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CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



Charter, Constitution, By-Laws 
Membership List 



Annual Report for the Year 
Ending October 31, 1914 



PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 
1914 



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CONTENTS 



Annual Meeting, Report of 29-77 

Auditing Committee, Report of .... 43 

By-Laws 26-28 

Charter 19-22 

Children's Lectures . 30,79,87-90 

Constitution 23-26 

Donations 43 

Donors, List of 136-146 

Election of Officers 76 

Executive Committee, Report of ... . 33-75 

Funds 33-43 

Jonathan Burr 34 

Philo Carpenter 34 

Marshall Field 34 

T. Mauro Garrett 35 

General 33 

Henry D. Gilpin 33 

Huntington W. Jackson 35 

Polk Dian' 35 

Lucretia Pond 36 

William Conrad Seipp 36 

Elizabeth Hammond Stickney 36, 37 

Lucretia J. Tilfon 37 

Elias T. Watkins 37 

Henry J. Willing 37 

Gilpin Trustees, Report of 40, 41 

Librarian's Report 78-135 

Meetings 71-75 

Members, List of 5-17 

Membership 44-70 

Museum Accessions 12S-135 

Officers and Committees, 1914-1915 ... 5, 6 

Publications 84r-86 

Treasurer's Report 41-43 



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MEMBERSHIP 

Membership in the Society may be had only 
upon recommendation of the Executive Committee. 
There is no entrance fee. Life membership, free 
from all dues, is five hundred dollars; annual 
membership twenty-five dollars. These payments 
carry with them the right to hold office, to vote, 
and take part in the proceedings of the Society; to 
the use of the Library and Reading-room; to ad- 
mission to all lectures and entertainments, andto 
a copy of the Society's current publications. 



FORM OF BEQUEST . 

/ give and bequeath to the CHICAGO HIS- 
TORICAL SOCIETY, incorporated by the Legis- 
lature of the State of Illinois, February ph, 1857, . 
ike sum of 

Dollars. 



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OFFICERS AND MEMBERS 

OF THE 

CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

1914-1915 

President 

CLARENCE A. BURLEY 

Vice-Presidents 

CHARLES H. OONOVER 

OTTO L. SCHMIDT 

Treasurer 

ORSON SMITH 

Secretary 

SEYMOUR MORRIS 

Librarian - 

CAROLINE M. McILVAINE 

ExECunyE Committee 

CLARENCE A. BURLEY, Chairman 

CHARLES H. CONOVER 

OTTO L. SCHMIDT 

Term ending November, IQIJ 
CHARLES F. GUNTHER 

JOY MORTON 
Term ending November, Ilfl6 
EDWARD L. RYERSON 

JOHN A. SPOOR 

Term ending November, igij 

SEYMOUR MORRIS 

EDWARD F. SWIFT 

Term ending November, igiS 

GEORGE MERRYWEATHER 

WILLIAM A. FULLER 



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Officers 

Trustees of the Gilpin Fund 
EUGENE H. FISHBURN 
CLARENCE A. BURLEY 
WILLIAM O. GREEN 
THE PRESIDENT and 
FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT 

ex officiii 

CoHHITTEeS 
Membership 
Frank Hamlin 
William H. Bush 
James O. Heyworth 
John W. Lowe 
John L. Shortali 

Finance 
Mr. Ryerson 
Mr. Fuller 
Mr. Swift 

House and Collections 
Mr, Ryerson 
Mr. Morris 
Mr. Gunther 

Libraries 
Mr. Merryweather 
Mr. Morris 
Dr. Schmidt 

Lectures and Entertainments 
Dr. Schmidt 
Mr. Gunther 
Mr. Morris 

Publication 
Dr. Schmidt 
Mr. Merryweather 
Mr. Conover 

Auditing 
Mr. Fuller 
Mr. Gunther 
Mr. Morton 



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HONORARY LIFE MEMBERS 



Ayer, Edward Everett 
Bartlett, Adolphus Clay 
Harris, Joseph 

Hutchinson, Charles Lawrence 
MacChesney, Nathan William 
McCormick, Cyrus Hall 
McCoRMicK, Nettie Fowler 
Ryerson, Martin Antoine 
Schmidt, Otto Leopold 
Skinner, Elizabeth - 
Skinner, Frederika 



LIFE MEMBERS 



Cobb, Henry Ives 
Farnam, William Whitman 
Hillebrand, Gerhard H. 
Honor£, Henry H. 
Jewett, Ellen Rountree 
Leiter, Joseph 
LowDEN, Frank Orren 
Lytton, Henry Charles 
Ogden, William Butler 
Page, Benjamin Vaughan 
Palmer, Honor£ 
Roberts, James Henry 
Sbipp, Catharina Orb 



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ANNUAL MEMBERS 

Adams, Cyrus H. 
Adams, George Everett 
Adsit, Charles Chapin 
Allen, Benjamin 
Armour, John Oqden 
Arnold, Bion Joseph 
Arnold, Katharine D. 
Baker, Alfred Landon 
Bannard, Henry Clay 
Bartholomay, Henry, Jr. 
Barton, Enos Melanctron 
Beale, William Gerrish 
Beatty, W. T. 
Beidler, Francis 
Beifeld, Joseph 
Blaine, Anita McCormick 
Blair, Edward Tyler 
Blair, Sarah Seymour 
Blount, Fred Meacham 
Boisot, Cmile K. 
Boldenweck, William 
Bowman, Ernest M. 
Bryan, Alfred C. 
Bryan, Frederick William 
Bryan, John Charles 
Brvson, William John 

BUFFINGTON, EUCENE JaCKSON 

Bunn, John Whitfield 
BuRLEY, Clarence Augustus 
BusR, William H. 
Butler, Edward Burgess 



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Members 

BvTZ, Otto Casper 

Byllesbv, H. M. 

Calhoun, William Jambs 

Carr, Clyde M. 

Carry, Edward Francis 

Carter, Helen Leslie 

Caruthers, Kate Soaper 

Chalmers, William James 

Chatfield -Taylor, Hobart Chatfield 

Cheney, Charles Edward 

Conover, Charles Hopkins 

CoNOTER, Henry Boardman 

Cox, Rensselaer W. 

Crane Charles Richard 

Crane, R. T., Jr. 

Crane, Richard T. HI. 

CuRTiss, Charles Ckauncey 

Davis, Nathan Smith 

Dawes, Charles G. 

Dee, Thomas J. 

Deering, Charles 

dbKoven, Annie Larrabee 

Delano, Frederic Adrian 

Dick, Albert Blake 

Dickinson, Albert 

Dickinson, William 

Donnelley, Thomas Elliott 

Drake, Helen Vernera 

DuMMER, William Francis 

EcKHART, Bernard A. 

Farwell, John Villars 

Fergus, Robert Collyer 

Field, Stanley 

Fishburn, Eugene Heald 

Fisher, Lucius George 

Fisher, Walter Lowrie 



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Members 



FLEMifiG, John C. 
Folds, Charles Weston 
FoRCAN, David Robertson 
FoRGAN, James Berwick 
Forsyth, Robert 
Frankel, Julius 
Freer, Archibald £. 
Fuller, Oliver Franklyn 
Fuller, William Alden 
Gardner, William Alexander 
Gary, John W. 
Glessner, John Jacob 
Goddard, Leroy Albert 
Goodman, William O. 
Goodrich, Horace Atwater 
Green, William Ogden 
Greenlee, Ralph Stebbins 
GuNTHER, Charles Frederick 
GuRLEY, William W. 
Hambleton, Chalkley Jay 
Hamill, Ernest Alfred 
Hamilton, David Gilbert 
Hamilton, Henry Edward 
Hamlin, Frank 
Hardin, Martin D. 
Harris, Albert W, 
Harris, George Bacon 
Harris, Norman Waite 
Haskell, Frederick Tudor 
Healy, Marquette A. 
Hewitt, Charles Morgan 
Heyworth, James O. 
Hibbard, Frank 
Hibbard, William Gold, Jr. 
HiNDE, Thomas Woodnutf 
Hines, Edward 



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Members 

Hitchcock, Annie McClure 
HoLABiRD, William 
HoLDOM, Jesse 
Hopkins, John Patrick 
HuGHiTT, Marvin 
HuLBURD, Charles Henry 
Hunt, Robert Woolston 

[nsull, Samuel 

[sham, George Snow 

SHAM, Ralph 

ONES, Arthur Blayney 

ones, David Bennett 

ONES, Thomas Davies 
Keep, Chauncey 
Keep, Harriet S. 
Kelley, William V. 
Kerfoot, William Dale 
Kimball, Eugene S. 
King, Francis 
Kirk, Walter Radcliffe 
KisER, John W. 
Lathrop, Bryan 
Lawson, Victor Fremont 
Lay, Albert Tracy 
Leicht, Edward Albert 
Lincoln, Robert Todd 
Logan, Frank G. ■ 
Lowe, John W, 
McCoNNELL, Charles Henry 
McCoRMicK, Harold Fowler 
McCoRMicK, Stanley 
McCrea, Willey S. 
McIlvaine, William Dickson 
McKinlock, George Alexander 
McMuLLiN, Frank Roswell 
Madlener, Albert F. 



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Members 



Manierre, George 
Mark, Clayton 
Mason, Julian Starkweather 
Mayer, Levy 
Merryweatuer, George 
Miller, John Stocker 
Mitchell, John James 
MoHR, Louis 
Morris, Seymour 
Morton, Joy 
Morton, Mark 
Munroe, Charles A. 
Newman, Jacob 
Nolan, John Henry 
NoYES, La Verne W. 
Oakley, Horace Sweeney 
Oris, Charles Tillinchast 
Otis, Lucius James 
Paepcke, Herman 
Palmer, Potter, Jr. 
Patten, Henry J. 
Payne, John Barton 
Peabody, Francis Stuyvesant 
Peck, Ferdinand Wythe 
Peck, Kate Tvrrell 
Peterson, Paul Christian 
Pike, Eugene Samuel 
Porter, George French 
Porter, Henry H., Jr. 
QuAN, Henry W. 
Rehm, William Henry 
Reynolds, George M. 
Ripley, Edward Payson 
Rogers, Walter Alexander. 
Rosenfeld, Maurice 
RosENWALD, Julius 



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Members 



Rubens, Harry 
RuNNEiLS, John Sumner 
Russell, Edward Perry 
Ryerson, Edward Larned 
Salisbury, Warren Metcalf 

SCHAFFNER, JoSEPH 

Schmidt, Fred M. 
Schmidt, Richard Ernest 
Schneider, Otto C. 
Scott, Frank Hamline 
Scott, Robert Lindsay 
Seeberger, Louis Augustus 
Seipp, Philip Walter 
Shaffer, John C. 
Shortall, John Louis 
Simpson, James 
Smith, Anna Rice 
Smith, Delavan 
Smith, Frederick Augustus 
Smith, Orson 
Smith, Solomon A. 
Spoor, John Alden 
Sprague, Albert Arnold 
Sprague Albert Arnold, 2nd 
Stewart, Pritchard 
Stone, James Samuel 
Sunny, Bernard Edward 
Swift, Edward F. 
Thorne, Charles Hallett 
TuTTLE, Frederick Bulkley 
Wacker, Charles Henry 
Walker, Elia Marsh 
Walker, Henry H. 
Walker, James Ransom 
Walker, William Bentley 
Warner, Ezra J, 



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Members 



Watkins, Elias Marvin 
Wegg, David Spencer 
Wells, Frederick Latimer 
West, Anna Sheldon Ocden 
White, A. Stamford 
Willing, Mark Skinner 
WiLMARTH, Mary Jane Hawes 
Wilson, John P. 
Wilson, John P., Jr. 
WiNCHELL, B. L. 

Wolf, Henry Milton 
Wolff, Harold Witte 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Adams, Charles Francis 
Dent, Thomas 
James, Edmund Janes 
Jameson, John Franklin 
Roosevelt, Theodore 
White, Horace 

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS 

Alvord, Clarence Walworth 
Anderson, Henry C. L. 
Appleton, Edward Dale 
Atkinson, Eleanor 
Barton, Edmund Mills 
Baskin, Oliver Lawrence 
Beaubien, Frank Gordon 
Beer, William 
Beers, John Hobart 
Blanchard, Mrs. Rufus 
Bond, Charles Frederick 
Bond, Shadrach Cuthbert 



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Members 



Bond, Thomas William 

BouRLAND, Benjamin Langford Todd 

Brennan, Edward Paul 

Brennan, George Albert 

Brown, Edward Osgood 

Bruwaert, Edmond 

Burke, John Crysostom 

Burnham, John Howard 

Burton, Clarence Monroe 

Bushnell, David Ives 

Carr, Clark Ezra 

Chapman, Arms Spafard 

Chapman, Charles C. 

Chapman, Frank M. 

Clinton, John Waterbury 

Colbert, Elias 

Cole, Harry Ellsworth 

Cook, Frederick Francis 

Cook, Minnie Gathright 

Corthell, Eva Spaulding 

Cox, Isaac Joslin 

Crane, Frank W- 

CURREY, JoSIAH SeYMOUR 

DeWolf, Edward P, 
Doughty, Arthur G. 
Douglas, Walter Bond 
Dunn, Jacob Piatt 
DuTTON, Marshall Martin 
Earle, Clarence Arthur 
Eastman, Francis Ambrose 
Fertig, James Walter 
Franklin, Marian Scott 
Gardiner, Asa Bird 
Gordon, Eleanor Kinzie 
GossELiN, Am£d£e £. 
Greeley, Samuel Sewell 



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Members 



Green, Samuel Abbott 
Greene, Evarts Boutell 
Greenlaw, William P. 
Grover, Frank Reed 
Harden, William 
Hart, William Octave 
Hayes, Harriet Hayden 
Higinbotham, Harlow Niles 
Hubbard, Elijah Kent 
Hull, Horace 
James, James Alton 
Johnson, Martha Heald 
Jones, Arthur Edwards 
Kelton, Dwight H. 
Kerfoot, Alice G. 
Kinney, Henry Clay 
KoEHNE, William Louis 

KOHLSAAT, HeRMAK HeNRY 

LeBeau, Emily Beaubien 

Leonard, Edward Francke 

Lewis, Benjamin F. 

Long, John Turner 

McClurg, Gilbert 

McClurg, Virginia Donaghe 

McCoRD, David Ross 

Martin, Joseph Stanley 

Meese, William Augustus 

Menard, Peter Abijah 

Mills, William C. 

Mitchell, William Arthur Right 

Oakleaf, Joseph B, 

Onahan, William James 

CySHAUGHNESSY, ThOMAS A. 

Ottofy, Frances Heald 
Page, Walter Hines 
Paine, Clarence Sumner 



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Members 



Petitclere, Emma L. 
Phillimore, William P. W. 
Prentiss, Mildred Jenkins 
Putnam, Elizabeth Duncan 
QuAiFE, MiLo Milton 
Radebauch, William 
Reed, Charles Bert 
Scharf, Albert Frederick 
ScHUPP, Philip C. 
Smith, Perry Hiram, Jr. 
Smith, Valentine 
Sparks, Edwin Erle 
Spencer, Roswell T. 
Starr, Frederick 
Stevens, Frank Everett 
Steward, John Fletcher 
Stewart, Judd 
Swearingen, James Strode 
Thacher, Edward Strode 
Upton, George Putnam 
Van Name, Addison 
Wait, Horatio Loomis 
Watson, Eliza Lucretia Bond 
Wells, Albert Emory 
Whistler, Garland Nelson 
Wood, James Whistler 



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AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

Whereas, it is conducive to the public good of a State 
to encourage such institutions as have for their ob- 
ject to collect and preserve the memonals of its found- 
ers and benefactors, as well as the historical evidences 
of its progress in settlement and population, and in 
the arts, improvements, and institutions which dis- 
tinguish a civilized community, and to transmit the 
same for the instruction and benefit of future gener- 
ations: 
Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State 
of Illinois, represented in the General Assembly, That William 
H. Brown, William B. Ogden, J. Young Scammon, Mason 
Brayman, Mark Skinner, Geo. Manierre, John H. Kinzie, 
J. V. Z. Blaney, E. I. Tinkham, J. D. Webster, W. A. Small- 
wood, V. H. Higgins, N. S. Davis, Charles H. Ray, S. D. 
Ward, M. D. Ogden, F. Scammon, E. B. McCagg, and 
William Barry, all of the City of Chicago, who have asso- 
ciated for the purpose aforesaid, be and are hereby formed 
into and constituted a body politic and corporate, by the 
name of the "Chicago Historical Society," and that 
they and their successors, and such others as shall be legally 
elected by them as their associates, shall be and continue 
a body politic and corporate, by that name, forever. 

Sec. 2, Said Society shall have power to elect a Presi- 
dent, and all necessary officers, and snail have one common 
seal, and the same may break, change and renew at pleasure; 
and, as a body pohtic and corporate, by the name aforesaid, 
may sue and be sued, and prosecute and defend suits, both 
in law and equity, to final judgment and execution. 

Sec. 3. The said Society shall have power to make 
all orders and by-laws for governing its members and 
property, not repugnant to the laws of this State; and 
may expel, disfranchise, or suspend any member, who, 
by his misconduct, shall be rendered unworthy, or who 
shall neglect or refuse to observe the rules and by-laws 
of this Society. 



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Sec. 4, The said Society may, from time to time, 
establish rules for electing officers and members, and also 
times and places for holding meetings; and is hereby em- 
powered to take and hold real or personal estate, by gift, 
grant, devise, or purchase, or otherwise, and the same, or 
any part thereof, to alien and convey. 

Sec. 5. The said Society shall have power to elect 
corresponding and honorary members thereof, in the va- 
rious parts of this State and of the several United States, 
and also in foreign countries, at their discretion: Provided, 
however, that tne number of resident members of said 
Society shall never exceed sixty; and William H, Brown, 
or any other person named in this act, is hereby authorized 
and empowered to notify and call together the first meeting 
of said Society; and the same Society, when met, shall agree 
upon a method for calling further meetings, and may have 
power to adjourn from time to time, as may be found 
necessary. 

Sec. 6. Members of the Legislature of this State, in 
either branch, and Judges of the Supreme Court, and offi- 
cers of State, shall and may have free access to said Society's 
library and cabinet. 

Sec. 7. This act shall take eifect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

Approved, February 7, 1857. 



Whereas, it is a duty to past and coming generations, 
for the honor of the State, and benefits of its citizens, 
to collect, preserve and diffuse the materials of its 
early history, the memorials of its founders and bene- 
factors, and the evidences of its progress in industry, 
arts and all the elements of an enlightened civilization; 
and whereas the Chicago Historical Society, acting 
under chartered powers from this State, has for several 
years past been actively and successfully engaged in 
prosecuting these laudable objects, and formed exten- 
sive collections of books, newspapers, pamphlets and 
manuscripts, relating to our State and National History, 
and now numbering over 30,000 volumes, besides 



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Charter 21 

establishing relations of exchange with the principal 
insUtudons of this and foreign countries — for the 
encouragement of the said Society, 
Section 1. Be it enacud by the People of the State of 
Illinois, represented in the General Assembly, That the 
Secretary of State be authorized and is directed, upon the 
written ortfer of the President or Secretary of the Chicago 
Historical Society, under the legal seal thereof, to deliver 
to the said Society iifty copies of all and each of the public 
documents (bound or unbound), books, pamphlets, charts 
or other publications by the State, as the same shall be 
hereafter printed, from year to year, or from time to time, 
and also such numbers of copies of documents which are 
now or may have been printed, as may b» contributed to 
said Society, without detriment to the public interests; 
Provided, that the documents herein granted shall be used 
by the said Society for the sole purpose of preservation in 
its hbrary, or of exchange with other States and institutions, 
or with individuals for publications of importance and value 
to the people of this State; but in no case to be sold for 
money; Provided, that the said Society shall make affidavit) 
through its President or Secretary, to the Governor of the 
State, at or before each biennial session of the General 
Assembly, that a sum not less than five hundred dollars 
has been raised and expended in and for the business and 
management of said Society in and during the two years 
preceding; and, at the same time, submit therewith a report 
of the meetings and transactions of said Society for the 
same period for the information of the people of this State. 
Sec. 2. This act shall be in force from and after its 
passage. 

Approved, February 22, 1861. 

AN act to amend AN ACT ENTITLED 

AN ACT TO incorporate THE CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETy, 

APPROVED FEBRUARY 7, 1857 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the People ^ the Stale 
of Illinois, represented in the General Assembly, That section 
five (5) of the act, to which this is an amendment, be so 
amended that said Society shall have power to increase 
the number of its resident members, from time to time, 
to any number that shall by it be deemed expedient. 



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33 Charter 

Sec. 2. The s>iid Society shall have power to borrow 
money and mortg:ige its real estate to secure the same, to 
an amount not exceeding twenty thousand dolUrs, to be 
used in completing and paying for the buildings now in 
process of erection on the real estate of said Society. And 
the real estate and property of said Society shall be exempt 
from taxation. ' 

Sec, 3. This act shall take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

Approved, January so, 1867. 



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CONSTITUTION 



Amended, January 16, 18S3 
Revised, November 21, 1893 
Amended, November 2^ 1906 
Amended, November 21, 1911 



ARTICLE I 
NAME AND OBJECTS 

This Society shall be called the Chicago Historical 
Society. 

Its object shall be to institute and encourage historical 
inquiry, to collect and preserve the materials of history, 
and to spread historical information, especially concerning 
the Nortnwestem States. 

ARTICLE II 

MEMBERSHIP 

Section \. This Society shall be composed of Hon- 
orary Life, Life, Annual, Honorary, and Corresponding 
members, all of whom shall be elected by ballot of the 
Executive Committee, unless by unanimous consent they 
shall be elected by a tiwa-voce vote cast at a regular meet- 
ing by twelve legally qualified voters. Two adverse bal- 
lots of the Executive Committee shall reject a candidate. 

Sec. 2. The dues for membership shall be as follows: 
For Life-Membership, five hundred dollars payable in 
money, or by services rendered or donations made, and 
publicly declared by resolution of the Executive Committee 
to exceed that amount in value to the Society: and for 
Annual Membership, tvfenty-five dollars per annum, the 
dues for the first fiscal year being payable within one month 
after election to membership and notice of such election; 
provided, that when such election shall occur after January 
first, the dues for the balance of said fiscal year shall be for 



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Constitution 



the proportionate part of the twenty-five dollars, and pay- 
able within thirty days after such election and notice. 

Annual members, when of the age of seventy years 
or upwards, completing or having completed the payment 
of not less than ten annual dues will be excused from further 
payment of annual du^s. 

. Persons who have heretofore made, or shall hereafter 
make, voluntary contribution of one thousand dollars or 
more to the Society's funds, oi donations publicly declared 
by resolution of the Executive Committee to be of that 
value to the Society's collections, may be elected Honorary 
Life Members, upon recommendation of the Executive 
Committee. 

The President and Secretary shall issue a Diploma, 
under seal of the Society, and certif)^ng the class of mem- 
bership, to each member elected, upon payment of the dues. 

Sec. 3. The right to hold office and vote, and to take 
any part in the proceedings of the Society, shall be accorded 
to and may be exercised only by the members of the three 
classes first hereinbefore named. 

Sec. 4. Before any person be elected a member by 
the Executive Committee such person shall be proposed 
by two members of the Society, and the name of such 
proposed member and the proposers shall have been posted 
for at least two weeks, 

ARTICLE III 

OFFICERS 

Section 1. The officers of the Society shall consist 
of a President, First and Second Vice-Presidents, and an 
Executive Committee of eight other members, all of which 
aforenamed shall be members of the Society, and also a 
Treasurer, Secretary, and Librarian. The President and 
Vice-President shall be ex-officiis members of the Execuuve 
Committee. 

Sec. 2. The President and Vice-Presidents shall be 
elected by ballot at the annual meetings for one year, and 
shall respectively remain in office until the election of their 
successors. 

They shall perform such duties as are common to such 
officers or as may be prescribed in the By-Laws. Vacancies 
occuring from any cause in any of these offices may be 



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Constitution ' 25 



filled bj^ ballot at any special meeting, notice of such election 
being given in the notice of such meeting. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee shall be chosen 
by ballot at the annual meetings, two members of which 
shall, from the time of the first election hereunder, hold 
their office until the next annual election of officers; two of 
them until the second such election; two of them until the 
third such election; and two of them until the fourth such 
election. The terms for which the first members so chosen 
at the first election shall hold their office, shall be deter- 
mined by lot immediately after such election. 

Sec. 4. At each annual meeting thereafter there shall 
be elected by ballot two persons to fill the places vacant 
by the expiration of the term of those heretofore elected as 
members of the Executive Committee, and of those who 
shall hereafter be elected such members. 

On the expiration of the term of any of the members 
of said committee, their successors shall be elected by ballot 
for the term of four years. 

Vacancies in the Executive Committee during an un- 
eimired term, caused by death, resignation, removal from 
omce, or inability to act, ma^ be filled by a majority of 
the remaining members of said committee, until the suc- 
ceeding annual election, at which time such vacancies shall 
be filled for the unexpired term in the same manner as 
members of said committee are elected for the full term of 
their office. 

Sec. 5. The Executive Committee, constituted above, 
shall alone hold, manage, administer, and control all the 
money, property, effects, and affairs of the Society: and 
said committee may appoint a Treasurer, a Librarian, a 
Secretary, and such assistants and employes in the service 
of the Society as to said committee may seem fit; and may 
prescribe the duties and fix the compensation of such officers, 
assistants, and employes; and said committee may make 
investments of the Society's funds, provided that no fund 
bequeathed to or held by the Society for a specific purpose 
shall be appropriated to or used for any other purpose, and 
provided further that said committee shall not incur any 
liability on the part of said Society in any one year which 
shall exceed its annual income; and it shall be the duty of 
said committee to make an annual report to the Society 
of all its acts and doings. 



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26 By-Laws 

ARTICLE IV 

MEETINGS 

Section 1. The annual meeting for the election of 
officers and the transaction of other business relating to 
the affairs of the Society shall be held on the third Tues- 
day of November in each year, and the fiscal year of the 
Society shall be^in with the first day of November in each 
year and end with the thirty-first day of the following Oc- 
tober. 

Sec. 2. The regular meetings shall be held at such 
times and conductea in such manner as shall be prescribed 
in the By-Laws and directed by the Executive Committee, 
provided no such regular meeting shall occur at the same 
time with the annual meeting. 

Sec. 3. At the annual meetings not less than twelve 
members having the right to vote, and at the special business 
meetings not less than seven such members shall constitute 
a quorum. 

Sec. 4. Special meetings and special business meet- 
ings may be called by the President, or, in case of his absence, 
by one of the Vice-Presidents, of which due notice shall be 
given at least two days beforehand. 

ARTICLE V 

AMENDMENTS 

This Constitution may be altered or amended by a 
two-third vote at an^ annual or special meeting; provided 
that a printed or wntten copy of the proposed alterations 
or amendments shall have accompanied the notice of the 
meeting at which thev shall be acted upon; and provided 
further that not less tnan twelve members having the right 
to vote shall be present when such vote is taken. 

BY-LAWS 

DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

Art. I. Section 1. The President shall preside at all 
meetings of the Society and of the Executive Committee, 
and call such special meetings and special business meetings 
as he may deem necessary, or as lie may, in writing, be 
requested to call by five members of the Society. 

Sec. 2, The Vice-Presidents in the order of their 
seniority, shall perform the duties of the President in the 



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By-Laws 27 

case of the absence of the President from the meetings of 
the Society or from Chicago. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee may adopt such 
rules for their own action not in conflict with the Constitu- 
tion and By-Laws of the Society, as they may find most con- 
venient and necessary. 

MEETINGS 

Art. II. Section 1. The regular meetings of the 
Society shall be held on the third Tuesday of each of the 
following named months, to-wit: January, April, and 
October. 

Sec. 2. The annual meeting shall be held on the third 
Tuesday of November, the precise hour in the case of this 
and all other meetings of the Society being designated by 
the President and stated in the notice of the meetmg. 

Sec. 3. The exercises of the regular and special meetings 
of the Society shall be under the direction of the Executive 
Committee, and in general conformity with the objects of 
the Society. 

Sec. 4. The order of business at the special business 
meetings of the Society shall be as follows: 

1. Reading the minutes of the next preceding business 

meeting. 

2. Reports of Officers. 

3. Reports of Committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Deferred business. 

6. New business. 

Sec. S. The order of business at the annual meet- 
ing of the Society shall be as follows: 

1. Reading the minutes of the next preceding meet- 

ing. 

2. Reports of Officers. 

3. Reports of Committees and Trustees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Election of Officers. 

6. Deferred business. 

7. New business. 

MEMBERSHIP 

Art. III. Section 1. The dues of the annual mem- 
bers of the Society shall be payable annually in advance 
on the third Tuesday of November in each year. 



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38 By-Laws 

Sec. 2. Should the dues of any member remain unpaid 
for the space of one month, the Executive Oimmittee shall 
notify him in writing, that unless his dues are paid within 
one month from the date of such notice his membership 
shall cease, and unless such dues are paid pursuant to such 
notice, or such default is accounted for to the satisfaction 
of the Executive Committee, such person shall thereupon 
cease to be a member of the Society. 

SUSPENSION AND AMENDMENTS 

Art. IV, The By-Laws in whole or in part may be 
suspended during any special business or annual meeting, 
by vote of a majority of the members present at any such 
meeting. The By-Laws may be amended on the same 
conditions prescribed for amending the Constitution. 



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REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 
November 17, 1914 

The fifty-eighth annual meeting of the Chicago His- 
torical Society was held in the Gilpin LihraiQ' of the building 
of the Society, 632 North Dearborn Street, Tuesday evening, 
November 17, 1914. 

The first article of the Constitution of the Society, the 
guide of the Society for its conduct for fifty-eight years, 
has been especially studied during the past few years, not 
with the motive of departing from time honored work, but 
on account of the necessity, imposed by the prc^ressive 
spirit of the times, to increase the Society's service to the 
community by the addition of some new activity or by 
changing existing conditions to give better facilities for the 
carrying on of the present work. The article reads as 
follows : 

"Its Object Shall be to Institute and Encourage 
Historical Inquiry, to Collect and Preserve the 
Materials of History, and to Spread Historical 
Information, Especially Concerning the North- 
western States." 

The reputation of our library facilities for purposes of 
local historical research, and of our bureau for local histori- 
cal information, is now so thoroughly established among 
lay and student workers that it is gratifying to note that 
the past year has shown increasing use of these facilities. 

The museum has continued to exert its attractions in 
the usual way and has been supplemented by two special 
exhibitions of exceptional interest. 

For some weeks the exhibition of pictures, books, var- 
ious materials, historical and otherwise, relative to Liberia 
attracted hundreds of visitors. This has been stated author- 
itativelj^ to have been the first large exhibition on Liberian 
civilization and progress ever held in this country. 

Following this a loan exhibition of archaeological objects 
embracing stone implements from the Chicago area and 
Europe, in all stages of their making, elicited great attention. 



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30 Report of Annual Meeting 

Indian Archaeology always attracts an audience, and 
hence it is strikingly noticeable that a city, within whose 
confines and near suburbs arrow heads, chippings, and 
pottery fragments can everywhere be picked up, should be 
without regular facilities for acquiring information on this 
subject by actual demonstration and handling of these 
aboriginal implements of agriculture, of hunting, and of war. 
This collection is still on display at the time of this meeting 
and we beg to call our readers' attention to a full account 
of these exhibits, with the lectures accompanying them, in 
the Librarian's Report. 

The Children's Lecture Course on Illinois and Chicago 
History on Saturday afternoons is now attended to the 
full capacity of Crerar Hall. 

The overcrowding of the building, particularly its 
Library department, demanded some relief, as the actual 
working library with its necessarily increasing accessions 
was becoming seriously hampered. 

The growth of the present library by donations, dating 
from the time of the Chicago Fire, readdy accounts for the 
accumulation of books not at all germane to an historical 
collection. To these early gifts were added books of all 
kinds, thus forming a nucleus for an historical book collection 
on liberal lines at a time when, with the exception of the 
Public Library, there were no other large libraries in our 
city. But when the creation of other large libraries of a 
general character made our general collection no longer 
necessary, the limitation of material to the Old Northwest 
was begun. Although this specialization began many 
years before the erection of the present building no attempt 
to separate completely the older collections was attempted. 
This was accomplished, however, during the months of the 
summer and fall with the great advantage of freeing much 
shelving space so that already the library's physical condi- 
tion has been markedly improved. In fact the building 
has been practically enlarged thereby. 

The history-loving public has always experienced diffi- 
culty in learning of the publications of historical societies, 
these publications not being in the regular book market 
and consequently not regularly advertised and handled by 
bookdealers. The Chicago Historical Society has long 
felt that its publications could not find their larger usefulness 
if confined to the libraries of its members and those friends 



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Report of Annual Meeting 



who by accident or inquiir would hear of them. There 
was no method by whicn the Society could keep its publi- 
cations before the public without the establishment of a 
special department for advertising and sale at an expense 
much in excess of any return. Such a plan could not be 
entertained. 

Through the courtesy of the University of Chica^ a sat- 
isfactory agreement between its Press and the Society was 
made. Thereby the Press of the University of Chicago has 
become the publisher of the pamphlets and books of the 
Chicago Historical Society and agrees to regularly advertise 
all these publications and to handle them as it does the 
University publications. The working of the contract for 
only a few months has demonstrated a greater sale of our 
publications than formerly. 

The Society has always found generous friends during 
its upbuilding and it feels confident that old and new sup- 
porters will liberally aid in its future course. A Study of 
the financial report will show that the Society's property 
is wholly unencumbered by debt, and that its means are 
sufficient to keep its doors open, but that further financial 
aid must be secured to carry on the larger requirements of 
the present times. The kindly interest and support of all 
our friends is solicited. 

On account of the unavoidable absence of President 
Burley and First Vice-President Conover, the meeting was 
called to order by the Second Vice-President, Dr. Schmidt. 

The Secretary of the Society, Mr. Seymour Morris, 
announced that a quorum was present. 

There were in attendance: William Boldenweck, 
William H. Bush, Rt. Rev. Charles Edward Cheney, 
Eugene H. Fishburn, Lucius G. Fisher, Julius Frankel, 
C. F. Gunther, Frank Hamlin, Ralph Isham, John W. 
Lowe, Seymour Morris, H. J. Patten, Paul C. Peter- 
son, Edward L. Ryerson, Frederick M. Schmidt, Otto 
L. Schmidt, Richard E. Schmidt, Hon. Frederick 
A. Smith, H. H. Walker, and the Librarian. 

It was moved by Mr. Isham that the minutes of the last 
annual meeting as printed in the Yearbook be approved and 
their reading be dispensed with. The motion was seconded 
and carried. 

The Secretary then presented the Executive Commit- 
tee's Report as follows: 



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REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE 

For the Fiscal Year Ekding October 31, 1914 

7*0 the Members of the Chicago Historical Society: 

Gentlemen: — ^The Executive Committee, in conformity 
with the Society's Constitution, has the honor to submit its 
Annual Report as follows: 

FUNDS 

The Chicago Historical Society's Funds consist of the 
Generiil Fund, representing the membership dues, gifts of 
friends and some small sums obtained by the sale of its pub- 
lications, and the Special Funds, thirteen in number, of 
which eleven were created through bequests by generous 
testators who valued the future and the mission of the 
Society. 

The General Fund is used for the maintenance of the 
Society's building, the care of its collections, the manage- 
ment of its ordinary business, lectures, exhibitions and so 
forth. 

The Special Funds are used according to the specifica- 
tions of gift, mainly for the purchase of books, bookbinding, 
and the printing of the Society's publications. Although the 
income from these various sources is managed with scrupu- 
lous economy, only the necessary business can be done at 
times in order that the savings of one period may allow a 
greater undertaking at another time. 

The Henry D. Gilpin Fund ($70,000.00— j« Report 
of Henry D, Gilpin Trustees) is under the exclusive care 
and management of trustees appointed under the will of 
Henry D. Gilpin. The income from this fund, as paid to 
the Society by said trustees, is applied entirely to the main- 
tenance of the Gilpin Library. The present trustees are 
Eugene H. Fishburn, Clarence A. Burley and William 
0, Green, and the President and First Vice-President of 
the Society, ex officiis. A full statement of the fund is 

33 



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Report of Executive Committee 



given in the report of these trustees, presented herewith on 
page 39. 

The Jonathan Burr Fund consists of a legacy of $2,000 
from the late Jonathan Burr, the income to be used in pay- 
ment of printmK the Society's publications. It is invested 
in a cottage and twenty-one lots in the Town of Calumet, 
acquired in settlement of a note secured by trust deed on 
said lots. The account stands as follows: 
Received rent on Trowbridge cottage. . . . $58.87 
Paid into General Fund on account of 

taxes and printing $58.87 



The Philo Carpenter Fund consists of a legacy of 
$1,000 from the late Philo Carpenter, the income to be de- 
voted to binding books and periodicals. The account stands 
as follows: 
Available balance on hand, Oct. 31, 1913. $100.00 

Received interest on bond 50.00 

Paid for binding $150.00 

$150.00 $150.00 

The Marshall Field Fund consists of $10,000, being 
the proceeds of the sale to the United States Government 
for the Library of Congress, of the eleven volumes of papers 
of President James Madison, which were purchased by 
Mr. Edward G. Mason in 1893 for the Society, with funds 
donated for that purpose by Mr. Marshall Field. By 
resolution of the Executive Committee it was voted that 
this fund should remain intact and the income therefrom 
be used toward defraying the expenses of editing, printing 
and distributing the Society's publications. 

The account of this fund stands as follows: 
Available balance on hand Oct. 31, 1913 $610.61 

Received interest on bond 400.00 

To publishing Reed's Masters of the 

Wilderness $553.75 

To publishing White's Lincoln and 

Douglas Debates 168.50 

Available balance on hand Oct 31, 1914 288.36 



$1,010.61 $1,010.61 



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The T. Mauro Garrett Fund consists of 11,000 be- 
queathed to the Society by the late T. Mauro Garrett. The 
t stands as follows: 



Received interest on bond $50.00 

Paid into General Fund $50.00 



The Huntington Wolcott Jackson Fund is a bequest 
of $1,000 from the late HuntitiKton W. Jackson, the income 
to be used in the purchase of hooks. The following state- 
ment shows the condition the fund: 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1913 $ 36.68 

Certificate of deposit 131.50 

Received interest on bond 50.00 

Received interest on certificate of deposit. 5.92 

Paid for books $ 50.00 

Certificate of deposit 131.50 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1914 42.60 



$224.10 $224.10 



The Polk Diary Fund of $3,500 was created out of the 
proceeds of the sale to the United States Government for 
the Library of Congress, of the twenty-four volumes of the 
diary and the letters and papers of President James K. Polk 
purchased by the Society in 1901 with funds collected for 
that purpose. By order of the Executive Committee it has 
been set aside, the income to be used for defraying the 
expenses of editing, publishing and distributing the So- 
ciety's publications, provided that such money as shall be 
necessary may be advanced towards the expenses of the pub- 
lication of the Polk Diary, such advances to be repaid into 
the fund as promptly as possible out of the proceeds and 
profits of sales of said Diary. This fund will increase in 
proportion to the sale of the James K. Polk Diary, pub- 
lished by the Society. A standard publication of this char- 
acter is assured of a constant although slow demand and 
will in the course of a few years replenish the fund. It 
is a matter of satisfaction that the fund enabled the So- 
ciety to give to the public this remarkable Diary in printed 
form, the four volumes of which were sent to every regular 
member of the Society in 1910. The sum now realized on 
the fund is $1,644.83. 



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36 Report of Executive Committee 

The Lucretia Pond Fund, being the proceeds of a 
bequest of real estate to the Society by Lucretia Pond, con- 
sists of a principal of $13,500, the income to be used in the 
purchase of books, pamphlets and documents or pictures 
and paintings of historical interest. The account of this 
fund stands as follows: 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1913 $ 80.84 

Certificate of deposit 1,100.00 

Received interest on bonds. 640.00 

Received interest on certificate of 

deposit 59.95 

Received balance of Librarian's Con- 
tingent Fund 12.25 

Paid for books, manuscripts and period- 
icals I 466.74 

Paid for one five per cent bond " 1,000.00 

Certificate of deposit 426.30 



«1 ,893.04 $1,893.04 

The William C. Seipp Fund consists of a legacy of 
$5,000.00 bequeathed to the Society by the late William C. 
Seipp. As no special disposition for this bequest had been 
made by the donor, the Executive Committee according to 
its established rule created a permanent fund to be known 
as The William C. Seipp Fund, proceeds of which are to be 
apphed to the general expenses of the Society. Unassigned 
bequests are much appreciated, for the general operative 
expenses, including those of the care and the improvement 
of the building, as well as freq^uent special undertakings of 
the Society, not provided for m the endowment funds for 
books, printing, etc., are paid from the General Expense 
Fund. The account of this fund stands as follows: 

Received interest on bonds $250.00 

Paid into General Fund $250.00 



The Elizabeth Hammond Stickney Fund consists of 
$6,650.00. Of this sum five thousand dollars was bequeathed 
to the Society by the late Mrs. Elizabeth Hammond 
Stickney, as a memorial to her husband, Mr. Edward 
Swan Stickney, the income to be used in maintaining the 
Stickney Library and making additions thereto. The nucleus 



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Funds 37 

of this library was the private library of Mr. Stickney, 
also bequeathed to the Society by Mrs. Stickney, On ac- 
count of the larger number of these books being on art, 
travel, philosophy and other subjects not allied to the work 
of the Society, Mrs. Cyrus H, McCormick generously ar- 
ranged, with all legal formality, a purchase of these books, 
with the express purpose of thereby increasing the principal 
of the fund and thus adding to its usefulness to the Society. 
The account of this fund stands as follows: 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1913 $ 154.09 

Certificate of deposit 1,100.00 

Received interest on bonds 260.00 

Received interest on certificate of deposit 59.61 

Paid for books $ 60.00 

Paid for cataloguer's services 15.00 

Paid for one five per cent bond 1,011.10 

Certificate of deposit 487.60 

$1,573.70 $1,573.70 

The Lucretia J. Tilton Fund consists of $3,000, be- 
queathed to the Society by the late Lucretia Jane Tilton, as 
a memorial to her husband, Lucian J. Tilton. The account 
stands as follows: 

Received interest on bonds $150.00 

Paid into General Fund $150.00 



The Elias T. Watkins Fund consists of $5,000 be- 
queathed to the Society by the late Elias T. Watkins. The 
t stands as follows: 



Received interest on bonds $250.00 

Paid into General Fund $250.00 



The Henry J. Willing Fund consists of $2,500 be- 
queathed to the Society by the late Henry Jenkens Willing. 
The following account shows the condition of this fund: 

Received interest on bonds $110.00 

Paid into General Fund $110.00 



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Report of Executive Committee 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSE- 
MENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
OCTOBER 31, 1914 



Balince on hand November 1, 1913 

Dues from aonual memben (5,514.08 

Bequests and donatioDs 1,022^ 

Interest and other sources 271.72 

Jonathan Burr Fund 58.87 

Philo Carpenter Fund 50.00 

Marshall Field Fund 400.00 

T. Mauro Garrett Fund 50.00 

Henry D. Gilpin Fund 2,322.03 

Huntinetoa W. Jackson Fund 55.92 

Polk Diary Fund 1,001.03 

Polk Diary Fund certificate of deposit 548.50 

Lucretia Pond Fund 712.20 

LucretiaPond Fund certificate of def>osit 1,100.00 

William C. Seipp Fund 250.00 

Elizabeth H. Stickney Fund 319.61 

Elizabeth H. Stickney Fund certificate of deposit. . 1,100.00 

Lucretia J. Tilton Fund 150.00 

Elias T. Watkins Fund 250.00 

Henry J. Willing Fund 110.00 



Binding S 328.30 

Books, manuscripts and periodicals 591.74 

Equipment 535.00 

Fergus historical publications 350.00 

Heating and lighting 537 J2 

Lectures and entertainments 255.50 

Postage 320.22 

Printing 454.58 

Publishing — 

1913 Yearbook 515.65 

Reed's MasUTi of Wilderntss 553.75 

White's Lincoln and Douglai DebaUs 168 JO 

Repairs and betterments 713.35 

Salaries 5,104.39 

Secretary's petty cash expenses 418.85 

General expenses 937.13 

Bonds in Stickney, Polk Diary and Fond Funds. . . 3,511.10 
Certificates of deposit in Stickney, Polk Diary and 

Pond Funds 1/)S8.73 J16,354.31 

Cash on hand October 31, 1914 1,779.72 

$18,134.03 



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BALANCE SHEET 
As AT October 31, 1914 

CiBh *.*" $ 1,779.72 

Cenificates of deposit 1,190.23 

Bonds 52,000.00 

Inventory of Polk Dian- 2^8.35 

Trustees of Henry D. Gilpin Fund 70,000.00 

• Real Estate 227,000.00 



LIABILITIES 

Capital and Surplus: 

General Fund 1226,448.76 

Jonathan Burr Fund 2^)00.00 

Philo Carpenter Fund 1,000.00 

Marshall Field Fund 10,288.36 

T. Mauro Garrett Fund 1,000.00 

Henry D. Gilpin Fund 70,000.00 

Huntington W. Jactson Fund 1,174.10 

Polk Diary Fund 3,883,18 

Lucretia Pond Fund 14,926.30 

William C. Seipp Fund 5,000.00 

Elizabeth H. Stickney Fund 7,987.60 

Lucretia J. Tilton Fund 3,000.00 

Elias T. Watlcins Fund 5,000.00 

Henry J. Willing Fund 2,500.00 



F BALANCE SHEET 



™. 


Cash 


catesoi 
Deposit 


Bomb 


Esutt 


SS; 


TMdi 




H,«8.Te 


'iiaiiso 


iV.ooo 

10,000 

ilooo 
-im 

i,soo 

14,S00 
2.501) 


t22S.00a 

I'm 






PMo CaqKOIet 

ManbaUTiSd 




1' 


s 
i 




iiomM 
■"!;2J8;35t 


10 








William C. Seipp 






so 

00 








Totals 


»I,J'».T2 


$i,ii».23 


tez.ooo 


1227, OOO 


172,238. 3S 


I3H.20S.30 



t Inventory of Pollc Diary. 



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Report of Executive Committee 



RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF THE GILPIN 

FUND OF THE CHICAGO HISTORICAL 

SOCIETY 

November 1, 1913, to October 31, 1914 



Certi6cate« of Deposit on hand Novem- 
ber 1, 1913 J 566.91 

6 months' interest due Jan. 1, 1914, on 
$17,000,3J4% bonds 297 .50 

6 months' interest due Jan. 1, 1914, on 
$52,000, 4% bonds 1,040.00 

6 months' interest due July 1, 1914, on 
$17,000, 3>^% bonds 297.50 

6 months' interest due July 1, 1914, oa 
$52,000, 4% bonds 1,040.00 

$7,000 City of Chicago 4% bonds, ma- 

tuied July 1,1914 7,000.00 

Interest on Certificates of Deposit 53.50 

$10,295.41 



DtSBURSEMBITTS 

Safety Boi rent $ 10.00 

$6,000 City of Chicago 4% bonds, due 

Jan. 1. 1920, @ 99^ 5,970.00 

$1,000 City of Chicago 4% bonds, due 

Jan. 1, 1924, @ 99j^ 995.00 

$1,000 City of Chicago 4% bonds, due 

Jan. 1, 1918, @ 99^ 997.50 

Inictesl one day on above $a,000 bonds .83 



$7,973.38 
Paid Chicago Historical Society: 

Annual appropriation $2,100.00 

Repairing exterior iron work 112.50 

Account bill of $120.45 for wire brush- 
ing and painting same 98,73 

Qeaning high windows 10.80 2,322.03 

$10,295.41 



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STATEMENT OF GILPIN FUND, NOVEMBER 1, 1914 

Chicaso City 3^% bonds, par value (17,000.00 

Chicago City 4% bonds, par value 53,000.00 

Total $70,000.00 

Amount received from Estate of Henry D. Gilpin, deceased. . 64,314.34 

Surplus $5,685.66 

Qiicago, November 1, 1914. 

(Signed) EucENE H. Fishburn, 

(Signed) Clarence A. Burley, lx...«— 

(Signed) Walter L. Fisher, ' """«"■ 

(Signed) William O. Grbeh. 

TREASURER'S REPORT 
For tbe Year Ending October 31, 1914 



180.00 



Balance on hand October 31, 1913 

Deposits by Secretary $7,798.89 

Deposited by Trustees Gilpin Fund 2,322.03 

Interest, City of Chicago bonds 60.00 

Interest, South Side Elevated Ry. Co. bonds." 

Interest, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Ry. Co. 

bonds 200.00 

Interest, Metropolitan Elevated Ry. Co, bonds 40.00 

Interest, Chicago City Ry. Co. bonds 150.00 

Interest, Peoples Gas Light & Coke Co. bonds. . . . 400.00 

Interest, Commonwealth Edison Co. bonds 250.00 

Interest, Commonwealth Electric Co. bonds 400.00 

Interest, City of Mobile bonds 90.00 

Interest, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe bonds 440.00 

Intetest on certificates of deposit 155.37 

Interest bank account 51 .67 

Certificates of deposit 2,748. SO 



Vouchers issued by the Secretary, couDteraigned by 

the President $16,354.31 

Balance on hand October 31, 1914 1,779.72 $18,134.03 

The above balance is made up as follows: 

General fund $1,448-76 

Field fund 288.36 

Jackson fund 42.60 



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Report of Executive Committee 



LIST OF SECURITIES HELD IN SAFE DEPOSIT BOX 
POND ruHD 

Four (4) Alley L bondi, each 11,000.00 $4,000.00 

One (1) Alchison,Topeka&SanMFeR.R.I>ond 500.00 500.00 

Eight (8) Peoples Gis Light & Coke Co. bond*. . 1,000.00 S.OOO.OO 

One (1) Metropolitan El R. R. bond 1,000.00 1,000.00 

One (1) Commonwealth Edison Co. bond 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Certificate of deposit, M. L. U T. Co. . 426.30 426.30 



Five (5) Atchison, Topeka k Santa Fe R. R. 

bonds 1,000,00 5,000.00 

One (1) City of Chicago bond 1,000.00 1,000.00 

One (1) City of Chicago bond 500.00 500.00 

One (1) Chicago TelepVne Company bond.... 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Certificate of deposit, M. L. k T. Co. . 487.60 487.60 



One (1) Commonwealth ElectHc Co. bond 1,000.00 1,000.00 

JACK80N FUND 

One (1) Commonwealth Electric Co. bond 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Cettilicateofdeposit,M. L. &T. Co.. 131,50 131.50 



One (1) Commonwealth Electric Co. I»nd 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Five (5) Commonwealth Electric Co. bonds.... 1,000.00 5,000.00 

LUCRETIA J. TILTON FUND 

Three (3) Chicago City Ry. Co. bonds 1,000.00 3,000.00 



(2) City of Mobile, Alabama, bonds 1,000,00 2,000,00 

(1) Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe R. R. 

bond 500.00 500.00 



Five (5) Atchison, Topeka U Santa Fe R. R. Co. 

■ bonds 1,000.00 5,000.00 

Five (5) Chicago, Burlington ti Quincy Ry. Co. 

Illinois Division bonds 1,000.00 5,000,00 

Five (5) Commonwealth Edison Co. bonds 1,000.00 5,000.00 

One (1) Commonwealth Edison Co. bond 1,000.00 1,000.00 

One (1) Cudahy Packing Co. bond 500,00 500.00 

Certificate of deposit, M. L. & T. Co. . 144.83 144.83 
Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) Giuon Smith, Treasurer. 



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To the Members oj the Chicago Historical Society: 

We hereby certify that we have examined the accounts 
of the Chicago Historical Society and of Orson Smith, its 
Treasurer, for the year ending October 31, 1914, the vou- 
chers for every disbursement, and the securities in the 
custody of the Treasurer, and that we find the same correct 
and as reported. 

C. F. GUNTHER, 

Orro L, Schmidt, 

Auditing Committee. 



DONATIONS 

The constant additions to the Society's collet 
dicate that the work the Society is doing is being increas- 
ingly appreciated by its members and by friends both in 
and outside of Chicago. In the Librarian's Report will be 
found a classified list of gifts to the Society's Library and 
Museum, and a tabulated List of Donors appears at the end 
of this volume. The following have made donations of 
money : 

Elizabeth Skinner « 25.00 

Frederika Skinner 25.00 

Seymour Morris, for Accession Clerk 60.00 

LaVeme W. Noyes, for painting 150.00 

C. A. Burley, O. L. Schmidt, C.li. Conover, each 

$50 for display case 150.00 

B. Allen, C. F. Gunther, F. G. Logan, H. J. Pat- 
ten, O. L. Schmidt, each $10 for Ellsworth 

picture 50.00 

Charles H, Conover, for advertising Polk Diary. 37.80 
O. L. Schmidt, for services of extra man for 

collating books 282 . 50 

Estate of General Newberry 300.00 



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Report of Executive Committee 



MEMBERSHIP 

While the Executive Committee feel keenly the need of 
a larger membership they acknowledge with gratitude the 
fidelity and interest of the present members who are carry- 
ing on its affairs, and whose efforts have made possible its 
present attainments. 

During the fiscal year there have been added to the 
Society's roll five Annual and two Corresponding Members, 
as follows: 



annual members 

Arnold, Katharine D. 
Crane, Richard T. III. 
Dee, Thomas J, 
Drake, Helen Vernera 
HiNDE, Thomas Woodnutt 
Paepcke, Herman 



corresponding members 



QuAiFE, MiLO Milton 
Spencer, Roswell T. 
Starr, Frederick 

Resignations of seven Annual Members have been 
accepted and three have been dropped for non-payment of 
dues during the year. Two Honorary Life, two Life, six 
Annual, three Honorary and six Corresponding Members 
have died, leaving the summary of the present membership 
as follows: 

Honorary Life Members 11 

Life Members 13 

Annual Members 221 

Honorary Members 6 

Corresponding Members 110 

361 



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Membership 45 



NECROLOGY 

The ever lengthening roll of those n'ho have passed from 
us has been increased during the year by tne eighteen 
following names, and one death had previously occurred, 
advice or which did not reach the Society until recently. 

Barnarj), Frederick 

Barnhart, Kenneth 

Blatchford, Eliphalet Wickes 

Burton, Le Grand Sterling 

Campbell, Charles Bishop 

OiETLAiN, Augustus Louis 

CuLLOM, Shelby Moore 

Deering, William 

Greenebaum, Henry 

Head, Franklin Harvey 

HiLLis, David M. 

McGovERN, Rev. James J. 

Morris, Edward 

MuLLiKEN, Charles Henry 

NicKERsoN, Samuel Mayo 

Peet, Stephen Denison 

Smith, Byron Laflin 

Stevenson, Adlai Ewing 

Wilson, James Grant 

Previously Deceased 
Redmond, Lily Meldrum 

As name after name has to be withdrawn from the rolls 
as members pass away, each leaves a gap even though the 
numerical strength of the Society be kept up. When there 
are descendants, the old names need not disappear and 
therefore members will do well to interest the younger gen- 
eration in the work of the Society as opportunity oners. 
Only in this way can the traditions of the Society be assured 
of being perpetuated. 

In giving as much space as we have to the biographical 
sketches classed under this heading, the thought has been 
that the members of the Chicago Historical Society may be 
considered as representative "makers of history" in Chicago, 
and that the accumulation of biographical data concerning 
them will in time constitute a basis for future historians 
concerning the present generation. 



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46 Report of Executive Committee 

Frederick -Barnard, the Pioneer Law Printer of 
Chicago, died at his home, 424 South Boulevard, Oak Park, 
on the tenth of April, 1914, in his seventy-ninth year. Bom 
of an old English family, in his boyhood in Somerton, Somer- 
setshire, he was a neighbor of Charles Dickens. In 1847 he 
came to Chicago, and as a tad carried papers for The Chicago 
Journal. He had an ambition to become a skilled crafts- 
man at printing, and by 1857 had become a master printer 
and joint proprietor of the printing establishment known b^ 
the nrm name of Beach & Barnard. The year of the Panic 
safely weathered, and a fine business built up, the fire of 
'71 obliterated it, but "before the ashes were cold," it was 
again started on the West Side, and has now for thirty years 
been well known at its present location, 170 North La Salle 
St., the firm name being Barnard & Miller. Legal work was 
their specialty, and Frederick Barnard came into personal 
contact with Abraham Lincoln, David Davis, Leonard Swett, 
Col. Van Arman, Emery Storrs, Judge Arrington, Wirt 
Dexter, and other great attorneys. His own dignified and 
genial personality made him worthy the friendship as well 
as the patronage of such as these. 

One of Mr. Barnard's two sons, Edward, is an attorney, 
and the other, Frederick, a member of the printing firm. 
Three daughters also survive him. The business will be 
carried on without interruption. Extended notices of 
Frederick Barnard are printed in The National Corporation 
ReporUr for April 16, 1914, and in Pvblic Safety, for May 1. 
The Old Time Printers' Association, and the Typothetae, 
of which last he was formerly president, held him in high 
honor, and The Chicago Historical Society, whose official 
printer he was for many years, is proud to record that the 
list of its Active Members was ennched by so honorable a 
name as that of Frederick Barnard. 

Kenneth Barnhart, secretary and treasurer of Mar- 
shall Field & Co., died December 6, 1915, at his Evanston 
home, 202 Greenwood Boulevard. He was a native of 
Streetsville, Ontario, was bom in 1858, educated in London, 
Ontario, and obtained his first business experience in the firm 
of A. R. McMasters & Bro., of Toronto. 

On December 14, 1880, he entered the employ of Field, 
Leiter & Company, and continued without interruption 
with that firm and its successors for nearly thirty-three years. 



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Membership 47 



For more than twenty years he was in charge of the foreign 
department, and for the last ten years has been an officer of 
the company. Only those who know the distinguished 
reputation of this house, at home and abroad, for excellence 
of business methods and high integrity, will appreciate the 
full significance of a fact so easily stated. 

Mr. Bamhart was a member of the Union League, Mid- 
day, and Evanston Country clubs and the Glenview and Old 
Elm Golf clubs. Among his associates, and honorary pall 
bearers at his funeral, were John G. Shedd, Stanley Field, 
James Simpson, Orson Smith, A. D. Jones, Lindsay T. 
Woodcock, Frank W. Porter, and others of Chicago's best 
business men. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Fanny 
M. Bamhart, and a son, Eugene M. Bamhart. Mr. Bam- 
hart had been an Active Member of the Chicago Historical 
Society since 1913. 

Ellfhalet Wickes Blatchford, a man notable for his 
activity in the organization and administration of educational 
and philanthropic enterprises in Chicago, passed away at 
the family residence, 1111 North La Salle Street, on January 
25, 1914, aged eighty-seven years. 

Mr. Blatchford was bom in Stillwater, N. Y., May 31, 
1826. His father. Rev. John Blatchford, a Presbyterian 
minister, came with his family to Chicago and became 
pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, The son, Eliphalet, 
was educated at Illinois College, Jacksonville, graduating in 
the class of 1845. By 1850 he had engaged in the lead and 
oil industry in St. Louis, and in 1854 came to Chicago to 
manage the firm's local office. The original partnership 
having been dissolved, the firm of E. W. Blatchford & Co. 
was organized, and still continues near the site of the first 
office of more than sixty years ago, the Blatchford shot- 
tower being a conspicuous landmark for miles. 

