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Full text of "Charles Conder; his life and work"

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CHARLES CONDER 

HIS LIFE AND WORK 



CHARLES CONDER 

HIS LIFE AND WORK 
• • BY FRANK GIBSON • • 

WITH A CATALOGUE OF THE LITHOGRAPHS 
AND ETCHINGS BY CAMPBELL DODGSON,M.A. 

KEEPER OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, BRITISH MUSEUM 
WITH ONE HUNDRED &f TWENTY-ONE ILLUSTRATIONS 






LONDON: JOHN LANE, THE BODLEY HEAD 
NEW YORK: JOHN LANE COMPANY 
TORONTO; BELL &> COCKBURN. MCMXIV 



Printed by Ballantyne, Hanson &> Co. 
at the Ballantyne Press, Edinburgh 



i?'r- Art 

if 7 



TO 

MY DEAR WIFE 

I DEDICATE THIS BOOK 



^ 



^ 



222044 



X 



PREFACE 

IT is more than four years since the world of art suffered 
a great loss through the death of Charles Conder, and 
it has been felt that no further time should pass without 
some record of the life and work of a very rare and exquisite 
personality in British Art — a personality which was only 
equalled, but certainly not surpassed in his own particular 
time and his own particular way, by another genius, namely, 
Aubrey Beardsley. 

Conder was neither a seer nor a self-advertiser in art, and, 
so far, his work has formed no school, though the influence of 
his painting on certain artists is undeniable. He was not even 
a great draughtsman, but he was an artist possessed of vast 
and astonishing powers of invention, and a brilliant colourist. 
He showed his genius in the decorative panels he designed, 
in his own distinctive style, for Mr. Bing, Mr. Edmund 
Davis, and others. These were achievements which would 
have gained him in other ages constant employment in 
adorning public buildings or palaces. His fan designs, too, 
are amongst the loveliest ever made in Europe. Indeed, 
as a decorative artist and painter-poet who created and 
lived in a fairyland of his own, Conder certainly deserves 
some record. 

As I had the privilege of knowing him from his earliest 
artistic years, having first met him in Melbourne in 1888, 

7 



CHARLES CONDER 

and subsequently been constantly in his company until his 
last illness, I found, while writing this book, a certain satis- 
faction in producing the first account in book-form of this 
great artist, whose life was cut so short. 

In doing this, I take here the opportunity to express 
my grateful thanks to those who have so kindly helped 
me with information concerning those periods of Conder's 
life when, through the force of circumstances, I did not 
come into contact with him. 

To the late Mrs. Conder I am indebted for many facts. 
Her sister, Mrs. Cecil Lawson, and her aunt, Mrs. A. A. 
Humphrey, have been unwearying in their efforts to help 
me. To Mrs. Frederick Pryce I owe the account of his 
earliest years and boyhood. His Australian art comrades, 
Messrs. Arthur Streeton, Tom Roberts, and A. H. Fullwood, 
have furnished me with letters from Conder as well as 
recollections of him, while Mr. William Rothenstein, Mr. A. 
C. Blunt, and Mr. J. G. Legge have supplied me with 
most interesting accounts of the artist's Parisian days. 

My thanks are also due to Mr. D. S. MacCoU and the 
proprietors of The Saturday Revieiv, for permission to 
reprint the poem which appeared three days after the artist's 
death. At the same time I thank Mr. Gordon Bottomley 
for so kindly permitting me to reprint his poem inspired by 
" L'Oiseau Bleu." 

Also, I wish to thank Mr. John Lane very much for 
kindly allowing Conder's interesting letter to appear in fac- 
simile. 

Further, I thank all those owners of Conder's works who 
8 



PREFACE 



have so readily lent pictures, fans, drawings, and lithographs 
for reproduction in this book, which so greatly adds to its 
value. 

And last, but most of all, I express my sincere gratitude 
to my friend Mr. Campbell Dodgson, for his generosity in 
volunteering to compile the exhaustive catalogue of Conder's 
lithographs and etchings. 

FRANK GIBSON. 
April 1913. 



B 



9 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



The Like of Charles Conder 23 

The Art of Charles Conder 44 

A Catalogue of the Lithographs and Etchings of 

Charles Conder 73 

List of Charles Conder's Works 93 

Index m 



II 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



Portrait of Charles Conder Frontispiece 

From a photograph by Frederick H. Evans 

Drawing on Silk To face page 23 

In the possession of Grant Richards, Esq. 

Portrait of Conder at the Age of Eight. ... „ 26 

From a photograph in the possession of Mrs. Pryce 

A Fan in Sanguine „ 30 

The property of John Lane 

Portrait of Mr. Max Beerbohm „ 36 

In the possession of Mrs. Beerbohm 

" In the Forest " . . „ 42 

In the possession of Mrs. Eaton 

" The Masquerade " „ 48 

In the possession of Edmund Davis, Esq. 

The Yellow Sands „ 52 

Design for a fan, in the possession of Mrs. Eugenie Joachim Gibson 

" The Shadow " „ 56 

In the possession of A. B. Clifton, Esq. 

" The Awakening " „ 60 

In the possession of Pickford Waller, Esq. 

Garniture for a Dress „ 64 

In the possession of Miss A lien 

" La Morte Amoureuse " „ 68 

In the possession of A. B. Clifton, Esq. 

The Peacock Fan „ 70 

In the possession of Grant Richards, Esq. 

13 



CHARLES CONDER 



rLATB 

Catalogue of Impression Exhibition I 

The properly of Tom Roberts, Esq. 

Title-Page for Catalogue II 

" The Hot Wind " HI 

The property of Mrs. F. Pryce 

" Design for a Fan " .... IV 

In the possession of J. G. Legge, Esq. 

Souvenir de Paris V 

Drawing on Silk, the property of fohn Lane 

Windermere VI 

The property of John Lave 

A Masque VII 

A Fairy Prince VIII 

" L'OiSEAU Bleu " IX 

The National Gallery, Melbourne 

Apple Blossom, Dennemont X 

In the possession of J. G. Legge, Esq. 

Facsimile of Letter written by Charles Conder ... XI 

Facsimile of Letter written by Charles Conder . . . XII 

Facsimile of Letter written by Charles Conder . . . XIII 

Illustration on Silk enclosed in Letter XIV 

Thz property of John Lane 

" Thorn and Mistletoe Fan " XV 

The property of Arthur Streeton, Esq. 

" F^TEs Galantes," Illustration to Poem by Verlaine . . XVI 

In the possession of L. Morley Harder, Esq. 

The Key of Blue XVII 

The property of J oh n La ne 

The Palais Royal XVIII 

The property of John Lane 

" Fickle Love Fan " , . . XIX 

The property of A. B. Clifton. Esq. 

Portrait of Charles Conder by Himself XX 

The painting is the property of C. L. Rothenstein, Esq. 

H 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

PLATE 

A Design for a Fan XXI 

" 1830 •• XXII 

The property of Mrs. A rth ur Halford 

"Pierrot" XXIII 

The property of A. B. Clifton. Esq. 

Int^rieur XXIV 

The photograph is the property of Mrs. F. Humphrey 

"Swanage Bay" XXV 

The property of Geoffrey Blackwell, Esq. 

" Swanage Bay " XXVI 

The property of Walter fessop, Esq. 

" Femme dans une loge au Theatre" XXVII 

The photograph is the property of Mrs. F. Humphrey 

" The Blue Birds Fan " XXVIII 

The property of Geoffrey Blackwell, Esq. 

" The Empire Fan " XXIX 

The property of Mrs. Walter Jessop 

" A Napoleonic Idyll " XXX 

The property of Mrs. Waller fessop 

The Pepys Family XXXI 

The property of Mrs. Walter Jessop 

" In the Glade " XXXII 

In the possession of Pickford Waller, Esq. 

Les Rideaux Roses XXXIII 

In the possession of Pickford Waller, Esq. 

" TocATTA OF Galuppi " XXXIV 

In the possession of Pickford Waller, Esq. 

In THE Land of Dreams XXXV 

In the possession of Pickford Waller, Esq. 

A Decoration XXXVI 

In the possession of Pickford Waller, Esq. 

Pearl XXXVII 

In the possession of Pickford Waller, Esq. 

Garniture of a Dress . XXXVIII 

In the possession nf Mrs. A. Humphrey 

Garniture of a Dress XXXIX 

In the possession of Mrs. A . Humphrey 

15 



CHARLES CONDER 

PLATE 

Garniture of a Dress XL 

In the possession of Mrs. A. A. Humphrey 

Two Panels on Silk for a Room XLI 

In the possession of John Quinn, Esq., of New York City 

Two Panels on Silk for a Room XLII 

In the possession of John Quinn, Esq., of New York City 

Two Panels on Silk for a Room ....... XLIII 

In the possession of John Quinn, Esq., of New York City 

Two Panels on Silk for a Room XLIV 

In the possession of John Quinn, Esq., of New York City 

Panel on Silk for a Room XLV 

In the possession of John Quinn, Esq., of New York City 

Harlequin s' Amuse. Lithograph XLVI 

Harlequin s' Amuse XLVII 

Lithograph on silk coloured by Conder, exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

Garniture for a Dress XLVIII 

In the possession of Mrs. John Lane 

"Pan" XLIX 

Now in the possession of the British Museum 

Madame Errazuriz L 

In the possession of Pickford Waller, Esq. 

" Spring by the Sea " LI 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

" From Conder's House " LII 

In the possession of Mrs. Richard Raphael 

Brighton, 1905 LHI 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

A Windy Day LIV 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

A Peacock Idyll LV 

1)1 the possession of Edmund Davis, Esq. 

Design of Invitation Card. Lithograph LVI 

Recreations of Cupid (Drawing) LVII 

" Crepuscule " LVIII 

In the possession of Mrs. A. Cecil Lawson 
16 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

PLATE 

"Blossom" LIX 

In the possession of Mrs. J. P. Johnson 

" The Motor Car Fan " LX 

The property of P. Wilson Steer. Esq. 

" The Yellow Fan " LXI 

The property of Edmund Davis, Esq. 

" The Brocade Fan " LXII 

The property of Mrs. Eugenie Joachim Gibson 

Le R^veil LXIII 

The property of Miss Amy Halford 

" Death and the Rose " LXIV 

The property of Miss A my Halford 

" On the Balcony " LXV 

The property of Mrs. A rthur Halford 

La Fille aux Yeux d'Or. Lithograph LXVI 

Coralie. Lithograph LXVII 

Beatrice and Calyste (Balzac Set). Lithograph .... LXVIII 

The Death of Esther (Balzac Set). Lithograph .... LXIX 

Chez Camille Maupin. Lithograph LXX 

L'Alcade dans l'Embarras. Lithograph LXXI 

Invitation Card. Lithograph LXXII 

Alice Sit by the Fire LXXIII 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

The Pink Fan LXXIV 

A Garden of Roses LXXV 

" The Pergola " LXXVI 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

The Siesta LXXVII 

" Two Nymphs in a Garden "....... LXXVIII 

The property of Pickford Waller, Esq. 

The Fountain LXXIX 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

A.D. 1830 LXXX 

In the possession of Arnold Bennett, Esq. 

c 17 



CHARLES CONDER 

PLATE 

"Jealousy" LXXXI 

The property of Mrs. Eugenie Joachim Gibson 

Design for a Fan LXXXII 

/;: the possession of Mrs. Henry II'. Harden 

The Bull Fight Fan . LXXXIII 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

" L'Offr.\nde " LXXXIV 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

La Toilette ■ . LXXXV 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

" The Garden Seat " LXXXVI 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

The Blue Sofa LXXXVII 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

Les Baigneuses LXXXVIII 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

Design for Invitation Card. Lithograph ..... LXXXIX 

" Confidences " XC 

Au Pays Bleu XCI 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

" The Guitar Player " . XCII 

In the possession of John Quinn, Esq.. of New York City 

Design for a Fan XCIII 

The Fairy Tale. Lithograph XCIV 

Invitation Card. Lithograph . XCV 

A Spanish Phantasy. Lithograph XCVI 

La Sieste XCVII 

The photograph is the property of Mrs. F. Humphrey 

" La Belle Antonia " XCVIII 

In the possession of John Quinn, Esq., of New York City 

" Fantasia " (Silk Panel) XCIX 

In the possession of John Quinn, Esq., of New York City 

Overmantel C 

In the possession of Edmund Davis, Esq. 

i8 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



PLATE 

Casino de Paris CI 

In the possession of John Quinn, Esq., of New York City 

" The Check Dress " CII 

In the possession of Mrs. E. S. Dodge 

A Nymph CIII 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 

" La Toilette " CIV 

In the possession of John Quinn. Esq., of New York City 

Garniture of a Dress CV 

In the possession of Miss Allen 

Garniture of a Dress CVI 

In the possession of Miss Allen 

La Plage CVII 

Exhibited at the Leicester Galleries 



19 



CHARLES CONDER 

HIS LIFE AND WORK 




DRAWING ON SILK 
/// the possession of Grant Richards^ Esq. 



THE LIFE OF CHARLES CONDER 

CHARLES EDWARD CONDER was born in 
London on 24th October 1868. He was the second 
son of James Conder, a civil engineer. His mother 
was a Miss Ann Ayres, whose parents were English, her 
father being a gentleman farmer. 

She was born in Bedfordshire, and after marrying James 
Conder, had two sons, James and Charles, and one daughter, 
Alice, who is the only surviving member of the family. 
Charles was the youngest child. 

Of Mrs. Conder, there is no particular record, as to 
whether she had artistic tastes or aspirations. She was, it 
is said, fond of music ; but on his father's side, Conder was 
a direct descendant of the famous sculptor Louis Francis 
Roubiliac, who is best known by his monument to Lady 
Elizabeth Nightingale (1761) in Westminster Abbey. 

Shortly after Charles Conder's birth, his father received 
an engineering appointment in India, which he went out at 
once to take up. His wife, with her baby son, joined him 
a few months afterwards, and lived in India until her death, 
which occurred in May 1873. Charles, then aged five, was 
sent back immediately to England, much against his will ; 
but being induced by the promise of a rocking-horse, he 
finally consented to go alone, and was put under the care 
of the stewardess. His first inquiry on arriving in London, 

23 



CHARLES CONDER 

in June 1873, was: "Are there any rocking-horses in Eng- 
land?" 

Shortly after his arrival, he was placed under the guardian- 
ship of an old and intimate friend of his mother, Mrs. Frederick 
Pr)'ce, and when he was six years of age, he was sent with 
his brother James to a " dames' " school for morning lessons. 
It was a small school kept by two ladies, who had been in- 
timately known to Mrs. Conder, and selected by her for her 
son James before she left for India. The next school was a 
boys' day-school, which was neither satisfactory nor successful, 
and led to both brothers being sent to a boarding-school 
at Eastbourne, in the spring of 1877. 

From the photograph here reproduced, taken of him at the 
age of eight, some idea may be formed of his character, and a 
forecast of what the man Conder would be. It is the expression 
of a " Gamin " full of fun and mischief. The half-smile of the 
mouth gives the impression of capability, of tender affection 
combined with wilfulness and gentle mockery. In the eyes, 
looking out of their corners in a knowing way, one can already 
recognise that his brain was full of intelligence and yet weak- 
ness coupled with " Polissonerie." It was sometimes a trouble 
to get his consent to be photographed. Mrs. Pryce tells 
an amusing and characteristic story of this. When she took 
him one day to have this photograph taken, he asked who 
it was for, and, as he did not like the person named, he made, 
when the critical moment of " Now ! " by the photographer 
came, an ugly grimace at the camera. Mrs. Pryce remon- 
strated and asked the boy to be good for her sake, and this 

is the expression which resulted on the request. 

24 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

James Conder was exceedingly clever. Of Charles, it is 
reported, that he was not very diligent with his lessons and 
rebelled against strict discipline. On one occasion he seriously 
determined to run away from the school, and one afternoon, 
watching his opportunity, slipped out of the gate, and was 
running down a side street, when he suddenly met Mrs. 
Pryce, who asked him where he was going to so fast. " Away 
from school," he said. " He had had enough of it." In reply 
to the question "Why?" he replied : " I hate the drill, I hate 
being drilled ; " this feeling went through all his life. He was 
popular amongst his school friends, though he was not 
especially fond of games. He was fond, of course, of draw- 
ing, also of poetry and fiction. 

At the age of fifteen he left school, but did not seem in- 
clined for the profession his father intended for him — that 
of a civil engineer. He wanted to take up art, but to this 
his father strongly objected. Mrs. Pryce had given him his 
first paint-box years before. This proved a great source of 
joy to him. He was always drawing anything that attracted 
him. He made caricatures, tried all manner of subjects, and 
on one occasion, he painted a swallow on the wing, right 
across a plate — a proof of his originality which, unfortunately, 
has not been preserved. When he was seventeen he was 
sent to Sydney, where he joined an uncle, who was in the 
employ of the Lands Department of the New South Wales 
Government as a trigonometrical surveyor, but though his call- 
ing took him much into the country, it was work that the 
young Conder disliked. He much preferred drawing and 

painting landscapes to mapping them out with scientific and 

D 25 



CHARLES CONDER 

exact instruments, and he sketched whenever he got the 
chance. In 1886, he left his uncle's surveying party, and 
came to Sydney, where he obtained a minor post on The 
Ilhtstrated Sydney News, doing there small landscape draw- 
ings for the meagre salary which never exceeded the sum 
of £2 per week the whole time he was on the staff of this 
newspaper. However, it was just enough to live upon. It 
was work that he liked ; and there was the congenial society 
of other artists, like A. Henry Fullwood, F. P. Mahoney, 
and B. E. Minns, with whom he often went sketching at 
Richmond, a favourite painting-ground near Sydney. The 
first-named artist relates that at this time Conder had not 
much idea of colour, and that his sketches were almost mono- 
chromes. On the other hand, he showed a very good sense 
of selection. He composed his work from his surroundings, 
but never attempted to make a literal copy of what was 
before him. Imagination was always the mainspring of his 
art ; even in these early days there was infinite promise. A 
water-colour entitled " Mirage," showing a nude figure hold- 
ing a mirror, standing on the side of a hill, which was ex- 
hibited at the Art Society of New South Wales, Sydney, in 
1888, is a good example of this period. Gradually his sense 
of colour awakened — at any rate, it became apparent in his 
painting, when his colour schemes became lighter and more 
delicate. He admired very much at this time the work of an 
Italian artist, G. Nerli (well known by his portrait of Robert 
Louis Stevenson), who spent many years in New South 
Wales and was a fine colourist. 

In 1888 Conder migrated to Melbourne, where he met 
26 




CHARLES CONDER AT THE AGE OK EIGHT 

Frotn a photograph in t/ic possfssion o/ Mrs. I'ryce 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

other Australian artists, including Arthur Streeton, the well- 
known landscape painter, and Tom Roberts. With these two 
he worked a good deal at Heidelberg, a picturesque suburb 
of Melbourne, which at that time was a favourite sketching- 
ground for artists. He also drew a little from the life, at 
evening classes held at the National Gallery, Melbourne, 
and with Streeton he conducted painting classes, exhibit- 
ing at the same time his own work at local exhibitions in 
Melbourne and Sydney. To one show, held in Melbourne 
in August 1889, called "The 9x5 Impression Exhibition," 
he sent forty-six paintings ; they were all studies or sketches, 
of landscapes mostly, with a few imaginative subjects bearing 
such titles as "Arcadia," "Dolce far Niente," "A Page from 
Herrick," "A Dream of Handel's Largo," &c. Conder also 
designed the cover of the catalogue of this exhibition. 
(Plate I.) 

The preface to this catalogue ran as follows : — 

The 9x5 Exhibition of Impressions at Buxton's Rooms, 
Swanston Street, Melbourne. 

" When you draw, form is the important thing ; but in 
painting, the Jirst thing to look for is the general impression 
of colour." — Gerome. 

To the Public 

An effect is only momentary ; so an impressionist tries 

to find his place. Two half-hours are never alike ; and he 

who tries to paint a sunset on two successive evenings must 

27 



CHARLES CONDER 

be more or less painting from memory. So in these works 
it has been the object of the artists to render faithfully, and 
thus obtain first records of effects widely differing, and often 
of very fleeting character. 

The exhibition created great interest and a certain 
amount of hostility in the newspaper press against Im- 
pressionism ; but the general public supported the exhibi- 
tion, which was in every way a practical success. 

