(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Chicago daily news almanac and political register for .."

This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 
to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 
publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 

We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 



at |http : //books . google . com/ 



1 I 




V^cvxV*-'. 






THE DAILY NEWS 

ALMANAC 



AND 



POLITICAL REGISTER 



FOR 



1900. 



COMPILED BY GEO. E. PLUMBE, A. B., LL. B. 



SIXTEENTH YEAR. 



ISSUED BY 
THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS COMPANY. 

THE CHICAGO. QUARTBBLY 

'. ; '• OF 

THE CHICAGO KECORS and TH4 CHICAQO^DAILY NEWS. 

PUBLISHED QCTARTEBLY AT CHKAOO, nx., BY THE CHfCAGO DAILY NEWS CO. 

SDBSCRII^IUN PRICE $1.00 PER ANNUM. 

VOL. 7, NO. 2. ' JAJ? O^I^Y, lyOp. - 

ENTERED AT THE CHICAGO PC^OTOFFICl AS SBCOND-CLASS MATTER. 

[Copyright, 1900, by TbE CrfiCAGO DAiLy News Co.] 



^3551 A 

.\T0:^ Lf-'OX AND 
p 1 ^2^ L I 



PREFACE. 



The year preceding a presidential election is important and 
interesting from a purely political point of view. The state con- 
ventions and the elections of the year indicate the popularity of 
new issues and frequently set the pace for the following cam- 
paign. In this regard the elections and the utterances of state 
conventions in 1899 are significant and valuable. 

The war in the Philippines and the conditions in Hawaii, 
Cuba and Puerto Rico will, in all probability, exert a powerful 
influence on the campaign of 1900. In all of these departments 
The Daily News Almanac for 1900 is singularly replete. In 
the article upon thie war in Luzon valuable official documents 
are given, including the report of the Schurman Philippine com- 
mission. As to other important and historic features of the year, 
like the Peace Conference at The Hague, the temporary adjust- 
ment of the Alaskan boundary and the Spanish treaty, very 
interesting official papers, which have rarely been published, are 
given in full. 

The Nicaragua canal, which is likely to be the subject of 
congressional legislation, is treated with a good deal of detail, 
and other subjects, like the Colonial Systetns of the World, 
Submarine Cable Lines, American Trusts, Railroads, Samoan 
affairs and partition, and many other topics, are given the 
prominence they deserve. 

Besides these discussions there is the same amount of 
material relating to finance, the army and navy, trade and com- 
merce, money, schools and education, pensions, agriculture, the 
churches, congress, national debt and other themes that have 
contributed so largely to the popularity of The Daily News 
Almanac in the past. 

Nothing of a political character has been omitted from the 
present volume that has any direct bearing upon the issues in 
the presidential campaign of 1900, while very much new material 
has been added to meet the demands of educators, clergymen, 
agriculturists and others interested in nonpolitical aflfairs. 

January i, Vi)00{ ' ' 



Chicago Daily News Almanac 



1900. 



NOTV.— The time nrlven In this Almanac fs local mean time, except when otherwise Indicated. 



ECLIPSES. 

In the year 1900 there will be three eclipses, two of the San and one of the Moon. 

1.— A Total Eclipse of the Sun. May 28. Visible to North Amerlcarand northwestern comer 
of South America, Europe, Northern Africa, and the North Atlantic Ocean. The path of 
totality ninning through Mexico, New Orleans, Mobile. Raleigh, Norfolk and across to Algiers, 
being of an average width of fifty miles. 

II.— A Partial Eclipse of the Moon, June 12. Visible to North and South America, Spain 
and Africa, occurring as follows: 



STAND A UD 



Moon enters Penumbra. , 

Moon enters Shadow 

Middle of Eclipse 

Moon leaves Shadow 

Moon leaves Penumbra. . 



BASTBRN 



12d. 8h.l5m.A. 
12d. lOh. 24m. A. 
12d. lOh. 28m. A. 
12d. lOh. 32m. A. 
13d. Oh. 41m. M. 



CENTRAL 



12d. 7h. 15m. A 
12d. 9h. 24m. A. 
12d, 9b. 28m. A. 
12d. 9h. S2m. A. 
12d.llh. 41m. A. 



MOUNTAIN 



12d. 6h. l&m. A. 
12d. 8h. 24m. A. 
12d. 8h. 28m. A. 
12d. 8h. d2m. A. 
12d.l0h. 41m. A. 



PACIFIC 



12d. 5h. 15m. A. 
12d. 7h. 24m. A. 
12d. 7h. 28m. A. 
12d. 7h. 32m. A. 
12d. 9h. 41m. A. 



First contact of shadow 4 degrees from South point of the Moon's limb toward the Bast. 
Magnitude of Eclipse — 0.001. (Moon's diameter — 1.0.) 

III.— An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, November 22. Invisible. Visible totsoutherahalf of 
Africa and to Australia. 



THE 70XJB SEASONS. 



Season. 



Winter... 
Spring..., 
Summer., 
Autumn .. 
Winter . . , 



Begins. 



December 21, 1899, 6:56 P.M. 

March 20. 1900, 7:38 P.M. 

June 21. 1900, 3:39 P.M. 

September 23, 1900, 6:20 A.M. 

December 22, 1900, 0:41 a.m. 



Lasts. 



D. H. m. 
. 89 42 
.92 20 1 
. 98 14 41 
. 89 18 21 



Common Year, 365 5 45 



March. 
June... 



EKBER SAYS. 

.. 7, 9, 10 I September 19, 21, 22 

.. 6, 8, 9 I December 19, 21, 22 



KOBimrO AKD EVEHHrO STARS. 

Mbrcitbt will be Evening Star about March 8, July 4 and October 29, and Morning Star 
about April 22, August 11 and December 7. 

Venus will be Evening Star till July 8 and then Morning Star the rest of the year. 

JUPITER will be morning Star till May 27; then Evening Star till December 14, and then 
Morning Star again the rest of the year. 



OHTIROH DAYS AKD CYCLES 07 TIMS. 



EpIpbQuy Jan. a 

Beiitua^usEmn BiiiiE^Ei^y Feb. 11 

S^XHfTeHtfuu ^uuduy Feb. ]H 

Oijhioutu;(?^luiH !Suiiday Feb. 2.^ 

Aah \VedHc*fttluy Feb. 2H 

Qimtlr^gaaitua ciuniiuy Mar. i 

Purloj .,,,, Mar. ]i 

Wild-Lent Sunday Mar.lH 

Palm SiiDduy Apr. f; 

GutKi FfUlny... Apr. l:t 

Ea>4tei- Sundfi>\ Apr. IS 

Lhiw Hundny, Apr. 2i? 

Rouatlon Sunday,. May 2iJ 

i«;un3ion Day May 2i 



Wbit SiJiJdny...... June 3 

Trinity Hunday. _ * JunelO 

i VrpuB irbriii t L Junel4 

HflTrHW New i'ewr (fjfSlilJ Sept.24 

V\TAt Sunday In Adrentir Dec. 2 

dirLstEnus. Dec. 2b 

Viniiitiirnl Letter.,.,. G 

y^i^ljir Cycle . , 5 

jjunar Cyt^Efl^ iOTCrttldtin Number) 1 

lUftuuD ludichon 

EpACt (Moon'A Aire, Jmn, 1) 

Jullitn Kerlod 6613 

Year uf tha World (fiet^tuagint) 7408-7409 

Dlcinyplun Period.,..,. r^ 



Moan's l^fjases* 




1900 




D. 

1 
8 
15 


BASTBBN TIME. 


CENTBAL TIME. 


MOUNTAIN TIME. 


PACIFIC TIME. 




s 


New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


8 52 room. 
40 mom. 
2 7 eve. 
6 53 eve. 
8 22 eve. 


H. M. 

7 52 mora. 
5 53 eve. 


6* 52 mora. 
10 40 eve.* 

7 eve. 

4 63 eve. 

6 22 eve. 
•7th. 


H.M. 

6 52 mora. 

9 40 eve.* 
11 7 morn. 

3 53 eve. 

6 22 eve. 
*7th. 




1 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 


6 
14 
22 

1 

il 

24 
30 

1? 

22 
29 

6 
14 
21 
28 

5 

26 

4 
12 

l§ 

17 
24 

23 


11 23 morn. 

8 50 mora. 

11 44 morn. 


10 23 morn. 

7 50 morn. 

10 44 mora. 


9 23 mora. 
6 50 mora. 
9 44 morn. 


8 23 mora. 
6 50 morn. 
8 44 morn. 




i 


New Moon. . 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


6 25 morn. 
34 mom. 
3 12 mom. 
36 morn. 
3 30 eve. 


5 25 morn. 
11 34 eve.* 

2 12 mora. 
11 36 eve.t 

2 30 eve. 
•7tlj. t23d. 


4 26 mora. 
10 34 eve.» 

1 12 mora. 
10 36 eve.t 

1 30 eve. 
•7th. t23d. 


3 25 mora. 
9 34 eve.* 
12 morn. 
9 36 eve.t 
30 eve. 
•7th. t23d. 




< 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
lAst Quarter. 
New Moon... 


3 54 eve. 

8 2 eve. 

9 33 mora. 
, 23 morn. 


2 54 eve. 

7 2 eve. 

8 33 mom. 
11 23 eve.» 
•28th. 


1 64 eve. 

6 2 eve. 

7 33 mora. 
10 23 eve.* 
•28th. 


54 eve. 

5 2 eve. 

6 33 morn. 
9 23 eve.* 

•28th. 




i 
s 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


8 39 mora. 
10 36 morn. 

3 31 eve. 

9 50 mora. 


7 39 mora. 
9 36 mora. 
2 31 eve. 

8 50 mora. 


6 39 mora. 
8 36 morn. 
1 31 eve. 

7 50 morn. 


5 39 mora. 
7 36 morn. 
31 eve. 

6 60 morn. 




•^ 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


1 59 morn 
10 38 eve. 

7 57 eve. 

8 27 eve. 


59 mom. 
9 38 eve. 

6 57 eve. 

7 27 eve. 


11 59 eve.* 
8 38 eve. 

5 67 eve. 

6 27 eve. 
•4th. 


10 69 eVe.* 
7 38 eve. 
4 67 eve. 
6 27 eve. 

•4th. 






First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


7 13 eve. 

8 22 mora. 
31 mora. 
8 43 morn. 


6 13 eve. 

7 22 morn. 
11 31 eve.» 

7 43 morn. 
•18th. 


6 13 eve. 

6 22 morn. 
10 31 eve.* 

6 43 mora. 
•18th. 


4 13 eve. 

5 22 morn. 
9 31 eve.* 
5 43 morn. 

•18th. 






First Quarter. 

Full Moon 

Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


11 45 mora. 
4 30 eve 
6 46 mom. 

10 62 eve. 


10 45 mom. 
3 30 eve. 
5 46 mom. 
9 52 eve. 


9 45 mora. 
2 30 eve. 
4 46 mora. 
8 62 eve. 


8 45 mom. 
1 30 eve. 
3 46 mom. 
7 52 eve. 




1 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 


2 56 morn. 
6 morn. 

3 57 eve. 
2 57 eve. 


1 56 morn. 
11 6 eve.^ 

2 67 eve. 
1 57 eve. 

•8th. 


66 morn. 
10 6eve.^ 

1 57 eve. 
57 eve. 

•8th. 


11 56 eve.* 

11 67 mom. 
^-Ist. t8th. 




1 


First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter 


1 

8 

15 

23 

31 

22 
29 

it 
i 


4 10 eve. 
8 18 morn. 
4 51 morn. 
8 27 morn. 
3 17 mora. 


3 10 eve. 
7 18 mora. 
3 51 mora. 
7 27 morn. 
2 17 mora. 


2 10 eve. 
6 18 morn. 
2 61 morn. 
6 27 mom. 
1 17 mora. 


1 10 eve. 

5 18 mora. 
1 61 morn. 

6 27 mora. 
17 morn. 




1 


FuirMoon. . . . 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 


6 eve. 
9 37 eve. 
2 17 mom. 
35 eve. 


8 37 eve. 

1 17 morn. 

11 35 morn. 


7 37 eve. 

17 mora. 

10 35 morn. 


3 eve. 

6 37 eve 
11 17 eve. 

9 35 morn. 
•21st. 




5 

1 


Full Moon... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
B'irst Quarter 


6 38 mom. 
5 42 eve. 

8 48 eve! 


4 38 morn. 
4 42 eve. 

6 1 eve. 

7 48 eve. 


3 38 mora. 
3 42 eve. 
6 leve. 
6 48 eve. 


2 .^8 morn. 
2 42 eve. 

4 leve. 

5 4b eve. 





l«t MONTH. 



JANUARY. 



81 DATS. 



iJaiiutirf Id namr^cl from Joun^J 
nil ancjcut Eomun [Itvliilty, audi 
I was adfled tu I he Uoman CaJeti 



ABfoids mfiTctar. 



SlftTtiJi emancipated, l^t^i 

Batll+i «f Priractjtnn, 1777. 
BMitIo of Stone River, laR 
Arniittl burriH UUhmninl, 17BL 
Grpnt R113 EhqiUkkT^ in N.K,,H>J3. 
Batne l^prm^fleld, Mu., IMtwi. 
Ituttle or jit^w OrlenriH. IBlfi. 
Ft. is an r> u ryM^h. , cfzipturod. 1779. 
Florida Rf^<]!eded. lAil. 
jMatifliiift sercdi^d^ 18KU 
LlTitMtln'fl lat »i>eud^lt tD ctf!t,lS<l3. 
Ft, PisbcT attRoted, Mfi. 
tten, BraddtHjk ss-IIh, iV.^a. 
FL riaher efljjtured, IBfiS* 
Anin(3sty biirj>a»aed. Mm. 
Morijati defeats Turletori ,17*11. 
Battle of rrederickftt(mn,l;Si;i. 
B a Itle of M ]J I SprI n irn, I wis?, I 
Battle of Somereet, N, J„ 1777. 
Jadksnn entera N .OrJPHnfi J813. 
Stone Heet suui ChaH'stnaHtfl 
Masfl&ere ttJTcr Jlafliu, fWS, 
Rhudd7 drlv'n fFm TeniiMlBSI 
OrFzaba tiikeii. lfl4S, 
VVpljflter'a feply to nftrn©.T''3Q 
New f*rnvldt^Eice tnlitn, ITTH. 
F If 3t i mt' ] b an k a t Ph i 1 a., I im. 
Brittfili lake Auposta,Gn„]i7l3. 
Con^tHatlinn Atu tended, im;^ 
NftrnlbJittk' nffCliarj'&t n,lHft?, 



iKeK.T^.T.. Pa.. 
J N. IlL, i Dd .. p. 



BLLuula. S, IIL, 

Va . Kj',, Mo., 

Kan., Ct>L, fla!., 

Ind,, Olif 



Sun I fiTin.Moou 

U.M.LBH. 11, ^1. 

" 1J+.4 4H- J} l:^ 




St.Paul.X^E. 

Wli.aud TtUclu 

N.E Newrork, 

xMlia n., Or, 

Siiu: i^uii'MiMin 

7 ;-^si|+^'*<| <t fi" 
7 ;^tH'4 'M *> 30 

7 ;^t> -1 iml 7 :-t-* 
7 :is? .i :-ii H 51 
7 :tfi t 3-.! 1(1 7 
~ Hji 1 .i:ilii eif 



7 HS 
7 l^M 
7 c^ 
- Srt 



1 :^^; 

4 H7 

4 aM 

-t an 

4 I ] 



^ Hii 4 l\l 

3(;.4 4a 



7 K.T 
7 .H 1 
7^4 

7 3H 

7 a2 

7 31 

- ai 



7 a^ 
7 1*7 
7 L>(1 

7 t^5 
7 '^4 

7 t]a 

7 2'2 



4 44 
4 4Ji 
i 17 
4 4^ 
4 4t> 
I 60 
4 5. 

4 .-^a 



. ao 4 55 
7 2ft 4 5(J 



i rp7 

4 &n 
" 

5 § 

6 4 



n]orn 

- ;^ti 

1 4H 

2 57 
4 'J 



Tnnri5 
n 10 

1 14 

2 1ft 

« 25 



led MONTH. 



FEBRUARY. 



SS DATS, 



41|tn Sat 




February is^ named from Kamftn 
dlTlui If Febni u fi{ P] u toj , or JA^t^- 
rua (Juno>, and waa nflsli-d to 
Boman Caleadiir &l>out Tlrl h. o. 



AmKaiG.i]r lusToat-. 



C! 1 1 cato, In w a/St, Lou I H, H , 1 1 S , , 
N eb., li.Y.i Pu., Va., K\\. Mo., 
K&a., dol., Caf., 



Battle of Cowan's Fqrd, ITSi 
Muxiluan cf^aalon of ]iB4g» 
Battle of Dnyer.lRBB. 
Clinton reaches N. Y^ 1770. 
Mfciillng TT'b sl'v fy iMyaijaae 
Treaty with Frantic, ITTii* 
Jeff l>n via' (jase dtamisBt?d,IJ?f.!&, 
Confderate nov't rormfdiinfiin 
ConTderate cnnKresumet, imil 
Eat t!fi Hornet & RosolutejwiS. 
LinC4.»ln left for Wash'n, 1SR1. 
First futltlve alavt! law, ITfft. 
Massacre of Gl^nenp. If^L 
Plukeni* ronta tbe Br[tlshj7T8, 
Bdttlc»li[|> Maine d€ St r'd, IHfci. 
Ilessl^an troojiH hired. 1776. 
Treatjuf GhontratlfleEi, tfll5. 
Ijoe com.4n-chleft 18fl4, 
Firgt nst'l thankaalvlnfr, 1705. 
Brmldock arrive* tn Va., 176&. 
Silver t^niOEjQti^^ed. 197B. 
BartTi} of atrdeiiBtiarjj, lfiI3. 
Battle Of ttup^ia Vifila, 1B47* 
JoliLLBOn tiapeacilird* IBCl^. 
CoaRtripilou bllipaflae<i, 18G&. 
Naabvlllo Burrendered, iSl^. . 



ei,wiif. s. jiikli!; 
N, 113.. Ibd., O, 






u - 

|7 ]4 
7 13 
1 7 12 

It 11 
|7 JO 



Hattie of Mtirria Nef^k, lITl 
FrLvate^rNafihyllledeBrdjaea^ g S7 5 48 



7 
7 

7 
7 
,7 

I? 1 

d nn 

H 57 

fl ftr> 

tl 54 
tJ 52 
fi5l 
G 50 

Itt 4S 
'6 47 
6 45 
(144 
,0 42 

\a 41 



flflea]setSrht.tJi, 



n.^.f li.M. H.scJn^HJ n. m.\ 
5 14, 7 45 7 7 5 '21' 7 4fi 
3 lol 9 2 7 fifj 22 9 1 
5 17 10 1(1; 7 5 5 23 10 12 
5 la 11 2Sl 7 5 5 24,11 23 
5 ] H nii.irn | 7 4 5 28 mQTti 



5 2a, hIB ;7 3 5 27 



115 22 



r>2H 

5 24 
5 25 
^ 27 
5 28 



,7 2 5 2H 
,7 1;.'J^ 
\ii .19.5 30 
rt 68 5 31 
5 S G 57 S E*2 
n 43. 5G6 34 



1 4i 

2 47 
a 41 
4 28 



OiJ2 

1 ,aH 

2 3S 

3 32 

4 in 

5 O 
5 37 1 



5 ^(l G 12 6 55 5 35' 8 
ft 31 riftCR tJo4 6Se riaea 
5 32 G 5S ,tj 52. 6 37 G &9, 
5 3:^ 7 57 e 51 5 38l 7 56 
SVii^ see IG 60,5 39 8 ffil 
5 3d 9 jj6 ,6 40|6 40l 9 51 
5 37 10 55 e 47 5 42 10 50 
5 3H n 57|;G 4G'5 43 11 50 



6 an 

6 41 

5 42 

6 4:^ 

5 44 
fi 4tj 

6 47 



mem , 4,1 5 44 morn 
58 6 43 5 45 O 5U 
15!* G 42 5 46' J 43 

2 54, ft 41 6 471 y 45 

3 44 G aw 5 4S' a SG 

4 20 G 3S 5 49 4 *22 
r* 8 G 37 5 5ti; 6 3 
6 i4l 6 hH5 tl 4TI _ 5 m 



St. Paul, N. E. 

Wlfl, at]d MEch., 

N.E. JVevr Yorlt, 

Mlnn^tOr. 



?an| listmiMoon 

rlj-eft ftetJ. j K.& a. 

R.H. O.lf. H.M. 
7 2(15 7, 7 45 
7 19 5 p 9 4 
7 1ft 5 1(1 10 2tl 
7 17 5 11 11 3d 
7 1G6 13 mora 
"14 5 14| f> 18 
7 1^^ 5 I« 1 5ri 
7 12 5 17 2 58 
7 10 n IB I 3 52 
7 & 5 20' 4 38 
" 7 5 21 6 17 
G 5 aa 5 51 
4 5 241 G 19 
3 5 25 rlftPB 
15 27 rt5B 
6 2S! 7 69 
G 58 S au S 59 
6 67 5 3110 1 
G 6155 33 11 3 
G 64 5 a4'niurn 



H 62 5 3b; 



G 51 5 3- 
4n 5 3n 
6 47 5 4U 
G 45 fS 41 
G 44 6 43 
<* 42 6 44 
H 40 5 4,1 



3 5 

3 54 

4 -*8 
6 61 

_B 48_ 





adMosTH. MARCH. bidats. 




I' 
I' 


i^Ji 


MartJh w*9 named from Mam, |'^^^i,^^Y^"l^*' 


St. Loun,a. iiu 

Va., Ky.,Mo,, 1 

Kan'. C^l.. Caf.J 


4f.'o"d'iEil;. 




5^ 


og ' 


the Eod nf jur. It wftfj the: J wi« S Jiilch:: 


N.E. NewTork, 




h 
-< 
C 


!i 


tlmt immt li of ttjeRomHn year. 


N. 11 


.Mud,. O.f 


lnd..Ohlo, 1 


MlBiL^Or. 






i^llTII 


Sim; Mori 11 


Sun iiUntMiMiti 


BUDI 


Bun-Hmm 1 






AliniC4H UISTOBI. tlpl'9 sn(B:!li,.v ^ r>'H fi,>w,|H.t8. | 


WeeMeti.|a,i».|| 




m 


1 


Tb. 


Artier 8 of con fed . nitf rt 'd. 1 m i H ' ?(^ 1 


%S^'",i^^ 


II.M- H.N.I 

*; Hi 021 


6 32 


f^^ 


H.lf 1 U. M. 

5 46 6 33 




ai 


2 


frl. 


a ni ti t KJ ad a I It^u t .-^e ti . , 1KS4, 


34 


5 51 7 00 


6 r^ii 


5 53 


7 4H 


ti 36 


5 48 7 63 




62 


3 


!^Jlt. 


Riittli> ot Uritjr Ci-eek^ ITTOh 


6 32 


5 52 tJ 


tJ31 


5 54 


i-> 


6 35 


5 49 ft 12 




8S 


4 


m\. 


Firsit eou|f trpfiH met, 17!^, 


6 31 


5 33 10 20 


6 20 


5 55 


10 14 


6 33 


5 51 10 28 




64 


fl Mo. 


Boj^tori nvasisarro. 1V7U. 


\}'29 


5 5,1 


n 31 


B 2N 


I» 5G 


1123 


6 31 


5 52 11 40 






tfiTu. 


BatLl(* of Pea Kid^e, 1W3. 


(> i^K 


5 no 


morn 


6 ^-^7 


5 57! 


niorn 


6 'iO 


5 53 raOTS 




Bii 


7VWe. 


BVbk^ society formed. l-HtM. 


'iJi 2W 


a 57 


J7 


6 2o 


5 5H 


28 


27 


3F^ 47 




67 


«,Th, 


&tamp Jirr. pftstspd^ inti. 


r, 24 


J r>fl 


1 3o 


6 24 


5 59 


1 ?!^ 


26 


5 56' 


1 46 




(^.'J 


9 FtL 


S imiUrT-M^rvimm: b!ittl(*,lflHg 


6 23 


r»5ft 


^J25 


6'^ 


6 1 


2 16 


6 24 


^^ 


S^*'^ 




ii^? 


in Srtt 


McCtel'ii croHs^^sFotnnsar, 1^*t2 


16^1 


d fl 


S W 


6 21 


2 


3 


22 


5 6P 


3 18 




TU 


' I srs. 


Ctnifert.rcnisttrn ndupted, lii(nl. 


t'. 20 


ti 1 


rt 44 


ii 10 


6 a 


3 37 


20 


« 


3 52 




71 




Mn. 


f T Tan t m u (le cl^u .- J n-c h 1 uf , l^iiJ 


tilH 


(5 2 


4 15 


6 17 


6 4 


4 10 


6 18 


6 ] 


4 22 




ir 


;^ 


Tu. 


Red river expedHion, tritii. 


6 Pi 


ti 3 


4 42 


JO 


6 5 


4 39 


6 17 


6 3 


4 48 






■; 


VVtv 


Npwbflrn raptured, iS/ffl. 
nlnud No. 10 bombarded. IBGl. 


6 11 


rt 4 


5 B 


iM4 


6 6 


5 6 


6 15 


6 4 


Oi 




7^1 


r* 


Th. 


6 l.'i 


6 a 


5 33 


16 13 


6 7 


5 32 


6 i^t 


6 5 




7n 


16 


Fr!. 


URtfte of Guilford, ITHI. 


6 n 


6 - 


rises 1 


6 n 


& B 


ripe 6 
7 45 


Oil 


** S 


rlHrt 




7ti 


17 


Sftt. 


Jcmton r T acu n t e ri. . lT?fir 


fl 


6 8 


7 4h 


+5 l<^ 


Ft S 


§ ? 


8 


7 63 




77 


8 


ttrj? . 


■^tKum art mietkled J"n. 
Tile (Vejion ief i .S F.. ^i^. 


3 7 


6 P 


8 4*1 


6 § 


6 10 


S44 


6 86 II 


•^^S 




7fl 


fl Mu. 1 


B 


<i 10 


50 


e 6 10 


9 43 


6 6 


6 11 


^m 




78 


20^7 «i 1 


WliJ-h 1 ii.^( 1 ui t'nT'rs Bottton J TitS 


a 4 <> I- 


16 ri6 


6 n 


f> n 


10 42 


4 


'^ JJI 


11 




SO 


21 Wq.I 


Buttle iM 1 leiidemiU. tEW4. 


5 2d ■! 


il 40 


6 3 


6 12 


11 40 


^ ? 


13 


11 69 




81 




Th. 


St-Ftinp net (tinned, 17fir>. 


rt (1,6 14 


nUhtti 


6 2 


6 13 


morn 


6 


6 14 


morn 






23 


FH. 


BJiUle of Winchester, 19^. 


5H 


U 15 


45 


5 


6 14 


30 


5 51^ 


fi ]*4 


66 




SS 


24 


Sat. 


Attaql on PeeVt^kl M7T7. 


.1 fi7 


]6 


136 


5 5ft 


6 15 


127 


5 5(t 


6 17 


1 46 




8^ 


il 


SO 


Hudson hyer rilscovored, IfldJk. 


7i 55 


t^ 17 


2 21 


^^ 57 


6 16 


2 14 


5 54 


6 18 


SV^ 




gg, 


26 


Mo, 


Forrc.1t hpnt'n nt Faducttb.lHi^ 


.^ 54 


6 IS 


3 2 


5 orp 


*n 17 


aE6 


5 52 


6 19 


SIO 




Kfi 


27 


Tn 


Tanning, Tei.. QiJip^^acrei 163fl. 


5 r>2 


6 ni 


3 3? 


o54 


6 18 


3 35 


5 50 


6 241 


a 45 




P« 


2fl Wo, 


SemluolP treaty, l^T3. 


f> i'>tJ 


6 211 


4 13 


5 5^J 


fllO 


4 10 


5 49 


fJ22 


4 16 




20 Th. 


Vera Cniz r-npitulHtee. 1J*47. 


o4';>6 21 


4 44 


5 ru 


rt:»0 


444 


5 47 


*}P. 


4 4i> 




ftS 


JU> Fri. 


Bttttle of SomefFiet. Ky.. iwtvt. 


5 17 d L':i 


sriP 


.^10 


6 21 


pefR 


'5 45 


6 24 


ael* 




ftp 


ailSHt. 


■ Trei^^tirybldfipi. burned' li^i^. 


^^4rf>-.j Tft3 


n 4716 22 


7 48 '5 4316 261 8 Oil 




4tli MO> 


TU. APRIL, 30 DAYS, 




g^ 


1 


sa 


AprllTrai! namert from flprfeff lNei?*SP'T^°plM 
no opeD). the *eaiun wbenbuUs 'i! tJJ-^Ij" s/&,ch: 


St.Loaia. S.lli., 

Va„KyMMo, 
Kan., Col., Cal. 


N.E.NrwTork, 




I- 


h 
< 
Q 




OpCfl. 


N. IIL. Iird., 0.1 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 






1 9im Sun McK>iil 


Bull SuDiSloOh 


8un 


Sun Moon 










llSBlCiS lOSTOBT. 


rlac3 ftctB. 


R.A 1^. 


riiKB:Beia.fit.*B. 


rlflpB 


iiefft. u,AE4. 




- " 








u^ti. n.u. 


H. M 


h.mJh.m.Ih. mJ 


n.w. 


U.jf. H. M, 




01 


1 


Hl'N. 


Bftttle Five Forki%, 18IJ.V 


p44d2,'i| 


H 


5 -jd 2;^ 


9 1. 


i> 41 


^^-T ,HZ 




<»'^* 


2 


Mg. 


BaitleiiiSelicfl, A!a , IffiS. 


!o 42 y 2tV 


16 IS 


5 4^1 


fJ^4 


16 10' 


.5 40 


28 10 28 




pa 


3 


Ta. 


[lldimond eTiseuaicd. Itf66. 


1.^ 40 


6:J7 


11 21 


5 4ri 


6 25 


11 V2 


Tf :iH 


30 11 32 




yi 




Wc. 


FirHt nevr&iiap<?r In L^ ft,, 1701. 


o30 


6 2ft 


mom 


541 


2H 


morn 


5 3tJ 


rt ^ I mora 




9S 


5 


Th. 


o 37 


6 29 


16 


n M) 


6 27 


7 


5 34 


6 32 


26 




9K 


C 


Frl. 


lAt hnn^f' of rep.uriranLz'd.ll^. 
Ilattitj of HhiUih, im. 


,5 ^n 


6 3^1 


1 4 


5 33 


28 


£Hi 


5 32 


n 33 


1 14 




07 


7 


8at. 


5 33 


6 31 


14li 


5 37 


6 29 


1 36 


5 31 


6 35 


I 62 




HH 


ft 


SlJi. 


I f^ laud No, TO taken, im. 


5 32 


ti;j2 


2 IB 


15 35 


6 30 


2 11 


5 20 


6:^6 


2 24 




f»n 


9 


Mo. 


Ijee >iun\'Tidered, Wa. 


5 3t> S 34 


2 45 


6 34 


6 31 


2 41 


5 27 


37 


2 51 




104) 


ID 


Tu. 


Hattleid Ft, Pn ii»kt.lSG3, 


o 'Jtt fl 35 


3 12 


5 32 




3 fl 


r» 25 


6 38 


Sf 36 




)J 


11 


Wo 


Ft. Sunjler horn horded, \ml. 


5 27 ki 36 


3 36 


(5 30 


6 33 


3 35 


5 23 


6 39 


4^§ 




lO'i 


1^ 


Th. 


Ft* PliUiw niaRSBcru, JMJ. 


5 25 fl S7 


4 


520 


33 


4 1 


W22 


41 




m 


UJ 


Fh. 


Vt. Sumter surrendered. IWI, 


.5 ^J4 3H 


4sa 


5 27 


6 34 


428 


5 20 


6 42 


^^i 




101 


;i4 


tnaL. 


Rflttre of JMfjiiIsr' Cortiera, l7JiJ. 


5 22 


6:^0 


4 51 


S2« 


6 35 


4 54 


5 8 


6 43 


4 47 




lOn 


15 


.ki;n. 


Lltifoludie.'^, IHtjf), 


Fi2t 


6 40 


r]Be« 


5 24 


|0 3*J 


liHCfl 


5 6 


44 


rises 




lf)(! 


10 


Mo. 


Porter linf^H^.ii Vlckabufp, 1BB3. 


5 19 


6 41 


8 43 


5 2.H 


t5 37 


8 36 


5 4 


6 45 


SQ^ 








Til. 


Demh ur FrapihUn, 1?J0. 


5 17 


6 42 


9 4H 


5 22 


6^-m 


9 34' 


5 3 


47 


9 53 




1' ^ 




Wu. 


HKlf^of Paul nt'vere. ivt^ 


5 10 


6 43 


16 40' 


5 20 


6 39 


10 HI 


5 11 


4H 


10 51 




lOf 




Th. 


HnttU^ of I^sSngttJn, 1775, 

i Loe rej»i*rQ8 C, S: A., 1:^61. 


5 14 


6 45 


1132 


ii 19 


6 40 


11 2:^ 


5 9 


40 


11 42 




1 c 


2C 


Fri. 


5 13 H 40 


morn 


5 n 


41 


morn 


S ^ 


50 


morn 




" ' 1 


^1 


Sill.. 


,'^[n*riiiih-AmeT.war tH^Ran.lffild. 


t7 ll]«^ 47 


19 


5 10 


42 


on 


5 6 


6 52 


US 




lis 




31 >. 


Foul Jones at Whlt*hftv^ti,i:ra 


n 0'0 4B 


1 


5 15 


6 43 


54 


5 4 




1 8 




iii 




MO. 


€«Uforl25.au0men. 1S86. 


S B-6 49 


136 


5 13 


6 44 


132 


5 3 


Gsl 


1 43 




ii' 


2^ 


Tu. 


HiiOKertftfceii the Oralie, ITTH. 
U.ies land otftce fstab'sird, 1602. 


J5 e.tl 66 


a 10 


5 12 


45 


2 7 


5 1 
4 50 


6 56 


2 3.4 




iifi 


h 


We, 


5 5 


6 51 


2 42 


5 11 


6 40 


2 41 


6 57 


s*i 




iij 


'2t 


Tb. 


New Orteans talen, ISIS. 


5 9 


6 52 




5 8)6 47 


3 14 


* Q^iS ^ft 


3 13 








Pri. 


Flah&aseorpui^ HtiHpend'di>lSei. 


5 a 


GS3 


3 45 




3 48 


4 56^7 


3 43 








Sat. 


BHttte(jrsaDffBtuckiiv'rt:T77. 


5 1 


6 54 


4 16 


5 7 6 4in 




*^hl I 


4 14 






fie 


»ts. 


Md, dci^ffl aB!'nstBy(i«ca'n,lHfil. 




6 55 


BOtB 


5 Gi^ 50 


aetft 


4 53 I 2 


ee-ti 




III 


3JLM5L. 


W^ a p h Injrti ] Jk 1 n a nnu ra l:«d.l78G. 


_4_58 


6 56 


3 


5 4 6 fill i4Mit4 52l7 a' 9 131 




1 
I 





6ll» MONTH. 



MAY. 



ai DAYS. 



121 
12L> 
12» 
124 
125 
I2ii 
12^ 
12l 
12J? 
130 
331 
1S2 
133 
134 
136 
136 
1B7 
138 
13I» 
140 
141 
UU 
143 
144 
145 
14ft 
14- 



C'^^ 



Til. 
We. 

Tti. 

Bt'Jf. 
M.J, 

'ru. 

Wy. 
Th, 
1<V}. 
Sat. 

Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 

Th. 
Frl, 
Sat. 

Mo. 
THk 
Wo 
Th. 

a at. 

, -. _. BliSH. 
148:t*H Mo. 

151i3llTh. 



M&y In from tne l^tln Maiua, 
tbe growing inyn Ell. 



AlKEUCiJS lUSTORV. 



towa. 



St. Laiilfl, S. 11]., 

I Eitn., Col., Cftl,. 

'I_]nd, Ohlo,_ 
&EJTJ ^un Mnori 
r\§('-s cii^r.H. n..t s. 



Dpw^^f ft vlrtory, 1S9S. 
' BaUltMif CLunfyllufMTtJle, ISl^i 
I-kHtciilT fttrSWjear im-ii, IHI]. 
(4 m J 1 1 fn tsaeB t he R a p i li' 1 1 . taij 4 
^orttown iSvtioi]aUMS. IHt'S. 
Atk. ftijd Term, tudiifi*?, ]fift]. 
a num Ro utfc^ T- Fi, . Cii ji t^ r d , 1803 
Bfltneof l^lo Alto.lK4n. 
Bsttie of Kertftea. Mex,. lS4fS. 
.Tij^iT. PftvlB captured, lfl*iS* 
Biutlo of Cborl'st u NecMHEL 
Vntvfn Point tftkun.lTTi 
War declur'd H(f n»t Mex.,13JU 
Cap« Cod dIacoTured, JtiU(3. 
Ft,<i^rftiihy tdJcen, IftfL 
Lincoln iinmlnjiled, l*WO. 
First nnltonal fast, IT7i^. 
Grant In yc-flts Virkuljurg, I9"i3. 
The "dnrk Liar.' /;mO. 
M*jtfclen[mrfrdPclnrfillonj;>7T, 
Ft (JaUitiLntHkon, iTHl. 
HrrnrikP iisii^aiilt^ fiumner, I^tO. 
St? tN cm' (it at Jflme^Uiwn, H'pi ir, 
JJftiihs « VHP ft StraitlHjrc, TSil^. 
HtttT Ic 1 Spottfiv ] V H Ti i a . 1,S(^, 
Ijist cfsnfefls. BuiTpMder, iSrUi. 
V^^r Erip Aiipprffi^nljnn'iljiSiU. 
Battle i<f l>alla>i. Gh., lit^. 
Haltlpof Wftxhaw, 1780. 
Tor in til takon, i.sfS2. 



S WEfl„B Mlc;b, 
N*. lEL, Ind . O 
Sun Sun .Moon 

rises aets.. n..^. 



4 ;(7 t! :-. 



t o4 

4 r>;4 

4 fil 
I 50 
I 41) 

'4 4Hi7 
• i 4H 7 

4 4t 
4 4^S 

■i 'i'2 

4 41 



7 ■ 



7 4 



■ H, 
7 I) 
7 10 
7 Jl 



4 4U,7rJ 



t fjii 

4 liH! 
137 
4 37 

i HfJ 

4 ;^^, 

I 34 
1 R3 



7 ir^ 

7 U 
7 "" 

- 1(3 

17 

7 IH 
7 HI 

7 yfl 



4 3^,7 2U 

It ^vj 7 yi 

4 ;^i 7 yi' 

t HO 7 2;^ 

1 :^[t 7 'j.i 

4 i^^> 7 2:< 

4 2>i'7 -7 



10 H 

10 ,^^4 

11 33 
morn 

iri 

4B 

1 14 

1 39' 

2 3 
2 27 

2 rii 

3 21 
3 62 
rises 

S34 
9 L'O 
10 IP 
il 1 

1 SS 
nut res 
12 

4H 

1 13 

1 ^:i 

2 ]Jl 

2 62 

3 34 

^^ 41, 
U \i ] 
in 11. 



3 H 62 
6 210 ft2 
5 l^JS^I 
1 5r» a 54 



4 5& 
4 S7 
4 firt 
4 6fi 
4 6-1 
1 fi3 
4 52 
4 &1 
4 SO 
4 40 
4 4H 
4 47 
4 4G, 
4 4 6 '7 



il 65 
M> 
B 67 
S 6H 

^ n 



4 44 

Jr 44 

4 43 
4 42 
4 41 
4 41 
4 40 
4 40 
4 3fl 



7 1^ 



54 

10 46' 

11 31 
tuorn 

fl 
042 

1 10 
137 

2 31 

'^ m 

2 50 

3 26l 
3 SHI 

rlH*» 

S 2.^ 

^ 2o! 

in 10" 

10 .->[' 

11 H.-!, 



5*t. Paul, N.K. 
Wl^.and Mlch^ 
N,E. New Vork. 

Allmi^Ur, 

Sun, StiTi:Moon 
riPCMtWiaJit *^ 

U.M H.M.. mTm, 

i (l*il 4 1"^ 14 



4 4n 7 
4 47 7 
4 ii.;!7 

4 46 - 



Oil 4 
7 1 1 47 

^ mom 



4 43 7 10 



_ 111 
7 41 
" 12 
. 13 
7 13 
7 14 
~ I.- 



4 :iH 7 Jfl 
3H 7 If! 
37 7 ^" 

4 H7'7 IS 



ri rrii.i' 

n ^; 

41 

1 13 

1 40! 

2 20 
'2 6h: 

3 41 

RPTS 
H 3;' 
M 2H 
10 -t 



7 12 

7 13 

7 14 

7 16 

7 10 

^ I 

IH 

1S"> 

20 

21 

23 

24 

26 

7 20 

7 2": 

7 2H 

7 i>^f 

7 3o 

" 31 

:v2 



h ;i7 



4 42 
4 W 
4 30 
4 3^ 
4 37 
4 36 
4 34 
4 33 
4 3l' 
4 31 
4 30 
4 20 
4 2S 
4 27 

4^^ 
4 24 
4 23 
4 2L^ 
4 2 J 
4 21 

4 2Ji:7 31 
4 J!' 7 36 
4 iSIf? 3»> 
4 iHh - 



23 

53 

1 ]R 

1 42 

2 4 
2 20 

2 60 

3 10 
3 40 

8 44 
30 

10 2H 

11 10 
11 4,1 
in nrn 

10 

40 

1 14 
i 42 

2 12 

2 40 

3 27 
(sets 

a 64 

n 41 

I0 2^) 



6 til MONTH. 



JUNE. 



30 BATS, 






152 
153 
154 
155 
160 
167 
15^ 

Igo 

163 
i6i 

105 
160 
107 
168 

im 

17«) 
171 
172 



178 
ITS 

im 

181 



FrL 
>(nt 

SI'S 

xMo. 

Tu. 

01 We. 

7'r'ii^ 

8 fVl. 

HLJf. 

Mo. 

Tu. 

We. 

Th. 

FrL 

Sat. 

^ux. 

Mo 

Tif. 

Ws 

Th, 

Frl 

@ftt, 

St It. 

Mo. 

TUk 

We. 

Th. 



J ime traced ttj J i] t3 a^ tho q n c cs , 
or ht*aven, vlio was thought to 
preal lie ov kt m arrlaues^ 



1MXIUC15 EQBTOEll, 



N(^li„Tsf.r., Pa.,, 
rt win. pS. Mich] 
N. IIL. list). O. 



»t LouIr, H JUJ 

Va,Ky,MQ.. 

Kan , CoL, Cal.,1 

Ind . Ohio 



St Paul. K.K, 

Wla and Ml* h., 

SE. New Vort. 

Minn . Or, 



20,FrJ. 
30i8nt 



Battle of Cold Harlnor, 18(U. 
Rattle Lake Chaiiiplafcrj^ |rtl3, 
Morrlmac&unk, t^sintlamMSSe. 
y r. PiJUiiw evacuated. iBtia, 
Battle uf Ptedmnnt, lan. 
Conft'ds. flur. Mi- tup bin. IJ)C2, 
ten tuns raid Canada, iStVl. 
BntUe of Chntranooira, 1302. 
Battle of Big Belli el, l.^^J 
War d'ol'd a^f^nsi THpcU, lSf>L 
Watker hinds in ?iiEiarVarl!*&6 
Grant errkB.Chkrkab'mltsy, {8*il 
Faiirlilve slave law r^p'i d.lBta. 
Natmnal fla* adopted, 1777. 
>Vajib'n takes ct}ninmnd. 1775, 
MlsHlftAlntiidir^c-overed, Ifm. 
llwttle of Bunker HiK, 1775. 
Uan, evac'Cri by Am^rlo'ns.lTVfj 
War de( I '0 jyr'n j« t En fr I ' r j J 815, 
Bftttio of 8t^>n j^ Ferr^, il^X 
U^ Sr A, i-eaehew ^iao rjafto. ISDQ 
Evrell cmsMOd PrjtomEn:^ IMVJ, 
Great Eastern at N. Y., litUO. 
Batlleof eevSOa, ISBft, 
C lister ujasi^at^re, 1870, 
Seven days' battles tKj^aii,!^*!^ 
M orm "n H ni oO b' d ,Carth ' ue^ 1 HTtl 
lat colonl'l aAf^cnibly t"'Ij<, Hiiy 
liowereachf^s^andy Ho'tjijiii 
GjiJteanh Ji nff*^< 3 , 1 HS2:. 




Ttl* MONTir, 



JULY, 



81 DATS. 



N 


6 


N' 


>h3 


h 


hid 


s^ 


< 


1* 


— - 


— 


— 


fi'A 


1 


,m's. 


h;^ 


-t 


Mo, 


W4 


S 


Til. 


H,- 


4 


We 




o 


Til. 


87 


ft 


rn 


I^IR 




8at. 


SB 


]^ 


SIX. 


on 


9 


Mo. 


E)| 


<f 


in. 


Lt2 


1 


Wo. 


m 


.:,^ 


Th. 


^i 


:i 


ML 


95 


4 


Sat. 


Ofi 


Tp 


Bt.N. 


vn 


H 


Mo. 


w 




Tu. 


S>lt 


H 


\v<^ 




fP 


Tit, 


201 




m. 


SOS 


21 


Sat. 


203 


yi 


BUS. 


204 


23 


Mo. 


205 


24 


Tu. 


18? 


2S 


Wp, 
Th. 


20a 


27 


Krl. 


L^*l 


j!H 


Sat, 


2 a 


2i^ 


»vs. 


2 1 


*V(i 


Mfk 


2 2 


iil 


Tu^ 



July nnm«l In hoiiarof .TtJJTuB- 
Cftjear.wiiO' was Ijorn uu the 12tli 
uf July, 

I.; li nif M II J^sH ^^1. n tit i'l IJ ^ 1 . 

VU'hftbiirK tiurn^i-nJi.^rcfL l>^*i. 
Rattle uf Curttinifc, Mn,. T8t;t. 
EJiittrn i.if Jaicu'j'Kiwru ITi^l- 
Haw:iU uEniv\i'il tit V S . im. 
\Vii>li'n ^:b<.i-'t^]i a? raiHial, Vi'.fl 
KiirrMiifloritf IH. lEikbiu]. lHi:i 
Kr'nrli ilNJi s Junril, N'tfr»n,n-H(», 
BntMe i.»l Ulf h M.mnlum. JSiU. 
N n r w a I k, Cf 1 n ci, , |> u rna J, iTTli, 
l^mf t rliitJ^ in N. Ym 1*E|. 
HmUt? of Carrlct'S Kord. Ifllil, 
BfiLLk>of Hus^lur'a Fanti, IHniJ. 
Wayin* tiil(t.','i>iiriny l^otntJTTy. 
8 fl 1 1 1 i n n I J !^u r re II f Jf rerl , isOB, 
Max] ml J inn ^hoE, ]a*>7. 



Murpan d(,'ft'HU si, Itwa. 
Con fed. tufiw:. HiLhiij4in_. 
Batllpof Boll (liii^lSUL 



. Hiihiunnd, 18m. 



tien. McCleiln tJikea uom.^a 
<ien- tjru(itcil4?fi.l>iH,i. 
.\UirnGonfl arrlviJi It] Utah, 1M7^ 
nfttrle of LunityS Lane, IS 14 
llHlleck Mm's MtCloMan. 19(72. 
AiSaniifiPBhJelaErt.lMe^ii. 
J'lHiLi!, Puerto UiiLu,talEf}t]. IW^ 
The AlAhamu fllart& o^t> ]*12. 
Petprab'g minp expiod'ih IWi-l. 
Ball)*! of Malat^?, Iflllfi. 



Chtcagy, luwa, . 
>ch.,^, v.. Pa.J 
a.WI*., S.Mich., 
N I1U lnd„ P.; 



Bmi] San 
1 'J^^ 7 'AM 



I t>i> 
1 Hif 
4 :^0 

•I ^^1 

4 ■■^L.f 
4 -AW 

I ;u 

4 J4,-> 

4 3i\ 
4 :^; 

4:^7 

I a,s 
4 ;^i> 
4 ■m 

4 41. 1 
1 41 
4 4L> 
4 4^4 
4 44 
4 44 
4 4f> 
4 4<1 
4 47 
4 48 
4 4^1 

4 m 

I4 -tS 



. ;5M 

7 ;u^ 

7 ;iH 

7 -AX 

7 ^m 

7 ;^7 

7 ;iT 

7 Mip 

7 m 

7 :ir) 

7 h:* 

7 M 

7 'M 

~ :^^^ 

;ii 

;n 

. :<<» 

7 ijn 

7 '2ii 
7'i^ 

7 ^^7 

7 20 

7 !?i" 

7 i>4 

7 '^'^ 

7 ^jT 

7 211 



Mcjunj 
II, mJ 

in g| 
inni;^ 

lis fitl 
1 1 '22 

II n1 

[U'llSI 

i> 2'2 

fiH 

1 4;^ 

2 \M^ 

A m 

rheff 
H 1^ 
>=< 4Ja 

n 21J 
n Gi 

10 -n 

III :»:> 

1 1 'A2 
morn 

n 13 
1 1 

1 T^B 

2 i^A 

A ri4 

SfLs 

7 44 

H n 

S ;ili| 

n 
n24l 



^:. LualB. H. 11!., 

Kftn.. rtjl.. C*^* 
In.]., QUI[>. 



H 
4 

4 3-^ 
I W.r 
4 30 
4 H> 
4 40 
4 41 
4 41 
4 41> 
4 43 
4 43 
4 44 
4 45 
4 4.1 
4 4+i 
1 47 



^E] IK Moon 

7 'JUIKI U 
7 'J!i HI 3i.'. 
7 I'ii hi .!>*: 

. 2>- \i- - 
7 2^ 



Si.Payl.N.E. 

N.K.NBwTtjrk 
Mlritt,. Or. 



2H 
i!7 

7 i;7 

7 i!7 
7 i!t^ 

7 2H 
7 25 

7G4 



ti ■.: 
1 ' 

1 5'Ji 

2 45 

3 4fl 
rintea 

8 9 
« 45 
f» m 

9 52 



I -J I 7 4.S 
t :■! 7 4^ 
! :'LJ 7 4 7 



t 47 7 24 1(1 i?4 
4 is: 7 i!3,10 5fl 
4 4H,7 22,11 3y 
4 oO;7 2'.^ mom 



4 rin7 21 
4 Jill7 2n 
4 5-17 ^0 
4 53 7 m 
4 54 17 W 
4 55 17 17 
4 5(5 7 KJ 
4 5tii7 IH 
4 57 7 15 
4 58 7 14 
4 5t^l7 13 



2: 

1 in 

2 4 

3 1 

4 1 

setEi 

7 40 

8 9 

3 35 
n 1 

9 27 



SUCL SUDlMMii^? 

rlHfg at^tBv U-*^_* 

,4 irt|7 in in 10 

4 K^ 7 4i>|in 55 
4 20^7 4?> 11 20 
I '.'07 4^1 11 40 
inoro 

W 
(151 

1 '35 

2 sa 

6 20 
S fj2 
9 22 
9 &1 

10 19 
10 5n 
U 20 
tdorti 

6 

u 5:1 

1 47 

2 45 

3 47 
Bet« 

7 4S 
S 14 
S37 
9 n 
t>92 



14 ^H 
4 24 
4 24 
4 25 
4 20 
4 E7 
4 £8 
4 2fl 
4 30 
4 31 
4 32 
4 3a 
4 34 
4 35 
4 36 
4 37 
4 AH 
4 30 
4 40 
4 41 
4 42 
4 43 
4 44 



47 
7 ii^ 
7 46 
7 45 
7 45 
7 44 
7 43 
7 43 
7 42 
7 4L 
7 40 
7 3ft 
7 39 
7 38 
7 37 
7 30 
7 35 
7 34 
7 33 
7 32 
7 31 
7 30 
728 



8tli MONTH- 



AUGUST. 



ai DATS* 









213 


1 


Wo, 


214 




Th. 


215 


3 


Frl, 


210 


4 


Sat. 




fj 


si:s. 


21 B 


ti 


Mo. 


219 


7 


Tu. 


*i?H 


H 


We. 


iJ21 


n 


Til, 







Frl. 


S^S 


1 


Sat, 


224 


2 


s^^, 


22B 


3 


xMo. 


\vm 


4 


Tu. 


227 


5 


VVfi. 






Th. 


223 


,7 


b'rL 


'2^<0 


H 


811 1, 


2S1 


9 


HLS. 


232 


20 


Mo. 


233 


21 


an. 


234 


22 


w«. 


S35 


^ 


Th. 


23fl 


*M 


KrL 


3S7 


25 


Sat. 


238 




St s 


23@ 


^jy 


Mo. 


S40 


Hfi 


Tu- 


241 


20 


W#. 


!i42 


30 


Th. 


1*43 


31 


FrU 



AujfOBt wai niLmci^ Tn tionar 

of AUgt]^tUH CKfi^At. he hflVJUfc^ 

bt^cu madu couiiul Liv tlila month , 



iMERIiAl HISTOai, 



Clorm'nriitrlp on Huds'n, IHfj; 
Battle of Ft. HtCphROi^Onr 1^13. 
€ornibilft9tiilb, from yp'ii, UPA 
CoL iBaaoIIaynehaniT'ri, 17*H. 
Farmift ont'Ts ,M bJlo htt^JW4 
Raid Ark mi baa exploded, l^K^. 
J^afayetie d^^l>atts■, Iftia. 
BatEK^Df Markjnnw, 1HI4. 
Brtttleuf CtJdttr MouDtn. 1RB3. 
BnttJi? r,f WlliifiTi Croefc. ISN^L 
Hat.^iillthiir BruliKa &pi*„ JBThI. 
Spanish |irotocol HEtfued, ISWM. 
xMarillJL 5urrendorf;db 18U& 
Doath of Farrainit. IfTTO. 
Ijifayotte visits The U. S.,1S24. 
Battle of BonnlufEton, 1777, 
Antl-Neh. con. Saratou&t 1854, 
Fan tc of MuZ hecan. 
Battl (? o f B I MQli c li s . Kt. ^ 1T«3. 
Battte of Pollen Tlmb rs, I7EH. 
I^awrence, Ka^,, aacketl, lf*3. 
Atfck. on Ft. Snip tor re pi,. lSt», 
Ftv Morgan eiirrcndiirn, l^ti. 
TirhJf^U cftEJt're WasihlnK'nJSy 
iJnttlo Rottm'B Stfltlon. OHU. 
StKmp-act riot Bouton, I IKS, 
Bitttio of Lontr liilantl. ITTS. 
Post-carBorv.C,APr. WJly. I9r4 
Sooood battle Bull Bun. t8i;2. 
Amcrle'qaifvnciiAte R, 1., 177S- 
Fr<^DCh fleet arrives^ 1781. 



€lpi3aKn, lywa, 

|Neti,i N. v., Pa.^ 
l!^.WJR..a,Mlch., 
11^. III., Tnd.. a 



^ Sum SmsjMoon 
rf pesi. PPT ? . i H,A- j _. 

ir M.l]i M.I ilh St^ 



4 ,"j:i 

4 ,-hl 

4 5-.J 

4 iJli 

4 57 

4 118 

4 r>L> 

5 
5 ] 
5 2 
'3 3 
5 4 



5 10 
1' 11 

!^ 12 

5 i:i 
5 15 

5 30 tJ 49 
5 17(6 48 
5 1 S 40 
J 10 45 



1[^ 

1^ 
. 1: 
7 IH 
7 15 
7 14 
7 12 
7 11 
7 10 
7 9 
7 7 
7 
7 4 
7 3 
7 1 
7 

ii 5^ 

6 55 

<l 54 
« 52 
e 51 



5 20j 
5 ]*1 
5 22 
5 23 
5 21 



43 

G 42 
40 



9 51 

in 21 

10 55 

11 35 
morn 

23 

1 19 
y 2y 
3 32 

TliH'fl 

7 10 

7 50 

8 22 

9 33 

10 14 

11 
U 51 
njOm 

48 

1 48 

2 49 

3 50 

4 51 
seta 
7 5 
7 29 

7 5''' 
^ 2'[ 

8 5I-; 

9 33 



8t. LouEi, S. llLj 

Va.^ Ky., Mo., 

Kan.t CoL. Cal.J 

IrKl., Ohio. 



SuDi SuniMoou 



St. Paul K, E* 
Wis. audM]ch„ 
N.B.^^e^ York, 

Minn.^ Or. 



0|7 12' 

17 11 

2 7 10 

3 7 B 
4J7 " 
417 
57 
7 



.. 0J7 _ 
5 10,0 50 
5 11 fl 5R 
5 12 57 
5 J3 55 
5 13;ft 54 
5 14 fi 53 
5 lok) 52 
5 IftlH 50 



5 17 
5 18 
5 19 
5 20 
5 i>' 
5 22 

D2r< 



40 

48 
4fl 
45 
43 
42 
40 



;' 2i (i i^9 
') 21 H-W^ 
"i 2.'t 30 
"p '.ill 34 

IJ5_2_7L0_33 



II. M.| 
9 551 
m 21' 
11 2 
U 43, 
mOTU 

32 

1 2:?! 

2 30, 

3 38 
rtao3i 
7 17 

7 50 

8 25, 

9 
9 30 

10 21 

11 8 
iijotn 



57 

1 50 

2 55 

3 5r^ 

4 55 
Aets ' 

7 
7 32 
7 50 
B 29 
9 2 
9 41 



Stln 



ln,H. 
I 45 
4 4*7 
4 47 
4 ^m 
4 50 
4 51 
4 52 
4 53 
4 54 
4 56 
4 57 
4 58 

4 59 

5 
2 
3 
4 
5 

8 
9 



5 
5 

5 _ 
5 10 
5 U 
5 12 
5 14 
5 35 
5 1*:1 



Sud Mooa 
8et.fl.'R.A 3 



7 27 
7 20 

7 25 
7 23 

7 ^J 
7 20 

7 1^> 
7 18 
7 10 
7 15 
7 13 
7 12 
7 10 
7 



7 
7 

7 4 

7 2 

7 1 

51^ 

50 
54 

r*2 
51 
49 

,- . . 47 

5 17!t5 45 
5 18 44 
5 10 ^1 42 
5201041 



47 
10 15 

10 48 

11 27 
morn 

15 

1 11 

2 14 

3 20 
riaea 
7 +>*? 

7 61 
B21 

¥{ 52 

e 27 

10 7 

10 52 

11 4^ 
luom 

40 

1 41 
243 

3 45 

4 49 

7 5 

7 2S 

7 52 
BIS 

8 50 

9 26 



mU MONTH. 



SEPTEMBER, 



30 DAYS. 



J44 

£4K 

230 
251 

254 
25B 

2ti»> 



1 
2 
3 
4 

ri 



T 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

JB 

14 

15 

Ifi 

i: 

18 

_ li" 

2lt3 2Cl 



8^t 

Mo. 
Til 
W(,v 

Kr], 
Mat. 
sr/N . 
Mo. 
Tu, 
We 
I'h. 
fii. 
8»t. 
sr>, 
Mij. 
Tu. 
We. 
Th, 
Frl. 

Sl;^ , 
Mo. 
Tu. 
\\a 
TU. 
VtU 

SIN. 



Beptembe^r, from Sf.pfum Uev- 
fiijllDn oa It WW the flev<?nttj 



AlSblCAN HISTORY, 



BatMoof Clianttllr,lSii!l 
AtlHnta Hiiirrfrrderr*. lsi;j. 
Treatv utsnro.U.^.it^. n.,17fiii. 

MayiloTTPr beiMSi ffE^}. 
n't. Wiiyne captunt'itlHRI!. 
BattEe (>f MnllnoilRl IleyJBiT. 
< 1*^1 1 ova owaril Hiilrt, InTS. 
Purry-3 v frt. in 1 .ake ErEe. J81hl 
Rut Me <jf Bnintlywlne, IT; 7, 
Battle i*f t'hniJii1t*peo, I&JL 

GL^n. Wfijfu kiiipfi, i:at. 

CJty t>l Mexico Ijikcn, 1K^7. 
l>olr(j«leii DMopt roii>tt'n. 17S7. 

BlItElO of WlBcllf-BttT. 1S(]4. 

JlFiti](Jc:>f Autlt^tfltr, W^. 
Kuf^Kiv-iialuvp Jnw aiifiit!dfIS50 
Battit'ofliita, IttS. 
HMUltJtif JifxlntriHin, Vn.. IBJSI. 
Battle of FlisMci'? HUl, WA^ 
ArnoUrii i^t■rl^oJl. ir^Ji. 
i*n m E Jo] les' v lct< Ty, l;7fl. 
MontCMt.">- €a|htiirt:i, iJ^^fi. 
PhLkn]<Mi3lil!i (!if>ti]Te(1. I7?r. 
HstrrianH Iimitj'n Vini2eii"p!i,ieil 
battlf^of PiliU KrtotJn IfeitM. 
Detroit retiik<^n. iMi'k 

c nna^e^e nif^ts at York. 1777. 



'tJiilqago. Jcjwa,^ St. Ldutfl, 8, HI., 
N^eh.^Mr., Pa.. Va., Ky., Md, 
!^.W;is.,S, MEch. JtBii , dc>],. Cai., 
N . 1]] , lnri„ O. 1n<l., Ohio. 

Suii[ Siin;Mr>i:3[i I Snnl auiiiMEwn 



n It. TT M 



^1 ''ji.M.llI,M.. I[. >l 

III Ti'. .-I if^ <j fil J0 2-i 



I St.PjiaLN.K. 
rVVlB.and M),-li., 

N.B, NewVurk, 

I Mhm.,O r. 

I Siiiii Sun, Moon 

rifles, fletfl J Hjk fl 
la.M".iiiT»]rii. .M 

5 L^lbi J^Tlin 5H 
.1 liMli Hi> II Dij 




ik"i 47 5 57 

Ti 4H r» rH"v 
5 >If)'5 n-A 
•^ 51 l.j 5ii 
,5 5i?!s 5IJ 
.■i 53 5 4iS 
NS 54 5 40 
Is fiH'i'ff 45 



U L'H r> Till ,' 

ti 5n, 5 5a i 

7 H;i, 5 51 : 
Sir* ;B5i.*.. ..- 
9 ] Sl>-^S47 
n 55l|-> Jn4lfl 4r,'l 



lOtb MONTH. 



OCTOBER. 



ai DAYS. 






Mo. 
Tu* 

We. 
Th. 

FrU 
Sat, 
Sl^S . 
Mn, 
Til. 

::<\ :v vv>. 

.> J ; ■ Th. 

;-^-"' l-_ i-rK 

*i87 U SIS. 
iSJ^.lf) Mil. 

'■_'^Mi 17SVe, 

-^ii} [^ Th. 
;L''t^j ILH KrL 
r.!3+:i liiM^at. 
12114 21 SttS. 

i.«l5 2V Mo, 
Il'SM! 2:^iTn. 

■,^^>7 L-'i'We. 

.11*^ i:." Til. 

LJ^Jik L^f=. I'-rf. 

flOl;*>S( StX 

;i02'2f) Mo, 

;t<n*i:io Tu, 



Oetober wtt."i forcucplj the 
€lglitF^ Toouth, ana Imnce Clic 
nnme from C^^^n {elgtithj. 



iCIjEcrtKo, 
l>^i^T>,,^.V., 1' 



lOWtt, 



AJUBIC4:f HlBTOflT. 



Jiipks'n ^e^lOTCE^ r.S,depa,lKti 
Ancfm hunttnn a npy. ITftil 
Harrison ut Torre 44amte. IBII 
Bfittlo of Gernmniown, 1777, 
Tet^uT3if3e]i tlllLtl. m3. 
' Peace pruclnlHjcil, J 7^1, 
s Brifltol, R.I.. bombarded, ITO 

First KTeat Chicaned flre, ISTI, 
I BuriTeof ij^trasburir, Vn,.tB(li. 
N[ivj]] acttflemy opened. 1M5- 
BiHilt! Luke i:biimpla|ti, ITTii. 
lin[[ le of Ui^Paca, t;a„ IiM>i, 
Unt[]o of i^u Off thrown, L'lia. 
De. luralion of rlwhtR^ 1774. 



, Vit., Ky,. Mu., 1 

i3.VVEw..g. Mleh. Ktin. Col., C&l., 

X^l]]. . Ind.. O, lud . , Clb iQ. 

iBnn I ^utii^ioon; Buni Sun, Moon 

TT.^kln.M. ii- >tJ|ii.m:Ji[,.m.| n. JiJ 
4;[|U> 55; i5 0.5 5 44 11 3: 



IWlft,fttid MJeb.. 
'N.K, NewVork> 
Mian., ur. 



j Gre^tl. t>ank panic lj^7. 



Hiirpcr'H F arsenal capt.W^ 
: BurKt(jnr''H |iiirrt?ndf>r, I7V7. 

Tr«^aty with Hi-nilnttlrs. iwjq. 

i'umwalUjft siifn^ndptp, ];>il. 

Gmnt fiMit'vt}! Rusec^raiiiPi, if&i 

f,aiUuj alike at 8aij Yrnn., iWh 

Ht'AKiat>49 nrrlve, ;77il 
I Topf'ka fonvi nt'n moots. SRSfi 

7,aaon y r ? t:)i'gt\ 8pri n tzffl . I,Hf H 

Bfltlpb oTOCiiait^ U. 1 , n:ii. 
I S?ecoP6lun a|?n>otl iiprnn. TSiiO. 

Ham AlbemaMeAu^iE, W4, 

Erlenvrjaloomplotcd^ Iflds^ 
, Mtdellan djest 11^1 
; 6tan Fr»n, baydtseoTercdt 17B9 
_GgE. ?JcTtt reTlrcra, iR(;i. 



oH'i) 4'L''iiiOri] 
5H n 40 
a.o lis 

1 Li Hfi 

2 5 35 

ii 5 ;^;^ 

4o3l 
5 5 29 



^ 5(i 

0;'T 57 

5 Gr^ 



6 5 28 

W 5 2ti 

Ji 5 2o 

,+i In Tj L':i 

It 3 ] ,"i Ln ] l> 30 

\i I'J .'i L^iMJ 37 

ii 14 5 J'-'Mioro 



3 37 

4 54 
riscH 
G 3 

t! 48 
T nw 
fi-^4 

i:f;*4 



Sutii EJun.MaoM 

' "" ;> 42 III 48 

5 HI 11 54 

u |ih moi'o 

HT ^ " 

35 

- .. 3^1 

5 5 33 

5 20 

ri2H 



f? J7 5 14 
(I IS D 12 
l.i 10 5 11 

ij 2nj{5 H 



ft "l>|0 

a 27 5 

e 2ft 5 ^ 

6 2e 4 5H 
6 30 4 fiR 



\r 4r\t,t dj"|Xij u(.p,.n ;;"» o ,i ■ 

B 32l4 5^^lmorni!G 2ttLl _gii 




H 10 
fJllHl5 2r! 

1 ;^H fj 12'.,1 Ifl 

2 :t7i Tt l:t5 1" 

ii:u\'^\ 14 " 

4 31 - 

r> 150 

Rets 
15 
ti59 
7 fiO 
j^ 48 
9 Oft 
10 5tt 



1 5 

2 2il 

3 37 

4 5« 
ntiofl 

H-! 57 
G41 
7,^<1 
S2U 
J) 241 
10 29 
n 31 
morn 
0,^4 

1 ^fl 

2 a7 

3 35 

4 34 
.r ^,^ -, 5 34 
(5 21} 5 3 6 S5 

sets 

7 42 
B 41 
9 43 
!0 51 
mora 



11th MONTH. 



NOVEMBER, 



80 DATS. 



h I 6 



smv 

307 
3(>H 

UUl 
311 
312 
313 
311 
315 
31(5 
317 
31H 
319 
320 
321 
321? 
323 
324 
32S 
32U 
S27 
32g 
820 



331 
332 „ 
3S3.2*t 
334 imi 



KrI. 
Sju. 

Mo. 
Tu. 
We, 

Tn. 

Fri. 

Sni. 

MS. 

Mo. 
Til. 
We. 
Th. 
Frl. 
Sat. 
SLN. 
Mo. 
Tu. 
Vta. 
Th. 
FtI. 
Slit. 

fnvy 

M.>. 

Til. 
Wi' 

Th. 
FtI 



Novumber, from Aor^m tdlne J, 
as It was furmerly tLt! nlncli 



ChLcuOi Iowa,! 

i^.Wla., S.Mkh, 
N. Ill ■ iBa.H O 



IMUICIH HlSfO&T. 



ESt.Loiiln, El. IIL« 

Va.» Ry., Mo., 

Kan., m.. CttL, 

111 4,. Ohio. 



Suiji ijup|Mooti 



But. Vronvh (^n-tk, N, T.. IHUl 
WEL^Iiiik^(i.<rrH fjirdwell. i;r<l. 
Uaitla nf i>rK'](iuF!ift, Lji,,ISMAJ. 
Kcnrjiv' l'(.'iilMi[iy ai^i1, IBt^J. 
H Lk t i ] i^ n t ii r Nas^b v 1 1 1p. iHi*^. 
Uniwn?Tillri Teir., Lafcen. 1663, 
l^utik* Lit Tt|i|}etrHii4:)e, I^IL 
t .\i n fed . eti V I pv* t a k i?a . ] StVl . 
H a t: t kM> f Tal 1 ad ppn . « a. , 1S13 
Bur n^ild L^ tak i? s turn iti li nd.lHty. 
Clierry Vallty ma^isacrtt ITTM. 
Montreal taken, lTi6. _^ 

HrOYiRlimal govt. inTex.,lflS&. 
U, S, Cliri&tlan etvin, nrw., ISJl. 
Articles nhnfTi adoptL^d, 177Y, 
ManiHCeo Ivst, 1S^. 
Hftltkn Knrj JET tile. Tenji.. l&(*t. 
Standard time adopt<?d, l&i^^. 
<;Je[ tywirp oL'm. dedicftted, 3803- 

hiiirnMkrtcr In'ruHlrk^k^lmrir. IS^. 
Ft. (i^'orf^'e t-apliiPi'd, iTf*, 
F I nil I ;i t Thai ta noi tra, lyti). 
El a II U* (.1*1 n m bl a. Ten n . , laU. 
J t, DagueciTif: tukon, Ufja^ 
jJ^JMurntT Truth dii?d, IrtffiL 
riiiM rti*e]nr"d In rt'ben^rnaSS; 
H. Koi^iiHe maBsaore, n2i>. 
Savanifali. Ga . taken, 177H. 
l^attle nf Franklin. Tf^mvjF*!^ 



U 5MJ27|5 P| II 8 

1 ir>i IJ 2«U f-U 1 17 

2 2K]|<ji 'diVA ^rt 2 2H 



3 43 Cso-t ^: 



d4.n 
tJ46 

t^ 47 

fi &fl 
tJ 51 
B 52 

d 54 
!i 5li 

d 59 



4 4;i 

4 42 
4 41 
4 4(t 
4 411 
4 3H 

4 as 

4 3'- 
4 3H 
4 36 

4 3r 

4 34 

4.^:i 



n;4 33 

21 W2 



4 31; 
4 31 
4 31 
4 30 
4 3^1 



_ f^K (j 31 
(J 14 Nil A2 

!i ISI'0 34 

a l:l' tJ 37 

9 215 id :w 

10 1^7 
I 27 



4 TjII 
4 
4 fhi 

4 ria 

4 52 
4 51 
4 f>0 



fet. FflQl. N. E. 
Wis. ftndMlfih., 

Mlan..ar- 



r1 aes if t ». rlab. .j^^ir j """"■ _' — --- 
nTii' IhTm^ i H. M ! H . W.'li . M ". M. 

;ii 34 !4 hi 
t\ 3J|4 fiH 

H HHl4 fhO 
*5 :^H 4 4lf 
tJ 40 4 4H 
M 41 4 47 
i] i-Z 4 4<-. 
J'> a [ 4 4 






3 41 

4 r.4 
rt « 

*.'!» 
7 2ti 

ft 31 



morn 
27 
1^7 

2 25 

3 23 

4 20 

5 10 

ly 

BPtH 

5 46 
42 
7 44 

57 , 

11 fj| 5ti 

meni 57 
14lld 58 



lii :^n 4 411^10 31 
'•i ji> 4 .j>' 11 31 



41 

d 4*i 

tl 4S 
G44 
,0 4.'V 
e 47 
G 43 
4y 
8 SO 
51 

d fj2 

Ig 54 
S 55 



4 4?^ 
4 47 
4 40 
445 
4 45 
4 44 
4 44 
4 43 
4 42 
4 42 
4 41 
4 41 
4 40 
4 40 
4 30 
4 30 
4 30 



uiurn 

2fl 

1 27 

2 23 

3 20 

4 Hi 
ti 13 

6 12 
eeta 
rt 55 

5 50 

7 51 

8 55 

10 1 

11 8 
mom 

15 



a 40 

•B 41 
IJ 43 

d 47 

d 4H 

tt 51 
52 
« 54 
ti 55 
e 57 
U 5:^ 
d5& 

7 
" *2 
3 
4 



. 8 
7 10 
7 11 
7 12 
7 13 

.7 as 

|7 ir 

l7r 



4 50 
4 4H 
4 4" 
\ 45 
4 44 

4 4;^ 

1 41 
4 40 

4 39. 

4 ;r 

4 HO 
4 35 
4 34 
4 3ft 
4 32 
4 31 
4 30 
4 2ft 
1 28 
4 27 
4 2*> 
4 25 
4 25 
4^J4 
4 23 
4 22 
4 22 
4 21 
4 21 
4 20 



Moon 



2 

1 14 

2 20 

3 40 
5 4 
« 22 
rlaes 
G 10 
7 10 
R14 
10 

10 22 

11 25 
morn 

26 

1 2^ 

2 28 

3 27 

4 2G 

5 27 

6 28 
seta 

5 BS 
e 34 

7 37 

8 4?t 
53 

11 4 

mom 

14 



I2tli MONTH. 



DECEMBER. 



ai BATS. 



335 
330 

3r*^ 

H3^ 
33ft 
34^1 
H41 
312 
343 
344 
345 
34dl 
347 1 
348' 
34ft 
3rjO 
351 
352 
353 
354 
3fi5. 
35ti 
357 
358 
^S9 
300 

302 
3^ 
364 
Sflo 



ri 


^,1 





5^ 


) 


F^al. 


V 


Ki:\ 


.s 


Mn. 


4 


■I'll. 


5 


We. 





Tkj, 


7 


hYL 


8 


Sal. 


ft 


JSVN. 


il 


Mo. 


J 


■In, 


-.' 


Ue. 


H 


'J ll. 


4 


Fri, 


5 


Hat. 


i', 


SI\. 


I 


Mu. 


M 


Ta. 





We, 


W 


Th, 


?1 


Frl. 


22 


Sat. 


23 


HUN. 


?.4 


Mrt, 


25 


rn. 


2t5 


We., 


,27 


TO, 


?8 


FH. 


as 


Hftt. 


3(1 


srs. 


31 


. M^>, 



IJteember, from Tiecem <ten)i 
the Roman Calender tyrinlng It 
tlic tenth inotith. { 



OlitcOAO, IowplI 

S.Wlfl.. S.Mich., 
N. \:U Inc. O. 



AllKJCUr HISTDEt. 



Habeas efHTJr re-ei*tHb,. IfVlS, 
KjiL'tnilhui Jt^hii BroHrnt IK^SW. 
ItovolutlonnrT army dis., 1783^ 
f^t^n ate e X p' 1 » Breok n ri'«tf ,1 i^i I 
W opceN tLT, SJ a»H , , taken ^ iTtiti. 
Adtl-slaTcry toe. (Ji^., 1H33. 
llaL Fralrle Gruve^ Ark,. liWJ, 
HrStUh take Nrn rt, K. 1.. Inti, 
Uattle of tJreatiJridHe, 1775. 
HaTannuh bfHltffed, ]>Wi. 
H 11 ni t(S [k^ cTf >!ifl 's K a p' ii tH-k . ISIK 
Uattle Franklin, Tenn., 180^. 
Ft. AleAlUster token, li^nt. 
Kan,->>b, bill anbrnitted, la^B.' 
Hivrtford convent'n nM;'t.H,]Eil4 
BiK'dau *■ tea party," 1773. 
Hattlu GoldHboTo, >'.(',, 1363, 
llattlt^ Mii^td^E'lnlWA, lad., 1812 
Am, ftrmy atVairy ForV, 1777. 
BtitUe l^ranesville, Va , 19*51, 
Sbcrm'n reaches Savan'b, Wii 
The embiirno art pae^ed, itiW. 
Warthlntttnn re»!|rns, 17B3. 
Treatytif Ghent, 1814, 
Amne?i[v proclaimed, 19C3, 
Brtttle of Trenton, ITTO. 
W a j< b I n ijt' a tnrt d e ri H'tal'rHlTTB 
MaBr.n aud ^lldnllsnr., 11ji3. 
Battle Ml^vy Cre'k.TeTin,, iHfi^t 
Me^k'an GiulBden cession, It^l 
Rnttio of <J in* bee. 17 15. 



StiL Sun Mooaj 
rls^ea aeta.[K.& r?. 

15^ ^ 



4 29 
4 20 
4 29 
1 20 

4 28 
_ _ 4 28 

7 I r. 4 2K S 50 



- ^^1 
7 10 
7 11 
7 12 
7 13 
7 14 



II. M 

1 25 

2 38 

3 50 

5 3 

6 15 
rigen 



7 17 
7 17 
7 IH 
7 10 
7 2ii 
7 i^l 
7 21 
7 22 
7 23 
7 24 
7 24 
7 2n 
7 25 
7 *2B 
7 20 
7 27 
7 27 
7 28 
7 28 
7 28 
7 28 
7l?0 
l7 29 



4 28| 7 5 
4 2H| fl 10 
4 2>^| ft ];i 
4 2^ 10 14 
4 l^K 11 15 
4 2.'^ 



4 2K 
4 Ii* 
4 20 
4 20 
4 29 
4 3I> 
4 30 
4 31 
4 31 
4 32 
4 52 
4 33 
4 B3 
4 34 
4 35 
4 3t5 
4 30 
437I 



Taorn 

14 

1 12 

2 9 



St. Loulfr, 3. Bl„ 

Va., Ky„ Mo., 

Kan.. CoL. Cfll. 

lad.. Ohio, 



St. Paul, N.K. 
Wle. and Mich.. 
N.E. New York, 
Minn, Of. 



Sun I 8 an I Moon 
rl Bes E^tjs. f K-*s. 
Hrirln.k./li. si, 



5054 39 
7 oU 30 



B 
8 
7 
« 3 

5t; 

peta 
39 

7 4^ 

8 55 

10 5 

11 Id 
morn 

27 

1 37 

2 48 



1 
2 
3 
4 

5 
G 

7 
7 
8 
, ft 
7 10 
7 10 
7 1 
7 12 
" 1:1 
7 13 
- 14 
7 14 
7 lu 
1 ^" 
~ Id 

Id 

jn 

7 17 

7 18 
7 18 
7 18 
|7 IH 
1I7 1ft 



4 38 
4 38 
4 38 
4 38 
4 38 
4 :?8 

4 SH 
4 38 
4 38 
4 39 
4 39 
4 39 
4 30 
4 40 
4 40 
4 40 
4 40 
441 
4 41 
4 42 
4 4! 
4 43 



4 44 
4 4 
4 45 
4 40 
4 40 
4 48 



1 23 

2 34 

3 45 

4 50 

6 7 



7 12 

8 ir> 
a 1^ 

10 17 
n 10 

morn 
13 



3 
4 

4 5ft 

5 55 

e 48 
Betfl 
tl 45 
7 51 



4 44 8 58 



10 a' 

11 151 
moin 

24 

1 33 

2 421 



hun| Sun 
rjaea acta. 

7 1814 20 
- 10,4 20 
21 4 10 
i 22,4 19 
7 23k 19 
" "''4 10 
4 19 
4 18 
4 18 
4 18 
4 18 
4 \d< 
4 19 
4 1ft 
4 19 
4 19 
4 10 
4 20 
4 20 
4 20 
4 21 
4 21 
4 22 
4 22 
4 2» 
4 24 
4 25 
4 25 
4 20 
4 27 
427 



Moon 
It,* Ft, 



7 24 
7 2p 
7 20 
7 27 
7 28 
7 29 
^ 30 
7 30 
7 31 
7 32 
7 33 
7 33 
7 34 
7 34 
7 35 
7 36 
7 3*i 
7*<i7 
7 37 
7 38 
? 38 
- 38 
39 
7 3ft 
7 39 

7 r- 



H. Jl. 

1 27 

2 42 

3 57 
T, 11 
G25 

rla^K 
5 51 
ti 5H 

8 H 

9 9 
10 13 
U 15 
tnorn 

10 
J 15 

2 15 

3 15 

4 16 

5 10 
13 
7 6 

33 
T4B 
8ft3 

10 5 

11 18 
morn 

31 

1 43 
B 50_ 



A CYCLICAL CALENDAR 

Of the Christian era, A. D. leOO to the millenlnm, showing at a Rlanoe a complete calendar 
for every month of every year, day of the week for every date, day of the week of birth- 
days, battle days, holidays, anniversaries, etc. 

{Copyright, liiB9, by J. Lee Knight, Topeka, Ka$.) 


FORMl. 


- 
FORM 2. 


FORM 3. 1 


8 


M 


T 


W 1 


P F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


8 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


8 


i 

16 

i 


i 

16 


3 

10 
17 

n 


18 1 
25 2 


5 6 
2 13 
9 20 

6 27 


il 

21 
28 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 

15 

22 

29 


2 

li 

23 
30 


3 

10 

hi 

31 


4 
11 

It 


5 

12 


6 
13 

i? 


if 

20 
27 


7 
28 


1 
8 

29 


1 


3 
10 
17 

if 


4 
11 
18 
25 


■ll 


FORM 4. 


FORMS. 


FORM 6. 1 


S 


M 


T 


W 


r F 


S 


8 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


8 


8 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


S 


5 
12 


6 
13 

i? 


il 


1 
8 
15 ] 


6 17 
53 24 
(U 31 


if 

18 
25 


ll 


5 

n 

26 


il 

27 


i 


1 

8 

15 


2 
9 

30 


3 
10 

hi 

31 


17 


if 

18 
25 


it 

26 


1 


7 
14 


i 

15 


i 

16 
23 
30 


INDBX TO MONTH FORMS: ALL YEARS. 


FORM 7. 1 


Common Yean. 


A B 


C 


D E 


F 


G 


Leap Years. 


8 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


8 


JAN. OCT. 


1 2 


3 


4 6 


6 


7 


JAN. APR. JUL. 


MAY. 


2 8 


4 


5 6 


7 


1 


OCTOBER. 


1 

16 
23 
30 


i§ 

17 

if 


i 


6 


6 
13 

i? 


il 

21 
28 


22 
29 


AUGUST. 


8 4 


6 


8 7 


1 


2 


MAY. 


FKB.MikR.NOV. 


4 6 


6 


7 1 


2 


3 


FEB. AUG. 


JUNE. 


6 6 


7 


1 2 


3 


4 


MAR. NOV. 


SEPT. DEC. 


6 7 


1 


2 3 


4 


5 


JUNE: 


APRIL. JULY. 


7 1 


2 


i 4 


5 


6 


SEPT. DEC. 


EocplantUion: The number of form for any month of any year is found under letter of- 
the year and on line with name of the desired month. Example: 1899. Year letter is A; 
under A on line with May is figure 2. Form 2 is calendar for May, 1889. 


EXPLANATION AND INDBX. 


i 

fH 


CI 

s' 


Tht; liiTiir^iH t n the table &m. .<■.* ti iii^^cju thy ycurs ul nnv rf^rifury, 
Ijid^XLHi EK.tneond in four ct ►lunula Tbe ItJittrs a uni itnllcatt; day 
f tbtj wt?c fe y n ^hlch the yen r^^ bi^ii l s i . a 1 1 y en rs bt^i n n I a^ on S ii d day 
arclndtJCftJ Ely (.lassA; thoso on Mondnj, B; Tuesday, C: Wedntvsday, 
Hi TnufiUliiy, (0; BMday, F, ami SaiLirday. G. From thia ctuissSacatlon 
tho inontb funin are arrange 1 jind iivlextad as abuve. a' ho leap ytars 
in iQtjle aro iirlnted in black-5j*i;o types cfiianion yiuirs liffht-farts The 
cyclBla repBrtUd every 400 yen rK.hpmio flrst column of fudeat ktttrj is 
furLtaja, ■i)flr),L>4sij,etc.; the second euKi ton for 17EK>. 2mi -^^O, oir ; [bird 
c III Ulna fi.ir l^u. 2200, etc., ami fuurUi columti for lull. SM». 'yA*K tjtc. 
It^HLi^ui. ^iU(1, eti^, are leap yt^arn. All i^ihe-v t^vi^-n cuuturled ajne cum- 

I- ■'•■• ■-■ ITS. 

iMi Lho yi^ur, as Tfi, '99, etc.. in the table. On same line under 
desired century is its class or index letter. 


i 


i 


A 


F 


00 06 


IS 


17 23 




34 


40 45 1 51 1 1 


62 


68 


73 1 79 1 90 {96 


D 


B 


B 


Q 


01 07 




18 24 


29 


35 




48|58|57| 


63 




74 |j 


JO 1 85 1 


n 1 


E 


C 


C 


A 


02 08 


i 13 


19 


30 


36 


41 


47 1 




58 


64 


69 


75 




86 


92 


97 


F 


D 


D 


B 


03 


14 J 


30 2a 


31 




42 48[ 


33 


59 




70 76 1 


81 


87 




98 


G 


E 


B 


C 


04 OS 


15 


26 


32 


37 


43 


1 


51 


60 


65 


71 1 


82 


88 


93 


99 


A ■ 


P 


F 


D 


IC 


) 16 


21 2- 


r 


38 


44 49 


55 




66 


72 77 1 


83 


94 


B 


Q 


a 


B 


05 11 


L 


22 2J 


$ 33 


39 


50 


56 


61 67 


78 1 


84 


89 95 


C 


A 










^^■PW 


"^"■^^ 




MBV 


^^•1 




^^m 


9^^ 


■^F" 




^^^ 


i^F" 






^^ 




9^^m0 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



IMPOBTS OF HEBCHAH DISB, WITH BATE OF DXJTT. 

For the flBcal year ended June SO, 1890. compared with the corresponding period of 1896. 
[Abbreviation: n. e. s., not elsewhere specified.] 



Imports— Frek and dutiablk. 



QuanVa. ValufB, 



1898. 



QuanV*. Value*. 



DtUy. 



Agricoltoral implements free . . 

Animals (No.)— Cattle free. . 

Do dut... 

Hdrses ■. free. . 

Do dnt... 

Sheep free.. 

Do dut... 

All other, including fowls free. . 

Do dut... 

Total |5J«-; 

Total 

Horses (free, No.)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

British North America 

Other countries 



577 

29t012 

800 

380,%7 



f?6,631 
2,886,602 
145,466 
269,443 
42,805 
1,063,517 
155,967 
83,714 



199,128 
1,064 
1,975 
2,396 

343,515 



1.76 hd. 
Various 



4,253,266 



105,513 
2,225.009 f242. 
296,092 
254,798 
46,132 
1,153,949 75c41.50hd. 
183.473 
81,560 

ezi;2io 

8.215315 



..5^ 



Total 

Horses (dut., No.)— Imported f rom— 

United Kingdom 

British North America 

Other countries 

Total. 



35 

722 
43 
800 



4.674,125 

60,540 
67.64C 
18,276 
145,466 



143 

745 

176 

r,064 



4,836,525 

155,275 
65,827 
84,990 

206,092 



2,019 

223 

2,285 



18,800 

216,3»8 

4.250 

269,443 



47 
1,916 

12 
1,975 



Antimon y ore free . . 1 bs 

Antimony, as regulus or metal dut. ..lbs. 

Articles, the growth, product and manufacture 

of the 17. 8., returned, n. e. s free. . 

Art works f ree . . 

Do dut... 

Art Works (free)— Imported f rom— 

United Kingdom 

France. 

Germany :..., 

Italy 

Other Europe. . . 

British North America . 

■ Other countries 

Total 

Art Works (dut.)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Italy 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Other countries 

Total 



232,877 
999 

254,798 



5,360,690 
2,230,902 



78,510 
121,U6 

8,783,241 

701,208 

1,662,219 



3,020.016 
2,316,728 



40,362 
179,378. 

3,540,921 

418,867 

2,040.121 



170,372 
353,408 
28.3U8 
80.484 
24,668 
36,050 
7,P' 
701.208 



186.410 

211,332 

16,608 

46,718 

6,424 

7C 

1,210 

418,857 



691,658 

524,216 

115.06C 

173,284 

48,741 

5,569 

3,601 

1.662,219 



478,90r 

1,251,297 

118,283 

108,444 

42,549 

86,120 

9,521 

2,040,121 



Asphaltum or bitumen, crude free. tons 

Do dut.. tons 

Bark, hemlock free.c'rde 

Bolting cloth free . . 

Bones, horns & hoofs, unmanufact'd. .free. . 
Bones and horns, manufactures of — dut.. . 
Books, music, maps, engravings, etc.. free.. 

Do dut... 

Books, etc. (free)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Other countries 

Total....! 



12,440 
79.060 
27,033 



34,15'c 
260,766 
106,306 



73,494 

17.846 



471,731 

165,20b 

1,588,907 

1,845.085 



234,«20. 

62,504 

207.480 

704,959 

181.706 . 

1,688,446 

1.393,478 



Books, etc. (dut.)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

China 



155.436 
554,291 
138.511 
35,506 
9,820. 
L538,90i 



751v -^ 
202,610 
548,354 
147.268 
26.717 
12.027 
1.688.446 



947,375 
65,843 

221,^ 
60,lir 

27,"- 

a- 



961,963 
6ai2l 

287,841 
60,810 
26,178 
4.1081 



.Xclb. 



.20^ 



...11.60 ton 



.30% 
.25% 



LMPORTS OF MER€1IAXDISE. 



latI»OHTfl-FBEE J^TiD DUTIAULi;. 



Jupati .,..,. _ , 

OtoercaiuitrlBS. , .., 

Total _,,. , 

BfAAS, and maTi ufni^ture^ of Uut ,...., 

Bread atuflta-flttT le y. . ...,,..., , . .dut....bu 

tjOTH*. . llUL. . . bu, 

Ottt* -i ..-,.ciut,..bu. 

oatmeal.. ..,.,... ^, ...dut .Jlia. 

J^ye... ,.,,„ attt...bu, 

Wheat,. ,..,..., dtit. , .bu, 

Whqiat flour. .dut,. brls. 

Faritmceuu? siibbi&nee:£. kib., ii.e.B., .fr^w, . 

Ah other, and prepartittuDA pf* etc,Md,iit. . 

Total _ 



Drtfltles atJsf— Crude, &&t Eorted, bunelsed or 

prtiparud , ..,..„. . .f rue. . . . 

Sorted^ t>unchDd or prepiLred +,.,.,„ .do i 

T0UI.........H.. _.,,.. 

BruflJho*.. ,dut 

iJDttrina find bqttOQ fiirm^ ...... . .dut. , 

Cameut— Roman, Fortlaad. etc duL..lba 

Cemeht ribs.)— Imiiorred fr^m— 

United E^lue^lGm ,,*..., 

Betsys um..,, , ^, ^ ^ 

Fmoca .....„, ,. , „ '.[,""[ 

aerrunoi^ ..,>.,........ 

Otber Europe* ,.-......., [[']' 

BHUih Nortb AmEtlim...., 

Otber eouot lioB , , , * ^ . - . . 

Tot&l.. ■ ■ 

Cbemleals, Drugs and Dyea-AllzaTln ond alii- 

arln eoJurg or dyop,ett.... free,.UJJi. 

ArgftL or argoJ. ur cmdo tartar. . . . , „.f rt?o. .Ur» 

Antolg.OTWldeR'efl diit lbs 

Harkfl, cl n pli f] a. or f J th er, utc,. free I b sf 

Cuiil-t&r «t>lurB and djcQ.^ ., , dut 

Coctilf Ileal . _ , _ ^ t.f ree. , ibn. 

tJrewoQda— IjOgwood-* , f ree.tobp 

AiiDtberr, *, ,, , . free 

BitniBta snd deco<;tit)n0 of dut.. ih'i 

Total. ^. , _ 

Lmnrood {todsK Imported from— 

Ceatru I America .^ 

Mexico _,,...... 

British West Indies ........ 

Utber Weatladlea.... . " 

Ot her oouQtrles *,.,....,,, ! , " 

Total........... , [[[ 

XJfj&woodFi. Kaf tracts of (lbs.) -Imp. from 

Uuitea Kingdom 

Ji^Dce. ^.^ .„ ^ 

Gcrmasy .^ ....,., ' 

SwiticTland...,, '■' 

Otber ctmatrle«H,* . . . - , ^ .,."]".! 

Total...... .,,.„...,,, .....[ [[\[ 

Gireerln ^.AntZ 

G utu a (fnooJlMi.l— Arabic. , 

Camphor, crude ,, . 

Chicle, . . _ , diit ' ' 

Oopa I cow rle, and diimar. free ' ' 

Qa nibier, or term J aponlua , , free . 

All other : ::::::iJS:: 

Total , 



i07.4(jr.fiau 

2,iTn,TyH 

Ji9WUHa 



Ifldlgo ...*..,....,,,../.... free 

Lkjorleo root... ,_*... ^ """'""fj.gg 
Lime, cbloride of, or bleaehinK jio ir- 

der-..,.. , free..ibfl, 

i JO... ^... ....,► dut Iba 

Mineral wati^ra, all oot artlflclal.V. .'freeVa/s! 

MlQBriLl waters. ju^ B&ld 

Oplam (Ibaj, crude or onmanufnetu red. .V. free 

tJO...., .., ,4 ►. .. .... (Jilt 

_ Pre p ared for nnofci ng. and other! etc. dut' 




CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Imports— Fbeb and Dutiabli. 



Opium, Crude (lbs.)— Imported from— 

united Kingdom 

Other Burope 

Asia and Oceanioa 

Other countries 

ToUl 



Opi 

CI 



ium, Prepared (lbs.)— Imported f rom— 

Jhina.. ..!?!: 

Other countries 



Total.. 

Potash (lbs.)— Chlorate of free. . 

Do dut... 

Muriate of free.. 

Nitrate of. or saltpeter, crude free.. 

Another free.. 

ToUl 



6fW,840 
4,287,63« 

12,ua0,966 
35,904,415 

171.7981581 



Total chemicals, drugs A dyes. ] 



Quinia, sulphate of, etc. free...OE. 

Soda— Caustic dot., .lbs. 

Nitrate of ...free. tons 

Sal soda dut. . . 1 bs. 

Soda ash dut.. .Itm. 

All oiher salts of dut... lbs. 

Total 

Sulphur, or brimstone, crude free.tons 

Sumac, ground dut. . .lbs. 

Vanilla beans free.. lbs. 

Another free 

Do dut. 

free 

dut 

Total 

Chicory root, raw, unground free. lbs. 

Do dut... lbs. 

Chicory root, roasted, ground or prep.. dut. ..lbs. 
Chocolate, prepared, etc. (not confectionery) 

Clays or earths of aii kinds *.'.**.*.*..*. .dut.. tons 

Clocks and Watches and Parts of (dut.)- 

Clocks and parts of 

Watches and parts of 

Coal, anthracite free.tons 

Coal» bituminous dut.. toon 

Coal, Bituminous (tons)- Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

Other Burope 

British North America 

Mexico 

Japan 

Other Asia and Oceanlca 

Other countries 

Total 

Cocoa, or cacao, crude, etc free. .lbs. 

Cocoa, prepared, etc dut.. .lbs. 

X!ooea, etc. (lbs.)- Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

Netherlands 

Other Burope 

Central America 

British West Indies 

Other We&t Indies 

Brazil 

Other South America 

Bast Indies 

Other countries 

Total , 

Coffee free..lb8. 

Coffee (lbs.)— Imported from- 

United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Other Burope 

Central America 

Mexico 



1898. 



QuanV$. Values 



48.074 
96.6U 
a,7U 



90,966 
300 

100.258 



4,372,477 

29,097,185 

125,061 

8JB1 .011 

21.400,565 



172,389 

8,301.235 

63,997 



176.210 
139,497 



868,906 
106.206 



5,851 
1,278.811 



133.245 
2.855 

756.900 

106.10B 
2.675 

266,818 

8.605 

1,273.811 



25.717.404 
636.564 



1,960,626 
722,57S 
627,676 



8.876,766 
1,612094 
1,376,810 
10,617,740 
374.614 
48,399 
25,717.404 



870,514,456 



1,796.985 
850.419 
7,3:t4.801 
2,409,967 
2,427,834 



34.511,168 



I114J68 
75.601 

42,813 



660,644 

1,697 

662,841 



45.026 



2,808,718 173.488. 

1,817,221 05356,263 1,509,916 
270,291 19,965.506 409.818 
898,182 39,828,207 . 892,551 

3,289.102|lft&47a698| 2.985,772 



896,906 
476,062 
2,729,760 
40.266 
589,714 



225,628 23,891, 
4,061.890 



120J»6 
2TO.755 
6.291,58^ 
6.06a42] 
25,773,522 
15,697,251 
41,470.778 



2.187 
2.963 



738;8S 
276.766 



14.729 
8,401,301 



811,733 
5.184 



200.728 
8,075 

486.985 

8.160 

3.401.801 



8,492,063 



304.14: 
113.898 
39,164 



1,257,225 



173,846 

1,203,376 

111.865 

63.U7 



254,206 
62,173 
5«,717 
361.005 
136,902 
4.459.188 



1899. 



QuanVs. Values 



104,819 
174.544 
235,136 



5]4,4i 



123,394 

820 

124,214 



8,978,421| 

18,4054344 

122,314 

44224.68(1 
45,444306 
,135 



128,683 

12,975,970 

272,174 



Ci75.690 
427,671 
620,600 



1,223,951 



AM 



919,104 

252,291. 

2,042,982 

20,905. 

810,742. 

817,062. 
2,943,9(g 



159,269 
885347 



1,124,446 
116,757 



1,258.784 



106,860 
1,439 



120.105 

- 7.662 

192,013 

284 

1.268,784 



35,512.364 
926,219 



2,030,945 

630384 

560,392 

68,513 

14396,650 

967,855 

4,631,201 

10,388,891 

112,023 

1,716,501, 



2.870,449 
183,136, 
1,285,412 
5,187311 
5,124370 
25.1JS8328 
17310,408 
42,668,781 



* "2,864 
11361 

201,416 
786314 

274,028 
1,061,960 



2,684 
8305,798 



263,294 

3,74fl 

2,736,409 

234.884 

21,412 

885,491 

657 

8305.796 



6,064,708 
295.4M. 



8.492.083 85.512,864 



65.067,681831320.341 



4,465,794 
92.319 
2,138,780 
3,665,289 
890,660 
45,296,800 



8,699,392 27,824,827 



843,447 

99366 

83,707 

8,597 

2,107,891 

157,000 

646,766 

1,378.604 

14.896 

224,747 

6,064,708 



554274,646 



494353 

8,265 

200,399 

404.187 

22,041 

6,366,7U 

2366,218 



Duty. 



.«olb. 



Iclb. 

...2-lOclb. 

Iclb. 

. . .260 tOD 



.»40clb. 



...2}i(clb. 



...n ton 



25% 

.Various 



. .670 ton 



..5clb. 



J 



IMPORTS OF MBRCHANDISB. 



15 



Imports— Free and Dtttiablb. 



1898. 



Qtumt'B. Values. 



1899. 



QiuinVg. Values. 



Duty. 



.966.9tBB2a417. 



11,701,201 
Sa417.812 
«),882.8dl 
10.496,299 
6.290,164 
G42.003 



West Indies 6,412,209 fb"r3,800 

Brazil 661,008.372 40,856.968 

Other South America 90,113,241 9,276,212 

Kast Indies 181,811,160 3,603,055 

Other Asia and Oceanica 4,947,018 918.10i 

Africa 42,305 6,010 

Other countries 1,477,692 221,789 

Total 1870,514.466 1 65.067,6 ^1 

Copper and Manufactures of — 

Oreandregulus free, tons 4,618^ 748,446 

Pigs, bars, iUKOts, etc free..lbs. 40,722,945 3,077,835 

Manufactures of dut 42,730 

Cork wood, or cork bark, nnmanf act'd .free. . 

Cork, manufactures of dut. . . 

Cotton and Manufactures of— Unman- 
ufactured free..lbs.| 52.660.363 

Waste or flocks free.. lbs. 

Cotton, Unmanufact'd abs.)- Imported from— 

United Kingdpm 12,604,972 

Other Europe 36,089 

South America 1,300,476 

East Indies 61,746 

Other Asia and Oceanica 3,968,.%7 

Africa (Egypt) 34,668,429 

Other countries 130,336 

Total 162,660.368 

Manufactures of (dut.)— Cloth (sq. yds.)— . , 

Not bleached, dyed, colored, etc 1420,106 120,767 1,260,932 

Bleached, dyed, colored, etc 434ffi8,291 6,313,688 61,204,781 

Total 44.778,399 6.434,460 62.4:6,713 



¥945.622 

35.268.01C 

7.217ie(] 

1,502.498 

840.736 

104,971 

216380 

,341165,274,616 



Clothing, ready-made, etc 

Knit Gtoods— Stockings, hose, etc 

Laces, edgings, embroideries, etc 

Thread (not on spools), yam, warps, etc.lbs. 
All other 



Total manufactures 

Cloths, etc. (sq. yd.)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Switxerland 

Other Europe * 

Japan 

Other countries 

Total r 

Other Mamif "fi of Cotton— Imported from- 

United Kingdum 

BoJglu m , 

Fratice 

German y , ^ . ^ . ► , 

S wluerland v.* 

Other l£arape. . , 

OJitna, ...., = 

.Iftnun*.. 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Utlu»r oouutxies 

Total '. 

Earthen, Stone and China Ware (dut.)— China, 
porcelain, parian, bisque, etc.— 

Not decorated or ornamented 

Decorated or ornamented 

Another 

Total 

Earthen, Stone and China Ware— Imported 

from— United Kingdom 

Austria-Hungary 

France. 

Germany 

Other Europe ;... 



Janan , . . . . 

Other countries.. 



Total.. 



.dut.. dot. 



5,260 1,173,160 



1317,970 



36,431.624 

4.242,S4£ 

3,456,5ff7 

1,271,022 

282,782 

88,1.'« 

12,026 

44,778.399 



166319 



61,108,228 6,604339 
89,068 



1,147,P02 
394,666 



5.019.6061 60,158.1.'i8 
6,032.484 



1,286.438 10,562318 



123,771 

4,847 

364,271 

8,226.172 

13,041 

5.019,608 



1,060,654 
4,084,483 

11,768.704 

687.99S 

4,291.110 . 

27.2Gr.300 



4,177,7U 

669,076 

600,801 

166,467 

32,206 

6,643 

1,646 

6,434,460 



6,667,468 

318,900 

3,222.669 

6,715,866 

4,80a414 

86.884 

29.407 

34.682. 



34,649. 
21,832,850 



834,226 
6,579,407 

273,727 
6,687,360 



2,709,925 
499.264 
909,055 

2,066,999. 
119.145 
313,288 
49.684 

6.687.360 



8.078 



6,013.146 
210.876 



1,124319 



1,677,711 
189,804 
107.821 

37306,062 
214,442 

60,168,168 



1,027,296 . 
4,336,268 
_ 14,549.863 
2,326,974^ 849,819 
4,535,977 
82,063,611 



41.047342 

4,667.601 

8.962309 

2.630,094 

134.490 

09,656 

64.022 

52.456,718 



225,1801 



136,776 
14,317 
10,064 

8,712.224 
15,446 

6,013,146 



107.023 
6,648,771 
6.766,794 



5,271389 

617,747 

519.725 

315.047 

17. :" 

5,664 

8.600 

6.766,794 



269,109 

3,704,069 

6.716,876 

6.987385 

91.424 

32,142 

86.602 

83.906 

44,175 

25,297,767 



1,009,168 

6.262,812 

321,025 

7,592,995 



2,934,518 
500,677 

1.422.283 

2,242,473 
136,613 
288.672 
68,964 

7,692.9J« 



2130U 



.2clb. 
.80 lb. 



..Various 
. .Various 



..Various 
..Various 
..Various 
..Various 
..Various 



55% 

60| 

.Various 



■ 6c dog. 



16 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS AI4MANAG FOR 1900. 



IMPORTS— FRKE and DUTIABLE. 



1898. 



Quanta. Valuta, 



1899. 



Quant's. Value*, 



Duty. 



Feathers, etc., natural and artificial— Featbers 
and downs, crude, not dressed, etc. . .free. , 

Do dot.., 

Feathers and downs, natural, dress'd, color 'd 

etc dot... 

Feathers, flowers, etc., artificial dut.. . 

Total .^ 

Fertilizers (free, tons)— Guano 

Phosphates, crude 

Another. 

Total 

Fil>ers, Vegetable, etc.. and Manufactures of. 
n. e. s. — Unmanufactured (tons) — Flax, 

and tow of free..... 

Flax dut 

Hemp, and tow of free 

Hemp dut 

Istle or Tampico fiber free 

Jute and J ute butts free . . . . ^ 

Manila free 

Sisal grass free 

All other free 

Jfree .... 

idut 

Total 

Flax (free and dutiable, tons)— Import 'd f rom- 

United Kingdom 

Other Europe , 

British North America 

Other countries 

Total 

Jute (tons)— Imported from— United Kingdom 

Bast Indies 

Other countries 

Total ^ 



|146,44S 
2,068,607 

774,250 
2,248,183 
5,261,397 



$l,768,(Je2 



4,524.172 



4,5(» 
9,810 



50.8U(] 

fiU.72(i 

1,254.001 

L37D,533 



4,210 
114,954 



4H,filO 

489,226 

969,183 

1,492.019 



1,779 
8,760 
299 
8,718 
2.663 
112,306 
60,270 
69,322 
9,791 



Total unmanufactured.. 



7.46U 
253,798 



245,012. 

948.586 

43,72s. 

516.605 

130,294 

2,543,498 

3,239.341 

6,169.900 

009,222 

11.980,996 

1,465,190 

13.446.186 



6.474 



1,306,620. 



8,941 
4.419 



477.108 , 

274311 

2,296.189 

.^^ 6,211,475 

71,89a 9;J11.377 

7,46d 513,247 

220,20: 1&507.090 

10.41J 

230,622 20.290,727 



2.116 

2,702 

711 



471.094 
89.971 



1.888 

8,774 

812 



545,417 
646,673 
114,430 



5,529 



1,193.507 



6,474 



1.806,520 



2.085 

109,909 

362 

112.306 



1U0.091 
2,428,409 

14,996 
2,548,498 



4.271 

78,784 

106 



Manila (tons)— Imported from- 

Uni ted- Kingdom 

Philippine Islands 

Other countries 



225,578 

2,065,103 

5,50d 

2,296,189 



Total 

Sisal Grass (tons)— Imported from - Mexico. . 

Other countries 

Total 



1,572 

48,541 

167 

50,270 



68,432 

890 



135.690 

3.092,285 

11,366 

8,239,341 



12,913 



1,988,272 



53,263 



6,211,475 



5,104.228 

65,672 

5,169,900 



Manufactures of (lbs.)- Bagging, gunny 

cloth, etc free 

Do dut 

Bags for grain, made of burlaps, .free 

Bags of Jute dut 

Burlaps free...... 

Do dut 

Cables, cordage, threads and twine, n. e. s. 

(lbs.) dut 

Coir yam (lbs.) free 

Twine, binding (lbs.) free 

Carpets and carpeting (sq. yds.), .dut 

Fabrics, plain, woven, of single jute yam 

dut.... 

Handkerchiefs dut.. . . 

Oilcloths (sq. yds. ) dut. . . . 

Yarns (lbs.) dut. . . . 

Another dut.... 

Total manufactures 

Fish (Ibs.)-Fresh- 

Lobsters, canned or uncanned free. . . 

Salmon free... 

Do dut.... 

All other. free... 

Do dut 

Cured or Preserved— Anchories and sardines, 

etc dut 

Cod, haddock, etc.,dried. 8m'k'd,etc.dut 

Herring— Dried or smoked dut 

Pickled or salted dut 

Mackerel, pickled or salted dut 



69.59t> 
2,302 
71,896 



8,902.213 

309,164 

9,211,377 



493,106 

},928,501 

426,065 



24,907 
449,614 
320,201 
566,049 
489,412 
5,181,718 

69.951 
131,453 
34,391 



454351 
2,530,914 
1,819,627 

254327 



1,956,883 



383,048 
14,249.050 
21.899,794 



466,350 
1,911,296 



76,130 
95368 
182,012 
74,742 

8.115364 
1,657,190 
216,034 
406,809 
12,796,462 
25,132,495 



6,696,859 
160,083 
963,969 



599.577 
16,379 
85,304 
252,771 
907,255 



730,460 



1,221,090 



113,360 



16,082,607 
5.432.265 
28.019,942 
16,241.870 



U10,674 1.152,873 

625.968 11.382.462 425.414 

107,840 3,690,0e| 87,279 

l,058,05g8l,902,69q 1,074.792 

9a2.822| 16,209,117^ 1.105.027 



..6056 

::SI 



3clb. 

...HOton 



618.015 tt-lOcsq-yd. 
'99V,749|lclb.ftl5K 
..Iclb. 

...eo% 



..7c lb. 



.10 lb. 
...3056 



. ..Various 



•He lb. 
..^clb. 
...dclb. 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 17 | 


Impobts-Frxb and Dutiablb. 


1898. 


1899. 1 


Duty. 


Quant's. 


VcUuea. 


QuanVB. 


Values. 


Salmon, pickled or salted dat 

All other dut 


903,990 


5.985io4o 


521,904 


NI,416 

321,287 

5.956,190 


iclb. 

30* 

2c lb. 

■::M. 

iclb. 

2c lb. 

...Various 

40 lb. 

Ic lb. 


Total 




Fmits, Including Nots (lbs.)— Bananas.free 




4^836,418 






Currants free 






Do , dut 


25.186,310 
13.661.434 
9,628,426 


837,987 
371.992 
509.002 

2,848.130 
886,722 
39,66U 
881.889 
922.357 
421,657 
8T3.198 

12,.329,012 


30.849.253 


856.762 

4.3»H.004 

1,097,696 

63.674 

282,400 

1,020,643 

64.3,361 

1.039,287 

15,689,659 


Dates dut 


Figs dut 

Ijemone dut 


Oranges dut 




4,933,201 


Plums and prunes dut 

Raisins .....dut 

Prepared or preserved fruits dut. 


6^ 


All other frutte free 






Do dut 

Total fruits 








Bananas— Imported from— 
British North America 




90,887 

1,669,749 
1,852,843 




87,047 
1.816,843 

162,766 
5,665,668 


Central American States. ... 






British West Indies. 






Cuba 






South America » . 




103,692 

48,081 

5?1,716 

4,236,418 


w 


Hawaiian Islands . 




• Other countries 






Total 






Lemons — Imported from— Italy 




2,771,875 
69,160 
17,095 

2.848,130 




17,725 
4,396,004 


British North America 




Other countries 






Total 






Oranges— Imported from— United Kingdom.. 




23,149 
207,464 

&^ 

1,991 

9,418 

7,083 

886,722 




87,672^ 
298.005 
139.644 

6,656 

19,145 

1,097.596 

1,222,687 

626,788 




Mexico 






British West Indies 






Cuba. 




Japan * 






Otner countries 






Total 






Nuts (lbs.)— Almonds dut. 

Cocoanuts free 


6,746,362 


659,659 
554.061 

^^ 

14.566.950 


9,957.427 


Do dut 






All other.. .*. dut. 






879,166 
18,317,201 


Iclb. 

...JiOcgal. 
...Various 


Total fruits and nute 






Furs— Furs and fur skins, undressed., .free 

Furs, and manufactures of dut 




3,832.603 
4.048,569 




6,646.680 
6,211.019 




Furs and Fur Skins, etc.— Imported from - 
United Kingdom 




'-^^ 

289,^ 

62,»73 

75 

859,357 

.3,832,603 




1,728.908 
79»,239 

l,866.76«i 
375,9W 
397,120 
161,704 
994 
429,804 

5,645,680 


France 






Germany 






Other Europe 






British North America 






South Ame ri ca 




Japan 






Other countries 






Total 






Furs, and manufactures of— Imported from— 
United Kingdom 




1,310.753 
235.710 

'^:^ 

15.733 

204,678 

19,849 

4,048.569 




l,373.7(ffl 

484,120 

1,804.251 

'« 

813,692 
46,U4 

5.211.019 


Belgium • 






France ... 






Germany 






Other Europe 






China 






Other countries 






Total 




3CT;946 


Ginger ale or ginger beer (pints) dut. .doz. 

Glass and Glassware (dut.)— Bottles, etc., empty 
or filled 


182,683 


132,709 


268,236 




338,861 
963,116 

569,380 

66,768 

9,880 

161,637 

662 


47,i89;66T 

2,651,534 

219,09£ 


371.369 
1,275,184 

521,967 
622 


Cylinder, crown, etc., unpolished lbs. 

Cylinder and crown glass, polished (sq. feet)— 
Unsllvered 


38,906.992 

2.810,541 
244,044 

519 


Silvered 


Plate glass (sq. ft.) — Fluted, rolled or rough. 
Cast. Dolished. unsllvered 


Cast, polished, sUvered 



18 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Imports— Frek and Dutiablb. 



Qtiont't. Vai'uea 



1898. 



Quont't. Values. 



Duty. 



All other 

Total 

Glass— Cylinder, etc. (lbs.)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

Belgium 

France 

Germany 

Other Burope 

Other oountiles 

Total 

Glue dut....Ibs. 

Grease and oils n. e. s free 

Grease n. e. s dut 

Haii^Unmanufactured free 

Manufactures of ~ dut 

Total 

Hats, Bonnets and Hoods, and Materials for, 

etc free 

Bats, bonnets and hood8,and materials.free. . 

Hats, bonnets and hoods dut 

Materials for ., dut 

Total 

Hay dut.tons. 

Hides and Skins, Other than Fur Sltins (lbs.)— 

Goatskins free 

All other, except hides of cattle, eto.f ree 

Hides of cattle dut 

Total 

H lde» ami 8 k 1 f i b t ms, )— 1 m ported f rom— 

UHlied Kingdom.. *.,.^,.,,., 

Frimcf? .* ,,,,,,.», 

itefmsny.. ...,>...... 

Otht»rlSiiir0po..*.^.,**-*,4.,»... 

Hrltish Worth America 

CfintriLl Atudrlciin States. 

Mexico ..,......, 

West I qdi^ .,. 

Buuth AiTierlca 

Kaht ] nt3 iei^ - 

Utb{}r A^iia and Ootfanltiit 

AfrSou 

Ulhor countiies 

TotaL 



11,574,841 
8,675,046 , 



11,769,872 
4,182.141 



2,890.943 



150,063 



8,729,0)8 



150,496 
186,711 
18.576 
25,245 
38,908,992 



65,835 43,039,835 



3,726,324 



8,206 

27,986 

641 

867 

_953J16 

^,990 

431,080 

16U48 

1,839,668 



82,558 
266,007 



89,138 
47.189,667 



193.297 

1,044,26U 

8.046 

82,583 

354 

1,694 

1.275,184 



5,358,079 



479.450 
436,171 
260.508 



.«clb. 



2,126,866 . 



1,814.964 

159,01D 

1.974.013 



86,808 

683,994 

1.624,047 

2.244,.S49 



619.370 
1.807,856 
2,426.726 



..Various 
..Various 



84,659 



19.871 



115.209. 



..14 ton 



64,923,487 
54.607,534 
126,243,596 
345.774.616 



15,776,601 
7.667.342 

134i24,98b 
87, 



71.082,102 
66.963,560 
ld0.820.12G 



18.4883%^ 
9.877,773 
13,621,946 , 
414168,046 



.15% 



46,tfr.S.«62 
19.90t428 
B,755.842 
23,191,180 
U,4U,711 

1.962.803 
13.300.7)^ 

4.230,753 
5».19n,320 
23.660.789 



6,482.18] 
3,460.286 
2,572,454 
8,860,465 
1.148,985 

193,874 
1,698,574 

419.853 
9,178,828 



7,834,150 

9.424,768 

245.774.616 



1,706,980 
1.226,844 
1,816.962 



48,700,441 
20,609,884 
22,406,250 
29,743374 
15,188.704 
2,516.834 
12,313,046 
8,20e,248 
61,611,440 
27,211,970 
9,196,661 
6,461,227 
9,293,758 



37,068,932268306,782 



Hide cuttings, raw and other glue 

stock .free... 

Hops >. dut.. .11 

Household and personal effects, 0to. . .free.. . . 
India Rubber A Gutta-Percha, A Manufactures 
ot— Unmanufac'd (free, lbs.)— Gutta-percha 
India rubber 



6,438369 
8326.509 
8,885,238 
4.1.S8363 
1,324.302 
287,567 
1,879,750 
387.970 

10,447.178 
5321,702 
2,246,061 
1,15833( 
1,455316 

41,988,046 



2,375,922 



648.165 
1,779,066 



1319,819 



718,968 

691,766^, 

8,112. " 



.12c lb; 



Total unmanufactured 

lii^lft Rubber^ Trade (lbs.) -Imported from— 

UnU«d Kingdom 

(JertDHhy,,,.. 

at UoT K 1,1 ru E>L^ 

C?«nt ml Aicter t ca 

Mexico 

Wcftc Indies 

Brazil 

<>tbeTlikiul<h America 

EUAt iDdi^B 

AfTlQJk 

Other «ioun tiles 

Total 

Manufactures of (dut.)— Gutta-percha 

India rubber 

Total manufactures 

Iron and Steel and Manufactures of— Iron 

ore dut. tons 

Pig iron dut. . tons 

Scrap iron and steel, etc dut.. tons 

Bar iron dut. . . lbs. 

Bars, railway, of iron or steel, etc. . .(1ut..ton« 



636,477 
46,065,497 
46,691. 



159.381 
25,386,010 
25,545,891 



518,939 
51,0:9.258 

51.598,197 



167,577 
31,708,766 
31,876.342 



9.001.797 

1.691,683 

5,661.862 

972.631 

136.874 

10,467 

26.670,127 

1,557,608 

418,860 

11,731 

21,967 

46,065,497 




IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 



19 



Imports-Free and dutiable. 



1898. 



QiianVa. Valuer. 



1899. 



QuanVs. Values. 



Duty. 



Hoop, band or scroll dut.. . lbs. 

Ingots, bl'ms, srbs, bil'ts.of steel, etcdut.. .lbs. 
Sheet, plate and taggers Iron or Bteel..dut..lb8. 

Ties for baling cotton free. .lbs. 

Tin plates, teme plates and tag- . 

gers tin dut.. .lbs. 

Wire rods dut. . . lbs 

Wire, and articles made from dut.. .lbs. 

Manufactures of— Anvils dut.. .lbs. 

Chains dut. . . lbs. 

Cutlery dut. 

Files, file blanks, rasps and floats... dut. 

Firearms dut. 

Needles, hand sewing and daming..free. 

Machinery dut. 

Shotgun barrels, in single tubes. 

forged, rough-bored free. 

All other dut. 

Total, not including ore 

Tin Plates, etc. (lbs.)— Imported from— 

Uni ted K Ingdom , 

British North America , 

Other countries , 

Total 

Ivory (free, lbs.)- Animal 

Vegetable 

Jewelry, Manufactures of Gold and Silver, and 
Precious Stones— Diamonds, uncut, includ- 
ing miners*, etc., not set free 

Diamonds, cut but not set dut 

Other precious stones, rough or uncut. free. . . 
Other precious stones, cut but not set. . .dut. 
Jewelry, and manufactures of gold aifd 

silver dut. . . . . , 

Total .*.. 

Precious Stones, etc. (free)— Imported from- 

United Kingdom 

France 

Netherlands 

Other Europe 

Brazil 

Other countries 

Total 

Jewelry, and other Precious Stones, etc. (dut.) 
—Imported from— United Kingdom. . 

France 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Other Europe. 

British North America 

Mexico 

East Indies 

Other countries 

Total 



30,»n,157 
5,899.900 



K^,097 

1,202.055 

183,' 



19.8(X1 
23.798,994 
i,211,29H 



S3.d29 

1,038,84; 

178,892 



in,fi62.345 

39.e01,639 

5,318,193 

777,908 

176,346 



3.809.148108,484.826 



&M.841 
348.854 
47,797 

\i.m 

944.056, 
35,344 

362,606, 
1,875,222 

48,885 
1,107,506. 
12,626,431 



34,6i0.6o6 

5,278.044 

622 436 

362,855 



2,613,564 
730,958 
348.0K) 
32,;^25 
21.006 
1,187.236 
42.7riO 
758,575 
407,746 
1,630.542 

138,871 
1,210,787 
12,098.239 



..Various 
..Various 
...IHclb. 



...li^lb. 
....«clb. 
..Various 
..l^clb. 
..Various 
..Various 
..Various 
..Various 



..Various 



17a872.133 
779,482 
10.730 
171.662345 



3,786,626 

22,151 

371 

8,809,148 



107,831639 
653.187 



2,591.806 
21,758 



108.484826 2,613.564 



244,1.S8 
16.156,128 



620.518 
165.931 



321,315 
8,864.257 



690.980 
88.479 



2.517,759 

4,438,0:j0 

2i,802 

1,982,456 

1,427,833 
10.388,880 



8,678,266 

8,497,284 , 

39,928 

2,140,275 , 

8,293,693 , 
17.649,446 



20% 
60% 



1,108,661 

124.454 

1,227.387 

71,660 

1.303 

7,096 

2,.540,561 



2,302.602 

60,266 

1,343,044 

8.447 



3,835 
.S.718.194 



1,958,618 

2.646.392 

539,146 

2,122,257 

573,186 

92,111 

6.747 

8,944 

6,918 

7,848,319 



3,600,367 

4.360,486 

917,857 

3,991,481 

1,018,962 

6,440 

13,980 

7.198 

15.531 

13,931,252 



Lead, and Manufactures of (dut., lbs.)— Lead in 

ore, etc 

Pigs, bars, and old 

I*lgs, bars, old and other in ore 

Manufactures of 



181.656.980 
8.313,090 



2,514.258 
82,271 



191,931295 
414,023 



2,763,884 
10,652 



4,250 



Lead, Pigs, Bars, etc. (Ibs.)- 

Unfted Kingdom 

Germany ^ 

Other Europe 

British Norlh America. . . 

Mexico 

Other countries 



-Imported f rom- 



10,575 



^clb. 
Iclb. 



..Various 



Total . 



644,482 

366,053 

1,120,528 

42,557,856 

137,867,339 

443,812 

184.970070 



17,830 

8,944 

28,938 

934,149 

1,601,458 

5,210 

2,596,529 



267,432 



7,522 



111,952 
33,212,663 
167,9984{49 

756,142 
192345.318 



1,910 

846.560 

1,906,111 

10,903 

2,774,036 



Leather, and Manufactures of— Leather (dut.) 

Band or.belting and sole leather 

Calfskins, tanned, etc 

Skins for morocco 

Upper leather and skins, dressed, etc 

Total leather 



155.860 

176,678 

3,081,770 

2,210,937 

6.625,145 



52,688 

258,846 

2,455,332 

2,470.841 

5.237,707 



20% 

20% 

10% 

Various 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Imports— Free and Dutiable. 



Manufactures of (dut.) — Gloves, of kid or 

other leather 

All other 



Total manufactures , 

Gloves— Imported from— Belgium.. 

France 

Germany , 

Other Bucope 

Other countries 



Total 

Malt— Barley dut. . . bu. 

Malt Liquors (dut., eals.)- In bottles or Juks. 

In other coverings 

Total 

Manganese ore and oxide of free. tons 

Marble and Stone, and Manufactures of (dut.)- 

Marble, and manufactures of 

Stone, and manufactures of, including slate. 

Total 

Matting for floors f ree.TOlls . 

Matting and mats fur floors, etc dut.sq.yds 

Metals, Metal Compositions, and Manufacture.** 

of (dut.)— Bronze manufactures 

Another , 

Total 

Musical instruments, and parts of dut..., 

Oils (gals.)— Animal or rendered— Whale and 

flsh dut... 

Other dut. . . 

Mineral free... 

Do dut... 

Veifetable— Fixed or expressed free... 

Do dut... 

Olive dut... 

Volatile or essential, and distilled. .free... 

Do dut... 

Total 



Paints, pigments and colors free 

Do dut 

Paper Stock, Crude (free; see also wood pulp)— 

Kags, other than woolen lbs. 

All other 



Total 

PaperatocJc, Crude— Impurted from- 

U n Ited K i iigdom 

BulKliuni ..,.,.. 

FrAnee*, - 

GeTumny . . - 

Jtoly.. 

Other Knropo-. , 

Bf Itjith North America 

EasL I Bdj ei4 r 

Japan.,,,..,,. _.*...„„., 

Othe r countr] es 

Total 

Paper, and Manufactures of— 

Lithographic labels and prints, n.e.s.dut 

Parchment papers lbs, 

All other 

Total 

Paper and Manufactures of— Imported from 

United Kingdom 

Belgium 

France 

Germany 

Other Europe 

J apan « 

Other countries 

Total 

Perfumeries, cosmetics, etc dut. . . . 

Pipes and smokers' articles dut. . ■ . 



1898. 



QuanVn. Values. 



_ 4,769 

733.536 

1.777,202 

2,510,737 



97,320 



2l).8W 
19.7«2,451 



673,214 
14,163 

870,147 
15,439 



736,87' 



49,800,209 



$3,381,168 

404.812 

5.783,960 



284,619 
1,6^,114 
2.((84,287 , 

790,679 

469 

5,884,1(» 



4.412 



695.102 

506,428 

1,201,530 



772,310 115.094 



689.454 
^9,502 



61.89i^ 
1.375,272 



480.281 
3.340,787 
3.821,068 



920,094 



221,830 
6,715 
98.252 
3.114 

1,893,878 
540,331 
923,801 

1.133.371 
377,707 

5,198,002 



8,470 
1,056.618 



699,961 
2,170,342 
2,870,323 



1,068.272 
273,141 



571,965 
254.407 
129.8^0 
212.526 , 
10,777 
80,318 
60,104 
2,870,323 



2.838,738 , 
2,833,738 



622,374 
68,166 
255,(£25 
1,708,826 
55.474 



1899. 



QuanVsA Valuen. 



4,98 ( 



916,^ 
1,928,655 
2,844.564 



37,908,009 



631,932 

y.058 

1,789,514 

2,775 



990,004 



65,596,56(] 



750,469 



39.437 
2,838.738 



432,008 
259,854 



251,186 
2,061,58-Z 
2,347,827 

720,931 

699 

6.398,125 



Duty. 



15,398,125... Various 

480.719 35% 

6.878,844 



4,447..... 45c bu. 



911,228.... 40c gal. 
570,677.... 20c gal. 
1,484,906 



876,478 



680.292 
203.319 
883,611 



2,651,106 



568,472 
3,559,346 
4,117,818 



1,057.79 i 



198,110 . 
1.569 

140,143 

(»7 

1,907,923 

611,234 
1,090,213 
1.381,363 

309,994 
6.641.116 



1,205.737 



805,515 
1,809,&9 
2.611,914 



1,006, !08 
2.36.092 
191,018 
579.014 
227,938 
109,981 
66.082 
9,051 
105,155 
61,115 
2,614,911 



799,087 

66,45:i 

2,331,515 

3,190,065 



544,652 
(»,011 
295,833 
1,920,129 
103,585 
221,300 
44,572 
3,190.065 



..Various 
..Various 



.6c8q.yd. 



......4556 

.Various 



4556 

. .8c gal. 
.8c gal. 



.. 40cgal. 
.Various 

..Various 



,25 to 35^ 



Ml,66060clb.&464 
280,997 ml 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 



21 



Imports— Frbk and Dutiable. 



QuanV». Values, 



1898. 



Quant's. Values. 



1899. 



Duty. 



Plants. Shrubs and Vines dut 

Platinum free.. lbs. 

Plum baffo free, tons 

Provisions, Comprising Meat and Dairy Prod- 
ucts (dut.)— Meat products- 
Meat and meat extracts 

All dther 

. Dairy Products (lbs.)— Butter 

Cheese 

Milk.. 

Total 



6,008 $1,032,192 



11,164 



472.401 



6,357 
16,970 



1763.538 
1,193,475 
1,061.850 



31,984 
10,012,188 



346,108 

80,081 

6.474 

1,343,173 

67,729. 

1,841,615 ■ 



23.700 
11319,993 



268,748 

100,647 

3,962 

1,562,193 



....35c lb. 
..Various 

6c lb. 

6c lb. 

2c lb. 



1,982,158 



Cheese (lbs.)— Imported from- 

Unlted Kingdom 

France...... 

Qermany 

Itoly 

Netherlands 

Switzerland 

Other Europe 

fifritish North America 

Other countries ^ 

Total 



m,439 
919,116 
263,796 

3,160,006 
867,066 

4,346,58(] 



10.012.188 



30,537 

146,860 
34,215 

417.816 
96,100 

585,309 

2r,9or 

3,755 

674 

1,343,173 



150,433 

1,008,71(1 

856.355 

3357,887 
1.091.285 
4,875,973 



Rice (Ib8.)-Rice dut 

Do (Hawaiian Islands treaty ) free .... 

Rice flour, rice meal and broken rice.dut 

Total 



51,629 

4,815 

11.819,998 



27,379 

192,089 

45.148 

475,201 

120,864 

653.968 

40.183 

6,820 

601 

1,562,193 



125396,33(] 

4,414.300 

60,474,686 

19a285,315 



2,604,572 



953.722 



151497,888 
2,GO5,60C 
49,979,805 



3,022.969 
135,683 
771,411 



...2c lb. 
•Mc lb. 



8,746,833 204,07a29g 



186,006 



10.492 
10,315,162 

1,762,297 



Salt (lbs.) free 26,063.89C 

Do dut...lb8.|316ja 00,216 

Sausage casings free 

Seeds (bu,)— Linseed or flaxseed dut. 

All oiliher free 

Do dut. 

Total 

Shells, unmanufactured free 

Silk, and Manufactures of— Unmanufactured- 

(free, lb8.)-Cocoons .". 

Raw, or as reeled from the cocoon 

Waste , 

Total unmanufactured 

Silk, Raw (lbs.)— Imported from— France. 

Italy 

China 

Japan 

Other countries 

Total 

Manufactures of (dut. )— Clothing, ready-made, 

and other wearing apparel 

Dress and piece goods 

Laces and embroideries 

Ribbons. 

Spun silks, in skeins, oops, warps, or on 

oeams lbs, 

Velvets, plushes, and other pile 

fabrics lbs 

All other 

T iTiil m fin ufntiL urea , 



84,168 
490.i 



568,922 8-12cl001bs. 



488,755, 



622,493 



150.515 81,968 



382,864, 
1.231.766 , 



87,602 

748,8n 

886,155 

1.221,634 



....25cbu. 
..Various 



860.706, 



973,944 



31,446,800 

659.267 

32.110,066 . 



13,637 
9,691,145 
1,646.701 



31,827,061 

650.278 

32,479,627 



339,984 
1,742,167 
2,612,279 
6,217,182 

403,610 
10.315,162 



1.192,008 
6,250,671 
6,811,188 

16,510,502 
1,182,431 

31,446.800 



830.248 
2,251,216 
2,612,299 
4.516,116 
82,266 
9,691,146 



1,248,087 
8,929.776 
6,497,983 

14,920,787 
280,478 

31,827,061 



1,866,279 

10,495,067 , 
3,349,464, 
2,085,411 



6,788,464 



1,727,710 

478,285 



Map u f afl tu re s f~lm po r r ed from— 

United Kluwdotn - 

Austrin-HunpaT?., , , .... 

Belfiiini.. 

(■ ranee. ....<, h ►, 

uermdn J ♦,♦..,«.**.,. 

Italy 

Switzerland.^ . . . * . , 

Other Europe- 

Cb ( ua* , 

jApaa. . 
Otner c 



13,062.364 
2,878.720 
1,726,242 

1,976,016 

l..'i53,687 
2,270.815 
25,105,482 



.Various 
...Various 



...Various 



eountrlos ... - , 

Total 

Soap (dut., IbB.)— Fancy, perfunied, eid.. 

Another 

Total 





.160 lb. 
.200 lb. 



576,189 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. - 



Imports— Frss and Dutiable. 



1898. 



QuanVa. Values 



1899. 



QvuinVs. Valtu* 



Duty. 



Spices— Uoffround (lbs.)— Nutmegs free 

Pepper, black or white free 

Ail other free 

I>o dut. 

Total : 

NutmofTs, Popper, et<r. itnie, lbs.)— Imported 

frCiiD— i;iifteii Klti«c(ium 

Kii her in lids .._ 

Of tier KuTupe , 

Brirlsh NortU Amerlua.. 

Bruish Wti^t rudlo*. 

ClJlrui.. : 

East [jutJb^i. , * 

UEiier A^iauhd Ooean^cn , 

Ai rk'tt , , , 

Other coutitiiiiie ..,.. , 

Total 

Spices. All Other (dut.)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom :. , 

Other Europe 

Mexico 

Other countries , 

Total 

Spirits, Distilled (proof gal8.)-Of domestic man- 
ufacture, returned (subject to internal 

reyeniie tax) free. 

Brandy dut. . 

All other dut. . 

Total 



1,213.994 
14,U60.18(i 
13.784,«HJ 

2,658,7U6 



tlUU,711 

8U8,W2 

264,e»l 

2.404,629 



1,530.102 
12.332.747 
Li851,056 

8,346,926 



1368.766 

l/fti3.iaj 

997,783 

332,6ii3 

2.782.281 



7.576,669 

2,028.148 

1,142,643 

2,515 

2,868.264 

2,506.689 

L,238,416 

498.870 

1,666,225 

58.380 

29,078.819 



699.742 
220,837 
85,968 
166 
106,366 
158,669 
795,63(1 



60,07i! 

2.19U 

2,139,938 



6.082,786 

1.076,872 

274,987 

260 

3,756,619 

2,426.110 

11.886,256 

1.401.846 

1,811,935 

46.884 

27,713,904 



874.533^ 

171,r^ 

26,161 

48 

284,092 

149,023 

1,220,982 

127,891 

92,7* 

2.362 

2.449,648 



191,68(1 
28.fi6i 
80,411 
13,88 

264.691 



244,83C 
27,498 
88,144 
22,161 



^ [ M r n.» ( not of {lDmf?»tl p niati u f aetu re, proof 
t!JUs,J-lmporl«d frum-Xlnit«d KEcigdom 

Bi.'Lglum. .,, ,, .. ..,H ..»*. 

Ifiin*.*.., ...4 ,.,t,,.-,m , 

l»ermai)f ,-.*..^.. 

ItiiLy 
"" 'thi 



854,586 

137,902 

770.830 

1.763,318 



734,901 

395,758 

1,004.135 

2,134,794 



998,273 

219,888 

1.227,157 

2.445,268 



834,<M8 
626,656 



1, 
3.144,619 



.$2.25 gal. 
..Various 



Nfttherluiids .., 

Uthijr hlufO|>e, ....,., 

Brttlijb Nurth Am^rlc-u. ... 

Wesl. indicia,. , , 

China 

Othur Asia had Oceanlou... 
Other cuuntrlest 



25.7.57 
172,907 
51,806 
9.946 
111,701 
9.329 
96,430 



Total sugar.. 



Total 

Sponges dut 

Straw and grass, manufactures of dut 

Sugar, Molasses and Confectionery- 
Molasses f ree.gals. 

Do dut.. gals. 

Sugar (lbs.)— Not above No.16 Dutch standard- 
Beet dut 

Cane. free 

Cane and other dut 

Above No. 16 Dutch standard- 
Beet, cane and other dut 

J free 

idut 

Total 

Not above No. 16 Dutch standard (lbs. )— Im- 
ported from— United Kingdom 

Austria-Hungary 

Belgium 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Central America 

Mexico 

Weat, Indies- 
British 

Cuba..; 

Other West Indies 

Brasll 

Other South America 

China. 

Bast Indies 



41,324 

21,194 

5,022 

908.732 



490,535 
32,316 

492.297 
35,969 
16.767 
56,886 
16.609 

183.919 
54.666 
11,243 
6,067 
2,810 



585.934 
263) 

272,228 

. 79.138 

23,919 

167,047 
20.962 

136.221 
26.566 
86,584 
19.240 
12,962 
1.446,995 



897,478 
36,000 

792.363 
55,935 
87.331 
83,149 
87,192 

265,208 
69,066 
26.720 
7.595 
11,644 
2,309.671 



401.725 



429,776 



.2056 



49.275 
8,564.272 



2.346 
641.670 



15.800 

5,682,590 



512 

783,806 



140,641,485 
499,766,798 
19484239U6 

10U068,e63 
499,766.798 
2190154053 



2,717,955723,336514 
16,660,109462.299,880 
S8,669,764p^3l8685T4 



2,434.«31 62,745,001 
16,660.1091462,299.880 
43,812.640|3517950689 



15.269,4131. 
17,287,683 
60,714,089 

1,692,935 
17,287,683 
77.676.437 



....3c gal. 
...1.95c lb. 
...1.95c lb. 



60,472.749398025066^ 



94,961,120 



16,651,960 
1,046,190 



888,472 
24,473 



16.694,179 
68,462,705 



431,5181 
1,469,468 



18a064.955 
2,306,063 

77.r^ 



4.764.387 
2,898,145 

232.798,204 
440,225.111 
211.342,294 
139.426,196 
192.755^229 
365,973 

i6io,2e96eg 



2,666.135754348,277 
57,128. 
1,696 
44,706 
195,149 
44,596 



13,806,655 



1.996.400 

236,598 

6,019.812 

8,088.331 



4,610,360264.606.400 



4.203,484247.212.606 
2.817,887 41,222.162 
3.940.648 22a877.0R4 
5,755 --- -^ 
11.""'^^ 



41,070 

5.963 

158,639 

62.976 

6,967.814 
16,412,068 
5,848,601 
810.276 
6,841,713 
6.365 



,246.9681916.037.6681 20.388.9481 



IMPORTS OP MBRC5HANDI8B. 



23 



Imports— FREE and Dutiable. 



Hawaiian Islands 

Philippine Islands 

Other Asia and Oceanica.. 

Africa 

Oth6r countries 



499.77fi.798 lia729,752'[4625«»9.880l«7JK7.fl8a 



Total 

Above No. 16 Dutch standard (lbs.)— Imported 

from— United Kingdom 

Au8tria-U ungary 

BYance 

Germany 

Netherlands 

China 

Other countries 

Total 

Ck)nfectionery dut. 

Sulphur ore free.. tons 

Tea free.. .lbs. 

Do dut... .lbs. 

Tea (lbs.)— Imported from— United Kingdom. 

British North America 

China 

East Indies 

Japan 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Other countries 

Total 

Tin in bars, bloclis. pigs, etc free. .lbs. 

Tin In Bars, etc. (lbs.)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

Netherlands 

Bast Indies 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Other countries 

Total 

Tobacco, and Manufactures of— Leaf (dut., lbs.) 

suitable for cigar wrappers 

Other 

Total leaf 

Tobacco, Leaf (lbs.)— Imported f rom— 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Other Uurope 

British North America 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Other countries 

Total 

Manufactures of (dut. lbs.)— Cigars, cigarettes, 

etc 

All other 

Total manufactures 

Toys dut 

Tors— Imported from— France 

Germany 

Other Europe 

Other countries 

Total 

Vegetables (dut., bu.) -Beans and dried peas... 

Onions 

Potatoes ....-^. 

Pickles and sauces 

All Other— In their natural state 

Prepared or preserved 

Total 

Wines (dut.)-Champagne and oth'r sparkFg.doB. 

Still Wines— In casks gals. 

In other coverings dos. 

Total 

Wines— Imported from— United Kingdom 

France 



258883gl38 58.037,8283917504968 



1898. 



Quant^i. Valuea 



aU,48U,6U0 

295,918 

64,435.286 

14(1 



4.991.263 

696,938 

6,698 

37,100,485 

38,107,744 

6,794,691 

13,380,854 

101.068.663 



69,455.847 
2,501,868 



3.011.390 
1,521,170 
38,631.890 
2,251,202 
26.233.407 
303.179 
2,47? 
71,967,715 10.064,283 



21,622,589 
8.783,288 



1,671,807 
179,086 



8.968.561 
6,488,547 
10,477.108 



896,806 

3,685,435 

489,875 

896.246 

57&64S 

4346,475 

685,728 

10.477,108 



831.902 



lB.i50Q 



1,171,878 



Quant' 9. Values 



381,279 

7,423 

1,368,195 



136.655 
32,977 
824 
864.661 
928,653 
170,996 
810,655 
2,434,921 



27,m 



9,653,672 
400,611 



580,183 

242,420 

5,811,051 

278,273 

8,106.663 

84.951 

742 



8,n6,151 



3,122,562 



4,882,412 

2L3,615 

24.738 

8.776,151 



8,918,294 
8,575.814 
7,488.608 



4U ^ 

8.505,882 

828,611 

253,694 

259.279 

2,848,524 

161,553 

7.- 



1,561,000 

52,497 

1,608.506 



2,214.482 



93,183 

2,020,045 

72,080 

29,174 

2,214.482 



149,227 
429,173 
473,154 



239,733 

499,950 

2,084.600 



223.827 8.264.828 2d8,667 



368.92i| 1,312,147 
5,969.180 



222,0^ 
8,788,187 



1899. 



51. , 

8.486,415 

180,043^)14 



1,807,378 

064,638 

66,007. 

12,284,496 

6,894,73H 
10,888,541 



62.745,601 



296,216 



74,068.153 



1,687,507 
1,221.639 
39.607,365 
2,068,248 
29,277,708 
281.439 
4, 
74,068,153 



gr,842.106 



ll,796,fi6» 
2,181.819 

62,420.247 
864,890 
180,071 

67,342,106 



4,]47,(M8 
9,888,583 
14,066,631 



849.884 

8,806,921 

474,829 



624,654 



7,1 ... 

891.008 

14,036,681 



418,684 



184,499 
771,960 
630,420 



1,930.870 1,302.710 2,250,461 1,671,682 ..40^gal 



86,627 
4,196,648 



98,271,186 



80,226 
26,367 



2,506 

176,013 

290,200 

1467,624 

1,602,936 



81,772 
970,804 



9,673,678 



878.092 

189,2Si 

4,797,175 

266,558 

4,007,805 

81,856 

2,907 

9,678.678 



11,843,367 



2,d0O.0S7 

400.609 

8,953,001 

1^,600 

25.1IU 

11.848,367 



4,849,034 
5,550,909 
9,900.063 



42,206 

3,791.385 

296,320 

491,642 

229.554 

4,964.82s 

87395 

9.900.083 



2,062,« 



2.148,909 



2.261.969 . 



101,62f 

2,086.63S 

47,83( 

26.978 

2.261,9f» 



274347] 1346361 
6,586,806 



201,607 
4,246,999 



Duty, 



....4-60clb. 



.lOclb. 



..11.861b. 
..86-65C lb. 



)62,450$4^bA;25f 
61.549 94glMk26^ 



.36^6 



166,830.... i'Scbu. 
....40c bu. 
294,801.... 25c bu. 

858,008 40% 

812,650 2556 

554398.... 2^0 lb. 

2.178.607 



3,668,7».. 13-18 doi. 



..Various 



=^ 



24 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALSUNAG FOR m¥i. 



iMPOttTS-FBEK ANH DlJTtABLE. 



Italy .....,, 

t.!lhi?r KEiriii>e,... 

01 her ROUQ tries,. 

Total 



Wwrt . rtnd Mnn u f fif 'i ii rwa of - 1 J n m anuf acl u red 
i f^ ?h ~^ * '* ' " ""^ ^"^^^ - ** '^^ LtKnii y .free . , . . 
Lofjs and round tl iiiber. , . ^ .;,",'! >«« 

Tim ber. ht' w f J , etc. , „ . . ;;;.;. ^ . ; f „a 



iKi 



Lu m be r^boanlfe,' p] iinltii. eW,V,V.\\ .\Vf rep 



dut.ckLft. 



r/n.. 



I" ..-.,__ H,U 

Hhlnglijs ,, ,^.. ■ ■ ., ^" r -, 

AH other unoianuraeturBd . \\''.^ Wfrea 

Ma n u f Hcld^ of ( dy Li-Ca liirtetwiije u^iii] mti 
J u rnj tTi tie . , , , ^ . , . , ^ J , J „ . ^ ^ 
WoortjiuliJ ,.... ^ ^r.,,^. . 

Aiiuifitr! ' ""■::^::;:::::::::::::::::!^^ 

Tfital wtwd nnd mFtnuractiinsH of ^ 

Ma baff fln r ( ai r r, > - 1 m jhorl ( ri f n nu - 

lJii!t<«l KlnKdriiu 

Opnlral American atatpft., ^l]lli\[[]l''^ 

Mejcleo. ....,,,. , .., . , , 

Cubii ._„ ......__. 

ytJier West 1 ndloi. . . . //.//.",,.' ' " " " 

Stmth AmpTloii , ' " 

Other ncmtiLrlGS r.... „,/.', M'..'/,','" 

T(n«i ^.''"^..^"^[[[[ 

^'pSm«h v?.?!*^ F^' ^^ n.) -Imnorlied fmra- 

HriLiHbftimb Aoiertija __, 

Other couDtriifii , . . . " 

Ttttal., , \.^^..[]..[['"[',l, 

Wciod Pn ] p iTi<j n ji) - 1 m poneri f mm - 

OT. be r Europe ,.. . -t'-.- ^^ r, ......,,, 

Brit ^gb North Amerlea .,,,,,.; ll """"■* ' 

Otliflr duuntries ■ ^ ^ -.'■-,-,-- , r. ."'.'!!!''" ' 

Total _..^ " ' 



rt^oulii^ bftlr of ure caiiiel. tftmt dlpuca, t!tc„ anrt 
laAnufactiirBSOf-UninaiiufHctured tlbsA 
LiDj^ I.eJothlUff: In tbQ irreaao ., ft^g 

„ I>ti dut...!!' 

acoured.... .free 

C IflM a, uom biuff : I n t Jii? jfr^aa e ' ' .' J .'f ree 

Do .dut. 

Sfou red frc^ 

, Da...,. dot. 

In tbo tfrt,'nfle. „ free. 

J^^-: dm. 

bcourtd free 

i>w - dut. 



Cl&ts rj, carpet: 



Total miin an uf flutu red ^ i^^*^ - 

Total .„ 

Wools rib*.)— Imported from— 
Clafis I— unitfld Kiuridom. 

Kranoe '"^"■•■ 

South Amerlcit // -*'■-■ 

AsJti and Oteanlca '.['.'."'^*' 

Otber tMuatri^ ^..^^^..,..,,.,1.1] 

Total.. ^......,.[[..[[ ., 

CI a^a S-Un I tec! Kingdom ] 

i>t.hi?rEtir(S[>e.. , , 

UrLtuh KoTtb Amerka. ^ 

Koitth Aiuerica ■-■" 

Asia and Oceanlca. ,,, 

Other countries. ^...1./... /..,'//. 

Total _ 




ai^l7,tiW| l:j,lKJ.B3a ?tj.7Sd,30W 
ImWt.^m 18.7E^,ffii2 



Class S^Uuited Kingdom. 
Franctf.. ;, .^ . . . . 



I.l5i,ti5l 2wu.or;i 
fl72a.o38 811,377 

3.2rif^ 47(5,337 



3t3H3| 



ua,i^i 
3,9?ii.aH 

i^ssa^j 



B,m,m: 



473. wr 



1.9^,954 




EXPORTS OF MERCHANDI8K. 



25 



Imports— FBBB and Dutiable. 



QiMnVs. Values. 



1898. 



QiMnt'a. Values. 



1899. 



Duty, 



Germany 

Other Barope 

British North America.,. . . 

South America 

China 

Other Asia and Oceanica. . 
Other ooontrles 



1,053,980 
19.147,496 
29,988 
10.589,418 
20,906,267 
6,506,141 
417,792 



I111,0«S 
1,925,507 

1,756 



721,358 
14,897,587 



I73,94fl 
1,507,048 



Total 

Manufactures of Wool— Carbonized. dut. . lbs. 

Carpets and carpeting dut.Bq.yd 

Clothing, etc., except shawls and knit 

fabrics dut 

Cloths dut.. .lbs. 

Dress goods, women's and children's 

dut.sq.yd 

Knit fabrics dut 

Rags, noils and wastes free. .lbs. 

Shoddy, mungo, flocks, etc dut.. .lbs. 

Shawls dut. 

Yams dut... lbs. 

All other dut. 

Total manufactures ..f 

Carpets (sq. yds.)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom , 

Other Europe 

Japan 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Other countries 

TotaL 

Cloth Gbs.)— Imported from— 

United Kingdom 

Austria-Hungary 

Belgium 

France. 