To enumerate all the bodies with which Mr. Blatchford 
was officially connected would exceed the limits of this 
necessarily brief notice. Among the more prominent offices 
held by him was that of treasurer of the Northwestern Branch 
of the United States Sanitary Commission, of which Mark 
Skinner, and later E. B. McCagg, were presidents. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Blatchford labored all through the Civil War 
period for the relief of the soldiers, the latter being one of the 



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Report of Executive Committee 



managers of the great Sanitary Fairs held in Chicago in 
1863 and 1865. 

When Mr. Walter L, Newberry willed to the city a fund 
for the Newberry Library to be established on the North 
Side, Mr. E. W. Blatchford and Judge WilHam H. Bradley 
were the first trustees. They in turn chose the other trustees 
constituting the board, and Mr. Blatchford became president 
of it, continuing in office until his death. Prior to the actual 
collection of books, a task entrusted to Dr. Wm. Frederick 
Poole, Mr. Blatchford had travelled abroad and in this 
countiy informing himself as to library architecture and 
administration. On the formation of the John Crerar Library 
Board in 1891 he became its president also, entering into the 
minutix of the administration of both libraries. 

Among other educatiorial institutions Mr. Blatchford 
was active in the organization of the Chicago Academy of 
Sciences, in 1857, and was later president; he was president 
of the Chicago Manual Training School from its or^nization 
in 1882 until its absorption by the University of Chicago; a 
trustee in Illinois College, Rockford Semmaiy, and the 
Art Institute of Chicago. He was for many years president 
of the Chicago Eye and Ear Infirmary. He became an 
Annual Member of the Chicago Historical Society in 1867, 
and in 1869 was added to the roll of Life Members. 

In his religious affiliadons Mr. Blatchford was president 
of Board of Directors of the Chicago Theological Seminary, 
vice-president of the American Board of Foreign Missions 
of the Congregational Church, one of the originators 
of the Chicago City Missionary Society, the Chicago Con- 
gregational Club, the Bohemian Mission of Chicago, and was 
one of the most prominent members of the New England 
Congregational Church of this city. 

Socially Mr. Blatchford, although a member of the 
Union League, University, Chicago, Literary and Com- 
mercial cluDs, preferred to entertain at his home, which 
stood on the site where it was rebuilt after the Chicago fire, 
and which contained a private library of over five thousand 
volumes,— a well-known center for intellectual activity and 
hospitality. In 1858 he married Mary Emily Williams of 
Chicago. The names of their seven children follow: Paul, 
Mrs. Amy Bliss of Beirut, Syria, Frances May, Edward W., 
Florence, Charles H., and Eliphalet H. Blatchford. 



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Membership 49 



Le Grand Burton, a member of a pioneer Chicago 
family, died June 7, 1914, in Berlin, Germany. He was bom 
in Chicago in 1846. His father. Stiles Button, a native of 
Connecticut, came to Chicago in May, 1836, arriving by 
the Great Lakes route. As a young man Stiles Burton had 
been employed, by a French merchant in Charleston, S. C, 
and later he had engaged in business in Montreal, acquiring 
facility in the French language, which was extended by 
much European travel. His place of business in Chicago, 
at the comer of State and Lake streets, is still in the posses- 
sion of the family, with much other real estate in which he 
invested in the early day. The son, Le Grand Burton, 
like his father proficient in the French language, assisted 
in the organization of the Alliance Frangaise in Chicago, 
became its president, and in 1913 was decorated by the 
French government as a chevalier of the Legion of Honor. 

His membership in the Chicago Historical Society, of 
which his father was a Life Member, dates from 1897. In 
this and in many other organizations, such as the Chicago 
Opera, the Art Institute, the French Theatre, and numerous 
clubs and social circles, his genial personality was familiar 
and always a welcome addition. He is survived by a widow, 
one child, and by his mother, Mrs. Ann Germain Burton,* 
who, past her ninetieth year, still resides at the Congress 
Hotel, together with her daughter, Mrs. Ira Holmes, and a 
grandson, £. Burton Holmes, the lecturer. 

Charles Bishop Campbell, judge of the Twelfth 
Judicial Circuit of Illinois, died in Kankakee, III., April 
1, 1914. Judge Campbell's interest in the French occu- 
pation of Illinois, the French Canadian colonization of the 
eastern part of the state, and especially in the Kankakee 
River trail from Canada to the Illinois country, with the 
special research which he had made in this department of 
history, had led, in 1904, to his acceptance of Corresponding 
Membership in the Chicago Historical Society, where much 
material bearing upon his chosen field is to be found. 

Charies Bishop Campbell was bom in Kankakee County, 
Illinois, March 1, 1869. His father and grandfather were 
soldiers, haying both served in the same regiment of Illinois 
Volunteers in the Civil War. He was educated in part 
in the local schools of the county, in a Methodist seminary 

* Deceued December 28, 1914. 



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50 Report of Executive Committee 

at Onarga, teaching for two years himself, then completing 
two years in De Pauw University and finishing at North- 
western University, where he also took the law course. He 
attended Chicago Law School as well, being in the same 
class with Mr. Leonard A. Busby. Opening a law office 
in Kankakee, Illinois, he hecame widely known, and in 
Tune, 1909, was elected one of the judges of the Twelfth 
Judicial Circuit. 

Mr. A, S. Chapman, of Rockford, 111., who was closely 
associated with him in his official career, writes: "Judge 
Campbell was an exceptional man, a man of the highest 
type of character and of marked ability. At his funeral 
the whole city of Kankakee was in mourning. Perhaps 
this tribute was due not only to his great personal popular- 
ity, but to the feeling of every man of the community that 
should he ever have his day in court he would be assured of 
absolute fairness and justice." 

Maj.-Gen. Augustus Louis Chetlain, a military leader 
during the Civil War and a personal friend of Gen. U. S. 
Grant, died at the residence of his son, Judge Arthur Henry 
Chetlain, in Sheridan Road, on the fifteenth of March, 1914, 
aged ninety years. 

Gen. Chetlain, who was bom Dec. 28, 1S24, in St. Louis, 
was of French Huguenot and Swiss ancestry. Two years 
after his birth his parents removed to Galena, 111. Here, 
as a boy of eight, he had his first taste of war, watching the 
oxen draw logs for a stockade to protect Galena against 
the Indians during the Black Hawk War. 

As a young man he was active in politics and took part 
in the campaign to elect Abraham Lincoln to the Senate. 
He was a friend of Grant's in Galena, and when the news 
that Sumter had been fired upon occasioned the calling 
of a meeting there, Chetlain was the first to enlist. The 
first choice of the company for captain fell upon U. S. 
Grant, but when he declined on the ground that his West 
Point training and previous service as Captain should en- 
title him to a colonelcy Chetlain was chosen at his sug- 
g:stion. The company was ordered to Springfield, and 
rant accompanied it, being appointed clerk in the gov- 
ernment office. He and Captain Chetlain were room- 
mates, and when, in a month or so, the latter was appointed 
lieut. colonel of the 12th Illinois Infantry, while Grant 



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Membership 51 



still remained only a clerk, there was some tendency to 
discouragement and a return to Galena was contemplated. 
His friend prevailed upon him to wait a while longer for 
the desired promotion. Chetlain was himself promoted 
in a short time to the rank of brigadier general. 

Among important commands which he held, was first 
that at Paducah, following his regiment's service at Cairo; 
at Smithland, in 1862; at Donelson, and at Shiloh, with 
the Twelfth; at Corinth, which latter city he commanded 
after the battle; and at Memphis, from Jan. to October, 

1865. He was mustered out at Talledega, Ala., Jan. 15, 

1866, with the rank of brevet major general. 

Until 1869 he served as assistant United States col- 
lector of revenues for Utah and Wyoming, when he became 
consul general at Brussels. In 1872 he came to Chicago 
to live, and ot^anized the Home National Banlc, and later 
the Industrial Bank of Chicago, becoming president of 
each. In 1898 he published a volume entitled, RecoU 
lections of Seventy Yean, which is rich in memories of 
well-known personages, both military and civil. 

In 1847 Gen. Chetlain married Emily Tenney, of Lor- 
raine County, Ohio, who died leaving a son, former Judge 
Chetlain. In 1865 he married Mrs. Annie Edwards Smith, 
widow of Gen. Melancthon Smith. He is survived by his 
widow and by his son. Gen. Chetlain became an Annual 
Member of the Chicago Historical Society in 1878 and con- 
tinued until his death. 

Senator Shelby Moore Cullom, colleague of Lincoln 
and for more than fifty years a conspicuous figure in the 
political life of the State of Illinois and of the United States, 
died at his late residence in Washington, D. C, on January 
28, 1914. 

With the name of Cullom are associated such names as 
that of Blaine, Conkling, Trumbull, Judd, Logan, Palmer, 
Washbume and Yates, and above all that of Lincoln, with 
whose rise to political eminence his own was coincident. 
Like Lincoln he was bom in Kentucky (Wayne County, 
Nov. 22, 1829), and like Lincoln was early brought to Illinois, 
his parents moving to Tazewell County m 1830. His father, 
Richard Northcut Cullom, a farmer, became a Whig leader 
in his district, which he represented in the 10th, 12th, 13th, 
and 18th general assemblies. Young Shelby Cullom was. 



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sa Report of Executive Committee 

like Lincoln, accustomed to the use of axe and plow from 
his childhood. The meagre opportunities for education 
in the public schools of his day not sufficing, he managed 
to save enough to pay his way through two years at Rock 
River Seminary, Mt. Morris, teaching school in the intervals. 
In 1853 he began to study law in the office of Stuart & 
Edwards, at Springfield, and by 1855 was admitted to the bar. 
Soon after he was elected city attorney and began to take 
his place among the brilliant group of lawyers of the day, 

Millard Fillmore was running for President in 1856, 
and CuUom became a candidate for presidential elector 
as a Whig, while at the same time he was elected to the 
Twentieth General Assembly of Illinois, representing Sanga- 
mon County. In 1860, during the Lincoln campaign for 
the presidency) he again represented Sangamon County, 
but this time as a Republican, with the support of both 
the Fillmore men and the "Free Soilers." At the following 
session he was elected Speaker of the House, succeeding 
Sidney Breese. 

CuUom supported Lincoln in the senatorial contest with 
Douglas and in the presidential campaign, and Lincoln, 
in the darkest hour of me first administration, in 1862, when 
the policy of the government was called in question, appoint- 
ed Cullom, together with Gov. Boutwell of Massachusetts 
and Chas. A. Dana of New York, to settle the claims as to 
expenditures at Cairo. Cullom did his duty on the claims 
commission but lost the senatorship that year. 

During the reconstruction period in 1864, 1866, and 
1868, Cullom was sent to Congress from the 8th district, 
helping to shape the policies of the nation, especially on the 
question of the payment of the national debt. He was 
also successful in securing the passage of the first anti- 
polygamy bill. 

As chairman of the Illinois delegation to the National 
Republican Convention of 1872, it fell to the lot of Shelby 
M. Cullom to propose for nomination to the presidency 
of the United States the name of Grant, and again in 1884 
and in 1892 he occupied the same responsible position. 
Cullom was representing Sangamon County in the Illinois 
Legislature in 1872 and 1874, being elected speaker again 
in 1873 and 1875. In the following year he became governor 
of Illinois, conrinuing until 1883, when he resigned, regarding 
this as the highest office he had held, and in fact as almost 



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Membership 53 



equivalent to the presidency. In 1883 he was elected Sena- 
tor from Illinois, succeeding David Davis; was re-elected 
in 1889, 1895, 1901, 1907, and indeed suffering no defeat 
until the final one which occurred, when Lawrence Y. Sheiman 
defeated him at the primaries in 1912, his tenn not expiring 
until March 3, 1913— a period of continuous service of thirty 
years in the Senate. 

Among the important posts which Senator Cutlom has 
filled are that of chairman of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, reporting the bill which went into effect 
April 4, 1887; chairman of the commission to establish 

tovemment in the Hawaiian Islands, 1898; chairman of the 
enate Committee on Foreign Relations; chairman of the 
Republican Caucus; and resident commissioner to super* 
vise the erection of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. 
To this last he gave his utmost endeavor, and the contract 
for its erection was signed only a few days after his death. 

At the funeral of Senator Cullom in Sprin^eld, Illinois, 
his late opponent, Senator Sherman, said of him: "He was 
of the type who build states and successfully govern nations. 
Neither the agitator nor the destroyer found in him a re- 
sponse. He always feared mistakes. He never feared 
criticism. In the remarkable development that followed 
the Civil War he observed that the distribution of things 
was as needful as their production. He made no crusade 
on common carriers. He supported the wise regulation, 
but never the destruction or embarrassment of railways. 
His interstate commerce law was a pioneer and it survives. 
Today his act is re-enforced and fortified by legislauon and 
administraUon unril the law that Cullom penned governs 
250,000 miles of railroads." 

The name of Shelby M. Cullom was first placed on the 
rolls of the Historical Society as an Annual Member in 
1889. On the 16th of April, 1894, he was made an Honorary 
Member. His autobiography, "Fifty Years of Public Ser- 
vice," is on our shelves, and the measures with which he 
was connected are part of the archives of our State. Senator 
Cullom was twice married, and one of the daughters by the 
first marriage became the wife of Wm, B. Ridgely, Comp- 
troller of tnc Currency under Roosevelt; the other the 
wife of Robert Gordon Hardie, the portrait painter. Neither 
of these children nor of those of the second marriage survive 
him. 



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Report of Executive Committee 



When asked, "Who was the greatest man you have 
known during your long public life?" he was wont to reply, 
"Abraham Lincoln, without question. I have never 
known an abler statesman, a shrewder politician, a more 
eloquent or forcible speaker, a keener lawyer or a more 
successful diplomatist. 

William Deering, promoter of ^riculture through 
the improvement of harvesting machinery and of education 
through the endowment of universities, died at his winter 
home in Miami, Florida, on the night of December 9, 1913. 
The life of William Deering aiFords an example of what 
may be accomplished after a man has passed the half-century 
mark. He was bom in Paris, Maine, April 25, 1826; edu- 
cated in Readheld Seminaiy, and began life with the in- 
tention of being a doctor. His father, James Deering, was 
president of the South Paris Manufacturing Company, 
makers of woolen fabrics, and William Deenng dropped 
medicine for wool, only in turn to abandon that for western 
farm land. He travelled in Illinois and Iowa in 1853, and 
visited Chicago, but notwithstanding his apprehension of 
the importance of this field of labor, the year 1865 found 
him apparently settling down to the manufacture and sale 
of dry goods, in Portland, Me., under the firm name of 
Deering, MilUken & Co., with subsequent extension of the 
business to Boston, New York and Chicago. 

In 1870, at the age of forty-four, ill health overtook him, 
and he was obliged to retire. Again he came out to Chicago. 
This was a penod of great activity along agricultural lines 
in the West, coincident with the advance of invention in 
reaping machinery and the adaptation of other labor- 
saving devices. A minister of the name of Gammon 
was engaged in the manufacture of reapers in Chicago. He 
interested Mr. Deering to invest capital, and they formed 
the firm of Gammon & Deering, building a factory in 1872 
at Piano. By this time the idea of a reaping machine had 
added to itself the attachment of a "binder. ' The reaper 
manufactured by the McCormick Company had in 1874 been 
transformed into a ''harvester" by the addition of the 
Withington wire binder, the gavels of wheat being wound 
about with wire. In tike manner the machine in which Mr. 
Deering was interested, which was of the Marsh type, was, 
in 1879, provided with a binding device invented by a man 



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Membership 55 



b;^ the name of Appleby, in which the binding was done 
with twine instead of wire. Associated with Mr. Deering in 
these experiments, after the withdrawal of Mr. Gammon, 
was Mr. John F. Steward and a skilled staff. 

In 1880 the companj' removed from Piano to Chicago 
and oi^anized the Deenn^ Harvester Company, of which 
William Deering was president and his two sons co-part- 
ners. The business grew until it employed an average of 
9,000 persons and turned out two machines per minute. 
In 1901 Mr. Deering retired from active interest in the 
business, and in the following year it was merged in the 
International Harvesting Company. 

When exhibiting his automobile harvester in Paris in 
1894, Mr. Deering was decorated with the order of knight- 
hood in the Legion of Honor. He made his home in Evans- 
ton, III., and contributed largely to the support of North- 
western University and of Garrett Biblical Institute, being 
honorary president of the board of both institutions. Ifc 
became an Annual Member of the Chicago Historical Society 
in April, 1897, and so continued until nis death. Another 
member of the Historical Society, Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick, 
said of him : " He was one of the men who had a great vision 
of the future possibilities of our country's development, 
and by his busmess he helped to promote the rapid growth 
of American agriculture and the prosperity of American 
farmers," 

Mr. Deering is survived by his widow, by his son Charles, 
secretary of the International Harvester Company, and 
by James and Elizabeth Deering, children of nis second 
marriage. 

Henry Greenebaum, banker, general agent for the 
Equitable Life Insurance Company, for sixty-five years a 
resident of Chicago and for forty-four years a life member 
of the Chicago Historical Society, died at his home, 4059 
Michigan Boulevard, on February 2, 1914, in his eighrieth 
year. 

Mr. Greenebaum was bom at Eppelsheim, Germany, 
June 18, 1833. He received a classical education there, 
and, in October, 1848, came to Chicago. His brothers 
Midiael and Elias had preceded him by two years and were 
already established in business. Henry entered the service 
of R. K. Swift Se Co., bankers, and in a few years, together 



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56 Report of Executive Committee 

with his btx>ther Elias, organized the banking house of 
Henry Greenehaum & Co. He also organized Uie German 
National and the German Savings banks, but in the general 
depression which followed the panic of 1873, they both went 
into liquidation, Henry Greeneoaum turning over his private 
fortune of a million dollars to meet the liabiliries, which 
were all paid. 

Coming to Chicago while it was still in the "village 
stage" of development, Mr. Greenebaum took part in such 
pioneer service as that of the volunteer fire department, 
m which gentlemen of the "first families" scorned not to 
be seen running to fires dragging their hand-engine after 
them. During the "Free Soil" campaign, Greenebaum 
stumped the State for Douglas, but his sentiments after- 
ward became thoroughly Republican, and when, on the 
outbreak of the Rebellion, the government was unable to 
provide sufficient equipment for the hastily summoned 
troops, Henry Greenebaum was one of the patriotic Chi- 
cagoans to personally equip a regiment. In 1868 he was an 
elector at latge for Grant. In 1869, upon the incorporation 
of the West Side Park Commission, Henry Greenebaum 
was one of the board of seven members, of which C. P. 
Holden was chairman, appointed by the governor of 
Illinois to preside over the park and boulevard system which 
have made Chicago famous. 

Mr. Greenebaum served at one time as alderman, and 
was proposed for mayor. He was prominent in all demon- 
strations of public spirit, and when the Peace Pact was 
signed between France and Germany, after the Franco- 
Prussian War of 187 1, Mr. Greenebaum was selected for 
the chairman of the great meeting and marshal of the parade 
in celebration of the event in Chicago. 

"The history of fire insurance in Chicago," wrote A. T. 
Andreas, "properly began with the wooden era of that expen- 
sive period of frame construction just antedating the great 
fire of 1871." The house of Henry Greenebaum & Co, 
is cited in Andreas' History of Chicago as members of the 
first board of underwriters. Since 1882 Mr. Henry Green&< 
baum has devoted himself to the business of the Equitable 
Life Insurance Company, of which he was general agent 
at the rime of his death. 

He was one of the founders of several Hebrew oiganiza- 
tions and churches, including the United Hebrew Chariries, 



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Membership 57 



of which he was the first president, the Independent Order 
of B'nai B'rith, and of Isaiah and Sinai congr^ations, but 
he befriended every religious sect that applied to him. 
In 1859 he married Miss Emma Hyman, who' died fifteen 
years before her husband. He is survived by two brothers, 
Elias Greenebaum of Chicago, how in his ninety-second 
year, and David S. Greenebaum of New York. 

Mr. Greenebaum was a friend of Stephen A. Douglas, 
as he was also of Abraham Lincoln, Gen. Grant, and John 
A. Lt^an. He became a life member of the Chicago 
Histoncal Society in 1870, and in the exercises held by the 
Society in commemoration of the Douglas centenary on 
April 23, 1913, he entered thoroughly into the spirit of the 
occasion, his white hair, fine black eyes, and erect figure 
making him conspicuous among the notable group of con- 
temporaries gathered about the base of the monument. 
A pnotograph was made of this group, and the Society is 
particularly fortunate in receiving from the family a fine 
portrait painting of Mr. Greenebaum. 

Franklin Harvey Head, business man, litterateur, 
and former President of the Chicago Historical Society, 
died at Maplewood, N. H., on the 24th of June, 1914. He 
was bom in Paris, Oneida County, N. Y., January 24, 
1832, his parents being Harvey and Callista (Simmons) 
Head. 

Graduating from Hamilton College with the bachelor's 
degree in 1856, he pursued the study of law there for two 
years under Prof. Dwight, receiving the degree of A.M. in 
1859. The degree of LL.D. was conferred upon Mr. Head 
at Hamilton CbUege in 1896. 

He began the practice of law in ICenosha, Wis., and in 
1860 married there Miss Catherine Putnam Durkee, who 
died in 1890. In 1865, following an illness, Mr. Head sought 
a less confining life and went to Utah. Here he acted as 
Superintendent of Indian AiFairs, became interested in 
ranches in Utah and California, incidentally making some 
valuable research in regard to Mormonism. 

Coming to Chicago m 1870 he did not resume the practice 
of law, though findmg many of his closest friends in that 
profession, but engaged in business here and elsewhere, 
taking an active part in the public and intellectual life of 
the city. He was at different times president of the Elk 



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58 . Report of Executive Committee 

Rapids Iron Company, the Chicago Malleable Iron Com- 

fany, the Chicago and Iowa Railway Co., the Cedar Rapids 
mprovement Co., and others, and served as a director in 
many banks and other corporations and institutions. Mr. 
Head was much in demand as a presiding officer, being of a 
tolerant and tactful nature, and relievms many a trying 
situation with his timely suggestions ana ready wit. He 
was a man who seemed to have time for many things other 
than business. He was one of the directors of the World's 
Columbian Exposition in 1895, and a member of the jury 
of awards at the Exposition Universale at Paris in 1900, 
receiving the decoration of a chevalier of the Legion of 
Honor in 1901. 

Mr. Head became an Annual Member of the Chicago 
Historical Society on January 21, 1890; vice-president, 
1899-1904; and was elected President in 1904, succeeding 
John N. Jewett, and serving until 1910. In December, 
1913, by vote of the Society, he was made an honorary 
member. Mr. Head, besides contributing occasional papers 
to the Society, was the means of much indirect benefit to it 
through his exceptionally wide acquaintance with men of 
letters in all parts of the country, not a few of the prominent 
lecturers who have appeared before the Society having come 
to Chicago as his guests. He was a trustee of the Newberry 
Library, dating from 1892, and was instrumental, as a mem- 
ber of the book committee there, in the formation of a 
symmetrical collection. He was also a governing member 
of the Art Institute, a member of the Mayflower Society, 
and treasurer of the Athenaeum. He was a member of 
many cliibs, serving twice as president of the Union League, 
for many years as president of the Twentieth Century 
Club, presidentoftheChicago Literary Club from 1890-1891, 
where he had been an active member since 1884. His 
Shakespeare's Insomnia and the Causes Thereof was first 
presented before that club. As historian of the Commercial 
Club he contributed a very readable volume on one of their 
western tours. One of his favorite haunts was the "Cliff 
Dwellers," and he was an unfailing attendant upon the 
sessions of "The Little Room." 

From his college days Mr. Head had shown a fine feeling 
for niceties of expression and the happy phrase in literature. 
Certain unpubli^ed works of his, such as the introduction 
to Prof. Swing's essays, Old Pictures of Life, indicate a 



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Membership 59 



serious vnn, but his own privately printed "unhistorical 
histories," such as DanU and the BoodUrs of hit Time, The 
History of Jekyl Island, A Notable Lawsuit, etc. , with various 
magazine arricles, must be classed with the most character- 
isuc American humor, and cause regret that he did not devote 
more rime to the development of his own gift in wriring. 

It has been said that Mr. Head possessed an "especial 
genius for friendship," and many who recall evenings spent 
at his home in Banks Street will remember the loving pride 
with which he related anecdotes of the originals of his 
"gallery" of aut<%raphed portraits from all parts of the 
country and from over seas. One of the last occasions on 
which Mr. Head appeared in Chicago at a large public re- 
ception was at the home of Mrs. LaVeme Noyes, when 
she entertained the son of Charles Dickens. 

Mr. Head had made his home in Washington, D. C, since 
the marriage of his daughter Elizabeth, Mrs. Merrill E. 
Gates. He is survived by this daughter and by his two 
younger daughters, Mrs. George W. Breck, of New York 
Gty, and Mrs. Herbert W. Perkins, of Chicago. 

David Makquis Hillis, lawyer and capitalist, died on 
September the 15th at his late residence, 6547 Kimbark 
Ave., of fever contracted in E^ypt two years before. He 
was bom in Greensburg, Indiana, in 1841. His father 
being a farmer, he received his early education at a county 
school and worked on his father's farm in the intervals. He 
nevertheless graduated from Butler University with the 
degree of A.B. in 1864. He then went to Yale University 
and studied law for a year. 

In 1865 he entered the law office of Folk & Hubbell, at 
Des Moines, la., practicing with them for two years, at the 
endofwhichtime, m 1868, he came to Chica^ and established 
himself as a lawyer. In 1871 he married Miss Dora Knights, 
the daughter of a Chicago pioneer, who survives nim, 
together with their two sons, Dr. David S. HilUs and George 
H. Hillis. 

Mr. Hillis had been an Annual Member of the Chicago 
Historical Society since February 13, 1908. He was also a 
member of the Indiana Society, of the Union Lei^ue Club, 
and a life member of the Art Institute, as well as one of the 
founders of the Independent Religious Society. 



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Report of Executive Committee 



Rev. James J, McGovern, pastor of St. Denis' Church, 
Lockport, 111., and a Corresponain^ Member of this Society 
since 1886, died at Mercj; Hospital, Chicago, March 31, 
1914. He was bom in Chicago on March 25, 1840, and in 
point of service was reputed to be the oldest Catholic priest 
in his diocese. He was elected to the College of the Propa- 
ganda of Rome at the age of twelve, said to be the first boy 
so elected. In 1862 he was ordained priest; served a 
year as private secretary to Cardinal Bamabo, returning 
to Chicago in 1863. He was made vice-president of the 
old University of St. Mary's of the Lake, where he became 
Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Sacred Scriptures. 
Among his published writings are: History of the Catholic 
Church in Illinois, Life of Pope Leo XIII., Life of Bishop 
McMullin, arid a Catholic Dictionary and Encyclopedia, 

Edward L. Morris, head of the house of Morris & 
Co., packers, died at his Chicago home, 4800 Drexel Blvd., 
November 3, 1913, in his forty-eighth year. He was bom 
in Oiicago October 1, 1866. His father, Nelson Morris, 
founder of the Morris Packing Company, was one of that 
group of men whose improved methods, coupled with the 
great natural advantages of Chicago, resulted in the building 
up of an industry which, in the words of Mr. Franklin Head, 
our late president, "dwarfed all other commercial enter- 
prises." 

Until he was fourteen years old Edward Morris was 
sent to the public schools in Chicago, and at that time his 
father started him "at the bottom rung of the ladder" in 
his own business. It did not take him long to climb, and 
at his father's death in 1907 the son was ready to assume 
control, having already become recognized as a leader in 
the commercial world. He was a hard worker, reaching 
his office at eight o'clock in the morning and utilizing his 
rime to the uttermost. He was much beloved by his 
employes, and looked after their welfare, leaving $100,000 
to add to their pension fund, which he had himself estab- 
lished. He was, moreover, a large contributor to charities 
in Chicago, such as the Jewish Associated Chariries, the 
Children s Memorial Hospital, the Chicago Home for 
Convalescent WoMen and Children, and many others. One 
of his pleasures was travel, particularly in England, and a 
gift of importance to us all was that of the Harvard Home, 



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Membership 6i 



presented by Mr. Morris to the town of Stratford-on-Avon, 
with money for its maintenance. 

Mr. Morris had been an Annual Member of the Giicago 
Historical Society since 1905, and while not personally active 
in its affairs was regarded as contributing, as do all men of 
broad sympathy and great industry, to the general well- 
being of the community, and to be looked upon as one who 
helped to make the name of Chicago known throuehout the 
world, — a man as worthy to be commemorated in Uie annals 
of history as the leader of an army, and, in a sense, of more 
constructive importance to humanity than many a monarch. 
On the day when his body lay in state in the palatial residence 
on Drexel Boulevard— a home to which the humblest em- 
ploye was admitted as readily as the wealthiest citizen — 
the flags on the Historical Society, the First National Bank, 
(of which he was a director), and many other insututions 
were at half mast, and the people stood in respectful groups 
for blocks along the avenue. Rev. Jenkin Lloyd Jones, who 
preached the funeral sermon, said that "Edward Morris, 
whom I have known for many years, was a man in a thousand 
as a husband and father." Mr. Edward Andrews, of the 
Chicago Board of Trade, declared that "his standard of 
business ethics was of the highest," while George T. Buck- 
ingham called him a "twentieth century organizmg genius." 

He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Helen Swift Morris; 
four children, Edward Morris, Jr., Nelson Swift Morris, 
£uth Mae, and Helen Muriel Morris; by his sisters, Mrs. 
Maurice L. Rothschild and Mrs. Maude Morris Schwab, 
and by his brother, Ira Nelson Morris. 

Charles Henry Mulliken, identified with Chicago's 
real estate interests since 1874, and an Annual Member of 
the Chicago Historical Society since 1879, died at the Chi- 
cago Beach Hotel on the day before Christmas, 1913. He 
was bom in Hallowell, Maine, in 1831. His father moved 
to Augusta, where the son was educated, entering the 
office of his father, who was a merchant. At eighteen he 
went to Boston, engaging in the office of a merchandise 
broker. In 1851 he returned to Augusta and founded the 
firm of Davis & Mulliken. Shortly before the Civil War 
Mr. Mulliken, as a member of the firm of Means & Mulliken, 
ventured upon the southern commission trade, with head- 
quarters at Boston, a line of packets running to Indianola, 



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6a Report of Executive Committee 

Tex., and a branch office at San Antonio. They did a 
thriving business, but the war brought ruin upon them, 
their stock of goods, valued at $50,000, being confiscated 
by the Confederacy. Mr. MuUiken, going to San Antonio 
to save something out of the wreck, was thrown into prison. 
He escaped, however, reached New Orleans, and was passed 
through the Union lines bj^ Gen. Butler. After clearing 
up the firm's debts by paying one hundred cents on the 
dollar, he came, in 1867, to Oiicago- In 1874 he entered 
upon the real estate business for himself, took a lead- 
ing posidon among the well-known firms, and became con- 
nected with many important changes in Chicago. 

Mr. Mullikcn was very active in Presbyterian circles, 
holding the office of elder in the Fourth Presbyterian Church, 
director in the McConnick Theological Seminary, and super- 
intendent of the Howe St. Mission. He was on the executive 
committee of the Presbyterian Social Union, president of 
the Chicago Bible Socie^, a member of the Citizens' Asso- 
ciation, Qiicago Club, Union Club, and the Real Estate 
Boaid. 

In 1851 he married Sarah E. Hallett, of Augusta, Me., 
and they had four children, of whom A. Heniy Mulliken 
became well known in Chicago. Mr. Mulliken is survived 
by a second wife, who was Miss Cora Shupp Waddel, to 
whom he was married in 1911. 

Samuel Mayo Nickerson, for nearly thirty years 

K resident of the First National Bank, an Honorary Life 
lember of the Chicago Historical Society, and prominent 
in artistic and social circles of Chicago, died on July 20, 
1914, at the summer home of his daughter-in-law, Fieldstone 
Halt, East Brewster, Mass., aged eighty-four. 

His parents. Ensign and Rebecca Mayo Nickerson, re- 
sided in Chatham, Mass., at the time of his birth, June 14, 
1830, but, desiring to give their children the best educational 
advantages, removed to Boston in 1837, where Samuel 
attended school. Later he was sent to New Hampton 
Academy, N. H. In 1847 he launched out on a sea-going 

Backet bound for Apalachicola, Florida, to seek his fortune. 
[is brother was already there, and Samuel entered the same 
general store as a clerk. At the end of three years, with 
what little he had saved, and with money borrowed from 
northern friends, he started a similar venture. After 



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Membership 63 



several years of hard work, his entire stock was swept away 
by fire. His one thought seemed to be to sustain his repu- 
tation for integrity, and although a compromise was tem- 
porarily made, all obligations were finally met. 

1858 found Mr. Nickerson in Chicago. Again under 
the necessity of borrowing money, his ctvdit proved good, 
and be engaged in the distilling of high wines and alcohol> 
retiring from this form of business in 1864. 

During the discussion of the National Banking Act, in 
1862-1863, it is said that a certain group of men used to 
gather in the office of Aiken & Norton, Room 1 of the old 
Board of Trade Building, on the northeast comer of La 
Salle and Water streets, to discuss the feasibility of a national 
bank in Chicago. Among them were Edmund Aiken, 
Samuel Allerton, Byron Rice, Benjamin P. Hutchinson, and 
Samuel M. Nickerson, then a man of thirty-two. When it 
was decided to enter upon the project of a national bank, 
Mr. Nickerson subscribed lai^ely to the stock, was elected 
to the first board of directors, and almost immediately 
made vice-president. Upon the death of Mr. Aiken, the 
president, in 1867, he was elected his successor. For twenty- 
four years he served continuously, resigned in 1891, but was 
again called to duty in 1897, finally retiring in 1900. It is 
officially stated that Mr. Nickerson was the central figure 
of the First National Bank during the guidance of the 
enterprise through the most important crises of its career. 
To it he gave the best portion of his life and almost all of 
his working time. Its second home, on the southwest 
corner of State and Washington streets was built, rebuilt after 
the fire, and supplanted oy its present home during his 
administration. 

When the Chic^o Historical Society's building was 
burned in the fire of 1871, Mr. Nickerson, who had been a 
member since 1869, was among the first to subscribe, to- 

5 ether with Wm. B. Ogden, Mark Skinner, Levi Z, Leiter, 
ohn Crerar, George Dunlap, and others, to a fund which 
resulted in its re-erection in 1877. He became a Life Mem- 
ber in 1871, and because of gifts greatly in excess of life 
membership dues, was made an Honorary Life Member in 
1883. 

In the distinguished mansion in which they lived, on the 
northeast comer of Cass and Erie streets, Mr. Nickerson 
and his wife (who was Mathilda Crosby, of Brewster, Mass.) 



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64 Report of Executive Committee 

had gathered one of the most complete general collections 
of paintings, porcelains, jades, lacquers, ivories, and other 
objects of art in the West, and on their departure for the 
East this collection was donated to the Art institute for the 
benefit of all Chicago. Another enterprise of importance to 
Chicagoans in whicn Mr. Nickerson was a prime mover was 
the establishment of the Chicago Musical Festival in the old 
Exposition Building, with Theodore Thomas as director — 
the forerunner of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. 

Mr. Nickerson was at one time president of the Chicago 
City Horse Railroad Company, which, it is said, he adminis- 
tered with great regard for public utility. He helped to 
organize the Union Stock Yards National Bank (now the 
National Live Stock Bank), and was its president for six 
years. In November, 1871, when Lincoln Park was being 
oiganized, the governor appointed Mr. Nickerson first on 
the board of commissioners, and the labors of that board 
resulted in the condemnation of sufficient land for the park 
and in the completion and dedication of the Lake Shore 
Drive. 

In 1900 Mr. and Mrs. Nickerson removed to New York 
City, where Mr. Nickerson died at the home of the late 
Hon. Roland C. Nickerson. He is survived by a sister, 
two grandchildren, Roland C. and Helen Nickerson, and by 
one great grandson, Samuel Mayo Nickerson, 3rd. 

Stephen Denison Peet, clergyman, author, and editor, 
a Corresponding Member of this Society since 1881, died 
in Northampton, Mass., May 24, 1914, at the age of eighty- 
three. His father was a pioneer missionary in the Middle 
West, and was instrumental in establishing Beloit College, 
Chicago Theological Seminary, and many churches in 
Wisconsin. The son, Stephen, bom in Euclid, O., had 
spent his boyhood in Wisconsin, often accompan3nng his 
father on missionary tours, and having his interest aroused 
in Indian life and the relics of the Mound Builders. He 
graduated from the first class in Beloit College in 1851, 
studied theology at Yale and Andover, and then returned 
to the West, where for forty years he held pastorates in 
Congregational and Presbytenan churches in Wisconsin, 
Ohio, and Illinois. His interest in archaeology led him, 
in 1878, to found The American Antiquarian, and he 
continued its editor and publisher for thirty-two years. 



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Membership 65 



He was the author of a series of volumes on prehistoric 
America and of many pamphlets and arricles. The series 
includes: Emblematic Mounds and Animal Effigies, The 
Mound Builders, Their Works and Relics, The Cliff Dwellers 
and Pueblos, Myths and Symbolism, or, Aboriginal Religions, 
and Ancient Monuments and Ruined Cities. Dr. Feet's 
later years were spent with his sons and daughters in Chicago 
and in Salem. He is survived by eizht children and By 
nine grandchildren. One of his sons. Dr. Charles Emerson 
Peer, is Professor of Geology and Geography at Lewis 
Insutute, Chicago. 

Mrs. David Hamilton Redmond (nee Lily Dermont), 
granddaughter of Mrs. John Kinzie's youngest sister, died 
in Harbor Springs, Mich., November 2, 1912, news of her 
death being communicated to us through Rev. Charles F. 
Westman, of Logansport, Indiana, on July 15, 1914. Mrs. 
Redmond's grandfather, George Meldrum, was one of the 
pioneers and large land-owners of the State of Michigan. 
His wife was Miss Sally Lytle, a sister of Mrs. John Kinzie, 
Sr., of early Chicago. Their daughter, Ann Meldrum, after 
her mother's death, lived with the family of her cousin, 
Col. John Kinzie, and later with that of Col. Robert A, 
Kinzie, becoming quite well known in Chicago society. 
She married, first, a Dr. Johnston, of the United States Army, 
and upon his death, Robert Dermont of Detroit, where 
the daughter Lily was bom in 1864. The latter, who was 
a writer of much literary ability, has resided since her 
marriage in Harbor Springs, Mich. She is survived by her 
husband, David H. Redmond, and by one son. She was 
made a Corresponding Member of the Society in 1903, at 
the time of the centenary of the founding of Fort Dearborn. 
The survivors of the Kinzie family were invited to assist at 
a reception given by the Historical Society to early residents 
and their descendants, and Mrs. Redmond, who had been 
instrumental in helping to reach the members of the family, 
and who was herself so closely connected, was present. 

Byron Laflin Smith, founder and president of The 
Northern Trust Company and an Honorary Life Member of 
the Chicago Historical Society, died at his home, 2140 Prairie 
Avenue, March 22, 1914, aged sixty years and ten months. 
Although comparatively short, his life has been of inesUma- 



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66 Report of Execviive Committee 

ble value to Chicago, which is proud to claim him as one of 
her representative men. 

Bom in Saugerties, N. Y., May 9, 1853, he was brought 
to Chicago when an infant by his parents, Solomon A. and 
Mari Laflin Smith, and educated in the public schools of 
Chicago, later attending the old University of Chicago 
(class of 1874). A characteristic item contributed by some 
of his comrades is to the effect that he was one of the best 

E layers on the University base ball team and the first 
oy in Chicago to learn to throw a curved ball. 

It will be remembered that Chicago's general develop- 
ment took a great step forward in the fifties oy reason of the 
introduction of railroads. It was, however, also a period of 
"wild-cat" and "stumptail" banking experiments. In 
1857, throujgh the activity of a few men who had sounded 
these theories and disapproved them, there was organized 
the Merchants Loan & Trust Company, of which the 
father of our subject, Solomon A. Smith, was shortly made 
president, so continuing until his death in 1879. Of him it 
was said that he had 'no respect for the man who could 
draw distinctions between corporate and individual honesty." 

Trained in such principles, Byron L. Smith made nis 
modest entrance in the banking world in 1871 as cterk and 
messenger of the National Bank of Illinois. One of his 
early duties was to assist his employer, Capt. George Schnei- 
der, to transfer the bank's currency in an open wagon from 
under the front steps of the latter's dwelling to temporary 
quarters on the West Side, following the fire of '71. 

In 1876 he became connected with the Hide and Leather 
National Bank; in Jan. 1880 a trustee of the Merchants Loan 
& Trust Company, and on Jan. 4, 1881, became vice-presi- 
dent of that bank, and served until 1885, when he resigned 
with the intention of retiring from active business. 

In Andreas' History of Chicaeo, volume 3, appear at in- 
tervals the enterprises with which Mr. Smith was con- 
nected during this time of comparative leisure, and from some 
of which he never disengaged himself. Among these were 
the Sunday evening service, b^un in Central Music Hall 
by the First Presbyterian Church m 1883, under Dr. Barrows, 
with musical service in charge of W. L. Tomlins, and the 
support and management in the hands of Marshall Field, 
Byron L. Smith, and a few others; also the Chicago Musical 
Festival Association, on whose committee of finance Mr. 



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Membership 67 



Smith served; the Chicago Athenaeum, of which he was an 
officer, and the Citizens' League, of which he was vice- 
president. In the annals of the Chicago Historical Society 
the name of Mr. Smith appears as an Annual Member and 
Treasurer in 1879, and in 1883 as one of four to give a 
thousand dollars toward relieving the Society of a mortage 
which had burdened them since 1858. The list on this 
occasion was headed by L. Z. Leiter, and the whole amount 
was raised by nine members. It is also stated that "twenty- 
five members were added within six months, and the first 
and second volumes of the Society's collections published." 
In consequence of this and of other gifts which were greatly 
in excess of the amount qualifying one for Life Membership, 
the name of Mr. Smith was transferred directly from the 
Annual Membership to the Honorary Life Membership roll. 
The so-called "life-work" of Byron L. Smith began in 
1889 with the organization of The Northern Trust Company, 
of which he was president from its inception to the time of 
his death. An idea of the place he held in the community 
may be gained from an editorial in The Chicago Tribune of 
March 24, which reads: 

"Chicago banking and business interests have lost in the death 
of Byron L. Smith an exemplar in the matter of commercial probity. 
. . , Involved in money dealings that offered opportunities to get 
something for nothing, he found no pleasure in taking that which did 
not belong to him. While this is apparently saying little, it is, indeed, 
saying much. The influence whicn his character necessarily exerted 
cannot be measured by the ordinary standards of achievement. His 
loveofchildren, flowers, and birds was a trait of gentleness to be treas- 
ured in the memory of his friends. His devotion to the ptactice of 
simple honesty in the affairs of men is an enduring legacy left to the 
community." 

The Chicago British American said of him: 

. . . "He took time during his arduous professional labors to 
work steadily for the common good," 

and The Bank Man states that 

"In the death of Mr. Smith every employe in The Northern Trust 
Company, from the smallest messenger to the senior vice-president 
feels that he has lost a personal friend. . , " 

In this connection it should be stated that the will of 
Mr. Smith provided for the employes of the bank who had 
been long associated with him an amount equal to half the 
year's salary of each, in addition to the generous pension 
fund which he had established. 



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68 Report of Executive Committee 

Among his subsidiary business interests were director- 
ships in the Chicago & Northwestern and Atchison, Topeka 
ana Santa Fe Railways, Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago 
Telephone Co., and his memberships in the Association of 
Commerce and the Chicago Board of Trade, of which latter 
he was treasurer from 1882 to 1885. 

Mr, Smith is said to have had an original way of admin- 
istering trusts which were committed to him. He did not 
leave to others what he could do himself. A striking example 
of this is shown in the affairs of The James C. King Home for 
Old Men, which he helped to plan with its founder, to provide 
such a place as they themselves would have enjoyed. Mr. 
Smith, as president of the insutution, was apt to appear at 
the home without announcement in advance, and was not 
content with an inspection of the parlor, but included the 
kitchen and the quality of the food prepared for his friends 
the inmates as amoi^ his proper subjects of inquiry. The 
Chicago Home for Incurables knew him not as a name only, 
but as a genial Friend to the most hopeless, and the Chicago 
Orphan Asylum, Presbyterian Hospital, O. S. A. Sprague 
Memorial Institute, Chicago Railroad Mission of the Pres- 
byterian Church, sick poor of the Olivet Memorial Church, 
and Visiting Nurse Association felt the stimulus of his per- 
sonal and "big brotherly" attention. 

With all of these duties Mr. Smith found some time for 
"play." He is said to have belonged to every golf club in 
the vicinity of Chicago, certainly to all in the neighborhood 
of his summer home, "Briar Hall," at Lake Forest; and his 
other clubs included the Bankers, Chicago, Commercial, 
Union League, University, Mid-Day, and Caxton clubs of 
Chicago, with the Metropolitan Club, Down Town Asso- 
dation, and Lawyers' Quo of New York. 

Mr. Smith is survived by his wife, Carrie Cornelia (Stone) 
Smith, whom he married May 24, 1876, and by their four 
sons, Solomon Albert, Walter Byron, Harold Cornelius, and 
Bruce Donald Smith. Although but thirty-seven years of 
age, Solomon A. Smith has been found competent to follow 
in his father's footsteps as president of The Northern Trust 
Company, the youngest president of any of the larger banks, 
and the youngest son, Bruce D., is assistant cashier and assis- 
tant secretary of the bank. 

On the day of the funeral flags were at half mast through- 
out the financial district, and for the first time in the history 



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Membership 69 



of the Chicago Clearing House the member banks suspended 
business for a time during the funeral services, which were 
performed by Mr. Smith's old friend and pastor, Dr. James 
G. K. McClure, and rich and poor throughout the city of 
Chicago united in declaring imperishable the qualities of 
kindliness and uprightness expressed by Byron L. Smith. 

Adlai Ewing Stevenson, vice-president of the United 
States under Grover Cleveland and an Honorary Member of 
this Society since 1900, died at the Presbyterian Hospital in 
Chicago June 14, 1914. He was bom in Kentucky, Chris- 
tian County, in 1835, and in 1852 removed with his parents 
to Bloomington, 111., where he has made his home. He was 
educated at Wesleyan University and Center College, Ky., 
and in 1857 was admitted to the bar and began the practice 
of law at Meamora, Woodford County, 111., tilling various 
public offices there. In 1869 he returned to Bloomington 
and formed a partnership with Judge James S. Ewing. 
In 1866 he had married Miss Letitia Green, of Danville, Ky., 
and they together founded a home in Bloomington that was 
for forty years renowned for its hospitality. 

His political career is briefly as follows: 1874, elected 
to Congress; 1885-89, first assistant postmaster-general; 
1892, elected vice-president of the United States on ticket 
with Grover Cleveland, following the Democratic Conven- 
tion at Chicago, at which he was chairman of the Illinois 
delegation. He served from 1893-97; was Democratic 
nommee for vice-president in 1900 and for governor of 
Illinois in 1908. In 1897 he was a member of tne commis- 
sion which met in Belgium to try to secure international 
bimetallism. In General Stevenson's book, Sonutking of 
Men I Have Known, published in 1909, his experiences are 
delightfully told, with graphic portraits of Cleveland and 
other men of the period. 

A student of American history, he was particularly well 
versed in that of Illinois and Kentucky, and m 1903 delivered 
the annual address before the Illinois Historical Society, 
his subject being. The Constitution and Constitutional Con- 
ventions of Illinois. Quoting from the McLean County Bar 
Assodarion, " . He knew Lincoln and Douglas, 

and in fact nearly all of those of our times whose names are 
associated with the history of our country. ... No 
stain ever touched his garments, and not even the breath of 



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7° Report of Executive Committee 

suspicion ever rested upon his good name." In his Auto- 
biograpk';/ Andrew D. White made the statement that of all 
the public men he had ever known Mr. Stevenson was the 
most delightful raconteur. Another has said, "He held the 
wine of gladness to the lips of his friends and made them 
drink to the health of all happiness and good will. . 
He had an irresistible power of humor without frivolity; a 
profound sense of life's seriousness without heaviness; dignity 
without dullness; honor without hauteur." 

The story of the administration with which Gen, 
Stevenson was so idendhed is too much a part of our na- 
tional history to need repetition here. His private life was 
one of unusual charm — an illustrauon of the ideal of Illinois 
as to its public men, never ceasing to be a part of the people 
and the best of neighbors, while not hesitating to take their 
places among the foremost when occasion calls them. 

He is survived by a son, Lewis Green Stevenson, and two 
daughters, Mrs. Julia Stevenson Hardin, of Chicago, and 
Miss Letitia Stevenson. The oldest daughter, Mary, died 
in 1892 and Mrs. Stevenson in 1913. For many of these 
facts we are indebted to Mrs. Hardin. 

Gen. James Grant Wilson, soldier, editor, and author, 
a Corresponding Member of the Society since 1865, died in 
New York City on February 2, 1914, at the age of eighty- 
one. He was the son of the Scotch poet, William Wilson, 
and was bom in Edinburgh April 28, 1832. His youth was 
spent in Poughkeepsie, N. Y,, whither his family came when 
he was a year old. At twenty-five he founded in Chicago 
what is considered the first literary journal published in tlie 
Northwest, called The Record. Leaving this work to become 
a major in the Fiftieth Illinois Cavalry in 1862, he took part 
in Grant's Vicksburg campaign, and m 1863 became colonel 
of the Fourth Regiment of U. S. colored cavalry. His pub- 
lished works include more than twenty volumes, among them. 
Life of Gen. U. S. Grant, Lives of the Presidents of the United 
Suites, Sketches of Illinois Oficers, The _ World's Largest 
Libraries, etc., and his most arduous editorial work was that 
done on 'Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography. He 
was for a long period president of the American Author's 
Guild, of the New York Geneali^ical and Biographical 
Society, and of the American Ethnological Society. In 1894 
he was knighted by the Queen Regent of Spain for having a 
statue of Columbus erected in Central Park, N. Y. 



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Meetings 



MEETINGS 

The first meetii^ of the Society in the year occurred 
November 4, when Professor Clarence W. Alvord presented 
a paper on Tke Spanish Conquest of St. Joseph, Michigan, 
in Ij8i. An audience of moderate size but of decidedly 
scholarly character gathered in the Society's Lecture Hall on 
this occasion and many learned for the first time that the 
Spanish Crown aspired to gain holdings as far north as the 
little village of Niles, Michigan, where La Salle's Fort St. 
Joseph's formerly stood. A vivid picture of this episode is 
found in the late Edward Gay Mason's March of the Spanish 
Across Illinois, published in 1886. 

On November 18 came the Fifty-seventh Annual Meeting, 
reported in the Yearbook for 1913. 

November 19, being the Fiftieth Anniversary of Lincoln's 
Gettysburg Address, exercises commemorating this event 
■were arranged. On this occasion members of the Loyal 
Legion and of the Grand Army were special guests and 
practically filled the Lecture Hall with a splendid body of 
men in dress uniforms. The venerable Bishop Cheney read 
the immortal Address, prefacing it with remarks so appro- 
priate and impressive that they were reported verbatim in 
the newspapers of the next day, Mr. Charles A. Kent, 
principal of the Eugene Field School, held the attention of 
the audience for an hour and twenty minutes while he com- 
pared pictures of the battle ground and cemetery fifty years 
ago with the scenes witnessed by himself there last summer 
during the reunion of the Armies of the North and South. 
Three of the lantern slides shown were unique, being from the 
photographs by Brady taken in the National Cemetery in 
1863 while the Gettysburg Addresses were being delivered. 
These were the gifts of Mr. Frederick Meserve, of New York. 

At the close of the program the audience was dismissed 
by "taps" sounded bj; Dr. Charles F. Barnes on the bugle 
and drum used by him in the Battle of Gettysburg. Many of 
the old soldiers expressed heartfelt appreciation at the honor 
paid them by the Historical Society, and the younger portion 



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Report of Executive Committee 



of the audience seemed to be impressed anew with the debt 
owed to the men who fought to preserve the Union. Among 
the many descendants of early citizens present were the 
daughters of Isaac N. Arnold, Chicago's Congressman 
throughout the entire period of the War. At the back of 
the platform, draped with flags, were the bronze bust of 
Lincoln by Volk, the bronze tablet of the Gettysburg Address 
by V. D. Brenner, and the bronze relief portrait by Pickett. 
At the rear of the room the Borglum head of Lincoln was 
festooned with oak leaves. The company lingered long after 
the program to examine the Lincoln collections of Mr. Frank 
G. Logan and of the Arnold family, the latter loaned for the 
occasion. 

On December 2d Miss Mattie E. French, of Kenosha, 
addressed the Society on the subject of Lights of Other 
Days: Lighting from the Earliest Times to the Present, exhibit- 
ing her valuable collection of over 150 lamps, candlesticks, 
and lanterns. The lecture proved very interesting to an 
audience of moderate size. 

On Tuesday evening, January 20th, Professor Harry 
T. Nightingale, Instructor in the Department of History 
and Ecomonics at Northwestern University and a member 
of the State Board of Equalization, read a paper on the 
subject of History and Political Science. A synopsis of this 
lecture shows that Professor Nightingale holds advanced 
views on the subject of the relation of these studies and on 
methods of inculcating good citizenship. His hearers 
were greatly diverted by specimen answers to elementary 
questions on government written by high school students. 
Professor Nightingale strongly advocated that political 
economy be taught even to the grammar schools in prepara- 
tion for citizenship. The City Qub, Woman's City Club, 
and the School of Civics and Philanthropy were represented 
in the audience. 

Hon. Jesse W. Weik, of Greencastle, Ind., who with 
W. H. Hemdon wrote a well-known biography of Lincoln, 
addressed an audience of high school students on Lincoln's 
Birthday on The Career oj the Immortal Railsplitter, illus- 
trating his remarks with letters and documents in the 
handwriting of Lincoln. Judge Dent, Mr. Logan, and Dr. 
Schmidt and other adults were present. This address will 



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Meetings 73 

long be remembered by everyone present. One of the 
most interesting of the papers was a page from an arithmetic 
copied by Lincoln on foolscap paper. At the foot of the 
page were the well known lines: 



On February 17th Mr. Horace White, of New York, 
formerly editor of T/u Chicago Tribune gave his much antic- 
ipated address on The Lincoln and Douglas Debates. Mr. 
White spoke with authority, having been appointed to follow 
the debates and write them up for the Tribune at the time of 
their occurrence. That his address was in no way a disap- 
pointment was amply attested by the enthusiasm of the 
audience of four hundred that gathered to hear the last 
survivor of those who listened to all of the joint debates. 
Many more were turned away for lack of seats. The news- 
paper accounts of the affair were so full that further comment 
IS unnecessary, particularly as Mr. White, at the request of 
' the Librarian, gave the manuscript of his address to the 
Society with permission to publish it, which has now been 
done. 

The audience was notable for the number of members 
of the Bar and members of this Society who were present, 
among them: 

Mr. and Mrs. George E. AdamB Mr. Harlow N. Higinbotham 

Miss Katherine D, Arnold Dr. and Mts. Henry Hooper 

Mrs. Emmons Blaine Mr. Charles L. Hutchinson 

Mr. Qarence A. Butley Mr. John W. Lowe 

Bishop Cheney Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan 

Professor Elias Colbert Mr. Joy Morton 

Hon. J.McCaRoDavis.ofSpringlield Mr. Spencer Morton 

Mr. Francis A. Eastman The Misses Skinner 

Mr. William A. Fuller Dr. and Mrs. 0. L. Schmidt 

Judge 3Jid Mrs. Goodrich Mr. and Mrs. Orson Smith 

Mrs. Frederick Greeley Mr. Homer Stillwell 

Mr. S. S. Greeley Mr. John P. Wilson 

Mr. Frank Hamlin Mr, M. L. Wilson, Fallon, Montana 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Hibbard, Jr. Mr. A. G. Woodbury, Danville 

On Saturday, March 14, at half past three o'clock, 
exercises were held in the Society's building in observance 

of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Introduction of the Ordi- 



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Report of Executive Committee 



nance Creating Lincoln Park. Mr. Burley presided and 
addresses were made as follows: 

Hon. John M. Armstrong, who as Alderman of the then 
13th Ward introduced the Ordinance, March 14, 1S64. 

Mr. Francis A. Eastman, Postmaster of Chicago 1869- 
1873. 

Mrs. Mary Ridpath Mann gave a lantern talk on "Early 
Chicago," 

Mr. Armstrong interested the large audience greatly 
by his recital of the circumstances leading up to his fathering 
of the ordinance when he himself was known as the Boy 
Alderman, and of the still earlier times, when with his gun 
and d(% he pursued rabbits in the fastnesses of sand hills 
and forest that stretched northward from the old city ceme- 
tery between the Green Bay Trail and the Lake, or fished 
in the Ten Mile Ditch that took its winding course under 
festoons of the wild grape in a southeasterly direction, 
emptying into the Lake opposite Wisconsin Street. Mr. 
Burley recalled a fact that seemed to awaken amused recol- 
lections in many minds; namely, that the boys of the neigh- 
borhood christened this stream the " S usque- John." Mr. 
Eastman dwelt on the less romantic theme of the real estate 
and transportation interests that were fostered by the 
establishment of a public pleasure ground in this rural 
district. 

Mr. Franklin S. Catlin at the close of the program pres- 
ented resolutions favoring the erection of a monument com- 
memorative of this event. These were unanimously adopted. 

On Monday evening, March 23rd, an Exhibition Illus- 
trative of Liberia was opened with a program of addresses 
by George W. Ellis, former secretary of the American 
Ije^ation at Monrovia, Ernest H. Lyon, for five years a 
resident of the Republic, and by Frederick Starr of the 
Department of Anthropology of the University of Chicago. 
The Liberian National Hymn was sung by seven members 
of the Umbrium Quartette. In the audience of 250 those 
of negro blood slightly outnumbered the whites; nevertheless 
the descendents of more than one noted abolitionist were 



r held, was brought to a close on Saturday evening, April 



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Meetings 75 

4th, with a stereopticon lecture by Professor Starr, entitled 
Liberia, the Hope of ike Dark Continent, in which he showed 
the present condition of Liberia, her enormous resources 
and the need of American assistance to prevent the aegres- 
sions of the great powers that constantly threaten to ansorb 
the rich little Republic. 

Between fifty and seventy-five persons examined the 
exhibits daily, and on Tuesday and Friday afternoons, 
when Professor Starr was present to answer questions, 
several hundred were in attendance. 

On April 23rd Dr. Henry M. Whelpley, of the Missouri 
Historical Society, St. Louis, addressed the Society on 
Mounds and Mound Builders of Illinois, illustrating the 
subject with stereopticon. Dr. Schmidt presided and 
requested Mr. William A. Peterson to tell the audience 
something of his remarkable collections of European and 
American stone artifacts on exhibition in the building. In 
a five minute talk Mr. Peterson gave enough facts to arouse 
an interest in this subject in the most indifferent listener. 
Dr. Whelpley held his audience in wrapt attention for an 
hour and a half, succeeding in impressing upon everyone 
the desirability of saving from destruction the monuments 
of the vanished races, particularly that great mound known 
as Cahokia, or Monk's Mound, in St. Clair County, Illinois. 
A list of the splendid loan exhibit made at this time will 
be found under Special Exhibitions. 

The meetings of other societies are treated under the 
head of Relations in the Librarian's Report. 

The Executive Committee feels that its annual report 
would be incomplete if it failed to publicly express and 
inscribe in the Society's records the Committee's apprecia- 
tion of the faithfulness and zeal of the Society's employees 
during the year. Their interest has been constant and 
their mdustry untiring. 