Conder also showed work at the annual exhibition of 
the Victorian Artists' Society in 1890, for which again he 
designed the cover of the catalogue (Plate 2), which greatly 
impressed his fellow-artists. Two of these paintings well 
represent his art at this period of his career : the first, called 
"The Hot Wind" (Plate 3), is one of his earliest imagi- 
native works — a half-nude female figure lying full length in 
the foreground of a sun-baked landscape ; she leans over the 
ashes of a fire in a brazier, which she rigorously blows to 
make it burst into flame, the smoke streams away in the 
wind, and a huge snake with uplifted head inquisitively 
crawls up to the woman. Technically, it is smooth in execu- 
tion, and is rather what artists call "tight" — that is, rigid 
and stiff in drawing — but good in colour. The whole is an 
Australian idyll in conception. It was sent to the Royal 
Academy in 1891 for exhibition in their summer show of 
that year, but was not accepted. The other canvas, entitled 
" Boys Bathing," signed and dated Heidelberg, 1890, was 
one of the most naturalistic works Conder ever painted ; it 

is ably drawn and modelled, and the atmosphere and heat 
28 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 



of a summer's day is well suggested. The technical influence 
of his fellow-artist Streeton is here very evident. These two 
paintings showed that Conder was certainly a rare and 
original artist. Some time previously to this, an oil painting 
of his called " Departure of SS. Orient^' which he had shown 
at an exhibition of the Art Society of New South Wales, 
was bought for the National Gallery, Sydney. This fact, 
and the growing reputation he was acquiring amongst artists 
and picture-buyers in Melbourne and Sydney, so impressed 
Conder's friends that it was felt he ought to have the chance 
of completing his art education in Europe. An uncle offered 
to provide the cost of the journey, and Conder, after five 
years' sojourn in Australia, left Melbourne for London in 
May 1890. 

The voyage included a short stay of a day or two at 
Colombo. Ceylon was a country that impressed him greatly; 
he would have liked to have lingered there to paint. He left 
the ship at Naples, to travel overland to London, and he 
describes his impression of Naples and Florence to his friend 
Tom Roberts in the following letter, written in Paris and 
dated August 1890: — 

Paris, August 1890. 

Dear Roberts, — I liked Florence immensely, and 

Browning's "Old Pictures in Florence" helped me very 

much in the Uffizzi and the other Galleries I visited. What 

a wonderful place it is, to be sure ; it laughs at time when 

other cities seem to crumble — it smells of age and the 

things that stay. Howells is too 19th century for it; the 

29 



CHARLES CONDER 

background he made of it for his charming Americans 
seems all very well, but it was a background after all. It 
seems strange to use Florence in that light, if you follow 
me, do you ? I mean just you are a cypher there, your 
individuality is nowhere — the 15th century, and not the 
19th is everywhere. I was sad at leaving it. 

I did a sketch in Colombo of a street scene, but fell in 
love, quite as much I think with the Neapolitan life and 
colour, and enjoyed the Bay of Naples over Chianti wine 
and the guitars which seem so popular there. I shall never 
forget one Sunday afternoon, a perfect day, giving two olive 
Italians, two francs for half-an-hour's music on their mando- 
line and guitar ; it was a veritable dreamland to look on 
that blue sea and rose green hill land by Vesuvius, and have 
Faitst divinely expressed to give the touch of sentiment to 
the whole. I never somehow expect things to have much 
romance, even in the most romantic surroundings, but that 
had, strange to say. It was a chapter from Arcadia, for 
the boy was beautiful, and had a lovely voice. 

It is a great misfortune that not more of Conder's letters 
are available, for his ideas on art and the philosophy of art 
were deep and original; his criticisms on masters like Claude 
Monet and Puvis de Chavannes are worth recording, though 
he was modest about airing his opinion, and only expressed 
his views to intimate friends. 

After leaving Florence he travelled through to Paris, 
where, however, he did not stay long, only having the time 
to visit the Louvre and other public galleries. Of the work 
30 



.*' 



^-r-' 



/ 



/* 




y. T- 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

there, he wrote his ideas fully in a letter to Mr. Arthur 
Streeton, which, with others, through a mishap, has unfor- 
tunately not been preserved. He reached London in August, 
and spent some three months in England with friends, part 
of the time at Gravesend with Mrs. Pryce, and the rest of 
the summer at Littlehampton, where he painted a fine study 
of the beach at that place with many figure groups, the whole 
scene full of light and movement and cleverly composed. 

In the autumn of this year he went to Paris, the city 
with its life and artists which had such a great and lasting 
influence on his art. On his arrival here he entered Julien's 
studio, but worked rather intermittently, as he was always 
impatient of any School routine. In his letters to friends, 
he writes that he works half the day at the School, but that 
most of the time is spent in his studio painting from the 
model, or studying at the Louvre. He seems at first to 
have been impressed by the work of Dagnan Bouveret, whom 
he likens to Leonardo da Vinci. Picard's painting also 
attracted him, but his chief admiration at this period is 
for Puvis de Chavannes, who, he says, "is great! great!" 
Conder, however, was at heart really a romantic, and was 
never much influenced by him. 

Mr. William Rothenstein, an intimate friend, relates that 
he first met Conder in the autumn of 1890 at Julien's (when 
he himself had been studying for a year), and from the first 
found him personally very interesting, and although he 
thought his life-drawing was singularly incompetent, he 
found Conder's experience much wider than his own in 
many ways. The visiting professors at the school, Lefebre, 

31 



CHARLES CONDER 

Constant, and Doucet, did not take much notice of Conder 
or his work. Mr. Rothenstein says that when Conder first 
came to Paris he was under the influence of his Australian 
comrade, Mr. Arthur Streeton, for whose painting he had an 
immense admiration. Gradually he became aware of all the 
vivid art movements around him at Montmartre, where he 
lived. He got to know, and became very intimate with, the 
French artists Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and M. Anquetin, 
who both fascinated him. It was perhaps the latter who 
had the strongest influence over Conder of any contemporary 
artist, and it was an influence which lasted all through his 
life ; he may have got a little from Daumier, who at one 
time was a great hero to Anquetin, but it was the latter 
who taught Conder a robuster view of life. It was probably 
through Toulouse-Lautrec that Conder conceived a great 
admiration for Degas, but there is nothing of Degas in 
Conder's art. 

In the following letters to Mr. Tom Roberts, he gives 
at this time his opinions on the work around him : — 

Paris, February 1891. 

Dear Roberts, — I'm as tired as possible, have been to 
two new Exhibitions to-day, Aquarellists, and Malitons. 
The latter was too crowded to see much, there didn't seem 
a great deal very interesting at either, Besnard had fine 
things at both, and Luc-Olivier Merson a very fine picture 
of " The Annunciation." Boutet de Monvel had some charm- 
ing water-colours like little Holbeins ; very few of the other 
pictures were artistic, though many seemed very well drawn, 
32 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

and many great men were represented, but their exhibitions 
seem to be regarded as rather failures, the strongest of the 
young painters seem to feel the light more than these men, 
and so don't perhaps feel opposite work. I feel Besnard's 
intensely in this particular, and indeed he has been an idol 
here for some time . . . but Puvis de Chavannes is great I 
great ! 

Again, in another letter to Mr. Tom Roberts, dated Paris, 
May 1 89 1, he writes: — 

"After dinner! The jabber of my friends, the click of 
the billiard balls, the smell of heliotrope, all belong so much 
to this Cafd, and will when it becomes a thing of the past ! " 

Written the same date, later, in the studio : — 

" Do you remember Whistler's portrait of Miss Corder, 
it seems to share honours with Puvis this year, it is a great 
picture, and is almost more than anyone expected, that 
Whistler should step into this rank of Art and take leader- 
ship so easily ; but Puvis is great, great, great ! and makes 
great pleasure. 

"Claud Monet seems to have made a great stride this 
year — some of his landscapes, they lived, and he does them 
in the funniest way. He paints a good deal still with pure 
colour, but you quite lose the paint at three or four yards, 
or less. He takes you among hayricks and sunsets in a 
most natural way, and then lets you see it as you have been 
used to — not in his, but your own way. I feel Monet in 
this way, or not at all. He is without bias and scoffs at 
poetry, boasts, I believe, of never having seen a Salon, 

E 33 



CHARLES CONDER 

probably a consummate poseur, as only a Frenchman can 
be ; but after all, they say (I do, too, modest little beast), 
the greatest Landscapist in his way. 

" Cazin is fine this year, but it would be absurd to com- 
pare him with Monet. Enough of pictures, my criticism 
isn't worth a D after all. 

*' In my own case (one knows best), I have remained 
myself without any temptation to follow others — not because 
I fancy my work so much, but because it would puzzle one 
to amalgamate a dozen one likes equally, and who work 
in opposite directions. — There is another question in favour 
of oneself. — You attract so much more attention if your 
work has some original quality, which tempts you to 
go on." 

The spring and summer of 1891 were spent in Normandy, 
where he painted some interesting landscape studies. One 
called "The Plum Tree" was a gift from the artist to 
Mr. Arthur Studd, with whom he had become acquainted 
in Paris ; it is an exquisite and delicate oil painting, a view 
looking up a hillside, at the bottom of which is a farm, 
and in the foreground the blossoming tree which gives its 
title to the work. 

Another fine study of this period is on rather a large 
scale, of white cliffs topped with golden green grass against 
a pale blue sky, and still deeper blue sea, a beautiful har- 
mony. This was painted near Yport. 

In the autumn of the same year he paid a visit to Algiers. 
A painting entitled "Mustadha, Algiers," is one of the results 
of this visit. It is a view from a flat roof top, looking over 
34 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

a parapet, on which a white-robed figure leans, of a Moorish 
town washed by a blue sea. In the immediate foreground 
is a large yellow vase filled with roses and lilac blossom. 
It is full of beautiful subtle colour, and is very interesting, 
as showing the gradual change of Conder's art into those 
delicate dreamy visions of natural scenes which makes it so 
fascinating, so alluring. 

In March 1892, Conder and Mr. William Rothenstein 
held a little exhibition together at the gallery of a picture- 
dealer named Thomas, at 43 Boulevard Malesherbe, and both 
artists had their work reproduced in the periodical " L'Art 
Fran^aise." Conder's exhibits were chiefly landscapes, 
amongst them a most beautiful moonlight scene at Algiers, 
some cliff scenery on the Normandy coast, and an exquisite 
landscape called "Almond Trees in Flower"; here by the side 
of a pool to the right are young trees in full blossom inter- 
twined with a rose tree, from whose flowers petals fall in a 
shower upon the head of a female bust. In the lower left- 
hand corner of the composition is written with the brush 
the well-known stanza from \.\vq Rubaiydt of Omar Khayyam: 

Look to the blowing Rose about us — " Lo, 
Laughing," she says, " into the world I blow ; 
At once the silken tassel of my purse 
Tear, and its Treasure on the Garden throw." 

Conder's work greatly impressed the critics who saw this 
exhibition. They were charmed with its delicacy, its finesse 
and originality. He also made his first appearance at the New 
Salon, Socidtd Nationale des Beaux Arts, with three landscape 
paintings, Avhich were well hung, and well mentioned by the 

35 



CHARLES CONDER 

critics. They were entitled " Les Roses," " La Perle," and 
" Les Champs d'Or." 

At the New Salon (Soci^td Nationale des Beaux Arts) 
of 1893 Conder showed four oil paintings : " July (Vetheuil)," 
"Soir d'ad," "Juin (Chantemesle)," and "May Day"— this 
last a beautiful work, a tree in full blossom, from which a 
young girl in a soft grey dress pulls a spray — the whole 
delightful in sentiment and colour. These pictures so in- 
creased his reputation, that he was elected this year an 
Associate Member of the Soci^td, a distinction he showed 
he deserved, for he sent to the exhibition the following year 
six admirable works — three delicate sea-pieces, and three 
landscapes. 

He did a good deal of landscape work at this period, 
painting in company with Mr. A. C. Blunt, an intimate 
friend whom he first met in Paris. Conder stayed with him 
in his cottage at Chantemesle, a picturesque district on the 
Seine between Mantes and Vernon, and some thirty miles 
below Paris. Here, during his stay, Conder decorated one 
of the walls of the house, and painted two panels over the 
fireplace. He also stayed at the little town La Roche Guyon 
some two or three miles distant from Chantemesle. At the 
inn on the river of the first place, there used to be some of 
his work in the shape of decoration. The colour and general 
character of these more or less idyllic landscapes, and also 
the backgrounds for his later figure pieces were influenced 
by the scenery round Chantemesle and La Roche Guyon ; 
also the colour and atmosphere of the northern coast of 
France, which he first visited, and often returned to, 
36 




FORTRAir OF MR. MA\ BEERBOHM 
In the possession oj Mrs. Beerbohm 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

especially pervaded Conder's later fancies and colour 
schemes. 

In 1894 Conder returned to London, principally living 
there, and exhibiting at the New English Art Club, where 
he had already showed for the first time in April 1893, 
with two oil paintings, one entitled " Marine " and the 
other " Landscape." Next April, at the same Society, he 
showed two water-colour drawings on silk — "The Palmist," 
and " Le Premier Bal." At their autumn exhibition of 
1895 he was represented by one of the most delicate and 
typical of his imaginative works — " L'Oiseau Bleu " (Plate 9) 
— an exquisite piece of decoration and fancy, which now 
belongs to the National Gallery, Melbourne. In the work 
exhibited these last two years, the influence of Anquetin is 
discernible. 

He was elected in 1901 a Member of the New English 
Art Club, to which he sent something almost annually, up to 
within two years of his death. It was in 1893 that he first 
began to draw designs for fans, by which branch of art he 
is generally better remembered than by anything else. 

The following letter to Mr. John Lane (Plates 11, 12, 13, 
and 14) is interesting as giving his views on fan designs 
and their mode of reproduction : — 

C/o VV. L. Hacon, Esq., 
The Deanery, Dornoch, 

sutherlandshire, n.b., 
2,rd August 1896. 

Dear Lane, — I have done a fan that might suit you — it 
is a company of several figures in a landscape, and is all done 
in one colour except the border which is in another — the 

37 



222044 



CHARLES CONDER 

principal colour is red — the sanguine colour of old drawings, 
it could be reproduced at little expense, and printed in the 
two colours it is painted in if you cared. I think it's one of 
my best fans, and will send it on if you care to have it — it 
would cost ^lo. 

I feel sure that this is the most practical way of painting 
fans that are to be reproduced, and it in no way makes them 
lose value in themselves, as they are painted on silk in a 
pretty tone of red, and in the case of printing them, they 
too, could be printed on silk, as has often been done. 
Should you care to have a book of fans to bring out, say, 
at Christmas, I should be pleased to do them if I were to 
do five say, you already have some of your own to fill up 
and I am sure they would please people who care for the 
sort of thing I do — they could have as a literary accompani- 
ment a verse here and there from the Fetes Galantes, and no 
copyrights would be required. 

We are having a good time here and if it weren't for so 
much rain, I think Scotland would be a very nice place 
indeed. One sees the most wonderful sky effects. But the 
populations are essentially golfers, and take little interest in 
anything else. I haven't seen the month's Yellow Book, 
if you have one to spare I should be much obliged. 
With kind regards, 

Yours very sincerely, 

{Signed) Charles Conder. 

PS. — I enclose a scrap of silk with the red I mention 
and another colour. 
38 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

Conder was right when he said this fan (still owned by 
Mr. John Lane) was one of his best. Painted in 1896, it well 
represents the work he was doing in this way, and in which 
he excelled for the next few years. It differs, as usual, in 
design and colour from his other fans, and is a lovely 
harmony in sanguine and dark red. There are memories, 
of course, of Watteau in the conception, but still it is 
essentially Conder! Another delightful fan design of this 
time is the one in the possession of Mr. Morley Horder, 
called "Fetes Galantes" (Plate 16), a lovely idyll which 
glows in colour like a kingfisher's plumage. 

It was with a series of these designs for fans, as well as 
drawings on silk, that he held his first exhibition in London in 
May 1899, at the Carfax Gallery, then situated in Ryder Street, 
St. James's. This exhibition was followed at intervals by simi- 
lar shows of his work at the same gallery in January 1900, the 
Dutch Gallery, in Brook Street, in November and December 
1903, and at the Leicester Galleries in 1904 and in December 
1905. He also showed at the first exhibition of the Interna- 
tional Society of Sculptors, Painters, and Gravers, in May 1898, 
and their succeeding exhibitions until March 1909, when at 
the exhibition of Fair Women held by the same society, a 
wall at the New Gallery was devoted to his work, which 
consisted for the most part of water-colour drawings on silk 
and a few oils. No complete exhibition of his life-work in its 
entirety has as yet been held, though it is projected. He also 
had three exhibitions of his work in Paris during his life- 
time — the first in 1901, jointly with Mr. William Rothenstein ; 
at the gallery of M. Moret, in the Rue Royale, in December 

39 



CHARLES CONDER 

1901, and again in 1906 at Durand Ruels. An exhibition of 
his work, the first ever held in America, was held in New 
York in December 191 1, two years after his death, at the 
galleries of the Berlin Photographic Company. The cata- 
logue was prefaced with an appreciative article on his life and 
work by Mr. Martin Birnbaum, who has done much to make 
his work known in the United States. Conder also illus- 
trated two books, namely, The Story of Beauty and the Beast, 
translated from the French by Ernest Dowson, and published 
by Mr. John Lane in 1895. For this book Conder designed 
four plates, which were printed in colour. The other book 
was Balzac's romance. La Fille aux Yeux d'Or. 

Reproductions of his drawings and designs for fans 
appeared from time to time in The Yelloiu Book, The Savoy, 
The Pageant, and other magazines, while The Saturday 
Review, in a Christmas number, reproduced in colour one of 
his fan designs. 

In June 1901, he first met Mrs. Stella Maris Belford, at 
the house of her aunt, Mrs. A. A. Humphrey. Mrs. Belford 
afterwards became his wife. They all met again at Amble- 
teuse in August, when he painted the beautiful sea-shore 
scene entitled, " Crdpuscule Tendre." He was married to 
Mrs. Belford on 5th December 1901. They came to live in 
London — first at i Redesdale Street, Chelsea, then at Wel- 
lington Square — but they finally settled, in 1904, in a charm- 
ing old-fashioned house situated at 91 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea, 
where they lived until his last serious illness in 1907, and 
where he did a great deal of work — oil paintings, landscapes, 

figure pieces, water-colour drawings, and panels on silk for 
40 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

well-known patrons (Mr. Edmund Davis, Mrs. Halford, and 
others) ; also innumerable designs for fans, pastels, many 
drawings in red and black chalk, pen drawings, lithographs, 
and two etchings, and occasionally he decorated silk dresses 
with graceful designs for his friends. He and his wife were 
fond of entertaining, and their house was several times the 
scene of such entertainments as one not-to-be-forgotten 
fancy-dress ball, and frequent "at homes," where young 
artists, litterateurs, and musicians met. 

He generally spent his summers abroad. In August 
1902, the year after he was married, he was painting at Petits 
Dalles, on the French coast, near Dieppe. The spring of 
1903 found Conder and his wife paying a visit to Venice, 
where he found many motifs. Before they returned to 
London they stayed with the Princess Troubetzkoy at her 
villa on Lago Maggiore in June. The results of these 
travels were seen at the show of his work at E. J. van 
Wisselingh's gallery in November and December of the same 
year. The exhibition included fans, drawings on silk, and a 
few paintings ; there are several reminiscences of Venice and 
the Italian Lakes. In 1904 he was at Brighton, where he 
painted several views of the sea from the esplanade ; one of the 
best of this series is the "Windy Day" (Plate 54), which was 
recently shown at the last exhibition of his work at the 
Leicester Galleries (January 191 3), a fine rendering of a 
stormy sea, with the subtle tones of freshly-lit gas-lamps and 
deepening twilight. The next year he and Mrs. Conder went 
to Algeciras, returning home through Spain. He was busy 
in 1905 with the exhibitions of his work at the Leicester 

F 41 



CHARLES CONDER 

Galleries, 1905-6, and also with his last exhibition in Paris in 
the spring of 1906. After showing four works at the autumn 
exhibition of the New English Art Club in 1906, his health 
began to fail. He went to Brighton for change, but while 
there he was taken seriously ill, and removed to Crow- 
borough. Finally he came to London. After a time he 
recovered somewhat, sufficiently enough for him to travel the 
following summer to Newquay, where he was partially re- 
stored to health. Indeed, he painted several studies of the 
sands and typically Cornish scenes. He returned to London, 
but in the autumn of 1907 became seriously unwell again, 
and after a long and painful illness, during which time he 
was tenderly and devotedly nursed by his wife, he died of 
brain fever on 9th February 1909. He was interred in 
the little churchyard at Virginia Water, where his wife 
also lies, for she did not long survive him, having met 
with an accident, from the effects of which she died in 
April 1912. 

The news of his death did not seem to attract much 
notice in the newspapers, but the following tribute appeared 
in the Saturday Review of 13th February 1909, from the pen 
of Mr. D. S. MacColl: 

CHARLES CONDER, 9TH Febru.^ry 1900 

You had a dream : At the gate of Paradise, 
A traveller found the szuorded sleeping Angel, 
Beside a\ rust}' sword without a fame. 
The track lay open to the heart of Eden, 
But thickly tangled up with thistle and rose 
For ages now, for no one comes. 
42 







a 5 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 



Through the Australian desert, through the press 
Of maddening, wanton Hfe in cities roaring, 
You held your charter to the radiant gates : 
Seagates of spring, blossoming rose and snow, 
Floodgates of night, passion and vision of pain; 
Therein abide, even in your Chantemesle, 
That all men pass, where no one ever comes. 