Germany 

Other Europe 

Other countries 

Total 

Dress Goods (sq. yds.)— Imported f rom— 

United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Other Europe 

Other countries 

Total 

Zinc or Spelter, and Manufactures of (dut.)— In 

blocks or pigs, and old lbs. 

Manufactures of 

Total 

All other articles free.... 

Do dut 

Total value of merchandise free .... 

Total value of merchandise dut 

Total value of Imports of merchandise 



1,510,166 

562.777 

34,843 

7.954,482 



6,105,714 
14.264,561 

3,944.065 

830,96U 

61,008,791 



1; _ .^ 

894,188 

88J368 

5,786,882 



589.745 1.790,132 631,397 



....20olb. 
..Various 



5.062,261 



1.724.489 
1,674,262 



765,181 
3.966.577 

6.086,060 
387.269 
253,779 
443,843 
39,683. 
185,447 
956,780. 

14,823,771 



4,092,898 
27,098,564 



...Various 
..Various 



814.540 



173.870 



1.756.902 

832,606 
.909,466 

6,906,548... Various 

625,796|44clb.&60;( 



....25c lb. 

..Various 

...Various 

Various 



70,224 
55.331 
109,681 
564,364 
13331,967 



12,244 
93,918 
25,995 
589.745 



509,566 
883.188 
13,887 



92,817 
1,790,132 



235,495 
272,840 
7,36(j 
78,755 
36,978 



641.706 

850,827 

9.810 

223,234 



1.756,902 



4,062.973 

49,976 

106,321 

111.760 

720,854 

3,580 

6,79r 

6.062,261 



3,009,630 

47,009 

89,522 

123,940 

686,057 

3.060 

6,359 

3,065,577 



2,807,708 

83,808 

152.215 

210,545 

822.688 

9,219 

6,730 

4,092.898 



79,212 

136,174 

241,3r4 

763,667 

7,712 

6,931 

3,909.466 



13.366.681 
7,036,334 
7,381,048 
1,339.168 
2,296 

29,125,529 



2,318,563 
1.620,346 
2,060,994 



849 
6,036.060 



12,676,762 
7,187,661 
7.135.801 
97,727 
633 
27,098.584 



2,338.525 
1,913.688 
1,630.388 
22.707 
240 
6,995.548 



3,250.965 



127,033 
11 
138,727 



2,124,928 99,004 
17.083 
116,089 



...]}ftclb. 



6,397,310 
6,538,849 . 



5,888.373 
5,460,527 



291,414175 . 
324,635,479 . 
616.049.6541. 



300267,948 
396848,906 
697116,864 



£XPOBTS OF DO MESTI O HEBCHAin)ISE. 

[Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1899.] 



Exports, and Coxtntbies to Which exported. 



1898. 



QuanVs. Valtbes. 



1899. 



QuanVs. Values. 



Agricultural Implements — Mowers and reapers, 

parts of.. ; 

Plows and cultivators, and parts of 

All other, and parts of 



and 



Total.. 

Snorted to— United Kingdom 

Iranoe 

Germany 

Other Europe. 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras . 



$5,500,665 

987,250 

1,181.817 

7,609, 



19,058,830 
1.546,410 
1,832,957 

12,432.197 



1,146,026 
1,252,167 . 
1,232,242 . 
1.451,284 , 
781,415 , 
14.9101. 



1,372,398 
1,781,659 
1,646,711 
2.641,891 
1.521,054 
6.244 



26 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Exports, and Countries to Which exported. 



QuanVs. Vcdttet 



ML'j(iL:u 

Sarit^) Uuuilntfo , 

Cuba...... , 

Pin? rto Kico ..,..,. 

OtUc^r We^t Indtea und Bermada. . 

Arnontinn ..„ , 

Bruzll.. 

Co]iL>rub]A , 

OlberSoutl) AnacHea.... , 

Bast [nd^fjA (BrltJpii) , 

BrlEitth A ii»tr;i Enjoin , 

Otlier AalH (ind Ort-anica ..., 

Afrlcn..,,. , 

Other countrl*?^ , 



Total agricultural ImplementB 

Aluminium, and manufactures of 

Animals-Cattle (No.)-United Kingdom 

Other Burope 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras . 

Mexico 

West Indies and Bermuda 

South America 

Asia and Oceanica 

Other countries 

Total 

Hogs (No.)— United Kingdom 

B rltish North America 

Mexico 

West Indies and Bermuda 

South America 

Asia and Oceanica 

Other countries 

Total 



Horses (No.)— United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Other Burope 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras.. 

Mexico 

West Indies and Bermuda 

South America. 

Asia and Oceanica 

Africa 

Other countries 



Total 

Mules No. 

Sheep (Xo.)-Unlted Kingdom 

Other Burope 

British North America 

Mexico 

West Indies and Bermuda 

South America 

Other countries 

Total 

All other, and fowls 

Total animals 

Art Works— Paintings and statuary 

Bark, and extract of, for tanning 

Beeswax 

Blacking— Stove polish 

Another 

Bones, hoofs, horns and horn tips, strips and waste. 
Books. Maps, Engravings, Btchings and Other Printed 

Matter— United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Other Europe , 

British North America , 

Central American States and British Honduras. 

Mexico 

Santo Domingo , 

Cuba 

Puerto Rico 



.lbs. 



1898. 



878,966 85,481,464 806,126 28,213.573 



15,805 1,068,239 



96 
1,958 



439.255 



4.036 

4,097 

1,468 

24 

8,686 

122 

14,411 

22,129 

72 

7,913 

7,669 

9,415 

234 

1,297 

2,013 

21 

m 

117 



51.150 



142,178 



5,056 

1,475 

296 

190,690 



151,004 



$124,868 

1,07S 

7,817 

2,504 

7,432 

377.054 

24.756, 

4.843. 

196,054. 

8.333. 

697,565. 

56,169. 

224.806, 

420. 

7,609,732 . 



3,709 
69 
2.301 
74,757 
223 
241 
74 
37.827,5001 389.490 



7.066 

78.40G 

1,232,157 

7,462 

2,rM 




6,176,569 
664,789' 



1,016,896 

60 

108.446 

9,748 

38,871 

12,409 

27.467 

1,213.886 



250,175 
46,243.406 



273.521 
329,9(U, 
41,827 



851,567, 
174,861 



841.096 

80.451 
102,385 

62,402 
722.049 

34,261 

125,006 

560 

22.506 
1.832 



1899. 



<iuant'». VcUueb. 



20 

1.3H3 

7.800 

17,949 

42 

6,139 

128 

38,031 

20,1^- 

661 

5,484 

4,852 

10,088 

99 

1.188 

1,565 

Sj 

779 

127 



45«778 
6,755 



84,782 
3.286 
5,654 
1,180 
356 
143,286 



152,494 



1222,476 

r35 

43,104 

2.955 

11,460 

1,679.019 

84,130 

1.640 

284.204 

6,701 

768,672 

66.491 

340,758 



12,432,197 
441,846 



221,087 
3,485 
96,920 
1,94»,968 
5.1<13 
13,295 
11.373 
30.516,838 



125 
6,847 
87.642 
96.936 

33,110 

2,888 

227,241 

8,024.952 

97,780 

824,295 

491,400 

667,165 

6.228 

81,8« 

154418 

4,569 

75.316 

16,680 



5,444,342 
516.90) 



98,080 708^7 



75,823 
11,525 
34,794 
8.620 
20,046 
858,555 



322,037 
37,880,916 



308.495 

4l!916 
420,219 
431,968 
195.7a0 



782.697 
38,473 

121,296 
50,490 

814,400 
41,103 
57319 
11,904 
45.743 
16.831 



EXPORTS OP MERCHANDISE. 



27 



Exports, and Countries to Which Exported. 



1898. 



QuanVs. Values 



QuanVs. Valuet. 



1899. 



Other West Indies and Bermuda. 

Argentina. 

Brazil 

Colombia , 

Other South America 

China , 

East Indies (British) 

Japan 

British Australasia 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Africa 

Other countries 

Total 



26,614 
163,770, 
17,484 
43,556 
15,8»> 
12331 
27,e08 
92,706 
33.521 
41,»» 



Brass, and Manufactures of 

Breadstufls— Barley bu . 

Bran, middlings and mill feed .' tons. 

Bread and biscuit I bs , 

Buckwheat bu. 

Corn 'IiiihI— United Kingdom 

Gi^rmnnj' ,»*^^. 

Oilii I* KtiftiiH? 

Biiil?*li VoTtti AQjertcft 

O'/nniL Amertcan States and British Honduras 

M^'SM.-'l H ..P 

8(n»:<i DoiDiitgo .1 

CufiJi ». 

Pn ►Mt u R ic( I 

. Oliii'i VVprit lndt<?Ji anil Bermuda 

SoiUli Amc'iicuK, . , 

Ari] li ntjd 1 Jttjanltia 

A r r . i^ii 

Ot h'T nounirlea 



2.434.325 



127.642 
20,971 
46,536 
«8.i»5 

123.060 
29.448 
22.118 
86,168 

150.862 

51,478 

80,363 

76 

2,666.136 



1,320,093 



1,351.049 



11,237.077 

91,189 

15,990.558 

1.370,408 



5.542,010 
1,329,519 

7&S.2»V1 



Total. 



82,876,864 

11,447.9H0 

39,a».528 

48.211.439 

23,47(5.509 

130.227 

125.310 

409 

1.066.512 

200 

789,54;i 

96,419 

16,261 

1,302.442 

4,29H 

206.744,989 



2.267.400 

127,953 

16.447,240 

1,533,980 



1.5J75.274 
2.002.588 

84«!028 



29.580,7.'>8 

3.985.687 

14.171.961 

17,203.43.'! 

7,850,810 

70.9(;*) 

43.657 

166 

415,808 

80 

314.120 

d8,m\ 

10,168 

60»,5ir 

1,608 

74.196,85011 



Commeal brls 

Oats bu 

Oatmeal lbs 

Rye bu 

Rye flour bi;l8 

Wheat (bu.)— United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras 

Mexico 

West Indies and Bermuda 

South America 

British Australasia 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Africa 

Total 

Wbf at Flour {brls,)— United Kingdom 

FranM .„„....... 

GerniHny , ...,.,.. 

UtliPrEiirnpfi 

BritmhNiirth AmeTlcu 

Oniml AmarVcan Suites and British Honduras 

Mpxicr* " . -- ^ 

SanKt Domingo 

Cul?a 

T'u ertfl K! ro . . . - 

Othrr West ludles And Bermuda 

B mtll - 

Colombia 

Dthsr Sioatb America 

China 

K»9tlndl&6 (British) 

HonglcoDg.r....* 



68,607.817 

6.2;%,194 

34,605.873 

43,629.764 

19,150,676 

73,332 

154,644 

572 

636,106 

1.% 

686,409 

49,082 

277,837 

1,076,769 

6,364 

74.069.aM 



27.512,398 

2.0>».10] 

1^866.290 

17„%0,1(53 

6,867,627 

36,313 

63,412 

266 

298.507 

63 

320.018 

23.122 

117^1 

474,890 

2.397 

t«.9Tr.448 



827,661 

69.130.288 

85,50().3.')(l 

15,541,57 

3,410 



1.766,068 
20.632,914 
1,757,978 
8,825.7fiJJ 
11.815 



791,488 

30,309,680 

68.042,505 

10.140,876 

4,82(i 



1,776.868 
9,787,640 
1,296.988 
5,986.078 
15,015 



80.163,805 

30.(V41,289 

3.218.401 

22,124.014 

6,116,901 

41,540 

45 

1,884 

1.837,488 

102,816 

70,a3 

5,493,470 

148,281,261 



76.834.624 

32.56K2S0 

8,124.643 

21,807.934 

6.104.800 

48,806 

41 

1,580 

1,706,171 

86.896 

69.667 

4.850,94(> 

145.684.659 



74,613..S04 

2,232,190 

10,311,450 

41.045,883 

8,869.314 

39,869 

7,083 

899 

258.492 



66,867.397 

1.676,339 

7,666.210 

.Si.268.327 

6,142.290 

84,323 

6,145 

823 

191,211 



30,112 

2,528.219 

139,482815 



22.445 
1.805.659 



Jiip^n _ 

British Austral aslH... 

Other Asia and Oceaiiica . 
AfTlCft.^ 



Total 

Preparations of. for table food. 



9,132,465 
3.826 
190.a%) 
1,282.457 
667,471 
250.228 
19.240 
85.889 
246.293 
90.578 
770.289 
687.592 
116,2.')6 
865.290 
19.609 
8.866 
939.053 
161.654 
41.845 
139,766 
832.5i>3 
10,694 

16,349,943 



41.088.120 

16,990 

861,731 

5.146.080 

2.767.208 



86.848 
197.388 

1,160,736 
460,498 

3,886.418 

3,210,»)'2 
641,147 

1.740.204 
89,806 
39,678 

3,836.72r 
644,088 
174,118 
614,C: 

1.611.9S6 



10,233;S60 
1,959 
602.874 
1,861,949 
743,4(a 
248,956 
34,537 
84,694 
442.081 
152,079 
ra9.277 
818,816 
98,519 



4,672 
1.221,314 



249,519 



68,283,718 



18.502,690 73,098, 



41,385.609 

7,720 

2,007,404 

7,214,864 

8,886.653 

986.717 

138,979 

146,106 

1,719.225 

492.664 

2368,501 

3.899.027 

426,904 

1,410,486 

io6;no 

17J»7 

72£710 
29034 
82R475 

e0,777 

,870 



1,765,207 



2,133,110 



28 



CHICAGO tJAiLT NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1000. 



EXPOUTSi ASr* COtJNTBlEa TO '(VHicn EirOHTEB. 



QtianVs, Vatuen, 



Xtf99. 



Q^anVs, Yaiua. 



All bther. .„,,,,.. 

Totftl breadetuOB , ,..►.., * 

Bricks -Butldlpic M. 

tSre....... 

ToUl , , 

Bruoni Cf>rD , ...,.,.....,. 

BfLMtm^ und UruMlit!3 , - , , , 

C^hQiiLuB . , , K . . , ^ . , Iba. 

CaTrlBsea^ Cars. (itliDr Vebiuleti, flbd Parts of— Curs, im^ 
£cng:Br tuirt truinbl.uncl pari* of— Forstertin ntilwaysi. 

For ulber niilwayFi , 

All m her tinrrLafcfQft. and pitrtij uf, Oicuiit Gjcles,. ,.,,., 

Total , , „ , ,^ , . 

BKl}r.]rtod tcj— UDliedJKiniEdisQi. ,. 

IfYanCij -...*+ .H + r,*,.. p. 

Gtirmany 

Other Eumpti'... ,.* r 

Britiali N^jrtli AmerfcA ...,►.....,.,,,. 

Centrttl Atuerlcan StAtes and Britlsb UoaduHia .... 

Mexico.. , ,.....,..,* T 

Ssnto Dtmiiago. .-.►►.►..-*..*►. 

Ciiha..^.. 

l^uerto RlPO, . , , - ■ - 

Other Wt?st Indies uDd Bermuda. , 

ATf^cntlD^ - ^ - . — .............. 

llrazll " ■ . - 

C.til [imbla ►.,..... ■ ' 

athoT Sovilli AmarLca .*...,.,.. 

Cnina 

BaHt Indlea (Brit isb) 

Japan....... - 

BrUUh AnBtralftiin. - '.-. 

OtliprAsift and Occanlca 

Africa,- .,.,.H*,,, ^^'--^ r 

OtbcT cK>iintrloa , . ^ i. h .^ . h - - ■ ■ 

Total....... ...,. ..H.,..*.... 

Cycles, and Parta of-United K^nffdom....... *,..► 

l^ran<!0 ^■■' ,.,...,-,.....+ ... 

Uenuany.. . ............ ^ . -. — *...*. ^ * 

Other Bdrot]*.... .,.,,,.,..*..+..,-.* *,,.*.^*, 

Bntlib HoTtb, AmflHcB- . .,...» h - 

Central AnieriQj!tn &tatfta ttad British Hotidi]rafl...H, 

Mexico. ^ ' — ...... L....,....-*..* , 

ganto LK}i]iln^o — . . — . . ^ - - *.,...,,,. 

Cuba., . * ,.,..... K * , . ♦ 

Puerto Kict>. .- 

Otber Weat lodlea and Berinuda — 

AJi^Dtlna — . — ■ 

Brazil... , - 

GoiOinbla — - - ^ * - ■ ^ 

Otbef Boutb Amerioa.. ► ........*.,-.. h . , .* 

ChlDO 

Baab IndSea (British) 

UOQI^kODg. +. ,.,,.,, K , p — . — , 

Japan ► ► - , 

Brltf ah Austrotaflltt. .. , .....,..». 

Other Aain and OceaDlOa ....-*..,.. 

Africa ..*.,-,►,..-, 

Other countries. - ■ - - ■ - 

Total. - * ' 

Total caf rlftgfiB, cars, etc - 



ijmi 



13:^I^J1M 

Lir.atiQ . 



vt^s^j^ 



7,W6" 



ITS^UI 



mmi -. 



saWM^ aii.aiij a.^nuia 



1^5^907 

311 i»] 



Celluloidt find maoiif actnrea of. ..*.*. 

Cement -■. ■■- ........tjrls, 

ChecpicnMt DrQHS, Dyea and Medicines (lba.>— Aoldft. 

AfiheHn pot ani!t peari 

Cappfer. Bulphate of. ++.... — ■ 

"^jBH and dyeatufh. ..^ . , — - 



Dye 
Mm 



Jiseutf ...*►.. 
ne. acetate or. .- ..,.►.. 
Mtdlcinea^ patent orpraprletarr. 
Hciote, herb a and barka, o. e. s. . ^ . 
Allotbar.,... ^..K*.... 



Total * - ' 

Cldw.. ►. ■■' * - g°^* 



1,47«.IJW 






71.031! 
IftlSSJl 

m.[ "^ 
laa.aiiH 

43s 14V) 

24, Ul 

5^1 
1l4Mi 
337,HMi 
5ti4,773 

10,753 

io,ae7j 

35dpl3» 



3.4M,4t*} 



1.171 
1j,1J8I 

1,^10 

e.s«i..=i2y 



M.lfJU.l 




7m,m 

106.SOT 

99*1016 
610.247 

21,Mt 

131^1 

8471 

lU&,fi8a 
61,5^1 

IdJSI 

6.0S& 



4.ton,3») 



478,381 
l.ln.SiB 

23,tn4 

M.441 

3d6.0^ 

^,U4tJ 
200^1;^ 



a,SH0,Hi4 



BXP0BT8 OV MBRCHANDISE. 



29 



Exports, and Countries to Which Exported. 



Clocks and Watches— Clocks, and parts of 

Watches, and parts of 

Total 

Einiorted bo— Unltflt^ KlDKdom 

FraQCt!. ,. ,,r. 

^Jfriiiaiiy.. 

Other Europe ^ 

Uritisih North AiuerkiM ;•:•:• vv • v; 

retiiral AnHTitan i^tm+js and British Honduras.. 

Mo JtlTO- 

Wi-'fit Indies nnd Btrniud a 

AivenilDa....- 

BraiU..*. -,,*..... 

Other South Aw cri pa.. 

China 

East ladl«atlirll3bl)J 

JiLiiun 

Elmii^b Autitrahi^ia 

Other A*la and Oeeattitsa 

Af rton - - ' 

Ulber coauLrlea. ^ 

Total 

Coal and Coke— Coal (tons)— Anthracite 

Bltuminoas 

Total coal 



BKpurted to (UinsV-Unlted Kingdom 

I^rante,.-... 

G4c;maa ny 

Other liln ro po 

Krittfih Nnrth AraerVCft u •••;vvv ■•..• 

Cent nil Amtjricttii SUtes and British Honduras.. 

Mivlro 

Siintti Dndt^nffo 



j'ljj'TLu Kierp ., 

oLhr'r W(*Eit Indloa iinil Bermuda 

lini^U , 

^'nlotubln .,.,..,,.,... 

OtluT Siiuth Anj*;rli:;a 

A^\n And {.ic^e^DtiiU.. . , 

OlheruLjunLrleB 

Total coal •• 

Coke *o°* 

Coffee and cocoa, ground or prepared, and chocolate.. .. 
Copper, and Manufactures of— Ore (tons)— 

United Kingdom 

Germany 

Other countries 



Total 

Ingots, bars, plates and old (lbs.)— United Kingdom. . . . 

France 

Germany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Mexico 

Other countries 

Total 

Manu f actu res of i ••• i •;•••,• j/ 

Total copper and manuf 's of, not including ore. . 

Cork, manufactures of 

Cotton and Manufactures of— Unmanufactured— lbs.— 

Sea Island 

Upland and other 

Total 

Exported to— United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Mexico 

South America 

Japan 

Oth^r Asia and Oceanica 

Other countries 

Total unmanufactured .^^^^^^^^ 



QtuinVs. Values. 



1.32(i.562 
2,682,414 
4.008.9il6 



2,«or 

37 

6,906 

3.186.745 

6.t!68 

34U.426 

3.384 

21(J.(n'9 

9.7WJ 

183.840 

17,570 

i6,ioy 

6,165 

16,641 

4,o51 

4,008,9»> 

212,021 



5.886 

2 

2,507 

8,3»5 



72,306,274 

60,666,376 

32.896,962 

111.431.962 

l,3»6.fi65 

186,545 

77,107 

278336.641 



15.610 902 



1766050390 
4a,0ia931 
929.262,297 
532,654,257 
^1,247,259 
21.216.287 



112.106,823 
~B99,49£ 
8,553 



QiumVs. Values. 



t965.557 

771,912 

1,727,469 . 



646,436 
11,219. 
]1.21(; 
33,522 

319,196 
6.998 
20,128 
12.059 , 
28.UO 
40.898 

85.mo 

18,50_^ 
48.1^3 
163,4:« 
162,722 
25,2t-4 
73,612 
307 
1,727,469 



5.906.171 
5,777,678 
11.683.749 



550 
11,322 

lii6 

37.346 

»,610.922 

19.-3a5 

974.040 

11, -'88 

464,888 

21,014 

422,488 

93.778 

38.284 

20.425 

47,9:fi) 

9,974 

U,683,749 

608,784 



137,369 



679,939 
900. 



824,166 



8,079,164 
6,770,671 
3,705.987 
12,332,912 
165,215 



9,154 



31.075, _. 
1,105.236^, 
32.180,872, 



45,891 



2,767,291 



7,428,226 

451,800 

653 



3860264295l2aft442.215 »778410293!a09.664. 



1899. 



11,043,621 

819,810 

1.868,431 



1,572.957 
3,478,976 
5,061,933 



7.S96 

1,011 

27 

31.871 

.'i,63i,7r.: 

4,6«W 
460.818 

4,«4: 

357,:^58 
21,980 

224,208 
47.028 
14,0^2 
82,(»7 

119,191 

52,773 

5,051,933 

215.513 



1,612 



4.296 
5.910 



72,?22,568 

48,172.635 

44,600.972 

87,938.298 

1,133.038 

266,734 

152,&14 

,6361254,987,079 



8834653993 227,674,924 3T5926824l|207 203,077 
3850264295 2a>,442,2ir ^""" ' 



105.853,(14 1804?219:-{5 
JM,5yy.724 401,708.208 
54,886,2458*4.487271 
81.938.894541385.936 

3.9(!1,586 " " 

1,321,473 



49,114.841 
18,064,891 



91,967,051 

~, 062.664 

2.496 



652,177 
2,901 
18.065 
82.791 

410.2:S7 
2,757 
28,ai8 
14,886 
26.«lt) I 
Cr.74o 
«3,:>32 

i6,»a*9 , 

78,51? i 
133.307 
188.602 ! 
34.WUI 
62,476, 
41 ' 
1,863,431 



6,478.693 
7.182.336 
13,661,028 



30,612 

2,39S 

158 

88,705 

10,848,534 

13.104 

l,2a'>.265 

12,827 

685,297 

45.098 

478,857 

150,254 

43,816 

162.475 

287,205 

96,524 

13,661,028 

632,788 



192,8 



179,066 



261,540 
440,575 



9,668,(M 

6.673,345 

6,206,096 

11,719.778 

146.63,') 

• 88,800 

21,086 

34,476,343 

1,607,186 

35,983,529 



62.385 



18,361,697 

207203,077 

37i:i410293 209.564,774 



99,709,862 
21,946,691 
47.346,679 
30,614,182 
2,994,674 
1.043.473 



5.775,784 

133.762 

IW 

.774 



30 CHICAGO DAIIiY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. | 


BXPORTS, AND COUNTBIKS TO WHICH EXPORTED. 


1898. 


1899. II 


QuanVs. 


Values. 


QuanVa. 


Values. 


Waste lbs. 

Manufactures of— Cloths (yds.), colored 

Uncolored 


12,521.574 


•511,004 


14,308.829 


$524,802 


79.415.376 
191,092,442 
270.507,818 


4,138.887 
9,151,936 
13,290,823 


108.940.972 
303,063,083 
412.004.055 


5,221,27S 
13,748,610 

18,969397 


Total 


Exported to f yds.)— United Kingdom 


10,765.645 

163,687 

487.387 

1,381.134 

14,116,228 

8,496.741 

6,679.429 

2,642,038 

138,662 

22.878 

18.598,473 

2,673,651 

8.666.686 

6.857,768 

24,000.968 

115,492,797 

13,411,373 

302.652 

580,861 

1.148,627 

26,630,361 

1,8,149.131 

100,641 

270.507.818 


726.284 
8.878 
43,096 
91.877 

415,910 
120,167 
12,163 
2,206 
793,175 
181,868 

28i;803 
1,126,871 
5,195.845 
627,843 
32,169 
47,284 
114,088 

13,29o!823 


9,951,404 

24,131 

257,145 

1.270.813 

17,114.475 

13,527,417 

8,399,834 

4,444,898 

9,001,886 

3.852.581 

18748 736 

8i;762,638 

221.04a642 

5,547,691 

678,001 

33,267,717 

9,696,464 

77.577 

412,004.055 


628.445 

81,162 
819,241 
667,514 
481.569 
198.893 
447,839 
169,057 

8921343 

II 

5,079 
18,969,897 


f^iTlllOi^ .1 1 ,iV,^., + .,. ." 


(t k rmttny *.....» , 


Other JSiirope , 


Brltlsli Nortb Amerlm 


CTQHtml AiupncjLTi Btuies and British Honduras 

Mi^irltio 


SiirDtu DciinlDJiO...... 


CobB .....*,,*. 


l*UErtp RicQ ,..,...... 


Other Weflt- Indies and Bermuda 


Areentiinii4r...ii+. '. 


BraKiL ►......<,..,.-.<. 


Colombia .,, ..^., K << 


Otliitp R^iiitli AtrK^tHitn. . , , , , 


China , 


East indipH^Britlsh) 


HonifkuD^ 


.1 11 iTan .. , ...,,,. 


lU it':"fi AuatTfii^inH ►► 


( iMuT Asia and Oc'^ariica 


A 1 1 Joft. . _ 


(Jttiitr etjun tries ^ 


Total cloths 


Other Manufactures of — Wearing apparel 




934,192 

283,643 

2,216,434 

3,733,269 


*7,b88'.492 


1,275,839 

315,376 

8,006,803 

4.596,017 


Waste, cop and mill lbs. 

All other 


7,096908 


Total 






Exported to— United Kingdom 




380,089 

4,478 

190,041 

l,68l!645 

334;651 
18,491 
li:715 

961920 

11 

34,810 

1:11 

8,289 

167.274 

319,178 

62,728 

7.312 

3,73£,2e^ 

17,024,092 




480,978 
99,774 

Si 

ld6!236 
65,484 
41.667 
46,798 

21,812 
2,386 

1191496 

5,907 

4.697,017 

23,567.914 


Frurif , , . , , ► , ► 






Germnny , 






Ottii^^r Europe.,... 






BritinU North AmeHca 






Central America j] States and British Honduras 






Mexttx) 






S^anto DomlnKO 






GQhav^r?;,^:;:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 




Puerto liloo 






Other West Indies and Bermuda 






Argentina + >. 1 .. + ,, 






Braill.. ......... *.*,..„ 






Colom biA 




fltb«ir Hcnitti Atni^rJr^H. 






China, 






Ee^t I ndit! a ( Brit Ifth > , , 






HttHiiku ng 






BritraH AnfttralaJ^iai 






Othtjf Asia and OccatUca 






Africa r 






Other couDtrles 






Total other manufactures of 






Total manufactures of 






Earthen, Stone and China Ware -Earthen and stone ware 
China ware 




193.334 
39,658 
232,992 




312,887 
38,943 
851,880 






Total 






Eggs doz 


2.754,810 


157!55a 


3,693,611 


641,885 
212,374 


Feathers 


Fertilizers, phosphates, crude tons 


1 474,230 
474.230 


4,359,834 
4,359,&34 


5 780,513 

\ 41,587 

822,100 


6,989,891 

974,474 

6,964.365 


All other 


Total 


Exported to —United Kingdom 


98.315 
14.864 
183.231 
147,377 
4,574 

21 

2,422 

76 

23,139 


779.657 

83,1.30 

1.738,351 

1,184.193 

537 
56,475 
3,378 

417,7a^ 


176,098 
64,445 
270,089 
244,615 
6,401 

26 
55,351 


1,179,381 

131.687 

100,^ 

144 

736,631 


France 


Germany 


Other Europe 


British North America 


Central American States and British Honduras 

Mexico 


West Indies and Bermuda 


South America 


Asia and Oceanica 





EXFOBTa Ob-* MERCnANl>l8E. ,'U 


Exports, ani> CorsTftiF.fi to wnira EiPOiitED. 


Ifetia 1 IMHO 


i^aiinVa. 


Vu^ut'^.'Qu4i|i£>. Talufm. 




3HI 




TOt&l ,., K^, ..^. .......... T.n ,.--^-^-^^- n 


FIljeTB.Vtf^tBljle, ftndTeJEtiiti timEseH-MntnifELL'tuto* ot- 


fyil,Si2ii , . 4 ^[*yX^ 


LOfrlftBO AAA'. . . * >. . , ,.....„*„.,-..... . JbJi. 


ij,imj;fli 


Kill*? B.bTJ^ijJS 7;!5.m 

iit^Larti' LiTtij.irt- 


Alldthi^t , , n,i< - 




iyc.b^i 


g4(n«.U) 


ToLaL..^- ^'^ -...►-- 




a.n.JMa'j'^., 


K^inti liVAHh tith^r tint n miltu tin * .x.^... ll. .IbB. 


7,'.*<li,t^l 

37,!iJ7y,Jiiri 


ii.Baii i,n\7\ 1^.77 


Dri*!4, MuoMfed urenEiid-Ood, badclocfcH tittku and 


nerrina + -►,,,. ...^ Sh*i. 


Other....' -." ' ;IV' 

Pieklod-MaL'lteTeJ. ■ JHa. 

OttL^r . ' , . . . r . ,, .brln . 


SiLltoon-Cjinned ►. , lbs. 


2.mMi mwum 




CjtP n cd Usb otber tfa an an 1 mon and fheJ 1 Hsu . , ....... r . 




1J4.M 






111^.110..., 

fjA:.HJ!^,.. 


2Ji"i;fH 


stj'^llflfib OrBters ...... ,4. ..... ^^.t 




W7.:tt 


Oihf^r ,4 r,, .H ...,..<. 




miA^ 






aj.H*i»,. .., 




TOtAl ., H.,.. .,.H, 




FraitsMid PTutB-Ayp^esi. dr^Pd ,..,Jbfl. 


'i^w'iih'ii 


l,iW,7(T !^i.m 

sliH^tt^l 

i.ft:i,w^ o.fJi,>,fifW> 

2/ra,.4Jii ,,., 

i,if;i,7JK,..4...,. 
^t2,:](H .4.. 4 


l.t?^.'i.7;1 


Orauirtsa ..T--.. „,.„..... 

Pnine^j.. * . * ,..,♦.-.,..... *..*..,...,», .IN*. 

RUlsiDB , ., ..*.. ...,-lbs. 


3424741 
l,Wli.5l 






S,5<iy.71 


1 (Vther + ...... i i ........... i r 




tHi.KJ 


KntS * * . -*. ...,..,, t ,r,.Tn 




Hil^i^ .,.,.„,., 


lM2ij 


Total , . . ^ .* . H . . . . r 




T>m4T.:^ici' 


T,Jft»?.4*1 






an-^rti(i^ 

74T,;iW... 


:4.iyt!.4y 






TtG.SiJ 






J4i«4u9:i ,.-.. 


8HLt«;H 






ipiy&,.W4.., 


flCJ! 1,111 






l^HTl^V^K 

;i\T]n. 

Sft^M^l. ,... 

i;«s4 .., 

:i8j7,^ 

2;Mji 


IJrHlOi 


CetitrAl Aiuerican StutDsiuad BritisU Uonduroe. .. ,. 




?r.3-i 


Mexico * * <■ .- i --**-* d ., +. tF, 




7h.V2 




. 


i,7Jl 


CUbH. i 4 .,,.,4... ,,.. .p^,.H'# X.,. ,,. 




^41.^ 






4,>ia 






rjfMftij... ....... 


fi7,fi,'J 


Aivf ntlaii .. , — . . . r r . * 




itjtii 


iT4:ai 


IL ftl3„ 


17,2(1 






3U^.... ...... 

4;-?447ll.. 


6.T4 






23.1^; 


China ......... 

EBi't I ndieH{ British} ..,.. ,,.,.., 




21^,7(1 


TIf 1 1 1 Ah A ti Atral jla lu. 




t«jii. 


SJ>.lll 


nt.hi^r AMia And tJt^i^ahifra 




llT^ln 


AfriUa ^ . ...n. n .n tP. 




ilB.^ 






W..... 


UtJfi 


Total f ruita and nuts.. *,...,*.- 




o.oi3,:iirj'. 


7.mA^ 


.Furn]tu]:e of metal , . . , 




21.7'^'.. 


lS2.i:l 


Fnrsand fcihir £tkln»— Da Ited ELLu^'dum . . . i . , .,, 




IfnUai^jy; 


It.iK^JiSl 






i&Twi 


4Li4^ 


f Ttifniti fi v 




s-irSii:: :""::: 


5TiUa 






15/i7l'........-. 


l4^,ai 


Br! tl ah North AmerlCAd 




3fltMtH| 


427,*H 


Otlitir countries. .......<... p < h . p . + . h . . < .h . . . p . . < p < ^ . « p . h 






s:^^ 


Total 




a.aSfi.tfTol.. 


3.flffipW 


LtlasH and GlutisTpara-' Window slaas 




2^.4af... ...... 


■ 2m 


All gtbiir ...*.-*.,.* * *...,.... .,...* 




i,ia7,taH| 


1,470.^1 


Total T*** „....,..*.* 




L2]i,o&i! 


LaOtLflS 


(S Iwroifi m srajie euffflr. h . p ,*.,*., * , p , , . .A^n. 

Qlaa . ... i ........,........i . ib^^ 


2.sia.Tn 


3Ull44ii 3.:'l(M.tR7i K**.):!^ 


(^r^aae, RreaaA Bvrapa, and nil »imp sTo^k. , 


l.[K4,-'ifia 




G V npowder and Oth er JSxpl usi tch-G nn po wdpr. ....... I tjs 

CarttidiEtii. and other. .....,,-, 

Total ..... . 4 . , r . . r . r . - - -.,,...-..,,, . . . . . . . 


iTatGJri 


i;fti.iii4 i,504,m 

l,a5fl,7H:J, 

1.39Q4406! 






***^n ; — 











82 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



EXPOBTS, AND COUKTRIIS TO WHICH E2POBTEB. 



QuanVa. 



1898. 



1809. 



Values. QuanV8 



Hair, and manufactures of 

Hay 

Htflpa lind SkliiSj Other than Furs (lbs.)— 

Liiit(*d Klogdom 

Frajic* ^ 

iiennfttiy..,,, 

Otbftr Europe 

British Nnrtb America 

Central American States and British Honduras.. 

Meilco^ ^ 

Wi^st 1 ad uib and Bermuda • 

JapiLb ...-r 

Oin e r Aai a and Oceanica 

Africa ..... 

O that &OUU trloe 

Total 

Honey 

HopH(ltia.)-roiied Kingdom 

Oiher EnTupe 

firllti'h North America ' 

Cenrrnl Au^erlcan States and British Honduras.. 

MeKico 

Knnt^ I>Oi II I HBO. 

(^nbd 

Puerto Rjco , 

Other Wi'sllmltf^a and Bermuda 

^nuth Aim^ricEi 

East Indies (SHtli-h) 

BriiSRb AuMfciilaj^lH 

Othpr A aJ a an d K h' i^anica : 

Utbi^r countries.., 

ToUi^ 



81,827 



P\3b,n& ^ 

1.151.273! gl,916 



318.&51 
687,736 

4379.327 
882.021 

6,142.937 



29.456 
67.882 

892.292 
64,492 

460,325 



19,117 

1.472 

20.200 



2,676 

• 168 

1,205 



80.962 

8,760 

11.536.073 



6,660 

391 

1.015.032 



1503.712 
858.992 



343,970 
259.151 

5,118,499 
511.816 

8,878,576 



40,068 
30.273 

430.417 
67,824 

355,871 



16.408 
3.75fl 
4,975 



2,606 
683 
875 



3,700 
10.140,840 



560 
929.117 



16,809.457 

282.374 

21.885 

290.772 

122 

8,097 

495 

6.734 

8.615 

27.008 

682..')f% 

23,827 

3,318 

17.161.669 



2,468,853^ 18.961,836 

^^ 757,773 

464,013 



85,185 

3,279 

82.425 

19 

389 

54 

773 

1.248 

8.760 

93.101 

3.090 

323 

2.642.779 



Ice. 



. .tons 



22.542 



India Rubber and Gutta Percha, manufactures of —Boots 

and shoes pairs 

All other 

Total 

India rubber, scrap and old 

Ink— Printers' 

Other 

Total 

Instruments and Apparatus for Scientific Purposes, In 
eluding Telegraph, Telephone, and Other Electric- 
United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras 

Mexico 

West Indies and Bermuda 

Argentina 

Brazil 

Other South America 

China 

Japan 

British Australasia , 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Africa 

Other countries 

Total 

Iron and Steel, and Manufactures of— Iron ore tons 

Pig iron— Ferro-manganese tons 

A II other tons 

Scrap and old, fit only for remanuf acture tons 

Bar Iron lbs. 

Bars or rods of steel, other than wire Ib-s. 

Bars or rails for railways— Iron tons 

Steel— Europe tons 

British ^orth America 

Central American States and British Honduras .... 

Mexico 

West Indies and Bermuda 

South America 



391,83-2 



224.705 
1,499,157 
1.723,862 



113.924 
flO.OO'i 
203,927 



174.31fi 
2H4,942 
239,618 
805,016 

58.711 
287,2'<0 

88,815 
109,696 

88.2:13 
12:1800 

.S1.199 
230.197 

57.907 
107.959 

94,637 

194 

2.770.8&3 



Japan 

Asia and Oceanica . 



11.537 

8.403 

228.465 

60.195 

10.684.034 

37.776,372 

2,769 

22,162 

84,669 

62H 

30, 

S: 

49,681 
24.952 



34.224 
844,743 

2,3a'>.252 
632.334 
163.261 
470.052 
37,160 
428,427 

1,555,405 

11,074 

661,151 

124,445 

207,016 

1,160,766 
61.3.358 



66.899 



17,961 

288 

7,251 

974 

4,995 

13,122 

a').406 

752.663 

46.562 

3,292 

21,145.512 



3,291.347 

131,473 

61,389 

8,783 

2,362 

42 

1 

130 

690 

2.062 

11,382 

113.291 

6,440 

301 

3,626.144 



22,898 ^,461 



486,586 



.260,886 

1,604,499 

2^65,385 

876,962 



104,693 
106,280 
210.973 



9rX),426 
454.818 
412,9»5 
272.381 
429,734 

80,136 
427,041 
185.700 
247,062 
113,981 
120,951 

34.135 
232,892 
177,624 
180.857 

77,748 

799 

8,399,180 



31,412 

495 

299,271 

91,985 

23,564.511 

73,861.862 

11,776 

30,.570 

92.569 

1,636 

28.873 

9,337 

10.338 

8.360 

48616' 



66,400 
20,667 
8,2:0,62S 
1,041,227 
365,144 
944,874 
141.706 
581,753 
1,720.503 
34,627 
587.689 
190,278 
248,060 
192.588 
959.016 



BXPOBTS OF MEB0HANIH8B. 



88 



BXPOBTS. AVB COUNTBIBS TO WmOH BXPOBTSD. 



Quont't. Valuei, 



1808. 



QuanVt. Fdlue*. 



18d9. 



Afrloa 

Total 

Billets, ingots and blooms tons 

Hoop, band and scroll Ibe. 

Bods, wire, of steel lbs, 

Sheetsand plates— Iron lbs. 

Steel lbs. 

Tin plates, terne plates, and taggers tin lbs. 

Btmctural Iron and steel 



8,106 



lin.786 
4,gl8.8TO 



16.101 
M76,98ll 

82.40e.aM 
9,087,071 

27.880,088 



..tons 

Wlro lbs. 

Car wheels No. 

Citings, n. e» s. 
Cntlery— Table 

All other 

Firearms 



. 8Q.fi« 

unr,05ieM 
»,ooe 



-.J 8,7S8.2TQ 
880.083 fi6.«B7Q7 
— ~1 16,107.088 

40,060 
n&19i476 



vojan 



182.801 

mm 

088 
1,188,489 



1183.004 
ft.298.1» 



Builders' Hardware and Saws and Tools— Locks, hinges 
and other builders' hardware. 
Saws.. 



Tools,n.e. 8. 

Total 

Erportfid to— United Kingdom 

Prad<^e 

Qto-Tutuny 

OLhcT fiuropti . , — 

BritiEih Ndrtb America 

CentrAl American ^States and British Honduras . 

MoitPD ..,. 

§AU to Domingo.., 

Cubs., 



Pnerto Htco 

Oth^f West Indies and Bermuda.. 

ArKeiitlna....«.H..^ 

Brazil... ♦,,,,.* 

Colomblti,. 

Other Soutb America 

Cmua. .*,*H.,* 

Kaflt Indies (BrltlHti) 

JspflQ.. 
Ifiti 



Bmisb AiiBtral)iila 

Qthur A^AHadOtieanioa..... 

AfrlCA.... ..*. 

OttjeTGoustrleaK^ 

Total 

Machinery* Machines, and Parts of— Blectrical 

Metal-working 

Printing presses, and parts of. 

Pumps and pumping machinery 

Se^lQ^Miujhlaes, and Parts of— (Tnited Kingdom.. 

France,..*..,,,., 

l.iL^riniinf ... .,^..^,,^. * 

Oihtr Europe 

Britlsb Nortli Amerlcu 

Central AcQDiiciui States and British Honduras... 

Maxltro.... 

Santo Domingo 

Cuba.. ....*.»...* , 

Puerto RJou 

Other Weal Indies and Bermuda 

ArsEOPtlna^.,.,. 

Brftilh..... ..,„. , 

Colo mti<l a , 

Oth«r Sonth America 

Cblnn..^... ►.,....... 

Easi Indies (Brltlftb) ., 



.1 apa 

Bntt^b AuatralasJfb , 



Otbk^r Ajila and. Oceunlca. 

Africa.,.. 

Other countries^ <<<.., 

Total 

Shoe machinery. 

Steam Engines, and Parts of —Fire engines No. 

LocomotiTe engines No. 

Stationary engines No. 

Boilers and parts of engines 

Tynewriting Machines, and Parts of —United Kingdom. . . 

granee 



120.44fl 
804.076 
81.181 
126,877 
({r2,22S 



8.007,7« 

808,7»l 

2.223,787 

8.428.882 



"•lIl'S 
lol,aa] 

778.828 

566.568 

n0.82f] 
82,462 

461,682 
18,107 
66,061 
9,486 
62,==" 

147,„_ 

2U5.881J 
19,6«l 
22.086 
78.5U1 
877.686 
108,868 
208.683 
8.718 
6.428.882 



2.062.664 

4,618,688 

874,616 

2.028.084 



102,800 

861.702 

211.648 

141.172 

80.812 

197.6BS 

1.28S 

8,7» 

8,120 

17,471 

77.188 

96.066 

82,86fi 

101.28S 

3.848 

4,863 

6,883 

274,164 

30,061 

10.666 

160 

8.186.864 



9 
468 
666 



805,78C. 

7,497 

8.888,710 

808,670 

987,668 



8e6,67« 
94.606 



888.790 
10f7,r- 

884.747 

1.684.868 

10.046 

1.760.088 

8.801.180 

1JB.124 

1j066l686 

81,487 

164.608 

681.440 



4.808.768 

8»,784 

8.719,866 

7348.872 



13S84M0 
mi67 
806372 
778,676 
006.047 
82.480 
866.218 
11.072 
882379 
18.780 
79.617 
8a8,&79 
226,191 
108,768 
284,060 
66,688 
41,680 
87,489 
1.018.011 

288.700 

1,904 

7348.872 



2.786,110 

6,491.666 

847,006 

2,710,664 



066.484 
96.968 
688380 
167376 
168306 
20313 
870302 
2378 

4386 
22.174 
143.808 
112.808 
60.874 
127380 
4344 

Z'SS 

6,270 
821.786 



878 
8,264.844 



4 

619 
606 



858.986 
18.078 

i,m,'4ao 



1,084,060 

ieo .yT 



84 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS AlilfANAO FOR 1900. 



BXP0BT8« AMD COUKTBIIS TO WHICH SXPOB'nD. 



QuanVt. Foluef, 



1898. 



QuanV*. Foluet. 



rrermauT 

uihtr Ear(ii>e..„*K„„ 

BHtltih North Ameriisi 

Centra) American States and British Honduras.. 

Mexico , 

S&biti UomhiiEO * , 

i'uiia .._ 

Fucrto Blco . , 

Oilier West India and Bermuda 

Arct^nlloa 

Brwil,. 

Colom bta . . , . , 

Otbar^outb AcDttrtca,.. 

China 

Kas 1 1 Qdlet ( BrltLah ] 

Jtti.pAn....H^...._., 

Brklsb Aa&trql&Kla, 

Utb e r Aflla and CJceaalca. 

AJfK-B,. ..,*__, 

Ot he f coviatf lea 

Total....' 

AU other 



1426,014 
2».a68 
61,(577 

xm 

28.975 

i,45r 

8t 
4,226 

18,187. 
4.945 
4,228 

14,6R2 
2.642 
9,014 
4.220 



9.965 
864M2 



1,902.163 
13,836,981] 



I5O7.00O 

369,008 

60,828 

2.440 

45,824 

208 

19,70) 

4.229 

6.786 

31,164 

6,186 

8.942 

26.981 

6.799 

12,961 

7,2© 

77.285 

18,400 

81,627 

76 

2,449,206 

18,722,251 



.No. 



Nails and Spikes (Ib8.)-Cnt. . 

Wire 

All other, including tacks.. . 

Pipes and fittings 

Safes 

Scales and balances 

Stoves, ranges, and parts of 

All other manufactures of iron and steel 

Total iron and steel, etc., not including ore 

Jewelry, and Other Manufactures of €told and SilTer— 

JeweuT 

Other manufactures of gold and silver 

Total 

Lamps, chandeliers, and all other devices for illuminating 

purposes 

Lead, and Manufactures of (lbs.)— Pigs, bars, and old 

HPStherl"!!!^!!!!!*!!!!!!!!!!"!!'!!!!;!!.!;!!; !!!';!!;!; 

Total 

I^eatbcr. and Mann fifsturen of— Leather, sole (lbs. )- 

tJalted Bllngtlom.... 

G«rmiiiir ...► 

Other Europe. 

BritlAh North America 

We^BtlntiieB aad. BeTmuila 

Bouth Affl^rlCA 

Jat>aD, 

BnUsh AtifltralasiH 

Obhar Asia and Ooeool ca 

Africa P ■ 

Oth er counirlui. 

Total 

Leather, Other— Upper leather-Kid, glazed 

Patent or enameled 



82.310,800 

22,894,0(16 

43)6,082 



612,234 ^ 

466.787 61J288,212 



1,848 



246.722 

8,068,016 

87,614 

843,200 

882,960 

9.306,Vn 

70406,886 



4,719,846 



2,267 



604,216 

978.484 

286.947 

6,874,228 

146JM9 

880,214 

608.789 

10,460,779 

93,716.951 



556.n9 
1«S,061 
747.780 



729,191 
283,962 
963,156 



672,010 



777,409 



82,560 
801,968 



1,462 
104.404 
117,152 
223.018. 



161.806 
269309 



O.502 
97.745 
180,8ti5 
235,112 



30,019.896 
806.900 

4.201,948 

1,066.204 

41.828 

42,960 

1,663.106 

178.682 

192,118 

166,688 

44,6U 

87313,019 



6,125.672 
60,805 
787,867 
208,161 
8,072 
9,071 
837,886 
87,724 



84.689 

8371 

6.644,663 



31,881,148 
411,181 
8,041,063 
848.119 
86,23(1 
17,142 
767,961 
137,084 
880,887 
126.678 
48,691 
87,120312 



Splits, buff, grain, and all other.. 
*• ""^ ' ^ner 



All other leatl 

Total ^ 

Exported to— United Kingdom 

franoe 

Oermany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras.. 

Mexico 

Santo Domingo 

Cuba 

Puerto aioo 

Other West Indies and Bermuda 

Argentina 

Bjrasil 

Colombia 

Other South America 

British Australasia 

Other Asia and Qceanica 



249,990, 
93,847 

9.949.598 
858,421 

11,151,861 



6,168388 

666;sS7 

157,707 

7366 

4321 

165.00B 

284W7 

73,018 

26.496 

10,714 

6.280,904 



8,025.217 

291,228 

687.602 

1,162,161 

674,866 

4,718 

9,810 

660 

2,298 

1,894 

16.106 

4,360. 

64,02S. 

4,189. 

13,288. 

289,124. 

88.0W. 



694,266 

82,906 

11370,822 

1,060374 

13,444.609 



9306,806 
385,087 

1300,306 



9373 

1,760 
14328 

8.84^ 
36,016 
84,488 
68,913 

8,781 

mm 

818346 
89.00 



i 



EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 



36 



EZPOBTS, AND COUXTBIES TO WHICH EXPORTED. 



QuanV8. Valuea. 



18i»8. 



Quant's. Values 



1899. 



Africa 

Other countries 

Total leather, other . 

Mannfaotures of— Boots and shoes— United Kingdom. . . , 

Franco...* 

(.Ti^nDAny 

Other Europe , 

British Nfirth America 

Central Ami^ricuu St tiies and British Honduras 

Al exloo 

West Indies & ad Bermuda 

ColOTUkMl,, _ 

Other Hgntl) AiaeTlca 

Br1tl&JiAu&tra]9.firu,,.,.4 

OthDr Ajila and ( kieunLca 

Africn..,H* 

Otht:r UDnntrieK 

Total 

Harness and saddles , 

All other 

Total leather and manufactures of 

Lime brls. 

Malt bu. 

Malt Liquors— In bottles doz. 

In other coverings gals. 

Total 

Marble and Stone, and Manufactures of —Unmanufactured 

Manufactures of— Booting slate 

Another 

Total 

Matches 



690. 

ii,ia.86i 



368,766 
26,778 
t58.672 
36,113 

286,051 
88,907 
87,669. 

290,516 
41,430 
28,879, 

236,(Jr9, 

177.418 

93.247 

3,521 

1,816.638 



t324i71 

268 

18«444,6fl9 



214.665 
1,286,033 
21.U3.640 



626,2(2 
39,664 
79,578 
60,481 
427.023 
106.554 
212,245 
601,095 
34,231 
36.662 
400.067 
176,588 
99.8n 
2,178 
2.711.886 



48,887 
406.'n)2 



406,231 
3B1.80S 



42.268 
287.478 



237,652 

798,676 

23.466.986 



73,377 
462,066 



71.785 
324,087 



407,031 
88,648 
686,679 



1,^ ._ 

602,066 



95,953 

1,370,075 

422,607 

U 



1.733..?73 

164,761 

1.888,124 



68.903 

1,363.617 

464.236 

1.886,766 



78.548 



103.6H3 



Musical Instruments (No.)— Organs.. 

Pianofortes 

Ail other, and parts of 

Total .., ........,.,.,, 



13.421 



742.963 

232,144 

406,760 

1.383.867 



17,119 
1,16G 



S&vti.} atorea— Reaiti, tar, lurpeatlne, and pitch (brls.)- 

Resld. ..,..,,,,,,, 

Tflr, 



966,997 

263,960 

661,896 

1.791,843 



t urpentlne and ijltch 

Total 

E:tport€ d to tbrla >)— Un i tod K i ngdom 

14l*l-Daany. ...,.............+ . + ,_.,, 

Otber Europe,.. , 

British North Amurlra. 

Central Am^srlcan Sinwa ajid British Honduras.. 

Mexico 

SnntD Dotulngo 

Cuba.,.. , , 

I^uerto lUco.. , 

O^ber WeatlndltiB and Bennudu 

Argentina.^ 

BfMl]. .*..,*,., 

Colombia.............. . f... 

Otber South Amtiiica 

China.,. ..,..., 

Japan.... ,,.,.,,. 

British Australasia.. ., 

Other Asia and Oceanioa. 

Africa , 

Other counirlea... 

Total reslB » tar^ etc. 



2,206,20S 
19.316 
19,226 

2.J44.744 



3 

36.476 
48,611 

3,774.838 



2,663,229 



614,206 
620,427 
696,053 



22,946 
2,623,081 



Turpentine, Spirits of (gals.)— United Kingdom. . . . 

Germany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras.. 

Mexico 

Santo Domingo 

Cuba 

Puerto Rico 

Other West Indies and Bermuda 

Argentina 

Braail 

Colombia 

Other South America 



6.774 

4,32S 

2,80G 

4,077 

404 

7.687 

63,782 

U3,06£ 

6,087 

49,768 

2,188 

8.067 

60.288 

42,979 

962 

36 

2,244.744 



7.608,837 

2,810,720 

6,079.490 

670.432 

7,468 

10,071 

1.229 

48,149 

4,676 

22.81G 



1,068,266 

843,611 

1,102,677 

111,482 

16,466 

10,212 

6,166 

7,643 

m 

16,863 

96,161 

194,409 

13,102 

96,878 

4,636 

17,762 

106,664 

62,726 

2,046 

92 

3,774,338 



766,966 
625,760 



3,741,681 
86,008 
64,953 

8.882,636 



50,460 
6.0U 
8,714 
1,781 
4,867 
639 
5,200 

41,776 

127.960 

6.661 



3.026 
11,03Q 
63,443 
46.061 

1,670 



1,176,698 

859,268 

1,092,808 

132,740 

13.924 

8,924 

8,760 

9,082 

1,281 

U,508 

74,242 

220,213 

12,617 

80,540 

6.943 

19,1U 

99,628 

67.884 

3,128 



11,767 
160.884 



2.166,130 
787.125 

1,768,074 
207.600 



15.352 

1.648 

7,786 

129,606 

'r 

61,984 



2.623.061 



3,882.686 



2,634,867 

627,47S 
9,495 
lD,d4{ 



9,646 
26,648 
180,186 
186,784 
14,110 
111.284 



2,996,638 

876,389 

1,606,970 

230,768 

4,181 

4,893 

627 

86,374 

4.846 

10,764 

66,785 

51,791 

.6,788 

47,880 



86 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



BXPOBTS. AND COlTNTaiXS TO WHICH BZPOBTSD. 



China... 
Japan.. 
British Australasia. . 



Other Asia and Ooeanlca 

Africa 

Other countries 

Total 

Total naval stores 

Nickel, nickel oxide and matte lbs. 

Nursery stock 

Oil Cake and Oil-Cake Meal (lbs.)— Cottonseed 

Flaxseed or linseed 

Total 



919,72r.701 

436Swsa 

1866084082 



Exported to (lbs.)— United Kingdom . 
Firan 



.noe 

Germany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

West Indies and Bermuda 

South America 

Other countries 

Total oil cake and oil-cake meal . 

Oilclotha-For floors 

Other 

Total 



861137^738 
67.81.%2S7 
433.308je64 
487.844.680 
8.679,ea6 
12^296^ 



801,282 
12i966 
186fiOBiaQ 



Oils-Animal (gals.)-Flsh. 

Lard 

Whale 



Other. 

Total anii"tf 

Mineral, Crude— Inoludinff all natural oils, without 
regard to gravity (gals.)- France 

Other Europe 

British N(uruiAmerica 

Mexico 

Cuba 

Puerto Rico 

Other countries 

Total 

Mineral, Refined or Manufactured, Not Including ResidU' 
um (gals.)— Naphthas, Including all lighter products 

of distillation ^ 

Illuminating 

Lubricating and heayy paraffin oil 
Total 



Eiportodi to (KalA.)— Onlted Kingdom 

FrahC(j,.,K., 

CJiTin^ny ,^ ,».,*.* 

Other IS iirope........ 

British North AmerlcB 

Central Amtrtfian ^tut«s and British Honduras... 

Mqjciao ..... 

gaato Doming, 

CubB,.., ,.*.*.»*......... 

I*mjrtoiU<:o 

Ottiifir Wtigt Ind i I'A ail 4 Bermuda 

AiireatLna ,.,..,.. 

BraiiU. ,..* 

Colombia . - 

Other South America 

China*,.., -H...... 

Eaat iDdlea (British). 

Honglioaff 

Jap^Ei ....» 

BrU Jsb An Hcmlaal b- 

Uihor AbIb a uA Uctf amca 

Af n Cft, . , . r 

A}th er court tri es 

Total mineral, reflnedor manufactured (not includ- 
ing residuum) 

Residuum, Including tar, and all other, from which the 

light bodies have been distilled brls. 

Total refined or manufactured (including residuum) 



1898. 



Quanti. Value*. 



6.666 
12,600 
808.608 
20,660 
60,088 

m 

18,861.140 



6,090.11(1 



666.980 
775,102 
83,802 
128,711 
1,668.045 



85,125,657 
16,042,002 

7,718366 
83!9,4fiS 



21%265,668 



»a431316 

li;067,602 

1.064,g6(] 

U06.868 



&79,826 
243,202 
200,642 
4,106,714 
11,009,189 
20.661,064 
1.080,62! 
U,288,64C 
44,628,66& 
86.762,60! 
15,782,648 
53,886,166 
20,485,806 
18.621,006 
12,202,744 
42,020 



QuanVa. Valuea. 



12,494 

4,088 

126.668 

7,866 

a44« 

^60 
5,880,806 
9,166,144 



1.408,608 
96.880 



8,040,710 106110607t 
4,610,834 486/»l,8B0 



12.661,6841567170868 



8,895,960 374,485.428 

629,967 66,807,446 

3,795,548 I63.9&7,01fi 

4,661.127643,001,007 



86,571 

167,178 

8,724 

1,460 



12,661,5841567170666 



29,428 
89,212 
118.641 



106.194 
805i26 
87,726 
50,667 
608,882 



3,221,437 
644.761 

817,514 
207,648 
61306 



86 



1,060,797 
42,922.682 
7,280.454 



800^78375 61^842,983 805.966JM6 



11,167.,^ 
1,133,288 
6388,404 
12,431,666 
787,369 
112,834 
184,068 
60,051 
8U56 
82,677 
886,289 
1,007,496 
1,582.281 
108.145 
967,067 
2,665.096 
2377,r^ 
991.) 



1,965,606 

1,242,969 

1,114,103 

8,468 



90ft978378 51.242,983906,966346 



475,562{ 589.388 
1 61.782.316 



20,060 
20,200 
271,944 
88,22(1 

17,791388 



4307,782 



7,101357 

11328,086 

849,086 

100,968 



«17,-^ 
79,767 
166,872 

2,109304 



63.630,510 
18.009,904 
20.fflG 
7,969371 
8,297,176 

leaooo 



43*8362 U8368.0eO 



,786 
.__.,. 460 
67,484,060 



.460212.734,107' 



,012,778 

,666^53344388 

^T0312^ 
1,128,072 
1369368 

1,066308 

554,65( 

3,978,82( 

7,371,2fl( 

9,131,066 
22369,791 
'",4fi0,724 



,216 24, 



. ,929 18,196.402 
3,816,126 83,602376 



17,188,666 
16,768396 
12,4863« 
40,046 



8,476 

106,494 

16,970 

8936| 

23 

S.100.419 
9.962,955 



1,110.222 
184,929 



9,268,396 
6362,744 

14,581,142 



8347,924 

654346 

4382,664 

6371,161 

64,728 

164.070 

4,825 

1344 

14,681,148 



81.060 
101,462 



191343 
412,447 
86.970 
64368 
704,127 



766.061 
1,420 
895,386 
192.686 
12.518 



6308398 



1,170394 
41,087,081 

7348,196 
60,200,518 



12.023,768 

1.118354 

6.642.815 

18364.060 

762.684 

181,883 

191.480 

89.966 

125,156 

61.016 

888,854 

797,604 

1,480,U8 

129,600 

890,400 

1316366 

1300319 

1,889374 

2,461,476 

1,786301 

1382,061 

"^^ 

6O30O318 



730,214 880,766 
lsi.07D.S7g| 



aXPOBTS OF Ml!;itCHA.NDlS13, 



37 



Exports^ jno Coustkies to Which Eipuhteu, 



Vwetftblp— Com .gvkl^. 

CottOHset^d (gals.)— United KiQE^Qui........ ... .... 

Fx&nce,* 

QennanyM , n + - * ► , ^ . , . , , . , ,„.,,. -,►,., ^ * 

Other Eumpe.- . * , - , . -^ ... ^ ^ 

Bzlti^b North America. .... 

C«ptrPil Acaerlcan States aad Bhtlsh UotidurHa. . 

Meiltso , _ 

Santo DumLngo ^ 

Cuba, . , , , , . 

PuorifiRlco, .,,_„,._,.„_ 

Otbur Wtidl IndJcs and Bt'riDnrta.H..H. .►.,. ., 

Argentina 

BrnzJ],,.. ..,,.. .„ 

Otker Sonth Anicrlr*.. ,. ♦^ .,...,..<*..♦.,... 

BnttshAustraJaala 

OtTier Asia and Oceanica ...... 

Africa . ► ► ^ . » * . , . - 

Total 

Linaefld: galB., 

Vohttlle or EssenLLal-FepperiuLnl., ,li»8. 

Other, ...►.,- 

AHotber ,. 

Total vf^f!Ptablo 

PtLLalB, PlEmentu and CoIuh— Cttrbon bLHtik, tr^ui bJadk. and 

lampblack .,.. ..,..,.,,,..,,.. 

Zinc, oxide of .,,.,,..,.,,..... , lbs. 

All otiicr >,» ...... .........L..X. 

Total ., 

Paper, and Mantif a£tiir€J} of —Paper bati£^(t]r;i<;. 

Priming paper lbs. 

WrltiTiK paper and en^elopea, ,.,..,...,. 

All other.. 

Ttotal 

parafflji and FaralSin Wax U^g,)— United Klngdutn 

Fran CO,,....,....,... ^,...... ,,.,..,. , 

(it^Tjna.ny. ,,,.,,..,.,,,..,.......» .,..,, 

Other iCiiropG.. ......x.... 

British North Aoierlca 

r,entrnl Anierkcan StaleB and BrltUb Honduras.,, 

Moxldo 

We>i Ibdiea and Bermuda. ^ 

Bfuil ,. . , ..,.,. 

Other 8oath Amor^oa... . ..^ . ..... — . — .....,,,...,. 

Japan.. , 

BritlBb Ausr.ralaflla < . , 

Other Asia and Oceanloa.. ..,.,,,..,. 

AJnca.. 

Total... 



Perfumery and co^motlcs.. 
Plated wane . , .,.,., 



ProTlainns. Ootnpnalng Meat and Dairy Producta- 
prod uflta— Beef p rodact* -Ca nb^d f I bu.) — 

United Ktnf;dom„. -..,.„,, .,. 

Fi^ncB. . ....... — . — ...,.....,, 

iiermanj'... ,......,.,.,.,,.,,....,.,,.,, 

Other yiuropft ».*... 

Brltlijib North Anicrica..,,..*.,...,..... 

Centra Ji American Btatei and BrlHsli Honduras.., 

Miixico 

Santo Domlnffo... 

Cnba,. ....,,...,...-. 

Fucirtu Kioo. 

Other Went Indies and Bermuda . .. . 

Ar^eotina... . . , 

Braill.,.,, ..,.*.... 

Colombia....... ,....,.*...,.., 

Oilier Bnntb AqierltJa. ,.,,......... 

China. i.. .....,.*, 

fiaat Indies (British) ....„.„,., 

HongkoDK * -*.. - 

Japan — .,.. 

British Australasia 

Other Aela and Oceanica .,...-.. ,..,..., 

Africa ........ — 

Other conn tries.. 

_ Total 



iflua. 



(Juant'^. Tflfw^. 



2,5(l».tKi|C 

15n4T1.^ 

t,72T.433 
82,^73 

T5l.fi04 
7tt,fi06 

i+&.srfi 



7,m,ni 



10r,4ll&,B0S 



■i.7«a.s?ti 

iy,7£W.S3B 
444,eU) 

a,6ff7.7(j: 

111.8711 

^,161 
716.H!^l 

t5ifi3H^4tiO 



a.7«3.ini 

4:ra,oi7 

2rj7^33a 

112,1+3 

UUHfi 

i4f^,SKt 

134.4XU 

IfiT.SlT 

fi.OUO 

B37.1572 

3B3.4S5 

2^ 
g?,10R.S7ll 



to75.t>46 

aiiir.iaa 
e^w^-sia 

H,H77,;iil& 
115.0*8 

3L^,7tJi* 
27.834 
3,774 

m 

g.M7 

I(M.&*4, 

mm 

lD.lil7,t il1^ 

3s.4mr 

ISllHIl 

s«i,4y7 

Ll.ai'J,0i5jl, 



id&&. 



Qii^nft. raliKj. 



17,Jill,'^J^ 
7i(},4ti«j' 

70a.r" 

91,1 
47,^ 

laitj.ftai! 

5<H,fi2T.3ia 



U7,44S2 



17M2a 



l.Oni.alft., 



1RH,HIM 
3,Tfle.3al 

3.tt7l.424 

ma75ft 

3l.ffiH 

l&7,HfH 

l,24t; 

m 

&,7TXt 
ISB,:^ 
I17,24fj 



4i7,j;f4 






107,:^mSli 

3,oaej]u 

30,J73.&17 

I53.79r] 

a,4SI^46i 
211314 

74,&U,701 






14,31^; 

411 



4>.41L' IHM^ 



ISO 

il.t^l 

54.'i 

17.711 

34,47D 
1D,713 
7,^ 

au. 



14S.17^J 



3fiL74;:f 
15.14^ 
17I,U42 

m,ifH 

I22,aiii 

laHii 

IraiW 
345^7 iti 
^,310 
£01,155 

5.m4«U 



Sfl ,385.4751 



U1,51T 

fi,I14 

<giJ14 

30.r;7 

im.44^ 

9im 

14,tl.^ 
?70,13S 



47,IjHI 

im.EiT 

KtB,2ii7 



lttl,S!7 
3lH.&?^ 

5J.TS.73ti 
I,4^7.4Br> 



4.Q&U,LU 
Icil/JMI! 

a,e5i 

31,SG5 

sti.iin 
im 

13,663 

7.BSJ 

I32,^rcf 

l{ir,83fi 
El.i'XJH 






21:14.12;: 

iy,67t1 
117 

m 

],4i5 

17.101 
S,W3 
UJ^il 
W.HU 
1.301 

a,4LB 

86, W5 

47tt,b"a 



a.jjogi^apfi 



GHIGAOO DAILY NEWS ALMANAO FOB 1900. 



EXPORTS, AND OOUKTRIBS TO WHICH EXPOBTBD. 



Quont't. VMuet. 



FreBh Ob«<)— United Kingdom 

BrlUsh North America 

West Indies and Bermuda ... 

Other countries 

Total 

Salted or Pickled, and Other Cured (lbs.>-Balt*d or pickl*d 

Other cured 

Total 

Eiportnrt to (Iha.)— United Kingdom 

fciTaiiGe ,.,. + ,, ..++, + ,H^* 

Genuatiy 

Other Eu rope 

BrilLHh North Ameri c» 

Centmli AmuheaD Htates and British Honduras 

Mexico 

B&nto l>oia Ingo 

Cuba. 



mj68xyri 



Pu erttj Rico 

Oiher Went Incites aoti Bermuda 

Brain 

OoJombla 

Otlter Sou th America 

Aflla ojjd OoeiiDica, 

Africa 

Other can ntHea 

Total heef, salted, etc 

Tallow flhs.KTJnlted Kingdom 

Praace 

Oemaay 

other Earope 

Biitiih North America 

Central Am&rlcnn States and British Honduras .. 

Mexico 

Ban to l3om1 ngtt 

Cuba.. , 

Puerto Rico 

ottiet- We&t tnf:les and Bermuda 

BffliU 

Co loin b Ift *- - - - 4 

Otbur^uuth America 

Asia tL net i MKii d lea 

Other coutj tries , 

Total 

Ho? Pmdticts— Bacon pbs.)— United Kingdom 

Ftance 

UermmiT .- - 

Other Europe 

firltlsb North Atuerlrrk 

Oentnil American States and British Honduras .. 

Mejrico 

Batito DoMluHO.... 

Cuba.. ,,-.... *,,--..-► 

PtjertO Klco 

Othesr vf^^t IndltiH and Bermuda 

Brnill..,. 

CiMumbliL ............ 4 

Other b^out b A ineri i!a 

China , .,, 

Other Asia anil f^ceanica 

Afrbli. , , 

Total 

Hams (lbs.)— United Kingdom 

France 

Oermany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras . 

Mexico 

Santo Domingo 

Cuba 

Puerto Rico 

Other West Indies and Bermuda 

BraslL , 

<k)lombia 

Other South America 

China 

British Australasia 



1898. 



144,860 
4»,578 



44,314,47s 
1.58B,068 
45.90a.5n 



19,279,0>7 
828.776 
4,882,150 
5,687,286 
8,864.157 



8,375 
60,600 

279,186 

16,70] 

5,809,486 

22,400 

250,186 

8,128.675 

1,417.626 

618,600 

18,500 

45,90^,581 



41. 

0,608,964 

11,195,548 

11,419,748 

247,875 

2,306JB1 

636.742 

786.768 

404,767 

6.807 

2,041,606 

5I72JM6 

warn 

458,411 

lS8.56fl 

2,S60 

81,744. 



QtumVt. Folues. 



9.678 
84,744 



22,966,568 288,18R974 28,545,185 



2,868,407 

150.051 

2,518.516 



1,125,707 
17.9U 
271,011 
286.508 
155.52tJ 

80.oni 

18.7aC 
856 
811,088 
1,287 
18.240 
175,027 



489,500 

21,100 
2,518,518148441,189 



65,66(1 
80.75fl 
961 



851,645 
445,281 
423,421 
7,186 
96.67S 
24,864 

ao,88« 

18,^ 

287 

86,917 

25.07C 



20.088 
6,447 



1889. 



1142763^456.488 



488361 
442^ 
172,196 



1,579,812 
48,141,188 



20.065,196 

180,40( 

5,»il,6» 

6,728.916 

8366.963 

678.50( 

11,744 

9B.574 

618,0n 

24,801 

4,944,672 

41,56( 



15308,088 

16.895,666 

29,714,611 

507,78! 

'814,721 
874,881 
497,77C 
10.0U 

701,60J 
277,996 
782,0M 

11,707 



8.141368 10736130B 4,867356 



84319307 896^474J0i 

'l2366,ll( 

86,151.67{ 

88,531,12s 

9,804,71{ 

268.64( 

1B4,48S 

81362 

U353,801 

676,706 

27,826 
236.428 

60,110 
247,887 

76,250 
46,380.918(662,661.480 



,748177,7«23&4 1( 
'^ 1,145,49(1 
9318,118 
20,634,49f ] 
6,g68.26( 
24838f 
277,628 
69.065 
6,229,486 
127,284 
1,686.168 
82,412 
194,827 
818341 
103,490 
46.758 



89,056 
86,6<9 
14,063 



2326,784 

145,996 

2,671,780 



1,186322 

10301 

SI9306 

848374 

187382 

86,^ 

686 

4,875 

82314 

1337 

260.616 

3.680 

14,718 

174,486 

66,217 

26.688 

1,186 

2.671 JH) 



1388,114 
616,018 
677,487 
1,190,962 
16.829 
92,126 
88,675 
16340 
19,160 
547 
68315 
87,778 
14,408 
88.768 
31383 
618 



8031^477 



6,976,288 

604,189 

17,014 

17377 

1,903 

643381 

74388 

47,075 

416,745 

1,863 

16,766 

7332 

80354 

6,405 

41.557,067 



106,499 

908,010 

,808,573 

500.000 

283S0 

80,956 

7,483 

860384 

U,641 

147,981 

8319 

16,607 

84387 

13,127 

6380 



EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 



89 



EXPORTS, AND GOUNTBDES TO WHICH EZPOBTBD. 



QuanVa. VcUuea 



1898. 



Quant's. Vaiue§, 



Other Asia andOceanica 

Africa 

Other ooontrles 

Total 

Pork abs.)— Fresh 

Baited or pickled 

Total 

Exported to (IbB.)— United Kingdom 

l<Tanoe 

GOTTDMiy.,... 

Otiier Europe 

British Korth AmeHea. 

Ctiitral American States and British Honduras.. 

Santo UomLnifO. ,..,HH.. 

Cntja.........,.-..^... 

Puerto Rico 

Other Wtwt Indies and Bermuda 

BrazlL. *....,.... 

Colooiblar,.^ 

Other South AmeHca.. 

A&U find Oi-eaalrji 

AlrSi^ii --. 

OthQiT couo trifu 

Total 



317,866 

16,568 
20Q.186361 



535,223 
21&.6Gfl 



Si3,71fl 
1B,W4 
1.45(1 
18.987,526 225.84&750 



23,1% 

1.789 

20,774,064 



12,224,285 
88,183,078 
100867,363 



815,075 

4,908,r-^ 



41,310364 
• ,197JO0 



,075 41.311 
,961137.19 



5,722.086 178;S07,564 



31,6(IL732 

112,900 

9,617,086 

13.829,836 

15,751.791 

1,423.606 

95,00(1 

267.600 

3,656.700 

19,205.017 

32,300 

154,099 

4,242,440 

144.735 

85.500 

147.629 

100l3g7,368 



2,014.666 
5,670 



90.686.214 
212,986 
15,515.225 
26,558.646 
17.99i.454 
1.806,575 
1123n 
752.766 
8.882.800 
16,686.667 
117.900 
171,474 
4,515,55fi 
168.980 
209,600 
160,988 
5,722.0361178,607^ 



2,722,661 
7.917,066 

ia63u.m 



804.817 

867.101 

7a438 

5.338 

14,109 

176,219 

985,879 

2.045 

8.8«l 

31&50e 

9,84(1 

6.8Sfl 

8,319 



5,805^266 

12,472 

834,018 

1.572.405 

983,818 

68,896 

5,949 

89,466 

178.151 

872,600 

7,868 

9.618 

286,675 

12,688 

11,201 

9.760 

10,889.727 



Ijiiv! (3 bfl,) -United KtnKdom 

Franc*?...- ►. 

Germany. 

Otber Europe 

BhttEih North Amt'rlea 

Ce^ntral AmbTEcan Suites and British Honduras.. 

Mef ]^co . , 

Banto Dom i iigo , - 

Cuba, ,^ . - - - . - 

I'uerio Kioo 

Other West Indies mid Bermuda 

Aj-Kcn tina, .* . . , 

Braiai 

Culom bta , , 

f.*tber Soath Am pr(c« 

Asia and Oceaulcft 

Africa. , 

Other CO untries. 

Total 

Lard compounds, and substitutes for (cottolene, lardine 
etc.) lbs- 
Casings for sausages 

Mutton. lbs. 

Oleo and oleomargarine (Ib8.)-Oleo, the oil 

Oleomargarine, imitation butter 

Total 

Szported lo Clbp.l -Unlled Kingdom 

Ck*niiftny,*K,. 

NettierlaDdA 

f kthet EtiKjp e 

Brlttflb NorLb America 

Oential AmtirlcaE. Btaten and British Honduras.. 

Muxidu..... ,..,, 

PuKftollk'o 

Other West led tea and Bermuda 

OolQEuMa.. 

Otber South Amprica. 

Alia and OeeHoleo. 

Other cOUB tries ...,,,, 

Total 

Poultry and game 

All other meat products 

Dairy Products— Butter (lbs.)— Dnited Kingdom 

Germany 

Other Europe 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras . 

Mexico.. 

Santo Domingo 

Cuba 

Puerto Bieo 



24t077,725 

21.307.238 

233344.879 

138.510,606 

6,589,294 

2.666,023 

3,b0e,76e 

489,767 

20,139,616 

3,609.13] 

6,482,068 

46,00! 

15,362,301 

2.057,866 

10,837.48( 

661,288 

2,018,217 

4lS00 

700.341016 



18,807. 
1,1»,U« 

7, _, 

866,448 

160,161 

177,681 

29,682 

1.027,66; 

190,630 

418,487 

8,133 

973.991 

12a4a 

681,Q» 

46.854 

146,228 

2.498 



.640 201646.770 



32,312^97 

[2.813,2g^22SL23ai75 

~,6ffiU8^l59!u^86; 

" 7,016.98( 

2,742.674 

3,2703W 

468,927 

27,291,604 

4,741,704 

6,504,892 

58,91: 

17.839,66( 

1,706,261 

9,746,66( 

1.307,334 

8.263,787 

64312 



89.710.072711259361 



12310,730 
1.8S0.281 
13.60a7H7 
9367,911 
873.408 
156,967 
lf«,6B9 
27.945 
1,462,604 
266.872 
869,568 
3,686 
1,219382 
105,119 
(B8366 
81,966 
888.165 
8.113 
42,206,462 



21,343,(K» 



329.169 



1,118,669 

1321,519 

27,961 



22.114.712 



132 579,277 

4,828336 

136.907313 



379,110 



9,164,137 
31,990.067 
81,452,099 
11,536,983 



10,990 
9,017 



1,763,190 
98,896 
161,766 
198,896 
112,960 
136,907313 



14,801,641 

1,448,800 

1.141,279 

8.809,468 

279,896 

249,07fl 

56,816 

43,71£ 

18.900 



7,904.413 142 39a492 
886,2»7 -'-^^ 

8.290.710147.999314 



1.200.231 

1.671,062 

29.427 



9,183.660 

609,703 

9,608,.%2 



551.425 

1,911,780 

4378.818 

668,194 

49.604 

1,254 

961 



170,090 
8.4a 
15,865 
22,44( 
12,894 



,700,908 

90,612,969 

86,462,770 

19,129,704 

912304 

22.876 

7314 

204391 

2,120.436 

128324 

222312 

271,688 

158,820 



8.290.710147.939314 



85,739 
4,198,078 



476.875 

2,060,029 

5,514,623 

1.260,434 

67,618 

2,514 

731 

22,908 

206,098 

11,225 

28.913 

28,675 

16,829 

9,693,363 



183306 
6.834,865 



2,269,981 
171,786 
139.4U 
604,061 
.48,681 
48,72( 
7.0U 



10378,788 
918362 
972301 



2Sai96 
280,924 

76.54^ 
68534( 

46.70t 



1.705,190 
135,299 
141.427 
824,906 
46,687 
49,767 
11.164 



40 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Exports, and Countbixs to Which Bxpobtxd. 



QuanVa. Values. 



1898.' 



Quant's. Values. 



1899. 



Other \y est Indies and Bermuda.. 

Brazil , 

Colombia 

Other South America. 

China 

Japan 

Other Asia and Ooeanlca 

Africa 

Other countries 

Total 



1,867.369 
749,66S 
134,644 
651.66G 
21,666 
116,20i 
255.a04 
aO.987 
86,276 
25.600.026 



88,191 
19,672 
91,623 
4.68C 

23.097 
63,996 
4,186 
5,686 
8,864.766 



88,861 



211.-^ 

17,147 

22,986 

30.247,997 



CheeiiO flba J- United Kingdom 

Oettiiiuiy.,,... ,. 

BrtUah North Am^rRu 

Cepirfll Amuriuun tiiaies and British Honduras . 

Mexico^.,..,,,,... 

8ai)tu DomiufjcV' 

Tuba 

Pu*?no Rico 

UTheT West Indlei &nd Bermuda 

Brailk.... 

Co! ombi a, 

Other South A m^rtca ■ 

ChlQB........ 

JapftD , 

OtnoT Aaia und Oceanlca 

Other ^0 im tries 

Total 

Milk 



88,146,236 
105 
13,149.662 
166.187 
128,541 
82,766 
219.681 
12,167 
766,812 

9l|6M 
184,89S 

44.264 

86,694 
241.216 

10.868 
68.167.280 



8,267,607 

1,073.447 
17,731 
14,436 

8,984 
26,888 

1,586 
90,488 
2OT 
U.082 
17,07S 

4,817 

8.867 
26,071 

U41 
4,660,824 



1889,100 

177,614 

15,127 

Ul,319 

6.160 

18.608 

48.128 

8,606 

8,471 

8,268,961 



28,716,719 2,063,400 



11,878,701 
160,324 
167,666 

89,766 
635,236 
220,917 
719,608 
6.616 

64,54(1 
110,467 
101,960 

63.680 
818,271 

22,441 
88.196,768 



942,612 
17,602 
19,889 

4,928 
76,864 
27,404 
85,945 

-638 

7,960 
13,862 
11,161 

6.965 
86,044 

2,266 
8.816.049 



Total provisions, etc 

guicksilver lbs. 
Ice lbs. 

Bice bran, meal and polish lbs. 

Salt lbs. 

Seeds— Clover lbs. 

Cotton lbs, 

Flaxseed or linseed bu , 

Timothy lbs. 

Other ffrass seeds 

AU other 

Total 



671,670 



1,049.211 



16734a960, 



175ii08606 



978.460 

687,146 

5.668,841 

17,078,214 



414.988 
27,601 
86,496 
66,151 



1,128,471 

8^704 

14,481,96e 

26.246,684 



81,156,881 
82,764,781 



10,238,780 



1,893.101 
197.268 
231,237 
317.173 
167,100 
149,845 

2.964,728 



19.982,284 
84,448.806 
2.880,901 
16,149,611 



516.896 
88,611 
80,801 
86.816 



E;xpOTt£d to— Ublted Kiaffdom 



1,264,922 
197,088 

8316,4« 
«B,710 
166,800 
168.002 

6.079.896 



"roiaoe 

Oerrnany,.. 

Other Europftr , , 

Brltlfib North America 

Centra] Americaii states and British Honduras. . 

Mexico ,., 

Santo Dominetr,. .,.'«.. , 

Cnbft 

Puerto Rtco 

Other West Indies and Bermuda 

ArfcentlQa.. . 

BttisU 

Colombia. — 

Other South Amerlen 

Cttioai... , 

BrltlBh Austml m la 

Other Ab I BL and Oceanlca 

Af ri ea .,..., 



Total seeds.. 



Shells 

bilk, manufactures of 

Soap— Toilet or fancy 

Other lbs. 

Total 

Spermaceti and spermaceti wax lbs 

Spirits, Distilled (proof gals.)— Alcohol— Wood 

Other, Including pure, neutral, or cologne spirits 

Brandy 

Bum 

Whisky— Bonrbon 

Bye 

All other 

Total 



1.06S.9n 

44,904 

838,904 

390,948 

481,486 

5.887 

29,472 

864 

2,613 

19 

8,970 



1.783 
2,845 
909 
76,134 
5,609 
2,229 
2,954,723 



129.143 
297.074 



862.486 

172,184 

^920.891 

1,641,418 

1,884,233 

4,875 

16,724 

830 

4.190 

539 

4,884 

103»2 

1,085 

1,604 

2.440 

616 

60.684 

7,113 

4,380 

6,079,896 



29.397,734 



236,687 



275,935 
l,U4,e68 
1,390.608 , 



116,068 
290,729 



1,619,380 
24,886 
607.684 
286,696 
17,486 
86,860 
2,978.661 



199.23(1 
463,616 
©.466 
845,678 
241,066 
81,164 
80.149 

1,860.858 



214.443 
727,062 
1,476.028 
20,844 
850,719 
224,918 
104,884 
19,686 
8.423.991 



314,826 
1,143,284 
1,457,610 



57.929 
414,875 
427^ 
29,289 
1,175.308 
267,865 
166,617 
24,872 
2,495,612 



EXPORTS OF MHRCHANDIBB, 



41 



EXPOBTS, AMD GOUNTBIXS TO WHICH EXFOBTBD. 



Quant* a. VcUuu. 



1888. 



Quanta. Valuta. 



Starcb lb« 

Statlonerr. except of paper 



72.806^ ^mM^ 1101328.776 O.S0B.973 



Stereotype and electrotype plates. 



Straw and palm leaf , mannlactares of « 

Sugar and Molasses— Molasses gals 

Slnip gals 

Sugar, brown lbs, 

Sugar, Re finca (Iba).— United Kingdom 

Cermauy -.. 

Otlipir Europe. 

BHilijti Nortb America 

Ceo tra 1 Am eri cu n States and British Honduras 

M ejtlco - , , 

HuDtoBututtiifo, 

Other West ]nd[<.^B and Bermuda , 

Cf » IfiQibia 

i>tlLef i^ou ita America 

Asia ai^i d Oceonlca 

Afrii^a V 



1,006,016. 
ei.489 
817.468 



8317,828 

7.SiU641 

460.682 



287,302 
7M.727 

i7.r 



M7.183 

2,076 

6,949 

74.161 

1,041.466 

416,961 

80,280 

1,789.814 



Total 

Candy and confectionery 

Total sugar and molasses 

Tin, manufactures of 

Tobarco, and Manufactures of— Unman urd (lbs. >— Leaf . . 

Stems and trimmings 

Total 

EipOTti'd Uk ObBO—UnJtiHl Kingdom 

France,,,--. * 

GenE&Tir.*......, 

Otbcr E^iuop« 

British North A mt'rlea 

1 cntr?,! Amcric&iT ^tuLiis and British Honduras 

M«:£lco 

West lud les and Bo rm uda 

ArfeotiTiD ,,H..K.,.^ 

Cuiom bla. 

Other ^uth America 



90.866 
1.281,107 

290.661 
6.047. 



24,606 

96 

816 

4,669 

60.406 
18,722 

1.616 
96,877 
26.816 

6,204 
67,2ffr 
14.988 
801.611 



5,682.06(1 

10,070/»1 

408,1M 



1.120.8B8 
60.940 
869,780 






808,997 
68C 

2,01C 

2.086,781 

412,112 

1,036,120 

22.670 

2,068381 

819,641 



2381,709 



780316 
2,111.668 



9.462,228 



1^061 

80 

96 

08,012 

19.047 

60.104 

1.206 

106,6^ 

16316 

2,828 

108.723 

16,711 

426,208 



606.170 



,26&9Qa 21,924.887 



2G126&9Q8^ 
268.020214 



268,866 



2.963388 



27%42U96 



365,470 



247,248 li;i91327 
22,171,660 28a31&122 



Brll 



British A-ti9tTalaal&.. 



Other Asia aad OceuDlca. 

Africa. ^^♦..'VH^.K 

Othei' countries 

Total unmanufactured 

Manufactures of —Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Plug 

AU other 

Total 

Kitporuid to— United Kingdom 

Fmnoe ,.* — 

0«TmaD^ 

(Hhei- Europe *.*.,*.H-,. 

Britieh North Amen uj*. 

Cent 1^1 AmerJcaa States and British Honduras.. 

Mejdco **.. * 

Cuba.. 

(itber West Indies aiid Bermuda 

A]rgC!ntlua,..K.....'.. 

BrasU 

fOLombla 

Other goutli America 

Ch^Da-- ^.,. ^-.-. 

East indies (Brlttfih ) ; . . . . 

Uungkonsr ,.,*.,.* 

Japan _..... 

BTitlftb AiutralaAla 

Other Asia and Ocean lea 

Africa,..*....^ 

Other countries 

Total manufactures of 

Toys , 

Trunks, valises and' traveling bags ., 

Varnish 



88,480,226 

22,018,206 

60,808,406 

70,462,488 

7,Ka,78U 

218,429 

1,814,086 

8,201,279 

286,146 

66.029 

1,172,617 

2,761,246 

8,687.619 

2,400 

268.0201214 



8,676,626 86,790321 
1.724,68a 28:666.171 
4,826.749 60.891,017 
6,486,086 78.668,817 



26,17a771 

296.447 

25.467408 



700,906 
80,777 
186,686 
811,646 
12,084 
8.0&7 
100,296 
197,086 
882.869 

21,196 ^ 

260,206 8317.901 

296 1,600 

22,171,680 a8&613.122 



12,688.066 

179,226 

1.868,700 

2,765,017 

867,071 

49,689 

1,068.97S 

24,ig637S 

2,701,884 



...M. 
...M. 

.lbs. 



7321,660 
1,918,624 
4.021.447 
6,697,076 

148,786 
269311 
24,677 
6,449 
97,668 
8.414,482 
8744299 
40,898 

«*gs 

25,4674818 



1,647 
1.005.906 
9,439.002 



87,881 

2,018.616 

2,077,664 

684.882 

4.818.498 



8,732 
1,169.467 
8.999.946 



78,172 

2,197368 

2.097315 

807.072 

6,ire,oi2 



82,016 
828.404 
188,608 

40.489 



727.MO 
18.242 
80366 

876,970 
82,841 
61,694 
20,829 

jeo,647 



84,666 
822.671 
246.017 

612.240 
1,732.916 



5.179,012 



Vegetables— Beans and peas ., 



. .gals, 
...bu 



896341 



177,668 
104.608 
422.698 



854,284 



1,094.004 



438.184 



^^M 



1.269,8» 



42 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



BxpoBTS, AND Countries to Which Ezpoutid. 



18&8. 



Qiumt*8. Values, 



1899. 



Quant^s. VcUuea. 



Onions bu. 

Potatoes ba, 

Vegetables, canned 

All other. Including pickles and sauces 

Total 

Vessels Sold to Foreigners (tons)— Steamers 

Sailing vessels 

• Total 

Vinegar - gals. 

Wbalebpne lbs. 

WI ne— In bottles dOB . 

I n other coverings gals. 

Total 

Wood, and Manufactures of — Timber and unmanufac- 
tured wood— Sawed Mfeet 

Hewn cubic feet 

Logs and other 

Total 

Exported to- OnJtedKlniidom 

ift-aDce..... 

Germiknr. 

Other Europe . , 

Brlilih J* orth America 

Central AiutiTJcmi States and British Honduras. 

M S'Xlco , 

Gil bfl -.-.-- - , 

Other Weeit Itidieaand Bermuda 

ArgeDtlna, r 

BraKlL.-,^-.*.H,,,*KH*...., 

riolombJa. 

Other Sou th Amort en . . ^ 

British A uHtralasia . . , 

Other Asia and OctiauloA 

Aittca ..,.,. ^.. 

Total timber and unmanufactured wood 

Lumber (M feet)— Boards, deals and planks 

Joists and scantling 

Total 

H^xported to (M feel.}— United Kingdom 

Prance ....... h...*... 

O^rman J 

Other Euro lire ...,..,, 

Br) t is h N onh A iD^^rica 

Central Ami^rlcati States and British Honduras. 

Alexlco.. — ... 

BaBto DOmlTiff . . * 

Cuba. 

PaertoRlco. 

Other Wtisi Indies ond Bermuda 

ATgentlna. 

Brazil 

Colombia . *. * 

Other Bouih Amerl ua 

ChlDfl 

Hongkong > ..<.., H ., P .. - 

Jnuan.... 

Britiah Austral as ta... 

Other Am a an d Oceanloa 

Africa. 

Oiht^rooudtrioi 

Total boards, deals, etc 

Shingles M. 

Shooks— Box 

Other No. 

Staves No. 

Heading 

Another 

Manufactures of— Doors, sash and blinds 

Furniture, n. e. s.— United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 



100,148 
105.187 



190,832 
400,086 
880.039 
860,l&r 
2.881.788 



104,902 
661,833 



1134.250 
.449,989 
'565,001 
888.908 
2.796.600 



078 
2,207 
2,946 



120,243 
24,800 
144,543 



148 
1,607 
1, 



49,400 
17,625 
67.025 



106.657 
129,470 



12.98fl 
882,786 



107.814 
144.283 



13.479 
896,44:^ 



9,072 
1,623,108 



46.721 



10,973 
1,496,07S 



728,749 



52.015 
624,315 
676.330 



388,675 
5.489.714 



8,438.578 
1,128,898 
3,189,820 
7.757,291 



416,448 
4,796,068 



4.161.007 
818341 



8,Q82.92& 



1.881,621 

1,202.576 

1.111,820 

49.626, 

296.689. 

14363. 

5,121 

11,728 

7,278. 

154,201. 

9a28r 

45,246 

7,757,291 



3,482,156 

384,068 

1,171,104 

1.444,568 

880,347 

^28,988 

257,918 

43,723 

6.U00 

18,706 

4324 

22.445 

26,198 

239.758 

120.625 

111.451 

8342,527 



790,669 



12,080.318 

387.671 

12.407.969 



973,064 

84394 

1,007,458 



15.221,060 

371340 

15,502.906 



124 070 
20.080 
87.805 
116,751 
79,798 
3.254 
65,215 
2.096 
28,897 
4,060 
85,963 
75,096 
48,706 
4,366 
40.<886 
17,26fl 
907 
7.086 
40,801 
42,586 
22,460 
147 
836,269 



2,853,842 
368,101 
817,088 
2.004.828 
1,097,138 
38,409 
843,300 
38.090 
258,076 
51,129 
513,302 
876,.%2 
629,796 



516.490 
121409 
14.592 
62.287 
451,604 
405,118 
447,999 
2,171 
12,407,989 



150.340 

^!858 
165,976 
92,000 

4,795 
78,774 

2.088 
64,466 

43T5 

' 47,449 

89,085 

84,866 

3,768 
40,229 
15,487 

2,401 

1,257 
46,817 
63,704 
41,929 
243 
1,007,468 



3,606.492 

436447 

1,101.310 

2,880362 

1.308301 

60,506 

797,600 

34.174 

780.904 

61.543 

653,601 

990.780 

443,^ 

49,736 

521315 

188,545 

24.125 

13.828 

610,087 

620,697 

704,476 

a945 

15.692.906 



544,079 
64,142.760 



101.040 

486,860. 

557,895 
3,559,760 

227.32S 
3,266,880 . 

817,515 



78,734 



44.325,545 



126,989 

434.290 

690.806 

8,718.302 

177.006 

8,081,295 

1,136,907 



Other Europe 

British North America 

Central American States and British Honduras . 



1,027,403 
234,447 
314,084 
260.253 



74,586 



1.083,626 
74.962 
173.741 
231,208 
439,536 
}t7.489 



SUMMARY-IMPORTS AND EXI»ORT8 OF MERCHANDISE. 



43 



Exports, and Countbies to Which Exported. 



.1898. 



QuanVs. Valueg. 



1899. 



QuanVs. Valuet. 



Mexico 

ifianto DKjiui DKu 

Cuba,,,.., _ 

Puerto H ico : 

Utber West tDdies and Bermuda., 

Ar^ntina , 

nriiKSI.. , ..„, , 



^ I i s\ ruerica.. 



East Indies (British) - . . . 

.Tapan 

British Australasia 

Other Asia and Oceanica 

Africa 

Other countries , 

Total furniture, n. e. s 

HoKsheads and barrels, empty 

Trimmings, moldings, and other house finishings 

Woodenware 

Wood pulp lbs, 

Another.:. 

Total wood, and m annf actures of 

Wool an(| Manufactures of —Wool, raw lbs. 

Manufactures of— Carpets yds, 

Dress goods yds. 

Flannels and blankets 

Wearing apparel 

All other manufactures of 

Total manufactures 

Zinc, and Mahuf actures of— Ore tons 

Manufactures of —Pigs, bars, plates and sheets lbs . 

All other manufactures of 

Total, not including ore 

All other articles 

Total value of exports of domestic merchandise. 

Carried \ti cars and other land vehicles 

America n vessels— Steam 

Fflreijim vc ssels— Steam, 

Bebtflan 

Brttish 

Butch 

Frfeucb 

Q t'rmaD 

Jtailnn. 

Nur^H^piiin 

AU ntbt^r 

A me rtf'H 1 1 vessels— Sailing 

ForfEiTii vr'ssels- Sailing 

Bt; liria n 

British 

Iii]tc?i 

Kreneh 

(rt^rmii fi 

K-allan 

Kcirwc^fflan 

All DtlKif 



9157,096 
ll.ti57 
24.91(J 
G.041 

(J2.224 
»).Ul() , 
$1410. 
75.90 
21..S20 
18.565, 
27.424 
]85.i)24 
147.23d 
343.178 , 
3,378. 
3,701851 



I24L771 

9,012 

S2.248 

23,914 

97,170 

77.157 

32,819 

29.969 

66.555 

10.06 

7.138 

16.56^ 

250,650 

243,232 

880.570 

1,944 

8,571.375 



50,428,161 



287,494. 

600.042. 

536,67C 

8,017,787 , 

87.618,252 



121,139 



18,071 



210,137 

376,273 

^ 728.691 

55,962,270^ 696.319 

2,995,683 

41,679,416 



1,683,419 



192,891 
80,979 



164,274 
41,472 

47,439, 
429,033 
407.414 



237,360 



107,779 
27,6o7 



11.310 



313,37G 



81,138 
16,983 
42,672 



1,047,407 



15.489 



448,145 



25,892.221 



1.251.246 18,321,376 



4,560,145 . 



972,076 

184,894 

1.166,970 



1210291913 



1204123134 




58,151,413 
708.880 
1,660,418 
8,.<W9.819 
4,427.681 
8.822,446, 
3,927,064 



77,160,770 

56,494.817 

993,766.966 

16.488.412 

753,389,367 

26,662.948 

15,760.064 

10a425.869 

2,561,651 

25,382.818 

44.194,827 

20.0Q5,8a3 

57,696,7.58 

2.889 

32,778,791 

1,142,518 

978.317 

6,601,061 

4,262.810 

7.544.666 

4.396,216 



STTMMABY-IKPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHAKDISE 

FFiscal years 1898-99.1 



GROUPS. 



Imports. 

Free of Duty— Articles of food and live animals 

Articles in a crude condition for domestic industry. 

Articles Manufactured— For mechanic arts 

For coDsumution 

Articles of voluntary use, luxuries, etc 

Total free of duty 

Dutiable— Articles of food and live animals 

Articles in a crude condition for domestic industry. 



1898. 



Values. . 

$105,064,473 

152,192,787 

20,461,375 



4,459,447 
291,414,175 
76,141.871 
49,235,568 



Per ct. 
36.06 
52.22 
7.02 
3.17 
1.63 
100.00 
23.46 
15.17 



1899. 



Valu^. Per ct. 

$89,814,258 29.91 

175321,653 

20,180,433 
9,685,186 
6,266,418 

300.267,948 100.00 

122,065,660 30.76 

46,676,724 11.76 



58.89 
6.72 



1.76 



44 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



OBOUPS. 



1808. 



1899. 



IMPORTS. 

Articles Manuf aotiii«<l~For mechanic arts , 

For con samption , 

Articles of voinntary use, luxuries, etc , 

Total dutiable 

Free and Dutiable— Articles of food and live animals. , 
Articles in a crude condition for domestic industry. , 

Articles Manufactured— For mechanic arts 

For consumption 

Articles of YOiuntary use, luxuries, etc 

Total Imports of merchandise 

Per cent of free 

Duties collected 

Domestic— Products of— Agriculture 

Manufactures 

MinluK 

Forest 

Fisheries 

Miscellaneous 

Total 



Values. 

I38,12»,184 
88,140,811 
72,989.026 

824486,479 



181JW6,844 
201.428,875 
58,584,566 
97.382.404 
77.448,472 
616,049.6&1 



149.819,894 



853,683.570 
290.697,854 
19,410.707 
37,900,171 
5,435,483 
3,164,628 
1,210,291,913 



Foreign— Free of duty.. 
Dutiable 



Total. 



9,677,368 
11.513,054 
21,190,417 



Peret. 
11.74 
27.15 
22.48 
100.00 



Vdluet. 

140,582,066 
984186,220 
88,648.217 

396348.906 



29.41 
82.70 
9.51 
1531 
12.57 
100.00 



211,869,91£ 
221,996.877 

60,712,518 
106,621,40(j 

93,914,636 
697,116.854 



47.84 



7034 
24.02 

1.60 

8.13 
.45 

100.001.204, 



784,909,009 
838,667.794 
28,882,547 
42,816.775 
6.025,44fl 
34»1.56« 
.123,131 



45.67 
54.33 
100.00 



9,604,498 
13377,792 
23,067^ 



Perttr 

24.98 
2234 
100.00 



3039 
3135 
8.71 
15.56 
13.47 
100.00 
1337 



65.20 
28.13 
2.39 
3.51 
30 
.27 
100.00 



41.12 
5838 
100.00 



GOLD Aim SILVER. 



Gold and Silyeb. 



Gold— Imports.., 
Bxports.... 

Silver— Imports. . 
Exports. . , 



1898. 



1120,391,674 
15,406.391 
30.927,781 
55.105.239 



|l88,a'>4,608 
37.522,0e» 
30.675,056 
56.819,055 



TOKKAOE. 



Vessels. 



Bntered— Sailing tons 

Steam tons 

Cleared— Sailing tons 

Steam tons 



1898. 



4,740385 
21,007,647 



1899. 



4,611.094 4,249,399 



4,220378 



TOTAL VALTTE OF DCFORTS AND EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN 
MEROHANDIS E BY OOT7NTRIE8. 

[Fiscal years 189B-99.] 



Countbhs. 



IMPORTS. 



1898. 1899. 1898. 1899. 



Exports. 



EUROPE. 

Auatiifr-Hudjmr; 

Aiurefl and M Eide ira Islands , 

Bel glu m 

JOeu mark 

Pradtse * 

<lermaD7 ^ 

G Ibralmr.. , 

Oreeoe. 

Greenlaadn laeiaiid, etc , 

Italy,. 



Malta, GoKKPi ^tu .. 

NetberlAndfi... 

Portugal 

Rug$<la, Baltic, utc. 

Servla.. _,,►_,.. 



Spald,. 

Bw?r1ei) and Norvray . 

BwUfcerlEiiMi 

Turkey 



United i .. 

Total Europe 

North America. 

Bermuda 

British Honduras * 

British North America— Nova Scotia. New Brunswick, etc, 

8 uebeo, Ontario, etc 
ritish Columbia 

Newfoundland and Labrador 

Total British North America , 



$4,716,510 

23.7W 

8,741.826 

211,877 

52,780,848 

09,697,378 

32,519 

910,300 

I44,22r 

20,332,637 

13,476 

12,625.066 

2,605,370 

12 

2,825,606 

1,714,081 

12,096 

8,675,565 

2,675,053 

11,380.886 

2,119,837 



16,561.266 

9323 

10,652,777 

280,196 

62,145,887 

84,242.795 

17.996 

944,621 

78,406 

24332,718 

9,770 

14,4&7,620 

2,975,604 

2,^*.228 
1,710,161 

"8.9^;868 
2.605,565 

14.826.094 
2,360.302 



$7,878,935 



$5,607,912 
864,828 
47,619,201 
12,697,421 
^459,290 

804,82S 
127,560 



23,290,866 25,034. 

64,352 144, 

64,274,524 79,305, 



10,228,545 



6,318,786 
263.970 
189,075 



106.94a.lB5 118,472,048 540910,606 511,816476 
305933.691 358385.064 973 806,246 986.78U]B0 



469,282 
171,920 



494,812 
196,208 



986,916 1.065.888 
576.111 499388 



4,095,331 
23.143,411 

4,631,744 

872,115 

32.2<2.6m 



8.708.462 
23.044,926 

4,449.776 

388.168 

81.586.882 



4.638.968 
74.917, 

4,267 V 

1,175,788 

84,889.819189.578.609 



4,710,548 
79,Qi»343 



1,595,497 



TOTAL VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OP SIERGHANDI8B. 



45 



GOXTNTRIES. 



IMPORTS. 



1898. 1899. 



Exports. 



1898. 1899. 



Central American States— Costa Rica.. 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicarairaa , 

Salvador 



Total Central American States., 



Mexico 

Mlqnelon, Langley, etc 

West Indies— British 

Danish 

Dutch 

French 

Haiti 

Santo Domingo 

Cuba 

Puerto Rico 

Total West Indies 

Total North America . 



Argentina 

Bolivia 

Brazil *. 

ChUe 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

Falkland Islands . 
Gnianas-Britisb . . 

Dutch 

French 

Paraguay 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 



South America. 



Total South America . 



Aden 

China. 

East Indies— British . 

Dutch 

French 

Portuguese 

Hongkong 

Japan 

Korea 

Russia, Asiatic 

Turkey in Asia 

All other Asia 

Total Asia 



Auckland, Fiji, etc. . 
British Australasia.. 

French Oceanlca 

German Ooeanica. . . . 
Hawaiian Islands. . . . 
Spanish Ooeanica. . . . 
lx>iiga, Samoa, etc. ; . 
PhlSppine Islands. . . 



OCBANICA. 



Total Ooeanica.. 



British Aftica... 
Cuiary Islands. 
French Africa. , 
German Africa. 

Liberia 

Madagascar, 



Portuguese Africa . 
Spanish J 



-^ Africa.. 

Turkey in Africa— Egypt. . 

Tripoli 

All other Africa , 

Total Africa 

Grand totaL 



12.782,426 



.-_,741 

1,0R&,866 

799,145 

7,206,480 



13,561,896 

2,U1,264 

911,84S 

1,086,703 
9,206.345 



$1,690,161 
L201,714 

762.20B 
1,049.606 

796i675 
6.820,168 



11.241,191 

1,102,779 

8314»6 

1.186,960 

626,414 

4.968.832 



19,004363 
161,0!« 



22,994,001 



21,206,989 



86,283 206,006 



26,480.281 
194,624 



10,632.182 
827.760 
174,243 



138 

. .477 
2,414,866 
32,070,631 



14,160,483 8,886;240 
707,622 
644,463 
1,617430 
2,968,679 
1,161,268 
9,661,66fl 
1,606,946 



690,828 

246,902 

28,736 

826,426 

8,125,696 

26,411,410 

8,179,827 

47.668,806 



26,4423)4 



8,761,817 

488,066 

474.436 

1,642,964 

2,466,966 

1,104,613 

18,616,707 

2,686,848 

86,129.336 



91.376.807112.138.871 



13R6273411OT.981,409 



6,916.879 



6,U2,6«1 



61,760,369 

3,736,307 

5,188,604 

765,590 



5r,875,747 
2,981,089 
5,126,731 
1,064,663 



3,060,968 

1,457.136 

12,661 



714.247 
1,722,480 
7,772,564 
92,091,604 



3,500,207 
1,661,009 
37,929 
160 
1,496,978 
1,281,100 
6,507,847 

86.576,020 



6,429,070 

20,676 

13^7.036 

2,361,727 

3,2n,257 

866,193 

1,010. 

1,747375 

'408,414 

150.041 

699 

l;dQ2,606 

1,214,248 

2.746,261 

33,821,701 



9,563,510 
31,296 
12,240,036 
2,107,124 
3.042,094 



1,749,645 

443.757 

170,090 

10,751 

1,326,650 

1,2«2.822 

2,861,684 

35,660,932 



1,921.941 
18,619,26e 
82,550,312 



2,017.756 
20.326,436 

27.238.469 

14,529,335 21,313,946 



698,845 
9.998,894 
4,606,013 
1,201,416 

152,266 



993,741 

14,498,440 

4,341,986 

1,548,978 

7,682 



746,517 
25,223,610 



2,479,274 6.266Ja00 
26,716,493 20,385,641 



406 
113,562 
3,284,778 
78,431 
g2,6O4,508|lO7j08I421 



111.060 
2,326,07£ 



126,936 
618,015 
243.190 
433,976 
44,707,791 



7,732,626 

17.264,688 

141,679 

167,607 

124,814 

48,360.161 



6,578,896 
185,121 



926.849 

3,502,402 

290,557 



17,187,380 

8,815 

68,606 

3,830,415 

26,850,230 



17,831,463 

10,649 

25,814 

4,409,774 

26,997,506 



4.743 

15.609.863 

300,684 

8.721 

5.907,155 

4.070 

39.982 

127.804 

22,003,022 



10,121 

19,777,129 

287,124 

27,573 

9,305,479 

6,883 

56,522 

404,171 

29,874,993 



875,388 
26,283 
476,836 



1,311,282 



6,670 

16,772 

15,343 

33 

6,017,707 

65,8ir 

692.84^ 

7;i96,6a0 



9,390 
t475 
7,169 



12,027,142 

274,827 
668,186 
2,139 



15,155,610 
216,^6 
543,555 



7,489,929 

60,066. 

953,737 

10,442,970 



226.738 
816,915 



18,412 

1,134 

1,606,008 



659,188 
17,615,730 



494,196 

278 

659,605 

18,694.424 



'616,049;664 697,116364 1231482380 1227203068 



CHrt'AGO DAtLT NEWS ALMANAC FOR IDOO- 



TOTAL VALUl OF DTPOETS Aim EXFOBTS INTO ATSTD TMJOK TWB JTHVtZD BTATSS 
__ From Oct. h I78i>. to J u d« ;)0, 1808. 



nai. , 
im.. 

17136.. 
L707.. 
ITJJfl., 

jaui.. 

mu. . 

lani.. 
laor.. 

IBIO... 

jau,.. 

181^... 

1A14.,. 
1816... 

isie... 
mT... 

mm.,. 

isai... 

133L., 
162^.. H 

ISM,.. 



18^.. 

isaa.. 

1S33.. 
1B34,. 

I£f6.. 



MEHCHANUIBE. 



18^. 

fMO. 
IM]. 

1/U4. 
184II. 

iai7, 

1^. 
l»Jd. 
1S50, 
1861. 
186?. 

1354, 

ia!i.s. 
lai^. 

18GT. 

1£^. 

18SU. 
IBttD. 



ImprrTts, 



l33-(W},(JJt) 
2»,aiN3.lilU 

81.4;*i,l(M 

79aJeya48 

fll,353,rtii^ 

ni,:sta.5U 
85.om.ooo 

86.muw 

7T,a3IXU00 
:Q,0U5.tUll 

11^,011^:^4 

147,103j«Kl 
0&.3fi0j000 

i3i,75e.uro 

87.12oj(lV 

64.5^834 
^U871,twr^ 

ri,4Blt371 
73,165,1(3 

9ai£&,:^io 

7IMAie.Sll 

81,Q2U.E»a 
ti7.088,3aS 

y6,865,179 

a6^Lai,7«z 

M.017,M3 
lU8,*ffl9,7(|) 

17ii,57B.lM 
13a472.8Q9 

%H?7(I,238 
1^.4gO>{)t^ 

afi.2aS.7t)8 
122,957.S*4 

O(i,0ra,07l 

ioe.i»4pfc& 

llif.lM.S^ 
ll7.&H.Ort5 
m,4^^<^ 
I4a.{i38,ti44 
141,!^>,hl9 

2J0.771.429 
2(I7.440.;«8 
36;s.777H2fi5 
2W3EEJ,7S*4 
367,B0S,7le 
810.1^,310 
348,43F1,S43 

a31,3,la,?4] 



ETpf}Ti!t. 



t20,2tl&JW 

iitj>i3,{m 

i».763,U9e 
M.10y,Si3 

iS,574.ffii5 
51.ifl*.TJ0 

70.y(7i,7eo 
B^,oaa5i3 

7I,9&7,144 
77.tt99,m4 

9S,s<is,oai 

M,03H,ifi3 
108Hit4;},150 

:^5«7,3a8 

ti,yS7.44l 
52,567,763 

S7.(571.5aJ 
ltf,%iaH8 
70.14.UZ1 
H9.^1,a6t^ 

UL35ai01 
ti8.;jSt^D4}i 

eae^JOo 
eo,73a,s,^i 

V"J,8i»,r8SJ 

74,aoy,jM7 
e4,(^hsi0 

ri,6m7B6 

si.a3o,«5a 

1(£!.2U0,2L6 
116,^l6,8Ge 
124,338,701 
ILL443.137 
104,978,670 
112,351 nhTS 
1^,(aii^.»^l 
111,817,471 
ilO,8T7,ffl)6 
83,825,e38P 
106,746,8Et3 
IOS.OIOhUI 
100.^63,248 

:t5Hj4i.6i« 

J3S.1^^6L& 
140351, m 
144,375.t2y 
168,916,350, 

iij*i,aa4.2;j] 

303,4a&,2S2 
1287.043,764 
?mii»U,603 
Sm,3l9,42|| 

273,0U,S74 
297,002.051 
aH3.S7«,0Kf 



HPEtlK^ 



Exc 'jyA fjf 

»>r 

I i f It fk. si 

«3,Ty4,H44 
10,lR7jHh9 
lO,74l],W;i 

4,010,438 

ijmrs 

2l.7tiK,3Hfe 

a3,fttlj,^( 

24,UBI,eMt5 

40;^,t£!i> 

30,28U,^ 
lS,a43.90S 

4,5miap 

7.300,920 

26,a«:f.9?j 

W. 1643^830 
iH,.=i»0,OM} 

7,lffil,7fl7 
18.t5l2,U;^ 

^,SJS,632 
39,502,7^ 

K.oe7»6oe 

H0.4S|^1 
l^103,S46 
11,678,481 

L6^9S^47^ 
4JS8k831 

18,6:^1,604 
4,156,338. 
S,lOr,0K7 

lf^9Q8.87.^ 

345,736 

tiS&,77n 

2a,68&.337 

i8.eoi,i6a 

I3.MU,2LL 
&,^S.486 

52,310.460 
19,0;^^6 

44,as&.3S6 
JW,4/0,2aJ 
IMiaOTS 
,J,«03,S(34 

7444,311 
8,8^0,^17 

10,443,129 
856,037 
^.188300 
21,856,170 
4l>.456jh7 
(10.387,083 
00.760080 
^8ay,206 

M,6M,6iS 

38,431:280 
glXMO,OtB 






Ejporfji, 
flOprt OF Hi 



bpccie iticLiiOed with 

metiibiindlHc prior 

tyoJB21. 



«S.0R4,B90 
3,3eft34fi 

8,378,370 

H.8ao,ya3 
ii,loJ,WO 
7,480,741 
7,40a,(il2 
8,l56.9tJ4 
7,9Q&,046 
6,y07.5W 
7,07IJ.38& 
17,911. OK! 
18,131,447 
liI,M0,88r 
10,^10.414 
n,747,ll« 
&,606,17t( 
8,89^^18 
4.U88;053 
4,087^10 
£J,32U,K^ 
5,830,420 
4,070,342 
3,777,7^ 
24,131,289 
«,8e0i284 
tijOkil^HO 

5,43t^.60S 
5.605,044 
4.30l,3H3 

(5.7,^,697 

a,s5a.ei2 

4,307 AT* 
13.461,7»e 
10.274.496 

8,560.136 



«ia478,tl^ 
10^10,180 
ti,372,a87 
7,014,.<)52 
S.797,(E6 
4,704.66,^ 
&.014.6^ 
8.313,470 
4.921,030 
2,l78,7Ta: 
9,014,S31 
&,fifj6,3*0 
2,811,701 

6.477*776 
4,334,3^ 
5Jff8JJ4S 
8,508j0lfi: 
8,77*1,743 
8,417,014 
10,0^.3^ 
4,813,5;s> 
1,530,751 
6,164.:?14 
B.litjy.4a5 

8,ua6,^ 

1^007,034 
16,841 ,tilO 
6.404.^110 
r.B32.t«»4 
2^,472,752 
43,674,135 
27,486,875 
41,2&],£01 
68,347343 
4^746.486 

62,638.147 
03.3S 1.411 
06,54&23Sr 



Combined. 



imports. 



Total 
e£porU. 



tEi,O0O,L«0 
3y,iXlU.(W0 
31,J"jt)0,000 
i{],lUt>,OIN> 
^,IWJJ00 
«^75<J,3te5 
8l.4;*sl61 
75.3711.406 
rtK.&&L7UD 
7V,OtiOa4a 
9L.35a,Ti3B 

m35S.611 

7fi.3a:-i;«i 

(M.Ot)li,fli>i 
86,000,000 

mii,ot»,ouo 
m,iiDaJiK/, 

LT8,ftOO.[IM 
56,S«0.000 
6ti.4O0.aJO 
86.400,100 
63.400.O(JI> 
7T,O3U000 
?i.ilU&,000^ 
l2.9t;a,0Q|] 
118,011,274 
U7,l0i;,00t 
e9,250,UX 

mjau.ou 

S7.126^ 
74.450,000 
f^.&85,734 
83.:^ 1,641 
77,570.367 
^0.61^,142 
flK.840,0?6 
84,074,477 
?J,184.088 
^,6(J9.B34 
74.4M2,527 
70.870,900 
10a.lI>J,l3l 
1O1,Q09,26H 
108,118,811 
1X631,833 
149,80^742 
18n,y60,0R5 
l4(l,aH9,317 
lU, 717,404 
HB.i"eS,1S3 
li*7.l4L^IO 
I2^,SM6.1T7 
100,183.087 
04,768,710 

I17>2M,MS4 
121,601,797 
14^,64^,038 
164,!^,U!;^ 
147,857*488 
17^138,318 
216,^4,033 
212,946,442 
267,1^.617 
304,5ft;!,381 
2ttl,4f^,620 
8L4,680.MS 
360.ay0.l4l 
X@,4113,160 
^0H,76B,l»t 
362,16ti254 



impvrtn 
immani or 



|L»,20&,16e 
IS,013,(H1 
L1},:6,^JMi8 
J0,1{W.673 
;i3.043.72S 
47,980.Br2 
68.574.625 
61J2!»,710 
81.337^11 
78,tti5,i^^ 
70.071,790 
0:iUE2O,6J3 
71,9fi7,144 
56.S0C033 
n.tZf»,V74 
^fe.50«.«Jl 
101,^.063 
IOS.348,lflO 
22,i30,'J«0 
62,20,^13 
6^,767,070 
0! ,316.833 
38.5?7.236 
^.856,017 
M,a(37.441 
5:^,5*7,763 
8LV^Q5^ 
a7,tt71.6e0 
M3,l»1,m 
70l 142,531 
60,091,0*01 
65,0(4, : 
73.100.381 
74,699,0% 
7a.O«.fi57 
09.685,^ 
77,686353 
32,334,827 
72,2^,OS0 
73,338,871 
?3,8|0,6O8 
81,810,563 
87,176,943 
00,110,439 
101,336.073 

m.e8a.6T7 

128,Hb3,i)40 
117.4l9,Efr6 
108.488.«18 
131,028.4}tt 

1^1361,808 
t04,tilr5»4 

843ia4at} 
iiL^mojoiB 

IW.tHOtOOtJ 
113,488,616 
168,618,61^ 
154,01^,131 
145,755.^ 
151,«»,720 
^18,3884111 
2Q»,6$a,lK!0 
230i.9?G4^7 
37e,83&,36a 
2T5si66346 
838,064.008 

a5e,7E&,4fi3 
4(IO,122,3ai 



JFlftflal rear pncJed Sept. 30 prior to iBtSj Biqoe that date ended June 30- 



t3.7^.a44 
MUieiJ»9 
lO,74tV,90f 
4,900,CS 
l,66«ijarrs 
21.7{SG,»S0 
23,801,0.19 
244»44»S 
7.234.380 
_ 403,536 
20^380.^88 

43J6.18S 

7,000,936 
26,fti3.8ra 
27,a7-ii,0S7 
.^,16(1.860 
31 ,56a, WO 

7,106.7^7 

7,3Jti,ttS2 
38,6»SJIS4 

tt,0373» 
60.^^,631 
6,>,ia?,^ 
lL,^3r8.431 

30,94^,47^ 
4,75e,PBl 

^,4lSt,GSS 
n.Q8L2^ 
2Jai,2»7 
4,6»L4S6 

7,375435 

1£,216,188 
2,133,86^ 
2;972,SSS 
21.680.641 
13.a^3^ 
lT,m.B7S 
t3,li4.3^ 
28,^,1IS& 
6l.^lfu9B6 
33JU9,8I1 
a,aif0,7!ia 
41,0«;4.7I6 

(URH374 
4.5SBM7 

2,007,968 
8,308,281 

0f»,797 
3,101,610 

a.a»7,r^ 

37.fld,4_^ 
37MBjtt^ 





IMrOBTa AND EXPORTS OF GOLD AND SLLYEH, 47 








MERCHANDISE. 


Spec HE. 


MlBCHANDlRE ANO SPESCIB 
COMUJNED. 










fiJC'jfS r?/ 










Exct^a fit 






ij 


Imparti, 


Uj:ports. 


import* 
{roman) 

or 
erpfyrtt 
iiUiUcs). 


Imports, 

^oia and 

silver. 


Exvorta, 
sUver. 


TntM 
imporU. 


Tot^il 
exports. 


impftrtx 
expftriu 






961 


f2m:mbi2 


saifl.&^^.ic-Ki 


»^J5K,7«3 


U)o.dai*Ml 


fay.7i<l,08O 


«,T;-;'>,bii0.i6:s] twsl.^^4,i^^^ 


«8l>,y05,240 






8fi? 


18H.Ssti.ffi7| im.f^.501 


L3Ci.2S4 


IRAUm 


3fi,fiK7.(i4(] 


30&.771.7WI aar.iir'is.ui 


2i,7HSA12 






^^ 


UA.^.m 


5itn,Wl,itT 


3S,aVl,3t» 


»,584,105 


W.15G,(5ll 


^K,11jy,LE!0, 2HR.l2l,0o8 


i5.^UJ3S 






sfi* 


31tt.*47.3SS 


, i5B,H:-;7.B8a 


is:,i5oass5 


13,ll&.f;i2 


iai,<'i;*^,Mi 


aaH^xJ.syo '2tt4,284,5a9 


tVi.f(28.a»i 






lati 


2b«s745.f)flW 


10i,02&H303 


7!?,71(i,?r7 


tf.BlO.^n"^ 


(>7.H4,^:i3R 


^.565,^^"]? JS,fi7J,5a!) 


U.FiSi,!?.^ 






*e 


&iJSi2Mi 




S5,yfi3,»tt 


lfl.71tXI,ft93 


«i.0*4,(fl'l 


*(,^.'>I^,lii8 4;^.11<^ViW3 


io.ta)a6«5 






aer 


•js&,7tih{m 


*^!&iJJX},lH 


ltlIJM,966 


'22,(j:fl.4r,'i 


l50.8Sfl.87a 


417,8:^1.671 :^i,;^<.&K^ 


(52.457,068 






8H8 


mMD^m 


%1 963 89y 


7&,4fl3,541 


I4,ifle.;y5ti 


yft.7a4,ii!G 


^i.t;3i.808 :^7Ji.r87j.«.i| 


*J12J$3 






^ 


4i7„jfti,a?j 


'-»(|liH7.B07 


131.888*^ 


19.80? .87fi 


.'i7.rt3,:WO 


4;i7;ii4.^>,'-)i> ;i4:^.'iyi,ifr7 


W.058,17B 






la™ 


4;*ii.Sfi8.40e 


;jH2,77l,7rt8 


4;i.WBi.«40 


'2fiA\^UT\* 


r»HJa5,iiHri 


u^:si7,vi7 


45(.>,1f^.4;i< 11,450,163 






ari 


£aU,2KlfSM 


M2,8aOJ7S 77:403.5tJb 


2lJJ7U.ua4 


W,441,UHH 


f>tl.4yci,70fi 


Ml.3m,Mi6; 2^1,542 






,rtT3: 


t52«,54l6.(ir7 


444a77,68fiIS3ll7.M 


l,^.7ja,rtfil* 


7^,877,5;^ 


fH0,;i«,7ai 


6'M,tJ&5.120 llK.a*l,fi4ti 






WJij, . , . ^ 


[ti3J0H,?lO 


5a3,4TS.miliati&fi.'^ 


3l,4rtl^Md^r 


S4,rtlS.A74 


W5;^,til7,l47 


tJOr.08tt.49fi 


&i,528,e5l 






liflTJ 


ab7.4(JfisH43 


a?f^s28S,0«i lH.{f:6 6itti 


:j(1.4y/Jl.H3 


m.fm.4i^ 


B5ft.8H 1,348 


IJ63.St 1^446 


57.mi,m 






m^ 


63o.00f.,4;* 


fti;i,443,7ll 


VJ.ffiir^ 


ao.ix«>ji7 


t»2,l;«Jl3 


6,'i3.y0ti,l5a 


»5lto.574jmi 


5f,fiSH,7W 






OTfi 


4eujiu« 


&MJ,a&4.tt71 


TSMr-mi 


ij,ii!*H6ai 


6«,£OH,3(ki 


47ti.t,V?,SJi 


69U.89U.973 


iay.JM,>H2 






1S77 


4oi,32;ii3« 


(J03,47&»220 


i6USi(m 


«.7;4,414 


M>,ke,23J 


4y3.oer?,640 


«58,ti87.467 


Jf^.539M7 






S7a„.,, 


437,061 ,S3S 


e&136o,7Et; 


2^7Jit4ZU 


29,831,314 


3a,7«,135 


4eti.rt72,84<j 


Ti8,6llS.h*S)i 


2«j,:.^,«s 






srg 


44S.T77,T?D 


7m,439.44l 


Wi<3BJ6efi 


m^inOlO 


M.ilW7.44l 


44i<p.07,'J,77,i 


736,4;^.«S3 


389,363. ft/r 






aeo 


tie7.a5iH74e 


836,SS8,«36 


/67/M.3JS 


saaw^sio 


17.143,919 


7^.989,tlflH 


S62,V81,^ 


3J.7K!^J 






881 


«42,yti4.<Eie 


9a3.3rr7,H^ 


2a>.7ia.7J4i 


li0,67^,4*.fl' 


]f3,lOfl.847 


768,Lt«M3r] 


021,781 J Si 


3?,ftJ7.7:^ 






8fla 


734.tiMi^74 


750,542,207 


£S.3fJ2.flK? 


4a,472,HH0 


4»,4 17.479 


7<N.in.tHi4 


7flfi,95«.73K 






885.,... 


•m.m.m 


sr£t,a;ft+,4{K 


itlf>.6M.*,« 


ia,48»,391 


31,830,3:iS 


751.E?TO.8l>5 


Sao.m,T<& 


J<W,9S9,430 






SM 


fxu,^m,f^i 


740^13,«R^ 


72^5.516 


37,4^,262 


67,183,J»;5 


m.l33,3M 


807.W:IWK2 


/f.Jt2,523,(l?7 i 






8So,.. . 


ft77,5ar„m 




lf4M142^ 


43,343.ja;S 


i-2,2^l,m 


KX\,Tt^Xm 


784,421,280 


je3,s5i.i;2iti 






m 


iS5486,Ue 


<{7fl534 fl3C 


44.0fiH.e94 


^,m,sm 


72,4^]3.410 


Kn.m.-m 


761,iSa,M) 


77.!J5?J.44S : 






SS7 


ta^.^sisjtiS 


716,lSS,3ll 


'^i^-^MS 


00,170.7113 


3&.Kfi.rt3l 


7^2Ainf^ 


752.l8l>,Wlt> 


,'3W9,(>^ 






; fl88 


m:.^,iu 


taft.0(>4,ai7 


3fi,003,FHT7 


W.3:57,9S8 


*«,4 14,188 


rfl,s.2u&,i[|} 


7l2.a'&,«H0l 40,ffJt>,4lO 






flflj^. , + + b 


746.1S1,6S3 


74J;401,37S 


2;,7;;u^^ 


2S,9txl.t)7;i 


96.64 l.pSa 


774,U91,73.'i 


B:^9,0J2,EiU6^ *^,3Jh,JW 






dsu..... 


7^,aia*ft9 


8fl7,K8stS^ 


&i.5iH:^^ 


;i:-t.»;Ej,m 


6^.148,430 


823,28fij:«i 


'J0a,B77JW' A6,S^,316?J 






S91 


8M.9]6,19e 


a&l,4fl0.81U 


3SM4.fiH 


3tl.i^.447 


108.aVJ.fl4'i 


881.175.«4a 


9tt^,4,%4,4,^ }i2/J.ifiMtS 






flH3 


8?r,4l7-J.W2 


i.(iao,iKS,mj 


2XXi.tf76,S»8 


*S,(i&4.!i40 




S97,E»S7.00-^;i,lU^/2H4,0;^i 


2jfl,227.de3 ' 






sag,.... 


»^m.m 


iw,m.m 


1S.7;^7^ 


«.3»>^.(K^ 


i9,4l8.1(S 


(JlO.TfiB.riS.'^i 


it^,083.;L-i7 


><GS14Mf^ 






«M 


fiM.flw.eaa 


mMG,m 


237.14.^930 


95,7Ji^»,!!7l 


27,429.;t3t> 


740,780.293 


1.0iy,.'M^8S8 


27h,mAi-'^ 






SOfi 


731,JI«!J.W& 


ara,6.«.1t56 75,i(Si,£W) 


ftti,5«:p.y«9 


i;^76a,7bT 


788,566.90; 


w;i,;*>i,93:f 


m,73&m> 






Rflfi .,4 K 


77**,T24,fi74 


R8S.t50«.m lif2.tii<^2fi* 


rt3„TO.2Dl 


7^,!fti.Hl7 


8*2.03t>,W;f> 


l,OJft,55e.S.-i6 


213,53 t.6.H} 






«w 


7^,730,413 


\mi.^iMi^m^2^.}44 


llrJ.643.LW: 


ou;m3i8 


880,378. 41S) 


l,L>^,aOI.774 


:^3,tl^?.355 






18UB 

Total, 


fH(J,My.t564 
39&;U9t>h4a7 




eiS.4^J267G 


lol,31S,4ofV 
1.940,lii(>,S«> 


71}.ol !.«>;« 


767.,3«e,lU0 


l„T0l,y9iI.»60 


534,e24,8.^i 






Sf;2:^4i49ei 


:.i,m,m,i»\ 


oiatJinn.fifl? ;ii;i 


i:^.!^:Si3«6| 


2,432,714,7^ , 






•FlscalyearentledSept, MprioTlolS4;^^alrn;ethiitdaleed(leaJui]e3n. 






NoTR,— Mereha 


nrtiRfl anfl specie are combine 


tl In the columuft at. rjpht Of table for the 






purpcweof «ti(jwliii 


f the total inwartl an 
IMPORTS AND E3 


fl ontwara 


move^n 


lent ot valucK hy years. 
AKD SILVER. 






JORTB OF 


QOLJy 








[Fiscal years 


m^^.] 1 








OUTS BY Cot*irTRl£0, 




GOLI3. 1 SILVER. 






















180S. 


13! to. 


i8e«. 


1800. 






FfAnoe. 


lfi3.7TO.157 


Il0,afi2,l44 


124,71 


S H,424 






German^.. H. ....«„....*. ,........► 


8,4r^.U6y 


i90.flaa 


a,24 


J 1,940 






United KinKaotD ►.*...,,. - 


*J>1 ^1,538 


UM^^l^ 


35,06 


3 nu.ioi 






Other E 
BrktiJib ] 


Lin?p0...... 






&4&:m 

3&,y7(i 


^■iu 


1> 
iea,33 


2 Ta 

J 383.949 






ioiirturart. 










DoiqlniOD of Canai 


la-<3iieh#c, Ontarto* etc . . , . 




4J07,4Vti 


13,314,813 


^83 


I lt>Lia8 






British CoiuEDbtii 






3i,42?,SK 


2.aM.47a 


3.37a6J 


^ 2,^tl,!tcv6 






Cetitral Ameiicaii 


dtales 




5U^,'i4it 


643:i7i 


mSf 


(3 7tI5.2SH 






MeilHJ 






&J32.28ii 


^,4bhdoi 


25,028,888; 2^m:Mil I 






West iDdieft^Brttl 


5h , 




1L^.W9 
6.1ti5.0(ia 

558.T3S 


44,013 
Slx383 


iH,7* 


i 40,359 
25.1tJl 

(^ 483,18<i 






Otber 












West Indis 


«,„,_ ...._._. ,„, 




@«j.(Xi8l ti5Jt04 






Other North AEn«r1 


ca . H ..,..-,. - 




1:^ 

tE50,3SI 


34^,:^ n:2i 


1 13,454 
3 2tt4.050 
^ 3,8il9 






CoJombi 
VePGKuc 


&........... 






^;8&7 

197,339 


137,55 
49 






>]& 










Other South Ainer 
ChlDA^^^* - 


ea,,,,, ...H... ..,,..,, 




18,508 


^^:m 


5Te,^Jj 


b 6;i780 

: S 
















«:^ 






BrithMb AUHtrala.Eiii 


L ..,,.*... ,,..,.. 










HatrallM) leJatidB. 






la^oo 


m,m 
























^^^ 




^^ 









48 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALBiANAO FOR 1900. 



IMPOSTS BT-COUNTBIBS. 



OOLD. 



1898. 1899. 



SILVXR. 



1898. 1899. 



Other Ooeanloa.. 
Total 

Ore and bolUon . 
Coin 



I860 
120881^4 



I88JBM0B 



80.837^781 



iiaae75,066 



»1J87,488 



SzrOBTB BT CouiTTHns. 



France.,, * 

GermanT,. ►.*..♦. 

Uiii ted KinKdom 

Other B tifope. 

DtMnintdn oi Can ftd a— Quebec, Ontario, etc.. 

British Columbia 

Cetitrn-l American Btal^a 

MoxSoo ...H ., 

Yfviit [iidt«&— Cuba. - , 

HalU 

aan to I5ts m liJRO , 

Otb^r Weeit ladtoa ,.,,«,«. 

Other North AmerldA... 

OolOEnblft..-. ..*. ,.,. 

VcDfizuel^ n.^,, , .., 

Othc^r Sotith America 

ChEna,*, ,., *.** 

Bujit IndleetBrititbJ .,»♦♦*.. 

HonghODg: .,., ^+.*,.. 

Japau 

H awftljan lAlan^a ,. — , 

AU Otbgr cou n tries ^ - - 

Total 

Ore and bullion 

Coin, 



4,016^ 
441100 



86.767,fi61 
63.187.0GS 

7,000.000 
8,018,000 
9,062,215 



8,191.190 

98,973 
118,778 

11,166 

4.197,646 

848,771 

182.660 

40,019 
211,901 

26,100 
106,422 

22,710 



4,660.004 
64,874 
27,960 
»7,805 
10,886,916 
806,188 
124342 
176,604 
188,606 
19,922 
863,439 
976 



28,163,285 
7,784,516 

1063,250 

915 

^,456.009 

100 

m,437 

23,743 

878,837 

l,199,On 



25.120,282 

5,545,774 

2,066.406 

60,612 

48.044,196 

1,882 



22,971 



66i80e 



960 
389,986 



2,144 
27,137 



aQ,600 
91,680 
19,196 



64380 76,022 



1,080,365 



15.406.391 



6,000 
87,622.086 



65.820 

978,458 

1,488,588 

6,824,747 

6L910 

75,000 

3.246 

55.105.239 



96,120 
1,043,432 



8,571,048 



287,704 

8,745 

56,319,065 



2,060.155 
13.337,236 



86.115 
87,485,971 



47,717.444 
7,387.796 



50.420,003 
5,890,062 



GOAL FAOOTTOTION AND OOKSUXPTIOK. 



The coal production and consumption of 
the world during the last fifteen years are 



g resented in some tables recently prepared 
7 the treasury bureau of statistics. These 
show that while the United Kingdom is 
still the largest coal producer of the world 
the United States is a close second, and if 
the present rate of gain is continued will 
soon become the leading coal producing 
country of the world. The coal production 
of the United Kingdom in 1897 was 202.000,uuo 
tons; that of the United States, 179,000.000 
tons; Germany, 91.000,000; France, 30,000,000; 
Belgium, 22,000.000; Austria-Hungary, 12,- 
000,000; Russia, nearly 10,000,000; Australasia, 
nearly 5,000.000; Japan, over 5,000,000; Brit- 
ish India, 4,000,000; Canada, nearly 4,000,000, 
and Spain, 2,000,000, while no other country 
reached 1,000.000 tons in production. The 
United States, however, has gained much 
more rapidly during the fifteen years under 
consideration than has the United Kingdom, 
or indeed any of the important coal pro- 
ducing countries of the world, her gain dur- 
ing the fifteen years being over 73 per cent 
and that of the United Kingdom less than 
24 "per cent. 

The announcement Just made by the geo- 
logical surrey that the coal product of the 
United States in 1898 was 219,886.000 short 
tons against 226,287,000 for Great Britain 
shows that the United States is rapidly 

Saining upon that country as a coal pro- 
ucer and will soon become the leading coal 
producing nation of the world. 

As an exporter of coal, however, the 
United States takes low rank In proportion 
to its production and stands fourth in the 
list of coal exporting countries. In 1897 the 
exportations of coal from the United King- 
dom were 48,000,000 tons, from Germany 
12,000.000, from Belgium over 6,000,000 and 



from the United States a little less than 
4,000,000, though in 1898 the quantity ex- 
ported was slightly above 4,000,000 tons. 
Australasia comes next to the United 
States as a coal exporting country, her ex- 
ports amounting to nearly 3,000,000 tons, 
while France exported about 2,500.000, Japan 
2,000,000 and Canada about 1,230,000 tons in 
1897. 

France is the largest coal importing 
country, her importations In 1897 being 
nearly 12,000,000 tons, while Germany im- 
ported 6,000,000, Austria-Hungary 5,600.000. 
Italy 4,250,000. Canada nearly 4,000,000, 
Belgium nearly 3,000,000, Russia 2,500,000, 
Sweden over 2,250,000, the United States 
nearly 1,500,000 and Australasia 1,000,000 
tons. No other cotmtry Imported as much 
as 1,000,000 tons. 

Great Britain is also the largest consumer 
of coal in proportion to population, her coal 
consumption in 1897 being 8.87 tons per 
capita; that of Belgium, 2.70 tons; the 
United States, 2.42; Germany, 1.58; Canada, 
1.25; France, 0.98; Australasia, 0.97; 
Sweden, 0.50; Austria-Hungary, 0.37; Spain, 
0.19; Italy, 0.13; Russia, 0.09, and Japan, 
0.07 of a ton per capita. 

According to these figures, which are 
summarised from a report of the coal 
production of the principal countries of the 
world, Just issued by the British govern- 
ment, the United States now produces 
about 30 per cent of the coal of the wojid, 
the product of the fourteen countries 
enumerated in the tables being in 1897 
666,000,000 tons, of which the United States 
produced 179,000,000 tons, while in 188S 
she produced but 27 per cent of the total 
product of the countries enumerate. As 
above indicated the 1898 figures make an 
even more satisfactory showing for the 



STATISTICS OP AGEICULTUEB. 



United States, wbose product in long tons 
for that year is 196,282,000, against 202,- 
042,000 long tons produced in Great Britain. 
The following table shows the coal mined 
in an countries producing more tlian 1,000.- 
000 tons annually, in 1883, 1890 and 1898, 
figures for 1897 being given in cases where 
those for 1898 are not accessible: 



^tans.f Long tons. 

U. K'gdom.. 163,^37,000 181,614,000 

a. States... 102, 868,000 140,883,000 

Germany ... 56.953,000 70,236,000 

France 20,426,000 25,180,000 

Belgium .... 18,178,000 20,366,000 

Au8.-H'g'y . 8,087,000 9,926,000 

Russia 3.964,000 5,998,000 

Australasia. 3,057,000 4,045,000 

Japan 1,021,000 2,663,000 

Brit. India.. 1,316,000 2,169,000 

Canada .... 1,609,000 2,754,000 



Lima tnnt. 
20;j,042,000 
19fi.£S2,00O 

♦9J,S.V.^0OO 
♦3O^3;37,0OO 
21,72^,000 
♦11,611.000 
§1»,£29,0O0 
•Ei,Bfl^iUOO 
«5,0«f»,000 
♦4,0^3,000 

5.!tg-o,ooo 



•1897. t2,2401b8. §1896. 

Note.— In addition to the above the pro- 
duction of lignite in 1897 was: Germany, 
29,420,000 tons; Austria, 20,458,000; Hungary, 
3,871,000; France, 460,000; Italy, 314,000, and 
Spain, 54,000 tons. 

The following tables, summarized from 
the report above named, present the im- 
ports and exports and per capita consump- 
tion of coal in each of the leading coun- 
tries in 1883, 1890 and 1897: 

QUANTITY OV COAL IMPORTED. 

Tons of 2,240 lbs. 
Omntriesinto l&as. 1890. 

which imported. Tom. Tons. 



France 11,053,000 11,164,000 



Germany 2.181,000 

An. -Hungary .. 2,356,000 

Italy 2,352,000 

Canada 1.806,200 

Belgium 1,731,000 

Russia 2,264,000 

Sweden 1,033,000 

Spain 1,297,000 



4,166,000 
3,625,000 
4,356,000 
3,085,000 
1,984,000 
1,743,000 
1,630,000 
1,718,000 



11.5M.000. 

6>'7a.EK)0 
6.(550,000 

3,s:h.100 
2.7riiNilOO 
2,n1i3.0OO 
2.fiiHi,O00 
l.RTiSJHW 



1890. 


1807. 


Tons. 


ZbtM. 


962,000 


1,402,000 


1,033.000 


1,073,000 
1625,000 


806,000 


296,000 


460.000 


12,000 


69,000 


1,000 


9,000 



Countries Imto j883. 

which imported. Tons. 

United States. 723,000 

Australasia ... 717,000 

China ♦Sll.OOO 

Cape of G. H. 164,000 

Japan 17,000 

Un. Kingdom.. 11,000 

♦1886. §1896. 

QUANTITY OF COAL EXPORTED. 
Tons Of 2,240 lbs. 

1883. 1890. - 1897. 

Tons. Tons. Tons. 

Un. Kingdom.. 29, 442,000 39,660,000 48,130,000 

Germany 8,705,000 9,145,000 12,390,000 

Belgium 6,867,000 

United States. 1,021,000 
Australasia ... 1,521,000 

France 1,165,000 

Japan 397,000 

Canada 469,000 

Au. -Hungary . 630,000 
British India.. 779 

Cape of G. H.. 99,000 

Italy 9,000 

Spain 11,000 

CONSUMPTION OF COAL PER CAPITA. 

I8li3. 1890. . 1897. 
Tons. 

United Kingdom 3.79 

Belgium 2.45 

United States 1.91 

Germany 1.09 

Canada 71 

France 81 

Australasia 74 

Sweden 26 

Austria-Hungary 25 

Spain 14 

Italy 08 

Russia 06 

Japan 02 



6,114,000 

1,933,000 

1,960,000 

1,860,000 

1,239,000 

812,000 

673;000 

27,000 

141,000 

7,000 

17,000 



6.261.000 

3,820,000 

2,833,000 

2,440,000 

2,103,000 

1,221,000 

847,000 

212,000 

172,000 

23,000 

3,000 



Tons. Tons. 
3.81 3.87 



2.68 
2.23 
1.32 
1.17 
.91 
.94 
.36 
.31 
.16 
.14 
.07 
.04 



2.70 
2.42 
1.58 
1.25 
♦.98 
.97 
.50 
♦.37 
§.19 
.13 
♦.09 
♦.07 




60 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC TOR 1900. 



WHEAT CROP OF THE WORLD.— CONTINUED. 



Country. 



1894. 



1895. 



1896. 



1897. 



Netherlands . 

Belffinm 

Franoe 

Spain 

Portugal 

Italy 

Swltserland . . 
Germany 



Austria . 



Uunsary.. 

Croatia-Slavonia 

BoBuia-Herzegovlna 

Total Aastrla-Hangary . . 



Ronmania 

Bulicaria.. 

Bervia 

Monten^Ot) 

Turkey in Europe . 
Greece 



Russia proper. . . . 

Poland 

North Caucasus. . 
Finland 



Total Russia in Europe . 
Total Europe 



Siberia 

Central Asia 

Trans-Caucasia 

Total Russia in Asia. . 

Turkey in Asia 

Cyprus : 

Persia 

British India 

Japan 

TotolAsla 

Algeria. 

Tunis 

Bfrypt.... 

Cape Colony 

Total Africa 



West Australia 

South Australia 

Queensland 

New South Wales 

Victoria 

Tasmania 

New Zealand 

Total Australasia.. 



Bushels. 

H,618.00C 
847^1,000 

i06,aoo.oo(] 

9,000,000 
121.fiO6.O0C 

4,500,00(1 
110.681.00(1 



BvshelM. 

4,282,000 

18.790.000 

340.482,000 

81,218.000 

7,000,000 

118,162,000 

6,000.000 

108.160,000 



Bushela. 

6.046.000 

20,664,(«0 

888,798,000 

71,892,000 

6,600.000 

146.288,000 

4.800,000 

110,689.000 



Bu»hel$. 

94,637,000 
8,200.000 

as,9i»,ooo 

4,800,000 
107.015.000 



Bwhets. 

s^nu^no 

203(i6,000 
871,881,000 
99,000.000 
8,200,000 
188,872,000 
4,600,000 
116,0004)00 



48,190,000 
141,866,000 

8,786.000 
2,000.000 
.000 



41.767.000 

158,012,000 

8,661.000 

2.000.000 

210,440.000 



a06.609.000 




41,2004)00 

U9,688.000 

8,000.000 

2,100.000 

17O,W8.000 



48.587,00(1 
30.010,000 

7,600.000 

2SO.O00 

20,000.000 

6,600,000 



68,602,000 
87,000.000 

9,400,000 

2'J0.()00 

21,.')00.000 

4,000,000 



n,194,00U 
48,276.000 

9,:«0,000 

220,000 

24,000,000 

4,800000 



86,448,000 
80,739,000 

7,000,000 

200,000 

17,800,000 

8,200,000 



66,457.000 
86,000,000 
11,000,000 
220.000 
21,000.000 



339,667,00(] 

16,749,000 

61,678.000 

148,000 



292.272,000 

17.aS7,000 

b7,12T.000 

100,000 



889,086,000 

24,8624)00 

40349,000 

1004)00 



418,242,000 



876.886,000 



865.146.000 



286,388,000 



404,886.000 



1 617.670.000 



1.462.821,000 



1,600,734,000 



1,162,053,000 



1,5484«1.000 



80,421,000 
6,000,000 
47.000,000 



80,899.000 
7,462.000 
47,000,000 



34.160.000 
12,880,000 
^,000,000 



«3335,000 
U4)87,000 
40,000,000 



48,000.000 
11,000,000 
40,000.000 



88.421,00(] 85.361,000 



88,990,000 



93,922.000 



94.OGO.00O 



46,000.000 
2.000,00( 
22,000,00( 
262.784,00( 
20,308,00C 



46.000.000 
2.200,000 
22.000,0a) 
284.379,000 
20.341,000 



44,000.000 
2,400.000 
20,000.000 
205,610,000 
18,000,000 



48,000,000 
2.400.000 
20,000,000 
182,667,000 
18.000,000 



44.000,000 
2.400,000 
20,000,000 
242,W1,000 
18,0004)00 



430,613.000 410,281.000 



879.000,000 



864.989,000 



421,881,000 



28,900.00C 
10,700,00( 
12,000,00( 
3,196,000 



24.400.000 
7,600.000 

14,000,000 
2.642,000 



64.796,000 48,442,000 



17,600,000 
6.600,060 

12,000,000 
2,267,000 



16,000,000 
6,00a600 

12,000.000 
2.200,000 



22,000.000 
6,600,000 

14,0004X)D 
1.990,000 



87,467,000 



86,200,000 



44,430.000 



637,O0C 
14,047,00( 
426,00( 
6,708,00( 
16,736,00( 
860.00( 
5,046.000 



176,000 
8,027,000 

662,000 
7,263,000 
11,807.000 

899,000 
8.727,000 



194.000 
6,116,000 

128.000 
6,869,000 
6.848.000 
1,202.000 
7,0694)00 



262,000 
23)8.000 

620.000 
9.182.000 
7,816,000 
1,827.000 
6.118,000 



4214)00 
4,Ui4)00 
1,041,000 
10.808,000 
104)14,000 



43.360.0001 82.461.000 



26,906,000 



37,662,000 



84.9604)00 



RBCAPITIJLATION BT CONTINENTS. 



Continents. 



North America.. 
South America.. 

Europe 

Asia 

Africa. 

Australasia 

Grand total.. 



1894. 



Bushels, 
613.420.000 
100,799.000 
1,617,670,000 
430,513,000 
64,795,000 
48,860,000 



2,660,667.000 



1895. 



Bushels. 

634,698,000 

88,916.000 

1,462,821,000 

410.281,000 
48,442,000 
82.461,000 



24)62,618,000 



1896. 



1897. 



