(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A check-list of plants mentioned in the Arnold Arboretum bulletins"

LANDSCAPE 
ARCHITECTVRE 

A QVARTERLY 



COVNTRY PLANNING 
TOWN PLANNING 

ESTATE PLANNING 






OCTOBER -1919 




reasons why HICKS EVERGREENS 
are ^varantccd to grow 



ROOT ^UN^D 




THEY have food mota and good rooU are the 
firm con»iiloratlon in buying Evergreens. 
Tlic only way to Ket good roott ii to toot- 

prunr :ind trmBplant. This ml only lnrr<^«^ii the 
nii: .11 rootB but !:■ .illrr 

nil' II a ainaller i l'>'*t 

in 'I ' iie tree on t.. ...ot- 

pruncO; that on the left has net. 



4FK 




DUG an J PACKED l^IGHT 





THE second consideration is carefully dug trees. Evergreens that are dug right and that reach 
the customer with a ball of soil that is compact and intact the way we send them, are pretty 
sure to thrive. 

The larger-sized trees are packed with a conical shaped canvas lashed and cross lashed about 
the ball of soU that is held firmly to a wooden platform. 

This is our own invention. Whether they remain in transit one day. ten days or longer makes 
little difference. Smaller trees with fibrous roots have the usual burlap sewed on. 



ADAPTED TO CLIMATE 




I 




EVERGREENS must stand not only the cold of winter but the 
heat of summer. We offer only species that will stand severe 
variation in temperature and wc have gone to the ends of the earth 
to get them. They come from Kew England, Rocky Mountains in 
Colorado, mountains of Northern Japan, Korea, Manchuria, Southern 
Siberia, the Caucasus Mountains and the Balkan Peninsula. 

J HICKS NURSERIES, Westbury, L.I., N.Y. 



-JO 

■So 



i 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

A QUARTERLY MAGAZINE 

Country Planning — Town Planning — Estate Planning 
Official Organ of the American Society of Landscape Architects 

Vol. X OCTOBER, 1919 No. 1 



CONTENTS 

Page 

A Check-List of Plants Mentioneei in the Arnold Arboretum 

Bulletins i 

Compiled by CHARLES DOWNING LAY 
and ROBKRT WHEELWRIGHT 

Hook Reviews ......... 54 



' Library 

NEW YORK 
BOTANICAL 



PUBLISHKD QUARTERLY BY 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE, Inc. 

Crescent & Mulberry Sts., Harrisburg, Pa. 
EDITED BY 

CHARLES DOWNING LAY, Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects 
HENRY VINCENT HUBBARD, Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects; 

Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Harvard University 
ROBERT WHEELWRIGHT, Member of the American Society of Landscape Architects 
THEODORA KIMBALL, Associate Member of the American Society of Landscape Architects; 

Librarian, Harvard School of Landscape Architecture; Contributing Editor 



50 CENTS A COPY. $2.00 A YEAR 
Editorial Office 15 East 40th Street, New York City 



Copyright, igig, by Charles Downing Lay. Entered as second-class matter, October 3, 1910. at the Post Office al 
Harrisburg, Pa., under Act of Congress of March 3, 187Q 



x-v: 



niOMAS B. MEEIIAN CO. 

Wholesale JSurseryinen 
DRKSHKR, PENNSYLVANIA 



There are nurseries AND nurseries, hut it is worth 

keeping in mind THI*", nursery that can fill ycnir 
orders complete and with ever>- care in the digging, 
handling and shipping, by personal super\-ision and 
years ot experience. 

The MEEHAN NURSERIES have been estab- 
lished over halt a century. 

Neiv Fall Jf^holesale Catalogue 
Ready Now 



Landscape Architecture 

A QUARTERLY MAGAZINE 
Official Organ of the American Society of Landscape Architects 

Vol. X OCTOBER, 1919 No. i 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS MENTIONED IN 
THE ARNOLD ARBORETUM BULLETINS 

IN OCTOBER, 1914, we published a list of plants mentioned in 
the Bulletins of Popular Information issued by the Arnold Arbore- 
tum up to that time. 

The present list includes almost all plants mentioned in the Bulletins 
from their beginning, on May 2, 191 1, to the last number issued July 
26, 1919. The list of October, 1914, is, of course, entirely revised, 
corrected to date, and incorporated in this list. 

Mr. E. H. Wilson, Assistant Director of the Arnold Arboretum, 
has read this list in proof. For this kindness we wish to express our 
thanks and our appreciation of the moral support implied. 

We who have worked on this list (and the work has not been easy) 
are again impressed by the value ot the work being done by the Arbore- 
tum; in the introduction and testing of new varieties from different 
parts of the world; in rescuing from oblivion many native plants of 
limited distribution; in testing and pointing out the most valuable 
varieties of common plants for garden use; and in fostering our inherited 
love for plants as part of the natural landscape. It is a work which 
must constantly increase in value as the trees and shrubs planted there 
grow older and show their value or lack of value more clearly. 

CHARLES DOWNING LAY 
ROBERT WHEELWRIGHT 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Size Naue Time or Flowceimg Habitat KtHMEi 

j-3' — Abclia Rrandiflora Oct. China FIs. axillary, pink, tubular; Ivs. 

(A.chincnsis X A.uniflora) dark green, lasting; rock-garden. 

4-6' — A. lOnglcriana China Large fls.; strong-growing; hardy. 

T. — Abies amabilis N. A Handsome young tree. 

T. — A. balsamea N. E. A Short lived in cultivation. 

I).^ var. Hudsonica Very dwarf; not attractive. 

A. brachyphylla (sec A. homolepis). 

T. — A. cephalonica S. E. Europe. . . 

var, Apollinis Greece Winter-killed 1917-18. 

T. — A. cilicica Asia Minor. . . . Promising. 

T. — A. concolor Colorado Fast growing; hardy; best (or 

New England. 

var. Lowiana California Hardy but less desirable than 

Colorado form. 

T. — A. Fraseri N. E. A In cultivation short lived. 

T. — A. grandis N.E.A Handsome young tree. 

A. Hudsonica (see A. balsamea, var. Hudsonica). 

T. — A. holophylla Korea Grows rapidly. So hardy it 

promises to rival A. homolepis. 

T. — A. homolepis Japan As handsome and promising as 

A. concolor. 

T. — var. imibellata Japan Green cones. Lighterlvs. than type. 

D. — A. lasiocarpa Rocky Mts Dwarf form; short lived; of no 

value ornamentally. 
A. Lowiana (see A. concolor, var. Lowiana). 

T. — A. magnifica Calif., Sierra 

Nevada Killed 1917-18. 

T. — A. nobilis N. W. A Just keeps alive as nearly pros- 
trate shrub in .Arboretum, 
though they are handsome 30- 
ft. specimens in North Mass. 

T. — A. Nordmanniana Caucasus Hardy. 

T. — A. Picea (alba) Central Europe 

D. — var Dwarf form. 

T. — A. Pinsapo Spain Winter-killed 1917-18. 

T. — A. sibirica Siberia Short lived; of no value. 

T. — A. Veitchii Japan Handsome. Doubt longeWty. 

T. — Acanthopanax ricinifolium . July Japan-Korea... Small white fls. in flat clusters; 

palmately lobed dark Ivs.; 
shining black fruits; large tree. 
S. — A. sessiliflorum E.Siberia Frt. shiny, black; clusters con- 
spicuous in winter. 

T. — Acer capillipes Japan Green- and white-striped bark; 

A. diabolicum Japan (has not grown well. 

var. purpurascens Fls. cup-shaped, bright red. 

12' — A. ginnala April E.Siberia Fls. pale yellow, fragrant; Ivs. 

drop early; A. C. brilliant scarlet. 

T. — A. griseum C. China Bark reddish brown, lustrous; 

young Ivs. red. 

T. — A. Henryi China \ t,-;i,„j ,0 

T. \ 1 ■/ !• r'U- > KiUed 1Q17— 18. 

T. — A. longifolium China ) ^ ' 

T. — A. mandshuricum Siberia Large tree. Perfectly hardy. 

100' — A. platanoides April Europe Bright yellow fls. before the Ivs.; 

A. C. clear yellow. 

T. — var. columnare Pyramidal, erect branches. 

T. — var. cucullatum Abnormal Ivs. 

S. — var. globosum Dwarf shrub; one of the most 

valuable of all dwarf maples. 

S. — var. nanum Pyramidal; dwarf, attractive, use- 

T. — var. laciniatum Abnormal Ivs. [ful for gardens. 

T. —Tree. D. =Dwarf. S. =Shrub. V. =Vine. Heavy-face type =ETergreen. A. C.=Aatiuim Coloiiag 

♦One of best of species or varieties. 
"Weevil" indicates Conifer is most subject to attack of the white pine weevil. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



Size 

T.- 
T.- 
T.- 
T.- 



T.- 
T. 



T- 

S.- 

T.- 
T- 

T- 
S- 

S.- 

5-6'- 



Name Tiue of Flowering Habitat 

Acer platanoides 

var. palmatum 

var. Schwedleri 

var. StoUii 

-A. rubrum March N. A 

A. rufinerve 
A. saccharum 

var. monumentale 

-A. spicatum April N. A 



-A. tataricum April Europe and Asia 



-A. truncatum N. China 

-iEscuIus arguta Okla. and Texas 

JE. austrina (see JE. discolor, var. mollis.) 
-JE. Bushii Arkansas 

{JE. glabra X M. discolor, var. mollis?) 
■JE. carnea Europe 

{JE. Hippocastanum X JE. Pavia) 



var. Briotii 
-M. discolor 



var. mollis June 

-JE. georgiana June 



Georgia, Alabama 
and South. . . 



Central Georgia 



T.—JE. glabra May U. S. 



T — 

T.— 

S.- 



var. Buckleyi. 



var. leucodermis 

-JE. Harbinsonii 

{JE. georgiana X JE. discolor, var. mollis?) 
-JE. Hippocastanum 



W. Missouri. 
Mo. and Ark. 



var. Baumannii (fl.-pl.) 

var. incisa 

var. laciniata 

var. pyramidalis 

var. umbraculifera. . . 

var. variegata 

iE. humilis June Europe. 



Remarks 

Abnormal Ivs. 
Purple Ivs. 

Better than Schwedleri. 
Earliest to change color. 



Columnar. 

Shrub or small tree. Fls. yellow, in 
long, erect racemes. 

Small tree or large shrub. Fls. 
white, erect clusters; scarlet 
wings of fruit in summer, re- 
maining long. 

Small tree. Hardy. 

Yellow fls.; small shrub. 

Perhaps rarest flowering tree in 

Arboretum. 
Similar to JE. Hippocastanum; 

blooms later. In nurseries called 

JE. rubicunda. 
Fls. handsomer and darker colored. 

Fls. red calyx, yellow petals. 

Fls. scarlet. Beautiful shrub or 
small tree. 

Large red and yellow fls. in short 
compact clusters; broad round- 
topped; good garden plant. 

Fls. pale yellow. Ohio Buckeye. 
Earliest of American species to 
fl. Occasional bright red A. C. 

Seven instead of five leaflets; 
not otherwise different. 

Pale bark. 

Fls. red and yellow. Lvs. open 
late. Good garden plant. 

Noblest of exotic trees; needs 
deep, rich soil; few trees suffer 
more from city conditions. 



D. 

S. 
D. 

T. — JE. octandra 



JE. hybrida 

{JE. octandra X JE. Pavia). 
JE. Michauxii June Europe. 



E. States. 



T.—^. Pavia S. States. 

var. atrosanguinea 

var. Whittleyi 

6' — JE. parviflora S. States . 



All horticultural curiosities of 
no interest to general planter. 



Dwarf; fls. yellow and red; at- 
tractive and useful. 

Many forms. Fls. of different shades 
of red; valuable garden plant. 

Dwarf; fls. yellow and red; at- 
tractive and useful. 

Valuable ornamental tree; differs 
from JE. glabra in absence of 
prickles on fruit. 

Not yet established. 

Flowers freely. 

Flowers freely. 

Fls. white, in long, narrow erect 
spikes; rarely over 6' high but 
sometimes 20 ft. or more in di- 
ameter. Perfectly hardy. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Sue Naue 

D. — ^sculus rosea nana. 



Tiue or Flowcbino Habitat 



M. rubicunda (sec /E. carnea) 
iE. turbinata 



JS.. versicolor (see JE. hybrida) 
T.— Ailanthus 



V. — Akebia lobata. 



Japan. 

Asia. . . 
Japan. 



V. — A. quinata Japan. 



T. — Alnus glutinosa Europe. 

60-70' — A. hirsuta April Japan. . 



T. — Amelanchier alnifolia N. W. Coast. . . 

S. — A. Bartramiana N. E. N. A 



T. — A. canadensis May 



Wests. States. 



A. humilis. 
T.— A. Isvis May N. A. 

S. — A. oblongifolia May N. A. 



3-4'- 



-A. obovalis May N. A 

A. pumila 

A. sanguinea. 

A. spicata. 

A. stolonifera 
-Amorpha canescens July Middle West. 



V. — Ampelopsis megalophyDa 

Ampelopsis (see Parthenocissus) 
3-4' — Andromeda (see Lyonia and Pieris). 

D. — A. glaucophylla 

D. — A. polifolia 

T. — Aralia chinensis Asia 

T. — var. glabrescens Japan 

T. — var. mandshurica Manchuria. 

30' — A. spinosa N. A 



V. — Arctostaphylos Uva-ursi. 
8' — Aronia arbutifolia 



N. A. 

N. A. 



RtMAIU 

Dwarf; fls. yellow and red; at- 
tractive and useful. 

Closely related to Grecian tree. 
Fls. less showy, white with 
scarlet markings. Promises to 
be valuable. 

Most generally useful of Urge 

deciduous exotic trees. 
Fls. small, purple. Frt. edible, 

rarely produced here. 3 leaflets; 

bronze .\. C. 
Slender and graceful vine; Ivs. 

stay green very late. 

Large tree. 
Medium size; shapely tree; smooth 
pale bark; large dark green Ivs. 

Small shrub of swamfis and bogs. 
Solitary fls. 

Larger than A. Isevis; easily dis- 
tinguished by coat of fine down 
which covers the lower surface 
of the Ivs. which are first sil- 
very, never red. 

Easily distinguished by red color 
of unfolding Ivs. 

Always shrubby; border of 
swamps; gray color of unfold- 
ing Ivs., thickly covered with 
silky hairs. 



Fls. small, violet, crowded in 

clustered terminal spikes; Ivs. 

and stems whitened with hoary 

down. 
20-30' long; large di\nded Ivs. 

often more than 3' in diameter. 



) Swamp plants; can be grown in 
I dry soil. 
Resembles A. spinosa. 
Lvs. pale underneath. 

Fls. small, white, in twice com- 
pound panicles 3-4' long Black 
frt. ripe in Oct. Xot always 
hardy in N. E. 

Evergreen carpet plant. Frt. 
bright red; excellent for poor 
soil. 

Tall, slender, irregular. Frt. scar- 
let, remaining well into winter; 
scarlet A. C; showiest of all 
N. A. shrubs. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



Size Name 

lo' — Aronia atropurpurea . 

12-18' — A. melanocarpa , 



Time 



OF Flowering Habitat 
N. A 



Remarks 
Tall, erect shrub. Frt. dark 
vinous red, ripens and falls 
early. Orange and red A. C. 



6-10'- 
6—10'- 

T.- 
lo-is'- 



var. elata 

var. grandifolia 

Azalea (see Rhododendron). 

-Asimina triloba 

-Benzoin aestivale 



-B. obtusilobum 



Stems spreading into 

a broad mat. 
More common. 
Broader Ivs. 



Fruit 

black 

and 

lustrous. 



S. U. S. A 

April N. A 



Berberis (see Mahonia). 
D. — B. diaphana 



S. — B. dictyophylla. 



S.- 

S.- 



S.- 

s.- 



s.- 
s.- 

s.- 
s.- 
s.- 
s.- 
s.- 
s.- 

D.- 

s.- 
s.- 
s.- 

T.- 
T.- 

T.- 
T.- 
T.- 



-B. Gagnepainii. 
-B. Julianse .... 



-B. Neubertii 

(B. vulgaris X B. aquifoli 

-B. Poiretii 

-B. Regeliana 



um) 



-B. Sargentiana. 
-B. Sieboldii. . . . 



-B. sinensis. 
-B. Thunbergii. 

var. microphylla. 

var. Maximowiczii. 

-B. triacanthophota 

-B. Vernae 

-B. verruculosa 



May 
June 



-B. vulgaris 

-B. Wilsonae 

var. Stapfiana. 

-Betula pendula 

var. dalecarlica. 



var. gracilis. . 

var. Youngii. 

-B. Maximowiczii. 



S. — Buddleia Davidil (variabilis) 



Now established in Arboretum. 
Fls. yellow. Frt. bright red, 
small. Lvs. fragrant, uninjured 
by insects; bright yellow A. C. 

Japan One of rarest plants in Arboretum. 

A. C. gold. 

China Exceptional value. Low, round 

shrub. Fls. solitary, pale yel- 
low. Frt. red, large. A. C. 
brilliant. 

China Tall shrub; slender erect stems. 

Frt. red. Lvs. small, shiny, 
light green above, silver white 
below; upper side of lvs. turns 
scarlet; perfectly hardy. 

Tall, yellow-gray branches. 

Tall, pale branches. Frt. blue- 
black. Lvs. dark, shining. 

Moderate size, broad-topped 

shrub. Lvs. large, dark, last 
through November. 

Japan Called Hakodate. Medium size; 

Fls. large, pale yellow in long 
clusters. Frt. showy; large, 
thick lvs.; A. C. orange and red. 
Tender. 

Japan Lvs. hardly surpassed in bright- 
ness of scarlet. 



Larger than the type. 

China Injured 1917-18. 

China Attractive. Fls. light yellow. 

China Dwarf, spreading. Fls. yellow. 

Frt. black. Tender. 

Europe None more useful. 

China Rather tender. 

Considered hardier, injured 191 7- 

18. 

Europe Slender, pendulous branches. 

Cut-leaved, weeping. Insects have 

killed it oft. 

Pendulous. Lvs. deeply divided. 

Another pendulous form. 

N. Japan Handsomer than B. papyrifera. 

Pinkish bark. 
Fls. small, purple, fragrant. Not 

perfectly hardy but fls. on new 

wood. One of the most useful of 

recent discoveries. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Sizi Nauk I'iuk or Flowxrino Habitat 
S. — Buxus microphylla, var. japonica Japan 



S- 
S- 

S.- 



-B. sempervirens. 

-Callicarpa amcricana. . 



N. A. 



D— ' 



D.- 
D. 
D.- 
D. 
D." 
D.- 
D. 

D.- 

D.- 



C. japonica August Japan and Korea 

Calluna vulgaiis Europe 



var. alba 

var. alba minor. . 
var. alba rigida. . 
var. alba Scarlei. 
var. alba tenella. 

var. Alportii 

var. hypnoides. . , 



var. rubra 

var. toraentosa. 



S. — Caragana Maximo wicziana. June N. China. 



T. — Carpinus Betulus. 

T. — var. pendula 

T. — var. pendula Derva:sii. 



T. — Castanea crenata. 



T." 
T.- 
S.- 
T.- 
S.- 
T.- 



S." 
T.- 
T.- 
T." 
T.- 



-C. Hcnrj-i 

-C. molUssima 

-C. pumila 

-Catalpa bignonioides . 

var. nana 

-C. Bungei 



Japan. 



W. China. 
China. . . . 

N. A 

U. S. A... 



China. 



-C. Bungei (see C. bignonioides, var. nana). 

-C. Duclou.\ii W. China 

-C. Fargesii W. China 

-C. Kaempferi (see C. ovata). 

-C. ovata Cent, and W. 

China 



T.— C. 



speciosa. 



N. A. 



T.— C. Teasii July 

(C. ovata X C. bignonioides) 
2-3' — Ceanothus americanus July 



S. — C. Fendleri 

2-3' — C. ovatus June 



E. U. S. A. 



Rocky Mts... 
E. U. S. A.. . 



RruAKi 
Shrub of rather open habit. Lvt. 
small, yellow-green. The only 
really hardy box. 

Axillary clusters of violet frti. 
Not hardy here. 

FIs. small, pink, not conspicuoui. 
Frt. violet. Smaller than Am- 
erican species; hardy; desirable. 

Plant in well-drained, sandy soil, 
fully exposed to sun. Perfectly 
hardy, spreads into masses. 
Remains in fl. 2-3 months. 

FIs. white. 

Dwarfer than var. alba. 

FIs. white. 

Tall-growing. FIs. white. 

FIs. white 

Tall-growing. FIs. crimson. 

Very compact, small-lvd. FIs. 
purple, sparse. 

Dwarf, compact. FIs. crimson. 

Compact. FIs. red. Lvs. gray- 
green. 

Slender, wide-spreading, arching 
and spiny stems. FIs. canary- 
yellow, abundant. 

Not particularly pendulous. 

Handsomer plant than var. pen- 
dula. 

Hardy but does not grow par- 
ticularly well. 

Noble tree. 

A tree of good promise. 

Not immune to disease. 

C. Bungei of nurseries. 
FIs. white, in small clusters. Lvs. 
dark. Probably of slight value. 

Injured 191 7-18. 

Seems hardy. 
Seems hardy. 

Small tree. FIs. small, light yel- 
low, in profusion. Hardier than 
either American species but 
inferior. 

Handsomest of all catalpas and 
a fast-growing desirable orna- 
mental. 

Hardy; fast-growing. Enormous 
fl. clusters. 

Broad shrub. FIs. white in dense 
clusters. Valuable for natural- 
ization. Many hybrids between 
this and Californian varieties 
raised in Europe only one of 
which is hardy in .\rboretum. 

Only hardy western species. 

Varies chiefly from C. americanus 
in shape of lvs. 



