, and settled on a new farm in the town of 
Mansfield, Cattaraugus Co., where their home has been ever since. 
Children — 

1. Anson Linsly, b. in Granby, Mass., Dec. 8, 1825. 

2. Edwin Adenis, b. in Wethersfield, Vt., Aug. 24. 1828. 

28 



218 ALLIKD FAMILIES. 

3. Mary Clark, b. in Mansfield, N, Y., March 28, 1833. 

4. Theodore Chapin, b. in " " Oct. 28, 1835. 

5. Harlan Charles, b. in. " " Sept. 3, 1838. 

6. Lydia Ann, b. in " " Feb. 28, 1845. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Anson L., m. Oct. 24, 1849, Mary Harris of Mansfield, N. Y. 
She was b. Nov. 6, 1824. Res., Otto, Cattaraugus Co., N.Y. 
Parmer. Children — 

1. Ina Althea, b. in Mansfield, N. Y., Aug. S, 1850. 

2. Edwin Daniel, b. in " " Jan. 11, 1855. 

3. Ida Lucelia, b. in " " Jan. 6, 1859. 

Edwin A., went South for his health in the Autumn of 1850. 
After wandering about for two or three years, he finally located near 
Camden, Madison Co., Miss., and is there now, (1862) for aught his 
friends know. He has taught school most of the time during his 
residence at the South, but when his sister Mary left there, June 
1861, he was attending to his farm, and mourning over the sad con- 
dition of our country, and rebelling, in lieart, against the rule of Jefi". 
Davis. What fearful trials may have been his, ere this, his friends 
know not. He m. April 4, 1854, Rachel Jemima Fleming, of Madi- 
son, Miss. She was b. Dec. 26, 1834. Children— 

1. Anson "Warner, b. in Madison, Miss., Feb. 10, 1855. 

2. Edwin Marion, b. Feb. 2, 1857. 

The other children are unm., and reside with their parents, with 
the exception of Harlan C; he is in Shiawassee Co., Mich., where he 
has purchased some land, which he is improving. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1200) 

KEZIA CHAPIN, dau. of Moses Chapin, Esq., and wife 
Kezia, m. Otis Skeele of (Chicopee) Springfield. Children — 

1. Julia Emeline, b. July 11, 1809. 

2. Ruhema Chapin, b. in Hartford, Conn., June 23, 1815. 

3. John Otis, b. March 30, 1819, unm. 

4. Henry Edwin, b. March 10, 1829. 

5. Adaline Marcy, b. Feb. 2, 1831, unra. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 
Julia Emeline, m. Stephen C. Bemis ; had 7 children. 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 219 

EuHEMA Chaplv Skeele, m. May 16, 1838, Amos Call. He is a 
Machinist, res. iu Springfield ; has held important offices in that 
city. Children — 

1. Charles Amos, b. June 3, 1839. 

2. George Norton, b. Aug. 7, 1844. 

3. Euema Chapin, b. Aug. 6, 1851. 

Henry E. Skeele, m. Sept. 17, 1855, Lucy A. Chapin, dau. of 
Quartus Chapin, formerly • of Chicopee, Mass. A machinist, in 
Springfield and Chicopee. Children — 

1. Edwin 0., b. March 19, 1858. 

2. Anna Cornelia, b. April 1, 1861. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1203) 

LAURA CHAPIN. dau. of Moses Chapin Esq., and wife Kezia, 

m. Dec. 21, 1821, John Kellogg of South Hadley. He d. May 18, 

1847, ae. 55. Mrs. Laura (Chapin) Kellogg d. March 30, 1861, ae. 

59 yrs. 9 mos. 9 days. Children — 

1. Amos, b. Oct. 21, 1822, unm. 

2. Kezia C, b. Aug. 16, 1824 ; m. VVm. Smith, Jan. 1851, and 
ha^—i Julia R., b. Nov. 2, 1851. ^ciara N., b. July 1856. 

3. Catharine B., b. Aug. 21, 1826 ; m. Harvey Judd, Dec. 1, 

1847, and has — 'John Kellogg, b. Jan. 1851. ^Mary Laura, b. 
March, 1855. 

4. Ruth C, b. Nov. 19, 1828 ; m. Nelson W. Burnett, Jan. 1852, 
and has— 1 Julia A., b. Dec. 1852. ^Katy I., b. Sept. 1856. 

5. Laura M., b. Feb. 30, 1831; m. Elliot Montague, July, 1855, 
and has — 'George Elliot, b. July, 1857. ^gam^gi Edwin, b. 
March, 1859. 

6. Julia, b. May 15, 1833; m. David C. Ayres of N.Y., April, 1860. 

7. John Edwin, b. Dec. 1, 1835 ; m. March 20, 1861, Jane R. 
Smith, dau. of Nelson Smith. 

8. Lois A., b. Jan. 27, 1840 ; m. Rufus Hinckley, 1858, and has 
— iLewis Dwlght, b. Feb. 1859. ^a daughter, b. Feb. 1862. 

9. Harriet E., b. June 20, 1842, unm. 
10. Mary W., b. May 20, 1846, unm. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1543) 
MARY BLISS CHAPIN, dau. of Chauncey and Nancy J., b. 
in Springfield, Mass., Dec. 22, 1825 ; m. Sept. 8, 1852, Rev. Pliny 
B. Day, of Hollis, N. H. Children— 



220 ALLIED FA Ml LI KS. 

1. Oliarlos Loml)ard, )). April 28, 1S54. 

2. George Chapin, b. May 13, 1859; d. Dec. 12, 18G1. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

(1544) 

JULIA ANN CHAriN, dau. of Chauncey and Nancy J. 
Chapin, b. in Springfield, Mass., Nov. 2, 1827 ; m. Feb. 5, 1852, 
Rev. J. B. Grinnell. Res. in Grinnell, Iowa. Children — 

1. Catharine Hastings, b. Dec. 20, 1852 ; d. May 15, 1856. 

2. George Chapin, b. Oct. 13, 1855 ; d. Sept. 20, 1857. 

3. Mary Chapin, b. Sept. 24, 1857. 

4. Carrie Holmes, b. April 2, 1859. 

SIXTH GENERATION. 

(547) 

BETHIA E. CHAPIN, dau. of Capt. Phineas and Sabrina 
Chapin, b. Aug. 27, 1782 ; ni. April 21, 1799, Joseph Pease, who 
was b. May 9, 1775. Mrs. Betliia Erato (Chapin) Pease d. Oct. 8, 
1859, ae. 77. Mr. Joseph Pease d. Nov. 8, 1839. Capt. Pease, in 
his younger days, taught school ; afterwards, a farmer ; then, mer- 
chant ; then lumber manufacturer and dealer, and farmer. He 
served in various town offices; was Representative to the Legislature ; 
Justice of the Peace ; Deacon of the Church, and a very highly 
esteemed and useful citizen. Res., (Chicopee,) Springfield. Chil. — 

1. Joseph Haskell, b. June 11, 1807. 

2. Christopher Harley, b. Dec. 21, 1808. 

3. James, b. May 23, 1811. 

4. Phineas Chapin, b. May 22, 1813. 

5. A daughter, b. March 17, 1816 ; d. April 16, 1816. 

6. A daughter, b. April 16, 1817 ; d. May 8, 1817. 

7. Margaret, b. June 23, 1818. 

8. Julia, b. Aug. 1, 1820 ; d. March 30, 1856. 

9. Marshall, b. Nov. 13, 1822. 

10. John Romeyn, b. June 8, 1824. 

11. Charles Northau, b. July 7, 1827. 

12. A son, b. Aug. 28, 1830 ; d. Oct. 19, 1830. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

Christopher Harley Pease, b. Dec. 21, 1808 ; m. April 16, 
1833, in Palmer, by Rev. Mr. Bachus, to Olive Sherman, b. Dec. 
14, 1807. Children— 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 221 

1. Benj. Franklin, b. March 23, 1834. 

2. Utley, b. Aug. 14, 1835; d. March 22, 1837. 

3. Oscar, b. Aug. 25, 1838 ; d. Oct. 21, 1838. 

4. George, b. Jan. 6, 1843 ; d. June 23, 1843. 

5. Alsie, b. Oct. 11, 1845. 

James Pease, b. May 23, 1811; m. Aug. 18, 1848, in Spring- 
field, 111., to Mahaley Hamilton, who was b.Nov. 1,1823. Children — 

1. Julia M., b. Dec. 11, 1849. 

2. Charles I., b. July 28, 1853. 

3. Ella G., b. Dec. 2, 1855. 

4. Jerome C, b. Dec. 24, 1857. 

Margaret Pease, b. June 23, 1818 ; m. (1) Mr. Mossman ; 
no issue ; (2) April 27, 1843, (by Rev. E.B.Clark, Chicopee, Mass.,) 
to Charles T. Webster of Hartford. Ct. Children— 

1. Charlie McCloud, b. Aug. 6, 1847. 

2. Maggie Elizabeth, b. July 14, 1851. 

3. Frank Pease, b. July 17, 1855 ; d. May 1, 1856. 

Marshall Pease, b. Nov. 13, 1822 ; m. May 19, 1847, (by Rev. 
E. B. Clark, Chicopee, Mass.,) to Harriet C. Chapin, dau. of Dea. 
Giles S. Chapin. She was b. April 27, 1823. Farmer. Children — 

1, Marshall Carletou, b. Nov. 27, 1850. 

2. Daniel Pearsons, b. July 7, 1857. 

John Romeyn Pease, b. June 8, 1824; m. Sept. 17, 1848, 
Catharine McAfee, b. April 3, 1828. Children— 

1. Phineas Chapin, b. Nov. 22, 1850 ; d. Aug. 16, 1851. 

2. Letitia Irene, b. Sept. IS, 1853. 

3. Emma Jane, b. May 5, 1857. 

4. Margaret Bertha, b. April 23, 1862. 

Charles Northan Pease, b. July 7, 1827 ; m. Nov. 14, 1849, 
(by Rev. H. Cooley, Southwick, Mass.,) to Thirza A. Piatt Loomis, 
b. March 26, 1828. He is a Painter. Children— 

1. Clifford Beecher, b. Aug. 18, 1850. 

2. Julia Bertha, b. Feb. 27, 1855 ; d. Oct. 15, 1857. 

3. Marshall Chapin, b. April 29, 1862. 



PART III. 



GE^E^LOaY 



OF THE 



DESCENDANTS OF JOSIAH CHAPIN. 



SON OF DEA. SAMUEL CHAPIN, OF SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



GENEALOGY. 



JOSIAH CHAPIN probably came to this country with his fath- 
er, Dea. Samuel Chapin. It is supposed he spent some time in 
Springfield. The birth of his eldest son, Samuel, is recorded on 
the Springfield Records, but it will be seen by his record below that 
he was born in AVeymouth, from which place he removed to Brain- 
tree, where he probably continued to reside for more than twenty 
years, as his fourteenth child was born there in 1680. He removed 
to Mendon, Worcester County, where his fifteenth and youngest child 
was born in 1684. He was one of the original grantees of the town 
of Mendon ; built the first saw-mill there ; was the leading man of 
the town, much engaged in public business ; was chairman of the 
Selectmen for more than twenty years ; was the first Representa- 
tive from that town to the General Court. His descendants have 
become very numerous. The following is copied from a record sup- 
posed to be in his own handwriting. 

" An account of my own (Josiah Chapin's) marriages, and 
of the marriages of my children, and of ye births of my children 
and grandchildren, and of the deaths of my wives, children and 
grandchildren, which began in the year of our Lord, 1658. 

In the month of November, 1658, I was — 

I. Married to Mary King in Weymouth. 

II. I was married to my second wife, Lydia Brown, at Ipswich, 
ye 20th of Sept., A. Dom., 1676. 

III. I was married to my third wife, Mehitabel Metcalf, in Ded- 
hani, the 22d of June, A. Dom., 1713. 

Births of my Children. 

1. Samuel Chapin, b. in Weymouth, Nov. 11th, A. Dom., 1659. 

2. John Chapin, b. in Braintree, June 11th, 1661. 

.3. 3Iary Chapin, b. in Braintree, ye 27th of August, 1662. 

4. Deborah Chapin, b. in Braintree, ye 16th of June, 1664. 

5. Josiah Chapin, b. in Braintree, ye 17th of December, 1665. 

29 



226 DESCENDANTS <>K JOSIAH (IIAIMN. 

6. Slieiu Cliai)iii, 1). in P.riiiiitroc, yc lilli day of .May, 1GG7. 

7. Seth Cliapiii, b. in Braintree, ye 4th of August, 1GG8. 
S. Joseph Chapin, b. in Braintree, 17th of May, 1670. 

9. Henry Chapin, b. in Braintree, 15th of Feb. 1G71. 

10. Ephraim Chapin, b. in Braintree, 18th Dee., 1G73. 

11. Deborah Chapin, 2d, b, in Braintree, Feb. 12th, 1675. 
These were the children of Mary, my first wife. 

12. Lydia Chapin, b. in Braintree, the 29th of Sept. 1677. 

13. Sarah Chapin, b. in Braintree, 12th March, 1679. 

14. David Chapin, b. in Braintree, 11th Kov. IG80. 

15. Hannah Chapiu, b. in Mendon, 11th Nov. 1684. 
These four were by the 2d wife. 

Abigail Adams, daughter of Joseph Adams and Mary, his wife, 
b. in Braintree, Feb. 17, 1684. 

Mary, dau. of Joseph and JVEary Adams, b. in Braintree, Feb. 
6th, 1683. 

Marriages of my Grandchildren. 

Deborah Eead was married to Thomas White, July 16th, 1711. 

Seth Chapin, Jun'r married Abigail Adamsof Braintree,Feb. 5,1713. 

Mary Adams was married to Ephraim Jones, in Braintree, 
April 1, 1714. 

Bethiah Chapin was married to Jonathan Thayer, June 24th, 1714. 

Mary Read was married to Nathaniel Tyler, March 2d, 1714-15. 

Marriages of my Children, and Births of Grandchildren. 

Seth Chapin married Mary Read, (his first wife,) May 23d, 1689. 

Seth Chapin married Bethiah Thurston, (his 2d wife,) 25th March, 
1691. 

The births of the children of Seth and Bethiah Chapin — 

1. Seth Chapin, b. in Medfield, July 2d, 1692. 

2. Bethiah Chapin, b. Feb. 16th, 1693. 

3. Josiah Chapin, b. March 1st, 1695-96. 

4. John Chapin, b. May 13th, 1698. 

5. Mary Chapin, b. April 30th, 1700. 

6. Samuel Chapin, b. June 2d, 1702. - 

7. Deborah Chapin, b. June 14th, 1704. 

8. Hopestill Chapin, b. Nov. 27th, 1705. 

9. Joseph Chapin, b. March 6th, 1707. 

10. Abigail Chapin, b. June 10th, 1710. 

11. Lydia Chapin, b. Feb. 2d, 1712. 



DESCENDANTS OF JOSIAH CHAPIN. 227 

12. Benjamiu Ohapin, b. April 6th, 1713. 

13. Ebenezer Chapin, b. Dec. 23cl, 1714. 

14. Japheth Chapin, b. Feb. 24th, 1716. 

Sarah Chapin, daughter of Seth Chapin and Abigail, his wife, 
was b. July 3d, 1715. 

Ephraim Chapin married Margaret Torrey, Jan. 23d, 1705. 
The births of the children of Ephraim and Margaret Chapin — 

1. David Chapin, b. Oct. 19th, 1706. 

2. Ephraim Chapin, b. July 16th, 1710. 

3. Henry Chapin, b. March 24, 1709. 

4. Eliza, b. Sept. 1716; d. March 24th, 1717. 

Deborah Chapin was married to Samuel Read, July 8th, 1693. 
The births of the children of Samuel and Deborah Read — 

1. Mary Read, b. Aug. 11th, 1694. 

2. Deborah Read, b. Jan. 25th, 1695. 

3. Hopestill Read, b. Feb. 2Sth, 1698. 

Lydia Chapin was married to Daniel Taft, Dec. 6, 1706. 
The children of Daniel and Lydia Taft — 

1. Abigail Taft, b. Sept. 14, 1707. 

2. Josiah Taft, b. April 2, 1709. 

3. David, b. April 19, 1711. 

4. Lydia, b. April 13, 1713. 

5. Daniel, b. Dec. 15, 1715. 

6. Ephraim. b. May 25, 1718. 

Sarah Chapin was married to Ebenezer Read, Feb. 7, 1703-4. 
The children of Ebenezer and Sarah Read — 

1. John Read, b. Aug. 3, 1707. 

2. David, b. Aug. 19, 1709. 

3. Ebenezer, b. Feb. 27, 1711. 

4. Lydia, b. May, 1706. 

5. Hannah, b. March 19, 1714. 

6. Abigail, b. March 15, 1716-17. 

Hannah Chapin was married to John Holbrook, June 13, 1706. 
The children of John and Hannah Holbrook — 

1. Thomas Holbrook, b. March 15, 1706. 

2. Hannah, b. May 4, 1709. 

3. Lydia, b. April 22, 1711. 



228 DESCENDANTS OK JO.SIAII CIIAIMN. 

4. Joskih, 1). Jan. 17, 1714. 

5. Moses, 1). April 23, 1717. 

6. Joliii, b. .Seitt. 23, 1721. 

Deaths of my Family. 
Slieui Cliaphi d. June 6, 1GG7. 
Deborah Cliapin, Aug. IC, 1GG8. 
Henry Cliaiun, March 20, 1G71. 
Mary, my wife, d. May 30, 1G7G. 
Mary Adams, June 30, 1GS7. 
John Chapin d. at sea, Feb. 22, 1G86. 
Seth Chajjin's wife, Mary, Sept. 12, 1G89. 
Samuel Chapin, April 10, 1G92. Drowned at sea. 
Josiah Chapin, May 20, 1G93. Slain in Lord Russell's fight. 
Deborah Read, April 9, 1702. 
David Chapin, Oct. 4, 1704. 
Lydia, my 2d wife, Oct. 8, 1711. 
Josiah Cha, son of Seth C, Nov. 6, 1718. 
Japheth Cha, son of Seth C, April 15, 1717. 
Eliza Cha, dau. of Ephraim C, March 24, 1717. 
Abigail Cha, wife of Seth C, Jun'r, April 28, 1722. 
Mehitabel, my 3d wife, Dec. 2, 1724. 

Finis." 

The following is added in the handwriting of another. 

The Deaths of my Parents. 
My honored father Chapin d. A\m\, 170G. 
My honored mother Chapin d. March the 2, 1704. 

My sister, Abigail Chapin, d. Sept. 1738. 

My brother, Seth Chapin, d. April the 1, 1724. 
My brother, Samuel Chapin, d. April the 27, 1752. 

Nathaniel Nelson, b. April the 22, 1701. 
Deborah Chapin, b. July the 10, 170—. 

Nathaniel Nelson and Deborah Chapin were married April the 
15, 1725. 

Hon. Henry Chapin, of Worcester, who kindly furnished the 
foregoing, says : 

" From the foregoing, I infer that the list before the word " finis" 
was made by Josiah Chapin himself, from time to time. I seem to 
detect the marks of age in the form of the last few entries made by 
him. It is quite a curiosity to me. They shew to me that the old 
gentleman was a painstaking, sensible man." 



DESCQiVDANTS OF JOSIAH CHAPIN. 229 

The descent of Judge Hexry Chapix, of Worcester, as follows : 

Moses Chapin, his great-grandfather, b. in Mendon or Milford. 
His children — 

David Chapin, liis grandfather, b. in Milford. 

Nathan Chapin. 

.Mrs. Saunders. 

Mrs. Legg. 

Children of David Chapin — 

Elisha Chapin, b. in Milford, (dead.) 

Judith Chapin, m. Ezra Wood. 

Sarah Chapin, m. Jonathan Wood. 

Lydia Chapin, m. Elias Hayward, (dead.) 

Joseph B. Chapin. 

David Chapin. 

The last five children b. in Upton. 

Children of Elisha Chapin, b. in Upton. 

Experience Chapin, ra. Palmer Wood. 

Sarah A. Chapin, m. Thomas E. Wood. 

Henry Chapin, — the writer — a very prominent man ; Ex-mayor 
of the city of Worcester, and is now Judge of Probate and Insol- 
vency, Worcester' county, Mass. 

Dea. Samuel Chapix, son of Seth Chapin, b. June 2, 1702 ; 
lived in Uxbridge, and there m, Anna Graggin, May 19, 1729. He 
d. in Uxbridge, April 27, 1752 or 1753. Children— 

1. Anna, b. May 12, 1731. 

2. Samuel, b. March 12, 1732-3. 

3. Ephraim, b. May 24, 1735. 

4. Deborah, b. Jan. or June 17, 1737 ; m. Dexter Wood, March 3, 
1757. She was the great grandmother of Henry W. Taft, Esq. of 
Lenox, Mass. 

Daniel Chapin and Abigail Chapin had 3 sons — 

1. Daniel, who was afflicted with the epilepsy; he was never m., 
and d. at Bellingham, Mass., April, 1S43. 

2. Oliver, b. in Mendon, now ]\[ilford, Worcester Co., Mass., 
Oct. 1. 1759. 

3* Amariah, was a portrait painter; m.; d. in Boston, leaving 

3 sons ; no information given respecting them. 

Daniel Chajiin, the father, d. between the years 1775 and 1779. 
His widow, Abigail, m. Ebenezer Eleld, of Northfield, Mass., and d. 
June 7, 1801, ae. 73. 



230 DESCKNDANTS OF JOSIAII CI^AIM.V. 

Oliver Chapi.\, son of Daniel and Abigail, b. Oct. 1, 1759 ; 
m. April 29, 1784, Mary Jones of Milfortl. 

Oliver Chapin d. in Brattleboro', Vt., June 26, 1811, ae. 51. His 
widow, Mary, d. in Brattleboro', Aug. 27, 1849, ae. 84. In 1775, he 
entered the Revolutionary army, as a private soldier, and served in 
various situations until Dec. 1779. In 1789, he moved from ^Milford 
to Orange, Hampshire, now Franklin Co., Mass. In 1799 and 1804, 
represented the towns of Orange and Warwick, in the General 
Court. In 1806, moved from Orange to Brattleboro', Vt. He was 
engaged as a country merchant while in Orange, and also in Brattle- 
boro' ; was in turnpike building at this time, and in 1804 built the 
bridge across Conn. River, between Hinsdale, N. H., and Brattle- 
l)6ro', Vt. 1807, appointed Second Assistant Judge of the County 
Court, AVindhara Co., Vt., and 1809, First Assistant Judge of said 
Court. Mr. Chapin was a good penman, and kept a record of his 
early life, but his papers were destroyed by fire. 

Children of Oliver and Mary Chapin — 

1. Cyrus Cliapin, b. at Milford, June 10, 1785 ; d. at Brattleboro', 
April 27, 1811. Educated at Brown University, Providence, R. I. 
Country trader, or merchant, unm. 

2. Jonathan, b.at Milford, May6,1787; d. in Orange, July 14, 1793. 

3. Abigail, b. July 2, 1789, at Orange ; m. Thomas Harris of 
Charlestown. Mass. Widow — nine children. 

4. Mary, b. Feb. 10, 1793, at Orange ; d. an infant. 

5. Oliver, b. May 10, 1801, at Orange ; d. an infant. 

6. Charles, b. July 10, 1803, at Orange. Educated at Harvard 
College ; studied medicine with Dr. J. Gorham of Boston. Prac- 
tised medicine in Springfield, Mass., about four years ; returned to 
Brattleboro', Oct. 19, 1850. May 8, 1827, m. Elizabeth B. Bridge, 
of Charlestown, Mass. She d. March 28, 1828, her birth-day, ae. 21 
yrs., leaving one child — Elizabeth Alice, b. Feb. 27, 1828, and she 
m. Jan. 7, 1847, Joseph Clark, of Brattleboro', and is the mother of 
4 children, two of whom are dead. Dr. Chapin m. (2) Jan. 6, 1830, 
Sophia Dwight Orne, of Springfield, Mass. ; 5 children, all 1). in 
Brattleboro'. 

1. Lucinda Orne, )). Dec. 31. 1830 ; m. Josiah Wheelwright, of 
Boston, and has had 3 children, one deceased. 

2. Oliver Howard, b. July 15, 1832. Civil Engineer. 

3. Mary Wells, b. Sept. 27, 1834 ; m. Dec. 29, 1854, Charles 
Warden, of Philadelphia, Penn. No children. 

4. William Orne, b. March 10, 1837. Clerk. 

5. Charles Jones, b. Aug. 31, 1846. At school. 



DESCENDANTS OF JOSIAH CHAPIN. 231 

Dr. Chapin has been considerably employed in public affairs, 
Representative in the Legislature, United States Marshall for the 
district of Vermont, and Disbursing Agent for monies to pay for 
Government buildings at Rutland and Windsor, Vt. 

John Chapi.v was from Mendon or Milford ; he moved to Heath, 
now Franklin Co., Mass.; m. Rhoda Albee ; d. in Heath, 1815, ae. 
84. He gave each of his grandchildren (numbering some over fifty) 
a Bible ; he wrote on a blank leaf of each a word of exhortation 
that they would read it carefully and prayerfully. (Done in the 
84th yr. of his age.) He had 4 sons — Isaac. Jacob, b. in Mendon, 
Mass., Sept. 27, 1762. John and Ziba. Had 3 daughters— Bethia, 
Rhoda and Phebe. He had 3 nephews — Stephen, Luther and Seth ; 
also 1 neice, who m. Nahum Wedge. John had cousins residing in 
Berkshire Co., Mass. Joseph and Peter Chapin were not brothers. 

Jacob Chapin, son of John and Rhoda, b. in Mendon, ]\rass., 
Sept. 29, 1762 ; m. Jan. 28, 1787, Hannah Brooks. He was 70 yrs. 
of age when he d. They had 10 children, 8 of whom lived to years 
of maturity. Three were sons — two are now living, one was killed 
when a child. The two following are mentioned ; no othjer names 
given. 

1. John, b. in Heath, March 27, 1790 ; m. Sept. 1814, Clarissa 
Patterson. They live in Wis.; had 7 sons (one d. when a lad) and 
5 daughters. 

2. Jacob Chapin, son of Jacob and Hannah, b. in lleatli, Mass., 
May 20, 1800 ; m. Oct. 20, 1824, Sarah Sawyer; have no children. 
Residence, Westminster, Vt. The men, most or all of them, were 
farmers. 

There are several Chapins up the River from Westminster, Vt., 
descendants from Milford. One at Bellows Falls says his father was 
brother to Luther and Stephen Chapin. Mr. Jacob Chapin has a 
cousin Ziba at Cambridgeport, Vt., and one who m. John Spooner 
resides in Springfield, Mass.; he has worked at the gun business. 

Caleb T. Chapin, of Wbitinsville, Worcester County, Mass. 
descended from Samuel Chapin, as follows, viz. — I Gen. Samuel. 
II Gen. Josiah. Ill Gen. Seth. IV Gen. Joseph. V Gen. 
Gershom. VI Gen. Phineas. VII Gen. Caleb T. Chapin. 

General Israel Chapin, of Hatfield, b. in Mendon, Mass., was 
brother to Mary Chapin, grandmother of Mrs, Sumner Chapin, of 



232 DESCKNUANTS l)F JOSIAH CIIAI'IN. 

Cliicopoe. General Israel C!liai»iii had live suns. 'Israel. ^Thad- 
deiis. "Samuel. 'Henry, I), in llatiield, Mass., now (1862) 80 yrs. 
of age; res. in Norwalk, Huron County, Ohio. ^George. 'The fore- 
going may not he according to the order of tiieir hirths. Henry 
states that his father removed from Hatlield, Mass., to Canandaigua, 
N. Y., 1794. He d. in 1795. 

Oapt. Israel Chapiiv, son of Gen. Israel Chapin, h. April 25, 
1764 ; m. May 3, 17S5, Abigail Nash, dan. of Noah Nash of Hat- 
field, ]\lass., b. Oct. 15, 1764. They removed to Canandaigua, 
N. Y., June, 1791, where they spent the remainder of their days. 

It is said that " about 1798 or 1799, Capt. Chapin, with a few 
other gentlemen of the village, then a feelde band, organized a (C.) 
Church, and procured a clergyman ; that himself and wife both 
united with the church at the time ; that he was appointed a deacon 
at the organization, and continued so through life, and that they 
were both brigiit and beautiful examples of piety, and died in the 
full hope of a glorious resurrection at last in Christ their Lord." 

At the death of his father. Gen. Chapin, in 1795, Dea. Chapin 
succeeded him in the ofifiee of Ati'ent of Indian Affairs, and contin- 
ued in the oftice through the administrations of Washington and 
Adams. After this, owning a large property at the outlet of Canan- 
daigua lake, three miles from tlie village, valuable for its water power, 
he built the mills still called Chapin's mills, and in 1815 sold out 
in the village, and removed his family there, where Dea. Israel 
Chapin d. Aug. 31, 1833. Mrs. Abigail Chapin d. Aug. 26, 1828. 
Children — ' 

1. Charlotte, b. Jan. 28, 1786 ; d. Feb. 9, 1797, ae. 11. 

2. Clarissa, b. June 9, 1788; m. Hon. John Greig,Canandaigua,N.Y. 

3. Betsey, b. Sept. 16, 1790, lives with Mrs. Greig. 

4. Charles, b. April 7, 1793 ; d. Oct. 1, 1817, unm. 

5. Sally, b. Nov. 8, 1795 ; d. Aug. 23, 1797. 

The Hon. Jolin Greig is an attorney at law in Canandaigua. 
Mrs. G. and Betsey are the only survivors of the family." — Nash's 
Genealogy. 

Hon. John Greig is deceased. 



'o 



Lev[ ChapiiV, b. in or near Mendon, Mass, May 6, 1776. In 
early life he removed to Westmoreland, N. H., where he m. Nancy 
Church, b. Jan. 5, 1772. He had a brother Stephen, who removed 
to D. C. ; some of his descendants now res. in that vicinity. 



DESCENDANTS OF JOSIAH CHAPIN. 233 

Children of Levi and Nancy — 

1. Nathaniel, b. Nov. 21, 1792 ; res. in Westfield, Mass. ; has a 
family. 

2. Levi, b. July 2, 1796 ; res. in Walpole, N. H. ; has a family. 

3. Hermon, b. Oct. 9, 1799; res. in New Hartford, Pine meadows, 
Ct. ; has a family. 

4. Jonathan, b. March 6, 1802 ; res. Walpole, N. H. 

5. Phillip, b. Sept. 3, 1805 ; res. Baltimore, Md. ; has a family. 

6. Rhoda, b. May 12, 1808 ; m. Mr. Hervey ; res. Chesterfield, 
N. H. ; has a family. 

Hermon Chapin, son of Levi and Nancy, removed to New Hart- 
ford, Ct., 1826, where he has continued to reside ; m. May 28, 1828, 
Catharine Merrill, of New Hartford. Children — 

1. Edward M., b. Sept. 5, 1833 ; m.; res. New Hartford, Ct. 

2. George W., b. Feb. 22, 1837 ; res. Cleveland, Ohio. 

3. Phillip E., b. 1838 ; res. New Hartford, Ct. 
Six others, deceased. 



30 



^ 



PART IV. 



A CENTENNIAL DISCOURSE, 



DELIVERED BEFORE THE 



FIRST CONGREGATIONAL SOCIETY IN CHICOPEE, 
SEPTEMBER 26, 1852. 



BY E. B. CLARK, 

Pastor of the Church, -which was Organized Sept. 27, 1752. 



PUBLISHED Br REQ.UEST OF THE PARISHIONERS. 



DISCOUESE. 



ISAIAH LIX: 21. 

" As for me, this is my covenant with them saith the Lord : my spirit that is 
upon them, and my words which I have put in thy mouth, shall not 
depart out of thy mouth, nor out of the mouth of thy seed, nor out of the 
mouth of thy seed's seed, saith the Lord, from henceforth and forever." 

The great means of perpetuating the institutions of religion, are 
God's Word and Spirit. These He grants to his people in such 
measures as they are prepared to receive and improve. The pious 
parent, taking the word of God as his rule of life, regards it as 
above all price, and he teaches it faithfully to his children, invoking 
the divine blessing upon his labors. For he knows that without the 
aid of the Holy Spirit, the good seed of the word will not spring up 
and grow ; he is therefore no less anxious to secure the Spirit's aid, 
than to sow the seed. And thus through the agency of the Spirit, 
and faithful parental training, the promises of God are secured, and 
piety is handed down through successive generations. 

It is therefore one of the greatest blessings, to have a pious 
ancestry, the influence of whose prayers and godly life reach down 
to the latest generations. Thus it is, that God by His "Word and 
Spirit perpetuates the institutions of religion through the line of his 
people. And it is a remarkably interesting fact, that most of those 
who are sincerely and truly pious, had a devoted ancestry. They 
have been trained up in a christian family by those who themselves 
were familiar with the family altar in childhood, and were regularly 
led to the house of God on the Sabbath. We shall find these 
remarks confirmed by the investigation which we are about to make 
into the history of this people. 

It is always interesting to gather up the relics of the past, and 
place ourselves for the time, amid the scenes and circumstances in 
which our fathers lived and died. We thus place the past and pres- 
ent side by side, and are qualified to judge of the progress of 
events, to sympathise with our fathers in their privations and labors, 
and honor them for their deeds of virtue and valor. 



238 URV. MK. CLARK'S 

It was early in tlio spring of 1G36, that Wm. Pynchon, Esq., 
Henry Smith, John Burr, and others, came from Iloxbury to the 
Connecticut river, and settled with their families in Agawam, which 
is now Springfield. The original settlement retained the name of 
Agawam till April IGth, 1640, when the inhabitants, in a general 
meeting, ordained that thereafter it should bo called Springfield. 

The limits of the town, by various purchases of the Indians, were 
not very definitely fixed, but comprised a territory of nearly twenty- 
five miles square, embracing West Springfield, Westfield, South- 
wick, Sufiield, Enfield, Longmeadow, Somer*, Wilbraham, and Lud- 
low. But the settlement was for many years confined chiefly to the 
village of Springfield. Those pioneers came not into the wilder- 
ness to escape from the restraints nor the burden of supporting 
religious institutions, for it was only the next year after the arrival 
of the first families, that a Christian Church was gathered, and Rev. 
George Moxon settled over it in the ministry. 

With the surrounding Indian tribes our fathers lived on terras of 
the utmost cordiality and friendship. All the lands that came into 
their possession, were purchased fairly and honorably, and to the 
entire satisfaction of the natives, who harbored no feelings of hostil- 
ity to the English. 

As an evidence of this, is the following interesting circumstance. 

In 1637, the next year after the first families arrived and estab- 
lished themselves on the present site of Springfield, occurred the 
Pequot war, to defray the expenses of which, this colony, together 
with those at Windsor and Hartford, was very heavily taxed. Con- 
sequently, the next winter being one of uncommon severity, the 
three colonies were reduced to a state of alarming distress. 

" In this emergency, three men were sent among the Indians 
above, in search of bread stuff's ; and their mission was 'entirely 
successful. On that occasion, our river exhibited a spectacle, never 
before, certainly never since, seen upon its waters. A fleet of fifty 
canoes laden with corn, the product of the rich meadows of Pocomp- 
tuck, was at once launched upon the stream and borne onward by 
the force of the current, and urged forward by the powerful arm of 
the red man, and carried instant relief to the half starved, suff"ering 
strangers." 

Such was the friendly state of feeling existing between the 

English and Indians in those early days. Our fathers came among 

them not to defraud and expel them as enemies, but to live with 

them on terms of equality, to teach them habits of industry, to 

traffic with them, and do them good. 
/ 



CENTENNIAL DISCOURSE. 239 

Tims the white man and the red man lived as neighbors and 
friends for forty years. In 1675, the whole scene was changed ; the 
hour had arrived in which the momentous question was to be settled, 
whether the whites were to be extirpated from the land of their adop- 
tion, or the red men subdued, and scattered and driven from the 
place of their fathers' sepulchers. 

By the agency of Phillip of Pokanoket, the youngest son of Mas- 
sasoit, a union was formed for a " general rising of the natives to 
sweep the hated intruders from the ancient hunting grounds of the 
Indian race." 

Among others, the colony at Springfield was marked for the 
slaughter, and so artfully the treacherous plot was laid, that destruc- 
tion must have been the result, but for a timely warning from their 
friends at Windsor. Aroused by the alarm of impending danger, 
they fled in consternation to the forts, and were saved with the 
exception of two men and one woman. The savages pillaged the 
town, and committed twenty-nine houses and nearly as many barns 
to the flames, and destroyed all the mills. It was in the month of 
October; crops had been gathered in, and the winter stores of the 
colonists were swept away as in a moment. 

Thus amid the ashes of their dwellings, and the destruction of 
their gathered harvests, the colonists looked with fearful apprehen- 
sion upon the approaching winter. But a merciful God, who stays 
His rough wind in the day of the east wind, so ordered that the 
winter was uncommonly mild, and the stores that escaped the flames 
supplied the need of the colonists. 

In the midst of these dark and terrific scenes, was the family of 
Dea. Samuel Chapin,* who died Nov. 11th, 1675, in a single month 
after the burning of Springfield. Deacon Chapin came from Eng- 
land or Wales, and arrived at Springfield with his family (of four 
sons and two daughters) at an early period, and became a leading 
man in the town. Another daughter was born in Springfield, in 
1644, so that his arrival must have been at a previous date. In the 
year 1664, 28 years after the settlement of Springfield, two of the 
sons of Dea. Samuel Chapin, Japbet and Henry, married. Henry 
married Bethia, daughter of Benjamin Cooley of Longmeadow, and 
Japhet was married the preceding July, to Abilene, daughter of 
Samuel Cooley of Milford. After remaining a few years in the vil- 
lage of Springfield, the two brothers removed to this northern sec- 
tion of the town. I have not been able to ascertain the precise year 
of their settlement, nor whether they both came in the same year. 

* Deacon Chapin was the ancestor of nearly all the Chapins in this country. 



240 REV. MR. CLARK'S 

In 1666, two years after the marriage of these two sons, Deacon 
Samuel purchased of Mr. John Pynchon, a large tract of land, 
embracing most of the river flats lying between the Chicopee River 
and Willimansett brook, or Wallamausick as it was then spelt. 

In the month of April, 1G73, Samuel, the father, deeded to his 
son Japhet, a large portion of the tract which he had purchased of 
Major Pynchon. And the probability is that about this time the 
two brothers removed to this section of the town, as pioneers in the 
wilderness. 

About 180 years ago, our now beautiful and highly cultivated 
plain was a howling wilderness. Here was the undisturbed lair of 
tbe wild beast, and the savage warrior found a safe retreat from his 
pursuers in the tangled thicket. Hither the two brothers, Japhet 
and Henry, came and planted themselves down in the midst of the 
forest. Except a house on the south side of Chicopee River, their 
nearest neighbors lived in the village of Springfield. 

Japhet built his house at the north end of what is now Chicopee 
Street, a little north, and west of the house now owned by Mr. 
Ogden, on the next lower offset, where he had a charming view of 
the river and the hills on the opposite shore. Henry located some- 
where toward the lower end of the street. They together at that 
time owned most of the land lying between Chicopee River and 
Willimansett brook, and extending some distance eastward on to 
the plain. 

These men had been faithfully trained up from their childhood in 
the ways of virtue and religion by their pious father, and evinced in 
their lives that these parental labors were not in vain. For though 
the house of God was nearly six miles distant, through a pathless 
wilderness, and across the unbridged river, the return of each Sab- 
bath-day found these men punctually in their places in the house of 
God. Japhet particularly was distinguished for his devoted piety. 
And he had need of piety to sustain him amid the heavy trials that 
awaited him ; for a daughter was to be carried captive by the merci- 
less savages. The days of peace and friendship with the Indians, 
which had continued for forty years, were passed away, so that the 
red man was now a constant source of fear and alarm to our fathers. 
Their fire-arms for defense were their constant companions in the 
field and by the way, and they went even to the house of God on 
the Sabbath, " as when one goeth down to the battle." 

Hannah, the second daughter of Japhet, married John Sheldon of 
Deerfield, Dec. 3d, 1703, and removed to that frontier town, and 



CENTENNIAL DISCOURSE. 241 

lived in the house of his father, Capt. John Sheldon. On the night 
of the 29th of the next February, in a little less than three months 
after the marriage," occurred one of those terrific scenes which no 
tongue can adequately describe. That evening the happy villagers 
of that town retired to rest with the usual prospect of a quiet night, 
but they were aroused from their midnight slumbers, by the war cry 
of the savages, to behold their buildings in flames, and themselves 
in captivity. Being unable to force the door of Capt. Sheldon's 
house, the Indians made a hole with their hatchets, and thrusting in 
a musket, fired and killed the Captain's wife. The son and wife 
leaped from the chamber window to make their escape, by which 
effort she sprained her ancle and was taken captive, while he 
escaped. 

The prisoners, numbering 112, among whom were Hannah, wife 
of John Sheldon, and Kev. John Williams, pastor of the church, 
and his family, were taken to Canada, and after about two years 
were redeemed. 

Religion was a needful antidote to the anguish of a father's heart, 
as he thought of his daughter in captivity. 

About this time Japbet received a sympathising letter from his 
brother in Mendon, comforting him under his aflflictions, which letter 
I here present entire — verbatim et literatim. 

mendon, Aprel 8th, 1704. 
Deare Brother : 

I cannot with my pen express the consern- 

edness of sperit that is in me for you and my deare cusen that is led 

captive by the barbarous heathen, god is by such dispensations 

trying the faith and patience of his children, it is therefore my dayly 

request that god will support her in body and sperit and her bodely 

captivity may prove to her speretual enlargment, and that god wil 

please to give you comfort in hope, knowing that god is able to find 

out a way for escape, tho no way appears to us. as abraham being 

called to offer up his Son Isaac, who did it willingly knowing that 

god was able to rais him from the dead, these afflictions arise not 

out of the dust, but there is a cause, we are redy to complaine of 

the freuch and Indian enemis, but they are not the cause, but as it 

was sometime said to Jerusalem, yower wais and yower doings bath 

procured these things to thyself. So may new england say that our 

sins have brought the Sword of the wildenness upon us. I do there- 

31 



242 REV. MR. CLARK'S 

fore believe there must be a general Reformation before the rod of 
god -will be taken olT from us. Brother I long to see you, and did 
intend to have given you a visit this month, but multitud of busnis 
publik and pirtiquler throngs me so that I have no prospect of com- 
ing tliis spring, thougli I cannot come to see you yeat I sliall be 
glad to heare from you by all oppertunities thorow the little time 
that is remaining to us heare, and that our prayers may dayly meet 
at the thron of grace and that we may so demeane ourselves heare 
that at last we may have a joyeful meting in the kingdom of glorey, 
so with kind love and Respects to yowerself and my sister, wish my 
love to all my cusens I Rest yower loving brother, 

Josiah Chapin. 

After the death of Japhet Chapin, in 1712, the children received 
a lengthy letter from Rev. John Williams, of Deerfield, instructing 
them concerning the improvement which they should make of his 
death, and speaking of him as having been a man of great piety. 
This letter, the record states, was in the hands of Deacon Edward 
Chapin before he died. 

Japhet left six sons, Samuel, Thomas, John, Ebenezer, David, 
and Jonathan, all of whom were settled along on the street, near to 
each other. Henry Chapin left but two sons, Henry and Benjamin. 

I have not been able to ascertain the locality of the house of the 
father, nor that of either of the sons. I think that Henry built 
south of the Chicopee, and Benjamin on the north side. 

Although a few others came in and settled here from time to time, 
still for many years the Chapin families occupied nearly the whole 
territory. In 1753 there were 27 persons taxed as belonging to this 
parish, and 20 out of the whole 27 were Chapins. 

The 8 sons of Japhet and Henry Chapin had each large families, 
amounting in all to 87 children. Samuel had 10, Thomas 11, John 
8, Ebenezer 13, 11 sons — David 12, 10 sons — Jonathan 11, Henry 
10, and Benjamin 12, making to Henry Chapin 22 grand-children, 
and to Japhet 65, from their sons alone. 

Here these men lived and trained up their numerous families, toil- 
ing for their daily bread through the week, and taking those who 
could go to the distant sanctuary on the Sabbath. All but one of 
these 8 sons of Japhet and Henry, lived to be more than three score 
years and ten — the youngest was 64 and the oldest 95 when he died. 
These all became old men, and saw their numerous children settled 
around them, and their children's children rising up on every side, 



CENTENNIAL DISCOURSE. 243 

when all the religious privileges they enjoyed aside from those of 
the family altar, were obtained by going to the distant center of 
the town on the Sabbath. 

Of course with the greatest exertions on their part, with no means 
of conveyance but horses on which they rode, but a small portion of 
this community could visit the public sanctuary on the sabbath. 
Many of the women, the little children and the feeble, must neces- 
sarily spend the long hours of their sabbath days at home. And 
thus, with no sabbath schools and books of religious instruction but 
the Bible, unless it might be the New England Primer, and by the 
reverence for the holy day which prevailed in those early times, and 
the strictness with which they were accustomed to observe it, the 
sabbath day must have been long and tedious to the young families 
of our fathers. And yet, notwithstanding all the disadvantages 
under which they lived, from the character of the men that were 
thus trained, we have no question that on every pleasant sabbath 
morning a large company from the settlement north of the Chicopee 
were present in the old meeting-house in Springfield. 

" For (I quote from an old record bearing date 1743,) it is consid- 
ered disorderly for persons to be away from home, and absent from 
the stated worship of the families, and religious meetings, unless it 
be in very extraordinary cases." 

I seem to see them now, the fathers, mothers and children, some 
on foot, and some mounted on their well trained horses, wending 
their way soberly and seriously through the tall forests that over- 
shadow their lone pathway, till they reach the house of God. There 
they bow in reverence, and offer their prayers and praises, listen to 
instruction from the oracles of God, and return at evening to ponder 
the truths they have heard, and reduce them to practice in the daily 
avocations of life. 

But these godly men were not content to remain with the rising 
generation around them so far away from the privileges of the sanc- 
tuary ; hence in the spring of 1750, they applied to the General 
Court, and received on the 10th of June, 1751, an act of incorpora- 
tion as the 5th parish of Springfield. The first parish meeting was 
called on the 13th day of July following. Another meeting was 
held in August, at which time the first steps were taken toward 
building a meeting-house, and another in October following with ref- 
erence to obtaining a Pastor. And not trusting to their own wis- 
dom, they reverently applied to the Association for advice respect- 
ing a candidate for settlement. 



244 REV. MR. CLARK'S 

This advice was obtained, and accordingly the services of Mr. 
John McKinstry were engaged for a quarter of a year. Having 
preached for them the stipulated time, at another parish meeting on 
the 7th of January, 1752, Mr. McKinstry received a unanimous call 
to settle with them in the gospel Ministry, but the negotiations 
respecting the salary continued till the 7th of the next June, when 
all those matters were arranged, and the time of the Ordination was 
voted to be on the 9th day of the next September. The New Style 
was adopted by Great Britain in 1752, calling the 3d of Sept. the 
14th, omitting eleven days, so that during that year there was no 
9th of Sept. And it has been ascertained from notes left by a mem- 
ber of the Council, that the ordination of Mr. McKinstry actually 
took place on the 27th of Sept. The question arises, whether the 
Church was organized on the day of Ordination, or at a previous 
day. It would seem that the Church must have been formed at a 
previous day, and from an old diary kept, as I suppose, by Deacon 
Edward Chapin, this opinion might be confirmed, which is the fol- 
lowing : " March 15, 1752. This day the Rev. Mr. Breck adminis- 
tered the Lord's supper to us in the 5th parish." 

I also find among the old papers a Church list, beai-iug date of 
June, 1752, containing 43 names, and the tax assessed upon each 
one for defraying the expenses of the communion. From all this we 
should naturally infer that the church was organized before this 
time. And yet in all the parish votes, and in the communication 
which the parish received from the Association approving their 
doings in giving Mr. McKinstry a call, there is no mention of a 
Church, and no intimation that such a distinct organization existed. 
Neither is there an intimation of any action of the Church as a dis- 
tinct body, till the day the pastor was settled. I therefore conclude 
that the Church was organized on the same day of the ordination, 
which was the 27th of Sept., 1752 ; and as nearly as I can ascertain 
consisted of 43 members. Some of these were living on the west 
side of the Connecticut, as the parish then embraced all the north- 
ern part of the town of W. Springfield. All but eleven of the 43, 
are Chapins. The Pastor's salary was to be gradually increased for 
four years, from c£49 6s. Sd. to c£62 13s. 4d. and thus it was to 
remain. One half of the salary was to be paid in lawful money, 
and the other half in grain at the market price. In addition to this, 
he was to have, as the parish first voted, 20 cords of good merchant- 
able wood. Then it was voted that they add one cord a year till it 



CENTENNIAL DISCOURSE. 245 

reached 30 cords, and that was to be ever after the fixed amount of 
wood. Subsequently it was voted, that the worthy Mr. McKinstry 
shall be always provided with a sufliciency of firewood. 

According to a parish vote of June 24th, the 27th of August was 
observed as a day of fasting and prayer, to implore the divine bless- 
ing and assistance in reference to the occasion of settling their min- 
ister. The clergymen convened on the occasion, were Rev. Messrs. 
Stephen Williams of Longmeadow, Samuel Hopkins of W. Spring- 
field, Peter Raynolds of Enfield, Ct., Robert Breck of Springfield, 
Noah Merrick of Wilbraham, and John McKinstry of Ellington, 
Ct., the father of the candidate. 

All but one of the six sons of Japhet Chapin, and both the sons 
of Henry, were living at this time, and their names with one excep- 
tion (Ebenezer,) I find on the church record. 

At the time of the ordination, the meeting-house was in an unfin- 
ished state. It was raised " on the 5th of June, 1752, through the 
indulgence of heaven, with great joy and safety." And in Decem- 
ber following, at a parish meeting, it was 

" Voted, to cover the outside of the meeting-house with quarter 
boards, to glaze all the windows, to do the plastering overhead, and 
to finish the lower part of the house." Such being the state of the 
house, they were of course unable to meet in it for the present. 

On the next November, 1753, all things were ready, the new 
meeting-house was completed, and agreeable to the customs of those 
early days, a committee was chosen in parish meeting to perform 
the delicate and responsible duty of seating the meeting-house, with 
liberty duly granted by vote, to seat men and women together. The 
rule of seating was the last tax list. The usual custom at a later 
day, was to go by the age and list. This custom of seating a house 
of worship by a committee, has passed away, never to return. I 
can find no intimation that there was anything like a public dedica- 
tion of the house ; but as these old men, bending with age, the sons 
of Japhet and Henry, assembled at the roll of the drum, and entered 
these courts of the Lord, to unite in the solemnities of public 
worship, and felt that at last they had secured a tabernacle for the 
Lord in their midst, where He might record His name, and a minis- 
ter to break unto them and to their posterity the bread of life, their 
pious hearts were jubilant with praise to God, for His loving kind- 
ness to them and to their children ; and thus those humble courts 
were solemnly and sincerely dedicated to the Lord. 



246 REV. MR. Clark's 

Benjamin, son of Henry, and David, son of Japliet, each 70 years 
of ago, were elected deacons of tlie church. After three years, 
Dea. Benjamin went to his rest, at the age of 73, but Dea. David 
lived and served his generation for 20 years longer, and after an ill- 
ness of a single week, slept with the fathers at the age of 90 years, 
in 1772, He was evidently a man greatly beloved and venerated, 
and was eminently devoted and useful to the last, a pillar indeed in 
the Church of God. It was said of him by a poet of that day, 
" speaking freely of the patriarch David," 

" He was an Israelite indeed, 

In whom there was no guile ; 
His reason and his mental powers 

Did service to him give, 
And to his friends and kindred near. 