43 



THE ART OF CHARLES CONDER 

CONDER'S oil paintings are not so generally well 
known as his drawings on silk and designs for fans ; 
nevertheless he painted some very fine canvases almost 
up to the time of his last illness in 1906. He worked a good 
deal in oil in his Australian days, and then followed the large 
and delicately painted landscapes done on or near the Nor- 
mandy coast, and at Chantemesle and Givernay on the Seine, 
between the years 1891 and 1895 (indeed there are some who 
prefer these pre-Anquetin works, those delicate and dreamy 
visions of apple blossom, and the sea, to anything else he 
did). And there are the numerous figure paintings, portraits, 
fetes galantes pieces, and landscapes, of later date, most of 
which have great charm, like the " Crdpuscule Tendre " of 
1901, or the exquisite " Blossom " of the following year. 

Conder's first essays in oil painting were made in Sydney 
and later in Melbourne. In both places he gradually acquired 
from his fellow artists the current procedure of painting then 
in vogue, which had been spread by Australian artists who 
had studied in Paris in the studios of Carolus Duran, or 
in the Julien Schools under the instruction of Gerome, 
Boulanger, and Lefebre. In Melbourne he painted much 
in company with Arthur Streeton, whose influence, technically, 
was very great at this time on his work, though Conder was 
always personal in his outlook, and more especially so in his 
44 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

colour. His work at this period is careful, and rather smooth 
in execution. 

After a year spent in Paris, his style began to change. 
He worked on a larger scale, his handling of the medium 
is more delicate, more subtle and tender. After 1895 water- 
colour drawings on silk and designs for fans occupied a good 
deal of his attention and time. Water-colour was a medium 
in which he expressed himself perfectly, but he made the 
most persistent efforts to do the same in oil, and was 
often successful. An excellent example of this is the picture 
called " The Green Apple," which was painted at Vetheuil in 
1894. Here the fair-haired and Eve-like lady who offers us the 
apple, and who with her broad-brimmed hat and flowing 
dress of whitish-grey quite fills the foreground of the bluish- 
green landscape, is painted in a facile fluid manner, that at 
first sight the work resembles a large water-colour, but it 
is purely oil painting of the most delicate kind. This poetical 
work was offered to the National Gallery of British Art, but, 
unfortunately, refused, a mistake which, however, may be 
rectified in the future, as it has since been presented by its 
former owner, Mr. Dalhousie Young, to the Contemporary 
Art Society. 

Other good examples of Conder's work in oil are the first 
two paintings he showed at the autumn exhibition of the 
New English Art Club in 1894, a landscape and a marine ; 
also a lovely work shown at the same Society's spring ex- 
hibition in 1898, called "A Sea View," a vision of calm, 
opalescent sea, winding along white cliffs lying in quiet 
light underneath a sky faintly tinged with rose-colour — all 

45 



CHARLES CONDER 

good examples where the paint is beautifully handled with 
subtlety and finesse, in keeping with the sentiment of their 
subjects and the mood they stirred in the artist. 

" In the Forest " is another work of this period, being dated 
1897. Few painters of our generation, unless it be Mr. P. 
Wilson Steer, have produced such an exquisite piece of wood- 
land painting. Here three gaily dressed ladies wandering 
through a thick wood have come upon an opening in the 
trees, where the sun, which is low, shoots shafts of light across 
the green turf and round the group. One of the ladies has 
seated herself on the ground and holds an animated conver- 
sation with her companions who are standing. Thus their 
dresses of dark blue, scarlet rose red, and ashen grey have 
a beautiful setting and harmonise with the greens and golds 
of the foliage and grass partly wrapped in shadow and partly 
steeped in light. 

The exquisite painting " Cr^puscule Tendre" (Plate 
58) is a lovely poem, a perfect Greek idyll in sentiment. 
Two Grecian women wander arm in arm along a strip of 
sandy shore bounded by reedy dunes ; the beach, upon which 
a boat is drawn up, stretches round the blue waters of the 
bay. A temple is visible in the distance, in mid-distance, 
and the tender twilight broods over all, making it a poetical 
harmony of deep blues, purples, and cold greens. This 
beautiful work was painted at Ambleteuse in 1900. A year 
later was painted quite a different landscape, but equally 
beautiful. This is the fairy-like work called "Blossom" 
(Plate 59), a superb study of an orchard in full bloom, 
which forms a radiant vision of colour of delicate pinks and 
46 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

blues. The trees rise out of green grass and a mass of blue- 
bells, beyond which is a stretch of summer sky. The whole 
work is full of jewel-like colour. 

Both canvases were first exhibited in 1903 and are ex- 
cellent examples of a period when Conder was trying to make 
the best of the resources of oil painting, in the matter of impasto 
and its richness. Technically these two works are different 
to his oil paintings in the earlier nineties, where the thin 
delicate method of painting is replaced by a more robust 
style and greater richness of colour. Later, that is after 
1904, he tried harder to express himself in oil painting with 
more or less success ; he succeeded best with his landscapes 
like those in the latest exhibition of his work at the Leicester 
Galleries (January 1913), such as the "Brighton," 1905 
(Plate 53), "A Windy Day" (Plate 54), "From Conder's 
House " (Plate 52), a lovely vision of the Thames at Chelsea, 
with its distant bank, lined with church steeples, chimneys, 
and house-tops, and the river's broad gleaming surface ; a 
view half framed with trees. How beautifully here has he 
expressed the clear soft light illuminating everything. 
Another extraordinarily poetical landscape is " Spring by 
the Sea" (Plate 51), which gives one the impression of a 
fascinating dream of Arcadia. 

The reason for the success of these paintings seems to be 
that he worked with the paint in as fluid a state as he could 
get it, whereas, in his figure paintings of this date, he is 
not always happy with his vehicle, for when he had to draw 
the figure on a large scale with a medium like stiff oil paint, 
his hand does not seem to work so freely, and the result 

47 



CHARLES CONDER 

is comparatively stiff and lifeless, though occasionally success 
is attained, if not in drawing, nearly always in colour. 
The figure piece " Mademoiselle Maupin " (1905) is one of 
the best paintings of this kind. The subjects of his oil 
paintings are somewhat different from his water-colours on 
silk ; they are often less imaginative, and embrace a wider 
range of theme. Variously they are pure landscapes that do 
not contain a human being, blossoming orchards with a single 
figure, enchanted gardens with distant gaily-dressed groups 
of men and women, and haunting coast scenes with white 
cliffs, seas, and skies of pearl. Indeed his landscapes are 
conceptions of a fair)'-like world, a background quite in 
harmony with the imperious, petulant, radiant, or disdainful 
women who adorn it, be they nymphs who bathe in rivers or 
pools, or who recline in cool arbours of silvery green foliage, 
or who wander along sandy shores by calm sapphire seas, 
or sit amongst ruined columns under azure skies, by play- 
ing fountains. The indoor subjects are numerous. Here 
women, sumptuously arrayed in silks, dance in eighteenth- 
century ballrooms, or appear as spectators at the bull-ring, 
watching their favourite toreadors. Often the scene is at 
some gas-lit Parisian cafe, where they meet to gossip, or 
discuss the world with gay Lotharios. Conder was never 
tired of rendering according to his fancy (and none knew the 
Bohemian social life of Paris better than he), and a very com- 
plete poetical vision of the artificial life of the theatre or the 
cafd it is. There are also reminiscences of English gardens 
and woods, where English women appear in summer dresses 

in such pictures as "The Garden Seat" (Plate 86), "In the 
48 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

Forest" or "The Blue Sofa" (Plate 87), "The Gardener's 
Daughter," or souvenirs of the fancy-dress ball at his own 
house at Cheyne Walk. Again, the homes of various friends 
and patrons like Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Davis, where he 
himself figures, form the motive for such paintings as " The 
Masquerade." Often his oil paintings were designed as 
actual views of places, as for instance the two paintings 
of " Swanage Bay" (Plate 25). That owned by Mr. Geoffrey 
Blackwell, and technically one of the finest of his oils — where 
the dresses of the two ladies, wading ashore, one in an in- 
describable blackish-green, the other in a dress of delicate pink 
and silver, are in perfect unison with the calm sea and distant 
pearl-grey cliffs — is very similar to another version in oil of 
the same place (Plate 26), and painted from the same spot, 
belonging to Mr. Jessop, a seascape full of the dreamy senti- 
ment of a summer's day. Into the misty heat-laden bay 
glides a yacht, figures are bathing from a boat, a girl in a 
muslin dress walks along the little jetty. The Brighton 
scenes are also actual transcripts, though varied by the artist 
in his own individual way. His portrait work was almost 
entirely accomplished in oil painting, and most of this was 
done after 1900, though an important portrait of Aubrey 
Beardsley was painted in 1896, a work that seems to have 
mysteriously disappeared, no one quite knows how or where. 
He painted a portrait of himself, which was given to Mr. 
William Rothenstein, of which a reproduction is here given 
(Plate 21), thanks to Mr. C. R. Rothenstein, the present 
owner. It is a half-length, where he has painted himself 
side-face, half turning to the spectator with a look of inquiry, 

G 49 



CHARLES CONDER 

the outline of his face silhouetted against a gleaming white 
cloud. The colour is pleasing and it is drawn and modelled 
with a facility and power which he did not always reach in 
his portrait work. 

Mr. Max Beerbohm, too, was a subject of an interesting 
portrait. It shows him seated in a theatre box ; he is 
immaculately attired, and probably exchanging witty repar- 
tees with some friends on a fancy-dress ball which is in 
progress. Some waltzing couples are seen below the red 
curtain on the left side. This is a good example of Conder's 
portraiture, and it well exemplifies how he treated such sub- 
jects. Purists for firm draughtsmanship may cavil at the 
apparent lack of exact drawing in this painting, but admirers 
of Conder's work will not fail to appreciate the refined and 
rich colouring, the skilful painting of the blacks, the in- 
genious way the blues of the cushion are repeated in the 
drop scene of the stage, the gleaming gilt of the chair, 
the white shirt against the dull scarlet of the box, and the 
gay, whirling group of dancers. The face, too, is well 
characterised, and the picture is clearly an affectionate 
souvenir from the painter to a friend whose genius and 
personality he liked, and whose art and friendship was 
appreciated in return. 

Women, however, make up the majority of his sitters. 
Baroness A. de Meyer sat for him more than once, and one 
of the best portraits is that where she is painted in a 
green dress, a work that was shown at the International 
Society Exhibition of 1906. The portrait of Lady Ottoline 
Morrell, exhibited at the New English Art Club in 
50 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

1905, is especially noticeable for Conder's remarkable 
colour gift. 

Conder's portraits seem to have been painted somewhat 
upon the principles that Whistler worked, that is to say, he 
seems to have had chiefly in his mind the decorative quali- 
ties of the appearance of his sitter, and to have aimed at 
producing a painting with its colour scheme, and composi- 
tion, which should be beautiful in itself, and be interesting 
to the spectator as a portrait, whether he knew the sitter or 
not. The likeness of his sitter he did not seem to pay great 
attention to, and draughtsmanship and modelling are not 
strong features in any of his portraits ; indeed, in such cases 
he often showed a curious inability to draw a face, but as 
portraits from a decorative point of view they are interesting, 
and often have much charm. The portrait study of Madame 
Errazuriz (Plate 50), shown at the most recent exhibition 
(1913) of Conder's work at the Leicester Galleries, is a good 
example of this. It shows an elegantly dressed lady — a true 
Parisian — turning with a quick movement and vivacious 
look towards the spectator. Behind her is a half-curtained 
window from which the dark night is seen, and only illumi- 
nated buildings and the grey sails of boats are visible. 
Inside the room and to the left is a settee with striped 
cushions and curved back which leads up to the silhouetted 
form of the lady against the ivory white of the curtain. 
Despite the ill-drawn face, this painting has an indescribable 
charm owing to its beautiful colour scheme of blues, blacks, 
and creamy-whites, which add still further to its fascination. 

Other successful portraits were those of Mademoiselle 

51 



CHARLES CONDER 

Gdnee, Mrs. Lawson, Miss Lawson, Mrs. Humphrey, Miss 
Kinsella, and Mrs. Patrick Campbell. 

In his drawings on silk, and in his numerous designs 
for fans, the fluid medium of the wash and the finely ribbed 
surface of the silk suited his dreamy art perfectly. He could 
set down with a quick touch, and with ease, his visions far 
more quickly and spontaneously than he could with oil. 

His first fan was done in 1893; it was rather in the 
nature of an experiment, and was painted in oil on a board. 
He was greatly delighted with the form of the design, and 
it led to the fan shape being adopted in water-colour on silk, 
and also drawings and panels in the same medium and 
on the same material. Here was a new method which — 
though Conder was indebted to Chinese and Japanese art — 
will always be associated with his name. With the washed 
silk he gets the most beautiful surfaces, the most tender 
and elusive hues ; the delicate tint of those dainty drawings, 
so many of which were shaped for fans, agree perfectly with 
the frail texture of the material and their idyllic subjects. 
Here his own fancy is afforded the widest scope, and by 
the simplest means ; indeed, one or two graduated tones 
are often enough to stir the imagination and to fill the 
mind with delights fantastic and with the beauty of dreams. 

The variety of motive and subject in this class of Con- 
der's work is almost endless. Life, as he saw it, is expressed 
literally ; on the other hand, one often feels it is far more 
removed from reality. Take his well-known silk panel, 
" L'Oiseau Bleu" (Plate 9), painted in 1895, an exquisite 
work, where the great mass of creamy, yellow cumulus 
52 




§■2 



a 5 



•^ 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

cloud, the sunlit wood, and the two brilliantly-illuminated 
figures under the blue bird itself balance the richly-coloured 
group of ladies, the rose reds and blues of their silken 
dresses delicately drenched in shadow, are emphasized by 
their large black hats. 

It was one of Conder's first imaginative works, and one 
of his greatest ; one which has inspired a charming essay 
from Mr. Max Beerbohm,* and also the following poem from 
Mr. Gordon Bottomley : — 

L'OISEAU BLEU'' 

{After Mr. Charles Co?tder) 

What gold invisible haze 
Reveals what lime-girt place 
Of garden-alleys still 
None know to feel ? 

Fruit-feasting while the slow 
Fountain-rain laps below 
Cold-dreaming Naiades 
Long green-grey knees. 

Great hats and low ripe hair, 
Sacque-bosoms almost bare, 
Silk skirts soft-puffed and wide, 
Drooping beside. 

Small faces, hesitant, pale, 
Gowns, trees, all tremulous, frail ; 
Faint violet, faint green, 
Faint rose scarce seen ? 

* Words for picture " L'Oiseau Bleu," from " Yet Again," by Max Beerbohm, 1909. 
- Tile Gate of Smaragdus, by Gordon Bottomlev. 

53 



CHARLES CONDER 



Where is this gathering's 
Dance consort of slim strings? 
In it I long to play 
The Viola. 

Tuned to the undertone 
Of water plashing down 
Deep marble honey-dull 
Of ripples full. 

Mid bergomask or fain 
Impossible pavane 
The blue bird of romance 
Floats o'er the dance. 

A Madam elegant, 
A dandy-figurant, 
In vain the bird pursue 
(As I do too). 

Yet it is near, so near, 
This land fantastick, dear, 
(Where none but one can come). 
The bird drops home. 



" Le Premier Bal " is another romantic work, where a 
lady in mid-Victorian costume, low dress, puffed sleeves, 
and ample skirts sits in front of a curtain, beyond which 
is seen a view of a calm wide river. Across this stretches 
a bridge connecting a castle, St. Angelo it may be. A man 
to the left, in a Cardinal's habit, in passing, half turns to the 
lady, who has unmasked, and with the subdued light from 
the ballroom, turns to him inquiringly. The colour of this 
exquisite drawing haunts one like a romance. Indeed, it is 
the colour in most of Conder's works which is the essential 
54 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

thing. It is his greatest gift, especially in these drawings 
and fans, where it can be seen to its utmost, as well as in its 
astonishing range and invention. It is often so delicate that 
it affects us like perfumes, or gleams of light on water or a 
landscape. And his colour schemes are undoubtedly founded 
on nature — perhaps some passing effect in natural landscape, 
whether it be bright evening light or violent afterglow, or a 
cool breezy morning, or even a grey day ; whilst moonlight 
effects often enter into his colour motives. In all his themes, 
slightly drawn and coloured as they seem to be, it is 
wonderful how he gets the tone and mood of a day ; and 
in the diminutive glimpses of the landscapes in these 
drawings, and in the fan designs, we get a wonderful 
sensation of space and distance — three or four simple 
washes, and lo! a complete picture — a chalk cliff with a 
building nestling in its wooded heights overlooking a sea 
which reflects an opalescent evening sky ; two figures in 
the foreground emphasize the little vignette, which measures 
but two or three inches in size, a tiny note it may be, that 
expresses more of the sentiment and romance of a scene 
than many and many an elaborate naturalistic oil painting. 
Conder can do the same thing on a larger scale. Take the 
silk panel called " Jealousy " (Plate 8i), where a little comedy 
is going on in a verandah opening on to the sea. Here the 
sunlight and freshness of a breezy late afternoon softly floods 
the room, and softly lightens the dresses, the faces, the forms 
of the actors and actresses of this drama. The " A.D. 1830" 
(Plate 80) is another scene from the theatre, but more 
dramatic than " Jealousy." Or look at Mr. Jessop's drawing, 

55 



CHARLES CONDER 

" A Napoleonic Idyll " (Plate 30). Here is the great General 
between two destinies — two women with dresses streaming 
in the wind, and who, like two Fates, turn to him with 
tragic gestures. They stand by the side of a lake, bordered 
and hemmed in with mountains, round whose summits and 
across the sky threatening black clouds gather. It is one 
of the few instances where Conder represents storm, and the 
colour, with its steely greys, and blacks, and blues, and 
iridescent gleams over dresses, tree-stems, water, clouds, and 
sky, is in keeping with the dramatic sentiment of the whole, 
treated, not indeed with literary sentiment, but in a purely 
pictorial way. 

Conder could suggest tragedy in the same pictorial 
manner. Take the work called " The Masquerade," where 
the scene is a ballroom, brilliantly lit, with a group of 
revellers standing in a row against arched windows which 
look into the night : Pierrot, Columbine, Harlequin. To the 
left in shadow, with a black cloak, which half-conceals her 
deep-red dress, stands a lady, who reminds one somewhat of 
one of Rossetti's women, in deep thought, while a Death's- 
head peers into her face. In the foreground, to the right, 
are two great black poodles, who complete the composition. 
It is a mixture of gaiety, with a tragic note — gaiety of colour 
outlined with sombreness of shadow, but beautiful colour as 
colour/^/' se. 

The subjects of these drawings were many and varied in 

range ; and what a world it was that the artist lived in. The 

personages of the Italian comedians appear in it again and 

again in many guises and in many situations ; even Samuel 

56 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

Pepys and his London (Plate 31) figure in it; tales from the 
age of Louis Quinze ; characters from the romances of Balzac 
and Theophile Gautier; 1830 was a magic and romantic date 
for Conder, and Mademoiselle Maupin a goddess. He saw 
Venice, with its gondolas and lagoons, through the eyes of 
Byron and Shelley. There are also lands where it is 
always afternoon — magic shores where, on a couch piled 
with luxurious cushions of indescribable purple hues, recline 
two nymphs clad in light robes of pale canary colour, pro- 
bably reading a love-tale. Beyond, a calm sea and a blue 
sky barred with gleaming white clouds, where the shadows 
are purple ; or we look under and through the arch of a rock, 
in the shade of which rest surely the sirens three, on to a sea 
coloured like a sapphire. A single figure bathes in the sea, 
and a terrace juts out into it, and farther along still are 
headlands, rocky islets, and great clouds of cumuli. We 
feel the land we stand on is one of "The Fortunate Islands." 
Even where the scene is London there is the same air of 
romance mingled with close observation of national pheno- 
mena. A drawing called " The Balcony " (Plate 65), 
illustrates this — a group of five women in white, black, and 
green dresses ; to the right one of them, a dark beauty, 
Spanish in complexion, holds out a white shawl, which 
harmonises agreeably with her costume of shell pink. 
Behind are tall buildings, classical in style, and bathed in 
afterglow. Another idyll of a similar nature — one of the 
most perfect of its kind — is the drawing called " The 
Shadow," shown in his first exhibition at the Carfax Gallery 
in May and June 1899. Before the rose-coloured curtain 

H 57 



CHARLES CONDER 

to the right stands a masked figure, sinister in aspect. His 
shadow reaches as far as the dainty dress of one of the two 
women who sit upon the sofa ; through the golden-barred 
window are seen a statue and the figure of another woman, 
distant houses, and an expanse of sky. The perfect design 
and colour harmonies of ivory and cream whites, rose reds, 
olive greens, and an accent of dark blue makes this an un- 
forgettable work. 