A CHECK-LIST 


OF 


PLANTS 


7 


Size 


Name Time 


; OF Flowering H.^bitat 


Remarks 


T 


— Cedrus atlantica glauca. . . . 
— Celastrus articulatus 






Winter killed 1917-18. 
Frt. in axillary clusters. 


V. 




Japan 


v.- 


— C. flagellaris 




N. E. Asia 


Hardy; little value. 


V. 


— C. scandens 




N. A 




T. 


— Cercidiphyllum japonicum. 


May 


Japan 


Very hardy and generally satis- 
factory tree in E. Mass. Fls. 
inconspicuous. Unfolding Ivs. 
red. 


T. 


— var. chinense 

— Cercis canadensis 


May 


China 




5°'- 


N. A 




T- 


— var. alba 

— C. chinensis 






Fls. white. 


5°'- 


China 


Fls. more beautiful and larger 










than C. canadensis. 


T.- 


— C. reniformis 




Texas 


Branches often winter-killed. 


S.- 


— Chaenomeles lagenaria 


May 


China 


Better known as Pyrus japonica. 


s.- 


— C. japonica 




Japan 


Japanese Quince. 


D.- 


— var. Maulei 




Japan 


Lo%v spreading. Fls. crimson to 
white. Well suited for rock- 
garden, low banks, etc. 


T.- 


— Chamsecyparis pisifera ar- 










gentea 




Japan 


Attractive small plant. 


T.- 


— C. thyoides 




N. A 


White Cedar. Injured 19x7-18. 


D.- 








Dwarf, compact, pyramidal ha- 
bit. Red in winter. 










D.- 


— var. leptoclada 

— C. obtusa 






Dwarf; bluish green. 


T.- 




Japan 


D.- 


— var. nana 






Best variety. 


2-3'- 


— Chamaedaphne calyculata. . 




N. A 


Low, much-branched shrub. Fls. 
white. Lvs small. Does well 
in dry garden soil. 


T.- 


— Chionanthus retusa 




China 


Less attractive than C. virginica; 
of comparatively little interest. 


T.- 
















C. tinctoria. 


V.- 


—Clematis apiifolia 




Japan 


Hardy, fast-growing, free-bloom- 
ing 
Rapid grower. In appearance like 


V.- 


— C. dioscoreifolia 




Quelpaert Is. . . 



V.- 
V.- 

s.- 
s.- 



-C. paniculata Japan 

-C. tangutica W. China 

-Clethra acuminata July S. Appalachian. 

-C. alnifolia July Maine to Florida 

-C. barbinervis July Japan 



S.— I 

V.- 
S.- 



C. canescens (see C. barbinervis). 

C. tomentosa July Florida. 



-Cocculus trilobus Japan .... 

-Colutea arborescens July S. Europe. 



C. paniculata. Fls. fragrant, 
larger and sho^vier, blooms later 
and lasts till mid-October. Lvs. 
thicker. Unusually hardy. 

Fls. small. Frt. showy and per- 
sistent. 

Hardy. Fls. vase-shaped, bright 
clear yellow. Frt. showy. 

Fls. yellowish white, drooping 
clusters. Lvs. dull. Not as 
desirable as C. alnifolia. 

Perhaps the most beautiful sum- 
mer-Sowering shrub of New 
England. 

Blooms 2 weeks earlier and is a 
larger plant than C. alnifolia. 
Fls. less fragrant. 

White hairs on underside of lvs. 

Fls. 2-3 weeks later than C. 

alnifolia. Hardy. 
Holds its bright green lvs. late in 

fall. 
Fls. bright yellow. Inflated pods 

tinged with rose-color. 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Sue 
S.- 



s.- 
s.- 
s.- 



Naue Tiuk or Floweiimo Haditat 
-Colutca cilicica July Asia Minor. . 

-C. orlentalis July 



-Cornus alba June Europe. 

var. Rosenthalii 

-C. Amomum N. A. . . 



40' S.- 

S.- 

S.- 

S.- 

60'- 

S.- 
T.- 

T.— 



-C. Arnoldiana A. Arboretum 

(C. raccmosa X C. obliqua) 

-C. asperifolia July S. U. S. A 

-C. Baileyi 

-C. candidissima (see C. raccmosa). 

-C. cirtinata (see C. rugosa). 

-C. controversa W. China 



-C. f cmina July , 

-C. florida 



var. pendula 

C. kousa 



S. U. S. A 



Japan and 
China 



S.- 
60-70'- 

S.- 
6'- 

S.- 



-C. mas March Europe and W. 

Siberia 



-C. Nuttallii. 



-C. obliqua 

C. paniculata (see C. racemosa). 
-C. paucinervis July 

-C. racemosa July 

-C. rugosa 



Pacific States. 

U. S. A 

Central China. 
U.S. A 

U.S. A 



S.- 
S.- 
S.- 

s.- 
s.- 



4-5'- 
S." 



-C. sanguinea S. Europe . . . 

-C. stolonifera E. N. A 

var. flaviramea 

-Coronilla Emerus S. E. Europe. 

-Corylopsis Gotoana Japan 



C. pauciflora Japan. 

-C. spicata April Japan. 



-C. Veitchiana April 



China. 



S.— C. WillmottisE 



China. 



KruAiK* 
Fls. bright yellow. Inflated pods 

tinged with rose-color. 
Fls. sulphur or orange-red. Pods 
more ornamental than fls. 

Promises well. 

Fls. small, white. Not satis- 
factory unless it has plenty of 
room; needs circle of 25 feel. 
Frt. bright blue in autumn. 
Purple stems. 

Fl. clusters handsomer than those 
of its parents: bears little fruit. 

Tall, broad shrub. Frt. white. 

Frts. ripe in July. 



Lvs. alternate. Spreading branches. 
Promises to be valuable. 

Not native in Arboretum. Not 
so handsome as C. Nuttallii. 

No especial value. 

Hardy. Small tree. Fls. abun- 
dant, bracts larger, more 
pointed, not so white as C. 
florida and fls. 3-4 weeks later. 

Fls. bright yellow, in dense clus- 
ters. Foliage good. Frt. bright 
scarlet, lustrous. 

Involucres nearly twice the size 
of C. florida. Difficult to keep 
alive outside its native damp 
woods. Never succeeded in 
Arboretum. 

Fls. white. Frt. black. Trifle 

tender. 
Round-headed; fls. freely, creamy 

white. Frt. white. Lvs. turn 

dark red. 
One of best native dogwoods; 

Fls. creamy white. Frt. pale 

blue. Lvs. large. Green bran- 

chlets. Difficult to transplant; 

spreads into broad thickets. 
Small flat fl. clusters. Frt. black. 
Frt. white. [Red branches. 

Frt. yellow. 

Holds its lvs. late; rather tender. 
Hardiest. Promises to become 

popular. 

Spreading branches. Fls. yellow, 

in spikes. 
Fls. primrose-yellow, in short 

pendulous racemes before lvs. 

Important addition. Killed to 

ground igi7-i8. 
Fls. or buds apt to be destroyed 

by cold in X. E. This also true of 

C. Veitchiana. Killed to ground 

1917-18. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



Size 
80'- 

S.- 

30'- 

s- 

D.- 



Naue 
-Corylus chinensis. . , 



Time of Flowering Habitat 
China 



-Cotinus Coggygria. 
-C. americanus 



-Cotoneaster acutifolia. 
var. villosula 



D. — C. adpressa. 



S.- 
D.- 

S.- 
S.- 
S.- 



s.- 
s.- 



-C. ambigua 

-C. apiculata 

C. buUata 

var. macrophylla , 
var. floribunda. . . 

-C. Dielsiana 



S . Europe, 
China 

Alabama and 
Missouri 



China. . 
Thibet. 



China. 



China. 
China. 



var. elegans. 
-C. divaricata. . . . 



S. — C. foveolata. 



S.- 
1-2'- 

D.- 
D.- 

S.- 

D.- 

S.- 

S.- 

s.- 

s.- 
s.- 



s.- 
s.- 

T.- 
T.- 



40- 
T.- 



-C. Franchetii. . 
-C. horizontalis. 



var. perpusilla. 

var. Wilsonii. . 

-C. hupehensis 



China. . . . 
China. . . . 
W. China. 



China.... 
W. China. 



W. China. 

China. . . . 
W. China, 



China. ... 
China. . . . 
W. China. 



-C. microphylla 

-C. moupinensis W. China. 



-C. multiflora, var. calocarpa. June 
-C. nitens 



China. 
China. 



-C. racemiflora China. 

var. soongarica June China. 



-C. Zabelii 

var. miniata. . 
-Cratsgus apposita 
-C. aprica 



China. 
China. 



S. U. S. A. 



-C. arkansana May Arkansas. 

-C. Arnoldiana May N. E 



S.— C. Bissellii. 



Remarks 
Promises to become important 
ornamental tree. 



Fls. less conspicuous. Foliage 

larger, lighter color, turns orange 
and scarlet. Perfectly hardy. 

Fls. red. Frt. black. 

Fls. red. Frt. black. Dwarfer, 
more compact than type. 

Dwarfest of all, creeping. Fls. red. 
Frt. red, larger than C. hori- 
zontalis. Lvs. persistent. 

Fls. red. Frt. black. 

Fls. red. Frt. red. Lvs. persistent. 

Fls. red. Frt. red. 

Fls. red. Frt. red. 

Arching stems and branches. Fls. 
red. Frt. red. Lvs. small, 
A. C. reddish purple. One of 
best. 

Fls. red. Frt. red. 

Fls. small, red. Frt. red in great 
abundance. One of best. 

Fls. red. Frt. black. Brilliant 
orange and crimson A. C. This 
and C. moupinensis are tallest. 

Fls. red. Frt. red. Less hardy 
than others. 

Low, spreading, forming mat. Fls. 
red. Frt. red, small. Lvs. dark 
and lustrous, persistent. 

Dwarfer, smaller lvs. than type. 

Taller than type. 

Fls. white, large. Frt. large, scar- 
let. Tall, broad, fast growing. 

Low mat. 

Fls. reddish. Frt. black. A. C. 
brilliant. Tree-like habit. 

Slender, arching stems. Fls. whit^ 
conspicuous. Frt. scarlet. 

Fls. small, red. Frt. black. 
Smaller, more compact than C. 
horizontalis. 

Fls. white. Frt. red. 

Large and vigorous shrub. Fls. 
white. Frt. red, completely 
covering branches. Handsom- 
est of all. 

Fls. red. Frt. red. 

Fls. red. Frt. red. 

Fls. large. Frt. large, dull orange- 
red. Lvs. small. Perfectly 
hardy. 

Long wide-spreading branches. 
Late frt. to end of November.* 

Strong zig-zag branches. Frt. 
scarlet, rarely yellow, ripens in 
August, falls early. 

A. C. good. 



lO 



LAN DSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



SuT. N«yr. Time or Floweiing Habitai 
S. — Craticgus Boyntonii S. Appalachian. 



S.— C. Buckleyi. 
T. — C. Carrierei. 



T. — C. coccinioides. 



S. Appalachian 



St. Louis. 



T. — C. Colorado 

30' — C. cordata S. Appalachian. 



T. — C. Crus-galli. 
S. — C. cuprea. . . . 



S.— C. Delosii.. 

T. — C. Dawsoniana 

T. — C. DouRlasii 

T. — C. durobrivensis. 



20' — C. EUwangeriana. 
T. — C. fecunda 



Toronto 

Puget Sound. 



Missouri. 



S.— C. foetida. . , 
5-6' — C. fructuosa 



West Chester, 

Pa 

S. — C. fruticosa 

S. — C. infera Pennsylvania . . 

S. — C. intricata June U. S. A 

T. — C. macracantha June 



D.— C. modesta N. E. U. S. A. 



T.—C. mollis May Ohio, 111. 



T. — C. monogyna Europe. 

T. — var. pendula 



T. — C. multiflora. 



var. calocarpa 

S. — C. nemoralis 

T. — C. nigra May 



Europe 

30' — C. nitida May Miss. Valley. 



RrHAkKt 

Tree-like. FU. large in few-fld. 

clusters. Frt. yellow-Treen, 

flushed red. Brilliant A. C. 
Tree-like habit. FU. large. Frt. 

large, russet-red. A. C. brilliant. 
Thick-pointed, lustrous Ivs. Frt. 

large, orange-red. Omamentid 

plant of the first class. 
Large, bushy tree. Compact fl.- 

clusters. Frt. red. A. C. orange 

and scarlet. 
Frt. bright red in abundance in 

early September. 
Latest to flower. Lvs. turn orange 

and scarlet. Best in winter. Frt. 

small, scarlet, lasting until 

spring. Washington Thorn.* 
Cockspur Thorn. 
Small shrub, k. C. good. Frt. 

russet or copper. 
Frt. orange and red, large numbers 

in a cluster. 
Frt. black. 
Fls. I in. diam. in many-fid. 

clusters. Frt. dark crimson, lasts 

till midwinter. 
Wide-spreading horizontal bran- 
ches. Frt. large, oblong, falling 

in October. 
Large round-topped tree. Fls. 

small with rose-colored anthers, 

in many-fld. cl usters. Frt. 

abundant, orange-red. Lvs. lus- 
trous. 
Small shrub. FU. and frt. large. 
Frt. deep orange-red in small erect 

clusters. A. C. red-purple. 

Frt. orange-red. A. C. brilliant 
orange and red. 

Dwarf habit. 

Long, stout spines cover branches. 
Would make good hedge. Fls. 
especially showy in large clus- 
ters. Frt. less beautiful than C. 
succulenta. 

Often only 12-18 in. high. Frt. 
green, yellow or orange and red. 
A. C. bright scarlet. 

Large tree. Frt. ripens and falls 
in Sept. 

Weeping form, graceful and worth 
cultivating. 

Tall, slender, wide-spreading. Frt. 
black. Fls. white. 

Fls. larger than tj-pe. 

Small shrub. Fls. and frt. large. 

Fls. large. Frt. black, early ripen- 
ing. 

Wide-spreading branches, lustrous 
foliage. Frt. orange-red, long 
persistent.* 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



II 



Size 



T.- 
S.- 
20'- 
T.- 
T.- 



Name 

Crataegus orientalis 



-C. Oxycantha 
-C. Peckii 
-C. pedicillata. . 
-C. peregrina. . . 
-C. persistens. . 



Time of Flowering Habitat 
S. E. Europe. 



Persia. 



T. — C. pinnatifida. 



N. China, Man- 
churia and 
Korea 



T.— i 

T.- 

T. 

T.- 
T." 
S.- 
T.- 



var. major. 
C. pruinosa 



N. A. 



-C. prunifolia. 
-C. punctata. . 



-C. rivularis 

-C. rotundifolia 

-C. Smithii June 

-C. submollis 



T. — C. succulenta. 



Unknown. . . 

N. E. A 

Rocky Mts. 

N. E. A 

W. Penn.... 
Ill.-Texas. . 



T. — C. tomentosa June 

S.— C. triflora June 

D.— C. uniflora June 



N. E. A.... 



E. N. A.... 
S. U. S. A. 



S.- 

S.- 

2-3'- 



S.- 
D.- 

D.- 
D.- 
D- 
D.- 

D.- 

2'- 

T.- 



-Cytisus capitatus July 

-C. leucanthus 

-C. nigricans July 



-C. purgans 

C. scoparius. 

var. Andreanus co;npactus 



U. S. A. 

Europe. 
Europe. 



Europe. 



-Daphne alpina June 

-D. altaica June 

-D. caucasica June 

-D. Cneorum May 



Alps 

S. Siberia 

Caucasus 

Central Europe 



-D. genkwa May China. . . . 

-D. Mezereum April Europe. . . 

-Davidia involucrata W. China. 



Remarks 
Deeply divided silvery Ivs. Large 
fls. Orange and red frt. 



Ascending and spreading bran- 

Frt. dark purple. [ches. 

Lvs. remain green after all other 
hawthorn lvs. have fallen. Frt. 
crimson, remains late. Excep- 
tional value.* 

Lvs. large, lustrous, deeply 
divided. Fls. large. Frt. scarlet. 

Handsome. Cultivated for its frt. 

in Pekin. 
Lvs. large, blue-green. Fls. large 

with rose-colored anthers. Frt. 

large, bright scarlet, remaining 

late. Few handsomer. 
Compact small tree. Frt. scarlet. 

Lvs. lustrous. A. C. brilliant. 
Large, wide-branched, flat-topped 

tree. Frt. red or yellow. 
Small tree. Frt. black. 



Frt. pear-shaped, ripening and 

falling in Sept. 
Late-flowering. Frt. scarlet, glo- 
bose, on long stems, eagerly 

eaten by birds. 
Type of the group Tomentosse 
Usually 3-fld. clusters. Frt. dull 

red. 
1-2 ft. high. Fls. small, in one- 

rarely two-fld. clusters; no great 

value. 
Small shrub. Fls. yellow. 
Fls. white. 
Low, slender, hardy shrub. Fls. 

yellow in long, erect racemes. 

For this climate one of the best 

plants of its class. 
Seems at home. 

Fls. yellow, dark crimson wings. 
Stems nearly prostrate. Per- 
fectly hardy. 

Fls. white. 

Fls. white, fragrant. 

Fls. white, disagreeable odor. 

Rather capricious as to soil and 
situation. 

Fls. pale lilac. Winter killed 191 7- 
18. 

Fls. fragrant, before lvs. Frt. 
scarlet, showy. 

Medium-sized tree related to our 
Flowering Dogwood, but with 
two large floral bracts in place 
of the four smaller bracts of 
the American tree. 



12 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Size 



S — 



Naue 
Dccodon verticillatus. 



Tiye or Flowkking Habitat 

Maine to 

Florida and 
Louisiana 



S.- 
S.- 

S.- 
D.- 



-Deutzia candelabrum 

(D. Sicboldiana X D. gracilis) 

-D. discolor 

var. major 



-D. globosa. 
-D. gracilis. 



C. China. 
China. . . . 



W. China. 
Japan. . . . 



D. — D. grandiflora June 



N. China. 



S. — D. hypoglauca China. 

S." 
S-6'- 



S.- 

s.- 

s.— 

s.- 
s.- 
s.- 

s.- 
s.- 
s.- 

s.- 
s.- 
s.- 
s.- 



D. kalmixflora 

(D. purpurascens X D. parviflora). 

D. Lemoinei June 

(D. gracilis X D. parviflora). 

var. Avalanche June 

var. Boule de Neige* June 

var. Candelabre June 

var. compacta June 

D. longifolia 

D. magnifica 

(D. \'ilmorinfe X D. scabra). 

D. myriantha 

(D. Lemoinei X D. purpurascens). 

var. Boule Rose June 

var.FleurdePommier June 
D. parviflora 



W. China. 



-D. purpurascens 

-D. reflexa 

-D. rosea 

(D. gracilis X D. purpurascens). 
var. campanulata. . . . June 

var. e.ximia June 

var. floribunda June 

-D. scabra July 



China and 
Mongolia. . . . 



W. China 



KCMAIU 

Water Willow, better known at 
Nctza. Shrub with arching 
stems from 2 to 3 feet long, 
growing only in the wet, often 
submerged, borders of streams 
and ponds where it often spreads 
into broad thickets. FIs. and 
frts. are not conspicuous. Stems 
hanging over the water make an 
interesting and attractive mar- 
gin. A. C. early and bright 
scarlet. 

Graceful drooping branches. FIs. 
white, in elongated clusters. 

FIs. white in clusters. 

FIs. larger than type. More 
vigorous plant. 

Erect stems. FIs. white in clusters. 

FIs pure white, erect or spreading 
racemes. Better in S. Middle 
States than here. 

Distinct; first to bloom. FIs. 
white, in one-to-three-flowered 
clusters. Rare in cultivation. 

Handsome. As hardy as D. parvi- 
flora. FIs. pure white, in clusters. 

FIs. carmine, small compact clus- 
ters. 

Resembles D. gracilis, taller and 
broader. FIs. larger, pure white. 

1 Handsome and more compact 
forms. 

Tall shrub. Sometimes injured by 
Hardy and handsome. [cold. 

FIs. white. 

(Handsome varieties, apparently 
hardy. FIs. tinged rose. 
Large vigorous shrub. FIs. in 

compact, many-fld. corymbs. 
Not hardy. 
Value undetermined. 
FIs. tinged purple. 



FIs. tinged purple more or less. 



D.- 
S.- 



var. candidissima 

var. crenata 

var. plena 

var. Pride of 

Rochester 

var. Watereri. 

-D. Sieboldiana Japan. . . 

-D. VilmorinE C. China 



Japan and China Hardy and generally cultivated. 
FIs. white, tinged rose, erect 
clusters. Lvs. very rough. 

FIs. double, pure white. 

Branches brown. Lvs. less rough. 

FIs. double, tinged rose. 



FIs. tinged rose.* 
FIs. tinged red on outer surface. 
FIs. small, white. Minor value. 
Hardy in sheltered position. 

Graceful, spreading stems. FIs. 

white, loose clusters. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



13 



Size Name Time 
S. — Diervilla florida 

S. — var. venusta 

10-12' — D. japonica 

S. — D. praecox 

var. Avant Garde .... 

var. Conqu^rant 

var. Esp6rance 

var. Fleur de Mai 

var. Floreal 

var. Gracieux 

var. Le Printemps* . . 

var. Seduction 

var. Vestale 

T. — Diospyros virginiana 



S. — Dipelta fioribunda. 
S. — Dirca palustris 



or Flowering Habitat Remarks 

Korea Small shrub; pale pink fls. As a 

garden plant the wild type is 
more desirable than any of its 
progeny. 

Korea Hardy, rapid grower. Fls. rosy 

pink, in clusters, in greatest 
abundance. Earliest to flower.* 

Japan Largest. Fls. rose-color, pale 

yellow, dark red, or nearly 
white on the same branch.* 
Japan Large fls. of a rather disagreeable 



T. — Elaeagnus angustifolia . 



S. — E. longipes July 



S. — Elsholtzia Stauntonii 

S. — Enkianthus campanulatus. 



S. — E. perulatus. .. 
S. — E. subsessilis. . 

V. — Epigsea repens. 
S. — Erica camea. . . 



April 
April 



Fls. pale rose. 