Almost while he did live, 
Sometime before he left this world, 

It was his good desire. 
That he no longer should abide, 

Tlian service would r'^quire ; 
And as this was his holy wish, 

He had his sweet request ; 
And b}' an illness very short, 

Went peacefully to rest." 

Dea. Sam'l Cooper was probably elected to the oflRce to fill the 
place of Dea. Benjamin Chapin, but all that we know of him is that 
he lived on the west side of the Connecticut River, Though Dea. 
David Chapin had finished his course and gone to his rest, and the 
church mourned for him as for a father, yet he had left among them 
a deep and visible impress of his sincere and devoted piety. His 
son Edward was 28 years of age when the father died ; he was 
elected Dea., took his father's mantle and bore it 28 years, and died 
in 1800, at the age of 76. It was during his life that the parish 
was divided, and the portion on the west side of the river became a 
separate parish in 1786. 

Three years after the division of the parish, by which it was 
much weakened, and the pastor becoming old and infirm, a mutual 
council was called, and a new arrangement was made between him 
and his people. 

By that arrangement, Mr. McKinstry was to retain his pastoral 
relation to the Church and Society, but he was to preach, adminis- 
ter the ordinances, solemnize marriages, attend funerals, and visit 
the sick, as he might be invited, and was to receive a salary of ^£18 



CENTENNIAL DISCOURSE. 247 

and 15 cords of wood during his life ; provided, however, another 
minister was settled over the parish, this sum was to be reduced to 
X12 a year. For some cause the salary was not promptly paid, 
and the pastor had claims on the parish for old arrearages, that ran 
back for years before the division took place ; and those of the new 
parish on the west side of the river, felt that by the division, they 
were released from all obligations to their former Pastor, and refused, 
or were I'eluctant to pay their proportion of these arrearages. 
Hence followed a long and bitter controversy, producing alienation, 
and greatly weakening the parish in numbers and ability. After he 
relinquished preaching, Mr. McKiustry lived for 24 years, and died 
Kov. 9, 1813, aged 90 years. So long as he was able, he met with 
the people on the Sabbath, gave out the hymns and led in the devo- 
tional services, while a sermon was read by some other person. Dr. 
Lathrop of West Springfield, preached his funeral sermon from Gen. 
25 : 8. " Then Abraham gave up the ghost and died in a good old 
age, an old man and full of years." 

Of him the Dr. thus speaks : 

" Mr. McKinstry was a man of good natural talents, a respecta- 
ble scholar, and sound divine. His preaching, though it suffered 
some disadvantage from the feebleness of his delivery, yet was edi- 
fying to his stated hearers. He was a man of exemplary piety, of 
a candid spirit, of a modest, humble disposition, of great resignation 
under trials, of steady, unwavering patience under long continued 
infirmities, and of christian fortitude and hope in view of approach- 
ing dissolution." 

Thirteen years previous to the death of his Pastor, Dea. Edward 
Chapin fell asleep. From what I can gather of his character as a 
parent, a citizen, and a christian, I have no hesitation in pronounc- 
ing him a burning and a shining light. For many years he was the 
clerk of the parish, was chairman of committees for the transaction 
of their most ditficult and delicate business, from time to time, and 
was the principal man in the church ; the comforter of the afflicted, 
a guide to the enquiring, and an example to all in christian zeal, 
faith, and purity of life. 

A letter has fallen into my hands, which Dea. Edward wrote to 
his son Edward when in the army, bearing date 28th Aug. 1777, 
which is a most interesting and valuable relic of the man. In gram- 
matical construction, purity of diction, in penmanship, and the sen- 
timents of elevated, pure, simple piety, and parental tenderness with 
which it abounds, it shows that he was not only a christian, a father 



248 REV. MR. CLARK'S 

who was deeply solicitous for the spiritual good of his children, and 
a true patriot, but a very intelligent man for that day. 

The house in which he lived, and where he brought up his family, 
is still standing on the east side of the way, and the first south of 
the meeting-house. His son, the late Dr. Calvin Chapin, graduated 
at Yale College in 1788, was for a time tutor in College, studied 
theology, and settled in the parish of Rocky Hill, Wetherstield, Ct., 
where he labored the remainder of his life, a very distinguished and 
valuable minister of the gospel. For many years he was a member 
of the college corporation, and the Recording Secretary of the 
American Board. 

The Rev. Aaron L. Chapin, now President of Beloit College, 
Wis., is the grandson of Aaron, who was the eldest son of Dea. 
Edward, and who lived in Hartford. None of the descendants of 
Dea. Edward's family are remaining here. When he died, it was 
indeed a dark and gloomy day for this church, for its main earthly 
pillar was then removed, and utter extinction seemed inevitable. 
For eleven years they had already been without an officiating pas- 
tor, death was making inroads upon the members of the church, the 
additions were very few, and ruin seemed to be at the door. 

In 1804, the number of male members of the church was only 7 ; 
there were a few more females, but altogether they were indeed a 
little band, without a preacher or deacon, without indeed a leading 
member to take charge of their meetings, for Mr. McKinstry had 
now become very old, and very infirm. But in the Lord there was 
still a friend, one who remembered His Zion, even in her weakness, 

and who in mercy directed hither the feet of one who was willing to 

ft 

take and to bear responsibility for his Lord and Master. A valua- 
ble accession to this little band of believers was made in the person 
of Dr. Amos Skeele, who being a professional man and a devoted 
christian, removed from Somers to this place in 1804. Mr. Caleb 
Pendleton moved into the place and united with the church about 
the same time ; he was a good reader, and aided them much. But 
still this was one of the waste places of Zion. 

The number was so small that were willing to be taxed for the 
support of the gospel, that after doing all they could, together with 
the little help they received from the Missionary Society, they could 
hire preaching but a small portion of the year, and on Dr. Skeele 
and Mr. Pendleton devolved the responsibility of conducting relig- 
ious worship the rest of the time. 



CENTENNIAL DISCOURSE. 249 

Mr. Skeele was chosen to the office of Deacon about eight years 
after his removal to this place, so that for 12 years the church was 
destitute of even so much as an officer. 

What a picture of desolation, poverty and gloom is presented in 
this part of our history ! It is a cold and winter day — there is no 
bell to summon the community to the house of worship, and no sig- 
nal to mark tlie hour of meeting. The wind howls around the old 
and shattered temple, playing wantonly with its loose and worn out 
covering, and forcing its way through crack and crevice and broken 
pane, as if in mockery "at such attempts to resist its power. And 
there, without a tire, a dozen persons assemble, not to be charmed 
with the performances of a gifted and eloquent preacher, but to 
attend a deacon's meeting. A portion of scripture is read, a hymn 
given out, but there is no leader and they cannot sing ; a prayer is 
offered and a sermon read. The few hearers are scattered over the 
house, shivering with the cold, and listening as devoutly as circum- 
stances will permit. Another prayer is offered, and the morning 
service is closed. 

In the P. M. they assemble again, just enough to make desolation 
desolate, go through with the services, and retire. And these meet- 
ings, thus conducted, WQre continued, not for two or three Sabbaths 
only, but a quarter part of the time for 35 years. For the last 10 
years of his life, the burden was on Dea. Edward Chapin. And for 
nearly a quarter of a century did Dr. Skeele and his associates 
assemble in their dilapidated temple every Sabbath, and there they 
conducted the public worship of their covenant keeping God, accord- 
ing to the best of their ability. Indeed, at that time it was neces- 
sary for that little band to walk by faith, for there were no appear- 
ances, not so much as a cloud the bigness of a man's hand, that 
could afford them hope of better times to come. Yet in those days 
of weakness, and fear, and much trembling, these servants of the 
Lord faltered not, but to the best of their ability discharged the obli- 
gations that were laid so heavily upon them ; and preacher or no 
preacher, the sanctuary was thrown open, and a worshipping assem- 
bly was gathered there every Sabbath ; the waiting eyes of these 
few sheep were turned beseechingly unto the great Shepherd, and 
though they waited long, they waited not in vain. While these men 
were waiting, God was for years by His providence and grace, disci- 
plining and preparing for them an under shepherd, who at the 
appointed time should come to them in the fullness of christian love, 
consecrated to his Master's service. 
32 



250 REV. MK. CLARK'S 

Mr. Alexander PhoRiiix was the son of a wealthy merchant in N. 
Y., graduated at Washington College, and devoted his attention to 
the legal profession. After a time, he laid aside his law books, and 
engaged in the mercantile business, but in this he was unsuccessful, 
and domestic afflictions pressed heavily upon him, till feeling that 
his way was hedged up on every side, ho was led at last, like Saul 
of Tarsus, to enquire what the Lord would have him do 1 

Though late in life, his mind was directed to the study of theolo- 
gy, that he might prepare himself to build up some one of the waste 
places in Zion. He became a preacher, and when in the earliest of 
his labors, his feet were directed to Chicopee, he was at once con- 
vinced that he had found the waste place in which he was to labor. 
And when Dea. Skeele and others received an intimation that Mr. 
Phoenix might be induced to settle with them, their joy was such as 
words could not express ; they were so few and feeble, and had been 
so long destitute of a pastor, that to have an evangelical, devoted 
minister settled over them, was more than they had even dared to 
expect, it was rather an object of hope. But it was even so. On 
the 28th of April, 1824, Mr. Alexander Phoenix was ordained and 
installed as pastor of this Church, which on that memorable day 
received indeed an ascension gift. This was the dawn of brighter 
days. The people flocked to the house of God, and listened with 
joy to the message of grace, as the new pastor opened and pressed 
home the truth. For thirty-five years the church had been without 
an officiating Pastor. In a year and a half from this time, the new 
meeting-house was dedicated to the God of Israel, and the old one 
in which the fathers seventy-four years before had bowed and wor- 
shipped the covenant keeping God, was removed and devoted to a 
secular purpose. 

Five years passed away, and then in 1831, that year of the right 
hand of God, that year of revivals beyond all others in modern 
days, when in all parts of New England such multitudes were 
brought into the kingdom of Christ, this church was not " left as a 
peace not rained upon." For here, too, the showers of grace 
descended, the church was revived and greatly strengthened in num- 
bers and graces. A large proportion of the adults came out on the 
Lord's side, and a great moral change was visible in the whole 
aspect of society. There were about 40 additions made as the fruits 
of that revival, and during the whole of Mr, Phcenix's ministry, of 
eleven years, there were about 76 members added to the church. 



CENTENNIAL DISCOURSE. 251 

A great debt of gratitude is due to Mr. Phoenix from this people, 
for his faithful and self-denying labors here, for he received but a 
nominal salary; being a man of wealth, he lived mostly from his 
own private means, while the church and parish gained strength and 
character every year. When he came, though the church was 
receiving aid from the Missionary Society, with all they could do 
they could support preaching but a quarter or half the time. But 
with their new pastor was added strength ; the meeting-house was 
built, and the debt was paid, foreign aid to support the gospel was 
no longer needed, and the various causes of benevolence have 
received annually the contributions of this church and people. Thus 
was their ability increased by their effort to support the gospel min- 
istry. Mr. Phoenix left when he felt that duty called him away, but 
still in the evening of his days he looks back upon those 11 years of 
his pastorate here as the happiest and most useful portion of his 
life. He had been the means of raising this church to a self-sustain- 
ing state, and had thus prepared the way for another pastor, and 
resigned the charge. 

Blessings on his memory ! The reward of a useful man will be 
his. Soon after Mr. Phoenix left, the Rev. E. B. Wright was install- 
ed as pastor of the church ; but owing to his feeble health and often 
repeated request, the parish yielded to his wish, and he was dismiss- 
ed in the spring of 1839, after a pastorate of 6^ years. There 
were 11 additions to the church during his ministry. In Oct. of the 
same year, the present incumbent was inducted into the oflRce of 
pastor over this flock, whose humble labors God has seen fit, in a 
measure, to bless. 

The Lord has allowed us to enjoy frequent seasons of refreshing 
from His convicting and converting Spirit, so that during these thir- 
teen years, 85 members have been added to the church, 56 of whom 
were received on profession, and the rest (29) by letter. 

There are at present 85 members of the church, nearly half of 
whom are Chapins. Both Japhet and Henry are represented in 
their descendants, not only in the church, but in its officers. Dea. 
Orange Chapin, descending from Japhet through Thomas, and Dea. 
Giles S. Chapin from Henry, through Dea. Benjamin. And with the 
exception of about 35 years, between the death of Dea. Edward, 
when for some 12 years there was no Dea., and the appointment of 
Dea. Giles S. Chapin, one at least, and sometimes both of those 
church officers have borne the name of the honored and worthy 
fathers of this place, from the time of the organization of the 
church to the present day. 



252 KBV. MR. CLARK'S 

Since the organization of tlie churcli 100 years ago, great are the 
changes that have taken place. Then the country was new, and the 
conveniences and comforts of the people few and meager. The 
houses were unpainted, the yards unfenced, and their furniture and 
tools of rude construction. They were destitute of carriages of all 
kinds, but the ox cart, and money was exceedingly scarce.* What 
a contrast do we now beiiold in the air of neatness and comfort 
which everywhere appears around us, and within the humblest 
dwellings in our midst. 

Tlien there was no sabbath school to draw the minds of children 
and youth to the oracles of C4od, and no religious books adapted to 
the capacities of children. But few persons could even write their 
names, and for mental improvement the advantages were small 
indeed, for their public schools lacked almost every thing but perse- 
verance that was necessary to make them attractive and useful. 
Tiien a bible was so costly, that Japhet Chapin made provision in 
his will that a portion of bis property should be appropriated to get 
each of his grand-children a bible. Now, the conmion day laborer 
may carry home four beautifully bound, clearly printed, elegant 
bibles in pay for a single day's work. The whole missionary enter- 
prise has risen up since that time. We have frequently given more 
in a single year to the cause of benevolence than the whole of Mr. 
McKinstry's salary, although the parish is now reduced in its area 
to less than half its former size. I have no time to speak of the 
changes that have taken place around us, though the Chicopee and 
the Connecticut have been pressed into the service of man, and the 
tramp of the iron horse is hourly heard, dashing across our plain 
with his mighty train, and the lightnings tell us the news of the day. 

But one lesson I would have deeply impressed upon our minds, 
and that is, gratitude, not only to those good men who planted these 
Institutions, but to those who, at a later day in trial, and in deep 
poverty, clung for years to the sanctuary and the institutions of 
religion with a death grasp, and thus handed down to us the precious 
blessings of a living church. To tliem no sacritice seemed too great 
to secure and transmit to their children the blessings of the sanctua- 
ry. A view of their toils, sacritices, and self-denials, should cause 

* As an evidence of the scarcity of mont-y, I find an old church record containing the names 
of the church members in 1752, in 1753, in 1754, in 1756, and 1757, and a regular tax of sixpence 
was annually assessed upon each member to defray the communion expenses, and even this was 
too heavy for some to pay, as it appears from the fact that the names of nine persons are placed 
by themselves as being behind in their taxes for the year 1756. From 1757 onward for more 
than half a century, I can find no church record, and no evidence that one was kept. 



CENTENNIAL DISCOURSE. 253 

our hearts to cluster around the stated means of grace, the institu- 
tions of religion ^vith warmer affection, and lead us to strive the 
more to make them minister to our good. A great debt of gratitude 
is due to their memory for the precious influence which comes down 
to us from them — and let their descendants ever cherish toward them 
the deepest emotions of veneration and affection. 

From this history we learn how intimately connected is the 
support of religious institutions with the temporal as well as 
spiritual good of the people. No community can afford to live with- 
out the sabbath and sanctuary privileges. We see as in letters of 
light, that godliness is profitable unto all thingS; having promise of 
this life that now is, and of that which is to come. May God deep- 
ly impress this lesson upon our minds, and in emulating the virtues 
of our fathers, may we be able by grace to transfer to future gener- 
ations these same gospel institutions in their purity and moral power. 

As we have thus glanced over the history of the church, many 
places appear where the members might erect their Ebenezer and 
say with emphasis, " Hitherto hath the Lord helped us ;" while 
under all the circumstances, the present existence of this church is 
a monument of the faithfulness of God to His covenant with His 
humble and confiding children, and an illustration of the truth of 
the text, " My word shall not depart out of thy mouth, nor out of 
the mouth of thy seed, nor out of the mouth of thy seed's seed saith 
the Lord, from henceforth and forever." 



APPENDIX. 



The following letter is an exact copy of the original, capital letters, punctua- 
tion, spelling, and all, with the exception of a few paragraphs omitted. This 
and that of Josiah Chapin, together with many other valuable and interesting 
papers, were found by the author of this discourse in an old chest in a neigh- 
bor's garret. 

Springfield Thursday 28 Aug. 1777. 
Dear Son 

After long waiting for intelligence from you to know where to 
direct a Letter & still receiving none as yet, what has become of the Post we 
expected we know not, or what part you are ordered to or where stationed, I no 
longer refrain from writing hoping a few lines may find way to you by some 
means or other. Part of the Militia being called for ; Capt. Ephraim Chapin is 
preparing to march soon to the Northward, I expect to send this by him or Seba 
Bemont who goes his waiter, hoping proper care will be taken to know where 
your Regnt is & send this to you, for I conclude there is communication open 
from North to South as yet, but how soon it may be otherwise we know not, for 
it seems that the Continental officers are expert in Runing to the amazement 
and confusion of those that trusted in them. You can hardly conceive what a 
shock it gave us at home when we heard that Ticondaroga with the stores &, 
everything was left to the Enemy without so much as trying to defend it. Such 
vast expense of labor and cost to build and store it, & all thrown away in an 
hour I Confusion on somebody .'* — but this is according to the language & ideas 
of this vain World. Let us now raise our thoughts to a Divine Superintending 
Providence, that governs all the affairs of Men, and we shall remember that 
vast armies have been destroyed «fc imense treasures lost from time to time in 
ages past, when a covenant professing people forsook the Law & broke the 
just command of a Holy God, — how like to this is our case. It seems that as 
we have persisted in walking contrary to God, that God is determined to walk 
contrary to us (as he declared to the Jews of old by the mouth of his prophets) 
until we think on our way, & return unto him by penitent confession of and 
heartily forsaking our sins. This is no discouraging consideration neither, for 
it will remain an everlasting truth (which the prophet of old was directed to 
proclaim) Say unto the righteous it shall be well with him. Of what impor- 
tance must it then be to every individual person to secure an interest in the 
Divine favor in such a day of dark and gloomy aspects as the present day is. 
Is it not enough to astonish and even confound any thinking person to see such 
numbers in military Array for the Defence of our Religion and Liberties and at 
the same time by their Impious Language and practices provoking and even 

* On the 5th of July preceding the date of this letter, Ticonderoga was surrendered by the 
Americans under General St. Clair, to the British commander, General Burgoyne. 



APPENDIX. 255 

Daring Heaven's whole Artillery to Discharge upon this Guilty Land in heavi- 
est vollies. Certainly it may be said to the Wicked it shall go ill with him. 
But notwithstanding all the gloomy aspects we are under there is ground of 
hope ; for the foundation remaineth sure, he that repenteth and forsaketh his sin 
shall find mercy. It would seem as if a merciful God was not only waiting for 
our return to him, but most earnestly inviting us thereto ; by sundry kind inter- 
positions of his Providence in the great plenty of the fruits of the Earth for our 
sustenance, the successful Battle at Fort Stanwix and also at Bennington. 

» * » * n 

Perhaps you may have heard before this that cousin Lieut. Israel Chapin very 
narrowly escaped Death and Captivity In the Battle near Ti — when Sergt. , 
Nathan Chapin and Gideon Chapin were Captivated ; with sundry others 
belonging to Springfield. But Sergt. Nathan behaved himself so steadily and 
honest amongst them that he embraced a very fair opportunity to bring off nine 
with him, they did not like to wait (it seems) for an exchange of prisoners they 
being ordered to go in a boat to Crown Point to mow their grass for them, and 
having only one inhabitant in the boat with them ; they entertained him so 
generously with a bottle of Rum (which they were allowed to carry for their 
own refreshment while mowing) that he fell into a very sound sleep, upon which 
they rowed the boat to a port of their own choosing and left their pilot to finish 
his nap in the boat, and advanced with a quick step homeward. The Sergt 
arrived home this day fortnight in health, tho much fatigued which gave us all 
great joy, he behaved valiantly in the fight, Discreetly when in captivity and 
Courageously in the arduous undertaking of making his escape. * * » * 
As his escape was in answer to fervent prayers I hope it is acknowledged with 
gratitude to the great Arbiter of all Events. 

My Dear Dear Child I want to tell you something of the trying disappoint- 
ments which have happened to me relating to your situation and to begin with 
my meeting you at Worcester in so weak a state if I could have gained the 
consent of the two gentlemen w ith whom I was going to court I should have 
turned about and helped you home, but that was not to be had — then I wrote a 
letter and sent giving advice for the recovery of your health, but that you did 
not receive. I made haste homeward with full expectation of finding you there, 
but to my great grief found you gone 3 days before my arrival ; & what wound- 
ed me very sensibly was that you was so unfit on account of your weak state, 
and yet could not have time to stay a few days to recruit your health at home. 
I thought of following after to bring you back, but when I considered how far 
you might have got I dispaired of overtaking you, and then my only relief in 

that anxiety for your welfare was to recommend you to God and his grace. 

* •♦ » « 

And blessed be God for the consolation afforded upon the rect of your little 
Letter of the 24 June, which was much more welcome to us than a thirty Dollar 
Bill could have been There you express yourself in the most comforting lan- 
guage when you profess to put your trust in the Lord, and we hope you may not 
be deceived in so important a matter — and indeed it is the crown of our wishes 
for you and our daily prayers that you may be enabled by divine grace so to 
trust in the Lord as to dwell secure from fear of evil. Those and only those are 
safe who do truly trust in the Lord, be sure, take heed you dont deceive your- 
self in so important a matter I am very sensible of the need you stand in of 



256 



APPENDIX. 



Divine special Grace to enable you to resist the snares and temptations you are 
surrouiided with, and would therefore charf^c you ap;'ain with the most afFection- 
ate tenderness to stand fast in the Faith of Divine llevelation for the truths 
therein recorded are firmer than mountains of brass, and will remain forever. 
My son if sinners entice thee consent thou not. * " You may be sure that 
you arc daily and repeatedly remembered at the Throne of Grace, dont be want- 
ing on your part in working out ycmr salvation. It gives me joy to think and 
hope that you have engaged in the arduous, necessary joyful work — if you have 
indeed fi-^ced your trust in the Lord, you are safe and we are happy — Farewell. 

This with the love of your Mama Brothers and Sister comes from .your affec- 
tionate Father Edward Chapin. 



The following is a list of the deacons in this Church. 



Benjamin Chapin, 


elected in 


1752 


died 


1756 


aged 


74 


David Chapin, 


t( 


1752 


it 


1772 


u 


90 


Samuel Cooper, 














Edward Chapin, 


(( 


1773 


u 


1800 


tt 


76 


Amos Skeele, 


(1 


1813 


resigned 


1825 






Simeon Stedman, 


(1 


1825 


(1 


1837 






Joseph Pease, 


<( 


1825 


died 


1839 






Giles S. Chapin, 


(( 


1837 










Orange Chapin, 


<i 


1840 











PART V. 



AN 



ADDRESS, 



DELIVERED AT THE 



OPEXIXG OF THE TOWN HALL IX SPRINGFIELD, 

]MARCH 24, 1828, 

CONTAINING 

SKETCHES OF THE EARLY HISTORY OF THAT TOWN, 
AND THOSE IN ITS VICINITY. 



BY GEORGE BLISS. 



PUBLISHED AT THE REQUEST OF THE TOWN. 



33 



ADDRESS. 



Our assembling this day, in this Hall, is a subject for mutual 
congratulation. That the town has, with so much unanimity and 
concord, undertaken and completed a building, so convenient for the 
transaction of public business, evinces in the inhabitants, a spirit of 
liberality and harmony, highly honorable to our society. This 
building, so ornamental to the place, has been completed without 
accident and without contention.* The occasion suggested a wish 
to have an historical account of the town. Such a history will, 
probably, be peculiarly interesting to the inhabitants ; but it is also 
important to the community in general. This was the earliest set- 
tlement, in the western part of the State, and itself the parent of 
many others. It was a colony from the settlements about Massa- 
chusetts Bay, begun and carried on while those settlements were yet 
in infancy. It was an important post against the Indians ; and 
being adjacent to Connecticut, and the only town bordering on that 
colony, it was long involved in great and violent disputes with that 
government. 

The means of compiling such an account are not over ample ; but 
some care has been taken to collect what remains. Many facts now 
known, may soon be lost ; many which might have been found half 
a century ago, are now irrecoverably gone. Very few traces of the 
ecclesiastical history of the town can be found. 

Several of those who were here at the first settlement came from 
England, when the governor and company came over, in the year 
1630. How many I am unable to ascertain. 

William Pynchon, Esq. who may properly be called The father of 
the town, was one of the patentees in the colony charter, named in 
the deed of 1627, and the charter of 1628. He was appointed a 
magistrate and assistant in Oct. 1629, in England, when the gov- 
ernor and other officers were appointed. He came' from England 
with governor Winthrop, and first settled at Roxbury. The number 

* See Appendix A. 



260 HON. GEORGK BLISS' ADDRESS. 

who then came to Massachusetts, cannot be given ; I)ut it is said 
there were 2000 in J(i;JO. iuid in 1G;]:J, a large addition, bringing 
with them several distinguislied ministers. 

The discovery of Connecticut river, was, probably, not made so 
early as that of .some other streams less important, owing to Long 
Island stretching along before its montli. But in 1G31, a bark 
which had been to the south, sailed up the river some distance. The 
Plymouth colony had sent to build a trading house, and the Dutch 
began a settlement at Hartford. But it is said, that the first dwel- 
ling house built on the river, l)y an European, was at the mouth of 
Windsor Little river, by William Holmes, in Oct. 1033. 

The information given of the favorable situation of that river, 
induced many of the inhabitants about Boston, to make strenuous 
efforts to remove. The General Court had prohibited any persons 
removing without their consent. This proliiltition was grounded on 
their being engaged in a joint undertaking, to make improvements 
for the common benefit ; and if every one were at liberty to desert 
it when he pleased, it might not only prevent a beneficial improve- 
ment, btt endanger the lives of those who remained. For one or 
two years, applications to remove to the Connecticut, were unsuc- 
cessful ; but this did not hinder exploring parties from going out 
and making arrangements for settlements. This was the case in 
regard to Wethersfield, Hartford and Windsor. There is a tradition, 
that some of those that came to Wethersiield, in the year 1634, 
remained through the winter. 

Early in the year 1635, the people of Watertown, and Dorchester, 
and afterwards those at Newton, obtained the consent of the General 
Court, that they should remove to the Connecticut river. In May, 
1635, Mr. Pynchon, and the inhabitants of Roxbury. had also liberty 
granted them to remove themselves to any place that they should 
think meet, not to pi'ejudice any other plantation, provided they 
continued under the government of Massachusetts. A similar con- 
dition was annexed to the leave given to the other towns. In the 
latter part of the year 1635, the Dorchester peopfe, with their min- 
ister, Mr. Wareham, came to Mattaneaug, at first called Dorchester, 
and afterwards Windsor. Those from Newtown, or Cambridge, 
came to Suckiang, called by them Newton, and since Hartford ; 
those from Watertowm, to Pauquiaaug, called Watertown, now 
Wethersfield. 

In the same year, ]\Ir. Pynchon, Henry Smith, Jehu Burr, and 
probably, some others, came to this place, called by the Indians 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 261 

Aggawaui, and began to build a house on the west side of the river, 
on the Aggawam, iu the meadow, called from that fact House- 
meadow.* The Indians, seeing this, and being perfectly friendly, 
informed them that the house would be exposed to the flood, and 
they abandoned it, and came and built a house on the east side of 
the river ; probably, on the lot afterwards owned by Mr. Pynchon, 
and still possessed by his descendants. It is supposed they returned 
to Roxbury iu the fall. Mr. Pynchon, at the spring election after, 
was chosen a magistrate, as he had been years before ; but it is 
noted' on the record, that he was absent at the time of election. 

In the spring of the year 1636, Mr. Pynchon, with a number of 
other persons, with their families, removed from Roxbury, and came 
to this place. How long they were on the journey, or in what 
course they came, is now unknown. It is mentioned that some that 
went from Hartford, in the winter before, were ten days in getting 
to Boston. It is not easy for those who dwell at ease, and are in 
the enjoyment of civilized society, and the various domestic comforts 
which we possess, to conceive of the difficulties, perplexities, and 
distresses, attending a new settlement, among hordes of savages and 
wild beasts, at a distance of a hundred miles from civilized society, 
and a wilderness, interspersed with mountains, rivers, ponds, and 
marshes, intervening. It is rare that new settlers go a great dis- 
tance without having something of a road by land or water. It is 
not common that they put themselves so far from neighbors. Ordi- 
narily they continue under the protection of a government able and 
willing to repel aggression and redress their wrongs. 

When Mr. Pynchon, and those who accompanied him, came here, 
they made an agreement, the original of which is in the first book of 
records of the town, subscribed by them. It is dated May 14, 1636, 
and consists of fifteen articles. The first of which provides for the 
settlement of a minister. The second limits the number of families 
to forty, and not to exceed fifty. The other articles provide for the 
rule and mode of division, and defraying the expenses of the settle- 
ment.f This agreement has the signature of only eight persons, 
though there is internal evidence that there were twelve concerned. 
The names of those who subscribed it are, William Pvnchon, Mat 
thew Mitchell, Henry Smith, Jehu Burr, William Blake, Edmund 
Wood, Thomas UflFord, and John Cabell. Jehu Burr and Thomas 
Utford, did not write, but made their mark. The other four who 
were united with them were, Thomas Woodford, John Reader, 

* Appendix B. t Appendix C. 



262 HON. GEORGE BLlSS' ADDRESS. 

Samuel Butterfield, and James Wood. It is worthy of remark, tliat 
not one of the first adventurers died here ; and, I believe, none hut 
Mr. Pynchon left descendants here. Several of them gave up their 
allotments to the company. This was the case with Blake, Ufford, 
Mitchell, the two Woods, Reader, and Butterfield. Burr remained 
here two or three years, and then removed into Connecticut. Cabell, 
in 1G41, sold his lot to the town. Mr. Pynchon, in 1652, and Smith, 
in 1653, went to England, and died there.* All, except Pynchon, 
Smith, and Cabell, gave up their interest, and it was afterwards 
granted to other persons. The first allotment was so diflferent from 
the actual settlement, that it is not easy to trace it. 

It was of the first importance, situated as the early planters were, 
to prevent persons deserting the undertaking, while in its infant 
state, to guard against the admission of improper associates, and to 
prevent the property from accumulating in two or three hands. 
They, therefore, ordered, in January, 1638-9, that a person who had 
a lot, should not sell to one who was already provided. When a 
person was desirous of removing, he was bound to give the planta- 
tion notice ; and if they disallowed the sale he was about to make, 
the plantation was to take the lot, if they chose, at an appraisement. 
If no measures were taken after 10 days notice, the first bargain 
might proceed. In making the actual settlement, the following was 
the most general course : to allow each inhabitant a house lot on the 
west side of what is now called Main street, eight rods wide, from 
the street to the river ; a like width in tlie meadow, in front of his 
house, to the foot of the hill ; and a wood lot of the same breadth, 
extending, at first, eighty, and afterwards, an hundred rods, nearly 
to the top of the hill ; and, when practicable, an allotment in the 
interval on the west side of the river, of the same width, as near as 
might be directly against his lot. This was the ordinary course ; 
there were a few instances where the lots were wider ; but, I 
believe, onlv one narrower.! 

The original limitation to fifty families, may seem strange and 
extraordinary to us, at this day. But it is apparent that those who 
made that agreement contemplated, at first, having their house lots 
all on the west side of the street, within the compass of two miles. 
AVhen this limitation was made, the house lots were to be much 
wider than they afterwards established them. The marsh, or mead- 
ow, on the east side of the street was considered unfit for building ; 
and the upland east of it was reserved for wood lots. But the man- 

. _. — ., , . . 

* Appendix D. t Appendix E. 



HON. GEORGE BLlSS' ADDRESS. 263 

ner of cultivation is also to be considered ; it was very diflferent 
from that of the present day. It is very evident, from the early 
history, that it was extremely difficult and inconvenient for any con- 
siderable number to gain a subsistence together. They had very 
strong inducements, not only for their mutual accommodation, but 
more than that, for their self-defence and self-preservation, to keep 
in compact settlements. Yet, neither their fears, nor public prohibi- 
tions, could prevent their wandering and scattering themselves 
abroad. It may be stated, with truth, that to some, a roving, unset- 
tled disposition, was a sufficient cause for wishiug to remove. This, 
however, could not generally be the case. The manner of cultiva- 
tion gives the only and full solution of the difficulty. They gener- 
ally had their farms in common. Partition fences were a work of 
much labor and time. It is apparent, from the places selected for 
the first settlement, that the principal dependence was upon the 
intervals and cleared lands. They took only the natural grass for 
their cattle, and the land which was clear of timber, for their plant- 
ing grounds. To fell the forests, and clear land for a crop of wheat 
or corn, was a work of much labor, and one to which they had been 
but rarely accustomed before their emigration. Potatoes, which 
now afford so much aid in a new settlement, were then unknown. 
Tradition has always represented the house lots as originally a birch 
plain. The above considerations unquestionably operated upon the 
first associates at this place. 

When the settlement was made here, there were no white inhabi- 
tants on the east side of the river nearer, in any course in which they 
would travel, than Watertown. A settlement had, indeed, been 
begun at Concord, a short time before. On the west side of the river 
the only settlements were those towns which had been commenced 
the year before. These places, at first, bore the names of the 
towns which they respectively left. 

The first settlers came, indeed, as did all the other plantations, 
under the license, and the professed authority and protection of 
Massachusetts ; but they were so separated from the towns on the 
Bay, as to be obliged, principally, to rely on themselves. Agawam 
was at first united with the other towns below, on the river, as no 
distinction had been made in the license to remove ; all being sub- 
ject to the same restriction. 

The license, in one instance, mentions towns, and in others planta- 
tions on Connecticut river. A joint commission for their govern- 
ment, for the term of one year, was made, containing regulations as 



2G4 HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 

to the mode of administering justice. In this commission there was 
a saving of the rights of tliose who had just obtained the patent of 
Connecticut.* It appears by the Connecticut record, that under 
this order, at a court holden at Newton, [Hartford] Nov. 1636, Mr. 
Pynchon was present, with the other magistrates. In the year 
1637, Mr. Pynchon was again appointed, with Mr. Ludlow and oth- 
ers. In 1G38, it is stated on the town record, that " there was a 
free choice according to the order from Mr. Ludlow, by the planta- 
tion, of two eommittys for the general court, to be holden at Hart- 
ford, April 4, 1638, and the partys chosen are Mr. George ]\Ioxon 
and Jehu Burr." And it appears that both Pnychon and Burr 
attended. 

Agawam was also assessed with the towns in Connecticut, to fur- 
nish its quota of troops, and to pay a portion of the expense of the 
Peqiiot war. The number of men required of them, was seven, and 
the amount of tax they were to pay, was c£86. 16s. sterling, the 
whole being ,£550. Dr. Trumbull, in his history of Connecticut, 
observes that this place did not furnish the troops, but paid the 
assessment. I should have come to a different conclusion, were it 
not for his authority. I find no evidence of any payment or assess- 
ment, on our records ; and the Pynchon minute book gives no hint 
respecting either troops or money for that purpose. When the leave 
was given to come here, the General Court loaned to the adventu- 
rers certain military stores and ammunition, to be furnished by the 
towns of Watertown, Dorchester and Roxbury.t 

This place did not long continue united with the other towns on 
the river. The three towns formed a voluntary constitution, in Feb- 
ruary, 1639, in which no mention is made of Agawam. The inhab- 
itants of Agawam, believing themselves to be within the jurisdiction 
of Massachusetts, Feb. 14, 1638, came into a voluntary agreement, 
and appointed William Pynchon, Esq. a magistrate, with extensive 
powers, and directed the proper course of proceeding, till they 
should receive orders from Massachusetts. This regulation most 
clearly shows the wisdom and prudence of the people, and is as pure 
a specimen of democratic legislation as is extant.f It has been sug- 
gested that Mr. Pynchon was dissatisfied with some proceedings at 
Hartford, in which he was personally concerned, and that he joined 
with Massachusetts oh that account. I find no evidence of this ; 
but I do find that the south line of the colony of Massachusetts had 
been run, and it was then supposed to be ascertained that the line 

* Appendix F. t Appendix G. J Appendix H. 



H0\. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 265 

passed between Springfield and Windsor. From the time of making 
the last mentioned order, Springfield continued within the jurisdic- 
tion of Massachusetts, and sent deputies to the General Court, as 
the other towns did. 

The original name of the place was Aggawam, or, as our ances- 
tors sometimes wrote it, Agaam. There were several other places 
in the State which had the same Indian name. The most famous 
was Ipswich ; and there were two in Plymouth colony. The precise 
signification of it, I know not ; but finding that places bearing this 
name, are meadows, with a small river running through them, near 
to which they unite with larger waters, I am induced to conjecture 
it is indicative of its local situation. The name was changed from 
Aggawam to Springfield, by vote of the town, in general meeting, 
April 14, 164U. Hubbard, in his general history, states that the 
name was given out of regard to Mr. Pynchon, who had his mansion 
in a town of that name, near Chelmsford, in Essex, before he came 
to this country. Whatever be the origin, it is peculiarly appropri- 
ate. It is very rare that a place so abundantly watered with rivers, 
brooks, streams and springs, can be found.* The first appearance 
of the name upon the records of the General Court, is in 1641 ; 
before that it is spoken of as Aggawam. That name often occurs in 
the records of 1638, 39, and 40 ; afterwards it was always called 
and known by the name of Springfield, and no other. 

Much uncertainty has existed as to the date of the incorporation 
of the town. When the Massachusetts Registers were first publish- 
ed, it was stated as 1635, or 1645, leaving it uncertain which was 
the true time. This was continued for several years. At length 
the latter date was exclusively fixed upon as if it had been discov- 
ered that the town was incorporated in 1645 ; and for several years 
that date has been generally adopted. I have repeatedly examined 
the public records of that period, with attention and care, and have 
not been able to discover a single fact occurring in 1645, which 
should induce the selection of that year, in preference to any other 
in that century. That such a mistake should occur, will not be 
thought very strange, for so far as I can find, there is not in print, 
anywhere, the incorporation of the most ancient towns. This is to 
the disgrace of the state. It has long been a complaint, that our 
ancient laws can hardly be found. Some of the general acts have, 
indeed, been repeatedly published, but many others were never 

* Appendix I. 

34 



266 HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 

printed. The record of incorporation of the oldest towns is extreme- 
ly laconic. For example, it was " ordered that Aggawam shall bo 
called Ipswich." " Trimountain is made a town by tlie name of 
Boston." " Wessacuscous shall bo a town by the name of New- 
bury ;" and persons were ai)pointed to set out the bounds. 

No regular act of incorporation, as they are now made, was given 
to any of the towns till long after the time of which we are now 
speaking, if any ever passed during the existence of the colonial 
government. In regard to Springfield, no such transaction of the 
General Court can be found, as, according to the practice of that 
day, could be called an incorporation. After searching thoroughly, 
in Massachusetts and Connecticut, I have come to the conclusion 
that the town never was incorporated. The settlement, for two or 
three years, united with the other towns in Connecticut, and sent 
deputies to the General Court. But it is styled in the Connecticut 
records, the plantation of Aggawam. If the general license, origi- 
nally given to remove to the river and form settlements, called indis- 
criminately towns and plantations, and the authority given for their 
government, in which was included a direction as to the choice of 
constables, and prescribing their duty as town officers, can be deem- 
ed an act of incorporation, it ought to bear the date of the commis- 
sion then given ; but a license to settle anywhere on the river, can 
hardly be called an incorporation of a particular town or place. 

It is probable that when the jurisdiction of Connecticut was 
renounced, and application made to Massachusetts for direction, it 
was made by the name of the town of Springfield, during the year 
1640, and that its not having been made a town by the General 
Court, was not adverted to at the time. Very soon after, it was rec- 
ognized as a town, sent deputies to the General Court, and conduct- 
ed, and was treated, in all respects, as a town. The settlement was 
begun in 1636, and the place is recognized by the name of Spring- 
field, by the General Court, in 1641. In 1647, additions were. made 
to the town of Springfield. Were I to fix the date, it would be 
1641 ; as from that time it was recognized by the name of the town 
of Springfield, by the Legislature. The mere vote as to the name, 
in 1640, ought not to affect this question. 

The limits of the town were not originally better defined than the 
date of incorporation. The earliest notice I find on this subject, is 
an order of the plantation, bearing date January 3, 1638, appoint- 
ing six men to set out the bounds of the plantation, on both sides of 
the river, and to mark the trees for the clearing of it. It may here 



HOM. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 267 

be observed, once for all, that the dates in our ancient records begin 
the year the 22d of March. January, February, and the former 
part of March, are reckoned in the preceding year. Sometimes, 
instead of the heathen names of the months, they reckon 1, 2, 3, 4, 
and so on. In this case, they begin with April as the first. Count- 
ing the time by this rule, the order was January, 1639, as we reck- 
on, and a return was made, describing the boundaries as fullows : 
" We have laid out the boundaries of the plantation up the river, on 
the other side of the river, and the bounds are at a brook above the 
great meadow, which is about a quarter of a mile above ye mouth 
of Chicopee river. The brook in the long meadow, at the lower 
end, is the bounds southward, and the brook a little below, on the 
other side, — and the bounds that is set for gathering candlewood 
into the woods." The distance east and west is not mentioned in 
this order, or return ; but the town claimed and exercised jurisdic- 
tion to the extent of five or six miles from the river. There is noth- 
ing on the records of the General Court, for the first ten years, as to 
the bounds of the town, though it is frequently mentioned as a town 
within the colony limits. 

In the year 1647, the town petitioned to have the land at Fresh- 
water, (now Enfield,) granted to them, and also to have Woronoco, 
(now Westfield.) And in that year the bounds of the town were 
greatly enlarged. It was ordered by the General Court, in March, 
1647, that all the land east of Connecticut river, from the town of 
Springfield, down to the warehouse, which they built there, and 
twenty poles below the warehouse, should, for the present, belong to 
the town of Springfield. The warehouse was at \Yarehouse point, at 
a house occupied by John Bissell, nearly in the north line of Windsor- 
It was meant to include all the land within this colony, according to 
the measuring of Woodward and Saflfery. Over this territory, IMas- 
sachusetts claimed and exercised jurisdiction for a century from that 
date. The eastern boundary of that tract w^as also left wholly 
undefined. 

In the autumn of the same year, another annexation was made of 
a very valuable tract of land, called Woronoco, including part of 
the towns of Sufiield, Westfield, and Southwick. " October 27, 
1647, Woronoco upon Connecticut river, within the jurisdiction of 
Massachusetts, is ordered to be, and reputed to be, a part of the 
town of Springfield, and liable to pay charges there, as others of 
the same town, till erecting another plantation, it shall be annexed 
thereto." By a subsequent order, Springfield was to adjoin North- 



268 HON. OKORGF, BLlSS' ADDRESS. 

ampton and Iladley, and to extend eastward to the foot of the 
mountains, wliich meant the eastern base of the first mountains. 

Tliis territory included the towns of Westfiehl, Suffiehl, and a 
great part of Southwick, and the whole of West Springfield, on the 
west side of the river, and the towns of Springfield, Enfield, Som- 
ers, Wilbraham, Ludlow, and Longmeadow, on the east ; and con- 
tained, according to the last census, a population of 21,r)31, and a 
territory nearly 25 miles square. The most of it was, at that time, 
in a wilderness state. One or more early establishments had been 
made at Woronoco. This was an important post for the beaver 
trade with the Indians. It was claimed both by Connecticut and 
Massachusetts. I believe there is no doubt both had trading houses 
there. The progressive settlement and division of this territory into 
towns and parishes, I shall notice hereafter. 

One leading object of the first settlers, in coming to this place, 
was that they might have a settled minister, and unite in a church. 
Mr. Pynchon left his minister, Mr. Elliot, at Roxbury, and the towns 
in Connecticut brought ministers with them. But in a short time 
after he came, a minister was settled here, and a church gathered. 
The Rev. George Moxon was probably settled in the year 1637. 
He was in that year made a freeman, at Boston, and in April, 1638, 
was appointed a deputy, by this town, to go to Hartford. When he 
came from England, Is not known. There are no early church rec- 
ords extant, but there is no reason to doubt that a church was gath- 
ered at the time of his coming here. Mr. Pynchon, and several oth- 
ers who were here then, were church members, and persons eminent 
for piety, and professedly designed to organize a church, without 
delay. The formation of the church has been, by some writers, I 
know not upon what authority, postponed to the year 1645, as the 
time of incorporation of tiie town was. This church was probably 
the fourteenth in Massachusetts.* After Mr. Moxon left Springfield, 
there was an interval of nearly nine years, in which they had not a 
settled minister. During that time they had several preachers, who 
stayed some time. With that exception, there have been, with very 
short interruptions, one or more settled ministers ever since Mr. 
Moxon came here. 

In the year 1639, a house for Mr. Moxon was built, by a volunta- 
ry assessment. The house was 35 by 15 feet, with a porch and a 
study in it. The roof was thatched, and the cellar planked, instead 

* The editor of Winthrop's Journal, postponing it to 1645, makes it the 26th. 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 269 

of stone wall. Mr. Moxon had a grant of a house lot and other 
lands, as the other inhabitants had. His homelot was fourteen rods 
instead of eight. In the year 1645, a contract was made by the 
town, with Thomas Cooper, to build a meeting-house. The house 
was to be 40 feet long and 25 wide ; to be 9 feet between joists, to 
be double studded, four large windows, two on each side, and one 
smaller one at each end ; one large door at the south side, and two 
smaller doors ; to have joists for a floor above, to be underpinned 
with stone ; to shingle the roof, with two turrets, one for a bell, the 
other for a watch-house ; for which he was to be paid fourscore 
pounds, [to be paid] in wheat, peas, pork, wampum, debts and labor. 
Each inhabitant was to furnish twenty days' work in all. The meet- 
ing-house was placed a rod or two northwest of the place where the 
store of Daniel Lombard now stands, and fronting to the south. A 
road, one rod wide, passed on the south side of it, to the training 
field, or burying ground. It is probable this was then the only house 
here with a shingled roof, or stone underpinning. A chamber floor 
was laid, and the chamber occupied for a store, by John Pynchon 
and others ; but it seems, afterwards the floor was removed and a 
gallery made. Mr. Moxon's salary was at first forty pounds sterling, 
and paid by an annual tax. 

As Springfield was on the borders of Connecticut, and for many 
years the only town bordering on that colony, and had once united 
with them, it was frequently claimed to belong there. There was, 
however, a more violent contest as to Woronoco. Mr. Fenwick, the 
governor of Saybrook, had established a trading house, and claimed 
it as within the patent of Connecticut. This, probably, embraced 
part of Southwick and Suffield, as well as Westfield. In making 
the grant to Springfield, it is called Woronoco upon Connecticut 
river. The controversy with Mr. Fenwick was carried on for several 
years. But as affecting Springfield, there arose a more serious and 
bitter controversy. 

The patentees of the charter of Connecticut, had, about the time 
of the first settlement on the river, commenced a fort at Saybrook 
point, at the mouth of the river. They appointed John Winthrop, 
Jr., son of the first governor, their commander, and vested him with 
authority over the river. He claimed a toll from all passengers to 
aid in supporting the fort. This was exacted, not only from foreign- 
ers, but the inhabitants of the towns on the river. The towns 
below, sensible that they had settled on the lands of the proprietors 
of the fort, and were liable to be ousted by them, did not controvert 



270 

the payment. The inhabitants of Springfield strenuously resisted 
payment, and when it was attempted to l)e enforced, they deter- 
mined to have the full benefit of this great natural highway, and 
appealed to the General Court for assistance and protection. The 
General Court resolved that they were not bound to {)ay toll. The 
people in Connecticut, on the river, afterwards agreed to purchase 
the fort and the jurisdiction of the river, and also the claim against 
Springfield for the toll which had accrued before the purchase. The 
Saybrook government had subsisted indei)endent of that on the 
river, for nearly ten years, when this purchase was made, which was 
December 5, 1C44. The government of Connecticut claimed the 
toll which had accrued. This occasioned as great and famous a 
controversy between Massachusetts and Connecticut, as almost any 
in their history. It was long agitated before the commissioners of 
the united colonies. The arguments on both sides were learned and 
powerful. Not only the two colonies, but the whole four united col- 
onies were finally engaged in the quarrel. The commissioners deter- 
mined it was reasonable that Springfield should pay ; but they 
resolved never to yield. 

In order to test the principle of this decision, the General Court 
of Massachusetts ordered that all vessels belonging to the other col- 
onies, should pay a certain toll upon entering the harbor of Boston. 
This was greatly resented, and seemed likely to break up the con- 
federacy of the colonies. More urgent common danger induced all 
parties to suspend their controversy, which, I believe, was never 
resumed. The conduct of Massachusetts has been very severely 
blamed by Connecticut historians, and is spoken of with more disap- 
probation by Hutchinson, than I think it deserves. As to the right 
to the claim, it rests upon the same ground with that of Connecti- 
cut. Both of them were probably very impolitic ; but both must 
stand or fall together. 

The town increased rapidly, and the settlements extended in all 
directions, till an event took pla&e which seemed likely greatly to 
check, if not to destroy it. Mr. Pynchon had been employed in all 
public concerns, and had been a magistrate from 1636 to 1650, 
including the two or three years when the town was united with 
Connecticut. In the year 1650, he fell under the censure of the 
General Court, for having published a book, not in accordance with 
their sentiments, in some of its theological opinions in regard to the 
atonement. He was left out of the magistracy, and cited before 
them, and laid under heavy bonds. The next year, Mr. Pynchon, in 



HON. GEORGE BLTSS' ADDRESS. 271 

a letter addressed to the General Court, retracted his sentiments. 
The censure of hlui was suspended, but he was so much dissatisfied 
that he went to England, and Mr. ]\Ioxon went with him. Whether 
he approved Mr. Pynchon's book, is not known. Mr. Pynchon did 
not take his family, but Mr. Moxon did. Neither of them returned. 
Henry Smith, Mr. Pynchon's son-in-law, remained here a year, and 
then sold his property, and, with his family, removed to England, 
and remained there till he died. 

Mr. Pynchon was a man of distinction, of eminent piety, and 
respectable talents. He appears to have had the confidence of the 
town while he remained. Henry Smith was a man of education, 
and was appointed a magistrate when Mr. Pynchon was left out. 
He was a good penman, and much employed in the affairs of the 
town.* 

The loss of three such men could not but have been severely felt. 
But the absence of ]\Ir. Pynchon was made up in his son, John 
Pynchon, who remained here. He was a man of uncommon talents, 
and admirably adapted to his situation. To mention no others, 
Deacon Samuel Chapin, and Elizur Holyoke, were well qualified for 
public business, and much employed in it. 

The subject of the title to the land within the town, is one that 
ought not to be passed over. So far as the General Court could 
give a title, I think it may be fairly inferred that it lias been done. 
In the establishment of the most ancient towns, there was no express 
grant of the riglit of soil. It seems to have been implied in the 
authority to be a town. By the colony laws of 1636, it was pro- 
vided, that the freemen of every town, with such others as are 
allowed, shall have power to dispose of their own lands and woods, 
and to grant lots. The acts and doings of the General Court, hav- 
ing made this a town, gave the right to dispose of the land within it. 
The law provided that a record of such grants, and the bounds of 
each man's lot should be made, and a transcript of it sent to the 
General Court. In regard to Springfield, a special order was made 
of this import. 

