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Full text of "A chapter of Hopkins genealogy. 1735-1905"

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GIVEN BY 

BATES FUND 




VI. TOF.L WILLIS HOPKINS. 



A CHAPTER 



OF 



HOPKINS GENEALOGY 
















CHICAGO 

THE LAKESIDE PRESS 
1905 




The genealogist can not long remain a mere compiler of 
family statistics. In following back the currents which have 
united in his own life he finds himself traveling from one town 
to another of colonial America and he is brought into vital or 
accidental relation with many important events of American 
history. 

Dotted through the desert of history he finds oases where his 
own people encamped, where they did great deeds, or at least saw 
great deeds performed and lent the influence of their presence. 
"Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrims' pride" means 
something for the man who is aquainted with his ancestors 
which it never can mean for the man who does not know his 
own grandparents, but has a vague idea that he is an American. 
BENEDICT 



ELLA WARREN HARRISON 

COMPILER 

ARCHIBALD WILSON HOPKINS 

PUBLISHER 



DEDICATED TO 

A BONNY, FLAXEN-HAIRED BOY WHO CAME ONE DAY TO AN EARTHLY HOME 
BRINGING A BIT OF HEAVENLY SUNSHINE. THEY GAVE HIM A NAME HONORED 
AND LOVED BY ALL THE COUNTRY SIDE, THE NAME OP HIS GRANDFATHER, 

JOEL WILLIS HOPKINS. 

HEIR TO ALL THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE GENERATIONS BEHIND HIM, INHER- 
ITING BOTH THE GOOD AND EVIL OP THEIR NATURES, HE FACES HIS BATTLE OF 
LIFE. MAY HE MEET IT WITH HIGH COURAGE. "MAY THE LORD BLESS HIM 
AND KEEP HIM; THE LORD MAKE HIS FACE SHINE UPON HIM AND BE GRACIOUS 
UNTO HIM ; THE LORD LIFT UP HIS COUNTENANCE UPON HIM AND GIVE HIM PEACE.' 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

DEDICATION - 5 

SCOTCH-IRISH NOTES 15 

VIRGINIA NOTES 17 

"THE VALLEY" - 23 
NOTES FROM THE SESSION BOOK OF COOK'S CREEK AND PYKED 

MOUNTAIN CONGREGATIONS - 27 

JOHN HOPKINS, PIONEER 37 

THE JOHN HOPKINS FAMILY 40 

RED OAK, OHIO FAMILY 43 
ITEMS COPIED FROM THE SESSION BOOK OF THE OLD STONE CHURCH 

AT RED OAK, OHIO 49 
INSCRIPTIONS ON THE STONES IN THE OLD CHURCHYARD AT RED 

OAK, OHIO 52 
OLD LETTERS WRITTEN BY ARCHIBALD HOPKINS OF RED OAK, 

OHIO - 59 

WILL OF ARCHIBALD HOPKINS OF RED OAK, OHIO 63 

THE ARCHIBALD HOPKINS FAMILY - 65 

THE WILLIAM HOPKINS FAMILY 68 

THE JOHN HOPKINS FAMILY 95 

THE JANE HOPKINS POGUE FAMILY 1 1 1 

MARY HOPKINS POGUE 145 

THE SARAH HOPKINS GILLILAND FAMILY 146 

THE ROBERT HOPKINS FAMILY 160 

THE GORDON HOPKINS FAMILY 163 

THE BENJAMIN HOPKINS FAMILY 171 

THE THOMAS HOPKINS FAMILY - 172 

THE ELIZABETH HOPKINS KINKEAD FAMILY 178 

ELIJAH HOPKINS 184 

THE JAMES HOPKINS FAMILY 185 

HARRIET HOPKINS EVANS 189 

THE ARCHIBALD HOPKINS FAMILY - 190 

THE EDWIN HOPKINS FAMILY 193 

THE GRACY ANN DUNLAP FAMILY - 197 

7 



LETTER WRITTEN BY BENJAMIN HENTON 205 

THE SARAH HOPKINS HENTON FAMILY 207 

THE JOHN HENTON FAMILY 207 

THE DAVID HENTON FAMILY 208 

JANE HENTON RALSTON 214 

THE SILAS HENTON FAMILY 215 

THE ELIZABETH HENTON SITES FAMILY 219 

ESTHER HENTON FAWCETTE 219 

THE HANNAH MARY HENTON WALKER FAMILY 220 

SARAH HENTON 226 

THE MARY HOPKINS POAGE FAMILY 229 

THE JOHN HOPKINS POAGE FAMILY 229 

THE JANE POAGE POAGE FAMILY 230 

THE GEORGE POAGE FAMILY 243 

THE THOMAS POAGE FAMILY 250 

THE JAMES POAGE FAMILY - 255 

THE HARRIET POAGE POWERS FAMILY 257 

THE ANN POAGE STEWART FAMILY- 261 

THE ELIZABETH POAGE BRUBAKER FAMILY 265 

THE MARY POAGE WILSON FAMILY 266 

THE REBECCA POAGE METCALF FAMILY 266 

THE ROBERT WATSON POAGE FAMILY 267 

THE WILLIAM POAGE FAMILY 267 

LETTERS WRITTEN BY JANE HOPKINS POAGE FAMILY 273 

THE JANE HOPKINS POAGE FAMILY 280 

THE JOHN HOPKINS POAGE FAMILY 282 

THE W 7 ILLIAM LlNDSEY POAGE FAMILY 284 

THE EDWIN POAGE FAMILY 285 

AMY POAGE 285 

THE HANNAH AMANDA POAGE MCDOUELL FAMILY 285 

THE JANE ISABELLA POAGE McKAY FAMILY - 285 

ROBERT POAGE 286 

ROBERT C. POAGE 286 

THE ANN E. POAGE GARRISON FAMILY 286 

THE HANNAH HOPKINS SHANKLIN FAMILY 291 

THE JOHN HOPKINS SHANKLIN FAMILY 291 

RUTH HOPKINS - 299 

THE THOMAS HOPKINS FAMILY 303 

THE JOHN HOPKINS FAMILY 303 

THE FRANCES GORDON HOPKINS FAMILY 305 

BENJAMIN HINTON HOPKINS 305 

8 



THE ANNA JANE HOPKINS SCOTT FAMILY 306 

THE RTJFUS C. HOPKINS FAMILY 309 

THE JOHN HOPKINS FAMILY 313 

MARY HOPKINS - 3 J 3 

THE THOMAS HOPKINS FAMILY 313 

GEORGE BAXTER HOPKINS 313 

THE JOHN HOPKINS FAMILY 314 

LUCINDA HOPKINS ARMENTROUT 314 

JOSEPH BAXTER HOPKINS 314 

THE CYRUS HOPKINS FAMILY 315 

THE ANN HOPKINS RICE FAMILY 321 

MARRIAGE BOND GIVEN BY ANN HOPKINS AND JAMES RICE 323 

JOHN RICE - 3 2 4 

JAMES RICE 3 2 4 

ANNA JANE RICE HALL 3 2 S 

THE THOMAS HOPKINS RICE FAMILY 325 

THE GEORGE POAGE RICE FAMILY - 327 

THE WILLIAM CYRUS RICE FAMILY 330 

WILL OF ARCHIBALD HOPKINS (PIONEER) 339 

SALE BILL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 341 

RECEIPTS GIVEN BY THE HEIRS 345 

WILL OF JENNET HOPKINS 348 

THE ARCHIBALD HOPKINS FAMILY - 349 

THE EPHRAIM HOPKINS FAMILY 349 

THE ARCHIBALD HOPKINS FAMILY 351 

THE WILLIAM HOPKINS FAMILY 367 

THE ARCHIBALD HOPKINS FAMILY - 367 

THE JOHN HINTON HOPKINS FAMILY 368 

THE DAVID RALSTON HOPKINS FAMILY 371 

WILLIAM E. HOPKINS 37 2 

FRANCES HOPKINS HOPKINS 37 2 

THE ELIZABETH HOPKINS HARNSBERGER FAMILY 372 

JANE HOPKINS CRISMAN 375 

MARY HOPKINS ROLSTON 375 

THE ELIZABETH HOPKINS HOPKINS FAMILY 375 

THE WILLIAM HOPKINS FAMILY 3 Sl 

THE JOHN HOPKINS FAMILY 382 

NAMES OF THOSE WHO HAVE SERVED IN THE ARMY OR NAVY - 393 

COMPILER'S NOTES - 395 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



PAGE 



FRONTISPIECE VI. IOEL WILLIS HOPKINS 

OLD HOUSE BUILT BY JOHN HOPKINS, PIONEER 37 

OLD RED OAK CHURCH, OHIO 49 

HOPKINS GRAVES, RED OAK CEMETERY 52 

HOUSE BUILT BY II. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, RED OAK 63 

IV. IOEL WILLIS HOPKINS 69 

V. ARCHIBALD WILSON HOPKINS - 73 
IV. JOHN CRAWFORD HOPKINS - 83 
OLD BEECH TREE, FORT BRIDGE RED OAK CHURCH 108 
III. SARAH HOPKINS GILLILAND 146 
III. THOMAS AND III. GORDON HOPKINS - 163 
HOUSE BUILT BY III. BENJAMIN HOPKINS GRAVE OF III. ELIJAH 

HOPKINS - 171 
HOUSES BUILT BY III. JAMES, III. THOMAS, AND III. GORDON 

HOPKINS 177 

III. JOHN, III. JAMES, AND III. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS 185 

III. GRACY ANN HOPKINS DUNLAP 197 

IV. JAMES ALEXANDER WALKER 223 
OLD UNION GROVE CHURCH 265 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, GRANVILLE, ILLINOIS 311 
HOPKINS GRAVES, GRANVILLE, ILLINOIS - 335 
IV. JOEL WILLIS HOPKINS 397 



ii 



Does not every genealogical student learn to know men, not only for 
what they are, but for what ancestral factors have made their lives possible ? 

Life histories of Christian fortitude and love and unselfishness, which 
make us wholesomely ashamed of being discontented with the comforts 
which the least fortunate of us now enjoy. 

This is the historic lore that genealogy furnishes, besides stimulating our 
own interest in the notable events of our early development into a nation. 

BENEDICT. 



SCOTCH-IRISH NOTES 

From "The Puritan in Holland, England, and America," by Douglas 
Campbell. 

"Driven from their adopted home in the north of Ireland by English 
persecution, there was burned into their very souls the bitter recollection of 
a century of English ingratitude and broken faith. They were un-English 
in their origin, and they came to America, which they have always looked 
upon as their only country, hating England, her church, and her form of 
government with the intensest hatred. By them American independence 
was first openly advocated, and but for their efforts, seconding those of 
the New England Puritans, that independence would not have been 
secured. As these men founded none of the American colonies, their story 
has found no place in Colonial History ; but this story is needed to complete 
our sketch of the Puritans in America. They were the Puritans of the South, 
Calvinists in theology and republicans in politics. For centuries Ireland 
has been a thorn in the side of England, causing ceaseless irritation, 
because its people would not tamely submit to what they justly regarded 
as the oppression of their neighbors. During the reign of Elizabeth, 
Edmon Spencer had laid before the English Council an exhaustive scheme 
for the pacification of the sister island. He proposed that the native popu- 
lation should be substantially exterminated by the sword and by famine, 
and replaced by English settlers. Nothing came of the scheme at this time, 
but in the early days of James the First, it was taken up, although on a 
restricted scale. A rebellion of two of the great nobles in the province of 
Ulster furnished an excuse for confiscating their vast estates, amounting 
to some two million acres. Of this princely domain, about three-fourths, 
consisting mostly of bog, fen, and mountain wastes, was returned to the 
Irish tenants. The remaining five hundred thousand acres of fertile land 
were thrown open to protestant colonization. Here begins the history of 
the Scotch-Irish as a distinctive people. 

"It was under such conditions that the colonization of Ulster was begun. 
The men who gave it character were the same class as those who afterwards 
made New England. They were promised full indulgence for their reli- 
gion, and, so far as trade and commerce were concerned, an act of parlia- 



ment placed them, with all the inhabitants of Ireland, on an equality with 
their English brethren. These Scotch settlers were selected under the 
direction of James himself, and were picked men, even superior to the 
English colonists. In 1698, upon the demand of the English manufactur- 
ers, the woolen industry of Ireland was utterly destroyed. It was claimed 
that labor was cheaper there than in England, and that, therefore, the manu- 
factured product could be sold at a lower price. This was not to be en- 
dured. The interference of parliament was invoked, and by a series of 
repressive acts, the Irish looms were closed. As one result of this legis- 
lation, twenty thousand of the protestant artisans of Ulster, deprived of 
employment, left Ireland for America, carrying with them the remembrance 
of how English faith, plighted to their fathers, had been broken under the 
influence of English greed. 

"This, however, was but the beginning of the exodus. In 1704 a Test 
Act was passed for Ireland, almost as severe in its provisions against the 
Dissenters as against the Catholics, while no Toleration Act like that in 
England mitigated its severity. In practice it was enforced most rigor- 
ously against the Protestants. Under this act none of the non-conformists 
were allowed to hold any office above that of petty constable. They were 
forbidden to keep schools of any character, marriages by their ministers 
were declared invalid. The issues of such marriages were bastardized 
before the law, and men were even prosecuted for living with their wives. 
The dead were not exempt, for they were denied burial in their ancestral 
churchyards, among their fathers, by whom the churches were founded. 
A new exodus to America began, which continued until the passage of the 
long-delayed Toleration Act for Ireland in 1712. At first they hoped for 
speedy relief, but as soon as 1719, all such hope was abandoned and there- 
after ships enough could not be found to carry from Ulster to America 
the men who were unwilling to live except in the air of religious freedom. 

"We were told that in 1727 six ships, loaded with families from Ulster, 
landed in Philadelphia in a single week, and that throughout the whole of 
the eighteenth century the arrival of two or three in a day was not uncom- 
mon. This stream of Scotch-Irish settlers flowed first westward, then 
south, following the eastern border of the mountain range which divides 
the Atlantic coast from the Mississippi Valley. Flocking into Western 
Virginia, they formed almost its entire population. The Scotch-Irish Puri- 
tans, like their brothers in New England, came of a fighting stock. In 
the Colonial wars their section furnished most of the soldiers of Virginia." 



16 



VIRGINIA NOTES 

(Written years ago by Dr. Archibald Hopkins, of Harrisonburg, Va., 
for his son, Dr. William Davis Hopkins. Dr. Archibald Hopkins was a 
grandson to "Ercebald" Hopkins.) 

"A family of Hopkins emigrated from the north of Ireland to this coun- 
try many years before the Revolutionary War, and landed first at Albany, 
N. Y. How long they remained there is not known. This family con- 
sisted of a man, his second wife, and three sons by his first wife. Owing 
to some difficulty between the sons and their step-mother, either at Albany, 
N. Y., or Baltimore, Md. (where we hear of them next), the three sons 
deserted the family roof and retired to the valley of Virginia. This was 
then almost a wilderness. They traveled up the valley as far as Green- 
briar County, where they settled, and remained but a short time. Being 
attacked by Indians, and driven away from Greenbriar County, they re- 
turned to Rockingham County, which was then included in Augusta 
County, and settled in the western part, on Muddy Creek. (Braddock's 
defeat occurred on July 9, 1755. The consternation was universal, and 
many of the settlers on the western frontier fled across the Blue Ridge, 
and even as far north as Virginia.) The names of these three broth- 
ers were John, William, and Archibald, or "Ercebald," as spelled in an old 
deed. They sang the psalms as they were written in the Old Testament, 
and would not, in that day, tolerate innovations in the shape of modern 
rhymes. They were amongst the founders, or first members, of Cook's 
Creek, or, as it is now called, the New Erection Church. Their nearest 
neighbors were the Shanklins, Loves, Baxters, Gordons, Bryans, Rices, 
Ralstons, etc., with whom they and their descendants married and inter- 
married. An old deed, now in the possession of Miss Ruth Hopkins, of 
Harrisonburg, Va., from William Castleberry and wife to Ercebald Hopkins, 
conveying three hundred and fifty acres of land lying in the county of 
Augusta, on Muddy Creek, for the sum of five shillings, current money of 
Virginia, is witnessed by Pat Cunningham, Abraham Bird, and John 
Pirkins, and was admitted to record at a court held for Augusta County, 
on the i6th of March, 1757, John Madison being clerk of the court. This 
is the place where Archibald settled, and his descendants have owned the 

17 



place until 1875, when it was sold to William Chrisman. John Hopkins 
settled at the Neff place, about two miles west of Archibald. William 
settled five miles north of the other two. There is in Richmond, Va., 
the record of a patent made by 'George the Second, by the Grace of God, 
of Great Britain, France, and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, etc.,' 
to Ephraim Love and William Hopkins for 204 acres in the County of 
Augusta, on the head branches of Muddy Creek, between the lands Jacob 
Dye lives on and the mountains, described by meets and bounds, as usual 
with all other wording of those old patents, executed by 'Thomas Lee, 
president of our council and Commander-in-chief of our Colony, etc.' 
(Dated 5th of September, 1749.) In connection with Ephraim Love, they 
surveyed the land for which this patent was issued." 



18 



From the time of the first settlements till 1734, it was all one county, 
called Spotsylvania County. In 1734 Orange County was formed from 
the western portion, including all of Virginia west of the Blue Ridge. It 
was called Orange County because of the color of the soil. 

The act of the Assembly, constituting Augusta and Frederick Counties, 
was passed November i, 1738, but the business of the people of Augusta 
County was transacted at Orange Court House till December, 1745, when 
the court of Augusta was organized. In the meantime, all persons in the 
valley having suits to prosecute, or any law business to transact, had to 
take the long trip on horseback, through the gaps in the mountains, and 
by bridle-paths to Orange, spending two or three days on the way. More- 
over, as there was no minister for the Established Church in the valley 
until 1747, all couples wishing to be married had to travel across the Blue 
Ridge to Orange, or elsewhere, in search of a minister authorized by law 
to perform the ceremony. Until October, 1780, no minister, except of the 
Church of England, had authority to celebrate marriage except by dispen- 
sation of the governor. In October, 1780, by an act of the legislature, all 
ministers of the gospel were authorized to celebrate the rites of matrimony 
on and after January i, 1781, but dissenting ministers, not exceeding four 
of each sect in any county, were to be specially licensed by the County 
Courts. Ministers of the Established Church were authorized, ex officio, 
to perform the service. Notwithstanding a large majority of the people 
had become Dissenters long before this, the legislature elected by the free- 
holders clung to the establishment, and it was not until October, 1784, 
that all ministers were put on an equal footing in respect to this matter. 
The first court house in Augusta County was, no doubt, like those on the 
frontier, a log-cabin. A carpenter's bench with half a dozen chairs upon it 
served as the judgment seat, and though the house was barely sufficient to 
contain the bench, bar, jurors, and constables, the occasion of the first 
court must have brought the whole population to town. 

The system of two distinct courts, one of law and the other of chancery, 
continued until 1831. 

Peyton, in his history of Augusta County, says: "The first Augusta 
County settlers were, for the most part, the descendants of the ancient Cal- 

19 



edonians, who boasted that they had never been subject to the law of any 
conqueror. They belonged to various highland clans, and were strongly 
imbued with the prejudices, feelings, and sentiments of their pecuh'ar clan. 

Each clan bore the name of their hereditary chief, and were supposed 
to be allied to him in different degrees by ties of blood. Every individual 
sought to show his attachment to his leader as the head of his family. 
This feeling strongly exhibited itself in the Augusta County colony, which, 
from intermarriages, soon assumed something of the character of a numer- 
ous and increasing family." 

Early in 1 740, or shortly before, there was a great influx of people into 
the valley. On May 22, 1740, fourteen heads of families appeared at 
Orange Court House to "prove their importation." Among these families 
was Robert Poage, his wife, Elizabeth, and his children, Margaret, John, 
Martha, Sarah, George, Mary, Elizabeth, William, and Robert. The 
Hopkins and Poage families are closely related by many marriages. 

The first reference to a public road was June, 1739, "John Poage, 
David Davis, and George Hutchinson having, according to an order of 
court, viewed and laid off the road from Beverly Manor, etc., it is ordered 
that the road be cleared from John Young's, at the North Mountain, to 
the top of Blue Ridge, to the bonds of Goochland Co." 

On November 18, 1773, it was determined to build a chapel in the 
neighborhood of Cook's Creek. This was the first building of the Cook's 
Creek church. When it became necessary to build a new church, they 
chose a different location, and called it the "New Erection." 

The members of this church were Dissenters, or Seceders. They sang 
psalms, and were very strict about Sabbath keeping and attendance at 
the communion service. The book containing the records of this church 
from 1759 to 1835 i s st ^ ^ n existence. It is called "The Session Book of 
Cook's Creek and Pyked Mountain Congregation." 

Rockingham County was partitioned off from Augusta County October, 
1777, and held its first session April 27, 1778. It is the central county of 
the tier of counties which ranges through Shenandoah Valley from the 
Potomac, at Harper's Ferry, to Purgatory Mount, on the north bank of 
the James River. Its area is nine hundred square miles. Its surface is 
comparatively level, excepting the western part, where it is broken by the 
projecting spurs of the north range. On the eastern boundary stands the 
great mountain wall, the Blue Ridge, while east of the center is situated 
"The Peake," the southern termination of the Massanutten Range. It is 
one of the most beautiful spots in the world, and those early settlers must 
have felt the inspiration of the grand old mountains about them. 

20 



The first title to real estate put on record in Rockingham County was 
a deed of bargain and sale from Robert Shanklin and Rebecca, his wife, 
March 24, 1777. 

Land office treasury warrant, No. 832, was issued to John Hopkins, 
Sr., for 1,537 acres, April 2, 1782. It was issued to authorize him to take 
up any vacant and unappropriated land within the commonwealth of Vir- 
ginia. Four hundred and thirty-seven acres were taken up by Rebecca 
and Jane Poage, recorded in grant book 44, page 478; 159 acres by Rebecca 
and Jane Poage in Harrison County, book 53, page 456. In 1782 
the largest landowners were the Chrismans, Bears, Gordons, Hopkins, 
Hintons, Ralstons, Shanklins, and Scotts, all of which names appear many 
times in this history. 

Andrew Shanklin was sworn Justice February 23, 1782. 

From 1800 to 1860 emigration and immigration were the order of the 
day. The sons of farmers and others, descendants of early settlers, were 
enticed away by the low price of rich lands in the West, Kentucky, Ohio, 
Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri. Often whole families sold out and left 
in search of new homes near the frontier of civilization. Sometimes sev- 
eral families went together, to form a congenial neighborhood. Letters 
are still in existence that were written by Hopkins people who had settled 
in Jessamine and Logan Counties, Kentucky, to their old friends and rela- 
tives in Rockingham County, Virginia. 

These emigrants packed in wagons their provisions, clothing, bedding, 
and such cherished articles as they could not leave behind, and spent weeks 
on the road, carrying their food with them, and camping out at night. 
Some of these family flights involved much hardship and suffering, as the 
way was rough, roads in some places being not much more than trails 
through the wilderness. They had no springs to their wagons, and prob- 
ably the most comfortable way of traveling was horseback. Many a 
woman has gone hundreds of miles in the saddle, carrying her baby in her 
lap, through heat and cold, rain and snow, with clothing that we would 
think utterly insufficient; crossing rivers and climbing mountains, and yet 
living to tell her children and grandchildren of the pleasures and perils 
of the journey. Until within a few years there were those who remembered 
"the log cabins, the linsy-woolsy, the short gowns, the hunting shirts, the 
moccasins, the pack-horses, the simple living, the shoes and stockings for 
winter and state occasions, the deer and the rifle, the fields of flax and the 
spinning-wheel, and the wool and loom, and with them the strict attention 
to religious concerns, the catechising of children, the regular going to church, 
the reading of the Bible, and keeping Sabbath from the beginning to the 



21 



end, the singing of the psalms all blending, presented a beautiful pic- 
ture of enterprise, economy, and religion in laying the foundation of society." 
At last a tardy recognition is being made of the sterling character and 
worth of those pioneers. They fought the same battles, and stood for the 
same principles, as the Pilgrims. Stern and uncompromising in matters 
of conscience, yet they were never guilty of persecuting those who did not 
believe as they did. Thankful, indeed, may they be who have in their 
veins the splendid old Scotch-Irish blood. 



22 



THE VALLEY 

" 'The Valley,' as the expression is understood by those who live in it, 
denotes the tract of country in Virginia bounded on the east by the Blue 
Ridge and on the west by a parallel ridge called, in most of its extent, 
the North Mountain. It is a fine agricultural district, presenting the ad- 
vantages which result from a soil generally fertile, hills and vales, number- 
less springs of pure water that never fail, streams of various sizes that never 
go dry, luxuriant forests, a climate suited to grains and grasses in great 
variety, and eminently favorable to health. Its scenery is not surpassed in 
variety, beauty, or grandeur by many districts in America. From the tops 
of its mountains the eye rests on landscapes lovely beyond description. 
Here may be seen, in one view, the mountain, the hill, the valley, the forest, 
the meadow, the cliffs, the stream, the farm, the farm-house, the village, 
the school-house, and the church. A moral, industrious, contented popula- 
tion dwell here ; intelligent, yet unostentatious in their habits and manners, 
and to a great extent the descendants of those who settled in this region 
when it was a wilderness, and who, while contending with the savage for this 
fine country, laid the foundation of literary institutions, and formed the 
churches which have contributed largely to make the population what it is. 

"Manya dweller in other sections of our happy country turns his thoughts 
to a region far from his home, and to other days, and exclaims, 'The Valley ! 
I love it! It was the home of my youth, and in it are the graves of my 
fathers!' Peace to their memory. They were a God-fearing and law- 
abiding people, because they strictly kept the Sabbath holy and reverenced 
the sanctuary. Dangers they met with undaunted firmness, hardships 
and privations with unrepining endurance. The right to worship God 
according to the dictates of their own conscience, and the advantages of 
education, they prized above any other blessings which earth could give. 
To secure the first they sought a dwelling-place in the wilderness far, far 
from their fatherland; and for the second, they relied on their own exertions 
under the blessing of God. 

"The first settlers in this valley, with few exceptions, were from the north 
of Ireland. They were the descendants of the Scotch, who, for various 
reasons, had emigrated to this country, and had taken with them the kirk 
and the school. They were decided Presbyterians. Deep abhorrence of 

23 



Popery and a strong dislike to Episcopacy were to be expected amongst 
those whose fathers had felt the oppressions and cruelties of Claverhouse, 
and whose friends had suffered and fought and died at Londonderry." 
# $ $ $ # # 

"In passing from Staunton to Lexington along the road leading through 
Brownsburg, about twenty-two miles from Staunton, the traveler will notice 
a brick church a few hundred yards on his right, and near it a large grave- 
yard, almost filled with graves of the generations who, for more than a 
century, have assembled there from Sabbath to Sabbath to worship God. 
The house that is now occupied is the third in which the congregation of 
New Providence have worshiped. The first was a wooden structure, and 
stood a short distance east of where the road to the church crosses the creek. 
The second was of stone, and occupied in part the ground that is covered 
by the present building. This house was built either in 1745 or 1746. It was 
an era of no little consequence, and a work of no little difficulty to the people 
who accomplished it. Some of the traditions of the congregation will illus- 
trate this. At that time there was but one vehicle that moved on wheels in 
the congregation, and it was a one-horse cart. The heavy timbers for the 
roof and galleries were dragged to the place with one end resting on the axle 
of the cart and the other on the ground. The wheels gave way under the 
weight of the last one, and the people collected and carried it nearly a mile. 

"It is said that in the year the church was built the pastor, in visiting 
through his charge, took dinner on one occasion with a family by no means 
amongst the poorest in the congregation. When all were seated at the 
table, it was seen that there was not both a knife and fork for each plate. 
The mother of the family in making an apology, told him that they had 
saved money to buy a set of knives and forks; but since the church was 
commenced they had given to that object, and must do without them till 
the next year. 

"The sand used in plastering the house was carried in sacks on horse- 
back about ten miles, and this was done chiefly by the girls of the congre- 
gation. There are those now living who know that their grandmothers 
assisted in this. There was then no committee on church extension to 
aid feeble congregations in building houses of worship, and with the spirit 
which animated these people few churches of our country would ask for aid. 

"The people of that period were not unfrequently disturbed by alarms of 
Indians, and the whole of a family would go to church on a Sabbath be- 
cause they dared not leave any at home. The father and sons carried their 
weapons with them, prepared to defend their lives, and a large number 
of armed men were frequently seen at the church." 

From "The Captives of Abb's Valley." 
24 



"Pride in ancestry which endured the hardships of an ocean voyage of 
several weeks in a small sailing vessel, which built log cabins on the borders 
of the primeval forest, which turned the virgin sod with the clumsy plow 
of two centuries ago, which bled from the wounds of the stone weapons of 
the Indians, which dressed in homespun, and was ignorant of the luxuries 
of the present day such pride is not a dangerous thing to instill into 
the veins of an American citizen." 



NOTES FROM THE SESSION BOOK OF COOK'S 
CREEK AND PYKED MOUNTAIN CONGRE- 
GATIONS, 1759-1835 



Reed for on account of bank 

Pds. S. D. 

Thomas Shanlin o 3 o 

John Hopkins, Sr o 3 o 

Darby Magan o 3 o 

David Ralston o 3 o 

Benj. Hinton o 3 o 

John Curry o 3 o 

Archibald Hopkins o 3 o 

Ephraim Lane o 3 o 



June i4th, 1784. At a Sacrament the collection reed, was three pounds, 
sixteen shillings. Cr. same day paid Thomas Scott for the wine, i Pd., o s. 

Same day Miss Hopkins for bread, o pds. n/6, the remaining Ball, 
of Pd. i, S. 16, D. 76. left in the hands of John Hardiman, Senr. 



1794, Dr. Wm. Thomas Shanklin L. s. p. 

June 16, To cash left in yr hands i 2 2 

At a sacrament held at Harrisonburgh in 

the hands of Thomas Shanklin. . i 2 6 



May 1 8, 1795, Cash in the hands of Thomas Shanklin Bu 
Church money o 



May, 3 1 , 1 796, Cash left in the hands of Thomas Shanklin .2 12 o 

June 1 9th, 1786. CR. L. s. p. 

June 19, 1786, By cash to Thomas Shanklin on account of 

James Linison 2 12 o 

27 



June 4th, 1789, Lodge in the hand of John herdman the 
sum of sixteen shillings of collection 

money o 16 

Some time tres't, 7/6 7 6 



1793. P. s. p. 

June 3, By cash for wine o 17 6 

June 3, By the depreciation of cut mony left in his hands 

in June, 1792 o 4 6 

By mystake o o ir 



May xoth, 1795. Paid out of the Publick money for 
Table linen for the use of the congrega- 
tion by Thomas Shanklin 4 12 

out of the collection of the year, 1794. 



A copy of North Mountain subscription for the Revt. Benj'n, Ewin, for 
the year 90, from May, 1790. 

L. s. d. 

George Baxter i 4 

Archibald Hopkins o 9 o 

John Hopkins o 15 o 

Thomas Shanklin, Jr o 9 o 

Thomas Shanlin, Sr i o o 

James Shanklin o 6 o 

James Henton o 6 o 

Ephriham Hopkins o 10 o 

Elizabeth Shanklin o 6 o 

Thomas Gordon o 12 o 

David Berry o 9 o 

John Berry o 12 o 

William Rolston o 15 o 

David Rolston o 12 o 

Benjamin Henton o 15 o 

David Rolston, Sr o 12 o 



Among the names of members belonging to the congregations of Harri- 
sonburgh and Cook's Creek in 1810 and 1811, we notice the following: 
Joseph Baxter, mother, Daughter Sarah, 

John Baxter sister, Anne, 

and wife, Mrs. Ann Hopkins, Wm. Chrisman, 

28 



Thomas Hopkins, 
wife, 



Davis Ralston, 
wife, 



Mrs. John Hopkins, 
Jenny Hopkins, 
Ellj. Cratzer. 
Later in the book we find the following names under the heading, 

"From the year of our Lord 1780 until 181 1, found on record, with additions 

to 1828." 



Joseph Baxter, 
Mrs. Baxter, his wife, 
Phebe Ewin, wid. 
Mrs. Baxter, wid. 
David Rolstons, snr. 
Mrs. Scott, wid. 
John Hopkins, senr. 
Joseph Henton, 
Mrs. Henton, his wife, 
Mrs. Catherine Gordon, 

wid. 

Jesse Ralston, 
Jane Rolston, 
Archibald Rolston, 
Elizabeth Rolston, 
M. Ann Gordon, 

Polly Gordon, 



10 br. i2th, 1759. 
John Hopkins, 
Jean Gordon, 



April 1 6, 1760. 

Skidmore Monsy, 
Mary Scott. 



Sally Gordon, 
Jane Gordon, 
Ruth Gordon, 
John Gordon, 
and wife Haney, 
William Dunlap, 
Archibald Hopkins, 
Mrs. Hopkins, his wife, 
John Henton, 

David Henton, 
Jane Henton, 
Esther Henton, 
Peggy Henton, 
John H. Rolston, 
Mrs. Mary Rclston, his 

wife, 
David Scott, 



Jane Henton, 
Martha M. Baxter, 
Mary Rice, 
George Baxter, 
Sarah Ann Hopkins, 
Ethel Henton, 
Elizabeth Ann Hopkins, 
David Bear, 
John Bear, 

Elizabeth Baxter, 
Samuel Bear, 
Robert Rice, 
Andrew Bear, 
John Rice, 

Mrs. J. Bear, 
Sarah Rice, 
Sarah Rolstone. 



MARRIAGES. 

Septbr. 1 5th, 1760. 

Christopher Armentroute, 
Susanna Powers. 



10 br. 29, 1762. 
George Braxter, 
Mary Love. 



Janr. 
May 
7 br. 



BAPTISMS. 
1762. 

Feby. Samuel Irwin, Aug. 26, Marg't Irwin 
Septr. Wm. Ralston. Mch. John Irwin. 
Novbr Eliz. Hopkins, 
John Hopkin. Novbr Ephriam Hopkin. 
Sarah Hopkins. June 24jean Scott. 

29 



1760. 
Mary Hopkin. 

1761. 
Eliz. Ralston, 



The minutes of the meetings are not recorded until 1812. Entries, 
containing names familiar to this history, are as follows: 

1812. Cooks Creek Meeting house May 1812. Were added to the 
church, Jesse Ralston, Archabal Ralston, Polly Gordon, Polly Baxter. 



Departed this life Anne Hopkins 29 of May, 1812. 



At a sacrament held in Harrisonburgh 13 of June, 1813, four members 
were added to the church, viz: Jacob Parrot and wife, Elizabeth Hopkins 
etc. 

baptized same time Polly Anne Hazle, Ann Hopkins Beard, Benjamin 
Henton Ralston, and Elizabeth Mary Baxter, all infants. 



2nd of April 1814. Departed this life Thomas Gordon. 



Departed this life Elizabeth Hopkins, Wife of John Hopkins, 22nd. of 
April, 1814. 



Baptized on Monday the 3oth. of May, 1814, Ann Jane Hopkins, 
daughter of Thomas Hopkins. 



Departed this life Mrs. Jane Hopkins, August 28th, 1814. 



Baptized at Cooks Creek meeting by the Rev'd John Ewing Sarah Ann 
and Thomas G. Hopkins children of Archibald Hopkins, i7th of August, 
1815. 



Baptized same time Pheby Ann Ewing daughter of William Ewing, 
Sarah Ralston and Anna Liza Ralston daughter of Jesse Ralston, Martha 
Hall Baxter and Samuel Clark Hazle son of James Hazle. 

February 22nd. 1817, Departed this life Mrs. James Herron. 

About the same time Mrs. Hannah Chrisman. 

10 of September, 1817. 

Removed from out of the bounds of the Congregation of Cooks Creek 
and Harrisons Burgh Tomas Hopkins and Wife sarah, his two sons, John 
and Frances and sister Ruth. 



14 of December, 1817, Baptized by the Rev't Conrad Spean at Cooks 
Creek Meeting house, Benjamin Briant Ewing son of Wm. Ewing, John 
Hopkins son of A. Hopkins. 

30 



At a Presbytery held in Harrisonburgh, commencing March 5, 1818, 
the Rev'd Daniel Baker was ordained and installed the Pastor of the United 
Congregations of Cooks Creek and Harrisonburgh. 

Were added to the Church the same time Henton Ralston and Wife 
Mrs. Henneberger and Kinly Berry. 



At a sacrament held at Harrisonburgh October, 1818, were added to 
the Church to wit Joseph Baker, John Baker, Betsy Sites, Mrs. Sprinkle 
Mrs. Bruffy Mrs. Wm. Hopkins, Deborah Butler, and Mrs. Thos. Logan. 



At a sacrament held at Cooks Creek Meeting house, on Sabbath nth. 
of April, 1819, 15 were added to the church to wit; Henry Smith, Archi- 
abald Hopkins, Elenor Chrisman, Ruth Gordon, Jane Gordon, Lidia Et- 
inger, Nancy Swartz, Polly Herron, Adelia Ewing, Lidia Etinger, Rebecca 
Langly and James Brown with Thomas, Ketty and Lucy people of color. 



Baptized same time 6 adults and 5 infants to wit Nancy Swarz, Ledia 
Etinger, and Rebecca Langly Thomas, Ketty and Lucy adults, also 
Ester Moffet daughter of David Beard, John Hopkins Ralston, Peggy Ann 
Berry, Henry Alexander Christman, and Samuel Miller, infants. 



At a sacrament held at Harrisonburgh 1819, were added to the 

Church on examination 8, to wit Mrs. Miller, Mrs. Polly Gordon, Eliza 
Herron, Sarah Like, Johana Scot, James Mallory, David Yakle, and Mrs. 
Hannah Davis, by certificate. 

Baptized same time 3 adults to wit Sarah Like, Elizabeth Henneber- 
ger, Ester Hopkins. 



At a sacrament held at Cooks Creek Meeting house October, 1819, 10 
were added to the church, to wit - - Jacob Bear, Tinkle Rachel Gamble, 
Nancy Harrison, Nancy Maker, John Blair, Elizabeth Blair, Hannah 
Mallory, Ruth Henton. 



At a sacrament held at Cooks Creek meeting house Mrs. Nail joined 
herself to the Church, Baptized ten to wit Agnus Jane Hopkins, Samuel 
D. Baxter, John Rodgers, Jesse Ralston, (Sarah Ellen, Elizabeth, Mary, 
John and Andrew Cougler,) John Berry. 



Mr. Thomas Scot departed this life 12 of May, 1822. 



Saturday, August 21 1822 Archibald Hopkins, John W. Ralston, John 



Scott, and Robert Herron, were ordained to the office of Ruling Elders 
in the united congregations of Cooks Creek, and Harrisonsburgh. 

Baptized same time. 

Rev'nd Joseph Smiths, daughter Elizabeth Hill. 

Jesse Ralstons, do. Lucritia, 

David Beards, do. Margarit Martha, 



At a sacrament held at Cooks Creek meeting house 9 were added to the 
church to wit: (27 September, 1823). 

John Gordon, Margaret Beard, Malinda E. Ralston. 

Nancy Gordon. Anna Snyder. Catharene Snyder. 

Rebeccah Longly, William Ralston and Edith a colored woman, be- 
longing to William Hopkins. 

At a sacrament held at New Erection Sept. 25, 1825, were added to 
the communion of the Church the following, viz: Mrs. Devier. Mrs. 
Carrier. Mrs. R. Rankin. Mrs. Hetty Rankin. Miss McAmie. Miss. Char- 
lotte Canmbell. Baptized. Malinda J. Ralston. John M. Gordon. 

At a sacrament held in Harrisonburg, May 7th. 1825, was received to 
communion of the church. 

On examination. Baptized. 

Milanda Hinton. John Bill Smith. 

Died during the month of April, 1825, Mrs. Kratzer Mrs. Brian, & 
Mrs. Higgins. 



At a sacrament held at Cooks Creek meeting house, November 4th. 
1826, James Hopkins joined himself with the Church. 



gth. March 1828. The session of C. C. & H. met at New Erection; 
opened with prayer. Present Rev. A. W. Kilpatrick, Mod. Mesrs. Wm. 
Ewin, Jepe Ralston, Archibald Ralston. Archibald Hopkins. & John H. 
Rolston, elders. 



April 6, 1828. 

Mr. Archibald Hopkins, was appointed to attend the Preby. at the com- 
ing Spring session. The session then adjourned to meet at this place on 
the igth Inst., at 2 O'clock, P. M. concluded with prayer. 



Deaths of Church members. 
1831. Ruth Henton. 
1834. Mrs. Cathrn. Gordon, died Jan. 
1833. Mrs. Nancy Bear, died in Oct. 

32 



June ayth. 1831, Sacrament N. Erection, Received on certificate Mrs. 
Agathy W. Thornton, on examination, George Baxter, Nathaniel Ervin, 
Sary Ann Hopkins, Esther Henton Solome Neff, Matilda Anderson, Sarah 
Limerman, Mrs. Catherine MCartney, Elizabeth Ann Hopkins. 



May. roth 1834. 

The session of the H. & Cooks met according to appointment Opened 
with prayer, Present A. W. Kilpatrick, Moderator, Elders, Present, Wm. 
Ewing, A. Hopkins, I. H. Rolston. 



Members added to the Church. 
Nov. 1826. James Hopkins, on Exam. 



New Erection sacrament administered Lord's Day May 4th. no addi- 
tions 1833. Infants baptized. 

Parents names 

James Anderson Wm. D. Bears. 

Margaret E G. Baxters. 

Ann Elizabeth Arch. Hopkins 

Abner W. Kilpatrick, 



33 



How dimly conscious of heroic action 

Those hardy leaders in a nation's van ! 
As dim their vision of the coming grandeur 

That in the pathos of their lives began. 

Not stalwart men alone, but babes and women, 

Not scores and hundreds, in thin ranks they come, 

By single families, few friends, few neighbors, 
To cheer their outlook with a kindred home. 

Behind them all they loved, a haunting picture, 
The fireside joys, their kindred, altars, graves, 

Before them naught but the mysterious riddle 

Solved by time alone, that which destroys or saves. 

Wisely they builded, not alone the cabin, 

Not for self only and the world of sight ; 
With church, with school, the Bible, and the Sabbath, 

They reared their hamlet God its life and light. 

Rise up, O children ! Call your mothers blessed ! 

Give honor to your fathers while you may ; 
There's a glory that abides forever ! 

There's a kingdom not to pass away ! 

H. V. WARREN. 



, 




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JOHN HOPKINS, PIONEER 

John Hopkins, with his brothers, Archibald and William, came to the 
Shenandoah Valley some time before 1749. We find in the old "Session 
Book of Cook's Creek and Pyke Mountain Congregation" the record of 
his marriage on October 12, 1759, to Jean Gordon. He settled at the 
"Neff place" two miles west of Archibald Hopkins, near the mountain. 
This and the Gordon farm were the first two settlements in that locality. 
T. M. Gordon says, "I can remember seeing the mounds of an old fort on 
my father's farm where they protected themselves from the Indians, and 
the place goes by the name of Fort Spring to this day." Jean Gordon 
Hopkins is said to have been a good shot and often stood guard over her 
husband, protecting him with her rifle while he worked. It was here at 
the foot of North Mountain, with the wonderfully beautiful scenery of the 
Blue Ridge always in sight that John and Jean Gordon Hopkins made 
their home and reared their family. They built a substantial brick house. 
James M. Rice, of Peoria, 111., says, "When I visited in Rockingham, Va,. 
in 1876, 1 saw the old house built about 1760, not far from the time Archibald 
Hopkins was born, which house was still in good order, two stories high, 
with four big fire places in it, two up stairs and two down. One of them I 
measured down stairs, was ten feet and eight inches across from the outside 
of the jamb on one side to the outside of the jamb on the other. There 
was a nice spring house by the residence with a large spring of cold crystal 
water and in front of the house was a row of willow trees, I should think 
about three feet or three and a half in diameter when I saw them a little 
more than twenty-five years ago." This house must have been the scene 
of many merry times and many sad partings for ten children played out 
their childhood, grew to manhood and womanhood, married, said good- 
bye to the old fireside and went to far-off places to make themselves new 
homes. These homes were "far off" not so much on account of distance 
as because of the lack of means of communication, in those days, be- 
tween separated localities. It is no wonder that these brothers and 
sisters knew but little of each other and in some cases lost track entirely 
of the whereabouts of the next generation, and that to-day it is a difficult 
matter to trace them in their life histories. 

37 



John Hopkins died before June 4, 1791, as a letter from the old Cook's 
Creek church, bearing this date, speaks of Jane Hopkins as the "daughter 
of John Hopkins, disceased." 

We know that he made a will for we find in an old legal paper these 
words, " Whereas the Commonwealth of Virginia did grant and convey to 
John Hopkins, senior, a certain Tract of Land formerly in Harrison 
County now in the County of Lewis, aforesaid lying on the Hilly upland 
run, a Branch of Stone coal Creek, Containing 800 acres which patent is 
dated the 28th day of August, 1787, as by said patent will appear, and 
where-as the said John Hopkins since died, having first made and published 
his last Will and Testament and therein and thereby given and bequeathed 
the above Tract of Land to three of his daughters to wit: Hannah, Ruth, 
and Ann as by said Will and Testament doth more fully appear." 

He must have had other lands than those spoken of in this quotation for 
we find that "Land office Treasury Warrant No. 8321 was issued to John 
Hopkins, Sr. for 1537 acres of land April 12, 1782. It was issued to author- 
ize him to take up any vacant and unappropriated land within the common- 
wealth of Virginia. 437 acres were taken up by Rebecca and Jane Poage, 
recorded in Grant Book 44, page 478 (in Harrison County); 159 acres by 
Rebecca and Jane Poage in Harrison County in Grant Book 53, page 456." 

There is a tradition that John Hopkins served in the Revolutionary 
War under General Washington and was in the siege of Yorktown. 

In a letter written December 7, 1876, by Cyrus Hopkins, of Uppertract, 
Pendleton Co., Va., a grandson of John Hopkins, the pioneer, he says, 
"John Hopkins lived in Rockingham County and was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War. He also represented his country in the Legislature." 
We also have this from the War Department, military secretary's office, at 
Washington: "The records of this office show that one John Hopkins 
served as a private in Captain David Stephenson's Company, 8th Virginia 
Regiment, commanded by Colonel Abraham Bowman, Revolutionary War. 
He enlisted February 21, 1778, to serve three years. He was transferred 
to Captain William Croghan's Company, 4th, 8th, and i2th Virginia 
Regiment, commanded by Colonel James Wood, in June, 1778; to Captain 
William Croghan's Company, 4th Virginia Regiment, commanded by 
Colonel John Nevill, in September, 1778, and to Captain-Lieutenant 
Leonard Cooper's Company, same regiment, in May, 1779. His name 
last appears on the roll dated December 9, 1779, without special remark 
relative to his service." 

We find in Henning's Statutes at Large, Volume VII., page 179, the 
following: "To the Militia of the Co. of Augusta and for provisions fur- 
nished by sundry inhabitants of said Co. viz. 

38 



To Archibald Hopkins, John shanklin, 

355. each L3, s. 10, 

" Lieutenant John Hopkins, " 2, " 14. 

In Volume XLI., page 95, we find: 

" Be it therefor enacted that it shall and may be lawful for any person, 
chargeable with any part of the half tax, for the year 1785, to make pay- 
ment of any part, not exceeding two thirds thereof, in certificates issued, 
or to be hereafter issued, by John Hopkins, Esq., Commissioner of the 
Continental Loan Office in this state, for interest due on loan office certi- 
ficates, etc." 

Volume XI., page 309: 

"Act for surveying the lands given by law to officers and soldiers on 
continental and state establishments and for other purposes * * * Be it 
enacted by the General Assembly that it shall be lawful for the deputations 
of officers consisting of, 

Major General Muglenburg, 

" " Chas. Scott, 

" " Geo. Weeden, 

Brigadier General Dan'l Morgan, 

" " Jas. Wood, 

Colonel William Heth, 

Lieutenant Colonel Towles, 

" " Hopkins, 

" Clark, etc., 

of the Continental line * * * to appoint superintendents for the pur- 
pose of regulating the survey of lands appropriated by law as counties, 
etc." 

The receipt here reproduced may add another bit of testimony. 

Aprail 7th, 1781. 

Reed, of Thomas Gordon Twentie two pounds twelve shillings it 
being his part in order to raise clothes and provisions agreeable to an Act 
of Assembly passed for that purpose. 

JOHN HOPKINS. 

I, James M. Rice, a great grandson of said John Hopkins and a great 
great grandson of said Thomas Gordon, do hereby certify that the above 
is a full true correct and literal copy of an orginal receipt now in my pos- 
session, it is written on a piece of paper that had been cut out of some old 
letter or other document and it has some parts of some of the original writ- 
ing on the back yet. It came to me as being the great great grandson of 
said Thomas Gordon. 

April 30, 1895. JAMES M. RICE. 

39 



/. JOHN HOPKINS (the pioneer) was married Oct. 12, 
*759 t J ean Gordon, sister oj Thomas Gordon. 

CHILDREN. 

ARCHIBALD, born, 1760. 
SARAH, 
MARY, 

JANE, 1767. 

HANNAH, 1769. 

RUTH, 

THOMAS, " 1773. 

JOHN, 1776. 

ANN, " 1780. 

Name of tenth child not known. 

Home, Rockingham, Virginia, near Harrisonburg. Business, Agri- 
culture. 



40 



"The first thought of the man who has just discovered the name of 
his grandfather's grandfather, is that he belongs to an old and superior 
family, and he is apt to put on airs in the presence of one who has only a 
grandfather of his own." 



THE RED OAK, OHIO, FAMILY 

WRITTEN BY THE LATE REV. T. M. HOPKINS, OF DENVER, COLORADO 

II. Archibald Hopkins, first child of John Hopkins and Jean Gordon, 
was born in Rockingham County, Virginia, near Harrisonburg, in 1760. 
His father and mother, John and Jean Gordon Hopkins, were Scotch-Irish. 
He grew up to manhood in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley under the 
shadow of North Mountain, always in sight of the wonderful haze of the 
Blue Ridge mountains. He was short of stature, a great talker, and very 
energetic. 

He was married about 1785 to Elizabeth Poage. They made their 
home near the parental roof. To them were born six children, William, 
John, Jane, Mary, Sarah, and Robert. These children were all somewhat 
under medium size. Elizabeth Poag Hopkins must have died soon after 
the birth of Robert, for Archibald Hopkins married a second wife, Mar- 
garet Shanklin, and her first child, Gordon, was only three years younger 
than Elizabeth's last child, Robert. By his second wife, Archibald had 
ten children, Gordon, Benjamin, Thomas, Elizabeth, Elijah, James, Har- 
riet, Archibald, Edwin, and Gracy Ann. These were all larger and more 
robust than the others. In 1804 he moved from Virginia to Mayslick, 
Mason County, Kentucky, where his sister, Jane Hopkins Pogue, the wife 
of General Robert Pogue, had lived for about thirteen years. He did not 
like the conditions he found there and slavery troubled him so he went 
into Ohio, prospecting. At Red Oak, Brown County, he met the Rev. 
James Gilliland and seems to have formed for him a strong attachment. 
Returning to Kentucky, he told his wife he had found his preacher any 
way. Very soon after, in 1805, he went with his family to Red Oak, Ohio. 
He is said to have crossed the Ohio River at Ripley with wagons in which 
were his wife and twelve children, his household possessions, and a barrel 
of whiskey. One of the great grandsons says he remembers hearing the 
old folks tell of the hardships they had to endure on the road to Ohio. 
They tied logs to the backs of the wagons to help in holding back in going 
down steep hills. It was still harder to climb those hills. They carried 
chunks of wood or stones to block the wheels to let the horses rest. It is 
also said that during these resting times the whiskey was passed around to 
refresh the weary pilgrims. 

43 



Elizabeth Shanklin, Archibald Hopkin's second wife, was a large, fine 
looking woman. One of her grandchildren remembers her as a " glorious 
old woman." Four children were born after reaching Ohio, making a family 
of sixteen, all but one of whom (Elijah) grew to maturity, married, and had 
families. At Red Oak, three miles north of Ripley, Archibald obtained 
land, and in this fertile but heavily timbered country he proceeded to make 
a home. With great energy and perseverence he and his sons removed a 
portion of the heavy forest and erected a comfortable house and barn. 
The house was built of brick, two stories high, a hall through the middle, 
and two windows on each side of the front door. This house was the pride 
of all his grandchildren. The barn was built of logs and plastered so as 
to hold flaxseed. He also built a flaxseed-oil mill, which he operated. He 
soon saw his rich acres graced with abundant crops, and prosperity within 
his borders. He and his sons were excellent horse trainers and kept the 
finest horses in all that region. At that time, transportation of all kinds 
was by horse and wagon and they were often called upon by their neigh- 
bors for help with their magnificent teams. 

The little boys, of whom I was one, were very proud of the Hopkins 
teams. As his ten sons, one by one, married some excellent maiden, al- 
ways a member of the church, he was settled in the neighborhood on a 
farm of his own, usually not less and generally more than a hundred acres. 

I do not think there was a house in all that reigon on the floor of which 
there was anything nicer than a rag carpet. Everything was home made. 
The women spun and wove flannel for dresses and blue jeans for the men's 
clothes. A young girl with a red flannel dress, cut and made so as to 
economize material, was just as attractive then as the most fashionably 
dressed lady of to-day. Shoes were valuable in those days. The farmer 
killed a beef, took the hide to a tannery (many went to General Grant's 
father at Georgetown), and got half of the hide in return for leather. Out 
of this he made his own harness and shoes. I remember one winter day I 
sat patiently watching my father as he cut and made a pair of shoes for 
my youthful feet. Some excellent women, who walked two miles or more 
to church, carried their shoes and stockings until near the church, then 
retired to the woods, completed their toilet, and came into the church with 
all the dignity of queens. 

The farm of John Hopkins, second child of Archibald, was near the 
church. The spring from which the congregation drank during the recess 
in the church service was on his farm. John had six sons, each of whom 
was six feet tall, and each of whom became an elder in the Presbyterian 
Church. He was said to have raised thirty-six feet of "Elder timber." 

Gordon lived for many years in a two-story brick house about two miles 

44 



from the church, on the Russelville road. His sons were famous as good 
farmers and fine horsemen. Probably no family in the neighborhood was 
more popular. For many years Gordon was superintendent of the Sunday 
School. He and Robert were the two most acceptable men in offering 
public prayer that I ever knew. Mose Kimball once said, "Robert Hopkins 
was the best man that ever lived." William, Archibald's first child, lived 
near his father on a fine farm with an excellent orchard. He had a nice 
two-story house in the hills. 

All these homes were on the hilltops, giving magnificent views from 
every window. But the hills had their drawbacks and one of the grand- 
sons said, " There was not a spot on the farm of Robert, Archibald's sixth 
child, where a wagon could stand without being blocked." Robert had but 
one son. His wife and daughters were very domestic, seldom going away 
from home. They and many other women of the church knit socks for 
the missionaries. It was quite common for the women of the church to 
promise socks and stockings for the missionaries. 

Grandfather was an earnest protestant and a devout Presbyterian. 
Family prayers were always observed, and the candle needed for the read- 
ing of the Scriptures was blown out during the prayers, the great open fire 
furnishing sufficient light for that part of the service. That grandmother 
tried to make Sunday attractive for the children is proved by the fact that 
she always had preserves for breakfast on Sunday morning. Grandfather 
was the patriarch of all these families with their growing children. When 
William returned from Illinois, in 1833, where he had gone looking for a 
new home, his father went to see him and hearing his plans said, " Tut, tut, 
William, this will never do. We have lived here together so long and we are 
not going to be separated now." They always obeyed "Old Archie" and 
for two years William waited for his father's consent. When one of the 
younger sons was married, his bride referred to her husband as "Mr. 
Hopkins." Grandfather overheard her and said, "Tut, tut, there is only 
one Mr. Hopkins in this family. I'm Mr. Hopkins." He visited all the 
families to see that they attended to their religious duties, that they paid 
the minister, that they had family worship, and that they greased their 
shoes on Saturday night ready for the Sabbath service. My belief is that 
all the Hopkins families were very faithful in attending to family prayers 
morning and evening, and in teaching the Catechism on Sunday afternoon. 
I think this was true also of the majority of the neighborhood. The Pres- 
byterian Church of Red Oak was for about three decades one of the largest 
and most influential in the entire state of Ohio. It was organized in the 
year 1789. The social life of the whole community was intimately con- 
nected with the church life. Members could visit before and after the 

45 



service and during the intermission. The young men had a chance to 
show their gallantry by stepping down to the spring and bringing water 
in tin cups for the young women. They were very strict Sabbath observers 
and the bearing of the young men to the young women was of the greatest 
propriety, yet human nature asserted itself so far as to establish acquaint- 
ances which ultimately resulted in happy marriages and the founding of 
excellent families. A singing school and an occasional wedding, an ordi- 
nary social gathering or a blackberrying party furnished abundant oppor- 
tunities for fanning the flame that the mischievious cupid had ignited at 
the church. If any of the congregation were ill or in trouble, the entire 
company would learn of it and all the news of the countryside could be 
heard there. 

The church was located in a beech wood. Only one or two of these 
magnificent trees are left. Under the shadow of the church is the grave- 
yard where many of our dearest are buried. The congregation came 
from all points of the compass, many walking, more on horseback. For 
years there was but one carriage in the community and that was hung on 
straps for springs. All around the church for a radius of a half-mile or 
more horses were tied. Each man had his own limb on some grand old 
beech to which his horse was tied during the three or four hours' service. 
The shade was so perfect that the animals could afford to be patient. For 
many years the service began at twelve o'clock. The first sermon was 
often an hour long, and then came a recess of fifteen minutes, after which 
there was a second sermon. It was not until some time in the forties that 
the Sunday School was organized. In 1817 the congregation built the old 
stone church which now stands. The roof sloped four ways and was sup- 
ported by two huge posts or columns painted sky-blue. The double doors 
were on the side where the second and fifth windows from the left now are. 
They had no chimney because they had no fire. The pews were high with 
doors. The pulpit was a high, large, box-shaped affair painted snow- 
white and the minister shut himself in with a door. The clerk's desk faced 
it and was like it, only smaller. It would accommodate just two persons 
who led the congregation in the song service. The whole houseful of peo- 
ple joined in the grand old tunes. The communion table ran the whole 
length of the aisle with seats running the entire length of each side. A clean 
linen cloth was spread over this table and it usually required three sittings 
to accommodate the communicants. 

In 1806 the Rev. James Gilliland became pastor of this church, retain- 
ing the position thirty-six years. He was in some respects a remarkable 
man. He left a large church in South Carolina because he was opposed to 
slavery and settled here, in the woods, where his salary never exceeded three 
hundred dollars a year. He was fifty years in advance of his time on the 

46 



question of slavery and the use of intoxicating liquors. All through Ohio 
the farmers owned their stills and a good still was sometimes worth more 
than the farm. They raised good corn but could not market it. A horse 
or mule could carry twenty bushels of corn when distilled into liquor, but 
only six or seven when in the grain, so distilling seemed a necessity. Mr. 
Gilh'land organized in his church both a temperance and an anti-slavery 
society. The anniversary of one was always held on New Year's Day 
and the other on Christmas Day. We often had the finest orators in the 
country to address us on these occasions. In the old record book of this 
church is this resolution, which was passed by the session December i, 1832, 
" Whereas, in the judgment of the session, the common use of ardent spirits 
is not merely useless but has long been, and still is, one of the most fruitful 
sources of crime, misery, and death, and that those who continue to coun- 
tenance and encourage the practice, are guilty of a heinous sin and deeply 
partake of the sin of others, especially in this day when so much light is 
thrown on the subject and so many benevolent efforts are made to arrest 
the destructive evil, therefore 

Resolved, that church members who continue to distill ardent spirits, to 
use them, to buy them, to sell, or give them to others except for medicinal 
or mechanical purposes, are guilty of a great sin and bring scandal on the 
church for which they ought to be dealt with in the same manner as for 
other scandalous crime." All obeyed but one member whom they excom- 
municated. 

Grandfather had always furnished whiskey for barn raisings, log roll- 
ings, and in harvest. One day Mr. Gilliland talked with him about the 
harm of it and asked him if he could not do without it. After that he had 
no whiskey. This perhaps accounts for the fact that all his sons and 
nearly all his grandsons were temperate men. Very soon after he came to 
Red Oak he was made ruling elder in the church. The following record 
is on the church books for November 4, 1808, "Session met agreeably to 
appointment. Constituted with prayer. Members all present. Archi- 
bald Hopkins having been duely elected by the congregation to the office 
of ruling elder on ye 23rd. of May last, now appears and takes his seat in 
session, having been formally ordained as appears from his certificate." 
This position he held for forty years. He always stood by his minister. A 
daughter of Mr. Gilliland once laughingly said, " Mr. Hopkins always con- 
sults father about everything, even the marriage of his children." 

Now think of my experience when a youth. Each family had a pew, 
shut in by doors securely buttoned. Among the families who came to the 
church on Sundays, were the Salsburys, the Dunlaps, the Kinkaids, the 
Pangburns, the Gillilands, and the numerous Hopkins families. There 
were grandfather and grandmother with faithful Aunt Harriet, who stood 

47 



by them until they went to their long home. There was Uncle William, his 
head always shaking a little with palsy. I remember seeing his sons Joel 
and John, young men over six feet tall. There was my father, John, 
with his eight children and mother all packed into one pew. Discipline 
was nearly perfect in his household. Children were to be seen and not 
heard. When any one of his children got a little restless under the one- 
hour sermon, a single glance from the head of the family was sufficient to 
allay all disturbance. The little ones would often look into mother's face 
and ask, "When will it be through?" and her kind voice would respond, 
"Before long." Aunt Mary Pogue was there, short, active, red-headed, 
quick of step. She was proud of her noble husband, Colonel John Craw- 
ford Pogue, who was every inch a gentleman. They had no children. 
Then came Uncle Robert, with so much reverence in his heart that he 
showed it in his step. His wife was a daughter of the Rev. James Gilliland. 
They had four daughters and one son. Uncle Gordon was there, large and 
stately in his movements, with his wife who was always cheery and bright, 
and a pew full of children. Aunt Elizabeth Kinkaid was not behind any, 
in the numbers nor the attractiveness of her household. Uncle Archibald 
came too. He was large and rather solemn and brought his beautiful wife 
and little ones with him. Then came Uncle Edwin with his young wife 
and little children, and Aunt Grace Dunlap, the youngest, and one of the 
handsomest of the tribe, bringing her family. Aunt Jane had married Mr. 
John Hopkins Pogue and moved to Crawfordsville, Indiana. Aunt Sarah 
had married Rev. A. B. Gilliland and gone to Venice, Butler County, Ohio. 
Uncle Benjamin had died and Uncle Thomas and Uncle James had gone 
to Ripley where they were engaged in business. Hence they were not 
present in the church as I remember it. 

Grandfather thought all his farmer boys needed was to learn to read, 
write, and cipher to the "rule of three." I believe that my father, John, 
was the only one of the sons who disregarded this rule so far as to send his 
children away to school. However, grandfather's sons were naturally so 
capable that the most of them were at some time elected elders in the Pres- 
byterian Church, and none of them ever took a second place in his influence 
for truth and right. 

When grandfather was quite an elderly man he slipped on some ice on 
his porch and fell, hurting his hip so that afterwards he rode horseback on 
a side-saddle. His saddle horse, Bonny, a beautiful dapple gray, took 
him everywhere, up and down, over and through places that people would 
not now attempt. All the last years of his life, his daughter, Harriet, ac- 
companied him, she too riding horseback and sitting as firmly and riding 
as fearlessly as her father. 

48 




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ITEMS COPIED FROM THE SESSION BOOK OF 
THE OLD STONE CHURCH AT RED OAK 

In the list of church members, October i, 1807, the names of Archibald 
Hopkins and wife, William Hopkins, and Polly Hopkins appear. 

Archibald Hopkins was elected ruling elder May 23, 1808. 

Nov. 4, 1808. Red Oak. "Session met agreeably to appointment. 
Constituted with prayer. Members all present. Archibald Hopkins 
having been duly elected by the congregation to the office of Ruling Elder 
on ye 23rd of May last, now appears and takes his seat in session, having 
been formally ordained as appears from his certificate." 

They formed a "Corporation" which William Hopkins joined on 
December 19, 1814; John Hopkins joined on December 4, 1815; Archibald 
Hopkins was elected trustee December 4, 1815. Names of Hopkins mem- 
bers of "Corporation" were Archibald Hopkins, John Hopkins, Robert 
Hopkins, J. M. Hopkins, Archibald Hopkins, Jr., William W. Hopkins, 
Gordon Hopkins, and Gordon Hopkins, Jr. John C. Poage was elected 
treasurer and Gordon Hopkins a trustee of the "Corporation." John 
Hopkins, son of Archibald, was treasurer of the church from December i, 
1818, to 1822. 

" Feb. 19, 1817 The society proceeded to the consideration of a place on 
which to build a meeting house." The old stone church was built in 1817. 

Resolution on temperance. December i, 1832. 

"Whereas in the judgment of the session, the common use of ardent 
spirits is not merely useless, but has long been and still is one of the most 
fruitful sources of crime, misery and death and that those who continue 
to countenance and encourage the practice are guilty of a heinous sin and 
deeply partake of the sin of others, especially in this day when so much 
light is thrown upon the subject and so many benevolent efforts are made 
to arrest the destructive evil, therefore 

Resolved, that church members who continue to distill ardent spirits, 
to use them, to buy them, to sell or give them to others, except for medical 
or mechanical purposes are guilty of a great sin and bring scandal on the 
church for which they ought to be dealt with in the same manner as for 
other scandalous crime." 

49 



Nov. 4: 1808. Red Oak. "John Hopkins and Sally Hopkins applied 
for admission to communion and on examination were admitted. Adj. 
Concluded with prayer." 

"April 14: 1813. Robert Hopkins applied for membership to the 
church and was admitted." 

"Oct. 29: 1817. Gordon Hopkins and Elizabeth Hopkins admitted 
on examination to the church." 

"Jan. i, 1819. Benjamin Hopkins admitted on examination to the 
church." 

"Aug. 22, 1820. Thos. Hopkins applied for admission to church, was 
admitted." 

"Oct. 5: 1821. James Hopkins applied for admission to the com- 
munion and on examination was admitted." 

"Mch. 12: 1823. Harriet Hopkins was admitted to the communion on 
examination." 

"Sept. 30, 1828. Gracy Ann, Arch, and Edwin Hopkins were ad- 
mitted to ch. membership." 

"Aug. 22: 1832. Robert Hopkins admitted to church." 

" April 2, 1835. Fidelia Hopkins granted a letter to join Ripley church." 

"Jan. 18, 1837. James Hopkins admitted to the church." 

"Sept. 8: 1838. Elizabeth Hopkins admitted to the church." 

"Died. 