Fls. rose. 

Fls. pink. 

Fls. pink. 

Fls. rose. 

Fls. pink and white. 



Fls. red. 
Fls. white. 
E. N. A. .. 



[purple hue. 



Lemoine hy- 
brids. Hardier 
•and better than 
hybrids com- 
monly grown 
here. 



April U.S.A... 



S. and S. 
Europe, 
Minor, S 
Asia .... 



W. 
Asia 
. W. 



Perfectly hardy, fast-growing 
shapely tree. Lvs. thick and 
leathery, dark green and shin- 
ing above and pale below. Frt. 
does not become sweet and suc- 
culent until after it has been 
touched by the frost. 

China Fls. large and showy, Weigela- 

like. Hardy. 

Valuable for its small but very 
early and abundant yellow fls. 
which appear before the lvs. 
Deserves a conspicuous posi- 
tion in all collections. 

Small tree. Fls. small, pale yellow, 
fragrant, axillary, almost hidden 
by lvs. These are long and 
narrow, like those of some 
Willows, and retainsil very white 
color during the season. 

Japan Fls. and frts. here profusely. Frt. 

hangs gracefully on long slen- 
der stems and is oblong, scar- 
let, lustrous and covered with 
small, white dots; tart and 
rather agreeable flavor; some- 
times used in cooking. 

Fls. rosy pink, in long, erect 
spikes. Lvs. light green. 

Tali shrub. Handsomest of the 
three species. Slender erect 
stems and branches. Fls. light 
yellow or rose-colored. Bright 
scarlet A. C. Garden plant of 
real value. 

Smaller plants. Fls. smaller, 
yellow. Less valuable orna- 
ments of the garden. 

Difficult to cultivate. 

Fls. rosy red. One of the few 
perfectly hardy Heaths. Blooms 
in early spring; one of the first 
of the genus to fl. here. 



Sept. N. E. Asia 



Japan. 



Japan 

Japan 

N. E. A 

Alps of Central 
Europe 



14 



LAN DSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Slit Naiik 
S. — Erica vagans 



Time or Flowminc Habitat 
Europe 



T. — Eucommia ulmoides. 



T. — Euptelea Franchctii 

T. — E. polyandra 



T. — Evodia Henryi. . . 
S. — Evonymus alata. 



China 

Japan, \V. China 
Japan 



W. China. 
E. Asia... 



S. — E. Bungeana 

S. — var. semipersistens. . . 



N. China. 



Probably 
Chinese. 



S. — E. europsea. 



50' — E. lanceifolia. . . . 

E. radicans 
D. — var. acuta. . 

V. — var. vegeta . 



Europe. 



W. China. 

W. China. 

N. Japan. 



V. — var. minima. 
S. — E. yedoensis 



Japan. 

12' — Exochorda Giraldii April China. 



S. — var. Wilsonii. 

S.- 



May 



-E. macrantha 

(E. racemosa X E. Korolkowii). 

S. — E. racemosa (grandiflora) 

T. — Fagus sylvatica 

T. — var. bornyensis 

T. — var. miltonensis 



China.. 
C. Asia. 
China. . . 



KCHAIKS 

Cornish Heath. One of the true 
Heaths which can be grown in 
New England. 

Hardy Rubber Tree. Lv». thick, 
dark, lustrous, 5-6 in. long. 

Promises to succeed. 

Small tree with erect branches 
and pyramidal habit. FIs. open 
before Ivs. Large, conspicuous 
orange-red anthers hanging on 
long slender filaments. L-ess 
desirable and less hardy than 
Cercidiphyllum. 

FIs. small, pink, in small clusters. 
Lvs. dark, lustrous. Aromatic. 

Broad flat-topped shrub of open 
habit. Large, wide-spreading, 
rather compact, shrub with 
branches furnished with broad 
corky ridges. Inconspicuous 
fls. and frts. Habit and unusual 
clear rose A. C. are its chief 
claims. 10-12 ft. in diam. 

Small light pink frt. remains 
several weeks after lvs. fall. 
A. C. pale yellow. 

Broad shrub, 10-12 ft. high, with 
bright green lvs. which do not 
fall until Dec. Frt. inconspicu- 
ous. 

Shrub or small tree. Frt. dull red 
with orange seeds. Lvs. remain 
green till after frt. has colored. 

Promises to be valuable. Bush or 
tree. 

Lies flat on ground. 

Naturally a vine; can be grown 
as low broad bushes. Hardiest, 
handsomest and most desir- 
able of all the forms of this use- 
IvH plant which have been tried 
in the Arboretum. Frt. is pro- 
duced on young plants in great 
abundance. 

Lvs. )i in. long. 

Shrub or small tree. Conspicuous 
for colored lvs. and brilliant 
frts. 

Perfectly hardy plant of first-rate 
importance. Produces larger 
and handsomer fls. than the 
well-known Pearl Bush of gar- 
dens. 

Fls. larger than E. racemosa 
and promises to be better plant. 

More upright growth than E. 
racemosa. 

Fls. white; showy racemes. 

} Erect trunks, horizontal and 
pendulous branches. Hand- 
some trees. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



15 



Size Name 

Fagus sylvatica 
T. — var. pendula . . 



Time of Flowering Habitat 



S. — Forsythia europaea April Albania. 



F. Fortune! (see F. suspensa, var. Fortune!) . 

S. — F. intermedia April 

(F. suspensa X F. viridissima). 



S. — var. pallida April 

S. — var. primulina April 

S. — var. spectabilis April 

S. — F. suspensa 



S. — var. Fortunei 

S. — Fothergilla Gardenii 



China. 



China 

S. E. U. S. A. 



10-12' — F. major S. E. U. S. A. 



S.— F. montana S. E. U. S. A... 

S.— F. monticola S. E. U. S. A... 

T. — Fraxinus americana N. A 

T. — var. subcoriacea Ohio 

T. — F. anomala 

T. — F. Biltmoreana S. Appalachian . 

S. — F. Bungeana N. China 

F. chinensis 
T. — var. rhynchophylla China 



T.— F. cuspidata S. W. U. S.... 

T.— F. dipetala Mts. of Calif.. 

T. — F. excelsior Europe 



T. — var. pendula. 



T.— F. Greggii S. W. U. S... 

T. — F. longicuspis Japan 

T. — F. mandschurica N. E. Asia. . 



T.— F. Ornus S.E.Europe. 



-F. oregona Pacific Coast. 

W.China.... 

U. S. A 



T, — F. Paxiana 

T. — F. pennsylvanica 

T. — var. lanceolata. . . 
T. — F. platypoda 



U. S. A... 
W. China. 



Remarks 

One of most remarkable trees of 
abnormal growth. Wide-spread- 
ing and tent-like. 

Less beautiful than following. 
Rather rigid erect stems and 
branches. 

General name for number of 
hybrids. Handsomer and per- 
haps hardier than parents. 

Fls. pale straw. 

Fls. pale primrose, in crowded 
clusters. 

Fls. deep, bright yellow, in pro- 
fusion.* 

Best suited for draping high 
walls. 

Now most generally used. 

Small plant and a native of the 
coast region. Less hardy than 
the mountain species. 

Fls. small, white, showy terminal 
heads before Ivs. Lvs. resemble 
Hamamelis. A. C. light orange 
and red. Mountain species and 
very hardy.* 

Large, vigorous and very hardy 
shrub. 

Mountain species and very hardy 
here. 

Most valuable for timber. 

Faster grower; handsomer. 

Not entirely hardy. 

Branches densely pubescent. 



Small tree, not particularly 

shapely. 
Not hardy. 
Not hardy. 
One of the most important timber 

trees of world, but this and its 

var. miserable in N. E. 
Grafted standard, forming um- 
brella head. 
Not hardy. 
Shrub or small tree. 
Grows well for few years, then 

fails. 
Small tree. Never successful here. 

All right in Middle Atlantic 

States. 
Large tree in West. Probably 

never wi!I grow large here. 
Some specimens killed 1917-18. 
Smaller than F. americana. Not 

worth growing for shade or 

ornament. 
Not proper for street planting, as 

often used in West. 
Has grown rapidly. Too recently 

planted to judge value. 



i6 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Sue Nauc Time or Fioweumo Habitat 
T. — Fraxinus potamophila Turkestan and 

Songaria 

T. — F. quadrangulata Mississippi 

Valley 

T. — F. rotundifolia S. Europe and 

S. W. Asia... 
T. — F. syriaca 



T. — F. texensis 

D. — Gaultheria procumbens 

D. — Gaylussacia brachycera. . . . 



S. — Genista elata. 
S. — G. germanica. 
S. — G. pilosa. 
S. — G. tinctoria. . 



15' — Halesia tetraptera 

go' — var. monticola 



Halimodendron haloden- June 
dron. 



S. — Hamamelis mollis Feb. 



S. — H. japonica Feb. 



Texas 

N. A 

S. Pa., S. Del., 
S. W. Va 



Europe. 



Europe. 



T. — Ginkgo biloba China. . . 

T. — Gordonia alatamaha Oct. Georgia . 



S. U. S. A. 
S. U. S. A. 



Siberia. 



Cliina. 



Japan. 



S.— H. vernalis Jan. S. Mo. 

S. — H. virginiana Oct. N. A. .. 



Remaeu 

Most promising of exotic Aihe« 
for ornamental tree. 

One of the noblest American 
trees. Prefers limy soil. 

Small tree, graceful drooping 
branches. 

Uninjured for 38 yrs. Killed to 
ground IQ17-18. 

Established in Arboretum. 

Difficult to cultivate. 

Only a few inches high. One of 
the rarest shrubs. Very hardy, 
adapting itself readily to cul- 
tivation. In the Arboretum 
grows as well in full exposure to 
the sun as it does in the shade. 



To admire but not to plant. It 
may become a dangerous weed. 
First planted in Salem, has 
spread through Essex Co. 

This tree is very hardy; it grows 
rapidly; lives to a great age. 
Kernel of frt. delicate flavor. 

Fls. white, resembling Camellia. 
Last tree to bloom. K. C. 
orange and scarlet. Makes 
shrub in sheltered spot in Ar- 
boretum. 

Grows in low altitudes. 

Mountain form. Often free of 
branches to 60'. Fls. larger. 
Frt. twice as large. Ever)' 
reason to believe will prove one 
of the handsomest flg. trees. 

Called Salt-tree because it in- 
habits the saline steppes near 
the river Irtish. Fls. pale rose, 
pea-shaped, fragrant, in great 
abundance, in short clusters. In 
fl. during several weeks. Lvs. are 
clothed with a pale silky down. 

Fls. bright yellow, larger than 
those of the other species, 
remain for weeks in good con- 
dition. Hardy, fast growing. 
A. C. good.* 

Large, Wgorous, and perfectly 
hardy shrub. Two forms, one 
of them blooming a few days 
before the other, about the mid- 
dle of February. Uninjured 
by the severest cold. Excel- 
lent subject to plant in city 
yards. 

Small clusters of fls. with long 
pale yellow strap-shaped petals. 
Fls. seem to cover the branches 
and form one of the most inter- 
esting features. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



17 



Size 
T.- 

S.- 

S.- 



Name 
-Hemiptelea Davidii. 



Time of Flowering Habitat 
N. China. . . . 



S.— 



-Hippophae rhamnoides .... 
-Holodiscus discolor 

Hydrangea arborescens. 

var. grandiflora 



Europe, Cent. 

Asia 

W. of Rocky 

Mts 



U. S. A. 



S. — H. Bretschneideri June 



E. Siberia. 

U. S. A.... 
Japan. 



S. — H. cinerea 

S. — H. paniculata 

var. grandiflora. 

var. praecox July 

var. tardiva. 
V. — H. petiolaris June Japan. 



-H. quercifolia July S. U. S. A. 

-H. radiata U.S.A.... 



S.- 
S.- 
D.- 



-H. xanthoneura June 



var. Setchuenensis . . . June 

var. Wilsonii June 

-Hypericum Buckleyi 



China. 



China 

China 

S. Appalachian 



T.- 

S.- 



S.- 
5-6'- 



-Hex Aquifolium. 
-I. crenata 



Europe. 
Japan . . 



-I. decidua S. States 

-I. glabra N. E. to Texas 



S.— I. laevigata E. U. S. A. 



var. Herveyi 

-I. monticola S. States . 



Reuaees 

Prickly Elm. No value as orna- 
mental. 

Stays green late. Orange-colored, 
persistent frt. on female plant. 

Near relative of the Spireas. 
Long drooping clusters of white 
flowers. 

Hardy, shapely shrub and pro- 
duces large clusters of sterile 
white fls. in profusion. Good 
habit. 

Large, hardy shrub. First of the 
shrubby Hydrangeas to bloom.* 



Fls. early.* 

Best deciduous vine for brick or 
stone walls. Fls. white, broad 
heads. Lvs. bright. Plant on 
N. or E. side of bldg. Best. 

Frequently winter-kills. Lvs. very 
handsome. 

As a foliage plant is the most 
beautiful of the American spe- 
cies. Fls. white, flat heads, ring 
of neutral fls. Lvs. dark, blue- 
green above, silvery below. 

Fl. earliest of all hardy Hydran- 
geas. Resembles H. Bretsch- 
neideri. 



One of the gems of the genus. 
Dwarf plant growing here only 
a few inches high, but spread- 
ing into a broad mat which 
becomes covered with fls. Very 
rare in cultivation. Well suited 
for a sunny position in the rock- 
garden. 

Not hardy in New England. 

Upright growing, sometimes a tall 
tree. After 25 yrs. was killed 
1917-18. 

Frt. red. 

Its compact habit and its shining 
persistent lvs. make it one of 
the very best of the broad- 
leaved evergreen shrubs which 
can be grown in this climate. 
Very hardy, yet slightly in- 
jured 191 7-18. 

Showy, as the frt. is large and 
bright-colored. Easily culti- 
vated. Grows rapidly in ordi- 
nary garden soil. Round- 
headed shrub 8-10 ft. across. 

Yellow-fruited form. 

Deciduous. Red berries. 



i8 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Size Name Time or Floweiimo Haeitat 
T.— Ilexopaca E. U. S. A... 



20' — I. pedunculosa Japan. 

S. — I. scrrata Japan. 



S.— I. verticillata E. U. S. A 

S. — Indigofcra amblyantha. . . . July Cliffs of Hupeh 



S. — I. decora July China and Japan. 



S. — I. Gerardiana July Himalayas 

D. — I. Kirilowii July Manchuria and 

Korea 



3-4' — I. Potaninii June 



T. — Juglans cathayensis. 



N. China. 



Juniperus chinensis 
D. — var. Sargentii. . . 



China. 



Kehaeu 

Only broad-leaved everifreen tree 

which i> hardy in this latitude. 

Largest plants killed 1917-18, 

others survived. 

Frt. red, handsome. Only small 

specimens here. 
Frt. is smaller and less bright- 
colored than that of I. verticil- 
lata. 
Common plant. Round-headed 

shrub &-10 ft. across. 
Slender, erect stems. Fls. small, 
rose, in erect axillary clusters. 
Continues to produce its fl.- 
clusters until Oct. Lvs. smalL 
One of the most beautiful of 
recent introductions. Perfectly 
hardy. 
Large, pure white fls. More beau- 
tiful than I. Gerardiana. Killed 
back to the ground every win- 
ter, but sends up new stems 
and fls. profusely every year. 
Purple fls. Winter-kills but revives. 
Habit and foliage are excellent. 
Low leafy plant which spreads 
into a broad mass. Fls. pure 
pink, lasting several weeks. Ex- 
ceedingly valuable garden 
plant. 
Slender, erect branches. Fls. 
bright rose, in erect, spreading 
racemes, larger than L am- 
blyantha. 
Tree with splendid foliage and 
nuts resembling those of the 
American Butternut. 



J. communis 
D. — var. depressa. 



D. — var. depressa aurea. 

2' — var. montana 

D. — -J. conf erta 



D. — J. horizontalis 

D. — var. Douglasii. 



Korea and 
Japan . . . 

N. E. U. S. A... 



N. Hemisphere. 
Japan 

Maine to British 

Columbia. . . . 

Michigan 



Low, dense mat; 
branches.* 



wide-spreading 



D. — J. procumbens Japan. 

J. Sabina 
D. — var. cupressifolia 



D. — var. tamariscifolia . 

D. — J. squamata 

J. virginiana 
D.— var 



Himalayas 

Coast of Maine. 



Dwarf form. Broad masses of 
stems ascending from prostrate 
base. 

Yellow-tipped branches. 

Most dwarf of prostrate forms. 

Long prostrate stems. Grows in 
sand. 

Procumbent and prostrate stems. 

Lvs. steel-blue, turning purple in 
autumn. Grows on sand-dunes 
of Lake Michigan. 

Wide-spreading, procumbent 

steins. Lvs. blue-green. 

Only a few inches high with small, 

spreading, prostrate stems. 
Vigorous prostrate shrub. 
Prostrate. Frt. dark purple-black. 

A form with branches spreading 
close to the ground. 



A CHECK-LIST 


OF 


PLANTS 


19 


Size Name Time 
Juniperus virginiana 
S. — var. globosa 


OF Flowering Habitat 


Remarks 


S. — var. tripartita 

S. — Kalmia angustifolia 

S. — K. Carolina 

S.— K. latifolia 

S — var. alba 


June 
July" 




well worth a place in collections 
of these dwarfs. 

Low, broad shrub with spreading 
and erect branches forming a 
wide open head. 

Handsome dwarf shrub. Well 
deserves cultivation. 

Dwarf species recently discovered. 
Promises to be hardy. 

For the northern states the most 
valuable of the broad-leaved 
evergreens which can be suc- 
cessfully grown in the open 

Fls. white. [ground. 


U.S. A 

Appalachians. . 
N. A 








D. — var. myrtifoUa 

S. — var. obtusata 




Fls. minute. Dwarf form. 




Fls. rarely. Lvs. like Rhododen- 


S. — var. polypetala 

S. — var. rubra 




dron. 
Corolla divided in narrow lobes. 




Fls. nearly red. Lvs. dark. 


S.— K. polifolia 

S. — var. microphylla 

T. — Koelreuteria paniculata. . . . 


U. S. A 

U. S. A 

China 


Small tree with large, pinnate lvs. 



4-6' — Kolkwitzia amabilis June W. China. 



T. — Laburnum Adamii 

(L. anagyroides X Cytisus purpureus). 

T. — L. alpinum Mts. of 

Europe. . 



Cent. 



20-30' — L. anagyroides 

var. bullatum 

var. pendulum 

var. quercifolium , 

var. semperflorum 

S. — L. caramanicum 

T.— L. Parksii 

(L. anagyroides X L. alpinum). 



L. vulgare (see L. anagyroides). 
T. — Larix americana 



Europe. 



Asia Minor. 



E. N. A., 



E. Siberia. 
Europe. . . . 
Japan 



L. chinensis (see L. Potaninii). 
T. — L. dahurica 

L. decidua 

T. — L. Kaempferi 

L. leptolepis (see L. Kaempferi). 

T. — L. occidentalis W. N. A.. 

T. — L. Potaninii. 

T. — L. sibirica 

S. — Ledum 

D. — Leiophyllum buxifolium 



E. Siberia 

N. A 

Pine barrens N. 
J. &S 



and erect clusters of bright yel- 
low fls. followed by conspicu- 
ous bladder-like frts. Well 
suited to withstand heat and 
drought, as well as cold. 

Fls. rose. Frt. hairy, crimson. 
Hardy and one of most beauti- 
ful recent introductions. 

Fls. dull purple, rarely yellow. 
More curious than beautiful. 

Large shrub or small tree bloom- 
ing about two weeks later than 
L. vulgare. Perfectly hardy. 
Most desirable yellow-fig. large 
shrub in this climate. 

Not very hardy. 

Lvs. curled and contorted. Un- 

Pendulous. [attractive. 

Leaflets sinuately lobed. 

Produces second crop of fls. in 
autumn. 

Small shrub, not hardy. 

Small, hardy tree. Most desirable 
yellow-flg. small tree in this 
climate. 

As ornamental tree most pictur- 
esque of all Larches. 



Most rapid grower. 
Largest of genus. 

Hardy but diflScult to cultivate. 
Hardy but difficult. 



ao 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Sue Name Tii» or FiowctiMO Haiitat 
S. — Leucothoci Catesbsi S. Appalacbiaa. 



S. — L. racemosa S. Appalachian. 

T. — Libocedrus deeurrens Sierra Nev 

S. — Liguslrum amminalum Japan 



S. — L. amurense. 



E. Siberia. 



S. — L. ibota Asia . 



var. Regelianum. 



-L. ovalifolium. 
-L. vulgare 



China. . 
Europe. 



S.- 
T.- 

T.- 
S.- 
S.- 
S.- 
S.- 
S.- 

S.— 



var. f oliolosa 

■Liquidambar formosana Cent. China . . . 

■L. styraciflua U. S. A 

Loiseleuria procumbens White Mts. & N. 

Lonicera Altmannii Cent. Asia 

L. amoena (L. tatarica X L. Korolkowii, var. floribunda) 

L. Arnoldiana (L. tatarica X L. Korolkowii) 

L. bella 

(L. Morrowii X L. tatarica) 
L. csrulea N. Hemisphere 



var. graciliflora. . . 



S. — var. gracilipes 

S. — L. canadensis 

S. — L. chrysantha 



Cent. Asia. 



S. — L. f ragrantissima . 



Turkestan . . 
N. E. N. A. 
E. Siberia. . 



China. 



V. — L. Giraldii June China 

S. — L. gracilipes Japan. 



Kemacu 

One of the hardiest and moit 
desirable of the broad leaved 
evergreen shrubs. It needs 
rather moist soil and a shady 
position. 

Lvs. remain green until Nov. 