Bushels. 
481,193,000 

64,069,000 ,,^ 

1,600,784,000 1.162,068,ggdl,548,881,000 
879.000,000 ^™ 

87,4&7.OO0 

26,906,000 



Bushels. 
609.761,000 
46,100,000 



864,989,000 
86,200,000 
27,6624)00 



2,488,8494)00 2,226.745,000 2,879,9044)00 



1898. 



Bushels. 



421,821,000 
44,489,000 
84,960,000 



The most trustworthy estimates that can be obtained for the principal wheat-growing 
countries of the southern hemisphere and for India for the year 1896^ are f^ven below: 

Production, I ProductUm 

Countries. Bushels. Countries. Bushels. 

Argentina 70,000,000 Australasia 074)00,000 

ChDe 16,000.000 India 280,000000 

Uruguay 7,000,0001 





STATISTICS OP 


AGRICULTURE. 




61 


STATISTICS OP THB PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS. 
Acreage, production and valne* of the t>rincipal farm crops in tlie United States, 1866 to 1808. 


Yeab. 


CORN. 


WHEAT. 


Area, 


ProOucticm. 


Value. 


Area. 


i¥oductio». 


Vaitt«. 


1866 


si.mm 

44 • m 

45 »4 
50 L13 

U ^ 

62 ^ 
64 )25 

S ^ 

68 . rao 

73 160 

76 »8 

78' (51 

70. (66 
72 «K 
68 (69 
82 130 

r^ 

77 :, «1 


Bu^h^.ia. 
8h7.H4fi,296 
Vfi-ijr^XOOO 
WHi..^3;,000 
pr^.^W^OOO 
l.HW.lixH.OOO 

m,m.m 

l,iJ'Ji,7JlK000 
K^-fi 1 '- 500 

1; 500 

1, wo 

^ 1 

»0 

{; iS 

2, )80 

2, L66 


Ml 1,450,880 

4Fr7,7t^.768 
424.ri^.f>.649 
52'^,:^'ti ,1.609 

4^fti..^V>.910 

411 <#: 1.151 

-.*:ri266 

1 

499 
170 
176 

000 

B29 
S30 
534 


Arm. 

ms'XM32 
l»,lnl,0O4 

I8,1i;»2,60l 

24 *^ 027 

2« M6 
8a 560 

sa ^ 

i i 
11 

86 184 

87 r88 

i ^ 

86 164 

38 m 

38 130 

;4 136 

89 »6 

44 . (78 


Btwhete. 

11 

292,136.000 
420,122,400 

ill 

467,102:947 


HI 

497,080;i42 
446,602.126 

i!:ig:lS 

275,820,390 

822,111:881 
237,988,998 


867 


im :.::::::::::.:::: 


1869 


1870 


87i:::.:::::::::::::.::::: 


872, 


873 


874 


1876.;,. 


1876 


1877 


KIS/...,...... . 


1879 


18B0 


18ffl 


Tim :::.::::::.::::.: 


1888 


1884 




lie::::::::::::::::::::::: 




18ffi 


1880 


1890 


Iffil 


802 


8SB 


iS . . .. 


SB::::::::::::::::::::::: 


1891? 


1897..... 


im. :::.:.::::: 




Ybar. 


OATS. 


RTB. 


Area. 


Production. 


Vcdue. 


Area. 


Production. 


Value. 1 


1886 


Acff^. 
8>^W,219 
10,74>i.4l6 
9,<^Ni.:86 

9M[M1 

9SW,7Sli 
9,7M,7D0 
10,Sf<7,112 
Uiilo.WS 
18,:i^,008 
12,ettHJ48 
18.17t».T0O 
12.fW:i,oOO 

3o;r§4;o82 

23.f>5d,474 

26.320/^ 

11 

35.; 10 


^v^,i4i,i/re 

27H,r.^ft,|IOO 
2.y.E*^Af,.W 

^^ap.ii-i-i.ooo 

247,277.400 

i-b.!. 74^1,1 100 
i;71.:47.i«) 
270,;>4<I,<IOO 

4LH,L>7ti.,'iflO 

ilT.88^:«) 
4 H,4PL()00 
WJ.!^iMl.aO 

rKi.,^,400 
ti^ife^tiOO 

tmAM.m 

523,(2 l,i«0 

fas,(xi«,i«8 

8^,443.n87 

7rrT,.^l»^404 

:l;:'-:_48 


H^.OS7.1t46 
r*i.EW,?,^56 

IKS 

08H4iiti37 

iliS 

103,844.896 
ll&.Mi.m 
im ,753,468 
20,51:4,294 
lM,^lli.o66 
i:j;^,iss,y70 

l*fT,fk*0.:.'« 
iei.£3fl,[70 

SO0,6?J.;90 

Si 


LH5V.176 

.0(^.531 
l.[)4J^.fl64 

.150„^fi6 
1,116,716 

■.,4iKj-i74 

:rt22:70O 
Li£i.'i,460 

l,7f.^,(]19 

:'-'i-| 

58 

f7 

.;.„,. mB6 
l,Lki4,790 


i.. 1. 

'^S,IJM,l«0 
22,5W,>«0 
3a,Si7,iJ00 

J5.47ri,^«0 

sj4:>t)00 

^ia;i^4;H00 
£1,170,100 

^■>,K4'J,7H0 

2;^,fl;^+,460 
2L-m,m 
3n.rN,ti60 

■^4.[M;fViSW 

^ilpit'ilfi 


ilU49.1S0 

Pii 

14,8671040 


Se?::::::::::::::::::::::: 


1868 


1889 


1870 ::.::::..::::.: 


1871 


1872 


wra..::.:: :...::.:::: 


1874 


1W5 . 


1876::..:..:::: :::: 


1877 




1879 


1880 * 


1881 * 


1882 


1888 


1884 


1885** 


13.504,820 


1886 " 


iSm^ 


uv" 




188B ' 


Iflw " 


m — 


n^BB ' 


'tSSt 


SR 


SB* ' ' 


WBt ' 


K::::::::::::*.:::::::: 


•All 


▼alues in t 


his and the f 


oUowinR tab 


les are in r 


old. 





62 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALS£ANAO FOR 1900. 


STATISTICS OF THE PRINCIPAL FARM CBOPS.-CONTINUBD. 
Acreage, prodaotion and valiie of the principal farm crops in the United States. 1866 to 1898. 


Yeae. 


BABLXY. 


Buckwheat. 1 


Area. 




Value. 


Area, 


Production. 


Talue. 


1866 


;-g| 

i.;-i^:.i06 
i.-wi.fa6 

t,7t",Ofl3 

1,7I>^.^11 

l.TLiiJ.400 
.(L-Ml.TtJO 

2To!l09 
■2.i^KS]S 

:?.;2i+,:fi9 
2.^LVi.;«7 

r^:'S"l:^ 

rvi:.3.579 

;i.-iiK.i.'i6l 
^H.z-i-uflri 

3.1711 fiOJ 

■>,ivrfi,:»30 
3,;b.ii6 


^i^iVuoo 

;>i,f||;»'^.200 

[^'^;:7[S:mo 

:!)i.lJMJi.40O 
:fi.(>44.491 

;tH.tju..iOO 
;t4.*-iU400 
4:J.i^.\'aO 

.Hi.2<s,l00 
.K..l^k^,.■vl6 

4l.|f:L«) 

3.(.l.ve7 
t>M.lJ:^.<00 
.>;H^jif,(jOO 
oi',ii^.<00 

<vl,rtJ4.<lOO 

Ve.Llffii.Lfl'6 
t17.l6*i,a44 
H*;.!iiS.l56 

t!?.S(2'..l05 
fil.^Ui,466 

K7.ii;:\744 


IS,ir.';.746 
1<1.?'.^.164 

•.\yxA.\ab 

^I?:714:j29 

L>iyiLMi,L80 
^,*M.H01 
?:h. 714.444 

r4}.<tO.T42 

'Vi.Sl7J.513 

:fl).7f:s.(jl5 
3!>. 1:1.1. 428 
L;lt.77i>.l70 

i^i:.3!;o:5io 

iSi 

45.47U,342 

;^^«.o■3l^/l62 
^,r?,».:-«6 

27,i;3-(,127 
:^.;il^.418 

?-\<L+L'41 
2.-,, 143.139 


'11 

Jia:497 

4&4.1B8 

575:580 
fWti.441 

mMCO 
^.(05 

ft4rai3 

El 
^^ 

Sbl,461 

Mm 

tj7H;S2 




8:i&<^ 

7,K57.7TO 

a,n[ti.i300 
nj.O?*2joo 

10,1T7.000 
l^,:'4fi.>ffl0 

i;ii40j»0 

iLDiu:;^ 
7,fi(e,e54 

lolsSiooo 
it,43aj8i 

li,m.311 

i5:'?ui::wi 

I4,[S^J.783 
I4.m.451 

lLrJi.Ll27 


6,622389 




1888 


1860 


lg70 


isTi:::::::::::::::.:::::: 




1878 


1974 


1876 


1876 


1877 


1878... 


1875::::; :.: 




1881 


1882 


1888 


1884 


iffls:::::. :::::::::::::::: 


1886 




IffiS 


1880* 


isyo 


\oM 


1892 


18B8 


18M 


isS::::::. .::::::. ..:.... 




Iw?" 


1886 




YEAH. 


POTATOES. 


HAT. 1 


Area. 


Production. 


VoZue. 


Area. 


Production. 


Value. 


866 


i.i-j|.;«l 

i:^^b:u9 

i.'.r^'.ai8 

l.-i31.»l 

i.'jAiao 

I.-UILIMI 

I>1 11,1)41 

i!^Wa)0 
s.-ia^.wo 

2.W7.fl8? 
1\H51,W9 
3.714,770 

2:tX)c\lB6 

^.TS7,B78 

2:Tfa'iJ66 

a.634ln 


BU'^hflB. 

Itf7.3ti}.976 
^i:.:8;^.00O 

nv;.(Aii.i.00O 
;ti.f^^;.0OO 

lauiiLTOO 
i:i,^>lrlOOO 
1i>l,(.iHLP.0OO 
irjfi.lWl.OOO 
lftii.H:T.0OO 
13^,j^.T,0OO 

1SI.JJ*H00 

7(!,^jri.508 
206. Ml ,125 
liMi,^j^.00O 
175,fr2?t.i)00 
IK^a^^l.OOO 
ir^^.Miij.UOO 

^ji^l.B46 
im.07-S.946 

lrK;:^l,619 

70,787 JB8 

G4.015^ 


tTii.r.-. 168 

M4^' 186 

,^7.4^ 1.162 
MJMP\Bi 

6T.*.7 jl5 

nfl- )75 

bl.o:! ri4 
Si!^,2'i|..Ml 
:iii,.^;g )44 
H7,fli.i.'»l 

7;>,r^.N J90 

7^.1.V.I08 
7>iAA'..m 
tl|..v».:r40 
>.l,i 1.560 
7'j.riM.ll8 
llJ.ai!^-. 885 
in. 0^3.521 
V.KiJ4]: 530 
in8,r/,^B01 
yi.o-^'.787 

m^i 901 

w:rt:';06B 
Tu.67-iT72 


17 104 

20 ■ -..W 

21 ']64 

1 1 

37 301 

8&.:'V508 
8t '701 

» 908 


3l,T7!^.iS27 
2*1.377,000 
2rl,]41.«0 
2^i.4^?.ll00 

211.3;^. no 
^i^f^.aoo 

26.1166.100 

25.i;i;i.aoo 

;jo.8ijr.ioo 
:ii.ti^j,300 
Lftj.HCH,a6 
;i,V4Si;iOOO 
Hl,^J'^,388 
3.^,1:55.064 
y8.13&.040 
4«.se4.009 
4!^.47fi.460 
44.raL550 
41,7l!e.4» 
41,4S*,«« 
4(i.t>l,^.094 

(50.197.689 

«o.fti7.m 


"Si 


1887 


1868 


isS::: :::.:::::::::""! 


1870 


1871 


1872::::::::::::::::::::.: 




1874*"* 


1875 


18T6 


iw?::::::::::::::::::.::: 


1878 




1860* 


1881 


1882 


1888 


1884 


1886 


^:::::::::::::::::::... 




1868 


i^S 


^Sn" 


1891 


1ffl2 


]Sgo * 


1891 


IfM 


1896 


1ffV7 


MB*"* 





STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE. 



53 



STATISTICS OF THB PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS.-CONTlNinBD. 
Acreage, production and yalne of the principal farm crops in the United States, 1866 to 1897. 



Ybab. 



Tobacco. 



Area. Production. 



Value. 



Cotton. 



Area. Production. Value. 



1806.. 
1887.. 
1868.. 
1888.. 
1870.. 
I8n.. 
1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879,. 
1880.. 
188L. 



Acreit. 

*vr,:!83 

i 88 

4 .01 

t 168 

i '68 

4: )12 

4 (78 

i 163 

( M9 

( 167 



f3^.:srKftt 
2J :■ B 
2! 
21 



Aeret. 



1884.. 
188&.. 
1886.. 



188B.. 
1800.. 
1801.. 
1803.. 
1803.. 
1804.. 



4lt.M0O 
fl(t:^,rtl6 

64jl:j^« 

ffT] L.22 

61i8,730 

747;;v36 

722 1B8 

74:>.£46 

7(K>.ii62 



892.616,700 
891,278,860 
446,296.889 
449,880,0U 
613,077,668 
461,646,6a 
641,604,000 
662,796,000 
632,687,000 
886,240,000 
666,795,000 
488.256,619 
622.216,116 
666377.039 
496,621,686 
483,023,9(>3 
406.678385 
491.644.000 
408.004,320 






■(■■: 



18 
60 

;;j 40 

-I... '< 83 

^; ,■ ■ 84 

i>-: 69 

ivir . . 42 

nj- _ gg 

H6!*4k!:30 



-■■-64 
167 
i61 
117 
61 
08 
B8 
til 

as 
no 

166 

182 

»42 

M8 

m 

JOO 

no 

too 

160 

sue 

198 
. ill 
107 
179 
166 
NX) 
135 

167 



1204361,806 
190383310 
226,794,168 
261,067,087 
292.708,086 
242.672,804 
280362,629 
289,863,486 
228013.080 
238,109,946 
211,656,041 
285,731,194 
198.467.706 
242,140.987 
280,266,242 
294,135.647 
809,696,600 
250394,750 
258,993,385 
269.989,812 
809,381,938 
337,972.458 
854,464,340 
402.961,8]4 
869,068358 
826313,296 
262.262,286 
274,479637 
287,120,818 
260.338,096 
291.811,564 
319,491.412 



NUMBBR AND VALUE OF FARM ANIMALS IN THE UNITED STATES-1868-99. 



JANUABT 1. 



1868.. 
1860.. 
1870.. 



187a. 
1874.. 
1876.. 
1876.. 
18n.. 
1878... 
18»... 
1880.. 
1881... 
1882... 
1888.., 



1887.. 






18».. 



- HOBSSS. 



Number. Value. 



6,756,940 

6332,798 

8,248,800 

8,702,000 

8,990.900 

9,222.-— 

9.383,l„ 

9,604300 

9,736300 

10,166,400 

10,329.700 

10.988,700 

11301,800 

11,428.626 

10321364 

10388.111 

11,160,688 

11,664372 

12,077,667 

12,496,744 

18,173,986 

18,868394 

14318337 

14,066,760 

16306.802 
16361,180 



16,134367 
14.864,667 
18,900,ni 
13,666,807 



8482,696,226 
688,024,787 
671319.461 



669.707316 
684,468,967 
666,927,406 
646,87a969 
632,446,986 
610306,681 
600313,681 
678364308 
618,296,611 
667,964.826 
616324,914 
766341308 
838.784,400 
852,282,947 
860,823,308 
901,686,766 
946,006,164 
983,194,827 
978316362 
941328,822 
1.007306,686 
902326,1'" 
769324,r 
676,780^60 
600,140,186 
462348,896 
478,863.407 
611,074.813 



MULES. 



Number. Value. 



866.686 
921,662 
1,179.500 
1342300 
1,276,300 
1.310,000 
1389.860 
1398.760 
1,414,600 
1,443,600 
1,637300 
1,718,100 
1,729,500 
1,720,781 
1386,166 
1371,079 
1,914,136 
1,972369 
2,062308 
3,117441 
3,191,727 
3,267374 
3,881,007 
3,296.683 
3314,690 
3381,138 
3368381 
3.888.106 
3378,946 
3,316.664 
3,367,686 
2,134313 



166,416,769 
98,886,360 
128,684,796 
126,127,786 
121,027,816 
124,658,086 
119^1,869 
111.602,718 
106366,114 
09,480,976 
104322.969 
96.083,971 
106,948319 
120,066,164 
130,946.878 
148,732390 
161,214,976 
162,497,007 
163,881,006 
167,067388 
174,863368 
179.444,481 
182.894.090 
178.847370 
174383,070 
164,768,761 
146.2833U 
110327,884 
108304,467 
92303300 
99.063.062 
95,9684361 



MlLCH Cows. 



Number. Value. 



9.247,714 
10,096,600 
10,028,000 
10,808,500 
10,676,900 
10,706300 
10,906,8U0 
11,066,400 
11360,800 
11300400 
11,826,400 
12,027,000 
12,868,663 
12,611,682 
18,126,686 
13,601306 
13,904,122 
14386,888 
14322,088 
14366,414 
16,298,626 
16,962.888 
16.019301 
16,416,861 



16.487,400 
16304,689 
16,187,686 
15,941^ 
16.840386 
16.990,U6 



8319,681,153 
361,752,676 
394,940,746 
874,179,093 
829304,983 
314.358.931 
299,609300 
811389324 
320346,728 
807,743311 
296,499366 
266,963,928 
279.899,420 
296,277,060 
826.480,810 
896375,406 
428,486,649 
412,008,098 
889,986,623 
878,789,689 
866362,173 
266,226376 
868.162,183 
846397300 

^,399,786 
866,908,061 
863.601,729 
868.066,546 
860380.908 
484318.836J 
474,233.925 



u 


CHICAGO DAILY KEWS 


iLU.4NAC FOR IDOO. | 


NUMBER AND VALUE OP FARM ASTMALS.-COyTINTTHK | 


Januaht 1. 


CATTLE, OTHER 


SSEiP. 


Swixa. 


fl/feim* 


Aiimftfr. 


riiiu*. 


JTumbfr. 


Value. 


Ji?um(«!r. 


VfMtUf. 


iStttt 


IL»|2.4ai 
li.18.^.386 

is,;iS3.600 

iB;^,!i]0 
10,413.300 
ltl^lH.\UO 

ll*,SJ3.3O0 
2O.9M7,7O0 

IS 

^4l.1fr5.343 
S3.31J,750 

^K 

au.tn9,«J4 

5&,B&4,19G 
J»,508.40S 


KM9.144,ee9 

3UH.an,4rii 

34«vlfifl,«0 

^:^^ 

soT.ios^ase 

34l,7tiUl5l 

3t33.6lil,a© 
4ti3.0ia),49P 
Hll.Wfl,109 

fillJ,=iO,S30 
sJ7.y;iM;Vt 


38.ftn,ei2 
a7,73i,2re 

3a,flt»,3U0 

ari7Ki,eoo 

35.935.300 

aa.wMjoo 

3n.74U,flU0 

iwa^yoo 

40,7^5,000 

43,ai6.ffl« 
4y,2a7^ 

B0,3G0,34S 
43,544,75& 

Iti 

3(5.91 B.fH;-J 

■a^,i]i,4,'i,H 


K8,4O7.80H 

^^ 

74.0e6H887 

anjaf,6e3 
ao.tws.ots 

lO4.0frD.7Kl 
106,6^ 4J64 

j07,9eO,BSO 

looies^jei 

lOe.397,447 

iitt,i2t,2eo 

8&,18t>lla 

W,eea.767 

' S5. 107,7^1 


i&t.ai7,'^ 
3b.;ii(i.47ti 

26.761,400 

2y.4ffr.'^ 

31,7yt:J«0 
;i2,tiW2,Q50 

38,077,100 
34.TIK,100 

44;m!2ou 

45,142;iS67 
44;346;625 
iStl,ti3,'i.l0t3 

44"l)B5,71G 
42,B4ajS9 
4ft.e0O.2W» 


l*(j, 18^766 
187,lHl,5tJg 

i3a.7;i3,S28 

i;©.739.015 

149.^.^ 
17fi.070,4S4 
171,0n,lft^ 
m«3!J.533 

111 

a20,9nj082 

lilts 

271}.3S4,SM 

ai}t,soi.as7 

lt^!5f7i77U 
174,3&1,40S 
170,109.74,1 


,810,112. 711 
l,eEJ}.ail,flS3 

I,446,4a3;0fi2 
^7U,Bn.66a 

SI 

2'4(A043^4Tfl 
2,flO7,O»,068 
2.41S;!7^0CQj 

i;727mOK4 
l.flJ^4l4.Hli 

l'.&m4L>7 




isre 

1S7H 


MB 

STil.,., 


}^-- " ■' 


im ,. 

1^:::::::::::::;;::::: 


ISWI 

IW 

esa ... . ..... 


l!lHl... .......... . 


m^,.,,,, 

IHS^ ,,..,. 

HWl .. 


HUT.., 

1S*'h...., ,, 

l!!(y7....x 


lase ,,,,,,......, 




lS?«^i ...... 


NUMBERS 


QV FAB 


M ANIMALS IN TT 


IK UNITED STATES -JAN. J, Ififfif. 1 


BTATllS ANU T 


iSBHlTOH 


lES, 


BOTifS. 


Mults. 


Milth 


Other 
cattie. 


^uep. 


Swin*. 


M*lDe..,,,.,.. 

Neir liampsli Ire . . ► , 

Vermont. .,.,...„ 

AfftSftocbustitts.. .. ,....,,.., 


li 
1 

IS 

151.S17 

yBi;353 
7ffija4 

7S1.B&1 




179,71>1 
2&.5U 

II 

25{i,961 
25t.075 

mm 


S 

m 

105,mO 
141,509 

^^ 

*2G0;^ 
833.301 
2I3,*tO 

a*i,iHi 

ti3«,433 

aii,53& 

'li 

B70.1S6 
2.163,564 


3*H,03a 








Rhode [Hl&nd . . . 




OonneotJoni .-*►,.-,, 

NewTo!(t , 

New Jerfier h , . . 

HpiiDByfcvunia , ,,...,....* <^,, ,_. , 

f Jeinware ,,*,,,.,.... . . — ^ , 

; .%laT^ Uml 

VirfTlnitt. ., . . . . 




51 

35,yss 

1U,S«& 
8:354 

IS 

U0,U04 

3rf5,880 

8,416 

Te>4io 


North 1-artjiinA...... 

j^aiuh CurullGa , 

Gp(.<rgla.-. 

KlurS da 














A lii buma .- 


S '^l 


MiiSiMftSppL 

TxiulfilaDa ►.,.., 






Te xaa, 

ArkHnsafi. 


2,613 617 
11B,733 
J8B,0e8 

fi97!fi4a 
3.780,471 

: 11 




TAIlJ3***l*f"(! . 1 


We^it Virgrinlft ..*......, 


Oli!o ...,^ 

MloblfTiiD. **^** 

Indiana ,.,...., 

HIIuqIm ,,...,... 


W] t^oon Bin ..* „ ^ ^* 


MlnnesQUi.. 

lima 












NebrasltH,... *.'^ ^. - 

South imKota 




«5a;384 

29Q.74i; 


: 


^^. 




mS? 



PRODUCTION OF PETROLEUM. 



65 



FARM - AN1MAL8.-CONTINUBI). 



States and Territories. 



North Dakota. 

Montana 

Wyoming . . . 

Colorado 

New Mexico.. 

Arisona 

Utah 

Nevada. 

Idaho 

Washington... 

Oregon 

Califomia 

Oklahoma 

Total 



Horses. 



175,137 
164,923 
72,258 
146.(S7 
83,»51 
fi0,414 



44,305 
128,077 
168,694 
185,844 
842,265 

42,649 



18,665,307 



Mvles. 



7,086 

924 

1,514 

8.667 

1,041 
1,S99 
1,384 
917 
1.441 
5.609 
62.915 
8,407 



2,134,218 



MiUh 
cows. 



171,078 
43.994 
18.140 
91,666 
19,317 
18.404 
57,787 
18,069 
31,500 
115,485 
116,561 
818.425 
37.014 



15.990,115 



Other 
cattle. 



252.640 
952.596 
694.978 
978.259 
701,967 
881,812 
803,116 
224,317 
381.066 
265,376 
573,646 
664,704 
257.505 



Sheep. 



369.721 
8.377.547 



1.655.551 
3.128.692 
1.014,287 
2.116.949 

576.994 
2.311.^ 

758.8124 
2.575,468 
2.175,545 



38,114.458 



Stuine. 



111.969 
42.265 
22.345 
20,713 
30,201 
23.286 
47.806 

]a44i 

75.718 
156.748 
216.430 
874,141 

i«3)l 



88,651,631 



ATERAGB value of farm animals in the united STATES 
ON JAN. 1-1880 TO 1899. 



Mules. 



MOch 
Cows. 



Other 
Cattle. 



SvHne. 



1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1885. 
1896 
1867. 
1888, 
1869 



JCH4.75 

iiS.44 
r.^.53 
:i.i.59 
^U64 
75.70 

:3.27 

7J.16 

71.89 

f*.84 

'rr.oo 

r.ii.Ol 
i\\J22 
47. 8i 

;ii.07 
:-i1.61 
M.26 
:^^.4Q 



tw.2-j 
7H.yt 

7it.2ti 
7LIJIH 

ilM 



23.16 

w:n 

27.4(1 
3^.09 
I»J15 

K.U 
21. U2 

%1h4{] 

ai.T5 
31,77 

2am 

!{7:4.'i 



iia.iD 

17iB 
19,80 
Sifll 

Sfl.63 
^,25 
21.17 
HJ.Tll 
17.79 
17.l£ 

14.79 

¥3.15 

15.24 
14.60 

30L33 
22.7» 



12.21 
2.39 
2.37 
2.53 
2.37 
2.14 
1.91 
2.01 
2.05 
2.13 
2.27 
2.60 
2.58 
2.66 
1.96 
1.58 
1.70 
1.82 
2.46 
2.75 



$4.28 
4.70 
5.97 
6.75 
5.57 
5.02 
4.26 
4.48 
4.96 
6.79 
4.72 
4.15 
4.60 
6.41 
5.98 
4.W 
4.35 
4.10 
4.30 
4.40 



PRODUCTIO H OF FETROLETJX. 

Prodnction of crude petroleum (and its equiyalent in refined illuminating oil) in Russia and 
the United States, 1881 to 1897. 



YEAR. 



18S2. 
1883. 
1884. 
1886. 
1886. 

im'. 

1888. 
1800. 
1881. 
1892. 
1883. 
1884. 
1886. 
1886. 



Crude Petroleum 
Produced. 



Rwsia. United States. 



U. S. gaUons. 

2W.riffl,000 

snM.v.^.h.ooo 
4.^i:^iL000 
6tiV:n 2.000 

fjLti>'i.iM100 
KJ.hHU,«JO 

|li|.T:AOOO 

l,(nm.:M.O0O 
l.l-^^;.?7'i,000 
1,-i ,000 



,000 
»000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 



17. S. gallons. 
1,101,017,000 
l,lt:i.T7:>.000 
l,ft^l,4.>ii<)00 

iHi.tMi.,a)o 

1.0J7.1T1.IJ0O 
fJi>5.LieE»000 

l,l87.90ej]00 

i.i^m,DOO 

1,476393.000 

i,tt^24.ri5u,uoo 
2.i^T<>,-.*j;[.ooo 

2,^'rl. 33^1.000. 
2,U^>.r-t5.',000 
2.1 ri'i. 470.000 

2,;-'--i.47<^ooo 
2.i>-.ii,;:;i.^,ooo 



equivalent in Refined 
Illuminating Oil. 



Russia. ^ 


U. 8. gaUons. 


7STlo000 


n. 


-i;iOOO 


U'.. 


ii'i-ooo 


ir 


^ 000 


21 


000 


2! 


000 


X 


000 


df 


000 


fir, 


000 


41 


000 


bi 


000 


u 


000 


(St 




» 


lOOO 


71 


lOUO 


8( 


000 


' ft 


JOOO 



United States. 



U.S.galUms. 

828,013.000 

871,328,000 

961,091,000 

738,664,000 

762,881,000 

688,552,000 

884,042,000 

890,930,000 

869.779,000 

1,107,651,000 

1.448,414,000 

1,710.198.000 

1.691.038.000 

1,624.999.000 

1.664.858,000 

1,666.107.000 

1,920,258.000 



NoTE.Mhie hundred gallons of American petiroleum produce about 75 gallons of refined 
Illuminating oil; lOOgallons of Russian petroleum about37}t^gaHon8of refined illuminating oil. 



r>c 



CHIC AGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR l&OO. 



THE yUBIjO BOmAUI. 
AR«:AB of TACANT. BKSEKVKD and API^ROFRLiTED LANDS. 



^TJ^TES ANI> 



iimi 



Ftfttrvid. 






Apprc^HriatM. 



Tom. 



Pi 



A]nltatda 

A.r3zona. , 

Arkansas . . , . . 
CallfuTiiia 

t'Eurldu... .,♦.,. 
Lilabo ....,.,... 
TudUn Ter., .. 
KiLnBu^ . .,.,. .. 
i^lliJ^tFlllii 

MinDusOta, . .. 

MiRB4^>uri 

MnattiinUi ...,., 

Nebraiska 

Neradfi, _,,,.. 
New A1i^x:IcOk„, 
North DiikuUk.. 

UTsh 

WlseoiiEilii 

Wyoming . 

Otiipr statflSn, 

TotivU 

Alas)ta 

Grand t^taL/ 






I.OU0.8Jlii. 






e^mm_i\Ji 



ftJ^a<iDlW 4] .57 



LtKI 
71.07 

Ji^.fll 



(ima72,aaa 21.12 
lyjjoi AW 



3.(E 

1.3^7 
nor 
1;: 
im 

fl7,.K; 
tja.7K 

:tl.4ft 
I.IT 



1,47-1 .Kir 5.1! 
Ji7J4W .24 



Prct4 AcTfjs. pTti. 

fl7,lW,tMj5 

:^,l3W<i.U10 

fla,fte.iya 

45.K^,LIS4 
I,77T,U5 



7tl,[i2"J .14 
3^l&0,«lS (i.7^ 

^AiTtrm ^,871 



aU,r^Jt.«V 23.1KJ ^.SUd,:£!2 



u5,451,EftJT 10,37 



ao.21 



2ft3ais 



fUlO,tfI...Jc()... 



4UJ47.eTJ 

ijj.fir&04ii m\M] 

2^23UHi7U - ~"^ 

10.7m.7a5 

33,1^1 .S^ B7.1(j 

lo.uieura t\M 

K*,W07,aB3 au.4j 

H,214^:^ " "^ 

4L3a&,5n 



11 . l;^J ^a 1^ 28 ,06 2%,'ST^M-i 67 . 6^ 



1.04 TVAAh'l' tm 

.01 - 



1,772hHW 41.71 



lijL)uil&;^ 



33. IB 

n.m 
m.m 
tft.iy 

5.01 



5.8H5^6fi 
2H.e44JK3G 

ai4ijtiMe 

3a.4H7.3afi 



7.73 
'3U.71 

LO-J 



^.9U5>71^ 

4;^;i/]0.1ffi» 
i:i.2-.'7.ftti 

3S.ilts.:fl^ 

i5.-ii<^7irj 

__ __^ 21,g7T.7ta 
57,4^ 10.6ai*.2i^J 

er.iii 3D,^f,tHi7 



4».t» 



7.ai v.rm% 

10.93 9i,»S[i»3 

^14. U6 ^XM.SOO 

lW^t5,0«J 

ti2.3T 2a,afft.l83 

^.31» ^Sl-I^QUU 

79.3ft ftl,dMl.MO 

^8,71 2!*,C^WIIJ 

^MM 4i,'nMJ^tllJU 

i2.S4 y6.5ioe,73U _ 

7.^.39 4UaH7,33a 2M 

4.3H 70^331 J^SUO 3,7t> 

10.5a miM7,U05 4,li 

47.39 44.^,oe; -Am 

K'tM a*.7ri3,*5H3 LBO 

^32. «a iiu«ai,2ijj 3.^ 






yjlD,157 

»i.4£«.848 

2aLM19^ ,0i 57H,7yi,lHU 09.1l6ibS790e4^.S9| 30.47 
7:&jf7lftn063y 3:.8oiuS09a2.532 
3U9.5adOllclOO.tJUJ "■ ~ 



\J1 

3.83 

L77 

l.gti 
2;7S 
1.U3 

2.ra 
a.n; 

l.StJ 



24,353,2i!3 50. 3C 4&,lgaaS^ ^.6S 



42.«f ^jmmi ?.25 
07 .7u flfi.2Ta,oao Left 



02.15^ lflOOOJ95«>UOO.OO 



^^lMJ22Tit7V6«JI 



a Inciludinfii I'uresT. reepr^tis wtr.ti drawn frcra entry Bloiie .fulj' 1, litiiH. if Land oti^r Qf Ohlo^ 
IniitmiiA. i]Unoi» an<1 Iowa, fonnerly puLilJe-laiid &tal&^. as^^en In tbeQenerulLandOmcG 
reports, 117sUJ^E.t3L'U ULureti^ land aren oi ef^jhteen eastern fttateSt the District of Coiutiil>la and 
Teiaa, ajccordlng to I be eleventh cen&us»J*U,ll0.40tJacTf.'a, c Nearly, d An?a unknowD^ e In- 
cluding leaned latidft. / Ej^cI uaW© of Puerto Kico^ Guahi and the Philippine ialandfl. a Total 
area d lipoid of br thif natlunal b'<>i'iii'iiiu6m, ?i{i,t)^JiO a^reB» Lucludlng 3,550 acreAlu Alaak&. 
h KxCluatre of oailjlaK terrliurlea. 

PCTBLIC LANDS PIT FOR PRODUCTIVE USES. 



Far mort!> Important thaa tlif: exact aroa 
of the public? domain legally opi^n to settle- 
meat Is Ihe quei^ikm liio^' innpli of tbli* 
public land 1ft aflniilly lit for evil tl vat Ion 
or for other prtirtucilve uiH.*w. Having regard 
to pres^^Dt eoEidltlona^ It inutt be admitted 
that all the heat parts of t tip public dODi^m 
bDT4^ b-coa appro^jvLateEl, and that cumpani' 
tlvftly Terj little twd agricultural land 
n.' ma ins on^n to netlleiutut; thi^ mineral 
Tftlue of tnat whSfh rE^tiiAlna may ht; very 
gTi^atr hut eTon of the mlnriral deiKiHitB It 
may be sulci that the infjat ai-cesBlble and 
iDoat i-anlly trorkod fimon;^ tbem ha ire proba- 
bly hii!en ajipropriared. Looking Into tho fti- 
tare, tbf question ht't^ouu^Fi uiuch morp dfth- 
cult, for no one can tell: (^t<^u approilmateJy 
how mnch or tho land ijinv lylotf waste naay 
be ultlEoately redalmwi lo productive uaea. 
The one tblrgr needed, so far as eatiferns 
the grpater part of \h\': hja^S'ThOtit) acrea of 
vacant public land In the United WtFite* 
proper, inr lading nearly' fill weat of tlie 
nloety-eli^liub or one biindrtidth meridian, 
is Ein adequate Hupply of wDtpr, and tbia 
applies to much of the mlaeral land as 
wflli OS to ibol which It l8 desire c! to 
reel aim for a.fflcultural purposaa. Vast 
iractrt of arid land In the western United 
rotates eantalta, lu an uu^uniial decree all the 



elemedta of fertility eicopt water, and with 
the aid of in-igatlon could be made to yield 
luore Qtiundantly than even tbe beat land 
of the humid re^lDue. It bail beea said tbat 
"flagebrusb Is unerrinjf evldODce of klDdly 
sidl and abundant aunsbioe.^^ 

IrliHtlrnateEt of the auionnt of thu land 
which can be [rrlefated with tbe water Ht 
I'uuimand vary greatly, hut there Is noae 
for the arid rE^glon as a vrboJe more autboii- 
tative than those of Maj. J. W. FowelL 
ftjrmerly director of tha United Statjfrs 
E^eolOiicleal Harvey, and Mr, F. B. Newell^ 
chief bydrcijjfapher of that survey. MnJ. 
Few I?]] eat! mated that at If^aat IGOnCtHH square 
TnlleB^ or 3S.0W),tHX» acreB^ could by efoaora- 
Ically reclaluiE'd by Irrigation within the 
pteaont peuf ration; or, as be said beforn a 
eonjjri?HHlonfll en mm it tee lo ISSO, that about 
HKitOflfl,QO(i aert-M could be recJalmea by the 
utni^Eitlon of perennial Etrertma olone^ Mr. 
Newell places the Irrlsrablit qmonnt at 
7i,0CH},ont) acres, <vr about 7.6 ppr cent of the 
total art?fi of the aixtetin western public- 
laud states and terrl tori aft. This la a vtry 
conservative estlmata, in which financial as 
well as enETlneerlni^ con;;] derations are taken 
into acc^Tnat, and It looks not to tb^ remuta 
future, but on If to whst Is likely to he 
pnmtflble and therefore practlenble within 



THB PUBLIC 1X)MA1N. 67 




a generation. Fntore improyements in irri. creasing popalation, may in the course of 
gation engineering and methods and dlscov- time make ft profitable to irrigate a much 
eries of new underground water suppUes, larger area, but any attempt to stote the 
together with the increasing demand for ultimate extent of irrigation would be only 
agricultural products resulting from an In- conjecture. 

C3:^S8IFICATION OF LANDS RBSBRVBD FROM SBTTLEMENT IN THB UNITED 

STATES PROPER. 




States and Tesbi- 

TORIES. 


Indian 

Ttservu- 

tiona. 


Fcyrest 
reserves. 


National 
parks. 


Jteser' 

voir 
sites. 


Military 
reserva- 
tions. 


Other 

reserved 

land. 


Total. 




Alabama. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


Acres. 


101.412 
864X17 


^?Sa) 


^^Sio 

19.762^ 

T9,840 
5,415,346 

1,474,834 




Arizona 


15,150,757 


4,496,00U 


^ 

(n,]80,240 


""^. 




Arkansas 


im'sm 




CMiftYrviH, 


1.K 


87571,794* 
8.103,360 




Ck>lorado 




Florida..:....:::::::::: 






Idaho 


-S 


4,008,900 


«88.400 


1,561 




Indian Territory 

Kansas 

Louisiana 












158 


79074 
8,417,796 












Mictiigan 


1^^ 










Minn^ota 




















M ssonri 










1,000 




1,000 
12:008,087 




Montana 


9,882.400 
6,918,715 

J:M 


5,010,000 


ell8,400 


88,201 






Nebraska 






Nevada 








5,029,274 
8,746,504 




New Mexico 


2,768;686 




25,179 


150,240 




North Dakota 






Oklahoma. 








ilSS 

i:046 


—ms®- 




i.6^440 








Sontb Dakota 






» 




Utah 




139.712 




Wash Ington 


*"i207:886" 




Wlsconsm 








Wyoming. 


8,241,760 


el,897,000 




1,250,425 




Other states 






Total 


88a»6.Tm 


45,885,554 


3,388,792 


240,951 


829,854 


24374,890 


156.769,743 




a. InolndlDs a. resRirailCm partly In Mlselflalppt. 

tCfefiftamdiieriiin. 

« Hot Syrliiffs rtatT^-fltionK 

it Sequoia, 1 ostinLtt? iintl f:Ji'd(?ra1 Grunt national parka. 

eFtiTtof tW Tellow&i^ne naitODul jmrk 

/ Area Accordlnp to th^ coiriml.*fii[onei- or Indian uttiilriiH 10,fl3S,.'i'ia acres. 

tf Moual Ranker nation b I park. <?rtBt<?n bj act of Ma rob 2, IMi. 

h N«w YorlfH North Cfltolfiira and Iowei. 

i Connociicui. Be In ware. District of ColTinabia, GcorRlu., IUIdoIk, Indiana, Iowa. Kentucky, 
Mfttne, Mar^lAfid, M ftBsacliijapttSt New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina. 
Ohio, PfennsjlTaola. Rhode iBland, Sooth Carolina, Tenneaaee, Teite and Virginia. 

CHARACTER OF THB VACANT PUBLIC LANDS IN FIFTEEN WESTERN STATES 
AND TERRITORIES. 




States and Tebbitobies. 


Woodland 
and forest. 


OraMng 
land. 


Desert. 


Total. 




Ariwna 


Acres. 

S 


Acres. 


Acres. 

15,UUO,000 

19.000,000 


Acres. 

TiMooo 




California 




Colorado 




Idaho 






Montana 






Nebraska 






Nerada 


« 


20.000.000 




New Mexico 




North Dakota 












qJ^q^ 


19,200,000 






Sof^m Dakota 






Utah 


m 


10,000,000 




II Wniih'f iifft>nn 




■ Wyoming 


5.000,000 




|l Total 


124.800,000 


866.400,000 


69,000.000 


658.700.000 





68 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALBiANAO FOE 1900. 


[From Poor's Railroad Manoal.] 
Number of miles of railroad in operation in each state and territory of the United States dar- 
ing the years ended Deo. 31, named in the heading. 


STiriKS Avm Groups 

OF bTATBB. 


1880. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


1895. 


1807. 


1896. 


. New England. 
Maine 


1^ 

9K 
6,982 


1^ 

1,006.64 
6340.57 


2,m« 

1,006.54 
636038 


. 6,914,69 


7,019.36 


97439 
7324.65 


1,764.77 
2,12039 
7,265i!2 


1307.98 

1,008.15 
7380.72 


New Hampshire 

Vermont 


Massachusetts. 


Rhode Island 


Connecticut '.. 


Total 


, MiddU Atlantic. 
New York 


5^ 
«'^ 
1,010 
15,181 


7,746.86 
2,062.8 
8,700.58 

20,114.89 


8,919.9f 
20,4273! 


8.116.10 

314.94 

1389.44 

2036 

21,10230 


8.110.51 
2.176.10 
9,485.66 
315.44 
1300.80 
^.66 
21350.07 


9.66134 
21,704.78 


8341.16 

1316!0i 

2238 

22,128.64 


8,162.64 
2343.02 

22.084.43 


New Jersey 


Pennsylvania 


Delaware 


Maryland ) 

District of Columbia. 1 
Total 


Central Northern. 
Ohio 


26,100 


7,987.99 
7,106.15 

Si 

86.944.93 


6,136.26 
10.180.88 

5,786.61 
87,46631 


83S138 

6,927!67 
88.362.46 


8.668.74 
38,77o!40 


89,39832 


8,766.79 
7,828.1 

m 

40,112,14 


M 

40,429.74 


Michigan 


Indiana. . . . .' 


Illinois 


Wisconsin 


Total 


South Atlantic. 
Virginia 


8,474 


111 

17308.12 


8,678.64 
1,547.11 

4370!25 
236637 
18,25439 


8.576.69 
1,806.19 
8,22937 

4,946.89 
19.78132 


IE 

19312.68 


2,076.16 

5!2io!w 

8,069.05 
19,967.68 


Hi 

Is 

20,496.75 


8,674.58 
20,746.11 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 


South Carolina. 


Georgia 


Fiorma.:.::::::::..:.::: 


Total 


£^&'''^:X^!^: 


li 

1,127 

652 

6,906 


2,946.88 
2,798.9 

1,749!96 
18,388.36 


13,866^6 


Ifl 

14,072.71 


8,051.25 
8,001.43 

1,90234 
14,222.68 


8,064.46 
14,442.13 


2,274.19 
14,918.98 


m 

15.27237 


Tennessee 


Alabama 


Mississippi 


Louisiana 


Total 


Soutnweatem. 
Missouri 


8,966 

280 
14,066 


1,388.77 
1,260.66 
82,905.95 


1,272.08 
33324.17^ 


6360L66 

Si 

1,376.02 
83,861.90 


9,184.61 

»1 

1,439.60 
1,379.14 
84366.96 


6,571.58 
9!434!]2 

l!506.'0S 

1,152.5C 

431.17 

84,»2.04 


1302.0i 

484.97 

85.533.88 


6,810.65 

e04!97 
86,179.20 


Arkansas 


Texas 


Kansas 


Colorado 


New Mexico 


Indian Territory ) 

Oklahoma ) 

Total 


Northwegtem. 
Iowa 


6,400 
3,151 
1,953 

1,226 

612 

106 

12,347 

'•Si 

289 

1 


5,407.47 

2,610.41 
1,002.93 
2,195.58 
27,249.37 


8,436.61 

2322.77 

l!048.'71 
2.29032 
27300.10 


8,506.00 

m 

2,70739 
28,745.49 


liiwii 

2,721.63 
29,210.94 


8,523.1S 

2;684;71 
2,800.80 
1,177.98 
2,82835 
29.405.06 


8,518.91 
6,176.76 
5,538.7 

29!719.60 


2;971.06 
80,113.90 


Minnesota 


Nebraska 


North Dakota ) 


South Dakota S 


Wyoming 


Montana 


Total 


Pacific- 
California 


4336.45 

946.11 
12.020.22 
166,817.41 


4,484.63 
1,07937 


4.623.65 

Sfs 

423.23 
1.1M.97 

]3!382.68 
175.223.44 


4.692.39 

*il 

l!d69!08 

1,089.99 

18,60137 

177.753.86 


4,76735 

i;067.7S 
18,911.66 
181.061.42 


IS 

14,432.74 
184.603.19 


uWvg 


Oregon 


Wasnington 


Nevada 


Arizona 


Utah 


idafc:.:::. :.:.... .::.::: 


Total 


United States 



STATISTICS OF RAILWAYS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



STATISTICS 07 BAILWATS 07 TEE VHITEB STATES. 
For the year ended June 80, 180B. 



The following is a synopsis of the elev- 
enth statistical report of the United States 
interstate-commerce commission for 1898, 
and from the summaries in their reports the 
figures below are taken: 

MILEAGE. 
On Jane 30, 1898, the total single-track 
railway mileage in the United States was 
186,896.32 miles, there being an increase in 
this mileage daring the year of 1.967.85 
miles. The states of Arkansas, California, 
Loaisiana, Missoarl, New York and Wis- 
consin show an increase in excess of 100 
miles. The aggregate length of railway 
ntileage. inclading all tracks, on the date 
given was 247,532.52 miles, the increase 
being shown as 4.088.11 miles. This aggre- 
gate mileage was distributed as follows: 
Single track, 186,396.32 miles; second track, 
11,293.25 miles; third track, 1,009.65 miles; 
fourth track, 793.57 miles; yard track and 
sidings, 48,039.73 miles. The length of the 
single track operated mileage covered by 
railway reports filed with the commission 
was 184,648.26 miles, which indicates that 
the mileage of the country is covered by 
reports in a substantially complete manner. 

CLASSIFICATION OF RAILWAYS. 

The number of railway corporations on 
June 80, 1898, Included in the * 'statistics of 
railways in the United States," was 2,047. 
Of this number, 1,049 maintained operating 
accounts, 836 being classed as independent 
operating roads and 213 as subsidiary oper- 
ating roads. Of roads operated under lease 
or some other form of agreement^ 317 re- 
ceived a fixed money rental, 172 a contin- 
gent money rental and 275 were operated 
under some form of contract or control not 
capable of description in a single phrase. 

The operated mileage covered by mergers, 
reorganizations and consolidations during 
the -year under review was 7,220.42 miles. 
The corresponding figure for the previous 
year was 14,834.34 mUes. 

EQUIPMENT. 
On June 30, 1898, there were 36,234 locomo- 
tives in the service of the railways. This 
number is larger by 248 than the previous 
year. Of the total number of locomotives 
reported. 9,956 are classed as passenger 
locomotives, 20.627 as freight locomotives 
and 5,234 as switching locomotives, a small 
number being unclassed. The total number 
of cars of all classes reported as in the 
service of railways on the date named 
was 1,826,174. being an increase of 28,694 as 
compared with June 30, 1897. Of the total 
number, 33,696 were assigned to the pas- 
senger service and 1,248,826 to the freight 
service, 43,753 being assigned to the service 
of the railways themselves. The number of 
cars owned by private companies and in- 

fividuals that a^e used by railways in 
ransportation is not covered by reports 
filed with the commission. 

An inspection of the summaries which are 
designed to show the density of equipment 
and the efficiency of Its employment shows 
that during the year ended June 30, 1898, 
the railways in the United States used 
twenty locomotives and 718 cars per 100 
miles of line. Referring to the country at 
large, it appears that 50,328 passengers were 
carried and 1,343,906 passenger-miles were 



accomplli^ed per passenger locomotive, and 
42,614 tons of freight were carried and 
6,530,498 ton-miles accomplished per freight 
locomotive. All of these items show an 
increase as compared with those of the 
previous year, ended June 80, 1897. 

Including under the term equipment both 
locomotives and cars, it te noted that the 
total equipment of railways on June 30, 1898, 
was 1,362,408. Of this number 641.262 were 
fitted with train brakes, the increase being 
113,976, and 909,574 were fitted witb auto- 
matic couplers, the increase in this case 
being 230.849. The summaries indicate that 
practically all of the locomotives and cars 
assigned to the passenger service are fitted 
with train brakes, and that out of a total 
of 9,956 locomotives assigned to this service 
5,105 are fitted with automatic couplers, and 
32,697 cars out of a total of 33,695 cars in 
the same service are also so fitted. A cor- 
responding statement for freight equipment 
is as follows: Out of a total of 20,627 loco- 
motives assigned to the freight service 
19,414 are fitted with train brakes and 6,229 
with automatic couplers, but out of a total 
of 1,248,826 cars * assigned to the freight 
service only 567,409 are fitted with train 
brakes and 851,533 with automatic couplers. 
The number of switching locomotives fitted 
with train b/akes was 8,877, and the number 
fitted with automatic couplers was 1,199. 
Of the total number of cars of all classes 
in service on June 30, 1898. 607,786 were 
fitted with train brakes, the increase during 
the year being 115,227, and 896,813 were 
fitted with automatic couplers, the increase 
in this case being 227,876. 

NUMBER OF EMPLOYES. 
The number of persons employed by the 
railways of the United States, as reported 
on June 30, 1898, was 874,558, which is 
equivalent to 474 employes per 100 miles of 
line. As compared with the numl>er of em- 

f»loyes for the previous year, there was an 
ncrease of 51,082. The number of employes 
on June 30, 1898, was 956 in excess of the 
number on June 30, 1893, and 89,524 in exceso 
of the number on June 30, 1895. The em 
ployes of railways, as reported to the com- 
mission, are divided into eighteen classes. 
It thus appears that on June 30, 1898, there 
were In the employ of the railways 37,939 
enginemen, 38,925 firemen, 26,876 conductors 
and 66,968 other trainmen. There were 
47,124 switchmen, flagmen and watchmen. A 
distribution of employes conforming to the 
four general subdivisions of operating ex- 
penses shows that the services of 32.431 
employes were required for general admin- 
istration, or eighteen per 100 miles of line; 
261,866 for maintenance of way and struc- 
tures, or 142 per 100 miles of line; 171,600 
for maintenance of equipment, or ninety- 
three per 100 miles of line, and 398,987 for 
conducting- transportation, or 216 per 100 
miles of line. This statement does not in- 
clude 9,754 unclassified employes. 

The report contains a comparative state- 
ment of the average daily -compensation of 
the different classes of employes for the 
seven years 1892 to 1898. There Is also 
given in the report a summary which shows 
the total amount of compensation reported 
as paid to the railway employes of the 
country during the four fiscal years ended 
June 30, 1895 to 1^8. This summary shows 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



that tbe aggregate amount of wages and 
salaries paid during the year ended Jane 
30. 1898, to more than 99 per cent of the 
persona on the pay rolls of railways vas 
1496,065,618, the Increase, as compared with 



the preceding year, being |29,464,0S7. This 
amount of compensation represents 60.62 per 
cent of tbe total operating expenses of 
railways and 39.69 per cent of their total 
gross earnings, or |2,681 per mile of line. 
CAPITALIZATION AND VALUATION OF 
RAILWAY PROPERTY. 

The amount of railway capltAl Dutstand- 
ing on June 30. 1898, not inrJijJitsi; current 
liabilities in the term, was no. an, £54, 031. 
This amount, assigned to a mJleagif bar^is. 
represents a capital of f60,3^? per mWe of 
line. The amount of capital w^totj existed 
in the form of stocks was is,!!;*^!^^?.^:;!. of 
which S4, 269, 271, 714 was connmon stock and 
11,118,996,607 was preferred ntotiU. The 
amount which ezistea in th? foroa of ftitifled 
debt was $6,430,285,710, comprLplng moT^Knge 
bonds, 14,640,762,632; miscoilJiPf'UDi ol>IVi:;a- 
tions, M86,977,279; income bftudji, f2&M: i 38, 
and equipment trust obligatlutit^, l^u,:. LI. 
The amount of capital stocK rriT^n^ d^ rl- 
dends was $3,570,155,239, or ' ' of 

the total amount outstandliig. j...^, .^<u.»nt 
of funded debt, excluding cQUipment trust 
obligations which paid no interest, was 
1852,402.622. 

Of tne stock-paying dividends, 6.63 per 
cent of the total amount outstanding paid 
from 1 to 4 per cent; 7.15 per cent paid from 
4 to 5 per cent; 7.60 per cent paid from 

6 to 6 per cent; 3.69 per cent paid from 6 to 

7 per cent, and 4.54 per cent paid from 
7 to 8 per cent. The amount of dividends 
declared during the year ended June 80, 
1898, was 196,152,889, which would be pro- 
duced by an average rate of 5.29 per cent on 
stock on which some dividend was declared. 
The amount of mortgage bonds paying do 
interest was f526,124,l88, or 11.84 per cent; 
of miscellaneous obligations, 1146,116,874, or 
30.01 per cent; of income bonds, |180,161,660. 
or 68.71 per cent. The amount of current 
liabilities outstanding at the close of the 
year named was 1540,013,995, or $8,012 per 
mile of line. 

PUBLIC SERVICE OF RAILWAYS. 

The aggregate number of passengers car- 
ried dnring the year ended June 80, 1898, as 
returned in the annual reports of railways, 
was 601,066,681. indicating an increase, as 
compared with the year ended June 80, 
1897, of 11,621,483. The number of passen- 
gers carried one mile dnring the year was 
13,379,930,004, there being an increase of 
1,122,990.357 as compared with the year pre- 
vious. The increased density of passenger 
traffic is shown by the fact that in 1898 the 
number of passengers carried one mile per 
mile of line was 72,462, as compared with 
66,874 for the previous year. The corre- 
sponding figure for 1893, however, was 83,809. 
The number of tons of freight carried dur- 
ing the year was 879,006,307, there being an 
increase of 137,300,361. The number of tons 
of freight carried one mile was 114,077,576,- 
305, which, compared with the previous 
year, shows the large increase of 18,938,- 
554,080. The number of tons of freight car- 
ried one mile per mile of line was 617,810, 
which is 98.731 greater than the correspond* 
Ing item for the year preceding. 

EARNINGS AND EXPENSES. 

The gross earnings of the railways of the 
United States, covering an operated mile- 



age of 184,648.26 miles, were |1^7,S26,621 
for the year ended Jupe 30, 1888, being 
greater by $126,236,848 than the oorrespond- 
Ing item for the fiscal year preceding. The 
operating expenses donng tne same period 
were $817,978,276, being an increase of 

165,41** fll? a« r'«T^n«— f4 THf»« ♦»»f» Tonf 1?97. 
Tlv :■' -■ - ■■ ■! ■;■■;-- v. -r-- ■ ^i ■ n ' c--^ fr-ni 
opn'J'StiQQ for Lht* iisciiJ year unilcr rpDsld- 
erntloD were: fasaenifer revenue, |266.i}70.- 
49ff; lupreas^ ns comriiirefl wltb tbe previouB 
year. |15,S34,F.S3. MulJ, |S4, 60^,352; lucreaae. 
$86^S^cf, Kiiir<J6B. *25.90a.0T3: Inpi-pasc. 
$l,M7^0Llfl^ Other I'arnlD^s frotEi passenj^l- 
ser^lce. 57.:^i>[»00, Freight revenup. Ifiifi*- 
727,7lSf; Increase, |103,97S,40B. Oth^r earnings 
fraiu freight atrvh-eT M, 683,205; Jncrea^ge. 
$473rM3K Orbpr enroJuga froin operation, to- 
clijiJlng A few' uaelawilttefi Itpm^^i ^l^tmjv^. 
Tbo op 1' rat lug expeti^ii f^^r tbe ytar w^rc 
ast^lfnpd El A fnUnwo; Malntc'naBce of n'&S 
aoc] ntrurturoit, HT^i^I'liS^iR; iDcre^Fe as com* 

G\rM w3<h the jirpccain^ yeapt V13,S«0,&5&. 
HlL(t?niinct- of eqiilpiQjenl. fl43.6^4»M2; tn- 
cr. lie, |I^.Sfi2,&01, CundactLiig traoBporta- 
ti( !, f4€4.€74.27&^ lnrrcane, l^2,U^,ni. Ijen-* 
er I (?3:p(?nR(:^8, i^^Jl^.&fi^; defrtase^ f4,5E@. 
Thi. prosa earutopii av^rngert |fl,T55 ptjr mi it 
of ILoe iiuil orif.TnlJdg t^ipcnsei $f43r) per 
mlie of line^ Thpap ararjimts nTPt r*>apRi;- 
tively, ^S33 and ^24 greater than tiie coiTe- 
sponding figures for 1897. The report con- 
tains a further analysis of the operating 
expenses of railways in the United States 
for the years 1896 to 1898, in accordance 
with the fifty-three accounts embraced in 
the prescribed classification of these ex- 
penses. 

The income from operation— that Is, the 
amount of gross earnings remaining after 
the deduction of operating expenses, and 
commonly termed net earnings— was $429,- 
852,845. This amount is $69,787,836 greater 
than it was for the preceding year, ended 
June 80, 1897. The amount of income from 
other sources was $138,202,779. The following 
items are embraced in this amount: Income 
from lease of road, $96,471,678; dividends on 
stocks owned, $15,614,638; interest on bonds 
owned, $10,529,343, and miscellaneous In- 
come, $16,587,120. The total income of the 
railways, 9567,666,124— that is, the income 
from operation and income from other 
sources— is the item from which fixed 
charges and other analogous items are to be 
deducted before reaching the amount avail- 
able for dividends. Taking from this 
amount the total deductions from income, 
1427,236,703. leaves |140,319,421 as the net in. 
come for the year available for dividends or 
surplus. 

The total amount of dividends declared 
dnring the year, including |87,976, other 

fayments from net incomei was |96,240,864. 
t therefore appears that the surolus from 
the operations of the year was S44,078,567. 
An analvsis of the total deductions from 
income, $427,235,703, mentioned above, shows 
that they were composed of the following 
items: Salaries and maintenance of organi- 
zation, 1443,825; interest accrued on funded 
debt, $246,126,691; interest on interest-bear- 
ing current liabilities, $7,073,963; rents paid 
for lease of road, |92,891,008; taxes, |48,- 
828,224; permanent improvements charged to 
income account, |6,847,905, and other deduc* 
tions, $30,524,597. 

The railway companies make annual re- 
ports to the commission of two kinds. These 
are designated, respectively, as operating 
reports and financial reports. The former 



FAILUBBS AND ▲OQBBGATB LIABILITIBS. 



61 



are filed by sach companies as maintain 
full operating accoants, and the latter by 
sach companies as have leased their prop- 
erty to others for operation, their own in- 
come, aside from Inyestments, being the 
annual fixed or contingent rental paid by 
their lessees. It follows that certain items 
of income and expenditure most be dupli- 
cated in comprehensiTe statements like the 
foregoing, which are compiled from railway 
reports of both classes. These conditions 
seem folly explained by the statistician, 
who inserts also in his report a statement 
which constitutes an income account of the 
railways of the United States as it they 
were represented by a single, simply organ- 
ized corporation, the duplication of items of 
income and expenditure due to intercor- 
porate contractual relations being elimi- 
nated therefrom. 

RAILWAY ACCIDENTS. 

The total number of casualties to persons 
on acconnt of railway accidents during the 
year ended June 30, 1898, was 47,741. The 
aggr^ate number of persons killed as a re- 
Bult of railway accidents during the year 
was 6,869, and the number injured was 40,882. 
Of railway employes, 1.958 were killed and 
31,761 were injured during the year covered 
by this report. With respect to the three 
general classes of employes, these casualties 
were divided as follows: Trainmen, 1,141 
killed. 15,645 injured; switchmen, flagmen 
and watchmen, 242 killed, 2,677 injured; 
other employes, -575 killed, 13,489 injured. 
The casualties to employes resulting from 
coupling and uncoupling cars were: Persons 
killed, 279; injured, 6,988. The correspond- 
ing figures for the preceding year were: 
Killed, 214; injured, 6,283. 

The casualties from coupling and un- 
coupling cars are assigned as follows: 
Triunmen, killed, 182, injured, 6,290; switch- 
men^ flagmen and watchmen, killed, 90, in- 
lured, 1,486; other employes, killed, 7, in- 
jured, 212. The casualties resulting from 
falling from trains and engines are assigned 
as foUows: Trainmen, killed, 366, injured, 
2,979; switchmen, flagmen and watchmen, 
killed, 60, injuried, 369; other employes, 
killed, 67, injured, 621. The casualties to 
the same three groups of employes caused 
by collisions and derailments were as fol- 
lows: Trainmen, killed, 262, injured, 1,367; 
switchmen, flagmen and watchmen, killed, 
13, injured, 69; other employes, killed, 88, 
Injured, 367. 



The number of passengers killed during 
the year was 221 and the number injuria 
was 2,946. Corresponding flgures for the 

Jtrevious year were 222 killed and 2,796 in- 
urM. In consequence of eollisions and de- 
railments 72 passengers were killed and 
1,134 passengers were injured during the 
year embraced by this report. The total 
number of persons other than employes and 
passengers killed was 4,680; injured, 6,176. 
These flgures include casualties to persons 
classed as trespassers, of whom 4,0& wei^ 
killed and 4,749 were injured. The sum- 
maries containing the ratio of casualties 
show that one out of every 447 employes 
was killed and oite out of evenr twenty- 
eight employes was injured, with refer- 
ence to trainmen— including in the term 
enginemen, firemen, conductors and other 
trainmen— it is shown that one was killed 
for every 160 employed and one was injured 
for every eleven employed. One passenger 
was killed for every 2,267,270 carried and 
one injured for every 170,141 carried. Uatioe 
based upon the number of miles traveled, 
however, show that 60,542,670 passenger- 
miles were accomplished for each passenger 
killed and 4,643,270 passenger-miles accotai- 
plished for each passenger injured. 

CONCLUSION. 

In the conclusion of his report the statis- 
tician repeats bis previous recommenda- 
tions to the efTect that reports should be 
secured from express companies engaged in 
interstate trafllc; that reports should be 
seeured from corporations and companies 
owning rolling stock which is used in inter- 
state traffic, and also social reports from 
corporations and companies owning depot 
property, stockyards, elevators and the 
like; and that reports should be secured 
from carriers by water, so far as their 
business is interstate traffic. 

It is further stated that nothing has 
occurred in the administration of the 
statistical division of the commission to 
weaken the confidence expressed in former 
reports in the proposal that there should 
be established under the Jurisdiction of the 
commission a bureau of statistics and ac- 
counts, which shall have as its chief pur- 
pose the establishment of a uniform system 
of accounts for the carriers, and that it 
would be desirable also, should the commis- 
sion see fit, to provide for a monthly report 
of the earnings and expenses of operating 
railways. 



FAXLUBES AND AGORgOATS LIABILITIES-1879-1899. 
[From Dun's Review, New York.] 



CAIiSN- 

DAB 
YBAB8. 



1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1888. 
1884. 
1885. 
1888. 



No. of 
fan- 
wrea. 



No. of 
eoneema. 



702,157 
746,828 
781,6tJ9 
822,266 
868,963 
901,760 

9i9,seo 

960,841 

904.281 

1,046,662 

1,061,140 



Perct. 

of failr 
urea. 



.96 

.68 

.71 

.83 

1.06 

1.21 

1.16 

1.01 

.90 

1.08 

1.04 



LinhO- 
Uies. 



98,149,068 
65,768,000 
81,166,962 
101^3^^546 
172,8r4,173 

114,644,119 
107,660,944 
138330.978 
148,784,887 



CALEN- 
DAR 

Years. 



1890. 
1891. 
1898. 
1863. 
1894. 
1896. 
1896. 
1897. 
1806. 
1800*. 



No. of 
faih 
urea. 



10,907 
12,373 
10,344 
15.242 
18,886 
18,197 
16.088 
18,861 
12.186 
4,868 



No. of 
coticema. 



Perct. 
of fail- 
urea. 



1,110,590 
1,143,951 
1,172,705 
1,198,113 
1,114,174 
1,309,283 
1,151,679 
1,058,521 
1,006,880 



1.07 
.88 
1.28 
1.26 
1.09 
1.31 
1.26 
1.10 



IddbO' 
Uiea. 




*Flrst six months. 



«a 



ailCAOO DAILY NFAViS AIJJANAC FOR 190u. 



KSAMCIAX AKD OOMMEROIAX 6TATI3TIC8 OF THZ mriTEB flTAfia, 
Upon a per <?iipi!a basLs 137U-9d. 



YPAn. 



\m.,. 

WHO.., 
1883,,. 



\m,. 



June I. 



ji.ijrr.oou 

■ifia-T,unj 

&T,4M.D0U 



Ui-i V E n S >i K M P' 1 X A N r i: < For Capl ttt [ ■ 









UH.7;i 
18.56 

115, 4« 



21 .IE 






Bl W 



84 . 

Ml. 21 „ 
31.75 VS 

^M a* 

32.*'. n. 



m 

-.-,-1 

1.41 



^,411 K.™ 



33.82 
.41 
.4« 

.97 



J. .HI 



J7 2.31 

Jvi 2, -JO 

.M 2. til 

,W l.W 

.tti 1.71 



1.6« 



20 .97 

,50 M 



,T1 



ri ,65 

32 ,47 
S2 ^ 



.34 
.44 

.51 



I, 

n 

i+on 
§01 

tJ.5ti 

e,fi2 

(1.07 

6.(« 
(1(15 
7.(31 

7.m 

7. iff 
6.2? 

6.7tl 

fl.Ol 
6.44 
fi.}4 

6.77 

4,4g 
4,TB 



IK 03 

8.S4 
(5,97 
7.(J7 
0.25 

B,tt7 
fi.2l 

4.98: 

&.M 

bM 

iM 
4.9L 

4.^ 
4-ftl 
4.1fi 
447 

4.Ki 
4.3ii 
4,Tfi 
fi.&Ti 
6.29 
(3.37 
B.48 
S.ll 
4.£»£ 



.»4 
.74 
.7U 

.68 

.(5H 
.(]2 

.(39 
1.14 

M 
l.(JS 

i.ia 

1,04 
1J7 
l.US 
1,27 

1.45 
1,71 
IM 
2.m 

2.07 

l.'Al 
1.9^1 

i.uS 



Uou> Ajii> BiLVKa, 



^? 



W,B5.P 
,m 
.&7.fi 

.eii.4 
■sn 

.H7.2 
.Kt,5 
,!M.T 
.@D4 

l.til) 

l.UD 

LOU 

],II0 

LOU 

1,00 

LOU 

LOO 

LOO 

IM 

1:S 

LOD 

LCJO 
1.0) 
LUO 

LUO 
LllsJ 

),mj 
1 ou 



^1 

ill 



l.^>.&7 

in.a7 

1« 17 
16. 5t) 

I7.tifl 

la.ofi 

18. IR 
1,^,1^ 
la.lH 
1^,57 
KAl 
20.7a 
21.13 
aLBM 
^3.10 
19. 7e 
aO,S3 

2K,T2 
36.49 

:t2,56 

aLBC 

30. 3S 
34, SS 




11.328 

L33ii 
1,32; 
1.208 
L278 
1.246 
LI56 
l.SOl 

Lisa 

1.123 
Ll4.'j 
L13H 

I Am 

Lll(^ 
Lli:) 

i.m 
.97^ 

.9@f« 

.9E^5 

LD46 

.908 

,871 

.im 

.fl35 
.CM 

.f«4 



,a7,i* 

Mil 
.84.* 
.79*S 

.m^ 

,724 
.66 

,4U-1 

.4(}S 
.46^ 



COLNAUE 
PEli 

Capita 

OF— 



Piioitrc- 

TTtJN PEP 

CAflTA 

OF— 



Vi 



TSTEBN'l 



I* 



Itsjl 






ULTUTOKtif 
KE VENUE. 



1^ 



Aiferu^ ad 
rate. of tin ty 



sl 



5=^ 



im. 

l»7i. 

i»7a, 

1S74. 
1876. 

i.s7e - 

iH7.i, 
LsiiJ . 

* l.^^ . 
I SSI .. 

• i.<sa . 

liK\ . 

. Hf4l . 

|.H.S.i . 



IH 



J ^.^4 . 
3801. 

im. 
\m 

1^97, 

lase. 



10. ()0 
.64 

La? 

.75 
1,0s 

,E«J 
L0:1 

,MJ 
J 24 
Lfti 
l.'^C 

.41 

-4y 

.^] 
,£2 

.li6 

:^ 

.«* 
1.17 

,m 

L(B 



10.04 

.OH 
.W3 
.10 
.16 

.&! 

,so 

M 
.66 
.£4 

■ M 

.61 

M 
.60 
.67 



,19 

.KH 
,0ft, 



t*) 



*1.30 
Lll 
.(^ 
.95 
.7B 
.7i! 
.88 
LOi; 
LOci 
,?0 
*71! 
.6tj 
.(33 
.5fi 
,6fi 
.67 
,61 

.bii 

,66 

.53 

.50t 
h64 
.&1 
'.5ti 
Si 
.44 



«).41 

,58 
.71 

M 

.72 

.96 
,8^ 

*78 
.84 
M 

,87 
.S* 
.9U 

,91 
,99 
1,06 
1.L4 
1,18 
L15 
LKI 
L14 
L14 
l.Ol 
,9G 



«a.(}ei ri.6i 

M 2,49 
.3i 1.97 



1,6H 
2.1a 



88 L2i 



.63 
.42 

1.85 

2.16 

,81 



.71 
,34 

,94 

_ .Ml 
6| 1.22 

.76 

671 i,ae 
.01 

.76 
Lfi8 

.83 
1.70 
L^ 
2.24 
LS7 
J, 63 



1.06 
,99 
.47 
.M 
,67 

L07 
.67 

1.24 



3,il2 

2.7S 
2.39 
Fl,53 
2.53 
2.5G 
2.32 
2,32 
2.47 
2.6^ 
2.T9 
2.ffil 
2,21 
2hOO 

2.{ja 
2oe 
2. or 

2.k4 
2.2a 
2.:!8 
6.35 
241 
^,16 
2.0G 

3.01 

3,^ 



>». fie 1=11.0(1 

6.30 12.(55 

4.3i> 13..!^ 

4.i^ 15.U1 

4.40 ia.26 

3.8£^ ILfi? 

3.:^ m.29 

2.99 9.49 

iM 9.21 

3.10 \i.'J& 

2,S& 12. 6L 

3,20 12, a* 

2.80 i;S.64 

3.0H 13.0G 

8,47 12,10 

3.42 10.3:3 

ij.tti 10. &I 

3.22 116a 

2.9(i llM 

2.SB ViM 

2.0s 12.^ 

2,75 1S,3S 

2.53 12-44 

3.rj7 12.(M 

2,5fl 9,32 

2.(JS 1U.4H 

2.4Q lo.oe 

2.4fl 1[),84 

2,17 7. 96 



*t.9t^H7. 

5.23 4L 

4,44 38. 

3.76 38. 

3.61 40. 
3.2^ 44. 

2.77 42- 
2.(j"7 42, 
2.7*^ 44, 
AM 4M 
S.7S 43, 
4.12 42 
3.^ 42, 
3.47 41, 
a.lt 45, 
3.80 45, 
3.fl5 47. 
3.W 4a, 
3.eO 45, 

3.62 44, 
3.3<.1 4ti. 
a.Cfi 48, 
2.5f7 49. 

1.90 m 

2,14 41, 

2.20 «0, 

2.43 4'i, 
1,^40. 



UJiJ42.Sl 

95 it8.94 

85 37.00 

07 26.i« 

£3 SS6,88 

e£ 38.20 

74 30.19 
SQ 2t>.i;fl 

75 K.l^ 
.81 B&.P7 

48 ^,m 

.20 2».75 

« ao.ii 

.45 fS»M 
61 1^.41 

.bi so.m 

M 31.02 
.69 ».«) 

.US aa.s] 

41 29.12 
38 25,25 
.71 21.36 
66 ^.49 

06 au.^ 

76 20.33 
IB a>.B7 
41 21.J« 
20(24.71 



3.18 
3,K1 

a.:(i 

4.49 
4.47 

4.s;j 

4.M 
4 47 

3.^ 
hM 

2.m 

3,07 
3,44 
3.6ti 
^i.r 
li.J6 

3.14 
2. Si 

3.r 

,S.7i 

6.15 

4.43 
4.S2 
4.1^] 
4.78 



J 



FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL. 



FINANCIAL AND COMMBRCIAL STATISTICS OF THE U. S.-Contixued. 



Year. 



BXPOBTS. 



Domestic Per cent of domestic 
merchandise, products exported. 



Consumption per Capita. 



if 




1870.... 
1871... 
1872..., 
1873.... 
1874.... 
ISTSi.... 
1878.... 
1877.... 
1878.... 
1879.... 



1883.... 
1884^.. 
1885:... 
1886.... 
1887..., 
1888.... 
1889.... 
1890.... 
1891.... 
1892.... 
1893».. 
18M.... 
1895.... 
1896.... 
1897.... 



9.77 
10.88 
10.56 
12. la 
13.81 
11.86 
11.64 
12.72 
14.80 
14.29 
16.4S 
17.28 
13.97 
14.96 
18.20 
12.94 
11.60 
U.96 
11.40 
11.90 
13.50 
13.68 
15.58 
12.44 
12.78 
11.87 
12.11 
14.17 
16.271 



Perct. 
78.40 
70.74 
74.13 
76. IC 
79.87 
76.96 
71.67 
72.68 
77.07 
78.12 
88.25 
82.63 
76.31 
77.0U 
78.96 
72.96 
72.82 
74.4(] 
78.23 
72.87 
74.61 
78.69 
78.69 
74.06 
72.28 
69.78 
66.02 
66.28 
70.541 



72.39 
07.44 
65.47 
70.08 
70.69 
70.75 
68.97 
71.28 
67.74 
65.78 
68.47 
67.23 
67.20 
67.56 
68.96 
61.68 
68.71 
65.83 
69.38 
68.16 
67.36 
66.13 
65.9G 
71.20 
60.83 
66.00 
70.59 
67.82 



.24 

8.6( 
8.68 
8.8( 
3.51 
8.8f 
6.6f 
6.41 
6.88 
6.48 
6.46 
8.71 
2.58 
2.99 
2.96 
8.86 
2.4S 
1.74 
8.67 
4.85 
2.16 
3.72 
2.89 
4.11 
2.8e 
8.78 
7.83 
11.14 



76.14 
78.96 
71.x 
86. 7« 
73.a 
68.18 
66.77 
97.02 
72.67 
71.47 
61.17 
43.22 
66.85 
47.22 
62.35 
67.24 
76.0r 
60.13 
W.77 
63.30 
53.09 
48.80 
37.86 
46.10 
53.26 
60.76 
48.84 
65.06 
47.0UI 



Lbs. 
12.82 
14.1( 
11. 1( 
16.19 
13.6C 
11. 9C 
14.77 
14.08 
13.71 
15.90 
18.94 
19.64 
16.15 
20.80 
16.30 
16.16 
19.Gfi 
16.84 
19.50 
17.22 
18.50 
22.02 
24.08 
17.0r 
16.91 
22.48 
18.40 
18.46 
26.26 



Bu. 
5.41 
4.69 
4.79 
4.81 
4.4( 
6.» 
4.81 
6.01 
6.72 
6.56 
6.35 
6.00 
4.96 
6.64 
6.64 
6.77 
4.57 
6.17 
6.62 
6.34 
6.06 
4.58 
6.91 
4.85 
3.41 
4.64 
4.78 
8.88 
4.21 



Bu. 
22.62 
27.4( 
21. OG 
22.86 
2U.96 
18.66 
28.14 
26.18 
26.37 
26.61 
28.88 
81.64 
21.96 
29.24 
2r.4C 
81.04 
82.60 
27.68 
23.80 
81.28 
82.00 
22.78 
80.38 
23.60 
22.70 
16.96 
14.78 
28.91 
22.78 



Lbs. 
83.( 
86.S 
40.4 
89.E 
41.5 
43.1 

88.9 

40.7 
42.! 
44.2 
48.4 

61.: 
sa.i 

61.E 
66.( 
62.7 
66.' 
51.1 
62.e 
66.1 
68.6 
68.4 
66.(] 
62.0 
61.0 
64.5 
81.1 



Lbs. 
6.00 
7.91 
7.28 
6.87 
6.50 
7.06 
7.33 
6.94 
624 
7.42 
8.78 
8.25 
8.30 
8.91 
9.26 
9.60 
9.30 
8.5S 
681 
9.10 
7.88 
7.96 
9.61 
8.24 
8.01 
9.22 
8.04 
9.95 

11.45 



Lbs. 
l.ld 

1.14 1.62 

1.46 1.68 

1.58 1.68 

1.27 1.61 

1.44 1.50 

1.35 1.38 

1.23 1.28 

1.^ 1.06 

" 1.11 



(^.rosT 



1.21 
1.39 
1.54 
1.47 
1.30 
1.06 
1.18 
1.87 
1.40 
1.- 
1.! 
l.i 
1.26 
1.87 
1.82 
1.84 
1.88 
1.31 
1.56 
.91 



1.27 

1 "^ 
1.40 
1.40 
1.48 
1.20 
1.20 
1.21 
1.20 
1.8S 
1.40 
1.42 
1.60 
1.51 
1.38 
'-.12 
1.00 
1.01 
1.10 



6.1Q 

6.C^ 

7.21^ 

7.f 

6.1 

6.81 

6.51 



10.0 

10.2-., 

10.74^ 

lO.f 

11.1 

11.21 

VS.i 

12.7! 

13.f 

16.2 

15. 1( 

16. f 

15.18^ 

14.9r 

16.16^ 

14. t 

16.( 



.40 
.41 
.46 
.48 
.45 
.46 
.47 
.47 
.50 
.66 
.47 
.49 
.48 
.37 
.39 
.45 
.55 
.61 
.66 
.46 
.46 
.44 
.48 
.31 



Yrab. 



Consumption 
OF Raw Wool. 



a 



POSTOFnCS 

Department. 



Public 
Schools. 




1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1876 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1861 
1882 
1888 
1884 
188& 
1886 
1867 
1888 
1889 
1890 
lfi»l 
189B. 
1866 
1804 
3896 
1896 
1887 



Lbs. 




6.43 


82.7 


6.78 


29.4 


6.75 


45.3 


6.67 


33.2 




17.6 


6.28 


22.1 


6.21 


18.8 


6.16 


16.3 


6.28 


16.9 


6.0B 


14.2 


6.11 


34.9 


6.66 


17.3 


6.86 


19.0 


6.62 




6.86 


20.6 


6.69 






28.9 


6.68 


27.4 


6.81 


28.9 


6.88 


31.8 


6.0B 


27.0 


6.48 


80.8 


6.72 


83.1 


7.06 


86.7 


6.08 


14.2 




46.1 


6.88 


45.9 


8.86 


67.8 


6.84 


48.06 



Percent 
+ 2.41 



--6.82 
--2.23 
- ■ 1.10 
-11.88 

- .86 

- .70 
-1.02 
-2.43 

- .26 
+ 2.66 
+ 1.67 
+ .84 

- .12 
-8.16 

- .60 
-h2.10 

- - 2.74 
--2.71 
--6.88 

- - 1.71 

- - 1.26 

r?:iS 

+ 1.47 
4-1.8B 

- .40 



Per cent. 
35.6 
31.0 
ay. 3 
tJ6.4 
27.3 
26.3 

27.; 

17.1 
1^.5 
15 J 

le.u 

17.3 

i6.a 
]d.& 
li.a 

14.0 

14.3 

ia.9 

12> 
12.3 

I3*a 

zzi 
11. a 

B.08 



ia.->i 

,51 
M 

.m 

.Iti 

.ffir 
.m 

.72 
.BU 
.H5 
.T» 
,7fl 
.77 
M 
M 
.9S 
.97 

i.ue 

1.14 
IJO 
I.IQ 
M6 
1.11 



.m 
.m 
.m 

.76 
.7B 
.74 
,73 

.n 

,73 
.77 
.77 
.§1 

.m 
.ay 

.91 

l.Ul 
l.U 
L14 
l.W 
1.30 
}M 

i.icr 

1.K3 

l,iVt 



MUlions. 
12.1 
12.8 
12.6 
12.8 
13.1 
13.4 
13.7 
14.0 
14.4 
14.7 
15.1 
16.4 
16.7 
16.0 
16.4 
16.7 
17.1 
17.4 
17.8 
18.2 
18.5 
18.8 
19.2 
19.6 
20.1 
20.4 
20.9 
21.1 
(♦) 



5.(10 
5.1» 

G.n 

i^M 

6.t.T 

o.n 
6.r]T 

B.05 

6.2y 

t: 111 
b.uo 
6.65 
6.96 
7.28 
7.60 
7.85 
8.12 
8.31 
8.49 
8.60 
8.84 
8.98 
(*) 



48.28 
82.24 
88.89 
42.53 
28.00 
19.70 
14.83 
11.67 
11.12 
14.02 
35.45 
67.71 
66.92 
60.44 
42.58 
.31.96 
26.61 
88.a 
42.26 
84.06 
84.16 
41.41 
48.63 
86.84 
21.70. 
21.19 
22.78 
14.09 
14.49 



*No<lata. 



ei CHtCAdO DAILY N£VVS AL^JANAC FOB IWO. 


EE0EIPT8 AKD EXl^EKBlTimES OF THE GOY^S^S^mEKI-im-m. 
REVEXCE BT FISCAL TEARg. 


Teah 


Giulontt. 




tasL 


SalfM o/ 


niiCEUJjrzocs Eonmji^ 




Extf*9 of 

overordir 
7m ru pi> 

pt:-HAi%tUf-£S 


ioana and 

SUltJI of 

O'tiil (Of 11, 


■other mis- 
Ceiianeimt 


m... 

ma. . , 

Ib73... 
874... 

977... 

S7a... 

1; 

885::; 

IffiH. , , 

If©*... 


*i7fi.ii7,an 

19U,G4l3.4ir7 

21ti.3TO,?S7 

157.167,732 
jai.860,4S*a 

J37,250,W8 

189^U66 
55«.lfif*,t57e 
220.4 ](},7ao 

2l4,7[MMy7 
J*5,l*f7,4ttU 

ai,47].a3S 

iD2:ftifi:w23 

!?l7,^8e,P^ 

2^'e3?:743 
229.1)68, 5j^ 
■iiy.ft33.20& 
I77.4S2,^»M 
3TO;i55,[in 
laUBlfl.MI 

iS2a:iS,aL7 

160,tEJ.7ai 
7dJi^J3fl 
14fl.S75,OC2 
206.13t(.14a 


Mi.rt5K,«51 
1430»6,]&4 

;c.(S4LM7a 
iKTCwirji 

118,(30.408 
110.aHl,Q35 
ll3.fiCl,Fn 
I24,0t9,m 
135,264 .a«i 
*8.4?r,5t6 
l+4,7Sy,!W» 

I2r,s»^ir73 

1 16,80^.936 

nfl,a2a.3a] 

lS*,2»t^72 

M.HHl.SU 
42,«]&.TQ5 

ifn;o27,Va4 

147.111,233 
4;i.4ai,fi73 

4i^.7(la,&4 
14ti.tifW,T:4 

l7<t,'JUf.B4I 


|4.2QU.:!;m 

680,ia5 
■"■"^15,255 


1,;JJW,715 
4,000.344 

2,576.714 

:.4ia.&i0 

lJ:?A4e7 

1.07U.743 

iG4,:61 

4,763,I4C 

olsiulToe 


F-l7,7?fT,;3at 
ia,7Q5,4<» 

0;412!^ 

3.B7a,2M 

1. 505,048 
110 


|15,0El7,a22 
17,74S.4)m 

17-075]04S 
1S,431,SL6 
17,456,776 

III 
lii 

24,'0ll,O&^ 

2ao6e.fi2a 

26,00&,8I5 

III 

ie:ton:S8 

34>l«.73a 


411,266,478 
5a»,3S3,«6 

333J38.a06 

287.482.0Se 

25T!7fi3,S7fl 
273,827,164 

a;-i^,52e^,ei 
^lso,7^.^^9 

3!>8,S87;fia 
34S,5lS,3:i 

2w!m,oi» 
f^i6,9eo:tiao 


iis3,tj9i3a5 




u,7m 




31 
1,617 

mV^Mi 

32.803 

i.&6e 






&:6;)u:t)0B 






iLiwe^on 
a.U3a,e^2 
o.3ri8.m 

3,182.000 

],ff7a,ea7 

iii&;p 

i,24;i:i2y 

l.e7l^.'246 
























2:^&r.mi\..... 




• JCx p e n (1 Itureg \n^x ceJ?a of rtiv enti &. 1 
BXPENDLTUEES BY rJStCAL TEARH. | 


Year 


cmL A^U MliKI'UAJfllOUa 


ment. 


Navy 
depart- 


Indian?, 




(fii public 

atbt. 




_ 
iaixm, pur- 
fctmdjf. etc. 

7,001, IM 

1,805.074 


other clv^il 


18«7.., 

leaa,.. 


«51 ,110,224 

60,9ft*,7S7 
7:iS2fl,]10 

mMutm 
n.07o,7«a 

6*5.956,574 

5.'i 177,704 
65,74 .m 
&IJia,630 
64^4 6,335 
57,Klft,l6l 

6a,f;7ti,0Ha 
7idm.m 

fi5,2e4.B!36 
7^,^.JW1 

W},Oy.0fi4 
S],40Et.^i^ 

no.04fe.ie7 

9y.H49H9eS 

lii;^,7ii2,7yG 
i(H,Ek;i,73tJ 

y3,'279J3U 
t7,3lti,£31 
(10,101 .S«T 


tll5.2a4,4Hj 
]^3.34f^tV^S^ 

H6.LirJ,167 

^^3^s.l3e 

*2,?!S,effT 
4].1S(l,(H^i 
8a.O7O,Sa0i 

4i}.46tt,4Ul 
43,670,494 

39,429.aB 
43,y70,678 
84,334463 

*4,Baf,838 

48,T%,uas 

4^895,4K 

siifliaiwo 

32y,S4l,264 


|3UL»04,{lll 
21.240,810 

2i!407;oas 

ill 

|s;388;4S7 

m 

2a,7sn.7ya 

27,147,732 
iM,66l,We 


7.4W,aJf7 

iif 

m 

M 
1 


141,063.164 
147.452,aa8 
1^891/J29 


1143.781^ 
ll-,a57.H«l 

ill 

i(iilfiOo;g7& 

106.^,ftiB 

y6,7L'l7,r>76 
8:,*.50ti,tJl 

M 

4i;ooi:43* 

37;a47:i35 
S7,7ai!llO 


1 








, Bra'.:: 
il?::: 

Iji^... 




1,0G1,349 




Hg5. „ 




396... 




ll?... 




Buj;:: 


ij!,5r7a,fi42 

ia.40I,S3] 


ISSH 




hks 




i8ua... 




I8ff7... 




11^... 




W9... 


:::::;:::::;, 



AMEBICAN TBUST8. 



65 



AXEBICAH TRUSTS. 



Monopolies, trusts, syndicates, or by 
whatever other name organizations formed 
for the purpose of controlling the output 
of manufactured products, for regulating 
prices or for adjusting wages, may be 
known, are not peculiar to either the pres- 
ent age or to our own country. 

In the sixteenth centurr the people of 
England complained of the extortions of 
the monopolies which had been granted by 
the crown and the whole system was at- 
tacked In parliament In 1597. No restrain- 
ing law was passed, because of the personal 
solicitation of the queen, but In 1601 par- 
liament took up the subject and a Hat of 
the most objectionable monopolies was read 
in the house of commons. One member 
of that body caused a sensation at the time 
by asking, *'Is not bread among the num- 
ber?" 

In 1628 the so-called statute of monopolies 
was passed, which proylded that all monop- 
olies should be illegal, except such as 
might be granted by parliament, the only 
exceptions oeing the control of new manu- 
factures and Inyentlons. For a time this 
law put an end to the formation of monop- 
olies which have now become so common 
in nearly every clyllized country on the 
globe. In England, despite the industrial 
energy of the country and its extensive 
commerce, the trust system has not made 
the advance it has in some other countries 
in Europe or in America. A recent writer 
In explaining this apparent anomaly says 
that "this is doubtless due in some degree 
to the thorough application of the princi- 
ple of free trade, for it is well known that 
the largest trusts are powerless unless their 
Interests are secured by a protective tariff 
excluding from home markets the products 
of foreign countries." 

Technical journals in Qermany credited 
the empire with 180 trusts, or private mo- 
nopolies, in 1897, and the number has con- 
siderably Increased since then. In such 
industries as brick, stone, plaster of parls, 
glue, mortar and the like there are over 
forty trusts, of which a recent writer says: 
"Of these trusts— in the widest sense of 
the word— it may be said that by hindering 
unlimited underbidding they have proved 
an actual blessing to the trades concerned, 
without becoming a menace to the public 
welfare." The same writer says: "The 
activity and extension of trusts in Ger- 
many has not yet led to serious apprehen- 



sions or open hatred on the part of large 
portions of the population as now appears 
to exist in the United States. Although 
aiming primarily at the establishment of 
better prices, German trusts cannot be ac- 
cused of the exploitation of the public at 
large or of the working classes. As re- 
gards the establishment of prices, also, the 
trusts have hitherto displayed a wise mod- 
eration." 

In Austria-Hungary there have been 
fewer trusts organized, chiefly because op- 
posed to them there is a strong and pro- 
nounced public senliment. As a rule tney 
have been censured because of their atti- 
tude regarding the subject of wages. 

Perhaps in no country in Europe has the 
trust system assumed the proportions it 
has acquired in France. The iron trade, 
the chemical industries, the bottle-glass, 
sugar reflnlng, zinc and many other im- 
portant lines of Industry are controlled by 
trusts and have been so for many years. 

In Belgium and Denmark there are large 
Interests in international trusts. In Bussia, 
while the courts do not recognize the for- 
mation of trusts as legal, strong Industrial 
organizations control many of the commodi- 
ties. Iron, brandy, sugar, petroleum and a 
vast number of other products are in the 
hands of monopolies which oppress the 
people. Not only is no resistance ofTered 
them by the government, but "many of 
them have been organized under the protec 
tion and with the assistance of the govern- 
ment." 

In the United States trusts are of com- 
paratively recent origin, but the rapidity 
with which they have, of late years, been 
formed indicates the popularity of a system 
that is centuries old in Europe. The fol- 
lowing table, giving a list of the principal 
trusts in this country, has been prepared 
with care from several reliable sources of 
information and is as nearly complete as 
it has been possible to make it. Many 
small combinations, of a local character, 
have been purposely omitted. That it is 
free from all errors is not claimed, for 
authentic Information Is in many instances 
impossible to reach. It is believed to be 
the largest and most reliable list of Amer- 
ican trusts yet published. The (*) Indi- 
cates that the amount of capital stock Is 
estimated, no authentic flgures being at- 
tainable. Credit is given to the Investor, 
American Monthly, Beview of Bevlews, 
Chicago Securities and other publications: 
Common Preferred 
Name of trust. stock. stock. 

A. Booth ft Co. (fish and oysters) $3,000,000 $2,500,000 

Acker Process company '.« 8,000,000 

Acker Process Patent company 2,000,000 

Amalgamated Copper company *75,000,000 

American Actuation company of New York city (manufacturers of 

power-regulating machinery) 5,000,000 ..' 

American Agricultural Chemical company (twenty-three fertilizer 

plants) m.,./. 20,000,000 20,000,000 

American Air Power company (controls Hoadley patents on air mo- 
tors for cars) 7,000,000 

American Alkali company 24,000,000 

American Automatic Weighing Machine company (three companies). 775,000 
American Beet Sugar company (four factories, 7,600 acres of land- 
west of Missouri) 15,000,000 

American Bicycle company (100 plants— 75 per cent all in country)... 20,000,000 

American Birch company (to control New York market) 4,000,000 

American Brass company, Waterbury, Oonn 20,000,000 

American Brick company 7,600,000 



6,000,000 
775,000 

4,000,000 
10,000,000 
6,000,000 



7,500,000 



M^^^^^&aaM^aMi 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Common Preferred 

Name of trtut. stock. stock. 
American Bridge company (to control 75 per cent of brldge-bulldlng 

trade) :. * $30,000,000 $20,000,000 

American Car and Foundry company (eight leading car manufactur- 
ing companies, Inclading Michigan Peninsular Car comftauy) 30,000,000 30,000,000 

A.merlcan Car Supply company (manufacturers railroad supplies).... 50,000,000 

American Caramel company 1,000,000 500,000 

American Cereal company 3,400,000 

American Chicle company (forming with chewing gum plants) 6,000,000 3,000,000 

Anaconda Copper Mining company 80,000,000 

American Cotton Oil company (123 properties) 20,327,100 10,189,600 

American Edible Nut company 5,000,000 

American Electric Heating company 10,000,000 

American Felt company 2,500,000 2,500.000 

American Fisheries company (Menhd. oil, 15-18 companies) 8,000,000 2,000,000 

American Gas and Electric Lighting Fixture company (forming with 

fourteen plants) 9,000,000 6,000,000 

American (Winning company 5,000,000 

American Glass company (window glass dealers) 1,200,000 

American Glucose Sugar Refining company 3,000,000 

American Glue company 1,400,000 

American Grass Twine company 15,000,000 

American Hard Rubber company (three companies) ♦2,500, OQO 

American Hat company 15,000,000 10,000,000 

American-Hawaiian Steam Navigation company 750,000 

American Hay company (100 firms) •5,000,000 

American Hide and Leather company (proposed combination of upper 

leather tanneries) 30,000,000 30,000,000 

American Honduras company of Augusta, Me •lO.OOO.OOO 

American Ice company (Maine ice companies and artificial ice) 30,000,000 30,000,000 

American Incandescent Light company 2,000,000 

American Indies company (gas, electric, etc., in new colonies) 13,000,000 5,000,000 

American Iron and Steel Manufacturing company (nut and bolt 

combine— total capital, $30,000,000), to be issued now 12,000,000 3,000,000 

American Lamp Chimney company (one-third total supply in United 

States) 600,000 250,000 

American Last company (combination of manufacturers of lasts).... 2,000,000 1,500,000 
American Linseed OH company (eighty-two plants), reorganization 

and consolidation 16,750,000 16,750,000 

American Lithograph company 3,000,000 3,500,000 

American Machine (sewing) company ♦lO.OOO.OOO 

American Malting company (thirty companies) 15,000,000 15,000,000 

American Mica company 3,500,000 

American Pastry and Manufacturing company 2,000,C00 1,000,000 

American Pipe and Foundry company (five iron pipe companies) ♦10,000,000 

American Plow company (seventeen manufacturers, Chicago) 65,000,000 

American Pneumatic company (pneumatic companies, Boston) 10,000,000 5,000,000 

American Power and Transportation company 12,500,000 

American Radiator company (incorporated to combine boiler, ra- 
diator and heating apparatus manufacturing) 5,000,000 5,000,000 

American Railways company ♦25,000,000 

American Railway Equipment company ♦9,730,000 7,730,000 

American Saddle company (manufacture of bicycle saddles) 1,000,000 800,000 

American Sardine company (embracing all companies outside Chi- 
cago syndicate, or about 25 per cent) ♦3,000,000 

American Sardine Trust (embracing 75 per cent of factories— Chicago 

syndicate) 

American School Furniture company 10,000,000 

American Sewer Pipe company (proposed to include forty-eight com- 
panies) 12,600,000 12,500,000 

American Shear company 1,000,000 

American Shipbuilding company 15,000,000 15,000,000 

American Shot and Lead company 3,000,000 

American Silk Manufacturing company ♦60,000,000 60,000,000 

American Silk Ribbon company ♦50,000,000 

American Spirits Manufacturing company (whisky, 18 districts) 27,000,000 27,000,000 

American Steel and Wire company (fifteen to .twenty companies) ... . 40,000,000 60,000,000 

American Steel Hoop company 19,000,000 14,000,000 

American Stoneware company (forming— twenty-five potteries east of 

Mississippi river) 2,500,000 

American Strawboard (nineteen plants) 6,000,000 

American Sugar Refining company 36,96S,000 

American Switch company 5,500,000 

American Thread company (thirteen companies) 5,000,000 

American Tin Plate company (281 mills) 20,000,000 

American Tobacco company (plug) 33,500,000 

American Warp Drawing Machine company 2,300,000 




AMERICAN TRUSTS. 67 



Common Preferred 

Name of trust. stock. stock. 

American Window Glass company (forming— to control 80 to 90 per 

cent of all) •$15,000,000 $15,000,000 

Associate Wine Dealers (agreement with California corporation) 5,000,000 

American Wood Working Machinery company (fourteen firms) 2,000,000 2,000,00(> 

American Woolen company (combination worsted manufacturers) 30,000,0^ 20,000,000 

American Writing Paper company (twenty-seven mills— 76 per cent 

of the fine writing paper output) 12,500,000 12,600,000 

American Zinc company (all leading manufactories) 5,000,000 

American Smelting and Refining company 32,500,0i)0 32,500,000 

American Enameled Paper company^. 5,000,000 

American Vinegar company 7,000.000 4,000,000 

Arizona United Copper Mining company 10,000,000 

Arizona Water company (several land, improvement and canal com- 
panies) 1,500,000 

Asphalt Company of America 30,000,000 

Association of Boat par Manufacturers of the United States (agree- 
ment on prices) 500,000 

Atlantic Brass company 1,000,000 

Atlantic Clay company 2,0o0,t00 1,000.000 

Atlantic Snuff company (all but two big companies) 2,000,000 8,000, OOu 

Atlas Cement (Increase capital) 6,000,000 

Automobile Machine and Screw company (forming— nine screw 

manufacturers in United States) 6,000,000 4,000,000 

Automobile Trust *3,000,000 

Autotruck Combine (forming— to control exclusive rights under 

Hoadley-K night patents in Europe and America) 200.000,000 

Autotruck Electric company (to acquire patents and work the same). 1,000,000 

Baltimore Brick Concerns » 4,Ov)0,OuO 



Baltimore Electric Ught company (three electric light companies 
of Baltimore) 5,000,000 

Banana Trust (combine southern importers) 

Banana Trust (forming to compete with United Fruit company) 

Barrelmakers' Combine 

Bessemer Ore association (lake mines) ♦20,000,000 

Bethlehem Steel company 15,000,000 

Billiard Table Trust 

Bituminous Coal Trust (proposed— to consolidate bituminous coal 
interests about Pittsburg) 30,000,000 30,000,000 

Blast Furnace Combine (five Pennsylvania concerns— forming) •25,000,000 

Boiler Manufacturers' Trust 

Bolt and Nut (several associations — carriage, stove, tire, etc.) •10,000,000 

Borax Consolidated Limited International Consolidation— United 
States and foreign countries 3,000.000 5,000,000 

Borden Condensed Milk company 20.000,000 

Boston and Seven Devils Copper company 5,000,000 

Boston Breweries company 4,000,000 

Boston Coal, Dock atid Warehouse company ("J. P. Morgan's Coal 
Combine") 

Boston Drug Jobbers' Trust 

Boxmakers' Combine (of California and Oregon) ♦1,000,000 

Brass Foundry and Machine company (iron, steel and brass castings) 6,000,000 

Bread and Cake Combine ^250,000 

Breweries Trust 

Brewers' Combine (Conn.) (now forming) 2,500,000 

Brewers' Combine (Mass.) (now forming) 2,500,000 

Brewers* Combine (western— to control Omaha plants) 

Brooklyn Wharf and Warehouse company 5,000,000 

Broom Manufacturers' Association of United States (regulates 
prices) •10,000,000 

Broom Twine (selling combine) 500,000 

Buffalo Gas company (all gas interests of Buffalo) 7,000,000 2,000,000 

California Fruit Growers' association (formed to fight refrigerator 
car combine 

California Fruit Packers' association (twenty-six canneries) 2,500,000 

California Raisin Growers' association (2,000 growers and sixty 
packers; controls 95 per cent of the crop) 5,000,000 

California Wine Makers' Corporation 10.000,000 

Cambria Steel company (plants in five counties in Pennsylvania) 16,000,000 

Candy Manufacturers *75. 000,000 

Canned Goods Trust (proposed) 20,000,000 

Canning Machinery Pool 

Carnegie Steel company (forming— Includes fifteen Carnegie & Frlck 
iron, steel and coke companies) 100,000,000 250.000,000 

Carpet Manufactui "rs' Combine (proposed) 

Casket Trust (consolidation proposed of casket manufacturing Inter- 
ests) 25,000,000 



CHICAGO DAILY NBWS ALMANAC FOR 1000. 



Comntpn Preferred 



Name of trtMt. stock. 

Cast Iron Pipe Trust (six companlet-^ftgreement).... *|15,000,000 

Cedar Shingles Manufactorers' association (WasUngton state, limits 

prodQCt) •5,000,000 

Cement Combine (proposed) 12,000,000 

Central Coal and Coke Company of Ohio (selling agency) 500,000 

Central Blectric railway of Kansas City (consolidation of present 

companies) 500,000 

Central Foundry company (soil pipe combine) 7,000,000 ^7,000,000 

(jentral Hudson Steamboat company (nine Hudson river boats) 1,000,000 

Central Lumber Company of California *70,000,000 

Central Mattress BVinufactnrers' association (thirty-one western 

manufacturers) *2,000,000 

(Central New York Brewing company (consolidation of nine leading 

breweries of Syracuse. N. Y.) 2,200,000 1.800,000 

Central Union Qas company. 6,000,000 9,000,000 

Central Union Telephone company (consolidation of Bell telephone !■ 

Indiana. Illinois and Ohio, except certain cities) 6,605,300 

Chain Trust (proposed) •12,600,000 ♦12,600,000 

Chair Trust (proposed) 

Chamber Furniture Manufacturers' association (fifty manufacturers 

of sideboards, etc., fixed prices) •lO.OOO.OOO 



Champagne Trust (proposed) 25,000,000 25,000,000 

Charleston (S. C.) Consolidated Railway, Gas and Electric com- 
pany 1,500,000 

Chemical company (pharmaceutical manufacturers) *50,000,000 

Chicago and Northwestern Granaries company (177 country eleyators 

and two warehouses, five breweries and malt houses) 3,125,000 

Chicago Breweries, Limited 2,000,000 

Chicago City Railway company 14,000,000 

Chicago Consolidated Traction company (eight suburban companies) 14,400,000 

Chicago Edison company (absorbed four companies) 4,975,900 

Chicago Laundry company (three-fourths of the laundries of Chicago) ♦7,000,000 

Chicago Milk company (to control milk output in vicinity of Chicago) 3,000,000 3,000,000 

Chicago Packing and Provision company (two plants) 1,000,000 1. 000,000 

Chicago Railway Terminal Elevator company (five elevators) 1,402,920 1,330,850 

Chicago Sash, Door and Blind company (thirty-five Chicago com- 
panies) 3,500,000 2,500,000 

Chicago Telephone company 4,336,500 

Chicago Union Traction company 32,000,000 



Chicago Vehicle company 1,000,000 

Cigar Trust (proposed— twenty-three Tampa and Key West cigar 

manufacturers) 20,000,000 

Cincinnati Coal Elevator (3ombine 

City of Chicago Brewing and Malting company (English and 

American companies) 3,125,000 3,125,000 

Cleveland and Sandusky Brewing company (eleven breweries) 3,000,000 3,000,000 

Cloth Finishers' Combine 

Coal Trust (proposed— all mines in Pittsburg district) 25,000,000 

Cocoanut Trust ♦7,000,000 

C!old Storage Combine (proposed) 12,000,000 

(Colorado Fuel and Iron company 11,000,000 2,000,000 

(Columbia Automobile company 3,000,000 

Columbia Chemical company (soda-ash makers— proposed) 45,000,000 

Columbia Electric Vehicle Manufacturing company 5,000,000 

Columbia Electric Car Lighting and Brake company (three ^com- 

panics) 11,000,000 

€k>lumbia River Canneries company 2,000.000 

(Columbian Electric Car Lighting and Brake company 10,000,000 

Columbus (O.) Gas Light and Heating company (will own two big 

companies) 1,700,000 3,800,000 

(Commercial Chemical Company of United States (paris green manu- 
facturers form selling agency) 2,000,000 

Commonwealth' Electric company (twelve companies— Chicago light- 
ing—pools with Chicago Edison company) 3,000,000 

Compania de la Hacienda de Coahuayula 5,000,000 

(Compressed Gas Capsule company 15,000,000 

Consolidated City Water company (three companies, Los Angeles, 

Cal.) 2,400,000 

€k>n80lidated Gas company of Newark, N. J. (all gas companies be- 
tween Passaic and Elizabeth) 6,000,000 

(Consolidated Gas of Pittsburg (companies in Pittsburg and Alle- 
gheny) 4,000,000 2,500,000 

Consolidated Gas, New York (all gas companies but New Amster- 
dam) 86,730,000 

Consolidated Ice company (Pittsburg concerns) 2,000,000 2,000,000 

Consolidated Ice company (New York and Maine companies) 6,500,000 8,500,000 



AMERICAN TRUSTS. 



Common Preferred 

Name of trmt. stock. stock. 

Ck>n8olidatea Smeltine and Refining company 127,000,000 127,000,000 

Consolidated Street Car company 10,000,000 8,000,000 

Consolidated Traction of New Jersey (consolidated trolleys in 
northern New Jersey) 15,000,000 

Consumers' Alliance, New Jersey 500,000 

Consumers' Ice company (all ice dealers of Indianapolis) 1,000,000 

Continental Cement company 5,000,00^ 5,0oo,000 

Continental Cotton Oil company (seven southern companies) 3,0u0,000 3,000,000 

CJontinental Cracker company (consolidation of several companies).. *10,OCO,000 

Continental Clompressed Air company 15,000,000 

CkMiUnental Manufacturing company (to manufacture chemicals) 1,000.000 500,000 

Continental Oil company 3,000,000 3,000,000 

(Consolidated Rubber Tire company 10,000,000 

Continental Tobacco company (plug— with late increase of capital).. 85,000,000 

Copper Sheets and Bolts Manufacturers' association (fixes prices)... *5,000,000 

(Cornstalk Combine (proposed) 50,000,000 

(Corset Trust , •30,000,000 

(Cotton Duck Manufacturers 

Cotton Tarn Combination (forming— seven mills in Massachusetts).. 8,460,000 

(Cox Electric Cart company 1,000,000 

Cuban Steel company 

Cuban Tobacco Trust 12,500,000 7,600,000 

Derby Hat Pool (four big companies sell together) 3,000,000 

Detroit City Gas (all natural and artificial gas companies in the 
city) 4,650,000 

Denver City Tramway company (consolidated street lines) 6,000,000 

Denver Trust (combination proposed of all railway, water, electric 
light, coal, gas and telephone companies in Denver, Col.) 60,000,000 

Diamond Match company (six mills in various places) 11,000,000 

Dietrichs Gear company 1,000,000 

Distilling Company of America (a whisky trust) 55,000,000 70,000,000 

Dominion Steel company *16,000,000 

Dnw Pool (wholesale dealers of New York city) 5,000,000 

East Jersey Electric company 1,000,000 

Edison Portland Cement company 9,000,000 2,000,000 

Electrolytic Chemical company 5,000,000 

Electrical Lead Reduction company 12,000,000 

Electric Axle, Light and Power company 26,000,000 

Electric Boat company 5,000,000 5,000,000 

Electric Company of America 25,000,000 

Electric Storage Battery company (total capital) 13,000,000 5,000,000 

Electric Vehicle Company of Washington 

Electric Vehicle Transportation company 25,000,000 

Encaustic Tile company (to control all companies) 4,000,000 3,000,000 

Ewlng-Essick Engine company 5,000,000 ; 

Express Company General... 1,000,000 

Factory Insurance association (twenty-nine companies) 34.655,000 

Farming Machinery Trust (proposed) *50,000,000 

Federal Ink and Supply company 16,000.000 4,000,000 

Federal Sewer Pipe company 12,500.000 12,500,000 

Federal Steel (five or six big iron and steel companies) 63,261,000 46,484,800 

Federal Varnish company (capital to be increased to 130,000,000 
later on) 100,000 

Feed Dealers' Trust (proposed) 

File Manufacturers' Trust (proposed) 

Fire Clay Sewer Pipe Trust (forming with thirty-one companies).... •20.000,000 

Flreprooflng company » 1,000,000 1,000,000 

Fireproofing (nine Ohio companies sell togethei^ *3,000,000 

Fish and Oyster Trust (St. Louis corporation to control trade in 
south, west and southwest) 6,500,000 

Five States Milk Producers' association (farmers to keep up prices 
of milk, as against the trust) 20,000,000 

Forged Steel Joint Trust (proposed) 100,000 

Foundry Supply Combine .-.. 

Fowler Bros., Limited, of Chicago (five English and American com- 
panies), provisions 8,755,000 

Fox River Brick and Tile company, consolidated (fifteen brick 
yards in Wisconsin) 200,000 

Francis Gowdy Distilling company (combination eastern gin com- 
panies) 100.000 

Fuller Round Bale company 5,760,000 2,250,000 

Gardiner Artificial Wood company 9,000,000 3,000,000 

Gas Fixtures Trust 9,000,000 6,000,000 

Gas Self-Lighting company 1,500,000 

(General Carriage company 20,000.000 



70 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Common Preferred 
Name of trtut. itock. stock. 

General Chemical company (combination of manufacturers of 
**heavy chemicals," conservative capitalization) 112,500,000 f 12,500,000 

General Electric company of Minneapolis (light, heat and power)... 2,100,000 

General Electric company (New York) 18,276,000 2,557,200 

G. H. Hammond company of Chicago (paclcers and shippers of 
dressed meats, with a large number of domestic and foreign 
agencies) 4,700,000 

Glass Combination *10,000,000 

Glass Tableware Trust (proposed) *25,000,000 

Glove Trust (proposed) 12,000,000 8,000,OOG 

Glucose Sugar Uetining company ^ 26,000,000 14,000,000 

Granite Combine (to Include New England granite quarries) *12,000,000 

Granite Ware Trust (four companies combining) •20,000,000 

Grape Growers' Pool (agree on prices In northern Ohio) 2,000,000 

Great Laices Towing company 2,500,000 2,500,000 

Grocery (Combine (proposed) 

Hanover Street Railway company (lines between Plymouth and 
Nantasket Beach, Mass.) 660,000 

Havana Commercial company (Cuban tobacco trust) 12,500,000 7,500,000 

Havana Electric railway (electric, gas, telephone, etc.) 5,000,000 

Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar company 2,312,756 

Herkimer County Light and Power company (companies In three 
cities in Herkimer county, New York) 400,000 

Home company (Delaware) 1,000,000 

Hoop Iron Trust (proposed) 

Hot- Air Furnace Manufacturers' association (fixed prices) 5,000,000 

Horseshoe Combine (proposed) 

Horseshoe Trust 7,000,000 

Illinois Electric Vehicle and Transportation company 26,000,000 

IllinoiB State Board Fire Underwriters (seventy-two companies) 49,430,760 

Indiana League of Fire Underwriters (twenty-seven companies) 10,028 567 

International Air Power company (controls nearly all patents of 
American Air Power company— general manufacturing) 6,400,000 600,000 

International Automobile and Vehicle Tire company (three com- 
panies) 1,500,000 1,500,000 

International Car Wheel company 10,000,000 5,000,000 

International Cement company 25,000,000 25,000,000 

International Copper company 

International Heater company (four companies) 900,000 900,000 

International Needle company 1,000,000 2,000,000 

International Packing company of Chicago (seven plants) 1,000 1,500,000 

International Paper company (twenty-five manufacturers of news 
and printing paper) 16,040,400 20,530,700 

International Power company (steam and air power machinery) 

International Silver company (twenty-four companies— 75 per cent 
of silver plate companies) 11,000,000 5,000,000 

International Smokeless Powder and Dynamite company 9,000,000 l.OOO.OOC 

International Steam Pump company (five companies) 12,500,000 15,000,000 

International Zinc Mining and Smelting company of Camden 250,000 

Iron Mills Trust (embracing thirty-four iron mills In Chicago- 
proposed) 

Jersey City Water Supply company 1,000,000 

Jewelry Manufacturers' Trust (300 firms In New England and 200 
firms In middle Atlantic states) •30,000,000 

Kanawha and New River Consolidated Coal and Coke company 40,000,000 

Kentucky Distilleries and Warehouse company (fifty-seven Bourbon 
plants) 18,500,000 10,500,OOC 

Kern Gaslight Lamp company 8,000,000 4,000,000 

Keystone Watch company 3,000,000 

Key West Cigar Combine 

Kings County Electric Light and Power company (all companies In 
Brooklyn except one) 1,968,000 

Kings Ck)unty (N. Y.) Traction company (consolidation of Nassau 
Unci) 15,000,000 

Knickerbocker Ice company, Chicago (twenty-eight companies) 4,000,000 8,000,000 

Knit Goods company (many plants In New York and New England). 15,000,000 5,000,000 

Kodak Limited company (consolidated English, French, German- 
American- companies) 5,000,000 3,000,000 

Lake Carriers* association (three lines— pool prices) 10,000,000 

Lake Shipyards Combination (comprising six companies) *30,000,000 

Lake Superior Consolidated Iron Mines 28.722.000 

Lamp and Tableware Combine 2,000,000 4,000,000 

Lanyon Zinc company 1,000,000 2,000,000 

Leather Combine 

Ledger Paper Trust (Massachusetts companies— proposed) •42,000,000 

Lewis Motor Vehicle company 4,500,000 450,000 

Lexington (Ky.) railroad (four companies) 800,000 



AMERICAN TRUSTS. 71 



Common Prefcrrec 

Name of trust. slock, ttoek. 

Liquor Organization (proposed combination of llqnor interests of 

Greater New York) 11,000,000 

Linen Thread company (selling agency for three manufacturers).... 4,000,000 

Lumt>er Carriers' association (yesseis on great lakes) 6,000,000 

Lumber Mill Consolidation (proposed combination of North Caro- 
lina pine lumber mills) 20,000,000 

Macl>eth-£yans Glass company (forming— live chimney concerns, all 

in the United States) 2,000,000 

Maine Woolen Mill Trust (proposed) noo.OOO.OOO 

Manufactured Rubber company (to control output) 5,000,000 |1,000,000 

Manufacturers' Paper company of Chicago (selling agency for many 

mills) 10,000,000 

Maple Flooring Manufacturers' association (fixed prices) 2,000,000 

Maritime Improvement company (total capital) 3,oo0,o0o 

Marsden company of Pennsylvania (cellulose trust) 30,752,200 1,515,000 

Maryland Brewing company (seventeen brewery companies of Balti- 
more) 8,260,000 3,250,000 

Massachusetts Consolidation (consolidation five copper ore mines in 

Michigan) 2,500,000 

McClurg Publishing Corporation (incorporated in Ohio) 600.000 

Merchants' Distributing and Distilling company (total capital) 6,000,000 

Merchants' Wire and Nail company (formed to compete w.th 

American Wire and Steel company) 500,000 500,000 

Merritt Electric Air Brake company 1,000,000 

Metropolitan Street Railway company (most street railways in New 

York city) 40,000,000 

Metropolitan Tobacco company (selling combine) 500,000 500,000 

Mexican Coal and Coke company (to operate coal mines and oil and 

gas wells in Mexico) 6,000,000 

Milk Combine of Scranton, Pa. (entire supply) 1,000,000 

Milwaukee and Chicago Breweries company (English and American) 8,875,000 3,875,000 

Milwaukee Electric Railway and Light company (all in city) 6,494,500 

Mineral Water Combine 4,000,000 

Mississippi River Steamboat Pool (three companies) •10,000,000 

Monongatiela Light and Power company , 

Monongahela River Consolidated Coal and Coke company 20,000,000 10,000,000 

Montana Coal and Coke company 5,000,000 

Monumental Ginger Ale and Mineral Water company (Ginger Ale 
Trust— capital will be increased later to 11,000,000), capital 100,000 

Mount Vernon-Woodbury Cotton Duck company (proposed to be or- 
ganized in Delaware to control 90 per cent of United States duck 

product) 23,500,000 

Mutual Mercantile Agency 2,000,000 

National Abrasive Manufacturing company (controls corundum and 

other abrasive materials) 1,000,000 

National Association of Wagon Manufacturers (fixed prices) *40,000,000 

National Biscuit company (90 per cent large bakeries in United 

States) 29,000,000 23,000,000 

National Carbon company 5,500,000 4,500.000 

National Car Equipment company (forming in California) 10,000,000 

National Carpet company (forming— nearly all mills in the United 

States) 25,000,000 25,000,000 

National Dining Table association (thirty -nine firms— fixed prices).. *2,000,000 

National Electric company 25,000,000 

National Enameling and Stamping company (controls patents and 

four plants) 20,000,000 10,000,000 

National Glass company (seventeen flint bottle, etc, companies).... 4,000,000 8,000,000 

National Glove company (proposed) 12,000,000 8,000,000 

National High Temperature Furnace company 600.0 >0 

National Lead company (twenty-six white lead plants) 14,905.400 14,904,000 

National Leather Belting company (aboat fourteen plants) ,.... ♦10,000,000 10.000,000 

National Light and Power company 15,000,000 

National Metallic Roofing Trust (allied with National Steel com- 
pany—capital nominal and to be increased to $12,000,000 later), total 
capital 100,000 

National Mirror Manufacturers* association (forty companies, fix 

prices, etc.) 6,000,000 

National Molasses and Simp Dealers' association 

National Oil Engine company 3,000,000 ...*. 

National Salt company of New Jersey (to combine 90 per cent of salt 

manufactured by evaporation) 7,000,000 6,000,000 

National Screw company (forming— includes American and thirteen 

other companies) 10 000,000 

National Shear company 1,500,000 1,500,000 

National Starch company (price agreement with other companies In 

1898) 4,450,700 4,036.20n 



72 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Common Prtferrtd 

Name of trtwt stock. stock. 

National Steel company (eight plants) $32,000.000 127,000,000 

National Strawboard company (50 per cent of the boslneas of th(^ en- 
tire country— forming) 2,000.000 2,000,000 

National Tin Plate ana Stamped Ware company 20,000,000 

National Traction (Company of Dayton, 10,000 

National Tube company (combination of steel pipe mannfacturers).. 40,000,000 40,000,000 

National Tube company (thirteen companies) 40,000,000 40,000,000 

National Wall Paper company (thirty companies) 27,931,500 7,500,003 

National Woolen company (now forming) *50,000,000 

Natural Gas Trust (total capital) 5,000,000 

Naugatuck Valley Brass Trust 20,000,000 

New Amsterdam Gas company (consolidated three companies) 13,000,000 10,000,000 

NewarlE (N. J.) Consolidated Gas company (cons<Aidated seren com- 
panies) «,000,O0O 

New BriclE and Tile company 200,000 

New England Cotton Yam company 5,000,000 6,500,000 

New England Dairy company (to control butter, milk and cheese 

production— capital to be increased to $30,000,000) 600,000 250,000 

New England Electric Vehicle Transportation company (sub-com- 
pany of New York Electric Vehicle Transportation company) 25,000,000 25,000,000 

New England Zinc company 1,000,000 

New York Autotruck company 10,000,000 

New York Electric Vehicle Trapsportation company (enlargement of 

Electric Vehicle company) 25,000,000 

New York Gas and Electric Light, Heat and Power company of 

New York city 36,000,000 

New York Suburban Gas company 1,500,000 

Nicholson Tile company (flye plants— 70 per cent product) 2,000,000 

Nicholson File company (70 per cent product— five plants) * 2,000,000 

^lles-Bement-Pond company (combine to manufacture machine tools) 5,000,000 3,000,000 

North American Ore and Metal company 1,000,000 

North Carolina Pine Timber association 20,000,000 

North Jersey Street Railway company (consolidated trolleys and 

two ferries) 5,000,000 

North River Light, Heat and Power company 300,000 

North Star Mines company 5,000,000 

North Texas Construction company (square bale cotton gins In 

Texas— capital to be Increased later) 100,000 

Northwestern Grass Twine company (consolidation of three western 

concerns— will be absorbed by American Grass Twine company)... 7,500,000 

Northwestern Plow and Implement association 

Northwestern Underwriters' Agency (Minneapolis and St. Paul com- 
panies) 10,000 

Oil Stove Trust 

Oil Trust (now forming) 

Onward (Construction company (chartered to erect buildings and run 
hotels) 

Orange Growers' Trust ♦20,000,000 

Otis Elevator company (thirteen passenger companies— 85 per cent \ 

product) 6.600,000 4,500,000 

Oyster Trust (capital may be doubled later— total capital) 5,000,000 

Pacific American Fisheries company (will control 70 per cent of all 

salmon caught in Puget sound waters) «.... 4,000,000 6,000,000 

Pacific Biscuit company (proposed) 

Pacific Ck>ast Fruit nsBOclatlon (controls prune output of California) . . 1,000,000 

Pacific States Telephone (four telegraph and telephone systems of 

Pacific coast) 10,000,000 

Paducah (Ky.) Railway and Electric Light company (all railway and 

electric light plants of Paducah) 200,000 

Paint Manufacturing Trust (proposed) 12,000,000 

Park Steel company - 16,000,000 

Passenger Coach Trust (proposed) -"i-' 

Patent Medicine Trust (proposed) , 25,000,000 

Pennsylvania Manufacturing, Light and Power company (eight elec- 
tric light companies of Philadelphia) 15,000,000 

People's Gas Light and Coke CJompany of Chicago (agreement with 

three others, absorb others) 28,760,000 

People's Gas Light and Coke company, Buffalo (consolidated) 4,975,000 3,025,000 

Philadelphia Fish and Game company 850,000 650,000 

Photographic Paper (twenty-four companies manufacturers of sensi- 
tized paper) , •2,000,000 

Pittsburg Brewing company 6,500,000 6,500,000 

Pittsburg Plate Glass company 0,850,000 150,000 

Plate Glass Trust (now forming) :•••.•••; 

Pressed Steel Car company (controls 138 patents and two principal 

plants for making cars, etc., from pressed steel) 12,500,000 12,500,000 



AMBEUC^N TRUSTS. 73 



Cort^tmm Preferred 

Name of trust. stock. stock. 

Print Cloth Pool (thirty mills, restrictg prodnctlon and fixes prices).. •|50,000,000 

Puerto Bico company (to operate properties in Puerto Rico— Phila- 
delphia and Pittsburg), capital. 1,000,000 

Pad Trust 

Papeterie Ck)mblne r 

Patent Leather Trust (sixteen Newark, N. J., concerns) 11,000,000 

Paterson and Passaic Gas and Electric company (consolidation of 

four companies) 6,000,000 

Paterson Brewing and Malting company 6,000,000 

Pennsylvania Manufacturing Light and Power company (all electric 

companies of Philadelphia) 15,000,000 

Pennsylyania Sugar Refining company 8,000,000 

Pennsylvania Smelting company 

Pennsylvania Worsted Spinning company 

People's Light and Power company (fourteen companies in New 

Jersey) 20,000,000 

People's Telephone (Corporation 5,000.000 

Petersburg (Va.) Railway and Electric (consolidation all companies) 500,000 

PI. . . i'lJils nij4] Murylr^Ql Pure Rye Distilling company 30,000,000 ^ 

Pliisirmrj-WDKlitjnLi] Vlom Mills company (limited) 2,500,000 12,500,000 

PlU»htirg Ccittl iJuuibiue 

Pittsburg ijiuncJry couiimor 1,750,000 1,750,000 

Pittfiburf ^toyf! uniJ lUbgi^ company 

PliiBibvrs' Combine , 35,000,000 

Powder Smoti^f^HFi campaoy 9,000,000 1,000,000 

Puget Sounii Paeters' iif§sueiation (eight big salmon packers— fixed 

prJeesi , : 1,000,000 

Pull<>y Mauufdeturpra^ Tru^t 

Rf^Aiius company (Anttiritcite Ck>al Trust) *150,000,000 

Reed Tldp row^r eontijany mow forming) •40,000,000 

Relrlgemior Tniitt itbirty-^Lx firms— 80 per cent of trade) 8,000,000 

Repnbllc tron ssd ISteel raF],|iany (thirty-one bar and forge iron com- 

paiitts, etiM 80,000,000 25,000,000 

ReytioliJii Tohacro ^'ompiiD^ 5,000,000 

River Coal Opera tors' wmpnny (Pittsburg to New Orleans) •11,000,000 

RollirLg Mill Tniiit tl-hii ty-tive mills) 30,000,000 25,000,000 

Royal Baking Powder company (consolidation of five leading con- 
cerns) 10,000,000 10,000,000 

Rubber Goods Manufacturers' company... 25,000,000 25,000,000 

Rye Gin (Combine (embracing two-thirds output United States) ♦10, 000 

Safe Trust (ten companies) 2,500,000 16,000,000 

Saginaw Valley Traction company (consolidation four companies) 700,000 400,000 

San Francisco Breweries, Limited (agreement with other breweries) 20,000,000 

Santy-Kalsomine company (plaster trust) 3,000,COO 

Sash and Door Combine (twenty-six companies) 15,000,000 

Scott-Jenney Electric company 30,000,000 

Sergeant Automobile company (railroad semaphore signals) 2,000,000 

Severy Process company.. 7,500.000 

Sheet Steel Trust 60,000,000 

Siemens & Halske Electric company 1,300,000 700,00O 

Sloss-Sheffield Steel and Iron company... 10,000,000 10,000,000 

Smelters* Trust (proposed) 25,000,090 25,000,000 

Soap Trust •25,000,000 25,000,000 

Southern Gar and Foundry company (increase) 2,750,000 

Southern New England Brick Manufacturers *6,000,000 

Spanish-American Mining company 5,000,000 5,000,000 

Sperry Flour company (California) 10,000,000 

Springfield (Mass.) Breweries company (four breweries) 1,150,000 1,150,000 

Spruce Lumber Combine (proposed to control spruce lumber in north- 
em New England) 100,000,000 

S. S. McGInre company (alliance between Harper & Brothers and 
S. S. McClure company) 

Stauffer Chemical company (California companies combine to fight 
the big combine) 

Standard Chain company (forming— 95 per cent machine-made 

chains) 3,250,000 8,250,000 

Standard Distilling and Distributing company (twelve whisky dis- 
tilleries) 16,000,000 8,000,000 

Standard Gas Stove and Manufacturing company (proposed by manu- 
facturers of Cleveland, controlling about 80 per cent of gas stoves, 

etc., manufactured in United States) 3,000,000 2,500,000 

Standard Metal company (forming— ten companies— car Journal bear- 
ings, etc.) 4,000,000 1,800,000 

Standard Oil company 110,000,000 

Standard Phosphate and Fertilizer company 600,000 400,000 

Standard Rope and Twine company 12,000,000 



74 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Common Preferred 

Name of truat, stock, stock. 

Standard Sardine company (consolidation of leading Maine canner- 
ies) 15,000,000 

Standard Shoe Machinery company (to riyal the United Shoe Ma- 

chlnery company) ^ 2,500,000 |2,600,000 

Standard Telephone company 10,000,000 

Steel Beams association •20,000,000 

Steel Bridge Trust (proposed) 40,000,000 

Steel Rail Manufacturing association 50,000,000 

Steel Steamers (forming with all manufacturers on great lakes) 15,000,000 15,000,000 

Steel Tired Car Wheel company (six or seven car wheel companies).. *2,000,000 

St. Louis ft North Arkansas Railroad company 1,250,000 

St. Louis Breweries, Limited (seventeen plants) 9,000,000 

Swift ft (3o., Chicago (beef) 20,000,000 

Tanners' Trust 50,000,000 

Telephone Trust (opposition to Bell company, embracing 90 per cent 

factories producing independent apparatus— proposed) 7,000,000 

Tennessee Coke, Coal and By-Product company 20,000,000 1,000,000 

Temple Iron company (consolidation seven anthracite coal companies 
in Pennsylvania) ; 

Texas Cattle Combine (proposed) 40,000,000 ..: 

The Art Manufacturing Ck)mpany of New Jersey 500,000 

Theatrical Trust (fifty big ones work together) 30,000,000 

Thrashing Machine Trust (proposed) 

Thrasher Combine (twenty-eight factories) 

Tin Sign Combine 4,000,000 

Tobacco Warehouse Trust (said to have been formed In Danville, 

Va., comprising eight warehouses) 1,000,000 

Torrington Needle company 1,500,000 1,500,000 

Trenton Gas and Electric company (four companies) 2,000,000 

Tubular Dispatch company (consolidation two companies) 2.100,000 

Umbrella Hardware company (formed to control prices) 2,000,000 

Union Bag and Paper company (will control, as claimed, entire 

paper bag business of the country) 16,000,000 11,000,000 

Union Carbide company (acetylene consolidated) 6,000,000 

Union Copper Mining company 3,000,000 

Union Light and Power company (four companies of Salt Lake and 

Ogden, Utah) 4,250,000 300,000 

Union Match company 10,000,000 

Union Steel and Chain company 80,000,000 30,000,000 

Union Switch and Signal company (consolidated with National 

Switch and Signal company) •2,000,000 

Union Tobacco company (BlackwcU's Durham consolidation) 12.000,000 7.350,000 

Union Typewriter company (five companies) 10,000.000 8,015,000 

United American Glue company (proposed)... 20,000,000 16,000,000 

United Breweries company (thirteen breweries, Chicago) 5,463,000 

United Electric Company of New Jersey •20,000,000 

United Fruit company (ten big companies tropical fruits, including 

Boston Fruit company) 20,000,000 

United Ice Cream company (four companies in Chicago) 300,000 

United Laundries company 1,000,000 

United Lighting and Heating company 6,000,000 6,000,000 

United Power and Transportation company (to control street rail- 
ways in Pennsylvania) 12,500,000 

United Railways and Electric company of Baltimore (all in city)... 24,000,000 14,000,000 

United Shoe Machinery company 8,625,000 8,625,000 

United States Biscuit company (all big biscuit and cracker com- 
panies in the United States) 30,000,000 25,000,000 

United States Bobbin and Shuttle company (proposed) 1,200,000 800,000 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry company (ten companies) 15,000,000 16,000,000 

United States Can company (all preferred stock) 25,000,000 

United States Dry Paint company (forming— mineral paints) 3,000,000 4,500,000 

United States Dry Paint company (mineral paint combine) 7,500,000 

United States Dyewood and Extract company (leading manufactur- 
ers of dyestuffs and extracts) 4,000,000 6,000,000 

United States Envelope company (ten companies) 750,000 3,750,000 

United States Finishing company (three New Jersey companies- 
proposed) 5,000,000 

United States Flour Milling company (nineteen mills, including 

Hecker-Jonea-Jewell company) 35,000,000 ^5,000,000 

United States Glucose company 3,000,000 2,000,000 

United States Glue company (forming to control glue product) 15,000.000 10,000,000 

United States Leather company 62,854,600 62,254,600 

United States Mining company of Portland, Me ^10,000,000 

United States Oil company 1.260,000 

United States Plate Glass company 1,000,000 

United States Playing Card company (allied with three other com- 
panies) 3,600,000 



THE WORLD'S COFFEE TRADE. 



75 



Name of trust. 

United States Rubber company 

United States Sugar Reflolng company (glucose) , 

United States Varnish company (fifteen leading varnish c jncern -.) . . . 

United States Vehicle company (iucoipoiated in Delaware) 

United States Worsted company : 

United Traction and Electric company (all roads In and near Provi- 
dence) 

United Traction company (controls all electric roads in Reading, 
Fa.) 

United Wine and Trading company 

United Zinc and Liead company (to unite mills in Missouri atid Kan- 
sas) 

Universal Fuel company 

Upholstery Combine 

Valve Manufacturers' Trust (proposed) 

Virginia and Carolina Fertilizer company 

Virginia Electric company of Norfolk (consolidation all companies 
in city) 

Virginia Iron, Coal and Coke company 

Warehouse 0)mbine (proposed) 

Watch Case Trust (proposed) 

Watch Combine (proposed) 

Western Drug Jobbers (western combination) 

Western Elevator association (forty in Buflfalo) 

Western Pennsylvania Stove Manufacturing Trust (now foiming)... 

Western Stone company of Chicago (eight quarries) 

Western Strawboard company (proposed combination of stravvboard 
manufactories) 

Westlnghouse Air-Brake company (bought American and Boyden 
companies in 1898) 

Wholesale Druggists' National association (twenty-five firms) 

W^holesale Grocers of New England 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor company 

Window Glass Combine 

Wire Cloth Manufacturers' Association of America (twelve Anns 
agree on prices) 

Wire Fence Trust (to compete with Steel and Wire Trust) 

Woods Motor Vehicle company 

Woolen Card Combine 

Wool Hat Trust (proposed) 

Worsted Spinners' Trust 

Wrapping Paper Trust 

Writing Paper Trust (forming with thirty-five mills in the Connecti- 
cut valley) 

Yarn (cotton hosiery) Manufacturers (fixed prices) 

Zinc Trust (proposed to consolidate zinc and lead mines In the Jop- 

lin district) 

Total 

G rand total 



Common Preferred 

utock. stock. 

$23,666,000 |23,525,&00 

2,000,000 

18,000,000 18,0A000 

25,000,000 

40,000,000 30,000,000 

8,000,000 



1.400.000 
700,00J 



5.000,000 
1,000,000 



1,000,000 



24,000,000 



450,000 
7,500,000 



•30,000.000 

♦15,000,000 15,000,C00 

•15,000.000 

15.000.000 

2,250,000 



2,500,0C0 2,500,000 



10,950,000 

•25,000,000 

•75,000,000 

500,000 

30.000,000 



5,000,500 



7,500,00a 2,5^0,000 



»30,000,000 
2,000,000 



•40,000.000 
2,500,000 



7,318,844,0(» 2,2;i2.»«),a50 
9.551, 18j950 



THE WORLD'S COiTEE TBADE. 



The following statistics will convey a fairly complete Impression of the volume of the 
world's coffee trade and of the relative importance of the various producing and consuming 
countries: 



Country. 



Brazil— Rio 

Santos 

Victoria 

Bahia and Ceara 

Java 

Padang 

Celebes .....••. •• 

Ceylon and British East India. 

Venezneia 

Costa Rica 

Mexico 

Gaatemala 

San Salvador 

Nicaraf^a 

Haiti 

Puerto Rico 

Jamaica and British W. Indies. 
Total 



*1899-1900. •1898-99. 1897-98. 



t Hags. 
8.250,000 
6,750,000 
400,000 
400,000 
550.000 
55.000 
28.000 

3:«.ooo 

850,000 
250,000 
850.000 
425,000 
120,000 
80,000 
475.000 
200,000 

100.000 

13,(J^,000 



Bags. 
3.G00.000 
6,000.000 
350,000 
370.000 
244,000 
62,000 
35.000 
267.000 
900.000 
297,000 
aiS.OOO 
475,000 
150,000 
100.000 
4&5.000 
200.000 
100,000 



12,410,000 



Bags. 

6,050.000 
450.000 
440,000 
772.000 
45,000 
45,000 
240,000 
775.000 
295,000 
300,000 

850,000 

482,000 
250.000 
100,000 



15,574,000 



1890-97. 



Bags. 

8.411.000 

4,960.000 

308.000 

290,000 

705.000 

6H,000 

43,000 

280.000 

1,000.000 

290,000 

250,000 

800,00b 

850,000 
800,000 
100,000 



13,153,000 



1895-96. 



Bags. 



3,135,000 
300,000 
425.000 
(572,000 
69,000 
48,000 
300,000 
1,000,000 

)9it,noo 

300,000 

S0O.O0O 

630,000 
200.000 
125.000 



10,034,000 



* Estimated. 1 132 lbs. 



76 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



wnnntkJ. PRODTIOTS OF THE WJTZD 8TATES-1890-96. 
[United States Geological Survey.] 



PBODUCT8. 



METALLIC. 

Piff Iron (spot ralue) long tons 

Sliver, coining value. . . .troy ois. 

Gold, coining value troy oss. 

Copper, value at N. Y.clty.. . .lbs. 

Leaa,Tal.at N. Y.clty, short tons 

Zinc. val. a^ N. Y. city, short tons 

Quicksilver, value at San Fran* 
Cisco flasks 

Alnminlum, val. at Plttsbuiv.lbs. 

Antimony, value at San Fran- 
cisco. short tons 

Nickel, val. at Philadelphia, lbs. 

Tin T lbs. 

Platinum, value (crude) at San 

Francisco troy ounces 

Total val.of metallic products 

NONMBTALUC (spot value). 

Bituminous cool short tons 

Penna. anthracite long tons 

Stone 

Petroleum barrels 

Natural gas 

Brick clay 

Clay (other than brick), longtons 

Cement barrels 

Mineral waters gallons sold 

Phosphate rock long tons 

Salt barrels 

Limestone for iron flux, long tons 

Zinc white short tons 

Gypsum short tons 

Borax pounds 

Mineral paints short tons 

Grindstones 

Fibrous talc. short tons 

Asphaltum short tons 

Soapstone short tons 

Precious stones 

Pyrite longtons 

Corundum and emery, .short tons 

Oilstones, etc pounds 

Garnet for abrasive pur..sb't tons 

Mica pounds 

Bary tes (crude) long tons 

Bromine pounds 

Fluorspar short tons 

Feldspar longtons 

Manganese ore long tons 

Flint longtons 

Monasite pounds 

Graphite ponnds 

Bauxite longtons 

Sulphur short tons 

Fuller's earth short tons 

Marls short tons 

Infusorial earth&tripoll,sh*t tons 

Pumice stone short tons 

Millstones 

Chromic iron ore long tons 

Cobalt oxide pounds 

Magnesite short tons 

Asbestos short tons 

Buttle pounds 

Total value of nonmetalllc 

Kstlmated value of mineral 

products unspecified. ....... 

Grand total 



1896. 



Quant'tt/ Value. 



8.623.127 

58,834,800 

2,568.132 

40aO61,4aO 

188,(n0 

81,499 

30.765 
1,300.000 

601 
17.170 
(none.) 



137.610276 
48,523,287 



60,960,361 



360,000 

9,613,473 

25,795,312 

930,779 

18,860,726 

4,120,103 

20,000 

224,139 

13.508,000 

48,032 



46,089 
80.503 
22.183 



115,483 
2,120 



nx 

546,580 
6,600 
9.U4 
10,088 
11,124 
30,000 



$760 
18,364 
5,260 
9,872 
60,000 
3,846 



786 

10,70U 

1,500 

504 

100 



190.250.000 
76.0>».23t> 
53,088.000 
49,456.eOB 
10.528,000 
6,519,920 

1,075.449 
520,000 

61,290 
4,464 



944 



287,606,906 



114.891,515 
81,748,651 
30,142,661 
58,518,709 
13,002,512 

9,ooaooo 

800,000 

6,473,213 

4,136,192 

2303,372 

4,040,839 

2,060,000 

1,400.000 

573344 

676,400 

530,455 

a26,&)6 

3U9.443 

577,663 

354,065 

97,850 

320,163 

113,246 

127,098 



•65,441 
tl.750 
46,513 

144,601 
52,000 
35J»0 
90,927 
21,226 
1,500 
48.460 

47,338 
87,200 



30,000 
26.792 



22,667 
6,667 
15.301 
11.000 
6,100 
350 



333,986,310 
1,000,000 



622,533,216 



1897. 



QuanVty Value. 



9.652,680 

53.860.000 

2,774"' 

494078,274 

212,000 

99,980 

26,648 
4,000.000 

756 
28,707 
(none.) 

160 



147.000.965 
46,974,714 



10.968,463 



1,039,345 

15.973,202 

4,247,688 

25,000 



16,000,000 
60,913 



57.009 
75,945 
21.923 



143.201 
2,165 



2,554 

•82,676 

t740 

26,042 

487,149 

5.062 

11,175 

11,108 

U,9o2 

44,000 

U.254,402 

51,108 

20,590 

2,276 

17,118 

60,000 

3,833 

168 



inone.) 

19,520 

1,143 

580 

100 



195.122.299 
69,(87,172 
57.»63.00( 
64.080.18( 
11.885,728 
8.498,300 

998,445 

1,500,000 

109,655 



302,196,602 



119,6674!24 

79,301,954 

84.667,772 

40,929,611 

13,826^422 

8,000,000 

1.000,000 

8,178,283 

4.605.620 

2,673,202 

4,920,020 

2,124,000 

1,760.000 

755,864 

1,080,000 

795,793 

368.058 

396466 

664,632 

365,629 

130,675 

891,541 

106,574 

149,970 

80,853 

80,774 

14.452 

58,295 

129,004 

37,160 

43.100 

95,605 

26,227 

1,980 

W,277 

57,652 
45,690 
112,272 
80,000 



(none.) 

81,232 

13,b71 

6,460 

350 



327,617,480 
1,000,000 



630.815.962 



1898. 



Quantty Value. 



lt77S.^ 

64,438.000 

8418,398 

52^375591 

231.269 



115,380 10,385,910 



81.003 
5,200,000 

1,120 
13,4U 
(none.) 



ie6502j023 
47,663,075 



55.854.233 



11.968 

28,853,464 

1308,885 

17,612.634 

6,275,819 

33,000 

291,638 

16,000,000 

58.850 



54.356 
76,337 
22,231 



190,150 
4,064 



2,967 
•129,620 

486,979 
7,676 
12,000 
15,957 
19,130 

230.776 

25,149 
1,200 
14360 
60,000 
2,733 
600 



(none.) 
7,848 
1363 

m 

140 



1116,557.000 
7a384.485 
64.463,000 
61,849.132 
17.345,175 



1,188.627 
1.716,000 



184.060 
4.694 



1313 



344,079,986 



132,586313 

75,414337 

86,607364 

44.183360 

14.760,(^ 

9.000.C., 

1,000.000 

9,781301 

8,051,833 

3,453,460 

6,212.554 

2,638.000 

2310,000 

755.280 

1,120,000 

694,866 

489.760 

411,430 

675319 

287012 

160,920 

M7,731 

275,064 

180.738 

6B360 

103334 

27364 

108330 

126.614 

68,050 

82305 

129,185 

42370 

12,462 

75300 
76,437 
82.900 
106300 
80,000 
16,601 
13300 
253B4 

19,076 

10300 

700 



352,7673011 
1,000,000 



607,847,788 



•Sheet, pounds, t Scrap, tons, t Crystalline, pounds. $ Amorphous, tons. 



GOLD AND SILVER. 



77 



GOLD AND 8ILVEB. 

WORLD'S PRODUCTION OF GOLD AND SILVER. 
[From the Report of the Director of the Mint, 1898.) 



GAIiENDAR 
YEARS. 



1498-1530... 
1521^1544... 
1545-1560... 
1561-1560... 
1581-lflOO... 
1601-1620... 
1621—1640... 
1641-1660... 
1661-i680... 
1681—1700... 
1701—1720... 
ir21-1740... 
1741-1760... 
1761—1780... 
1181-1800... 
1801-1810... 
1811-1820... 
1821-1830... 
1831—1840... 
1841-1850... 
1851-1866... 



Gold. 



1107,931,000 
114,205,000 
90,492.000 
90,917.000 
98,005,000 
113,248,000 
110,324,000 
U6.67l,000 
123.048.000 
143,088,000 
170,403,000 
253,611,000 
327,161,000 
276,211.000 
236,4644)00 
liai52,000 
76,063.000 
94,479,000 
134341,000 



662,666,000 



Silver 
(coining 
value). 



$54,703,000 
96,986.000 
20r,240,000 
248,990,000 
348,254,000 
351,579,000 
827,221,000 
304,526,000 
280.166,000 
284,240,000 
295,629,000 
358,480,000 
443,232,000 
642,658,000 
730,810.000 
371,677,000 
224.786,000 
191,444,000 
247,930.000 
324,4()0,r" 
184,169,( 



^ 


'♦4 


§ 


t*; 


It 


II 


66.4 


33.6 


55.9 


44.1 


30.4 


69.6 


aB.7 


73.3 


22.0 


W.O 


24.4 


75.6 


25.2 


74.8 


27.7 


72.8 


30.5 


69.6 


33.6 


66.6 


36.6 


63.4 


41.4 


58.6 


42.6 


57.5 


33.7 


66.3| 


24.4 


7.5.6i 


24.1 


76.9 


26.3 


74.7i 


33.0 


67.0: 


85.2 


64.8 


52.9 


«7.1 


78.3 


21.71 



Calendar 
Years. 



1856-1860. 
18K1-1866. 
1866-1870. 
1871-1876, 
1876-1880. 
1881-1885. 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 



9670.416.000 
614,944.000 
648,071,0011 
577,883,000 
672,081,000 
495,582,000 
106,163,900 
106.774.900 
110,196,900 
123.489.200 
118,848.700 
130,650.000 
146.661,500 
167,494,80(1 
180,567,80(] 
200.406,000 
202 956,000 
237,504.800 



Total . . . 9.220.725,400110.793,437,100 



SUver 
(coining 
value). 



1188,092,000 
228361,000 
278,313,000 
409,332,000 



604,773,000 
120.626,800 
1244281,000 
140,':06.400 
156.42r,700 
163,082.000 
177.352.300 
196.014,400 
213,944,400 
212,829.600 
217.610,800 
213,463,700 
236.730,300 






78.1 
TZ.9 
70.0 
68.6 
63.0 
45.6 
46.8 
46.9 
43.9 
44.3 
42.1 
42.4 
42.6 
42.4 
46.3 
47.7 
48.7 






21.9 
27.1 
30.0 
416 
47.0 
54.6 
53.2 
64.1 
66.1 
66.7 
57.9 
67.6 
67.5 
97.6 
68.7 
62.3 
61.3 
41.4 



PRICE OF BAR SILVER. 

Highest, lowest and average price of bar silver in London, per ounce British standard 
(.925)7»nce 1833. and the equivalent in United States gold coin or an ounce 1.000 fine, taken at 
the average price. 



CALEN- 
DAR 

Year. 



1834. 
1835. 
1836. 
1837. 
1838. 
1839. 
1840. 
18fl. 
1842. 
1843. 
1844. 
1816. 
1846. 
1817. 
1848. 
1849. 

isra 

1851. 
1852. 
1853. 
ISU. 
18S6. 
1866. 
1867. 
1866. 
18S0. 

IflBL 

ifles. 

1863. 
1884. 



Lowest 
quota' 
tton. 



Highest 
quota- 
tion. 



Average 
quota' 
tion. 



Value of 

a fine 
ounce at 
average 
quotaVn. 



11.297 
1.313 
1.308 
1.315 
1.305 
1.304 
1.323 
1.323 
1.316 
1.308 
1.297 
1.304 
1.298 
1.300 
1.308 
1.304 
1.309 
1..S16 
1.337 
L326 
1.348 
1.348 
1.344 
1.844 
1.853 
1.344 
1.860 
1.352 
1.883 
1.346 
1.846 
1.845 
1.888 



Calen- 
dar 
Year. 



1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1886. 
188e:. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1802. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895, 
1896. 
1897. 









78 


CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 








SILVER WITH GOLD. 








The followiDR table exhibits the value of the pure sllvor in the silver dollar, reckoned at 






the commercial price of silver bullion, from flU cent* to $1.2*.>29 ( 


parity of our coining rate) per 






fine ounce. [From report on precious metals in the United States, 1892, and subseanent ad- 






ditional reports by the director of the mint.] 








PHteof 


pure rfi'vr 

in a xiirtr 

dttliar. 


Ftiet uj 
tilptrprr 
fincuimcf. 


ValiMofthe 

pure silver 

in a silver 

dollar. 


Price of 
silver per 
fine ounce. 


Value of the 

pure silver 

in a silver 

dollar. 


Pricf^tif 


Valueo/tht 
pUTettlfjetr 
in a ftitrrr 






$0.60 


90.464 


$0.78 


10. (»3 
.611 
.619 
.626 

.m 

.<>42 
.649 
.(S7 
.6»w) 

jm 

.♦kS8 

.m\ 

.704 
.712 
.719 
.727 


$0.96 




.742 - 


$1.14 


fO.882 






61 


.471 
.480 

.487 
.495 
.5(K 
.510 
.518 
.52») 
.5:U 
..541 
.549 
.5.57 
M'A 
.572 
..5S0 
.588 
.5115 


TJ 


.J<7 

.98 

99 




.750 

.758 
.766 
.773 
.781 

.789 
.797 
.804 
.812 

.8:.>0 
.8»8 
.835 
.843 
.851 
.K;'>9 
.8fi6 
.874 


1 15. 