Respectfully submitted. 

For the Executive Committee, 
Seymour MorHis, Secretary. 

Mr. Eugene H. Fishbum, Chairman of the Trustees of 
the Gilpin Fund, then presented the Report on the Gilpin 
Fund, which appears on page 39 of the Execudve Commit- 
tee's Report. 



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76 Report of Annual Meeting 

Mr. Frankel moved that the Report of the Trustees of 
the Gilpin Fund be accepted, approved, and placed on file. 
The motion was seconded and carried. 

In the absence of the Treasurer, Mr. Orson Smith, the 
Treasurer's Report was presented and read by Mr. Paul 
C. Peterson as printed on page S9 of the Executive Com- 
mittee's Report. 

On motion of Mr. Boldenweck, duly seconded and 
carried, the Treasurer's Report was accepted and ordered 
placed on hie. 

The Report on Membership was read by the Acting 
President, who requested those present to show their respect 
for the departed members of the Society by arising during 
the reading of the Necrology. 

Bishop Cheney moved that the Chair appoint a Nominat- 
ing Committee of three to prepare a ticket of the officers 
and trustees to be elected at this meeting. The motion 
was seconded and carried. 

The Chair appointed Bishop Cheney and Messrs. 
Hamlin and Lowe. 

The Librarian, Miss Mcllvaine, then presented the 
Librarian's Report, reading highly interesting extracts 
therefrom. The full text of the report follows on pages 
76 to 133. 

Mr. Lowe moved that the Librarian's R«)ort be accepted, 
approved, and referred to the Library Committee. The 
motion was seconded and carried. 

The nominating Committee presented its Report, which 
was read by the Chairman, Bishop Cheney, as follows: 

The undersigned members of the Nominating Committee 
hereby recommend the election of the foUowmg members 
as officers for the ensuing year: 

Clarence A. Bitrley, President, 
Charles H, Conover, First Vice-President, 
Dr. Orro L. Schmidt, Second Vice-President. 
Executive Committee, term ending 1918: 
George Merryweather, 
William A. Fuller. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Charles Edw. Cheney, 
Frank Hamlin, 
John W. Lowe. 



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Report of Annual Meeting 



Mr. Ryerson moved, seconded by Mr. Patten, that the 
Report be accepted and that the Secretary cast the ballot 
of the Society for the election of the persons named in the 
Report of the Nominating Committee, Carried, 

The Secretary thereupon cast the ballot of the Society 
and declared the persons named in the Report of the Nom- 
inating Committee duly elected to their respective offices. 

The election of new members being the next order of 
business the Chair presented the name of Professor M. M, 
Quaife and moved that the Secretary cast the ballot of the 
Societjf for the election of Professor Quaife to the Corre- 
spondmg Membership. 

The motion was seconded and earned. 

The Secretary thereupon cast the ballot of the Society 
and the Chair declared Professor Quaife duly elected to 
the Corresponding Membership of the Society. 

Mr. Lowe presented the name of Mr. Richard T. Crane 
III, and moved that the Secretary cast the ballot of the 
Society for the election of Mr. Crane to the Annual Mem- 
bership. 

The motion was seconded by Mr. Walker and carried. 

The Secretary thereupon cast the ballot of the Society 
for the election of Mr. Richard T. Crane III, to the Annual 
Membership of the Society. 

There being no other business the Chair reported briefly 
on plans for the Illinois Centennial in 1918 and the meeting 
was adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Seymour Morris, Secretary. 



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LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 

To the Executive Committee of the 

Chicago Historical Society: 

Gentlemek: — I have the honor to submit my Report 
as Librarian of the Chic^o Historical Society for the year 
ending October 31, 1914. 

Each year in surveying the achievements and the failures 
of the twelve months that have passed some activity looms 
lai^er than all the rest. Last year the development of the 
Society's Chicago History Lectures for Children eclipsed 
all other activities, but 1914 will probably be remembered 
in the annals of the Society as the year of the Great Exodus. 
I refer to the elimination from the Library of some 30,000 
works on subjects unrelated to the Society's field. 

Preparations for this Exodus had been going on in a 
quiet way for forty years; that is, since 1874, at which time 
the loss of the Society's second library by fire was heralded 
from one end of the country to the other. So widespread 
and in some instances so indiscriminate was the response 
to the cry for help in assembling new collections, that thou- 
sands of works on science, religion, and art, as well as on 
history, were donated. It should be said here that no books 
in any way related to the Middle West nor any purely his- 
torical works bearing on the United States have been included 
in the Exodus. , 

During the last ten years active measures have been 
taken to segregate all materials foreign to the Society's 
field in the unused parts of the building, and had not the 
congestion become so great that an addition to the building 
was needed, it is doubtful if the officers of the Socie^ would 
have overcome their reluctance to part with anythmg that 
had come to the Society as a gift, however foreign to its 
field. 

The space thus gained will permit a complete rearrange- 
ment of the Gilpin Library and provide shelves for new 
accessions for perhaps three years to come; but by the end 



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1 



ibyGoogIc 



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Gifts 79 

of five years, certainly, the building of a stack room will 
be necessary. Many of the members feel that the central 
nave of the Gilpin Library, instead of being obstructed by 
book shelves, should be equipped with table-top cases where- 
in some part of the rare books, manuscripts and valuable 
early maps owned by the Society might be perpetually on 
exhibition. At present these are kept behind locked doors 
and see the light only on rare occasions. 

The Children's Chicago History Lectures were so fully 
reported on in the last Year-Book that it is only necessary 
here to say that the experimental stage is long since passed. 
The new season opened the first Saturday in October with 
over three hundred eighth-grade pupils present, and com- 
munications from the teachers show that they are gradually 
coming to recognize the value of the new impetus that the 
Historical Society is giving to local history studies in the 
schools. The question is frequently asked, "Does the Society 
intend making this a permanent part of its workP" Thus 
far Lhe Society is indebted to Dr. Schmidt for this new line 
of a> tivity. 

It is a pleasure to record an unusual amount of money 
donated by members of the Society for special purposes 
during the year. These gifts are enumerated under the 
head of Donations, but are dwelt upon here because when 
a member of the Society who is not an officer sees a need 
and supplies it the Executive Committee rejoices and 
redoubles its efforts to administer alFairs in such a manner 
that no funds shall be wasted and that the greatest benefit 
shall accrue to the Society from all available sources. The 
following are among the valued benefactions of the year: 

EQUIPMENT 

Messrs. Buri.ev, Conover and Schmidt have together presented 
to the Society the handsome bronze display case that contains Mt. William 
A. Peterson's eihibit. 

Mr. Samuel Insull presented to the Society 434 Mazda Tungsten 

Mr. Enos Barton has added a house-telephone to the Library equip- 
ment that is doing good service in saving trips to the Librarian's desk. 

Ma. Seymour Morris contributed $60.00 to pay for the services 
of an Accession Cierit for one month. 

Mr. Richard E. Schmidt as in former years secured bids, made con- 
tracts and superintended all major repairs on the building without charge 
though the service rendered hai cost him much time and saved the Society 



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Bo Librarian's Report 

Under the head of Accessions will be found a list of 
all the more important gifts to the Library and Museum, 
but attention is directed to the following gifts and loans 
particularly significant in the Society's field: — 

CHICAGO AND ILLINOIS 

1803-57. A memento that is Familiar to all is the "Wau-bantie 
Stone" that formed the basis of a fountain made of fire relics in Mr. Isaac 
N. Arnold's side yard. Thestoryof the stone is that a soldier in Fort Dear- 
born carved the portrait of Chief Waubansle that decorates one side of this 
block of granite. The removal of the landmark emphasizes the inevitable 
passing not only of this historic home, but of the old residence district 
of the lower North Side. This comes to the Society from the Dauobters 
OF Mr. Arnold. 

1817-21. The thanks of the Society are especially due to Mr. C. M. 
Burton, who has copied from his collections a number of letters of Major 
Daniel Baker, commander of Fort Dearborn after its rebuilding, and has 
permitted the Librarian to make copies of the correspondence. This is 
only one of many benefactions that this generous scholar has performed 
for the Society. Indeed students of Northwestern history go to the man 
for aid just as they would go to any historical society and the writer has 
never heard of one turned away without more than he asked. The dona* 
tions of his historical library to the cityof Detroit was consummated last year 
and now students are eagerly waiting for Mr. Burton's translations of 
Margr^s works to reach publication. 

1818. ThepianobroughttoIllinoisbyGeor^Flower, one of the foun- 
ders of the English Colony in Edwards County in 1818, for his daughter, 
Martha, later Mrs. Wilham Pickering. The gift of Miss Martsa P. 
Flower, of Marsbfield Hills, Mass. The piano, which was made by Cle- 
menti in London, remained at Park House until the fair Martha was married 
to General William Pickering in 1824 when it was transferred to their home 
also in New Albion. Their son, William Richard Pickering, now 85 years 
old, writes that people came for miles on horseback to see and hear hit 
mother perform on this piano. General Pickering was appointed govemot 
of Washington Territory by President Lincoln. 

1827. A colored photograph of Chief Alexander Robinson's first and 
second cabins on his Reservation on the Desplaines River, the gift of hit 
granddaughter, Mrs. Anna Kleinkopp. This reservation contained two 
square miles of land and was granted to Chief Robinson in payment for 
his services as Interpreter at tlie Treaty of Prairie du Chien, 1829. Hi) 
daughter Mrs. Mary Rager lives there to-day. See also under field wore. 

1830. A Chicago Volunteer Fireman's belt used in Chicago during 
the 30*5 and once the property of C C. P. Holden, is the gift of Dr. O. L. 
ScBMiDT. It will find a place of honor beside the cape and bucket of Chi- 
cago's First Volunteer Fire Company already in the Museum. 

1833, Acrayon portrait of Mr. Benjamin Jones, who came toChicaeo 
in 1833 and was in 1837 the first Street Commissioner of the Town, is the 

Eift of his grandson Mr. Cbarles Colbv Blake. Benjamin Jones was a 
rother of William Jones, the father of our late well-known citizen, Hon. 
Fernando Jones. 



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Gifts 81 

1835. A marble butt of H. O. Stone by Leonard W. Volk, with pede*- 
tal for the same, is the sift of hit daughters Mm. C. A. GuNH aod Mm. 
Secor Cunningham. Mr. Stone came to Chicago in 1835 and his general 
■QetchandisJDg business is advertised on the cover of the first Chicago 
Directory, 1844, where he gives notice as follows: "No charge for showing 
Goods at 114 Lake St.—Cash Advances Made on Produce Left in Store — 
Cash Paid at All Times for Wheat and Flour." The "goods'* included 
everything from "nails, sash, glass and putty" to "Muslin de Lanes and 
Chusans, Tuscan, silk and velvet Bonnets." 

1836. Two pieces of jewelry made by Isaac Speer, Chicago's first 
jeweler, who began business in 1836 and was in 1855, and for many years 
after, at 77 Lake St. The gift of his son Dr. Crarles Speer. Dk- Speer, 
a member of the Chicago Zouaves, was with Ellsworth at Alexandria. His 
father made the gold badge bearing the insignia of the Company that was 
the proud possession of each Chicago Zouave. They coat (10.00 each. 

1836. An oil portrait by Healy of Hon. C. C. P. Holden who came to 
Chicago in 1836; a badge and baton used by Mr. Holden in Lincoln'i funeral 
procession. The trowel and mallet used by him as President of the Board 
of Cook County Commissioners in laying the comer stone of Cook County 

Court House, July 4, 1877, recall the fact that for many years no occasion 
was complete without the presence of this useful citizen. The gift of his 

1840. Apieceof Haviland china from a set made for Burley & Tyrrell, 
and bearing their mark, said to be the first imported china sold in Chicago. 
This set was bought by Christopher Hageman about IS40 and is presented 
by Miss Lizzie Da vies, a friend of the family who received it as a keepsake. 

1848. A bronze bust of James H. McVicker who opened his theater 
in Chicago in 1857, also thirteen volumes of programs of the McVickei 
Theater Company. This bust has stood for many years Jn the foyer of 
the theater and its temoval marks the end of the old regime in that early 
play house. Mr. and Mrs. McVicker's advent in Chicago occurred in 
May, 184S, when they played in Mr. John B. Rice's Chicago Theater, 
established the previous year. 

1856. From the Estate of Mr. Henrv Greenebaum have come an 
oil portrait of Mr. Greenebaum painted about 1856 when be was campaign- 
ing for Stephen A. Douglas, also a large number of early r«)Orts of public 
b<^iea and institutions in which Mr. Greenebaum was an officer. 



1857. The life mask of Stephen A. Douglas made in Chicago in 1857 
by Leonard W, Volk is presented by the son of the sculptor, Mr. Stephen 
A. Douglas Volk, of New York. 

1861-5. A 12-inch shell that was found embedded in a large cypress 
log while it was going through the lumber mill. The log was cut on the west 
bank of the Mississippi near New Madrid, Mo., and the shell must have been 
thrown by a gun-boat during the Civil Wat. The gift of Mb. Herman 

1863-1903. Record books of the Chicago Astronomical Society. 
The gift of the Society through its President, Prof. Elias Colbert, Pro- 
fessor of Astronomy in the Old Chicago University. 



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8a Librarian's Report 

1864. Sword of Col. Jam««. A. Mulligan and Regimental Flag of 23rd 
Illinois Volunteers, the Irish Brigade," also a sword of Lieut. Jame* 
Nugent. The flag bears the words "Lay me down and save the flag," the 
dying order of trie gallant Col. Mullipn when he was being borne 
from the battlefield of Winchester, Va,, m the defence of Washington, by 
Lieut, Nueenc who was shot down a few moments later. The gift of the 
Daughters of Col. Mullican. 

1866-71. From Mrs. H. S. Tiffany 254 iteieoscopic views of 
American scenery, 75 ofthese being views ofChicaBO before and at the time 
of the Great Fire. 

1871. "An incident of the Chicago Fire," by S. H. Kimball, of Oak 
Park, tells the circumstances of his finding the glass standard of a lamp in 
the ruins of Mrs. O'Leary'i cow-shed, when, as a boy, he and his brother 
searched the place for relict to add to their cabinet on the day after the fire. 



ELLSWORTH 8 ZOUAVES 
1861-65. A manuscript entitled: "The Story of Ellsworth and Hii 
Zouaves" is presented by Mr.. H. H. Miller, formerly of Chicago and a 
member of the Ellsworth Zouaves, later of Company A, 77th Illinois In- 
fantry. He now resides in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, but like all good 
Chicagoans never forgets the earlier home. 

1856-61. Agroupof four Chicago Zouaves with elaborate decoratioiu 
in colored crayons is the original draft made by Ellsworth for a sort of 
diploma to he sold to aid the Zouaves in procuring equipment. Dk. 
Schmidt, Mr. Guhtber, Mr. Henry J. Pattbh, Mr. Frank G. Loqan 
and Mr. Benjamin Allen have each contributed ten dollars toward the 
purchase price which is $50.00. 



t the framed photograph of 



the photograph that he had this frame a 



■jponoroi oi jvijcjtiuru, cu wnujn \.4ji. ii^iiswurcii wii:} ciii^dgcu at liic tiuic ui 
his death, is on exhibition in the South Room. These articles consuting 
of letters, desi^s for uniforms, a sword, etc., are most intimately associated 
with him and reveal much of his remarkable character. As the life of 
Ellsworth has never been written satisfactorily it seems desirable that 



these remain in Chicago where the name of this " military geni 

more than anywhere else, by reason of the fact that he made the Chicago 

Zouaves a synonym for perfection of drill and deportment throughout the 



United States and with their help is said to have "revolutionized the Ameri- 
o military system." 



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Gifts 



83 



Mr. Judd Stewart, of New York, who ownt Lincoln'* letter to the 
pannts of Elliworth, loam the Bmall oil painting of the hero. An affi- 
davit by Col. Ellaworth'a aunt on the back of this, itatet that it wai paint- 
ed for the parents thortly after hii death and hung in their home as long as 
the}' lived when it came to her by requeit. 

LINCOLNIANA 
The Society is indebted to Mr. Frank Hamuh for a large framed 
photograph of tlie capitol at Washington, taken by Brady at the time the 
inauguration of Lbcob and Hamlin was taking place. 



Mias Katherihb D. Arnold, a daughter of the late Isaac N. Arnold, 
the biographer of Lincoln, has presented to the Society a number of books 
and pictures that belonged to her father's collection of Lincolniana, alto a 
silk banner, a relic of the Civil War, given to Mr. Arnold by Mrs. Lincoln 
after the death of the President. Noticeable among these mementoes are: 
The portrait of Lincoln, engraved by Halpin after the painting of F. B. 
Carpenter, bearing an autograph presentation by Mr. Carpenter to Mr 
Arnold. Hesler's photograph of Lincoln with that of hii friend O. H. 
Browning, of Quincy, is framed with a letter from Robert T. Lincoln. 
The large photograph of W. B. Ogdea formerly hung in Mr. Arnold's library. 
Thirty pieces of china bearing the Arnold monogram and crest are relics 
reminiscent of the Pine Street home before the Fire, but the portrait 
of John Bright, the facsimile of the Magna Charta (presented by Lord 
Ripon), and the Certificate of Membership in the Royal Historical Society 
of Great Britain recall Mr. Arnold's visit to England and his addres* on 
Lincoln delivered before the Society. 

GENERAL AMERICANA 
1794. Mr. La Verne Noybs is the donor of one of the most import- 
ant gifts of the year, namely, a small painting, said to have been painted 
by an officer of Anthony Wayne's Legion. Wayne is represented surround- 
ed by his officers, one of whom is William Henry Harrison, then a lieutenant, 
engaged in a parley with a small delegation of Indians. Correspondence 
with Mr. Calvin M. Young, of Greenville, Ohio, to whom a photograph 
of the picture was sent, brings out the facts that the Indian spokesman is 
probably Chief Little Turtle and neit to him the Wyandot Chief, Tarka, 
The Crane, bearing the great peace-pipe. By Wayne's side is his aide, 
Captain William Wells, acring as interpreter and scribe. It will be remem- 
bered that Welis was stolen by the Indians when a boy and was brought 
up in the family of Little Turtle, who was a father to him and whose daugh- 
ter he married. It was only a few days before the Battle of Fallen Timbers 
that Wells severed his allegiance to the Miami Chief in order to join Wayne's 
Legion. Mr. Young indentihes the scene of the picture as a spot in the 
suburbs of Greenville and the hill in the center of the background asTecum- 
teh Point. The time of the conference represented, Mr. Young thinks, 
is probably just before the Treaty of Greenville, and the site, Stony Alley, 
outside the walls of the Fort, a bastion of which is shown at the extreme 
right. He suggests that if the Society should delegate some one to visit 



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84 Librarian's Report 

the site he would be giad to eive him alt necessary inforniatioD for the 
identification of the scene. Mr. Young is a member of the Ohio ArchiC- 
ological Society. The picture h reproduced, p. 76. 

Fourteen BeDJamin Franklin bank notes. Thegift of Mr-Th^ofhilb 
E. L£oN. 



valuable collection of papers relative to eUves, mainly in Kentucky, ITSS- 



As this meeting was being called to order there was handed to n 
valuable collection of papers relative to bIi .-■>■.. 

1860. The gift of Me. Julius Frankel. 

PUBLICATIONS 
The Society's Yearbook for 1913 contained 173 pages 
and was issued in May in an edition of 1500 copies. It 
has been in some demand because of its description of the 
work for children, and also for the bibliographical data 
contained in the classified lists of a 



Beginning with 1914 the publication work of the Society 
was placed in the hands of The University of Chicago Press. 
Satisfactory sales of early as well as recent publications are 
reported. 

In March the Society inaugurated a new series of pub- 
lications under the caption Fort Dearborn Series, the 
initial volume being Dr. Charles Bert Reed's Masters of 
the Wilderness. Besides the paper which gives the title to 
the work, a study of the Hudson's Bay Company, this 
volume contains two other papers read before the Society 
by Dr. Reed, namely. The Beaver Club, and A Dream of 
Empire: The Adventures of Tonty in Old Louisiana. The 
idea of the Publication Committee in departing from the 
fonnat of the earlier publications of the Society is that a 
series of attractive bibelot volumes will go far to popularize 
Central West Histoiy. The choice of Dr. Reed's work 
for the first volume of this series was particularly fortunate, 
for historical facts are presented by him with the pictorial 
skill of a painter and in such perfect literary form that the 
work bids fair to become a classic. 

In April the Society issued an edition of 750 copies of 
Professor Frederick Starr's Catalogue: Exhibition of Objects 
Illustrating the History and Conditions of the Republic of 
Liberia. This has served to awaken an interest in the 
present problems of the little black republic. 

Mr. Horace White's address on the Lincoln and Douglas 
DebaUs, delivered before the Society of February 17, 1914, 



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Publications 85 



though published in July, was not sent to members until 
late in September in oraer that this important publication 
might not be overlooked in accumulations of mail during 
the vacation period. It is being much sought by collectors 
of Lincolniana and indeed by all classes of readers, even 
by people not generally classed as readers, for Mr. White's 
work is a human document being a narrative of his per- 
sonal experience while accompanying Mr. Lincoln for the 
purpose of writing up the Joint Debates for The Chicago 
Tribune. He prefaces the narrative with a survey of the 
factors that combined to make Lincoln the expKinent of 
the will of the people in 1860. 

It is gratifying to note that the sale of the Diary of James 
K. Polk, I844 to 1849, continues to hold its own, about ten 
sets of the work being disposed of annually at $20.00 per 
set. Mr. Charles Conover contributed the cost of advertising 
this work for 1914. 

In August the Library Committee consummated a 
transaction long contemplated, namely, the taking over of 
all the publications of the Fergus Printmg Company. These 
consist of three series as follow: 

Chicago Historical Society Publications, vol- 
umes 1 to 5. 
Fergus Historical Series (made up mainly of 
addresses read before the Chicago Historical 
Society), Nos. 1 to 34. 
Historical, biographical, and genealogical works 
on Illinois. 

To those unfamiliar with the Fergus Historical Series, 
it may be interesting to know that it was undertaken by 
Robert Fergus in 1876 as a labor of love to preserve for the 
future generations the materials of Chicago history which 
he realized would not always lie ready to the hand as they 
had while the pioneer citizens were still alive to fumisii 
original data. 

Moreover, the Historical Society, in the fifteen years 
of its existence before the Great Fire, had drawn into its 
membership nearly all of the prominent lawyers, writers 
and military men of the day, and addresses delivered by 
them accumulated in the archives of the Society faster than 
did the funds for their publication. Perceiving this, the 



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Librarian's Report 



canny Scotchman arranged with the Society to print all of 
its occasional papers and proceedings, furnishing to its mem- 
bers the requisite number of copies in a large octavo size 
with special title pages and covers bearing the Society's 
seal, and publishing with his own imprint the same matter 
in a convenient pocket sized pamphlet that obtained a vogue 
with historical students sufficient to make the House of 
Fergus known from ocean to ocean, while the Society's 
connection with these publications was forgotten. Indeed 
one sometimes sees them cited by students of history as the 
"Publications of the Fergus Historical Society. " However the 
thrifty members of the Historical Society were perfectly 
content to receive their special editions and to leave to the 
Fergus Company the burden and profit of general distribu- 
tion throughout the country. Needless to say that while 
much prestige accrued to the House of Fergus as purveyors 
of western history, the venture has not been profitable 
financially but has been continued as a labor of love down 
to the present time. It should be added that all of the 
addresses profited by the editing and annotating of Robert 
Fergus and his three sons, George H., Benjamin Franklin, 
and John B.,who, like their father,had a passion for accuracy, 
a very high standard of typographical excellence, and unlim- 
ited loyalty to Chicago institutions. 

Price lists of the Chicago Historical Society's publica- 
tions and of the Fergus Historical Series may be had by 
addressing the Librarian. 



PUBLICITY 

About December 1, owing to the kindness of Mr. Mor- 
ris, the Society's poster was again placed in the street cars. 
Notwithstanding the fact of tnat being the holiday season 
when the rooms of the Society are ordinarily almost deserted, 
the attendance for the month was 837 persons. The No- 
vember attendance was 465. Not only was the attendance 
increased measurably, but the character of the visitors 
changed, the percentage of the merely casual being less. 

Much space was given in the city press to Mr. Horace 
White's address on the Lincoln and Douglas Debates. 
February 17, 1914. 



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Children's Lectures 87 

On April 15th, Mr. Henry M. Hyde very courteously 
devoted nis column in the Tribune to an account of the 
Society^s Saturday afternoon lectures for children. The 
article attracted wide attention and was quoted in the 
SOth Anniversary Number of the Journal, this paper later 
publishing a long article on the Society's Library. 

Most widely advertised of all the Society's activities 
was the celebration commemorating the SOth anniversary 
of the founding of Lincoln Park, when Mr. John M. Arm- 
strong, called uie "Father of Lincoln Park,' was the prin- 
cipal speaker. 

CHILDREN'S LECTURES 

The third season of Chicago History LEcruREa for 
Children opened on Saturday, October 3d, with 350 
student delegates from the eighth grade of the public schools 
present. The highest attendance thus far was on October 
24, when 417 were in attendance. As the audience room 
can muster but 300 chairs it is hoped that someone interested 
in the encouragement of these youthful investigators will 
provide 100 folding stools, as there is ample space for addi- 
tional seats. This work is carried on as in the two preceding 
years through the generosity of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

The lectures are given by Mrs. M. R. Mann, Saturday 
afternoons from October to June, in the Society's Lecture 
Hall, and cover the following subjects: 

Period of Explorations, 1673-1803. 
Period of Settlement, 1804-1837. 
Period of Growth and Expansion, 1837-1871. 
Period of Rebuilding, 1871 to Present. 

A detailed description of the delegate system and the 
method of recording attendance was given in the Yearbook 
for 1913, pages 85 to 89. 

The hour of the lecture is three in the afternoon but the 
children are admitted to the building at two o'clock, being 
met at the door by the Librarian who personally conducts 
them over the building explaining the exhibits in their 
historical sequence. Sometimes there are more than a 
hundred children in one of these groups almost breathlessly 
quiet because listening intently, or asking and answering 



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questions in the most animated manner. The advantage 
of having a library supplemented with objects illustrating 
its subject matter can hardly be overestimated. 

Whatever else is bein^ done toward moulding the immi- 
grant into good citizenship, initial steps are being taken in 
these lectures that can hardly fail to- produce results in that 
direction. 

The Cyrus H. McCormick School had the best record 
of attendance for the 1913-14 course, being credited with 
a total of 81 delegates for the four lectures. 

All delegates are instructed to report to their classmates 
on the Monday following a lecture on everything noted in 
connection with the lectures and historical exhibits. Tiny 
flash lights are often used to assist in the taking of notes in 
the darkened room. 

The essay printed below was voted the best contributed 
to the Society this year. Amoi^ the points considered are 
faithfulness to the facts given in the lectures, and indi- 
viduality. It should be said that only thirty schools were 
invited to compete for the privilege of having an essay printed 
in the Yearbook. 

EARLY CHICAGO 

Essay On Lecture 

By Esther Olson of the James Monroe School: 

The fiist Fort Dearborn was built in 1803 at the place mhert Ruth 
St. Bridge now stands. The fort was built of logs 15 feet in length 
which were sharpened at the ends. It had a rectangular shape and 
was composed of two blockhouses opposite each other, and some houses, 
whose walls foimed the outside of the fort. In the middle was a block- 
house, larger and stronger than the test, into which the people went 
after the other two had been shot down or taken. Around the fort wat 
a double stockade made of logs, which were placed upright in the 
ground. 

The first civilized settler in what js now Chicago was a negro, by 
the name of Jean Baptiste Point de Sable. Me lived in a small cabin 
on the Chicago River which he afterwards sold to Mr. John Kinzie, 
who with his family was the 6isl white settler in Chicago. 

In the summer of 1812 began the second war for independence, 
or, as it is now known, the "War of 1812." This war was fought be- 
tween the Americans and the British and raged along the Canadian 
border and on the Great Lakes. 



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Children's Lectures 89 

' In th« Shawnee tribe was an Indian Chief, named TecumKh, who 
greatly opposed the idea that the Indiana ihould sell their land to the 
white people, and he thought that pretty soon the white people would 
drive the Indians into the western ocean. T«cumseh wanted the 
Indians to join and make a treaty to fight af^ainst the settlers. At 
last, after much discussing, his wishes were gratified, and all the Indians 
except those around Fott E>eaibom, who wete friendly to the tettlen 
until afterwards, joined. The Potawatamies, those who were friendly, 
afterwards for some reason became their bitter enemies. 

August 15, 1812, a long procession moved down what ii now 
Michigan Avenue, unril they came to what is now Prairie Avenue and 
18tb Street, where there were some large sand hills. This procession 
was composed of three companies or parts. First a company of soldiers, 
then a company of wagons with women and children, and lastly a 
company of friendly Indians, riding horseback. Among the soldiers 
was Captain Wells, of whose parentage little is known. When William 
was ten years old he was kidnapped by the Indians and taken to their 
home where he lived until he had grown into manhood, ^when he went 
away to General Wayne's camp where he was made a captain. While 
Mr. Wells was living with the Indians he married Little Turtle's 
daughter. Soon after joining the army. Captain Wells, as he was 
devoted to his family, went and got them and took them home with 
him where they lived as white people. One of Captain Wells' great 
grand-daughters is now living in the South and is very proud of her 
Indian ancestry and blood. 

As the soldiers went around these hills the women, children and 
Indians were hid entirely from sight. The Indians realized that the 
soldiers could not protect the women and children, and they fell upon 
them and massacred many. This was called the "Fort Dearborn 
Massacre." 

In 1830 the first map of Chicago was made, and some people say 
that the city began, but it was not until 1837 thai Chicago was in- 
corporated. In 1830 the village covered only ^ of a square mile, 
and its population was about 200. Now Chicago covers about 130 
square miles and has a popularion of about 2,000,000. In 1830 only 
Lake Street was laid out, and now there are over 200 streets. 

For a number of years it has been the custom to throw 
open the building to children on February 12th and 22d 
in honor of the birthdays of Lincoln and Washington. On 
the afternoon of Lincoln's birthday this year the children 
had the privilege of listening to Hon. Jesse W. Weik on the 
subject of The Career of the Immortal Railsplitler. This is 
treated under the head of Meetings of the Society inasmuch 
as members of the Society and other adults attended. 

On Saturday morning, February 21st,Mr. John Adamson 
gave his illustrated lecture for children, entitled Washington, 



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90 Librarian's Report 

Boy and Man. Invitations had been sent to a number of 
the schools for the 7th grade children. Thirteen hundred 
youthful patriots responded making it necessary to divide 
the audience and givf the lecture twice. A class from the 
School for Destitute and Crippled Children was brou|ht 
in after the last audience was seated and it was charming 
to see how readily chairs were given up to the httle cripples. 
A photc^raph of one of these groups is shown on the opposite 
page. 

The following letter is from a teacher: 

Calumet High School, Chicago, March 28, 1914. 

Secretary of the Chicago Historical Society, 

Dear Sir: — Allow me to thank you foe the tickets to lectures and 
exhibitions that you have lately sent to our school. As a teacher of 
history in Chicago High Schools for the last fifteen years I feel that ire 
teachers owe a great deal to your Association both for invitations to 
lectures for ourselves and foi oui pupils. 

Thanking you again, I am very sincerely yours, 

(Signed) Victoria A. Adaus. 



SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS 

On December 2d and for a week thereafter a valuable 
collection of lamps illustrating methods of lighting from 
antiquity to the present was loaned by Miss Mattie E. 
French, of Kenosha, Wis. 

Three special exhibitions of Lincolniana were made during 
the year; namely, on November 19th, The Fiftieth Anniver- 
sary of the Gettysburg Address; on February 12th, the 
birthday; and on February 17th when Mr. Horace White 
addressed the Society on "The Lincoln and Douglas De- 
bates." This subject exceeds all others in interest. 

On February 21st an exhibit in honor of Washington's 
Birthday was made. Two particularly interesting relics 
shown were a razor, once the property of and used by 
George Washington, and a lancet with which he was bled. 
A letter throwing light on these was recently found and is 
given below. It was written by Hon. Joseph Gillespie to 
the Secretary of the Society and reads as follows: 



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Special Exhibitions 



EdwardsTllIc, 24 June, 1882. 

Dear Friend: — ... I enclose a razor that has been in my 
family for upwards of 65 years according to my recoilection. My 
father always told me that it came from an inmate of the family of 
Genl. Washington. It was always preserved as a sacred relic by my 
father and upon his death passed into my possession, where it has 
remained with the exception of the time it was on exhibition at the 
Philadelphia Centennial. ... I have not a particle of doubt of its 
genuineness as a relic of the Father of his Countn'. A Mrs. Lewis 
has given me a lancet which 1 also send to you, which, she assures me, 
has always been preserved in her family as a memento of Genl. Wash- 
ington. I know her grandfather well — Thomas Tindall, who was in 
the habit of bleeding and carried a lancet, which he had occasion to 
use in bleeding Genl. Washington, and it was ever after kept and pre- 
served as a sacred relic, ... I take it that there is no fact in history 
much better authenticated. . . . 

Yours truly, 

J. GlLLESFIE. 

Added to the Society's collection of Washington docu- 
ments was a paper which excited great interest among the 
boys, namely, the Original Survey and Plat made by 
Washington for Lord Fairfax in 1751, loaned by Mr. J. B. 
Foley. Other valuable exhibits were the correspondence 
of Maj. Sebastian Bauman, Washington's trusted aide at 
Valley Forge, loaned by Mr. George A. Brennan, and the 
Rembrandt Peak portrait loaned by Mr. C. F. Gunther. 

On March 4th, the Anniversary of the Ordinance Estab- 
lishing Lincoln Park, original plans of the Park and the lirst 
reports of the Park Commissioners were shown, together with 
early views of the upper North Side, including Wright's 
Grove, the Lake View House, "The Ten Mile Ditch," 
"Dawn," (the home of S. H. Kerfoot), and the homes of 
S. B. Chase, Judge Ebenezer Peck, Dr. Dyet, and many 
others. 

From March 23rd to April 4th Professor Starr's Col- 
lection Illustrating the History and Present Conditions of 
Liberia, was shown and attracted hundreds of visitors. 
A catalt^ue of that remarkable exhibition, said to be the 
first of its kind, was published by the Society. In gathering 
this material Professor Starr has done a splendid 
for the "Little Black Republic," the only real col 
United States ever had, and its exhibition here wa: 
valuable from an educational point of view. 



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On April 13th the long awaited Exhibition of Aboriginal 
Remains was opened. This has so grown in interest for 
the public that it is retained until the present time. It 
will be seen from the following list of a few of the most 
important exhibits that the Society is greatly indebted not 
only to local archxolo^sts but also to residents of our 
neighboring state, Indiana, for the greater part of the 
CD ect ons shown. 

ABCH£OLOGICAL REMAINS 

Mr. WiiLiAM A. Peterson, of Chicago. Exhibit of European and 
American Stone Artifacts, including the following: Flint Core 
(France Cave Dwelling); Three-sided Too! (Freneh Nioeene 
Period); Obsidian Cores and Scrapers removed from same, illus- 
trating conoidal cleavage; Gouge highly polished (Sweden); Gouge 
(North Carolina); Three Axes showing round holes for the 
handles, probably made with wooden drills; Jade Ceremonial Axe 
(New Guinea); Diili highly polished (Sweden); Hand Dalit 
(Denmark); Axe showing double hafting (Arizona); Plow-share, 
18 inches long, showing polished point, indicating at least 150 yean 
use in sandy soil (Illinois); 3 Ceremonial Axes (Illinois), etc. 

Mr. PhilipC.Schupp, of Chicago. Exhibit of Stone Artifacts mainly 
from the vicinity of Bowmanville: Three Flint Hoes, 9 to 14 
inches in length, showing the high polish of long use in sandy sdl; 
Three Blue Flint Ceremonial Hoes; Stone Axe, 12 inches in length; 
Axe embedded in root of a tree; Red Flint Knife, 10 inches long; 
Six Pocket Knives; 50 Spear heads, some 7 inches in length; 50 
War-poincs; 50 Bird-points; 100 Drills; Stone Beads; Arrow em- 
bedded in leg-bone of an animal; Mortar and Pestles; Indian 
Grindstone illustrating method of shaping sides and cutting edge 

Chicago Historical Society. Maps of Indian Trails and Village! 
in the vicinity of Chicago, together with Flints and Pottery 
gathered white making archa^ilogical survey of this region by 
Albert F. Scbarf; Plaster Model of Cahokia Mound, St. OaitCo., 
III., etc. 

Dr. O. L. Schmidt. Bones and Pottery taken from Mound in Union 
County, III. 

Mr. H. S. Wbtherell. Finds from Mounds on Fox River near 
Algonquin. 

LATER INDIANS 
Mr. J. M. Stouder^ of Fort Waj-ne, Ind. Contents of the grave of 
Little Tunle, Chief of the Miamis, whose place of burial was un- 
identified for 100 years, discovered in 1911 by workmen in digging 
for a railway near Fort Wayne. This collection well illustrates 
the Indian custom of burial with all of phe favorite possessions. 
Chief among the treasures of this celebrated Chief are the sword 
presented to him by Washington in 1797, a medal bearing the 



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Special Exhihitions 93 

portrait of Washington, four pairs of Rivet armlett, four large 
double-barred silver crosses, many small ctosses, btooches, ver- 
milion paint and wampum beads; next are the small anns, flint- 
lock pistols, knives, etc.; next come utensils, such as table knives, 
shears, pincers, and a copper kettle filled with beans. Mr. Stouder 
has marked the site of the grave with a stone tablet and is taking 
subscriptions for a monument to be placed on this spot. The 
Historical Society was able to exhibit with these a miniature 
of Captain William Wells, Little Turtle's son-in-law, and a photo- 

fraph of his great -great-granddaughter, Mrs. Eva C. Corthell, of 
acksonville, Fla 
Mrs. C. Gorhan Ball, of Lafayette, Indiana. A Collection of 
Paintings by her father, George Winter, widely known as the 
"Catlin of Indiana," asfollows: "Indian Village on the Mississine- 
"' er, Indiana," a large canvas in oils showing over 40 figures 



of Indians with a group of Indian women playing a gamblinggan 

all of the figures being portraits studied from life in 1338; "'^taty 

of Kee-wau-nay" shows a forest scene on the Wabash River, Col. 



A. C. Pepper, Lewis H. Sands, George H. Profit, United States 
Commissioners, and Interpreter Jos, N. Bouropas seated at a 
table, surrounded by Indians wearing peace boimets, being ad- 
dressed by Chief Mass) ue-buck. 

Thirteen portrait studies from life as follows: Chief I-o-wah, Chief 
Ke-wa-nay, Swaw-go, Ken-tuck, Ash-ku-u, Mas-sa (squaw), 
Maurie, Yu-ca-top-kone, Mie-Shawt-Coose (Pottawattomie 
ChieO, Ben-Ache, Francis Godfroy, Godfroy's Home, Frances 
Slocum and two Daughters, and Bourierte (Interpreter). Frances 
Slocum, a white i^hild stolenduring the Revolution by the Delaware 
Indians from her home in the Wyoming Valley and finally adopted 
by the Miamis of the Wabash, was known as "The Wtiite Rose 
of the Miamis." She was the wife of She-buck-o-nah, the Deaf 
Chief, and lived and died at Deaf Man's Village, where this sketch 
was made by Mr. Winter in 1839 at the request of the Slocum 
family. The writer knows of no . contemporary portraits of 
Indians of this region that compare with the above in beauty 
and interest. The life of George Winter would doubtless read 
like a romance. 

Mk. William A, Pbterson. Specimens of bead and porcupine work, 
also headdresses of dyed hair and porcupine fur, 100 pieces. 

Mr. Th£opbile LtoN. Buckskin Coat and Leggings heavily beaded. 
War Bonnet, Flying-Shield, Quivers with Bows and Arrows, War 
Drum, 3 Papoose Carriers, Medicine bags. Pipe-bag, Moccasins, 
Bone Necklace, Beaded Vest, etc., 100 pieces. 

Miss M. TwiTTY, of Oak Park. Beaded Smoking Cap purchased by 
Edward Twitty in Manchester, England, in 1842. 

Cbicaco Historical Society. A Collection of 50 Portraits of Local 
Indians, among them Black Hawk, Pokagon I. and II., Shabbona, 
Alexander Robinson, Wau-ban-sie, and "The Prophet;" Specimen 
of Indian Picture Writing on Elk Skin, representing a Savage 
War Party engaging United States troops; Buckslin Indian 
Costume, headdress, and moccasins presented to Fernando Jones 
by Pottawattomie Indians; Portrait of Mr. Jones wearing Indian 
Costume, painted by Arthur Pickering. 



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FIELD WORK 

On July 29th Mr. Albert F. Scharf, the author of the 
Map of Indian Trails in the Vicinity of Chicago, guided a 
party composed of Dr. O. L. Schmidt, Dr. W. S. Orth, and 
the Libranan over the western end of the Desplaines-Chicaeo 
Portage Trail, with a view to identifying certain landmarks 
along the route taken by Joliet and Marquette in 1673 
on their return voyage of discovery of "the South Sea and 
the great river they call the Mississippi which is supposed 
to discharge itself into the sea of California."* 

The entire Portage Trail, nine miles in length, extended 
from the Rapids of the Desplaines below Riverside to Lee's 
Place (Bridgeport) along the north bank of the West Fork 
of the South Branch, or Portage River.** The eastern 
two-thirds of the Trail having been given over to commerce 
for many years does not now present the field for invest^a- 
tion that it did when the Society began its work in 1856 
under the direction of Dr. William Barry. 

The first vestige of the Portage Trail became visible 
crossing a farm that lies on the slight ndge paralleling the 
Drainage Canal, N. E. of the mtersection of Central 
Avenue and 38th Street. That this ridge was recognized 
as an advantageous elevation by pioneers as well as Indians 
is evidenced by the fact that the embankment for a projected 
railroad, mentioned in the Canal Commissioner's Report of 
1833, was actually thrown up alone this ridge and in the 



covered with the sod of seventy years, it is still sharply 
defined by its three feet of elevation above the gentle 
slope of the ridge. Here a few flints were found and many 
more were exhibited by the farmer. Following Austin 
Avenue a few blocks south of this farm, the party came to 
the Ogden Ditch, perhaps twelve feet deep at this point, 
where are exposed strata of shell-filled marl beneath peat 
three feet thick, thus establishing the location of the ancient 
bed of Mud Lake. 

Returning to 39th Street and running half a mile west to 
Ridgland Avenue the oak timber begins to appear in a thickly 

• Fronienac'a Report to Colbert, Nov. 2, 1672, relative to Joliet'i 
expedition. 

"Gurdon S. Hubbard laid that this was known »s the Portage 
River when he came to this region in 1818. 



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Field Work £5 



set wedge-shaped grove, that, surrounded by treeless prairte, 
became the 'Pointe Aux Chfines" of the voyageurs and 
gave the name to the Portage, as shown on Bellin's map of 
1755,* Here also wherever the sod had been removed 
the flints in abundance were found marking the trail. 

Going west on 39th street to Oak Park Avenue the party 
entered the enclosure of Mount Auburn Cemetery, a beautiful 
tract of oak forest, where for seven years the owner, Mr. 
Georee Schrade, has labored to remove the ridge that 
interfered in the laying out of the cemetery, in the process 
ofwhich removal bones, stone axes, and flints were unearthed. 
One fine axe and several arrows were presented to Dr. 
Schmidt by Mr. Schrade. 

The party then followed the ridge trail out of the ceme- 
tery westward through the oak timber, picking up flints 
frequently, until it ended in the Rapids of the Desplaines, 
where is the Ford below the Spillway Dam. At the edge of 
the river bank Mr. Scharf directed the party to look for 
pottery, for here the camp fires were wont to be lighted. The 
clay bank was found to be literally full of small blackened 
potsherds, many of which were gathered for the Societ}^s 
collections. The return was made by way of the romantic 
Bourbon Spring, Laughton's, with its near-by Indian Mound 
and Riverside Boulevard. 

When one has traversed the flint sown ridge, gathered 
pottery at the camp sites, and crossed the river at the ford 
or rapids that the lapse of two hundred and forty years 
has failed to change, he scans the Portage Trail on the 
charts laid down by Mr. Scharf with new vision and is 
better able to judge of the service that this careful investiga- 
tor has performed in mapping the trails before it was too 
late. It is hoped that the Forest Reserve plan will be so 
heartily endorsed by popular vote at the coming election 
that even technicalities of the legislature will be powerless 
to prevent the passage of a bill giving Chicago the right 
to protect and perpetuate the beautiful river valleys that 
were the homes and "happy hunting grounds" of her Indian 
predecessors. 

'The Report of the Canal Commissioners, 1825, mention* 
"the small lake called Lac de la Pointe Aux ChSnes" at a possible 
feeder for the canaL 



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96 Librarian's Report 

On October 17th, at the invitation of Mr. John F. Steward, 
a joint committee of the Illinois Historical Society and the 
Chicago Historical Society made an all day expedition to 
Kendall County to view the site of the Fox Indian battle 
ground that lies on a hill just south of the town of Piano, 
on the Fox River. The locality is called "Maramech" on 
Franquelin's Map of LaSalle's Colony, 1684-88, when it 
was an important town of the Miamis. Therefore Mr. 
Steward, who owns the land, has named the elevation that 
rises seventy-five feet above the river "Maramech Hill." Mr. 
Steward was bom near this interesting spot in 1841 and early 
became acquainted with the Indian graves and with the 
Sauk and Fox and Kish-Wau-Kee Trails that had their 
crossing at Maramech, for it was over the first mentioned, 
then the main east and west thoroughfare of the pioneer, 
that the elder Steward had, in 1838, brought his little famil/ 
in a "prairie schooner" to make their home in these romantic 
surroundings. However, it was not until 1874, when one 
day Mr. Steward climbed the hitl to gain a view of the pan- 
orama of the Fox Valley, that he noticed that the curved 
brow of the summit was encircled by an embankment and a 
corresponding ditch, and that this rampart extended slant- 
wise down the steep face of the hill to the Little Rock Creek 
below. Part way down this protected passage an iron axe 
of French make 9)4 inches in length, was found. He next 
found ranges of rifle pits at another angle of the summit, 
and when on the two surrounding hills he discovered defenses 
corresponding to these and quantities of flint arrows he 
realized that here battles must have been fought between 
the red man and the white. But when p and wlio were the 
commanders? For the next thirty years Mr. Steward gave 
all of his spare time to solving the problem. In the course 
of his research he mastered the French language in order 
to read the original narratives of the explorers and to search 
the archives of Paris. He amassed a great collection of 
early American maps and mastered their details so thoroughly 
that he became a recognized authority on the cartogra[>hy 
of the upper Mississippi Valley. From this investigation 
Mr. Steward learned that the ancient name of the Fox 
River was Pestekuoy, or River of the Buffalo, the ancient 
name surviving only in the name of the little Lake Pistakee, 
in which it has its source, and that later cartographers named 
it Riviere du Rocher, River of the Rock. To-day Little 



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Field Work g? 



Rock Creek and Big Rock Creek are the names of the two 
tributaries of the Fox that flow on either side of the Maramech 
Hill, while only a French league awa^ on the river towers 
the great rock that gave the nver its French name. 

By 1903 Mr. Steward had so correlated the facts drawn 
from these original sources that he was able to piece together 
a fairly complete account of the happening in northern 
Illinois from the 17th to the 19th century. This was pub- 
lished in a work entitled Lost Maramech and Earliest Chicago. 

The solution of the problem of the battlemented hills 
Mr. Steward finds in the fact that in just such a spot as this 
one league from "The Rock" the Fox Indians intrenched 
themselves in 1730 to resist the measures planned by the 
French for their extermination, and that here, from August 
17th to September 8th, the combined forces of St. Ange from 
Fort Chartres, De Villiers from Fort St. Joseph, and De 
Noyelles from Fort Miamis, 1300 strong, laid siege to the 
ancient citadel, which was strongly defended until the water 
supply was cut off by the building of a fort which commanded 
the covered path to the creek above menUoned. On the 
8th of September under cover of a violent storm the Foxes 
escaped from their fort only to be slaughtered by the allies. 
Thus perished almost an entire nation to make way for 
advancing civilization. 

So closelj' does the configuration of the country conform 
to tfie descriptions of contemporary writers that the student 
who seeks to disprove Mr. Steward's contention for this site 
will do well to personally survey it and then to compare the 
survey with that of the vicinity of The Rock on Illinois 
River— the location favored by Parkman — which is known 
to Mr. Steward only less minutely than that near The Rock 
on the Fox River. 

Late in the year, at the suggestion of the Librarian, a 
group of 175 members of the Prairie Club, interested in the 
preservation of the forest tracts along the Desplaines River, 
visited Chief Alexander Robinson's Reservation near Nor- 
wood Park. After wandering about this beautiful tract 
under stately elms, lindens, and oaks of great size, viewing 
the graves of Chief Robinson and his numerous descendants, 
and listening to a short address of welcome from Mrs. Maiy 
Robinson Rager, who spoke, holding her father's war club 



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Librarian's Report 



in her hand, the party voted this the most interesting spot 
in the vicinity of Chicago, and, because of its romantic 
history, well worthy of special effort to preserve its beauties 
intact for the pleasure and instruction of future generations. 
Coffee was furnished through the courtesy of Cnase & San- 
bom; and Dr. £. A. Earle, of Desplaines, a Corresponding 
Member of the Historical Society, contributed cream, sand- 
wiches, and doughnuts for the entire party. 

RELATIONS WITH OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

This Society participated in the conference of Local 
Historical Societies, in connection with the 29th Annual 
Meeting of the American Historical Association in December, 
by a report on the activities of the year. 

At the Annual Meeting of the American Association of 
Museums, held at Milwaukee May 19th and 20th, the 
Historical Society was represented by the Librarian, who 
reported on the Society's work for children. On the 21st, 
members of the Association spent an hour in this building 
studying the methods used here for cooperating with the 
schools. The visitors were also interested in the maps of 
Indian trails. 

The Historical Society contributed three pieces of wood 
from the following historic buildings from which a gavel 
was made for the convocation of the 126th General Assembly 
of the First Presbyterian Church: Fort Dearborn, the Mass- 
acre Tree, and the Green Tree Tavern. The first Protestant 
Church was organized in Fort Dearborn in 1833, Rev. 
Jeremiah Porter, pastor. 

The Librarian has represented the Society in the Council 
for Museum and Library Extension at all of its meetings 
during the past year. The annual election of officers resulted 
in the election of the following: N. H. Carpenter, President; 
Prof. Geo, H. Mead, Vice-President; Carolme M. Mcllvaine, 
Sec reta ry-Tre a s ure r. 

The Board of Directors of the Society of Colonial Dames 
of Illinois have held meetings monthly in the Committee 
Room of this building and have presented to this Library 
a very beautiful book on old silver in American churches. 

The Kaskaskia Chapter, D. A. R., have met monthly 
in the Lecture Hall. On the afternoon of April 20th Mrs. 



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New Street Names 99 

Frank R. Chandler presided, Mrs. B. A. Fessenden read a 
French romance, and Miss McDvaine presented a paper on 
"Lafayette's Visit to Illinois, 1824-25." Mrs. Lucius 
C. Pardee, a granddaughter of Thomas Mather, of ICaskas- 
kia, loaned for the occasion various souvenirs of the dinner 
and ball tendered to Lafayette by Governor Coles and the 
citizens of Kaskaskia April 30, 1825. Among other articles 
of dress were gloves hearing the miniature of Lafayette 
stamped on the wrists. For this occasion Mr. Conover 
kindly loaned examples of rarely beautiful blue Staffordshire 
ware plates, some decorated with pictures of the landing 
of Lafayette at Castle Garden, others with views of his 
home "LaGrange." 

On the same afternoon the Librarian gave a lantern talk 
on "Early Chicago Homes" before a visiting group of the 
Ravens wood Woman's Club. 

On April 25th the Librarian gave a lantern talk on 
"Chicago from 1673 to 1871" for the Parents' Club of the 
Chicago Commons. 

In October the following resolution was forwarded to the 
Society by Mrs. E. B. Erickson: 

"At the first regular meeting of the Rogera Park Woman's Club 

it was moved that our Club endorse the purchase of the property just 

south of the Rush Street Bridge, which occupies the site of old Fort 

Dearborn, this purchase to be effected through the efforts of the Chicago 

Historical Society. 

"The motion was unanimously carried." 

Mrs. Ericson stated that she is informed that if this site 
could be purchased, the city would take care of it as part 
of the Park system. The work of widening Michigan Avenue 
is to begin in March or April. Proceedings of the City 
Council for March 9, 1914, contains plans for this improve- 
ment. 

NEW STREET NAMES 

No activity of the year has been more commended than 
has the support afforded by the Society to the Association 
of Commerce in its efforts to retain the old street names and 
to commemorate worthy characters in history in the re- 
naming of the streets that had duplicate names. However, 
in The Revised List of New Street Names Adopted by tke 
City Council, January 26, 1914, published in the i 
of the Bureau of Maps and Plats, we still find many i 



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Librarian's Report 



that bear the stamp "Made in Chicago," as for example: 
Gratten, Inanda, Karlov, Kedvale, Kiona, Kolin, Kolmar, 
Kongee, Kostner, Liano, Magnet, Mandel, Midas, Ogallah, 
Oketo, Onarga, Ozinam, and Sarak. 

- The following quotation from the above mentioned 
report would seem to indicate that it is only a question of 
time when this alphabetic system will be extended to cover 
the entire city if the recommendations of the Head of the 
Map Department are adopted: 

"The plan followed, where it became necessary to assign entirely 
new names, was to make such assignment on an alphabetical basis; 
all new names commencing with the letter "A" in the first mile [East 
or West of State Street], " fi " in the second, " C" in the third, etc. The 
possibleextensionofthisplan, so as to cover all of the streets in the city 
of Chicago,excepting the numbered streets on the South Side, taken in 
connection with the new house numbering system, would give Chicago 
a better system of naming and numbering than any other large city in 
the worfd. This statement, of course, is not to be construed from a 
sentimental standpoint, but from a standpoint of utility and simplicity. 
... In this connection the tendency shown in the City Council 
during the past few months to make changes at the instigation or 
request of individuals, or any set of individuals, where such changes 
are not in conformity with the general plan of the ordinance, is to 
be deplored. It is my recommendation that no further changes be 
made excepting where the circumstances fully justify such action, and 
juch change ii made in con/ormily milh the general plait." 

In more than one instance public-spirited citizens, rebuffed 
by the methods of the Sub-Committee on Streets, were 
driven to the length of canvassing the residents on their 
streets for many miles, on those hot summer days of 1913, 
to obtain signatures to petitions praying to retain old names 
that meant home to them. To these and to the members 
of this Society and of the Association of Commerce who 
left their offices to spend entire mornings in the tobacco- 
laden air of the committee rooms in order to press the claims 
of pioneer citizens to recognition in the street nomenclature, 
the patriotism and sanity of the Mayor and Council, in 
listening to the pleas, in spite ofthedamorof the opposition 
does not seem "deplorable." 

That the prefixes North, South, East, and West make 
for better system and simplification is open to grave doubt, 
for people who have lived in Minneapolis and in Washington 
City, where this system has been m use for many years, 
generally agree that it has merely multiplied the chances 
of mistake. 



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Attendance 



While rejoicing that the names of Augustus Harris 
Buriey and of other distinguished citizens have been 
assigned to streets, many have regretted that the name of 
Hubbard Court was lost and have asked why Gurdon 
Saltonstall Hubbard was not commemorated in one of the 
new street names. It should be said that the Historical 
Society through its President and other officers presented 
more than one petition recommending that this name 
be given to Michigan Street, as that name duplicated the 
Avenue, and also because the extension of Michigan Street 
west of the river was at one time called "Hubbard Street" 
and ran through a subdivision of the early city opened by 
Gurdon S. Hubbard. For reasons not stated by the Com- 
mittee these petitions were not granted, but when the name 
Austin Avenue was given to the street the reason for the 
opposition to the name of Hubbard was not far to seek, for 
a name beginning with "A" was needed to (it into the alpha- 
betic system, this being in the first mite north of Madison 
Street. However, the north and south street dividing 
Austin from Oak Park has always borne the name of Austin 
Avenue, so that a new duplication was created. 
"0 mighty GesatI dost thou lie so Ion? 

Are all tny conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils. 

Shrunk to this little measure? 
" But jresterday the word of Czsar might 

Have stood against the world; now lies he there, 

Aad none so poor to do him reverence." 

ATTENDANCE 
The total attendance including visitors to the Library 
and collections, and those present at lectures, special anni- 
versaries, etc., is 15,384, divided as follows; — 

Visitors Totals 







Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 




1st 


quarter, 


193 


40 


1,405 


312 


1,950 


2iid 


1 quarter, 


156 


82 


1,925 


500 


2,663 


3rd 


quarter. 


146 


34 


683 


252 


•1,115 
•815 


4th 


quarter. 


84 


32 


502 


197 






579 


188 


4,515 


1,261 


6,543 




•The building being closed to visiti 


ira, other tha 


n spedal students, ex- 



cept on Tuesday and Friday afternoons during July, August and Seple: 
ber, the attendance for the third and fourth quarters « 
third that of the corresponding period last year. 



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Librarian's Report 



LECTURES (adult) 

November 4, Alvord 60 

December 2, French : . 100 

January 20, Nightingale 75 

February 17, White., 500 

March 14, Armstrong 200 

March 23, "Liberia 250 

April 4, Starr 250 

April 23, Whelpley 200 1,635 

children's CHICAGO LECTURES 

North Side Schools : 2,147 

South Side Schools 2,228 4,375 

OTHER CROUPS 881 

ANNIVERSARIES 

Lincoln's Birthday 350 

Washington's Birthday 1,300 

Gettysburg Day, Nov. 19th, 306 1,950 

Total 8,841 

Applications signed for books record 1,500 volumes 
specifically called for. About 500 less than last year. 

Applications signed for permission to photograph pictures 
and museum objects record 64 specifically called for. 

A letter was received from Mrs. Emily Beaubien LeBeau, 
written on her eighty-ninth birthday. Mrs. LeBeau has 
witnessed the complete evolution of Chicago, having been 
brought to Fort Dearborn from Detroit by her father, Mark 
Beaubien, in 1829. Another early Chicagoan heard from, is 
Anson A. Pike, of Spokane, Washington, who arrived at 
Fort Dearborn March 1, 1830, with his father, a veteran of 
the War of 1812, and a brother of Albert Pike, who was 
transferred to this post from Mackinaw. If still living, Mr. 
Pike is now ninety-five years of age. 

Among notable visitors and early residents who have 
signed the Visitors' Register are the following: 

Cecelia J. Armstrong, bom in Chicago, Oct. 14, 1836, 
daughter of A. M. Talley, Mgr, Chicago Democrat for 
Mr, Wentworth. 



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J. M. Annstrong, bom in Chicago, 1842, alderman in 
1863^, "Father of Lincoln Park." 

P. M. Balken, came to Chicago in 1849. 

O. A. Benson, bom in Lincoln Park House, Feb. 9, 
1876. 

H. H. Bloom, N. Panama. 

Mrs. Charles Catlin (Maiy E.), bom in Chicago in 1850. 

Franklin S. Catlin, bom in Chicago, 1876. 

Harry de Caux, Pine Ridge, S. D., related to Qiief 
Seven Mountains. 