Broad shrub with large fl. -clus- 
ters near the ends of the stems. 
Frt. lustrous black like that of 
L. vulgare. 

The branches terminate with large 
fl.-clusters. Pyramidal habit. 
Tall shrub with arect stems 
which form a narrow head. 

Broad shrub sometimes lo ft. 
high, with spreading slightly 
recurved branches, small, dark 
green lvs. which turn purplish 
in autumn. Frt. in short nod- 
ding clusters, purplish black 
with pale bloom. 

Lower and denser shrub. Large 
lvs. Horizontally spreading 
branches which form a broad 
flat-topped head. Seedlings of 
the variety are often identical 
with L. ibota. 

Not perfectly hardy even in S. 
New England. 

Tall, broad, shapely shrub. Fls. 
white, bad-smeIling,covershrub. 
Frt. lustrous, black, very decora- 
tive. Great value in frt. and lvs. 
that are retained in good con- 
dition till winter. Well suited 
for hedge plant. A variety 
with yellow frt. less beautiful. 

Frt. larger. Lvs. narrower. 

Injured every winter. 

Grows as far north as S. Conn. 

Hardy but difficult. 

Red frts. 

i Graceful shrubs. Fls. pink. L\-s. 
silvery. 

Large, \-igorous hybrid. Fls. pale 
yellow. Frt. red, lustrous. 

Fls. small, yellowish. Frt. bright 
blue, ripens early. Attractive 
in habit. 

Slender, \-igorous, beautiful. Fls. 
pale yellow, drooping. 

Slender and graceful. 

Fls. pale yellow. 

One of the most conspicuous of 
the early-flg. species. 

Fls. fragrant, in early spring 
before lvs. appear. Lvs. green 
until Nov. Not perfectly hardy. 

Fls. wine-colored with white fila- 
ments and style. Lvs. long, 
narrow, dark. 

Pink fls. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



11 



Size Name Time of Flowering Habitat 

V. — Lonicera Heckrottii 

(L. sempervdrens X L. italica?) 



v.— L. Henryi. 



China. 



V. — L. hirsuta. 



S. — L. iberica Europe 

L. involucrata 
S. — var. serotina July Rocky Mts. 



L. japonica. 
V. — var. chinensis. 



V. — var. Halliana. 
S. — L. Koehneana 



China. 



Cent. Asia. 



S. — L. Korolkowii 

S. — var. floribunda. 

S. — L. Ledebourii July Pacific Coast. 



S. — L. Maackii Amoor River. . . 



S. — var. podocarpa. 



. . . C. China . 



Cent. Asia. 
S. — L. Morrowii Japan 



S. — L. minutiflora 

(L. tatarica X L. Morrowii). 



Remarks 

Believed to be a hybrid, probably 
of American origin. Fls. 
although not fragrant are very 
beautiful. Outer surface of the 
corolla deep rose; inner surface 
pale yellow. 

Vigorous climbing plant. Has 
preserved its large dark green 
Ivs. through the winter. Long, 
slender stems. Spreads over 
low bushes and rocks. Fls. 
open rose, turn orange-red, in 
axillary clusters. No perfume. 

Eastern American species of 
climbing Honeysuckle. Com- 
pact clusters of bright red frts. 
surrounded by the cups formed 
by the union of the two upper 
Ivs. 

Latest flowering. Pale yellow fls. 

Fls. long, slender, bright yellow, 
tinged with red, and surrounded 
by large, leaf-like dark red cups 
which remain under the large, 
black, lustrous frt. 

More beautiful than Hall's. Dis- 
tinguished by red color of 
young stems and Ivs. 

Large, hardy, vigorous shrub. Fls. 
yellow, tinged red on outside. 
Lvs. thick, yellow-green. Bran- 
chlets dark red-purple. 

Graceful. Fls. pink. Lvs. silvery 
[gray. 

Fls. bright yellow, tinged red, 
surrounded by large leaf-like 
dark red cups which remain 
under large, black, lustrous frt. 
Lvs. green till Nov. 

Tall, narrow shrub. Fls. white and 
largest of any Bush Honey- 
suckle, very handsome. Frt. 
small, bright red, remains till 
winter. Lvs. dark. Hardy. 
Valuable decorative plant. 

Vigorous shrub, wide-spreading 
branches, open habit. Fls. are 
smaller and less beautiful. Frt. 
large, scarlet, lustrous, ripens in 
Oct. Lvs. remain green till Nov. 

Remarkable in the beauty of its 
brilliant, orange-yellow, trans- 
lucent frt.* 

Broad, high bush with wide- 
spreading lower branches cling- 
ing close to the ground. Fls. 
yellow, in profusion. Frt. large, 
orange-red, very showy. Lvs. 
pale blue-green. Requires large 
space. 



12 



LAN DSCA PE ARCHITECTURh 



Size 
S.- 



Nauf. Tiue or FLOwnnco Habitat 

-Loniceni mucndcnicnsis 

(L. tatarica X L. Morrowii). 
-L. multi flora 

(L. micranlha X L. Morrowii). 



-L. muscaviensis 

(L. Morrowii X L. Ruprcchtiana). 
-L. notlia 

(L. tatarica X L- Ruprechtiana). 



S.- 
D. 



-L. orientalis S. E. Europe. 

-L. pileata June China 



v.— L. prolifera E. N. A 



V. — L. prostrata China. 



S.- 

S." 

2-3'- 



v.- 

S.- 



-L. quinquelocularis. 
-L. Ruprechtiana. . . . 
-L. saccata 



China. 



-L. segreziensis 

(L. quinquelocularis X L. xylosteum). 
L. similis. 

var. Delavayi 

-L. Standishii China . 



S. — L. syringantha W. China. 



S.- 

S.- 

lo'- 



S.- 

s.- 

D.- 



var. Wolfii . 
-L. tangutica. . . . 
-L. tatarica 



W. China. 
W. China. 



var. lutea. 

var. rosea. 

-L. thibetica. . . . 



V. — L. tragophylla. 



S. — L. trichosantha. 



VV. China and 

Thibet 

China 



N. and C. China 



S.— L. utahensis N.W.N. A.... 

S. — L. Xylosteum Europe and N. 

Asia 

S. — L. xylosteoides 

(L. tatarica X L. Xylosteum). 
V. — Lycium chinense 



SlKAlU 

Fls. pale yellow. Frt. large, orange- 
red, lustrous. 

Frt. translucent, is perhaps the 
most beautiful of all the Honey- 
suckle frts. 

Large and translucent scarlet frts. 
Fls. yellow. 

Fls. pale pink. Frt. orange-red, 
lustrous. Best planted as iso- 
lated specimen.* 

Frt. is black and lustrous. 

Prostrate stems form a compact 
mat. Fls. small, pale yellow, 
very fragrant. Killed to ground 
1917-18. 

Eastern American spedes of climb- 
ing Honeysuckle. Frt. bright 
red, clusters, surrounded by 
cups formed by union of the two 
upper Ivs. 

Hardy and free-growing, with 
prostrate stems. Fls. small 
white, fade yellow. Frt. orange- 
red. Lvs. small, oval, bluish 
green. 

Fls. large, yellow. Lvs. narrow. 
Fls. pale yellow, not conspicuous. 
Frt. bright scarlet, translucent, 
Fls. white. (showy. 



Killed 1917-18. 

Fls. fragrant, in early spring 
before the lvs. appear. Lvs. 
green until Nov. Not perfectly 
hardy in N. E. 

Graceful arching branches. Fls. 
Niolet, sweet scented. Garden 
plant of real value. 

Fls. purple, in small clusters, 

Fls. pink, small. [fragrant. 

Vigorous, as broad as tall. Fls. 
white, pale yellow, pink, and 
rose. Frt. yellow and red. 

Frt. bright yellow. 

Frt. scarlet. 

A low plant with slender, spread- 
ing branches. 

In habit and general appearance 
resembles the Woodbine of 
Europe. Fls. golden yellow. 

Erect stems. Fls. large, yellow 
and white. Frt. bright red. 

Fls. pale yellow. 

Frt. large, dark crimson, lustrous. 
Lvs. held late. 

Fls. white. Frt. large, red. 

Useful for draping walls. The 
scarlet shining frts. add greatly 
to the autumn beauty of this 
hardy plant. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



23 



Size Name 

Lyonia (see Pieris). 

S. — L. mariana 



Time of Flowering Habitat 



S.— L. ligustrina E. N. A 

T. — Maackia amurensis July E.Siberia... 



T. — M. hupehensis C. China . 

S. — Maddenia hypoleuca May Cliina.... 



T. — Magnolia acuminata. 



E. N. A. 



M. conspicua (see M. denudata). 
T. — M. cordata May Georgia. 



T. — M. denudata. 



T.— M. Fraseri. 



China. 



Appalachian 
Mts 



T.— M. glauca E. U. S. A 



T. — M. grandiflora. ... 

T.— M. Kobus 

T. — var. borealis. 



T.— M. liliflora 

T. — M. macrophylla. 



S. E. U. S. A. 

Japan 

Japan 



China 

S. E. U. S. A. 



T. — M. major 

(M. glauca X M. tripetala). 

T. — M. pyramidata Alabama and 

Florida 



Remarks 

Small shrub. Fls. white, racemose, 
on leafless shoots. Common in 
East. Not particular about soil 
or situation. 

Bright scarlet A. C. 

Every way inferior to its American 
relative, Cladrastis lutea. Red- 
dish bark. Fls. creamy white, 
in erect spikes, inconspicuous. 
Of little ornamental value. 

Hasnot yet fld. here. Growing well. 

Fls. without petals, in short 
clusters. Frt. small, black, 
cherry-like. Related to Choke- 
cherry. 

Fls. small, yellow-green, not very 
conspicuous. Hardy, fast-grow- 
ing tree of rather formal 
pyramidal habit. 

Small round-headed tree. Fls. 
small, cup-shaped, bright 
canary-yellow. 

Yulan Magnolia. One of the 
most beautiful of all early-fig. 
trees. Fls. frequently touched 
by late frost. 

Earliest American species to fl. 
Fls. creamy, sweet-scented, 8- 
10 in. diam. Open habit. Com- 
paratively small tree. Perfectly 
hardy. 

Perfectly hardy, easily cultivated, 
One of the most beautiful of 
the small trees which can be 
successfully grown in this part 
of the United States. Fls. 
white, fragrant. Frt. scarlet, 
handsome.* 

Not hardy. 

Much less valuable ornamental 
plant than the Chinese M. 
conspicua. Large, hardy, fast- 
growing. 

Medium-sized tree, symmetrical 
habit. Fls. often 12 in. wide, 
creamy white marked with 
dark red spot at base, inside. 
Lvs. often 30 in. long. Wide- 
spreading branches forming a 
broad, round-topped head. Per- 
fectly hardy. Plant it in shel- 
tered positions for the lvs. are 
easily torn by the wind. 

A handsome plant with the gen- 
eral appearance of M. glauca. 
Fls. larger, fragrant. Less hardy 
than either parent. 

Not hardy at the North. 



24 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Time or Flowciino Habitat 
Japan 



Size Name 

Magnolia salicifolia 

T. — M. Soulangcana 

(M. conspitua X M. denudata). 
T. — var. Alexandrina 
T. — var. Lcnnei 
T. — var. Norbcrtiana 
T. — var. speciosa 
S. — M. stellata Asia 



M. Thompsoniana (see M. major). 
T.— M. tripetala E. U. S. A.. 



China 

N. W. U.S. A.. 



M. Wilsonii 

S. — Mahonia Aquifolium May 

S. — M. japonica 

S. — M. pinnata 

D. — M. repens S. Rocky Mts. 



T. — Malus, var. pendula 

T.— M. angustifolia S. E. U. S. A. 



T. — M. Arnoldiana 

(M. floribunda X 
T. — M. atrosanguinea. . . . 

(M. floribunda X 
T. — M. baccata 



-). 



May 



Manchuria. 



T.- 



var. Jackii May 



Korea. 



is' — var. mandshurica . 



May 



N. E. Asia. 



T. — M. cerasifera May 

(M. baccata X M. prunifolia?) 

T.— M. coronaria E. U. S. A. . . 

T. — M. Dawsoniana 

(M. fusca X apple tree). 

T. — ^I. florentina ('crataegifolia) 



T. — M. floribunda Asia . 



REMAIEt 

Killed 1917-18. 



Fls. white. Form with pink fls. 
Perfectly hardy, usually free- 
flowering and very desirable 
(shrub. 

Umbrella tree. Fls. large, white, 
fragrant. Lvs. large. 

Killed 191 7-18. (like. 

Fls. yellow. Frt. blue. Lvs. holly. 

I Live but unsatisfactory here. 

Only a few inches high. Lvs. 
lighter green and less lustrous 
than M. Aquifolium. Perfectly 
hardy; promises to be one of the 
best evergreen ground-covers. 

Pendulous form of common .Apple, 
more curious than beautiful. 

Hardy. Last to fl. Fls. deeper pink 
than other American species. 

Fls. pink. Fls. and frt. larger 
than M. floribunda.* 

In brightness of color not sur- 
passed. 

Tall, narrow tree. Fls. white, on 
long, drooping stems. Frt. yel- 
low, not much larger than pea' 
Hardy and handsome tree. 

Fls. pure white, 2 in. diam. Frt. 
deep crimson, lustrous, on long, 
drooping stems. 

Fls. large, white, fragrant. Early 
bloomer. Frt. yellow or red. 

Give good room for development. 

Fls. pure white, fragrant. Frt. 

[globose, dull red. 

Vigorous tree with the peculiar 
oblong yellow frt. of its Ameri- 
can parent. 

Small tree with much-lobed lvs. 
like those of the European 
Hawthorn. Fls. small, white. 
Frt. small, bright red. 

Handsomest and most satis- 
factor>' of all flg. trees. .As it 
reaches maturity it assumes a 
picturesque habit. Broad 
shrub with a trunk di\'ided at 
the base into several large 
stems. Fls. deep rose-color in 
the bud, turn white before the 
petals fall and are produced in 
the greatest profusion. Dark 
green foliage is handsome. Frt. 
yellow or orange, size of peas; 
make little show; devoured by 
birds. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



25 



Size Name Time of Flowering Habitat 
T.— Malus fusca N. W. Coast. . . 

T. — M. glaucescens W. N. Y. and 

Ontario 

T.— M. Halliana China 



Remarks 
Frt. yellow, yellow-green, often 
flushed red, and occasionally red. 



T.— 



var. Parkmanii. 



T. — M. ioensis 

T.— var. Bechtel Crab. 



Miss. Valley. . . 



T. — M. micro malus 

(M. baccata X M. spectabilis?) 



T. — M. Niedzwetzkyana. 



T. — M. prunifolia . . 
T. — var. rinki 



Turkestan . 



China. 
China. 



M. Ringo (see M. prunifolia, var. rinki). 
D. — M. Sargentii Japan. 



T. — var. arborescens. 



T. — M. Scheideckeri 

(M. spectabilis X ). 



S. — M. Sieboldii. 



30' — var. arborescens. . 



T. — var. calocarpa. 



T.— M. Soulardii 

(M. ioensis X common apple). 
20-30' — M. spectabilis N. China 



Tree-like shrub or small tree. 
Type recently discovered. Fls. 

single, rose. 
Small shapely tree. Fls. double, 

rose-red. Frt. size of pea, red.* 

Fls. double, pale pink, look like 
small clustered roses; greatest 
profusion. One of the most 
charming of all hardy flowering 
trees. Last crab apple in the 
collection to bloom.* 

Pyramidal habit. Fls. small, pale 
pink. Frt. light yellow. A rare 
plant. 

Remarkable in the red color of 
the fls., branches, Ivs. and frt. 
Small tree. One of the first 
apples to bloom. 

Fls. like common apple. 

Fls. like common apple. Frt. 
greenish yellow, sometimes with 
reddish cheek, rarely red, i}i 
in. diam., juicy and acid. 

Low wide bush, native of salt 
marshes. Excellent plant for 
small gardens. The only shrub 
apple which is now known. A 
valuable late-flowering plant. 
Buds dark rose. Fls. white with 
pink tinge. Frt. small, red, wine- 
colored, or yellow. 

Tree form. Long horizontal 
branches. 

Branches are erect and slightly 
spreading, forming a narrow 
pyramidal head. Fls. pink and 
white, in profusion. Frt. yellow, 
J^-i in. diam. 

Last of Asiatic species to fl. Low, 
dense shrub, spreading. Fls. 
small, white tinged rose. Frt. 
small, yellow. Really a dwarf 
form of var. arborescens. 
Korea and Japan Ascending, wide-spreading bran- 
ches. Fls. small, immense quan- 
tities, late bloomer. Frt. yel- 
low or red, minute. 

Broad shrub or small tree. Fls. 
pink and white, i in. diam. Frt. 
brilliant scarlet, very beautiful. 



May N. China and 
Japan 



Japan 

Miss. Valley 



T.- 



var. Riversiana. 



Probably hybrid. Pyramidal 
habit. Fls. large, pink, semi- 
double. Frt. pale yellow, f^- 
in. diam. 

River's Crab. Best form. 



26 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



SiZF. 

T.— Mains Iheifcra 



Nauk Tihe or Flowceiho Habitat 

May C. and \V. China 



M. torintjo (see M. Sieboldii). 

T. — M. Zumi Japan. . 

S. — Morus acidosa May E. Asia. 



T.— M. alba. 



T. — var. tatarica. . 

S. — Myrica carolinensis. 

S. — M. cerifcra 

S. — Neillia affinis 



Asia. 



S. — N. sinensis. 



S.- 
S.- 
T.- 



-N. longeracemosa 

-Nemopanthes mucronata.. . 
-Nyssa sylvatica 



S. E. U. S. 
China 



W. China. 



China 

N. E. N. A. 

Maine 
Florida. . . 



t o 



30' — Oxydendrum arboreum . . . . Aug. E. N. A. 



D.- 



-Pachistima Canbyi 

-P. myrsinites 

-Panax sessiliflorum . 



S. — Parrotia persica. 



W. Va 

Rocky Mts.. 
E. Siberia. . 



Trans - Cauca - 
sus and Persia 



V. — Parthenodssus quinquefolia . . . 


... N. A 


V. — var. hirsuta 




V. — var. Saint Paulii 


... Illinois and 




Missouri 


V. — P. vitacea 




V. — Periploca graeca 




V. — P. sepium 


. . . Korea 


T. — Phellodendron amurense 


. . . E. Siberia 


T.— P. chinense 


... C.China 



RCHAIU 

Zif;-zag branches. Fls. rose in bud, 
almost white. Frt. ftmall. "Red 
tea" made from Ivs. 

Slender tree. FIs. pink and white. 
Fls. smaller than other mulberries. 

Frt. black, lustrous, pleasant 

subacid flavor; great quantities. 
Russian Mulberry. Larger and 

hardier than our native M. 

rubra. 
Weeping form. 
Common Bayberry of North. Lv». 

hold late. 
Wax Myrtle. 
Not yet flowered in Arboretum. 

Fls. pink. 
Interesting plant related to spi- 

reas. Tall, handsome, hardy. 

Fls. clear purple in racemes. 

Lvs. light, incisely cut. 
Not yet flowered in Arboretum. 

Fls. pink. 
Fls. inconspicuous. Frt. red, 

showy on female plant in July. 
A. C. unsurpassed by any native 

tree. Only small plants can be 

moved. 
Sorrel Tree. Fast-growing, late- 
flowering, with handsome fls. 

Foliage splendid in the autumn. 

Saved apparently by its acid 

juices from the attacks of 

insects. This tree is too little 

known. Perfectly hardy. 

Less hardy than P. Canbji. 

Fls. small, inconspicuous, borne 

in globose, compact terminal 

heads. Frt. black, showj-. Lvs. 

dark, di\nded. Large, hardy 

and vigorous shrub. 
Broad, round-headed shrub, with 

erect stems and lvs., which in 

shape resemble those of the 

native Witch Hazel. A. C. 

splendid, clear yellow, orange 

and red. 
Often sold in nurseries as Ampe- 

lopsis Engelmannii. 
Young branches, tendrils and 

lvs. are covered with soft down. 
Attaches itself to walls and grows 

rapidly. 
Cannot attach itself to trees or 

walls. Brilliant A. C. 
Tall, \'igorous \-ine. Fls. green 

and brown. 
Slender stems. Fls. long-stalked, 

sepals dark brown, conspicuous. 

Lvs. small, dark, very lustrous. 
A. C. clear yeUow, early. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



27 



Size Name Time of Flowering Habitat 
T. — Phellodendron sachalinense E. Asia 



S. — Philadelphus coronarius. . . . 



S. — var. salicifolius 

S. — P. Falconeri 

S. — P. floridus 

P. grandiflorus (see P. pubescens). 
S. — P. hirsutus June 



S. E. Europe. . . 



China and Japan 
S. Appalachians 



S. Appalachians 
6' — P. inodorus S. Appalachians. 

S. — P. insignis 

P. latifolius (see P. pubescens). 

5' — P. Lemoinei June 

(P. coronarius X P. microphyllus). 
6' — var. Avalanche* 

var. Boule d'Argent 

var. Bouquet Blanc 

6' — var. Candelabre* 

var. Conquete 

var. erectus* 

var. Fantasie* 

var. Gerbe de Neige* 

var. Manteau d'Her- 

mine 

var. Mont Blanc* 

var. Nufie Blanche 

var. Pavilion Blanc 

var. Perle Blanche 

var. rosea 

S. — P. Magdalenae C. China 

30' — P. maximus 

(P. latifolius X P. tomentosa?). 

3-4' — P. microphyllus June Colorado 

S. — P. pekinensis N. China 

20' — P. pubescens S. Appalachians 

S. — P. purpurascens July China 

P. Schrenkii 
S. — var. Jackii June Korea 



Remarks 

Small tree. Fls. yellow, incon- 
spicuous. Frt. black, berry- 
like. Bright yellow wood and 
roots. All parts of these trees 
are permeated with a fragrant 
aromatic oil which apparently 
makes them immune from the 
attacks of insects. Tall, straight 
trunk. Wide-spreading branches 
forming a shapely flat-topped 
head. Good subject to plant in 
narrow streets.* 

Fls. small, creamy white, fragrant. 
Still one of the best garden 
plants of genus. 