.S?9 

.897 

.905 

.913 

.t»20 - 

.928 

.936 

.944 

.951 

.959 

.9tn' 

.975 
.982 
.990 

.\m 

1.000 






62 


.80 


1 16 






63 


.81 


1.17 






.H4 


.82 


1.00 


LIS 






.6b 


.83 


1.01 


1. 9 






,m 


.84 


1.02 


1.20 






.67 


.85 


1.03 


1.21 






r»8 


8»> 


1 04... . 


1 22. 






.(g) 


.87 


1 05 


1.23 






.70 


.88 


l.Oti 


1.24 






in::::::.: 


.89 


1.07 


1.25 






72 


.90 

.91 

.92 

.93 

.94 

.95.. . 


1.08 


1.2f> 






.73 

.74 


l.(W 


1.27 






1.10 


1.28 






.75 


1.11 


1.29 






i-T?:::::::: 


1.12 


1.2929 






.77 


1 13 . 




















COMMERCIAL RATIO OF SILVER TO GOLD EACH YEAR SINCE 1688. 






From 1688 to 1832 the ratios are taken from Dr. A. Soetbeer; from ISXJ to 1878 from Plxley and 






Abell's tables; and from 1879 to 1898 from daily cablegrams from London to the bureau of the 
mint: 






Year. 

IfiSS 


Ratio. 
14.94 


Year 


Ratio. 


Year. 


Ratio. 


Yeah. 


Ratio. 
15.r>7 


Year. Ratio. Year. 


Ratio. 






1724... 


15.11 


1759.... 


14.15 


1794.... 


1829... 


15.78 


1864.... 


15.37 






1689 


5.02 


1?25. . . 


5.11 


760. .. . 


4.14 


1795. . . . 


15.55 


1830... 


16.82 


1865 




5.44 






K2W 


5.02 


1726. . . 


.5.15 


761.... 


4.54 


1796.... 


15.«S 


18:^1... 


15.72 


18«!6 




5.43 






hm 


4.98 


ir27... 


5.24 


762.... 


5.27 


1797. . . . 


15.41 


1832... 


15.73 


867 




5.57 






um 


4.92 


1?28... 


5.11 


763.... 


4.99 


1798.... 


15.59 


1833... 


15.93 


8()8 




5.59 






lem 


4.83 


1729... 


]4.aj 


7W.... 


4.70 


1799.... 


15.74 


1834... 


15.73 


869 




5.60 






694 


4.87 


1730... 


4.81 


765.... 


4.83 


1800.... 


15.t» 


1835... 


5.80 


1870 




5..57 






695 


5.02 


1731... 


4.94 


766.... 


4.80 


1801.... 


15. 4«; 


1836... 


5.?i 


1871 




5.57 






696 


5.00 


1T32... 


5.09 


767.... 


4.85 


1802.... 


;5.2»i 


1837... 


5.83 


■\m 




5.63 






<i97 


6.20 


1733... 


5.18 


768.... 


4.80 


1803.... 


5.41 


1838.... 


5.85 


1873 




5.92 






698 


5.07 


17:i4... 


5.39 


1769.... 


14.72 


1804.... 


5.41 


1839... 


5.62 


874 




6.17 






699 


4.94 


1735... 


6.41 


1770.... 


14.62 


1805.... 


5.79 


1840... 


6.62 


875 




6.59 






1700 


4.81 


ir36. . . 


5.18 


1771.... 


14.66 


1806.... 


5.52 


1841... 


5.70 


8T6 




7.88 






1701 


5.07 


1787... 


5.02 


1772.... 


14.52 


1807.... 


5.43 


1842.... 


6.87 


877 










1702 


16w52 


1738... 


4.91 


1773.... 


14.62 


1808.... 


6.08 


1813... 


6.93 


1878 




7 94 






1703 


15.17 


1739... 


4.91 


1774.... 


14.62 


1809.... 


5.96 


1844... 


5.85 


1879 




8 40 






704 


16.22 


1740. . . 


4.94 


1776. . . . 


14.72 


1810.... 


5.77 


1846... 


6.92 


1880 




8.05 






705 


15.11 


1741... 


4.92 


1776.... 


14.66 


1811.... 15.53 1 


1846... 


6.90 






8.16 






706 


16.27 


1742... 


4.85 


777.... 


14.54 


1812.... 


16.11 


1847... 


5.80 


1882 




8.19 






707 


16.44 


1743... 


4.85 


778.... 


14.68 


1813.... 


16.25 


1848.... 


5.85 


888 




8.64 






708 


16.41 


1744... 


4.87 


779. .. . 


14.80 


1814.... 


15.04 


1849... 


5.78 






8.57 






.709 


16.31 


1746... 


4.98 


1780.... 


14.72 


1815.... 


15.26 


1850... 


6.70 


886 




9.41 






710 


16.22 


1746. . . 


15.13 


1781.... 


4.78 


1816.... 


15.28 


1851... 


5.46 


886 




20.78 






711 


16.29 


1747.... 1 15.26 


1782.... 


4.42 


1817 ... 


15.11 


1852... 


6.60 


8Rr 




21.13 






712 


16.81 


1748.... 15.11 


1783.... 


4.48 


1818.... 


15.36 


1863. . . 


5.83 






21.99 






713 


16.24 


1749.... 1 14.80 


1784.... 


4.70 


1819.... 


15. as 


1854... 


6.83 


889 




22.10 






714 


16.13 


1750.... 14.65 


1785. . . . 


4.92 


1830.... 


15.62 


1856... 


6.S8 


890 




19.76 






715 


16.11 


1751... 


14.39 


.786.... 


4.96 


1821.... 15.95 1 


1856... 


6.88 


891 




20.92 






716 


16.09 


1752... 


14.54 


787.... 


4.92 


1822.... 


16.80 


^m... 


6.27 


892 




23.72 






717 


15.13 


1753... 


14.54 


788.... 


4.65 


1823.... 


16.84 


1858... 


6.38 


898 




26.49 






718 


15.11 


1754... 


14.48 


789.... 


4.75 




16.82 


1859... 


6.19 


894 




32.56 






719 


16.09 


1755... 


14.68 


790.... 


6.04 


1825.... 


15.70 


1860... 


6.29 


805 




Sl.fiO 






720 


16.01 


1756... 


14.94 


791.... 


5.05 


1826.... 


15.76 


1861... 


a.m 


89R 




ao.G6 






731 


15.05 


1757... 


14.87 


792.... 


5.17 


Iv827.... 


15.74 


18G2... 


5.86 


W 




34.28 






1722 


Jf-il 


1758. . . 


. 14.85 


793.... 


5.00 


1828.... 


15.78 


18d3. . . 


16.37 


896 




35!^ 






iT& 


16.20 

























GOLD AND SILVER. 79 


PRODUCT OF GOLD AND SILVER IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Approximate distribution, by producinf; states and territories, of the product of sold and 
silver in the United States for the calendar year 1897, as estimated by the director of the mint. 


States and TERKiToniEs. 


GOLD. 


Silver. 


Total 
valv^. 


Fine 
ounces. 


Value. 


Fine 
ounces. 


Coining 
valu>e. 


Alabama 


358 
86.011 
140.089 
707,160 

7,222 

82,320 

6 

6 

3,033 

211,663 

143,983 

17,246 

1,674 

65.456 

4.097 

275,491 

6 

858 

83.500 

5 

189 

20.312 

642 


U.i^s.:!!!!) 

iy.](4A^i) 
l.;iH,:{D 

vti 

(i:^7iO 

■i.isii) 

4.;i7;i.-i(Ni 

M,700 
^ 100 

:s.'.iOn 


100 
116,400 

2,239,900 
474,400 

21,636.400 

4,90lJoO 


$129 

150.4J/r 

2,896,032 

613,366 

27.974,335 

776 

6,336,906 


$7,529 

1928.497 

5.791.932 

15.231,666 

47,078.535 

150,076 

8,038.605 

100 

100 

140.664 

3,000 

24.630.887 

4.565281 

1.054.035 

34,988 

1,442312 

84.950 

6.885.7d6 

100 

100 

'A,m 

658,114 

11329 

127,000,172 


Alaska 


Arizona 


California 


Colorado 


Geonda 


Idaho 


Iowa 


Maryland 






Michigan 


60,300 


77,964 


Minnesota 




15,667.966 

1228,900 

539.500 

69,000 

200 

147,600 


20.257.487 

1..5HH,881 

(W7.635 

388 

89.212 

2.T9 

190,836 


Nevada 


New Mexico . 
North Carolin 








a 












South CaVoiln 
South Dakota 
Tennessee 


a 


















Texas 


404,700 
6,265,600 


523,240 
8,100,978 


Utah 


Vermont, 


Virgi n la 






Washington . 
Wyoming.... 








106,900 
100 


138,214 
129 








Total 


2,774,985 


67,363,000 


53,8G0,0W) 


69,637.172 




PRODUCT OF GOLD AND SILVER IN THE UNITED STATES FROM 1T92 TO 1897. 

The estimate for 1792-1873 Is by R. W. Raymond, commissioner, and since by the director of 

the mint. 


Tears. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total 


YKAltS. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


April 2, 1792- 
July 81, 1834 

July 31. 1834- 
Dec. 31, 1844 

1846. 


$14,000,000 

7,500,000 
1,008,327 
1.139,357 

sS 

60,000,000 
55,000,000 
60,000,000 
66,000,000 

iiS 

^^000 

gumooo 


InsigniU- 
cant. 

60,000 
60,000 

6o!ooo 

s 

60,000 

iooiooo 

2,000;000 

ii!ooo.ooo 

11.250.000 
10,000,000 

16,000,000 


$14,000,000 

7,760,000 
1,068,327 

60,060,000 
66.050,000 
60,060,000 

66!060!OOG 

46;i60;000 

m 

68,000.000 


im. 

1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1886. 
1886. 

1800.' 

18W! 
1896. 
896 
1897. 




$48,500,000 
36,000,000 
36,000.000 
38,600,000 
33,400,000 
39,900,000 
46,900,000 
51,200,000 

86;ooo;ooo 

34,700,000 
32,600,000 
80,000,000 

39!600,000 

»^ 

67.363,000 


$23,000,000 
28,760,000 
35,760,000 

89,8001000 

IS 

SBllOKOOO 

64!000.000 
72,051,000 

691637.172 


$66,500,000 
64,750,000 
71.750,000 
70,800.000 
65,100,000 
78,700,000 

IS 

79i30o!ti00 
76,200,000 

M 










1816 

1817 










18ffi 




|Qen 




1851 




Sa! .... 




1858.'" ". 




1854. 




mb.:::::::::: 




1865 








HI::::::::: 








WBl*" 




1863.' 




IfML 




Um! " ' 




IfMk.' 




1805 








imr" ' 




Man* 


Total Is 


M70,397,709 


1,514,607.172 , 


J,685,004.881 


IffifL 








- 


1 









so 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



STOCK OF GOLD AND SILVER IN THE UNITED STATES FROM 1873 TO 1898. 

The stock of gold and silver and tbe amount per capita at the close of each fiscal year, from 
1878 to 1898, in the United States, is exhibited in the following table, compiled from the reports 
of the director of the mint: 



Fiscal Year Ended 



1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
I88U.. 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1883.. 
1884.. 
1885., 
1886.. 
1887.. 
1888., 
1889.. 
1890., 
1891., 
1892., 
1898., 
1894. 
1895.. 
1896., 
1897.. 
18U6.. 



Total Coin a^d Bullion. 



POPHLA- 
TION. 



4i.«n,ooo 

4+t.;i-».s,iiiji> 

47.M#i,tll.5(> 

51J116X)U) 

5iG.14!<il[ltJ 

:Mi,li7H,i<lil 
tlJ,lS-».ll(lj 

4if!,1MJ;.1llifl 
iw,;t!f;,ii(ii 
t;i",srs.i!(.<] 

tXMLC^.itJfl 



Gold. 



I l7.o7'.^..l98 
12I.|:ml06 
litffc.tkHi.^W 
If" I 'J E 472 
^i:l.].ti.-.l77 
«7 
06 
. i38 

t>42.:.y^.il68 

5BH,ri:.^,i|fl6 

("hV).;V.'1J:«6 

(iik5,JxL'..il29 
'>:►!. ?i.v.rBi6 

r^-^7.ftk7.'B6 

r?.*i;..L'7o..>42 
Hii;L"^Mr80 



saver. 



li.i.;hV>.t78 
l',uii-7.t«5 
;^^■.4l^.!©2 

►ti.lM7.l07 

r]7..^3i-,;m 

li^.:):':l,f;78 
17.),:t'^lJ44 

^:;;i.:*J^.I42 

>;^.i:.H.r88 

;i^:Ml'.^■1.."J66 

rf^.E.iUT.i08 
A:t[\.Ms.-\VS 
J<uV.lliyi9 



:jrii.:i 1:7^44 

<il."xnf; 1.484 
irj-i,.'^7.767 

<u^,7L>,il71 
iSi|/riX^781 
tvi;:.^i7'J,743 



PEE Capita. 



Gold, saver, ^^^c 



18.23 
3.44 
2.75 
2.88 
3.61 
4.47 
6.02 
7.01 
9.32 
9.65 
10.10 
9.93 
10.48 
10.29 
U.15 
11.76 
U.09 
11.10 
10.10 
10.15 
8.98 
9.18 
9.10 
8.40 
9.56 
11.66 



10.15 
.24 
.44 
.81 
1.21 
1.85 
2.40 
2.96 
3.41 
8.87 
4.34 
4.65 
6.05 
6.44 
6.00 
6.44 
6.86 
7.39 
8.16 
8.70 
9.20 
0.13 
8.97 
8.81 
8.70 
8.56 



$3.S8 
8.68 
8.19 

a.ee 

4.82 
6.82 
7.42 
9.97 
12.78 
13.62 
14.44 
14.68 
16.63 
16.r3 
17.16 
18.20 
17.96 
18.49 
18.26 
18.86 
18.13 
18.31 
18.07 
17.21 

18.:: 

20.12 



CIRCULATION OF MONEY IN THE UNITED STATES. 



July 1. 



Amownt of 

money in 

United States. 



Amount in 
circtUation. 



Population 
June 1. 



Money per 
capita. 



CirculO' 
tionper 
capita. 



1872.., 

1873.., 

1874.. 
11875.. 
'l876,., 

1877.. 

1878.. 

1879.. 

1880.. 

1881.. 



1884.. 



1800 . 
1891.. 
1882.., 
1883.. 
1894... 
1805... 
1896... 
1897... 
1886.., 



*7fe.731.5t.i 
T74,*i6,fHli> 

ait>. mi. 78 1 

-(E^>U&iI,&*7 

7yL2ba,67t{ 

tU&L.^l541 

l,3U5,ttat,lU7 

l,4at.5Al,823 

V4ao,e<(i>7iy 

l.(»l^,4Sl»,Bltt 
1,706,451. IH^ 
l,8IT,t{fi&.@36 

1.000,442.^2 

2,07a,3^.iU 

2,1I4,3^1&J> 
2.1^.234.07^ 
f,372,a»,fiUl 

s,auai2i6,tiK5 

2,31&.6K1<838 

3,44U.^t,^l 
2,i5a,83»,K»5 



t7;«i.ftClgl..^ 
7al.Rffl,H]» 

Ti>t, M, SMT 

rj7,nw.;Bi§ 

722,314,883 
7211, 132. U^ 
8tfi,tt3L7V3 

l,ll4,2»8,m 

i,i74,aiao,4ijt 

l,'2'^,3U5,til« 
1,343,625. WW 

i,2KJ.:QU,5a{j 

1,317,538, 14a 
l»ftra,170Hl57O 
l,i«t.3Kl,iHt* 

1. 4417. 440, 707 
l,H01.3*7,lg7 
l.SQ@,701,;^ 
1,I»4,(IG1.38S 
l.dUl, 179.666 
l,duU,ilS1,G3itt 
L(Hli.il28,34H 
L§43,4;^,74f9 
l.()G2,4S4.23B 



41,677. E3U) 
43, 796. out! 

46.35«,0(» 
47,6g6,iJU> 

4D,a«^,aau 

60. IK, 783 
62,4US.(tD 

fitl,l41k(Uf 
&7,401,ilJU 

^n,389.0UI 
(^0f75,aJO 

as,4u^uuu 

6lt,83ri.au0 
tiS,SQ^.OOU 
09,753,000 
7L3ft),0OU 

72,aat.ou« 

74,533.000 
7^,l4d,(»0 



ftfJ.TB 

la.itj 

17.62 
li,4ti 
id. IS 
21 M 
24.04 
27.41 
2&.^ 
a0,(5L 
31.06 

^U51 

U4.40 

3;>,80 
M.U 
34. M 
'm2l 
34.7j> 

^.4(t 
S3.7T 



flS.lfl 

IS.W 
17. le 

IS. 12 

15, fig 

15.33 
Lti.75 
UJ.41 
21.71 
22,37 
22.S1L 
2S.f3 

21. BS 
!^.46 

as. 58 

22.^ 

^4L 
24.41 

23.03 
^LU 

^.07 
24.74 

2&.aa 



The difference between the amount of money In the country and the amount In olrcnla- 
tion represents tbe money in the treasury. Currency certificates, act of June 8. 1872, are in* 
eluded in the amount of United States notes in circulation in tabled for years 1873 to 1891, in- 
clusive; since 1891 they are reported separately. "* 



.J 



GOLD AND BILTBR. 



SI 



GOVERNMENT PAPER CDTmENCY IN 


CIRCirLATIOX. 




jtTA'i ax 


tlUt6$. 


1^, 


rate*. 






Tntat 


m. 


siio.ii^it: 
aofi,4irr.Ji4 
80i.raiJ,(y7 

,^{it.897,aiS) 
H0tLrt41.»sl 

»iS,T73,S91 

U4s.Fia3.r>7S 




IM.^tiO.lXiO 
lIUkMKiy 

ills 

li,4L^.f*iil 

11.E£a).UiO 
21,3C5.{«0 

iJ.y;s5.{M> 

3tVn 15.1 100 


MrSS 

13B,7W.7W 

S'l.y:i5,4jrT 
ll^.f.rtH7.^E70 
llG,7TO.7*t 

ia),a^T0.:i9n 

PJ»fl70.Ul'J 
4^,381:541^ 


ax»,:ttJT,s:fl 

35;a02,44'^i 
pH7.310,04:i 

32t;.tian]aw 
32f!,4KtJt3 

;^JSt.7;^^T^>2 

I.;.'- . ..i: ..i-.-i 


384,:9IK5.'I7 

^uOhUiu.ht;^ 
8iiijrj(5.»« 

TO7,8iy,Kf.t 
MtGKlKWl 

SaUBlM.lTIJ 
mi.(^hl.4S;-| 


883, . :: : 




isaa . . . :: : 




flW.., ...... 




88b:::;:.. .::;:;::::;::::::::::: 




|:::::::::::::-.:::::::;::::::: 


08,051 Jii57 

nfl,oeo.sofi 


E01 


^U8 


flUB 





UOLD AN1> &LLVKU IN CUtCLTLATiON IN TUK UXITKLi STATES. 
Tbe treasury ut^tt^sof im are not ijicludeJ in the toral for sllvfjr, aUboiijtli prei*oT]i<?ri in 
thtj tB,bIe, Bs they are ImjtKJ uptia silyar: ^^ - < 

7'fftiil Sih^r i^if\'^^^ Trfintu'v Suimi^i- „, . , li.Jioltin i 



JitBraso. 



131331^377 



1886. 
U88T. 
1898. 

1891. 
18B2.. 
18Q8,. 
1884., 

18S6., 

mi.. 

1898. 



Oo}d 
coin. 



3iijed3,4U 



:mim22y^ 



cfrff> 
Ji,(BBl03G 

Hi,EW73;in 



7lU>aK7S 
9J;Bffi»437 

u»2joea8M,]iass74m] 

S7fl,0{i5,4S3-imTBiJ5fl 

374^')ea.s8i m,M)^ir» 

4«8,07aAM 130^^96 
40e^Tir7.74tl L4i;»5«<33» 

'OSmiJSi 4Bit8li@ 
5LULl4frftr5 4J7ja&OL}l 



«321 JiTtViAt: |L'HH2V,L»S;i *; Ifl. 1 1 0.729 



. .iHyHO;HS| ai,!f.liJ.[H-Hi! 5 ^.WWJIIMI .... 
4lM,4<10.ttiVi ;ii>,;M],f^H v:i.tiai.(j8tf.... 
4il.770.8i;S 3»,T\WJ|d Bfi^-fiT^flU , „, 
4fla.EiaJ.l4J 33,47I.iKM^l0l.K?O,94fi^.... 

4tt7,644jnfla 66,50l3.14%g,llftOn , , . . 

611,664,3^1 6IJ^,3(M0^;^7f; 

4flS!,&ie,3il MAU.^W.mAift 

J*li.77tf.40() 5tf^fiG.im^2^Vm 

fiHa,K14ail& 67,^:t.mi>t07,;fl.4.148$4a4B3,165 
5W,OOtt,07B fifi.7!»ff.48ir53e,P80,80a UftjKiHW: 
4*t,tf33i710 57,0Sai.74;i[;l2»i,43!J.165 140jtWl,e04 

S*k;3T8^^fle 5i,L9urrb7,{iiR;sei ^ 

6sa,6se,(53fi 51,088, itaaiSLisuaa 

499h44»,342 5^175.»i^.2££^50@ 



SJ,474,a»0 
43,Tft£;.iSl 

4a,&7«;i(e 

50.35J.ti^ 

ts.40o.^a 



«neH780,Sl[)i 57.3KI.7*^l^ffK)f.''ri5.0f*0' 5H W5.SSfl M.IS^iS^: 
7J54.71t5.7ii! FK!.;fflI.;5l-^0].W;i.rt*,H LlUXl5.75^l T0.H7JJ.I 



lW3a.W0lfi8.ii3B,S44 

ft&^7,361 69,9(«jaQl5 

fia.riftejff? 59,^J2fl.M0 
T 



Fia0.77e,07*1 

I36,Srr7.I03 
]tia4^1tUV>5 

]8i.8S2.7;^:; 

:j4CltU,4*ffl 
llK^44S.H'i 

42rt,ri;-l'^ J Irl 
4i^[H1U7ti 

431,Viaj.<i:^ 
44^H4i5r]J]3 
JjeVRsJ? 1^^117 

513.213.(>1!:^ 

Hsiv.e»;77ti 



44.2 

;^9.2 

&y 
»o.4; 

Sl>,0 

HI] 

'.m.i 

77 4 

73,5 



COINAGE OIT GOLD AND MlLVlCll OF THE WORLD fcOR THE TEAR3 1874-flT. 



&dLl>. 



CALEarDAa YEAita. 



Fine 



m4. 

1875 . 

Irt7g, 

1880. 
1881. 

UN. 



18^. 

I8ea. 



18B0. 



TotaL. 



*T,.Via,37P 
ia30&,ti45 

7,'ji3.y&i 
74U,8iU 
4kB32,&51 
5J07L8SJ 
4.810,001 
4J^,Trd 
4,571i,<JlCr 
8L(>4e.5]0 

8.1:0,^11 

i.319.72& 
&.783W*ia 
8,»4^,S!^ 

U. 178,856 
0K47ti,^£^ 



Til hit'r 



tlr-t5,77a,;-if*7 
Hl&,yH7.4:J8 

201J^l(i,4tJe 
lBS.!ffle,<^ll 

W,75Ji,Sll 
lJb,7^^,lFl 
147,015,375 

(»9.tly7J7a 
1043^5^114 

9S,7^,6Ha 
IW.e43.070 
I34,t)»!,4tl5 
13l,!^,!^ia 
lti8.90UlU 
74E),'i44,»^ 
1]U.5:44X32 
ITZ.473,134 

227,631,083 
2Ill,(»r,438 
lET.8d^,5n 

4a?,7ia,a4S 



4,360.400,710^ 



STl.VEH. 



Fftut 



7a.«io.8:,i 

02.747 a ly 

SS,441J,:Vt(i 
ISl,+f7l,fl70 
8M^4,655 
65^442.074 
8i3.5^.051 
85,I^.09U 
^.511.]^ 
74.120.127 
9S.[>J4>475 
0S.5tirtJi44 
13fl.38S^ 
mj^,OUQ 
107JS8,2,Tti 

injttfu^ 

lUtl,962,049 
I30,3af.fl47 
1(«.(B7.783 
87,473,533 
01,057.00;^ 
113,^2,018 



Cninino 



#1 03.1131, a;(3 
llfl,D15,4(>7 
li'S.B77,lJy 
]l4,SS0£f.?tR2 

&4,fiILtl74 
ll8,OIO,UUi 

nn,7H&,Ht+4 

i09,aak7i>s 

(^8:s2,0ii4 
ia«JtM,5T4 

134,851. mi 
1^,41 1.31^ 

li)£t;^E2,£tid 
L'i[?,2nH,]44 
l3!),2&4,gW 
l.-»S.517,»4: 
137,^53.800 
liagt)flt&,78{J 
12L{ilO^10 
1^395.740 
lff?HTfflJ,S9l 



3.ima08.87l| 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



TREASURY HOLDINGS OF GOLD AND SILVER. 



Total gold 
coin and 
bvUion. 



Gold lets 
certificates 
outstand- 
ing. 



Total 
silver dol- 
lars and 
bullion. 



saver dol- 
lars and 
bullion 
lesscertiflr 
cates out- 
standing. 



Subsid- 
iary 
silver. 



Total net 
silver. 



1878 
1879 
18H0 
1881 
1882 
188;^ 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 

ias8 

1889 
1890 
1891 
I89i 
1H93 
189 1 
1895 
189J'. 
1897 
1898 
1899 



ri28,460,208 
185.236,475 
126,145,«< 
163.171,661 
148,506.890 
196.078.568 
204,876.594 
247,028,625 
282,838,124 
278,101,106 
813.753.617 
a0».6Ot.32O 
821,612,«S 
238,518,122 
256.577,706 
188,455,433 
131,217,4»4 
155,893,932 
161,307.143 
178,076.654 
202.825,047 
261,201.428 



1103,562.523 
119,966.655 
118,181.527 
167,412.141 
148,477.370 
188,271,198 
133.729,954 



156,798,749 
186,875,669 
198,866,247 
186,711,561 
190,232.404 
117,667,723 
114,342,367 
95.485,414 
64.873,025 
107,512,363 
106,345,284 
140,790,735 
167,004,419 
228,546,159 



915,060,828 
33,239.917 
49.549,851 
65,854,671 
90,884,724 
116,396.235 
139,616,414 
169,461,996 
184,345,764 
222,401.405 
254,499,241 



J15,062,748 
32,825,487 
43,760,282 
26,743.942 



43,776,549 
43,189,408 
67.921,062 
96,229,539 



323,909.360 
379.706.279 
433.868.402 
480.476.527 
495,409,178 
495,786,906 
4.%.662,413 
504.583.679 
604.932.226 
601,516.817 



54,111,865 
82,685.929 
26,699,317 
72.341,131 
106,977,699 
153,987,362 
168.314,797 
176,054,164 
160,249,888 
146,247,211 
141,273,146 
99,647,474 



96.860.506 
8.008,401 
24,350,482 
27,247,697 
28,048.681 
28,486.001 
29.600.720 
81.286J309 
28.904,682 
26,977,494 
26,061,741 
25,129,738 
22.805,226 
19,666,695 
14,224,714 
11,856,944 
17,889,531 
16,662346 
16,637,424 
16,210,344 
12,097,682 
6,070.497 



921.913,254 
41,728,838 
68,110,764 
58,901,689 
63,9274365 
72,261,550 
72,790,123 
99.167,961 
125.134,221 
107,260,882 
80,163,606 
57,716.662 
49,504,548 
91,997326 
121,202,313 
165,848,806 
186,204,328 
192,606,990 
175386,767 
162,457,666 
168,870,827 
106,717,971 



MONEY OF THE WORLD. 

Monetary systems and approximate stocks of money in the principal countries of the world 

as reported by the treasury department's bureau of mint. 



COtJNTRIBS. 



ii 




lilt? 



Per Capita. 



United States*... 
United Kingdom 

France 

Germany 

Belgium 

Italy 

bwitzerland 

Greece. 

Spain 

PortugaL 

Roumania 

Servia .' 

Austria-Hung'y . 

Netherlands 

Norway 

Sweden 

Denmark 

Russia 

Turkey 

Australia 

BKy?* 

Mexico 

Cent. Am. st'tes. 
So. Am. states... 

Japan 

India 

China 

Straits Settl'm'ts 

Canada 

Cuba 

Haiti 

Bulgaria .... 

Siam 

Hawaii 

Cape Colony. 
8. A. Rep.... 

Finland 

Total .... 



G.&S. 
Gold . . 
G.&S. 
Gold . . 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
Gold.. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
Gold.. 
G.&S. 
Gold.. 
Gold . . 
Gold., 
Silver 
G.&S. 
Gold . . 
Gold . . 
Silver. 
Silver. 
Silver. 
G.&8. 
G.&S. 
Silver. 
G.&S. 
Gold . . 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
G.&S. 
Silver. 
G.&S. 
Gold., 
Gold . 
Silver, 



1 to 15.96 



1 to 15.50 



_ to 16.60 
1 to 15.50 
1 to 15.60 
1 to 16.50 
1 to 15.60 



1 to 14.95 
to 14.28 
to 14..S8 
ltoia957 
ltol4. 
1 to 14. 
1 to 14.^ 
1 to 14.38 
ltoU.38 
1 to 14.08 



ltol6?fi 



to 15.50 
1 to 15% 



1 to 16.50 
1 to 15.50 
1 to 16.60 
1 to 16.18 
1 tol5 



1 to 13.69 
1 tol5 
1 tol4.„ 
I to 14.88 
1 to 14. 
1 to 12.90 
1 tol5?^ 
1 to 14.: 
1 to 15.1 



1 to 15.60 
1 ro 15.50 
1 to 15.50 
1 to 14.95 
1 to 15.98 



1 to 14.28 



1 to 14.38 



72.9 

89.6 

38.5 

62.3 

6.4 

31.8 

3.0 

2.2 

180 

6.1 

6.4 

2.3 

46.0 

4.9 

2.0 

5.0 

2.3 

126.0 

22.0 

6.0 

7.8 

13.0 

3.8 

37.5 

45.0 

296.0 

360.0 

3." 

5.8 

1.8 

1.0 

83 

5.0 

.1 

1.7 



9925.1 

438.0 

810.6 

668.5 

80.0 

96.5 

24.0 

.6 

45.5 

5.2 

14.5 

1.2 

227.7 

21.9 

7.8 

8.6 

15.3 

756.6 

50.0 

132.1 

80.0 

8.6 

1.3 

77.5 

79.9 



1 lo 12.90 



126.0 



16.0 
2.0 
4.0 
1.0 

20.0 
4.0 

37.5 

29.2 

4£ 

l4,594.9 



9638.2 

121.7 

419.8 

212.8 

46.0 

42.6 

10.7 

1.6 

49.8 

6.1 

10.6 

2.7 

145.5 

66.1 

2.3 

5.7 

6.4 

128.4 

40.0 

7.0 

6.4 

106.0 

19.0 

85.0 

60.4 

692.0 

750.0 

242.0 

5j0 

1.6 

4.6 

6.8 

193.4 

l.O 

1.0 

1.2 

.4 



R36.1 
112.0 
124.6 
132.2 
79.1 
69.5 
14.3 
80.6 
137.6 
89.0 
83.7 
2.7 
86.2 
45.5 
8.8 
27.7 
7.0 



4.0 

8.4 

750.6 



912.42 
11.01 
21.06 
12.78 
4.62 
8.08 
8.00 
.21 
2.53 
1.02 



5.02 
4.47 
8.90 
1.76 
6.66 
6.86 
2.07 
26.42 
3.00 
.67 
.39 
2.07 
1.77 



35.0 

■*'4.*i 



9.4 



8.01 
l.U 
4.00 
.80 
4.00 
40.00 
20.83 
8».44 
1.66 



98.56 
3.05 

10.90 
4.07 
6.92 
1.36 
3.56 
.62 
2.76 
1. 

1.96 

.17 

8.20 

11.45 
1.15 
1.14 
2.36 
I — 

i! 

1.40 

.66 

8.15 

6.76 

.93 

1.34 

1.99 

1.96 

62.06 

.96 

.83 

4.50 

2.06 

88.68 

10.00 

.66 

1.88 

, .16 



94.38 
2.81 

3.r 

2.63 
12.17 
5.41 
4.77 
12.76 
7.64 
7.64 
6.24 
1.17 
1.90 
9. ■ 
1.90 
5.44 
8.04 



3.07 
2.64 
20.01 



4.10 



8.62 



3,977.5 



2,322.8 



S-eO" 8.0B 



925.36 
16.88 
85.19 
19.38 
23.71 

9.85 
16.83 
13.68 
12.93 

9.86 
10.89 

2.86 
10.12 
26.20 

6.96 

8.40 
12.04 

6.86 

8.78 
82.82 

8.75 

u : 

8.W 
28.U1 

2.89 

1.96 
62.05 
10.66 

1.94 
12.60 

2.86 
43.68 
60.00 
21.88 
83.77 

5.43 



1.77 



8.80 



*Nov. 1, 1898; all other countries Jan. 1, 1898. 



GOLD AND SILVER. 83 


MONETARY SYSTEM OF THE UNITED STATES. 
[From Muhleman's Monetary Systems of the World.] 




Wgt. 


Fine- 
ness. 


Ba- 

tio to 
gold. 


Limit of 
issue. 


Denomi- 
nations. 


Legal-ten- 
der anal- 
iiy. 


Receity- 
abU. 


Exchange- 
abU. 


Redeem- 
abU. 


Gold coin.. 


25.8 
KT.to 
dol- 
lar. 


300-lOOG 




None. 


To 

6 

2H 


Unlimited 


For all 
dues. 


For certif- 
icates un- 
derllmita- 

tions. 




G old cer- 








Issue sus- 
pended 80 
long as 
free gold 
In treas'ry 
is below 
HOO.000,000. 


tio.ooo 

-•i.dOO 
l,(i(iO 
60O 
lUO 
50 
20 


None. 


For all 
public 
dues. 


For gold 
coin at 
treasury 
oranyoih- 
er money. 


In gold 

coin at 

treasury. 










Silver dol- 
lars 


412.5 
IIT. to 

dol- 
lar. 


9001000 


1.5.988 

tOl; 


K e q ulre- 
mont to 

redeem 
t r e a sury 
notes. 


11 


Unlimited 

unless 
other wise 
contr a c t- 
ed. 


For all 
dues. 


For silver 
c'rtiflc'tes 
or smaller 
coins at 
treasury. 


May be 
dep(»slted 
for silver 
certifi- 
cates. 


Silver cer- 
t tificates . 








Silver dol- 
lars In use 


$1,000 $20 

5U0 lU 

10(> 6 

50 2 

1 


None. 


For all 
public 
dues. 


For dol- 
lars or 
smal ler 
coins. 


In silver 
dollars. 








'■ U. S. notes. 

1 

! 








8346,681,016. 


Same as 
silver cer- 
tificates. 


Same as 
silver dol- 
lars. 


*For all 
dues. 


For all 
Icinds of 
money ex- 
cept gold 
certifi- 
cates. 


In coin at 
sub-treas- 
ury in N. 
Y.und San 
Francisco 
in sums of 
riOorover 








Tre a 8 n r y 
notes of 
1890 . . 








fl56,0«,615. 


Same as 
silver cer- 
tificates. 


Same as 
silver dol- 
lars. 


For all 
dues. 


For U. S. 
notes. 


In coin at 
treasury. 










C u r r ency 
, certifi- 
cates 








Same as 
U.S. notes. 


$10,000 


None. 


Not re- 
ceivable. 


For U. S. 
notes. 


In U. S 

notes a t 
subtreas- 
ury where 
Issued. 










National 
bk. notes 

t 








Volume of 
U.S. bonds 
and their 
cost. 


f 1.000 
500 
100 
50 
20 
10 
5 


None. 


For all 
dues ex- 
cept du- 
ties and 
interest 
on public 
debt. 


For silver 
and minor 
coins. 


In lawful 
money at 
treasury 
or bank of 
issue. • 








' Subsidiary 
! coins 


385.8 
lar. 


900-1000 


14.953 
tol. 


Needs of 
the coun- 
try. 


50c 
25c 
10c 


Not to ex- 
ceed $10. 


To amount 
of $10 for 
all dues. 


For minor 
coins. 


In lawful 
money at 
treasury 
in sums of 
$20 or any 
multiple. 


Minor 
coins..... 


5KJt. 

^6 
gr. 

let. 

48 RT. 


6c -§i 

lc-'»5 

per, 5% 

tin and 

zinc. 




Needs of 
the coun- 
try. 


5c 
Ic 


Not to ex- 
ceed 25c. 


To amo'nt 
of 25c for 
all dues. 




In lawful 
money at 
treasury 
in sums of 
?20orover. 




•Duties on imports by regulation only. | 



SJ 



CHICAGO DAILY NEVTS ALMANAC KOR 1900, 



COINS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Anihorttr for chjIdIh^ huA tih:3.ng&s la vrelKht ami l3iiGne!i», tutal umoutit otilnvdi Icgat-toodor 

quality. 



QOLTt COINS, 

Dit\thir l'lfi^Ifj:—Auih9riK^d lobp colued^ apt. 

.ao. Tela I aiiKhuar ctditeil to Juuti ,4*j, Itiflti, 
Ij ,1** t,4T2.ai I. Fn I M PKa 1 u* n dL' r 

J^ufl^f^ — Auihurlied to Ik- cuLQ(?d. act of 
April 3, lim^. Mt'liftit, H'TOtiTiiijf!; lttierit'sa,,5>lfl?i: 
wL^ieUi c banned, ait uf June 'iS, LS;i4, tn 2iiS 
pralnB; tlneut:!^ cbtini^ud, art 4.^1 J ua^^ 2f^ J^iJ, 
to .^G35 1 ti ne D PAS c ti III] M:^! I . fict u f J a n , IH, ! f<^. 
tfl hHIW- Total ainyunt rikinpd to Juno M IJSM* 



ifiJima: tlnt?iies3 clianiTfed, fletof Juti(;2S, ISW, 
to -^.JPsaj; dDt^ntssa djatiffcd. avt of Jim. Ifi. 
IHi'IiTh lo .3)1)- ToUil aniyQiir pnlfiL^d t<> ,lunp iW. 
laiiiiiH l^r^stljft,;iiO. Fuil It'KHl tender, 
<^uiirifr-£;^f^j^f-Aiil>uirlKeci TO be oolnod, act 

M*^i\ wttjffbt t liitnged. Htl ui Juiic lil, 1K3U to 
^.D^rsJns; tlao be s#[!b allied, act of Juno 2H, 
183-1* lo .KHfiS.1^ fliiennsfl e^baniifGd, act of Jun. 
1J!{» lfl37, Ui.l^lU. Total amnuat coidbd to June 
ao, iaO&. i!38,&l0,33a Fu ll iBta i tPbil e r. 

Thrte-Dff Hi* r PifCf - A ut b orJ sied to he; coined , 
atitof Feb. 2U iSicV; wtiight, 774 rtraluja; lioo- 
neiiB. .WM; i>OLaai£e dlacontitiueLi. act of SopT. 
28. imf. ToMil auioiml: coliiodi ^iei^,3tG. FuU 
Ipfial tender. 

tnif lifj;^ir— Authorized to be coLiiGd, art 
31 rtrrb :4. 1*191 weiKl]t,3S.SirrEiUt?1 flnpni^as, SXJO: 
CHS L n HHC d i ern n tt n t3 ed sAct of B<>pt . 3in iSiMl. Toi a L 
amtjanteoinud, *l«,41iiMH;T;. Bull legal tfiodfsr. 

DnUar — Authorised to be colOHd, act of 
April:;, 17P3; weiplit. ijnirrame; tinenei*a, .miAi 
weiKhtchanFcd, act of Jan. 1*, ISi*. to 412^ 
f^rainEi; tlDc<Dt^iJ^ chanfred, net of Jan. IB, Mi>^ 
to JXKJ; cumaizo dLscMjntlimtd, act of Ftib, 12^ 
IftTft- Total iimount culiiod to I'ob, TJ, JSTli, 
^,cs;^lH2;5tf. CoSuiiM^ rcaitthortzt'dH an fif reli. 22t, 
l;STb. CoinajiO dlsctsiitlnufici afrt^r Julf ll Ij^IHt 
excf^ptfomcrtaEu jjurpot'e^, tiot Jn[y 1-1, ]j^X 
Auiountuolned to Jpno3tit IS^. W*U,i!ff:,Vtiy. Kutl 
Le^al tetidtrexc-ept when otherwitHj provldtid 
Ln tilt) contract. 

Trade IiDf^nr— Authorized to bq coibpd, act 
of Feb, 13, 1^3; wclffht, 4^ eralna; tliteness, 
AMI; leifttltfadt^r limited to fo, act of JunCifi, 
LS74{rc7. Etat-1; coinage llmUi^d ta export tie- 
maud noci legaMon dor Quality repeal ed. joint 
resoEutlOTi.iJulr23, iBTri; oginage disco utimJOtl+ 
ac^ Fob. ^, WS!. Total AmouDt coined, tSCv 

Jjrtif'-Doliirtr— Authorized to be coinecl> act of 
Aprll'a. 17B35 freight, Ignitus; tiDCTioflJi, .>ilir,4i 
weight channL+d, aet of Jan. Isk Tsat, tu 2(Ji;H 
ArarnH; titkeiie;^ (^banEed. act of Jao, TS, iSiT 



to .900; weight fhauKed, act of Feb. '^U 'l^'^vi^ 
li^^aralpB; wi?l>Elitehaijgefl. act of Fcl?, l% iSi'A-, 
l3U grata if or lft!/J jyrraina. Total aruoimt 



ooidS°to June' 30, iSSK, fia>,4;ir,[;Sl. Lesal 



to 



tender, 110. ^ . ^ . . 

fiV^^upnbffia UtilJ-Dotlnr^MiilioiiiS^ to bo 
coined, act f An tf.S,iaiCJ; wtJkjht. lifiltgrainfl? 
flneneaa, sn}. Total amount coiued, eSi^l," 
uSZ.aOi LcffiiJ tender, fill 

Qtiartiir-I}uUftr—A.uih<}rite6 to l>e coined, aet 
of April 2. 17lfi; Tf^^lghi^ IQi ffraina; tineui^tiap 
.aP3-4; welglit changed, act of Jau. II?. 1J^7. lo 
lauiffralnsT 0nepo&& ehaneod, a^:^t of Jflq. lA, 
1837, to ^m:. weight cbanffcd, aLt of Feb. 21. 
1953. to 96 Brains; \Ttdsht clmnjgred, aot of Feti. 
"[% iSTrfi tc 6W gT&Tna. OF 'Jfi.iV grains. Total 
atnount. coined to June 30, WBA^ ta^.m^,^3b^. 
I^^al tender. HO. * , , ^ ^ 

r'ohimlAtiti Qiiarter-Dnllar— Anthoriied to be 
coL 3 s ed .act of Ma rch 3. l*m : welfrh t, S«. iJi sm\ n s : 



fin(?Ticsa, .900. Total amount coiued. Fia005.75. 
Legal tender, Hi). 

Twntty-<yni Pf *?(*(•— Authorized tube coined, 
ftci of ftiarcJi 3. 1875^ weliurht, 5 K^finiB, or 77. lU 
f^aius; flneneas, ,yiW; coinage prohibiteii. act 
o f fil a y ^ . 1^7*. Total am onn t ct>l ned , ^t,f;a), 

n^jij^ -Authorised to ha coined, act of Aprij 
3. liV^t weiBht, -ILO Ktnina; hiienoes, ►8!fe,4? 
welabt changed, aet of Jan. Id, H^^ to ilk 
era Ins; tirieneiiS changed, act of Jan. IB. 1^ 
Ui A*.ni; weight c banned, act of Feb. £1, 1553, to 
'^A Kraln^iL weight ehau^d, aet of Feb. IS, 
liiri. to 34 i^raing, or ^5H jn-aina. Total amount 
eolTU'd to l}mw m, IBSB, *;«],yT3,tl01i)0. I^ugal 
tender. tlO- 

jE/f<^f rKm^-Autliorisied to be coined, aciof 
Aprlia,lTlW^ welffbt.ad.H grains, flnenoss.ifga.4i 
weight changed, act of Jan. 1ft, l^^, to Stg*) 
gramn: flneiiei^^ ehan^'ed, aet of Jan. W. Vm. 
to /.WO: weiinht changed, act of Foti. ^L 18&!, to 
19-2^ra3n^i coinage dl&con tin ai^. aet of Ii'eb. 
12, ld7;i. Toral niuount coined, S4.88(J.31&,40. 

Thrre-Ccut P^Jcr^— Authorized to be coined, 
act of March a, 1^1: witit;ht. I^^ grains; flne- 
nens. ~f*i: welKtit changed, act of March 3, 
ISria, to ILnQ vrainfi; finenenfi changed, act of 
March 3* H?o3,tu ,90l>; coinage di6ccmtiRued,act 
of Fob, U ISra. Tut a I amount ooined, |l.2t2,- 

MIKOJI COINS. 

nftvCfiit fniffeff)— Anthoiized to he oolnod. 
aet of May 16, wm, weight, n.lfi grralne, com- 
posed of fii per cent copper and 135 per Cf^nt 
n I eke t . Total amoun t ce i n ed t o J une rO. 1 biSA, 
*la,So2.331.W. I^Kai tender for SI. but retluotd 
to i^ cents bj- aet {>f Feb. 12, lii7E*. 

Threr-Ctnt (^Lit^cJj— Authnriied tobe coined, 
aet of March a, lHt:«5; weight, 30 grains^ com- 
puB^Hl of 1^ per cent cepiier apd 2a per cent 
nickel, Toi-al amount colned.|iMl;+Jft.4^. Le- 
gal tender ft>r i%^ een ta^ but reduced to 25 cent* 
by act Keh. It, 137a. Coinage dlsconUnued, net 
of Hcpt.i{si, ISUO. 

Twn-Ufnt timmsg)— Anlhorlaad to be colaed, 
aet of April 22, l^JW; weight, m er™tn&, csobj- 
poisd of 96 per cent eupper and 5 per cent tin 
and Kiaa Coinage discontinued, act of Febr 
LJ, IST;^. Total anionnl coined. K>l2,ttifl. 

Ci'iit {ii^jfpifer'i— Authorized to be coined, act 
of April 2, 17fi2; weighU 264 grakiF; weight 
cbanped. act of Jan, 14, ITW. to 208 inainsi; 
Weight changed by proclamation of the preM- 
denc> Jan, ttl nw^, in confonnily with act of 
March 3, I7S^, Co Ity itTHins: coinage djacon- 
tinned, act of Feb. 21. ia&7. Total ameuDt 
coined, ?l,&£i,aS;.44. 

Cf lit iihkfcf'^'i— Atithoriijed to be coined, set of 
Feb. 2t. lBi7; weiffht, ?isTaJns. compLised of S6 
per cent eopper and 12 per cent nlckeL Coin- 
atfe discontinued, act of April ^> 18tj4. Total 
amount coined. f2,00T,720. 

Out [brojiEtf I — Coinage fluthoriied, ftct of 
April ^i, l^if; weight, i.'i grains, composed of 
l^pcr cent oopper and ^ percent tin ami xincs. 
Total amount coined to June 30. 18Qe1> fS,btti?f- 
iilTAi, Legia tender, 25 cents. 

HfiffCfntlenppi'r)— Authorized to be coined, 
act of ApriTi, liW; weight. 13!^ grain <v; weight 
changed, net of Jait- lu 1T95J. to ItW grains: 
we Eglit changed by proclamation of the presJ-^ 
dent, Jan.vr;. 17Sli. In conformity wlili act of 
Miirch '6, 17S&, to ti4 jzratni;: coinage diacon- 
tinned, ^et of Feb. 2L m^T. Tot*l ainoitnt 
coined, fSD,Oaj.lL 



TOTAL COINAGE. 
6old.,..«l,WiO,?iti,13a.OO 

Siilrer. .. 7^7.277,71*^,75 

Minor... 30,3Qi,Or^;^r 

Total,, K,T18^%v,Ji:i).I'i 



COmA(?E 

Gold : 

f^tlver...... h£.4Sa,g84X» 

Minor...... L439,484.11 



Totar^9,K2.tWa,V!3.'LiJ 



A. 

















GOU) AND SILVER. 85 


COINAGE OF NATIONS. 


Countries. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Gold. 


SUver. 


United^'States 


18,547,229 
33,695,006 




$47,053,060 

23,402;560 
84,602,786 

■*21,7i9i86' 

25,133,476 

10,284 


"ii 




IS 


Mexico 


Great Britain 


Australasia 


India* 




5,679,692 

'*2,718!fl68' 
80,986,666 


36^.«g 


France 


20,845.387 


Germany 


Rnssiat 


86.882.498 


Finland 


Au8tri&-Hi(ngary t 


18,206,728 


9,056,188 


83396,739 


m 

67,000 
109,007 


88.610,668 


6,722,330 


Britrea 


Spain 




205,649 
23,883.505 




2.890.407 
147.966 

"siisxiMo 


6,724.106 

4J%6,028 
864,000 

964,800 
147.400 

135,513 

44a435 

619.8:^0 
720,133 


Japan. 


1,515,000 


1,125,000 


Portnaral 


Netherlands 


135,683 




Norway 




Sweden 


896,921 






Denmark 






Switzerland 


772,000 
8,420,717 


44,390 
414,483 


1,544,000 
60.114 


1,930 
7,473 

662,770 

i2,SS3 

1,700,000 

347 
140,000 

98,000 




Turkey 




Bffypt 


^•s§ 


Abyssinia 








Liberia... 








Hongkong 




2,200,000 

8.253.340 

6,092,709 

347 






CWna 








Indo-China 








23,836,427 
10,636,955 
2,773,428 

347 
66,964 


Tnnig , 


232 


232 




Canada . 




Newfoundland 








632,500 


Costa Rica 








Haiti ::.:.. 




730,285 








Argentina 




982,715 




466,483 




BollTia 






1,508,087 
2,704,831 




Peru 




4,(^3,270 








Colombia 








1,189,282 
449,807 

552,480 
623,687 


SUmador 




1,102,073 




169,798 




Venezuela. 








Chile...!!!:!;!..!!:! !!..!. 


8,353,212 


4,243,919 

1,000,000 

500,000 

30,000 


5,424,686 


677,877 




Uruguay 


49 


Guatenutla. 


146 








British Honduras 










British West indies 










« 


Puerto Rico 




8,389,222 




167,240 
392 




German K^t Africa. 








German New Guinea 

Monaco 


S>Z 








127,440 


**"45b!446* 


386,000 








453,554 
193,000 

689,985 






Congo State 








mm 






354,630 






Bulgaria 








S 














Ceylon 




236,850 
2,589,823 








8«ftTn... 






3,322,762 




Total 










281,087,438 


121,610,219 


195,899,517 


153,395.740 


437,n9.346 


167,760,297 




*Rupee calculated at coining rate, 10. 4737. 1 

ISilver ruble calculated at coining rate, 10.7718. 1 

^ iFlorin calculated at coining rate, 10. 4052, under the coinage act of Aug. 2, 1892. 1 













86 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


1 


VALUE OF FOREIGN COINS-OCT. 1, 1899. 
[Prepared by the Director of the Mint.] 


Countries. 


Statidard. 


Monetary unit. 


Vahts 
Oct. i, 1899. 


Argentina 


Gold and silver 

Gold 


Peso 


9.96.5 
.20.3 
.19.3 
.43 6 
.54.6 

1.00 
1.00.0 

4(5.5 
.43.6 

5.a'{.5 

.706 
.70.3 
.»;7.4 
.68.9 
.(•w.2 

.71.8 
.♦•6.0 

a) 

.66.1 
AYl.S 
MA 
.fo.l 
.71.0 
.68.3 

.43.6 
.92.6 
.26.8 
.43.6 

4.943 
.19.3 
.19.3 
.53.8 

4.86.6^ 
.19.3 
.96.5 
.20.7 
• .19.3 
.49.8 


Austria-Hungary 




Belgium 


Gold and silver 

Silver 


Franc 


Bolivia 


Bolivian 
Milreis.. 


0. 


Brazil 


Gold 




British possessions, N. A. (except 
Newfoundland) 


Gold 


Dollar 


British Honduras 


Gold 


Dollar 


Central American States- 
Costa Rica 


Gold 


Colon 


Guatemala i 

Honduras ( 

Nicaragua | 

Salvador J 

Chile 


Silver 


Peso 


Gold and silver 

Silver 


Peso 


China 


Tael.... 
Peso 


f Ainoy 


Canton 

Chefoo 


CbinKiang.... 

Fucbau 

Haikwan (cus- 
toms) 

Hankow 

Hongkong 

Nichwang 

Ningpo 

Shanghai 

Swatow 

Takao 


Colombia 


Silver 


[Tientsin 


Cuba!. ..:.:...::::..::..:::..:::::.::: 


Gold and sliver 

Gold 


Peso 


Deum ark 


Crown 


Ecuador 


Silver 

Gold 

Gold .. . 


Sucre 


Egypt 


Pound (100 piasters). . . : . 
•Mark 


Finland.....'..........:..:....: ": 


b^ance 


(iold and silver 

Gold 


Franc 


German empire 


Mark.... 


Great Britain 


Gold 


Pound st 
Drachma 


prlins? 


Greece 


Gold and silver 

Gold and silver 

Silver 


i 


Haiti 


India 


Rupee 


Italv 


Gold and silver 

Gold and silver* 

Gk)ld 


Lira 


Japan 

Liberia 


Yen 

Dollar . . 


i Gold 


i Silver 




1.00.0 
.47.4 
.40.2 

1.01.4 
.26.8 
.08.2 
.43.6 

1.08.0 
.51.5 


Mexico 


Silver 


Dollar 


N etherlands .- 


Gold and silver 

Gold 


Florin 


Newfoundland 


Dollar 


Norway 


Gold 


Crown 


Persia 


Silver 


Kran 


Peru 


Silver 


Sol.. 


Portugal 


Gold 


Milreis.. 


Russia 


Silvert 


Ruble... 
Peseta. . 


^Gold 


Spain 


Gold and silver 

Gold 




:i9:3 ■ 

.26.8 
.19.3 


Sweden 


Crown 


Switzerland 


Gold and silver 

Sliver 


Franc 


Tri poll 


Mahbub 
Piaster.. 


of 20 piasters.. 


Turkey 


Gold 




.()4.4 

1.08.4 

.19.3 


Uruguay 


GK)ld 


Peso 


Venezuela. 


Gold and silver 


Bolivar 






*Gold the nominal standard. Silver practically the si 

t Silver the nominal standard. Paper the actual ct 
measured by the gold standard. 

tThe ^'British dollar" has the same legal value as tl 
Straits settlements and Labuan. 

§The law of February 11, 1895, introduced the gold 
weighing .589 grams as the monetary unit. 


^ndard. 

irrency.the depreciation 

le Mexican dollar in Ho 

standard, with an Idei 


I of which Is 
ligkong, ths 
U gold peso 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 
[By Alexander Summers, Statistician U. S. Bureau of Education.] 

POPULATION. ENROLLMENT, AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE, NUMBER AND SEX 
OF TEACHERS IN COMMON SCnOOLS-lS97-9H. 



STATE OR Territory. 



Est. 
total 
popula- 
tion 

in am. 



Enrolled 
in element- 
ary a7id 
secftndary 
schools . 



Per 
cent 
of pop- 
ulation 



Average 
daUy 

attend- 
ance. 



TEACHER.<t. 



Male. Female. Total, 



United States.. 



North Atlantic Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. . 
South Central Division. . . 
North Central Division. . . 
Western Division 



North Atlantic Division- 
Maine 

New Hampshlrel 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

NewYorkI 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



South Atlantic Division- 

Delawaret 

Maryland 

District of Columbia. . . , 

Virginia I 

West Virginia§ 

North Carolina§ 

South Carolina I 

Georgia 

Florida. 



South Central Division- 
Kentucky I 

Tennessee^ 

Alabamal 

Mississippi! 

Louisiana!! 

Texaal 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Indian Territory 



North Central Dlvlslon- 

Ohlo 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota^ 

South Dakota^ 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



Western Division- 
Montana 

Wyoming} 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Wafihington§ 

Orc«onS 

California 



72,737,100 



15,038,(38 



20.68 



10,286,092 



131,750 



277,443 



20,247,100 
9,8fi8,500 
12.868.600 
25,737.600 
4,015,300 



3.614.463 
2,134,725 
2,875,»56 
6,669,572 
744..510 



17.85 
21.63 
22.34 
22.03 
18.51 



2.587,468 
1,314.622 
1.870.510 
3.99f5.8ft5 
5ir),597 



19,231 
20.199 
.31,317 
54.911 
6,092 



80.732 
2('>.6a5 
29,167 
124.442 
16.497 



655.400 

396.700 

aS4,100 

2,(»4.000 

417.001) 

863,900 

6.«>l,000 

1.837.(100 

6,196,000 



173.200 
1,200.000 

285,3Q() 
1,7(M.(JD0 

866.000 
1,754.000 
1,274,000 
2,097,000 

515,000 



2,016.000 
1.877.000 
1,741,000 
1,448.000 
l..S47,000 
2.821.000 
1,295.000 
323,(K)0 



134,405 
64,207 
6.5,582 
456.141 
65.384 
147,838 
1,208.199 
304,680 
1,173,082 



33,174 
236.003 

44.()98 
867,817 
236,188 
399,375 
258,183 
450.832 
108,455 



601.893 
481 .585 
3t8,899 
367,579 
182,341 
612,140 
308,808 
77,121 



20.51 
16.10 
19.61 
16.93 
15.68 
17.11 
17.56 
16.59 
18.93 



19.15 
19.67 
15.(r7 
21.59 
27.27 
22.77 
20.27 
21.50 
21.06 



24.90 
25.(56 
20.04 
25.39 
13.54 
21.70 
23.46 
23.83 



97,616 
47,718 
48,0(;0 
349.147 
47,370 
105,002 
827,6.52 
200,278 
864,626 



134.639 
84.383 
213,421 
150.768 
214.540 



278,715 
74,001 



30^,697 
3;i8,17<J 
♦222,690 
223.900 
I32,04f} 
404.3T2 
191.447 



•1,257 
202 
389 

1,174 
193 
373 

5,461 
&S4 

9,348 



218 
1,144 

148 
8.013 
4,0'.« 
8.ffi>5 
2,245 
4,019 
1,121 



4.909 
5,121 
•4.741 
3,649 
1,3(B 
6.179 
4,515 
841 



•5,470 
2.509 
2.S97 

12,029 
1,659 
8.570 

28.924 
5.442 

18,732 



8,843 
9Q9 

5,562 
2.712 
8,522 
2,728 
4,986 
1,671 



6,051 
4,014 
•2,778 
4,254 
2.472 
6,774 
2,668 



'J. in; 



L]»]r. 



245,900 
112.3(]0 
.')84,900 
181,500 

87.020 
264.900 

41.080 
157,200 
472,100 
373,400 
1,495,000 



a^ii 



20.69 
25.06 
18.72 
22.01 
20.69 
21.75 
26.12 
22.49 
19.12 
21.91 
23.47 
27.86 



14.26 
11.61 
17.91 
14.59 
16.79 
26.76 
17.89 
18.92 
20.74 
22.83 
17.36 



<i1^'K7 
j;;:j*{1 

*'.\r. n\ 
*::■ m 
*::■■ m 

■IJ1M592 
4L165 
r.i'JOO 
]Ti,')80 
L^/i -.134 



•23,400 
•8.700 
69,973 
16,950 
9.011 

t49,638 
4.982 
21.528 
64,192 
62,799 

185,424 



7.U^V 

41,71^ 

.: ;kH 
Mia 



201 
102 
744 
833 
156 

m 

40 

824 

1.033 

11^50 

1,407 



9.1 LM 
„'">4H 

Mil 

,m^ 

,e?2 
m 

175 



270 
279 
837 
274 



2,443 
6,025 



409.198 



99.963 
46.804 
60,484 
179.:i53 
22,589 



6,727 
2,711 
2,786 

LS,203 
1.852 
3.943 

84.385 
6.276 

28,080 



4,987 
I.IW 
8.576 
6.806 
7,217 
4.978 
9,505 
2,792 



9.960 
9,1.35 
7.519 
7.91 a 
3.834 
12,953 
7,0781 
2,107 



25,256 
15,223 
25,267 
16,673 
12,4»» 
11.243 
28.6H4 
16.266 
3.637 
4.508 
9.608 
12,613 



1,086 

536 

2.982 

603 

435 

1,3H9 

314 

848 

3.321 

3,698 

7,432 



•Approximately. tSalt Lake City estimated, tin 1802. §ln 1896. I In 1897. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



AVERAQB NUMBER OF DAYS TAUGEIT, SALARIES OF TEACHERS, VALUE OF 
SCHOOL PROPERTY. STATE AND LOCAL TAXATION-1897-98. 



State or Tekritorv. 



AVERAGB 

Monthly 
Salaries 

OF 

Teachers. 



^«^*»- nStie^. 



Value 
of public 

school 
property. 



Raised 

from state 

taxes. 



Raised 

from local 

taxes. 



Raised 

from 

other 

sources, , 

state and 

local, 

etc. 



United States.. 



North Atlantic Division.. 
South Atlantic Division. . 
South Central Division... 
North Central Division.. . 
Western Division 



North Atlantic Division— 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania c 



South Atlantic Division- 
Delaware 

Maryland 

District of Columbia... 

Virginia c 

West Virginia d 

North Carolina d. ..... . 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

South Central Division— 
Kentuclcy 



Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texasc 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Indian Territory 

North Central Division- 
Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michij^an 

Wisconsin , 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota d 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



Western Division- 
Montana 

Wyoming d 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington d 

Oregon d 

California 



143.1 



1>S46.16 



Z)t38.74 



1492,703,781 



S35.e00,64S 



1134.101,063 



I2a39»,578 



174.5 
112.7 
98.6 
152.4 
151.8 



556.13 
2)81.21 
M0.21 
46.&H 
b58.59 



541.00 
581.46 
534.74 
88.14 
560.92 



198.197,537 
22,286,066 
21.780,411 

211,848.906 
38,6fM),88U 



12,500,732 
4,44.5,888 
6,530,317 
7,289.537 
4,735,189 



52,358.676 
6.492.677 
4,380,672 

62,450,015 
8,422,014 



11,418.888 
1,0^.565 
679.413 
6.868.475 
1,412,287 



137 

C134.6 
154 
186 
191 
188.8 
176 
185 
150.4 

«/ieu 

Cl82 

185 

120.2 

111 
68.8 

C83.2 
C116.9 

104 

ce 115.4 

d90.2 

c80.' 

clOl.6 

106.3 

106 

69 

86.! 



40.61 
C37.10 

41.40 
137.50 
104.63 

88.49 



26.32 
C27.64 
26.04 
51.44 
51.00 
43.08 



86.82 
42.69 

0h 36.60 
051.20 
94.48 
31.98 



49.72 
88.45 

0h 34.08 
043.10 
64.81 



23.78 
25.18 



21.98 
24.29 



4,225,401 
e3.284.121 

1.800,000 
89.077.406 

4,679.334 

9,879,922 
71^,511 
14,601.840 
C4S,917.00B 

/904,426 

04.500.000 

^.750,000 

3,090,777 

3,471.667 

970,675 



513,066 

d58,831 

87,196 



122,487 

291,849 

d3J6O,00O 

2.194,896 

5,481.406 

hi 6,000 
602,966 



36.04 



d44.08 
0Z3L88 



006.18 



«32.18 
34.26 
61.81 
88.50 
37.00 



<^.69 
.29.60 
44.87 
36.75 
31.08 



3,977.070 
755.824 

C5.448.814 

d3.l3a780 

C0l ,500.000 

fl.6;i6.05& 

0LO66.OOO 

6,081,866 

2,294.397 

600,000 



987,512 
842.680 
760,460 
C666,919 
902.810 
136,529 



721,506 
18,387,878 
1,302.167 
2,164,301 
dl7,lC7398 
3,265,486 
12.506,897 

eh 209.000 

1,797,761 

U,261,665 

840,241 

1,439.758 

21,522 



d63,360 
18,821 
91.965 
54,1^3 
242.403 
d7,30O.0OO 
97,299 
8,560,848 



548,800 



cl 

dl .830,219 
d505,0Sl 



415,607 
432,100 



cl,10B,395 



162 

144 

158.7 

160.8 
nl60 

166 

162 

141.7 

122 
de138.4 

131 

124.3 

(n49.2 

ellO 

dl60.7 

96.6 

180 

157 

154 

100 

148 

123.9 

172.4' 



41.75 
e48.25 
60.87 
43.02 
41.00 
61.90 
37.10 
49.40 
39.92 
h49.00 
42.61 
(148.82 

69.28 
60.40 
164.07 



40.25 
51 84 
85.24 
29.50 
86.72 
81.20 
42.40 
85.51 

h37.00 
36.04 

d36.66 

48.61 
42.86 
(53.74 



73.23 


63.17 


61.76 


41.66 


1(n.(XI 


61.50 


fS.U 


47.47 


42.13 


34.53 


42.02 


33.75 


77.40 


64.56 



41,4284289 
21.636.212 
4S,705.»18 
18,138,589 
014,800.000 
14,559.564 
17.450,534 
16,718,410 
2,132.738 
d 2,929.744 
8,943,924 
9,504.961 

1,857,964 

441,460 

5,987,708 

0281,000 

472,106 

2,662.506 

265,011 

697,718 

4,977,679 

3,748,154 

17,849,468 



234,014 

2,051,724 

831,487 

121,384 



d«150,000 
cm41.S.9ll 
tn670,002 

806,690 
tn890,047 

341,627 



39,803 
106,627 
147,663 
£28,563 
124,743 

27,306 

em,140 
(1206.134 
3M9 
c66,634 
31,828 
129,806 
33.912 
14,722 



1,748.888 
1,558.276 
1,000.000 
c673,647 
602,576 
516,107 



680.060 
0849,900 



160,093 



92,224 



8,149 

85,888 

r792,245 



10.316.661 
43».354 

16,142,096 

(^,908354 
4,061,380 
3,012,280 
7,W1,634 
4.791.982 
l.lia441 

(11,181,037 
2,068.064 
8,479,261 

160,094 

20837O 

2,129,421 



<2,8434a63 



233,548 

764,183 
87,266 

156.69( 
1.126,648 

886,478 
2,684,416 



WTOBT 
'I4U130 

rirJ.728 

il;^T,291 
2Ki.ll7 

^L802 

:itfjll5 
)J4,756 

58,667 

1.407 

783,638 

pllO,906 

1,833 

61,871 

86 

30.984 

47,762 

219,128 

95,971 



a Certain states report their school term In months. These months have been rednced to 
days by multiplying them by 20. b Average for those states reporting, c In 18964)7. din 1895^ 
e Approximately. /Itp 1891-92. ^Estimated, hin ISftHM. iState appropriation for colored 
schools, fclncludes money appropriated from the federal treasury. I In 1894-95. m Includes 
poll tax. nin 1893-94. o Includes some miscellaneous receipts, p Includes all receipts in 
cities. <7 Included in local taxes, r Includes some funds. 



STATISTICS OP EDUCATION. 



COMMON-SCHOOL STATISTICS, CLASSIFIED BY RACBS--18B7-fl8. 



Statk. 



Estimated num- 
ber of pencma 5 to 
IH years of a^ge. 



Alabama (189&47) ... . 

Arkatn|«8 

Delaware (18B1-S2) . . . 
District of Colnmbia. 

Florida. 

Georgia. 

Kentucky (1896-97). . . 

Louisiana 

Maryland. 



Mississippi (1996-97). 

Missouri 

N. Carolina 

So. CaroUna(1886^). 
Tennessee (1805-96).. 

Texas (1896-97) 

ViH^nla (1886-97) 

WestYirginia 



WMU, Colored. 



334,700 
883,000 
89,850 
46,720 
95.460 
884,100 
663,900 
222,100 
2T2,700 
216,300 
897.900 
887.600 
178.700 
480,300 
767,850 
340,100 
279,700 



Total 6,828,980 2,844,670 67.86 

Total (1889-90).. *6,132,948 *2,510,847i 67.16 



286,900 

129,100 

8,980 

25,700 

75,640 
300,400 

96,600 
236,600 

78,700 
815,000 

54,600 
232,400 
296,500 
162,000 
232,050 
242,000 

11,500 



Percentage of 
the wThole. 



White. Colored. 



63.84 
72.08 
81. 6t 
64.61 
65.80 
51.69 
85.89 
48.42 
77.64 
40.71 
94.26 
62.51 
37.34 
74.78 
74.53 
68.48 
96.04 



46.16 
27.92 
18.39 
35.49 
44.20 
48.41 
14.61 
61.58 
22.36 
60.29 

5.74 
37.49 
62.66 
25.22 
25.47 
41.57 

3.96 



82.65 
82.85 



PupiJs enrolled 

in the 
public schools. 



WhUe. Colored. 



216,686 
224,247 
28,316 
29,311 
67,657 
270.367 
432,572 
109,732 
190,745 
170,811 
666,816 
261,223 
119,027 
886,483 
477,659 
244,583 
227,676 



132.213 
79,dbl 
4,858 
15,387 
40.798 

180,565 
69,321 
71,609 
45.258 

196,768 
31,767 

138,153 

139,156 
95,102 

134.481 

123,234 
8,512 



4,113,811 1,506,742 
3.402,420 1,296.969 



Per cent of per- 

sons 5 to in 
years enrolled. 



White. Colored. 



(M.74 
67.84 
71.06 
62.74 
70.87 
70.36 
76.71 
49.41 
69.96 
78.97 
78.16 
67.89 
67.86 
80.47 
63.08 
71.98 
81.40 



70.58 
66.29 



46.06 
61.63 
54.10 
60.87 
53.SM 
60.10 
71.76 
80.28 
57.51 
62.47 
56.18 
69.45 
46.93 
68.70 
67.95 
60.92 
74.03 



63.97 
61.66 



STATm 



Average daily 
attendance. 



Per cent of 
enrollment. 



White. 



White, Colored. 



Ntmiberof 
teachers. 



White. 



Alabama ( 189&^ 

Arlutnsas 

Delaware (1891-92) 

District of Columbia . 

Florida 

Ctoorgla. 

Kentucky (189647) 

Ix>uisiana. 

Maryland.. 



Mississippi (189G4I7) 

Missouri 

North Carolina 

Soutti Carolina (1896^.. 

Tennessee (1895^) 

Texas (180&fl7) 

Vlnrinla (1896-97) 

West Virginia 

Total 

Total (1880«))......... 





(S.60 
63.68 
69.73 
77.30 
68.48 
(0.65 
61.41 
75.00 
68.78 
60.51 
64.63 
55.76 
69.43 
70.63 
70.17 
69.37 
67.71 
64.66 
63.64 



66.00 
61.14 
60.66 
76.21 
b7.83 
60.58 
62.14 
69.48 
49.76 
61.26 
51.13 
49.87 
71.81 
68.57 
61.45 
56.34 
66.96 
60.85 
62.74 



6,063 

6,536 

734 

789 

2,106 

• 6,188 

8,564 

2315 

4.200 

4.747 

14.6!i9 
4,954 
2,938 
7,267 

10.045 
6,448 



78,903 



2,466 

1,537 

106 

86S 

684 

8,319 

1.396 

1,019 

787 

8,ir 
ec. 

2,263 
2,045 
1,878 
2.908 
2,127 

243 

2H.909 
24,072 



*nnited States census. tApproximately. 
SIXTEEN FOBMBB SLAVE STATES AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 



TEAR. 



1870-71. 

1871-72. 

1832-73. 

1873-74. 
^1874-75 . 
^1875-76. 

1876-77. 

1877-78. 

1878-79. 



__ - Jl . 
18R1-S3. 



1864-85. 



Common school 
enrollment. 



White. Colored. 



1,827,139 
2,034,946 
2,013,684 
2,215,674 
2.284377 
2,249,263 
2.37ailO 
3,540,448 
2376,911 



571,506 
675,150 
685.942 
784,709 
802.374 



817,240 
1.002313 
1,080,463 



Eoependir 

twes {both 

races). 



$10,386,464 
11.623,288 
11476,048 
11.823,775 
13,031,514 
12,033,865 
11.231,073 
12.093,091 
12,174,141 
12,678.685 
13,656314 
15,241,740 
16.363,471 
17384,658 
19.253374 



Tbar. 



1885-80.. 
1886-87.. 
1887-S8 . . 
1888-89.. 
1889-90.. 
1890-91 . . 
1891-92.. 



1898-94.. 
1894-95.. 
1895-96.. 
1896-97.. 
1897-98*.. 

Total.. 



Common school 
enrollment. 



White. 



2,773,146 
2,975,7r<J 
3,UO,606 
3,197,830 
3,402,420 
3,570,634 
3,607,549 



3,848.541 
3,846,2b7 
3,913301 



66.196.310 



1.048,669 
1.118,566 
1,140,405 
1,213,092 
1,296,969 
1,329,549 
1,354,316 
1367,616 
1,432,198 
1,«28,698 
1,449325 
1,460.084 
1.506,742 



24.313.672 



Expendi- 
tures (both 
races). 



t30,206,113 
20.821,969 
21310,166 
23,171,878 

" 24380,107 
26.690.310 
27,691.488 
28,536,738 
29,223346 
29,443,664 

81.217,479 



646,630,246 



♦Subject to correction. 



90 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS AND IN PRIVATE 
HIGH SCHOOLS AND ACADBMIB8-1897-98. 



Statb or Terri- 
tory. 



Public High Schools. 



Secondary 
teacher*. 



Fe- 
male. 



Secondary 
students. 



Male. 



Fen 
male. 



Private Secondary 
Schools. 



Secondary 
teachers. 



Male. 



Fe- 
male. 



Secondary 
students. 



«»"■ ,^. 



United States. , 



6.315 



North Atlantic Div... 
South Atlantic Div. . 
South Central Div. . . . 
North Central Div... 
Western Div 



1,316 
387 
552 



North Atlantic Dlv.- 

Maine 

New Hampshire. . . . 

Veimoni 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut , 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 



South Atlantic Div.- 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Dist. of Columbia. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina.... 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



South Central Div.- 

Kentucky 

Tennessee :. . 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Indian Territory.. 

North Central Div.- 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



Western Div.- 

Montana 

Wyoming . 
-^oloi ^ 



Colorado.. 
New Mexico. . 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington. 

8regon 
aliforuia.... 



14 
46 
5 
66 
28 
14 
- 86 
105 
24. 



698 



176 



8,642 



189,187 



260,413 



4,075 



52,172 



2,245 
512 



3.441 
564 
700 

4,204 
490 



61,6J1 
9,742 
13,607 
94,163 
10,024 



80,096 
14,641 
194»1 
131,415 
14,960 



1,788 
600 



245 



2,412 

692 

781 

1,112 



20.5T6 
8,745 
10,307 
10.261 



170 
58 
55 
495 
73 
112 
616 
134 
532 



16 
75 
49 
.70 
36 
22 
93 
116 
35 



103 
130 
55 
93 
37 
358 
78 
3 
5 



178 
435 
353 



256 



16 
6 
110 
5 
5 

17 



162 
87 
86 

861 
S2 

195 
1,198 

260 

490 



43 
15 
84 
121 
33 



111 



93 
51 
242 
40 

4 
4 



647 
366 
631 
588 
327 
3J6 
566 
301 
25 
36 
225 
178 



23 
6 
98 
2 
8 
16 
17 
15 
42 
22 
246 



3.873 
1.467 
1.348 

14,604 
1,339 
3,106 

21,491 
3,842 

10,681 



449 
1,5:« 
1,203 
1,616 

644 

399 
1,298 
2,173 

428 



1,985 

2,293 

1,036 

1,666 

660 

4,790 

1,204 

97 

76 



17,601 
10,042 
13,921 
11,660 
7,339 
4,780 
10,909 
6,776 
360 
677 
5.381 
4,677 



305 
137 

1,963 
48 
66 
371 
191 
141 

1,044 
()38 

5.061 



4,695 
1,868 
1.808 

18,718 
1,810 
3.776 

25,083 
6,848 

16,501 



655 
2,389 
1,753 



2,014 
3,281 



2,769 
3,064 
1,641 
1,906 
1,195 
7,053 
1.682 



22 



28,207 
12,770 
21,147 
16,808 
9,457 
6,930 
15,303 
10,367 
648 
938 
8.022 
6.918 



631 
170 
2,965 
79 
91 
520 



1,586 

956 

7,559 



100 
44 

266 
45 
121 
697 

1T7^ 



11 
84 
37 
151 



119 
161 
87 
66 
28 
138 
48 
8 
9 



104 
66 

138 
30 
76 
84 
76 

163 
4 
11 
23 
28 



71 
191 



113 

96 
127 

33 
133 

48 
114 

16 



187 
123 

77 



149 

27 



190 
99 

211 
73 



101 

181 

4 

18 



1,342 
1,331 
1,016 
2,796 
325 
1.253 
6,539 
2,214 
4,768 



127 



1,799 



763 

1.649 

15 



1,766 
2,570 
1,484 
1,067 

417 
2/127 

645 
21 

210 



1,804 
446 
T27 
907 
1,373 
2,244 
17 
162 
196 
344 



11 
11 
44 
112 



6 
41 
43 
181 



70 
146 

489 







STATISTICS OF 


EDUCATION. 




»ll 


UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES OF LIBERAL ARTS IN THE UNITED 1 
8TATE8-1897-98. | 


States atsd Tebri- 
ToaiKs, 1897-98. 


1 

il 

480 

u 

73 
86 
198 
42 


Profess- 
ors AND 
Instruct- 
ors. 


Students. 


Total 
number. 


Prepara- 
tory depts. 


ColUgiaU 
depts. 


Graduate 
depts. 


Profession- 
al depts. 


*rotal 1 
numb^. ' 


MaU. 


Fe- 
male. 


MaU. 


Fe- 
male. 


Mcde. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male 
8,669 


Ff- 

male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 1 
male. 


United States.... 

North Atlantic Div. 
South Atlantic Div.. 
South Central Div... 
North Central Div.. 
Western Division. . . 

NorthAtlanticDiv.- 
Maine 


11,571 


1.577 


31,647 


14.292 


64,738 


16,708 


1.057 


26,378 


98:; 


11>«20 


35,236 


3,619 
1,252 
14241 
4,337 
1,122 


122 

133 
298 
863 
161 


5,n4 
2.766 
5,844 
14,946 
2,387 


687 

858 

3,440 

7,781 

1,526 


20,235 
6,093 
6.369 

18,622 
3,il9 


2,311 
795 
2,297 
9,374 
1,931 


1,512 
444 

107 

L409 

197 


194 
23 
92 
626 
123 


8.476 
2,697 
4,060 
10,191 
964 


168 
63 
80 
571 
101 


36,427 
12,236 
16,443 
46,425 
7,289 


3,500 
2265 
5,991 
19.238 
4,152 


4 
2 

i 

1 
3 

28 
4 

32 

2 
U 

6 
10 

3 
16 

9 
11 

6 

13 
24 
9 
4 
9 
16 
8 
1 
2 

a5 

14 

?! 

10 
9 
22 
26 
3 
6 

i 

3 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 

I 


107 
64 
81 
743 
. 71 
301 
1,2;« 
141 
881 

19 
254 
403 

'fi 

153 
84 

109 
51 

190 
452 

102 
46 
138 
220 

78 
8 

7 

787 

269 

1,036 

299 

i 
1 

306 

19 
11 
204 
11 
32 
16 
15 
84 
125 
605 


1 






843 
564 
361 

3,674 
610 

2,116 

!;!§§ 

5,676 

472 
1,112 
363 
1,340 
733 
970 
164 

1.190 
1,721 
699 
415 
669 
1,209 
430 
20 
16 

3,324 
1.799 
3,164 
1,631 
1,600 

1,666 
82 
189 
864 

1,184 

34 

42 
60 
105 
53 
337 
245 
2,265 


189 


7 




183 

116 

283 

2,246 


6 
■*i23 


646 
6.969 
671 
2,798 
11,984 
1,562 
10,073 

124 

i,7n 

2.443 
1,760 

664 
2,ii89 

954 
1,7S2 

499 

2,993 
5,326 
1,359 

646 
1.636 
3,231 
1,072 

212 
69 

7,786 
3.190 
10300 
3,968 
2,649 
3.885 
4,267 

*'^ 

493 
2.241 
3,161 

112 
88 
926 
100 
449 
166 
148 
746 
780 
3,774 


194 

""99 
668 
189 

'? 

1,333 

14 
219 
280 
149 

IM 

116 
446 
3U 

1.079 

'•Si 

^; 

155 
66 

3,454 
1,154 
3,487 
1,426 

2',160 
1:799 

'S 

491 
57 
456 
161 
100 
856 
637 
1,778 


New Hampshire..., 
Vermont 


12 




99 
380 
149 

'"829 

5 
106 
126 
68 
113 

62 
80 
106 

320 
783 
172 
34 
182 
519 
262 

1,734 
876 
517 
766 
916 
723 
44 
87 
667 
670 

49 
22 
205 
16 
66 
58 
81 
141 
183 
1,170 


i 

217 
547 
125 

186 

3 
217 
1.53 
35 
5 
13 
8 
10 
5 

12 
60 
4 
4 

9 
17 

1 


■■■'37 

29 

. 37 

■"35 


Massachusetts .... 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 


10 
1 


477 


19 






428 
2.509 


""34 
6 


58 
4 

1 

16 
10 

3 

8 
26 
29 

51 
97 
12 
6 
28 
69 

13 

139 
29 

171 
68 
29 

n 

114 
9 
30 
65 
70 

12 
8 

21 
3 
5 
8 

i 

30 
66 


3,486 

203 

1,536 

19 
475 
385 
279 
163 
659 
180 
442 
254 

1,213 
1,646 
468 
155 
820 
1,428 
475 
186 
63 

2,748 
1,068 

"•^ 

641 

436 

1,678 

2,069 

236 

271 

850 

1,456 

78 
60 

882 
68 

252 

402 
884 
631 


217 
39 
412 

9 

?? 

85 
21 
262 
51 

IS 

709 
959 

^ 

126 
787 
290 
145 
47 

L271 
358 

1,352 
399 
97 
176 

1,017 

1,047 
245 
274 
660 
896 

92 
56 
252 
41 
169 
34 
69 
214 
338 
261 


New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

SouthAtlanticDiv.- 
Delaware 


Maryland 


****i3 

6 

1 
1 

2 

1 
10 

""68 
11 
2 


241 
1,374 
350 
123 
298 
30 
281 


41 

18 

3 

i 


Dist. of Columbia. 
Virginia 


West Virginia 

North Carolina. . . . 
South Carolina.... 
Georgia 


Florida 


South Central Div.— 
Kentucky 


588 
IWl 
159 
72 
464 
630 
170 
6 


""24 

6 

47 

3 


Tennessee 


Alabama 


Mississippi 


Louisiana 


Texas 


Arkansas 


Oklahoma .... 


Indian Territory . . 

North Central Div.— 
Ohio 






129 
86 

657 
63 
88 

133 
38 
87 
1 
3 
93 
86 


67 
28 
323 
25 
80 
49 
27 
6 


1,232 
319 
3,593 
1,496 
259 
961 
916 
6:^7 


70 
12 

201 

112 

« 

32 

82 

7 


Indiana 


Illinois 


Michigan 


Wisconsin 


Minnesota 


Iowa 

Missouri 


North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 


2 

63 
15 






423 
355 


22 

27 


Kansas 


Western Division- 
Montana 


Wyoming 


4 
14 


2 

8 






Colorado 


256 


21 


Arliona 

Ut*h 


2 
8 
3 
6 
1 
164 


1 

1 






Nevada 






Idaho 


Washington 

Oregon 


1 

2 

108 






160 

658 


12 
68 


Calffomia 






VHMi 


mm^m» 


mm^mm 


mmmm 












mm^mm 






mmmmmmf 



92 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES OF LIBERAL ARTS IN THE]UNITBD STATES. 



States 

AND 
TSHRITORIES, 

1897-98. 



United states... 

Nortb Atlantic Div. 
8outh Atlantic Dlv. 
South Central Dlv.. 
North Central Dlv.. 
Western Dlv 



8.2S0.410 
628,008 



2.dea093 
257^15 



North Atl'tlc Dlv.- 

Maine 

New Uampshlre.. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts — 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

South Atl'tlc Div.- 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Diet, of Columbia. 

Vlrifinla 

West Virginia 

North Carolina... 
South Carolina... 

Georgia 

Florida 



South Centr'l Dlv.— 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

Texas 

Arkansas 

Oklahoma 

Indian Territory 

North Cent'l Div.- 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota.... 
South Dakota.... 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



Western Div.— 

Montana 

Wyoming . . . . 

Colorado 

New Mexico.. 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington . 

Oregon 

California.... 



Income in 1897-98. 



From 

UMUm 

See*, 



From 
pro- 
ductive 
funds. 



67,080 
97,000 
15,992 
824,365 
101,'Sl 
521,298 
813,046 
158,490 
720,464 



300 
199,045 
161.835 
102,808 
7.836 
80,693 
25.000 
36,636 
13,860 



78,689 
178,286 
81,632 
14,200 
55,914 
178,687 
30,451 



10,872 



329,en 
270,606 
672,940 
252,998 
51,140 
133,049 
201,626 



21,575 
58,564 
120,691 



10,500 

610 

37,010 



8,180 

40,200 

518 

40,206 



137.179 



From 
U.S. 

govern- 
ment 

state or 

munic- 
ipal 

appro- 
pria- 
tions. 



,174 
492,583 
1.58ai98 
386,842 



71,978 
65.000 
34,619 
695,747 



t062.580 
171,000 



4, 
80,395 
64,949 
93,405 

6,406 
45,218 
27.572 
47,970 
20,277 



96,537 
129,019 
29,200 
42,043 
100,566 
76.082 
11,206 
8,000 



375,600 
115,977 
486,706 
97,042 
80,887 
82,942 
98,671 
191,390 
4.060 
3,300 
17,497 



11,000 
'^',548 



7,_.. 

3,800 

412 

8,000 



302.897 



$10213371 



816.702 
466,351 



1,748,332 

887,617 



58,000 
5,000 



273,104 
38,000 
408,215 



38,000 
79,100 
111.128 
62,600 
69.560 
25,000 
27,000 
88.073 
16,000 



66,341 
61,200 
350 
5,000 
40,138 
72,500 
66,877 
12,000 



834,924 
80,000 
248,000 
213,000 
293,000 
128,905 
72,979 
71,784 
80,000 



164,260 
88^ 

19,000 
46,076 
126,000 



48,700 
60,000 
60,450 
44,000 
40,250 

3aooo 

423.141 



Total 
income. 



7.926.196 
1.691,804 
1,599.162 
6,367,137 
1,629,082 



213,196 
107,000 
104,489 

1,712,316 
131,752 
847.420 

2,744344 
489,499 

1,575,680 



44,869 
393,-:299 
382,610 
278,769 

90,836 
177,204 

99,872 
148,92b 

70,420 

254,523 



116,115 
67,243 
214,974 
344,183 
112,591 
21,100 
13,800 



1,121,827 
491,073 

1,613,185 
649,061 
497,903 
400,514 
391,395 
^80,970 
44,300 
62,216 
245,061 



41.500 
47,243 
236,067 



48,700 
82,948 
64378 
45,680 

111,688 
78,782 

881.646 



Ubrar 
ries, 
bound 
vol- 
umes. 



7,006.325 



3^,855 
797J815 
516^1 

2Ji26.138 
340,911 



129,682 
80,000 
88,268 
719,969 
100,000 
323,000 

186,762 
638.842 



10,600 
185,810 
138,700 
160,425 
18.600 
U0,100 
71,300 
83,410 
18,870 



82,187 
169397 
61,260 
80,000 
71,700 
74,569 
22,708 
2,200 



434,641 
200,905 

226.661 
131,142 
92,000 
130,506 
195.«)5 
10300 
17,857 
n,520 
107357 



6,700 
5,750 
55,257 



3.400 
19.000 
6.457 
6,100 
27,146 
27,413 



Value of 

sden- 

tific 

appara 



111,004382 



5,472,756 
598377 
713,510 

3,359,122 
860,788 



148,625 

102,000 

105,000 

1,313.450 

siaooo 

400,756 
1,413,727 

570,000 
1,064,198 



23,000 
182377 
96,600 
95.200 
51.000 
33360 
22300 
75,450 
19,000 



68,940 
276,025 
70,360 
38,800 
126,250 
93,075 
83300 
6,000 
600 



442,800 
186,750 
565,580 
612,212 
382,500 
132,900 
287,850 
319.105 
12,850 
6,750 
235,660 
185,175 



8,800 
60,000 
69,100 



40,000 
20,.500 
17,080 
85,000 



28,660 
562.700 



Value of 
grounds 
and 
build- 
ings. 



54,209,825 
13,5.52,126 
10,404,700 



9,176,795 



1,091,666 
650,000 
725,000 
8,142,425 
1,177,967 
6,74.3,030 
20,891,155 
2,525,000 



101,600 
2.017,626 
4377,500 
2,159,000 

520.000 
1,523,500 

845,000 
1360,000 

460,000 



1,265,600 

3,414.700 

865,000 

440,000 

1,845,000 

1.959300 

495,000 

60.000 

60,000 



8,072.956 
3,710,000 
a078.235 
2,833.704 
2,596.000 
2,747360 
2,173,798 
4,884,000 
230300 
390,500 
1,844.400 
13U300 



225,000 

111340 

1,406,400 



85,000 
825,000 
156,184 

i3aooo 

644,000 



5.261,671 



Produc- 
tive 
funds. 



C1I9632651 



7,654,724 
31,434,468 
8,047,758 



1,661312 
1,500,000 
756,000 
15,421377 
807,481 
6,919,771 
24,199,969 
3300,000 
9,465306 



83,000 

3,407,600 

1,279,075 

1,779,000 

114,760 

770.942 

560300 

855,618 

424,800 



1,372,495 
2,406300 
365,000 
692300 
1,917,313 
720,716 
160,600 



7343,200 

2,041383 

10,499,217 

1309,983 

1,482,479 

1,662,091 

1,556,769 

3,771,839 

34,000 

82.600 

453,952 

897,155 



616,910 



196,427 
95,000 
7,472 
150.000 
342,000 
6,639.949 



fac- 
tions. 



17532239 



?28313 

320372 

2309316 

314.495 



114,600 

156300 

34,640 

1369355 

13300 

127,500 

1,1901861 

4,000 



200 
72,968 
43,078 
155381 



151373 
31,614 
69,749 

213,765 



96381 
180,461 
800 
7.000 
7,800 
83,500 
4,430 



506314 
171360 
653304 
252,851 
80,129 
86,421 
153,856 
860307 
U303 
22300 
83307 
123,874 



2,000 



67,075 



800 



500 

82,250 
U,600 
200,770] 



' 


STATISTICS OP EDUCATION. 


^ 


INSTRUCTOBS AND STUDENTS IN COEDUCATIONAL COLLEGES AND UNIVBR8I- 
TIE8 AND IN CO^J^EGES FOR MEN ONLr-1897^ 


Statk oe Txrbitokt. 


1 

4^ 


Profess'rs 

AlfD IN- 
STBUCTORS. 


Students. 


IMdl 
income. 


Preparatory. 


CoUegiaU. 


GradtMte. 


Male. 


mdU. 


Male, 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 
male. 


Male. 


Fe- 

mcUe. 


United states.". 


480 


7,788 


1,524 


31,647 


14,292 


54,7S8 


16.708 


a609 


1067 


I19;2ia^ 


North Atlantic Division. 
Soutb Atlantic Division.. 
South Central Division.. 
North Central Division.. 
Western Division 


81 

ii 

198 
42 


697 


116 
183 
296 
821 
158 


5344 
14,9i6 
2.387 


a440 
7,781 
L626 


20,235 
6.098 
6,369 

18.622 
8,419 


2,811 
795 
24297 
9J(74 
1.981 


1,512 

J 

197 


194 

i 

626 
123 


7.926,196 
1^^ 


North Atlantic Division- 
Maine 


4 
2 

3 
9 
1 
3 

23 
4 

33 

2 

11 
6 

10 
8 

15 
9 

11 
^ 6 

13 
24 
9 

4 
9 

1 

1 
2 

85 
14 
81 

6 
12 
19 

8 

1 
4 


55 

428 
71 
207 
840 
141 
590 

19 
200 
170 

97 

iM 

80 
80 
51 

134 
233 
77 
87 

lis 

59 
8 

7 

19 
11 
91 


1 






843 
664 
861 

8,674 
610 

2,115 

6,676 

103 
887 
472 

"^ 

970 
164 

1,190 

1,721 

690 

415 

1.SS 

430 

8,324 
1,799 
8.154 
1.631 
1,600 

\'^ 

1,665 

li 
864 

1,184 

84 


189 


7 




^!ooo 

KH.489 

847,420 

1,576.680 

44,869 
893,299 

» 

90,836 
177,204 

99.872 
148,925 

70,420 

254,528 
455,628 
115,115 
67,243 
214,974 
844.188 
112,591 

?J:SS 

1,121,827 
491,073 

1,613.186 
649.061 
497,903 

44:300 
269,683 
41500 


New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 


12 




99 

'"*829* 
6 

1 

113 
140 

i 

106 

820 
783 
172 
84 

in 

262 

7 
18 

1,725 
751 

■■a 
i 

728 

1 

670 

49 
22 
205 


i 

IS 

125 
186 

8 
217 

5 

12 
60 
4 

4 
9 
17 

1 


SI 
66 

"as" 

13* 

""e 

1 
1 

"'2* 

1 
10 

*"'68* 

'1 


6 

1 

"57* 
4 

48 

i 

3 
12 

28 
8 
26 
29 

i 

i 

80 

J 

137 
28 
144 

97 
112 
9 
80 
64 
65 


477 


19 


Rhode Island 


§ew"fSrt"f::::::.:::::: 


1,636 

19 

279 
163 
659 
180 
442 
254 

1,213 
1,546 

4S 

155 

820 

1,438 

475 
186 
58 

J 

78 


"2i7 
89 
412 

9 

85 
21 
263 
51 
169 
161 

292 
85 
126 

787 
2U0 

97 
175 

896 
92 


New Jersey 




South Atlantic Division- 
Delaware 


Maryland 


District of Columbia. . . . 


West Yii^hiia 


North Carolina 


South Carolina 




Flo^^a 


South Central Division- 
Kentucky 


Tennessee 


Alabama. 


Mi&sissippi 


Louisiana 


Texas 


Arkansas 

Oklahoma 


Indian Territory 

North Central Division- 
Ohio 






129 
86 

657 
68 

88 

1 

87 
1 
8 
93 
36 


67 
28 

1 

80 

6 

""*2* 
53 
16 


Indiana 


Illinois..::::::::::::::::: 


Mlohiiran 


Wisconsin 

Minnesota 


Iowa 


Missouri 


North Dakota. , r . . -r r - - 


Soath Dakota... « 


Nebraska 


KansAff .T. .- -.-T,,. 


Western Division- 


Wyoming 


4 

14 


2 

8 


Colorado!. 


New Mezioo 


Arizona • . . 


1 

I 

8 
12 


11 
2 
6 
5 

?? 

841 


J 


56 
252 
58 
92 
Am 


1^ 

84 


105 

2^ 


16 
56 

68 

i!} 

188 
1,170 






64,878 
46,680 

111,688 
78,782 

881646 


Utah 


2 
8 
8 
6 

lei 


1 
1 

...... 

108 


Nevftda. 


Idaho 

VITftfllilnirt/m 


Oii^gon 


80 884| 
64 631 1 


CiUuornla. 






1 



94 CHICAGO DAILY 


NEWS ALMANAC 


FOR 1900. 






INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS IN COLLEGES AND SEMINARIES FOR WOME]^ 1 
WHICH CONFER DEGRBBS-1897-98. 1 


State or Territory. 


3 

1 
i 

.d 

148 

21 
48 
61 


Professors 

AND 

Instructors 


Female STrDEXTs. 


Total 
income. 


1 








1. 


United States 


W2 

27n 

G7 


l,83t 

421 
519 
5IS 
J«2 
iA 


5.004 


14,566 


430 


I3^»>1 


North Atlantic Division 


1,132 
1.213 
1.390 
1,113 
157 


4,537 
4,':89 
3,720 
1,446 
64 


244 
79 
80 
26 
2 


1,520,285 
719.732 
626,361 
452,478 
107,405 


South Atlantic Division 


South Central Division 


North Central Division 

Western Division ^ 

North Atlantic Division- 
Maine 


2 
5 
5 

1 
8 

5 

i;^ 

1 

9 
«,♦ 
11 

n 

12 
9 

13 
2 

;< 
«; 

4 

1 
1 
12 

2 

2 


10 
i:-{8 
»: 

8 
54 

29 
57 
1 

29 
38 
37 

24 

28 
14 

28 
4 
(! 

1 

9 
7 

4<V 

5 

3 


() 
170 
117 

8 
120 

58 

1:^5 

3 
96 
81 
144 

108 
15i 
87 
121 
17 
%\ 
lU 

9r, 

51 
17 

7 

i:j3 

18 
54 


287 
14 

511 
50 

2^0 

144 
2S2 
10 
322 
191 
2U0 

244 
382 
111 
457 
46 
70 
50 

220 
217 
144 
22 
399 
111 

157 


27 

2.506 

l,lf» 

2 

834 

657 

1,229 

2 

764 

980 

1,257 

789 

9;ir 

655 
911 

8i) 

28:^ 
(» 

317 

2rt4 

26 

10 

im 

00 
64 


6 

101 
84 

64' 

6 

7 

ii' 

17 

38 

11 
22 
16 
19 

is' 

10 
10 

5' 

2 


18.325 
656.144 
489,222 

12.000 
346.5d4 

102 046 
177,086 
4,.500 
115,100 
123.200 
197,900 

87.406 
155.:M0 

8.S.500 
117.427 

14.950 

62,rr8 

14,000 

140.523 
90.856 
31,500 

5.»ro 

157.579 
23,050 

107,405 


Massachusetts 


New York 


New Jersey.... 

Pennsylvania 


South AtlanUc Division- 
Maryland 


V I rg I ni a 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 


South Carolina 


Georgia 


South Central Division— 
Kunl iipty , 


AlnbaUlH - 


MSEit^L^^tf^pi 

' Lonlhkuna — 

Tiijcaa 

ArkatiBD^ 

Norlh Central l>lvision— 
Ohio ...^ 


1 lllnoifl- 

Wi6contilD.„,.r-^x 

MltiMi'wm..,^ ^ 




Cnllforniti' -.^- 




^ SCHOOL AND COL 


LEGE 1 


POPULATION 


IN 1897-98. 






Grades. 


Number 


ofPuf 


I1.S. 


Public. 


PHvaU. 


TotaL 


Blcmpntury (prlftiary and grammar) 


14,589,036 

45<),813 

29,728 

8.096 

46,?45 


1,249,6(55 
166,302 
71,330 
46,136 
21,293 
70,950 


15.838,701 
626.115 
101.058 
64,231 
67.538 
70,950 
23,601 
10,878 


^ticontJury U^Jijb pcTi^iols, seminaries) ' 


Col 1 c^o^ - 


l^jfuMi^loTiiiJ Hchuuis. 


Nonniil 8t;bCKj]!i, .,,,,. » 


BtiiftiJn?S9 schofslft.^L^ . . 


Kt? f rni Bc hyo 1 Hi. 


23.501 
10,335 
3,744 
8.86<; 


!j!ichu<>lEt for (leaf , 


483 


flchCHjl* fur blind ^ 


IniitUuiiuns for feeble-minded 


866 


Total 


v>x:^,m 


1,626,524 


16.805,»t8 




The number of business schools In IK 
L{|i5; 84]hoold for LLe blind, 3(;; institution 


)7-98was 
8 for th( 


J 337; reform sc 
^leeble-minded 


hools, 90; Bcho 
,29. 


ols for 


the deaf. 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE-182»fl8. 



GROWTH OF PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



Theological 

SCHOOLS. 



I 



LAW SCHOOL8. 



i 


1 






3 


S? 


'< 


^ 


M 


40(> 


68 


M>7 


«i 


687 


«7 


m 


72 


mi 


73 


H58 


77 


744 


83 


845 



Medical Schools.* 



Regulau. 



HOM'OPATHIC. 



1 


i 






:3 


s 


^ 


^ 


14 


311 


14 


2W 


Iff 


390 


19 


478 


2() 


476 


2() 


4tf^ 


21 


6<« 


21 


(fi» 



1891-92 
18D3-S3. 
1898-94. 
1894-96. 
1895-96. 
189e-9r. 
18U7-98. 



7.328 
7,729 
7.886 
7.658 
8.050 
8.017 
8.173 
8.371 



5.252 
6.078 
6,776 
7,311 
8.960 
. 9.780 
10,449 
11,615 



2,147 
2.423 
2,494 
8,077 
2.738 
2.902 
3.142 
3.423 



14.538 
14.9:^4 

x^.xm 

17.601 
18.660 
iy.9l>9 
21.438 
21.002 



1.220 

J.(«i 
1.415 
1,666' 
1.875 I 

l,9rj6 

2,038 
1.786 



Dental 
Schools. 



Schools of 
Pharmacy. 



Nurse Traininq 
Schools. 



veterinary 
schools. 



1890-91.. 
1891-92. . 



1893-94., 
1894-95. 
1885-96. 
189f*-97.. 



2,016 
2,874 
2,852 
4,152 
5.347 
6,399 
6,460 
6,774 



194 
216 
264 
283 
817 
354 
862 
401 



2.884 
2.799 
3.394 
3,658 
8,859 
3,873 
8.426 
3,538 



47 
66 
131 
177 

298 
377 



255 
457 
556 



1,«!13 

i.8«a 
2.3:« 
2,710 
3,985 
5.094 
7.2J.3 
8.805 



"9- 


95 


8 


105 


7 


114 


8 


118 


9 


VXl 


10 


\?Q 


12 


153 


14 


173 



513 
533 
564 
554 
474 
382 
364 
326 



•There were also in 1897-98 six eclectic schools, with 147 instructors and 638 students; two 
pbysio-medical schools, with 48 instructors and 107 students. 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE-lSSS-Se. 



Tr 



Candidates. 



183K 



1828; Jackson 

1S28 Adams 

1832 Jackson 

1832Clay 

1832Floyd 

W32tWlrt 

Van Baren.. 

1836 Harrison 

"White 

Webster 

Mangiiin 

1840;Van Buren.. 
1840; Harrison.... 

IMOBimey 

I844Polk 

1844!ciay 

1844Birney 

1848 Taylor 

1848 Cass 

1848' Van Buren.. 

tttti Pierce 

isesoott 

laa^Hale 

lifiB Buchanan... 

1866 Fremont 

1866 Fillmore 

MBDouKlas 

ggBreckinr'ge. 

J«D Lincoln 

laaOBell 

IfMMcCIellan... 
m Lincoln... 
WSiSeymonr.. 



Party. 



Democrat. . 
Federal — 
Democrat.. 

Whig 

Whig 

Whig 

Democrat. . 

Whig 

Whig 

Whig. 

Whig 

Democrat. . 

Whig 

Liberty 

Democrat. . 

Whig 

Liberty 

Whig 

Democrat. . 
Free Soil... 
Democrat. . 

Whig 

Free Soil... 
Democrat.. 
Republican 
American.. 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Republican 

Onion 

Democrat. 

Republican 

Democrat. 



Popular 
vote. 



647,231 
509,097 
687,502 
550,189 

33,108 

761,549 

736,666 

1,128.702 
1,275,017 
7,059 
1,337,243 
1,229.068 
62,300 
1,360,101 
1,220.544 

291,268 
1,601,474 
1,386,678 

156,149 
l,838,lfJ9 
1,341,264 

874,534 
1,375,157 

84.5.763 
1.866.352 

589.581 
1,808,725 
2,216,067 
2,709,618 



Elec- 
toral Yr Candidates, 
vote. 



219 
49 
11 
7 

170 
73 
26 
14 
11 
60 

234 



170 
105 



107 



254 
42 



174 

114 
8 
12 
72 

180 
39 
21 

216 
80 



1892 
1896 
18!i6 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 
1896 



Grant 

Greeley 

O'Conor.. . . 

Grant 

Black 

Tlldem 

Hayes .^ 

Cooper. 

Smith 

Hancock . . 
Garfield.... 

Weaver 

Dow 

Cleveland... 

Blaine 

Butler 

St. John 

Cleveland... 
Harrison.... 

Streeter 

Fisk 

Cleveland... 
Harrison. . . . 

Bid well 

Weaver 

Wing 

McKinley ... 

Bryan 

Bryan 

Levering 

Bentley 

Matchett 

Palmer 



Party. 



Republican 

Democrat. . 

Ind. Dem... 

Republican 

T'mpera'ce 

Democrat. . 

Republican 

Greenback. 

Prohibition 

Democrat, 

Republican 

Greenback. 

Prohibition 

Democrat. . 

Republican 

Greenback. 

Prohibition 

Diamocrat. . 

Republican 

Labor 

Prohibition 

Democrat. 

Republican 

Prohibition 

People's. 

Socialist. 

Republican 

Democrat 

People's.. 

Prohibition 

National . . 

Soc. Labor. 

Nat. Dem.. 



Popular 
vote. 



a015.071 

2,834,079 

29.408 

3,597,070 

5,608 

4,284.885 

4,083.950 

81.740 

9,522 

4,442,035 

4.449,053 

307.306 

10487 

4,874,986 

4,861,981 

173,370 

150,369 

5,588,660 

5,441,902 

147,521 

249,937 

5,6!i6..')62 

5,162.874 

264,0^6 

1,055,424 

22,613 

7,107,822 

6iR8.86i> 

^22,2- 

130.683 

L3,950 

33,545 

183,800 



Elec I 
toral 
vote. 



214 
•66 



184 



155 
214 



219 

182 



277 
145 



271 
176 



•Owing to the death of Mr. Greeley, the 66 electoral votes were variously cast: Thomas A 
Handricks receiving 42, B.Gratz Brown 18, Horace Greeley 3. Charles J.Jenkins 2, David Davis l. 



96 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 


DTTEKNAL BEVENUE. 

Comparative statcanent showing the receipts from the several objects of internal taxation 
in the United States durinK the fiscal years ended June 30, 1898 and 1899. 


OarEtTS OP TAXATION. 


1898. 


1899. 


Increcise. 


Decrease. 


SPIRITS. 

Spirits distilled from apples, peaches, grapes, 
pears, pineapples, oranges, apricots, berries 
and prunes 

Spirits distilled from other materials 


fl,552,592.94 

86,188,6B0.91 

221.225.24 

4,152,572.58 

89£216.74 

822.91 

33;570!50 
92,646,999.77 


n.486339.50 

4.896,086.63 

469,874.64 

1,077.11 

2i663!l0 

l4,6flBiOO 

99,283,694.16 


742,514.10 

76,657.90 

254J» 

090.00 


1115,753.44 


Rectifiers (special tax) 




Retail liquor dealers (special tax) 




Wholesale liquor dealers (special tax) 




Manufacturers of stills (special tax) 




Stills and worms, manufactured (special tax).. 

Stamps for distilled spirits intended for export 

Case stamps for dlstUled spirits bottled in bond 

Total 




114.90 
19,002.60 


6,736,534.39 


TOBACCO. 

Cigars weighing more than 3 pounds per thou- 
sand 


13,626,049.71 

406,676.88 

3,598,011.69 

6,698.47 

981,^69.04 

17,667,276.46 


•16,307,108.ft3 

647,415.52 

4,203,753J6 

9,461.39 

+1.751,797.44 

t:»,458,989.26 

73,657.46 

22,462.00 

^& 

770,333.63 


2,t581,058.34 

141,738.64 

610,7^.17 

2.767.92 
819,928.40 
10.796,712.81 
73,667.46 
22,462.00 
29,139.12 
324.090.01 
760,388.40 




Cigars weighing not more than 8 pounds per 
thousand 




Cigarettes weighing not more than 3 pounds 
per thousand 




Cigarettes weighing more than 8 pounds per 
thousand 


SnuflT. » . .. 




Tobacco, chewinir and smolclng 




Dealers in leaf tobacco 


'-"" 


Dealers In manufactured tobacco 






M anuf acturers of tobacco 






Manufacturers of cigars 






Miscellaneous collections relating to tobacco.. 
Total : 


9,945.B 




86,230,622.37 


62,493,207.64 


16,262,686.27 




FERMENTED LIQUORS. 

Ale, beer, lager beer, porter and other similar 
fermented liauors 


38,885,161.63 
152,647.61 
201.150.15 
276,471.76 


$67,673,301.31 
179,357.40 

177,090.84 


28,788.149.68 
26,709.79 

in6;9R7!69 

177,090.84 








Retail dealers In malt liquors (special tax) 

Wholesale dealers In malt liquors (special tax) 

Additional collections on fermented liquors 

stored in warehouse, act of June 13, 1898 








Total 


39,515.421.14 


68,644,668,46 


29,129,137.31 




OLEOMARGARINE. 

Oleomargarine, domestic and Imported 

Manufacturers of oleomargarine (special tax). 

Retail dealers in oleomargarine (special tax) . . 

Wholesale dealers lA oleomargarine (special 

tax) 


1,107,774.64 

" 7,600.00 

156,134.00 

44,272.00 


1,609,912.56 
71,884.00 


107,188.00 
27,612.00 










Total 


1,316,780.64 


1,956,618.56 


640,838.02 




FILLED CHEESE. 

Filled cheese, domestic and imported 


14,129.23 

2,283.32 

156.00 


ns.oo 


2,767.18 




Manufacturers of filled cheese (special tax)... . 

Retail dealers in filled cheese (special tax) .... 

Wholesale dealers in filled cheese (speoUl tax) 

Total 






16.618.65 


18,098.42 


1.579.87 




MIXED FLOUR. 

Per barrel of 196 lbs., or more than 98 lbs 




1,787.10 

1,961.23 

632.01 

1,700.88 

1,850.40 


l.'W7.10 

1,961.23 

532.01 

1,700.88 

1,859.40 




Half barrel of 98 lbs., or more than 49 lbs 






Quarter barrel of 49 lbs., or more than 24^ lbs.. 






Eighth barrel of 24^ lbs. or less 






Manufacturers, packers, or repackers of mixed 
flour (special tax) 






Total 




7,84a62 


7,84ae2 




SPECIAL TAXES NOT ELSEWHERE ENUMER- 
ATED. 

Bankers, capital not-exceeding 125.000 


2,500.00 
44,473.00 


448,702.08 
8,302,184.91 


446,202.06 
3,267,661.91 




Bankers, capital exceeding 125,000, for each ad- 
ditional Ji:000 In excess o^ $26,000 




♦ Includes g.161.23, at $3 per M. ± Includes 11,936.92, at 6 cents per pound. 1 
t Includes $3,466.27, at y cents per pound. § Includes ^,070.31, at «1 per barreL | 













INTERNAL REVENUE. 97 


COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS OF INTERNAL TAXATION.-OONTINITID. 


Objects of Taxation. 


1898. 


1899. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


SPECIAL TAXES.— CONTINUED. 

Billiard rooms 




$367,0:4.66 
367.010.70 
181,919.42 
8,106.01 
50,522.73 
61,»19.22 
ia283.17 
72,164.98 


1967,074.65 
367,010.70 
181,919.42 
8,106.01 
50,622.73 
61,349.22 
18,233.17 
72,164.98 
64,876.89 




Brokers, stocks, bonds etc 




Bickers, commercial 






Brokers, castom-house 






Brokers, pawn ." 






Bowlinff alleys 






Clrcn ses 






Exhibitions not otherwise provided for 


r. . . . 




Theaters, museums and concert halls 






Total 


$46,9r3.00 


4.921,698.21 


4374,(S».21 




LEGACIES AND DISTRIBTTTIYB 8HABES OF 
PERSONAL PROPERTY. 

Legacies, lineal issue or ancestor, brother or 
sister 




558.247.00 
226,668.08 

48,680.65 

«,72L9B 

896,2er.ffl 


658,247.00 
225,568.08 

48,630.65 

6,721^ 

896,267.63 




Legacies, descendant of a brother or sister .... 






Legacies, brother or sister of the father or 
mother, or a descendant of a brother or sis- 
ter of the same . 






Legacies, brother or sister of the grandfather 
or grandmother, or a descendant of the 
brother or sister of the same .... ... 






Legacies, any other degree of collateral con- 
sanguinity than is hereinbefore stated, or 
stranger in blood 






Total 




1,236,485.28 


1,235,436.25 




SCHEDULES A AND B. 

ScheduleA : 


724,073.94 
70,343,66 


38,618,081.20 
5,219;737.46 


37,894.007.26 
6,149,393.80 




Schedule B 




Total 


791,417.«0 


43,837,818.66 


43,043,401.06 




BANKS, BANKERS, ETC. 

Bank circulation 










l^otes of persons, state banks, towns, cities, 
etc., paid out 


1.180.00 






11,180.00 


Total 


1,180.00 






1,180.00 


MISCELLANEOUS. 

Excise tax on gross receipts 




643,446,41 


643,446.41 




Cpium 


261,080.'6t 

136,750.07 

1,060.76 


114.90 


Playing cards 


271,128.84 

166,576.26 

4,716.97 


10,0i8.18 
29,826.18 
3,6S6.21 


Penalties 




Collections not otherwise herein provided for. 
Total : 




399,006.39 


1,085.868.47 


686,862.06 




Aggregfl-te receipts 


170,866,819.36 


273,484,573.44 


102617,754i» 








DISTILLBl 

Number of gallons of spirits rectified in th 
1899, by states and territories. 
Stat£s and Territories. Oa JJnn s. 

Alabama 3uy.l(i5 .% 

Arkansas 7.:i22.74 


!) SPIRITS. 

e United States during t 

Sfatf/t and Territories. 
Mom fin Fi, Idaiioand Ute 
Nctirafika nod Dakotas. 


he year enc 
ih 


led June 30, 

Gallons. 
58.728.00 




389,266.16 


California and Nevada 2,i^.vm. HO 


New HaiuiiJAhLre, Maine 


and Vap- 


Colorado and Wyoming 71,9(58. 50 


KlOIlt* - 


1,400.27 
865 891 38 


Connecticut and Rhode Island .... 5.^^ ,Uff=H . U 

lUinols *-:N 55 

Indiana IJ.'' rs 


New Jf,';T&m 




D nnd Arlzrin 


a 


17 467 63 


N< V Vork,,,. 

N< I'l h Ciirollna. .« 




634168.27 
8,608,606.41 


io^.t:..:...:::::::.: -.:.::..:::... , » 


01 HJ. .*.,.. - 


KanRft^ iO 


Ol '^On and Wn.ahini7t.nr 




Louisiana "and Mississippi' .' '. '. '. ." .* ! ." ' u> ; ■ 19 
Marylaiid, Delaware and District 
of Columbia 6.^4 211 73 


P< iiii#jlvai 
Tcrinessee 
Texas ..... 


lia 






|:g| 

1,8791888! 18 


Vifeltiln 


Massachusetts : SJlfl SS7 57 






Michigan ^^?T '-T" 41 




HfinnAAOta ri.k i - ' ~ U 




Missouri 2'^'.' 1 35 


Total 


97,066,606.07 







98 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1000. 



■:illO.. 
:LSka 
Liampalilre.. 

it-rtHjy 

Meik'u 

V<>rk 



PRODUCTION OF FBRMBNTBD LIQUORS FOR THB FISCAL YBAR ENDBD JUNE SO, 18991 

SteOet and Ttrritoriet. Bti . ?«. ,^' '. - u nd TwrttoriM. Barrels, 

Alabama. ^ ; i05 M mo.. 164.344 

Arkansas ttSN Lska 216.665 

California 7i ia9 

Colorado .'A- m. 

Connecticut t , 99 

Florida i 21 

GeoTffla ]]: 188 

Illinois 8,.>i 34 

Indiana jk ©6 

Iowa 1 02 

Kansas 412 

Kentucky i'\i i28 

Louisiana iv . i81 

Maryland '.*7'i.J98 

Massachusetts 1, Vr^i ii89 

Michigan xh.430 

Minnesota [jt<i H2 

Missouri 2,^ ,*« 



2.048,999 

4,088 

«««^ 

107 

2,786,489 

II 2&4,1» 

■rlvuniii 4,299.006 

f^iP'tixift 7.022 

-!•,;;;:::::::;:•.:::■•:•:••::::•.:::: ^^ 

Vir^flma. 187,079 

WeatVlriitnift 1«,738 

WificonsiD 2.797,188 



Total 38.58l,U4 

RBCBIPTS B7 STATBS AND TBRRITORIBS DURING THE FISCAL YBAR 1899. 



States and Territories. Cc 

Alabama I 92 

Arkansas 80 

Califomiaa 4 48 

Colorado 2) 1 22 

Oonnecticutc 2 . 08 

Florida « *-^iAr 50 

Gteorgia su].;. 8U 

Illinois 47;.M^ 87 

Indiana 17 i 97 

lowa^ 2- 28 

KansiEksd ^ ^ 

Kentucky 22 23 

Louisiana 6 2 74 

Maryland/ 8 41 

Massachusetts 8 86 

Michigan 4 : 49 

Minnesota 2 - 23 

Missouri 16,-^ 84 



■ l^erHturie*. CoUecUons. 

L «681,0O7.21 

I l5tL h...* 3,428.079.88 

ilauip£blrei 1,341.086.08 

Jt^rwj.. 8,074.2».I8 

viexlcoj IS2.807.28 

\fyTlt 46.684,980.98 

ti C^ruHna 4,921,016.91 

,,......, 21,841.066.76 

'Uk 1,074,921.81 

>yIvftjTra 28.386.573.68 

h Camlina 284,278.16 

:s«eo 2.178,896.60 

.s 1.677,888.60 

inSa 4,815,861.08 

t V^lrtflnfca 1,480,106.67 



Total 278,484,673.44 



a IncludingMie state of Nevada, bincluding the state of Wyoming, e Including the state 
of Rhode Island, d Including the Indian Territory and the territory of Oklahoma, e Includ- 
ing the state of Mississippi. /Including the state of Delaware, District of Columbia and two 
counties of Virginia, o Including the states of Idaho and Utah, h Including the states of 
North Dakota and South Dakota. 4 Including the states of Maine and Vermont. J Includ- 
ing the territory of Arizona, k Including the state of Washington and theterritory of Alaska 

STILLS SEIZED AND CASUAI/TIES TO OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES FOR THB 
LAST TEN YEARS. 





1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


^- 


TotaL 


Stills seised 


683 
1 

1 


1 

" 


.- 


80G 1,016 


1.874 


1,906 
8 


2.273 

a 


mi 

6 


2,190 


"1 


Officers or employes wounded. . . 





ILLICIT STILLS SEIZED, 1899. 



AJ&lt&ma 

ArkAnsaa . ^ 

Fti iiTK \\ Cni L f orala ..... 
Florida 

gooivLa - - *-.. 
^tioni] KOntueky ..... 
Fifth ^L^ntUPlty ,..,,.. 
Sevt'dth Kent-usity .., 
EJiirmti Kuntucfcj,.... 
Lo L] isi HDA ( em bracl Dg 

Mls«lssl[ipVL, 

FliijE MU?hlHan 

Flftb New LrE?rst^y 

Flrai New York 



. — StUls Seized — . Persons 
Destroyed.Removed. arrested 



187 



7 

14 
11 
166 



8 


138 




116 


1 






1 


66 


260 




3 


, 


2 




3 


6 


9 



DistricU. 



Third New York 
Fourteenth New York 
Fourth N. Carolina... 
Fifth North Carolina. 
Twenty-third Penn.. . . 

South Carolina 

Second Tennessee 

Fifth Tennessee 

Fourth Texas 

Second Virginia 

Sixth Virginia 

West Virginia 



' — Stills Seized — s Persons 
Destroyed.Removed. arrested 



9 
1 
171 
868 
2 
146 
41 
46 

I 

204 
8 




Carol 



INTERNAL REVENUE. 



QUANTITY OF LEAF TOBACCO USED BY MANUFACTURERS DURING THE UiST 

TEN YEARS. 



Pounds. 



Product. 



Total. 



1889.'.. 
1S90... 



1S93.... 
ISM... 



1896... 
1897. 



83,513,962 
220,423,612 

91,746,811 
220,116,473 



9,115,810 

237,959.329 

90,875,830 

9,907.222 



&(,428,797 
12,497483 

215,961,699 
77,359,405 
12,614,409 

227,666,589 
77,499,875 
16,094,338 

230,062,119 
75,938.866 
19,114,190 

213,345,527 
77,452,711 



17,477,402 
260,957,660 

83,460,874 
1,977.100 

17,061,349 
247,868.CL4 



Ciffars and cigarettes. . 

Tobacco and snuff 

Cigars and cigarettes.. 

Tobacco and snuff 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Tobacco and snuff 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Tobaeco and snuff 

Cigars 

Cigarettes .,... 

Tobacco and snuff. 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Tobacco and snuff 

Cigars •. 

Cigarettes 

Tobacco and snuff 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Tobacco and snuff 

Cigars (large) 

Cigars (small) 

Cigarettes 

Tobacco and snuff 

Cigars (large) 

Cigars (small) 

Cigarettes . 
obaccc 



303,987,574 
3U,8e2,784 

332,511.067 
339,012,619 
312,907,679 
817,610,403 



Tobacco and snuff.. 



367,in.083 
34^,877,787 



NOTB.— The quantity of leaf tobacco reported used in 1898 includes scraps and stems. 
MATERIALS USED FOR THE PRODUCTION OF DISTILLED SPIBITS-1899. 



STATES. 



afaZf. Wlieat 



j^y Rye. Com. Oats. ^^^ j,^^ ^ni^ ToUa. 



Other 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Georgia 

Idabo 

Illinois 

Indiana. 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . . 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

New Hampshire. 

New Jersey 

New York.... 

North Carolina. . 

Ohio 

Oklahoma Ter.... 
Pennsylvania.... 
South Carolina . . 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia.... 

Wisconsin 

Total 



Bu. 

4,874 

1,839 

5,753 

17 

4,519 

184 

10,051 

33 

834,514 

305,612 

62 

515.084 



13 
2,904 



Bu. 

SO 



Bu, 

15,253 

17 

12.182 



21 

18 

5,360 



18 
200.946 
70,063 

19 
740,802 



Bu. 

28,704 
12,792 
4,238 

146 
11.467 

523 
58,644 



Bu. 



Bu. 

"ii 



Qals. 



Bu. 



Bu. 
85,152 
16,n5 
28.148 
180 
28,168 



6,442,927 
2,557.765 



3,182,647 



7,645 



258 
200 



81,654 

863 

19,997 



467,802 
4,655 
4,522 
15.324 



43,928 

4,453 

178,942 

415.654 



169,3tJ2 
943,355 



555 
7,478,698 
2,941,368 

663 

4,448,844 



1,780,923 



504.596 

9,971 

204,707 

479,667 



32,000 

73.209 

26,271 

197,581 

163 

204.812 

8.748 

18,467 

572 

81 

3.588 

16 

6,669 

70,635 



1,562 
8,143 



3,467 

***837 
133 



2 

206 



48,000 

206,994 

26,630 

296,934 

232 

1,099,916 

2,837 

15,006 

457 

81 

11,729 



48.000 
861,452 



549 



87,780 



1,603.795 

1,471 

79,642 

30,053 

169,505 

4,772 

266 

24,918 

380 

606 

289.723 



132 
702 



264 



6,540 



35 



5,620 



128,000 

643,715 

279,837 

2.005.511 

1,866 

1,388,103 

36,844 

208,678 

5,934 

318 

40,348 

396 

^^ 



2;4n,4i7 



19,182 1.518 3.383.867 15.682.809|l4.805 1.380t 2.920,660 



5;^ 21,580,466 



The average yield per bushel of grain used was g^ggfi^— *-*6 + gallons of 

The average yield per gallon of molasses used for the production of spirits 
a gallon. 

gallon of molasses used in the production of rum was 



.8U + of a gallon, 

The average yield per 
+ of a gallon.- 



spirlts. 
wo« 76a654 
948,355 
1.491379 „^ 
1,977,305 ' -^^ 



83551A 



100 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



OPERATIONS OF MANUFACTURERS OF TOBACCO AND CIGARS. ' 
(Calendar year 1898.) 

Number of registered manufacturers of tobacco 3,186 

Number wbo qualified as manufacturers for the purpose of buying and selling refuse 

scraps, cuttings and clippings 60 

Number wbo qualified as manufacturers for tbe purpose of disposing of the old stoclt of 

manu f ac tured tobacco 135 

Number of persons who produced perique tobacco 67 

Number who qualified as manufacturers and confined their operations exclusively to 

the manufacture of snuff 105 

Number who qualified as tobacco manufacturers who also operated cigar factories 1,800 

Number who qualified for the express purpose of manufacturing plug, twist and smok- 
ing tobacco and snuff 1,( 

Total 3,186 

QUANTITY OF TOBACCO AND SNUFF MANUFACTURED. Pwmds. 

Quantity of plug and twist tobacco produced 160,876,541 

Quantity of fine-cut chewing tobacco produced 11,415,231 

Quantity of smoking tobacco produced 89.240,526 

Quan tity of snuff produced 18,007.631 

Total quantity of tobacco and snuff produced .275,B9,Si9 

CIGARS AND CIGARETTES MANUFACTURED. 

Number of cigars weighing^nore than 3 pounds per 1,000 produced 4,458,886,966 

Number of cigars weighing not more than 3 pounds per 1,000 produced 466,d2H,384 

Number of cigarettes weighing not more than 3 pounds per l.UUO produced .4,884J(]87,982 

N umber of cigarettes weighing more than 3 pounds per 1,000 produced • 1,745,915 

CIGAR FACTORIES. 

Number of cigar and cigarette factories operated « .30, 856 

Number making cigarettes exclusively 839 

LEAF TOBACCO. Pmmda. 

Quantity of leaf tobacco used in the production of large cigars /. . . 88,46^,874 

Quantity of leaf tobacco used in the production of small cigars 1,977,100 

Quiintity of leaf tobacco used in the production of cigarettes 17,061,349 

Quantity of leaf and scra^ tobacco used in the production of chewing and smoking 

tobacco and snuff 247,368,4U 

Total leaf tobacco used... . 849,877, 787 

Average quantity of leaf tobacco used per 1,000 large cigars li 

Average quantity of leaf tobacco used per 1,000 small cigars A 

Average quantity of leaf tobacco used per 1,000 large cigarettes 1821 

Average quantity of leaf tobacco used per 1,000 small cigarettes 3.84 



SUGAR STATISTICS. 

Quantity of sugar imported Into the United States from the principal countries of supply 
during each fiscal year from 1895 to 1898, inclusive. 



Countries from 
which impouted. 



Ciii^'i 

Gonuanr 

Dtucb Ea^t iDdiCc^. 

H«n'flii.. -,. 

Biiclsb West indlses 

BriiitL... 

BiiEijalt l:iuijitia. 
Santo l>nralngo 
Philippine ifilQndB.. 

Porto itii:o,,.. 

Bf'iifi am... .,;.,,..,,. 

Euypt *.,,.,,.. 

Uj^IcktI Kingdam... 
AiiL!»trih-HaTiirarj?... 
NfeiljiTtantK . ,. 

France 

China 

Dutch Guiana 

British Africa 

Danish West Indies 

Hongkong 

Canada 

Other countries. 
Total 



Pounds. 
2,127,602,319 



1894. 



326,574,584 
256,821,752 
258,447,122 
134,455,359 
89,421,821 
124,052,343 
75,546,080 
80,479,170 





1897. 



1898. 



Anntial arfroMt 
1896-Jisyn. 



Potmds. 


Per ct. 


1^16,890,463 


;}l.3S 


695,066,534 


15.32 


478,410,862 


la.31 


376,825,818 


9.70 


244,249,344 


6.29 




4.69 


141,304,457 




99,700 572 


2.67 


87,970,271 


2 26 


79,708,306 


2.06 


61,866.770 


1.60 


53,999,097 


1.64 




liSi 


39,660.821 


1.08 


28 188,569 


73 


19,062.656 


.49 


15,512,^6 


.40 


15.382,418 


,40 


18,745;018 


.36 




.20 


3,060,368 


.08 


29,386.686 


.76 


3,884,987,89 


100.00 



THE PEACE CONFERENCE. 



101 



THE PEAOB OOnJTJslbEVOB. 



In parsnance of the rescript of Nicholas 
II., czar of Russia (a copy of which may be 
found in The Daily News Almanac for 1899, 
page 102), for the limitation of tlie evils 
of militarism, an international conference 
was appointed to be held at The Hague on 
the 18th of May, 1899, to which the various 
governments of the world were Invited to 
send delegates to represent them in the 
proposed deliberations. On the Uth of Jan- 
uary, 1899, a circular was issued by Count 
l^nravieff, Russian minister of foreigp af- 
fairs, to all the powers having diplomatic 
representatives at St. Petersburg, In which 
the various proposals to be submitted for 
dlBCOssioii at the conference were outlined. 

PROPOSALS SUBMITTM). 

This circular was as follows: 

"When, in the month of August last, my 
august master instructed me to propose to 
the governments which have representa- 
tives in St. Petersburg the holding -of a 
conference with the object of seeking more 
efficacious means for assuring to all peoples 
the blessings of real and lasting peace, 
and, before all. In order to put a stop to 
the prc^n^essive development of the present 
armaments, there appeared to be no <mstacle 
in the way of the realization, at no distant 
date, of this humanitarian scheme. The 
cordial manner in which the step taken by 
the Imperial government was greeted by 
nearly all the powers could not fail to 
strengthen this view. While highly appre- 
ciating the sympathetic terms in which the 
adhesions of most of the powers were 
drafted, the Imperial cabinet also feels 
lively satisfaction at the testimonies of 
very warm approval which have been ad- 
dressed to it and continue to be received 
from all classes of society in various parts 
of the globe. Notwithstanding the strong 
current of opinion which set in in favor of 
the Idea of general pacification, the polit- 
ical horison has undergone a sensible 
change In this last respect. Several pow- 
ers nave underiaken fresh armaments, 
striving to further increase their military 
forces, and in the presence of this uncer- 
tain situation It might be asked whether 
the powers considered the present moment 
opportune for the international discussion 
of the Ideas set forth in the circular of 
Oct. 12 (old style), 1898. 

"Hoping, however, that the elements of 
trouble agitating the political spheres will 
soon give place to a calmer disposition, of 
a nature to favor the success of the pro- 
pofed conference, the imperial government 
ii of opinion that it would be possible to 
proceed forihwith to a preliminary ex- 
change of views between the powers with 
the object (a) of seeking without delay 
means for putting a stop to the progressive 
increase of military and naval armaments, 
a question the solution of which becomes 
evidently more and more urgent in view of 
the fresh extension given to these arma- 
ments; and (b) of preparing the way for a 
discussion of the questions relating to the 
possiblli^ of preventing armed contllcts by 
the pacific means at the disposal of inter- 
national diplomacy. 

**In the event of the powers considering 
the inesent moment favorable for the meet- 
ing of a conference on these bases, it would 
certainly be useful for the cabinets to come 



to an understanding on the subject of the 
programme of their labors. The proposals 
to be submitted for international discussion 
at the conference could, in general terms, 
be summarized as follows: 

"1. An understanding not to increase for 
a fixed period the present effective of the 
armed military and naval forces, and, at 



the same time, not to increase the budgets 
pertaining thereto; a preliminary examina- 
tion of the means by which a reduction 



might even be effected in future in the 
forces and budgets above mentioned. 

"2. To prohibit the use in the armies and 
fleets of anv new Idnd of firearms what- 
ever, and of new explosives, or any pow- 
ders more powerful than those now In ose 
either for rifles or cannon. 

**3. To restrict the use in military war- 
fare of the formidable explosives already 
existing, and to prohibit the throwing of 
projectiles or explosives of any kind from 
balloons or by any similar means. 

**4. To prohibit the use in naval wariare 
of submarine torpedo-boats or plungers, or 
other similar engioes of destruction; to 
give an underiaking not to construct ves- 
sels with rams in the future. 

"6. To apply to naval warfare the stipu- 
lations of the Geneva convention of 1864, 
on the basis of the ariicles added to the 
convention of 1868. 

"6. To neutralize ships and boats em- 
ployed in saving those overboard during or 
after an engagement. 

**7. To revise the declaration concerning 
the laws and customs of war elaborated in 
1874 by the conference of Brussels, which 
has remained unratified to the present day. 

•*8. To accept in principle the employ- 
ment of the good offices of mediation and 
facultative arbitration in cases lendlnj; 
themselves thereto, with the object of pre- 
venting armed conflicts between nations; 
an understanding with respect to the mode 
of applying tliese good offices, and the 
establishment of a uniform practice in 
using them. 

"It is well understood that all questions 
concerning the political relations of states 
and the order of things established by 
treaties, as generally all questions which 
do not directly fall within the programme 
adopted by the cabinets, must be absolutely 
excluded from the deliberations of the con- 
fereoce. 

"In requesting you, monsieur, to be good 
enough to apply to your government for 
Instructions on the subject of my present 
communication, I beg you at the same time 
to inform it that, in the interest of the 
great cause which my august master has so 
much at heari, his imperial majesty con- 
siders it advisable that the conference 
should not sit in the capital of one of the 
great powers, where so many political in- 
terests are centered which might, perhaps, 
impede the progress of a work in which 
all the countries of the universe are equally 
interested." 

PERSONNEL OP THE CONFERENCE. 

Notwithstanding the very general feeling 
of skepticisni as to the results of the con- 
ference, the czar's invitation was accepted 
by twenty powers, which are named below, 
with their delegates: 

United States— Seth Low, president of the 



102 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1000. 



Columbia nniyersity. New York; Andrew u. 
White, ambassador at Berlin; Stanford 
Newell, minister at The Hague; Gapt. Wil- 
liam Croxier of the ordnance department of 
the army, Capt. A. T. Manan of the navy, 
Frederick HoUb, secretary of the delega- 
tion. 

Great Britain—Sir Julian Panncefote, G. 
0. B., her majesty's ambassador at Wash- 
ington; Sir Henry Howard* K. C. M. G., 
minister at The Hague. They were as- 
sisted, as naval and military experts, by 
Vice-Admiral Sir John Fisher, K. C. B., 
and MaJ.-Gen. Sir John Ardagh, E. G. I. E. 

France— M. Leon Bourgeois, ex-premier; 
M. d'Estoumelles, deputy for La Sarthe 
and formerly charge d'affaires at the 
French embassy in London. 

Germany--Count Munster, ambassador at 
Paris; Baron von Stengel of the Munich 
uniyersity. Prof. Dr. Zorn of the University 
pf Konigsberg; Capt. Siegel, naval attache 
at the German embassy in Paris; Col. 
Gross von Schwarzhoff, commanding the 
94th regiment of infantry. 

Denmark— M. de Bllle, Danish minister 
in London; Col. Schnaek, ex-war minister; 
Baron Reedtz Thott. 

Austria-Hungary— Count Rudolph Welser- 
sheimb, first under secretary at the foreign 
office in Vienna; Herr von Okolicsanyl, 
Austro-Hungarian minister at The Hague, 
assisted by an expert in international law, 
and Lieut .-Col. Kuepach, chief of the gen- 
eral staff of the 3d infantry division at 
Linz, acted as military adviser to Count 
Welsershelmb. 

Russia— M. de Staal, ambassador in Lon- 
don (president of the conference); Prof. 
Martens of the St. Petersburg university; 
M. de Struve, minister resident at The 
Hague. 

Italy— Count Nigra, ambassador at Vi- 
enna; Count Zaninl, minister plenipoten- 
tiary at The Hague; Gen. Zuccari, formerly 
military attache at Berlin; Capt. Blanco, 
naval attache in London. 

Portugal— Count de Macedo, Portuguese 
minister at Madrid; Angostinho d'Ornellas, 
Portuguese minister at St. Petersburg; 
Count de Selir, Portuguese minister at The 
Hague. 

Spain— Duke de Tetuan, life senator and 
ex-minister of foreign affairs; Senator 
Lamirez de Villaurrutia, minister plenipo- 
tentiary at Brussels; M. de Baguer, minis- 
ter plenipotentiary at The Hague. 

Holland— M. de Beaufort, minister for for- 
eign affairs; Prof. Asser, another great au- 
thority on international law. 

Belgium— M. Beemaet, president of the 
chamber of deputies and minister of state; 
Chevalier Descamps-Davld, senator; Count 
de Grelle-Roglar, minister plenipotentiary 
at The Hague. 

Switzerland- Dr. Both, Swiss minister at 
Berlin; Col. Euenzli, member of the na- 
tional council (Aargua); M. Ddier, national 
council (Geneva); Dr. Suter, an official in 
the political department, secretary to the 
Swiss delegates. ^ «.,^^ 

Sweden and Norway— Baron de Bildt, 
Swedish minister in Rome, assisted on the 
part of Sweden by Col. Brandstrom and 
Commander Hjulhammar as military and 
naval experts, and on the part of Norway 
by M. W. Konow, president of the odel- 
sting, and Gen. Thaulow. 

Turkey— Turkhan Pasha, member of the 
council of state and formerly minister for 



foreign affairs; Nouri Bey, general secre- 
tary at the Porte. 

Persia— Mirza Biza Khan (Arfa-ed-Dow- 
leh), minister resident at St. Fetersboig, a 
soldier as well as a diplomat. 

Slam— Maiquis Suriya. minister to Fiance. 

Servia- M. Myatovitch, minister to Great 
Britain. 

Japan— Baron Hayashl, minister plenipo- 
tentiary at St. Petersburg; M. Motono, 
Japanese minister at Brussels; Col. Uye- 
hara, for the army; Gapt. Sakomolo, for 
the navy. 

Boumania— M. Al Beldimano, Roumanian 
minister in Berlin; M. Papinlu, Boumanlan 
minister at The Hague; Col. Coanda, direc- 
tor of artillery from the war office at 
Bucharest. 

China— Yang-Yo, ambassador at St. Pe- 
tersburg, also accredited to The Hague. 
ASSEMBLING OF THE CONFERENCE. 

The delegates met at The Hague on the 
18th of May, 1899, and the conference was 
organized by the election of M. de Staal, a 
Russian delegate, to preside over the de- 
liberations of the body. The c<HifereBce 
held its sessions until the 29th oi July, 
1899, when It adjourned. 

THE RESULTS. 

It is not within the scope of this arUde 
to give an account of the routine work of 
the confer^ice, but simply its accomplish- 
ments. In a word, disarmament failed, tmt 
arbitration won a most signal victory. In 
brief, the conference appointed three com- 
missioners to deal with the three groups 
of questions contained in the Russian cir- 
cular given above, which were known as the 
first, second and third commissions. The 
first dealt with the subject of disarmament, 
limitation of expenditure, prohibition of 
new styles of firearms, limitation of the 
use of explosives and prohibition of the 
use of rams or of submarine boats. Tlie 
American members on this commission wer0 
Messrs. White, Mahan and Grozier. 

The second commission considered the 
laws of warfare, application of the Geneva 
convention to naval warfare, neatralization 
of vessels engaged in saving the ship- 
wrecked during or after a naval engage- 
ment, and a revision of the declaration of 
Brussels of 1874 on the notification and the 
customs of war. The American members 
of this commission were Messrs. White, 
Newell, Mahan and Grozier. 

The third commission had charge of the 
subjects of mediation and arbitration, 
which were regarded by both Great Britain 
and the United States as the most im- 
portant ones . before the conference. The 
American members of this commission were 
Messrs. White, Low and HoUs. 

At the final session of the conference the 
president announced that sixteen states had 
signed the arbitration convention, fifteen 
tbe convention relating to the laws and 
customs of war and that relating to the 
adaptation of the Geneva convention to 
naval warfare, seventeen the declaration 
prohibiting the throwing of projectiles or 
explosives from balloons, sixteen the dec- 
laration prohibiting the use of asphyxiating 
f:ases and fifteen the declaration prohlbit- 
ng the use of expansive bullets. 

THE ARBITRATION PROJECT. 

We give In full the text of the project of 
the convention for the peaceful regulation 
of International conflicts: 



♦ THE PEACE CONFERENCE. 



103 



SECTION 1.— THE MAINtIinANCE UP 
THE GENERAL PEAQB. 
Article 1. In order to prevent as far as 
possible the recourse to force in interna- 
tional relationst the Signatory powers agree 
to employ all their Efforts to bring abont, 
by pacific means, the solution of the differ- 
ences wbicb may arise between states. 

SEC. 2.->GOOD OFFICES AND MEDIA- 
TION. 

Art. 2. The signatory powers agree that 
in case of grave disagreement ot conflict, 
before appealing to arms, they will have re- 
course, so far as circumstances allow it, to 
the good offices or mediation of one or more 
of the friendly powers. 

Art. 3. Independently of this recourse, the 
signatory powers consider it useful that one 
or more powers that are not concerned in 
the conflict should offer of their own Initia- 
tire, so far as the circumstances lend them- 
selres to it, their good offices or their me- 
diation to the disputing states. 

The powers not concerned in the conflict 
have the right of offering their good offices 
or tlieir mediation even during the course 
of hostilities. 

The exercise of this right can never be 
considered by either of the disputing 
parties as an unfriendly act. 

Art. 4. The part of the mediator consists 
in the reconciliation of contrary preten- 
sions and in the allaying of the resentments 
which may be caused between the disputing 
states. 

Art. 5. The duties of the mediator cease 
from the moment when it is announced, 
whether by one of the disputing parties or 
by the mediator himself, that the compro- 
nnise or the basis of a friendly understand- 
ing proposed by him have not been ac- 
cepted. 

Art. 6. Good offices and mediation, 
whether recourse is had to them by one of 
the disputing parties or on the Initiatiye of 
powers not concerned in the conflict, have 
exclusively the character of counsel and are 
devoid of any obligatory force. 

Art. 7. The acceptance of mediation can- 
not have the effect, unless it be agreed to 
the contrary, of interrupting, retarding, or 
impeding mobilization and other measures 
preparatory to war. 

If It (mediation) Intervenes before the 
opening of hostilities, it does not, unless 
the contrary be agreed upon, interrupt the 
current military operations. 

Art. 8. The signatory powers agree to rec- 
ommend the application, in circumstances 
which permit of it, of a special mediation 
In the following form: 

In the case of a grave disagreement en- 
dangering peace, the disputing states 
should each choose one power to which they 
may Intrust the mission of entering into 
direct communication with the power 
chosen by the other side, for the purpose of 
l^reventing the rupture of pacific relations. 

During the continuance of their mandate 
the duration of which, unless the contrary 
Is stipulated, cannot exceed thirty days, the 
question in dispute is considered as referred 
exclusively to these powers. They must 
apply all their efforts to arranging the dif- 
ference. 

In case of the actual rupture of pacific 
relations, these powers remain charged with 
the common mission of profiting by every 
opportunity of re-establishing peace. 



SEC. 8.~INTEBNATI0NAL COMMISSIONS 
OF INQUIRY. 

Art. 9. In cases In which differences of 
opinion should arise between the signatory 
powers with regard to the local circum- 
stances which have given rise to a disagree- 
ment of an international character which 
could not be settled by the ordinary diplo- 
matic methods, and In which neither the 
honor nor the vital Interests of these pow- 
ers are at stake, the interested parties 
agree to have recourse, so far as the cir- 
cumstances permit It, to the Institution of 
international commissions of inquiry, in 
order to establish the circumstances which 
have given rise to dispute and to clear up, 
by an impartial and conscientious Inquiry 
on the spot, all questions of fact. 

Art. 10. The international commissions of 
inquiry are constituted, unless it Is stipu- 
lated to the contrary, In the manner deter- 
mined by article 31 of the present conven- 
tion. 

Art. 11. The interested powers undertake 
to furnish to the International commission 
of inquiry, to the fullest extent that they 
shall consider possible, all the means and 
all the facilities necessary for the complete 
knowledge and exact appreciation of the 
facts in question. 

Art. 12. The international commission of 
inquiry shall present to the Interested pow- 
ers its report signed by all the members of 
the commission. 

Art. 18. The report of the international 
commission of inquiry has in nowise the 
character of an arbitral decision. It leaves 
the disputing powers entire freedom, either 
to conclude a friendly arrangement on the 
basis of this report, or have recourse ulti- 
mately to mediation or arbitration. 
II.— OP INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION. 
SECTION 1.— OF ARBITRATION. 
(Justice Arbitrale.) 

Art. 14. International arbitration has for 
its object the Settlement of disputes be- 
tween states by Judges of their own choos- 
ing and in coniormity with their reciprocal 
rights. 

Art. 15. In questions of right, and espe- 
cially in questions of the interpretation or 
application of international conventions, 
arbitration is recognized by the signatory 
powers as the most effective and at the 
same time the most equitable means of set- 
tling disputes not arr&nged by diplomatic 
methods. 

Art. 16. The agreement to arbitrate may 
be concluded for disputes already in exist- 
ence, or for disputes about to arise (con- 
testations eventuelles). It can deal with 
every sort of dispute or only with disputes 
of a specified category. 

Art. 17. The arbitral convention involves 
an engagement to submit In good faith to 
the arbitral decision. 

Art. 18. Independently of general or spe- 
cial treaties, which may already bind the 
signatory powers to have recourse to arbi- 
tration, these powers reserve to themselves 
the liberty to conclude, either before the 
ratification of the present article or after- 
ward, new agreements, general or particu- 
lar, with the object of extending compul- 
sory arbitration to all cases which they 
Judge capable of being submitted to It. 

Art. 19. With the object of promoting the 
development of arbitration, the signatory 
powers consider it useful to lay down cer- 



104 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



tain rules concerning arbitral Jurisdiction 
and procedure. 

These proTisions are only applicable in 
case the parties themselTes do not adopt 
other rules with reference to this matter. 

SEC. 2.-<»F THE PERMANENT COURT 
OF ARBITRATION. 

Art. 20. With the object of facUitatine 
immediate recourse to the arbitration oi 
international differences not settled by dip- 
lomatic means, the signatory powers pledge 
themselTes to organize in the following 
manner a permanent court of arbitration, 
accessible at all times and working, except 
there be a contrary stipulation of the dis- 
puting parties, in conformity with the rules 
of procedure inserted in the present con- 
vention. 

Art. 21. This court has competence in all 
cases of arbitration, unless the disputing 

J>artie8 agree to establish a special arbitral 
urisdiction. 

Art. 22. An international bureau estab- 
lished at The Hague and placed under the 
direction of a permanent secretary-general 
is to act as the officer (greffe) of the court. 

It is to be the intermediary for the com- 
munications dealing with the meetings of 
the latter. 

It is to have care of the archives and the 
conduct of all the administrative business. 

Art. 23. Each of the signatory powers 
shall designate in the three months follow- 
ing the ratification of the present act four 
persons at the most, of recognized compe- 
tence in questions of international law, and 
enjoying the highest esteem (Joulssant de 
la plus haute consideration morale), and 
ready to accept the duties of arbitrators. 

The persons thus nominated will be en- 
tered, with the title of members of the 
court, on a list which will be communicated 
by the bureau to all the signatory powers. 

Every modification of the list of arbitra- 
tors shall be brought to the notice of the 
signatory powers by the bureau. 

Two or more powers may agree to nom- 
inate one or more members in common. 

The same person may be nominated by 
different powers. 

The members of the court are appointed 
for a term of six years. Their appointment 
may be renewed. 

In the case of the decease or of the re- 
tirement of a member of the tribunal, the 
vacancy will be filled In accordance with 
the rules established for nomination. 

Art. 24. The signatory powers which de- 
sire to apply to the court for the settlement 
of differences which have arisen between 
them choose out of the general list the 
number of arbitrators Jointly agreed upon. 

They give notice to the bureau of their 
intention to apply to the court and of the 
names of the arbitrators whom they have 
nominated. 

Art. 25. The tribunal sits usually at The 
Hague. 

It has the right to sit elsewhere, with the 
consent of the parties in litigation. 

Art. 26. Every power, though not a signa. 
tory of this act, can apply to the court 
under the conditions prescribed by the pres- 
eat convention. 

Art. 27. The signatory powers consider It 
a duty, in case a snarp conflict should 
threaten to break out between two or more 
of them, to remind these that the perma- 
nent court is open to them. 

Consequently, they declare the fact that 



one or several of them reminding the dis- 
puting states of the provisions of the pres- 
ent convention, and the advice given, in 
the higher Interest of peace, to apply to 
the permanent court, can only be considered 
an exercise of good offices. 

Art. 28. A permanent council, composed 
of the diplomatic reoresentatives of the 
signatory powers resident at The Hague, 
and the Dutch minister for foreign affairs, 
who shall discharge the functions of presi- 
dent, shall be constituted in that city as 
soon as possible after the ratification of 
the present act. 

This council shall be charged with estab- 
lishing and organizing the international 
bureau, which shall remain under its direc- 
tion and under its control. 

It shall notify the powers of the constitu- 
tion of the court, and shall provide for its 
installation. 

It shall decree its procedure, as well as 
all other necessary regulations. 