Matilde Kearney Clowry, came to Chicago in 1852. 

Bertha R, Comstock, Miami, Fla., great niece of Alex- 
ander Chamberlain, the friend and companion of 
Captain Wells, accompanied Wells to Ft. Dearborn in 
August, 1812, was left for dead at the Massacre, but 
recovered and lived to be 98 years old at Logansport, 
Indiana. 

Russell Cooney, great-grandson of Chief Alexander 
Robinson. 

Charles A. Crane, Mecteetse, Wyoming, came to Chicago 
Feb. 14, 1866. 

Rev. Geo. A. Cressey, Morgan Park, HI., one of Lincoln's 
soldiers, Co. "D, ' 6th Minnesota Infantry. 

Julia Patterson Cross, daughter of Dr. R. W. Patterson 
and Julia Quigley. Dr. Patterson came to Chicago 
in 1842. 

DeWitt H. Curtis, arrived in Chicago Oct. 6, 1842. 

C. C. Dearborn, Kansas City, Mo., great-grandnephew 
of General Henry Dearborn. , 

C. Sumner Douglas, 1826 E. 35th St., Chicago. 

Helen Vemera D., bom in Chicago, daughter of John 
B. and Josephine Corey Drake. 

F. A. Eastman, Postmaster at Chicago, 1871. 

George Eberlen, came to Chicago, 1848. 

Gertrude £. English, bom in Chicago, 1858. 



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Librarian's Report 



John Q. Fergus, Co. "A," 19th 111. 

Archibald Flower, Chairman Governing Body of the 

Shakespearean Memorial, Stratford-upon-Avon, related 

to George Flower, Edwards Co., Ill, 

Oswald G. Flower, Major Middlehill, Broadway, Dor- 
setshire, England. 

Bedelia Kehoe Garraghan, bom in Chicago March 2, 
1S43, went to school at Academy Sacred Heart with 
the daughters of Chief Alexander Robinson. 

Robert Glenk, Curator La. State Museum, New Orleans, 
Louisiana. 

Dr. J. H. Goodell, Marseilles, III. 

Richard T. Greener, Consul U. S. A., Vladivostok, 
E. Siberia, 1898-1906. 

Al. Meta H. Dearborn Healy, daughter of Robert T. 
Dearborn. 

H. N. Higinbotham, lived in Chicago since 1860. 

Albert T. Hill, Sydney, N. S. W. 

C. S. Hubbard, came to Chicago in 1855. 

Oliver Jackson, came to Chicago in 1845. 

V. C. Kelford, Broadview, Sask., Canada. 

Margaret G. Kidder, bora in Chicago 1863, daughter of 
J. L. Walsh, the first Irishman in Chicago. 

General Charles King, Milwaukee, soldier and author. 

Mrs. Agnes Kleinkopf, granddaughter of Chief Alexander 
Robinson. 

W. L. Kyle, came to Chicago in 1849. 

Leonard Lively, S. Africa. 

Juliet (Gordon) Low, Savannah,^ Ga., great-grand- 
daughter of John Kinzie. 

William R. Manierre, son of Geo. Manierre, who came to 
Chicago in 1835, bom April 25, 1847. 
saac Markens, New York, Lincoln collector, 
jseph McDonald, came to Chicago in 1846. 



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Attendance 105 



William H. Menard, son of E. E. Menard, nephew of 

Pierre Menard, Prairie du Rocher, 111. 
William Morley, came to Chicago in 1857. 
Jacob T. Moss, 1st Lieut. 53rd 111. 
Mrs. Hiram Pearson Murphy, came to Chicago in 1840. 
J. C. Nelson, Captain 89th O. V. I., arrived in Chicago 

Sept. 22, 1840. 
George Eddy Newcomb, bom in Chicago Feb. 16, 1864. 
CharleyOs-Ke-Mon, grandson of Chief Seven Moimtains. 
Louis Pelzer, University of Iowa, Iowa Cityi la. 
Frank C. Peterson, came to Chicago in 1866. 
John K. Prindiville, bom in Chicago 1851. 
R. Spence Prindiville, bom in Chicago in 1855. 
J. A. Quinlan, came to Chicago in 1852. 
John P. Riley, Sergeant K, 2nd Wisconsin Volunteer 

Cavalry, in Chicago, June, 1848. 
Hugh Ritchie, came to Chicago in 1849. 
Laura Dean Root, daughter of Phillip Dean, who came to 

Chicago in 1835, Park Ridge, III. 
Fritz H. Schumann, Leipzig, Germany. 
Chief Seven Mountains, Sioux Tribe, S. D., 97 years 

old, fought in Custer's Massacre, his mark. 
F. B. Smith, came to Chicago and entered store of S. C. 

Griggs & Co., Booksellers, 1862. 
Captain C. Schimmels, bom in Chicago in 1845. 
J. V. Stevens, B.S., M.D., came to Chicago in 1866. 
Mrs. Emma A. Talcott, attended several sessions of the 

convention that nominated Abraham Lincoln, wmmmmm 
M. Bross Thomas, nephew of Wm. Brass, visited C j 

in October, 1860, called on Lincoln same montf 
Frederick B. Tuttle, Calumet Club. 
Warren Upham, Secretary Minnesota State His^ ' 

Society, St. Paul. ' 

Henry H. Walker, came to Chicago in 1869. 



Librarian's Report 



Margaret £. Walsh, daughter of J. J. McGrovem, bom 

in Chicago, Nov. 3, 1836. 
Jesse W. Weik, biographer of Lincoln, Greencastle, Ind. 
Horace White, New York, connected with The Chicago 

Tribune 1857-1874, being part owner and chief editor 

1865-1874, author of Lincoln and Douglas Debates. 
W. N. Williams, Sydney, N. S. W., Australia, "traveling 

for pleasure." 
E. £. Wood, Plainfield, 111., bom at Plainfield, 1848, 

son of £. J. Wood, who came to Chicago in 1845. 
Robert Mann Woods, Major 64th Illinois Volunteers. 

SCHOOLS 

Jewish Training School, Joseph L. Bache, with 200 pupils. 

Doolittle School, £. Wheeler, eighth grade. 

Cottage School, Helen Erickson, Riverside, 1)1., and 

11 diildren. 
Miss E. J. Bowler, with 20 children from Cicero. 
£. Conway, with 24 children from Cicero. 
Chicago Marshal) High, 5 students. 
Norton Park School, Cicero, 111., Florence M. Newell, 

with 20 children. 
Theodore Roosevelt School, Cicero, 111., Kathryn 

Rooney, with 21 children. 
Theodore Roosevelt School, Cicero, III,, Kathryn Roo- 
ney, with 22 children. 
J. Sherlock School, Caroline Mason, with 20 children. 
J. Sherlock School, Cicero, 1)1., Mary T. Murphy, with 

42 children. 
J. Sherlock School, Cicero, 111., E. J. Bowler, with 25 

children. 
Chicago Latin School, Miss Ferry, with 18 boys. 
Evanston Academy of N. W. U., Harry T. Nightingale, 

with 30 students. 
Evanston Academy, F. 6. Kent, with 12 students. 



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Repairs and Equipment 



Flower High School, Cicero, 111., £. F. Downey, with 

class of 16 children. 
Ray School, Autrey C. Rape, with class of 37 pupils. 
Francis Scott ICey School, Abbie L. Jones, with 16 eighth 

grade pupils. 
Ray School, Isabel A. Johnston, with 42 pupils. 
Francis W. Parker School, Herman T. Lukens, with class. 
Darwin School, B. Whitsit, with 127 pupils. 
Marshall High School, Hany M. Gem and 70 pupils. 

OTHER GROUPS 

American Association of Museums, 22 members. 
Tuesday Club, Mrs. Ernest D. Bishop, with 11 members. 
"The RoUickers" of Brookfidd, President Hugh Walter 
and 16 members. 

CATALOGUING 

Through the generosity of Mr. Seymour Morns it was 
possible in March to employ temporarily a special clerk to 
write up arrears of books in the Accession Record, and 
this record has since been kept up to date. Since September 
the Accession Record has been carried on by Miss Eliza- 
beth Waterston, who also has charge of the propaganda 
work for the Children's Lectures and assists with the Lib- 
rarian's correspondence. 

The great desideratum in the Library is a competent 
person to catalogue the library materials consisting of oooks, 
manuscripts, and maps accumulated since 1910. The total 
number of cards in tne General Catalogue is 24,083. The 
Portrait Index contains 10,115 entries, the Index of Illi- 
nois Views 2,695, and the Index of Negatives and Lantern 
Slides 400 entries. 

REPAIRS AND EQUIPMENT 

The repairs on a building constructed entirely of fir< 

materials are complicated and expensive, particula 

the matter of exterior iron work. Among the u 

features of this building are the iron window frames. I 



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io8 Librarian's Report 

the past summer all of the window frames on the rear of 
the building were thoroughly wire-brushed and painted. 

The windows in the rear of the building are protected 
b^ iron shutters and it would be well if those on the street 
sides could be provided with iron curtains or have wire glass 
substituted for the heavy plate now in use. There is, of 
course^ some loss of light with the latter. Many windows 
have been altered so that they can be opened and a number 
of transom lifts have been supplied. These windows have 
previousl}^ been sealed to prevent the access of dust, but 
with the increased use of the building more ventilation be- 
came necessary. 

The work of the summer in disposing of thousands of 
unused books, thus making space in the Library sufficient 
to take care of the accessions for some years to come, has 
not relieved the congestion of Museum objects and pictures. 
The third floor of the building, which has never been finished 
inside, is lighted by a skylight and would make an excellent 
gallery for paintings. 

A steel cabinet for storing museum articles when not on 
exhibition is much needed, for it is only by exercising great 
care that these can be kept from being ruined by soot and 
dust. 

The newspaper collections have now outgrown the space 
allotted them and horizontal roller shelves are great desider- 
ata particularly for the early Illinois papers. 

The glass and bronze museum case presented by Messrs. 
Burley, Conover, and Schmidt shows all exhibits to the best 
advantage possible. This, with three glass cases purchased 
from the Art Institute, adds greatly to the beauty and dignity 
of the Main Hall but contrasts painfully with the temporary 
wooden display cases still used in the other parts of the build- 
ing. The need of display cases has reached a critical point, 
for valuable loans are bein^ withdrawn because of our in- 
ability to keep them on exhibition. 

A folding metal screen of ten leaves has been added to 
the Museum equipment and is serviceable for housing a 
large number of maps in a small space. 



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Library Accessions 109 

ACCESSIONS 

The additions to the Library by gift and purchase 
since November 1, 1913, are as follow: 

Donation I Purchuet Total 

Manuscripts 112 10 122 

Volumes 435 215 650 

Pamphlets 509 48 557 

Maps 71 1 72 

Pictures, etc 844 177 1,021 

1,971 451 2,422 

Of the 2,422 items received 1,971 were donations. 

The sum of $591.74 was expended for books, maps, pictures, 

etc., 451 items being purchased. 

The classiiied list of accessions that follows serves to 

indicate the degree in which the various departments in the 

Sonety's chosen field are being strengthened: 

MANUSCRIPTS 

Indentures, bills of sale, and other papers (98) relative 
to slaves in Kentucky, 1788-1860. The gift of Mr, Julius 
Fkankel. 

Letter from William Qark to his son, dated V 
City, May 19, 1834. The gift of Mr. Charles H 

William Qark, b. Aug. 1, 1770, d. Sept. 1, 183S, v 
brotherof George Rogers CUrk; with Merriwether Lewi 
Miisouri River; Governor Missouri Territory, 1813. 

Report of Researches about the Location of 
Village, Chicago, 1833, by Rev. Franz L. Braun 
of the Author, 

Reminiscences of A. H. Burley in coming t 
1837; a paper read by him at a meeting of tl 
Club in 1891. The gift of The Fergus Printing 

" Beneath the Dust of a Generation," a paper 
the Chicago Literary Club by Arthur B. Wells 
of the Author. 

Much of the matter for the above was drawn from 
the late Ezra B. McCagg. 

Sketch of the life of James Carter, who came 
111., from Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1841. The gi 
Helbn Leslie Cakter. 



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Librarian's Report 



MANUSCRIPTS 

Charles Mears' Diary at Little Sauble, Mason Co., 
Mich.| 1856, also papers connected with Chicago business 
matters, 1859, etc. The gift of Miss Carrie Mears, 

Pay Rolls of "Chicago Zouaves," Chicago Highland 
Guards, Chicago Light Infantry, etc., 1861. The gift of 
W. H. Christian, Stcvensville, Texas. 

"The Story of Ellsworth and His 2^uaves." Manuscript. 
The gift of Mr. H. H. Miller, Steamboat Springs, Col. 

Statement of the Military Service of Peter P. Wood, 
Second Lieutenant and Captain, Batteiy "A," Chicago 
Light Artillery, called "Wood's Battery,'' May 10, 1911, 
signed by the acting Adjutant General U. S. A. The 
gift of Mr. p. p. Wood. 

Record Books of the Chicago Astronomical Society, 
1863-1903. The gift of the Society through its President, 
Prof. Elias Colbert. 

Receipt for One Hundred Dollars paid by Michael 
C. McCarty to James T. Young, Nov. 14, 1866. The gift 
of Mr. Charles H. Conover. 

A Certificate of Stock in the Woman's Home, 1868; 
Ccrtiiicate of Stock in the Inter-State Industrial Exposition 
of Chicago, 1873, both in the name of Palmer, Fuller & Co. 
The gift of Mr. William A. Fuller. 

Certificate of Stock in the Masonic Temple Association 
owned by Buckner S. Morris, signed by Buckner S. Morris, 
President, E. L. Sherman, Secretary, Chicago, August 
4, 1855. The gift of Mr. Charles A. Crane, Bar X 
Ranch, Wyo. 

Certificate of Stock in Huck's Chicago Brewing Company 
issued in favor of Edmund Knauer, signed by J. M. Huck, 
Pres., L. C. Huck, Secy., October, 1867. The gift of Mr. 
Thomas S. McClelland. 

General History of the First Congregational Church of 
Park Ridge, Illinois: Paper read at an Historical Social 
held at the Church February 4, 1910, by Mary M. Perkins. 
The gift of Miss Mary M. Perkins, Park Ridge, Illinois. 

Letter of Abraham Lincoln to Mrs. Amanda H. Hall, 
dated Executive Mansion, Washington, March 20, 1865, 
facsimile. The gift of Miss Jennie E. Dickinson. 



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Library Accessions 



MANUSCRIPTS 

Copy of a court order entered in the Circuit Court at 
Belvidere, County Seat Boone County, in which appears 
the order entered in the first case that Mr. Lincoln ever 
took to the Supreme Court of the State of Illinois. The 
giftofW. N.Horner. 

Affidavit, written and signed by Stephen A. Douglas, 
relating to a notice or subpoena that was served personally 
on Major Bucklin by Mr. Douglas. The gi^ of Hon. 
Jesse W. Weik. 

Lt. Gen'l U. S. Grant's Account Book containing list 
of bed and table linen in his home, December 3, 1868. The 
gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

Letter of General U. S. Grant to Mr. M, Y. Johnson, 
Sept. 24, 1880, offering to "pair" his vote, with answer to 
same. Photographic facsimile from original owned by Madi- 
son L. Johnson. The gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

Original letters and papers from the correspondence 
of the late Hon. Isaac N. Arnold. The gift of Miss Kathe- 
rine D. Arnold. 

George A. Bender, Commission as Major in the National 
Guard of Chicago, Illinois State Militia, signed b" '^"'' 
John M. Palmer, May IS, 1871. The gift of Rol 
Bender. 

"Oration by Governor John M. Palmer at the F 
of the Remains of Governor Bissell from Hutchinsoi 
tery to Oak Ridge, May 31, 1871." The gift o 
Katherine D. Arnold. 

Autograph letters of G. S. Hubbard, A. J. Gallow 
J. Wcntworth, to John H. Goodell, dated Chicag 
29, 1871, March 27, 1877, June 3, 1876, and May 2 
relative to early history of Marseilles, Illinois. 1 
of Dr. John H. Goodell. 

"An Incident of the Chicago Fire," by S. H. K 
of Oak Park. The gift of the Author. 

"Reports and Correspondence with Reference to 
Stationed in Chicago, 1871." The gift of The 
Printing Company. 



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CHICAGO IMPRINTS 
"Minutes First Annual Meeting of the Northwestern 
Freedman's Aid Commission," Cnicago, James Banut, 
1844. The gift of Lake Forest College. 

The Prairie Farmer, Chicago, 1846, 1852-1854, 1884r- 
1909, 12 volumes; Farmer's Voice, 1888-1912, 22 volumes. 
The gift of Mr. Burridge D. Butler, publisher of The 
Prairie Farmer. 

"Presentment of the Rev. William F. Walker, His 
Answer, and the Verdict of the Court; or, Ecclesiastical 
Justice in the Diocese of Illinois, Chicago: Geer l^ fFUson, 
PrinUrs, Daily Journal Office, 1847. 

"The Revised Charter and Ordinances of the City of 
Chicago, published under the supervision of the Common 
Council, 1851, by George Manierre, Chicago: Printed at The 
Daily Democrat Office, 1851. The gift of The Estate of 
Henry Greenebaum. 

"William Jones and Silvester Marsh, Plaintiffs in Error 
vs. William Johnston in Error to the Circuit Court of the 
United States for Illinois." (Chicago, 1854.) 

Testimony in the case, which concemed Kinzie'a Addition to 

Chicago, it Eiven by Mark Beaubien, John H. Kinzie, Geo. W. Snow, 

Gurdon S. Hubbard, Edw, S. Kimbedy, etc., etc., and covets the 

period from 1811 to 1854. 

"The Gallery of Scripture Engravings, Historical and 
Landscape, Printed in Oil Colors," ny John Kitto, Chicago: 
Published by H. C. FosUr, 1856. The gift of Dr. O. L. 
Schmidt. 

Chicago Directories for 1856, 1859, 1865, 1869, and 1871. 
The gift of Mr. Charles Stier. 

"Dearborn Seminary, First Soiree Musicale by the 
Young Ladies, Light Guard Hall, Tuesday evening, June 
30, 1857." Chicago: Hay's Print, 1857. 

Model First Reader, English-Dakota, by S. R. Riggs, 
Chicago, Geo. Sherwood W Co., 1873. 

"Real Chicago Platform, as Expounded by the Demo- 
cratic Orators at Chicago," Chicago, 1860, Broadside. 



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Library Accessions 113 

CHICAGO IMPRINTS 

"Charter and Constitution of the Firemen's Benevolent 
Association of Chicago, and By-Laws of the Board of Di- 
rectors as amended in 1860," Chicago : Steam Press of Thomas 
and Day, 1860. The gift of the Estate of Mr. Henry 
Greenebaum. 

"Scoriae: Eulogy on Shakespeare, 1864; What We 
Breathe, 1869; The First Christmas Eve, 1874; The Sun 
That Never Sets, 1879," by EHas Colbert, Chicago: Fergus 
Printing Company, 1883. The gift of the Author. 

"The Apostolic Workman, a Sermon Preached at the 
Consecration of the Rt. Rev. Robert Harper Clarkson, D.D., 
as Missionary Bishop of Nebraska and Dakota," by Rt. 
Rev. Henry B. Whipple, H.Ti., Bishop of Minnesota, Chicago, 
Street, Pearson y Co., 1866. 

"Funeral Ceremonies at Crosby's Opera House, held 
Sunday, January 7, 1866, in Honor of Nineteen Deceased 
Members of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery and of 
Batteries 'A' and 'B,' Illinois Light Art., Presiding 
Officer: Charles Randolph, Esq., President of the Board 
of Trade;" Chicago: Tribune Print, 51 Clark St. Program. 
The gift of Mrs. H. S. Tiffanv. 

"Chicago Sunday School Union: Program 
Concert," 1866. Chicago, 1866. 

"Transactions of the Chicago Academy of 
volume I, Chicago: Published by the Academy, 
The gift of the Estate of Mr. Henry Greeneb/ 

"An Address in Behalf of the Western Alumni 
at the Presentation of Perry H. Smith Library I 
Trustees of Hamilton College," by John Dean C 
cago: Press oj Jameson W Morse, 1868. The g 
Fergus Printing Company, 

"General Principles of Pinkerton's Natio 
Agency," Chicago, 1869. 

" Parks in the West Division of the City of 
Chicago: Republican Job Printing, 1869. The ( 
Estate of Mr. Henry Greenebaum. 



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CHICAGO IMPRINTS 

The Mothet's Journal: A Family Magazine, vol. 35, 
edited by Mrs. Mary G. Qarke, Chicago: /. N. Clarke, 
1869. The gift of Dr. Otto L. Schmidt. 

"New Map of Kelloge's Lists, Illustrating the Situation 
and Distribution of the Newspapers of Chicago, St. Louis, 
and Cleveland Lists, Being Also a Correct Rauroad Map," 
by A. N, Kellogg, Chicago, engraved by Eustace Wyszynski 
for Shober and CarqiievilU, no date. (Probably in the late 
60*8.) The gift of Mrs. Julia Lemas, the daughter of Mr. 
Wyszynski. 

Sample book of engraved Vignettes, Chicago buildings, 
etc., the work of Robert N. Piratzky, for Ed. Mendl. The 
gift of Mrs. Anna Piratzky. 

"Argument before the United States Si^rcme Court, 
in the case of Arthur Bronson and John H. Kinzie, et al." 
by Isaac N. Arnold, 1843. 

"Memorial to the Congress of the United States of the 
Executive Committee of tne Convention held at Chicago, 
July 5, 1847, on Improvements of Rivers and Harbors." 
Albany, N. Y., 1848. 

Life Sketch of Rev. Dr. Heinrich Wunder, who served 
the St. Pauls House, September 21, 1851, to December 22, 
1913, the parent of 88 Lutheran Synodical Churches in Cook 
County. The gift of Rev. Franz L. Braun. 

The Chicago Republican, Chicago, Monday, October 16, 
1871. The gift of Mrs. Elizabeth G. Wood. 

Six Chicago newspapers printed just after the Chicago 
Fire. The gift of Mr. Henry E. Hamilton. 

Cartoon from Judy, London, November 20, 1872, 
representing "Brother Jonathan" seeking "John Bull's" 
assistance after the Chicago Fire. The gift of H. A. Spoor, 
London. 

"Reminiscences of Chicago during the Forties and Fif- 
ties," with an Introducrion by Mabel Mcllvainc, Chicago, 
Lakeside Press, 1913. The gift of Mr. Thomas E. Don- 



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Library Accessions 



CHICAGO MISCELLANY 

"Papers Read at the Second Congress of Women, 
Chicago, October IS, 16, and 17, 1874." Chicago: Fergui 
Printing Co., 1874. 

Four volumes, twenty-three pamphlets, newspaper 
clippings, old letters, sample book of specimen advertisements, 
by the Fergus Printing Company covering a long period of 
years. The gift of The Fergus Printing Company. 

"Old Monroe Street," compiled by Edwin F. Mack, 
Chicago, 1914. The gift of the Author. 

"Chicago City Manual," 1913, by Francis A. Eastman, 
Chicago: Bureau of Statistics and Municipal Library, 1913. 
The gift of Colonel Eastman. 

"Souvenir of the Celebration of the Fortieth Anniver- 
sary of the Dedication of the First House of Religious 
Worship in Chicago, being the First Presbyterian Church 
at the Comer of Clark and Lake Streets, January 4, 1834, 
January 4, 1914." The gift of Mr. Philo A, Oris. 

"Plan of Lincoln Park, Chicago," designed byO. Benson, 
Landscape Gardener and Superintendent, Chicago: Skober 
tif Carqunille Lith. Co., no date. The gift of Mrs. Olaf 
Benson. 

"Robinson's Atlas of the City of Chicago, 111.," Phila- 
delphia, 1886, S volumes. The gift of Mr. Levy Mayer. 

McVicker Theater programs, 1898 to 1913, 13 volumes. 
The gift of The McVicker Theater Company. 

"Saint James's Church, Chicago, and its Rector: A 
Study of a Metropolitan Pastor,' by James ©"Donnell 
Bennett. The gift of the Author. 

"Genevieve Grahame (Jones) Grant," Chicago, Lake- 
side Press, 1895. 

Founder of the Twentieth Century Club of Chicago, the daughter 

of Hon. Fernando Jones. 

"The American Girl in the Stockyards District: a Study 
of Chicago Stockyards Community," Louis M ""'■'"••" »"' 
Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1913. 
Miss Louise Montgomery, 

"A Primer of Civics: Elementarz Objnvateli 
for the Guidance of the Immigrant," by J 
Issued by the Colonial Dames of Illinois, Cnica 
lace Press, 1914. The gift of Mrs. Henry B. W 



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"Travel and Descriptioii, 1765-1865, together with 
a List of County Histories, Atlases, and Biographical 
Collections and a List of Territorial and State Laws," by 
Solon Justus Buck {Collection} of the Illinois State Historical 
itJfflfy, Vol. IX), Springfield, 111. Thegift ofTHELiBRARY. 

"Perpetuity and Identity of the Threefold Priesthood," 
by Bp. S. Chase, Peoria, 1843. 

"Three letters addressed to Bishop Chase," by Samuel 
Chase, Peoria, 1843. 

"Malignity Exposed; or, A Vindication of Bishop Chase 
against the Malicious Accusations of an Anonymous Pam- 
phlet, Printed in Ann Street, New York," by Rev. S. Chase, 
Peoria, 1847. 

"Narrative of Events Connected with the Elecrion of 
an Assistant Bishop," Jubilee College, 1848. 

"Sermon in Memory of Rev. Philander Chase," by Rev. 
D. Chase, Jubilee College, 1852. 

"Democratic State Convention," Springfield, 1839. 

"The Philosophy of Money and Banks," by Prof. J. B. 
Turner, Jacksonville, A. V. Putnam, Printers, 1842. The 
gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

"Essay on the Educadon of American Farmers," by 
Prof. J. B. Turner, Jacksonville. The gift of Dr. O. L. 
Schmidt. 

" Parting Address of the Gnothautii of Knox College," 
by Alexander U. Jenkins, of Galena, June 25, 1850, Galena, 
111.: PrinUd by Ckas. Sweney, 1850. The gift of Dr. O. L. 
Schmidt. 

"A Plan for an Industrial University for the State of 
Illinois, Submitted to the Farmers' Convention at Granville, 
Held November 18, 1851," by Prof. J. B. Turner, Granville, 
1851. The gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

"Abstracts of the Unreported Opinions of the Supreme 
Court of Illinois," by George S. Williams, Ottawa, 1875. 

"Thomas Sloo, Jr. : A Typical Politician of Early Illinois," 
by Isaac Joslin Cox, 1911. The gift of the Author. 



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Library Accessions 



"The Genesis of the Whig Party in Illinoi 
Thompson. {Reprinted from Transactions c 
State Historical Society, 1912.) The gift of t1 

"Chapters from Illinois History," by Edwar 
Chicago: Herbert S. Stone W Co., 1901. The 
R. Hall McCormick. 

"Relative Cost of Steam and Water P 
Coal Field," by H. Smith, Louisville, 1848. 

"The Story of Illinois and Its People," by 1 
Nida, Chicago: 0. P. Barnes, Publisher, 19 
of the Author. 

" Digest of Laws of the I. O. O. F. of lUinoii 
Willard, Peoria, 111., R. W. Grand Lodge of III., 

"The Illinois River: Physical Relations an<i 
of the Navigarion Dams," by Lyman G. Coo 
Qohesey fc Co.], 1914. The gift of L. G. Coole 
District. 

"Taxation in Illinois" {American Econoi 
1911). 

"Irish Settlements in Illinois" (Catholic 
1881). 

Portrait Biographical Album of DeWit 
Counties, 111., Chicago: Chapman Bros., 1891. 

"Early Milliners and Dressmakers in 
Illinois," by Mrs. A. M. Thayer, 1912. 

"Galesburg, Monmouth, Knoxville, and / 
rectories," Chicago, 1857. The gift of The Fi 

IMG CbMPANY. 

"Metropolis City Directory and Businei 
for Southern Illinois for 1870, with a brief h 
Metropolis City," published by T. V. Glass 
1870. The gift of Mr. Clarence A. Burley. 

"The Galena Directory and Miners' Anr 
for 1848-9," Galena, 1848. The gift of Dr. O, 



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MORMONISM 

"Mormonism Portrayed; Its Errors and Absurdities 
Exposed," . . . by William Harris, Warsaw, 111., SAar^ y 
GambU, Publishers, 1841. The gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

"A Voice of Warning and Instruction to All People, or. 
An Introduction to The Faith and Doctrine of the Church 
of Jesus Christ, of the Latter Day Saints," by Parley D. 
Pratt, Manchester, Eng., 1841. 

"Trial of the Persons Indicted in the Hancock Circuit 
Court, for the Murder of Joseph Smith, at the Carthage 
Jail, on the 27th day of June, 1844. Quincy, 111., n. d. 

"Proceedings of a Convention Held at Carthage in 
Hancock County, Illinois," Quincy, 1845. 

" Series of Pamphlets," by Orson Pratt, One of the Twelve 
Apostles of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 
Liverpool, 1851. 

"Mormonism in Illinois" {American Whig Revieto, 1852). 

"Book of Mormon: Is It from God?" by Rev. M. T. 
Lamb, Salt Lake City, 1885. The gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt 

LINCOLNIANA 
"Commemorative Proceedings of the Athenaeum Club, 
on the Death of Abraham Lincoln, April, 1865," New York: 

C. S. ffeslcott y Co., 1865. The gift of Miss Katherine 

D. Arnold. 

"True Story of Abraham Lincoln," by E. S. Brooks, 
New York: Lothrop Pub. Co., 1896. 

"Reminiscences and Souvenirs of the Assassination of 
Abraham Lincoln," by J. E. Buckingham, Washington, 
1894. 

"Inner Life of Abraham Lincoln," by F. B. Carpenter, 
New York: Hurd fc Houghton, 1869. 

" Lincoln and the Sleeping Sentinel," by L. E. Chittenden, 
New York, 1909. 

"Abraham Lincoln's Visit to Evanston in 1860," by 
J. Seymour Currey, Evanston, III., 1914. The gift of the 
Author. 

"Lincolniana Book Plates and Collections," edited by 
H. Alfred Fowler, Kansas City, 1913. The gift of Mr. 
J. B. Oakleaf. 



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Library Accessions 119 

LINCOLNIANA 

"Lincoln, the Lawyer," by F. T. Hill, New York: 1906. 

"Lincoln Year Book," compiled by J. T. Holson, Dayton, 
1906. 

"A Paper on the National Republican Convention of 
1860," read by Hon. Elbridge G. Keith, Treasurer of the 
University, at the University of Illinois, June 19, 1904. 
The gift of Mr. Carl Keith. 

"Illinois." (Poem in folder bearing portrait of Lincoln.) 
The gift of Mr, William A. Meese. 

"Catalogue of the Libraiy of the late Major William 
H. Lambert of Philadelphia: ' Part I. Lincolniana, First 
Section. Large Paper. The gift of Mr. Judd Stewart, 
of New York City. 

"Lincoln's Masterpiece," by Isaac Markens, New York, 
1913. The gift of the Author. 

"Why President Lincoln Spared Three Lives," by Isaac 
Markens, New York, 1911. The gift of the Author. 

"The Martyr President," by R. H. Newell, New York: 
CarUton, Publisher, 1865. The gift of Miss Katherine 
D. Arnold. 

"Lincoln's Campaign: The Political Revolution of 1860," 
by Osbom H. Oldroyd, Chicago: Laird y Lee, Publishers, 
1896. 

"Lincoln and Ann Rutledgc," by D. J. Snider, St. Louis: 
Sigma Publishing Co., no date. 

"In Mcmoriam: President Lincoln Dead," a Poem by 
Alfred B. Street, Albany: Andrew Boyd, Novelty Printing 
Press, 1870. The gift of Miss Katherine D. Arnold. 

"Campaign in Illinois: Last Joint Debate of Lincoln 
and Douglas at Alton," Washington: JReprint Chicago 
Daily Times, 1858. 

"Danced Quadrille with Lincoln: Recollections of the 
Days before trie Civil War when the Great EmaP"-"""'- 
v»as a Welcome Guest in the Home of the Writer in 
field," by Bartow A. Ulrich, Chicago, Extract, The 
Inter-Ocean, February IS, 1914. The gift of the Ai 

"Obsequies of Abraham Lincoln in Union 
New York, April 25, 1865. Printed by D. Fan N 
1865. The gift of Miss Katherine D. Arnold. 



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LINCOLNIANA 

"Abraham Lincoln," Address of Major Robert Mann 
Woods before the Annual Meeting of the Illinois Society of 
Los Angeles, California, February 12, 1913. The gift 
of the Author. 

"Order of Exercises: Eult^istic Services under the Au- 
spices of the Young Men's Association of Chicago, in Memory 
of Abraham Lincoln, at Bryan Hall, on Saturday, Apnl 
22, 1865, at 8 P. M., George M. Kimbark, President Young 
Men's Association, Presiding." The gift of Miss Jennib 
E. Dickinson. 

"Lincoln as I Knew Him," by C. H. Zane. {Sunset 
Magazine.) 

GIFTS OF UR. TODD gTEWAKT 

"Abraham Lincoln and His Last Resting Place," com- 
piled by Edward S. Johnson, Springfield, 111., no dau. 

"Abraham Lincoln, no. 17," (Excerpt source unknown, 
1864). 

"Abraham Lincoln: Military Order of the Loyal Legion 
of the United States Commandery of the State of Pennsyl- 
vania Memorial Meeting February 13, 1907"; also "Me- 
morial Meeting, February IS, 1911." 

"Abraham Lincoln: Speech of Hon. S. D. Fess, of Ohio, 
in the House of Representatives, Thursday, February 12, 
1914, Washington," 1914. 

"The Centenary of the Birth of Abraham Lincoln 
1809-1909; Program of Exercises in Commemoration of 
That Event," Washington: Osborn H. Oldroyd, 1908. 

"A Collection of Lincoln Literature. . .To Be Sold at 
Auction Monday, May 21, 1906. . . by The Merwin-Clayton 
Sales Company, New York." 

"Father Abraham," by Ida M. Tarbell (American 
Magazine, February, 1909). 

"Memorial Day Exercises Held at the Lincoln Monu- 
ment, Springfield, Illinois, Sunday, May 30, 1909" (Forty- 
third Annual Observance of Memorial Day, Springfield, 
Illinois, Stephenson Post No. 30, Illinois G. A. R.). 

"History of the Administration of President Lincoln," 
by Henry J. Raymond, New York, 1864. 



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Library Accessions 



LINCOLNIANA 

"The Life and Public Services of Hon. Abraham Lincoln, 
of Illinois, and Hon. Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine," Boston: 
Thayer y Eldridge, 1860. 

"The Life of Abraham Lincoln, and of Andrew Johnson," 
by Henry J. Raymond and by John Savage, New York: 
National Union Executive Committee, no date. 

"Lincoln Centennial 1809-1909: Patriotic Exercises in 
Grange Hall, Foxboro, Mass., Friday Evening, February 
12, 1909 at 8 o'clock." 

"List of Books and Magazine Articles on Abraham Lin- 
coin," (Chicago Public Library, Special Bulletin No. 7, 
January 1909). 

"Proceedings at the First Annual Meeting and Dinner 
of the Lincoln Fellowship, Held at Delmonico s, New York 
City, Wednesday, February 12th, 1908"; also "Proceedings 
at the Fourth Annual Meeting. . .February 11, 1911." 

"Lincoln's Inaugurals, The Emancipation Proclamation, 
Etc." {Old South Leaflets, no. ii.) 

" Masterful Tributes to the Memory of President Lincoln, 
and The Volunteer Soldier, Delivered at the Columbia 
Theatre, Washington, D. C, April 4, 1907 for the Benefit 
of the Relief Fund of Encampment No. Ill, Union Veteran 
Legion," by William Jennings Bryan and John M. Thurston, 
Washington, D. C. 

"Memorial Record of the Nation's Tribute to Abraham 
Lincoln," compiled by B. F. Morris, Washington, D. C: 
W. H. y 0. H. Morrison, 1865. 

"Opinion on the Constitutional Power of the Military 
To Try and Execute the Assassins of the President," by 
Attorney General James Speed, Washington: Government 
Printing Office, 1865. 

"A Reception by President Lincoln," by C. Van Sant- 
voord {Century Magazine, February 1883). 

"Three Great Speeches [by] Abraham Lincoln," Phila- 
delphia: Benjamin F. Emery, pr., no date. 

"National Politics. Speech of Abraham Lincoln, of 
Illinois, Delivered at the Cooper Institute, Monday, Feb. 
27, I860" {Tribune Tracts, no. 4). 

"A Tribute to the Memo^ of Abraham Lincoln," 
Albion Lodge No. 26, F. & A. M., February 12, 1906, no place. 



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Librarian's Report 



SLAVERY AND THE CIVIL WAR 

"American Bastile . . . ," by J. A. Marshall, Philadelphia: 

T. W. Hartley & Co., 1884. 

"Anricipations of the Future to Serve as Lessons for 
the Present Time, with an Appendix, on the Causes and 
Consequences of the Independence of the South," by J. 
W. Randolph, Richmond, Va., 1860. 

"An Artilleiyman's Diary," by Jenkin Lloyd Jones, 
Private 6th Wisconsin History Commission, February, 
1914, The gift of The Commission. 

"Becchenbrook: A Rhyme of the War," by Margaret 
T. Preston, Baltimorei Kelly y Piet, 1868. The gift of 
Dr. O. L, Schmidt. . 

"Berdan's United States Sharpshooters in the Army of 
the Potomac, 1861-186S," by Capt. C. A. Stevens, St. Paul, 
Minn., 1892. 

"General Nathaniel Lyon and Missouri in 1861." The 
gift of Hon. Walter B. Douglas, through Miss Mabel 
Mcllvaine. 

"Gettysburg: The Pictures and the Story," Gettysburg: 
Tipton & Blacker, 1913. 

"Grafted into the Army," by H. C. Work, Sheet Music, 
Chicago: Root & Cady. 

"Grant in the Wilderness," by Frederick Hill Meserve, 
New York, April, 1914. The gift of the Author. 

"Letter from J. C. Lovejoy, Esq., to His Brother, Hon. 
Owen Lovejoy, M. C, with Remarks by the Editor of the 
fFaskington Union." The gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

"The Lost Cause; a New Southern History of the War 
of the Confederates," by Edward A. Pollard, New York, 
1866. The gift of Mrs. R. Hall McCormick. 

"Loyalty on the Frontier; or. Sketches of Union Men 
of the South-West," by W. A. Bishop, St. Louis, 1863. 

"A Monograph of the Great Rebellion," by James 
Peckham, formerly Lieut.-Col. 8th Infantry, Mo., New York: 
American Newt Company, 1866. The gift of Hon. Walter 
B. Douglas, through Nliss Mabel Mcllvaine. 

This interesting book is an attempt to accouDt for officer* who 

were lost track of after the War. 



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Library Accessions 123 

SLAVERY AND THE CIVIL WAR 

"Naval Scenes on the Western Waters. The Gun- 
boats, 'Taylor,' 'Carondelet,' and 'LaFayette,' no place, 
no date. The gift of Mr. George E. Adams. 

"Notes Taken in Sixty Years," by R. S. Elliot, St. 
Louis, 1883. 

Our Young Folks, edited by J. T. Trowbridge, G. 
Hamilton, and L. Larcom, Boston: Ticknor y Fields, 
18S6-I866. Volumes 1 and 2. 

"Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government," by 
JefF Davis, New York, 1881, Vol. I. The gift of Mrs. 
R. Hall McCormick. 

"The South: A Tour of Its Battlefields and Ruined 
Cities, A Journey through the Desolated States, and Talks 
with the People," by J7 T. Trowbridge, Hartford, Conn., 
1866. 

"South and North; or. Impressions Received During, 
a Trip to Cuba and the South," by John S. C. Abbott, 
New York, 1860. 

"The South Vindicated from the Treason and Fanaticism 
of the Northern Abolitionists," published by H. Manly, 
Philadelphia, 1836. 

"The Southern Side; or, Andersonville Prison," compiled 
by R. Randolph Stevenson, Baltimore, 1876. The gift 
of Mrs. R. Hall McCormick. 

"The Stars and Stripes in Rebeldom: A Series of Papers 
Written by Federal Prisoners (Privates) in Richmond, 
Tuscaloosa, New Orleans, and Salisbury, N. C." Boston, 

1862. 

"Speech on Amending the Constitution to Prohibit 
Slavery," by L. Trumbull, Washington, 1864. 

"Underground Railroad from Slavery to Fret 
New York, 1899. 

The Yankee, Lewisburg, Virginia, May 29, 1862 
gift of Mr. Roswell T. Spencer. 



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124 Librarian's Report 

MIDDLE WEST 

"Early Days in Arkansas, Being for the Most Part the 
Personal Recollections of an Old Settler," by Judge William 
F. Pope, Little Rock, 1895. 

"History of Methodism in Arkansas," by Horace Jewell, 
Little Rock, Ark., 1892. 

"South-Western Methodism: A History of the M. 
E. Church in the South-West, from 1844 to 1864," by Rev. 
Charles Elliott, Cincinnati, 1868. The gift of Dr. O. L. 
Schmidt. 

"Missouri Literature," edited by Richard H. Jesse 
and Edward A. Allen, Columbia, 1901. 

"Monroe and the Early Mexican Revolutionary Agents," 
by Isaac Joslin Cox, Washington, 1913. The gift of Mr. 
Isaac Joslin Cox. 

"Riparian Lands of the Mississippi River," by F. H. 
Tompkins, New Orleans, 1901. 

"Some Facts of the History of Minnesota," by Edward 
D. Neil, Saint Paul, Minn. : The Pioneer Press Co., 1888. 

"Pioneer Preparation and Spinning of Flax and Wool," 
by M. Custer, Bloomington, 1912. 

"Macinac and Lake Stories," by M. H. Catherwood, 
New York: Harper & Bros., 1900. 

"Summer Resorts of the Mackinaw Region and Adja- 
cent Localities," by J. A. Van Fleet, Detroit, 1812. Tiie 
gift of Mr. DwiGHT L. Kelton. 

"Marine Disasters on the Western Lakes during the 
Navigation of 1871." Compiled by Capt. J. W. Hall, 
Detroit, 1872. The gift of The Fergus Printing Com- 
pany. 

"On the Way to Iowa. An address delivered . . . May 25, 
1910," by Daenas GifFord Weld, Iowa City, 1910. The gift 
of the Author. 

"Early Detroit: A Sketch of Some of the Interesdng 
Affairs of the Olden Times," by C. M. Burton, 1914. The 
gift of the Author. 

"A Journey to Ohio in 1810," by Margaret Van Horn 
Dwight, New Haven, 1914. The gift of Mr. Charles H. 
CoNOVER. 



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Library Accessions 125 

MIDDLE WEST 

"The Great West . . . Guide Book," by E. H. Hall, 
New York: D. Applcton & Co., 1866. 

"Woman on the American Frontier," by William W. 
Fowler, Chicago: C. B. Beach & Company, 1877. The 
gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

"A Geographical and Topographical Description of 
Wisconsin; with Brief Sketches of its History, Geology, 
Mineralogy, Natural History, Population, Soil, Productions, 
Government, Antiquities, etc., etc.," by I. A. Latham, 
Milwaukee: /. A. Hopkins, 1846. The gift of Dr. O. L. 
Schmidt. 

"The Louisiana-Texas Frontier," by Isaac Joslin Cox, 
Reprint from the Quarterly of the Southwestern Historical 
Association, 1913. The gift of the Author. 

"Treaty of Greenville . . . ," by F. E. Wilson, Piqua, 
Ohio, 1894. 

"Anthony Wayne," by J. R. Spears, New York: D. 
Appleton & Co., 1910. 

"Major George Adams," by Geo. A, Katzenberger, of 
Greenville, Ohio; Columbus, Ohio: Reprint, 1914. 

INDIANA 

"Address to the Vincennes Legislature," by L Bla 
Vincennes, 1829. 

"Address at First Stated Meeting of Ind. Color 
Society," by L Blackford, Indianapolis, 1829. 

"Address before the Vincennes Historical . . . Socie 
Judge Law, Louisville, Ky., 1839. 

"Substance of Speech of W. C. Foster, Den 
Republicans, Monroe Co., 1840," Tcrre Haute, 1840 

"Anniversary Lecture . . . before Historical 
County of Vigo, Ind." . . . 1844, by Robert B. Croes, 
nari, 1845. 

"General Lawsof State of Indiana, Passed at 31st 
of General Assembly," Indianapolis, 1847. 

"Laws of a Local Nature, Passed at 22nd Scs 
General Assembly of Indiana," Indianapolis, 1847. 

"Local Laws of State of Indiana, Passed at 31st 
of General Assembly," Indianapolis, 1847. 



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Librarian's Report 



Rising Sun Recorder (Rising Sun, Ind). One Hundredth 
Anniversary Edition, August 16, 1914, 

Contains article on Col. Abel C. Pepper, who was a GomnuMioner 

at Treaty of Chicago, 1833. 

The Calumet Record: Industrial Edition of the Greater 
Calumet Region, Chicago, 1912. The gift of Mr. Henry 
W. Lee. 

"Historic Indiana," by JuHa Henderson Levering, New 
York, 1910. 

Indiana, Past and Present, published by M. R. Hyman 
Company, Indianapolis, Ind., Volume I. The gift of Dr. 
O. L. Schmidt. 

WAR OF 1812 

The War, Saturday, June 27, 1812-Tuesday, May 18, 
1813. New York, 1813. 

"Blue Jackets of 1812," by W. J. Abbot, New York, 
1887. 

"Hero of Erie," by J. Bames, New York: D. Appleton 
& Co., 1898. 

"Military Heroes of the War of 1812," by C. J. Peterson, 
Chicago, 1892. 

"Oliver H. Perry and the Battle of Lake Erie," by J. 
C. Mills, Detroit: John P. Phelps, 1913. 

biography 

"Life and Letters of Dr. William Beaumont, Including 
Hitherto Unpublished Data Concerning the Case of Alexis 
St. Martin," by Jesse S. Myer, St. Louis, 1912. The gift 
of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

"Daniel Boone," by R. G. Thwaites, New York: D. 
Appleton & Co., 1902. 

"Biography ofGeneral Lewis Cass. . .," New York, 1843. 

"Complete Life of General George A. Custer," by J. 
Whittaker, New York, 1876. 

"Life of Stephen A, Douglas," by William Gardiner, 
Boston: Roxburg, Pr., 1905. 

"Autobiography of Henry Walbridge Dudley," Menasha, 
Wisconsin, 1914. The gift of the Author. 



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Library Accessions 127 

BIOGRAPHY 

"Oration . . . , with Other Proceedings . . . , on Death 
of General W. H. Harrison," by A. S. White, LaFayette, 
Ind., 1841. 

"Eulogy on LaFayette, Delivered in Bloomington, 
Indiana," by A. Wylie, Cincinnati, 1835. 

"Life of the Marquis de LaFayette," by Robert Wain, 
Jr., Philadelphia: Published by J. P. Ayres, 1826. The 
gift of Dr.'0. L. Schmidt. 

UNITED STATES 

"The Agricultural Activities of the Jews in America," 
by Leonard G. Robinson, New York, 1912. The gift of 
The Jewish Agricultural and Industrial Aid Society, 
New York City. 

" Brief History of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution," by Mrs. Adlai £. Stevenson, 'Sloomington, Illinois: 
Pantagrapk P. and S. Company, 1913. The gift of Miss 
Letitia Stevenson. 

Burton's Gentleman's Magazine, vols, 6 and 7, 1839-40, 
containing "The Journal of Julius Rodman, Being an Ac- 
count of the First Passage Across the Rocky Mountains 
Ever Achieved by Civilized Man." London. The gift of Mr. 
Charles H. Conover. 

Note. — As the editor slates that Mr. Rodman began hit 

journey in 1791 and returned four years later this informatioD if true 

would give him precedence of Lewis and Clatk. This is believed to 

be apocryphal. 

" Der Deutschamerikanische Farmer; Sein Anteil an der 
Eroberung und Kolonisation der Bundesdomaene der Ver. 
Staaten besonders in den Nord Centralstaaten," von Joseph 
Och, Columbus, Ohio, 1913. The gift of Mrs. Conrad Seipp. 

"Georgia's Landmarks, Memorials and Legends," com- 
plete in two volumes, by Lucian Lamar Knight, Atlanta, 
1913-14. The gift of Dr. Orro L. Schmidt. 

"The Granger Movement, 1870-80," by Solon Justus 
Buck, Cambridge: Harvard University, Pr., 1913. 

"History of the Federals and Democratic Parries in the 
United States," by A Citizen of Wayne County, Ind., 
Richmond, Ind.: Kickmond Democratic Assodatidn, 1837. 

"History of the United States," by Emma Willard, 
New York: A. S. Barnes & Co., 1847. 



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Librarian's Report 



UNITED STATES 

Knickerbocker, New York Monthly Magazine, volumes 
43 to 54, New York: S. Hueston, 1854^1859. 

Tke New Yorker, edited and published by H. Greeley & 
Company, 1837 to 1841. The gift of Dr. Otto L. Schmidt. 

"Old Silver of American Churches," by E. Alfred Jones, 
Privately printed for the National Society of Colonial Dames 
of America, Arden Press, Letchford, Eng., 1913, No. 89 of 
506 copies. The gift of The Illinois Society, C. D. A. 

"Our Letters of the Continental Marine Committee and 
Board of Admiralty, August, 1776, to September, 1780," 
New York, 1914. The gift of Mr. Horatio L. Wait. 

"Seven Centuries of Costume in America," by Alice 
M. Earle, New York: Macmillan Co., 1903. 

"The Star Spangled Banner," by Oscar Geoi^e Theodore 
Sonneck, Washington, 1914. The gift of Mr. Charles 
H. CONOVER. 

"Voyage dux Estats-Unis de L'Am&ique, 1793-1798," 
by Moreau de Saint-Mery, New Haven, 1913. The gift of 
Mr. Charles H. Conover. 

Woman's Who's Who in America, 1914-1915. New 
York: American Commonwealth Co., 1914. 



MUSEUM ACCESSIONS 

GENERAL AMERICANA 

Mary Ball Washington, mother of George Washington. 
Portrait reproduced in colors from the original from life, 
owned by the donor. The gift of Mr. W. Lanier Wash- 
ington. 

Fourteen Beiriamin Franklin bank notes. The gift of 
Mr. Th£ophile E. LioN. 

Cordial-bottle, once the properw- of Gov. Winthrop of 
Massachusetts. The gift of Mrs. George W. Woodward. 

Knitting needles in tin holder. The gift of Mrs. Geokge 
W. Woodward, 



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Museum Accessions i£9 

GENERAL AMERICANA 

Part of a picket of the 20 foot palisade of Fort Creve 
Coeur. The gift of Dr. J. F. Page, Eureka, III. 

Major James M. Bucklin, identified with the canal 
enterprises of the early history of Illinois. Photograph. 
The gift of Hon. Jesse W. Weik. 

Shawneetown, III., during flood of March, 1913. Photo- 
graph. The gift of Mrs. Elizabeth Eddy Carroll. 

The old bank and Governor Posey** mantion are thown. 

254 Stereoscopic views of American scenery. The gift 
of Mrs, H. S. Tiffany. 

Six photographs taken in Sac and Fox settlement, 
Tama Co., la., by the donor, Mr. J. A. Havbbrg, Rock 
Island, 111. 

General Anthoiw Wayne and Staff conferring with the 
Indians before the Treaty of Greenville, 1795. V/ith Wayne 
are Lieut. William Henry Harrison, William Wells, the hero 
of Fort Dearborn, and others. Oil painting, said to have 
been painted by a member of General Wayne's staff. The 
gift of Mr. La Verne Noyes. 

Spike from the "Niagara," being one of those removed 
at the time the vessel was raised in 1913. The gift of Dr. 
Otto L. Schmidt. 

Section of Atlantic Cable. The gift of Mr. 
McAuLEY. 

Tfiis was presented by Cyrus Field to his friend Uria 

the grandfather of Mrs. McAuley. 

A white satin badge commemorating the death 
Henry Harrison. The gift of Mr. W. D. Heatb. 

Original life mask of Stephen A. Douglas, ma 
cago in 1857 by Leonard W. Volk (replica 4th 

B resented to the Chicago Historical Society on 
louglas Anniversary by a son of the sculptor. 
of Mr. S, A. Douglas Volk, National Academy 
New York City. 

Th« above came to the Societj; as a direct result o 
paid to the memory of Douglat b^ thi« Sociei:^ in Jt« specia 
ation exercises on the 100th anniversary of fiis birth, Apri 

An original photograph of I. Wilkes Booth. 1 
Mr. W. D. Heath. 



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13© Librarian's Report 

CHICAGO PORTRAITS 

Mr. Henry Greenebaum. OH portrait by Phillips. The 
gift of The Estate of Mr. Henry Greenebaum. 
See tUo under Nbckoloov. 

Hon. C. C. P. Holden. Oil portrait. The gift of Mrs. 
C. C. P. Holden. 

Mr. Holden came to Chicago as » Ud in 1836. He served through 
the Meiican War and in 1850 went to California. From 1855 to 1873 
he waa in the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad. He was in the 
City Council continuously from 1861 to 1872. Mr. Holden was a 
inovi[» spirit in all civic improvements of hit time and wag known as 
the " Father of the West Side Water System." As President of the 
Cook County Comraisaioncra he laid the comer icone of the Court 
House in 1877. 

Benjamin Jones. Crayon portrait. The gift of Mr. 
Charles Colby Blake, a granason. 

Ottilie A. Liljencrantz, author of "The Thrall of LeJf the 
Lucky" and a "Ward of King Canute," Photograph 
(framed). The gift of Ma. G. A. M. Liljencrantz. 

A broni^ bust of James H. McVicker. The gift of the 
McVicKER Theater Company. 

Photograph of Mr. Edward Morris, together with data 
relative to his life. The gift of Mr. Edward LaBart. 

Hon. William B. Ogden. Photograph {framed). The 
gift of Miss Katherine D. Arnold. 

Chief Alexander Robinson's tirst and second cabins on 
his Reservation on the Desplaines River. The gift of his 
granddaughter, Mrs. Anna Kleinkopf. 

H. O, Stone. Marble bust by L. W. Volk, with pedestaL 
The gift of Mrs. Walter C. Gunn and Mrs. Secor Cun- 
ningham. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Walker. Photograph. The gift 
of Miss Louise E. Kimball. 

Group of Portraits of Deceased Physicians and Surgeons 
of Chicago, 1808-1913. The gift of Dr. George Isham. 

Framed Photograph of Chicago Club of Veterans of the 
Mexican War. The gift of Mrs. C. C. P. Holden. 

Officers of the Local Board of the 12th Biennial Convention 
of the General Federation of Women's Clubs, Chicago, 1914. 
Photograph by Matzene. The gift of Miss Mabel Mc- 
Ilyainb. 



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Museum Accessions 



CHICAGO VIEWS 

Six photographs of Indian village sites in vicinity of 
Chicago. The gift of Mr. James M. Pyott. 

The Old Kinzie House: The first house built in Chicago, 
1779, located near the S. E. comer of Pine and Kinzie streets. 
Colored lithograph, copyrighted 1901. The gift of Mr. 
John B. Fergus. 

Site of the Indian Massacre of 1812 at the foot of 18th 
Street: old tree marks the spot. Photograph taken in 1890, 
by Mr. James M. Pyott. TTie gift of Mr. Pyott. 

A handsomely framed reproduction of Charles Francis 
Browne's paintine of "The Forks," Chicago, 1831, also 
the calendar of Tne Northern Trust Co., bearing the same 
picture. The gift of Mr. Byron L, Smith. 

Twenty-five views from "Chicago Illustrated," pub- 
lished by Jevne & Almini, Chicago, 1863-66. The gift of 
Dr. Otfo L. Schmidt, 

Colored view of North Side of Randolph Street from 
Clark to State, showing Wood's Museum, S. D. Childs' 
Store, etc., in the sixties. The gift of S. D. Childs & Co. 

Mrs. O'Leary's Cottage on DeKoven Street, where the 
Great Fire started October 9, 1871. Original photograph. 

Seventy-five stereoscopic views of Chicago before and 
after the Great Fire, 1871. The gift of Mrs. H. S. Tiffany. 

Fout Chicago Fire photographs. The gift of Mrs. H. 
S. Tiffany. 

Forty-five stereoscopic views of Chicago before and after 
the great Fire. The gift of Mr. A. F. Stevenson. 

Chicago as seen Six Months after the Great Conflagration. 
Original photograph by E. L. Brand. 

Chicago Lumber Market in 1890, looking northeast 
from Lake Street Bridge. Photograph taken by the donor, 
Mr. James M. Pyott. 

Seven kodak views taken on the Alexander Rt 
Reservation on the Desplaines River, May 1914. T 
of Mr. Carlton Cleveland, 



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Librarian's Report 



CHICAGO RELICS 

Antique iron candle-holder found under house owned 
by Henry Stier, 183 Orchard Street (old number), near 
Willow, about 1870. The gift of Mr. Charles Stier. 

Two pieces of jeweliy made by Isaac Speer, who came 
to Chicago in 1836, and was the first jeweler in this city- 
The gift of Dr. Charles Speer. 

Piece of the wedding dress of the late Mrs. S. H. Kerfoot, 
Sr. The gift of Miss Alice G, Kerfoot, a daughter. 

). Kerfoot took place in 1847, this 

Volunteer Fireman's Belt. This belt originally belonged 
to Chicago Volunteer Fire Company in the thirties. The 
gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

Badge of the Volunteer Fireman's Benevolent Associa- 
tion, Chicago, marked P. P. W., (father of the donor) ; badge 
of the Volunteer Fireman's Benevolent Association, Chicago, 
marked C. P. W., (uncle of the donor); silver match box 
presented to P. P. Wood by Engine Company, "Enterprise," 
March 14, 1860. The gift of Mr. P. P. Wood. 

"Inaugural Banquet of the New Hall of the Board of 
Trade, of the City of Chicago, August 31, 1865. Silk menu. 
The gift of Mr. Louis A. Seeberger. 

A ticket for the United States Prize Concert held in 
Crosby's Opera House, Chicago, May 28, 1866. The gift 
of Mr. W. D. Heath. 

Baton, trowel and mallet used by Mr. C. C. P. Holden, 
as President of the Board of Cook County Commissioners, 
:_ I— "T,g t[,g comer stone of Court House, July 4, 1877. 
■t of Mrs. C. C. P. Holden. 

rty-one pieces of china bearing the crest and mono- 
f Isaac N. Arnold, being relics of the Chicago Fire, 
t of Miss Katherine D, Arnold. 

iece of Haviland china, being part of a set purchased 
1840 by Mr. Christopher Hageman of Burley & 
, said to be the first imported china sold in Chicago, 
t of Miss Lizzie Davies. 



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Museum Accessions 



LINCOLN AND THE CIVIL WAR 

Abraham Lincoln. Photograph by Shtnn, Pittsfield, 
111. The gift of Mr. Roswell T. Spencer. 

Abraham Lincoln and Hon. O. H. Browning. Photo- 

fraphs, framed, with autograph letter of presentation to 
saac N. Arnold from Robert T. Lincoln. The gift of Miss 
Katherine D. Arnold. 

St. Gaudens' Statue of Lincoln, Lincoln Park, Chicago. 
Photograph, 28x38 inches. The gift of Mr. A. P. Jennings. 