" La Morte Amoureuse," another drawing on silk, is 
equally beautiful in its invention and air of melancholy 
romance. Five richly-dressed people, two men and three 
women, gather round a coffin ; one, a stately figure in a yellow 
cloak, holds a mourning staff; his companion, holding a glass, 
seems to toast the departed. A woman to the left, with a 
white veil and light red dress, leans on the coffin in deep 
reverie, and a Spanish lady, with a mantilla and purplish- 
grey dress, holding a fan, listens to the toast, whilst the 
group is completed by a fair-haired lady equally as thoughtful 
as her companions. This last figure reminds one by her 
type and by the colouring of her dress of one of Paul 
Veronese's blond beauties. Behind the group is to be seen 
a landscape, in which are a church and a castle surmounted 
by a clearing sky. 

Another unsurpassable work is the unnamed drawing on 
silk belonging to Mr. Grant Richards, which shows two 
women resting by the edge of a fountain. One reclines on 
cushions and turns to look at the spectator; the other, half- 
risen from the same couch, fastens a bracelet on her wrist. 
Overhead stretches a trellised vine, laden with heavy clusters 
58 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

of its purple fruit. Some distance off stands a pink-robed 
Mussulman within a hedged garden. The beauty of this 
painting lies again in the indescribable colour harmonies of 
deep blues, purples, pale greens, rose reds, and greys. 

Conder is perhaps best known to most people as a fan 
painter, and many think this is his greatest claim to 
distinction. Many of them are certainly amongst the most 
wonderful things he did, and, as Mr. Charles Ricketts has 
truly said, his fans will some day be considered classics. 
The fan shape appealed to Conder, as it has attracted other 
great artists : Corot, Degas, Manet, and Mr. Charles 
Shannon, who have painted fans occasionally, but apparently 
only as an amusement or an experiment. For Conder it was 
perhaps the most serious occupation of his life, and one with 
which his name will always be linked. His fans are different 
from those of the eighteenth century in France, for Conder's 
style is purely English. Their designs melt into the frail 
texture of the silk, and the little oval panels, wreaths, 
ribbons, as well as the lace-like borders, are charming pieces 
of decoration and fancy, and, like the little fairy-like scenes 
they adorn and frame, vary in the design of every fan. 
Sometimes the gracefully curved and dotted line edges of 
the outside ornament of these show slightly the influence 
of Beardsley, but in no other way — if anything Conder 
influenced Beardsley. Conder's invention is his alone, and 
his fans are unique of their kind. 

Mr. J. G. Legge (Plate 4) owns one which is one of 
Conder's earliest, painted about 1893. It shows the influence 
of Puvis de Chavannes, whom Conder warmly admired at 

59 



CHARLES CONDER 

that time, and it has some of the severity of the master's 
design in it which is missing in Conder's later fans. 

The motive of these fan designs are varied enough. 
They range from idyllic themes like the two figures in the 
very beautiful "The Awakening," with its bluish-grey and 
faint rose-red colour harmonies. Or that strange but haunt- 
ing fancy, "The Peacock Fan," with the wistful face as a 
centre piece and the swinging peacocks as pendants, which 
are loosely but gracefully connected with wreaths and gar- 
lands to the wonderfully designed border. Then there is 
"The Yellow Sands," which shows his magical feeling for 
light and movement, emphasized by the charming medallion 
with the Peacock Idyll wreathed by a tender floral design 
held together with a lover's knot, and above this the ex- 
quisite cream-coloured festoons with a streak of the luminous 
blue sky showing. The saddened figures seated at the base 
of a shattered column, called "Fickle Love" (Plate 19), is 
another superb combination of ivor}' whites, golden sky, and 
dresses of ashen grey and vieux rose, to such a reality of our 
everyday life like "The Automobile Fan" (Plate 60). Here a 
motor-car has broken down. The owner and the chauffeur 
busy themselves with the machine ; a lady is being consoled 
for the delay by her male fellow-traveller : her long coat 
of pale apricot hue is the keynote to a view over a bridge, 
beyond which we see cathedral towers and distant low hills, 
flushed with the delicate rosy and purplish tones of sunset. 
This is a modern subject treated with beauty and feeling. 

One of the most remarkable features of these drawings 

on silk and designs for fans is Conder's v-ersatility and 
60 




<;V. 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

invention ; he never seems to repeat himself. In fan after 
fan, in drawing after drawing, the composition and the 
colour of each is different from that preceding it ; the fertility 
of his invention is astonishing, and every work of this kind 
seems to be a new discovery. 

Several of Conder's fans are mounted for use, generally 
on sticks of plain mother-of-pearl or simple ivory. Occasion- 
ally he designed a leaf for the handle of a French eighteenth- 
century fan, and the result is not incongruous, but most of 
his fans are framed like his drawings, and as such make 
perfect decorations for a room. Perhaps he considered that 
the real value of them should be as accessories to dresses, 
and for fair ladies, for there is a well-known story told of 
him that when once asked " Why was he so fond of painting 
fans?" he replied, "That he some day hoped to see his 
choicest fans in the hands of the most beautiful women." 

In another age Conder would have been employed decor- 
ating the rooms of palaces or great houses, as Watteau was 
so employed by Audran. 

His first essays in this direction were the panels on silk 
(Plates 41, 42, 43, 44, 45) which he did for M. Bing, the 
well-known Parisian dealer and authority on Japanese art, 
when he opened his exhibition of L'Art Nouveau in Paris, 
1898. Here they were shown at M. Bing's house in a small 
boudoir, furnished in the style of Louis Seize. A year later 
these panels were displayed at L'Art Nouveau exhibition 
at the Grafton Gallery. Some of these panels became the 
property of Fritz Thaulow, the artist, and nine of them were 
shown at an exhibition of Conder's work which was held 

61 



CHARLES CQNDER 

at the Carfax Gallery in 191 o. They were afterwards bought 
by Mr. John Ouinn of New York City, whose house they 
now adorn. They are some of the most perfect examples 
of his decorative work ; long, narrow panels on silk of a 
creamy tone, on which are painted a series of medallions, 
here large, there small, the latter grouped and clustered 
above, beneath, or alongside the former, which occupy the 
centre of the panel, each medallion loosely strung together 
in the most decorative way with garlands of fruits and 
flowers, with ribbons and wreaths. Each little idyl is set off 
with a playful but consistent setting : a pastoral is framed 
with crooks, a tourney with lances, a fair dame's vanity with 
a peacock decoration. The subjects of these large and small 
paintings are finely varied : an antique myth, a tournament, 
Marguerite with her jewel case, and Mephisto in the back- 
ground, a fete galante of the period of Louis Ouinze or the 
First Empire, furnish examples of his many-sided art. 
All are distinctively Conder, if sometimes reminiscent of 
Watteau. Every panel, every line, shows the artist's inex- 
haustible fancy. 

The exhibition of these panels in Paris and London 
launched him as one of the most exquisite of decorative 
artists. In London it led to his being employed to adorn 
two rooms in the house at Holland Park of a well-known 
patron of the arts, Mr. Edmund Davis. The lower of these 
rooms is decorated with a series of oval panels, painted on 
silk, and set into satin-wood panelling round the walls. In 
the upper room, a bed-chamber, they form a frieze, fit decora- 
tions for such a place, for the sleeper awakes in an atmos- 
62 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

phere filled with the beauty of dreams. They illustrate no 
particular story, but are just decorated panels which add 
grace and dignity to beautiful rooms exquisitely furnished. 
They are decorations which are not only most pleasing in 
colour and design, but sensuous with the warmth of luxury. 
The decoration of these panels is full of fancy. Here a 
Watteau-like crowd of eighteenth-century figures are as- 
sembled at the edge of a lake bordered with colonnades and 
graceful trees. They dance, they converse, they make love. 
In another panel a similar joyous company wander through 
a park all bathed in the glow of a late afternoon, and make 
the woods echo with songs to the accompaniment of guitars. 
And there are panels where nymphs bathe in blue seas and 
bask in the warm sun on rocks or yellow sands ; or they 
sit on the brook-side under willow trees ready to plunge 
into the cool water. In others the scene is a loggia where 
through the broad arches we see a wide expanse of fertile 
cultivated plain, bordered on one side by wooded hills, at 
the base of which flows a winding river ; in the foreground 
are luxurious women hastening to the bath, and some 
prepare for a siesta on couches before taking it. There 
are also narrow upright panels containing a single figure : 
here Aurora, there Endymion, while Love in the guise of 
a rosy boy is often seen in full flight, radiant with garlands. 

Mr. Pickford Waller, too, has some of the finest decora- 
tive panels of their kind, notably an octagonal-shaped panel 
called "In the Glade "(Plate 32). The subject is classic: a 
meeting of tall graceful nymphs under a canopy of roses, 
overhanging boughs, and bunches of grapes with trails of 

63 



CHARLES CONDER 

vine leaves. Beyond this is a terrace, a temple, a distant 
town backed by a cloudy sky. Another is a long narrow 
panel entitled "A Decoration" (Plate 36), where five ladies 
arrayed in summer costume assemble in a garden bathed 
in shimmering sunshine full of fragrant blossoms. The oval 
above this holds a composition showing two women exchang- 
ing confidences under twilight sky. The whole panel seems to 
be a painted summary of a summer's day. It is well named, 
for it is a perfect piece of decoration and fully reproduces 
the charm and poetry of such a day. The silk panel in the 
same collection, called " The Pearl " (Plate 37), is, in spite of 
the somewhat clumsy drawing of the figures, most beautiful 
owing to its fascinating pale opalescent colour. 

Conder's drawings and lithographs are not the least in- 
teresting part of his work. His draughtsmanship, though 
frequently weak, and not always correct, had often more rare 
artistic and unusual qualities. It had style, it had originality, 
and, for all its apparent uncertainty, gave exactly what the 
artist wanted. It shows the influence of no particular artist, 
unless it be that of Gabriel St. Aubin, and then only techni- 
cally. He was fond of drawing in sanguine, or black chalk, 
and also made several pastels and pen drawings. 

The drawing in black chalk called "Pan" (Plate 40), in 
the British Museum, is a good example of a class of drawing 
which Conder often made. It may not show a cold perfec- 
tion of draughtsmanship, but it has other artistic qualities, 
including style and power, whilst it also shows Conder's 
wonderful discrimination of the nature of his material ; and 
with what completeness does this vigorous drawing give us a 
64 




GAKNITURE FOR A DRESS 
In the possession of Miss Allen 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

real Hellenic idyll, the frolics of Pan and his Nymphs in the 
forest. The drawing called " Peacock Idyll " (Plate 55) has 
the same character. His early lithographs were the best he 
did. The first ones exhibited were the Balzac Set at the 
Carfax Gallery in 1900, and his drawings and lithographs 
became more familiar to the public at the exhibitions of 
" The Society of Twelve," where he exhibited in 1904, 1905, 
and 1906. The lithographs, and more especially the draw- 
ings exhibited there, often showed a mastery of touch and a 
most sensitive rendering of form. 

" The Leaning Tree " was first shown at the Carfax Gallery 
in April 1900 under the title " L'Abbe divague," and after- 
wards under the title of " The Leaning Tree " at the exhibi- 
tion of "The Society of Twelve" in 1905. It is one of 
Conder's most beautiful fancies in lithography ; this graceful 
vignette has a strange charm with its group of four figures 
under the bending tree. 

The six plates in the Balzac Set are all very interesting. 
The series opens with one of the chief incidents in the story 
called La Fille mix Yeiix d'Or (Plate 66); the meeting of 
" Paquita and Henri de Marsac" in the garden of the 
Tuileries is romantically conceived. "Coralie" (Plate 67), 
too, is a print that has charm and distinction. One of the 
most interesting of the lithographs is the " Bdatrix et 
Calyste" (Plate 68). Here the lovers, whose features are 
faintly visible in the twilight, stroll along the gleaming cliff 
which shines with its half circle of beach behind them to the 
left. There is a romantic air about the whole of this plate. 

" Chez Camille Maupin " (Plate 70) is one of those scenes 

I 65 



CHARLES CQNDER 

so dear to Conder. It is an interior showing magnificently 
dressed women, brilliant lights, and gallant dandies of 1830. 

The sixth lithograph of this set, " L' Alcalde dans L'Em- 
barras" (Plate 71), is also a subject after the artist's favourite 
choice, a fancy-dress ball. It has wit and design ; and all 
interest is concentrated round the discomfiture of the Alcalde 
and the laughing and jesting crowded dancers. 

The " Beatrix et Conti " was designed for the Balzac Set 
but was rejected ; it has very much the same sentiment as the 
" Bdatrix et Calyste," but the time of day is different, namely 
high noon, and the pair sit by the sea looking at ships and 
clouds, in converse, interrupted by the importunate sailor. 
This is a rarer plate, but is inferior to the " Beatrix et 
Calyste." 

Conder drew three other subjects from Balzac which were 
published separately. They are " La Peau de Chagrin," " Un 
Prince de la Boh^me," and " Lucien et Esther." They are 
all inferior to the first six published in 1899, and were done 
some years later when the artist was breaking up in health 
and his powers were failing. 

In what is known as the Carnival Set, but are most likely 

illustrations to Miirger's La Vie de Boheme, there are some 

characteristic and excellent examples of Conder's invention ; 

for instance, the beautiful attitude of the figure balancing 

herself against the chair on the plate called " Schaunard's 

Studio," and the dancing women in " La Mi-Careme," are 

most expressively drawn. The movement of the dancing 

couple and the women round the fountain in the plate called 

" A Spanish Courtyard " are most happily placed, and contrast 
66 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

excellently with the dancing figures. " The Sea Wall " in 
the same series is a complete contrast to this ; it is a lovely 
dream, well drawn and composed, and is beautiful in its 
sense of repose (Plate 46). Of the " Harlequin s'amuse," 
there is a coloured version (Plate 47) which shows subtle 
differences from the pure lithograph, and only three on 
silk exist coloured by Conder himself. 

" The Fantaisie Espagnole " (Plate 93) contains some of the 
most virile and vigorous of Conder's figure-drawing, and 
" The Fairy Tale" (Plate 92) has a playful charm and fancy. 
"The Gossip," showing the ladies on a sofa, with billowy 
skirts, is fine in unity of design. " The Dressing-Room " 
is remarkable for the grouping of the figures. Other litho- 
graphs, like "The Guitarists," "The Harlequin's Courtship," 
" The Buddha," lack completeness in composition, and show 
waning powers. Of the Invitation Cards, the best is most 
certainly the one to a fancy-dress ball at the artist's house. 
Its design is charming, and the rich qualities of the blacks 
are especially noticeable. 

Of the four etchings, the two book-plates are the most 
successful, so far as design is concerned, but etching was 
a medium that Conder did not use much ; he can hardly be 
claimed as an etcher at all. 

Neither can he be considered a great illustrator. The 

drawings he made for Balzac's La Fille aux Yeux d'Or 

rather fail in that respect. The frontispiece is a good prelude 

to the book, and has something of the famous novelist's spirit 

and outlook in life, combined with the artist's fancy, but some 

of the other plates are weak in design and drawing. The 

67 



CHARLES CONDER 

meeting of " Paquita and Henri de Marsac" is distinctly 
inferior to the lithograph of the same subject. One of the 
best designs is the " Paquita and the Marquise de San-Rdal," 
with its hint of coming tragedy. The original drawings for 
this book are more interesting for themselves than as illus- 
trations. Nor can the designs made for the Yellow Book 
sustain his reputation as an illustrator, for the " Winder- 
mere " (Plate 6) is downright bad ; both figures are badly 
drawn, the clouds and sky are out of tone, and the whole 
design is muddled. The same remarks apply to "A 
Masque " (Plate 7), which is equally obscure. " A Fairy 
Prince" (Plate 8) is happier. It would seem that Conder's 
fancy was of an independent nature and could not be bound 
down to illustrate other visions than his own. The illustra- 
tions for Beauty and the Beast are much superior in their 
conception and design. In two of these plates — " Beauty in 
the Garden" and "Beauty at Dinner" — nothing could be 
more in harmony with the old fair)''-tale. 

Conder had no particular method of working. He could 
paint under any conditions, whether they were physically 
favourable or otherwise. He seldom drew from life, but 
almost entirely from memory. He observed and drew what 
he had seen from memory. For instance, he would wander 
into a room, pick up a bit of china or any object that attracted 
his attention, place it on a table and draw it, only glancing at 
it once or twice. In his Australian days, or the first three or 
four years spent in France, he painted large landscapes on 
the spot, but not quite literally, and they were generally 

finished indoors. The scenes, backgrounds, and figures in 
68 







_j 



«ii "iiifmiii 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

his drawings on silk were all painted in the studio, but not 
from any model, except that he casually made sketches of 
friends and used them afterwards. 

Those tiny scenes in the medallions of his fans, where 
a whole world is expressed more completely than in many 
a large canvas, were painted entirely from his imagination. 
Although he had the mien of a dreamer, his observation 
was very acute. His brain seemed to retain for future use 
whatever he chose to select. 

He could, and often did, paint at night by artificial light, 
when he would produce some of his most beautiful colour 
pieces. His numerous sketches in chalk and pastel were 
rarely studies from life, but usually ideas, conceptions, and 
fancies that came into his mind which he felt compelled to 
express. He had no method or scheme when he was painting 
a picture, nor did he ever make studies for it. 

He was indifferent about painting materials, and did not 
favour any particular brushes or colour. But he was most 
fastidious in the choice of the materials he fancied for his 
drawings, especially regarding the silk, and was untiring in 
the search in London or Paris for the silks or ribbons on 
which he wanted to paint, whether it was a dress or anything 
else. In one instance, for example, for the sash (Plates 38, 39, 
and 40) he had various ribbons sent him, and also went from 
shop to shop himself until he had found one with the par- 
ticular border he had fancied in his mind would be suitable 
for the design he had conceived. In this instance it is a 
border of raised satin-like ribs on each side of the ribbon, 
and each rib is joined by a scollop. He even went so far as 

69 



CHARLES CONDER 

to sew on the fringe at the end of the sash himself. He also 
varied the natural tint of the silk he chose according to the 
subject and scheme of colour he had in his mind. Some- 
times it was plain white, sometimes a warm creamy hue. 
The two lappets belonging to a parure of a dress, though 
lovely in colour and good in composition, are a sad memento 
of his failing power owing to ill health. 

Conder in appearance was of average height. He was 
strongly made, inclined to be fair in complexion ; his eyes 
were grey and generally dreamy in expression, of which the 
photograph in the frontispiece is a good illustration. His 
manner was quiet as a rule, but he easily got excited in the 
company of congenial friends, and then, being a good ra- 
conteur, became the merry centre of a gathering. He was 
popular with all his friends, especially with those who knew 
him intimately, and even those who did not know him well 
were struck with his charm of manner and conversation. 
Indeed the charm and generosity of his nature is always 
remembered by his friends. Conder had considerable capa- 
city for business, and his resourceful mind found a way out 
of all difficulties. 

He liked the Bohemian side of society in Paris, and when 
he lived there mixed frequently in it, a fact that interfered 
a good deal with his work, and gave him at one time the 
character of idleness. But however that may be, his output 
of work, considering the shortness of his life, is remarkably 
large. 

Conder's art will most certainly live in the future for 
the two great artistic qualities alone which it possesses, 
70 




2-^ 

fa c- 



HIS LIFE AND WORK 

namely, colour and poetry. He was undeniably a colourist 
of wide range and invention. Here he can challenge the 
greatest masters, for the colour faculty with him was pre- 
eminent whether he worked in oil or water-colour, and it is 
for the most part founded on some out-of-doors effect in 
nature as he had seen it, whether it was the light and heat of 
Australian landscape, the fascinating tones of the northern 
country of France, or the freshness of the southern coast of 
England. He seemed somehow to capture the essence of a 
scene and to depict it with the most exquisite and delicate 
harmonies, interwoven with all the details of his fancies, 
whether it was a simple landscape or a bal masque, or a 
Bohemian restaurant at Montmartre, or one of those Elysian 
scenes or fetes galantes he loved to imagine. It has been 
said by some people that his art owed nothing to his 
Australian experiences, but this is surely not so, for the five 
years he spent in that country, from his seventeenth to his 
twenty-first year, is a very impressionable period in a young 
man's lifetime, and it is certain that it influenced Conder's 
colouring. In Melbourne and Sydney he was already much 
remarked amongst his fellow artists as a rare and original 
colourist. It was in his Australian days, too, that he first got 
what was a favourite motive, and one that remained, which 
he liked to paint all his life — roses and fruit-trees in full 
bloom. The writer was first privileged to meet Conder in 
the month of November 1888, in an orchard near Melbourne, 
where he was engaged in painting apple-trees in full blossom. 
The result was a picture equal in poetry and charm with the 
landscape work he did in Europe up to 1897. Conder's art 

71 



CHARLES CONDER 

has naturally influenced other artists of talent. As a conse- 
quence he has had many imitators, but not one of them has 
possessed anything of his personality or genius. For Conder 
was neither a pioneer nor a recorder in art, but a painter 
of faerie, a master of exquisite colour and beautiful design. 
He possessed unique gifts of imagination and fancy, and 
must surely take his place as one of the rarest and most 
original artists of his time. 



72 



A CATALOGUE OF THE LITHOGRAPHS 
AND ETCHINGS OF 

CHARLES CONDER 

COMPILED BY 

CAMPBELL DODGSON, M.A. 