It shall decide all questions which may 
arise touching the woraing of the tribunal. 

It shall have absolute powers as to the 
nomination, suspension or recall of the 
functionaries and employes of the bureau 

It shall fix the pay and salaries and con- 
trol the general expenditure. 

The presence of five members at meetings 
duly convoked shall suffice to enable the 
council to deliberate in valid form. De- 
cisions are taken by a majority of votes. 

The council addresses each year to the 
signatory powers a report on the labors of 
the court, on the discharge of the adminis- 
trative services and on the expenditure. 

Art. 29. The costs of the bureau shall be 
borne by the signatory powers in the pro- 
portion fixed by the international bureau 
of the Universal Postal union. 

SEC. 3.— OF ARBITRATION PROCEDURE 

Art. 30. The powers which accept arbitra- 
tion will sign a special agreement or com- 
promise (acte special: compromis). In 
which is clearly laid down the object of 
the dispute, as well as the extent of the 
arbitrators' powers. This document shall 
confirm the undertaking of the parties to 
submit themselves in good faitn to the 
arbitrators' decision. 

Art. 31. The arbitral functions may be 
conferred on one single arbitrator or on 
several arbitrators, named by the parties at 
their own discretion, or chosen by them 
among the members of the permanent arbi- 
tration court established by this act. 

In the absence of a contrary agreement, 
the formation of the tribunal of arbitration 
shall be proceeded with as follows: 

Each party shall name two arbitrators, 
and thev shall choose together an umpire 
(sur-arbltre). 

In case of a division of votes, the choice 
of the umpire shall be intrusted to a third 
power, named in agreement by the parties. 

If an agreement is not come to on this 
subject, each party shall designate a dif- 
ferent power, and the choice of the umpire 
shall be made in concert by the powers so 
designated. 

Art. 32. When the arbitrator is a sover- 
eign, or the chief of a state, the arbitra- 
tion procedure shall be exclusively settled 
by his high determination. 

Art. 33. The umpire is president de Jure 
of the tribunal. 

When the tribunal does not include an 
umpire, it shall itself name its president. 



THE PEACE CONFERENCE. 



105 



Art. 34. Except there be a stipulation to 
the contrary, in case of the decease or 
resignation of one of the arbitrators, or his 
inability from any cause whatever to act, 
the vacancy will be filled in accordance 
with the rules established for nomination. 

Art. 35. The seat of the tribunal is desig- 
nated by the disputing parties, or, in de- 
fault of such designation, by the tribunal of 
arbitration. 

The seat thus fixed upon can only be 
changed In consequence of a new agreement 
between the interested states, or, in case 
of necessity (raison majeure), by decision 
of the tribunal itself. 

Art. 36. The disputing parties have the 
right to name to the tribunal delegates or 
special agents, to serve as intermediaries 
between the tribunal and the litigants. 

They are, moreover, authorized to intrust 
the defense of their rights and interests be- 
fore the tribunal to counsel or advocates 
named by them for that purpose. 

Art. 37. The tribunal decides upon the 
choice of languages authorized to be em- 
ployed beforelt. 

Art.'' 38. The arbitral procedure comprises 
as a general rule two phases, the prelim- 
inary phase and the definitive phase. 

The first consists in the communication 
made by the agents of the disputing parties 
to the members of the tribunal and to the 
opposing party of all printed or written 
deeds and of all documents containing the 
cases of the parties. 

The second Is oral and consists in the 
bearing before the tribunal. » 

Art. 39. Every document produced by one 
of the parties must be communicated to 
the other party. 

Art. 40. The hearing before the tribunal 
Is directed by the president. It is recorded 
in reports set forth by secretaries ap- 
pointed by the president. These reports 
alone are to be regarded as authentic. 

Art. 41. The preliminary procedure being 
private and the debates being public, the 
tribunal has the right to refuse all new 
deeds or documents which the representa- 
tives of one of the parties wish to submit 
to it without the consent of the other. 

Art. 42. The tribunal remains free to take 
Into consideration new documents or proofs 
of which the agents or counsel of the dis- 
puting parties have made use in their argu- 
ments before It. 

It has the right to demand the production 
of these documents or proofs apart from 
the obligation of making them known to 
the opposite party. 

Art. 43. The tribunal can, moreover, re- 
quire from the agents of -the parties the 
production of all the documents and expla- 
nations which it requires. In case of re- 
fusal the tribunal takes note of the fact. 

Art. 44. The agents and counsel of the 
litigating parties are authorized to present 
orauly to the tribunal all the arguments 
they consider useful for the defense of 
their cause. 

Art. 45. They have the right to raise ob- 
jections or Incidental points. The decisions 
of the tribunal upon these points settle the 
controversy, and cannot give rise to any 
farther discussion. 

Art. 46. Th§ menfbers of the tribunal 
have the right to ask questions of the 
agents and counsel of the disputing par- 



ties, and to demand from them explana- 
tions of doubtful points. 

Neither the questions put nor the observa- 
tions made by the members of the tribunal 
In tl^e course of the debates can be re- 
garded as enunciations of the opinion of 
the tribunal In general or of lt» members 
in particular. 

Art. 47. The tribunal alone is authorised 
to settle its competence, by the interpreta- 
tion of the agreement to arbitrate as well 
as of other treaties which may be invoked 
In the matter, and by the application of 
the principles of Intematlonal law. 

Art. 48. The trtbunal has the right to 
make rules of procedure for the direction 
of the arbitration, to settle the forms and 
periods within which each party will be 
obliged to finish Its case, and to carry out 
all the formalities necessary for the recelv 
ing of evidence. 

Art. 49. The agents and counsel of the 
disputing parties having presented all ex- 
planations and evidence on behalf of their 
cause, the president of the tribunal an- 
nounces the closing of the hearing. 

Art. 50. The deliberations of the tribunal 
take place with closed doors. 

Every decision is taken by a majority of 
members of the tribunal. 

The refusal of a member to give his vote 
must be noted in the report. 

Art. 51. The arbitral decision voted by a 
majority must state the reasons on which 
it is based. It is to be set down in writing 
and signed by all the members of the 
tribunal. 

Those members who are In a minority 
may, when signing, record their dissent. 

Art. 52. The arbitral decision is read out 
at a public sitting of the tribunal in the 

Sresence of the agents and counsel of the 
isputlng parties, or after they have been 
duly summoned. 

Art. 53. The arbitral decision, duly pro- 
nounced and notified to the agents of the 
disputing parties, definitely decides the 
question at issue, and closes the arbitration 
proceedings instituted by the agreement to 
arbitrate. 

Art. 54. Except In the case of a contrary 
provision contained in the agreement to ar- 
bitrate, revision of the arbitral decision 
may be demanded of the tribunal Which has 
given the decision, but only on the ground 
of a discovery of a new fact, which would 
have been of such a nature as to exercise 
a decisive influence on the Judgment, and 
which at the moment of such Judgment wag 
unknown to the tribunal itself and to the 
parties. 

The procedure of revision can only be 
opened by a decision of the tribunal ex- 
pressly declaring the existence of the new 
fact, possessing the character set forth in 
the preceding paragraph, and declaring that 
the demand Is admissible on that ground. 

No demand for revision can be accepted 
three months after notification of the de- 
cision. 

Art. 55. The arbitral decision Is only ob- 
ligatory on the parties who have <!oncinded 
the agreement to arbitrate. 

When it is a question of the interpreta- 
tion of a convention existing between a 
greater number of powers than those be- 
tween which tha difference at Issue has 
arisen, the disputing parties notify to the 
other powers who have signed the conven- 
tion the agreement to arbitrate which thev 



108 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



taaye made. Each of those powers has the 
right to iDteryene in the proceedings. If 
one or more of them have availed them- 
selves of this privilege, the interpretation 
contained in the Judgment is equally oblig- 
atory on them also. 

Art. 66. Each party bears its own ex- 
penses and an equal share of the expenses 
of the tribunal, without prejudice to the 
penalties which may be imposed by the tri- 
bunal against one or another of the parties. 



It is proposed to add the three following 
articles to those relating to the permanent 
court of arbitration! 

"Article A. The members of the court 
shall enjoy diplomatic priTileges and im- 



munities in the exercise of their func- 
tions. 

"Article B. The bureau is authorised to 
place its premises and its organization at 
the disposal of the signatonr powers for 
any cases of special arbitration. (Four le 
fonctionnement de toute Juridiction spe- 
ciale d'arbitrage.) 

**Article C. ^e signatory powers pledge 
themselves to cotaimunlcate to the bureau a 
copy of every arbitral stipulation agreed 
upon between them, and of all Judgments 
resulting from arbitral Jurisdictions other 
than that of the court. They pledge them- 
selves to communicate to the bureau the 
laws and regulations and all documents 
registering the execution of the Judgments 
pronounced by th^ court." 



0L08B 07 THE SPAHISH WAB. 



Our record of the Spanish-American war 
closed last year with a very fragmentary 
and Incomplete synopsis of the treaty 
adopted by the commissioners at the Paris 
confefence on the lOth of December, 1898, 
That document is of so much importance 
and interest to the American people and 
may be so far-reaching in its effects unon 
the foreign policy of the United States tnat 
It is worthy of an unabridged publication in 
this volume. The treaty was transmitted 
by the president to the senate for ratifica- 
tion on the 4th day of January, 1899, and is 
M follows! 

' "The United States of America and her 
majesty the queen regent of Spain, in the 
name of her august son, Don Alfonso XIII., 
desiring to end the state of war now exist- 
ing between the two countries, have for 
that purpose appointed as plenipotentiaries: 

"The president of the United States- 
William R. Day, Cushman K. Davis. Wil- 
liam P. Frye, George Gray and Whltelaw 
Beid, citizens of the United States. 

"And her majesty the queen regent of 
Spain—Don Bugenio Montero Rios, presi- 
dent of the senate; Don Buenaventura de 
Abarzuza, senator of the kingdom and ex- 
minister of the crown; Don Jose de Garnica, 
deputy to the cortes and associate Justice 
of the Supreme court; Don Wenceslao 
Ramirez de Villa-Utrutia, envoy extraor- 
dinary and minister plenipotentiary at 
Brussels, and Don Rafael Cerrero, general 
of division; 

"Who, having assembled in Paris, and 
having exchftnged their full powers, which 
were found to be in due and proper form, 
hav(^, after discussion of the matters before 
them, agreed upon the following articles: 

"Article 1. Spain relinquishes all claim of 
sovereignty over and title to Cuba. 

"And as the Island is, upon its evacua- 
tion by Spain, to be occupied by the United 
States, the United States will, so long as 
such occupation shall last, assume and dis- 
charge the oUIgations that may, under in- 
ternational law, result frdm the fact of its 
occupation, tor the protection of life and 
property. 

"Art. 2. Spain cedes to the Uhlted States 
the Island of Puerto Rico and other islands 
now under Spanish sot^reighty in the West 
Indies, and th^ i$l|tnd of Gtiam In the 
Marianas, or Ladrones. 

"Art. 8. Spain ce<le0 to the United States 
the archipelago known as the Philippine 



Islands, and comprehending the Islands 
lying within the following l&e: 

"A line running from west to east along 
or near the twentieth parallel of north lat^ 
tude and through the middle of the naviga- 
ble channel of Bachi, from the one hundred 
and eighteenth (118th) to the one hundred 
and twenty-seventh (127th) degree meridian 
of longitude east of Greenwich, thence along 
the one hundred and twenty-seventh (I27tn) 
degree meridian of longitude east of Green- 
wich to the parallel of -four degrees and 
forty-five minutes (4.46) north latitude, 
thence along the parallel of fonr degrees 
and forty-five minutes (4.46) north latitude 
to its intersecticm with the meridian of 
longitude one hundred and nineteen degrees 
and thirty-five minutes (119.86) east of 
Greenwich, thence along the meridian of 
longitude one hundred and nineteen degrees 
and thirty-five minutes (119.85), enst of 
Greenwich, to the parallel of latitude seven 
degrees and forty minutes (7.40) north, 
thence along the parallel of latitude seven 
degrees and forty minutes (7.40) north to 
its intersection with the one hundred and 
sixteenth (116th) degree meridian of longi- 
tude east of Greenwich, thence by a direct 
line to the intersection of the tenth (10th) 
degree parallel of north latitude with the 
one hundred and eighteenth (118th) degree 
meridian of longitude east of Greenwich, 
and thence along the one hundred and 
eighteenth (118th) degree meridian of longi- 
tude east of Greenwich to the point of 
beginning. 

"The United States will pay to Spain the 
sum of twenty million dollars (120,000,000) 
within three months after the exchange of 
the ratifications of the present treaty. 

"Art. 4. The United States will, for the 
term of ten years from the date of the ex- 
change of the ratifications of the present 
treaty, admit Spanish ships and merchtn- 
dise to the ports of the Philippine islands 
on the same terms as ships and merchan- 
dise of the United States. 

"Art. 6. The United States will, upon the 
signature of the present treaty, send back 
to Spain, at its own cost, the Spanish sol- 
diers taken as prisoners of war on the 
capture of Manila bv the American forces 
The arms of the soldiers in question ahau 
be restored to them. 

"Spain will, upon the exchange of the 
ratifications of the present treaty, proceed 
to evacuate the Phllipplnea as well as tba 



CLOSE OF THE SPAKISH WAB. 



107 



Island of Guam, ob terms similar to those 
agreed npon by the commissioner appointed 
to arrange for the evacuation of Puerto 
Kico and other islands in the West Indies 
under the protocol of Aug. 12, 1898, which is 
to continue in force till its provisions are 
completely executed. The time within 
which the evacuation of the Philippine 
islands and Guam shall be completed 
shall be fixed by the twa governments. 
Stands of colors, uncaptured war vessels, 
small arms, guns of all calibers, with their 
carriages and accessories, powder, ammuni- 
tion, live stock and materials and supplies 
of all kinds belonging to the land and naval 
forces of Spain in the Philippines and 
Goam remain the property of Spain. Pieces 
of heavy ordnance, exclusive of field artil- 
lery, in the fortifications and coast defenses, 
shall remain In their emplacements for the 
term of six months, to be reckoned from 
the exchange of ratifications of the treaty; 
and the United States may, in the mean- 
time, purchase such material from Spain 
if a satisfactory agreement between the 
two governments on the subject shall be 
reached. 

"Art. 6. Spain will, upon the signature of 
the present treaty, release all prisoners of 
war and all persons detained or Imprisoned 
for political offenses in connection with the 
insorrections in Cuba and the Philippines 
and the war with the United States. 

"ReciprocaUy, the United States will re- 
lease all persons made prisoners of war by 
the American forces and will undertake to 
obtain the release of all Spanish prisoners 
iB the hands of the insurgents in Cuba and 
the Philippines. 

"The government of the United States 
will, at its own cost, return to Spain and 
the government of Spain will, at its own 
cost, return to the United States, Cuba, 
Puerto Rico and the Philippines, according 
to the situation of their respective homes, 

grisoners released or caused to be released 
y them respectively under this article. 

••Art. 7. The United States and Spain mu- 
tually relinquish all claims for indemnity, 
national and individual, of every kind, of 
either government, or of its citizens or sub- 
jects, against the other government that 
may have arisen since the beginning of the 
late insurrection in Cuba and prior to the 
exchange of ratifications of the present 
treaty, including all claims for Indemnity 
for the cost of war. 

•The United States will adjudicate and 
settle the clafms of Its citizens against 
Spain relinquished in this article. 

••Art. 8. In conformity with the provisions 
of articles 1, 2 and 8 of this treaty, Spain 
relinquishes in Cuba and cedes in Puerto 
Rico and other islatids in the West Indies, 
in the island of Guam, and In the Philip- 
pine archipelago, all the buildings, wharves, 
barracks, forts, structures, public highways 
and other Immovable property, which. In 
conformity with law, belong to the public 
domain, and as such belong to the crown of 

*"And it is hereby declared that thp re- 
llnQuishment or cession, as the case may 
be, to which the preceding paragraph 
refers, cannot In any respect impair the 
property or rfghU which by law belong to 
the peaceful possession of property of all 
kinds/ of provinces, municipalities, public 
or private establiahments, ecclesiastical or 



civic bodies, or any other associations hav- 
ing legal capacity to acquire and possess 
property in the aforesaid territories re- 
nounced or ceded, or of private individuals, 
of whatsoever nationality such iQdivIduals 
may be. 

"The aforesaid relinquishment or cession, 
as the case mav be, includes all documents 
exclusively referring to the sovereignty 
relinquished or ceded that may exist in the 
archives of the peninsula. Where any docu- 
ment in such archives only in part relates 
to said sovereignty, a copy of such part 
will be furnished whenever it shall be 
requested. Like rules shall be reciprocally 
observed in favor of Spain in respect of 
documents in the archives of the islands 
above referred to. 

•'In the aforesaid relinquishment or ces- 
sion, as the case may be, are also included 
such rights as the crown of Spain and its 
authorities possess In respect of the oflScIal 
archives and records, executive as well as 
Judicial, in the islands above referred to, 
which relate to said islands or the rights 
and property of their inhabitants. Such 
archives and records shall be carefullv pre- 
served and private persons shall without 
distinction have the right to require, in 
accordance with law, authenticated copies 
of the contracts, wills and other instru- 
ments forming part of notarial protocols or 
files, or which may be contained In the 
executive or Judicial archives, be the latter 
In Spain or in the islands aforesaid. 

•'Art. 9. Spanish subjects, natives of the 
peninsula, residing In the territory over 
which Spain, by the present treaty, relin- 
quishes or cedes her sovereignty, may 
remain In such territory or may remove 
therefrom, retaining in either event all 
their rights of property. Including the right 
to sell or dispose of such property or of its 
proceeds; and they shall also have the right 
to carry on their industry, commerce and 
professions, being subject in respect thereof 
to such laws as are applicable to other 
foreigners. In case they remain In the 
territory they may preserve their allegiance 
to the crown of Spain by making, before 
a court of record, within a year from the 
date of the exchange of ratifications of this 
treaty, a declaration of their decision to 
preserve such allegiance; In default of 
which declaration they shall be held to 
have renounced it and to have adopted the 
nationality of the territory in which they 
may reside. 

"The civil rights and political status of 
the native Inhabitants of the territories 
hereby ceded to the United States shall be 
determined by the congress. 

•'Art. 10. The inhabitants of the territories 
over which Spain relinquishes or cedes her 
sovereignty shall be secured in the free 
exercise of their religion. 

"Art. 11. The Spaniards residing In the 
territories over which Spain by this treaty 
cedes or relinquishes her sovereignty shall 
be subject In matters civil as well as 
criminal to the Jurisdiction of the courts of 
the country wherein they reside, pursuant 
to the ordinary laws governing the same; 
and they shall have the right to appear 
before such courts and to pursue the same 
course as citizens of the country to which 
the courts belonsr. 

"Art. 12. Judicial proceedings pending at 



108 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



the time of the exchange of ratifications of 
this treaty in the territories over which 
Spain relinquishes or cedes her soyerelgnty 
shall be determined according to the follow- 
ing rules: 

"1. Judgments rendered either In ciyil 
suits between private individuals or in 
criminal matters before the date mentioned, 
and with respect to which there is no re- 
course or right of review under the Spanish 
law, shall be deemed to be final and shall 
be executed in due form by competent 
authorities in the territory within which 
such Judgments should be carried out. 

"2. Civil suits between private individuals 
which may on the date mentioned be unde- 
termined shall be prosecuted to judgment 
before the court in which they may then be 
pending or in the court that may be substi- 
tuted therefor. 

"3. Criminal actions pending on the date 
mentioned before the Supreme court of 
Spain against citizens of the territory 
which by this treaty ceases to be Spanish 
shall continue under its jurisdiction until 
final judgment; but, such judgment having 
been rendered, the execution thereof shall 
be committed to the competent authority of 
the place in which the case arose. 

"Art. 13. The rights of property secured 
by copyrights and patents acquired by 
Spaniards in the Island de Cuba and in 
Puerto Rico, the Philippines and other 
ceded territories at the time of the ex- 
change of the ratifications of this treaty, 
shall continue to be respected. Spanish 
scientific, literary and artistic works, not 
subversive of public order in the territories 
in question, shall continue to be admitted 
free of duty into such territories for the 
period of ten years, to be reckoned from 
the date of the exchange of the ratifications 
of this treaty. 

"Art. 14. Spain will have the power to 
establish consular offices In the ports and 
places of the territories the sovereignty 
over which has been either relinquished or 
ceded by the present treaty. 

"Art. 15. The government of each country 
will, for the term of ten years, accord to 
the merchant vessels of the other country 
the same treatment in respect of all port 
charges, including entrance and clearance 
dues, light dues and tonnage duties, as it 
accords to its own merchant vessels not 
engaged In the coastwise trade. 

"This article may at any time be ter- 
minated on six months' notice given by 
either government to the other. 

"Art. 16. It Is understood that any obliga- 
tions assumed In this treaty by the United 
States with respect to Cuba are limited to 
the time of its occupancy thereof; but it 
will, upon the termination of such occu- 
pancy, advise any government established 
in the island to assume the same obliga- 
tions. 

"Art. 17. The present treaty shall be rati- 
fied by the president of the United States 
by and with the advice and consent of the 
senate thereof and by her majesty the 
queen regent of Spain, and the ratifications 
shall be exchanged at Washington within 
six months from the date hereof, or earlier 
if possible. 

"In faith whereof, we, the respective 
plenipotentiaries, have signed this treaty 
and have hereunto affixed our seals. 

"Done In duplicate at Paris, the 10th day 



of December, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight. 

"WILLIAM R. DAY, 

"CUSHMAN K. DAVIS. 

"WILLIAM P. FRYE, 

"GEORGE GRAY, 

"WHITELAW REID, 

"EUGENIC MONTERO RIOS, 

"B. DE ABARZUZA, 

"J. DE GARNICA, 

"W. R. DE VILLA URRUTIA. 

"RAFAEL CERRERO." 
THE SENATE'S ACTION. 
A long debate followed the reference of 
the treaty to the senate and its ratification 
was most strenuously opposed. The speeches 
made were rather against the retention of 
the Philippine islands than adverse to any 
of the specified conditions of the compact. 
The opposition to the ratification was led 
by Senators Gorman (dem.) of Maryland 
and Hoar (rep.) of Massachusetts. Those 
opposing the acceptance of the treaty were 
divided Into two factions, one of which 
advocated its rejection on the ground that 
the United States had not acquired sover- 
eignty in the Philippines and did not desire 
it, while the other desired to commit the 
government to a declared policy of offering 
its aid toward the establishment of an in- 
dependent government for the Filipinos as 
it had already undertaken to do in the case 
of the Cubans. 

The debate was continued to the 6th of 
February, 1899, and until the day previous 
the fate of the treaty was in doubt. On 
the 5th of February, 1899. news was re- 
ceived of the attack upon the United States 
forces at Manila by Aguinaldo, and this 
Inexcusable act of the Filipino chief, which 
was in direct violation, of the terms of the 
truce between the two belligerents, resulted 
in securing the adoption of the treaty on 
the day following. This was accomplished 
by three senators, who did not favor the 
treaty— McEnery (dem.) of Louisiana, Mc- 
Lanrin (dem.) of South Carolina and Jones 
(silver) of Nevada— leaving the opposition 
and joining the aovocates of the measure. 
they being influenced by the ill-considerea 
attack upon Gen. Otis by the insurgent 
forces. 

SENATE VOTE ON THE TREATY. 
REPUBLICANS IN PAVOR. 

Aldrich (R. 1.1 Gallinger Piatt (Conn.) 

Allison (la.) (N. H.) Piatt (N. Y.) 

Baker (Kas.) Gear (la.) Pritchard 
Burrows Hanna (O.) (N. C.) 

(Mich.) Hansbrough Quay (Pa.) 

Carter (Mont.) (N. D.) Ross (Vt.j 

Chandler HawleyiConn.)S6weU (N. J.) 

(N. H.) Kyle (S. D.) Shoup Udaho.) 

Clark (Wyo.) Lodge (Mass.) Simon (Ore.) 
Cullom (111.) McBride (Ore.)Spooner (Wis.) 
Davis (Minn.) McMillan Teller (Col.) 

Deboe (Ky.) (Mich.) Tharstoiimeb.) 

ElkIn8(W.Va.) Mantle(Mont.) Warren (Wyo.) 
Fairbanks Mason (111.) Wellington 

(Ind.) Nelson (Minn.) (Md.) 

Foraker (O.) Penrose (Pa.) Wolcott (CoL) 
Frye (Me.) Perkins (Cal.) --42. 

DEMOCRATS IN PAYOR. 

Clay (Ga.) Lindsay (Ky.) Petttw (Ala.) 
Faulkner McEnery (La.) StdliyanCMiss.) 

(W. Va.) McLaurin ^10. 

Gray (Del.) (S. C.) 

Kenney (Del.) Morgan (Ala.) 



CLOSE OF THE SPANISH WAR. 



109 



PEOPLE'S PABTY IN FAVOB. 

Allen (Neb.) Harris (Kas.) Stewart (Nev.) 
Butler (N. C.) Jones (Nev.) -5. 
Total-57. 

REPUBLICANS AGAINST. 

Hale (Me.) Pettigrew Rawllngs 

Hoar (Mass.) (S. D.) (Utah.) 

—5. Turner (Wash.) 

DEMOCRATS AGAINST. 

Bacon (6a.) Gorman (Md.) Murpbj (N.Y.) 
Bate (Tenn.) Jones (Ark.) Pasco (Fla.) 
Berry (Ark.) MaUory (Fla.) Roach (N. D.) 
Caffery (La.) Martin (Va.) Smith (N. J.) 
ChUton (Tex.) Mills (Tex.) Tillman (S. C.) 
Cockrell (Mo.) Mitchell (Wls.JTurley (Tenn.) 
Daniel (Va.) Money (Miss.) Vest (Mo.)— 21. 

PEOPLE'S PARTY AGAINST. 

Heitfeld (Idaho)— l. 

Total— 27. 

Paired— CtennoB (rep.) of Utah and Wil- 
son (rep.) of Washington for, with White 
(dem.) of Calif omia against; Proctor 
(rep.) of Vermont and Wetmore (rep.) of 
Rhode Island for, with Turpie (dem.) of 
Indiana against. 

THE M'ENERY RESOLUTION. 

After the ratification of the treaty Sena- 
tor McEnery (dem.) of Louisiana, who had 
voted in the afflrmatiye on that question, 
introduced the following resolution: Re- 
solved, That by the ratification of the treaty 
of peace with Spain It is not intended to 
Incorporate the inhabitants of the Philip- 
pine islands Into citizenship of the United 
States, nor is it intended to permanently 
annex said islands as an integral part of 
the territory of the United States; but It 
is the intention of the United States to 
establish on said islands a government 
suitable to the wants and conditions of 
the Inhabitants of said islands, to prepare 
them for local self-government and in due 
time to make such disposition of said 
islands as will best promote the interests 
of the citizens of the United States and the 
Inhabitants of said islands. 

Mr. Hoar (rep.) of Massachusetts made 
an effort to secure an amendment to this 
resolution providing that the consent of the 
Filipinos should be secured for any form of 
government proposed by the United States, 
which failed to pass. Senator Bacon 
(dem.) of Georgia then offered the follow- 
ing resolution: 

ReHolved, That the United States hereby 
disclaim any disposition or intention to 
exercise permanent sovereignty, jurisdic- 
tion or control over said islands, and assert 
their determination when a stable and in- 
dependent government shall have been 
erected there, entitled in the judgment of 
the ^United States to recognition as such, 
to transfer to said government, upon terms 
which shall be reasonable and just, ail 
rights secured under the cession by Spain^ 
and to thereupon leave the government and 
contpo^ of the islands to their people. 

A yea and nay rote was demanded, re- 
sulting 29 to 29. Ih announcing the vote 
the- ^ce-presldent said: "The vote Ib a 
tie. The chair votes In the negative. The 
amendment is lost." The detailed vote 
follows: 



TEAS. 

Bacon. Hale. Murphy. 

Bate. Harris. Perkins. 

Berry. Heitfeld. Pettigrew. 

Caffery. Hoar. Pettus. 

Chilton. Jones (Ark.) Quay. 

Clay. Jones (Nev.) Rawlins. 

Ck>ckrell. Lindsay. Smith. 

Faulkner. McLaurin. Tillman. 

Gorman. Martin. Turner— 29. 

Gray. Money. 

NAYS. 

Allison. Kyle. Piatt (N. Y.) 

Burrows. Lodge. Pritchard. 

Carter. McBride. Ross. 

Chandler. McEnery. Shoup. 

Deboe. McMillan. Simon. 

Fairbanks. Mantle. Stewart. 

Frye. Morgan. Teller. 

Gear. Nelson. Warren. 

Hanna. Penrose. Wolcott— 29. 

Hawley. Piatt (Conn.) 

The vice-president voted in the negative. 

The vote was then taken on the McEnery 
resolution Feb. 14, 1899, which was adopted 
—yeas, 26; nays, 22— several democrats who 
were present and not paired withholding 
their votes. The detailed vote follows: 

YEAS, 

Allison. Hale. Mason. 

Burrows. Hanna. Nelson. 

Chandler. Harris. Perkins. 

Deboe. Kyle. Pettus. 

Fairbanks. Lodge. Piatt (N. Y.) 

Faulkner. McEnery. Quay. 

Frye. McLaurin. Sullivan. 

Gear. McMillan. Teller— 36. 

Gray. Mantle. , 

NAYS. 

Bacon. Lindsay. Piatt (Conn.) 

Bate. McBride. Rawlins. 

Caffery. Martin. Ross. 

Carter. Money. Simon. 

Clay. Moi^an. Smith. 

Cockrell. Murphy. Stewart. 

Hawley. Pettigrew. Warren— 22. 

Hoar. 

The formal interchange of ratification of 
the peace treaty took place at the execu- 
tive mansion in Washington on the llth 
day of April, 1899, Ambassador Cambon of 
France acting as the representative of the 
Spanish government. This formal recogni- 
tion that the war had ended and that the 
United States and Spain were again on 
terms of peace occurred just one year 
from the day when President McKlnley 
recognized that diplomatic consideration of 
the Cuban question had failed and that war 
was Inevitable. It was on April 11, 1898, 
that President McKlnley sent his war mes- 
sage to congress, saying that he had ex- 
hausted diplomatic efforts and asking con- 
gress to clothe him with the war power. 
In that message he declared: **In the 
name of humanity, in the name of civiliza- 
tion, in behalf of endangered American 
interests which give us the right and duty 
to speak and to act, the war in Cuba must 
stop." 

War was not declared until April 21, 1898, 
but the end of peaceful relations between 
the United States and Spain was on the 
llth, and the return to a • recognition of 
peaceful relations occurred on the first 
anniversary of that' day, making the break 
between the two nations just one year. 
The president's proclamation of peace bore 
date April 11, 1899. 



110 



CHICAGO daily' NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



THE SAMOAir AFFAIK. 



Tbere is no Island called Samoa, but the 
name is applied to a group of twelve 
islands in the Pacific* with the affairs of 
which our goyemment has become rather 
intimately InyolTed. The islands are lo- 
cated about 2,000 miles south and 300 miles 
west of the Hawaiian islands and 14 degrees 
south of the equator. They lie in an almost 
direct line between San Francisco and 
Australia and slightly south of the direct 
steamship line connecting the Philippines 
with the proposed Panama and Nicaraguan 
interoceanic canals. Their special Impor- 
tance, therefore, lies in their position 
as coaling and repair stations on these 
great highways of commerce rather than 
in their direct commercial value, their 
population being small and their imports 
and exports of comparatively little im- 
portance. 

INHABITANTS AND PRODUCTS. 

The group consists of ten inhabited and 
two uninhabited islands, with an area of 
1,700 square miles and an aggregate popu- 
lation, according to latest estimates, of 
36,000 people, of whom something over 200 
are British subjects, 125 Germans, 26 Amer- 
icans, 25 French and 25 of other nationali- 
ties, while the remainder are natives of 
the Polynesian race. The bulk of the popu- 
lation is located in the three islands of 
Upolu, Savaii and Tutuila; the number 
in Upolu being 16,600, in Savaii 12,600 and 
in Tutuila 3,700. The islands are of vol- 
canic origin, but fertile, producing cocoa- 
nuts, cotton, sugar and coffee; the most 
Important, however, being cocoanuts, from 
which the "copra" of commerce is obtained 
by drying the Icernel of thft cocoanut, the 
"copra," which is exported to Europe and 
the United States, being used In the manu- 
facture of cocoanut oil. The exportation 
of copra from the Islands in 1896 amounted 
to 12,666,909 pounds, valued at |231,372. A 
considerable proportion of this was ex- 
ported to the United States; a larger pro- 
portion, however, to Germany, whose cit- 
izens control its commerce through a trad- 
ing company which has long been estab- 
li^ed there. The cocoanut and copra 
production, however, varies greatly from 
year to year, owing to the fact that many 
of the cocoanut trees have been destroyed 
In recent wars between native factions, a 
single individual being able, by cutting out 
the crown of the tree, to permanently 
destroy in two minutes* time the fruit- 
bearing qualities of trees which require 
several years for their growth. 

The government of the Samoan Islands 
had been from time Immemorial under the 
two royal houses of Malletoa and Tupea, 
except on the island of Tutuila, which was 
governed by native chiefs. In 1873, at the 
suggestion of foreign residents, a house of 
nobles and a house of representatives wei'e 
established, with Malletoa Laupepa ajxd 
the chief of the royal house of Tupea ^as 
joint klftgS. Subsequently Malletoa becajae 
sole king. In 1887 ne was deposed by the 
German government upon the claim of :iih- 
lust treatment of German subjects, ^o 
formed the bulk of the foreigu populatapn 
on the island, and was deported first' to 
German New Guinea and then to the 
Cameroons, in Africa, and finally In 1888- to 



Hamburg; Tamasese, a native chief, being 
meantime proclaimed by the Germans as 
king, thoush against the protest of the 
British and American consuls at Samoa. 
Mataafa, a near relative of Malietoa, made 
war upon Tamasese and succeeded to the 
kingship. 

THE BERLIN TREATY. 
In 1889 a conference between the repre- 
sentatives of the American, British and 
German governments was held at Berlin, 
at which a treaty was signed by the three 
powers guaranteeing the neutrality of the 
islands, in which the citizens of the three 
signatory, powers would have equal rights 
of residehce, trade and personal protection. 
They agreed to recognize the independence 
of the Samoan government and the free 
rights of the natives to elect their cblet 
or king and choose a form of government 
according to their own laws and customs. 
A Supreme court was established, consisting 
of one Judge, styled the chief justice of 
Samoa, who was at that time W. L. 
Chambers, an American, formerly a resi- 
dent of the state of Alabama. To this 
court are referred: First, all civil suits 
concerning real property situated in Samoa; 
second, all civil suits between natives and 
foreigners or between foreigners of dif- 
ferent nationalities; third, all crimes com- 
mitted by natives against foreigners nt 
committed by such foreigners as are not 
subject to any consular Jurisdiction. The 
future alienation of lands was prohibited, 
with certain specified exemptions. The 
capital was located at Apia, the chief town 
of the group of Islands, and a local admin- 
istration provided for the municipal district 
of Apia. A commission was appointed to 
investigate titles to lands alleged to have 
been purchased from the natives, and this 
in 1894 complcfted its labors, confirming 
about 76,000 acres of lands to Germans, 
86,000 to British and 21.000 to Americani. 
though much of this land has since changed 
hands. Malletoa, who had been deported, 
was restored as king in November, 1889, 
and continued as such, until his death, 
which occurred Aug. 22, 1898, when the 
consuls of the three powers, with the 
chief Justice as president, took charge of 
the administration, pending the election 
of a successor. It is out of the election 
and recognition of this successor to King 
Malletoa, deceased, that the recent dis- 
agreements between the representatives of 
the three governments maintaining the 
Joint protectorate over the islands have 
occurred. 

CAUSE OF THE TROUBLE. 
The events leading up to the disagree- 
ment between the three goven^ments had 
their inception in the election of a king 
by the people of Samoa, whie^ waa held 
Nov. 14, 1898, there being two candidates. 
These Were Mataafa ana Malietoa Tanns, 
SOD of the last ruler, who died in Septem- 
ber, 1898. In this contest Mataafa received 
a vote six times as large as the total 
received by Malietoa. During the reign of 
the last king Mataafa bad oeea an exile 
since 1893 on an island in the Marshall 
group, but in response to a nearly unani- 
mous demand of his people ^ was per- 



THE SAM AN AFFAIR. 



Ill 



Kitted to return. The pledg*' waft flTeu 
bj tlie adberentB of Mataa^fa tbat If nla 
rt;tiira were permttteid tliey wouM do noth; 
iDg to disturb tbe eilatiog goveramept, and 
Uv was brouslit from Jaluli to Apia. 

Tberp was do dlsputlns the Kieat popu- 
larity of Mataafa wl1.b tlie SH-iuoans nor 
his capacity to govern them, bTit hla rleht 
to the throne was di^Dted. It wefl. elImo 
believed by some of bia oppoDeats that be 
was too mueh under Germao influence. 
The other claliDant to tbe Buceeaalon 
bPtjugbt the case to tbe Supreme <:ouct. 
Tamaseae* xvho had at one time aapired 
to the kiDRshlp. but had ^Ithdrawh In tho 
IntPrest oif Malietoft, claimlug that tbe 
eleetlon bud not been cuuduc^ted aci^orfilng 
to the eatabllfjhed customs of the country 
and that Ms-Uetoa wafl the legally elected 
klne TblH court proceedtng was brouj^ht 
Bnder sertion 6, article 3, of tbe Berlin 
treaty which nroTldes: *'Iio ease any ques- 
tion shall hereafter arise in Samoa renpett- 
IDJE the rightful election or appointment of 
king or any other chief cialmlnff authority 
OTer the Is^uda. op respectlcg the vallrilty 
of the powers whli^h. tbe kins cr nny other 
cblef may claim in the cserelse of thru 
office* Boeb qnestlon shall not lead to war» 
but BhaU be presented for decision to the 
cWef JuHtlce of Samoa, who sbflll decide 
It Iti TTTitlDS, conformably to the provisions 
of this act, and to the la^a and cualonis 
of Samoa not in conflict therewith; and the 
signatory governments will accept and 
abide by ench deciston.'* 
MALIETOA DECLARED TO BE KIXG. 
The case was opened on the i&th ot 
December, 1S93. Eleven doys were occu- 
pied In the trial, and Dec. 31 the court 
rendered the decision that MalletoR Tamis 
was the Hghtful and leKal klPK of Samoa, 
The court declarea also that Tamayese 
should be vlce-Uue and the lp>?al sunce^sor 
TO the throne. Tho ^maln basis of this 
decision was that Mataafa had Invall- 
dated bla claims to the throne by his re- 
nouncing such claims when he .^^s per- 
muted to return to Apia from hla pile, 
and also becauae native customs precluaed 
him from becoming the mler. 
DISAGREEMENT OF TOE CONSULS. 
The rendering of this decision was fol- 
lowed by a meetlnp of the three consuls 
ot tbe Bighatory powers to the B^J^J 
twaty at which the officers of the British 
mud German warships in the Jarbor were 
present. The American and Bntlah con- 
£ils npheld the finding of the coiirt and 
propoaea thn immediate crowding of Malip- 
tna. To this proposal tbe German consnl 
entered a vigorous protest and .declared 
b{m«elf in favor of Matfiafa, whose fol- 
loS^S had coUeetcQ at Mnllnuu. Ho^ttHtl^B 
At once bef^an, the ne^^ king ^^^ing ao 
«nny of atiout 1.2M men and the supporters 
at Mataafa a force ot abont Z,m men. A 
batue toote place on the let of January. 
1199. in which tbe king was def pated, while 
Mataafa 'H followers, forming a lawless 
band, began pillaging the oop^try and 
Swateoed the life of tbe chief Justice and 

'^'^ EECXVB OF THB KING. 

Boti tb*^ Mag and the chief jnsttce took 
reSge on a British war vessel then in the 
iSSSt. On the 6th of Jancary the consuls 
Srtbe treaty powers m^t and issued a 



proclamation in which they announced that 
the Mataafa party ^ being la poeacBSkip of 
the government^ would be recngnlsed as 
head of aCCalrs, pending inatruetkua from 
the treatv powers. Dr. Rallel, a CJerman 
and preaiiieiit of thp municipal council, waK 
appoliifed SB tbe head of tbe provljjlonal 
government, Tho next day be lasuetl an 
order which closed the Supreme courts »ii 
act that the American and British consuls 
declared to be a usurpation of po^ver. 
Capt. Sturdce of the Br(t3sh war veseel 
Porpoise issued a declaration that the 
Supvt'me court ha v lug been 11 legal !>' closcj 
bv the provlslouol govertimeDt, It would 
hold a session upon that day at noon, and 
if resisted he would open fire on tbe town 
in Its defense. Both the German couf^ul 
and Dr. itaffcl protested, while the latter 
declared that he aloue constituted the 
Supreme roort. To offset this all tbe Amerl- 
ican aud Brit 19 b Consuls united In a proc la- 
ma tlim which declareii that the formation 
of a provtfiional KOveninient did not in any 
way interfere with the Samoan Supreme 
court. A counter proclamation from Dr. 
Haflel fnllowedi In which he maintained 
his piTJSltloD against the eilatence of the 
court. 

THE COURT OPENED. 
Capt. atnrdee^ however, landed a force of 
marines with i'he chipf Justice, who forced 
the door to thij court bouae. retostated Jus- 
tice Chamber* aud raided the British and 
American flags over the building. ThSe acti 
euraged the (rcrman residents^, and one of 
them destroyed the doors and windows of 
the court bonsc. For this act of vandalism 
hp was arreated, fined $100 and imprisoned, 
but wa& forcibly rescued by Dr. RafTel and 
eent to the ^iernjan consulate for protec- 
tion. 

ARRIVAL OF ADMIRAL KACTZ, 
On the V!]Tb of January the Uulled States 
warship Philadelphia, uuder command of 
Hear- Admiral Kautz, was ordered to Apia 
to protect American Interests, A few daja 
later the American and British consuls 
united in a protest to the German consul 
agalnftt the hlijh-hanried proceedings of De'. 
Raffel, aud refused lunger to hold official 
Intercourse with either unless an apology 
and retraction was given and n^ade for 
their acts toward tbe chk*f justice. The 
German government notified Its conanl that 
hla protest against tbe Sxinrema court waa 
not sufitalned. which greatly relieved for a 
time the tension of afTalfS, Coniparative 
quiet reigned In the Islands until March, 

On thp ath of March the United States 
vessel with Admiral KaiitK arrived at Apia, 
and two days later a meeting was held on 
his Bhlp of th<s consuls and the officers of 
the Hrltlsh and German war vcBsela. As a 
result of this conference Admiral Kaut?;. 
on the lltb of March, 1399. Issued tbe fol- 
lowing proclamation: 
ADMIRAL EAUTZ* PRQCLAMATIOK. 
''To his tolgbneea Mataafa and the thir- 
teen chiefs aJBS«=ltited with him in partic- 
ular, and to all the people of Samoa, both 
foreign and native. In general: 

"1. WbereasH at a meeting held this day 
on board the United States flagBhlp Phlla- 
dalphia, at anchor at Apia, at wMcti were 
I present conaulaT representatlveB of the 
ftlffnatory powora of tbe BerUn ^aty of 
18SJ) ana tSe tbree senior naval otacera of 



112 



OHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



the Bame powers, it was agreed that the 
so-called provisioDal goyernment under Hieh 
Chief Mataafa and thirteen other chiefs, 
can have no legal status under the Berlin 
treaty and can therefore not be recognized 
by the consular and naval representatiyes, 
it is hereby ordered that the high chief and 
the thirteen other chiefs go quietly to their 
homes and obey the laws of Samoa and re- 
spect the Berlin treaty. 

'2. It Is further ordered that all the 
chiefs and their people who have been 
ejected from their homes and who have 
been sent to different points in the 
Samoan islands return quietly to their 
aforesaid homes without molestation. 

**3. The guarantee of protection as far 
as lies in the power of the naval force 
now in this harbor is given to all who 
quietly obey this order. On the other hand, 
it will be used against all who disregard 
it or the rishts of quiet and peaceably 
disposed people. 

"4. The treaty of Berlin recognizes the 
chief Justice of Samoa as the highest 
officer under the existing government, and 
as long as he holds his office his authority 
must be respected and the decree of the 
court must be carried out. 

"5. Trusting that all residents of Samoa 
will have the good sense to observe the 
requirements of this proclamation, which 
is issued In the interests of peace, with an 
earnest regard for the rights of all, both 
foreign and native, and so there may be 
no occasion to use i)ower to enforce it, I am 
respectfully. ALBERT KADTZ. 

"Rear- Admiral U. S. Navy, Commander- 
in-Chief United States naval force ou 
Pacific station." 

On the next day the German consul 
issued a counter proclamation in these 
words: 

"Notice to all Samoans: By the procla- 
mation of the admiral of the United States. 
dated March 11, it was made known that 
the three consuls of the signatory powers 
of the Berlin treaty, as well as the three 
commanders of men-of-war, had been 
unanimous in deciding to recognize no more 
the provisional government composed of 
Mataafa and their thirteen chiefs. 

"I, therefore, make known to you that 
this proclamation is quite false. I, the 
German consul-general, continue to recog- 
nize the provisional government of Samoa 
until I have received contrary instructions 
from my government. 

"(Signed.) ROSE, 
"German Consul-General. 

"Apia, March 13, 1899." 

EFFECT UPON THE NATIVES. 
This notice stimulated the followers of 
Mataafa to acts of violence. Admiral 
Kautz threatened to bombard the towns 
unless they desisted, but this had no effect. 
Fire was opened upon the villages by the 
Philadelphia and the two British vessels 
in the oarbor, and many of them were 
uirned and much property was destroyed. 
The American consulate was attacked by 
the. natives and on% sailor was killed. On 
tije 13th of March Dr. W. Solf succeeded 
Dr. Raffel as president of the municipal 
council of Apla^-a change that greatly Im- 
proved the situation, as the new official 
was highly esteemed by both factions. 



CROWNING OF THE KING. 
On the 23d of March Malletoa was 
crowned as king at Mulinuu, the Germans 
absenting themselves from the ceremonies. 
A few days later the British and American 
consuls informed Mataafa that if he would 

five up the war and disband his followers 
e would no longer be regarded as a rebel, 
but no attention was paid to the notifica- 
tion and the war was carried on. 

THE MARINES AMBUSHED. 
On the 6th of April a band of British and 
American sailors having landed were at- 
tacked by ambushed Samoans, and two 
officers and four sailors from the Philadel- 
phia and one officer and five sailors amone 
the British were killed. The sailors were 
forced to retreat and fell back, leaving 
their fallen on the field. The American 
officers killed were Lieut. Philip Lansdale 
and Ensign J. R. Monaghan and the Brit- 
ish officer was Lieut. A. Freeman. Mataafa 
lost in the battle nearly 100 killed and 
wounded. More skirmishes took place on 
the 22d and 23d of April between the Brit- 
ish force under Lieut. Grant and Ma- 
taafa's followers, in which the latter were 
forced to retreat. 

A JOINT COMMISSION APPOINTED. 

On the 13th of April, 1899, a joint com- 
mission consisting of one representative 
from each of the powers was appointed for 
settling all the questions in dispute regard- 
ing Samoa. This commission was made up 
of Bartlett Tripp of South Dakota, ex- 
American minister to Austria-Hungary, to 
represent the United States; C. N. B. 
Elliott of the British embassy at Wash- 
ington, D. C, to represent Great Britain, 
and Baron Speck von Sternburg of the Ger- 
man embassy at Washington, D. C, to 
represent Germany. The joint commission 
arrived at Apia on the 13th of May, 1899. 
On the 16th the commissioners assumed 
control of affairs. They declined to recog- 
nize either Malietoa or Mataafa as king, 
demanded that each should lay down his 
arms and sustained Judge Chambers as 
chief justice of the Supreme court. Malie- 
toa was then declared to be the rightful 
king, and he immediately abdicated the 
throne. After some weeks of examinatidn 
the commissioners succeeded in forming a 
treaty which all of them signed, and which 
was transmitted to their respective govern- 
ments for ratification and adoption. 

THE PROPOSED TREATY. 

The treaty contains more than 6,000 
words, and after enunciating the chief evils 
that beset the administration under the 
Berlin treaty the compact provides for 
radical changes in the methods of admin- 
istrating the government of Samoa. 

The chief evils were grouped under four 
beads: 

1. Those which appear to Inevitably at- 
tend the election of a king of Samoa and 
his subsequent eff6ris to exert his author- 
ity. 

2. Those which are due to the rivalry of 
foreign nationalities ^^^tween themselves 
and to their disposition to take sides in 
the native politics and thus, .increase the 
importance and. bitterness of disputes 
which arise. 

3. A third class of evils have their origin I 
in the fact that for many years there nas 



THE SAMOAN AFFAIR. 



113 



been no law or government in Samoa other 
than native custom outside the limits of 
the municipality. Murder and other serious 
crimes have remained unpunished when 
committed by persons of rank, and the 
Supreme court and the nominal government 
at MuUnuu have been equally powerless 
to exert any force. 

4. The insufficient enforcement of the cus- 
toms regulations has allowed unscrupulous 
traders to distribute large numbers of arms 
among a native population rent by political 
factions and ready to fight both one another 
and Europeans. 

The treaty may be summarized as fol- 
lows. It begins with a declaration of the 
neutrality of the islands of Samoa and an 
assurance to the respective citizens and 
subjects of the signatory powers of equality 
of rights. It provides for the immediate 
restoration of peace and good order, and to 
this end permanently abolishes the office 
of king and limits the authority of chiefs, 
but creates a system of native government. 
Provision is made for tbe appointment of 
an administrator at Samoa, to be appointed 
by the three signatory powers, or, falling 
their agreement, by the king of Norway 
and Sweden. The administrator's salary 
will be $6,000 a year, and he is to execute 
all laws in force in the Samoan Island^. 
He shall possess the pardoning power and 
make municipal appointments with the con- 
sent of the legislative council, the legisla- 
tive power being vested in the adminis- 
trator and the legislative council of three 
members, one being appointed pj each of 
the three powers. There is also to be a 
native assembly, composed of the governors 
of different districts of the island. 

The chief Justice of the Supreme court Is 
to be appointed as at present, receiving a 
salary of $6,000. The jurisdiction of the 
court Is increased by the modified treaty, 
while the present system of consular juris- 
diction is to be abolished. The treaty con- 
tains municipal and customs regulations, 
all of which are more strict than at pres- 
ent. The general provisions of the act are 
to remain In force for three years, although 
in the meantime special amendments may 
be adopted by the consent of the three 
powers, with the adherence of Samoa. 

DISTURBANCES CONTINUE. 
The visit of the commission at Apia did 
not restore peace to the country, and the 
strife between the followers of Mataafa 
and Malietoa continued. Early In October 
trouble broke out anew between the natives 
in the Atua district. The report says that 
the thirteen chiefs who were associated 
with the rebel (or Mataafa) government 
declare that they constitute the legal gov- 
ernment of the country. They Issued a 
proclamation to the three consuls regarding 
the poll tax. The document informs all 
Samoa that a poll tax of $1 a head must 
be paid by all the able-bodied natives and 
colored tnen outside of 'the town of Apia 
by Nov. 1, and is signed by adherents of 
Mataafa. To offset this President Solf. 
without the consent of the consuls, issued 
in bfs own naQie a proclamation that a 
poll tax will be levied and collected at the 
end of th^ year.' This action of the presl* 
dent aibnsed the people, who seem to think 
that Solf believes himself in supreme 
power. Some of the consuls took exception 



to his proceedings, but steps were taken 
to set aside the action of the Mataafa 
faction. 

The Mataafa people, ever since the com- 
mission left Samoa, have been accusing 
the adherents of Malietoa of causing strife 
and not obeying the commission's orders, 
but nearly all the trouble since that time 
has been caused by Mataafa people, and 
they seemed to be bent on having a fight 
before the year closed. At a funeral of 
one of the chiefs fifty-two rifles were 
counted in the procession, and Mataafa had 
informed the commission that his party had 
no arms left. They have hundreds of rifles. 
It Is said, and If not restrained by the men 
of -war would have been fighting the Malle- 
toans long ago. 

Wp"'**'^ by the Mataafa complaints, the 
Malietoa people were compelled to leave 
Apia and live In their villages. The gov- 
ernment Issued a notice that all might 
come and go as they pleased on legitimate 
business, but has allowed natives to keep 
possession openly of fowling pieces, which 
were prohibited by the commission's orders. 
Hundreds of revolvers are owned by 
natives, but they have never been collected, 
and rifles are also plentiful with them. 

PROPOSED PARTITION. 

The failure of the tripartite rule in Samoa 
seems to be acknowledged by the three 
powers. This fact gave force to a semi- 
official report, published the last of Octo- 
ber, 1899, to the effect that negotiations 
were going on for a division of the islands 
between the United States, Germany and 
Great Britain. 

On the 8th of November, 1899, it was 
officially announced from Berlin that an 
agreement, subject to the approval of the 
United States, had been arrived at between 
Great Britain and Germany, by virtue of 
which the Samoa treaty is repealed and 
the islands of Upolu, Savall and the small 
adjacent islands fall to Germany as free 
property, and the Island of Tutulla and 
the subsidiary islands go to the United 
States. Great Britain, it is added, re- 
nounces any claim to the Samoan islands, 
and Germany in turn surrenders any claim 
to the Tonga islands and to Savage Island 
in favor of Great Britain, and also cedes 
Ghoisul and San Isabel, the two easterly 
islands of the Solomon group, with their 
insular surroundings, to Great Britain. 

The Consular representatives of the two 
powers in Samoa and the Tonga islands 
are to be withdrawn for the present and 
German subjects are to have the same 
rights as the British in regard to the free 
and unimpeded employment of native la- 
l>orers in the whole of the Solomon group 
In the possession of Great Britain, includ- 
ing Cholsul and San Isabel. Regarding thle 
agreement it is observed that the assent of 
the United States is regarded as assured. 

A further agreement concluded between 
Germany, Great , Britain and the United 
States is to the effect that the question of 
compensation for damages during the late 
trouble will be submitted to an imperial 
court of arbltratlc^ for adjudication. 

Especial interest attaches to the division 
of these Islands from 4ie standpoint of the 
United States by reason of the fact that 
the harbor of Pago-Pago, in the island of 



114 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Tutulla, the southermnost of the group, was 
ceded to the United States for a naval and 
coaling station, first in 1872, and afterward 
confirmed by a treaty signed at Washing- 
ton Jan. 17, 1878. and ratifications exchanged 
on Feb. 13 of the same year, by which 
the United States was given the right to 
establish at that harbor a station for coal- 
ing, naval supplies, freedom of trade, com- 
mercial treatment as a favorod nation, and 



extraterritorial consular Jurisdiction. This 
harbor was occupied by the United States 
in 1898, presumably with the purpcfse of 
utilizing its advantages as a coaling and 
supply station. Tutulla has a population of 
8,700, and an area of fifty-four square miles. 
The United States declined to accept the 
agreement as to the disposition of the 
Samoan islands reached by Great Britain 
and Germany, but proposed a new one. 



NATT7BALIZATI0N LAWS 07 TEB UNITED STATES. 



The conditions under and the manner in 
which an alien may be admitted to become 
a citizen of the United States are pre- 
scribed by sections 2165-74 of the reTued 
statutes of the United States. 

DECLAUATION OF INTSNTIONS. 

The alien must declare upon oath before 
a Circuit or District court of the United 
States or a District or Supreme court of 
the territories, or a court of record of any 
of the states having common-law jurisdic 
tion and a seal and clerk, two years at 
least prior to his admission, that it is his 
bona fide intention to become a citizen of 
the United States, and to renounce forever 
all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign 
prince or state, and particularly to the one 
of which be may be at the time a citizen 
or subject. 

OATH ON APPLICATION FOB ADMISSION. 

He must at the time of his application to 
be admitted declare on oath, oefore some 
one of the courts above specified, *'that he 
will support the constitution of the United 
States, and that he absolutely and entirely 
renounces and abjures all allegiance and 
fidelity to every foreign prince, potentate, 
state or sovereignty, and particularly, by 
name, to the prince, potentate, state or 
sovereignty of which he was before a cit- 
izen or subject," which proceedings must 
be recorded by the clerk of the court. 

CONDITIONS FOK CITIZENSHIP. 

If it shall appear to the satisfaction of 
the court to which the alien has applied 
that he has made a declaration to become a 
citizen two vears before applying for final 
papers, and has resided continuously within 
the United States for at least five years, and 
within the state or territory where such 
court is at the time held one year at least: 
and that during that time "he has behaved 
as a man of good moral character, attached 
to the principles of the constitution of the 
United States, and well disposed to the 
good order and happiness of the same," he 
will be admitted to citiaenshlp. 

TITLES OF NOBILITY. 

If the applicant has borne any hereditary 
title or order of nobilitv he must make an 
express renunciation of the same at the 
time of his application. 

80Lb;SBS. 
Any alien in iijL- a£-> gf 21 yearB and up- 
waM ivbch bas bot^n in tbi& armJi>s of the 
UDked States, und tas beta hopqrably dia* 
chiirgi^ tbcr^frooi. muy hccoma «il citizen ou 
hia pijtltlon, wirjjout any pvevlouis diJclEira- 
tifjn of Ittfintion, provided tbat be bag re- 
Bldfjd JU tba United StntCB at ka4t one 
year pr^ivlEiup to bis aDpUcatinD. snd is of 
good mj.*ral cbavactqrK at la ju die Jail j de- 



cided that residence of one year in a par- 
ticular state is not requisite.) 

MINORS. 

Any alien under the age of 21 years who 
has resided in the United Stiites three years 
next preceding bis arriving at that age, and 
who has continued to reside therein to the 
time he may make application to be ad- 
mitted a citizen thereof, may, after he 
arrives at the age of 21 years, and aftor he 
has resided five years within the 0nit^ 
States, including the three years 6f his 
minority, be admitted a citizen; but be 
must make a' declaration on oath and prove 
to the satisfaction of the court that for two 
years next preceding It has been his bona 
fide intention to become a citizen. 

CHILDBEN OF NATUHALIZBD OIXIZaNS. 

The children of persons who have been 
duly naturalized, being under the age of 2i 
years at the time of the naturalization of 
their parents, shall, if dwelling In the 
United States, be considered as citizens 
thereof. 
CITTZENS' CHILDREN WHO ARE BORN ABROAD 

The children of persons who now are or 
have been citizens of the United States are, 
though bom out of the limits and lurisdic- 
tion of the United States, considered ha 
citizens thereof. 

CHINESE. 

The naturalization of Chinamen is e%' 
pressly prohibited by section 14, chapter 126, 
laws of 1882. 

PROTECTION ABROAD TO NATUBALnKO 
CITIZENS. 

Section 2000 of the revised statutes of the 
United States declares that **all naturalized 
citizens of the United States while in for- 
eign countries are entitled to and shall re- 
ceive from this government the same pro- 
tection of persons and property wUcb i» 
accorded to native-bom citizens." 

THE RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE. 

The right to vote comes from the state, 
and is a state gift. Naturalization Is a 
federal right and is a gift of the union, not 
of any one state. In some of the stat^ 
aliens (who have declared intentions) vote 
and have the right to vote equally with 
naturalized or native-born citizans, but in 
most of them only actual citlaeos may vote. 
The federal naturalisation laws^a^ply to 
the whole union alike, and provide that xu> 
aJleu b;^^v h*i [i;itur«Jiz^ until after five 
year&' re6lden(^e. £|yetli' aftet five, y^ar^! 
i^aldanco and duQ naturalization, be IB not 
entltlod to vot^ unless the laws of the Mat^ 
(^ufcr the pc^vUege tipoa hlxiik, and m ^fr- 
eral fit4tes be mAyrVote: sit mdiiths af^ 
landing If be has <IM^red his lotehSori, 
tiQder United States law, to become^ a 

CltlS^D. 



THE NICARAGUA CANAL. 



THS HICASAOXIA CAKAL. 



A waterway ^tcross the isthmus between 
the continents of North and South America, 
connecting the Atlantic and Paclflc oceans, 
has been the dream of commerce for three 
centuries. The revival of Spanish trade 
that followed the conquest of Peru and 
Chile led the king of Spain, Ferdinand, to 
consider a nearer route to his new pos- 
sessions than the long and dangerous one 
around Cape Horn. His proposal was that 
a canal be cut across the Isthmus at what 
Is now Panama. No steps were taken to 
begin the work, and his successor, Philip, 
abandoned the idea of a canal at Panama 
and favored a location farther north, the 
one that is now being considered across 
Nicaragua. With the Increase of Spanish 
commerce the demand for this waterway 
became more urgent, but Philip's ambitions 
in Europe and the loss^ be sustained by 
reason of them madd the building of the 



oceanic canal through Nicaragua, and 
called for proposals, a concession being 
given to Mr. Beniski. In 1826 Mr. Clay, who 
was then secretary of state, ordered an ex- 
amination of the route. In 1829 Qen. Wer- 
meer of Belgium obtained a franchise in 
the name of King William of Holland, but 
the revolution of 1830, which separated Bel- 

Slum from Holland, put an end to the un- 
ertaklng. In 1837 Morazan, president of the 
Central American federation, attempted to 
carry out the scheme, but the survey wa? 
brought to a close by the dissohition of 
the government. In 1843 J. L. Stephens 
carried out a confidential mission to Cen- 
tral America on behalf of the United States 
{government. In 1844 Don Francisco Cantel- 
on of Nicaragua endeavored to induce 
Louis Philippe to take up the question of 
the interoceanlc canal, but he was inter- 
ested in the Panama project. 




Bin [TS- EYE VIEW <a 

DP Tl4( 

NICARAGUA CANAL. 



canal an impossibility. For the two suc- 
ceeding centuries the canal, while seriously 
considered, was not actively projected. Tn 
1656 Great Britain eiideavored to control 
the transit trade through Nicaragua and 
sacked and burned Leon. The expedition 
demonstrated to England the value of Lake 
Nicaragua for intero^eaiiic communication 
and was the l>egittnlhg of an attempt to 
control rt, w'&l^h li ltd iiiUll 1C90. 

AttPiiEfDD wst* call ii to tlio cttaal project 
and inter^^t a^&in u ^^'akentd la it by tb9 
report of Von lluiutioldtp who explored 
Central Amed^iL !^M:iwe<en 1T99 and 1804. 
Regaj^ng a 'caii!il iit:r(>B£ NJcaragna be 
said: '^I ^^p\i\d vnju^i^r \t the United 
State* were to let an (spportualty escape 
of gBttlng such ^^^ork tntti their own 
handfi. * • *;! th^reftre n>pi^it that it 
ia atacjlqtely li^dl^inai^e for the United 
State^i tt> effect a paBftkgt; tinm tbe Mexican 
fUtf to the Pa^ia*; oetan. and 1 »ni certain 
they tt-li] do ft." In ni^Z- tha United States 
congreea decreed the gTjtttias of an Inter- 



In 1847 the British government advanced 
claims to the control of the proposed inter- 
oceanic waterway, but the Nicaraguan gov- 
ernment, acting with the approval and sup- 
port of the United States, signed a contract 
for building the canal. This concession 
lapsed, and In 1849 Cornelius Vanderbllt and 
his associates contracted with the govern- 
ment for a regular transportation service 
across Nicar-tr'-* ffotr —^nr. ^o n.-^-,n, 
CcrmpUcationi ];riL.Li:f [m.i- 

vened, and if ^-.b-^ u-i\ Ni,i:i the royriiusjijti 
of the Clayton-t;uhvi^r treaty, April i», i^^u. 
that the nentridit^ of &I1 And Aof pr^&uut 
or prospective inter<jc#»aoie watHrwuye 
across Nicaragua was ab&olute^y guaian- 
teed. 

This treaty was signed ob April 19, 1850, 
before the development of steam oavigatioD 
had rendered th^ ^^trr. <*??": al commercially 
possible, before ; - urlnental railway 

was practicable m'i -i- ■■. time when the 
discovery of gold lu c'Lillforhia seemed to 
render an intr r.^rp^iilc: canal an early 



116 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



necessity. It was in form intended to effect 
fiye principal objects: 

1, Ttie United States and Great Britain 
were to anite in Jointly protecting persons 
engaged in building any canal or railroad 
across the American isthmus from "unjust 
detention, confiscation, seizure or any vio- 
lence whatever.'* 

2. They were to protect the canal when 
completed from interruption, seizure or un- 
just confiscation, and "to guarantee the 
neutrality thereof, so that the canal may 
forever be open and free and the capital 
invested therein secure." 

5. "Vessels of the United States or Great 
Britain, traversing the said canal," in case 
of war between the contracting parties,^ 
were to be exempted from blockade, deten- 
tion or capture by either of the belligerents. 

4. Neither party, it was agreed, would 
ever obtain for itself or maintain any ex- 
clusive control over the canal, or erect any 
fortifications commanding the same, or as- 
sume any dominion over any part of Cen- 
tral America. 

6. All other nations were to be invited to 
enter into similar stipulations, to the end 
that they might "share in the honor and 
advantage of naving contributed to a work 
of such general interest and importance as 
the canal herein contemplated.*^* 

This treaty was ratified by the United 
States senate under the impression that 
Great Britain had abandoned her terri- 
torial encroachments in Central America. 
As a result of some correspondence between 
the two governments it became known that 
Great Britain had given up practically noth- 
ing. In pursuance of the pledge given In 
the treaty there was a storm of disappro- 
bation in this countrv, united with a popu- 
lar demand for the abrogation of the treaty 
on the part of the United States. This 
might easily have been accomplished at 
that time, but no direct steps were taken 
to that end until the administration of Mr. 
Buchanan. This movement was met by a 
few concessions by England, which caused 
Mr. Buchanan to accept the treaty as sat- 
isfactory to the United States. It has been 
the chief effort of American statesmen ever 
since that time to show that this treaty 
has little or no validity, in which they 
have failed to satisfy the American con- 

Sress or the British government. The fact, 
owever, remains that. In the opinion of 
this nation, the canal should be, if con- 
structed, under American control. This pol- 
icy of "American control," as enunciated 
by President Bayes, is directly opposed to 
the Clayton-Bulwer treaty, which is still 
In forc6. Two plans have been proposed 
to remove this obstacle. One Is to delib- 
erately annul our agreement with Great 
Britain, while the second Is to ask that 
government to abrogate the treaty upon the 
best terms we can make with her. 

During Mr. Arthur*s administration a 
treaty was made with Nicaragua, providing 
for the building of the canal, and also 
declaring that "the United States shall 
have exclusive control of the construction 
of ' the canial and railway «nd telegraph 
lines, if the same shall be built, and shall 
be Invested with all the rights and powers 
necessary -thereto.** 

Mr. CJleveland, immediately after his in- 
angnration, finding this treaty unratified. 



withdrew it on the ground that controlling 
foreign territory in this way would lead to 
entangling alliances. The Cleveland policy 
was tnat the canal should be built by pri- 
vate individuals rather than by the gov- 
ernment, and as a result of this the Mari- 
time Canal company was organized, hav- 
ing obtained valuable concessions from 
Nicaragua, with a large capital. This com> 
pany expended about $6,000,000 in prepara- 
tions, and then asked the government to 
become responsible for the work by guaran- 
teeing the bonds and securities of the com- 
pany. This congress declined to do and the 
Maritime company ceased to be an impor- 
tant factor in the work in 1893. 

For two years or more the Nicaragua 
canal scheme has been, in one form or an- 
other, before congress, and several commis- 
sions have been appointed to make esti- 
mates as to the cost of the work. 

Three routes have been surveyed. The 
first was made in 1850-52 by Col. O. M. 
Childs. This survey was for a waterway 
with a depth throughout of seventeen feet. 
In the canal portion the bottom width was 
to be fifty feet, while In the excavated 
channels in the river and lake the bottom 
width was to be 160 feet. Locks were to be 
250 by 80 by 17 feet. Ships were to pass 
from the sea level on each side to the 
summit lake level of 108 feet by fourteen 
locks, each with an eight-foot lift. The 
lake was to be held at 108 feet elevation by 
a dam in the Rio Grande valley, nine and 
three-quarter miles west of the lake, and 
another at Castillo rapids, thirty-seven 
and one-quarter miles east of the lake, in 
the San Juan river. The lowest lock on the 
east side was to be at a point ninety miles 
from the lake, where the canal was to 
leave the river and extend across the flat 
alluvial land to Grey town, where at that 
time there was a well protected harbor. 
The total length of the Childs canal was to 
have been 194.4 miles, and its cost, includ- 
ing 15 per cent for contingencies, was esti- 
mated at $31,538,319. 

The next survey was made in 1872 by an 
expedition under Commander Lull of the 
United States navy, and associated with hitai 
was A. G. Menocal. later the engineer of 
the Maritime Canal company. The depth 
of the canal was to be twenty-six feet and 
Its bottom width fifty, sixty and seventy- 
two feet, according to locality. In the ex- 
cavated river channel the bottom width was 
to be eighty feet and something over eighty 
feet in the lake channel. Commander Lull 
proposed several changes. The Pacific ter- 
minus was to be Brito, the same as that 
proposed by Childs. The ascent from the Pa- 
cific coast to the lake was to be via the 
Rio Grande valley, and by means of eleven 
locks of ten and one-half feet lift, and the 
canal was to be cut directly through the 
western divide to the lake. This portion was 
to be sixteen and one-quarter miles long. 
The route across the lake was to be fifty- 
six and one-half miles long. The San Juan 
was to be navigated by placing dams In 
the river at four places, the uppermost at 
Castillo, the lowest a mile below the mouth 
of the San Carlos. This river portion was 
to be sixty-six and one-half miles long. 
At the lowest dam the canal was to leave 
the river, follow Its left bank to the San 
JuanlUo, and then proceed by a straight 
course to Greytown. The total length of the 
canal from ocean to ocean was to be 181% 



THE NICARAGUA CANAL. 



117 



miles. The total cost was estimated at 
$65,722,147. 

The third survey was made by Mr. Meno- 
cal, ander direction of the government, in 
1886. He was to make an estimate for a 
twenty-eight-foot canal. He made some 
ciianges in the Loll route, especially in that 
portion of it that provided for the canal- 
ization of the San Juan river. His estimate 
was $60,036,197. In 1895 congress provided 
for a commission consisting of Col. Ludlow, 
D. S.' A.; M. T. Endlcott, U. S. N., and 
Alfred l^oble, a private citizen, which was 
to report upon the feasibility and cost of 
completing the canal company's work. The 
commission estimated the cost of the work 
at 1133,472,893, but its report was not favor- 
able to the company and it recommended 
the appointment of a new commission, with 
enlarged powers, to make a more exhaust- 
ive examination of the proposed routes. 
Such a new commission was appointed, con- 
sisting of Admiral Walker, tJ. S. N.; Prof. 
Lewis M. Haupt and Gen. Hains. This 
commission, with a force of 250 men, includ- 
ing eighty engineers, with complete ap- 
paratus for boring, testing rainfall, evap- 
oration and flow of streams, with other 
appliances, landed in December, 1897, and 
spent three months in the work. The esti- 
mated cost of construction was: Admiral 
Walker, $125,000,000: Prof. Haupt, $90,000,- 
000, and Gen. Hains, $140,000,000. As to 
the routes the commission recommended, 
that of the Maritime and the Lull route 
were the best two to be followed. 

In March, 1899, congress authoMzed the 
president to appoint a new commission to 
examine all possible routes across the isth- 
mus, especially the two known as the Nica- 
ragua and Panama routes, and to determine 
which is the most feasible and practicable 
one of the two. In accordance with this 
act the* president KPlrntffl tbr- f-'V-^ng 
gentlemen to nf-wr^ nn Ejnrit f-^>T]wiii>.>.iiiii '. 

Rear-AdDiiriil John O. Walkor, U. i^. J^.; 
Samuel Pnaro of Flnrlrln, Alfrprt Nnhle, 
C. E., of lUlDoJ!?; Georjre ¥!. Morrlaou, C. B., 
of New York 3 Col. Pptor 0. Halna. D. S. 
A.; Prof. WltljBin H. Burr of ConnRt^Mmt, 
Lieut.-Col. Oswalil H, Ernat. CL S, A.; 
Prof. LewfB M. Haopt, C. K., olTPeiinsyl- 
vania; Prof, Emory R. JohDi^oii of Pennpyl- 
vania. 

The report of this commission had not 
been Issued at the time of going to press. 
The secretary of state, however, gave out, 
on the 31st of May, the following synopsis 
of its report: 

*Tbe commission understood that It was 
required to consider all routes heretofore 
proposed having any merit; that new routes 
appearing to have merit should be devel- 
oped, and the entire region of canal possi- 
bilities should be examined with sufficient 
thoroughness to enable a Just and compre- 
hensive comparison of the various routes to 
be made and the most desirable one se- 
lected. With this view the commission 
made a careful study of all data bearing 
upon the Nicaraguan canal question. 

"Much delay to the work and great an- 
novance to working parties were caused by 
attempts at revolution and by the strained 
relations between the governments of Nic- 
aragua and Costa Rica. The outbreak of 
the war between the United States and 
Spain was also a serious matter. 

•The report goes Into minute details with 



respect to all matters connected with the 
construction of the canal, and says after 
mature deliberation the commission has 
adopted and estimated for the route from 
Brito to Lake Nicaragua, called the Childs 
route, and from the lake to Qreytowo, 
called Lull route. 

*'Tbl8 line leaving Brito follows the left 
bank of the Rio Grande to near Bueno Re- 
tiro, crosses the western divide to the val- 
ley of the La J as, which it follows to Lake 
Nicaragua. Crossing the lake to the head 
of the San Jnan river it follows the upper 
river to near Boca San Carlos, thence in 
excavation by the left bank of the river to 
the San JuaniUo and across the low country 
to Greytown, passing to the northward of 
Lake Silico. 

"It requires but a single dam with regu- 
lating works at both ends of the summit 
level. The surveys have in general revealed 
better physical conditions than were hith- 
erto supposed to exist, especially as to the 
amount of rock in the upper river, whereby 
it is possible to greatly reduce the esti- 
mated cost of construction. 

"To determine the proper unit of prices 
for excavation, the average of prices actu- 
ally paid to contractors on the Chicago 
drainage canal, which represent cost of 
plant, prices paid for work done, and con- 
tractors' profits, was taken. To these 
prices certain percentages were added for 
the difference in location, climate, etc. 

"In obtaining the estimates for the cost 
of locks, the prices actually paid for build- 
ing the government locks at Sault Ste. 
Marie were taken and 33 per cent was 
added for the difference of location. 

"After giving due weight to all the ele« 
ments of this important question, and with 
an earnest desire to reach logical conclu- 
sions based upon substantial facts, the 
commission believes that a canal can be 
built across the isthmus on this route for 
not exceeding $118,113,790. 

"Col. Hains concurs generally with the 
views of the other members of the com- 
mission, but his estimate of the cost i» 
1134,818,308." 

The full report will be submitted by the 
president to the LVIth congress. 

TECHNICAL DETAILS. 

Total distance from ocean to ocean, 169.4 
miles. 

Canal in excavation, 28 miles. 

Lengths of basins, 21.6 miles. 

River San Jnan, 64.5 miles. 

Lake Nicaragua, 56.5 miles. 

Free navigation In lake, river and basins, 
142.6 miles. 

Elevation of summit level of canal above 
sea level, 110 feet. 

Length of summit level, 153.2 miles. 

Number of locks, 6. 

Greatest lift of lock, 45 feet. 

Dimensions of locks, 800 feet long, 100 
feet wide. 

Depth of canal, 30 feet. 

Least width at bottom, 100 feet. 

Time transit from ocean to ocean, 28 
hours. 

Length of LaKfe Nicaragua, 110 miles. 

Average width, 40 miles. 

Surface area, about 2,600 square miles. 

Area of watershed of lake, about 8,000 
square miles. 



118 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



DISTANCES IN NAUTICAL MILES BETWEEN COMMERCIAL PORTS OF THE WORLD 

AND DISTANCES SAVED BT THE NICARAGUA CANAL. 

[Compiled from data furnished by the United States flydrographio oflBce. Length of sailing 

routes approximate only.] 



. Between 



Around 
Cape Horn 
for saHing 

vetsels. 



Via Magel- 
lan for 
fvXl-pow-- 
ered steam 
ve»8eU. 



Via Cape 

of Oood 

Hope. 



Via 

Niearaaua 

canaL 



Advantage 
overaaii' 
ing route. 



Advan- 
tage over 
stean^ 
route. 



New Tort and 3an Francisco. 

Pujtet Bound 

Sfeika » 

BDrlnir S*trult 

Acapultrd 

MA^tMhvn 

HuQKkung. 

T okokama, , 

Melboufue 

Auakland.^ 

UoDOlnlu. 

Cftlliio 

G-umy aqu li 

YaLpurnl^. 

New OPieaiif* A Ban Francisco 

Acapnlco* 

MuzatJiia... 

CaJlAU , 

latp^ralBi? 

LLrerpuol nnd Han Francisco 

Ae!ipiilcM>. 

Airtiiithm 

iLiiclEliini].,., 

Gim^&ijuil 

Calltto 

Valpamipp 

J-iuiioluIn.. 

Yokohaiua , 



15,GG0 



13.174 
18,»35 
14,439 
16,70» 
ll,fi66 
12,037 



13,7«) 
12.(n0 
1&,480 



9.420 
16,000 



15,620 



12,130 
"9.386* 



72.860 
1IS90 
1:^290 

1^640 
10.800 

H.440 
i:i539 
]Tgao 

1^.402 
J'L005 
S.B06 
]:ti94 
)I.B75 
J^^B67 
11.919 
10.030 
UB60 
«700 
i:^,B10 



13.760 
15.217 
12,8a0 
14,060 



4,9U7 
6.666 
«,U7 



ia753 



a2T0 



8,308 
8.510 



13,367 
"14.666' 



9,862 
8,462 
6,417 
8,744 
8,227 
6,014 
4.147 
2,285 
2.915 

1^ 

6.766 
6.396 

11,182 
6,947 
6.464 
7,734 
9,187 

11,947 



8,058 
6.«QD 



4,138 
7,063 



4.406 
11.853 



7.908 



948 
1,646' 



2.S06 
8.137 
6.873 
6.896 

iim 

9.892 
9.636 
9.487 
7.021 
4,561 
6.897 
6.110 
6.968 
737 
4,678 

1,026 
4.473 
2,568 



Length of canal in nautical miles 147 

New Tork to eastern port of canal 2,060 

Liyerpool to eastern port of canal 4,780 

Hamburg to eastern port of canal 5,127 

Havre to eastern port of canal 4,691 

New Orleans to eastern port of canal 1.300 



Western port of canal to San Francisco. 

Western port of canal to Portland , 

Western port of canal to Puget Sound.. . . 

Western port of canal to Valparaiso 

Western port of canal to Caliao 

Western port of canal to Yokohama 



.2,700 
.3,346 
.8,468 
.2,807 

■r 



OBEAT CANALS 07 TEE WOBLD. 



The great canals of the world and the 
growth of the business passing through 
them were recently discussed by the treas- 
ury bureau of statistics. The business of 
the Suez canal, the Kaiser Wilbelm, the 
St. Mary's falls, the Welland and New 
York state canals, and, incidentally, the 
commerce passing through the Detroit riyer, 
are giveh in detail for a term of years, and 
thus is presented statistical data convenient 
for those desiring to study the question of 
ship canals connecting great bodies of 
water. 

The Sues canal shows a net tonnage of 
6,576 tons In 1869, its first year; 436,609 in 
1870, oyer k million in 1872, more than two 
millions in 1875, and a steady Increase until 
1891, when the figures reached 8,698,777, 
since which time there has been compara- 
tively little change, the figures for 1897 
being slightly below those of 1896, but 33 
per cent in excess of those of 1887, and more 
than three times those of 1877. 

The Kaiser Wllhelm canal, which has 
been In operation but three years, shows an 
Jncrease of BO per cent In that period in 
the tonnage passing through it, that of the 
first year after its opening being 1,505,983, 
and that for the fiscal year ending March 
81. 1898. 2,469.795. 

The St. Mary's falls canal, conneetlnjr 
Lake Superior with the lower lakes, shows 



a more rapid gain than the Suez. The 
freight tonnage passing throhgb the St. 
Mary's |alls canal in 1881 is given at 1,667.- 
741, reaching more than three million tons 
in 1886, more than five millions in 1887, more 
than seven mlUiotis in 1889, more than 
nine millions in 1890, more than eleven mil- 
lions in 1892, more than thirteen millions in 
1894 and more than eighteen millions in 1897. 
Incidentally the freight tonnage passing] 
through the Detroit river, which connects 
Lakes Superior, Michigan and Huron with 
Erie and Ontario, is shown to have in- 
creased from 9,000,000 tons In 1873 to 23,900, 
620 in 1896, an increase in that time of 200 
per cent, while the Increase in the regis- 
tered tonnage through St. Mary's falls 
canal alone in that time Is from 1,204,446 to 
17.619,933. 

The Welland canal statistics show that 
the quantity of freight passed through that 
canal in 1880 was 819.934 tout, and In 1896 
1.279,987, though, comparing 1896 with 1872, 
1873 and 1874, no Increase Is round, the fig- 
ures of 1872 being 1.383,104 and those of 
1878 1.506.484, while the tons passed from 
United States ports to United states ports 
throufrh that waterway fell from 748,567 
in 1874 to 658.213 In 1896. 

The New York canal tables show a steady 
decrease since 1880 Ih the tons of merchan- 
dise carried to tide Water. The number of 



FOREIGN CARRYING TRADB. 



119 



tons of freight carried to tide water on the 
New York canals in 1880 was 4,067,402; in 
1890, 3,024,765, and in 1897, 1,878,218, while aU 
other canals mentioned, as above indicated, 
show large gains in business meantime. 

The average of freight rates, especially 
on the great lakes and by rail, in competi- 
tion witn the lakes and their canals, shows 
ft material decrease between Chicago and 
New York, whether freight is carried by 
lake and rail, lake and canals, or by all 
rail, though the reduction where carried 
by the all-water route of lake and canals 
is greater than In cases where a part 6r all 



of the transportation is by ralL The aver- 
age rate per bushel for wheat from Chi- 
cago to New York by lake and canal was 
in 1877, 11.24 cents per bushel; in 1887, 8.5 
cents, and in 1897, 4.25 cents. In the combi 
nation of lake and rail freights the rate 
fell from 15.8 cents per bushel in 1877 to 12 
cents in 1887 and 7.37 cents in 1897, while 
the all-rail freight fell from 20.8 cents per 
bushel in 1877 to 15.74 cents in 1887 and 12.32 
cents in 1S97. 

The following table presents the statistics 
of freight tonnage on the great canals of 
the world from 1880 to 1897: 



TRAFFIC THROUGH THE GREAT CANALS OF THE WORLD-1880-18W. 



YSAB. 



St Maru*8 

falls freight 

tonnage. 



Detroit river 

freight 

tonnage. 



WeUand 

canal, 

freight 

traneported. 



New York 

canal, freight 

Umeto 

tidewater. 



4,067,402 
8,086,889 
8,0iS8,]^ 

2,8se,m 

2,»U.788 
2,716,219 
8J816.177 
8,168,923 
3,684,661 



Siuz canal, 
net vessel 
tonnage. 



1801.. 



T8W.. 



*1,784,880 

2,874,657 

4,627,769 
6,4»4,6I9 
6,411,423 
7,616,022 
9,041,213 
8.888,769 
1U14,838 
10,796.673 
18,196,860 
16,062,680 
16,289.061 
18,962,766 



*20,286.249 
•17.672,240 
•17,872.183 
•17,685.174 
•18,046.949 
•17,777,828 
•18,968,066 
•18.864.260 
•19,099,060 
19,n7,860 
21,760,918 
28,209,619 
28,668,819 
28.091,890 



819.934 
681,506 



26,8^,679 
27,900,620 



1,006,166 
887,811 
784.928 
960,185 
777,918 
878,800 

1,066.278 

1,016,066 
976,018 
956.664 

1,294,828 

1,279,987 



16.619 

e,8i6 

x,xi6.896 
1,608.746 
2,078,878 
1378,218 



8,067,421 
4,186,779 
6,074,808 
6^776,861 
6,8n.600 
6.886,752 
6.787.656 
6!9eB,0B4 
6,640,884 
6,788,187 
6,890,094 

7,669,068 
8,089,176 
8^883 
8,660,283 
7,899.873 



* Gross tonnage. 
FOREIGN O ARRYI HQ TRADE. 

Values of imports and exports of the United States carried in American and foreign ves- 
sels each fiscal year for tlie last thirty years, with the percentage carried in American vessels- 



Teab Ended juns i 



1880... 



UM... 



IMPORTS. 


Exports. 


|il 


InAvierican 


In foreign 


In American 


In foreign 


vessels. 


vessels. 


vessels. 


vessels. 


tm,mm 


^a.^yitm 


|l.^iJM,748 


8285,979,781 


83.2 


]m.-m.m 


lK)»J40,Ma 


ja9,733;S4 




85.6 


im.m,7\f) 


»oa,020.fiJ4 


m,Ts.m 


892.801 962 




m,^siSMS 


^ni.iifj^Tsa 


i^.\)44.n 1 


893,929,679 


29.2 


l74,;^Hfla4 


471,S0i],7GG 


17l,&«;j6 ! 


^'^iPl 


26.4 


mm.-Hii 


ja&,f!SQ,135 


17Jt«2l,21 ; 


27.2 


lB7m2.12^ 


8fl3,5HSI.Eje& 


l.-jG^r.dO ; 


601.838,949 


26.2 


14a.3WJ,70* 


a;MMy.5<jo 


mmiis 


492.215,487 


27.7 


iSl.aMjMf 


S£&,tm,SSi 


IW.KStl,^! 


630,364,708 


26.9 


i4^*9B,jfra 


aB,4W,Rfi& 


m,m,f\z , 


669688 664 


26.8 


143,a»,3&3 
149,811,868 




i^,4Sr,.m 


too'tto'^ 


g;2 


isa,em,i4fi 


i^lMi^2f& 


116,905.^12 , 


777;ie2,'7l4 


16.6 


130,!69.eS6 


fi71.6lT,Httl 


Oe.96^9] 1 


6941881348 


16.0 


im^m^m 


6fi4,17W7fl 


im.4lB.21 1 


mM^,m 


fil!i^lJ93 


W.Sa:f,B2 i 


615,287,007 


17wi 


iizmiMz 




mm.*n 


^9W^477 


lU 


llB.e41,SI7 


+9l,937,&3fl 


78,406,fi8 ; 




b^^i,''J}^ 


TC.g91.Q65! 


631,802,! 92 


14.8 


]33.^fS,2^ 


&IS,223,SBr 




SoiSSiSSo 


14.0 


120,Tfi2(Q'10 


,'>e&,12tl.B81 


giogisriB 


14.8 


124.S2S,a77 


fi23,e-«.m 


76„3&2.01 


789,694,424 


12.9 


}S:}S;§^ 


GTifisSiijes 


Mi^^iw 


916m^ 


Hi 


1^7.005,434 


70,67IJ,b7 1 


78S,^^^n4 


13.2 


uim.m 


fiOft.BlOJSl 


71,2^,89 i 


825<796,9i8 


13.8 


KB.?2^.m(J 


em.m^MU 


^.mM 


606,867.88(1 


11.7 


vr""''^\ 


f'-n-^ UJl VJI 


' 1 


i.^^ 


^ 



120 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



POLITIOAL KOVEMEHTB OF THS TEAE 1899. 



TArranged in tbe order 
THE UNION REFORM PARTY. 

The union reform party, which had Its 
inception in Ohio as a state organization in 
1898, was launched as a national alliance at 
Qincinnati. O.. on the 1st of March, 1899. 

There were about 300 delegates present 
and persons from the following states: 
New York, PenosylvaDia, Maryland, West 
Virginia, Georgia, Kentucky, Arkansas, 
Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Washington, 
Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Min- 
nesota. 

The committee on permanent organiza- 
tion submitted the names of R. S. Thomp- 
son of Ohio for chairman, Asa Taylor of 
Nebraska for secretary and T. J. Donnelly 
of Cincinnati for assistant secretary. 

The following was adopted as the nation- 
al platform of the party: 

"Our present system of gOTernment vests 
the entire law-making i)ower in representa- 
tives. The people elect these representa- 
tives but have no control over their actions. 

*'An experience of over 100 years in the 
practical operation of this system has 
proved that it does not provide a govern- 
ment of, by and for the people. 

"Representatives cannot always know 
certainly the will of their constituents, and 
even where that will has been clearly 
manifested it has been continually disre- 
garded. 

"Legislative bodies, from municipal coun- 
cils to the national congress, have been 
controlled by corrupt influences. Legisla- 
tion has consequently been in the interest 
of the corrupt few and against the interest 
of the voiceless masses. 

"Under this system the people are dis- 
franchised on all mattery of legislation. 
They are allowed to vote for men, but are 
denied the right to vote for measures. The 
people are governed by laws which they did 
not enact and cannot repeal. 

"As the result of this system great abuses 
have arisen and politics has become a 
synonym for corruption. 

"The people have seen these abuses, but 
being disfranchised on all legislative ques- 
tions have been unable to provide a remedy. 
They have become divided into parties and 
factions contending with each other in re- 
gard to the legislation needed. They have 
overlooked the fact that under our system 
of government they have power neither to 
enact legislation which thev desire nor to 
prevent legislation to which they are 
opposed. 

"In search for relief the people have 
turned from one party to another and have 
organized new parties without number. 

^'But all such efforts have been fruitless 
and must continue so to be as long as the 
people are disfranchised. They must be 
Invested with the power to make their own 
laws before they can have laws made in 
their own interest. 

"So long as the people have no voice In 
legislation it is useless for them to con- 
tend among themselves regarding the legis- 
lation which they need but cannot enact. 

"That we may have a government con 
ducted in the interests of the people, and 
which will provide for the peace, prosper- 
ity, morality and happiness of the entire 
gation, we must have a government which 



of their occurrence.} 

is in fact of the people, by the people ^nd 
for the people, and in which the people 
shall rule. 

"We, therefore, reserving to ourselves the 
right to our individual opinions on all 
questions of legislation, unite for the 
accomplishment of this end— the enfran- 
chisement of the American people and the 
establishment of a government in which 
the will of the people shall be supreme. 
And to this do pledge our united labors. 

"And we invite all persons who believe in 
the principles of liberty and the declara- 
tion of independence to unite in support of 
the following platform: 

"Direct legislation under the system 
known as the initiative and referendum. 

"Under the 'initiative' the people can 
compel the submission to themselves of 
any desired law, when, if it receives a 
majority of the votes cast, it is thereby 
enacted. 

"Under the 'referendum* the people can 
compel the submission to themselves of 
any law which has been adopted by any 
legislative body, when, if such law fails to 
receive a majority of the votes cast, it will 
be thereby rejected." 

A national executive committee was ap- 
pointed consisting of the following named 
gentlemen: R. S. Thompson, chairman. 
Springfield, O.; A. G. Eichelberger, secre- 
tary, Baltimore, Md. ; J. M. Dunlap, vice- 
president and treasurer, Franklin, Ind. : 
Edward Evans, North Tonawanda, N. Y. ; 
Asa Taylor, Omaha, Neb.; W. J. Seelye, 
Wooster, O.; Sheridan Webster, St. Louis, 
Mo.; F. A. NaiUe. Colwyn, Pa.; J. G. 
Waite, Sturgis, Mich. 

THE PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

The national organization comzaittee met 
in response to call of Chairman Park In 
Kansas City, Mo., on May 15. After sev- 
eral hours of general discussion the follow- 
ing subcommittee was appointed to prepare 
an address to the populists of the United 
States embodying a plan of action for their 
general guidance, to the end that all 
straight populists might act with common 
purpose and on common lines, thereby 
making their forces effective: William L. 
Peek, Georgia, chairman; Jo A. Parker, 
Kentucky; L. Stebbins, Nebraska; H. F. 
Jones, Texas; L. H. Weller, Iowa, secre^ 
tary. 

The full report of the subcommittee as 
adopted by the organization committee is 
as follows: 
"To the Populists of the United States: 

"1. We congratulate the official members 
of the national ominlzatlon committee of 
the national people^s party on their success- 
ful efforts to curtail and minimize the dis- 
integrating and destroying forces set in 
motion by the advocates of the 'fusion' 
policy of and during 1896, as also upon 
their succesf In so reorganizing the earnest 
and true membership of the national peo- 
ple's party into such active, effective work 
as to awaken large hopes that in the elec- 
tion of 1900 onlv clean-handed and straight- 
forward work in support of the principles 
set forth in the Omaha platform and candl< 



POLITICAL MOVEMENTS OF THE YEAE 1899. 



121 



dates nominated thereon shall be consid- 
ered in our ranks. 

"8. We congratulate the membership of 
the people's party throughout the nation on 
the success attending upon their educa- 
tional and propagauda efforts among the 
people to the extent that the principles of 
the party are to-day accepted by thousands, 
including many prominent politicians and 
metropolitan newspapers who a short time 
ago ridiculed and reviled them. 

"3. We congratulate the membership of all 
political organizations which have indorsed 
any of the paramount propositions con- 
tained in the Omaha platform and respect- 
fully suggest to all such that a generous 
appreciation of the efforts of the people's 
party during years of educational work in 
the interests and behalf of all such can 
best l>e attested by uniting their political 
fortunes under the banner of the people's 
party. 

"Plan of action: 

"That the voters of the nation may feel 
assured that the people's party shall not 
again be betrayed in national convention 
or its working forces passed into the bands 
of the enemy, and to inspire confidence 
among the masses in the integrity of our 
acts and sincerity of our demands for in- 
di^pendent action as a party, we respect- 
fully submit to the populists of the nation 
tbe following plan of action: 

"1. That the national organization com- 
mittee hereby instructs its chairman to pro- 
ceed with the formation of people's party 
precinct clubs in all the states on the plan 
recommended by the Gindnnatl convention 
of September, 1898, or some relative plan, 
deemed by the members in the differen,t 
states most efBcient. and to appoint in 
each state not having members already 
selected three members of the national 
organization committee, and with the 
assistance and advice of these committee- 
men to select a state organization com- 
mittee of the same number of members as 
the then existing state committee, and 
through these committeemen to organize 
as far as possible organization committees 
in congressional districts, counties and 
voting precincts. Wherever it is positively 
Jcnown that those members of national, 
state and other committees now existing 
are unqualifiedly opposed to fusion with 
either of the old parties rfnd for indepen- 
dent, straightforward action by the peo- 
ple's party they are to be selected as 
members of the several organization com- 
mittees. 

**2. It shall be the duty of these several 
committees to use all honorable means to 
secure the selection of delegates to the 
various conventions leading up to the 
nominating presidential convention of 1900 
who are opposed to fusion; and, failing in 
this, to provide for and send contesting 
delegates to the several conventions. That 
is to say, if those who are opposed to 
fusion are unfairly or dishonorably treated 
in the county convention they shall send a 
delegation to contest the seats of the 
fusion delegation in the state convention. 
If the state convention is controlled in the 
Interest of *fu8ion' and against an honor- 
able and straightforward people's party 
pc^cy, as soon as this is determined the 
mlddle-of-the-rsad delegations shall leave 
the convention and uniting with the con- 



testing delegations shall hold another state 
convention and send a contesting delega- 
tion from that state to the national con- 
vention. Should the national convention be 
controlled by straight populists all dele- 
gates sent under this plan shall feel them- 
selves in honor bound to vote to nominate 
those candidates for president and vice- 
president recommended by the referendum 
votel provided, that in the Judgment of the 
national organization committee a suf- 
ficient number of said clubs shall have 
been organized to make such a vote both 
practicable and representative of the will 
of the party. 

"Should the national convention of 1900 
be controlled In the interest of 'fusion' the 
straight delegations shall leave said con 
vention and Join the contesting delegations 
sent under this plan in a straight conven- 
tion, and there carry out the will of the 
populists of the nation without regard to 
the 'fusion' convention. 

"In this case the national organization 
committee and the several state, district, 
county and precinct committees organize<L 
under this plan shall be recognized as the 
only committees having any authority in 
the affairs of the people's party. 

"If it should so occur that the national 
committee fail to issue a call for a national 
people's party convention within due time, 
in the discretion of the national organiza- 
tion committee, said organization commit- 
tee shall then proceed to issue a call for 
a "national convention. 

"We offer this plan of action knowing 
that it will (first) show to every populist 
that we are willing to remain in good fel- 
lowship ^th our 'fusion' brethren with 
whom we have differed in the past in 
accepting distasteful allegiance with the 
enemies of the people's party; provided 
they will, with us, stand squarely on the 
original principles of the party and the 
line of action intended by its founders, who 
declared at Omaha in 1892 that the two old 
parties were jointly responsible for the 
miseries of the people and th0 unjust 
legislation which oppressed them; second, 
if they refuse to do so that we wish them 
to know that we can go with them no 
farther, preferring to adhere to the grand 
principles of untainted populism rather 
than to trafBc in those sacred principles for 
personal or political advancement and gain. 

"We share the humiliation of the populist 
voters who have found themselves In the 
past forced to vote for candidates not in 
sympathy with each demand of the peo- 
ple's party platform and urge them to 
diligently work In the future to avert any 
repetition of such complications. 

"We recommend that an earnest effort to 
carry out the request for the referendum 
vote asked for by the Cincinnati conven- 
tion be made so that the fullest expression 
on the question may be obtained. 

"In order that states using the national 
precinct referendum club systems of party 
government may be made most effective 
we recommend that these clubs be pre- 
pared to vote on national candidates and 
other questions between Oct. 1, 1899, and 
Jan. 1, 1900. and send tabulated vote of 
same by states to Hon. Milton Park, chair- 
man national organization committee, 
Dallas, Tex., who, as soon as practicable. 



122 



CmCAOO DAILY NEWS ALMANAO FOB 1900. 



shall certify national rranlta of same to 
the public.''^ 

BIMBTALLIO LEAGUE. 

The OWo Valley League of Bimetallic 
clubs met at Louisville. Ky., on the -SOth 
day of May, 1899. Judge James P. Tarvln 
of CoYingtoD, Ky., was elected president, 
and Allen Glarlc of Indiana was chosen 
secretary. 

Speeches were made by the democratic 
candidate for gOTcrnor, Mr. Goebei; Gen. 
Watt Hardin, J. J. Lentz, Matt O'Doherty, 
William J. Bryan, L. A. Bussell, John S. 
Rhea, George Fred Williams, A. G. Caruth 
and seyeral others. The following resolu- 
tions were adopted: 

*'ResolTed— 1. Our faith in bimetallism is 
rindicated by erents. The necessity for 
the restoration of the double standard was 
aclcnowledged by the president and con- 
gress in 1897, when a commission wis sent 
to Europe to entreat other nations to aid 
in establishing bimetallism, and the failure 
of the commission to secure Eur)poan co- 
operation confirms the friends of free coin- 
age in their belief that relief can come 
only by the independent action of the 
United States. The present logical ratio 
of 16 to 1 is the only ratio at which bimet- 
allism can be restored, and opposition to it 
is confined to those who oppose bimetallism 
at any ratio, and to those who misappre- 
hend or ignore the reasons which led three 
national conventions to adopt it. That 
whatever paper money needs to be Issued 
in this country to supplement a gold and 
silver currency should be issued by the 
government of the United States directly 
without the intervention of any bank or 
corporation whatever. 

*^2. We favor and recommend the enact- 
ment by the democratic national conven- 
tion in 1900 of the Chicago platform of 1896 
without change. 

"3. We especially favor and recommend 
the adoption by the democratic national 
Convention of 1900 of the financial plank in 
the Chicago platform of 1896 without any 
change. 

**4. We believe that the trust is the result 
in large measure of the methods that have 
been used, among which is the demonetiza- 
tion of silver, by which the volume of cur- 
rency has been kept below the demands of 
business. We favor the destruction of the 
result as well as the removal of the causes. 
The establishment of independent bimetal- 
lism at 16 to 1 would do more to cripple or 
destroy the organization and the operation 
of the trust than any other single act. We 
recommend, therefore, the adoption by the 
democratic national convention of 1900 of 
an appropriate and specific declaration 
against the organization and existence of 
the trust and a specific promise of legis- 
lative and executive action tending to their 
extermination. 

"5. We hereby express our continued con- 
fidence in William Jennings Bryan and 
favor his nomination for the presidency of 
the United States in 1900." 

THE ANTI-TRUST CONFERENCE. 
Pursuant to a call Issued by Gov. Sayers 
of Texas to the governors of various states 
to meet at St. Louis, Mo., on the 20th of 
September, 1899, for the purpose of con- 
sidering what course should be pursued 



regarding the trusts, eleven states re- 
sponded upon a call of the roll. 

The states represented and their repre- 
sentatives were as follows: 

Michigan— Gov. Pingree and Attorney- 
General Oren. 

Missouri— Gov. Stephens and Attorney- 
General Crow. 

Texas— Gov. Sayers and Attorney-General 
Smith. 

Arkansas— Gov. Jones and Attorney-Gen- 
eral Davis. 

Tennessee— Gov. McMilUn. 

Iowa— Gov. Shaw. 

Colorado— Gov. Thomas and Attorney- 
General Campbell. 

Indiana— Attorney-General Taylor. 

Montana— Attorney-General Nolan. 

Mississippi— Monroe McClurg, democratic 
candidate for attorney-general. 

Washington— Insurance Commissioner G. 
G. Helfner. 

Gov. Sayers of Texas was made perma- 
nent chairman. 

While it was the design of the promoters 
of the convention that nothing of a par- 
tisan character should be Injected into it, 
early in the proceedings there was a good 
deal of defection and the republican 
delegates retired from the conference, leav- 
ing delegates from the following eight 
states: Michigan, Missouri, Texas, Arkan- 
sas, Tennessee, Mississippi, Montana and 
Washington. These delegates unanimously 
adopted resolutions demanding: 

"L The enactment and enforcement, both 
by the several states and the nation, of 
legislation that shall adequately and folly 
define as crimes any attempted monopolisa- 
tion or restraint of trade in any line of 
industrial activity, with proTisions for 
adequate punishment both of the individnal 
and the corporation that shall be found 
guilty thereof; punishment to the corpora- 
tion to the extent of its dissolntion. 

"2. The enactment by each of the states 
of the union of legislation for the adequate 
and proper control and regulation of cor- 
porations chartered by that state, and we 
recommend as efflcaclons a system of re* 
ports to and examination by state author- 
ity of the corporations organized under its 
laws, to the end that they be brought to a 
fair observance of the laws under which 
they are created. 

"3. The enactment by each state of laws 
that will prevent the entrance of any 
foreign created corporation into its limits 
for any other purpose than Interstate com- 
merce, except on terms that will put the 
foreigii created corporation on a basis of 
equality with the domestic created corpora- 
tion of the state entered, and subject to 
the same laws, rules and regulations of the 
state that it enters which are applicable 
to the domestic corporations of that state, 
and to this end we recommend legislation 
that would make it mandatory upon cor- 
porations seeking to engage in business 
outside the state of their creation that 
they procure licenses ^ from the foreign 
state as a condition precedent to theii 
entry into such state; such license to be 
granted on such terms and subject to such 
restrictions as will place the corporation 
subject to the same control, inspection, 
supervision and regulation as the domestic 
corporation of that state, and to be revoc- 
able if the conditions thereof are violated. 



POLITICAL M0VE;MENTS of the year 1889. 



128 



'4. The enactment of state legislation 
declaring that a corporation created in one 
state to do business oxclusively in other 
states than where created shall be pro- 
hibited from admission into any state. 
(This proposition is supported by decisions 
of the Supreme courts of several states, 
but we believe it should become legislative 
enactment, uniform throughout the states.) 

"5. That no corporation should be formed 
in whole or in part by another corporation. 

"6. That no cori>oration shall own or hold 
any stock in another corporation engaged 
in a similar or competitive business and 
that no officer or director of a cori>oration 
shall be the officer or director or the ownei 
of stock in another corporation engaged in 
a similar or competitive business the object 
or result of which is to create a trust or 
monopoly. 

"7. Recognizing that trusts are usually 
composed of corporations and that corpora- 
tions are but creatures of the law and can 
exist only in the place of their creation 
and cannot migrate to another sovereignty 
without the consent of that sovereignty, 
and that this consent may be withheld 
when desired, we recommend as the sense 
of this conference that each state pass 
laws providing that no corporation which 
is a member of any pool or trust in that 
state or elsewhere can do business In that 
state. 

Resolved. That It Is the sense of this 
conference that all the capital ptach; of 
private corporations should bo fuUy paid 
either, first, in lawful money, or. m-coud, 
in property of the actual cash value of 
the amount of the capital stocii; abi1 ^at 
in all private corporations wiih a i-t;\- ;al 
stock issued in excess of (he am <-nt 
actually paid up as above prarliled rhe 
shareholders shall be liable to xh^ i?itent 
of twice the face value of the stock held 
by each.'* 

THE ANTI-IMPERIALIST LEAGUE. 

The declaration of Edwin B. Smith In 
calling the league convention to order on 
the 17th day of October, 1899, in the city 
of Chicago, that "We propose next year to 
contribute to the defeat of any party that 
shall then stand pledged to the subjugation 
of any people," makes the movement a 
political one and entitles it to classifica- 
tion under this head. Upon the opening of 
the convention about 100 delegates were 
present representing some fifteen states 
and territories. 

The opening address was made by Mr. 
Morton of Nebraska. He was followed by 
Mr. Schurz of New York, Mr. Atkinson of 
Massachusetts, Prof. Tolman of Illinois, 
Gov. Boies of Iowa and several others. 

The following were elected as officers of 
the league: 

Chairman-J. Sterling Morton, Nebraska 



City, Neb. 
Vlci "- 



ice-Gbairmen— Rufus D. Smith, Ohio; 
Edwin Burritt Smith, Chicago. ^ ^ 

Secretaries— Erving Window, Boston; 
WllUam J. Mlae, Chicago. ^^_^ ^ ^^^ 

Committee on Programme— Edwin Burritt 
Smith, Chicago; J. Laurence Laughlin, 
Chicago: Erving Winslow, Boston 

Committee on Resolutions— Carl Schurz, 
New York: Herbert Welsh, Philadelphia; 
Louis B. Ehrlch, Denver: Prof. J. Lau- 
twee Laughlin, Chicago; Dans Estes, Bos- 



ton; E. Burritt Smith, Chicago: Sigmund 
Zeisler, Chicago: C. B. Wilby, Cincinnati; 
Horace White, New York; Edgar A. Ban- 
croft, Chicago. 

Honorary VIce-Chairmen— Ex-Gov. George 
S. Boutwell, Groton, Mass.; Gen. William 
Birney, Washington, D. C; Gen. A. O. 
McClurg, Chicago, 111.; Senator William 
E. Mason, Chicago, 111.; Gen. John Beatty, 
Columbus, O.; Senator R. F. Pettigrew, 
Sioux Falls, S. D.; Gov. John Lund, St. 
Paul, Minn.; Gov. Charles S. Thomas, 
Denver, Col. ; Ex-Gov. Horace Boies, Water- 
loo, Town: EdH^nrd Atkinson, Brookline, 
MiJr^H,; Aijilrf'Vs- (.rjrQEffiet New Yorlt, N. Y.; 
Dr. Ktui] ri.-;.>3i.>u*. St. IjouIis, Mo.; Sena- 
tor C?irrrv>-, 1 raQklln, La.; Hamuel Gomp* 
erB, Sv^v \uE^. M, Y,; CoiigreiMman J. J. 
Lentr, ColiimhUHp O,; TboniBH A, Moran, 
Chicsjifr,, nu; George W. Oehs. Chatta- 
no^^^Fi, Tt'nn.; Prof. HertnaziD van Hoist, 
Chivnjio. m.i Edward M. Shepard, New 
York, N, y.; Rev. W. R, HimtiD^ton, New 
York, N. Y.; Patrick O'Farretl. Washing- 
ton, D. C^; E3E-S€Dator George F. Edmunds, 
Biirlingcaii. Vt.; Rpv. W. D. McHugh, 
OiNuha, Neb.: Eev. A. W. Sample, Minne- 
sora; Louiji U, Ebrtch, Deuvei-. CoL ; Hor- 
aci' White, New York. N. ¥.; Carl Schurs, 
Ntw York, N. T.; Hi-rbert Welsh, Phila- 
deJ[iMia^ Pu.i CtariLin N. MtiariEPs, Chicago, 
111.: AnBtlD G. Foi. New York, N. Y.; Rt.- 
Re>\ H. C. Potter, New York, N Y.; Rt.- 
Rev. John Ijin^-nster Sp^ilftliiR. Peoria, 
111.; Rev. TbetMlDre L. Cwyler, N^jw York, 
N. \\; lnjinn FMt-^, MostoQ, Mhhs.; Rev. 
Hf^rbtTt 9. Bleelow. Citiclnaatl, 0.; J. L. 
Slrv'lr*o, San AntonlOp Tvx*l George Foster 
P€ .riy, New York, N. Y.: Rev. W. H. 
Fish, Jr., Denver, Gol.; Edgar A. Bancroft, 
Chicago. 111. 

At the second day's session the following 
platform was adopted: 

'*We hold that the policy known as im- 
perialism is hostile to liberty and tends 
toward militarism, an evil from which it 
has been our glory to be free. We regret 
that it has become necessary in the land of 
Washington and Lincoln to reaffirm that all 
men, of whatever race or color, are entitled 
to life, liberty and the pursuit of happi- 
ness. We maintain that governments de- 
rive their Just powers from the consent of 
the governed. We insist that the subjuga- 
tion of any people Is 'criminal aggression* 
and open disloyalty to the distinctive 
principles of our government. 

"We earnestly condemn the policy of the 
present national administration in the 
Philippines. It seeks to extinguish the 
spirit of 1776 in those islands. We deplore 
the sacrifice of our soldiers and sailors, 
whose bravery deserves admiration even in 
an unjust war. We denounce the slaughter 
of the Filipinos as a needless horror. We 
protest against the extension of American 
sovereignty by Spanish methods. 

"We demand the immediate cessation of 
the war against liberty begun by Spain and 
continued by us. We urge that congress 
be promptly convened to announce to the 
Filipinos our purpose to concede to them 
the independence for which they have so 
long fought and which of right is theirs. 

••The United States have always pro- 
tested against the doctrine of International 
law which permits the subjugation of the 
weak by the strong. A self-governing 
state cannot accept sovereignty over an 



124 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



onwllliDg people. The United States citn- 
Dot act upon the ancient heresy that might 
makes right. 

"Imperialists assume that with the de- 
struction by American hands of self-gOT- 
emment in the Philippines all opposition 
here will cease. This is a grleyous error. 
Much as we abhor the war of 'rrlmtnal 
aggression' in the Philippines, grcjii^v iis 
we regret that the blood of the Fitig h^Dci 
is on American hands, we more U4.'^|»ly 
resent the betrayal of American toatiEa- 
tions at home. The real firing line is- zioi 
in the suburbs of Manila. The foe ie uf our 
own household. The attempt of 1861 was to 
diride the country. That of 1899 is to 
destroy itCi fundamental principles and 
noblest ideals. 

"Whether the ruthless slaughter of the 
Filipinos shall end next month or next 
year is but an incident in a contest that 
must go on until the declaration of inde- 
pendence and the constitution of the 
United States are rescued from the hands 
of their betrayers. Those who dispute 
about standards of value while the founda- 
tion of the republic is undermined will be 
listened to as little as those who would 
wrangle about the small economies of the 
housenold while the house is on fire. The 
training of a great people for a century, 
the aspiration for liberty of a vast immi- 
gration who have made their homes here, 
are forces that will hurl aside those who 
in the delirium of conquest seek to destroy 
the character of our institutions. 

"We deny that the obligation of all 
citizens to support their government in 
times of grave national peril applies to 
the present situation. If an administra- 
tion may with impunity ignore the issues 
upon which it was chosen, deliberately 
create a condition of war anywhere on the 
face of the globe, debauch the civil service 
for spoils to promote the adventure, organ- 
ize a truth - suppressing censorship and 
demand of all citizens a suspension of 
judgment and their unanimous support 
whUe it chooses to continue the fighting, 
representative government itself is im- 
periled. 

"We propose to contribute to the defeat 



of any person or party that stands for the 
forcible subjugation of any people. We 
shall oppose for re-election all who in the 
white house or in congress betray American 
liberty in pursuit of un-American ends. 
We still hope that both of our great polit- 
ical parties will support and defend the 
declaration of independence in the closing 
campaign of the century. 

"We hold with Abraham Lincoln that no 
man is good enough to govern another man 
without that other's consent. When the 
white man governs himself, that is self- 
government, but when he governs himself 
and also governs another man, that is more 
than self-government— that is despotism. 
Our reliance is in love of liberty, which 
God has planted In us. Our defense is in 
the spirit which prizes liberty as the herit- 
age of all men in all lands. Those who 
deny freedom to others deserve it not for 
themselves, and under a Just God cannot 
long retain it. 

"We cordially Invite the co-operation of 
all men and women who remain loyal to 
the declaration of independence and the 
constitution of the United States." 

The following form of petition to be 
circulated among the people was adopted 
for presentation to congress: 

"We, the undersigned citizens of the 
United States of America, respectfully 
petition your honorable body to bring about 
an inmiediate cessation of hostilities in 
the Philippine islands, and to announce to 
the people thereof with all convenient 

Eromptitude that it is the purpose of the 
fnited States not to interfere with their 
aspirations for independence or to subject 
them to our authority, but only to aid 
them in setting up an Independent govern- 
ment of their own choice, and to protect 
them against hostile foreign interference 
and to assist them with the military and 
naval forces of the United States so far as 
may be required in the maintenance of 
order and security until such a government 
shall be established." 

The convention adjourned on the 18th of 
October. 



MEK OF THE TEAB 1899. 



ELIHU BOOT. 
Elihu Root, secretary of war, was born at 
Clinton, Oneida county. N. Y.. Feb. 16, 1846. 
His father was Oren Root, for many years 

ftrof essor of mathematics in Hamilton ool- 
ege. In his youth he taught school and 
paid his way through Hamilton, subse- 
quently studying law there, and he com- 
pleted his course at the University Law 
school in New York. He then entered the 
law office of Mann & Parsons. His first 

Sartnership was formed with John H. 
trahn and the next with Wlllard Bartlett, 
who became a Judge of the Supreme court. 
Mr. Root was connected with the munic- 
ipal-reform movement in New York city in 
1871. In 1879 he was the republican candi- 
date for judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas, but was defeated, though polling a 
large vote. He was chairman of the re- 
publican county committee in 1886 and 1887, 
and for many years executive member of 
the 21st assembly district. He was appoint- 
ed by President Arthur United States at- 



tomey for the south district of New York 
and served two years. During his long 
career as a lawyer Mr. Root has been 
leading counsel in many noted cases, nota- 
bly for Tweed and Ingersoll on the exposure 
of the frauds perpetrated upon the county 
of New York by the Tweed ring, for Judge 
Hilton in the Stewart will case, for the ex- 
ecutors in the Hoyt and Havemeyer will 
cases, and for the contestants in the Ham- 
mersley will case. He is now counsel for 
and director in several banks, is attorney 
for several steam railroads and the chief 
adviser of the syndicate controlling the 
Broadway (New York city) railroad. He is 
also counsel for many large private corpora- 
chair * ^ 



tions. Mr. Root was 



lirman of Gov. 



Roosevelt's campaign committee in 1898. He 
was appointed by the president to be sec- 
retary of war upon the resignation of Gen. 
Alger, and assumed the duties of that of- 
fice Aug. 1, 1899. 

JOSEPH H. CHOATE. 
Joseph Hodges Choate of New York* am> 



MEN OF THE YEAR 1899. 



120 



bassador to Great Britain, was born in 
Salem, Mass., Jan. 24, 1832. He graduated 
from Harvard univeralty in 1862 and en- 
tered Dana Law sctiool, from which he was 
graduated in 1854. He was admitted to the 
bar, and removed to New York city, where 
he entered upon the practice of his profes- 
sion—which he continued to the time of his 
present appointment— and became one of 
the most prominent lawyers in the country. 
While always an active republican, he had 
never held political office until selected by 
the president to represent this country at 
the court of St. James. Mr. Choate has, 
however, been active In New York politics, 
and was a member of the committee of 
seventy whose work broke up the Tweed 
ring In that city. In 1894 he was president 
of xhe state constitutional convention. In 

1897 he was a candidate for United States 
senator, but was defeated by Thomas C. 
Piatt. Mr. Choate has been president of 
a number of New York city clubs, and in 

1898 he was elected president of the Amer- 
ican Bar association. When John Hay was 
selected secretary of state to succeed Mr. 
Day Mr. Choate was appointed in his place 
to the embassy to London. 



HORACE A. TAYLOR. 
H. A. Taylor, assistant secretary of the 
treasury, is the editor and proprietor of the 
Madison (Wis.) Journal, and nas been for 
many years one of the most prominent fig- 
ores In the political field in tne state. He 
has been at times a candidate for governor 
and has wielded no little influence in Wis- 
consin politics. Mr. Taiylor was born In 
1887 In St. Lawrence county. New York. 
He went to Wisconsin in 1855. and after 
wOT^king on a farm, driving a stage and 
dealing In real estate he drifted Into the 
newspaper business and, with his brother, 
the late Lute A. Taylor, started the River 
Falls Journal. Three years later he gave 
his Interest In this paper to his brother and 
went to Hudson, where he purchased the 
Hudson Chronicle and changed its name 
to the Hudson Times. A short time after- 
ward be purchased the Hudson Star and 
combined the names of the two papers, and 
published the Hudson Times and Star for 
over thirty years. Besides publishing a 
weekly paper, Mr. Taylor branched out Into 
lumbering and banking, in both of which 
enterprises he did well and. laid the founda- 
tion for a fortune. He was always a re- 
publican, and his papers were always 
■tanchly faithful to that party. He went 
into politics and in 1876 was appointed 
state timber agent by Gov. Ludington and 
held the place through successive admin- 
istrations until 1881, when he resigned to 
take the position of United States consul to 
Marseilles. He returned to Wisconsin in 
1888, and five years later he was elected 
to the state senate. While serving as sen- 
ator lie was appointed United States rail- 
road commissioner by President Harrison. 
Daring the World's Fair Mr. Taylor repre- 
sented the department of the interior on 
the commission. When he retired from the 
railroad commission in 1893 Mr. Taylor re- 
turned to Madison and took charge of the 
Journal, in which he had purchased a con- 
trofling interest. Since that time he has 
confined himself to editorial work. He was 
appointed assistant secretary of the treas- 
mj to succeed Mr. Howells of New Jersey 
In Febmaiy. 1899. 



JOHN N. IRWIN. 
John N. Ir^vin, minister to Portugal, was 
born in Ohio in 1847, attended school in 
Keokuk, Iowa, and graduated at Mlemi 
university (O.). Upon the breaking out of 
the civil war he enlisted as a private In 
the 45th Iowa infantry and served until 
1864. Entered Dartmouth college (N. H.) 
and graduated from that institution In IS^, 
and engaged in merchandising at Keokuk. 
In 1883 he was appointed governor of Idaho, 
but resigned after a service of stx months. 
In 1880 he was appointed governor of Ari- 
zona, but resigned before the close of his 
term. Appointed minister to Portugal In 
1899. 

WILLIAM P. LORD. 
William Paine Lord of Oregon, minister 
to Persia, was born in Dover, Del., in 1889, 
and was graduated from Fairfield college in 
1860. He began the study of law, but on 
the outbreak of the civil war aided In rais- 
ing a battalion of Delaware cavalry, of 
which he was first captain, later major, 
finally becoming Judge-advocate on the staff 
of Gen. Lew Wallace. At the close of the 
war he resumed his legal studies, and on 
graduation from the Albany Law school 
was admitted to the bar in Oregon In 1866. 
At this time he was appointed a lieutenant 
in the 2d United States cavali7, and saw 
service in Alaska. He then resigned his 
commission, and in 1868 went to Salem, 
Ore., where he built up a successful law 
practice. In 1878 he was chosen state sen- 
ator for four years, but resigned in 1880 to 
accept the republican nomination for jus- 
tice of the Supreme court. He was elected 
by a good majority, and re-elected In 1882 
and 1888. While yet on the bench he was 
nominated in 1894 for gdternor. His term 
in that office expired on Jan. 1, 1899. 

ADDISON C. HARRIS. 
Addison O. Harris of Indiana, minister to 
Austria-Hungary, was bom in Wayne county, 
Indiana, in 1840, and graduated at But- 
ler college In that state about 1864. He 
studied law, and was admitted to the bar. 
In 1876 he was elected to the state senate, 
of which body he was a member for four 
years, in w^ich he devoted his energies 
to securing reform in the state statutes. 
Since 1886 be has been prominent in state 
politics, and In 1896 was candidate for the 
United States senate, but was unsuccessful. 

ARTHUR S. HARDY. 
Arthur S. Hardy, minister to Greece, was 
born in Boston Aug. 13, 1847, and gra^luated 
at the West Point Milftary academy. He 
served as second lieutenant in the 3d artil- 
lery, but soon resigned and spent some 
time In foreign travel and study. Upon his 
return to this country he was appointed 
professor of civil engineering in Iowa col- 
lege. Later he became one of the editors 
of the Cosmopolitan Magazine in New 
York, and in 1888 became professor of 
mathematics in Dartmouth college, where 
he remained until 1893. In 1897 he was ap- 
pointed minister and consul-general to 
Teheran, Persia, which position he held 
until April, 1899, when he was transferred 
to Athens. Mr. Hardy is the author of 
several books, among which are "But Yet 



126 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



a Woman," "The Wind of Destiny," "Ele- 
ments of Quarternlons," "New Methods in 
Surveying" and some others. 

WILLIAM B. MERRIAM. 

William Rush Merriam. director of the 
twelfth census, was born at Wadbam's 
Mills, Bssex county. New York, in July, 
1849. In 1861 his parents removed to St. 
Paul, Minn., and that city has been his 
home ever since.- At 12 years of age he 
began bis school life at Racine. Wis., and 
was graduated from Racine college in 1871. 
He then entered the First national bank 
of St. Paul as a clerk, and thoroughly mas- 
tered the business of banking. In 1873 he 
was elected the first cashier of the Mer- 
chant's national bank of St. Paul, which 
was organised at that time. In 1880 he was 
elected vice-president, and in 1882 president 
of that institution and occupied the latter 
place at the date of his appointment. In 
1882 he was elected to represent his ward 
in the lower bouse of the state legislature, 
was re-elected in 1886, and was speaker of 
that body during the following session. 
Two years later he received the republican 
nomination ior governor of the state, and 
was elected by a large majority. In 1890 
he was elected for a second term. The rec- 
ord of his life is that of a successful busi- 
ness man. He has occupied places of honor 
in almost every capacity in regard to 
schools and charitable institutions, giving 
liberally to local charities. He is a mem- 
ber of the University club of New York 
and the Metropolitan club of Washington. 



FREDERICK H. WINES. 

Dr. Wines, assistant superintendent of 
the census, was born in Philadelphia in 
1838, and is the son of the Rev. Dr. E. C. 
Wines, the well-known clergyman, teacher, 
author and philanthropist. Mr. Wines was 
graduated in 1867 from Washington (now 
Washington and Jefferson) college, in 
western Pennsylvania, in which his father 
was a professor. He was educated for the 
ministry at Princeton, N. J. During the 
war he served as chaplain in the regular 
army, and was stationed on the frontier 
In southwest Missouri, where he had the 
opportunity to participate in only one en- 
gagement, but was mentioned by name in 
the official dispatches for distinguished 
courage and gallantry on the field. 

At the close of the war he was called to 
the pastorate of the First Presbyterian 
church of Springfield, 111. He sustained this 
relation for four years, at the expiration of 
which he was appointed secretary of the 
newly created board of state commissioners 
of public charities, a position which he has 
occupied, except for a single brief interval, 
during thirty years. During the period he 
has filled the positions of secretary of the 
National Prison association, president of 
the national conference of charities and 
correction and expert special agent of the 
tenth census in 1880 for the collection and 
establishment of statistics relating to de- 
fective, dependent and delinquent classes, 
and of the eleventh census in 1890 for the 
collection of statistics relating to crime, 
pauperism and benevolency. The statistical 
atlas of the United States, first published 
in 1870, was his conception, ana he fur- 



nished some of the statistical 
published in that work. 



diagrams 



HERBERT PUTNAM. 
Mr. Putnam, the new librarian of con- 
gress, was born in New York in 1861. He 
is the youngest son of the late George P. 
Putnam, the weU-known publisher and 
founder of the house of G. P. Putnam's 
Sons. He was educated in the public and 
private schools of New York, was graduated 
from Harvard in 1883, and studied at the 
Columbia Law school. In 1884 Mr. Putnam 
went to Minneapolis and was admitted to 
the Minnesota bar. Early in his residence 
in that city he became librarian of the 
Minneapolis Athenaeum, a proprietary 
library. Later through his efforts the 
Minneapolis public library was founded and 
the Atheneeum was merged with it. From 
its organization the Jlinneapolis publio 
library has been one of the most progress- 
ive In the country. Its building is also one 
of the best equipped in the United States. 
Mr. Putnam resigned as librarian at MInne- 
apolls in December, 1891, and went to Bos- 
ton to practice law. He was about to trans- 
fer his activities Ito that profession to Min- 
neapolis, when he was chosen librarian of 
the Boston puldic library. Four years' ex- 
perience in administration of the largest 
city library and the foremost library In 
the country in the point of efficiency 
made him the most available man for 
librarian of congress. In point of breadth 
and completeness of its collections, no less 
than in its strength as an educational in- 
stitution, the Boston public library at pres- 
ent much excels the national library, Mr. 
Putnam was president of the American Li- 
brary associfttlon in 1898, and was the can- 
didate of that body for the post of libhtrian 
of congress. 

JAMES P. TALIAFERRO. 
Mr. Taliaferro, United States senator 
from Florida, was born at Orange, Va., 
Sept. 30, 1847, and went to Florida in 1868 
He has always been a democrat, and was 
once chairman of the state committee. He 
is president of the First national Lank of 
Tampa, vice-president of the C. B. Rf^cers 
company of Jacksonville, and is a membtf 
of the st&te board of health. He was 
elected to the senate to succeed Samsel 
Pasco, and his term will expire March 4, 
1905. 

ALBERT J. BEVERIDGE.. 
Albert J. Beverldge, United Slates sen- 
ator from Indiana, was born in 186$ on a 
farm on the borders of Highland county, 
Ohio. His father and all his brothers were 
away at the war, and at the close of that 
struggle Beverldge's father lost ~ all hte 
property, and the family moved to Illinois. 
From the age of 12 Albert's life was one of 
hardship. When 12 he was a plowboy, at 14 
he was working as a day laoorer on rail- 
road work; at 15 he became a logger and 
teamster, and by reason of a natural com- 
mand of men was placed in charge of tf 
logging camp. He went through the hi) 
school by wortcing at nights and In- tL, 
morning and borrowed $50 to go to coll^^ 
on. He got through his first year of 
working as steward of a club, and b^ 



MEN OF THE YEAR 



127 



the end of tbe year be had taken prizes 
in philosophy, science and oratory snmcient 
to pay two years' expenses. He was com- 
pelled to begin college late each y .^ar and 
quit early in order to go to work. Tbe 
strain proved too much for him, and to 
recover bis health Mr. Beyerldge went west 
and for some time lived with tbe cowboys. 
He then went to Indianapolis, where be 
read law in the office of Senator McDonald. 
After bis admission to tbe bar tbe cases 
which came to him were of great impor- 
tance, and his first pleading before a court 
was in tbe Supreme court. His career as a 
political speaker commenced in tbe Blaine 
campaign, and he has since stumped Indi- 
ana in every campaign. In 1895 he was in- 
vited by the Union League club of Chicago 
to respond to tbe toast of honor at its 
Waahihgton's birthday banquet, and this 
address was so well received that be was 
requested to close tbe republican national 
campaign at tbe Auditorium in Gbicago. 
Since- then Mr. Beveridge has delivered ad- 
dresses in many of tbe large cities of tbe 
country. He has never sought political of- 
fice, and, with tbe exception of the time 
q^nt in giving these addresses, has de- 
voted hiQiself to his law practice. He was 
elected tp succeed David Turpie, and his 
term- of office will expire March 4, 1905. 

WILLIAM A. GLARE. 
W. A. Clark, United States senator from 
Montana, was bom Jan. S, 1839, near Con- 
nellsvflle, Fayette countv. Pennsylvania. 
Be is the son of John and Mary (Andrews) 
ClarM, both natives of that county. Tbe 
father of John Clark, whose name was also 
John, was a liative of County Tyrone, Ire- 
land, who emigrated to this country and 
I settled in Pennsylvania soon after tbe rev- 
^plntionary war. Mr. Clark's father was 
« farmer, and his boyhood days were spent 
on the homestead, where be enjoyed tbe 
advantages of three months' winter school 
and nine months of such farm work as the 
boy could turn bis band to. At tbe age of 
14 he entered Laurel Hill academy, and ac- 
quired a good English education. In 1856 
his father moved to Iowa, and there Wil- 
liam assisted tbe first year in improving 
and tilling tbe new prairie farm, teaching 
a term of school the succeeding winter. 
He then attended an academy at Mount 
Pleasant, becoming a disciple of Black- 
ttone. Here he prosecuted bis legal studies 
for two Tears, but did not afterward en- 
gage in the profession. In 1859-60 he taught 
school in Missouri and in 1862 be crossed the 
great plains, driving a team to tbe South 
park, Colorado, and that winter worked In 
the quartz mines in Central City, gaining 
knowledge and experience that afterward 
served him to good purpose. In 1863 tbe 
news of the gold discoveries at Bannack, 
Mont., reached Colorado, and Mr. Clark 
was among the first to start for this new 
El Dorado. After sixty-five days' travel 
with an ox team, he arrived at Bannack 
iost in time to Join a stampede to Horse 
Prairie. Here he secured a claim, which he 
worked during this and the following sea- 
son, cleaning up a net $1,500 tbe first sum- 
>r, which formed tbe basis of bis future 
ef»eratlons in Montana and the beginning of 
tne immense fortune he has since accumu- 
lated. To the time of his election to tbe 
•eniate he was engaged in mining, banking 



and merchandising, in which be carried on 
tbe most extensive and important opera- 
tions in the state, and has accumulated a 
princely fortune. He was chosen senator 
to succeed Lee Mantle, and his term of of- 
fice will expire March 4, 1906. 

MONROE L. HAXWARD. 
Mr. Hayward, United States senator from 
Nebraska, was born in Essex county. New 
York, Dec. 22, 1840. He enlisted in com- 
pany I, 22d New York infantry, at tbe out- 
break of tbe war, and was transferred to 
the 6th cavalry later and mustered out of 
the service in 1862. He graduated at Fort 
Edward Collegiate institute, New York, and 
removed to Whitewater, Wis., with his 
father in 1865, where be studied law and 
was admitted to the bar. He came to Ne- 
braska in 1866, and located at Nebr«iska 
City, where be has since resided. He is a 
wealthy man and has many line farms well 
stocked with finely bred cattle. He has de- 
voted bis attention mostly to law and spec- 
ulations, and has given comparatively lit- 
tle attention to politics. In 1886 he was ap- 
pointed district Judge to fill an unexpired 
term, and that is tne only siate cfflce he 
has ever held. In 1898 Judge Hayward was 
the republican party's candidate for gcv- 
empr. He was defeated by less than 3,000 
majority. It was the sympathy be clcimed 
as the defeated standard-bearer of tbe 
party that gained him the Strength he 
early demonstrated in the contest, ^.his is 
tbe first office to which Judge M. L. Hay- 
ward was ever elected in tbe state or else- 
where, with the exception of being a dele- 
gate to tbe state constitutional conventiob 
in 1875. He was elected to succeed Wil- 
liam V. Allen, and bis term will expire 
March 4, 1905. 

JOHN KEAN. 
John Kean, United States senator from 
New Jersey, was born at Ursino, Union 
county, N. J., Dec. 4, 1852. He studied at 
Yale college, and afterward was graduated 
from tbe Columbia College Law school, and 
read law in the office of Chetwood & Magie. 
Mr. Kean was admitted to the bar, but 
law practice was distasteful to him and 
he embarked in tbe banking and manufac- 
turing business. In which be has displayed 
marked ability. He is president of the Na- 
tional state bank of Elizabeth and is its 
largest stockholder. He is one of the di- 
rectors of tbe Elizabethport Banking com- 
pany, president and controlling spirit of tbe 
Elizabethtown, Water company and the 
Ellzabetbtown Gaslight company, and holds 
tbe principal interest in the Elizabeth 
Street Railway company. He is also inter- 
ested in a number of other enterprises in 
Elizabeth, and is vice-president of the Man- 
hattan Trust company of New York city. 
He has been actively Identified with pol- 
itics for many y«ars. In 1882 be ran for 
congress against Miles Ross, whom he de- 
feated by 2,295 plurality. In 1884 be ran 
again, against Robert S. Green, who after- 
ward became governor of New Jersey, and 
was beaten by 1,848 plurality. He ran a 
third time in 1886 asrainst William Mc- 
Mabon and won by 637 plurality. In 1892 
Mr. Kean was tbe republican candidate for 
governor against George T. Werts, who de- 
feated him by 7,625 votes. In January, 



128 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



1899, be was elected to the United States 
senate to succeed James Smith, Jr. His 
term of office will expire March 4, 1906. 



CHAUNCEY M. DBPEW. 
Mr. Depew, United States senator froio 
New York, was born In PeeksklU, N. Y., 
April 23, 1834, and at the age of 32 was 
graduated at Yale. Returning to his native 
village, he studied law in the office of Wil- 
liam Nelson, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1858. During that year he served as 
delegate to the republican state conTi?'Qt1oD, 
beginning the practice of law in i^^r.^. 
In 1861 ne was elected to the ati^<mbi^^ 
from the 3d Westchester county dls^irkt. 
Re-elected in 1862, he was made ^pEukt^r 
pro tem.; two years later he was elec'tifd 
secretary of state by a majority of 3i>,ULKf. 
The post of United States minlf*trr t^ 
Japan was tendered to him by FrtuMeiit 
Jonnson, but the superior attract laua of 
an Important business connection led I] Em 
to the decision to retire from politltul Ufe. 
In 1866 he was appointed attorney tor the 
New York & Harlem Railroad compaoy; in 
1869 he came to hold the same remtlna to 
the New York Central & Hudson Rlvrr 
Railroad company. In 1875 he becasie g^D- 
eral counsel for the entire Vandeibilt bjsi- 
tem of railroads and a director in each of 
the lines comprised in that sysletu. Iti 
1874 he was chosen regent of the state uuU 
versity and a member of the bulldiDf^ cutn- 
mission connected with tbe state rapLtoL, 
In 1882, when William H. Vanderbl3t re- 
tired from the presidency of the Ntw York 
Central, Mr. Depew became second vlcf;- 

S resident, and t^iree years later the pref^I- 
ency was conferred upon him. This posi- 
tion he retained until, at the time of Cor- 
nelius Vanderbilt's withdrawal from the 
chairmanship of the entire Vanderbllt sys- 
tem of railroads, he succeeded to this post 
At the national republican convention of 
1888 Mr. Depew was a candidate for the 
presidential nomination, but withdrew his 
name when the Blaine vote went to Ben- 
jamin Harrison. For seven years he was 
? resident of the Union League club of New 
ork city, and on retiring was elected an 
honorary life member. The Yale Alumni 
association chose him as its president for 
ten successive years. At the time of his 
election to the senate he was president of 
the Republican club, regent of the univer- 
sity of the state of New York and member 
of tbe St. Nicholas, Holland and Huguenot 
societies and the New York chamber of 
commerce. His term of office will expire 
March 4, 1905. 



PORTER J. M'CUMBER. 

P. J. McCumber, United States senator 
from North Dakota, was born in Chicago, 
111., Id 1866. His parents moved in that 
year to Rochester, Minn., where he resided 
nntU be went to North Dakota, when a 
young man of 23 years. Ue is a lawyer, and 
was educated in the public schools of Minne- 
sota and the law department of Ann Arbor, 
from which he was graduated in 1880. He 
commenced practicing his profession in 1881 
at Wahpeton, where he Is still located. 
He has been a member of tbe legislature, 
either in the house or senate, for two 
terms, and has always been a leader on the 



floor, standing generally with the reform 
element and for better laws. 

CHARLES A. CULBERSON. 
Charles A. Culberson, United States sen- 
ator from Texas, was bom at Dadeville, 
Ala., June 10, 1856. He is a son of the 
Hon. David B. Culberson, former mem- 
ber of congress from the 4th Texas district. 
He has b^n remarkably successful in polit- 
ical life, having served the state for four 
years as attorney-general and four as gov- 
ernor. Just prior to his election as senator. 

ITis Jj;ij^ Nl.H uiwh.O TiuJii Al;jL.!ituEt tu trll- 
iiioie^ lex., ill Ijji'j, wiierv yinujjjs CiiIt^raoD 
attt'iiUt^ (he put>llc ai'Luol:) und a high 
tichoul conduotpd by Prof. Looncy+ After 
Hiudylne II few years in his f4t berg's law 
Lrlllee. be graduiitef) at tbe law H^hwl of 
rbe CTiilvergUy of TlrgJpiA. Id his pto- 
TonBloEjal rareef b^ whq dlatluguUbed ou ac- 
luLiDt of hlrt aeffiise of tbe prisoner in the 
L^iifQiid murder ense. In wbltb be cou- 
vIiH-ed Jtid^^L' Woods of tbe fedprnl court 
ihiiL tbe kokiux Jaw v^'a^ uneuiiiiEita' 
Moufll aud the ,onit withaut jurJstiJetlon. 
He wflg <?lppred i.'uuntj attornfty of Marlon 
eounty, dt^rliued a Dcaiu I nation fof thi? ipg- 
i»1aturf?, ntjil, nnovlue' Id Dallas, formed a 
law partuersblp wltb Judgff Bch>kbotit, 
whieb cubnri-tian was lY'iiKJitiPd till IR^, 
when he was DDUihiated without oppoi3ltl(>n 
for mttomefir^tienil, by thp domocritlc state 
eouTemloii. HiB dutli^B a* attomey-peneral 
werft dlsehDrs:^ ^vkb msrki^d snr^eaiin and 
as governor be Euln^d ruirJoiial dMindtlon 
on aeoDunt of bts vEporaus aetlou 'u prowtrt- 
ly assfLTDblfiig th'- lepisljitui-ii? ai>d prevent- 
JuK the Corbet fh'JT:^s)nsTJhi[]H prt^c b^bt 
tiiklRfr plaoe in Tt'jiiid. £il^ tc+ruj ot i^ce 
as governor of Texas expired in Jami«ry, 
1899, and he was elected to the United 
States senate to succeed Roger Q. IQlls. 
His term of service will expire March i, 
1905. - 

JONATHAN ROSS. 
Jonathan Ross, appointed to succeed Mr. 
Morrill as senator from Vermont, was born 
in Waterford April 80, 1826. He rtad law 
in the office of William Hebard, ar.d lo- 
cated in St. Johnsbury in 1866, where be 
still resides; is a graduate of Dartmouth 
college; was a member of the Vermont 
house In 1866, 1866 and 1867 and a senator 
from the countv of Caledonia in 1870; was 
a member of the state board of education 
from 1866 to 1870; was one of the council 
of censors in 1869; was elected an assistant 
Judge of the Supreme court in 1870, re- 
ceiving successive elections since; was ap- 
pointed second assistant Judge by Oov. 
Famham in 1882, vice Timothy P. Redileld, 
promoted, and was elected chief Judge in 
1890. 

ADDISON G. FOSTER. 
Addison G. Foster, United States senator 
from Washington, was bom Jan. 28, 18S7, at 
Belchertown, Mass., and is a descendant of 
Reginald Foster, who landed at Ipswich, 
Mass., in 1638. His father, Samuel Poster, 
was a thrifty village merchant. When 13 
years of age Mr. Foster accompanied his 

Earents to Sheboygan Falls, wis., where 
is father in 1860 secured land and began 
to clear it for a farm. That was wl£pie 
Mr. Foster got his first experience in log' 



MEN OF THE YEAR 1899. 



129 



elDg, Afterward he niid bis hrotb^^r HlAr((>il 
for Pike*s peiik, but tb^y turned back nuii 
he taugbt ecbool ta M labour I and iftorwurti 
returned liome aod went to Wii^tnahti, ^[luu. 
He beld tbp at&cvs of connly aurTeyor aod 
county a ml It Dr. Afterward lie Wft8 eii^agh^d 
in forwarding and coniiiitsslon business In 
Lake City aod Bed Witif, U\un. In 1^77 lie 
formed a parlaernyp with Col. 0, W. 
Qrlggrs Id til e fuel nnd oontr acting bitsliiofl^, 
wblcD partnersbliJ baft oontlnuetJ tn thid 
day. In iS7& tbt^y fnriDpd tte Beay^^r Drtm 
Lumbal- ctitnpaay atid \a 1SS4 Jurorporati'd 
the Lehieb Coal and iron eompany. lie H 
BtlU A leading ofDi^er Jo tboae eampauli'D 
and ylef^-preetldent of tbe St. Fa til and 
Tftcoma. Lumber compFiny^ orpranlzed 1q Ib^H, 
since wblcb time be hits made blft hnme In 
Tacomaf Wash. He was elected to flu<TL'<?iJ 
John L, Wilson, and hJs term ^111 eipJre 
M&rch 4, I90G. 

NATHAN B. SCOTT. 

NitbAtk Bay Scott, United Statea senator 
from West Virginia, wb.r born itt Guernaey 
coHBty, Ohio, in 1^-12. He enUared in the 
anlDU army and t^an [nuatL'ted out in 1S6&, 
and settled Id WbPeUnR sbortly aftt/rwanl 
and went to work as an employe of ibe 
Oentml Gla^e {company. In a BoaTt time be 
wad employed aiA maniiger QQd rooh iitt^f- 
ward waa aeleeted president of tbo com- 
paoy, which ptialtioa he filled for vpare. Ho 
serr^d two years nn (i resident t>r ibe BeL'Dud 
braccb of tb^^ cJtj eouneU of Wh^eHni^. He 
waa elected in 1SS3 as a metnber of the 
•tate senate, and again In 1IIB<!p, serving eight 
▼e&rs. Id tbe la^t race bp dpfcaleil John (K 
Pendleton in a strongly democratic dl^trk-r, 
Mr. Pendleton being afteri^'fiird eli?cti?d to 
congrefls^ Wbilp n inenitter nt tbe aennfe be 
had passed tbe n]utuiil eu^Idgu bn'ik Inw t>f 
the fltflte. Fat flve years be waa West Vir- 
ginia's CBPiDber of the repnbUcari nnrloral 
committee, and durlni^ tbe entire time whb 
a memhcr of tbo eifciiUve committee, Dwr- 
Inj? the cnoipalgn of IS^fi he was sclertcd hy 
Pj^sldent McKliihy to fierve witb Gen. 
PaVFell Clnyton and Vlce-Pn^aldent Hob art 
in tbe hpadi^uflrterB »t New Ynrk city, la 
recostuitlon of bis sc^rTicea President M'^Kln- 
ley appolntfrdi him commlaalouL^r of Internal 
reveusie. He orpanlzccl the rtr.it artvlnfg 
hnnk IH tbe state of Weat VlrgSniQ and Ls 
■inl prf?sidcnt of tbat luatltminn. Be was 
electee! to the ^nate to succeed Charles J. 
Faulkner and bii term of offlce wiU ciptre 
March 4, 190&. 

JOaEPH V. QUARLESp 
Joa«pb V. QuarlBfl. tJulted States Be nut or 
from WlBconglDt vrnv born at Ki-naHba an 
Dee. le, 1S43. His fatber'n family rnme 
or! dn ally fram New HajupHbire, and bia 
f&tuerp Joseph V. (juarlea. Sr., T^ae a native 
of tbat state. Eotb blB parenta wt*re among 
the earUefit aet tiers of KeuofiliJi. and were 
mnfrled tbete when It was bnf a mrre 
handeL Young Quarlea pafsupd bf-i pin id Eos 
id tbe public flcboolft and tbe Eilgb fecboolrt of 
Keno^ba. graduating from xh^ latter wben 
be WH9 17 yflflrs of age. Tbe follow I n^r two 
years wtre spent in tpucblng and earning 
Hioncy In other uaya for lbs eipynaes of a 
college courae^ wbleb be bad set tia boart 
«pon parsnlng. In tsrtt! h& entered tbe Uni- 
▼eraity of !C!^^::- ; ^"^ a freahniFin. He 
WAa coRfsp-'^':^' ^^'" clasamate;^. eitd 

vpg« the organlzai-luii of tbe claaa wfts 



chosen its president and class orator foi 
that year. The straggle of the goyem 
ment with the rebellion enlisted hli 
sympathies and aroused all his patriotl< 
impulses. He left his studies and enlisted 
in the 39th regiment of Wisconsin infantrj 
and was mustered into service as flral 
lieutenant of company 0. At the expira' 
tion of his seryice he returned to thi 
university and graduated with tbe class ol 
'66 with tbe degree of A. B. He thei 
entered the law department of that instl 
tution, spending a year therein. Havini 
exhausted his financial resources he re 
turned to Kenosha and continued his la^ 
studies in the office of O. S. Head, a dis- 
tinguished lawyer of those days, witt 
whom, upon his admission to the bar ic 
1868, he formed a law partnership, the firm 
being Head & Quarles. His ability and 
activity soon led to his being called outside 
to duties other than his profession. In 187( 
he was elected mayor of Kenosha, and th< 
two following years he was president of the 
Kenosha board of education. In 1879 be 
was a member of the legislative assembly, 
and in 1880 and 1881 he was the representa- 
tive of Kenosha and Walworth counties Ie 
the state senate. 

DAVID B. HENDERSON. 
David Bremner Henderson of Dubuque, 
speaker of the house of representatives, 
was born at Old Deer, Scotland, March 14, 
1840; was brought to Illinois in 1846 and to 
Iowa in 1849; was educated in common 
schools and at tbe Upper Iowa university; 
studied law with Blssel & Shlras of Du- 
buque, and was admitted to tbe bar In the 
fall of 1866; was reared on a farm until 21 
years of age; enlisted in the union army in 
September, 1861, as private in company G, 
12tli regiment Iowa infantry volunteers, 
and was elected and commissioned flrsi 
lieutenant of that company, serving witb 
It until discharged, owing to the loss of hif 
leg, Feb. 26, 1863; In May, 1863, was ap- 
pointed commissioner of the board ol 
enrollment of tbe 3d district of Iowa, serv- 
ing as such until June, 1864, when he re- 
entered the army as colonel of tbe 46tl; 
regiment Iowa Infantry volunteers, and 
served therein until the close of his tern 
of service; was collector of internal rev 
enue for the 3d district of Iowa fron: 
November, 1865, until June, 1869, when h( 
resigned and became a member of the la^ 
firm of Shlras, Van Duzee & Henderson 
was assistant United States district attor 
ney for tbe northern division of the dlstrid 
of Iowa about two years, resigning in 1871 
is now a member of the law firm of Hen 
derson. Hurd, Lenehan & Kiesel; waf 
elected to the XLVIIIth, XLIXth, Lth 
List, Llld, Lllld, LIVth, LVth and LVItl 
congresses as a republican. 

PEED PUNSTON. 
Qen. Fnnston, United States volunteers 
was born in New Carlisle, O., Nov. 9, 1865 
His family moved to Kansas in 1867, wheri 
he attended school at lola and at the stati 
university at Lawrence. In 1890 he becami 
a newspaper reporter In Kansas City, am 
the next year was attached to the Unites 
States Death Valley expedition as botanist 
In 1898 he was .sent to Alaska by the gov 
emment to explore and report upon th 
flora of the territory, and camped in th 



130 



CHICAGO DAILY NBWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Klondike Id the winter of 1893-4. Later he 
became a lecturer and railroad employe. 
In 1896 he joined the inaurgent army in 
Cuba; was twice wounded, and after 
eighteen months' service he returned to the 
United States and was made colonel of the 
20th regiment of Kansas volunteers. The 
command was sent to the Philippines and 
he took part in several battles. He was 
promoted to be brigadier-general for swim- 
ming across the Rio Grande river at Ca- 
lumpit under a heavy fire from the enemy 
and establishing a rope ferry by means of 
which the troops were enabled to cross the 
rivei.* and win an engagement. 

OOL. ALBERT D. SHAW. 
Col. Albert D. Shaw of Watertown. 
N. Y., commander-in-chief of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, was United States 
consul at Manchester from 1878 to 1886. He 
was rated during that time as one of the 
most eflScient members of the government's 
consular staff, and his reports on com- 



mercial and industrial conditions in Eng- 
land became authorities. He distinguished 
himself at the outbreak of the Spanish- 
American war by tendering President 
McKinley the services of 10,000 veterans of 
the civil war. Col. Shaw is a New Yorker 
by birth and was born in 1841. He was 20 
years old when he enlisted in the 35th New 
York volunteers for the war against the 
confederacy. He fought at Rappahannock, 
the second Bull Bun, Chantilly, South 
Mountain, Antietam and in many of the 
lesser engagements of the war. Gov. Fen- 
ton appointed him colonel of the 35th New 
York national guard. He resigned this 
office to become consul at Toronto, where 
he remained until his promotion to the 
Manchester post. In 1897 he was elected 
commander of the New York department. 
Grand Army of the Bepublic, and it was 
that department's support of him that 
elevated him to his present office. Col. 
Shaw is the author of the text-book used 
in the public schools of New York entitled 
"The Teaching of Patriotism and Civics." 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS. 