The general right of civilized man to appropriate to his use, a 
part of the land claimed by those who roam the forest in a savage 
state, I cannot here discuss ; and I feel that, in the present case, 
there is no necessity for observations on the subject. The greater 
part of the land within the limits of the town, extensive as they 

* See Appendix K. 



272 HON. GEORGE BLlSS' ADDRESS. 

were, was obtained by fair purchase from the Indians. There are 
several deeds on record. Tliey were made to agents, in behalf of the 
town. The names of the grantors I shall not undertake to give. 
The first deed is dated July 15, 1636, tlioiigh a bargain had been 
made before. This was Accomsiek, and all the ground on the side 
of Aggawam, except the ground then planted by the Indians ; and 
also, all the ground on the east side of Quineaticott river, called 
Uscjuaiok Nayassett, reaching about four or five miles in length, 
from the north end of Massacksick, up to Chickuppe river, and also, 
Massacksick and grounds adjoining, reserving the ground then 
planted, and liberty to take fish and deer, ground nuts and acorns, 
and a kind of wild peas.* § The second deed is dated April 14, 1652, 
and conveys the land below Longmeadow, lying on Freshwater, at 
Enfield. A third deed was made June 20, 1666, of the right of 
those who gave it, to the land at Aggawam and Quana ; and also, 
the higher meadow and uplands, from the mouth of Aggawam river, 
up to the ponds west of it ; and all the land into the woods, where 
Ensign Cooper and Samuel Marshfield had a meadow. The fourth 
deed, made in the year 1674, was considerably more extensive. It 
contains, in the first place, a confirmation of the other deeds, from 
Longmeadow to Chicopee, as far east as the five mile pond, " which 
lyes by the hay path ^ The south bounds of the tract sold by said 
fourth deed, is " the riveret called Freshwater, on Asmentuck, 
including the meadows thereon, to its head, and thence eastward to 
the riveret called Scantick, up to the place where it comes down 
from the mountains, and including the meadows on both sides of 
Scantick. The foot of the mountains is the eastern boundary — 
northerly the Chickuppe river, and west the land first sold." After- 
wards, March 16, 1680, a deed was made of the residue of Enfield, 
down to Saltonstall's brook, and to extend east eight miles. A deed 
was likewise made of Woronoke, June 3, 1669. Another deed was 
made of Suffield. Through the agency of John Pyncbon, Esq., like 
purchases were made of Northampton and Hadley. 

Some may ridicule the idea of purchasing of the Indians, but 
there is no reason to believe that they did not understand what was 
meant by a sale of land. These transactions were at different peri- 
ods, from 1636, to 1680. They well understood what the English 

* Appendix L. 

(Notes marked with a § are furnished by O. Chapin.) 

§The price paid for the land mentioned in the above deed, is 18 fathum of wampum, 18 coats, 
18 howes, 18 hatchets, and 18 knives. And in addition to the above, Mr. Pynchon gave to 
Wenthoma 2 coats. 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 273 

claimed by virtue of sucli sale. It appeal's that the town, as early 
as April 16, 1640, passed an order to restrain the Indians from 
breaking up any new grounds, or from planting that which was 
broken up the year before ; and, as to the swamps in the neck, a 
part of the land first sold, that stakes should be set up, so that the 
Indians might be resti'ained from extending themselves farther. 
Mr. Moxon, Henry Smith, and Thomas Mirrick, were appointed a 
committee to execute the order. 

The Indians received for these purchases more than what they 
sold was worth to them. I go farther, and agree with the judicious 
and pious historian of Connecticut, that our ancestors gave the full 
value, and more than the full value of their lands. Whoever is con- 
versant with the hardships, toils and privations attending a new set- 
tlement in the wilderness, and will take the trouble to compute what 
is expended and laid out on and about a settlement, to make land 
produce anything — how much its value depends on neighboring set- 
tlements — on roads, fences, and the various improvements of civil- 
ized life — will inevitably come to the conclusion that wild land, in a 
wilderness, remote from neighbors, cannot be of much value. Lands 
in our new settlements, are worth but little now. And yet their 
value is very much enhanced by reference to other places already 
cleared and settled. 

The people here taxed themselves to pay for purchases of the 
Indians. The first tax on record, except a voluntary one for Mr. 
jMoxon's house, is one of <£20 sterling, to pay Mr. Pynchon, in part, 
for the Indian purchase. This was May 6, 1644. Several grants 
were made afterwards, upon condition that the grantees should pur- 
chase the Indian title. 

The administration of justice, as long as William Pynchon 
remained here, was under his direction. The first year after he 
came, he acted under the general commission given at the time of 
removing ; then for two years under the associates at Connecticut ; 
and for one or two years, by the order of the town, in town meet- 
ing ; and from 1640 to 1650, under commissions given from time to 
time by the General Court. His authority as a magistrate was 
extensive in civil and criminal cases. He officiated as judge of 
probate, and tried causes. All trials were, however, by jury. The 
jury to consist of six men, when twelve could not be had. An 
appeal, upon giving bonds, might be had to the court at Boston. 
All capital trials were to be at Boston. November 6, 164S, the 
town, by vote, appointed that four courts should be holden in each 
35 



274 HON. 

year. Tlic constablo ol' llic luwu was to execute all processes, and 
while there was no gaol, he was to confine persons in his custody, 
by imprisoning in irons. To sujjply the want of grand jurors, the 
town voted to choose two men annually, who were to be under oath, 
to present all offences to the magistrate, and all breaches of town or 
court orders. These were called presenters. 

The authority given to the selectmen was, in some respects, differ- 
ejit from what they now have. The following is the copy of the 
record of a vote, in the hand writing of William Pynehon. The 
hand is not easily read, and perhaps a word or two may be mistaken. 
" Springfield, the 26th of the 7th month, 1644.— It is this day 
agreed by general vote of the towne, that Henry Smith, Tho. 
Cooper, Samuel Ohapin, Richard Sikes, and Henry Burt, shall have 
power to direct in all the prudential affairs of the towne, to prevent 
anything they shall judge to be to the damage of the towne, and to 
order any thing they shall judge to be for the good of the towne ; 
and they or any three of the five shall have full power for a year's 
space ; and what they or any three of them shall order, shall be 
of full power and virtue. Also to hear complaints, to arbitrate con- 
troversies, to lay out highways, to make bridges, repair highways, 
especially to order the making of the way over the niuksy meadow, 
to see to the scouring of the ditches, and to the killing of wolves, 
and to the training up of the children in their good ruling, or any 
other thing they shall judge to be to the profit of the town." Mr. 
Pynchou's records are preserved, and in the hands of Edward Pyn- 
ehon, Esq. There are many proceedings of the town recorded in 
his record book, and not found elsewhere. 

After Mr. Pynehon was left out of the magistracy, Henry Smith 
had the same power which Mr. Pynehon had exercised. When 
Smith went to England, it was vested iu three persons, of whom 
§John Pynehon was one. After Northampton and Hadley were 
settled, the commissioners of Springfield and Northampton united 
and held courts alternately here and at Northampton, until a county 
and county courts were established. 

Drunkenness and lewdness seem, at that period, to have been not 
very uncommon. They were much more generally and more severe- 
ly punished than they now are. 

As this part of the country increased, the people determined to 
apply to the General Court to have a county established, and May 

§ At the early age of ten years, John Pynehon came to Springfield with hia father. 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 275 

7, 1662, the western part of the state was made a county by the 
name of Hampshire. I have, on another occasion, inadvertently 
stated this to be in the year 1660. I know not that the law erect- 
ing the county is in print ; I have never seen it. There were in the 
county only three towns, Springfield, Northampton, and Hadley. 
There were, however, a number of other settlements commenced, 
which a short time after were towns. 

It is not in my power precisely to fix the time of the early settle- 
ments in the different parts of this town. Grants were not unfre- 
quently made years before the land was occupied. Though they 
were recorded, the date of the grant or transfer is not given. The 
county records do not reach back far enough. Probably, the earli- 
est settlement, except the homelots in the street, were in Long- 
meadow. This was not earlier than 1644, and not later than 1646. 
The first residents in Longmeadow were in the meadow, and not on 
the hill. Permission to build on the hill was not given till the year 
1703, when the inhal)itants, generally, built where the street and 
meeting-house now are. There were one or two early settlements at 
Skipmuck, probably the beginning of the year 1660. On Chicopee 
river, the first cultivation was begun on the south side of that river, 
and near its mouth. The oldest was in the year 1645. 

It is very difficult to fix the time when the inhabitants began to 
build on the west side of the river. The land there was improved 
as a common field, as well before as after settlements were com- 
menced. There were, as I believe, three distinct parts of West 
Springfield, occupied about the same time. One was south of Aga- 
wam river, begun by the ancestors of the Leonards and Coopers. 
Another was in the tirst parish under the hill ; and a third on Chic- 
opee plain, above. These commenced, as far as I can ascertain, in 
1653, and soon rapidly increased and extended. 

The first house built east of the town street, on the east side of 
the river, was Charles Ferry's, who had bought the east part of his 
father Harmon's meadow, and had, in 1661, a special license to 
build there, and his descendants own the place to this day. 

While this town was thus increasing, a large tract of land above 
it was purchased of the Indians, through the agency of John Pyn- 
chon, Esq., including what is now Northampton, Hadley, and Hat- 
field. A flourishing settlement was commenced in Northampton in 
1653. Soon after, the towns of Hadley and Hatfield were settled.* 

* See Appendix L. 



276 HON. GKORGE BLlSS' ADDRESS. 

Ill the year 165-5, settlements were begun at Freshwater, (now 
Enfield ;) and in 1656, a considerably extensive allotment was made 
of lands at Woronoco, (Westfield.) In 1660, or 61, it seems, a set- 
tlement was commenced at Suffield. 

An order was mgjile, March 12, 1662, that there should be a high- 
way laid out to the House of Correction, that is to l)e built on the 
meadow, and thence to the house that is next to Thompson's dingle ; 
from which it appears that other settlements were then made or con- 
templated, on Maple street. 

One or two of the first instances of prosecutions for witchcraft, 
arose from transactions in this town. The delusion on this subject 
was not then as great as it was afterwards. It was, indeed, the gen- 
eral belief of the age, that witchcraft and diabolical possession were 
not unfrequent. This was a capital offence, and tried before the 
Court of Assistants at Boston, and one of the cases afterwards came 
before the General Court. Hugh Parsons and Mary Parsons were 
prosecuted and finally acquitted of this offence. They lived at the 
lower end of Main street. The character and situation of their 
accusers, I have been unable to learn. There is nothing on our rec- 
ords on the subject. 

In addition to the plantations before mentioned, Quabog, or 
Brookfield, had been purchased, and a settlement commenced there 
before 1673. I ought to have noticed Deerfield before. Another 
plantation was begun farther up the river, at a place called Squau- 
kege, now Northfield. 

The country had undoubtedly been to a considerable extent 
improved and cleared. The inhabitants of the county had greatly 
increased, as well in this town as others. The Indians could not but 
see with regret, the alterations that were making. Their planting, 
hunting, and fishing grounds were gradually diminished. King 
Philip saw, and felt this most sensibly, and was determined to make 
an effort for the entire extirpation of the English ; and for that pur- 
pose made strenuous exertions to combine all the tribes of Indians 
in one confederacy. This he effected to a great extent. It is for- 
eign from my purpose to give an account of the origin and progress 
of the Indian wars, any farther than this town and the settlements 
connected with it, were particularly affected. 

When the English first came to this place, they were received by 
the Indians with friendship ; and for nearly forty years, lived with 
them as neighbors, in harmony and peace. Occasionally, complaints 
were made of the misconduct of the Indians. They were, when 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 277 

complaints were substantiated, obliged to do right by their neigh- 
bors. On the other hand, it is evident, that when the Indians 
informed the magistrates of injurious treatment, prompt and speedy 
justice was done to them. It is evident that our ancestors did not 
undertake to apply and enforce their regulations upon the Indians 
living in a savage state, who had never acknowledged their jurisdic- 
tion.* The white inhabitants and Indians, residing so near to each 
other, must have had daily intercourse, and been familiarly 
acquainted. 

In June, 1675, when Philip's war broke out, there was a general 
alarm. Many transactions occurred afterwards to excite suspicion, 
and this not merely in remote regions. Quahog, or Brookfield, was 
attacked and destroyed. Injury had been sustained at Northfield, 
Deerfield, Northampton, and Hatfield. It was understood that Phil- 
ip himself was in this part of the country. AVhat fortified places 
there were in the town, does not certainly appear. The old brick 
house, built by John Pynchon, Esq., before the year 1660, a great 
part of which is still standing, was used as a fort. The portico, and a 
part of the roof, have been removed. There is reason to believe there 
were one or two more forts south of the meeting-house. It has also 
been said, that the south part of the town was palisadoed ; probably 
not so as to afford very great security. The Indians who were on 
this side of the river, had their principal settlement on Longhill, 
where they had a fort. The place was admirably adapted to pre- 
vent surprise, and was also well calculated for concealment. Dur- 
ing the night of the third or fourth of October, three hundred of 
Philip's warriors were received into the fort, and there concealed by 
the Springfield Indians. Toto, a Windsor Indian, was informed of 
a plot to burn the town, and massacre the inhabitants. This he 
communicated to the people at Windsor, who, without delay, sent an 
express to give the alarm here. This, at first, occasioned great con- 
sternation. The people here betook themselves to the forts, and 
took such measures for security as they could, upon the emergency. 
The Springfield Indians, however, appeared as usual, professed cor- 
dial friendship, and in a great degree, quieted the fears and alarms 
of the English. The Rev. Mr. Glover, who, with others, had 
retired to the fort, and had removed his librarv, and some of his 



* The difficulties in reg-ard to governing the Indians within the local limits of the colony, 
must have been sensibly felt, very early. A letter of Mr. Pynchon's to governor Dudley, and 
the proceedings of council thereon, published by the learned editor of Winthrop, in the appen- 
dix to the 2d volume, will show the sound principles which they adopted, leaving the indepen- 
dent tribes to their own laws and customs. 



278 HON. GEORGE BLlSS' ADDRESS. 

valuable effects, to Mr. Pynchon's, upon finding all to be quiet, and 
notliing heard or seen of an enemy, moved back his library to his 
own house. The Indians lay perfectly still and concealed. Some 
of the Englisli, however, were not satisfied ; and in the morning of 
October 5th, Lt. Thomas Cooper, and Thomas Miller, went out as 
scouts, to examine and explore the fort and Indian settlement. 
While advancing towards it, they were both fired upon and killed. 
Mr. Cooper, being very athletic and vigorous, got into one of the 
forts before he exi)ired. 

An assault upon the town immediately followed. Three men and 
one woman were killed, including the two above named. About 
thirty dwelling houses and twenty-five barns, were destroyed. Tlie 
mills, and house of correction, or gaol, were also burnt; but the old 
meeting-house was preserved. 

The Indians retreated before they had completed the work of 
destruction. That so few lives were lost, was very extraordinary. 
The colonial governments of Massachusetts and Connecticut had a 
considerable force in this quarter. But apprehending the danger to 
be farther north, they had established their head-quarters at Hadley, 
and no troops were then stationed here. 

John Pynchon, Esq., who had been commander-in-chief in Massa- 
chusetts, had a day or two before, resigned the command. At his 
urgent request, Capt. Samuel Appleton had been appointed, and 
while in Massachusetts, according to the terms of the confederacy 
of the united colonies, would have the chief command. It is sup- 
posed Mr. Pynchon was at Hadley, when the attack took place. 
Major Treat, who commanded the Connecticut forces, received 
orders to march into Connecticut, to protect their towns. It has 
been supposed he was at "Westfield, on his way, when the alarm was 
given ; but it would seem by Appleton's letters, that he was left at 
Hadley, when Appleton came to Springfield with a large force, as 
he did, upon information of the attack. The Indians, however, 
retired, and the English forces were not able to come up with them, 
though th<^y immediately pursued. 

The dismay, horror, and confusion of such a scene as presented 
Itself to our ancestors, we cannot conceive ; but it may be more 
easily conceived than described. The most of the inhabitants, 
though conversant with the Indians, knew as little of war, and 
especially of Indian wars, as we do. They had known the Indians 
only as friends and peaceable neighbors. These circumstances give 
this attack all the shocking features of a civil war. The produce 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 279 

for the approaching winter had been gathered, and was destroyed. 
There are three original accounts of this transaction, which I have 
seen. The first is contained in a letter from John Pynchon, to his 
son, then in England ; the second is the official report of Capt. 
Appleton to the governor; and the third, by Jonathan Burt, written 
in a blank leaf of a record book of the town. They all represent 
the distress and consternation as very great. They all breathe a 
spirit of piety, and an acknowledgment of the interposition of divine 
providence, not often to be found in these days. The whole accounts 
are interesting, but I must content myself with extracts. Mr. Pyn- 
chon writes as follows : 

Springfield, Oct. 20, 1675. 
Dear son Joseph, — The sore contending of God with us, for our 
sins, and unthankfulness for former mercies, and unfruitfulness under 
our precious enjoyments, hath evidently demonstrated that he is very 
angry with this country. God having given the heathen a large 
commission to destroy his people, and exceeding havoc they made in 
this end of the countr3% destroying two or three great places above 
Northampton and Hadley, and lately they have fallen upon Spring- 
field, and almost ruined it by burning of houses. About 30 or 32 
dwelling houses all burnt down, and some twenty-five barns full of 
corn and hay. The Lord hath spared my dwelling house ; but my 
barns and outhousing all burnt down, and all my corn and hay con- 
sumed ; and not anything have I left of food either for man or beast. 
All my mills, both corn mills and saw mills, burnt down those at 
home in this town, and also those I had in other places. — So that 

God hath laid me low — I am really reduced to great straits. 
****** 

How God may dispose of us I know not. We are yet here at 
Springfield. My house garrisoned with soldiers and full of troubles 

and hurries. 1 am not able to afTord you any help, but by my 

prayers, which I am always putting up for you ; and as God shall 
enable shall be ready to do to my utmost otherwise. The Lord in 
mercy be good to you and us ; how he may deal with us I know not. 
Where his Providence may cast me,' whether to Boston, or further 

on, whether I may live to get out of this place, is only with himself 

***** 

The official letter of Mr. Appleton discloses some particulars not 
before published. It is addressed to governor Leverett, and dated 
October 12, 1675. He was at Hadley when he wrote. It contains 
the following : 



280 HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 

"As to the state of poor desolate Springfield, to whose relief we 
came [though with a march that liad [nit our men into a most "vio. 
lent sweat and was more than they could well bear,] too late. 
Their condition is indeed most afflicted, there being about thirty- 
three houses and twenty-five barns burnt, and about fifteen houses 
left unhurnt. The people are full of fear, and staggering in their 
thoughts as to tiieir keeping or leaving of the place. They whose 
houses and provisions are consumed, incline to leave the place as 
thinking tliey can better labour for a living in places of less danger 
than where they now are. Hence seem unwilling to stay except 
they might freely share in the corn and provision which is remaining 
and preserved by the sword. I cannot l)ut think it conducive to the 
public, and for ought I see to the private interest, that the place 
should be kept; there being corn and provision enough and to spare 
for the sustenance of the persons whose number is considerable and 
cannot be maintained elsewhere without more than almost any place 
can aff"ord to their relief. The worth of the place is also considera- 
ble and the holding of it will give encouragement and help to others 
and the quitting of it great discouragement and hazard to our pas- 
sage from one place to another ; it being so great a distance from 
Hadley to any other town on this side of the river. I have in regard 
of the present distress of the poor people adventured to leave Capt. 

Sill there to bo ordered by the Hon'd. Maj'r. till further order. 
* * * * 

In the account of Springfield houses we only presented the num- 
ber of them on the east side of the river and that in the town platt 
for in all, on the west side and in the outskirts on the east side, there 
are about sixty houses standing and much corn in and about them," 

In another letter, dated October 17, 1G75, he says : " By a letter 
from Major Pynchon, I am informed of an old Indian Squaw taken 
at Springfield, who tells that the Indians, who burnt that town, 
lodged about six miles of the town. Some men went forth, found 
twenty-four fires, and some plunder. She saith there came of the 
enemy 270, that the enemy are in all about 600. The place where 
they keep is at Coassitt as is supposed about fifty-six miles above 
Hadley." 

Mr. Burt's account is short. " On the 5th day of October, 1675, 
a day to be kept in memory of posterity, when the barbarous 
heathen made an assault on this poor towne, killed two men, and a 
woman and wounded several, one of which died soon after, burnt 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 281 

down 29 dwelling houses and barnes, and much corn and hay. But 
God did wonderfully preserve us, or we had been a prey to their 
teeth. God in his good providence, so ordered it that an Indian 
gave intelligence of the enemie's designs to fall on this towne, 
whereby we escaped with our lives for which we should give God 
the glory. Jonathan Burt an eye witness of the same." 

A short time after this, October 14th, an attack was made upon 
Hatfield, but was soon repelled by Appleton's forces. 

The council, in answer to Capt. Appleton's letter, by their com- 
munication dated October 15th, say : " We are very sensible of the 
great loss sustained at Springfield, and are of the same opinion with 
you that it is not advisable to have it deserted, and would hope that 
the inhabitants of almost one hundred houses would be able to 
defend the maine of the remainder while the enemy is abroad." 

It has been supposed that ]\Iajor Treat, with the Connecticut 
forces, was passing through Westfield, at the time of the attack on 
Springfield, and came to their relief. Appleton's official letter, how- 
ever, is diflferent. He says, in his letter of October 12th, already 
quoted, that upon a report of Indians lower down above Hartford 
he was, while I was absent, [when he came to Springfield] recalled 
by the council of Connecticut upon the eighth of this instant and is 
not yet returned, nor do I know how it is with him nor when he is 
like to return." If Treat had been at Springfield between the 5th 
and 12th, Appleton would have seen him, and mentioned the fact. 

The people here were kept in fear, and frequently alarmed. No 
very extensive injury was done. Two or three persons were killed. 
At a later period, Skipmuck suffered considerably, and Benjamin 
Wright was taken captive. The people were so much disposed to 
abandon and desert their settlements, that Mr. Appleton found it 
necessary, by general orders, as commander-in-chief, to issue a proc- 
lamation, dated November 12th, 1675, to prohibit the inhabitants of 
Springfield, Westfield, Northampton, Hadley, and Hatfield, from 
removing, without liberty from him ; and any person found without 
a pass signed by him, was to be taken up and confined. This pro- 
hibition was approved by the General Court. 

An allowance was made by the General Court, to Springfield, by 
an abatement in the rates, for the great loss it had sustained, and 
the straights put to, of 66150. Northampton was also abated 6618 
12s. 6d. ; and Hadley £9 3s. 4d. Major Pynchon was remunerated 
c£128 by him disbursed, and his expenses, deSO. Notwithstanding 
36 



282 HON. GEORGE BLISS ADDRESS. 

the severe loss sustained from this attack of the Indians, the town 
evidently soon revived, and the number of inhabitants increased. 

The treacherous conduct of tlie Indians here, led to their exter- 
mination. In the course of the war, many were undoubtedly 
destroyed. The most of the survivors, in the course of a few years, 
removed to the westward. A few, and but a few, remained, and dis- 
posed of their lands. The laud on Longhill and on the side of Aga- 
wam meadows, was taken possession of by right of conquest, 
Longhill was then called Forthill, and was after this granted by the 
town, and English settlements formed there. Indeed, this w'as 
through the country, to a great extent, a war of extermination. 
The severity exercised by the government towards the Indians, 
especially those that remained peaceable, and did not unite with 
Philip, cannot be justified. Eliott, the Indian apostle, made great 
exertions to protect his praying, or christian Indians, but his efforts 
were to a great degree vain. The Indians and squaws were sent 
away, June 24, 1675. At first, they were placed upon certain 
islands, and afterwards, by an order of the General Court, passed 
May, 1677, those which were in Massachusetts proper, exclusive of 
Plymouth colony, were to be confined to four plantations : Natick, 
Punkepaug, (Stoughton,) Wassanemesit (Grafton,) and Wamesit 
(Tewksbury.) Gookin, in his accounts, enumerates in 1674, 1100. 
In Plymouth colony, they were more numerous and less rigorously 
treated. A vigilant superintendence was kept over them, after they 
were confined in those towns. 

Seldom have any of the remnants of the Indians been seen here 
by any now living, unless when transiently passing through the 
town, from the west ; and those that have been here were, probably, 
of the Mohegan, or Grafton tribes. Their degraded and miserable 
condition cannot fail to draw a sigh from every benevolent bosom.* 

Before the Indians had been subdued, an enemy, in many respects 
more formidable, was setting itself in array against the colony. 
The king of England manifested a determination to sieze upon and 
vacate the charter. This had been several times threatened, but in 
the year 1683, a process of quo warranto was served. The conse- 
quence of a judgment in favor of the king, would have been to 
annul all proceedings under it, and to revest all the land within the 
colony, in the king's hands. But in order to quiet the people, and 
render the measure less unpopular, the process contained an express 

* A company of the Stookbridge Indians passed through this town, at the commencement of 
the revolutionary war, on their way to Roxbury. 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 283 

provision, that the private interests of individuals should be pre- 
served, and no man receive any prejudice in his freehold or estate. 
Judgment was the next year given in favor of the Crown, and the 
charter vacated. 

Before judgment was given upon the quo icarranto, at least before 
it was known here, some important measures were taken in this and 
some other towns, to obviate the effect of annulling the charter. 
The town, though Enfield, Suffield, and Westfield, had Ijeen made 
separate towns, contained large quantities of common and undivided 
lands. These the town claimed to hold and dispose of, as they 
thought proper. Probably not one tenth part of the land had been 
sold or divided. None of the pine plains or hills had been granted. 
The tradition has always been, that the measure I am about to state 
was taken in order to make the property the estate of individuals, to 
protect it from seizure. In February, 1685, but dated 1684, the 
town, in fall meeting, passed a vote, that all lands on the east bound- 
aries of the town, through the wliole length of it, from north to 
south, extending on the east side of the river, four miles west, and 
on the west side extending east to boundaries particularly named, 
should be, and thereby were, granted to each (then) present inhabit- 
ant, his heirs and assigns, forever, according to certain proportions 
then stated. This afterwards formed the outward commons, includ- 
ing the greater part of Wilbraham, and Ludlow, on the east, and a 
great part of West Springfield, on the west side of the river. The 
lands were to be laid out in five divisions, and every inhabitant to 
have an allotment in each of them. This was extremely inconven- 
ient, and as between the different inhabitants of the town, a very 
impolitic and unjust division.* A man with a small property, would 
have assigned to him five lots, each three or four miles long, and 
perhaps only a rod wide. 

It is hardly to be conceived that this course could have been pur- 
sued, had there not been some urgent and pressing necessity for it. 
Soon after this vote, the proprietors assumed the management of 
that land. The separate allotment of it was not completed for many 
years after ; the last was in 1740. The records of these proprietors 
and their proceedings, are not in a good state of preservation. 
Probably, some of the original minutes may be lost. These lands 
lying so inconvenient to make farms, and it being very difficult to 
acquire all the titles, is, beyond question, a prominent reason for 
their being settled so much later than other parts of the town. At 

* Appendix M. 



284 HON. GEORGE BLISS' AUDnESS. 

the time when the order above mentioned was made, it was in town 
meeting ajrreed, that all the common lands not included in the for- 
mer vute, on both sides of ti)e great river, should be to, or lie com- 
mon to the [then] present inhabitants, their heirs and assigns for- 
ever ; and not to be granted out at any time, but by the joint con- 
sent of the inhabitants, in tewn meeting, orderly called. 

Resting upon this vote, the same persons who were made propri- 
etors of the outward commons, undertook to hold meetings, and 
make grants of land, not in town meeting, but by the name of the 
proprietors of the inward commons/ The town, indeed, after this, 
from time to time, granted out particular allotments, without oppo- 
sition. In the year 1703, the town made extensive grants to the 
inhabitants of Longmeadow, on the town street, and of the lands 
east of it. 

However, after some time, the proprietors of the inward com- 
mons, in 1721, proceeded to allot a part of the common lands, 
apportioning them by the rule given in the vote of 1685. This 
excluded from any share in them, those who had removed into the 
town after that period, though present at tlie time of division. 
Occasional complaints were made, and when they could not be sti- 
fled, the proprietors would make grants, to quiet troublesome indi- 
viduals. 

Perhaps it is not easy to determine what the precise meaning of 
the town was, by their vote. They meant to protect the land from 
forfeiture, and designed also, that it should remain common. After 
the inward common grants were made, the town confirmed and rati- 
fied their proceedings. The books of the proceedings of both sets 
of proprietors, so far as they are known to exist, are witli the town 
clerk. A second allotment was made by the proprietors in 1740, by 
a new rule, eraljracing nearly 400 persons. A third was made in 
1754, by a different ratio, and including .'')44 persons. 

The exact situation of the land which the first settlers allotted 
here, before tliey altered it by cultivation, cannot be ascertained. 
As well from the appearance of the ground at present, as from the 
town records, it seems that the town brook, in its natural state, ran 
by the side of the meadows, through the town street, in the course 
in which it now runs. The vegetable matter dug up out of the 
meadow, siiews that there was once a quantity of pine or hemlock 
timber, which covered the meadow east of the brook. Hemlock 
roots are now to be found in many parts of the meadow. There is 
a tradition that the laud on the hill, westward of Goose pond, had a 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 285 

very large and heavy growth of oak timber upon it ; that very large 
timber for the first or second meeting-house, was cut therefrom. For 
many years past, it has given no evidence of having ever been oak 
or timber land. If it ever produced oak, the soil must have been 
greatly weakened and almost destroyed, by repeated burnings. But 
there is great reason to doubt whether tbe land near the town, was 
at first very heavily timliered. An early ordinance, made in 1647, 
for the preservation of the timber, notices the very great scarcity of 
timber for building, sawing, and for shingles, and prohibits the car- 
rying it out of town, to any other place. The prohibition to extend 
from Chicopee river to Freshwater brook, and to extend from Con- 
necticut river six miles east. It may be fairly inferred, that when 
this order was made, the growth on the plains was sparse. 

I have already observed, that the manner of cultivating the 
cleared lands, was by throwing them into a common field, inclosing 
them with a general fence. This mode of cultivation, though prob- 
ably the only one they could at first adopt, produced much dispute 
in regard to fences, cattle and swine. Some contending that cattle 
should be restrained to a later period, and others that they should 
go into the fields early in the season. Gates were set up and main- 
tained on the three passages to the river, at the upper, nuddle, and 
lower wharves, and persons appointed to take charge of them. 
Common fields existed here before there were any statutes to regu- 
late them. 

I believe there is not under the colony charter, any record in the 
town books, of the choice of a deputy to the General Court. It is 
certain that they were generally chosen and attended. I have been 
at a loss to account for this omission. It is conjectured, however, 
that in this choice of a deputy, a magistrate presided. The Pyn- 
chons, father and son, were magistrates during the whole time. 
They presided in the election, and kept the record of the choice. In 
fact, I find that in Mr. Pynchon's record book, these elections are, 
some of them, entered. Many other proceedings of the town are to 
be found only in that book. 

By the colony law, towns might choose a deputy either from their 
own town, or from another, and either for one session of the General 
Court, or for a year. This town, when there was no special reason 
for sending a member, elected one from Boston or its vicinity. By 
inspecting the records of the General Court, it appears that this was 
frequently the case. It is, therefore, not always to be inferred from 
a man's being a representative of the town, that he belonged to it. 



286 HON. OKORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 

It is apparent tliat the town considered tiie sending of a deputy 
every year, and twice a year, a burden. His expenses and liis 
wages were to be paid by the town. There are charges in the 
accounts against tlie town, for a horse for the deputy to the Bay, 
and for liorso lieeping ; also, for the deputy's diet, and his wages. 
On several occasions, leave was given by the Court, that he might 
be absent the second session. From tlse frequent recurrence of the 
grant of ^£4, for the deputy, I conjecture that this was the sum paid 
for one from Boston or its vicinity. 

The municipal regulations which were very early adopted here, 
were very various and extensive. They embraced many things 
which were afterwards provided for by general statutes. In some 
cases they probably were but transcripts of the laws ; and it is not 
always easy to separate those that were merely local, from those 
extending through the whole colony. The distance of this place 
from the seat of government at Boston, and the difficulty of access 
to it, made it more important that they should have a system of their 
own. These regulations were adopted from time to time, from their 
first fixing on this spot. They were reduced to a system February 
5, 1650* ; but the date on the record is 1649. As they improved 
their lands so extensively in common, without partition fences, which 
I have already noticed, many of their regulations relate to fences, 
to the time and manner of pasturing their cattle, and the preventing 
of damage by swine. Probably, these are not so interesting as some 
other parts of their bye-laws. Among their regulations, were three 
for security against fire ; requiring each householder to have a lad- 
der annexed to his house, to have his chimney swept at stated peri- 
ods, and a general prohibition against carrying fire abroad uncov- 
ered ; and penalties were annexed to the violation of these rules. 
Ignorant of their situation, on a cursory examination, we should, at 
the present day, be tempted to conclude they had been transcribed 
from the rules of some city, or populous town, without regard to the 
propriety of adopting them. But when the fact is known, that their 
houses and barns, and other buildings, were all covered with thatch, 
that their chimneys were wooden frames, covered with mortar, that 
girdled and dry trees, and wild thatch, and other wild grass, w^ere 
scattered about their roads and fields, the urgency of such regula- 
tions will be very apparent. There are others, which, at this day, 
appear quite as extraordinary, but we may not have as good grounds 

* See Appenclix N. 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 287 

to judge of their propriety ; whereas, if we knew all the induce- 
raents to establish them, they might evince their wisdom and pru- 
dence. 

While there were a very few inhabitants, (only thirteen names 
being mentioned) they built a house for the Rev.' Mr, Moxon; and 
in March 20, 1638, passed the following order : " that in considera- 
tion of certayne charges which the present inhabitants have been at 
for Mr. Moxon's house, and tensing his lott such as shall for future 
tyme come to inhabite in ye place shall beare a share in the like 
charges in proportion with ourselves." It seems they considered 
this as a permanent benefit, and that those that came after them 
ought to bear a share of the burden. 

Several of the very early regulations indicate an anxiety about 
the scarcity of timber. There is one which not only shows this, but 
also what extent they appropriated for settling lots. October 17, 
1638, "it is ordered, [I presun)e by the selectmen,] with the consent 
of the plantation, that from this day forward noe trees shall be cut 
down, or taken away, by any man, in the compass of ground from 
the Mill river upward, to John Reader's lott [which by the original 
agreement was the most northerly,] which parsell of ground is 
appoynted for house lotts ; and in case any man shall trespass, con- 
trary to this order, he shall be liable to the fine of five shillings." 

Some other of the early regulations will better show the state of 
society, than any description. 

November 23, 1638. " It is ordered that a foot path and stiles be 
allowed at every man's lotts end next the greate river." 

February 14, 1639. " It is ordered that it sliall be lawful for any 
inhabitant to fell any canoe trees and make them for his own use or 
for the use of any inhabitant, yt grow on ye common but not to sell 
or any ways pass away any cannoe out of ye plantation uutill it be 
five years old, and in case any shall transgress this order after this 
day he shall be lyable to a fine of twenty shillings." 

" It is also ordered yt it shall be lawfull for any man to put over 
horse, cowes or younger cattell on the other side of the river at the 
first of November and to take them away thence on the 14th of 
April, and if any shall trespass this order he shall be lyable to pay 
any damadges that shall appear to be done by his cattayle." 

" It is ordered that all yt have a ditch by the highway before their 
doors shall keep it well scoured for the ready passage of the water 
that it may not be pent up to flowe the meddowe." [The impor- 
tance of this will appear, when it is considered that the settlement 



288 HON. GEORGE BLlSS' ADDRESS. 

was on the margin of a marsh, and any ol)struction in the water 
course would be extensively injurious. J 

November 14, 1G39. " It is mutually agreed on by the planta- 
tion that ye sealed Peck which Mr. I'ynchon hath shall be the ordi- 
nary peck to bye and sell by in the plantation, and whoever will 
may repayre to the constable and have his peck sealed paying him 
2d. for his labor with ye seal." 

" It is also ordered, yt ye exercise of trayning shall be practiced 
one day in every month ; and if occasions doe sometimes hinder 
then the like space of tyme shall l)e observed another tyme, though 
it be two days after one anotiier. And yt this tyme of trayning is 
referred to ye discretion of Henry Smith, who is chosen by mutual 
consent to be Serjeant of the Company, who shall have power to 
choose a Corporal for his assistant. And whosoever shall absent 
himself without a lawful excuse, shall forfeit twelve pence, and yt 
all above 15 years of age shall be counted for soldiers and the time 
to begin the first Thursday in December next." 

" It is also mutually agreed on, yt no person in this plantation, 
shall trade, give or lend to any Indian, any quantity of Powder, lit- 
tle or greate, under ye penalty of 40s. for any tyme, yt any person 
shall be found a transgressor, in this kind." 

There are many regulations of wages and labor. The earliest as 
follows : 

November 14, 1639. " It is also agreed for the ordering of labor- 
ers wages yt Carpenters shall have for 9 months 2s. 6d. per day 
and for three months from ye 10th of November to the 10th of Feb- 
ruary 2s. per day. Mowers shall have 2s. 6d. per day. Sawers 6s. 
6d. per C ft. they to fall and hewe and the owner to bring to the 
pitt. Also for husbandry or any ordinary labor to have 2s. per day 
for 9 months, only from the 24th of April till the 24th of June they 
are left to their liberty as men can agree with them and for ye other 
3 months, viz from November 10th till February 10th, to have ISd. 
per day." 

The above shows that there were no saw-mills here, and it seems 
this was the case some years after ; for a new order as to the wages 
of Sawyers, was made November 17, 1642 : " For the ordering of 
Sawyers wages workmen of this nature shall saw henceforth at 3s. 
8d. per C ft. for boards and 4s. 4d. per C ft. for slitworke, ye timber 
to be brought home to ye pit and hewn and made ready, and if said 
workmen shall sawe timber and sell the boards they shall not exceed 
the price of os. 6d. per C ft. provided that if the pit be made, within 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 289 

the place of distance, yt is betwixt Mr. Pynchons house and Samuel 
Wrights it shall be accounted as in the town." 

The license to fell canoe trees, without the consent of the 
plantation, was annulled April 16, 1640; and a penalty of 20s. 
imposed for every tree felled without license. 

May 1, 1645. It was " voted, with the consent of the planta- 
tion that whosoever shall take any mans canoe or vessel without his 
leave shall be lyable to the fine of 2s. 6d. for every such default." 

January S, 1646. " It is agreed by the plantation with John 
Matthews to beate the drum for the meetings for a years space at 
10 of the clock on the lecture days and at 9 o'clock on the Lord's 
days, in the forenoons only, and he is to beate it from Mr. Moxons 
to E. Stebbins house, and ye meetings to begin within half an houre 
after, for wliich his payns he is to have 4d. in wampum of every 
family in the town, or a peck of Indian corn if they have not wam- 
pum^ 

The rule of allotting and dividing the lands in the town, before 
the year 1685, is no where laid down, except what is stated in the 
original agreement, in 1636. A power was, however, given to per- 
sons designated from time to time, to admit inhabitants, and to make 
allotments of lands, according to the original agreement. This 
must have been done, in very many instances, without being entered 
on the town records. In regard to the greater part of the original 
settlers on the town street, the only evidence of their title is in the 
record of the town recorder ; and there is commonly neither the 
date of the grant nor the time of recording mentioned upon record. 
The entry is usually in this form : A. B. is by grant of the planta- 
tion, possessed of a house lot, 8 rods broad, and 80 rods long, 
extending from the street to the river, and of a piece of meadow 
opposite thereto, of equal breadth, extending east from the street, 
40 rods, to the foot of the hill, and of a wood lot in the rear thereof, 
in the same direction, of the same breadth, extending east 80 rods ; 
and also, of a lot over against his house lot, on the west side of the 
river, extending from the great river to Agawam river, all bounded 
on the north by C. D. and on the south by E. F. 

There were about forty original house lots granted on the town 
street. I have taken some pains to ascertain the names of the orig- 
inal settlers, and the order of their allotments.* The grants were, 
probably, all made between the year 1636 and 1652. It is evident 

* See Appendix E. 

37 



290 HON. GEORGE BLISS ADDRESS. 

that many of those who had house lots were not here for several 
years after the first settlement. In two rates made January, 1639, 
there are only 13 assessed. Two years afterwards, allotments of 
planting grounds were made to 17 persons, and in 1C43, there were 
22. In 164G, 42 persons were assessed to pay for the purchase of 
the Indians, and there were G vacant lots also assessed. In KioG, 
there were 52 who had taken the oath of fidelity. In 16G4, there 
were recorded as admitted inhabitants, 74 persons. These were all 
that were in the different parts of the town.* 

When Mr. Moxon determined to leave the town, his real estate 
was purchased, and appropriated to the use of the ministry. After 
he left the country, many efforts were made to procure a settled 
minister. In the year 1655, the town voted that Mr. Thompson, 
" during his continuance a preaching minister in Springfield, should 
possess the ministry house and lot bought of Mr. Moxon, for the 
time he should continue among them, in dispensing the word of 
God, and carrying on the place of a preaching elder" ; and to give 
him 6650 a year, and to increase it to c£GO. At this time, an order 
was made that the rates should be assessed on the value of the 
property owned by each inhabitant. And further, it was concluded 
" that it is meete and requisite that every person should allow some 
maintenance to the ministry though not possessed of land or estate 
to rate him thereto, and therefore it was agreed that every person 
being at his own hand, and not a son or servant, who hath noe land 
or estate, or whose land or estate doth not amount to 5s. in the year 
in the rate, that every such person should be liable to pay to the 
ministers maintenance five shillings per annum." 

The next year, Mr. Thompson left the place, and a committee 
was appointed to devise means to procure a minister ; and in the 
meantime it was voted by the town, " that whereas Deacon Wright 
on the Lord's day was chosen to dispense the word of God in this 
place, till some other should be got for that work, that Deacon 
Wright should have for his labor in that employment 50s per month 
for such time as he attends on the work." Again, in November of 
the same year, a vote was passed " to allow Deacon Wright, Dea- 
con Chapin, Mr. Holyoke, and Henry Burt =€12 for their past servi- 
ces in the Lord's work on the Sabbath, to be distributed by the 
selectmen ; and that in future they would allow at the rate of ^£50 

* Appendix D. 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 291 

a year,* till such time as they should have a settled minister, to be 
distributed and ordered by the selectmen." 

A similar course was taken the next year ; and Mr. Holyoke and 
Henry Burt were appointed to carry on the work of the Sabbath ; 
and if they were disabled, Deacon Chapin was to supply their place. 
In November, 1657, Mr. Holyoke was made choice of, as the record 
expresses it, " to carry on the work of the Sabbath, once every 
Sabbath day, which he accepts of ; Mr. Pynchon is made choice of 
for one part of the day, once a fortnight, which he will endeavor to 
attend, sometimes by reading notes, and sometimes by his own medi- 
tations, till March next." Deacon Chapin and Henry Burt were 
chosen " to carry on the other part of the day, once a fortnight, to 
be allowed at the rate of c£40 a year." 

In 1659, a Mr. Hooker w^as here as a preacher, and efforts were 
made to settle him, but without success. According to the date on 
the records, February, 1659, but evidently 1660, the Rev. Mr. 
Peletiah Glover was here as a minister, and the town voted him a 
salary of c£60, if he would stay out the year. Mr. Glover remained 
here as the settled minister many years. 

The above instances of designating lay exhorters, and agreeing to 
pay them for their services, are not very common, and would not be 
thought very regular at this time. In 1660, the town agreed that 
Mr. Glover should have the parsonage and dfiSO a year as a salary. 

After Mr. Glover's house was burnt down by the Indians, the 
town built him a new one. It appears, by the items of charge, that 
brick were used for the chimney. The house was fortified, and, 
probably, the roof shingled. The cost of the house was d£108. 15s. 
It is apparent from the records, that brick were made in the town ; 
for mention is made in the year 1672, in a grant of land, of a reser- 
vation of the clay pits thereon, and of a passage to them. It is 
probable brick were first made here when Mr. Pynchon built his 
brick house w'hich is now standing.§ This was about the year 1660. 
That house, when first built, compared with those around it, must 
have appeared like some Baron's castle. The red freestone, which 
was so abundant in the eastern part of the town, was used in under- 
pinning that house. It has been the tradition, that the use of that 
stone, and the manner of working it, was lost for nearly a century. 
The stone that was used for building and other purposes, was taken 

t This, I think, a handsome compensation for those days, and not a trifiing sum. It was given 
for leading the devotional exercises, and reading a sermon on the Sabbath. 

§ Tom down, several years since. 



292 HON. GEORGE BLlSS' ADDRESS. 

from the streams, and was very different from that brought from the 
plains.* 

Before the town was burnt, it bad been determined to build a new 
meeting-house, A place was designated for it further west tlian the 
first one stood. A contract was made for hind for that purpose, with 
the owner of the house lot north of the old one, and the meeting- 
house was fixed very nearly in the place where the one which was 
removed in 1819, stood. It was not built till 1677. It was 50 by 
40 feet, high enough for galleries, when they should be needed ; was 
underpinned with stone, and cost about c£400 of the currency at that 
time. It was fortified, as was the grist mill ; and the town, for 
some years, kept a garrison in the latter. At this period, the style 
of building began very much to improve. Probably the houses 
erected after tiie Indians had burnt the town, were better built, 
though many of them were thatched. They were all with high 
peaked roofs, and when glass was used at all, it was the small dia- 
mond glass, set in lead. 

Mr. Glover continued in the ministry here till his death. The 
record of his death is, " The Rev'd Peletiah Glover fell asleep in 
Jesus, March 29, 1692." The town very soon after, invited Mr. 
John Haines to be their minister ; but though repeatedly urged, he 
declined to settle here. The town seems not to have been very 
successful in the settlement of a minister ; but there are two things 
remarkable in their conduct. First, tiiat they did not relax their 
eiforts ; and secondly, while destitute of a minister, they regularly 
and constantly had public worship. 

Not succeeding with Mr. Haines, they passed the following vote : 
"Voted to send Captain Thomas Colton, and Serjeant Luke Hitch- 
cock to the Bay for the procuring a minister, to preach the word of 
God to this town ; and that they apply themselves to the Rev'd the 
Presiderit of the College, with the rest of the elders in Boston, for 
their help for the obtaining a minister that may promote conversion 
worli among vsy In consequence of this message, the Rev. Daniel 
Brewer, of Roxbury, came and was settled here in the year 1694. 

For the regulation of society, and the promotion of good morals, 
the General Court, in 1675 and 1677, passed several laws, with a 
view of adopting the system of Alfred the Great, by directing tyth- 
ingmen to be appointed in each town, who should each have the 

* In granting the land at the mouth of the Pecowsick, a reservation was made of the stone on 
the flats in Connecticut river. 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 293 

inspection of ten or twelve families, and prosecute for all transgres- 
sions of the laws within their several districts. Such officers were 
chosen in this town, their districts assigned them, and their duties 
enjoined by the county court. There were four tythings, or districts 
of that name, in the year 1678, within the bounds of the present 
town of Springfield ; one in Longmeadow, and two in West Spring- 
field. These tythingmen had not only to enforce the laws respect- 
ing the Sabl)ath, and licensed houses, and the use of spirituous 
liquors, but were to see that no person was abroad from home after 
nine o'clock at night. How strictly the duty enjoined them was 
performed, I have no means of ascertaining. 

The sumptuary laws, which restrained and regulated the apparel 
and dress of the inhabitants, appear to have been very much disre- 
garded. The court records are full of complaints, that the law 
against wearing silks was not enforced in this and some of the other 
towns. 

While there were, apparently, great exertions made to oblige chil- 
dren to attend meeting on the Sabbath, and to behave with decency 
and reverence during the time of public worship, and no small pains 
were taken to prevent their being out at unseasonable hours, or in 
improper company, I have not been able to find that so much atten- 
tion was paid to schooling, as I had expected. A tract of land at 
the lower end of Chicopee plain, on the west side of the great river, 
was appropriated by the town, in the year 1654, " either for the 
helping to maintain a schoolmaster or ruling elder, or to help beare 
any other town charges." This land was many years let out, and 
the income expended in schooling. One of the turrets of the meet- 
ing-house was sometime occupied for a school room. The first 
school house was built in 1679. The house was 22 feet by 17 ; the 
studs were 8J feet, and there was a chamber in it. From ten to 
twelve pounds were annually paid to a schoolmaster. The house 
was first erected in the way to the upper wharf; probably, with a 
view to accommodate scholars on the west side of the river, espec- 
ially in the winter. This was afterwards removed, and rebuilt at 
the middle of the town, near where the first meeting-house stood, 
but on the spot on which Daniel Lombard's store now stands.§ 

Other schools were kept in the town, as the inhabitants increased 
in the different parts of it. An entry, of the following tenor, is 
made in the book of selectmen's orders, in the year 1682 : " The 



§ The Chicopee Bank is now (1862) on or near the same ground. 



294 HON. GEORGE KLISS' ADDRESS. 

selectmen agreed with Goodwife Mirrick to encourage her in the 
good work of training up children and teaching children to read that 
she should have 3d. a week for every child that she takes to perform 
this excellent work for." The defect of schooling, for the first forty 
years after the town was settled, is apparent, in the number of per- 
sons who could not write their names, and in the very great numljer 
of bad writers and spellers. From the commencement of the last 
century, provision has been made for supporting public schools ; and 
with very short intermissions, a grammar school, as well as others, 
have been kept. 

There is one other subject in the early history of the town, upon 
which information might be gratifying to the inhabitants — that of 
roads and bridges ; and there is no one subject more involved in 
uncertainty. The town designated the selectmen, or other persons, 
to lay out highways and roads. For many years there was no 
county authority ; and after county courts were established, the rec- 
ords for 30 or 40 years, are not to be found. A surveyor's compass 
was not used here for the first 60 or 70 years. The monuments 
referred to in laying the roads, were most of them perishable. It is, 
therefore, very difficult to trace an old road, unless it has been new 
laid. The road through the street is only incidentally mentioned. 
It seems to have been the starting point on which all the house lots 
were bounded. It was to extend from against Mr. Pynchon's, down- 
wards, four rods from the east side of the brook, till the brook passes 
into the meadow, opposite the house of widow Marble. This road 
was continued to, and through the Longmeadow. At first, only 40 
rods of ground were reserved for the meeting-house. In February, 
1644, a purchase was made of two acres and a half, for a training 
place, which was afterwards appropriated for a burying ground, and 
is still used for that purpose ;§ and two rods were appropriated to go 
to the meeting-house. This was, from time to time, enlarged. A 
road of one and a half rods, at first, was made to the training place, 
which was soon increased to two rods, and afterwards farther 
widened. The passages through the meadow, east of the street, 
were difficult, and it was long before they became very good. At 
first, there was an order that a highway, two rods wide, should be 
laid out through the hassekcy meadow, where State street now is. 

Among the duties of the surveyors, is designated that of making 
a horse way across the meadow, to the bay path ; and in the year 

§ A rail-road now passes over said " burying ground," the remains of persons buried there 
liaving been removed to the new cemetery. 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 295 

1648, it was " agreed by the town, that those who would join, to 
make a cart way there, should have liberty to bar it up, and to take 
4d. a load of any that cart over that way who have not joined in 
making it." 