KEEPER OF PRINTS AND DRAWINGS, BRITISH MUSEUM 



K 73 



PREFACE 

I HAVE attempted this catalogue in the hope of correcting the vague 
impression, in which I myself shared when I first undertook the task, 
that Conder's original prints were limited to the Balzac Set, a few 
other lithographs, and one dry-point, of which only a single proof was 
believed to exist. I have spared no pains in endeavouring to ascer- 
tain precisely what those other lithographs were, and in the course of 
my investigations the " unique dry-point " has split up into three states 
of its own, and proved to be but one of several essays, all somewhat 
amateurish, in this technique. 

Conder's first, and best, period as a lithographer is limited to the 
year 1899, the year of "The Leaning Tree" and the Balzac Set. A 
few isolated experiments may intervene between that year and 1904, 
though only one of them, the portrait of Mrs. A. A. Humphrey, is 
dated, and that not very legibly. The more important Carnival Set 
belongs to 1904, though the date of its publication falls later. Several 
lithographs are actually dated 1905, and others resembling them in 
style have been grouped with these ; a few, bearing signs of failing 
power, may be later still. Thus a chronological order has been 
attempted, but no guarantee can be given that it is in all respects 
correct. The invitation -cards are placed in a separate class, at the 
end. They rank, by their size and destination, as minor works, but 
are none the less charming examples of Conder's decorative fancy. 

I had nearly included among the early lithographs a design called 
" Lord S. and the ' Canard Sauvage,' " which was presented by Conder 
to Mr. W. Rothenstein in March 1900, but I bow to the superior 
technical knowledge of Mr. Rothenstein, who pronounces it to be a 
drawing in lithographic chalk that has not been printed.* Other 

* In the foreground a woman reclines, looking to the left ; she rests her left elbow on pillows. 
Behind her is a row of five men, the foremost of whom resembles, probably by chance, the late 
Lord Salisbury. The man next to him gesticulates with his right arm and holds a candle in 

75 



CHARLES CONDER 

lithographic drawings on transfer paper, one of which has been 
reported from New York, are, of course, not included in a catalogue 
of prints. The design, dated 1896, for Mr. Dalhousie Young's cycle 
of songs, " In a Gondola," is interesting as a forerunner of the litho- 
graphs, but has no possible claim to be described among them, being 
a reproduction of a drawing by the half-tone process. 

In the following catalogue the dimensions are generally those of 
the extreme limits of the work, except where a ruled border-line 
exists, which is taken as the limit to be measured, though stray lines 
often cross the border. The actual dimensions of the stone can rarely 
be perceived, and, as a matter of fact, Conder's early lithographs were 
never drawn direct on the stone, but were transferred from a drawing 
on paper. 

A complete collection of the lithographs, with the exception of 
No. 8, is in the British Museum. The Mus^e des Beaux-Arts at 
Buda-Pesth possesses a large and representative collection, including 
" The Leaning Tree," the Balzac and Carnival Sets, and a number 
of separate subjects. 

I am indebted to Mrs. A. Cecil Lawson and Mrs. A. A. Humphrey 
for much help in the preparation of this catalogue. C. D. 

his left hand. To the right, at a lower level, is a man holding a long staff. In the distance, 
to the left, is a background of vague architecture with a dome and bridge ; in the sky are 
fantastic shapes, including a horse with a human figure crouching on its back, gjxii^. 
Black ; the woman's head and some of the figures are retouched with pencil and black chalk. 



76 



I. LITHOGRAPHS 

I. THE LEANING TREE 

A GROUP of four persons : a lady seated, wearing a cloak and large 
hat ; another standing behind her, in a large dark hat, leaning forward ; 
a third figure in mask and turban crouching behind ; and a young man 
in a white satin suit with ruffles at the wrists, who stands on the left 
and leans forward. Over all a tree, growing from the left, bends 
across to the right. Signed below on the right, CONDER. 

loxgl-. Printed in brownish red on Japanese paper. Published 
by Messrs. Carfax & Co., 1899. There is a single trial proof, in black, 
heavier in effect, with rather more work on the stone towards the 
right. This lithograph was first exhibited at the Carfax Gallery in 
April 1900 under the title, " L'Abb6 divague." 

THE BALZAC SET {2-^) 

Twenty-five copies of this set were issued in 1899 in a portfolio, 
with the title, " Six Lithographed Drawings from Balzac, by Charles 
Conder. Published and sold by Carfax & Co., Limited, 17 Ryder 
Street, St. James's, London, S.W." 

The published impressions are printed in a brownish red on stout 
Japanese paper, and are signed in pencil. A few trial proofs exist in 
black, light brown, and other shades of red. 

2. LA FILLE AUX YEUX D'OR 

The scene is the garden of the Tuileries. A young woman, 
Paquita Valdes, stands towards the left, raising her skirts with both 
hands, and looking at Henri de Marsac, a tall young man in a silk 
hat, who stands before her. The duenna peers over her right 

77 



CHARLES CONDER 

shoulder. Two men and a woman are seen to the right. Signed 
CONDER in right-hand corner. Ruled border-line. 

7tV ^ l\- There is a trial proof in red, another in grey. 

An earlier version of this subject is the second of the six wooodcut 
illustrations by Conder to Ernest Dowson's translation of " La Fille 
aux Yeux d'or," 1896. 

3. CORALIE 

A man in a dressing-gown (Lucien de Rubempre.'') stands before a 
fireplace with his back to the spectator, and looking round towards the 
right, where Coralie sits upon a sofa with a wicker back, in front of a 
bed. Near the foot of the sofa are the title CORALIE and the 
signature CONDER, 1899, 

8|- X 11^. There are two trial proofs in different shades of brown 
(one of which is in the Melbourne National Gallery), and one in red. 
Mademoiselle Coralie, actress, figures in " Un Debut dans la Vie," 
" Illusions Perdues," and " La Rabouilleuse." 



4. BEATRIX ET CALYSTE 

Beatrix, Marquise de Rochefide, and her lover, Calyste du Gu^nic, 
are seen side by side in a landscape where, to the left, the waves are 
breaking at the foot of white cliffs. Signed at the bottom on the left, 
CONDER, 99. Ruled border-line. 

6^x 1 2 J. An illustration to " Beatrix." There are two trial proofs 
in reddish brown, and one in black. 

5. ESTHER (No. i) 

Esther lies, half undressed, on a bed, beyond which a young man 
is seen, holding- his tall hat in his hand. Near the foot of the bed 
stand two women. Clothes are strewn about in disorder on the near 
side of the bed. Beside a pair of slippers is the title Esther ; the 
signature, CONDER, 99, is more to the left. Ruled border-line. 

9J X I2y\. There is a trial proof in black. 
78 



LITHOGRAPHS 



6. CHEZ CAMILLE MAUPIN 

A young man sits writing at a table lit by a single candle, on the 
other side of which a lady stands. In the foreground, on the right, 
two couples are standing. Other figures are indistinctly seen in the 
background, where a glimpse of a brilliantly-lighted room is seen 
through an arched door. The title, signature, and date are beneath 
the table on the left. Ruled border-line at top and left side only. 

8|- X 1 1 J. A trial proof in very pale brown is in the Melbourne 
National Gallery ; there also exists two in different shades of brown, 
and one in black. 

"Camille Maupin" is the pseudonym of the authoress, F^icit^ des 
Touches, who figures in " Beatrix," " Illusions Perdues," &c. 

7. L'ALCADE DANS L'EMBARRAS 

A stout man in a cocked hat is dancing with a girl, while clown 
and pantaloon caper behind them. A woman sits on a bench to the 
left and watches them. No title. The signature and date, Conder, 99, 
are in the lower corner on the right. 

8 J X lof . There is a trial proof printed in black. 

" L'Alcade dans I'Embarras" is the title of a play in which 
Coralie has a great success at the Panorama Dramatique (" Illusions 
Perdues "), Part ii. 

8. BEATRIX ET CONTI 

A gentleman and lady in the costume of 1830, the lady having a 
large veil attached to her hat, are seated by the sea, looking to the 
left. A sailing-ship is seen in the distance with clouds passing over 
it. Behind the seated pair stands a sailor, raising his left hand ; the 
tackle of a sailor's boat is seen behind him. In the left lower corner 
is the title Beatrix et Conti ; on the opposite side are the signature and 
date, CONDER, 99. 

8 J X loj. Very rare ; designed for the Balzac Set but rejected. 
Mr. W. Rothenstein has a proof in black. 

The subject is an illustration to " Beatrix." 

79 



CHARLES CONDER 

THREE SUBJECTS FROM BALZAC (9-1 1) 

Not published as a series. Probably some years later than the set of 1899 

9. LA PEAU DE CHAGRIN 

A young man stands on the left, holding a sheet of paper in his 
left hand. Two women in white dresses sit listening to him, and 
another man sits in a chair to the right. The title Le [sic) Peau de 
Chagrin appears near the right lower corner, and the signature 
CONDER on the left. 

9^ XI if. Border-line. The stone was larger, and the work 
exceeds these limits in some places. Printed in sanguine ; exhibited 
at the Society of Twelve in 1905. 

10. UN PRINCE DE LA BOHfeME 

A young man (La Palferine ?) stands on the right, hat in hand, 
talking to a lady who lays her left hand on his shoulder. Two men 
walk towards the left. In the background is an open-air bookstall. 
The title is in the right lower corner, the signature CONDER in the 
left. 

8f X I \\. Printed in sanguine. 

II. LUCIEN ET ESTHER 

Lucien turns his back to a dressing-table lit by three candles, and 
makes a gesture with his right hand as if to hasten the departure of 
Esther, who stands before him, in evening dress, while her cloak lies 
upon a chair to the right. Behind the two are seen the curtains of an 
alcove. Three men and a woman are seen at some distance through 
the open door. Signed CONDER in the left lower corner ; the title, 
Lucien et Esther, is towards the right. 

8xii|. 

Two States 

I. There is a rough, irregular edge at the top, and the height, 
measured through the C of the signature, is 8y\ ins. 
80 



LITHOGRAPHS 



This state is printed in a brownish colour on pale buff paper, and 
the impressions are not signed in pencil. There is also a trial proof 
(B.M.) in a redder colour, not sanguine, on Japan paper, touched by 
Conder in sanguine in many places where the drawing, when trans- 
ferred to the stone, had failed to print. Lucien's cloak, for instance, 
is fully shaded ; there is much more detail and an indication of pattern 
on Esther's dress. The rough edge at the top is now seen to be the 
fringe of a valance at the top of the curtains, extending a little beyond 
the bedpost. In the left lower corner Conder has added in sanguine, 
C. C. retouched, and before the title the words Les Adieux de. Hence 
the lithograph has been exhibited under the title " Les Adieux de 
Lucien et [d'] Esther." 

II. The rough edge has been effaced, and the height is 8 ins. 

The impressions of this state are printed in sanguine and signed 
in pencil. 

12. PORTRAIT OF MRS. A. A. HUMPHREY 

Bust in profile to left, with dark hair, the eye nearly closed. 
Signed C. Conder, 1901 (the last figure indistinct). 

'j'^y^']. Drawn in 1901, transferred to stone and printed by 
Goulding. Twenty-five impressions were taken, in brown, black, and 
sanguine (information from Mrs. A. A. Humphrey). 

13. CUPID'S HOUR 

A pair of lovers recline in an alcove. The nearer of the two 
turns her head away from her companion, who toys with a cluster of 
fruit that hangs over the head of the couch. A dove flies towards the 
fruit, and a Cupid flutters near the distraught lover, covering his face 
with his hands. Another Cupid is seen in a dazzling ray of light, 
which passes into the room through the window beyond the alcove. 
A woman crouches in shadow near the end of the couch, resting her 
arm on a chest carved with a lyre and heart. Near these emblems is 
the signature Conder. 

9x12!^. Printed in sanguine. 

L 81 



CHARLES CONDER 



THE CARNIVAL SET (14-21) 

This set, drawn in 1904, was published in 1906 by Messrs. Ernest 
Brown & Phillips without a printed wrapper, title, or list of subjects. 
There is, consequently, some uncertainty about the names by which 
the artist meant them to be known (see note on No. 15). Fifty copies 
were issued, all printed in red, and signed and numbered in pencil. 

Six of the set, omitting Nos. 16 and 21, were shown at the first 
exhibition of the Society of Twelve in 1904. 

There is no coherent motive running through the whole set, and 
the general title, which is of recent invention, is not applicable to all 
the subjects. The first two, certainly, and perhaps the preludes to a 
harlequinade reckoned as the third and fourth, are illustrations to 
Henri INIurger's " La Vie de Boheme" In the fifth the scene changes 
to Spain, and in the sixth to a fantastic Orient, which has cast its spell 
on the seventh also ; in the eighth we are introduced to an equally 
unreal Arcady of 1830. 

14. SCHAUNARD'S STUDIO 

Schaunard, the painter, sits at his easel, smoking a pipe, with 
the model on his left. His studio has been invaded, this sunny 
morning, by five young ladies, who pry about the room or sit near 
the wide window, where a large picture stands in its frame. To 
the left is the title SHAUNARD—LA VIE DE BOHEME; 
to the right the signature CONDER. 

15. LA MI-CAREME 

A room in a restaurant, on the windows of which are advertise- 
ments, while a placard announcing a " Bal Masque " is seen on the left. 
Two young men, one of whom brandishes a champagne bottle, sit at a 
table watching: two eirls who dance tocrether on the left. Another 
girl, on the right, leans back and looks at them, while she rests her 
hands on the shoulders of a man in fancy dress of the Louis XIV 
period. Two girls in carnival attire are indistinctly seen on the far 
82 



LITHOGRAPHS 



right, where the signature CONDER is placed in the lower corner. 
The title LA MI-CAR^ME is in the corresponding position on 
the left. 

81 X I si. This subject was shown at the first exhibition of the 
Society of Twelve, 1904, and is reproduced in the catalogue. Among 
the titles there enumerated the only one that seems possible is 
" L'Arrivee de Musette," for " L'Entree en Scene," the only other that 
could be considered, must rather belong to No. 17. In view of this 
ambiguity it seems best to adhere to the title on the lithograph itself. 

16. THE GREEN-ROOM 

A girl in profile to the left, in tights, wearing a hat, reclines on a 
couch, at the head of which stands a Pierrot dressed in white. She is 
listening to a girl in a check dress and large hat, who sits at the foot 
of the couch. Further back another girl is tidying her hair, mirror in 
hand, and a third stands beyond her, talking to Harlequin. Signed, 
on the right, CONDER. 

8fxii|. 

17. L'ENTREE EN SCfeNE 

Columbine, about to pass through a door to the left, is supported 
by a Pantaloon in a sugar-loaf hat, and a masked woman in a turban. 
Behind this group is a pair of figures indistinctly characterised, and 
on the right stands Harlequin with a girl at his back on tiptoe, lifting 
her hand to the crown of his head. Signed, on the left, CONDER. 

8fXI2^. 

18. A SPANISH COURTYARD 

Three women are grouped about a circular fountain on the left, 
watching a couple whirling in a rapid dance. A poodle sits at the 
feet of the foremost spectator. A man and woman standing, a man 
on horseback, and a man in a wide-brimmed hat are seen in the 
background to the right under a wide archway. Signed, on the left, 
CONDER. 

8ixii|. 

83 



CHARLES CONDER 

19. A DREAM OF ARABY 

A Sultana, lightly draped, lies in the open air on a low couch 
under trees, her head overhung by a rose-bush. A bird alights on 
her left hand as she raises it ; its fellow hovers in the air. A maid in 
an Oriental head-dress watches her mistress from the foot of the 
couch. A barque floats on the calm sea, and a white palace rises in 
the distance. Signed, on the right, CONDER. 



8JX12. 



20. THE SEA-WALL 



Nine women, lightly robed, stand or lounge on the terraces of 
what seems an Eastern palace, though a seagull wings its way across 
white cliffs which rise beyond the wall with the inconsistency of 
dreamland. But perhaps the swarthy Turk and the Sultana, or 
Persian beauty, who enter with stately pace from the left, are but 
Parisians in travesty and the sun-bath a seaside interlude in the 
pleasures of " La Vie de Boheme." Signed, on the right, CONDER. 



8HX12. 



21. A PASTORAL FANTASY 



A lady in 1830 costume bends forward as she accepts a flower 
from the hand of a man in dark clothes on the right. On the left is 
a woman standing in the shade of trees, and in the background are 
a seated girl and a man with a shepherd's crook, standing near her, 
who watches the principal figures from a distance. In the sky are 
clouds and a flight of birds. Not signed. 

8f X 12. This lithograph differs in technique from the rest of the 
set, being drawn with the brush ; the dark parts give the effect of 
broad uniform washes. 

22. PSYCHE 

A woman stands near the sea, bending forward, and resting her 
hand on a low table before her. Another woman stands behind her, 
84 



LITHOGRAPHS 



and a third is indistinctly seen beyond the end of the table. The 
scene is framed by vine-hung pillars at either end. Sicrned 
CONDER. 

6i X 7i- Drawn with the brush. Printed in black, greenish 
brown, and sanguine. Probably near in date to No. 21. Never 
exhibited. 

23. HARLEQUIN S'AMUSE 

Five figures, to the left a Pierrot, and in the centre Harlequin, 
are seen upon the stage with their backs turned to footlights and 
audience. Oval, in a border of ribbons and roses. Signed, on the 
right, CONDER, 1905. 

ioxi2|^. There are impressions on paper in sanguine, and in 
black ; also impressions on silk, three being coloured by hand, besides 
one printed in purple on white silk. 

24. FANTAISIE ESPAGNOLE 

A young man on the left, wearing a black cap, short cloak, and 
knee-breeches, grasps with his right hand the shawl of a girl who 
dances and looks round to her left. A woman in a crinoline stands 
behind them, using a fan. Towards the right are two other women, 
one of whom looks straight to the front. In the background a view 
of sea and hills is seen through a wide arch festooned with vines. 
Signed, on the left, in reverse, CONDER, 1905. 

ii4Xi7i- Drawn on the stone. There are impressions in red 
and black, and at least four on white silk, one of which, printed in 
pale brown, was presented by Mrs. A. Cecil Lawson to the British 
Museum ; others are in purple and black. 

25. THE MAYPOLE 

Four women, two of them undraped, are seen in the foreground. 
At some distance behind them a maypole is being erected by a 
number of men, and in the distance a town is seen. Signed in the 
right lower corner, CONDER, 1905 (in reverse). 

85 



CHARLES CONDER 

I if'ff X I5j3g^. Drawn on the stone. Exhibited at the Society of 
Twelve, 1905, as "The Spirit of May." Printed in sanguine, and in 
black. 

26. GOSSIP 

Two young ladies, in voluminous white dresses, sit and chat after a 
ball or opera. In the background is a piece of tapestry with a Cupid 
and a term of Pan. Not signed. 

io|xi4j^\. There are impressions on paper in both black and 
red, some of which have been printed since the artist's death. Mrs- 
Eugenie Joachim-Gibson has one printed in purple on white silk; 
there are others on silk in red, black, and purple. The lithograph was 
was shown under this title at the second exhibition of the Society of 
Twelve in 1905. At the Leicester Galleries, 191 3, the title was 
changed to " Conversation." 



27. THE FAIRY TALE 

A group of six women in a room, through the window of which a 
row of houses is visible. To the right of the window are a clock, 
a book-case, and an arm-chair. A tall girl in the foreground, wearing 
a hat, sits on the floor with her feet upon a cushion, reading from a 
picture-book a tale to which the others listen. In the left lower 
corner is the title The Fairy Tale, and on the right, CONDER, 1905. 

1 1 X 2 j^. There are impressions on paper in red, and in black ; 
also on silk in red, black, and purple. 



28. THE DRESSING-ROOM 

Seven girls dressing for a ball, or ballet, who fall into groups of 
two, three, and two. The one whose toilet is least advanced stands 
on the right, raising both hands to her head-dress. At her feet is the 
signature, CONDER. 

lof X \\\. Printed in black and in sanguine. 

86 



LITHOGRAPHS 



29. LA GUITARISTE 

A garden terrace, on which a lady plays the guitar, sitting on a 
stone bench, with an attendant swain behind her. Pierrot approaches 
her from the left, and Harlequin clutches at his coat to restrain him. 
In the foreground, and on the right, are three women. Signed, on the 
left, C. CONDER. 

8f X i6f. Printed in black and in sanguine. 

30. ESTHER (No. 2) 

A tall woman in a white dress stands with a maid behind her, 
towards the right. On the left are two seated women, one of whom 
fondles a dog; at her feet is a stool. The title ESTHER is in the 
right lower corner, the signature C. CONDER in the left. Ruled 
border-line. 

15x10. Printed in black and in sanguine. Exhibited at the 
Society of Twelve, 1906. 

31. HARLEQUIN'S COURTSHIP 

Harlequin and his beloved sit on a couch to the left. Pierrot 
reaches out his hand from behind a pillar, and touches Harlequin's 
hat. A lady watches them from her chair, placed near a pair of 
columns. On the right is an open view towards a town by the sea. 
Signed in the left lower corner, C. CONDER. Ruled border-line. 