Abraham Lincoln. Eneraving, F. Halpin, New York, 
from the painting by F. B, Carpenter in 186L The gift 
of Miss Katherine D. Arnold. 



Wisconsin Republican Badge — Lincoln and Hamlin, 
1860, bearing portrait of Lincoln. The gift of Dr. O, L. 
Schmidt. 

The Capitol at Washington. Framed photograph taken 
bv Brady at the time the inauguration of Lincoln and 
Hamlin was taking place. The gift of Mr. Frank Hamlin. 

Canteen from Battle of Gettysburg. Presented by 
Dr. C. Barnes. 

Three lantern slides from original negatives 
scenes during the delivery of the Gettysburg 
November 19, 1863, thought to be the only camer 
of the event in existence. The gift of Mr. F. H. ] 
of New York. 

Two hundred copies of the Gettysburg Addr 
somely printed and accompanied by a portrait o 
The gift of the Magill-Weinsheimer Co. 

Silk banner. Design: Coat of Arms of lUinoi: 
ground surrounded by stripes of red and white wi 
of stars white on blue. The gift of Miss Kath 
Arnold. 

The above was presented to Mr. I. N. Arnold by Mi 
Lincoln as a relic ptized by the martyred president. T 
beheved to have been part of the flag of an Illinois regiment 



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Librarian's Report 



LINCOLN AND THE CIVIL WAR 
Photographs of ten panels representing in relief, scenes 
in the Life of Lincoln, made for the American Terra Cotta 
and Ceramic Company, Chica^, by Kristian Schneider, 
sculptor, for decorations on the Lincoln Memorial Building 
at the University of Illinois. The gift of The Sculptor. 

Boutonniere of evei^reen and pansy in small frame, worn 
on Mr. Holden's arm in President Lincoln's funeral pro- 
cession at Chicago; also a flag and baton used by Mr. Holden 
on that occasion. The gift of Mrs. C. C. P. Holden. 

Program of the Lincoln funeral procession printed in 
white on black silk and handsomely framed. The gift of 
Miss Helen V. Drake. 

Lincoln home, Springfield, 111. Photograph. The gift 
of Mr. Roswell T. Spencer. 

A group of Chicago Zouaves with elaborate decoration. 
Original sketch in colored crayons by Col. E. E. Ellsworth. 
The gift of Messrs. Benjamin Allen, Charles F. Gunther, 
Frank G. Logan, Henry J. Fatten, and O. L. Schmidt. 

The Chicago Zouaves in 1860, 1882 and 1910. Framed 
photographs. The gift of Mr. Benjamin F. Fergus. 

Edward B. Knox and George H. Fergus, Zouave survivors, 
1882. Photograph. The gift of Mr. John B. Fergus. 

A projectile found embedded in a large cypress tree, 
felled on the banks of the Mississippi River in the neighbor- 
hood of New Madrid, Mo., thrown during the Civil War 
by a gunboat of either the Federal or the Confederate Army. 
The gift of Mr. Hermann C. Paepcke. 

Sword of Col. James A. Mulligan and R^mental Flag 
of 23 Illinois Volunteers, the "Irish Brigade," also, a sword 
of Lieut. James Nugent. The gift of the Daughters of 
Col. Mulligan. 

Photc%raph of Norman B. Judd and wife, taken at 
Berlin. Mr. Judd was appointed United States Minister 
to Prussia by President Lmcoln and served from 1861 until 
1865. The gift of Mrs. A. B. Hewitt, of Lake Forest. 



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Museum Accessions 



LINCOLN AND THE CIVIL WAR 

The following letter is reminiscent of anoi 
of Lincoln's: 

Deu Mi»: 

I am sending id separate cover, a copy of the Fn 
in Chicago, date January, 185S. 

Mr. Z. Eastman was publisher of this Fre« Soi 
afterwards American Consul under President Li 
England . 

Thewritetwas at onetime Printer's devil, on thi 
Respectfully, 

(Signed) W. 



Photograph. The gift of Miss C. M. McIlv 
Col. Robert G. Shaw's command, the 54th Mi 
regiment of colored troops mustered into the U. S. s< 
state. 

"San Jacinto" and "Trent" in old Bah 
November 8, 1861, before seizure by Masor 
Original painting by Theodore H. Hesshen, 
Mr. Hesshen. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Caroline M. McIlvaine 



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OF DONORS 



F Arts akd Sciences, Boston, Mass. 
AN Society, Worcester, Mass. 
iR Publishing Co, 
;cAL Society, New York City. 
- Association, Washington, D. C. 
STORicAL Society, New York City. 
ICAL Society, Philadelphia, 
cago. 

AK.INE D. 

ncAco. 

G. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
iT. 



Palha. 

Orleans, La. 
ws, Chicago, 
it, Wis. 
of Chicago. 



runswick. Me. 



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List of Donors 137 



Buck, E. H., Aloha, Mich. 

Buffalo Historical Societv, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Bunker Hill Monument Association, Boston, Mass. 
*BuRLEY, Clarence A, 

BuRNHAM, Capt. J. H., Bloomingtoti, 111. 

Burns, Mrs. Thomas H. 
*BuRTON, Clarence M., Detroit, Mich. 
♦Butler, Burridge D. 

California Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, San Francisco. 

Cambridge Historical Society, Cambridge, Mass. 

Campbell, Frank James. 

Canada, Department of Mines, Ottawa. 

Canadian Institute, Ottawa, Can. 

Capitol Cartoon Syndicate, Newark, N. J. 

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 

Washington, D. C. 
ICarroll, ^lRs. Elizabeth Eddy. 
*Carter, Miss Helen Leslie. 

Case School of Applied Sciences, Cleveland, O. 

Chamberlin, Henry Barrett. 

Chapman, A. S., Rockford, 111. 

Cheney, Rt. Rev. Charles Edward. 

Chicago Academy of Sciences. 

Chicago Assocution of Commerce. 

Chicago Astronomical Society. 

Chicago Board of Education. 

Chicago Bureau of Maps and Plats. 

Chicago Bureau of Public Efficiency. 

Chicago City Council. 

Chicago Commons Association. 

Chicago Daily News. 

Chicago Department of Health. 

Chicago Herald. 

Chicago Hospital College of Medicine. 

Chicago Kent College of Law. 

Chicago Kindergarten Institute. 

Chicago Legal News Company. 

Chicago Literary Club, 

Chicago Mendelssohn Club. 

Chicago Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitarium. 

Chicago Permanent Charter Commission. 

Chicago Public Library. 



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List of Donors 



Estate Board. 

iL OF Civics and Philanthropy. 
I Park Commissioners. 
\L Park Commission, 
LOGICAL Seminary. 

iNE. 

& Company, Chicago. 
iNCE Committee for the Distribution 
TURE, Chicago. 

iNCE Publishing Society, Boston, Mass 
H., Stephensville, Tex. 
ciation of Chicago. 
Chicago. 

lSsociation of Chicago. 
ranston, 111. 
rleton. 
. Elias. 
icis D. 

ILES H. 

lE. 

LIN, Cincinnati, O. 

:9 A., Meeteetse, Wyo. 

ipringfield. III. 

ship Co, 

4bs. Secor. 

Catherine Buckmaster, Alton, 111. 

MOUR, Evanston, 111. 

Winnetka, 111. 

E. 

*,, New Orleans, La. 

lizzie J., Chicago. 

ERicK C, Glencoe, 111. 

IE Society of the Cincinnati, 

ss Jennie E. 

THAN. 

icAGO, p. E. 

;r. 

BLiSHiNG Company, Oak Park, 111. 

lOMAS E. 

Walter B., St. Louis, Mo. 
Ielen V. 
Y Walbridge. 



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List of Donors 

Durante, Oscar. 

Du SOUCHETT, F. D. 

♦Eastman, Col. Francis A, 
Educational Am Society. 

ElSENSTAEDT, ISIDORE. 

Essex Institute, Salem, Mass. 

Ericson, John. 

Erickson, T. H. 

Eutaxias, D, S. 

Farmers' Review, The. 

Farrington, F. H., Brandon, Vt. 

Fenton, Benjamin F., Medford, Mass. 
tFERGUs, Benjamin Franklin, 
tFERGUs, John B. 
♦Fergus Printing Co. 

Ferree, Barr, New York City. 

Ferrill, Will C, Denver, Colo. 

Fessenden, Charles Newton. 

Field Museum of Natural History. 

Flagg, Mrs. W. H. 

Francis, David R., St. Louis, Mo. 
*Frankel, Julius. 

Free Public Library, Jersey City, N. J. 

Freeman, W, B, 
•Fuller, William A. 

Gaffney, James. 

Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, III. 

Gary Public Library, Gary, Ind. 

Geissler, Alfred. 

General Electric Company. 

German-American Historical Society of 
Chicago. 

GEkMAN Society of Chicago. 

Glenwood Manual Training School, Glenwoi 
*Goodell, Dr. John H., Marseilles, 111, 

Goodman & Dickerson Co. 

Gookin, Frederick W. 

Gospel Trumpet Co., Anderson, Ind. 

GossELiN, M. l'Abb£ Am£d£e, Ottawa, Can. 

Grand Rapids Public Library, Grand Rapids, 

•fGREENEBAUM, HeNRY, EsTATE OF. 

Greener, Richard T. 
Grinnell College, Grinnell, la. 



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List of Donors 



Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis. 
Indiana State Library, Indianapolis. 
Inland Printer Co. 
Insull, Samuel. 

Interstate Commerce Commission, Washington, 
Iowa Masonic Library, Cedar Rapids. 
tIsHAM, Dr. George S. 

JAMESON, Dr. J. Franklin, Washington, D. C. 
ennings, a. p. 
ewish Agricultural and Industrial Aid S' 
New York City. 

John Crerah Library. 

Johnson, Major E. S., Springfield, III. 

Jones, William A., Washington, D. C. 

Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka. 

Katzenberger, George A., Greenville, O. 

Keeley, James. 
•Keith, Carl, Kcnilworth, 111, 
*Kelton, Dwight L. 
fKERFOOT, Miss Alice G., Pittsbureh, Pa. 

KiLBOURN, Mrs. Helen Hesler, Montreal, Can. 
fKiMBALL, Miss Louise E., Chicago. 
*Kimball, S. H., Oak Park, 111. 

KiNSELLA, James E. 
fKLEiNKOPF, Mrs. Anna. 
*Lake Forest College, Lake Forest, 111. 

Lake Mohonk Conference on International 
tration, Mohonk Lake, N. Y, 

League of Minnesota Municipalities, St. Paul. 

Leake, Mrs. J. B. 
jLaBart, Edward. 
*Lee, Henry W. 
•Lemos, Mrs. Julia. 
tL£0N, TnioPHiLE E. 

Lewis Institute, Chicago. 

Library of Congress, Washington, 

tLlLJENCRANTZ, G, A, M. 

Lincoln Highway Association, Detroit, Mich. 
Little Chronicle Company. 
tLoGAN, Frank G. 
Los Angeles Celebration Commission, Los j^ 

Cal. 
Louishna State Museum, New Orieans, 



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List of Donors 143 



Mowers, S. A., Fayette, Pa. 

MULLER, L. G, 

Mulligan, Miss Alice, Chicago. 
tMuLLiGAN, Daughters of Col. 

Municipal Court of Chicago. 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass. 

National Printer Journalist, Chicago. 

Nelson, Capt. I. C. 

New Haven Colony Historical Society, New Haven, 
Conn. 

New Jersey Historical Society, Newark. 

New York Public Library, New York City, 

New York Historical Society, New York City. 

New York State Education Department, Albany. 

New York State Historical Association, Glens Falls. 

New York State Reservation at Niagara. 

Newberry W. C, Estate of. 

Newberry Library, The. 

Newcomb, George Eddy. 

Newport Historical Society, Newport, R. I. 
*NiDA, William Louis, River Forest, 111. 

Nightingale, Harry T., Evanston, 111. 

Nixon, Mrs. W. K. 

North Carolina Historical Society, Chapel Hill. 

Northwestern University, Evanston, III. 

Nova Scotia Historical Society, Halifax. 
tNoYES, LaVerne. 

Oklahoma Historical Society, Oklahoma City. 

OakleaF; J. B., Moline, 111. 

O'Brien, Howard Vincent, 

Ohio Archaeological AND Historical Society, Columbus. 

Olcott, George C. & Sons. 

Ontario Historical Society, Toronto, Can. 

Osaka Library, Osaka, Japan. 

Ostrom, Mrs. Augusta Babcock. 
*Oris, Philo a. 
fPAEPCKE, Herman. 
tPAGE, Dr. J. F., Eureka, III, 

Parker, C. M., Taylorville, III. 
tPATTEN, Henry J. 

Peattie, R. B. 

Pennsylvania Federation of Historical Socie 
Lebanon. 



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List of Donors 145 



Society of Colonial Wars in the State of New York, 
New York City. 

Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Vermont, 
Burlington. 

Society of the Sons of the Revolution in the State 

OF Illinois, Chicago. 
tSpEER, Dr. Charles W. 
•tSpENCER, RoswELL T., Chicago. 
*Spoqr, H. a., London, Eng. 

Starbuck, Mrs. Sidney. 

Starr, Prof. Frederick. 

State Historical Society of Iowa, Iowa City. 

State Historical Society of Missouri, Columbia. 

State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison. 

Steele, Fred M., Highland Park, 111. 

Stennett, Dr. W. H. 

Stevens, Frank E., Dixon, III. 

Stevens, Silas C. 
IStevenson, a. F. 
'Stevenson, Miss Letitia, Bloomington, III. 

Steward, William, Bridgetown, N. J. 
•Stewart, Judd, New York City. 
•fSTiER, Charles. 

Stone, Dr. James S. 

Straus, Simon. 

Strawbridge, C, H,, Morgan Park, 111. 

Stouder, J. M., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Stube, John H. 

Texas State Historical Association, Austin. 
Thompson, Prof. Charles M., Urbana, III. 
'tTiFFANY, Mrs. H. S. 

ToMLiNsoN, Webster. 
*Ulrich, Bartow A. 

Underhill, Volney. 

Union Signal, The. 

Union Stock Yards. 

United States Brewers' Association, New Yoi 

U. S. Department of the Interior, Washington 

Unity Publishing Co., Chicago. 

University of Chicago. 

University of Cincinnati, O. 

University of Illinois, Urb ana-Champaign. 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. 



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146 List of Donors 



University 07 Minnesota, Minneapolis. 

University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, 

University of Toronto Library, Toronto, Can. 

Virginia State Library, Richmond. 
tVoLK, S. A. Douglas, New York City, 

Voter Company, The, Chicago. 
•Wait, Horatio L, 

Walinger Co., The, Chicago. 

Walker, Dr. James W. 

Ward, Miss Annette P., Cleveland, O. 

Washington University State Historical Society, 

Seattle. 
fWASHiNGTON, W. Lanier, Ncw York City. 

Wayland, John W., Hamsonbui^, Va. 

Weber, George W. 
fWEiK, Jesse W., Grecncastle, Ind. 
♦Weld, Laenas Gifford. 
*Wells, Arthur B. 

Western Bank Note and Engraving Co., Chicago. 

Western Reserve Historical Society, Cleveland, O. 

Wight, Peter Bennett. 

Wilkinson, Harry. 

Willard, Major Samuel. 

Williams, Mrs. Alice, Northfield, Minn. 

WILLIA^w, Theodore F., Wisconsin Veterans Home, Wis. 

Wisconsin Archeological Society, Milwaukee. 
•Wisconsin History Commission, Madison. 

WisEWELL, Dr. Francis H., Phelps, N. Y. 

Woman's City Club of Chicago. 

Woman's Presbyterian Board of Missions of the 

Northwest, Chicago. 
•Wood, Mrs. Elizabeth G. 
•fWooD, P. P., Chicago. 
♦Woods, Major Robert Mann. 
tWooDWARD, Mrs. George W. 

Yale University Library, New Haven, Conn. 

Ylvisaker, Rev. Nils. 

Young Men's Christian Asociation of Chicago. 

Young, William L. 

Youngs, Florence E., New York City. 



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51 
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CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY 



Charter, Constitution, By-Laws 
Membership List 



Annual Report for the Year 
Ending October 31, 1915 



PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 

1915 



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''^ ■-' 27 1916^ 

v^BSIDGE,Mfg> 



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CONTENTS 



Annual Meeting, Report of 31-71 

AuDiTiNo CoMMirrEE, Report of .... 42 

By-Laws 29-30 

Charter 21-24 

Children's Lectures 83-86 

Constitution 25-29 

Donations 42 

Donors, List of 113-120 

Election of Officers 70 

Executive Committee, Report of ... . 32-69 

Funds 32-40 

Jonathan Burr 33 

Philo Carpenter ' 33 

Marshall Field 33 

T. Mauro Garrett 34 

General 32 

Henry D. Gilpin 32 

Huntington W. Jackson 34 

Polkprary 34 

Lucretia Pond 

William Conrad Seipp 

Elizabeth Hammond Stickney . 

Lucretia J. Tilton 

Elias T. Watkins 

Henry J. Willing 

Gilpin Trustees, Report of ... . 

Librarian's Report 

Meetings 

Members, List of 

Membership 

Museum Accessions 

Officers and Committees, I915-I916 

Publications 

Receipts and Disbursements . . . 
Treasurer's Report 



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CLASSES OF MEMBERSHIP 

Governing Membership 

Honorary Life $1000 

Life 500 

Annual 25 

Non-Governing Membership 

Sustaining Life $100 

Sustaining Annual 10 

Membership in the Society may be had only upon 
recommendation of the Executive Committee. Non-Gov- 
erning Members have all the privileges of Governing Mem- 
bers except the right to vote and to nold office. 



DESIDERATA 

Increased Space Monthly Bulletin 

Increased Income Free Literature for 

Increased Staff Schools 

Lincoln Memorial Room Traveling Exhibfts 

Gallery for Paintings Museum Equipment 

More Children's Lec- Marking Historic Sites 

TURKS Newspaper Cases 

Lectures in Social Completion of Cata- 

CeNTERS LOGUE8 

AoDmoNAL Publications Rebinding Books 

Evening and Sunday Opening 
Sixtieth Anniversary Commemorative Volume 



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TO PROSPECTIVE MEMBERS 

Indian, Spanish, Frenchman, Englishman, American — 
all these have ruled over the territory that is now Chicago. 
For sixty years past the Chicago Historical Society has by 
research and collection, uncovered and preserved the record 
of those early days and the periods that followed them. 

Our own times, too, receive daily from its trained workers 
the same analysis and preservarion. 

The relics, the paintings, the books and pamphlets of the 
Society preserve for Chicago its historic background. 

To you the Society oflFers its libraries, its collections and 
the research service of its staff. It offers you a consunt 
succession of special exhibitions of picturesque mementoes of 
the past. It offers you its series of lectures by experts 
upon topics of historic interest. It offers you its social 

§atherings where the rising generation may enjoy the priv- 
ege of acquaintance with the earlier citizens and their 
priceless traditions. 

From you the Society hopes for the support that is fairly 
due a dignified public enterprise which takes the form of one 
of the best historical museums in the country. We believe 
that the Society will help you and that you will help the 
Society. 

The Society actively serves the public. Students, 
writers, genealogists, historians from all over the United 
States use its collections. It wishes, now, by increasing its 
resources to add to those collections. 

Furthermore, the Chicago Historical Society is serving 
its public by the illustrated lectures through which It gives 
annually thousands of public school children a grasp of the 
^at and true stories that lie behind their city of to-aay. It 
18 our belief that no sounder training in patriotism is being 
done. Certainly none could receive a more eager welcome 
from the children themselves. This work we wish to de- 
velop further in the near future. 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

/ give and bequeath to the CHICAGO HIS- 
TORICAL SOCIETY, incorporated by the Leets- 
lature of the State of Illinois, February f, 1857, 
ike sum of 



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1856-1916 

THE year Nineteen Sixteen bong the Sixtieth 
unce the organization of our Society it is fitting 
that this Anniversary be made commemorative 
of the founders of this Institution, of which all 
Chicagoans are proud, and be in some degree repre- 
sentative of Chicago's development from a frontier 
setdement to a center of culture. To this end ihe 
Executive Committee bes[}eaks the conjperation of 
the entire Membership. It is planned to issue an 
Aimiversary FSibUcation that shall be so valuable 
that it will be treasured and handed dowm in the 
^unilies of our members. It will contain, besides a 
History of the Society, portraits of early members 
and views of early scenes ^miliar to every one 
six^ years ago but almost unknown to the pres- 
ent generation. 



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OFFICERS AND MEMBERS 

OF THE 

CHICAGO HISTORICAL S 

1915-1916 

President 

CLARENCE A. BURLEY 

Vice-Presidents 

GEORGE MERRYWEATHEl 

OTTO L. SCHMIDT 

Treasurer 

ORSON SMITH 

Secretary 

SEYMOUR MORRIS 

Librarian 

CAROLINE M. McILVAINE 

Executive Committee 

CLARENCE A. BURLEY, Chaii 

GEORGE MERRYWEATHEl 

OTTO L. SCHMIDT 

ex offi 
Term ending November, IQ16 
EDWARD L. RYERSON 

JOHN A. SPOOR 

Term ending November, IQI7 

SEYMOUR MORRIS 

EDWARD F. SWIFT 

Term ending Novemier, 191S 

WILLIAM H. BUSH 

WILLIAM A. FULLER 

Term ending November, Igi9 

CHARLES F. GUNTHER 

JOY MORTON 



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Officers 

Trustees of the Gilpin Fund 
CLARENCE A. BURLEY 
WALTER L. FISHER 
WILLIAM 0. GREEN 
THE PRESIDENT and 
FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT 

fxoficiis 
Committees 
Memherihip 
William H, Bush 
Fkane Hamlin 
John W. Lowe 
Julian S. Mason 
Charles A. Munrob 
John L. Shortall 

Chas. D. pLATt, Sicritary- 
Finance 
Mr. Ryerson 
Mr. Fuller 
Mr. Swift 

House and Collections 
Mr. Ryerson 
Mr. Morris 
Mr. Gunther 

Ltbraries 
Mr. Merryweather 
Mr. Morris 
Dr. Schmidt 

Lectures and Entertainments 
Dr. Schmidt 
Mr. Gunther 
Mr. Morris 

Publication 
Dr. Schmidt 
Mr. Merryweather 
Mr. Bush 

Auditing 
Mr. Fuller 
Mr. Gunther 
Mr. Morton 



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HONORARY LIFE MEMBERS 



Ayer, Edward Everett 
Bartlett, Adolphus Clay 
Harris, Joseph 

Hutchinson, Charles Lawrence 
MacChesney, Nathan William 
McCoRMicK, Cyrus Hall 
McCoRMicK, Nethe Fowler 
Rysrson, Martin Antoine 
Schmidt, Orro Leopold 
Skinner, Elizabeth 
Skinner, Frbderika 



LIFE MEMBERS 



Cobb, Henry Ives 
Farnam, William Whitman 
Hillebrand, Gerhard H. 
Honor£, Henry H. 
Jewett, Ellen Roumtreb 
Leiter, Joseph 
Lowdbn, Frank Orren 
Lytton, Henry Charles 
OoDEN, William Butler 
Page, Benjamin Vauohan 
Palmer, HoNOBi 
Roberts, Jahes Henry 
Seifp, Catharina Orb 



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ANNUAL MEMBERS 

Adams, Cyrus H, 

Adams, George Everett 

Adsit, Charles Chapin 

Allen, Benjamin 

Andrews, Dr. Frank T. 

Armour, John Ogden 

Arnold, Bion Joseph 

Arnold, Katharine D. 

Baker, Alfred Landon 

Bannard, Henry Clay 

Barge, William David 

Bartholomat, Henry, Jr. 

Barton, Enos Melancthon 

Beale, William Gerrish 

BeiDLER, Fkancis 

Beipeld, Joseph 

Blackstone, Isabella Farnsworth 

Blaine, Anita McCormick 

Blair, Edward Tyler 

Blair, Sarah Seymour 

Blount, Fred Meacham 

BoisoT, £mile K. 

boldenweck, william 

Bowman, Ernest M. 

Bryan, Alfred C. 

Bryan, Frederick William 

Bryan, John Charles 

Bryson, William John 

Bupfington, Eugene Jackson 

BuNN, John Whitfield 

BuRLEY, Clarence Augustus 

Busby, Leonard A. 



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MeTnbers 

Bush, William H. 

BuTLEK, Edward Burgess 

BuTZ, Otto Casper 

Byllesby, H. M. 

Calhoun, William James 

Carr, Clyde M. 

Carry, Edward Francis 

Carter, Helen Leslie 

Caruthers, Kate Soaper 

Chalmers, William James 

Chatfield-Taylor, Hobart Chatfield 

Cheney, Charles Edward 

Conover, Henry Boardman 

Cox, Rensselaer W. 

Crane, Charles Richard 

Crane, R. T., Jr. 

Crane, Richard T. III. 

Curtiss, Charles Chauncey 

Davis, Nathan Smith 

Dawes, Charles G. 

Dee, Thomas J. 

Deering, Charles 

deKoven, Annie Larrabee 

Dick, Albert Blake 

Dickinson, Albert 

Dickinson, William 

Donnelley, Thomas Elliott 

Drake, Helen Vernera 

DuMMER, William Francis 

Eckhart, Bernard A. 

Fairbane:, Kellogg 

Farwell, John Villars 

Fergus, Robert Collyer 

Field, Stanley 

Fisher, Lucius George 

Fisher, Walter Lowrie 



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Members 



Fleming, John C. 
Folds, Charlbs Weston 
Foley, John Burton 
FoRGAN, David Robertson 
FoRGAN, James Bbrwick 
Forsyth, Robbrt 
Frankbl, Julius 
Freer, Archibald £. 
Fuller, Oliver Franklyn 
Fuller, William Alden 
Gardner, William Alexander 
Gary, John W. 
Glaser, Edward L. 
Glessner, John Jacob 
Goddard, Leroy Albert 
Goodman, William O. 
Goodrich, Horace Atwater 
Green, William Ogden 
Greenlee, Ralph Stebbins 
Gunthbr, Charles Frederick 
Gurley, William W. 
Hambleton, Chalkley Jay 
Hamill, Ernest Alfred 
Hamilton, Henry Edward 
Hamlin, Frank 
Hardin, Martin D. 
Harris, Albert W. 
Harris, George Bacon 
Harris, Norman Waite 
Haskell, Frederick Tudor 
Hauberg, John H. 
Healy, Marquette A. 
Heath, Albert G. 
Hewitt, Charles Morgan 
Heyworth, James O. 
Hibbard, Frank 
Hibbard, William Gold, Jr. 



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Members 



HiNDB, Thomas Woodnutt 
HiNES, Edward 
Hitchcock, Annie McClure 
HoLABiRD, William 
HoLDOM, Jesse 
Hopkins, John Patrick 
HuGHiTT, Marvin 
HuLBuRD, Charles Henry 
Hunt, Robert Woolston 
Insull, Samuel 
IsHAM, George Snow 
IsHAM, Ralph 
Jones, Arthur Blayney 
Jones, David Bennett 
Jones, Frank H. 
Jones, Thomas Davies 
Keep, Chauncey 
Kelley, William V. 
Kerfoot, Willum Dale 
Kimball, Eugene S. 
Kimbark, Charles A. 
King, Francis 
Kirk, Walter Radcliffe 
Kiser, John W. 
Lathrop, Bryan 
Lawson, Victor Fremont 
Lay, Albert Tracy 
Lincoln, Robert Todd 
Logan, Frank G. 
Lowe, John W. 
MacVeagh, Eames 
McCoNNELL, Charles Henry 
McCoRMicK, Harold Fowler 
McCokmick, Stanley 
McCrea, Willey S. 
McIlvaine, William Dickson 
Madlener, Albert F. 



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Members 

Magee, Henry W. 
Makierrb, George 
Mark, Clayton 
Mason, Fay Calhoun 
Mason, Julian Starkweather 
Mayer, Levy 
Merryweather, George 
Miller, John Stocker 
Mitchell, John James 
MoHR, Louis 
Morris, Seymour 
Morton, Joy 
Morton, Mark 
MuNROE, Charles A. 
Newman, Jacob 
Nolan, John Henry 
Noyes, LaVerne W. 
Oakley, Horace Sweeney 
Ons, Charles Tillinghast 
0ns, Lucius James 
Paefcke, Herman 
Palmer, Potter, Jr. 
Patten, Henry J. 
Payne, John Barton 
Peabody, Francis Stuyvesant 
Peck, Clarence Ites 
Peck, Kate Tyrrell 
Peterson, Paul Christian 
Pike, Charles Burrall 
Pike, Eugene Samuel 
Porteii, George French 
Porter, Henry H., Jr. 
QuAN, Henry W. 
Rehm, William Henry 
Reynolds, George M. 
Ripley, Edward Payson 
Rogers, Walter Alexander 



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Members 

R08ENF£U>, MaukicE 

RosENWALD, Julius 
Rubens, Hakry 
RuHKELLs, John Sumner 
Russell, Edward Perry 
Ryerson, Edward Larned 
Salisbury, Warren Metcalf 
Schaffnbr, Joseph 
Schmidt, Fred M. 
Schmidt, Richard Ernest 
Schneider, Otto C. 
Scott, Frank Hamline 
Scott, Robert Lindsay 
Seeberger, Louts Augustus 
Seipp, Philip Walter 
Shaffer, John C. 
Shortall, John Louis 
Simpson, James 
Smith, Anna Rice 
Smfih, Delatan 
Smith, Frederick Augustus 
Smith, Orson 
Smith, Solomon A. 
Spoor, John Alden 
Sprague Albert Arnold, 2nd 
Stewart, Prttchard 
Stone, James Samuel 
Storey, William B. 
Sunny, Bernard Edward 
Swift, Edward F. 
Thorne, Charles Hallett 
TuTTLs, Frederick Bulkley 
Wacker, Charles Henry 
Walker, Elia Marsh 
Walker, Henry H. 
Walker, James Ransom 
Walker, William Bentley 



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Members 

Warner, Exra J. 
Watkins, Elias Marvin 
Wego, David Spencer 
Wells, Frederick Latimer 
West, Anna Sheldon Ogden 
WnrrE, A. Stamford 
Willing, Mark Skinner 
WiLMARTH, Mary Jane Hawes 
Wilson, John P. 
Wilson, John P., Jr. 
WiNCHELL, B. L. 

Wolf, Henry Milton 
Wolff, Harold Witte 

SUSTAINING LIFE 
Bartholomay, Clara Schmidt 
Bush, Wilhelmina Gentry 
Dickinson, Theodore G. 
Donnelley, Reuben H. 
Dunham, Mary V. 
Firt,D, Della Spencer 
Gary, Elbert H. 
Keith, William Scott 
Merrick, Zella 
Morgan, Alden K. 
Rogers, Susan C. 
Whitehead, Grace Laflin 
Williams, Anna Perkins 
SUSTAINING 
Adams, Joseph 
Ambbrg, William A. 
Armour, Mrs. Phillip D. 
Bailey, Edward P. 
Bentley, Cyrus 
Besly, Kathleen M. Healy 
Bowes, Frederick M. 
Carpenter, Benjamin 



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Members 

Carpenter, Myrok Jay 
CoBURN, Anna Swan 
FoLsoM, William Rickords 
Goodrich, Albert W. 
GooKiH, Frederick W. 
Gorton, Louise Steoer 
Grey, Walter Clark 
Johnson, Frank Seward 
Kohlsaat, Christian C 
Lee, Frances Glessner 
LoEscH, Frank J. 
MacDonald, Charles A. 
MacLeish, Andrew 
McCoRMicK, Alexander A. 
Mears, Careje Ellen 
Platt, Charles Dennis 
Rosenthal, James 
Rutter, William McMurtie 
Schmidt, I,oui8 E. 
Sheriff, Andrew R. 
Smith, Carrie Stone 
Stephens, Redmond D. 
Stevenson, Robert, Jr. 
Stone, Rev. John Timothy 
Swift, Annie M. 
Wells, Arthur B. 
Williams, Lawrence 
Wilson, Ella Crane 
Wilson, Martha 
Wilson, Milton 
Windsor, John Carpenter 
Zimmerman, Herbert F. 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Dent, Thomas 
■James, Edmund Janes 
Jameson, John Franklin 



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Roosevelt, Theodore 
White, Horace 

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS 
Alvord, Clarence Walworth 
Anderson, Henry C. L. 
Appletok, Edward Dale 
Atkinson, Eleanor 
Barton, Edmund Mills 
Baskin, Oliver Lawrence 
Beaubisn, Frank Gordon 
Beer, Willlum 
Beers, John Hobart 
Blanchard, Mrs. Rufus 
Bond, Charles Frederick 
Bond, Shadrach Cuthbert 
Bond, Thomas Willum 
Bourland, Benjamin Langford Todd 
Brennan, Edward Paul 
Brennan, George Albert 
Brown, Edward Osgood 
Bruwaert, Edmond 
Bureb, John Crysostom 
BuRNHAM, John Howard 
Burton, Clarence Monroe 
Bushnell, David Ives 
Carr, Clark Ezra 
Chapman, Arms Spafard 
Chapman, Charles C. 
Chapman, Frank M. 
Clinton, John Waterbury 
Colbert, Elias 
Cole, Harry Ellsworth 
Cook, Frederick Francis 
Cook, Minnie Gathright 
Corthell, Eva Spaulding 
Cox, Isaac Joslin 



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Members 
Crane, Frank W. 

CURREY, JOSIAH SeYMOUB 

DeWolf, Edward P. 
DouGHiY, Arthur G. 
Douglas, Walter Bond 
Dunn, Jacob Piatt 
DuTTOM, Marshall Martin 
Earle, Clarence Arthur 
Eastman, Francis Ambrose 
Fertig, James Walter 
Franklin, Marian Scott 
Gardiner, Asa Bird 
Gordon, Eleanor Kinzie 
GossELiN, Am£d£e E. 
Greelet, Samuel Sewell 
Green, Samuel Abbott 
Greene, Evarts Boutell 
Greenlaw, William P. 
Grover, Frank Reed 
Harden, William 
Hart, William Octave 
Hayes, Harriet Hayden 
Higinbothah, Harlow Niles 
Hubbard, Elijah Kent, Jr. 
Hull, Horace 
James, James Alton 
Johnson, Martha Heald 
Jones, Arthur Edwards 
Kelton, Dwight H. 
Kerfoot, Alice G. 
Kinney, Henry Clay 
Koehne, William Louis 
Kohlsaat, Herman Henry 
LeBeau, Emily Beaubien 
Lewis, Benjamin F. 
Long, John Turner 
McClurg, Gilbert 



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Members 



McCluro, Virginia Donaohb 
McCoRD, David Ross 
Martin, Joseph Stanley 
Meese, William Augustus 
Menard, Peter Abijah 
Mills, Willum C. 
Mitchell, William Arthur Right 
Oakleaf, Joseph B. 
Onahan, William James 
O'SHAUGHNEsay, Thomas A. 
OiTOFy, Frances Hbald 
Page, Walter Hines 
Paine, Clarence Sumner 
Petitclers, Emma L. 
Phillimore, William P. W. 
Prentiss, Mildred Jeneins 
Putnam, Elizabeth Duncan 
Quaife, Milo Milton 
Radebauoh, William 
Reed, Charles Bert 
ScRARP, Albert Frederick 
ScHUPP, Philip C. 
Smith, Valentine 
Sparks, Edwih Erle 
Spencer, Roswell T. 
Starr, Frederick 
Stevens, Frank Everett 
Stewart, Judd 
Swearinoen, James Strode 
Thacher, Edward Strode 
Upton, George Putnam 
Van Name, Addison 
Wait, Horatio Loomis 
Watson, Eliza Lucretia Bond 
Wells, Albert Emory 
Whistler, Garland Nelson 
Wood, James Whistler 



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CHARTER 

AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE CHICAGO HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

Whereas, it is conducive to the public good of a State 
to encourage such institutions as have for their ob- 
ject to collect and preserve the memorials of its found' 
ers and benefactors, as well as the historical evidences 
of its progress in settlement and population, and in 
the arts, miprovements, and institutions which dis- 
tinguish a civilized community, and to transmit the 
same for the instruction and benefit of future gener- 
ations: 
Section 1. Be it enacud by the People ^ tke State 
of Illinois, represented in the General Assembly, "Inat William 
H. Brown, William B. Ogden, J. Young Scammon, Mason 
Brayman, Mark Skinner, Geo. Manierre, John H. Kjnzie, 
J. V. Z. Blaney, E. I. Tinkham, J. D. Webster, W. A. Small- 
wood, V. H. Higgins, N. S. Davis, Charies H. Ray, S. D. 
Ward, M. D. Ogden, F. Scammon, E. B. McCagg, and 
William Barry, all of the City of Chicago, who have asso- 
ciated for the purpose aforesaid, be and are hereby fonned 
into and constituted a body politic and corporate, by the 
name of the "Chicago Historical Society," and that 
they and their successors, and such others as shall be legally 
elected by them as their associates, shall be and contmue 
a body politic and corporate, by that name, forever, 

Sec. 2. Said Society shall have power to elect a Presi- 
dent, and all necessary officers, and shall have one common 
seal, and the same may break, change and renew at pleasure; 
and, as a body politic and corporate, by the name aforesaid, 
m^ sue and be sued, and prosecute and defend suits, both 
in law and equity, to final Judgment and execution. 

Sec 3. The said Society shall have power to make 
all orders and by-laws for governing its members and 
property, not repugnant to the laws of this State; and 
may expel, disfranchise, or suspend any member, who, 
by his misconduct, shall be rendered unworthy, or who 
shall neglect or rd^use to observe the rules and by-laws 
of this Society. 



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as Charter 

Sec. 4. The said Society may, from time to time, 
establish rules for electing omcers and members, and also 
times and places for holdmg meetings; and is hereby em- 
powered to take and hold real or personal estate, by gift, 
grant, devise, or purchase, or otherwise, and the same, or 
any part thereof, to alien and convey. 

Sec. 5. The said Society shall have power to elect 
corresponding and honorary members thereof, in the va- 
rious parts of this State and of the several United States, 
and also in foreign countries, at their discretion: Provided, 
however, that uie number of resident members of said 
Society shall never exceed sixty; and William H. Brown, 
or any other person named in this act, is hereby authorized 
and empowered to notify and call together the first meeting 
of said Society; and the same Society, when met, shall agree 
upon a method for calling further meetings, and may have 
power to adjourn from time to time, as may be found 
necessary. 

Sec. 6. Members of the Legislature of this State, in 
either branch, and Judges of the Supreme Court, and offi- 
cers of State, shall and may have free access to said Society's 
library and cabinet. 

Sec. 7. This act shall take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

approved, February 7, iSs7- 



Whereas, it is a duty to past and coming generations, 
for the honor of the State, and benefits of its citizens, 
to collect, preserve and diffuse the materials of its 
early histoiy, the memorials of its founders and bene- 
factors, and the evidences of its progress in industry, 
arts and all the elements of an enlightened civilization; 
and whereas the Chicago Historical Society, acting 
under chartered powers from this State, has for several 
years past been actively and successfully engaged in 
prosecuting these laudable objects, and formed exten- 
sive collections of books, newspapers, pamphlets and 
manuscripts, relating to our State and National History, 
and now numbering over 30,000 volumes, besides 



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Charier 23 

establishing relations of exchange with the principal 
institutions of this and foreign countries— for the 
encouragement of the said Society, 

Section I. Be it enacted by the People of ike StaU of 
Illinois, represented in the General Assembly, That the 
Secretary of State be authorized and is directed, upon the 
written order of the President or Secretary of the Chicago 
Historical SociETy, under the legal seal thereof, to deliver 
to the said Society fifty copies of all and each of the public 
documents (bound or unbound), books, pamphlets, charts 
or other publications by the State, as uie same shall be 
hereafter printed, from year to year, or from rime to time, 
and also such numbers of copies of documents which are 
now or may have been printed, as may be contributed to 
said Society, without detriment to the public interests; 
Provided, that the documents herein granted shall be used 
by the said Society for the sole purpose of preservarion in 
its library, or of exchange with other States and insritutions, 
or with individuals for publications of importance and value 
to the people of this State; but in no case to be sold for 
money; Provided, that the said Society shall make affidavit, 
through its President or Secretary, to the Governor of the 
State, at or before each biennial session of the General 
Assembly, that a sum not less than five hundred dollars 
has been raised and expended in and for the business and 
management of said Society in and during the two years 
preceding; and, at the same time, submit therewith a report 
of the meetings and transactions of said Society for the 
same period for the information of the people of this State. 

Sec. 2. This act shall be in force from and after its 
passage. 

Approved, February 22, 1861. 

AN ACT TO AMEND AN ACT ENTrtLED 
AN ACT TO INCORPORATE THE CHICAGO HISTOIUCAL SOCIETY, 
APPROVED FEBRUARY 7, 1857 
Section 1. Be it enacted by the People ^ the StaU 
of Illinois, represented in the General Assembly, That section 
Hve (5) of the act, to which this is an amendment, be so 
amended that said Society shall have power to increase 
the number of its resident members, from rime to time, 
to any number that shall by it be deemed expedient. 



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34 Charier 

Sec. 2. The said Society shall have power to borrow 
money and mortgage its real estate to secure the same, to 
an amount not exceeding twenty thousand dollars, to be 
used in completing and paying for the buildings now in 
process of erection on the real estate of said Society. And 
the real estate and property of said Society shall be exempt 
from taxation. 

Sec. 3. This act shall take effect and be in force from 
and after its passage. 

approved, January $o, 1867. 



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CONSTITUTION 



Amendcxl, January 16, 1S83 
Seriied, November 21, 1893 
Amended, November 2<^ 1906 
Amended, November 21, 1911 

ARTICLE I 

NAME AND OBJECTS 

This Society shall be called the Chicago Historical 
Society. 

Its object shall be to institute and encourage historical 
inquiry, to collect and preserve the materials of history, 
and to spread historical infonnauon, especially concerning 
the Northwestern States. 

ARTICLE II 

MEMBERSHIP 

Section 1. This Society shall be composed of Hon- 
orary Life, Life, Annual, Honorary, and Corresponding 
members,* all of whom shall be elected by ballot of the 
Executive Committee, unless by unanimous consent they 
shall be elected by a viva-vocf vote cast at a regular meet- 
ing by twelve legally qualified voters. Two adverse bal- 
lots of the Executive Committee shall reject a candidate. 

Sec. 2. The dues for membership shall be as follows: 
For Life-Membership, five hundred dollars payable in 
money, or by services rendered or donations made, and 
publicly declared by resolution of the Executive Committee 
to exceed that amount in value to the Society: and for 
Annual Membership, twenty-five dollars per annum, the 
dues for the first fiscal year being payable within one month 
after election to membership and notice of such election; 
provided, that when such election shall occur after January 
first, the dues for the balance of said fiscal year shall be for 

*AtameetinsoftheSociety January 21, 1916, this Section was amended 
to read as follows: 

"Section 1. This Society shall be composed of Honorary Life, Life, 
Annual, Sustainins Life, Sustaining, Honorary, and Corresponding mem- 



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Constitution 



the proportionate part of the twenty-five dollars, and pay- 
able within thirty days after such election and notice.* 

Annual members, when of the age of seventy years 
or upwards, completing or having completed the payment 
of not less than ten annual dues will be excused from further 
payment of annual dues. 

Persons who have heretofore made, or shall hereafter 
make, voluntary contribution of one thousand dollars or 
more to the Society's funds, or donations publicly declared 
by resolution of tne Executive Committee to be of that 
value to the Societ3r's collections, may be elected Honorary 
Life Members, upon recommendation of the Executive 
Committee. 

The President and Secretary shall issue a Diploma, 
under seal of the Society, and certifying the class of^ mem- 
bership, to each member elected, upon payment of the dues. 

Sec. 3. The right to hold ofBce and vote, and to take 
any part in the proceedings of the Society, shall be accorded 
to and may be exercised only by the members of the three 
classes first hereinbefore named. 

Sec. 4. Before any person be elected a member by 
the Executive Committee such person shall be proposed 
by two members of the Society, and the name of such 
proposed member and the proposers shall have been posted 
for at least two weeks-t 

*At I meetingof the Society, January 21, 1916, this Section wat amended 
by the insertion at the following provisions: 

"Sustaining members shall have, upon the payment of ten dollars, all 
the privileges of Annual members for one year, except the right to vote or 
hold office." 

"Sustaining Life members, upon the payment of one hundred dollars, 
shall have all the privileges of Annual members, except the right to vote or 
hold oSa, for and during their respecdve lives; and the money so received 
shall not be expended for current expenses, but shall be invested, and only 
the income thereof may be expended." 

IS amended 

" Sec. 4. Before any person be elected an Annual member by the 
Executive Committee such person shall be proposed by two members of 
the Society, and the name of such proposed member and the proposers 
shall have been posted for at lessi two weeks; Sustaining members may be 
elected, however, at any meeting of said Committee upon applicarion with- 
out such proposers and without being posted." 



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Constitution 



ARTICLE III 



Section 1. The officers of the S 
of a President, First and Second Vice 
Executive Committee of eight other mi 
aforenamed shall be members of the 
Treasurer, Secretary, and Librarian. 
Vice-President shall be ex-offi^ciis memb' 
Committee. 

Sec. 2. The President and Vice- 
elected by ballot at the annual meetinf 
shall respectively remain in office until 
successors. 

They shall perform such duties as ; 
officers or as may be prescribed in the E 
occurring from any cause in any of t 
filled bjr Ballot at any special meeting, m 
being given in the notice of such meetin 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committt 
by ballot at the annual meetings, twc 
shall, from the time of the first elect 
their office until the next annual electic 
them until the second such election; tv 
third such election; and two of them u 
election. The terms for which the first 
at the first election shall hold their oJ 
mined by lot immediately after such ele 

Sec. 4. At each annual meeting tl 
be elected by ballot two persons to fi: 
by the expiration of the term of those I 
members of the Executive Committee 
shall hereafter be elected such members 

On the expiration of the term of : 
of said committee, their successors shall 
for the term of four years. 

Vacancies in the Executive Comm 
expired term, caused by death, resign; 
office, or inability to act, may be fille 
the remaining members of said comm 
ceeding annual elecdon, at which time 
be filled for the unexpired term in tl 



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Constitution 



members of said committee are elected for the full term of 
their office. 

Sec. 5. The Executive Committee, constituted above, 
shall alone hold, manage, administer, and control all the 
money, property, effects, and affairs of the Society: and 
said committee may appoint a Treasurer, a Librarian, a 
Secretary, and such assistants and employes in the service 
of the Society as to said committee may seem fit; and may 
prescribe the duties and fix the compensadon of such officers, 
assistants, and employes; and said committee may make 
investments of the Society's funds, provided that no fund 
bequeathed to or held by the Society for a specific purpose 
shall be appropriated to or used for any other purpose, and 

{trovided further that said committee shall not incur any 
lability on the part of said Society in any one year whicn 
shall exceed its annual income; and it shall be the dut;^ of 
said committee to make an annual report to the Society 
of all its acts and doings. 



ARTICLE IV 



Section 1, The annual meeting for the election of 
officers and the transaction of other business reladi^ to 
the affairs of the Society shall be held on the third Tues- 
day of November in each year, and the fiscal year of the 
Society shall be^n with the first day of November in each 
year and end with the thirty-first day of the following Oc- 
tober. 

Sec. 2. The regular meetings shall be held at such 
times and conducted in such manner as shall be prescribed 
in the By-Laws and directed by the Execurive Committee, 
provided no such regular meeting shall occur at the same 
time with the annual meeting. 

Sec. 3. At the annual meetings not less than twelve 
members having the right to vote, and at the special business 
meetings not less than seven su«^ members shall constitute 
a quorum. 

Sec. 4. Special meetings and special business meet- 
ings may be called by the President, or, in case of his absence, 
hy one of the Vice-Presidents, of which due notice shall be 
given at least two days beforehand. 



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By-Laws 39 

ARTICLE V 

AMENDMENTS 

This Constitution may be altered or amended by a 
two-third vote at an^ annual or special meeting; provided 
that a printed or wntten copy of the proposed alterations 
or amendments shall have accompanied me notice of the 
meeting at which they shall be acted upon; and Provided 
further that not less than twelve members having tne right 
to vote shall be present when such vote is taken. 



DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

Art. I. Section 1. The President shall preside at all 
meetings of the Society and of the Executive Committee, 
and call such special meerings and special business meetings 
as he may deem necessary, or as ne may, in wriring, be 
requested to call by live members of the Society. 

Sec. 2. The Vice-Presidents in the order of their 
seniority, shall perform the dudes of the President in the 
case of die absence of the President from the meerings of 
the Society or from Chicago. 

Sec. 3. The Executive Committee may adopt such 
rules for their own acUon not in conflict with the Consritu- 
rion and By-Laws of the Society, as they may find most con- 
venient and necessary. 



Art. IL Section 1. The regular meetings of the 
Society shall be held on the third Tuesday of each of the 
following named months, to-wit: January, April, and 
October. 

Sec. 2. The annual meeting shall be held on the third 
Tuesday of November, the precise hour in the case of this 
and all other meetings of the Society being desi^ated by 
the President and stated in the notice of the meetmg. 

Sec. 3. The exercises of the regular and special meetings 
of the Society shall be under the direction of the Execurive 
Committee, and in general conformity with the objects of 
the Society. 



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30 By-Laws 

Sec. 4. The order of business at the special business 
meetings of the Societ); shall be as follows: 

1. Reading the minutes of the next preceding business 

meeting. 

2. Reports of Officers. 

3. Reports of Committees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Deferred business. 

6. New business. 

Sec. 5. The order of business at the annual meet- 
ing of the Society shall be as follows: 

1. Reading the minutes of the next preceding meet- 

ing. 

2. Reports of Officers. 

3. Reports of Committees and Trustees. 

4. Election of new members. 

5. Election of Officers. 

6. Deferred business. 

7. New business. 

HEMBEILSHIF 

Art. in. Section 1. The dues of the Annual mem- 
bers of the Society shall be payable annually in advance 
on the third Tuesday of November in each year.* 

Sec. 2. Should the dues of any member remain unpaid 
for the space of one month, the Executive Committee shall 
notify him in writing, that unless his dues are paid within 
one month from the date of such notice his membership 
shall cease, and unless such dues are paid pursuant to such 
notice, or such default is accounted tor to the satisfaction 
of the Executive Committee, such person shall thereupon 
cease to be a member of the Society. 

SUSPENSION AND AMENDMENTS 
Art. IV. The By-Laws in whole or in part may be 
suspended during any special business or annual meeting, 
by vote of a majority of the members present at any such 
meeting. The By-Laws may be amended on the same 
conditions prescribed for amending the Constitution. 

*At a meedDg of the Society, January 21, 1916, this Section was ameoded 
to read as follows: 

"Art. III. Section 1. The dues of the Annual and Sustaining 
membets of the Societjr shall be payable annually in advance of the third 
Tuesday of November in each year. 



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REPORT OF THE ANNUA! 
November 16, 1915. 

The fifty-ninth annual meeting of the 
Society was held in Crerar Hall of the 
at eight o'clock on the evening of Tuesi 
1915, pursuant to notice given, as provid 
tion. 

President Burley called the met 
half past eight o'clock, and Secretary 
present, on motion. Dr. Schmidt was a; 
of the Meeting. 

The following members were prese 
Bush, Clarence A. Burley, Robert ( 
Franeel, William A. Fuller, Frank 
Lowe, A. F. Madlener, LaVerne Noye 
John L. Shortall, Dr. O. L. Schmidt, 
A. Smith, and the Librarian. 

It was moved by Mr. Bush that the ! 
annual meeting as printed in the Yearboo 
their reading be dispensed with. The mi 
and earned. 

The Secretary then presented the Exei 
Report as follows: 



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REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE 

For the Fiscal Year Ending October 31, 1915 

To the Members of the Chicago Historical Society: 

Gentlemen; — ^The Executive Committee, in conformity 
with the Society's Constitution, has the honor to submit its 
Annual Report as follows: 

FUNDS 

The Chicago Historical Society's Funds consist of the 
General Fund, representing the membership dues, gifts of 
friends and some small sums obtained by the sale of its pub- 
lications, and the Special Funds, thirteen in number, of 
which eleven were created through bequests by generous 
testators who valued the future and &e mission of the 
Society. 

The General Fund is used for the maintenance of the 
Society's building, the care of its collections, the manage- 
ment of its ordinary business, lectures, exhibitions and so 
forth. 

The Special Funds are used according to the specifica- 
tions of gift, mainly for the purchase of books, bookoindiog, 
and the printing of the Society's publications. Although the 
income trom these various sources is managed with scrupu- 
lous economy, only the necessary business can be d<me at 
times in order that the savings of one period may allow a 
greater undertaking at another time. 

The Henry D. Gilpin Fund ($70,000.00— j« Report 
of Henry D. Gilpin Trustees) is under the exclusive care 
and management of trustees appointed under the will of 
Henry D. Gilpin. The income from this fund, as paid to 
the Society by said trustees, is applied enrirely to the main- 
tenance of the Gilpin Library. The present trustees are 
Clarence A. Burley, Walter L. Fisher and William 
O. Green, and the President and First Vice<President of 
the Society, ex oficiis. A full statement of the fund is 

32 



Funds 33 

given in the teport of these trustees, presented herewith on 
page 39. 

The Jonathan Burr Fund consists of a legacy of 12,000 
from the late Jonathan Burr, the income to be used in pay- 
ment of printing the Society's publications. It is invested 
in a cott^e and twenty-one lots in the Town of Calumet, 
acfiuired in settlement of a note secured by trust deed on 
said tots. The account stands as follows: 
Received rent on Trowbridge cott^e .... 
Paid into General Fund on accoimt of 

taxes and printing* 



The Philo Carpenter Fund consists of a legacy of 
$1,000 from the late Philo Carpenter, the income to be de- 
voted to binding books and periodicals. The account stands 
as follows: 

Received interest on bond $50.00 

Paid for binding $ 2.50 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1915 47.50 

$50.00 $50.00 

The Marshall Field Fund consists of $10,000, being 
the proceeds of the sale to the United States Government 
for the Library of Congress, of the eleven volumes of papers 
of President James Madison, which were purchased by 
Mr. Edward G. Mason in 1893 for the Society, with funds 
donated for that purpose by Mr. Marshall Field. By 
resoluUon of the Executive Committee it was voted that 
this fund should remain intact and the income therefrom 
be used toward defraying the expenses of editing, printing 
and distributing the Society's publications. 

The account of this fund stands as follows: 
Available balance on hand Oct. 31, 1914 $288.36 

Received interest on bond 400.00 

To publishing Year book, 1914 $5"'* ''' 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1915 1 



$688.36 $6 
t the time of closing the 



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Report of Executive Committee 



The T. Mauro Gakrett Fund consists of $1,000 be- 
queathed to the Society by the late T. Mauro Garrett. The 
account stands as follows: 

Received interest on bond $50.00 

Paid into General Fund $50.00 



The Huntington Wolcott Jackson Fund is a bequest 
of $1,000 from the late Huntington W. Jackson, the income 
to be used in the purchase of books. The following state- 
ment shows the condition of the fund: 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1914 $ 42.60 

Certificate of deposit 131.50 

Received interest on bond 50.00 

Paid for books $ 35.00 

Certificate of deposit 131.50 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1915 57.60 

$224.10 $224.10 

The Polk Diary Fund of $3,500 was created out of the 
proceeds of the sale to the United States Government for 
the Library of Congress, of the twenty-four volulnes of the 
diary and the letters and papers of President James K. Polk 
purchased by the Society in 1901 with funds collected for 
that purpose. By order of the Executive Committee it has 
been set aside, die income to be used for defraying the 
expenses of editing, publishing and distributing the So- 
ciety's publications, provided that such money as shall be 
necessary may be advanced towards the expenses of the i>ub- 
lication of the Polk Diary, such advances to be repaid into 
the fund as promptly as possible out of the proceeds and 
profits of sales of said Diary. This fund will increase in 
proportion to the sale of the James K. Polk Diary, pub- 
fished by the Society. A standard publication of this diar- 
acter is assured of a constant although slow demand and 
will in the course of a few years replenish the fund. It 
is a matter of satisfaction that the fund enabled the So- 
ciety to give to the public this remarkable Diaiy in printed 
form, the four volumes of which were sent to every regular 
member of the Society in 1910. The sum now realized on 
the fund is $1,734.00. 



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Funds 35 

The Lucretia Pond Fund, being the proceeds of a 

bequest of real estate to the Society by Lucretia Pond, con- 
sists of a principal of $13,500, the income 

purchase of books, pamphlets and docui 

and paintings of historical interest. Th 

fund stands as follows: 

One five per cent bond 91 

Certificate of deposit 

Received interest on bonds 

Received interest on certificate of 
deposit 

Paid for boots, manuscripts and period- 
icals 

Bond on hand Oct. 31, 1915 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1915 

«2 

The William C. Seipp Fund consisi 
$5,000.00 bequeathed to the Society by tl 
Seipp. As no special disposition for this 
made by the donor, the Executive Comm 
its established rule created a permanent f 
as The William C. Seipp Fund, proceeds c 
applied to the general expenses of the Soc 
bequests are much appreciated, for the 
expenses, including those of the care and 
of the building, as well as freq^uent specia 
the Society, not provided for in the end< 
books, printing, etc., are paid from the 
Fund. The account of this fund stands < 

Received interest on bonds 

Paid into General Fund 



The Elizabeth Hammond Stickney 
$6,650.00. Of this sum five thousand dolla 
to the Society by the late Mrs. Eliz 
Stickney, as a memorial to her husba 
Swan Stickney, the income to be used ii 
Stickney Library and making additions the 
of this library was the private libraiy 
also bequeathed to the Society by Mrs. i 



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36 Report of Executive Committee 

count of the larger number of these books being on art, 
travel, philosophy and other subiects not allied to the work 
of the Society, Mrs. Cyrus H. McCormick generously ar- 
ranged, with all legal formality, a purchase of these books, 
with the express purpose of thereby increasing the principal 
of the fund and thus adding to its usefulness to the Society. 
The account of this fund stands as follows: 

Certificate of deposit $487.60 

Received interest on bonds 310.00 

Received interest on certificate of deposit 10.11 

Paid for books $ 614.80 

Cash on hand Oct. 31, 1915 192.91 



$807.71 $807.71 

The Lucretia J. Tilton Fund consists of $3,000 be- 
queathed to the Society by the late Lucretia Jane Tilton, as 
a memorial to her husband, Ludan J. Tilton. The account 
stands as follows: 

Received interest on bonds $150.00 

Paid into General Fund $150.00 



The Elias T. Watkins Fund consists of $5,000 be- 
queathed to the Society by the late Elias T. Watkins. The 
account stands as follows: 

Received interest on bonds $250.00 

Paid into General Fund $250.00 



The Henry J. Willing Fund consists of $2,500 be- 
queathed to the Society by the late Henry Jenkens Willine. 
The following account shows the condition of this funa: 

Received interest on bonds $110.00 

Paid into General Fund $110.00 



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STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSE- 
MENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
OCTOBER 31, 1915 



Balance on hand November 1, 1914 % 1,779.72 

Duet ^rom annual memben (5,447,92 

Bequest! and donadont 295.00 

Interest and other BOurce* 165.23 

Ceitificatei of Depoiit 3,000.00 

Side of Duplicate* 808.78 

Jonathan Burr Fund 

Philo Carpenter Fund 50.00 

MarshaU Fudd Fund 400.00 

T. Mauro Gartett Fund 50.00 

Heniy D. Gilpin Fund 2,121 .72 

Huntmgton W. Jackson Fund. . . . , 50.00 

Polk Diary Fund 89. 17 

Lucretia Pond Fund 698.84 

Lucretia Pond Fund Certificate of Depodt 426.30 

William C. Seipp Fund 250.00 

Elizabeth H. Sticfcney Fund 320. 11 

Elizabeth H. Stickney Fund Certificate of Depotit. 487.60 

Lucretia J. Tiiton Fund 150.00 

EUas T. Watkins Fund 250.00 

Heniy J. Willing Fund 110.00 15,170.67 

$16,950.39 

DIBBURBEUEHTI 

Binding t 2.50 

Bookt, manujctipts and periodicals 2247.93 

Equipment 107 .00 

Feteua Historical PubUcations 125 .00 

Publishing — 

1914 Yearbook S84.77 

MacNaul Jegerson-Lemin Compact 158 .58 

Subscription to Writings an American History . 50.00 

Repairs and betterments 1549.86 

Salaries 4759.77 

Heating and lighting 528.34 

Postage 248.37 

Printing 280.76 

Secretary's petty cash expenses 308.70 

General expenses 542.19 

Cetrifieates of Deposit for General Fund 3000. 00 $14,493 . 77 

Balance on hand October 31, 1915 2,456.62 

$16,950.39 



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Report of Executive Committee 



BALANCE SHEET 

As AT October. 31, 1915 

AlBBTl 

CmIi J 2,456.62 

Ceitificatei of depont 276^3 

Bonds 52,000.00 

Inventray of Polk Dianr 2,149.18 

Trustees ofHeniyD. Gilpin Fund 70,000.00 

•Real Estate (Burr Fund) 2,000.00 

$128,882.13 

LIABILITtEl 

Capita! and Siuplut: 

General Fund $ 842.74 

Jonathan Burr Fund 2,000.00 

Philo Carpenter Fund 1,047 JO 

MarshaU Fidd Fund 10,103.59 

T. Mauro Garrett Fund 1,050.00 

Henry D. Gilpin Fund 70,000.00 

Huntuifton W. Jackson Fund 1,189.10 

Polk Dwnr Fund 3,883.18 

Lucieda Pond Fund 14,813.11 

William C. Seipp Fund 5,250.00 

Eliiabeih H. Stiekney Fund 7,692.91 

Lucretia J. Tilton Fund 3,150.00 

Elias T. Watkin* Fund 5,250.00 

Henry J. Willing Fund 2,610.00 



DIGEST OP BALANCE SI 



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Cuh 




BOMil 


Kal 
Ettmte 


luecui 


ToUb 




« 84J.74 

""ii'.ia 
103. n 
«.oo 

'"ii'M 

to'.aa 
«3.gi 
so. 00 

MO.OO 
10.00 


»3i:w 


|i:d66 

10,000 

ilooo 

'iSiS 


"m;66o 






T. HuuvGuRtt,'!! 




»Tb;666:66 


1,04T.M 

11 




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!JS:S 

I.IU.OD 


■"^ 


tl.lH.S! 