I have not been able to find any trace of the laying out or making 
of the road to the Bay, as it was called, or the road to Boston. 
That what is called the old bay road was made and used very early, 
is very evident, from various occasional references to it, in the rec- 
ords * It is worthy of remark, that all the roads at and near the 
centre of the settlement, were made very narrow ; in some instances 
only two rods wide, and in no case exceeding four rods. But the 
roads at a distance from the settlement, were made, in several 
instances, twenty, in others ten, and in no case, less than eight rods 
wide. This is to be accounted for, only by a reference to their hab- 
its and customs. The streets in the centre were narrow, because 
they esteemed the land too valuable, or the difficulty of making 
wide roads too great, to be very broad ; and the roads more remote 
were left wide to accommodate the inhabitants with pasturing. This 
reason is, in several instances, expressly assigned for laying the 
roads so broad. It was a part of their common law, whatever might 
be the opinion of courts and lawyers, that the inhabitants had a 
right to turn their cattle on to the commons and roads. It is not 
more than 40 or 50 years, since it was a very extensive practice for 
farmers to turn their cattle on to the commons in the spring, and to 
take them home in autumn. Usually, this was done at the opening 
of the common fields, in October.t 

Before proceeding with the history of the town, it may be proper 
to notice the subject of the contest between Massachusetts and Con- 
necticut, respecting certain parts of the town of Springfield. I 
have already stated that Enfield, Suffield, and Somers, were origi- 
nally settled as a part of Springfield, and under Massachusetts 
jurisdiction. Not only these towns, but a considerable portion of 
Wilbraham, Longmeadow, West Springfield, and Southwick, were 
claimed by Connecticut. This claim was resisted on the part of 
Massachusetts. The state of the controversy has been very much 
misunderstood, and in some instances, much misrepresented by those 
who ought to have known better. The whole, however, having been 
now amicably adjusted between the two states, it is no further 
important than as matter of history ; and it may be material that 

* See Aiipendix O. t Appendix P. 



296 HON. UEUKUli JJLISS' AUURKSS. 

the conduct of those concerned should bo vindicated from aspersion 
and misrepresentation. 

After various fruitless attempts, an agreement between the two 
state governments was made in 17 J 3, that the charter line should 
be run in a way agreed upon ; and that, let the charter line i)ass in 
one place or auotlier, certain towns mentioned, which had been set- 
tled by Massachusetts, should belong to that province, and certain 
others to Connecticut; and that an equivalent should be given in 
other lands. As the line was then run, it took a part of what is now 
Wilbraham, Longmeadow. West Springfield, and Southwick, with 
all the lands south of them, into Connecticut ; and the line accord- 
ing to the agreement was established, and monuments erected. 
This running was ratified, and Connecticut received a grant of 
equivalent lands, and sold them and received the avails, part of 
which constitute a portion of Yale college funds. This line, as thus 
ratified, was acquiesced in, and the jurisdiction over the purchased 
and ceded territory, continued as before, to be exercised by Massa- 
chusetts, till about the year 1748, At this period, the towns of 
Enfield, Suffield, and Somers, united with Connecticut. The claim 
of Massachusetts to them was formally renounced to Suffield, and a 
part of Southwick, in the year 1803 ; and her claim to the other 
part of Southwick, then in dispute, and also to the whole of West 
Springfield, was confirmed by Connecticut. On the east side of the 
river, the right to the towns of Somers and Enfield, was, in 1826, 
ceded to Connecticut, and the right to that part of Wilbraham and 
Longmeadow, which was south of the colony line, confirmed to 
Massachusetts. The most ancient grants of land in Enfield and 
Suffield, are to be found only in the records here and at Boston. 

Having made such observations as have occurred to me, in rela- 
tion to the more ancient regulations, I proceed with the history of 
the town. 

Soon after the Rev. Mr. Brewer was settled here, the people on 
the west side of the river, feeling the inconvenience of passing the 
river in a boat, to meeting, upon application to the General Court in 
the year 169G, were incorporated as the second parish in Springfield, 
with a provision that the lands in the common field, should be taxed 
either in the first or second parish, as they were owned. Very soon 
afterwards they settled a minister, and built a meeting-house. 

In the year 1713, Longmeadow was incorporated as a separate 
parish, by the name of the third parish, including all that part of 
the town south of a line running east from the mouth of Pecowsick. 



HON, GEORGK BLISS' ADDRESS. 297 

In a short time afterwards, they proceeded to build a meeting-house, 
and in 1716, settled a minister. 

Soon after the decease of the Rev. Mr. Brewer, the first parish, in 
1734, voted to settle the Rev. Robert Breck. This measure created 
the most bitter and violent animosities. The majority of the church 
and jpeople were warmly attached to him ; a respectable minority in 
both, were very much opposed to him. The contest on the subject 
involved not only the clergy, far and near, but the civil authority of 
the county and of the province. The principal objections were to 
the correctness of Mr. Breck's theological sentiments. Most of the 
neighboring clergy were against him. After various attempts to 
procure his ordination, he was finally settled in the beginning of the 
year 1736. He published his confession of faith, in connection with 
Dr. Cooper's ordination sermon. Judging from that, and candor 
ought to induce a belief that he then published his real sentiments, 
it would seem that even strict Calvinists could not object to his 
creed. Those who were most active in opposing him, were soon 
reconciled, and many of them became his warm friends. During his 
long ministry, the church and parish were well united in him. 

That part of the town which is now Wilbraham, was not improved 
so early as other parts not better for cultivation. This was owing, 
in some degree, at least, to the lots being laid out in such long and 
narrow strips. As far as I can learn, the first settlements were begun 
in 1731. They had so much increased, and so great was the dis- 
tance from the centre of the old parish, that in 1740, they were 
incorporated as the fourth parish in Springfield. This parish era- 
braced only the second and third divisions of the outward commons. 
It was commonly known by the name of the mountain parish, or 
Springfield mountains. In the year 1741, they settled a minister, 
and in 1748, built a meeting house. 

In the year 1750, the first parish being about to build a new 
meeting house, the former one not being large enough, the people in 
the north pai't of the town, on both sides of Connecticut river, were 
incorporated into a separate paiish, by the name of the fifth, or 
Chicopee parish. The general boundary on the east side of Con- 
necticut river, was Chicopee river. In 1742, a minister was settled, 
and soon afterwards, a meeting house built in that parish, on the 
east side of the river. In the year 1757, the south west part of the 
town was made a parish, by the name of the sixth parish. This 
iacluded what is now Aggawam, or Feedinghills ; and in 1762, a 

38 



298 HON. GEORGE BLlSS' ADDRESS. 

minister was settled there. Tiie same provision was tlien made 
with regard to the taxation of the lands in the meadows, or common 
field, as had been adopted when the second parish was incorporated. 
In the year 17G3, tiio eastern part of the town, including the 
mountain parish and half a mile west of it, was made a district by 
the name of Wilbraham, having all the powers of a town, excepting 
the privilege of sending a representative, in which they were to unite 
with Springfield. 

For many years, the town had existed in great harmony, and as 
few local or sectional dissentions and jealousies appeared, in the 
transaction of public business, as are ever found. The public busi- 
ness was transacted at the centre of the first parish, and generally, 
the public ofiicers chosen from the various parts of tlie town. The 
public town offices were all kept at the centre of the first parish. 
For some years, however, before the year 1773, it was apparent that 
the seeds of dissentlon were sown ; and they sprung up from time to 
time. The method of dividing the school money, the plan of holding 
town meetings, and of keeping the grammar school, were subjects of 
contest. The parish of Longmeadow, and those on the west side of 
Connecticut river, united against the first parish. Chicopee was 
divided. In transacting the ordinary town business, parties were 
nearly balanced : commonly there was a small majority against the 
first parish. In choosing representatives, Wilbraham united with 
the first parish, and made a majority. Contention, whenever any 
efforts were made to transact town business, became constant and 
violent. For a year or two, the town meetings were holden on the 
west side of the river, and the town records kept there. In one 
instance, when the choice of municipal officers was attempted, after 
spending four days, only a part of them were chosen. 

It was very evident that the inhabitants could not proceed harmo- 
niously together. Probably, all parties were to blame. When a 
poll was required upon every vote, a permanent session, to transact 
the business commonly done in one day, would be requisite. Various 
proposals were made, and at length, at the recommendation of the 
more moderate and judicious, from the various parts of the town, a 
vote was passed to submit the case to three impartial and respecta- 
ble men, from a distance. They were the Hon. Erastus Wolcott, of 
Windsor ; William Williams, of Hatfield ; and Joseph Root, Esq. 

of . The referees met, and after a full hearing of all parties, 

they made known their judgment, that the town should be divided 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 299 

• 

into two towns, by Connecticut river ; stating the terms on which 
that division should be made, providing, as had been before done in 
regard to the parishes, that the lands in the common field, or 
meadow, should be taxed in the town in which the owner lived. 
They also recommended that the north east part of the town should 
be made into a separate town ; and declared that it was not expedi- 
ent that any other division should take place. When this report 
was made known to the town, it was, by a major vote, rejected ; and 
the town determined to oppose such* a division. Upon the petition 
of the first parish, the General Court, after a full hearing, carried 
into efi"ect this report; and in February, 1773, "West Springfield was 
incorporated into a separate town, upon the terms recommended. 
Ludlow was also made a separate town at the same time. Ludlow 
included all that part of the outward commons which lay northerly 
of Chicopee river, and all the land north of that river, extending 
one mile and an half west of the outward commons. 

I have stated the facts in this case, because some have repre- 
sented the transaction as an extraordinary one. It has been said, 
that the majority were set off into a new town, at the request of a 
minority. This is not true : Springfield then contained more inhab- 
itants than West Springfield. The terms of division, especially as 
to the right of taxing, have been said to be unjust. Neither is this 
true : the land in the general field, owned on the east side of the 
river, were generally in the actual occupation of the owner ; and in 
the mode of access, and cultivation, and getting the crops, usually 
practised, they passed through no other part of the town, and had no 
benefits of their roads, schools, &c. Exceptiug the inconvenience 
of passing the river, they were as near the owners, on the east side 
of the river, in many instances, as to the settlements on the west. 
In many cases, the lands were laid out, and always occupied as 
appendages to the house lots on the east side of the river. That, 
including a part of the inhabitants on the east side of the river, a 
majority of the town were against a division, must be admitted. 

The bitterness which this division occasioned, lasted for several 
years. An alteration was made in the law in regard to taxes, and I 
believe, the towns are now as much in peace as other towns. In 
the year 1783, Longmeadow was made into a separate town, by the 
parish lines. 

During the revolutionary war, the town did not very much 
increase. It felt, in common with the country in general, the pres- 



300 HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 

sure of the struggle for independence. But in that period, a founda- 
tion was laid for much of its subsequent increase and present pros- 
perity. In tlie time of the war, this was a recruiting post and a 
rendezvous for soldiers. Being centrally situated easy of access, 
and at the same time so far inland as to l)e out of the reach of 
sudden invasions of the enemy, it was, early in the war, fixed upon 
as a suital)le place for making and repairing the various munitions 
of war, and a depot for military stores. At first, the whole was 
confined to Main street. The Various artificers employed, had their 
shops where they could find a convenient place, and resided them- 
selves in that part of the town. The laboratory for cartridges, and 
for. the various fire works manufactured on such occasions, was in 
the barn then owned by Ebenezer Stebbins, on the place now owned 
by Dr. Kingsbury, south of Festus Stebbins'. After two or three 
years, the public works were removed on to the hill, where they now 
are. This was done gradually, in the years 1778 and 1779, as 
accommodations could be found. At first, with the exception of the 
powder magazine, the whole of the public buildings were placed 
upon a square of ten acres, on the land appropriated by the town for 
a training field. A few cannon were cast here during that war, but 
no small arms were manufactured till after the peace of 1783. At 
the close of the war, the workmen employed were discharged, and 
the arsenals, magazine and shops, were left in the charge of a store 
keeper. 

When the object of making arms was under consideration of the 
national government, in the year 1794, the convenience of the place, 
and the arsenals, magazines and shops, already here, were a suffi- 
cient inducement to establish the national armory here : This was 
done. At ditferent periods since that time, lands have been pur- 
chased, and erections made, for the public accommodation. This 
establishment has, without question, been one great source of the 
prosperity of the town. 

But, in the chequered scenes of life, we have presented to view 
some shade, as well as sunshine. The various transactions which 
took place here, in the attempt forcibly to prevent the execution of 
the laws, ought not to be unnoticed. Though it might be necessary 
and expedient, under the then existing circumstances, forcibly to 
stop the sitting of the courts of Justice, in the year 1774, yet it had 
a tendency, and in some instances produced the eifect, to unhinge 
people's minds, and to generate a spirit of insubordination. The 
people, at the close of the revolutionary war, in this part of the 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 301 

country, were very heavily burdened. Their debts were great, and 
taxes enormous. The different times and occasions, when an armed 
and organized force was seen in our streets, to prevent the regular 
administration of justice, from the year 1783 to 1786, I shall not 
undertake to detail. I think, however, it would be improper to pass 
without notice, some of the events connected with this town, that 
took place at what is called the insurrection, or Shay's insurrection. 
Passing over what had occured before, in the winter of the year 
1787, large bodies of men, were collected from various quarters, 
organized as a military force. Daniel Shays assumed the general 
command. From various quarters, the insurgents all seemed to be 
centered al Springfield. Shays himself, had the command of a large 
body collected eastward of this town. Luke Day had also a large 
force in West Springfield. A third party, under Eli Parsons, were 
at Chicopee. The object was, beyond doubt, to possess themselves 
of the military stores and arms, at the arsenal here. In arms and 
ammunition they were quite deficient. A considerable force, by 
order of government, under the command of Major General Shepard 
was stationed at the stores, with orders to defend and protect them. 

The plan of Shays was, that all three of these bodies should, 
from different quarters, at the same time, attack the troops at the 
arsenal. This was good policy ; anxl had it been carried into effect, 
the town might have been destroyed, or greatly injured. Nothing 
so much like impending destruction, had taken place since the burn- 
ing of the town, by the Indians. But the same kind Providence 
that had before mercifully interposed, now turned the wise counsel 
into foolishness. Shays sent a message to Parsons and Day. inform- 
ing them that he should be at the stores, at an appointed hour of the 
next day, and requesting them to meet him there. Day, for some 
reason now unknown, or without reason, sent back, that he should not 
be ready to go that day, but would be there the next. Day's mes- 
sage was intercepted, and the messenger detained, though unknown 
to either of them. 

At the time appointed, notwithstanding repeated cautions and 
assurances from Shepard, that his approach would be treated as a 
hostile attack, Shays with his party in close column, drew near thd 
arsenal, and was fired upon by Shepard, and the party soon dis- 
persed. Day and his party, in the meantime, were entirely igno- 
rant of the proceedings here. Though the distance was not more 
than two miles, in a direct line, the firing of the cannon was not 
heard, or noticed, at West Springfield. The inhabitants of this 



302 HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 

town had most of them removed : many of them were, a second 
time, induced to flee in the dead of niglit ; but, in fact, there was no 
danger. 

This was one of the most unpleasant occurrences in our history. 
To see brethren and neigliburs in hostile array against each other, 
and a civil war commencing, was most distressing. Happily, it ter- 
minated without much bloodshed, and He who can bring good out of 
evil, so overruled it that this insurrection aided to lead to the adop- 
tion of the Federal Constitution. 

There is one other event in our history, which I may notice ; 
which is, the removal of all the courts from this place to Korthamp- 
ton, in the year 1793. This town had, from the first settlement, 
been a place for the administration of justice. After the county 
was formed, a part of the courts had always been holden here. This 
event, it was supposed, would have an unfavorable effect upon the 
town. It was considered that the removal of courts from a place 
where they had long been holden, and where business was arranged 
with that view, would be prejudicial, even though it were admitted 
that the original establislmient of them in a place might be injurious. 
It is difficult to determine what the actual consequences were ; for 
the Armory was first established the year after, and contributed to 
prevent any injurious effects from being apparent. The re-establish- 
ment of courts here, in 1813, shows very plainly that the town has 
not sustained injury by again becoming a shire town. 

The agency which this town had in effecting the settlements 
about it, may possibly be better understood by bringing them into 
one view. It appears from the records of the General Court, that 
the settlement at Northampton, was begun upon the petition of the 
inhabitants of Springfield, and others, in the year 1653. Mr. 
Pynchon and Mr. Holyoke, two of the petitioners, with Samuel 
Chapin, were appointed to lay out the lands at Marwolluck, or 
Nanatuck, for it is spelt both ways, either on the west side, or 
east side of the river, not appropriating more than 100 acres to 
one person. This was done, and in 1654, a report of the proceed- 
ings of the agents was made. They settled the west side of the 
river. Whether there were many actual settlers removed thither 
from this place, I have not ascertained. Pynchon had, however, 
large grants of land there. He was the agent to buy of the Indians, 
and one of the superintendents of the plantation, for several years. 
Hadley, at first embracing both sides of the river, was in the course 
of a year or two afterwards, disposed of in the same way. In regard 
to Westfield, Enfield, and Suffield, the case was somewhat different. 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 303 

As these places -were annexed to Springfield, and composed a part 
thereof, the town, from time to time, made grants of land to indi- 
viduals. 

As to Westfield, the earliest that I find of any grant, is January 
7, 1655, when a grant was made to several persons, of lands at 
Woronoco ; and the town agreed that the lands there should be 
rated only half so much as in the other parts of the town for 6 years. 
In the year 1663, still farther, and more extensive grants were made 
there, both on the northerly and southerly side of the river, upon 
condition the grantees build and settle thereon, in one year, and 
reside there four years. Some of these grants were to persons from 
Windsor, but most of them from Springfield. That town was incor- 
porated April 14, 1670. A committee was appointed by the town 
of Springfield, to lay it out, and grant out house lots. At first, it 
was only 6 miles square, or equivalent thereto, making the line 
9 miles one way. This was confirmed by the General Court. 

Several of the inhabitants of Springfield, had grants of land on 
the way to Windsor. The earliest that I find, is in the year 1664. 
In 1669, a number of grants were made. It is stated, that if it 
were well ordered and managed, the land about Stony river might 
make ^ fine village, or small plantation. In 1670, upon the petition 
of several inhabitants of Springfield, the court grant a tract of 6 
miles square, for a plantation, or township ; provided tljat in 5 years 
there be 20 families ; and that they procure some able and faithful 
minister, and maintain him there. Mr. Pynchon and five other 
inhabitants of Springfield, were authorized to divide, allot and 
grant out the lands there. 

Though grants of land by the town of Springfield, were made 
much earlier and more extensively at Freshwater, or Enfield, than 
at Sufiield, it happened that Enfield was incorporated at a later 
period. This was done in the year 1683, upon the petition, as the 
record states, of Springfield proprietors, extending six miles down 
Connecticut river, from the mouth of Longmeadow brook, and east- 
erly ten miles from the river. Major Pynchon and others, were 
authorized to grant out lots and admit inhabitants. 

The order of the General Court, in regard to Xorwottuck, [Had- 
ley,] is worth noticing. It is stated, that " the persons petitioning 
to remove into this colony, had begun to remove into Norwottuck, 
and made some beginning in regard to a plantation on the east side 
of the river, in order to a plantation, and that there are many desira- 
ble persons having a great wish to go along with them, who may in 



304 HON. GEORGK BLISS' ADDRESS. 

time be joined to that church ; for their further help in the ministry 
, whereby they are enabled not only to carry on a town but church 
work also, the court grant their desire and appoint persons to lay 
out the town so as shall be most suitable for the cohabitation and 
full supply of those people, that this wilderness may be populated, 
and the main ends of our coming into these parts promoted." 

In reviewing the history of the town, while there have been a 
good proportion of persons of respectable talents and education, I 
can point to no one who has attained the highest rank. John Pyn- 
chon, Esq. may, perhaps, with one exception, be considered as more 
above his fellows, than any other of the inhabitants. He was born 
in England, and was a child when his father came to this country. 
"Where he was educated, is to me unknown. He was distinguished 
in peace and in war. He seems to have been more employed as a 
negociator with the Indians, than any other one. He was long a 
magistrate and assistant, and many years a judge. Perhaps he was 
more confided in by the town, than any other man. In the town 
records, and also, in the county court records, he is spoken of in the 
style of "■the worshipful Major,'' or '■'the worshipful Major Pyn- 
chonr He died in this town,§ at an advanced age. 

The exception made above, refers to the Hon. John Worthington. 
His education, and the circumstances of the country, were so 
extremely different from that of Mr, Pynchon's, that it would be 
impossible to compare the two men. His talents, had he taken the 
popular and prevailing side, at the commencement of the revolution, 
would probably have obtained for him the highest honors in the state. 

The town has increased, not only beyond the ideas of the first 
associates, but far beyond the expectations of many of the present 
generation. By the last census, there were within the limits of the 
town, as it was in 1670, no less than 21,581 souls. Within the 
limits of the present town, by the 

Census of 1791, there were 1,574 
1800, " 

1810, " " 2,767 
1820, " " 3,914 
♦' May, 1827, *' " 5,788 
Probably, at this time, the population exceeds 6,000.§ 

% In 1703. 

§ Population of Springfield iu 1862, probably about 20,000 
Chicopee in 1860, 7,180 

27,180 



HON. GEORGE BLISS' ADDRESS. 305 

The increase of inhabitants is not more remarkable than the set- 
tlements eastward of the town brook. Persons now living, can 
remember when the number of dwelling houses on State street, were 
only seven, and three or four on Maple street, and not a single one 
on the hill. On Main street, there were but one or two houses east 
of the brook ; the meadow bad a few shops on its margin. The 
place where the Town Hall stands, was a deep marsh, and the water 
was frequently standing there in great depth. 

To recur to the building of this house, with which I began. It 
ought to be recollected, that the town, more than a century since, 
contributed largely to building the old Court House, and had a right 
to use it for town purposes. That building being so small that it 
could not contain near all the legal voters in the town, it was mani- 
festly proper that a suitable place should be provided. That this 
may long continue a place where the inhabitants may peaceably 
assemble, and transact their municipal concerns, is most fervently 
to be wished. In order to this, a most important duty devolves on 
you. In tracing the history of the town, from the first to the present 
hour, we may fairly claim that it has been as well united as almost 
any other place. Still tjiere are some things which, on review, can 
aflPord no pleasure. There are some dark spots in the picture. If 
we wish to avoid the mistakes we, or those before us, have commit- 
ted, and the faults of which we have been guilty, we must, in con- 
cert, seek the things which make for peace. Mutual concession 
must be made ; jealousies and heart-burnings must be suppressed. 
If a fire is seen to be kindling, it must, without delay, be quenched. 
One section of the town must not claim more than its fair proportion 
of advantage. The territory of the town is extensive, and the dif- 
ferent sections must feel themselves to compose one whole, and seek, 
not the good of a particular neighborhood, but that of the whole 
town. A body so numerous as the voters in this town, cannot think 
alike, on all subjects. A readiness to give others the same privilege 
of expressing freely their opinions, which we claim for ourselves, is 
all-important. Efforts to keep order in ourselves, and others, are 
also requisite. Experience and observation have taught us how 
easily strife and angry passions may be excited, and it is the duty of 
all to avoid, as far as possible, the occasions of offence. 

It is the right, and I believe, the duty of all, as far as they can, 
to attend town meetings. I would not go so far as to fine every one 
who was absent without excuse ; but it would be fair to insist that 
39 



30G HON. GEORGE bliss' address. 

persons so situated, should not find fault with the doings of those 
who do attend. 

Our great sources of expense, schools, highways, and the poor, 
will demand much and faithful attention. In the first settlement of 
the country, our ancestors made them a public charge, and obliged 
every man, according to his ability, to contribute his proportion. 
Many plausible schemes have been devised, either for throwing off 
the burden altogether, or shifting it from those who ought to bear it. 
Were I authorized to advise, I should say, — " Stand ye in the ways; 
see and ask for the old paths ; where is the good way 1 And walk 
therein." 



APPENDIX. 



[A.] 

In a town so extensive as this, for after all that has been lopped 
oflF, it is about 10 miles by 7, it is remarkable that all local interests 
were so far given up as to induce an agreement to build a Town 
Hall, with great unanimity. There were other interests, and con- 
flicting claims and jealousies, quite as diflScult to keep quiet, as 
those resulting from local situation. Probably, the plan which was 
adopted, was the only feasible one. The building proposed to be 
erected, was, of necessity, to be large, or it could not accommodate 
the town. The town did not require for their use, more than one 
floor. The Masonic bodies in the town were desirous of erecting for 
themselves a spacious Hall. From the situation of the ground, it 
was convenient to have the Town Hall above the basement story ; 
it was therefore proposed to have a range of stores under the Town 
Hall, and to have the Masons contribute towards the building, 
according to the accommodation they should have ; and that the 
persons who should contract to build, should have the cellar and 
basement story, towards a compensation for building. In addition 
to this, the old Town House was to be disposed of, to the first par- 
ish, to procure a title to the ground on which the Hall was to stand. 
These various interests were brought to unite in the object, and 
assurances made to secure their respective rights, and the whole 
completed without accident or contention. The corner stone was 
laid with appropriate Masonic ceremonies, and addresses made on 
the occasion. The building was completed February, 1828. 

[B.] 

The tradition with regard to building first in Housemeadow, is 
rendered nearly certain, by an entry in the registry of deeds, made 
Lib. B. Fol. 20, by John Holyoke, the register, in the year 1679. 
In a note explaining the terms of an Indian deed, he says, "Agaam. 



308 APPENDIX. 

It is that meadow on the south of Agawam River, where the Eng- 
lish did first build a house, which we now commonly call the house 
meadow, that piece of ground it is which the Indians do call Aga- 
wam, and there the english kept their residence., who first came to set- 
tle and plant at Springfield now so called." From the expressions 
here used, " kept their residence," it seems that a house must have 
been built there ; and probably those who came in 1635, lodged 
there till they went back in the fall. 

[C] 

"May the 14th, 1636. We, whose names are underwritten, being 
by God's Providence, ingaged together to make a plantation, at and 
over against Agaam on Conecticot doe mutually agree to certayne 
articles and orders to be observed and kept by us and by our suc- 
cessors, except wee and every of us, for ourselves and in oure per- 
sons, shall think meet uppon better reasons to alter our present res- 
olutions. 

" lly. Wee intend, by God's grace, as soon as we can, with all 
convenient speede, to procure some Godly and- faithfull minister, 
with whome we purpose to joyne in church covenant, to walk in all 
the ways of Christ. 

" 2ly. Wee intend, that our towne, shall be composed of fourty 
familys, or if wee think meete after, to alter our purpose ; yet not 
to exceed the number of fifty familys rich and poore. 

" 3ly. That every inhabitant shall have a convenient proportion 
for a house lott, as we shall see meete for every ones quality and 
estate. 

" 4ly. That every one, that hath a house lott shall have a propor- 
tion of the Cow pasture to the north of End brook, lying northward 
from the town ; and also that every one shall have a share, of the 
hassehy marish over agaynst his lott, if it be to be had, and every 
one to have his proportionable share of all the woodland. 

" Sly. That every one, shall have a share, of the meddow, or 
planting ground, over against them as nigh as may be, on Agaam 
side. 

" 6ly. That the Longmeddowe, called Masacksick, lying in the 
way to Dorchester,* shall be distributed to every man, as wee shall 
think meete, except we shall find other conveniences, for some for 
theyre milch cattayle and other cattayle also. 

■• The way to Dorchester was, probably, to Windsor, then called Dorchester. 



APPEiXDIX. 309 

" 7ly. That the meddowe and pasture called, Nayas towards 
Patuckett, on ye side of Agaam, lyeinge about fower miles above 
In the ridge shall be distributed" [erasure of six and a half lines,] 
" as above said in the former order, and this was altered and with 
consent before the hands were set to it. 

" Sly. That all rates that shall arise upon the town, shall be layed 
upon lands, according to every ones proportion, aker for aker, of 
howse lotts, and aker for aker of meddowe, both alike on this side, 
and both alike on the other side ; and for farmes, that shall lye 
farther off, a less proportion, as wee shall after agree except wee 
shall see meete to remitt one half of the rate from land to other 
estate. 

"9ly. That whereas Mr. William Pynchon, Jehu Burr, and Henry 
Smith, have constantly continued to prosecute the same, at greate 
charges, and at greate personal adventure, therefore, it is mutually 
agreed, that fourty acres of meddowe, lying on the south of End 
brooke, under a hill side, shall belonge to the said partys free from 
all charges forever. That is to say twenty akers, to Mr. William 
Pynchun, and his heyres and assigns forever, and ten akers to Jehue 
Burr, and ten akers to Henry Smith, and to their heyres and assigns 
forever, which said forty akers is not disposed to them as any allot- 
ment of towne lands ; but they are to have their accommodations in 
all other places notwithstanding. 

" lOly. That whereas a house was built at a common charge 
which cost c£G and also the Indians demand a grate some, to bye 
their right, in the said lands, and also a greate shallope, which was 
requisite for the first planting, the value of which engagements, is to 
be borne by each inhabitant, at theyre first entrance, as they shall 
be rated by us till the said disbursements shall be satisfyed, or else 
in case the said howse and boat be not so satisfyed for ; then so 
much meddow to be sett out, about the said howse as may counter- 
vayle the sayd extraordinary charge. 

" Illy. It is agreed that no man except Mr. William Pynchon 
shall have above ten acres for his house lot. 

" 12ly. Anulled. 

" i3ly. Whereas there are two Cowe pastures, the one lying 
towards Dorchester, and the other Northward, from End brooke. It 
is agreed that both these pastures shall not be fed at once ; but that 
the time shall be ordered by us in the disposing of it for tymes and 
seasons, till it be lotted out and fenced in severalty. 



310 APPENDIX. 

" 141y. May 16, 1G36. It is agreed that after this day, wee shall 
observe this rule, about dividing of planting ground, and meddowe, 
in all planting ground, to regard chiefly, persons, who are most apt 
to use such ground. And in all meddowe, and pasture, to regai'd 
chiefly, cattel and estate, because estate is like to be improved in 
cattel and such ground is aptest for their use. And yet wee agree 
that no person, that is master of a lott, though he hath not cattel, 
shall have less than three acres, of planting ground, and none that 
have cowes, steeres, or year olds, shall have under one acre a piece, 
and all horses, not less than four akers, and this order in dividing 
meddow by cattell, to take place the last of May next, soe that all 
cattayle that, then appeare, and all estates, that shall then truly 
appeare, at d£20, a Cow shall have this proportion in the medowe, 
on Agawam side, and in the large meadow, Masacksick, and in the 
other long meddowe called Nayas, and in the pasture at the north 
end of the town called End brook. 

" 15ly. It is ordered that for the disposinge of the hassaky mar- 
ish, and the granting of homelots, these five men undernamed, or 
theyre Deputys, are appoynted, to have full power, namely, Mr. 
Pynchon, Mr. Michell, Jehue Burr, William Blake, Henry Smith. 

" It is ordered that William Blake, shall have sixteen polle, in 
bredth for his homelott, and all the marsh in bredth abuttinge at the 
end of it, to the next highland, and three acres more in some other 
place. 

'• Next the lott of William Blake, Northward lys the lot of 
Thomas Woodford, being twelve polls broade, and all the marish 
before it to the upland. Next the lott of Thomas Woodford lys the 
lott of Thomas Ufford, beinge fourteen rod broade, and all the mar- 
ish before it to the upland. Next the lot of Thomas Ufford, lyes 
the lott of Henry Smith, being twenty rod in breadth, and all the 
marish before it, and to run up in the upland on the other side to 
make up his upland lott ten acres. 

" Next the lott of Henry Smith lyes the lott of Jehue Burr, being 
twenty rods in breadth, and all the marish in bredth abuttinge, at 
the end of it, and as much upland ground on the other side as shall 
make up his lott ten acres. 

" Next the lott of Jehue Burr, lyes the lot of Mr. William Pyn- 
chon," beinge thirty rod in bredth, and all the marish at the east end 
of it, and an addition, at the further end, of as much marish, as 



APPENDIX. 311 

make the whole twenty foure acres ; and as much upland adjoining, 
as makes the former howse lott, thirty acres in all togeather fifty 
fowre acres. 

" Next the lott of Mr. Pynchon lyes the lott of John Cabel, 
fowreteene rod, in breadth, and fowre acres and halfe of marish at 
the end of his lott. 

" Next the lott of John Cable, lys the lott of John Reader, beinge 
twelve rod in breadth and fowre acres and a halfe in marish at the 
fore end of his homelot. 

" The lotts of Mr. Matthew Michell, Samuel Butterfield, Edmund 
Wood, and Jonas Wood, are ordered to lye, adjoining to mill brooke, 
the whole being to the number of twenty-five acres, to begin three 
of them on the greate river, and the fowrth on the other side of the 
small river. 

" It is ordered that for all highways, that shall be thought neces- 
sary, by the five men, above named, they shall have liberty and 
power, to lay them out, when they shall see meete, though it be at 
the end of mens lotts, giveing them alowance for so much ground. 

" We testifie to the order abovesaid being all of the first adven- 
turers and undertakers for this Plantation. 

William Pynchon, The mark T of Thomas 

Math. Mitchell, Ufford, 

Henry Smith, John Cabel." 

The mark | of Jehu Burr, 

William Blake, 
Edmund Wood. 

This is in the hand writing of Henry Smith, except the two con- 
cluding lines, in Mr. Pynchon's hand. 



There is no evidence, from the town records that Mr. Mitchell, 
the two Woods, Blake, Ufford, Reader, Woodford, or Buttei-field, 
remained here any time. When they went, I have no information. 
From the title given to Mitchell, " Mr. Matthew Mitchell," he must 
have been a man of some note. Jehu Burr, called by some histo- 
rians, John Burr, from a mistake in reading the old writing, was a 
carpenter. He was here in 1639. When a voluntary rate was 
made for Mr. Moxon's house, he paid a larger sum than any other, 



312 



APPENDIX. 



except Mr. Pynchoii. In January, lG4:i, lie seems to have left the 
place. A person of that name appears on the Connecticut records 
as a magistrate or deputy. 

A list of the inliahitants of Springfield, from 1636, to 1664, and 

the time of their coming. 



REMOVED. 

]G3G William Pynchon 1652 

Hcniy Smith 165:1 

■'William Blake 
*Edmuii(l Wood 
*Thomas Ufford 
John Cabel 1641 

*JVlatthew Mitchell 
*iSamuel Buttertield 
*James Wood 
*.Jolin Reader 
*Thoraas Woodford 1639 

1638 John Searle 
Richard Everitt 
Thomas Horton 

Rev. George Moxon 1652 

1639 Thomas Mirrick 
John Leonard 
Robert Ashley 

John Woodcock 1642 

John Allin 

John Burt 

Henry Gregory 

Samuel Hubbard 

Elizur Holyoke 

William Warriner 

Henry Burt 

Rowland Stebbins 

Thomas Stebbins 

Samuel Wright 

Richard Sikes 

John Deeble 

Samuel Chapiu 

Morgan Johns 

Thomas Cooper 

James Bridgman 

Alexander Edwards 

*John Dobie 

Roger Pritchard 

Francis Ball 

John Harmon 
1645 *William Vaughan 

* Willi am Jess 

Miles Morgan 

*Abraham Muudou 

Francis Pepper 

*John Burrhall 

Benjamin Cooley 
Jan. John Matthews 
1645-6 George Colton 

Joseph Parsons 
Nov. John Clarke 



1640 



Jan. 
lt41-2 



1642-3 

April 
1643 



May, 
1644 



1646 James Osborne 
Thomas Rieve 
Widow Margaret Bliss 
Nathaniel Bliss 
Thomas Tomson 
Richard Exell 
William Branch 
Grififith Jones 
Reice Bedortha 
Hugh Parsons 
John Lombard 
*John Scarlet 
George Langton 
Lawrence Bliss 
Samuel Bliss 
John Bliss 

1651-2 Anthony Dorchester 
John Lamb 
Samuel Marshfield 
John Dumbleton 
Jonathan Taylor 
Rowland Thomas 
Thomas Miller 

1653-4 Benjamin Parsons 
Obadiah Miller 
Abel Wright 

1656 Hugh Dudley 
William Brooks 
Simon Beamon 
Samuel Terry 
John Lamb 
Benjamin Mun 
*John Stewart 
Thomas Bancroft 
Thomas Noble 
"Richard Maund 
Thomas Gilbert 
Simon Sacket 

1658 Richard Fellows 

1659 Rev. Peletiah Glover 
*Tahan Grant 
Nathaniel Ely 
Samuel Ely 

1660 John Keep 
Edward Foster 
*Thomas Sewall 

1664 Thomas Day 
John Riley 
John Henryson 
William Hunter 
John Scott. 



Those with this (*) mark, did not remain in town. 



APPENDIX. 



313 



[E.] 

The actual grants of house lots, iu the original settlement on the 
street, as made at first, so far as they can be gathered from the rec- 
ords, was as follows, beginning at the south. 



Names. Width of lots. 

John Lombard, 6 

Hugh Parsons, 8 

Jonathan Burt, 8 

Benjamin Cooley, 8 

Reice Bedortha, 8 

Griffith Jones, 8 

John Matthews, 8 

Jonathan Taylor, 8 

Thomas Thomson, or ) , . 
Widow Margaret Bliss, 3 

George Langton, 8 

Nathaniel Bliss, 10 

Nathaniel Pritchard, 8 

John Harmon, 8 

Henry Burt, 8 

Samuel Wright, 8 

Rowland Stebbins, 8 
Morgan Johns, only a short distance 

in front, 

Widow Deeble, 8 

John Clarke, 8 

Alexander Edwards, 8 
James Bridgman, at first 
Thomas Horton's, 

Thomas Mirrick, 8 

John Leonard, 8 

Robert Ashley, 8 



Names. Width of lots. 

Francis Ball, first John Wood- ) 

cock's, bounded north by way > 8 

to training place, ) 

James Gregory, or Thomas Steb- t , .> 

bins', bounded south by do. J 

William Warriner, 8 

Richard Sikes, 9 

Richard Exell, 8 

Samuel Chapin, 8 

George Moxon, 14 

Henry Smith, 20 

Elizur Holyoke, 20 

William Pynchon, 30 

Thomas Cooper, before ? ,. 

John Cabel's, J ^* 

John Searle, 8 

Miles Morgan, 10 

Francis Pepper, 10 

Simon Beamon, 10 

John Stewart, - 10 

Samuel Terry, 10 

Hugh Dudley, 10 

Obadiah Miller, 10 

Simon Sacket, 10 

Abel Wright, 10 

Richard Maund, 10 



[F.] 
A fact is mentioned in the addition to the last edition of Win- 
throp's Journal, to show that the General Court of Massachusetts 
considered all the settlements as still subject to them. *' 1636, 4th 
month, 28. Warrant to the constable of Watertown at Connecticut, 
[Wethersfield,] to seize and inventory, John Oldham's goods, who 
had been slain by the Indians, for payment of his debts. 



[G.] 
'• 1635. By the General Court it was ordered that there shall be 
two Drakes lent to the plantations at Conecticott, to fortifie them- 
selves withall, also six barrels of powder, (2 out of Watertown, 2 
out of Dorchester, and 2 out of Rocksbury,) also 200 shott, with 

other Implements, belonging to the that may conveniently 

be spared all which are to be returned again upon demande." 
A Drake is a small piece of Artillery. 
40 



314 APPENDIX. 

[IL] 

"February the 14 1638. 

" Wee the Inhabitants of Agaam upon Quinnetticot taking into 
consideration the manifold inconveniences that may fall upon us, for 
want of some fit magistracy among us. Being now, by Gods Provi- 
dence, fallen into the line of the Massachusetts jurisdiction ; and it 
being farr off to repayre thither in such cases of Justice as may 
often fall out among us, doe therefoi*e think it meett l)y a general 
consent and vote, to ordaine, (till we receive further directions from 
the General Court, in the Massachusetts Bay,) Mr. William Pyn- 
chon, to execute the office of a magistrate, in this our plantation of 
Agaam. viz. To give oaths to constables and military officers, to 
direct warrants, both processes, executions, and attachments, to 
heare and examine misdemenor, to inflict corporal punishment, as 
whipping, stockinge, byndinge to the peace or good behaviour, and 
in some cases, to require sureties, or if the offence require it to com- 
mit to prison, and in defaults of a comon prison, to committ delin- 
quents to the charge of some fit person or persons till Justice may 
be satisfied. 

Also in the tryall of actions for debt or trespass, to give oaths, 
direct juries, depone witnesses, take verdicts, and keep records of 
verdicts, judgments, and executions, and whatever else may tend to 
the kings (or keeping) peace, and the manifestation of our fidelity to 
the bay jurisdiction, and the restraining of any that violate Gods 
laws ; or lastly, whatever, else may fall within the power of an 
assistant, in the Massachusetts. 

It is also agreed uppon, by a mutuall consent, that in case any 
action of dett, or trespasse be to be tryed, seeing a Jury of 12 fit 
persons, cannot be had, at present, among us, that six persons, shall 
be esteemed a good, and sufficient Jury, to try any action under the 
sum of ten pounds, till we see cause to the contrary, and by com- 
mon consent shall alter this number of Jurors, or shall be otherwise 
directed from the general court in the Massachusetts." 

[I-J 
The hill east of the original settlement furnishes a very great 
supply of springs of the purest water, as they issue from the sand. 
There are within the bounds of the present town four streams empty- 
ing into the Connecticut, sufficient to carry mills, and are improved 



APPENDIX. 315 

for that purpose. Pecowsic, which is on the southern border, Mill 
river, called by the Indians, Vsquaick, the Chicopee, and the Willi- 
mansit. Garden brook, called in the records also, ye town brook, 
rises on the plains, and comes to the street opposite to Mr. Pyn- 
chon's settlement, before which it separates, and a part of it flows 
off northward, and a part of it along by the side of the street, 
upwards of a mile. On this, near its mouth, the first Grist mill 
was erected. Mill river, and the Chicopee, have been very exten- 
sively improved for mills, and machinery, of all kinds, impelled by 
water. The latter is capable of being improved for those purposes, 
to almost any indefinite extent. The same observations may be 
made with regard to West Springfield, in a very considerable degree, 
though the mill seats have not been so much occupied. The Aga- 
wam, or Westfield river, if not diverted for the uses of the canal, 
must afford valuable situations for mills. 

[K.] 

Hutchinson says, Pynchon was a gentleman of learning, as well 
as religion. He laid the foundation of Roxbury ; but afterwards, 
removed to Connecticut river, and was the father of the town of 
Springfield. Johnson, in his " Wonder-working Providence," pub- 
lished in 1654, says : " About this time, Mr. Pynchon, sometime a 
magistrate, having out of a desire, to better his estate, by trading 
with the Indians, settled himself, very remote, from all the churches 
of Christ, in the Massachusetts Government, upon the river Con- 
ectico, yet under their Government, he having some godly, persons 
resorting unto him, they there erected a town, and church of Christ, 
calling it Springfield, it lying upon this large navigable river hath 
the benefit of transporting their goods by water, and also fitly seated 
for the Beaver trade with the Indians, till the merchants increased 
so many that it became little, worth by reason of their out buying 
one another ;* which caused them to live upon husbandry ; the 
town is mostly built, along the river side, and upon some little riva- 
lets of the same. There hath of late been more than one or two in 
this town greatly suspected of witchcraft, yet have they used much 
dilligence, both for the finding them out, and for the Lords assisting 
them against their witchery ; yet have they, as is supposed, 

* Mr. Pynchon seems to have been an extensive dealer in furs, while at Roxbury. He 
farmed out the privilege, and paid a sum to the General Court. After he came to Springtield, 
he pursued the same business. "Woronoco was a place famous for the beaver trade ; and Mr. 
Pynchon paid the General Court a certain sum for the right to trade with the Indians in furs. 



316 APPENDIX. 

bewitched not a few persona, among whom, two of the reverend 
elder's cMldrcn. These people inhabiting the town, having gath- 
ered into a church body called to the office of a pastor, the reverend 
Mr. Moxon who remaineth with them at this very day. Of whom 
as followeth : 

As thou with strong and able parts art made, 

Thy person stout, with toy], and labour shall. 

With help of Christ, through difficulties wade. 

Then spend for him : spare not thyself, at all. 

When errors crowd, close to thyself and friends, 

Take up truths sword, trifle not time for why, 

Christ called his people, hither for those ends. 

To tell the world that Babels fall is nigh. 

And that his churches, through the world shall spread, 

Maugre the might of wicked men and devils, 

Then Moxon, thou needst not at all to dread 

But be avenged on Satan for his evils. 

Thy Lord Christ, will under thy feet him tread." 

When this account of Moxon was written, he was here ; but 
before it was published he had returned to England. He died, very 
poor, out of the ministry, September 15, 1687. 

[L.] 

An explanation of the Indian names of places in this deed, which 
is almost cotemporaneous, is made by John Holyoke, in the margin 
of the registry of it, in 1679. He says, " Agaam is that meadow 
on the south of Agaam river where the English first built. Quana 
is middlemeadow adjoining to it. Masacksick is the long meadow. 
Usquaick is mill river and the lands adjoining it. Nayassett is the 
three corner meadow and land adjoining, extending northerly to 
Chicopee river." 

The deed of Northampton from the Indians, to John Pynchon, is 
dated September 24, 1653. Chichaallop, and a number of other 
chiefs named, all of Nonatuck, sold all the grounds on the west side 
Quinnecticott river, beginning from the small river, below Manhan, 
called Sonkwank, and so up by Quinnecticott river, to the little 
meadow called Capawonk, namely to the little brook, or gutter, on 
this side Capawamp, which little brook is called Musquamp, and all 
the ground westward from Quinecticott, for nine miles out into the 
woods, as far as Nausconick. The grounds included are there called 
by many Indian names. This deed was assigned to Northampton 
inhabitants, Jan. 16, 1662. 



APPENDIX. 317 

[M.] 

The rule of apportioning these lands to individuals, was by estates 
and polls. The polls to be estimated at twelve pounds each, and all 
male children under age to be considered- as polls. It was also 
ordered, that when divided while common or unfenced, they should 
be free to all the inhabitants for grass, herbage and timber, and till 
improved, should not be taxed. There was a provision for a school 
and a ministry lot in each of these divisions. 

[N.] 

The laws of the colony were at this time in manuscript. They 
were not printed till 1651 ; and it is doubtful whether, even then, a 
copy was kept here. • 

" Febry the 5th 1649 

" A copy of such orders as are made and confirmed by the Inhab- 
itants of Springfield the day and year above written. 

" 1. For the prevention of disorders in puttinge cattell to pasture, 
on the other side of the great river, to the prejudice of men's corne ; 
and yet that men may have the benefit, of the pasture there, for 
theyre cattell, in seasonable tyme. It is therefore ordered, that no 
person shall put over any cattell on the other side of the great river, 
to Pasture there, until the 15th day of October yearly, and from 
thence untill the eighth day of March they may continue there, by 
which day the fields there are to be cleared of cattell of all sorts, 
and if any cattell shall be found there going at liberty, and not 
under the hand of a keeper, or in an inclosed piece of ground, before 
or after the days abovesayd, the owners of the said cattell shall be 
lyable to a fine of 12d. a head for all that shall be found within a 
100 rodd of any corne or meddowe, one halfe of the fine to the 
informer, and ye other halfe to the towne, and shall make goode 
whatever damadge shall appeare to be done by theyre said cattell 
in that tyme. 

2. " Whereas the planting of Indian corne in the meddows and 
swamps on tba other side of Agawayn river, hath occationed a long 
stay, after mowing tyme, before men can put theyre cattell thither 
to pasture. Therefore it is ordered (with the consent of all those 
that have planting ground there), that no more Indian corn, shall be 
planted there, either in the meddows or swamps, that soe the cattell 
that have allotments there may be put over by the 15th day of Sep- 
tember yearly, provided they take a sure course, to prevent, theyre 



318 APPENDIX. 

cattell from goinge over the river, either by fencing, or a keeper in 
the day tyme, and by securing them in some inclosure in the night. 
But there is liberty, for calves to be put over thither, by the 14th of 
August. And in case any person, shall put cattell there before the 
day expressed, he shall forfeit 2s. 6d. by the head, for every such 
default, and also be lyable to pay all daniadge that his cattell shall 
doe on either side of the river. [This order was soon changed, and 
the same rule adopted as in the first regulation.] 

** 3. It is ordered that if any Inhabitant shall desire to make a 
Cannoe, he may have liberty to fell any tree or trees, in the towns 
commons, and make it or them into Cannoes for his own use, or the 
use of any Inhabitant. But no such inhabitant shall have liberty, 
to sell or in any kinde to pass away, any Cannoe soe made out of 
the towne, untill it be full five years old, or if he lend his cannoe, it 
shall be returned within a month. And in case any shall transgress 
this order, he shall be lyable to a penalty of 20s. for every default. 

" 4. It is ordered, that whosoever, shall take away or make use of 
any mans Cannoe, without his leave shall forfeit unto the owner 2s. 
6d. for every such default.* 

"5. It is ordered that there shall be no barns, orhowseingbuiltorset 
up in the highway, betwixt the streete fence, and the brooke, except 
there be soe much room as they can leave 4 rod for the streete or 
highway, and then men may make use, of that side, next the brooke, 
for what building they please. And if any shall transgress, this 
order it, shall be lawfull for the selectmen to appoynt men to pull 
downe, and demolish such building. 

"6. For the prevention of sundry evills, that May befall this 
Township, through ill disposed persons, that may thrust themselves 
in amongst us, agaynst the likinge, and consent of the generality of 
the inhabitants, or select Townsmen, by purchasing a lott. or place 
of habitation, &c. It is therefore ordered, and declared, that no inhab- 
itant, shall sell, or in any kind pass, away his house lot or any part of 
it, or any other of his allotments, to any stranger, before he have made, 
the select Townsmen, acquainted, who his chapman is, and they accord- 
ingly allow of his admission, under penalty, of paying twenty shil- 
lings, for every parcell of land, so sold, or forfeitinge his land, soe 
sould, or passed away. But if the select Townsmen, see grounde to 
disalowe of the admission, of the said chapman, then the toun, or 

* These regulations as to canoes, were important, as they were the vehicles in which the farm- 
ers every day went from one part of their farms to another. 



APPENDIX. 319 

Inhabitants, shall have 30 days iyme to resolve, whither they will 
buy the said allottments, which said alottments they may buy, as 
indifferent partys shall apprise them. But in case the Inhabitants 
shall delay to make a purchase of the said lauds, above 30 days 
after the propounding of it to the select Tounsmen, then the said 
seller shall have his liberty to take his chapman and such chapman, 
or stranger shall be esteemed, as entertained and alowed of, by the 
tonne as an Inhabitant. 

" 7. It is ordered, that, if any man of this tounship, or any pro- 
prietor of land, have, or any that shall or may dispose of land here, 
shall under the colour of friendship, or any other ways, entertaine 
any person, or persons here, to abide as inmates, or shall subdivide 
their howse lotts, to entertaine them as tenants, for a longer tyme, 
than one month, or 30 days, without the consent of the select Touns- 
men, (children or servants of the family that remain single persons 
excepted,) shall forfeit for the first default, 20s. to the Towne and 
alsoe he shall forfeite 20s. per month, for every month, that any 
such person or persons shall soe continue, in this Tounship without 
the consent of the select Tounsmen ; and if in tyme of their abode, 
after the limitation abovesaid, they shall neede relief, not beinge 
able to maintaine themselves, then he or they, that entertained such 
persons, shall be lyable, to be rated by the selectmen, for the reliefe 
and maintenance, of the said party or partys, so entertained, as they 
in their discretion shall judge meete. 