Polly Hopkins Aug. 15, 1822 
Benjamin " Aug 1827 



Baptisms, copied from the Session Book of the Red Oak Church. 
Oct. i; 1808, for Arch. Hopkins one infant. 
No baptisms are recorded after this date until 
Jan. 27; 1822. Elizabeth daughter of Robert and Fanny Hopkins. 
Feb. 23; 1823. Wm. R. son of Gordon and Ann Hopkins. 
Aug. 15; 1824. John son of Benjamin and Fidelia Hopkins. 
Mch. 26; 1825. George Burder son of William and Jane Hopkins. 
July 31 ; 1825. Mary Jane daughter of Robert and Fanny Hopkins. 
Aug. 14; 1825. Thomas Scott son of Gordon and Ann Hopkins. 
Oct. 30; 1825. Wm. Williamson son of John and Nancy Hopkins. 
Feb. 5; 1826. Elizabeth A. daughter of Benjamin and Fidelia Hopkins. 
July 8; 1827. Margaret daughter of William and Jane Hopkins. 
Oct. 28; 1827. Amanda daughter of Robert and Fanny Hopkins. 
Jan. 5; 1828. Thomas Mayse son of John and Nancy Hopkins. 
Mch. 28; 1829. Archibald son of Gordon and Ann Hopkins. 
July 1830. John M. and Archibald sons of John and Nancy Hopkins. 
July 3; 1831. Melinda daughter of William and Jane Hopkins. 
Nov. 13; 1831. Nancy Ann daughter of Gordon and Ann Hopkins. 
June 3; 1832. Elizabeth Jane daughter of John and Nancy Hopkins. 
Apr. 20; 1843. James Alexander son of Robert and Fanny Hopkins. 
May 31 ; 1834. Eleanor Jane daughter of Gordon and Ann Hopkins. 
May 31; 1834. Harriet Ann daughter of John and Nancy Hopkins. 
Jan. 14; 1837. Alonzo A. son of Edwin and Keziah Hopkins. 
Nov. 10; 1836. Frances H. daughter of Robert and Fanny Hopkins. 
Nov. 25; 1839. Amanda daughter of Archibald and Rachel Hopkins. 
May 30; 1840. Albert M. son of Gordon and Ann Hopkins. 



Inscriptions on the stones in the old churchyard at Red Oak, Ohio. 

Elijah 
Son of Archibald and Margaret 

Hopkins. 

Died Nov. 16, 1819, aged 17 yrs 
9 mo. and 26 days. 



Polly G. Hopkins 

aged 25 
Died Aug. the i5th 1822. 



Benjamin Hopkins 
Born Aug. i, 1799 
Died July 20, 1827 



Thomas H. 
Infant son of Benj. and Fidelia 

Hopkins 
aged 5 mo. and 16 days. 



Elizabeth A. Hopkins 
Born Dec. i, 1825. 
Died Oct. 28, 1872. 
" Lizzie, thou wast mild and lovely. 

Here thy loss we deeply feel; 
But 'tis God who has bereft us, 
He can all our sorrows heal." 
"Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord." 



Fidelia Hopkins 

Born May 1800; 

Died June 25, 1882. 



A small monument marks the graves of Benjamin Hopkins' family and 
they are all inclosed in an iron fence. 

52 




HOPKINS GRAVES IN OLD RED OAK (OHIO) CEMETERY 



Sacred to the Memory of 

Edwin Hopkins 

Born Sept. 30, 1810; 

Died July 10, 1846, 

aged 35 yrs & 20 days. 

(This stone is the largest and handsomest of the family stones, and is 
most beautifully lettered.) 



Archibald Hopkins. 

Died Jan. 25, 1848 

in the 88th year of his age. 



There is no memorial stone for Rev. Robert Hopkins in this cemetery. 
His daughter is buried here and her stone has this inscription: 

Nancy Ann 

Daughter of Robert and A. C. J. Hopkins, 

Missionaries to the Dakota Indians. 

Died Nov. 14, 1849, aged 2 years. 



53 



A small monument inclosed by an iron railing marks the resting-place 
of Rev. James G. Hopkins and his two children. 

Rev. James G. Hopkins. 

Died June 29, 1851, aged 30 yrs. 

10 mo. & 13 days, and in the fifth year of his ministry in 

the Presbyterian Church. 
" No pain, no grief, nor anxious care, 

Invade thy bounds nor mortal woes 
Can reach the peaceful sleeper here, 
While angels watch his soft repose." 



Agnes Johnston, 

Daughter of Rev. Jas. G. & Ann K. Hopkins 
Died Nov. 20, 1851, aged i yr. 

7 mo. & 15 days. 
" This lovely bud so young and fair, 

Called hence by early doom, 
Just came to show how sweet a flower 
In paradise would bloom." 



Mary Kelly, 

Daughter of Rev. Jas. G. & Ann K. Hopkins. 
Died June 12, 1854, aged 13 yrs. 

9 mo. and 9 days. 
" Beautiful, lovely, 

She was but given, 
A fair bud to earth, 
To blossom in Heaven." 



54 



Nancy C. M. 
Wife of John Hopkins. 
Born in Union Co., South Carolina, 
Dec. 27, 1788. Died, Aug. i, 1851. 



Margaret, 

Wife of Archibald Hopkins. 

Died March 9, 1854 in the 84th 

year of her age. 



John Hopkins. 

Died Feb. 19, 1872 

in the 84th year of his age. 



The original quaint stones to the memory of Robert and Fanny (Gilli- 
land) Hopkins were two slabs of marble mounted on the same base. They 
have been taken away since the death of the two daughters and replaced 
by a simple monument which bears the following words: 

Robert Hopkins 

1794-1874. 
Fannie, his wife. 

1799-1869. 
Amanda Hopkins, 

1827-1903. 

Harriet Hopkins. 

1838-1903. 



Milton McPherson, grandson of Robert and Fannie, died in August, 
1904. 

These four graves are in the new cemetery. 



55 



"The old divines did well in calling this life a school of probation. We 
are all at school and are one day going home." 

PARSON FRANK. 



OLD LETTER WRITTEN BY ARCHIBALD HOPKINS 
OF RED OAK BEFORE HE LEFT VIRGINIA 

Rockingham County, April i6th, 1793. 

My Beloved friend; We are absent in Body, but if this finds you in Time, 
far as we are distant, we must shortly meet, and O ; what a solemn meeting 
is approaching, alas; that I can be so insensible, so little conserned about 
the one thing needful, daily acknowledging myself to be a candidiate for 
Eternity, and that I expect to be rewarded according to the things done in 
the Body whether they be good or evil, and yet no more conserned, so de- 
lighted with these perishing time-things, such warm affections for Creature 
objects, and so Cold and insensible for the God that made me, and ever since 
supported me and has laid such an Angel Astonishing plan of Salvation for 
my redemption, Alas that we can be so ungratefull whare the interest is 
our own. I think if I am not decived ; I, the longer I am acquainted with 
my own Heart and the lives of my fellow mortals, the more I see of that 
lamentable situation that man is falling into. The Crown is falling from 
our heads, for we have sinned. We have had since I seen you a Number 
of the warmest Gospel sermons that ever I have heard, but it appears to 
be in vain O alas; Alas; What a Deep sleep is fallen on professors of religion 
in this part. Neither his judgments awaken us, nor his mercies invites 
us, but we are a saying by our conduct, " we will not have him to be Lord 
over us." We have been making an attempt to settle with Mr. Ervine for 
time that is past. We fall considerable in Debt and I think, that if it was 
not for a very few, he would be turned off without recompense at all. I 
received yours by Mr. Shanklin which affords matter of both rejoicing and 
mourning. You say you have found an Acquaintance you hope with a 
member of the Lords people in that Country, but they are thinly scattered, 
and chiefly middle aged, and elderly people. These are the people that 
must support the Gospel and it it to be expected that they will endeavor 
to keep the Church pure and encourage the spirit of religion and if they are 
Dissiples indeed they will cry mightily for A time of refreshment from the 
Spirit of the Lord, and when religion is encouraged, by elderly people, it is 
a great encouragement for youth. Then the Lord is pleased to revive his 
works and to give his word success. But what a cause of lamentation is 
it that youth will not serve the Lord when common experience gives us so 

59 



many examples of the uncertainty of our lives, and they that seek me 
early shall find me. Some time last fall one of the Widow Bells sons went 
out to hunt and shot a Dear, it was a wet Day and he only wounded it and 
he ran till he was very hot and got wet, came home took sick and died 
bidding adue to tune and all its enjoyments in a few days. In a short time 
after, one of her Daughters Departed this life, What loud Preachers these 
things ought to be, if only these youth had been zealously engaged about 
Religion. Minding scarcely any thing else at all, the Men of the world 
would soon have said, " that wont do, how will these people live ? why they 
are a going mad ! " But what a pitty it is, that we think so much more 
about how we shall live, than how we shall Die. We promise ourselves a 
long time to live here. But when I take a serious View of myself, and 
Consider the Days past, how short and how triffling they have been spent, 
and to put the matter to the long period that I can be of any service either 
to my Master or my fellow mortals, what is it ? Why if we ware to live as 
long again as we have lived, to look before us it would look a great while, 
but when it is once gone, it is as a tale what is told. But Me thinks I hear 
the reador a saying now is the acepted time and now is the Day of Salva- 
tion and you an me is perhaps verry verry near our home, and that it is high 
time for us to awake, for our Salvation is nearer now than when we Believed, 
and not to be Conformed to this world, but to be transformed by the re- 
newing of our mind that we may prove what is that good and acceptable 
will of God, and what a triffling thing it is that we cant deny ourselves and 
take up our Cross and follow the once despised, But the now exalted Lamb 
of God, since he has said, "learn of me for I am meek and lowly and you 
shall find rest unto your Souls, for my yoke is easy and my burden is Light." 
You Desired me before I would Write to you to converse with Mr. Ervine 
on that sentence in my former letter. I had not an opportunity, and I 
am verry well satisfied that he does not hold it necessary that our first 
thoughts should be the sins of the world. Far be that from him, and he is 
far from being satisfied to think that we should be contented in this day 
when, iniquity abounds, and the love of many, waxes cold, when thare is 
so few if any, in these parts that is Conserned about the Cause of Zion. 
The Last Sermon that was preacht at the new Erection was from these 
words, "Let God Arise, let his enemys be scattered; let them also that hate 
him flee before him." psalm 68 - i and i and I think of all Days that I 
have heard or seen, I never heard Mr. Ervine Preach with as much fervor, 
and encourage as much for Christians to Pray for a revival, to plead the 
promises of the Lord for there is surely to be a day as has never yet been 
seen. Did any of us believe that Jesus had seen enough to satisfy him for 
his Blood, and that his Converts had yet surpast the Drops of Dew from 

60 



the womb of the morning, or that the Knowledge of him had covered the 
Earth as the waters covered the sea ? Did we believe that he had got the 
Heathen for his inheritance and the utmost parts of the earth for his pos- 
session ? Well all these then is promist to him of his father and what are 
we a doing, are we a giving him no rest, are we a Crying mightily for a day 
of his power, that his enemies might flee Before him, the plagues of our 
hearts might be subdued and every thing that exalted should be abased, 
and those that would not be abased should be obliged to flee, that Religious 
Conversation might become so universal that those that hate it would be 
obliged to flee before it. May this be the earnest prayer of you, my fellow 
mortal, and of me and every Creature that names the Name of Christ. 
I am yours 

Arch. Hopkins, 
Addressed to 

Mr. John Boyd 

Mercer County 

Letter from Archibald Hopkins to Col. Robt. Pogue, Staunton, Va. 
Owned by Jno. T. Shanklin, Johnson's Junction, Ky. 

(No date.) 

Dr Sir, I will just inform you that I have wrote to Thomas Hopkins 
that you are in Virginia and if he gets his letter I make no doubt but he will 
go and see you but if he should not come, I will take it as a verry great 
favour if you will go and see him, I expect he will have some money, and I 
am in so much need of money as I ever was since I have anny use for it I 
expect you have seen Mr Bodly since I have and, it is probable you had 
some conversation on my Business and is acquainted with how it stands, 
and if you go and Mr Parrots have not paid in the money agreeable to 
promise I have wrote to Thomas Hopkins that they must expect to pay me 
for my trouble and expence for I dont know but I will be obliged to send 
for it and I know of not other opportunity of getting it Brough out to me I 
am Sir your friend and humble Servant 

Archibald Hopkins 
Robert Pogue. 
Addressed to 

Col Robert Poague 

To the Mail in 

Stantion Virginia. 
Written on the back, 

Joseph & Tom Baxter Ex. apointed by will the will not signed 
but agreed to by the Legatees. 

61 



Letter from Archibald Hopkins, Red Oak, to Col. Robert Pogue. 
Owned by Jno. T. Shanklin, Johnson's Junction, Ky. 

Cleremont County July 8 1807 

Dr Sir I expect Mr. Scott will be with me before long and he will expect 
some money, and all my expectation is from you I wish you to let Mr. Gamble 
know, that I am in want of money, and cant do with out it and that I will 
be under the disagreeable necesity of pushing for it and all that is due in 
Kentuckey our situation is such, that I wish to put off going to Virginia 
this fall if I can, I want to know when David Hinton goes to Virginia, I 
wish to write by him to Thomas Hopkins to know if my business really 
called for me thare if Hinton dont return in time for me to get an answer 
from Virginia, so that if I must go. I would have time before it would be 
too late in the season I would take as a great favour if you have an oper- 
tunity of writing to Virginia, and desire an answer to know whether it is 
my duty to go to Virginia or not till another season, and if you write let him 
know that I want as much of my money as can be got, and it is likely that 
some opertunity of bringing it may offer we are all well give my Love to 
all my friends in Mason 

Arch Hopkins 
Robert Pogue 
Addressed on back, 

A Hopkins letter 

to 
Col. Robert Pogue 



Date 8th July 1807 



62 





HOUSE BUILT BY II. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, RED OAK, OHIO. 



WILL OF ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, RED OAK, OHIO 

I, Archibald Hopkins, of Brown County, in the State of Ohio, do make 
and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following 
that is to say; First, it is my will that all my just debts and funeral expenses 
be fully paid. I give and devise and bequeath to my beloved wife, Mar- 
garet Hopkins, in lieu of her dower, one equal undivided third part of all 
my lands, the west end of my house including the kitchen, also an equal 
interest in the entry and in the lumber-room above the entry, during her 
natural life, and her riding mare saddle and bridle, her choice of three 
cows, one-fourth of the sheep, one-hundred and fifty dollars in money, a 
sufficient stock of provisions for herself and family, and for her creatures 
for one year after my decease, and all my household and kitchen property 
except what is here-in-after bequeathed to some else of my family, all my 
books to remain with my wife while she lives and after her death my will 
and desire is that my children shall divide them equally among them. I 
give and bequeath to my sons William, John, Robert, Gordon, Thomas, 
James, and Edwin Hopkins, each five dollars, to the heir of my son Benja- 
min Hopkins, deceased, five dollars, and to my daughters, Jane Poage, 
Mary Poage, Sarah Gilleland, Elizabeth Kinkaid, and Gracy Ann Dunlap, 
each five dollars, and to my daughter Harriet Hopkins, Eight-hundred 
dollars. The above legacies bequeathed to my children, I will shall be 
paid by my son Archibald Hopkins to them in one year after my decease, 
except the last half of the legacy bequeathed to my daughter Harriet which 
shall be paid to her as follows, one hundred in two years after my decease, 
one hundred in three years, one hundred in four years, and one hundred 
in five years. I give and bequeath to my son Archibald Hopkins, my 
clock after the decease of my said wife, Margaret Hopkins, I further give 
and bequeath to my said daughter, Harriet, two beds and bedding and 
bed-steads, and one side-saddle and one bureau and bridle. And further 
I give unto my said daughter Harriet Hopkins, the room in the West end 
of my house, including the kitchen, and the cellar under the same, and the 
privilege of a pass way in the entry, and to the said cellar after the decease 
of my said wife Margaret Hopkins, if the said Harriet is then an unmarried 
woman, to her to have and to hold as long as she remains a single woman 
but no longer, and it is my will and desire that my son Archibald Hopkins 

63 



shall find and keep my said daughter Harriet in a suitable riding creature 
after my decease and so long as she remains a single woman and shall after 
the death of my said wife Margaret Hopkins, find and keep the said Harriet 
in a milch cow and is to find her in provisions and fire-wood and twenty 
pounds of wool in the grease, a year, as long as she remains an unmarried 
woman and no longer. I give and devise to my said son Archibald Hop- 
kins, the farm on which I now reside subject to the encumbrances before 
mentioned and legacies bequeathed for him to pay, situate and being in 
Union township, in the County and State aforesaid being part of a tract of 
Sixteen-hundred and sixty-six and two-thirds acres, pattended in the name 
of Andrew Lewis and bounded as follows to wit Beginning at a beech 
and white walnut near a hollow ; thence North one hundred and sixty poles 
to a locust, ash and buckeye; thence East two hundred poles to two buck- 
eyes and a hickory; thence South one hundred and twenty poles to a lynn 
and beech; thence West one hundred and seventy four poles to a sugar 
tree and buckeye; thence South thirty three degrees West forty nine poles 
to the beginning, containing one hundred and fifty three acres more or less 
to him the said Archibald Hopkins and to his heirs and assigns forever. 
And further it is my will and desire that my executors shall as soon as they 
can after my decease sell at private sale the following described tract of 
land adjoining the above described tract to wit; Beginning at a beech 
thence South eighty degrees West ninety two poles to a buckeye and elm; 
thence South fifteen degrees East two hundred and three poles to a stake; 
thence North seventy six poles to a buckeye; thence East fifteen poles to 
a beech; thence North one hundred and fourteen poles to the beginning, 
and the money arising therefrom shall go to the payment of my just 
debts, funeral expenses and for executing this my last will and testa- 
ment. The balance including any money I may have and that may arise 
from the sale of any personal property that I may then have, shall go to 
the payment of the legacy of one hundred and fifty dollars to my said 
wife, the remainder shall then be divided into four equal parts and I give 
and bequeath to the Bible society of Brown County one part and to the 
Missionary society of the said county one part and to the Abolition society 
of said County one part and to the Tract society one part and lastly I hereby 
constitute and appoint my said sons John Hopkins, Robert Hopkins, and 
Gordon Hopkins, executors of this my last will and testament revoking and 
annulling all former wills by me made and ratifying and confirming this 
and no other to be my last will and testament. In testimony whereof I 
have hereunto set my hand and seal this sixth day of April in the year 1839. 

ARCHIBALD HOPKINS. 



64 



//. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, first child 0} Jean Gordon 
and John Hopkins, was married about 1785 to Elizabeth Poage. 
CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM, born Jan. 29, 1786; died Sept. 16, 1848. 

JOHN, born Oct. 24, 1787; died Feb. 19,1872. 

JANE, born Apr. 7, 1789; died Apr. 22, 1863. 

MARY, born Aug. 7, 1790; died Mar. 15, 1872. 

SARAH, born June 10, 1792; died in the sixties. 

ROBERT, born May 14,1794; died Sept. 9,1874. 

Elizabeth Poage died some time in 1794. 

ARCHIBALD HOPKINS was married for a second time to Margaret 
Shanklin. 

CHILDREN: 

GORDON, born May 24, 1797; died Jan. 28, 1869. 

BENJAMIN, born Aug. i, 1799; died July 20,1827. 

THOMAS, born Aug. i, 1799; died Jan. 18, 1892. 

ELIZABETH, born Sept. 28, 1800; died Jan. i, 1871. 

ELIJAH, born Jan. 20, 1802; died Nov. 16, 1819. 

JAMES, born Aug. 23, 1803; died Feb. 19, 1887. 

HARRIET, born Dec. 31, 1805; died Sept. 23, 1873. 

ARCHIBALD, born Oct. 1808; died Mar. 26, 1874. 

EDWIN, born Sept. 30, 1810; died July 10, 1846. 

GRACY ANN born Sept. 27, 1812; died June 18, 1882. 

ARCHIBALD HOPKINS died January 25, 1848, in his eighty-sixth 

year. Margaret Shanklin died March 9, 1854, in her eighty-fourth year. 

They are buried side by side in the old churchyard at Red Oak, Ohio. 

III. WILLIAM HOPKINS was the first of Archibald's children to 
come to Illinois. He left Red Oak early in September, 1835, with his wife, 
nine children, ten head of cattle, and thirty head of sheep. One big four- 
horse prairie schooner carried the household effects, and a two-horse 
spring-wagon, then an object of curiosity in the neighborhood, made a 
comfortable place for the wife and little ones. At Funk's Grove, near the 
present site of Bloomington, 111., they were delayed for some time by high 

65 



water. William and a part of the family finally moved on leaving the 
older boys with the stock to follow as soon as they could. A Sunday came, 
and grass for the cattle had given out. The boys thought it necessary to 
move to pastures new and did so, but with condemning consciences and a 
feeling that if their father had been there he would not have allowed it. 
Reaching their new possessions, they lived in the wagons until a rude cabin 
could be built. That same fall a better cabin was erected and the first 
was used for a stable. After a few years a frame house was built. This 
was moved away in 1845, when a much larger and better house took its 
place. 

Archibald, William's eldest son, ran a store in Hennepin, in partner- 
ship with his Uncle George Willis. He was ambitious and had entered 
considerable government land. While attending school at Jacksonville, 
111., he spent his vacations working at the Willis' Mill (known later as 
McManis' Mill). 

He died of typhoid fever before his plans were perfected. 

Joel, the second son, in his early manhood clerked in his Uncle Thomas 
Hopkins's general store at Ripley, Ohio, but came with his parents to Illinois 
and helped make the new home, remaining with them and caring for them 
in their old age. He was a man of unusual strength and endurance. He 
was six feet and four inches tall and weighed one hundred ninety pounds. 

Elizabeth was a woman of most cheery temper and great patience. She 
married J. W. Margrave, a man of unusual talents. He spent much of his 
time and energy teaching and working in the church, Sunday school, and 
choir in the many communities where he made his home. He was choir 
leader and elder in many of these places. 

John lived at first near his parents; with the forty-niners went to Cali- 
fornia, but finally settled on a farm at Marshalltown, Iowa. He was a 
deacon in the church and leader of the singing for many years. 

Martha was for a dozen years the mother to Joel W. Hopkins's chil- 
dren; later married Deacon McCord and lived in Granville. 

Stephen Dawse, a fine, tall, largely built man of muscular strength, 
but an epileptic from young manhood, lived at home until after his father's 
death, when he was taken by his brother Joel to his home, where he and 
his sister Martha took care of the invalid with unbounded patience, and 
at a great personal sacrifice, until his death. 

George Burder made his home on a farm near his father's. He was a 
man of strong opinions and great thrift. He held the positions of deacon 
in the church and trustee of Wheaton College. 

Margarette, an unselfish, helpful, wholesome, and jovially natured 
woman, was a public school-teacher and lived with her parents. She took 

66 



a prominent part in all muscial affairs in the church. She was a large 
woman, of dark complexion and fine figure. 

Malinda was a fine-appearing young woman and, like her sister, a good 
singer and an able church worker. She married Abbott Barker, a car- 
penter by trade, and later a farmer at Mazon, 111. He was a sterling 
Christian, deacon in the church, and for many years choir leader. Malinda 
is buried at Granville, 111. 

In all these homes family worship was faithfully maintained. 

Gordon and Archibald, William's brothers, came to Illinois later, and 
settled near Aurora, Kendall County, 111. 



67 



///. WILLIAM HOPKINS, the first child of II. Archi- 
bald Hopkins and Elizabeth Poag, was married March jp, 
1812, to Jane Wilson Willis, who was born January 22, 1790, 
and died December 21, 1857. 

CHILDREN : 

ARCHIBALD WILSON, born Dec. 28, 1812; died Dec. 17, 1839. 

JOEL WILLIS, born July 29, 1814; died Feb. 16, 1902. 

ELIZABETH, born Jan. 28, 1816; died May 24, 1892. 

JOHN CRAWFORD, born Feb. 25, 1818. 

MARTHA, born June 20,1820; died June 24,1881. 

STEPHEN DA WSE, born Sept. 19, 1822; died Jan. 10,1867. 

GEORGE BURDER, born Nov. 8,1824; died May 30,1904. 

MARGARET, born Apr. 2,1827; died Nov. 16,1857. 

MELINDA, born May 1,1831; died May 22,1865. 

III. WILLIAM HOPKINS, first child of Archibald Hopkins and 
Elizabeth Poag, was a medium-sized man, five feet ten inches tall, had a 
sandy complexion, was nervous, wiry, quick in his movements, and pal- 
sied somewhat in later life, hands and head shaking. He was a very 
strong man, and used an axe well. He always attended the "raisings," 
and carried a corner up alone. He came to Illinois in 1833 on a prospect- 
ing tour, and made a claim near Florid. He went home, intending to 
move his family West, but his father, Archibald Hopkins, heard of his 
plans, and said, "Tut, tut, William, this will never do." They always 
obeyed "Old Archie," and for two years William waited. He then 
returned to Illinois and bought the claim of Alexander Laughlin, entering 
the land east of Granville, 111., where his grandson, A. W. Hopkins, now 
lives. He shortly afterwards brought his family to the new home, where 
he lived and died. He is buried in the Granville cemetery. 

Jane Willis, wife of William Hopkins, was a large woman, with dark 
hair, probably blue eyes, deliberate in her movements, and of good judg- 
ment. Her son Joel said, "After she had had nine children, she beat 
Amaziah Baird, a seventeen-year-old lad, in a foot-race." The children 
inherited their mother's physique, were unusually large, finely built, 
strong, and of good carriage. They always had family prayers twice a day 

68 
















f 



*'- 







IV. JOEL WILLIS HOPKINS. 



at William's home, as they had had in their father's home. A letter written 
to Joel Hopkins, March 13, 1898, by Adeline M. Weed, Berkeley, Cal., 
says: "I remember I was quite impressed by the stately dignity of your 
mother, my Aunt Jane. I told my mother I would like to live to be old if 
I could have the fine bearing of Aunt Jane. I think she was sixty-three, 
but that seemed like old age to me then." Of their children, Joel and 
John were sandy, all the rest had brown hair and gray eyes. 

IV. ARCHIBALD WILSON HOPKINS, first child of 
III. William Hopkins and Jane Wilson Willis, died at twenty- 
seven years of age. 

He was attending school at Illinois College, Jacksonville, 111., and Joel 
W. Hopkins remembered going to Jacksonville to get his books after his 
death. He is buried in the Granville Cemetery. 



IV. JOEL WILLIS HOPKINS, second child of William 
Hopkins and Jane Wilson Willis, was married December 10, 
184.0, to Eleanor Jane Harrison, who was born February 23, 
1820. 

CHILDREN : 

EVELINE WINSLOW, born Nov. 6, 1841; died Jan. 5, 1848. 

HELEN DE ARMOND, born June 22, 1843. 

ARCHIBALD WILSON, born Jan. 4, 1845. 

MARY HARRISON, born Dec. 30, 1846. 

ELEANOR JANE, born Feb. 13, 1849; died Jan. 25, 1858. 

Eleanor Jane Harrison Hopkins died February 20, 1849. 

IV. JOEL WILLIS HOPKINS was married second, January 31, 
1862, to Mrs. Sarah Smith Harrison, who was born June 7, 1823, and 
died June 27, 1897. 

CHILDREN : 

MARTHA BELLE, born May 22, 1863. 

IV. JOEL WILLIS HOPKINS was active in the public affairs of his 
county, state, and nation. No history of Putnam County could be written 
without taking into account his great influence in molding the character 
of its people, shaping their policy and promoting their interests in lines of 
progress, good order, moral, and religious development. At one time he 

69 



was a member of the State Board of Agriculture. He was a delegate to the 
Republican National Convention at Cincinnati that nominated Hayes for 
President, a member of the 26th General Assembly, and County Judge. In 
business he was unusually wise and successful. At the time of his death 
he was president of the Peru National Bank, the Putnam County Bank, 
and the Granville Bank, and left a large estate, chiefly in farm lands. 

In his character there was an unusual combination of qualities. To the 
world, the church, his neighbors, and friends, he was a tower of strength; 
to his family, all of that, and a world of tenderness besides. He was at 
ease in the presence of the highest dignitaries in the land, and so simple and 
kind that no one, however humble, ever felt abashed in his presence. At 
his death it was said of him, "Know ye not that there is a prince and a 
great man fallen this day in Israel ?" 



F. EVELINE WIN SLOW HOPKINS, first child of Joel 
Willis Hopkins and Eleanor Jane Harrison, died at seven years 
of age, and is buried in the Granville cemetery. 

V. HELEN DE ARMOND HOPKINS, second child 
of Joel Willis Hopkins and Eleanor Jane Harrison, was mar- 
ried September 3, 1867, to Robert L. McCord, who was born 
August 7, 1830. 

CHILDREN : 

JOEL HOPKINS, born Sept. 24, 1868. 

JAMES BENNET, born Apr. 5, 1870. 

MARY ELEANOR, born May 14, 1872; died Feb. n, 1900. 

ROBERT LEIGH, born Mar. 13, 1875. 

ARCHIBALD WILSON, born Feb. 6, 1878; died Sept. 24, 1902. 

WILLIAM, born Nov. 6,1879; died Nov. 6,1879. 

Home, Lake City, Iowa; Business, clergyman. 

VI. JOEL HOPKINS McCORD, first child of Helen 
De Armond Hopkins and Robert L. McCord. 

Graduated from Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, class of 1891. 
Home, Sioux Rapids, Iowa; business, president Sioux Rapids State Se- 
curity Bank. 

70 



VI. JAMES BENNET McCORD, second child of 
Helen De Armond Hopkins and Robert L. McCord, was married 
August 14., 1895, t Margaret Mellen, who was born Novem- 
ber 9, 1870. 

CHILDREN: 

JESSIE FAIRBANK, born July 12, 1897. 

MARY HELEN, born Jan. 19, 1899. 

ROBERT, born May 5, 1900. 

Margaret Mellen is the daughter of a missionary of the American Board, 
and was born in Africa. She graduated from Oberlin College in the class 
of 1893. 

VI. JAMES BENNET McCORD graduated from Oberlin College 
in the class of 1891, and from the Northwestern Medical College, Chicago, 
111., class of 1894. He practiced medicine at Lake City, Iowa, until the 
fall of 1899, when he received an appointment from the American Board 
of Commissioners of Foreign Missions to join the Zulu Mission as medical 
missionary. He sailed from Boston October n, 1899. His station is at 
Durban, Natal, South Africa. About the time of his going to Africa, the 
Natal government had passed a law requiring of doctors practicing in 
Natal, an English diploma. To save the expense of a journey to England 
and the time, the American Board wrote to Mr. Chamberlain, secretary 
for foreign affairs, to procure for Dr. McCord a license to practice in Eng- 
lish territory. Mr. Chamberlain accordingly wrote to the Natal govern- 
ment recommending that he be permitted to take an examination in Natal, 
but all plans failed, and he was obliged to go to England and enter the Uni- 
versity in London. He studied a year and took the examinations with the 
class in July, 1902, receiving a membership in the Royal College of Physi- 
cians and the Royal College of Surgeons. He returned to his work in the 
Zulu mission in August. He is now laboring to establish a dispensary 
and hospital at Durban. 

VI. MARY ELEANOR McCORD, third child of Helen 
De Armond Hopkins and Robert L. McCord, was married June 
27, 1895, to Ralph Larkin, who was born June 29, 1870. 

CHILDREN: 

ROBERT EDGAR, born Oct. i, 1897; died Sept. 24, 1899. 

VI. MARY ELEANOR McCORD was born in Toulon, 111., removing 
to New Windsor with the family in her seventh year, to Lyonsville, when 



she was ten years old, and to Sheffield when she was fourteen. From here 
she went to Oberlin College for four years, graduating in the class of 1894, 
after which she taught in Toulon one year and in Lake City, Iowa, for two 
years, and spent one year in the Moody Bible Institute. She was married 
in the summer of 1895, and in the following September went with her 
husband to Turkey, under the A. B. C. F. M. Because of frequent mas- 
sacres in the interior, they spent one year in Beirut, Syria, studying Arabic, 
and reached their destination, Mardin, October, 1896. In October, 1897, 
her little son was born, and a few months later she was taken with a severe 
sickness, from which she never recovered. They returned to America in 
the summer of 1898, and spent the last year of her life in Colorado. Little 
Robert died September 24, 1899, and the mother followed February n, 
1900. The predominant trait of her Christian character was her unwaver- 
ing faith. When starting out across the country for Turkey in the times of 
the terrible massacres, she wrote: "God calls us to go, we cannot hesi- 
tate. He will lead us. If he should take us home, it would be our great 
gain. You must not grieve." And in Colorado, during the last bright 
days of her life, she prayed for grace to live or die just as God willed. 
Faith gave her the victory. Her death was a triumph. 

Ralph Larkin graduated from Knox College, Galesburg, 111., class 1892, 
and from the Congregational Theological Seminary, Chicago, 111., class of 
1895. 

Home, Ontario, Cal.; business, clergyman. 

VI. ROBERT LEIGH McCORD, fourth child of Helen 
De Armond Hopkins and Robert L. McCord, studied at Oberlin, 
in 1891 and i8g2. 

He graduated from the Iowa University, class of 1896, and from its 
law department in 1899. While studying law in Iowa University in 1898) 
he enlisted in the 6th battery, Iowa Volunteers, Light Artillery, as corporal. 
The battery went into camp in Des Moines, in July, but were never called 
to active service. He was mustered out in September as "An efficient drill- 
master, and a soldier who can intelligently handle a body of men." 

VI. ARCHIBALD WILSON McCORD, fifth child of 
Helen De Armond Hopkins and Robert L. McCord, was born in 
Toulon, III., February 6, 1878. 

He studied at Oberlin, Ohio, and at Grinnell, Iowa, and afterward 
took a commercial course at Capital City Commercial College, Des Moines, 

72 




V. ARCHIBALD WILSON HOPKINS. 



Iowa. His ambition lay along business lines. Nothing better presenting 
itself, he accepted a clerkship in a store, and worked so hard and faithfully 
that he is still the merchant's standard of faithful service. Wishing to 
make banking his life work, he worked for a few months in the Lake View 
State Bank, and later in the law office of his brother in Sac City. It was 
here that he became acquainted with Judge Goldsmith, who, recognizing 
his sterling qualities, sent him to Salem, S. D., as a clerk in his bank there. 
He had been there but a few weeks, when the manager of the bank became 
ill, and he assumed the direction of the business in his absence. He filled 
the place with so much ability and fidelity that the directors of the Early 
State Bank, at Early, Iowa, made him cashier and a director in their bank. 
Few young men in business have, by the force of merit alone, risen so 
rapidly, or won, in so short a time, so much respect and friendship. He was 
stricken with typhoid fever early in September, 1902, and after a brave and 
determined fight, died like a Christian, recognizing God's will as "all right." 

VI. WILLIAM McCORD, sixth child of Helen De Armond 
Hopkins and Robert McCord, died the day he was born. He 
was buried in the Granville cemetery. 

V. ARCHIBALD WILSON HOPKINS, third child of 
Joel Willis Hopkins and Eleanor Jane Harrison, was married 
April 14. 1898, to Cara L. McVay, who was born October 17, 
1861. She is a graduate of the "Western," at Oxford, Ohio. 

CHILDREN : 

ELEANOR JANE, born Feb. 15, 1899. 
JOEL WILLIS, born Sept. 19, 1902. 
Home, Granville, 111. 

V. ARCHIBALD WILSON HOPKINS, the only son of Joel Willis 
Hopkins and Eleanor Jane Harrison, was born and has always lived at 
the old homestead at Granville, 111. He studied for a short time at Oberlin 
College, then went to Hillsdale, Mich., where he graduated with the class 
of 1870. From that time until the death of his father, February 16, 1902, 
he was associated with him in business, along the lines of farming, stock- 
raising, and kindred interests. For years he was a director of the Peru 
National Bank, and at his father's death became president of both the Gran- 
ville bank and the Putnam County bank, at Hennepin, 111. He has been 
quite a traveler in both the Old and New World. He served the Republican 
party as a member of the 37th, 38th, and 4ist General Assemblies of Illinois. 

73 



V. MARY HARRISON HOPKINS, fourth child of Joel 
Willis Hopkins and Eleanor Jane Harrison, was married May 
19, 1875, to William W. Wright, who was born September 10, 
184.2. 

CHILDREN : 

ELEANOR MATILDA, born May 30, 1877. 

WILLIAM W., born Aug. 12, 1878. 

MARY AMELIA, born Nov. 6, 1880; died July 30, 1881. 

HELEN GERTRUDE, born July 22, 1884. 

V. MARY HARRISON HOPKINS graduated from the musical de- 
partment of Rockford College in 1865. She then studied two years at 
Oberlin College and one year at the New England Conservatory, Boston, 
Mass. 

William W. Wright is a lawyer and has served Stark County, Illinois, 
six years as master in chancery, and afterwards twenty-five years as judge. 
He was a delegate from the Peoria district to the National Republican 
Convention which met in Chicago in 1884. He stands high as a lawyer, 
and has been connected with many prominent cases. 

VI. ELEANOR MATILDA WRIGHT, first child of 
Mary Harrison Hopkins and William W. Wright. 

Graduated from the Toulon, 111., High School, class of 1894, and from 
the Toulon Academy in 1897. She is at the Toulon home with her parents. 

VI. WILLIAM W. WRIGHT, second child of Mary 
Harrison Hopkins and William W. Wright. 

Studied in the schools of Toulon until 1897, when he went to Wooster, 
Mass., and afterwards to the University of Illinois, where he graduated 
from the law department in 1904. He was admitted to the bar in Arkansas 
in 1902 and in Illinois in 1904. Is associated in business with his father 
in Toulon, 111. 

VI. MARY AMELIA WRIGHT, third child of Mary 
Harrison Hopkins and William W. W T right, died a baby, and 
is buried in the Granville Cemetery. 



74 



VI. HELEN GERTRUDE WRIGHT, the fourth child of 
Mary Harrison Hopkins and William W. Wright. 

Graduated from the Toulon Academy in 1902. She studied at Welles- 
ley one year, and is in the University of Illinois, Champaign, 111., class of 
1905. 

. 

V. MARTHA BELLE HOPKINS, child of Joel W. 
Hopkins and Mrs. Sarah S. Harrison, was married March 3, 
1898, to Sidney Whitaker, who was born December 20, 1859. 

CHILDREN: 

SIDNEY HOPKINS, born Mar. 13, 1899. 

JOHN HOPKINS, born June 22, 1900. 

JOEL HOPKINS, born Aug. 22, 1901. 

SARAH HYDE, born May 24, 1903. 

WlLHELMINA SCHOETLER, bom Sept. I, 1904. 

V. MARTHA BELLE HOPKINS, child of Joel W. Hopkins and Mrs. 
Sarah S. Harrison, was in the High School at Ottawa, 111., 1880 and 1881, 
and studied at Wellesley College from 1882 to 1885. Just before her grad- 
uation she was called home by the illness of her mother. She spent the 
year 1888-89 traveling in Europe. Her home is "just over the way" from 
the old homestead. 

Home, Granville, 111. ; business, agriculture. 



75 



IV. ELIZABETH HOPKINS, third child of William 
Hopkins and Jane Wilson Willis, was married February 8, 
1838, to James Willis Margrave, who was born in Kentucky, 
August 16, 1814.. 

CHILDREN : 

THOMAS EWING, born Sept. 3, 1839. 

JANE WILSON, born Sept. 6, 1841; died Mar. 24, 1866. 

CHARLES T., born Sept. 20, 1843. 

WILLIAM A., born May i, 1845. 

MILISSA, born Sept. 4, 1847. 

SUSAN G., born Jan. 20, 1849. 

LAURA H., born June 19, 1850; died Feb. 10, 1873. 

MARTHA ELLEN, born Feb. 20, 1857. 

The first home of IV. Elizabeth Hopkins and J. W. Margrave was at 
Granville, 111. About 1844 they went to Marion, Iowa, and later to Hia- 
watha, Kansas. Of their children, Jane was born in her grandmother's 
old home at Granville, 111.; William in Peoria, 111.; Martha and Ellen in 
Platteville, Wis. ; and the rest in Iowa. Elizabeth Hopkins Margrave died 
May 21, 1892, and is buried at Hiawatha, Kansas. 

Home, Hiawatha, Kansas; business, proprietor Hiawatha Greenhouses. 

V. THOMAS E. MARGRAVE, first child of Elizabeth 
Hopkins and J. W. Margrave, was married April 18, 1864., to 
Hannah Henderson, who was born in Concord. Ohio, 

CHILDREN: 

MARGARET W., born Mar. 12, 1865; died Dec. 19, 1896. 

GEORGE H., born Jan. 26, 1867. 

JENNIE R., born Oct. 2, 1868. 

ALFRED W., born Aug. 28, 1870. 

MARY E., born Jan. 6, 1872. 

ANNIE, born Apr. 8, 1874; died Aug. n, 1874. 



V. Thomas E. Margrave enlisted in Company H, 2oth Illinois Infantry, 
Volunteers, on June 13, 1861, and was mustered out June 13, 1864. He 
was in the battles of Frederickstown, Mo., in 1861; Fort Henry, 1862; 
Fort Donaldson, 1862; Pittsburg Landing, 1862; Siege of Corinth, 1862; 
Brittan's Lane, 1862; Port Gibson, 1862; Raymond, 1863. 

Home, Gordon, Sheridan County, Neb.; business, lumber merchant. 

VI. MARGARET W. MARGRAVE, first child of Thomas 
E. Margrave and Hannah Henderson, was married April 15, 
1886, to Samuel B. Frye, who was born in Michigan. 

CHILDREN : 

MATTIE E., born Nov. 26, 1888. 
LESLIE E., born Jan. 6, 1892. 
JENNIE, born Apr. 16, 1895. 

MARGARET H., born Dec. 2, 1897. 

Home, Reserve, Kan.; business, agriculture. 

VI. GEORGE H. MARGRAVE, second child of Thomas 
E. Margrave and Hannah Henderson, is not married. 
Home, Gordon, Neb.; business, ranchman. 

VI. JENNIE R. MARGRAVE, third child of Thomas 
E. Margrave and Hannah Henderson, was married March 2, 
1896, to E. R. Pyle, who was born in Nebraska. 

CHILDREN: 

MARGARET E., born Apr. 20, 1897. 
HANNAH M., born Mar. 31, 1898. 

Home, Reserve, Kan. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. ALFRED W. MARGRAVE, fourth child of Thomas 
E. Margrave and Hannah Henderson, is not married. 
Home, Gordon, Neb. ; business, ranchman. 

VI. MARY E. MARGRAVE, fifth child of Thomas E. 
Margrave and Hannah Henderson, was married May /, 
to Fred. C. Duerfeldt, who was born in New York. 

CHILDREN : 

GEORGE H., born Jan. 3, 1896. 

Home, Gordon, Neb. ; business, ranchman. 

77 



VI. ANNIE MARGRAVE, sixth child of Thomas E. 
Margrave and Hannah Henderson, died when four months 
old, and is buried at Ashland, Neb. 

V. JANE WILSON MARGRAVE, second child of Eliz- 
abeth Hopkins and J. W. Margrave, died March 24., 1866, in 
St. Joseph, Mo. 

She was on her way home from Dr. Jackson's Sanitarium, " Our Home 
on the Hillside," N. Y., where she had been for treatment for consump- 
tion. She was twenty-five years old. 

V. CHARLES T. MARGRAVE, third child of Elizabeth 
Hopkins and J. W. Margrave, was married September 19, 
1868, to Agnes Whillans, who was born in Canada. 

CHILDREN: 

ELIZABETH CECILIA, born Jan. 2, 1870. 

EDITH L., born Dec. 6, 1871; died July 2, 1873. 

JAMES W., born June 7, 1877; died Jan. 30, 1878. 

ANNA M., born July 27, 1880. 

NELLIE A., born Dec. 13, 1883. 

Home, Gordon, Sheridan County, Neb. ; business, ranchman. 

Mrs. and Mr. Charles Margrave lived first in Brown County, Kan., and 
then Richardson County, Neb., where they were among the first settlers. 
In 1885, they moved to Sheridan County, Neb. They now live at 304 Pine 
Street, Gordon, Neb., still owning the ranch where Charles spent so much 
of his time. 

VI. ELIZABETH CECILIA MARGRAVE, first child 
of Charles T. Margrave and Agnes Whillans, was married No- 
vember 25, 1891, to Clarence E. Park, who was born in Sarpy 
County, Neb. 

CHILDREN : 

BETH EVA, born Oct. 7, 1892. 

SARAH AGNES, born Dec. 15, 1893. 
MARGARET ANNA, born Dec. 23, 1895. 
EMMA JEANNETTE, born Sept. i, 1898. 
Albany, Neb. ; business, ranchman. 

78 



VI. EDITH L. MARGRAVE and JAMES W. MAR- 
GRAVE, second and third children of Charles T. Margrave 
and Agnes Whillans, died when babies, and are buried at Salem, 
Neb. 

VI. ANNA M. MARGRAVE, fourth child of Charles T. 
Margrave and Agnes Whillans, graduated from Bellevue Col- 
lege, 1903, A. B. 

VI. NELLIE A. MARGRAVE, fifth child of Charles T. 
Margrave and Agnes Whillans, graduated from the Gordon 
schools in 1903, and is studying at Bellevue College, class of 1907. 

V. WILLIAM A. MARGRAVE, fourth child of Elizabeth 
Hopkins and J. W. Margrave, was married January 13, 
1867, to Margaret Rubeti, who was born in 184.8. 

CHILDREN : 

JULIA E., born June 2, 1869. 

MARGARET LUNETTE, born Apr. 13, 1873; died Mar. 31, 1875. 

WILLIAM C., born June 27, 1876. 

JAMES T., born June 28, 1880. 

EARL IRVIN, born Jan. 31, 1883. 

Home, Reserve, Kan. ; business, ranchman. 

Margaret Rubeti was, by her mother, a member of the Sac tribe of 
Indians. Her father was a Canadian Frenchman, whose education was 
commenced with a view to his becoming a Roman Catholic priest. This 
plan he abandoned, and going to the West, was employed by the American 
Fur Company. In 1851 Margaret was left an orphan. The Rev. S. M. 
Irvin took her to his home in the "Iowa and Sac Mission" and brought 
her up and educated her as though she were his own child. She taught 
the first school on the Reservation, and still remembers her trying experi- 
ences when her pupils could talk no English and she could talk no Indian. 
The home at Reserve, Kan., is one that the Hopkins clans may well covet. 

V. WILLIAM A. MARGRAVE, beginning with nothing has added 
acre to acre till he owns large tracts of land at Reserve, Kan. His son 
James T. Margrave manages his estates at Gordon, Neb. 



79 



VI. JULIA E. MARGRAVE, first child of Margaret 
Rubeti and William A. Margrave, was married February. 14, 
1888, to George LeClire, who was born January 18, 1865. 

CHILDREN : 

RUBIE, born Dec. 2, 1889. 

STEWART, born Sept. 16, 1893; died July 16, 1896. 

MARGARETTE, born Aug. 27, 1896. 

WALTER, born June 20, 1900. 

Home, Reserve, Kan.; business, ranchman. 

VI. MARGARET LUNETTE MARGRAVE, second 
child of Margaret Rubeti and William Margrave, died at 
five years of age. 

VI. WILLIAM C. MARGRAVE, third child of Margaret 
Rubeti and William Margrave, was married March 17, 1897, 
to Mary Julia Walter, who was born Aug. 28, 1877. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM C., born June 8, 1898; died Feb. 5, 1899. 

HOWARD JOSEPH, born Sept. 15, 1900. 
JULIA, born Sept. 12, 1903. 

Home, Reserve, Kan.; business, ranchman. 

VI. JAMES T. MARGRAVE, fourth child of Margaret 
Rubeti and William Margrave, was married December 24, 1901, 
to Mary Etta Honstedt. 

Home, Gordon, Neb. 

VI. EARL IRVIN MARGRAVE, fifth child of Margaret 
Rubeti and William Margrave, is studying at Manhattan Ag- 
ricultural College. 



So 



V. MELISSA MARGRAVE, fifth child of Elizabeth Hop- 
kins and T. W. Margrave, was married May 26, 1872, to Deloss 
A. Tisdel, who was born February 29, 1827, and died May 13, 
1898. 

CHILDREN : 

MARY, born Nov. 20, 1875. 
WILLIS DELOSS, born Feb. 13, 1877. 

BELLE, born Mar. 26, 1881. 

MYRON, born Oct. 4, 1883. 

ARTHUR LEE, born Apr. 8, 1885. 

GURNEY, born July 21, 1890; died Apr. 4, 1892. 

All the children were born on a farm in Salem, Richardson County, Neb. 
Home, Reserve, Brown County, Kan. 

VI. MARY TISDEL, first child of Melissa Margrave and 
Deloss A. Tisdel. 

Has been a very successful teacher. Her health required a vacation, 
and she is in the home at Reserve, Kan. 

VI. WILLIS DELOSS TISDEL, second child of Melissa 
Margrave and Deloss A. Tisdel. 

Is in the restaurant business, Minneapolis, Minn. 

VI. BELL TISDEL, third child of Melissa Margrave and 
Deloss A . Tisdel. 

Is in the home, Reserve, Kan. 

VI. MYRON TISDEL, fourth child of Melissa Margrave 
and Deloss A . Tisdel. 

Is employed in a large grocery house in Santa Barbara, Cal. His 
future prospects are very bright. 

VI. ARTHUR LEE TISDEL, fifth child of Melissa Mar- 
grave and Deloss A . Tisdel. 

Is in the home, Reserve, Kan. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. GURNEY TISDEL, sixth child of Melissa Margrave 
and Deloss A . Tisdel, died when twenty months old, and is buried 
at Reserve, Kan. 

81 



V. SUSAN G. MARGRAVE, sixth child of Elizabeth 
Hopkins and J. W. Margrave. 

Has given all of her best days to her father's family. She closed out 
her millinery business to care for her mother during her last illness, and 
since then has been her father's right hand. Writing of her he says, " I 
cannot estimate her worth." 

Home, Hiawatha, Kan.; business, florist. 

V. LAURA H. MARGRAVE, seventh child of Elizabeth 
Hopkins and J. W. Margrave, was married March, 1872, 
to James McCullough, who was born in Pennsylvania. 

CHILDREN : 

ROBERT BENTON. 
MILLIE. 

Two other children were born to Laura H. Margrave and James 
McCullough, who died in infancy and are buried at Salem, Neb. 

VI. ROBERT BENTON McCULLOUGH, first child of 
Laura H. Margrave and James McCullough. 

Is in Arkansas City, in the dray business. 

VI. MILLIE McCULLOUGH, second child of Laura H. 
Margrave and James McCullough. 

Makes her home with her grandfather, J. W. Margrave, in Hiawatha, 
Kan. 

V. MARTHA ELLEN MARGRAVE, eighth child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and J. W. Margrave, was married April 13, 
1881, to Walter Stewart Hermon, who was born in Ohio, February 
6, 1859. 

CHILDREN : 

HAROLD CLYDE, born Feb. 18, 1882. 
MABEL, born Oct. 22, 1884. 

ROY, born Oct. 15, 1887. 

DOROTHY, born Aug. 2, 1892. 

Home, Reserve, Kan. ; business, agriculture. 



82 




IV. JOHN CRAWFORD HOPKINS. 



IV. JOHN CRAWFORD HOPKINS, fourth child of 
William Hopkins and Jane Wilson Willis, was married May 
5, 184.5, t Sarah Richey, who was born January 5, 1825, and 
died February p, 1888. 
CHILDREN: 

GEORGE HENRY, born Nov. 14, 1846; died Mar. 1,1896. 

WILLIAM OTIS, born Aug. 28, 1849. 

ARATHUSA ELIZABETH, born Feb. 19, 1851. 

NATHANIEL RICHEY, born Oct. 13, 1854. 

SARAH JANE, born Mar. 29, 1857. 

MARGARET SUSANNA, born Mar. 27, 1859. 

JOHN CHARLES, born Jan. 16, 1862; died Oct. 23, 1862. 

FREDERICK WADE, born May i, 1864. 

Home, Green Mountain, Iowa; business, agriculture. 

George Henry Hopkins was six feet and one inch tall and weighed two 
hundred and twenty pounds. Brown hair and dark eyes. 

Fred. W. Hopkins weighs two hundred and ten pounds and has a dark 
complexion. 

William Otis Hopkins is six feet and one inch tall and weighs two 
hundred and sixty pounds, has brown hair and eyes. 

Nathaniel R. Hopkins, the "Goliath" of the Hopkins tribe, is six and 
a half feet tall and has brown hair and eyes. 

IV. JOHN CRAWFORD HOPKINS went to Iowa in May, 1855, 
and has lived in Marshall County ever since. He was one of the charter 
members of the church at Green Mountain, was chosen deacon June 6, 1857, 
and has held the office ever since. He is the only one of the original mem- 
bers now living. Because of his blindness, he cannot officiate at the com- 
munion service. He was for eleven years superintendent of the Sunday 
school, and has always been ready for any service for the "Master." At 
eighty-six he is the last one left of his father's family. 

V. GEORGE HENRY HOPKINS, first child of John 
C. Hopkins and Sarah Richey, was married November 13, 
1873, to Alice E. Croxton. 

CHILDREN : 

SUSAN, born Jan. 3, 1875. 

HELEN ELVIRA, born June 24, 1880. 
JOHN CROXTON, born July 20, 1886. 
Home, Canal Dover, Ohio. 

83 



V. GEORGE HENRY HOPKINS was superintendent of the J. B. 
Plow Manufacturing Co. at New Comerstown, Ohio. He came home 
from his business late one evening, seemingly well and in good spirits. 
His wife was out, so he went to bed. When she came in later she found 
him asleep, and in the morning she was unable to arouse him. Investiga- 
tion proved that he had died in the night, making no sign. Physicians 
pronounced it heart failure. 

VI. SUSAN HOPKINS, first child oj George Henry 
Hopkins and Alice Croxton. 

Is at home, Canal Dover, Ohio. 

VI. HELEN ELVIRA HOPKINS, second child of 
George Henry Hopkins and Alice Croxton, was married No- 
vember 13, i go i, to John Alvin Vinton. 

Home, Canal Dover, Ohio. 

VI. JOHN CROXTON HOPKINS, third child of 
George Henry Hopkins and Alice Croxton. 
Is at home, Canal Dover, Ohio. 



84 



V. WILLIAM OTIS HOPKINS, second child oj John C. 
Hopkins and Sarah Rickey, was married December 27, /#77, to 
Jane B. Gowdy who was born December 8, 1856. 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES HARRY, born Nov. 8, 1878. 
JOHN Ross, born Sept. 18, 1880. 
Jane B. Gowdy Hopkins died July 26, 1882. 

V. WILLIAM OTIS HOPKINS was married second, May 2, 1892, to 
Amelia Clark, who was born July 10, 1861, and died April 22, 1900. 

Home, Columbia Falls, Montana; business, agriculture. 

VI. JAMES HARRY HOPKINS, first child of William 
Otis Hopkins and Jane B. Gowdy, was married September 2, 

1903, to Emma Schr eider. 
Home, Melbourne, Iowa. 

VI. JOHN ROSS HOPKINS, second child oj William 
Otis Hopkins and Jane B. Gowdy, was married September 21, 

1904, to Meta Strau. 
Home, Melbourne, Iowa. 

V. ARATHUSA ELIZABETH HOPKINS, third child 
of John C. Hopkins and Sarah Rickey. 

Cares for her father at Green Mountain, Iowa. 

V. NATHANIEL RICHEY HOPKINS, fourth child 
of John C. Hopkins and Sarah Rickey, was married December 
9, 1888, to Alice Clayton Clark, who was born June 17, 1867. 

CHILDREN: 

OTIS LAUNCELOT, born May 17, 1890. 
HAZLE ARATHUSA, born May 22, 1897. 

V. NATHANIEL RICHEY HOPKINS and Alice Clayton Clark ran 
away to be married, her parents objecting because of the difference in 
their ages. Alice Clayton Clark and Amelia Clark (Mrs. William Otis 
Hopkins) were sisters. 

Home, Canastota, South Dakota. 

85 



V. SARAH JANE HOPKINS, fifth child of John C, 
Hopkins and Sarah Rickey, was married January 5, 1881, to 
Harvey Hazlehurst, who was born September 9, 1856. 
CHILDREN: 

MAGGIE ALICE, born Nov. 11,1882. 

EVELYN Lois, born Oct. 3, 1884. 

THADDEUS HOPKINS, born Nov. 21, 1886. 
BOYD LESLIE, born Nov. 29, 1888. 

PAUL FENTON, born Nov. 25, 1890. 

NINA ARATHTJSA, born May 9, 1893. 
HARRY HOBART, born July 17,1896. 
GLENN CRAWFORD, born Sept. 21, 1898. 
Home, Milford, Iowa; business, agriculture. 

VI. MAGGIE ALICE HAZLEHURST, first child of 
Sarah Jane Hopkins and Harvey Hazlehurst, was married 
April 6, 1904, to T. A. Lenon. 

Home, Columbia Falls, Montana. 

VI. EVELYN LOIS HAZLEHURST, second child of 
Sarah Jane Hopkins and Harvey Hazlehurst, was married 
September 9, 1903, to K. S. Myers. 

Home, Milford, Iowa. 

V. MARGARET SUSANNA HOPKINS, sixth child of 
John C. Hopkins and Sarah Rickey, was married November 
14., 1890, to John H. McAfee, who was born January 18, 1859. 
CHILDREN: 

BLANCHE, born Dec. 15, 1891. 

Home, Columbia Falls, Montana; business, agriculture. 

V. JOHN CHARLES HOPKINS, seventh child of John 
C. Hopkins and Sarah Rickey, died a baby and is buried at 
Green Mountain, Iowa. 

V. FREDERICK WADE HOPKINS, eighth child of 
John C. Hopkins and Sarah Rickey, was married September 
26, 1895, to Luella Jane Bovee, who was born December 15, 1867. 

Home, Green Mountain, Iowa: business, agriculture. 

86 



IV. MARTHA HOPKINS, fifth child of William Hopkins 
and Jane Wilson Willis. 

When twenty-nine years of age, went into the home of her brother 
Joel Willis Hopkins to mother his motherless little children, and to assist 
him in the care of their invalid brother Stephen Dawse Hopkins. For 
thirteen years she gave herself without stint to these loved ones, when the 
marriage of her brother in 1862 relieved her somewhat of these cares, and 
Oct. 15, 1867, she was married to James B. McCord. For seven years 
her home was in the village of Granville. In August, 1874, her husband 
died, and she went to Toulon, Illinois, to make her home with her niece 
Mrs. Mary H. Hopkins Wright, where for seven years she was surrounded 
by all the comforts that loving hearts could devise. She died at Toulon, 
Illinois, June 24, 1881, and is buried in the cemetery at Granville, 111. 



IV. STEPHEN DAWSE HOPKINS, sixth child of 
William Hopkins and Jane Wilson Willis, was never married. 

He was a life-long invalid, and lived and died in the home of his brother 
Joel Willis Hopkins. He is buried in the cemetery at Granville, 111. 



IV. GEORGE BURDER HOPKINS, seventh child of 
William Hopkins and Jane Wilson Willis, was married April 
2, 1850, to Rachel Catherine Brando, who was born May 18, 
1825, and died September 17, 1892. 

CHILDREN: 

GUSTAVE WADE, born Jan. 13, 1851; died Mar. 12, 1852. 
WILLIAM K., born Jan. 27,1853; 

MARY EVA, born Feb. 4, 1855; died July 3, 1902. 

HENRY MILES, born Feb. 7, 1857. 
ALBERT WADE, born Feb. 27, 1859. 
MARGARETTE ANN, born April 2, 1861. 
GEORGE LEWIS, born April 17, 1863; died Feb. 20, 1865. 
KITTY, born April 27, 1866; died Oct. 27,1866. 

RACHEL MELINDA, born Mar. 9, 1868. 
GEORGE B., born Feb. 20, 1871. 

Home, Granville, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

8? 



V. GU STAVE WADE, first child of George Burder Hop- 
kins and Rachel Catherine Brando, died a year and a half old, 
and is buried in the Granville Cemetery. 

V. WILLIAM K., second child of George Burder Hopkins 
and Rachel Catherine Brando, was married February 19, 1878, 
to Clara A. Barnard, who was born September i, 1854.. 

CHILDREN: 

MABEL K., born Nov. n, 1878. 

WADE BARNARD, born June 14, 1884; died May 21, 1887. 

Home, since 1879, Crete, Neb.; business, agriculture. 

Clara A. Barnard graduated from the Vermont State Normal School, 
Randolph, Vt., Class of 1875. William K. Hopkins studied at Wheaton 
College, Wheaton, 111., 1869-1871. 

VI. MABEL K. HOPKINS, first child of William K. 
Hopkins and Clara A. Barnard. 

Graduated from the Crete High School, Class of 1897, and from Doane 
College, Class of 1900. 

VI. WADE BARNARD HOPKINS, second child of 
William K. Hopkins and Clara A. Barnard, died when three 
years old, and is buried at Crete, Neb. 

V. MARY EVA HOPKINS, third child of George 
Burder Hopkins and Rachel Catherine Brando. 

Was two years at Wheaton College. She went to Chicago in January, 
1887, and engaged in Bible work with Miss Dyer, where she stayed until 
April, 1892, when she was called home by the serious illness of her mother. 
To her she gave a daughter's most devoted care until her death, September, 
1892. She then kept the old homestead bright and homelike for her 
father, always ready with a glad welcome for the children and grand- 
children, until the spring of 1902, when a mortal malady shut her in with 
pain, for which no remedy was found. She died July 3, 1902, and is buried 
in the Granville cemetery. She left a legally adopted daughter, Madelene, 
born September 22, 1898. 



88 



V. HENRY MILES HOPKINS, fourth child of George 
Burder Hopkins and Rachel Catherine Brando, was married 
December 20, 1881, to Mary M. Nutten, who was born May 2, 
1854. 

CHILDREN: 

EDITH ALICE, born Oct. 2, 1882. 
GEORGIA BETH, born Jan. 24. 1884. 
IRMA ADA, born Sept. 16, 1887. 

ALBERTIS LYNN, born Feb. ig, 1890. 
CARL NUTTEN, born Mar. i, 1903. 
Home, Vilisca, Iowa; business, fuel and feed store. 

V. HENRY MILES HOPKINS studied at Wheaton College, Wheaton, 
111., 1875-76, and later at Hillsdale, Mich., 1876-77. 

Mary M. Nutten graduated from Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Mich., 
in the class of 1877, received the degree of B. A. She took the degree of 
M. A. in 1880. 

VI. EDITH ALICE HOPKINS, first child of Henry 
Miles Hopkins and Mary M. Nutten. 

Graduated from the Vilisca High School, Iowa, with the class of 1900; 
studied at Wheaton College, Wheaton, 111. ; and took one year in a business 
course at Tarkio, Mo. 

She is at home at Vilisca, Iowa. 

VI. GEORGIA BETH HOPKINS, second child of Henry 
Miles Hopkins and Mary M. Nutten. 

Studied at Tarkio, Mo., two years, and graduated from the Schoemaker 
School of Oratory, May, 1904. 
She is at home, Vilisca, Iowa. 

VI. IRMA ADA HOPKINS, third child of Henry Miles 
Hopkins and Mary M. Nutten. 

Is in the Vilisca High School, class of 1907. 

VI. ALBERTIS LYNN and VI. CARL NUTTEN, the 
fourth and fifth children of Henry Miles Hopkins and Mary M. 

Nutten. 

Are in the home, Vilisca, Iowa. 



V. ALBERT WADE HOPKINS, fifth child of George 
Burder Hopkins and Rachel Catherine Brando, was married 
February 27, 1883, to Louisa Virginia Martin, who was born 
October 2, 1860. 

CHILDREN : 

K. MARTIN, born Apr. 13, 1884. 

PAUL ELLSWORTH, born Feb. 20, 1886. 

LEWIS STORY, born Feb. 2, 1888. 

Of these three boys, their mother says, "We find them alike in the 
traits which they have inherited from a common ancestry, and unlike in 
an individuality, which belongs to each human being. For the present 
they are boys, boys with the virtues and faults, the likes and dislikes, 
which belong to boyhood. They like some work and a great deal of play, 
and in God's good time will doubtless marry and carry forward the name 
and race, let us hope, not unworthily." 

V. ALBERT WADE HOPKINS went with his brother William to 
Nebraska in 1879, where he remained until 1883. He was then married 
and returned to Illinois, living on a farm in LaSalle County until 1887, 
when he moved to Crete, Neb. In 1895 he moved to Vilisca, Iowa, where 
his home now is. 

Louisa Virginia Martin was educated in the schools of Nebraska City. 
She taught from 1877 to 1883, when she was married. She is a story writer 
of some merit many periodicals having published the work of her pen. 

Home, Vilisca, la.; business, agriculture. 

VI. K. MARTIN HOPKINS, first child of Albert Wade 
Hopkins and Louisa Virginia Martin. 

Graduated from the Vilisca High School, la., in 1904, and is taking 
the electrical course of study at Ames, la. 

V. MARGARETTE ANN HOPKINS, sixth child 0} 
George Burder Hopkins and Rachel Catherine Brando, was 
married on June 27, 1883, to Baxter French, who was born May 
22, 1859. 

CHILDREN: 

FLORENCE SARAH, born Apr. 7, 1884. 
RACHEL CATHERINE, born July 24, 1886. 
GRETCHEN HOPKINS, born Dec. 2, 1888. 
AMOS ZENO, born Sept. 27, 1890. 

EVA HOPKINS, born Oct. 18, 1892. 

90 



V. MARGARETTE ANN HOPKINS studied at Wheaton College, 
Wheaton, 111. Baxter French studied at Oberlin College, Oberlin, O. 
They lived on the old French farm at Granville, 111., until 1890, when 
they moved to Sioux City, la. From there they moved to Castona, la. 
where Baxter French died. Since then Margarette A. Hopkins French 
and her family have lived at Wheaton, 111., where her children are in school. 

V. GEORGE LEWIS, the seventh, and V. KITTY, the 
eighth child of George B. Hopkins and Rachel Catherine Brando, 
died when children, and are buried in the Granville Cemetery. 

V. RACHEL MELINDA HOPKINS, ninth child oj 
George Burder Hopkins and Rachel Catherine Brando, was 
married March 28, 1892, to Ellsworth Edgerley, who was born 
April 4, 1 86 1. 

CHILDREN : 

KENNETH HOPKINS, born Jan. n, 1895. 
NEVA MARGARETTE, born June i, 1898. 

V. RACHEL MELINDA HOPKINS studied music at Oberlin 1884- 
1886. Since her marriage her home was at Clarion, la., until the death 
of her sister, Mary Eva Hopkins, when she, with her family, returned to 
the old homestead at Granville, 111., to be with her father, where she still 
makes her home. 

Home, Granville, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

V. GEORGE B. HOPKINS, tenth child oj George Burder 
Hopkins and Rachel Catherine Brando, was married June 2, 
1892, to Emma Carl, who was born July 12, 1873. 

CHILDREN : 

MARGARETTE EMMA, born July 19, 1893. 
ARVILLA FAY, born Jan. 3, 1895. 

OPAL RUTH, born Oct. 4, 1898. 

George B. Hopkins attended Oberlin 1886-87. 
Home, Cimmeron, Kan.; business, stock raising. 

IV. MARGARET HOPKINS, eighth child of William 
Hopkins and Jane Wilson Willis, was not married. 

She was a tall woman with a dark complexion, and quite vivacious. 
She was a good singer. She made her home with her brother Joel Willis 



Hopkins, at Granville, 111., where she died, and is buried in the cemetery 
at Granville. 

IV. MELINDA HOPKINS, ninth child of William Hop- 
kins and Jane Wilson Willis, was married in the home of her 
brother Joel Willis Hopkins, March 5, 1856, to Abbott Barker, 
who was born January 12, 1823. 

CHILDREN: 

HANNAH JANE, born Jan. 16, 1857. 
JOEL HOPKINS, born Jan. 31, 1860. 