9y\x 15x6- Printed in black and in sanguine. 

32. THE BUDDHA 

Five women in a room in which the most conspicuous object is 
a kind of altar bearing an image of an Eastern goddess. One of 
them walks across the room to take a wreath of flowers proffered 
by one of a pair who are seated on the left. Another pair of women, 
standing and seated, balance the first pair on the other side. Un- 
signed. 

12x18. Drawn on stone. Printed in black and in sanguine. 

87 



CHARLES CQNDER 

33. THE SALUTE 

The Church of S. Maria della Salute and the white wall of the 
Dogana are seen on the further side of the Grand Canal. Near the 
foreground are three gondolas, and in front on the left a flight of steps 
in shadow, where a figure, crouching beneath a twisted pillar, watches 
a pair of dancers, near whom a woman leans back, holding a fan. 
Not signed. 

10x13^-. Drawn on lithographic paper. Not printed until the 
winter of 19 12- 13. The earliest proofs were in black; a more success- 
ful iirage in red was produced by Way in January 19 13. 

INVITATION-CARDS (34-37) 

34. INVITATION-CARD TO AN EXHIBITION AT 
15 RUE ROYALE, PARIS, 2-24 DECEMBER 1901 

Two ladies, half-length, one of whom holds a rose in her hand, 
while the other rests her left hand on the handle of a stick. On the 
wall behind are indications of a small oval painting, and two framed 
fans. Signed, on the left, CONDER. At the top is the address: 
15 Rue Royale. The invitation below, printed by J. Minot, Paris, 
is not in Conder's autograph. 

si ^ 5f- The whole is printed in pale greyish green and in pale 
brown ; the size of the card is 8J x 6 ins. There are also proofs before 
letters. This design was reproduced, printed in pink, on the invitation- 
card to the exhibition held at the Leicester Galleries in 1913. 

35. INVITATION-CARD FOR MR. AND 
MRS. EDMUND DAVIS 

A gentleman on the right, in a white pierrot's dress, holds in his 

right hand the strings which regulate the antics of a crowd of puppets 

on the floor. The lady standing near him has just taken off her 

mask ; a harlequin stands behind them, at whose feet is the signature 

88 



LITHOGRAPHS 



CONDER. There is an ornamental border to the design, and a white 
space to the left contains the lithographed inscription : " Mr. and Mrs. 

Edmund Davis request the pleasure of Company to 

dinner on Saturday, December loth, 1904, at 8 o'clock. Disguise 
imperative. 13 Lansdowne Road, W." 

6f X 98- I he invitation is printed in black. 

36. INVITATION-CARD TO A FANCY-DRESS PARTY 
AT THE ARTIST'S HOUSE 

A decorative design framing a group of ladies and gentlemen in 
fancy dress. At the top is the address: "91 Cheyne Walk, S.W.," 
and in a space below : " Mr. and Mrs. Charles Conder request the 

pleasure of Company to a Fancy-Dress Party on 

Saturday, February i8th [1905], at 9 o'clock. R.S.V.P. Disguise 
imperative." The signature Conder is in the left lower corner. 

6yV X 9%- Printed in black. 

n. INVITATION-CARD TO AN EXHIBITION AT 
THE LEICESTER GALLERIES, 1905 

A girl stands on the left, aided by a Cupid in raising a curtain. 
Another figure is indistinctly seen behind her. A palette and a land- 
scape sketch fill the space beneath a lithographed inscription which 
conveys an invitation from Messrs. Ernest Brown & Phillips to the 
private view of an exhibition of pictures by Charles Conder, on 
Thursday, December 7th, 1905. Signed, on the left, C. C. 



M 89 



II. ETCHINGS 

38. PORTRAIT OF MRS. CONDER 

Full length, in three-quarter face to right, wearing a hat and 
sitting in an arm-chair. Her left hand rests lightly on the curved 
handle of a stick, to which a loop of ribbon is attached. Near her 
right foot are the initals, C. C. 

7j ^ 5f • Dry-point. Nine impressions known to the writer. 

Three States 

I. Unfinished and light in effect ; the chair and lower part of dress 
only slightly suggested. No indication of the feet ; no signature. 
Towards the left of the plate, beneath the back of the chair, and at 
right angles to the main subject, is a sketch in outline of a nude female 
figure, without hands or feet. Two impressions (British Museum and 
Mrs. A. A. Humphrey). In the British Museum impression the line 
which defines the nose has failed to print, and the outline of the 
further cheek appears to be part of the nose. 

II. A locket is lightly sketched in beneath the collar. Two 
impressions (British Museum and Mr. W. H. Jessop) more effectively 
printed than the first state, with some tone. One of these was 
exhibited at the Society of Twelve in 1906. 

III. As described ; very much more work on all parts of the plate. 
The sketch of a nude figure has disappeared beneath an indistinct 
cushion (.'') beside the chair. 

Of this state, there are three strongly-marked varieties of printing. 

{a) The plate wiped clean, so that the whole design is equally 
visible. One impression, strong in burr (British Museum). 

[b) Much tone on the plate, especially towards the left ; the work 
90 



ETCHINGS 



to the right, with signature, still distinctly visible ; the face and neck 
wiped clean. Two impressions (Buda-Pesth and another). 

(c) Much deeper tone on the lower part of the plate, under which 
the signature, feet, and lower part of dress are completely hidden. 
The lady appears to be standing rather than sitting. Two im- 
pressions (British Museum and another). 



39. THE CLOAK 

A lady standing, scantily draped, holding a basket. A maid 
behind her, to the left, is raising with both hands a large cloak, in the 
act of putting it over her mistress's shoulders. 

51^x4. The plate was found in 19 12, and four impressions of it 
were taken. It is very vague and loose in drawing. 



40. BOOK-PLATE OF MRS. CONDER 

A lady seated on a couch raising her left foot in the act of putting 
on, or drawing off, a stocking. The subject is enclosed in an oval, 
on the outer line of which is some ornament composed of ribbons. 
Not signed. 

2^ X 2f . Rare, the plate having been lost ; an impression belongs 
to Mrs. A. Cecil Lawson. 



41. BOOK-PLATE OF JERRARD GRANT ALLEN 

A young man in eighteenth-century costume, seated on a pedestal 
facing to the right, holds in his hand a sheet of music. The figure is 
placed within an architectural frame. Within the frame, to the left, is 
the signature C. CONDER. Above the subject are engraved — not by 
the artist — the words Self Developenient is Greater than Self Sacrifice, 
and beneath it the owner's name. 

Subject, 2f X 2^ ; plate, 3I x 2fi. 



91 



LIST OF 
CHARLES CONDER'S WORKS 



The following list of Conder's pictures is as complete as it is at present 
possible to give, as they are somewhat scattered. 

Examples of his art exist in Australia, for the main part in Victoria 
and New South Wales, where he lived from 1885 to 1890, and where he 
first seriously took up art ; in France, where he studied and painted from 
1890 to 1895 ; in England, where he spent the rest of his life. Some of 
his important works are in America, and there exist also examples of his 
art in Germany and Austria. 



" Mirage " 


. Water-colour Painted 


1888. 




" A Taste for Literature " 


Oil 


tf 


jt 




In the possession of M 


rs. Ernest Keep, Melbourne. 








" That Fatal Colour " 


Oil 


, Painted 


1888. 




"After the Play" . 


,, 


. The 9X 


e. Exhibition of 


"Collins Street, 11 A.M." 


ir 


Impressions, 


Melbourne, 


" Harmony in Old Rose " 


* * yj 


1889. 






"Arcadia" 


ff 


» 




II 


" Sketch Portrait " . 


• • i> 


>) 




If 


" The Melbourne Twilight " . . 


» 




ti 


"The Sunday-School Teacher" . „ 


» 




It 


" All in a Garden Fair " 




}t 




fi 


" Impressionist's Camp " 




» 




11 


" Dolce far Niente " . 




If 




If 


" The Sun and I " . 




» 




It 


"A Page from Herrick" 




» 




n 


"Dusk" . 




»» 




» 


"A Sydney Holiday" 




>» 




n 


" Prince's Bridge " , 




» 




It 


" All on a Summer's Day 


• ft 


» 




93 



CHARLES CONDER 



"Riddell's Creek" . 

"Waiting" 

" Sketch Portrait " . 

"In Spring" . 

" Afternoon Tea " . 

"Queen's Wharf " . 

" How we Lost poor Flossie" 

" The Guitar " . 

" Fruit Market " 

" Elsternwick Road " 

"The Fur Cloak" . 

" Dear Lady Disdain " 

"A Dream of Handel's Largo 

" Old Time is still a'Flying " 

"The Happy Days of Wooing 

" Late Afternoon " . 

" Herrick's Blossoms " 

"The Three Cows" 

" Collins Street at 5 P.M." 

" Centennial Chair at Sorrento 

"Burning Off" 

" Sandridge Pier " . 

"Going Home" 

" Five o'clock Train " 

"The Children's Hour" . 

" Sunset and Moonrise " . 

"The Day is Done" 

" Harry St. Maur, Esq." . 

" Myosotis "... 

" An Impressionist " 

"The Hot Wind" . 

" Boys Bathing " 

''The Beach at Littlehampton 

"The Plum Tree" . 

" Cliffs at Yport " . 

" Mustapha, Algiers " 

" Twilight in a Garden, Algiers 

" Almond Trees in Flower " 

" Les Roses " . 

94 



Oil 


The 9 X 


S 


Exhibition ol 


>» 


Impressions: 


Melbourne, 


>i 


1889. 








>» 








)» 


?» • 








)> 


I? 








7> 


»» • 








»> 


>> ' 








»> 


)) • 








»» 


»> • 








l» 






f> ' 


M 


»> 


»» • 


l» 


»» 


M * 


l» 


» 


>' 


I> 


»» 


» 


II 


M 


»» 


» 


»> 


»» 


»» 


l> 


>» 


»l 


» 


>» 


>» 


M 


l» 


• >) 


» 


» 


» 


T» 


» 


»» 


»» 


>» 


» 


» 


M 


»l 


fj 



Exhibited at Victorian Art- 
ists' Society. Painted 1890 
Painted 1890. 
1891. 



1892. 

Exhibited at Salon (Soci^t6 
Nationale), 1892. 



LIST OF WORKS 



"LaPerle" .... 


Oil 


" Les Champs d'or " 


» 


"July, Vetheuil" . 


r> • 


" Soir d'^e " . . . . 


tt ' 


" Juin, Chantemesle " 


» 


" May Day " . . . . 


)) 


" Castle on Rock "... 


. Water-colour 


" Marine Mer, Grise et nuages " 


on oil. 


" Marine Mer, bleue et falaise " 


i» 


" Marine Mer, verte et ombre " 


>» 


" Paysage, avec personages " . 


»> 


"Paysage" .... 


»> 


" Paysage, Une moisson " 


»7 


"Marine" .... 


Oil 


"Landscape" .... 


J» 


"The Green Apple" 


» 


" L'Estacade " . 


' M ' 


"The Palmist" 


. Water-colour 


" Le Premier Bal " . 


>r 


" L'Oiseau Bleu "... 


» 


" Almond Blossoms " 


Oil 


" A Summer Afternoon " . 


» 


" The Peacock Fan " 


. Water-colour 


" In the Forest "... 


Oil 


" Under the Vine " . 


. Water-colour 


"Blossom" .... 


Oil 


" Landscape " . 


t> 


" Design for a Fan " 


. Water-colour 


"A Prospect" .... 


>» 


"Golfers" .... 


Oil 


"Fan" 


. Water-colour 


" Souvenir Sentimental " . 


>} 


"Soird'a^" .... 


II 


" Fantaisie Byzantine " . 


II 


" Eventail Bleu "... 


' ft * 


" Eventail Biege "... 


» 



Exhibited at Salon {Soci6t6 

Nationale), 1892. 
Exhibited at Salon (Soci6te 

Nationale), 1893. 



Exhibited at Salon (Soci^d 
Nationale), 1894. 



New English Art Club, 

November 1894. 
Painted at Vetheuil, 1894. 
Painted at Dieppe, 1895, 
New English Art Club, 

April-May 1895. 
New English Art Club, 

Nov. and Dec. 1895. 
New English Art Club, 

Nov. and Dec. 1896. 
New English Art Club, 

Nov. and Dec. 1897. 



International Society of 
Sculptors, Painters and 
Gravers, First Exhibi- 
tion, May 1898. 

New English Art Club, 
April 1898. 

New English Art Club, 
Nov. and Dec. 1898. 

Salon (Soci^t^ Nationale), 
1898. 



95 



CHARLES CONDER 



"1826" 



"The Bathers" 



(fan) „ 



"The Romantic Excursion" (fan) 

" The Spangled Fan " 

" The Automobile Fan " . 

" Les Indolents " (fan) . 

"1827" (silk panel) . 

" La mye de roi "... 

"The Wooing of the Fair Fasti 

dious" (fan) 
" The Silver Spring " (fan) 
"The Bathers" 
" L'entr^e en scene " (fan) 
" Promenade au Cr6puscule " (fan) 
" Pierrot " (fan) 
" Berthe le repentre " (fan) 
" La fortune est touisours femelle " 
" Melancolie " (fan) . 
" Fair Ameret has gone astray" 
" La Fille aux Yeux d'or (fan) . 
" Awake, awake break through your 

veils of lawn " (fan) . 
"The Scotch Lake" 
" A Decorated Piano " . . 
" Beaux enfans vous perdez la plus " Water-colour 
" Belle rose de vos chappeau " (fan) 
"C'est Tercis et c'est Amente" (fan) 

"A curtain" 

" Shepherd the old towns fall, this is 

the end " (fan) .... 
" Elvira talked longly with her 

friend " (fan) .... 
" Love Mounted " (fan) . 
"The Avenue" .... 
" Le retour de Pierrot " (screen, 

signed Conder Blunt) . . Water-colour 
"A chair decorated " (signed Conder 

Blunt) ,» 

96 



Water-colour Salon (Soci6t6 Nationale), 
1898. 
„ . New English Art Club, 

Nov. 1899. 
„ . Painted 1899. 




• II 

. Painted 1901. 


II 
II 


. Exhibition of Conder's 


II 


. Work at the Carfax Gal- 


» 


lery, Ryder Street, May 
. 1899. 


It • II II 

Water-colour „ „ 



II 
11 



II 

Oil 



>> 

II 



II 

Oil 



LIST OF WORKS 


"Donna Sabine "... 


Sanguine . 


Drawings and 


Paintings 


"The Windmill" (fan) . 


>» 


at Carfax Galleries, April 


" In the Garden of Fortunio " 


»» 


1900. 




"The Shadow" 


Water-colour 


ri 


II 


"Morning in the Park" . 


Oil 


» 


II 


" L'Anglais " (fan) . 


. Water-colour 


II 


II 


" Beaux enfans, vous perdez la plu. 








Belle rose de vos chappeau " 


}i ' 


n 


t> 


"The Willow Tree" 


Oil 


ft 


II 


"Chez Paquita" 


Drawing . 


II 


II 


"The Meeting" 


>» 


I» 


II 


" La Morte Amoureux " . 


. Water-colour 


II 


II 


"The Pearl" .... 


>i 


II 


II 


"Venus, Juno, and Minerva" . 


If • 


1) 


II 


" Beauty and the Beast " 


i» 


II 


II 


"The Amber Fan" . 


» 


II 


II 


" L'Abbe divague" . 


. Lithograph . 


II 


II 


" La Fille aux Yeux d'or " 


• i> • 


tf 


II 


" Chez Camille Maupin " . 


i> 


II 


II 


"Esther" 


II 


II 


II 


" Beatrice and Calyste " . 


»> 


II 


II 


"Coralie" .... 


»i 


II 


II 


" L'Alcade dans I'embarras " . 


II 


II 


II 


" Providence and a Guitar " (fan) 


Water-colour 


II 


}f 


" Venus and Adonis " 


Drawing . 


II 


II 


" De Marsay and Paquita " 


Water-colour 


II 


}> 


" A Title Page "... 


Drawing . 


II 


n 


" The Satin Gown " (fan) 


Water-colour 


II 


» 


"The Prince discovers Himself" 


Drawing . 


II 


II 


" Rosamund's Pond " 


Water-colour 


II 


II 


"A Title Page" 


Draiving . 


II 


II 


" Chinoiserie " (fan) .... 


Water-colour 


II 


II 


"The Handkerchief " 


Sanguine . 


II 


II 


" Moonlight at Vetheuil " 


Oil 


II 


II 



Pictures and Water-colours 



1. "In Scotland" . 

2. " Souvenir of Rejane " 

3. " Plaza des Toros d'autrefois " 



Oil . Catalogue of Exhibition 
Water-colour held in 1901 at M. 

Oil . Moret's, 15 Rue Royale. 
N 97 



CHARLES CONDER 



4- 
5- 
6. 

7- 
8. 



9- 

lO. 

II. 

12. 

13- 
14. 

15- 

16. 

17- 



18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23- 

24- 
25- 

26. 

27. 
28. 
29. 
30- 
31- 

32- 

33- 
34- 
35- 
36- 



"Pepita" . . . . 

"Lajet^e" 

" La Plage a Svvanage " 

" Landscape at Pourville " 

" Les Belles Ecouteuses " . 



Water-colour Catalogue 



Oil 



Water-colour 



of Exhibition 
in 1901 at M. 



held 

Morel's, 15 Rue Royale. 



Les donneurs de serenades et les belles Ecouteuses 
Exchangent des propos, fades sons des rumeurs brumeuses. 

— VERLAINE. 

" Des Roses " (study) 

'' Sur la plage " . 

" Le Reveil " . . . . 

" Le Passe-port "... 

" Le Gue " 

" La Cascade " . 
" Fete champetre " (panneau 
decoratif) .... 
" La diseuse de bonne aventure " 
" Reverie " .... 



" F^te de nuit " . 

" Fete galante " . 

" Les Causeuses " 

" Soir d'^t^ " 

" L' Automobile " 

" Sous les saules " 

" La Femme en rouge " 

" Le Temple d'amour " 

" Dans la Galerie " 

"La Toilette" . 

" Au temps des chevaliers ' 

"L'Empire" 

" L'Anglais " 

" Les Medallions" 

"Distractions Champetres 

" Les Roses " 

" Romanticisme " 

" Crepuscule " (painting in wax) 

" Les Chaises a porteur " (mounted 

fan) 

98 



Oil 


» 


It 


» 


)> 


» 


Water-colour 


)l 


II 


)i 


tt 


l> 


>f 


» 


I> 


Oil 


»l 


>» 


» 


» 


II 


Water-colour 


»» 


tt 


»» 


» 


It 


Fans 






Water-colour 


l» 


tt 


» 


» 


It 


If 


It 


It 


»» 


t> 


It 


» 


>l 


It 


» 


»» 


II 


>» 


» 


>» 


» 


l» 


»l 


>> 


»> 


tt 


» 


» 


»» 


i> 


l> 


tt 


» 


» 


n 


i> 


• M 


It 


M 


IJ 


It 


I> 


• II 


tt 


» 


It 


tt 


)> 


II 


tt 


l> 


II 


II 



LIST OF WORKS 


" The Oyster Beds "... Oil 


New English 


Art Club, 


" Marine with Figures " 






fj 


Nov. and Dec. igoi. 


" Bathers " 






' ft • 


w 


1} 


"La Plage — Morning" 






l> • 


)> 


y> 


" The Dancer " 






. Water-colour Exhibition at 


the Dutch 


" Fdte Antique " 






» 


Gallery (Van Wissel- 


"River Scene on the Ept 


" 




Oil . 


inghs), Nov 


and Dec. 


" ^tretat " (fan) 






. Water-colour 


1903. 




" The Dante Fan " . 






' f> ' 




}t 


" Les Flaneurs " 






» 




ff 


"A Screen " (Fifine) 






t> 




}f 


"The Wreath Fan" 






i> 




fy 


"The Check Fan" . 






rt • 




}f 


"Cr^puscule Tendre" (fa 


n) 




» 




tJ 


" The Promenade " . 






>} 




ff 


"The Corridor Fan" 






» 




ft 


"The Gondolier" . 






Oil 




tr 


"LeH^raut" . 






» 




tf 


" Blossoms " . 






» 




;> 


" Spring " (fan) 






Water-colour 




ff 


"Cr^puscule" . 






» • 




rt 


" Sur la Plage " 






Oil . 




tf 


" Le Jardin ferme " . 






Water-colour 




tt 


" Lake Scene at Ghiffa " . 






Oil 




It 


" La Toilette " . 






Water-colour 




}f 


" Sous la Colonne " . 






» • 




tt 


" L'Esplanade " 






» 




tf 


"Ambleteuse, Marine" . 






Oil 




tf 


" Les Dryades " 






Water-colour 




ft 


"L'lle Abandonn^e" 






»» • 




}} 


"Cassandra" . 