" 8. For the regulating of workmens and labourers wages. It is 
ordered. 1. That all workmen shall worke the whole day, allowing 
convenient tyme for food and rest. 2d. Thatt all husbandmen and 
ordinary labourers from the first day of November to the first of 
March shall not take above 16d. by the day, wages, for the other 8 
months, they shall not take above 20d. by the day, except in time of 
harvest, such as reaping, and mowing, or for other extraordinary 
worke, such as are sufficient, workmen, are allowed 2s. pr. day. 3. 
That, all carpenters, joyners, sawers, wheelwrights, or such like arti- 
ficers, from the first day of November, to the first of March, shall 
not take above 20d. pr. day wages. And, for the other 8 months, 
not above 2s. pr. day. Taylors, not to exceed I2d. pr. day, through- 
out the year. 4. That all teames, consisting of 4 cattell, with one 
man, shall not take above 6s. a day wages : From May till October, 
to worke 8 hours and the other part of the year six houres for theyre 
days worke. 



320 APPENDIX. 

'♦ And it is further ordered, that whosoever shall, either by giveing 
or taking, exceede these rates, lie shall be lyable to be punished by 
the magistrate, according to the quality and nature of the offence. 

" 9. It is ordered, that every householder, shall have in a ready- 
ness, about his house, a snfficimt ladder, for length suitable to his 
bowsing, to prevent the danger of fire, on penalty for every neglect, 
5s. 

" 10, It is ordered, that if any person, shall bo taken notice of, to 
carry fire in the streete, or from house to house, not being suffi- 
ciently covered, soe as to prevent doinge hurt thereby, he shall for- 
feite 5s. for every such offence, proved against him, besides all dam- 
ages, for what hurt may come thereby. 

"11. It is ordered, that if any trees be felled, in the common, 
having no other worke bestowed on them, above six months, it shall 
be lawfuU for any man, to take them : but any Timber that is cross 
cutt or fire wood that is cutt out, or set on heaps, or rayles, or clefts 
or poles, no man may take any of them, till they have lyen 18 
months, after it is so cross cut or cloven. And in case any person 
shall be found to take away, or convert to his own use, any tymber, 
or fyrewood, &c., as aforesaid, before the tyme above limited, he 
shall be liable to make satisfaction to the owner, in kinde, or other- 
wise, to his content ; and shall also forfeite 10s. to the Toune Treas- 
ury, for every such parcel of tymber, rayles, boettes, or firewood, 
that he shall soe disorderly take away, and convert to his own use. 
[N. B. This order was in some respects modified in 1660, but sub- 
stantially continued.] 

" 12. Whereas, there is observation taken, of the scarcity of 
Tyml)er, about the Toune for buildinge, sawing, shingles, and such 
like, it is therefore ordered, that no person shall, henceforth trans- 
port, out of the toune, to other places any building tymber, bord, 
loggs, or sawen boards, or planks, or shingle Tymber, or pipe staves, 
which shall be growing in the Toun commons ; or from Chickuppe 
river, to freshwater brooke, and six miles east from the great river ; 
and, if any man, shall be found, to transgress this order, he shall be 
lyable to a fine of 20s. for every freight, or loade, of such Tymber, 
boards, shingle, or such like, by him soe transported. 

" 13. To the end that such candleivood as lyeth near the Towne 
may not be wasted by such as burne Tarr, &c., to ye prejudice of 
the Inhabitants, It is therefore, ordered, that no person, shall have 
liberty to gather, or havinge soe gathered, to burn any candlewood 
for the makinge of Tarr, Pitch, or Coale, within the compass of six 



APPENDIX. 321 

miles east, from the great river, and soe extending from Chicliuppe 
river, to the Longmeadow brcJolie ; and if any shall be found to 
burue any candlewood, soe gathered, within the limits or bounds, 
above expressed, he shall forfeite 20s. for every load of candlewood, 
soe gathered, and burnt for Tar, Pitch, or Cole, or ye like use. 
Provided notwithstanding that every Inhabitant, may gather candle- 
wood for his own family use where he pleaseth.* 

" 14. Whereas, it is judged, offensive, and noisome, for flax, and 
hempe, to be watered, or washed, in or by the brooke, before mens 
doors which is for ordinary use, for dressinge meate, therefore it is 
ordered that no person henceforth, shall water or wash, any flax or 
hemp, in the said brooke, either on the east or west side of the 
streete, or any where, near adjoyninge to it, and if any person shall 
be found transgressiuge herein, he shall be liable to a fine of 6s. 8d. 
for every such default. 

" 15. It is ordered that no person shall gather any hopps, that 
grow in the swamps, or any common grounds, untill the fifth day of 
September yearly, upon payne of forfeitinge what they shall soe dis- 
orderly gather, and 2s. 6d. for breach of order, the forfeiture to the 
informer, the 2s. 6d. to the Toune treasurer. 

" 16. Whereas it is judged needful, in sundry respects, that each 
Inhabitant, should have the severall parcells of his land, recorded 
therefore for prevention of future inconveniences. It is ordered, that 
every particular inhabitant, of this tounship shall repayre to the 
recorder, that is chosen and appoynted, by the toune for that pur- 
pose, who, li^on information given him, by each person, of his sev- 
erall parcells of land, the number of acres, with the length and 
breadth of ye said alotments, and who are borderinge on each side 
of him, shall by virtue of his office, fairly record each parcell of 
land, with the limits, bounds and situation, thereof, in a book, for 
that purpose, for which his pains, the owner of the said lands, shall 
pay unto the Recorder, two pence for every parcell, of his land, soe 
recorded. And, if any person, shall neglect the recording of his 
lands, longer than six months, after ye grant of it, he shall be ly^- 
ble to a fine of 3s. for every parcell of land, that is not then 
recorded ; and if after that he shall neglect to record it 12d. pr. 

* This regulation as to candlewood, refers to the state of the plains, and the customs of the 
people, at that time. By the perishing of old trees, there were, on and in the ground, many 
pine knots, and hearts of trees, which were generally used for torchlights. Till within 50 
years, it was the custom of the people, to have gathered, every fall, for family use, a quantity of 
these pine knots, &c. A prudent fanner would almost as soon enter upon the winter without 
hay, as without pine. This was gathered on all uninclosed land, wherever found. 

41 



322 APPENDIX. 

montli for every months neglecte, of any parcell ; And auncient 
grants are all to be recorded, by the last of May next, upon like 
penalty. 

" 17. It is ordered, tl)at if any person, whose bouselott lyes 
inclosed in a general fence, shall desire to inclose a part of it, for 
yards, gardens, or orchard, his neighbour, on each hand of him, shall 
be compellable to make and sufficiently maintain, the one half of 
the said fence, from tyme to tyme, provided his share of fence 
amount not to above ten rods, provided alsoe, that ye said fence 
exceede not the charge of a sufficient five foot pale, or five rayles. 
And in case any neighbour shall refuse to doe his share, of ye said 
fence, within 3 months, after due notice, given him of it, he shall be 
lyable to pay, what damadge his neighbour, shall sustaiue, through 
his default : and alsoe 5s. per month soe long as he shall neglect for 
contempt of order. 

" 18 and 19. [The 18th and 19th are respecting fences, and the 
oversight and repair of them, and have nothing peculiar in them.] 

" 20. For the better carryinge on of Toune meetings, it is ordered 
that whensoever, there shall any public notice, be given to the 
Inhabitants by the select Tounsmen, or any other, in theyre behalfe, 
of some necessary occation, wherein the selectmen desire, to advise 
with the Inhabitants, and the day, tyme, and place of meetinge be 
appoynted, It is expected, that all the Inhabitants attend person- 
ally, such meeting, soe appoynted. And, in case, the tyme and 
houre of meetinge be come, though there be but nine of the Inhab- 
itants assembled, it shall be lawfull for them to proceed,* in agitation 
of whatever busyness is there propounded to them, and what the 
major part of the Assembly there mett shall agree upon. It shall 
be taken as the act of the whole toune, and binding to all. 

" 21. The first Tuesday in November yearly [altered afterwards 
to February,] is mutually agreed on and appoynted, to be a general 
toune meetinge, for the choyce of Toune officers making, continuing 
and publishing of orders, &c. on which day, it is more especially, 
expected that each inhabitant, give his personall attendance, and if 
any shall be absent, at the tyme of calling, or absent himself .with- 
out consent of the major part, he shall be lyable to a fine of 2s. 6d. 

" 22, It is alsoe ordered, that on the first Tuesday, in November, 
there shall be yearly chosen, by the Inhabitants, two wise, discreete 
men, who shall by virtue of an oath imposed, on them by the mag- 
istrate, for that purpose faithfully present, on the Court days, all 
such breaches of Court, or toune orders, or any other misdemenors, 



APPENDIX. 323 

as shall come to their knowledge, either by their own observation, or 
bj" credible information, of others, and shall take out process for the 
appearance of such as are delinquents, or witnesses, to appeare the 
sayd day ; when all such presentments, by the sayd partys, shall be 
judicially heard, and examined, by the magistrate, and warrants for 
distresses, granted for the levying of such fines or penaltys as are 
annexed to the orders violated, or which shall seeme meete and rea- 
sonable to the magistrate, to impose, or inflict, according to the 
nature of the offence. These to stand in this office for a year or till 
others be chosen in their roome.* 

" 23. It is ordered and declared, that when any man, shall be 
fairly and clearly chosen, to any office, or place of service, in and to 
the tonne, if he shall refuse to accept, or shall afterwards neglect to 
serve, in that office, to which he shall be chosen, every such person 
shall pay 20s. fine for refusall to the Tonne Treasurer, unless he has 
served in that office the yeare before ; no person being, to be com- 
pelled to serve two years, together in the same office, except select- 
men, two whereof, if chosen againe, are to stand two yeares 
together ; that so, there may be always some of th& old selectmen 
who are acquainted with the Toune aflFaires, joining with the new. 

24. — [Relates to the regulation of swine, and is not necessary to 
be transcribed. An officer, unusual in later years, was chosen as a 
general swine ringer, and his fees stated.] 

" 25. To the end that the common Highways of the Toune, may 
be layed out where they may be most convenient, and advantagiose, 
for the general use of the toune, it is therefore ordered, that the 
select Tounsmen shall have full power, and authority, to lay out all 
common highways, for the Toune, where and how they shall judge 
most convenient, and useful, for the Inhabitants, though it be 
through or at the end of mens lotts. Provided, they give them rea- 
sonable satisfaction, according to equity ; but if the party like not 
thereof, then it shall be referred, to the Judgment of indifferent par- 
tys mutually chosen, by the partye and the select Tounsmen : and 
if those two indifferent partys, do not agree they shall pitch upon a 
3d person to join with them and determine it. 

•' 26. And the Select Tounsmen are alowed liberty to set a cer- 
taine.toll, on carts, that shall pass any highway, which shall appeare 
more than ordinary chargeable, in the reparation of it. 

* These officers, called presenters, were chosen for many years. After grand jurors were cho- 
sen, they had only town orders to execute. 



324 APPENDIX. 

" 27. For the equall and indifferent carryinge on and bearingo the 
charge, of niakinge and repayreing such common highways, and 
bridges as are, or shall be thought, needful, to be made, or repayred, 
from tyme to tyme, within this township, it is ordered, that every 
householder, that hath, or keepeth in his use, or possession a Teame, 
consistinge of four cattell, shall on due warninge, given him by the 
surveyor, send at every day, and place appoynted, his said teame, 
with his cart and such necessary tooles, as the surveyor shall alowe 
of, and an able man therewith, to doe such work, as the surveyor 
shall appoynt him. The like is to be done, by those that have but 
halfe teames. And it is further ordered, that every other house- 
holder, who hath no teame, shall by himself or some other faithful 
labourer, attend the worke appoynted him, by the surveyors, on 
every day that he shall be called, or required soe to worke. And it 
is alsoe ordered, that all persons inhabitinge in the toune, who are 
above dfilOO, estate in other rates, and yet have no teame, every 
such person shall be compellable to send one suflRcient labourer, to 
the highway worke, on every day, that he shall be duly warned 
thereunto, accordinge to his proportion with other men. 

" It is alsoe further ordered, that every person shall cut downe his 
stubbs, and cleare the highway before his lott, of tymber wood, 
standing trees, (which are hereby declared to be a mans oun,) or 
any other offensive matter, that the surveyors shall warne him of, 
within three days after notice given him, or else be lyable to a fine 
of 12d. for every defect. 

" 28. Whereas, there are surveyors, chosen yearly, for the over- 
sight and amendinge of highways, bridges, and other defects of that 
nature, that soe the common highways of the Toune may be kept in 
continuall reparation. To that end, and for the regulatinge of sur- 
veyors, in the discharge of their office, It is ordered yt ye surveyors 
for the tyme heinge, shall take care, 1. That highways, bridges, 
wharfs, &c. belonging to theyre care, be made, repayred, and 
amended sufficiently, accordinge to theyre discretion, or as they shall 
be directed by the select Touusmen. 2. That all highways be kept 
clear from trees, Timber, wood, earth, stone, or any other offensive 
matter yt shall annoy the highway, within a mile of any dwelling 
house. 3. That if any person, upon notice given him by the sur- 
veyor, shall neglect to remove, or cleare away, any such annoyance 
to the highway, or offensive matter, by him caused, longer than 3 
days, then the surveyor shall doe it, and have double recompense for 
all his labor, cost and charge, from the party so neglecting, besides 



APPENDIX, 325 

the 12d. which the party is to pay in way of fine, for neglect, accord- 
ing to the order forementioned. 4. That the surveyor shall give 
three days warninge to such as they call for, and require to come to 
the highway worke, viz, the day of warning and a day more, soe 
that men must come the 3d day after warning, unless the surveyors 
give them longer tyme. 5, That they shall require no householder 
to worke above 6 days in a yeare, nor more of these six days than 
shall, in a due proportion, fall to his share, 6. That the surveyors 
shall require no man to worke above two days in a weeke. 7, That 
they call for these 6 days, for as many of them as shall serve, within 
the compass of tyme betwixt the 20th of May and 20th of June, 
yearly, and not at any other tyme, unless by the consent of the 
major part of the select Tounsmen, it be agreed unto ; and yet, 
inasmuch as sometimes ways suddenly become defective, that they 
may not too long be neglected, it is declared, that three of ye select- 
men meetinge, and any two of them agreeing, may appoynt and 
allow the surveighours to repaire such defective ways. 8, That 
they duly present to the select Tounsmen, all defects of persons, or 
teames, that, on lawfull warning given, neglect to come to the worke 
appoynted, who shall give warrant to the constable, for present dis- 
tress, of 2s. fine for a man, and 5s. for a man and teame, to be 
employed in the next worke that is to be done about highways, 9. 
That they give in theyre accounts yearly, to the selectmen, at the 
general meetinge in November, when they yield up their ofiice 
another yeare," 

These byelaws, some of them, were made at an earlier date, and 
adopted into this code at this time. They were all revised and tran- 
scribed, in the year 1G64, and entered in another book. Some of 
them were then modified, and a few of them repealed. The most of 
them were never formally annulled ; but as new circumstances 
occurred, and other regulations, either public or private, were made, 
they went out of use. 

There were two or three regulations, not in this system, which 
ought to be noticed, As to highways, in 1640, the surveyor was to 
" oblige all to remove stubbs, saw pits, or tymber, from the high- 
ways ; and if any person neglected, he should forfeite Is. and if con- 
tinued, 2s." 

As far as the brook lay upon the street, there was a special regu- 
lation as to that, made in 1657 : " that all the Inhabitants between 
Mr. John Pynchou's and the lower side of Benjamin Parsons', who 
are proprietors of any part or parcel of the wet meadow before our 



326 APPENDIX. 

doors, shall take care to cleare and scour the brook, soe far as theyre 
lott or alotments is in breadth, in the same meadow ; and that it be 
done sufficiently, to the approbation of the selectmen : and that by 
the last of June next, upon penalty of 3s. 4d. per week, for every 
parcell that is found undone at that tyme, and so to continue pr. 
week, till the worke be fully done ; the which fines shall be duly 
levied by the constable, and improved for public use." 

In 1660, this subject was again before the town, when, uniting 
an order made January, 1638, as to scouring ditches before the 
houses, and the order of 1656-7, it was provided " that the propri- 
etors of the meadows should keep a good and sufficient ditch, well 
cleared, for the easy and ready passage of ye water, and for that 
purpose, from 6 or 8 rods above where the brook come to the street, 
should annually, in the month of May, secure and cleare ye said 
ditches and water passages, of sand, dirt, wood, or any rubbish, so 
that ye water may have free passage away, without penning up, to 
flow the meadows. Every person neglecting, to pay 5s. to the town, 
and for after neglects, 3s. 4d. a week : the whole to be done under 
the care of two of the selectmen, to be specially appoynted for that 
purpose." 

The method of defraying town charges, appears to have been one 
of some difficulty. At first, the assessment was upon land, by the 
acre ; this was afterwards confined to the homelots. To pay for the 
land purchased of the Indians, each individual was assessed accord- 
ing to the quantity of land he held. In 1655, it was ordered that 
" all lands and bowsing, and live stock, which a person owned, 
should be appraised and assessed'at their value." 

This mode of rating was again altered Feb. 1660-1. Houses, 
lands, and living stock, (except swine put up for fatting and killing,) 
were to be appraised and assessed ; and men's persons also, to be 
valued from 16 years old and upward, at c£12, c£16, or 6e20, at the 
discretion of the selectmen ; all except sick or infirm, to be included. 
Men also to be rated for their merchandising and trading, according 
to the trade they drive in the town, to be determined by the select- 
men. In 1663, a fourth class for rating persons, was made, to be 
set at 668. All were to be valued by the appraisers. 

At the first settlement of the town, it was much infested with 
wolves and foxes. A premium was given for the killing of each. 
This was to be levied, at first, only upon cattle ; but afterwards, it 
was a general charge upon the town. Some years, the claims on 
this account amounted to a considerable sum. 



APPENDIX. 327 

To shew the value of estate here, at an early period, and the rel- 
ative value of its different kinds, I have taken from the Pynchon 
records, a copy of the inventory of Nathaniel Bliss, taken February 
14, 1654-5. He lived a little south of where Union street unites 
with Main street. 

" Housing and home lott, 5 acres, 
Wet meadow before the house, 3 acres, 
Wood lot, b acres, ..... 

Over ye great river, 9 acres, .... 
At the Longmeadovv, 26 1-4 acres. 
Over Agawam river, 5 acres, 
Meadow on the Mill river, 2 acres, 

2 Cotes, 

3 Swine, ....... 

3 kettles, 1 skillet, and 1 pale, 
7 pieces of pewter, 13s.; 7 do. of tin, 4s. 
AVarming Pan, .5s.; a fraying pan, 2s. 
Earthen ware. 4s.; wooden ware, 2t;s. 

2 bedsteads, 10s.; 2 chairs, 3s. . . . 

3 boxes and a chest, ..... 
Axes, spades and hoe, ..... 
Plough chain and share, lUs.; curtain stayes, 7s. 

Cradle and chest, 

Bedtick, with flocks and feathers, . 

A musket, sword, and bandaliers, . 

Hat, 5s.; jacket and 2 pair of breeches, 18s. . 

Pillow, 3s.; books, 10s.; a spinning wheel, 2s. 

£42 Ids. 6d. 

It seems that the cows were appraised at upwards of $16 each, 
while land in the homelot and meadows was not more than 85 an 
acre. Land was then abundant, and cattle were very scarce. It 
appears that the accounts of the selectmen were audited yearly, and 
a particular statement made and entered on the record. A minute 
account was given of the town's property : e. g. In 1660, it is 
noticed, " that Lawrence Bliss is to pay for the chain of the steel- 
trap which he lost ; and there is one of the town's one iron hook 
and eye, in the post of the gate going to the training place, and 
another at Thomas Cooper's house." 

[0.] 
On the subject of the roads in the town, though there is no record 
of the laying out of Main street, yet it is constantly referred to, as a 
road, a street, and a highway. It was ordered to be four rods in 
breadth, till it left the brook, and then to be three rods ; and from 
tlie bridge across the brook, to the gate at the upper end of Long- 
meadow, it was to be also four rods, and through the meadow, of 
the same width. It passed under Longhill. The town street has 
been several times regulated ; it was done in 1664, by the select- 



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328 APPENDIX. 

men, and in 1769, by a committee of the Court of Sessions, when it 
was made a county road, if not before. The upper end of the street 
was made 6 rods wide, in 1662, from the bank of the meadows up to 
Round hill. The road through -the meadow, called the middle 
causey, now State street, was only two rods wide ; the road from the 
meadow up the hill, was wide. From the rear of the wood lots, to 
pass up the great hill, it was twenty rods broad ; the principal 
ascent was overcome by winding up the hill, farther south than any 
part of the present county road. The road to the burying ground 
was originally only one rod, then altered to 1^, and afterwards to 
two rods. The original roads to Skipmuck, the Sixteen-acre road, 
the road through Longmeadow, and through West Springfield, on 
the way to Windsor, were all laid and kept, many years, twenty 
rods wide. 

[P.J 

The right to permit cattle to run upon the town commons, was 
considered, in the early settlement of the town, a most important 
privilege. It was constantly exercised by the inhabitants, and much 
dependence was placed upon the commons for pasturing cattle dur- 
ing the summer. The highways that were laid twenty rods broad, 
were laid of that width, avowedly, for the purpose of pasturage. 
The cattle were all branded, and each man's brand was recorded. 
While wood lands remained uncultivated and unfenced, the right of 
pasturing upon them was claimed ; and for more than a century and 
a half, was exercised, without question or dispute. Nearly all the 
milch cows, as well as young cattle, which were kept in the town, 
especially in the first parish, were, till within forty years, depastured 
on the commons. There were many evils in this practice : cattle 
would destroy young timber ; persons were tempted to set fire to 
the woods, that there might be better feed. After the country 
became populous, the pasture grounds were diminished, and the 
ancient simplicity and honesty being much diminished, it was found 
that cattle were not very safe on the plains. Immediately after the 
law authorizing towns to restrain cattle from going at large, was 
passed, in 1800, this town passed a vote imposing such a restraint. 
This has tended to increase the growth of wood, and also the quan- 
tity of pasture land. 



INDEX TO NAMES. 



PART I.— CHRISTIAN NAMES OF CHAPINS. 

The figures at the left hand of the names denote the number of the 
Generation. After I had completed the numbering of the Genealogy, I 
received several additional names, in some instances one in a family, in others 
three or four and more, and several whole families, and a few names were 
overlooked. Those who are not numbered are designated by pages, thus, 
" Silas, p. 48." Those in the Appendix are designated thus, " Lucy W., ap." 



G. Names. 

A. 

4 Aaron, 

4 Aaron, 

5 Aaron, 

5 Aaron, 

6 Aaron, ap 
6 Aaron, 

6 Aaron, 

6 Aaron, 

7 Aaron L., D. D., 

8 Abba Jane H , 

9 Abba R., 
7 Abbie M., 

4 Abel, 

5 Abel, 

5 Abel, 

6 Abel, 

7 Abel C, 

7 Abel D., 

8 Abel L. 
5 Abiah, 
5 Abiah, 
h Abiah, 
5 Abiah, 

5 Abiah, 

6 Abiah, 
6 Abiel, 

4 Abigail, 

5 Abigail, 
5 Abigail, 
5 Abigail, 
5 Abigail, 
5 Abigail, 

5 Abigail, 

6 Abigail, 
6 Abigail, 



Kos. 



7a 

93 

304 

244 

527 

p. 48 

703 

p. 99 

1553 

2234 

2481 

1693 

55 

183 

408 

1011 

1288 

1900 

2264 

182 

291 

399 

400 

240 

654 

717 

127 

295 

301 

346 

381 

228 

273 

813 

464 



G. Names. Nos. 

6 Abigail, 767 

6 Abigail, 904 

7 Abigail, 1731 
7 Abigail, 1229 
7 Abigail, 1125 
7 Abigail D., 1663 
7 Abigail E., 1575 

6 Abigail W., 589 

7 Abijah W., 1870 
4 Abilene, 44 
6 Abina, 705 
4 Abner, 115 

4 Abner, 122 

5 Abner, 345 

6 Abner, 461 
6 Abner, 849 

5 Achsa, 328 

6 Achsa, 982 

7 Ach.sa, 1727 
7 Achsa, J 349 

7 Adaline, J289 

8 Adaline, 2150 

6 Adaline A., 1875 
8 Adaline M., 2313 

7 Adaline M., 1636 

7 Adaline W., p. 69 

8 Adan, 2355 
8 Adella, 2008 

7 Addison, 1604 

8 Ader, 2009 
6 Adolphus, 929 

6 Adolphus, 890 
8 Adolphus F., 2093 
8 Adolphus G., 2272 

7 Adolphus P., p. 90 

7 Agnes, ' 1370 

8 Agnes Amelia, 2196 



G. Names. Nos. 

6 Ahira, 823 

7 Ahira, Jr., 1633 
7 Ahira P., ]611 
7 Alanson, 1163 
7 Albert, p. 92 

7 Albert, 1565 

8 Albert, 1974 
7 Albert B., 1923 

7 Albert F., 1567 

8 Albert H., 2274 
7 Albert J., 1430 

7 Albert P., 1358 

8 Albert R, p. 150 
8 Albert T., 2127 
8 Albert W., 2392 
8 Albertis B., 2197 

6 Alden, 1010 

7 Aldus M., 1749 

6 Alexander, 938 

7 Alexander. 17.58 

8 Alexander A., 1509 
7 Alexander H., 1766 

6 Alfred, 1027 

7 Alfred, 1J02 

7 Alfred, 1907 

8 Alfred, 2352 
7 Alfred E., 1849 
7 Alfred R., 1908 

9 Alice, 2444 

7 Alice C, 1431 

8 Alice D., 2255 

7 Alice E., 1485 

8 Alice E., ap. 
8 Alice H., 1988 
8 Alice S., 2162 
6 Allen, 780 
8 Allen K., 2367 



42 



330 



INDEX. — PAKT I. 



f) Almeria, 
9 Aloiizo, Dr., 
7 Aloiizo, 

7 Alonzo, 

8 Alorizo, 

7 Alonzo 1?., Rev, 

8 Alonzo B., 
8 Alonzo B., 

7 Alonzo C, 

8 Alonzo K., 
G Alpha, 

7 Alpha, 
.') Alpheus, 
G Alpheus, 
7 Alpheus, 

6 Alva, 
^ Alvin, 

7 Alvin, 
G Ama, 

G Amanda, 

7 Amanda, 

8 Amanda, 
8 Amanda, 
6 Amariah, 
6 Ambrose. 

6 Amelia, 

7 Amelia, 
7 Amelia, 

7 Amelia, 

8 Amelia C, 
8 Amelia L., 
8 Amelia L., 
7 Amelia S., 
6 Amery, 

6 Aniinta, 

7 Aminta, 

6 Amy, 

7 Amy H., 

5 Anizi, 

6 Andrew, 

8 Andrew, 

7 Andrew A., 

8 Andrew B., 

7 Andrew J., 

8 Andrew J., 
8 Andrew P., 
7 Angeline, 

Angeline, 

Angeline, 
G Ann, 
7 Ann E., 

Ann E., 

Ann Jeannette, 

Ann J., 

Ann M., 

Anna, 

Anna, 

Anna, 

Anna, 

Anna, 

Anna, 



7 
8 



8 
7 
7 
8 
5 
5 
5 
6 
6 
6 



6 Anna, 



1020 


G 


(iHf) 


6 


not) 


(5 


20G4 


7 


1937 


7 


13(10 


7 


2120 


7 


2169 


5 


1786 


7 


2205 


8 


682 


8 


1048 


6 


309 


8 


697 


8 


1150 


7 


923 


7 


499 


7 


1207 


5 


910 


8 


836 


7 


1105 


7 


2123 


7 


1945 


8 


850 


8 


701 


8 


735 


5 


1091 


5 


1355 


7 


1779 


5 


2176 


6 


1956 


6 


2158 


4 


1615 


5 


p. .57 


7 


994 


7 


1755 


8 


751 


8 


1338 


6 


310 


7 


720 


5 


p. 147 


5 


1506 


6 


2251 


6 


1769 


6 


2084 


6 


p. 148 


7 


1492 


7 


1710 


6 


2200 


6 


41S 


7 


1912 


8 


2175 


6 


18G5 


6 


1921 


7 


2212 


6 


231 


7 


263 


6 


293 


6 


561 


7 


588 


8 


734 


9 


765 


6 



Anna, 

Anna, . 

Anna, 

Anna, 

Anna, 

Anna, 

Anna, 

Annah, 

Annah C, 

Annette Eliza, 

Annie P., 

Anson, • 

Antoinette, 

Anvelia, 

Aretus, 

Ariel Cooley, 

Arlington M., 

Arrabella, 

Arrabella B., 

Arrilla, 

Artemas W., 

Arthur, 

Arthur G., 

Artiiur Japhet, 

Arthur N., 

Artimesia, 

Aitiaiesia, 

Arvilla, 

Asa, 

Asa, 

Asa, 

Asahel, 

Asahel, 

Asahel, 

Asahel, 

Asahel, 

Asahel, 

Asaph, 

Asaph , 

Asenath, 

Asenath, 

Asenath, 

Asenath, 

Asenath, 

Asenath, 

Asenath, 

Asenath, 

Ashbel, 

Ashbel, 

Ashbel, 

Ashbel P., 

Asher, 

Atlas, 

Augusta, 

Kev. Augustus 

Augustus P., 

Austin, 

Austin, 

Austin, 

Aurelia, 

Aurura, 

Avalinc, 



826 


7 Avaline, 


1267 


910 


7 Avis M., 


150.5 


934 


5 Azubah, 


243 


1081 


() Azubah, 


525 


1143 


6 Azubah, 


538 


1240 


7 Azubah, 


1259 


18.59 






377 






1902 


B. 




2344 






2161 


7 Barnebas B., 


1300 


822 


4 Bathsheba, 


59 


20G8 


5 Bathsheba, 


384 


1939 


7 Bathsheba, 


967 


1159 


6 Bathsheba, 


1532 


1134 


7 Baxter, 


1784 


1384 


7 Beaumont, 


1524 


770 


6 Bela, 


874 


p. 148 


7 Bela, 


1389 


p. 99 


3 Benjamin, 


23 


1273 


4 Benjamin, 


120 


1671 


5 Benjamin, 


.376 


p. 147 


5 Benjamin, 


411 


2075 


6 Benjamin, 


960 


2011 


7 Benjamin F., 


1791 


209 


7 Benjamin M., 


1451 


212 


7 Benjamin M., 


1876 


1608 


4 Benoni, 


96 


254 


5 Benoni, 


314 


825 


6 Beriah, 


1001 


p. 48 


3 Bethia, 


21 


70 


4 Bethia, 


124 


200 


5 Bethia, 


193 


1292 


6 Bethia, 


547 


1304 


7 Bethia, 


1268 


2141 


6 Betsey, 


533 


2146 


6 Betsey, 


710 


515 


6 Betsey, 


1021 


1184 


7 Betsey, 


1230 


196 


8 Betsey, 


2389 


353 


5 Beulah, 


360 


544 


6 Beulah, 


854 


704 


5 Bezaleel, 


412 


779 


5 Bezaleel, 


414 


796 


G BHss, 


624 


1084 


6 Briant, 


1035 


1J87 


6 Bridgman, 


548 


429 


8 Burdett, 


2202 


522 


G Burt, 


835 


1209 






2082 






829 


c. 




942 






1883 


7 C. Amelia, 


1714 


L.,681 


3 Caleb, 


• 37 


1383 


4 Caleb, 


47 


811 


4 Caleb, 


133 


945 


5 Caleb, 


148 


1651 


5 Caleb, 


151 


2370 


6 Caleb, 


444 


2455 


7 Caleb, 


1066 


553 


7 Caleb, 


1293 



INDEX. — PART I. 



331 



7 Caleb S., 
7 Calvin A. 

5 Calvin, D.D., 
Q Calvin, 

6 Calvin, 

7 Calvin N., 
g Caniraa, 

6 Camillus, 

6 Camillus M., 

8 Campbell, 

7 Carlo, 

8 Carlo, 
7 Carlos, 

6 Caroline, 
6 Caroline, 

6 Caroline, 

7 Caroline, 
7 Caroline,' 
7 Caroline, 
7 Caroline, 

7 Caroline, 

8 Caroline, 
8 Caroline, 

7 Caroline A. E. J 

7 Caroline E., 

8 Caroline G., 

6 Caroline L., 

7 Caroline S., 

Carrie B., 

Carrie E., 

Carrie L., 

2 Catharine, 

4 Catharine, 
Catharine, 
Catharine, 
Catharine, 
Catharine, 
Catharine, 

6 Catharine, 

7 Catharine, 

8 Catharine E., 
8 Catharine J., 

7 Catharine L., 

8 Catharine Mary 

9 Catie Taylor, 
8 Caty C, 

6 Celia, 
6 Celia, 
G Celia, 

8 Chalmers, 

9 Chandler C, 

5 Charity, 

6 Charity, 

4 Charles, 

5 Charles, 

6 Charles, 

7 Charles, 
7 Charles, 

7 Charles, ' 
7 Charles, 
7 Charles, 
7 Charles, 



8 
8 
8 



1533 

1158 

308 

459 

492 

1401 

962 

667 

1442 

2017 

1104 

2203 

1665 

739 

741 

1023 

1271 

1519 

1641 

1655 

p. 69 

p. 147 

1938 

., 1635 

1465 

2247 

(ap.) 

1948 

2336 

2204 

2168 

4 

76 

147 

150 

179 

229 

339 

448 

1262 

2330 

1940 

1474 

, 1957 

2483 

2356 

753 

981 

984 

2323 

2448 

313 

793 

81 

379 

953 

1188 

1217 

1219 

1235 

1291 

1441 



/ 

7 
8 
8 
8 
8 



7 Charles, 
7 Charles, 

7 Charles, 

8 Charles, 
8 Charles, 
8 Charles, 

8 Charles, 

9 Charles, 
9 Charles, 

5 Charles C, 

6 Charles C, 

7 Charles C, 

8 Charles E., 
8 Charles D., 

7 Charles D., 
Charles E., 
Charles E., 
Charles E., 
Charles E., 
Charles E., 
Charles E., 

8 Charles F., 

6 Charles H., 

7 Charles H., 
Charles H., 
Charles H., 
Charles H., 
Charles H., 
Charles H., 
Charles J., 

8 Charles K., 
8 Charles L., 

7 Charles L., 

8 Charles Loring, 
7 Charles M., 

9 Charles N., 

7 Charles O., 

8 Charles O., 

8 Charles O., 

9 Charles P., 
8 Charles S., 

7 Charles W., 

8 Charles W., 
6 Charlotte, 

6 Charlotte, 
Charlotte, 
Charlotte, 
Charlotte, 
Charlotte, 
Charlotte, 
Charlotte B., 
Charlotte H., 
Charlotte H., 

7 Charlotte R., 
6 Chauncey, 

6 Chauncey, 

7 Chauncey, 
6 Chester, 

6 Chester, Eev. 

7 Chester, 
7 Chester, 

9 Chester A-, 



1529 
1741 

1898 

2042 

2129 

2117 

2208 

2453 

p. 168 

264 

868 



/ 

7 
7 
7 
8 
7 
7 
7 



8 Chester I., 

6 Chester W., 

7 Chester W., 

8 Chester W., 
5 Chloe, 

5 Chloe, 

6 Chloe, 
6 Chloe, 

6 Chloe, 

7 Chloe, 
6 Cisera, 



1545 


1 Cisily, 


1947 


8 Clara A., 


ap. 


7 Clara Maria, 


1675 


8 Clarence, 


1686 


8 Clarence E., 


1124 


7 Clarinda, 


1947 


6 Clarissa, 


2184 


6 Clarissa, 


2428 


6 Clarissa, 


2438 


6 Clarissa, 


2012 


6 Clarissa, 


732 


6 Clarissa, 


1628 


6 Clarissa, 


1403 


7 Clarissa, 


1467 


7 Clarissa, 


p. 96 


7 Clarissa, 


1967 


8 Clarissa, 


2359 


7 Clarissa A., 


1980 


7 Clarissa M., 


2407 


7 Clarissa S., 


2101 


8 Clark, 


1018 


7 Claudius P., 


1930 


6 Clements, 


1925 


6 Cleone, 


2490 


6 Climene, 


1776 


6 CoflSn. 


p. 157 


6 Consider, 


p. 157 


6 Consider, 


2426 


8 CoraE., 


2393 


6 Cordilah, 


1869 


7 Cornelia, 


2170 


7 Cornelia, 


420 


7 Cornelia, 


670 


8 Cornelia, 


1215 


7 Cornelia L., 


1662 


7 Cornelius, 


1730 


7 Cornelius K., 


1810 


7 Cornelius 0., 


2103 


8 Cornelius W. 


1871 


5 Cynthia, 


1043 


6 Cynthia, 


1376 


6 Cynthia, 


1275 


6 Cynthia, 


768 


6 Cynthia, 


p. 54 


7 Cynthia, 


J 770 


7 Cynthia, 


629 


7 Cynthia, 


807 


7 Cyrithiaett, 


1571 


6 Cyreneus, 


1581 


7 Cyreneus, 


2487 


8 Cyreneus, 



p. 148 

1022 

1903 

2239 

178 

272 

508 

706 

p. 21 

1530 

954 

1 

2007 

1435 

ap. 

2322 

1234 

427 

473 

575 

479 

729 

841 

919 

1056 

1256 

1491 

1950 

1760 

1742 

1792 

2201 

1625 

1000 

469 

470 

478 

446 

501 

p. 1.50 

871 

p. 85 

1522 

1794 

2383 

1704 

1734 

1558 

1706 

2181 

210 

450 

752 

p. 21 

951 

1178 

1181 

1819 

1254 

447 

1086 

1958 



332 



INDEX. — PART I. 



7 Cyreneus B., 


](i!t:! 


7 Delia, 


1263 


8 Edward M., 


2074 


6 Cyrus, 


'JIH 


6 Dennis, 


877 


7 Edward P., 


580 


7 Cyrus, 


1740 


7 Dennis, 


17(1] 


7 Edward P.. 


1469 


7 Cyrus, 


1745 


7 Dennis, 


1112 


7 Edward P., 


1899 


8 Cyrus F., 


2:5(51 


7 Dennis, 


1244 


8 Edward P., 


1983 


8 Curtis, 


1954 


6 Desconi, 


821 


8 Edward R., 


2375 


8 Curtis, 


21.35 


7 Densmore D., 


p. 99 


8 Edward W., 


2081 


6 Curtis S., 


1)26 


6 Dexter, 


1012 


7 Edwin, 


1204 






6 Diadeina, 


853 


7 Edwin, 


1743 






7 Diana, 


1833 


7 Edwin, 


1768 






6 Diantha, 


p. 48 


7 Edwin, 


1822 


D. 




7 Dolphin D., 


1266 


7 Edwin, 


ap. ]630 






5 Dorcas, 


202 


9 Edwin C, 


2482 


G Dan, 


422 


6 Dorcas, 


592 


7 Edwin E., 


1578 


6 Dan, 


993 


6 Dorcas, 


1015 


8 Edwin H., 


2052 


7 Dana, 


1069 


7 Dorcas D., 


1197 


8 Edwin M., 


2236 


4 Daniel, 


99 


7 Dorcas D., 


1601 


8 Edwin W., 


2283 


5 Daniel, 


153 


6 Dormer, 


546 


« Edwin P.. 


2110 


5 Daniel, 


234 


8 Dwight, 


2281 


7 Egbert W., 


1634 


5 Daniel, 


266 


7 Dwight S., 


1473 


6 Elam, 


817 


5 Daniel, 


325 






6 Elam 


896 


5 Daniel, 


397 






6 Elam, 


956 


5 Daniel, 


4(;7 


E. 




7 Elam, 


1591 


6 Daniel. 


456 






5 Eleanor, 


211 


6 Daniel, 


762 


3 Ebenezer, 


13 


6 Eleanor, 


873 


6 Daniel 


8U6 


3 Ebenezer, 


40 


6 Eleanor, 


889 


6 Daniel, 


999 


4 Ebenezer, 


73 


8 Eleanor, 


2090 


8 Daniel, 


2388 


4 Ebenezer, 


135 


8 Eleanor D., 


2125 


6 Daniel D., 


658 


5 Ebenezer, 


214 


7 Eleanor M., 


1812 


7 Daniel D., 


1413 


6 Ebenezer, 


p. 19 


8 Eleanor v., 


2092 


7 Daniel E., Eev. 


1851 


6 Eber, 


500 


4 Eleazer, 


71 


7 Daniel F., 


1432 


7 Eber, Jr., 


1169 


5 Eleazer, 


208 


7 Daniel F., 


1850 


7 E. Brewer, 


1110 


6 Electa, 


1005 


6 Daniel M., 


1036 


6 Eddy, 


440 


7 Electa, 


1347 


6 Daniel S., 


855 


6 Edgar, 


1248 


7 Electa B., 


957 


7 Darius, 


1175 


5 Editha, 


278 


7 Electa G., 


1594 


8 Darius, 


2062 


5 Editha, 


378 


7 Elenora, 


1831 


2 David, 


5 


6 Editha, 


523 


5 Eli, 


365 


3 David, 


16 


6 Editha, 


755 


4 Elias, 


79 


4 David, 


82 


8 Edmund C, 


2010 


5 Elias, 


252 


4 David, 


86 


7 Edmund D., 


1866 


8 Ehas, 


2261 


4 David, 


88 


8 Edmund D., 


2409 


7 Elias C, 


1620 


4 David, 


134 


8 Ednah, 


2147 


7 Elias F., 


1573 


5 David, 


225 


4 Edward, 


95 


6 Elihu, 


814 


5 David, 


253 


5 Edward, 


305 


7 Elihn, 


1588 


5 David, 


317 


6 Edward, 


783 


5 Elijah, 


166 


6 David, 


763 


6 Edward, 


931 


6 Elijah, 


490 


6 David, 


p. 48 


7 Edward, 


1059 


6 Elijah, 


702 


6 David, 


p. 48 


7 Edward, 


1518 


7 Elijah, 


1145 


6 David, 


p. 48 


7 Edward, 


1765 


7 Elijah, 


1735 


7 David, 


1294 


8 Edward, 


2047 


5 Elinor, 


167 


7 David, 


1310 


8 Edward, 


2143 


j> Eliphalet, 


191 


7 David, 


1659 


8 Edward B., . 


2318 


5 Eliphalet, 


215 


6 David B., 


659 


7 Edward C, 


1551 


6 Eliphalet, 


534 


7 David B, 


1664 


8 Edward C, 


2091 


7 Eliphalet, 


1228 


8 David C, 


2266 


8 Edward C, 


2182 


7 Eliphaz S., 


1195 


5 David J. B., 


281 


7 Edward D., 


1422 


4 Elisha, 


50 


7 David M., 


1759 


7 Edward D , 


1481 


4 Elisha, 


83 


2 Deborah, 


p. 2 


8 Edward D., 


2280 


5 Elisha, 


165 


4 Deborah, 


61 


7 Edward E., 


1684 


6 Elisha, 


463 


7 Delanson, 


1631 


8 Edward F., 


2222 


6 Elisha, 


483 


5 Delight, 


250 


8 Edward L., 


2214 


7 Elisha, 


1736 


6 Delia, 


761 


7 Edward M., 


1464 


8 Elisha, 


2211 



INDEX. PART I. 



333 



8 Elisha A., 2195 

7 Elisha B., Dr. 1367 

7 Elisha S., 1503 

6 Eliza, 730 

7 Eliza, 1895 

6 Eliza, 1087 

7 Eliza, 1220 
Eliza, 1253 
Eliza, 1307 
Eliza, 1536 
Eliza A., 1276 
Eliza Ann, 1499 
Eliza A., 1599 
Eliza M., 1955 
Eliza Maria, 2473 
Eliza S., 1333 
Elizabeth, 98 
Elizabeth, 110 
Elizabeth, 136 
Elizabeth, 138 
Elizabeth, 185 
Elizabeth, 216 
Elizabeth, 227 
Elizabeth, 238 
Elizabeth, 323 
Elizabeth, 366 
Elizabeth, 625 
Elizabeth, 646 
Elizabeth, 657 
Elizabeth, 680 
Elizabeth, 684 
Elizabeth, p. 48 
Elizabeth, 776 
Elizabeth, 830 
Elizabeth, 837 
Elizabeth, 1139 
Elizabeth, 1328 
Elizabeth, 1346 
Elizabeth, 1517 
Elizabeth, 1832 
Elizabeth, 1839 
Elizabeth, p. 148 
Elizabeth, 2095 
Elizabeth C, 2219 
Elizabeth D., 1480 
Elizabeth L., 1775 

8 Elizabeth Lucy, 2089 

7 Elizabeth N., 1574 
Elizabeth 0., 1552 
Elizabeth S., 1152 
Elizabeth S., 1356 
Ella, 2058 
Ella, 2458 

8 Ella, 2279 
8 Ella Jane, ^ 2213 
8 Ella S., 2163 
8 Ella S., 2237 
8 Ella S., 2238 

6 Ellen, 736 

7 Ellen, 1327 

8 Ellen, 2098 



8 Ellen, 
7 Ellen A., 
7 Ellen A., 
7 Ellen E., 
7 Ellen G., 

7 Ellen G., 

8 Ellen L., 
8 Ellis W., 
8 Ellora E.. 
8 Ellsworth, 
7 Elmer, 

7 Elmira, 

7 Elsey E., 

7 Eraerilla E. A., 

6 Elvira, 

7 Elvira, 
Elvira, 
Elvira M., 
Elvira N., 
Ely Wells, 
Emeline, 
Emeline, 
Emeline A., 
Emeretta, 
Emeretta R., 
Emerson, 
Emerson, 

8 Emigene, 
6 Emily, 

Emily, 
Emily, 
Emily, 
Emily A., 
Emily C., 
Emily E., 
Emily M., 
Emma, 
8 Emma F., 

8 Emma J., 
Emma J., 
Emma L., 
Emma M., 
Emma P., 

9 Emma S., 
5 Enoch, 

5 Enoch, 

6 Enoch, 
6 Enoch, 

6 Enoch, 
8 Enoch, 

7 Enoch C, 
5 Enos, 

4 Ephraim, 

5 Ephraim, 

6 Ephraim, 

7 Ephraim, 

7 Ephraim A., 

5 Erastus, 

6 Erastus, 

6 Erastus, 

7 Erastus S., 



8 
8 
7 
8 



2053 


7 Erie, 


1058 


1487 


8 Estella S., 


p. 132 


1668 


4 Esther, 


63 


1427 


4 Esther, 


112 


1559 


5 Esther, 


187 


1809 


5 Esther, 


316 


p. 141 


5 Esther, 


347 


2360 


6 Esther, 


532 


2223 


6 Esther, 


790 


2324 


7 Esther, 


1083 


1687 


9 Estullah, 


2456 


1592 


6 Ethan C, 


p. 48 


1821 


8 Ethan Davis, 


2256 


1614 


7 Ethan S., 


1357 


898 


8 Etta A.,' 


2358 


1593 


7 Eugene, 


1525 


1748 


8 Eugene H., 


2165 


1194 


8 Eugene E., 


2397 


2265 


4 Eunice, 


100 


1610 


4 Eunice, 


130 


1537 


5 Eunice, 


145 


2122 


5 Eunice, 


223 


1313 


5 Eunice, 


261 


2199 


6 Eunice, 


433 


1737 


6 Eunice, 


472 


p. 50 


6 Eunice, 


481 


1540 


6 Eunice, 


805 


2402 


7 Eunice, 


1049 


916 


7 Eunice, 


1137 


709 


7 Eunice, 


1243 


2063 


8 Eunice, 


1959 


2088 


7 Eunice C, 


1406 


2166 


7 Eunice G., • 


1369 


2177 


5 Eunice L., 


311 


1815 


8 Eunice M., 


2070 


1429 


7 EveHne, 


1037 


1563 


7 Eveline, 


1247 


2160 


8 Everett H., 


ap. 


2273 


4 Experience, 


48 


2315 


5 Experience, 


222 


1931 


5 Experience, 


390 


1695 


6 Experience, 


974 


2357 


4 Ezekiel, 


101 


2475 


5 Ezekiel, 


327 


158 


6 Ezekiel, 


808 


277 


7 Ezekiel B., 


1077 


471 


4 Ezra, 


105 


475 


5 Ezra, 


329 


748 


6 Ezra, 


457 


1976 


6 Ezra, 


816 


1131 


7 Ezra, 


1600 


509 


7 Ezra, 


1602 


128 


7 Ezra, 


1607 


409 


7 Ezra C, 


1497 


1019 


8 Ezra E.^ 


2245 


1894 






1782 






207 


F. 




573 






1016 


8 Fanny, 


2059 


1886 


8 Fanny, 


2106 



43 



334 



INDEX. — PART I. 



9 Fanny A., 
7 Fanny W., 
() Fcstus, 
7 Fidelia, 

7 Flavel P., 

8 Flora M., 

8 Florence E., 

7 Florilla N., 

8 Floyd P., 

6 Frances, 

7 Frances, 

7 Frances D., 

8 Frances E., 

7 Frances J. A., 
7 Frances M., 

7 Frances M., 

8 Frances M., 

6 Francis, 

8 Francis, 

7 Francis A., 
Francis M., 
Fi-ancis M., 
Francis N., 
Francis S., 
Francis U., 
Frank, 

9 Frank N., 

7 Frank S., 

8 Frank W., 

9 Frankie C, 

7 Franklin C, 

8 Franklin D., 
5 Frederick, 

5 Frederick, 
G Frederick, 

6 Frederick, 

7 Frederick, 

7 Frederick, 

8 Frederick, 

9 Frederick, 
9 Frederick, 

Frederick A., 
Frederick C, 
Frederick J., 
Frederick N., 

7 Frederick S., 

8 Frederick W., 

9 Freelove T., 



7 
7 
7 
8 
8 
9 



7 
9 

8 
7 



\ 



G.^ 



\ 5 Gad, 
^ Gad, 

exGad, 

6 Gad, 

4 George, 

5 George, 

6 George, 

6 George, 

7 George, 
7 George, 
7 George, 



2427 
149G 
9G3 
1368 
1274 
2328 
2137 
1428 
2107 
1024 
1100 
1708 
2332 
1772 
1281 
1507 
2006 
944 
2108 
1583 
1624 
1676 
1879 
2416 
2395 
2457 
2484 
1526 
2218 
2467 
1811 
1970 
235 
415 
662 
fc68 
1512 
ap. 
1962 
2459 
2466 
1450 
2489 
2311 
1919 
1444 
2408 
2423 



140 

930 

421 

828 

126 

394 

542 

987 

1114 

1257 

1277 



7 George, 
7 George, 
7 George, 
7 George, 

7 George, 

8 George, 
8 George, 

7 George A., 

8 George A., 

7 George C., 

8 George Dudley, 

9 George D., 
8 George E., 
7 George F., 
7 George F., 

7 George F., 

8 George F., 
7 George G., 
7 George G., 

7 George H., 

8 George H., 
8 George M., 
7 George S., 
7 George W., 
7 George W., 

7 Georgiana, 

8 Georgie Jerome, 
8 Gertrude, 
8 Gertrude E. 
4 Gideon, 

4 Gideon, 

5 Gideon, 
5 Gideon, 

5 Gideon, 

6 Gideon, 
6 Gideon, 

5 Gilbert, 

6 Gilbert, 
8 Gilbert, 
8 Gilbert, 

6 Giles, 

7 Giles, 

6 Giles S., 

7 Giles S., 

8 Giles S., 

6 Gordon, 
G Gordon, 

7 Gordon M., 
7 Gorham, 
7 Graham, 

7 Graham W., 
6 Gratia, 

8 Gratia E., 



H. 