Jap. 1— New Year's day. In all the states 
except Arkansas, Kentucky, Massachusetts. 
Mississippi, New Hampshire and Rhode 
Island. 

Jan. 8— Anniversary of the battle of New Or- 
leans: In Louisiana. 

Jan. 19-Iie**s birthday: In Florida, Alabama, 
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina 
and Virginia. 

Feb. 6— Mardi-Gras, Shrove Tuesday (the day 
before Ash Wednesday, the first day of 
Lent): In Alabama and city of New 
Orleans, Louisiana. 

Feb. 12— Lincoln's birthday : In Illinois, Minne- 
sota. New Jersey, New York, Washington. 

Feb. 22— Washington's birthday: In all the 
states except Arkansas,Iowa and Mississippi. 

March 2— Anniversary of Texan independ- 
ence: In Texas. 

March 4— Firemen's anniversary: In New 
Orleans,La. 

March— Good Friday (the Friday before 
Easter) : In Alabama, Louisiana, Maryland, 
Pennsylvania and Tennessee. 

April (first Wednesday)— State election day: 
In Rhode Island. 

April 6— Confederate Memorial day: In Lou- 
isiana. 

April 19— Patriots' day : In Massachusetts. 

April 21— Anniversary of the battle of San 
Jacinto: In Texas. 

April 26— Memorial day : In Alabama, Florida 
and (Borgia. 

May 10— Memorial day : In North Carolina and 
South Carolina. 

May 20— Anniversary of the signing of the 
Mecklenburg declaration of independence: 
In North Carolina. 

Majr ;.. 'HI dsrs In Arltmia, Cali- 

f orti; t^, k •■-.-■. ■•-'.iLh Cflnnf cttcu t^ IK* la wure, 
lo^A. UiinuL^, ladtafia, Kansas, Kerilucky, 
Mo^lQQ, MutylaEKl^ MaBJ3ai:liu3«ttii, Mlcblisan, 
MlQDCSota, MK*iBpiirl, MpDtnna, Sfi^brasika, 
NoTiirta, Now Hampslilre, New JtTitf j. New 
York, StiTih iJHtcola, Olilo, Oktuhoma, 
Oreflon, PfnnpyWania. Hhodr TslAml, South 
Hf^tioMx TMi.n.^i?ofl, !Trti>i Vf^rnn^Tit Wis- 

June 3— Jefferson Davis' birthday: In Florida. 
July 4— Independence day: In all the states. 
July 24— Pioneers* day : In Utah. 
Aug. IfV— Bennington Battle day : In Vermont. 



♦Septettitier jAi^^t Mom! ay)— Labor ^Saj'r In 
Ambaitxa. ColonulP^ Conn &ctl out, }!>€lBware, 
Florida, <jeorjJFla« iduho, llltnoLa, Indiana, 
lows, Kunsfti]. Eenturkfi Mat da. MAr^lund, 
MarHfiacbiiootta, MIchii^aD, Mlnneaota, Mis- 
souri, Montaaa. N«brftBka. New Hampshire, 
Now Jersey^ New Torlc+ Ohio, Oregon, P«iin- 
njlvaiilEi, Rliodp iHlunil, Bontb Carol Jna, 
SiTuth iJukoLa, Tennessee, Texas. Utah. Vlr^ 
fJiTiLji.WiLHinriiihhJi. \Vi«f:ii]]S][i niul Wyo ming . 

Seii(. ':i .\..;;j:. . . : y: \;. '■ ./... mla. 

Oct.4— Labor day: In California. 

Oct. 15— Lincoln day : In Connecticut. 

Oct. 31— Admission in the Union day: Nevada. 

Nov. 1— All Saints' day: In Louisiana. 

November (generally the Tuesday after the 
first Monday)— General election day: In 
Arisona, Calif omla, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, 
Kansas, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri. 
Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New 
Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, 
Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, South 
Carolina, Tennessee, Texas. West Virginia, 
Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming. 

November, the last Thursday in— Thanksgiv- 
ins day: It is observed in all the states, 
although in some it is not a statutory holiday. 

Nov. 25— Labor day : In Louisiana. 

Deo. 25— Christmas day: In all states, and 
in South Carolina the two succeeding days 
in addition. 

Sundays and fast days (whenever appointed) 
are legal hoUdays in nearly all the states. 

ArN r dnj t A a loffal hollJay fn Kansas. Mftine- 
-H.Hih. North rhUsotftr WJeconsIn aorl Wwo- 
nuiiKi the (lay belns aoi by The ffovemiir— 
In >^ia<bm5kHt April 'Zi; Call forma, Sept. 9; 
ColortifJo, on the thint hYlday fu April: 
FlorlUa, Feb. 1\ Htiode laltind. first Ftfday 
in ApTlls Terns, Feb. 23; Oeorjrla, first 
Frldfly in December: Mnnt^iUH, tbird Tues- 
day la April! DtAb, first Saturdfly In April; 
aim Maho, nn VTUiar aft^p Alay 1. 

Bypry yaturtlay after V^ o'ciocli noon K alefpftl 
hollduy Jm New YotK New Jt^rsey, Pennsyl- 
TjuHn, Maryland and Virgin) &» and ttjc cfty 
< ' New Orleans. 

*Labor day was made a national holiday by 
congress. It is the only strictly national 
holiday we have, not excepting the Fourth 
of July. 



DTTEBANCKS OP STATE CONVENTIONS. 



131 



Utterances of i^tate Conbenttons. 

RBSOLUTIONS ADOPTED AT VARIOUS STATE CONVENTIONS IN 18W ON 
NATIONAL QUESTIONS. 

THE FINAKOES. 



[Where parties are omitted 
IOWA. 

KBPUBLIOAN. 

Wereadopt the following declaration from 
the Iowa republican platform of 1898: 

The monetary standard of this country 
and the commercial world is gold. The 
permanence of this standard must be as- 
sured by congressional legislation, giving to 
It the validity and vitality of public law. 
All other money must be kept at a parity 
with gold. And we urgently call upon our 
senators and representatives in congress to 
lend their best endeavors to enact these 
propositions into law. 

We denounce the Chicaeo platform and 
its declaration in favor of free trade and 
free silver coinage at the ratio of 16 to 1, 
and its attack upon the courts, as threaten- 
ing the Aiherlcan people with a departure 
from the policies of good government that 
would prove fraught with evil to the Ameri- 
can people. The enormities of that plat- 
form call for the resistance of all good 
citlsens. 

As republicans, we make recognition of 
the loyalty and exalted patriotism of the 
sound money democrats and men of all 
parties who put aside partisanship in order 
to maintain the good faith of the nation 
and in resistance to the Chicago platform 
and Its candidate. 

DSUOOSATIO. 

We, the democrats of Iowa, in convention 
assembled, unqualifledlr and unreservedly 
indorse the Chicago platform of 1896 in 
whole and In detail and declare our un- 
wavering fidelity and adherence to the 
same, and we proclaim our admiration for 
and loyalty to that peerless exponent of 
democratic principles, William J. Bryan, 
and favor his nomination in 1900. 

P]B0PLB*S PARTY. 

The people's party of the state of Iowa 
hereby reaffirm the national platform of 
the party as adopted at Omaha, A. D. 1892, 
and reaffirmed at St. Louis in 1896. 

For the purpose of meeting the obliga- 
tJons of our contracts the free and un- 
limited coinage of gold and silver at the 
ratio of 16 to 1 meets our approval, but for 
internal commerce the truly scientific money 
of the United States is a money not de- 
pendent upon intrinsic value or coin redemp- 
tion, bnt a money idsued solely by the 
government, without the intervention of 
corporations, thus nationalizing the money 
trust. Such a money should be a full legal 
tender for all debts, public and private, 
without any exception or limitation in pay- 
ment of all dues. It should be Issued in 
volume commensurate with the business 
demands of the country and increase of 
population. 

KENTUCKY. 

BEPUBLIOAN. 

We regard it as settled beyond dispute 
that the maintenance of a sound currency 



no declaration was made.] 
through republican administration and legis- 
lation is the foundation upon wliich rests 
the most remarkable period of industrial 
progress, commercial activity and general 
prosperity within the experience of the 
people of the United States. 

DBMOOBATIO (BBOULAB). 

The democrats of Kentucky, in conven- 
tion assembled, reaffirm, without the slight- 
est qualification, the principles and policies 
declared in the democratic national plat- 
form adopted at Chicago in 1896. Their 
faith in bimetallism Is vindicated by 
events. The necessity for the restoration 
of the double standard was acknowledged 
by the president and the congress in 1897 
when a commission was sent to Europe to 
entreat other nations to aid us in establish- 
ing bimetallism. The failure of this com- 
mission to secure European co-operation 
confirms the friends of free coinage in their 
belief that relief can come only by the 
independent action of the United States. 
The present legal ratio of 16 to 1 is the only 
ratio at which bimetallism can be restored, 
and opposition to it is confined to those 
who oppose bimetallism at any ratio and 
to those who ignore the reasons which led 
three national conventions to adopt it 

DBUOCBATIO (ANTI-OOBBBL). 

We indorse and reaffirm the principles of 
the democratic platform and policy as 
enunciated by It at its convention in Chi- 
cago in 1896. We recognise William Jen- 
nings Bryan as the most thoroughly 
equipped leader of the people of the United 
States in their contest against wrong and 
oppression; we regard him as a fearless 
advocate of principles which. If enacted 
as laws, will secure honest government, 
civil liberty and promote the welfare and 
happiness of the people of the United 
States. We declare that he is our choice 
for the democratic nomination for presi- 
dent in 1900. We apprehend disastrous 
consequences from the unnatural alliance 
between the nominees of the Louisville 
convention and the Louisville Courier- 
Journal and Times. These papers are 
avowed enemies of bimetallism and Bryan, 
and we regard such alliance as a serious 
menace to every principle embodied in the 
democratic platform of 1896 and the out- 
cropping of a deliberate conspiracy to 
fasten the shackles of the gold standard 
upon the people of the United States for- 
ever. 

pboplb's pabtt. 
(See declaration on trusts.) 

MARYLAND. 
BBPITBLICAN. 

We believe in the gold standard and that 
all our currency should be made by law 
redeemable in gold coin at the option of 
the holder. To this faith we confidently 
pledge the influence and votes of the Mary- 
land members in each house of congress. 



132 



CHICAGO DAILY NBWS ALMANAC FOB 1000. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

BBPDBLIOAN. 

Defects exist in our currency system 
which must be remedied. Bonds and notes 
payable in coin must be established by law 
to be payable in gold and provisions made 
for supply of gold when required. The re- 
publican party stands unreservedly pledged 
to maintain the existing gold standard, and 
we look with confidence to the LVIth con- 
gress for the enactment of measures to so 
perfect our monetary system that there 
shall be ample money for the expanding 
business of the country and to so arm and 
guard the treasury that it can at all times 
protect the national credits 

DBUOOBATIO. 

To-day, as on every proper occasion since 
the democratic national convention of 1896, 
the democrats of Massachusetts reaflSrm 
and indorse in general and in particular 
the principles of the platform adopted by 
that convention. We pronounce that polit- 
ical code one written not for a year or for 
a single campaign, but for all time, being 
made up as it is of the fundamental prin- 
ciples of democracy, upon the acceptance 
and enforcement of which alone a free gov- 
ernment of, by and for the people can be 
maintained. New conditions may and do 
compel additions to that platform, for con- 
ditions change, but the Chicago platform, 
like the declaration of independence, stands 
as a part of the fundamental code of demo- 
cratic government. 

Particularly do we reiterate our belief in 
the financial plank of the Chicago platform 
and renew our demand for the free and 
unlimited coinage of both gold and silver 
at the ratio of 16 to 1. Heavy and unex- 
pected discoveries of gold and of new 
processes for extracting that metal, to- 
gether with the other supplies, have re- 
sulted since 1896 in an increase in th« 
volume of money estimated at $441,000,000 
for the United. States alone. The imme- 
diate revival of prices and trade accom- 
Sanying this increase demonstrated the 
emocratic contention that the evils from 
which the nation suffered so gravely in the 
five years prior to 1897 proceeded from a 
contracted currency for which republican 
financial legislation had provided no form 
of relief. 

But the benefits of a rise In the price 
level under the gold standard are of neces- 
sity unequally and unjustly distributed. 
The farmers of the west and south, before 
compelled to sell their products in the 
world's markets in competition with silver- 
using countries, are condemned to low 
prices for what they sell, while the rising 
scale of prices at home, due partly to the 
increased volume of money and more to 
the intervention of the trusts, results in the 
exaction from them of higher prices for all 
they have to buy. The prosperity of New 
England rests upon the prosperity of her 
customers, and Massachusetts in pleading 
the cause of the farmers of the west and 
south advances her own industrial interests, 
and no system which decreases the income 
and increases the outgo of the farming 
community can afford a safe foundation for 
a sound commercial fabric. 

The agricultural interests of the nation 
cannot be left to the chance of failing 
crops and famine In other lands, nor can 



national prosperity be founded upon expec- 
tation of disaster to foreign peoples. 

If there should now be a sudden check in 
the production of gold such as is indeed 
threatened by the prospect of war in the 
Transvaal, or if there should be a new and 
heavy demand for that metal such as any 
European crisis would at once create, all 
the evils of a currency famine would at 
once reappear and again the nation would 
be left without a remedy. Only by the 
establishment of bimetallism can a stable 
and Just equilibrium of prices be effected. 

We denounce unqualifiedly the purpose of 
the republican party to surrender to the 
banks the governmental function of issuing 

Saper money and controlling its volume, 
uch action would create a trust in com- 
parison with which all other monopolies 
would be trivial. Already there exists 
among the banking corporations a complete 
unity of interests and a practical unity of 
action, and by a perversion or an evasioii 
of the law many national banks In th4 
money centers are consolidating, creating 
branches under other names and manifestt- 
ing a purpose to adopt that system of 
centralization and monopoly which hat. 
seized upon the commercial interests of th^ 
country. 

The power over mercantile credits whlclt 
the great banking trust, already In sight, 
possesses is in Itself a menace to com- 
mercial Interests, and to add the power 
arbitrarily to expand or contract the 
volume of money would be to deliver dver 
to the banking interests the fortunes of all 
the people. 

To-day our trust magnates are our bank- 
ers. They hold the bank stock, they sit <ui^ 
the boards of directors, they select the" 
officials and -they will apply to their com- 
mand over the supply of the nation's money 
the same merciless and extortionate meth- 
ods which they use in turning to their own 
profit their present monopolies. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

DBMOCBATIO. 

We heartily and earnestly indorse and 
reaffirm the declaration of principles pro- 
mulgated by the party In convention 
assembled at Chicago in 1896 and recognize 
in the Hon. W. J. Bryan of Nebraska the 
ablest exponent of those principles, the 
statesman and the patriot, the great 
tribune of the people. 

PBOPLB'S PABTT. 

(See plank on trusts.) ^ 

NEBBASKA. 

BBPUBLIOAN. 

We adhere unequivocally to the gold 
standard and are unalterably opposed to the 
free coinage of silver. Gold has been our 
standard since 1884 and is now the standard 
of every civilized and Important country In 
the world. After more than twenty years 
of harmful agitation and a campalrn of 
extraordinary earnestness and foil alseas- 
sion, the people of the United States by a 
majority of more than half a million decided 
In favor of that standard. Our experience 
and present prosperity In the amplest and 
fullest measure demonstrate the wisdom of 
that decision. 

DBMOOSATIO. 

We, the democrats of the state of Ne- 



UTTERANCES OF STATE CONVENTIONS. 



133 



braska, in coDyention assembled. Indorse 
and empbasize eacb and every plank of the 
national platform adopted at Chicago in 
1896. 

Our confidence in the principles set forth 
in that platform has been increased as 
those principles have been vindicated by 
events. The gold standard is less defen- 
sible now than it was in 1896, since the 
president has confessed its failure by send- 
ing a commission to Europe to secul'e 
international bimetallism, while the in- 
ability of the commission to secure foreign 
aid is added proof that the people of the 
United States must act alone if they expect 
relief. The present legal ratio of 16 to 1 
is the natural and necessary ratio and the 
opponents of that ratio have nothing to 
offer in its place but the evasive and 
ambiguous phraseology which for years 
furnished to the gold-standard advocates 
a mask behind which to hide while they 
secretly labored to make gold monometal- 
lism permanent. Any improvement in busi- 
ness conditions due to the increased pro- 
duction of gold or to a favorable balance 
of trade ipstead of supporting the gold- 
standard doctrine shows that more money 
makes better times and points the way to 
bimetallism as the means of securing a 
permanent increase in the volume of stand- 
ard money tbroughout the world. 

The republican scheme to lessen the vol- 
ome of standard money by making gold the 
only legal-tender money has at last become 
apparent to all and must be resisted by the 
debt-paying and wealth-producing classes of 
the country. The plan to retire the green- 
backs in the interest of national bank 
notes, denounced by the democrats in 1896, 
bnt then defended by the republicans, has 
boldly stalked forth from its hiding place 
and threatens the formation of a gigantic 
paper-money trust. 

FBOPLX'S PABTT. 

We affirm our devotion to the national 
platform of 1896 and to every plank therein 
contained. (This platform advocated the 
free coinage of silver at the ratio of 16 
to 1.) 

OHIO. 

BIPX7BLICAN. 

The republican party of Ohio reaffirms 
the principles declared by the St. Louis 
platform. 

We earnestly indorse the great adminis- 
tration of WUUam McKinlev. It is dis- 
tlngnliihed to a remarkable degree in the 
history of national administrations. Under 
the last democratic administration a'nd as a 
result of th» democratic principles and 
pcdlcy our industries were destroyed, capital 
and labor were unemployed, the poor suf- 
fered as never before in our history, agricul- 
tural products could not be sold because 
consumers could not earn money with which 
to buy, and every branch of trade felt the 
Mightlng influence of the democratic tarlil- 
JefOrm hard times; the treasury of the 
United States was depleted and the gold 
reserve disappeared. The government bor- 
rowed money to pay current expenses, in- 
creasing the public debt in time of peace 
by hundreds of millions of dollars. The 
democratic party proposed to the people as 
a remedy tor. aU these democratic ills a 



depreciated and dishonest currency which 
inteasifled every evil. 

During all that period of depression and 
distress the republican party stood fast for 
the principles and policies under which 
American industries had been built up and 
had flourished beyond example— the prin- 
ciples and policies under which the people 
had prospered and the nation had grown 
great for a generation— stood fast for a 
sound and honest currency, and in 1896 
elected to the presidency William McKin- 
ley, the best exponent of republicanism and 
true American ideas and policies, the friend 
of every American Industry and the wise 
and patriotic defender and advocate of 
honest money. Under his splendid repub- 
lican administration public credit has been 
restored, the prosperity of the people has 
developed, our commerce has grown great, 
our trade, domestic and foreign, has in- 
creased to a degree never before known and 
the people are looking with confidence for 
greater things to come. 

DBM0CB1.TIC. 

We heartily reaffirm the entire Chicago 
platform of 1896 and we especially empha- 
size the financial plank therein, and we 
continue to demand the free and unlimited 
coinage of silver and gold as equal in 
primary money at the ratio of 16 to 1, 
independent of all other nations In the 
world. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

BBPUBLIOAN. 

We reaffirm the principles of our party 
declared in the national platform by the 
St. Louis convention. The republican party 
of Pennsylvania stands unequivocally and 
unreservedly for sound money, and favors 
a currency with which to pay the wages 
of labor and the earnings of capital, the 
soldier and pensioner, as good as gold the 
world over. To further these ends we be- 
lieve in maintaining the existing gold 
standard, and are unalterably opposed to 
the free coinage of silver at the ratio of 
16 to 1. 

DBMOCBATIO. 

The democracy of Pennsylvania In con- 
vention assembled, again renewing our 
pledges of fideUty and devotion to the 
sacred rights of the people; true to the 
faith and principles of our party as de- 
clared in the platforms of our several 
national conventions, and proud of our 
matchless leader, William Jennings Bryan, 
realize that the issues involved in the 
coming campaigrn in Pennsylvania are 
honest government, clean politics and the 
redemption of our state from republican 
misrule and corruption. 

PBOPLB'S PABTT. 

We, populists of Pennsylvania, assembled 
in state convention this 7th day of Septem- 
ber, 1899, affirming our unshaken belief in 
the basic tenets of the people's party as 
expounded in the Omaha, St. Louis and 
Cincinnati platforms, and pledging our- 
selves anew to continued advocacy of those 
grand principles of human liberty until 
right shall triumph over might, love over 
greed, do proclaim: 

That there are two great domestic ques- 
tion$ before the American people, first, the 



134 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



money question, and, second, the railroad 

Question, which inyolves the trust question. 
Lud these questions we would solve by 
the Issue of paper money irredeemable in 
coin and by the nationalization of the rail- 
roads. • • • We know that the demo- 
cratic and republican parties do not advo- 
cate these measures. We know that they 
stand in the way of solving these questions 
and we cannot prostitute our principles by 
supporting the candidates of either of such 

Sarties. The populist does not want a gold 
ollar nor a silver dollar, but a paper dollar 
that will be an honest dollar, something 
that gold and silver dollars, the volume of 
which cannot be regulated at will by the 
government and in response to the demands 
of trade, cannot be; and he does not want 
the railroads to continue to be operated by 
corporations as preferential carriers but by 
the government as common carriers; and 
seeking to secure these things, and unable 
to secure them by voting for democrats or 
republicans who are opposed to these 
things, who are obedient to those who profit 
unfairly from things as they are, he must 
support his own candidates. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

BSPUBLICAN. 

The unexampled abundance of money in 
all parts of the country is a complete 
refutation of the contention that an easy 
financial condition can be secured only by 



debasing tbe monetary standard, and 
demonstrates that the wealth of a nation 
is not increased by diminishing the value 
of the unit of Its expression. The right- 
eousness and the wisdom of the mainte- 
nance of the sold standard have been again 
conclusively shown in the result of the last 
congressional election and to that standard 
we reaflSrm our adherence. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

BBPXTBLICAN. 

We, the republicans of South Dakota, in 
convention assembled, unhesitatingly re- 
affirm our allegiance to and accept the 
principles of the republican party as 
declared by the republican platform adopted 
at St. Louis. 

FUSION. 

The union reform forces of South Dakota 
in convention assembled reaffirm in detail 
the platform of the allied reform forces 
adopted at Chicago and St. Louis in 1896 
and we view with pride the steadfast 
adherence to principle which has constantly 
marked the career of our matchless leader, 
William J. Bryan, whose nomination we 
favor as the presidential candidate of the 
people in 1900. 

we demand of our national lawmakers 
the enactment of a law compelling the 
redemption and destruction of all national 
bank notes, and that their place be supplied 
by government legal tender notes. 



TBT78T8. 



IOWA. 

BBPUBLIOAir. 

To maintain the welfare of the people is 
the object and end of all government. In- 
dustry and commerce should be left free to 
pursue their method according to the 
natural laws of the world, but when the 
business aggregations known as trusts prove 
hurtful to the people they must be re- 
strained by adequate law and if need be 
abolished. 

DSMOCBATIC. 

We view with alarm the multiplication 
of those combinations of capital commonly 
known as trusts that are concentrating 
— ^ .,_,__ t^^^^p^^^ irrnBhlDg out 

■rss uf Hmlli.nl mf^nns, 

tunlMt^Ei fsjr labor, artlQclKlly ItmltlE^ pro- 
AurtJon Eip{} rnlBllnji^ prIcpH apd crFiRtlnjE; an 
1d(] 11!^ 1 1*1 nl con ill r 1 n . dl Cf^ r e lU f mm & « t site 
of HOflali^m only In the rpnpert tlist UDfler 
Eiocliilhth Tn'Tirflta of priMlitrfiOD wnuld be 
for alt, whtle uoder thi* truwt ^vT^h^m mey 
go to Inrrefliie tiie fortune nf tnoBCt trusts 
HQd CdtublnitUotiH ttat are tbe direct r,nt- 
grtjwtd of thf} pnJIry nf 1"Tif^ repn^H'an 

fmrty, wbtcL Las uol only lu.o^t^vl vii«^se 
nstitutions, but has accepted their support 
and solicited their contributions to aid that 
party in retaining power, which has placed 
the burden of taxation upon those who 
labor and produce in time of peace and who 
fight our battles in time of war, while the 
wealth of the country is exempted from 
these burdens. We condemn this policy and 
it is our solemn conviction that the trusts 
must be destroyed or they will destroy free 
government, and we demand that they be 
suppressed by the repeal of the protective 



tariff and other privileges conferred by 
legislation responsible for them by the 
enactment of such legislation, state and 
national, as will aid in their destruction. 

PB0PIJg*8 PABTT. 

The rapid concentration of private Indus 
tries into consolidated organizations, com- 
monly called trusts, which is now awaken- 
ing and alarming the American people, is 
the result of economic law and the develop- 
ment of the age and cannot be remedied 
by restriction or penal anti-trust legislation 
or outlawed In tne courts, but such evils 
can be remedied only by the ownership of 
natural and economic monopolies by the 
whole people in their collective capacity as 
nation, state and municipality, in order 
that there may be equality of all men in 
the gifts of Ood to the common life, equal- 
ity of economic opportunity and political 
power, equality in access to all the national 
and social resources needful for the living 
of free, righteous, happy and complete 
lives. We charge the republican and demo- 
cratic parties that while recognizing the 
disease they have utterly faled to discover 
or prelscribe the true remedy. 

KENTUCKY. 

BEPUBLIOAN. 

We pledge the republican party of Ken- 
tucky to the enactment of all such laws as 
may be necessary to prevent trusts, pools, 
combinations or other oivanlzations from 
combining to depreciate below its real value 
any article, or to enhance the cost of any 
article, or to reduce the proper emoluments 
of labor. 

We congratulate the republican party 
that existing federal legislation for the 



UTTERANCES OP STATE CONVENTIONS. 



135 



sappression of harmful trusts, pools and 
combinations is the work of a republican 
congress, performed during the administra- 
tion of a republican president, and we 
congratulate the country that in the sup- 

Sression of Injurious combinations repub- 
can legislation has had in the past, as it 
will have in the future, due regard for 
the interests of legitimate business, the 
purposes of such legislation being the 
remedy for wrong, and not embarrassment 
to industry, enterprise or thrift. 

DEMOCBATIG (BBGULAB). 

We believe the trust is the result of the 
policies pursued by the republican party, 
chief among which are the demonetization 
of silver and the passage and enforcement 
of protective tariff laws, such as the Mc- 
Kinley and Dingley bills, by all which 
there is made a distinct discrimination In 
favor of corporate wealth. The re-estab- 
llshment of independent bimetallism at the 
ratio of 16 to 1 and the repeal of all pro- 
tective tariff laws would. In the opinion 
of the democracy of Kentucky, seriously 
cripple If not wholly destroy the organiza- 
tion and operation of all trusts. 

DBMOCBATIO (AITCI-OOBBBL). 

We condemn the president of the United 
States for using the power of his great 
office to advance the Interest of trusts— 
the recognized enemies and oppressors of 
the American people— and we demand the 
enactment of a law that will protect the 
rights of all from their aggressions. 

PEOPLB'S PABTT. 

We are opposed to trusts and combina- 
tions of capital whereby the fruits of 
labor are boldly stolen to build up colossal 
fortunes for the few; but we do not con-* 
slder it possible to regulate or abolish 
them by state restrictive legislation. 
Trusts are founded upon the monopolies of 
pubUc utilities and the only solution of 
the trust problem is through the public 
ownership and operation of Buch public 
utilities. As long as private corporations 
own and operate the means of transporta- 
tion and control the money of the country, 
trusts will continue to multiply and thrive 
until they destroy liberty and fastenupon 
the people an industrial despotism. There- 
fore we urge as a means of destroying 
trusts and preventing monopoly: 

1. The Issuance and the control of all the 
money of the country, gold, silver and 
paper, by the government, and that the 
volume of money shall at all times be 
kept sufficient to maintain the stability of 
prices, the restoration of silver coinage at 
the ratio of 16 to 1 with gold, and the 
Issuance of a full legal tender paper 

2. The public ownership and operation of 
railroads, street railways, telephones, elec- 
tric lights, water works and other public 
utilities. 

MARYLAND. 

BBPUBLICAN. 

Legitimate business interests, f airly cao- 
italized and honestly managed, have built 
up our industiies at home, giving employ- 
ment to labor as never before, and have 
enabled us to successfully compete with 
foreign countries In the markets of the 
^orld. Such industries must not be struck 



down by legislation aimed at the dishon- 
estly organued trust, which stifles com- 
petition and oppresses labor. We are 
opposed to legislation merely for popular 
effect and in reckless disregard of business 
revival after prolonged depression. We 
strongly favor laws to successfully suppress 
trusts and all combinations which create 
monopoly. 

DBMOOBATIO. 

We view with alarm the mnlttpllcation 
over the land of such gigantic industrial 
and commercial trusts, the outgrowth of 
republican legislation, as stifle competition, 
threaten popular government, increase the 
cost of living and curtail the individual 
rights of the people, and we favor vigorous 
measures by the states and by congress to 
repress this great and growing evil. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

BXPUBLICfN. 

The republican party of Massachusetts is 
unqualifiedly opposed to trusts and monop- 
oly and the capitalization of fictitious and 
speculative valuations, and reiterates its 
declaration in the platform of 1894 against 
stock-watering in all forms, and points to 
the existing legislation and especially to 
the anti-stock watering laws of that year, 
passed by a republican legislature and 
signed by a republican governor, as proof 
of its progress, sincerity, wisdom and 
courage upon this issue. 

It believes that similar laws enacted by 
all the states in connection with the federaJ 
trust law already passed by a republican 
congress would put an end to the danger 
from the growth of great combinations and 
trusts. 

DBMOCBATIO. 

The monopolistic corporations or con- 
solidations of corporations known com- 
monly as trusts are wholly evil, pernicious 
and contrary to public policy. They despoil 
with one hand the producer and with the 
other the consumer. They have closed the 
avenues of employment to hundreds of 
thousands of men, including all classes, 
from the day laborer to the successful 
salesman. By their methods of coercion 
and intimidation, reinforced as they are 
by the iK)rrupt favor of railroad corpora- 
tions, they drive out of business and into 
penury or a position of dependence indi- 
viduals engaged in productive or distribut- 
ing business. The plea of these defenders 
of trusts that by the volume of their busi- 
ness and by their vpry control of their field 
they are able to introduce economies which 
cheapen the price of the product to the 
consumer is disingenuous, deceptive and 
unworthy of consideration. 

The purpose of monopoly is extortion, and 
neither an individual nor a corporation can 
be trusted with the power which monopoly 
confers. We hold that the mere success of 
the democratic party In state and nation, 
coupled with its known and vigorously 
expressed hostility to trusts In all their 
forms, will begin the disintegration of these 
oppressive corporations. 

But we pledge ourselves, furthermore, to 
give due trial to such remedies as may 
hasten this process— for example, the com- 
pulsory system of publicity for all trust 
records and accounts; a federal law pro- 



186 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



blbltlng a monopoly from making more 
divergent prices for its products in differ- 
ent parts of the country tnan are warranted 
by differing freight rates, thns preventing 
underselling in one state to drive out com- 
petition at the expense of the consumer 
in other states where the monopoly is com- 

{»lete; and a more rigid enforcement of the 
aw against railroad discriminations pend- 
ing the actual government ownership and 
operation of all railroads, which this con- 
vention demands and which will, when 
accomplished, be the most effective barrier 
to the formation of any new trusts. 

And, finally, we demand that all special 
privileges conferred by law, whether of 
taxation, incorporation or operation, that 
shall be determined to contribute to 
monopoly, be abrogated and annulled. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

DKMOOBATIC. 

We enter our solemn protest against the 
encroachment upon governmental affairs by 
aggregated capital in the form of trusts 
and combines as being inimical to the best 
interests of the people and the cause of 
free and untrammeled government; and ex- 
press ourselves as unalterably determined 
to aid by all possible and proper means in 
the control or destruction if necessary of 
those enemies of good government. 

PBOPLB'S PABTT. 

We are opposed to trusts and combina- 
tions of capital whereby the fruits of labor 
are boldly stolen to build up colossal for- 
tunes for the few; but we do not consider 
it possible to regulate or abolish them by 
state restrictive legislation. Trusts are 
founded upon the monopoly of public 
utilities and the only solution of the trust 
problem is through the public ownership 
and operation of such public utilities. As 
long as private coroorations own and 
operate the means of transportation and 
control the money of the country, trusts 
will continue to multiply and thrive until 
they destroy liberty and fasten upon the 
people an industrial despotism; therefore 
we urge as the means of destroying trusts 
and preventing monopoly the issuance and 
control of all the money of the country, 
gold, silver and paper, by the government, 
and that the volume of money shall at all 
times be kept sufficient to maintain the 
stability of prices; the restoration of silver 
coinage at the ratio of 16 to 1 with gold 
and the issuance of a full legal tender 
paper money; the public ownership and 
operation of railroads, street railways, 
telegraph, telephones, electric lights, water 
works and other public utilities. 

' NEBRASKA. 
BBPUBLIOAN. 

The republican party now, as always, 
opposes trusts and combinations having for 
tneir purpose the stifling of competition 
and arbitrarily controlling production or 
flxing prices; but we also recognize that 
legitimate business interests, fairly capital- 
ized and honestly managed, have built up 
our industries at home, given the largest 
employment to labor, at the highest 'wages, 
and have enabled us to successfully com- 
pete with foreign countries In the markets 
of the world. Such industries must not be 



struck down by legislation aimed at dis- 
honestly organised institutions which de- 
stroy legitimate enterprise and the oppor- 
tunities of labor and plunder the public. 

We favor the creation by act of congress 
of a bureau of supervision and control of 
corporations engaged in interstate business 
witn power similar to those exercised over 
national banks by the comptroller of the 
currency, enforcing such publicity and reg- 
ulation as shall effectually prevent dis- 
honest methods and practices; and generally 
such legislation, state and national, as 
from time to time may He required for the 
correction of abuses. 

DXMOCBATIC. 

The industrial trusts springing up on every 
hand testify to the administration's indif- 
ference to monopoly or to its inability to 
cope with it. 

We denonnce the failnre of the adminis- 
tration to enforce the present law against 
trusts or to recommend new laws U the 
present law is deemed insufficient. 

We are opposed to the principle of 
monopoly wherever it manifests itself. We 
demand the enforcement of the present 
federal law, the enactment of such new 
legislation as mav be necessary and a con- 
stitutional amendment, if the present con- 
stitution is construed to protect trusts, to 
the end that the monopolization of industry 
by private corporations may be absolutely 
prevented. Every trust rests upon a cor- 
poration and every corporation is a creature 
of laws, and the laws, state and national, 
must place upon the corporations such 
limitations and restrictions as will protect 
the public from Injury. 

PBOPLB'S PABTT. 

We condemn the republican national 
administration for its complicity with un- 
lawful combinations, which have Increased 
nearly 100 per cent within the last three 
years as a result of its failure to enact 
and enforce laws in the interests of the 
people. 

In dealing with trusts and corporations 
having a monopoly of public necessaries we 
claim that the law of the land requires 
that they shall serve the public for reason- 
able compensation and in the absence of 
any legislation upon the question of what 
is reasonable the Judiciary may determine 
the question. The trust danger of this 
country Is so appalling that the evils 
thereof must be combated by every branch 
of the government. We demand judges who 
wHI obey the law that vests the Judiciary 
with Jurisdiction to protect the people 
from unreasonable and oppressive prices for 
the necessities of life. 

OHIO. 

BBPUBLIOAN. 

We commend the action of the LXXIIId 
general assembly of Ohio In passing the 
stringent law now on our statute nooks 
prohibitlne the organization of "trusts,*^ 
and we denounce such unlawful combina< 
tions as inimical to the Interests of the 
people. We congratulate the people of the 
state upon the fact that a republican 
legislature enacted this law and we demand 
its rigid enforcement. We pledge our 
party to such further legislation as experi- 
ence may determine necessary to prevent 



UTTERANCES OF STATE CONVENTIONS. 



187 



the formation and operation of sucli iniq- 
oitotts and dangerous combinations. 

DBMOOBATIG. 

We declare that all gnlawful combina- 
tions of capital are the 1t!|,'llLiiiute fruits of 
a gold standard and osLut {^oiiiipt re[3ub- 
llcan legislation on qis>^8tioiig oC thi^ tariff, 
and we demand that an uriicieH tiie ptues 
of which are controlhrf hj thi? truata be 
placed on the free li&i:. We denouuc^ the 
attorney-general of Uie [JulEt^d Stair^s, 
appointed from the st:if.t? of New ,?i't>=oy» 
the hotbed of tmsts, for hiti m^usal to 
enforce the statutes of the United States 
against them, and we commend the present 
attorney-general of Ohio for his earnest 
efPorts to enforce the statutes of Ohio 
against such illegal combinations, and 
pledge the nominee of this conyention for 
attorney-general to the enforcement of the 
statutes of the state against them. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 
DBMOOBATIG. 

We are opposed to all combinations of 
capital calculated to produce monopoly or 
restrain trade as being inconsistent with 
the spirit of free Institutions; and if their 
establishment cannot be constitutionally 
prevented we hold that they should be so 
regulated and limited by proper legislation 
that individual effort and opportunity shall 
not be impaired. 

PEOPLE'S PABTT. 

We declare that where trusts and monop- 
olies are not the artificial creation of trans- 
portation and other discriminations, and 
can, therefore, be destroyed by the re- 
moval of such discriminations— but are 
the growth of natural conditions— they 
must continue to be monopolies because of 
the very nature of their being, as railroads, 
tteam and street; telegraph and telephone 



lines, water and gas and electric lighting 
plants, necessarily enjoying special rigbts; 
that the government, the state, the munic- 
ipality, must be the monopolist in order 
that the people may be protected in their 
rights, where monopoly cannot be de- 
stroyed, or where, being of natural growtb^ 
it is not to the interest of the people to 
destroy it, the government must be the 
monopolist. Private monopoly must be a 
bane; government monopolization of natural 
monopolies must be a blessing. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

BXPUBLICAN. 

We favor the enactment of such laws as 
will carry out the provisions of the state 
constitution relating to trusts and unlaw- 
ful combinations, and we pledge our party 
to such legislation as will fully control 
trusts, monopolies and combinations organ- 
ized and created in restraint of trade, for 
the purpose of. limiting the output of prod- 
ucts or increasing the price thereof, and 
such legislation as may be necessary to 
prevent the formation and operation of 
such dangerous combinations. 

FUSION. 

We denounce as a menace to the well- 
being of our country the formation of the 
vast aggregation of Industrial trusts for 
the control of the price and the limit of the 
production of almost every article of 
necessity; that these trusts are being con- 
summated under the present national 
administration and under the very shelter 
and protection of our laws and aided by 
the secret encouragement of high repub- 
lican oflQclals, and are an evidence of the 
domination of aggregated wealth over the 
republican party and of the utter Indiffer- 
ence of the present administration to this 
great menace, and testify to that party's 
sympathy or inability to cope with 
monopoly. 



FOREIGN POLICT. 



IOWA. 

BBPUBLIOAN. 



We approve the administration of William 
McKinley. He came to the presidency 
with every American Industry prostrated 
In city and on farm throughout the land 
and with the American people pervaded 
with discontent; while the evil shadow of 
the despotism of Spain rested upon neigh- 
boring lands. To-day the borders of the 
republic have enlarged the area of freedom 
in two oceans and the prosperity of the 
American people is beyond that of any 
time in our history. William McKinley 
takes rank with the greatest of presidents. 

DBMOCBATIC. 

We rejoice in the exalted sentiment and 
motive that prompted the government of 
the United States to take up arms in 
defense of the bitterly oppressed people 
of Cuba, in the successful termination of 
the war with Spain and In the patriotism 
and unsurpassed bravery displayed by our 
soldiers and sailors on land and sea. The 
war for the liberation of the tyranny- 
cursed island was worthy the greatest re- 
Snbllc and the best civilization that has 
ourisbed in the tides of time, but for 
the same reason that we glory In the suc- 
eessfol war against Spain we deprecate and 



condemn the war against the Filipinos. 
One war was for the emancipation of the 
people, the other for the subjugation of the 
people; and if the war against Spain was 
right— and it was— that against the natives 
of the Philippines, who have committed no 
offense save to love liberty and to be will- 
ing to fight and to die for it, is wrong. 
The attempt, unauthorized by congress, to 
conquer the natives of the oriental islands 
is a repudiation of the American doctrine 
of consent affirmed in the declaration of 
independence and in conflict with the prin- 
ciples which fieorge Washington and his 
fellow patriots of the revolution made 
sacrifices to establish. We also condemn 
the war against the Filipinos, believing it 
to have been inspired by Great Britain for 
the purpose of producing conditions that 
will force an Anglo- American alliance; and 
we not only protest against the war and 
demand Its termination, by extension to 
the Filipinos of the same assurance given 
to the Cubans, but we record our deep- 
seated antagonism to an alliance with 
Qreat Britain or any other European power, 
and express our detestation of the attempts 
made in British Interests to disrupt the 
friendly relations which have uniformly 
obtained between the United States and 
Germany. 



138 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS AI^MANAC FOR 1900. 



We oppose the conquest of the Philip- 

{ tines because Imjperialism means milltar- 
sm, because militarism means government 
by force and because goyemment by force 
means the death of government by con- 
sent, the destruction of political and indus- 
trial freedom and the obliteration of equal- 
ity of rights and assassination of demo- 
cratic institutions. 

PBOPLB'S PABTT. 

We charge the republican and democratic 
parties that while recognizing the disease, 
they have utterly failed to discover or pre- 
scribe the true remedy. The declaration of 
congress, "that the people of Cuba are and 



of right ought to be free and independent, 

should apply with equal force and effect 

to the Filipino and his native land,, and 



the same rights and liberties so guar- 
anteed to one by the United States should 
also immediately be guaranteed the other 
and tendered to both. 

KENTUCKY. 

BBPTJBLICAN. 

We declare our confidence in the policies 
adopted and the measures taken by the 
president to restore order and to establish 
progressive governments in Cuba, Puerto 
Rico and the Philippines, and we pledge 
him our continuous support until these 
objects are fully attained. 

DBMOCBATIC (BBOULAB). 

We Indorse the war carried to success 
for the freedom of the enslaved Cubans. 
We honor and applaud the courage and 
heroism of our soldiens and sailors therein 
engaged. But we declare the conduct of 
the present administration regarding th^ 
Philippines to be repugnant to the bill of 
rights, the constitution and declaration of 

independence. 

MARYLAND. 
bbpublican. 

While we deplore the insurrection in the 
Philippine islands, wherein by cession from 
Spain we acquired the right of sovereignty, 
duty demands that we retain and pacify 
them and safeguard the interests of com- 
merce until the problem of their final dis- 
position be solved in such manner that the 
glory of our fiag be not sullied nor the 
liberty It stands for restrained. We repose 
our trust for such a solution of the problem 
in our wise and patriotic president and the 
republican majority in congress. 

DBMOOBATIO. 

We declare our unalterable opposition to 
the creation and maintenance of a large 
standing army in time of peace and we 
insist upon the supremacy of the civil over 
the military authority and we demand the 
strictest economy in the collection and dis- 
bursement of the public revenues. 

We believe in the time-honored doctrine 
so earnestly impressed upon us by the 
"fathers of the republic" of peace, com- 
merce and honest friendship with all 
nations, entangling alliances with none. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

BBPUBLICAN. 

The recent war with Spain, which was 
necessitated by humanity, hag been over- 
whelmingly vindicated by the results so 
speedily and splendidly attained. We com- 
mend the tact, the patience, the skill and 
the statesmanlike spirit with which the 
president has approached the perplexing 
problems arising from the war. 



Under the treaty with Spain the law of 
nations put upon the United States the 
responsibility for the peace and security 
of life and property, the well-being and 
the future government of the Philippine 
islands. Accepting this responsibility ft is 
our profound trust that the present hos- 
tilities can be brought to an early termina- 
tion, and that congress, guided by a wise 
and patriotic administration, will establish 
and maintain in those islands, hitherto the 
home of tyrants, a government as free, as 
liberal and as progressive as our own, in 
accordance with the sacred principles of 
liberty and self-government upon which the 
•American republic so securely rests. 

DBMOOBATIO. 

To the war with Spain— a war rightly 
waged in the cause of humanity and which 
was forced upon an unwilling republican 
administration by the insistence of demo- 
crats in house and senate — there has suc- 
ceeded a war of criminal aggression in the 
Philippines. 

We hold that this war is wanton and 
needless, for had the same promise of 
freedom been made to the people of those 
islands that the democrats secured for the 
people of Cuba no revolt against the 
American authorities would have occurred. 
It is in violation of the principles of 
American constitutional liberty, not only 
because it is prosecuted by the adminis- 
tration without the congressional action 
which the constitution prescribes, but 
because it is a denial of that right of 
self which, from the day our fore- 
fathers faced the British at Concord bridge, 
has been a cardinal precept of American 
political philosophy, until now William 
McKInley, with the applause and overt 
sympathy of the British government, has 
discarded it; it is a wasteful war in all its 
material aspects, since by the incompetence 
and confusion which have attended its 
prosecution It has cost the nation heavily 
in blood and treasure, the very fiower of 
our youth being sent to death under an 
Incompetent general, while the notorious 
and scandalous misappropriation of moneys 
has resulted in an enormous deficit in the 
federal treasury, despite the collection of 
burdensome and iU-aaJusted war taxes. 

We demand that to the Filipinos, as to 
the Cubans, shall be said to-day that they 
are and of right ought to be free and 
independent, and we hold that such a 
declaration, coupled with the expression of 
the purpose of the United States to pro- 
tect the islands from the assaults of any 
foreign power, would speedily restore order, 
purge our national honor of the stain put 
upon it by injustice and bad faith and 
advance American trade in the far east by 
giving our merchants a market among peo- 
ple grateful for the gift of independence. 

The extension of American trade in all 
directions is an end to be sought by all 
patriotic Americans, and we demand that 
the settlement of the Filipino problem 
shall be attended by every possible ex- 
pedient for fostering and extending the 
commerce of the United States with, the 
islands and for preventing their acquisition 
by any foreign nation. 

The evils which result from the prosecn- 
tion of this Philippine war are not confined 
to nor are they greatest In the island of 
Luzon. They react upon our own people 



UTTERANCES OP STATE CONVENTIONS. 



139 



and particularly upon the working classes. 
Back of the gaudy trappings of imperialism 
lurks tlie less spectacular but more terrify- 
ing form of militarism. Against a great 
standing army the democracy, botfi of 
state and nation, has resolutely set its 
face, but in the reiterated demands for 
more and more troops to subdue the 
Tagalos may be detected the purpose to 
have ultimately more soldiers to employ 
at home. Already all free peoples of the 
world gaze in amazement at the facility 
with which monopolistic corporations in 
the United States are able to secure the aid 
of armed forces, both state and federal, to 
oTerawe their workingmen in time of labor 

dissensions. 

NEBRASKA. 

RBPUBLIOAN. 

While we deplore the insurrection in the 
Philippine islands yet we recognize the 
duties and obligations imposed upon our 
nati(Hi b7 the victoiT of our navy and 
the matchless valor of our arms, resulting 
in the treatv of Paris, which imposed 
npon the president the duty of maintaining 
the authority of the United States over 
the territory acquired thereby; and so long 
as there is one gun pointed at an American 
seedier, Sb long as there is an armed enemy 
assaulting our flag, so long must patriotic 
and loyal Americans uphold our president 
In affording protection, tranquillity and 
peace to all who recognize our lawful 
occupation. 

SBMOCRATIO 

We believe that the Filipinos should have 
received the same treatment as the Cubans 
and that as the Cubans were assured of 
ultimate Independence and protection so the 
Filipinos should have been assured in the 
beguining of our nation's intention to give 
them independence as soon as stable gov- 
ernment could be established and protec- 
tloo from outside interference. Such assur- 
ance should be given now. If the Cubans, 
as stated In the resolution of intervention, 
are and of right ought to be free, the same 
can be said of the Filipinos and this nation 
would suffer no humiliation in acknowledg- 
ing adherence to the doctrine that govern- 
ments derive their Just powers from the 
consent of the governed. 

We are opposed to militarism and con- 
gratulate the democrats, populists and sil- 
v^ republicans in the United States senate 
upon their successful resistance of the at- 
tempt of the administration to raise the 
standing army to 100,000. 

We are opposed to entangling alliance 
with England or any other European nation, 
and contend for an American civilization 
which will recognize the rights of man 
and by a noble example teach the world 
the blessings of self-government. 

PBOPLE'S PARTY. 

We condemn the administrative policy 
which has converted a war for humanity 
into a war of conquest. We believe that 
the Filipinos should have received the 
same treatment as the Cubans and that as 
the Cubans were assured of ultimate inde- 
pendence and protection so the Filipinos 
should have been assured in the beginning 
of our nation's intention to give them inde- 
pendence as soon as a stable government 
could be established and protectl6n from 
oatslde interference. Such assurance should 
be given now. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

REPUBLICAN. 

The magnificent achievements of our army 
and navy in the war with Spain for the 
liberation of the downtrodden and oppressed 
people of Cuba from the domination of 
Gastilian despotism, accomplished under 
the master guidance of a republican admin- 
istration, are necessarily subjects for high- 
est encomium by a convention of repub- 
licans. To the same master guidance, 
controlled by the great principles that have 
shaped the high destiny of the republican 
party, from Lincoln to McKlnley, the peo- 
ple can safely commit the solution of the 
momentous problems of the future of Cuba, 
Puerto Rico and the Philippine islands. 
Their wise solution will vastly Increase our 
foreign trade, spread American civilization 
abroad and add to the honor and power 
and glory of this great nation. To give 
continued employment to the industry, in- 
genuity and skill of the American mechanic 
and laborer, we must find new markets 
abroad for our surplus products. The com- 
mercial control of additional territory will 
afford new mai^ets, which will necessarily 
increase our commerce and develop our 
manufacturing interests. We have' ceased 
to be content with supplying products for 
home consumption alone. We must keep 
pace with other nations in seeking new 
fields for. our commerce, and to this end 
we support the policy of industrial, com- 
mercial and national expansion. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

We are radically and unalterably opposed 
to imperialism in the United States of 
America. When we have solved some of 
the race problems that confront us at home 
then by example we can proclaim the 
blessings that flow from free institutions 
and thus procure "benevolent assimilation 
without criminal aggression." 

We are opposed to entangling alliances 
with foreign kingdoms and empires. 

We commend the action of congress In 
declaring that our war with Spain was for 
humanity and not for conquest. 

We proudly recognize the valor and glo- 
rious achievements of our gallant soldiers 
and sailors from Bunker Hill to this very 
hour as being among the most thrilling and 
glorious in the history of the world, but we 
profoundly regret that American soldiers 
are being unlawfully used in the name of 
liberty to crush and destroy dawning repub- 
licanism in the orient, and we denounce 
the secret and vicious alliance now in evi- 
dence between England and the republican 
administration, whereby this nation may 
become involved in war with foreign 
nations. 

We demand that the Cubans and Fili- 
pinos not only be permitted but encouraged 
to establish independent republics, deriving 
all of their governmental powers from the 
consent of the governed. 

people's party. 

As American citizens honoring the 
memories of our forefathers who dared 
flght for liberty, and cherishing the rules of 
eternal rectitude they handed down to us, 
we are shamed and humiliated by the war 
of "criminal aggression" being carried on 
in the Philippines, where we are doing 
under the folds of our flag, that stands for 
so much, much the same thing that we 
righteously chastised Spain for doing in 



140 



CHICAGO DAILY NBWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Cuba— putting forth our efforts to crush a 
people whose only crime is proclaiming ths 
truth that governments are constituted fot 
the benefit of the governed, that all Just 
government must rest on the consent of 
the governed, and who have the courage to 
defend these truths, against overwhelming 
odds, with their lives. We protest against 
this staining of our flag, consecrated to 
the cause of liberty, not of oppression: the 
cause of self-government, not of subjuga- 
tion; emblem that we would have stand 
for right, not might; love, not greed; and to 
the president we say: Gease to make war 
upon the Filipinos, accord to them the 
right of all men born in the image of their 
Creator, the right to be free and govern 
themselves, extend to them henceforth the 
hand of protection, withdraw the hand of 
chastisement, bring home the troops that 
are engaged in the un-American work of 
crushing a people struggling to be free. 

To an alliance with Great Britain, whose 
ideals, though unfortunately shared by our 
president, are not ours, we are strenuously 
opposed, as we are to entangling alliances 
with any foreign nation. The Monroe doc- 
trine we would emphasize and extend so 
as to embrace the Thilippines. saying to 
monarchical Europe: Hands off the repub- 
lics of America and the Philippines; they 
are under our protection. We cannot look 
unconcernedly upon any attack on their 
institutions, any interference with their 
working out their destiny as • republics, 
and we in our turn will in the future as 
in the past scrupulously avoid Interference 
in European affairs. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

BBPITBLICAN. 

Never in history were niore splendid 
achievements won and grander opportuni- 
ties opened at so little cost of life and 
treasure as in the war with Spain. Amer- 
ica has suddenly become one of the 
dominant powers of the earth. Henceforth 
her voice must be heard in the council of 
the nations. The new situation Imposes 
upon us new and greater responsibilities. 
Although these have come unsought, they 
will be met squarely by the republican 
party, which has never evaded responsibil- 
ity. We have confidence in the loyalty of 
the people, confidence In the great party 
that has so long shaped the destinies of 
the republic, confidence that this same 
party will solve successfully the new prob- 
lems presented, confidence that the prin- 
ciples of American liberty and humanity 
will ever follow the flag. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 
BBPTTBLICAN. 

We indorse the present republican admin- 



istration and earnestly commend the wi&e, 
able and patriotic statesmanship of Fresl 
dent McKinley, displayed in the conduct of 
the war with Spain and the insurrection in 
the Philippines, and pledge our hearty 
support of the administration in all meas- 
ures looking to the honorable and speedy 
termination of hostilities by the completa 
subjugation of the enemies of our country 
and the vindication of our flag. 

We heartily commend our soldiers In the 
Phillppinefl for their bravery, and point 
with pride to their patriotic valor in de- 
fense of our country and flag, and depre- 
cate the attempts of certain disloyal, un- 
American enemies of our country to cast 
odium upon our brave bovs by attempting 
to stir up dissension in tneir ranks and to 
embarrass the administration in its efforts 
to suppress the insurrection now existing in 
the Philippines. 

FUSION. 

We denounce the war being waged 
against the Filipinos as a repudiation of 
the declaration of Independence, an aban- 
donment of the Monroe doctrine, an assault 
upon liberty everywhere, which ties the 
hands of the great republic and estops ns 
from Justly protesting against monarchical 
aggression in South Africa or elsewhere. 
It is a revolution backward from the his- 
tory and traditions of our government and 
will establish in this country an imperial 
despotism, masquerading under the forms 
of democracy. The censorship of the press 
in Manila and its suppression in Havana 
are bu't forerunners of an abuse which will 
be attempted here by the same power. 
Such a policy, subordinating the civil to 
the military, may Inflict upon us the hor- 
rors of Russian militarism, a perpetual 
debt and increasing taxes, while it can 
compensate no one but syndicates of capital 
which will exploit the islands under, the 
protection of American arms. We npnold 
the flag of our country in its purity, a flag 
consecrated to the cause of human freedom 
and baptized in the blood of freedom's 
martyrs, and we exhort the people to rescue 
the emblem of ov liberties from those who 
have erected it over political despotism, 
militarism, chattel slavery and polygamy. 
We oppose an alliance with England or any 
other foreign power, and we demand of the 
national administration that it give polit- 
ical independence to Cuba and that the 
Filipinos be assured that they will be 
assisted to erect a republic of their own 
to be governed by themselves. 

We extend an earnest Invitation to 
organized labor to Join with us in an 
organized effort to defeat this republican 
policy of expansion or imperialism that 
means simply a large standing army to 
intimidate organized labor and higher 
taxes that labor always pays. 



RIVERS AND CANALS. 



Lengths of the navigable rivers and canals of the most important countries of thf world. 

Rivers. Canals. Total. * RiytrsJ\i*ut}£. "mpl. 

Miles. MUes. Miles. Ooimtrits. MUes. Mih^f. Miia. 

Belgium 668 JW 1,146 

Portugal 432 .... 431 

Sweden and Norway .... 423 92 S15 

The Netherlands 313 866 1,168 

Canada 2,695 492 S.08T 

Brazil 20,483 .... 20,4SS 

China 3,404 4,882 8.S3t 

India 2.892 2,061 4.46S 



Cowntries. 

United States 15,502 3,064 18,566 

Germany 14,499 1,214 15,713 

France 4,968 2,897 7,866 

Great Britain and Ireland. 1,642 2,875 4,517 

Russia 19,274 805 20,079 

Austria-Hungary 2,691 882 3,073 

Italy 1,752 294 2,046 

Spain 760 248 998 



AMERICAN COLONIES AND PROTECTORATES. 



American (SDolonies anti protectorates. 



HAWAIL 



The commission appointed by the presi- 
dent to recommend to congress sueb legls- 
lAtion as might be regarded necessary for 
the government of Hawaii (see Daily News 
Almanac fw 1899, page 148) presented their 
report to congress Dec. 6, 1898. This report 
was accompanied by three bills for the gov- 
ernment of the islands, which embodied the 
<M>ncln8ion8 reached by the commission. 
The result was that several bills were pre- 
sented to both houses, all of which fol- 
lowed mainly the suggestions given by the 
commlBsion in its report. Botn the senate 
and house blUs provided for a delegate to 
represent Hawaii in the congress of the 
United States, a provision which raised 
strenaous opposition to the measures which 
was confined to neither party. The oppo- 
8iti<m to the bills demanded that any en- 
actment for the government of Hawaii 
should contain a clause declaring that noth- 
ing in the measure should imply the future 
admission of Hawaii as a state of the 
onion. The granting to the colony of repre- 
sentation like that accorded to the terri- 
tories was held to be the initial step in 
the direction of statehood. The bills were 
further opposed because they placed 
Hawaii in the same relation to the states 
of the union as the states themselves held 
to each other, which would provide for 
the admission of the products of Hawaii 
Into ports of the United States free of 
duty. While this in itself was not regarded 
as of great importance, it was held that 
snch a provision in the law would establish 
a precedent Puerto Rico, the Philippines 
and other dependencies might demand 
should be accorded them. 

Still another bill was introduced in Feb- 
mary providing that the contract-labor 
laws In force in the United States should 
apply to Hawaii and that the Chinese ex- 
clusion act should be enforced. It was ob- 
jected to this bill that its provisions were 
already in force In Hawaii, because the 
Supreme court of the country had decided 
Jan. 7, 1899, that "there shall be no further 
Immlnation of Chinese into the Hawaiian 
ManoM except upon such conditions as are 
now or may hereafter be allowed by the 



laws of the United States." Congress ad- 
journed on the 4th of March, 1899, without 
having passed any of the bills providing a 
government for Hawaii, and administration 
affairs have been continued there as they 
existed at the date of the annexation of the 
islands. That the union has proved advan- 
tageous to Hawaii is shown by an article 
from Gov. Dole, which appeared in Harp- 
er's Weekly. In it he says: 

**The immediate effect of annexation is a 
rise in the values of real estate and sugar 
stock, and a general upward tendency in 
all kinds of business. There is exeltement 
among speculators. Although these circum- 
stances tend to support the theory of the 
existence of a boom, it is probable that, 
with the limited amount of land in the 
group, the new land' values will rather 
increase than fall as time goes on, while 
values of sugar stocks will be affected fav- 
orably or otherwise mainly by the price 
of sugar and the state of the labor market, 
although it is evident that there is now a 
slight Inflation of values. Local politicians 
are considerably excited over the consum- 
mation of annexation, even to the extent of 
taking measures to influence the selection 
of local officials by the government at 
Washington. There is some discontent 
among this class with the civil-service 
status of the government of the republic 
of Hawaii, as it is and has been, on ac- 
count of tne absence of the political spoils 
system. Although annexation has inspired 
these with hopes in this direction, there 
is impatience at the slow and uncertain 
progress of events toward a permanent form 
of government on American lines. 

"Speculators are discontented with the 
Hawaiian land system, which intentionally 
excludes them from all participation in its 
benefits, and are looking hopefully to Wash* 
ington for legislation that shall open the 
public lands to their manipulation, and are 
discussing means to promote such legisla- 
tion." 

On the 1st of October, 1899, the military 
force stationed in Hawaii consisted of 466 
men. 



CUBA, 



The authority of the United States was 
cradnally extended over the island of Cuba. 
Santiago and the province of which it was 
the capital were occupied bv the Americans 
fn»n the date of the capitulation ot the 
city (July 17); Manzanillo was occupied 
Oct. 11; the evacuation of Puerto Principe 
was concluded on the 5th of December, and 
Plnar del Rio was given up at about the 
time. During the month of October 
the American commissioners (Ma j. -Gen. 
Janes F. Wade, Rear-Admlral W. T. 
and MaJ.-Gen. M. C. Butler) 
the Spanish conmiissloners that 
authority in Cuba must cease on 

1st ot December, 1898. The time was 

ifterward extended to Jan. 1, 1899. At the 
r of IS on that day the formal transfer 
sntlwrlty was made, the Spanish flag 
I lowered on the forts and public build- 




ings of Havana and the United States 
ensign was raised. It was saluted from 
both the Spanish and American batteries, 
a brief speech was made by Gen. Castel- 
lanos, surrendering Spanish authority, 
which was responded to by Gen. Brooke on 
behalf of the United States government. 
Gen. Brooke was appointed military gov- 
ernor. 

PURPOSES OF THE UNITED STATES. 
In assuming the ofiice of governor-general 
Gen. Brooke issued a proclamation in 
which he outlined the purposes of the gov* 
emment in these words: **The object of 
the i^resent government is to give protec- 
tion to the people and security to person 
and property, to restore confidence, to en- 
couri^e the people to resume the pursuits 
of peace, to build up waste plantations, to 



142 



— — — — ^ 
CHIOAQO DAILY NEWS ALBfANAO FOB 1900. 



resume commercial traffic and to afford foil 
protection in the exercise of all civil and 
religious rights." 

PAYMENT OP CUBAN TROOPS. 

A very perplexing question confronted the 
government even before the transfer of 
Cuba to our sovereignty, and tliat was. 
What disposition should be made of the 
insurgent army? To complicate this ques- 
tion the Cubans themselves were not agreed 
as to the proper course to be followed. 
Early in November, 1898, a convention, 
composed of delegates from each division 
of the Cuban army, had been held at Santa 
Crux, of which Campato was the president. 
It soon developed that there were two 
factlons>-the extremists, under the lead of 
Gen. Oomeis, who were opposed to the 
island being governed by the United States 
troops, and the conservatives, of whom 
Gen. Garcia was the leader, who favored 
disbandment of Cuban troops upon some 
terms that would be acceptable to both 
the United States government and the 
Cubans. As a result of this convention 
Gen. Garcia was appointed chairman of a 
commission which should visit Washington 
and arrange some basis with the presi- 
dent upon which the army could be dis- 
banded. The commission reached Wash- 
ington, but the death of Gen Garcia, Dec. 
11, 1898. was a serious impediment to the 
negotiations which had already been begun. 
A portion only of the Cuban army had been 
disbanded, owing to the impossibility of 
obtaining money for paying the soldiers 
the arrears due them, and they had re- 
mained as garrisons in towns evacuated by 
the Spanish troops. Both the government 
and toe Cuban officers recognized the wis- 
dom of paying these soldiers, whose homes 
had been destroyed, and in this way fur- 
nishing them the means that would enable 
them to return to the peaceful pursuits of 
life. 

THE 13,000,000 AGREEMENT. 

An agreement was concluded in Washing- 
ton between the president and the Cuban 
commission under which the government 
advanced the sum of $3,000,000 to be dis- 
tributed among the Cuban troops upon the 
surrender by them of their arms. This 
sum was regarded bv the Cuban radicals 
as far too small, they demanding some- 
thing like 167,000,000, upon the claim that, 
the insurgent army consisted of 40,000 men, 
most of whom were entitled to three years^ 
pay. The date set for beginning the service 
pay of the Cuban troops was Feb. 24, 1895. 
Gen. Gomez' demand was for compensation 
at the rate of 111,000 a year for himself; 
for the major-generals, some twenty in 
number, $7,600 a year each; for the briga- 
dier-generals, about 200 in number, $5,500 
a year each, and so on down to the privates, 
who were to receive pay at the rate of $648 
annually each. Gen. Gomez was finally in- 
duced to sign an acceptance of the sum of 
$3,000,000 in lieu of his demands. This 
agreement was substantially as follows: 

"1. The Cuban officers in each province 
shall assist the American officers in dis- 
tributing the funds. 

**2. That these officers shall at once meet 
at some convenient point and decide how, 
when and where the payments are to be 
made, and arrange any other details. 

*'8. That the sum paid to each man shall 
not be regarded as part payment of salary 



or wages due for service rendered, but to 
facilitate the disbandment of the army, as 
a relief of suffering and as an aid in get- 
ting the people to work. 

**4. The Cubans shall surrendw their arms 
to the Cuban assembly or to Its representa- 
tives. 

**6. The committee on distribution sliaU 
use its best endeavors to distribute it among 
the population so that all may secure work. 

"6. That the $3,000,000 shall be placed sub- 
ject to the order of Gen. Brooke, and that 
action in the matter shall be immediate.*' 

CRITICISM OF GEN. GOMEZ. 

This act of Gen. Gomez did not please the 
radicals of the Cuban army, and at a meet- 
ing held early in March he was deposed 
from the chief command by a vote of 26 to 
4. Gen. Gomez at once issued an address 
to the Cuban people in which he said, 
among other things: 

"Foreigner as I am, I did not come to 
serve this country by helping it to defend 
its Just cause as a mercenary soldier; and. 
consequently, since the oppressive power of 
Spain had withdrawn from tills land and 
left Cuba in freedom, I had sheathed my 
sword, thinking I had finished the mission 
which I had voluntarily imposed upon my- 
self. I am owed nothing. I retired con- 
tented and satisfied at having done all I 
could for the benefit of my brothers. Wher- 
ever destiny rules that I make my home, 
there can the Cubans depend upon a 
friend." 

This address nroduced a profound impres- 
sion upon the Cuban people. On the 4th of 
April the Cuban assembly again met, and 
upon the question. Shall this assembly 
dissolve? the vote stood 21 to 1 in favor of 
dissolution. A few days later, on the 7th, 
the generals of the Cuban army voted to 
reinstate Gomez as commsnder-in-chief of 
the army, and chose a board of three of 
their number to assist him in distributing 
the $3,000,000 and in disbanding the Insur- 
gent forces. 

PAYING THE SOLDIERS. 

Defective and fraudulent pay rolls, added 
to the temper of some of the Cuban officers, 
made the disbursement of the funds a dif- 
ficult matter, and Gen. Brooke appointed a 
commission, consisting of one American and 
one Cuban for each corps of the army, to 
distribute the money, and designated the 
places in the provinces at which the pay- 
ments should be made. The payments in 
Cuba began about May 27 and were com 
pleted Sept. 21, 1899, the total number of 
soldiers paid being 33,930. Each received 
$76. 

REFORMS INSTITUTED. 

The efforts of the government in Cuba 
have been exerted chiefly in three direc- 
tions. The first was toward the refonna- 
tion of the courts, which were so corrupt, 
venal and disgraceful under Spanish rule 
as to have utterly destroyed tneir useful- 
ness or value as mediums for the dispensing 
of Justice among the people. During the 
year they iMive neen remodeled and have' 
gained the respect and confidence of the 
citizens of the island. 

The second reform included a change In 
the educational system of the Island. The 
absence of competent teachers who'nnder- 
stood Danish, the paucity of text-books 
and the Inability of the people to oompre- 



AMERICAN COLONIES AND PB0T£:GT0BAT£». 



143 



bend the adyantages to be derived from a 
system of common schools like that of the 
United States have made progress com- 
paratively slow, notwithstanding the fact 
that a good deal has been done. A large 
number of native Cubans have been placed 
in schools and colleges of this country who 
will, upon their return, take up the educa- 
tional work as it has been begun. The fact 
that the people are poor, as the result of 
their long rebellion, has been a serious 
obstacle in the path of public education. 

The third reform has been the improve- 
ment of the sanitary conditions of the 
cities. Thi9 work was inaugurated by Gen. 
Wood immediately upon the surrender of 
Santiago, which had the reputation of being 
the filthiest and most unhealthful city in 

FUEETO 

The American cotumiflBlonera to adha^t 
the evacuation of Puerto Rloo (MaJ.-GL^ti. 
J. R. Brooke, Rear- Admiral W. 8. Srhipy 
and Brig. -Gen. W. W. Gordon i gsive notice 
to the commission Jippointefl by Spain fyr 
a similar purpose thm tht Jslnni must be 
evacuated by the ?ipiinlah forccjs on op 
before Oct. 18, 18S?*. Tiio work w&a com- 
pleted at the app(»ititt^d time, and at tb^ 
noon hour of that \intv: ibf^ United States 
flag was raised on-r all tbe public build- 
ings and forts at San Juan, the bauds 
playing American a Ira and the people cbeflr- 
ing the proceedinffR with the greatest 
enthusiasm. MaJ.-ueti. Brooke vrafi mn^e 
military-governor of tbe lelasd, Gan. Grant 
was placed in com eu and of tbe dlE«trlct of 
San Juan, and Gm. Henry Id that of 
Ponce. By the 23d of October the last of 
the Spanish troops liEtcJ embarkeri for Spjjln, 

An Insular govemtj^iit was at once com- 
pleted, Munoz, Blaucur La pes and Carlioii- 
nel of the Spanisb Inenlur eahini't taking 
the oath of allegiarce to tbe U tilted Statea. 
They were retalood In tbelr respective 
ofBcIal positions by tieu. Brnok^. 

The people of tbe If^land did not take 
kindly to a military rnlp, and df^manderl 
the establishment of a territorial forra of 
government similar to that of Arijiann and 
New Mexico. Until, bowpver, con^rreis 
should provide for do^b a chunge in the 
administration of alTaira Id tbe Inland It 
was not possible to comply with tbe wlnhes 
of the people as pjsrpressed In a publtct 
meeting held at Srd Juan Oet. 30, m?^. 
Dr. H. K. Carroll waa sent by the preel- 
dent 99 a special eonaiuleoluueJ' to tho 
island to examine ItR ^Qndltioo, the ne^rlB 
of the people and tbe fortn of pavertsment 
best suited to all fhe fa luting cnndltlnDft, 
In January, 1899, ]^faJ.-Oeti. Brooke ^-qh 
transferred to Cn>ift and Brig, -G en. Gnj 
V. Henry was apiKlntPd ^vftrnor cenernl 
of Puerto Rico. On the Mb of F^bruafT, 
1899, the heads of tbe several departments 
resigned because Gen. Henry removed from 
ofBce Senor Carbcnnei and nlaeed tvto 
Americans at the hend of dfv!*foiis of pub- 
lie works, which a<:t wns declared to be 
in violation of the policy already an- 
nounced by the go^ernor-geaeTal. On tbe 
day following the entire cabinet was dis- 
charged and the ndmlnfatratlon was car- 
rled on by four depanuiente— fltate, finance, 
Interior and Justice. In fnetltntinff tbJB 
change In the admlD 1st ration of tb^? ^0'^'- 
emment Ge5 Hec.^ ^-^'.^ iL>- ^^^:^ mi 
oatUne of his policy. He said: "The heads 



the West Indies. He at once Inaugurated 
a system of street cleaning, enforced the 
most rigid rules for the maintenance of 
public cleanliness and entirely changed the 
conditions of the municipality. Under him 
the city became both clean and healthful, 
and in these respects it will compare 
favorably with average American towns. 
What was done in Santiago was, in- a 
greater or less degree, accomplished in 
Havana and other towns in which American 
troops were placed as a garrison. The 
revenues of the island have more than 
paid for all that has been accomplished 
and Cuba has learned already many lessons 
from these reformatory measures which 
will be of inestimable value when tBe 
people assume self-government. 

RIOO. 

of the new departments will confine their 
duties to their departments and the gov- 
ernor-general will preside and give instruc- 
tions directly to the heads of these depart- 
ments. Heads of the new departments 
who object to the Introduction of Amer- 
ican methods and to the investigation of 
their departments will be relieved and the 
vacancies will be filled by the appoint- 
ment of the most competent persons, 
irrespective of party affiliations." 

One of the first objects of the govern- 
ment was the improvement of the public- 
school system of the island. Fortunately 
one of the heads of the departments was 
Gen. John Eaton, who had been for sev- 
eral years at the head of the bureau of 
education at Washington, and Gen. Henry 
delegated him to organise a general sys- 
tem of public schools. Gen. Eaton says of 
the schools of Puerto Rico as he found 
them that, "Under Spanish rule there ex- 
isted a system of public schools in the 
island— elementary schools supported by 
the municipalities, and a higher grade of 
schools by the insular government. Only 
three schoolhouses in the whole island 
belong to the public. In one school of 
seventy pupils there were only six books. 
There is a strong demand at present for 
Instruction in the English language. Gen. 
Henry offers to pay out of the public fundfi 
160 a month to teachers of English. As 
there are very few such teachers in the 
island the plan was adopted of supplying 
for all pupils English readers and requir- 
ing regular dally lessons. The teacher has 
to see that the task is duly performed, and 
a special teacher of English, assigned to a 
group of schools, visits each school twice 
a week, and sees that the English is cor- 
rectly pronounced and written. For adults 
evening schools, served by volunteer teach- 
ers gratis, have been established for the 
special teaching of English." 

Early in the year the "Republican Party 
of Puerto Rico** was formed, its founders 
being the radicals under the lead of Rossy 
and a colored man named Barbosa, who is 
a graduate of Michigan university. The 
platform says the party looks to the time 
when the island "^all have a place among 
the states of the. union/' but expresses 
willingness to await congressional actioq. 
It favors free, public, nonsectarian schools, 
free trade ^ith the United States, reduc- 
tion of oppressive taxation, and closes with 
this declaration: 

"We congrati^Ute ourselves and our 



144 



OHIGAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



country on being nnder the protection of 
the American flag, the recognized emblem 
of liberty, and will lend every effort to 
advance <nyillzatlon, to teach loyalty, to 
lore American institutions and honor 
Washington, Lincoln and McElnley, whose 
names are household words in the land." 

Besides the changes made in the public- 
school system of Puerto Rico, Gen. Henry 
instituted several legal reforms, the laws 
relating to marriages being radically 
changed to prevent concubinage and to 
legitimize children bom of such cohabita- 
tion. . 

Gen. Henrv was recalled from Puerto 
Rico in April. 1899, and Brig. -Gen. G. W. 
Davis succeeded him as governor-general. 
A fraction of the inhabitants strenuously 
object to military rule in the island, and 
in June, 1899, two representatives of 
popular govemment-nj. J. Henna and M. 
z. Gaudia— came to Washington to present 
their reasons for demanding an immediate 
change. The document is a long one, but 
the following extracts embody its essential 
features: 

'Puerto Rico finds itself at this moment 
in an extraordinary situation. The island 
is de facto by virtue of actual occupation 
and de Jure by virtue of the treaty of 
peace between the United States and 
Spain, concluded at Paris on Dec. 10, 1898, 
an Integral part of the territory of the 
United States of America. And, neverthe- 
less, neither its soil nor its ports, its 
commerce, its inhabitants, are for any 
practical purpose considered American. 
The flag of the United States of America 
floats over the soil of Puerto Rico, but it 
does not make American even the children 
who are born under Its shield. • • • 

"Puerto Ricans are treated as an in- 
ferior people, needing to be educated, and 
Christianized, and civilized; and in the 
procession of the peace Jubilee, celebrated 
with great pomp at Washington, which 
the president reviewed, surrounded bv his 
cabinet and the diplomatic body and the 
elite of Washington society, no other 



symbol was made to appear to represent 
Puerto Rico and Puerto Rlcan civilization 
than a dilapidated little negro boy riding 
on the back, of a not less dilapidated little 
pony, with the announcement, which ex- 
cited the Joyous shouts of the multitude, 
of 'Puerto Rlcan Express.' This is the 
reeoflrnition which Puerto Rico has secured 
for having opened its arms and offered no 
resistance to the American invaders! 
• • • 

* 'Puerto Rico was not by any means a 
proper subject for American intervention. 
The voice of Puerto Rico was not heard. 
The idea that the Puerto Rlcan people 
might have something to say on the sub- 
ject, or that a bargain of this kind, no 
matter how generous on the part of one 
belligerent, might need at least pro forma 
the consent of the Puerto Rlcan people, 
was not ev^n thought of. 

"This pamphlet is intended not to make 
opposition to the government, but to aid 
it in doing Justice to Puerto Rico. It hai^ 
been prepared to show to the people of the 
United States of America and of the whole 
world that the Puerto Rlcan people do not 
submit in silence to treatment as slaves or 
as dependent beings little less than sav- 
ages, needing protection from the outside 
and entitled to nothing else than guardian 
ship by the sword. 

'The Puerto ^ican people. In asking 
from the people to whom they have been 
added that the principles of the first en- 
actment to be found in their statute books 
be applied to them, are not asking for 
favors. They are demanding Justice.'* 

Nothing of importance has occurred slnee 
the arrival of these representatives. The 
people of the island understand that the 
only power in this country to change or 
modify the present administration of 
affairs is held by the congress of the 
United States and they are awaiting its 
action with patience and confidence. 

On the 1st of October, 1899, the military 
force stationed in Puerto Rico amounted 
to 3,362 men. 



GUAM. 



An account of the capture of the Island 
of Guam in June, 1898, may be found in 
The Daily News Almanac for 1899, page 
140. In February, 1899, the Bennington, 
Commander Taussig, visited the harbor of 
San Luis d'Apra, the chief port on the 
island, and took possession by raising the 
United States flag over Fort Santa Cruz 
and the government buildings at the 
capital, Agana, about five miles from the 
harbor. Commander Taussig acted as gov- 
ernor-general until relieved by Capt. R. P. 
Leary in August, 1899, who is still in 
office. 

The last of October, 1899, Capt. Leary 
reported that he had been obliged to expel 
from the island seven of the eight friars 
who resided there. In explaining his posi- 
tion Capt. Leary says that he exhausted 
all efforts to overcome their influence, but 
was forced to adopt heroic measures to 
establiHh American authority. Capt. Leary 
states that every one of tho reforms which 
be pr6|>08ed was defeated through the 



hostile influence of the friars. He de* 
Clares they resisted every decree, no mat- 
ter of what character, from a spirit of 
Intedtie conservatism. 

Capt. Leary also found many ex-convlcts 
at Guam, who had been sent by the Span- 
ish authorities from Manila. These he 
considered to have a contaminating influ- 
ence, and he ordered them to board ves- 
sels bound for Spain. 

Changes have been made in land tenure 
at Agana. Land which sold as low as 
110 or 115 an acre when the island was 
under Spanish rule suddenly advanced to 
over 1100. Before Gov. Leary came foreign- 
ers were grabbing everything in sight, 
knowing that American rule would mean 
a boom for Agana. The governor issued t 
proclamation in which it was decreed that 
none but American citizens should hold 
land in the islands. Many of the nattr^ 
have sworn sUegiance to tlje govenuni^t 
and are rftpectful to the flag. 



r 



NATIONAL SOUND-MONEY LEAGUE. 



146 



TRADE WITH 00L0HIE8 AXm PB0TECT0SATS8. 



Ck>mmeree between the United States and 
GntMi, Puerto Bico, HawaU and the Philip- 
pine islands continues to grow with amas- 
ing rapidity. The September Summary of 
Commerce and Finance shows that the im- 
ports from these islands are 61 per cent 
greater than in the corresponding months 
of 1898 or 1897, and the exports to them 161 
per cent greater than in the same months 
of 1898 or 1897. The total of our imports 
from these four islands or groups of Islands 
was. in the nine months of 1899, 163,273,224; 
against ^4,471,276 in the corresponding 
months of 1898, and 133,059,106 in the same 
mcHithS of 1897, while our exports to them 
in nine months of 1899 were $29,921,783, 
against $11,933,833 in the corresponding 
months of 1898, and 911,480,163 in the same 
months of 1897. 

An examination of the details shows that 
in the matter of exports our sales to each 
of these Islands or groups of islands have 
been greater in the nine months Just ended 
than in any corresponding period in the 
history of our commercial relations with 
them, except those to Cuba in the year in 



which reciprocity brought our sales to that 
island to a much higher figure than they 
ever attained in any preceding or sub- 
sequent year. From Puerto Bico, Hawaii 
and the Philippines the imports of the nine 
months just ended are larger than in any 
corresponding months in the history of our 
commerce with those islands, though from 
Cuba they are necessarily less than in the 
years prior to the destruction of her sugar 

§lantatl(ms and works during her war with 
pain, our chief sugar supply at that time 
being brought from Cuba. 

The following tables show the exports to 
and imports from Cuba, Puerto Bico, Hawaii 
and the Philippines in the nine months of 
each year since 1894. It will be seen that 
the total exports for the nine months of 
1899 are greater than those of the corre- 
sponding months of any preceding year 
shown, while the imports are also greater 
than those of any preceding year, except 
in the case of Ouba, from which our chief 
sugar supplies were drawn prior to the 
destruction of her plantations during her 
war with Spain. 



Nnn M'THB END- 
ED 8BPT. 30. 



1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
18B7. 
1896. 
18B9 



Exports from the United 
States to— 



Cuba. 



7,124,801 
6,044.566 
6,154,251 
6,438,562 
18,361,849 



Puerto 
Rico. 



11396,274 
1.364.273 
1,458,444 
1,604,974 



2,662.589 



Hawaii. 



12,431,666 
8,139,886 
2390307 
3,766,268 
4,679327 
8,280,016 



FhUip- 
pines. 



167,473 
121,948 
112,448 

64,660 
84.866 
777329 



Imports into 

States 



TBS UNITED 
FROM— 



Cuba. 



43^^16 
22,726,266 
14,886,786 
14,399,176 
25,922306 



Pvsrto 
Rico. 



Hawaii. 




PMUp- 
pines. 



12,807,006 

4,698326 
8362,080 
8,164,004 
4,4983«> 



NATIONAL SOXnm-KONET LEAOTHS. 

[Nonpartisan.] 

Headquarters, 417 Honadnook building, Ghicaso. Eastern oflSoe, Bowling Green oflSoes 
Broadway, New York. 



officers of the lbaoub. 
J sterling Morton, president. ..Nebraska City 

A. B. Hepburn, treasurer New York 

C. L. Huudiinson, associate treasurer. Chicago 
B.y. Smalley, general secretary Chicago 

executive committee. 

M. E. Ingalls, chairman Cincinnati 

J. Kennedy Tod. New York 

H.P.Bobin8on .Chicago 

Edwin Burritt Smith.^. Chicago 

Jolrn B. Jackson Pittsburg 

J. K.Cowen ^. Baltimore 

James L. Blair St. Louis 

Louis B.Bhrioh....v Colorado Springs 

George Foster Peabody NewYonk 

alternates. 

J. 0. Schmidlapp Cincinnati 

A.B.Willson Louisville 

A. B. Kittredge Sioux Falls 

E.P.Wells Jamestown, N. D. 

W. H. Dnnwoody Bfinneapolis 

F.O. Winkler Milwaukee 

J.W.Norwood WilmUigton. N. 0. 

WlBiamF.Ladd Galveston 

BemyHents New York 

Viqp-FRBSIDBNTS. 

Alal>aaiiQr-B. H. Clarke Mobile 

■ - • ft-Morrls M. Cohn LitaeBock 

i»-Lovell white. . . y... .San Francisco 
■ "~ G. Osbom .T New Haven 



Delaware— H. A. DnPont Winterthur 

Florida— Dr. J. L. Gaskins Starke 

Georgia— Henry G. Turner Quitman 

Indiana— Lucius B. Swift Indianapolis 

Kansas— E. N. Molrill Hiawatha 

Kentucky— Geo. M. Davie Louisville 

Louisiana— J. C. Morris New Orleans 

Maine— Chas. F. Libby Portland 

Maryland— Henry A. Parr y. . .Baltimore 

Massachusetts— Bdw. Atkinson. Boston 

Michigan— Edwin F. Conely Detroit 

Minnesota— Thomas Wilson St Paul 

Mississippi— Addison Croft Holly Springs 

Missouii— James L. Blair .St. Xouis 

Montana— Wilbur F. Sanders Helena 

Nebraska— J. 8. Morton .-.Nebraska City 

New Hampshire— F. C. Faulkner Keene 

New Jersey— John Keehe Elisabeth 

New York— Wm. C. Corn well Buffalo 

gorth Carolina— Wm. A. Blair Winston 
orth Dakota-J. M. Devine La Moure 

Qhio-Vireil P. KUne Cleveland 

Oregon— M. C. Ge^ge Portland 

Pennsylvania— J. B. Jackson. Pittsburg 

|Lhode Island— Wm. B. We^en ... .Providence 

•lina—G. 9« Bd wards Charleston 

I Galveston 

■ ouse Burlington 

Richmond 

it..... North Yakiscia 

« .w«ldweH Wheelfiig 

,il6w imwankee 

'.Carey Cheyenne 



South CarolIna--G. 
Texas— J. F. Cam] " 
Vermont— C.W. 
~" W.L. 

jWtVlr^J^. 

Wisoonsln-^. G. , 

wyomisg-Joseph | 



146 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



THE OOLONIAL 8X8TSKS OF THE WORLD. 



[From United States 
The colonleg, protectorates and depend- 
encies of the world number 126. They 
occupT two-flfths of the land surface of 
the globe, and their population is one-third 
of the entire people of the earth. Of the 
600,000,000 people thus governed, over three- 
fourths live between the tropics of cancer 
and Capricorn, or within what Is known as 
the torrid zone, and all of the governing 
countries lie In the north temperate zone.. 
Throughout the globe-encircling area known 
as the torrid zone no important republic 
or independent form of government exists 
save upon the continent of America. 

The total imports of the colonies and 
protectorates average more than $1,600,000,- 
000 wdrth of goods annually, and of this 
vast sum more than 40 per cent is pur- 
chased from the mother countries. Of their 
exports, which considerably exceed their 
imports, 40 per cent goes to the mother coun- 
tries. Large sums are annually expended 
in the construction of roads, canals, rail- 
ways, telegraphs, postal service, schools, 
etc., but in most cases the present annual 
expenditures are derived from local reve- 
nues or are represented by local obligations. 
The revenues of the British colonies in 
1897 were £151,000^000 and their expendi- 
tures £149,000,000. While the public debt in 
the more important and active of these 
communities aggregates a large sum, it is 
represented by canals, railways, public 
highways, harbors, irrigation and other 
public improvements intended to stimulate 
commerce and production, the railroads in 
operation in the British colonies alone ag- 
gregating 66,000 miles. 

The most acceptable and therefore most 
successful of the colonial systems are those 
in which the largest lll)erty of self-govern- 
ment is given to the people. The British 
colonial system, which nas by far outgrown 
that of any other nation, gives, wherever 
practicable, a large degree of self-govern- 
ment to the colonies; the governors are in 
all cases appointed by the crown, but the 
law making and enforcing power is left 
to the legislative bodies, which are elected 
by the people wherever practicable, in 
minor cases a portion being elected and a 
portion appointed, and in still others the 
appointments divided between the British 
government i^id local municipal or trade 
organizations, the veto power being In all 
cases, however, retainea by the home gov- 



Bureau of Statistics.] 
ernment. The enforcement of the laws is 
intrusted to courts and subordinate organi- 
zations, whose members are in many cases 
residents or natives of the communities 
under their Jurisdiction. In the French 
colonies less attention is given to law 
making and administration by local legisla- 
tive bodies, the more important of the 
colonies being given members in the legisla- 
tive bodies of the home government. In 
the Netherlands colonies and in the less 
advanced communities under British con- 
trol the laws and regulations are adminis- 
tered in conjunction with native function- 
aries. 

Of the 125 colonies, protectorates, de- 
pendencies and "spheres of influence'* which 
make up the total list, two-fifths belong to 
Great Britain, their area being one-half of 
the grand total and their population con- 
siderably more than one-half of the grand 
total. France is next in order in number, 
area and population of colonies, etc., though 
the area controlled by France is but about 
one-third that belonging to Great Britain 
and the population of her colonies less 
than one-sixth of those of Great Britain. 

Commerce between the successful colonies 
and their mother countries is in nearly all 
cases placed upon practically the same 
basis as that with other countries, goods 
from the home countries receiving in the 
vast majority of cases do advantages over 
those from other countries in import duties 
or other exactions of this character affect- 
ing commerce. In the more prosperous lind 
progressive colonies, the percentage of im- 
portations from the mother countries grows 
somewhat less as the business and pros- 
perity increase. The chief British colonies 
in North America (Canada and Newfound- 
land), which in 1871 took 60 per cent of 
their importations from the home country, 
took in 1896 less than 30 per cent from the 
United Kingdom; those of South Africa 
(Cape Colony and Natal), which in 1871 took 
88 per cent from the home country, took 
but 71 per cent in 1896; those of Australia 
and the adjacent islands, which in 1876 
took 48 per cent from the home country, in 
1896 took but 40 per cent. The French 
colonies now take from the home country 
about 42 per cent of their total imports, 
while the British colonies obtain about 40 

Eer cent of their total imports from the 
ome country. 



COLONIBS. DBPENDBNCIBS AND PBOTBCTORATBS OF NATIONS OF THE WORLD. 
[Compiled from Statesman's Year-Book, 1896.] 



COUNTRIES. 



United Kingdom* . 

France 

Germany 

Netherlands 

Portugal 

Spain 

Italy 

Austria-Hungary . . 

Denmark 

Russia 

Turkey 

China 

U^ilted States 

Total 



♦Includes fendatorv native states 



Number 

of 
colonies. 




AREA (Square Miles). 



Mother cotmr 
try. 



120,979 
204,002 
206.880 
13,648 



197,670 

110,646 

240,022 

lfi.289 

8,516480 

1,116,067 

1,886341 

8,5Sr,000 



OoUmUs. 




POPULATION. 



Mother cotmr 
try. 



89.824.663 
88.517,975 
52,279,915 
4,928,668 
6,019,720 
17,566.682 

2,185,286 
126,6884)12 

24,128,690 
886,000,000 

75,194.000 



Colonieg, 



844,050,122 
62,643,980 
10,647,000 
83,911,744 
9,216,707 
200,000 

osaooo 

1,668,002 

114.229 

6,684.000 

17.489.r~* 



■ ■_ I 844MMi 

om^^M^SflB^gges^populaH^^ 



1 



THE COLONIAL SYSTEMS OP THE WOBLD. 



147 



COLONIES, PROTBCTpRATES. DEPENDENCIES, ETCm GROUPED BY GRAND DIVI- 
SIONS OF THE WORLD. 

C. C. indloates crown colonies, in which the crown has the entire control of legislation, ths 



administration belnc carried on by public officers under the control of the home goyemment. 
R. I. indicates colonies possesslns representatiye institutions. In which the crown has no 
more than a veto on legislation, but the home goyemment retains the control of public officers. 



R. 6. indicates colonies possessing responsible goyemments, in which the crown has only 
a veto on legislation and the home goyemment no control oyer any public officer except its 
own representatlyes. 

NORTH AMERICA. Possession and form Area. 

Colonies. of government. 8q. miles. 

Bahamas, W. I British R. 1 6,794 

Barbados .• British R. 1 166 

Bermudas British R. 1 19 

Canada British R. G 3,316,647 



Cuba U. S., temporarily. 

Curacao, W. I ^ Dutch colony 

Greenland Danish possession. 

Guadaloupe, etc.. W. 1 French colony 

Honduras, British British C. C 

Jamaica, etc., W. I British C. C 

Lpeward Islands, W. I British R. I , 

Martinique, etc., W. I French colony 

Newfoundland British R. G 

Puerto Rico, W. I United States 

St. Croix, W. I Danish colony 

St. John, W. I • Danish colony 

St. Pierre and Miquelon French colony 

St. Thomas, W. I Danish colony , 

Trinidad, W. I British C. C 

Windward Islands, W. I British R. I 

Total North America 



48,220 

436 

34,000 

722 

7,562 

4,416 

701 

381 

42,200 

8,650 

74 

21 

90 

28 

1,868 

648 



Popula- 
tion. 
60,699 
188,000 
15,794 
6,250.000 
1,631,687 
44,153 
10,516 
190,704 
31,471 
644,270 
127,723 
175,863 
202,059 
806,708 
19,783 
944 
6.927 
14,390 
224,445 
231,899 



3,461,638 9.886.935 



SOUTH AMERICA. 

Falkland Islands British C. C... 

Guianas: British '. British R. I... 

French French colony. 

Dutch Dutch 

Total South America 



6,500 
96,560 
46,880 
46,060 



1.890 
280.000 
26.9b0 
71,200 



195,990 



380.040 



1,348.581 
2.317.430 
12,955 
26,080 
219.511 
70,937 
174.621 
992.386 



EUROPE. 

Bosnia Austria-Hung, protect.. 16,205 

Bulgaria Turkish tributary 88,562 

Faeroe. Islands Danish colony 510 

Gibraltar British C. C 2 

Herzegovina Austria-Hung, protect.. 3.528 

Iceland Danish provlncp 39.756 

Malta and Gozzo British R. 1 126 

Roumelia Turkish tributary 13.862 

Total Europe 112.660 6.162,491 

ASIA. 

Aden and Perim British C. C 85 41,910 

Annam French protectorate 105,000 6.000,000 

Bahreim Islands British protectorate 273 68,000 

Baluchistan British protectorate 106,000 500,000 

Bokhara Russian dependency 92,300 2,130,000 

Cambodia French protectorate 38,600 815.000 

Ceylon British R. 1 25,365 3,008,466 

China dependehcies ^ Dependencies 2,923,800 14,500,000 

Cochin China French possession 22,958 1,917,000 

Cyprus British administration.. 3,584 209,291 

Hongkong , British C. C 81 248,498 

India: British British C. C 988.993 221,292.952 

French French possession 196 282,923 

Fortugaese Portnguese possession... 1,295 661,884 

Khiva Russian dependency 22,320 700.000 

Macao :.. Portuguese possession... 6 68,100 

Malay federated native states British protectorate 28,220 460,000 

Samoe Turkish tributary 180 44,661 

Slkkim British protectorate 3,090 60,000 

Straits Settlements British C. C 1,472 612.842 

Tonquln French possession 121,246 14,000,000 

Total Asia..... 4, 

AvitidA. 

Algeria French colony 307.940 4,174,700 

Angola Portuguese possession... 616,670 19,400,000 



486,013 267,410,627 



148 



GHIOAOO DAILT NEWS ALBCANAO FOB 1900. 



AnacA.-«»NTur[JiD. _ 

^, . Poi»emion and form' Area. 

Ooionis$, of government. Sq.mties. 

Atcensloo British 0. G 36 

AsoTM. and Madeira Ulaodt Portnsnese proyioce — 1,510 

Baratoland British 0. C 10,298 

Bf^chttanaland British protectorate 400,000 

Brltisii East Africa British protectorate 667,680 

British Central Africa British protectorate 60,000 

British South Africa British protectorate 750,000 

Canary Islands Spanish proTince 2,808 

Cape Colonj British B. G 276,900 

Cape Yerde Islands Portognese possession. . . 1,660 

Centa Spanish province ^.. 13 

Comoro Islands French protectorate 620 

Congo Free State Belgian protectorate.... 869,570 

Dahomey French possession 15,000 

Egypt Turkish tributary 383,800 

Eritrea Italian colony 60,000 

Fernando Po Spanish possession 1,500 

French Sudan French pospession 60,800 

Gaboon-Congo French possession. 220,000 

Gambln British 0. C 2,700 

German Bast Africa German protectorate.... 863,266 

Gerinkn S. W. Africa German protectorate.... 820,750 

Gold coast: British British C. C 90,000 

French French protectorate 50,000 

Kamerun German protectorate.... 190,530 

Lagos British C. C 15,000 

Madagascar French possession 228,500 

" " 0. C 877 

257 

310,000 

20,860 

500,000 

3,860 

20 

764 

47 

•4 



Mauritius and dependencies British _. _ 

Mayotte and Nossi Be French possession. 

Mozambique Portuguese possession... 

Natal British B. I 

Niger Territories British protectorate 

Obock and Tajura French possession....... 

Providence Island German possession...... 

Reunion French possession 

St. Helena British C. C 

St. Marie French possession 

Senegambia French possession 234,000 

Sierra Leone British C. C 4,000 

Somali British protection 142,000 

Togoland German protectorate,... 19,000 

Tripoli Turkish tributary 898,878 

Tristan d'Acunha British C. C 45 

Tunis French protectorate. 

Uganda British protectorate, 

Zansibar British protectorate. 

Zulnland British C. C 



44.920 

70,000 



14,220 



PopulO' 
Hon. 

240 

401,624 

250,000 

4,000,000 

6,868,000 

846,000 

6,000,000 

291,700 

1,800,000 

111,000 

6,090 

64,000 

14,000,000 

600,000 

7,789,000 

200,000 

60,000 

285,000 

6,000,000 

16,000 

8,000,000 

200,000 

1,600,000 

660,000 

8,600,000 

2,000.000 

8,600,000 

896,700 

18 ' — 

1,600',000 

660,< 

26,000,000 

28,000 

100 

176,000 

4,116 

7,667 

6,000.000 

136,000 

700,000 

800,000 

1.016.000 

102 

1,600.000 

5,000,000 

260,000 

180.000 



Total Africa 7,611,916 129,806,889 



OCEANICA. 

Bismarck Archipelago German protectorate.... 

Borneo, British North British protectorate 

Borneo, Dutch Dutch possession 

Carcdine Islands and Palaos German possession 

Emperor WilUamsland German Protectorate. . . . 

FUi and Rotuma Isles British G. C 

Guam United States 

Hawaii United States 

JTaya and Madura Dutch possession 

Marquesas Island French possession 

ManAiall Islands German possession 

New Guinea: British British C. 

Dutch Dutch possession 

New South Wales British R. G 

JJNew Zealand British R. G 

Philippine Islands U. S., temporarily 

Queensland British ft. G 

Soi|tb Australia British R. G 

Society Islands and dependencies. French possession 

^Spanish colonies Spanish possession 

Sumatra Dutch possession 

^smanla British B. G 

^*6r and Archipelago .^. Dutch possession 

Victoria British B. G 

t^est Australia British E. I __ 

■ Total Oceanica 4, 



18.180 

79.100 

348,060 

1,606 

81,000 

7,740 

200 

6,682 

60,660 

492 

135 

88,460 

243,000 

310,700 

104,471 

114,820 

668.497 

908,690 

982 

1,170 

76.640 

26,215 

28.654 

87,884 

>75,M0 



190,000 

496,000 

1,290,006 

47,000 

190,000 

126,000 

2,000 

107,000 

86,070; — 

6.100 

10; 

850,000 

240,000 

1,277.870 

748,812 

6,990,000 

460,650 

867,401 

87,060 

81,r 

1,590,00# 

160,1 
2.110,( 



21»,tt4 



iS:3 



T^B ALASKAN BODNDABY. 



U9 



THE ALABXAW BOTTHDART. 



The coDtroTeray regarding the tMondary 
line between Alaska and British Columbia 
was discussed in full in The Daily News 
Almanac for 1896, page 79. The subject of 
this dispute was referred with eleven 
other questions to the Ani^o-American Com- 
mission (see Daily News Almanac for 1899, 
page 169), which met in Quebec, Canada, 
Aug. 23, 1898, and adjourned Feb. 20, 1899» 
to meet again Aug. 2, 1899, unless some 
other date should be agreed upon. The 
Alaska boundary question proTed to be the 
rock upon which the commission split, and 



different that some OMdiflcation of thf 
Venezuela boundary reference should be in- 
troduced. They thought the reference 
should be made to six eminent jurists, 
three chosen \jj each of the high contract- 
ing parties, without proTiding for an um- 
pire, they believing that finality would be 
secured by a majority vot^ of the jurists 
so chosen. 

"They did not see any present prospect 
of agreeing to a European umpire, to be 
selected in the manner proposed by the 
British commissioners, while the British 




THB PROVISIONAL ALASKA BOUNDARY. 



[The boundary commonly claimed by the United States is indicated by the broken line 
sweeping across the upper part of the map in a^bold ^urve. Tl^eliiMotadmed by Canada is 



sweeping across the upper part of the map in a bold curve. The line claimed by Canada is 
not snown, but would oe near the bottom of the map. The boundary established temporarily 
by the niodus Vivendi is shown by the solid line A JB, and this wUl probably be continued to 

. al „ 

ion, lying south of Klnkwan and west Qf Pyramid harbor, which is 



the American boundary, as shown by the dotted line. 

United States full possession and control of the coast, of 

of tlie porcupine nver reglo 

supposed to be rich in gold.] 

it has not been called together since its 

adjournment in February. At the time of 

adjournment the commissioners made a 

public statement as to the reasons for their 

failure to come to a settlement, from 

which the following is an extract: 

♦*The diiBculties, apart from the imme- 
diate delimitation of this boundary by the 
commission itself, arose fropi the conditions 
under which it might be referred to arbi- 
tration. The British commissioners desired 
that the whole question should be referred 
on terms similar to th^ provided in the 
reference of the Venesuelan boundary line, 
and which, by providing an umpire, would 
insure certainty and finality. The United 
States commissioners, on the other hand, 
thought the local conditions in Alaska so 



probably 

This provisional line retains for the 
' ~rll harlH>T8, towns and villages and 



commissiooers were unwilling to agree to 
the selection of an American umpire in 
the manner suggested by the United States 
commissioners. The United States commis- 
sioners further contended that special stipu- 
lations should be made in any reference to 
arbitration, that tlie existing settlements 
on the tidewaters of the coast should in 
any event continue to belong to the United 
States. To this contention the British 
commissioners refused to agree." 

The settlements referred to are Dyea and 
Skaffuay, which are situated at the hesd 
of Lynn canal, and these two ports prac- 
tically control the most frequented routes 
to the gold fields in the Klondike region. 
Canada, therefore, contended most strenu- 
ously for a seaport on the canal, together 
with an unobstructed waterway to the 



150 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Pacific. The Americans' refusal to yield 
either of the ports named was based upon 
the fact that they were clearly some miles 
within American territory, and they had 
been so long held and occupied by the 
United States that any adjustment of the 
boundary line must concede these ports to 
this country. 

After the adjournment of the commission 
the foreign offices of the United States and 
Great Britain undertook to settle the con- 
troversy between themselves. 

After a good deal of negotiation a 
modus Tiyendi was agreed upon .in Octo- 
ber, 1899. which effects A temporary settle- 
ment of the main point in the dispute, 
namely, the demand of Canada for a port 
on Lynn canal. The provisional line estab- 
lished temporarily retains for the United 
States full possession of the coast, of 
all harbors, towns and villages and of the 
Porcupine river region, lying south of 
Klnkwan and west of Pyramid harbor, 
which is supposed to be rich in gold. 

The following is the text of the agree- 
ment: "It is hereby agreed between the 
governments of the united States and 
Great Britain that the boundary line 
between Canada and the territory of 
Alaska in the region about the head of 
Lynn canal shall be provisionally fixed, 
without prejudice to the claims of either 

{>arty in the permanent adjustment of the 
ntemational boundary, as follows: 
"In the region of the Dalton trail, a line 
beginning at the peak west of Porcupine 
creek, marked on map No. 10 of the United 
States commission, l)ec. 31, 1895, and on 
sheet No. 18 of the British commission, 
Dec. 31, 1895, with the number 6500; thence 
running to the Klehlni (or Klaheela) river 
In the direction of the peak north of that 
river, marked 6020 on the aforesaid United 
States map, and 5025 on the aforesaid 
British map; thence following the high, or 
right, bank of the said Klehini river to the 
Junction thereof with the Chilkat river, a 
mile and a half, more or less, north of 
Klukwan— provided that persons proceeding 
to or from Porcupine creek shall be freely 
permitted to follow the trail between the 
said creek and the said Junction of the 
rivers, into and across the telritory on the 
Canadian side of the temporary line wher- 
ever the trail crosses to such side, and 
subject to such reasonable regulations for 
the protection of the revenue as the Cana- 



dian government may prescribe, to carry 
with them over such part or parts of the 
trail between the said points as may lie 
on the Canadian side of the temporary 
line such goods and' articles as they desire 
without being required to pay any customs 
duties on such goods and articles; and 
from said Junction to the summit of the 
peak east of the Chilkat river, mirked on 
the aforesaid map No. 10 of the United 
States commission with the number 5410, 
and on the map No. 17 of the aforesaid 
British commission with the number 5490. 

"On the Dyea and Skaguay trails, the 
sununits of the Ghilkoot and White passes. 

"It is understood, as formerly set forth 
in communications of the department of 
state of the United States, that the citizens 
or subjects of either power found by this 
arrangement within the temporary Juris- 
diction of the other shall suffer no diminu- 
tion of the rights and privileges which they 
now enjoy. 

"The government of the United States 
will at once appoint an dfflcer or officers, 
in conjunction with an officer or officers to 
be named by the government of her Britan- 
nic majesty, to mark the temporary line 
agreed up<Mi by the erection of posts, 
stakes or other appropriate temporary 
marks." 

While the establishment of the provis- 
ional boundary cannot be regarded as a 
victory for either side, it Is unquestionably 
true that the United States government 
secured everything it demanded In the way 
of concessions. 

Great Britain has not secured a port on 
tidewater, and the nearest point In British 
territory to a stream leading to tidewater 
that is navigable by canoes Is a. mile and 
a half distant. The head of nlivigation 
proper is twenty-two and one-fourth statute 
miles on the American side of the pro- 
visional boundary. A Alight concession of 
territory to Great Britain was necessary 
in order to more clearly define the line, 
but this does not benefit British Interests 
in any way, as the line is so drawn as to 
give to the United States control of all 
the passes leading to the Klondike and the 
Porcupine country from tidewater. 

It is understood that the modus Tivendi 
will continue in force at the pleasure of 
both parties to it, no date being fixed for 
its expiration. 



YALTTE IK OOLD OF $100 CimREKOT IN THE ITEW YORK XARXET~1868-78. 



PERIODS. 



January. 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September — 

October 

November.... 
December .... 



64.7 
86.0 
.2 
.2 
76.6 
79.5 
74.6 
67.7 
67.6 
66.2 



64.8 
63.1 
61.4 
67.9 
56.7 
47.6 
1^.7 
89.4 
44.9 
48.3 
42.8 
44.0 



71.4 
72.3 
76.6 
78.6 
75.9 
67.2 
66.0 
67.2 

67.4 
09.5 
78.2 



72.2 
70.7 
71.7 
72.1 
71.6 
71.4 
70.1 
68.7 
69.6 
72.9 
74.4 
74.0 



82.4 

'"1.7 
1.8 
-J.4 
87.2 
88.r 
86.1 
84.8 

8r.i 

:3.7 

89.8 
90.- 



90.8 
89.7 
90.1 
90.4 

::l7 

89.0 
89.0 

:d.o 

87.r 

88.8 
89.9 
^.6 



1.8 91 



91.7 
90.7 
90.8 
90.0 
88.0 
87.8 
87.6 — 

88.3^- 

88.6 

89.1 




94.0 

H:! 

94.2 
9B.5 
94.9 



97.8 
97.8 
^.8 



.6 97. 



97.9 
98.0 
98.8 
99.4 
90.8 
99.8' 



94.9 99.6 
96.2^99.6 
96.899.6 



99.6 
99.: 
99.9 



tOn July 11, 186i, 8100 in greenbacks was worth only $35 In gold. 



SUBMARINE CABLES OF THE WORLD. 



151 



stjbmabute cable uneb o; the wobxd. 

Showinff lenffth, points between which operated, company operating, etc.— also the 
owned and controlled by yarious goyemments. 



lines 



[From Report of International Bureau of Telegraph Adminlstaratlon.] 



No. Length 

eablea. cables. 
Anglo-American Telegraph Co. : * 

Transatlantic system — Valen- 
tia (Ireland) to Hearts Con- 
tent (Newfoundland) 

Minon, near Brest (France) to 
St. Plerre-Mlquelon 

Communication on American 
coasts 

European communication ._ 

TotaL ." 



7^10 

2,718 

1,964 
101 



No, 



15 12,293 



Commercial Cable Co.: 

Transatlantic system— Water- 
yille (Ireland) to Canso (Nova 
Scotia) -^^ 

Canso (Nova Scotia) to New York 

Canso (Nova Scotia) toRockport, 
Mass 

Communication in Europe 

TotaL 

Direct United States Cable Co. : 
Ballinskelligs Bay (Ireland) to 

Halifax (Nova Scotia) 

Halifax (Nova Scotia) to Rye 

Beach,N.H 

Total 

Western Union Telegraph Co,: 
Transatlantic system— Sennen 
Cove, near Penzance (Eng- 
land), to Dover Bay, near 

Canso (Nova Scotia) 

Dover Bay (Nova Scotia) to New 

York .^ 

Gulf of Mexico system . 



1 

2 


611 
839 


7 


9.0fi9 


) 

1 


2,564 


; 1 


635 


2 


3,099 



2 6,107 

2 1,776 
8 459 



Total 12 

Gompagnle Francaise du Tele- 
^r?^_ ^^ «„-.«„ New York: 
St. Pierre- 



7,342 



graphe de Paris a New York: 
Brest (France) to °* »«"— " 



Miquelon ... - - - 
St. Pierre to Cape Ck)d, Mass.. 

Other branch lines 

Total 



2,282 



4 3,5 



Gompagnle Francaise des Cables 
Telegraphique: 
Brest (France) to Cape Cod, 



African Direct Telegraph Co. . . 

Black Sea Telegraph (X> 

Brazilian Submarine Tel. Ck).: 
Carcavellos, near Lisbon (Por- 
tugal), to Madeira, to St. Vin- 

CABLES 



1 8,250 



eabl 

pent (Cape Verdo Inland i, to 

Pe r nanibii c [J i Bruz 1 1 > 6 7,375 

Central and ^outh AtaeirfcaQ Teh 

OKraphCo .,.,... 15 7,500 

CoiflpHtftje Aii^iuaude des CatJiy* | 

TijK^gmpbique ..... 1 1,114 

CompaDSa Telegrafloo-TelelcDlca I 

del PUta , 1 28 

CotupfiuiiL Telegrafioo del Rio <le 

m PJatJi... .. 1 28 

rubu Suliii4aTiiie Tpl^ftrapn ro. . . . 4 1.048 

m rect & [lan Ish Te i eiTfu-p h Co ..... . 4 710 

J}\TVict weal India Cable Co t 
Uertnurla-Turks lalanda, ami 

Turh£ IfilandH-TaTntLrtqiie 2 (t) 

Eastern and Soath Africaa Tt'le- 

prapb €o 13 8,832 

Ensiern Plrtonsfgn Australiii^lA 

aiidCtiJDaTelepmpbCo 27 17,36tf 



ICftstom l^eEeurapb Co.; 
AnjTlu-Spaiiiah'PortuffaeBe' bJe- 

tem „..*.,,► ...- 12 4,185 

B^Btom iresi of Malta 17 4.ti03 

Italt>-Ureek i*yRtoai..,r.,. .-. 2 2M 

AnatTO-Omek fiist^*iD , 1 wa 

Qreek uTEteiQ ,. 12 w9 

Turt€Kittekiy4tflm,.,,.,.- ..-» 4 578 

Turkish sjr atom.. 16 Bf2 

Riiy ptoEurope an Hf nte la 4 2,5« 

Ekfrptlaii fivMeits 1 156 

Etfyptolndian Bjatem ....... 13 I1,8U6 

TotAl ,... 81 26,163 



Europe and Azores Teleirra'h Co, 2 1,058 
Great N^^^lJllernT^ilepTaJ:lb Cq.: 

<;abloa tn l'ji,iri>pn and A^ni. ,, ... 24 

Hulifai and UerniiiLta Cable Co. ► 1 

iDdo-ii^uropKau Toleizrapti Co...... 2 

India Ru liber, fiutta Ferebfl and 

Telegfraph VVi>rlt!i Co, ,-,.*.,,,. . 3 

Meilcaii TeiegTSpb C<* 3 

Rlrer Plate Telflfc^raph Co 1 

Soeietfl Ji'™n<!alBe des Telei^rapht^a 

aoTJB-Marina. ...._....,.,,.,,... 19 

SoLSiti American Cable Co... 2 

D H ited StHtea a ad Haiti Telegraph 

and Cable Co . ^ 1 

West AfrictiD Tel^tTHph Co 11 

Wcpt Coaist uf America T«leKra|>h 

no,,... -. 8 

Wostorn an d BranUl a n Te I eirrapti 

Co. r. , 16 

West India and Punama I'ela* 

graph Co, .*.. , ...*- 22 



6,962 
850 
U 

145 

1,627 

82 

4.720 
2.048 

1,- - 

2,977 

1,964 
6,164 

4.657 



Total, all Unea ,,,.,„.. 818 146,419 

OWNED BY NATIONS. 



Austria «L 

Belgium 2 

Denmark 73 

France 54 

Qermany 68 

Great Britain and Ireland 135 

Holland.. *.!......*•.•••••. •-••'..•• 24 

SaT^..::: ^ i-gei 

Norway 325 



214 

65 

235 

6,035 

2.225 

1,989 

65 



Portufi^. 

BusBla. 

Spain 

Sweden, 

Switterland 

Toikey 

•Nautical miles. 



115 
231 
1,744 
96 
10 
344 



Anrent! n e Rep iibl \ e and Brazil. ... 49 

AiJ>t rti LlR iiurf I*iuff Zealand 31 

BiLhLkma islands, , 1 

British Anierlca...... 1 

Brlt[&b India Uado-EumiJOiLa 

Tele^Niipb DepartiBont i HI 

Cljlna 2 

Corhin China and Tunqulu. , 2 

JapiiD ..,*.y^,w ." '0 

Mii^rifl...... .- 1 

Niivc^lle Caledonia 1 

Netherlands Indies. 7 

SeneKal. Afrit a-Dafcar to Goree 

Island. ^ "' 1 



119 
315 
213 
200 

1,919 
113 

774 

1,508 

2 

1 



TotaL U42 

tOfflcial figures not announced when this list was revised. 



19,880 



168 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



INFORMATION PBRTAININti TO SUBMABINB TBLBORAPH LINBS. 

Length of first successful cable • miles.... 

Length of first successful Atlantic cable miles.... 

Length of direct United States cable (Balllnskelligs Bay to Halifax, Nova 

Scotia) miles 

Length of French cable (Brest, France, to Gape Cod, Massachusetts) miles. . . . 

Distance from San Francisco to Hawaii (proposed line) miles. . . . 

Distance from Hawaii to Wake Island (proposed line) miles.... 

Distance from Wake Island to Guam (proposed line) miles.... 

Distance from Guam to Manila (proposed line) rr miles.... 

Distance from Manila to Asiatic coast miles.... 

Depth of water in which first successful cable was laid feet 

Depth of Atlantic cable lines feet 

Greatest depth at which cable has been laid, Haiti to Windward Islands. ..feet 

Greatest depth between San Francisco and Hawaii feet 

Greatest depth between Hawaii and Manila (estimated) feet . 



Present cost per mile of cable (estimate by Bright) 

Cost of laying per mile, ayerage 

Number of words per minute sent on first line 

Number of words per minute on first successful Atlantic cable line at beginning. . . . 
Number of words per minute on first successful Atlantic cable line, after experi- 
mental stage 

Present rate of speed (without duplex) 

Present rate by automatic system (without duplex) 

Increased use of wire by duplexing. percent.... 

Number of cables laid across the North Atlantic 

Number now working 

Average life of cable years.... 



^750 

I87S 

8 

8 



Original rates for messages, first Atlantic lines (minimum, 20 words or less) . . 

On first reduction (minimum, ao words or less) 

Original word rate, without minimum 

Present word rate, without minimum 

Length of telegraph cables of the world (1896) miles. . . . 

Length of land lihes of the world (1896— estimate by Bright) miles. . . . 

Cost of cable lines of the world (estimate by Bright) 

Cost of land lines of the world (estimate by Bright) '. ,.. 

Total length of telegraph wires, land and cable (estimate by Bright) miles. . 



15 
25 
50 
80 
16 
18 
25 
$100 
160 

10.25 

170.000 

6tB,000 

C28O,000.O0O 

1810,000.000 

^--r- 2,aoo,ooo 

Number of cable messages sent annually (estimate by Bright) 6,O00l0OO 

Per cent of world's lines built by governments 10 

Per cent built by private enterprise 

Time of message and answer, Washington to Santiago battlefield and return, .min. . 

Time of message, Washington to London and reply, In chess i oatch of 1898 sec. . . 

Number of cables owned by nations 

Length of cables owned by nations miles.... 

Number of cables owned by private companies 

Length of cables owned by private companies miles.... 

Longest single line without intermediate landing miles.... 

Present route of telegrams from Washington to Manila: To New York by land; to 
Valentia, Ireland, by cable; to Brighton, England, cable and land; to Havre, 
France, cable; to Marseilles, land; to Alexandria, Egypt, cable: to Sues, Egypt, 
land; to Aden, Arabia, cable; to Bombay, India, cable: to Madras, land; to 

Singapore. Malayan Peninsula, cable; to Saigon, Cochin China, cable; to Hong- 
ong, cable; to Bolinao, Philippine Islands (Luzon), cable; to Manila, land. 
Distance miles.... 



90 
12 



Every body of water lying between the 
inhabited portions of the earth, with the 
single exception of the Pacific ocean, has 
been crossed and recrossed by submarine 
telegraph lines. Even that vast expanse of 
water has been Invaded along its margin, 
submarine wires stretching along its west- 
em border from Siberia to Australia, while 
Its eastern borders are skirted with lines 
which stretch along the western coast of 
the two Americas. Several adventurous 
pioneers In Pacific telegraphy have ven^ 
tured to considerable distances and depths 
in that great ocean, one cable line running 
from Australia to New Zealand, a distance 
of over 1.000 miles, and another extending 
from Atistralla to the French colony of New 
Caledonia, 800 miles seaward. 

The chief obstacle in the past to the con- 
struction of a grand trans-Pacific cable was 
found in the fftct that midoeean restins 
places could not be satisfactorily obtained 
or arranged for. no single government con- 
trolling a sufficient number of suitable 
landing places to make this seem practic 
able, in view of the belief that the dls- 



14,000 

tances from which messages could be sent 
and cables controlled were limited. With 
landing places at Hawaii, Wake island, 
Guam and the Philippines, however, no sec- 
tion of a cable stretching from the United 
States to Asia and touching at these points 
would have a length equal to that now in 
daily operation between France and the 
United States. The length of the French 
cable from Brest, France, to Cape Cod, 
Massachusetts, is 3,250 miles, while the 
greatest distance from land to land on the 
proposed Pacific route would be that from~ 
San Francisco to Hawaii. 2,089 miles, that 
from Hawaii to Wake island being 2,040 
miles, from Wake island to Guam 1,290 
miles, from Guam to Manila 1,520 miles and 
from Manila to the Asiatic coast 630 miles. 
While the depth of the Pacific is somewhat 
greater than that at which any cable has 
been laid, the difference between its depth 
and the greatest reached by cables in the 
Atlantic would be very slight, the cable 
recently laid from Haiti to the Windward 
islands being in 18,000 feet of water, while 



NATIONAL DEBTS. 



153 



the ^eatest depth between San Francisco 
and Hawaii is 18,300 feet and the greatest 
depth between Hawaii and Manila Is esti- 
mated at 19,60<rfeet, though this estimate 
iB yet to be yerifled by detailed sonndings. 
Otto Kmmmel, who was the first to dis- 
C1188 the bathymetric data and calculate 
the area and rolume of the various 
oceanic basins, puts the mean depth of 
the Pacific at 2,160 fathoms, against 2,040 
for the Atlantic, in which cables have 
already been so successfully laid, and 
later researches and actual soundings, 
while they have developed extreme depths 
at certain points in the Pacific, have not, 
in the opinion of experts, been such as 
to warrant the belief that the depths along 
the proposed line would be considerably 

E eater than those in which cables have 
en already successfully laid and oper- 
ated. 

The developments in construction, lay- 
ing and operating of submarine cables and 
in their availability for general public use 
have kept pace with their extension 
throughout the civilUed world. From a 
mere gutta-percha-coated wire the sub- 
marine conductor of electricity has de- 
veloped in half a century into a great 
cable having a central copper core sur- 
nranded by numerous layers of noncon- 
ducting material and protected by steel 
wire wound spirally about it, and in turn 
further protected by waterproof and in- 
sect-proof wrappings. From a steamer- 
towed open barge, tne facilities for laying 
have developed to a fleet of nearly fifty 
steam vessels, with every facility for 
laying, picking up, splicing and repairing 
the cable lines. From a speed rate of 
three words per minute, which was made 
on the first transatlantic cables, the speed 
of transmission has been accelerateif to 
fifty words per minute, and even more 
than that with the automatic transmit- 
ters now coming into use with cable lines, 
while by the duplexing of the cables their 
carrying capacity is doubled. From a cost 
to the sender of $100 per message, which 
was originally charged on the first trans- 
atlantic cables, the rate from New Tork 
to London and the great cities on the con- 
tinent of Europe has fallen to 25 cents per 
word. From several hours required for the 
transmission of a message and receipt of a 
response, the time has been so reduced 
that messages from the executive mansion 
to the battlefield at Santiago were sent 
and a response received within twelve 



minutes, while a message sent from the 
house of representatives in Washington to 
the house of parliament in London in the 
chess match of 1898 was transmitted and 
the reply received in thirteen and one-half 
seconds. 

The effect of this ready and inexpensive 
method of transmitting thoughts and words 
from continent to continent throughout the 
civilized world is shown in the rapid 
development of international commerce 
since it began. The first successful cable 
lines between the United States and 
Europe were put into operation in 1866. 
In that year our commerce with Europe 
amounted to I6&2.232.289: in 1876. to 1728,- 
969,053; in 1886, to 1896,911,504; in 1896, to 
11,091,682,874, and in 1898, to $1,279,739,936, 
while our commerce with the whole world, 
which in 1866 amounted to $783,671,588, had 
by 1898 reached the enormous sum of 
$1,847,531,984. 

With this . evidence of the advantage of 
prompt communication between commercial 
centers desiring an interchange of their 
products, it may not be improper to call 
attention to the fact that the United 
States now obtains but a small proportion 
of the commerce of Asia, which it Is at 
present able to reach only through the long 
and devious submarine and land telegraph 
lines across the Atlantic, the continent of 
Europe, the Mediterranean, the Red sea or 
the Persian gulf, the Indian ocean, land 
lines across India, cable lines again by 
way of the Straits Settlements and thence 
along the Asiatic coast and among the 
islands of Oceanica. The commerce of the 
countries of Asia and Oceanica lying com- 
mercially adjacent to the Philippine 
islands amounts to more than $2,000,000,000 
annually, their imports alone averaging 
$100,000,000 a month, or $1,200,000,000 per 
annum. Of this enormous market the 
United States at present obtains less than 
6 per cent, despite the fact that the im- 
ports into the countries in question are 
largely composed of the classes of articles 
produced in the United States and offered 
for sale by her manufacturers and mer- 
chants. With a direct cable communica- 
tion across the Pacific, direct water com- 
munication through a Nicaraguan canal, 
and an increase in the number and capac- 
ity of American steamships, it seems not 
Improper to suppose that a material addi- 
tion might be made to the share obtained 
by the United States in the trade of that 
part of the world. 



NATIONAL DEBTS. 

(From United States Consular Reports.] 



COUIITBY. 



SnfcUiid... 
France 

Germany.. 

Pmssia.. 

Bavaria. 

Total.. 

Bnasia — 



Debt. 



£683,000,000 13,323,819,600 



14884.000.000 



•107.717,015 
321,2S1,108 
70,919.205 



502,807,828 



1978.000.000 



6,248.686.000 



624,204,858 

1,578.016,666 

846.128,811 



2.447349,830 



4,769,487,000 



Country. 



Austria-Hungary : 

Austria 

Hungary 

Common debt 

Total 



Italy .. 
Spain., 



Grand total. 



Debt. 



£119,000.000 
181,000.000 
229.000,000 



929,000,000 



610,184,900 
1369,646,700 



$579,113,500 

880336,600 

1,114,428,600 



2,574.878300 



2.482,814,812 
1.796.880,799 



4356.727.928 28.685,266.441 



♦Interest, 8 per cent, tinterest, £29.000.000 ($141,128300). tlnterest. ia9,e27,946 ($96,619,408). 



151 



CHICAGO DAILY Nt-lWS ALMANAC FOlt IWO. 



lAND TELI:ghJlFH BTSTEJiB OF THE WORLD, 



C0[7XTHJE,S. 



.Xitmbfruf LtJi-Qthof 



United Kinji^doiii .. 
LTnEtt'rt tjtates..,.. 

Frunze?. ,...■.. 

iJennims'..,. ,,.... 

Uuflsla — ,,., . 

Japau — rn.T.-^H. 
Ai:]Btriilm n. , ,,..*, 

Italy ......-.-., 

Beltflutii.,,.. 

SpMLlll,.,^,.,.. 

Ait:KeiitTna4 . . . . ,.^ . . 
Infirt,.,. ,.,,...,, 

NettiprlimrtJ*. 

Mt'.TLif" 

Cfl]iai[ri .,, 

Slur it 7,0 find J , 

Turkfy.. 

Bffrpt 

ElQiiiniinla ,,, 

Cape Cri]niij.L. .. . . , 

Sweden....... , 

Depmurk 

Norway , , 

Portuj^al .H, 

Brain;,. 

Chile ,, . 

Greece -. 

B^TTla . .. , . ,.x^ 

Cuba ..,.,.,........ 

Uruffuaj- .^.. 

Colombia , ., 

Persia ,,,... - 

Perp 

PnrKxiiaj ,,,. 



LO<K 

hm 

£^ 

Let* 

KB 
1^ 

K>& 

UJ 
S19 
US 
41 
*S5 



41 im 

JMJlfi 
49,375 

m - 

3,l<i4 

4.3iHJ 
S,S83 

10.143 
LHOO 

4.3B0 

4,4W( 
L401 

a/!0 






1.017JU3 

H)4.3T3 

W.24T 
13,J7[ 

10,150 

25,150 
9,375 

fl7fi 

HM\ 
+4,000 

*aouo 
e,(i;o 

*3,.'-jO0 






tioji. per ctipildj. ■^^*^*^ 



77.aS(i7h1 
.^.39Q,aS4 

10.:^, 163 
8,002,fl57 

T^sasjo 

S.t3U9,ll 

4,Ki3,987 

4.T36,734 
4,583.7^ 
*4.aB.fjOQ 
3.345.714 

2.(177^702 

3,390.B34 
2.37S.3iH 

2aT7,4T7 
l,!>ILT5i 
L^,2B1 
1.354,^37 
L283sE*5 
I,l5».Si5B 
94L785 

en^,4^ 

705,687 
357.014 

833.477 

aaaon 

ll£,64e 



4is,m^ 



3aitJ4,075 


S.OO 


7D.lJM.flOC 


}.03 


S8.517.ia75 


3.T6 


52,Brr^.yi5 


.T:4 


4L2al,Ji4S 


.50 


135,063,313 


.11 


«.?70,fiai 


.Sti 


a.^^fiU) 


2,40 


m,?9o.49a 


.n 


«.(I«9,S31 


L43 


n,565,«i3a 


.34 


a964,&ll 


1.3S 


f22£,ono,ooo 


.«} 


4,oss.e5e 


M 


i2^578.eei 


.31 


S.^SOhOOU 


,75 


2,9eB,S4fl 


LOtt 


S4,1^,!KIQ 


.11 


fiJ34,406 


.25 


et,m,m 


.41 


1,537,30* 


1,*G 


4,9i&.at« 


.44 


3,lB&,i5S5 


.es 


2,000.ftl7 


.95 


fi,mn.73fl 


.27 


I4,332,5a0 


,00 


2JI3,115 


.4S 


2,4:as0i) 


.39 


£,314,laJ! 


,115 


l,5ft*^(J7¥ 


.55 


1,631,667 


.3^ 


818,S4S 


.3& 


a,87S,«M 


<0S 


^,mm 


.{irfi 


3.«31,e44 


.03 


■4HI.00(I 


.07 



^KatJiiJiited. tExcluHlTe off tpdattiry Slate*. t^tate IIprs only, SPopuIated 

LiaUOR STATISTICS. 
FeTipentefl IJqaora prnrfiiced fn encli tttttt? anrl territory from IBSB to I8a&. 

{ From Itepurta nf tiip C^>napitJig>oneT of latetnal Reveppcl 



12U.^ 
204.012 

aos^aao 

24a92'^ 

8,.')1&139 

147,055 

i]o,&4a 

1L373 

im.en> 

1-778.135 

1,068,314 

l£.(y8 

767,1115 

a.s]ti.oao 

15.973 
Lllfi.(W7 

J4oa,€w 

18.307 

l72,firB 
1&38& 
1B4,4«» 

»a>oss 

3,300.878 

19,QgO 
6»,«0 

4i,B|a 

T^lU 

4eaL7fr 

98,000; 



States and Tkrritobieb. 



Aluhan^a ,,, ,. 

Callftkrnia tinti Nevada, , 

Colorado and Wyointnif 

Comiet:tlcut sini Rhoctti lEtand 

Plorida,.. 

GeofKb^- ■ *' ■ ' ■ 

IlUnolB ,,,..,,.,,,... 

ladUDa., . ., 

Iowa *. ..,,.,,, 

Kansas apa Indian Territory. . 

[fe^ntuuky ,. „ ,. 

Louliilaria and Mt&M tfiippl 

Maryland,, Uist. ^.'tjlppibla fc Df^laware 

Ma^achiiaijttii, 

Mlpbigap — * 

MJnneGOta 

MliiSDUrl. 



Mop tana, IduliiO und Utah . 
Xebrfttilta aTJfl Liakntas . 



New nampsb[rf f JtlalnG iind Vprmoat 

New,Tersey ,-..., 

New MpTiro and ArJZpna,.,..., 

New York,,,,,,,....... 

North Carolina. , 

imio.. ., 

OretiOQ and Wafebln^un ,.-. 

Fen imylvan!a, . , , , , **,-*..,►,. 

ftootb CartilLna -,,-,- ,..,., 

Til nneaeeo - - 

Tpxfin , 

Vtrginia .».,*-,►. .- ,, 

West VlTtfiiila 

WlBCOllStfl *. 

Total P . , 



1SP3. 



Qarrefa. 
44 .UH 
7^7 .ras 
2au7S5 
40S,1i3fl 



69.267 
3.417,^ 

038,204 
130,5rta 

86; ,653 

292,^1 
8B3.(t3l 

1,^1.780 
7i^.^.'i5 
410,570 

3,281, l4iJ 
Ei5,i*47 
170.773 
409,155 

L915.7?4li 
7.1U 

B,m,441* 



S.834.807 
33IJ.72& 

5,^i5 
PT,425 
l;!lJflS 

79,480 

^5ilL17i^ 



iefl4. 



727,^197 
188J»;i 

4;-ia,eiiP 



78,40? 
8,310,134 

ei«j,o«7 

136.048 
fi.t*7 



»waao 

830,5^3 
Lai8,3J47 
655,580 
390,»0^ 
3,188,449 
73,137 
17e,?r2 
36C2ff^ 

l.aaa,so5 

4,5flf{ 

9.7:^,3;i'i 



3,6ta.En3 

8,447^0 
0,^1 1 

1^.1* 

1H7,1^3 

76.t)li^J 

ii!,;ax) 

2,90^,461 



rJ3^:4fB,at3 



isa5. 



2HJW 
19a, 1,50 



84,405 
3,2S3,32i 

127.101 

6,013 

8S7,B97 



Lm,747 
659,470 
420,378 

B.l.HO.S'il 

87.044 
J 79,61 7 

1,994,541 

4.078 
B,75B,a0l 



a,fi33.on7 

175.945 



9,805 
ffi,0W 
331,2*4 
76,017 
1(©,322 
3,80?,00t 
;H:<.iaa.7K4 



1896. 



31.6(39 

*mof» 

210,327 
&5a,590 



ID4J44 

3,530.724 

637,176 

130,080 

G,0E{9 

40i,sao 

246,898 
e93,t>42 

L580.33a 
722.244 
463,283 

2^262,048 
110,4(5^ 
176,132 

m.iy 

4,7r« 

10,06L047 

5 

2,876,668 

1M).494: 

1.047.081 

n.ioi 

fltS,7«0 

8r7,635 

116,177 

3,flM,aa4 



35,85^,2^ 



3897, 



36,;i70 
?fia,-4l 
30fi,85a 
i7L3(J5 

2,460 

109,300 

8.344,9* 

€34.201 

142,163 

S.255 
378,290 
251,043 

916. lau 

1,670,56& 
410,814 

133,[I10 

178.408 
2S5,5^ 

2mA^ 

3J91 
94ai/i30 



2,a31,e09 
1^^,469 

B,905!,aOl 
8,400 
ULSWJ 
2U6.9fiT 
10^,354 
133,125 



34,41 iS.Rg 



1898. 



Bamla. 
41&.049 

G8i,lfi3 

io.9aa i 
. i?s,»7a 

3,601.163 
175,8&1 
49QJ47 , 

B8i,irL_ 

LSOS^GOi 
7a2.647 

65a$i2 

313^9S9 

2,11^310 

4,218 

10.fl5a,4S0 

SO 

23g,3bl 

l;345,072 

7,190 

iaoj26 

323,761 

138,144 

1«,322 

2.88fl,aCa 



H7,a29,3a9 



REIilGIOTJB. 



155 



EeItgtOU0. 



BTATI8TI08 OF THX OHTJKOHEB. 

[From the New York Independent.] 

Whereyer practicable, official year books haye been relied upon. Where they are lacking, 
the best possible estimates by authorities in the different denominations haye been glyen. In 
some cases fiyen those haye failed through unwillingness to gather statistics, as with the Ply- 
mouth Brethren, or through lack of organization. In some oases the flfcures of the census of 
1860 are continued. As the Roman Catholic church includes children, a deduction is made, the 
result being approximate rather than absolute. 

Some of the losses are more apparent than real, being due to the substitution of official 
figures for estimates in the tables of last year. 
MINISTERS, CHURCHES AND COMMUNICANTS IN 1897 AND 1898 IN UNITED STATES. 



DENOMINATIONS. 



MINISTERS. 



1897. 1898. 



Churches. 



1897. 1898. 



COMMUNICANTS. 



1897. 



ADVBNT1ST8- 

1. Eyangellcal 

2. Adyent Ctiristians 

8. SeyenthDay 

4. Church of God 

5. Life and Adyent Union 

6. Churches of God in Jesus Christ 

Total Adyentists 

ARBTBNIANS- 

1. Orthodox 

2. Byangelical 

Total Armenians 

BAPTISTS- 
L Regular (north) 

2. Regular (south) 

3. Regular (colored) 

4. Six Principle 

6. SeyenthDay 

6. Freewill 

7. Original Freewill 

8. General..... 

9. Separate 

10. United 

11. Baptist Church of Christ. 

12. Primltlye 

13. OldTwo-Seed-in-the-SpiritPredestlnarian 

Total Baptists. 

BRETHREN (RIVER)- 

1. Brethren in Christ 

2. Old Order, or Yorker 

8. United Zion's Children 

Total Riyer Brethren 

BRETHREN (PLYMOUTH)- 

1. Brethren (IJ 

2. Brethren (IL) 

8. Brethren (III.) 



84 

912 
864 
19 
00 
94 



80 

610 

1348 



80 

610 

1^03 

29 



1,147 

26,600 
47,779 
617 
3,000 
2,872 



1,401 



1,483 



2,140 



2.195 



81,945 
886 



1 14, 700 17,166 



12,672 
14 
123 
1,879 
120 
660 
19 
25 
80 
2,130 
800 



10,190 
14 

lao 

1,850 
120 
660 
91 
26 
80 
2,130 
300 



26,250 

14,471 

18 

109 

1,624 

167 

680 

24 

204 

162 

8,630 

473 



28,986 

14,462 
18 
111 
1,671 
167 
G76 
91 
204 
162 
8,630 
473 



32,112 

162 
7 
20 



32,145 

162 
7 
20 



47,602 

78 
8 
26 



60.289 
78 



886 



2,126,000 

1.728,^ 
987 

9,205 
91.911 
12,000 
28,000 

1,599 
18.209 

8,254 
126,000 
12351 



4,167,300 

4.000 
214 
625 



179 



4. Brethren (IV.)'. 

Total Plymouth Brethren 

CATHOLICS- 

1. Roman Catholic 

2. Independeht Catholic 

Polish Branch 

Old Catholic 

8. Reformed Catholic 

Total Catholics 

ATHOLIC i^OSTOLlC 

JHINBSB TEMPLES 

CHRI8TADELPHIANU 

CHRISTIANS— 

i. Christians (Christian Connection) 

2. Christian Church South 

Total (Christians 

CHRISTIAN CATHOLIC mowie) 

CHRISTIAN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENTISTS 

CHRISTIAN UNION. 



Ill 
109 



Ul 

114 
88 
86 



4,739 



2,419 

1.235 

718 



10,840 

20 

3 
8 



U.001 



14,869 



819 
14,676 



6,661 
8,166,9ffj 



10,871 
95 



11,051 
96 



1,400 
100 



],a 



102 



14.880 
10 

47 



1,826 
170 



' 10 
47 
63 

1.424 
174 



17,000 

425 

1,000 



8,333,179 
1.491 



CHUR CH OF GODJjyinebrennerian) . 
CHURCHY 



[TRIUMPHANT (Schweinfurth).. 



1,500 

7 

10 

8,500 

183 
460 



1.49S 
20 
10 
10,000 
183 
460 



1,405 
13 
13 
843 
294 
680 
12 



40 
13 
416 
294 
680 
12 



1,277 

105,600 
16,000 



121,600 
6.000 
764 
40,000 
18,214 
88,000 
884 



156 



GHI0A60 DAILY NEWS ALBIANAO FOR 1900. 



STATISTICS OF OHUBCHBS.— CONTDf UED. 



DSNOMINATIONS. 



MINISTEBS. 



1897. 1898. 



Chubches. 



1897. 1898. 



Communicants . 



1897. 1898. 



OHDBCH OF THA NBW JBRUSALBM 

COMMUNISTIC S0C1BTIB8- 

1. Shaken 

2. Amana 

8. Harmony 

4. Separatists. 

6. Altruists 

6. Church Triumphant (KorestaanEcclesia). 

Total Communistic Societies 

CONQRBGATIONALISTS 

DISCIPIiBS OF CHRIST 

DUNKARDS- 

L Q^rman Baptists (ConserratlTes) 

2. German Baptists (Old Order) 

8. German Baptists (Progressive) 

I. Seventh-Day Baptists (German) 

Total Dunkards 

BPI8COPALIAN8- 

1. Protestant Episcopal 

2. Reformed Episcopal 

Total Episcopalians 

EVANGELICAL BODIES- 

1. Bvangelfcal Association 

2. United BvangeUcal Church 

Total Evangelical 

FRIENDS- 

1 iytends (^hodox) 

2. BWends (Hicksite) 

8. Friends (Wllburite) 

i. Friends (Primitive) 

- Total Friends 

FRIENDS OFTHE TEMPLE 

GERMAN EVANGELICAL PROTESTANT. . 

GERMAN EVANGELICAL SYNOD 

GREEK CHURCH- 

1. Greek Orthodox 

2. Russian Orthodox 

Total Greek Church 

JEWS 

LATTER-DAY SAINTS- 

1. Church of Jesus Christ Latter-Dav Saints. 

2. Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of 

Latter-Day Saints 

Total Latter-Day Saints 

LUTHBRANS- 

OENBBAL BODIES. 

1. General Synod..... 

2. United Synod in the South 

8. General Council 

4. Synodical Conference 

IMiEPT,>TpE3fT SYNODS. 

6. UnltiKl NcrwtrfQTi 

Ik Joint Syayd of OliiO 



189 



117 



160 



100 

16 
7 

1 
1 
1 
5 



7,674 



6,7(6 

1,6S0 
1,600 
250 
200 
26 
205 



6,780 

2,316 

150 

250 

6 



5.475 
5,922 

2,406 

150 

231 

6 



80 
6,646 



T75 
100 
145 



31 
6,614 
10,068 

850 

100 

160 

6 



8,980 

616.195 

1,061,079 

86,000 

4,000 

12,000 

IM 



3.930 

626.864 

1,066,615 

90,000 

4,000 

16.000 

191 



2,720 

4,668 
87 



2,7! 

4,764 
103 



1.0Q8 



6.098 
93 



1,116 



6,296 
104 



101.194 



656,640 
8.863 



4.745 
996 



4,857 



426 



6,186 



1,6U 
605 



1,787 

684 



667,508 
94,742 



109,194 

979,604 
9,743 



1,479 



2,219 



2,471 



1,093 


201 

63 

9 

1.093 


4 


4 


1,130 


1.1I 



7. Buffalo. . 

8. TlftUKe'8,NorweglaQ 

9. Ele^l^en'a, NOTWtii^ian 

10. TvxM * 

11, German of Town... , 

12 NorweKiaa Lutheran 

15. MlcblHan... ...,...,. 

14. Panlsiiln Ameritiii 

16. Icelaodlc, 

16. [fnnmnueL, 

J 7. Suomai, Fliiiilih. 
8. Norwetflau S'Me 

19- SI ova klftTi. , H . 

20. BfuiEEti United 

iiideipendi^at conj^regations. . 

' Total Lutherans 

Waldenstromians' 



801 
600 



1,185 

204 

1,128 



860 
434 
26 
91 
7 

10 
382 
215 
83 
42 
7 

22 
9 
50 
7 
70 

© 

6,626 
140 



151,770 

90,921 
21,992 
4,329 

m 

117,474 

840 

86,600 

194.618 



18.504 



116,714 
50,190 



43 
301 

1,700 

2,200 
3,900 



1,106 

207 

1,214 

1.879 

868 
449 
26 
89 



175,904 

02.073 
21.992 
4," 

"na©6 

840 
86,500 
199,234 

6.0B0 
48.000 



600 

600 
1,200 



1,606 

425 

1,810 

3,225 

1,026 



670 

796 

610 
13» 



1,496 

427 

2,066 

2,451 

1,060 
606 
89 
217 




11 
417 
251 
66 
47 
7 
46 
11 
50 



11 
794 
676 
88 
66 
26 
61 
44 
60 



6,482 
140 



190,594 
40,690 
823,054 
520,005 

126,110 
86,273 
4,400 
16,166 
2,100 
1.819 
67,807 
64,164 
13,843 
6,900 
8,009 
5,100 
4,700 
5,600 
650 

J'Sffi 
21.000 

1,607«40B 

20,000 



480,030 
1,200,000 

300,000 

40.639 
340,688 



190.839 
88,612 
847.288 
519,524 

123,575 
86,097 
4,300 
17.488 



L289 
71.074 
66960 
7^ 
1,080 
8.000 
6,118 
6,000 
6,500 



7,963 

26,000 

1.626,552 

gO.«P 



RKLIGIUU3. 



157 



STATISTICS OF CIIUHCHES.-Co^TINCED. 



DESOUrNATlONfl, 



MBNNONITBS- 

L MeiiQDEtiie ., — ..,,- 

'i. Bruederboef .......... ^ - . ^ ... . 

S. AualBli , 

4. OW Amlab 

5. ApofitoWe, ,.-4 

6. Ref ormt^ii . — . ^ - 

S, Ctiiux!b tit iioa in Christ 

ft. Ol(i(Wr&l0Ti 

10. fiuQdciB Conference 

U. l>&f i^nBeIf;>}s 

IS. Btftthien In Christ.. 

Total MtJanocittea...,--... 



SiKTHODISTS- 

L Metbo4i9t Kplscopal ^ . 

2. (JnloTi AmaHmn Metbodlst Episcopal. . 

a, AlricaQ Meibodiat Epls<x>jial.. ,r. 

4 AfrScaa Union Metbydlst EpJsoopal 

6. African MtJiboaJJji BplacopaL Klon 

G. BlOtbodl&t PrDlHJB.tunt ....,,.,. 

7. Wesleyso Methootat — .,.,.,., 

%r MethOdtiit Eplscopals South * 

9. Oongrei^attoniLl Metbortlbt 

m Cooirewational Methodist {cdJorea) 

IL NewCtinfrraKS^tlouat Metbodlst.,,,.. 

R ZlOnUttloo A]?o?tulltr ,n,, 

li. Colored Mc^tticwilat E^[»copal ............. 

il Prlmlilvo ML^thoiilat.... ...,...-.. 

]& Free MetbotliJt. ♦,.... 

IdL tzidepenrlont MetbociUt.,,.^ ^ 

W* DvantzoUat Mlaatonary , , - 

Total Metbodlstfi ► 

itOBA VI AN9. 

PRB3BTTKRIANS" ^ ^. . ^ a. . 
L Fresbrterian in the mited Stales of 

America (northern^ 

%. Cuqaberlftnd Presbyter! a ti .■■■►" 

1 Cumberland Preifbyterlan (colored) 

4 Welsli OalTlnL'iUe.,. ..- 

(k United Presb yterian 

& I*njsljytertaii in tiie United Stittcfl iaonib 

em) ,..*»,, ■ — " — 

7. Associate Cburcli of North America ^ 
a. AMOOUte Reformed 3ynod of the rion tb 
ft Reformed Prestijfterlan In the United 



BfltN(!*T*;n-'^. 



1B&7. I IBBS. 



10, Keformea PrcsbyUfrian In North Aiuer- 



Icft ttieneral Synod* 

II- Reformed Presbyiorlan (CovenantddV. 
12, lleformed Preabyterlan in the United 

States and Canada 



Total Presbyterians , . . . 

B2FORM15D- 

1, R«f urmed In Amerifla , 

2. H* formed I n ITnllG d Stated 

a. Chrtfltlan RBformod 

Total Reformed , . . . 

§ALVATlOSr ARMr ,.., 

■aCHWENKhKLDI.^Ka .►. 

^Oi:iXL> n FlETH KKN , VJL" ' ■ 

SOCI HT Y i;>J II BT H IC AL CUliTlT BE... 

SFIEIITUALISTS... 

THEOSOPHICAJ^ &0CIET¥ 

i [TN-ITS!T> BRETOHEN-^ ^ 

L United Bfettarcn In Cbrlat 

1 United Urethren vOld ConfltltutlonJ, 
Total United Brethren., . , -, . 

UNTTARIaKS ,. * 

UNI VERS AI.I9TS,. --* 

VOT OTiTTfiERS * ■ ♦ ■■ . . - 

IKD BFB £f DBNT OONG liiSG ATioNS - - . 

0fspd tot-al. 



3^5 

lb 

43 
lUU 
IS 

41 

m 



IU.411 

bSXXi 

b 

30 

l,l»7 

T7 



laj 



ti,70& 
1,^71 

m 



vai 



ii^j 

1,089 

ai 



SHI 

m 
ift 

17 

«r 
•jfi 

4fi 



IJOUI 

5,.72|i 

m 

2.7S9 
1,J8B 

uoo 
& 

-TO 
1^005 



17 



l.m 
TOO' 



bab 

T73 
fiSU 






ham 

Soil 



L44?l 

m 

41 



llJUCi 

l.Ut* 
Ul 



CQtrHt'Ut:^. L'O.MAIUNICANTS. 



1^37. 



IL^ 

'2b 
2 

:s4 
50 
IB 
in 
ii; 
n 

67 



cii 

4.^uO 

70 

i.fkia 

mi 

^7& 
5 
35 
'32 

Moy 

Tue 



&0.wa 
1112 



IHD 



2^Sbi 

rti 



2,C5£t 



i,m 

7ilU 



690 
^^ &4 

m.9m 



U,TU1 



b 

'& 

2 

fVl 

w 

l>i 
15 
Hi 
11 



2^,ST1 

in 

5,8.^< 
7U 

IVMi 

5 
05 
S^ 

i,:*o 

00 

i,22y 

15 

13 






1W4 
I&lI 

2.STS 
3! 
1^ 

lOtJ 

so 



u,m 



l,iViO 



71a 
♦ 

.JO 
4 

334 

m 

4,172 

H5r. 



fl,(K7 

84tl 
2U0 

IdU 



740 



^^1 
123 



1,150 






Wb\ 



18»7 



21,000 

2.4;i3 
i,i;5a 

471! 

GIU 
2,e[iO 
1,15(! 