)» • 




tt 


" Au bord de la Mer " 






>» • 




tt 


" In the Land of Dreams' 


t 




» • 




ft 


" Venise la Rouge " . 






yi • 




tt 


" Magnolias " . 






jy 




tt 


" Portrait of Mrs. Bedforc 


I" . 




Oil 




ff 


"1839" (panel) 






Water-colour 




tt 


"Swanage" 






Oil 




tt 


" The Lake Garden " 






Water-colour 




tt 


"The Haystacks" . 




• 


Oil 




tt 



99 



CHARLES CONDER 



" Le Piliseport " 

"The Fountain" 

"The Poppied Sleep" 

" Church of the Santa Maria 

Salute " . 
" Fantaisie Verte " . 
" La Fontaine" 
" La Promenade " . 
"Au Grand Canal, Venise 
" Les Meules " . 
" Swanage " 
" The Sea Terrace " . 
"The Bacchanalians" 
"The Piazza" . 
" Under the Willows " (fan) 
" Fantasie Vert " (fan) 
" The Lagoon " (fan) 
"The Canary Fan". 
"Sunset" (fan) 
"The Brocade Fan" 
" The Willow Tree " (fan 
" Pastoral en Gris " . 
" En Domino " 
" Riverside " (fan) . 
" Those Yellow Sands " (fan) 
" Les Causeuses " 
" Ballerina " . 
" L'Heure Exquise " 
" The Shadow of Harlequ 
" Danse Champetre " 
" Au Cafd " 

" A Summer Afternoon " 
"The Garden of Indolence" 
" The Awakening " (fan) 
" Crdpuscule Tendre " (fan) 
" Souvenir de Murger " 
"Sous la Colonne" . 
"Wood Nymphs" . 
"The Lake Garden" 
" Les Coulisses " 
lOO 



dclla 



Sanguine 
Chalk Drawin^ 
Water-colour 



Water-colour Exhibition at the Dutch 
Gallery (Van Wissel- 
inghs), Nov. and Dec. 
1903. 



Oil 
Water-colour 
Oil 






Salon (Soci^t6 Nationale), 
1904. 



The International Society 
of Sculptors, Painters, 
and Gravers, 1904. 



Exhibition at the Leicester 
Galleries, Oct. 1904. 



» 


tt 




>' 


' It 




Water-colout 


' »> 




» 


• It 




It 


• tt 




» 


• tt 




» 


• tt 




V 


tt 




n 


tt 




K 


• It 




t> 


tt 




» 


• tt 




tt 


• It 


n 



LIST OF WORKS 



"The Poppied Sleep" 
" Fete Antique " 
"6tretat" (fan) 
"Cassandra" . 
"The Check Fan" . 
"The River Nymph" 

Dated 1905. The proper 



ty ofjolm Qi 



" Portrait of Lady Ottoline Morrell 



Water-colour 



Oil 

uinn, Esq. 

Oil 



"The Swing Fan" . 


Water-colom 


" The Willow Trees " (fan) . 


» 


"The Bird Cage" (fan) . 


If 


" Queen Margot "... 


ri • 


"Dreamland of Blue" . 


It • 


" Under the Awning " 


» 


" A Bower of Roses " . . , 


tt 


" The Bull Fight " (fan) . 


>} 


"The Pink Fan" . 


J} 


" Beach at Petites Dalles " 


Oil 


"The Evening Rendezvous" . 


Water-colout 


" On the Sea Terrace " . 


>i 


" Fate Champ^tre " . 


» 


" The Rose Garden " 


f> • 


"The Town Mice" . 


» 


"The Poplar Alley" 


}f • 


" Pepita " 


Oil 


" A November Day at Brighton " 


>> 


" Mdlle. de Maupin " 


yy • 


" Nymphs at the Fountain " . 


>» « 


" Portrait of Antonia " 


ft 


"A Dance in Seville" 


»T • 


" Portrait Group " . 


M * 


"The Moonlight Conversation " 


yy • 


"A Stormy Day at Brighton " 


• yy 


" L'Heure Exquise " 


, Water-colour 


"The Pool" .... 


Oil 


" Group in a Garden " 


« >i 


"A Sea Nymph" . 


>» 


"The Blue Sofa" . 


« >» 


"The Gardener's Daughter" . 


• f> 



Exhibition at the Leicester 
Galleries, Oct. 1904. 






New English Art Club, Oct. 

and Nov. 1905. 
Exhibition at the Leicester 

Galleries, 1905-1906. 



It 

tt 



ti 
11 
ti 
II 
11 
It 
II 



lOI 



CHARLES CONDER 


" The Swing " . 


OtV 


. Exhibition at the Leicester 


" Two Nymphs and the Sea " . 


n 


Galleries, 1905-1906. 


" Clair de Lune "... 


}9 


»> !> 


" En Grande Toilette " . 


a 


' » » 


" Balcony Fete in Seville " 


rr 


11 t) 


"At Dusk" .... 


. JVaUr-coiou) 


n »> 


" The Brink of the Lake " 


• ft 


■ If If 


" Souvenir d'un Ballet " . 


tt 


» »> 


" In the Shadow of Pan " 


>> 


It t> 


" Blossoms— Rose " . 


tt 


tt » 


" Night and the Bathers " 


• tt 


» >» 


" The Terrace Garden " . 


• ry 


»> »> 


" En Travestie au Pare "' 


f} 


t> »» 


" Wood Nymphs " . 


yt 


>i » 


" In the Glade " (decorative panel) 


»» 


» »> 


" The Conversation " 


• »> 


)i i> 


" Paysage Fantastique " . 


• >» 


New English Art Club, June 


" The Howe, Oxfordshire " . 


Oil 


1906. 


" A Fruit Garden at Gisore " . 


yt 


II » 


" Three Sea Nymphs " . 


ft 


» )> 


" Souvenir d'un Ballet " 




yy 


New English Art Club, 


" A Beach in Cornwall " 




»> 


Nov. and Dec. 1906. 


"Wood Nymphs" . 




yy 


II » 


" Jealousy " 




Water-colou7 


>» j> 


" The Baroness de Meyer 


r* 


Oil 


International Society of 


" The Croquet Players " 




l» 


Sculptors, Painters, and 


" Decorative Panel " 




. Water-coloui 


Gravers, 1906. 


" The Blue Sofa " . 




Oil 


„ 1907. 


" Les Esclaves " 




yy 


)i » 


"The Napoleon Fan" 




. Water-colou} 


' >» II 


" Figures on the Shore " ( 


fan) . 


II 


International Society of 


"The Yellow Fan" . 




yy 


Sculptors, Painters, and 


" The Awakening " . 




yy 


Gravers, Feb. and March 


" Dreamland in Blue " 




1) 


1908. 


"Fan" . 




II 


II » 


" Cr^puscule Tendre " 




Oil 


International Society of 


"L'OmbreRose" . 




Water-colouf 


Sculptors, Painters, and 


"A Ribbon" . 




>i 


Gravers, 1909. 


"The Iris Fan" 




>» 


II )> 


"Wood Nymphs" . 




Oil 


11 »» 


102 









LIST 


OF WORKS 




"Three Sea Nymphs" . 




Oil 


Internation 


al Society of 


"L'Esclave" . 




II 


Sculptor! 


>, Painters, and 


"Ambleteuse " . 




yy 


Gravers, 


1909. 


"L'Heure Exquise" 




• ^i 


It 


II 


"The Peacock Lady" . 




11 


II 


II 


"The Pepys Family " . 




. Water-coloui 


II 


11 


"The Willow Fan". 




II 


II 


It 


"Fan" .... 




II 


» 


It 


" L' Automobile Fan " 




II 


» 


II 


"The Yellow Sands" (fan) 




II 


• » 


11 


" A Decorative Panel " . 




II 


It 


II 


"Idyll" .... 




• II 


n 


It 


" The Brocade Fan " 




»i 


II 


tt 


"The Pink Fan" . 




II 


M 


>i 


"Fan" .... 




• 11 


» 


II 


"Fan" .... 




• II 


jf 


ff 


"Les Villas l^couteuses" 




II 


tt 


It 


"A Napoleonic Idyll" 




II 


tt 


It 


"Portrait of Lady Ottoline Morrel 


Oil 


t> 


It 


" The Howe in Spring " . 




II 


tt 


11 


"Blossoms" . 




II 


tt 


II 


"Nymphs of the Fountain " 




• II 


tt 


II 


" Cr^puscule Tendre " 




• ji 


tt 


II 


"The Sanguine Fan" 




. Water-colout 


It 


II 


" Dolce far Niente " 




II 


tt 


II 


" Folly— a Fan " 




^t 


tt 


II 


" The Brink of the Lake " 




11 


II 


tt 


" Alice Sit by the Fire " . 




Chalk Drawin^ 


r 


ti 


" Portrait of a Lady " 




Etching 


11 


It 


"A Painted Gown, a Sash, 


and 


a 






Fan .... 




. Water-colout 


II 


11 


"A Painted Shawl and a Fan 


i» 


II > 


It 


11 


" A Screen "... 


, 


>i • 


11 


II 


Nine panels for the decoration of 


a 


Exhibition 


at Carfax Gal- 


room 




. Water-colout 


lery, Jan. 


1910. 


"Fickle Love "(fan) 




oti Silk 


11 


i> 


" Beauvais " (panel) . 




II 


It 


It 


"The Boudoir" (fan) 




II 


It 


tt 


" Hydrangeas " (panel) . 




II 


It 


It 


" Les Incroyables " . 




• II 


It 


II 



103 



CHARLES CONDER 



"The Lake" (fan) . 

" La Morte Amoreuse " (panel) 

" L'Amour Voltigeant" (fan) 

" Near Arundel " (panel) . 

" Freneuse near Chantimesle " 

" The Adriatic " 

" Brighton " . 

" 6cume de Matin " 

"The Cornfield" 

" L'isol^e " 

"Apple Blossom at Chantimesle" 

"Dieppe" 

" L'apres-midi d'un Pecheur " 

"Pierrot" (ova! panel) . 

" Le roi d'Ys " (fan) 

" Pegasus " (fan) 

"Trois Caprices Bleu" (panels) 

" L'Estacade a Dieppe " . 

"The Fortune Teller" (panel) 

"Fan" . 

" Fan " . 

" Beauvais " 

" Fan " . 

" Les Incroyables " 

" Fan " . 

" The Rose Fan " 

"The Spanish Fan" 

" Fan with Greek Landscape ' 

" The Pages " (fan) . 

"The Sultana" (fan) 

"The Iris Fan" 

" Paysage Fantastique " (fan) 

" L'lmp^ratrice " (fan) . 

"The Lagoon" (fan) 

"The Spanish Piazza" (fan) 

" The Golden Fan " . 

f^Lent by Mrs. Ernest Peixoiio.) 
" The Checked Dress " (pastel) 
"Casino de Paris " . 
"Cinderella" .... 
104 



Water-colour 
OH Silk 



Oil 



Exhibition 


at 


Carfax Gal 


ler\', Jan. 


19 


10. 


»» 




>» 


ti 




» 


It 




tt 


n 




n 



Water-colour 








oa 








Water-colour 








» 








Oil 








Water-colour 








>t 


Exhibition at Carfax Gal- 




lery, 


April 


1910. 






»» 


tt 






» 


tt 






f> 


tt 






ji 


tt 




F"irst Exhibition of Conder's 




Work at the Galleries of 




the 


Berlin 


Photographic 




Company, 


New York, 




Dec 


. 1911. 








>» 








tt 








tt 








tt 








It 








tt 








It 




Drawing . 




tt 




Sanguine . 




)t 





LIST OF WORKS 



Blue Fantasia " 

The Silk Panel 

Offrande " . 

The Toilette " 

Jealousy " 

A Small Silk Screen " . 

Imperia "... 

Spring Blossoms " 

The Sea Shore, Venice " 

Women by the Shore " . 

Two Nymphs in a Garden " 

The Fountain " 

Spring Landscape " 

The Nymphs " 

Nude" .... 



Lent by John Alexander^ Esq. 
Drawing lent by A. E. Gallatin, Esq, 



" Portrait of a Lady" 

" Silver Point " . 

" The Rehearsal " . 

"The Guitar Player" 

"To the Ladies " 

" A Dream of Araby " 

" Schaunard's Studio " 

"A Masquerade" 

"Spanish Phantasy" 

"The Dance" . 

" Sc^ne Espagnole " 

" Sc^ne Galante " , 

" Gossips " 

"Mi-Careme" . 

" Les Saltimbanques " 

" Toreador " 

" Foyer de la Dance " 

"A.D. 1830" . 

" Tapestry Design " . 

" Children on Sands " 

"L'Offrande" . 

" Cinderella " . 



Water-colour First Exhibition of Conder's 

„ . Work at the Galleries of 

Water-colour the Berlin Photographic 

Pastel . Company, New York, 

Water-colour Dec. 191 1. 



Oil 



» 
n 




































. Etching 


>» 




II 


» 
. Sanguine 






II 

M 


» 
Pen Drawing 
. Lithograph 


' » 




II 
1) 


» 


>l 




II 


i( 


• »J 




»» 


» 
. Lithograph 


» 




11 
II 


• f> 


» 




» 


» 


» 




»> 


»» 


)) 




II 


» 


» 




II 


>» 


>» 




II 


j> ' 


I» 




» 


Water-colout 


» 

Exhibition 
Galleries, 


atth 
Jan. 


II 
e Leicester 

1913- 


If 


)) 




>i 


»> 


»» 




II 


»> • 


» 




II 



o 



105 



CHARLES CONDER 


" Harlequin " Water-colour Exhibition at the Leicester 


"The Pink Fan" . 




„ . Galleries, Jan 


• 1913- 


" The Siesta " . 




» 


II 




" Lagoon Roses " 




» 


II 




" Iris Fan " 




» 


II 




" Water Nymphs " . 




ty 


II 




" A Garden of Roses " 




11 


» 




"Gossip" 




» 


u 




" Flowers " (fan) . 




11 ' 


» 




" Courtyard at Seville " 




»> 


»» 




" The Pink Shawl " . 




ft • 


II 




" The Red Kimono " 




Oil 


l» 




" The Barge " . 




» 


II 




"Pan" . 




Black Chalk Drawing 


II 




" La Belle Antonia " 




Oil . 


II 




" Overmantel " . 




. Water-colour 


II 




"Imperia" 




» 


II 




"Au Pays Bleu" . 




Chalk Drawing 


)> 




" Peacock Decoration " 




. Water-colour 


>> 




" Love's Arrow " 




. Pastel . 


» 




"The Masqueraders " 




. Water-colour 


II 




" Le Chapeau " 




• II 


t> 




"The Bull Fight" . 




n • 


II 




"Outside the Temple" 




■ II • 


II 




" Buddha Fan " 




' ' II * 


II 




"The Shell" . 




II 


II 




"Decoration" . 




• II • 


II 




" La Toilette " . 




II ' 


II 




" Bacchantes " 




• »» • 


II 




" The Pergola " 




)) • 


II 




" The Terrace Fan " 




II 


II 




"A Confidence" 




• II ' 


II 




" Une Fantaisie " . 




II • 


II 




" Portrait of a Lady " 




II • 


II 




" The Rose " . 




' 11 • 


n 




" The Flirtation " . 




• II * 


II 




"La Plage" . 




»i • 


II 




"A Nymph" . 




• /> • 


It 




" Harlequin s'amuse " 




Coloured Lithograph 


It 




" At Dusk "... 




Oil 


II 




1 06 











LIST 


OF 


WORKS 




" Battersea Bridge " 


. 


OtV 


. Exhibition 


at the Leicester 


" La Blanchisseuse " 








Galleries, 


1913- 


" The Luxembourg Gardens " 








' It 


}i 


" Mademoiselle de Maupin " 








• II 


II 


" The Garden Seat " 








• It 


,, 


" On the Terrace " . 








' It 


,, 


" From Conder's House " 








• It 


,, 


"The Sands" . 








• 11 


It 


" Two Nymphs in a Garden " 








t> 


It 


" Spring by the Sea " 








• It 


II 


" The Swing " . 








It 


It 


"A Windy Day" 








It 


tt 


" Apple Blossoms, Givernay " 








It 


It 


" Summer Night " . 








It 


II 


" River near Battersea " . 








It 


n 


"Au Clair de Lune" 








• tt 


„ 


"The Gardener's Daughter" 








' ti 


tt 


"The Fountain" . 








' tt 


It 


" Madam Errazuriz " 








' It 


II 


"Souvenir d'un Ballet" . 








tt 


II 


" View of Gibraltar " 








tt 


It 


"The Blue Sofa" . 








It 


II 


"Brighton, 1905" . 








It 


It 


" Les Baigneuses " . 








tt 


II 


"Esther" . . . . 




Lithograph , 


i> 


It 


"The Guitarist" 






It • 


It 


It 


"The Dressing Room" . 






» 


tt 


It 


"Cupid's Hour" 






>r 


It 


II 


" Harlequin s'amuse " 






If • 


It 


It 


" Spanish Courtyard " . 






» 


It 


tt 


" Le Peau de Chagrin " . 






tt • 


It 


II 


" Prince de la Boh€me " . 






» • 


tt 


II 


" The May-pole " . . . 






» • 


tt 


II 


" Les Adieux de Lucien et Est) 


ler" 




)) 


It 


II 


" Harlequin's Courtship " 






» 


It 


II 


" The Fairy Tale " . . . 






» 


It 


II 


"Conversation" 






» 


It 


It 


"The Carnival Set" 


Se 


ven J 


Lithograp 


hs „ 


It 



107 



CHARLES CONDER 



LIST OF CONDER'S WORKS IN PUBLIC GALLERIES 

America 



Metropolitan Museum of New York — 
" The Spanish Fan " . 



Water-colour. 



Australia 

National Gallery of New South Wales — 

" Departure of SS. (9m«/ " . . . Oil. 1888, 

National Gallery of Victoria — 

" L'Oiseau Bleu " Water-colour 

"Chez mademoiselle Maupin " . . . Lithograph. 

"Coralie" „ 



Austria 

Buda-Pesth, Mus6e des Beaux Arts — 

" The Leaning Tree," Balzac Set, Carnival Set Lithographs. 



England 



London, British Museum — 
"Pan" 



Drawing in Black Chalk. 



France 



Paris, The Louvre Gallery — 
"Magnolias" 



Water-colour. 



Ireland 

Dublin Municipal Gallery of Modern Art- 
" Stormy Day, Brighton " . 
" The Gondolier " 
"The Finding of Don Juan " 
" The Grey Fan " 
"The Nightingale" . 
" The Bather's Repose " . 
" Behind the Scenes " 
108 



Oil. 

Water-colour. 
Sanguine. 
Water-colour. 

}> 
Drawing. 



LIST OF WORKS 



BOOKS ILLUSTRATED BY CHARLES CONDER 

La Fille aux Yeux dOr. (The Girl with the Golden Eyes.) 

By Honors de Balzac. Translated by Ernest Dowson. With six 
Illustrations engraved in wood by Charles Conder. Published 
by Leonard Smithers. London, 1896. 

Frontispiece, 

Henri Meets Paquita. 

Paquita is Driven Home. 

Paquita and Henri. 

Paquita and the Marquise de San-Real. 

The Death of Paquita. 

The Story of Beauty and the Beast. 

The complete Fairy Story translated from the French by Ernest 
Dowson. With four Plates in Colour by Charles Conder. Pub- 
lished by John Lane. 1898. 

Beauty (^Frontispiece). 
Beauty at Dinner. 
Beauty in the Garden. 
Beauty in the Bedroom. 

REPRODUCTIONS OF CONDER'S PICTURES ARE TO BE 

FOUND IN 
The Yellow Book. 

Volume IV. January 1895. " Design for a Fan." 
„ VI. July 1895. " Souvenir de Paris." 

X. „ 1896. "Windermere." 

XI. October 1896. "Recreations of Cupid," and "A 

Romance." 
„ XIII. April 1897. "A Fairy Prince," and "A Masque." 

The Savoy. 

Illustration to " Mandoline " from the " F^tes Galantes " of Paul 
Verlaine. A wood engraving from Water-colour by Charles 
Conder. 
Frontispiece to " La Fille aux Yeux d'Or." Wood engraving after an 
unpublished Crayon Drawing by Charles Conder. 

109 



» 



CHARLES CONDER 



The Pageant for 1896. " L'Oiseau Bleu." ^ 
„ 1897. " Le Premier Bal. 

The Saturday Review. \ design for a Fan. 
Illustrated Supplement. S 

The Studio, May 1898. 

Winter Number, 1 901-1902. 
", Illustrated article, April 1905. 

The Connoisseur, April 1904. 

La Mode et les Modes, February 1902. 



no 




The firo/itrly of Tom Roterts. Esg. 



.A 



PLATE I 




I 1 I'l.E-PAr.E FOR CATALOGUE 



rr.ATi-: n 




^ i' 



•^ 




SOUVENIR OE PARIS 
Drazving on silk, the property of Mr. John Lone 




S: 




A MASyUE 



PLATE V'll 




A FAIRY PRINCE 



PLATE VIII 







W 




% ^i 



^J 




APPLE BLOSSOM, DliNNEMONT 
In the f>osscssioK of J . G. Legge, Esq. 