A distinct and interesting plant. 

Fls. delicate, white. 



Tall shrub of rather open habit. 
Fls. small, early, of no great 
ornamental value. 
.Fls. white, large, solitary, scent- 
less. Although still little known, 
one of the most distinct and 
beautiful of the genus. 

Souvenir de Billard one of first 
hybrids. Last to bloom.* 

First of Lemoine's hybrids. 



Partial list of Lemoine hybrids. 
Some of uncertain origin. In- 
teresting and beautiful plants. 



Fls. white, fragrant, in drooping 

leafy panicles. Lvs. small, dark. 
Largest of all the Mock Oranges. 

In old gardens near Boston this 

plant sometimes grows to a 

height of 30 ft. 
Not one surpasses it in delicacy and 

in the fragrance of its small fls. 
Low broad, compact bush. Fls. 

small, tinged yellow, cover bush. 
. Fls. large, slightly fragrant, in 

small racemes. 
Large, vigorous shrub. Fls. white, 
[purple calyx, fragrant. 
Hardy shrub with erect stems. 

Fls. rather small. Blooms early. 

No special value. 



28 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Size Name Time or Floweiinu Hahitat REiiAEit 

S. — I>hiladcli)hus sericanthus Asia More op«n habit and later to B. 

than P. pckinennis. 

S. — P. splcndcns Large, vigorous shrub. Us. un- 

(!'. grandiflorus X ). usually large, scentless. 

S. — P. tcnuiflorus E. Siberia 

T. — Photinia villosa June E. Asia Small tree or arborescent shrub. 

Fls. white, in profusion. Frt. 
bright scarlet. Lvs. thick, dark. 
A. C. brilliant. 

S. — var. lacvis June E.Asia Tall shrub, slender, spreading 

branches. Frt. handsomer and 
more abundant than type. 

T. — Picea Abies Europe Norway Spruce. Fast-growing, 

hardy tree. Dies at the top 
when 30-40 yrs. old. 

D. — var. Clanbrasiliana Seldom more than 6 ft. high.* 

1-2' — var. Gregoryana Sub-globose. 

D. — var. nana Very good dwarf. 

D. — var. prostrata* Interesting plant. 

D. — var. pumila Exceedingly dwf. habit. 

D. — var. pygmea Exceedingly dwf. habit. 

T. — P. bicolor Japan Probably handsomest Spruce we 

can grow. Better specimens can 
be seen in New England than 
in Europe.* 

T. — P. glauca (canadensis) N. N. A Grows rapidly and is very hand- 
some for about 30 >TS. 

T.— P. Engelmannii Colorado Early promise of this not realized. 

Specimens in Arboretum now 
P. excelsa (see P. Abies). [dying. 

T. — P. Glenhii N. Japan and In .\rboretum 22 yrs. Show no 

Saghalien. . . . signs of failure. 

T. — P. jezoensis E. Asia Has not succeeded well in .Arbore- 
tum though large specimens at 
Warren, R. I. 

T. — P. mariana N.N. A Black Spruce. 

S. — var. Doumetii Compact pyramidal plant which 

does not often grow more than 
10-12 ft. tall and is of bluish 
color. 

T. — P. omorika Balkans Narrow, rather compact pyramid. 

Grows rapidly. Promises to be 
valuable. VV'ee\'il. 

T. — P. obovata Siberia Well established in .\rboretum. 

T. — P. orientalis Caucasus Hardy here. Valuable ornamen- 
tal tree not unlike in general 
appearance the Red Spruce, 
P. rubra. Wee\-il. 

D. — var Dwarf of the preceding. 

T. — P. Menziesii It is probable that this tree will 

not much longer retain its 
popularity. 

D. — var Promises to be valuable. 

T. — P. pungens Rocky Mts Quickly loses value as ornamental 

tree. 

D. — var. compacta Good dwarf form, little known. 

T. — P. rubra Appalachians.. Difficult to establish. Injured 

1917-18. 

T. — P. Sargentiana W.China Injured 1917-18. 

T. — P. Schrenkiana Cent. Asia Hardy and healthy in Arboretum 

but will probably never be 
important. 

T. — P. sitchensis N. W. Coast. . . Not hardy here. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 29 

Size Name Time of Flowering Habitat Remarks 

Pieris (see Lyonia). 

S. — P. floribunda April S.Appalachian Very hardy. One of the best 

broad-leaved evergreen shrubs 
which can be grown here. 
Broad, low, rounded head. Fls. 
creamy white. Lvs. dark. 
S. — P. japonica Hardy plant with handsome foli- 
age. Fls. large, white, clusters. 

T. — Pinus Armandi W. China Weevil. 

T. — P. ayacahuite Mexico Injured 1917-18. 

T. — P. Banksiana N. E. and North 

T. — P. Bungeana. 

T. — P. cembra Very slow growing. Hardy. 

T. — P. densiflora Japan In Arboretum 30 yrs. Promises 

well. 

6'-8' — var. pumila Much cultivated in Japanese 

gardens. Forms a head of 
spreading branches 10-12 ft. 
through. Perfectly hardy. 

D. — var. umbractilifera Handsomest dwarf conifer in 

Arboretum. 
P. echinata E. U. S. A Injured 191 7-18. 

T. — P. excelsa Himalaya Never satisfactory here. Weevil. 

T. — P. flexilis Grows slowly and probably wil- 

never be large or important in 
this climate. 

T.— P. Jeffreyi W. N. A 

T. — P. koraiensis Siberia, Korea, 

Manchuria.. . 

T. — P. Lambertiana Calif. Sierras . . Largest of all pine trees. Gives 

little promise here of ever be- 
coming a large or valuable tree. 

T. — P, montana Europe 

S.— var. Mughusi Mugho Pine. Form of P. montana. 

S.— var. pumiho / B^^^j ^1^^^^ with numerous 

erect stems occasionally reach- 
ing the height of 15 ft. and 
covered with dark green foliage. 

T. — P. monticola W. Coast Successful here. 

T. — P. nigra Europe Austrian Pine grows fast, short- 
lived. 

T.— P. parviflora Japan In Arboretum 30 yrs. Promises 

well. 

T. — P. pentaphylla Japan Well established in the Arboretum. 

T. — P. peuce Balkans Hardy. 

T. — P. ponderosa. 

T. — var. scopulorum 

T. — P. pungens E. N. A 

T.— P resinosa E. N. A 

T. — P. sinensis N. China Growing well. Appears hardy. 

var. denudata 
var. yunnanensis 

T.— P. Strobus 

D. — var Dwarf forms. 

T. — P. sylvestris Scotch Pine. More pyramidal in 

habit than forms of the white 
pine. Life here is usually not 
more than 30-40 years. 

T. — P. Thunbergii Japan In Arboretum 30 yrs. Promises 

well. 

T.— P. virginiana E. N. A 



30 



LAN DSCA PE ARCHITECTURE 



Sue 
T.- 



Naue 
-Platanus acerifolia. , 



Time or Flowiuho Habitat 



T — 



P. oricntalis S. E. Europe 

and Asia 



T. — Populus adenopoda. 



Minor. 
China.. . . 



T.- 
T.- 

T.- 
80'- 



T.- 
T.- 
T.- 
T.- 
80'- 

T.- 
T.- 
T.- 
T.- 



-P. alba 

-P. canescens 

-P. lasiocarpa. . . . 
-P. Maximowiczii. 



Europe. 
Europe. 
China. . 
£. Asia. 



S — 



P. Sieboldii 

P. Siraonii 

P. suaveolens 

P. szechuanica 

P. tomentosa 

P. tremula. 

var. Davidiana. 

var. tomentella. 

P. VVilsonii 

P. yunnanensis 

P. fruticosa 

var. dahurica . . 



China. . 
E. Asia. 
E. Asia. 
China. . 
E. Asia. 



China. . 
China. . 
China. . 
E. Asia. 



E. Siberia. 



S. — var. Friedricksenii 

S. — var. ochroleuca 

D. — var. Veitchii 

D.— P. tridentata July 

S. — Prinsepia sinensis 



E. N. A... 
N. China. 



S. — P. uniflora China 

T. — Prunus alleghaniensis S. Conn, and 

W. Penn 

T. — P. americana E. U. S. A 

P. Armeniaca. 
T.— var. Mikado 



T. — P. canescens. 



T. — P. cerasifera 

3-4' — P. concinna May 



T.— P. Conradinae. 
T. — P. dasycarpa. 
S. — P. Davidiana. 



Caucasus 

Mts. C. China., 



W. China.. 
Manchuria. 
China 



Remaiu 

Grown as P. orientalii in U. S. 
Origin unknown. Kxcellent for 
street plantint;. A noble tree. 

Lvs. more divided than P. aceri- 
folia. Specimen in Arboretum 
only a small bush and winter- 
kills often. 

Lvs. of Chinese Poplars tinged 
red when young, makes them 
attractive. All are hardy and 
fast growing except P. lasio- 
carpa. 

Useful for exposed positions. 

Useful for exposed positions. 

Suffered 191 7-18. 

Recommended for planting in 
N. states. Often confused with 
P. suaveolens.* 

Small tree. 



Only propagated by grafting. 



Suffered 191 7-18. 

Excellent plant for small garden. 

Excellent plant for small gar- 
den. Fls. white, look like minia- 
ture roses. 

Handsomer than P. fruticosa. 

Fls. yellow. 

Fls. white, free-blooming. 

Excellent for rock-garden. Fls. 
white. 

Fls. small, axillary, bright yellow, 
produced in profusion. One of 
the earliest shrubs to expand 
its bright green lvs. Branches 
arching and spiny. 

Fls. small, white. Not much 
beauty. 

Frt. blue. Considerable orna- 
mental value. 



Small tree, erect branches. Form 
of common .\pricot. Hand- 
some and satisfactory. 

Fls. small, purple-rose, very fra- 
grant, before lvs. Great beauty 
in bark, dark, very lustrous. 

Myrobalan Plum. 

Tree-like in form. Fls. before lvs., 
white with wine-colored calyx. 
Earliest to bloom. Less valu- 
able than P. subhirtella. 

Always delicate. Killed 1917-18. 

Purple or Black .\pricot. 

Not of great importance as a 
garden plant here. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



31 



Size Name 

S. — -Prunus dehiscens. . . 



Time of Flowering Habitat 



May W. China. 



P. fruticosa 
T. — var. reflex Europe 

T.— P. hortulana S. 111. to Okla. 



T. — P. incisa May Japan . 



T. — P. Lannesiana Japan. 

T. — P. Maackii June 



T. — P. mandschurica May 



T. — P. Maximowiczii Japan 

T. — P. Munsoniana Miss. Valley. . . 

T. — P. nigra British America 



T. — P. orthosepala. 



P. Padus 
T. — var. commutata. 



Kansas. 
E. Asia. 



Prunus pendula (see. P. subhirtella, var. pendula). 
var. ascendens (see P. subhirtella, var. ascendens). 
T. — P. persicoides April 



T. — P. pilosiuscula. 
T. — P. salicina 



E. Asia. 



P. Sargentii (see P. serrulata, var. sachalinensis). 
P. serotina 
T. — var. pendula N. A 



Remarks 
Small, spiny shrub. Fls. pale 
pink before Ivs. Frt. small, 
compressed, hairy. 

Handsome small tree, drooping 

branches. 

Round-topped tree, wide-spread- 
ing branches. Fls. small, before 
Ivs. Frt. globose, scarlet, lus- 
trous, like large cherry. Forms 
are distributed as fruit trees. 
Handsomest of American plum 
trees. 

Large shrub or small tree. Fls. 
white, rarely pale rose, before 
Ivs. Caly.x showy and remains 
on young frt. some time. 

Poor, short-lived. Injured 1917- 
18. 

Fls. small, white, erect clusters. 
Frt. small, black. Birch-like 
bark, bright orange. 

Sometimes considered var. of 
common Apricot, but distinct 
in appearance. Fls. tinged rose 
caly.x deep red. Frt. yellow, 
spotted red, sweet, succulent, 
flesh inferior to cultivated 
forms. Very hardy. 



Most northern of the American 
plum trees. Small tree with 
dark, rough bark. Fls. slightly 
tinged with pink and becoming 
rose-color in fading. Valuable 
on account of its hardiness, 
early appearance of the fls. and 
the early ripening of the frt. 
Fls. and frt. larger than P. 
americana. Desirable. Canada 
Plum. 

Attractive when in fl. Very 
hardy. Fruit handsome. 

Arborescent shrub or small tree. 
Fls. pure white, in long, pen- 
dant racemes, very fragrant. 
Frt. not known here. Incor- 
rectly distributed as P. Maackii. 
Lvs. before any other tree in 
E. Mass.* 



Hybrid (peach and almond). Fls. 

pale pink, uninjured by cold.* 
Chief value is early bloom. 
Origin of so-called Japanese 

plums. 



Weeping form occasionally culti- 
vated. 



32 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Size Name 
Prunus scrrulata 
T. — var. sachalinensis 



Time or Floweeimg Haiitat 



Japan. 



T.- 
T.- 



var. albo-rosea. 
var. fugenzo . . . 



T. — var. pubescens 

T. — var. spontanea 

T.— P. Simonii N.China. 

10-15' — P. subhirtclla May Japan. . . . 

T. — var. ascendens May Japan.... 



S. — var. autumnalis. 
T. — var. pendula. . . . 



Japan. 



S. — P. tomentosa. 



May 



China. 



S. — var. endotricha May W.China. 

S. — P. triloba China. . . . 



var. plena May China. 

P. virginiana 
T. — var. leucocarpa 



T.— P. Watsonii. 
T. — P. yedoensis. 



T. — Pseudolarix amabilis . , 
T. — Pseudotsuga taxifolia. 



Kansas. 
Japan.. 



China 

W. U. S. A. 



Pyrus (see Aronia; Chaenomeles; Malus). 

T. — P. amygdaliformis Caucasus. 

T. — P. auricularis (malifolia) Caucasus. 

(P. communis X Sorbus Aria). 



KXHAIU 

Most beautiful of all flg. cherriet. 
Large, hardy tree, 80' in Japan. 
P'ls. large, pink or rose, in great 
abundance. Lvs. dark. A. C. 
orange and red. Bark smooth, 
red-brown, lustrous. Formerly 
called P. Sargentii.* 

Buds rose. Fls. large, double, white. 

Fls. double, rose-pink, English 
call it James H. Veitch. 

Smaller than var. sachalinensis. 
Fls. open a week earlier, smaller. 

Similar to var. pubescens, fls. 
slightly rosier. 

Called Apricot Plum. Frt. red, 
sweet, fair quality. Short lived, 
would grow only as curiosity. 

Fls. pink, greatest profusion. 
Broad, shrubby plant, not 
known wild. 

Often called Prunus subhirtella. 
One of the most beautiful of 
early spring-flg. trees. 

Fls. semi-double. Blooms both 
spring and autumn. 

Long, slender, pendulous branches 
which are covered with small 
pink fls. before the lvs. expand. 
Plants produced by grafting 
at the ground-level grow to a 
larger size, live longer, and 
when in fl. look like fountains 
of pink mist. 

Broad vigorous shrub of excellent 
habit. Buds pink. Fls. white 
with red stalks and calyx. Frt. 
small, hairy, scarlet, sweet and 
good flavor. 

Later blooming than type. 

Tall shrub, irregular growth. Fls. 
pink, in profusion, single, i in. 
diam., appear before lvs. Should 
be better known. 

Common garden plant. Fls. 

[double. 

Frt. large, light yellow, translu- 
cent and of better flavor than 
common choke-cherry. 

Fls. attractive. Frt. handsome. 
Very hardy. 

Small tree. Origin uncertain. 
Fls. pink and white. Hardy, 
but buds killed sometimes.' 

Deciduous lvs. Interesting, beau- 
tiful and hardy tree. 

Douglas Spruce. Colorado form is 
hardy here. Can be counted 
among the most beautiful con- 
lifers in the world. 

Natural hybrid. Fast grower. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



33 



Size 
T.- 

T.- 

T.- 



T.- 
T.- 
T. 
T.- 



T.- 
T.- 
T.- 
T.- 
T.- 
T.- 



T.- 

T.- 



Nahe 



Time of Flowering Habitat 



-Pyrus betulaefolia China. 

-P. Bretschneideri May China. 



-P. Calleryana. 



W. China. 



-P. communis May 

-P. elaeagrifolia May 

-P. Michauxii 

-P. ovoidea May 



-P. panifolia 

-P. pashia May 

-P. phaeocarpa 

-P. salicifolia 

-P. serotina 

-P. serrulata May 



Europe 

S. E. Europe. . . 

Caucasus 

China 



Caucasus. 
China. . . . 
China. . . . 
Caucasus. 
W. China. 
W. China. 



P. Simonii (see P. ovoidea). 
-P. ussuriensis April 



-Quercus alba . 



T.- 
T. 
T.- 
T.- 



-Q. aliena 

-Q. arkansana. 
-Q. bicolor. . . . 
-Q. Catesbaei . . 



Korea and Man- 
churia 

N. A 



Korea 

Arkansas. . 

N. A 

S. U. S. A., 



T.— Q. Cerris Europe. 



T.- 
T.- 



loo - 
T.- 



T.- 
T.- 



30-40- 
loo'- 



-Q. coccinea. 
-Q. conferta. 



U.S.A... 
Hungary. 



-Q. crispula. 
-Q. dentata. 



var. pinnatifida. 
-Q. georgiana 



-Q. glandulif era . . 
-Q. grosseserrata. 



Japan. 
Japan. 



C. Georgia. 



Japan. 
Japan. 



Remarks 

Tall, narrow tree. Lvs. pale. Has 
blight. 

Fls. large. Frt. yellow, globose, 
good flavor. Lvs. large, lus- 
trous. 

Shapely, pyramidal tree. Raised 
from seed collected by Wilson. 
Fls. pale pink. Frt. small. Be- 
lieved most resistant of pears 
to blight. 

Parent of common garden pears. 

Lvs. silvery when unfolding. 

Handsomest, earliest to bloom. 
Frt. yellow, juicy, large at base, 
tapering to apex. A. C. bril- 
liant scarlet. Apparently free 
[from blight.* 

Frt. small, brown. 

Not attractive. 

Fast-growing. Fls. large, sparse. 

Frt. brown. Apparently free 

from blight. 



Tall shapely tree. Fls. large. Lvs. 

large, thick, lustrous. 
Handsomest A. C. of white oak 

group. Lvs. turn later than 

most oaks. 

KiUed 191 7-18. 

Hardy. 

A. C. more brilliant than Q. 

coccinea. Smaller tree. Lvs. 

more lustrous. 
Grows verj' rapidly while young 

but short-lived as the stems are 

usually cracked by the cold. 

Appeared killed in May, 19 18, 

but recovered. 

Large, common forest tree in 
some parts of Hungary. Lvs. 
deeply divided into numerous 
narrow lobes and turn brick-yel- 
low in autumn. Perfectly hardy, 
shapely, fast-growing tree. 

This and Q. grosseserrata largest 
and best of Japan. 

Remarkable for the great size 
of the lvs. which are often a 
foot long and 8 in. broad. 

Deeply divided lvs. 

Rare tree. Uninjured for 21 yrs., 
killed 1917-18. Small specimens 
survived. 

Small tree. Bears acorns when 
I ft. high. 

This and Q. crispula largest and 
best of Japan. 



34 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Size Name Time or FLOwitiNo Habitat Rihaiu 

T. — Qucrcus hctcrophylla C. U. S. A First hybrid oak noticed in 

America. A|>r>earcd liilled in 
May, igi?, but recovered. 

T. — Q. imbricaria Seriously injured 191 7-18. 

T. — Q. lyrata Appeared killed in May, 1918, 

but recovered. 

T. — Q. macrocarpa Hardy. 

T. — Q. minor Hardy. 

T. — Q- mongolica Mongolia and 

Siberia 

T. — Q. montana Hardy. 

T. — Q. M uhlcnbcrgii Hardy 

Q. pannonicii (see Q. conferta). 

T. — Q. paluslris • Handsome A. C, less brilliant 

than Q. coccinea. 
Q. pedunculata (see Q. Robur). 

T.— Q. Phellos Appeared killed in May, 1918, but 

recovered. 

T. — 0- prinoides Hardy. 

T. — Q. Robur Europe Grows rapidly while young. 

Short-lived as the stems are 
usually cracked by the cold. 

T. — var. pendula Pendulous branches. Slightly in- 

jured 191 7-18. 

T. — Q. rubra S. U. S. A Appeared killed in May, 1918, but 

recovered. 

T. — Q. serrata Korea Small tree with dark bark. Lvs. 

are bright green on the two 
surfaces. 

T. — Q. sessiliflora Europe Grows rapidly while young. Short- 
lived as the stems are usually 
cracked by the cold. 

80' — Q. variabilis Japan Under surface of lvs. silvery. 

Bark corky. 

T. — Q. velutina One tree killed 191 7-18. 

30' — Rhamnus cathartica Europe Valuable shrub for our climate. 

Lvs. bright and shining, and 
remain on the branches late. 
Black shining fruits. One of the 
best hedge-plants in this climate. 

S. — R. Frangula Tall shrub. Slender erect stems 

and branches. Verj- lustrous 
lvs. whicb fall in the autumn 
without change of color. 
12-15' — Rhododendron arborescens. July Appalachian Tall shrub. Fls. large, white 

Mts with red filaments, in clusters. 

Lvs. dark and shining, pale 
below. Blooms late.* 

D. — R. arbutifolium Spreads into low, wide mass. 

(R. ferrugineum X R. minus) Fls. small, unattractive, rose. 

Foliage handsome. Value in 
ability to cover either sunny or 
shady banks. Usually fotmd 
under R. Wilsonii. 