HaTB.ai 


MJ,000 


•1.000 I7S.IM.18 





* Society's Building and Land valued approximately at $225,000.00 a. 
omitted ftoin the assets as they do not produce an income, 
t Inventory of Polk Diary. 



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Funds 39 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF THE GILPIN 

FUND OF THE CHICAGO HISTORICAL 

SOCIETY 

November 1, 1914 to October 31, 1915 

RBCEIPTt 
1914. 

Dec. 30. 6 months* interest due Jan. 1, 1915, on tl7,000, 

3)4% bonds f 297.50 

6 months' inteiest due Jan. 1, 1915, on S53,000, 

4% bonds I,0e0.00 

$1,000 City or Chicago 4% bonds, matuied Jan. 1, 

1915 1,000.00 

1915. 

July 17. 6 months' interest due July 1, 1915, on $17,000, 

3>i% bonds 297.50 

6 months' interest due July 1, 1915, on $54,000, 

4% bonds 1,080.00 

$4,000 City of Chicago 4% bonds matured July 1, 

1915 4,000.00 

Oct. 7. $1,000 City of Chicago 4% bonds matured July 1, 

1916 1,000.00 

31. Interest on Ceitificate of Deposit 32.59 

$8,767 J9 



DISBVRSEMEHTS 
1914. 

Dec 30. $2,000 City of Oiicago 4% bonds, due Jan. 1, 1917, 

@ 99fi $1,990.00 

Balance of bill of $120.45 for wire brushing and 

painting 21.72 

1915. 

July 7. $l,000City of Chicago 4% bonds, due Jan. 1, 1919, 

@ .9919. 991.90 

$3,000 City of Chicago 4% bonds, due Jan. 1, 1932, 

@ .9706 2,911.80 

Interest six days on above $4,000 bonds 2.67 

Oct. 22. Paid Chicago Historical Society, annual appropria- 
tion 2,100.00 

$8,018,09 
31. Certificates of Deposit in Safety Vault Box: 

No. 15866 $710.67 

No. 15938 38.83 749J0 

$8,767 J9 



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Report of Executive Committee 



STATEMENT OF GILPIN FUND, NOVEMBER 1. 1915 

Chicago City 3Ji% bonds, par Talue tl7,00O.OO 

Chicago City 4% bonds, par value 53,000.00 

Certificates of Deposit 749.50 

Total t70,749.5O 

Amount leceived from EttateofHeniyD.Gilpiii, deceased 6M14.34 

Surplus $6,435.16 

Clakemcb a. Buklet, ] 
Walter t. FiSHEit, } Trustees. 
William O. Gkeen. J 



TREASURER'S REPORT 
For tbe Year ExDiNa October 30, 1915 



Balance on hand Novembei 1, 1914 

Deposit! by Secretary 

Deposited by Trustees Gilpin Fund 

Interest, Chicago Telephone Co. bonds 

[nterest. South Side Elevated Ry. Co. bonds 

[nterest. City of Chicago bonds 

[nterest, Metropohtan Elevated Ry. Co. bonds 

[nterest, C. B. & Q. Ry. Co. bonds 

[nterest. Commonwealth Electric Co. bonds 

[nterest. Commonwealth Edison Co. bonds 

Interest, Chicago City Railway Co. bonds 

interest. Peoples Gas Light & Coke Co. bonds 

Interest, Atchinson, Topeka k Santa Fe Co. bonds. . 

St, City of Mobile, Alabama, bonds 

St, Cudahy Company bonds 

Interest on Certificates of Deposit 

.nterest on Bank Account 

CertiGcates of Deposit 



(6,664.79 
2,121,72 
50.00 
180.00 
60.00 
40.00 
200m 
400.00 
350.00 
150.00 
400.00 
440.00 
90.00 
12.50 
65.S2 
32.54 
3,913.90 



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Vouchers isiued by the Secretary, countemBned 

by the President J14,4M.07 

Balance od hand October 30, 1915 2,456.62 $16,950.6! 

The above balance is made up as follows: 

General Fund $842.76 

Stickney 192.91 

Caipenter 47.50 

Jackson 57.60 

WatWns 250.00 

Garrett 50.00 

Tilton 150.00 

Willing 110.00 

Pond 313.09 

Field 103.59 

Polk 89.17 

Swpp 250.00 

$2,456.62 



LIST OF SECURITIES HELD IN SAFE DEPOSIT BOX, 
NOVEMBER, W15 

POND FUND 

Intctut Semi-uiniultr 

Four (4) South Side El bonds... $1,000 Mcb 4}% Jan. & July $90.00 

One (1) Atchison bond 500 4% Apr. & Oct. 10.00 

EightfS) Peo.GajLt.&C.Co.. l,000each 5% Mar.EiSept. 200.00 

One (1) Metropolitan El 1,000 4% Feb.&Aug. 20.00 

One (1) Com. Edison Co. bond. 1,000 S% Mar. & Sept. 25.00 
STICKNET ?UMD 

Five (5) Atchison bonds 1,000 each 4% Apr.&Oct. 100.00 

One (1) City of Chicago. 1,000 4% lan.&July 20.00 

One (1) City of Chicago 500 4% Jan. & July 10,00 

One a) Chi. Tel. Co. bond... 1,000 5% June & Dec. 25.00 

CARFEHTBR FUND 

One (1) Com. Edison 1,000 5% Mar. & Sept. 25.00 



JACKSON FUND 

One (1) Com. Edison 1,000 5% Mar. & Sept. 25.00 

Certificate of Deposit, M. L. & T. Co 131.50 



One (1) Com. Edison 1,000 5% Mar. & Sept. 25.00 



: (5) Com.Edison 1,000 5% Mar.&Sept. 125.00 



\ J. TllTON FUND 
Three(3) Chicago Cy.Ry.bonds. 1,000 5% Feb. Sc Aug. 75X0 



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42 Report of Executive Committee 

HBHKT 3- VTILUNO FUND 

Two (2) atyofMobacAla.... 1,000 4J%Apr.!tO«. $45.00 

One (1) At^iiion bond 500 4%Apr.!tO«. 10.00 



Five (5) Atchiionbondi 1,000 each 4% Apr. & Oct. 100.00 

Five (5) C.B.&Q.,IH.Div.... l,000each 4% Jan.&July 100.00 

W. C. 8E1PP FUND 

Five (5) Com. Edison 1,000 each 5% Mar. & Sept- 125.00 

POLK PIAST FUND 

One (1) Com.Ediwn 1,000 5% Mar. & Sept. 25.00 

One (1) Cudahy Pkg. Co. bond. 500 5% Ma; & Nov. 12.50 

Certificate of Deposit, M. L. & T. Co. 14t83 

Respectfully subn^tted, 

Oksoh Shitb, TttaiMier. 

To ike Members of the Chicago Hiitorical Society: 

We hereby certify that we have examined the accounts 
of the Chicago Historical Society and of Orson Smith, its 
Treasurer, for the year ending October 31, 1915, the vou- 
chers for eveiy disbursement, and the securities in the 
custody of the Treasurer, and that we find the same correct 
and as reported. 

(Signed) William A. Fuller, 
Joy Morton, 

Auditing Committee. 



DONATIONS 
The constant additions to the Society's collections in- 
dicate that the work the Society is doing is being increas- 
ingly appreciated by its members and by friends both in 
and outside of Chicago. In the Librarian's Report will be 
found a classified list of gifts to the Society's Library and 
Museum, and a tabulated List of Donors appears at the end 
of this volume. The following have made donations of 
money: 

Wm. A. Fuller, for desk $ 95.00 

H. J. Patton 100 . 00 

O. L. Schmidt, for lectures 750.00 

O. L. Schmidt, for Fergus Series 75.00 

Elizabeth Skinner 25.00 

Frederika Skinner 25.00 



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Membership 



MEMBERSHIP 

While the Executive Committee feel keenly the need of a 
larger membership they acknowledge with gratitude the 
fidelity and interest of the present members who are carry- 
ing on its aifairs, and whose efforts have made possible its 
present attainments. 

During the fiscal year there have been added to the 
Society's roll seven Annual Members, and one Corresponding 
Member, as follows: 



ANNUAL MEMBERS 

Blackstone, Isabella FAitNswOiiTH 

(Mrs. T. B.) 
Hauberg, John, Rock Island, III. 
Heath, Albert G. 
Jones, Frank Hatch 
Peck, Clarence Ives 
Rogers, Walter Alexander 
Smith, Solomon A. 

corresfonding member 
Hubbard, Elijah Kent, Jr. 

Resignations of four Annual Members have been accepted 
and one has been dropped for non-payment of dues during 
the year. Five Annual, one Honorary and four Corre- 
sponding Members have died, leaving the summary of the 
present membership as follows: 

Honorary Life Members 11 

Life Members 13 

Annual Members 231 

Honorary Members S 

Corresponding Members 106 

356 



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Report of Executive Committee 



NECROLOGY 



The ever lengthening roll of those who have passed from 
us has been increased during the year by the ten following 



Adams, Charles Francis, LL.D., Boston, Mass. 

CONOVBR, CHARLES HOPKINS 

FisBBURN, Eugene Heald 

Hamilton, David Gilbert 

Hubbard, Elijah Kent, Middletown, Ct. 

Keep, Harriett (Mrs. Albert) 

Leonard, Edward Franke, Amherst, Mass. 

Smith, Perry Hiram, Jr. 

Sprague, Albert Arnold 

Steward, John Fletcher 

Charles Francis Adams, President of the American 
Historical Association, publicist, and railroad president, 
died March 19, 1915. Commenting upon the event, Tkf 
Nation remarked, "It has often been said that the Adams 
family is America's chief contribution to the doctrine of 
hereditary genius." Widi John Adams, John Quincy 
Adams, and Charles Francis Adams (American Ambassador 
to Great Britain) as his immediate ancestors, it is to the 
greatest praise of the man that not only did he honorably 
bear so great a name, but that he added peculiar distinction 
to it. 

He was bom in Boston, May 27, 1835, took his A. B. 
degree at Harvard in the class of 1856; was admitted to 
the Bar in 1858; and on the outbreak of the Rebellion 
entered the United States army as First Lieutenant in the 
1st Massachusetts Cavalry, served through the war, and 
emerged with the brevet rank of Brigadier-General honor- 
ably won, at the age of thirty. 

Deparrine from the tradition of his family, which had 
hitherto tended to public office, in the stricter sense, Charles 
Francis Adams gave ten years to the Massachusetts Board 
of Railroad Commissioners, 1869-79; six years to the Board 
of Arbitration of the Trunk Lines Railroad Organizarion, 
1879-84; and twenty-four years, from 1877 to 1890, to the 
Union Pacific System, first as Government Director of die 
same, and from 1884 to 1890 as President of it. 



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John F. Steward A. A, Spbague 



Charles H. Conover Eucene H. Fishburn 



ntzedbyGoOQlc 



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Membership 



His CkapUrs on Erie, published in 1871 was called the 
"first piece of muck-raking in the United States," and his 
Railroads, their Origin and Problems, and Notes on Railway 
Accidents exhibit the same faculty for keeping his mind open 
for the truth that made his historical work of such worth, 
and demonstrate that great literary faculty and what has 
been called "the historical bent" are not incompatible with 
the most intensely practical reasoning and business ability. 

Gen, Adams became an Overseer of Harvard University 
in 1882, and served that institution faithfully thereafter, 
even to the point of writing an attack upon its course of 
study and what he considered the "illiteracy" of its under- 
graduates. With the same high sense of civic patriotism he 
planned and protected the Metropolitan Park System of 
Boston, along the newer lines of development, 1892-95. 

In 1895, because of conspicuous services, Mr. Adams was 
made President of the Massachusetts Historical Society, 
and in 1901, he became President of the American Historical 
Association, becoming a constant contributor to the pub- 
lications of both bodies. 

Charles Francis Adams enjoys the distinction of having, 
according to the dictum of The American Historical Review, 
"an absolutely independent and fearless American mind." 
In an essay for The Dial on Adams' work Lee at Appomattox 
and Other Papers, Franklin H. Head, our late President, 
remarked that Mr. Adams "through access to papers of 
his father — who was Ambassador to London during the 
Civil War and afterward a member of the Court of Arbitra- 
tion — and also through access to the letters of Hamilton 
Fish, has been enabled to give an inside account, . . . of the 
otigin and adjustment of [the Alabama and other] such 
claims, much of which is wholly new to the general public." 
It might be added that these writings are not impertinent 
to matters with which the United States is dealing in the 
present crisis. In the same paper, Mr. Head pointed out 
that under the tide An Undeveloped Function, was embodied 
Gen, Adams' suggestion that "our various Historical Socie- 
ties, from a broad standpoint, should endeavor to shed light 
by their discussions on political questions of national im- 
portance," 

In his Life of Charles Francis Adams, — his father — 
Gen. Adams has, as The Nation well expresses It, "set the 
whole matter of the relations between England and the 



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46 Report of Executive Committee 

United States completely straight." The Nation pithily 
remarks that "He never became petrified into a severe 
dogmatis^" It was this quality in him which made him 
the first Northern writer to do justice to the causes of the 
Civil War from a Southern standpoint. It was the same 
heroic passion for truth which impelled his researches into 
the actual social and moral conditions of Puritan New 
England. His Life of Richard Henry Dana may be said to 
be a compend of the intellectual development of the nine- 
teenth century. 

Three Episodes of Massachusetts History; Massachusetts, 
its Historians and its History; three Phi Beta Kappa Ad- 
dresses, three Prince Society PublicationSy and a long list of 
writings for the historical societies menrioned above, con- 
sritute the remainder of his written service, save for occa- 
sional and unrecorded efforts. But his influence was not 
limited by his writings. It was a stimulous to integrity 
and openness of mind m every direction. 

Although resident in Washington during his later years. 
Gen. Adams accepted Honorary Membership in this Society 
with whose aims he was in sympathy, and the Society is 
proud to have borne his honored name upon its rolls, and 
to know that that name is still alive in that of his son, 
Charles Francis Adams, II, of Boston, Mass. 

Charles H. Conover, late President of Hibbard, 
Spencer, Barclett & Company, and one of the most active 
members of the Chicago Historical Society, died at his home 
1200 Lake Shore Drive on November 4, 1915. 

At this rime, so soon after this unexpected event, it is 
impossible to express the sense of loss felt by the Society, 
and which will be felt more keenly as it is more fully realized. 
Suffice it to say that there has rarely been a member of this 
Society who seemed more fully to .appreciate, and more 
actively to further its purposes, than did Mr. Conover. 
Although "only a business man," he possessed unusual 
literary and artistic judgment, a most discriminating sense 
of what befitted the Society in its chosen field, and was 
himself a collector of note in certain directions. 

Mr. Conover had himself collected and verified the data 
for a most complete litde volume on "The Conover Fam- 
ily." From this work we gather that it was an old Dutch 
family, Mr. Conover's first ancestor in America being 



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Membership 



Wolfert Gerretsen van Couwenhoven from Couwenhoven, in 
the Netherlands, who in 1630 settled in Rensselaerwyck, 
near Albany, and held the very important position of 
Superintendent of Farms for the Patroon. He later removed 
to New Amsterdam, now New York, where he cultivated 
the "Bowery," or "Farm No. 6," in the company's employ. 

Charles Hopkins Conover was bom in Easton, Penn., 
July 12, 1847, the eldest child of William Schenck Conover. 
He began business with Pratt & Co., of Buffalo, hardware 
merchants. In 1871 he came to Chicago and entered im- 
mediately into a business connection which was severed 
only by his death. The house of Hibbard & Spencer, 
wholesale hardware merchants, was located before tne Fire 
at the comer of State and Lake streets. In 1871, immediate- 
ly after the Fire, they found temporary quarters on the east 
side of Michigan Avenue, between Lake and Randolph 
streets, and, by 1872, at the comer of Lake and Wabash. 

Mr. Conover entered the business as Buyer, assisting 
Mr. William Gold Hibbard, and buying was his special 
province to the end. Anecdotes arc current of the exacti- 
tude of his judgment based on scientific knowledge of the 
materials and manufacture of the smallest article of hard- 
ware. In like manner he knew the minutest details of the 
management of the great house. In 1882 this business was 
incorporated under the name of Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett 
y Co., with Mr. Conover as one of the Directors. On the 
death of Mr. Spencer in 1890, Mr. Hibbard remained 
President, Mr, Bartlett became Vice-President and Mr. 
Conover Secretary. In 1903 Mr. Bartlett became President 
and Mr, Conover Vice-President. At this time they 
erected their new main building at the south end of State 
Street Bridge — one of Chicago's models of excellence in 
business architecture. Mr. Conover became President of 
Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co., succeeding Mr. Bartlett, 
January 1, 1914. For years he had shared tJie responsiblli- 
ries of the active management of this, one of the largest 
houses of its kind in the country, of late years had borne 
the heavier burden by reason of Mr. Bartlett's absence 
from the city. It was his habit to make a daily "round" 
of the entire establishment, which has a floor area of eleven 
acres. It is said that he was called upon to settle differences 
between the humblest or the highest of the employes, which 
he did always by trying to arrive at the right of Oie matter. 



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48 Report of Executive CommUtee 

A little magazine, Ttoo Bits, published b^ the employes, 
shows by cartoons and photographs, in which Mr. Conover 
figured, the kind of regard in which he was held by all the 
other members of the great staff. With a wholesome 
respect, they still did not stand in such awe of the head of 
the house as to fear to include him in their fun. 

Mr. Conover was very fond of good books. One who 
knew him well said that he seemed to absorb a page at a 
glance, that he read more books in a month than most 
business men do in a year, and remembered what he read. 
He had a kindly habit of bringing down a basket of books 
which he had read, and distributing them among the em- 

Eloyes of the company. To the Historical Sodety, which 
e joined in 1894, he was continually giving choice things, 
always accompanied with explicit information helpful to 
the Librarian. 

His rarest gift is that of his Lewis and Clark collection, 
the most complete collection of the "Travels" of these 
American explorers of the Great West in existence. The 
collecrion is described in Victor Paltsit's Bibliographical 
Data together with that of the Brirish Museum, The Boston 
Athenaeum, and others, far surpassing them all. (See 
C. H. S. Annual Report, 1910, pp. 310-315.) In November 
1910, Mr. Conover became the Society s Second Vice- 
President, and in 1912 its First Vice-President. His great 
Eersonal charm not only endeared him to the older members 
ut also won many new members for the Society, and he 
seemed to take a boyish delight in every little advantage 
whidh he could put in the Society's way. 

Aside from his general collections of Americana, which 
were large, Mr. Conover had a fondness for blue and white 
porcelain, and possessed a very complete collection of his- 
torical pieces. He had also large collections of coins and 
medals, both of the United States and of foreign countries. 
He was a governing member of the Art Institute, a directiH* 
in the National Bank of the Republic, and Chicago & Great 
Western Railroad, and a member of the Chicago, Commer- 
cial, Chicago Athletic, Glen View Golf and Ontwentsia 
Qubs. 

For many years Mr. Conover had made an annual trip 
abroad, motoring particularly in the Chateaux country in 
France, or among tiie Italian Lakes, and long ago he visited 
Japan, a country to which he always desired to return. 



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Membership 49 



Mr. Conover was married in 1881. His wife, Delia 
Louise Boardman, of Marshalltown, Iowa, was a woman of 
the greatest amiability. She died in April of last year. 
Their two eldest daughters, Mrs. Ralph W. Owen, of Madi- 
son, Wis., and Mrs. Eugene S. Talbot, Jr., of Chicago were 
Vassar graduates, and the youngest daughter, Margaret 
B. Conover, attended Vassar for two years. Their son, 
Henry Boardman Conover, a graduate of Yale University, 
is in business in Chicago with the Stewart Manufacturing 
Company. These four, and five grandchildren survive 
him. 

To the kindness of Mr. J. J. Charles, now President of 
Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Company, and of Mr. Con- 
over's devoted secretary, Miss Henrich, we are indebted 
for many of the details concerning his business relations. 
To the family we wish to convey the assurance that Mr. 
Conover will be always held in loving remembrance by this 
Society. 

Eugene Heald Fishburn, senior member of the real 
estate firm of Ogden, Sheldon & Company, and Chairman 
of the Trustees of the Gilpin Fund of this Society, died at 
his home, 701 Rush Street, on the morning of April 27, 1915. 
Although one of the gentlest and most unobtrusive of men, 
there is none who has more faithfully furthered the interests 
ofthe Society in its material affairs, or who has more tenderly 
endeared himself in the affections of the officers than Mr. 
Fishburn. 

A native of Illinois, bora in Magnolia, June 6, 1842, 
Mr. Fishburn'a parents were Abraham L. and L. Anna 
Pomeroy Fishburn. Coming to Chicago in 1872 he was 
later employed by the old firm of Ogden, Fleetwood & Com- 
pany, and in 1890 was admitted to partnership in the firm 
of its successors, Ogden, Sheldon & Company. This his- 
toric firm, founded in 1836, when Chicago's population was 
between 3,000 and 4,000, brought Mr. Fishburn into con- 
tact with Chicago's first mayor, whose fundamental knowl- 
edge of real estate and other matters in Chicago had in large 
part established our standing with the world at large. 
After the Fire of 1871 there was an unprecedented period of 
investment in land, which even the panic of 1873 did not 
terminate. To the men who withstood the spirit of specula- 
tion and honestly aided in the rebuilding of Chicago all 



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Report of Eocecutive Committee 



honor is due, an honor in which the finn with which Mr. 
Fishbum was associated deserves a generous share. 

Having estahlished a reputation for broad knowledge 
and unimpeachable integrity in real estate matters, Mr. 
Fishbum, in 1894, became President of the Chicago Real 
Estate Board. On the occasion of the special meeting of 
this Board called after his death, Mr. William A. Bond, 
presiding, said, in part, " . . . . His nature was extremely 
gentle, almost womanly. One could not be thrown with him 
closely without feeling the impress of his lovable manner, 
and of his high moral standards." Many others spoke to 
the same effect, and it was apparent that upon these Chicago 
business men, engaged in the most strenuous affairs the same 
quiet radiance had been shed of which we had been conscious 
in (Uiite other relations. 

To the Chicago, Historical Society, of which he became 
an Annual Member in 1891, he gave twenty-four years of 
his best judgment and ripe experience in the administra- 
tion of the Gilpin Fund as Chairman of its Board of Trustees. 
Through his long association with the well known men of 
his profession, and his sympathetic courtesy to all, Mr. 
Fishbum was rich in the most delightful reminiscences, and 
his humorous and kindly way of relating a story added to 
what might otherwise be "dry facts" the charm of history 
in its best form. Though suffering from failing eyesight, 
and having to depend increasingly upon the services of his 
secretary, Miss Bentley, he had carefully collated from the 
old hies of his correspondence such letters as he deemed of 
interest to the Society, presenring them, together with one 
of the rarest treasures of the firm, — the Letter-book of 
William B. Ogden. 

As Treasurer for sixteen years of McCormick Theological 
Seminan^, Mr. Fishbum performed an enduring service. 
In the Memorial to him issued by the Board of Trustees 
of the Seminary, it is stated that during the period of his 
Treasurership, "the financial condition of the Seminary 
emerged from an uncertain to a firm condirion. Every 
phase and every item of the business and financial matters 
of the institution through all these years received Mr. 
Fishbum's close attention and wise counsel." Mr. Fishbum 
was an Elder and Clerk of Session of the Fourth Presbyterian 
Church. In his last report, printed in the Church bullerin, 
opposite the Memorial notice, he had the satisfacrion of 



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Membership 



writing that "The new church buildings on Lincoln Park- 
waj; from Delaware Place to Chestnut Street were dedicated 
during the week from May 10 to May 17, 1914," and "The 
annual meeting of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian 
Church in the U. S. A. opened in the new church May 21, 
1914." In the tribute to him signed by John Timothy Stone 
and William S. Potwin, it is stated that the night before he 
passed away he assisted at the Communion Service at the 
Seminary. "His efficient work as Clerk of the Session and 
Treasurer of the Seminary was done, and all was left in 

Cirfect order as his work always was." Those who knew 
m best said that the Fourth Presbyterian Church was his 
"hobby," and how he must have rejoiced in its latter day 
development, resulting in its harmonious church edifice, 
manse, library and business office. 

Another of Mr. Fishbum's "hobbies" was the Chicago 
Nursery and WaiPs Orphan Asylum, to which he gave not 
only money but love and fatherly counsel. 

Mr. Fishbum was married, in 1868, to Miss Susan W. 
Moore, but was left a widower for many years. No children 
survive him. A brother, Edward P. Fishbum, resides at 
814 Linn St., Peoria, Illinois. 

On the occasion of the Society's last annual meeting, 
Mr. Fishbum was present, and although seeing but dimly, 
grasped every detail of the Society's transacrions with the 
utmost alertness. His warm sympathy and cordial interest 
in everything, and gentle, human kindness will never be 
forgotten. 

David Gilbert Hamilton, late President of the Chicago 
Cit^ Railway Company, and originator of the Narional 
Railway Company of Chicago, died Februair 16, 1915. 
He was the son of Polemus D. and Cynthia Holmes Hamil- 
ton, and was bom in Chicago on January 10, 1842, 

Mr. Hamilton's boyhood was passed here among a 
generation who might be called "the builders of Chicago." 
He graduated from the old Chicago High School in ^ly, 
1862, and received his degree from Asbury, now De Pauw 
University, in 1865. He studied law at the old Chicago 
University Law School, and graduated in 1867. His law 
office was located on the site of the very house in which he 
was bom, at 126 South Clark Street, and although the 



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52 Report of Executive Committee 

office was bumed in the Great Fire of 1871, he soon returned 
to the same location. 

To have lived in Chicago from the period of the foities 
through the time of the Fire, was to have passed through 
about three periods of historj^, — the expansion through 
the coming oi railroads, the Civil War, with resultant read- 
justments, and the enrire reconstnicdon of the city after 
the Fire. With such a beginning, one became well-versed 
in the character of the place and its people, and this knowl- 
edge made Mr. Hamilton a specialist m the management 
of estates, and the examination of titles. 

Mr. Hamilton had, in 1870, associated himself in business 
with Gen. R. K. Swift, — the first government land agent 
in Chicago. The partnership was dissolved in 1872, and 
Mr. Hamilton continued in business alone. About this 
rime he became Receiver and President of The Anglo- 
American Land and Claim Association for the colonizarion 
of Texas and the construction of railroads there, an organi- 
zarion whose affairs he successfully closed. 

By 1883, Mr. Hamilton had become interested in Chicago 
City Railway management, at a rime when the system was 
compararively insignificant. For five ytits he gave much 
time to it as a Director, helping to build up the business. 
In 1888, in company with a number of other Chicago 
capitalists he organized the National Railway Company of 
Illinois, the object of which was to acquire and operate 
street railway properties, and the scene of whose operarions 
was chiefly St. Louis. Mr. Hamilton was first a Director, 
and the following year became President. For ten years 
the "Hamilton Sjrndicate," as it was called, engaged in the 
development of street railways' in St. Louis, absorbing a 
number of compering lines. Mr. Hamilton conrinued to 
reside jn Chicago, and in 1899 relinquished control. 

He had, in 1898, again become a Director of the Chicago 
City Railway Company, becoming Vice-President in Jan- 
uary, 1899, and President in April of the same year. He 
conrinued in this connection unril February, 1905, when, 
his health failing, he resigned and thereafter spent much 
rime abroad. 

Mr. Hamilton became an Annual Member of the Chicago 
Historical Society, November 20, 1894. He was also a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Oiicago, and of De Pauw University, for many years 



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Membership 53 



Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Immanuel Baptist 
Church, and held membership in the Union League, Wash- 
ington Park, Calumet, and Onwentsia Clubs, although 
not especially active in club circles. 

In 1870 Mr. Hamilton married Miss Mary Jane Kendall, 
the daughter of Dr. Lyman Kendall, of Chicago, and Mrs. 
Hamilton survives him, residing at 999 Lake Shore Drive, 
Their children are Bruce P. Hamilton and Adelaide K. 
Ryerson. 

Elijah, Kent Hubbard was bom in Chicago, July 12, 
1835. He died in Middletown, Conn., June 26, 1915. The 
year 1835 was a marked period in Chicago's career. There 
was even talk of her incorporation as a city, and a one-story 
and basement Court House was erected that year. In 
May, 1835, a land office had been, opened here, and the 
great "boom" was on. The father of our subject, Elijah 
Kent Hubbard, Sr., with his wife Elizabeth De Koven, had 
come to Chicago from Middletown, just in time for the rise 
in real estate values. Mr. Hubbard is known to have ad- 
vertised 350 lots for sale the month before his son's birth. 
On December 5, 183S the elder Hubbard's name appears 
among the directors of Chicago's first bank, a branch of 
the Illinois State Bank, John H. Kinzie being President, 
and the other Directors, Gurdon S. Hubbard, Peter Pruyne, 
R. T. Hamilton, Walter Kimball, H. B. aarke,Geo.W. Dole, 
and E. D. Taylor, with W. H. Brown as Cashier. The bank 
was located at the comer of LaSalle and South Water 
streets in the end of Gurdon Hubbard's warehouse. Elijah 
Kent Hubbard, the elder, was a member of Chicago's first 
Board of Trade and when his cousin Gurdon S^tonstall 
Hubbard, in September 1836, introduced the first Insurance 
Company to Chicago (The Howard, of New York), E. K. 
Hubbard was not long in following his example as an agent. 
He is next heard of as direcring the driving of piles across 
the prairie at Madison Street, and laying of stringers for 
the Galena & Chicago Union Railroad in 1838, — a project 
which Chicago had to defer for ten years because of a 
preference on the part of the farmers for plank roads. 

It was evident that upon the young Elijah fell his father's 
mantle of great acrivity. When the widowed mother re- 
turned with him to her home in Middletown the son attended 
the noted School of Daniel H. Chase, spent two years in 



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54 Report of Executive Committee 

Dartmouth College, and at the age of eighteen was ready for 
business. 

He entered the employ of the Russell Manufacturing Co., 
of Middletown, makers of textiles, as a clerk and time- 
keeper. Two years later, in 1855, he returned to Chicago. 
Twenty years had wrought ^reat changes in the little village 
since his birth. It was possible for this youth of twenty to 
enter upon a flourishing business, under the firm name of 
Dyer & Hubbard, wood and coal dealers, with docks oppo- 
site the Lake House, at which young Hubbard boarded. 
He also dealt in grain and lumber. The Chicago Directory 
of 1858 records that he then lived at the Tremont House. 
In 1864 he married, his wife being Anna Jones Dyer, daughter 
of Governor Dyer of Rhode Island. Their children were 
Elijah Kent Junior, Louis De Koven, Anna J. (who is Mrs. 
C. S. Stillman of Wellesley), Katherine F. (who is Mrs. 
Clarence S. Wadsworth of Middletown), and another son, 
Elisha Dyer Hubbard. In 1897 he married a daughter of 
Henry G. Hubbard, of Middletown, now deceased. 

For thirty years he continued in successful business in 
Chicago, and at the time of his leaving for Middletown in 
1885 was Chicago's oldest native bom atizen. 

In 1891 Mr. Hubbard became President of the Russell 
Manufacturing Co., of which he had once been timekeeper, 
and of which nis uncle, Henry H. Hubbard, had laid the 
foundations in 1834. In 1892 H. K. Hubbard was presi- 
dential delegate-at-lai^e from Connecticut. He was known 
in New York almost as well as in Connecticut. It is said 
that "He knew the textile business as few men in America 
knew it. He found a substantial textile industry in Middle- 
town, he made it a nationally great one by his energy, his 
industry and his knowledge of how to hay the raw material." 
It was also said of him that "with all his business keenness, 
he had the fine inner character of the superlative eentlemen." 

Exceedingly loyal to the place of his birtn, he more 
than once took the trip half across the continent to attend a 
gathering of the Chicago Historical Society, of which he 
was an Annual Member, 1869-71, and a Corresponding Mem- 
ber, 1906-1915. He was present at the Centennial of the 
building of Fort Dearborn in 1903 and greatly enjoyed meet- 
ing, among others, his old playmate, Nellie Kinzie Gordon. 
A Chicago relative of Mr. Hubbard's is Mrs. Louise DeKoven 
Bowen, whose father, John DeKoven, was his uncle. One 



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Membership 55 



of his mother's sisters was the wife of Judge Hugh T. Dickey, 
and another was the wife of Mr. Julius Waosworth, both 
prominent citizens of Chicago, and later of New York. 

We are indebted for much of this data to Miss Elizabeth 
Skinner of Chicago. 

Mrs. Harriet S. Keep, widow of the late Albert Keep, 
died at her home 2010 Michigan Blvd., on Easter Sunday, 
April 4, 1915, aged eighty-three. 

Mrs. Keep was bom in East Bloomfield, N. Y., March 
30, 1832, her maiden name being Harriet S. Gunn. For a 
number of years before her marriage she held the position 
of head instructress in Homer Academy, Homer, N. Y., an 
institution of high standing in the East. In 1860 she married 
Albert Keep and came to Chicago to live. Mr. Keep had 
made Chicago his home since 1851, having come here to 
enter the drygoods firm of Peck, Keep & Co., which com- 

Bised Philander Peck, Albert Keep, and the latter's brother 
enry, the store being located at 211 South Water Street. 
In 1857 Mr. Keep had sold out to Harmon, Aiken & Gale, 
himself investing in real estate and erecting a number of 
buildings. In 1873 he was made President of the Chicago 
& Normwestem Railroad, continuing in that position (or 
many years. The real estate business which Mr. Keep 
founded is now under the leadership of his nephew, Chaunccy 
Keep. 

Mrs. Keep's chief activities so far as public matters were 
concerned were largely in connection with foreign missions, 
to which she gave liberally af her time and means, especially 
in the direction of the Woman's Presbyterian Board of Mis- 
sions of the Northwest. 

Socially, Mrs. Keep belonged to the line old circle whose 
homes were the pride of Chicago a generation ago, and she 
persisted in keeping her mansion on Michigan Boulevard as 
the family residence despite the encroachments of business 
in that direction. Her only child was Mrs. Ralph Isham, 
who died some twenty years ago. 

She is survived by a sister, Mrs. Lucy G. Merrick, and 
by a grandson, Albert Keep Isham, a senior at Harvard. 

Edward Francke Leonard, for twenty-five years a 
Corresponding Member of this Society, died in New York 



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$6 Report of Executive Committee 

on Aprili?, 1915. He was a native of the town of Mansfield* 
Conn., bom December 30, 1836. 

Francke Leonard, as he was familiarly called, was a 
descendant of Richard Mather and John Williams of Deer- 
field, and the son of a country doctor. Dexter Melancthon 
Leonard, a Quaker. His boyhood was spent in the Berkshire 
foothills near North Hadle^, Mass. He attended Hopkins 
Academy, Brown University, and graduated from Union 
College in 1856, being admitted to the bar two years later 
from the Albany Law School. 

The peculiar interest attaching to Mr. Leonard from our 
standpoint arose from his connection with Governor Cullom 
and later Abraham Lincoln. In 1858 Mr. Leonard went to 
live in Springfield, Illinois. In a short time he took a 
position in the office of the State Auditor, and soon after 
became private secretary to Cullom. It was the period 
of the "birth of the Republican Party." When Lincoln's 
election had taken place, and the inaugural party were on 
their way to Washington, Mr. Leonard was one of the 
number, and it also fell to his lot to be the last survivor 
of those who accompanied Mr. Lincoln's body from Wash- 
ington to Springfield. In all the great events and the ex- 
pansion of uiought of the time, he had his part as a staunch 
Republican, altnough in later years not himself holding 
office. Frequently called away b^ his business, he was still 
idenrified with the social and civic life of Springfield for 
fifty years. 

Railroads in Illinois were becoming a matter of increasing 
importance; Mr. Leonard was deeply interested, and came 
to be ranked as an authority on railroad arbitration. He 
was concerned in the construction of the "St. Louis Short 
Line" — now a part of the Illinois Central Railroad — and 
at the rime of his reriremcnt from active business was 
President of the Toledo, Peoria, and Western road, with 
headquarters in Peoria. 

Mr. Leonard became a Corresponding Member of this 
Society on January 15, 1890, and had for lone been aTrustee 
ofthe Illinois State Historical Society, as well as of the Union 
League and Sangamon clubs of Springfield. Although, on 
leaving Springfield, he went to live in Amherst, Massachu- 
setts, near his old home, and among all the refinements and 
beauty of that grand old colonial town, he never fot^ot 
his western attachments, and continued to correspond and 



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Membership 57 



contribute what he could to the history of the great times 
in which he had a part. His home was one of those roomy 
oid mansions, surrounded by ample grounds, such as the 
East has known how to preserve, and Mr. Leonard, with 
his genial and scholarly tastes, fitted perfectly into the 
picture, a "gentleman and a scholar" whom we were proud 
to have upon our rolls. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Adeline Leonard, 
and by a dai^hter, Mrs. Edward G. Fanner, Jr., of Spring- 
field, Mass. 

Perry H. Smith, Jr., a lawyer, eldest son of the late 
Perry H. Smith, died at his home in Chicago on the 12th 
day of November, 1914. He was bom at Appleton, Wis., 
May 10, 1854. Five years later his parents moved to 
Chicago and began that remarkable career which made 
them known to the social world of both America and Europe. 

As a senator from Wisconsin, Perry Smith, the elder, had 
been instrumental in effecting the "Superior Grant," which 
made possible the building of the St. Paul and Fond du Lac 
railroad, later consolidated with the Chica^ and North- 
western road. Perry Smith, the elder, was Vice-President 
of the latter road at the time that William B. Ogden was 
President, and is said to have so won the confidence of the 
latter as to be intrusted with the active management of 
the system. The first home of the family in Chicago was 
on the southwest comer of Cass and Erie streets. After 
the fire of 1871, they built at the nothwest comer of Pine 
Street (now LinctJn Park Boulevard) and Huron Street, a 
house of triangular form, with a fan-shaped porrico and 
triple stairways, filled it with the rarest furniture, paint- 
ings, statuary, books and bric-a-brac, and there entertained 
with so gracious and lavish an hospitality as to make their 
home one of the chief centers of Chicago's social life. As 
an American railroad magnate, known to many of the 
diplomatic corps abroad, the elder Perry H. Smith was 

Presented at several foreign courts. He was democratic in 
is objection to the required court costume, and on one 
occasion was given an informal audience with a certain 
monarch, who, in the heat of a discussion of American 
railroad policy, laid his hand enthusiastically on Mr. Smith's 
shoulder, clad in its plain broadcloth coat, saying heartily 
"I concur with you. Monsieur, as against these gentiemen. ' 

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58 Report of Executive Committee 

He possessed one of the finest collections of works c 
ing the life of Napoleon the First on this continent. 

In such a home, and amid such surroundings, Perty H. 
Smith, Jr., had his early education. While the family were 
resident in Brussels, he had music lessons from the same 
master as the daughters of King Leopold, and often went 
skating with them. He became an enthusiastic lover of 
outdoor sports, hunting, riding, fishing, and the like, and 
also acquired his fathers taste for collecting objects of art, 
in which he became a connoisseur. 

Returning to America he prepared for college at Charlier's 
Institute, completed his formal education at Hamilton Col- 
lege, graduating with the bachelor's degree, like his father 
before him, and then studied law at Columbia College. 
Admitted to the Bar in 1876, he returned to Chicago and 
entered the law office of John N. Tewett, late President of 
the Chicago Historical Society. In 1879 he entered into 
partnership with Mr. Kales, of the well known firm of 
Beckwith, Ayer & Kales, the new firm being Kales & Smith. 
His father's lingering illness and death in 1885, leaving his 
estate in a complicated situation, drew Mr. Smith away 
from the practice of the law and entailed upon him a pro- 
longed struggle with business matters for which his previous 
traming hadnot prepared him. In 1880 Perry H. Smith, Jr., 
who was a democrat in politics, ran for Congress, but was 
defeated \>y Chas, B. Farwell. Accepting the office of head 
of the Reeistry Department in the Chicago Post Office, he 
acquitted himself with honor and great fidehty of the duties 
of this position, involving the transmission of enormous 
sums of money annually, and remained in office twenty 
years, until his death. 

Mr. Smith was the first President of the Chicago Demo- 
cratic Club, and one of the founders of its successor, the 
Iroquois Club. He was also a member of the Chicago, 
University, and Union League clubs for many years, and 
in 1894 became a Corresponding Member of the Chicago 
Historical Society. 

Twice married, Mr. Smith's first wife was a daughter of 
William S. McCormick, of C. H. McCormick & Bros.,— 
Emma Louise McCormick, who died in 1893. There were 
four children of this marriage, three of whom survive: 
Ruby McConnick Smith, of Saginaw, Mich., Hubert P. 
Smiui, of Chicago, and Robert McCormick Smith, of Quincy, 



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Membership 



HI. His second wife — Mrs. Elizabeth Qark Sawyer of Vir- 
ginia, with their daughter, Emily Smith, survives him. His 
mother, Mrs. Perry H. Smith, Sr., is still living in Santa 
Barbara, California. 

Albert Arnold Sfrague, founder and President of the 
great wholesale grocery house of Sprague, Warner & Com- 
pany, died suddenly at his home, 2710 Prairie Avenue, on 
the evening of January 10, 1915, in the eightieth year of his 
age. 

The variety and vitality of the connections severed by 
the death of "A. A. Sprague" as he was customarily called, 
would be hard to estimate. Tke Chicago Tribune in an 
editorial on January 12tli, stated that 

" By the death of Albert Arnold Sprague, Chicago loses not only one 
of the great metchanta nho helped to build this commercial metropolis 
of the midcontinent, but also a citizen who always interested himself in 
and helped to support the higher activities of the community. To the 
idvancement of music, art, education, and philanthropy Mr. Sprague 

eve of his thought as well as his means, and he leaves a name which will 
honorably and gratefully recorded in the annals of the dty." 

Bom in Randolph, Vt., May 19, 1835, Mr. Sprague had 
the inesrimable advantage of the self-discipline imposed by 
farm life. At twenty he was ready for college, having 
provided for his own education, and in 1859 was graduated 
from Yale University. 

The choice of business as a career, especially so hard and 
strenuous a business as that of the wholesale grocer, was 
not so common after a college education as it is now. But 
this was the choice made by Mr. Sprague. He came to 
Chicago in 1862 and entered into partnership in the wholes- 
sale grocery business with Mr. Z. B. Stetson under the firm 
name of Sprague & Stetson. This was of course in War time, 
an excited period of Chicago's existence. By the end of a 
year Mr. Stetson had retired, and, in partnership with 
Ezra J. Warner, Mr. Sprague founded the house of Sprague 
& Warner. By 1864 a younger brother, Otho S. A. Sprague, 
wounded in the War, came back to cast in his lot with the 
firm which now styled itself " Sprague, Warner & Company." 

The original building occupied by the fiim was at No. 
14 State Street. After the War, in 1866, they moved to 
Nos. 9-11-13 Wabash Avenue and in 1870 to 62 Michigan 
Avenue (old numbers). Like the other wholesale houses 
in this region they were burned completely out in the 



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_ Report of Executive Committee 



Canal Street on the West Side. Bv 1873 they were again 
located on Michigan Avenue, at Nos. 53-55, removing in 
1875 to the northwest comer of Michigan and Randolph, 
where they remained for thirty-four years, in ever-increasmg 
pro^erity. 

The difficult' of transportation of goods in the growing 
complexity of Qiicago's loop, the advent of an underground 
freignt tunnel, together with a general movement for a 
Chicago Beautiful, lead to the abandonment by many whole- 
sale houses of the boulevard and adjacent avenues in favor 
of sites on the river. In Apnl, 1909, Sprague, Warner & Co. 
moved to a monumental building at Erie and Roberts 
streets, near the North Branch, with a water frontage of 
390 feet and a floor area of nearly two acres. A little history 
of the house, published on their fiftieth anniversary, states 
that "Fifty years ago one teamster with one horse did 
all the hauling, both in and out, for what is now the house 
of Sprague, Wamer & Company. To-day a hundred car- 
loads of merchandise can be transported from Spra|ve, 
Wamer & Company's shipping-room to the railroad freight 
houses by means of'^an undeiground tunnel." 

It might have been supposed that the presidency of such 
an establishment would nave precluded much acrivity in 
other lines. Albert Arnold Sprague though in active control 
of the affairs of this house was not too busy to lend a hand 
in matters of public welfare. A member of the Relief and 
Aid Society, in 1871 he assisted with the distribution of 
the immense contributions handled by that organization for 
the (ire sufferers, and remained one of the leading spirits 
through life. 

The first meeting for the organization of the Commercial 
Qub of Chicago was held December 27, 1877. A. A. 
Sprague was present, together with J. W, Doane, L. Z. 
Leiter, J. H. Walker, H. J. MacFarland, Wm. T. Baker, 
Anson Stager, N. K. Fairbank, W. A. Fuller, Geo. C Qark, 
Edson Keith, Murry Nelson, and John J. Jones. In 1881 
he was made its Vice-President, and in 1882, President. 

The first May Festival of Music was held in Chicago, 
May 23-26, 1882, in the south end of the Exposition Build- 
ing on the Lake Front at Adams Street. A. A. Sprague and 
Georee L. Dunlap were Vice-Presidents of the orgamzation, 
of which Mr. N. K. Fairbank was President, Philo Otis, 



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Membership 



Secretary, and George Sturges, Treasurer. The singers 
were Madam Matema, Anna Louise Caty. Sig. Campanini, 
Myron Whitney, and others. The first Opera Festival in 
Chicago to provide Grand Opera at popular prices was 
organized April 16, 1884, with the names of A. A. Sprague, 
Henry Field, R. T. Crane, and others on the Board of Direct- 
ors, and among the singers, Adelina Patti, Sig. Giannini, 
NIcoIini, and Cherubini. The financial success was extra- 
ordinary. 

When the Chicago Orchestra proper gave its first concert 
in 1893, and when it dedicated its Orchestra Hail, December 
14, 1904, the name of A. A. Sprague was prominent among 
those who had made the organization possible and perma- 
nent. It was significant that on his death the programme 
of the Orchestra for the succeeding concert was in memory 
of A. A. Sprague. 

In the same way he supported the Opera. The last 
day of his life was given inpart to a concert of the Flonzaly 
Quartet at the Fine Arts Theatre. The Art Institute, the 
Presbyterian Hospital, and the Chicago Orphan's Asylum 
were generously benefited in his lifetime and by his will, 
A costly collection of paintings had been gathered by Mr. 
Sprague. Another of his hobbies was the administration of 
a fund left by his brother for scientific research. 

He was one of the organizers of the Northern Trust Co., 
and a director in that, and in the Chicago Telephone and 
Edison Electric companies. 

Mr. Sprague was in the habit of spending a portion of 
each year in Pasadena, Cal., where he had a beautiful estate. 
He was an enthusiastic member of the Annandale Golf 
Club there, as well as of Onwentsia in Chicago, and the 
Country Qub in Pittsfield, Mass. 

With the passing away of Mr. Sprague the great business 
which he helped to build loses the last of its founders, but is 
left in the hands of his nephew, A. A. Sprague II., and of Ezra 
J. Warner, Jr., with Manon A, Dean as Managing Director. 

In !862 Mr. Sprague married Nancy A. Attwood, daugh- 
ter of Ebenezer A. Attwood. She survives him, together 
with their daughter, Mrs. Frederick S. Coolidge of Pittsfield, 
Mass., and a grandson, Albert Sprague Coolidge. 

John Fletcher Steward, patent expert, and for some 
years head of the patent department of the International 



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62 Report of Executive Committee 

Harvester Company, died at Piano, 111., on Tune 25, 1915. 
The passing away of a man like Mr. Steward marks ao era 
in the history of Agriculture in America and we might say in 
the world. He was one of the last of the pioneers, and had 
he lived until August he would have completed a half century 
devoted to the improvement of harvesung machinery. 

Bom on June 23, 1841, in the town where he died, — 
Piano, 111. — the log house in which he lived stood beside 
a wheat field, and it was about this time that there was 
erected in Piano what is known as "the old Steward saw 
mill," When a little lad he whittled out a practical water 
wheel, "tinkered" clocks and jewelry, and worked in the 
saw mill, attending school only during the winter. At 
twenty-one he enlisted in the 127th Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry and fought through the War. In the month fol- 
lowing his discharge he married Sarah Chandler of Pontiac, 
Mich., a teacher. 

An inveterate student, young Steward devoted six years 
to Geology and was chosen assistant geologist to Major 
Powell in exploring the Grand Canyon of the Colorado. 
He also perfected himself in shorthand, and read deeply on 
mechanical matters, in later life becoming expert as an 
astronomer and photographer. 

Mr. Steward s father, Marcus Steward, and his uncle, 
John F. HoUister, rebuilt the Adolph Pressure Reaper, a 
circumstance which doubtless had much to do with turning 
the attention of John and his two brothers to harvesring 
machinery. The first task of the young "veteran" on 
returning from the war was digging for the foundation of the 
stone factory building in Piano, now known as "Number 
Three," which was to be the home of the Marsh Harvester 
Works, The Marsh Harvester was manufactured by Lewis 
Steward — brother of John F. — and Charles W. Marsh, in- 
ventor, with his brother Wallace W. In 1865, John F. 
Steward entered their employ as superintendent, only once 
thereafter leaving his life work, when for his health, he joined 
the Powell expeiOrion as above stated. 

In 1873 Mr. Steward was sent to Russia in the interest 
of agricultural machinery, and on his return worked on 
contract for the Marsh harvester concerns and was then 
re-engaged as an inventor bj; William Deering. 

Mr. ■ James Deering writes of him in Ttu Harvester 
World for July, 1915: "When in 1879 the late William 



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Membership 63 



Deering took the exclusive manufacture of the Marsh 
harvester, a relation was established of notable power and 
success. Mr. Deering was the business man — the execu- 
tive, far-seeing organizer. Mr. Steward was the practical 
man, inventing, judging the inventions of others, experi- 
menting with untiring energy and unstinted devotion. . . . 
Mr. Steward's energy and ambition were boundless. His 
hand was in everytning. . . . He studied patent law and 
became a patent attorney. He came to have no equal as 
a patent expert in his line. When the Deering Harvester 
Company was merged in the IntemadonaT Harvester 
Company, Mr. Steward became the patent expert of the 
latter company and had charge of its patent business." 

Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick, writing m the same publica- 
tion, said: "Keen in his power to foresee the trend of coming 
necessiries, alert and tireless in bringing his plans to a success- 
ful conclusion, and loyal to the interests he served, he com- 
bined in his own personality many elements which contrib- 
uted to the success of that business, especially in its formative 
period." 

In the year 1874, Mr. Steward, having climbed a hill 
near his home to qbtain a view of the Fox River Valley, 
noticed that the brow of the hill was surrounded by an 
embankment and a ditch, with ranges and rifle pits at anoth- 
er angle, and corresponding fortifications on two neighbor- 
ing huls. For the next thirty years he gave almost all his 
spare time to the solurion of this circumstance. He pro- 
cured all the early American maps of importance, becoming 
an authority on the cartography of the upper Mississippi 
Valley, learned French in order to read the narratives of the 
explorers, and so correlated the facts obtained, as to enable 
him to write his interesting treatise Lost Marameck and 
Earliest Chicago. In this Mr. Steward develops the ex- 
planation of the fortified hills, finding that in just such a 
spot as this, one league from "The Rock" from which the 
Riviere du Rocher was named, the Fox Indians entrenched 
themselves in 1730 to resist the French from Forts Chartres, 
St. Joseph, and Miamis, but where they met almost complete 
extinction. A joint committee of the Chicago Historical 
Society and the Illinois Historical Society in October, 1914, 
visited the locality called "Maramech Hill," under Mr. 
Steward's guidance. He had purchased the hill and erected 
a monument upon it. Parkman favored another location 



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64 Report of Executive Committee 

for this battle — that of The Rock on Illinois River, but 
those who would seek to disprove Mr. Steward's theory will 
do well to note the closeness with which the configuration 
of the country on this Fox River site conforms with descrip- 
tion by contemporaries. (S« Yearbook, 1914.) 

Mr. Steward became a Corresponding Member of this 
Society in 1903, and has been an enthusiastic advocate of the 
Society's aims ever since, excelling in his knowledge of the 
cart<^raphy of the Mississippi Valley. He accjuired the 
French language after he was sixty years of a^ in order to 
read the writings of the explorers in the original. He was 
knighted by the King of Siam for his services on the Jury 
of Awards at the St. Louis Exposition, and was awarded nu- 
merous medals and diplomas at various World Expositions 
by the United States and other governments. But it is 
not in such distinctions as these that the measure of the man 
is found. Rather is it in the simple words of an associate 
in business, "Honesty that leanea backward and sincerity 
that knew no fear were the foundation of his character. 
His friendships were deep and true, and his devotion to a 
friend or principle that he believed in never faltered." 

The foremost men in the Harvester industry were pall- 
bearers at the funeral. He is survived by his wife, Sara 
Chandler Steward, and one son, Charles A. Steward, of 
Piano, Illinois. 



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Meetings 65 

MEETINGS 

On November 16, 1914 occurred the Fifty-eighth Annual 
Meeting of the Society, reported in the Year-book for 1914. 

On Febnia^ 16 a Special Meeting of the Society was 
addressed by Professor Willard C. MacNaul, late of the 
University of North Dakota, his subject being The Jeffer- 
son-Lemen Tradition: A ChapUr of Illinois History 1786- 
1820. The speaker presented letters and documents in 
evidence that the Rev. James Lemen was a secret agent of 
Thomas Jefferson charged with the mission of checkmg the 
introduction of slavery into Illinois. An audience of one 
hundred and fiftj^ listened with interest to the address. 
Many representatives of Baptist institutions were present, 
the paper being particularly significant to members of this 
denommation, owing to the prominent part played by Mr. 
Lemen in the history of that church. The manuscript, 
which was purchased by Dr. O. L. Schmidt and presented . 
to the Society, has since been published. 

Following this, Mr. Edward P. DeWoIf, of Waukwan, 
presented) by means of lantern slides, the subject of "The 
Errors Committed in Locating the State Line between 
Illinois and Wisconsin." The speaker treated particularly 
the history of that part of the line of north latitude 42° SO* 
which the Constitution of the State of Illinois prescribes as 
its northern boundary line, versus the State line, recognized 
as the line which separates Illinois from Wisconsin. He 
showed that the latter was located and marked by two 
commissioners, one for the United States and the other for 
the State of Illinois, between 1831 and 1833 and was after- 
wards subjected to formal legislative processes that resulted 
in an effective approval that could not have been intended 
by the bodies enacting them. At the close of the paper, 
Mr. DeWolf gave an interesting sketch of the itinerary of 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Kinzie on their journey through the 
Indian country from Fort Winnebago to Chicago and return 
in 1831. The subject of the northern boundary of the state 
is one that fitly- comes up for settlement in view of the ap- 
proaching celebration of the centennial of Illinois statehood. 

The Fiftieth Anniversary of the close of the Civil War 
was marked by a special meeting on April 15, when Hon. 
William J. Calhoun was the orator of the occasion and 



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66 Report of Executive Committee 

charmed his audience by a reeume of the Gvil War that 
could hardly be surpassed for depth of insight and excellence 
of presentation. The following extract from a letter voices 
the appreciation of one of his hearers. 

Union League Gub, April 19, 1915. 

Chicago 

Restine und«i the ipellof Mr. Calhoun' b heart-felt and toul stirring 
addreu, d Jivered in the assembly room of the Historical Society on 
Wednesday, April I5th, I feel myself impelled to tender my thanks for 
the privilege of being present, and congratulations for the success of 
thia celebration of the fifrieth anniversary of the clow of the Civil 
War. . . . 

What a pity it is that all Chicago, all the coimtr;^ in fact, could 
not have heard that address. He seemed to me to be inspired. . . . 

The exhibit of Civil War trophies that was opened to 
the public at this time is fully treated under the head of 
Specul ExHiBrrioNS in the Librarian's Report. 

On the afternoon of July eighth the Ninetieth Birthday 
of Mme. Robert LeBeau, nee Emily Beaubien, was cele- 
brated in the Societj^'s Building by an informal gathering of 
members of the Society and old residents. The vener»>le 
woman appeared to wear her fourscore years and ten 
lightly, and as she sat in a chair of state, surrounded by 
flowers, receiving congratulations her clear blue eyes danced 
as gaily as though tney had looked out upon Chicago for 
sixteen instead of eignty-six summers. Emily Beaubien 
came to Chicago in 1829 at the age of five when her father, 
Mark Beaubien, brought his family here from Detroit, having 
come himself three ^ears earlier. Having witnessed the 
complete transformation of a frontier army post into a world- 
city, and being gifted with a philosophic mind and the 
dramatic sense of her race she is able to bring the pageant 
of Chicago's history before the eyes of her hearers. But it 
was in sparkling repartee that the guest of honor shone most 
during tne reception, and many who greeted her will long 
treasure her brilliant sallies of wit. 