PLATE X 














y' /.sc^ ^^^.-w- /^^^^ ^^2^^ '-- 

FACsnrii.i'; oi- i.n tek wimtjkn kv ciiakies contikr 




PLATE Xl 






^^2^ 



^ 











/ 



FACSIMILE or I.ETTEK W 



; WRITTEN HV ITIAHIES CONUKK 



PI.ATF. Xl[ 



(:^'i--<^ 



a-e^t^^ 



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FACSIMILE OK I.ETTKR WRITTEN BY CHAKI.ES CONDER 



PLA TE .Kill 




II.MISTKATIO.N ON SILK ENCLOSKIi IN lErTKU 
Ihc t,ro/>crty of My. John Lane 



ri.ATF. A/r 










H J. 



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I'OKI'KAIT OF CHARI.KS CONDER HY HIMSBl F 
The fininting is ihc />rpfierty 0/ C. L. Rothenste'm, Esq. 



f/.ATK .\X. 




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" FEMMK HANS TNE LOOK AU THEAI KK 
The pliotogj aph is the prof'ei ty of M}-. F. 1! tini/ hi ty 



fi ATE \.\rir 



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" IN THK GLADE '" 
/// ihe /•osst:ssi'o/i of FUk/i}Til l}'alUr, Esq. 



FLA TB XX.XIl 




:§ 



;v. 



a. 



--Jl^ W.' *''V-, ■" -*»■ 




"TOCATTA OF GALUPPI 
/« the />osscssi0ti of Pkk/ord Waller, Esq. 



PLATE XXXir 




O'^ 



0-5' 






5^ 



5 "^ 




A DECORATION 
In the possession of Pickford Waller, Esi;. 



PLATE .y.XXl'l 







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;-: ^^f-a ..--:> ,^v^ 



>• > 







(- 



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GARNITURE OF A DRESS 
1,1 the possession of Mrs. A. Humphrey 



PLATE XX XV in 



Si 
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W. . ••**^*'*' ••••)•••.' • . .^ 

4. . ; ^ .... 



GARNITURE OF A DRKSS 

lit tlte possession of Mrs. A. Hiiniplirey 



PLA TE XXXIX 








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TWO I'ANKLS ON SII.K I'OR A ROOM 
/« t/if /•I'ssrssion of John Quinn^ ^sg., of Nav York City 



FI.Air. XL/ 





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TWO PANKl-S ON SIl.K FOR A ROOM 
//. /he fiosstssion o/ John Quinn, Esq., of Nev ) 'ork Cily 



PLATE XLII 




TWO PANELS ON sil.K KOR A ROOM 
//; the /.osscssion oj Jolin Quinn, Esg., of Nnu York City 



ri.ATE XL/// 




F*lif> 




JL 




TWO PANELS ON SILK FOR A ROOM 
/m the possession of John Quinn. Esq., of Ne-,v York City 



PLATE XI.IV 




.....I-^^^^-^^xi^,:?----- 



PLATE XLV 



4 a'^K 




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f^. ,''3rT^S-'J' 











CARNITURE FOR A DRESS 
In the possession of Mrs. John. Lane 



PLATE XLVIll 







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MADAME ERRAZURIZ 

ht the possession of Pick/oni Waller^ Esq. 



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RECREATIONS OP CUPID. 
( Drawiny ) 



PLATE LVIl 




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" BLOSSOM ■' 
/» the pi'sscssion o/ Mrs. J . J', lolntsott 



PI. ATE LIX 




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i>*'Si*«i^.jife_. 




LE REVEII. 
The pfopetty of Miss Awy Hat/orti 



PLATE LXIIl 




DKATH ANIl iilK KOSK 
The property of Miss Amy Hal/ord 



PLATE I.Xlf 




b. 

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35 







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55 




ALrCE SIT BY THE FIRE 
Exhibited at the Leicester Catteries 



PLA TE LXXlIt 




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dc Ch.C0NDEF\ a la fHai^ot? cle> f^i'ti^l-e^ 

du 2 au 24- Delce-mbrf^ I90I. 



DESIGN FOR INVITATION CARD. 
( Lithograph ) 



PLATE LXXXIX. 




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INDEX 



INDEX 



"Abbe divaque, L'," 65 

"A.D. 1830," 55 

" Alcalde dans I'Embarras, L'," 66 

Algeciras, Conder at, 41 

Algiers, Conder at, 34, 35 

Allen, Jerrard Grant, his book-plate, 91 

" Almond Trees in Flower," 35 

Ambleteuse, Conder at, 40, 46 

Anquetin, M., his influence on Conder, 32, 37, 

44 
Aquarellist Exhibition in Paris, The, Conder 

on, 32 
" Arcadia," 27 
Art Franqaise, Conder's work reproduced in, 

35 

Art Nouveau in Paris, Exhibition of, 61 

Art Society of New South Wales, The, Conder 

exhibits with, 26, 29 
Audran, employs Watteau, 61 
" Automobile Fan, The," 60 
" Awakening, The," 60 
Ayres, Anne, mother of Conder, 23 

" Balcony, the," 57 

Balzac, La Fille aux Yeux (POr, and other 

works, illustrated by Conder, 40, 57, 65-67, 

75-78, 109 
Beardsley, Aubrey, compared with Conder, 

7, 59 

Conder's portrait of, 49 

" Beatrix et Calyste," 65, 66 

" Beatrix et Conti," 66 

" Beauty and the Beast," 68 

Beerbohm, Max, Conder's portrait of, 50 

inspired by " L'Oiseau Bleu," 53 

Belford, Stella Maris, Conder marries, 40 



Berlin Photographic Company, New York, 

40 
Besnard, Conder on, 32, 33 
Bing, Mr., his decorative panels by Conder, 

7, 61 
Birnbaum, Martin, his article on Conder, 40 
Blackwell, Geoffrey, owner of " Swanage 

Bay," 49 
" Blossom," 44, 46 
" Blue Sofa, The," 49 
Blunt, A. C, with Conder in Paris, 8, 36 
Bohemian life in Paris, Conder's acquaintance 

with, 48, 66, 70 
Book-plates by Conder, 67, 91 
Bottomley, Gordon, his poem "L'Oiseau 

Bleu," 8, 53 
Boulanger, Professor of Painting, 44 
Bouveret, Dagnan, Conder on, 31 
" Boys Bathing," 28 
" Brighton," 47 

Brighton, Conder at, 41, 42, 49 
British Museum, The, Conder work in, 64, 76, 

85, 90, 108 
Brown & Phillips, Messrs. Ernest, 82 
Browning, Robert, " Old Pictures in Florence," 

29 
Buda-Pesth Musee des Beaux Arts, Conder's 

work in, 76, 91, 108 
" Buddha, The," 67 
Buxton's Rooms, Melbourne, 9x5 Exhibition 

in, 27 
Byron, Lord, his influence on Conder, 57 

Campbell, Mrs. Patrick, portrait of, 52 
Carfax Gallery, The, Conder exhibitions at, 39, 
57, 62, 65 

113 



CHARLES CONDER 



Carnival set, Conder's, 66, 75, 76 
Cazin, Conder on, 34 
Chalk, Conder's work in, 69 
" Champs d'Or, Les," 36 
Chantemesle, Conder at, 36, 43, 44 
Chavannes, Puvis de, Conder on, 30, 31, 33, 59 
Chelsea, Conder's home in, 40, 47, 49 
"Chez Camille Maupin," 65 
Chinese art, influence on Conder of, 52 
Colombo, Ceylon, Conder in, 29, 30 
Colourist, Conder as a, 54, 55, 71 
Conder, Alice, sister of Charles, 23 
Conder, Anne, mother of Charles, 23, 24 
Conder, Charles, analysis of his genius, 7, 
59, 70 ; his birth and education, 23-25 ; his 
life in Australia, 7, 25-29, 71 ; exhibits in 
Melbourne, 27 ; comes to London via 
Ceylon and Italy and Paris, 29 ; artistic 
influences on, 31, 44, 59, 71 ; his life in 
Paris, 31-5, 45, 48, 70; visits Normandy 
and Algiers, 34 ; his exhibitions in Paris, 
35> 39i 42i 88 ; his exhibitions in London, 
37, 39. 41, 42, 47, 51, 86, 89; his fan 
designs, 7, 37, 40, 52, 59-61 ; his marriage, 
40; his home in London, 40, 41, 89; his 
book illustrations, 40, 65-68, 75, 77, 109; 
his foreign tours, 41, 44; his death, 7, 42; 
his oil paintings, 44-9 ; his method in water- 
colour, 45 ; his portrait work, 49-52, 90 ; his 
silk panels, 52, 55, 58, 61-64 ; as a colourist, 
54-6, 71 ; his drawings and lithographs, 
64, 75 ; his etchings, 67, 75, 90 ; his method 
of work, 68-70 ; his personal appearance, 
70 ; his influence on other artists, 72 
Conder, James, brother of Charles, 23 

his education, 24, 25 

Conder, James, father of Charles, in India, 

23 
Conder, Stella Maris, her marriage, 40, 41 ; 

her death, 42 ; portrait of, 90 
Connoisseur, The, no 
Constant, Professor at Julien's, 32 
Contemporary Art Society, the owners of 

" The Green Apple," 45 
"Conversation," 86 
" Coralie," 65 
Corder, Miss, Whistler's portrait of, 33 

114 



Corot, fans by, 59 

" Cr^puscule Tendre," 40, 44, 46 

Crowborough, Conder at, 42 

Daumier, his influence on Conder, 32 

Da Vinci, Leonardo, Condor on, 31 

Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Edmund, their decorative 
panels by Conder, 7, 41, 49, 62 

their invitation card by Conder, 88 

" Decoration, A," 64 

Degas, Conder's admiration for, 32 

fans by, 59 

Dieppe, Conder at, 41 

Dodgson, Campbell, his catalogue of Conder's 
lithographs and etchings, 9, 73 

"Dolce far Niente," 27 

Dornoch, Conder at, 37 

Doucet, Professor at Julien's, 32 

Dowson, Ernest, T/ie Story of Beauty and the 
Beast, 40, 68, 109 

his translation of La Fille aux Yeux 

d'Or, 78 

Drawings by Conder, 64 

" Dressing-Room, The," 67 

Dublin, Conder's work in, 108 

Duran, Carolus, studio of, 44 

Dutch Gallery, Brook Street, Conder's exhibi- 
tion at, 39 

Eastbourne, Conder at school in, 24 
Errazuriz, Madame, Conder's portrait of, 51 
Etchings by Conder, 67, 75, 90 

Fair Women, Exhibition of, 39 

" Fairy Prince, A," 68 

" Fairy Tale, The," 67 

Fan designs by Conder, first^made in 1893, 52 

their distinction, 7, 37, 52, 59, 60, 69 

" Fantaisie Espagnole," 67 

" Fetes Galantes," 39, 109 

" Fickle Love," 60 

Fille aux Yeux d'Or, La, Conder illustrates, 

40, 65, 67 
Florence, Conder in, 29, 30 
" From Conder's House," 47 
Fullwood, A. Henry, Conder's friendship with, 

8, 26 



INDEX 



" Garden Seat, The," 48 

"Gardener's Daughter, The," 49 

Gate of Smaragdus, Bottomley's, 53 noti 

Gautier, Theophile, Conder illustrates, 57 

Gende, Mile., Conder's portrait of, 52 

Gerome, Professor of Painting, 44 ; quoted, 27 

Givernay, Conder at, 44 

"Gossip, The," 67 

Grafton Gallery, the, Conder's work exhibited 

at, 61 
Gravesend, Conder at, 31 
"Green Apple, The," 45 
" Guitarists, The," 67 

Hacon, W. L., 37 

Halford, Mrs., her work by Conder, 41 
" Handel's Largo, A Dream of," 27 
" Harlequin s'amuse," 67 
" Harlequin's Courtship," 67 
Heidelberg, Melbourne, 27, 28 
" Herrick, A Page from," 27 
Holbein, Monvel's work compared with, 32 
Horder, Morley, his Conder fan, 39 
" Hot Wind, The," 28 
Howells, Conder on, 29 

Humphrey, Mrs. A. A., aunt of Mrs. Conder, 
8, 40, 76, 90 ; portrait of, 52, 75, 81 

" Illusions Perdues," 79 

Illustrated Sydney News, The, Conder on the 

staff of, 26 
Illustrations, Conder's book, 65-7, 109. See 

Balzac and the Yellow Book 
Impression Exhibition in Melbourne, The 

9x5, Conder exhibits in, 27, 28 
International Society of Sculptors, Painters, 

and Gravers, Conder exhibits at, 39, 50 
" In the Forest," 46, 49 
" In the Glade," 63 
Invitation Cards by Conder, 67, 75, 88 

Japanese art, influence on Conder of, 52 
"Jealousy," 55 

Jessop, Mr., owner of Conder's work, 49, 55, 90 
Joachim-Gibson, Mrs. Eugenici her " Gossip," 
86 



"Juin," 36 

Julien's, Paris, Conder studies at, 31, 44 

"July," 36 

KiNSELlA, Miss, portrait of, 52 

" Landscape," 37 

Lane, John, Conder's letters on fans to, 8, 

37 ; his Conder relics, 8, 39 ; publishes 

Conder's illustrations, 40, 1 10 
Lago Maggiore, Conder at, 41 
La Roche Guyon, Conder at, 36 
Lawson, Miss, Conder's portrait of, 52 
Lawson, Mrs. Cecil, 8, 76 ; her designs by 

Conder, 85, 91 ; Conder's portrait of, 52 
•' Leaning Tree, The," 65, 75 
Lefebre, Professor at Julien's, 31, 44 
Legge, J. G., on Conder in Paris, 8 

his Conder fan, 59 

Leicester Galleries, The, Conder's exhibitions 

at. 37, 39, 41, 42, 47, 51,86,89 
Lithographs by Conder, 64, 65, 75 
Littlehampton, Conder at, 31 
London, Conder in, 29, 31, 37, 40, 42 
" Lord S. and the ' Canard Sauvage,' '' 75 
Louis Quinze, Age of, Conder's love of, 57, 

67 
" Lucien et Esther," 66 

MacColl, D. S., his poem on Conder, 8, 42 
" Mademoiselle Maupin," 48, 57 
Mahoney, F. P., Conder's friendship with, 26 
Malilon Exhibition in Paris, The, Conder on, 

32 
Manet, fans by, 59 
Mantes, 36 
" Marine," 37 
"Masque, A," 68 
" Masquerade, The," 49 
" Masqueraders, The," 56 
" May Day," 36 
Melbourne, Conder's life in, 7, 26-29, 44, 68, 

71 
Melbourne, National Gallery, Conder's work 

in, 37, 78, 93 

The 9x5 Impression Exhibition in, 27 

Merson, Luc-Olivier, Conder on, 32 

115 - 



CHARLES CONDER 



Meyer, Baroness A. de, Conder's portraits of, 

50 
" Mi-Careine, La," 56 
Minns, B. E., Conder's friendship with, 26 
Minot, J., printer, 88 
"Mirage," exhibited in 1888, 26 
Mode et /es Modes, La, no 
Monet, Claude, Conder on, 30, 33, 34 
Monvel, Boutet de, Conder on, 32 
Moret, M., Conder exhibits with, 39 
Morrell, Lady OttoUne, her portrait by 

Conder, 50 
" Morte Amoureuse, La," 58 
Miirger's La Vie de Bohhne, 66, 82 
" Mustadha, Algiers," 34 

Naples, Conder in, 29, 30 
"Napoleonic Idyll, A," 56 
National Gallery of British Art, declines 

" The Green Apple," 45 
Nerli, G., Conder's admiration for his work, 

26 
New English Art Club, The, Conder exhibits 

at, 37, 42, 45, 50 
New Gallery, The, Conder exhibits at, 39 
Newquay, Conder at, 42 
New Salon, Soci6t6 Nationale des Beaux 

Arts, Conder exhibits at, 35, 36 
New York, 108 ; Conder exhibition in, 40, 62 
Nightingale, Lady Elizabeth, monument to, 

23 
Normandy, Conder in, 34, 35, 44 

Oil paintings by Conder, 44, 47 
"Oiseau Bleu, L'," exhibited 1895, 37, 52 

poem inspired by, 8, 53 

Orient, departure of S.S., 29 

" Paquita and Henri de Marsac," 65, 68 

" Paquita et la Marquise de San-Real," 68 

" Page from Herrick, A," 27 

Pageant, The, Conder's work in, 40, 1 10 

" Palmist, The," 37 

" Pan," 64 

Paris, Conder's exhibitions in, 35, 39, 42, 88 

Conder's life in, 8, 30-36, 44, 48, 68, 70 

the Louvre, 30, 31, 108 

116 



Pastel, Conder's work in, 69 
" Peacock Fan, The," 60 
"Peacock Idyll," 65 
" Peau de Chagrin, La," 66 
" Pepys, Samuel," 57 
" Perle, La," 36, 64 
Petits Dalles, Conder at, 41 
Picard, Conder on, 31 
" Plum Tree, The," 34 
Portrait work by Conder, 49-52 
" Premier Bal, Le," 37, 54 
" Prince de Boh^me, Un," 66 
Pryce, Mrs. Frederick, her reminiscences of 
Conder, 8, 24 

QUINN, John, his Conder panels, 62 

Richards, Grant, his work by Conder, 58 

Richmond, Sydney, N.S.W., 26 

Ricketts, Charles, on Conder's fans, 59 

Roberts, Tom, Conder's friendship with, 8, 
27 ; Conder's letters to, 29, 32, 33 

" Roses, Les," 36 

Rossetti, D. G., women of, 56 

Rothenstein, C. R., 49 

Rothenstein, William, his Conder portrait, 
49 ; his Conder designs, 75, 79; his exhibi- 
tion with Conder, 35, 39 ; on Conder in 
Paris, 8, 31 

Roubiliac, Louis Francis, ancestor of Conder, 
23 

Royal Academy, the, rejects "The Hot Wind," 
28 

Rubat'ydt of Omar KhayyAm, quoted by 
Conder, 35 

Ruels, Durand, Conder exhibits with, 4 

Salisbury, Marquis of, 75 note 

Saturday Review, The, poem on Conder in 

8, 42 ; reproduces a Conder fan, 40, 1 10 
Savoy, The, Conder's work in, 40, 109 
" Schaunard's Studio," 66, 82 
Scotland, Conder in, 38 
" Sea View, A," 45 
" Sea Wall, The," 67 
" Shadow, The," 57 
Shannon, Charles, his fan designs, 59 



INDEX 



Shelley, P. B., his influence on Conder, 57 
Soci6t6 Nationale des Beaux Arts, La, 

Conder exhibits with, 35, 36 
Society of Twelve, The, Conder exhibits with, 

65, 80, 82, 83 
" Soir d':6t6," 36 
Spain, Conder in, 41 
"Spanish Courtyard, A," 66 
"Spring by the Sea," 47 
St. Angelo, Castel, 54 
St. Aubin, Gabriel, influence of, 64 
Steer, P. Wilson, as a woodland painter, 46 
Stevenson, Robert Louis, his portrait by 

Nerli, 26 
Story of Beauty and the Beast, The, illustrated 

by Conder, 40, 68 
Streeton, Arthur, Conder's friendship with, 

8, 27, 31; his influence on Conder, 29, 

32,44 
Studd, Arthur, Conder presents " The Plum 

Tree" to, 34 
Studio, The, 1 1 o 
" Swanage Bay," 49 
Sydney, N.S.W., Conder's life in, 25, 26, 44, 

71, 93 ; National Gallery, Conder's work in, 

29,93 

Thaulow, Fritz, his panels by Conder, 61 
Thomas, dealer, Paris, 35 
Touches, Felicity des, 79 
Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri de, Conder's friend- 
ship with, 32 
Troubetzkoy, Princess, entertains Conder, 41 



Venice, Conder in, 41, 57 

Verlaine, Paul, Fetes Galantes, 39, 109 

Vernon, 36 

Veronese, Paul, colouring of, 58 

Vesuvius, Conder on Mount, 30 

Vetheuil, Conder at, 36, 45 

Victorian Artists' Society Exhibition, 

Conder's work in, 28 
Virginia Water, Conder's grave at, 42 



1890, 



W.\LLER, Pickford, his Conder panels, 63 

Water-colour, Conder's use of, 45 

Watteau, 61 ; his influence on Conder, 39, 

62 
Way, T. R., prints " The Salute," 88 
Westminster Abbey, Roubiliac's monument 

in, 23 
Whistler, J. McNeill, Conder on, 33 

his decorative portraiture, 51 

" Windermere," 68 

" Windy Day," 41, 47 

Wisselingh, E. J. van, Conder exhibits with, 

41 

Yellow Book, The, Conder's work in, 38, 40, 

68, 109 
" Yellow Sands, The," 60 
Yet Again, by Max Beerbohm, 53 note 
Young, Dalhousie, former owner of " The 
Green Apple," 45 

Conder's design for his In a Gondola, 76 

Yport, Conder at, 34 



117 



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