The children were both born at Granville, Putnam County, 111. The 
family moved to Mazon, 111., April, 1861. Here Melinda Hopkins Barker 
died, and was buried in the cemetery at Granville, 111. Abbott and Melinda 
Hopkins Barker were charter members of the Wauponsie Grove Congre- 
gational Church, which was organized May 6, 1864 (now Park Street 
Church, Mazon). Of this church Abbott Barker has been both deacon 
and trustee for many years. 

Home, Mazon, 111.; business, agriculture (carpenter by trade). 

V. HANNAH JANE BARKER, first child of Melinda 
Hopkins and Abbott Barker, was married December 28, 1876, 
to Albert Denmon Beckhart, who was born October 8, 184.7. 

CHILDREN : 

MABEL GRACE, born Nov. 28, 1877. 

GEORGE NEWPORT, born Mar. 27, 1879. 

CHARLES ABBOTT, born Dec. 3, 1880. 

EARL ALBERT, born Jan. 28, 1888. 

CLARENCE HOPKINS, born Sept. 8, 1889. 

FLORENE MELINDA, born Sept. 30, 1897. 

Albert Denmon Beckhart is a graduate of the University of Illinois, 
Class of 1875. He was married to Hannah Jane Barker at Cerro Gordo, 
111., where he was principal of the public school. In the fall of 1877 he 
took charge of the school at Buffalo, 111., where Mabel Grace was born. 
The next spring he supplied the Methodist Episcopal pulpit at Mechanics- 
burg. This finally resulted in his leaving school work and devoting him- 
self entirely to the ministry. He held charges at Raymond, 111., where 
George Newport was born, at Auburn, 111., where the churches had great 
revivals, and at Nilwood, 111., where Charles Abbott was born. In the 

92 



fall of 1882 he took what is called in conference language a "location," 
and moved to Kansas onto a farm, in order to give his father a home. 
Here he stayed for five years, when his father died. He then took charge 
of the city schools of Belleville, Kan., where Earl Albert was born. Still 
the pulpit called him, and he accepted a charge at St. Francis, Kan., 
where three new churches were built, and many added to the membership. 
This was a mission field. Then followed a charge at Phillipsburg, Kan., 
where Clarence Hopkins was born. Another mission field at Hill City, 
Kan., followed this, and then came a charge at Ellsworth, Kan. In 1893 
the family visited the World's Fair at Chicago. In 1894 he was trans- 
ferred to work in Iowa, and stationed first at Oakland, then at Anita, 
where Florence Melinda was born, then at Macedonia, after which he was 
recalled to Oakland. At the close of his work here he retired from active 
work, and went onto a farm near Atlantic, la. Since 1889 he has been a 
trustee of the Kansas Wesleyan University at Salina, Kan. 
Home, Atlantic, la.; business, clergyman. 

VI. MABEL GRACE BECKHART, first child of Hannah 
Jane Barker and Albert Denmon Beckhart. 
Is at home with her parents, Atlantic, la. 

VI. GEORGE NEWPORT BECKHART, second child 
of Hannah Jane Barker and Albert Denmon Beckhart, was 
married December 17, 7902, to Bess Ashley, who died April 6, 
1904. 

Home, Atlantic, la.; business, insurance solicitor. 

VI. CHARLES ABBOTT BECKHART, third child of 
Hannah Jane Barker and Albert Denmon Beckhart, was married 
February 19, 1901, to Grace Herbert, who was born at Atlantic, 
Iowa, November 15, 1883. 
CHILDREN : 

MARGERY ELLEN, born July 31, 1902. 
LILLIAN GRACE, born June 21, 1903. 
WILLIAM BRUCE, born June 21, 1904. 
Home, Wiota, la.; business, agriculture. 



V. JOEL HOPKINS BARKER, second child of Abbott 
Barker and Melinda Hopkins, was married September 21, 1886, 
to Hettie F. Robinson., who was born March 15, 1862, and died 
October 24., 1887. Joel Hopkins Barker was married a second 
time, December 18, 1889, to Maud E. Robinson (sister of his 
first wife). 

CHILDREN: 

BYRL ABBOTT, born June 5, 1892. 

HELEN MARGARET, born June 8, 1897. 

ERNEST CLYDE, born Aug. 1,1900. 

RUTH MELINDA, born May 8, 1903. 

V. JOEL HOPKINS BARKER attended the Morris Normal 
School, Morris, 111., 1878-79. He owns a farm of rich land near Mazon, 
111. He has been superintendent of the Wauponsie Grove and Mazon 
Congregational Sunday schools for fifteen years. 

Home, Mazon, 111.; business, agriculture, stock raising. 



///. JOHN HOPKINS, second child of Archibald and 
Elizabeth Poage Hopkins, was born in Rockingham County, 
Va., in 1805. 

After his marriage he went onto a farm near the old Red Oak church, 
where he lived and died. Each of his six sons was nearly or quite six 
feet tall, and each of them was made an elder in the Presbyterian church. 
Some one once said that "John Hopkins raised thirty-six feet of elder 
timber." He believed in educating his children, and each child, the 
daughters as well as the sons, was sent to the neighboring academy. They 
went on horseback across the hills, carrying all baggage in saddle-bags. 
Some of them were pretty homesick, but they improved their opportu- 
nities, as they have shown by their lives. Thomas left home early in the 
forties to attend the academy in South Salem, O., a distance of fifty miles. 
When the midwinter vacation came, he was so homesick that he made 
up his mind to go home. The roads were wretchedly muddy, and he 
arrived the evening of the second day, long after every one had gone to 
bed. He was nearly exhausted, and thoroughly chilled with the cold, 
but he was at home. Six of the children attended this school. There 
were two terms a year. In March of 1852 the last one bid a final farewell 
to Salem Academy. Robert and James both attended Hanover College, 
in Indiana. Robert did not finish the course, but James graduated. He 
then attended Lane Theological Seminary, Cincinnati, O., one year, and 
afterwards studied privately with Samuel Crothers, D.D., of Greenfield, O. 

Archibald Hopkins, of Red Oak, O., remembers that when his father 
was somewhat advanced in years, he said, "I used to say 'Come, boys'; 
now I say 'Go, boys.' " He often quoted the words of Solomon, "The 
King himself is served by the field." He died at the ripe old age of eighty- 
five, and is buried with his kin in the churchyard at Red Oak, O. 

III. JOHN HOPKINS, second child of Archibald Hopkins and Eliz- 
abeth Poag, was married June 7, 1815, to Polly Gilliland, who was born 
February 3, 1797. 

CHILDREN : 

ROBERT, born May 23, 1816; died July 4, 1851. 
JAMES G., born Aug. 16, 1820; died June 29, 1851. 
Polly Gilliland Hopkins died August 14, 1822, and is buried in the 
churchyard at Red Oak, O. 

95 



III. JOHN HOPKINS was married a second time October 28, 1824, 
to Nancy Mayes, who was born in South Carolina, December 27, 1788. 
She was the adopted daughter of her uncle, Colonel John Means. She died 
August i, 1851, and is buried in the churchyard at Red Oak, O. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM WILLIAMSON, born Sept. 26, 1825; died Sept. 26, 1880. 

THOMAS MAYES, born Nov. 24, 1827; died May 17, 1901. 

JOHN MEANS, born May 9, 1830. ) 

ARCHIBALD NEWTON, born May 9, 1830. ) J 

ELIZABETH JANE, born Mar. 18, 1832; died July 5, 1869. 

HARRIET ANN, born May 9, 1834. 

IV. ROBERT HOPKINS, first child of John Hopkins 
and Polly Gilliland, was married August 23, 1842, to Agnes C. 
Johnson. 

CHILDREN : 

MARY FRANCES, born Sept. 10, 1843. 

WILLIAM JOHNSON, born Nov. 6, 1845. 

NANCY MAYES, born July 15, 1847; died Nov. 14,1849. 

SARAH JANE, born Mar. 23, 1849. 

ANN KELLY, born May 15, 1851; died July 18, 1852. 

After their marriage, Robert and Agnes Johnson Hopkins went as 
missionaries to the Dakota Indians. Robert had not completed his college 
course, but was licensed and ordained by the Presbytery, of which Dr. Riggs 
and Dr. Williamson were the leading members. When Robert and his 
wife went to their fields there were no railroads beyond Galena, 111. They 
took a common road-wagon and a two-horse team and traveled with them 
to Fort Snelling. Passing that point on their way to Laque Parle, where 
Dr. Williamson was located, they met some hostile Chippewa Indians, one 
of whom leveled his gun on Robert, but the old flint-lock did not come to 
time and no damage was done. Another was more successful, and struck 
the little black mare Robert's father had given him, on the shoulder, inca- 
pacitating her for service. The company now walked in the blazing sun, 
with the temperature at a hundred degrees. Mrs. Hopkins did not recover 
from the effects of this walk for years. Robert Hopkins's work was the 
founding of a mission station on the Minnesota River, not far from where 
St. Peter now is. He and Mr. Alexander Huggins built homes for them- 
selves and began their self-denying work. The Indians often went on 
hunting expeditions in mid-winter. Robert would take his tent and snow- 

06 



shoes and follow them, living with them, and eating the unwholesome food 
which they gave him. It would have given mortal offense had he returned 
any portion uneaten. He did so much hard work that the relatives fancied 
when he visited them that he was bent as a man accustomed to bear heavy 
burdens. When asked why he went on these trips with the Indians, he 
said, " If I did not, I would lose so much time from my life work, which is 
to carry the Gospel to the Dakotas." His mantle has fallen on three 
grandchildren, Harley S. Parker and Agnes and Clarissa Pond, who have 
all served in home mission fields. Robert and Agnes Hopkins worked 
seven years with the Dakota Indians, then returned to Ohio with four 
children, for a visit. One of the children died November 14, 1849, during 
this visit, and is buried at Red Oak. Robert Hopkins and his brother 
James were very dear to each other, and when the time came for Robert 
to return to his field of labor, each felt the sorrow of the parting very 
keenly. It was but a few months before James was taken sick, and after 
some days of suffering died, June 30, 1851. On the following Friday, 
July 4, 1851, Robert was drowned in the Minnesota River, on the bank of 
which his mission was stationed. Neither of the brothers knew that the 
other had left the earthly life until they met in their " Father's house." 

IV. JAMES HOPKINS is buried in the old churchyard at Red Oak, 
Ohio. 

IV. ROBERT HOPKINS'S body lies in a little cemetery near 
St. Peter, Minn., among other missionaries to the Dakotas and members 
of their families. 

Agnes C. Johnson Hopkins was married a second time to Gideon H. 
Pond. Home, Bloomingtcn, Minn. After the death of Robert Hopkins, 
Agnes C. Johnson Hopkins went to South Salem, O., where her baby, Ann 
Kelly, died. Gideon H. Pond was also a missionary to the Indians. His 
wife had died and left him six children to care for. He persuaded Mrs. 
Hopkins, with her three children, to go back with him to the Dakotas as 
his wife. 



97 



V. MARY FRANCES HOPKINS, first child of Robert 
Hopkins and Agnes C. Johnson, was married July 28, 1864., to 
Edward, R. Pond, son of Gideon H. Pond. 

CHILDREN : 

AGNES POAGE, born May 19, 1865. 

GEORGE JUDSON, born Aug. 6, 1867; died Jan. 16, 1900. 

FANNY WILSON, born Aug. 26, 1869. 

SARAH CLARISSA, born Oct. 12, 1871. 

JEANNETTE HINE, born June 25, 1873. 

EDWARD ROBERT, born May 6, 1876. 

ARCHIE HOPKINS, born May 23, 1879; died June 28, 1879. 

HAROLD HOLLISTER, born Dec. 3, 1881. 

Home, Bloomington, Minn. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. AGNES POAGE POND, first child 0} Mary Frances 
Hopkins and Edward R. Pond. 

Is a matron in the Presbyterian Mission School at Good Will, So. Dak. 

VI. GEORGE JUDSON POND, second child of Mary 
Frances Hopkins and Edward R. Pond, died at twenty-three, 
and is buried at Bloomington, Minn. 

VI. FANNY WILSON POND, third child of Mary 
Frances Hopkins and Edward R. Pond, was married October 
f, 1808, to Thomas C. Williamson. 

^/ / / * 

CHILDREN: 

MARGARET OLIVE, born July 13, 1899. 

Home, Greenwood, So. Dak.; business, bookkeeper. 

VI. SARAH CLARISSA POND, fourth child of Mary 
Frances Hopkins and Edward R. Pond. 

Has been assistant matron at Good Will, So. Dak., for three years. 
She is now at home in Bloomington, Minn. 

VI. JEANNETTE HINE, VI. EDWARD ROBERT, 
and VI. HAROLD HOLLISTER, the fifth, sixth and eighth 
children of Mary Frances Hopkins and Edward R. Pond. 

Are at home, Bloomington, Minn. 

98 



VI. ARCHIE HOPKINS POND, the seventh child of 
Mary Frances Hopkins and Edward R. Pond, died a baby, and 
is buried at Bloomington, Minn. 

V. WILLIAM JOHNSON HOPKINS, second child oj 
Robert Hopkins and Agnes C. Johnson, was married September 
5, 1870, to Charlotte Harrison, who was born at Wolf Island, 
Can., July, 184.9. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNIE, born Jan. 22,1872. 

MERLE ROBERT, born May 3, 1874. 
LEIGH HARRISON, born Mar. 25, 1876. 
JOSEPH IR WIN, born Aug. 11,1878. 
CHARLOTTE, born Dec. 9, 1880. 

MARK LUMAN, born Oct. 6, 1883. 
RACHEL FRANCES, born July 29, 1887. 
WILLIAM JOHNSON, born June 10, 1890. 
Home, Bloomington, Minn. 

VI. ANNIE HOPKINS, first child of William Johnson 
Hopkins and Charlotte Harrison, is a dentist. 

Home, St. Louis, Mo. 

VI. MERLE ROBERT HOPKINS, second child of Wil- 
liam Johnson Hopkins and Charlotte Harrison, was married 
May 20, 1902, to O. M. Pond. 

Home, Elkton, S. D. ; business, dentist. 

VI. LEIGH HARRISON HOPKINS, third child of 
William Johnson Hopkins and Charlotte Harrison, is a loco- 
motive fireman. 

Home, Huron, S. D. 

VI. JOSEPH IRWIN HOPKINS, fourth child of Wil- 
liam Johnson Hopkins and Charlotte Harrison. 

Is a student at the University of Minnesota. 
Home, Bloomington, Minn. 

Q9 



VI. CHARLOTTE HOPKINS, fifth child of William 
Johnson Hopkins and Charlotte Harrison. 
Is a music teacher, residing in Esterline, S. D. 

VI. MARK LUMAN, VI. RACHEL FRANCES, and 
VI. WILLIAM JOHNSON, the sixth, seventh, and eighth 
children of William Johnson Hopkins and Charlotte Harrison. 

Are in their home, Bloomington, Minn. 

V. NANCY MAYES HOPKINS and ANN KELLY 
HOPKINS, the third and fifth children of Agnes C. Johnson 
and Robert Hopkins, died when little children. 

V. SARAH JANE HOPKINS, fourth child of Robert 
Hopkins and Agnes C. Johnson, was married July 2, 1872, 
to Harleigh S. Parker. 

CHILDREN : 

OWEN ROBERT, born June 12,1873. 

HARLEIGH SAGE, born June 14, 1875. 

GUY CLEMENT, born Feb. 16, 1878. 

FRANK GILBERT, born Nov. 2, 1879; died Jan. 10, 1882. 

MABEL MARCELLA, born Dec. n, 1881. 

LUCINDA AGNES, born Dec. 8, 1883. 

RALPH SETH, born Feb. 7, 1886. 

JOHN PAUL, born Feb. 20, 1888. 

SARAH FRANCES, born Mar. 10, 1890. 

ELIZABETH HOPKINS, born Aug. 4, 1894. 

Home, Bloomington, Minn. ; business, millwright. 

VI. OWEN ROBERT PARKER, first child of Sarah Jane 
Hopkins and Harleigh S. Parker, married in 1901, Myrtle 
Drew of Newton, Iowa. 

CHILDREN: 

ROBERT MORRIS, born May 22, 1902. 

Home, Minneapolis, Minn.; business, employed in a clothing house. 

100 



VI. HARLEIGH SAGE PARKER, second child of Sarah 
Jane Hopkins and Harleigh S. Parker, was married in IQOO 
to Elizabeth Chambers. 

Home, Flambeau, Wis.; business, agriculture. 

VI. GUY CLEMENT PARKER, third child of Sarah 
Jane Hopkins and Harleigh S. Parker. 

Is a teacher. 

Home, Bloomington, Minn. 

VI. FRANK GILBERT PARKER, fourth child of Sarah 
Jane Hopkins and Harleigh S. Parker, died a baby. 

VI. MABEL MARCELLA PARKER, fifth child of Sarah 
Jane Hopkins and Harleigh S. Parker. 

Graduated from the high school in June, 1903, and is now a teacher. 
The rest of the children are at home, attending the schools at Bloom- 
ington, Minn. 



IV. JAMES G. HOPKINS, second child of John Hopkins 
and Polly Gilliland, was married October 22, 184.6, to Ann 
Kelly. 

CHILDREN : 

MARY KELLY, born Sept. 3, 1847; died June 12, 1851. 
AGNES JOHNSON, born April 5, 1850; died Nov. 20, 1851. 

Mrs. Ann Kelley Hopkins was married a second time to James McJ. 
Gillespie. 

IV. JAMES G. HOPKINS graduated from Hanover College, Ind. He 
afterwards studied at Lane Seminary, Cincinnati, O., and then studied 
privately with Samuel Crothers, D.D., at Greenfield, O. He was pastor 
for five years of the Presbyterian Church at Washington Court House, O. 
He died in his father's house June 29, 1851. One of his children had died 
only a few days before this, and the other died only a few months after. 
All are buried in the old churchyard at Red Oak, O. 

101 



IV. WILLIAM WILLIAMSON HOPKINS, third child 
of John Hopkins and first child of Nancy Mayes, was married 
April 3, 1851, to Mary Ann Shields, who was born March 14., 
1830, and died April 20, 1892. 

CHILDREN : 

STUART NEVIN, born Sept 27, 1852. 

JOHN THOMAS, born May 2, 1855. 

WILLIAM M., born Feb. 16, 1858. 

CORNELIA JANE, born Sept. n, 1862; died Dec. 8, 1862. 

ARCHIBALD ELMER, born June 12, 1864. 

LUTHER SHIELDS, born Jan. 17, 1866. 

IV. WILLIAM WILLIAMSON HOPKINS lived in Brown County, 
O., until 1870, then removed to Van Buren, and later to Jefferson County, 
la. He died in Jefferson County, in 1879, and is buried at Fairneld, la. 

V. STUART NEVIN HOPKINS, first child oj William, 
Williamson Hopkins and Mary Ann Shields, was married 
November 8, 1885, to Kate Doyle, who was born December 9, 1858. 

CHILDREN: 

EARL, born Dec. 8, 1886. 
MURIEL, born June 5, 1888. 

V. STUART NEVIN HOPKINS is a graduate of the State Normal 
School at Kirkville, Mo. He is superintendent of public instruction, and 
ex officio auditor of Oklahoma. 

Home, Guthrie, Okla. 

V. JOHN THOMAS HOPKINS, second child of William 
Williamson Hopkins and Mary Ann Shields, was married May 
15, 1884., to May Irene Hymer, who was born May 17, 1860, 

CHILDREN: 

MARIE ALICE, born Apr. 7, 1885. 
CHARLES HAROLD, born Dec. 15, 1887. 
JOHN JAY, born Oct. 15, 1893. 

ROBERT JAMES, born July 27, 1895. 
HELEN LOUISE, born July 8, 1897. 

V. JOHN THOMAS HOPKINS is a graduate of the classical course 
of Parson's College, Fairfield, la., Class of 1881, and of McCormick Sem- 
inary, Chicago, 111., Class of 1884. He was licensed to preach by the 
Presbytery of Iowa, April, 1884, and ordained by the Presbytery of Kear- 

102 



ney, October, 1886. He is now pastor of the Presbyterian church at 
Indianola, la. 

VI. MARIE ALICE HOPKINS, first child of John 
Thomas Hopkins and May Irene Hymer. 

Graduated from the classical course at the high school of Indianola, 
la., in May, 1902, and entered the Simpson M. E. College, Indianola, 
la., in September of the same year. 

The other children are attending the public schools at Indianola, la. 

V. WILLIAM M. HOPKINS, third child of William 
Williamson Hopkins and Mary Ann Shields. 

Left home at the age of twenty, and has not been heard from since. 

V. CORNELIA JANE HOPKINS, fourth child of 
William Williamson Hopkins and Mary Ann Shields, died a 
baby, and is buried at Red Oak Cemetery, Brown County, Ohio. 

V. ARCHIBALD ELMER HOPKINS, fifth child of 
William Williamson Hopkins and Mary Ann Shields, was 
married June 2, 1887, to Luella Belle Simmons, who was born 
October 17, 1864. 

CHILDREN : 

EDITH MARIE, born May 10, 1888. 

HARRY EUGENE, born May 28, 1889. 

MARK ARCHIBALD, born Feb. 28, 1891. 

EARL EDWIN, born Mar. 18, 1893. 

EDNA BERNICE, born July 22, 1900. 

V. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS is a mechanical engineer. He studied 
at Parsons College, Fairfield, la. The older children attend the public 
schools of Dixon. 

Home, Dixon, 111. 

V. LUTHER SHIELDS HOPKINS, sixth child of 
William Williamson Hopkins and Mary Ann Shields, was 
married September 17, 1896, to Cora May Briggs. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM BRIGGS, born Apr. i, 1898. 
MARION, born Sept. 4, 1899. 

ROBERT SHIELDS, born Apr. n, 1901. 
Home, Dubuque, la.; business, jeweler. 

103 



IV. THOMAS MA YES HOPKINS, fourth child of John 
Hopkins and second child of Nancy Mayes, was married May 
12, 1851, to Cornelia Lewis, who was born September 17, 1837, 
and died January 8, 1860. 

IV. THOMAS MAYES HOPKINS was married a second time, 
February 28, 1861, to Louise Morgan, who was born October 14, 1833, 
in Westfield, Chatauqua County, N. Y. 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES GILLILAND, born Dec. 2, 1861. 

CAROLINE DIXON, born Nov. 26, 1863. 

EDWIN KIRKWOOD, born Mar. 19, 1866. 
ADDISON ALEXANDER, born Apr. 17, 1868. 

THOMAS MAYES, born Mar. 24, 1871. 

LOUISE MORGAN, born June i, 1873. 

WILBUR LEWIS, born Oct. i, 1875. 

IV. THOMAS MAYES HOPKINS, son of John and Nancy Mayes 
Hopkins, was born November 24, 1827, at Red Oak, Brown County, O. 
He made a public confession of his faith in Christ in the Presbyterian 
church at Red Oak at the age of fifteen. His preparatory studies were 
pursued in the South Salem Academy, Ross County, O., and he grad- 
uated from Hanover College in 1852. As was often the custom in those 
times, he studied theology privately for a year with Rev. Samuel Crothers, 
D.D., of Greenfield, O., the Rev. Hugh Fullerton, of South Salem, O., 
and the Rev. G. P. Vandyke, of Red Oak, O. He entered the theological 
seminary at Princeton in 1853, where he graduated in 1855. He was 
licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Chillicothe, Ohio, June 6, 1855, 
and ordained by the Presbytery of Miami, Ohio, May 13, 1856, being at 
the same time installed pastor of the church at Pleasant Valley, O., which 
he had been serving since his graduation. In 1859 he became pastor at 
Bloomington, Ind., where he remained for ten years. 

He was pastor at Piqua, O., 1869-1876, where, aside from his pastoral 
work, he was active in the temperance movement, which was at that time 
agitating the state of Ohio. The excitement was so high that he was at 
one time "egged." He was instrumental in starting a newspaper for 
the advancement of temperance principles and politics. He was pastor 
at Xenia, O., 1876-80, and in the Third Church, Cincinnati, O., 1884-1886. 
In 1886 he removed to Denver, Colo., and served as pastor of the Capital 
Avenue Church until 1891, when he resigned to accept the presidency 
of Westminster University. He took a leading part in the organization 

104 



of this university and the securing of funds to build the structure at West- 
minster Heights, north of Denver; but the panic of 1893 occurred just 
when his plans appeared ready for fruition, and the project was suspended. 
During the present year (1903) efforts have been made to revive the work, 
and it is hoped that the institution may open its doors to pupils in Sep- 
tember of 1904. 

In 1895 Dr. Hopkins organized the York Street Presbyterian Church 
of Denver, Colo. For two years he preached in a tent and raised the 
money to pay for the lots. Then the little chapel was put up, and the con- 
gregation is now a thriving one. One of the officers of the church re- 
marked to him not three hours before the fatal stroke came, "Doctor, 
that church will be a monument to you long after the rest of us are laid 
under the sod." 

He was stricken with apoplexy while engaged in watering the lawn of 
the church, a labor of love on his part. This was on May 10, 1901, and 
he died with all his family about him at midnight, May 17, 1901. He 
was buried in the Fairmount Cemetery, Denver, Colo. 

He received the honorary degree of D. D. from Hanover College in 
1885. He was commissioner to the General Assembly at Philadelphia in 
1 86 1, when the Southern church seceded, also at Cleveland in 1875, and 
at Philadelphia in 1888, which was the one hundredth anniversary of the 
organization of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in 
America. He was an earnest and forceful preacher and fruitful pastor, 
and was greatly beloved by those among whom he labored. He took 
special interest in practical works of reform, even to the extent of accepting 
political duties, which are sometimes denied to ministers. 

V. JAMES GILLILAND HOPKINS, first child of 
Thomas Mayes Hopkins and Louise Morgan, is a graduate of 
Gross Medical College, Denver, Colo. He is not married. 

Home, Pueblo, Colo. ; business physician. 

V. CAROLINE DIXON HOPKINS, second child of 
Thomas Mayes Hopkins and Louise Morgan. 

Graduated from Cooper Academy, Dayton, O., class of 1885. She 
is a teacher in West Denver High School. 



105 



V. EDWIN KIRKWOOD HOPKINS, third child of 
Thomas Mayes Hopkins and Louise Morgan, was married 
March 25, 1896, to Alba Leeper, who was born November 19, 
1871. 

CHILDREN: 

HAROLD DUNBAR, born Dec. 25, 1896. 
ALBA KIRKWOOD, born Mar. 26, 1898. 
CARL MORGAN, born Sept. 22, 1901. 

Home, Idaho Springs, Colo.; business, mining interests. 

V. ADDISON ALEXANDER HOPKINS, fourth child 
of Thomas Mayes Hopkins and Louise Morgan, was married 
November 29, 1900, to Nellie B. Parker. 

CHILDREN : 

HELEN ELIZABETH, born Jan. 22, 1902. 
Home, Pueblo, Colo.; business, law. 

V. ADDISON ALEXANDER HOPKINS graduated from Lake 
Forest College, Lake Forest, 111., Class of 1893. 

V. THOMAS MA YES HOPKINS, fifth child of Thomas 
Mayes Hopkins and Louise Morgan. 

Graduated from the Denver High School class of 1892. He studied 
at Lake Forest University and at Denver University, graduating from 
the medical department of Denver University, Class of 1901. 

Home, Denver, Colo. 

V. LOUISE MORGAN HOPKINS, sixth child of Thomas 
Mayes Hopkins and Louise Morgan. 

Is a graduate of the preparatory department of Denver University. 
She studied at Lake Forest, 111., from 1892 to 1893. She is a teacher in 
the ward schools of Denver, Colo. 

V. WILBUR LEWIS HOPKINS, seventh child of Thomas 
Mayes Hopkins and Louise Morgan. 

Is in Denver, Colo. 

1 06 



IV. JOHN MEANS HOPKINS, fifth child of John 
Hopkins and third child of Nancy Mayes, was married Decem- 
ber 18, 1856, to Lizzie Kinkaid, who was born May 15, 1831. 

CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM ARCHIBALD, born June 12, 1865; died Oct. 14, 1899. 
ELIZABETH MARY, born Apr. 13, 1868. 
Lizzie Kinkaid Hopkins died April 21, 1868. 

IV. JOHN MEANS HOPKINS was married a second time, October 
13, 1870, to Almira McKibben, who was born April 2, 1836. 

CHILDREN: 

WALTER SCOTT, born Apr. 10, 1874. 
Home, Matoon, 111.; business, agriculture. 

V. WILLIAM ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, first child of 
John Means Hopkins and Lizzie Kinkaid, was married Decem- 
ber 28, 1887, to Harriet Newell Martin, who was born August 
26, 1867. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM HENRY, born June 29, 1889. 
CHARLES EARLE, born Sept. 27, 1892. 

Home, Mattoon, 111.; business, agriculture. 

V. ELIZABETH HOPKINS, second child of John Means 
Hopkins and Lirzie Kinkaid. 

Lives at her father's home, Mattoon, 111., "a comfort to all." 

V. WALTER SCOTT HOPKINS, third child of John 
Means Hopkins and first child of Almira McKibben, was married 
January i, 1900, to Nellie Decker Millar, who was born Febru- 
ary 27, 1877. 

CHILDREN : 

HELEN MILLAR, born Oct. 20, 1900. 
PAULINE MCKIBBEN, born Dec. 17, 1904. 
Home, Mt. Carmel, 111.; business, agriculture. 

107 



V. ARCHIBALD NEWTON HOPKINS, sixth child 
oj John Hopkins and Polly Gilliland, was married November 
26, 1874., to Harriet Martin, who was born May, 1832. 

Home, Red Oak, O. ; business, agriculture. 



V. ELIZABETH JANE HOPKINS, seventh child of 
John Hopkins and fifth child of Nancy Mayes, was married 
November 2, 1854, to William A. Gilliland, who was born April 
20, 1829. 

CHILDREN : 

FRANK, born Sept. 4, 1855. 

HARRIET. 

ANNA MARY. 

LIZZIE, born Jan. 20, 1861; died a baby. 

ELIZABETH NORA. 

JAMES HOPKINS, born July 4, 1863. 

JEANETTE. 

ALTHEA. 

William A. Gilliland was married a second time, August 4, 1870, to 
V. Harriet Ann Hopkins, eighth child of John Hopkins, and sixth child 
of Nancy Mayes, a sister of his first wife. 

Home, on one of the beautiful hills of Red Oak, O., not far from the 
old church. The daughters Harriet and Althea with Mr. and Mrs. 
Gilliland, make the spacious old home a restful spot to the wanderers who 
come their way. Books and papers testify to their love for literature, 
and their contact with the world by travel make them interesting com- 
panions. 

The daughters of Elizabeth Hopkins and W. A. Gilliland had each a 
year's schooling at " The Western," at Oxford, Ohio. Later Lizzie studied 
at Lebanon, O., and Jeanette and Althea at Hanover College, Ind. James 
also studied at Lebanon, O., and was for a while in business in Minneapolis, 
Minn. After a severe illness there he returned to Ohio, and for four years 
conducted a shoe store in Ripley. In 1898 he went to Chicago. 

As a family the Gillilands are simple in their tastes, fond of books and 
music. The married members are devoted to the care of their households 
and families. 



108 



I 




OLD BEECH TREE NEAR RED OAK CHURCH, 21 FT. 6 IN. IN CIRCUMFERENCE. 
FOOT-BRIDGE NEAR OLD RED OAK (OHIO) CHURCH. 

RED OAK CHURCH, FROM WILLIAM GILLILAND'S. 



VI. FRANK GILLILAND, first child of Elizabeth Jane 
Hopkins and William A. Gilliland, was married February 13, 
1879, to Mary Kirkpatrick, who was born April 17, 1856. 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES ARCHIBALD, born Dec. 26, 1882. 

CHARLES ALBERT, born Jan. 31,1884. 

WILBUR LEO, born Sept. 7, 1886. 

EARNEST, born July 5, 1890. 

LAURA CHRISTINE, born Oct. iq, 1896. 

Home, Red Oak, O.; business, agriculture. 

Frank Gilliland is an elder in the old Red Oak church. 

VI. HARRIET GILLILAND, second child of Elizabeth 
Jane Hopkins and William A . Gilliland. 

Studied at "The Western," Oxford, O. She has traveled, and is a 
student of nature, people, and books. She is in the old home at Red 
Oak, O. 

VI. ANNA MARY GILLILAND, third child of Elizabeth 
Jane Hopkins and William A. Gilliland, was married April 
18, 1882, to Steward Kincaid, who was born October 28, 1858. 

CHILDREN : 

IRENE, born Nov. 30, 1887. 

WILLIAM WALTER, born Oct. 27, 1889. 

Home, Russelville, O. 

Stewart Kincaid is an elder in the Russelville church. 

VI. LIZZIE GILLILAND, jourth child of Elizabeth Jane 
Hopkins and William A . Gilliland, died a baby, and is buried 
at Red Oak, Ohio. 

VI. ELIZABETH NORA GILLILAND, fifth child of 
Elizabeth Jane Hopkins and William A . Gilliland, was married 
July 25, 1886, to Dr. S. L. McKreight. 

CHILDREN : 

ALTHEA, born Jan. 24, 1892; died Apr. 5, 1897. 
MARION, born Feb. 20, 1896. 

Home, 311 Wesley Avenue, Oak Park, 111.; business, physician. 
Dr. S. L. McKreight is an elder at Oak Park, 111. 

IOQ 



VI. JAMES HOPKINS GILLILAND, sixth child oj 
Elizabeth Jane Hopkins and William A . Gilliland, is unmarried. 
And is in Chicago, 111., with Swift & Stroker, real estate agents. 

VI. JEANETTE GILLILAND, seventh child oj Elizabeth 
Jane Hopkins and William A. Gilliland, was married October 
3, 1889, to Chambers Baird. 

CHILDREN : 

HAROLD CHAMBERS, born Dec. 25, 1890. 
FLORENCE JEANETTE, born Mar. 5, 1896. 

Home, Ripley, O.; business, law. 

VI. ALTHEA GILLILAND, eighth child of Elizabeth 
Jane Hopkins and William A . Gilliland. 

Studied at "The Western," Oxford, O. She greatly enjoys everything 
progressive and literary, and is an important factor in the good times in 
her father's house at Red Oak, O. 

V. HARRIET ANN HOPKINS, eighth child of John 
Hopkins and sixth child of Nancy Mayes, was married August 
5, 1870, to William A. Gilliland. 

She was a sister of Elizabeth Ann Hopkins, Mr. Gilliland's first wife. 
Mr. Gilliland studied medicine, but never practiced. 
Home, Red Oak, O. 



110 



///. JANE HOPKINS, third child of Archibald Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Poag, was married in 1806 to John Hopkins 
Pogue (cousin 0} John Crawford Pogue}. He was born March 
15, 1783, in Bath County, Va., and died in 1876. 

CHILDREN : 

SILAS, born Nov. n, 1808; died Feb. i, 1893. 

ELIZABETH, born Nov. 21, 1809. 

MARY ISABELLA, born Jan. 5, 1811; died Dec. 1,1891. 

ROBERT ELNATHAN, born June 14, 1812. 

ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, born Dec. 17, 1813; died Nov. 14, 1900. 

SARAH AMANDA, born Nov. 3, 1815; died Nov. 13, 1867. 

HANNAH SOPHIA, born Apr. 9,1817. 

WILLIAM ALFRED, born Mar. 8, 1819. 

CYNTHIA ANN, born Dec. 29, 1820. 

SAMUEL, born Apr. 19, 1822; died in infancy. 

HARRIET JANE, born Oct. 12, 1823; died Sept. 18, 1895. 

MARGARET, born June i, 1825; died Apr. 26,1894. 

SAMUEL McYouEL, born June 2, 1827. 

After the marriage of John Hopkins Pogue and Jane Hopkins they 
must have lived for a time in Kentucky, as Silas was born in Kentucky, 
in 1808. 

Mrs. Hannah Sophia Pogue Youel writes, " My Grandmother Hopkins's 
given name was Elizabeth, Grandmother Pogue's name was Mary, and her 
husband was designated as Colonel Robert Pogue, Greenup County, Ky. 
The wife of General Robert Pogue, of Mason County, was Jane, and 
Hannah Shanklin was her sister. They all had the name of being grand 
women. I knew my Grandmother Mary Hopkins Pogue and Aunt Jane 
Pogue. They were both good and smart, and Aunt Hannah Shanklin 
was extolled by the whole kin. I have heard Aunt Mary Pogue and mother 
talk about Aunt Ruth Hopkins and Uncle and Aunt Hinton, but where 
they come in I do not know." Mrs. Youel says John Hopkins Pogue 
was born in Bath County, Va. He was a brother of George Pogue, of 
Ripley, O. He died in Montgomery County, Ind. 

Home, Crawfordsville, Ind.; business, agriculture. 



in 



IV. SILAS POGUE, first child of Jane Hopkins and John 
Hopkins Pogue, was married November 8, 1833, t Elizabeth 
Crawford, who was born August n, 1810, and died September 
n, 1890. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM CRAWFORD, born Dec. 10, 1834. 

JOHN HOPKINS, born Aug. 1,1836. 

MARGARET J., born Jan. 2, 1840; died Aug. 2, 1857. 

REBECCA ANN, born Jan. 12, 1848; died Dec. 13, 1900. 

Home, Mace, Montgomery County, Ind. 

V. WILLIAM CRAWFORD POGUE, first child of Silas 
Pogue and Elizabeth Crawford, was married June 14., 1865, 
to Mary A. Crawford, who was born March 27, 184.5, a ^ Knox- 
ville, III. 

CHILDREN : 

JOHN CRAWFORD, born Mar. 28, 1866; died Feb., 1868. 

EDNA POGUE, born Sept. 29, 1868. 

Mary A. Crawford Pogue died August, 1896. 

Home, Northville, Tenn. ; business, gardener and beekeeper. 

V. JOHN HOPKINS POGUE, second child of Silas 
Pogue and Elizabeth Crawford, was married June 6, 1865, to 
Mary Peter sort, who was born June 6, 184.1. 

CHILDREN : 

EDMUND O., born May 13, 1866. 
CHARLES M., born May 27, 1868. 
LOUISA, born Apr. 6, 1875. 

Home, Mace, Ind. ; business, agriculture. 

V. JOHN HOPKINS POGUE served in the Civil War, Company B, 
roth Reg. Indiana Volunteers. 

VI. EDMUND O. POGUE, first child, and CHARLES 
M. POGUE, second child of John Hopkins Pogue and Mary 
Peterson, are with their father. 

Home, Mace, Ind.; business, agriculture. 

112 



VI. LOUISA POGUE, third child of John Hopkins Pogue 
and Mary Peterson, was married April j, 1895, to Alvin I. 
Stout. 

CHILDREN : 

KENNETH POGUE, born Dec. 8, 1900. 
WALLACE I., born Sept. 23, 1902. 

Home, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

V. MARGARET J. POGUE, third child of Silas Pogue 
and Elizabeth Crawford, died when seventeen years of age. 

V. REBECCA ANN POGUE, fourth child of Silas Pogue 
and Elizabeth Crawford, was married to John Wilson Hogsett, 
who was born November 8, 1835. 
CHILDREN : 

ADA MAY, born Oct. 28, 1869. 

CASPER WILSON, born Nov. 20, 1870. 

DAISY EDITH, born Feb. 15,1872. 

SHERMAN, born May 9, 1873. 

Home, Brownell, Kan.; business, physician. 

V. REBECCA ANN POGUE died December 13, 1899, and is buried 
in the Brownell cemetery. 

VI. ADA MAY HOGSETT, first child of Rebecca Ann 
Pogue and John Wilson Hogsett, married - - McCandless. 

Home, Sterling, Kan. 

VI. CASPER WILSON HOGSETT, second child of 
Rebecca Ann Pogue and John Wilson Hogsett, is married. 
And lives at Brownell, Kan. 

VI. DAISY EDITH HOGSETT, third child of Rebecca 
Ann Pogue and John Wilson Hogsett, married 
Dillon. 

Home, Sterling, Kan. 

VI. SHERMAN HOGSETT, fourth child of Rebecca Ann 
Pogue and John Wilson Hogsett, is unmarried. 

Home, Brownell, Kan. 

"3 



IV. ELIZABETH POGUE, second child of Jane Hopkins 
and John Hopkins Pogue, married Boyd. 

CHILDREN : 

ELIZABETH, who married Alexander Garvin. 
Lives at St. Charles, Mo. 

IV. MARY ISABELLA POGUE, third child of Jane 
Hopkins and John Hopkins Pogue, was married November 
25, 1830, to James Cuthbert Scott, who was born in Virginia, 
November 25, 1806. 

CHILDREN: 

CUTHBERT ALEXANDER, born Oct. 19, 1831. 

JOHN THOMAS, born Apr. 16, 1833. 

JAMES SAMUEL, born May 28, 1834. 

FRANCES JANE, born Jan. 26, 1836. 

ELIZABETH ANN, born Oct. 7, 1837; died Sept. 29, 1838. 

SARAH AMANDA, born Aug. 10, 1839; died Aug. 16, 1866. 

ROBERT WILLIAM, born Mar. 4, 1840. 

CHARLES WAUGH, born Sept. 29, 1842; died Nov. 6, 1850. 

HARRIET SOPHIA, born Mar. 29, 1845. 

HENRY HOPKINS, born May 7, 1847. 

James Cuthbert Scott was a physician of no small ability. After his 
marriage he moved to Indiana. He died at New Orleans of cholera, 
May 25, 1849. It i g rather a notable fact that he was born, married, and 
died on the 25th of the month. 

IV. MARY ISABELLA POGUE SCOTT was born in Kentucky; 
she died and was buried at Laporte, Ind. 

V. CUTHBERT ALEXANDER SCOTT, first child of 
Mary Isabella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, was married 
at Rob Roy, Ind., October 9, 1852, to Martha Robb, who was 
born December 8, 1834. 

CHILDREN: 

EVA, born Dec. 8, 1853. 

Home, 1019 Sixth Avenue, Council Bluffs, la. 

V. CUTHBERT ALEXANDER SCOTT enlisted in the First 
Nebraska, Company F, as first lieutenant, and was afterwards promoted 
to captain. He resigned in June, 1861, and afterwards raised Company B, 

114 



35th Missouri, at St. Joseph, Mo. He was one of the staff officers of 
General Totten, and near the close of the war was honorably discharged, 
after which he went into the hardware business at Golden, Colo., where he 
died, July 5, 1881, and is buried. 

VI. EVA SCOTT, child of Cuthbert Alexander Scott and 
Martha Robb, was married, June 24., 1884., to Frederick Wil- 
liam Lyon, who was born January 19, 1853- 

VI. EVA SCOTT LYON is a director of one of the public school 
kindergartens. 

Home, 1019 Sixth Avenue, Council Bluffs, la.; business, freight clerk, 
Union Pacific Transfer Station. 

V. JOHN THOMAS SCOTT, second child of Mary 
Isabella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, was married about 
1850, to Amanda Craig of Warrensburg, Mo. 

CHILDREN: 
CRAIG. 

KATIE, died in infancy. 

V. JOHN THOMAS SCOTT was born in Indiana, and died near 
Clarinda, la., May 8, 1863. 

VI. CRAIG SCOTT, first child of John Thomas Scott and 
Amanda Craig, unre ported. 

VI. KATIE SCOTT, second child of John Thomas Scott 
and Amanda Craig, died in infancy. 

V. JAMES SAMUEL SCOTT, third child of Mary Isa- 
bella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, was married to Nancy 
Nixon. 

CHILDREN : 

ALBERT HENRY, born 1856. 

ROBERT MILTON, born 1857. 

FLORENCE, born Sept. 5, 1859; died Apr., 1902. 

EDA. 

FRANK. 

Home, West Jordan, Utah. 



V. JAMES S. SCOTT was instrumental in pushing the Union Pacific 
R. R. on the plains, and many of the incidents and dangers he encoun- 
tered should be matter for history. 

VI. ALBERT HENRY SCOTT, first child of James 
Samuel Scott and Nancy Nixon, was born at Clarinda, Iowa. 

Home, 3246 Curtice Street, Denver, Colo.; business, railroad engineer. 

VI. ROBERT MILTON SCOTT, second child of James 
Samuel Scott and Nancy Nixon. 

Was an engineer, and was fatally injured when about twenty-one. 

VI. FLORENCE SCOTT, third child of James Samuel 
Scott and Nancy Nixon, was married to Martin York. 

CHILDREN: 
ALICE. 
Home, Denver, Colo.; business, baggage master. 

VI. FLORENCE SCOTT YORK died at Springfield, Utah, April, 
1902. 

VII. ALICE YORK, child of Florence Scott and Martin 
York. 

Lives with her aunt at Clinton, O. 

VI. EDA SCOTT, fourth child of James Samuel Scott and 
Nancy Nixon, was married to C. I. Benford. 

Home, 511 Seventh Avenue, Clinton, la.; business, secretary Fish 
Wagon Co. 

VI. FRANK SCOTT, -fifth child of James Samuel Scott 
and Nancy Nixon, is unmarried. 
Home, Duluth, Minn. 



116 



V. FRANCES JANE SCOTT, fourth child of Mary 
Isabella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, was married to 
Captain G. W. Tool. 

CHILDREN : 

FLORA SCOTT, born Dec. 10, 1866. 
GEORGE SCOTT, born Jan. 9, 1869. 
MARY McKiNNEY, born Mar. 17, 1871. 
HATTIE SCOTT, born Apr. 7, 1874. 
Home, Napa, Napa Valley, Cal. 

V. FRANCES JANE SCOTT began teaching when fourteen years 
old. She taught and went to school until she had attained several degrees 
at Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, la. 

VI. FLORA SCOTT TOOL, first child of Frances Jane 
Scott and G. W. Tool, was married to Willey Dudley. 

CHILDREN: 

WARREN, born 1891. 
HAROLD, born 1895. 

Willey Dudley is a Methodist minister located at Shenandoah, la. He 
is a lecturer at Chautauqua Associations. 

VI. FLORA SCOTT TOOL DUDLEY is an enthusiastic worker 
in missionary lines. It is said that nature reasserted herself and gave to 
this woman the beautiful Hopkins's red hair abundant, long, glossy, and 
smooth, just like her great-grandmother's (Jane Hopkins), and not another 
red head in two generations in this branch of the family. 

VI. GEORGE SCOTT TOOL, second child of Frances 
Jane Scott and G. W. Tool, is unmarried. 

VI. MARY McKiNNEY TOOL, third child of Frances 
Jane Scott and G. W. Tool, married Albert Keplinger. 
Home, South Auburn; business, harness. 

VI. HATTIE SCOTT TOOL, fourth child of Frances 
Jane Scott and G. W. Tool, married to Charles Hood. 

Home, 212 N. 8th Street, Council Bluffs, la. 

117 



V. ELIZABETH ANN SCOTT, fifth child 0} Mary 
Isabella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, died a year old. 

V. SARAH AMANDA SCOTT, sixth child of Mary 
Isabella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, was married Novem- 
ber, 1863, to John Fullinwider. 

CHILDREN : 

HARRY CLAYTON, born June 12, 1865. 
Home, Cedar Rapids, la. 

VII. HARRY CLAYTON FULLINWIDER, child of 
Sarah Amanda Scott and John Fullinwider, married Ruby Chew. 

V. ROBERT WILLIAM SCOTT, seventh child of Mary 
Isabella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, is unmarried. 

He is a mine prospector. 

Home, 512 E. Case Avenue, Cripple Creek, Colo. 

V. CHARLES WAUGH SCOTT, eighth child of Mary 
Isabella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, died when eight years 
old. 

V. HARRIET SOPHIA SCOTT, ninth child of Mary 
Isabella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, was married Novem- 
ber 14, 1865, to William A. Thompson. 

CHILDREN: 

WENDELL T., born Apr. 23, 1867. 

SAMUEL GRIFFIN, born Oct. 8, 1869. 

MARY LUCILE, born Apr. 7,1871. 

WILL SCOTT, born Feb. 3, 1874. 

FULTON CUTHBERT, born Nov. 17, 1876. 

BRUCE PIGOT, born Sept. 13, 1880; died July 2, 1899. 

William A. Thompson enlisted in Company D, Eighth Iowa Infantry 
Volunteers; was a non-commissioned officer and a prisoner, spent the last 
year of service in an Invalid Corps. He went to Dakota on a farm in 1881. 
His health is fairly good for one of his age. 



118 



VI. WENDELL T. THOMPSON, first child of Harriet 
Sophia Scott and William A. Thompson, was married April 2, 
1897, to Adele A. Youel. 

CHILDREN: 

MARION ELSIE, born Dec. 6, 1898. 

VI. SAMUEL GRIFFIN THOMPSON, second child of 
Harriet Sophia Scott and William A . Thompson, was married 
September 27, 1899, to Sarah Murvaine. 

CHILDREN : 

SCOTT GERALD, born Mar. 9, 1901. 
WILLIAM EDWARD, born Sept. 13, 1902. 
MARGARET IRENE, born Sept. 10, 1903. 

VI. MARY LUCILE, third child of Harriet Sophia Scott 
and William A. Thompson, unreported. 

VI. WILL SCOTT THOMPSON, fourth child of Harriet 
Sophia Scott and William A. Thompson, unreported. 

VI. FULTON CUTHBERT THOMPSON, fifth child 
of Harriet Sophia Scott and William A. Thompson, unreported. 

VI. BRUCE PIGOT THOMPSON, sixth child of Harriet 
Sophia Scott and William A. Thompson, died when nineteen 
years of age. 

V. HENRY HOPKINS SCOTT, tenth child of Mary 
Isabella Pogue and James Cuthbert Scott, was married February 
14., 1883, to Lizzie Fritz. 

CHILDREN : 

EVA BELL, born Nov., 1883. 
Home, La Porte, la. 

VI. EVA BELL SCOTT, first child of Henry Hopkins 
Scott and Lizzie Fritz. 

Graduated from the high school at La Porte, la., June, 1904. 

IV. ROBERT ELNATHAN POGUE, fourth child of 
Jane Hopkins and John Hopkins Pogue, died unmarried. 

119 



IV. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS POGUE, fifth child of 
Jane Hopkins and John Hopkins Pogue, was married Septem- 
ber 15, 1836, to Ann Robbins. 

CHILDREN : 

ELIZABETH SOPHIA, born Oct. 28, 1837. 

SARAH ANN, born Feb. 2, 1839; died 1873. 

Ann Robbins Pogue died March 25, 1839. 

IV. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS POGUE married for his second wife 
Eliza Ann Young. 
CHILDREN: 

JAMES ROBERT, born 1841. 
HARRIET, born 1844. 

JOHN C., born 1847. 

CHARLES A., born 1858. 
Home, Burbank, Cal. 

IV. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS POGUE died November 14, 1900, 
and Eliza Ann Young, April 18, 1898. Both are buried at Burbank, Cal. 

V. ELIZABETH SOPHIA POGUE, first child of Archi- 
bald Hopkins Pogue and Ann Robbins, was married December 
20, /#55, to Elijah C. Mount. 

CHILDREN: 

MARCUS AURELIUS, born Nov. 14, 1856; died Mar. 10, 1880. 
WILLIAM BRAINARD, born May 28, 1858. 
JAMES EDGAR, born Dec. 4, 1862. 

FINLEY POGUE, born Nov. 26, 1866. 

Home, New Ross, Ind. 

VI. MARCUS AURELIUS MOUNT, first child of Eliza- 
beth Sophia Pogue and Elijah C. Mount, died unmarried, at 
twenty-four years of age. 

VL WILLIAM BRAINARD MOUNT, second child of 
Elizabeth Sophia Pogue and Elijah C. Mount. Not Reported. 

VI. JAMES EDGAR MOUNT, third child of Elizabeth 
Sophia Pogue and Elijah C. Mount. Not Reported. 

Home, Dubuque, la. ; business, General Agent International Hornston 
Company of America. 

120 



VI. FINLEY POGUE MOUNT, fourth child of Elizabeth 
Sophia Pogue and Elijah C. Mount, was married June 9, 1896, 
to Henrietta Allen. 

Home, Crawfordsville, Ind. ; business, law. 

V. SARAH ANN POGUE, second child of Archibald 
Hopkins Pogue and Ann Robbins, was married April 20, 1856, 
to John H. Shaver. 

CHILDREN: 

MARY JANE, born 1856; died 1861. 

CHARLES. 

ALMA. 

RICHARD ALFONSO, born 1868. 

John H. Shaver died in 1869. 

V. SARAH ANN POGUE SHAVER married second Merret Hendrick. 
CHILDREN: 
IDA. 
JOHN. 

V. JAMES ROBERT POGUE, third child of Archibald 
Hopkins Pogue and first child of Eliza Ann Young, was married 
October 25, 1866, to Mary Keith, who was born May, 1845. 

CHILDREN : 

ALLEN, born Aug. 20, 1867; died Feb. 20, 1870. 

WILLIAM, born Dec. 10, 1868; died Mar. 2, 1870. 
ELLA, born Mar. 13, 1871; died Sept. 29, 1887. 

INFANT SON, born Aug. 19, 1873; died Sept. 30, 1873. 
Mary Keith Pogue died September 14, 1874. 

V. JAMES ROBERT POGUE married second October 7, 1875, 
Lizzie Crawford, who was born March 28, 1850. 

CHILDREN : 

EDITH, born Aug. 7, 1876. 
HATTIE, born Sept. 19, 1878. 
Home, Burbank, Cal. ; business, agriculture. 

V. JAMES ROBERT POGUE enlisted in the United States Army 
August 20, 1862, and was discharged July 20, 1865. 

121 



The first, second and fourth children of James Robert Pogue 
and Mary Keith died in infancy. Ella Pogue, third child of 
James Robert Pogue and Mary Keith, died at sixteen years of age. 

VI. EDITH POGUE, fifth child of James Robert Pogue 
and first child of Lizzie Crawford, was married to Cecil Lock- 
wood. 

CHILDREN: 
SON. 

Home, 1261 E. 56th Street, Los Angeles, Cal. ; business, employed by 
the Transfer Company. 

VI. HATTIE POGUE, sixth child of James Robert Pogue 
and second child of Lizzie Crawford, was married to Harry 
Ludlow. 

CHILDREN : 
SON. 
Home, Burbank, Cal. ; business, agriculture. 

V. HARRIET POGUE, fourth child of Archibald Hopkins 
Pogue and second child of Eliza Ann Young, was married in 
1865, to Larkin Buckles. 

CHILDREN: 
NETTIE. 
CHARLES. 

Home, Long Beach, Cal. 

V. JOHN C. POGUE, fifth child of Archibald Hopkins 
Pogue and third child of Eliza Ann Young, married Ida Dick- 
er son. 

Home, Landors, Wyo. 

V. CHARLES A. POGUE, sixth child of Archibald Hop- 
kins Pogue and fourth child of Eliza Ann Young, was married 
to Sarah Edmonds. 

Home, Burbank, Cal. 



122 



IV. SARAH AMANDA POGUE, sixth child of Jane 
Hopkins and John Hopkins Pogue, was married November 15, 
1832, to Samuel Voris, who was born March /j, 1805, and died 
May 10, 1880. 

CHILDREN: 

MARY JANE, born Oct. 7, 1833; died Feb. 12, 1901. 

WILLIAM McQuEARY, born July i, 1835; died July 2, 1863. 

MARGARET ELIZABETH, born Sept. 17, 1838; died July 9, 1898. 

HARRIET AMELIA, born Mar. 29, 1841. 

SARAH ABBIE, born Feb. 9, 1843. 

NANCY ANN, born Aug. i, 1845; died Mar. 30, 1846. 

JOHN CRAWFORD POGUE, born Aug. n, 1849. 

HANNA BELL, born Sept. 15, 1853. 

SAMUEL HOPKINS, born Feb. 11,1865. 

V. MARY JANE VORIS, first child of Sarah Amanda 
Pogue and Samuel Voris, was married September 14., 1852, to 
Ephriam Preston McCreight, who was born April 25, 1825, 
and died December 16, 1895. 

CHILDREN : 

SARAH ALICE, born July 15, 1853; died Sept. 14, 1893. 

SAMUEL GILBERT, born Nov. 13, 1854. 

MARY BELL, born Aug. 16, 1856; died Nov. 10, 1902. 

INFANT SON, born Sept. 29, 1858; died Sept. 29, 1858. 

LUELLA JANE, born Nov. 20, 1859. 

WILLIAM VORIS, born Apr. 25, 1862. 

MARGARET POAGE, born July 2, 1864; died Oct. 28, 1878. 

EVA IRENE, born Sept. 15, 1866; died Apr. 2, 1891. 

JOHN, born May 5, 1869. 

JAMES, born May i, 1871; died July 12,1880. 

LESTER HARVEY, born Mar. 23, 1875; died Au g- n, 1880. 

HATTIE, born May 14, 1878; died July 25, 1880. 

Home, Soldier, Kan. 

Ephraim Preston McCreight is buried at Aroca, Kan. 



123 



VI. SARAH ALICE McCREIGHT, first child of Mary 
Jane Voris and Ephriam Preston McCreight, was married 
December 25, 1873, to J. A. Cranston. 

CHILDREN : 

BERT ALLEN, born June 29, 1876. 

ARCHIE PRESTON, born Dec. 5, 1877. 

LEROY JAMES, born Jan. 30, 1879. 

ELLA FLORENCE, born Jan. 17, 1881. 

ETHEL MAY, born Dec. 31, 1883. 

CLIFFORD EARL, born July 15, 1885. 

CHARLES LEWIS, born Aug. n, 1887. 

JOHN RAY, born Aug. i, 1889. 

LESLIE VERL, born Sept. n, 1893. 

Home, Odebolt, la. ; business, agriculture. 

J. A. Cranston is a brother of W. C. Cranston who married Mary Bell 
McCreight. The brothers married sisters. Sarah Alice McCreight died 
September 14, 1893, and is buried at Odebolt, la. 

VII. BERT ALLEN CRANSTON, first child of Sarah 
Allen McCreight and J. A. Cranston, was married January 
12, 1898, to Berdina A . Traver, who was born January 6, iSjf. 

CHILDREN: 

LEE ALLEN, born Dec. 22, 1898. 
WARREN EVERT, born Oct. 22, 1900. 
Home, Odebolt, la. ; business, agriculture. 

VII. ARCHIE PRESTON CRANSTON, second child of 
Sarah Alice McCreight and J. A. Cranston, was married Feb- 
ruary 5, 1902, to Grace E. Traver, who was born November 6, 
1882. ' 

Bert Allen Cranston and Archie Preston Cranston married Berdina A. 
Traver and Grace E. Traver, who were sisters. 

VII. LEROY JAMES CRANSTON, third child of Sarah 
Alice McCreight and J. A. Cranston, is helping on the home 
farm. He is unmarried. 

Home, Odebolt, la. 

124 



VII. ELLA FLORENCE CRANSTON, fourth child of 
Sarah Alice McCreight and J. A. Cranston, is keeping house 
for her father. 

Home, Odebolt, la. 

VII. ETHEL MA Y CRANSTON, CLIFFORD EARL, 
CHARLES LEWIS, JOHN RA Y, and LESLIE VERL, the 

fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth children of Sarah Alice 
McCreight and J. A. Cranston, are all in school, Odebolt, la. 

VI. SAMUEL GILBERT McCREIGHT, second child of 
Mary Jane Voris and Ephriam Preston McCreight, was mar- 
ried February 4., 1880, to Jennie Youel, who was born September 
3, 1860. 

CHILDREN: 

ELTON, born May 17, 1881. 

FRANK, born Aug. 19, 1882. 

BLANCH, born Feb. 26, 1884. 

RAY, born Apr. 28, 1886. 

VERL, born Aug. 20, 1889. 

CLARENCE, born June 27, 1892. 
Home, Soldier, Kan. ; business, farming. 

VII. ELTON McCREIGHT, first child of Samuel Gilbert 
McCreight and Jennie Youel, unreported. 

VII. FRANK McCREIGHT, second child of Samuel Gil- 
bert McCreight and Jennie Youel, unreported. 

VII. BLANCHE McCREIGHT, third child of Samuel 
Gilbert McCreight and Jennie Youel, was married September 
18, 1901, to Pearl Ditch, who was born January 15, 1879. 

One child. 

VII. RAY McCREIGHT, VII. VERLE, and VII. 
CLARENCE, the fourth, fifth, and sixth children of Samuel 
Gilbert McCreight and Jennie Youel, are at home, Soldier, Kan. 

125 



VI. MARY BELL McCREIGHT, third child oj Mary 
Jane Voris and Ephriam Preston McCreight, was married 
September 10, 1878, to William C. Cranston, who was born 
April 19, 1849. 

CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM R., born Aug. 24, 1879. 

SON, who died Oct. 10, 1881. 

ARTHUR A., born Sept. 24, 1882. 

ORR B., born Dec. 28, 1884. 

MAY C., born Jan. 19, 1886. 

RAY P., born Sept. 20, 1889. 

FLORENCE B., died Jan. 13, 1895. 

SON, who died Dec. 2, 1896. 

Home, Lenora, Okla. 

One of the last letters Mrs. Mary Bell McCreight Cranston wrote was 
the one giving the above dates. After her death, the letter was sent on by 
her daughter, who added a postscript saying that the hands which had 
written it had been folded in their last rest for two months. She is buried 
at Riley, Okla. 

W. C. Cranston is a brother of J. A. Cranston who married Sarah Alice 
McCreight. The brothers married sisters. 

VL LUELLA JANE McCREIGHT, fifth child of Mary 
Jane Voris and Ephriam Preston McCreight, was married 
April 5, 1 88 1, to Henry Page, who was born May 4, 1855. 

CHILDREN : 

LAURA M., born Jan. 6, 1882. 
WALTER J., born June 15, 1883. 
MAUD B., born Sept. 25, 1885. 
ALBERT S., born Sept. i, 1890. 
STELLA M., born Nov. 29, 1895. 
HARRY, born Aug. 10, 1898. 

INFANT SON, born May 7, 1901. 
Home, Holdenville, I. T. ; business, plasterer. 

VII. LAURA M. PAGE, first child of Luella Jane Mc- 
Creight and Henry Page, was married December 15, 1900, to 
Louis Bleecker. 

Home, Holdenville, I. T. ; business, lather. 

126 



VII. WALTER J. PAGE, second child of Luella Jane Mc- 
Cr eight and Henry Page. 

Is a plasterer. 

Home, Oklahoma City, Okla. 

VII. MAUD B., ALBERTS., STELLA M., and HARRY, 

the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth children, are at home, Holden- 
ville, I. T. 

VII. The seventh child of Luella Jane McCreight and 
Henry Page died a baby. 

VI. WILLIAM VORIS McCREIGHT, sixth child of Mary 
Jane Voris and Ephriam Preston McCreight, was married 
November 29, 1891, to Delia Calef, who was born May 8, 1872. 

CHILDREN : 

MARY, born Oct. 27, 1894. 

MAGGIE, born Oct. 27, 1894. 

ARTHUR, born Apr. 20, 1897. 

CHARLES, born May 15, 1899. 

ETHEL, born Aug. 8, 1900. 
Home, Soldier, Kan. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. MARGARET POAGE McCREIGHT, seventh child 
of Mary Jane Voris and Ephriam Preston McCreight, died 
at fourteen years of age, and is buried at Glenwood, Iowa. 

VI. EVA IRENE McCREIGHT, eighth child of Mary 
Jane Voris and Ephriam Preston McCreight, was married 
in 1890 to William Brakey. 

VI. EVA IRENE McCREIGHT BRAKEY died April 2, 1891. 

VI. JOHN McCREIGHT, ninth child of Mary Jane Voris 
and Ephriam Preston McCreight, was married April 7, 1897, 
to Laura Corcoran, who was born December 4, 

CHILDREN : 

HAZEL IRENE, born Mar. 13, 1898. 
ANNIE MILDRED, born July 2, 1899. 
LULU MARCIA, born Apr. 10, 1901. 
MARY ALICE, born Aug. 12,1904. 
Home, Carl, Kan. ; business, agriculture. 

127 



VI. JAMES, VI. LESTER, and VI. HATTIE Me- 
CREIGHT, tenth, eleventh, and twelfth children of Mary 
Jane Voris and Ephriam Preston McCreight, died July 12, 
August n, and July 25, 1880, of scarlet fever. They are 
buried at Buck's Grove, Kan. 

V. WILLIAM McQUEARY VORIS, second child of Sarah 
Amanda Pogue and Samuel Voris, was married November /, 
1854, to Margaret Miller. 

WILLIAM McQUEARY VORIS enlisted in the Seventh Illinois 
Regiment when the Civil War broke out. After two years he was made 
second lieutenant of United States Volunteers. He died of fever at Milli- 
kens' Bend, July 2, 1863, and is buried at Bird's Point, La., thirty miles 
from Vicksburg, Miss. Margaret Miller Voris died at Ukiah, Cal. 

V. MARGARET ELIZABETH VORIS, third child of 
Sarah Amanda Pogue and Samuel Voris. 

Went to California in 1875 where she lived, on account of her health, 
the rest of her life. She taught school as long as her health permitted. 
She made her home with Mr. and Mrs. Milton Wambolt at Lakeport, Cal. 

V. HARRIET AMELIA VORIS, fourth child of Sarah 
Amanda Pogue and Samuel Voris, was married December 29, 
1838, to Samuel McCreight, who was born November 16, 1835, 
and died May 8, 1902. 

Samuel McCreight and Ephriam Preston McCreight were brothers. 
CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM CYRUS, born Sept. 23, 1859; died Dec. 6, 1862. 

ALMA FLORENCE, born Aug. 27, 1865; died May 23, 1892. 

FRANCES BELLE, born Dec. 14, 1868. 

SARAH EDITH, born June 9, 1873. 

ELIZABETH MYRTLE, born Feb. 2, 1875. 

RALPH VORIS, born Nov. 20, 1876. 

JOHN HOPKINS, born Mar. 25, 1880. 

HARRY CUMMINGS, born Sept. 15, 1881. 

HATTIE MAY, born Mar. 19, 1883; died Aug. 12, 1883. 

Home, Aledo, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

Samuel McCreight served in the Civil War. He was second lieutenant 
in Company A, Thirtieth Illinois Regiment. 

128 



VI. WILLIAM CYRUS McCREIGHT, first child of 
Harriet Amelia Voris and Samuel McCr eight, died a little 
child, and is buried at Sunbeam, III. 

VI. ALMA FLORENCE McCREIGHT, second child of 
Harriet Amelia Voris and Samuel McCreight, was married 
March 25, 1885, to Henry Emerson Wood, who was born 
September 16, 1855. 

Home, Viola, 111. ; business, merchant. 

ALMA FLORENCE McCREIGHT WOOD died May 23, 1892, 
and is buried at Aledo, 111. 

VI. FRANCES BELLE McCREIGHT, third child of 
Harriet Amelia Voris and Samuel McCreight. 

Was a teacher for five years. She now makes her home with her 
mother at Aledo, 111. 

VI. SARAH EDITH McCREIGHT, fourth child of 
Harriet Amelia Voris and Samuel McCreight, was married 
April 9, i go 2, to Louis William Elhart, who was born January 
30, 1872. 

Home, Joy, 111., five and a half miles from Aledo; business, agriculture. 

VI. SARAH EDITH McCREIGHT graduated from the high school 
of Aledo in 1892 and taught in the high schools of Aledo and Millersberg 
for six successive years. 

VI. ELIZABETH MYRTLE McCREIGHT, fifth child 
of Harriet Amelia Voris and Samuel McCreight. 

Graduated from the Aledo High School in 1895. She has taught for 
six years and is now teaching in Aledo, 111. 
Home, with her mother in Aledo. 

VI. RALPH VORIS McCREIGHT, sixth child of Harriet 
Amelia Voris and Samuel McCreight. 

Lives at Sunbeam, 111. He is a successful farmer. 