8 H. Adaline, 
6 Hadassah, 
6 Hadassah, 

2 Hannah, 

3 Hannah, 
3 Hannah, 



3d, 



1330 


3 Hannah, 


39 


1795 


4 Hannah, 


43 


1844 


7 Hannah, 


p. 85 


1860 


4 Hannah, 


119 


1877 


4 Hannah, 


131 


1964 


5 Hannah, 


154 


2128 


5 Hannah, 


181 


ap. 


5 Hannah, 


356 


1873 


5 Hannah, 


396 


1690 


6 Hannah, 


462 


1932 


6 Hannah, 


496 


p. 131 


6 Hannah, 


551 


2235 


6 Hannah, 


888 


1425 


6 Hannah, 


1003 


1549 


7 Hannah, 


1154 


1562 


7 Hannah, 


1644 


2380 


7 Hannah A., 


1107 


ap. 


7 Hannah L., 


1700 


1910 


7 Hannah M., 


1348 


1678 


7 Hannah M., 


1613 


2077 


7 Hannah M., 


1836 


2374 


8 Harmon, 


1994 


1805 


6 Harriet, 


757 


1237 


6 Harriet, 


791 


1773 


6 Harriet, 


1034 


1916 


7 Harriet, 


1115 


, 2345 


7 Harriet, 


1252 


2420 


7 Harriet, 


1523 


2221 


7 Harriet, 


1534 


91 


7 Harriet, 


1637 


103 


7 Harriet, 


1747 


247 


7 Harriet, 


1889 


298 


8 Harriet, 


2080 


391 


8 Harriet, 


2126 


700 


8 Harriet, 


2206 


771 


7 Harriet A., 


1504 


p. 19 


7 Harriet A., 


1622 


914 


8 HarrietA., 


1986 


1971 


7 Harriet D., 


1922 


2210 


7 Harriet E., 


1126 


766 


8 Harriet E., 


2018 


1147 


9 Harriet E., 


2422 


1018 


8 Harriet I., 


2233 


1888 


7 Harriet L., 


1472 


2415 


8 Harriet L., 


1991 


959 


7 Harriet S., 


1612 


1006 


8 Harriet S., 


2154 


1864 


7 Harriet W., 


1468 


1067 


7 Harrietta M., 


ap. 


1520 


7 Harry, 


1212 


721 


8 Harry B., 


2419 


442 


7 Harry G., 


1527 


2157 


8 Hart, 


1952 




7 Hart H., 


1063 




6 Harvey, 


758 




6 Harvey, 


1009 




7 Harvey, 


1242 


1990 


7 Harvey D., 


1867 


521 


9 Hattie J., 


p. 131 


869 


9 Heber W., 


2443 


8 


7 Helen, 


1101 


14 


7 Helen, 


1909 


15 


8 Helen, 


2215 



INDEX. — PART I. 



335 



Helen A., 

Helen E., 

Helen L., 

Helen M., 

Helen S., 

Heman, 

Heman, 

Heman, 

Heman, 

Henrietta, 

Henry, 

Henry, 

Henry, 

Henry, 

Henry, 

Henry, 

Henry, 

Henry, 

6 Henry, 

6 Henry, 
Henry, 
Henry, 
Henry, 
Henry, 
Henry, 
Henry, 
Henry, 
Henry, 
Henry, 
Henry A., 
Henry A., 
Henry A., 
Henry A., 
Henry B., 
Henry C, 
Henry D., 
Henry D., 
Henry E., 
Henry G., 
Henry H., 
Henry J., 
Henry L., 
Henry L., 
Henry L., 
Henry M., 
Henry M., 
Henry M., 
Henry M., 
Henry O., 
Henry S. 
Henry S., 
Henry W., 
Henry W., 
Henry W., 
Hepzibah, 
Hepzibah, 

6 Hepzibah, 

7 Hepzibah, 
9 Herbert A., 

7 Herbert S , 

8 Herbert M., 
7 Hervey, 

7 Hervey, 



8 
8 
9 
8 
7 
5 
6 
7 
7 
■7 
2 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 
5 
6 



7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
7 
8 
8 
8 
7 
8 
8 
9 
7 
8 
6 
7 
8 
7 
9 
7 
7 
7 
8 
5 
6 



6 



2189 


8 Hervey, 


2371 


4 Jacob, 


94 


2254 


5 Hezekiah, 


152 


4 Jacob, 


123 


p. 168 


6 Hezekiah, 


449 


6 Jacob, 


976 


1966 


5 Hiram, 


242 


7 Jacob N., 


1721 


1419 


6 Hiram, 


694 


7 Jacob K., 


1733 


274 


7 Hiram, 


1489 


7 Jaman, 


1722 


936 


6 Hitty, 


786 


6 James, 


727 


725 


7 Hoit, 


1202 


6 James, 


759 


1764 


7 Holly, 


1521 


6 James, 


838 


p. 85 


7 Hollister, 


2040 


6 James, 


991 


3 


9 Homer C, 


2429 


7 James, 


1297 


19 


7 Horatio, 


1070 


7 James, 


1639 


22 


7 Horotio E., 


1623 


7 James, 


1643 


52 


6 Horatio N., 


584 


7 James, 


1808 


108 


7 Horatio N., 


1226 


8 James, 


2142 


114 


7 Horatio P., 


1806 


8 James, 


2145 


371 


6 Horace, 


559 


8 James, 


2149 


652 


6 Horace, 


660 


5 James 0., 


342 


722 


7 Horace 


1232 


7 James 0., 


1189 


949 


7 Horace, 


1703 


7 James 0., 


1280 


1051 


8 Horace, Dr. 


1961 


8 James T., 


1979 


1164 


8 Horace, 


2041 


2 Jane, 


p. 2 


1214 


7 Horace B., 


1151 


5 Jane, 


296 


1649 


8 Horffce B., 


2379 


6 Jane, 


743 


1502 


7 Horace E., 


1761 


6 Jane, 


772 


1638 


7 Horace D., 


1488 


6 Jane, 


775 


2048 


7 Horace J., 


1359 


7 Jane, 


1301 


2105 


6 Huldah, 


482 


7 Jane, 


1303 


2207 


6 Huldah, 


804 


7 Jane, 


1882 


1120 


8 Huldah, 


2051 


7 Jane, 


1890 


1926 


6 Huldah W., 


866 


8 Jane, 


1972 


2097 


7 Huma, 


1449 


7 Jane E., 


1415 


2421 


7 Hummiston, 


1295 


7 Jane E., 


2232 


1466 






7 Jane E., 


1906 


2055 


I. 




7 Janette E., 


1191 


688 




2 Japhet, 


2 


1647 


5 Ichabod, 


315 


4 Japhet, 


54 


p. 150 


9 Ida, 


2488 


5 Japhet, 


172 


1820 


8 Ida E., 


2252 


5 Japhet, 


370 


2451 


8 Ida E., 


2406 


6 Japhet, 


505 


1306 


8 Irvin, 


2326 


6 Japhet, 


941 


1554 


4 Isaac, 


121 


7 Japhet, 


1177 


1739 


5 Isaac, 


385 


7 Japhet, 


1179 


2373 


6 Isaac, 


977 


7 Japhet. 


1780 


340 


7 Isaac N., 


1855 


7 Japhet, 


1807 


839 


8 Isaac W., 


1999 


6 Jairus, 


695 


1337 


7 Isabel, 


1076 


6 Jairus, 


744 


1841 


7 Isabella, 


1878 


5 Jason, 


237 


1813 


7 Isabella, 


1913 


6 Jason, Rev. 


661 


p. 148 


8 Isabel G., 


1996 


5 Jathiel, 


276 


1777 


9 Isabel W., 


2424 


5 Jehial, 


331 


1669 


7 Isade A., 


1632 


6 Jehial, 


833 


1800 


5 Israel, 


292 


4 Jemima, 


65 


2159 


6 Israel, 


423 


5 Jemima, 


184 


173 


6 Israel, 


439 


5 Jemima, 


410 


453 


5 Ithamar, 


362 


6 Jemima, 


1007 


847 


5 Ithamar, 


363 


8 Jemima, 


2384 


1155 






8 Jenette, 


2124 


2442 


J. 




5 Jeremiah, 


141 


1568 




5 Jeremiah, 


248 


2037 


4 Jabez, 


60 


6 Jeremiah, 


425 


1542 


5 Jabez, 


192 


6 Jeremiah M., 


431 


1827 


6 Jabez, 


529 


5 Jerusha, 


230 



336 



INDEX. — PART 1. 



(! Jerusha, 48U 

6 Jerusha, 784 
G Jerusha, p. 72 
G Jerusha, 9G4 

5 Jesse, 3G4 
G Jesse, 812 
G Jesse, p. 48 

7 Jesse S., J 192 

8 Jessie, 2U15 

6 Joanna, GG3 
G Joanna, 7J1 
G Joanna, 712 
5 Job, 188 

7 Job W., 1071 
5 Joel, 149 

5 Joel, 189 

6 Joel, 438 

7 Joel, p. 19 
7 Joel, 1057 

3 John, 12 

4 John, 66 

5 John, 197 
5 John, 201 
5 John, 259 

5 John, 344 

6 John, 556 
G John, 569 
6 John, 749 

6 John, 843 

7 John, 1085 
7 John, 1744 
7 John, 1790 

7 John, 1884 

8 John, 1960 

6 John A., 502 

7 John A., 1173 

7 John B., 1857 

8 John B., 2185 
7 John H. P., 1339 
7 John Madison, ]286 
7 JohnM., 1854 

7 JohnM., 1874 

8 JohnM., 2156 
7 JohnO., 1414 
7 John P., 1168 

7 John P., 1872 

8 John P., 2056 

7 John E., Dr. 1362 

8 John Reuben, 1927 
8 JohnK., 2173 
6 Jonas, 998 
3 Jonathan, 17 
3 Jonathan, 18 

3 Jonathan, 41 

4 Jonathan, 97 

5 Jonathan, 283 

6 Jonathan, 434 
6 Jonathan, 803 
6 Jonathan, 815 

6 Jonathan, 921 

7 Jonathan B., 1040 
6 Jonathan E., 810 
4 Joseph, 87 



4 Joseph, 92 

4 Joseph, 111 

4 Joseph, 117 

5 Joseph, 251 
5 Joseph, 300 
5 Joseph, 358 
{] Joseph, 905 
7 Joseph, 1717 
y Joseph, 2310 

7 Joseph A., 1426 
9 Joseph A., 2441 

8 Joseph B., 2171 
7 Joseph C, 1410 

7 Joseph E., 1564 
g Joseph L., 2314 
g Joseph M., p. 48 

8 Josephine, p. 141 
8 Josephine E., 2297 

7 Josephus, 1720 
2 Josiah, 6 

4 Josiah, 89 

5 Josiah, 286 
. r^ Josiah, 287 

Josiah, 1824 

Josiah, 1881 

Josiah B., 1868 

Josiah D., 2405 

Josiah P., 867 

Josiah S., 2378 

5 Jube, 284 

6 Jube, 557 

5 Judah, 294 

8 Judson, 2140 
(3 Julia, 737 
8 Julia A., 2114 

Julia A., 2179 

Julia C, 1788 

Julia C, 1680 

Julia E., 1528 

Julia E., 1691 

Julia M.. 1738 

Julia M., 2083 

Julia M., 2401 

Julia E., 2078 

Julia S., 2188 

Juliann, 1544 

Juliann, 1891 

Julianna, 1848 

Julianna N., 1045 

Juliett, 1566 

Juliett, 1804 

Juliet T., 1317 

Julius, 204 

Julius, 911 

Julius, 1013 

Julius, 1312 

Julius, 1729 

6 Justin, 970 

7 Justin, 1072 

8 Justin D., 2133 
7 JustinaM., 1381 

5 Justus, 245 

6 Justus, 714 



K. 

5 Kezia, 

7 Kezia, 

8 Kibbee V., 



4]3 
1200 

2270 



6 Laertes, 
6 Laura, 
6 Laura, 

6 Laura, 

7 Laura, 
7 Laura, 
7 Laura, 

7 Laura, 

8 Laura A., 
7 Laura J., 
7 Laura S., 
7 Laura S., 

7 Lavinia, 

8 Lawson, 

7 Leander Z., 
6 Lebbeus, 

8 Leila, 

5 Leonard, 

6 Leonard, 
6 Leonard. 

6 Leonard B., 

7 Leonard B., Jr., 
7 Leonard M., 

7 Leonard M., 

7 Leonidas, 

8 Lester V., 
5 Levi, 

5 Levi, 

6 Levi, 

6 Levi, 

7 Levi, 
7 Levi, 

7 Levi L., 
5 Lewis, 

5 Lewis, 

6 Lewis, 

8 Lewis, 

7 Lewis D., 

8 Lindley H., 

8 Lizzie, 

9 Lizzie H., 
8 Lizzie J.. 

7 Lizzie M., 

8 Lizzie S., 

7 Loan A., 

8 Lodie, 

7 Loarissa B., 

7 Lockey, 

5 Lois, 

6 Lois, 
6 Lois, 
6 Lois, 

8 Lois Ann, 



777 

424 

782 

787 

1203 

1167 

1251 

1605 

1941 

1557 

1561 

1685 

1656 

2067 

1657 

917 

2118 

162 

477 

487 

468 

1129 

1121 

1122 

1127 

2085 

159 

359 

794 

906 

1723 

1726 

1109 

312 

788 

903 

2227 

1698 

2417 

2060 

2485 

2346 

1803 

2319 

1793 

2341 

1616 

1447 

322 

436 

p. 50 

818 

2130 



INDEX. — PART I, 



337 



7 Lois E., 


162G 


5 


Lucy, 


199 


M. 




7 Lois M., 


1609 


5 


Lucy, 


257 






8 Loomis E., 


2320 


5 


Lucy, 


270 


6 Mahala, 


857 


6 Lorenzo, 


467 


5 


Lucy, 


349 


7 Mahala, 


1797 


6 Lorenzo, 


582 


6 


Lucy, 


511 


7 Mahala J., 


1683 


7 Lorenzo, 


113U 


(5 


Lucy, 


626 


7 JIalina, 


1718 


8 Lorenzo B., 


2119 


6 


Lucy, 


915 


6 Malviua J., 


665 


7 Loring D., 


1042 


7 


Lucy, 


1223 


8 Manfred, 


2005 


8 Loring D., 


1928 


7 


Lucy, 


1231 


6 Manly, 


465 


8 Loring D., 


1933 


7 


Lucy, 


1258 


7 Manley, 


1098 


8 Lottie C, 


2321 


7 


Lucy, 


1290 1 


7 Manly, 


1108 


8 Lottie, 


2414 


7 


Lucy, 


1325 1 


7 Marchia, 


1697 


6 Louis, 


687 


8 


Lucy, 


2136 


8 Marcia W., 


2164 


7 Louis S., 


1482 


7 


Lucy, 


1379 


6 Marcus, 


925 


7 Louisa, 


1208 


8 


Lucy. 


2089 


6 Marcus, 


1074 


7 Louisa, 


1897 


7 


Lucy Ann, 


1918 


7 Marcus, 


1689 


8 Louisa, 


1965 


7 


Lucy A., 


1705 


6 ilarcy. 


978 


9 Louisa, 


p. 168 


8 


Lucy A., 


2099 


4 Margaret, 


113 


8 Louisa J., 


1995 


6 


Lucy Doolittle, 


1030 


5 Margaret, 


146 


7 Louisa M., 


1092 


7 


Lucy D., 


1752 


5 Margaret, 


341 


7 Louisa P., 


1443 


7 


Lucy E., 


1652 


5 Margaret, 


348 


7 Louisa P., 


1801 


7 


Lucy J., 


1412 


6 Margaret, 


555 


8 Louisa W., 


2057 


6 


Lucy L., 


586 


6 Margaret. 


620 


(j Love, 


716 


9 Lucy M., 


2480 


7 ^largaret. 


1078 


7 Love, 


1510 


7 


Lucy W., 


ap. 


7 Margaret, 


1901 


7 Lovica, 


1261 


6 Luke, 


989 


8 Margaret D., 


2333 


6 Lovica, 


430 


6 


Luna, 


563 


5 Maria, 


.350 


7 Lovica, 


1249 


8 


Lura S., 


2390 


6 ilaria. 


858 


6 Lovica, 


541 


5 


Luther, 


170 


6 Maria, 


870 


5 Lovica, 


403 


5 


Luther, 


275 


6 Maria, 


892 


5 Lovina, 


401 


(i Luther. 


928 


7 Maria, 


1089 


7 Lovina, 


1781 


7 


Luther, 


1183 


7 Maria, 


1099 


8 Lovina, 


2144 


7 


Luther, 


p. 154 


7 Maria, 


1123 


8 Lovincia M., 


2398 


8 


Luther, 


2(j66 


7 Maria, 


1135 


7 Lovira, 


1920 


8 


Luther D., 


207 1 


7 Maria, 


p. 85 


5 Lovisa, 


258 


7 


Luther ¥., 


1584 


7 Maria. 


1326 


7 Lovisa, 


1213 


3 


Lydia, 


36 


7 Maria, 


p. 99 


8 Lovisa, 


2096 


4 


Lydia, 


51 


7 Maria, 


1516 


7 Lovisa C, 


1323 


4 Lydia, 


107 


7 Maria, 


1538 


7 Lovisa C, 


1363 


4 


Lydia, 


132 


7 Maria, 


1646 


7 Lovisa Cooley, 


1366 


5 


Lydia, 


416 


7 Maria, 


1796 


8 Louisa E., 


2180 


6 


Lydia, 


517 


8 Maria, 


2043 


7 Lucas B., 


1269 


6 


Lydia, 


475 


8 Maria, 


2065 


7 Lucas E., 


1713 


6 


Lydia. 


p. 5] 


8 Maria, 


2102 


6 Lucina, 


686 


7 


Lydia, 


1079 


8 Maria, 


2343 


6 Lucina, 


937 


7 


Lydia, 


1596 


7 Maria A., 


1798 


7 Lucina, 


1161 


7 


Lydia A., 


18.53 


7 Maria A., 


1802 


7 Lucina, 


1174 


7 


Lydia J., 


1789 


9 Maria A., 


2446 


8 Lucina, 


2229 


8 


Lydia .J., 


2327 


7 Maria M., 


1621 


6 Lucinda, 


769 


8 


Lvdia S., 


2072 


7 Maria M., 


1896 


6 Lucinda, 


975 


6 


Lydia Todd, 


1029 


8 Maria M., 


2282 


7 Lucinda, 


1513 


6 


Lyman, 


565 


7 Maria W., 


1463 


7 Lucinda, 


1658 


6 


Lyman, 


585 


7 Mariann, 


1375 


7 Lucinda C, 


. 1044 


7 


Lyman, 


1702 


7 Mariett, 


1887 


5 Lucretia, 


306 


7 


Lyman A., 


1332 


9 Marion, 


2460 


7 Lucretia, 


1265 


7 


Lyman D., 


1471 


7 Marsha, 


1352 


7 Lucretia, 


1445 


7 


Lyman E., 


1278 


7 Marshall, 


1068 


5 Lucius, 


307 


7 


Lyman K., 


p. 147 


8 Marshall P., 


1985 


7 Lucius, 


1073 


7 


Lyna P., 


1238 


8 Marshall W., 


1968 


8 Lucius D., 


2391 


7 


Lysander, 


1211 


4 Martha, 


62 


8 Lucius P., 


1989 


7 


Lysander, 


1829 


5 Martha, 


174 


8 Lucius T., 


1318 













44 



338 



INDEX. — I'AUT 1. 



5 Miiitlia, 

5 Martliii, 

6 JSlaitlia, 

7 Martha, 

7 Martha, 

8 Martha, 

7 Martlia A., 

Martlia A., 

Martha A., 

Martlia A., 

Martha ]?., 

Martlia E., 

Martha G., 

A[artha J., 

Martha J., 

Martha K., 

Martha T., 

Martin, 
(5 Martin, 

Martin, 

Martin P., 

Marvin, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

JMary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

iSIary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 
6 Mary, 
6 Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Maiy, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 

Mary, 



368 

372 

713 

1818 

1858 

2054 

1424 

1645 

17J'J 

19<»2 

1982 

2248 

840 

1692 

2309 

1336 

1494 

386 

969 

1828 

p. 54 

1353 

45 

49 

109 

129 

137 

143 

219 

256 

318 

338 

367 

432 

504 

558 

591 

678 

719 

738 

745 

764 

778 

846 

856 

894 

907 

.955 

1535 

1166 

1176 

1224 

1233 

1302 

1308 

1345 

1391 

1446 

1514 

1572 

1640 

1677 



8 Mary, 

8 Mary, 

8 Mary, 

8 Mary, 
8 Mary, 

8 Mary, 

9 Mary, 

7 Mary A., 

7 Mary A., 

7 Mary A., 

8 Mary A., 
8 Mary A., 
8 Mary A., 
8 Mary A., 

7 Mary B., 

8 Mary Caroline, 
8 Mary D., 

8 Mary D. Ette, 

7 Mary E., 

7 Mary E., 

8 Mary E., 
8 Mary E., 
8 Mary E., 
8 Mary E., 

8 Mary E. A., 

8 Mary F., 

8 Maryette, 

8 Mary L, 

7 Mary J., 

7 Mary J., 

8 Mary J., 
8 Mary J., 

7 Mary L., 

8 Mary L., 

9 Mary L., 
7 Mary M., 
7 Mary M., 

7 Mary M., 

8 Mary M., 

7 Mary R. D., 

6 Mary S , 

7 Mary S., 

7 Mary S., 

8 Mary S., 

6 Mary T., 

7 Mar'y T., 

9 Mary Uretta, 
7 Mary W., 

7 Mary W., 

6 Matilda, 

4 Mehitable, 

5 Mehitable, 

5 Mehitable, 

7 Mehitable, 

6 Melia, 

6 Melinda, 

7 Melissa, 

5 Mercy, 
7 Mercy, 

7 Mercy H., 

6 Merrick, 

7 Merrick W., 



1903 


8 Milo, 


2111 


2050 


7 Milo H., 


1560 


2061 


6 Milton, 


948 


2104 


K Milton, 


1951 


2209 


5 Mindwell, 


288 


2387 


5 Miiidvvell, 


319 


p. 168 


<i Mindwell, 


p. 50 


12(i0 


6 Minerva, 


740 


]8()3 


7 Minerva, 


1585 


19J1 


7 Minerva, 


1654 


1944 


7 Miranda, 


1218 


1975 


7 Miranda, 


2100 


2113 


4 Miriam, 


67 


22(12 


5 Miriam, 


157 


1543 


6 Miriam, 


484 


p. 157 


6 Miriam, 


746 


2155 


6 Miriam, 


1138 


2094 


7 Miriam, 


1311 


1555 


7 Miriam M., 


1421 


1814 


7 Morris, 


1725 


1666 


4 Moses, 


77 


1981 


5 Moses, 


186 


2076 


6 Moses, 


520 


2377 


6 Moses, 


647 


2250 


6 Moses, 


679 


2220 


Moses, 


715 


2045 


7 Moses, 


1088 


ap. 


7 Moses, 


1201 


1917 


5 Moses A., 


236 


1783 


9 Moses S., 


2464 


1987 


8 Moses W., 


2079 


2249 


7 Munro, 


1661 


1696 


6 Myron, 


795 


2183 


8 Myron E., 


p. 158 


2432 






1 038 






1039 






1799 






2240 


'N. 




1924 






1020 






p. 75 


8 N. Aug^usta, 


• 2325 


1483 


6 Nancy, 


560 


2226 


7 Nancy, 


1762 


644 


7 Nancy, 


1785 


1627 


7 Nancy C, 


1140 


2486 


8 Nancy E., 


1977 


1335 


7 Nancy P., 


1835 


1495 


7 Naomi, 


1319 


980 


7 Naomi, 


1817 


90 


5 Nathan, 


175 


290 


6 Nathan. 


506 


320 


7 Nathan C, 


15.56 


1160 


7 Nathan P., 


1055 


567 


4 Nathaniel, 


■ 58 


512 


5 Nathaniel, 


190 


1715 


6 Nathaniel, 


528 


392 


7 Nathaniel, 


1221 


1750 


7 Nathaniel F., 


1405 


1751 


6 Nathaniel M., 


864 


932 


7 Nathaniel AV., 


1094 


1041 


6 Nellie, 


452 



INDEX. — PART 1. 



339 



7 Nellie, 

8 Nellie B., 
Nelson, 
Nelson, 
Neri, 

Newman A., 
Newton, 
Neuman, 

7 Neuman S., 

4 Noah, 

5 Noah, 

6 Noah, 

6 Noah A., 

7 Norman, 

8 Norman, 

6 Norman J., 
8 Norris E., 
8 Novatus N., 



0. 



1681 

p. 158 

1062 

1936 

875 
1579 
1753 
1771 
1264 
74 

224 
p. 48 

666 
1746 
1993 
p. 48 
2073 
2271 



5 Obed, 


282 


6 Obadiah, 


540 


7 Obadiah, 


1250 


8 Ogden, 


2016 


7 Ogden N., 


1132 


7 Ogden N., 


1133 


5 Olive, 


262 


6 Olive, 


939 


8 Olive L., 


2403 


5 Oliver, 


285 


5 Oliver, 


221 


5 Oliver, 


249 


5 Oliver, 


269 


5 Oliver, 


289 


6 Oliver, 


443 


6 Oliver, 


590 


6 Oliver, 


754 


6 Oliver, 


845 


6 Oliver, 


p. 48 


6 Oliver, 


851 


6 Oliver, 


p. 48 


6 Ohver C, 


731 


7 Oliver, 


1061 


7 Oliver, 


1113 


7 Oliver, 


1390 


7 Oliver, 


p. 99 


7 Oliver, 


1539 


7 Oliver, 


1653 


7 Ophelia C, 


p. 105 


6 Oral, 


1008 


7 Oral, 


1531 


7 Orange, 


1199 


9 Orange W., 


2463 


8 Oriett, 


2152 


8 Orphelia S., 


2231 


6 Orphia, 


428 


5 Orlando, 


205 


6 Orlando, 


581 


6 Orlando, 


651 



7 Orlando, 
7 Orlando, 

6 Orramel, 

7 Orramel S., 
7 Orilla, 

6 Orrin, 

6 Orrin, 

7 Orrin, 

6 Orinda, 

7 Orson, 

7 Orynthia, 
7 Oscar, 

6 Otis, 

7 Otis, 
7 Otis, 

6 Otway, 



6 Pamela, 

7 Pamela A., 
7 Pamelia, 

7 Pamelia, 
7 Pamelia, 
7 Parker T., 

5 Parmelia, 

6 Parmenus, 
6 Parnel, 

6 Pattv, 

5 Paul, 

7 Pascal P., 

7 Pascal P., 

8 Pascal P., 

6 Peletiah, 

6 Perez, 

7 Perez, 

8 Perez, 
8 Perez, 

6 Perhna, 
t> Persis, 
6 Persis, 

6 Persis, 
^ Persis, 

7 Persis, 
7 Persis, 
"5 Persis, 
•^ Phares, 
5 Phebe, 

5 Phebe. 
(J Phebe, 

6 Phebe, 
G Phebe, 
6 Phebe, 

6 Phebe, 

7 Phebe, 

B Phebe A., 
7 Phebe E.. 

6 Phene, 

7 Phene E., 

8 Phene E., 

5 Philana, 

6 Philanda, 



1180 
1756 
1025 
1846 
1082 
p. 36 

820 
1595 
p. 48 
1904 
1206 
1699 

566 

707 
1047 

554 



968 

1402 

1227 

1272 

1845 

1452 

206 

922 

972 

924 

361 

1170 

1586 

2241 

488 

491 

1148 

2039 

2049 

831 

537 

973 

p. 48 

900 

708 

1728 

2368 

194 

280 

271 

750 

789 

908 

986 

992 

1298 

2253 

1420 

562 

1763 

2334 

375 

893 



7 Philena, 
9 Philetta, 
6 Philip, 

8 Philip, 
6 Philo, 

6 Philomela, 

6 Philara, 

4 Phineas, 
Phineas, 
Phineas, 
Phineas, 
Phineas, 
Phineas, 
Phineas, 
Phineas, 
Phineas L. 
Pliny, 
Pliny, 

6 Pliny, 

6 Polly, 

6 Polly, 

" Polly, 
Polly, 
Prentice, 
Priscilla, 
Priscilla, 
Pulaski, 



Q- 



6 Quartus, 

7 Quartus H., 



R. 

4 Rachel, 

5 Kachel, 

6 Rachel, 

7 Rachel, 
6 Ralph, 
6 Ralph, 

6 Ralph, 

7 Ralph, 

9 Ralph H., 

6 Ralph S., 

7 Rasselas M., 
4 Rebecca, 

6 Rebecca, 
6 Rebecca, 

6 Rebecca, 

7 Rebecca, 

7 Rebecca W., 
6 Rectus, 

6 Redexalana, 

7 Redexa, 

4 Reuben, 

5 Reuben, 

6 Reuben, 

6 Reuben, Rev. 

7 Reuben, 

7 Reuben S., Dr. 



J 255 

2447 

920 

2217 

583 

656 

781 

68 

84 

195 

233 

265 

552 

648 

718 

1385 

203 

579 

943 

536 

568 

1141 

1650 

1172 

1386 

1823 

1603 



901 
1707 



72 
279 
747 

1606 
733 
859 
995 

1165 

2439 
861 

1046 
104 

p. 32 
699 
909 

1080 

1498 
891 
809 

1576 

80 

142 

435 

623 

1642 

1364 



340 



INDEX. PART I. 



7 Reuben W., 


p. G9 


7 Sally, 


1.589 


8 


5 Klioda, 


17G 


7 Sally Ann, 


1350 


8 


5 Klioda, 


2G8 


8 Sally A., 


p. 148 


8 


5 Rlioda, 


405 


6 Sally W., 


1095 


7 


() Klioda, 


852 


1 Samuel, 


J 


7 


() Khoda, 


988 


3 Sanmel, 


9 


8 


7 Ivlioda, 


115G 


4 Samuel, 


46 


8 


7 liliodolphus, 


1587 


5 Samuel, 


160 


8 


Richard Clinton 


, 24G5 


5 Samuel, 


226 


5 


y Rilnna 0., 


24G2 


5 Samuel, 


351 


6 


G Riley, 


486 


G Samuel, 


417 


7 


8 Robert, 


2418 


6 Samuel, 


419 


8 


G Robbins, Mrs. 


785 


6 Samuel, 


622 


6 


8 Robert A. H., 


2187 


6 Samuel, 


696 


7 


8 Robert H., 


2014 


G Samuel. 


880 


7 


7 Robert M., 


1842 


7 Samuel. 


1667 


4 


5 Roderick, 


343 


7 Samuel, 


1915 


4 


6 Roderick, 


842 


7 Samuel B , 


1767 


5 


8 Rodney, 


21U9 


8 Samuel B., 


2261) 


6 


8 Rosaline, 


2131 


5 Samuel D., 


239 


G 


7 Rosaline A., 


1617 


6 Sanuiel D., 


689 


7 


7 Rosamond, 


1G29 


8 Samuel Davis, 


ap. 


7 


7 Rosina 


1825 


7 Sanuiel H., 


1377 


8 


7 Rosina, 


1862 


7 Samuel L., 


1774 


6 


G Roswell, 


510 


7 Samuel M., 


1270 


7 


7 Roswell, 


1186 


7 Samuel W , 


1064 


7 


7 Roswell, 


1222 


7 Sanmel W., 


1577 


7 


7 Roswell L., 


1541 


7 Samuel W., 


1880 


7 


7 Roxany, 


1146 


8 Samuel W., 


1953 


7 


7 Roxany, 


1354 


2 Sarah, 


7 


5 


8 Roxany, 


2046 


3 Sarah, 


10 


6 


8 Roxany E., 


2087 


3 Sarah, 


20 


7 


5 Roxany S., 


406 


3 Sarah, 


38 


8 


7 Royal, 


p. 71 


4 Sarah, 


57 


7 


7 :^hua, 


1378 


4 Sarah, 


64 


2 


G Ruey, 


9J3 


4 Sarah, 


85 


4 


G Rufus, 


507 


4 Sarah, 


125 


6 


G Rufus, 


524 


5 Sarah, 


180 


7 


G Rufus, 


965 


5 Sarah, 


220 


5 


7 Rufus, 


1060 


5 Sarah, 


255 


6 


7 Ruhema, 


1198 


5 Sarah, 


260 


(i 


4 Ituth, 


139 


5 Sarali, 


326 


6 


5 Ruth, 


217 


t> Sarah, 


760 


6 


5 Ruth, 


232 


6 Sarah, 


516 


7 


5 Ruth, 


2G7 


^3 Sarah, 


519 


7 


G Ruth, 


454 


<j Sarah, 


535 


7 


G Ruth, 


649 


<i Sarah, 


587 


6 


G Ruth, 


669 


6 Sarah, 


698 


6 


7 Ruth, 


1448 


6 Sarah, 


p. 36 


7 


7 Ruth, 


1511 


7 Sarah, 


1142 


9 


8 Ruth, 


2139 


7 Sarah, 


1309 


7 


G Ruth L., 


664 


7 Sarah, 


1453 


7 






8 Sarah, 


1946 


5 






8 Sarah, 


1984 


6 


S. 




^ Sarah, 


2121 


7 






o Sarah A., 


164 


6 


6 Sabra, 


455 


7 Sarah Ann, 


p. 99 


5 


G Sabrina, 


545 


7 Sarah C, 


1411 


6 


8 Sabrina 0., 


2268 


8 Sarah D., 


2246 


6 


7 Sabrina W., 


1190 


7 Sarah E., 


1486 


6 


G Sally, 


451 


7 Sarah J.. 


1709 


6 


G Sally, 


912 


7 Sarah J., 


1778 


7 


7 Sally, 


1052 


8 Sarah J., 


1943 


5 



Sarah .1., 2019 

Sarah ■!., 2369 

Sarah J., 2372 

Sarah M., I837 

Sarah O., 1171 

Sarah O.. 2269 

Sarah \V., 2335 

Sarah Yale, 24 JO 

Selah, 1.56 

Selah, 460 

Selah. 3d, lOUG 

Selwyn Jackson, 2259 

Semantha, 897 

Sumantlia, it^'M) 

Sereneus, 11]] 

Setli, 75 

Seth, 116 

Seth, 354 

Seth, 621 

Seth, 876 

Seth, 1065 

Seth, 1688 

Setli, 1969 

Seth D., 683 

Seth D., 1388 

Seth D., 1475 

Seth P., 1334 

Seth Stacy, 135] 

Seth Smith, 1365 

Sewell, 161 

Sewell, 476 

Seymour, 1893 

Sharon W., 2116 

Sharon P., 1236 

Shem, p. 2 

Slieni, 56 

Shelden, 564 

Sherman S., 1196 

Sibyl, 24] 

Sibyl. 526 

Sibyl, 485 

Sibyl, 53] 

Sibyl, p. 48 

Sibyl, 1216 

Sibyl, 1490 

Sybel L., 1682 

Sidney, 792 

Sidney, 947 

Sidney, 1569 

Sidney, 2461 

Sidney M„ 171-7 

Sidney P., 1674 

Silas, 198 

Silas, p. 48 

Silas, 1757 

Silas W., 865 

Simeon, 177 

Simeon, 513 

Simeon, 518 

Simeon, 530 

Simeon, 895 

Simeon S., 1193 

Solomon, 297 



INDEX. — PART I, 



341 



5 Solomon, 

6 Solomon, 
6 Solomon, 
6 Solomon, 

6 Solomon, 

7 Solomon, 

7 Solomon, 

8 Solomon E 

5 Sophia, 

6 Sophia, 
6 Sophia, 
6 Sophia, 
G Sophia, 

6 Sophia, 

7 Sophia, 
7 Sophia, 
7 Sophia, 

7 Sophia, 

8 Sophia, 

(j Sophrouia, 



D., 



Sophronia, 

Sophronia, 

Sophvonia, 

Spencer A., 

Statira, 

Stephen, 

6 Stephen, 

7 Stephen, 

8 Stephen, 

G Stephen M., 

Stephen M., 

Stillinan, 

Submit, 

Submit, 

iSubmit, 

6 Submit, 
G Sumner, 
G Susan, 

G Susan, 

G Susan, 

Susan, 

Susan A., 

Susan A., 

Susan C, 

Susan C, 

7 Susan L., 

8 Susan L., 
7 Susan M., 
7 Susan M., 

7 Susan R., 

8 Susan R., 
5 Susannah, 

5 Susanna, 
G Susannah, 

6 Sylvanus, 

7 Sylvanus, 

6 Sylvester, 

8 Sj'lvester, 
G Sylvia, 

7 Sylvia, 

7 Sylvia, 

8 Sylvia M., 



398 

441 

979 

983 

996 

1054 

1856 

1942 

163 

650 

728 

756 

902 

1017 

1053 

1144 

1149 

1382 

2044 

543 

1185 

1245 

1380 

2382 

1128 

69 

570 

1296 

2148 

578 

1320 

1182 

144 

155 

437 

593 

1014 

577 

848 

863 

1648 

1322 

1905 

1836 

). 139 

1547 

2172 

1550 

1672 

1619 

2263 

321 

324 

458 

493 

1157 

1033 

2069 

466 

1090 

1097 

1973 

45 



T. 



5 Tabitha, 
5 Tabitha, 
5 Tabitha, 

5 Thaddeus, 

6 Thaddeus, 
5 Thankful, 
5 Thankful, 
5 Thankful, 

5 Thankful, 

6 Thankful, 
6 Thankful, 

6 Thankful, 

7 Thankful, 

8 Thankful A., 
6 Theodore, 

6 Theodore, 
6 Theodore. 

6 Theodore, 

7 Theodore, 

7 Theodore, 

8 Theodore, 

9 Theodore, 

7 Theodore B., 

7 Theodore B., 

8 Theodore B., 
7 Theodore D., 

7 Theodore L., 
6 Therissa, 

8 Therissa P., 
3 
4 
5 
G 
6 



Thomas, 

Thomas, 

Thomas, 

Thomas, 

Thomas, 
6 Thomas, 
6 Thomas, 
6 Thomas, 

6 Thomas, 

7 Thomas, 
7 Thomas, 

7 Thomas, 

8 Thomas E , 
7 Thomas J., 
6 Thomas P., 

6 Thomas T., 

7 Thomas W., 
6 Ticrcy, 

4 Timothy, 

5 Timothy, 

5 Timothy, 

6 Timothy, 
6 Timothy, 

5 Tirza, 
G Tirza, 

6 Tirza, 

7 Titus, 

8 Titus, 

7 Titus B., 
5 Triphena, 



218 

373 

374 

213 

950 

169 

171 

302 

395 

514 

990 

1002 

1153 

1978 

426 

571 

966 

1028 

1299 

1515 

2013 

2452 

1371 

1914 

2198 

1470 

1711 

576 

2134 

11 

53 

168 

494 

497 

498 

539 

726 

742 

1241 

1246 

1582 

2020 

1136 

773 

p. 48 

1712 

824 

106 

p. 19 

330 

352 

827 

402 

480 

958 

1210 

2086 

1321 

299 



5 Triphena, 

6 Triphena, 

6 Triphena, 

7 Truman D., 



u. 



383 
832 
961 

1598 



6 Ulrica, 


549 


3 Union, 


42 


6 Uriel, 


495 


7 Uriel, 


1162 


6 Ursula, 


834 



7 Vashni, 


1660 


5 Vashti, 


393 


G Vashtia, 


997 


7 Velona H., 


1508 


6 Verannus, 


946 


6 Vestus, 


p. 48 


8 Verus, 


2132 


7 Vinela L., 


1324 



w. 

8 Wallace W., 2151 

6 Walter Eev., 971 

7 Walter E., 1840 

9 Walter F., 2445 

8 Walter H., 2376 
7 Warner, 1673 

6 Warren, 572 

7 Warren, 1305 
7 Warren, 1580 
7 Warren, 1834 

6 Warren B., 862 

7 AVarren D., 1287 

6 Wells, 819 

8 Wells C, 2216 

7 Wells M., 1892 
7 Weltha, 17J6 

6 Whitfield, 940 

7 Whitman, 1205 

8 Wilbur B., p. 158 
8 Wilbur T., 2230 
6 Willard, 844 

4 William, 118 

5 William, 3B9 
5 AVilliam, 387 

5 William, 389 

6 William, 927 
6 William, 935 
6 William, 952 

6 William, 985 

7 William, 724 
7 William, 1050 
7 William, 1116 



342 



INDEX. — PAUT I. 



7 William, 1225 

7 William, 1597 

8 Willard Parker, 2178 
7 William, 1843 
7 William, 1852 

7 William, 1885 

8 William, 1935 
8 William, 1949 
8 William, 2115 
8 William, 2284 
8 William, 2400 

6 William A., 655 

7 William A., 1409 

7 William A., 1433 

8 William A., 2186 

7 William D., 1754 

8 William E., 2224 
8 William F., ap. 
8 William H., 2167 
8 William H., 2267 
8 William H., 2385 



8 William H., 


2386 


7 Willis K., 


1679 


9 William H., 


2474 


6 Wolcott, 


774 


8 William H. D. 


, 2104 






8 William M., 


2329 






8 William N., 


p. 157 


z. 




8 William N., 


p. 157 






7 William 0., 


1387 


5 Zadock, 


380 


7 William S., 


1279 


7 Zalmon, 


J 075 


8 William U., 


2399 


6 Zalmana, 


445 


6 W^illiam W., 


723 


5 Zebulon, 


388 


6 William W., 


872 


6 Zebulon, 


p. 64 


7 William W., 


1340 


7 Zebulon, 


1847 


7 William W., 


1484 


6 Zelotes, 


550 


8 William W., 


2112 


7 Zelotes, 


1590 


9 Willie Emerson, 2425 


5 Zenas, 


355 


8 Willie F., 


2228 


5 Zerah, 


' 357 


8 Willie J., 


2312 


7 Zerah, 


1732 


8 Willie McKins 


try ,2331 


4 Zeruiah, 


102 


7 Willie N., 


1694 


6 Zerviah, 


574 


7 Willis, 


1670 


7 Zeruiah, 


1826 



INDEX TO NAMES IN PART I. WHO ARE CONNECTED WITH 
CHAPINS BY MARRIAGE, AND OF THEIR DESCENDANTS. 

The figures at the left hand denote the number of tlie Generation. The same 
rule is adopted in regard to numbering and paging as in the Index to names of 
Chapins. 



G. 



Names. 



Nos. 



A. 



4 Abbee Sarah, 58 
7 Harriet J., 1131 

5 Abigail, 140 
7 Abbot Eliza A., 1362 
5 Ackland Hannah, 275 
7 Adams Edwin, 1848 

5 Ellen, 269 

6 Polly, 849 

6 Sally, 814 

7 Adsit James M., 1905 

8 Alden Chas. W., 2390 
5 Alfred John B., 238 
5 Allen Mr., 374 
5 Abel, 216 
5 Asenath, 305 

5 Elizabeth, 249 
7 Harriet, 1136 

6 Joseph, 511 

7 Horace, 1185 

7 Mr., 1187 

8 Mary, p. 80 

6 Moses, 532 

7 James, p. 73 
7 Jerusha, 1119 
7 John, 1117 
7 Julia, p. 99 
7 Simeon, 1118 
6 Sophia, 944 



Gr. Names. Noa. 

6 Solomon, 464 

7 Luman, 1245 

4 Tabitha, 115 
7 Roxana, 1066 
6 Rev. William, 661 
6 Allerton Caroline, 823 
6 AUis Epaphroditus,912 
6 Oliver, 610 
6 Samuel, 663 

6 Alvord Justin, 436 

7 Ambler Alstead, 1585 

5 Amesden John, J68 

8 Anderson A. Jr., 1981 

9 Edward, 24.50 
9 Emma, 2449 

6 Andrews AbigailC, 875 
6 Archer Hannah, 872 

5 Arms Joanna, 234 

6 Armstrong Daniel, 873 
6 Arnold Hubbard, 593 
6 Ashley Enoch, 485 
6 Martin, 1833 



B. 

8 Babcock B. C. 2340 

7 Courtland, 1760 

8 Courtland C, 2338 



G 

8 
8 
6 
7 
7 
7 
7 
6 
7 
7 
7 
7 
6 
7 
6 
6 
7 
7 
4 



Names. Nos 

BabcockHemanC.2339 

Henry H., 2337 

Bainbridge Patty, p.99 

Baker Abiah C, 1398 



Charles, 

Elizabeth, 

Emily, 

James, 

James, 

Martin, 

Mary, 

Pamelia, 

Salem, 



1400 
1393 
1394 
■ 650 
1396 
1399 
1397 
1399 
4.58 



Balch N. A., Esq. 1837 

Ball Elizabeth, .572 

Mareb, 572 

Stephen, 1831 

Sylvester, 1878 

Bancroft Isaac, 107 
7 Bannon Susan, 1274 

5 Barber Abigail, 357 

6 Flavia, 806 

7 Mr., 1395 
7 Bard Mary, 1124 

6 Bardwell Miss 917 

7 Polly, 1847 
6 Bartlett Edwin, 1534 
5 Eunice, 325 
5 Heman, 910 



INDEX. — PART I. 



343 



6 Bavtlett Martha, 905 

5 Mehetable, 214 

5 Sarah, 242 

6 Titus, , 577 

6 Wait, 840 

7 Edwin A., 1316 
7 Juliet T., 1317 
7 Barton Hannah, 1073 

5 Bascom Rebecca, 151 

6 Eeuben, 646 

6 Eeuben, 656 

7 "William, 1373 
7 Carlos L., 1416 
7 Elizabeth C, 1372 
7 Henry M., 1417 
7 Mary L., 1374 
7 Philomela C, 1418 

7 Bassett Mary L., 1554 

6 Beach Lyclia, 495 

8 Beals Elizabeth, 1328 
8 George, 1330 

7 Mr., 1327 

8 Harriet, 1329 
8 Louisa, 1331 
6 Beardsley Achsa, 693 
6 Horace, 691 
6 Laurinda, 690 

6 Lucius, 692 
5 Beament Lois, 329 

5 Ursula, 331 

7 Bean Mr., 1796 

6 Beard David, 730 
G Minerva, 461 

5 Beardsley N., Rev. 239 

7 Bebee Mr., 1301 

6 Beckwith Benj'n, 7J2 

7 P. L., 1045 

5 Bedortha Lydia, 198 
4 Belding Lydia, 54 
7 Bemis Wm. L., 1369 
G Bennett Cynthia, 812 

7 Cassauibre, 1235 

8 ElihuChapin,2244 
8 Geo. Austin, 2242 
8 SarahMinerva,2242 
7 William, 1589 

6 Benton Eunice, 624 

7 Bif^elow Almira, 1642 

4 Billings Mr., 109 

5 Bingham Caleb, p. 23 
7 Birdsey Mr., 1187 

7 Bissell Mr., 1100 

6 Blackmer Emily A.,579 

8 Blake Alice, 1284 
G Charlotte, 1012 
8 Julia, 1285 

7 E. Judson, 1276 

8 Harriet C, 1283 
8 William S., 1282 
4 Bliss Abel, 6.5 
8 Curtis, 2135 
4 Elizabeth, 75 
3 . Esther, 22 



8 Bliss Lucy, 2136 

3 Margaret, 25 

3 Mary, 26 

5 Moses, 400 

2 Nathaniel, 4 

3 Nathaniel, 27 

3 Samuel, 24 

4 Samuel, 110 
7 Seth, Jr., 1289 

6 William, 908 

7 William, 1901 

7 Adelaide L., 2305 

8 Everette J., 2303 

7 Joel K, 1719 

8 Joseph A., 2306 
7 Julia M., 2307 

7 Mary C, 1866 

8 S. Eugene, 2304 
8 Lizzie L., 2308 

7 Bogardus Mr., 1152 

5 Boothe Mary. 292 

8 Bouk Emehne, 2380 
8 Harriet, 2379 

6 Boyhston Samuel, 919 
6 Brackenage Mr., 984 

6 Bracket Mary J., 1036 

7 Bradway Naomi, 1657 

7 BrazeltonAchinis,16l2 

8 B. W., p. 107 

6 Breck Mercy, 434 

7 Breed Fanny, 1620 

6 Bridges Kezia, 985 
3 Bridgman Sarah, 12 

8 Brigham L. A., 2297 
8 BrinsmadeJohnC.2411 
8 Anna J^., 2412 

7 William B., 1871 

8 Wm. Gold, 2413 
6 Brooks Eunice, 941 
8 Mary J., 2292 
6 Brown Collins, 555 
6 Cyrus, p. 27 
6 Dorcas, p. 27 
6' Elihu, 756 
6 Esther, p. 27 

6 Francis, p. 27 

7 Lockwood, p. 85 

8 Lucinda, 2108 
7 Thomas, 1920 

5 Timothy, 347 

6 Timothy, p. 27 

7 William, 1498 

8 Zuah Rebecca,1501 
7 Mr.. 1535 

6 Brownell C. W., p. 54 

7 Bryant Almira, 1503 
5 Buckingham Mr.. 375 
5 Buckley Mr., ' 270 
5 Bullard Asa, 349 

5 Burbank Mr., 366 

6 John, 779 
6 Burchard Horatio, 1024 
6 Seneca B., 1U23 



7 BurgeC, Rev. 1146 

6 Burgess Shepherd, 909 
5 Burke Miss, 149 

7 BurnhamFranklinl6]9 

5 Jerusha, 156 

8 Lizzie L., p. 152 

6 Sylvia, 447 
8 Willis Dm p. 152 

7 BurnettElizabeth,1732 
7 Enoch, 1144 
7 Burney Mary A.. 1720 

6 Burns Eunice, 548 

7 Louisa, 1357 
6 Burr Jonathan, p. 50 
6 Timothy, 778 

6 Burris Miles, 871 

7 Burt Diana, 1244 

3 EHzabeth, 18 
6 Eunice, p. 20 
6 Experience, p. 20 
G Jerusha, p. 20 
6 Lucy, p. 20 
G Milly, p. 20 

5 Nathaniel, 222 

4 Nathaniel, 85 

6 Sarah, p. 20 
G Sylvia, p. 20 

4 Mr., 98 
6 Samuel, p. 50 

6 Sophia, 938 

7 Thomas, 1696 

6 Bush Miss Olive, 754 

7 Martha J., 1756 

6 Frances M., 717 

5 Mr., 1260 

4 Butler Mary, 114 

7 Butterfield David, 1538 

6 'Button Lucinda, 435 , 
G Butts Sally, 860 

5 Susannah, 351 

7 ByersMiss, 1186 



c. 



6 Cady David, 


589 


7 Emeline, 


594 


7 Eunice, 


595 


5 Jesse, Esq., 


230 


6 Jesse, 


p. 48 


6 Orilla, 


p. 48 


7 Harriet N., 


59G 


7 Mary W., 


597 


6 Calkins Asenath 


608 


4 Camp Anna, 


81 


7 Campbell Jane, 


1133 


5 Canaan Ensign, 


268 


7 Cannon Miss, 


1489 


7 Capen Lucy, 


1318 


6 Carpenter Ezra, 


710 


7 Case Ellen, 


675 


7 Case Augustus H 


,1709 


7 Cass Sarah, 


1210 



344 



INDEX. — I'AKT 1. 