2jiy 



54^14 

3,(389.411* 

%i!rb 

030,550 

7,IMJ0 

m.mb 

182.MI 
IH.tfUO 

li!,O0U 
3l!J 

IC1^P58 

'i6.13& 
UiMi 



14,230 



175.642 

ia,a6ij 

I'J^OOO 

iia,ud3 

211,*^ 
I.Of^i 
10,lffl4 



5.000 



iBm. 



21 .tO) 

12,751 

209 
l.r»5 
9.17a 

4n 

t!]0 

2.U50 
l.laS 
2.Sliri3 



5d.2lS 

2h705.<501 

2,*JJ5 

7iiO,Hfel 

7,000 

610,«l 

Ifl0,9t54 

lti,500 

1.456,^145 

liaw 

i.auo 

b^,s}Oii 

UJOO 
2d,l^^ 
2.5(JS» 
4,i)U0 



liSiii 



954 ,W2 

l>l0.tBS5 
3&.000 
12.000 

lUniWt 

217,Cfr5 

l.(]&3 

Id,^ 



rou 



^Ufik2 

10,710 



357,^1 
40,000 

l,Of^ 

4ShO!HU 

3,0*J 

2li5.U7 
45.000 



;ft«j,i]7 

7O,00U 
Dl.(KS' 

7,oon 

14^ 



mji^\ ^,TUtK<^ 



G,383 

5sa 



1,543.401 

no.na 

24i!.Jtiy 



^70,277 

«j,oaD 

ojij 
1.300 
45.030 
3^00) 



75,000 
*3,B50 
2.000 
14,131 



g7.7i4,5aa| 



158 



CHIOAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



ROMAH OATHOUO OEUSOH OF THE TJKITSD 8TATBB. 

ApoHoUe DOeaaU— Host Rev. Mgr. Martlnelli, Washington, IX C. 

OarMnatmJameB Oibbons, Baltimore, Md. 

ABCHBISH0P8. 



Arehdioeetu. NamsB. 

St. Lottis, Mo John Joseph Kain. 

Cincinnati, O. .......; . . WllUam H. Eider. 

Chicago, 111 Patrick A. Feehan. 

Boston, Mass John Joseph Williams. 

Philaa^lphla, Pa Patrick John By an. 

Portlan(LX>re Alex. Christe. 

-New Yoi*. N. Y M. A. Corrlgan. 

BISHOPB. 



ArehdioceteM. Natneg, 

New Orleans, La P. L. Chapeile. 

San Francisco, Cal Patrick W. Biordan. 

St. Paul, Minn John Irelano. 

Milwaukee, Wis Frederick X. Katser. 

Santa Fe, N. M P.Bonrgade. 

Dnbnqne, Iowa John Henneesy. 



. tHoeeae$. Namet 

MobUe. Ala. Edward P. Allen. 

Springfield, Mass T. D. Beayen. 

Savannah. Ga Thomas A. Becker. 

Lincoln, Neb Thomas Bonacum. 

Manchester, N. H D. M. Bradley. 

Boston, Mass John Brady. 

-Helena, Mont John B . Brondel. 

St. Joseph, Mo M. F. Bnrke. 

Albany, N. Y T. A. M. Burke. 

NashTille, Tenn T. 8. Byrne. 

Indianapolis, Ind F. S. Chatard. 

Davenport. Iowa Henry Cosgrove. 

Winona, Minn Jos. B. Cutter 

Concordia, Kas J. F. Cunningliam. 

Baltimore. Md A. A. Curtis. 

Wheeling, W. Va P. J. Donahue. 

Dallas, Tex B.J.Dunne. 

Natchitoches, La Anthony Durier. 

Marquette, Blich E. Frederick. 

New Tork, N. Y J. M. Farley. 

Kansas' City, Kas L. M. Fink. 

Little Rock, Ark E. Fitwerald. 

Brie<Pa J. E. Fitzmaurioe. 

Detroit, Mich J. S. Foley. 

San Antonio, Tex J. A. Forest. 

Ogdensburg, N. Y Henry Gabriels. 

Galveston, Tex. .' N. A. Gallagher. 

Kansas City, Mo J. J. Glennon. 

Boise City. Idaho A. J. Glorieux. 

Sacramento, CaL Tbos. Grace. 

Belmont, N. C. . . . .'. . . . .Leo Haid. 

Providence. R.I M.J.Harklns. 

Portland JMe .J. A. Healy. 

Wichita. Kas John J. Hennessy. 

Natchez, Miss Thomas Heslin. 

Ashley. Pa M. J.Hoban. 

Kansas City, Mo John J. Hogan. 

Cleveland, O. . •. I. F. Horstmann. 

Belleville, 111 John Janssen. 

Cheyenne, Wyo T. M. Lenlhan. 



Syracuse, N. T 

I.ouisTnie. Kt: , 

Brooklyn, NpV...... 

Trc:Dt.-.vti, N.J 



Namet* 
.P. A. Lndden. 
►W. Q. McCJoafcejr. 
.C, B.MflDonuelf. 
.J. A. MoFanl. 
,B. J. McOavlck. 



DuJuth, MJim Jmnies MoQolrlek. 

Rocbest4sr, N. F .B. J. McQii&ld. 

COTlnfftuiit Kr ,P. C- Mae;^, 

Btfhver. Hoi... ..N. C Mats:. 

G iithTfo, Oklahomik T..T. MeersH?hat^rL 

ijrccn Ray. Wis S, G. Messmer. 

Bur Unffti^n, Vt ,. . J, B- MicUaud . 

WUuLLdgton, Del John J. Manaj^tiaii. 

Bl. Augusnine, Fla Jobn Moore. 

Los Angeles, Ca1'.^^...GeorRQ MontfOEDenr. 

Erlfc Pa* ,Toblas MuIIpd. 

CbarlBstou, S. C ,.,.., .H- P. Northrop. 
Vanootivtjr, vriiBU..H.,.Edwaiid O'D^a, 
Sioux Fftirs, 8, D.. . „ . . .Thos, O'GOrmaii 

Seraaton. Pa , . . W. O^Hiira. 

Plttsbara. Pa B- Ph elan , 

FtallRdelptitd, Pii .B. F. Prendergast. 

BuHiilo, ^ . V, J. B. QQlglifT . 

detuACtie 



her. 



Van Wajnt-, liifl......J. Udd 

Gmnd KnMi<J^ Mlcfa.. .H. i. REelit<*r 

New f^rltjans, |.a. Q, A. Rouxel. 

Aiton. HI — JamoA Ryan. 

Bult Lalc^iGlty, Ut^ih-.L. Rcaulaq. 

Qmahiw Net>. „R Soaimell. 

La C'rO!ii*e, Wis. .., J. Schwetjacli* 

Hftrrlsdurg, Pa.. J, W. ftbanahcn] 

ParMQ, N. D. - ....John ShAnlor 

Peoria, 111 J. L- Spaldinic 

H anf ord. Conn ........ M . T lemey . 

&t» Cloud. Mtnn. . - . . . * .Jam«e TroltecK 

REchmonf), Va, .A. Van du VyveT- 

T.fl.rGdo, TejE ,,P, Verdaguer. 

i'Lilumbua, O.^. , ., . ., ►.,Ts<;s.nt* 
South Orange, N J,...W. M. Wigger. 



Dioceses. Bishops. Reaidenu. 

Alabama. . . R. H. WUmer Mobile. 

H. M.Jackson, co- 
adjutor Eufaula. 

Arl. & N. M.. J. M. Kendrick Santa Fe. 

Arkansas.. . .Wm. M. Brown Little Rock. 

Boise James B. Funsten. . Boise City. 

California. . . W. F. Nichols^ San Francisco 

Sncram'to. Wm. H. Moreland.. Sacramento. 

Los Ang*s. J. H. Johnson Los Angeles. 

Colorado. . . .J. F. Spalding. Denver. 

Coxmecticut.Chaunoey B. Brews- 
ter. .....New Haven. 

Delaware.. . .L. Coleman Wilmington. 

Florida— 

Northem..B. Q. Weed Jacksonville. 

Southern. . W. C. Gray Orlando. 

Georgia C. K. Nelson Atlanta. 

Illinois- _, 

Chicago. . . . W. B. McLaren Chicago. 

Spr'^eld. .G. F. Seymour .Springfield. 

C. B. Hale, coadju- 
tor Cairo. 

Quincy . . . .Alex. Burgess Peoria. 

Inaiana— 

Southern.. Joseph M. Francis. .Indianapolis. 

Northern. .John H. White Michig'n City. 

Iowa T. N. Morrison Davenport. 



PR0TS8TANT EPI800PAL OEUBOE. 



Dioceses, Bishops. Residence, 

Kansas F. R. MiUspaugh.. . .Topeka. 

Kentucky .. .T. U. Dudley Louisville. 

Lezlngton.L. W. Burton Lexington. 

Louisiana ... Davis Sessums NewOrleans. 

Maine Vacant 

Maryland . . . W. Paret Baltimore. 

Easton . . . . W. F. Adams BastoA. 

Wa8h'ton..H. T. Satterlee Washington. 

Mass W. Lawrence Boston. 

Michigan- 
Eastern . . .T. F. Davies Detroit. 

Western.. .G. DeN. GiUespie. .Grand Rapids 
Marquette.G. M. Williams Marquette. 

Minnesota... H. B. Whipple Faribault. 

M. N. GUbert, co- 
adjutor St. Paul. 

Duluth. . . .J. D. Morrison Duluth. 

Mississippi.. H. M. Thompson. . .Jackson. 

Missouri.. . . .D. S. Tuttle St. Louis. 

W.Missouri.B. R. Atwill Kansas C^ty. 

Montana . . . .L. R. Brewer Helena. 

Nebraska.. . .G. Worthlngton. . . .Omaha. 
A. L. Williams, co- 
adjutor Omaha. 

Laramie. ..A. N. Graves Kearney. 

N. Hamp . . . W. W. NUes Concord. 



RELIGIOUS. 



169 



PROTBSTAIJT EPISCOPAL CHUBCH.-CONTINDED. 



I>ioct4£x. Jiltthopi. Residence. 

New Jersey .J. Stairtioroutrh Trenton. 

Neiwark....T, Ar Btarkc.*y, Newark. 

Ntjw York, . .H. C. Potter New York city 

0-Dtra,l...,R D. Buotlugton.. Syracuse. 

Albany W. C. Daane Albany. 

liOng Id... A. Np Little J ijhn.... Brooklyn. 

Wbst* ra. . . W . D. W ul Iter Buffalo. 

N.CBTollnfl,,J.B.Clitshire Raleigh. 

K.CJirt.>lEnttA. A. Waison Wllmineton. 

A»hQVlUe..jQUu9 M, riornfr...AshevllIe. 
N. DatotA.. .Siiiuuel O. Erin eUI... Fargo. 
Ohio— . 

Ohio w. A. Leonard Cleveland. 

Southern. .T. A. Jaggar Cambridge. 

B. Vincent, coadj.. Cincinnati. 

Oklahoma— 

Indian T. .F. K. Brooke Guthrie. 

Oregon B. W. Morris Portland. 

Penn O. W. Whitaker. . . . Philadelphia. 

Pittsburg. . C. W hitehead Pittsburg. 

Central. . . .E. Talbot S. Bethlehem. 

Rhode IsI'd.T. M. Clark, presid- 
ing bishop ProYidence. 

Wm. N. Mc vickar, co- 
adjutor Providence. 

S. Carolina. .Ellison Capers Columbia. 

8. Dakota. . . W. H Hare Sioux Falls. 

Tennessee . .T. F. Gailor Memphis. 



Dioceses. Bisfuips. Residence. 

Texas G. H. Kinsolving. . .Austin. 

Western.. .J. S. Johnson San Antonio. 

^ Dallas A. C. Garrett DaUas, 

Salt Lake ... A. Leonard Bait Lake City 

Vermont .. . .Arthur C. A. Hall. .Burlington. 

Virginia F. McN. Whittle. . . . Richmond. 

R. A. Gibson, ooad* 

« x^ . Jutor.. Richmond. 

Southern.. A.M.Randolph Norfolk. 

W. Virginia.G. W. Peterkln Parkersburg. 

W. L. Gravatt, co- 
adjutor Cha)lestown. 

Wisconsin— 

Milw'kee.. Isaac L. Nicholson. Milwaukee. 

F. du Lac. Charles C. Grafton.Fond du Lac. 
Washington- 

01ympia...W. M. Barker. 

Spokane... L. H. Wells. 

Africa S. D. Ferguson Cape Palmas. 

China— 

ShanghaL.F. R. Graves Shanghai. 

Japan John McKim Tokyo. 

Kyoto Sidney C.Partridge.Kyoto. 

Brazil Lucien L. Kinsolo- 

„ . . Ing Rio Grande. 

Haiti J. T. H. Holly P't-au-Prince. 

Honolulu . .A. Willis Honolulu. 



SETEODIST EPISCOPAL CETTBOH. 



BiMhifps. Residents 

TbamoA Bowman St. Lotii^, Mo. 

Band i>i Ufa 8. Foster ,,UfJitn;iTy,Maaa, 

Stepheti M. Morrill Chluiujo, 111. 

Bi*wHja G. Andrtiwa New York, N. Y. 

Henry W. Warrtnu Uuly'ty P&rlc, C-ol. 

CrnisD. Fo*s .,..,.... f*hj]adi;lp][iiu. Pa. 

John F- Tlurat Wa&bln^on. D. C- 

Wimam X, Nlnde , . . . .DtJtmifc. Mlcii, 

John M. Walden. .......... .CinulnnEitL O. . 

MtMHonarji BUhups—WUlla^m Tavlor- Vivl, Congo, Afj loii. 
Jame^ M. Ta^ibura, Calcutta, lodla. 



nuhopsr Residence. 

Wl] lard F, Mallfitleu Buffalo, N. Y. 

CharlL^s 11. FowJfe r Minneapolis, Minp. 

JotiD H. Vltit^L^nt Topeka. Kas. 

JaoicB Wh FiUtzerjild New Orleans, La. 

Isn nc w. .1 n ypi' Chattanooga.Tenn. 

Jc: ■ " * .viunn Oinaha, Neb. 

Di mmK-.'II Sa^ Francisco. Cal. 

CI M 'iiijo Fort Worth, Tex. 

™ 1 L..,iLj. L. 11 Portland, Ore. 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, SOUTH. 



Bisluyps. Residence. 

John C. Keener New Orleans, La. 

Alpheus W. Wilson Baltimore, Md. 

J. C. Granbery Ashland, Va. 

I R. K. Hargrove W.NashvlUe, Tenn. 

W. W. Duncan Spartanburg, S. C. 

9.R. Hendrix Kansas City, Mo. 



Bishops. Residence. 

C. B. Galloway Jackson, Miss. 

J. S. Key Sherman, Tex. 

O. P. Fitzgerald Nashville, Tenn. 

H. C. Morrison. Louisville, Ky . 

W. A. Chandler Atlanta, Ga. 



OQiraREaATIOKAL CHTJRCH. 



A. B. €, V. 1^ 

Frisid^nt—S^ B. Capeu. 
IVwMttrfr'— Frauk H< Wtgjirlii, 
SiffrftnH**— ReT. Judaon Smlthi D^ D., Rev. 
, Churl ei^ H. DaslelEs. D. D.. Rev, James L. 
I B&rtaQ, D. D. 

Btiitorial AVcr^tarj/— Rev. T3. E. titrong, D. D. 
Biitrtct ^ecrfifttriffl— Rov. €. C. Creefran, D. D., 
ni Bl&le Hoii*e, N= Y. iMv ; Knv. A. N. Hitch- 
cock, Pb . r > ! VI r -^ -i.- 1 ! 1 -^ f f ' ■ 't J I . i* >?igo, 111. ; 

Ri>V.Wh1:^ : . ijjl. 

Bta^^iuirti! „ „ ! f, Boston. 

AHEBTCAN MISSION AHY ASSOCIATION. 

President-V. A. Noble, D. D., Chicago, 111. 
Treasvrer—U. W. Hubbard. _ „ _ 

Secretaries- Rev. A. F. Beard, D. D., Rev. F. P. 

Woodbury. D. D., Rev. J. C. Ryder, D. D., Rev. 

M. B. Strleby, D. D. ^ ^ ^ 

Beadguart^n— 4th avenue and 22d street, 

N. Y. city. 

8UNDAT SCHOOL AND PUB. SOCIETY. 

PretWent-WiUard S. Scott, D. D., Worcester, 



Aeretary— George M. Boynton, D. D. 
Treasurer—^. Lawrence Barnard. 



IHeld Secretary— W. A. Duncan, Ph. D. 
DisMct Secretary— Rev. W. F.McMlllen, room 

1008 Association building, 153 LaSalle street, 

Chicago. 
Manager Western Agency— 1^. Herrick Brown, 

175 Wabash avenue, Chicago, 
fieadotmrters— Congregational House, Boston. 

HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 

Pre«i<fent-(}en. O. O. Howard, Burlington, Vt. 
2Vea«urer— William B. Howland. 
Secretaries— Joseph B. Clark, D. D., Washington 

Choate, D. D. 
Se^iretary Woman's Department- Mrs. Harriet 

S. Caswell. 
Editor Home Missionary, etc.— A. H. Clapp, D.D. 
HeadqtMrters — 4th avenue and 22d street, 

N. Y. city. 

CHDTICH BUELDINO SOCIETY. 

President— Dt. Lucien C. Warner, N. Y. city. 
Secretary— Her. L. H. Cobb. D. D., N. Y. city. 
Field Secretaries— B,ev. C. H. Taintor, Chicago; 

Rev. George A. Hood, Boston; Rev. H. H. 

Wikoff, Berkeley, Cal. 
Headgtuirters — 4th avenue and 22d street, 

N. Y. city. 



160 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



00N6RBGATI0NAL CHURCH.-CONTINtnBD. _ 



XDUCATION 80CIKTT. 

Pruidentr-W. H.WUooz, D. D.. Maiden. Mass. 
Secretary— ChATleB O. Day, D. D. 
Treatwren^S. P. WiUdns. 
JSeod^tiortert— Concregational House, Boston. 

lONISTEBIAL SBLIXV. 

Ohairman-BBY. H. A. StUnson, D. D.,N.T. city. 



aeeretary—Hf. H. Whittlesey, D. D., NewHayen, 

Conn. 
Treasurer— "EieY. 8. B. Forbes, 206 Wethersfleld 

avenue, Hartford, Conn. 
Head4uar(0ra-135 Wall street, Hartford«0(Mm. 

NATIONAL TBIXNNIAL COUNOIL. 

Bev. Henry A. Haien, D. D., Aubnmdale. 
Mass., Statistical Secretary and Bditor of 
**0(mirregaUonal Tea/r-Book." 



BAPTIST DEKOmKATIOK. 



BOssionarv Union — Hon. Bobert O. Fuller, 

president, Boston, Mass. 
Publication Society— S. A. Croser, president. 

Upland, Pa. , , 

Education Society— A. H. Strong, D. D., president, Bochester, N. T. 

SOUTHBBN BAPTIST CONVENTION. 
Hon. W. J. Northen, president, Atlanta, Ga. 
Foreign Mission Board— Prof . C. H. Winston, 

president, Blcbmond, Va.; B. J. Willlngham, 

corresponding secretaryi Bldunond, Va. 



Some Miesion Society— Stephen H. Greene. 

president, Boston. Biass. 
flietoHcoI Society— Lemuel Moss, D. D., PhUa- 

delphia, Pa. 



Sunday School Board— E. E.FoIk, pres.,Nash- 
Tille,Tenn.; J. M. Frost, seoMNashyille,Tenn. 

J7ome Mieeion Board— Bev. Henry McDonald, 
president, Atlanta, Ga.; I. T. Tionenor, D. D.. 
corresponding secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 



FEESBTTEEIAH OJSUKOH. 



StaUd Clerk and Treasurer— B/ay. William H. 
Boberts. D. D., 1319 Walnut street, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Permanent OlerX»— Vacant. 

TBUSTBES. 

Preeident— George Junkin, Esq. 
Trea«iirer-Frank K. Hippie, 1310 Chestnut 

street, Philadelpbia, Pa. 
Recordino Secretary— Jacob Wilson. 
Oi^Ice— 1^ Walnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOARD OF HOME. MISSIONS— SUSTKNTATIGN. 

Secretary— Bey. Charles L. Thompson, D. D. 
IVeoeurer— Henry C. Olln. 
Smeriniendent of Schools— "ELev. G. F. McAfee. 
OJice — Presbyterian House, Ufi 6th avenue, 
«ew York city. 

BOAAb OF rOBXION UTSSIOXH. 

Se£Titaru Emcntiis—\iev.it3\iTii C, l^owi Je Dh D. 
OofrfurpfindinQ Scere]U*ri(»— HeT. FranJc F. El- 

linwfunl. D. U,; Rev. A. W- Halaey, D. D.; 

Mr. Hol>ert m. Bpeet and Bef ■ Arthur J. 

Brown. D. D, 
IVfaffuiTr— Charlpfi W- nan*!. 
Sifid SrcrHaru—linv. Thum&s MurfthalL D. D., 

4B McCornik% l»loek.t1jk'ii«o, IJl. 
OJI« — PTOsbytprlan Hou«e, laC Stb arcnue, 

Mew York city. 

BOARD OT BDUOATION. 

OorrespondiM Secretary ^ Bey. Edward B. 

TVeaeurer— Jacob Wilson. 

Q^lce— 1319 Walnut street. Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOARD OF PUBLICATION AND SABBATH 
SCHOOL WORK. 

Secretary— Bav. Elijah B. Craven, D. D. 
S-uperintendent of sabbath School and Mission- 
ary IFbrfc— Bev. James A. Worden, D. D. 
Editorial Superintendent— Bey.J.B.Miller,D.D. 
Business Superintendentr-John H. Scribner. 
Manu/act*trer-Henry F. Sheets. 
Treoeurer— Bev. C. T. MoMullin. 
Oi^lce-lS19 Walnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

BOARD OT CHURCH BRSCTION. 

Corresponding Secretary — Bey. Brskine N. 

IVeaeurer— Adam Campbell. 
(Mice — Presbyterian House, 156 5th ayenue, 
«ew York city. 

BOARD OT MINISTERIAL RELIEF. 

Corresponding Secretary— Bey.B.L.Agnew,D.D. 



Recording Secretary and Treatwrm^BBY. Wil- 
liam W, Heberton. 

OJlce— Publication House, 1819 Walnut street. 
Philadelphia, ni. 

BOARD or rRBBDMXH. 

Correspondina Secretary— Bey. Edward P. 

Cowan, D. D. 
Recording Secretary— Bey .Samuel J.Fl8her4>.D. 
Treasurer— Bey. John J. Beacom, D. D. 
Office — 516 Market street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

BOARD OF AID FOR COLLBOBS ABD 
ACADEMIES. 

Corresponding Secretary— Bev. Edward C. Bay< 

D. D. - 
Q^lce — Boom 80 Montauk block, 115 Monroe 

street, Chicago, IlL 

COMMITTEE ON SYSTEMATIC BENEFICENCE. 

Chairman-BoY, W. H. Hubbard, D. D., Au- 
burn, N. Y. 

Secretary— Kiliaen Van Bensselaer, 66 Wall 
street. New York city. 

COMMITTEE ON TEMPERANCE. 

Chairmamr-Bev. John J. Beacom, D. D., 516 
Market street, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Corresp(md4ng Secretary— Bex. John F. Hill, 
Pittsburg.ra. 

Recordini^ Secrefary-George Irwin, P. O. box 
14, Allegheny, Pa. 

TVeaeurer— Bey. James Allison, D. D., Pitts- 
burg. Pa. 

PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL SOOISTT. 
Preeident-Bey. W. C. CatteU, D. D. JLL. D. 
Librarian— BeY. W. L. Ledwith, JD. D., ISSl 

Tioga street, Philadelphia. 
Oorrefl^Mm<lina Secretary— Bey. Samuel T, 

Lowrle, D. D., 1887 Pine street, Philadelplila. 
Recording Secretary— BeY. James Price, 107 

East Lehigh aVenue, Philadelphia. 
Treoeurer— Deb. K. Ludwlg, Ph. D.,37S9 Walnut 

street, Philadelphia. 

TREASURERS OF SYNODICAL HOICX MISSIONS 
AND SUSTENTATION. 

yew Jersey— W» M. Lanning, Trenton, N. J. 
New Torkr-A. P. Steyens, National Sayings 
Bank BnUding. Albany, N. Y 
rvanio— Frank K. HlppL 



Penney'vanio— F 



aipple^ 1310 Chestnut 



street, PhUadelphia, Pa. 
Maryland— D. C. Ammidon, 81 South Frederick 
street, Baltimore, Md. 



THB NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. 



161 



tEJtjt ISuticml (Srobetntnent. 



[Corrected to 
EXEUUTIVK DEFABTXSHT. 

PrcHdmt, WiUiam McKlnler (O.) $60,000 

See. to the President, John Addison Porter 

(Conn.) , 6,000 

Vice-Presidrnt 8,000 

U.S.I>m,Manhdl, A. A. W llaon (D. C). . . 8.000 

SEFARTIOHT OF BTATE. 

SertYtJjry, Jcbn Oay {D. C.) 8.000 

jtfct. ^i,, DavldJ, HilHN. ¥.1 4.500 

Becmid AmL *>&►. AlTcy A. Adte {D. C).. 4,000 
ThintAimt. titc^ Ttioa. V. Cj-ldJfr(W- Va.) 4,000 

SoU€lt'>r, Wiu,L. PenfleJd (lDd.),„ 8,600 

Ohlef (Tfprfc Wm. 11, Mlohnt^l (Ket).). 2,600 



(D. 



.2,100 



fjkief Ct>7UTiIdr Bureau^ Hubert ^. Chll- 

loii,Jr.UXC.} ...2.100 

(Bi*/ o/ ffttrwiuof Zn(ii'£fjiaftd Jrc:hfri», 

Pondletiin KlDg (N. CX 2,100 

fjhlef of Burtaut oj ^ccou.nff, Franli A. 

Branoffau {Oj.*. , 2,100 

Chief of Bii^tau of jfcirrf0i Cohimer««, 

rredericEmoi:j(Md.5.„V:. ;. 2.100 

OB iff of JJurcdit u/ IJofi* dTid Xrtltroru, A. 

ILA!leia<N. C.) 2,100 

Cfkief of liure^u at Appn^nimmt»^ Kulnert ^ 

Brent Moihfcr{K7.}r^.... ..2,100 

Tr«njfot^.I3ecrTL.Thomafl (N.Y.) 2,100 

eoek {?*', YA ' 2,400 

[Bureau qf Acoaunts now h&n tj barge of 

TBEAST7ET SSFABTXEHT. 

PHr. S>i., M.K.Alloa (0.), 



A*«f , S(?c., B'TRnk A. VnndtrHp (![!.>. ... 

A**f. i3«:,» Hymce A, Taylor fW [a. ) 

Aa^i. ^e*,, O. L. fclpanlding (MJch^) ., ... ... 

Ohlt'/Ctorft.Theo. F. Swayau (N J,>, 

Chief GfA^pLIHv,. Chns. Lymiiii J[Conn.). 
Ohf^r/ of Warrants niv.^ W, F, Maclcnnan. 
Ch ief pTith Mo7i*v3 D iv^ E ugentf B . D a*kiira 
Ofit*/ 0/ 0»t*. Z>tVr* ADdrew Johnaon 

(\v;Yii.> ... 

Artina Chiff of Bev.^ Ifarlm I>tv., Charles 

K SUooraaker tN, T.J 

Chief of Stutktnfm, P tinting aiicl Bld7ik» 

IHv.M^o. SlminuriB (D. C.J , . ► , * 

Chiffjff LortTM ojiii Oiir^eneyDii'., Andrew 

T. HemlnjEton tMflRs,J,.....H. 

Ch ief rj/ yt inf. D iv . , 1.^.- w i 3 J onT a r i. f I n d . >. . . 

Saperriiiag Architect's Office. 
Supervising Architect, Jas. E. Taylor (Pa.) 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing. 

IXrecf or, C. Johnson (Ky.) 

Asst, Director, Thomas J. SuUlyan (D. C). 
StifMt. Bngraving Div.t John B. Hill (N.T.) 

Office Steamboat Inspector. 
auperviaing Inspector, James A. Dumont.. 
Bureau of Statistios. 

Chie/, Oscar P. Austin (D. C.) 

Life-Saving Service. 



8,000 
2.400 
4,500 
4.600 
4,600 
8,000 
2,760 
8.600 
2,600 

2,760 

2,600 

2,600 

2,500 
2,600 
1,800 

4,600 

4,500 
2,250 



Qenn Supt, 8. I. Kimball (Me.). 

'It., Horace L. Piper (Me.), 

OomptroUers. 
Pint ComptnUUr, Bobt. J. Tracewell (Ind.) 

Asst.. Leander P. Mitchell (Ind.) 

CW Cl0r]lc CM. Force (Ky.) 

CMef Law Clefk, J. D. Terrell (Mich.) 

Begister of the Treasury. 

JUffUUr, Judson W. Lyons (Ga.) 

Asst., Nolen L. Chew (Ind.) 

11 



8,600 

8,000 

4,000 
2,600 

6,000 
6.000 
2,750 
2,760 

4.000 
2.250 



Noy.15,1800.] 

Auditor!. 

Au ■^t ir ff<r the TrtGSUTif Depti WllUaTn E. 

Andrtiw,"! { Neb J .., ^^ ......... . — . , . . .18,000 

Dti-ntif, Kdwurd McKt:tti;rich (lo^ai.^ ,: „ . 2,250 
A%i'iit'.sT for t it^ \ rr) r Hfpf ..b\ H . Morris (0-) 8,00U 

D€)i>iiii. i>. A. G rowvcrujr (Md.) 2^250 

Av<i\i"r /ir tfit: J^terfur lArjiC., WlUlAlll 

li ill ll^MOuod I Al ci.j 8,000 

Da-'j' i H. H, a. rorHi>n eS. D.).. , , 8,250 

AiU\i'vrfortiifi Navv iNfpf., W. W- Brown 

(ra >..... ......,,,,..,,...,,. 8,800 

JJfP'jfV-JobaM. BTvimrlWls.) 2,250 

AV'iit^^rffjrttif Sttit^ ana Othtr J>iipts.,B. ^ 

a. T[mine ( Wlft > 8,000 

Dip •It it, GiiQ. W. Ksterty (MinnO , 2,260 

Air.j j^^-r for th6 PottojfficeDepU Henry A- ^ ^^ 

Ca:^t[3tMlnn.),..,.r.,.....:. 8,000 

Dii}utit. JL L, Liiwaha (Ind.) 2JW) 

Treasurer of the United States. 

Treasurert EUis H. Roberts (K. Y.) 6,000 

Asst. Treasj, J. F. Mellne Q>. C.) S.fiOO 

Sti|>t.^at.Banfci{ed.IHD.,Thos.B.Boffers 8,600 

Oomptroller of the Ourrency. 

Comptroller, Charles G. Bawee fill.) 6.000 

I>eimtv, Thomas P. Kane (D.C.) 2,800 

Commissioner of IntemaPBevenue. 

Commissioner, Gk W. WUson (OX, 0,000 

Deputy, Bobt. WiUlams, Jr. (N. Y.) SJBOO 

Director of the Hint 

Director, Geo. E.Bobertsaowa) 4,600 

Bureau of Navigation. 
Commissioner, E. F. Chamberlain (N. T.). 8,000 

XTmted States Ooast and Geodetic Surveji 
Superintendent, Henry S. Pritchett (Mo.). 6.000 

Marine Hospital Service. 
Supervising Surg.-Qen., Walter Wyman.. . 4,000 

KAV7 BBPABTMENT. 

Secretary, John D. Long (Mass.) 8,000 

Asst. Sec., Clharles H. Allen (Mass.) 4,600 

Chief OlerfcT BenJ. P. Peters (Pa.) 2,600 

PHv.See., L. H. Finney, Jr 2,260 

Bureau Yards and Docks. 
€7»i6/,B6ar Admiral Mordeoal T. Bndloott. 
Civil Engineers, Prof. H. M. Paul, P. T. Cham- 
bers, A. C. Cunningham and H. H. Bousseau. 

Bureau of Navigation. 
Chi^, Bear Admiral A. S. Crowninshield. 
Asst. to Bureau, Commander W. 8. Cowles. 
lAeutenant'Commanders, Chas. B. Colahan and 

J. J. Hunker. 
LieuU., H. H. Ward, W. W. Phelps and (3has. 

Webster. ., ^ , ., 

Nautical Almanac 
Su^perintendent, Prof. 8. J. Brown. 
Professor, Prof. H. D. Todd. 
Assistants, E. J. Loomls, C. Keith, W. 8. Harsh- 



0£Boe Naval Intelligence. 
Chief InteUigence Officer, Comdr. B. Clover. 
Li«tit.-0(midrs., G. H. Peters and B. T. MnUi- 

iMuU^ H. W. Harrison, C. C. Marsh, W. L. 
Howard, S. B. W. Kittelle. 

Eydrographic Office. 
Rv{Iro(rrap7ier,Capt. J. B. Craiff. 
Commamaer.ii. D. Adams. 
lAeutefMvnt-Oofmmumder, B. G. Davenport. 
LUuL, F. W. Kellogg. 



162 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Libnrj And HatsI War Beeordi. 
SuperinUndenU Prof. B. K. Rawson. 
U»uL-Oommander, Geoige P. Colyoootesaefl. 

NatsI ObMrratory. 
SvpeHntmdent^ Capt. C. H. Davia. 
AMtUtant, Ltout. B. W. Hodges. 
AftrontmitetU Director, Prof, of Mathematlos 

8. J. Brown. 
Prc/eMorv o/JtfatIk«mattet, A. N. Skinner, F.J. 

J. See and M. Updegraff. 
A»H$tant Attronomen, Geo. A. Hill, Theo. I. 

King and F. B. LlttelL 
Prof t— or of MaihemaUea^, D. Todd. 
.Asmtatite,B. J.Loomls, w.S.HarBhman and 

H.B.Hedrick. 

Bureau of Ordnanee* 
Chiefs Bear Admiral Cbas. O'Neil. 
lAeuttnaWU^T, C. Fenton, W. McLean, Joeeph 

Strauss, L. H. Chandler, F. B. Bassett. 
Proft$»or^ P. B. Alger. 

Bureau of Equipment. 
Rear .Admiral, B. B. Bradford. 
ljUv/t.-0ammaindtr9. 8. W. B. Diehl, T. B. D. W. 

Veeder, W. H. Allen. ^ 
HeutenanU, G. W. Denf eld, J. B. Bllsh, F. L. 

Chapln, H. B. Parmentor. 

Bureau of Oonstruotion and Bepairt. 
Bear Admire^, Philip Hlchbom. 
^avot Oonftructor, D. W. Taylor. 
AMt. OoMtruetortt L. Spear, F. B. Zahm. 

Office of Judge-Advocate General. 
Judqe-AdvoeaU General, Capt. S. C. Lemly. 
Enngnt Geo. Mallison. 
Oapta4nt Wm. C Dawson, U. S. M. C. 

Bureau of Xcdicine and Surgery. 
Rear Admiral, W. K. Van Key pen. 
Aut. to Bureau, Medical Inspector J. C. Bovd. 
apeeial Dutv, P. A. Surgeon F. L. Pleadwell. 

Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. 
Bear AdmirdL Albert S. Kenny. 
AiMt, to Chief Pqyrna8ter,Geo.wSiinpBonJJ.8Jf. 
Paymaeter, T. H. Hicks. U. S. N. 
P. A. Pavnuuter, J. J. Cheatham. 
A$$t. Paymatter, David M. Addison. 
Kavsl Kxaminiiig Board. 
PreHdenL^eta Admiral John A. Howell. 
Members, Bear Admiral Benjamin F. Day and 

Capt. F. A. Cook. 

Board of Medical Examiners. 
PreHdcntiMed. Director J. B. Parker. 
Members, Med. Inspector J. C. Wise and D. N. 

Bertolette. 

Kaval Eetiring Board. 
Preeidentt Rear Admiral B. J. Cromwell. 
Members, Rear Admiral B. F. Day, Capt. F. A. 

Cook, Grove S. Beardsley and W. S. Dixon. 

Bureau of Steam Engineering. 

Rear AdmircU, Bngineer-ln-Chief George W. 

Melville. 
ChUf Clerk, Wm. H. H. Smith. 
Commander, H. Webster. 
IAetU.-Oonimander$,J. H. Perry. A. B. Willits, 

F. H. Bailey, W. F. Worthington. 
LieutfM R- S. Griffln. B. C. Bryan, C. A. B. King, 

W. W. White, C. B. Rommel. 
AasU Engineer^ John A. Henderson. 
State, War and Kavy Department Building. 
Sv/pU, Chief Engineer G. W. Baird. 

Board of Inspection and Survey. 
President Rear Admiral Frederick Rodgers. 
Members, Capt. Robley D. Evans, Comdrs. W. 

H. Emory, C. R. Roelker, Lieut.-Comdr. R. 

Henderson, Nav. Constr. W. Capps. 
Haval Dispensary. 
Surgeovit P. M. Rlxey. 



, Xuseum of Hygiene. 
Medical Director, Chas. H. White. 
Swrgeot^ C. G. Herndon and J. D. Oatewood. 

Kavy Pay 0£Boe. 
Pay Director^ Stephen Band. 
Headquarters of United States Xazine Ooips. 
OoL C-ommandanU Charles Hey wood. 
Adit, and Inspector. MaJ. George C. Reid. 
Quartermaster, MaJ. F.L. Denny. 
Paymaster, MaJ. Green Clay Goodloe. 
Asit. Quartermaster, Capt. Chas. L. McCawley. 
Surgeon, B. H. Green. 

Marine Barracks, Washington, B. 0. 
OdloneLF. H. Harrington. 
Major, R. Diokins. 

Oaptt., C. S. Radford, L.Kannaay, J. S. Bates. 
Surgeont B. H. Green. 

WAR DSPAETMEHT. 

Secretary, Blihu Root (N.Y.) 18,000 

Sec. to Sec. of War, V. L. Mason (D. Q.). . . . 2,250 
Confidential Clerk, Fred C. Squires (Mich.) 1.800 

AssL Sec., Geo. D. MeikleJohn (Neb.) 4,600 

CMe/ derfc, John C. bcofleld 3.500 

Headquarters of the Army. 
Jtfaior-Oen., Nelson A. Miles. 
- — -Qen., Lt.-CoL J. C. Gilmore. 



A<d^de-Gamp,Capt. F. mchler.6th Cav. 
Iruvector^Sfen^ Aid-de-Camp 1st Lieut. H. H. 

Whitney. 
Asst AdSt-Qen., Capt. J. B. Morton. 

A4}utant-0eneral*s Department. 
AdSt.'€hn., Brlg.-Gcn. H. C. Corbln. 
Assistants, Col. Thos. Ward, CoL James M. 

Moore, Lieut.-Col. J. C. Gilmore, Lleut.-Col. 

W. H. Carter, MaJ. J. A. Johnston. MaJ. 

W. A. Simpson, MaJ. Charles Bird, MaJ. Wm. 

S. Patten.^aj. M. C. Martin. MaJ. F. O. 

Hodgson, MaJ. F. M. Schreiner, Capt. J.Z. 

Dare. 
Chie/ OIer%. R. P. Thlan «2,000 

Inspeotor-Oeneral's Department 
Inspector^en., Brig.'Gen. J. C. Breokinrldge. 
AMts^MaJ. Thos. T. Knox, MaJ. 8. C. Mills. 
Chief OlerK W. H. Orcutt. 

Quartermaster's Department. 
Quarterm.'Oen., Brlg'-Gen. M. I. Lndington. 
Chief Clerk, Henry D. Saxton. 
D^t Quartermaster, MaJ. Theodore B. True. 

Subsistence Department 
Acta. Commissary-Oen^ Col. Jno. F. Weston. 
AsHstant, Lieut.-Col. Henry G. Sharpe. 
Chief CUrk, Wm. A. DeCaindry. 

Kedical Department 
S^wveor^Ge»., Brig.-Gen. Geo. M. Sternberg. 
Assts., Col. C. H. Alden, Col. Dallas Bache, 
Lieut.-Col. Chas. Smart MaJ. Walter Keed, 
Mai. J. C. Merrill, Mai. G. BVBushnelL 
Chief Clerk, Gtoorge A. Jones. 

Pay Department 
Pav7ruMter-(?en., Brfg.-Gen. A. E. Bates. 
Assistant, Lieut-Col. C. C. Snlflen. 
Chi^ Clerk, G. D. Hanson. 

Oorpi of Engineers. 
Chief of Engineers, Brig.-Gen. John M. Wilson. 
Assistants, Lieut-Col. A. MacKenxle, Capt 

Joseph B. Kuhn, Capt James L. Lusk. 
Chief Clerk, Wm. J. Wfuren. 

Public Buildings and Grounds. 
Officer in Charge, Col. T. A. Bingham. 



THH NATIONAL 



GOVERNMBNT. 168 

Principal Clvrk DiviHim of FUm, Jtfott. 

etc., B. 8. Hall (Vt.) l_„ 

P(»tage Stamp Agent, John P. Green (0.). . 2^500 
Postal Card Agent, Bd«ar H. Shook (W. 

_Va.) .....2W 

Stamped Envelope AgenU Chas. H. Field 

(Conn.) 2^ 

OFFICE FOURTH ASSISTAHT POSTMASTnuaENERAL. 
FOrnih .^ .-^.-il. i\ Mr Q,. J. L. Hristow \ K w;*.) . <,0(» 

Ch If} i 'iiTk. M, U CUBnoe <1IL) 2^ 

Chif/ iti)K nj Appointm^nU^ Cnrter B. 

Kitnu^Mc-; ,.... 3»000 

Chk^ Dfv. of iitmdi and Oomtnixaiunb. 

C'tirlsUiin B. Dlukef W.) 2,000 

ChieJ P O. rji^rwcior, W. E. Couhran {CoLV »,0a» 
Chief rferk Div, nf P. O. I^ispcctf}T» and 

MMf DivntJ^ithynsJohn P, niim tCal.J. 3.000 
EiHiUrn TUp. Rural Free JMfvfry, B.. Con- 

WfiiUrn DhK. ^rimk: M, Dioe (Lad.), tadqn. 

Ind^aqapolfs. . . . ., ^ 

MiHtary T*mftiU Strrvicf, fyulm-Dinctor- 

O-'Ti. of PoMts, IS. Q. Rathbone iO.) 4^ 

PoRfmoitUr^ Ha tmiti a, B. P. Tbompfion 

( lad. K ,..,,,.„, iSOl 

Cftif/ Hna7«e Uiv.t Chflj. ir, W, iJcel|r 

(Indj _,, , 3,fi00 

Purrf (? Rico- pirecf (»r^en. C(^ PtisCii W. H. 

Kiiiottandj .7. ^m^ 

Phmpftineji—rHTfC'tm^Qm. <if Pottj, Frank 
W.Vallle^CoL) 3;fflX( 

OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR FOR THE P06T0FFICE DE- 
PARTMEKT. 

Audita, Henry A Ca^iJe Oflnn.) 1,000 

I>™iit|/ jlfitliffjT^ A bni ham I J. Lai walie<lJid.l 2,fi00 
Chhf ('terk, JiihQ M. Bihthtip (Tenn), . . , 2J100 

Law CUrk, D. H- Fetitoii (lud.} a.OOU 

DwlniTSin^ Vterfc. R. W. Hf^UjiiviH Wis). . . 2,000 
^i(!^ <}l[)HfcH«ff IK tv. ATt h q T Ole meniflma ) 2,000 

(P* ). ..!^....,., ., 2,000 

Chiq Pay 2Mb., Jobn B. Blemaii (IlLl aX^ 

ChUl Clifcltin^ ami ^isorf^ng iWtf., fa. M. ^ 

JobTwon (iDd.} „ 2.0OO 

ChWlYyrHfiH Div. Kmannell&pelclJ (Npt>.> ».000 
Chiff REio^rdin^ IHv., B. A. Allen (Kafl.),. 2,000 

INTERIOR DEPARTKENT. 

Secretary, B. A. Hitchcock (Mo. ). 8,000 

Ptrat A$8t Sec., Thomas Ryan (Kas. ) 4,500 

Asst. See., Webster Davis (Mo.) 4,000 

CMef Clerk, Edward M. Dawson (Md.) 2,760 

General Land Office. 

CommisHoner, Singer Hermann (Ore.). . . . 5,000 
AMt.Cowr.,W. A. Richards 3,000 

Office of Indian Affiurs. 

Commiseioner, Wm. A. Jones (Wis.) 4,000 

A88t. C'omr., A. Clarke Tonner (O.) 3,000 

Stift. Indian Schools, Miss Estelle Reel 
(Wyo.) 3,000 

Pension Office. 

Commissioner, H. Clay Evans (Tenn.) 6,000 

IHrst Deputy Oomr., Jae. L. Davenport 

(N. H.) 3,800 

Second Deputy Comr., Leverett M. Kelly 

(111.) ..3,600 

0W«/Olerk.Wm. H.Bayly (O.) 2,2fiO 

Medical Referee, Jacob F. Raub (Pa.) 3,000 

Office of Commitsioner of Railroadf. 
Commissioner, James Lon^street (Ga.). . . . 4,600 

Patent Office. 
Commissioner, CTharles H. Duell (N. Y.). . . 6,000 
Asst Oomr., Arthur P. Greeley (N. HJ. . . . 8,000 
Chief Cleric Edward V. Shepard (N. Y.). . . 2;8SO 



Ordnance Department. 

Chief of Ordnance, Brig.-Gen. A. R. BuflSngton. 

Assistants, MaJ. V. McNally, Capt. C. B. 

Wheeler, Maj. C. E. Dutton, MajfT Chaa. S. 

Smith, Capt. Wm. Grozier. 

Chief Clerk, John J. Cook. 

Judge-Advoeate General's Office. 
Jvdge-Advoeate Oen., Brljr.-Cton. G. N. Lieber. 
Chief Clerk, Lewis W. Call. 

Signal Office. 
Chief aiqnaX Qgicer, Brlff.-Cton. A. W. Greely. 
Dishwrsla Qmeer, Capt. EliKene O.Fechet,U.8.V. 
Acting CM& Clerk, Geo. A. Warren. 

Record and Pension Office. 
Chief of Office, Brifr.-C^en. F. C. Ainsworth. 
AssistantryLni. John Truesdale. 
Chiefs of Division, Jacob Freeh, O. B. Brown. 

P08T0PFICB DEPARTMENT. 

Postmaster-Qen., Charles E. Smith (Pa.). .98.000 

Chief Clerk, Blaln W. Taylor (W. Va.) 2,600 

Asst. A1ty.'Oen., James N. Tyner (Ind.). . . 4,UU0 
LatD CUrk, Harrison J. Barrett (N. C). . . . 2,600 
Appointment Clerk, John H. Robinson 

Sunt. and'iHsbwrHngCUi^^^ Mef^ 

chant (Va.) .7 2,100 

2biN)0rapfter,A.VonHaake(N. Y.) 2,600 

OTFICF Fin^^T JL§tili^i>"T FDSTUlSTEItr^ENCRAL. 

FHr:<r Afah P. M. (?„ Perry 9. Heath ^Ind.) 4,000 

Chitf aerk, Geo, M. AUen (Ind.) 2,000 

Sufft. Div. P. O. Sup.. Mieha*jl W* I^mis 

^tO.l 2.000 

Suftt.DiiKFreeneHverVt Auguiit W. Ma- 

eLenp.).,. . ,.... 8,000 

Chief Div. of Salaries and AtUvwances, 

Ci'O. W, BeavetaiN. Y.)... 2,600 

Supt. Mr/ney-OriieT Uv^t^ni^ JameaT. Met- 

calf ( iawa) , 3,600 

Chief aUrk Motieit-ijnier SjiStern, Edward 

M. Oadsden {Ga.) ., . _, 2.000 

SupL praii'Utter OJ^, Uavld P. Lelb- 

liartlt ( Ind.j. ._. . , 2,500 

Chief Vierti Dead-LetUr Office. Wara Bur- 

)iiiffjiine(Ka8j..... 1300 

Chief Div. of CVffT/flponriCTiCp. J.R.AslnPa.) 1,800 
Ai^itt SujtU. Dtv-FrtJi DfSivtrv. E. C. Fowler 
iMd.), hdqre. Wa&h.; Wrii. O. E^Jens 
CllDJadora. Chtciieo; and Charles Hed- 
ges (TetL hdqrii. New Tof k 2,000 

OFFICE SBOONS ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Se^'frndAMt* P.M.G., W. @, ShallenbeTeer 

jPft.) 4,000 

Ctiirf vinrk, Gourde F. Stone (JS . Y.) 2,000 

Sm't. RaUwaitAdJuAtm^nti, .T.H.Crew(0.) 2,000 
Ohh'f Div. ^f Innpe^ian, Ju-mes B. Cook 

(Md.),... .„,, 2,000 

Otiirf Tmv. MiiU Eqvipm^At. Thomas P. * 

*irahftia(N.T ).......,_ 1800 

G«; tt, WuK- Railway Mail Service, James ' 

K-. White (Iii,J,,; 3,600 

Cfiiief Clerk Raiiitfay MaU Ser^fice, John 

W. Hollyday (O.) ' 2,000 

8%ni1, FtJT^^ Malls, N.M.Broofes (Va).. 3,000 
aii^f Cltrk Jb«4fln Ma«*. R. L. Maddox 

<Ky.) 2,000 

A^jt1.G*n.iiupt Eaflwa^MaU ^erpUf, Alex- 

auder Grakt (MJch.)*. „ . . , 2,000 

OmimiHIBD ASSISTANT P08TMASTER4ISNERAL. 

Third Asst. P. M. Q., Ed wlij C, Madden 

(Mieli.)... ._,,,,._. 4,000 

Ohiif C^A|, Edward B. KtjUojira a-oan.).... 2,000 
Oil iff tHv. Fi ruin«. A . W . Bi njihani t M 1 1 h.) 2,000 
Chief iHv.Pagtam StitTJitw Jamfju i^, Het! ve 

(N. Y.) 2J850 

Principal {nerk Ulattsiflcatiim IH^yUiiyn.D. 

t . * aiuitaln (T^, Y.) ..„,. ... 1,600 

I^ ...-,■ T ,.'.■■,■ rSF Be^ traWm iMv ixioji ,J o bn 
^___/^l. ^ ..-.^ 1,800 



164 



OHIGAGO DAILY NBWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Oflice of Education. 
OommisaUmer, William T. Harria (Haas.). 13.000 
Chic/ C7Ierk,Lovick Pierce (Ga.) 1300 

Oeological Sonrey. 

Director, Chas. D. Walcott (N. Y.) 6,000 

GMef Clerks Henry G. Rizer (Kas.) 2,400 

DEFARTKEKT OF JUSTICE. 

a^fW.-Gf n.. John W. OriKga (N. JO 8,000 

Si)[icitiyr-Uti\..A. K- niohtirriS £0.) 7.000 

Amt.At\^.-Gt'tt..ZtXfi. 10 B.v.MN.C-f 5,000 

Ayxi. Attu^-^fiu. lliiiiy M. ilovr /ra.i,... 6.000 
A mK a tt y. ' (Ifn., J ti is . I i . T Li i uti \tn< stm 1 1 1 . ) . . 6,000 
A^-t. Attu.-Onn^^ T.fiuisi A. I'ru4ir ( W I*. . . . . 6,000 
jl'i',1. AtJu.-Oni. lUciit. itj Jjit.^ VVlUls Van 

JHJvantet ^WyiJ.J.. .n.,.....^ ,... 6,000 

Aa^^t. AUif.'Qtii. {P. O, liFjjf.). Jat N.Tjuer 

dutUi..,-. ,,. *...,... 4,000 

S"iicitarof Int. fief. [Trtai. lirpt.}, Geo. 

.M. TboiuAft r Kj .K 4,500 

tlijd).: .*!........ 3,500 

Liifv f'U^rk ami Examiner uj Titl^fM^ A, J. 

tttiiiiJey (O.) ..„ 2,700 

UUkf CltrK uflcJ ^tijrf, of BuUaVnQ, Owil _^ 

Clfl7 (W. VaO. ,..„..........,., 2,ra0 

G*TK Jfjiwt. t'rank Btrontf (ArttH^ ...,*..... 4,0(]O 

Difltm/j^^w^ Chrk. Henry Ei^fMintOJ 2,800 

jlJJpfiEJiTnjfHt Hfr^. .Iilsepli P. Uutly (Pii.). 1,800 
J i'i 1^ « p( Vh u rttf f>i J^w Tdm\M, J ao. U . CiJ nip- 

iH^lUiU I :. 2,400 

S^*hfii*-ir *}^ Tmut. I Trfoa, DeplX Miiuilce 

I ). < t'i ', -ri rn.^ 1 1 1 li}wa.K . , : 4,500 

Xif.^^ N.'y<ri7.ir, KelU A. IletfVP iTennO 8,000 

Vii f fj f '!/• } -k S- •' i r i fur'it iijfi CJ^ { Trcas. Dcpt- ), 

CMTM' r ^■-•-.■Miirkn rinwftj 2,000 

DEFABTMENT OF AOBICTJLTUBB. 

Secretary, James W ilson (Iowa) 8,000 

A88t. Sec, Joseph H. Brlgham (O.) 4,600 

i^hisf Clerk, Andrew Geddes (Iowa) 2,500 

Appointment Clerk, J. B. Bennett (Wis.). . 2,000 
Private Secretary t(} Secretary of Agriculr 

ture, J. W. Wilson (Iowa) 2,250 

Chief of Weather Bureau, Willis L. Moore 
"1.^ 



(111.). 



4,500 



Chief of Bureau of Animal Induatry* D. ^ 

B. Salmon (N. J.) 4,000 

Statistician, .John Hyde (Neb.) 3,000 

Chemiat, H. W. Wiley (Ind.) 2.500 



EntoniotQ^U,L,. O. Ilgward tN.T.) 12,500 

Bnt'iTiinU F. ¥.Co?illD (W. rj........ ...... 3.600 

Ci'"'/ uf BioUjigicat Suniey, C: Hart Met- 



iirn (N.T.).., 3.5UU 

■ f »*flHff. a/Fttr&Hrit, Gltlord PincbOl 



iN. v.).. 



Ch 

P::n..hvtiM. G. VL BnMJtet I (lowftj 

Ch",t \tf Din. ftf AffriMitolaQjf, F. Lamsou 

>cri luier (Titiin.) . . , 

Cu,'f of Div. 0/ SoiLi, Mtllon Whitney 

■MlU ,.,,. 

C''fr ' iJt^ i>ti'. Ojf VftiftAibf& PhmiMogv GJttf- 

I '■ r ^ hulomt. B. T. daiiu way mo.) 

D\/>i-ttyr0^ciff/ Ex^rim^nt i^tations, A. 

< ' Trtifl if.'unn.). .. , ...»..,.. 

Ch,. f Dip. ftf AntmntMaiMl BUimTBtntftiUj 

i-. [., Evaoit (Mji ) ,H..,.,,,..,....,.,., 

E-; , ;.vr, Gi'f>rKO Wm. 1 mi (Minn.).. ........ 

B.'niL-iilturint.fir.. Wm. Si^amltfcf (Pa,^.., 
I/i/iftfir of the OfUcc of Pablla Rmd In- 

(iMiru, Hoy yt(ino{N.Y.) .h -,-,., ....,,.... 
Chief y/Ai-ctinji of FnrtiijTi Markets Frank 

11 . OlteliCMit CMflflH J , . 

Clii'f of Hecii J^i-iH^/m R, J, Whlttleton 

an> .....,,. 



. >.«)0 
21.500 

2,500 
2J500 
2,000 



INDEPENSEVT DEPABTXENTS. 
Oovenunent Frinting Office. 

Public PHnter, P. W. Palmer (111.) 4,500 

Chief CUrk, W. H. CoUlns (D. C.) 2.400 

Foreman of PnnUng, H. T. Brian (Md.). . . 2,100 
Foreman of Binding, H. C. Espey (D.C.) . . 2,100 

United States Givil Service Gonuniaiion. 
Commissioners, John B. Procter (Ky.), 
John B. Harlow (Mo.), Marie S. Brewer 

(Mich.) 8,600 

Chief ExamincTtA. L. Severn 3.000 

Secretary, JohnT. Doyle (N. Y.) 2,000 

Department of Labor. 
Commdssitmer, CarroU D. Wright (Mass.). 6,000 

ChUf Clerk, Oren W. Weaver (Mass.) 2,600 

Disbursing Clerk, Charles E. Morse (Pa.). 1,800 
Interstate (Tommeroe Gommission. 

Chairman, Martin A. Knapp (K. Y.) 7.500 

JudsonC. Clements (Ga.) 7.500 

James D. Yeomans (Iowa) 7,500 

Chas. R. Prouty (Vt.) 7,600 

J. W. Fifer (111.) 7,500 

Secretary, Edward A. Moseley (Mass.) 3^600 



TEE ILLINOIS OENTBAL BAILBOAD GOXFAITY. 



The Illinois Central Railroad company 
was Incorporated by a special act of the 
legislature Feb. 10, 1851. In the act of 
incorporation it was stipulated that 7 per 
centum of the gross income of the company 
should be paid into the state treasury for 
general revenue purposes. Pursuant to 
that proviso, more than $17,000,000 has 
been paid into the state treasury since 
1855, the year that the road was opened 
for traffic. The present state constitution, 



adopted In 1870, prohibits any legislation, 
agreement or covenant by which a less pro* 
portion than 7 per centum of the gross 
receipts of the road shall be paid into 
the public treasury. 

The following table shows the amonnts 
received into the treasury of the state 
from the Illinois Central Railroad company 
each year since the road has been oper- 
ated: 



1855* % 29,761.59 

1856* 77,(J31.66 

1857 146,646.84 

1858 132,005.53 

1869 132,104.46 

1860 177,557.22 

1861 177,257.81 

1862 212,174.60 

1863 300,394.58 

1864 405,614.04 

1865 496,489.84 

1866 427,076.75 



1867 $444,007.74 

1868 428,397.48 

1869 464,933.31 

1870 464,584.62 

1871 463^512.91 

1872 442,856.54 

1878 428,674.00 

1874 394,366.46 

1875 875.766.02 

1876 366,005.68 

1877 316,361.94 

1878 320,431.71 



1879 $325,477.38 

1880 368,348.66 

1881 384,582.52 

1882 396,036.11 

1883 388,743.19 

1884 366,679.62 

1885 367,788.92 

1886 378,714.60 

1887 414,374.67 

1888 418,966.89 

1889 460,244.66 



1890 $486,281.13 

1891 638,006.67 

1892 589,486.02 

1893 753,067.24 

1894 563,911.49 

1895 614,988.17 

1896 624,660.83 

1897 624,682.74 

1898 667,082.81 



Total.. $17,315, 193.24 



*Only 6 per centum of the gross receipts of the company was received into the state 
treasury during 1856 and 1856. 



THE ARMY. 



165 



rCorrected to Nov. 15, 1899.] 
General and Field Officers of the Regular and Volunteer forces of the United States. 

DIVISIOV AND BEPABTHEUT COKMANDERS OF THE REGULAR ARMT. 



HEADQOARTBUS OF THE ARMY. 
Ck>mmander, Maj.-Gen. N. A. Miles. 
Aid-de-camp, Capt. Francis Micbler, 6th Cav. 
Aid-de-camp, 1st Lt. H. H. Whitney, 4th Art. 
Adjutant-general, Lt.-Col. J. C Gilmore. 

Division of Cuba.— Consisting of the geo- 
graphical departments and provinces of the 
Island of Cuba; headquarters, Havana, 
Cuba. 

Commander, MaJ.-Gen. J. R. Brooke. 

Department of California.— States of 
California and Nevada, the Hawaiian 
islands and their dependencies; headquar- 
ters, San Francisco, Cal. 

Commander, Maj.-Gen. W. R. Shafter (retired). 

Department of the Colorado.— states of 
Wyoming (except so much thereof as is em- 
braced in the Yellowstone national park), 
Colorado and Utah, and the territories of 
Arizona and New Mexico; headquarters, 
Denver, Col. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. H. C. Merriam. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE COLUMBIA.— States Of 

Washington, Oregon, Idaho (except so much 
of the latter as is embraced in the Yellow- 
stone national park), and the territory of 
Alaska; headquarters, Vancouver Barraclis, 
Washington. 

Conunander,Maj.-Gen.W. R. Shafter (retired). 

DEPARTMENT OF DAKOTA.— States Of Minne- 
sota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, 
and so much of Wvoming and Idaho as is 
embraced in the Yellowstone national park; 
headquarters. St. Paul, Minn. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. J. F. Wade. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST.— New England 
states, New York, New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Co- 
lumbia, West Virginia, Virginia and North 
Carolina; headquarters. Governor's island. 

Commander, MaJ.-Gen. Wesley Merritt, 

Department of the Gulf.— States of South 
Carolina, Geoi^a, Florida. Alabama, Mis- 
rissippl and liouisiana; headquarters, At- 
lanta, Ga. 

Commander. Col. R. T. Frank, 1st artillery. 

Department of Havana.— Consisting of 
that portion of the island of Cuba embraced 

OFFICERS OF THE 
major-oenbrals. 
Miles, Nelson A. Brooke, John R. 

Merritt, Wesley. 

B RIG ADISR-GENERALS. 

Otis, Blwell S. Wade, James F. 

Merriam, Henry C. Anderson, Thomas M. 

ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 

[With rank of BrigadlerKJeneral.] 
Corbin, Henry C. 

ASSISTANT ADJUTANTS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of ColoneiJ 
Barber, Merritt. Volkmar, Willlara J. 

Sheridan, Michael V. Sohwan, Theodore. 
Ward, Thomas. 

[With rank of lileutenan^Colonel.] 
MacArthnr. Arthur. Hall, William P. 
Gilmore, John C. Wagner, Arthur L. 

Babcock, John B. Carter, William H. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Barry, Thomas H. Johnston, John A. 



within the following boundaries: Begin- 
ning at the mouth of the Almendares river; 
thence south and east following the Almen- 
dares to its tributary, the Rio Grande; 
thence along the Rio Grande to near its 
head; thence north via Santa Maria del 
Kosario to the headwaters of the Rio las 
Vegas: thence along the Rio las Vegas and 
the Rio Cojimar to the sea; headquarters, 
Havana, Cuba. 

Commander, Brig.-Cten. William Ludlow. 

Department of the LAKB8.-8tates of Wis- 
consin. Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, 
Kentucky and Tennessee; headquarters, 
Chicago, 111. 

(Commander, Brig.-Gen. T. M. Anderson. 

Department of Matanzas and Santa 
Clara.— Provinces of Matanzas and Santa 
Clara; headquarters, Matanzas, Cuba. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. J. H. Wilson. 

Department of the Missouri.— States of 
Iowa, Nebraska. Missouri, Kansas and Ar- 
kansas, the Indian Territory and the terri- 
tory of Oklahoma; headquarters, Omaha, 
Neb. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. H. C. Merriam. 

Department of the Pacific— Philippine 
islands: headquarters, Manila, P. I. 

Commander, Maj.-Gen. B. S. Otis. 

Depahtment of Puerto Rico.— Island of 
Puerto Rico and the islands and keys adja- 
cent thereto; headquarters, San Juan,Puerto 
Rico. 

Commander, Brig.-€ren. G. W. Davis. 

Department of Province of Havana 
and Pinar del Rio.— Consisting of all 
that portion of the island of Cuba within 
the limits of the provinoe of Havana (except 
such portion as is embraced in the Depart- 
ment of Havana) and the province of Pinar 
del Rio; headquarters, Havana, Cuba. 

Commander. Brig.-Gen. FitzhugL Lee. 

Department OF Santiago and Puerto 
Principe.— E*rovince8 of Santiago and Pu- 
erto Principe; headquarters, Santiago, Cuba. 

Commander, Brig.-Gen. Leonard Wood. 

Department of Texas.— State of Texas; 
headquarters, San Antonio, Tex. 

Commander, Col. Chambers McKibbin, 12th 
infantry. 

REQTJIAR ARMY. 

Heistand, Henry 0. 8. Simpson, William A. 

Andrews, George. 

INSPBCIOR-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Brecldnridge, Joseph C 

INSPECTORS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Hughes, Rot»ert P. Lawton, Henry W. 
Burton, George H. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Ck>lonel.] 
Vroom, Peter D. Garlington, Ernest A. 

Sanger, Joseph P. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Heyl, Charles H. Mills, Stephen C. 

Knox, Thomas T. 

judge-advocate GENERAL. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General. J 
Lleber, G. Norman. 



166 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



A88I8TA17T JVDOS-ADVOCATB GENERAL. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Barr, Thomas F. 

DEPUTT JUDOE-ADYOCATBS GENERAL. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.] 
Clous, John W. Davis, George B. 

Hunter, Edward. 

JUDGE ADVOCATES. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Groesbeck, Stephen W. Morrison, Jasper N. 
Growder, Enoch H. 

QUARTERBIASTER-OENERAL. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Ludington, Marshall I. 

ASSISTANT QUARTERUASTBRS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Moore, James M. Scully, James W. 

Lee, James G. C. Kimball, Amos S. 

DEPUTY QUARTERMASTERS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.] 
Furey, John V. Humphreys, Chas. F. 

Atwood, Edwin B. Wheeler, Daniel D. 
Marshall, James M. Bamett, Charles B. 
Simpson, John. McCauley, Chas. A. H. 

QUARTERMASTERS. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Hathaway, Forrest H. Pullman, John W. 
Jacobs. Joshua W. Pope, James W. 
Bird, Charles. Jones, Francis B. 

Clem. John L. Miller, Crosby P. 

Booth, Charles A. Summerhayes, JohnW. 
Patten, William S. True, Theodore E. 
Pond, George E. Hyde, John McB. 

PAYMASTERrGENERAL. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Bates, Alfred B. 

ASSISTANT PAYMASTERS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Coze, Frank M. Wilson, Charles I. 

DEPUTY PAYMASTERS-GENERAL. 

[With rank of LieutenantrColonel.] 
Towar, Albert S. Baird, George W. 

Sniffen, Culver C. 

PAYMASTERS. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Dodge, Prand s fi , KJ ^ ^'O n rn e. Chjirleej E. 

Mcdlure, Cbnrli?H Bu 1 1 i '^. John U 

W b 1 ppl(f , € h arlea I: [. Hi ■ l: ► ■ ] s, Harry L. 
ComotrTH, W i I U ]i rn H. W i i : i > m s, Jerome A. 
TuctiFr. WUlittTn V GK - r u Wtl lianj W. 
Mublentior(?, John C. R< H^irry L. 
Siuitli, Gc.ors&R "VI Wfbhier, 

Bate f , John JV N< i * ' ' h n rim . 

Hftltflrd, Ell iah W . W ■ ' m u 1 ) t on S. 

Haniner, W llUiim H. W ^ - - - - . - p ii W . 
CORPS OF ENGINEERS. 

unmv ov engineers. 
[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Wilson, John M. 



COLONELS. 

Robert, Henry M. Suter. Charles R. 

Barlow, John W. Smith, Jared A. 

Halns, Peter C. Mansfield, Samuel M. 
Gillespie, Greorge L. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. 

Benyaurd, Wm. H. H. Jones, William A. 
Lydecker, Garrett J. Damrell. Andrew N. 
Stiokney. Amos. Allen, Charles J. 

Mackenzie, Alexander. Raymond, Charles W. 
Ernst, Oswald H. Miller, Alexander M. 

Heap, David P. Adams, Milton B. 

Ludlow, William. Livermore, William R. 

MA,rnus, 
Heuer, William H. W Hi nrd ^ JoBRph H . 
Stanton, William S. B I xhy . W il it nm H . 
Handbury, Thomas H. Rossetlp William T* 
Adams, Henry M. aymonB, TboinHBW. 
Davis, Carles B. L. B. Ijanch, Bmlth \A. 
Quinn, James B. Klnimian. Dnn C, 

Lockwood, Daniel W. Bl ack. Wtl li am M- 
Ruffner, Ernest H. FHtn Walter L. 
Sears, Clinton B. HoeE$ileT. Suloioon W, 

Mahan, Frederick A. Dt^rbj-. Georjie MoC. 
Powell, Charles F. LiisJ!, J a men L. 
KnightlJobn G. D. At) bot, Fred eric Y ► 
Hoxle, Richard L. Oa^ey , Tho eh as L, 

Marshall, William L. B ! iik^hn ra. Theodore A 
CHIEF OF ORDNANCE. 

[With rank of BrigadieivGeneral.] 
BulBngton, Adelbert R. 

COLONELS. 

Whlttemore. Jas. M. Farley, Joseph P. 
Mordecai, Alfred. Babbitt. Lawrence S. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. * 

Marye, William A. Phipps, Frank H. 
Arnold, Isaac, Jr. Reilly, James W. 

McGlnness, John R. 

MAJORS. 

Kress, John A. Shaler, Charles. 

Dutton, Clarence E. Smith, Charles S. 
Butler, John G. Blunt, Stanhope E. 

Vamey, Almon L. Heath, Frank. 
Greer, John B. • Taylor. Daniel M. 

Pitman, John. Lyle, David A. 

CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER. 

[With rank of Brigadier-General.] 
Greely, Adolphus W. 

ASSISTANT CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER. 

[With rank of Colonel.] 
Dunwoody, Henry H. C. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL. 

Craig, Robert. 

MAJOR. 

Allen, James. 

RECORD AND PENSION OFFICE. 

[Chief, with rank of BrigadleivGeneral.] 
Ainsworth, Fred C. 

[Assistant, with rank of Major.] 
Tweedaie, John. 



FIRST CAVALRY— Colonel, Arnold, Abra- 
ham K.; lieutenant -colonel, Lebo, Thomas 
C: majors. Bell, James M.; Smith, 
Alien; Ward, Frederick K. 

SECOND CAVALRY— Colonel. Noyes, Henry 
E.; lieutenant-colonel, Wallace, William 
M.; majors, Hennisee, Argalus G.; Dorst, 
Joseph H.; Schuyler, Walter S. 

THIRD— CAVALBY-Colonel, Young, Sam- 
uel B. M.; lieutenant-colonel, Wessells, 
Henry W., Jr.; majors, Jackson, Henry; 
Swigert, Samuel M.; Steever, Edgar Z. 

FOURTH CAVALRY— Colonel, Vlele. Chas. 
D.; lieutenant-colonel, Hayes, Edward 



REGIXEKTAL 07FI0EBS. 



M.; majors, Rucker, Louis H.; Augur, 
Jacob A.; Morton, Charles. 

FIFTH CAVALRY— Colonel, Raflfertv. Wm. 
A.; lieutenant-colonel, Carr, Camillo, C. 
C; majors, Cooper, Charles L.; Dimmick, 
Eturene D.; Thomas, Earl D. 

SIXTH CAVALRY— Colonel, Sumner, Sam- 
uel S.; lieutenant-colonel, Wint, Theo- 
dore J.; majors, Huggins, Eli L.; Ander- 
son, George S. ; Rodgers, Alexander. 

SEVENTH CAVALRY-Colonel. Baldwin, 
Theodore A.; lieutenant-coloneL Wheelan, 
James N. ; majors, Godfrey, Edward S. ; 
Edgerly, Wlnfield S. ; Godwin, Edward A. 



THE ARMY. 



167 



EIGHTH CAVALRY— dolonel, Chaffee, Adna 
R.; lieutenant-colonel, Davis, Wirt;ma- 
jore, Hatfield, Charles A. P.; Sprole, 
Heniy W.; Stanton, William. 

NINTH CAVALRY-Colonel, McGregor, 
Thomas; lieutenant-colonel, Wells, Al- 
nuMid B. ; majors, Woodson, Albert B.; 
Forbush, WUliam C; Hughes, Martin B. 

TENTH CAVALRY— Colonel, Whitside, Sam- 
uel M.; lieutenant-colonel, Moore, Fran- 
cis; majors, Pratt, Richard H.; Kerr, 
John B.; Stedman, Clarence A. 

FIRST ARTILLBRY— Colonel, Frank, Boyal 
T.; lieutenant-colonel, Kinzie, David H.: 
majors, Calef, John H.; Tiernan, John 
L.; Ingalls, James M. 

SECOND ARTILLERY— Colonel, Penning- 
ton, Alex. C. M.; lieutenant-colonel, Has- 
kin, William L.; majors. Field, Edward; 
Scantling, John C; Grimes, George S. 

THIRD ARTILLERY— Colonel, Bawles, 
Jacob B.; lieutenant-colonel, Randolph, 
Wallace F.; majors, Hess, Frank W.; 
Kobbe, WiUiam A.; Merrill, Abner H. 

FOURTH ARTILLERY— Colonel, Guenther, 
Francis L.; lieutenant-colonel, Rodney, 
George B.; majors, Lancaster, James M.; 
Andruss, E. Van A.; Fuger, Frederick. 

FIFTH ARTILLERY— Colonel, Rodgers. 
John I.; lieutenant-colonel, McCrea, Tully; 
majors, Maybrick, John R.; Burbank, 
James B.; Day, Selden A. 

SIXTH ARTILLERY-Colonel, Williston, 
Edward B.; lieutenant-colonel. Smith. 
Frank G.; majors. Mills, Samuel M.; 
Yose, William P.; Ennis, William. 

SEVENTH ARTILLERY-Colonel, Has- 
broQck, Henry C; lieutenant-colonel, 
Woodruff, Carle A.; majors, Morris, 
Charles; Story, John P.; Greenough, 
George G. 

FIRST INFANTRY— Colonel, Harbach, 
Abram A.; lieutenant-colonel, Dempsey, 
Charles A.: majors, O'Connell, John J.; 
Edmunds, Frank H. ; Smith, Frederick A. 

SECOND INFANTRY-Colonel, Bates, John 
C; lieutenant-colonel, Corliss, Augustus 
W.; majors. Bowman, Alpheus H.; Hall, 
Charles B.; Maus, Marion P. 

THIRD INFANTRY-Colonel, Page, John 
H.; lieutenant-colonel, Goodale, Green- 
leaf A.: majors, Baldwin, Frank D.; 
Rice, Edmund; Hannay, John W. 

FOURTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Hall, Rob- 
ert H.; lieutenant-colonel, Sanno, James 
M. J.; majors. Price, Butler D.; Reade, 
Philip; Scott, Walter S. 

FIFTH INFANTRY— Colonel, Comba, Rich- 
ard; lieutenant-colonel, Hooton, Mott; 
majors. Chance, Jesse C: Forbes, Theo- 
dore F.; Borden, George P. 

SIXTH INFANTRY-Colonel. Kellogg, Ed- 
gar R.; lieutenant-colonel. Miner, Charles 
W. : majors, Whitney, Folllot A. ; Cro- 
weU, Wm. H. H.; Rockefeller, Chaa. M. 

SEVENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Coates, 
Edwin M.; lieutenant-colonel, Dougherty, 
William E^ majors, Richards, Wm. V.; 
Kendrick, Frederick M. H.; Van Orsdale, 
John T. 

EIGHTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Randall, 
George M.; lieutenant-coloneL Ellis, 
Philip H.; majors, Stretch, John F.; 
Ray, P. Henry; Pitcher, William L. 



NINTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Uscum, Em- 
erson H.; lieutenant-colonel, Coolridge, 
Charles A.; majors, Lee, Jesse M.; Foote, 
Morris C; Regan, James. 

TENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Ewers, Esra 
P. ; lieutenant-colonel, Lincoln, Sumner 
H.: majors, Duggan, Walter T.; Hoyt, 
Ralph W.; Brown, George Le R. 

ELEVENTH INFANTRY - Colonel, De 
Russy, Isaac D.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Brinkerhoff, Henry R.; majors, Davis, 
Charles L.; Myer, Albert L.; Mansfield, 
Francis W. 

TWELFTH INFANTRY-Colonel, McKlb- 
bln. Chambers; lieutenant-colonel, Buhb, 
John W. ; majors, Haskell, Harry L.; 
Gerlach, William; AUen, Leven C. 

THIRTEENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Bis- 
bee, William H.; lieut^iant-colonel, Rob- 
erts, Cyrus S.; majors, Auman, William; 
Duncan, Joseph W.; Gardener, Cornelius. 

FOURTEENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Dag- 
gett, Aaron S.; lieutenant-colonel, Thomp- 
son, J. Milton; majors, Potter, Carroll 
H.; Quinton, William; MatUe, Leon A. 

FIFTEENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Moale, 
Edward; lieutenant-colonel, Williams, 
Constant; majors, Guthrie. John B.; 
Buchanan, James A.; Cornish, George A. 

SIXTEENTH INFANTRY-Colonel. Hood. 
Charles C; lieutenant-colonel, Spurgin, 
William F.; majors, Ward, Henry C; 
Kirkman, Joel T.; Whitall, Samuel R. 

SEVENTEENTH INFANTRY — Colonel, 
Smith, Jacob H. ; lieutenant-colonel. Robe, 
Charles F.; majors, O'Brien, Lyster M.; 
Williams, Charles A.; Cowles, Calvin D. 

EIGHTEENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Car- 
penter, Gilbert S.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Van Home, William M; majors, Paul, 
Charles B.; Adams, Henry H.; Wheeler, 
William B. 

NINETEENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Sny- 
der. Simon; lieutenant-colonel, Boyle, 
William H.; majors, Leefe, John G.; 
Houston, Joseph P. ; Woodbury, Thomas C. 

TWENTIETH INFANTRY-Colonel, Whea- 
ton, Loyd; lieutenant-colonel, McCaskey, 
William S.; majors. Miller, James; Rog- 
ers, William P.; Rodman, John B. 

TWENTY-FIRST INFANTRY — Colonel, 
Kline, Jacob; lieutenant-colonel, Clapp, 
William H.; majors, Comman. Daniel; 
Lockwood, Benjamin C; Wittlch, Willis. 

TWENTY-SECOND INFANTRY-Colonel, 
French, John W. ; lieutenant-colonel, 
Harts, Wilso^ T. ; majors, Penney, Chas. 
G.; Baldwin, John A.; Reynolds, Alfred. 

TWENTY-THIRD INFANTRY — Colonel, 
Davis. George W.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Eskridge, Richard I.; majors. Sweet. 
Owen J.; James, William H. W.; Pratt, 
Edward B. 

TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY-Colonel, 
Freeman, Henry B.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Keller, Charles; majors, Markley, Alfred 
C; Wygant, Henry; Macklin, James E. 

TWENTY-FIFTH INFANTRY — Colonel, 
Burt, Andrew S.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Jocelyn, Stephen P.; majors, Craigie, 
David J.; Noble, Charles H.; WUson, 
David B. 



168 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



RETIKED LIST. 

ABOYB THB RANK OP CAPTAIN. ALPHABETICALLY ABRANGED. 
CARB WAR DBPARTMENT. 



ADDRESS 



Abbott, Henry L., Col. 

Adam, Emil, MaJ. 

Adams, Moses A., Chaplain. 

Alexander, Chas. T., CoL 

Andrews, Geo. L., Col. 

Andrews, John N., Col. 

Arthur, William, MaJ. 

Austine, WiUlam, MaJ. 

Avery, Robert, Lieut. -Col. 

Bacon, John M., Col. 

Bailey, Clarence M., Col. 

Baily. Elisha I., Col. 

Balnbridge, Augustus H., Lieut-Col. 

Bainbridge, Edmund C, Col. 

Baird, Absalom, Brlg.-Gen. 

Baker, Stephen, MaJ. 

Baldridge, Ben L., Chaplain. 

Barrlger, John W., Col. 

Bartholf, John H., MaJ. 

Bartlett, Charles G., Col. 

Bash, Daniel N., MaJ. 

Batchelder, Richard N., Brlg.-Gen. 

Bates, Robert F., MaJ. 

Beaumont, Eugene B., Lieut. -Col. 

Belcher, John H., Maj. 

Bell, George, Col. 

Bell, Willfam H., Brlg.-Gen. 

Benham, Daniel W., Col. 

Bennett, Clarence E., Lieut. -Col. 

Bentley, Edwin, MaJ. 

Bentzoni, Charles, MaJ. 

Bergland, Eric, MaJ. 

Bernard, Reuben F., Lieut. -Col. 

Beddle, James, Col. 

Billings, John S., Lieut. -Col. 

Bingham, Judson D., Col. 

Bliss, Zenas R., MaJ.-Gen. 

Blunt, Matthew M., Col. 

Bradford, James H., Lleut.-Col. 

Bradley, Luther P., Col. 

Brayton. George M., Col. 

Breck, Samuel, Brlg.-Gen. 

Brewerton, Henry P., MaJ. 

Brldgeman, Frank. MaJ. 

Brlnkle, John R., MaJ. 

Brooke, John, MaJ.-Gen. 

Brown, Hugh G., MaJ. 
Brown, Paul R., MaJ. 
Bryant, CuUen, MaJ. 
Bryant, Montgomery, Col. 
Burbank, Jacob E., MaJ. 
Burke, Daniel W., Brig.-Gen. 
Burns, James M., MaJ. 
Caldwell. Daniel G., MaJ. 
Campbell, John, Col. 
Campbell, Lafayette E., MaJ. 
Canby, James P., Col. 
Card, Benjamin C, Lleut.-Col. 
Carey, Asa B., Brlg.-Gen. 
Carlln, William P., Brig.-Gen. 
Carlton, Caleb H., Brig.-Gen. 
Carpenter, Louis H., Brig.-Gen. 
Carr, Eugene A., Brlg.-Gen. 
Carrington, Henry B., Col. 
Carroll, Henry, Col. 
Casey, James S., Col. 
Catton, Isaac S., Col. 
Cayenaugh, Harry G., MaJ. 
Chandler, John G., Col. 
Chase, Dudley, Chaplain. 
Chester, James, MaJ. 
Chlpman, Henry L., Lleut.-Col. 



Ciaik* Jo«t?pti C, aiftj, 
Clotisoti, Hi^ory W., Col. 
CocbTB.u, MelTllie A., Col. 
CoGi Joljti S., Lieut. -Col. 
Ctjlllpr, (if^ofKe W., Clinplflln^ 
CoUJnfl. Eili^ard, Heut.-CoL 
Cuuiptt)!!^ CbnrLea E,* Col. 
Comarcirlij {.l^'trus B., CoL 
Ctjuk, Henry C, CoK 
Cooney^ Mlcbatl^ CoU 
Cupplngt^f. John J.. Brlg.-GBa. 
Cciraon, Ja»e[iLi S.,. Maj. 
t.^rabbe, Georgia \\\. MaJ. 
Cm \eh 1 11 , \X il M aia P. , Eric. -G en, 
Crandjii, Fred M,^ Ma J, 
Cronkliite, Hyorr M., MsJ 
CiiEhlDE, Harry C^^ MaJ. 
Cuflbluj?. Satnuel T.,Brlg.-€r«D, 
Dandy, Geargi^ B., CoL 
Dartiog, Jotm A.. Maj. 
DeComay, Ford E., Mnj, 
D ill pn back. Jobn \\\, MaJ 
Dctdd. Sipphen G., Chaplaiii. 
Drain, tticbat-d C. Iir]g.-Gei]. 
DuBarry. Bt^iykJUan, Brltf.-Geo^ 
Dudlty, Natbnu A. M.. Col. 
Dunbar^ Oeorge W^^ C ha plain. 
KbJitelu, Fred H. E., MaJ. 
EekerHon, Tbeo. J.^ MaJ, 
Effan, Jobn, MaJ. 
Elhrtr, Prpd W., MiJ. 
niJerkln, William A., Col. 
Klllot, i^QorgQ H., Uol. 
I'Tioa. Herbert M,, Maj. 
Evans, Andrew W., Col. 
EwpD^ Clflrenon, MjiJ. 
recbet. Edmocid G., MaJ. 



For&ytb, Jamts W.. Maj. -Gen. 
Forsyth, Le^Jia 0.. Lieut. -CoL 
Foarer, Charloa W.h Maj. 
Frank, Royal T., Brlg.-Gen. 
FrjQT, Bleocowe E,, Li en t. -Col. 
GardJder, Asa B., MrJ. 
Ganlncrr, wmiam H., Lleut.-Col, 
Unty, George W., Col. 
Glheon, Horatio G„ Col. 
Gib^jon, JoBepb E,* Lieut. -CoL 
Gilbert, GharJt^ft C, CSol. 
Gil man, Jcreralnh H,, L! eat. -CoL 
Gordon, Davlcl S., CoL 
Gould, Winum P., MaJ. 
Graham, Lawrence V., GoL 
Graliam. William M,, Br!ff.->G«D. 
GretfO, John. Lieut. -CoL 
tJreonp. Oliver D.. Col. 
Orlersun, Bonjnnalu H., BrigH-Oeo. 
Gnii^anH Frank C, MaJ, 
<Jutin3, AlesQud^r McC., Mai» 
Hall, Henry H., Clmijlalp. 
Hail, Peter P. G., MaJ. 
liflnallton, .Tohn, Col. 
nannnQud. William A „ Brif.-Qeix. 
Hitrdin, Maitio B,, Brlff.-Gea. 
HarHs, Moses r Maj. 
Hafrh, Jotn P.. OoL 
nnwklns, Hnmlltoi* S„ Brlg.-Gen. 
Haivkins, John P., Brjg.-Gftn. 
Hnvvley, Willi ain, MaJ. 
Jlead, George E., LjgQt,-Qp3, 



THE ABAIT. 



169 



Hpaa, JohD Fk, Col. 
Heeet, Am bony, CJoL 
HerrlcliT Oagood E., Clifi plain. 
ilJDtDQ, Cbarlea B., MaJ. 
Botmrtf Ciutrleaj LienL-Col. 
Hofl^es, Henry C, Cul. 
HdiiEUnl, Sam B.. HHg, Oen. 

Hough. AJfred L,, Col. 

Howard, Olivet CX. Maj -G*?n. 

Hubbnrd, wmiaia R, CbaplaJa. 

Humplirers, Henry H,, Lieut. -Col. 

HuutiofftGn. Dayld L., Lieut. -CuL 

HUfjLt, Ueorgfl (J.^ Col. 

iB^fiUs, CharJcii H.. ilaj, 

JnrinQ, Jayan H,, Maj, 

Irwin, Berijiiia .T. D., CuL 

JackaoD^ Allen H,, Moj. 

JttckBon, James, Lieut. -Col. 

Jackson, John W., Chaplain. 

Janeway, John H., Lieut. -Col. 

Johnson, Lewis, MaJ. 

Jordan, WiUiam H., Col. 

Jndd, Edwin D., MaJ. 

Kanffman, Albert B., Maj. 

Reefer, John B., MaJ. 

KeUey, Joseph M.; MaJ. 

Kellogg, Sandford C, MaJ. 

KendaU, Henry M., MaJ. 

Kendig, Daniel, Chaplain. 

Kenuedb^, William B., MaJ. 

Kent, Jacob F., Brig. -Gen. 

Keyes, Alexander S. B., MaJ. 

Kirk, Ezra B., MaJ. 

Kirtland, Thaddeus S., MaJ. 

Kramer, Adam, MaJ. 

Lacey, Francis E., Lieut. -Col. 

LangdoD^^Loomls L., Col. 

Lamed, Daniel R., MaJ. 

Utimer, Alfred E^ MaJ. 

Lauderdale, John v., MaJ. 

Lawson, Qaines, Maj. 

Lazelle, Henry M., Col. 

Lewis, John R., Col. 

Undesmith, Eli W. J., Chaplain. 

Litchfield, Henry G., MaJ. 

LiTingston,* La Rhett L., Col. 

Lloyd, Thomas J., MaJ. 

Lodor, Richard, Col. 

Lorlng, Leonard Y., MaJ. 

Loud, John S., MaJ. 

Lowell, Delmer R., Chaplain. 

Ijrman, Wyllys, MaJ. 

MC Arthur, Joseph H., MaJ. 

McClure, Daniel, CoL 

McCook, Alex McD., MaJ.-Gen. 

MacFeely, Robert, Brlg.-Gen. 

McGonnlgle, Andrew J., MaJ. 

McKeever, Chauncey, Col. 

McLanghlin, William H., Lieut. -CoL 

McMiUan, James. MaJ. 

Madden, Daniel, MaJ. 

Magmder, David L., Col. 

Mallery, John C, MaJ. 

Manning, William C, MaJ. 

Mathey, Edward G. , MaJ. 

Matthews, Wasliington, MaJ. 

Mendell, George H., Col. 

Merrill, Sherman H., Chaplain. 

Mlddleton, Johnson V. D., Lieut. -Col. 

MUes, Evans, Col. 

Mnier, Marcus P., Brig. -Gen. 

lUlls, Anson, Brig. -Gen. 

Ifttchell. George, MaJ . 

Mixner, Henry R., Col. 

Vontgomery, Robert H., MaJ. 

** . John, Brig.-Gen. 

in, James N., MaJ. 

Michael R., Brig. -Gen. 
Albert P., Col. 




Ma^^L.-^r, TUeodorts MaJ. 

M ■vlfiu, Mylee, MaJ. 

MuNiNB, tl€»org« G.y Cbaplaln. 

Mniplir, John, MaJ. 

Mnuniy, Ki.'ihC'rl, Hrlff*-GeD, 

N2-h, Wimum H.p Btig-G^a, 

N<L vt'll, Steven T.^ Lieut, -CoL 

N^iL:eEit, Eobert MdJ. 

0!i^<f , Jani^^p CoL 

OluLHted, Jfirauld A-, MaJ. 

On], JflEoes C, Ms J. 

OviMstiitie, Samuel. fiHg^-O^D- 

Pi-.'^v, CbfirU'Hr Cfll. 

PijtfAbvr, t;t?orjje H., Maj. 

Pfiliiii^r, liiuufl N.K CoU 

Pn]];iN John U., Col, 

Pni-|;>r-f, Dfllngerfleia. C-al. 

Pnrl^Kr, John 1^,. Cheplaln, 

PfLi^:i?r. Lemtold O., Lkmt.-Col,. 

Parc-fHou, Juhn H., lirtgn-QeD. 

Pu[/kr. Julius H., JIai. 

Pcjirsin], Edward P., Col. 

Ptujsuiip WllUnm U., Cliaplala. 

PrnieingtoD, Alex C, M., FHg.-Gen, 

PoLjijTiraylrer, Galtjefaa. CuL, 

Fvunm\ WUlUiu H., Col» 

Pf^i ly, Alex. Col. 

Pen V. David. Col. 

PljH r, AIM. CoL 

Pol] vi'k, OtJif W\, MaJ, 

FO"io, DeWltt C.J ilaj. 

Porrt r^ CharleB, lieu L -Col. 

Port or, FlTi-JohD, Col. 

Porter, Jtimt3» B. M.. LleuL-Col. 

Pr . ^v- ! 11, J H m ea W . , Col . 

Po^veUp WllMftiii H., Col. 

Pr£m(\ Fred K., Maj. 

gulrjjbVi Ira, Wnj. 
nnanlL EdiPifttd L.^ MaJ. 
Rjindlett. Jatnys t\. Lieut -Col. 
B.^x-^i\ Eleary B„ MaJ, • 

Rt.tiurd. William H., MaJ. 
RiTDf^rn L N,, CbaplnlD. 
RlT;^][ig, Reary P., MaJ. 
RuMiision. Qeor-tfo F.. MaJ. 
Rr.< hi^^fltpr, WlUiam B,» Brlg.-Qcn, 
Rfj ?kweU, Alnjciu F., Lieut, -Col. 
RiM-b'DboroTieli, F. F., Col. 
Rol:*.:^. Bpnjainln II.. 11a}. 
Ro^h . Tlioniflfl ivi Mil J. 
RuLkLr, nanlel IT., Brlff.^Gen, 
Riiuv r, T'homaB II. ^ Muf.-Geq. 
Rim;.^!(?'i, Georpe l>., Erie. -Gen. 
RiLiLkLt\ B?n}iimlii P., Jftj. 
Rur;^i-^n. Kdmund K.. Mo J. 
Rv.sH.:.tl. il^orj^o B.. tli?uL-CoL 
Ruj^i^j'lJ. tnhTwld, MqJ, 
ScHl...ii[i, Wurttifoeton I., MaJ, 
Sun lord, GHiri:^ JJ,. CoL 
SJ»v:if;i\ Etbert B.. Lieut. CoL 
SftVT^lle, ?lharles(;., Bflg,-Gen. 
SiL\roM, Eufna, CoL 
Scuil'Jld, Ji>bn M., LleuL'Geu, 
Sriit, Do^iclafl M .^ Maj. 
St ^rf. Will I am n„ OhsplalQ. 
Sn^tt, Wlofldld. Chaplalu. 
Sf -rM)id. JohB B , Cbaplflln. 
S<'i:uu. Henry, MaJ. 
SI I lifter, William R., Brlg,-Gon. 
Slu^nnoD, wnilDTBiC.H Mttj. 
Sliiup, Alei, MrJ. 
Shurp, TlioiDaa, MaJ, 
Sliisi, Tboranis*, Lieut. -CoL 
Sk'1iJ(.ii, Daniel E.. Mai.-CJen. 
Slrjjpson, tieofjfe W.. Cbnplaln. 
SLriU-JuEi. MarpiiB D. L., Col. 
Slui [air, William. Brl^.-G^n. 
SkMiJLor, John Q., Maj. 
Smitn, Mfroil T.. CoL 
SljtUb, Andrew It,, Cot. 



170 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOE 1900. 



Smith, Charles H., Col. 
Smith, Joseph R., Col. 
Smith, Leslie, Lieut.-Col. 
Smith, Lewis, MaJ. 
Smith, Rodney, Col. 
Smith, Thomas M. K., Lieut.-Col. 
Smith, William, Brig.-Gen. 
Smith, Wm. F., MaJ. 
Stafford, Stephen R., MaJ. 
Stanley, Da via S., Brig.-Gen. 
Stanton, Thaddeus U., Brig.-Gen. 
Stewart, Charles S., Col. 
Stewart, Joseph, Lieut.-Col. 
Stone, Ebenecer W.. MaJ. 
Stoncb, George W. H., MaJ. 
Strong, Norton, MaJ. 
Siinivnn, Ttiomna C. Brig.-Gen. 
SiiiumrTB, .Tr>tin K., Col. 
Siiiiiii4^r. Ed will V,. Brtg.-Gen. 
Swiildfi^ Vetvr T,, CoL 
Si*"ftjne. Wfljyftr, Col. 
Terrell^ rh(\rl*>H 3lL, CoL 
Tlnfalier, Hugh A., Col. 
Thonjpfion, Mi^lltgm A., MaJ. 
Thrwkmorton, Chflrl*a B*, MaJ. 
TfJhuJL I oh II C. CiiL 
Tiifcrd. Sotivphii.. Cijl. 
To mpk ! ns . Cba rle 8 H . . Col . 
TowMf, Z. B.. Col. 
Towp, Franclii L,, Col, 
Towneena, E^i^fn F.. CoL 
Van ^'ftlzflh, Dutld D., CoL 
Van VllPt. Stewart, Col, 
Voo Voflr*t, Jflmts, UoV 
Vernon, CbatSe* A,. MaJ. 



Vickery, Richard S., MaJ. 
Vincent, Thomas M., Col. 
Vullum, Edward P., Col. 
Wagner, Henry, Lieut.-Col. 
Warner, Edward E., MaJ. 
Waterbury, William M., MaJ. 
Waters, William E., Lieut.-Col. 
Weaver, Francis H., Chaplain. 
Wedemeyer, WiUiam G., MaJ. 
Weeks, George H., Brig.-Gen. 
Wells, Daniel T., MaJ. 
Wheaton, Frank, MaJ. -Gen. 
Wheeler, George M., MaJ. 
Wherry, William M., Brig.-Gen. 
Whipple, William D., Col. 
White, Dayid. Chaplain. 
White, Jtottert ti., MaJ. 
Wblitf niDrt?. rjivpftl W., Lleut.-Col. 
WllfOTf. John A., LI«it.-CQL ^ 
Wlllk-lm. Thaiijas, MoJ. 
WUkina, Jobfj D., Col. 
Wlllard. Wella, Lient.-Col. 
Wilcox, Orlaoflo B.. Brig-Gen. 
WillJiiQja, Hnhfrt, Brfg.-Gea. 
Wtlls, Dftviti. *:haplK|o, 
WilaoD^ Davld^ Chaplain, 
WilaoT3, Tbdmjut. Col. 
WitchtT, Jobn a., MaJ. 
WalTPrttjn^ Wiinam D„ Lleut,^3oL 
Wood, fleury C, Cot. 
Wood, Thotnaa J., Brlj^.^CteO* 
Woodruff, Edward C, Lieut. -Go). 
Woodwa^^l, George A., Ca\. 
Worth, WllUaiii S,, Brtg,-G(?n. 



GENERAL 0FFI0EK8 AND 0FFI0EK8 OP THE GENERAL STATF, UNITEJ) STATES 

VOLUNTEERS. 



Lawton, Henry W. 
MacArthur, Arthur. 



GBKBRAL OFFICERS. 
^ MAJOR-OSNERAL8. 

Shatter, WlUiamB. 
0U8,ElwellS. 

BRTOADIIB-GBinERALS. 

Wilson, James H. Davis, George W. 

Lee, Fltzhugh. Sohwan. Theodore. 

Wheeler, Joseph. Hall, Robert H. 

Bates, John C. Wheaton, Loyd. 
Young, Samuel B. M. Grant, Fredenok D. 

Chaffee, Adna R. Hughes, Robert P. 

Ludlow, William. Smith, James F. 

Wood, Leonard. Funston, Frederick. 

OFFICERS OF THE GENERAL STAFF. 
ASSISTANT ADJUTANTS-OBNBBAL. 

[With rank of Lieutenant-Colonel.] 
Richards, William V. Scott, Hugh L. 
Barry, Thomas H. 

rWith rank of Major.] 
Sturgls, Samuel D. Greble, Edwin St. J. 
Pershing, John J. Noble, Robert H. 

Michie, Robert B. L. Alvord, Benjamin. 
Hiokey, James B. 

INBPBCTORS-OBNEBAL. 

[With rank of LieutenantrColonel.] 
Mans, Marlon P. Heyl, Charles H. 

Reade, PhUip. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Harrison, Russell B. West, Parker W. 
Rolf e, Robert H. Beach, Wm. D. 

Murray, Cnnliffe H. Brown, Robert A. 
Sharpe, Alfred C. 

JUDGE ADVOCATES. 

[With rank of Major.l 
Dudley, Edgar S. Hull, John A. 

McClure. Cnarfes. Dunn, George M. 
Carbaugh, Harvey C. 



Jones, Samuel R. 
Sawyer, J. Bstoourt. 
Von Sohrader, Fred. 
Long, Oscar F. 
Martin, Medad C. 
Cruse, Thomas. 



QUARTERMASTERS. 

[With rank of Major.] 



Miller, WUliam H. 
Thompson. Charles B. 
Devol, Carroll A. 
Brooks, John C. W. 
Bingham, Gonzalez 8. 
Schreiner, Francis M. 



Hodgson, Frederick G. Young, Haldimand P. 
Ladd, Eugene F. --- ^ ^ 



Baker, Chauncey B. 
White, William J. 
Aleshlre, James B. 
Qreager, Noble H. 
Knight, John T. 
French, John T., Jr. 
Cartwright, George S. 



Carson, John M., Jr. 
Ruhlen. George. 
Robertson, Edgar B. 
Hutchins, Morris C. 
Wilson, James L. 
Bellinger, John B. 
Roudiez, Leons. 

COMMISSARIES OF SUBSISTENCE. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Miles, Perry L. Davis. George B. 

Gallagher, Hugh J. Brainard, David L. 
Mercer, Carroll. Bnthers, George W. 

Wood, Oliver B. 

ASSISTANT COMMISSARIES OF SUBSISTENCE. 

[With rank of Captain.] 
Hacker, Theodore B. Read. James G. 
Bootes, Samuel B. 
Fenton, Eben B. 
Demlng, Peter C. 
Hutchins, Edward R. 
Milliken, Seth M. 



Ryan, Thomas F. 

Logan, James A., Jr. 

Street, Harlow L. 

Krauthoff. Charles R. 

, MothersiU, Philip. 

Pomroy, Frederick H. Landstreet, John. Jr. 

SURGEONS. 

[With rank of Major.] 
Cardwell, Herbert W. Kendall, WlUlam P. 



Hysell. James H. 
Hoyt, Henry F. 
Edie, Guy L. 
Crosby, William D. 
Raymond, Henry I. 
Ives, B'rancis J. 



Morris, Edward R. 
Potter, Samuel O. L. 
Harris. Henry 8. T. 
Armstroiur, Samuel T. 
Penrose. George H. 
Shiels, George F. 



THE ARMT. 



171 



De Niedeman, Wm. F. Laine, Damaso T. 
Carr, Lawrence C. Ducker, Orlando. 
Brown, Ira G. Combe, Frederick J. 

Davis, John O. Meaoham, Franklin A. 

Tumboll, Wilfrid. Eean, Jefferson R. 
Baloli, Lewis. Drake, Charles M. 

Winn, William B. Reefer, Frank B. 
Matthews, W. 8. H. Fisher, Henrv C. 
Eoheverria, Rafael F. Bwing, Charles B. 
ThonuiBon, Henry D. Bannister, William B 

ADDITIONAL PATMASTEBS. 

[With rank Of Major.] 
Gambrlll, William G. Ray . Beecher B. 
Downey, George F. Rochester, Wm. B., Jr. 
Fishback. George W. Holloway, George T. 
KeleherTTimothy D. Smith, Robert B. 

BEOnCEirTAL 0FFI0EB8 

ELEVENTH GAVALRY-Colonel, Lockett, 
James; lieutenant-colonel, Starr, Charles 
O.; majors. Sine, Hugh T.; Carson, 
Thomas G.; Nolan, Dennis E. 

TWENTY-SIXTH INFANTRY — Colonel, 
Rice, Edmund: lieutenant-colonel, Dick- 
man. Joseph .T.; majors, Anderson, Ed- 
ward D.; Cook, Frank A.; Henry, Guy 
v.. Jr. 

TWENTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, 
Bell, James M.; lieutenant-colonel, Cum- 
mins, Albert S.; majors, Byram, George 
L.; Hunt, Clyde D. v.; Cassatt, Ed- 
ward B. 

TWENTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY-Colonel, 
Birkhimer, William E.; lieutenant -colo- 
nel, Leonard, Robert W.; majors, Morgan, 
George H.; Porter, John B.; Taggart, 
Elmore F. 

TWENTY-NINTH INFANTRY - Colonel, 
Hardin, Edward E.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Sargent, Herbert H.: majors, Hawthorne, 
Harry L.; Case, David B.; Johnson, 
Evan M. 

THIRTIETH INFANTRY-Colonel, Gard- 
ener, Cornelius; lieutenant-colonel, Camp- 
bell, James R.; majors, Steele, Matthew 
F. : Hartigan, Thomas L. ; Levering, Leon- 
ard A. 

THIRTY-FIRST INFANTRY-Colonel. Pet- 
tet, James S.; lieutenant-colonel, Hayes. 
Webb C; majors, McMahon, John E.; 
Liggett, Hunter; Brett, Lloyd M. 

THIRTY-SECOND INFANTRY — Colonel. 
Graig. Louis A.; lieutenant-colonel, Stro- 
ther. Lewis H.; majors, S|pence. Robert 
Bi. L.; Cabell, Charles B.; Henry, Mor- 
ton J. 

THIRTY-THIRD INFANTRY — Colonel. 
Hare. Luther R.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Brereton. John J.; majors, Cronin, Mar- 
cus D.; March, Peyton C; Sirmeyer, 
Edgar A. 

THIRTY-FOURTH INFANTRY — Colonel. 
Kennon, Lyman W. V. ; lieutenant-colonel. 
Howze. Robert L.t majors, Penn, Julius 
A.; Wheeler, Joseph, Jr.; Shunk, Wil- 
liam A. 

THIRTY-FIFTH INFANTRY — Colonel. 
Kobbe, William A.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Plummer, Edward H.; majors. Short, 
Walter C.; Laws, Albert; Walsh, Rob- 
ert D. 

THIETY-SIXTH INFANTRY - Colonel. 
B^, J. Franklin; lieutenant-colonel. 
Orove, William R.; majors. Bishop. Wil- 
liam H.; Braden. John Q. A.; Luhn, Wil- 
Ifam L. 

THIRTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY-Colonel, 



Lord, Herbert M. Vamey, Thaddeus P. 

Howell. Seymour. Lynch, John R. 

Sohofleld, William B. Goodman^Thomas C. 

Houston, James B. Graham, William R. 

Pickett, George B. Sternberg, Theodore. 

Dawes. James W. Sanders, Junius G. 

Becker, Otto. Stanton, Charles B. 

Canby, James. Arthur, George G. 

Curry, Manly B. Stevens, Pierre C. 



Belknap, Hu^R. 



Wilkins, Joseph 8. ^ 

Monaghan, William. Slaugbter, Bradner D. 
CofBn, Eugene. 

SIGNAL OFTICBRS. 

[With rank Of Major.] 
Thompson, Richard B. Glassford, William A. 
Scriven, George P. Mazfleld, Joseph B. 

OF THE VOLiniTEEBS. 
Wallace, Robert B.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Hamer. Thomas R.; majors, Cheatham, 
B. Frank; Boyd, Charles T.; Orwlg, 
Henry B. 

THIRTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY — Colonel, 
Anderson. George S.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Crane, Charles J.; majors, Holbrook, 
Willard A.; Molr, Charles H.; Qoodler, 
Lewis E. 

THIRTY-NINTH INFANTRY-Colonel, Bui 
lard, Robert L.; lieutenant-colonel, Crow 
der, Enoch H.; majors, Mulford, Harry 
B.; Parker, John H.; Langhome, Geo. T. 

FORTIETH INFANTRY-Colonel, Goodwin, 
Edward A.; lieutenant-colonel, Byrne, 
Bernard A.: majors, McNamee, Michael 
M. ; Cralghill, William E. ; Case, James F, 

FORTY-FIRST INFANTRY-Colonel, Rich- 
mond, Ephraim T. C; lieutenant-colonel, 
Mallory, John S.; majors, Preston, Guy 
H. ; Wood, Palmer G. ; WhoUey, John H. 

FORTY-SECOND INFANTRY — Colonel, 
Thompson. J. Milton; lieutenant-colonel, 
Beacom, John H.; majors, Brown, Wil- 
liam C; Prime, John B.; Carey, Ed- 
ward C. 

FORTY-THIRD INFANTRY-Colonel, Mur- 
ray, Arthur; lieutenant-colonel, Wilder, 
Wllber B.; majors, Allen, Henry T.; Gil- 
more, John C, Jr.; Andrews, Lincoln C. 

FORTY-FOURTH INFANTRY — Colonel, 
McClernand, Edward J.; lieutenant-colo- 
nel, Scott, William S.; majors. Hale. 
Harry C; Walcutt, Charles C. Jr.; Mc- 
Coy, Henry B. 

FORTY-FIFTH INFANTRY — Colonel, 
Dorat, Joseph H.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Parker, James; majors, Frederick, Daniel 
A.; ^le, Edwin T.; Birkhaeuser, Theo- 
dore K. 

FORTY-SIXTH INFANTRY - Colonel. 
Schuyler, Walter S.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Pratt, Edward B.; majors. Miller. Sam- 
2S}„.^-I Johnson, WiUiam H.; Brooke, 
William. 

FORTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY — Colonel, 
Howe, Walter; lieutenant-colonel, Ed- 
wards, Clarence R.; majors. Wise, Hugh 
D.; Shipton, James A.; Anderson, Keller. 

FORTY-EIGHTH INFANTRY - Colonel, 
DuvaU, Wmiam P.; lieutenant-colonel, 
Jones, Thaddeus W.; majors. Rice, Sedg- 
wick; Dade. Alex L.; Howard, John. 

FORTY-NINTH INFANTRY - Colonel. 
Beck, William H.; lieutenant-colonel. 
Ducat, Arthur C; majors. Hinds. Ernest; 
Kirkman, George W.; Johnson, Carter P. 



172 



CHIOAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAO FOB 1900. 



OABRI80NED POSTS. 



Adams, Ft.. Newpprt, R. I. (East).— 

Hdqrs. C, H and I, 7th Art. 
Adjuntas, P. R.— B, 6th Cav. 
AguadlUa, P. R.— H, Uth Inf. 
Albonito, P. R.— G, 5th Cav. 
Alcatraz Island, Cal. (Cal.).— N, 3d Art. 
Angel Island, Cal. (Cal.).— Hdqrs. A, 2d 

Inf. 
Apache, Ft., Ariz. (Colo.).— E and G, 9th 

Cav. 
Arecibo, P. R.— A, 5th Cav. 
Armistead, Ft., Baltimore, Md. (East).— 

Det. D, 4th Art. 
Asslnniboine, Ft., Mont. (Dak.).— Det. 24th 

Inf. 
Banes, Cuba.— F, 10th XJav. 
Banks, Ft., Winthrop, Mass.— F, 7th Art. 
Baraeoa. Cuba.— B. 5th Inf. 
Barrancas, Ft., Warrington, Fla. (East).— 

H and L, Ist Art. 
Bayamo, Cuba.— L and M, 10th Cav. 
Bayard, Ft.» N. Mex. (Colo.).— K. 9th Cav. 
Benicia Barracks, Benicia, Cal. (Cal.).— 

Det. 
Bliss, Ft., El Paso, Tex. (East).— A, 25th 

Inf. 
Boise Barracks, Boise, Idaho (Col.).— H, 6th 

Cav. 
Brady, Ft., Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. (Lakes). 

— M, 7th Inf. 
Brown, Ft., Brownsville, Tex. (Texas).— 

L. 9th Cav. 
Calbarien, Cuba.— L, 2d Inf. 
Canby, Ft., Wash. (Col.).— Det. 
Cardenas, Cuba.— C, D and E, 10th Inf. 
Casey, Ft., Seattle, Wash.- Det. 3d Art. 
Caswell, Ft., Southport, N. C. (East).— O, 

4th Art. 
Canto, Cuba.— Det. 10th Cav. 
Cayey, P. R.— M, 5th Cav. 
Ciego de Avila, Cuba.— B, I and L, 15th Inf. 
Cienfuegos, Cuba.— M, 2d Inf. 
Circle (Jity, Alaska.— Det. L, 7th Inf. 
Clark, Ft., Bracket ville, Tex. (Texas).— 

M, 9th Cav. 
Columbus Barracks, Columbus, O. (Lakes). 

— G, 7th Inf. 
Columbus, Ft., N. Y. City, N. Y. (East).— 

A, 5th Art. 
Constitution, Ft., New Castle, N. H. (East). 

—Det. 4th Art. 
Crook, Ft., Neb. (Mo.).— I, K and M, 10th 

Inf. 
D. A. Russell, Ft.,Wyo. (Col.).— B, 1st Cav. 
Delaware, Ft., Delaware City, Del. (East). 

—Det. 
Douglas, Ft., Utah (Col.).— C, 9th Cav. 
Duchesne, Ft., Utah (Col.).— I, 9th Cav. 
Du Pont, Ft., Delaware City, Del. (East). 

— L, 4th Art. 
Dyea, Alaska (Col.).— L, 24th Inf. 
Egbert, Ft., Eagle City, Alaska.— L, 7th 

Inf. 
El Caney, Cuba.— E and D, 5th Inf. 
El Cobre, Cuba.— Det. 5th Inf. 
Ethan Allen, Ft., Essex Junction, Vt. 

(East).— Det. 
Flagler, Ft., Port Townsend, Wash.- B, 3d 

Art. 
Gibara, Cuba.— B, 10th Cav. 
Gibbon, Ft., Tananan, Alaska.— E and F, 

7th Inf. 
Grant, Ft., Ariz. (Colo.). Hdqrs. A and B, 

9th Cav. 
Greble, Ft., Jamestown, R. I. (East).— A, 

7th Art. 
Guanajay, Cuba.— I, K, L and M, 1st Inf. 
Guantanamo, Cuba.— H, 5th Inf. 



Hamilton, Ft., N. Y. (Bast).— Hdqrs. H, K 

and N, 5th Art. 
Hahcock, Ft.. N. J. (East).— O, I and L, 

5th Art. 
Harrison, Ft., Helena, Mont. (Dak.).— D, 

24th Inf. 
Havana, Cuba.— Hdqrs. G, H, I, K, L, M, 

N and O, 2d Art. 
Holguin, Cuba.— E and I, 10th Cav. 
Honolulu, H. I.— I and K, 6th Art. 
Huachuca, Ft., Ariz. (Col.).— F, 9th Cav. 
Humacao, P. 11.— C, 5th Cav. 
Hunt, Ft., Riverside Park, Va. (East).— A, 

4th Art. 
Jackson Barracks, New Orleans, La. (East). 

— D and O, Ist Art. 
Jefferson Barracks, Mo. (Mo.).— M, 6th Cav. 
Keogh, Ft., Mont. (Dak.).— F, 1st Cav. 
Key West Barracks, Key West, Fla. (East). 

-Det. 
Lares, Puerto Rico.— L, 11th Inf. 
Leavenworth, Ft., Kan. (Mo.).— B and K. 

6th Cav.; B, C and D, 1st Inf. 
Logan H. Roots, Ft., Ft. Roots, Ark. (Mo.). 

—A, 1st Inf. 
Logan, Ft., Col. (Ck)lo.).— C, 6th Cav. 
Mackenzie, Ft., Sheridan, Wyo. (Colo.).— L. 

10th Inf. 
Madison Barracks, Sacket Harbor, N. Y. 

(East).— I, 7th; E, F, G and H, 15th Inf. 
Manati, P. R.— K, 5th Cav. 
Manzanillo, Cuba.— Hdqrs. A, C, G and H. 

10th Cav. ^ 

Mason, Ft., San Francisco, Cal, (Cal.).— E. 

3d Art. 
Matanzas, Cuba.— A, C, D, F, G dnd M, 3d 

Cav.; Hdqrs. A, B, F, G and H, lOth Inf 
Mayaguez, P. R.— Hdqrs. D, E, H and L, 

5th Cav.; C, llth Inf. 
Mayari, Cuba.— D, 10th Cav. 
McHenry, Ft., Baltimore, Md. (East).— D, 

4th Art. 
Mcintosh, Ft., Laredo, Tex. (Texas).— D, 

25th Inf. 
McPherson, Ft., Ga. (Past).— B, O, D and 

E, 2d Art.; B, 7th Inf. 
Meade, Ft., S. Dak. (Dak.).— Hdqrs. 6, H 

and I, 1st Cav. 
Michie, Ft., N. Y., New London, Conn. 

(East).- B, 7th Art. 
Missoula, Ft., Mont. (Dak.).— Det. 24tlr Inf . 
Monroe, Ft., Va. (East).— Hdqrs. G, N and 

O, 4th Art. 
Morgan, Ft., Mobile, Ala. (East).— I, 1st 

Art. 
Mott, Ft., Salem, N. J. (East).— fl, 4th Art. 
Myer. Ft., Va. (East).— B, G, H and I, 3d 

Cav. 
Myer, Ft., Va. (East).— Signal Post; B, 

SIg. Corps. 
Niagara, Ft., Youngstown, N. T. (East).— 

Det. 7th Inf. 
Niobrara, Ft., Neb. (Mo.).— K, Ist Cav. 
North Point, Baltimore, Md. (East).- E, 4th 

Art. 
Nue vitas, Cuba.— K, 15th Inf. 
Ontario, Ft., Oswego, N. Y. (East).— I, 7tb 

Inf. 
Palma Soriano, Cuba.— Det. 5th Inf. 
Paso Caballo, Cuba.— Hdqrs. B, C and D, 

2d Inf. 
Philippine Islands.— A and B, Eng. Batl.: 

Hdqrs. A, C, D, E, F, K, L and M, 8d 

Cav.; 4th Cav.; E, 1st, G, H, K and L, 

3d, F, 4th, F, 5th; Hdqrs. A, B, C, D. 

E, F, G, H, L, M, N and O, 6th Art.; 

3d, 4th, 6th, 9th, 12th, 13th, Uth, 16th. 

17th, 18th, 19th, 20th, 21st, 22d and 28d; 



THE ARMY. 



173 



Hdqrs. A, C, E, F, G, H, I and K, 24th: 

Hdqrs. B, E. F, B. I, K, L and M, 

25th Inf.; nth D. S. Vol. Cav.; 26th, 27th. 

28th, 29th, 30th, 31st, 32d, S3d, S4th, S5th, 

36th, 37th, 38th, 39th, 40th. 43d, 46th and 

47th U. S. Vol. Inf. 
Pinar del Rio. Cuba.— O, B, G and I. 7th 

Gay.; Hdqrs. E. F. G and H, let Inf. 
Placetas, Cuba.— I and L, 2d Cav. 
Plattsburg Barracks, Plattsburg, N. T. 

(East).— C, 7th Inf. 
Point, Ft., San Francisco, Cal. (CaL).— 

Det. 
Ponce. P. B.— I, 5th Get. ; A, F and G, Uth 

Inf. 
Porter. Ft., Buffalo, N. Y. (Bast).— K, 7th 

Inf. 
Preble, Ft., Portland, Me. (East).— E, 7th 

Art. 
Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. (Cal.).— F 

and G, 6th Cav. ; C and O, 3d Art. 
Puerto Padre, Cuba.— K, 10th Cav. 
Puerto Principe, Cuba.— 8th Cav.; Hdqrs. 

A, C, D and M, 15th Inf. 
Quemados, <3uba.— A and F, 2d Art. ; Hdqrs. 

A. B, D, F. H. K, L and M, 7th Cav.: 

Hdqrs. A, B, G, D, E, F, G and H, 8th 

Inf. 
Rampart Oity, Alaska.— Det. E and F, 7th 

Inf. 
Reno, Ft., Okla. (Mo.).— D, 6th Cav. 
Riley, Ft., Kas. (Mo.).— Hdqrs. A. 6th 

Cav.; F, 3d, and B, 4th Art. 
Ringgold, Ft., Bio Grande, Tex. (Texas).— 

D, »th Cav. 
Robinson, Ft., Neb. (Mo.).— A, O and L, 1st 

Cav. 
Sagua la Grande, Cuba.— I, 2d Inf. 
Saint Francis Barracks, St. Augustine, Fla. 

(East).— A, 1st Art. 
Sam Houston, Ft., San Antonio, Tex. 

(Texas).— K, Ist Art.; G, 25th Inf. 
San Carlos (sub-post of Ft. Grant), Ariz. 

(Colo.).— D. 7th Inf.; C, 25th Inf. 
Sancti Spiritus, Cuba.— A, 2d Inf. 
San Diego Barracks, San Diego, Cal. (CaL) 

— D, 3d Art. 
San Francisco. Cal. (Gal.).^42d. 44th, 46th, 

48th and 49th U. S. Vol. Inf. 
San Jacinto, Ft., Galveston, Tex. (Texas). 

— G, Ist Art. 
San Juan, P. R.— F, 5th Cav.; E and G, 

5th Art.; Hdqrs. B, E, 1, K and M, 11th 

Inf. 
San Luis, Cuba.— E, 5th Inf. 
Santa Clara, Cuba.— Hdqrs. B, E, H and K, 

2d (Dav. 
Santiago, Cuba.- Hdqrs. A, C, F and G, 5th 

Inf. 



Schuyler, Ft., Westchester, N. Y. (East). 

— K, 7th Art. 
Screven, Ft., Tybee Island, Ga. (East).— F, 

1st Art. 
Sheridan. Ft., 111. (Lakes).- D, 5th Art., 

and I, K, L and M, 5th Inf. 
Sherman, Ft., Idaho (Colo.).- Det. 24th Inf. 
Sill, Ft., Okla. (Mo.).— 1 and L, 6th Cav. 
Slocum, Ft., New Rochelle, N. Y. (East).— 

L, 7th Art. 
Snelling, Ft., Minn. (Dak.).— Det. 7th; I, 

K, L and M, 8th Inf. 
Stevens, Ft., Hammond, Ore. (Col.).— M, 3d 

Art. 
St. Michael, Ft., Alaska (Col.).— Det. E 

and F, 7th Inf. 
Strong, Ft., Boston, Mass. (East).— Det. 4th 

Art. 
Sullivans Island, Moultrieville, S. C. (East). 

—Hdqrs, C and M, Ist Art. 
Terry, Ft., N. Y., New London, Conn. 

(East).- B and N, Ist Art. 
Thomas, Ft., Newport, Ky. (Lakes).— E, F, 

G and H, 2d Inf. 
Totten, Ft., WiUets Point, N. Y. (East).— 

Hdqrs. C and D, Bug. Batl., and N, 7th 

Art. 
Trinidad, Cuba.— K, 2d Inf. 
Trumbull, Ft., New London, (}onn. (East). 

—I, 4th Art. 
Vancouver Barracks, Vancouver, Wash. 

(Col.).— B, 24th Inf. 
Wadsworth, Ft., Bosebank, N. Y. (East).— 

B, M and O, 5th Art. 
Walker, Minn.— A, 7th Inf. 
Walla Walla, Ft., Walla Walla, Wash. 

(Col.).— E, 6th Cav. 
Warren, Ft., Boston, Mass. (East).— M, 4th, 

and G, 7th Art. 
Washakie, Ft., Wyo. (Colo.).— E, 1st Cav. 
Washington Barracks, Washington, D. C. 

(East).- M and O, 7th Art. 
Washington, Ft., Md. (East).— K, 4th Art. 
Wayne, Ft., Detroit, Mich. (Lakes).— Hdqrs. 

and H, 7th Inf. 
West Point, N. Y.— E, Eng. Batl. 
Williams, Ft., WiUard, Me. (East).— D, 7th 

Art. 
Winfield Scott, Ft., San Francisco, Cal. 

(Cal.).— I, 3d Art. 
Wingate, Ft., N. Mex. (Colo.).— H, 9th Cav. 
Wood, Ft., New York city (East).— Det. 
Wrangel, Ft., Alaska (Col.).— Det. 24th Inf. 
Wright, Ft., Spokane, Wash. (Col.).-M. 

24th Inf. 
Yates, Ft., N. Dak. (Dak.).— D, 1st Cav. 
Yauco, P. B.— D, 11th Inf. 
Yellowstone, Ft., Mammoth Hot Springs, 

Wyo. (Dak.).— M, 1st Cav. 

Department In which post is localted is 
shown in brackets. 



STRENGTH OF TEE ARKY. 

The military forces In the service of the United States on the 25th of October, 1899, were 
oompoeed as follows 



REGULAR ARMY. 

Enlisted 

Officers, men. Total. 

(General officers 7 .... 7 

Adjutant-Ctenerars dept 14 .... 14 

Inspector-General's dept.... 8 8 

Judge-Advocate (}en.'8 dept.. 7 .... 7 

Quartermaster's dept 89 105 144 

Sabsistenoe dept 19 168 182 

Medloaldept Ih7 8,314 8,481 

Pardept 26 .. . 26 

Corps et engineers 123 628 751 

Ordnance dept 62 681 743 

Signalcorps. 5 650 555 



Enlisted 
Officers, men. Total^ 

Chaplains 30 .... 30 

Record and pension oflSce .... 2 2 

Military academy 246 246 

Electrician sergeants 15 15 



Total 609 6,702 6^211 

10 regiments of cavalry 12,022 

7 regiments of artillery 10.191 

25 regiments of infantry 34,683 

Indian scouts and recruits 1,579 



Total 64,686 



174 



CHIOAOO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 190O. 



VOLUNTBBR8. 

Ctonersl officers and staff corps 280 

1 regiment of cavalry 1,2B4 

34 regiments of infantry 82,616 

Puerto Rico battalion 414 



TotaL 84,674 

BICAPITULATION. 

Regular army 61,566 

United States volunteers 84;W4 



Grand total 90,160 



On tbe Ist of October these forces were dis- 
tributed as follows: 

O!0Uen.Men, TotaL 

In the United States 1,666 9Mi d4J829 

InPuertoBioo 106 8,266 8,863 

J'^SS^r-V,- 801 10,796 U,187 

In PhiUppine Islands. 971 31344 83,316 

En route to Philippine Isld. 646 16,568 17,099 

InAlaska 16 484 489 

In Hawaiian Islands 13 463 466 



Total. 



8,783 95,436 99,158 

The adjutantrgeneral says in his report that **It is expected by Deo. L next, all the 
infantry regiments United States volunteers, shown above as in the united States, will have 
sailed for the Philippine Islands. These, with the troops now there, will give a total strenjrth 
of 2,117 officers and 63,606 enlisted men (an aggregate of 66,7i5). " 

PAST POUnOAL GOKFLBXIOH 07 TEE STATES. 

B., Republican; W., Whig: D., Democratic; U.. Union; A., American; A. M., Anti-Hasonic: 
x«. R., National Republican; P., Populist. 



States. 



Alabama. 

Arkansas. 

Gallfomia 

Colorada 

Connecticut.... 

Delaware 

Florida. 

Georgia. 

Idaho 

Illinois. 

Indiana. 

Iowa.. 



D. 



D. 



D. 



B. 



N.B. 
N.B. 



W. 



D. 



W. 



Kentucky..... 

Louisiana. 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . 
Michigan.... 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Bfisaourl , 

Montana, 

Nebraska — 

Nevada. 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey... 

New York 

North Carolina. 
North Dakota... 

Ohio 

Oregon. 

Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina.. 
South Dakota... 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia... 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



N.B. 

D. 

D. 
N.R. 
N.R. 



W. 



W. 



w. 



w. 



D. 

N.R. 

W. 



D. 



A.M. 
D. 



W. 



B. 



D. 



D. 



D. 



D. 



S 



In five states in 1892 the electoral vote was divided: Gallfomia gave 8 electoral Tptei^ for 
Cleveland and 1 for Harrison and Ohio gave 1 for Cleveland and 22 for Harrison; in MioUgan, 
by act of the legislature, each congressional district voted separately for an elector; In Oiw^n 
1 of the 4 candidates for electors on the people's party ticket was also on-the democratic ticket; 
in North Dakota 1 of the 2 people's party electors cast his vote for Cleveland, this causing the 
electoral vote of the state to be equally divided between Cleveland, Harrison and Weaver. 
In 1896 California gave 8 electoral votes to McKinley and 1 to Bryan; Kentucky gave 12 to 
McKinley and 1 to Bryan. 



THE NAVY. 



175 



C|r« It^aiJl* 



tCorwcted to Not. 15. 1S99.] 



ACTDTE 
ADMlBAIi. 
Geome Dewcr, Navy Department. 
K-mAE ADMIEALS. 
Fredetlci V. McNalr, Bupt Naval Academr. 
John A. Howell, pre si Naval l]xam. Board. 
Albert Em tz , com tie Pad a« S tatlpn . 
Geo. C Remey, couidl Navy Yard. I'ortfimoutli. 
Norman II. barqubar, comd^ l^orth At J. ^t&. 
J ohn C Watfcon, comdg A^\ atlt Station. 
Wlnfleld Sr Srbley, corndp Scmtb Ail. i^tatSou- 
8110^ Casey* comdl Nuvy YHrrt^LeaHiie Island. 
William T. Samp&OB, com dt Navy Yd,, BostHjn. 
Bartlett J. CwiawclU waiting orders. 
Jobn W. Philips comdt Navy Yard^ New York. 
Francla J. Flight nsoiiH cbm LlKlitboufle Board. 
Frederick Bodgera.prest Board Inspects on and 

LoulH f^'mpffH comdt Navy Yard » Mare Island. 
GtcjTge W. Simmeri cc^nidt Naval Station, Port 

Benjamin T. Day, mem Examinlnjr and It^s- 

aUi^ . ftldCorin ick , comd t N avy Y ard , Wash . 
A, S. Barker, comdif Navy \ ard»ftorroll£. 

CAPTAINS. 

Charlee B. Cotton, com dp recg ship Ind^pen- 

Sltaa W. Terry. waUinff ordera. 
MnrrUl Miller, comdnE recj? ship Vermmt. 
Joho J. Head, comdj; recff tihipBifJimpT^^ 
MortinierLi. Joljrp^jTi, capt Navy Vard, Boston. 
EdwlD M^t^heparri, linht house insp- 3d dibt, 
Hobley D. Evnos, nietn Bri. Inap- and Suryey. 
Frank WlldeB, capt Kavy Yard. New York. 
Henry Glass, com d^^ Pfti*acoU and Training 

Wtation. San FranelBCO. 
Plillip H, Cooper, leave absence. 
Henry C, Tavfor. War College, f^^^H^ort* , 
Geo. IT. Wadleiffb. eumda ri;c^' ship W^abtwh. 
aTs, CrowniDfibleld, cbtcf Bureau Navigation. 
I J araoB H . Band s, *;o v N aval 1 1 ome , 
' Yates StirlSng, mem Liizhthouse BoaTd, 
William C, Wise, comdjf nscg ship ^^inK[in. 
Joseph B. Cochlan, comdt Puget Sound Naval 

PuSell'F. HarTlnKt^n,CBpt Navy Yard, Portfl- 

Lou Is J . A 1 len, N avf Ya rd , Mare Island , 
G«o»«e W. M el vlhe, chief Bureau bteani En- 

Neheml atf M . Dyer, wait! ng orde rs. , „ ^ . , 
FranelB A. Coot>mem Examining and Itetlr- 

Ina Boards. „ . , 

Colby M. Cheater, aen irvsp KentTJCfrw. 
a E. Clark, capt Nayy Yard. Leai^ot Island, 
CharlCH J. Barclay, waiting orders, 
Peter A, Ut'arlcki Inap men, Ntsw port News. 
Charles I>. tilgsbee, comdf? Terns. 
Bent, p. Lam berton. wailing orrt«ra. 
RlcliarcJ P. Leary, gov I*- land <4uam. 
William 11. Whitinji, S^an Iraucisco, Cal. 
ChJWlesO'NeiU chief Bureau Ordnance. 
OutOM- F. Goodrich, conadg U. 8. S. Io}ra. 
Wmsh E. Cha^wicfc, comdg A^cmi ForAt. 
Tbaodoro F, Jewell, comcig Braoklyn, 
WOUam M. Folger. gen Insp ^^^^^^<J%^^^^ 
Clpna.no Andrade. pre&t V^grEscam Board, 
John Lowe, spociufduiy, Hartford, Conn. 
John Sehouler, Annapolis, Md. 
Francis W. IMcklns, coradg ^"^iw*™,- „„„ 
Lewis W. Hoblnson, recrtg rend, Chica^fo. 
Georae F. F* Wlldc, ci>mrtg Orfmm. 
cSiles H. Uavis, supt Naval Observatory. 
JaSnnan H. McCalla, comdg U, S. S. J\Vtt.^*rfc- 
Chides J, Train, conidg MaamchusettJi. 
^wlD White, watting OKlers. 
Wlimun H. HarJla, jfavy Yard. Portgmouth. 



LIST, 

Ualpb Astan. Insp mcb, Brooklyn. N. Y- 
Go org*? W. Plgman, comdg tJft<irtc*(OTU 
Jobn McGowan, coindg Afon.fUlit.ock. 
.1. ii. Greea, comdi Naval t^ia., liavanm Caha. 
Cbarlea H. Rockwell. comOg C, S, ]?» Uhicago. 
JamL'^s Mr Forsyth, con id g BaltiTntire. 
lisorge A. (>jn verse, Hureau of Navigation. 
Koyal B. Bradford, chief Bureau EQnipment. 
J. E. Craig, bydrograpbor Bureau E^Qulpinent. 
Cbarleft M. Thomas, comdg J^ancaxter. 
Al bert S, B n ow, waitl n g orde i"9 . 
Georgef;. Uclter, comdtf U. 8. S, PhUatl^lphia. 
WUtard H. Brownsoti, Cramp's abipjard. 
wniism \V. Mead, capt Navy Yard. Mare Isl. 
Kdwiu Sr HouBton. comdg i;. H., S. AmphitTUe> 
Edwin Longnecker, ccindg New Orleuns. 
George E, Ide, comdg Ymemit^. 
George M, Book, waiting orders. 
Thrtmas Perry, seey Llir tit house Board. 
C, H- StockKm. prest War College, Newport. 
Asa Walker, War College, Newport. 
( iijcnr J'arenbolt. IN aw Yard. Bt»ston 
Ed w a rd T. 8t rong, w altl n g orrters . 
Eugene W. Watsont Navy Yartl, Norfolk. 

COMMANDERS. 

Robert K. Impey. waiting orders. 

Jobn F. Merry, Naval Re fir., Honolulu. 

Wtlilatu C Gihsou, Navy Yard, New Ttork, 

Washburn Maynard, light house lusp. 8th dlst 

H- W. Lyon. Navy Yard, New York. 

J. II. Dayton, comdg San Juan, Puerto Rico, 

Morris ll. H. Mackenilc comdg Praitir. 

CharlceS, siperry, comdg VorkKntm* 

Krank Courtis, conjdg trng ship EaxfXr 

W. W, Rel Ringer, comdt Navy Yard. Pens aco I a 

William T. Bur well, comdg W'hf^finf . 

J. J. Hunker, comdg trrik: sblp nta., Newport. 

Franklin I Jan ford, lighthouse Insp, 10th dlat, 

Robert M. Berry, Naval Home, 

tianiucl W, Very, comdg (7(ijffiirt£. 

Henry N. Manney. Navy Yard. New York. 

Chapman C Todd, Navy Yard, WaabLnifton. 

J oae ph N . H eiu ph 1 1 1, com dg netroii. _ , 

Abraham B, n.l.lllle. Navy Yard, thew York. 

William T. Swlnbnmc. Navy Yd,,Portsmoutl] 

Wm, H. tCmory, mem Board Insp. and tiurvej 

George A. Blcknell. comdg Mmiocacu. 

C. T. Uutch5ns. comdt Cadets, Naval Aeademj 

Soth M- Acklej, comdg ( VmcoM. 

Benjamin F, TUley. comdg AJ^jrinda. 

Harry Knox, comd« U. B. ». PHn«t(Hi. 

Clifford H. West, Navy Yard. New V ork. 

John r. Merrell, comdg Mmivtjjnent. 

J oseph O . Eaton . N avy Yard , Boston . 

Edward P. Wood. llghthouHe tnsp. 5th dlat. 

William I. Moore, Naval Station, Port. Eoyal 

Charles Belknap, waiting orders- „ ^ ,, . 

Fernando P. GUmoro, comdg U. 8. S. Me n 

Eugene H. C. l.eutze, waning orders. 
Uriel Sebrce, lighthouse Insp. Vilh dlat. 
WlUiatn A. Wlnds{}r. iuspmch, BItzabethpor 
Albert R. Coudea, Insp ord Proving Grounds 
Edwin €, Pendleton, Hupt Gun Factory. 
Wl 115 aiji B w 1 ft, ord ofh ee , N av y Yd, . N J- ly Tori 
llenrv B. xMansfleld. llgbihouse Insp, l&th dls 
Charles B, Hoeiker, mem Bd. Insp. and Biirve 
F. M.Symonds, llghihousic inap, ath dlst. 
Walton Goodwin, coiodg trng ship Adanii, 
Jobn 1>. Ford. Columbian It^n Wutks, 
Albert RosQ, conidg ^itt*tnc*!. 
Richardson Clover, chief In telllgenee officer 
James M. Miller, dut eon U^ S. B. Scindi^^ 
Frederick M. Wise, eomdg N.K, i^ Enirrpr^ 
J. V, B.Blcecker, comdg tf. b. S, UUdeLuim 
Andrew Dunlap. comdg Kftlup. 
.lohn A. B. Smith. Navy Yaj^, New York. 
Edward H, Gheen. comdg Marvtta^ 



17H 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1D0&. 



We] la L. Field, QomAft D. S 8. Ranger 
Harr bon G. iX CQlhy, ccundB Marbiefitaft. 

LV^iT*^^^ Areola, ctiiDtlK U. fe. S Bf R/ilnfftflji 
SUllliLin ^ Co^Jea. [us&t llureuu Nari gallon. 

\lomuiJpr fV. UrJt«i, \avy \ arU. LeMtiie Is Id 
Fdwaicl O. Tautislif, lJ^.lit]iou&G inRp, VAih dls-t. 
J. El. Ptl!Btnj|ry* equin olltO(;,>'iivr Yd.. BrHAtiit], 
WllUajn fci, Huedtr. aoii^djL' nuut ^,5,;;;^, M'trtiii. 
Rnbart W. Mtllikjatu JSu.vy Ydnl. Norfolk- 
I Joorjie W. nii(rd, ftupt SB.. W, aud J^. hCd^. 
liii'^hjird JfiE^h, Nnvsu tiTJitkni, UrtvUe, i'.T. 
I IhiiTld Wt'bHter liurean s^tejim EuiiliiLM.'riDp. 
I riiirjiiM nL'lelunntT, ^uv Sjiiinr'ii ^nuR llHrbOfr 
' rliarlfS (.'. rniriwi.Jil, iMiiuljj: Mctnti'rt'U- 
iiiiV.und N. Sib.' V! '11-01], l"iLu>n Iron WitrkH. 
Cliarlos W. line, XjivhI SUlU>n,8an Frmicispo. 
(Jfjortfti H= Ki^iiruy, NeivhI At^iidi^my. 
VVllliiiTn ^. MriLito. Ilisp niEiiMl. OranipX 
BoynL Kr Inj^L-rgollK Naviil At'.n,df*iu¥, 
Adnltjh Marix, llBbthoiise ia&fj.4tli dJRt. 
Dqnpan Ttoimody. ]fc*flitlioui^e JuflpJTtd d]^t. 
Jamt;.^ U. J. KtHlley^ cuiiicJfj^ U, W. K. Riji'iiut^ 
.TidTt'tFion F, Closer, cmmlir .4^;NirrN^>f. 
liiiymond K HoKwre, tonjdt' U. ri. S. iV.rsftH;^c. 
beutOD .Si'LrodiJjri :Navy VjiriJ. \Vii?^ti[nijft<Ki 
f'Yankltti .L Drake. aTdoflii^y Xnvy i^ud, Mare 

ifllnrid. 
Thoiiins C. McT^eiim, (iomdj;! U^ 9. S, Don Jiw*rt 

Will la tu ,1. BnrnottP. comrte N. W. S. Sririirmti. 

Prnncis II. Ufdmnj, Navy Vftrd, Boston. 

Chnrles T. Korao, llj^hriiou^u h;tipl4tli dloL 

Kdwin K- Moore, citiDdf; Helrna 

A. V. WadhEifijEi, coiDc]^ U- S.S. .Vnrt/JVituhfIa, 

riamaa U. Adumji. ITyilroMrii|i.hln Ofht-e. 

KEct^arrt WrtiDwrl^ht, Xuval Acudcmy 

Jamn s K. Si+ 1 f 1 td uo, I i g b th ouse i n sp, aif cl I st , 

WllMam 11. ilvurt'lT, conidjif IrUt 

Joliu Mr Hh^Uij, coiiidji U. S. H. Flartforfi. 

Jobn A. RfHigera, ll^bi house In^p, tii}i dlftt, 

Jamea W. HarUn, ciomdK Cui'jfNi. 

(^n^tfneil BltiekUnffer, niival rend, Chrcajen, 

Penr GuTst^ Naval Adndnnir, 

Til ill es K. CoKiswnIL UiKlilhoum} Inyp, Jflt^lsi. 

Hrt^rlerJo SI user, li^rhihoii^w (usp, 7ih dM, 

Arihur B. Speytiffl, Navy rnrd, Nri^v' Torfc. 

LbGtieKer S. PTlinc, pqulp otHce. Navy Yard. 

Lpa^iir I=!(!ind. 
N. fit. liilgs, equip t>fflre, Xary tard. Noj-^tlk. 
1 i'OEiia^ H, atflreiiH. Navy Turd, Norfolk. 




William H, BeehlQr. naval attatbp. Floiiie. 

VIetiim, BerUn. 
ijUeR n. HEkrb&r. wattinff orders, 
John b. Bi1*:gs. coiudR D, B. 8. ff^fii?if?'. 

Newton Mason . fii uharffe Torpedo Station. 
E>Qnnl*i^ W. Af uUan. under suKpebHltm. 

LIE nr E N A N T- DOM M A ND K KS. 
Arthur P. Natro, comd^f Manilu. 
WIIHuTn W. Ktmbnll.cjomdtf Vir&u 
WiniHua P. Day, Rick leave/ 
John q. Wit BOti, ns R IntiiaTia. 
Uriah R. HarrEa. V. ft. E?, .Ifojitrtjyrih-r-ra. 
Rlchurd U. Davenport, HydrftwraTihic Offlee, 
Edward H. Bjirry. >lHUjM^rttHif. 
rii^rbert WlnaJow, L'. IS. S. ComMlfitiAin. 
William B. Turner^ lotva. 

[xj?orep P ColvocorpHPe-'i. Llbrnrj, Navy Df pt. 
t Maries E. Colaban. Bureau of NavJ^'ation, 
Albert G. Barry, ftj^st UKbthouso in^p, ;W diat, 
John A. Jforrts. tTti^rUdfrn. 
N J. K, Patoh, comdg (Jeltic. 
IboniasS. Phpl|>fi, Jr., nee^nbip h}^tttfndijfcr. 
Karl Itcjbrer, Newport. Ncw^. Va. 
Johu A. H. Nickels. Navy Yard, New Tork. 
a IC Curtis, Nary Yiird, Norfolk. 
Theodorlc Porter, tccr sblp Fnznkliif. 



D. D. V. StusLTU redff nhlp Vemwnt. 

C, A. Adams, ordered Astatic Statlon- 

KoaantJi Nllts. Mo^^tfcftp wefts, 

Dennla tl. Maban, Hwokivti. 

VVlJllam F. Low, C. S. y. CJiicago. 

N- 1'. Uouston, Lancaatfr. 

James H, Perry, Bnreau St^acp EEelneerinii;, 

VvarnerD. Bayley^ Aew York. 

Albert l\ Dlioa, Brcmk/^a. 

hI. J^ Mlufclpy Jjiet> mcb. Phlladelpblft. 

Flay ton S. Hlehmaii.nnlertd to lJ;S.e.Jt^*tt«irJt 

tSainutd F. Co in I/, rppg ship EWnnfintL 

Jolm Hubbard. Navy Tard, NowTorfc,' 

Alexander JMcCrackfn, U, S, S^Ore^n, 

(4enr|G:e L, Dyer ccundK Y<mfFUm^ 

Lewi!* C Hellner. Navy Yard, j^tew York. 

^lartln E. Hall, U. S. S, NrW Oriianr. 

Edward M. Iluii!be<?, B<M(m^ 

Jqappb B. Alnrdocfe. U. i?. &. S^enf York. 

1li]|{oO?terbaus, w alt I nu orders. 

<. hurl pa E. V reel and. Buititfiore. 

Forwln H. Rens, n ori>odo Station^ 

Albort.C.DI]lin(rhain, U. S. 5?- lV:j:yM. 

iietkriie F. W, ilolnian. Torpedo Statlbn. 

Narhan fianeiept, coradtf Ur S* 8, Scorptoti. 

Lniarus L. Heainey, Navy Yard^ Waabington. 

JamuFiR. Bull, Mimterey, 

It. A. Mi^rrlani, asi^l, tojreti tnflp, Keanarge. 

,lnhn B. Milton. Navy Yard, BoBton. 

WlltATO KRbuni. Navy Yard. Washlnjrt^Jn, 

Wlllfam IF Nfiuman. lnB|> ntch, Bath, Me. 

,] acob hJ , Hun tOT, H ii reau of NaT i gntlt^u . 

<;eL>ri:e VV. Meutsi, F. 8. S. ^/ar^(f^&N^. 

M. A- Staimton, Isthmian CatiuL Commlsalon- 

Aaron Ward, ordered Ablatli:; Stat i on , 

Chiirlea W, BartLett. Naval Acadpnjy, 

('bauncoy Thomas. IJ. S. S- Bultimorf.. 

WilEJam A. Marsball. U. ft. S. N«w Y<iTh, 

VViNtatti M. Irwin. U. ii-Sr Marietta^ 

nTohn 13, Ito^ler, Nasy Viind. Boqion. 

lYancla 1^^ Greene. M*mtgt}m£rif. 

Cs!rScJa(i,CalklnB, Bureau HydrojrraBhlo Office. 

Han Pruucfsco, 
WJIIfam Pk 1511 lott. Naval Station. CaTlte. P. I. 
Will Earn 1^. 8 ewfll 1, A hn reiula . 
Heory McCrfia, Navy Yanl, WasbliiJrlon. 
Fd wapfl P, Qnal through, fnsp daty, Biireau of 
hiC]nipniDnt. > 

jTEJuua C. Cresap, O. S, S, Bfttrnit. I 

AsberC, naker, pp^elal daty, Paris E\pos(tion, 
Will lam U.U. So a t h erland . twmd^ li> dph in . i 
L UL ] an Yo u n R. N a val StatTon, l? ava btiH 
Jesse M. Hotter, IJ. H. 8- Di£it. 
t harlei^ K. Foi. HeJina. ' 

Jnbn C. b'romont. HuperriEOr N- Y. Harbor. 
AlJ^ert, MertiE. Qlad^r, 
HtigoTR H, (Jalt, U. fi. a. BrwriWjfli. 
Vlncemlon L. OuttuiRD. CavtiB. p. L 
I-rauk E, Sawyer, eomdg Cceeatr 
WiJlbim II. SRbnelae. l^UmlfUihia. 
TMomai^ B Howard, O, 8. S. MannanoOi. 
WaKerC. CowJes, ABlatlc Station. 
Austin M. Kntf^bt, Naval Academy. 
{ -barles J. Badger, Cramp^a Ship Yard. 
Hamufl] W. B. Dlehl, Bureau EqnlpnienL 
Ueirlnald F. Nlcholaon, eoindgP^frajrat- 
Siiaiuel C, Jjetnly, J nd*te- Advocate General. 
Edmund B. L'odEfrwood, AUiant^, 
William l'\ nalsoy, N&vat Academy, 
l^'rank A, Wilder, rccff sblp TTafrMift. 
Henry Worrell, waltliiE ordere. 
William Wind*jr, Michifjan^ 
riiarles B. T. Moore. Btunin^ftmi.. 
Ten Kyke D. W, Tedder. Bureau KqnlpmeHt 

riavy Departmont- 
Affred Reynolds, tl. S, S. Nashvii^e. 
John M. Hoblnaon, U.R.S, TFilmlafffmi, 
John K. Barton. Nftvj Yard, Bost:ou. 
Hobert G, I>enlff. CJiica^th 
GeorffB H. Peters, ofHco NaTal InlcUiaence. 
Bradlev A. Flste. O. S. 8. Tm-kttfwn. 
Frank H. Hulaiea, U, 8, S, Mimoeacy. 
Jckhn |H\ Farteer, LT. 8. i^- Dixi*. 
Hamilton Ilar<;li1uj». StacMax. 
Jobn M. Bowytr, PHneetfm. 



THE NAVl. 



1T7 



Jobn C. ColweU, Nnval at taclieK London. 

William H. A. Boopey, Jfeii? Ort^an^, 

BdwBTd J. Dom^ Naval Academy. 

Bernard O. Bcott, Ci^na^rd. 

GtJOrwoB- KansriTOn BaltdmwWn 

Wmiain C. Eaton. tJ, 8. S. PhUfHtiJpMa 

Alfred H. Caniiga.ofdured AslatleBtarlrm. 

Abrabam V.Zftno, duty wilb Aiabnirui 

Jobn H. Edwards, Tfxa^. 

Stnry Polts, Kayal Adadt!niy. 

Itenry T- Cleaver, Yorkt*HL>ii, 

Albert B. WUlitH, Bureau fStpara Flniflneerlnj?* 

JnntSK Pn B. Lawrence, U. S. S. Jlffi£zi'^hiti^i:t(j|ip 

iJHRiKi fl. K. BceTGS, rec*r ehlp FrunHHtu 

TnrkKool, fnvjii. 

Albon C. Hodseon, Torpedo Station, Newiwrt. 

James M. Helm. llKlilliodBe insp. IiUb Dlt^lrlin. 

William G, Cnilpr Kfv<arh. 

Cameron Mt-H. Wlnslow^ WrtltiDg ordtTBr 

Charlea 1^1 nl, wnltlnijordf rs. 

Nfttlian H, Ufibor Newnort News. 

Walter 8. llnRhee. I*im(nkiphfa. 

Kldelio S. Carter, U. S. 8. Prairie, 

Frarik V. Flei-chpT, comcip Ennfe. 

AlesLinili r Kbarpe, Jr., tJ. S, w. Hurfffird. 

llariy H. 1 lL»aley, recp 6t3\n_ren)i*wt, 

t^aiiS K. Beatty, U. S. 8. TFftf^ffno. 

MoacG L, WchmIk KaTT Yard, Penpacom. 

Jghn A- Slinarmao, C B. S^ OiMfin-f, 

Rolwrt M. Boyle, Bnrcaia Ordnance. 

George M Btoney, Ki^val Academy. 

Fr^cieriek W. Coffin. Solace. 

Wythe M. Parka, Ifytva. 

Harry M. THfidffps, N^to. 

WlLlinni U. t ■uperlon. Bureau OrdnanCMi' 

.lame? T. t^iiiiclJ. walt!ni! ondorB. 

Frank ti. BaMt?y. M. iJ|. 8. Petrel. 

Gonri^ S^ WJJIlts. MarhUhetxft . 