VI. JOHN HOPKINS McCREIGHT, seventh child of 
Harriet Amelia Voris and Samuel McCreight. 

Is at home with his mother in the winter, Aledo, 111.; business, agri- 
culture. 

129 



VI. HARRY CUM MINGS McCREIGHT, eighth child of 
Harriet Amelia Voris and Samuel McCr eight. 

Is a clerk in a grocery store, Aledo, 111. 
Home, with his mother, Aledo., 111. 

VI. HA TTIE MA Y McCREIGHT, ninth child of Harriet 
Amelia Voris and Samuel McCreight, died a baby, and is 
buried at Sunbeam, III. 

V. SARAH ABBIE VORIS, fifth child of Sarah Amanda 
Pogue and Samuel Voris McCreight. 

Was a successful teacher at Benton County, 111., for about ten years. 
After her mother's death she kept house for her father until 1880, when he 
died. She then went to Texas where she remained seventeen years. In 
the spring of 1901, she came to Aledo, 111., where she now lives with her 
brother, John Crawford Pogue Voris. 

V. NANCY ANN VORIS, sixth child of Sarah Amanda 
Pogue and Samuel Voris, died a baby, and is buried at Red 
Oak, Ohio. 

V. JOHN CRAWFORD POGUE VORIS, seventh child 
of Sarah Amanda Pogue and Samuel Voris, was married 
November 30, 1876, to Hadessa Ross. 

CHILDREN: 

ALICE M., born Aug. 23, 1877; died Jan. 9, 1881. 

SAMUEL POGUE, born Mar. 9, 1880. 

CLIFFORD JOHN, born Nov. 8, 1881. 

MORRIS, born Mar. 14, 1883; died 1883. 

EARL CRAWFORD, born Feb. u, 1885; died Aug. 3, 1893. 

HADESSA MAY, born Nov. 6, 1887. 

Home, three and one-half miles west of Aledo, 111. ; business, agriculture. 
The children are all in the home. 



130 



V. HANNAH BELLE VORIS, eighth child of Sarah 
Amanda Pogue and Samuel Voris, was married November 15, 
1876, to John Clark Cranston, who was born April 13, 1854. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNA MABEL, born Oct. 15, 1877. 

CHARLES ORIEN, born Jan. 12, 1879. 

Louis VORIS, born Jan. 13, 1881. 

HUGH IRVIN, born Aug. 5, 1883. 

RALPH EMERSON, born Jan. 17,1885. 

LEILA FLORENCE, born June 5, 1889. 

MYRTLE LEONE, born Nov. 28, 1893. 
Home, Huron, S. D. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. CHARLES ORIEN CRANSTON, second child of 
Hannah Belle Voris and John Clark Cranston. 

Has taken up a homestead ten miles from Steel, N. D. The other 
children are in the home with their parents. 

V. SAMUEL HOPKINS VORIS, ninth child of Sarah 
Amanda Pogue and Samuel Voris, was married November 18, 
1888, to Phoebe Styles. 

CHILDREN: 

SARAH ALMA, born Jan. 31, 1890. 

Home, Elma, Howard County, la. ; business, carpenter. 

IV. HANNAH SOPHIA POGUE, seventh child of Jane 
Hopkins and John Hopkins Pogue, was married December 
13, 1837, to James Youel, who was born December 8, 1816, 
and died October 6, 1896. 

CHILDREN : 

ELIZABETH JANE, born Jan. 25, 1839. 

AMANDA, born Aug. 1840; died 1887. 

MARY S., born Nov. 25, 1845. 

CHARLOTTE, born 1847. 

MARGARET, born Aug. 29, 1849. 

RACHEL FRANCES, born 1853. 

WILLIAM HOPKINS, born 1859. 

James Youel was born in Rockingham County, Va., and died in Sac 
County, la. 



V. ELIZABETH JANE YOUEL, first child of Hannah 
Sophia Pogue and James Youel, was married August 23, 1862, 
to Aaron Giles Barnell, who was born May 20, 1839. 

CHILDREN: 

VIOLA, born May n, 1866. 

YUILL GORDON, born Sept. 4, 1867. 
ESTALENE, born Nov. 15, 1868. 

AVA H., born July 20, 1874. 

D WIGHT K., born Mar. 15, 1877. 
JAMES EARL, born Jan. 18, 1881. 

Three infant children are buried at Parkers' Grove, fourteen miles north 
of Cedar Rapids. Aaron Giles Barnell has held several township offices 
and has been an elder in the Presbyterian church for twenty years. He 
served three years in the Civil War. 

Home, Cedar Rapids, la. ; business, retired farmer and stock raiser. 

VI. VIOLA BARNELL, first child of Elizabeth Jane Youel 
and Aaron Giles Barnell, was married September, 1887, to 
Frank Emory Bowe, who was born January 24., 1867. 

CHILDREN : 

MYRLE CORNELIA, born May 28, 1888. 

HAROLD GILES, born May 29, 1890. 

CLAIRE SAVANT, born May 2, 1892. 
BERNICE ELIZABETH, born Dec. i, 1896. 

FOREST BARNELL, born Apr. 18, 1899. 

Home, Everton, Mo. ; business, agriculture and horticulture. 

VI. YUILL GORDON BARNELL, second child of Eliz- 
abeth Jane Youel and Aaron Giles Barnell, is unmarried. 

He has charge of the farm department of Malcolm V. Bolton & Co.'s 
real estate business, Cedar Rapids, la. 



132 



VI. ESTALENE BARNELL, third child of Elizabeth Jane 
Youel and Aaron Giles Barnell, was married February u, 1892, 
to Harry L. Jones, who was born in 1869. 

CHILDREN : 

IRVING, born Jan. 7, 1893. 

GLADYS, born Jan. 6, 1895. 

HAROLD BARNELL, born July 20, 1896. 

CLARENCE CECIL, born Jan. 31, 1898. 

FOREST, born Apr. 15, 1899. 

ELAINE, born Feb. 8, 1901. 

Home, Austin Minn.; business, agriculture and stock raising. 

VI. AVA H. BARNELL, fourth child of Elizabeth Jane 
Youel and Aaron Giles Barnell, was married May 22, 1895, 
to Henry Fisher, who was born September 4, 1868. 

CHILDREN : 

FERN FRANCES, born Apr. 12,1896. 
VICTOR BARNELL, born Mar. 17, 1898. 
Home, Cedar Rapids, la.; business, commercial traveler. 

VI. DWIGHT K. BARNELL, fifth child of Elizabeth Jane 
Youel and Aaron Giles Barnell, is not married. 
Home, Athens, la.; business, agriculture. 

VI. JAMES EARL BARNELL, sixth child of Elizabeth 
Jane Youel and Aaron Giles Barnell, is not married. 

He attended Coe College, Cedar Rapids, la., and is now city shipper 
for Warfield, Pratt & Howell, Cedar Rapids, la. 

VI. AMANDA YOUEL, second child of Hannah Sophia 
Pogue and James Youel, unreported. 



'33 



V. MARY S. YOU EL, third child of Hannah Sophia Pogue 
and James Youel, was married May 22, 1867, to Morgan San- 
ford Pratt, who was born June 26, 184.3. 

CHILDREN: 

BERTHA, born July 22, 1868. 

CLARA, born Dec. 10, 1869. 

FRANK EDWIN, born Aug. 6, 1874. 

THOMAS ALBERT, born Jan. 30, 1877. 

MAY EDITH, born Apr. 3, 1882. 

JAMES WILLIAM, born Jan. 22, 1885. 

ALICE SOPHIA, born Oct. 17, 1887. 
Home, Shellsburg, la. 

Morgan S. Pratt enlisted in the Fifth Iowa Veteran Infantry, Company 
C, July 1 6, 1 86 1. He was in the service nearly five years, fighting in the 
battles of Inka, Corinth, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills, siege of 
Vicksburg, and Mission Ridge, where he was taken prisoner and brought 
to Richmond, Va. He was in the Libby Prison for a short time and was 
then taken to Belle Island, where he stayed three months, then to Anderson- 
ville where he stayed six months, then to Millen, Ga., where he stayed 
three months and was exchanged at Savannah. While at Belle Island, 
he suffered terribly from the cold. He was removed to Andersonville in 
the spring. There were thirteen captured out of the same company, but 
only five lived to get home. He was in Washington, D. C., at the time the 
troops were reviewed and was mustered out of service November 24, 1864. 

VI. BERTHA PRATT, first child of Mary S. Youel and 
Morgan San ford Pratt. 

Graduated from the Iowa State Normal School and is teaching in 
Estherville, la. 

VI. CLARA PRATT, second child of Mary S. Youel and 
Morgan San ford Pratt. 

Is a teacher in Butler County, la. 

VI. FRANK EDWIN PRATT, third child of Mary S. 
Youel and Morgan San ford Pratt. 
Is a drug clerk in Cedar Rapids, la. 

134 



VI. THOMAS ALBERT PRATT, fourth child of Mary 
S. Youel and Morgan Sanford Pratt. 
In Sac City, la. 

VI. MARY EDITH PRA TT, fifth child of Mary S. Youel 
and Morgan Sanford Pratt, was married September 16, 1902, 
to Everett Elson, who was born October 27, 1881. 

VI. MARY EDITH PRATT studied at Coe College, Cedar Rapids, la. 

VI. JAMES WILLIAM PRATT, the sixth, and VI. 
ALICE SOPHIA PRATT, the seventh, children of Mary S. 
Youel and Morgan Sanford Pratt. 

Are in the home with their parents, Shellsburg, la. 

V. CHARLOTTE YOUEL, fourth child of Hannah Sophia 
Pogue and James Youel, was married October 19, 1870, to 
William Long Masson, who was born September 18, 1844, in 
Champlain County, Ohio. 

CHILDREN : 

THOMAS CLAYTON, born June i, 1872. 
JAMES CLARENCE, born June i, 1872. 
ADA HANNAH, born Mar. 6, 1874. 
JOHN EMORY, born Dec. 29, 1875. 

MARY JANE, born Nov. 26, 1879. 

Home, Sac City, la. ; business, agriculture. 

William Long Masson served three years in the Civil War. He died 
May 18, 1892, and is buried at Huron, S. D. 

VI. THOMAS CLAYTON MASSON, first child of 
Charlotte Youel and William Long Masson, was married 
November 2g, 1898, to Ida May Morton, who was born May 
20, 1872. 

CHILDREN : 

CHARLES EUGENE, born Oct. 16, 1900. 

Home, Sac City, la. ; business, employed in an elevator and feed store, 
Sac City, la. 

135 



VI. JAMES CLARENCE MASSON, second child 0} 
Charlotte Youel and William Long Mas son, was married 
March 8, 1897, to Minnie Ella Van Vleet, who was born April 
23, 1870. 
CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM JOHN, born Jan. 17,1898. 

FLOYD EMORY, born June 7, 1899. 

Home, Sac City, la. 

VI. ADA HANNAH MASSON, third child of Charlotte 
Youel and William Long Masson, was married December 31, 
1805, to James A . Duboy, who was born September 25, 1868. 

CHILDREN: 

ESTHER AMELIA, born Nov. 8, 1896. 
WILLIAM ABNER, born Aug. 5, 1898. 
MARY HELEN, born Feb. 26, 1900. 

Home, Sac City, la. 

VI. JOHN EMORY MASSON, fourth child of Charlotte 
Youel and William Long Masson, was married February 28, 
i goo, to Grace Myric, who was born April 9, 1881. 

VI. MARY JANE MASSON, fifth child of Charlotte Youel 
and William Long Masson. 
Is a dressmaker in Sac City, la. 

V. MARGARET YOUEL, fifth child of Hannah Sophia 
Pogue and James Youel, was married March i, 1870, to Clay- 
bourn David Worrell, who was born January i, 184.8. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM YOUEL, born Aug. 9, 1871. 
HARRY ELSWORTH, born Mar. 30, 1874. 
JAMES WALTER, born July 21,1875. 
CHARLES MORTON, born June 8, 1878. 
JOHN ARTHUR, born June 18, 1880. 

Home, Alpena, S. D. 

Claybourn David Worrell has been an elder in the Presbyterian Church 
for several years. He was a delegate to the General Assembly in 1894. 

136 



VI. WILLIAM YOUEL WORRELL, first child of Mar- 
garet Youel and Claybourn David Worrell, was married May 
30, 1899, to Anna Rose Wilson. 

CHILDREN: 

DWIGHT EVERETT, born Mar. 9,1901. 
MARGARET ISABELLA, born Jan. 27, 1902. 
Home, Huron, S. D. 

VI. HARRY ELSWORTH WORRELL, second child of 
Margaret Youel and Claybourn David Worrell, is unmarried. 
Home, Huron, S. D. 

VI. JAMES WALTER WORRELL, third child of Mar- 
garet Youel and Claybourn David Worrell, was married October 
29, 1902, to Janet Smith, of Huron, S. D. 

Home, Sheridan, Wyo. ; business, bookkeeper in First National Bank. 

VI. CHARLES MORTON WORRELL, fourth child of 
Margaret Youel and Claybourn David Worrell. 
Is at Alpena, S. D. 

VI. JOHN ARTHUR WORRELL, fifth child of Margaret 
Youel and Claybourn David Worrell. 
Is at Alpena, S. D. 

VI. RACHEL FRANCES YOUEL, sixth child of Hannah 
Sophia Pogue and James Youel, is unmarried. 
Makes her home with her mother, at Niobara, Neb. 

IV. WILLIAM HOPKINS YOUEL, seventh child of 
Hannah Sophia Pogue and James Youel, was married Decem- 
ber 27, 1880, to Jannet Hailstone, of Edinboro, Scotland. 

CHILDREN: 

CHALMERS JAMES, born Apr. 16, 1882. 
CLAYBOURN ELTON, born Apr. i, 1884. 
Govrs ARTHUR, born Sept. 25, 1887. 

Jannet Hailstone Youel died April 19, 1889. 



IV. WILLIAM HOPKINS YOUEL was married second, March 15, 
1894, to Jessie Gordon, who was born January 12, 1860. 

CHILDREN : 

ELLEN SOPHIA, born May 18, 1895. 
GEORGE EMERY, born Mar. 14, 1897. 
Home, Niobrara, Neb. 

V. CHALMERS JAMES YOUEL, first child of William 
Hopkins Youel and Jannet Hailstone, unre ported. 

V. CLAYBOURN ELTON YOUEL, second child of 
William Hopkins Youel and Jannet Hailstone, unreported. 

V. ELLEN SOPHIA YOUEL and GEORGE EMERY 
YOUEL, fourth and fifth children of William Hopkins Youel 
and the first and second children of Jessie Gordon. 

Are in the home with their parents. 



IV. WILLIAM ALFRED POGUE, eighth child of Jane 
Hopkins and John Hopkins Pogue. 
Has not been heard from for years. 

IV. CYNTHIA ANN POGUE, ninth child of Jane 
Hopkins and John Hopkins Pogue, was married to Smith Mc- 
Cullough. 

CHILDREN : 
MARY JANE. 

V. MARY JANE McCULLOUGH, child of Cynthia 
Ann Pogue and Smith McCullough, was married to - 
Coldwell. 

Home, Corvallis, Ore. 



IV. SAMUEL POGUE, tenth child of Jane Hopkins and 
John Hopkins Pogue, died in babyhood. 

138 



IV. HARRIET JANE POGUE, eleventh child of Jane 
Hopkins and John Hopkins Pogue, was married November 
27, 1845, to John Marland Sellar, who was born February 3, 
1823, and died September 23, 1897. 

CHILDREN: 

HENRY CLAY, born Jan. i, 1848. 

ROBERT MARSHALL, born Jan. 12, 1849; died Apr. 1898. 

JAMES EDGAR, born Aug. 21, 1850. 

JOHN THOMAS, born Feb. 29, 1852; died Sept. 5, 1881. 

MARY JANE, born Mar. 31, 1854; died Sept. 29, 1875. 

WILLIAM ALFRED, born June i, 1860. 

Home, Darlington, Ind. 

V. HENRY CLAY SELLAR, first child of Harriet Jane 
Pogue and John Marland Sellar, was married January 28, 1874. 

CHILDREN: 

BENJAMIN MORELAND, born Mar. 14, 1875; died Apr. 5, 1901. 
CLARA JANE, born Apr. 3, 1879. 

Home, Huron, S. D. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. BENJAMIN MORELAND SELLAR, first child of 
Henry Clay Sellar, 

Went with the Fifty-first Iowa Regiment to the Philippines. He died 
at twenty-six years of age, and is buried at Woonsocket, S. D. 

V. ROBERT MARSHALL SELLAR, second child of Har- 
riet Jane Pogue and John Moreland Sellar, is unmarried. 
Business, plumber. 

V. JAMES EDGAR SELLAR, third child of Harriet Jane 
Pogue and John Moreland Sellar, was married March 5, 1878. 

CHILDREN: 

ROBERT EVERETT, born Oct. 10, 1881. 
WILLIAM EARL, born July, 13 1885. 
Home, Spencer, la. ; business, agent. 

V. JOHN THOMAS SELLAR, fourth child of Harriet 
Jane Pogue and John Moreland Sellar, was married June 29, 
He was a physician, and died September 5, 1881. 



V. MARY JANE SELLAR, fifth child of Harriet Jane 
Pogue and John Moreland Sellar, died at twenty-one years of 
age, and is buried at Darlington, Ind. 

V. WILLIAM ALFRED SELLAR, sixth child of Harriet 
Jane Pogue and John Moreland Sellar, was married at Shells- 
burg, la., March 7, 1888, to Ella A. Weyer, who was born 
October 12, 1862. 

CHILDREN : 

HARRIET ANN, born May 3, 1890. 
MARY ALICE, born Dec. 9, 1895. 
Home, Darlington, Ind. 

IV. MARGARET POGUE, twelfth child of Jane Hopkins 
and John Hopkins Pogue, was married February 25, 184.7, to 
Daniel Skinner Lams on, who was born September 10, 1825, 
and died January 22, 1873. 

CHILDREN : 

JOHN THOMAS, born Mar. 27, 1848. 

JAMES E., born Aug. 3, 1849. 

WILLIAM ALBERT, born Oct. 29, 1854. 

ANNA JANE, born Jan. 8, 1860; died Nov. 4, 1897. 

HARRIET MAY, born Sept. 15, 1867; died Oct. 23, 1870. 

A few days after their marriage, Margaret Pogue and Daniel Skinner 
Lamson went to the forests of Howard County, Ind., to make themselves a 
home, the husband taking all their effects in a two-horse wagon, the bride 
accompanying him on horseback, a distance of more than fifty miles. In 
June, 1851, they removed to the prairie country of Rensselaer, Jasper 
County, Ind., and bought three eighty-acre tracts of land from the govern- 
ment at $1.25 an acre. They were located south of the county-seat on the 
Iroquois River. This is " Riverside," the Lamson home of to-day. Daniel 
S. Lamson was an influential and useful man. He faithfully read his Bible, 
kept the Sabbath, and attended public worship. He was of the Presby- 
terian faith, though not a church member until a few years before his death. 
The death of a beloved little daughter brought him into the church. In 
the fall of 1872 his health began to fail, and he left the two older boys on 
the farm and went to Rensselaer, where he died, January 22, 1873, and his 
body was laid to rest in the Egypt Cemetery near his home. 

140 



V. JOHN THOMAS LAMSON, first child of Margaret 
Pogue and Daniel Skinner Lamson, was married April n, 
1875, to Rebecca Elizabeth Smith, who was born June 21, 184.9. 
She was a descendant on the maternal side of General Braddock. 

CHILDREN : 

LEVI ERNEST, born May 8, 1878. 

Home, Rensselaer, Ind. ; business, agriculture. 

V. JOHN THOMAS LAMSON was born in Howard County, Ind., 
and went with his parents to Rensselaer when three years old. Here he 
grew to manhood, assisting his father on the farm in summer and going 
to school in winter. 

LEVI ERNEST LAMSON, first child of John Thomas 
Lamson and Rebecca Elizabeth Smith. 

Took a four years' course at Indiana State Normal School at Terre 
Haute, Ind. He is in the State University, Class 1905, Bloomington, Ind. 

V. JAMES E. LAMSON, second child of Margaret Pogue 
and Daniel Skinner Lamson, was married in Newton County, 
Ind., February 19, 1873, to Susan A. Blankenbaker, who was 
born in Boon County, Kentucky, March 13, 184.9. 

CHILDREN : 

HARLEY HARPER, born Oct. 17, 1875. 

Susan A. Blankenbaker Lamson died July 8, 1879, and is buried at 
Rensselaer, Ind. 

V. JAMES E. LAMSON was married second, July 20, 1881, to Anna 
Laura McCoy, who was born September 3, 1852. 

CHILDREN: 

HAZLE McCov, born Mar. 27, 1883. 
HELEN LOUZAINE, born July 16, 1886. 
LEON, born Nov. 5, 1888. 

Home, Rensselaer, Ind.; business, agriculture. 

V. JAMES E. LAMSON was born in Howard County, Ind., and 
when nearly two years old came with his parents to Rensselaer where he 
still lives in the old homestead, "Riverside." 

141 



VI. BARLEY HARPER LAMSON, first child of James 
E. Lamson and Susan A. Blankenbaker, was married April 16, 
1896, to Mary Babcock, who was born September 2, 1875. 

CHILDREN : 

CHARLES, born Nov. 17, 1896. 

ALFRED JAMES, born Sept. 20, 1898. 
RUTH ANNA, born July 17, 1900. 
Home, Rensselaer, Ind. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. HAZLE McCOY LAMSON, second child oj James 
E. Lamson and first child of Anna Laura McCoy. 

Graduated from the Rensselaer High School in 1902. She is a student 
at the State Normal School, Terre Haute, Ind. 

VI. HELEN LOUZAINE LAMSON, third child of 
James E. Lamson and second child of Anna Laura McCoy. 
Graduates from the Rensselaer High School in 1905. 

VI. LEON LAMSON, fourth child of James E. Lamson 
and third child of Anna Laura McCoy. 
Is a student in the Rensselaer High School. 

V. WILLIAM ALBERT LAMSON, third child of Mar- 
garet Pogue and Daniel Skinner Lamson, was married to 
Mary Peacock. 

CHILDREN : 
CLAUDE. 
EARL. 
FLOY. 

Home, Elm Creek, Buffalo County, Neb.; business, hardware. 

V. WILLIAM ALBERT LAMSON was born at the Lamson home- 
stead near Rensselaer, Ind., and received his education in the local 
schools. After his marriage he lived for a few years on a farm joining 
his father's and later went to Elm Creek, Neb., where he still is. 

VI. CLAUDE LAMSON, first child of William Albert 
Lamson and Mary Peacock, not reported. 

142 



VI. EARL LAMSON, second child oj William Albert 
Lamson and Mary Peacock, was married March, 1900, to Nellie 
Robins, who was born in 1876. 

CHILDREN: 

DONALD KARL. 
Home, Rensselaer, Ind. 

VI. FLOY LAMSON, third child oj William Albert 
Lamson and Mary Peacock. 

Is a teacher. She lives with her parents at Elm Creek, Neb. 

V. ANNA JANE LAMSON, fourth child of Margaret 
Pogue and Daniel Skinner Lamson, was married at Craw- 
fordsville, Ind., September 29, 1879, to Millard F. Kaesner, 
who was born at Foster's Crossing, Ohio, March 5, 1856. 

CHILDREN : 

A DAUGHTER, born and died Jan. 10, 1881. 

WILLIAM EARL, born Jan. 8, 1882. 

ALONZO, born June 8, 1883. 

WALTER DANIEL, born Nov. u, 1884. 

GROVER ANDREW, born Aug. 9, 1886. 

DAISY MAY, born Feb. 24, 1888. 

OMAR, born Oct. 1889. 

IRENE, born Mar. 9, 1892. 

CHARLES, born Jan. 27, 1894. 

CATHERINE CLYDE, born Oct. 30, 1895. 

MARGARET, born Sept. 5, 1897. 

V. ANNA JANE LAMSON died November 4, 1897, and is buried in 
Evergreen Cemetery, Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Millard F. Kaesner was married second, November 30, 1898, to Mrs. 
Josephine Morgan Gross of Blue Island, 111. 

Home, Colorado Springs, Colo. ; business, in the refining mills. 

In the spring of 1885, they moved from Ohio to Morton County, Kan., 
and later to Colorado Springs, Colo., where they are now. 

VI. The first child of Anna Jane Lamson and Millard F. 
Kaesner died the day she was born, and is buried in the Weston 

Cemetery. 

143 



VI. WILLIAM EARL KAESNER, second child of Anna 
Jane Lamson and Millard F. Kaesner, died of malignant small- 
pox in the hospital in Omaha, Neb., May 5, 1904., and is buried 
in the hospital cemetery. 

VI. ALONZO KAESNER, third child of Anna Jane 
Lamson and Millard F. Kaesner. 
Is in business in Idaho. 

VI. WALTER DANIEL KAESNER, fourth child of 
Anna Jane Lamson and Millard F. Kaesner. 

Enlisted November 8, 1902, on the United States Transport Hancock, 
at Mare de Lang, CaL, and has made two trips nearly half-way around 
the world. He has been transferred to the United States ship Alabama. 

VI. GROVER ANDREW KAESNER, fifth child of Anna 
Jane Lamson and Millard F. Kaesner. 
On a ranch in Colorado. 

VI. DAISY MAY KAESNER, sixth child of Anna Jane 
Lamson and Millard F. Kaesner. 

On July 4, 1904, while on a picnic with her parents and neighborhood 
friends, fell from a precipice in Cheyenne Canyon, one hundred and fifty 
feet. She was taken to a hospital in Colorado Springs, where she died July 
8, 1904, and is buried at Colorado Springs, Colo. She was sixteen years 
of age. 

VI. OMAR KAESNER, seventh child of Anna Jane Lam- 
son and Millard F. Kaesner. 

Is with his father in the refining mills of Colorado City, Colo. 
The other children of Anna Jane Lamson and Millard F. Kaesner 
are in the schools of Colorado Springs, Colo. 

V. HARRIET MA Y LAMSON, fifth child of Margaret 
Pogue and Daniel Skinner Lamson, died when three years 
old, and is buried in the Egypt Cemetery, Rensselaer, Ind. 

IV. SAMUEL McYOUEL, thirteenth child of Jane Hop- 
kins and John Hopkins Pogue, not reported. 

144 



///. MARY HOPKINS, fourth child of Archibald Hop- 
kins and Elizabeth Poag, was married to John Crawford Pogue (a 
cousin of the John Hopkins Pogue that her sister Jane married). 

They had no children, but adopted Sarah Amanda, the seventh child of 
Jane Hopkins (her sister) and John Hopkins Pogue, and cared for her 
as their own child. The last days of Mary Hopkins Pogue were spent in 
the home of this adopted daughter. She was a "little woman with blue 
eyes and red hair. She was quick in motion, would fly about her work, 
was a great helper in time of need, as many can testify." She was a great 
hand to ride horseback and could ride anything. Her husband died about 
1837, and was buried at Red Oak. In their early married life they lived 
at Ripley, Ohio. Then they moved onto a farm near Red Oak, Ohio, 
where John ran a fulling mill. In 1853 Mary Hopkins Pogue went with 
her adopted daughter, Amanda Pogue Voris, and her husband, Samuel 
Voris, to Aledo, 111., In 1864 they moved to Benton County, la., where 
Mary Hopkins Pogue died, February, 1873. She is buried near Parker's 
Grove, Shellsburg, la. Samuel Voris and his wife, Sarah Amanda Pogue 
Voris, are also buried there. 



///. SARAH HOPKINS, fifth child of Archibald Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Poag, was married February 7, 1822, to Adam 
B. Gilliland, who was born January 22, 1794, and died January 
5, 1885. 

CHILDREN: 

NANCY JANE, born Feb. 9, 1823; died May 29, 1899. 

AMANDA, born Dec. 12, 1824; died June 22, 1899. 

JAMES ALEXANDER, born Nov. 16, 1826; died Aug. n, 1857. 

FANNY MARY, born June 24, 1828; died Nov. 12, 1886. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, born Apr. 13, 1830; died May 31, 1875. 

SARAH ELIZABETH, born Jan. 18, 1832; died Aug. 8,1857. 

ARCHIBALD LUTHER, born Mar. 26, 1834. 

Home was at different places where Mr. Gilliland preached in Ohio, 
Hillsboro, Bethel, Riely, Venice. Sarah Hopkins Gilliland and Adam 
B Gilliland are buried at Venice, O. 

III. SARAH HOPKINS, fifth child of Archibald Hopkins and Eliza- 
beth Poag, was a lovely, modest, gentle woman, rather tall and slender, 
and graceful, with black hair and blue eyes. She was said to have been a 
very pretty, stylish young woman. She was a fine horsewoman, sitting 
the most spirited horse with perfect ease. She possessed a fine voice, 
and my grandfather used to love to hear her sing "Counter," a rare ac- 
complishment in those days. She was domestic in her tastes, and given 
to hospitality. She did her full share in helping grandfather in assisting 
slaves to the Canadian border. Many a time grandfather came home 
and found grandmother cooking doughnuts and hard biscuit, while a 
black man was safely hid in the loft of the cabin, or in the hay-mow. As 
soon as it was dark grandfather hitched up, and took the slave to the 
next station, driving like Jehu so as to make the return trip before day- 
light. This night march was usually made endurable by grandmother's 
doughnuts and biscuits. Sometimes on arriving at home in the morning 
he would find grandmother hiding another poor fellow, and would have 
to repeat his night ride. Grandmother made her trip from Virginia 
on horseback with her father, she having remained there several 
years after the rest of the family had moved to Ohio. We have in our 
possession a corner of a linen tablecloth, with knotted fringe, which she 

146 




III. SARAH HOPKINS (ilLLILAND. 



spun and wove before she left Virginia. We also have a piece of em- 
broidery which she made after she was sixty years old, showing her to be 
a skillful needle woman. There is in the family a blue and white wool 
and linen coverlet which she spun and wove. Though over ninety years 
old, it is in good condition. We have a piece of her wedding petticoat, of 
fine corded dimity, and a piece of her wedding dress, which was of thin 
white goods, with ten rows of trimming around the skirt woven into the 
goods. Another heirloom which we prize very highly is a piece of fine 
linen toweling, with knotted fringe, spun and woven by Elizabeth Poag, 
our great-grandmother, Archibald Hopkins's (Red Oak, Ohio) first wife. 
Adam Baird Gilliland graduated from Jefferson College, Penn., in 
1831. He studied theology, as he once said, "with the apostle Paul," 
his own father, the Rev. James Gilliland, of Red Oak, O. He was licensed 
to preach April 24, 1824, and spent the summer as missionary in the then 
thinly settled Scioto Valley. In the fall he took his family to Hillsboro, 
where he was ordained to preach, and installed as pastor of the First 
Presbyterian Church, with a salary of three hundred dollars a year, one 
hundred to be paid in money, and the rest in produce. He taught a private 
school for young ladies in order to eke out this small salary. In 1828 he 
went to Bethel, where he learned the cabinet maker's trade, and a number 
of pieces of furniture in the family bear testimony to his taste and skill. 
Adam Wade, of Venice, O., has a beautiful black walnut sideboard, with 
a black marble top. Mrs. Anna B. Folson has a cherry bureau. Miss 
Sarah Anderson has a bureau, stand, and breakfast-table that were made 
for his daughter, Nancy Jane, to go to housekeeping with. He was stated 
supply at Venice from 1839 to 1859. At one time he had a very urgent 
call to become pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Dayton, O. 
While debating it he happened to go to the cemetery at that place, and 
immediately declined the offer, saying, "There are too many small graves 
there, I cannot bring my little ones to so sickly a place." He was for the 
most part an extemporaneous speaker, rarely taking anything into the pulpit 
except a small piece of paper with the heads of his sermon upon it. Often 
in preparing his sermon ; the only books he used were his Bible and con- 
cordance. He was an able and successful preacher. He had deep sym- 
pathies and tender feelings, which were hidden by an abrupt, severe man- 
ner. He was occasionally witty, sometimes sarcastic. He was very enter- 
taining socially, and told a story well. In the presbytery he was very 
influential, frequently turning the vote of that body at the last moment 
by a few terse and clear-cut sentences. This influence was always on the 
side of what he believed was right, personal sympathies having no part 
in his decision. Sometimes he took advantage of an unguarded expression 



of a brother in presbytery and threw the entire body into a fit of laughter, 
while he sat down with a face as innocent as a child. He was always a 
stanch Republican, and a ranting Abolitionist. He was a lover of music, 
possessing a fairly good voice, and played the violin so that "you wanted 
to dance." His favorite hymns were "I would not live always," "Nearer, 
my God, to Thee," "Home, sweet home," and "Suanee River." At 
Venice, one of the most beautiful spots on the Ohio River, in sight of the 
church he served and helped to build, rests his body. His wife, three 
daughters, three sons-in-law, and ten grandchildren lie near him, waiting 
the resurrection morn. MARY LIZZIE ANDERSON, Dayton, Ohio. 

IV. NANCY JANE GILLILAND, first child of Sarah 
Hopkins and Adam B. Gilliland, was married December 28, 
1842, to Ichabod Fergus Anderson, who was born November 
26, 1820, and died May 4, i&73- 
CHILDREN: 

ADAM WILLIS, born Mar. 29, 1844. 
ELLA FRANCES, born Oct. 7, 1845. 
CLARA AMANDA, born July 16, 1848. 
SARAH CORDELIA, born Jan. 21, 1851. 
MARY LIZZIE, born Aug. 5, 1856. 
EFFIE JANE, born Feb. 19, 1860. 

Home, Venice, Lebanon, and Dayton; business, agriculture. 

IV. NANCY JANE GILLILAND ANDERSON belonged to that 
generation fast passing away who began housekeeping in log cabins, 
cooked by the open fire, spun the yarn and knit the stockings of 
the family, cut and made all garments, did their own scrubbing, 
baking, and washing, and with all this found time to help a sick 
neighbor, to read and keep abreast of the times, and to dispense 
a hospitality that puts ours to shame. She possessed a lively, kind 
disposition, and was much admired and respected. Like her father, 
Adam B. Gilliland, she was a person of strong convictions. Dur- 
ing the presidential campaign in 1880, Robert G. Ingersoll was to deliver 
a speech before the Republicans at the fair grounds at Dayton, O. Grand- 
father was very anxious about the election, and wanted very much to hear 
Ingersoll speak. Mother objected to his going to hear Ingersoll, because 
he was an infidel, and young men seeing these two preachers attending 
his political speech might go to hear his infidel lectures, and so be led 
astray. They argued the question pro and con for some time, both of 
them getting warmer and warmer. At last grandfather, with considerable 

148 



irritation, said, "Jane, I suppose if your house was on fire and the devil 
came along and wanted to help you put it out, you would not let him." 
" Oh yes," she said, " he might throw water, but he should not talk to my 
boys." This of course was followed by a laugh, and grandfather went 
to the speech, but he did not stay long. 

Ichabod Fergus Anderson was appointed by Grant as " United States 
gauger." He was ruling elder in the Presbyterian church for years. 
He and his wife, Nancy Jane Gilliland Anderson, are buried in the cemetery 
at Woodland, Dayton, O. MARY LIZZIE ANDERSON, Dayton, Ohio. 

V. ADAM WILLIS ANDERSON, first child 0} Nancy J. 
Gilliland and Ichabod Fergus Anderson, was married September 
16, 1869, to Mary F. Bundy, who was born August i, 184.7. 

CHILDREN: 

EDITH JANE, born May 3, 1871. 

Mary E. Bundy died Oct. 26, 1872, and is buried in Woodland Ceme- 
tery, Dayton, O. 

V. ADAM WILLIS ANDERSON was married second, March 21, 
1878, to Eliza Ellen Osborn, who was born September 17, 1848. 

CHILDREN: 

HARRIETS., born July 27,1880. 

LUELLA, born Dec. 22, 1883. 

JEANETTE, born Feb. 7, 1886; died Mar. 7, 1886. 

ANNA MARIE, born Apr. 22, 1890. 

Home, Dayton, O.; business, superintendent of Dayton & Xenia 
Traction Road. Adam Willis Anderson served in the Civil War in 
Company A, i46th Regt., from May 8, 1864, to September 5, 1864. 

VI. EDITH JANE ANDERSON, first child of Adam 
Willis Anderson and Mary F. Bundy. 

Graduated from the Dayton High School, Class 1890, and the Dayton 
Normal School, Class 1891. She is a teacher in the Dayton ward schools. 

VI. HARRIET E. ANDERSON, second child oj Adam 
Willis Anderson and first child of Eliza Ellen Osborn. 

Graduated from the Dayton High School, Class 1899, and the Dayton 
Normal School, Class 1901. 

149 



VI. LUELLA ANDERSON, third child of Adam Willis 
Anderson and second child of Eliza Ellen Osborn. 

Graduated from the Steel High School, Dayton, O., Class of 1902. 
She has a beautiful voice, and sings in the First Baptist Church, Dayton, O. 

VI. JEANETTE ANDERSON, fourth child of Adam 
Willis Anderson and third child of Eliza Ellen Osborn, died 
in infancy, and is buried at Woodland Cemetery, Dayton, Ohio. 

VI. ANNA MARIE ANDERSON, fifth child of Adam 
Willis Anderson and Eliza Ellen Osborn. 
Is attending school in Dayton, O. 

V. ELLA FRANCES ANDERSON, second child of 
Nancy J. Gilliland and Ichabod Fergus Anderson, was married 
October 30, 1867, to Andrew J. Kendall, who was born April 
10, 1839. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNA MAUD, born Feb. 15,1873. 

EFFIE AMELIA, born July 31,1878. 

CLIFFORD NEWTON ANDERSON, born Sept. 6, 1880. 

Home, Dayton, O.; business, millwright. 

Andrew J. Kendall traveled extensively in the United States, and spent 
six months in China in the interests of the Stillwell, Bierce, Smith, Vaile 
Co. He served in the Civil War, Company C, 2d Regiment, Missouri 
Cavalry, from September 8, 1861, to September 4, 1864. He died August 
4, 1900, and is buried at Dayton, O. 

VI. ANNA MAUD KENDALL, first child of Ella 
Frances Anderson and Andrew J. Kendall. 

Studied at The Western, Oxford, O., 1890-1893. She graduated from 
the Ada Normal School, Ada, O., 1894. She is employed by the National 
Cash Register Co., Dayton, O. 

VI. EFFIE AMELIA KENDALL, second child of Ella 
Frances Anderson and Andrew J. Kendall. 

Graduated from the Steel High School, Dayton, O., class of 1897. 
She is a teacher at Phillipsburg, O. 

150 



VI. CLIFFORD NEWTON ANDERSON KENDALL, 

third child of Ella Frances Anderson and Andrew J. Kendall. 
Is employed on the Dayton & Xenia Traction Road. 

V. CLARA AMANDA ANDERSON, third child of 
Nancy J. Gilliland and Ichabod Fergus Anderson, was married 
June 28, 1870, to John L. Cook. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNA BELLE, born Mar. 28, 1871; died Apr. 16, 1901. 

STELLA ANDERSON, born Feb. 6, 1873; died June 26, 1880. 

MABEL LOWES, born May 4, 1879. 

JENNIE SCOTT, born June 12, 1882. 

MARY ELLA, born May 31, 1886. 

Home, Dayton, O.; business, traveling salesman for the Gem Shirt Co. 

VI. ANNA BELLE COOK, first child of Clara Amanda 
Anderson and John L. Cook, was married April n, 1895, to 
Clarence Perry Folson, who was born June 28, 1869. 

CHILDREN: 

MIRIAM, born Apr. 29, 1896. 
ELEANOR, born July 10, 1899. 

Clarence Perry Folson is a hydraulic engineer. He has been to Jamaica, 
Brazil, and all over the United States in the interests of the Stillwell, Bierce, 
Smith, Vaile Co. 

VI. ANNA BELLE COOK FOLSON graduated from the Dayton 
High School, Class 1891. She died April 16, 1901, and is buried at Wood- 
land, Dayton, O. She was a beautiful, accomplished woman, greatly loved 
by all who knew her. She united with the church at twelve years of age, was 
a teacher in the Sunday school, leader in the choir, and active in all church 
work until motherhood occupied her in the home. With everything to 
live for in the earthly home, she has been transferred to the eternal home. 

VI. STELLA ANDERSON COOK, second child of Clara 
Amanda Anderson and John L. Cook, died a little child, and 
is buried in Woodland Cemetery, Dayton, O. 



VI. MABEL LOWES COOK, third child oj Clara A. 
Anderson and John L. Cook. 

Is a music teacher, Dayton, O. She plays the pipe organ in the Pres- 
byterian church, Dayton, O. Graduated from the Steel High School, 
Class of 1897. 

VI. JENNIE SCOTT COOK, fourth child of Clara 
Amanda Anderson and John L. Cook. 

Graduated from the Dayton high school in 1901, and is attending the 
Dayton Normal School. 

VI. MARY ELLA COOK, fifth child oj Clara Amanda 
Anderson and John L. Cook. 

Is attending the High School at Dayton, O. 

V. SARAH CORDELIA ANDERSON, V. MARY 
LIZZIE ANDERSON, and V. EFFIE JANE ANDER- 
SON, fourth, fifth, and sixth children of Nancy J. Gilliland 
and Ichabod Fergus Anderson. 

Make their home together. Sarah Cordelia is a dressmaker. Effie 
Jane is a teacher in the ward schools of Dayton. Mary Lizzie also taught 
in the county schools for ten years. She is now the home maker. Their 
mother was with them in this home until May, 1899, and they sorely miss 
her since she joined the dear ones in the heavenly home. 

Home, 927 Home Avenue, Dayton, O. 



IV. AMANDA GILLILAND, second child of Sarah Hop- 
kins and Adam B. Gilliland, was married February, 1866, to 
Samuel D. Anderson, a cousin of Ichabod Fergus Anderson. 

CHILDREN : 

FRANK, ) 

} twins, born in 1867, and lived only a few months. 
JENNIE, j 

Home, Hamilton, O. 

Ah 1 the members of this family are dead. Samuel Anderson died in 1873. 



152 



IV. JAMES ALEXANDER GILLILAND, third child 0} 
Sarah Hopkins and Adam B. Gilliland, was married, 1856, to 
Jane - -, in Iowa City. 

He died soon after the marriage. These words are on the marble 
which marks his grave: "My husband, James A. Gilliland, died August 
i, 1857, aged 31 years. Amiable and beloved, farewell. Thy years were 
few, but thy virtues many. They are recorded not on perishable stone, 
but in the book of life, and the hearts of thy afflicted friends." 



IV. FANNY MARY GILLILAND, fourth child of Sarah 
Hopkins and Adam B. Gilliland, was married September 29, 
184.7, to N. C. Wade, who was born August 15, 1826, and died 
October 28, 1890. 

CHILDREN : 

ROBERT GARY, born Sept. 10, 1848; died Mar. 15, 1882. 

NEHEMIAH ADAM, born Aug. 10, 1850. 

ANNA BELLE, born Nov. 10, 1851. 

MARY ELLEN, born Mar. 26, 1853; died Aug. 14, 1858. 

SARAH MARGARET, born July 28, 1855; died Aug. 17, 1858. 

LIZZIE JANE, born Sept. 23, 1857. 

FANNIE, born Feb. 5, 1860; died Dec. 5, 1862. 

EDWARD, born Nov. 6, 1870. 

Home, Venice, O. 

IV. FANNY MARY GILLILAND died November 12, 1886, and is 
buried at Venice, O. 

N. C. Wade was a ruling elder in the Presbyterian church at Ross, O., 
for twenty-seven years. 



'53 



V. ROBERT GARY WADE, first child of Fanny Mary 
Gilliland and N. C. Wade, was married September 28, 1867, 
by Rev. I. M. Hughes, to Eliza Toman, who was born December 
u, 184.9. 

CHILDREN: 

FREDERICK, born Sept. 17, 1870; died Apr. 24, 1882. 
BENJAMIN, born Aug. 4, 1877. 

V. ROBERT GARY WADE and his son Frederick died within a 
month of each other, and are buried at Venice, O. Eliza Toman Wade 
is with her son, Benjamin, at Millville, O. 

VI. BENJAMIN WADE, second child of Robert Gary 
Wade and Eliza Toman, was married to Myrtle Morris. 

CHILDREN: 

MORRIS, born Feb. 20, 1890. 
MILDRED, born Jan. 23, 1899. 
Home, Millville, O.; business, machinist. 

V. NEHEMIAH ADAM WADE, second child of Fanny 
Mary Gilliland and N. C. Wade, was married, 1883, to Nannie 
Sellers, who was born March 28, 1862. 

CHILDREN: 

JESSIE M., born Jan. 13, 1884. 

Home, Ross, O.; business, agriculture. 

V. ANNA BELLE WADE, third child of Fanny Mary 
Gilliland and N. C. Wade. Unmarrid. 

Home, Millville, O. 

V. MAGGIE and V. MARY ELLA WADE, fourth and 
fifth children of Fanny Mary Gilliland and N. C. Wade, died 
when children, within a few days of each other, with diphtheria. 



154 



V. ELIZABETH JANE WADE, sixth child of Fanny 
Mary Gilliland and N. C. Wade, was married December 24., 
1879, to Andrew J. Marsh. 

CHILDREN: 

GEORGE, born Sept. 23, 1880. 

STANLEY, born Dec. i, 1882. 

ANNA FREEMAN, born Nov. 19, 1884. 

CHARLES EDWARD, born Jan. 17, 1887. 

FLORENCE BELLE, born Apr. 10, 1890. 

MARY ELEANOR, born Apr. 10, 1890. 

Home, 841 Livingston Street, Cincinnati, O.; business, lawyer. 

All the children are in school. 

V. FANNIE WADE, sixth child of Fannie Mary Gilli- 
land and N. C. Wade, died a little child, and is buried at 
Venice, O. 

V. EDWARD WADE, seventh child of Fannie Mary 
Gilliland and N. C. Wade, was married to Mattie Dunn. 

CHILDREN: 
ROBERT. 
Home, Barnsbury, O. 



IV. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN GILLILAND, fifth child 
of Sarah Hopkins and Adam B. Gilliland, was married June 
27, 1854., to Sarah Johnson Marsh, who was born April 25, 
1836. 

CHILDREN: 

HARRIET FIDELLA, born May 28, 1855. 
INFANT SON, born Dec. 2, 1857; died Jan. 5, 1858. 

INFANT SON, born June 12, 1859; died June 13, 1859. 

GEORGE EVERETT, born Oct. 8, 1860; died Jan. 27, 1887. 
SARAH ELIZABETH, born Dec. 10, 1862. 
HANNAH JOSEPHINE, born Aug. 30, 1865. 
HOSEA FRANKLIN, born May 5, 1868. 
CHARLES ADAM, born Apr. 22, 1871. 
SAMUEL ARCHIBALD, born Apr. 19,1874. 

155 



IV. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN GILLILAND was a blacksmith, at 
Venice, Ohio. He went from there to Littleton, 111., and built a cabin 
and a blacksmith's shop near the town. Mrs. Sarah Hopkins Gilliland 
then went out, arriving May 8, 1856, the day of "the great storm" that 
blew the whole town away except one log cabin. Twenty-five were 
killed, and only one person in the town escaped injury. When the storm 
was at its worst Mrs. Gilliland was in a stage-coach on her way to Rush- 
ville, 111., to meet her husband. On reaching the new home they found 
it nearly all blown away. Bravely they went to work rebuilding the 
demolished houses, living on coarse corn meal, deer and buffalo meat. 
In 1860 they moved to La Harpe, 111., where Benjamin Franklin Gilliland 
died and is buried. His wife with their daughter Josephine and son 
Samuel Archibald went to Beatrice, Neb., in 1892, where they now live. 

V. HARRIET F. GILLILAND, first child of Benjamin 
Franklin Gilliland and Sarah J. Marsh, was married Septem- 
ber 13, 1874, to Edwin Coulson. 

CHILDREN: 

FANNIE PEARL, born June 19, 1875. 

RUBIE SARAH, born Nov. 20, 1876. 

MAGGIE BELLE, born Oct. 8, 1878. 

INFANT DAUGHTER, born June 2, 1880; died June 3, 1880. 

HENRY FRANKLIN, born Apr. 27, 1881. 

EDWIN CRANDALL, born Mar. 26, 1883. 

INFANT SON, born July 10, 1884; died July 10,1884. 

BESSIE ELLA, born Dec. 6, 1885; died Feb. n, 1886. 

CLYDE CLAIRE, born May 2, 1888. 

KARLE FAY, born Apr. 16, 1896. 

Home, Latham, Butler County, Kan. 

VI. FANNIE PEARL COULSON, first child of Har- 
riet F. Gilliland and Edwin Coulson, was married October 75, 

to Hollister Fish. 
Home, Idaho Springs, Colo. 



156 



VL RUBIE SARAH COULSON, second child of Harriet 
F. Gilliland and Edwin Coulson, was married March 12, 1896, 
to Arza W. Shriver. 

CHILDREN : 

HERCHEL, born Dec. 7, 1896. 

WILLIE COULSON, born Aug. 3, 1901. 
OLIVER W., born Dec. 26, 1903. 

The other children are in the home. 

V. The second and third children of Benjamin Franklin 
Gilliland and Sarah J. Marsh died when infants, and are buried 
at Littleton, III. 

V. GEORGE EVERETT GILLILAND, fourth child of 
Benjamin Franklin Gilliland and Sarah J. Marsh, was not 
married. He died at twenty-seven years of age, and is buried 
at La Harpe, III. 

V. SARAH ELIZABETH GILLILAND, fifth child of 
Benjamin Franklin Gilliland and Sarah J. Marsh, was married 
at La Harpe, III., October 10, 1888, to Albertus Homer Kidd, 
who was born in Ada, Ohio, March 19, 1863. 

CHILDREN : 

NORMA JOSEPHINE, born Jan. 12, 1893. 
DORA ALDONA, born Jan. 18, 1900. 
Home, Beatrice, Neb.; business, lawyer. 

V. HANNAH JOSEPHINE GILLILAND, sixth child 
of Benjamin Franklin Gilliland and Sarah J. Marsh. 

With her mother, have a home together at Beatrice, Neb. She is a 
stenographer. 



157 



V. HOSEA FRANKLIN GILLILAND, seventh child 
of Benjamin Franklin Gilliland and Sarah J. Marsh, was 
married November 19, 1896, to Mae Freeman, who was born 
in Detroit, Mich., September 25, 1873. 

CHILDREN: 

PERCY CYRIL, born Nov. 3, 1898. 

PAUL WESLEY, born Nov. 3, 1898; died Sept. 3, 1899. 

Home, Riverside, Cal.; business, druggist. 

V. CHARLES ADAM GILLILAND, eighth child of 
Benjamin Franklin Gilliland and Sarah J. Marsh, is not 
married. 

Home, Neola, la.; business, jeweler. 

V. SAMUEL ARCHIE GILLILAND, ninth child o] 
Benjamin Franklin Gilliland and Sarah J. Marsh. 
Court stenographer, Beatrice, Neb. 



IV. SARAH ELIZABETH GILLILAND, sixth child oj 
Sarah Hopkins and Adam B. Gilliland, was married in 1856 
to Isaac Anderson, a cousin of Ichabod Fergus Anderson and 
Samuel D. Anderson. She died August 8, 1857, and is buried 
at Venice, Ohio. 



IV. ARCHIBALD LUTHER GILLILAND, seventh child 
of Sarah Hopkins and Adam B. Gilliland, was married, 1838, 
to Lucy Ann Branough. 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES. 

FRANK ELMER. 
MARY ELLA. 
GROVE WESLEY. 
ADAM. 

HERBERT. 

158 



V. JAMES GILLILAND, first child of Archibald Luther 
Gilliland and Lucy Ann Branough, died a child, and is buried 
at Seneca, Kan. 

V. FRANK ELMER GILLILAND, second child oj Arch- 
ibald Luther Gilliland and Lucy Ann Branough, was married 
to Bell Williams. 

CHILDREN: 

MARY ERMA. 
STELLA GLADYS. 

Home, Council Bluffs, la. 

V. MARY ELLA GILLILAND, third child of Archibald 
Luther Gilliland and Lucy Ann Branough, was married to 
Charles McCutcheon. 

CHILDREN : 
IRENE. 
Home, Canton, 111. 

V. GROVE WESLEY GILLILAND, fourth child of 
Archibald Luther Gilliland and Lucy Ann Branough, was 
married. 

CHILDREN : 
HAZEL. 
Home, Axtel, Kan. 



///. ROBERT HOPKINS, sixth child of Archibald Hop- 
kins and Elizabeth Poag, was married, in 1819, to Fanny Gilli- 
land, who was born January 20, 1799, and died July 23, 1869. 

CHILDREN : 
LIZZIE. 

AMANDA, born 1827; died 1903. 
HARRIET, born 1838; died 1903. 
JAMES A., born Nov. 1837; died Aug. 27, 1890. 
JANE, born 
Home, Red Oak, O. 



IV. ELIZABETH HOPKINS, first child of Robert Hop- 
kins and Fanny Gilliland, was married in Union Township, 
Brown County, Ohio, by Rev. Hiram Bingham, November 9, 
184.3, t James McFerson. 

CHILDREN: 

FRANCES ANN, born Oct. 29, 1844; died Sept. 22, 1866. 

ROBERT HOPKINS, born Aug. 24, 1846; died Jan. 17, 1853. 

WILLIAM ADAM, born Apr. 21,1848. 

LOUISA JANE, born Apr. 9, 1850. 

MILTON CAMPBELL, born Nov. 10, 1851. 

SAMUEL LEWIS, born Mar. 14, 1854; died Aug. 14, 1881. 

AMANDA AGNES, born June 6, 1856. 

DAVID STEWART, born Jan. 19, 1862. 

EDWARD PAYSON, born Jan. 5, 1864. 

Home, Red Oak, O. 

V. FRANCES ANN McFERSON, first child oj Elizabeth 
Hopkins and James McFerson, died when 22 years old. 

V. ROBERT HOPKINS McFERSON, second child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and James McFerson, died when seven 
years old. 

160 



V. WILLIAM ADAM McFERSON, third child of Eliz- 
abeth Hopkins and James McFerson, is not married. 
Home, Red Oak, O. 

V. LOUISA JANE McFERSON, fourth child of Eliz- 
abeth Hopkins and James McFerson, was married June 5, 
1888, to Joel B. Morrow, who was born August 15, 1850. 

CHILDREN: 

MARY, born Apr. i, 1889. 

AUGIE E., born Dec. 13, 1890; died July 21, 1891. 

SON, born Jan. i, 1894; died Jan. i, 1894. 

Home, Russelville, O.; business, agriculture. 

V. MILTON CAMPBELL McFERSON, fifth child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and James McFerson, was married, March 
23, 1880, to Hannah Fenton. 

CHILDREN: 

MARY MCFERSON, born Apr. 5, 1885. 
Home, Red Oak; business, agriculture. 

V. SAMUEL LEWIS McFERSON, sixth child of Eliz- 
abeth Hopkins and James McFerson, died unmarried. 

V. AMANDA AGNES McFERSON, seventh child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and James McFerson, was married, Jan- 
uary ij, 1878, to Edwin Ackless Culler. 

CHILDREN: 

JAMES ALLEN, born June 14, 1879; died July 2, 1879. 

NELLIE MAY, born June 16, 1880. 

GEORGE EDWIN, born July i, 1883. 

CHARLES STEWART, born July 26, 1885; died Feb. 28, 1888. 

Home, Russelville, O.; business, liveryman. 

V. DAVID STEWART McFERSON, eighth child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and James McFerson, was married, May 
, 1891, to Ella McCutcheon. 
Home, Red Oak, O.; business, agriculture. 

161 



V. EDWARD PAY SON McFERSON, ninth child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and James McFerson, was married, Sep- 
tember 75, 1892, to Amelia Louise Beatty. 

Home, Chicago, 111.; business, with John V. Farwell, Chicago, 111. 



IV. AMANDA and HARRIET HOPKINS, second and 
third children 0} Robert Hopkins and Fanny Gilliland, were 
unmarried. 

They lived and died in the old home near Ripley, O. They are 
buried in the Red Oak, O., churchyard. 



V. JAMES A. HOPKINS, fourth child of Robert Hopkins 
and Fanny Gilliland, was married, October 7, 1862, to Mary 
Culler. 

CHILDREN : 

EDWIN CAREY, born Oct. 13, 1864. 

JENNIE M., born Mar. 24, 1867. 

SAMUEL GORDON, born Oct. 17, 1873. 

FANNY, born June 7, 1876. 

V. JAMES A. HOPKINS died August 27, 1890, and is buried at 
Paolo, Kan. None of his children are married. They live with their 
mother at Paolo, Kan.; business, agriculture. 

V. JANE HOPKINS, fifth child of Robert Hopkins and 
Fanny Gilliland, was married to Harry Bennington. 

CHILDREN: 

THOMAS NEWTON, who died when quite young. 



162 




'-*- 




III. THOMAS HOPKINS. 

III. GORDON HOPKINS. 



///. GORDON HOPKINS, seventh child o) Archibald 
Hopkins, and first child of Margaret Shanklin, was married 
September p, 1819, to Ann Kinkead, at her home in Ripley, Ohio. 

CHILDREN: 

ELIJAH A., born July 22, 1820; died Mar. 14, 1900. 

WILLIAM KINKEAD, born Oct. 5, 1822. 

THOMAS SCOTT, born June 19, 1825; died Aug. 7, 1897. 

A DAUGHTER, born Feb. 22, 1828; died a baby. 

ARCHIBALD G., born Jan. 24, 1829; died May 7, 1851. 

NANCY ANN, born Oct. 12, 1832; died May 3, 1833. 

ELLEN JANE, born Apr. 19, 1834. 

CAREY ALLEN, born Aug. 24, 1837. 

ALBERT N., born Apr. 6, 1840; died Jan. 22, 1868. 

V. GORDON HOPKINS and his family lived in Brown County, O., 
until some time in the fifties. They then came to Oswego, Kendall County, 
111., where they made their home the rest of their lives. He and his wife 
are buried at Oswego, 111. 

IV. ELIJAH A . HOPKINS, first child of Gordon Hopkins 
and Ann Kinkead, was married November 22, 184.2, to Eliz- 
abeth Gay, of Woodford County, Ky., who died April 8, 1862. 

CHILDREN: 

JAMES WILLIAM, born Aug. 3, 1843; died 1863. 

A BABY, who died. 

ANNAB., born June 18, 1847. 

JOHN T., born Feb. 6, 1850. 

AGNES, born Jan. 26. 1856. 

KATE G., born May 13, 1860. 

LIZZIE, born Mar. 30, 1862. 

IV. ELIJAH A. HOPKINS and his wife, Elizabeth Gay, are buried at 
Oswego, 111. Elijah A. Hopkins was a great lover of horses. 

V. JAMES WILLIAMS HOPKINS, first child of Elijah 
Hopkins and Elizabeth Gay. 

Enlisted in the United States Army in the fall of 1861, Company C, 

163 



Fourth Illinois Cavalry, Colonel T. L. Dickey's regiment that went from Ot- 
tawa, 111. He was orderly for Colonel Dickey, and for Colonel McCullough. 
The latter was killed at Coffee Mills Springs, Miss. Will Hopkins was 
one of those chosen to act as escort with the body to Bloomington, 111. 
He was granted a furlough at this time, and visited the home folks at 
Oswego. It was his last home-coming. He was killed at the siege of 
Vicksburg, very little being known of the circumstances of his death or 
burial. He was in the battle at Fort Henry, Fort Donaldson, and other 
places. 

V. The second child of Elijah Hopkins and Elizabeth Gay 
died a baby. 

* 

V. ANNA HOPKINS, third child of Elijah Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Gay, was married March 23, 1876, to Victor 
Mather. 

Home, Austin, Tex. 

Victor Mather was superintendent of the waterworks. Died in 1901. 

V. JOHN T. HOPKINS, fourth child of Elijah Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Gay, was married April, 1892, to Leauna B. 
Davis. 

Home, 4311 Dodge Street, Omaha, Neb.; business, real estate broker. 

V. AGNES HOPKINS, fifth child of Elijah Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Gay, was married January 5, 1887, to James 
Richardson, who died October 18, 1891. 

V. AGNES HOPKINS RICHARDSON was married again October 
21, 1896, to Charles C. Risk, who was born November 16, 1839. 

Home, Fairfield, la.; business, dry goods merchant. 

V. KATE G. HOPKINS, sixth child of Elijah Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Gay, is unmarried. 
Home, Oswego, 111. 

V. LIZZIE HOPKINS, seventh child of Elijah Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Gay, was married September 24., 1884., to W. H. 

Winser. 
CHILDREN : 

ROY A., born Mar. 3, 1886. 

Home, Aurora, 111. ; business, train dispatcher. 

164 



IV. WILLIAM KIN READ HOPKINS, second child of 
Gordon Hopkins and Ann Kinkead, was married October 14., 
184.7, t Mary Jane Baird, of Brown County, Ohio, who died 
June 12, 1856. 

CHILDREN: 

DRUSILLA FRANCES, born Oct. 11,1848. 

CORNELIA ARABELLA, born Nov. 13, 1850; died Sept. n, 1877. 

ROBERT MARCELLUS, born Jan. i, 1854; died Feb. 5, 1887. 

IV. WILLIAM KINKEAD HOPKINS owned and operated a woolen 
mill in Ohio until the fall of 1855, when he moved with his family to Ken- 
dall County, 111. They came by wagon. His wife, Mary Jane Baird, 
died the next summer, and is buried at Oswego, 111. 

V. DRUSILLA FRANCES HOPKINS, first child of 
William Kinkead Hopkins and Mary Jane Baird, was married 
August jo, 1880, to F. W. Clark. 

CHILDREN: 

CORNELIA STELLA, born Apr. 12, 1881; died Feb. 16, 1884. 
WILLIAM WINFIELD, born Dec. 12, 1884. 
HARRY HOPKINS, born Jan. 25, 1889. 

V. CORNELIA ARABELLA HOPKINS, second child of 
William Kinkead Hopkins and Mary Jane Baird, was married 
December 28, 1875, to H. C. Kerr. 

CHILDREN : 

HARRY WALLACE, born Apr. 27, 1877. 
Home, Hastings, Neb.; business, real estate. 

VI. HARRY WALLACE KERR, first child of Cornelia 
Arabella Hopkins and H. C. Kerr, was married September 25, 
1896, to Amy Morgan, who was born April 7, 1879. 

Home, Little Sioux, la. ; business, manager Review Publishing Co. 



165 



V. ROBERT MARCELLUS HOPKINS, third child of 
William Kinkead Hopkins and Mary Jane Baird, was married, 
in 1880, to Lizzie M. Copple. 

CHILDREN: 

LOTTIE BELLE, born Jan. 17, 1881. 

JOHN COPPLE, born July 19, 1882. 

CLARA D., born Jan. 22, 1886; died Oct. 22, 1886. 

V. ROBERT MARCELLUS HOPKINS and his wife lived in Ohio 
on a farm. He is buried at Oswego, 111. Mrs. Lizzie M. Copple Hopkins 
has made her home in Georgetown, O., since November, 1899. 

IV. THOMAS SCOTT HOPKINS, third child oj Gordon 
Hopkins and Ann Kinkead, was married February, 1866, to 
Lizzie Macklin, who was born in Ireland, February 5, 1838, 
and died October 10, 1890. 

CHILDREN: 

NEWT ROBERT, born Dec. 14, 1866. 

MARY MAUD, born July 11,1871. 
GORDON DEARMOND, born Oct. 13, 1874. 

THOMAS SCOTT, born Apr. 5, 1877. 

GUY HAMILTON, born June 10, 1879. 

HOY BEVERIDGE, born Sept. 30, 1884. 

Lizzie Macklin was a milliner in Aurora before her marriage. She 
died very suddenly in Aurora of paralysis of the brain. She is buried 
at Oswego. 

IV. THOMAS SCOTT HOPKINS was born in Ripley, O. His 
home for twenty-five years or more was at Oswego, 111., on a farm where 
his children were all raised. He sold his farm in 1896, and went to Fruit- 
hurst, Ala., where he died in 1897 from blood poisoning from an abscess. 
He is buried at Oswego, 111. 

V. NEWT ROBERT HOPKINS, first child of Thomas 
Scott Hopkins and Lizzie Macklin, was married at Yorkville, 
III., by Rev. J. G. Haige, December 14, 1887, to Emma L. 
Collins, who was born May 7, 1870. 

CHILDREN : 

LIZZIE E., born Jan. 8, 1895. 
Home, 592 Douglas Avenue, Aurora, 111. 

166 



V. MARY MAUD HOPKINS, second child of Thomas 
Scott Hopkins and Lizzie Macklin, was married November 14., 
1895, at the Palmer House, Chicago, by Rev. Bass, to D. W. T. 
Putt. 

Home, Fruithurst, Ala. ; business, physician. 

V. GORDON DEARMOND HOPKINS, third child oj 
Thomas Scott Hopkins and Lizzie Macklin, is unmarried. 
Lives in Aurora. 

V. THOMAS SCOTT HOPKINS, fourth child of Thomas 
Scott Hopkins and Lizzie Macklin, was married, April 5, 1900, 
at Yorkville, III., to Lydia Biesemeyer. 

Home, Rockford, 111.; business, brakeman on the C. B. & Q. R. R. 

V. GUY HAMILTON HOPKINS and V. HOY 
BEVERIDGE HOPKINS, fifth and sixth children of Thomas 
Scott Hopkins and Lizzie Macklin. 

Live in Aurora, 111. 



IV. The fourth child of Gordon Hopkins and Ann Kinkead 
was a daughter, who died in infancy. 



IV. ARCHIBALD G. HOPKINS, fifth child of Gordon 
Hopkins and Ann Kinkead, died in California at the age of 
twenty-two. He is buried there. 



IV. NANCY ANN HOPKINS, sixth child of Gordon 
Hopkins and Ann Kinkead, died less than a year old, and is 
buried in Ohio. 



167 



IV. ELLEN JANE HOPKINS, seventh child of Gordon 
Hopkins and Ann Kinkead, was married June, 1855, t Qv 
Wagner. 

CHILDREN : 

CHARLES HAMILTON, born June 6, 1856. 

MARGARET ANN. 

SCOTT. 

GORDON. 

FRANK. 

ALBERT. 

LAURA. 

Home, York, York County, Neb. 

V. CHARLES HAMILTON WAGNER, first child of 
Ellen Jane Hopkins and Cy Wagner, was married February 
6, 1 88 1, to Lettia M. Beattie, who was born July 5, 1858. 
CHILDREN: 

SCOTT B., born Oct. 18, 1881. 
GRACE L., born June 25, 1884. 
MARY W., born Jan. 31, 1886. 
JOSEPHINE E., born Feb. 22, 1887. 
VIOLA, born Mar. 3, 1891. 

Home, 539 Lafayette Street, Aurora, 111. 

MARGARET ANN WAGNER, second child of Ellen 
Jane Hopkins and Cy Wagner, was married to S. W. Johnson. 
Home, Yorkville, 111. 
No further report obtained of this family. 



168 



IV. CAREY ALLEN HOPKINS, eighth child of Gordon 
Hopkins and Ann Kinkead, was married December 31, 1860, 
to Mary Jane Cherry, of Naansay, III. 

CHILDREN : 

LIZZIE, born Nov. 15, 1861. 

MOSES CHERRY, born May 10, 1866. 

Mary Jane Cherry Hopkins died March 23, 1877, and is buried at 
Naansay, 111. 

Home, 511 Lafayette Street, Aurora, 111.; business, agriculture (retired). 