7 Castle Mr., 


15:5() 


7 


Colton Mi.ss, 


J 808 


6 Darrow Rachel, 


81G 


(i Chaffee Elam, 


(ilJd 


7 


Charles F., 


liiu; 


(i Di 


ivis Daniel, 


(i20 


8 Chandler Arthu 


r, 2351 


8 


Louisa C, 


p. 80 


6 Davis Isaac, 


869 


7 David, 


1781 


8 


Comstock ElizaA.2U23 | 


() 


Julius, 


p. 27 


(5 Samuel, 


888 


6 


Cone Ariel, 


854 


7 


James, 


1345 


5 Chai)maii Mr., 


411 


7 


Coney Mr., 


1043 


7 


Lavancha, 


159] 


() JJutscy, 


1018 


7 


Cook Charlotte, 


671 


6 


Love, 


702 


G Lydia, 


94:5 


4 


Noah, 


63 


6 


Lovica, 


p. 48 


7 Cliarter G. M., 


1718 


(i 


Mr.. 


()(i9 


6 


Phili]), 


G25 


8 Mary L., 


2298 


2 Cooley Abilenah 


, 2 


7 


Saraii H., 


ap. 


8 Harris L., 


2300 


5 


Abner, 


350 


5 


Stephen, 


348 


7 Chase Edward, 


1613 


6 


Aretus, 


p. 27 


4 


Submit, 


79 


7 James II., 


1613 


6 


Aslier, 


p. 27 


7 


Mary Ann, 


1607 


7 Child Caroline T., 1502 


2 


Bethia, 


3 


6 Day Albert Hon. 


1034 


8 Childs Albert, 


p. 157 


5 


Chloe, 


248 


G 


Clara, 


953 


8 Augustus L. 


p. 157 


6 


Elias, 


p. 27 


G 


Ezckiel, Jr., 


470 


8 Frederic L., 


p. 157 


6 


Harmon, 


p. 27 


5 


Joel, 


392 


8 Henry M., 


p. 157 


6 


Lorenzo, 


p. 27 


5 


John, 


176 


8 Julia E. 11., 


p. 157 


6 


Lydia, 


1006 


G 


Lucy, 


935 


7 Martin L., 


1751 


5 


Martha, 


352 


7 


Luke, 


1747 


7 Chisester D. Rev., 1465 


6 


Maria, 


p. 27 


6 


Martha, 


987 


5 Church Ezra, 


796 


7 


Martha J., 


2110 


G 


Mattoon, 


558 


4 * Jonathan, 


67 


5 


Cooper Bathsheb 


a, 386 


5 


Mr., 


316 


5 Mary, 


369 


4 


Lamberton, 


59 


7 


Pamelia, 


1286 


7 Clapp Mr., 


1190 


5 


Marcy, 


388 


7 


Pliny B. Rev 


,1543 


7 Wm. D., 


1443 


6 


Mercy, 


762 


G D 


saver Delilah, 


868 


4 Clark Anna, 


56 


4 


Timothy, 


51 


7 D 


ennisonH.Jane,1806 


fi Experience, 


949 


7 


Cowperthwait A 


Qie- 


8 D 


Bwey H. H., 


2063 


7 Jerusha J., 


1782 




lia A., 


1382 


5 


Russell, 


163 


7 Julia, 


1900 


7 


Corbett JenuieM 


.,1873 


6 Dibble Hannah, 


606 


G Joel, 


561 


6 


Corbon Alpheus, 


437 


4 Dickinson Catharine, 


Rachel, 


494 


8 


Cornell Henry S. 


,p.l32 






47 


r> Sally, 


254 


7 


John P., 


1097 


6 


Elizabeth, 


891 


C Abby W., 


732 


8 


John P., Jr., 


p. 132 


5 


Maiia, 


581 


t5 Benj. F., 


760 


8 


Sylvia C, 


p. 132 


4 


Submit, 


79 


7 Noah B., 


1239 


5 


Coss Mr., 


199 


4 


Thankful, 


54 


6 Clough Sally, 


842 


7 


Couse Jane C, 


1664 


6 


Mr.. 


889 


7 Coan Julia A., 


1365 


6 


Cox Mr., 


52() 


8 Dickey John, 


2383 


' Coats Mr., 


1897 


6 


Coy Mr., 


628 


8 Dillibar Adaiine, 


2295 


6 Cole Persis, 


486 


6 


Crague Frances 


p. 48 


8 


Cnroline, 


2294 


7 Mr., 


1252 





Crane Cyrus, 


856 


8 


Gilbert M.. 


2291 


6 Collins Ebenezer. 538 


6 


Crary Mr., 


634 


8 


Henry, 


2292 


I Edwin, 


598 


8 


Cronk Anna B., 


1787 


7 


Jesse, 


171G 


7 Jabez, 


601 


7 


Mary Ann, 


1829 


8 


Sanford, 


2293 


5 Joseph, 
7 Noah C, 


291 


7 


Crooks J.W.Esq 


.,1865 


8 


William, 


2296 


600 


7 


Crosby Mary, 


1068 


8 


Nelson C., 


2290 


6 Oliver, 


591 


() 


Susan, 


877 


5 D 


oolittle Lucy, 


177 


7 William, 


599 


7 


Cross Sarah E., 


1828 


4 D 


orchester Davi 


d, 100 


5 Colton Abigail, 


371 


2 


Crump Lydia, 


5 


9 D 


ouglas Freddie 


, 2471 


7 Calvin, 


1550 


7 


CumnunsJohn,J 


r.ll71 


9 


Simeon, 


2468 


4 Eunice, 


95 


6 


Currier Ruth, 


795 


8 


Barton M., 


2095 


3 Hannah, 


23 


6 


Curtis Lucy, 


655 


9 


Ellen M., 


2470 


8 Horatio, 


p. 80 
44 


6 


Sally, 


569 


9 


Henry C, 


2469 


4 Joseph, 
(i Laura, 


7 


Cushman Eunice, 1074 


9 


John B., 


2472 


777 








8 Dowd Mary, 


2324 


5 Margaret, 


376 








5 Dresser Reuben 


384 


8 Colton Marsia, 


p. 80 
1553 




D. 




6 D " 


unham Mr., 


p. 20 


7 Martha, 






6 D 


utcher John A 


, 719 


6 Nathan, 


430 








7 DuttonAmandaL.1854 


7 William, 


1206 


5 


Damon Lydia, 


205 


4 D 


wight Elizabeth, 77 


6 Dea., 


525 


6 


Maria M., 


1577 


6 


Miss, 


b"4y 


4 Mr., 


383 


^ 
< 


Darling Mr., 


1309 









*Prmtt'd Nathaniel in the body of the work, which is wrong. 



INDEX. — PART I. 



345 



E. 

8 Easton Arthur E., 2275 

8 Edward C, 2278 

8 Herbert L., 2276 

8 Ida Mary, 2277 

7 Isaac E., '1682 

5 Eaton Anna,, 198 

5 James, 211 

5 Sarah, 208 

6 Eddy Horatio, 818 
6 Polly, 956 
5 Edwards Jerusha, 308 

5 Elizabeth, wife of 

Elias Chapin, 252 

6 Elenwood Wid., 449 

7 Elder Lucy, 1296 

8 Elliott Wm. P., 2125 
7 EUis Cleaveland, 1265 

3 Elizabeth, 40 

7 Elmone Lydia, 1183 
6 Elsie, wife of Henry 

M. Chapin, 839 

4 Elsworth Mr., 76 
6 Elwell Aaron, 433 

5 Ely Abigail, 327 

6 Aurelia, 571 

3 Elizabeth, 

4 Jonathan, Jr., ] 12 

5 Lydia, 388 
5 Margaret, 197 

5 Mary, 162 

6 Mar.y, 807 
4 Miriam, 50 

4 Zebia, 69 

7 Eno William, J 731 

8 Jane M., 2316 
8 Julius Alva, 2317 

5 Lydia, wife of 

Thomas Chapin, 168 
5 Theodosia, wife of 

Chas. C. Chapin,264 
7 Etherton Mr., 1797 
7 Evans Virginia E. 1558 



F. 

7 Fairbanks Geo., 1406 
7 Rosanna, 1786 

5 Farnhara John, 164 

6 Maria, 720 

6 Farnsworth Z.H.,659 

7 Farr James, Jr., 1557 
7 Farrar George, 603 
7 James, Jr., 604 

6 James, 592 

7 John, 605 

7 Samuel, 602 

8 Fay WillardW., 2389 
4 Ferre Aaron, 130 
6 Abner, 480 
8 Ada E., p. 158 

46 



7 Ferre Achsa, 1266 

8 Alice E., p. 158 

6 Charles, 481 

7 Charles, 1875 
6 Eli, 1755 

6 Laura, 583 

7 Mary, 1211 

6 Solomon, 972 

8 Louis W., p. 158 

7 Felt Jacob, 1229 
7 Fesler Sarah, 1595 

6 Field Col., p. 20 

4 Elizabeth, ap. 117 

7 Fields Elsie M., 1630 
6 Fisher Catharine, 652 

6 Fisk Lucy W., ap.527 

7 Flagg Edward, J 809 

8 Stephen P., 1959 
7 Fletcher Miss, 1405 

6 Flowers Harriet, 822 

7 Foster Adaline, J(t57 
7 Julia, 1840 

7 Marvin, 1230 

8 Caroline E., 1239 
8 Lyna P., 1238 
7 Fountain MaryA. 1556 

5 Fowler Caroline, 141 

6 James, 704 

7 Sarah, 1264 

7 Miss, 1624 
6 Franklin Towers, 519 

4 Frarey Eleazer, 61 

8 Freeland Louisa, 1968 

5 Frink Sarah, 200 

6 Seiah, 824 

5 Tiercy, 330 

6 Frost Betsey, 808 
6 Noali, 432 

6 Fuller Betsey, 701 

7 Elvina, 1847 
6 Graham, 805 
5 Joanna, 245 
5 Sarah, 41 1 

8 Susannah, 2082 



G. 

6 Gardner Isaac L., 982 
6 Gaston Phebe, 815 
5 Gates Elijah, 263 

8 Gedine Wm. G., Gen., 
2087 

5 Gel^ton Lovina, 850 

6 Gelden Thomas, 664 

7 Gerrold Mary, 1764 
6 Giddings Susan, 821 
3 Gilbert Henry, 31 
3 John, 29 
3 Sarah, 28 

2 Thomas, 4 

3 Thomas, 30 



5 Gilligan Abiah, 188 

4 Goddard Giles, 132 
7 Goodhue Joseph, 1563 

6 Goodman Otis.Dr. 1531 

7 Goodyear Austin, 1921 
7 Gordon Emily, ]758 
7 Thomas, Rev. 1836 

7 Granger G. G., 1504 

8 Henry C, p. 147 
8 William, p. 147 

5 Graves Luciua, 236 
8 Nancy, 2071 
8 Theopilus, 2072 
7 Greene Alonzo, 1106 
7 Amanda, 1105 

6 Greene Benjamin, 462 

7 Carlo, 1109 
7 Daniel, 1763 
7 Joseph, 1307 

7 Hannah A., 1107 

8 John W., 2065 
7 Laura, 1103 

7 Sarah D., 1761 

8 Gridley Lois, 2129 

6 Sally, 918 

7 Griffin Peter, 1125 
7 Grinnell J. B., Rev., 

1544 
6 Griswold Clarissa, 922 

6 Goudy Salome B.,1269 

7 Grover Betsey, 1597 
7 Charlotte L., 1339 
5 Gurley Mr., 241 
3 Gurnsey Mary, 22 



H. 

6 Hale Albert, Rev. 654 

7 Albert, p. 92 
7 Catharine, 1407 

7 Sophia. 1408 

8 Wm. Henry, 2158 

6 Hall Eskridge 870 

7 Richard, 1555 
6 Miss, 584 
6 Hamilton E. J., p. 54 

6 Miss, 629 

7 Hardy Mr., 1083 
7 Mr., 1084 

7 Miss, 1085 

8 Harmon Charlotte V., 

1960 
7 Hancock Betsey, 1851 
7 Harris A]exander,1448 

6 Joseph, 869 

7 Harrison H. H., 1906 

8 Hart A. A., 1509 
7 Sarah E., 1506 
5 Hastings Lemuel, 322 
7 Hatfield Reuben, 1728 



346 



INDEX. — I'AllT I. 



7 Haven Elizabeth, 1423 
() Moses, 057 

7 Hawks Maria, p. 154 
G Hayes Abbee, ()H1 

6 Eli, r>:}7 
(i Hoyt .Samuel, JO-ii) 

7 Lucy A., ]()32 
7 Sarah T., KKU 

7 Hazen Al!en,Rcv.l3:i6 
ri Edward, 1342 

8 Fanny, 1344 
8 Henry, 1341 
8 Mary, 1343 

8 Henry Fanny L., 1857 
(i Herrick Avery, 678 
7 George, 14.')9 
7 Luciua, 1457 
7 Alonzo C, 14H2 
7 Edward M., 146IJ 
7 Esther M., 1461 
7 Henry D., 1458 
7 Moses C, 1455 
7 Wm. A., 1456 

6 Higby Isaac, 787 

7 Laura Chapin, p.54 

7 Higgins C. W., Kev., 

1468 

6 Hill Miranda, 855 

9 HinchmanC. C.,p.l67 
9 Franklin, p. 167 
9 Ford DeCamp, 

p. 167 
9 JohnMarshall,p.l67 
9 Lesbia, p. 167 

9 Lewis, p. 167 

9 Louisa Reed, p 167 
9 Mary, p. 167 

8 Theodore H., 1965 

9 Theodore H., Jr., 

p. 167 

7 Hine L., IIUI 

7 HitchcockAlmira,1855 
6 Caroline, 759 
6 Chloe, 838 
6 Elijah, 56i) 
4 Hannah, 55 

4 Jacob, 59 
2 John, 8 

5 Lois, 289 
5 Luther, 360 

5 Peresh, 403 

6 Keuben, 341 

6 Stephen, 915 

8 Holland AnnieE.,2348 
8 ArthurGilbert,2347 

7 Dr. J. Gilbert, 1775 

8 Kate Melia, 2349 
8 Theodore, 2350 
7 Holkins Harvey, 1220 
6 Holley Caroline E., 721 
6 HoUister Martha, 493 

5 Holman Rachel, 237 

6 Holman Ruth, 632 



7 Holmes Mabel, 1834 

7 Sarah, 1108 
6 Prudence, 637 

8 Holton Ezra, 1992 

3 Mindwoll, 16 

4 Miudwell, 89 
6 Horton Abigail, 798 

4 Anna, 46 
6 Betsey, 799 

5 Gad, 323 

6 Jerre, 801 
6 Jeremiah, 800 
4 John, 49 
6 Mary, 802 
4 Nathaniel, Dea., 63 

6 Samuel, 797 

7 Miss, 1304 

4 Howard Anna, 120 

5 Beriah, 406 

6 Thomas, 994 

8 Hoyt Richard, 1990 

7 Hubbard Abigail, 1055 

5 Jerusha, 380 

8 Washington, 2018 

9 F. O., 2022 
8 Samuel H., 2019 

6 Hummiston Lovina, 

570 

7 Mi.ss. 1292 
5 Humphrey Electa, 274 

8 Hunt Asahel A., 2194 
8 Caroline M., 2191 

7 John, 1747 

8 Eunice S., 2190 
7 Lottie F., 2193 

7 Wm. C, 1368 

8 Wm. C, Jr., 2192 

5 Hurd Love, 265 

6 Lydia, 647 
6 Pamelia, 651 
6 HutchinsonSophia,788 
6 Hyde Sophronia, 590 

I. 

6 Ingalls Sarah A., 1533 

7 IngersoU D. W., 1478 
7 Ireland W. H., p. 69 
6 Isham Demmis, p. 48 



4 Jackson Samuel, 139 

6 Jacobs Mr., 454 

7 Jameson Abiezer,1683 

8 Francis A., p. 153 

4 Janes Ruth, 13 
7 Johnson Julia, 1063 

7 Jenks Sophronia, 1717 

8 Jewel Fred. S., 2114 

5 Jones Eunice, 165 



6 Jones Hannah, 


819 


6 


Hezekiah, 


482 


4 


Jerusha, 


53 


5 


Phineas, 


250 


(5 


Simeon, 


764 


5 


Stephen, 


292 


6 


• Lucinda, 


1035 


7 


Mary J., 


1237 


6 


Dargo B. Rev 


.,759 


6 


Judd Abigail, 


463 


6 


Lydia, 


461 


8 


Mr., 


1717 



K. 

a Kellogg Arthur, 2366 

8 Ellen, 2362 

8 Ellis, 2363 

5 Gardner, 171 
7 George, 1737 

7 John, 1203 

6 Josiah, 951 

8 Josiah H., 2364 

5 Lucy, 371 

6 Naomi, 950 
8 Olive M., 2365 

7 Priscilla, 1811 

5 Silence, 379 
7 Moses S., 1812 
7 Kent Lydia, 1813 

6 Maria, 467 
6 Keyes Cotton, 1026 

6 Mather, . 1531 

7 KenneySusannah,1072 
6 Kibbee Israel, 612 

5 Rhoda, 345 

6 Lucy T., 679 

7 Orpha Z., 1660 
7 Mr., p. 43 
7 Kibly Phebe A., 1070 
7 Kidd Elizabeth, 1467 
7 Kidder Emily A., 1869 
5 KilburnClarissaM.361 
5 King Eunice, 226 
5 Mary, 304 

5 Thomas, 223 

6 Zeno, 853 

7 Knight N. A., 1130 
7 Otis A., 1778 
7 KnowltonAbbieC.1339 
7 KoonDeHlah, 1586 



7 Ladd Charles, 1349 

7 Horace, 1125 

7 Rhodolphus, 1126 

7 Lamb Alonzo, 1298 

5 Roxalany, . 415 

5 Mr., 273 

5 Lane Mary, 233 

5 Ruth, 234 

6 Langdon Achsa, p. 27 



INDEX. — PART I. 



347 



6 LangdonHannah, p.27 

7 Harvey, 1243 

5 John, 346 

6 John, p. 27 

6 Martin, p. 27 

7 Lazarus Ellen, 1117 
7 LeBarron Maria, 1172 

6 Lee Minerva, 794 

7 Mr., 1253 

6 Lenino James, 869 

7 Leonard Julia. 1169 

8 D. M., 2121 
7 Mary A., 1841 

4 Lewis Esther, 96 

5 Lilly Elizabeth, 340 

6 Littlefield Daniel, 484 

5 Lombard Chloe, 292 

6 Daniel, p. 20 
6 Nancy, 768 

4 Eachel, 88 

5 Sibyl, 354 

6 H. G., 769 

7 Long Catharine, 1773 
7 Look Philyer, 1507 

7 William, 1190 

8 Loomis Adaline, 2300 
7 Huldah, 1236 
6 Russell, 916 

6 Amelia W., 811 

9 Charter Franklin M., 

230 1 
9 George W., 2302 

7 Loring H. M., 1685 

8 Lovell Frederic, ap. 
7 John, ap. 1629 

5 Oliver, 296 

6 Lucore Lucy, 578 
6 Lucmda D., w. 

of DennisChapin,877 

5 Lydia, wife of 

Thomas Chapin, 168 



M. 

6 Maltby Eliza, 1019 
4 Margaret, w.of 

David Chapin, 134 

4 Markham Sibyl, 78 

2 Marshfield Samuel, 4 

3 Hester, 33 
3 Josias, 32 
3 Margaret, 35 

7 Marther Timothy,1785 

6 Martin Lucinda, 718 

7 Matlock Mr., 1882 
7 Marvin Mary A., 1590 

7 Mav Mr.. 1779 

8 McCrea Oriett, 2152 
8 D. L., 2153 
7 W. B., 1319 
7 McClure Amelia, 1371 

5 McGregory Abel, 258 
7 Eliza, 1442 



5 McGregory John, 257 
7 McKinstryEmily,1210 

6 Mary, 81 1 

7 Theodosia, 1205 
6 Meacham Andrew, 615 

6 Levi, 535 

7 Melendy Sarah C, 1389 

7 Melville Henry, Eev. 

1411 

8 Mary, p. 93 

6 Merrick Dr., p. 20 

7 Frank F., 1788 

5 Mary M., 142 

6 Sarah, 948 

6 Susanna, 777 

7 Merritt Lucy C, 1070 

8 Messenger Eugena, 

1993 
7 Metcalf Ebenezer,1259 
6 Thomas, 531 

5 Miller Daniel, 157 

5 John, 173 
2 Obadiah, 2 

6 Mr., 459 

6 Mills Lewis, 719 

7 Sophronia A., 1573 

8 Misner ChariesE.,2258 
8 Harvey C, p. 151 
7 Ira P., 1608 
7 Udelmer C, 2257 
6 Mixter Betsey, 703 
6 Monro Louisa, 946 
6 Mary, 945 

6 Montague John, 512 

5 Timothy, 319 

7 Moody John, 902 
7 Levi, 1216 

6 Moses. p. 85 

7 Sylvanus, p. 99 
7 Moore Sarah, 1450 
5 Moreton Hepzibah,343 

5 Lucretia, 235 

6 Olive, 1358 
5 Morgan Achsa, 239 

5 Benjamin, 167 

6 Betsey, 483 
6 Byron, 997 
6 Erastus, 479 

4 John, 43 

5 Morgan Lucy, 358 

6 Reuben, 390 
4 Stephen, 129 

6 Miss, 976 
Morris Hon. O. B., p. 2 

7 Morse Mr., 1080 

8 Sarah, 97 

4 Hiram F., 1801 

5 Mosely Israel, 381 

5 Pliny, 295 

6 Sibyl, p. 23 

7 Mosher Hannah, 971 
6 Munger Asa, 568 
6 Munger Perley, 574 



3 Munn Nathaniel, 10 
6 Hannah W., 1010 
6 Munson Mr., 1020 



Nash Abigail, p. 123 
5 Eunice, 158 

5 Simeon, 837 

7 Nealy John F., 1799 

8 Mary M., p. 118 

7 Nettleton Sarah, 1403 

8 Nelson Janett H.,1954 

7 Newbury Lucy, 1 033 

6 Nichols Miss A., 456 

8 Lavina, 2354 

7 Reuben, 1783 
7 Nicholson Mr., 1637 
6 Norton Walter, 728 



0. 

7 Olcott John, 708 

6 Orr Sarah, 655 

7 Ortou Sophia J., 1364 
6 Osgood Lydia, 648 
6 Otis Betsey, 995 
6 Miss, 996 



7 Page Sophia, A. C, 

1690 

■ 7 Palmer Sarah, 1567 

6 Walter, 812 

7 Parker A. G., 1208 

8 Josiah A., p. 80 
8 Orrin, 2113 

6 Parmenter Ruth, 440 

5 Parks Mrs., 198 

7 Parmelee Adaline H., 

p. 54 
7 Carlotte A., p. .54 
7 Laura Ann, p. 54 

6 Rev. Moses, 786 

7 Moses P., p. 54 
7 Phebe A., p. 54 
7 Sidney C, p. 54 
7 Simeon, 789 
7 Simeon, p. 54 
7 Simeon M., p. 54 
7 Wilson B., p. 54 

5 Parsons Eldad, 305 

6 Ely, 1010 

7 Eunice, 1207 
4 Hezekiah, 58 

8 Julia, 88 

6 Lucy, 542 

4 Luke, 57 

5 Miriam, 277 

7 Myra, 667 



348 



INDEX. — PART 1. 



7 


Parsons Per&is C 


..1827 


9 


Pickering C. E., 


2434 


9 Reed James M. 


2431 


5 


Zevial), 


190 


9 


Cyreneus, C. 


2436 


7 


Nancy A., 


1551 


6 


Payne Geo. W., 


1()3G 


9 


John D., 


2435 


8 


Sylvia L., 


2002 


6 Peabody John, 


751 


9 


Mary L., 


2432 


8 


Walter I., 


2003 


6 


Mr., 


1536 


9 


Amelia, 


2433 


8 


James, 


19.56 


7 Peacock Charles 


, 671 


6 Pindel Emily, 


552 


9 


Rice Charles, 


2476 


8 


Lemuel, 


672 


5 


Pink Mr.. 


326 


7 


Esther, 


1687 


8 


Stanton, 


673 


7 


Pinney Mr., 


619 


7 


Frances, 


1515 


7 


Pearson Daniel, 


Dr., 


7 PlatteeJosiah H 


..1614 


6 


Lois, 


415 






1887 


Pompey and Betty 


,p. 18 


6 


Mary, 


1014 


7 


Pease Abiel, 


617 


6 Pomroy Mr., 


519 


9 


Annah L., 


2479 





Abigail, 


534 


7 


Frank, 


p. 50 


9 


Charles. 


2476 


6 


Anna, 


611 


6 


William, 


757 


9 


Arthur W., 


2478 


5 


Azuba, 


191 


6 Pond Mr., 


992 


8 


Charles E., 


2026 


8 


Edward L. 


p.l52 


I*- 


Porter John, 


1176 


8 


Charles W., 


2099 


4 


Elizabeth, 


73 


5 


Jonathan, 


232 


8 


Chauncey D. 


, 2024 


8 


Emma C- 


p.l52 


6 


Rebecca, 


441 


7 


Diodatei3., 


1137 


6 


Erastus, 


973 


7 


Miss, 


nil 


8 


ElishaChapin,2023 


6 


Joseph, 


547 


7 


William, 


1559 


9 


Frank C, 


2477 


7 


Lois, 


619 


6 


Sarah A., 


1579 


8 


Laura M., 


2027 


4 


Margaret, 


75 




Post Levi, 


1446 


8 


Lois D., 


2025 


6 


Mary, 


539 


9 Potter Frederic, 


2021 


7 


Miss, 


1188 


6 


Mary, 


69 


6 


Nathaniel, 


p. 20 


7 


Miss. 


1189 


6 


Mary, 


618 


8 


Asahel W., 


2018 


7 


Miss, 


1192 


G 


Mary, 


622 


7 


Mr., 


1191 


8 


Mr., 


2130 


7 


Marshall, 


1889 


5 


Potwine Benjamin,301 


5 


Richardson Esther,3]2 


G 


Peter, 


924 


5 


Lydia, 


298 


7 


Eunice, 


p. 43 


4 


Samuel, 3d, 


102 


9 Powell Sarah, 


p 99 


6 


David, 


614 


6 


Stephen, 


613 


9 Powers Emma E 


,2299 


5 


Sally, 


359 


7 


Stephen, 


616 


8 


John G., 


2298 


6 


Robbins Asher, 


785 


7 


Theodore, 


1262 


7 


Lucina D., 


1387 


5 


Robinson Mr.. 


210 


C 


Walter, 


575 


7 


Pratt Ephraim, 


1494 


8 


Ethan C, 


p. 144 


7 


Mr., 


1486 


8 


Mary Ann, 


1500 


8 


H. S., 


p. 144 


G 


Harvey B., 


858 


4 


Sarah, 


79 


7 


Jonathan S.. 


13.55 


7 


Martha D., 


1723 


6 Price Polly, 


486 


8 


Marvin P., 


p. 144 


7 


Myron S., 


1617 


6 Prior Horace, 


670 


8 


Olive A.. 


0. 144 


8 


Nelly C, 


% 152 


7 


Charlotte A., 


677 


8 


Watson, 


p. 144 


7 Peck Annie, 


1776 


7 


Fanny, 


676 


4 Rockwell Jerush 


a, 77 


7 


Caroline B., 


1808 


7 


Mary L., 


674 


6 


Rogers Henry B 


, 1532 


6 Pendleton Jesse 


545 


7 


Milton F., 


675 


6 


Luranda, 


970 


6 


Pamelia, 


947 


8 


Proctor Cyrus, 


2070 


7 


Rood Erasmus, 


1263 


6 Penfield Alice, 


439 


5 


Purchase Jonath. 


in402 


7 


Susan, 


1025 


8 


Pepper Benjamin M., 


7 


Putnam Heman, 


1566 


6 


Root Anna, 


p. 48 






2036 


6 


Sarah, 


500 


6 


Azubah, 


p. 21 


8 


Herbert M., 


2037 








8 


Bridgman, 


p. 83 


7 


Pepper Joseph E 


..1140 




Q. 




6 


Dea., 


526 


8 


Joseph R., Jr 


,2035 






7 


Chloe, 


1058 


8 


Lizzie C, 


2038 


8 


Quinn Matilda F 


,1930 


7 


Elihu K., 


1275 


6 


Perkins Cynthia 


528 






7 


Louisa E., 


1113 


6 Perley David, 


p. 54 








6 


Thomas, 


p. 21 


5 Peirey Mary, 


407 




R. 




4 


Mr., 


243 


6 


Samuel, 


1537 








7 Rose Amanda M 


. H., 


7 


Phelps Asenath, 


1228 


7 


Rathbui'n Wm., 


1247 






U27 


5 


Benjamin, 


324 


8 


Sarah A., 


2029 


6 


Lois, 


540 


6 


Sarah W., 


689 


5 Reed Mr., 


271 


7 


Rowell Clara M 


,1435 


7 Philips Betsey, 


1689 


4 


Alrop, 


2430 


7 


Ellen L., 


1438 


8 


John P., 


2028 


8 


Hobart, 


2004 


6 


George, Rev. 


665 


6 Pierce Anna, 


590 


8 


James, 


1956 


7 


George A., 


1437 


8 


Julia E., 


1960 


7 


Thaddeus, 


1092 


7 


Miriam E., 


1436 


7 


Cynthia M., 


1562 


8 


DeWitt Chap 


in. 


7 


Mary A., 


1439 


8 Pickering: Charlesl957 






2000 


7 


Wm. E., 


1434 


8 


Edgar, 


1956 


7 


Emily S., 


1560 


5 


Rumrill Eleanor 


, 355 


9 


Frank B., 


2437 


8 


George T., 


2001 


7 


Julia, 


1199 



INDEX. — PART I. 



349 



Eumvill Julia C, 2078 

Russell John, 699 

Lovisa, 623 

Elijah P., 852 

Mr., 2 J 24 

Ryan Gate, J618 

Ryther Martha, 1989 

S. 

Sadler Levi, p. 72 

Manly, 1008 

Sereneus, 1111 

E. Brewer, IIJO 

Levi L., 1109 

Sarah, 37 

Sawin CaroiineB.,1753 

Catharine F., 1749 

Sawyer H. B., 1663 

Schripter Mr., 709 

Scott ClymeneE., 1075 

Sears Athnea, J 334 

Sexton Daniel, 179 

Daniel, 489 

Joseph, 104 

Joseph, 256 

Lovisa, 528 

Samuel, 220 

Sexton Ruby, 901 

Mr., 372 

Miss, 627 

Severance Mary, 1765 

Sarah Z., 1888 

Sewel Ezra, 719 

SliannonMarthaC.1927 

Shattuck Sfth, 448 

John E., 1115 

Shaw Daniel, 793 

Shears Hannah, 1104 

Shelden Charles, 255 

Daniel, 228 

Mr., 150 

Hannah, 9 

Harriet, 565 

Isaac, p. 14 

John, 15 

John, Jr., p. 4 

Daniel S., 1350 

Daniel T., 698 

Shetiherd Maria, 864 

Rachel L., 687 

Mr., 1535 

Sherwin Lydia, 1359 

Sibley Nancy, 977 

Mr., 14U2 

Sikes Benjamin, 119 

Hannah, 116 

Jlary, 96 

Phebe, 394 

Thankful, 126 

Simons Mr., 894 

Cornelia, p. 48 

Sisson Miss, 1305 

Skeele Marcy, 564 



7 Skeele Otis, 


1200 


8 Stanton Lizzie E 


.,2024 


7 


Roxany, 


1201 


7 StarkwealherLucyl732 


7 


Henry E., 


1705 


7 


Stearns S. E., 


1255 


6 Skinner David, 


790 


7 


Mr.. 


1381 


7 


Ellen E., 


1610 


6 


Steele Eli, 


870 


6 


Chauncey C. 


,p. 54 


5 Stebbins Caleb, 


290 


6 


Lewis C, 


p. 54 


8 


Cynthia, 


2287 


6 


Martin P., 


p. 54 


8 


Emma, 


2288 


6 


Myron W., 


p. 54 


5 


Ezra, 


146 


6 


Mary Ann, 


468 


8 


Frederick, 


2289 


6 Smith Achsa, 


9U6 


8 


Joseph 0., 


2286 


5 


Asenath, 


315 


o 


Lois, 


294 


5 


Miss, 


152 


5 


Moses, 


339 


6 


Daniel, 


626 


3 


Sarah, 


16 


4 


David, 


48 


7 


Seth, 


1715 


5 


Eleanor, 


71 


6 


A. W., 


1030 


6 


Elizabeth, 


491 


6 


Quartus, 


p. 20 


7 


Eli, Rev. 


1463 


8 Stedman AmeliaR.'2323 


7 


Enos, 


1174 


7 


Sophia, 


1367 


6 


Hiram, 


p. 18 


6 


Levi, 


1017 


7 


Jemima, 


1846 


6 


Stephens Josiah 


907 


5 


Jonathan, 


384 


8 


Sarah E., 


2097 


5 


Martin, 


410 


6 


StephensonEleazer729 


7 


Melinda, 


1064 


7 


Eli, 


1530 


5 


Mary, 


175 


6 Sterling Han'iet 


717 


5 


Mary, 


379 


7 


Stewart William 


, 1308 


5 


Mary, 


409 


7 


Miss, 


573 


5 


Philip, 


328 


5 


Stiles Asahel, 


299 


7 


Riley, 


1814 


6 Stillman Levi, 


767 


6 


Lucretia, 


546 


7 


Stocking Sarah, 


1242 


5 


Samuel, 


182 


6 Stoors Sophia L. 


, 861 


5 


Silas, 


196 


7 Stow Rebecca, 


1353 


7 


Mr., 


1792 


6 Street Caleb, 


967 


7 


Lindu, 


1109 


6 Strong Achsa, 


806 


6 


Anna K., 


1112 


6 


Dorcas, 


518 


8 


Charles H., 


p. 98 


7 


Julia, 


1757 


8 


Edward K., 


1995 


5 


Mr., 


318 


6 


Frances M., 


731 


8 


HemanNorto 


nl966 


7 


Harriet A., 


1466 


7 


Marttia E., 


1070 


7 


Harriet L., 


1856 


6 


Miss, 


566 


6 


Mary H., 


637 


7 


Miss, 


1294 


6 Snow Caroline, 


661 


9 


Alfred H., 


p. 168 


5 


Jabez, 


186 


9 


Louisa, 


p. 168 


5 


William, 


206 


9 


Norton, 


p-l68 


7 


Spangle Miss, 


1054 


9 


Marshall C, 


p.l6S 


7 


Sparhawk A. G. 


1267 


9 


Emily, 


p. 168 


6 


Sparks Miss, 


715 


9 


John W., 


p. 168 


6 


Miss, 


p.99 


6 Swan Tabitha, 


609 


6 


Spencer Betsey, 


630 


7 


Malvira M., 


1183 


6 


Chester, 


629 


7 


Swazey Augusta 


, 1703 


7 


Cynthia, 


1849 


6 Swift Mr., 


454 


5 


Elizabeth, 


226 


6 Switzer Amisa, 


857 


5 


Ezekiel, 


227 


8 


Sybrant Sarah E 


.,2378 


() 


Ezekiel, 


627 


6 


Symms Amelia, 


585 


5 


Phebe, 


244 


6 


Helen, 


585 


6 


Polly, 


628 








7 


Theodore, 


p. 43 




T. 




7 


L. B., 


1835 


6 Taft Charles, 


632 


7 


Sprague Betsey, 


1J79 


6 


Catharine, 


634 


7 


Levi, 


1181 


6 


David, 


635 


7 


Squires Mr., 


1445 


6 


Daniel, 


63] 


6 


Stacy Mary, 


621 


6 


Daniel, 


228 


7 


Stanton Emery, 


1672 


6 


Hannah, 


636 



47 



350 



INDEX. — PART I. 



6 Taft John, G33 

7 Sanford, 642 

6 Seth, G37 

7 Seth n., 643 
7 Betsey, 639 
7 Daniel, 641 
7 John, 640 
7 Lucretia, 638 
6 Talcott James W.,536 

6 Taylor Allen, 576 

4 Amos, 113 

7 Jane L., 1720 

5 Martha, 245 

5 Naomi, 203 

6 William, 469 

7 Emeline A., 1313 
7 Pliny A., 1314 
7 Rowland S., 1315 

6 Teed Lockey. 668 

7 Tenney AbijahN.,1394 
6 Mary Ann, 685 
6 Terrey Abel, 541 

6 Boaz, p. 21 

4 Samuel, 64 

5 Sibyl, 190 
3 Thomas, 9 
7 Thankful, w. of 

Dana Chapin, 1069 

8 ThayerHarrietA p.l71 
2 Thomas Rowland, 7 

7 ThurberEmelineA1042 

7 ThurstonRhodaE.1759 

8 Tinkhara Mr., 2122 

7 Tobey Alvan, 1895 

6 Todd Zeruiah, 969 

6 Torrey Elijah, 5J4 

8 Tower David, 2246 

9 Alice M., p. 151 
8 Town Maria L., p. 119 

7 Milton, 1821 

8 Orange C, 2077 

7 Tyler Silas, 1056 

6 Miss, 457 

u. 

8 UffordThirza, 2111 

7 Underwood Mary, 1291 

V. 

7 Valentine Ralph, 1097 

8 Ralph, p. 132 
8 Lewis S.. p. 132 

5 Winthrop, 267 

6 Van Horn Bathsheba, 

943 
6 Betsey, 979 

5 Flavia, 335 

6 Eleanor, 522 

5 Lucy, 363 

6 Lucy, 825 

7 Olive, 1221 
6 Vinton Abigail, 766 



w. 

7 WaldoHannahB.,1360 

6 Wallis Esther, 446 

6 Lydia, 445 
(i Ward Annie, 463 

7 Elizabeth D., 1477 
7 Marian, 1478 
7 Sally, 460 

6 Esther Maria, 679 

7 Henry A., 1479 
7 Henry Chapin, 1476 

6 Henry M., 684 

7 Wm. L., 1508 
6 Ware Lucy, 505 

4 Warner Abigail, 115 
6 Abigail, 875 
6 Joel, 442 

5 Eleazar, 143 

6 Roxauy, 874 

7 Charles P. L., 1748 
6 Warren Mary, 810 
4 WarrinerEbenezer,125 

4 Experience, 121 

3 Joanna, 23 
6 Justin, 934 
6 Roxany, 895 
6 Walter, 799 

5 WaterhouseCrocker353 

6 Lyman, p. 27 
6 Waterman Mr., 706 

6 Waus Benjamin, 713 

7 Webb Emily, 1110 
6 Webster Elijah, 978 
6 Esther, 438 
6 Ezekiel, 980 
6 Marcus, 1848 
6 Rhoda, 903 
6 Elijah L., 984 

6 M. C, 1021 

7 Weeks Roene, 1059 
7 Welch Amy, 1846 
6 Clarissa A., 903 

4 Wells Martha, 106 

4 Samuel, 62 

5 Susannah, 153 

6 West Joel, 705 

6 Weston James, p. 48 

7 WetherbeeJuliaM.1702 
7 Wheeler Horace, 1789 

5 Parthena, 266 
7 Rev. F. B.. p. 54 

6 White Angeline, 337 
6 Charity, p. 25 

6 Dr., p. 20 
5 Gad, 335 
5 Job, 313 
5 Lydia, 333 

7 Pomroy, 1272 
5 Samuel, 334 

4 Wilham, 106 

5 WiHiam, 332 
7 Harriet L., 1168 
7 Noah D., 1139 
7 Porter W., 336 



6 Whiting Seth, 904 
6 Whitney Charity, p.48 

6 Huldah, 492 
8 Edwin D., p. 1.57 

7 Josiah, 1752 

7 Rowena C, 1388 

8 Lucy J., p. 157 
7 Whitlier Malvira,1568 
7 Daniel W., 1424 
7 Louisa D.. 1867 

7 Sarah M., 1870 

8 Wilder Laura F., 1961 
7 Willard Mary G., 1733 

4 Williams Rev, D.D.,85 

5 Mary, 224 
7 Mr., 1099 

7 Nancy, 1746 

6 Willis Annis, 714 

5 Williston Israel, 280 

8 Wilson Alexander2029 

7 Elizabeth, 1214 
7 Elizabeth, 1332 

7 John, 1138 

8 Elizabeth M., 2028 
8 George W., 2034 
8 Isabella M., 2032 
8 John T., 2033 

7 Margaret A., 1611 

8 Mary G.. 2031 
8 Nancy J., 2030 
7 Winas Stephen, 1268 
7 WinchellCorinthial293 
7 Wing Miss, 1295 
4 Wolcott Jane Allen,92 

4 Martha, 89 
7 Mr., 1833 
7 Mr., J 858 

6 Wood Asa, 606 
6 David, 610 

6 Eunice, 614 

7 Rev. Glen, 1418 

5 John, 219 

6 Luke. 611 
6 Mary, 61 3 
6 Noah, 608 
6 Oliver, 609 
6 Ruth, 612 
6 Sarah, 615 

6 John A., 607 

7 Woodruff Mr., 1778 

6 Woodworth Mr., 753 

5 Work Elijah, 237 

7 WorthingtonAlf.,1254 

6 Jonathan, 401 
5 Wright Huldah, 351 

5 Lovina, 370 

4 Mary, 74 

6 Mary, 444 

6 Robert, 517 

5 Sabrina, 195 
3 Sarah, 11 

7 William H., 677 

6 Wyman Pamela, 662 
6 Sophia, 658 



INDEX TO PART II.-ALLIED FAMILIES. 



A general Index, showing the names of the Chapin heads of families and 
those connected with them, in Part II. Also showing on what page the names 
of their descendants commence. 



No. 

48 Chapin, Experience and David Smith, . 

211 " Eleanor and James Eaton, 

211 Smith, Eunice and Rev. John McKinstry, 

145 Chapin, Eunice and T. H. Moody and Elijah 

182 " Abiah and Samuel Smith, 

196 " Asenath and Dea. Silas Smith, . 

328» " Achsa and Philip Smith, . 

384 " Bathsheba and Jonathan Smith, 

400 " Abiah and Moses Bliss, 

410 " Jemima and Martin Smith, 

521 '• Hadassah and Elihu Ely, . 

543 " Sophronia and Rev. Stephen Bemis, 

547 " Bethia E. and Joseph Pease, 

555 " Margaret and Collins Brown, 

760 " Sarah and B. F. Clark, 

764 " Mary and Simeon Jones, 

840 " Martha G. and Wait Bartlett, . 

904 " Abigail and Seth Whiting, 

907 " Mary and Josiah Stephens, 

1005 Daughters of Col, Abel Chapin, 

1017 " " Capt. Ephraim Chapin, 

1023 Chapin, Caroline and S. B. Burchard, 

1024 " Frances and H. Burchard, 

1030 " Lucy Doolittle and A. W. Stebbins, 

1200 " Kezia and Otis Slieele, 

1203 " Laura and John Kellogg, . 

1543 •♦ Mary B. and Rev. Pliny B. Day, 

1544 " Julia A. and Rev. J. B. Grinnell, 

Hunt Harriet P. and Mr. Hunt, 



Chapin, 



Page. 
175 
176 
179 
182 
189 
190 
197 
197 
206 
208 
208 
209 
220 
210 
211 
211 
212 
*213 
213 
214 
216 
217 
ap. 
217 
218 
219 
219 
220 
ap. 



352 



INDEX. — PART II. 



INDEX TO TART II.— ALLIED 



FAMILIES. 

• 



G. Names. ] 


'age. 


4 SMITH. 




(48) 




Experience 




(Chaitn) aiicl 




David, 


175 


Edward and 




Sarah and 




Hugh, 


175 


5 1. Eleanor, 


175 


2. Agnes, 


175 


;5. Eunice, 


175 


4. David, 


175 


5. Mary, 


175 


6. Experience, 


175 


7. Trypliena, 


175 


8. Catharine, 


175 


5 David & Anna 


, 175 


6 I.Lewis, 


175 


2. Isabel, 


175 


:3. Orson, 


175 


Levs^is, 175, 


176 


I.Polly, 


176 


2. David, 


176 


3. Cliester, 


176 


4. Asenath and 




Cyrns Alvord, 


176 


5. Lewis, 


176 


6. Hervey, 


176 


7. Hiram, 


176 


8. Eunice, 


176 


9. Sophia, 


176 


lU. Milo J., 


176 


n. Charles H., 


176 


EATON. 




(211) 




5 Eleanor (Cha 


- 


PIN) and J AMES, 176 


6 I.Walter, 


176 


2. Justus, 


176 


3. Sarah, 


176 


4. Anna, 


176 


5. James, 


176 


6. Thaddeus C. an 


d 


Selemna, 17C 


,177 


6 Justus & Abi 




GAIL Farnham 


,177 


7 ] . Bridgman N., 


177 


2. Clarissa A., 


177 


3. Charlotte S. and 


E. T. Smith, 


177 


4. Leonard N., 


177 


G James and HuL- 


DAH Johnson 


177 


7 I.Ellen and John 


Down, 


177 


2. Frances and Mc 


Farland, 


177 



G. Names. Pago. 

6 Taylor, Sarah 

■ (Eaton) and 
Sylvestick, 177 

7 I.Ann Sophia, 177 

2. Harriet IMaria, 177 

3. Anson ChajMn, 177 

4. Geo. Sylvester, 177 

5. Varnuni Nash, 177 

6. CharlesAndrews,177 

7. James Eaton, 177 

8. Wm. Oliver and 177 
Mary Baker, 179 

9. Sarah Jane, and 177 
Geo.H.Nettleton,179 

10. David Eaton, 177 

7 Anson C. and 
Louisa (Buck- 
land,) 178 

1. Mary L., 178 

2. Willard B., 178 

3. Frank C, 178 

4. Fred A., 178 

5. Harriet B., 178 

7 Geo. S. and Ase- 
nath B. CoBii, 178 

8 I.Ella S., 178 

2. Sarah K., 178 

3. George E., 178 

4. William B., 178 

5. Edward S., 178 

6. William C, 178 

7 Varnum and 
Elizabeth 
Curtis, 178 

8 1. Henry C, 178 

2. Edward M., 178 

3. Arthur B., 178 

4. William C, 178 

7 CHAS.A.andJANE 
Davenport, 178 

8 1. Charles D., 178 
2. Carrie M., 178 

7 jAS.E.and Elec- 
ta Buckland, 179 

8 1. Henry B., 179 
2. Sarah J., 179 

7 West, Ann S. 
(Taylor) and 
Bailey, 178 

8 1. Arthur B., 178 
2. James H., 178 

7 Dickinson, Clar 
issaA.(Eaton,) 
and Lucius, 177 

8 I.Sarah, 177 
2. Ellen, 177 



G. Names. Page. 

McKINSTRY. 

5 Eunice Smith 
and Kev. John, 179 

6 I.John A., 179 

2. Eunice T., 179 

3. Elizabeth L., 179 

4. Archibald, 179 

5. Eoger A., • 179 
179 



6. Perseus, 



179 



7. Candace, 

6 Roger A. and 
Chloe Elmer, 179 

7 1 . Augustus, 179 

2. Oriin, and Marcia 
Cook, 179, 180 

3. Eunice, and 

N. Daniels, 179 

4. Lucina, and 

N. Daniels, 179 

5. Archibald, and 
Mary S.Tliorn, 180 

6. Lucy, and Ford 
and N.Millard, 180 

7. Lyman, 180 

6 Perseus&Grace 
Williams, 180 

7 I.Eliza, 180 

2. Emily, 180 

3. Theodosia, 180 

4. William, 180 

5. John A., 180 

6. Willard, 180 

7. Willard, 180 

8. Mary, 180 

9. Alfred, 180 

10. Alfred L., 180 

11. Archibald W., 180 

7 William and 
Mary T.Frink, 180 

8 1. Laura Jane and 

John White, 180 
2. Arthur, 180 

7 John A. & Mary 
E. Morton, 181 

8 1. JohnM., 181 

2. William A., 181 

3. Harriet E., 181 

7 AVillard&Maria 

A. DURBIN, 181 

8 I.Louis, 181 

2. Grace, 181 

3. Willard, 181 

4. Anna, 181 

7 Alfred L. and 

A. J. Granger, 181 

8 I.Alfred W., 181 
2. Edgar G., 181 



INDEX. — PART II. 



353 



7 Archibald W. & 
H. E. Putnam, 181 

8 I.Grace, 181 

7 FrxcH, Mary 
McKiNSTRV and 
James B., 181 

8 I.Eunice M., 181 

2. Abigail K.. 181 

3. Emily T., 181 

4. Eli R., 181 

5. Jesse F., 181 
G. Willard W., 181 

5 MOODY, 

(145) 
Eunice (Chapin) 
and Thomas H.,18-2 

6 I.Gideon, 182 

2. Mary, 182 

3. Eunice, 182 

4. Martha, 182 

ClIAPIN, 

E. Chapin Moody, 
and Elijah, 182 

5. Anna, 182 
(). Sophia, 182 
7. Elijah, 182 

Moody Gideon, 
M. Ferry, 182 

7 1. Rhoda, 182 

2. A son, 182 

3. Thomas H., 182 

4. Lo\Yman A., 182 
a. Mary A., 182 

7 Thomas H., and 
HaxnahFerry,182 

8 1. Thomas H., 182 

2. Mary, 182 

3. William F., 182 

4. Rhoda, 182 
.0. Zenas M., 182 
G. Gideon, 182 

7 Lowman a. and 
LouisaPatrick182 

8 I.Gideon, 183 

2. Malcora, 183 

3. Mary, 183 

4. Hattie, 183 

5. Annie, 183 

7 DiMMocK, Mary 
Ann (Moody) and 
Timothy, 183 

8 I.Mary Ann, 183 
2. Daniel, 183 

6 Ferry, Mary 
(Moody) and 
Charles, 183 

7 I. Elijah C, 183 

2. Justus, 183 

3. Archimedes, 183 



4. Adolphus, 

5. Mary, (1) 



183 
183 
183 
183 
183 
183 



6. Lucy R. 

7. Charles, 

8. Mary, (2) 

9. Thomas M., 

7 Elijah C, and 
Speedy Taylor, 
and Amanda 
Homer, 183 

7 Justus and Re- 
becca Crafts, 
and Mary Ann 
Morgan, 183 

8 I.Joan, (1) 183 

2. Pamela, 183 

3. Joan, (2) 183 

7 Archimedes, and 
Ann East- 
man, 184 

8 I.Sarah P., 184 
2. Mary Ann, 184 

7 Adolphus and 
Orpha Ben- 
ham, 184 

8 1. Mary Ann E., 184 

2. Charles B., 184 

3. Orpha D., 184 

7 Charles and 
Catharine Pres- 
ton, and Caroline 
Preston, 184 

8 1. Rosamond E., 184 

2. Catharine P., 184 

3. Elliot P., 184 

8 Ferry, Charles 
B. and Emily, 184 

9 1. Gideon L., 184 

8 McElwain, Or- 
phia D. Ferry and 
Dayid, J 84 

9 I.Reuben. 184 

2. Cornelia Y., 184 

3. Charles H., 184 

4. David, 184 

5. Herbert, 184 

7 Clark. Lucy R. 
(Ferry) andERAS- 
tus, 184 

8 1. Charles F., 184 
2. Sarah C, 184 
andAndrewMoody,185 
S.WilhaniB.. 184 

7 Chapin, Mary 
(Ferry) and Ly- 
sander, 185 

I.Eleanor v., 185 

2. Adolphus F., 185 

3. Mary D. Ette, 185 



7 Ferry', Tho:mas 
M. and Catharine 
Smith, 185 

1. Adolphus, 185 

2. Mary, 185 

3. Arthur E., 185 

4. Lucy U., 185 
5.Theron, 185 

8 Cl.\rk, Charles 
F. and Sarah A. 
Barton, 185 

9 1. Charles R., 185 

2. Lucy A., 185 

3. Marian B., 185 

4. Emma, 185 

6 Preston, Eunice 
(Moody) and 
John, 185 

7 1. Asaph, 185 

2. Homer, 185 

3. Gad C, 185 

4. John, (1) 185 

5. Eunice C., l85 
andPhineasBarton,l86 

6. Portia, 185 

7. Jabez, l85 

8. Caroline, l85 

9. Catharine, l85 

10. John, (2) 185 

11. Gideon M., 185 

12. Sophia&A. Juddl85 

13. Rachel, 186 

14. Simeon E., 186 

7 Asaph and Aure- 
LiA Butts, 186 

I.Amanda, 186 

2. Frances, ' 186 

3. Eliza, 186 

4. Asaph, 186 

5. Louisa, 186 
Homer and Eliza 
Sacket, 186 

1. Elvira, 186 

2. Edward, 186 

3. Carohne, 186 

4. Jennett, 186 

5. Henry C. 186 

6. Martha, 186 
Gad C. and Elec- 
ta Barton, Theo- 
dosia Church, 
Mary Wood, Lucy 
Alden, Olive Ar- 
nold, and Mary 
DiMOCK, 186 

Preston. 