Following the reception Mr. Burley presided over the 
informal program in the Lecture Hall which began with the 
singing of ' Auld Lang Syne" by the entire company. 
Mme. Le Beau made a Tittle address in which she was par- 
ticularly happy in her expressions of appreciation of the 
honor paid to the memory of her father in thus honoring 
her. A portrait of Mark Beaubien, painted from life, and 



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JOHN CRERAR HALL 



ENTRANCE HALL 



ILLINOIS ROOM — LINCOLN COLLECTION 

r ., ..i:,G00g[c 



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Meetings 67 



E resented to the Society some years ago by Frank G. Beau- 
ien, was flanked on the, platform hy the violin of the 
famous host of The Sauganash, recently presented by the 
Calumet Qub. When we read the euloeies of Mark Beau- 
bien pronounced by Mr. Wentworth and others who bene- 
fited by his generosities and realize that he was in his time 
as active a promotor of Chicago as the infant city had, it 
seems a cunous commentary upon our gratitude that there 
is no permanent memorial of Mark Beaubien in Chicago 
to-day. However the company that gathered to do honor 
to his daughter was a notable one, numbering, besides many 
grandchildren, nephews and nieces, Edward Beaubien, a 
younger brother of Mrs. LeBeau, and her half brother and 
sister, Frank G. Beaubien and Mrs. Guinthalyn Beaubien 
Bernard. Among members of the Society present were 
Miss Katherine D. Arnold, Mrs. Annie McClure Hitchcock, 
Mrs. T. B. Blackstone, Mr. S. S. Greeley, Mr. C. F. Gun- 
ther and Mr. Clarence A. Burley. For the names of other 
quests who also signed the Visitors Register, see the head- 
mg Attendance. Notes of congratularion were received 
from the following: Mrs. Kinzie Bates, Asheville, N. C.; 
Mrs. B. F. Chase, Mr. and Mrs. Edward P. DeWolf, Wau- 
kegan, 111.; Mrs. Cecelia DeWoIf Erskine, Miss Mary Warren 
D^son, Geneva, 111.; Mrs. S. A. R. FitzWilliams, Miss 
Frances R. Howe, Baillytown, Indiana; Col. Gurdon S. 
Hubbard, Mrs. Stella Dyer Loring, Mrs. Ellen P. Curtiss 
Manning, of Warrenville; Mr. Philo Otis, Capt. I. P. Rum- 
sey, Lake Forest; Mrs. Edward S, Upton, Waukeean; Mrs. 
W. H. Whitehead, Evanston; and Mrs. Eleanor Hamilton 
Keenon. 

The following telegram was read by Mr. Burley: 

July 8, 1915. 
Please extend to the daughter of lovable Mark Beaubien 1117 
heartiest congratulattoiu on this her 90th Birthday. 

John Kinzie, Charleston, S. C 
At the close of the program tea was served and much 
sociability was indulged in. 

On the evening of October 9th occurred the dedication 
of a room in the Society's Building to the Chicago Fire 
Department. The particular feature of the occasion — the 
44tn anniversary of the Great Fire — was the presentation 
to the Society of the "Mary Ann," an early hand fire engine, 
by Chief Thomas O'Connor on behalf of the City. Col. 



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Report of Executive Committee 



Frances A. Eastman, City Statistician, who was Postmaster 
at the time of the Fire, made aa address on "The Old Vol- 
unteer and Later Fire Companies, and the Great Fire of 
1871." The rest of the program was much curtailed. 

Because it is probably tne shortest presentation speech 
recorded we give in full the words spoken by our Fire Chief, 
affectionately called " Big Tom " by his admiring associates, 
but^it must be remembered that these few words gained 
greatly In impressiveness when pronounced from the emi- 
nence of his SIX feet six inches: — 

Speech of Thomas O'Connor, Chief of the Fire 
Department, in presenting the "Mary Ann" to the Chicago 
Historical Society, October 9, 1915: 

"I am glad to be here. What I have to say wiU not take many 

mitiutel. In relation to the engine which we are to present to the 

Chicago Historical Society, we have dedded that the Society is better 

able to take care of it than we are. 

"The engine was first owned by_ Chicago, then by Hyde Park, then 

by Riverdale; I myself have been in charge of and on duty at fire) 

where it worked. 

"I now present you and Mr. Burley with the engine. 
"I thank you all." 

The hand engine in all its magnificence of Scarlet paint 
and bright metal, having been put in perfect repair by the 
Fire Department, was the center of attraction before and 
after the exercises, and when the long handles went up and 
down under the vigorous pumping of the old firemen one 
could believe their claim that it can still throw a stream 
150 feet high. We are glad that the name of the engine 
is the "Mary Ann" for this recalls a statement we have often 
heard, namely, that Gurdon S. Hubbard purchased the 
first fire engine the City ever owned, and that Mrs. Hub- 
bard's name was Mary Ann. Possibly this should be 
denominated the "Mary Ann IH." 

The engine was not the only attraction in the Fire 
Department Room, however, for when it became known 
that this room was to be dedicated in perpetuity for this 
purpose, the Department presented a life-size portrait of 
the late Chief Dennis Swenie, in a sumptuously carved frame 
of solid walnut, and the widow of the Chief presented a 
picture that was one of his most valued possessions. This 
picture is said to include a portrait of every man in the 
Chicago Fire Department at the time of the Great Fire; 
not only that, but each man is in action in his particular 



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Report of Annual Meeting 69 

capacity. The faces and in many cases the full figures 
were photographed by Edward Brand and the accessories 
and some of the figures painted in by E. Nice. It was 
through Mr. Seymour Morris, Jr., that these portraits were 
secured. 

On the platform, besides Chief O'Connor, were Matthias 
Benner, Ex-Chief; John C. McDonnell, Chief of Fire Pre- 
vention Bureau; Mr. John Campion, Ex-Chief, Asst. Fire- 
man on "Little Giant," the engine that threw the first 
stream of water on Mrs. O'Leary's bam; C. Schimmels, 
Capt. Engine Co. No. 5, in Fire of 1871; Mr. Dewitt H. 
Curtis; Mr. W. N. Danks; Mr. Joseph Schreiner, Volunteer 
"Red Jacket," Co. 1853; and Mr. Adolph Wilke. 

The Executive Committee feels that its Annual Report 
would be incomplete if it failed to publicly express and 
inscribe in the Society's records the Committee's apprecia- 
tion of the faithfulness and zeal of the Society's employees 
during the year. Their interest has been constant and 
their industry untiring. 

Respectfully submitted, 
For the Executive Committee, 
Seymour Morkis, Secretary. 

President Burley, Chairman of the Trustees of the Gilpin 
Fund, presehted the Report of the Gilpin Fund, which 
appears on page 39 of the Executive Committee's Report. 
It was moved that the Report of the Trustees of the Gilpin 
Fund be accepted, approved, and placed on file. The motion 
was seconded and carried. 

In the absence of the Treasurer, Mr. Orson Smith, the 
Treasurer's Report was presented and read by Mr. Paul C. 
Peterson as printed on pages 40-42 of the Executive Com- 
mittee's Report. 

On motion of Mr, Shortall, duly seconded and carried, 
the Treasurer's Report was accepted and ordered placed on 
file. 

The Secretary then read the following letter; — 

November 16, 1915. 
Mr. Gatence A. Burley, 

President of the Chicago Historical Society, 

Dear Sir: — The undersigned herewith res])ectfully preseote his 
resignation ai a member of the Executive Committee. 
Respectfully yours, 
(signed) George Mef 



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70 Report of Executive Committee 

It was moved and seconded that the resignation of 
Mr, Merryweather from the Executive Committee be 
accepted. Carried. 

The President announced that the next order of business 
was the election of Officers, and that for the coming year 
a President, and two Vice-Presidents were to be ekcted; 
also three members of the Executive Committee, two to 
succeed the outgoing members for the term ending 1919, 
and one to fill out the term of the member whose resignation 
from the Executive Committee had just been accepted^ 
which term would expire in 1918. 

Mr. Hamlin moved that the Chair appoint a Nominatiiuf 
Committee of three to prepare a ticket of the officers and 
trustees to be elected at this meeting. The motion was 
seconded and carried. 

The Chair appointed Messrs. Hamlin, Shortall, and 
Peterson. 

The Librarian, Miss Mcllvaine, then presented the 
Librarian's Report, reading highly interesting extracts 
therefrom. The full text of the report follows on pages 
72-112. 

It was moved that the Librarian's Report be accepted, 
approved, and referred to the Executive Committee. The 
morion was seconded and carried. 

The Nominating Committee presented its Report, which 
was read by the Chairman, Mr. Hamlin, as follows: 

The undersigned, members of the Nominating Committee, 
hereby recommend the following members as officers for 
the ensuing year: 

Clarence A. Burley, President 

George Merryweather, First Vice-President 

Dr. Otto L. Schmidt, Second Vice-President 

ExecuOve Committee, term ending November, 1919: 
Charles F. Gunther 
Joy Morton 

Executive Committee to fill term of Geoi^e Menyweather 
expiring 1918: 

WiLLUM H. Bush. 
Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed) Frank Hamlin 



John L. Shortall 
Paul C. Peterson 



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Report of Annual Meeting 71 

It was moved and seconded that the Report be accepted 
and that the Secretary cast the ballot of the Society for the 
election of the persons named in the Report of the Nomi- 
nating Committee. Carried. 

The Acting Secretary thereupon cast the ballot of the 
Society and declared the persons named in the Report of 
the Nominating Committee duly elected to their respective 
offices. 

The election of new members being the next order of 
business, the following names were presented for election 
to the Annual Membership of the Society: 

Leonard A. Busby Eames MacVeagh 

Edward L. Glaser Henry W. Magee 

Charles A. Kimbark Kellogg Fairbank. 

It was moved and seconded that the Secretary cast the 
ballot of the Society for the election of these names to the 
Annual Membership of the Society. Carried. 

The Secretary thereupon cast the ballot of the Society 
for the election of these gentlemen to the Annual Member- 
ship. 

Mr. Shortall urged the desirability of opening the Build- 
ing on Sundays in order to increase the usefumess of the 
Society, saying there were undoubtedly many with historical 
inclinations -who would visit the institution on Simdays 
whom business prevents from so doing on week days. Mr. 
Shortall also referred to the introduction of lower member- 
ship dues as an expedient for increasing the membership 
and thereby strengthening the Society. Mr. Lowe spoke 
in favor of both plans and moved that the subject of opening 
the Building on Sundays and consideration of the mem- 
bership of the Society with reference to lower annual dues 
in some form of membership be referred to the Executive 
Committee with power to act. 

The motion was seconded by Mr. Fergus and carried. 

A very interesting display of gifts and accessions to the 
Society was on exhibition in Crerar Hall. Among these 
were stiown the gavel of the first mayor of Chicago and the 
Law papers, representing a collection of over 3,000 manu- 
scripts. The Librarian's Report describes these especially. 

There being no other busmess the meeting adjourned. 
Respectfully submitted. 

Otto L. Schmidt, Acting Secretary, 



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LIBRARIAN'S REPORT 

To the Executive Committee of the 

Chicago Historical Society: 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to submit my Report 
as Librarian of the Chicago Historical Society for the year 
ending October 31, 1915. 

In Chicago we are apt to undervalue our own and other 
Middle West archives, particulariy those of Chicago, assum- 
. ing that the pioneers wasted no time from money getring to 
make records. Aeain, we of the present generation still 
retain such an indelible impression and wholesome awe of 
the GREAT FIRE — such a sense as, no doubt, the survivors 
of the deluge experienced — that we feel that nothing of 
consequence by way of records can have survived the Great 
Confiagration. We have tried to picture mentally the rapid- 
ly growing settlement in the sand at the mouth of the 
Chicago River, her fort, her water front, her places of busi- 
ness, her homes — in short her degree of civilization — and we 
conclude that this will all have to be left to the imagination. 
But once in awhile a gleam dashes across this night ofoblivion 
and illumines some shop of home with almost the vividness 
of the search light. 

During the year just closed there have come to the His- 
torical Society quite a group of letters and documents that 
help wonderfully in visualizing the early days that are so near 
and yet so far. 

As the first scene that we wish to illuminate is far bact 
in the misty past of the fur-trading days, we are fortunate 
to have two lights to concentrate upon it. The first is 
made up of some 3000 manuscripts known as the Law Family 
Papers, purchased last summer. These papers cover the 
half century from 1800-1850 and throw light upon the fur- 
trade of the entire Northwest. The first document that 
interests us is dated 1802 and comes no nearer than Milwau- 
kee. It will be remembered that the building of Fort 
Dearborn was not begun until the following year, and 
Monsieur Le Mai must then have been the occupant of the 
cabin that in 1804 became the mansion of Jpnn Kinzie, 
at the foot of Pine Street where Kirk's Soap Factory now 



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NEW RECRUITS 

Com MEMO RATING THE FIFTIETH AnNIVEBSABV OF THE ClOSE C 

Civil War, and the Death of Abraham Lincoln, 
April 15, 1915 



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ffl/b 73 

Stands. This letter was written by Milwaukee's first settler, 
Fran9ois La Framboise, to Jacob Franks, an Indian Trader 
at Green Bay, sixteen years before Solomon Juneau settled 
in the city now famous around the worid. Probably every 
city has a professional first settler as well as an actual one. 
Written in French and addressed, "Monsr. J. Franks, 
Agt. a La Bai," it reads in translation as follows: 

Milwaukee 20 February 1S02. 
E)earSit. — I take the liberty to write to you to say that ourpeltriei 
sold badly at Montreal, and that peace has been made between France 
and England; such is the news received by way of Detroit. 

The Muskrat and the Coon are our best peltries. If you come to 
Milwaukee I pray to bring me about thirty pounds of salt. If you 
wish to bring your forge we will arrange together at to price. 

This is all the news I have at present. I am expecting a letter 
from Mt. [Biujnette. 

N. B. If there is any news regarding peltries be sure I will let 
you know. 

Sir, I am your good friend 

Fr. La Framboise. 

It was Joseph La Framboise, a brother of the writer, who 
was the father of charming Josette La Framboise who 
passed through the Chicago Massacre with the Kinzie family 
and later became the wife of Jean Bapriste Beaubien, some- 
times styled "The Second Gentleman of Chicago." A 
beaded reticule lined with doe-skin, which she carried on 
church and state occasions, is a recent gift to the Society 
from her niece Mrs. BrinkerhofF. 

The next letter of special interest is from John Kinzie 
and reads as follows: 

Chicago, July 19, 1826. 
Mr. John Law, Esqr. 
Green Bay. 

Sir; The bearer of this is Mr. Elias Taylor, he is sent on by me to 
enquire at Green Bay if there is a prospect to effect a Sale of a few Beef 
Cattle, about 40 head, chiefly Oxen and should a few Milch Cows be 
wanted they could be sent. Any assistance that you could offord Mr. 
Taylor in dfecting his object shall he gratefully acknowledged by me. 
With respect I aro Sit your 
Obedt. Servt. 
John Kinzie, 

Agent A. F. Co. 
Chicago. 

Not a very important letter possibly, but when it is 
remembered that Mr. Kinzie's descendants know of but one 
other letter penned by his hand, and that one in the archives 
of this Society, it will be seen that this document should be 



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Librarian's Report 



valued as an all but unique specimen of the hand writing of 
Chicago's first permanent settler. 

Letters from Ebenezer Childs, at Green Bay, to Peter B. 
Grignon, Chic^o, in 1835, arranee the terms for carrving 
the mails between these places. Mr. Childs writes that he is 
unable to obtain horses and that he would advise having the 
mail carried on foot as it will be much the cheaper, conclud- 
ing "Gardapee will carry it at $30 per month." 

The next letter is postmarked in red at Chicago and bears 
the frank of John S. C. Hogan, Chicago's second Postmaster, 
the son-in-law of Jonathan Bailey, wno first held that office. 
The letter is written for Mr. Hogan by his clerk and reads as 
follows: 

Cbicaso Post Office, 

October Stii, 1836. 
Peter GrienoD, Etqr. 
Green Bay. W. T. 
Dear Sir: Your favor bearing date of Sept. 28th caroe to hand this 
day enclosing a draft od roe for i372^ cets, I am very lorry that 
I have to enclose it back ai it lacks a veiy material item to me viz. — 
your order on the back of it, where I have put a (X) mark. It ii 
payable to P. B. Grignon or order. You have neglected to put your 
name or order on the back of the draft. When you do lo I will encloce 
you the money. 

YourObt. Servt. 

Thos. Watkiks, Astt. P. M. 
for John S. C Hogan, Poscmaitec. 

Among the 3000 Law papers are hundreds of documents 
bearing the signatures of early territorial governors and a 
vast amount of correspondence exhibiting the fur trade 
centering at Green Bay. 

Dovetailing into this collection but having even more 
intimate interest for us is a letter book of the mnerican Fur 
Company', at Mackinac 1823-27, loaned to the Society with 
the privilege of copying it. Extracts are not possible here, 
but Its interest becomes apparent when we remember that 
when John Jacob Astor in 1811 bought out the Association 
of British merchants known as "The Mackinaw Company," 
Mackinaw had for nearly a century been the great trading 
post of the fur dealers, while Chicago was merely a point 
for very limited distribution, a 8tm)pmg place on the way to 
St. Louis and the Southwest. From the letters we leam 
that very gradually the center of population was shifted from 
the old Bntish stronghold by a handful of men, by name — 
Crafts, Hubbard, Beaubien, and the two Kinzies, all origi- 



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Gifts 75 

nally in the employ of the Company. In 1815 Mr. Astor 

E laced the entire man^ement of the Company in the able 
ands of Ramsey Crooks and Robert Stuart. At this time 
Mr. Crafts was already independently established at Chicago, 
his trading house being about half a mile below Bridgeport — 
at " Hard scrabble, " where in April 1812 the prellmmaries 
of the Chicago Massacre had occurred. 

According to Gurdon S. Hubbard's narrative this Mr- 
John Crafts, being duly licensed to trade with the Indians, 
(he had been sent here by Mr. Conant of Detroit) was un- 
molested by the American Fur Company until 1819, in 
which year the Company transferred Jean Baptiste Beaubien 
from Milwaukee to Chicago, for the purpose of opposing 
him. Mr. Beaubien erected his trading houses at the mouth 
of the Chicago River, then about the foot of Harrison Street, 
where he set up housekeeping with his bride, Josette La 
Framboise, and in 1822 Mr. Crafts succumbed and engaged 
himself to the Company with Mr. Beaubien as his assistant. 
Here Mr. Crafts died m 1825, and Mr. John Kinzie, up to 
that time engaged in his trade of silversmith, became as- 
sociated with R4r. Beaubien as joint agent for the Company. 
It is only necessary to mention one more pioneer to have our 
dramatis personx complete — namely the redoubtable Dr. 
Alexander Wolcott, who arrived in 1819, having been ap- 
pointed Indian Agent for the Lakes in 1818. 

The relations of these five men come out in this corre- 
spondence with startling distinctness. That their relations, 
at dmes, became exceedingly strained, in the exigencies of 
trade, is very evident, but the wonderful diplomacy of Messrs. 
Crooks and Stuart apparently bridged over all difficulties, 
and in 1821 Ellen Mana Kinzie, the first white child bom in 
Chicago (1804), became the wife of Dr. Wolcott, and the 
tomahawk was buried forever. The license to wed the 
charming Maria was obtained from Peoria in Fulton County, 
John Hamlin, /. P. of that place, journeying to Chicago to 
perform the ceremony, there being no resident justice of 
the i>eace, no clet^man, and not even a chaplain at the 
Fort at this time. This is the first marriage of record at 
Chicago. 

The next illuminating document gives us a picture of 
Chicago in 1831, as seen through the eyes of a certain young 
Mr. Tinkham, of Middleborough, Mass. This letter is 
presented by Miss Sarah E. Marsh. 



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Librarian's Report 



Wenward, August 23, 1831. 
Dear Btotbcr; 

Anived at Chicago hanng been nearly five dajrs making the 
journey. Far three or four day* I wai near being lick in consequence 
of fatigue and exposure. Chicago is a very smdl place compared lo 
what I expected: it was the Fort and Garrison that gave it importance, 
but since the troops have been removed to Green Bay it is rather a dull 
place. Here we saw two Indians to one white man. They are almost 
all Potawatomies and still own a very extensive tract of country, from 
Michigan to the Mississippi. Peres La Clerc is here, — the brave, as 
he is called, who fired the first shot at the massacre of Fort Dearborn 
at Chicago which Hull surrendered with Detroit. His manhood is 
nearly departed. His proud spirit was not tamed by his foes, but by 
whiskey. Chicago is on three points where the river forks, about one 
half mile from the lake. The country on every side is low land prairie, 
and while we were there it was very wet all around. There is not a 
frame building in the place, tho' several are covered with clap boards. 
Cottonwood, which is only a species of Balm-ofCilead grows on the 
streams and wet places about Chicafjo. There is no road from this 
place except such as follow Indian trails. We began to cast about for 
some way to get from here to Danville, Henry's desrination, when he 
received a letter from his cousin, G. S. Hubbard, saying that we had 
better wait till he and Henry's Father should arrive in a two horse 
wagon, and as he was going on to Michilimackanac (proa, Mack-in-aw) 
we might all return to Danville in the wagon. We spent 11 days in 
Chicago, hunted, fished, walked about, looked at Indian Squaws and 
French; went to one court, a curious affair, but the story is long and I 
have not ume to tell it. By the way, I must relate the legal proceedings 
near here. Sometime, years ago, in a certain case, but, take notice 
all I write I mean for truth but what I aro now going to tell I did not tee. 
I shall not, therefore, risk my veracity on this story. Afewyear* ago a 
traveler was in this quarter somewhere not far from Chicago. Hearins 
that a criminal was to be tried that day he was led by curiosity to 
attend the court. He accordingly went to the pile of logs that was 
pointed out to him as the County Court House, here he found the 
judge seated on the end of a block, in his shirt and trousers, twas hot 
weather; one foot, he was barefooted was doubled up on the other 
knee and he was busiUi engaged in extracting an ugly splinter from 
under one toe nail. The Judge asked our traveler to take a seat, 
which he did, as there were many blocks standing about the ground. He 
noticed several men in the comer of the buildmg ued firmly by their 
wrists with strips of hickory bark. Not understanding this he inquired 
of the Judge, who was srill at his splinter, why these men were confined 
in this manner. The answer was interrupted by the constable entering, 
sweating and puffing and swearing he had had a "right smart chase 
after that fellow." The mysterywas now explained.^the people bdng 
rather wUd in this new country it was necessary for the constable, 
whenever a trial by jury was required, to run down and catch twelve 
good men, and true, tying them as tney caught them or they would 
run away before he had collected the legal number. He had with 
infinite fatigue caught eleven men and had gone in pursuit of the 
twelfth when two men on horse back rode by on a full run and a little 
dirty boy at the door, shouted, "A horse race by — ." This aroused 
every faculty of the aforesaid good men and true, they could stand it 



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Gifts 77 

no longer; the tough bark was no obnacle; they break them even as 
Sampson of old break the bonds of the Philistines and rushed from the 
Court House in every direction, hallooing with all their might, " Hurrah 
for Brimstone,"— "Hurrah for Lightfoot,"— "$50 on Brimstone," 
"(100 on Lightfoot." The Judge himself was not insensible to the 
spirit stirring occasion and adjourned the Court to some future day, 
and finding the traveler, addressed him in a truly dignified style of a 
man of his judicial consequence, "Stranger bai— I A hundr«l to fifty 

G. S. Hubbard is quite a gentleman, speaks good English and 
French, and knows every Indian tongue, and almost every Indian 

Eerson in this 200 mile^ and in some directions much farther. He 
as been in the Indian Trade since he was 13 years old; he ie about 
30. His influence among them is great; they all know him and appear 
to love and fear him. He is quite rich. I have not room for a detailed 
account of our journey from Chicago to St. Louis. The distance as 
we traveled was about 370 miles. You can Judge how we found the 
traveling from the fact that we traveled 15 da^s and rested 5 to get 
here. Of the whole distance there was not 20 miles of wood land, only 
skirting the streams now and then on the ridge. 

Your brother 
To Mr. Foster Tinkham R. Tinkham. 

Middleborough 

The following picture of the village four years later is 
by the hand of beautiful Harriet Hubbard, the youthful 
wife of Richard J. Hamilton, Esq., and the mother of the 
donor, Mr. Henry E. Hamilton. It is written to her little 
sisters Ann and Elizabeth, the former of whom became 
the wife of Gurdon S. Hubbard. 

Chicago, June S, 1835. 
My dear sisters Ann & Elita: — 

.._._. Ihavesoofieninmylettenhomementionedmyownsitua' 

tion that it is needless to say anyoiing on that subject but as I know you 
are blessed with very enquiring minds I will give you a description of 
the present appearance of this city that is the famous town of Chicago, 
in the first place I can tell you that since I came here it has changed so 
materially that I should never have suspected it of being Chicago if 
I had been absent from it in the mean while there are now a large num- 
ber of handsome houses in the place and several handsome stores & 
3 or 4 good public houses, in fact the town begins to assume the ap- 
pearance of a New England village and not a small one either. It is 
now beginning to look like winter somewhat but notwithstanding all 
that has been said of the excessive coldness of the climate we have not 
had any really cold or stormy weather this fall and winter unril, within 
the last 4 or 5 days, the weather has been cold but clear and not severe. 
Now the river is frozen so hard that sleighs begin to run on it and I 
expect we wil1_ have a real merry time the test of the season. It is 
delightful to ride on the ice the horses travel with such rapidity and 
sleid)s run as smoothly as you can imagine and we have the pleasures 
of ueigh-riding without any of the inc 



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Librarian's Report 



We are seldom troubled with the sight or company of Indians 
indeedsince the payment of theit annuities which took place in Novem* 
ber there are but few about. There were nearly five thousand here and 
we were surrounded night and day. You would both have been de- 
lighted to have seem them so man>[ in theirown costume viz., leggings 
and blanketi — with the skins of animals, feathers of birds, all the bit* 



of brass, glasi, tin Stc that could he collected hanging from v 

of their petioD without regard to place, order or anything eUe. 
write more »o my dear sisten Goodbye — Do not forget 



parts of their penon without regard to place, order or anytfa! 
your sister 



HATnr. 

The early chapters of Chicago and indeed Illinois history 
would be incomplete without the record of Colonel Hamilton. 
Born near Danville, Ky., in 1799, he studied law, and came 
to Jonesboro, 111., in 1820, the next year being appointed 
cashier of the newly established State Bank, at Brownsville. 
In 1831 he removed to Chicago, having been appointed by 
Gov. Reynolds, the first Probate Judge of Coolc County. 
At the same time he held the offices of Circuit and CounU' 
Clerk, Recorder and Commissioner of School Lands. He 
was a Colonel of State Militia, raised a volunteer company 
in the Black Hawk War, and was defeated for the colonelcy 
of a regiment in the Mexican War. He died in 1860. 

Another picture of Chicago in the 30's comes to us in the 
form of a remarkably well written narrative of the journey 
of a pioneer family by wagon from Fredonia, N. Y. It was 
written by Mrs. Harriet Warren Dodson one of the seven 
"beautiful Warren sisters" who with their parents came 
to make their home in the romantic spot later called for 
their father " Warren ville," at present a charming though 
deserted village. Most picturesque is the account of the 
arrival at Chicago of the covered wagon with its precious 
freight, the crowds of settlers in all the public houses, the 
alarm of the mother at the sight of Indians swarming around 
the Sauganash Tavern, crossing the river at Lake Street 
and the night's rest at The Green Tree Tavern, before 
beginning the drive through the flooded prairie road to the 
home already prepared by Mr. Warren. Although the stop 
in Chicago was brief, there was time for Mrs, Warren to 
renew acquaintance with her old friend Dr. Isaac Harmon, 
nor was tne time lacking for Mr. Elston and Silas Cobb to 
note the charms of the daughters, the latter afterward con- 
fessing that he had followed the wagon to this stopping place 
and resolved on the spot to have one of the girls for a wife, 

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Gifts 79 

if he lived and could get her. Continuing the narrative we 
find that in 1840 Mr. Cobb kept his vow marrying the 
fair Maria Warren. 

This home quite naturally became the center of a social 
circle that included not only the neighborinz families in the 
Fox River region but those of Chicago as well, and the names 
of Caton, Cobb, Bcecher, and Carpenter are frequently 
coupled with those of Sweet, Fowler, Naper, and Dodson, in 
the round of parties and weddings that enlivened the entire 
country-side. Strange to say the ample and elegant Warren 
homestead still stands, though with the loss of an entire ell, 
well back from the shaded roadway in Warrenville, across 
which its luxuriant lawns sweep unbroken to the opposite 
residences, and the giant oaks and elms lock their branches 
overhead as thougn to withstand the obliteration that 
must overtake this landmark as it has overtaken others. 

Judge William Prentiss, besides loaning to the Society 
adiary kept by anancestorof hisduring the \Varof 1812, has 

£ resented two letters written from Chicago to his father in 
'avenport, Iowa,in 1848, by Mr. James Wamock, who open- 
ed a business college here that year. The following extract 
is from one of them : 

Chicago, Oct. 19, 1848. 
.... I then left Sti. Louii by way of the III. river and the 
canaL and arrived here in Chica^, on the 9th Sept. 

1 have not yet done much in the way of teachingi as I did not 
commence my school until la«t week. I have yet but few pupSi, but 
I have several more engaged, lome of whom will probably commence 
next weeL I do not expect to do very much till about the close of 
navi^ationhere, as therewill then be a gocMj many persons, comparative- 
ly disengaged. This will probably be in a month. I have taken a 
room at $4.00 per month on the comet of Lake & State Bts., apposite 
tlie City Hotel, about 400 jraida from the Lake Shore, 150 yards from 
the river, where the principal shipping business Is done, and neatly 
fronting the new Market house and City Hall, now nearly completed. 
I think the location is a pretty good one, for my school. I think that 
if I can once get under way, and become well known, that I can do a 
good business here. 

Chicago is destined to be a ^at city. Its trade and commecdat 
bnfineas ate immense and rapidly increasing. You can count from one 
to two hundred steamers, bngi, sloops, schooners, &c at almost 
any time here in the river. The crowd of business is so great, that 
thtjr are about taking measures to have Chicago river considerably 
widened. The Galena railroad, when done, will also bring in an im- 
mense amount of Western Trade. A portion of it is finished and a 
locomotive will be running in a few days. There is a great trade 
centres here by means of teams, from a lUstance of 5 to 100 miles, of 



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So Librarian's Report 

which there i( often 1,000 to 1,200 in the City at once. I was out 
hunting on the prairie a few dayi ago along the course of the railroad, 
and standing on it, I counted 46 teams on the Des Plaines planlc toad, 
all in sight at the same time, just from where I stood. As nigh as 300 
teams loaded with wheat alone, have passed along this single toad in 
one day. There have been as high as 200,000 bushel of wheat n- 
ceived here in one day. 

I like Chicago very much. The streets are wide and regular, and 
thickly planted with trees, which, when green in summer, with the 
Lake bieeie, renders it very pleasant. I think it is vety probable thae 
I shall take up my permanent residence here in the Garden Ci^" 
bunt myself up a litar afeciionate eiifi and settle down bete for li(e. 
Respectfully 
Your friend, &c. 
Jas. Waknock. 

And here this too lengthy recital must close, even though 
we omit detailed mention at this time of one of the most 
interesting contributions of the year, namely, a secret 
chapter in the life of the good Chief Shabbona, as related 
by Miss Frances R. Howe, of Porter County, Indiana. This 
gifted woman, the author of "A French Homestead in the 
Old Northwest," is the daughter of the late Francis Howe, 
and the granddaughter of Joseph Bailly, of Baillytown, one 
of the first permanent settlers of Nomiem Indiana, both 
gentlemen having heen long and favorably known in Chicago. 

From Miss Caroline Blodgett, through Mr. Burley, have 
come a large number of AnO-slavery newspapers and pam- 
phlets that belonged to her father, the late Judge Blodgett. 
Ainong these will be found IS numbers of TV Liberty Tree, 
edited and published by Zebina Eastman, at Chicago, in 
18 41 - 4 6. This is so rare that it is known only by name to 
most collectors. 

A partial list of other important gifts appears under the 
heading Accessions. 

PUBLICATIONS 

An edition of 1100 copies of the Yearbook for 1914 was 
issued in February, R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company 
being the printers. Owing to many requests for extra copies 
from the families of deceased members the edition was nearly 
exhausted. In addition to the regular exchange list, numer- 
ous requests for the book from clubs and schools have 
been supplied. Mr. H. H. Miller, of Steamboat Springs, 
Colo., wntes: 

"There was not a page that did not give me something of interest. 

I was sorry not to find mote of the 1840 and 1850 families in your mem- 



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Publications 



bership list." [Mr. MiUer's father, the Rev. W. Y. Miller in 1849, 
lived at the S. W. cornet of State and Madison, but sold hia Chicago 
oranenvand moved to Knox Coun^, when the building of McVicker* 
o be talked of.] "My father could not stand living so 
. n7i.:._i._j._ •-'[ocery wa« across State Street on the 
a State Sueet south of Randolph," 

Through the generosity of Dr. Schmidt the Society was 
able to secure for publication a manuscript by Mr. W. C. 
McNaul, entitled: — "The JefFerson-Lemen Compact: The 
Relations of Thomas Jefferson and James Lemen in the 
Exclusion of Slavery from Illinois and the Northwest Terri- 
tory, with Related Documents. 

This paper, read February 16, 191S, was published for 
the Society by the University of Chicago Press, and re- 
ceived the comment, "an interesting and well written 
address," from Tke American Historical Review. The 
Firginia Magazine of History, after considering the documen- 
tary evidence produced by Mr. McNaul to prove the claim 
that Jefferson made a secret compact with Lemen to go to 
Illinois to oppose slavery in the Northwest Territory, reopens 
this question in the following words: "The whole matter of 
this alleged compact needs thorough investigation before it 
can be accepted as history." 

The A. C, McCIu^ Company report the sale of but two 
sets of "The Diary of James K. Polk ' during the year. Last 
year ten sets were sold. 

The University Press reports that the profits accruing to 
the Society from the sale of its publicarions, for the year end- 
ing June 30, amount to $74.15. The heaviest sales, 
225 copies, were on the "Lincoln- Douglas Debates" by 
Horace White. Of Dr. Reed's "Masters of the Wilderness ' 
125 copies were sold. 

The publication of J. W. Putnam's "History of the Illi- 
nois and Michigan Canal," decided upon by the Publica- 
Uon Committee early in the summer, has been delayed, until 
opportunity is had to bring the work down to date. This is 
in accordance with the writer's wishes expressed when the 
manuscript was submitted. Professor Putnam made ex- 
tensive use of the collections of this Society in compiling 
the work. 

The final issue completing the Fergus Historical Series, 
acquired by this Society a year ago, was published last 
er, twenty-five years having elapsed since the pre- 



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Librarian's Report 



ceding number saw the light. The title-page reads as 
follows: 



FcTKiu Hiitotical Seriei. — No. 30. 



NARRATIVE 

of the 

MASSACRE AT CHICAGO 

[Saturday], Augutt IS, 1812, 

SOME PRECEDING EVENTS 

by 

Juliette Augusta (Mapll) Kinzie 

Second Edition 

With lUutttationj, Additional Note*, and Index. 



CHICAGO: 

PBRGUa FKIMTIHO COMPANY 

1914 



The zeal for accuracy which is a well rec<^ized charac- 
teristic of this printing house is here emphasized, for the mat- 
ter for this pamphlet nas actually stood in type for a quarter 
of a century while Mr. George H. Fergus searched the 
archives here and at Washington for exact data for his 
foot-notes which on many pages exceed the original text. 

It should be recalled here fliat to the House of Fergus, 
father and sons, our city generally, and this Society in par- 
ticular owes a debt that can never be paid. The fact that 
from the time that Robert Fergus the head of the House 
came to Chic^o to engage in the printing and publishing 
business, until the death of George H. Fergus in 1911, these 
industrious Scotchmen kept diaries of events and maintained 
a card index of marriages, births, and deaths, thus con^ 
sttturing a "Bureau of Information" for everything that had 
any bearing upon the history of Chicago. The first "Business 
Directory* of Chicago was compiled oy Robert Fergus, set 
up in type without uie formality of "copy" and appended 
to a work on which he was engaged, entitled, "The Laws 
and Ordinances of the City of Chicago, Passed in Common 
Council, Printed by Edward H. Rudd, MDCCCXXXIX." 
Mr. Rudd had received the contract for this work from the 



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Children's Lectures 



city but sublet it to young Fergus who had arrived in Chicago 
in July 1839. 

The R. R. Donnelley & Sons Company, in the preface 
of their 1914 Christmas book, "Reminiscences of Chicago 
During the Civil War," with an introducdon by Mable 
Mcllvaine, acknowledged indebtedness to this Society's 
collections for a large portion of the material for this volume 
and sent copies of the book for the members of the Executive 
Committee and Librarian, as well as two copies for the 
Library. 

CHILDREN'S LECTURE COURSES 
The Chicago History Lectures for children of the Eight 
Grade were given on each Saturday during eight months 
of the school ^ear with the exception of two Saturdays that 
fell in the holiday season with the following attendance: 

Schools north of Madiion Street 4133 

Banner School, The Langland, nith 156 delegates. 

Schools south ofMadisiHi Street :....2680 

Banner School, The Eitle, with 124 delegaies. 

Total 6813 

The average attendance for the thirty lectures was 220. 
The largest attendance at a single session was 417 which 
overtaxed the capacity of the hall. 

The sustained interest in the study of Chicago history 
by school children must be very gratifying to the older mem- 
bers of the Society many of whom have prophesied sadly, 
that, with the passage of time, the men and affairs of the 
early city would inevitably become a sealed book to succeed- 



ig g< . . 

This is the fourth year that this course has been main- 
tained by Dr. Schmidt, and now as the younger brothers and 
sisters of the children who attended the first courses reach 
the eighth grade and so become eligible to attendance, they 
come tousfullofeagemess tosee themodel of Fort Dearborn, 
the violin of Mark Beaubien, the shoe of Long John Went- 
worth and the coat of Abraham Lincoln, rumors of which 
have long since reached them through the big brothers 
and sisters. 

There are certain classes of children not yet reached by 
these lectures, namely, children in detention schools, the 
blind, the crippled, children who live at too great a distance 



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84 Librarian's Report 

to walk and who cannot pay carfare, and those who from 
choice or necessity work on Saturdays. Boys and girls at 
this most impressionable age are so perceptibly influenced 
by the lecture, the building itself, the portraits and memen- 
toes of great men of achievement reverently treasured by the 
Historical Society, that no pains are spared to reach all of 
them with our delegate system (explained in the Yearbook 
for 1913) but our efforts are not always successful, as in 
the case of The John Worthy School. In acknowledging 
the receipt of tickets, the Principal wrote, "I wish my boys 
might see and hear this but the bars forbid." Surely a suit- 
able field for cultivating good citizenship. It is such a 
pretty sight to see the little chaps sitting up tall and sqiiar- 
mg their shoulders as the deeds of John Kinzie, Gurdon S. 
Hubbard, and Willam B. Ogden are recounted and they are 
urged to emulate them, that one covets for the slouched 
figures and dull eyes of delinquent children the spur of such 
examples. 

Mrs, Mann's lectures are well adapted for the purpose of 
the course and are invariably listened to with wrapt attention. 
Occasionally casual visitors have been called upon to con- 
tribute reminiscences. On December 5, Chief Seven Moun- 
tains, his grandson and nephew, representatives of the Sioux 
Nation, from Pine Ridge Reservation, S. D., happening to 
be in the neighborhood, were invited to talk and gave valu- 
able information on Indian manners and customs, the young 
men interpreting for the Chief, who is ninety-seven years 
of age and speaks only Sioux. On January 23, Mr. Henry 
E. Hamilton caused much wonder among his small listeners 
by recounting his boyhood days in the '40's when swimming 
in the Chicago river, picnicking on its grassy banks, gain- 
ing admission to the circus by carrying water for the elephant, 
and dancing around the May-pole in Ogden's Grove, just 
north of Huron street, were common experiences. 

Thirteen essays based on the lectures and historical 
exhibits were submitted in competition for the honor of 
being printed in the Yearhook. The essay voted to have 
the greatest number of points of excellence was that con- 
tributed by Julia Kotora, of the John Spry School, Room 
One. Favorable mention was made of the essays ofjames 
Vejooda, of the same school, Antonia Rozlilek, of The Throop 
School; Gertrude Kealer, of The Plamondon School, and 
David Lux, ofThe Willard School. The prize essay follows: 



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Children's Lectures 85 

EARLY CHICAGO 

By Julia Kotora, John Spry School 

Eighth Grade, Room One 

Through the kindness and public Gpirit of some unknown member of 

the Chicago Historical Sodety, the members of the eighth grade classes of 

Eublic schools were Fortunate enough to be able to enjoy four interesting 
xtures by Mrs. Mann, the daughter of the historian Ridciath, on the 
history of Chicago. The trip to the buildine, its wealth of historical pic- 
tures and relics, as well as the lectures, wete neartily appreciated by every 
member of our class. We are all very grateful to our benefactor. 

The Historical Sodety, which occupies its own building situated at 
Dearborn and Ontario streets, was founded in 1856 to perpetuate the early 
history of the "Garden City." The fire of 1871 wiped out the original 
structure with its wealth of treasures, and the great stone building that we 
visited was erected since then. Upon crossing the threshold our attention 
was centered upon a model of Old Fort Dearborn with its stockade and 
blockhouses. The walls of the auditorium were covered with pictures of 
the men who helped to make that tittle log-cabin village of 1828 the me- 
tropolis of the Mississippi valley. Among them were William B. Ogden, 
Chicago's first mayor, and John Wentwocth, her first congressman. As 
this room was htted up in memory of Abraham Lincoln, our martyr president, 
it is appropriate that his bust is on the stage as well as in the rear of the room, . 
so that you see him when entering and leaving. Many curious relics of 
the past were seen in the other rooms. 

The first lecture was on the early explorarions and was very interesting, 
as it dealt with the French who settled this section of the country. Father 
Marquette, a Jesuit priest, came down from Green Bay in a birch canoe in 
1673, by way of the Wisconsin and Mississippi and returned by the lUinoii 
River, crossed the portage and spent the winter in our neighborhood at 
Robey and 26th St. A cross marks the spot where his cabin stood. Father 
Marquette was accompanied by five Indians with whom hewas very friendly. 
They carried, instead of guns, a peace pipe. Marquette's health was poor, 
and he died at the age of thirty-seven on the way back to Mackinaw. 

LaSalle was one of the greatest explorers. He studied Joliet's and 
Marquette's maps and believed that the Mississippi River emptied into 
the Gulf of Mexico. In 1679 LaSalle and Tonty, his best friend, came to 
Chicago. LaSalle tried to form the Indians into a confederacy to help 
France. He was killed by one of his own men when returning with colonists 
from France. He built the first fort on the Illinois River and left Tonty in 
charge when he left for France. In 1803 the United States Government 
ordered a fort to be built at Chicago. It was made of logs and surrounded 
by a stockade. It had block houses at the opposite comers and houses 
for the soldiers inside. They built this fort for protection from the Indiana 
and they worked all summer and part of the winter in its construction. It 
was named "Fort Dearborn" after Gen. Henry Dearborn, the Secretary 
of War. 

Wayne's treaty of 1795 gave the United States the right to six square 
mites of land at the mouth of the Chicago River, and on this was built the 
fort. The first settler of Chicago was Jean Baptiste Point de Sable^ a negro 
fur trader from San Domingo. His cabin was built near the river and 
there he lived for seventeen years. Afterwards he sold it to a French 
trader who later sold it to John Kinzie, the agent of the Astor Company- 
Mr. Kinzie was a silver-smith by trade and was very friendly with the red 



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86 Librarian's Report 

men. He lived at peace with the Indians for twenty-three years. He was 
call«j "The Father of Chicago" because he was the first permanent white 
settler of Chicago. Illinois was then a part of the Indiana Territory, and 
its first capital was Kaskaskia, a French settlement in the Eouthem part of 
the state. In 1833, only fifty families were living at Chicago. The treaty 
of 1833 with the Indians was the greatest event m the early history of our 
dty. These people promised to walk twenty ntiles west of the Mississippi, 
and they did this and Chicago thrived. 

The Fort Dearborn Massacre occurred August 15, 1812, near ISth 
Street and Prairie Avenue. Fifty-two out of the seventy people were killed 
by the cruel Indians, and a fine monument marks the spot where these 
heroic men and women met this awful fate. Kinzie was one of those who 
escaped, and in 1816 he came back, the fort having been rebuilt, and ended 
his days in the midst of the growing city. There is a wholesale grocery 
store now where old Fort Dearborn used to stand and a tablet tells the 
fact. In 1871 the last building of the fort was destroyed. In 1837 Daniel 
Webster, delivering a famous speech, stood on the Wauhansee stone [which 
is now in the Chicago Historical Society's building]. 

Chicago began to grow in 1830, but up to that time there were only 
twenty-eight voters. In that year, at Mr. Ogden's suggestion, planked roads 
were built and people came here to trade and work. I.ake Street was then 
the busiest street of Chicago and all the fashionable people lived on the 
North Side. In 1834 Chicago's population was 2000 and in two years it 
was doubled. 

Chicago became acorporated dty in 1837. Thefirstmajror of Chicago 
was W. B. Ogden, a Democrat. The area of Chicago at that time was 10.7 
tquare miles. Today the area is 190,6 sr^uare miles. The invention of the 
steamboat and the building of railroads mduced the people of the East to 
come west and many settled in Chicago because they knew that some day 
the lake, the river, and the rich praines would make it a great city. The 
threshing machine brought people west to invest in the rich farm lands that 
could be purchased for $1.25 per acre. The Chicago River was not a good 
harbor unril a freshet washed the sandbar out, and in 1838, the first train 
passed over the tracks ofthe Northwestern Railway whidi led from Chicago 
to the lead mines of Galena. The rails were vioaden in those dajrs and the 
trains were pulled by horses. Thirteen years later a steam engine pulled 
into Chicago. In 1848, The Illinois and Michigan Canal was finishM and 
manyof the workmen remained in Illinois. 

The morning after the Chicago Gre the spirit "I will" ruled the dty, 
(or out of the ashes rose a beautiful ciiy with Its gigantic stone buildings. 
The Old Colony Building and the Masonic Temple with its 24 stories 
impresses the world with thdr greatness. One mistake was made for the 
builders did not realize that the foundarion must rest on solid rock if the 
structure was to endure for all times. This mistake was corrected, and 
now there are many skyscrapers in thedty. The World's Fair held at jack- 
~i Park in 1893 to commemorate the discovery of America, awakened a 



desire for "a city beautiful." The result is a grand ^stem of boulevards 
and parks. When the Wacket Plan is carried out, Chicago will rank as 
one of the most beautiful dties in the worid. 



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CAMP FIRE GIRLS AND BOY SCOUTS 
Lincoln 's 



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Special Exhibitions 87 

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS 

During the first week of December 1915, there were 
removed from the Society's Building, where they had been 
stored for many years, paintings and museum ODJects, that 
while vety considerable, were not a tithe of the great his- 
torical collection of Mr, Charles F. Gunther. The only 
part that had been kept on permanent exhibition by the 
Historical Society was the splendid group of life portraits of 
Washington by American old masters which included a 
Gilbert Stuart, a Rembrandt Peale, several Charles Wilson 
Peale's, a Copley and the St, Memin miniatures. With these 
are the portraits of Mary Ball Washington, Martha Washing- 
ton, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Daniel Webster, 
Henry Clay and many other patriots and statesmen. The 
presence of these portraits will be greatly missed by the 
visitors to the building. 

Mr. Gunther occupies a unique position in Chicago, in 
that, as the owner of the only extensive collection of onginal 
historical portraits of Americans in the West, he is our fore- 
most patron of patriotic education. With this veteran of 
the Civil War the visualization of American history has be- 
come a science. It must always be a matter of regret that 
Chicago has never availed herself of his magnificent offer 
to present the collections of his lifetime to the City for a 
public museum, if the municipality would provide a place 
for their exhibition, but America is not thoroughly awake to 
the value of historical museums. Some years ago a small 
museum was maintained on the upper floor of Mr. Gunther's 
place of business and many grey Haired men and women date 
their first inspiration to love of country from a boy and girl 
visit to that upper room in "Gunther's Candy store." 

Will this neglect of privilege go on until too late or will 
Chicago with her great resources of wealth and splendid 
activities for uplift, realize that in providing a home for this 
great arristic and historical collection she is building the 
Best kind of a bulwark against ignorance, degeneracy, crime, 
anarchy and bad ciuzenship generally? 

In response to a Proclamation of the Governor of Illi- 
nois, expressing the desire that December 3, the day of 
Illinois's admission to the union, be appropriately observed 
as "Illinois Day," an exhibit consisting of the following 
groups was, arranged: 



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Libranan's Report 



Official documents and other papers, bearing the State 
seals and the signatures of the governors of Illinois 
from the Military Government of George Rogers 
Clark to the present and including Territorial as 
well 35 State papers, 1778 to 1900. 

Pictures of early State Houses, etc. 

Portraits of the Governors and other State Officials. 

Portraits of citizens of Illinois in 1S18. 

Relics of Lincoln, Douglas and Grant. 

A special Exhibition of Lincolniana was opened on Feb- 
ruary 12, Mr. Silas C. Stevens loaning an interesring group 
of Lincoln portraits for the occasion. Visitors on tnat day 
numbered only 189, however many of these remained in the 
building several hours. 

On Washington's Birthday visitors numbered 341, the 
increase being accounted for by the extended nonces given 
in the papers and the postal card notices sent to the principals 
of schools, A pleasant feature of both holidays was the 
presence of working men and women brought by their child- 
ren, who had become acquainted with the building through 
the Saturday afternoon lectures. To the older people the 
existence of our American historical museum comes as a 
revelauon and many express gratitude that they and their 
children are permitted to enjoy its treasures. 

The Fiftieth Anniversar}^ of the close of the Civil War 
was marked by a special exhibition of Civil War relics. This 
was opened on April IS, the anniversary of the death of 
Lincoln with an address by Hon. William J. Calhoun. (See 
under Meetings.) At this time many valuable relics were 
added by gift and loan, one of the latter being a Photograph 
Album containing portraits of members of Battery "A" 
Chicago Light Artillery, one of the three batteries fitted out 
by the Chicago Board of Trade. This was exhibited by 
Mr. Russell Stevens. Among the well known men whose 
portraits appear here are: Abbott L. Adams, Calvin Durand, 
C. A. P. Gamsey, Benj. F. Nourse, John A. Nourse, W. S. H. 
Odell, F. B. and F. S. Rockwood, J. M. Sexton, Silas C. 
Stevens and S. H. Stevens, the father of the owner of the 
album. 



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Special Exhibitions 



Mr. Silas C. Stevens an uncle of Russell Stevens presented 
to the Society at this time his outfit as a private in this 
Battery, consisting of a bluejacket, trousers and belt, the 
insignia of the Board of Trade Battery, a silver watch carried 
throughout the war (a present from his father), a sewing 
kit made by his mother, and flags, revolvers, belts etc., 
captured from the Confederates, together with two portrait 
groups of veterans of Battery "A ' taken in 1865 or '66. 
This collection will be prized very highly. 

These treasures lie side by side with the arms and ac- 
coutrements of Albeit Dickinson of Battery " B " or Taylor's 
Battery, C. L. A., and serve to emphasize the splendid phys- 
ique of the flower of Chicago's soldiery. Both Mr. Stevens 
and Mr. Dickinson served throughout the war and both 
have gone through life with hearing impaired by the heavy 
cannonading in that conflict. Yet both are happy and 
hearty today, and both will tell you that they attribute their 
splendid constitutions largely to the athletics practiced dur- 
ing the fifties in the old Chicago Light Guard Hall at State 
and Randolph Streets, where Ellsworth and otherenthusiastic 
athletes framed scores of young men to become "Gymnasts" 
as they called themselves then. From this drill they natural- 
ly drifted into military drill. To those who knew Ellsworth 
it is no wonder that Chicago was the first to respond to 
Lincoln's call for 75,000 troops and that the first gun fired 
in the West was a Chicago gun fired by a Chicago Boy. 

Judge William Prenriss contributed a daguerreotype 
portrait and letters written from the front by a young 
soldier, Lt. Michael Gapen, of Macdonough Co., Illinois, whose 
expressions of loyalty and courage show him to have been 
one of those youths in whom serious mindedness seems to 
have been precociously developed by the needs of the time. 
He died of wounds received at Jackson, Miss,, July 27, 1865. 
One of these letters written to his sister, December 17, 
1862, is full of enthusiasm for the conflict. It reads, in 
part. 

And you seem willing to give up all honor in any way lo stop the 
war. Why I am perfectly astonished at you. I never have found 
that federal soldier yet that is willing to have the war close dishonorably 
to the U. S. Government, . . In reference to the Proclamation of 
Old Abe, that you speat of so lightly, I did not like it at hrst myself, 
but I have come to the conclusion that it is the best thing that could 
possiblj> be done. It just brings these proud Southerners down to a 
level with other people. 



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90 Librarian's Report 

Another letter directed to "Mr. Willie Prentiss" his ten 
year old nephew, has been treasured above gold and read 
hundreds of times through tear-dimmed eyes. Judge Pren- 
tiss, however, has expressed his satisfaction that his letters 
have fouiid a permanent home where they will be an inspira- 
tion to the successive classes of school boys that visit the 
collections here from week to week. 

The Ellsworth Zouave Banner, Chicago, 1859, the sword 
of Col. £. Elmer Ellsworth, buttons nom his uniforms, 
portraits and original designs for miifonns etc, drawn by 
that military genius, fonn a beautiful exhibit that is perhaps 
more complete than could be found in any other museum. 
Mr. Judd Stewart, of New York contributed a portrait of 
Col. Ellsworth that until last year had remained in the hands 
of a member of the Ellsworth family. 

Capt.Frank Yates, a survivor of the Chicago Zouaves, who 
helped to win the Champion Flag mentioned above, added 
to the exhibit a document of unique interest that he has 
treasured tenderly during the half century that has elapsed 
since it was issued. It reads as follows: 

Cadet*! Membership Certificate: This is to certify that Cadet 
Frank E. Yates, ii an active member of the U. S. Zouave Cadets, late 
Cadets of the 16th Reg't and is entitled to all privileges and immunities 
acccuing to such membership, according to the Regularions of the 
Company; Dated at the Company's Headquarters, Chicago, August 
4th, 1859, Signed E. £. Ellsworth, Command't, A. S. Cobb, Qerk. 

This organization was formed April 2, 1857, reorganized 
April 29th, 1859. Besides the insignia of the tiger, etc., the 
document bears the legends Camp Dearborn, Camp Juneau, 
Elgin, February 22, 1856; Camp Sinnissippi, Chicago, July 4, 
1859. 

Notwithstanding his fifty years of civilian life since the 
war. Captain Yates has not abated a jot of his military 
bearing, but like the faithful disciple of Ellsworth that he is, 
he remains an adept fencer, and an active business man. 



FIELD WORK 

The following letter from Mr. Jens Jensen is indicative 
of the common ground that exists for those who have the 
preservation of history at heart, and those who would pre- 
serve our native landscape. 



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Field Work 



91 



April 7, 1915. 
D»ar Mis9 Mcllvaine: 

I have desired for sometime 10 write you a letter urging the Chicago 
Historical Society to interest itself in establishins a Park a( Bowraan- 
ville, on the old sand ridges. This land is vacant and is right on the 
edgeof thedty, and adjacent to it ate the Adam* Woods itill in a prim- 
itive condition. The land may be purchased directly to the drainaEC 
canal, which will b« of great advantage for canoeing. You know the 
historic associations of this tract and it seems to me that our Park 
Boards ought to take historic associations into consideration when 
selecting land for parks and playgrounds. It adds so much more to 
the park and as years pass on the interest in places known to have been 
connected with the early pioneer life of this city and country, will 
increase many fold. The Peterson Woods adjacent to the Adams 
Woods have been subdivided and an interesting tract of land lost foi^ 
ever. We therefore should do so much more to tecuce the Adams 
Woods that are just as interesting as the Peterson Woods were. 
Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) Jens Jensen. 

In accordance with the instructions of the Executive 
Committee the Librarian sought information as to the his- 
toric interest of the sand ridge adjacent to the Adams Woods, 
at Bowmanville. Early maps indicate that Little Fort 
Road lay along this ridge, and constituted the link between 
Chicago s greatest Indian village (Bowmanville) and Green 
Bay. St. Cosme wrote in 1699 that this village which he 
designated "Le Mission de L'Ange Guardien des Miamis de 
Chicagwa," contained 150 cabms (tepees). This would 
mean 7S0 inhabitants. Mr. William A. Peterson to whom 
a copy of Mr. Jensen's letter was sent, wrote under date of 
May 18, that the Indian arrows found in this vicinity come 
mainly from this ridge, and that visitors are drawn there by 
the profusion of wild flowers growing in the woods. The 
Adams Woods, he says are on the Foster Farm, owned in 
part by the Porter and Perkins-Bass Estates. 

A study of the maps of Indian Trails in the vicinity of 
Chicago made by Albert F. Scharf is so interesting that hope 
is inevitably awakened that traces of these ancient highways 
may be found even to-day. In the immediate vicinity of 
the city this is manifestly impossible, but the excursions of 
the Ge<:^raphic Society and other walking clubs have 
brought to light many signs of primitive conditions in forest 
and river tracts that are still untouched. One of these is 
the old Detroit-Chicago road around the southern bend of 
Lake Michigan. As Lt. Swearingen In 1S03, when leading 



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92 Librarian's Report 

the 1st United States Infantry from Detroit to build Fort 
Dearborn, recorded more than one camp made on that road 
in the Sand Dunes of Indiana, that region comes within the 
scope of this Society's investigations. This march has of 
course a wider significance being the actual advance of 
civilization to its outmost post in accordance with the plan 
of Thomas Jefferson to push the frontier farther westward. 
There are untouched stretches of the road visible in Porter 
county near the Bailly Homestead, now the home of Joseph 
Bailiy's grand-daughter. Miss Frances R, Howe. Miss 
Howe relates that in her grandfather's time the Great Sauk 
trail was worn so deep in places by the travel of Indians and 
incoming settlers that horses on the road were half hidden 
in its depression. Mr. Scharf is now compiling the data 
for a map showing the meanderings df this road. 

RELATIONS WITH OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

On December 29, 30 and 31 Chicago had the honor to 
entertain the largest organization of scholars in the country, 
namely, the American Historical Association, in its 30th 
annual conference. Enrollment exceeded 350 members and 
although there were no stated meetings held in this Building, 
more than fifty special students visited the Society bearing 
letters of introduction from institutions from coast to coast 
and from Manitoba to Mississippi. 

The session most interesting to this Society was the 
Conference of Historical Societies presided over by Dr. 
Schmidt, who gave a summary of the history and work of the 
Chicago Historical Society that won prolonged applause 
from an audience of trained historians from all parts of the 
country. 

On January 1, Mrs. Ella Flagg Young, Mr. S. S. Greeley, 
Hon. Thomas Dent. Mr. H, NT Higginbotham and your 
Librarian assisted Miss Addams in receiving Old Settlers 
at Hull House and later each gave a talk on Early Chicago. 
The receiving party had been earlier entertained at dinner 
by Miss Addams. 