IV. CAREY ALLEN HOPKINS has been an elder in the Presby- 
terian church for over thirty years. 

V. LIZZIE HOPKINS, first child of Carey Allen Hopkins 
and Mary Jane Cherry, was married January 6, 1881, by the 
Rev. T. F. Jessup, to Isaac James Beattie. 

CHILDREN : 

CAREY HOPKINS, born Jan. 27, 1882. 
JOSEPH FRANKLIN, born Nov. 2, 1884. 
MURRAY BULLARD, born Nov. 3, 1886. 
STELLA MAY, born Mar. 7, 1889. 

Home, since 1882, near Bradshaw, York County, Neb.; business, 
agriculture. 

VI. CAREY HOPKINS BEATTIE, first child of Lizzie 
Hopkins and Isaac James Beattie. 

Graduated from the Bradshaw High School, Class of 1898. He was 
valedictorian, and won the Doane scholarship. He attended York College 
two years, and spent a winter at the State Agricultural College of Nebraska. 
He owns a half section of land in Hall County, Neb., which he expects 
to cultivate next year (1905). 

VI. JOSEPH FRANKLIN BEATTIE, second child of 
Lizzie Hopkins and Isaac James Beattie. 

Graduated from the Bradshaw High School, Class of 1901. 



169 



VI. MURRAY BULLARD BEATTIE, third child oj 
Lizzie Hopkins and Isaac James Beattie. 

Graduated from the High School, Bradshaw, Neb., 1903. 

VI. STELLA MAY BEATTIE, fourth child oj Lizzie 
Hopkins and Isaac James Beattie. 

Graduated from the High School, Bradshaw, Neb., 1904. 

V. MOSES CHERRY HOPKINS, second child oj Carey 
Allen Hopkins and Mary Jane Cherry, was married December, 
1888, to Hattie May Rickertson. 

CHILDREN: 

BESSIE MAY, born Nov., 1889. 

Home, Joplin, Mo. ; business, manager of Joplin Waterworks. 



IV. ALBERT N. HOPKINS, ninth child oj Gordon 
Hopkins and Ann Kinkead, died at eighteen years oj age, and 
is buried at Oswego, III. 






170 





HOUSE BUILT BY III. BENJAMIN HOPKINS, RIPLEY OHIO. 

GRAVE OF III. ELIJAH HOPKINS. 
THE FIRST HOPKINS GRAVE IN OHIO. 



///. BENJAMIN HOPKINS, eighth child of Archibald 
Hopkins, and second child of Margaret Shanklin, was married 
1824., to Fidelia Campbell, who was born in 1801, and died 
June 25, 1882, in her eighty-second year. 

CHILDREN : 

ELIZABETH A., born Dec. i, 1825; died Oct. 28, 1872. 
THOMAS, who died aged five months and sixteen days. 

III. BENJAMIN HOPKINS and Fidelia Campbell lived and died 
at Ripley, O. Benjamin died in 1827, and his widow and daughter, Eliz- 
abeth, lived on together till 1872, when the daughter died. After this 
the widow lived alone until her death in 1882. The old home still stands 
in Ripley, O. 



///. THOMAS HOPKINS, ninth child of Archibald 
Hopkins, and third child of Elizabeth Shanklin, was married 
by Rev. John Rankin, in 1826, to Sarah Johnston, who was 
born May 24, 1806. 

CHILDREN : 

ORLANDO JOHNSTON, born Sept. 6, 1830. 

MARY, born Apr. 2, 1834. 

JOHN THOMAS, born Mar. 9, 1836. 

MARGARET ELLEN, born 1838. 

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, born Sept. 9, 1840. 
HORACE EVERETT, born Nov. 19, 1848. 

Home, Ripley, O.; business, merchant. 

III. THOMAS HOPKINS left the farm quite early in life, and settled 
in Ripley, Brown County, O., where he engaged in the dry goods business, 
which, with other pursuits afterwards embarked in, became extensive. 
For many years he owned and operated the "Franklin Flouring Mills," 
located on the Ripley and Hillsboro pike, some two miles from Ripley. 
He also built an extensive wharf on the river frontage of the store property, 
and was among the first to build and introduce the wharf boat for the 
accommodation of steam craft. In connection with the wharf he erected, 
contiguous to the wharf property, a commodious warehouse for the storage 
of merchandise, which remained standing until within a few years, when 
it was dismantled. 

The family residence built by him was, in its day, regarded one of the 
finest houses in the town, and is still standing in good condition. A public- 
spirited man, of wonderful energy and activity, his labors for the com- 
munity in which he lived, for its Avelfare as well as his own, were not ap- 
preciated as they should have been in the days of his prosperity, but in 
after years, when reverses had overtaken him and the accumulations of 
a lifetime had been swept away, there were those who bore testimony of 
his indefatigable enterprises and of the great good he had done for the 
benefit of those who followed. He was ninety-three years old when he 
died. 

Sarah Johnston was born in Brownsville, Pa., but was living in Ripley, 

O., when Thomas Hopkins met her. She was a young woman of local 

172 



distinction and popularity, known by her intimates as the " belle of Ripley." 
She was in every respect a true woman, of fine attainments. She was an 
intimate friend of the Elaine family, and recollected well the birth of 
James G. Elaine, and his boyhood in their native town. She was a Pres- 
byterian, as have been all the members of her household. 

After the death of Joel W. Hopkins, of Granville, 111., the following 
clipping was found among his papers: "Mrs. Sarah Hopkins, wife of 
Thomas Hopkins, died yesterday afternoon at five o'clock, at her home on 
Mulbury Street, Jeffersonville, Ind., of old age. The deceased was eighty- 
one years old, and had long been a resident of Jeffersonville. Mrs. Hop- 
kins was an intimate acquaintance of the Hon. J. G. Elaine, and was 
familiar with many of the celebrated personages of other years. She was 
one of the committee of young ladies who gave a reception to General 
Lafayette upon his visit to this country in 1824." Thomas Hopkins 
and Sarah Johnston Hopkins are buried at Jeffersonville, Ind. 



IV. ORLANDO JOHNSTON HOPKINS, first child 
of Thomas Hopkins and Sarah Johnston, was married at 
Felicity, Ohio, October 12, 1853, to Malissa Ruhama Sargent, 
who was born at Felicity, Clermont County, Ohio, October i, 
1831. 

CHILDREN : 

EMMA FLORENCE, born Feb. 8, 1855; died Oct. 27, 1855. 

MINNIE BLANCHE, born Oct. n, 1857. 

NANNIE ELOISE, born Feb. 27, 1860; died Oct. 18, 1883. 

ALICE, born Apr. 5, 1864. 

RILEY, born Feb. 10, 1866; died June 24, 1867. 

ORLANDO JOHNSON, born Dec. 29, 1874; died July 26, 1876. 

IV. ORLANDO JOHNSTON HOPKINS volunteered as a private 
soldier of the United States Army at Ripley, Brown County, O., September 
12, 1861. He was commissioned by the government of Ohio as first 
lieutenant, Company A, 5Qth Regiment Ohio Infantry. After the battle 
of Shiloh, in 1863, he was commissioned by President Lincoln as captain 
and commissary of subsistence, U. S. A., at Jeffersonville, Ind. After 
Sherman's march to the sea he was ordered to Fort Riley, Kan., where 
he was honorably mustered out of the service. He has lived in Kansas 
twenty years, and twenty-three years in Denver, his present home. 

V. EMMA FLORENCE HOPKINS, first child of Or- 
lando Johnston Hopkins and Malissa Ruhama Sargent, died 
when only a few months old. 

V. MINNIE BLANCHE HOPKINS, second child of 
Orlando Johnston Hopkins and Malissa Ruhama Sargent, was 
married October 24, 1877, to James Wesley Hammond. 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES WESLEY, born Aug. 19, 1878. 
RUTH, born Sept. 23, 1879. 

CLARENCE EARL, born July 18, 1881. 
IRENE, born July 11,1883. 

Home, Cheyenne, Wyo. 

V. NANNIE ELOISE HOPKINS, third child of Or- 
lando Johnston Hopkins and Malissa Ruhama Sargent, died 
at twenty-three, and is buried at Denver, Colo. 

174 



V. ALICE HOPKINS, fourth child of Orlando Johnston 
Hopkins and Malissa Ruhama Sargent, was married December 
25, 1899, to Albert Delos Gilleland. 

Home, Denver, Colo. 

V. RILEY HOPKINS, fifth child of Orlando Johnston 
Hopkins and Malissa Ruhama Sargent, was born at Ft. Riley, 
Kan. He died at Junction City, Kan., when a little more than 
a year old, and is btiried at Ft. Riley, Kan. 

V. ORLANDO JOHNSTON HOPKINS, sixth child 
of Orlando Johnston Hopkins and Malissa Ruhama Sargent, 
was born at Leavenworth, Kan. He died a year and a half 
old, and is buried at Leavenworth, Kan. 



IV. MARY HOPKINS, second child of Thomas Hopkins 
and Sarah Johnston, was married June 17, 1891, to Rev. 
Samuel Weeks, a Methodist minister, retired, of Holman, 
Ind., who died in Jeffersonville, Ind., in July, 1895. 

At which place the widow still resides. 



IV. JOHN THOMAS HOPKINS, third child of Thomas 
Hopkins and Sarah Johnston, was married July 5, 1865, to 
Esther M. Dickinson, of Haddam, Middlesex County, Conn. 

CHILDREN : 

ROSA BONHEUR, born June 18, 1866. 
CHARLES DICKINSON, born Oct. 28, 1872. 
Home, Jeffersonville, Ind. 

IV. JOHN THOMAS HOPKINS, when about sixteen years old, was 
engaged in the Ohio River steamboat service, and was for ten years a clerk 
on packets, plying between Cincinnati, Maysville, Portsmouth, and Cat- 
lettsburg, at the mouth of the Big Sandy. Soon after the outbreak of 
the Civil War, he connected himself with the Union Army, serving as a 
civil employee. He remained twenty-five years in the quartermaster's 
department, during which time he was for nine years superintendent of 

175 



the Jeffersonville depot of the quartermaster's department at Jefferson- 
ville, Ind. A change of national administration from Republican to Demo- 
cratic required his resignation. Afterwards he was engaged in business, 
dry goods and notions, in Jeffersonville, remaining in that business twelve 
years, when he sold out. He is now general bookkeeper and teller of 
the First National Bank of Jeffersonville. 

V. ROSA BONHEUR HOPKINS, first child of John 
Thomas Hopkins and Esther M. Dickinson, was married 
November 15, 1888, to Charles H. Allen. 

Home, Jeffersonville, Ind. 

V. CHARLES DICKINSON HOPKINS, second child 
of John Thomas Hopkins and Esther M. Dickinson, was 
married June ij, 1901, to Lillie M. Pjau. 

CHILDREN: 

CHARLES D., born Apr. i, 1903. 
Home, Colorado Springs, Colo. 



IV. MARGARET ELLEN HOPKINS, fourth child of 
Thomas Hopkins and Sarah Johnston, was married April, 
1854, to Eli E. Kellogg, who was born 1834.. 

CHILDREN : 

EDGAR E., born Mar. 7, 1855. 
THOMAS, born Mar. i, 1857. 

Home, Denver, Colo. 

IV. MARGARET ELLEN HOPKINS KELLOGG died April, 
1902. 



176 




HOUSE BUILT BY JAMES HOPKINS, RF.D OAK, OHIO. 

HOUSE BUII.T BY THOMAS HOPKINS, RIPLEY, ( >mo. 

HOUSE BUII.T BY r.oKnoN HOPKINS, RED OAK, OHIO. 



IV. WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON HOPKINS, fifth 
child of Thomas Hopkins and Sarah Johnston, was married 
in 1863 to Martha Washington Fowler, of Louisville, Ky, 

Their married life proving incompatible after a few years, they were 
divorced. 

CHILDREN : 

HENRY, who died at the age of twenty-five. 

The life of William Henry Harrison Hopkins has been on the Ohio 
River, in connection with its traffic. During the War of the Rebellion he 
was superintendent of river transportation, under charge of officers of the 
U. S. Army. He is still connected with steamboats. 

Home, Louisville, Ky. 



IV. HORACE EVERETT HOPKINS, sixth child of 
Thomas Hopkins and Sarah Johnston, was married October 
/7, 1887, to Susannah Hawkins, of Jeffersonmlle, Ind. 

CHILDREN: 

H. EVERETT, born July 15, 1888. 
ALMAL., born Nov. 21, 1889. 
RUTH P., born Dec. 22, 1896. 
EDITH L., born May 5, 1899. 
CORRINNE, born Aug. 2, 1900. 

The dead are: 

H. STODDARD, aged 14 months. 
SUSIE MAY, aged 15 months. 

In earlier life Horace Everett Hopkins was connected with railroads. 
Later he became associated with newspaper work on Louisville daily 
papers, and as correspondent for those in other cities. He is now engaged 
in job printing in Jeffersonville, Ind. 



///. ELIZABETH HOPKINS, tenth child of Archibald 
Hopkins, and fourth child of Margaret Shanklin, was married 
in 1821 to William Kinkead, who died September 5, 1855. 

CHILDREN: 

ALEXANDER, born May 20, 1822; died Sept. 5, 1855. 

MARGARET ANN, born Apr. 23, 1824; died Nov. 4, 1899. 

NANCY JANE, born Aug. 17, 1827; died May 7, 1838. 

HARRIET AMANDA, born Sept. 19, 1829. 

ELIZABETH MARY, born May 15, 1831. 

WILLIAM GAY, born May 24, 1833; died July 4, 1883. 

LUELLA, born May 30, 1836. 

ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, born Apr. 16, 1838. 

JOHN POAGE, born Sept. 9, 1840. 

SARAH ELLEN, born Sept. 9, 1840; died July 24, 1874. 

IV. ALEXANDER KINKEAD, first child of Elizabeth 
Hopkins and William Kinkead, was married September 24, 
184.6, to Belle McClanahan, who was born at Ripley, Ohio, 
April 14., 1826. 

CHILDREN: 

DORA. 

MARGARET ANN. 
MARY ALICE. 

Home, Ripley, O.; business, agriculture. 

IV. ALEXANDER KINKEAD and his father, William Kinkead, 
died the same day, of cholera. They are buried in the same grave at Red 
Oak, O. 

Belle McClanahan Kinkead died August 22, 1895, and is buried at 
Monmouth, 111. 



178 



V. DORA KINKEAD, first child of Alexander Kinkead 
and Belle McClanahan, was married May 7, 1878, to A. B. 
Anderson. 

CHILDREN : 

HARRY, who is dead. 
MATTIE BELLE. 
GERTRUDE. 
KATHERINE. 

Home, Pawnee City, Neb.; business, physician. 



V. MARGARET ANN and V. MARY ALICE KIN- 
KEAD, second and third children of Alexander Kinkead 
and Belle McClanahan, are unmarried. 

Home, Monmouth, III. 



IV. MARGARET ANN KINKEAD, second child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and William Kinkead, was married Decem- 
ber 31, 184.6, to Adam Kelly, who was born September 17, 1818, 
and died April 21, 1876. 

CHILDREN : 

MARY ELIZABETH. 
SALLY GAY. 

IV. MARGARET ANN KINKEAD and Adam Kelly are both buried 
in the churchyard at Red Oak. The two daughters are unmarried, and 
make their home together in Ripley, O. 



IV. NANCY JANE KINKEAD, third child of Eliz- 
abeth Hopkins and William Kinkead, died at sixteen years 
of age, and is buried at Red Oak. 



179 



IV. HARRIET AMANDA KINKEAD, fourth child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and William Kinkead, was married Feb- 
ruary 17, 1850, to Ralph Voris Culter. 

CHILDREN: 

CHARLES ALEXANDER. 

SARAH ELIZABETH. 

MARGARET ANN. 

ELIZA JANE, born iS7; died Mar. 13, 1860. 

SAMUEL VORIS. 

THOMAS ELMER, born 1863; died June 16, 1891. 

LUELLA KINKEAD, born Dec. 23, 1866; died May 21, 1893. 

Home, Russelville, O.; business, agriculture. 

Ralph Voris Culter served in the "Hundred Days" service, Company 
B, i72d Regiment Ohio National Guards. He died August 20, 1901, 
and is buried at Red Oak, O. 

V. CHARLES ALEXANDER CULTER, first child of 
Harriet Amanda Kinkead and Ralph Voris Culter, was married 
October 29, 1874., to Molly R. Culter. 

Molly R. Culter-Culter died June 15, 1895. 

V. CHARLES ALEXANDER CULTER was married second, Decem- 
ber 23, 1896, to Clara A. Shotwell. 

CHILDREN : 

LAURA VORIS, born Feb. 5, 1899; died June 19, 1899. 

Home, 1539 Hapburg Street, East Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio; 
business, street car motorman. 

V. SARAH ELIZABETH CULTER, second child of 
Harriet Amanda Kinkead and Ralph Voris Culter. 
At home with her mother at Russelville, O. 



1 80 



V. MARGARET ANN CULTER third child of Harriet 
Amanda Kinkead and Ralph Voris Culter, was married Novem- 
ber 4, 1873, to M. P. Porter. 

CHILDREN : 

MINNIE MAUD. 
IDA MAY. 
MARY LIZZIE. 
HATTIE LEE. 
WILLIE GARFIELD. 
RALPH WYLIE. 
EDDIE BRYSON. 
PAUL McKiNLEY. 
TOMMY RAY. 
EDNA MARGARET. 

Home, Berkley, Va. ; business, clergyman. 

VI. MINNIE MAUD PORTER, first child of Margaret 
Ann Culter and M. P. Porter, was married February 5, 1896, 
to Tom Martin. 

Home, Ripley, O. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. IDA MA Y PORTER, second child of Margaret Ann 
Culter and M. P. Porter, was married October 19, 1899, to 
George F. Williamson. 

CHILDREN : 

HOY H. WILLIAMSON. 

Home, 120 Willoughby Avenue, East Norfolk, Va. ; business, railroad 
agent. 

VI. MARY LIZZIE PORTER, third child of Margaret 
Ann Culter and M. P. Porter. 

Is in her father's home at Berkley, Va. 

VI. HATTIE LEE PORTER, fourth child of Margaret 
Ann Culter and M. P. Porter, was married June 24, 1902, to 
Charles Hope. 

Home, Bliven, Berkley, Va. 

The rest of the children are in the home at Berkley, Va. 

181 



V. ELIZA JANE, the fourth, V. THOMAS ELMER, 
the sixth, and V. LUELLA KINKEAD CULTER, the sev- 
enth, children of Harriet Amanda Kinkead and Ralph Voris 
Culler, are dead, and buried at Red Oak, Ohio. 

V. SAMUEL VORIS CULTER, fifth child of Harriet 
Amanda Kinkead and Ralph Voris Culler, was married May 3, 
1883, to Abbie M. Mitchell. 

CHILDREN : 

EARL MITCHELL, born Dec. 17, 1886. 
CHARLES EDGAR, born Mar. i, 1890. 
Home, Georgetown, O. ; business, grocer. 



IV. ELIZABETH MARY KINKEAD, fifth child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and William Kinkead, not reported. 



IV. WILLIAM GAY KINKEAD, sixth child of Eliz- 
abeth Hopkins and William Kinkead, was married December 
6, 1861, to Amanda Tweed. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM QUINCY, born Mar. 7, 1863. 
SABINA ELMARY, born Apr. 27, 1864. 
ALBERT EMELIUS, born Nov. 13, 1865. 
JOHN TWEED, born May 25, 1868. 
EDWIN BELL, born Dec. 26, 1870. 
JENNIE HOPE, born Sept. 5, 1873. 

Home, Red Oak, O. ; business, agriculture. 

V. WILLIAM QUINCY KINKEAD, first child of Wil- 
liam Gay Kinkead and Amanda Tweed, was married March 
20, 1894., to Flora Stewart. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM ROBERT, born July 16, 1896. 
Home, Bloomenburg, O. ; business, banker. 

182 



V. SABINA ELAIARY KINKEAD, second child of 
William Gay Kinkead and Amanda Tweed. 
Is in the home at Red Oak, O. 

V. ALBERT EMELIUS KINKEAD, third child of 
William Gay Kinkead and Amanda Tweed, was married No- 
vember 17, 1898, to Wilhelmina Reith, who died March 7, 1900. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM SPARLING, born Feb. 21, 1900. 

V. JOHN TWEED KINKEAD, fourth child of William 
Gay Kinkead and Amanda Tweed, not reported. 



V. EDWIN BELL, fifth child, and V. JENNIE HOPE 
KINKEAD, the sixth child of William Gay Kinkead and 
Amanda Tweed. 

Are in the home at Red Oak, O. 



IV. LUELLA KINKEAD, seventh child of Elizabeth 
Hopkins and William Kinkead. She is unmarried. 
Has a home in Ripley, O. 



IV. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS KINKEAD, eighth child 
of Elizabeth Hopkins and William Kinkead, was married 
December 25, 1866, to Narcissa De Poy, who was born February 
n, 184.2. 

Home, Red Oak, O. ; business, agriculture. 



IV. JOHN POAGE KINKEAD, ninth child 0} Elizabeth 
Hopkins and William Kinkead, was married December 20, 
1869, to Joanna Carr, who was born September 10, 184.9. 

CHILDREN: 

HAMER CARR, born July 28, 1871. 

JOHN EVERET, born Feb. 21, 1878; died Sept. 29, 1878. 

NORA EDITH, born Oct. 20, 1880. 

Joanna Carr Kinkead died March 21, 1891, and is buried at Red Oak, O. 

V. JOHN POAGE KINKEAD was married a second time June 4, 
1896, to Lizzie Stephenson, who was born January 29, 1853. 

Home, Red Oak, O.; business, farmer. 



IV. SARAH ELLEN KINKEAD, tenth child oj Elizabeth 
Hopkins and William Kinkead, died at the home July 24., 1874.. 
She was unmarried. 



HI. ELIJAH HOPKINS, eleventh child of Archibald 
Hopkins and fifth child of Margaret Shanklin, died when 
seventeen years old at his father's house. He is buried in the 
old churchyard in Red Oak, Ohio. 

His was the first grave of the Hopkins family in the new home. 



184 




* 




III. JOHN HOPKINS. 

III. JAMKS HOPKINS. 

III. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS. 



///. JAMES HOPKINS, twelfth child of Archibald Hop- 
kins and Margaret Shanklin, was married by Rev. Alexander 
Rankin, October 3, /jj, to Nancy Ryan Clark, who was born 
June 18, 1815, and died November 14., 1896. 
CHILDREN : 

ELLEN CLARK, born Jan. 3, 1835. 

SARAH, born Aug. 7, 1837. 

VIRGINIA, born Apr. 2, 1840. 

JOHN CLARK, born Nov. 2, 1842. 

WILLIAM EDWARD, born Jan. 19, 1845. 
GEORGE IRWIN, born Aug. 29, 1847. 

ALEXANDER DUNLAP, born Sept. 3, 1851. 
MILTON EDWIN, born Jan. 28, 1857. 

Home, Higginsport, O.; business, farming. 

When James Hopkins was seventy years old he met with a serious acci- 
dent, which resulted in the loss of his left arm above the elbow. He died 
February 19, 1887. 

Nancy Ryan Clark Hopkins died November 14, 1896. Both are buried 
in the Clark Cemetery, Clairmont County, Ohio. 



IV. ELLEN CLARK HOPKINS, first child oj James 
Hopkins and Nancy Ryan Clark, was married April 3, 1862, 
to Joseph C. Wells, who was born March 9, 1819. 

CHILDREN: 

SALLIE, born Dec. 15, 1863. 

NANNIE MAY, born Sept. 14, 1865. 

DAUGHTER, born and died Jan. 9, 1868. 

JAMES, born June 19, 1869.; died Apr. 3, 1872. 

INEZ C., born Jan. 26, 1872. 

ANTOINETTE, born July 7, 1874; died Nov. 26, 1878. 

Home, Felicity, Clermont County, O.; business, agriculture. 
Joseph C. Wells is buried in the Clark Cemetery. 

185 



V. SALLIE WELLS, first child of Ellen Clark Hopkins 
and Joseph C. Wells, was married October 16, 1884., to Andrew 
Miller Early, who was born in Feesburg, Ohio, July 26, 1859. 

CHILDREN: 

LEWIS WELLS, born Nov. 3, 1885. 
VERN KEMPER, born Mar. 20, 1888. 
ROBERT LINN, born July 24, 1890. 

Home, Feesburg, Brown County, O.; business, agriculture. 

Andrew Miller Early is also a member of the commission firm of Dugan, 
Livingston & Co., 35 Walnut Street, Cincinnati, O. Sallie Wells Early 
studied at "The Western," Oxford, O., Class of 1881. 

V. NANNIE MAY WELLS, second child of Ellen Clark 
Hopkins and Joseph C. Wells, was married May 5, 1892, to 
Joseph W . Hayden, who was born March 21, 1851. 

CHILDREN : 

ANNETTA MAY, born Sept. 5, 1896. 
JOSEPH D WIGHT, born Mar. 3, 1899. 

V. NANNIE MAY WELLS studied at "The Western," Oxford, O., 
Class of 1884. J. W. Hayden is an elder in the Presbyterian church. 

Home, Felicity, Clermont County, O. ; business, shoe merchant. 

V. The third child (unnamed], V. JAMES, the fourth child, 
and V. ANTOINETTE, the sixth child of Ellen Clark Hop- 
kins and Joseph C. Wells, died when little children, and are 
buried ' 'in Clark Cemetery in sight of the old home; a beautiful 
place." 

V. INEZ C. WELLS, fifth child of Ellen Clark Hopkins 
and Joseph C. Wells. 

Studied at Oxford College, Oxford, O., 1889. She lives with her 
mother at Felicity, Clermont County, O. 



IV. SARAH HOPKINS, second child of James Hopkins 
and Nancy Ryan Clark, has been an invalid from childhood. 

Home, with her sisters in Augusta, Ky., and Felicity, O. 

1 86 



IV. VIRGINIA HOPKINS, third child 0} James Hopkins 
and Nancy Ryan Clark, was married October 3, 1871, to G. H. 
McKibben, who was born December 19, 184.1. 

CHILDREN: 

ALPHEUS, born July 15, 1872. 

NANNY CLARK, born Jan. 25, 1874. 

DOLLY HOUSTON, born Dec. 31,1875. 

HUGH LINN, born Aug. 9, 1877. 
ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, born July 29, 1879. 

JOSEPH PETTIT, born Sept. n, 1882. 

Home, Augusta, Ky.; business, Public Administrator and Guardian 
of Bracken County, Ky. 

V. ALPHEUS McKIBBEN, first child of Virginia Hop- 
kins and G. H. McKibben. 

Graduated from Central University, Richmond, Ky., Class of 1894, and 
from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., class of 1897. 

Home, 4729 Liberty Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa.; business, physician and 
surgeon. 

V. NANNY CLARK McKIBBEN, second child of Vir- 
ginia Hopkins and G. H. McKibben. 

Studied at Glendale College, Glendale, O. She is at home with her 
parents, Augusta, Ky. 

V. DOLLY HOUSTON McKIBBEN, third child of 
Virginia Hopkins and G. H. McKibben. 

Studied at Glendale College, Glendale, O., and at Neff College of 
Oratory, Philadelphia, Pa. She is at home with her parents, Augusta, Ky. 

V. HUGH LINN McKIBBEN, fourth child of Virginia 
Hopkins and G. H. McKibben. 

Studied civil engineering at Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind., Class 
of 1902. He is employed by the American Bridge Company, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Home, Aspinwall, Pa. 

V. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS McKIBBEN, fifth child of 
Virginia Hopkins and G. H. McKibben. 
Is a dental student at Pittsburg, Pa. 

187 



V. JOSEPH PETTIT McKIBBEN, sixth child of Vir- 
ginia Hopkins and G. H. McKibben. 

Is a student at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. 



IV. JOHN CLARK HOPKINS, jourth child of James 
Hopkins and Nancy Ryan Clark, is unmarried. 

Home, Hunnewell, Kan. ; business, merchant. 



IV. WILLIAM EDWARD HOPKINS, fifth child of 
James Hopkins and Nancy Ryan Clark, is unmarried. 

Home, Higginsport, O.; business, agriculture. 



IV. GEORGE IRWIN HOPKINS, sixth child of James 
Hopkins and Nancy Ryan Clark, was married November 25, 
1877, to Ella Frances Kay, who was born in 1845. 

CHILDREN: 

CARRIE Lou, born May 7, 1881. 

Ella Frances Kay Hopkins died January 19, 1886. 

IV. GEORGE IRWIN HOPKINS was married second, November 
9, 1893, to Minnie F. Bradford. 

Home, Georgetown, O. ; business, life insurance. 

V. CARRIE LOU HOPKINS, first child of George Irwin 
Hopkins and Ella Frances Kay, was married February 25, 1902, 
to Lewis Cochran. 

Home, Ripley, O. ; business, blacksmith. 



188 



IV. ALEXANDER DUN LAP HOPKINS, seventh child 
of James Hopkins and Nancy Ryan Clark, was married April 
8, 1879, to Ida May Foore, who was born 1853. 

CHILDREN: 

JAMES POWER, born Mar. n, 1880; died Mar. 2, 1884. 

Ida May Foore Hopkins died October 17, 1881. 

IV. ALEXANDER DUNLAP HOPKINS was married second, 
January 24, 1884, to Emma M. Norris, who was born May i, 1854. 

CHILDREN: 

JENNIE MARIE, born Mar. 24, 1885. 

ROBERT ALEXANDER, born Sept. 29, 1889. 
INEZ MARGARET, born Oct. 5, 1893. 
Home, Moscow, Clermont County, O.; business, farming. 



IV. MILTON EDWIN HOPKINS, eighth child of James 
Hopkins and Nancy Ryan Clark, was married October 4., 1882, 
to Henrietta Wise. 

CHILDREN: 

LIDA LEE, born Sept. 5, 1883. 

MILDRED EVANGELINE, born Nov. 15, 1887. 

ANNITA BELL, born Dec. 30, 1889. 

EDWIN WISE, born Mar. 2, 1891. 

STANLEY ARTHUR, born June 2,1901. 

Home, Higginsport, O.; business, agriculture. 



IV. HARRIET HOPKINS, thirteenth child of Archibald 
Hopkins and seventh child of Margaret Shanklin. 

Cared for her father and mother as long as they lived. She was remem- 
bered by her father in his will. She was a good horsewoman and rode on 
the Ohio hills wherever her father could go, and that was saying much. 
After both father and mother had passed on to the Eternal Home, she 

189 



married Noah Evans of Hillsboro, O., a ruling elder in the Presbyterian 
church at that place. He made her last years very happy ones. She is 
buried in the cemetery at Hillsboro. 



IV. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, fourteenth child of Archi- 
bald Hopkins and eighth child of Margaret Shanklin, was mar- 
ried at Ripley, Ohio, by Rev. Gilliland, March 29, 1837, to 
Rachel M. McLain, who was born July 14, 1817, and died 
October i, 1887. 

CHILDREN: 

AMANDA, born Sept. 14, 1838. 

BERNARD SCOTT, born May 3, 1841; died Feb. 18, 1842. 

HENRY M., born Aug. 21, 1845. 

MARY ALICE, born July 5, 1848; died Aug. 5, 1864. 

IV. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS and his wife, Rachel M. McLain, were 
born in Brown County, O. They went to Clark County, O., in 1856, 
where they stayed one year and then went to Kendall County, 111. 

Home, Oswego, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

Archibald Hopkins, and his wife, Rachel M. McLain Hopkins, are 
buried at Oswego, 111. 

V. AMANDA HOPKINS, first child of Archibald Hopkins 
and Rachel M. McLain, was married by Rev. L. M. Loss of 
the Au Sable Presbyterian Church, March 14, 1861, to Hamilton 
Cherry. 

CHILDREN: 

IDA, born Feb. 5, 1862. 

SARA, born Feb. 18, 1863; died Mar. 16, 1863. 

CHARLES, born May 13, 1865. 

ALICE, born June 3, 1869. 

SADIE, born Aug. 28, 1870. 

ROBERT, born Oct. 12, 1873; died Oct. 21, 1888. 

HAROLD, born May 22, 1881. 

Home, Naansay, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

V. AMANDA HOPKINS and Hamilton Cherry lived from March, 
1861, to November, 1878, on a farm in Naansay Township, then they 
went to Aurora, staying there eight years, when they returned to the farm 

190 



where they now live. Mrs. Cherry says, " I have an old arithmetic bearing 
the date 1804, which was used by my father, Archibald Hopkins, and his 
brothers, John, William, and Thomas Hopkins. Their names are all 
written in the book." 

VI. IDA CHERRY, first child oj Amanda Hopkins and 
Hamilton Cherry, was married November 16, 1892, to Jay 
G. Updike. 

CHILDREN: 

UNA, born Aug. 31, 1893; died Sept. 13, 1894. 

MARSHALL, born Jan. 21, 1895. 
MILDRED, born June 17, 1896. 
MARION, born July 14, 1898. 
LESTER, born Jan. 15, 1902. 

Home, Naansay, Kendall County, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. SARA CHERRY, second child of Amanda Hopkins 
and Hamilton Cherry, died a baby, and is buried in the Au 
Sable, III., Cemetery. 

VI. CHARLES CHERRY, third child of Amanda Hopkins 
and Hamilton Cherry, is unmarried. 

He has been a member of the Illinois State Legislature for several years. 
Home, Naansay, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. ALICE CHERRY, jourth child of Amanda Hopkins 
and Hamilton Cherry, was married December 6, 1893, to Truman 
W. Thompson. 

CHILDREN: 

MABELLE, born May n, 1895. 
ROBERT, born Aug. 21, 1899. 

Home, Naansay, Kendall County, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. SADIE CHERRY, fifth child of Amanda Hopkins 
and Hamilton Cherry, was married September 29, 1903, to 
Alanson K. Wheeler. 

Home, Naansay, Kendall County, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. ROBERT CHERRY, sixth child of Amanda Hopkins 
and Hamilton Cherry, died at fifteen years of age, and is buried 

in the Au Sable Cemetery. 

191 



VI. HAROLD CHERRY, seventh child of Amanda Hop- 
kins and Hamilton Cherry, is unmarried. 
Home, Naansay, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

V. BERNARD SCOTT HOPKINS, second child of 
Archibald Hopkins and Rachel M. McLain, died a child less 
than a year old, and is buried in the Churchyard at Red 
Oak, Ohio. 

V. HENRY M. HOPKINS, third child of Archibald 
Hopkins and Rachel M. McLain, was married October 12, 1876, 
to Josephine Small, who was born September 17, 184.8, at 
Aurora, III. 

CHILDREN : 

MARY ALICE, born June 15, 1878. 

JAMES ARCHIBALD, born Aug. 6, 1880. 

Home, Yorkville, 111. ; business, agriculture. 

V. MARY ALICE HOPKINS, fourth child of Archibald 
Hopkins and Rachel M. McLain, died at sixteen, and is buried 
at Oswego, III. 



192 



///. EDWIN HOPKINS, fifteenth child of Archibald Hop- 
kins and ninth child of Margaret Shanklin, was married Decem- 
ber 30, 1835, to Kesiah Shepherd, who was born March 5, 1812. 

CHILDREN : 

ALONZO ALBERT, born Nov. 17, 1837. 

MELINDA SHEPHERD, born June 2, 1841; died Feb. 16, 1886. 

LUTHER SHANKLIN, born July 4, 1844; died Oct. 21, 1885. 

Home, Ripley, O., where their children were born. 

III. EDWIN HOPKINS died at Ripley, O., and is buried in the 
churchyard at Red Oak. Kesiah Shepherd Hopkins died at Washington, 
D. C., September 3, 1873, and is buried in the Congressional Cemetery. 

IV. ALONZO ALBERT HOPKINS, first child of Edwin 
Hopkins and Kesiah Shepherd, was married November 29, 
1865, to Martha Ann Ray, who was born January 23, 1841, at 
Newark, Ohio. 

CHILDREN : 

LUTHER SHANKLIN, born Jan. 28, 1867; died Feb. 18, 1877. 

ALBERTA RAY, born Oct. 8, 1868; died Mar. 24, 1870. 

NORMAN THOMPSON, born Jan. 24, 1870; died Dec. 18, 1875. 

ALLEN LOWRIE, born June 3,1871. 

JENNIE, born Jan. 30, 1873; died Aug. 20, 1874. 

GRACE SHEPHERD, born Nov. 4, 1874; died Feb. 26, 1877. 

ANTOINETTE, born May 16, 1876. 

ANN ELIZABETH, born Aug. 9, 1878. 

CHAUNCEY RAY, born Nov. 6, 1879. 

NELSON KINGSLEY, born Feb. 21, 1882. 

The first child was born at Rockford, 111., the next three at Culpepper, 
Va., the fifth, sixth, and seventh at Washington, D. C., and the last three 
at Georgetown, Mo. 

Martha Ann Ray Hopkins died at Rockford, 111., October 14, 1890, 
and is buried there. 

IV. ALONZO ALBERT HOPKINS enlisted in Company B, i 4 6th 
Illinois Infantry at Rockford, 111., August 29, 1864, and was discharged at 
Springfield, 111., July 8, 1865. 

Home, Rockford, 111. ; business, retired. 



V. LUTHER SHANKLIN, the first, ALBERTA RAY, 
the second, and NORMAN THOMPSON HOPKINS, the 

third, children of Albert Alonzo Hopkins and, Martha Ann Ray, 
died in infancy. 

V. ALLEN LOWRIE HOPKINS, fourth child of Alonzo 
Albert Hopkins and Martha Ann Ray. 
Is a broker, 203 W. State Street, Rockford, 111. 

V. JENNIE, the fifth, and GRACE SHEPHERD HOP- 
KINS, the sixth, children of Alonzo Albert Hopkins and Martha 
Ann Ray, died when little children. 

V. ANTOINETTE HOPKINS, seventh child of Alonzo 
Albert Hopkins and Martha Ann Ray. 
Is her father's homekeeper. Rockford, 111. 

V. ANN ELIZABETH HOPKINS, eighth child of 
Alonzo Albert Hopkins and Martha Ann Ray. 
Is a teacher, Rockford, 111. 

V. CHA UNCEY RA Y HOPKINS, ninth child of Alonzo 
Albert Hopkins and Martha Ann Ray. 

Is a clerk of the Illinois Central Railroad at Rockford, 111. 

V. NELSON KINGSLEY HOPKINS, tenth child of 
Alonzo Albert Hopkins and Martha Ann Ray. 

Is a bookkeeper in the People's Bank and Trust Company, Rockford, 
111. 



194 



IV. MELINDA SHEPHERD HOPKINS, second child 
oj Edwin Hopkins and Kesiah Shepherd, was married December 
14, 1868, to Chauncey T. Ray, who was born January i, 184.2. 

CHILDREN : 

AGNES LOUISE, born Feb. 10, 1870. 

CHARLES KINGSLEY, born Nov. 28, 1871. 

HOBART BLAKEMAN, born Apr. 17, 1874; died Mar. 8, 1877. 

CHAUNCEY SHEPHERD, born Nov. 7, 1875; died June 7, 1876. 

WARREN HOPKINS, born May 5, 1877. 

WALTER NEIL, born Sept. 6, 1879. 

CHAUNCEY SHERMAN, born Jan. 13, 1883. 

The first two children were born at Culpepper, Va., the others at Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Home, Rockford, 111. 

Chauncey T. Ray enlisted in the Seventy-fourth Regiment Infantry 
Volunteers of Illinois at Rockford, 111., August 9, 1862, was in seventeen 
engagements, and was mustered out at Nashville, Tenn., January 10, 1875. 

IV. MELINDA SHEPHERD HOPKINS died February 16, 1886, 
and is buried at Rockford, 111. 

V. AGNES LOUISE RA Y, first child oj Melinda Shepherd 
Hopkins and Chauncey T. Ray. 

Is a trained nurse. Home, Chicago, 111. 

V. CHARLES KINGSLEY RA Y, second child of Melinda 
Shepherd Hopkins and Chauncey T. Ray, is unmarried. 
Home, Pittsburg, Pa. ; business, broker. 

V. HOBART BLAKEMAN RA Y and V. CHAUNCEY 
SHEPHERD RA Y, the third and fourth children of Melinda 
Shepherd Hopkins and Chauncey T. Ray, died when little 
children. 

195 



V. WARREN HOPKINS RAY, fifth child of Melinda 
Shepherd Hopkins and Chauncey T. Ray, served in the Spanish- 
American War. He enlisted in Colonel Bryan's regiment at 
Omaha, Neb., July 10, 1896, and was discharged at Augusta, 
Ga., May n, 1899. 

Home, Rockford, 111. ; business, assistant in the Rockford City Hospital. 

V. WALTER NEIL RAY, sixth child of Melinda 
Shepherd Hopkins and Chauncey T. Ray, is unmarried. 
Home, Mason City, la. ; business, agriculture. 

V. CHAUNCEY SHERMAN RAY, seventh child of 
Melinda Shepherd Hopkins and Chauncey T. Ray. 
Is a clerk. Home, Rockford, 111. 



IV. LUTHER SHANKLIN HOPKINS, third child of 
Edwin Hopkins and Kesiah Shepherd. 

Enlisted in the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry, Company I, at Rockford, 111., 
February 8, 1865, and was discharged at Memphis, Tenn., September 30, 
1865. He died October 21, 1865, and is buried at Rockford, 111. 



196 




III. GRACY ANN HOPKINS DUNLAP. 



///. GRACY ANN HOPKINS, sixteenth child of Archi- 
bald Hopkins and tenth child of Margaret Shanklin, was mar- 
ried September 5, 1833, to William Dunlap, who was born 
June 20, 1812, and died September i, 1888. 

CHILDREN: 

LEONADAS MILTON, born Aug. 13, 1834; died Oct. 24, 1853. 

BENJAMIN HOPKINS, born Feb. 16, 1837. 

WILLIAM HENRY, born Aug. 16, 1839. 

MARGARET AMANDA, born Jan. 3, 1842. 

MARY ELIZABETH, born Mar. 17, 1844. 

HARRIET SHEPHERD, born Sept. 4, 1847. 

JAMES ALEXANDER, born July 6, 1850. 

Home. 

III. GRACY ANN HOPKINS was always spoken of by those who 
knew her with enthusiasm. She was a fine-looking woman with captivating 
manners and a lovely character. Mrs. Bland Bennett, her granddaughter, 
says, " I wish I could give you a pen picture of her as I remember her, that 
would reveal her grace and stateliness. She was very beautiful, with 
golden hair and blue eyes, tall and slender. She was always busy and 
was exquisitely neat. I have heard my mother say she had a very sweet 
voice although I never heard her sing." She was fond of company and 
thought much of her relatives. 

IV. LEONADAS MILTON DUNLAP, first child of 
Gracy Ann Hopkins and William Dunlap, died at nineteen 
years of age, and is buried at Red Oak, Brown County, Ohio. 



197 



IV. BENJAMIN HOPKINS DUNLAP, second child 
of Gracy Ann Hopkins and William Dunlap, was married 
November 25, /#57, to Nancy A. Dickens, who was born April 

21, 1836. 

CHILDREN : 

FRANK, born July 4, 1859; died Nov. i, 1869. 

GRACE E., born Sept. 25, 1860. 

WILLIAM WALTER, born July 16, 1865. 
HARRY MAYO, born Dec. 12, 1870. 

IV. BENJAMIN HOPKINS DUNLAP has been quite a rover, 
visiting many places. He spent one year in Old Mexico. In 1857 he 
was on the frontier of Kansas engaged in freighting to the mountains. In 
1864 he had charge of a thousand head of cattle taking them to New Mexico. 
At Big Bend, Kan., he and his party were attacked by about 400 Indians. 
After a hot fight, the Indians were driven off, but not before six of his 
men had been wounded and he himself had received an ounce ball in his 
leg, breaking the bone below the knee. He was obliged to ride 300 miles 
in a stage coach before receiving surgical aid. The surgeons then wished 
to amputate his leg, but he objected, and the fact that he has a well, strong 
limb now proves that he was right. To-day he is a robust man of sixty- 
three years living among the mountains. 

Home, Caddo, I. T. 

V. FRANK DUNLAP, first child of Benjamin Hopkins 
Dunlap and Nancy A . Dickens, died at ten years of age, and is 
buried at Leavenworth, Kan. 



198 



V. GRACE ELIZABETH DUNLAP, second child of 
Benjamin Hopkins Dunlap and Nancy A. Dickens, was 
married October 7, 1884, to Bland Bennett, who was born at 
Fair field, Ky., March 23, 1852. 

CHILDREN: 

EDWARD DUNLAP, born July 20, 1885. 

GRACE BLAND, born June 13, 1888; died Jan. 7, 1890. 

MILDRED, born Nov. 30, 1890. 

KENNETH RAE, born Mar. 10, 1895. 

MARY GRACE, born Dec. 5, 1899. 

Home, Whitsboro, Tex. ; business, cotton, grain, and banking. 

V. GRACE ELIZABETH DUNLAP was educated in the public 
schools of Leavenworth, Kan., and had a year in a private school in Texas. 
Bland Bennett attended school at the old Gethsemane College, near Bards- 
town, Ky. 

VI. EDWARD DUNLAP BENNETT, first child of 
Grace E. Dunlap and Bland Bennett. 

Is a cadet at Wentworth Military Academy, Lexington, Mo. The other 
children are in the home. 

V. WILLIAM WALTER DUNLAP, third child of Ben- 
jamin Hopkins Dunlap and Nancy A. Dickens, was married 
in 1898 to Cora Lee Garrett. 

Home, La Jara, Colo. ; business, mining and ranching. 

V. HARRY MAYO DUNLAP, fourth child of Benja- 
min Hopkins Dunlap and Nancy A. Dickens, was married 
February, 1892, to Maud Edwards, who was born April, 1871. 

CHILDREN: 

GRACE ELIZABETH. 
B. BENNETT. 

Maud Edwards Dunlap died December, 1898. 

VI. HARRY MAYO DUNLAP was married second, July 23, 1902, 
to Annie Edwards, a sister of his first wife. 

Home, Caddo, I. T. ; business, banker. 

199 



IV. WILLIAM HENRY DUNLAP, third child of Gracy 
Ann Hopkins and William Dunlap, was married April 5, 1871, 
to Rachel King Larimer, who was born April 14., 184.7, an ^ 
died May 25, igoo. 

CHILDREN: 

NANCY LARIMER, born Jan. 26, 1873. 
GRACE ANN, born Jan. 6, 1875. 
BESSIE KING, born Nov. 24, 1878. 

Home, 1329 Central Street, Kansas City, Mo.; business, rental agent. 



IV. MARGARET AMANDA DUNLAP, fourth child of 
Gracy Ann Hopkins and William Dunlap, was married June 
25, 1862, to Erastus McCrillus, who was born September 10, 
1828. 

CHILDREN: 

EDWIN B., born Mar. 4, 1863; died Aug. 28, 1864. 

WILLIAM DUNLAP, born Oct. i, 1864. 

FRED B., born Nov. 8, 1866. 

CHARLES CLEVELAND, born May 21, 1869. 

Home, 925 S. Broadway, Leavenworth, Kan.; business, general collect- 
ing agency. 

V. EDWIN B. McCRILLUS, first child of Margaret 
Amanda Dunlap and Erastus McCrillus, died a baby, and is 
buried at Mi. Muncie Cemetery, Kan. 

V. WILLIAM DUNLAP McCRILLUS, second child of 
Margaret Amanda Dunlap and Erastus McCrillus. 
Is a druggist in Chicago, 924 E. sist Street. 

V. FRED. B. McCRILLUS, third child of Margaret 
Amanda Dunlap and Erastus McCrillus. 

Is a shipping clerk for the Abernathy Manufacturing Company, Leaven- 
worth, Kan. 

200 



V. CHARLES CLEVELAND McCRILLUS, fourth 
child of Margaret Amanda Dunlap and Erastus McCrillus. 

Is a traveling salesman for W. H. Hasbrouck & Co., New York, with 
his headquarters in Chicago. 

IV. MARY ELIZABETH DUNLAP, fifth child of Gracy 
Ann Hopkins and William- Dunlap, was married November 
4, 1869, t Edwin King Larimer, who was born September 19, 

1843- 
CHILDREN : 

EDWIN JONES, born Oct. 4, 1870. 

WILLIAM DUNLAP, born Dec. 12, 1871; died Sept. 2, 1873. 

JOSEPH ALEXANDER, born Sept. 13, 1873. 

MARY DUNLAP, born July 18, 1876. 

Home, 1400 Second Avenue, Cedar Rapids, la.; business, wholesale 
and retail hardware. 

F. EDWIN JONES LARIMER, first child of Mary Eliza- 
beth Dunlap and Edwin King Larimer, is unmarried. 

Home, Cedar Rapids, la.; business, associated with his father, E. K. 
Larimer in hardware business. 

F. WILLIAM DUNLAP LARIMER, second child oj Mary 
Elizabeth Dunlap and Edwin King Larimer, died a baby, two 
years old, and is buried at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

V. JOSEPH ALEXANDER LARIMER, third child of 
Mary Elizabeth Dunlap and Edwin King Larimer, is not 
married. 

Home, Cedar Rapids, la.; business, associated with his father, E. K. 
Larimer, in hardware business. 

F. MARY DUNLAP LARIMER, fourth child of Mary 
Elizabeth Dunlap and Edwin King Larimer, was married June 
12, icjoi, to William Loud Phipps, who was born in Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, August 3, i8j$. 

Home, 114 S. i3th Street, Cedar Rapids, la.; business, assistant store- 
keeper, C. R. I. & P. Ry. at Cedar Rapids. 



201 



IV. HARRIET SHEPHERD DUNLAP, sixth child of 
Gracy Ann Hopkins and William Dunlap, was married May 
28, 1879, to Alfred Lorett Stevens, who was born July 5, 184.1, 
and died March n, 1885. 

IV. MRS. HARRIET SHEPHERD DUNLAP is at Cedar Rapids, la. 



IV. JAMES ALEXANDER DUNLAP, seventh child of 
Gracy Ann Hopkins and William Dunlap, was married Sep- 
tember 13, /#77, to Elizabeth Winter, who was born March 17, 
1856. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM HENRY, born Sept. u, 1878. 

Home, Anaconda, Mont. ; business, purchasing agent of the Anaconda 
Copper Mining Company. 

V. WILLIAM HENRY DUNLAP, child of James Alex- 
ander Dunlap and Elizabeth Winter, is unmarried. 

He was a student at Armour Institute, Chicago, for three years. He 
now resides at Anaconda, Mont., and is connected with the drafting depart- 
ment of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company. 



202 



Bishop Wharburton once said that "high birth was a thing which he 
never knew any one disparage except those who had it not;, and he never 
knew any one make a boast of it who had anything else." 



203 



Letter from Benjamin Henton to Robert Pogue, Mason Co., Ky. Owned 
by John T. Shanklin, Johnson's Junction, Ky. 

AUGUSTA COUNTY May igih 1798. 
Dr Brother 

Last monday Evening I Received your letter dated the 25th of March 
and am now on my return from the pastures. I was at Dunlap's who owns 
the land on the Sioto. I did not find him at home but was Informed by 
his Brother that he would not Sell it and likewise that William Poage had 
been with him last week on the Same business. As I found the man had 
no Intention to Sell the Land I did not think it worth while to Wait for his 
Return home. 

Trade is very dull in this Contrey and money hard to Raise but if you 
Should make any purchas and want money I will try to make up one 
hundred pounds. I expect you to write to me as Soon as any purchase is 
made, first opportunity that you have. I have nothing meterial to write. 
We are Mutch as usual in helth so no more But wish to be Remembered 
to all Inquiring friends and Remains your most Effectionate bro. 

BENJAMIN HENTON. 
Addressed to Mr. Robert Poage 
Mason County 

Kentucky 
Sent by Mr. Kennady. 



205 



//. SARAH HOPKINS, child of John Hopkins and 
Jean Gordon, was married about 1782 to Benjamin Henton. 

CHILDREN: 

JOHN, born July 4, 1784. 

DAVID, born Sept. 5, 1786. 

JANE, born Oct. 23, 1788. 

SILAS, born Sept. 16, 1792; died Apr. 21, 1852. 

ELIZABETH, born Mar. 3, 1794. 

ESTHER, born June 17, 1796. 

HANNAH MARY, born Oct. 3, 1798. 

SARAH, born Sept. 20, 1800. 

Home, Rockingham County, Va., business, agriculture. 

Benjamin Henton lived in Rockingham County and moved to Augusta 
County not far from the dividing line between the two counties. 

II. SARAH HOPKINS is said to have been married twice, the second 
time to Robert Crawford. 

///. JOHN HENTON, first child oj Sarah Hopkins and 
Benjamin Henton, was twice married and had several children, 
one of whom was V. SARAH. 

Home, Ross County, O. 

IV. SARAH HENTON, child oj John Henton, was mar- 
ried to George Nicholas. 

CHILDREN : 
MARY. 
AMANDA. 
RUSH. 

Home, Cross Keys, Va. (Postoffice). 



207 



///. DAVID HENTON, second child 0} Sarah Hopkins 
and Benjamin Henton, was married in 1824. to Elizabeth 
Myers, who was born in 1800. 

CHILDREN : 

BENJAMIN F., born Aug. 20, 1826; died May 14, 1859. 

DAVID, born Mar. 9, 1828; died Jan. 9, 1850. 

SARAH JANE, born Oct. 26, 1829. 

MARY CATHERINE, born Aug. 25, 1831. 

ELIZABETH, born May i, 1834. 

JOHN, born Mar. 2, 1836; died Nov. 23, 1850. 

REBEKAH, born Dec. 16, 1838. 

Home, Waverly, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 

III. COL. DAVID HENTON was reared and educated in Rock- 
ingham, Va. He served in the War of 1812 in Capt. Tommy Hopkins's 
company (Hopkins was his uncle). David Henton was also colonel of 
state militia. 

He was in the mercantile business in Harrisonburg, Va., for a while, 
then moved to his farm, where he remained until he removed in 1839 to a 
place in the vicinity of Waverly, Lafayette County, Mo., "where for many 
years he was an important factor in the upbuilding and local advancement 
of this progressive city and its immediate neighborhood. He was a man 
of superior business ability, energetic in all the duties of life, temperate in 
his habits, and withal possessed of excellent judgment and honesty of pur- 
pose. A citizen of rare integrity of character, liberal and public spirited, 
he commanded the respect and confidence of all who knew him, and when 
he passed away, September 9, 1870, his death was mourned as a public 
loss. He was a loving husband and father, a kind friend and neighbor, 
and one of the tried and true pioneers of the early days, whose memory 
will be enshrined in the hearts of coming generations." (Quoted from a 
biographical sketch.) 

Elizabeth Myers Henton was born, grew up, and was educated in 
Virginia. The Myers family was of German descent. The Grandmother 
Myers's maiden name was Barbara Hart, and her parents came from Switz- 
erland. Elizabeth Myers Henton with the seven children accompanied her 
husband to the new western home where she will be remembered by all 
who knew her as a woman of genuine worth and refinement as well as a 
devoted wife and loving mother. 



208 



IV. BENJAMIN F. HENTON, first child of David and 
Elizabeth Myers Henton. 

Was a highly honorable, moral, and promising young man. He died 
at thirty-three years of age, and is buried in the Mt. Hope Cemetery near 
Waverly. 

IV. DAVID HENTON, second child of David and Eliza- 
beth Myers Henton. 

Was full of energy and enterprise. At twenty years of age, he with 
hundreds of others set out for the gold-fields in California. He succeeded 
well while there and started for home, but died at St. Louis, Mo., on his 
way. 

IV. SARAH HENTON, third child of David Henton and 
Elizabeth Myers, was married to B. F. Gordon. 

CHILDREN : 

Lu ELLA. 
HENTON. 

Home, Waverly, Mo. 

B. F. Gordon when quite young served in the Mexican War in Capt. 
Walton's company, Col. Doniphan's regiment of Missouri Cavalry. At 
the close of the war, he engaged in the mercantile and drug business. At 
this time he was married to Sarah Henton. When the Civil War began, 
he enlisted and served as colonel till about its close, when he was promoted 
to the rank of general, but it proved too late for any service in that capacity. 
He was a noble, brave soldier. The privations of army life left his health 
weakened and he lived but a short time after his return to Waverly. 

IV. SARAH HENTON GORDON married second, I. F. Scurlock, 
a clergyman in the M. E. Church from Atlanta, Ga. He died in 1901. 
Mrs. Sarah Henton Gordon Scurlock lives in Kansas City, Kan., with her 
son, Henton Gordon, and two grandsons, Gordon and Frank Harris. 



209 



V. LU ELLA GORDON, first child of Sarah Henton and 
B. F. Gordon, was married to Parker Harris, who was born 
in Livingston, Alabama. 
CHILDREN: 

GORDON. 

FRANK. 

V. LU ELLA GORDON was married second to John Norville. 

V. HENTON GORDON, second child of Sarah Henton 
and B. F. Gordon, was married to Mrs. George, of Hot Springs, 
Arkansas. 

Home, Kansas City, Kan.; business, law. 

V. HENTON GORDON was a prominent lawyer of Kansas City, 
but on account of failing health retired from practice several years ago. He 
is a graduate of the Washington and Lee Universities, and took a thorough 
law course there. Mrs. George Gordon died in 1900, after a lingering 
illness. Mrs. Scurlock makes a home for her son, Henton Gordon, in 
Kansas City, Kan. 

IV. CATHERINE HENTON, fourth child of David 
Henton and Elizabeth Myers, was married March 6, 1855, to 
I. F. Yancy. 

CHILDREN : 
EOLA. 
PAULW. 

LAYTON. 

DAVID. 

Home, Waverly, Mo. ; business, physician. 

I. F. Yancy was a skillful physician in Waverly, Mo., and a man of 
unusually gentlemanly bearing. When the Civil War began, he was one 
of the first to enlist and served in the capacity of surgeon. At the close of 
the war he returned to Waverly and resumed his medical practice. 

IV. CATHERINE HENTON YANCY is a very energetic, ambitious 
woman. When her daughter needed better opportunities for education 
than the schools of Waverly afforded, she moved to Lexington, where the 
daughter completed her education at Central Female College. Then Mrs. 
Yancy took her three sons to Fayette, Mo., where they had the advantages 
offered by Central Male College. When they were through, she returned 
to her home in Waverly and went with her sons on her large farm about 
five miles from the town. Here she now lives with her youngest son, David. 

210 



V. EOLA H. YANCY, first child of Catherine Henton 
and I. F. Yancy, was married to John Gont. 

CHILDREN : 

KATHERIN. 

SPENCER. 

RALPH. 

HARRY. r 

Home, Waverly, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 

V. PAUL W. YANCY, second child of Catherine Henton 
and I. F. Yancy, was married December 7, 1891, to Jean 
Bagly, of Bagly, Vermont. 

Home, Waverly, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 

V. LAYTON YANCY, third child of Catherine Henton 
and I. F. Yancy. 
Is in California. 

V. DAVID YANCY, fourth child of Catherine Henton 
and I. F. Yancy. 

Is on the home farm, Waverly, Mo. 



IV. ELIZABETH HENTON, fifth child of David F. 
Henton and Elizabeth Myers, was married June 18, 1856, to 
Spencer W. Brown, who was born in 1824.. 

CHILDREN: 

MARY ELIZABETH (MINNIE). 
SPENCER LEE. 
BENJAMIN HENTON. 
WILLIAM POLMORE. 

Home, Waverly, Mo. ; business, physician. 



211 



Spencer W. Brown was born in Rockingham County, Va., and was 
seven years old when his parents moved to Salina County, Mo. He entered 
the Medical College at Louisville, Ky., at the age of twenty-two. Here he 
remained one year and then attended the Jefferson Medical College of 
Philadelphia, Pa., where he graduated in 1850. He located at Waverly, 
Mo., where he began his medical practice. In 1854 he took a post-graduate 
course at St. Louis. He enlisted at the opening of the Civil War and was 
appointed surgeon of the First Regiment of the Trans-Mississippi Division 
of the Confederate States Army in which he served till the close of the war. 
He then returned to Waverly and continued to practice medicine till 1871 
when, on account of failing health, he retired. He with his family removed 
to their farm near Waverly where they now reside. 

V. MARY ELIZABETH BROWN, first child of Eliza- 
beth Henton and Spencer W. Brown, was married September 
/5, 1886, to Samuel M. Dyer, of Goodnight, Texas. 

CHILDREN : 

ELIZABETH. 
SAMUEL. 

Home, Goodnight, Tex. ; business, cattle raising. 

Samuel M. Dyer owned a cattle ranch and was quite successful in his 
business. He made frequent shipments of cattle to Kansas City. His 
last trip was made during intensely cold and disagreeable weather. He 
took a heavy cold and died of pneumonia in Kansas City. 

V. MRS. MARY ELIZABETH DYER is a brave, energetic 
woman, and is quite successfully going on with her husband's business. 

V. SPENCER LEE BROWN, second child of Elizabeth 
Henton and Spencer W. Brown, was married to Yula Platten- 
burg, of Dover, Missouri. 

CHILDREN : 

BENJAMIN HENTON. 
GEORGE PLATTENBURG. 

Home, Waverly, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 

V. BENJAMIN HENTON BROWN, third child of 
Elizabeth Henton and Spencer W. Brown. 
Is in the Chicago University. 

212 



V. WILLIAM POLMORE BROWN, fourth child of 
Elizabeth Henton and Spencer W. Brown. 

Is attending to his agricultural interests at Waverly, Mo. 



IV. JOHN HENTON, sixth child oj David Henton and 
Elizabeth Myers, died when only fourteen years old. 

He had already manifested noble characteristics and proved himself 
a worthy member of a worthy race. He is buried at Waverly, Mo. 



IV. REBECCA HENTON, seventh child of David Henton 
and Elizabeth Myers, was married in 1860 to John E. Corder, 
who was born August 21, 1836. 

CHILDREN: 

KATE, born Feb. 19, 1862. 

LESLIE WALKER, born Apr. 20, 1867. 
FRANK GORDON, born June 3, 1872. 

Home, near Waverly, Mo.; business, retired merchant and banker. 

John E. Corder is a Virginian, born in Rappahanock County. He is 
one of the Sons of the Revolution, his grandfather having served in that 
war. He came to Missouri in 1856 and located in Waverly. When the 
Civil War began, he enlisted in Shelby's Command, Confederate Army, 
and served three years. After the war, he returned to Waverly and engaged 
in mercantile and banking business. He has now retired to a large stock 
farm which he owns in Saline County, having made a success of all the 
enterprises of his life. 

V. KATIE CORDER, first child of Rebecca Henton and 
John E. Corder, was married to J. H . Crosswhite, who was 
born February 17, 1858. 

CHILDREN : 

JOHN E., born April 10, 1892. 

REBECCA HENTON, born July 3, 1894. 

Home, Waverly, Mo. ; business, physician. 



213 



V. LESLIE WALKER CORDER, second child of Re- 
becca Henton and John E. Corder, was married July 15, 1897, 
to Nellie Perry Buck, who was born December i, 1874.. 

CHILDREN: 

LEON WESLEY, born Feb. 2, 1900. 
DOROTHY HENTON, born Dec. 10, 1912. 

Home, near Waverly, Mo. ; business, farming and stock raising. 

V. FRANK GORDON CORDER, third child oj Rebecca 
Henton and John E. Corder, was married to Nellie McGoffee. 
Home, near Waverly, Mo. ; business, farming and stock raising. 



///. JANE HENTON, third child of Sarah Hopkins and 
Benjamin Henton , was married to Jessie Ralston. 

CHILDREN: 
HOLMS. 



214 



///. SILAS HENTON, fourth child of Sarah Hopkins 
and Benjamin Henton, was married October 24, 1824, to Susan 
H. Guiwn, who was born February 23, 1806, and died Febru- 
ary 77, 1853. 
CHILDREN : 

SARAH M., born Sept. 18, 1825; died Dec. 26, 1850. 

RACHEL A., born Feb. 17, 1827; died Dec. 10, 1862. 

SUSAN J., born Oct. i, 1828; died Mar. 4, 1849. 

D. BENJAMIN, born Nov. 23, 1830; died Apr. 25, 1902. 

WILLIAM S., born Nov. 26, 1832; died May 26, 1856. 

ROBERT A., born Dec. 24, 1834; died Mar. 22, 1894. 

HANNAH F., born June 16, 1837; died June 2, 1853. 

ELIZABETH V., born Sept. 26, 1841; died Feb. 9, 1866. 

IV. SILAS HENTON, his wife and seven children are all buried at 
Augusta Stone Church Cemetery. 

IV. SARAH M. HENTON, first child of Silas Henton 
and Susan H. Guiwn, died at twenty-five years of age. 

IV. RACHEL A. HENTON, second child of Silas Henton 
and Susan H. Guiwn, was married to Dr. Remer. 
CHILDREN : 

Two DAUGHTERS, both of whom are dead. 



IV. SUSAN J. HENTON, third child of Silas Henton 
and Susan H. Guiwn, died when twenty-one years of age. 



215 



IV. D. BENJAMIN HENTON, fourth child of Silas 
Henton and Susan H. Guiwn, was married in January, 1860, 
to Elizabeth Lewis Wilson (only daughter of the late Thos. P. 
Wilson and granddaughter of Rev. Dr. William Wilson, second 
pastor of the old Augusta Stone Church). 

CHILDREN : 

HANNAH, WINTERS, and THOMAS, who died in infancy. 
ELIZABETH, born June 28, 1866. 

Elizabeth Lewis Wilson Henton died in the early '7o's. 

IV. D. BENJAMIN HENTON married second Margaret 
(Peggy} McClung, daughter of the late Chas. McClung. She 
lived only a jew years. 

There are no surviving children, the two sons both being dead. 

Home, Ft. Defiance, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

IV. D. BENJAMIN HENTON was born and reared at Mt. Meriden, 
Va., and with the exception of a year or two of early manhood spent in the 
Far West and Mexico and a short time in Albemarle County, had lived all 
his life in Augusta County, Va. His mother was a member of the well- 
known Walker family of Augusta County, and through her he had an 
extensive connection. He was a confederate veteran and served in McCaus- 
land's brigade during the last two years of the war. 

V. ELIZABETH HENTON, child of D. Benjamin 
Henton and Elizabeth Wilson, was married December 8, 1886, 
to William McCue, who was born May 9, 184.9. 

CHILDREN : 

MABEL, born 1889. 

HELEN, born 1893. 

BESSIE, born 1895. 

Home, Ft. Defiance, Augusta County, Va.; business, agriculture. 



IV. WILLIAM S. HENTON, fifth child of Silas Henton 
and Susan H. Guiwn, died at twenty- four years of age. 

216 



IV. ROBERT A. HENTON, sixth child of Silas Henton 
and Susan H. Guiwn, was married July 25, 1860, to Hannah 
M. McCulloch, at the residence of the bride's uncle, William 
G. Miller, Mt. Vernon Forge, Rockingham County, Virginia. 
She was born October 3, 1838, at New Hope, Augusta County, 
Virginia, and is the daughter of Dr. George and Nancy Miller 
McCulloch. 

CHILDREN: 

NANCY M., born May 8, 1861; died Apr. 18, 1897. 

SILAS, born May 22, 1863; died Jan. 19, 1864. 

ALLIE, born Dec. 31, 1864. 

WILLIAM, born Apr. 22, 1868. 

SUSAN H., born Feb. 26, 1870. 

ELIZABETHS., born Feb. 13, 1873; died May 31, 1880. 

GEORGE McC., born Dec. 4, 1876. 

M. ROBBIE, born Jan. 2, 1879. 

Home, Marshall, Mo. 