8 I.Joseph S., 186 

2. John H., 186 

3. Electa, 186 

4. Lowel, 186 

5. JuUus, 186 

6. Simeon, 186 



48 



354 



INDEX. — PART II. 



/.Catharine, , 186 

S. Clarissa, l&G 

y. Ephraim, 186 

Barton, Eunice 
(Preston) and 

rillNEAS v., l!^6 

1. William, lfc6 
•2. James H., Ibli 
3. Asaph, 186 
4.Alvin, 186 

5. Walter, 186 

6. Clara. 186 

7. Homer, 186 

8. Olive, 186 
Kellogg, Portia 
(Preston) and 
David, 186 

l.NorrisP., J 86 

2. Ellen, 186 

3. Chester, 186 

4. Simeon, 186 
.5. Henry, 186 

6. Mary, 186 

7. Eliza, 186 

8. Jane, (1) 186 

9. Jane, (2) 186 

Preston, Jabez 
and LydiaGray186 
Preston, John 
and Phebe Betts, 

187 

1. Warren, 187 

2. Harriet E., 187 

3. Catharine, 187 

4. Alice, 187 

5. Marietta, 187 

6. Jennette, 187 

7 Gideon M., 187 

8 1. Augusta, 187 

Fay, Eachel 
(Preston) and 
Daniel, 187 

1. Eugene, 187 

2. Helen, 187 

3. Arthur, 187 

6 Pease, Martha 
(Moody) and 
William, 187 

1 . Jerusha and Joel 
Clark, J87 

2. Walter and C. 
Chapin, 187 

3. William and M. 
Barton, 187 

4. W^arren and F. 
Crafts, 187 

5. Christopher H. and 
J. Willey, 187 

6. Pliny and M. Bagg, 

id7 

7. Simeon. 187 



6 Burnett, SoniiA 

(ChaI'IN) and 
Enoch, 187 

l.PliiletusW., 187 

2. Eodney, 187 

3. Sophia, 187 
4.Diantha, 187 

5. Enoch, (1) 187 

6. Lyman A., 187 

7. Ann C, 187 

8. Elizabeth, (1) 187 

9. Elizabeth, (2) 187 

10. Enoch, (2) and 
Hanietta Stacy, 187 

11. William andE. J. 
Hannum, 187 

7 Burnett, Phile- 
tus N. and Abigail 
Burn, 187 

I.Henry A., 187 

2. Diantha E., 187 

3. George W., 187 

4. Charles, 187 
7 Eodney and Me- 

linthaCogginsISS 

1. Ann E., 188 

2. Mary, 188 

3. Charles, 188 
7 San ford. 

Sophia Burnett 
and George C.,188 

1. Samuel M.. 188 

2. Horatio G., 188 

3. Harriet S., 188 

4. Nancy H., 188 

5. Sophia B., 188 

6. George C, 188 

7. Charles W., 188 

8. Enoch B., 188 

9. George E., 188 
10. Charles W., 188 

7 Burnett. 

Lyman A. and 
Harriet Strong, 
188 
L Lyman M., 188 

2. Ella, 188 

3. Harriette P., J 88 

4. Freddie S., 188 

5. George S., 188 

6. Harriette L., 188 

Eice. 
7 Ann C. (Bur- 
nett) and 
Daniel G., 188 
I.William B., 188 

2. Enoch B., 188 

3. Lyman H., 188 

4. Emma S., 188 

5. Clara E., 188 

6. AnnaY., 188 



7. Frank G., 188 

8. Mary Ann D., 188 

Chapin. 
7 Elizabetii(Bur- 
nett)&Zerah, 189 
I.Edward B., 189 

2. Elizabeth S., 189 

SMITH. 

(182) 

5 Abiah (Chapin) 
and Samuel, 189 

lAbel, 189 

2. Samuel, 189 

3. Perez, 189 

4. Aaron, 189 

5. Hannah, and 

Mr. Bosworth, 189 

6. Martha, 189 

7. Abiah, Mr. Field 
and Mr. Eeed, 189 

Ely. 

6 Martha Smith 
and Joseph, 189 

I.Sophia, 189 

2. Lovica, 189 

3. Martha, 189 

4. Cynthia, 189 

5. Joseph, 189 

6. Samuel, 189 

7. Austin, 189 

7 Joseph & Sarah 
Goodman, 189 

l.Marianna, 189 

2. Charles. 189 

Joseph & Euth 
Attleton, 190 

3. Sarah, 190 

4. Charle.s, 190 

5. Emma, 190 

6. Joseph, 190 

7 Samuel and 

Sarah Chase, 190 
I.Helen A., 190 

7 Austin and Cli- 
mena Graves, 190 
1. Amanda G., 190 

SMITH. 

Silas, Sarah & 
Eebeckah, 190 
Perez, Philip, 
Silas & Sarah, 190 
(196) 
5 AsENATH Chapin 
and Silas, 190 

1. Horace, 190 

2. Eufus, 190 

3. Allen, 190 

4. Child, 190 



I\DBX. — PART U. 



355 



6 



. Asenath and 

S. Seymour, 190 

. Laura, 190 

. Warren, 190 

. Hiram, 190 

Horace and 
Eebecca Moody 
and Miss King, 191 
• MaryB., 191 

. Cordelia, 191 

. Silas M., 191 

. Asenath, 191 

. Josiah W., 191 

Wood, 
Mary B. (Smith) 
and James B., 191 
. Harriet N., 191 

Sarah, 191 

townshend, 
Harriet N. 
(Wood) and 
Dr. Norton S., 191 
Arthur S., 191 

James H., 191 

Mary E., 191 

Filler, 

CORDELL'i(SMlTH) 

and Joseph, 191 
Reuben T., 191 

Caroline R., 191 
Horace S., 191 

Dwight, 191 

Sarah J., 191 

Frank, 191 

Mary, 191 

Sjhth, 
Silas M. & Theo- 
DosiA Hunt, 192 
Watson L., 192 

Thomas H., 192 
Harriet L., 192 

Louisa H., J 92 

George H., 192 

.Mary J., 192 

Smith. 
Watson L. and 
Eunice A. Brew- 
ster, 192 
. Arthur W., 192 
. Nellie H., 192 
JosiAU W. and 
Jane S.Damon, 192 
. Isaac D., 192 
. Jane D., 192 
EuFus and Saloma 
Cl.vrk, 192 
. Philettis, 192 
. Almena, 192 
BethiaC, 192 
Phineas C, 192 
Paulina, 192 
Warren, 192 
. Minerva, 192 



] 



7 Philetus and Ma- 
ry E. Bates, 193 
l.MaryE., 193 

2. Eufiis C, 193 

3. Minerva A., 193 

Lyman. 
Almena Smith and 
Daniel F., 193 

1. Horaces., 193 

2. Eunice A., 193 

3. Amelia S., 193 
7 Buck. 

Bethia C. Smith 
and Franklin, 193 
I.SelinaA., 193 

2. EdsonA., 193 

3. Otis H., 193 
4.Semantha J., 193 
5. Charles E., 193 

7 Smith. 

Phineas C. and 
AmandaSadler193 

1. Albion L., 193 

2. Amelia E., 193 

3. Phineas L., 193 

Corning. 
Paulina Smith 
and Ezra H., 193 

Hazen. 
Minerva A. Sjhth 
and Elbridge, 193 
1. Ellen L., 193 

6 Allen and Polly 
Bartlett, 193 

1. Silas A., 194 

2. Mary B., 194 

3. Luna C, 194 

4. Clarissa D. and 
John Beckwith, 194 

5. Frances E. and 
Elisha Pomroy, Jr., 

194 

7 Silas A. and Olive 
Moody, 194 

I.Silas A., 194 

2. Martha L., 194 

3. Mary E., 194 

4. EliphazM., 194 

Eice. 
Luna C. Smith and 
Horatio Jr., 194 

1. Arthur A.. 194 

2. Nellie L., 194 
6 Sahth. 

Hiram and M.\ry 
Moody, 194 

l.RebekahA., 195 

2. Child, 195 

3. Edwin, and Sarah 
J. Wright, 195 

4. Hiram, Jr., 195 

5. Mary J., 195 

6. Julia A., 195 



7. Eliza A., 195 

d. Emily W., 195 

9. Josiah M., ]95 

7 Gaylord and 
Eebeckah 
(A. Sjuth,) and 
Moses, 195 

1. James W., 195 

2. Henry E., 195 

3. Lewis M., 195 

4. Josiah S., 195 

5. Freddie A., 195 

7 Hiram, Jr. and 
Harriet S. 
Coney, 195 

1. Ellis D., 195 

2. Hatlie V. Ann, 195 

3. Jennie B., 195 

Stacy% 
7 Mary J. (Smith) 
and William, 195 

1. William C, 195 

2. Clara J., 195 

3. Henry E., 195 

4. George G., 195 

5. Hiram S., 195 

LYiL\N, 

7 Julia A. Smith 
and John, 196 

1. Jlary I., 196 

2. Willie E., 196 

3. Nellie E., 196 

4. John E., 196 

7 Graves, 

Eliza A, (Smith) 
andJoTiL\M,Jr.l96 

1. Sarah L., 196 

2. Mary S., 196 
6 JUDD, 

Laura Smith 
and Zebina, 196 

1. Zebina Jr., and 
Eliza Turner, 196 

2. Warren S., 198 

3. Warren S., and Je- 
rusha Dickinson, 196 

4. Henry H. and Mary 
Bonner, and Jane 
Eoat, 196 

5. Lucy A. and Oliver 
E. Bonney, 196 

JUDD. 

1. Clarence E., 196 

2. Charlie, 196 

3. Henry, 196 

4. Edward W., 196 

1. Myron H., 196 

2. Emeline A., 196 

3. Clara L., 198 
I.Mary, 197 



356 



IiVDEX. — I'AUT II, 



nONNEY. 
J. Edmund 1., 
2. Joseph P., 
:i. Joseph P., 



197 
197 
197 



SMITH. 

(;kh) 
5 AcHSA (Ciiapin) 
and Phi:.ii', 197 

I.Chester, ]97 

2. Chaiincey and Miss 
Buxton, 197 

15. Lucretia and D. 
Chapin, 197 

4. Ljdia and Mr. 
Buxton, 197 

T). Achsa and L. Cha- 
pin, 197 

6. Philip and Huldah 
Van Horn, and Die- 
dema Griswold, 197 

I.Laura, 197 

7. Martha and Calvin 
White, 197 

8. Sarah and McMas- 
ter, 197 

9. Selima and H. 
Graves, 197 

10. Preston, 197 

SMITH. 

(384) 

5 Bathsheba 
(Chapin) and 
Jonathan and 

R. DuEssER, 197 

1. Mary, 197 

2. Sopiironia, 197 

3. Ehoda, 197 

4. Chauncey, 197 

5. Otis. 197 

6. Jonathan, 197 

7. Quartus, J 98 
S.Justus, 198 
9. Carlo, 198 

6 Chauncey and 
Miriam Eddy, 198 

Graves, 
Mary (Smith) 
and Levi, 198 

1. Harvey. 198 

2. Mary, 198 

3. Levi, 198 

4. Jonathan, 198 
6 MORETON, 

SOPHRONIA 

Smith and — 198 
l.Erastus, 198 

2. Mary, 198 



3. Julia and S. 
Perry, 198, 203 

4. Justus, 198, 203 

5. Abraham, 198 

6. Sophronia, 198 

7. Isaac, 198 



Smith. 

Otis and Anna 

Eno, 198 

. Otis, 198 

.William, 198 

. Sarah B., ■ 198 

and Edward C. 

Weld, 199 

. Chauncey, 198 

and Rachel Pom- 

roy, 199 

. Sumner, 198 

. Benj. FrankHn, 198 

Otis J. and Sarah 

M. Marcellus, 198 

. Edward W., 198 

. Maus V. v., 198 

, Catharine R., 198 

. James R., 198 

. Amelia L., 198 

William and Anna 

WiLKINS, 199 

, Mildred A., 199 

, William, 199 

Emma, 199 

Chauncey, 199 

Sumner and Mary 

HAYE.S, 199 

Howard F., 199 

Ann M., 199 

Clara W., 199 

Harriet H., 199 

Benj. F. and Sarah 
A. Soper, 199 

Ann E., 199 

Mary E., 199 

CeliaA., 199 

William C, 199 

Hattie E., 199 

Jonathan and 
Martha Ely, 199 
Jonathan M., 199 
Martha A., 199 

and Moses Cutler, 

200 
Juba E., 199 

Hiram M., 199 

Jonathan M. and 
Lucinda Warri- 
ner, 200 

Emily M., 200 

Ellen, 200 

Sophia, 200 

Charles F., 200 

Herbert, 200 

Mosely. 200 



1 



1 



Juba E. and Lydia 
Butterfikld, 200 
. Fanny C, 200 

'. Austin E., UOO 

. Frank A., 200 

Hiram M. and 
Martha Loomis, 
200 
.Lizzie J., 200 

Quartus and Eme- 
line White, Rho- 
da White and 
Catharine Latii- 
ROP, 200 

Emma W., 2(10 

. Seymour W., 200 
William Q., 200 

. Phebc A., 200 

John W., 200 

Chauncey H., 200 
Helen A. or R , 200 
Ellen W., 200 

Johnson. 
Emma VV. (Smith) 
and Oliver, 201 
. Sarah P., 201 

. Marian E., 201 

. Harriet E., 201 

. Mary E., 201 

Seymour W. and 
Eliza Wait, 201 
Chauncey, 201 

William Q. and 
Mary S. Thomas, 

201 
. I]mma R., 201 

Laura A., 201 

Oliver S., 201 

Frank G., 20] 

Mary L., 201 

Johnson. 
Phehe a. Smith 
and J. W., 201 

Francis A., 201 

Francis E., 201 

Ahce L., 201 

Smith. 
John W. and Eliz- 
abeth J.Bates,201 
Eliza B., 201 

William F., 201 
Chauncey H. and 
Ellen A. Wa- 

TROUS, 201 

Hattie L., 202 

Julia E., 202 

Ellen W. Smith 
ni. Thomas D., 202 
Eliza S., 202 

Kate E., 202 

Walter D., 202 



INDEX. — PART II. 



357 



5 Carlo and Mmi- 
ANXA Lloyd, 202 

1. Asenath, 202 

2. Maria, 202 
:?. Lucy, 202 
4. James and Agnes 

Winchell, 202 

r KixG. 

AsEXATH Smith 
and George, 202 

1. Henry, 202 

2. Georg-e, 202 

3. Frank, 202 

Bartlett. 

Mauia (Sjuth) and 

ElLEY, 202 

LLeroy, 202 

2. James, 202 

3. Winfhrop, 202 

4. Indianna, 202 

Saxborx. 

( Lucy S-ahth and 

Major, 202 

I.Henrv, 202 

2. Lucy" 202 
J Graves. 
Harvey & Eliza 

Bardwell, 202 

L Esther, 202 

2. Lathrop, 202 

3. Edward, 202 

4. Ann E., 202 

5. Lewis, 2;)2 

6. Aluiira, 202 

7. Frank, 202 

BiLLIXGS, 

Mary and Silas 
(Graves) 203 

LAbby, 203 

2. MarV, 203 

3. Jane, 203 

4. Cornelia, 203 

5. Samuel, 203 

Graves, 
Levi & Tabitha 
Field, 203 

L Louisa, 203 

2. Miron C, 203 

3. Maria C, 203 

4. Louisa, 203 
JOXATHAX and 

CarolixeSmith203 
L Alpha, 203 

2. Abby, 203 

3. Louisa, 203 

4. Carrie, 203 
Wait.MaryMgre- 
TOX& Russell, 203 

L Cbauncey, 203 

2. Albert, 203 



3. Mirana, 

4. Julia, 

5. Delia, 

6. Lyman, 

7. Mary, 

8. Mary, 

9. Emily, 

Wait, 
Ch.\uxcey and 
Martha B. 

KlXGSBURY, 
Julia, 

Albert and 
Jerush.\ Wait, ap 
Frank R., ap 

Mary, ap 

Lyjlax and Ella 



1. 



203 
203 
203 
203 
203 
203 
203 



a p. 
ap. 



1 



1 



Bartlett, 
Ida, 

Smith, 
Delia Wait 
and John, 
Albert, 



ap. 
ap. 



203 
203 

203 



4. 
5. 
G. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10, 



Crafts, 
sophroxia 
MoRETOX and 
Caleb, 

Harriet and Dexter 
Daniel, 203 

Maria and G. Bow- 
ers, and Dwight 
Kellogg, 203 

Charles and Miss 
Bowers, 203 

Edward and Martha 
Harwood, 203 

Thomas, 203 

George, 203 

Sophronia, 203 

MORETOX, 

Isaac and WlL- 
>IEXA, 204 

Anna, 204 

Wilniena, 204 

Ru.MRILL, 
Rhoda (Smith) 
and Asa, 204 

Susan, 204 

Julia, and 204 

Orange Chapin, 205 
204 
204 
204 
204 
204 
204 
204 
204 



Delia, 
Lucy, 
Alice, 
Asa, 
Elioda, 
George, 
Jonathan S., 
Clarissa L., 



7 RuiIRILL, 
Asa & Rebecca 

GOODELL, 204 

I.Eliza, 204 

2. Angeline and N. 
H. Morlev, 204 

3. Julia C," 204 

8 Temple, (Eliza 
(RuMRiLL) and 
Reubex, 204 

L Benjamin C, 204 
7 RUMRILL, 

George and S. 
SPELLJLiX and 
Drucilla 
Bexxett, 204 

I.Frances. 204 

2. George, 204 

3. James, 204 

4. Mary L., 204 

5. Melville C, 204 
7 Jonathan S. and 

P. A. AVillia?.is 
and Sarah A. 
Chamberlain, 205 

1. John A., 205 

2. Child, 205 

3. Child, 205 

4. Mary, ' 205 

5. William B., 205 

S.MITH, 

7 Susan (Eumrill) 
and Llther, 205 
LQuartusJ., 205 

2. Delia S., 205 

3. Luther, 205 
4.G.E.&E.A.Day, 205 

7 TOWNE, 

Della (Elmrill) 
and Jonathan, 
and Ebenezer 
Bartlett, 205 

1. Orange C, 205 

2. Henry E., 205 

8 Orax'ge C. and 
Eugenia S. 
Tenney, 205 

]. Florence E., 205 

7 Goodman. 

Lucy (Eumrill) 
and Oton, 206 

1. Julia Ann and Ed- 
win Burt, and Ste- 
phen Bently, 206 

2. Thomas T., 206 

3. Harriet A. and I. 
Streeter, 206 

4. Eldad W. and M. 
Coolege, 206 

5. Lucy, 206 



49 



358 



INDEX. — PART II. 



G. Lucy Caroline, 206 
T.Otoii, 2(J6 

1 IIatfikli). 

Alick (Kumkill) 
and William, 2(i6 

1. Lucy A., 2U6 

2. William and Eoxa- 
na K. Charter, 206 

3. Franklin «., 206 
' Aluro. 

Khoda (Kumuill) 
and Clark, 206 
L Francis T., 206 

■ Mace. 

Clarissa L. (Rum- 
kill) & William, 
206 
l.AbbyL., 206 

i BLISS. 

(400) 
Abiah (Chapin) 
and Moses, 206 
L Joseph T., 207 

2. William C, 207 

3. Esther and J. W. 
Talcott, 207 

4. Lois, 207 

5. Moses, 207 

6. Horace, 207 

7. Francis, 207 

8. Abiah, 207 

Sykes. 
LoLs (Bliss) and 
Mr., 207 

L Henry A., 207 

SMITH. 
(410) 
Jemima (Chapin) 
and Martin, 208 

1. Olivia, 208 

2. Jemima and Mr. 
Lord, 203 

3. Martin and Caro- 
line, 208 

4. Betsej' and .J. Bel- 



lows, 



i08 



Lucinda and Mr. 
Ainsworth, 208 

Lucina, 208 

Almena and Mr. 
Burr, 208 

Eunice and Sum- 
ner Adkins, Horace 
Adkins and Mr. 
Bugbee, 208 

ELY. 

(521) 
Hadassah (Cha- 
pin) & Elihu, 208 
Horatio, 208 

Abel C, 208 

Liva, 208 



4. Asaph, 208 

5. Eliliu. 208 
(i. Herrctt, 208 

7. Kczia. 208 

8. Eunice, 208 

9. Mahala, 208 
10. Lois, 208 
J J. Hadassah, 208 

1 Horatio and 

Frances Mann,208 



209 
209 
209 
209 



1. 



Frances A., 
Harriet P., 
Horatio, 
Elisha, 
Abel C. and 
TamerLeonard209 
Alexis, 209 

Asaph, 209 

Harriet, 209 

Lucy, 209 

, Mary, 209 

BEMIS. 

(r,43) 
SoPHRONiA (Cha- 
pin) and Eev. 
Stephen, 209 

Stephen C, 209 

Sophronia, 209 

Stephen C. and 
JlliaE.Skeele,209 
Stephen A., 209 
William C, 209 
Arthur I. and Anna 
E. Parker, 209 

Julia E. and Mr. 
Sturtevant, 209 

Thomas O., 209 

Cate C, 209 

Henry S., 209 

S. Augustus and 
Frances A. 

BURDICK, 209 

Li Hie, 209 

William C. and 
Emma O. Rog- 
ers, 209 
Edwin L., 209 

Pendleton, 
Sophronia (Be- 
mis,) and John, 210 
Susan S., 210 

John, 210 



BROWN. 

(5.%) 
Margaret (Cha- 
pin) &Collins,210 
I.Patty, 210 

2. Quartus, 210 

3. Ara, 210 

4. Ann B., 210 

5. Polly, 210 



6. Collins, Jr., 211 

7. Unevilda, 211 

8. Mary Ann, 211 

Whitman, 
Patty (Brown) 
and ICHABOD P. ,210 
I.Mary, 210 

2. Elizabeth A., 210 

3. Roswell, 210 

Willis, 
E. A. Whitman 
and Joshua, 210 

1. Prentice, 210 

2. John, 210 

Brown, 
Quartus and 
Thirza Smith, 210 



1. Quartus S., 


210 


2. Martha, 


210 


3. Harvey and Loui.sa 


Flowers, 


210 


4. Phineas, 


210 


5. Semantha and 




Ebenezer Ferry 


,210 


6. Edgar, 


210 


7. Orlina, 


210 


8. Alonzo, 


210 


Montgomery 


» 


Martha(Brown) 


and Amos, 


210 


1. Quartus, 


210 


2. Thirza, 


210 


3. Harvey, 


210 


4.Dau., 


210 


Brown, 




Edgar and Han- 


nah Rector, 


210 


1. Frank, 


210 


Kneeland, 




Ara (Brown) 




and Silas, 


210 


1 . Mary A., 


210 


2. Levi B., 


210 


3. Sarah, 


210 


4. Samuel 0., 


210 


5. Quartus, 


210 


6. Horace P., 


210 


7. Martha A., 


210 


8. Harriet U., 


210 


9. Se:nantha A., 


210 


Levi B. and 




HarrietP.Neff210 


1. Leander, 


210 


2. Lenwick, 


210 


3. Eudera, 


210 


4. Babe, 


210 


Stilson. 




Sarah Kneeland 


and Warren, 


210 


1. Florence C, 


210 


Brown. 




Collins, Jr., and 


Sarah Griswold, 



INDEX. — PART II. 



359 



Mary Neff and 
Sarah Wood, 211 

1. Louisa, and Fran- 
cis Wood, 211 

6 Tweed, 

uxevilda 
(Brown) and Da- 
vid, 211 
I.Margaret, 211 

2. Horace and Law- 
son, 211 

3. Mary E., 211 
4.Alonzo, 211 

5. Wallis, 211 

6. Emao^ene, 211 
6 Whitman. 

Mary A. (Brown) 
and Stephen, 211 

1 . Maria and Porter 
Broad, 211 

2. Louisa and Peter 
Tiffany. 211 

3. Sarah A. and Wood- 
niancy, 211 

4. James, 211 

5. Rufus, 211 

6. Harvey, 211 

7. Birtha, 21 1 

8. Semantha, 211 

9. Emma, 211 

6 CLARK. 

(7(30) 
Sarah (Chapin) 

and Bexj. F., 211 

I.Harriet P., 211 

2. Sarah D., 211 

3. Samuel W., 211 

4. Catharine L., 211 

5. James F., 21 1 

6. Henry L., 211 

7. Daniel C, 211 

6 JONES. 

(764) 
Mary (Chapin) 

and Simeon, 21 1 

I.Hannah, 2J1 

2. Delia, 211 

3. David C, 21 1 
4 Henry S-, 212 
S.Daniel, 212 

6. Daniel, 212 

7. Mary E., 2J2 
8 Pamelia, 212 
9. Child, 212 

.10. Sarah A, 212 

11. Lene T., 212 

12. Charles P., 212 

7 SiKES. 

Hannah (Jones) 
and QUARTUS, 212 
1. Frankie, 212 



2. Delia J., 212 

7 Jones. 

David C. and H.\r- 

RIET A.MlLLER,2!2 

1. Frederick D., 212 

2. Willie M., 212 
S.Alfred T., 212 

7 Henry S. and 
S.Elizabetii Par- 
sons, 212 
1. Charles P., 212 

6 BARTLETT. 

(840) 
Martha G. (Cha- 
pin) and Wait, 212 

1. Henry E. and Har- 
riet Chapin, 212 

2. Benj. Franklin and 
Fanny Childs, 212 

3. Elizabeth and 
James Russell, 212 

4. Hannah S., 212 

5. Asher and Ellen F. 
Mills, 212 

6. Pliny and Su.san 
Merrow, 213 

7. Harry E. and Mary 
Campbell, 213 

8. Clarissa C. and Rev. 
Lewis Green, 213 

9. Martha G. and Rev. 

Charles Shackford, 
213 

10. Catharine E., 213 

11. Wilham E.. 213 

12. Lucy A., 213 

7 W.^RREN. 

Hannah (Bart- 
LETT) and FiTZ 
Henry, 212 

1. Edward B, 212 

6 WHITING. 

(9U4) 
Abigail (Chapin) 
and Seth, 213 

1. Mary E. and C. D. 
Crackbon, 213 

2. Elizabeth, 213 

3. Nancy T., 213 

4. Abigail B.. 213 
5.Emeline, 213 
6. Edward S., 213 

6 STEPHENS 
(9U7) 
M.\ry (Chapin) & 

JOSIAH, 213 

1. Mary, 213 

2. Levi, 213 

3. Josiah, 213 

4. Benjamin, 213 



5. Mary A., 


213 


6. Phebe, 


213 


7. Sophia, 


213 


8. Eliza, 


213 


9. Edmund, 


213 



6 AVARNER. 

(1005) 
Electa (Ch.\pin) 

& Dr.PEARLY, 214 

1. Dorcas L., 214 

2. Electa, 214 

3. Sophia, 214 

4. Charles P. L., 214 
Abbee Electa 
(Warner Chapin) 
and John S., 214 

5. Julia A. and 
Charles Curtis, 214 

6. Harriet and E. C. 
Chapin, 214 

7. Isabella, 214 

7 8. John and Caroline 

Pease, 214 

I.AimC. 214 

2. Edgar, 214 

3. Jane, 214 

4. Oster, 214 
7 Van Horn. 

Dorcas L. War- 
ner and Roswell, 
214 
1. Nancy and John 
Cooley, 214 

7 Griswold. 

Electa (Warner) 
and Joseph, 214 

1. Frederick, 214 

2. Lucy A. and Elijah 
F. Page, 214 

3. Joseph, 214 

4. Sophia W., 214 

5. Frances J., 214 
7 Miller. 

Sophia (Warner) 

and Abner, 214 

1. Charlotte, 214 

2. Jane, 214 

3. Ann, 214 

4. Dorcas, 214 
.5. Charles, 214 

6. Sophia, 214 
7 Warner. 

Charles P. L. and 

Elvira CH.'i,PiN,215 

I.Charlotte, 215 

2. Emma L., 215 

6 Samuel Lym.\n & 

KiNGSBtiRY, and 

(1007) 
Jemima (Chapin) 
and Dr.Sa.muel,215 

1. Margaret. 215 

2. Charles, 215 



360 



3.Betsoy, 215 

4. llaiinali W., 2J5 
5.AbulC., 215 

6. Son, 215 

7 Calhoun. 

Margahet (Kings- 
bury) and Hon. 
Wm. 13., 215 

1. Martlia, 215 

2. William B., 215 

3. Cliarlus, 215 
7 Lee. 

Betsey (Kings- 
bur y)&Mr. Lee,215 
l.Roswell, 215 

2. Son, 215 

6 PYNCHEON. 
Daniel & Wright 

(10U8) 
Oral (Chapin) and 
Eber, 215 

1. Lucy and P. Sted- 
man, 215 

2. Julius, 215 

3. Henry, 215 

4. Mary and Mr. 
King, 215 

6 STEDMAN. 

(1017) 

Sophia (Chapin) 
and Levi, 216 

Mary A., 216 

Sophia C., 216 

Sarah H., 216 

Catharine, 216 

Phineas, 216 

William S- and Re- 
becca Hibben, 216 
Levi L., 216 

Catharine and E. 
Taylor, 216 

Amelia R. and 
Chalmers Chapin, 

216 
Benj. H. and Ellen 
Strong, 216 

Gates. 
Mary A. (Sted- 
man) and Elias,216 
Wilham, 216 

Levi, 216 

George, 216 

Betsey C, 216 

Isabella C, 216 

Sophia, 216 

.Julia, 216 

, Helen, 216 

Chapin. 
Sophia C. (Sted- 
man) and Dr. Eli- 
sha B., 216 



10 



INDEX. PART 


11. 


1. Julia S., 


216 


2. Helen A., 


216 


Goodman. 




Sarah H. (Sted- 


man) and Reuben, 




216 


1 . Alexander, 


216 


2. Jane. 


216 


3. Martha, 


2!6 


4. Eliza, 


216 


5. Samuel, 


216 


6. Mary, 


216 


7. Juliet, 


216 


H. Sidney, 


216 


Stedman. 




PiiiNEAS and Lucy 


W^rigut, 


216 


1. Mary A. and E 


. E. 


Beld'ing, 


216 


2. Edward, 


216 


Levi L. and C 


ARO- 


line Ferey, 


216 


I.Mary, 


216 


2. Ella, 


216 


3. Son, 


216 



6 BURCHARD. 

(1U23) 
Caroline (Cha- • 
PIN ) and Seneca 
B., 217 

1. AlmaF. and Charles 
Eldred, 217 

2. John, 217 

3. A babe, 217 

4. Benj. C. 217 

5. Caroline and Spen- 
cer Day, 217 

6. Cynthia and Wm. 
R. Stoors, 217 

7. Patrick H. & Ma- 
ry Moseley, and Ce- 
leslia L. Muzzy, 217 

8. Seneca B. & Bene 
B. Dunham, 217 

9. Wm. Chaffee and 
Frances Bustillo,217 

10. Horace, 217 

BURCHARD. 

(1024) 
Frances (Chapin) 

and Horatio, ap. 

1. Harriet, ap. 

2. Frances B., ap. 

3. Sarah M., ap. 

4. Louisa, ap. 

5. Horatio C, ap. 

6. Joiin A., ap. 

7. Jesse, ap. 

8. Mary, ap. 

9. Caroline, ap. 



6 STEBBINS. 

(1030) 
Lucy D (Chapin) 
and Aaron W., 217 
I.Anson L., 217 

2. Edwin A., 217 

3. Mary C, 218 

4. Theodore, C, 218 

5. Harlan C, 218 

6. Lydia A., 218 

7 Anson L. and Ma- 
ry Harris, 218 

l.InaA., 218 

2. Edwin D., 218 

3. Ida L., 218 
7 Edwin A. and Ra- 
chel J.Flemming, 

218 

1 . Anson V/., 218 

2. Edwin M., 218 

7 SKEELE. 

(1200) 
Kezia (Chapin) 

and Otis, 218 

1. Julia E. and S. C 
Bemis, 218 

2. RuhemaC, 218 

3. John O., 218 

4. Henry E., 218 

5. Adaline M., 218 

8 Call, 
ruiiema c. 
(Skeele) and 
Amos, 219 

I.Charles A., 219 

2. Geo. N., 219 

3. Ruema C , 219 
8 Skeele. 

Henry E. and Lu- 
cy A. (Chapin) 219 

1. Edwin O., 219 

2. Anna C, 219 

7 KELLOGG. 

(1203) 
Laura (Chapin) 
and John, 219 

I.Amos, 219 

2. Kezia C. and Wm. 
Smith, 219 
l.JuhaR., 219 
2. Clara N., 219 

3. Catharine B. and 
Harvey Judd, 219 
l.JohnK., 219 
2. Mary L., 219 

4. Ruth C. and Nelson 
W. Burnett, 219 
I.Julia A., 219 
2. Katy L, 219 

5. Laura M. and Elliot 
Montague, 219 



INDEX. — PART I/. 



361 



1. George E., 


219 


2. Scamael E., 


219 


6. Julia and David C. 


Ayres, 


219 


7. John E. and Jane 


R. Smith, 


219 


8. Lois A. and Rufas 


Hinckley. 


219 


l.Le\visD\vight,2J9 


2. Daughter, 


219 


9. Harriet E., 


219 


lU. Mary W., 


219 


DAY. 




(1543) 




Mary B. (Chapin) 


and Rev. P. B. 


, 219 


1. Charles L., 


220 


2. George C., 


220 


GRINNELL. 




(1544) 




Julia A. (Chapin) 


and Rev. J. B 


220 


1 Catharine H., 


220 


2. George C, 


220 


3. Mary C, 


220 


4. Carrie H., 


220 



6 PEASE. 

(547) 

Bethia E. Chapin 
and Joseph, 220 

1. Joseph H., 220 
2 Christopher H., 220 

3. James, 220 

4. Phineas C, 220 

5. Dau., 220 

6. Dau., 220 

7. Margaret, 220 

8. Julia, 220 

9. Marshall, 220 

10. John R., 220 

11. Charles N., 220 

12. A son, 220 

7 Christopher H. 
and Olive Sher- 
man, 220 

l.Benj F., 221 

2. Utley, 221 

3. Oscar, 221 

4. George, 221 

5. Aisle, 221 

James and Maha- 
LEY Hamilton, 221 

1. Julia M., 221 

2. Charles I., 221 



3. Ella G., 

4. Jerome C, 



221 
221 



MossMAN and 
Webster & Mar- 
garet (Pease) and 
Charles T., 221 

1. Charlie McC, 221 

2. Maggie E., 221 

3. Frank P., 221 

Pease. 
Marshall and 
Harriet C. (Cha- 
pin,) 221 

1. Marshall C, 221 

2. Daniel P., 221 

John R. and 
Catharine 

McAfee, 221 

1. Phineas C, 221 

2. Lettie I., 221 

3. Era ma J., 221 

4. Margaret B., 221 

Charles X. and 
T.A.P.Looius,221 

1. Clifford B., 221 

2. Julia B., 221 

3. Marshall C, 221 



50 



INDEX TO PART III. 



JOSIAH CHAPIN AND DESCENDANTS. 

The figures in the left hand column denote the Generation ; those in the right 
hand column, the page. The Generations are numbered from Dea. Samuel 
Chapin, the ancestor. 



G. Names. Page. 

Ch.\pin. 

2 JosiAH, 225 
King Mary, " 
Brown Lydia, " 
Metcalf Me- 

HETABLE, " 

3 ClL\PIN. 

1. Samuel, 225 

2. John, 
o. 31ary. 

4. Deborah, " 

5. Josiah, 

6. Shem, 226 

7. Seth, "^ 
b. Joseph, 

9. Henry, 

10. Ephraira, 

11. Deborah, 

12. Lydia, 

13. Sarah, 

14. David, 

15. Hannah, " 
4 Seth and Mary 

Read & Bethia 
Thurston, 226 

1. Sah and Abigail 
Adams, 

2. Bethia and Jona- 
than Thayer, " 

3. Josiah, 

4. John, 

5. Mary, 

6. Samuel, 

7. Deborah, 

8. Hopestill, 

9. Joseph, 

10. Abigail, 

11. Lydia, 

12 Benjamin, 227 

13. Ebenezer, 

14. Japheth, 



G. Names. Page. 

5 Seth and Abi- 
gail Adams, 227 
Sarah, 227 

3 Ephraim and 
Margaret 

TORREY, 227 

1. David, 

2. Ephraim, " 

3. Henry, 

4. Eliza, 

3 Read, 

Debor-ah Chapin 
and Samuel, 227 
I.Mary, 227 

and Nathaniel Ty- 
ler, 226 

2. Deborah, 227 
and Thomas White, 

226 

3. Hopestill, 227 

2 Adams, 
Mary&Joseph226 

I.Abigail, 226 

2. Mary and Ephraim 
Jones, 

3 Taft Lydia 
(Chapin) and 
Daniel, 227 

I.Abigail, 

2. Josiah, 

3. David, 

4. Lydia, 

5. Daniel, 

6. Ephraim, 

Read, 
3 Sarah (Chapin) 
and Ebenezer, 227 
I.John, 

2. David, 

3. Ebenezer, " 



G. Names. Page. 

4. Lydia, " 

5. Hannah, 

6. Abigail, 

3 Holbrook, 

Hannah(Chapin) 
and John, 227 
I.Thomas, " 

2. Hannah, 

3. Lydia, 

4. Josiah, 228 

5. Moses, 

6. John, " ^ 

On page 228, the deaths 
of several persons are 
mentioned, and births 
and marriage of Na- 
thaniel Nelson and 
Deborah Chapin. 

The Generation of most 
of the following are 
uncertain. 

Chapin. 
1. Moses, 229 

1 . David, 

2. Nathan, 

3. Mrs. Saunders, " 

4. Mrs. Legg, " 
l.Elisha, 

2. Judith and Ezra " 

Wood, 
■^. Sarah and Jonathan 

Wood, 

4. Lydia and Elias 
Haywaid,* " 

5. Joseph B., 

6. David, 
Chapin Elisha. 

1. Experience and 
Palmer Wood, " 



INDEX. — PART III. 



363 



2. Sarah A. and Thom- 
as E. Wood, 

3. Hon. Henry, 

Dea. Samuel & 
Anna Cragin, 229 
I.Anna, " 

2. Samuel, " 

3. Ephraim, " 

4. Deborah and Dex- 
ter Wood, 
Daniel & Abigail. 

I.Daniel, 

2. Oliver, 

3. Amariah, " 
Abifrail and E. 
Field, 

Oliver & Mary 
Jones, 230 

1 . Cyru.s, " 

2. Jonathan, " 

3. Abigail and Thomas 
Harris, '' 

4. Mary, 

5. Oliver, " 

6. Charles, 

Dr. Charles 
Ch.\pin and 
Elizabeth B. 
Bridge, 230 

Elizabeth A. & 
Joseph Cl.\rk,230 



Dr. Cil\rles & 
SophiaD.Orne230 

1. Lucinda O., 

2. Oliver H., 

3. Mary W. and 
Charles Warden, " 

4. William O., 

5. Charles J., 

John & Rhoda 
Albee, 231 

1. Isaac, 

2. Jacob, 

3. John, 

4. Ziba, 

5. Betliia, 

6. Rhoda, 

7. Phebe, 

Ch.\pin. 
Jacob & Hannah 
Brooks, 231 

1. John and Clarissa 
Patterson, " 

2. Jacob and Sarah 
Sawyer, " 

Stephen.Luther 
and Seth, 231 
Joseph&Peter231 

1. Dea. Samuel, " 

2. Josiah, 

3. Seth, 

4. Joseph, " 



5. Gershom, 231 

6. Phineas, " 

7. Caleb T., 

Gen. Isr.\el, 231 

1. Israel, 232 

2. Thaddeus, 

3. Samuel, " 

4. Henry, 

5. George, " 
Capt. Israel & 
Abigail Nash, 232 

1. Charlotte, 

2. Clarissa and Hon. 
John Grei^, " 

3. Betsey, 

4. Charles, 

5. Sally, 

Le\t and Nancy 
Church, 232 

I.Nathaniel, 233 

8. Levi, 

3. Hermon, " 

4. Jonathan, " 
.5 Philip, 

6. Rhoda and Mr. 
Hervey, " 
Hermon and 
Catharine 
Merrill, 233 

1. Edward M., 

2. George W., " 

3. Philip E., 



APPENDIX TO GENEALOGY. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 

(527) 

AARON CHAPIN, son of (188) Job and Abiah Cbapin, b. in 
Ludlow, Mass.. March 21, 1791; ni. Sept. 10, 1818, Lucy White 
risk, of Boston, Mr. Aaron Chapin d. in Walpole, Mass., Jan. 31, 
1833. Children— 

1. Lucy White, b. Dec. 4, 1819 ; d. Aug. 1852. 

2. Harriette Maria, b. Sept. 22, 1821 ; m. Thomas Emmons, who 
d. June 14, 1844. 

3. George Aaron, b. Jan. 18, 1824 ; m. Sarah H. Davis. 

4. Carolina Louisa, b. Jan. 9, 1826 ; m. May 8, 1854, Charles A. 
Hewius, of Boston. 

SEVENTH GENERATION. 

George Aaron Chapin, son of Aaron and Lucy W. Chapin, b. 
in Boston, Jan. 18, J 824; m. June 2, 1846, to Sarah H.Davis. 
Mr. Chapin is an importer and dealer in hardware and cutlery, Nos. 
56 and 58 Pearl street, Boston. Children — 

1. Samuel Davis, b. May 6, 1857. 

2. George Gilman, b. Sept. 1, 1849. 

3. Charles Davis, b. Oct. 31, 1857; d. Nov. 21, 1851. 

4. William Fisk, b. March 4, 1854 ; d. May 8, 1854. 

5. Mary Ingersoll, b. March 6, 1856. 

6. Clarence, b. March 20, 1858. 

7. Everett Hale, b. Feb. 2, 1860 ; d. Dec. 30, 1811. 

(1629) 

ROSAMOND CHAPIN, dau. of Ahira and Caroline Chapin, b. 
Aug. 30, 1832, in Prattsburgh, Steuben Co., N. Y. ; m. Nov. 2, 
1851, to John Lovell, of Huntisford, Dodge Co., Wis. Res. in 
Huntisford ; have one son — 'Frederick. 

(1630) 
EDWIN CHAPIN, son of Ahira and Caroline Chapin, b. May 
29, 1834, in Prattsburgh, N. Y. ; m. Oct. 27, 1858, to Elsie M. Field. 
Res. Forest City, Meeker Co., Minn. Farmer. One dau., Alice 
Emmeretta, b. Sept. 29, 1859. 



APPENDIX. 365 



ALLIED FAMILIES. 



SIXTH GENERATION. ^ 

(1024) 

FRANCES CHAPIN, dau. of Benjamin and Sarah Cbapin, b. 
in Springfield, Chicopee, Mass., Sept. 24, 1792 ; m. Sept. 2o, 1817, 
to Horatio Burcbard, of Marshall, (then Paris) Oneida Co., N. Y,, 
son of Jonathan and Beulah Burchard, b. in Springfield, j\Iass., Nov. 
12, 1791. In 1798, his father's family moved to Paris, now Mar- 
shall, Oneida Co., N. Y. Mr. H. Burchard was a Dea. and leading 
member of the Congregational church in Marshall, for many years, 
and until his removal to Aurora, Erie Co., N. Y., in 1839. In 1840, 
he selected and removed on to a farm on Rock River, near Beloit, 
Wis., where his widow and a portion of the family now (1862) re- 
side. Farmer. Dea. Horatio Burchard d. at Beloit, Nov. 17, 1850. 
Children all b. in Marshall, N. Y. 

1. Harriet, b. May 30, 1818 ; res. in Beloit, with her mother. 

2. Harriet Beulah, b. Oct. 6, 1819, was several years teacher in 
Freeport, 111.; m. Jan. 15, 1862, to Edward Burchard, 2d son of 
Gurden Burchard, Utica, N. Y., merchant, who now resides at Lake 
Forest, 111. 

3. Sarah Maria, b. Dec. 10, 1820 ; d. unm. at Beloit, Wis., Dec. 
21, 1853. 

4. Louisa, b. Sept. 1, 1823 ; res. with her mother, at Beloit. 

5. Horatio Chapin Burchard, b. Sept. 22, 1825 ; entered Hamil- 
ton College, N. Y., in 1847, and graduated there in 1850. Was two 
years Principal of the seminary in Monroe, Wis., and subsequently 
Principal of Freeport Union School. He was admitted in 1852, as 
an attorney and counsellor at law, and commenced practice at Free- 
port, 111., in 1855. He m. June 15, 1861, Miss Jane N. Laweor, of 
Lena, Stephenson Co., 111. ; res. Freeport, 111., and is a member of 
the firm of Burchard & Baston, Atty's. 

6. John Albert, b. Nov. 6, 1828 ; res. Beloit. A farmer. 

7. Jesse, b. Dec. 9, 1830 ; res. Beloit. A farmer. 

8. Mary, b. April 24, 1833 ; was educated at Beloit Seminary, 
Wis. Commenced teaching at Monroe, Wis., 1852, and d. there 
Oct. 30, 1852. Buried at Beloit, Wis. 

9. Caroline, b. June 8, 1835; d. at Marshall, N. Y., March J 2, 
1836, and was buried there. 



366 APPENDIX. 



EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Harriet Prince Ely, dau. of Horatio G. and Fanny Ely, and 
granddaughter of (-^Sl) Hada^sa (Chapin) and Elilm Ely, b. in Bos- 
ton, Jan. 31, 1826 ; m. March 2, 1845, to John Sylvester Hunt, b. 
in Lexington, Mass., Feb. 26, 1821 ; res. Boston. Mr. Hunt was by 
trade a joiner, but for the last eight years has been Lieut, of Police. 
Children — 

1. Harriet Gertrude, b. Dec. 15, 1845. 

2. Ellen Augusta, b. Jan. 18, 1848. 

3. Bertron Sylvester, b. Dec. 13, 1849 ; d. July 1, 1851. 

EIGHTH GENERATION. 

Chauncey Wait, son of Russell and Mary (Moreton) Wait, of 
Wliately, and great-grandson of Bathsheba (Chapin) Smith and 
Jonathan Smith, b. Sept. 1817; m. Martha B. Kingsbury. Have 
one dau., Julia, b. March 27, 1852. Mr. Wait has been a hotel 
keeper at Chicopee centre, Willimansett, and Holyoke. 

Albert Wait, son of Russell and Mary (Moreton) Wait, of 
Whately, and great-grandson of Bathsheba (Chapin) Smith and 
Jonathan Smith, b. Sept. 10, 1819 ; m. Jerusha Wait. Children — 

1. Frank R., b. Oct. 20, 1850. 

2. Mary, b. Aug. 15, 1855. 

Mr. Wait has kept a livery stable for several years, at Chicopee 
Falls, also at Chicopee Centre. 

Lyman Wait, son of Russell and Mary (Moreton) Wait, of 
Whately, and great-grandson of Bathsheba (Chapin) Smith and Jon- 
athan Smith ; ra. Ella Bartlett. Have one dau., Ida. 



ERRATA. 

M 

No. 143, after Mary, read m. Eleazar Warner, of Granby. j )|\| 

On p. 1, first line, for Samuel read Calvin. 
No. 67, for Nathaniel read Jonathan. 
" 107, for Brancraft read Bancroft. 
" 216, for Eliphalet read Elizabeth. 
" 388, for Mary read Marcy. 
" 491, for Percy read Perez. 
" 561, for Jael I'ead Joel. 
On p. 54, omit the No. 793, not the name. 
No. 854, for Uriel read Ariel. 

" 855, for Marinda read Miranda. 

" 910, for Anna read Ania. 
On p. 67, for 504, before Thankful, read 514. . 

" p. 85, 9th line from top, for fron. read from. 

" p. 99, under head of Aaron Chapin, for Brainbridge read Bainbridge. 
No. 971, for Waller read Walter. 

" 1026, for Almesia read Almeria. 

" 1072, for Lurana read Susannah. 
Page 185, Eunice Moody, 6th instead of 5th generation. 

" 186, Asaph Preston, 7th instead of 6th generation. 

" 187, before Martha Moody, read 6th generation. 
No. 1109, for Lindu read Linda. 

" 1112, for Annie R. Smith read Annie K. 

" 1187, for Bidsey read Birdsey. 

" 1319, for N. B. McCrea read W. B. 
On p. 140, for No. 1240 read 1242. 
No. 1389, for Malendy read Melendy. 

Page 147, under Lyman R. Chapin, for Elizabeth read Sarah. 
No. 1753, birth should read 1821. 

" 2042, for son read daughter. 

" 2065, for John W. Greene read John N. 

•' 2079, for b. March 10, read April 10. 

" 2089, before Lucy read Elizabeth. 

" 2354, in Index, for Lavina read Lovina. 

" 2430, in Index, for Alrop read Alsop. 

On p. 188, for Loman A. Burnett read Lyman A. 

Page 190, for Elimena Graves read Climena. 
" 191, 13th line from top, for wood read wool. 
" 198. 4th line from bottom, for Morse R. read Mause V. V. 

Page 202, 3d line from top, for Ellen M. Smith read Ellen W, 
"" 202, under Maria Smith, add 2. James, and the two next children, Nos. 
3 and 4. 



368 



ERRATA. 



Page 206, for Roxaiiy Charter read Roxany E. 

" 2229, 2d line from top, instead of or between Mendon or Milford, read 
now. 

" 229, under Dea. Samuel Chapin, for Grag-gin read Cragin. 
Names to be added to Indexes to Part I. 



8 


Chapin Emma R., 


p. 150 


6 


8 


Lovina, 


2353 




7 


Martin, 


p. 99 


7 


8 


Charter Franklin M., 


2301 


7 


8 


Geo. W., 


2302 


6 


7 


Coit Fanny L., 


1553 


2 


6 


Goddard Giles, (note 


) P--2'' 


7 



Ilazen Rev. Reuben, 2d 
line from bottom of p. 42 

Ilewins Charles A., ap. p. 364 

Murphy Mr., 1119 

Pease Anna, 539 

Root Dorothy, 2 

Rumrill James A., 1901 



The names standing against the following Nos. not bearing the Chapin 
name, should iiave been omitted in the Chapin Index, viz.: — Nos. 629, 1105> 
1106, 1107, 1317, 1330, 1435. 



FAMILY RECORD, 






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FAMILY RECORD. 



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