S. — R. austrinum Apalachicola 

River Fls. slender, pale yellow. 

S. — R. brachycarpum Japan Fls. pale yellow. Lvs. dark. 

4-10' — R. calendulaceum June Appalachian Flame-colored .\zalea. Fls. dear 

Mts yellow to flame. Most showy. 

Few shrubs more beautiful.* 

D. — R. canadense E. N. A Often covers large areas of moist 

or swampy land. Fls. rose- 
purple, unattractive. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



35 



Size 

s 

S. — R. canescens 



Name Time of Flowering Habitat 

Rhododendron candidum S. Georgia . . 

May - -- - 



E. U. S. A 

D. — R. carolinianum Appalachians.. . 



S. — R. catawbiense June 



S. — var. album. 

S. — R. caucasicum. . . 



Appalachian 
Mts 



R. caucasicum hybrids. 
Boule de Neige. . . 



dec 

Coriaceum. 

Glennyi. . . . 



Jacksonii. . . . 
Mont Blanc. 



Caucasus. 



Ochroleucum 

R. coreanum (see R. poukhanense). 
-R. dahuricum April 



var. sempervirens . 



D.- 

D- 

D. — R. ferrugineum. 

S. — R. hirsutum 

S. — R. japonicum May 

S. — R. Kaempferi May 

S. — R. maximum July 



N. E. Asia. 



Europe 

Europe 

Japan 

Japan 

U. S. A 



S. — R. Metternichii Japan 

6-8' — R. micranthum N. and VV. China 

S. — R. minus S. Appalachian 



R. molle (see R. sinense). 
S. — R. mucronulatum April N. China. 



Remarks 

FIs. white or pale pink, after Ivs. 

Fls. pink, very fragrant. Takes 
kindly to cultivation. 

Fls. small, bright pink in clusters. 
Earliest of American rhodo- 
dendrons. FIs. open and fade 
before young branches begin to 
grow. Lvs. very dark. Hand- 
somest. Absolutely hardy dwf. 
R.* 

Hardiest of all large-fld. rhodo- 
dendrons. Wide, low, round- 
topped, compact shrub. Fls. 
rose-purple, rather a disagree- 
able color. Lvs. dark, broad. 

Fls. early, white. 

Fls. yellowish white in compact 
clusters. Its hybrids or varie- 
ties should be more often found 
in our gardens. Hardiest rho- 
dodendron 1917-18. 

Early flowering and as a class 
are hardier than other hybrids. 

Rarely 3 ft., wide-spreading. Fls. 
pure white. 

Killed 1914-15. 

Fls. pale yellow. 

Probably Caucasicum hybrid. Fls. 
white, in clusters. 

Slightly injured 1917-18. Fls. 
rose, large. 

Dwarfer than Boule de Neige. 
Fls. earlier, rose then white. 

Killed 1914-15. 

Fls. small, dark rose. Lvs. dark, 
retained late. Very hardy. 

Lvs. more persistent. Fls. darker. 

Fls. rosy scarlet. Not very satis- 
factory here, short-lived. 

Fls. rosy pink. Not very satis- 
factory or long-lived here. 

Fls. flame. Handsome. A. C. 
most beautiful of all azaleas. 

Fls. red, soon wither unless in 
partial shade. 

Grows wild as far N. as N. E. 
Fls. pale pink or pink and white. 
Lvs. long, handsome. Abso- 
lutely hardy. 

Fls. rose. 

Fls. white, in small compact 
clusters. Suffered 1917-18. 

Plant of lower altitudes. Fls. and 
lvs. smaller than R. carolinia- 
num, more open habit; less 
valuable. Has been called R. 
punctatum generally. 

Tall, erect shrub. Fls. bright 
rose before lvs. This and R. 
dahuricum earliest of rhodo- 
dendrons. Very hardy. 



3(> 



LAN DSCA PE A R C II I I E CT U R E 



Sue Naue Time or Flowekimo Haiitat 

4' — Rhododendron myrtifolium 

(k. hirsiiUim X K. minus) 
2-8'— R. nudiflorum May E. N. A 



S- 
S.- 

S.- 

S.- 
S.- 



s.- 
s.- 
s.- 



-R. occidcntalc Sierra Nevada.. 

S. Europe and 

Asia Minor. . 

Korea 



-R. ponticum 

-R. poukhanense May 



var. yodogawa May 

-R. prajcox 

(R. dahuricum X R. ciliatum). 



R. punctatum (see R. minus). 

-R. rhombicum May Japan. 

-R. sinense China. 

-R. Schlippenbachii May Korea. 



S. — R. Smimovii . 



Caucasus. 



15-18' — R. Vaseyi May 



4-8' — R. viscosum July 



N. C. and S. C. 



E. N. A. 



-R. viscosum 
S. — R. Wellesleyanum 

(R. ma.ximum X R. catawbiense). 
S. — R. Wilsonii (see R. arbutifolium). 
Rhododendron hybrids. 

album elegans. White tinged blush; late. 

album grandiflorum. White tinged blush; late. 

atrosanguineum. Red; very early. 

bicolor. Purple tinged white on upper petal; early. 

Charles Bagley. Dark crimson. 

Charles Dickens. Red; early. 

delicatissimum. White tinged pink; very late. 

Edward S. Rand. Crimson. 

Everestianum. Light purple; early. 

F. L. Ames. Red-violet, white center; late. 

H. W. Sargent. Red; late. 

Hannibal. Rosy red-violet; early. 

Kettledrum. Crimson; early. 

King of the Purples. Dark purple. 

Henrietta Sargent. Pink; early. 

Lady Armstrong. Rose; early 

Mrs. Millner. Crimson. 

Mrs. Charles Sargent. Pink. 

Mrs. Harry IngersoU. Red-violet, spotted brown on upper petal; late 

purpureum elegans. Dark purple. 

purpureum grandiflorum. Dark purple; late. 

roseum elegans. Rose; early. 

Sefton. Dark red-violet; early. 
Rhododendron hybrids, uninjured 1914-15. 

atrosanguineum Charles Dickens 



KCMASU 

Compact, round-topped ihrub. 

Fls. good pink shade. 
Fls. pale rose or pink, fragrant, 

before or with lv». 
Fls. white. 
Hardy only in sheltered position*. 

Round-topped, compact shrub. 

Fls. large, rosy pink, fragrant. 
Fls. double. 
"Little Gem." Fls. pale rose, 

blooms so early they are often 

injured. Very hardy. 

Fls. rose-purple. 

Fls. yellow, beautiful. 

One of handsomest .\siatic 
azaleas. Fls. while, tinged rose, 
i to il4 in. wide, before Ivs. 

Fls. light pink, large clusters. 
Lvs. pale gray-green clothed 
below with a thick, felt-like 
rusty brown covering; suffer 
from summer sun. Grows best 
in partial shade. Plant from 
which much can be expected. 
Absolutely hardy. 

First American species to bloom. 
Slender stems, irregular habit. 
Fls. pure pink in small compact 
clusters, before lvs. 

Fls. white, blooms late. 



Less hardy than either parent. 



Rhododendrons 
most successful in 
the neighborhood 
of Boston previ- 
ous to 1914. 



H. W. Sargent 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



37 



Size 



Naue Time of Flowering Habitat 

Rhododendron hybrids, some individuals killed 1914-15. 
Adolf Diana 

atrorubrum F. L. Ames 

Bismarck F. B. Hayes 

Butlerianum Hanna Felix 

delicatissimiim King of the Purples 

Rhododendron hybrids, all individuals killed 1914-15. 



Alarich 

Albin 

Alfred 

Bluebell 

Circe 

Daniel 



Rhododendron hybrids killed 

Gomer Waterer 

James Smith 

Rhodora (see Rhododendron canadense). 

—Rhus canadensis N 



S. — R. copallina. 



Duke of Connaught 
Earl of Shannon 
Egge 
Elysium 
Fee 

Hercules 
Jay Goidd 
1917-18. 
Marquis of Waterford 
Marshall Brooks 



T. — R. javanica July 

T. — R. verniciflua 

S. — Ribes aureum 



China. 
China. 



S. — var. chrysococcum 

R. alpestre 
S. — var. commune May 



S.^R. cereum. . . . 
S. — R. curvatum. 



Headwaters of 
the Missouri 
River, to the 
N . W. of 
Arizona 

Montana 

Thibet 



Rocky Mts. 
C. Georgia. . 



S. — R. Cynosbati. . . . 
S. — var. inerme. 

S. — R. fasciculatum. . 



E. N. A 

N. W. U. S.. 
China 



S. — var. chinense China 

S. — R. missouriense Missouri 

Arkansas. 
S.— R. niveum N. W. N. A., 



to 



Remarks 

Lady Grey Egerton 
Marquis of Waterford 
Mrs. Harry IngersoU 
Prometheus 
R. S. Field. 

Mme. Wagner 

Mum 

Mrs. H. S. Hunnewell 

Menemoisyne 

Salmonum roseum 

Sir H. Havelock 



Mrs. Thomas Agnew 



Fragrant Sumach (R. aromatica). 
Rather a straggling plant with 
slender stems sometimes three 
or four ft. high. Fls. are bright 
yellow, on short a.xillary 
branches. Followed by red frts. 

Lvs. are rather more lustrous than 
those of the other Sumachs. 
Wings on the leaf stalks. Few 
plants present a more brilliant 
appearance when the lvs. turn 
bright scarlet. 

Small tree. Fls. white. A. C. 
very fine. 

The "Lacquer Tree" of Japan and 
China is as poisonous as R. 
toxicodendron. A. C. brilliant. 

Smaller plant than R. odoratum 
with more slender stems. Flow- 
ers smaller. Frt. black and 
orange. Perhaps a more attrac- 
tive plant. 

Frt. yellow. 

Fls. small, inconspicuous. Frt. 

acid, prickly and of little beauty. 

May prove valuable as hedge 

plant in cold regions. 
Fls. small, white, covering plant. 

Frt. red, sweet and edible. 

Handsome foliage. 
Little-known plant. Fls. long, 

white, gracefully drooping on 

long stems. One of the most 

attractive of the collection. 

Fls. white. 

Frt. bright red. Only species 

with frt. which ripens in the 

autumn. 
Frt. scarlet. A. C. bright shades, 

orange and scarlet. 

Fls. pale yellow. 
Fls. pure white. 



38 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Size 
S.- 



Name 
-Ribcs odoratum . . . 



TruE or I'lowkring Hahitat 

Dakota to 

Texas 



S. — R. pinetorum New Mexico. . . 



S. — R. robustum 

(R. niveum X R. oxyacanthoides). 

S. — R. stenocarpum W. China. 

4-5' — R. tenue May W. China. 



S. — Robinia hispida. 



T.— R. Holdtii 

(R. pseudacacia X R. neo-mexicana). 



S. — R. Kelscyi 

S. — R. neo-me.\icana. 

T. — R. pseudacacia . . 



S. Appalachian. 



T. — var. Decaisneana June 

T.— var. raonophylla. 

T. — var. umbraculifera 

S. — R. viscosa 



S. — Rosa Arnoldiana 

(R. rugosa X Gen. Jacqueminot). 



R. banksiopsis China 

S. — R. bella June N. Ch'na. 



S. — R. blanda 

S. — R. Carolina. 

S. — R. caudata June China. 



S. — R. cinnamomea. 

R. corvmbulosa. 

R. Davidii 

R. davurica. . . . 
S.— R. Eca; 



May 



China. . 
China. . 
China. . 
C. Asia. 



R. filipes. . 
-R. foetida. 



China 

Caucasus and 
Persia 



BrMAint 

Large, broad, very hardy, fatt- 
growing shrub. FIs. bright 
yellow, fragrant, in drooping 
clusters. Vt\. black, lustrous. 
In many books this plant 
appears as K. aureum, but this 
name properly belongs to a 
smaller plant from the North- 
west. .American Currant. 

FIs. bright orange-red. Most 
beautiful of all the goose- 
berries. 

Vigorous. FIs. white. 

FIs. white. 

FIs. dull yellow. Frt. bright red, 
luscious, juicy, sweeter than 
common currants. 

Shrubby Rose Acacia. Less often 
attacked by borers. FIs. bright 
rose. Spreads rapidly, may be- 
come troublesome. 

One of the most interesting Lo- 
custs. Vigorous tree. FIs. 
Better able to resist the borer 
than either of its parents. 

Desirable and handsome plant. 

Suffers badiy from the attacks of 
the borer. 

Almost impossible to keep the 
locust tree alive in eastern 
Massachusetts owing to the 
borer. Thirty varieties are now 
known. 

FIs. pale pink. 

Parasol Acacia. 

Suffers badly from the attacks 

of the borer. 
Dawson hybrid. Stout bush. 

FIs. single, bright red, showy. 

Foliage good. 
Hardy. 
Large shrub. FIs. bright red. 

Frt. red, showy. Hardy. 
Earliest of the five N. E. spedes. 

Large shrub; stout arching stems. 
FIs. pale pink, 2 in. wide, in 
clusters of 20-25. Frt. orange- 
red, I in. long. 

Killed to ground 1917-18. 

Killed to ground 191 7-18. 

Hardy. 

Small, exceedingly spiny shrub. 

FIs. pale canary-yellow. Lvs. 

small. This and R. Hugonis are 

first to flower. Hardy. 
Killed to ground 191 7-18. 
\ beautiful and little known rose. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



39 



Size Name 

Rosa fcetida 
S. — var. bicolor . . 



Time of Flowering Habitat 



S. — var. persiana June 



R. gallica 

S. — var. ofBcinalis June 

R. Gentiliana China .... 

S-8'— R. Helenae June W.China. 



S. — R. Hugonis May W.China 

S.— R. humilis U. S. A 



S. — R. Jackii July 



S. — R. Lheritierana 

(R. chinensis X R. pendulina?) 
R. lucida (see R. virginiana). 
S.— R. Marretii 



Korea . 



R. microphylla (see R. Roxburghii). 

R. Moyesii 

var. rosea 

S. — -R. multibracteata 



Hokkaido and 
Sanghalien.. . 



China. 
China. 



R. multiflora. 
S. — var. cathayensis. 



June China. 



D.— R. nitida. 



S. — R. omeiensis. 



Mass. to New- 
foundland . . . 

China 



R. Prattii .' 

R. Ro.xburghii. 
S. — var. normalis June 

S. — R. rugosa 



S. — var. alba 

S. — var. kamtschatica. . 

S. — var. rosea 

R. rugosa Hybrids. 

Conrad F. Meyer. . 



China 

China 

N. E. Asia. 



Kamtchatka. . . 



Remarks 

Austrian Briar. Fls. yellow out- 
side, dark copper inside. Har- 
ison's Yellow is believed to be 
a hybrid of this X R. spino- 
sissima. 

Persian Yellow is last of yellow- 
fid, roses to bloom. Dwarfer 
and better habit than Hari- 
son's Yellow. Fls. larger, better 
color, double. 

Fls. partly double, red, fragrant. 

Killed to ground 1917-18. 

Large shrub, slender, arching 
stems. Fls. single, pure white, 
in many-fld clusters, delicate 
fragrance. Hardy. 

Fls. single, clear yellow. Lvs. pale, 
small. No Chinese rose more 
beautiful.* 

Common Wild Rose of the inter- 
ior. Low plant. Lvs. dull. Least 
ornamental of native roses. 

Long stems lie flat on ground. 
Fls. white, in clusters, fragrant. 
Lvs. lustrous.* 

Fls. partly double, pale rose. 

Not uncommon in old N. E. 

[gardens. 

Fls. single, pink. Lvs. pale. 
Tall, arching stems. 

Killed to ground 1917-18 

Also suffered. 

Fls. pale pink. Bright red prickles 

make young shoots showy. 

Killed to ground 1917-18. 

Hardy and vigorous. Fls. clear 

pink. Probably type from 

which Chinese derived crimson 

Rambler. 
Most beautiful. Fls. rather dark. 

Short stems covered with bright 

red prickles. 
Vigorous. Fls. pure white, i in. 

diam. Frt. red on yellow stalks. 

Bright red prickles on young 

stems. Hardy. 
Killed to ground 191 7-18. 

Fls. pale shell-pink, size of R. 

rugosa. Frt. red. 
Native of sand-dunes. Grows 

well in garden. Fls. red. 
Fls. white. 

Fls. smaller. Lvs. smaller. 
Fls. pink.. 

Fls. pink, nearly double, clustered. 



40 



LA N DSCA PE ARCHITECTURE 



Size Name Tike or Floweiimo Habitat Rkhasu 

Rosa rugosa Hybrids, continued 

Lady Duncan Prostrate stems, can be used as 

(R. rugosa X R. Wichuraiana). ground-cover or vine. FIs. pink, 

smaller than K. rugosa. 

Mmc. Georges Bruant Fls. white, semi-double. 

Nova Zcmbia Fls. while, a sport of C. F. Meyer. 

rcpcns alba Prostrate stems. Hardier than R. 

Wichuraiana. Can be used as 
ground-cover or as vine. 

S. — R., "Sargent" Dawson hybrid. Fls. cu{>-shaped, 

(H. P. Baroness Rothschild pale clear pink, semi-double.* 

X R. Wichuraiana X 
Crimson Rambler). 

R. saturata China Hardy. 

3' — R. sertata June China Spreading, arching stems. Fls. 

solitary, pink, slightly fragrant. 
Hardy. 

S. — R. setigera July Mich, to Texas Tall arching stems. Fls. pink, 

clusters. Last to bloom. Foli- 
age handsome. No finer rose.* 

S. — R. sctipoda Mts. of Hupeh. Large vigorous shrub. Fls. dark 

pink, in broad, many-fid. dus- 
ters. Hardy. Promising. 

S. — R. simplicifolia Persia Fls. yellow. Not hardy. 

R. spinosissima Scotch Briar. 

S. — var. altaica Siberia Very hardy, tall, wide bush. Fls. 

numerous, large, single, white 
tinged yellow. Frt. black, shiny.* 

S. — var. fulgens Fls. pale pink. 

S. — var. Harison's Yellow Cross between Austrian and 

Scotch Briar. Hardy, free-flg., 
vigorous. Fls. pale yellow, 
semi-double. 

S. — var. hispida Fls. yellow. 

S. — var. lutea Fls. pale yellow. 

S. — R. stellata July New Mexico. . . Slender, pale yellow stems. Fls. 

deep rose, 2K-3 in. diam. Frt. 
dark red, prickly. 

R. Sweginzowii China Hardy. 

S. — R. virginiana N. E. N. A Common rose of seacoast. Fls. 

dark red to pink. Lvs. thick, 
lustrous. 

S. — var. alba Fls. white. 

S. — R. Wichuraiana July Prostrate stems. Fls. white. 

R. Willmottiae China Killed 1917-18. Grows well at 

Rochester, N. Y. 
R. xanthina Chinese Turke- 
stan Hardy. 

S. — Rubus coreanus China White stems. 

S. — R. laciniatus July Europe Long red stems. Good for cover- 
ing banks or fences. 
S. — R. lasiostylus China White stems. 

IWell suited for covering fences, 
etc., producing stems 10-20 
ft. long in a season. Fls. 
double, pink or white, in 
many-fld. clusters, resembling 
miniature roses. Little known. 

T. — Salix alba Europe '. . Lvs. shorter and narrower than 

S. fragilis, and covered with 
whitish silky hairs. 

T. — var. argentea Lvs. thickly^covered with silvery 

white tomentum. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



41 



Size 
T- 

T.- 
T.- 



Name Time or Flowering Habitat 
-Salix alba, var. csrulea 



-S. amygdaloides N. E. N. A. . . 

-S. babylonica China 



S. blanda 

(S. viminalis X S. babylonica). 



T.- 
T.- 

3-4'- 
6-9'- 



T.- 
T.- 
T.- 



T.- 

2'- 



-S. elegantissima 

-S. fragilis Europe. 



-S. gracilistyla Japan 

-S. humilis N. U. S. A.. 



-S. nigra N. E. N. A. 

-S. rubens (S. alba X S. fragilis). 

-S. Salamonii 

(S. babylonica X S. alba). 



-S. sepulcralis (S. babylonica X S. fragilis). 

-S. tristis N. U. S. A. 



S.— 

D.- 

S.- 
S.- 

s.- 
s.- 



S. repens 

var. argentea 

SaUaa oiBcinalis July 

Sambucus canadensis July 

var. acutiloba 

var. chlorocarpa 

var. maxima 



S. — S. nigra 

var. aurea 

S. — S. racemosa 

S. — var. Sieboldiana . 

S. — -S. pubens 

S. — var. leucocarpa . . 



Reuarks 
Commonest. Some consider it a 
species, S. caerulea. 

Well-known Weeping Willow of 
China. Sometimes suffers from 
cold in Mass. 

General name for group of Wil- 
lows, natural hybrids. Hand- 
somest has bright yellow bran- 
ches. It is without a proper 
name though it is sold as S. 
babylonica aurea, or ramulis 
aureis, as S. vitellina pendula, 
and as S. alba vitellina pendula. 

Probably hybrid of and often 
sold as S. babylonica. Hardy. 

Not rare in N. E. but more com- 
mon farther south. 

Native shrub with gray-green 
Ivs. and yellow anthers. Slen- 
der red stems make a handsome 
contrast with the silvery gray 
flower-clusters. 



Only female tree is known. Large, 
vigorous, hardy tree. Ascend- 
ing branches and drooping 
branchlets. 

A spreading shrub with slender 
stems and small gray-green 
Ivs. The anthers of the male 
plant are bright red when they 
first appear and much more 
showy than the gray inflores- 
cence of the female plant. 
Grows naturally on dry, barren 
soil. Spreads into large masses. 
Excellent plant for covering 
dry, barren slopes. 



N. Europe and 
Siberia. 

S.Europe Aromatic shrub. Fls. purple, 

showy. 

N. A Fls. white. Frt. black. 

Finely divided leaflets. A curiosity. 