IV. ROBERT A. HENTON was a soldier in the Confederate Army. 

V. NANCY M. HENTON, first child of Robert A. 
Henton and Hannah M. McC'-lloch, unreported. 

V. SILAS HENTON, second child of Robert A. Henton 
and Hannah M. McCulloch, died before he was a year old 
and is buried at Mt. Cavmd Church, Saline County, Missouri. 

V. ALLIE HENTON, third child of Robert A. Henton 
and Hannah M. McCulloch, was married January 23, 1901, 
to Margaret C. Miller, who was born May 5, 1866. 

Home, Miami, Saline County, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

V. WILLIAM HENTON, fourth child of Robert A. 
Henton and Hannah M. McCulloch, was married March 6, 
1895, to Ada Briston, who was born July 27, 1869. 

CHILDREN : 

Two SONS, who died in infancy. 

Home, near Miami, Saline County, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

217 



V. SUSAN H. HENTON, fifth child of Robert A. Henton 
and Hannah M. McCulloch, was married November 16, 1893 
to Rucker McDaniel, who was born December 18, 1870. 

CHILDREN: 

ROBERT H., born Oct. 20, 1894. 

JASPERS., born July 21,1897. 

JUNE ALEXANDER R., born Nov. 22, 1902. 

V. ELIZABETH S. HENTON, sixth child of Robert 
A. Henton and Hannah M. McCulloch, died at seven years of 
age, and is buried at Christian Cemetery, near Miami, Saline 
County, Missouri. 

V. GEORGE McCULLOCH HENTON, seventh child 
of Robert A . Henton and Hannah M. McCulloch, is unmarried. 
Home, Marshall, Mo.; business, grocer. 

V. M. ROBBIE HENTON, eighth child of Robert A. 
Henton and Hannah M. McCulloch, was married February 
12, 1904, to Alvin Parker. 

Home, Memphis, Tenn. 



IV. HANNAH F. HENTON, seventh child of Silas 
Henton and Susan H. Guiwn, died at sixteen years of age. 



IV. ELIZABETH V. HENTON, eighth child of Silas 
Henton and Susan H. Guiwn, was married to Dr. Davis. 



218 



///. ELIZABETH HENTON, fifth child of Sarah Hop- 
kins and Benjamin Henton, was married to John Sites. 

CHILDREN: 
AMANDA. 
ELIZABETH. 
MARY. 
JOHN. 
PRICE. 
LOUISA. 
CORNELIA. 

Family moved to Tennessee after the Civil War. 

IV. AMANDA SITES, first child of Elizabeth Henton 
and John Sites, was married to John Earman. 



IV. ELIZABETH SITES, second child of Elizabeth Hen- 
ton and John Sites, died unmarried. 



IV. LOUISA SITES, sixth child of Elizabeth Henton and 
John Sites, was married to Joseph Miller. 

Home, Athens, Tenn. 

The rest of the children unreported. 



///. ESTHER HENTON, sixth child of Sarah Hop- 
kins and Benjamin Henton, was married to - - Fawcette. 
Home, Terre Haute, Ind. 

2IQ 



777. HANNAH MARY HENTON, seventh child of 
Sarah Hopkins and Benjamin Henton, was married October, 
1819, to James Alexander Walker, who was born in October, 

*793- 
CHILDREN: 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, born Oct. 1820; died Feb. 1879. 

JOHN, born Jan. 1823; died 1859. 

SARAH JANE, born Jan. 1825. 

ELIZABETH, born Aug. 1827. 

JAMES ALEXANDER, born Aug. 1832; died Oct. 1901. 

HANNAH MARY, born Oct. 1836; died 1892. 

SILAS HENTON, born Jan. 1839. 

Home, Augusta County, Va. 

III. HANNAH MARY HENTON WALKER lived at the old home 
with her mother and sister Sarah, where both died. 

IV. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WALKER, first child 0} 
Hannah Mary Henton and Alexander Walker, was married 
in 1848, to Mary Houston. 

CHILDREN : 

ARCHIBALD ALEXANDER, born Apr. 1850. 

Mary Houston Walker died November 17, 1872, and is buried in 
Augusta Church Cemetery. 

IV. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WALKER was married a 
second time, in 1876, to Mattie Wright, who died February, i8*jg. 

CHILDREN : 

FRANK, born Jan. 1878; died May 1903. 
CHARLOTTE, born May 1879. 

TV. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN WALKER was a physician and a 
Christian gentleman of influence in his community. 



220 



V. ARCHIBALD A. WALKER, first child of Benjamin 
Franklin Walker and Mary Houston, was married October, 
1877, to Willie Moorman, who died in 1888. 

CHILDREN: 

HARRY, born 1879. 
FRANK, born 1882. 
MARY, born 1886. 

Home, Fort Defiance, Va. 

VI. HARRY WALKER, first child of Archibald A. 
Walker and Willie Moorman. 

Lives at Canton, O. 

VI. FRANK WALKER, second child of Archibald A. 
Walker and Willie Moorman. 
Lives at Fort Defiance, Va. 

VI. MARY WALKER, third child of Archibald A. 
Walker and Willie Moorman. 
Lives at Fort Defiance, Va. 

V. FRANK WALKER, second child of Benjamin Frank- 
lin Walker and first child of Mattie Wright, died at 25 years 
of age. 

V. CHARLOTTE WALKER, third child of Benjamin 
Franklin Walker and second child of Mattie W right, was 
married in November, 1899, to Albert Blanton. 

CHILDREN: 

ALBERT. 

SILAS WALKER, born Aug. 6, 1904. 

Home, Marion, N. C. 



221 



IV. JOHN WALKER, second child of Hannah Mary 
Henton and Alexander Walker, died in 1859. He went to 
California during the gold fever, lost his health and died there. 
He was unmarried. 



IV. SARAH JANE WALKER, third child 0} Hannah 
Mary Henton and Alexander Walker, was married in 184.5, 
to Thomas P. Crawford. 

CHILDREN : 

SARAH AGNES, born 1846; died Oct. 1849. 

V. SARAH JANE WALKER CRAWFORD died in 1846. 



IV. ELIZABETH WALKER, fourth child of Hannah 
Mary Henton and Alexander Walker, was married in 184.5, t 
Joseph Davis Craig. 

CHILDREN: 

JAMES ALEXANDER, born Mar. 1848. 

WILLIAM BELL, born Sept. 1850; died Feb. 1895. 

Home, Cold Sulphur Springs, Va. 

IV. ELIZABETH WALKER CRAIG writes as follows: "You ask if 
my home was broken up during the war. I never left home, though the 
section in which I lived was three times overrun by federal troops who 
destroyed everything we had except the house over my head, burned barns 
and all outbuildings of every description, and even destroyed the house 
furniture, carrying off such as they could. I thank God it is all past. 
I am sure I could never go through with it again. 

"My son, James Alexander Craig, was only sixteen when the war 
closed, but had volunteered and was on his way to join his command when 
he heard the news of Lee's surrender, so he was spared the hardships of 
the camp and strife of battle, and I, perhaps, a son. He was elected to the 
Legislature in 1895, and served four terms, but has since retired to private 
life. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church, and quite influential in 
church circles and the courts of the church." 



222 




IV. JAMES ALEXANDER WALKER. 



V. JAMES ALEXANDER CRAIG, first child of Eliza- 
beth Walker and Joseph Davis Craig, was married May, 
1869, to Susan Butler. 

Home, Cold Sulphur Springs, Va. 

V. JAMES ALEXANDER CRAIG, as has been said above, was a 
Confederate soldier. He has been in the house of delegates, is an elder 
in the Presbyterian church, and superintendent of the Sunday school. 

V. WILLIAM BELL CRAIG, second child 0} Elizabeth 
Walker and Joseph Davis Craig, was married in November, 
1879, to Lelia Brownlee. 

IV. JAMES ALEXANDER WALKER, fifth child of 
Hannah Mary Henton and Alexander Walker, was married 
in 1857, t Sarah Poague. 

CHILDREN : 

MAGGIE, born 1858. 

WILLIE, born 1859. 
ALEXANDER, born 1861. 

FRANK, born 1865; died 1890. 

JAMES, born 1867; died 1890. 

ALLEN, born 1869; died 1892. 

Home, Wytheville, Va. 

James Alexander Walker served in the Confederate Army four years. 
In June, 1861, he reported for duty as lieutenant-colonel of the Thirteenth 
Virginia Infantry at Winchester, having been promoted from captain in 
the Fourth Virginia Infantry. Later he was made brigadier-general and 
commanded the "Stonewall Brigade." He said, "To have commanded 
such a brigade as ' Stonewall' was glory enough for me." Of this regiment 
General Lee said, " It is a splendid body of men" ; and General Ewell, " It 
is the only regiment in my command that never fails." Early said of them, 
" They can do more hard fighting and be in better plight afterward than any 
troops I ever saw." Walker was in charge of this regiment in the entire 
valley campaign, and after Port Republic went with Jackson's corps to 
Richmond as skirmishers for the division. They were the first of the corps 
to fire a gun in that memorable campaign around Richmond, known as the 
" Seven Days' Fight." Walker directed the regiment with a master hand, 
and was within a hundred yards of the works when the enemy broke and 

223 



fell back. Out of 260 men, 128 fell killed and wounded. At Culpepper 
Court House they did heroic work and checked the advance of the enemy 
at just the time and place to save the battle from being lost. 

Captain S. D. Buck of Baltimore, Md., a fellow-comrade, says, "He was 
the best friend a good soldier ever had and a terror to the man who shirked 
his duty!" During the Battle of the Wilderness he got the only wound he 
received during the war, although he was in almost every battle in which 
the Army of Northern Virginia participated, from 1861 to 1865, when Lee 
surrendered at Appomattox. After the war he was a leading factor in the 
politics of the state. He was a member of the legislature of Virginia for 
two consecutive terms, was lieutenant-governor of Virginia from 1876 to 
1880, and a member of the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Congress. He was a 
lawyer of ability and success. He died in October, 1901, and is buried in 
the cemetery of his home town, Wytheville, Va. 

V. MAGGIE WALKER, first child of James Alexander 
Walker and Sarah Poague, was married in 1878, to James 
Jordan. 

CHILDREN : 
ANNIE, 
WILLIE, 
MARGARETTE, 
RUSSELL, 
WALKER. 

Home, Wytheville, Va. 

V. WILLIE WALKER, second child of James Alexander 
Walker and Sarah Poague, was married to Manly Caldwell. 

CHILDREN: 

VIRGINIA. 
SARAH POAGUE. 
WALKER. 

Home, Wytheville, Va. 

V. ALEXANDER WALKER, third child of James Alex- 
ander Walker and Sarah Poague, was married. 
Seven children, names unreported. 
Home, Florence, Ala.; business, law. 

224 



V. FRANK WALKER, fourth child of James Alexander 
Walker and Sarah Poague, died at twenty-five years of age. 

V. JAMES WALKER, fifth child of James Alexander 
Walker and Sarah Poague, died at twenty-three, and is buried 
at Wytheville, Virginia. 

V. ALLEN WALKER, sixth child of James Alexander 
Walker and Sarah Poague, married Maude Foote. 

CHILDREN: 
LAURA. 
FOOTE. 

V. ALLEN WALKER died at twenty-three years of age, and is 
buried at Wytheville, Va. 



IV. HANNAH MARY WALKER, sixth child of Hannah 
Mary Henton and Alexander Walker, died in 1892, unmar- 
ried, and is buried in Augusta Church Cemetery. 



IV. SILAS HENTON WALKER, seventh child of 
Hannah Mary Henton and Alexander Walker, was married 
in 1870, to Laura E. Boone. 

CHILDREN : 

ANNIE CRAIG, born Mar. 19, 1872; died Aug. 7, 1875. 
Home, Weyer's Cave; business, agriculture. 

V. SILAS HENTON WALKER went into the war at its commence- 
ment, a private in Company E, ist Virginia Cavalry. Once he was 
wounded at Yellow Tavern, about twenty miles from Richmond. He served 
during the entire war, and was commanding his company when the war 
closed, having been promoted from private to captain. He was elected 
to the Legislature from Augusta County in 1895, and with the exception 
of two years, has served continuously since, and is now elected for two 
years more. 



225 



IV. SARAH HENTON, eighth child of Sarah Hopkins 
and Benjamin Henton, died unmarried, and is buried in 
Augusta Stone Church Cemetery, Virginia. 



226 



"The best cure for snobbishness that could be prescribed for any 
man or woman would be a thorough study of his or her own family history 
in all its lines." 



227 



II. MARY HOPKINS, daughter of John Hopkins and 
Jean Gordon, was married to Robert Poage, of Greenup County, 
Kentucky. 

CHILDREN : 

JOHN HOPKINS, born Mar. 15, 1783; died 

JANE, born Mar. 22, 1784; died Oct. 25, 1831. 

GEORGE, born 1787; died Aug. 7,1849. 

THOMAS, born Feb. 4, 1792; died Mar. 21, 1867. 

JAMES, born *797- 

HARRIET, born Nov. 21, 1801; died Sept. 2, 1835. 

ANN, born Feb. 1 6, 1804; died 1845. 

ELIZABETH. 

MARY. 

REBECCA. 

ROBERT WATSON. 

WILLIAM. 

Home, Greenup County, Ky. ; business, agriculture and surveying. 

Robert Poage came to Kentucky from Virginia about 1800. Here he 
built one of the first brick houses in the locality. It is still standing, and is 
owned by James Poage, of Mayslick, Ky. Robert Poage was a surveyor, and 
qualified as assistant surveyor in Augusta County, Va., June 16, 1778. 
He was later surveyor of Greenup County, Ky. Robert Poage died 
before 1814, as a letter written in September of that year by his wife to 
her brother-in-law, Robert Pogue, of Mason County, Ky., asks about a 
deed, etc., speaking of "remembering about what Mr. Poage did." 

///. JOHN HOPKINS POAGE, first child of Mary 
Hopkins and Robert Pogue, was married in 1806, to Jane 
Hopkins, his own cousin. 

See the Jane Hopkins family, under Archibald Hopkins, Red Oak, O., 
page in. 



229 



///. JANE POAGE, daughter of Mary Hopkins and 
Robert Poage, was married October 2, 1806, to her own cousin, 
James Poage, who was born September 15, 1784., and died in 
1850, in Monroe County, Missouri. He was called "Major" 

CHILDREN: 

MARY ANN, born Sept. 18, 1807; died 1863. 

AMANDA, born Dec. 5, 1809; died 1860. 

ROBERT DARIUS, born Feb. 13, 1811; died July 21, 1864. 

ELIZA, born Sept. 1812; died Feb. 9,1845. 

MARTHA, born Feb. 1814. 

WILLIAM HOPKINS, born Aug. 1815. 

DAVIS, 

MARCUS, born May 22, 1819; died July 20, 1864. 

RUFUS A., born May 22, 1819; died Nov. 5, 1844. 

ANDREW FRANKLIN, born July 1822; died May 9, 1849. 

THOMAS MILLER, born Dec. 1823. 

JAMES EDWARD, 

SAMANTHA, born Sept. 14, 1826; died Oct. 25, 1850. 

SAMUEL, born Sept. 14, 1826; died Sept. 14, 1826. 

JOHN DAVIS, born June 22, 1829. 

Home, Monroe County, Mo. 

IV. MARY ANN POAGE, first child of Jane Poage and 
James Poage, was married, November 17, 1854., to James E. 
Crawford. 

Home, Florida, Monroe County, Mo.; business, agriculture. 



IV. AMANDA POAGE, second child of Jane Poage and 
James Poage, was married to W. H. Vawter, who was born 
in 1807. 

CHILDREN: 

ALFRED F., born Sept. 1840. 

JAMES H., born Feb. 1842. 

THOMAS P., born Aug. 7, 1843. 

WILLIAM FRANKLIN, born Dec. 28, 1844. 

Home, Marshall, Mo. 

230 



V. ALFRED F. VAWTER, first child of Amanda Poage 
and W. H. Vawter, was married, January, 1873, to Emma 
Major, who was born in 1850. 

CHILDREN: 
W. E. 
FRANCES. 
ALFRED. 
MAJOR. 

Home, Marshall, Mo.; business, druggist. 

V. JAMES H. VAWTER, second child of Amanda Poage 
and W. H. Vawter, was married in i86g, to Eva Vaughan. 
Home, Marshall, Saline County, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

V. THOMAS P. VAWTER, third child of Amanda 
Poage and W. H. Vawter, was married in i868 y to Addie 
Vaughan, who was born in 1852. 

CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM A. 
EMMA. 
A. T. 
EVA. 
T. P. 

lOLA. 

EDGAR. 

FRANK. 

AURELINE. 

VAUGHAN. 

Home, Marshall, Saline County, Mo.; business, merchant. 



231 



V. WILLIAM FRANKLIN VAWTER, fourth child of 
Amanda Poage and W. H. Vawter, was married, first, in 1869, 
to Latitia H. Buck, who was born in 184.7, ana died in 1872. 
He was married second, in 1888, to Susie F. Fray, who was 
born in 1863. 

CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM A. 

JOHN F. 

DAVID D. 

CHARLES E. 

MARTHA E. 

Home, Marshall, Saline County, Mo.; business, grocery and meat 
market. 



IV. ROBERT DARIUS POAGE, third child of Jane Poage 
and James Poage, was married September 3, 184.0, to Margaret 
Poage (daughter of Col. William Poage and granddaughter 
of John Poage). 

CHILDREN: 

ROBERT DAVIS, born Oct. n, 1841. 

MARY LOUISA, born Sept. 20, 1844; died June 28, 1892. 

JANE A., born Dec. 13, 1848. 

FRANCES CORDELIA, born Dec. 27, 1850. 

ELLA, born Aug. 27, 1856. 

EDWIN, born 1860; died Aug. 1864. 

JOHN ALLEN, born Feb. n, 1864; died Aug. 10, 1864. 

Home, Hannibal, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

V. ROBERT DAVIS POAGE, first child of Robert Darius 
Poage and Margaret Poage, was married May 2, 1867, to Sarah 
A. King, who was born June 12, 1844. 

CHILDREN: 

HORACE E., born Mar. 28, 1868; died Dec. 18, 1903. 

ARTHUR A. 

ANNA M., died Aug. 6, 1879. 

Home, Hannibal, Mo. 

232 



V. MARY LOUISA POAGE, second child of Robert 
Darius Poage and Margaret Poage, was married February, 
1865, to R. E. CaldwelL 

CHILDREN : 

EARL, born 1866. 

INFANT, born 1867; died 1867. 

WILLIAM, born 1869. 

DRAPHUS PARK, born 1885; died Feb. 1887. 

Home, Monroe County, Mo. 

V. JANE A. POAGE, third child of Robert Darius Poage 
and Margaret Poage, died an infant, and is buried in Monroe 
County, Missouri. 

V. FRANCES CORDELIA POAGE, fourth child of 
Robert Darius Poage and Margaret Poage, was married 
March 3, 1881, to Stephen White. 

CHILDREN : 

MABEL, born Dec. 1881. 
BARTLET, born July 2, 1884. 
CHARLES, born May 13, 1886. 
HORTENSE, born May 13, 1894. 

Stephen White died May, 1898. 

V. FRANCES CORDELIA POAGE WHITE married, second, 
Edwin P. Snell. 

Home, Florida, Mo. 

V. ELLA POAGE, fifth child of Robert Darius Poage 
and Margaret Poage, was married March 21, 1878, to Philander 
W. Hickman, who was born July 15, 184.7. 

CHILDREN : 

ELBERT A., born Aug. 28, 1883. 

WILLIAM WALTER, born Sept. 15, 1899. 

Home, Perry, Mo. 

V. EDWIN POAGE, sixth child of Robert Darius Poage 
and Margaret Poage, died when four years old. 

233 



V. JOHN ALLEN POAGE, seventh child of Robert 
Darius Poage and Margaret Poage, died when six months old. 



IV. ELIZA POAGE, fourth child of Jane Poage and James 
Poage, was married February 6, 1834, to William M. Vaughan. 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES M., born died in infancy. 

MARY JANE, born Apr. 16, 1836; died Mar. 1872. 

MARTHA ISABEL, born Oct. 1837. 
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, born Apr. 16, 1839. 
JOHN GRAY, born Oct. 1840. 

Home, Paris, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

V. JAMES M. VAUGHAN, first child of Eliza Poage 
and William M. Vaughan, died in infancy. 

V. MARY JANE VAUGHAN, second child of Eliza 
Poage and William M. Vaughan, was married April, 1860, 
to John Powell, who died February, 1880. 

CHILDREN: 
SUSAN F. 
LYDA. 

SIDNEY GRAY. 
NORA B. 
WILLIAM. 
MAMIE. 
Home, Paris, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

VI. SUSAN F. POWELL, first child of Mary Jane 
Vaughan and John Powell. 

Is at home, Paris, Mo. 

VI. LYDA POWELL and VI. NORA B. POWELL, 
the second and fourth children of Mary Jane Vaughan and 
John Powell, are dead. 

VI. SIDNEY G. POWELL, third child of Mary Jane 
Vaughan and John Powell, is married and lives near Perry, 

Missouri. 

234 



VI. WILLIAM POWELL, fifth child of Mary Jane 
Vaughan and John Powell, is unreported. 

VI. MAMIE POWELL, sixth child of Mary Jane 
Vaughan and John Powell, was married to Jack Blanton. 
Home, Paris, Mo.; business, editor of the Paris Appeal. 

V. MARTHA ISABEL VAUGHAN, third child of Eliza 
Poage and William M. Vaughan, was married November, 
1869, to John Manning. 

CHILDREN: 
ELLA. 

MARY LEE. 
CHARLES A. 
FRANK. 
MATTIE G. 
JOHN. 
IDA M. 
VIOLA. 

Home, Cairo, Mo.; business, stock farming. 

VI. ELLA VAUGHAN, VI. JOHN VAUGHAN and 
VI. VIOLA VAUGHAN, the first, sixth, and eighth children 
of Martha Isabel Vaughan and John Manning, are dead. 
The rest are unreported. 

V. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN VAUGHAN, fourth 

child of Eliza Poage and William M. Vaughan, was married 
November 14., 1872, to Mary Jane Poage (daughter oj William 
Hopkins Poage and Elizabeth Ann Pollard). 
CHILDREN: 

CORDELIA, died in infancy. 

WILLIAM GRAY, born Jan. 26, 1875. 

SUSAN C., born July 7, 1877. 

ELIZABETH B., born Sept. 2, 1879. 

NATHAN P., born Sept. 16, 1881. 

CHARLES A., born July 8, 1887. 

CALIFORNIA, born Feb. 18, 1892. 

OLIVER B., born Feb. 2, 1895. 

Home, Perry, Mo.; business, stock farming. 

235 



VI. WILLIAM GRAY VAUGHAN, second child of 
Benjamin Franklin Vaughan and Mary Jane Poage, was 
married September 30, 1897, to Jennie Beasheart. 

CHILDREN : 

ALVA FRANKLIN. 
NELLIE GRAY. 

Home, Perry, Mo. 

V. JOHN GRAY VAUGHAN, fifth child of Eliza 
Poage and William M. Vaughan, died at Westminster College, 
Missouri, while preparing for the ministry. 



IV. MARTHA POAGE, fifth child of Jane Poage and 
James Poage, was married July, 1838, to Harrison Vaughn. 

CHILDREN : 

ELIZA JANE, born Apr. 23, 1839. 

MARY ANN, born Mar. 5, 1841. 

JAMES ROBERT, born May 16, 1843. 

JOHN W. 

AMANDA BELLE. 

MILDRED. 

THOMAS MILTON, born July 24, 1851. 

JOHN F. 

ELIZABETH. 

V. ELIZA JANE VAUGHN, first child of Martha 
Poage and Harrison Vaughn, was married April n, 1861, 
to William E. Sproul. 

CHILDREN: 

I. T., born Jan. 15, 1862. 
J. E., born Jan. 23, 1864. 

Home, Strother, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

V. MARY ANN VAUGHN, second child of Martha 
Poage and Harrison Vaughn, was married to Jeff Sproul. 
Home, Taylor, Tex. 

236 



V. JAMES ROBERT VAUGHN, third child of Martha 
Poage and Harrison Vaughn, was married to Hattie Clark. 
Home, Texarkana, Ark. 

V. JOHN W. VAUGHN, fourth child of Martha Poage 
and Harrison Vaughn, is unmarried. 

V. AMANDA BELLE VAUGHN, fifth child of Martha 
Poage and Harrison Vaughn, is unmarried. 

V. MILDRED VAUGHN, sixth child of Martha Poage 
and Harrison Vaughn, is married and has three children. 
No further report. 

V. THOMAS MILTON VAUGHN, seventh child of 
Martha Poage and Harrison Vaughn, was married to Mattie 
Hoeker. 

CHILDREN: 

JESSIE, born 1879. 
MABLE,born 1881. 

ALICE, ) 

I born 1885 (twins). 
ALMA, > 

Home, Paris, Mo. 

V. JOHN F. VAUGHN, eighth child of Martha Poage 
and Harrison Vaughn, is married and has three children. 
Not reported further. 

V. ELIZABETH VAUGHN, ninth child of Martha 
Poage and Harrison Vaughn, is married to W. T. Brown. 
Three children. No further report. 



237 



IV. WILLIAM HOPKINS POAGE, sixth child of Jane 
Poage and James Poage, was married in February, 1842, to 
Elizabeth Ann Pollard. 

CHILDREN: 
JAMES A. 
SAMUEL B. 
SARAH C. 
MARY J. 

AMANDA CORDELIA. 
CHARLES W. 
RUTH. 

V. JAMES A. POAGE, first child of William Hopkins 
Poage and Elizabeth Ann Pollard, was married to Ella Hick- 
man. 

Home, Strother, Mo. 

V. SAMUEL B. POAGE, second child of William Hop- 
kins Poage and Elizabeth Ann Pollard, was married to Fannie 
Speed. 

Home, Strother, Mo. (Widow there.) 

V. SARAH C. POAGE, third child of William Hopkins 
Poage and Elizabeth Ann Pollard, was married to Albert Hen- 
derson. 

Home, Strother, Mo. 

V. MARY JANE POAGE, fourth child of William Hop- 
kins Poage and Elizabeth Ann Pollard, was married to Ben- 
jamin Franklin Vaughn, son of Eliza Poage and William 
M. Vaughan. 

Home, Perry, Mo. 

V. AMANDA CORDELIA POAGE, fifth child of Wil- 
liam Hopkins Poage and Elizabeth Ann Pollard, was married 
to Joseph F. Fawcett. 

Home, Victor, Mo. 

238 



V. CHARLES W. POAGE, sixth child of William Hop- 
kins Poage and Elizabeth Ann Pollard, was married to Mollie 
Hubbard. 

Home, Perry, Mo. 

V. RUTH POAGE, seventh child of William Hopkins 
Poage and Elizabeth Ann Pollard, is not married. 
Home, Perry, Mo. 



IV. DAVIS POAGE, seventh child of Jane Poage and 
James Poage, died in infancy. 



IV. MARCUS POAGE, eighth child of Jane Poage and 
James Poage, was married to Susan M. Burgess. 

CHILDREN : 

RUFUS M., born Nov. i, 1844. 
BETTIE, born Aug. 27, 1846. 

ANN, born Jan. 4, 1855. 

EMMA, born Oct. 4, 1857. 

DORA, born Nov. 7, 1860. 

M. WESLEY, born Nov. 5, 1864. 
Home, Paris, Mo. 

V. RUFUS M. POAGE, first child of Marcus Poage and 
Susan M. Burgess, was married August 14., 1870, to Mamie 
Kerr. 

CHILDREN : 

MINNIE, born Sept. 14, 1870; died Nov. 14, 1899. 
CHARLES, born Dec. 29, 1878. 
LIZZIE, born Jan. 23, 1881. 

Home, Santa Fe, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 



239 



V. BETTIE POAGE, second child of Marcus Poage and 
Susan M. Burgess , was married October 15, 1877, to William 
Vaughn. 

CHILDREN : 

CLARENCE, born Aug. 15, 1880. 
WESLEY, born Nov. 19, 1882. 
PAUL, born Oct. 13, 1884. 
GLENN, born July 2, 1888. 
Home, Goss, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

V. ANN POAGE, third child of Marcus Poage and 
Susan M. Burgess, was married October 23, 1873, to William 
Baskett. 

CHILDREN : 

MARY, born July 9, 1878. 

NATHANIEL, born 1880. 

LINA, born Jan. 6, 1881. 

Home, Paris, Mo. 

V. EMMA POAGE, fourth child of Marcus Poage and 
Susan M. Burgess, was married May i, 1884, to Alonzo Mc- 
Allister. 

CHILDREN : 

ARTHUR, born 1888. 
VERNA, born 1890. 
Home, Nelson, Mo.; business, clergyman. 

V. DORA POAGE, fifth child of Marcus Poage and 
Susan M. Burgess, was married June 10, 1880, to Thomas 
McAllister. 

CHILDREN : 

LILLIAN, born 1882. 
STELLA, born 1885. 
MADGE, born 1888. 
A. D., born 1889. 
EDGAR, born 

Home, Fayetteville, Mo.; business, merchant. 

240 



V. M. WESLEY POAGE, sixth child of Marcus Poage 
and Susan M. Burgess, was married September 17, 1887, to 
Nina Farthing. 

CHILDREN: 

EARL. 

GOLDEN. 

GLADYS. 

MARIE. 

RUTH. 

Home, West Plains, Mo. ; business, merchant. 

IV. RUFUS A. POAGE, ninth child of Jane Poage and 
James Poage, was not married. 

IV. ANDREW FRANKLIN POAGE, tenth child of Jane 
Poage and James Poage, died at twenty-seven years of age. 

IV. THOMAS MILLER POAGE, eleventh, IV. JAMES 
EDWARD POAGE, twelfth, IV. SAMUEL POAGE, four- 
teenth, children of Jane Poage and James Poage, are unre- 
ported. 

IV. SAMANTHA POAGE, thirteenth child of Jane Poage 
and James Poage, died at twenty-four years of age. 

IV. JOHN DAVIS POAGE, fifteenth child of Jane 
Poage and James Poage, was married November 23, 1852, to 
Susan M. Wright. 

CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM ABEL, born Sept. 7, 1853. 
JANE ELIZABETH, born Jan. 25, 1855. 
FRANCES DAVIS, born Sept. i, 1860. 

Home, Victor, Mo. 

241 



F. WILLIAM ABEL POAGE, first child of John Davis 
Poage and Susan M. Wright, was married November 24., 1882, 
to Margaret Calban. 

Home, Paris, Mo. 

V. JANE ELIZABETH POAGE, second child of John 
Davis Poage and Susan M. Wright, was married to Susan M. 
Johnson. 

Home, Berry, 111. ; business, physician. 

F. FRANCES DAVIS POAGE, third child of John 
Davis Poage and Susan M. Wright, died in Paris, Mo. 



242 



///. GEORGE POAGE, son o] Mary Hopkins and Robert 
Poage, was married in 1811, to Judith Blair Kemper, who 
was born September 10, 1788, in Garrard County, Kentucky. 
She was the daughter oj Rev. James Kemper and Judith Hath- 
away, of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

CHILDREN: 

SOPHIA TlMBERLAKE. 

ROBERT CYRUS, died Apr. 1904. 

JAMES HARVEY, died Feb. 24, 1888. 

SAMUEL DAVIS. 

GEORGE BENJAMIN, died Mar. 29, 1897. 

AUGUSTUS WILDS. 

MARY FRANCES. 

FRANCES SARAH, born June 10, 1827; died Aug. i, 1834. 

Home, Greenup County, Ky. (now Ashland) ; business, agriculture. 
Judith Blair Kemper died Oct. 21, 1848, at Ashland, Ky. 

IV. SOPHIA TlMBERLAKE POAGE, first child of 
George Poage and Judith Blair Kemper, was married to Henry 
B. Pollard. 

CHILDREN: 

MARGARET ANN, died about 1859. 

GEORGE BRAXTON, died about 1870. 

THOMAS ORVILLE. 

EDWARD YOUNG. 

JOHN CONDIT. 

WILLIAM HENRY. 

MILTON BROWNING. 

EMMA IRENE. 

SOPHIA ELIZABETH. 

GREEN FORREST. 

IV. SOPHIA TlMBERLAKE POAGE POLLARD was married 
second to Spencer Payne. 

Home, Ashland, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 

243 



V. MARGARET ANN POLLARD, first child of Sophia 
Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, died about 1859. 

V. GEORGE BRAXTON POLLARD, second child of 
Sophia Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, died when 
about twenty-five years old. 

V. THOMAS ORVILLE POLLARD, third child of 
Sophia Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, died in the 
Confederate Army. 

V. EDWARD YOUNG POLLARD, fourth child of 
Sophia Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, unre ported. 

V. JOHN CONDIT POLLARD, fifth child of Sophia 
Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, was married to 
Frances Johnson. He died in 1903 at Huntington, West 
Virginia. 

V. WILLIAM HENRY POLLARD, sixth child of 
Sophia Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, was twice 
married, first to Miss Powers. 

CHILDREN : 

MARY. 
HARRY. 

V. WILLIAM HENRY POLLARD married second, Miss Maupin. 
He died in 1904. 

V. MILTON BROWNING POLLARD, seventh child 
of Sophia Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, is unre- 
ported. 



244 



V. EMMA IRENE POLLARD, eighth child of Sophia 
Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, was married to 
William H. Sympson. 

CHILDREN : 
JAMES. 
BETH. 
MARY. 
WILLIAM. 
JUDITH. 

V. SOPHIA ELIZABETH POLLARD, ninth child of 
Sophia Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, was married 
to Henry Geiger. 

CHILDREN: 
JAMES. 
BERT. 
FOREST. 
HENRY. 
ESTHER. 
EMMA. 
COOK. 

Home, Ashland, Ky. 

V. GREEN FORREST POLLARD, tenth child of Sophia 
Timberlake Poage and Henry B. Pollard, died unmarried. 

IV. ROBERT CYRUS POAGE, second child of George 
Poage and Judith Blair Kemper, was married December 24, 
1839, to Anne E. Gallaher, who died July, 1904. 

CHILDREN: 

JAMES HARVEY, born 1840. 

LUELLA KEMPER, born 1843. 

EMMA, born 1845; died 1845. 

ASHLAND, born 1854; died Oct. 16, 1886. 

Home, Ashland, Ky. ; business, operator of flour mill. 

IV. ROBERT CYRUS POAGE is an elder in the Presbyterian church 
at Ashland. 

245 



V. JAMES HARVEY POAGE, first child of Robert 
Cyrus Poage and Anne E. Gallaher, was married to Mary 
C. Haskell. 

CHILDREN: 

NETTIE TENNYSON. 

MARY. 

EVELINE. 

HARRIET. 

Louis KEMPER. 

ROBERT OSBORNE. 

ANNA. 

Home, Ashland, Ky. ; business, wharfmaster. 

VI. NETTIE TENNYSON, first child of James Harvey 
Poage and Mary C. Haskell, is married to (name not given], 
and has two children, James and Harold. 

VI. MARY POAGE, second child of James Harvey Poage 
and Mary C. Haskell, died at thirteen years of age. 

VI. EVELINE POAGE, third child of James Harvey 
Poage and Mary C. Haskell, was married to (name not given). 

CHILDREN : 

MARY POAGE. 
EVELYN. 

VI. HARRIET POAGE, fourth child of James Harvey 
Poage and Mary C. Haskell, is unmarried. 

VI. LOUIS KEMPER POAGE, fifth child of James 
Harvey Poage and Mary C. Haskell, died young. 

VI. ROBERT OSBORNE POAGE, sixth child of James 
Harvey Poage and Mary C. Haskell. 
Is in college. 



246 



VI. ANNA POAGE, seventh child of James Harvey 
Poage and Mary C. Haskell, is married to (name not given). 

CHILDREN : 
MARIE. 
FRANCIS. 



V. LUELLA KEMPER POAGE, second child of Robert 
Cyrus Poage and Anne E. Gallaher, is unmarried. 
Lives at Ashland, Ky. 

V. EMMA POAGE, third child of Robert Cyrus Poage 
and Anne E. Gallaher, died when three months and eighteen 
days old. 

V. ASHLAND POAGE, fourth child of Robert Cyrus 
Poage and Anne E. Gallaher, was married November 18, 1879, 
to Helen May Flye, daughter of Edwin Flye of Maine. 

CHILDREN: 

EDWIN FLYE, born July 24, 1880. 
MARGUERITE, born 1885. 

Home, Ashland, Ky.; business, operator of flour mill. 

IV. JAMES HARVEY POAGE, third child of George 
Poage and Judith Blair Kemper, was married October 15, 
1851, to Sarah A. A. Gallaher. 

CHILDREN: 

JAMES EDGAR, died Nov. 13, 1904. 

JOHN BAYLESS. 

ANNA MARY. 

SARAH KEMPER. 

GEORGE HARVEY. 

ROBERT CYRUS. 

Home, Huntington, W. Va. 

IV. JAMES HARVEY POAGE is an elder in the Presbyterian 
church. 

247 



V. JAMES EDGAR POAGE, first child oj James Har- 
vey Poage and Sarah A. A. Gallaher, was married to Fannie 
Gallaher. 

CHILDREN: 
ERSKINE. 

Home, Missouri; business, agriculture. 

V. JOHN BAY LESS POAGE, second child of James 
Harvey Poage and Sarah A. A. Gallaher, was married May 
/7, 1 88 1, to Mary Moore Miller. 

CHILDREN: 

BLANCHE MILLER. 

Business, merchant. 

V. ANNA MARY POAGE, third child oj James Harvey 
Poage and Sarah A. A. Gallaher, was married October 24., 
1881, to Joseph R. Shelton. 

CHILDREN: 

SALLY POAGE, 

HARVEY WINSTON, 

ANDREW KEMPER, born in 1888. 

Home, Huntington, W. Va. 

F. SARAH KEMPER POAGE, fourth child of James 
Harvey Poage and Sarah A. A. Gallaher, died in 1879. 

V. GEORGE HARVEY POAGE, fifth child of James 
Harvey Poage and Sarah A. A. Gallaher, was married October 
19, 1889, to Ada Octavia Wright. 

V. ROBERT CYRUS POAGE, sixth child of James Har- 
vey Poage and Sarah A. A. Gallaher, is unmarried. 
Home, Huntington, W. Va.; business, civil engineer. 



IV. SAMUEL DAVIS POAGE, fourth child of George 
Poage and Judith Blair Kemper, died near Ashland, Kentucky. 

248 



IV. GEORGE BENJAMIN POAGE, fifth child 0} George 
Poage and Judith Blair Kemper, was married to Ruth Emily 
Wardlaw. 

CHILDREN : 

NANNIE BLAIR, died in infancy. 

HUDSON BREVARD. 

MARY BOONE. 

JULIAN KANE. 

VIRGINIA WARDLAW. 

Home, St. Louis, Mo., Webster Grove suburb. 

V. NANNIE BLAIR POAGE, first child of George 
Benjamin Poage and Emily Ruth Wardlaw, died in infancy. 

V. HUDSON BREVARD POAGE, second child of 
George Benjamin Poage and Emily Ruth Wardlaw, is unre- 
ported. 

V. MARY BOONE POAGE, third child of George Ben- 
jamin Poage and Emily Ruth Wardlaw, was married October 
31, i go i, to Gordmi Land, of Denver, Colo. 

V. JULIAN KANE POAGE, fourth child of George 
Benjamin Poage and Emily Ruth Wardlaw, was married 
October 9, 1885, to Sidney Bedloe Schuyler. 

CHILDREN: 

NENDER HUDSON. 

Home, Webster Grove, Mo. 

IV. AUGUSTUS WILDS POAGE, sixth child of George 
Poage and Judith Blair Kemper. 
Lives at Parkersburg, W. Va. 

IV. MARY FRANCES POAGE, seventh child of George 
Poage and Judith Blair Kemper, died when seven years old. 

IV. FRANCES SARAH POAGE, eighth child of George 
Poage and Judith Blair Kemper, died when a child. 

249 



///. THOMAS POAGE, son of Mary Hopkins and Robert 
Poage, was married June 75, 1815, to Mary Ann Powers, who 
was born November n, 7793, and died January 18, 1870. 

CHILDREN: 

EDWIN DEAN, born Mar. 22, 1816; died Jan. 17, 1842. 

EMILY ANN, born Jan. 6, 1818. 

JAMES ERVIN, born Mar. 4, 1820. 

RICHARD DEAN, born Dec. 27, 1823; died Jan. 21, 1904. 

EPHRAIM McDowELL, born Feb. 17, 1828; died July 17, 1901. 

SARAH JUDITH, born July 25, 1830; died May 24, 1882. 

LESLIE POWERS, born Mar. 1838. 

This family moved from Kentucky to Monroe County, Mo., in the 
early spring of 1830. 

IV. EDWIN DEAN POAGE, first child of Thomas Poage 
and Mary Ann Powers, died when twenty-six years of age. 



IV. EMILY ANN POAGE, second child of Thomas Poage 
and Mary Ann Powers, was married January 6, 1836, to Judge 
Granville Snell, who was born January 15, 1813. 

CHILDREN: 

ARABELLA E., born Nov. 2, 1836; died Feb. 22, 1874. 

SARAH ELIZABETH, born Nov. 28, 1838; died Oct. 2, 1872. 

MARY SUSAN, born Nov. 18, 1840. 

EDWIN POAGE, born Dec. 7, 1842. 

E. AMELIA, born Apr. 19, 1845. 

JULIA, born Nov. n, 1846. 

THOMAS, born July 17, 1849. 

CLIFTON, born Aug. 12, 1851. 

WATSON, born Aug. 12, 1851. 

LEVI, born Oct. 31, 1854; died Nov. 24, 1871. 



250 



V. ARABELLA E. SNELL, first child of Emily Ann 
Poage and Granville Snell, was married January 26, 1867, 
to Philip S. Hecker. 

CHILDREN : 

CHARLES G. 

WALTER. 

MARY. 

Home, Centralia, Mo. 

F. SARAH ELIZABETH SNELL, second child of Emily 
Ann Poage and Granville Snell, was married May 29, 1860, 
to C. C. Hagood. 

CHILDREN: 

EMMETT. 
MARY. 
JULIA. 
EDWIN. 

Home, Nevada, Mo. 

F. MARY SUSAN SNELL, third child of Emily Ann 
Poage and Granville Snell, was married February 18, 1868, 
to S. T. Hook. 

CHILDREN : 

THOMAS E., born Dec. 24, 1868. 
MARY E., born June 20, 1871. 

Home, Mexico, Mo.; business, live stock and agriculture. 

F. EDWIN POAGE SNELL, fourth child of Emily Ann 
Poage and Granville Snell, was married December 19, 1866, 
to Martha McCann. 

CHILDREN: 

W. W. 
C. G. 

SUSIE. 
HATTIE. 

Home, Paris, Mo. 

251 



V. E. AMELIA SNELL, fifth child of Emily Ann Poage 
and Granville Snell, was married January 26, 1867, to P. S. 
Hocker. 

CHILDREN: 

C. G. 

WALTER E. 
MARY E. 

Home, Paris, Mo. 

V. JULIA SNELL, sixth child of Emily Ann Poage and 
Granville Snell. 
Lives at Paris, Mo. 

V. THOMAS SNELL, seventh child of Emily Ann Poage 
and Granville Snell. 

Lives at 1404 Olive Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

V. CLIFTON SNELL, eighth child of Emily Ann Poage 
and Granville Snell, was married January, 1871, to Dollie 
Cartright. 

CHILDREN: 
FRANK. 
NADINE. 

Home, Holliday, Mo. 

V. WATSON SNELL, ninth child of Emily Ann Poage 
and Granville Snell, was married January, 1871, to Jennie 
Beckford. 

CHILDREN: 
HOWARD. 
EDWIN. 
EMMA. 
JULIA. 

Home, Nampa, Idaho; business, real estate and mining. 

V. LEV I SNELL, tenth child of Emily Ann Poage and 
Granville Snell, died when seventeen years of age. 

252 



IV. JAMES ERVIN POAGE, third child of Thomas 
Poage and Mary Ann Powers, was married to Gabriella Aber- 
nathy. 

CHILDREN : 

SALLIE. 

FANNIE. 

CORDELIA. 

ARZELIA. 

THOMAS. 

NELIA. 

Home, Paris, Mo. ; business, carpenter. 



IV. RICHARD DEAN POAGE, fourth child of Thomas 
Poage and Mary Ann Powers, was married December 6, 1864., 
to Amanda S. Valandingham. 

Amanda S. Valandingham Poage died and Richard Dean Poage mar- 
ried second, in 1881, Mrs. Snow. 

Home, Centralia, Mo. 



iv. EPHRAIM MCDOWELL POAGE, fifth child of 

Thomas Poage and Mary Ann Powers, was married February 
20, 1851, to Frances Louisa Quarks, who died January 28, 1852. 

IV. EPHRAIM McDOWELL POAGE was married, sec- 
ond, October 7, 1852, to Georgianna Boulware, who died No- 
vember 19, 1899. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM KANSAS, 

KATE ELMO, born Sept. 19, 1859. 

Home, Paris, Mo.; business, physician and merchant. 



253 



V. WILLIAM KANSAS POAGE, first child of Ephraim 
McDowell Poage and Georgianna Boulware, was married June 
26, 1883, to Viola Rawlings. 

CHILDREN: 

GEORGE RAWLINGS, born Oct. 31, 1885. 
Home, Paducah, Ky. ; business, clothier. 

V. KATE ELMO POAGE, second child oj Ephraim Mc- 
Dowell Poage and Georgianna Boulware, was married Jan- 
uary 18, 1882, to Thomas Grey Mitchell. 

CHILDREN : 

GLENN DEAN, born Apr. 29, 1889. 
Home, Paris, Mo. 

IV. SARAH JUDITH POAGE, sixth child of Thomas 
Poage and Mary Ann Powers, was married May, 1850, to 
William Grey, who died in 1885. 

CHILDREN: 
MARY. 
THOMAS. 

Home, Quincy, 111. 

V. MARY GREY, first child of Sarah Judith Poage and 
William Grey, married Charles T. Lemley. 

CHILDREN : 

GREY, born Dec. 29, 1874. 

GEORGE THOMAS, born Aug. u, 1881; died Apr. 1898. 

Home, Los Angeles, Cal.; business, real estate. 

V. THOMAS GREY, second child of Sarah Judith Poage 
and William Grey, died in Old Mexico. 

IV. LESLIE POWERS POAGE, seventh child of Thomas 
Poage and Mary Ann Powers, died at seventeen years of age. 



254 



///. JAMES POAGE, son of Mary Hopkins and Robert 
Poage, was married to Jemima McCormick. 

CHILDREN: 
ALBERT. 
JULIUS. 
ROBERT. 
JANE. 

Home, LaGrange, Mo. 

In 1858 this family started from Missouri to Texas by boat. The 
boat burned a hundred miles from St. Louis, and James Poage, his son 
Albert, and his daughter-in-law, the wife of Julius, were drowned. 

IV. ALBERT POAGE, first child of James Poage and 
Jemima McCormick, was married to Marcella Johnson, of 
West Virginia. 

After the disaster above mentioned Marcella Johnson Poage returned 
with a little daughter to Virginia. 



IV. JULIUS POAGE, the second child of James Poage 
and Jemima McCormick, was married to Sallie Laidley . 

CHILDREN: 
EDDA. 

Sallie Laidley Poage was drowned. 

IV. JULIUS POAGE was married, second, to S. N. 
Hatton, who died in 1902. 

CHILDREN : 
VIRGINIA, 

SALLIE BLACKWOOD, 
JULIA BOYD. 

V. EDDA POAGE, first child of Julius Poage and Sallie 
Laidley, was married to Professor James T. Wallace. 

Home, Oakland, Cal. 

255 



V. VIRGINIA POAGE, second child of Julius Poage and 
first child of S. N. Hatton, was married to Zeph McBride. 

V. SALLIE BLACKWOOD POAGE, third child of 
Julius Poage and second child of S. N. Hatton, married 
Mr. Simbaugh. 

Home, Isleton, Cal. 

V. JULIA BOYD POAGE, fourth child of Julius Poage 
and third child of S. N. Hatton, married Mr. Oats. 
Home, Sacramento, Cal. 



256 



///. HARRIET POAGE, daughter of Mary Hopkins and 
Robert Poage, was married to Richard Powers. 

CHILDREN : 

ROBERT HARVEY, born Mar. 3, 1820; died Jan. 27, 1853. 

MARCUS M., born Jan. 22,1821. 

MINERVA, born Apr. 6, 1822; died Aug. 3, 1847. 

MILFORD, born Mar. 3, 1824. 

WEALTHY A., born Mar. 25, 1828. 

MARY JANE, born June 3, 1830. 

JAMES NELSON, born Apr. 4, 1832. 

THERON B., born 

Home, Florida, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

IV. ROBERT HARVEY POWERS, first child of Har- 
riet Poage and Richard Powers, was unmarried. He died at 
thirty-three years of age, and is buried at Stockton, Cat. 

IV. MARCUS M. POWERS, second child of Harriet Poage 
and Richard Powers, was married January 18, 1844, t PHy 
Terrill. 

CHILDREN: 
COLUMBUS. 
CYRUS BENJAMIN. 
RICHARD EDWIN. 
ORVAL. 

GEORGE MILTON. 
WILLIAM. 
HARVEY. 
ARTHUR. 
IV. MARCUS M. POWERS was married, second, to Angeline Nesbit. 

CHILDREN: 
MINNIE. 
MARCUS ORION. 
NETA. 
EVA. 
BEULAH. 

Home, Stoutsville, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

257 



IV. MINERVA POWERS, third child of Harriet Poage 
and Richard Powers, was married October 12, 184.3, t J- M. 
Thompson. 

CHILDREN: 

RICE, who died in infancy. 

IV. MILFORD POWERS, fourth child of Harriet Poage 
and Richard Powers, was married August 24, 184.7, io Harriet 
M. Dixon. 

CHILDREN: 

LAURA, born Sept. 7, 1853. 
JAMES D., born Aug. 26, 1855. 
LUELLA, born Mar. 16, 1857. 
RICHARD B., born 
ANNA JANE, born Jan. 28, 1860. 
MARY C., born Apr. 30, 1864. 

Home, Corvallis, Mont.; business, clergyman. 

V. LAURA POWERS, first child of Milford Powers and 
Harriet M. Dixon, was married June 18, 18 , to M. J. McGee. 

V. JAMES D. POWERS, second child of Milford Powers 
and Harriet M. Powers, died unmarried. 

V. LUELLA POWERS, third child of Milford Powers 
and Harriet M. Dixon, was married October 8, 1884., to John 
Cobb. 

V. RICHARD B. POWERS, fourth child of Milford 
Powers and Harriet M. Dixon, is unmarried. 

V. ANNA JANE POWERS, fifth child of Milford 
Powers and Harriet M. Dixon, was married October 6, 18 , 
to Christopher Warherst. 

V. Mary C. Powers, sixth child of Milford Powers and 
Harriet M. Dixon, is unmarried. 

258 



IV. WEALTHY A. POWERS, fifth child oj Harriet Poage 
and Richard Powers, was married to W. H. Violet. 

CHILDREN : 

OSCAR. 

AURELIA. 

LAURA. 

WILLIAM. 

MARVIN. 

ADA. 

Business, agriculture. 

One of the daughters married William J. Jackson, and lives at Pueblo, 
Colo. 



IV. MARY JANE POWERS, sixth child 0} Harriet Poage 
and Richard Powers, was married to Martin Mason. 

CHILDREN: 
FLETCHER. 
GEORGE. 
THERON. 
MINNIE. 
BEULAH. 

Home, Paris, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

IV. MARY JANE POWERS MASON died, and is buried at Zion, 
Monroe County, Mo. 



IV. JAMES N. POWERS, seventh child of Harriet Poage 
and Richard Powers, was married in 1874, to Mary Forsyth. 

CHILDREN: 

HATTIE BELLE, who died in infancy. 

Home, Paris, Mo.; business, real estate and loan. 



25Q 



IV. THERON B. POWERS, eighth child of Harriet Poage 
and Richard Powers, was married February 23, 1870, to Lucy 
M. Hocker. 

CHILDREN: 

EMMA. 

CASSIE V. 

HATTIE R. 

HOMER N. 

OSCAR B. 

CHARLES O. 

JOSEPH THERON, who died in infancy. 

Home, Perry, Mo. ; business, agriculture and stock farming. 



260 



///. ANN POAGE, daughter of Mary Hopkins and 
Robert Poage, was married to John Stewart. 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES, born Jan. 3, 1830. 

HARRIET, born 1832; died 1874. 

ROBERT, born 1834; died 1842. 

MARY, born 1836; died 1857. 

HUGH MENART, born Feb. 24, 1838; 
JOHN WILLIAM, born 1841; died 1843. 

Home, Welsh, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

IV. JAMES STEWART, first child of Ann Poage and John 
Stewart, was married September i, 1860, to Mary Walden. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNIE L., born Jan. 7, 1863. 

EUGENE A., born June 29, 1865. 

JUAN, died Sept. 1867. 

ESTELLE V., born Oct. 24, 1870. 

BECK ELLA, born Oct. 4, 1873 ; 

MARY L., born Apr. 9, 1878. 

Mary Walden Stewart died, and James Stewart was married second, 
June 20, 1882, to Mary Loutham. 
Home, Palmyra, Mo. 

V. ANNIE L. STEWART, first child of James Stewart 
and Mary Walden, was married to Owen T. Thornburg. 

CHILDREN: 
ROY. 
NORA. 
JAMES. 
JOSEPHINE. 
LEE. 
JACK. 

ESTELLA. 

GEORGE. 
MARY. 

Home, Moberly, Mo.; business, stockman. 

261 



VI. ROY THORNBURG, first child of Annie L. Stewart 
and Owen T. Thornburg, was married March 6, 1902, to Ruby 
Edwards. 

CHILDREN: 

EUGENE, born Mar. 20, 1903. 
No record of the other children. 

F. EUGENE A. STEWART, second child of James 
Stewart and Mary Waldon, is unmarried. 
Home, Palmyra, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

F. JUAN STEWART, third child of James Stewart and 
Mary Waldon, died September, 1867, and is buried at Mt. 
Olivet, Monroe County, Mo. 

V. ESTELLE V. STEWART, fourth child of James 
Stewart and Mary Waldm, was married November 3, 1896, 
to George B. Bennett, who died July 6, i8gg. 

Home, Palmyra, Mo. 

F. BECK ELLA STEWART, fifth child of James Stewart 
and Mary Waldon, was married January 26, 1899, to Daniel 
McLeod. 

CHILDREN: 

J. STEWART, born Mar. 26, 1900. 

DANIEL MARSHALL, born Oct. 6, 1903. 

Home, Hannibal, Mo.; business, livery. 

F. MARY L. STEWART, sixth child of James Stewart 
and Mary Waldon, is unmarried. 

She is her father's homekeeper, Palmyra, Mo. 



262 



IV. HARRIET STEWART, second child of Ann Poage 
and John Stewart, was married to Henry Engle. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNIE M., born 1859. 

JOHN P., born 1861. 

WILLIAM P., born 1863. 

JENNIE, born 1865. 

JAMES L., born 1867. 

MATTIE BECK, born 1869. 

EDDIE POAGE, born 1872. 

Home, Middle Grove, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

V. ANNIE M. ENGLE, first child of Harriet Stewart 
and Henry Engle, is married. 

Lives at Evansville, Mo. 

V. JOHN P. ENGLE, second child of Harriet Stewart 
and Henry Engle, was married to Nannie Grimes. 
Home, Welsh, Mo. 

V. WILLIAM P. ENGLE, third child of Harriet Stewart 
and Henry Engle, was married to Minnie Daw son. 
Home, Omega, Okla. 

V. JENNIE ENGLE, fourth child of Harriet Stewart 
and Henry Engle, was married to Monroe Grimes. 
Home, Fayette, Mo.; business, livery. 

V. JAMES L. ENGLE, fifth child of Harriet Stewart 
and Henry Engle, not reported. 

V. MATTIE BECK ENGLE, sixth child of Harriet 
Stewart and Henry Engle, was married to William Willis. 

CHILDREN: 

ALTHA. 

VALERIA. 

ENGLE. 

Home, Moberly, Mo.; business, merchant. 

263 



V. EDDIE POAGE ENGLE, seventh child of Harriet 
Stewart and Henry Engle, was married February 8, 1895, to 
Rachel Cartright. 

CHILDREN: 
HUGH C. 
SARAH F. 
BLANCHE H. 

Home, Welsh, Mo. 

IV. ROBERT STEWART, third child of Ann Poage and 
John Stewart, died when eight years old. 

IV. MARY STEWART, fourth child of Ann Poage and 
John Stewart, died at twenty-one years of age. 

IV. HUGH STEWART, fifth child of Ann Poage and 
John Stewart, was married to Rebecca Berry. 
Home, Welsh, Mo. 

IV. JOHN WILLIAM STEWART, sixth child of Ann 
Poage and John Stewart, died a little child. 



264 




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///. ELIZABETH POAGE, daughter of Mary Hopkins 
and Robert Poage, was married to Robert Abraham Brubaker. 

CHILDREN: 
HARRIET. 
ROBERT. 
GEORGE. 
JOHN. 
EDWIN. 
REBECCA 
JULIUS. 
FRANK. 

IV. HARRIET BRUBAKER, first child of Elizabeth Hop- 
kins and Robert Abraham Brubaker, was married to 
Castle. 



IV. ROBERT, IV. GEORGE, IV. JOHN, and IV. 
EDWIN BRUBAKER, second, third, fourth, and fifth 
childred of Elizabeth Hopkins and Robert Abraham Brubaker, 
were not married. 



IV. REBECCA, IV. JULIUS, and IV. FRANK BRU- 
BAKER, sixth, seventh, and eighth children of Elizabeth 
Hopkins and Robert Abraham Brubaker, are unreported. 



265 



///. MARY POAGE, daughter of Mary Hopkins and 
Robert Poage, was married to Thomas Wilson. 

CHILDREN: 

ROBERT. 

GEORGE. 

MARY. 

JAMES. 

ELIZABETH. 

STEPHEN. 

Home, moved from Indiana to Illinois in the '3o's. No further record 
obtained. 



///. REBECCA POAGE, daughter of Mary Hopkins and 
Robert Poage, was married to John Pickett Metcalf, who was 
born August 17, 1795. 

CHILDREN : 

ROBERT. 
HORACE. 



266 



///. ROBERT WATSON POAGE, son of Mary Hop- 
kins and Robert Poage, was married to Mary Poage, daughter 
of Col. George Poage and Ann Allen. She was born Novem- 
ber 4, 1781. 

CHILDREN : 

ROBERT ALEXANDER. 
JOHN. 
BENJAMIN. 
SALLIE. 

All the children were born in Kentucky, and moved to Missouri in 
the '30*3. 



///. WILLIAM POAGE, son of Mary Hopkins and 
Robert Poage, was married to Ann McCormick, who was born 
January 16, 1801. 

CHILDREN : 

AMELIA. 

SOPHRONIA, born Mar. 31, 1827. 

JEMIMA V. 

HARRIET. 

MARY FRANCES. 

GEORGE. 

LUCRETIA. 

FRED W., born Apr. 16, 1837. 



267 



IV. AMELIA POAGE, first child of William Poage and 
Ann McCormick, was married to J. D. Rain. 
Home, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

IV. JAMES POAGE, second child of William Poage and 
Ann McCormick, was married to Emma Hickman. 
Home, Victor, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 

IV. SOPHRONIA POAGE, third child of William Poage 
and Ann McCormick, was married March 2, 1858, to John 
Poage, of Greenbrier County, W. Va. 

CHILDREN: 
SALLIE. 

EFFIE J., born June 27, 1861. 
LILLIE. 

Home, Edina, Mo.; business, hardware. 

IV. JEMIMA V. POAGE, fourth child of William Poage 
and Ann McCormick, was married to Thomas La Fau. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNE. 

Thomas La Fau died, and Jemima V. Poage was married second to 
James T. Hutton. 

CHILDREN: 
CHARLES. 
KATIE. 
LUTA. 
ELBERT. 
MAGGIE. 
HERBERT. 

Home, La Grange, Mo.; business, grocer. 

IV. HARRIET POAGE, fifth child of William Poage and 
Ann McCormick, is unre ported. 

268 



IV. MARY FRANCES POAGE, sixth child of William 
Poage and Ann McCormick, was married to T. W. Willis. 

CHILDREN : 
OSCAR. 
EUGENE. 
ADA. 
LUELLA. 
ANNA LEE. 
FREDERICK. 
FANNIE. 

Home, Winters, Cal. ; business, hardware. 

IV. GEORGE POAGE, seventh child of William Poage 
and Ann McCormick, is unre ported. 

IV. LUCRETIA POAGE, eighth child of William Poage 
and Ann McCormick, was married to George W. Martin. 
Home, Paris, Mo. ; business, agriculture and stock. 

IV. FRED W. POAGE, ninth child of William Poage 
and Ann McCormick, was married October 15, 1868, to Lizzie 
S. Nunn. 

CHILDREN : 
NEITA MAY. 
FANNIE LINSEY. 
ALBERT GATEWOOD. 

Home, Bentonville, Ark.; business, agriculture. 

V. FANNIE LINSEY POAGE, second child of Fred W. 
Poage and Lizzie S. Nunn, was married to William Preston 
Hopkins, son of Rev. Preston Brok Hopkins, of Elm Springs, 
Ark. 



269 



"It is no more than courteous that we should follow back, from son to 
father, the affection that has vanished from the earth, and that we should 
learn how much we owe to the virtues of our forebears." 



271 



Letter from Jane Hopkins Pogue to her husband, Col. Robert Pogue, 
in the army. Owned by John T. Shanklin, Johnson's Junction, Ky. 

November 3 oth, 1812. 
MY DEARE HUSBAND 

I sent Edwin to see Mr Marshall and showed him the agreement bee- 
tween Walker and yourself. I have enclosed his letter to you that he has 
writen to me. I sent Edwin to se the man that was owing you wheet as 
soon as the milldam and race was finished with a request to diliver there 
wheet, but they have all faild except W. Mats who has dilivered one small 
load. I would not have been so uneasy, but Mr. Walker has been threat- 
ning you with heavy damages. He has not said an illnatured word to 
me yet. But has talked very short to Bill and some of the neighbors. 
He wishes me to borrow the wheet and says he must start again Chrismes. 
Before wheet took a rise I purchased 200 bushels lest there should be some 
failurs, same I got for half a crown A bushell but It cannot be got for less 
then three shillings in cash and will soon be three and sixpence. I have 
been reading of the gallent conduct of G. Tupper and I am much gratifide 
thareat, when our Mayslick horsmen came home, many of them said he 
ought to be shot, others that they would Rather kill him than an indian. 
But that is Mayslick patriotism you know. We are all in health and long 
very much to se you again. The children join in love to you and their 
brothers. I Add no more But remain your loving wife untill death. 

J. POGUE 

Col R Pogue 

P. S. we have not got all our corn in yet But we shall quit it and git our 
wheet out. I have done everything in my power to fulfill the contract 
with walker indeed more than was convenient. Your contract says as 
soon as you conveniently can after water comes But I will still persevere 
in getting the wheet delivered in the mill 
(Adressed on the outside to) 
Col Robert Pogue 

Commander of the 4th regiment of 
Kentucky militia 



273 



Letter from Robert Pogue to his wife, Jane Hopkins Pogue. Owned 
by John T. Shanklin, Johnson's Junction, Ky. 

WASHINGTON CITY, agth Feby, 1816. 
DEAR JANE: 

I suppose your anxious to hear from me. I have had very disagree- 
able weather on my journey, but enjoyed good health. Our friends in 
Rockingham is well. I did not call at Augustia. I have presented my 
petition to Congress on account of Berry's land and the prospect at present 
is favourable but their is no knowing how soon that may be blasted. I 
shall be better able to judge on Saturday next. I have seen James Brown 
who tells me he is not hear prepared to pay me any money, but has no 
doubt but them notes sent by Wilson will be paid off. He says if I had 
written to him, he should have instructed his agent specially to take them 
up, and would write now if I thought Wilson would not have left Orleins 
before a letter could reach thair, and he says it would be an accomidation 
to him if I could make out with the payment of two of the notes and for- 
ward the other two on next fall after he makes sail of his crop of sugar, 
but if I insist on it, the whole money shall be raised as soon as he gits home. 
I expect to leave this place on Monday next for Richmond and from 
thence to Kentucky. I shall likely stay a few days in Augusta to rest 
and see my friends. This is one of the tirisomest places I ever was in 
and the poorest tables that ever I was at in what is called good tavern. 
Beef sells in market for 16 Dollars pr 100 not of a good quality, every- 
thing else that is eatable in proportion. I have heard no forin news that 
is interesting. Their is no part of the Union that is moure favoured with 
plenty than Kentucky nor no part that is less gratefull to the giver. The 
people for 50 miles round this city, it appears to me, is not able to supply 
this town with provitions without infringing on the necessities of their 
own families. You can scarcely walk the street without meeting a Beggar 
that is rely so through necessity. The Drawn butter that we use for the 
purpose of pouring over Boiled fish looks like grewel and can not in jus- 
tice be called anything else and a small portion of tanted butter mixed with 
it. One family in Kentucky I am of opinion, uses as much solid food 
in one year as six of the same size does in this country. Take the country 
through. As for high living on fish and oysters their is but few Kentucky- 
ians that would fatten on them. 

I discover my mind turns much more on any affairs at home when 
abroad, than it does when there, which teaches me this lesson that it is 

274 



our duty and interest to turn our attention more immediately to the business 
that is within our reach, for the business that is done when the mind is 
absent might as well be let alone for nothing short of mistakes and disorder 
is the consequence. 

Give my love to all the family, etc. 

I ever remain your affectionate hausband, 

ROBERT POGUE. 
Mrs. Jane Pogue. 



Letter from William Pogue to his mother, Jane Hopkins Pogue. Owned 
by John T. Shanklin, Johnson's Junction, Ky. 

LEXINGTON, November ;th 1817 
DEAR MOTHER 

I, yesterday, received a letter bearing date the 4th of this month from 
my father, wherein he requests me to write to you immediately to relieve 
your anxiety respicting me, as, he says that, you are apprehensive that I 
am drowned on my way from this place to Mason; but I did not start as 
the money that I expected to get was not and could not be got out of Bank 
and there was an understanding betwixt me and my father if I did not 
get the money I would not go down; for that reason I did not go but re- 
mained in Lexington and attended to my business, of which there was a 
considerable press, it being about the commencement of court. 

I will inform you that the clock which I supposed was on the way to 
Mason was not taken by the Waggoner that had promised to transport 
it ; but it yet remains in this place and I will send it by the first opportunity 
to Mr. Mackey. 

If Amanda wishes to go to Lexington to go to school, I desire you 
or some of the family to inform me when she will be ready to come, that 
I may make arrangement with Mr Ely the for her schooling and also know 
where she will board or where she would desire to board and find out 
when the next quarter will commence that she may know when to prepare, 
and when she is ready I will go down for her as I have promised. 