As for some years past, the Society made its annual sub- 
scription to the fund for compiling "Writings in American 
Histoiy," published under tne able direction of Dr. J. 
Franklin Jameson. This work has now become an indispens- 
able tool for history students. 



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Relations with Other Institutions 93 

In response to the request of the Civics Extension Com- 
mittee, organized, "to aid the Public Schools to wider use of 
civic and educational resources," the Society permitted some 
of its rarest early maps to be photographed and donated 
three sets of the following publications to the Committee 
for circulation in the schools as a unit in its experimental 
"Package Library." 

" Father Marquette," Addresses before the C. H. S., April 3, 1900, by 

Franklin MacVeagh and Edwaid 0. Brown. 
"The Chicago Common Council and the Fugitive Slave Law," by 

Charles W.Mann, 1903. 
" Early Days of Praria and Chicago," by Hon. David McCulloch, 1904. 
"Bounda^ Dispute between lUinois and Witconsin," by William 

Radebaugh, 1904. 
"Some Indian Landmarks of the North Shore," by Frank R. Grover, 

1905. 
" Hon. Joseph Duncan, Fifth Governor of Illinois," by E. W. Blatchford, 

1905. 
"Hon. John Peter Altgeld, Twentieth Governor of Illinois," by E. O. 

Brown, 1905. 
"Gutdon Saltonstall Hubbard," by Henry E. Hamilton, 1908, 
"Masters of the Wilderness," by Charles B. Reed, 1909. 

The Municipal Art Committee of the City Club, headed 
by Mr. Everett Millard, in preparing to make recommenda- 
tions to the Trustees of the Ferguson Fund appealed to the 
Society for suggestions as to local historical characters suit- 
able to be commemorated in fountains, tablets, etc. Records 
showing the character of such men as Captain Nathan Heald, 
Captain William Wells, the Kinzies, the Beaubiens, Gurdon 
S. Hubbard, Shabbona, and Black Partridge, were shown to 
Mr. Millard. A copy of the Committee's report has since 
been received in which the recommendation was made that 
the Historical Society be consulted when plans were under 
consideration for monuments of local interest. 

It has been resolved by the Executive Committee to aid 
Mr. Ezra Meeker, of Tacoma, Washington, by letter, and 
in such other ways as seem practicable, in his effort to secure 
the passage of a bill by Congress, providing for the survey 
of certain parts of the Oregon Trail, and the completion of 
his labor of love in marking the same. Mr. Meeker made 
many friends in Chicago when several years ago he traveled 
through here with his ox team and the prairie schooner 
with which his parents made the trip to Oregon in 1852, and 
lectured for the Society. 



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94 Librarian's Report 

On the evening of March 17, a meeting was held in the 
Society's Building under the auspices of ladies of St, James' 
Church, in the interest of St. Luke's International Hospital 
at Tokio. Mr. George Higginson presided, and Mrs. C. R. 
Pancoast, of Philadelphia, made the address. An audience 
of over one hundred was present, among them a number of 
the members of this Society. 

On April first 300 members of the Prairie Club gathered 
at the Historical Society to listen to a lantern talk on "In- 
dian Trails of the Chicago Region" by Miss Mcllvaine. 
The museum exhibits attracted much attention before 
and after the program. Of particular interest were the 
manuscript maps of Indian trails by Mr. A. F. Scharf, and 
many seemed to realize for the first time that the Club's 
walking tours take them through actual Indian country. 
Mr. William P. Monroe, Chairman of the Committee having 
the meeting in charge, later transmitted a resolution of 
the Board of Directors of the Club thanking the Society 
for its hospitality to the Prairie Club. 

On April 13, The Midwest Chapter of The Alden Kindred 
of Amenca held a meeting in the Society's Building, when 
Mr. Seymour Morris, Jr., gave an illustrated lecture on "The 
Pilgrim Movement in England, Holland, and America." 
The President, Mr. Emmons Alden, a lineal descendant of 
John Alden, presided. The lecture was preceded by a 
brief sketch of the Collections of the Chicago Histoncal 
Society by Miss Mcllvaine. 

On April 16, in a Conference on the Relations of Historical 
Libraries to Secondary Schools, held at The University of 
Chicago, Dr. W. Dawson Johnston, Librarian of the St. 
Paul Public Library, in a very able paper cited the delegate 
system used in the Chicago Historical Society's Lectures for 
Children as one of the best agencies he knew of for stimulat- 
ing interest in history. Your Librarian led the discussion 
of the papers presented and took the opportunity to urge the 
value of museum exhibits in teaching American history. 

Sixteen Lincoln letters and documents were phot<^raphed 
for the Panama Pacific Exposition, being part of a chrono- 
logical arrangement of Lincolniana exhibited by the Illinois 
State Historical Society. The collections of Mr. L<^an and 



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New Street Names 



Mr. Dummer were drawn upon as well as our own to make 
up this number. 

On the evening of August 10, a group of 40 members of 
the Young Woman's Club of the Fourth Presbyterian Church 
visited the Historical Society and was conducted over the 
Building by the Librarian, who gave a talk on the History of 
the Soaety and some of its Early Members. 

On the evening of Sept. 21, the Society's Building was 
thrown open for a meeting of the Chicago Law Institute, 
when a portrait of Judge William H. Holden, by Arvid 
Nyholm, was presented to the Institute by fifty-three of its 
members. The program was in charge of Mr. Burley and 
Mr. Robert C. Fergus. 

The Board of Directors of the Illinois Society of Colonial 
Dames and the Kaskaskia Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution have met monthly in the Building. 

STREET NAMES 

The interest in street names awakened three years ago 
seems to grow as time goes on, and it is well that it does 
for when the old landmarks are vanished we may still trace 
some of them in the street nomenclature if a little concerted 
effort be put forth. 

In spite of so-called "improvements" that are the out- 
ward signs of the inward graces of Chicago push, energy, 
and enterprise, there are certain districts of the city that 
have acquired and kept a degree of their old-time charm, 
and something of the character that was theirs by nature, 
by geographic posirion, or that was bestowed upon them 
by our first City Beautiful advocates — ^William B. Ogden, 
Gurdon S. Hubbard, Walter L. Newberry, George W. Snow, 
Cyrus H. McCormick, Isaac N. Arnold, Belden F. Culver, 
the LeMoyncs, the Wallers, and others. Around Washing- 
ton Square and its adjacent streets where the giant elms 
planted before the fire, still unfurl their veils of green each 
recurring spring only a little less vigorously than the year be- 
fore, are still found stately homes built immediately after 
the great conflagration — the Isham house, the E. B. Wash- 
bum home, the O. F. Fuller house, and at the south the 



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96 Librarian's Report 

dignified row where have lived J. P. Reynolds, Dr. Bogue, 
mlliam Dickinson, and others. At this side The Union Qub 
building still stands, white on the east the New England and 
Unity diurches, like the elms, are relics of the fire, for the 
walls of each withstood the flames. On the west The 
Walton stands sentinel over a certain degree of gentility 
where once were the mansion and gardens of Mrs. Jones, 
later Mrs. E. B. McCagg, a sister of the Ogdens. Here a 
block of stores marks the first real encroachment of the 
business interests that will sooner or later change this beauty 
spot into some form of metropolitan hideousness, such as 
has overtaken others, for example the district affectionately 
called "Cranford " east of State Street and south of Chicago 
Avenue, which, centering about the Sheldon, Arnold, and 
McCormick homes, has long defied enterprise. 

With the transfer of tne Waubansie Stone from the 
fountain in Mr. Arnold's garden to the keeping of the 
Historical Society, it seemed as though the spell tnat held 
this charming old residential neighborhood together had 
been broken at last. The broad highway of the new City 
Beautiful must sweep away the ancient glories of Pine Street, 
leaving not even the name, and with it the little architectural 
gem known as "Mr. Sheldon's Castle" at Erie Street. Some 
think we cannot give the latter up but must needs petirion 
the Council to remove the Gothic building intact to the west 
end of Water Works grounds, where it would harmonize 
well with our water tower of the same ilk. A photographic 
survey of old homes on the North Side made for the Society 
by Mr. A. J. Watress preserves much of the beauty of the 
old regime. 

Space is lacking to speak of Cass Street, sacred to the 
memories of H. H. Magee, Joseph Medill, Dr. Sawyer, H, H. 
Porter, Mrs. Reed, the Johnsons, S. M. Nickerson, the 
Rumsey's, the Higgins, the Stantons, the Isaac McCaggs, 
and last and most important St. James' with its tower 
dating from before the War. The writer knows, though 
less intimately, other beauty spots now faded almost beyond 
recc^nition that need to be recalled before it is too late to 
study their architectural features. For example. Park Row, 
whose windows, filled with the youth and beauty of "the 
militaiy set," looked down upon Lincoln's funeral, still 
exists behind the wall of automobile signs. Woodland 
Park, Groveland Park, Ellis Park, Aldine Square, and others 



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New Street Names 97 

like them on the South Side all had their glorious days and 
now are more or less crumbling ruins. Union Park and its 
diverging streets on the West Side srill show examples of 
grandiose residential architecture where once the Bull's 
Head Tavem loomed large on the open prairie. Will not 
some one undertake to make photographs of these localities f 

Soon these neighborhoods will loose all the aspect of 
homes, for apartments, stores, and warehouses will replace 
them. Probably this is quite as it should be since New York) 
London, Paris, though less rapidly, are undergoing transfor- 
mation, but one difference is noriceable — the older cities 
toitk all their changes do not alter the names of their streets but 
on the contrary cling to the old names steeped in associa- 
rions, homely, literary, or heroic, that to the end of time will 
arouse curiosity and stimulate investigation. 

In The Tribune of August 12, there appeared In the 
column of "The Friend of the People" the following inquiry: 

'o Austin avenues in the 



In his answer, over one hundred words in length, the 
Superintendent of the City Map Department touches not at 
all on the east and west Austin Avenue, which is the "dupli- 
cate" inasmuch as the north and south street, which is the 
boundary between Austin and Oak Park, was named many 
years before. 

As the Superintendent of the Map Department offers no 
explanation for bestowing the name "Austin Avenue" on 
Michigan Street, perhaps the following extract from his 
official report to the Mayor and Councilmay be of interest 
to people who awoke one morning to find themselves living 
on streets bearing such pseudonyms as "Karlov," "Ked- 
vale," "Kiona," "Liano," "Onarga," and the like: — 

"The plan followed, where it became necessary to assign entitely 
new namet, wai to make such assignment on an alphabetical basis; 
all new names commencing with the letter "A" in the fiist mile [east 
or west of State Street], "B" in the second, "C" in the thiid^ etc. 
The possible extension of this plan, so as to covei all the streets m the 
dty of Chicago, excepting the unnumbered streets on the South Side, 
taken in connection with the new house numbering system, would 
give Chicago a better system of naming and numbering than any other 
large city in the world. This statement, of course, is not to be con- 
strued from a sentimental standpoint, but from a standpoint of utility 
and simplicity." 



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Librarian's Report 



From the above it is plain that in this section only 
names beginning with "A' will be acceptable to the Map 
Department, which accounts for the refusal to consider the 
name of "Hubbard" in memory of Gurdon S. Hubbard, 
suggested by this Society in conjunction with the Associa- 
tion of Commerce. The special propriety of this name lies 
in the fact that the street originally bore that name on the 
west side of the river, having received it in recognition of the 
great service Mr. Hubbard did in attracting eastern capital 
to Chicago. It seems that with only a hasty pen sketch of 
a plat of land just north of "The Forks," in which lay Hub- 
bard Street, he sold half of it to a New York company 
for $85,000, the whole tract having cost but $5,000 a few 
months before. Such a transaction was so entirely unheard 
of that when the news reached Chicago by the stage coach 
and water route it was not believed and the boom that ensued 
was delayed until he arrived to confirm it, whereupon the 
wildest speculation ensued. 

Mr. Hubbard is remembered by all who knew him as a 
man of sterling character and the broadest sympathies. 
Again and again one hears the plea that if this name cannot 
be restored to the street that originally bore it, then that 
some street be found, falling within the domain assigned to 
the letter "H," where the property owners will be proud to 
have the name of Hubbard. 

ATTENDANCE 
The total attendance recorded in the Library was 6374, 
somewhat below the average yearly figure, owing to the fact 
that the building was closed to all but special students during 
the summer, except Tuesday and Friday afternoons. The 
attendance was divided as follows: 

Visitors Readers 

June to September 1508 258 

Eight other months 4029 585 

5537 843 
Total 6374 

The attendance at the Saturday afternoon lectures for 
children is reported under the head of Children's Lecture 
Courses. 



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Attendance 99 • 

Applications signed for books record 1551 volumes 
specincally called for. This iigure by no means represents 
tne use made of the Library, for in the case of newspapers 
and collections of manuscripts a student will frequently 
have certain volumes reserved for his use for a week or more, 
for which only one application slip is filed. 

The following notable visitors and early residents have 
signed the Visitors* Register: — 
Frank W. Annii, Aurora, III. 
Charles H. J. BaHey, grandsgn of J. R Bailey, Chicago'i Fiin Poit- 



I. AdiasoD B^ara, came to Chicago, 1S58. 
_liam David Baige, grandson of John 
111., who came to fllinoii in 1820. 



William David Baige, grandson of John Diion, the founder of Diiooi 



J 3, Chile, South America. 

Edward Beaubien, son of Mark Beaubien. 

Fannie O. Beaubien, granddaughter of Mark Beaubien. 

Frank G. Beaubien, son of Mark Beaubien. 

H. £. Beaubien, Whiting, lad. 

Mrt. I. L. Beaubien. 

J, Wentwonh Beaubien. 

Clarence E. Bement, Lansing, Mich., President. Michigan Pioneer and 

Historical Society. 
George A. Bender, came to Chicago in 1847; in the Civil War from 

1862-65. 
Matthew Benner, Ex-Fire MarEhall. 
B. A. Bloomfield, grandson of B. Van Vehter who came to Chicago, 1836, 

and kept toll-gate at Brush Hill. 
Charles L. Boyd, came to Chicago, 1849. 
Qarence S. Brigham, Worcester, Mass. 
Mrt. Leia Brinkerhoff, a granddaughter of Jean Baptiite Beaubien, 

bom in Chicago, 1857. 
John J. Brown, bom in Chicago, 1842. 
John Campion, Ex-Chief, Chicago Fire Department. 
Edward C. Casdenas, Mexico City, Mexico. 
Jerorae M, Chapman, came to Chica^, 1849. 
Ozro Clapp, Chicago, joined the Chicago Board of Trade 1856 and 

is now the oldest continuous living member. 
Elizabeth W. Clench, a great-great-granddaughter of Cape John 

Whistler, who built Fort Dearborn. 
Elias Colben, came to Chicago, 1857. 
Clinton Collier, charter member of the Calumet Club. 
Mrs. Henry M. Cooper, Chicago, daughter of Levi Day Boone, who 

came to Chicago, 1836. 
Forrest Ctissey, Geneva, ID. 
E. G. Curtis, present when Lincob was nominated. 

Smes H. Davidson, Savanah, Ga., descendant of George Washmgtoo. 
a. George E. Dawson, daughter of Edward Manierre, bom in 
Chicago, 185a 



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Librarian's Report 



Hani Dietrich, Innibnick, Austria. 

Beiijaiiiin Warren Dodson, Geneva, HL 

M. F. Edwards, Lexington, Va., grandnephev of Got. Ninian Edwards. 

Emma Tyler Flagg, bom in Chicago, 1&38. 

Mitchell D. FolUnsbee, grandson of Horatio N. Follanabee. 

Frank Fgreman, son of Henry Foreman, who came to Chicago in 1854. 

Alexander E. Ftear, member of Ellsworth Zouaves. 

O. F. Fuller. 

Adolph Georg, came to Chicago, 1859. 

Eva May Goodwin, granddaughter of Lucinda Legg, who came to 

Chicago, 1826. 
Mrs. Mary Brayman Gowdy, Kansas City, Mo., daughter of Geo. 

Mason Brayman. 
Samuel S. Greeley, bom Oct. 11, 1824. 
Nettie Thomas Grove, Kansas City, Mo., Secretary of Missouri Valley 

Historical Society. 
C. F. Gunthcr, came to Chicago, 1863. 
James Marshall Hadley, came to Chicago from Marshall Co., lU., 

1845; bom in 1833. . 
Charles Harris, Excelsior Engine Co. No. 5; came to Chicago 18S3. 
S. D. Haskell, "First wholesale dry goods merchant b Chicago, 1864." 

eihn J. Herrick. 
arriette M. Hinsdale, daughter of J. T. Hinsdale, bom in Fort Dear- 
born, 1838. 
Mrs. Eugene Hoadley, granddaughter of Luther Stone. 
P. Hogan, came to Qiicago, 1850. 
Thomas M. Hoyne, Chicago. 
F. C. Ingalls, Ingalls, Kansas, great-grandson of Thomas and Melissa 

Church. 
BriK.-Gen. B. J. Irwin. 
W. L. Jenks, Port Huron, Mich., President, Michigan Historical Con>- 



Mis. H. H. Kellogg, Chicago, descendant of John Quincy Adams. 

Rev. Henw C. Kmney. 

Theodore Latton, came to Chicago, 1851. 



Rev. Henw C. Kmney. 

Theodore Latton, came to Chicago, 1 

H. B. Learned, Washington. D. C. 



Emily Beaubien LeBeau, signed on her 90th birthday, 
came to Chicago, 1829. Daughter of Mark Beaubien. 

Jane Martin Leech, bom 1821. 

Albeno Manatana, Algedras, Spam. 

Kate Manierre, Chicago, daughter of Edward Maoierre, who came to 
Chicago, 1835. 

J. Allen Marvin, Kansas City, Mo., cousin of Reuben TayIoi,.who 
took up 160 acres of Government land in Chica^ in the thinies 
and after whom Reuben St., now Ashland Blvd., is named. 

General W. Gordon McCabe, President, Virginia Historical Society, 
Richmond, Va. 

J. C. McDonnell, Chief of Fire Prevenrion Bureau. 

Alexander C. McMurtry, 88th III. Inf. 

William Milton, Spokane, Washington. 

George Monsarrat, son of David Monsarrat, secretary to William 

CharlelT 



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Attendance loi 



Chailei £. Morriton, bom in Qiicago, 1855t ion of Eiekiel Morritoa, 
who came to Chicago in 1833. 

0. L. Mun«r. 

Harriet F. Murphy, bom in Chicaio, 1838, sitter of Hiram Peanon 

Murphy. 
Thomas O'CoiuiDr, Fire Marshall 
Francis Heald Ottofy, St. Louii, Mo., a granddaughter of Capt. Nathan 

Heald and Rebecca WeUi. 
Edward P. Prickect, EvanECon, 111., grandson of Abraham Prickett who 

put motion in Convention of 1818 at Easkaskia, deciding that 

State be admitted and Constitution drawn up. 

1. V. RtKiney, Liverpool, England. 

I. P. Rumsey, Captain Taylor's Battery. 

F. A. Sampson, Secretary of State Historical Society of Missouri, 
" ■ mbia. Mo. 



fe 



Columbi. , 
Ferdinand Schapper, Blue Island, 111., came to Chicago, 1850. 
Capt. C Schimmels, Capt. Engine Co. No. S at time of Great Fire. 

Joseph Schreiner, Volunteer Fireman, 1853. 
frs. Alice Beaubien Shields, Chicago. 
St. George L. Sioussat, Nashville, Tenn. 
Justin H. Smith, Boston, Mass. 

W. V. Stevenson, 57th HI., Battles of Donelson, Henry, and Shilo. 
Frank W. Swett, River Forest, 111. 
Mrs. Leonard Swett. 
Leonard H. Swett, Fort Collins, Colo.; bom in Bloomington, III., 

November 11, 1858. 
W. H. Swett. 
Mary R. Thomas, came to Chicago, 1857, daughter of Edmund Roberts, 

Canal Commissioner, 1830. 
Joseph A. Todd, whose grandmother was present at the birth of Abra- 

nam Lincoln. 
Erasmo Trevino, Buenos Ayres. 
Richard S. Tuthill. 



Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Von Sennet, 656 Buckingham PI., Chicago. "I 

have lived for two delightful hours in the past." 
Horatio L. Wait. 
W. H. Wait, Ann Harbor, Mich. 

William Wayman, Ex-Foreman, Excelsior Engine Co., No. 5. 
Albert E. Weed, came to Chicago, 1854. 
W. H. Whitehead, Evanston, III., bom in Chicago, June 4, 1835; his 

father Rev. H. Whitehead came to Chicago m 1833 and built the 

first Methodist church. 

fWolfenstetter, bom in Chicago, 1847. 
rank E. Yates, member of original Chicago Zouaves, commanded by 
Col. E. E. Eliworth, late Captain ISth N. Y. Cavalry; served five 
years and three months. 

SCHOOLS 
Bismark School, Helen T. Bovricki and 8 pupils. 
Biyant School, S. H. Gerst and 13 pupils. 
Burke School, Anna Kelly and 60 pupils. 



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Librarian's Report 



Gresham School, Anna E. Wite and 128 pupil*. 
Marshall High School, Hairy M. Oem and 102 pupib. 
Nettelhoist School, Kite OeverdoD, with 8 pupili. 

OTHER GROUPS 
P. H. Qark, with 16 Boy Scoun. 
Ralph L. Hailett, with 16 Boy Scout*, Ttoop 66. 
J. E. Monciieff, with 16 Boy Scout*. 
K. A. Riggle, with 8 Boy Scouts, Troop 45. 

THE CATALOGUES 

The total number of cards in the General Catalogue is 
24,083. This includes special lists of newspapers, maps, 
atlases, genealogies, etc. The Portrait Index contains 10,115 
entries, the index of Illinois Views 269S, and the Index of 
Negatives and Lantern Slides 400 entries. In addition 
to the above card indices, check lists of Illinois Territorial 
and State Laws, and county atlases and histories, have been 
prepared. 

A good beginning was made last summer upon the task of 
cataloguing the accessions accumulated since 1910. Unfor- 
tunatdy the services of the competent cataloguer, who had 
been employed experimentally, could not be retained for the 
salary the Society was able to offer. 

The acquisition of the Law Papers, 3000 in number, last 
summer swells the accumulation already large. It is highly 
desirable that only trained assistants be employed in cata- 
loguing, for the reason that a catalogue entry for a book or 
manuscript is a permanent record that is difficult to make, 
and anytning less than absolute accuracy and completeness 
is not economy but extravagance. This has been demon- 
strated so often that it has become axiomadc in the library 
world to say, "Do a thing right the first time," while in 
the mail order business the maxim ts, "Ic costs less to make 
mistakes and correct them than to take time to avoid blun- 
ders." This emphasizes the distincrion between a moral 
obligation and a money obligadon. 

REPAIRS AND EQUIPMENT 

More extensive repairs were made on the Buildine in 

1915 than for many years past. The House Committee, Mr. ' 

Ryerson, Chairman, with the advice of Richard Schmidt, 

Garden, and Martin, recommended the overhauling of the 



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lAbrary Accessions 103 

cement work in the basement around the entire foundatioD 
as welt as the inside walls. This was accomplished by the 
Ruud-Nelson Company in one month, so that a basement 
room could be redecorated in time for the dedication of 
The Chicago Fire Department room on October 8. At 
the same time repairs were made on the roof, and the steam 
plant was put in order. 

Steel cabinets for storing museum objects have been in- 
stalled but horizontal newspaper files for early Illinois news- 
papers have yet to be provided. The three Chicago papers 
currently filed have nearly reached the limit of the present 
cases and we have the prospect of having a complete file of 
the Chicago Evening Post added next year. 

The enormous collections of photographic portraits 
recently added make steel filing cases an immediate necessity. 

Mr. Fuller presented a handsome steel desk for use in the 
secretarial and Dook-keeping work and Dr. Schmidt furnished 
an outfit of carpenter's tools that had long been needed. 

Alderman Ellis Geigeri in co-operation with Mr. William 
H. Bush on behalf of the Society, succeeded in having an 
ordinance passed by the City Council permitting the Society 
to place signs at State Street and at Clark Street indicating 
the location of the Society's Building. This has apparently 
been of much assistance to persons wishing to visit Uie Build- 
ing and has even attracted the attention of conductors on 
the street cars so that would-be visitors to the collections 
here are not carried out of their way. 

Through the kindness of Mr. Emmons Alden, Superin- 
tendent of Streets in this ward, the cross walk at the alley 
just west of the Building has been paved with cement. This 
dark and uneven walk had for years been a menace to life 
and limb for evening visitors to the Society. 

ACCESSIONS 

At the beginning of the fiscal year, November 1, 1915, 
inventory showed the number of volumes in the Library to 
be 24,698, pamphlets 7893, manuscripts 25,000, total 57,591. 
The number of maps, photographs, prints, and museum ob- 
jects it has not been possible to count accurately. 

The additions to the Library and Museum by gift and 
purchase entered in the Accession Record since November 1, 
1914. are as follow: 



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104 Librarian's Report 

Gifu Putcliases Total 

Manuscripts 783 3,002 3,785 

Volumes 293 114 407 

Pamphlets 568 36 604 

Maps 34 16 50 

Pictures 8,680 139 8,819 

10,358 3,307 13,665 

Of the 13,665 items received, 10,358 were donations and 
3307 were purchased, the sum expended for books, maps, 
pictures, etc., being $2,247.93. The only large purchase was 
a collection of manuscripts, relating to the fur trade in the 
Northwest, knowfi as the Law Family papers, some 3000 in 
number. The largest gifts of the year were, by a strange 
coincidence, three collections of photographs of early Chicago 
cidzens as follow: The Calumet Club, 300; Mr. J. M. 
Johnson, 700; The C. D. Mosher Memorial Offering to 
Chicago, 7000. The Calumet Qub Collection is mentioned 
in some detail below. That of Mr. J. M. Johnson is ex- 
ceedingly interesting inasmuch as it contains many portraits 
of prominent professional men. The great Mosher Collec- 
tion was made by this famous Chicago photographer in 
anticipation of the Second Centennial of American Independ- 
ence in 1976, and filed in a vault in the Court House in ac- 
cordance with provisions of the City Council with the ap- 
proval of Carter H. Harrison given in 1880. Though the 
last Court House was raised in 1908 the chest containing the 
portraits was not transferred to the Historical Society until 
1915, when, at the instance of Col. Francis A. Eastman, 
Alderman Ellis Geiger introduced a resolution in the Council 
providing for placing it in the keeping of the Society. 

The public spirit and foresight of Mr. Mosher have given 
to the City a priceless legacy in this enormous collection of 
human documents that is now assured of a safe resting 
place, it may be long after 1976, 

"When other men our lands will till — 
When other men our streets wUl fill." 

The classified list of .accessions that follows while not 
complete will serve to indicate the various departments in 
the Society's chosen field that have been strengthened 
through the generosity of its friends. The complete Ust of 
DONORS will be found at the end of this report. 



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Library Accessions 



MANUSCRIPTS 
Cotton Mather's "Patema" Manuscript, prepared for 
the information and spiritual guidance of his son, the Rev. 
Increase Mather. The gift of Miss Elizabeth Skinner. 

This unique volume it wntten entirely ii 
elder Mather. It is said by Miss Skinner to h 
most prized books. 

Diary of Philo Adams, 1817-1831. Original manuscript. 
The gift of Rev. Clair S. Adams, through Mr. Philo 
Adams Otis. 

Contains an account ofhb journey from Vermont to Ohio in 1817. 

Autograph letters of Illinois governors and statesmen 
(93). Tne gift of Mr. Charles H. Conover. 

The above comprise letters from John Reynolds, Thomas Ford, 
Thomas Cailin, William H. Bissell, Daniel P. Coolc, and others exceed- 
ingly important. 

Correspondence between Cornelius I. Swartwout, Quincy, 
111., and General Robert Swartwout, New York, 22 letters, 
1837-1848. The gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

"The Illinois-Wabash Land Company, with an Intro- 
duction," by Qarence W. Alvord. Facsimile, privately 
printed by Cyrus H. McCormick, 191S. The gift of Ma. 
McCormick. 

In making this curious document available to students, a distinct 

service has been done for the colonial history of Illinois. The date of 

it cannot be later than 1769. 

" Forrifications Erected by the French Along the Illinois 
River and at the Lower End of Lake Michigan," by Dr. 
John H. Goodell, of Marseilles, 111. Ms. The gift of the 
Author. 

In this interesting document, which fills twelve pages of foolscap, 
and is accompanied by a map, the author, who is a scholar veil versej 
in early Illinois history, controverts the idea that Marquette and 
Joliet used the Calumet Portage instead of that of the Chicago. 

Correspondence between members of the families of 
Hubbard and Hamilton, at Chicago, 1835-1885. The gift 
of Mr. Henry E. Hamilton. 

The writer knows that Mr. Hamilton values these letters above gold 
and had treasured them for half a lifetime. They will not be less pnied 
by the Historical Society for they make us better acquabted with two 
of the pillars of Chicago Society. 



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Librarian's Report 



MANUSCRIPTS 

Letter from Emily Beaubien, Sweet's Grove, near Naper- 
ville, III., April 13, 1846, to Robert Le Beau, New Ark, 111. 
The gift of Mrs. Emily Beaubien Lebeau. 

The above i( the young \»dy'i answer to a piopoaai of matriage 
which, though il fills two pages with language that sounds more like a 
legal opinion than a love letter, leaves the reader quite in the dark as 
to the writer's intentioni. Notwithstanding the excessive legal ver- 
biage, Mr, LeBeau'g reply, which was given to the Society some years 
ago, reads precisely as though she had accepted his proposal with 
enthusiasm. 

"Recollections of Early Chicago Residents," by Henry E, 
Hamilton. The gift of the Author. 

The list includes John H. Kinzie, Richard J. Hamilton, Walter L. 
Newberry, George W. Dole, John B. Turner, John Kiniie, William H. 
Brown, Richard Jones Hamilton, Harriet L. Hamilton, Gurdon S. 
"'"""■ nF.DeWoir,JohnS. Reed, and Charles 

"Jonathan Young Scammon," by Edwin A. Munger, 
Chic^o, 1915. Typewrittgn manuscript. The gift of 
Mr. Edwin A. Munger. 

Letter from Elizabeth Greenwood, Chicago, 111., August 
15, 1836, to her grandmother, Mrs. Jane Knox. TypevritUn 
copy. The gift of Mrs, Sidney S. Miles, 

Letters and documents relative to Chicago (44), 185fr- 
1870. The gift of The Estate of Henry Greenebaum, 
through Mrs. Alexander Bergman. 

Two manuscript maps of Chicago drawn b^ Thomas 
Oiurch, Chicago in 1836 and Chicago in 1860, indicating the 
shore lines in 1834 and 1836. The gift of Mrs. Seneca D. 
Kimbark. 

It is not improbable that the first mentioned map figured in the real 
estate transactions that laid the foundations for the large fortune 
amassed by Mr. Church, who was Mrs. Kimbark's foster father. Com- 
ing to Chicago in 1834 he found here but 400 inhabitants, besides the 
200 troops in Fort Dearborn, and being unable to find a lot for sale on 
South Water Street, then the only business street, he bought 40 feet 
on what is now Lake Street, the street not then being laid out except on 

fiaper. Here at Nos, 111 and 113 (old nos.) he erected the first store 
rondng on Lake Street. Beginning his business career at 12 years by pickr 
ing up stones at 6}i cents a day he saved his earnings and conibming 
thrift with other steriing qualities he became universally respected and 
loved. An early writer says of him, "no brighter example of the success 
attendant on strict integrity of purpose, unswerving pertinacity, and 



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Museum Accessions 



MANUSCRIPTS 



ChuKh." Truly a shining eximple of the Chicago spirit. 

Personal papers of Major George A. Bender, 1856-1888. 
The gift of Major Bender. 

Map of a portion of the City of Chicago, Illinois, showing 
the line or limit of the excavation for the improvement of 
the navigation of Chicago River and the boundaries of 
the grant to Jean Baptiste Beaubien as determined by 
Brevet-Lieut. Col. J. D. Graham, Corps of Topographical 
Engineers, under the authority of the Acts of Congress of 
July 21, 1852 and August 1, 18S4, and the orders of the 
Hon. Jefferson Davis, Sec'y of War, April 10, 1855, and 
consented to and confirmed by the parties in interest. The 
gift of The Fergus Printing Company. 

A series of four hand-colored historical charts of the 
Chicago Region from the Glacial E[>och to the Present, 
compiled by Chades A. Kent. The gift of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. F. Dumhek. 

Mi. and Mrs. Duramer have equipped every school in Chicago, 
studying Chicago history, with a set of these charts. 



MUSEUM ACCESSIONS 

Portraits of 300 "Old Settlers" of Chicago, 1839-1879. 
Photographs. The gift of The Calumet Club. 

This remarkable collection is the result of the labors of a Committee 
consisting of Marcus Stearns, Joel C. Walters, James H. Rees, Silas 
Cobb, Mark Kimball, and Franklin D. Gray. It is contained in three 
massive carved oak frames bearing the ensign of the Club— ^e Calumet 
or ^pe of Peace. 

The temptation is strong to name all of the dear old faces, but 
what need. They are all there — the original pioneers — and why should 
they not be gathered hy a Committee such as the Old Settlers Com- 
mittee of the Calumet Club, Chicago's first and perhaps last genuine 
aocial club. In passing we can only stop to drop a tear of jo^ that such 
men and women of strong individuality lived and made Chicago what 

Violin said to be the famous one played by Mark Beau- 
bien, the genial host of The Sauganash. The gift of The 
Calumet Club. 



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Librarian's Report 



When Mr. Beaubien came to Chicago in 1826, he brought with hint 
a Tiolin which thereafter figured constantly in the social gatherings of 
the infant city. Sad to relate, the violin which now reposes in the 
antique rosewood box is of modem design, in fact appears to be a 
pathetic subnitute for the origioal which must have been stolen from 
the place of honor in the Club's collections at some dme previous to 
the fire that in January, 1893, partially de$troj>cd the Clubhouse, for 
the wood of the iostnunent, as well as the box, is charred and water 
stained. Mr. Frank G. Beaubien, a Corresponding Member of this 
Sodetv, and a son of MarL Beaubien, by his second marriage, testifies 
that the latter on his death bed, April 11, 1881, placed the violin in his 
hands with the words, "Give my old violin to my friend, John Went- 
worth." One old citizen, Mr. Harris, says that he accompanied Mr. 
Wentworth to the meeting of the Calumet Club, at which the violin, 
encased in its green doth bag. was presented. Edward Beaubien says 
the original instrument had mothei-oF-pearl inlaid about the lower 

However we cannot be too grateful to The Calumet Gub for hand- 
ing down to us the heirloom that, cruel as the deceprion is, nevertheless 
serves to recall so vividly Mark Beaubien, of whom it was written at 
his death, "The memory of no man who has ever lived here will be 
cherished more, and certainly no man deserves it more." A recent 
interview vrith Mr. F. B. Tuttle brings out the fact that he is sure that 
this is the violin upon which at, the Calumet Oub Old Settlers' Annual 
" ' n the third Friday of May, 1879, Mr. Beaubien at the age 



Enty-nine played "Money 
n Indis ' ■ ' '^ 



then an uidiaii tune to which Gurdon S. Hubbard performed a wild In- 
dian dance. 

Four Real Daughters of the War of 1812. Framed 
ambrotype. The gift of Mr. Gborgb A. Satterlee. 

The above, daughters of Mr. Wm. Twogood — Mrs. Emily Satterlee, 
bom 1820; Mrs. Sarah H. Chapin, bom 1824; Mrs. Elizabeth V. Jones, 
born 1831; and Mrs. James F. Harvey, bom 1837— came to Chicago with 
their patents, William and Sally (Van der Cook) Twogood, in the fall 
of 1836 driving all the way from their borne in Ramertown, N. Y., in a 
barouch built by their father who, bom in 1794, had served in the 
Second War with Great Britain. All are living except Mrs. Satterlee 
who died Sept. 15, 1914, having lived in Chicago 77 years. An ex- 
quisitely beauriful vraman to the day^ of her death, Mrs. Satterlee was 
a wonderful hostess and on her 93d birthday, attired in pale lilac moire 
andque, point lace and diamonds, entertained a large company charm- 
ingly. Among the prominent cirizens and members of patriotic sodedet 
present was Mme. LeBeau who remembered meeting Emily Tvrogood 
at a ball at the Lake House in 1841 when she as Emily Beaubien made 
bet formal debut. The meedng of these two women at the93d birthday 
party was most affecring, 

Pappoose Carrier, Sioux tribe, Pine Ridge, S. D. The 
gift of Mr. Charles Willis (Os-ke-mon). 

Mr. Willis, the grandson of Chief Seven Mountains, who at the 
age of 90 accompanied him on bis visit to the Sodety, was carried on 
this board as an infant. 



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Museum Accessions 



Bead reticule carried by Mme. Jean Baptiste Beaubien 
(Josette La Framboise). The gift of Mrs. Charles E. 
Brinkerhoff, 

Tfiis bag, carried for man^ Tears for church and drest occaaioDS, iru 
after the death of Mme. B. (m 1845} die prized possession of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Caroline Fields, who tare it to her niece, the donor. 

Silver snufF box, taken from the grave of Chief Alexander 
Robinson at the time of the removal of the family cemetery 
on his reservation from the west to the east bank of the 
Des Plaines River. The gift of a grandson, Mr. Russell 
CooNEY, 

It should never be forgotten that to the courtly chief, half Scotch 
and half Ottawa, Chicago's first civilian, John Kiniie, was largely 
indebted for the safety of himself and family at the time of the Chicago 
massacre. Sohinson lived at that time at St. Joseph, Michigan, and 
it is said shelteted the Kinzie family for months. 

Two pieces of wood from the old cottonwood tree at 
18th Street, containing bullets believed to have been fired 
in 1812 in the Fort Dearborn Massacre. The gift of Dr. 
Frank T. Andrews. 

Di. AndtewB procured the pieces himself. 

A flute, formerly owned by Egbert B. Van Vlack who 
brought it to Chicago when he came to take up residence 
here in 1832, is bequeathed to the Society under the will of 
his daughter, the late Clara V. Garnet, of Gresham, 
Oregon. The dft is transmitted by Miss M. E. Buckley, 
Executrix, Gresham, Oregon. 

The flute had been in the Van Vlack fam3y for more than a century. 

Court House Square, showing the famous "Red Jacket" 
Volunteer Fire Company on parade, 1846, with their hand- 
engine bearing the portrait of the illustrious Indian chief 
for whom the Company was named. Enlarged photograph 
from a daguerreotype. The gift of Dr. 0. L. Schmidt. 

This picture is believed to be the earliest camera view of Chicago 
in existence. As the original was a negarive, we here see the Public 
Square and its surroundings reversed, the church on the left being the 
First Methodist, S. E. comer of Clark and Washington, and the one in 
the background, the Unitarian, on the north side of Washington near 
Dearborn. If the sturdy Company lined up in the foreground, could 
but right-about-face, we could recognize the faces of some of the elite 
of that day, for b its membership were Frank T. Sherman, afterwards 
Mayor, Wnata Jones, K. K. Jones, William Jones, George H. Laflin 
whose original red-jacket graces the fire collecrion downstairs, C. D, 



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Librarian's Report 



Gnmni*, jMome Beecher, and C. C. P. Holden. Thit Cmnpanr was 
prominent in the River and Harbor Convention Parade in 1847, and 
in 1852 took their engine to New York, where under Chief U. P. Harrii, 
diey outdasted allorthecompaniesof that ctty by throwing a ttreamcM 
water to the top of the flaKp<>le in the Cit}r Hall Square. 

Chicago in the fifties, sixties, and seventies. One hun- 
dred and thirty-two sUreoscopic viftos. The gift of the late 
Mrs. Seneca D. Kihbark. 

Giicago before and after the great fire. Forty photographs 
and engravings. The gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

Chicago before and after the World's Fair. Twenty-six 
photographic views. The gift of Mr. Julian S. Mason. 

Chicago before and after the World's Fair. Forty-nine 
photographic views. The gift of Mr. J. W. Taylor. 

"Westward Hoi" Bn^avtng by T. D. Booth, from a 
painting by J. H. Beard. The gift of Mr. Julius Frankel. 

Thii engraving is one of the premiumi given with the lottery dckctl 
add at $5.00 each to create funds to finance The Crosby Opeia Houm 
after the fortune of U, H.Crosby,itB foimdec,had become embarrassed. 
210,000 tickets were sold, the great prize being the Opera House itself, 
laid to have cost over $600jOOO, and the lesser ones, the work) of art 
gathered within its walls. The drawing of this lottery, Jan. 21, 1867, 
brought interested visitor* from every part of the United States in 
(uch numbers that all the hotels were crowded, the Armory titled, and 
the plan failing for building benhs in the Tunnel, hundreds slept in 
the streets. The drawing was supervised by a committee composed 
W W. F. Coobough, J. C. Dore, James C. Fargo, I. Y. Munn, J. A. 
£llis, Clinton Bri^s, B. G. Ball, F. A. Hitman, Amos T. Hall, Chaun- 
cey Bowen of Chicago; David Pulsifer of Boston; Charles R. Stickney 
of Fall River; Samuel Castner of N. Y.; C S. Needles of Phiiadelphlai 
Walter Ingersoll of St. Louis, L. C. Rouse of St. Louis. The 
honorable nature of the transaction is indicated by the following: The 
person holding the lucky number, 586,000, was A. H. Lee, of Prairie 
du Rocfaer, III., who offered to sell his orize to Mr. Crosby for $200,000, 
which sura was promotlv paid him. The 210,000 premium engravings, 
including scores of such familiar subjects aa "The Little Wanderer,' 
"Washington Irving at Sunnyside," etc., saved the consciences of the 
■crupulous, greatly promoting the sale of tickets, and a short genera- 
don ago graced the walls of dignified homes throughout the land. 

Thus ended Chicago's first and last colossal lottery, but many 
citizens aver to this day that the beauty and dignity of Crosby's Opera 
House has never been equalled. 

"The Little Wanderer." Engraving by C. Rost. The 
gift of Miss Maretta Twitty of Oak Park. 

Like the preceding this is a Crosby Opera Hoiise Lottery premium. 



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Museum Accessions 



A hand-pump fire engine, said to have been used in 
Chic^o at a very eariy date, comes to the Society through 
the efforts of Chief McDonnell, of the Fire Prevention 
Bureau, and was fonnally presented by Thomas O'Connor, 
Chief of the Chicago Fire Department, on October 9. 

The name of the eni^ne is the "Maty Ann." Her exact pedigFce 
hat been impossible to trace, but inaimudi as steam fire engines were 
introduced in October, 1S57, there can be no question that she has 
passed the half^century mark. The acquisition of the eneine brought 
about the dedication of a room to the Eariy Fire Department and since 
the opening, many relics, treasured by the firemen, have been added. 

Dennis Swenie, late Chief of the Chicago Fire Depart- 
ment. Oil portrait, life ii%e, by Van Ness. The gift of 
The Chicago Fire Department through Mr. Seymour 
Nf ORRIS, Jr. 

Chicago Fire Department in action at the Great Fire, 
1871. Photograph by E. Brand, Chicago. The gift of Mrs. 
Martha Swenie through Mr. Seymour Morris, Jr. 

Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. Bronze tablet bearing 
medallion head of Lincoln. The gift of Mr. Jules Ber- 
chem. 

Abraham Lincoln. Colossal bas-relief in staff. The gift 
of Major Chas. H. McConnell. 

"Abraham Lincoln, Sixteenth President c^ the United 
States." Colored lithograph. Currier & Ives, 157 Nassau 
St., New York, No. 205. The gift of Mr. Walter M. Hill. 
Description: Bust, beard; facing right. Faetim. tig. 

Abraham Lincoln. Photograph of St. Gaudens* Statue 
of Lincoln in Lincoln Park. The gift of Mr. Louis A. 
Damon. 

The statue a gift to Lincoln Park, by bequest of $40,000 under the 
will of Eli Bates, was unveiled October 22, 1887, the orator of the 
occasion being the late Leonard Swett. (£li Bates became a member 
of the Chicago Historical Society in 1869.) A copy of the proceedings 
of this unveiling is desired for the Society. 

Hon. Hannibal Hamlin. Engraving from a photograph 
by E. E. McQee, Philadelphia, Published by Currier &ives. 
New York. The gift of Mr. Silas C. Stevens. 

Hon. Leonard Swett. Marble bust by L. W. Volk. The 
gift of Mrs. Swett and Mr. Leonard H. Swett. 



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Librarian's Report 



Stephen A. Douglas, about 1834. Photographic en- 
largement from a daguerreotype. The gift of Dr. O. L. 
Schmidt. 

"Elmer E. Ellsworth, late Colonel of the New York Fire 
Zouaves. Taken from a portrait in the possession of an 
intimate friend of Colonel Ellsworth." Lithograph after 
crayon by J. E. Baker. The gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

"Murder of Colonel Ellsworth." Engraving. The gift 
of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

"Zouaves Leaving for War." Colored lithograph by 
Dingham & Dodd, Hartford, Conn. The gift of Dr. 0. L. 
Schmidt. 

John Wilkes Booth. Photograph by D. W. Wilson, 
Hartford, Conn. The gift of Mr. A. B. Stedman. 

Sword said to have belonged to J. Wilkes Booth. The 
gift of Mrs. Nellie Snyder Stover. 

Id an affidavit Mrs. Stover states that she had often beard Ker 
father, the late John H. Snyder, of Canton, III., sajr that this sword was 

£' fen to him by a Civil War soldier who valued it highly as a relic of 
e tragedian. 

A Drum Major's scarlet coat, worn in the Revolutionary 
War by Derick Morlcy. Loaned by Mr. Frank Morley 
Woodruff, Curator of the Chicago Academy of Sciences. 
The buttons were cast by the owner and the doth woven by his wife. 

George Rogers Qark. OH portrait, after the one by 
Reavis in the State Library, Richmond, Va. The gift of 
The Calumet Club, through Mr. Lawrence Hej^orth. 

"View of Col. Johnson's Engagement with the Savages 
(commanded by Tecuipseh) near Moravian Town, October 
5, I8I2." Hand-colored woodcut by N. Dearborn. The 
gift of Dr. O. L. Schmidt. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Caroline M. McIlvaine, Librarian. 



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LIST OF DONORS 

Adams, Milward. 
Adams, William M. 

American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass. 
American Institute of Homeopathy. 
American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, Pa. 
American Telephone and Telegraph Co., New York 
Andreae, Percy, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Andrews, Dr. Frank T. 
Architectural Record Co., New York, N. Y. 
Armour Institute of Technology. 
Augsburg Seminary, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Aurora Daily Beacon News, Aurora, III. 
Bancroft, Frederick, Washington, D. C. 
Bates, Miss Frances Barton. 
Beaubien, Edward. 
Beer, William, New Orleans, La. 
Beifeld, Joseph. 
Bender, Major George A. 
Benton, J. H., Boston, Mass. 
Berchem, Jules. 
Bergman, Mrs. Alexander. 
BiDWELL, Mrs. Caroline Dickerman. 
Blodoett, Miss Caroline. 
Board of Education. 
Bowser, A. J., Chesterton, Ind. 
Boy Scouts of America, New York City. 
Braun, Rev. L. F. 
Breen, John J. 
Brennak, George A. 
Brinkerhoff, Mrs. Charles E. 
Brown, James Edgar. 
Buck, Solon J., St. Paul, Minn. 
Buckley, Miss M. E., Gresham, Oregon. 
Bunker Hill Monument Association, Boston, Mass. 
Burton, C. M., Detroit, Mich. 

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
Carpenter, Mrs. G. A. 



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114 Z,ijf of Donors 



Case School of Applied Science, Oeveland, Ohio. 

Chapman, A. S., Rockford, 111. 

Charities Commissiok, Springfield, 111. 

Chase, Hon. John, Denver, Colorado. 

Chicago Daily News. 

Chicago Herald. 

Chicago Mendelssohn Club. 

Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Chicago Tribune. 

Chicago Warehouse and Terminal Co. 

Children's Museum of Boston. 

Christian, W. H., Stephenville, Texas. 

Citizen's Association. 

City Club of Chicago. 

City Council of the Cmr of Chicago. 

City of Chicago Municipal Tuberculosis Sanitakium. 

Clapp, O. W. 

Clinton, J. W., Polo, III. 

Commissioner of Education, Washington, D. C 

Commissioner of Public Works. 

Commonwealth Edison Co. 

Comstock, W. H. 

CoNOVER, Charles H. 

Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn. 

Connery, Francis D. 

Conrad, Martin. 

Continental Fire Insurance Co., New York Gty. 

Cook, A. R., Springfield, lil. 

CooNEY, Russell. 

CORNWELL, Jos. A. 

Corthell, Mrs. G. A. 

Cox, Isaac Joslin, Gncinnati, Ohio. 

Crampton, Richard L. 

Crapo, James. 

Crissey, Forrest, Geneva, III. 

Crosby, Mrs. A. F. 

CuRREY, J. Seymour. 

Dahl, M. E. 

Damon, Louis A. 

Davis, J. McCan. 

Dbpew, Chauncey M., New York, N. Y. 

DeWolf, Edward P., Waukegan, 111. 

Dial Publishers. 



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List of Donors 



DoDsoN, Mary Warren, Geneva, 111. 

Donnelley & Sons, R. R. 

Donovan, Miss Helen. 

DouBLEDAY, Page & Co., New York City. 

Doughty, Akthur G., Ottawa, Canada. 

DuMMER, Mr. and Mrs. Wh. F. 

Eastman, Col. Francis A, 

Efficiency and Economy Committee, Urbana, III. 

elsenstaedt, isidore. 

Fair, The. 

Fairlie, John A., Urbana, III. 

Fergus, Robert C. 

Fergus Printing Co. 

Ferguson, Mrs. Clara J. 

Ferry, Mrs. Abbt Farwell. 

Field Museum of Natural History. 

FiLSON Club, Louisville, Ky. 

Flanagan, A. & Co. 

Frank, Mortimer. 

Frankel, Julius. 

Frear, Alexander E. 

Frear, Austin. 

French, D. A. 

Fuller, W. A. 

Gardiner, Mrs. Fanny Hale, Racine, Wis. 

Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, III. 

Geiger, Hon. Ellis. 

General Education Board, New York City. 

Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Ga. 

German-American Historical Society of Illinois. 

German Society of Chicago. 

Gerstenberg, Miss Alice. 

GooDELL, Dr. J. H., Marseilles, III. 

Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C. 

Gray, Dr. Allen W. 

Green, M. S. 

Greenebaum, Estate of Henry. 

Gross, H. H. 

Grosse, Mr. and Mrs. Louis. 

Grove, Miss Nettie Thompson, Kansas City, Mo. 

Gunther, C. F. 

Hamilton, H. E. 

Hamilton, W. A,, Evanston, IlL 



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ii6 List of Donors 



Harlan, Edgar B., DesMoiaes, Iowa. 

Harper Memorial Library. 

HARRiBfAN, Ret. CELUaES C, Albany, N. Y. 

Harrison, Harry F. 

Harrison, William Preston. 

Hart, W. O., New Orleans, La. 

Harvard UNivERsmr, Cambridge, Mass. 

Hayes, Mrs. H. H. 

Heartman, Chas. Fred, New York City. 

Heile, Mrs. Adolph. 

Herricc, Robert. 

Hill, Tames W., Peoria, 111. 

Hill, Walter M. 

Hispanic Society of America, New York, N. Y. 

Huron College, Huron, S. D. 

Illinois State Historical Library, Urbana, 111. 

Illinois State Historical Society, Springfield, III. 

Illinois Training School for Nurses. 

Indiana State Library, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Insurance Deft, op the State of Illinois, Springfield, III. 

Interstate Commerce Commission, Washington,]!). C. 

Jambs Sprunt Historical Publications, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Japan Society, New York City. 

Jenks, William L., Lansing, Mich. 

Johnson, J. M. 

Kaskaskia Chapter Daughters of the American 

Revolution. 
Keeley Co., Dwight, 111. 
Kent, Charles A. 
KiMBARK, Mrs. Elizabeth P. 

KlHBARK, C- A. 

King, Gen. Charles, Camp Douglas, Wis. 

KiNSELLA, James E. 

Lake Forest Public Library, Lake Forest, 111. 

Lake Mohone Conference on the Indians and Other 
Dependent People. 

Lake Mobonk Conference on International Arbitra- 
tion, Mohonk Lake, N. Y. 

Larson, L. E. 

Lawson, Victor F. 

LeBeau, Mrs. Emily Beaubien. 

Lee, Henry W. 

Lee, J. W., Jr., Philadelphia, Pa. 



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List of Donors 



Leonard, G. Russell. 

Lewis, E. B., Litchfield, III. 

LtBKARY Bureau of Railway Economics, Washington, 

D. C. 
Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 
Logan, Frank G. 

Longmans Greene & Co., New York, N. Y. 
Loring, Mrs. Stella I>yer. 

Louisiana Historical Society, New Orleans, La. 
Love, Charles A., Aurora, 111. 
Marsh, Miss Sarah £. 

Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Md. 
Mason, Caft. Roswbll H. 
Mason, Julian S. 

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Mass. 
Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, Mass. 
Mayer, N. A. 
McClurg, Ogden T. 
McCoNNELL, Major C. H. 
McCoRMicK, Cyrus Hall. 
McIlvaine, Miss Mabel. 
McNally, James. 
Meeker, Arthur B. 
Merriman, Charles. 
Merryweather, George. 
Metcalf, Printers & Engravers. 
Miami UNivERsmr, Oxford, Ohio. 
Michigan College of Mines, Houghton, Mich. 
Michigan Historical Commission, Lansing, Mich. 
Mid-Day Club, The. 
Miller, H. H., Steamhoat Springs, Colo. 
Miller, Lloyd G. 

Missouri Valley College, Marshall, Mo. 
Moore, A. A, Oakland, Calif. 
Moore, Charles, Lansing, Mich. 
Moore, Ensley, Jacksonville, 111. 
Mountain School Herald, The, Berrien, Mich. 
MuNGER, Edwin A, 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Mass. 
National Education Association, Ann Arbor, Mich. 
National Information Bureau, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
National Wholesale Liquor Dealer's Association. 
Newberry Library, The. 
New York Historical Society, New York City. 



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ii8 List of Donors 



New York Public Library, New York City. 

New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. 

NiLES, Mrs. Sidney S., Oak Park, 111. 

North, Ralph H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Northwestern Uniterstty, Evanston, 111. 

O'Connor, Hon. Thomas. 

Olcott's Land Value Maps Co. 

Oliver, Prof. E. H., Ottawa, Canada. 

Olson, Nils F. / 

Open Court Publishing Co. 

Oregon Historical Society, Portland, Oregon, 

Oregon State Imigration Office, Portland, Oregon. 

Ormes, a. E., Evanston, III. 

Patten, Henry J. 

Pennsylvania Society, New York City. 

Peoria Star, The, Peoria, 111. 

Permanent Charter Commission. 

PiNNEO, G. M., Gary, Ind. 

Poole, Ernest, Sugar Hill, N. H. 

Prairie Club of Chicago. 

Prentiss, Hon. William. 

Prince, Benjamin, New York City. 

Providence Public Library, Providence, R. I.. 

Public Library, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Public Library, St. Paul, Minn. 

QuAiFE, Dr. M. M., Madison, Wis. 

Ransom, Dick, Twin Lake, Wis. 

Rea, Miss Lillian, Lake Forest, 111. 

Rea, Paul M., Charleston, S. C. 

Reed, Dr. Charles Bert. 

Relief Society Magazine, The, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Republic Publishing Co., New York City. 

Retzer, Paul H., Glen EUyn, 111. 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R. I. 

Rice, Ervin A. 

Richards, R. C. 

Richmond College Historical Papers, Richmond, Va. 

Robbins, Gen. Walter R, 

Rogers, Elmer E. 

Rogers, Mrs. Henry W., Riderwood, Maryland. 

Rosenberqer, Jesse L. 

Rowland, Dunbar, Jackson, Miss. 

Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa, Canada. 

RuMSEY, Capt. I. P., Lake Forest, 111. 



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List of Donors 119 



Russell, Lindsay, New York City. 

Sanitary District of Chicago. 

Satterlee, George A, 

Schmidt, Dr. Orro L. 

Sc&ENECTADY CouNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY, Sdienectadv, 
N.Y. 

ScHOLL, Dr. Wm. M. 

ScHREiNER, Joseph. 

Seebergbr, Louis A. 

Selleck, Wm. E. 

Sellers, Edwin Jaquett, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Shapiro, Leo H. 

Short, Harry. 

Smith, David, Dixon, 111. 

Smith, Justin H., Boston, Mass. 

Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. 

Society of Colonial Wars in the State of Vermont, 
Burlington, Vt. 

Society of Pennsylvania Women in New York, New 
York City. 

South Park Commissioners. 

Special Park Commission. 

Sprague, a. a., II. 

Stanislas, Sister M., Joliet, 111. 

Starr, Prof. Frederick. 

State Board op Charity, Boston, Mass. 

State Board of Rhode Island and Providence Planta- 
tion. 

State Historical Society, Bismarck, N. D. 

State Historical Society of North Dakota, Fargo, N. D. 

State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 

Stedman, a. B. 

Steele, Frederick M., Highland Park, 111. 

Stennett, Dr. W. H. 

Stevens, Mrs. J. Austin. 

Stevens, Silas C. 

Steward, J. F., Piano, 111. 

Stewart, Judd, New York City. 

Stover, Mrs. Nellie Snyder, Plymouth, Ind. 

SwENiE, Mrs. Martha. 

Swett, Mrs. Leonard. 

Swett, Mr. Leonard H. 

Tauer, Walter. 

Tavenner, Hon. Clyde H., Washington, D. C. 



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List of Donors 



Taylor, Bert Leston. 

Taylor, J. W. 

Teachers College, Columbia University, New York^City. 

Tepee Book, The, Sheridan, Wyoming. 

ToMLiNSON, Webster. 

TORREV, C. A. 

Tracy, Gilbert A., Putnam, Conn. 

United States Brewer's Association. 

University of Chicago Libraries, The. 

Uwivertsiy of Cincinnati Record, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo. 

University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 

University of Illinois Library, Urbana, III. 

University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn. 

University of North Dakota, University, N. D. 

Upton, George P. 

Van Der Cook, H. R. 

Van Pelt, George H. 

Vermont State Library, Montpelier, Vt. 

Virginia State Library, Richmond, Va. 

Von Frantzius, Fritz. 

Walker, Henry H. 

Washburn-Crosby Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Washington State Historical Society, Tacoma, Wash. 

Washington University State Historical Society, 

Seattle, Wash. 
Wasson, Rev. E. A., Newark, N. J. 
Watriss, a. W. 
Weed, A. E. 

West Chicago Park Commissioners. 
West End Women's Club. 

Western Reserve Historical Society, Geveland> Ohio. 
Weyburn, Lewis A., Oak Park, 111. 
Wilbur, Miss Alice E., Waukegan, 111. 
WiLLARD, Miss Mary F. 
Williams, Mrs. E. M., Notthfieid, Minn. 
Williamson, Mrs. Charles S. 
Willis, Charles, Milwaukee, Wis. 
WiNSLOW, Chas. S., Evanston, 111. 
WiTKowsKY, Mrs. Conrad. 
WooLLEY, Mrs. Erving Y. 
Yale Ukiversity Library, New Haven, Conn. 
Yale University Press, New Haven, Conn. 
Yates, Frank E. 



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