N. H Frt. yellow-green. 

Europe Fl. -clusters at least three times as 

large as those found on the 
wild plants, followed by such 
large and heavy bunches of 
frt. that the branches are hardly 
able to support them. 



Europe. 



Europe. 
Japan. . 

N. A. . . 



Var. with yellow Ivs. 

Best as a foliage plant. 

Frt. red. 

Rare var. Frt. orange-colored. 



42 



LA N DSCA PE ARCHITECTURE 



Size 
T.- 



T." 
V.- 

T.- 

S.- 



Naue 
-Sassafras officinale . 



TiiiE or Flowebimo Haiitat 
N. A 



-S. Tzumu China. 

-Schizophragraa hydra nge- July Japan, 
oidcs 



-Sciadopitys verticillata. 

-Shepherdia argentea. . . 



Japan. . . 
VV. N. A. 



T. — Sophora japonica August China. 



T. 

T.- 

2-4'- 

S.- 

s.- 
30'- 



var. pendula 

var. pyramidalis 

-S. viciifolia June 



-Sorbaria sorbifolia 

-S. stellipila 

-Sorbus americana N. A, 



C e n t . a n d W. 

China 

E. Siberia and 

Japan 

Japan 



50- 
T.- 



T.- 

S.- 



S.- 

s.- 



12- 

s.- 



var. decora. 
-S. commixta. . . . 



Japan. 



-S. Aucuparia 

-SpiriBa arguta Europe. 

(S. multiflora X S. Thunbergii). 
-S. Henryi China. . 



-S. Miyabei China. 

-S. nipponica Japan . 



-S. nudiflora 

-S. trilobata Siberia. 



-S. Van Houttei. 

(S. cantoniensis X S. trilobata) . 



-S. Veitchii. 
-S. Wilsonii . 



China. 
China. 



Bemaiu 

Free from pests. Handsome tree. 

Frt. blue with scarlet calyx, vtry 

showy, fast eaten by birds. A.C. 

unsurpassed. Suckers easQy 

transplanted. 
Only other species known. Not yet 

established in Arboretum. 
Fls. less showy than Hydrangea 

petiolaris but more interesting. 

Lvs. smaller, darker. Has been 

most difficult to establish in 

Arboretum. Very rare. 
Curious Umbrella Pine. Perfectly 

at home at the Arboretum. 
Shrub or small tree. Fls. minute, 

clustered, axillary. Frt. small, 

handsome crimson or yellow, 

subacid. Ripens early in autumn. 
Very hardy, good habit. Fls. 

creamy white in erect clusters. 

Lvs. dark. Branchlets green. 
Fls. rarely. 
Erect branches. 
Fls. pea-shaped, blue and white, 

showy. Lvs. small, pinnate. 

I Handsome shrubs. Fls. small, 
white, in large erect clusters; re- 
main in good condition a long 
time. Lvs. dark, di\-ided. 
Lvs. bright shades of yellow and 
scarlet in autumn. Frts. remain 
on the branches in good condi- 
tion until the flocks of northern 
robins arrive, when they will 
eat every berry in preparation 
for their long flight southward. 
Handsomest. 

Narrow tree with tall clear stem. 
Fl. -clusters of moderate size. 
Frt. bright red. .•\. C. orange 
and red, chief value. 

Usually short-lived. More desir- 
able than S. Thunbergii. 

Tall, hardy, \'igorous shrub. Fls. 
white in large flat clusters on 
upper side of wide-spreading, 
arching branches. 

Fls. flat clusters, white, profuse. 
Blooms before S. Henryi and 
S. Veitchii. 

Large shrub with long arching 
branches and one of the hand- 
somest of the still little-known 
Spireas. 

Hybrid. Buds are pale pink. 

Dwarfer and better than S. Van 

Houttei. Perfectly hardy and 

[free-flowering. 

Suffers in cold winters. Less 
valuable than S. trilobata. 

Hardy. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 43 

Size Name Time of Flowering Habitat Remarks 

S. — Staphylea Bolanderi Calif 

S. — S. colchica Caucasus 

S. — var. Hessei. 

S. — var. Coulombieri Probably hybrid. 

S. — S. emodi Himalayas 

20-25' — S. holocarpa May \V. China Fls. white to rosy lilac, in pendu- 
lous racemes, fragrant, before 

S. — S. pinnata Europe Little value. [Ivs.* 

S. — S. trifolia N. A Little value. 

S. — Stuartia pentagyna S. Appalachian . Fls. white, cup-shaped, not unlike 

those of a single Camellia. One 
of the most desirable of the sum- 
mer-flowering shrubs which can 
be grown in this climate. Large, 
free-flowering shrub. A form 
with bright purple stamens 
which make the fls. more con- 
spicuous than those of the com- 
mon form with yellow stamens. 

T. — S. pseudo-Camellia Japan Taller plant. Tree-like in habit. 

Small, slender tree common on 
the mountain slopes of central 
Japan. Fls. white, cup-shaped, 
resemble those of a single- 
flowered camellia. They are 
smaller than those of the two 
American Stuartias. A. C. dark 

S. — S. virginica S. States [wine color. 

S.^Styra.x japonica June Japan Fls. pure white, bell-shaped, hang- 
ing gracefully down from the 
branches on long slender stems. 
One of the handsome flowering 
shrubs of Japan. Perfectly hardy 
in the neighborhood of Boston. 

T. — S. obassia Japan Small tree. Hardy but does not 

S. — Symphoricarpos racemosus (fl. freely in .Arboretum. 

S. — var. laevigatas Handsomest form. 

S. — Symplocos paniculata (era- Japan One of the most beautiful flower- 

tjegoides). ing shrubs which Japan has con- 

tributed to our gardens. Fls. 
small, white, in abundant clus 
ters. Frts. small, bright blue, a 
color not often seen in northern 
gardens. Large and perfectly 
hardy shrub. 

S. — Syringa affinis May China Fls. pure white, borne in loose, 

rather narrow, open clusters, ex- 
tremely fragrant. Very hardy; 
grows rapidly. Habit is loose 
and not attractive. 

S. — var. Giraldii May China Fls. purple or mauve-colored. 

20' — S. amurensis June Siberia Fls. %vhite in flat, spreading or 

slightly drooping clusters. First 
of tree lilacs to bloom. 

S. — S. chinensis May Fls. purple-red, in long clusters. 

(S. vulgaris X S. persica) Varieties with rose-colored and 

with pale, nearly white, fls. 
Sometimes known as S. rotho- 
magensis. Shrub as large or 
larger than the common lilac. 
Slender branches. Lvs. inter- 
mediate in shape between those 
of its two parents. One of the 
most valuable of all lilacs. 



44 



LAN DSCA PE ARCHITECTURE 



SiZK Name 
S. — Syringa cmodi 



Time or Flowekiho Haiitat 
Himalayas. . . 



S. — S. Henryi 

(S. Josikcea X S. villosa). 



S. — var. Lut6ce 

S. — S. hyacinlhiflora. 

(S. vulgaris X S. oblata). May 



30-40' — S. japonica June Japan. 



S. — S. Josikaea Hungary . 



S. — S. Juliana; June N. China. 



S. — S. Koehneana Korea. 



S. — S. Komarovii China. 

S. — S. Meyeri May China. 

S. — S. microphylla China. 



S. — S. oblata. 



China. 



30' — S. pekinensis June N. China. 



S. — S. persica Caucasus. 



S. — var. alba 

S. — var. laciniata. 
S. — S. pinnatifolia . . . . 



China. 



KcMAtU 

Large, broad shrub. Fls. small, 
white in long narrow clusters, 
fragrant. Last to bloom. Lvs. 
large, light yellow-green above 
and silvery gray and covered 
with soft while hairs below. 

General name for group of hybrids, 
later fig. than parents. Kls. vio- 
let or reddish purple in clusters 
about I ft. long. 

Handsomest.* 

Large size. Fls. small blue-purple, 
very fragrant. Chiefly valu- 
able on account of its earliness. 

Lustrous bark like that of a cherry 
tree. Wide round-lopped bead. 
Fls. white, erect clusters. Last 
to bloom and most tree-like of 
the lilacs. One of the most beau- 
tiful of the flowering trees which 
can be grown in this climate.* 

Tall shrub. Loose, unattractive 
habit. Fls. small, purple in long, 
slender open clusters. Lvs. 
small. Least attractive of all 
lilacs. 

Same general character as S. 
pubescens. Fl. buds rose. Fls. 
fragrant but not so fragrant as 
S. pubescens. 

Large, vigorous. Fls. pale rose in 
short, broad compact clusters, 
fragrant. 

Large shrub related to S. villosa. 
Handsome foliage and fls. 

Fls. dark purple. 

Fls. small, fragrant, pale pink. 
Often second bloom in Oct. 

Fls. large, pale lilac, verj- fragrant. 
Lvs. thick and leathery. A. C. 
deep bronze-red color. Tall, 
broad shrub. 

Shrub rather than a tree. Nu- 
merous stout stems pendent at 
the ends and covered with bark 
peeling off in thin layers like 
that of some of the birch trees. 
Fls. while, in half-drooping, flat, 
and unsymmetrical clusters, in 
great quantities. 

Blooms rather later than the com- 
mon lilacs. None more beau- 
tiful than this Persian lilac. 
Wide and shapely bush. Fls. 
in long clusters which weigh 
down the slender branches; fra- 

Fls. white. [grant.* 

Lvs. deeply lobed. 

Fls. and fl.-clusters are small and 
not conspicuous, but the deeply 
divided lvs. are unusual. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 45 

Size Name Time of Flowering Habitat Remarks 

S. — Syringa pubescens China One of the best. Tall shrub with 

erect stems. Fls. large clusters, 
pale lilac, fragrant, free-flg. 
Hardy. 
S. — S. reflexa June China Fls. deep rose, in compact, cylin- 
drical clusters, disagreeable 
odor. Stout, vigorous shrub. 
S. rothomagensis (see S. chinensis). [Best new lilac. 

S. — S. Sargentiana June China Fls. paler than S. refle.xa, in large 

loose clusters. 

S. — S. Sweginzowii Korea Appears to be perfectly hardy. Fls. 

nearly white, flesh-colored in 
bud, slightly fragrant. One of 
the latest, if not the latest, of 
the true lilacs to fl. here. 

S. — S. tomentella China Large shrub related to S. villosa. 

Fls. palest rose. Handsome 
foliage. 

S. — S. villosa N.China Blooms later than the other 

lilacs. Large, vigorous and very 
hardy shrub with good foliage. 
Fls. pale pink or rose-colored, 
disagreeable odor. 

S. — S. vulgaris Bulgaria A plant for the North, for in S. 

New England and southward 

the Ivs. in summer are often 

temporarily disfigured by white 

S. Wilsonii (see S. tomentella). [milde%v. 

S. — S. Wolfii Mongolia Fls. small, dark blue, purple, or 

rose, in clusters 2 ft. long, i ft. 
diam., no fragrance. 

S. — S. yunnanensis June S.W.China.... Tall open habit. Fls. small, 

creamy white, tinged rose, un- 
usual and delicate fragrance. 
Syringa hybrids, best varieties. 
Charles X. Rosy lilac. 
*PhUemon 1 

*Ludwig Spaeth > Dark red-purple. 
Congo J 

Macrostachya "Ipjnk 

Gloire des Moulins / 
*Marie Legraye. Single; white. 
Mme. Lemoine \ta„ .ki<,. „,u;>o 

Miss Ellen Willmott/^°^"«; ^^'''- 
Justi. Blue. 
Syringa hybrids, best of the newer varieties. 
Deuil d'Emile Gall6. Double; pale pink. 
Waldeck Rousseau. Single; pink. 
L'Oncle Tom. Single; dark red-purple. 
Grand Due Constantin. Light lilac. 

Toussaint I'Ouverture. Red-purple, in unusually long, narrow clusters. 
De Mirabel. Single; dark lilac; long narrow clusters. 
Edmond Bossier. Single; dark rose-purple; large broad clusters. 
Maurice de Vilmorin. Double; pale lilac. 
President Loubet. Single; deep lilac. 
Languis. Single; pale pink, dark rose buds. 
Rfiamur. Single; large; rose; broad clusters. 
Syringa hybrids, other good varieties. 
MarUensis pallida. Pale pink. 
Furst Lichtenstein. Single; pink. 
Condorcet. Double; pale blue, rose-colored buds. 

T. — Tazus baccata Europe Suffers more or less severely here 

from cold. 



46 



LAN DSC A PE ARC/// / /• C 7 C /< I: 



Size Nahk Tiue or I-'lowkkinc Habitat Rcmaiks 

2' — Taxusbaccata, var. repandcns Form which is perfectly hardy 

A broad, flat-topped, rather 
compact shrub, with exceed- 
ingly dark green foliage. A 
plant of great value for thii part 
of the country. 

T. — T. cuspidata Japan Entirely hardy here. A forest tree 

in Japan. Some plants in .Arbor- 
etum show signs of tree develop- 
ment, (desired. 

T. — var. capitata Probably best if tree form is 

4'-s' — var. nana Very dark green Ivs. Wide-spread- 
ing, rather irregularly growing 
branches. Attains a height of 
only 4-5 ft., but sometimes 
covers a space 10-15 f'- 'n diam- 
eter. Most valuable of all dwf. 
evergreens. Incorrectly called 
var. brevifolia. 
Tcucrium Chamaedrys Killed igi7-i8. 

T. — Thuya occidentalis N. A Some forms are very dwf. Others 

grow into large globular masses. 
Others are narrow pyramids. 
Some have pendulous branches. 
They vary, too, in the color of 

T.— T. plicata W. N. A [the foliage. 

T. — T. Standishii Japan Perfectly at home at the Arbore- 
tum. 

D. — Thymus Serpyllum July Forms mat. Fls. small, lilac, in 

quantities. Useful for rock- 
garden. 

D. — T. vulgaris S. Europe Dwf. shrub spreading rapidly into 

broad mats, completely cov- 
ered with short clusters of 
purplish blue two-lipped fls. 

T. — Tilia alba Often called Tilia Michauxii. 

Distinguished from T. ameri- 
cana by the pale lower surface 
of the Ivs. which is more or less 
covered with star-shaped clus- 
ters of while hairs. 

T. — T. americana N. E. N. A Growing to its largest size on rich 

hillsides and moist bottom- 
lands. Greatest beauty in the for- 
ests of New Brunswick, north- 
ern New England, and the val- 
ley of the St. Lawrence River 
Distinguished by the green and 
shining lower surface of the Ivs. 
Here the Ivs. are sometimes 
made brown by the red spider. 
Often sold in the nurseries as 
Tilia alba spectabilis. 

T. — T. argentea Europe Large tree, compact head. Lvs. 

dark above, silvery white be- 
neath. 

T. — T. cordata N. Europe Distinguished by its small, thin, 

more or less heart-shaped lvs. 
which are pale on the lower sur- 
face and furnished with con- 
spicuous tufts of rusty brown 
hairs in the axils of the principal 
veins. Hardy and desirable tree. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



47 



Size Name Time of Flowering Habitat 

T. — Tilia cordata, var. cordi- 

folia 

T. — T. euchlora or T. dasystyla 



T. — T. europaea (see T. vulgaris). 

T. — T. flavescens 

(T. americana X T. cordata). 
T.^T. floribunda (see T. flavescens). 
T. — T. hybrida (see T. vulgaris). 
T. — T. heterophylla 



Appalachians . 



T. — T. intermedia (see T. vulgaris). 
T. — T. japonica 



T.— T. Michauxii (see T. alba). 

T. — T. mongolica 

T. — T. petiolaris 



E. Asia. 



E. Asia. 
E. Europe. 



T. — T. platyphyllos June Europe. 

r. — var. grandifolia. 

T. — var. pyramidata. 

T. — var. vitifolia. 

T. — T. spectabilis 



T. — var. Moltkei 

T.— T. vulgaris 

(T. platyphyllos X T. cordata). 



T. — var. pallida. 
T. — Torreya nucifera. 



Hungary. 
Japan ... 



S. — Tripterygium Regelii July 

T. — Tsuga canadensis 



T. — T. chinensis. . . 
T. — T. caroliniana. 



Korea and 
Japan. 

N. A 



Blue Ridge. 



T. — T. densiflora Japan. 



Remarks 
. Sold as T. europsea or vulgaris. 

Large Ivs. 

Hybrid. Pyramidal tree. Large, 

dark green Ivs. lustrous on their 

upper surface. Grows rapidly. 

Its habit is good. 

Usually under the name of T. 

floribunda. Remarkable in its 

rather small, thick and very 

(lustrous Ivs. and large fls. 

Lvs. are larger than those of the 

other lindens. Silvery white 

on the lower surface. The 

slightest breeze makes them 

turn first one surface and then 

[the other to the eye. 

.Small tree with pendulous 

branches. Related to T. cor- 

[data. First to unfold lvs. 

Beautiful tree. Lvs. which are 
silvery white on the lower 
surface hang down on long, 
slender stalks and flutter grace- 
fully in the breeze. Branches 
are also pendulous. Rather nar- 
row but open head. A supposed 
hybrid of this tree with T. amer- 
icana and sometimes sold in 
nurseries as T. alba spectabilis 
is a very handsome tree. 

Recognized by the yellow tinge of 
the lvs. and the thick stalks, 
and by the prominent ribs of 
the frt. First to bloom. 

Believed to be a hybrid. Very 
vigorous and fast-growing tree 
of much promise. Lvs. large, 
silvery beneath. 

Lvs. thicker than type. 

Fine, round - headed tree with 
rather small somewhat pendu- 
lous branches. 

One of the handsomest evergreen 
trees in Japan. Hardy in this 
climate. Large tree with a tall 
trunk and dense head of dark 
green foliage. 

Half-climbing shrub. Fls. small, 
white, in clusters lo in. long. 
Frt. three-winged. 

Dwf. and other abnormal forms 
often occur in the woods. Sar- 
gent's Hemlock, one of these. 

Injured 191 7-18. Will probably 
never be successful here. 

Smaller tree than our northern 
hemlock, but is even more 
graceful in the droop of its 
slender branches. Can be de- 
pended on to flourish in S. N. E.* 

Killed 191 7-18. 



48 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Size 
T.- 



Nauc 

-Tsuga diversifolia . . 



Tike or Floweiinc Habitat 
Japan 



T.— T. heterophylla Alaska to Cal . 

T. — T. Mertensiana (Pattoniana) Pacific Coast. . . 

T.— T. Sieboldii Japan 

T. — T. yunnanensis China 



T. — Ulmus americana. 

U. campestris (sec U. procera). 
U. effusa (see U. laevis). 

T.— U. foliacea 



T — 
T.— 

T. — var. stricta 



var. Dampieri. 
var. pendula. . 



/"Europe. 
. < Africa . 
(Asia 



T. — var. suberosa 

T. — var. umbraculifera. 

T. — var. variegata 

T. — var. Wheatleyi. . . . 
T.— U. glabra 



T.— 
T.— 
T.— 
T.— 

T.— 



var. atropurpurea. . 
var. Camperdownii. 

var. crispa 

var. fastigiata 

var. heterophylla. . 
var. pendula 



Persia and Ar- 
menia. 



Europe and Asia 



N. and W.China 



U. hollandica 

(U. foliacea X U. glabra). 



var. belgica. 



T.- 
T.- 
T.- 
T.- 



var. Dumontii. 
var. Klemmer. 
var. superba. . . 
var. major. . . . 



100 — var. vegeta. 



ECMAEU 

Mountain Hemlock. Perfectly 
at home at the Arlxjrctum. 

Largest and handsomest of all 
hemlocks. Probably short- 
lived here. 

Doubt if will ever live long in N.E. 
Largest and most widely dis- 
tributed of the conifers of China. 



(Paler bark than U. procera. 
Smooth and shining Ivs. Fertile 
seeds in abundance. 
Fastigiate. 

Very pendulous branches. 
Cornish Elm. Narrow pyramidal 

head. 
Corky wings on branches. 
Dense globose head. 

Lvs. blotched white. 

Wheatley Elm. Pyramidal tree. 

Scotch or Wych Elm. Smooth 
trunk and branches. Fertile 
seeds and does not sucker. 
Many abnormal seedlings. Least 
beautiful. 

Little to recommend it. 

Regularly pendulous branches. 

More curious than beautiful. 

Exeter Elm. Narrow pyramidal 
[tree. 

Horizontally spreading branches. 
Handsomer than var. Camper- 
downii. 

General name of a race of hybrids, 
among them some of the hand- 
somest and most valuable of 
European elms. 

Tall tree, straight trunk, rough 
bark. Handsome and desirable 
as street tree in Holland; too 
soon to judge its value here. 

Fastigiate. 

Fastigiate. 

Narrow, pyramidal tree. 

Dutch Elm. Large tree; short 
trunk, rough bark, wide-spread- 
ing branches with corky wings. 
Suckers. 

Huntingdon Elm. Massive trunk, 
spreading and ascending bran- 
ches. One blown down, 1911, 
Magdalen College, Oxford, 142' 
high, trunk 27' around 5' from 
ground. Grows more rapidly 
than other elms. Suckers freely. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



49 



Size Naue Time of Flowering Habitat 

T. — Ulmus las vis Scandinavia and 

N. Russia. 
U. major (see U. hollandica, var. major). 

U. minor England 

U. montana (see U. glabra). 
U. nitens (see U. foliacea). 
U. pedunculata (see U. Isevis). 
loo' — U. procera 



Remarks 
Broad, pyramidal head. 
to unfold Ivs. 

Small-lvd., large tree. 



Earliest 



T. — var. viminalis 

U. sativa (see U. minor). 

U. scabra (see U. glabra). 

U. surculosa (see U. procera). 
D. — Vaccinium canadense 

S. — V. corymbosum 



N. E. N. A., 

E. N. A.. . . 



D. — V. macrocarpon 

D. — V. Oxycoccus 

D. — V. pennsylvanicum N. E. N. A.. 

D.— V. vacillans N. E. N. A.. 