I would be much pleased to know how soon arrangements could be 
made for Jane to go to school and receive a good education, as I find by 
observation that an understanding, such as I fondly believe the most of 
our family possess, will always command admiration from those less 
informed and repsect and esteem from the learned, and what is still in- 
finitely more satisfactory, it will enable such adepts to from correct ideas 
of the understanding and qualifications of any person in whose company 
they may be, if it be but for a few minutes. Yet there are still greater 

275 



and more weighty considerations in making choice of one whom they 
design for their friend and companion through life, and whom, when 
once received as such, they can never abandon or forsake. How essential 
a requisite is it that we should pry into the depths of their understanding 
before they fix a seal and disposition which perhaps may be forever fatal 
to their happiness and ruinous to their comforts in life, moreover a woman 
well educated will more than recompense in the instruction of a family, 
for the time she may have spent in her own education. The incorrect 
impression which a child receives is difficult, indeed, almost impossible 
to destroy. When it commences going to school, it must be both untaught 
and taught to bring it as far forwards as one that has been properly in- 
structed from the beginning. This has been a subject of debate in our 
debating society (of which I am a member) and it has been decided that 
a woman should have equally as good an education as a man and these 
were the grounds, to enable them to avoid imposition to which they are 
much more exposed than men, to enable them to instruct their children 
in which they, by their domestic situation, have a greater share than the 
men, and to avoid embarrassments in the administration of an estate 
should they survive their husband, with the particulars of which estate 
they are always better acquainted than any other person living. 

I wish Amanda to write to me as soon as she can and inform me what 
branch she has learned, that I may know what class she is prepared to 
enter. Give my love to John and the rest of the family. Tell Robert 
I wish him to learn as fast as he can, and do not let him stay a single night 
from home as it is one of the worst practices that a student can be guilty of. 

I add not, but Remain your affectionate son 

WM L POGUE 
(Addressed on the other side to) 

Mrs Jane Pogue 
Mayslick 

Mason County 



John Pogue to his mother, Jane Hopkins Pogue. Owned by John T. 

Shanklin, Johnson's Junction, Ky. 

AMANDA Ap 2ist 1832 
MY DR MOTHER 

After a long intension I assume the high privilege of addressing one 
who is entitled to the liveliest sence of moral obligation owing to the fact 
that she has born the burden of my being. When I consider the many 
sleepless nights, the anxiety, the vexation, the troubles, you must have 

276 



had to endure for my sake, I am brought to lament that hitherto I have 
been unfaithful, but am happy to say that the older I get, so in proportion, 
my affection for you increases, but this is all the tribute you can ever expect 
from me, for I shall never be able to reward you for the services you have 
rendered to me. My only dependence on this very important matter is 
in God who is fully sufficient to reward for all you bore relative to your 
unworthy son. I often feel great anxiety on your account thinking you 
are in sickness, in trouble, have lonesome nights, thinking of your children 
with great doubts and fears on your mind about their future prospects 
in this world, but let me tell you my dear mother, never let this be the case 
more than you can help. Those fearful apprehensions are only calculated 
to torture your mind, rather turn the vision of your faith to the solemn 
admonition of the Saviour Be not anxious for your life &c. You have 
evry reason to expect the Lord will provide for your children. My only 
wish is that you may lift up your prayer for the remnant that are left pray- 
ing that the Lord will not let them run heedlessly on after the common 
vanities of the times, which so often prove a mar to the children of this 
world, and far more dangerous than the loss of all the goods and chatties 
of the world. 

You will tell father that the Furnace is doing well. She is making 
excellent iron at the rate of three and three quarters or upwards. The 
waggons from Maysville were landed in the night and were received, but 
the river took a suden rise and covered them just before I got from Sandy 
with corn. A part of them have been got out and we hope to get the balance 
when the river falls. The rise amounted to six feet, in a few hours, the 
same night, which was beyond calculation, but such is the fact. Many 
things occurs to put us on the watch. Dr. Hollingsworth has lately mar- 
ried a fine sensable lady. I expect you will surely do me the pleasure of 
writting to me, as I have already hinted, it will frequently relieve many 
an anxious thought and allways give me pleasure to hear from home. Tell 
Am especially she must write. The friends are all well as far as I can hear. 
You will give my warmest love to Father Edwin & Hana and yourself 
Robert Aven and Col Mathews &c and rest assured that I will continue 
your dutiful son 

JOHN 
Mrs Jane Pogue 

(Addressed on the other side to) 
Mrs Jane Pogue 

Mason Cty 
Mayslick 
Ky. 

277 



Letter from John Pogue to his father, Robert Pogue. Owned by John T. 
Shanklin, Johnson's Junction, Ky. 

MASON COUNTY Nov 2oth 1817 
DEAR FATHER 

Yours of the i3th is just come to hand in which we receive much satis- 
faction, and feel gratified with the idea of your being well, and haveing 
spirits as high as the waters, for we believe them to be very high and I can 
say with equal propriety that we are in the same situation. 

I have just returned from seeing Maj. Gray, he lives about thirty one 
miles from here, and find the mast is not as plenty as was expected and in 
consequence of the extreme wet weather, is all sprouted and he is unwilling 
to winter our hogs on that account. I therefore think it best to keep them 
at home; and buy corn and feed them, which I find from a rough calcula- 
tion will cost us about seventy or eighty dollars, I have not received Tait's 
corn yet, but I expect it shortly. 

Mr Metcalfe has offered me four shillings per bushel for wheat, I have 
some thoughts of letting him have what we have at Robertson's, as I expect 
the market for wheat will be low this season, and I think we will have 
enough in our barn for our own use. 

Mr Houghton's progressing with the saw mill. He is almost ready to 
raise. Moor is about half done the race. I have bought the iron for the 
irons, and am about to employ Shotwell to make them as it is out of the 
power of uncle Shanklen to do it. I will manage and work for the best, 
and save all I can. A sound resolution is highly necessary in this case, if 
we act from a principle of duty, we will not greeve at losses, or exult when 
we are gainers. Such a principle we hope to cultivate. Let it not be long 
before we hear from you again, for we are anxious on your account. I 

remain with Obedient respect your 

son JOHN 

(Addressed on the other side to) 
Robert Pogue 

Stantown 

Virginia. 



278 



Letter from John Pogue to his father, Robert Pogue. Owned by John T. 
Shanklin, Johnson's Junction, Ky. 

AMANDA August nth 1829. 

DR FATHER I suppose you are anixous to hear how we are coming on. We 
generly had very bad weather ever since I got here, but we have succeeded 
in getting Rock quarryed and hailed, as well as the nature of the case would 
admit, and the work is now going on as well as we can reasonably expect. 
If the weather should keep good, I think the masons will reach the summit 
of the stack in 12 or 15 days. The foundation of the pot-house is built and 
the frame ready to raise. We are now getting out the boards. They have 
none of the right kind of nails to put them on with. We should now be 
glad to have a cag of sixpeny of the small size if they could be got in Mays- 
ville and sent on convenently. It is probable that Lindsey will go up the 
river to see about an engine, if the health of his family will admit of his 
going. Little Amanda has had an attack of the flux and in some measure 
recovered as to the disease, but in a verry low and languid state. Mrs 
Culver is now lieing in a fever, but I think she is geting better. The matter 
between Dr McDowell and Mr Culver is not settled. They still have no 
communication, but they both seem to be acting in the line of their partic- 
ular duties and I think with prudent management, the thing in some 
measure will wear away so as not to hinder business. The shoes that 
you ordered have never come to hand. There is a shoemaker about 
settled at Vincent Powell's who engages to do our shoemakeing on as good 
terms as it can be done any where else. It will therefore not be necessary 
to make any other contract about the article. If there should be some 
money got for Lindsey, to go up the river, to defray expenses, it would be 
well. I supose the want of the engine will be the only thing that will keep 
us out of blast about Christmas. We are all, except the two cases mentioned, 
very well. Give my love and respects to all the family. I remain your 
dutiful Son 

JOHN H. POGUE 

N B it is not necessary to give yourself much trouble about the nails without 
they could be sent direct. If we cant do otherwise, we will try to-pennys. 

J. H. P. 

(Addressed to) 

Genl. Robert Pogue 
Mason County 
Kentucky. 



270 



//. JANE HOPKINS, daughter 0} John and Jean 
Gordon Hopkins, was married June 4, i/p/, to Robert Poage, 
of May slick, Mason County, Ky., who was born in Augusta 
County, Va., October 6, 1766. 

William Poage, son of Robert, the pioneer, married Ann Kenedy. In 
company with Daniel Boone and others, he and his family settled at Boon- 
ville, Ky., about September, 1775. In February, 1776, he removed 
his family to the fort at Harrodsburg, and in the spring of that year cleared 
ground and planted corn two miles from the fort. He had great mechanical 
skill, and during more than two years made all the wooden vessels used by 
the people in the fort. He also made the woodwork of the first plow used 
in Kentucky and the first loom on which weaving was done in that state. 
On September i, 1778, in a fight with the Indians, he was wounded by 
three balls, but his companions escaped unhurt. The next day they found 
him and carried him to a hiding-place. The Indians discovered them and 
laid for them, but were found out and attacked. Four of them were killed, 
one of whom had Poage's gun, which was recovered and became the 
property of his son, Robert Poage of Mason County, Ky. William Poage 
was carried home, but died the next day. Ann Kennedy was four times 
married, first to Mr. Wilson, second to William Poage, third to Joseph 
Lindsay, who was killed at the battle of Blue Licks in 1782, and fourth to 
James McGinty. She is said to have been a woman of rare energy and 
ingenuity. Collins says she brought the first spinning-wheel to Kentucky 
and made the first linen manufactured in that country from the lint of 
nettles, and the first linsey made from nettle-lint and buffalo wool. Wil- 
liam Poage and Ann Kennedy were the father and mother of Robert 
Poage, who married Jane Hopkins, daughter of John Hopkins the pioneer. 



280 



//. JANE HOPKINS, daughter oj John Hopkins and 
Jean Gordon, was married June 4., 1791, to Robert Pogue, of 
Mason County, Ky. 

CHILDREN: 

JOHN HOPKINS, born Sept. 24, 1792; died Aug. 18, 1836. 

WILLIAM LINDSEY, born May 24, 1794; died an old man (no date). 

EDWIN, born Mar. 27, 1797; died Nov. 27, 1841. 

AMY, born May 24, 1799; died Aug. 17, 1800. 

HANNAH AMANDA, born Mar. 4, 1801; died Jan. i, 1827. 

JANE ISABELLA, born Apr. i, 1803; died May 21, 1827. 

ROBERT, born Apr. i, 1803; died a baby. 

ROBERT C., born Aug. 20, 1805; died Sept. i, 1836. 

ANN E., born June 19, 1808; died Oct. 10, 1838. 

Robert and Jane Hopkins Poage lived in Mason County, Va., on a 
large plantation, a part of which is still held by members of the family. It 
is said that the first white child born in Kentucky was their oldest son, 
John Hopkins Poage. Mrs. Carttrell of Normal, Ky., says, " Grandmother 
(Jane Hopkins Poage) was a woman of great personal courage, energy, and 
ability. She managed a large family of slaves and a very large farm during 
the absence of her husband and oldest son in the War of 1812." 

The spelling of the name was chansred at an early date from "Poage" 
to " Pogue." 



281 



III. JOHN HOPKINS POGUE, first child 0} Jane Hop- 
kins and Robert Pogue, was married November 20, 1832, to 
Sarah Ann Moore, 0} Cable County, Va. (She was oj Dutch 
descent.} 

CHILDREN: 

FREDERICK ROBERT, born Sept. 1833. 
ELIZA JANE, born Mar. 20, 1835. 

Home, Greenup County, Ky.; business, agriculture. 

III. JOHN HOPKINS POGUE was a man of fine Christian char- 
acter. He was an elder in the Betheseda Presbyterian Church, now Ash- 
land. He lived on the farm given to him by his father, now owned and 
occupied by his daughter, Eliza Jane Garttrell and her sons and widowed 
daughter, Anna G. Kerr. 

IV. FREDERICK ROBERT POGUE, first child of John 
Pogue and Sarah Ann Moore, died in infancy, and is buried 
in one of the Ashland, Ky., cemeteries, beside his father. 



IV. ELIZA JANE POGUE, second child of John Pogue 
and Sarah Ann Moore, was married October 25, 1853, to Henry 
C. Gartrell, of Cincinnati, Ohio, who was born May 23, 
and died April, 1870, at Ashland, Ky. 

CHILDREN: 

RICHARD MOORE, born Sept. 9, 1854; died June 18, 1878. 

JOHN HOPKINS, born June 24, 1856; died Sept. 2, 1857. 

ANN MARIA, born Dec. 12, 1859. 

HENRY C., born Mar. 12, 1861. 

VIOLA, born Apr. 9, 1863. 

VIRGINIA, born June 25, 1866. 

ETHELBERT HOPKINS, born Nov. 24, 1869. 

Home, Normal, Ky., a suburb of Ashland, built on her farm. 



282 



V. RICHARD MOORE GARTRELL, first child of Eliza 
Jane Pogue and Henry C. Gartrell, died at twenty-three years 
of age, and is buried in the cemetery at Ashland, Ky. 

V. JOHN HOPKINS GARTRELL, second child of Eliza 
Jane Pogue and Henry C. Gartrell, died in infancy, and is 
buried in the cemetery at Ashland, Ky. 

V. ANNA MARIA GARTRELL, third child of Eliza 
Jane Pogue and Henry C. Gartrell, was married February 
8, 1893, to W. M. Ken, who was born in Gallia County, Ohio, 
July 22, 184.0, and died May 9, 1898. 

Home, Normal, Boyd County, Ky. ; business, banker and hardware. 

V. HENRY C. GARTRELL, fourth child of Eliza Jane 
Pogue and Henry C. Gartrell. 

Is on the farm their mother inherited from her Grandfather Robert 
Poage. 

V. VIOLA GARTRELL, fifth child of Eliza Jane Pogue 
and Henry C. Gartrell, was married September 20, 1893, to 
Judge M. H. Houston, who was born in Rockbridge County, Va. 

Home, Ashland, Ky. ; business, law. 

V. VIRGINIA GARTRELL, sixth child of Eliza Jane 
Pogue and Henry C. Gartrell, was married June 10, 1895, to 
Judge Thomas Cherrington, of Ironton, Ohio, who was born 
in Gallia County, Ohio. 

Home, Ironton, O.; business, law. 

V. ETHELBERT HOPKINS GARTRELL, seventh child 
of Eliza Jane Pogue and Henry C. Gartrell, was married 
November 28, 1901, to Mabel E. Conant, of Newton, Mass. 

Home, Normal, Ky. ; business, manufacturer of fire brick. 

283 



///. WILLIAM LINDSEY POGUE, second child of Jane 
Hopkins and Robert Pogue, was married, first, to Ann Mc~ 

Cormick. 
CHILDREN: 

HARVEY EDGAR, born 1825. 

AMANDA. 

III. WILLIAM LINDSEY POGUE was married second to Caroline 
Beach. 

CHILDREN : 
WILLIAM L. 
ROBERT. 
HARRIET. 
MARY ELIZA. 

IV. HARVEY EDGAR POGUE, first child of William 
Lindsey Pogue and Ann McCormick, was married to Frances 
Wood, of Maysville, Ky. 

CHILDREN: 

JOHN FLEMING. 
HARVEY EDGAR. 
JAMES WOOD. 
PROVENCE MCCORMICK. 
THOMAS LIGHTFOOT. 
Home, Avondale, O. 

V. JOHN FLEMING, PROVENCE McCORMICK, 
and THOMAS LIGHTFOOT POGUE, the first, fourth, 
and fifth children of Harvey Edgar Pogue and Frances Wood. 

Live with their mother at Avondale, O. 

V. HARVEY EDGAR POGUE, second child of Harvey 

Edgar Pogue and Frances Wood. 
Lives at Maysville, Ky. 

V. JAMES WOOD POGUE, third child of Harvey Edgar 
Poage and Frances Wood, was married to Madge Adele Ellis, 

of Atlanta, Ga. 

Home, Atlanta, Ga.; business, clergyman. 

284 



///. EDWIN POGUE, third child of Jane Hopkins and 
Robert Pogue, was married January 20, 1820, to Maria Met- 
calf, of Fleming County, Ky. 
CHILDREN: 

Four of the children died in infancy. 

ROBERT. 

Maria Metcalf Pogue, died November 27, 1841. 



///. AMY POGUE, fourth child of Jane Hopkins and 
Robert Pogue, died a baby, and is buried in Mason County, 
on the home farm. 



III. HANNAH AMANDA POGUE, fifth child of Jane 
Hopkins and Robert Pogue, was married September 12, 1822, 
to J. E. McDouell, who was born in Flemingsburg, Ky. 



III. JANE ISABELLA POGUE, sixth child of Jane 
Hopkins and Robert Pogue, was married November 27, 1828, 
to William MacKay. 
CHILDREN: 

ANDREW WILLIAM. 

285 



IV. ANDREW WILLIAM MacKAY, first child of Jane 
Isabella Pogue and William MacKay, unreported. 



III. ROBERT POGUE, seventh child 0} Jane Hopkins 
and Robert Pogue, died in infancy. 



III. ROBERT C. POGUE, eighth child of Jane Hopkins 
and Robert Pogue. 

Went to see his brother John during his fatal illness with the yellow 
fever, contracted the disease, and died a few days later. 



///. ANN E. POGUE, ninth child of Jane Hopkins and 
Robert Pogue, was married June 3, 1829, to Samuel Garrison. 

CHILDREN : 

ROBERT, born Mar. 30, 1830. 

SAMUEL, born Oct. 28, 1833; died Jan. 5, 1860. 

JOHN, born Aug. 30, 1836. 

BLACKBURN, born May 30, 1838. 



286 



IV. ROBERT GARRISON, first child of Ann E. Pogue and 
Samuel Garrison, was married to Fanny Burch, of Marietta, O. 

IV. ROBERT GARRISON was married second to Lizzie Garland. 

CHILDREN: 
ANNA RICE. 
WALLACE BRUCE. 
KATE. 

Home, Bowling Green, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 

IV. ROBERT GARRISON graduated from the Marietta College, 
Marietta, O. 



IV. SAMUEL GARRISON, second child of Ann E. Pogue 
and Samuel Garrison. 

Was a graduate of Marietta College, Marietta, O., and from a law 
school in Cincinnati, O. 
He died January 5, 1860. 



IV. JOHN GARRISON, third child of Ann E. Pogue 
and Samuel Garrison, was married to Katrina Garrison, of 
Scottsville, Ky. 

CHILDREN: 

LOUELLA POAGE. 
ETTA HOPKINS. 
MINNIE WIGINGTON. 
KENNETH. 
LESTER HUGO. 

Home, Bowling Green, Ky. ; business, teacher. 

IV. BLACKBURN GARRISON, fourth child of Samuel 
Garrison and Ann E. Pogue. 

Entered the army in October, 1861, under John M. Harland, Tenth 
Kentucky Infantry. He was mortally wounded at the battle of Chicka- 
mauga on the igth of September and died October 10, 1863. 

287 



" There isn't so much difference in the troubles on this earth as there 
is in the folks that have to bear them." 



28q 



II. HANNAH HOPKINS was born in Rockingham 
County, Va., July, 1769. Her father was John Hopkins, 
and her mother was Jean Gordon. She was married in 
to James Shanklin, her own cousin, who was born May 
1768, and died May u, 1863. Hannah Hopkins Shanklin 
died August 3, 1817. 

Of her James Shanklin, her husband, said: "Under all her afflictions in 
this vale of tears she manifested a great degree of patience and resig- 
nation to the Divine will and a firm reliance on the Saviour of sinners who 
was all her salvation and desire." 

The following is a copy of the letter given them when leaving Virginia 
for Kentucky. "This is to testify that James Shanklin and Hannah, his 
wife, have lived in this Congregation from infancy to this time, that they 
have never exposed themselves to the sensure of the Church, and are both 
in full communion, are hereby certified, Cook's Creek, Sept. 29, 1794. By 

order of Session, 

BENJAMIN IRVIN, V.D.M." 

II. HANNAH HOPKINS and James Shanklin came to Mason County, 
Ky., in 1794. She and her sister, Jane Hopkins Poage, wife of Gen. Robert 
Poage, were not far apart, and a third sister, Mary Hopkins Poage, wife of 
Col. Robert Poage, lived in Greenup County, Ky. Hannah Hopkins and 
James Shanklin had several children who died in infancy. One child grew 
to maturity. He was, 

JOHN HOPKINS, born Nov. 8, 1796; died Nov. 10, 1874. 

Home, Mason County, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 



///. JOHN HOPKINS SHANKLIN was married 
January 20, 1820, to Sally Metcalj, who was born January 
28, 1800, and died November 4, 1856. 

CHILDREN: 

JAMES HOPKINS, born Dec. 4, 1820; died July 23, 1887. 
SALLY PICKET, born Feb. 10, 1822; died Dec. 18, 1895. 
Home, Mason County, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 

291 



IV. JAMES HOPKINS SHANKLIN, first child of 
John Hopkins Shanklin and Sally Metcalf, was married June 4., 
/&/5, to Agnes Virginia Poage, who was born October 7, 1824., 
at the old homestead, Greenup County, Ky., where she still lives. 

CHILDREN: 

JOHN T., born Aug. 12, 1846. 

WILLIAM PICKET, born Sept. 20, 1847. 

SAMUEL ALBERT, born Dec. 21, 1853. 

NANNIE POGUE, born May 30, 1858. 

ROBERT ANDERSON, born Sept. 20, 1861; died Jan. 14, 1862. 

SALLY METCALF, born June 13, 1863. 

Home, Mayslick, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 

V. JOHN T. SHANKLIN, first child of James Hop- 
kins Shanklin and Agnes Virginia Poage, was married May 
28, 1891, to Minnie Hendrick, who died March 30, 1892. 

V. JOHN T. SHANKLIN was married a second time, September 
20, 1893, to Mollie Calvin, who was born April 2, 1864, in Boyd 
County, Ky. 

CHILDREN: 

LOUISE CALVIN, born Sept. 28, 1894. 

VIRGINIA POAGE, born July 30, 1899. 

JAMES HOPKINS, born Feb. 8, 1902. 

Home, Johnson's Junction, Fleming County, Ky. (Postoffice) ; business, 
agriculture. The farm is in Mason County, Ky. 

V. WILLIAM PICKET SHANKLIN, second child of 
James Hopkins Shanklin and Agnes Virginia Poage, was 
married March 4., 1885, to Clara McAllister, who was born 
February 22, 1864., in Dallas County, Tex. 
CHILDREN: 

GLEN POAGE, born Jan. 4, 1886. 

MARY MCALLISTER, born Aug. 2, 1890. 

AGNES VIRGINIA born May 17, 1896. 

The first child was born in Dallas County, Tex., and the second and 
third in Shelby County, Ky. 

Home, Millersburg, Ky. (since March, 1901); business, agriculture. 

V. WILLIAM PICKET SHANKLIN is an elder in the Presby- 
terian church. 

292 



V. SAMUEL ALBERT SHANKLIN, third child of 
James Hopkins Shanklin and Agnes Virginia Poage, was 
married January 20, 1881, to Anna Eliza Piper, who was 
born October 22, 1862, near Paris, Ky. 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES ALEXANDER, born Mar. 14, 1883; died May 12, 1887. 

ELLEN FITZGERALD, born Mar. 7, 1889. 

AGNES VIRGINIA, born Apr. 15,1892. 

Home, Maysville, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 

V. SAMUEL ALBERT SHANKLIN is a deacon in the Presby- 
terian church. 

V. NANNY POAGE SHANKLIN, fourth child of 
James Hopkins Shanklin and Agnes Virginia Poage, was 
married June 21, 1881, to William Letton Piper, of Nicholas 
County, Ky. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM ERNEST, born May 14, 1883. 

ELIZA ANN, born Sept. 21, 1884. 

AGNES POAGE, born Sept. 30, 1886; died May 9, 1887. 

JAMES SHANKLIN, born Apr. 7, 1888. 

SARAH METCALF, born June 24, 1889. 

Home, Carlish, Nicholas County, Ky. ; business, stock farmer. 

V. ROBERT ANDERSON SHANKLIN, fifth child of 
James Hopkins Shanklin and Agnes Virginia Poage, died a baby. 

V. SALLY METCALF SHANKLIN, sixth child of 
James Hopkins Shanklin and Agnes Virginia Poage, is un- 
married. 

Makes her home with her mother at the old homestead. 



293 



IV. SALLIE PICKETT SHANKLIN, second child of 
John Hopkins Shanklin and Sally Metcalf, was married in 
184.5 t William Poage (first cousin of Mrs. Agnes Virginia 
Poage Shanklin, wife of James Hopkins Shanklin). 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES SHANKLIN, born Apr. 25, 1846. 

JOHN FALLIS, born Apr. 29, 1849. 
GEORGE HOPKINS, born Mar. 25, 1852. 

ANNIE KENNEDY, born Mar. 25, 1854. 

SALLY METCALF, born Dec. 15, 1859. 

WILLIAM, born Mar. 22, 1860. 

Home, Mayslick, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 

V. JAMES SHANKLIN POAGE, first child of Sally 
Picket Shanklin and William T. Poage, was married Novem- 
ber 30, 1894., to Mary Louise Jones, who was born March 12, 
1859, near Ashland, Ky., and died September 6, igoi. 

Home, Mayslick, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 

V. JOHN FALLIS POAGE, second child of Sally Picket 
Shanklin and William T. Poage, is unmarried. 
Home, Mayslick, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 

V. GEORGE HOPKINS POAGE, third child of Sally 
Picket Shanklin and William T. Poage, was married March 
15, 1883, to Mary Elizabeth Callison, who died February i, 1904.. 

CHILDREN: 

INFANT, born Jan. 13, 1884; died Feb. 3, 1884. 
FOREST C., born Jan. 24, 1885. 
MABEL P., born Jan. 5, 1888; died Mar. 20, 1894. 
MYRTIE P., born Dec. 10, 1890. 

Home, Gallatin, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 



2Q4 



V. ANNIE KENNEDY POAGE, fourth child of Sally 
Picket Shanklin and William T. Poage, was married Novem- 
ber 3, 1880, to H. C. Hawings, who was born in Mason County, 
Ky. 

CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM PICKET, born Aug. 6, 1881. 

Home, Mayslick, Ky.; business, agriculture and county surveyor. 

V. SALLY METCALF POAGE, fifth child of Sally 
Picket Shanklin and William T. Poage, was married October 
23, 1889, to James C. Darnell, who was born in Fleming 
County, Ky. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNIE POAGE, born Apr. 16, 1894. 

ISABELLE THOMPSON, born Aug. 5, 1896. 
Home, Mayslick, Ky. ; business, agriculture. 

V. WILLIAM POAGE, sixth child of Sally Picket Shank- 
lin and William T. Poage, was married October 30, 1889, to 
Marguerite B. Barnett. 

CHILDREN: 

RAY GRADY, born Aug. 19, 1890. 

ROBERT TRIMLE, born Aug. 25, 1893. 
MARY GENEVIEVE, born Aug. 26, 1901. 
WILL ETTA, born Aug. 22, 1904. 

Home, Gallatin, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 



295 



"A true delineation of the smallest man and his scene of pilgrimage 
through life is capable of interesting the greatest man; that all men are 
capable of interesting the greatest men; that all men are to an unspeakable 
degree brothers, each man's life a strange emblem of every man's life ; and 
that human portraits faithfully drawn are of all pictures the welcomest on 
human walls." Carlyle. 



29? 



//. RUTH HOPKINS, daughter 0} John Hopkins and 
Jean Gordon, was not married. 

She made her home with her brother Thomas Hopkins. 
Home, Harrisonburg, Va., until 1818, when she moved to Christian 
County, Ky., near Harpersville. 



299 



" They that on glorious ancestors enlarge 
Proclaim their debt instead of their discharge." Young. 



301 



//. THOMAS HOPKINS, son of John Hopkins and 
Jean Gordon, was married March 10, 1795, to Sarah Erwin, 
who was born July 28, 1775, and died June n, 1857. 

CHILDREN : 

JOHN, born Feb. n, 1796; died Mar. 16, 1872. 

FRANCIS GORDON, born Nov. 22, 1800. 
BENJAMIN HINTON, bom Oct. 13, 1806; died 1869. 
ANNA JANE, born Dec. 8, 1813. 

RUFUS C., born Nov. 16, 1816. 

Home, Harrisonburg, Va., until 1817, when they moved to Christian 
County, Ky., near Hopkinsville ; business, agriculture. 

///. JOHN HOPKINS, first child of Thomas Hopkins 
and Sarah Erwin, was married January 21, 1820, to Jane 
Erwin, who died June 16, 1832. 

CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM ERWIN, born Feb. 24, 1821; died Aug. 24, 1903. 
THOMAS CHALMERS, born Sept. 17, 1826; died. 

III. JOHN HOPKINS was married second to Nancy Andrew. 

CHILDREN: 

JANE ELIZA, born Jan. 6, 1838. 

III. JOHN HOPKINS was married third to Dorothy Choate, who 
was born April 17, 1812, and died January 12, 1894. 

CHILDREN: 

DAVID CHOATE, born May 9, 1849; died April 13, 1875. 
Home, Kearsage, Henderson County, 111.; business, agriculture. 

IV. WILLIAM ERWIN HOPKINS, first child 0} John 
Hopkins and Jane Erwin, was unmarried. 

Home, Kearsage, 111. 



303 



IV. THOMAS CHALMERS HOPKINS, second child 
of John Hopkins and Sarah Erwin, was not married. 



IV. ELIZA JANE HOPKINS, third child of John Hop- 
kins and first child of Nancy Andrew, is not married. 
Home, Oregon. 



IV. DAVID C HO ATE, fourth child of John Hopkins 
and first child of Dorothy Choate, was not married. 



304 



///. FRANCIS GORDON HOPKINS, second child of 
Thomas Hopkins and Sarah Erwin, was married May 6, 1830, 
to Martha L. Battle. 

CHILDREN: 

MARTHA, born 1831. 
THOMAS B., born 1832. 
Home, Lafayette, la. 



///. BENJAMIN HINTON HOPKINS, third child 
of Thomas Hopkins and Sarah Erwin, was married July 

, to Salina Wheatly, who was born about 1812. 
Salina Wheatly Hopkins died February 17, 1891. 



305 



///. ANNA JANE HOPKINS, fourth child of Thomas 
Hopkins and Sarah Erwin, was married May 30, 1836, to 
James Scott, who was born January 25, 1816, and died Feb- 
ruary 24., i8gi. 

CHILDREN: 

THOMAS WILLIAM, born May 14, 1837. 

ROBERT FRANCIS, born Oct. 14, 1839. 

RIIFUS HOPKINS, born June 24, 1842. 

MARY STEWART, born Mar. n, 1845; died Feb. 24, 1898. 

SAMUEL WILSON, born Nov. 13, 1847; died June 25, 1848. 

FRANCES ALICE, born May 29, 1849; died Feb. 16, 1889. 

WALTER BENJAMIN, born Mar. 14, 1852. 

JAMES ALBERT, born Apr. 28, 1855. 

CHARLES, born June 28, 1858; died Oct. 12, 1870. 

Home, Monmouth, 111. ; business, grocer. 

IV. THOMAS WILLIAM SCOTT, first child oj Anna 
Jane Hopkins and James Scott, was married April 24, 1872, 
in San Francisco, CaL, to Mahina Beats Morton. 

CHILDREN: 

FLORENCE L., born Nov. 30, 1875. 

JOHN JAMES, born July 20, 1878. 

Malvina Beals Morton Scott died August i, 1878. 

Home, San Francisco, Cal. ; business, accountant in the customs house. 

IV. THOMAS WILLIAM SCOTT was in the grocery business till the 
beginning of the Civil War, when he enlisted in Company F, Seventeenth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served as sergeant and seargeant major. 
He was in the battles of Frederickton, Mo., Fort Donaldson, Shiloh, Inka, 
and Hutche Bridge, and various skirmishes. He was wounded at Shiloh 
and discharged on account of ill health, November, 1862. He went to 
California in 1865 and has been employed in the United States Custom 
House continuously ever since. 



306 



V. FLORENCE L. SCOTT, first child of Thomas William 
Scott and Malvina Beats Morton, was married March 6, 1896, 
to William H. Jones. 

Home, San Francisco, Cal. 



V. JOHN JAMES JONES, second child of Thomas 
William Scott and Malvina Beats Morton, was married October 
, 1904., to Madeline Rowe Bean. 
Home, Boston, Mass. ; business, salesman. 



IV. ROBERT FRANCIS SCOTT, second child of Anna 
Jane Hopkins and James Scott, was married November 3, 
1896, to Mary Coffey, of Marion, O. 

Home, Monmouth, 111. ; business, grocer. 



IV. RUFUS HOPKINS SCOTT, third child of Anna 
Jane Hopkins and James Scott, was married to Marietta Usher, 
of Hopkinsville, Ky. 

CHILDREN : 

HAROLD USHER, born Jan. 17, 1885. 
Home, Monmouth, 111.; business, grocer. 

IV. MARY STEWART SCOTT, fourth child of Anna 
Jane Hopkins and James Scott, died unmarried, and is buried 
at Monmouth, III. 

IV. SAMUEL WILSON SCOTT, fifth child of Anna 
Jane Hopkins and James Scott, died in infancy. 



307 



IV. FRANCES ALICE SCOTT, sixth child of Anna 
Jane Hopkins and James Scott, died unmarried, and is buried 
at Monmouth, III. 



IV. WALTER BENJAMIN SCOTT, seventh child of 
Anna Jane Hopkins and James Scott, is unmarried. 
Home, Monmouth, 111. ; business, grocer. 



IV. JAMES ALBERT SCOTT, eighth child of Anna Jane 
Hopkins and James Scott, is unmarried. 
Home, Monmouth, 111. ; business, grocer. 



IV. CHARLES SCOTT, ninth child of Anna Jane Hop- 
kins and James Scott, died unmarried, and is buried at Mon- 
mouth, III. 



308 



///. RUFUS C. HOPKINS, fifth child of Thomas Hop- 
kins and Sarah Erwin, was married in 1853 to Sophia Bain. 

CHILDREN: 

HENRY, born Nov. 30, 1854; died May 15, 1876. 
CLARA, born June 22, 1857; died June n, 1877. 

Sophia Bain died in 1860. 

III. RUFUS C. HOPKINS was married a second time, to Margaret 
Cusic. 

CHILDREN : 

MARY, born Oct. 16, 1863. 
CLEMENT, born May 28, 1868. 

Home, San Francisco, Cal. 

III. RUFUS C. HOPKINS left Virginia in 1818, when but two years 
old, so has no recollections of the family in that state. He lived in Kentucky 
until about 1835 and then went to Illinois, where he remained about two 
years. From here he went to Jackson, Miss., to join his brother Frank, and 
in 1850 to California. He has little communication with any of the family 
except those in Illinois. At eighty-six years of age (1902) he retains all 
his faculties and is quite active. He employs his time in writing, but not 
usually for publication, though he has one book of poems, "Rose and 
Thistle," in print. His son will doubtless edit his later works. His 
daughter Mary is his homekeeper. 



309 




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" The man who has not anything to boast of but his illustrious ancestors 
is like a potato the only good belonging to him is underground." Sir T. 
Overbury. 



311 



//. JOHN HOPKINS, son of John Hopkins and Jean 
Gordon, born 1776, and died September 14, 1842, was married 
to Elizabeth Baxter, who was born June 22, 1776, and died 
June 27, 1844. 

CHILDREN: 

MARY, born Oct. 2, 1789. 

THOMAS, born Aug. n, 1791. 

GEORGE BAXTER, born Jan. 16, 1794. 

JOHN, born Jan. 5, 1796. 

LUCINDA, born June 3, 1798. 

JOSEPH BAXTER, born May 3, 1800. 

CYRUS, born Nov. 23, 1809. 

Home, Upper Tract, W. Va. 

///. MARY HOPKINS, first child of John Hopkins and 
Elizabeth Baxter, died in childhood, and is buried at Upper 
Tract, Pendleton County, Va. 



HI. THOMAS HOPKINS, second child of John Hop- 
kins and Elizabeth Baxter, was married October 14, 1819, to 
Eunice Cunningham. 

CHILDREN: 

MARY E., born Nov. 13, 1820. 
GEORGE B., born July 25, 1822. 
CAROLINE, born Mar. 19, 1824. 
AMANDA, born Nov. 15, 1825. 
REBECCA H., born Feb. 25, 1828. 
SARAH ANN, born July 8, 1830. 
JEMINA, born Feb. 24, 1833. 



///. GEORGE BAXTER HOPKINS, third child of 
John Hopkins and Elizabeth Baxter, died in childhood. 

313 



///. JOHN HOPKINS, fourth child of John Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Baxter, was married April 12, 1825, to Phebe 
Dyer. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM LOVE, born June 6, 1826. 

JOSEPH BAXTER, born Apr. 5, 1828. 

MARY JANE, born Sept. 29, 1830. 

ANN ELIZABETH, born Mar. 27, 1833. 
GEORGE WASHINGTON, born Mar. 27, 1833. 

JAMES DYER, born Mar. 24, 1836. 

MARGARET L., born Apr. 16, 1838. 

REBECCA D., born 1839. 



///. LUCINDA HOPKINS, fifth child of John Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Baxter, was married to Daniel Armentrout. 
Home, Upper Tract, Pendleton County, Va. 



///. JOSEPH BAXTER HOPKINS, sixth child of 
John Hopkins and Elizabeth Baxter, died in childhood, and 
is buried at Upper Tract, Pendleton County, Va. 



///. CYRUS HOPKINS, seventh child of John Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Baxter, was married to Susan E. Johnson, who 
was born in Pendleton County, Va., January 17, 1814.. 

CHILDREN: 

WILLIAM JOHNSON, born Sept. 6, 1837. 
MATTIE H., born Feb. 27, 1840. 

JOHN J., born Dec. 19, 1843. 

Susan E. Johnson died August 6, 1858, and is buried in Rockingham 
County, Va. 

III. CYRUS HOPKINS married second Mrs. Jane Rolston Hop- 
kins, who died November 8, 1884, and is buried in Rockingham County, Va. 
CHILDREN: 

CHARLES D., born Feb. 27, 1866. 

Home, Upper Tract, Pendleton County, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

A letter from Cyrus Hopkins, Upper Tract, Pendleton County, Va., 
dated December 27, 1876, says: "John Hopkins lived in Rockingham 
County and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and also represented 
his country in the legislature of Virginia. There were three brothers, 
William, John, and Archibald. They came to Virginia from Albany. 
When they first came there were but two; they then located in Greenbrier 
County in southern Virginia, but not being satisfied with the country, sold 
out and returned to Albany. When they again returned, they brought 
with them one other brother, and all three located in Rockingham County, 
Va. 

"My father, John, married a Miss Baxter, and removed to Pendleton, 
to what is known as Upper Tract; his younger brother, Thomas, remained 
in the county of Rockingham on the old homestead until his family was 
about grown; he then sold out and removed to Kentucky and afterwards 
to Ohio. 

" As to the history of my aunts on the father's side, I have no recollection 
of ever seeing any one except Aunt Sally." 

" Respectfully, 

CYRUS HOPKINS." 



IV. WILLIAM JOHNSON HOPKINS, first child of 
Cyrus Hopkins and Susan E. Johnson, was married May 4, 
1869, to Sarah S. Kile, who was born in Pendleton County, Va. 

CHILDREN: 

THOMAS BRUCE, born Mar. 16, 1870; died Aug. 28, 1871. 

MARY SUSAN, born June n, 1872. 

JOHN EDWARD, born Apr. 6, 1874. 

WILLIE EUNICE, born Jan. 4, 1877. 

Home, Upper Tract, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

IV. WILLIAM JOHNSON HOPKINS was a soldier in the Con- 
federate Army, was in the Eighteenth Virginia Cavalry. 

V. THOMAS BRUCE HOPKINS, first child of William 
Johnson Hopkins and Sarah S. Kile, died an infant. 

V. MARY SUSAN HOPKINS, second child of William 
Johnson Hopkins and Sarah S. Kile, was married September 
75, 1897, to Ernest W. Hefner, who was born January u, 1872. 

CHILDREN: 

CHARLOTTE, born June 21, 1898; died Apr. 2, 1900. 

CHARLES SAMUEL, born Feb. 23, 1901. 

WILLIAM HOPKINS, born Aug. 22, 1903; died Nov. 15, 1904. 

Home, Sutton, Braxton County, W. Va.; business, county clerk, Brax- 
ton County, Va. 

V. JOHN EDWARD HOPKINS, third child oj William 
Johnson Hopkins and Sarah S. Kile, is unmarried. 

V. WILLIE EUNICE HOPKINS, fourth child of Wil- 
liam Johnson Hopkins and Sarah S. Kile, was married Decem- 
ber 27, 1899, to Frank H. Kidd, who was born April 4, 1876. 

CHILDREN: 

MILDRED, born Mar. 5, 1901. 
PAUL, born Sept. 10, 1903. 

Home, Flat Woods, Braxton County, Va.; business, commercial 
traveler. 

316 



IV. MATTIE H. HOPKINS, second child of Cyrus 
Hopkins and Susan E. Johnson, was married April i, 1868, 
to Captain J. H. Daugherty, who was born in Moorfield, W . 
Va., September 24., 1839. 

CHILDREN: 

MORRIS BAXTER, born Apr. 17, 1869. 

SUSAN HOPKINS, born Dec. 16, 1872. 

ANNIE HAMILTON, born May 27, 1875. 

SALLIE TOLBERT, born Dec. 1,1877. 

MARY ROLSTON, born May 12, 1880. 

WILLIAM HENRY, born Apr. 5, 1883. 

JAMES HAMILTON, born Apr. 13, 1886. 

Home, Franklin, W. Va. ; business, merchant. 

V. MORRIS BAXTER DAUGHERTY, first child of 
Mattie H. Hopkins and J. H. Dougherty, is unmarried. 

Home, Washington, D. C.; business, clerk in the Treasury Department. 

V. SUSAN HOPKINS DAUGHERTY, second child of 
Mattie H. Hopkins and J. H. Daugherty, is unmarried. 
Home, Franklin, W. Va. ; business, teacher. 

V. ANNIE HAMILTON DAUGHERTY, third child 
oj Mattie H. Hopkins and J. H. Daugherty, was married 
December 18, 1898, to Hugh Carey Boggs. 

CHILDREN : 

ANNIE MARGUERITE, born Aug. 3, 1900. 
RICHARD HOPKINS, born Aug. 12, 1903. 
Home, Franklin, W. Va.; business, agriculture. 

V. SALLIE TOLBERT DAUGHERTY, fourth child of 
Mattie H. Hopkins and J. H. Daugherty, is unmarried. 
Home, Savannah, Ga. ; business, trained nurse. 

V. MARY RALSTON DAUGHERTY, fifth child of 
Mattie H. Hopkins and J. H. Daugherty, is unmarried. 
Home, Petersburg, W. Va. ; business, stenographer. 



V. WILLIAM HENRY DAUGHERTY, sixth child of 
Mattie H. Hopkins and J. H. Dougherty, was married to 
Lenora Bible. 

CHILDREN: 

ALICE, born Sept. 6, 1902. 

ANNIE MABLE, born Jan. 1904. 
Home, North Fork, W. Va. ; business, agriculture. 

V. JAMES HAMILTON DAUGHERTY, seventh child 
of Mattie H. Hopkins and J. H. Daugherty. 
Is a student at Franklin, W. Va. 

IV. JOHN J. HOPKINS, third child 0} Cyrus Hopkins 
and Susan E. Johnson, was married to Fannie Harper, of 
Upper Tract, W. Va. 

CHILDREN : 

SALLIE, born Aug. 26, 1883. 

JOHN JAMES, born Aug. 27, 1888. 

WILLIAM BOULDIN, born May 9, 1891. 

CHARLES BAXTER, born Apr. 29, 1895; died Aug. 3, 1895. 

LESTER HARPER, born June n, 1898. 

RICHARD WORTH, born Apr. 7, 1901; died July 9, 1901. 

MARTHA, born July 8, 1903; died Oct. 22, 1903. 

Home, Upper Tract, W. Va. ; business, physician and surgeon. 

IV. JOHN J. HOPKINS was a soldier in the Confederate Army. 
Served in Company B, Fourteenth Virginia Cavalry. He studied medicine 
at the University of Virginia from 1869 to 1871. He then went to New 
York and graduated from the University Medical College in 1874. He is 
medical examiner for two life insurance companies and is chairman of the 
Democratic committee of the county. 

IV. CHARLES D. HOPKINS, fourth child of Cyrus 
Hopkins and first child of Jane Rolston Hopkins, was married 
July 3, 1900, to Fannie M. Bear. 

CHILDREN : 

CHARLES RALSTON, born Nov. 7, 1901. 
MARY MARSHALL, born Nov. i, 1902. 
Home, Higginsville, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 



"Ay, but pedigree's a poor thing to boil the porritch pot wi'." 



3IQ 



II. ANN HOPKINS, daughter of John Hopkins and Jean Gordon, was 
born August 21, 1780, four miles northeast of Harrisonburg, in Rocking- 
ham County, Va. (this was then part of Augusta County). She married 
about April 3, 1802, James Rice, a Virginian, of Rockingham County (son 
of John Rice and Mary Rice, nee Finney), formerly a student of Jefferson 
Medical College, but at this time engaged in mercantile and land invest- 
ment. They moved about 1805 to Greenup County, now Boyd County, 
Ky., where Mr. Rice continued his land investments, and under Robert 
Poage, his wife's brother-in-law, was appointed surveyor of Greenup 
County. Here six children were born to them, five boys and one girl. In 
the winter or early spring of 1815, her husband was drowned, near Cat- 
lettsburg, Ky., while attempting to cross the Ohio River in a skiff, attended 
by a negro servant. The boat capsized; he was an expert swimmer, but 
it is probable that he was seized with a cramp or that the weight of his 
clothing overpowered him. 

James Rice was a man of fine humanity, and while not a completed 
graduate of the Jefferson school, he was called upon by all the people in his 
vicinity for medical attendance which he gave them free gratis. It was in 
response to one of these calls that he lost his life. It had been his intention 
soon to return and complete the course, only a term of which was unfinished, 
that he might be fully equipped for duty, there being no other so well 
educated medical practitioner in that county. Mentally he was unusually 
progressive and clear. Successfully accurate and active in all business 
places and duties, one of his tenacious purposes was to give the highest 
educational advantages to his children. 

Ann Hopkins Rice, a little frail woman, so unexpectedly left with six 
children (the youngest being born after the death of his father) in a com- 
paratively new country, with her husband's rather extended business 
interests and plowed lands in the embryo of development, with a brave 
spirit accepted the trust. When her boys had come to manhood, people 
used to say, "I would like to see the mother of those young men." She 
was delicate and small, with a spirit sweet and pure, and the Gordon blood 
in her veins. This picture was given me largely by my mother, her erst- 
while daughter-in-law, so that old-time legend of inharmony is broken. 

In 1815, soon after the birth of the youngest child, she removed from 
Greenup County to Christian County, near Hopkinsville,to be in touch 
with her brother, Thomas Hopkins. The estate in Greenup had been 

321 



intrusted to friends, whose administration was unsuccessful, and the 
children came to majority with nothing except a remnant of old slaves. 
This deprived them of all opportunities of advanced education, a great 
regret to them. With Southern inheritance, tradition, and blood in their 
veins, they had come to young manhood just in time to be caught and swep, 
away by the moral wave of abolition of the slave, and they did not hesitatet 
though at a great personal sacrifice, to salute the flag of freedom that it 
might long wave over the land of the free and the home of the brave, nor 
to question between personal sacrifice and duty to humanity; even though 
it were exteriorly a black humanity, the blackness would be no darker 
because of their making. Twenty-five dollars each secured outfit mem- 
bership and transport to a Liberian colony. One old colored man, faithful 
to the tradition, refused "to leave missus and the boys, "and with them, in 
the spring of 1835, came to Henderson, then a part of Warren County. 111., 
traveling in wagons, stopping at wayside inns or hospitable pioneer hearth- 
stones, and occasionally being forced to camp out, but thinking no dis- 
comfort a hardship that brought them nearer to a state of freedom. There 
was no bitterness in their memories of " the old Kentucky home." They 
were born and bred there, and to this day they know " you're mighty lucky 
when you married a girl like Sue." 

In 1841, after her son George was married, Ann Hopkins Rice made 
her home with him for a number of years, though her last years were with 
her son Cyrus William, at Oquauka, Henderson County, 111., where she 
died February 16, 1850, tenderly regretted by her children and friends. 

Written by James Montgomery Rice, Peoria 111. 



322 



MARRIAGE BOND GIVEN BY ANN HOPKINS AND JAMES RICE. 

1804. 

I do hereby certify that my son James Rice is above the age of twenty 
one years old this Second day of April one thousand eight hundred and 
four to which I set my hand. 

MARY RICE 
Attest John Rice A copy atteste, 

S. T. LOGAN, Clerk. 
Wm. Cromer, 
Rockingham County. 

This day came Thomas Hopkins before me a Justice of the Peace for 
the said county and made oath that Ann Hopkins was above the age of 
twenty-one years. Given under my hand this 3rd day of March, 1804. 

PEACHY HARRISON. 
A copy atteste, S. A. Logan, Clerk. 

Know all men by these presents that we, James Rice and Thomas Hop- 
kins are held and firmly bound unto John page, Esquire, Governor of 
Virginia, and his successors for the use of the Commonwealth, in the sum 
of One hundred and fifty dollars, to which payment well and truly to be 
made, we bind ourselves, our heirs, Exors. and adrms. jointly and severally 
firmly by these presents, Sealed and dated this 3rd day of April, 1904. 

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas a marriage 
is shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound James Rice 
and Ann Hopkins, daughter of John Hopkins of Rockingham County, if 
therefore there shall be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage 
then the above obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force 
and virtue. 
Signed, sealed and delivered in the 

Presence of JAMES RICE (Seal) 

G. M. Harrison ANN HOPKINS (Seal) 

A true copy of bond recorded in Rockingham County, Va. 

J. M. RICE. 



323 



II. ANN HOPKINS, tenth child of John and Jean 
Gordon Hopkins, was married shortly after April 3, 1804., to 
James Rice, son of John (son of William, son of William, son 
oj Thomas} and Mary Finney, of Accomac County, Va. 

CHILDREN : 

JOHN, born Oct. 27, 1808; died date lost. 

JAMES F., born Oct. 27, 1808; died Jan. 21, 1851. 

ANNA JANE, born 1809; died about 1831. 

THOMAS HOPKINS, born Nov. 14, 1810; died Sept. 1889. 
GEORGE POAGE, born Oct. 27, 1812; died July 7,1890. 
WILLIAM CYRUS, born July 9, 1815; died Feb. 14, 1897. 

Home, Rockingham County, Va., until about 1805, when they moved 
to Greenup (now Boyd) County, Ky. James Rice was a farmer or planter 
and also served as Deputy Surveyor of Greenup County, Ky., for his 
brother-in-law, Robert Poage. He was drowned in the Ohio River, near 
Catlettsburg, Ky., about 1814. About 1816, Ann Hopkins Rice, with her 
little children went to Christian County, Ky., near Hopkinsville, to live. 
Here she remained until 1835, when she, with her sons, came to Monmouth, 
111. She was a devout, lovely, brave, and intelligent woman, a Presbyterian 
in faith. 

///. JOHN RICE, first child of Ann Hopkins and James 
Rice, died in Kentucky. He was unmarried. 



III. JAMES RICE, twin brother oj John, second child of 
Ann Hopkins and James Rice, was not married. 

He was licensed as an attorney at law of the Supreme Court of Iowa, 
March 23, 1842, was commissioned by the Governor of Iowa as lieutenant- 
colonel Third Regiment, March 29, 1842. He went to California overland 
in 1849. He died January 21, 1851, at Oquawka, 111., and is buried there. 



324 



///. ANNA JANE RICE, third child of Ann Hopkins 
and James Rice, was married to Hon. Alexander Hall, of 
Kentucky, who had, about 1828, moved from Rockbridge County, 
Va., to Kentucky. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNA JANE, born 1832; died 1841. 
ALEXANDER, born 1834; died Apr. 12, 1858. 

IV. ANNA JANE HALL, first child oj Anna Jane Rice 
and Alexander Hall, died when a child. 

IV. ALEXANDER HALL, second child of Anna Jane 
Rice and Alexander Hall, was married 1857, to Mary K. Cog- 
hill, who died July jj, 1858. 



III. THOMAS HOPKINS RICE, fourth child of Ann 
Hopkins and James Rice, was married April 12, 184.9, a ^ ine 
home of Hardin Davis, Henderson County, III., to Mrs. Mary 
Irvannah Elletl. 

CHILDREN : 

JAMES ALBERT, born Jan. 7, 1850; died June i, 1856. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER, born Dec. 13, 1852; died Dec. 5, 1883. 
MARY, born June 5, 1856; died June 5, 1864. 

ANN, born June 5, 1856. 

JESSIE, born July 5, 1858; died May 7, 1859. 

Home, Henderson County, 111. 

III. THOMAS HOPKINS RICE was a farmer, nurseryman, and 
horticulturist. He was a trustee of the Fall Creek Presbyterian Church, 
Henderson County, 111. He was a very honest, kind-hearted, wise man, 
and served as justice of the peace for several years. His later years were 
spent at Monmouth, 111. Here he and his wife died and are buried. 

325 



IV. JAMES ALBERT RICE, first child of Thomas Hop- 
kins Rice and Mary Irvannah Ellett, died when six years old, 
and was buried in the old Ellett graveyard, but was after- 
wards removed to the cemetery at Monmouth, III. 

IV. WILLIAM ALEXANDER RICE, second child of 
Thomas Hopkins Rice and Mark Irvannah Ellett, was married 
October 13, 1881, to Ellen Morton, who was born September 
26, 1856. 
CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER, born Aug. 2, 1882. 

NANNIE HARDING, born Dec. 17,1883. 

Home, Monmouth, 111. 

IV. WILLIAM ALEXANDER RICE was a graduate of Monmouth 
College, Class of 1873. He taught two years in Oregon, then entered the 
First National Bank at Monmouth, 111., and was made assistant cashier in 
1879, m which capacity he served till 1882. After this he was made cashier 
and part owner of the bank of Atchison County, Mo. He lived at Rockport 
and is buried at Monmouth, 111. 

Ellen Morton Rice studied at Monmouth College. 

V. WILLIAM ALEXANDER RICE, first child of Wil- 
liam Alexander Rice and Ellen Morton. 

Is a student in Monmouth High School. 

V. NANNIE HARDING RICE, second child of William 
Alexander Rice and Ellen Morton. 

Is a student in the Monmouth High School. 

IV. MARY RICE, third child of Thomas Hopkins and 
Mary Irvannah Ellett, died when eight years old, and is buried 
at Monmouth, III. 

IV. ANN RICE, twin sister of Mary, fourth child of 
Thomas Hopkins Rice and Mary Irvannah Ellett, is not married. 
Home, 189 E. Forty-first Street, Chicago, 111. 

IV. JESSIE RICE, fifth child of Thomas Hopkins Rice 
and Mary Irvannah Ellett, died in infancy. 

326 



///. GEORGE POAGE RICE, fifth child of Ann Hopkins 
and James Rice, was married February 4., 184.1, to Caroline 
Montgomery, daughter of James Montgomery, son of John, 
son of William, son of Alexander, son of John. 

CHILDREN: 

JAMES MONTGOMERY, born Mar. 8, 1842. 

JOHN HOPKINS, born Feb. 14, 1844. 

WILLIAM CYRUS, born Apr. 30, 1846; died May 8, 1850. 

JANE ELIZABETH, born July 30, 1848; died May 18, 1849. 

MARY LOUISE, born June 15, 1850. 

CARRIE, born Apr. 15, 1853. 

ANN, born Oct. 1856; died in infancy. 

CHARLES EDWARD, born Nov. 3, 1858. 

III. GEORGE POAGE RICE studied for the ministry at Clarksville, 
Tenn. He moved with his mother from Christian County, Ky., to Mon- 
mouth, 111., in 1835. He was in the mercantile business with his brothers 
a few years in Monmouth, then he farmed in Henderson County, 111., till 
1857, when he went to Oquawka, 111. Here he entered the mercantile 
firm of Phelps & Rice, which continued four years, when he retired. He 
was forty years a ruling elder in the Presbyterian church. He died in 
Omaha, Neb., July 7, 1890, and is buried at Monmouth, 111. 

Home, Oquawka and Monmouth, 111., and Omaha, Neb. 

IV. JAMES MONTGOMERY RICE, first child of 
George Poage Rice and Caroline Montgomery, was married 
September 14., 1871, to Eliza F. Ballance, who was born Jan- 
uary 26, 1844, and died February 77, 1895. 

CHILDREN: 

LILLIAN BALLANCE, born Mar. 26, 1873. 

JULIA MARGARET, born Oct. 28, 1874; died Mar. 4, 1875. 

CAROLINE MONTGOMERY, born Mar. 18, 1876. 

MARY VIRGINIA, born Oct. 18, 1880. 

MONTGOMERY GORDON, born Aug. 24, 1882. 

WILLIS BALLANCE, born Dec. 6, 1884. 

Home, Peoria, 111. 

32? 



IV. JAMES MONTGOMERY RICE was born in Monmouth, 111., 
and lived on a farm in Henderson County, 111., until he was fifteen years 
old. The family then moved to Oquawka, 111. He was in the freshman 
class at Monmouth College 1860-1861. He enlisted August 20, 1861, in Com- 
pany E, loth Illinois Infantry, for three years. He was corporal, sergeant, 
and detailed clerk at brigade headquarters, and was in engagements at Pitts- 
burg Landing, Corinth, Missionary Ridge, Ringold, Buzzard Roost, Peach 
Tree Creek, Ezra Church, Jonesborough, capture of Atlanta, and others, 
and was honorably mustered out of service September 18, 1864. 

He was general inspector of rifle practice, Illinois National Guard, 
from May 30, 1875, until January, 1896, when he resigned. He graduated 
from the law department of Michigan University in 1866, and was ad- 
mitted to the Supreme Court of Illinois April 14, 1866, and to the Supreme 
Court of the United States in 1890. He was city attorney of Peoria in 
1877, is a member of the state bar association, and was the principal or- 
ganizer of the Peoria Law Library Association. He was a member of 
the State Legislature 1871 to 1873, anc ^ is the author of the third clause in 
the declaration of war with Spain. He was a member of the General 
Assembly of the Presbyterian Church 1899 and 1900, and is the author 
of the new method of electing standing committees in that body. (See 
Appleton's American and English Encyclopedia, 1900.) 

Eliza F. Ballance, daughter of Charles Ballance (son of Willis, son of 
Charles), was born in Peoria, 111. She graduated from the Monticello 
Seminary, Godfrey, 111. She died February 17, 1895, and is buried at 
Peoria, 111. She was a faithful member of the Presbyterian church, and 
of several patriotic ladies' societies. All of her children are members of 
the Second Presbyterian Church, Peoria, 111. 

V. LILLIAN BALLANCE RICE, first child of James 
Montgomery Rice and Eliza F. Ballance, was married Sep- 
tember 4, 1896, to Daniel Rufus Brigham, of Milwaukee, Wis. 
(son of Lydia Card and Daniel Morgan Brigham, of Cleveland) , 
who was born April 10, 1865. 

CHILDREN : 

DANIEL MORGAN, born May 8, 1899. 

CAROLINE RICE, born Mar. i, 1901. 

DANIEL RUFUS BRIGHAM died at Denver, Colorado, February 
19, 1902, and is buried at Springdale Cemetery, Peoria, 111. 

V. LILLIAN BALLANCE RICE graduated from Smith College, 
Northampton, Mass., Class of 1894, and was professor of history and 

328 



English literature in the State Normal School of Arizona, 1896-1897. Her 
married life was spent in Denver, Colo. 
Home, Peoria, 111. 

F. JULIA MARGARET RICE, second child of James 
Montgomery Rice and Eliza F. Ballance, died before she was 
a year old, and is buried at Peoria, III. 

V. CAROLINE MONTGOMERY RICE, third child of 
James Montgomery Rice and Eliza F. Ballance. 

Studied at Smith College, Northampton, Mass., and taught in the 
public schools of Peoria, 111., and Denver, Colo. 
Home, Peoria, 111. 

V. MARY VIRGINIA RICE, fourth child of James 
Montgomery Rice and Eliza F. Ballance, graduated from Mich- 
igan University, Class of 1902, receiving the degree of A. B. 

Home, Peoria, 111. 

V. MONTGOMERY GORDON RICE, fifth child of 
James Montgomery Rice and Eliza F. Ballance. 

Is a student in the law department of Michigan University, Class of 
1906. 

V. WILLIS BALLANCE RICE, sixth child of James 
Montgomery Rice and Eliza F. Ballance. 

Graduated from the Peoria High School, Peoria, 111., in June, 1901. 
He is a student in Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

IV. JOHN HOPKINS RICE, second child of George 
Poage Rice and Caroline Montgomery, was married December 
29, 1869, to Margaret J. Martin. 

CHILDREN: 

FRANK MONTGOMERY, born Sept. i, 1871. 

ANN LOUISE, born Sept. 2, 1873. 

SALLIE PLUMMER, born July 31, 1876. 

WILLIAM CYRUS, born Mar. 9, 1880. 

MARY, born Oct. 2, 1884; died Sept. 24, 1885. 

EVA M., born Aug. 30, 1886. 

Home, Wichita, Kan. 

3 2 9 



IV. JOHN HOPKINS RICE enlisted August 10, 1862, in Company 
C, pist Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted to sergeant and 
first lieutenant on December 26, 1862. While guarding the bridge over 
Salt River, Ky., he was captured by John J. Morgan, the raider, and 
paroled. He was in the parole camp at St. Louis, Mo., until exchanged 
in June, 1863. He was at Vicksburg, Port Hudson, New Orleans, Mor- 
ganzia, La., Brownsville, Tex., Brazos de Santiago, Tex., Palo Alto, 
Mobile, and was mustered out July 12, 1865. He has been a farmer, 
justice of the peace, school director, treasurer of the school board, and is 
a member of the Presbyterian church. He moved to a farm near Wichita, 
Kan., February 14, 1900. 

V. FRANK MONTGOMERY RICE, first child of John 
Hopkins Rice and Margaret J. Martin. 

Is a farmer near Wichita, Kan. 

V. ANN LOUISE RICE, second child of John Hopkins 
Rice and Margaret J. Martin, died in infancy. 

V. SALLIE PLUMMBR RICE, third child of John 
Hopkins Rice and Margaret J. Martin, was married to Frank 
Jones. 

Home, near Wichita, Kan. 

V. WILLIAM CYRUS RICE, fourth child of John Hop- 
kins Rice and Margaret J. Martin. 
Is a farmer near Wichita, Kan. 

V. MARY RICE, fifth child of John Hopkins Rice and 
Margaret J. Martin, died an infant. 

V. EVA M. RICE, sixth child of John Hopkins Rice and 
Margaret J. Martin. 

Is in the home with her parents at Wichita, Kan. 



IV. WILLIAM CYRUS RICE, third child of George 
Poage Rice and Caroline Montgomery, died about four years old. 

330 



IV. JANE ELIZABETH RICE, fourth child of George 
Poage Rice and Caroline Montgomery, died an infant. 

IV. MARY LOUISE RICE, fifth child of George Poage 
Rice and Caroline Montgomery, was married May 29, 1879, 
to John Thomas Marriott, who was born March 6, /#55, in 
Brimfield, III. 

CHILDREN: 

CAROLINE MONTGOMERY, born Mar. 24, 1886. 
WILLIAM HENRY, born Sept. 16, 1888. 

Home, Wakefield, Neb.; business, merchant and broker. 

IV. MARY LOUISE RICE, taught school at Minar, III, and Brim- 
field, 111., and was assistant principal of the Elmwood High School. 
She studied at the Peoria Normal School, and at Valparaiso, Ind. 

IV. CARRIE RICE, sixth child of George Poage Rice 
and Caroline Montgomery, was married November i, 1877, 
to Lyman Weeks Case, who was born December i, 1853, at 
S wanton, Vt. 

CHILDREN: 

BERTHA, born Aug. 9, 1878. 

FREDERICK ALBERT, born Apr. 30, 1880; died June, 1881. 

MONTGOMERY BABCOCK, born Feb. n, 1882. 

Home, Peoria, 111.; business, loan broker and loan agent. 

V. BERTHA CASE, first child of Carrie Rice and Lyman 
Weeks Case. 

Is a graduate of the State Normal School of Nebraska, Peru, Neb. 
She has been a teacher in the Omaha public schools since 1899. 

V. FREDERICK ALBERT CASE, second child of Carrie 
Rice and Lyman Weeks Case, died in infancy. 

V. MONTGOMERY BABCOCK CASE, third child of 
Carrie Rice and Lyman Weeks Case. 
Is a student in the University of Nebraska. 

331 



IV. ANN RICE, seventh child of George Poage Rice and 
Caroline Montgomery, died in infancy. 



IV. CHARLES EDWARD RICE, eighth child of George 
Poage Rice and Caroline Montgomery, was married July 17, 
1890, to Emma Lyon. 

IV. CHARLES EDWARD RICE graduated from the Monmouth 
College in 1877, and from the Omaha Theological Seminary in 1895, 
was ordained a Presbyterian minister March, 1894, and has served several 
churches in Nebraska as pastor. He was engaged in work for the Amer- 
can Sunday School Union from 1887 to 1892. He died June 8, 1903, at 
his home in Hotchkiss, Colo., where he is buried. His widow still lives 
there with her brother. 



///. WILLIAM CYRUS RICE, sixth child of Ann Hop- 
kins and James Rice, was married April 14, 1844, to Mary 
Montgomery Walker, who was born August 29, 1827, and died 
July 20, 1871. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNA, born May 22, 1849; died Dec. 25, 1854. 

WILLIAM P., born Aug. 4, 1859; died Aug. 8, 1860. 
CYRUS WALKER, born May 19, 1861. 
FLORA, born Mar. 6, 1864. 

III. WILLIAM CYRUS RICE was elected county surveyor on the 
organization of Henderson County in 1841. In 1843 ne was m ade probate 
judge. In 1854 he was elected representative to the General Assembly 
from the fortieth district, composed of Henderson and Warren counties, 
and re-elected in 1858. He was made county judge in 1873, an ^ served 
until 1890, when he retired. He was a devout, earnest, kindly man, 
possessing all the Christian virtues. He lived all his married life at 
Oquawka, 111., where he died on February 14, 1897, and is buried. 

Home, Oquawka, 111. 

IV. ANNA RICE, first child of William Cyrus Rice and 
Mary Montgomery Walker, died when five years old. 

332 



IV. WILLIAM P. RICE, second child of William Cyrus 
Rice and Mary Montgomery Walker, died when a year old. 

IV. CYRUS WALKER RICE, third child of William 
Cyrus Rice and Mary Montgomery Walker, was married Sep- 
tember 9, 1897, to Catherine Southerland, who was born Novem- 
ber 28, 1868. 

CHILDREN : 

WILLIAM CYRUS, born July 7, 1898. 

ROBERT VAN VALSEN, born Sept. 30, 1899. 

V. CYRUS WALKER RICE is a graduate of Monmouth College. 
He studied law with his father, and with Judge T. Lyle Dickey, of the 
Supreme Court of Illinois, and at the Chicago Law School. He first 
entered into partnership with his father at Oquawka, 111., then, in 1885, 
he became associated with James Montgomery Rice at Peoria, 111. 

In 1892 he went to Chicago, where he has practiced since. His office 
is in the Ashland block. 

Home, Chicago, 111. 

IV. FLORA RICE, fourth child of William Cyrus Rice 
and Mary Montgomery Walker, was married June 20, 1893, 
to Irving Torrence Brady. 

CHILDREN: 

MARGARET MARY, born Aug. 3, 1894. 

DOROTHY, born Nov. 5, 1899. 

Flora Rice studied at Monticello Seminary. 

Home, 314 Sixtieth Street, Chicago, 111.; business, law. 

Irving Torrence Brady died at Chicago, 111., September 29, 1902. 



333 




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3 
2; 



o 



. J 



^ ^ 

OH 

O 



- = 

~- ^ 

3 ^ 

> 



THERE LIVED A MAN. 