D.— V. Vitis-Idaea 

var. minor 

S. — Viburnum acerifolium E. N. A. . . . 

V. affine (see V. pubescens, var. affine). 
S. — V. alnifolium May E. N. A. . . . 



S. — V. americanum N. E. N. A 



S. — V. bitchuense Japan. . . 

S. — V. bracteatum June Georgia. 



S. — V. buddleifolium. 
S. — V. burejaeticum . . 



Manchuria, 
Korea and 
N. China. 



Long known as U. campestris. The 
English elm rarely produces 
seeds. Is propagated by suckers. 
Splendid, tall, long-liv'ed tree 
with a massive trunk and erect 
or spreading branches. Has 
grown to a larger size in Boston 
and its suburbs than any other 
planted tree. 

Small Ivs. Supposed to be a 
[seedling. 



Beautiful for ground-cover in na- 
tive woods. 
Els. white, bell-shaped. One of the 
most beautiful shrubs of east- 
ern N. America. Habit is good. 
Fls. and frt. are beautiful. No 
other plant has a more splen- 
did autumn color.* 
I Will grow in dry ground, though na- 
f tive to swamps. Beautiful plants. 
I Beautiful for ground-cover in na- 
' tive woods. 

.Tufted creeping stems. 'Fls. small, 
pink or white. Frt. dark red. 
Valuable as an undershrub for it 
grows well in comparatively 
[dense shade. 
Hobble Bush or Moosewood of 
northern woods. Fls. white, 
showy. Frt. red, later black. 
Deep A. C. 
So-called High-bush Cranberry. 
Less compact than that of the 
other species. Frt. translucent, 
orange-red and very lustrous, 
remains on the branches through 
the winter. A. C. bright orange- 
red. 
Somewhat resembles V. Carlesii. 
Fls. smaller, and habit not so 
good. 
Rarest of American Wburnums. 
Grows naturally only on the 
cliffs of the Coosa River near 
Rome, Georgia. Tall shrub 
with numerous slender stems. 
Injured 191 7-18, but recovered. 
Better suited for milder climate. 
Neat shrub. Fls. creamy white, in 
small, compact clusters. Frt. 
small, black. Lvs. small. Little 
to recommend it. 



so 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 



Sict Navi 

D. — Viburnum Carlesii . . . . 



TiuE or Floweiimc Habitat 
Korea 



S. — V. cassinoidcs June N. E. U. S. A.. . 



S. — V. dentatum June N. A. . 

S. — V. dilatatum June Japan. 



S. — V. erosum Japan and Korea 

S. — V. furcatum Japan and Korea 

S. — V. bupehense China 

S. — V. Lantana May Europe 



V. lantanoides (see V. alnifolium). 
S. — V. Lentago June E. N. A 



S. — V. macrocephalum, var. sterile 

S. — V. moUe June 



S. Ken., S. Mo.. 
S. — V. nudum Appalachians. . 



S. — V. Opulus N. Europe and 

Siberia. 



D. — var. nanum 

var. sterile 

S. — var. xanthocarpum 

S. — V. ovatifolium China 

V. plicatum (see V. tomentosum). 
T. — V. prunifolium U. S. A 



KtHAlM 

Compact habit. Earlieit of the 
viburnums to fl. Very hardy and 
blooms freely when not more 
than a foot high. F1.-buds are 
rose-rjink. Inner surface of the 
corolla is white and as the fl. 
opens the color of the outer sur- 
face gradually fades to pink and 
then to white. Ornamental 
plant of great beauty and value. 

Native of swamps. Ore of the 
handsomest. F'Is. slightly 
tinged with yellow. Frt. larger 
than that of the other species, 
first yellow-green, later becoires 
bright pink and finally blue- 
black, glaucous bloom. Splen- 
did in autumn dress. 

Fls. white. Clusters of bright blue 
frts. Improves with good culti- 
vation. 

Very valuable. Large shrub. Fls. 
creamy while in clusters. Frt. 
bright red, lustrous. 

Little to recommend it. 

Closely related to V. alnifolium. 

Vigorous, erect stems. Fl. of no 
importance. Frt. red and one of 
most attractive of all nbumunr.s. 

Among the shrubs of W. Europe 
which are really valuable in New 
England. Tall, compact, round- 
headed shrub with large, thick, 
dark green Ivs. Frt. when fully 
grown is bright red but finally 
(turns black. 

Large shrub or small round- 
headed tree. Fls. creamy white, 
in large, rounded clus;ers. Frt. 
dark blue, sv\eet. Lvs. lustrous. 
One of the most beautiful ard 
desirable of the shrubs of the 
X. United States. Splendid in 
autumn dress. 

Chinese Snowball. Short-lived. 

Nearly round thick lvs. on long 
stems. 

Has never become established in 
the Arboretum. Southern rela- 
tive of V. cassinoides. 

Fl. -clusters smaller than those of 
the American species. Larger 
and handsomer shrub with 
thicker and darker green Ivs. 

Low, dense, little bush. 

Guelder Rose. 

Frt. yellow. 

Killed to ground 1917-18. Pe- 
[covered. 

Small shapely tree of the Middle 
States. A. C. deep wine-color. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 



51 



Size 
S.- 



S.- 

s.- 
50-40'- 



Namk Time of Flowering Habitat 

-Viburnum pubescens W. and S. of 

W. N. Y. 



var. affine S. Missouri. 

-V. rhytidophyllum W.China... 

-V. rufidalum S. U. S. A... 



S.- 

s.- 



-V. Sargentii N. E. Asia. 

-V. Sieboldii Japan 



S. — V. theiferum June W. China. 



S. — V. tomentosum. 



Japan. 



S.— 



var. dilatatum. 



S.- 
S.- 

S." 

S. 



var. lanceatum 

var. rotundifolium. 
-V. Veitchii 

-V. venosum July 

var. Canbyi July 



Japan. ... 
W. China. 



Coast Cape Cod 

to N. J. 
Pa. and Del... . 



-V. VVrightii June Japan 

-Vitex Agnus-castus S. Europe, W. 

Asia. 
-V. incisa N. China 



v.— Vitis sstivalis Cent. U. S. A. 



Reuarks 

Shrubby, with slender stems 
spreading into large clumps. 
Fls. white, in small abundant 
clusters. First-rate garden 
plant. Grows naturally on lime- 
[stone soil. 

Suffers from cold. Lost Ivs. 191 7- 
18, but recovered. 

Southern plant distinguished by 
its thick and shining Ivs. Lar- 
gest of the American species. 
No other Viburnum has such 
handsome foliage. Rusty red 
felt covers the winter buds and 
the edges of the leaf-stalks. 

Dark green Ivs. with long, narrow 
terminal lobes. Frt. compara- 
tively small and dull-colored. 

Tree-like shrub. Fls. in large clus- 
ters. Frt. bright red, then black. 
Lvs. light, lustrous, disagreeable 
odor when crushed. Fast-grow- 
ing, hardy. 

Stout and vigorous. Fl. of no im- 
portance, small clusters. Frt. 
large, abundant, light orange, 
then scarlet. 

Cannot be spared from our collec- 
tions. Large flat-topped shrub. 
Wide-spreading horizontal bran- 
ches. Frt. small, at first bright 
red and finally nearly black. 
A. C. orange and red. 

Not to be confounded with the 
true Viburnum dilatatum. Large 
shrub. Fls. creamy white in 
numerous clusters. In the au- 
tumn it is covered with small, 
bright red, lustrous frts. which 
remain in good condition for a 
long time. 

Hardy. 

Handsome foliage. Lvs. fall after 
all other Viburnums. 

Resembles V. dentatum. Blooms 
a couple of weeks later. 

Broad, tall, round-topped shrub. 
Fls. large, flat clusters. Frt. 
bright blue. Lvs. large, lustrous. 
Greatly improved by cultiva- 
tion. Last V. to bloom. 

No American counterparts. Only 
value is in large, bright red frt. 

Not hardy in New England. 

Large shrub of open, graceful 
habit. Stems killed to ground in 
severe winters, which rather im- 
proves plant. Fls. rose. Valu- 
able for its good habit. 

Summer grape of the middle 
states. Large, dark green lvs. 



52 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

SiZK Name Tihx of Floweriko Habitat Rehaiu 

V. — Vitis amurensis E. Siberia Hardy and valuable plant. Le»i 

vi({orous than V. Coignetix. 
Valuable for walls and trellUe*. 

V. — V. arizonica Small, pale gray-Kfecn Ivj. 

V. — V. bicolor E. N. Y. and Vigorous plant with large, deeply 

southward. lobcd Ivs., dark green on the 

upper surface and pale blue- 
green on the lower surface. 

V. — V. cinerea Miss. Valley . . . Very large Ivs. which are dark 

green and dull on the upper 
surface and ashy gray on the 
lower surface, which, like the 
young shoots, is clothed when 
the Ivs. unfold with a thick, 
felt-like, gray covering. 

V. — V. Coignetia: N. Japan Enormous, thick, prominently 

veined Ivs. semi-conaceous, pale 
on the lower side which turn 
scarlet in the autumn. Large, 
vigorous vine. One of the hand- 
somest of the grape-vines. 

V. — V. cordifolia Pa. and S Thin Ivs. light green on both sur- 
faces. Large clusters of small, 
blue frt. One of the largest and 
most vigorous of the American 
species. Frts. edible after frost. 

V. — V. Davidii Stems are thickly covered with 

spines. A. C. red. In severe 
winters the stems are killed back 
to the ground. 

V. — V. Doaniana S. W. U. S. A. . . Fast-growing plant. Lvs. are 

large, thick and firm, rather 
pale bluish green in color. 
Native of the Te.xas Panhandle. 
Perfectly at home in Xew 
England. Frt. grows in small 
clusters and is covered with a 
pale bloom. 

V. — V. labrusca N. E Large berries which vary in color 

from dark purple to reddish 
brown or amber color. Fox 
grape of Xew England. Lvs. are 
covered below with tawny white, 
tan-colored, or red-brown felt. 

C. — V. monticola Texas Sweet Mountain Grape of the 

limestone hills of southwestern 
Texas. 

V. — V. Pagnuccii Lvs. which are sometimes shaped 

like those of an ordinarj- grape- 

\-ine and sometimes are deeply 

and variously lobed much like 

V. palmata (see V. rubra). those on the Virginia Creeper. 

V. — V. rotundifoiia S. U. S. A Muscadine or Southern Fox Grape. 

v.— V. rubra Cent. U. S. A. 

V. — V. vulpina U. S. A Frost Grape. 

V. — Wisteria floribunda N. China Common Japanese Wisteria. Fls. 

purple, smaller, more fragrant, 
in narrower and more open dus- 
ters than W. sinensis, hardier. 
A. C. clear yellow. 

V. — var. alba Fls. pure white. 

V. — var. macrobotrys Fls. in very long clusters. 

V. — var. rosea Fls. pink, or white, tinged pink. 



A CHECK-LIST OF PLANTS 53 

Size Nawe Time of Flowering Habitat Reuares 

V. — Wisteria floribuada, var. variegata Lvs. blotched with yellow. 

V. — var. violacea-plena Fls. double, ugly. Blooms rarely. 

V. — W. frutescens U. S. A Slender vine. Fls. small, fragrant, in 

short, compact clusters. Blooms 
later than Asiatic species. 

V. — var. alba U. S. A Fls. white. 

V. — W. japonica Asia Smaller than other Asiatic species. 

Fls. pale yellow, in small clus- 
ters. Not hardy in North. 

V. — W. macrostachys Mo., La., and Handsomer than VV. frutescens. 

Texas. Fls. larger, in longer racemes, 

Fragrant. Blooms later than 
Asiatic species. Hardy. 

V. — var. magnifica A fine form. 

V. — var. albo-lilacina Fls. blue and white. 

W. multijuga (see W. floribunda). 
V. — W. sinensis China Only white-fld. form known. Vig- 
orous and hardy, but fl.-buds 
often killed by cold in N. E. 
V. — W. venusta Japan .• . . Hardy. Fls. white, in broad clus- 
ters. Earliest to bloom. 

T. — Xanthoceras sorbifolia China Shrub or small tree. Fls. white, in 

spreading racemes. Red at base 
of petal. Frt. like buckeye. 
Lvs. dark. 

D. — Xanthorrhiza apiifolia May Yellow-Root. Fls. small, chocolate, 

in terminal racemes, with open- 
ing of lvs. A. C. pale canary- 
yellow and green. Spreads 
rapidly into dense masses which 
take entire possession of the 
ground. Will not thrive in lime- 
S. — Yucca concava. [stone soil. 

S. — Y. filamentosa variegata. 

S. — Y. flaccida Generally appears under the name 

S. — Y. glauca Rocky Mts. [of Y. filamentosa. 

S.— Y. lineata. 
S. — Y. patens. 

T. — Zelkova crenata Caucasus. 

T. — Z. serrata Japan Keaki is most valuable Japanese 

wood. Genus related to Ulmus. 
Flourishes here. 

2-4' — Zenobia pulverulenta N. C. Fla Deciduous Ivd. shrub. Fls. pure 

■white and from y^-yi in. long 
and broad, produced in compact 
clusters arranged along leafless 
branches of the previous year 
and are perhaps more beautiful 
than those of any of the andro- 
meda-like plants. Chalky white 
lvs. covered with a dense white 

2-4' — var. nuda Green lvs. [bloom. 

Six best conifers for Southern New England: 

Tsuga caroliniana Pinus resinosa Abies concolor 

Pinus Strobus Tsuga canadensis A. homolepis 

List of exotic trees recommended for planting in the Northern States 

Populus Maximowiczii Salix fragilis Fagus sylvatica 

Ginkgo S. babylonica (not always hardy Tilia vulgaris 

Pseudolarix in Mass.) T. platyphyllos 

Larix decidua Cercidiphyllum T. cordata 

Populus alba Morus alba /Esculus Hippocastanum 

P. canescens Ailanthus Acer platanoides 

Salix alba English Elm 



BOOK REVIEWS 

REPORT OF THE UNITED STATES HOUSING CORPORATION. rU. S. 
Bureau of Industrial Housing and Transportation.) Vol. II, Wash.ngton, 
Government Printing Office, KjKj. 524 + xix pages, lllus., plans, iifa x 9 
inches. Price $1.50. 

The Housing Bureau was created to help win the war by providing for workers 
in war industries such housing and living conditions as were required for the health, 
self-respect, and efficiency of the workers, in order that the production and shipment 
of munitions and supplies might not continue to be imperiled by the intolerable living 
conditions caused by the war in manufacturing centers. This volume is a part of 
the accounting which the Housing Bureau is called upon to make to the Secretary 
of Labor and thus to the people of the United States. As a record of actual physical 
achievement, when measured against the whole of the task which was to be performed, 
it is like the record of most of the other government bureaus, which came to their 
maximum activity and efficiency only shortly before the time when the armistice 
made their efficiency of no further military value. Although the power of the Housing 
Bureau for further creative effort has terminated, the need for proper industrial hous- 
ing and town planning has not ceased with the war, as has the need for munitions. 
There is now a great and growing housing shortage in this country, and the content- 
ment and consequent efficiency of industrial workers is no less important to the 
country in peace than in war. The Housing Bureau in endeavoring to do its job as 
logically and effectively as possible was obliged to evolve certain methods of determin- 
ing what the circumstances were in each housing problem dealt with, and certain 
conceptions of what should be aimed at in handling these problems; and the records of 
this organized thinking ought to be immediately valuable to such of us as are now deal- 
ing with similar problems. Furthermore, the detailed records of the house plans and 
housing schemes worked out by the Housing Bureau, even though less than half of 
them ever came to construction, form much the largest available collection of data as 
to comparative advantages and relative costs of work of this kind. The more important 
items have been carefully stated and tabulated in the report, without, however, any 
considerable attempt to draw from this mass of data the conclusions which it may 
warrant, this being obviously too slow a process to be possible in the time. 

Careful study and comparison of this material, however, should throw a great deal 
of light on various practical points in industrial housing, and will be equally valuable 
to the people of this country whether it shall incidentally also show that the Housing 
Bureau was correct or incorrect in the various decisions which it was forced to make, 
under stress, with such skill and information as it then had at hand. 

To quote the editor's note: 

"The accompanying volume endeavors to set forth in as small space as practicable 
those activities and accomplishments of the Housing Corporation which were most 

S4 



BOOK REVIEWS 55 

directly concerned with the design of its various housing projects. The general pro- 
cedure of the corporation is discussed merely in those aspects which more directly 
affected project design, and therefore, while the activities of the Architectural, Town 
Planning and Engineering Divisions are fully covered herein, mention is made of 
certain aspects only of the work of the Real Estate Division, the Transportation Divi- 
sion, the Homes Registration Division, and the Construction Division, and only 
occasional reference is made to the other divisions of the corporation, all of which are 
to be considered in detail in Volume I of the corporation's report. 

"The main body of the present volume consists essentially of three parts: (i) A 
short general statement of how the Housing Corporation proceeded to ascertain what 
the situation was in the community to be aided, and how it determined what its appro- 
priate action for relief should be in each case; (2) a necessarily incomplete statement 
of some of the general principles governing this kind of design which the design divi- 
sions considered in their procedure or which they learned from their experience; and 
(3) a short and compact record, in plans, perspectives, tables, and text, of what the 
problem was which the corporation actually found in each of its important projects, 
and what attempt was made to solve it, as a matter of complete and reasoned 
design. 

"This volume shows by plans and other drawings as much as was possible in the 
allotted space about the more important projects; it states in tabular form, for com- 
pactness and ease of comparison, all the information as to the projects which it was 
practicable to represent by figures; and it sets down, in the text describing each pro- 
ject, only those facts which were of particular interest or which had a special and impor- 
tant influence upon the design. 

"The appendix contains reprints of most of the directions which were issued by 
the corporation as guides in design and construction, and the form of contract entered 
into by the general contractor. 

"A biblicgraphy is included covering the most important articles rn industrial 
housing published during the war to April, 1919, compiled by the crnsuhing librarian 
primarily from the references collected for current use in the work of tl e corpcr.T i n." 

Chapters VI and VII, dealing with the general appearance cf the housin: pr jett 
and scm.e ccnsideraticns as to costs and types of development, make no attempt at 
any completeness of technical discussion; they merely set forth som.e of the more 
fundamental considerations for the non-technical reader v. ho might want to know wl at 
the problem was with which the Housing Corporation was concerned. 

The project descriptions in Chapter VIII are similarly non-technical. The draw ings 
consist mostly of simple layout plans showing the street system, the house-locations, 
the lot-subdivisions, and in some cases the tree-planting. This simplicity enables the 
plans to be reproduced each upon one page. The architectural drawings consist of first- 
and seccnd-flcor plans, together with elevations or perspective drawings of the more 
important types of buildings in each project illustrated. These plans and drawings are 
more than ordinarily intelligible to the lay reader. It is a pity that more photographs 
could not have been used, but the work under construction was obviously for the most 



56 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

part in an incompleted state, so that photographs would not have been as explanatory 
as the drawings are. 

Although certain members of Congress, according to reports in the daily press, 
seem to find the volume a useless piece of extravagance — an "account of a great effort 
for future generations to know what somebody had done to aggrandize themselves," 
as Representative Treadway put it, — this record of experience will be of practical 
productive value in the hands of municipalities, housing companies, employers of 
labor, real estate men, technical designers of various sorts, and builders, who as tax- 
paying American citizens are entitled to the information. 



NOTE 

IN the previous number of Landscape Architecture attention should 
have been called to the fact that the minute upon the life of Charles 
Mulford Robinson was written by Professor James Sturgis Pray, as 
Chairman of a Committee, with Mr. Pitkin and Professor Frederic 
Noble Evans, who were appointed for this purpose by the American 
Society of Landscape Architects. 



AN DORRA 

TREES THAT ARE DIFFERENT 

9 GroAvn Avido apart and froquonlly 
transplanlodr tko roots and tops are 
right,- and Avill add real valuG to 
park or roal Gstato dovelopomont 

ORNAMENTAL TREES MD SHRUBS. WER 1000 ACRES 

ANDORRA NURSERIES 

Wm. Warner Harper Prop. Chestnut Hill Philadelphia 
Your inquiry will brind our Fall List 



Hardy Native Trees 
and Flowering Shrubs 

Selected stock, grown and col- 
lected for immediate effect 

Rhododendron maximum Azalea nudiflora 
Kalmia latijolia Amelanchkr canadensis 
Pinus strobus Ilex 

Tsuga canadensis Viburnums 

Hamamelis virginiana Camus altemifolia 
Myrica aspienijolia Corylus americana 

Hardy Ferns 

NimSBRY-GROWN TSUGA CAKADENSIS 

«nd PINUS STROBUS 
FUt, water-worn stones for walks and walls 

CHARLES G. CURTIS COMPANY 

ColltctoT* and Growers 

CALLICOON, NEW YORK 

Send for Price-List. 



Dreer Specialties 

HARDY PERENNIALS. Pot-grown 
stock, that can be planted in and out 

of season. 

ROSES FOR THE GARDEN. 

Strong two-year-old plants from pots. 
All of the popular varieties and will 
give immediate results. 

CANNAS and PAHLIAS. All the 
good standard varieties, as well as a 
selection of the most promising 
Novelties. 

Decorative Plants, Aquatics, Hardy 
Vines, Choice Flowers, Vegetable 
and Farm Seeds, Lawn Grass Seeds, 
Garden and Spraying Implements, 
Fertilizers, Insecticides, Etc. 

ff^rile for Calahgue 

HENRY A. DREER 

714-716 Chestnut Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



BOBBiNK CBi> Atkins 




Nursery nfflHE: i^Po^O Catalogue 



Roses 

Evergreens 

Rhododendrons 

Trees and Shrubs 

Old-fashion Flowers 

Spring-flowering Bulbs 

Fruit Trees and Bushes 



WITH CONSISTENT SERVICE 



RUTHERFORD ~ NEW JERSEY 



Ldy i^nanes uownin/A i 



3 5185 OC