Once, in the flight of ages past, 

There lived a man and who was he ? 

Mortal, however thy lot is cast, 
That man resembled thee. 

He suffered, but his pangs are o'er; 

Enjoyed, but his delights are fled; 
Had friends his friends are now no more; 

And foes his foes are dead. 

He saw whatever thou hast seen; 

Encountered all that troubles thee; 
He was whatever thou hast been; 

He is what thou shalt be. 

The annals of the human race, 

Their ruins since the world began, 

Of him afford no other trace 
Than this there lived a man. 

Montgomery. 



335 



THE ARCHIBALD (ERCEBALD) HOPKINS 

FAMILY 



WILL OF ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, THE PIONEER. 

This nineteenth Day of March 1799 I, Archebald Hopkins, Jr., of 
Rockingahm County and State of Virginia, being weake in body but of 
Perfect mind and memory Do make this my Last will & testament. I 
bequeath to my wife, Jennet Hopkins her Dowry according to law & to 
have her choice of all the feather beds in my possession & to have one with 
such furniture as she shall choose for one bed ; I bequeath to my Son Eph- 
riam Hopkins the Plantation he now lives on Lying on both Sides of mudy 
Creek Containing 310 acres by Survey to him and his heirs & forever, 
I bequeath to my grand Son Archibald Hopkins, Son of Ephriam Hopkins 
a tract of land lying on both sides of mudy creek and adjoining the Lands 
I now live on & Lands formerly belonging to Thomas Shanklin & Like- 
wise a Part of the Land I now live on and joining the fore track begining 
at a Pine on the West side of the Creek in a line of the land I now live on 
& running from thence a strait line to the wright hand of the lowernopt 
gap in the hill on the East side of the Creek, Continuing still a strait line 
from sd gap until it strikes the line of my land on the east side of the Creek 
to him and his heirs &c for ever & Forever my Son Ephriam Hopkins to 
have the profits arising from the lands untill his son Archibald Hopkins 
is 21 years of age, Provided he lives till that period on the Land he now 
lives on, I bequeath to my grand Son Thomas Hopkins Son of Ephriam 
Hopkins, a track of land lying on mudy Creek now occupied by James 
McHoney & likewise two other surveys joining said track land to him & 
his heirs &c forever & Forever that his father Ephriam Hopkins have the 
profits arising from the lands until his son Thomas Hopkins is 21 years of 
age Provided resides till that Period on the land he now occupies, & should 
sd Ephriam Hopkins remove to a distant part of the Country then my execu- 
tors to have the care of my grand Sons lands after such removal & the profits 
arising from sd lands to be appropriated for the benefit of my grand Sons 
untill they are of the age afforesaid, I bequeath to my Son william hopkins 
the Plantation I now live on that is all the lands that is included in the 
inclusive Survey, I made, except that Part that I have before mentioned 
as given by this will to my grand Son Archibald hopkins and my wifes 
Dowey Dureing her life with all its improvements to him & his heirs 

33Q 



&c foever & Forever that the Plantation I purchased of George & David 
Berry Sen to be sold & preserving the water courses and benefits of the 
waters of said plantation for the benefit of the Plantation I have given 
by this will to my Son William hopkins and all my other Lands that I 
possess in harrison County & the other Countys in that Part of said State 
if any to be likewise sold & the money arising from sutch sale to be eaquealy 
Devided amongst my three Daughters Children to those they now have 
and to those they shall hereafter have, & all my Personal estate except 
one of the waggons and all other Plantation utentials & two horse beasts 
which is to remain the property of my Son William & he is to have his 
choice of the waggons & likewise of the horse beasts except my wifes 
horse beast I order that she shall have the first choice and Sadie & her 
weareing appearl preserved as her own property & all the Personal estate 
that Remains that is not already mentioned to be sold & the money arising 
from said sale & all the debts to me Due or hereafter may become due 
(except that Debt Due to me from Benjamin Smiths estate for the warrent 
he got from me the money of which I leave to my Son william) to be 
eaquealy Devided between my wife and three Daughters & I appoint 
william Prolston & my son wilh'am hopkins executors of this my Last will 
& testament & the Reservation of the water courses to extend in breadth 
three Poles with the meanders of the Creek from Mathew Harrison Line 
of the one fork & from about 60 Poles of the other fork of the Creek. 



340 



SALE BILL OF PERSONAL PROPERTY. 

Owned by Ruth Hopkins, Harrisonburg, Va. 

The sale bill of the Estate of Archibald Hopkins, Deed May 8th 1799. 

L S P 

Wm Hopkins to three old tubs o 2 o 

Ditto to one Sifter o 2 6 

Ditto to one old tub o o 8 

Ditto to three old Barrels o 2 8 

Ditto to one pair of Stilards o 3 8 

Ditto to two old tubs o o 7 

Jean Hopkins to one meat tub o 2 10 

Ditto to Ditto o i 10 

Ditto to one Bell o i 4 

Ditto to one D. oven o i 4 

Ditto to one iron pot o i 4 

Ditto to one large kettle o 18 4 

Ditto to one D. oven o 6 3 

Ditto to two washing tubs o 3 6 

Ditto to one box iron o i 6 

Ditto to one flat iron o 3 3 

Ditto to two pails o i 3 

Ditto to two iron trammels o 15 3 

Ditto to two Buckets o 4 4 

Ditto to one frying pan o 3 i 

Rodger Mallery to one grindstone 038 

Jacob Nicely to one grindstone o 5 6 

Thomas Hopkins to one Cider Barrel o 6 6 

Jennet Hopkins to one double Barrel o 10 6 

Henry Maryers to one Ditto o 4 6 

Jennet Hopkins to one hive bees o 6 6 

Henry Sprinkle to one Ditto o u 4 

Jos Baxter to five empty hives o i 3 

Archibald Rutherford to one waggon n i 3 

Jacob Nicely to one Brindle Cow & Calf 6 4 3 



L S P 

Adam Losh to one Black Cow & Calf 6 3 3 

John Harrison to one Black Cow & Calf 6 5 i 



35 16 2 

Samuel Miller to one red Cow & Calf with white face 5 19 7 

Nicholas Ludwick to one Black Cow & Calf 5 14 7 

James Burges to one Black Cow & calf 5 15 7 

James Rolstone to one Red Cow & young calf 7 o 7 

John Miller to two shepp i 10 3 

Benjamin Webb to two Ditto i 6 6 

Gawn Hamilton to two Ewes and their lambs i 14 6 

Ditto to Ditto 2 6 6 

John Hopkins to two ewes and their lambs 2 10 6 

Benjamin Webb to two ewes 2 10 6 

John Hopkins to two ewes & their lambs i 4 6 

Susannah Polsel to one Brown heifer & calf 4 10 6 

John Diver to one Brown heifre & calf 5 17 6 

Gawn Hamilton to two Brindled Steers n 17 6 

Wm Cravens to two Brown steers 9 6 6 

George Chrisman to two Pyded steers 7 8 6 

Ditto to one Bull and puded steer 7 16 6 

Amas tharp to one black & one brown steer n 8 6 

Hugh Diver to one red steer 7 3 i 

Michael Roop to one Black horse 24 16 i 

John Hopkins to one negro man jack 130 16 i 

Ephriam Hopkins to Ditto Humphrey 42 3 i 

Saml Miller to the service of them i year 10 months 31 3 i 

John Hopkins to Ester & Child 6 3 i 

Archibald Rutherford one girl Nanny for 3 years 10 10 i 

John Pence to one girl Sail for 6 years 30 12 7 

Richard Hollenshead to one Boy Dan for 10 years 41 12 7 

William Hopkins to one jackscrew i 12 7 

John Chrisman to one tin plate stove & pipe 6 n 7 

Jennet Hopkins to ten Chairs 6 19 7 

Ditto to one Wool Sheel 6 3 7 

Ditto to one spinning wheel 6 9 7 

Ditto to Ditto 6 4 7 

Ditto to six geese 6 7 7 

436 9 7 
342 



L S P 

Wm Bolston to one Black mare 20 

George Mowry to one Black Colt 20 2 

Wm Hopkins to one Bay Colt 17 2 

John Hoover to one sorrel Colt 15 5 

Henry Sprinkle to two Black heifers white faces 3 13 

James Bolstone to one dark Brindle heifer 4 13 

Henry Sprinkle to two Black heifers 4 5 

Solomon Vance to two black stears with white faces 3 16 6 

Ditto to one pyded steer & one red Bull 4 5 9 

Andrew Blain to one yellow steer & red one 7 5 9 

Wm Cravens to one Black Cow white face 5 2 9 

George Humlickhouser to one clock 3 9 

Jennet Hopkins to 2 pr dog irons tongs shovel 2 tramels 5 9 

Ditto to one bed & Bedding 4 9 

Ditto to one Bedsted mat & Covering i 10 9 

Aaron Thomas to one arm Chair i i 9 

Jennet Hopkins to a quantity of hemp 3 5 i 

Ditto to one woolen wheel 3 9 i 

Aaron Thomas to one old tub 3 i i 

Ditto to two Ditto 3 i 9 

Ditto to one Ditto & gun 319 

John Hopkins to two old tubs 3 10 9 

Jennet Hopkins to one Cupboard 2 10 9 

Ditto to one Bed & Bedding 6 10 9 

Ditto to one walnut box 6 10 9 

Ditto to one bed bedsted & covering 12 15 9 

Joseph Waxter to one arm chair 12 3 9 

Jennet Hopkins to one table 12 9 9 

Christain Miller to one piece sole leather 12 10 9 

Ditto to one syde of upper leather 12 10 9 

Wm Hopkins to one syde harness leather i 3 i 

Benjn Bolstone to two hogs 5 7 



171 2 9 

John Hoover to one hog 3 7 i 

Jennet Hopkins to old pewter i 7 i 

Jacob Woolf to five Bushels buckwheat 41 pr bushel 171 

Christain Miller to one lamp i i 3 

Jennet Hopkins to one womans saddle i 3 3 

Henry Mawyers to ten Bushels tye a 53 pr Bushel 2 10 3 

343 



L S P 

Andrew W. Lain to Ditto at Ditto 2 . . 3 

To Bonds Due to the Estate 13 3 

To Cash then in hand 123 3 4 

To sundry articles kept by the Widdow at the appraisement 

which is not in the sale Bill amounting to 6 19 6 

to Bood Devided amons the Legatees at the appraisement . . 63 6 



70 in 

35 l6 2 

43 6 9 7 

171 2 9 

I35 1 10 5 
Marked Sale Bill of Archibald Hopkins Deed 



344 



RECEIPTS GIVEN BY HEIRS OF ARCHIBALD 

HOPKINS. 

Owned by Ruth Hopkins, Harrisonburg, Va. 

October soth 1800 Received of the Executors of my husbands estate 
one hundred and eighty four Pounds two shillings & nine Pence in Cash 
and one horse Beast appraised to forty Pounds and one bed and furniture 
appraised to twenty pounds as part of my Dowry as willed to me by my 
Late husband Received Per me Jean Hopkins 

her 
Jean Hopkins 

mark 
No. i. 

October 2oth 1800 Received of the other Executors of Archibald Hop- 
kins Deceast the sum of 76 pounds 7 shillings and 2 pence it Being a part 
of my wifes Dowry left her father Received by 

William Rolstone 

for Joseph Chrisman 
No. 2. 

October 2oth 1800 Received of the other executors of Archibald 
Hopkins estate the horses and waggon and the other Plantation utentials 
as willed to me By my Late father and appraised to one hundred Pounds 
& eight Pounds Seventeen Shillings and Six Pence Received Per me 

Wm Hopkins 

October 2oth 1800 Received of the other Executors of Archibald 
Hopkins Deceased the sum of 96 pounds and fore pence Half penny it 
Being a part of my wifes Dowry left her by her father Received by me 

William Rolston 
No. 3. 

October 2oth 1800 Received of the executors of Archibald Hopkins 
Estate the sum of one hundred and fifty nine Pounds Seventeen Shilling 
and five pence as Part of my wifes Dowry willed to her by her father Ar 
Hopkins. Received by me John Hopkins 

No. 4. 

345 



August 22 1801 Received of the executors of my husbands estate 
three hundred and nine Dollars fifty cents as Part of my Dowry willed to 
me by husband Ar Hopkins Received Per me 

her 
Jennet Hopkins 

mark 
No. 5. 

August 2nd 1 80 1 Received of the other executors of Arch estate the 
sum of one hundred & fifty four Dollars & ninety Cents as Part of my 
wifes Dowry willed to her by her father Received Per me 

Win Rolstone 
No. 6. 

August 22 1801 Received of the other executors of Arch Hopkins 
estate for Joseph Chrisman the Sum of one hundred and fifty four Dollars 
and ninety Cents as part of his wifes Dowry willed to her by her father 
Received Per me. 

Wm Rolstone 

for 

Joseph Chrisman 
No. 7. 

October i6th 1802 

Received of the Exectrs of Archibald Hopkins the sum of fifty five 
pounds ten shillings it Being a part of the legacy left me By my husband 
By me 

her 
Jane Hopkins 

mark 
Test 

Jos. Chrisman 
No. 8. 

October i6th 1802 

Received of the other Extors of Archibald Hopkins the sum of twenty 
seven pounds fifteen shillings it Being a part of the legacy left to Josh 
Chrismans wife left to her by her father By me 

William Bolstone 

for 

Joseph Chrisman 
John Hopkins 
No. 9. 

346 



October i6th 1802 

Received of the other Estors of Archibald Hopkins the sum of twenty 
seven pounds fifteen shillings By me William Rolston 

John Hopkins 
No. 10. 

Written on the back. 

Settled with Jeennot Hopkins 100 Dollars to thomas herron and 23 
Dollars and 33 cents for Dofty's estate august 22d. 1801 



347 



WILL OF JENNET HOPKINS, WIDOW OF ARCHI 
BALD (ERCEBALD) HOPKINS, THE PIONEER. 

Owned by Ruth Hopkins, Harrisonburg, Va. 
Thie first day of July 1803 I Jennet Hopkins of 
Rockingham County & state of Virginia do make and 
ordain this to be my last will and testament that is 
to say I bequeath to my Daughter in law Nancy Hop- 
kins wife of Ephriam Hopkins ten pounds likewise I 
bequeath to my grandaughter Jennet Hopkins daughter 
of Ephriam Hopkins fifty pounds I bequeath to my 
grandaughters Sarah gracy hannah & peggy Hopkins all 
daughters of Ephriam Hopkins thirty pounds each to 
be levied out of my estate to be in the care of my 
Executors to be paid to them as they severally come 
of age and if any of them shold die before they come 
to age without heirs of their own body their legacy 
to be equally divided amongst the rest the money to 
be put to interest for their use as soon as conven- 
ancy will admit I bequeath to my son Ephriam Hopkins 
a note of twenty two pounds ten shillings and the 
sum of twenty five pounds fifteen shillings that I 
paid for him of executions and my part of the price 
of a negro man named umphra and a sorrel mare that 
he has now in his possession to him and his heirs 
forever I bequeath to my son William Hopkins one 
good feather bed and furniture and the one half of 
my thirds sence my husbands death that is of the 
mill 

and the stock belonging to me is to be appraised 
indifferent men and my son William may ke 
ment if he Chooses the remainder of 

I bequeath to my three daughters Elizabeth Mary 
ually devided amongst them or their heirs 
that my son Ephriam Hopkins shold bring 

his room against the heirs of George Baxter 
(Torn off.) y Deed husband Conserning my father 

te then what I have bequeathed to him 
to my estate and be 
s Elizabeth Mary and 
oint my son William sole executors of 

this 

348 



/. ARCHIBALD (ERCEBALD} HOPKINS, the pio- 
neer, married Jennet Love, about 1757. 

CHILDREN: 

EPHRIAM, born 1758; baptized Nov. 1762. 

WILLIAM H. 

JANE. 

MARY. 

ELIZABETH, died Apr. 22, 1814. 

Home, Rockingham, Va.; business, agriculture. 

I. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS married Jennet Love and lived and died 
in Rockingham County, Va. That he was a pillar in the church we know 
from the old session book which records him as one of the elders for many 
years. Some of his children's children still live in the county where he 
did his life's work. He died May 8, 1799, and is buried at Cook's Creek 
Church Cemetery. 

Jennet Love Hopkins made her will July i, 1803. The date of her 
death is unknown. She is buried beside her husband. 

//. EPHRIAM HOPKINS, first child of Archibald Hop- 
kins and Jennet Love, married Nancy Shanklin. 

CHILDREN: 

ARCHIBALD, born died about 1879. 

THOMAS. 

JENNET. 

SARAH, born 1792. 

GRACY. 

HANNAH. 

PEGGY. 

II. EPHRIAM moved to Kentucky soon after 1803, where all his 
children, stayed, except Archibald, who returned to Harrisonburg, Va. 

Lewis Chrisman Hopkins, of Mt. Clinton, Va., says that Ephriam 
Hopkins had eleven children. The oldest one, Archibald, returned from 
Kentucky to Virginia, and was brought up in the family of his Uncle 
William. None of the Virginia people know anything about the remaining 
children, and diligent search has failed to discover them. 

349 



Letter from Ephriam and Nancy Hopkins to William Hopkins. Owned 
by Ruth Hopkins, Harrisonburg, Va. (William was Ephriam's brother. 
Their father was Archibald, the pioneer.) 

Jesamine County gth Sept 1810 

Dear Brother & Sister we Imbrace this oppertunity of writing to 
Inform you that we are all in A Tolerable good state of Health at present 
thanks be to God for his Mercys Hopeing these few Lines May find you 
all Enjoying the same Blessing I would wish you to send me some satis- 
faction for the use of Humphrey for the space of four years if you have 
not Sold my Gun & Watch send them out By the Bearer my Daughter 
Sally is of age and she wants you to send her Legacy that is coming from 
her grandmothers Estate By her Uncle Jones Ewin for which he will pro- 
duce an order on you for the same give our Love to all Enquiring friends 
so we add no more but still Remains you affectionate Brother & Sister 

Ephriam & Nancy Hopkins 
Mr William Hopkins 

(Addressed on the other side) 
Mr William Hopkins 
Rockingham County 
Virginia 



350 



///. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, first child oj Ephriam 
Hopkins and Nancy Shanklin, was married to Elizabeth Gordon. 

CHILDREN : 

SARAH ANN, died 1874. 

THOMAS GORDON, born Apr. 9, 1815; died Oct. 30, 1883. 

JOHN, born 1817; died Mar. 23, 1852. 

AGNES. 

WILLIAM DAVIS, born 1823. 

ARCHIBALD, died in boyhood. 

Home, Harrisonburg, Va. ; business, physician. 

We find in Cook's Creek session book that Sarah Ann and Thomas 
Gordon, children of Archibald Hopkins, were baptized August 17, 1815, 
and their brother John was baptized December 14, 1817. 

ARCHIBALD HOPKINS died about 1879, near ninety years of age. 
He was known as "Red Archy." 

IV. SARAH ANN HOPKINS, first child oj Archibald 
Hopkins and Elizabeth Gordon, was married August, 1831, 
to Archibald Hopkins, son of William Hopkins and Anne 
Ralston. 

CHILDREN : 

ANN ELIZABETH, born June 3, 1832; died Jan. 5, 1875. 
ABNER KILLPATRICK, born Aug. 7, 1833; died Feb. 8, 1852. 

HESTER LOVE, born Feb. 9, 1835; died Aug. 1895. 

FRANCES AGNES, born Apr. 25, 1837; died Aug. 4, 1839. 

SALLY LAVINIA, born Sept. 29, 1839. 

RUTH GORDON, born Sept. n, 1841. 

LEWIS CHRISMAN, born Sept. 4, 1843. 

NANCY CATHERINE, born June 9, 1845. 

Home, Harrisonburg, Va. ; business, agriculture. 



V. ANN ELIZABETH HOPKINS, first child of Arch- 
ibald Hopkins and Sarah Ann Hopkins, was married August 
17, 1852, to Fernando C. T. Brightwell, who was born August 
9, 1829, in Spotsylvania County, Va. 

CHILDREN: 

ZULU, born Oct. 17, 1853. 

SARAH FRANCES, born Apr. 7, 1857. 
ROBERT E. LEE, born Aug. 23, 1863. 

Home, Lexington, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

V. ANN ELIZABETH HOPKINS BRIGHTWELL died January 
5, 1875, an d was buried in the Presbyterian burial-grounds, Tabo, La- 
fayette County, Mo., near Higginsville. 

VI. ZULU BRIGHTWELL, first child of Ann Elizabeth 
Hopkins and Fernando C. T. Brightwell, was married at 
H arris onbitrg, Va., October 27, 1885, by Rev. J. H. Smith, 
to Oliver B. Garrett, who was born April 12, 1855. 

CHILDREN : 

EUGENE HOPKINS, born Sept. 8, 1886; died Feb. 17, 1887. 
BESSIE LEE, born Apr. 25, 1888. 

FERNANDO C., born Dec. 13, 1889. 
EDWARD LINDLEY, born June 10, 1892. 

Home, La Belle, Lewis County, Mo. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. SARAH FRANCES BRIGHTWELL, second child 
o) Ann Elizabeth Hopkins and Fernando C. T. Brightwell, 
was married to Frank Hopkins (son of Rufus R. Hopkins, 
grandson of James, great-grandson of John, great- great- grand- 
son of William, the pioneer). 

CHILDREN : 
LIZZET. 
ZULU GLENN. 
JOY. 

Home, Washington, D. C. 



352 



VI. ROBERT E. LEE BRIGHTWELL, third child of 
Ann Elizabeth Hopkins and Fernando C. T. Brightwell, was 
married December j, 1890, to Cam Landis. 

CHILDREN : 

BERNICE, born 1891. 
JENNETTE, born 1893. 

Home, 2210 Olive Street, Kansas City, Mo. 



V. ABNER KILLPATRICK HOPKINS, second child 
of Archibald Hopkins and Sarah Ann Hopkins, died a little 
child. 



V. HESTER LOVE HOPKINS, third child of Arch- 
ibald Hopkins and Sarah Ann Hopkins. Unreported. 



V. FRANCES AGNES HOPKINS, fourth child of 
Archibald Hopkins and Sarah Ann Hopkins, died a little child. 



V. SALLIE LAV IN I A HOPKINS, fifth child of Arch- 
ibald Hopkins and Sarah Ann Hopkins, was married Feb- 
ruary 4., 1862, to Richard T. Brightwell, who was born January 
13, 1831, in Spotsylvania County, Va. 

CHILDREN: 

ALBERTA NEILL, born Nov. 15, 1862. 
DEWITTE FRANCIS, born Sept. 24, 1864. 
INFANT DAUGHTER, born July 21, 1868. 
ANNIE RUTH, born Oct. 26, 1869. 

INFANT SON, born Feb. 21, 1872. 

MARY JOHNSON, born July 8,1873. 
Home, Parkerville, Platt County, Mo. ; business, justice of the peace. 



353 



VI. ALBERTA BRIGHTWELL, first child of Sallie 
Lavinia Hopkins and Richard T. Brightwell, was married 
November, 1884, to William E. Nash. 

CHILDREN : 

MABEL ANNA, born Sept. 12, 1885. 

LAVINIA FRANCES, born Dec. 1887. 

DORA JENETTE, born Dec. 1889. 

MARY STELLA, born Mar. 20, 1891. 

ALBERTA, born June 1894. 
ELIZABETH DAVIDSON, born Mar. 22, 1897. 

AGNES, born Aug. 22, 1902. 

Home, Parkerville, Platt County, Mo.; business, meat market. 

VI. DEWITTE FRANCES BRIGHTWELL, second child 
of Sallie Lavinia Hopkins and Richard T. Brightwell, was 
married January 25, 1897, to Nettie Pope. 

CHILDREN: 

LETA MAY, born Oct. 24, 1898. 

Home, Kansas City, Mo.; business, gripman. 

VI. The third child of Sallie Lavinia Hopkins and Richard 
T. Brightwell died an infant. 

VI. ANNIE RUTH BRIGHTWELL, fourth child of 
Sallie Lavinia Hopkins and Richard T. Brightwell, was 
married June 3, 1895, to J. William Davis. 

Home, Platte City, Mo.; business, clerk. 

VI. The fifth child of Sallie Lavinia Hopkins and Richard 
T. Brightwell died an infant. 

VI. MARY JOHNSON BRIGHTWELL, sixth child of 
Sallie Lavinia Hopkins and Richard T. Brightwell, was mar- 
ried December i, 1899, to Thomas Breen. 

CHILDREN: 

NONA MARIE, born Oct. 4, 1898. 
THOS. ARCHIBALD, born Jan. 12, 1902. 

Home, Parkerville, Mo.; business, mechanic. 

354 



V. RUTH GORDON HOPKINS, sixth child of Arch- 
ibald Hopkins and Sarah Ann Hopkins, is unmarried. 

She lives with her uncle, Dr. William Davis Hopkins, at Harrison- 
burg, Va. 

V. LEWIS CHRISM AN HOPKINS, seventh child oj 
Archibald Hopkins and Sarah Ann Hopkins, was married 
October 25, 1865, to Cordelia Whitman. 

CHILDREN: 

JAMES PIERCE, born Aug. 30, 1866. 

INFANT, born Oct. 25, 1868; died Nov. 2, 1869. 

ADELAIDE, born May 21, 1870. 

FANNY LOVE, born Dec. 12, 1872. 

NANCY KATE, born June 21, 1874. 

ANNIE ELIZABETH, born Sept. 15, 1876. 

JOHN ARCHIBALD, born July 15, 1877. 

SARAH HOPKINS, born Apr. 13, 1879. 

ABNER KILPATRICK, born Aug. 19, 1880. 

DAVID RALSTON, born Nov. 8, 1882. 

Home, Mt. Clinton, Va.; business, agriculture. 

* V. NANCY CATHERINE HOPKINS, seventh child oj 
Archibald Hopkins and Sarah Ann Hopkins, was married 
October 27, 1865, to Thomas Bradshaw, who was born March 
27, 184.3, i n Lewis County, Mo. 

CHILDREN : 

GABRIEL SMITH, born July 5, 1867. 

ANNIE VIRGINIA, born Sept. 21, 1868. 

ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, born Dec. 5, 1870. 

ZULA LOVE, born Dec. 19, 1881; died Jan. 28, 1891. 

LEWIS K., born June 14, 1874. 

JOSEPH WILLIAM, born Nov. 19, 1878; died Mar. 23, 1894. 

ELIZABETH CHRISMAN, born Oct. 27, 1872; died Jan. 14, 1876. 

NANNIE KATE, born Jan. 21, 1877. 

Home, La Belle, Louis County, Mo. 



355 



VI. GABRIEL SMITH BRADS HAW, first child of 
Nancy Catherine Hopkins and Thomas Bradshaw, was married 
September 7, 1892, to Molly Byers, who was born June 75, 1871. 

CHILDREN: 

ONETA, born June 2, 1893. 

Cz, born Mar. 12, 1895. 

MARY KATE, born June 16, 1897. 
LEONE, born Feb. 26, 1901. 

INFANT, born Dec. 30, 1903. 
Home, Eklaka, Custer County, Mont.; business, sheep ranch. 

VI. ANNIE VIRGINIA BRADSHAW, second child of 
Nancy Catherine Hopkins and Thomas Bradshaw, was mar- 
ried January 26, 1887, to Marion Edward Campbell, who 
was born April 29, 1866, in Knox County, Mo. 

CHILDREN : 

LAWSON P., born June 4, 1888. 

EDWARD MARION born Apr. i, 1893. 
CHARLES MORSE, born Nov. 6, 1902. 
Home, Green City, Sullivan County, Mo.; business, merchant. 

VI. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS BRADSHAW, third 
child of Nancy Catherine Hopkins and Thomas Bradshaw, 
was married June 29, 1898, to Jennie Hendrick, who was 
born November 8, 1875, in Lewis County, Mo. 

Home, Labelle, Lewis County, Mo.; business, teacher. 

VI. ZULA LOVE BRADSHAW, fourth child of Nancy 
Catherine Hopkins and Thomas Bradshaw, died January 28, 
i8gi, at nine years of age. 

VI. LEWIS K. BRADSHAW, fifth child of Nancy 
Catherine Hopkins and Thomas Bradshaw, was married 
February 23, 1898, to Grace Lillian Eliot, who was born March 
2, 1875, in Vermillion, Edgar County, III. 
CHILDREN : 

LEWIS EARL, born Nov. 29, 1898. 

EARNEST ELIOT, born Nov. 12, 1900. 

Home, Newark, Knox County, Mo.; business, veterinary surgeon. 

356 



VI. JOSEPH WILLIAM BRADSHAW, sixth child of 
Nancy Catherine Hopkins and Thomas Bradshaw, died 
March 23, 1894., at fifteen years of age. 

VI. ELIZABETH CHRISM AN BRADSHAW, seventh 
child of Nancy Catherine Hopkins and Thomas Bradshaw, 
died January 14., 1876, at three years of age. 

VI. NANNIE KATE BRADSHAW, eighth child of 
Nancy Catherine Hopkins and Thomas Bradshaw, was mar- 
ried March 17, 1887, to Andrew Hall, who was born November 
75, -T#75, in Sangamore County, III. 

CHILDREN: 

NIANNA, born Dec. 28, 1887. 

THOMAS HARDIN, born Oct. 25, 1889, 
IRVINE CATHERINE, born Dec. 28, 1901. 

Business, agriculture. 

IV. THOMAS GORDON HOPKINS, second child of 
Archibald Hopkins and Elizabeth Gordon, was married to 
Sarah Ralston. 

CHILDREN: 

JESSIE RALSTON, born Sept. 30, 1838. 

ARCHIBALD, born Sept. 30, 1838; died Nov. 26, 1868. 

HARRISON, born Feb. 12, 1841. 

ELIZABETH, born Nov. 15, 1842; died Mar. 18, 1852. 

AGNES, born Dec. 6, 1844. 

DAVID, born Mar. n, 1847. 

HANNAH, born Mar. 25, 1849. 

MARGARET, born Jan. 17,1851. 

ERASMAS, born Jan. 2, 1854. 

DEWITT, born Feb. 27, 1856; died July 19, 1860. 

Home, Singers Glen, Va.; business, agriculture. 

V. JESSIE RALSTON HOPKINS, first child of Thomas 
Gordon Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, was married to - 
Hoover. 

Home, Baltimore. 

357 



V. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, second child of Thomas 
Gordon Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, was married July 21, 
1863, to Sarah A. Ralston, daughter of Fealdon Ralston. 

Home, Singers Glen, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

V. HARRISON HOPKINS, third child of Thomas Gor- 
don Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, was married October 3, 1867, 
to Catherine Long. 

CHILDREN : 

EUDORA, born July 21, 1868. 

THOMAS, born Mar. 1,1870. 

WILLIAM B., born Feb. 25, 1872; died June n, 1893. 

ELLA M., born Mar. 25, 1874. 

LEWIS A., born Sept. 9, 1876. 

NANNIE, born Aug. 29, 1879. 

SAIDA, born Oct. 9, 1881. 

Five children are dead. 

Home, Singers Glen, Va.; business, agriculture. 

VI. EUDORA, first child of Harrison Hopkins and 
Catherine Long. 

Is a trained nurse in the Methodist Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. Un- 
married. 

VI. THOMAS ALBERT, second child of Harrison Hop- 
kins and Catherine Long, was married December 29, 1898. 

CHILDREN : 

OPHA KATE, born Oct. 9, 1899. 

WELDON ORVILLE, born Sept. 21, 1901. 
Home, Roseville, 111.; business, agriculture. 

VI. WILLIAM B., third child of Harrison Hopkins and 
Catherine Long, was drowned June n, 1893. 



358 



VI. ELLA M., fourth child of Harrison Hopkins and 
Catherine Long, was married November 26, 1901, to Edwin 
Austin, who was born March 29, 1867, in Northfield, la. 

CHILDREN: 

FERN, born 1903. 
HERALD, born 1904. 

Home, Wapello, la.; business, agriculture. 

VI. LEWIS A., fifth child of Harrison Hopkins and 
Catherine Long, is unmarried. 
Home, Illinois; business, agriculture. 

VI. NANNIE HOPKINS, sixth child of Harrison 
Hopkins and Catherine Long, was married December 24., 
1902, to Mir on Beard. 

Home, Singers Glen, Va. 

VI. SAIDA HOPKINS, seventh child of Harrison Hop- 
kins and Catherine Long, is unmarried. 

Lives with her parents at home in Singers Glen, Va. 

V. ELIZABETH HOPKINS, fourth child of Thomas 
Gordon Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, died at ten years of age. 

V. AGNES HOPKINS, fifth child of Thomas Gordon 
Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, died unmarried. 

V. DAVID HOPKINS, sixth child of Thomas Gordon 
Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, was married to Ellen Ralston. 
Home, Fawquill County, Va.; business, agriculture. 

V. HANNAH HOPKINS, seventh child of Thomas 
Gordon Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, is not married. 
Home, Kirkwood, 111. 



359 



V. MARGARET HOPKINS, eighth child of Thomas 
Gordon Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, was married October 
24., 1869, to David R. Miller. 

CHILDREN: 

ARCHIBALD H., born May 15, 1871; died Apr. 27, 1897. 
HETTIE AGNES, born Apr. 14, 1878; died Aug. 31, 1896. 

VI. ARCHIBALD H. MILLER, first child of Margaret 
Hopkins and David Miller, was married to Josie HalL He 
died in his twenty-sixth year. 

Home, Kirkwood, 111. 

VI. HETTIE AGNES MILLER, second child of Mar- 
garet Hopkins and David R. Miller, was married to John 
McKee, of Biggsville, III. She was born in Rockingham 
County, Va., and died in her nineteenth year. 

V. ERASMAS HOPKINS, ninth child of Thomas Gor- 
don Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, unreported. 

V. DEWITT HOPKINS, tenth child of Thomas Gordon 
Hopkins and Sarah Ralston, died a child. 

IV. JOHN HOPKINS, third child of Archibald Hop- 
kins and Elizabeth Gordon, was married April 13, 184.3, t 
Malinda Jane Ralston, who was born May 5, 1825. 

CHILDREN : 

FERNANDO C., born Sept. 13, 1845. 
JOHN HINTON, born Feb. u, 1848. 
WILLIAM NEWTON, born Jan. 8, 1850. 

Home, Singers Glen, Va.; business, agriculture. 



360 



V. FERNANDO C. HOPKINS, first child of John 
Hopkins and Malinda Jane Ralston, was married October 13, 
1874., to Angeline Rinker. 

CHILDREN: 

ARTHUR DAVID, born Aug. 5, 1875. 
WILLIAM LUTHER, born Mar. i, 1877. 
BESSIE BELL, born Mar. 13, 1881. 
JOHN ALBERT, born Jan. 2, 1883. 
ANNIE LAURA, born Aug. 15, 1886. 
FRANKLIN ED., born Sept. 3, 1890. 
ETTA MARY, born Sept. 3, 1890. 

SADIE ELIZABETH, born Aug. 23, 1893. 
DASIE ALICE, born Jan. 28, 1896. 
Home, Singers Glen, Va.; business, agriculture. 

VI. ARTHUR DAVID HOPKINS, first child of Fer- 
nando C. Hopkins and Angeline Rinker, was married March 
4., 1902, to Jane Wolfe, who was born September n, 1875. 
CHILDREN: 

HERALD HOLMES, born May 26, 1903. 
Home, Mansfield, 111.; business, agriculture. 

VI. WILLIAM LUTHER HOPKINS, second child oj 
Fernando C. Hopkins and Angeline Rinker, is unmarried. 
Home, Mansfield, 111.; business, agriculture. 
The rest of these children are in the home at Singers Glen, Va. 



361 



V. WILLIAM NEWTON HOPKINS, third child of 
John Hopkins and Malinda Jane Ralston, was married Jan- 
uary 27, 1874., to Elizabeth Rinker. 

CHILDREN: 

CHARLES BAXTER, born Dec. i, 1874. 
ARCHIBALD JOHN, born Jan. 26, 1876. 
EFFIE JANE, born Jan. 10, 1877. 

ANNIE ESTELLE, born Nov. 5, 1878. 

ELLA MAY, born Feb. 29, 1880. 

CORNELIA ELIZABETH, born May 13, 1881. 
FANNY ROLSTON, born May 10, 1883. 
HARRY HANES, born May 31, 1885. 

MARY ISABELLE, born Mar. 17, 1887. 

BERTHA SCOTT, born June 22, 1889. 

BRUCY BREWER, born Aug. 22, 1890. 

Home, Singers Glen, Va. 

VI. CHARLES BAXTER HOPKINS, first child of 
William Newton Hopkins and Elizabeth Rinker, was married 
December 10, 1896, to Vista J. Davis, who was born August 
2, 1870. 

CHILDREN : 

ARCHIBALD LEE, born Mar. 31, 1898. 
ARLIE GUY, born Mar. 30, 1900. 
NELLIE RUTH, born June 2, 1903. 

Home, Singers Glen, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

VI. ARCHIBALD JOHN and VI. ELLA MAY HOP- 
KINS, second and fifth children of William Newton Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Rinker, are at Greenmount, Va. 

VI. EFFIE JANE HOPKINS, third child of William 
Newton Hopkins and Elizabeth Rinker, is at Singers Glen, 
Va. 

VI. ANNIE ESTELLE and VI. CORNELIA ELIZA- 
BETH HOPKINS, the fourth and sixth children of William 
Newton Hopkins and Elizabeth Rinker, are at Mansfield, III. 

362 



VI. FANNY RALSTON HOPKINS, seventh child of 
William Newton Hopkins and Elizabeth Rinker, was married 
September 15, 1904., to James W. Stultz, who was born in Au- 
gusta County, Ky. 

Home, Singers Glen, Va. ; business, milling. 

The other children are in the home at Singers Glen, Va. 



IV. AGNES HOPKINS, fourth child of Archibald Hop- 
kins and Elizabeth Gordon, was married to John Hopkins 
Ralston (son of Mary Hopkins and Hinton Ralston). 

Home, Mt. Clinton; business, farming. 

IV. WILLIAM DAVIS HOPKINS, fifth child of Archi- 
bald Hopkins and Elizabeth Gordon, was married to Fanny 
Hopkins (second child of William Hopkins and Hester Krat- 
zer, his first cousin). 

Home, Harrisonburg, Va.; business, physician. 



IV. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, sixth child of Archibald 
Hopkins and Elizabeth Gordon, died when a lad. 



363 



The great thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what 
direction we are moving. O W. Holmes. 



365 



//. WILLIAM H. HOPKINS, second child of Archibald 
Hopkins and Jannet Love, was married, 1806, to Anne Ralston, 
who died May 13, 1812. 

CHILDREN: 

ARCHIBALD. 

JOHN HINTON, born Mar. 24, 1809; died Sept. 22, 1869. 

DAVID RALSTON. 

Anne Ralston Hopkins died May 13, 1812. 

II. WILLIAM H. HOPKINS married second Hester Bear Kratzer. 

CHILDREN : 
WILLIAM E. 
FRANCES JANE. 
ELIZABETH MARGARET, born Dec. 15, 1822; died Jan. 22, 1899. 

The members of this family are all buried at the New Erection Cem- 
etery in Rockingham County, Va., except Frances Jane who is buried at 
Harrisonburg, Va., and Elizabeth Margaret at Port Republic, Va. 

Home, Rockingham County, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

///. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, first child of William H. 
Hopkins and Anne Ralston, married Sarah Ann Hopkins, 
daughter of Archibald Hopkins and Elizabeth Gordon. (See 
page 344.} 



367 



///. JOHN HINTON HOPKINS, second child of 
William H. Hopkins and Anne Ralston, was married October 
/p, 184.2, to Elizabeth Margaret C off man, who was born March 
13, 1822, and died June 25, 1889. 

CHILDREN: 

ANNIE RALSTON, born Nov. 21, 1843; died Nov. 14, 1865. 

SAMUEL COFFMAN, born July 16, 1845; died Mar. 31, 1864. 
VIRGINIA, born Feb. 10, 1847; died Oct. n, 1863. 

JANNET LOVE, born Nov. 17, 1848; died Feb. 1850. 

MARY FRANCES, born Oct. i, 1850; died May 15, 1856. 

THOMAS WALLACE, born Aug. 25, 1852. 
CATHERINE COFFMAN, born Oct. 20, 1856. 
JOHN HINTON, born May 25, 1859; died July 24, 1859. 

ELIZABETH LOVE, born Aug. 19, 1860; died Sept. 7, 1885. 
VIRGINIA GORE, born Aug. 30, 1863; died Sept. 1864. 

Home, Rockingham County, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

IV. ANNIE RALSTON HOPKINS, first child of John 
Hinton Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret C off man, died at 
twenty -two years 0} age, and is buried in the New Erection 
Cemetery. 

IV. SAMUEL COFFMAN HOPKINS, second child of 
John Hinton Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret C off man, died 
at nineteen years of age, and is buried in the New Erection 
Cemetery. 

IV. VIRGINIA HOPKINS, third child of John Hinton 
Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret C off man, died at sixteen 
years of age, and is buried in the New Erection Cemetery. 

IV. JANNET LOVE HOPKINS, fourth child of John 
Hinton Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret C off man, died when 
a year old, and is buried in the New Erection Cemetery. 

368 



IV. MARY FRANCES HOPKINS, fifth child of John 
Hinton Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret C off man, died when 
five years old, and is buried in the New Erection Cemetery. 



IV. THOMAS WALLACE HOPKINS, sixth child of 
John Hinton Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret Coffman, was 
married June 30, 1894., to Nova Ward, who was born February 

12, 1879. 

CHILDREN: 

EDWARD HINTON, born Feb. 11,1897. 

WALLACE CLEMONS, born Sept. 14, 1898. 

JOHN KIRK, born June 22, 1900; died Feb. 16, 1902. 

CATHERINE COFFMAN, born Feb. 8, 1902; died Feb. 10, 1902. 

HENRY WARD, born Jan. 17, 1903; died July 7,1903. 

ELIZABETH MARGARET, born Aug. 9, 1904. 

Home, Garvin, Ind. Ter.; business, agriculture. 



IV. CATHERINE COFFMAN HOPKINS, seventh 
child of John Hinton Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret Coff- 
man, was married May 16, 1878, to Stephen Harnsberger, who 
was born July 5, 1852. 

CHILDREN : 

BESSIE INGLE, born Mar. 15, 1879. 

MARY MOORMAN, born June n, 1881; died Mar. i, 1895. 

JOHN HOPKINS, born Nov. 3, 1882. 

ROBERT SAMUEL, born July 15,1887. 

Home, Catlett, Fauquier County, Va.; business, physician. 

V. BESSIE INGLE HARNSBERGER, first child of 
Catherine Coffman Hopkins and Stephen Harnsberger, was 
married November 30, 1904., to William B. Weaver. 

Home, Clarksville, Texas. 



IV. JOHN HINTON HOPKINS, eighth child of John 
Hinton Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret Coffman, died in 
infancy. 



IV. ELIZABETH LOVE HOPKINS, ninth child of 
John Hinton Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret Coffman, was 
married October 16, 1884., to John P. Kegg, who was born 
July 4, 1854. 

CHILDREN: 

JOHN MONTGOMERY, born Aug, 4, 1885. 
Home, Asheville, N. C.; business, merchant. 



IV. VIRGINIA GORE HOPKINS, tenth child of John 
Hinton Hopkins and Elizabeth Margaret Coffman died when a 
year old. 



370 



///. DAVID RALSTON HOPKINS, third child 0} 
William H. Hopkins and Anne Ralston was married to 
Lavinia Campbell. 
CHILDREN : 

MARGARET JANE. 

LAVINIA. 

CAMPBELL. 

Home, Rockingham Co., Va.; business, agriculture. 

IV. MARGARET JANE HOPKINS, first child of 
David Ralston Hopkins and Lavinia Campbell, was married to 
Charles Patterson. 

Home, Riverton, Augusta Co., Va. 



IV. LA VINIA HOPKINS, second child of David Ralston 
Hopkins and Lavinia Campbell, was married to James Bear. 
Home, Winter Park, Fla. 



IV. CAMPBELL HOPKINS, third child of David 
Ralston Hopkins and Lavinia Campbell, died unmarried, and is 
buried in the New Erection Church Cemetery, Rockingham 
Co., Va. 



371 



///. WILLIAM E. HOPKINS, fourth child 0} William 
H. Hopkins and first child of Hester Bear Kratzer, died unmar- 
ried. He is buried in the cemetery at New Erection Church, 
Rockingham Co., Va. 



III. FRANCES JANE HOPKINS, fifth child of Wil- 
liam H. Hopkins and second child of Hester Bear Kratzer, was 
married to William Davis Hopkins (son of Archibald Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Gordon). 

Home, Harrisonburg, Va.; business, physician. 



///. ELIZABETH HOPKINS, sixth child of William 
H. Hopkins and third child of Hester Bear Kratzer, was married 
November 17, 184.6, to Henry B. Harnsberger, who was born 
November 26, 1816, and died September, igoq.. 

CHILDREN: 

FRANCES HOPKINS, born Apr. 9, 1848. 
ELIZABETH HESTER, born Oct. 21, 1849; died Sept. 27, 1877. 
KATE COFFMAN, born May 16, 1854; died July 23, 1893. 
JANET LOVE, born Nov. 23, 1856. 

JOHN ISAAC, born June 3, 1858. 

ANNIE VIRGINIA, born Dec. i, 1861. 
Home, Port Republic, Va.; business, agriculture. 

372 



IV. FRANCES HOPKINS HARNSBERGER, first 
child of Elizabeth Hopkins and Henry B. Harnsberger, was 
married November 9, 1872, to J. W. Blackburn, who was born 
April 24, 1847. 

CHILDREN: 

HENRY HARNSBERGER, born Aug. 13, 1873. 

ELIZABETH LETTITIA, born Sept. 5, 1874. 

JOHN FRANCIS, born Jan. 2, 1877. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM, born Jan. 7,1880. 

ADELAIDE, born Apr. 5, 1881. 

ANNIE LEWIS, born May 5, 1885. 

JANE, born Sept. 24, 1886. 

JOSEPH B., born May 8, 1888. 

OLEVIA FRANCES, born Nov. 12, 1891. 

Home, Shendon, Va.; business, agriculture and insurance. 

V. HENRY HARNSBERGER BLACKBURN, first 
child of Frances Hopkins Harnsberger and J. W. Blackburn, is 
unmarried. 

Home, Grottoes (Shendon), Va. ; business, civil engineer and geological 
coal expert. 

V. ELIZABETH LETTITIA BLACKBURN, second 
child of Frances Hopkins Harnsberger and J. W. Blackburn, 
was married December 10, 1897, to Albert Kemper. 

CHILDREN : 

FRANCES HOPKINS, born Feb. 20, 1899. 
ALBERT STRAGER, born Mar. 20, 1901. 
MARGARET GRAHAM, born May 23, 1903. 

Home, Port Republic, Va. ; business, physician. 

V. JOHN FRANCIS BLACKBURN, third child of 
Frances Hopkins Harnsberger and /. W. Blackburn, is un- 
married. 

Home, Harrisonburg, Va.; business, law. 



373 



V. FREDERICK WILLIAM BLACKBURN, fourth 
child of Frances Hopkins Harnsberger and J. W. Blackburn. 

Is a divinity student. 

Home, Grottoes (Shendon), Va. 

V. ADELAIDE BLACKBURN, fifth child of Frances 
Hopkins Harnsberger and J. W. Blackburn, was married 
August 29, i goo, to Herbert Snapp, who was born April, 1870. 

CHILDREN : 

RICHARD LEONIDAS. 
GLADYS VIRGINIA. 

Home, Hagerstown, Md. ; business, express agent. 
The other children are in the home at Shendon, Va. 



IV. ELIZABETH HESTER HARNSBERGER, second 
child of Elizabeth Hopkins and Henry B. Harnsberger, was 
married May 29, 1877, to J. W. Rousseau. 



IV. KATE COFFMAN HARNSBERGER, third child 
of Elizabeth Hopkins and Henry B. Harnsberger, was married 
January 75, 1879, to W. I. Harnsberger. 

CHILDREN: 

ROBERT S., born Oct. 30, 1879. 

J ANNEX LOVE, born Aug. 9, 1883. 
WILLIAM INGLES, born Sept. 12, 1889. 
KATHLEEN, born Jan. 24, 1891. 

JOHN, born July 16, 1898. 

Home, Shendon, Va. 



374 



//. JANE HOPKINS, third child of Archibald Hopkins 
and Jennet Love, married Joseph Chrisman and went to Ken- 
tucky. No trace of her family has been found. 



II. MARY HOPKINS, fourth child of Archibald Hop- 
kins and Jennet Love, married William Rolston. Her family 
has not been found. 



II. ELIZABETH HOPKINS, fifth child of Archibald 
Hopkins and Jennet Love, married her own cousin, John 
Hopkins, son of William Hopkins, the pioneer. (See page 382.) 



375 



IV. JANET LOVE HARNSBERGER, fourth child 
of Elizabeth Hopkins and Henry B. Harnsberger, was mar- 
ried May 23, 1888, to Charles G. Harnsberger. 

CHILDREN: 

THOMAS KENNERLEY, born Apr. 26, 1889. 
ELIZABETH MARY, born June 25, 1891. 
ANN VIRGINIA, born Oct. 16, 1892. 

GRACE ROLSTON, born July 5, 1897. 
Home, Elkton, Va. ; business, agriculture and civil engineer. 

IV. JOHN ISAAC HARNSBERGER, fifth child of 
Elizabeth Hopkins and Henry B. Harnsberger, was married 
December 5, i&95, to Adelaide Kemper, who was born March 
3, 1862, and died June n, 1902. 

CHILDREN : 

MARGARET CLARE, born Nov. 4, 1896. 

HENRY BAKER, born Aug. 20, 1898; died Sept. 5, 1898. 

GEORGE KEMPER, born Dec. 4, 1899. 

ESTHER LEWIS, born Feb. i, 1902. 

Home, Port Republic, Va.; business, agriculture and civil engineer. 

IV. ANNIE VIRGINIA HARNSBERGER, sixth child 
of Elizabeth Hopkins and Henry B. Harnsberger, not re- 
ported. 



376 



No man is born into the world whose work 
Is not born with him. There is always work 
And tools to work withal, for those who will; 
And blessed are the horny hands of toil. 

Lowell. 



377 



THE WILLIAM HOPKINS FAMILY 



379 



I. WILLIAM HOPKINS came, with his two brothers, John and Archi- 
ibald, to Virginia before 1749. He settled five miles north of his brothers. 
There is in Richmond, Va., the record of a patent made to Ephriam Love 
and William Hopkins for two hundred and four acres of land, dated Septem- 
ber 5, 1749. Tradition says that he married a sister of Ephriam Love. 
There is a suggestion that he went with his nephew, Ephriam Hopkins, 
to Kentucky, but extended search has not found any trace of him there. 
In Cook's Creek session book a list of church members in 1810 and 1811 
is given. This list gives the names of the family of Thomas Hopkins 
(son of John) and his mother (John's widow), also Mrs. John Hopkins 
and Jenny Hopkins, presumably Mrs. Elizabeth Hopkins Hopkins, as 
her oldest child was Janet and Mrs. Ann Hopkins. We notice that where 
a man and his wife were both members, it is given in this way, i.e., 
Thomas Hopkins We also notice that where the husband is living, but 

Wife. 

not a member of the church, the wife is given by her husband's name, as 
above, Mrs. John Hopkins. Hence we conclude that Mrs. Ann Hopkins 
was the widow of William Hopkins. If he entered land in 1749, he was 
of age at that date, and must then have been born as soon as 1728. John 
died before 1791. Archibald died May 8, 1799, and we conclude that 
William had also finished his earthly life. We find a little later that 
"Anne Hopkins" departed this life May, 1812, which would make her 
about sixty years old. 



/. WILLIAM HOPKINS. Tradition says that he mar- 
ried a sister of Ephraim Love. 

CHILDREN: 

JOHN, baptized May, 1761. 

Home, Rockingham County, Va.; business, agriculture. 

II. JOHN HOPKINS, son of William Hopkins, married 
his own cousin, Elizabeth Hopkins, daughter of Archibald, the 
pioneer. She was baptized November, 1761, and the church 
records say died April 23, 1814. They were probably mar- 
ried about 1781. 

CHILDREN : 

JENNET, born Mar. 18, 1782. 

ELIZABETH, born Jan. 5, 1784. 

WILLIAM, born Nov. 23, 1785. 

DAVID, born Dec. 25, 1787; died 1857. 

MARY, born 1789; died about 1850. 

ARCHIBALD, born Jan. 26, 1791. 

JAMES, born Dec. 8, 1793; died Apr. 30, 1852. 

Home, West Rockingham County, Va.; business, agriculture. 

COPY OF AN OLD RECEIPT. 
Owned by Ruth Hopkins, of Harrisonburg, Va. 

Oct. 20, 1800, Received of the executors of Archibald Hopkins Estate 
the sum of one hundred and fifty nine Pounds Seventeen Shillings and 
five Pence as part of my wife's Dowry willed to her by her father Archibald 
Hopkins. Received by me 

JOHN HOPKINS. 

///. JENNET HOPKINS, first child of John Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Hopkins, was married to John Bryan. She 
died in early life and is buried at Cook's Creek. 



382 



///. ELIZABETH HOPKINS, second child of John 
Hopkins and Elizabeth Hopkins, died unmarried. Her home 
was with her sister Mary. She is buried at Cook's Creek. 



III. WILLIAM, the third, and DA VID, the fourth, children 
of John Hopkins and Elizabeth Hopkins, were unmarried. 
They lived with their brother, James, and each died when 
about forty years old. They are buried at Cook's Creek. 



III. MARY HOPKINS, fifth child of John Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Hopkins, was married to Hinton Ralston. 

CHILDREN: 

JESSE. 

JOHN HOPKINS, baptized Apr. u, 1819. 

DAVID. 

JAMES P. 

ELIZABETH, baptized Sept. 1823. 

JANE. 

ANN. 

Home, Rockingham County, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

III. MARY HOPKINS RALSTON lived on a farm adjoining her 
father's, John Hopkins, where she died, and is buried at Cook's Creek. 

IV. JESSE RALSTON, first child of Mary Hopkins 
and Hinton Ralston, was married about 184.1 to Fanny Bear. 

Home, Lafayette County, Mo.; business, agriculture. 

IV. JESSE RALSTON died in Missouri. 



383 



IV. JOHN HOPKINS RALSTON, second child of 
Mary Hopkins and Hinton Ralston, was married to Agnes 
Hopkins. 

Agnes Hopkins died and John Hopkins Ralston married second Frances 
J. Bear. 
CHILDREN: 

CHARLES. 

FRANK. 

HOLMES. 

HINTON. 

MARY. 

Home, Rockingham County, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

V. CHARLES RALSTON, first child of John Hopkins 
Ralston and Frances J. Bear. 

Lives at Mt. Clinton, Va. 

V. FRANK RALSTON, second child of John Hopkins 
Ralston and Frances J. Bear. 

Lives at Chrisman. Va. 



IV. DAVID RALSTON, third child of Mary Hopkins 
and Hinton Ralston, was married to Ann Bear. 

Ann Bear Ralston died, and David Ralston married second Martha 
Young. 

Home, Missouri; business, agriculture. 



IV. JAMES P. RALSTON, fourth child of Mary Hop- 
kins and Hinton Ralstton, was not married. 



384 



IV. ELIZABETH RALSTON, fifth child of Mary Hop- 
kins and Hinton Ralston, was married about 1842, to Christy 
Bear. 

CHILDREN: 
MARY. 
JOHN. 
NEWTON. 

Home, Harrisonburg, Va. ; business, agriculture. 

IV. JANE RALSTON, sixth child of Mary Hopkins 
and Hinton Ralston, was married to John Hopkins. 

CHILDREN: 

FERNANDO. 

JOHN. 

NEWTON. 

John Hopkins died, and Jane Ralston married second Cyrus Hop- 
kins, of Pendleton County, W. Va. 

CHILDREN: 
CHARLES. 
Living in Missouri; business, agriculture. 

IV. ANN RALSTON, seventh child of Mary Hopkins 
and Hinton Ralston, was not married. 



III. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, sixth child of John 
Hopkins and Elizabeth Hopkins, is unreported. 



385 



///. JAMES HOPKINS, seventh child of John Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Hopkins, was married first to Elizabeth Bryan, 
who was born March g, 1797- 
CHILDREN: 

HANNAH JANE, born Feb. 29, 1820; died June 2, 1896. 
WILLIAM RUFUS, born Jan. 3, 1822; died Dec. 12, 1902. 
MILTON, born Mar. 8, 1826; died in infancy. 

Elizabeth Bryan Hopkins died June, 1826. 

III. JAMES HOPKINS was married second, September 22, 1829, 
to Elizabeth Copeland, who was born January 20, 1807, and died Feb- 
ruary 25, 1876. 

CHILDREN: 

JOSEPHINE, born June 25, 1834. 
ARCHIBALD, born Nov. 22, 1844. 

After the death of James Hopkins, April 30, 1852, Elizabeth Copeland 
went to friends in Laporte, Ind. 

IV. HANNAH JANE HOPKINS, first child of James 
Hopkins and Elizabeth Bryan, was married December 21, 
1837, to Samuel Bear, who was born November 4, 1804.. 

CHILDREN: 

VIRGINIA L., born Feb. 8, 1839. 

MARY E., born Oct. 5, 1840. 

HOLMES B., born Nov. 15, 1842; died Jan. 19, 1877. 

JAMES W., born Dec. 23, 1844. 

ANDREW H., born July 28, 1852; died in infancy. 

Home, Mt. Crawford, Va. ; business, frescoer and painter. 



386 



V. VIRGINIA L. BEAR, first child of Hannah Jane 
Hopkins and Samuel Bear, was married June 4, 1861, to 
Michael Lindon. 

CHILDREN : 

LILLIAN E., born Aug. 19, 1862; died Aug. 3, 1881. 

MARY E., born May 2, 1866. 

MAUDE E., born Aug. 3, 1868. 

ANNA BOYD, born Jan. 17, 1870. 

NELLIE B., born Oct. 5, 1871. 

Home, Mt. Crawford, Va.; business, teacher. 

VI. LILLIAN E. LINDON, first child oj Virginia L. 
Bear and Michael Lindon, died at nineteen years of age. 

VI. MARY E. LINDON, second child of Virginia L. 
Bear and Michael Lindon, is unmarried. 

VI. MAUDE E. LINDON, third child of Virginia L. 
Bear and Michael Lindon, was married September n, 1900, 
to B. F. Kagey. 

Home, Weyers Cave, Va. 

VI. ANNA BOYD LINDON, fourth child of Virginia 
L. Bear and Michael Lindon, is unmarried. 

VI. NELLIE B. LINDON, fifth child oj Virginia L. 
Bear and Michael Lindon, was married March 16, 1897, to 
Rev. B. V. Surlzer. 

Home, Poolsville, Md. 



V. MARY EMMA BEAR, second child of Hannah Jane 
Hopkins and Samuel Bear, was married March 12, 1868, to 
V. C. Switzer, who was born October 23, 1831, at Horn's Mill, 
Rockingham County, Va. 

Home, Mt. Crawford, Va.; business, chair maker and painter. 

38? 



V. HOLMES B. BEAR, third child of Hannah Jane 
Hopkins and Samuel Bear, was married November 15, 184.2, 
to Emma H. Parks. 

CHILDREN : 

LILLIAN LEE, born Nov. 12, 1866. 

NANNY BOYD, born June 6, 1869. 

HARRY A., born June 14, 1872; died Aug. 12, 1872. 

JENNY HOPKINS, born July 17, 1874. 

Home, Richmond, Va.; business, druggist. 

V. JAMES W. BEAR, fourth child of Hannah Jane 
Hopkins and Samuel Bear, was married March 18, 1875, to 
Annie R. Hill. 

CHILDREN: 

MARY VIRGINIA, born Feb. 20, 1876; died Feb. 29, 1876. 
HOLMES BOYD, born Jan. 30, 1877; died July 10, 1904. 

Home, Mt. Crawford, Va.; business, painter and cabinetmaker. 

V. ANDREW H. BEAR, fifth child of Hannah Jane 
Hopkins and Samuel Bear, died in infancy, and is buried at 
Cook's Creek Cemetery. 



IV. WILLIAM RUFUS HOPKINS, second child of 
James Hopkins and Elizabeth Bryan, was married June i, 
184.8, to Elizabeth Bowman. 

CHILDREN : 
ADELAIDE. 
LUCY MILLER. 
MARY LIZZIE. 
FRANK DAVIS. 
ALICE BOWMAN. 
WILLIAM R. 
CRAWFORD MCCLURE. 

IV. WILLIAM RUFUS HOPKINS lived at the old homestead of 
his father and grandfather, known as "Mountain Home," until his wife 

388 



died. He then went to Washington, D. C., to live with his son, Frank 
D. Hopkins, where he died. He is buried at Cook's Creek, Rockingham 
County, Va. 

V. ADELAID, LUCY MILLER, and MARY LIZZIE, 

the first, second, and third children of William Rufus Hopkins 
and Elizabeth Bowman, died in infancy, and are buried at 
Cook's Creek Cemetery. 

V. FRANK DAVIS HOPKINS, fourth child of William 
Rufus Hopkins and Elizabeth Bowman, was married to Sallie 
Brightwell, of Lexington, Mo. (great- great- granddaughter of 
Archibald, the pioneer). 

CHILDREN : 

LIZZETTE. 
ZULA GLENN. 
FRANK JOY. 

Home, Washington, D. C. 

V. ALICE BOWMAN HOPKINS, fifth child of William 
Rufus Hopkins and Elizabeth Bowman. 

Lives with her brother, Frank Davis Hopkins, in Washington. She 
is employed in the Loan & Trust Bldg., Washington, D. C. 

V. WILLIAM RUFUS HOPKINS, sixth child of Wil- 
liam Rufus Hopkins and Elizabeth Bowman, was married 
December 22, 1896, to Ada McWhorton, who was born May 

3, i$75' 
CHILDREN: 

CHARLES BOWMAN, born Jan. 3, 1901. 

HERBERT FRANK, born Feb. 18, 1903. 

Home, Oklahoma; business, agriculture. 



389 



V. CRAWFORD McCLURE HOPKINS, seventh child 
of William Rufus Hopkins and Elizabeth Bowman, was married 
December 22, 1896, to Alice Schelf, who was born January 13, 
1880. 

CHILDREN: 

ARTHUR GOEBEL, born Dec. 4, 1902. 
Home, Oklahoma; business, agriculture. 



IV. MILTON HOPKINS, third child of James Hop- 
kins and Elizabeth Bryan, died in infancy, and is buried at 
Cook's Creek, Rockingham County, Va. 



IV. JOSEPHINE HOPKINS, fourth child of James 
Hopkins and first child of Elizabeth Ann Copeland, was married 
March 75, 1860, to Joseph Hickman, who was born February 
27, 1832. 

CHILDREN: 

Two children, who died in infancy. 

NELLIE HOPKINS, born July n, 1866. 

JOSEPH HICKHAN, died Sept. 14, 1901. 

Home, Laporte, Ind. 



IV. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS, fifth child of James 
Hopkins and second child of Elizabeth Ann Copeland, was 
married September 28, 1873, to Elizabeth Ryan, of Bridgeport, 
W. Va. 

CHILDREN : 

Two children, who died in infancy. 

MARY JOSEPHINE, born Dec. 7, 1883. 

Elizabeth Ryan Hopkins died February, 1884, when Mary Josephine 
was a tiny baby. Her aunt, Josephine Hopkins Hickman, took her to 
her home, and brought her up as her own child. 

IV. ARCHIBALD HOPKINS lives in Chicago, 111. 

390 



Time, like an ever-rolling stream, 
Bears all its sons away; 
They fly forgotten, as a dream 
Dies at the opening day. 

O God! our help in ages past, 
Our hope for years to come, 
Be thou our guide while troubles last, 
And our eternal home. 



39* 



Who serves his country well has no need of ancestors."- -Voltaire. 



SOLDIERS. 

REVOLUTIONARY WAR. 

Archibald Hopkins, John Hopkins. 

WAR OF 1812. 

David Henton, John Hopkins, 

James Hopkins, Robert Hopkins, 

Thomas Hopkins. 

MEXICAN WAR. 
B. F. Gordon. 

CONFEDERATE ARMY. 

B. F. Gordon, John Hopkins, 

Frank Gordon, Edward Young Pollard, 

D. Benj. Henton, John Condit Pollard, 

Robert Henton, Thomas Orville Pollard, 

Lewis C. Hopkins, T. A. Walker, 

William Johnson Hopkins, Silas Walker. 

UNION ARMY. 

Adam Willis Anderson, Thomas E. Margrave, 

Aaron Giles Barnell, William Long Masson, 

Spencer W. Brown, Ephraim P. McCreight, 

John E. Corder, Samuel McCreight, 

Ralph V. Culter, John Hopkins Pogue, 

Blackburn Garrison, Morgan S. Pratt, 

Alonzo Albert Hopkins, Chauncey T. Ray, 

James William Hopkins, James M. Rice, 

Luther Shanklin Hopkins, John H. Rice, 

Orlando J. Hopkins, Thos. William Scott, 

Andrew J. Kendall, William A. Thompson, 

Gay Kinkead, William McQ. Voris, 

John P. Kinkead, I. F. Yancy. 

393 



SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR. 

Robert L. McCord, Benjamin Moreland Sellar, 

Warren Hopkins Ray. 

UNITED STATES NAVY. 
Walter Daniel Kaesner. 



394 



COMPILER'S NOTE. 

In the final gathering together of the accumulated threads of life that 
have been found in our search for the members of the Hopkins family, 
many things might be said. 

The work has been laborious and patience-trying because so many 
have taken no interest in it. 

The Poages, as a rule, said (when they said anything), "You can find 
nothing about the Poages." Now, it is a fact that much has been found, 
and if each one had given what he personally knew, the bits might have 
been put together and a complete record made. It is to be regretted 
that so many were unwilling to give even the data of their own families, 
and the ridiculous reluctance on the part of some of the women to give 
the dates of their birth is beyond comprehension. When, as in many in- 
stances, two, three, and four letters have been written, with stamps in- 
closed for reply, without results, the case seemed hopeless, and the attempt 
abandoned. 

However, there have been those who have given their hearty co-opera- 
tion. Among these we mention the late Rev. T. M. Hopkins, of Denver, 
Colo. ; the Gillilands, and Mr. Archibald Hopkins, of Red Oak, O. ; Miss 
Lou Kinkead, of Ripley, O.; Mr. John T. Shanklin, of Johnson's Junc- 
tion, Ky. ; Dr. and Miss Ruth Hopkins, of Harrisonburg, Va. ; and Professor 
A. W. Williamson, of Augustina College, Rock Island, 111. To these we 
give a heartfelt "thank you," and to all others who, in busy lives, have 
taken time to answer our questions. Not all of those who gave encour- 
agement and help when the work began six years ago, are in the earthly 
home to enjoy its completion. 

Rev. T. M. Hopkins, of Denver, Colo., was greatly interested in it, 
and gave of his knowledge, time, and talent to its accomplishment; but 
he has been in his Father's house many days. One of the lists of children 
herein recorded was made out by a mother on a sickbed. A few days 
later her daughter added a postscript saying the hand that had written 
it was quiet forever. Some who have written in the joy of a cloudless life 
have written again out of the night of grief. 

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And so, as knowledge of the homes has increased, there has been re- 
joicing in your joys, and sorrow for your griefs, and the future of these 
lives will always be full of interest to your compiler. 

ELLA WARREN HARRISON. 
MRS R. D. HARRISON. 

Princeton, 111. 



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