Walter i\ Worth Install, Buroap i^toam En- 

wflllanj sr'uttle, nifJTlf!ntf)n, 

KfjwajTl R. Freeman. Iit4kin^, 

ThtH>. F. HiLrg<lcirEF. M*tn<iiinnrk. 

Frank H. Eldridpn, V.^.^. Oi-erjriTJ.. 

EdKar T. Warbnrton, Naval Acfidomy* 

Honrr C- Gearlrie, D- ^- H^- f.'^i!'mii. 

Temmlu M. Potra, wuit^ni;; orders, 

Wiuram H- Allen, Bureau Euulpmenf. 

Barns T. WaUtiitf, KflT^al StftlloHi CavU*, P. 1. 

ClSftori^ J. Boneb, Vnvrmit^. 

J. n. Scat!*, U. i^. S. Chica^ {aide lo Admiral). 

Abraliam T^. Culver, U. B, S, Cht^/i^pt, 

Henry T. Mayo, UdIqu iron Works. 

rhsrU** C EoKera. (J.8,S. iVWo York. 
I Joha T, i^cwtt>P, Navy Yard. New Ynrl. 
I W Bide mar D. Bone. U. B. H. Ihd<i/na. 

ChttTlpB h\ Pond, II. S. S, fifl^rufjis, 

WflU*r McLoaiir Bnrt*nM Onloance. 

W, L Cli amber*. U, S- B. Trxtu. 

.Tames C, Gil more ► r'rtsunerfrom Ya^kttm^n. 

Penjftuiln Tappap. comdfr C, S, S, Vullott, 

C burins A, Gove, O B ^^. Miii^mrJiiigftts. 

Itf ? \\ i tt CoJTtn a n , N aval A oadem y . 

William Han nam, Hlf^k leave. 

liU]bard Henderson, Board Insp. tind purvey, 

Thomas D. GdiTii], U. tJ, W. Hitjiforti. 

Henfv Mrnott. U, S, B, Amtna 

Richard MuUfgan, Offif^t^ l^aval IntEllicence. 

W, BrnnncrsrHUther. IJ. 8. S. OAaH4',FffOiv 

F, H, Bberman, Knify Yard, New Ynrfe. 



ITedlciil GorpB. 

MBDICAL DlKBCTOBS. 

[HaDit of Captain.] 



Walter K, Scobelds prea Medieal EiamlntNA 

Board, PbUadtlphlii. 
Qrtj^^n B. Beardsloy, iBcm Kqtlrina Buanl. 
William R, Van Uuypen, clilef Bureau Me 3 

i*nrt Bnrjtery. ; 

T. C. Waltyn, Naval Lnboratory. New York, 
. iJliHrleft n. While, Nciva! ?4u50um of Hyjjlono* 
GH>rj(re W. Woods. Naval llotmiial. New York, 
I JasKJsH. Fllat,SmEth!^iilau InaMtiiMon. 



Geork*e V- Wlni^lqw. Navy Yard, Bost-on. 
Hopca J. Babio, pres Bi.*arfl Medicjiil Kiam- 

Incrs, New York. 
JuPtpb B, J'arkfr, tnem Medk'd^l iCxaEciiiiinjz 

.Tni^H^fiii fj. Avrrs. Navttl FFoH|>ita>, Boaton 
.\f>vl h". Prtcb^ walttuK prdtirB. 
Jumei&A. HHWke, Navy Yard, Kew Vorii. 
Ttnbert A. Manulim, Naval Hospttol, Phlla. 
Dwlffbt J]>icken&tiu, Novqj lln§,t*, Wafcblnt^ton. 

MEDICAL ISS^FBCTOHB, 
[Bank of Commander,] 
Wci- «. Fariv^ll- Nary Yani, I,ca;ruc Ijland. 
JobTi C WlrtOk njcm Examining ile^ard. 
17. P. Bradley, Naval Ho^^>ltttL Mare Islanrl. 
rharli's V. dravEilt, tuyni MedlcaJ Examlnlni? 

lion I'd. New York 
Tanl KltKhltaona, New York {Floot SuTjjeonV 
Wm. 6. t>l.Ton, narm Retiring Buard. 
C. A. B(s?»rrrii^d, Naval Hript>HaU Newport, 
Herrsu?it'. I'errions, Baltimorf^ [li"']eeTi, 
Nclsim M. K*?rt.*bce, Naval Hospital, Norfolk. 
FrankUri lloLNTfl, Marine RcndfK. Phi I a, 
Ja tn e B 11. W npcener, N n to I T J t >&p , Ca v i tc. 1 \ 1 
Thomns K. Stivers, iMMJarU^lpliimFleet Hurn). 
Mtmiy H. Blntons, ^vjijtinti orders. 
Jolm C, noyd^ asRt. Rureau ol Med ancl Surg. 
Geo» E. tl^ Unrmon, lirmmuii, 

BUTlGEUNa. 
[Ennk of Llcutenant4.Viminander.J 
Howard WsIISk Vhnagn. 
Daniel N^Herto I ette. mem Medical Kinm Bd. 
E/ra Z. iJprr. Navy Yard, Portsmouth. 
Knink B. ^tepbcnftitn, flpvjjoj^ 
Hre^iley M. lllxcy. Njivat l>J^;TJcnisary, 
Waltor A MefUurkJ, U, j^. K Uuhtinn. 
L-nmhtirljiud tt, lIiMndon, MuFeuiii Hypfcnr. 
Lu+;it'n ^3- llonsbcriier. waiting r>rdetf, 
iidwaril 11. firecn, hdqrs MftrJnc Corps. 
Hamupl 11. Dlekson. Navy Yard, Wasbin^tun 
Hiivld O- Lewis, U. i^. S. iuwiu 
llowaid E, AmcB, Navy Yard, Norfolk 
frttnk Andurson, Naviil HitSpitaL Yokohania. 
PhllLipB A. Loverinj^r, Navy Yard. Mare lalanii. 
William H, Du Bose. Naval Aeadooiy. 
( '■ bar! es T, J ti bbe tt , Vhti rfvs f > *u. 
N. FI, Drake, mem MefSlj^al Exam Bd. N. V. 
Henry G, Beyer, rocd ship JS^nhti^h 
,lobn M, Stoelc, Torpedo ^taLimi. Newport, 
nlames E. Gardner. Marine Kent!. Boston. 
M 11 lard H. Cra w ford , N av a I Re n r| , Ne w York . 
tf octree P. LuTflsden, recruitiinK duty, Buffalo. 
Emlyn H. MarsiellPr, U. S. ta, Riefiin^uvi. 
WlllW H. Kuab, »sht(if- 
Jame**Cr Byrnes. Maa^tJctw^rtiit. 
Samuel H. GrifQth, Pnifrie, 

[Rank of LleuleDant] 
Avt?rley C H. Ru&bell, KewarJc 
Cli^mcntBiddlt], Tf.jran. 
I U=nry T, Pf^ruy, waiting orders. 
Jiiiuics n. Gate wood, Limmst^r. 
Oliver Diebl, Nifhfgun. 
John M. Brticrar. ArfiphitritE. 
PbJlIp Leatsli, U, B- S- KftfJ Tvrk^ 
1 Joyd W, Curtis, recff ship Vermont. 
Ik'ury B. I'iUa. Marine Barracks. Sltku. 
YietorC. B. Mcnns,Rt:'e Bend, Ban Franeleco. 
FrtJtlerlck J. B. Cordclro. New OrlrajiK. 
Francis W. F. Wltiber. Cftimr. 
OIlTor D, Norton, Mfynofln^tk. 
Krederlck A, Heeler. Naval HogpR^l- Boflt^on. 
l^nac W. rcite, MonUreiir 

Andrew R, Went worth, redp sbl p hififFCiirleiirt. 
Corblti J. Dot^kti!r, M'Jfif tcacy. 
Thomas A^ Berry hill. U, B, B, M'>mmo<iMlQ^ 
Epiiene P. Btone, Naval Disptuifiary. 
ticorwe M. Peckeral, D. 8. S, MtttUfrr^. 
RimtfP.Crandeil, O. H, S. VuHMMfuUfiji^ 
H, N, T. ilarrlPr waiting orders. 
John E . U f ic, D . S ► S. noipfiiu 
A. N. 1». McComiIck, U, S. 6, Mimiiiomtrif. 



178 



CHIOAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOB 1900. 



Fay Oorps. 
PAY DIBBGT0R8. 
[With rank of Captain.] 
Charles H. Bldredge, Navy PayOfBce, Norfolk. 
Edward May, Navy Fay Office, Boston. 
Henry M. Denniston, Navy Pay Office, N. Y. 
Frank C. Cosby, gen insp Pay Corps. 
George Cochran, Navv Pay Office. Phila. 
Albert 8. Kenny, chief Bureau Supplies and 

Accounts. 
George A. Lyon, waiting orders. 
Edward Bellows, gen strkpr, Portsmouth. 
Arthur Burtis, waiting orders. 
Edwin Putnam, gen strkpr, New York. 
Robert P. Lisle, ordered to League Island. 
Leonard A. Frailey , gen strkpr, Washington. 
George E. Hendee, Navy Yard, Boston. 

PAY INSPECTORS. 
[With rank of Commander.] 
Henry T. Wrlerht. m&vy Yard, New York. 
Duniel A, ymltiik wait^ni? orders^ 

Jo.-.r|iU Foster. New York illeetK 

Thrifdore S. Tbonipeoii. Navy Pny Office, Ban 

KrHticis«o. 
WkrtJhm J, TbomsoD, Baltimore iflectK 
Hc*nry G, ColhT. Nnyy Pny Offlre^ Baltimore. 
Jo hi] B. Hcdticfd. orcl tn Navy yard, NcjrfolK. 
Ichitl'Od G. HubbSn waliLn^ or^ere. 
Jof^l P. Lonii!|«. cBdetfitrltpr, Naval Academy. 
Htfiiry T. n. Hurrlfl, rocK Hhln Vipmji'mt 
Stephc^n Riitid. H&yv Pay Offlde. Wafibingt^m. 
LawreDce G. Bdi^St L\ IS. S. Mtansttchusetts. 

PAYMASTERS. 
[With rank of Lieutenant<;ommander.] 
Samuel K- Colhoun. torpedo station, 
JOf^iah H. 8taQiun^ II. g. 8. Phiiadelphia^ 
Jamei] A. Ulim, U, B. S, Imta, 
Jamen K, Cjiuh, Kayy Pay OtHcB, Partjsmodth. 
J. N. SpleJ, N&Tal H (5111 r,Vhiliidelph 111. 
Reah Fniier, Nwvy ViinrLeiiifuelr^tdDd, 
HfcrrtTU B. imiry, dotblnt! fartnry. New Vork. 
Chnr](!a W. I.ittleflijld^ rucipr Bbip WahuHti. 
Arttiur Petet&jin. Navy Yard. Ijeaeim I elan d. 
WJlilani W. Gait. Navy YartL Norfulk, 
JotiQ Clyde BnJllyaa^ ord tti trnp ship Aiiama. 

[With rant of LitJiittinant,] 
John R. Martin^ Drd t^ recu ship Richmond^ 
Charges M. Ray, Naval Aeadpmj. 
MJtcboll C Maollonald, Naval j^ttLtlou, Cavlte. 
BaiPtact? iJ. Kiiff^ra, U. IS. B. Orfi^oii^ 
LeL^dsC. KL^r, reckf 3hSp/nd*!;iipndi'nc£^* 
Rlohrirrl T. M. BaU, Chl^iagfi. 
CHiELi'lesLi^. WlUlami, iTf^Qitrkpr, Bodton. 
TlirnuEia J, Coffits, TratnlUK Station^ Newport. 
Jobn S. CarpGiiter^ U. S. S. 1'^xa^. 
Llvini::;ct>n Hunt, Navy Vard, WaAhlnjjton. 
Jc ■! .'■■ . ^-i I'lil, Navy Yard. Kew York. 
W : ' ■ ■. 1 r. ttS6t. t a jso u atrkpr. Le^a^uf^ lal. 

Gi - 'I EupAOn , assl Bureau 3 uppUea and 

Hoiry R. Skillivanj, ord Naval Station, CftTlte. 
Samuel L. Heap, D. S. S. BTuohijrn. 



John Q. LoveU, U. S. S. AmpMtHte. 

James S. Phillips, Sofiice. 

Thomas S. Jewett. Glacier. 

Frank T. Arms, Indiana. 

Thomas H. Hicks, Bureau Supplies and Accts. 

HenryB. Jewett, U. S. S. Newark. 

Ziba W. Reynolds, ord Charleston. 

Samuel McGowan, gen strkpr, Cavlte. 

Henry A. Dent, asst gen strkpr, Norfolk. 

Walter L. Wilson, D. S. S. Penmcola. 

William J. Littell, Navy Yard, New York. 

PhiUp V. Mohun, sick leave. 

Martin MoM. Ramsey. Coast Survey Office. 

Joseph J. Cheatham, Bureau Supplies and Ac- 
counts. 

Richard Hattan, Navy Yard, New York. 
Karine Corps. 

BRIGADIER-GENERAL, COMMANDANT. 

Charles Hey wood, hdqrs Washins^n. 
GENERAL STAFF. 

GeoTise G. BeLdr coL, ad J and insp, hdqrs 
WashlDpton. 

Charles 11. LaucbhcHmer, tnaj, asst adj and 
ill ill}, belqrH Wa^talQ^tf^D. 

Frank jj. Denny, coL and qtrmstr, hdqrs 
Waj^hmfirtnn. 

Thim. C. Prhbce, maj and asst qtrmstr, asst 
qtrrri^tr'e nfllce, Philadelphia. 

Chariffi T.. McCfi^wley, ma] and asst qtrmslar, 
niarlnf: bk^, WashlDi^ti^ 

Cyrtia S. Rrtflford, capt and asst qtrmstr, 
ndqrs WaililcLKtJifa. 

Robert P. I<'aunt Le Roy. capt and asst 
qlrmstr. asst qtrmetr^s office, Philadelphia. 

WillEaiis B^ Lf;iDly, capt ajid asst qtrmstr, 
CavUt^ IM. 

Green Clay Qoodloo, col and paymaster, 
llilqia Waahlnjrtcio.. 

Gk!(trKi^ HicbaniEi. ma] and asBt paymaster, 
bd^rci Wasbluifton. 

COLONELS. 

James Forney, marine bks. League Island. 

Perolval C. Pope, marine bks, Manila, P. I. 

Robert L. Meade, marine bks, Cavite, P. I. 

Charles F. Williams, marine bks. Mare Island. 

Henry C. Cochrane, marine bks, Bost<m. 
LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. 

William S. Muse, marine bks, Norfolk. 

Francis H. Harrington, marine bks, Washing- 
ton. 

Mancil C. Goodrell, Seattle, Washington. 

George F. Elliott, Cavite, P.I. 

Allan C. Kelton, marine bks. Island Guam. 
MAJORS. 

Richard Wallacta, If aval Academjr. 

Bf'njimiEn K. RaaaelL U. S. B. Neio Fflffc, 

Otf^ay C". Be IT rm an, Ndval Academy. 

Willlnru F, Spicer, U, S. S. Bronkl-^n. 

Pfti,]| m. C> Murphy, TralnlnR Statlnn^Newport. 

Wnibvm P. Btddhr supt of recniJtlnff. 

BaniJcitih Dickius. Navv Yard, Wafihinfitoa. 

Thomas K. Wood, watting carders. 

L. W. T. Waller, Cavity. P. L 

Harry K, White, Manila, P. I. 



HEAR ABUIHALS, $4,600. 
Thomas 0. ScifHd^e^WaBlUn^on, nx. 
Ri:>^er N. Stem^eU Waahington, D. C. 
Gcoi-ge B. Balch, BaUlmort/Md. 
Aaroa K. Huiifhes, Wafthlni^du, D^ C 
Thonms B. Philips, Washin^itou. D. G. 
Francis A. iS^jfi, WBahlngrton, D. C. 
Bamucjl R. Fran kl Id. WaBblbrton. D, G. 
John H. UpBlitir. Wawtiliigloii, D.C. 
B, B. Lurp, Ni.'W]>ort, it. I, 
JarEi^A E. JtnietU WasblTiprtoii, D. C- 
L, A. KIcniHJrly. West Newton, Mass. 

D. B. IE - ■ •■ ■-■ ■•■■■■ ■ '■■i^.Vsil. 
A, W, V,-. kV. 



BETnUSB LIST. 



A. K, K. Benham, WaahtngtOti,D, C, 

John ItwId, Waahloffton, D. C 

Buacroft OherardJ, New York. 

O. Fh Stanton, N(jw Ijondon^ Conn. 

Hanr^ Mrben, Snw York. 

J. A. Oreor, Wasliliiffion, D. C. 

Gen rap IJrown, Tndlanapolia, Ind^ 

Jobn a. Wttlkt^r, WaHbloffton, D. C. 

Franclis M, Ritmbav, WabUin^Q, D- C. 

Joseph N. MUler, New York. 

Montgomery Sicard, Washington, D. C. 

Edmund O. Matthews, Newport. 

F. M. Bunco, Hartford, Conn. 

Lester A. Beardsley, Little Falls, N. T. 

Thomas O. Selfridge, Jr., Washington, D. C. 



THE NAVT. 



179 



Henry L. Howlson, New York. 
Nlchol Ludlow, Washington, D. C. 
I. B. Tryon, GoxsaoklejR. Y. 
Edwin Stewart, Washington, D. C. 
J. A. Smith, Philadelphia. Pk. 
J. E. Tolfree, New York, N. Y. 
Joseph TreUy. San Francisco, CaL 
James Bntwistle, Faterson, N. J. 

GOMMODOBES, $3,750. 
Albert G. Clary, leave of absence. 
Somerrllle Nicholson, Washington, D. C. 
WlUlam K. Mayo, Washington. D. C. 
William P. McCann, NewKochelle, N. Y. 
James H. Gillis, Washington, D. C. 

E. B. Potter. Belvidere, 111. 

R. li. Phythlan, Annapolis, Md. 
R. R. Wallace, Washington, D. C. 
CAPTAINS, $3,375. 
Thomas O. Corbln, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Francis Lowry, Barlington,yt. 
A. T. Maban.^ew Yort. 
H. B. Seely J»hiladelphla, Pa. 
H. S. Ross, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
J. L. Hannum, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Richard Rush, Washington, D. C. 

COMMANDERS, $2,625. 
Thomas L. Swann, sick leave. 
Smith W. Nichols, Dorchester, Mass. 
C. A. Schetky, leave of absence. 
Oeorge T. Davis, Asheville. N. C. 
Thos. Nelson, Annapolis, Md. 
John K. Winn, Chelsea, Mass. 
W. B. Newman. Hackensaek, N. J. 

A. J. Iverson, Boston, Mass. 

F. L. Tanner. Washington, D. C. 
J. C. Mavong, San Francisco, Cal. 
J. D. Oraham, New York. 
Samuel BeldentNew London, Conn. 

B. B. Richards, Washington, D. C. 
Robert S. Jasper, Charlestown, W. Va. 
William H. Drlggs, Washington, D. C. 
John H. Moore, Washington, D. C. 

H. 0. Rittenhouse, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Robert O. Peck, Washington, D. C. 
H. F. Flchbohm. Chicago. III. 
O. G. Hannis, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
H. H. Barroll. Danberry, Conn. 

LIBUTENANT-^OMMANDEBS. $2,260. 
Antolne B. McNair, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
Charles E. McKay, Orange, N. J. 
Henry C. Tallman, New York. 
Francis O. Davenport, Detroit, Mich. 
Frederick I. Naile, Norristown, Pa. 
Oonvemenr K. Haswell, New York city. 
Edward M. Stedman, Chicago, HI. _ 
Socrates Hnbbard, Garden City, N. Y. 
Leonard Chenery, New York. 
E. L. Amory, Boston. Mass. _ 
Isaac Hazlitt, Washington, D. 0. 
Frederick A. Miller, leave of absence. 
William P. Randall, New Bedford, Mass. 
Francis H. Sheppard. St. Andrews, Fla. 
George F. Morn8on,Wa8hington, D. C. 
Charles W. Tracy, Boston, Mass. 



David C. Woodrow, Cincinnati. O. 
R. M. G. Brown, Washington, D. C. 

MEDICAL DIEECTORS, $3,300. 
Willi B.m Gr[ftr, Wftehlntfton^ D. C, 
SBmuel Jaiikson, WAahm^tdn. li. C, 
TlioniDA J. l*arnpT. Coldlwstei-, Mlch^ 
John Y. Tavlor, WnalilrjEton, D. C. 
PljtneflB J. Horw tt 2, FhlFBdelpIila, P*; 
F. M. Gunni^ll. WttshlnKtop^ D. C^ 
SnraueJ F. CcmBs. Cunibridofj. Maea, 
Edwurrl Sljl^tpen, Pbllflilelphlft, Pa, 
Jntvjb S. Durtg^Ah, Han ETrainjiBca, CaL 
G&.tnst" P^'ck. EiiKitiH^tkK.j. 
W. T ([i]rsL Washinfft^sn, D, C. 

A. L. fiihnn, New Fork. 

R C, DuaD. WaHblDMton, D. O- 
D. Biwilitood, BroQlilyn, N, Y. 
D. RtndleberjEer, New Torfc^ 
P. 8. Walosn leuve nf ab&ijiica. 

B. M. Wii\]A, New Y-oTk. 

I, N. PeiirofieH Bnooklro- N* Y. 

SURGJEONS, $2,100. 

C. J. Clebome, Wemersvllle, Pa. 
L. Baldwin, Louisville, Ky. 

MEDICAL INSPECTORS, $3,300. 
William E. Taylor, Honolulu. H. I. 
John G. Spear, Norristown, Pa. 
Archibald C. Rhoades, New York. 
A. S.Oberly, leave of absence. 
F. Woolverton, Suspension Bridge, N. Y. 
W. H. Jones, Bethlenem, Pa. 

PAY DIRECTORS, $3,300. 
James H. WatmoughjWashlngton, D. C. 
Thomas H. Looker, Washington, D. C. 
Charles W. Abbot, Warren, R. I. 
Alexander W. Russell. Philadelphia, Pa. 
J. D. Murray, Annapolis, Md. 
Caspar Schenck, Annapolis, Md. 
Luther G. Billings, Clifton, k. Y. 
A. J. Prltchard, Baltimore, Md. 

PAY INSPECTORS, $3,300. 
Francis H. Swan, Brookllne, Mass. 
W. W. Woodhull, San Juan, Puerto Rico. 

PAYMASTERS. $2,100. 
W. W. Barry, New Bedford. Mass. 

CHIEF ENGINEERS. $a,Jl00. 
Brn.fanilr. ■' ■■■■ V.Tk: city. 

Wnilam H • ... , , ;:- C. 

Thc^iMlort^ Zi-inri.. ^v^ lurk *.-\ty. 
Jam^i W. Ivin^, Ftillad^lphja. i*a,. 
EdTj'tn FlthUn. Bridge ton, N.J. 
WJlliamil. Stamm, rhilsdcLiJblat Pa, 
F. C. Dado, PlillJideUiliia. Pa. 

D. B. Maccimb. Boston. M^se. 
HoTsry MaRon, riymaiith. Conn. 
Edward B. Latrh. ArsLdomr^ Pa. 
GeurKU W. Sen^nnr. VVaslilnjitoo.il. C. 
Chsii-kift H- TjOrlDtf, Bn>f}k]yT>. N. T. 
Edwnrd Farmi^r, llofitcin. Mass. 

F. A. WUbod. Boston, Masa, 
A, Kirby, WMhlagtou, Lh C* 



UST 07 THE YSSSELB 07 THE XT. S. NAV Y Dff OO KMISSIOy, WITH FAMES OF 
GOKMAVBINa AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS. 

[Corrected to Nov. 16, 1899.] 



ABARENDA-<3omdr. Benjamin F; Tllley, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Wm. E. Sewell, exec- 
utive. 

ACCOMAC— Acting Boatswain Timothy Sul- 
livan, comdff. 

ACTIVE— Acting Boatswain Aaron B. Ire- 
Ian, comdg. 

ADAMS— Comdr. Walton Goodwin, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Henry Minett, executive. 

ALBATROSS— Comdr. Jefferson F. Moser, 
oomdc; Lieut. Hugh Rodman, executive. 

ALLIANCE— Comdr. Albert Ross, comdg; 



Lt.-Comdr. Edmund B. Underwood, exec- 
utive. 
AMPHITRITE-Capt. Edwin S. Houston. 

comdg: Lt.-Comdr. Edward B. Barry, 

executive. 
BALTIMORE— Gapt. James M. Forsyth, 

comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Cbarles E. Vreeland. 

executive. 
BENNINGTON— Comdr. Conway H. Arnold, 

comdg: Lt.-Comdr. Charles B. T. Moore, 

executive. 
BROOKLYN-Capt. Theodore F. JeweU« 



180 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Deonis H. Maban, eX' 
ecutive. 

CAESABr-Lt.-Comdr. F. E. Sawyer, 
comdg. 

GALLAO— Lt.-Comdr. Beojamln F. Tappan, 
comdf. 

CASTINE— Comdr. Samuel W. Very, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Jobo A. Sbearman, executive. 

CELTIC— Lt.-Comdr. Nathaniel J. K. Patch, 
comdg; Lieut. Wm. S. Hogg, executive. 

CHARLESTON— Capt. George W. Plgman, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. John A. N orris, exec- 
utive. 

CHICAGO— Capt Charles H. Rockwell, 
comdg; Lt.-Oomdr. Wm. F. Low, execu- 
tive. 

CHOCTAW— Acting Boatswain Christopher 
J. Cooper, comdg. 

CONCORD— Oomdr. Seth M. Ackley, comdg; 
Lieut. Bernard O. Scott, executive. 

CONSTELLATION— Comdr. John J. Hunk- 
er, comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Herbert Winslow,. 
executive. 

CULGOA— Comdr. James W. Carl In, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Henry C. Gearing, executive. 

DETROIT— Comdr. Joseph N. Hemphill, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. James C. Cresap, .ex- 
ecutive. 

DIXIE— Lt.-Comdr. Jesse M. Roper, execu- 
tive. 

DOLPHIN— Lt.-Comdr. Wm. H. H. South- 
erland. comdg; Lieut. Thomas Snowden, 
executive. 

EAGLE-Lt.-Coiiidr. Frank F. Fletcher, 
comdg; Lieut. Albert M. Beecher, execu- 
tive. 

ENTERPRISE— Coradr. Frederick M. Wise, 
comdg; Lieut. Levi C. Bertolette, execu- 
tive. 

ESSEX— Comdr. Frank Courtis, comdg; 
Lieut. Edward E. Wright, executive. 

FARRAGUT— Lt.-Comdr. Reginald F. Nich- 
olson, comdg. 

FISHHAWK— Mate Jas. A. Smith, comdg. 

FRANKLIN— Capt. Wm. C. Wise, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Theodoric Porter, executive. 

GLACIER— Lt.-Comdr. John B. Briggs, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Albert Mertz, execu- 
tive. 

HARTFORD— Comdr. .Tobn M. Hawley, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Alexander Sharp, Jr., 
executive. 

HELENA— Comdr. Edwin T. Moore, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Charles E. Fox, executive. 

HERCULES— Boatswain James W. Angus, 
comdg. 

INDEPENDENCE-Capt. Charles S. Cotton, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Thomas S. Phelps, 
executive. 

INDIANA— Capt. Francis W. Dickins, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. John C. Wilson, ex- 
ecutive. 

IOWA— Capt. Charles F. Goodrich, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Wm. H. Turner, executive. 

IRIS— Comdr. William H. Everett, comdg; 
Llent. John M. Orchard, executive. 

IROQUOIS— Lt.-Comdr. Charles F. Pond, 
comdg. 

LANCASTER— Capt. Charles M. Thomas, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Nelson T. Houston, 
executive. 

MACHIAS— Comdr. LeavItt 0. Logan, 
comdg: Lt.-Comdr. Hamilton Hutchins, 
executive. 

MANILA— Lt.-Comdr. Arthur P. Nazro, 
comdg; Lieut. Albert L. Norton, execu- 
tive 

MAHTlLKllKAt>— CoBitEr. Harriittm O. O. 
Ct^Lby, rcpmflp; Lt. -Comdr, Q^otfse W* 
MCDtE. eiecMTlTP. 



MARIETTA— Comdr. Edward H. Gheen 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Wm. M. Irwin, execu 
tive. 

MASSACHUSETTS-Capt. Charles J. Train, 
comdg; Lt. -Comdr. Kossuth Niles, execu- 
tive. 

MICHIGAN— Comdr. Charles P.* Perkins, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. William Winder, ex- 
ecutive. 

MONADNOCK — Capt. John McGowan. 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Thomas B. Howard, 
executive. 

MODOC— Acting Boatswain Emil H. Eycke, 
comdg. 

MONOCACY— Comdr. George A. Blcknell, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Frank H. Holmes, 
executive. 

MONONGAHELA— Comdr. Albion V. Wad- 
hams, comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Uriah H. Har- 
ris, executive. 

MONTEREY— Comdr. Charles C. Comwell, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. James H. Bull, execu- 
tive. 

MONTGOMERY— Comdr. John P. Merrell, 
comdg; Lieut. Francis E. Greene, execu- 
tive. 

NASHVILLE^— Comdr. Raymond P. Rodgers 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Alfred Reynolds, ex- 
ecutive. 

NERO— Lt.-Comdr. Harry M. Hodges, 
comdg; Lieut. John Hood, executive. 

NEWARK— Capt. Bowman H. McCalla, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Clayton S. Richman, 
executive. 

NEW ORLEANS— Capt. Edwin Longnecker. 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Martin E. Hall, ex- 
ecutive. 

NEW YORK— Capt. French E. Chadwick. 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Joseph B. Murdock. 
executive. 

NEZINSCOT— Boatswain Lee B. Boland. 
comdg. 

OREGON— Capt. George F. F. Wilde, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Alexander McCrackiu. 
executive. 

PENS ACOLA— Cant. Henry Glass, comdg; 
Lieut. Richard M. Hughes, executive. 

PETREL— Lt.-Comdr. James T. Smith, 
comdg; Lieut. Albert N. Wood, executive. 

PHILADELPHIA— Capt. George C. Relter. 
comdg; Lt. -Comdr. Wm. H. Schuetze, 
executive. 

PORTER— Lieut. IrvIn V. Gillis, comdg. 

PRAIRIE— Comdr. Morris R. S. Mackenzie, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Fidello S. Carter, ex- 
ecutive. 

PRINCETON— Comdr. Harry Knox, comdg: 
Lt.-Comdr. John M. Bowyer, executive. 

RANGER— Comdr. Wells L. Field, comdg: 
Lieut. John H. L. Holcombe, executive. 

RESOLUTE— Comdr. James D. J. Kelley, 
comdg; Lieut. Reuben O. Bitler, execu- 
tive. 

RICHMOND— Capt. John J. Read, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Samuel P. Comly, executive. 

ST. MARY'S-Comdr. William H. Reeder. 
comdg; Lieut. George R. Evans, execu- 
tive. 

SANTEB— Lt.-Comdr. Richard Wainwrlght, 
comdg. 

SARATOGA— Lt.-Comdr. William J. Bar- 
nette, comdg; Lieut. Andrew T. Long, 
executive. 

SCINDIA— Comdr. James M. Miller, comdg. 

SCORPION— Lt.-Comdr. Nathan Sargent, 
comdg; Lieut. Roger Welles, Jr., execu- 
tive. 

StOUX— Boatswain Albert F. Benson, 
comdg. 



THE NAVY. 



1^ 



SOLACE— Comdr. Andrew Dunlap, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Frederick W. Coffin, executive. 

SYLPH— Lieut. William J. Maxwell, comdg. 

TACOMA— Acting Boatswain Charles T. 
Chase, comdg. 

TECUMSEH— Boatswain James Dowling, 
comdg. 

TEXAS^-Capt. Charles D. Slgsbee, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Albert C. Dillingham, execu- 
tive. 

DNCAS— Lieut. Thomas J. Senn, comdg. 

VERMONT— Capt. Merrtll Miller, comdg; 
Lt. -Comdr. Daniel D. V. Stewart, execu- 
tive. 

VIXEN— Lt.-Comdr. William W. Kimball, 
comdg; Lieut. Leon 8. Thompson, execu- 
tive. 



WABASH— Capt. George H. Wadlelgh, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Frank A. Wllner, 
executive. 

WHEELING— Comdr. William T. Burwell, 
comdg; Lt. -Comdr. Frank B. Beatty, ex- 
ecutive. 

WILMINGTON-Comdr. Charles O. Alii- 
bone, comdg; Lt.-Comdr. John M. Robin- 
son, executive. 

YANKTON— Lt.-Comdr. George L. Dyer, 
comdg; Lieut. Isaac K. Seymour, execu 
tlve. 

YORKTOWN— Comdr. Charles S. Sperry, 
comdg; Lt.-Comdr. Bradley A. Flske. 
executive. 

YOSEMITE;— Capt. George E. Ide, comdg; 
Lt.-Comdr. Clifford J. Boush, executive. 



SHIPS OF THE UHITED STATES HAVT. 

July 1, 1899. 

[Abbreviations.- ffuH: 8., steel; 8.W., steel, wood sheathed; I., iron; W., wood. Propul- 

aion: 8., screw; T. 8., twin screw; Tr. 8., triple screw; P., piiddle.] 

FIRST BATE. 



NAME. 



Iowa 

Indiana 

Massachusetts.. 

Oregon 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Columbia 

Minneapolis 

Texas 

Puritan 

Olympla 

Chicago 

Baltimore 

Philadelphia.... 
Monterey 

Newark 

San Francisco... 

Charleston 

Mlantonomoh... 

Amphitrite 

Monadnock. 

Terror 

New Orleans .% . . 

Lancaster 

Cincinnati 

Raleigh 

Reina Mercedes. 
Atlanta 

Boston 

EnSlikio. ....,.-,. 

Y«ijk«c 

Pfalrle. .......... 

rHxie... 

ToflQimlte. ...... , 

B<dace , 

Panther 

Hartfont ...,..*. 
Mayrtowor....... 

Katabdln 

Cuaaijtous...H.^' 
M&bopac. ....■■■ . 
ItanliattAo. 



11,340 



9,215 
8.200 
7.376 
7,376 
6,315 
6,050 
6,870 



Type. 



Ist-class battleship.. 

do 

do 

do 

Armored cruiser.. . . . 

do 

Protected cruiser. . . . 

do 

2d-clas8 battleship . . 
Double-tur. monitor. 
Protected cruiser.. . . 



12.106 

9,738 

10,406 

11.111 

18,769 

17,401 

18,600 

§0,862 

8,610 

8,700 

17,813 



T.8. 
T.8. 
T.8. 
T.8. 
T.8. 
T.8. 
Tr.8 
Tr.S 
T.9. 
T.8. 
T.8. 



Station or condition. 



Pacific Station. 
North Atlantlo Station. 

Do. 
Asiatic Station. 

Do. 
North Atlantic Station. 
In reserve, League I., Pa. 

Do. 
North Atlantic Station. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 
Navy Yard. Boston. 



SECOND BATE. 



4.600 
4,413 
4,324 
4,084 

4.006 
4,008 
3,730 
3,990 
3,900 
3.990 
3.900 
8,437 
3,250 
3.213 
34213 
3,090 
3,000 

3,000 



Protected cruiser.. . . 

do 

do 

Barbette turret, low 

freeboard monitor. 
Protected cruiser.. . . 

do 

do 

Double-tur. monitor. 

do 

do 

do 

Protected cruiser. . . . 

Cruiser 

Protected cruiser.. . . 

do 

do 

do 



.do. 



s. 


9,000 


16.1 


T.8. 


18 




10,064 


20.9 


T.H. 


10 


s. 


8,816 


19.68 


T.8. 


12 


8. 


5,244 


lii.6 


T.8. 


4 


s. 


8,8fi9 


19 


T.S. 


12 


s. 


9,913 


9.63 


T. i. 


12 


H. 


6,666 


8.20 


T. 1. 


8 


I. 


i,426 


10.6 


T. i. 


4 


1. 


uw 


10.6 


T.;i. 


6 


1. 


H,m 


12 


T. i. 


6 


I. 


l,6U0 


10.5 


T.8. 


4 


sw 


7 600 


21 


T.H. 


10 


w. 


1,(K)0 


21 


8. 


12 


H. 


10,0U) 


19 


T.8. 


11 


H. 


10,U10 


19 


T.8. 


11 


H. 


3,700 




8. 




8. 


4,030 


16.6 


8. 


8 


8. 


4,030 


15.6 


S. 


8 



South Atlantic Station. 
Asiatic Station. 
Pacific Station. 
Asiatic Station. 

Do. 
Navy Yard, lS"orfolk,Va. 
Asiatic Station. 
League Island, Pa. 
Special service. 
Asiatic Station. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 
Asiatic Station. 
Training service. 
Navy Yard^ewYork. 
Navy Yani,Portsmouth , 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Repairing at Navy Yard, 

Navy Yard,Mare Island . 



THIRD RATE. 



6.S88 
6,146 

e,i4s 
4jm 

1h380 
3,790 

•im 
2, Km 



Cruiser (oonTertcd^l^* 

,..do, I, 

...do 1. 

...d«„,,. „... 8* 



do I. 

do.......... S. 

HoHplt-uL ship .9. 

CrulBer (convened K K 

Oruiwjr....... ..nV. 

Cruiser anJiiTisttert i , 3. 



Hartio^def eit&e ram 
i^ini^ie-tur. monitor. 

......do....> ,.... 

do... 






3.B00 
3.2G0 
3,%0 



2m 
4,70) 

S,Oi53 
340 

34U 



8. 

3. 
8. 
S. 

B, 
S. 
3. 
S. 

a. 

TkS. 

S. 

a. 



fl Spf^ctal EGrvlf^B'. 
in ill reserve, LuHggelfird. 
Kl JJ peel a I eervloe. 
10 Umnoa. to W»r Dept.(to 

be returned ahortly), 
]0,As1atie Statiua.Gaani. 

« Pacmii StftTJoti. 
... Spi'ciiLl Reryloe. 

B^L itAiUEue la] find VardK 
3H,Bpoclalfiervi<:L^. 

9 Navy V^ar^, New TotTc 



Navy Tflrd.Leajurue lai'U. 
Do* 
Dd. 
Do, 



182 



GHICAQO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



SHIPS OF THB UNITED STATES NAVY.-CONTINUW). 



NAMX. 



Tvpe. 



&ai4xm or condition. 



Detroit., 

Muur^umerj.. 
Miirblehieaa.. 
MolUean *.*.». 

CttflktUi 

Jat%ym 

Lehltfb 

M(^<tK4Uk, 

Ntitumt, ,.,*,,. 
NfcDt.iiclcet.... 



Passaic 

Benninffton . . 

Ck>ncora. 

Torktown 

Topeka 

Dolphin 

Wilmington.. 

Helena 

Adams 

Alliance 

Essex 

Enterprise.... 



Nashville 

Monooacy 

Castine 

Maohias 

Don Juan deAus- 

trla 

Isla de Luzon. 
IsladeCuba.;. 

Alert 

Ranger 

Annapolis 

VioksburR 

Wheeling 

Marietta 

Newport 

Princeton 



2.060 
2,089 
2,089 
1,900 
1,875 
1,875 
1,876 
1,875 
1,876 
1,876 

im 

1,710 
1.710 

i.no 

1,700 
1,486 



1,875 
1.376 
1,875 
1.876 

1,871 
1,870 
1,177 
1,177 

1,150 

i,oao 

1,080 
1,020 
1020 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



Unprotected cruiser. 

do 

do .... 

Cruiser 

Single-tur. monitor. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



do 

Gunboat 

...do 

...do 

...do 

Dispatch boat 

Light-draft gunboat. 

do 

Cruiser. 

...do 

...do 

...do 



Light-draft gunboat. 

do 

Gunboat 

do 



do 

do 

do 

Cruiser. 

do 

Composite gunboat.. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



6,227 

5,580 

5,451 

1,100 

840 

840 

840 

840 

340 

840 

840 

3,486 

8,405 

3,382 

2,000 

2,268 

1394 

1,988 

'800 

800 

800 

800 

2,586 

860 

2,199 

2,046 

1,600 

2,627 

600 

500 

1.227 

1,11B 

1,061 

1.064 

1.008 

800 



1S.71 
18.6 
18.44 

6.'66 
6.50 
6.50 
6 - 
6c _. 
6.60 

5.60 
17.6 
16.8 
16.14 
16 
15.6 
16 
16 



T.S. 
T.8. 
T.8. 

S. 
6. 
S. 
8. 
8. 
S. 
8. 

8. 

T.8. 

T.S. 

T.8. 

8. 

S. 

T.8. 

T.S. 

8. 

8. 

8. 



2,199 16. 



.3 
16.5 



T.S. 
P. 

T.8. 

T.S. 

8. 

T.S. 

T.8. 



18.7 
12.71 
12.88 
18.3 
12.29 
12 



8. 

T.8. 
8. 

8. 



10 North Atlantic Station. 
10 South Atlantic Station. 
10 Pacific Station. 

6 Training service. 

2 Navy Yardjieaffue Isl'd. 

2 Do. 

2 Do. 

2 Do. 

2 Do. 

2 Naval Station. Fort 
Royal, 8. C. 

2 Navy Tard, Pensaoola. 

6 Asiatic Station. 

6 Do. 

6 Do. 

8 Navy Yard, Boston. 

8 Special service. 

8 South Atlantic. 

8 Asiatic Station. 

6 Training service. 

6 Do. 

6 Do. 

1 Public Marine; School, 
Boston. 

8 Asiatic Station. 

6 Do. 

8 Do. 

8 North Atlantic Station. 

4 Asiatic Station. 

6 Do. 

6 Do. 

8 Navy Yard,Mare Island. 

6 Do. 

6 Naval Academy. 

6 Navy Yard, Boston. 

6 Asiatic Station. 

6 Do. 

6 Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 

6 Asiatic Station. 



FOURTH BATE. 



Solndia 

Celtic 

Saturn 

Rainbow.... 
Alexander . 

Iris 

Sterling 

Caesar 

Nero 

Nanshan . . . 
Abarenda . . 



Hannibal . . 
Leonldas . . 
Resolute. . . 
Lebanon.. . 

Justin 

Southery... 
Pompey... 
Arethusa. . 
Brutua .... 
Cassius.... 
Culgoa .... 
Glacier .... 

Hector 

Marcellus.. 

Zaflro 

Manila.... 
Yankton... 
Vesuvius.. 

Petrol 

Scorpion... 
Fern 



•7,600 
6,428 

•6,220 
6,206 
6,181 
6,100 
6,668 
6,016 
4.925 

♦4,827 
4,670 
4,460 
4,291 
4.242 
4,175 
3,375 
3,300 

•3,100 

•3,085 



Ship.. 



Collier.. 

M. 

Distilling ship.. 
Collier nr. .:... 
DistllUngship.. 
Collier..:....:... 

...do 

...do 

...do 

do 

§?EfiJ."!!'.^::::: 

do 

Transport 

Corner 

do 

do 

do 

Tank steamei . . 

Collier 

do 

Supply ship.... 

Refrigerator ship . . . 

Collier 

do 

Supply ship. 
Transport . . . 

Yacht 

DynamitC'gun vessel 

Gunboat 

, Yacht 

840 Training ship. 



1,900 

929 
802 
8S0 



f.^ 




1: 


13 


,6(* 




S. 


ia 


.800 





i: 


"H 


ilooo 




8. 







8.' 


I 


i'M 




8. 


"1 


1.069 




8. 




1.101) 






*j 


i,oa 





B. 








8. 








8. 


•' 






8. 


a 






i: 


2 
2 






'i;266 




?;.... 


■| 






S. 


i 






1,200 




8. 


750 
7,tO 




8. 

8. 


i 


3.7U5 




T.8. 


\m 




S. 


n 


2,80Q 




T.8. 


800 




8. 


t» 



Navy Yard, Mare Island 
Asiatic Station. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 
Navy Yard, Boston. 
San Juan, P. R. 
Special service. 
Asiatic Station. 
Pacific Station. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Navy Yd., League Isld. 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Navy Yd., League Isld. 
League Island. 
Padfic Station. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 

avy Yard, Boston. 
^ avy Yard, Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 
Do. 

pecial service. 

lavy Yard, Boston, 
^static Station. 
Navy Yard. New York. 
Naval Militia, Washing- 
^ ton. D. C. 



THE NAVT. 



183 



NAME. 



Bancroft ... 

Vixen 

Gloncester.. 

Michigan.... 



Wasp 

Frolic 

Dorothea. . 
BlCano... 

Pinta 



Stranger.. 
Peoria.... 



Hist.. 

Eagle~ 

Hornet 

Hawk 

Siren 

SylTia 

Vllrfng 

Callao 

Pampango . 
Paragua.... 

Samar 

Alleen 

Kanawah... 
Blfrlda 



Galam 



.lamianes. 



Leyte 

Alba7 

Oneida 

PanaT , 

Manileno... 
MarlTeles.. 
Mlndoro. . . . 



Alyarado. . 



Sandoyal 

Huntress.... 

Vasco 

Onardoqui . . 
Urdanew.... 

Inca. 

Shearwater . 

Belusan 

Mindanao . . . 



806 
786 



m 
seo 

660 

•54« 
488 



473 
434 
426 
375 

*m 

*302 
218 
208 
201 
201 
201 



•175 
♦173 



151 
151 
160 
142 
142 
142 
142 
137 
100 

100 



Type. 



Gunboat.. 

Tacht 

do... 



Cruiser. 



Yacht 

do... 

do... 

Gunboat.. 



.do.. 



Tacht 

Gunboat (converted) 



Yacht 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Gunboat 

do 

do 

do 



192 Yacht.. 



do... 
do... 
do... 
Gunboat.. 



do... 

do... 
Yacht. ... 
Gunboat.. 

do... 

do... 

do... 

Yacht..... 
Gunboat. . 



do... 

. Yacht 

42 Gunboat . 
do... 
do... 

Yacht 

do... 

Gunboat . 
do... 



Co. 



1,213 
1,260 
2.000 



1,800 
660 

1,688 

eoo 

810 



600 

860 

800 

1,000 



420 
260 



900 



660 
125 



125 



125 
500 



137 



400 



T.S. 

8. 



P. 



S. 

s. 
s. 

T.S. 



8. 
8. 
8. 
8. 

i:. 

8.' 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.8. 

8. 

8. 

8. 

8. 

T.S. 

T.8. 

T.S. 

8. 

T.8. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

8. 

8. 



tio 



tiJ 



station or condition. 



Navy Yard. Boston. 
North Atlantic. 
Naval Academy. Annap- 
olis, Md. 
Special service. North- 
western lAkes. 
Naval Sta., Port RoyaL 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 

Do. 
Under repairs; roady for 

armament in Julv. 
Naval MiUtia,San Diego, 

Cal.. 
Loaned to Louisiana. 
Under repairs at Boston 
for Naval Training 
Station, Newport. 
Pensacola Station. 
Special service. 
Loaned to N. Carolina. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Naval Militia. Virginia. 
Loaned to Maryland. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Loaned to New York. 
Loaned to Rhodelsland. 
Loaned to New Jersey. 
Special service. 
Repairing; ready for ar- 
mament in July. 
Asiatic Station. 

Do. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Asiatic Station. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Navy Yard, New York. 
North ^Atlantic Station, 
Navy Yd., Portsmouth 
NTavy Yard. Portsmouth 
Loaned to New Jersey. 
Asiatic Station. 

Do. 

Do. 

Loaned toMassachus'ts. 
Loaned to Pennsylvania 
Underrep's; Asiatic Sta. 

Do. 



TOBPBDO BOATS. 



Cushing(No.l).. 
Ericsson (No. 2).. 

Foote(No.8) 

Rodgers(No.4).. 
WIn8low(No.5)« 
Porter (No. 6).... 
Dupont (No.7).. 
Rowan (No. 8)... 
Farragut (No. 11) 
Davis (No. 12).... 

Pox (No. 18' 

Morris (No. 14J... 
Talbot (No. 15).. 
Owln(No.l6).... 
M'ckensie(No.l7) 
McKee(No.l8)... 
M«nlyCNo.23)... 
(No. 28).. 



ilo.. 

Stiletto.. 



105 
120 
142 
142 
142 
165 
165 
182 
273 

m 

132 
105 

*^ 

65 
65 



145 
66 
81 



Torpedo boat. . 

.....\do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 



W. 



23.5 
24 
24.5 
24.5 
24.5 
28.6 
28.5 
26 
80 
_ -. 22.5 
1,760 23.5 
1,760 24.5 
860 20 
86020 
- 20 



1.900 
600 



1,720 
1,800 
2,000 
2,000 
2,000 



8,200 
5.600 
1,760 



T.S. 

T.S. 

T.8. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

TS. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

T.S. 

S. 

8. 

8. 

S. 

8. 

a 

8. 

8. 



Navy Yard, New York. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Naval Sta.,Newport,R.L 

Do. 

Do. 

Naval Sta..Puget Sound. 
Navy Yard, Mare Island. 

Do. 

Do. 

Naval 8ta.,Newport.R.I. 
Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
Newport. 
Ijoague Island. 
Navy Yard. New York. 
Naval Academy. 
Navy Yard, New York. 
Asiatic Station. 
Torpedo Station, New- 
port, R. I. 



*Bstimated. tSecondary battery. tMaln battery. STorpedo tubes. 



CnrCAGO DAILY NEWS ALMAXAG FOR 1500. 



MOtlOUEJlUtiltL, . 



Jam«atown. . 



S a! PS OF THE UKITBD fiTATKS NAVr.-CaNtisuBD, 
TCGS. 



Nauie. 


1 . 


Tupr. 


1^ 

as 


1^ 


■a ~ ■ ^£ 
^ 1 "^ 


If 

3 


K^uEifjn or cnfiditifm. 






Tug... 


1. 

a. 

w. 

w. 

w. 

I. 

1. 

1. 

I. 
S. 

9. 


^1 
&&0 




3. 

s. 

a. 


JfiLvauii f^iatu-iu. t''.^^htl. 


Jjftive fH ►..,... . 


do^, .., 


*u Pufli?l Srmud Nil pal Hi a. 


AHco 


. ,dOH..«..«.^«..«.^ 


*3 


Navy Vard, Nurful^. 


A pach? 


rtn 


Do. 




,„_j rio , 


Fort Royal, B. G. 


{'hie<Uqjs^W 


,..,,L .. ilQ., .*..*., 






a, 

s. 
s. 

s. 

s. 

s, 
s. 
s* 
H, 
a, 
s. ; 

a. 

8. 
9, 

S, 


»l 

*a 
*3 
*3 
*1 

*"} 

'a 

*4 
-1 

*5 

*& 
*l 
** 

*1 
*1 
+1 
M 


I>j. 


t'htiL'tllfl' 


l.._..dei _.._. 


188 

m 




.... 


Navy S^ard. PHnsa-COla, 
Norfolk, Vii. 


i'i&ri!Lti6i ■► +n ►■- 


■H9S 
TIE 

4'ill 

?7o 


. . , . .do . , . , ».,.., 




- ,do., .- . 


HonoliHa 


MHJi&a^^lL 

Modoe.., .., 

Mohawk. .,. . 


,.*... do 

(l{j..» 


Koy West. 
IjL^a.Rnp Inland. E*a. 
Nikvj- Yiirrt, Norfolk. 


Jfezliisi^oL ,.. , 


..... ^do .....,.,,...»,, 


Kfj West, 


OsuiiQiA 


......do,.... 

do 


Navy Yard, CostoD* 

Ntiiit Vork. 


Flscataquu *../... 
Putitlas *-♦. 


tiOI 
tV7r 
tlW 


do .,,,,,, 


1,(5110,..,., 

4i5 ,,,.. 

3 OOfl ' . . . 


Portsmouth, N. H. 
rit;i^iiiLm. 


Potoiuajo ^1 ^ 


.,..,.do 

, ,^ do,.* 




apetiiilsenrict. 

Navy Yard, Pensacola. 


POWTltltATl^.^ltFI'F 




..... 




......dfl..... 

do* 


Navy Vard, Bn.stoiL 
Nayy Yard, Nurffslk. 


Tttconuft 


, - do*., .. . * 




Navy Yarrtr Peniiit'ijlfl. 


TotJumBeb. ....... 


2U 
411 

3011 


. dtj,.. .-.,*.+ 






Navy YaTd,W5k3hiiHjtoa. 


vieliant- ....... 


...4.. do..... .* .*.A 


Joan. P. R. 
S'laro Island. 




OOr ...* .►. 


1. 
I. 
1. 
I. 
I. 
1. 


Port Bnyal, S. C 


VVotapaluckK.H--K 


«i^ 


do.,. 

.^ .do..... .. .. 


Navy Yatd. Ntiw York. 

AeJiatic Station, 


i^ureste ,.,.., 




do 








Bo. 


Pettultta - ., 




do. 










Do. 






^.__dD.. 


Do. 


[Una 4 ..*^-, 




Steaid iannch. 








Do* 


Ondlua * ■ 




Ht*^iiiti liafife i* , * 


' 










Do' 




45(3 

is: 
m 

?^ 




I. 

t 

I. 

w. 


Sift 
14T 




a. 

k'. 

s. 

8, 

a! 


"*i 


EtepBlrJntf at Navy rard, 

Norfolk, 
Yard tug, BoEfton, 
NaT, 9ta., Newport. K 1. 
Yan:l tUB. Npw York, 


Iwana.., ...h 

Ijo vrt pn k .......... . 


;;;:::5S::::::::::::::: 

,,..,.1o 

ao 

,do ^ 


Karkt^^ta. .r 


NJtia .- .-HK 


Ntivy Yard. New York. 
Navy rani aoacon. 
Naval Apademy, Ati- 

napolls, Md. 
Navy Yard. New ToTt 
Yard Uifn. Wa^hta^ton. 
Yard ing, Norfolk. 
Yard tug. Man? islfind. 
Yard tUB.Doaimo lalanrt. 
Naval sTta.. Port Royal. 
Nav. at a., Piigot Soutnl . 


Kockel^ 


;;^tand[sli.^,... 


_,„.do. 


TraEIIc 


,,,.,,do 


Triton .., 


do ., 

::;:::3g::::::::::::::: 
::::::aS:::::;;:::;:::: 


JIB 

45l> 




Walmeta..., 

Unartllla 


Pf^najCOOkh 4 n 


Pawluctet 




......clo 


H. 



SAILIXO SHIPS 



Portsmoatli.... 
aaratoga...... 

9t. Mary's...... 



3. no; 
1,13)J. 

1,160 

1.120 

i,m 

3,035 



......do. 



ship,. 



do. 



....,*do, 
do. 



,.do. 



w. 
w. 

w. 

w. 
w. 

w. 







SaJliJ 
aedla 

galls 

Sail 6 

9 alls 


i 
S 

13 



















TraJQlrijE Service, 
atatlonary traln'ir Ahip* 

NewpiHt. 
Trttnalerrtid to Marine 

Ftchspltal SerYlco. 
NavalMiHt.Ja^ N, .T. 
r*nl>lit MarlpD jipbool, 

Phllartolplila, 
Pub Lin Marine 9ctiool. 

"BwYork. 



RECEiviXQ em PS, 



Franknn,.,.... 

Wabasb 

Yentiont 

iTidop&ndenco 
Elcbmond .... 
pEjm*aetila. .... 



2.700 

a.ooo 



RBcoivIng ship.. 

, do, ...... 

,,4.,, do 

do....... 

do 

do 



1,060 

eso 






B. 
Sails 

BOJlB 

a. 

B. 



Recgi?MpH??orfotk. 
ftecu sbjp, Boiton. 
Recg abip. New York. 
Reog ablp, Mare Island. 
Bcwahlp.Leaflme laid. 
l<3rba Bbena laJand. 



TIIK NAVT. 



IS^ 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVF-— C03fTlNL'IGt»* 



Najle. 


P 


iVrf 


^ 
5 


Ill 




"3^ ' 


P 


ftr^fiHon or Qf3ti<lHff}ft. 


Omaba, 


1,575 
],3n5 

4J00 


SailLxia Bhlp .. 


W. 

w. 
w. 

w. 

w. 
w. 






gulls 


4 
4 


Xa^al MiJtUib N Y 


Cruiser,. .^. ...... 






S, 






SdillDff ship .,,, 

Cruller 


' 


3. 




3atp»io,„.„ 


.do.*.*., ►.4...... 


Pujrct t^oand NJiTttl Sta- 
tion- 
Naval a! tilt la, Pf^nn, 
Niiynl MllkEu M<\ 


8t Tjonla 


BuElliig BbLp . 


DQle , ... . 


..*... do. .,.. 

Crulsser.... 






Sails 

s. 

s. 


Minne^ta. 


1.J[|Q 




Naviii Mtihia, ^i[l±;ii 


Yanllo .,, 


......do... 

do 


Naval Militia. CaJ, 
^aval MHitia, Mleh, 



•Sci^oDdarj battery ^ud,";. tlD ordinary. 
VESSELS UNDER CONSTRUCTION. 



lllkitile 



WlBCODJ&Jll. 

MiBSOTiri* . . . 



Ohio* 



Geomia 

Now jL^rsey,.., 
Ptfnoailivftijla.. 

CttHfornJa 

tjebra^ka 

WeiLVlrgSnla.. 
Altfhuy ,..*.... 
Cl3q.tumoOgii... 



nev*?lana-.. 
Denver ...... 

Mi?9 Moines, - 
liftlveston... 

I'ncr.tma 

I'lnnffer . . , . . 



u,ssa 

U.S23 

ii,sa& 
12,^ 



l-'5,.^.HI 



rJ.rtu Armored omtser.... Jaw 



Unnboat No. IB . 
Arkafi&ae.. .^,p* 




l^.UUD. 



UlK^ow bftttleshtp. 

do*...,. .,.,.„ 

do 

do 



.do. 
,do. 
,,do. 



.do. 



..do. 
. .do . 

....(Jo..,,.. 



. do 



13, LOO) do 

Bh ^Ti Protected cruiser. .. . J^ w 
;s,ioaoroiBer - ^Sw 



a, 100 
xm 
y.TOo 
3,1m 

y,2G0 

m 



l,lTfi 
^14 



......do 

do*.,,* 

do 

do ., 

..,.,rto 

Snbmarlne torpedo 
boat. 



Boiliagablp.. 



Rnnboat,- 
Monitci-.. . 



3,m 

3.214 

431J 
430 

m 



do 

do... 

do 

Torpedo boat de^tyr. 

,..*.. do* ...*.,* 

do.,. 

do. 



.,do* 
.do. 



,.do.. 
,.d<>.. 



BW 

sw 
svv 



Co. 



lO.OCJ 
lO.UJO 
lO.(3fJO 

laoQo 

10.000 

le.wo 

liJ.WO 

1(3,000 

IH.OOO 
19,000 

'jri.tMO 

l.TUO 

4.70C 
4. TOO 
"ITOfi 

h-m 

1,3(10 



2.400 

3.400 
2,400 
3.W0 

B.OOO 

B.OUO 
S.OOO 

a.ooo 

e.oQO 
T,aoo 

7,300 
B,400 



•T.S. 
T*B, 
T.B. 

T-fi. 
T,H. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S, 

T.S* 

T.S. 
T,S. 



T.S, 
T.S. 

TS, 
T.B. 
T.R. 
T,S. 
I.K. 
T.S. 



Sallfl 



T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 
T.S. 

T.S. 

T..H. 
T.S. 

T.S. 
T.S. 



^' f B o e k to.* Nbw port 
H'Cramp & SkiTTS, PWJa- 



™| I NflTtsor!- NewB jiblp 
5s B nil ding and Hry 
^^ I j, B o e k _^to.* Nb w po r t 

IH,- . - 

{ dulphia. 
IRjL'iilou Ironworks. San 

F'mnotscd. 
SO'Wm. Pramp & Soufi, 

I Pl]ilad<^lphin. 
^iNowpoi-t ^'pwa Wh5i> 
B u i Id ] nff a ru) 1 ii-y Df id k 
1 t.*o,.Nfe^vpaTtNewsi.Va, 
20 Union Iron Wtjrka. S^an 
I Kranelflco, 
, Contract not awarcled. 
Do. 
Do. 
Bo. 
Do. 
Do. 

I Bpinj; completed. 
} Contract not yet award- 
ed. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Du. 
Do, 

* Coliioiblan Iron VVork^ 
and Dry l>iK'k Co,^ 



Balliioorn, Md., undtr 

c^onrrart witb J. P. 

Hulland Torpedo 

BoHtO». 
Bath li-on Work?!, Bj^tU. 

Mv. 
Contract not awardt^d. 
Newport Ngwjj Shlij 

niandrrjfTflnd I>itOoc'K 

Co. .N e wjH^rt News, '^^ &. 
Balb Iruii Works, Bath. 

Mo. 
La wis Nlson. BUiabeth- 

poft. N.J. 
Un^on Iron Works. Ban 

FraucJsno, 
Neatit! ft LL^yj, Phila. 
Do, 
DO. 
Wm- R. Ti-lj?^ Co., Rloh- 

mond.Va. 
Do. 
Harlan ft HollloKS worth 

Co., WUmlngton, Del. 
Do. 
Fall lltyeT Eni?lne Co., 

WeymfiiiEh. Ma ^ s^ 



186 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS AJMAVAC FOB 1900. 



VBSSBLS UNDBB CONSTRUCTION.-CONTIlfUBD. 



Maodonough.. 
Paul Jones.... 



Perry . , . . 
Preble.... 
Btewart . 



Traztnn... 

Whipple . 
Woraen.. 



DahlgrenCNo. 9). 
T. A. M. Crayen 

(No. 10). 
StrinKham(No.l9) 



Golds borough 

(No. 20). 
Bailey (No. 21). 



Bagley(No.24)... 
Barney (No. 25) . . 
Biddle(No.26r. 



Blakeley(No.27). 

DeLong (No. 28). 
Nicholson (N0J29) 

O'Brien (No. 30).. 
Shabrick (No. 81) 

Stockton (No. 82). 
Thornton (No. 33) 
Tingey(No.84) 

Wilkes (No. 86)... 



400 

420 

420 
420 



483 
146 
146 

840 



247« 



IffT 
167 
167 
165 



174 
165 



165 
165 



Torpedo boat dstyr. 
..do 



Tupe. 



.do.. 
.do., 
.do., 



..do. 



..do 

. do 

..do 

..do 

..do 



..do. 
..do. 



..do.. 
..do.. 
..do., 
..do.. 



...do. 

Torped9 boat . 

do 

do 



...do.. 
...do., 
...do.. 



.do.. 



8,400 

7,000 

7,000 
7,000 
7.000 



8.300 

8,300 

4,200 
4,200 

7,200 



6,000 
5,600 



4,200 
4,200 
4,200 
3,000 

3,000 



3,000 

3,000 
8,00( 
8,000 

8,000 



T.8. 

T.8. 

T.8. 
T.8. 
T.8. 



T.8. 

T.8. 
T.S. 
T.8. 
T.S. 

T.S. 



T.S. 
T.8. 



T.8. 
T.8. 
T.S. 
T.8. 

T.8. 
T.8. 

T.8. 
T.8. 

T.8. 
T.8. 

T.S. 

T.8. 



Station or condition. 



Fall Biver Eiurine Co., 

Weymouth, Mass. 
Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco. 
Do. 
Da 
GsB Bngine and Power 
Co. and Chas. L. Sea- 
bury & Co., Consoli- 
dated, Morris Heights, 
N.Y. 
Maryland Steel Works, 
Sparrow Point, Md. 
Do. 
Do. 
Bath Iron Works, Me. 
Do. 

Harlan A Hollings- 
worth Co.'s Works, 
Wilmington, Del. 

Wolff A Zwicker _ 
Works, Portland, Ore. 

Gas Bn^e and Power 
Co. and Chas. L. Sea- 
bury & Co., Consoli- 
dated, Morris Heii^hts, 
N. Y. 

Bath Ironworks, Maine. 
Do. 
Do. 

Lawley & Sons, South 
Boston, Mass. 
Do. 

Lewis Nixon, Bllsabeth- 
port^N. Y. 

Wm. R. Trigg Oo^ Rich- 
mond, Ya. 
Do. 
Do. 

Columbian Iron Works, 
Baltimore, Md. 

Gas Engine and Power 
Co. and Chas. L. Sea- 
bury A Co. Consoli- 
dated, Morris Heights, 
N.Y. 



* Torpedo tubes. 

COST OF BABE METALS. 

The following shows the cost of rare metals per pound avoirdupois, says the Mining and 

Scientific Press: 
1. Gallium 168,600.00 



2. Vanadium 10,780.00 

3. Bubidium 9,800.00 

4. Thorium 8,330.00 

5. Glucinium 5,800.00 

6. Calcium 4,900.00 

7. Lanthanum 4,900.00 

8. Lithium 4,900.00 

9. Indium 4,410.00 

10. Tantalum 4,410.00 

11. Yttrium 4,410.00 

12. Didymium 4.410.00 

13. Strontium 4,200.00 

14. Arium 3,675.00 

15. Erbium 3,676.00 

16. Ruthenium 2,695.00 

17. Niobium 2,450.00 

18. Rhodium 2,450.00 

19. Barium 1,960.00 

20. Titanium 1,102.00 

21. Zirconium 1.040.00 



22. Osmium |1,040.00 

23. Uranium 

24. Palladium 

25. Tellurium 

26. Chromium 

27. Gold 

28. Molybdenum 

29. Platinum 

30. Thallium 

31. Iridium 

32. Tun^ten 

33. Potassium 

34. Selenium 

35. Cobalt 

36. Magnesium 

37. Bismuth 

38. Sodium 

39. Cadmium 

40. Manganese 

41. Arsenic 

42. Aluminium .84 



980.00 

560.00 

490.00 

490.00 

300.00 

246.00 

144.00 

122.60 

112.00 

36.00 

28.00 

18.80 

8.00 

4.60 

2.75 

2.60 

1.80 

1.10 



FIFTY^IXTH CONGRESS. 



187 



From March 4, 1899, to March 4, 1901. 

SEHATS. 

RepubliMtu, 66; DemocratB, 25; PlOPLl'S FABTT, 6; Vacant, 4. 



President pro tern— TRKiam P. Frye, 

ALABAUA. 

John T.Morgan Selma MW 

Edmund W. FeUns Selma. 190B 

ABKANSA8. _ 

James H. Berry BentonTllle 1901 

James K. Jones Washington 190B 

CALIFORNIA. _ 

Vacant 1905 

Geo. C.PerkiM San Francisco.... 190B 

COLORADO. 

Edward O. Woicott, Denyer ..1901 

Hmrylf. IWJer Central City 1908 

CONNECTICUT. 

Jo§enhR.ffawley Hartford 1905 

OrvmeH.I>latt. Meriden 1903 

DELAWARE. 

Richard R. Kenney Dover. 1901 

Vacant 1905 

FLORIDA. 

James P. Taliaferro JacksonTille 1906 

Stephen R. Mallory Pensaoola 1903 

6BOR01A. 

A ngnstns O.Bacon Macon 1901 

Alexander 8. Clay Marietta 1908 

IDAHO. 

Gwrge L. Shoup Salmon City 1901 

HiNBT Hkitfbld Lewiston 1906 

ILLINOIS. 

Shelby M. OuOom SinrinKfleld.: 1901 

wmiamE.MoBon Chicago 1908 

INDIANA. 

Albert J. Beveridge Indianapolis 1905 

Okarle* W, Fairbankt Indianapolis 1903 

IOWA. 

John H. Oear Borlington 1901 

WmtamB.AmMm. Dnbaqne 1903 

KANSAS. 

Lnden Baker. Leavenworth 1901 

William A. HABUI8 Linwood 1908 

KENTUCKT. 

William Lindsay Frankfort 190i 

WUUamJ.Deboe Marion 190^ 

LOUISIANA. 

Oonelson Caffery Franklin 1901 

Samuel D. McBnery New Orleans 1908 

MAINE. 

WOHamP.Frve Lewiston 1901 

Eugene HaU Ellsworth 1905 

MARYLAND. 

Louit B.MeOomae Hagerstown 1905 

Qeorge L. Wellington Cumherlacd 1908 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Qeorge F. Hoar Worcester. 1901 

Henry Cabot Lodge Nahant 1905 

MICHIGAN. 

JametMcMman Detroit 1901 

Jiittuf CBwrrowe Kalamazoo. 1905 

MINNESOTA. 

KnvteNOeon Alexandria 1901 

CuBhmanK. Davie St. Paul 1905 

_ MISSISSIPPI. 

William V. Sullivan Oxford 1901 

Hernando D. S. Money .... CarroUton 1905 

_ MISSOURI. 

Fhincis M. CockrelL Warrensburg. . . .1905 

GeotxeO. Vest KansasCity 19 3 



MONTANA. 

Thomas H. Carter Helena... 

William A. Clark Butte 

NEBRASKA. 

John M. Thureton, Omaha.. . 

Vacant , 



1901 
.1905 



.1901 
.1905 



NEVADA. 

William M. Stewart.. .Carson City 1905 

JOHMP.JONX8 GoldHill 1 — 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

WiUiam E. Chandler Concord 1901 

Jacob H. OdUinger Concord 1908 

NEW JERSEY. 

WiUiam J. SeweU Camden 1901 

JohnKean Elizabeth 1905 

NEW YORK. _ 

Chatmeey M. Depew New York 1905 

Thomas C. Piatt Owego. 1908 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

MAiuox BUTLKR. Raleigh 1901 

Jeter C. Prttehard Man£all 1908 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Porter J. McCumber Wahpeton 1906 

Henry C. Hanebrough. Devirs Lake 1908 

OHIO. 

Mareue A. Hanna Cleveland 1906 

Joseph B. ForaJcer Cincinnati 1908 

OREGON. 

Oeorge W. MeBride Portlan* 1901 

Joseph Simon Portland 1903 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Matthew 8. Qwi/l/* Beaver 1905 

Boies Penrose Philadelphia 1903 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Oeorge P. Wetmore Newport. 1901 

Nelstm W. Aldrich Providence 1905 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Benjamin R. Tillman Trenton 1901 

John L. McLaurin Bennettsviile. . . .1903 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

Riehard F. Pettigrew Sioux Falls. 1901 

James H.Kyle Aberdeen 1908 

TENNESSEE. 

Thomas B. Turley Memphis 1901 

William B. Bate Nashville 1906 

TEXAS. 

Horace R. Chilton Tyler 1901 

Charles A. Culberson Dallas 1905 

UTAH. 

Vacant 1906 

Joseph L. Ikvwlins Salt Lake City. . .1903 

VERMONT. 

RedJMd Proctor Proctor 1905 

Jonathan Boss St. Johnsbury....l903 

VIRGINIA. 

Thomas 8. Martin ScottsviUe 1901 

John W.Daniel Lynchburg 1905 

WASHINGTON. 

Addison O. Foster ...Tacoma 1906 

George F. Turner Spokane 1908 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

Stephen B. ElMns Blklns 1901 

Nathan B. Scott Wheeling 1905 

WISCONSIN. 

Joseph V. Quarles Milwaukee 1905 

John C. Spooner Hudson 1908 

WYOMING. 

Francis E. Warren Cheyenne 1901 

Clarence D. Clark Bvanston 1906 



*Appointed by the governor. 



188 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



HOITBE 07 SEFSESENTATIVES. 

Republicans (i»italic«), 186; dcmocrata (In roman), 163; populists (in bmaix caps), 6; 
silventes (IN CAPS), 8. Vacant, 1. Whole number, 857. Those marked * served In the LVth 
congress. Those marked t served in a previous house. 
SpeaJter-David B. Hmdenon. .Iowa. 



ALABAMA. 

1. Creorge W. Taylor* Demopolis. 

2. Jesse F. Stalllngs* Greenville. 

3. Henry D. Clayton* Buf aula. 

4. Gaston A. Robbins* 8elma. 

6. Willis Brewer* Hayneville. 

6. John H. Bankhead* Fayette. 

7. John L. Bamett Gadsden. 

8. Joseph Wheeler* Wheeler. 

9. Oscar W. Underwood* Birmingham. 

ARKANSAS. 

1. Philip D. McCulloch,Jr.*...Marianna. 

2. John 8. Little* Greenwood. 

3. Thomas C. McRae* Prescott. 

4. William L. Terry* Little Rock. 

5. Hugh A. Dinsmore* Fayetteville. 

6. Stephen Brundidge, Jr.*. . . .Searcy. 

CALIFORNLA. 

1. John A. Barham* Santa Rosat 

2. Marlon DeVries Stockton. 

3. Victor Metcaif Oakland. 

4. JtMus Kahn San Francisco. 

5. Eugene F. Loud* San Francisco. 

6. RusseU J, Waters Los Angeles. 

7. James C. Needham. Modesto. 

COLORADO. 

1. JOHN F. 8HAFR0TH* Denver. 

2. JohnC.Bell* Montrose. . 

CONNECTICUT. 

1. E. Stevens Henry* Rockvllle. 

2. Nehemiah D. Sperry* New Haven. 

3. Charles A. BtbsseU* KilUngly. 

4. Ebenezer J. HiU* Norwalk. 

DELAWARE. 

John H. Hoffecker Smyrna. 

FLORIDA. 

1. Stephen M. Sparkman* Tampa. 

2. Robert W. Davis Palatka. 

GEORGIA. 

1. Rufnsi K Letter*.. H.. Savannah. 

2. Jam es M, GriggB* Dawson. 

3. Elijah B. LetpJ»* Montezuma. 

4. Willi am Ch a d iimso n • CarroUton. 

6. LewnidaB V. LlvJnKsttjQ* Kings. 

6. Cliaj-leaL. Bart I e it* Macon. 

7. Jolin W* M uflrtojC, , Rome. 

8. WlUriLm M. HowiLTd* Lexington. 

9. Fnrifib Carter Tar** Jasper. 

10. W. II. Fl eju hi^ „ , . , . . Augusta. 

11. Wllllain G. Brantley* Brunswick. 

IDAHO. 

EDGAR WILSON Boise. 

ILLINOIS. 

1. James B. Mann* CShicago. 

2. WUliamLoHmer* Chicago. 

8. George P. Foster Chicago. 

4. Thomas Cusack Chicago. 

6. Edgar T. Noonan Chicago. 

6. Henry 8. Bowtell* Chicago. 

7. Oeorge E. Foss* Chicago. 

8. Albert J. Hopkins*. .... Aurora. 

9. Bobert R. Hilt* Mount Morris. 

10. George W. Prince* Galesburg. 

11. WaJaer Beeves* Streator. 

12. Joseph O. Gannon* Danville. 

13. Vespasian Warner* Clinton. 

14. Joseph V. QraW* Pekin. 

15. Benjamin F. Marsh* Warsaw. 

16. William B. Williams Pittsfleld. 

17. Benjamin F. Colwell* (Chatham. 

18. Thomas M. Jett* HiUsboro. 



19. Joseph B. Crowley Robinson. 

20. James R. Williamst Carmi. 

21. William A. Bodenberg B. St. Louis. 

22. Oeorge W. Smith* Murphy sboro. 

INDIANA. 

1. James A. Hemenway* Boonville. 

2. Robert W. Mlers* Bloomington. 

3. William T. Zenor* (3orydon. 

4. Francis M. Griffith* Vevay. 

6. Oeorge W. Fari^ Terre Haute. 

6. James E. Watson* Rushville. 

7. Jesse Overstreet* Franklin. 

8. Oeorge W. Cromer Muncle. 

9. Charles B. Landis* Delphi. 

10. E. D. Crumvacker* Valparaiso. 

11. Oeorge W. 8teele*f Marion. 

12. James M. Robinson Fort Wayne. 

13. Abraham L. Brick. South Bend. 

IOWA. 

1. Thonias H^ge Burlington . 

2. Jof R.Lan^.,. Davenport. 

8. Iki Hd B. B^idrrsan* Dubuque. 

4. Oiibr H N. Ett rw n Northwood. 

6. Bc'beTt G^ C^usths*. Tipton. 

6. John F. Lafev* Oskaloosa. 

7. John A. T. Hull* Des Moines. 

8. WiUiam P. fM^h urn* Clarinda. 

9. Stfiith McPlmrifrn Red Oak. 

10. Joii atftan P. Bali iver* Fort Dodge. 

IL LotThojrma StormLake. 

KANSAS. 
At Large— TF. J*. BaUey .Baileyville. 

1. Charles Ouirtis Topeka. 

2. JttsUn D. Bowersock Lawrence. 

8. Bi>wiN R. RiDGELY • Pittsburg. 

4. James M. Miller Council Grove. 

6. WUliam A. Cdlderhead Marysville. 

6. WaUamA.Beeder Logan. 

7. Chester I. Long* Hutchinson. 

KENTUCKY. 

1. Charles K. Wheeler* Paducah. 

2. Henry D.Allen Morgantleld. 

8. John 8. Rhea* RussellvUle. 

4. David H. Smith* Hodgenville. 

6. Oscar Turner Louisville. 

6. Albert S. Berry* Newport. 

7. Vacant. 

8. George 6. Gilbert ShelbyviUe. 

9. Samuel J. Pttgh* Vanoeburg. 

10. Thomas Y. Fitzpatrick* Prestonburg. 

U. Vincent Boerbng London. 

LOUISIANA. 

1. Adolph Meyer* New Orleans. 

2. Robert C. Davey* New Orleans. 

8. Robert F. Broussard* New Iberia. 

4. Phanor Breazeale Natchitoches. 

5. Joseph B. Bansdell Lake Provid'ce. 

6. Samuel M. Robertson* Baton Rouge. 

MAINE. 

1. Amos L.Allen Alfred. 

2. Charles E. Littleiield Rockland. 

3. Edunn C. Bwrleigh* Augusta. 

4. Charles A. Boutme* Bangor. 

MARYLAND. 

1. John W. Smith Snow Hill. 

2. WiUiam B. Baker* Aberdeen. 

3. Frank C. Wachter Baltimore. 

4. James W. Denny Baltimore. 

5. Sidney E.Mudd*i Laplata. 

6. Oeorge A. Pearre Cumberland. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. Oeorge P. LoAvrenet^ North Adams. 

I 2. Frederick H. OUleU* Springfield. 



FIFTT-SIXTH CONGRESS. 



189 



HOUSB OF RBPRESBNTATIVBS.— Continued. 



8. John R. Thaver Worcester. 

4. Oeorqe W. Weymouth* Fltchburg. 

6. wmiam 8: Knoa^ Lawrence. 

6. WiUiam H. Mood/y* HaverhlU. 

7. Ernest W. Roberts Chelsea. 

8. Samuel W.McCall* Winchester. 

9. John F. Fitzgerald* Boston. 

10. Henry F. Naphen Boston. 

11. Charles F. Spragvs* Boston. 

12. WiUiam C. Lovering* Taunton. 

18. William 8. Greened FaU Kiver. 

MICHIGAN. 

1. John B. Corliss*. Detroit. 

2. Henry O.Smith Adrian. 

8. Waahinaton Gardner Albion. 

4. Edward L. HamUtnn Nlles, 

6. WiUiam Alden Smith* Grand Rapids. 

6. Samuel W. Smith Pontlac. 

7. Edgar Weeks Mt. Clemens. 

8. John W. Fordney Saginaw. 

9. RosweU P. Bishop* Ludington. 

10. Bosseau O. Crump* Bay City. 

11. WiUiam 8. Mesicfr Mancelona. 

12. Carlos D. Shelden* Houghton. 

MINNESOTA. 

1. James A. Tawnei/* Winona. 

2. James T. McCleary* Mankato. . 

8. Joel P. Heatwole* Northfleld. 

4. Frederick C. Stevens* St. Paul. 

6. Loren Fletcher* Minneapolis. 

6. Page Morris Duluth. 

7. Frank M. Eddy* Glenwood. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1. John M. Allen* Tupelo. 

2. Thomas Spi»ht* Ripley. 

3. Thomas C. Catchings* Vicksburg. 

4. Andrew F. Fox* West Point. 

6. John 8. Williams* Tazoo City. 

6. Frank A. McLaln* Gloster. 

7. Patrick Henry* Brandon. 

MISSOURI. 

1. Janit'^ T. T,loT(l» ShelbyvlUe. 

2. Witilaiu Wk Hnckur KeytesviUe. 

3. J< « d » T. Don stiiirty ^ Liberty. 

4. Cliiirloii F. Cochrun* St. Joseph. 

6. WEI] Imm 8, Owhurd" Kansas City. 

8. Jhi^m A. Dfi Aruioud* Butler. 

7. Jan] t a A. Ccjoney * , , Marshall. 

8. l>irHE?y W. sbflcaeJford Jefferson City. 

9. Cli 11 fii p Cl ark*t ^ ■ - Bowling Green. 

10. Bir hard nuHhotdt* St. Loui s. 

U. Cfuirifi F. Joy* St. Louis. 

12. Ch . 1 t\€9 K Pmrr f * St. Louis. 

13. Btwjirrt A. Roblj- .. Perry ville. 

14. WiUlain D, VrtEidl^i^r CapeGlrardeau 

16. Mu^o euas E. Bento d Neosho. 

MONTANA. 

Albert J. Campbell Butte. 

NEBRASKA. 

1. E.J. Burkett Lincoln. 

2. David H. Mercer* Omaha. 

8. John S. Robinson Madison. 

4. William L. Stark* Aurora. 

a. RODBR'KD.Sl7THEKLAND*NelSOn. 

tt. William NeviUe North Platte. 

NEVADA. 
FRANCIS G. NB WLANDS*Reno. 
NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1. Cyrus A. Sikllowai^ Manchester. 

2. Frank O. darki* Peterboro. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1 . Henry C. Loudenslager* Paulsboro. 

2. John J. Gardner* Atlantic City. 

8. BM4amin F. Howell* NewBrunswick 

4. Joshua S. Solomon* Boonton. 

6. James F.Stewart* Paterson. 



6. Bichard Wayne Parker* Newaft. 

7. WiUiam D. Daly Hoboken. 

8. Charles NeweU FowUr* Elizabeth. 

NEW rORK. 

1. Townsoud Si uii^ii I Glenhead. 

2. JchnT. biiiMi' nil.J Brooklyn. 

8. EcJmiind 11. l)nuK»'- Brooldyn. 

4. Bf rtium T- CiJvytODK* Brooklyn. 

5. Frnii)! |], WHson,*.H.. Brooklyn. 

6. Mttotull May Brooklyn. 

7. Nil h4 1 Itthi M still, rt. . . - , New York city. 

8. DtmklJ, Klfpftliin New York city. 

9. TJitKiuis J. IJrndk'^* New York city, 

10. Ani^iH J. OuinsijJiijiiV. New York city. 

11. \^ ulhifii Hitl/ef .., New York city. 

12. G yf- 31. MtHltllan' New York city. 

13. J< [Ti j-ikin M. Levy., New York city. 

14. WdllniH A, Cbanler New York city. 

15. 3i\i-'i\' Uiiuert, Jr, New York city. 

16. Joh[i Q. UnflL'TtiSlL.. New Rochelle. 

17. AtiU\t.r S. Tfmpkini Nyack. 

18. Ju h n If Kr 1 rhn urK.,. Dover Plains. 

19. Anr*<ir \\ .S. t'm-in-aiti'* Hudson. 

20. Wnrtln II.Giyiin Albany. 

21. John K^ Sit'Witri..., Amsterdam. 

22. Lutit n iV. /- itta iir^ r ♦. Gloversvllle. 

23. Lr. His W. Em^ rjon Warrensburg. 

24. C?MjWts A. Vhkl(PFfn'j* Copenhagen. 

26. J'n I n fa S. fihf rma-n* - Utica. 

26. G' • . i.;n^ 1 r. /id wV . , , . , Norwich. 

27. Mhi.'id E. l)r\xeoil Syracuse. 

28. Sf r K. Prtv"^*" * Auburn. 

29. C{hirU.,f Sir. GUh't* Addison. 

30. Jnnrif U' Wttthwijrth* Geneseo. 

31. J,nn'-f! M. K. tj'Grtidji Rochester. 

32. V illiiimn. Kyan. Buffalo. 

83. Jj' A)ru Sr Ah:£anilPT* Buffalo. 

U. Edauird23, Vrciland. Salamanca. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

1. JohnH. Small Elizabeth City. 

2. George H. White* Tarboro. 

3. Charles R. Thomas Newborn. 

4. John W. Atwater Rialto. 

5. W. W. KItchin* Roxboro. 

6. John D. Bellamy Wilmington. 

7. Theodore F. Kluttz SaUsbury . 

8. BomtUus Z. lAnney* Taylors ville. 

9. William T. Crawford Waynesville. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Burleigh F. Spalding. Fargo . 

OHIO. 

1. TTiniam J?. Sliatt^tti* Madlsonville. 

2. Ja t:<tb TL Bramwalt* Cincinnati. 

3. Job n 1j. Bifniier*. Dayton. 

4. RobtiTi. B.Gurduii St. Marys. 

6. Diiviij ^|ci=k.lfl()Li"H,H , Napoleon. 

6. Stth ir. iJjyjifiiV..... Lebanon. 

7. W't!i*rL. nVtirfr*... Springfield. 

8. A^rfht^Hild J.itbratui* Delaware. 

9. JiriN^A II. :r^-}uitiard* Toledo. 

10. Stt{'i\'- a 3f lyf rirjti Oak Hill. 

11. ClidrifsIL Uf(f*vtnor* Athens. 

12. J(i li Ti .1 , Li'Tita;* .,,,*,, Columbus. 

13. JajNitf A. Norton*.,.. Tiffin. 

14. Wiri'kU S. Kerr* Mansfield. 

15. H t^rif C, Vnn VoorJiis* Zanesvllle. 

16. Jo Ht^ )i J.GAii Steubenville. 

17. Jchii .V. McDowen*., Mlllersburg. 

18. B"tH>i IF. Tayhr* Lisbon. 

19. Ci\arU-n Dlctt* Akron. 

20. Fi\-mmii. O . PhUtijf^ Medina. 

21. TAwdoK E* li urt&fi*^ Cleveland. 

OREGON. 

1. Thomas H. Tongue* Hlllsboro. 

2. Malcolm A. Mood/y Dallas. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
At Laage—Galusha A. Groi*;*t. .Glenwood. 

8a/m%ul A. Davenport* Erie. 

1. Henry H. Bingham* Philadelphia. 



190 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOE 1900. 



H0U8B OF aBPRESENTATiyE8.--Goirmn7XD. 



24. 



At 



JSobrrf jiAimt , Jt* Philadelphia. 

WiUlKtDMeALetii-' Philadelphia. 

Ju PHC* IL T&ung ' Philadelphia. 

Ai i mi ( ^ Uartmr* Philadelphia. 

Tk^\mAs s. mifkr... West Chester. 

ItHtm p. Tl'Vuiiji'ir* Norristown. 

Dnvrd H. Hiirbifr.,.,. Mauch Chunk. 

HtHiry D. Green Reading. 

2tf urrfrtrt Br'*«iii**. Lancaster. 

Wiiilam fTffmif/;* Bcranton. 

Stcinlbf VV. DavBnpurt Plymouth. 

Jaiues w. Rvftn PottsviUe. 

Mr i f h n B- im\»tti\* Harrishunr. 

¥vT*lrr^\i. {7 irj^ht, Susquehanna. 

Uiyrace. a. Pixcksj* Welfaboro. 

Ruf ufl K. PoiJc Danville. 

ThttdA^ii^ M. MrJhim* Chamberahurg. 

Edward D, ^Sflpler York. 

JSrn r;i I ni liJ. ThnjH cf-. , Bedford. 

Su J n mtt* Nr JacJi Indiana. 

Joh n DaJsell* Plttsburff. 

Wiitmm H. Grahmn* Allegheny. 

BriHHi F. Achfariit* Washington. 

Jofivph B. i^hfy^viiUef' Chlcora. 

At tu^liiiofi Gii^iitoti Meadville. 

Jo^i [til r. P.\\AoY Franklin. 

JaineaK. P. iiiul Ridgway. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

lieVoQU Bt*n* Middletown. 

Adin B. Oapron* ^ . . . .Stillwater. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

WilUam BlUottn Beaufort. 

W. Jasper Taibert* .Parksville. 

Asbury C. Latimer* Belton. 

Stanyame Wilson* Spartansburg. 

David E. Finley Yorkville. 

James Norton* Mullins. 

J. William Stokes* Orangeburg. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

- Large— Bobert J". Oamble\. . .Yankton. 
Charles H. Burke Pierre. 

TENNESSEE. 

Walter P. Bmumlmv* Jonesboro. 

Hen ry It. ffit)tf>n* Knoxville. 

Jc!m \ ;Mrnjri*.. , ChattanooRa. 

CI -^[M'liiiraiis Crossville. 

Ja I -: L III JL nlson* Murfreesboro. 

Jc::.. u . j^LLinyi* Nashville. 

Nh;Jju]iiflN,Cox* Franklin. 

Tlintxis W. Sims*.,. Linden. 

Rife A. Piqrcfl* Union City. 

Ed^^Ftl W. Carmaek* Memphis. 

TEXAS. 

Thomas H. Ball * Huntsville. 

Samuel B. Cooper* Woodvllle. 

R. C. DeOraflenrled* Longview. 



4. John L. SbeppAri! . 



..Pittsbnrg. 
6. Jo^p p h w, Tia3 u?y* .^Gainesville. 

6. RotJOTt K. BurlEe* Dallas. 

7. Robert L. lii'nrv',,.. ".Waco. 

8. Sail] uel W. 'l\ Lnii]iam*t. . ..Weatherford. 

9. Alt^ert B. BurlcRun. Austin. 

10. B. ft. BnwJty* Galveston. 

11. Rud«jlph Kletvert^' Cuero. 

12. James L. Slavden* San Antonio. 

13. Jobn U. Bu^piienf-' Vernon. 

UTAH. 

Brlgham H. Roberts Centerville. 

VERMONT. 

1. ff. Henry Poweri* Morrlsvllle. 

2. WiUiam W. Grout* Barton. 

VIRGINIA. 

1. William A. Jones* Warsaw. 

2. William A. Young* Norfolk. 

8. John Lamb* Richmond. 

4. Sidney P. Epes* Blaclcstone. 

5. Claude A. Swanson* Chatham. 

6. Peter J.Otey* Lynchburg. 

7. James Hay* Madison C. H. 

8. John F. Bixey* Culpeper. 

9. William F. Rhea Bristol. 

10. Julian M. Quarles Staunton. 

■ WASHINGTON. 

At Large— TTeslev L. Jones* Yakima. 

Francis W. Cushman r .Tacoma. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

1. Blackburn B. Dovener* Wheeling. 

2. AUton G. Dayton* PhiUppi. 

3. David E. Johnson Bluefleld. 

4. BomeoH.Freer Harrisville. 

WISCONSIN. 

1. Henry A. Cooper* Racine. 

2. Herman B. Dahle Mt. Horeb. 

8. Jos. W. Babcock* Necedah. 

4. Theobald men* MUwaukee. 

6. Samttel 8. Barney* West Bend. 

6. James H. Davidson* Oshkosh. 

T.JohnJ.Esch.... La Crosse. 

8. Ed/ward a. Minor* Sturgeon Bay. 

9. AUacander Stewart* Wausau. 

la John J. Jenkins* Chippewa Falls 

WYOMING. 

Frank W. Mendell New Castle. 

TERRITORIES. 

ARIZONA —John F. Wilson Prescott. 

Nbw Mexico— Pedro Perea Bernalillo. 

Oklahoma— Denni« Flynn*, . .Guthrie. 



State. B. D.Peo.Sit 

Alabama 9 .. .. 

Arkansas 6 .. .. 

California ii 1 .. .. 

Colorado 11 

Connecticut 4 

Delaware 1 

Florida 2 .. .. 

(Georgia 11 .. .. 

Idaho 1 

Illinois 14 8 .. .. 

Indiana 9 4 .. .. 

Iowa 11 

Kansas 7 .. 1 .. 

Kentucky* 2 8 .. .. 

Louisiana 6 .. .. 

Maine 4 



RECAPITULATION. 
State. B. D.Peo.8iL 

Maryland 4 2 . . 

Massachusetts... 10 3 .. 

Michigan 12 .. .. 

Minnesota 7 .. .. 

Mississippi 7 .. 

Missouri. 3 12 .. 

Montana 1 .. 

Nebraska 2 2 2 

Nevada 1 

New Hampshire. 2 .. .. 

New Jersey 6 2 .. 

New York 16 18 .. 

North Carolina . . 2 6 1 
North Dakota.... 1 .. .. 

Ohio 15 6 .. 

Oregon 2 .. .. 



State. 

Bonsylvania^ . . 

RhodelBlMML 7 .. 

South Carolina.. .. 7 

South Dakota.... 2 .. 

Tennessee 2 8 

Texas 1 12 

Utah 1 

Vermont 2 .. 

Virginia 10 

Washington 2 .. 

West Virginia... 3 1 

Wisconsin 10 .. 

Wyoming 1 .. 



B.D.Peo3a 
20 10 . 



Total 185168 5 

*Vacantl. 



FlKrV'-glXTlI CtJNGKEas. 



101 



81LKAT0RS CAlph»beti«^r Airv^e^* 



Aldrlcli, N. W ...Rboda iKlaDdl 
Allison. WlLllam B.... Iowa 

daecmt AiiiniRtufl O Georplji 

ilKKurb LuclL^n. .......... EkunsivH 

Bate^ W. B Tenuea^^e 

Berry. Jamt^e H ,.,,.. HArtanaas 
Bf^Biid^f], A- J-P -, . . * . .tndlann 
Burrows. J ulltia C — Michigan 
BuLlcr^ MurJoa.l^onli Caroflna 

Cattery, D LonlfrlauA 

Carter, TbomaB H Montana 

Chun d ler. W.E.Ne w il amnsli i re 
CbUt<jn. Hiirtiue R.. . . . . . .Tt;iaji 

Clark, CluK'ut^e D Wjomln^ 

Clark, W, A. .Montana 

ClftT, AleiancloT B Georsfia 

Cuckrf II, F. M MLBSGurl 

Ctilocraon, C, A, .T^xas 

Cuilom, &li c ] by M ........ Ill t noia 

Daniel, John W. Tni-(rlnla 

Davli^t C. K. . . . . .. . ..Mlnno?otn 

Deboe, W.J . . Ktntucsky 

Depijw, C- A. Ke w York 

ECmi^s, S. B. West Virginia 

PaLrtoanlts, C.W..H....inaiiiTia 
Foralser. Joaepb B. . . , . . . . Ohio 

Fofittr. A. Gr. . . WasbJngtOD 

Fry e. WllUflm P. >,,-,,. - Maine 
Qall Inger, J.H.Ng^ Hais psta Ire 



Gear. John H , . .luwa! 

Hflif, Kn^ij'nc.,. ..Maine 

Uanna. Marcua A.,.-,,^^,. .OhLo, 
HanHhrou^h, Ji.C'..K- LVjikotai 

iIlarriH, Wilklauj A .Kanbaw 

ilawliiy, JiiH. H,- ►..Ctfnnct'tltiiii 

Heltfeld. Hf nr^\ Idaho 

Uoar. Qcortii^ F.Ma£BaQhusette 

Jones, JFimcs K, Arlcanpan 

Joiiea, Jobu P. . ., Nuvailu. 

rKcan. Jtjbii..< Npw Jern^'y 

Kijnnej , Riizhard R. .iXilawart 
Kylv, J. U. . . .. , . . .Suntb Dakoia 

Lindtiay,WIl[lam...iKt?]itucky 
Lodge, 11. C Masaachusetiii 

M c B rf ri c . iii^orffe W — . Or<?Af cni 
Mtht .'oiii His, L. Ji ...... M ary 1 ar i r1 

MeCumher, P. J N. Utikuia 

Mi^Bn^rFt S- U. Louisiana 

Mi^ljiiirL n . 4 . L..Soiith Ca ri..' H ii a 
McMillan, Jaii]eg...,,Mi{^h'L^tkn 

Mai iory, S, R Florida 

Martin, Tin rnias M Virjrlnla 

Maaon, WiLliam £[..... .UlTnukA 

Mone^i IL D. 3 Mls^latilii^l 

Mqijjqu. Jolin T- , r ., . . AlaDaioa 



Nelson, Ennto-, 



....MlnaeBota 
rPeniiBflTanla 



Perklnfln G, C ..California 

P^ttl^rew. It. l'\.£iuuTb Dakota 
PhfCtos, Edmunrl W. . .AhtUaDiu 
riait. On illell,... Connecticut 

Piatt, TbnmaB € Staw York 

PHtt'liardH J. C. North Carolina 
Protiior. KedfleLd ..Ycrmont 

Qnarlrri, J . V Wl.'^oomln 

ij^ua)' . M, t^r . , . . . . .Penuaylvama 

Hfiwhns, JrjReph L ....Utah 

Itu&si, J ouat Jaann ,<..-.. Ve rni o n i 

8t'( *tu N. B West Vi fkI i d a 

l^ewifli. W. J .,. .Ntiw JersMl 

ishoup, George L. r .tdalui 

.S i mfjiii , JouBp h ^ , , tfrcjiu n 

Sooont^r, John C. ..^.WJfitJtpn^.En 

r^Lewai t. W, M Nevada 

riulUvan. W. V Mlssl&sljjpi 

TaHufCTTO. J. P. .Fktrlrta 

If Ilur, llL-ury M Culoradj.i 

'Hi urstohr .lohn M , ., .NehmsJia 
TlDinau. B. It . .S?outb t an>llnrt 

Turlffj-, Thos. B Tetajc-.s-Si.'t* 

Turner, O po rjia J'^ , Wash U\g ton 
Vest, George G--.,, 4.. .MiEisourl 

Warren^ F. E Wyomiuif 

WellinKtun, (t. L.. . . ..Maryland 

Wetmure.Geo. P. Rhode J a land 
Wokotf . E. O , , . . .Colorado 



REPRESENT ATIYEB (Alphnbetif^aUy ArTanged), 



Jlcbeison, E. F. . .FennB^ Ivanlia Burk*?, Koht, K .- , h ,. Texas 

Adams, lioFit,, Jr.Pe nn sylvan I ai HurktMt. E. J .Nobrahka 

A^amson. W' ni, C. > . . . .(p^OTijial Burleigh. E. C... Muine 

Al^itander, l>eA. S. ,New Torki Burleson, A. B , . ,TejiaK 

Alien, A. L , aiaino Burnett, J. L . . . . Alabama 

Alleti, e. 1>. ...,.,... . Kentucky s Burton. T. E , Oblo 

Allen, J. M Mlssissslppl.Butler^T, tt,,,...P&nD3ylvftalfl 

Atwster, J. W-.North CaroUDa'^ ^^ ^ , „x * 

, .„ ,„, , Calderbead, W. A ......Kansas 

Babcocte, J. W Wisconsin Cold woU. B. V. Illinois 

BnUey, J . W. . . - -^ToxabCaiuphell. A. J .Montana 



Bailey, W.J,,. .Kansas 

Baker, w, B .........Maryland 

Ball, Thoinaa H Teiaft 

Dan th ead. John It . . . Alabama 

Barber, L. U PennsylTB nia 

Barb amis John A California 

Barney , S. S. WiaconMl u 

Bartiioldt. K, Ml&sonrl 

Bartletl, C. L.., , Georirla 

Seli. J. C. , , .Colorado 

Bellamy, J. D. .North Carolina 

Benton, M.Sl M Issfturi 

Berry* A. S. Kcntncky 

BlnKtiftBQ. H. H...PenniiylTanlii 
Blabop. R, P.. ....... . MlchlgaD 

Boering, V. Kentucky 

BoutelVH. S .Mllnole 

BoutiJlle. C. A Maine 

Bo wcr^clk J. D.. .- .. , , .Kanaaa 
Braflley> T» J. . , New York 



BreaicalO, P Loulalanh 

BrennertJohn L, , , . . , Oblo 

Brewer, YfUUn .Alabama 

Bricks A. L Indiana 

Brt-mweli, J. H. . .. . h , . . . . , .Ohio 

HTCKiiniu M . . .PennsylTanJ a 

BroujsaaTd, Robt. F,. Louisiana 

Brown, Setb W,. Oblo 

Brcwnlow. w.P.....Ti'nneHsee 

BmndldEe. ^., Jr. .. ..Arkansas . 

BuU. MelvllTe. . ,Bb(Mlo Island I>aly. W. U. 
BuTke. C. H South Dakota Du Szell, Job n 



Cannohn J> G,, IHluois 

Capron, Adjn B. Jtbnde Irilfind 
Camiack. E. W. , . . . . Tennessee 

Cai(:b1iii?Ri T, C MbsLsslppI 

Chanler, W. A New York 

Chicterlng, C. A JMe^w York 

Clark, C- .Mlsanuri 

Clarkf3. F. G. .New Hamp^iblrc 

Clay tun. B. F New York 

Clayton, H. D . . - . . ,, . , A labama 

Cocbrim, Cbai?. F MlBEH^urk 

Cocbronei, A. V. S....New Vork 

Connetl, Wm PennsylTanlft 

Cooney, J. A ........ . . .Mlsaourl 

Cooper, ir. A. Wisconsin 

Cooper, R B , .Teiaa 

CorllFiFi. Joiin B Mlcbljian 

ConaEng, B. G Iowa 

Cowherd, Wm. S.,.,, Missouri 
Cor, N. N , .l^ennoesee 



Bran tley. Wm. G. ..... . Georff la' n ranfoVd .' J ^ W . - ". *. V. ..... Te xm 



Cromer, Q. W Indiana 

Crowley. J. B. , . . . I lllnoie 

Crump, R. O. Mlubltfau 

Crnmpacker, E. D, Indiana 



Ctimmlnus, A, J. . . , , .New York 

CurtlB, G Kau<ia& 

Cusack. Tho?. Ill1nol& 

CughmanH F W,-, Washington 



Dablc. U. B. 



H_..W1aronslT5 
. ...Nf^w ,lers€*y 
. l't;[]ntiyK^ania 



rmvfljijKkrtt S. A. Pennsylvania 
1 )a venijii jrt , S. W . .Pen n t?y 1 TanI a 
Iiaifey, Rubt. C- — .LouJHlana 

UavldEiEKn, .1. H Wiiseuoslit 

paviB, Robt. W. tlurldu 

i iitv ton. A. G . . . Weal Vlr^i nifl 
DoArtnE)i]d, l>. A.... ..Missouri 

DLiGrallyiirletl. R, C .ToiaE 

lleVrlep, Marinn California 

iJonny, J, W Marylatid 

J>Jck, Charles Ohio 

l>ix]£»inur^.J1, A, .Arkansas 

Lio]]lvef,J. P luwH 

riuu^herty. J , , . .MlBSOurl 

Duvencr, a. B . „ West Virffjnia 
DrfKiis, E. H... , , , . . . ,New Vork 
Drlscoll. M. B. .Nevf York 

Kddy , F. M _,..,.._, M Inuesoln 
Elliott, Wm....So[ith Cartillna 
Em erbon . L. W ....... N<? w Vork 

KppH, S. P Virginia 

Ii:»t3b,j.j,,.,, WlBconsin 

Faris, G*^o. W.. ...Indtuno 

Fin ley. Ti. K. . ..Sonlb Carolluii 
Fltzgf?Tald, J. F.Miiasixcbuscttt 

Flt?4jerald. J. .!, Now York 

Flfsipatrlck, T, T..,.. Kentucky 

Fleming, Wm, H.. Gconflfi 

Fleteher, L. ....... . . .Minnesota 

Korrtney, J. W Mleblt;tat:i 

FosR.Geo.F IlliooiE 

Foster, G. P ....... Illlnolt 

Powler. C, N .New Jersey 

Fox, Andrew F Mlsslsslpn 

Freer. It. H. . , . . , West Vlralnlf 

GalTien. Jobn W,.,... Tennessee 
Garni. Ic, R. J.....etrath Dafcote 
{^nrrlner,.loli.rt J,. New Jersej 

(iardner. Wash .Mloblfifar 

((fi'7ron, A. PennsylvanlE 

t ; n)5-uf5. 11 R,, Tenni'saet 

GULK-rt. i^. ....... ..,,EoDtiiokj 



lO'JT 



CmCAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOE 1900. 



BKl'llBi^ENTATlVEaH-COSTlSUBD. 

Gill. .1. J Ohio MeRfte, TboniBfl C Arkaa^asShepnrd, J, L. TeiaA 

(iUlet. C. W .New \'urk Mftdttoji. J. W Geor^f Jrt Sliuwaltei-. J. B^ ^^unaylvaDla 

G tllett^ F.H Mafi!iarfaufl4j[ U MHhon, T, M .. , . . PeanaylTanlft jSlblcy. J. C f'enasj]Taiil& 

Mabu, J* R lUlDtilfl.t^ImEi. Tbetua W-. ■ . .Tenuesiqij 

Marflh, li. F lliluoKfeiayden, J. h.,. Texas 



.New Yurfe 



Iji-irdun, H. U 

(iraiiT, JoaeiiU V Jllimhi^i.MHrsiitt)!, tr. A.* ..,-.Otiki SmiilL J, H.....N6rtb CArolinh 

liHibum, W^H,,,rci]n.HyU iiriHi Nhiv. Mitchell.. New Vurlt ^mkttin IX H l£eatuc>iv 

G rqpn, 1>. U Fennaylvjt n i li! Mi.'^^Usont d ^ Ohlo'siiniith, U^ Wh * , _ lIlliiMkh 

trneene.W, S Mafiaat: Lu^j^l-u^'M Laurie LI, F. W '" ' " ^ 



U rimtli. *\ M . - . , . 1 tuiliirttt Merct r, D. H. . . 

fimsveUL-r, C. 11 oLlivMeLciiLf. V. H, 

Mil, W. W.... YtTii.i^m ^h'ver. A. 



i.iiuw, U. A-, 



. « . *.Wyuiuiii(r i?iu}tk, II, C. . Mlelil^wTi 

„ , . .Ncfbranka Hmlth, Jh W Marv land 

Mitibtifub.sstnlih, H. W..,. Mlchltfin] 

,.„Ca]lfornla.Suilt!i. W. A ....MlehS^sLiii 

.IxiuiiilaDa Snodj^rasd, C. IQ ^TtrnDestiet.' 

■ ■' u ■ ■ ■ - -- 



.Tijnnhy i v :l 1 1 l:i M ij^i s RoLiert W- , I udltma Hontbanj, J.yi uhli> 



ir' . ... _ 

^Jilicr^ J, M. -Kuti^ai^'E^paliJiD^. B. F..^ North DhMhj: 

P. . . . . Pentjii^y Ly.ui [;i AHmn, K. ^. .......... W [Bcorislu Spark maii^. M. ...... . .KlorwJis 

8 pL^rry ^ N. D, . . , — Coiin«(?t It5u i 



llntLJ. K. _ . __..,„........., 

IliimilUint K. L, ^^MU-m^faniMDOdyi W. U ...Maiibdchuiiet^^s 

Hii nil e J-, A. , , „ J^e nn^if 1 van la ■ Motid 7. M. A , , , Oreijo d 

llHUtfHb, G.N lt>wa;M wnn J. A. .Tenbessee 

I f nwlgy, U. B .TeiftB iinriian, ^ „,,,,,,.... . .Ohio 

ilay, auincH ,...»„ Virginia Murri-., PaBu Mlimeftcta 

M tuift. feflil tiey E MiiTjrlancl 

MuUur. N,,.,,,> Now fork 



H eat wol e, J . 1". . . . . . Mlubt^^ot ti 

iiedee, Tbomas „., . . rlowa 

lli^bienwiiy, J^ A Indlmitt 

HetideTsyu. D. H... ........ .Icjwa 

Hi?nry , B, S Coniiecttcat 

11 in ry^ Pmrlpk , — MISE4]i5Sl)H]| 

1 1 i.'[i ry, Robert L ..... Taxas 

I Uri'Jpurii^ W,P.,. .-.lut^a 

I U i ] I . K, ,1 , . . , .Coaooi-t tf^uT 

lliit, K. R...„...,...H,.,.lll1n(tiB 
» I ' 'thiQket-. J. H . . , , . ^ .Delawiire 

II ..[jKlTSfl, A. J-r...., nUiiols 

1 f o w EiTdi W m, 3i , , i . ► . . .ti e^Tif lu. 

HowkU, B. F .Nt-^w >l ertfey 

Unll,J. a;t...... Iowa 



J flelt, 3. M Feb nsyl vau Is 

.lenkinaT J. J „ Wl^cirnisiin 

.ly tt, ThOi M lUintjla 

Julin^n, D, B.,,Wefil Vlrtfibla 
Jojioa, W. A- .*.,,,. *..,Vtr»jliila 



Naptien,H F. ..MaMUCbusetts 
Nijqilliam. J* Ch . , i« California 

NevUk-, W ,J*eljmBka 

NewJandSH P, O Novuda 

Nonnaa. E. T.^ llllnolB 

N orton ,J BonthCarotlim 

Norton, J. A., ,.„Oiilti 

O^TTady, .T. M. E . . . . .New Tor^ 
Olmsif d, M, E,r, .PenQaylvania 

Vtc.y^ 1 Vttfr J ,.,►.. . VlrfTlnla 

Oijen,TIn!£jbBlt].„..Wtseorisi.n 
V er^tree i, Jes^e. Ind iana 



Packer, H, H. PenDsylTanln 

Parker. 11- W New Jersey 

t'Brnf;'. ^. B, +, , , ♦>, * . .New York 
Pearue, C. K.. ....... . . .MI&BOurl 

> „v i — ™ i ■ r. - iPearre, G. A..... Maryland 

JfiiiOb, W. L WaahliJjrton pearsob, R. . . ..North Carolina 

■oy, LM? ..MlEJsyin t PeThlns^ D. D. ..Iowa 



Peters, M. a, ..,,..,, Kaoaas 

PliUUps, P. O..-. Olilo 

Pie rot, R. A. * . , -TeDueaspi.^ 

Pol It, B. K , ,P€tbnHylva nla 

Powers, H, H. . . . . n vennoiiT 

JMinol^ 



Kiihu, JuUua,. , , ., , . ,CaI|fc]Trila 

Kerr, W, 9.... Ohio 

KeEubam, J* H» New York 

rcitohln, \Y. W..Nortti Carol Sua ^^^^^^ „ ^ 

It 1 bin , T, F . . . . North Can . Una' i*!;^ ii i itr n t iicik v 

, ^ , Quarles. J.M Vlrtflbla 

Lacey; .7, F Towa'i 

LarufcJ, John , . , VlruiDla; Ransdelli J. B. * TjPJiIsI nna 

Labdttj C. B ......... . . .Inmana Ray^ G. W , . . .Nu w York 

Lane, J. R Iowa Rt^t^der, W. A- . . , Eaosas 

l.flTiham, a, W. T. Texas Ree vol!, W. ........... . ., llllnoSB; 

LaLimer, A. C. ..SOutli Carolina! Bhea, J. S , Kebtucfcy 

Lawrenee, ti&o. P, ,,..., . .Ma!!^B.[RhBa, W. F VlrfilDla 

IjijniK, J.J Dlilo iRiL'tianlHon, J- U TEbneasee 

Laater. H. E .Goorffjfti Rldfiely, E. R., , -, ., Kaofiaa 

Levy, J, M New York ■* ' "^ ' --- — -,. 

fje wis, B, B , Oeor^ b 

Linne?, R. Z. ., North Carolma 
Llttauer,L.N. ....... New York 

i -Ittle, J, S Arkansajj 

l.ltiletteld, c.B... ..Maine 

Ijivinjfrttont L, F. Ueor^a 

Lloy tU J. T Missouri 

LiibfT, C* I. ..,..*.* KariAaa 

l^rimeT, Wm Milnuls 

Loudr K. F Califoriita 

LOnfleosIaEeT. n. C.N. Jersey 
Lovt-rlnhf. W. G..MagaaehuaE;tia 
Ly brand. Archibald Ohio' 

McAJeer, Wm, ...PcnnSTlvania 
McCall, S. W. .. ,Mas3acliusea& 

McCloary, J. T. Idlnnuauta 

MeClellab. G. B ..... ,Neflf York 
MoCuUocli, P. D., Jr. .Arkansas 



Bplffht, T JWlHEllS3lpj>i 

Spra^u^ C. F,. . .Maasaebiiaetts 

BtallTuff^p J, F — AlAbama 

Btarkf W. h .NebruGka 

lati^ew.G. W Indiana 

Btephens, J,H .,,TexD4 

Stcivens, F. C ^Mlnneaou 

^itewart, Alei.. WL&Gonsln 

Stewart^ J* F ,*H'ow Jersey 

Stewart. J. K New York 

St< 1 kes , J. TV . . . . Hontli CflroUn a 
S u 1 Lo way. C A..N^ w H am pah irci 

Sulxer, W.... N^jw York 

Sutherland, R. D- .***NebrB*ka 
Si^aniion. C. A VlrKlnhi 

Talbert . W.J... Soath CaroKn a 
Tate, IT. C, .,..,►. .,,..,Georfrla 
Taw bey, J. A ..... . . .Mlimesotii 

Tayler. R, W .... .Ohio 

Taylort G. W .Alabama 

Terry, VV. L, .,.., ,.. Arkanfias 
Thayer, J. R. . . . Ma-ssachuHotts. 
TJioraaB. C. R,, North Carolina 

ThgTnaa, Ijot Iowa 

Thronp. J. IS Pennaylvania 

Tonjpkini. A. &. . , . , *.New York 

ToaEue, T* H Oref^on 

TnrnernOH..*.,. Eeutucky 

rndertiin. J. Q New York 

Urjflerwood. O. W Alabama 

?aiidlTer, V^.H..... . .Miaaoml 

Van Yoorblii, H. C .OWo 

Vreelandp B. B ,Kew Tmk 

Wiicht*r, F. C. Maryland 

Wad» worth. J. W.. . .Ne w York 
Wa b ^er, I . P . . . , Fenns y It an la 

Warner, V llllbolii 

\YaterB, R. J* * * .California 

Watson. J. B .....,....HlndlanBp 

Weaver, W. L. . Ohio 

Weeks, k Mlchl^n 

Wey mon th ,G, WJktaaBachusette 

„_„^, „ Wheeler, C. K. *..*,. .Ki^ntuckr 

Rehh. K. A... . . . „, .....Mlssiinri Wheeler, J.. . , Alahama 



Rtordan, D. J,.. -,.-.. Ne w Yerk 

Rtxey.J. F...*»** Vlrfflbla 

Rehh. K, A... . . . „, .....Mlssiinrl 

Robb[[i9, G. A. , Alabama 

Roberta, B. H Utah 

Roherts, E, W, ..Ma^tmachusettB 

RohfirtRnn, S. M Lu>biatana 

Robibson, J. M.. luilEi^na 

Robinson. J. ».*.,»., Nehra«ka 

Kodenbyrg. W- A lUInOii! .. .-^ 

Rucke r. W. W M lasot i r I f Wrl glil, C, T . . . . . t^eiinsyl van J a 

R2S-c;ir;:;:;.cScIi™Uou«g.j^B ^nj,»w.nia 

■■ ■ *" " ' '-^Yoang. W. A Virginia 



White, G.H ....North Cjirolina 

Wil]lftinB,J, R. llUnnlfi 

WllllamB,J. S.. Mlii3isfilppl 

Williams. W. B .llMtioi't 

Wll&on.B.. , Idabo 

Wil&tpn, r. K.. ., .New Y^^rk 

Wllfton. a. aoutli Capoll bfi 



Ryan, J, W PeunsylTanla 

Ryan, W. H. . , *New York 



Salmon. J, a....*.*.New J€rsoy 

dcbildcr, T New York 

Shacke If ord. D. W . . . . Mtseourl DEIEG ATES* 

„-_.„„_., ,^- Shalroth, J. F,.. ,...,. Colorado 

McBowell, J. A Ohto ehaltue. W. B Ohio Flyou, X>,T..... Oklahoma 

McLaln, F. A Mlaal^Mppi Hbeldon. C. D,.. .. .....Mkhl^an Pertsa. P .....New Mexico 

McPhjeraon, S , Iowa Sheriiian, J. 13 .Neis Vtriv, Wilson, J. F. . . , .Arizona 



ZenOT, W. T. ...,....,. . .Tndiana 
Zl««lOTi E. D Peonflylvanla 



JUDICIAL, 



l&S 



Jiititnal. 



SU^E-EJCE COimT OF THE tJWTTZ]) STATBS, 
Ctu/ Jwttict-M£iijVLL.i;E W. FLTj^Liiitt llliiioia, 1BM8. 

Justices— J ao.M.HarUu.-li onlu ell y . .. , ItiTT 

Honoe Gray ......... . »,M.asiaiH!jjuaet.tfl, . . . Ibeil 

David J. Hrewfcr LC[L£1!ii.lim ....... „_^i!iWii 

Hef^rr B^ Brown.. .MlcUtifim. . . .,. ... . .itGUO 



a tM>rK') .Sit I ruH , ,1 r Pen uay l-rania. _ . _ IflSe 

tklwani IJ. WUit« ....... LoulsUma. ....... jmi 

Uufus VV. Peekbam Ni?w Turk... ..iBaG 

lo&e^a^h McKtiNiia .. Citlifurnlu ,.....U0§ 



I'ffrii -J. 11. MtiKenncv, JJ. C ■...,,.,....., J88(J 

a^lnrieai CbU^f JnstLoe. lianOTt^ Juntirc^H, |U),lUll: (^lerk. }i».Jlia 

MUTShat—J. M. WrlntiE . Kentucltv , .Kt.EiUi) I Wi^/iwrf i r-.l . C. B. Liuvlii, N l-w Yurk , . . , . . .M.jO) 

tJHITED BTATEB CIE-CUIT OOtJETS OF APPEALS. 



FiKST CiHCiii IT. -.fiirii/i's -Mr. .1 nstikri? Horace 
Grruy; Lltuult .] mJi^et^. be Baron B. CntL W. 1^ 
Futuatii; iJiiiLrlcT. .Iinlj^es, Frauds C. l^tvr&U, 
H^thaa Wtibtii Artbkir L. IJri^wn, EiJ^ar Al- 

8fiCQND ClIIULTLT. -JiiifHj('.!f-Mr. JllfitliN^ JtU- 

fus w. Pt'uidmui: Circuit .hid jj«^. WillltimJ. 
Wailaco. HI. >i. ljnci>mbc^ NaLbaniei Shlumnn: 
UitttrlotJaJtft^a. tloytll, WUeek-r, W.Li/Fown- 
vend. A. G. Coie. Bdw. ft. Tiiuiijua. Aildiflon 
Sfowd. t*fi!rft-Wm. Parkinri. Ntiw Fyrk c-Ety. 
TllIHJJ UiaCLTIT. —Jwt^}r)l -Mr. JuHLk*B 
G«ortf© Sliira**, Jr.! ClniuCL .lurtjjes, M. W, 
Acibe^tjii, Li. M. UailiiH, (t«<»«ij (;ray; DifitrkM; 
jiidH;)^. Jobn B. Mcfbtirson. AiiUruw Kirk|.iar.- 
riak, Jonmib BuiUn^tun. Eil^atil Q. Briuirorirl. 

PutJKTH CfitClTiT. -Jn^r.j*«-Mr. Chk^f Jga- 
tlCMi Mi?ltflllti W. Kiill(-r, (ihli'f J«i3t|«o Lfnlturt 
Statf'i*;C!roult-IiiilKt-!*'<^ ti- Mlmontori. Nalhftn 
GiiCT; piiatrkstrl lihIich.'H. .rutin J, Jacky4>fl. ThihfiiaH 
e. Puraell, rl^riiUtitn (i. Kwai-t. W. II. Hrnjiv- 
Iftfi T, J. Morris* RflTqiind WaMdl, Jr.. John 
F»nL iltfrk -M. V, Mehniyy. iClchmomi. Vtt. 

riiTTii €iaciTiT.— JTHJtyrA-Mr, JuAtki? K. [i. 
Whlt«; OlreiiU .IiMiKe^^. D. A. Pflnh-^;. A. P. 
Mija^rmkk, naviil l> rthoVtiyj niwtHft Jddtf™, 
WT.T. N^^wtaaa. KLiiotjr' Sjjaer. CNarlfw Hwayne. 
J. W. tiucke. Juhn Brnoe* tL T: Toulmln. il. C, 
NiLfiu, Obi&rlfl« Parlance. Al&i^k Beiarman. Hid- 

oiBcnrr ooxjets of 

(l^ttlarii.'!! of l]ln:ult 

PiaaT .ImiiciAij CirTUit. — Mr. nluatlcGh 
Qny, Bij.^l<iii, Mm^a. Dl&tflcta [>f Mai up, N*fw 
IIuiQp^ihiTe, MasflfflCUuJWtta, libotlt? J ^1 unci. 
OtrcnitJiat}M -Le Bftr^tn H, Colt, Br[&t<»l. R. U 
July 5. 1*^; W, U. Hutimm. Port Land. Me,. 
Mmn!b r. l!%a 

iiKOU s u hJ rr I H CI A L Ct nc cttt. —Mr. T n ml pu 
E^kbani. DlatriuUiof Vornn>Tir, CuDni^ticulH 
Keir Vof k. 0(rt?tUi J^K^'ii'Jt- W in . J . Wall aoi-, 
Altoanrn K. T.I April Jt, lSrt5£; M. II. I*>KMHiil«?, 
»e* Yorlf, Mar 3", !9S7; Nathaniel ftblpman, 
Hirtrnrd, lYnifi . Mrvrrh |7, \\m, 

Tmnai JtiNNrH. riiuiriT. -Mr, Jiisttce 
^bijrik^, I'JU'^i'iiTi:. i'L HlMrriotd ot New .U!r~ 
»r* Pe t! TiH V 1 V 1 L r ! i il . n ^ ' I a warn . rirvntt J tidvfs— 
IfpKma W. A^^bi'M ID, PlttKbur^, l*a.. Ft^h. 3, 
llHl f^nrise M. Tlalla^. PhiludHphlii. Pa., 
Warch IT.lSl^?; Qtjorjje tlrurn WIUnUiittt>u. Itel.. 
Mmrcnia, ia?i!i. 

FmriiTH J rntoiu. CTttrt'iT.-Mr. Clif ef Jua- 
llMe*alTer.WaslilnKton,D.€,DlHti'U!tBnrMary' 
Iiftd, Virultita. West Virfdnla. North Oanilina, 

mpQtoQ, ^^hitrlPhiEnnH )^> C. Ti*o. Ifl, Iflftlj Nii- 
tkari 1 Joff, (^ lark Sibil rif, W. Va.. Mariib 17, IHH^ 

Tflrra JmicixiL CntciTrT. — Mr. .Tur^rk^c* 
Wdit^. fiistriftrt of <i«Mr(da. Flurlcin, Ala- 
™iTia. MlN^iii^ippl. Louisiana. Tt^iaH. f'trniU 
JWt4fi9^Doa A. Pardee, New Ofloatis. La., 



ward B. Meek, U. E, Bryant, T. S Maxey^ 
OEcrfc - J am t^n M r McK oe. New Orl on u », La. 

&1XTI1 Ci Bf r^jT.— Jii^l^jr— MrJ ii«itk-e Jotin Mr 
Harlan; Circuit Jiii:ltfi5s. W. ll.l''aft, II, ILLui^ 
ton, Wni. K. Day; llii^trlct imigMm, Albert C 
TbumpHOn, A J , lik^kK, U . H, 8wati, H. J*'. M<*Tei^ 
en i», Wji ittr 1-^ vanH, E . i^ . 11 am ui omi , < M>. C ! ark ► 
VUrk— b^iink t>. Lo vuJ aod. Clni: i n aa ti , O . 

H E VT3x\T H C I iU?u iTr — Judy c j( - M r. .1 u sLf ce H. 
B, Brown; Cirpnlt Jud(T«s. W, A. Wutjdh, J. 
ii^J Ejnki n H, 1 \^tt! r >i . ( in jsac ?a p ; JJ I fl trlct J ii dgpfl, 
*:. L\ KiJlilfiattt. .1. H. BakeT. W. J. AUk^, VkTlI. 
Heuman, IL Bimn, tJ^r/'fc-EdWr M, iioiloway. 
Cbl^imo, lEl. 

EmHTU CTHCLTiT,-Jtjatr^*i - Mr Juki Iw B- L 
BreTTi^r; Cirtult JudgeH, 11. C Caldwell, W. 11. 
Hanbom. A. M. Thaytr; l>lstriel Jud^iirs, Wm. 
H. Mtm^^er. O. P, J^biriis. J, S. Wotdfioii, Wiu, 
Liiebren, J, V. VhUHm. J. A. WilHaiuH, Mo(u?Js 
Halli^tt, Wm. 0. llouk, J. A. Kiner, l']|[ntiT B. 
AUafn^, John H. KojCxTii.Chad. F, Amidon, John 
E r Carl an d . J no. A . M aralj all . VJ^rk~J . D. Jor- 
dun. E^th [.ii^uH, Mo. 

Ninth ViucviT.—Jud^it -MTJuatiri^.lonepb 
MoRennai Oirnitt Judges, K. .M. I toss, Uilliain 
B. fJUlmrt, W. W. MurroWE lUsrrirt .InUtfirsi, 
JaniL'g y..Bi;atr3,',.l..l. l>i,>lTav^ N r \\ I tilling^ 
er T, P. Haw lay. O. Wellborn, Hiram Kuowlfs, 
(;. IL HanfonL Cifrk-¥. D. Montkton. Sau 
FVanClsco. 

THB TmiTED STATES, 

Judiies, fti,(liiy tsacb.) 
May 1 a. 11^1: A. P. McCorroick, Dtj|]:i.h. Tei., 
Marcb 17. mti; IK U. Shrlby, UuniJiviUe, Ala., 
Mar^^li 2, IHfly. 

^[.\TB JUDTfTTAT- ClHCTTTT, - Mr. JllHtlCI* 

Rarl mi, I Ii fltrkts Or r Ohto, M kdi I fian . Ii tuit u t! ky , 
Tenneasi^e. Cinuiit JroUHi>—W. IL Taft. €ln- 
L'tiiimti. a., Mareb 17. lrtl'-^ 11. IL Lnrt^hn. Kaflb- 
Tllle, Tenn.. Mai^h 37. IM»!J5 Wm. H. Day, Can^ 
U>n, t>., Feb. 2H. IHiJtK 

flEiTENTH JunirTAT.. Cill€TJrT.— Mt. Jnstlce 
BrOi/ifTi, Cbkaj^'O, 111. Dlatrkl^ of Indiana, lllt- 
Holft. WlEMHinajiL Vij^iiit Jjwi4)**j*— W. A. Wcotie, 
lndUnapniiti.iTid..MftT(Jb llMni J.iLJenklnH. 
Milwaukee. Wis, March '^3. 1*1^^: Petjyry. GrpaK' 
cup, ChTcatfo, ni.. Jan. SI, IMTiii, 

BEOBTH jrrjuuAL Ci [W'UtT, ' Mt. .Tu»ib:e 
Drc w«r, 1 ^ea vv n w orth . K an. 1> iHtri^j I » of M i nne- 
snta, North l>akoi^a, Batith Daliitiai. WynmlnK, 
Iowa. Mkaoiirl, Krtn'^aH. ArWaiii^i^fl, Ni.btaska, 
Co lorail o, Vtnh ► n^r f j if J n .'?{;rn— W^. 1 L 8n nbo rn, 
Ht.Paul. M]Tin., Manh IT, IHW2; H. C, Taldwell. 
Little Rouk, Ark.. Miinb 4. leHJ; Ainoi* M. 
Thavff, St. LonJrt. Mo.. Atisr, % WH, 

NINTH JCnnClAL f^TRTITlT.— Mr. .fnatlCH^ Mc- 
Kpnna. n^atrJi^iBof California. Montana, WMh- 
Inirton. LTMho. On £!on- Nf^vada. tUnuitJudms 

K. M Hor,s, J^^i4Anlfolrfi,^al..Fek25.1Sf«V! W, 
B. Ill] ben, Ft-rilatid. Ore.. Mairb l!4, If^rij Win. 
W. .Msjrrow. San FranclEseo, Cal., May Jd, IfiW, 



ITHITED STATES OOITIIT OF OlAIKSt 

("BalarleB of Juflfrefl, W.iSffil each.) 
Chkf JiMicf-C .C.N OTT. Ko w York, IfiflS. .,^ 

Jirffl*i^La^fence Weiaon. .TIKnntg ..,. ifls?t i fl. J. Poi?i1d .,, Indiana. iMg 

i Ohitf 0/(^^Jfc— Archlhald HoT^kinitp MftasRChn«cttB» ISTO, »I,O0CL 



194 



CHIOAQO DAILY NFWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



XUBOES OF THE UHITED STATES DISTRICT OOURTS. 

(Salaries, ^,U00 each.) 



DlSTUICTS. 



ALABAMA— Northern and Middle Dist. 

I Southern Distrlci 

'ALASKA 

ARKANSAS— Eastern District 

Western District 

ARIZONA 

CALIFORNIA-Northern District 

Southern District 

COLORADO 

CONNECTICUT 

DELAWARE 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

FLORIDA— Northern District 

Southern District 

GEORGIA— Northern District 

Southern District 

IDAHO 

ILLINOIS— Northern J>lstrict 

Southern District 

INDIANA 

INDIAN TKRRITORY-Norlhern Dlst. 

Middle District 

Southern District 

Additional Judge 

IOWA— Northern District 

Southern District 

KANSAS 

KENTUCKY.... 

LOUISIANA— Eastern District 

Western District 

MAINE 

MARYLAND..... 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MICHIGAN— Eastern District 

Western District 

MINNESOTA 

MISSISSIPPI— Two Districts 

MISSOURI— Eastern District 

Western District 

MONTANA 

NEBRASKA 

NEVADA 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NEW JERSEY 

NEW MEXICO 

NEW YORK— NortlH'rn District 

Southern District 

Eastern DlstrU^t 

NORTH CAROLINA— Eastern District. 

Western Disi rlci 

NORTH DAKOTA 

OHIO— Northern District 

Southern District 

OKLAHOMA 

OREGON 

PENNSYLVANIA— Eastern District... . 

Western District 

RHODE ISLAND 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

TENNESSEE— Eastern and Middle Dlsts. 

Western District 

TEXAS— Eastern District 

Western District 

Northern District 

UTAH 

VERMONT 

VIRGINIA— Eastern District 

Western District 

WASHINGTON 

WEST VIRGINIA 

WISCONSIN— Eastern District .... 

Western District 

WYOMING 



Name. 



John Bruce 

H. T. Toulmin 

Charles S. Johnson.. 

John A. WilUams 

John H. Rogers 

Webster Street 

John J. De Haven. . . 

Olln Wellborn 

Moses Hallett 

W. K.Townsend 

Edward G. Bradford 

E. F. Bingham 

Charles Swayne 

James W. Locke 

Wm. T. Newman. . . 

Emory Speer 

James H. Beatty — 

C. C. Kohlsaat. 

Wm. J. Allen 

John H. Baker 

W.M. Springer 

Wm. H. H. Clayton.. 

Hosea Townsend 

John R. Thomas 

Oliver P. Shlras 

John S. Woolson 

Wm.C. Hook 

Walter Evans 

C. Parlange 

Aleck Boarman 

Nathan Webb 

Thomas J. Morris.... 
Francis C. Lowell .. . 

Henry 11. Swan 

Henry F. Severons.. 

William Lochren 

Henry C.Nlles 

E. B. Adams 

John F. Philips 

Hiram Knowles 

Wm. H. Munger 

Thomas P. Hawley. . 

Edgar Aldrich 

Andrew Kirkpatrick 

Wm. J.Mills 

Alfred C.Coxe , 

Addison Brown.. .. 
Edw. B.Thomas... 
Thomas R. Purnell 
Hamilton G. Kwart . 
Charles F. Amidon.. 

A. J. Ricks 

Albert C. Thompson 
John H. Burford . 
Charles B. Bellinger 
John B. McPhersdn.. 
Joseph Bufflngton. . 

Arthur L. Brown 

W. H. Brawley 

John B. Carland 

Charles D. Clark 

Ell S. Hammond 

David E. Bryant 

Thomas M. Mazey. . 

Edw. R. Meek 

John A.Marshall... 
Hoyt H. Wheeler. . . . 
Edmund Waddlll.Jr. 

John Paul 

C. H. Hanford 

John J. Jackson 

W. H. Seaman 

Romanzo Buun 

Uohn A. Rlner 



Uenidence. 



Montgomery 

Mobile 

Sitka 

Little Rock 

Fort Smith 

Phoenix 

San Francisco 

Los Angeles 

Denver 

New Haven 

Wilmington 

Washington 

Pensacola 

Jacksonville 

Atlanta 

Macon 

Boise 

Chicago 

Springfield 

Indianapolis 

Muscogee 

South McAlester . 

Ardmore 

Vinlta 

Dubuque 

Des Moines 

Leavenworth 

Louisville 

New Orleans '. 

Shreveport 

Portland 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Detroit 

Grand Rapids 

Minneapolis 

KoscinsKo 

St. Louis 

Kansas City 

Helena 

Omaha 

Carson City 

Littleton 

Newark 

Las Vegas 

Utica 

New York city 

Brooklyn 

Raleigh 

Hendersonvllle... 

Fargo 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

Guthrie 

Portland 

Harrlsburg 

Pittsburg 

Providence 

Charleston 

Sioux Falls 

Chattanooga 

Memphis 

Sherman 

Austin 

Fort Wortb 

Salt Lake City.... 

Brattleboro 

Richmond 

Harrisonburg...... 

Seattle 

Parkersburg 

Sheboygan 

Madison 

Cheyenne 



Feb. 27,1875 
Jan. 13,1887 
June 14,1888 
Sept. 22,1890 
Nov. 27, 189B 
Mar. 21, 1806 
June 8, 1887 
1,1895 
12.18T7 

-. S:il^ 

April 22.1887 
May 17, 1889 
1.1872 
I3.188fi 
18.1885 
7.1891 

28,1889 

April 18,1887 
Mar. 29.1892 
12.1895 



Mar 
Jan. 
Mar 
May 



Feb 

Aug. 

Feb. 

Mar 

Feb. 



Date of 
commi$Hon. 



Dec. 
May 
Jan. 
July 
Aug. 
Aug. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Jan. 
May 
Jan. 
July 
Jan. 
Jan. 
May 
May 
Aug. 
May 



18.1807 
10,1806 

1.18W 

4,1882 
14.1891 

1.1869 

S.1809 
16.1894 
18.1881 
24.1882 

L1879 
10.1806 
19,1891 
25.1886 
18,1886 
1L1801 

17, 1805 

June 25. 1888 

Feb. 21,1800 

18,1807 

9,1800 
20.1801 
20.1806 
81.1806 

4. 



2.1881 
15,1886 

5: 



Feb. 
Sept 
Feb. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
May 
June 
Feb. 
May 
July 
Aug. 
July ^ 
Sept. 23, _ 
Feb. 16,1 
April 15,1 
Mar. 2, 1 
Feb. 23.1 
Oct. 16.1^ 
Jan. 18.1flOt 
Aug. 8L " 
Jan. 21. 

17, 

27. 

25. 

18. 
4. 

I 
1 



June 

May 

June 

July 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Feb. 

Aug. 

April _, 

Oct. 30, 

Sept. 22, 



IfT^TBD STATR9 DISTKICT ATTORN KYS, 



UIVITEB BTATES DISTRICT ATTDElTEYS. 



Dr^tBiCTS. 



AlA BAM A— Northeru district..,.,,,.,, 

Mldrilt) DtsptHot 

SoatttL^rn District. , ,,,,.,.. 

ALAitKA... , 

AHIZONA ,.. 

ABKAJ^SAB-Bft^itera District .,... 

Wtifitern District., „»,._„,_..., 

C ALl FOHN' i A— Nfirtliem Diei j iut 

i^criiT ki(*ro Di^trifjL 

Gt)lJ>UAlX> ....,,.,. ,,.„.,,.._. 

ctjNNRf ritniT. 

l>h:lawakh: 

IHSTlUrT OK GOLLTMBFA.,,.., 

i?fX>Kl I JA -Northern iJIgtrict. ,.....,.,. 

i?i>ijthfcrn IM^tHut. ...x.....^... . 

GRORQIA-Nortliyra District.,,..,,..... __. 

^outbem DJaLiic't.. ,.., h . p h «... ^ k >> h h h . «... ^ .. h > . i Murlon K rwifi 

IDAHO .............llifberE, V Wy^Wr , 

ILTjI NO 13 -Northern DlsMel..,. .,..-. .,,> ■I'lFrj-n K H- rjn^u 

fjotithti'm DUtrlt^L. , , * ^^ , » , . ^ , * ^ . , , . h . . . . . ,.1 . ( n\^ 1 \ lnh \.\\\i^\- , . 

IN DIANA Adiort W \V]>ljJinl 



JVuTnff, 



Wjii. VKUKban.... 

VVLllTlill lr>. KetfSlJ, Jf , ,, , 
MuirlH Ur Wit:k(.^r5ihH.iii.. 
Robert A, KHtidriob.. .. 
kolinrt K. MiiiTtsoti , . , , r 

JiuLTUb TrR'ber... .^... 

Jameei R. Bflrpu^s 

Kraiils L, <'tioajbs 

Kraak P. Mint 

lineiey W. Whilfortl,.. 

Will. .MlclitkC'l Hyrne ,-., 

Tlioa, Hr Au'letsrjD 

Jolni HTuKsLii..., 

Jf>a. V. KtripUn^ 

EiljEar A. Anifler..... .,. 



INDIAN TKllRlTOKr-Xon^ern DUtrJct, . 

t3(:?ntral ]>istri(!t,,.. ... h,.h .^^.^.n ..n . .h< n*, . 

Sout bfcrn J>iHr.rlet.. . . ^ 

in WA Northera Dlatrlct. ,...,,.. 

&Jatbr:^^p District. ... . ^ . + ., + .,,, ^ , h , 

KANSAS. ...:. 

KENTUCKY 

liOUJHJ AN A-mnHtBrn Uiiitrlet 

Weftf*irn Utstrlut. . ..... ., .... .... 

JfcLAINR 

HAHTr^AND. ...K... 

MASdACBUaETTIi,.,.....-.. 

MICHIGAN -Kastflra Dlalrlet. 

Wewtem DEatiicL, . , . 

MtNNTSSOTA , , 

WISSIBSIPPI -Northern DIstrtcL. 

^atUern DihtrJot. . ...... ^ ,. . . h . , . > m ^ , . 

Ml&SOUtti- IflaiiterEi DlstrieL 

We^tfim DifltTlot.. ., ., . 

MONTANA. ..K... 

N12BRAi3lLA.. .............. 

NEVADA .,... 

NKW HAM i^SUIRHi. ^ ........... . 

NK W .1 K RH H; V 

NKW M6;X1C0 ....,, 

NKW YORK Nurtbern Uiatrlct , . . 

Southern LUsJrlct .. 

EtvHier n Dli^t riot 

NO ttr r [ i ■ A ROi.i N A-iCiLHtern Wetrkt. , . . , , 

W^r^Ti^rn I >i.st rlut. ...-...,.. 

NORTH DAKOTA...... ...,,,...,..... 

OHIQ— NtsrtberQ Dliktrk-t p , ,. 

8outlitirti DlEstricti 

OKLAHOMA ... ,,.., 

ORKtiON P..P .,.P..P,.P. 

PRNNH¥LVANIA-EivsteraI>ltttriL»t......... 

Western District ......„, ,. . 

HHODB liiLAN D. ..... _ . 

-(Otrril CAROLINA 

-iin:i H DAKOTA 

rvi N y }CSSI5S)— EjigtGrn l^^trlct 

.VMiilJTt Dlatrlct.. 



FJiny l^ . 

.liihiiH. Wllkihs 

Wllltaai U. .Krhnaon. 
Homci." <x. MeMllliLH 

JjawflsMlitf*!, ., 

Isnac E. J^ELiiibt^rt 

Rcoben D, J J ill 

J. VViirrt GMrlejf. Jr... 

Mliltms C Kliiiner 

Ihxiuc W. Dyer...,, p., 

Julin C, Hoj^.. 

Buyd a. Jones. 

William D.t^urdBm.., 



, Wi«t«rn District 

T^RXAB-Kastf-m I>lstrlct, 

Ncinbcm Dlslrlet, . ..,...,..,,,„.. i w iiiiam U . Atw*ili 

W«atera DfcslrlcL .....,., ^ ^ .,...,, lk'nr> Torru^ll 

jljurK 



Rrtiiilenff- 



CeoftfeG, Cnvell 

Ftobert G, K van* 

iMii.i!l£ A. MontKuitic^ry 

Albert M, Laa 

Rilwara A. UoKht 

VVillinm WiirniT , 

WillUuJ B, Rotluen*.. . . 
WlllliuniiiGn S. !SiimriMM-<, 

Surd la SiiTUTuertlf Id 

rhn.rl*frt J, HuTiiblett..... 

.1. Keiinij Ilk'o. 

WilJtsiiii B.< hi fliers 

ibJi.'^. U. Bruwri 

\\iM\ ry L. btiirnf^tt 

UetirKt^ H Pttlil ....... 

ClauileM. fieri] ard 

Alfrpd K.Dniiuii .,. 

I'ulrtek H. Rtjiirlc(.+ 

SiitTiue] D, J>o^l^:e.... 

SVnilUrm K. BuJidy. 

f Vacant), 

JuhJiH, Han 

Jtimea M. Becic 

DiinE[!l li. ElpiiUJir , . 

(^haHtH A. Wilson 

AhiRJ Ijiitbrci^p., 

JtmiPfl D. Kllloti 

William D. Writflit 

At) ram M . Ti M man 

(,'4-on:!ij Rtit>doli:>ti 

MHTtHi.-i r. MrlA^mftriJr ... 



UTAH . ...,......,..,.-. iCIjfl rfos P. Wblttcmore, . . 

VBJiMONT , j.Jameft L. Martin p.. 



YI (IGlNlA-Eastern District i Rdifar Allan 

Wt^fitern DTsi.rlct. ;Thf»ina& M- Alderson, 

WrASFUNOTON p ,.... ^W. R. Gay ..., 

WEST VIRGINIA JiJseph D. Gjvineii... ... 

WBCONSLN -Eastern DIfltrlet MJ Uon C. PliJllM>s 

W«it«rn Diitrlot., ...,.*. *........ .,►-..... David K. Joni'a 

WTOMING ,...**.. .,..P Tlmuthy ¥. Burhc 



BlnumKliiim„ 
,Mimtmjmt>ry, 
Mobile. 
Sitka. 
Preacott. 
IJTIU" Rook. 
JforiSiultir 
San PranfiiscD. 

iHrnver. 

HurTford. 

WMiriUoEi'UD. 

VVaHUtf^iit'Ou. 

Pu'usauola 

Jiifki^unvillu. 

Atlanta. 

Macon. 

Moscow, 

Cli k^amo, 

f^pftiiiftleld. 

UKliananollj^, 

VlnllJi. 

S<i\itli McAlest«r, 

Ardinorp. 

I'^diir Rapidfi. 

Coryflon. 

To])cka. 

l..{haHviilf. 

N(?W UrlfuilH. 

ehrt!vc|k)rt. 

Parrland. 

BaltEioiiri^. 

Bo»Lt»rii. 

DLtrciir. 

Grand Rapids. 

ei. Panl. 

0-Vfonl. 

Vli'kfihurif. 

St. bonlK, 

KHn?!as CJtjf. 

HeJeiia. 

OmiLhii. 

CarHun nty. 

roiiiorj;]!. 

New BriinsiWicik. 

AlbuuuL^rqiit^ 

Buffalo, 

Nftw Vorlrclty. 

tlr^ioklyn. 

Ralel^b. 

Wlnfifon, 

l-arffO. 

Cleveland. 

CInclimati. 

Portland. 

Philntltilii^hta- 

Pitt^biir^. 

Provldcn(?e. 

Cbjir lesion. 

Slfnux h^lla. 

KuoxvlllE^ 

Nasbvllle. 

Memphis, 

(4alTC3t<iti. 

l»iklla.H. 

Ban Antonio. 

Bait I Jike 01 tf, 

Brati.ltiboro. 

NOrfnlh. 

Abingdon. 

SeaO W: 

CbJirlft^lon. 

O^hkoHh, 

I A Cntsae. 

Cbeyeuiitii, 



196 



GHICAOO DAILY NEiWS ALM ANAO FOR 1900. 



UJIITKD STATES KABSHAXS. 



Districts. 



ALABAMA— Northern District 

Middle District 

Souttiern District 

ALASKA.., 

ARIZONA 

ARK ANS AS— Eastern District 

Western District 

CALIFX>RNI A- Northern District 

Southern District 

C50IX)RAD0 

CONNBCTICUT 

DEIJVWARE 

DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA 

FLORIDA— Northern District 

Southern District 

GBORG 1 A— Northern District 

Southern District. 

IDAHO 

IIjLINOIS— Northern District 

Southern District 

INDIANA 

INDIAN TBRRITORY-Northem District.. 

Central District 

Southern District 

lOWA-Northem District 

Sou them District 

KANSAS 

KENTUCKY 

IX)UISIANA-Eastern District 

Western District 

MAINE 

MARYLAND 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MICHIQAN-Eastem District 

Western District 

MINNESOTA 

MISSISSIPPI-Northern District 

Southern District 

MISSOURI - Eastern District 

Western District 

MONTANA 

NEBRASKA 

NEVADA 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

NEW JKRSEY 

NEW MEXICO 

NKW YORK-Northern District 

Southern District 

Eastern District 

NORTH CAROLINA- Eastern District 

Western District 

NORTH DAKOTA 

OHIO-Northem Dl strict 

Southern District 

OKLAHOMA 

OREGON 

PENNSYLVANIA— Eastern District 

Western District 

RHODE ISLAND 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

TENNESSEE— Eastern District 

Middle District 

Western District 

TEXAS— Eastern District 

Northern District 

Western District 

UTAH 

VERMONT 

VIRGINIA-Eastem District 

Western District 

WASHINGTON 

WEST VIRGINIA 

WISCONSIN— Eastern District 

Western District 

WYOMING 



Name. 



D.N.Cooper 

Leander J. Brjran 

Frank Simmons 

James M. Shoup 

William M. Griffith 

Henry M. Cooper 

Solomon F. Stahl 

John H. Shine 

Henry Z. Osborne 

Dewey C. Bailey 

EdsonS. Bishop 

John C. Short 

Aulick Palmer 

Thomas F. McGourin . 

JohnF. Horr. 

Walter H. Johnson 

John M. Barnes 

Frank C. Ramsey 

John C.Ames 

Charles P. Hitch 

Samuel E. Kereheval.. 

Leo E. Bennett 

Jasper P. Grady 

John S. Hammer 

Edward Knott 

Geo. M. Christian 

Wm. Edgar Sterne 

A. D.James 

Charles Fontellen 

James M. Martin 

Hutson B.Saunders... 

Wllllani F.Alrey 

Chas. K. Darlliur 

William R. Bates 

A. Oren Wheeler 

Wm. H. Grimshaw 

Geo. M. Buchanan 

Frederick W. Collins... 

Ix>uis C. Bohle 

Edwin R. Durham 

Joseph P. Wool man.... 

T. L. Mathews 

J. F. Emmltt 

Euftene P. Nute 

Thomas J. AlooU 

Creiffhton M. Foraker . 
William R. Compton... 

William Henkel 

Charles J . Haubert 

Henry C. Dookery 

Jas.M. Millikan 

JohnE. Hagtfart 

Matthias A. Hmalley . . . 

Vivian J. Fairin 

C. H.Thompson 

ZoethHouser 

James B. Rellly 

Frederick C. Leonard. . 

James S. McCabe 

Lawson D. Melton 

Edward G. Kennedy. . . 

Richard W. Austin 

John W. Overall 

Thomas H. Baker 

John Grant 

George H.Green 

George L. Siebrecht. . .. 

GlenMlller 

Fred A. Field 

Morgan Treat 

S. Brown Allen 

Clarence W. Ide 

John K. Thompson 

Thomas B. Reid 

William B. Canon 

FrankA.HadMU 



Jtuidenee. 



Birmingham. 

Montgomery. 

Mobifo. 

Sitka. 

Tucson. 

Little Rock. 

Fort Smith. 

San Francisco. 

Los Angeles. 

Denver. 

New Haven. 

Wilmington. 

Washtngtoo. 

Pensaoola. 

Jacksonville. 

Atlanta. 

Macon. 

Boise City. 

Chlcairo. 

Springfield. 

Indianapolis. 

Mnsoogee. 

SQuth McAlester. 

Ardmore. 

Dubuque. 

Des Moines. 

Topeka. 

Lonisvllle. 

New Orleans. 

Shreveport. 

Portland. 

Baltimore. 

Boston. 

Detroit. 

Grand Rapids. 

St. Paul. 

Oxford. 

Jackson. 

St. Louis. 

~ nsasClty. 

Helena. 

Omaha. 

Canon City. 

Oonoord. 

Trenton. 

Albuquerque. 

Blmlra. 

New York city. 

Brooklvn. 

Raleigh. 

Greensboro. 

Fargo. 

Cleveland. 

OlBOinnati. 

Gntbrie. 

Portland. 

Philadelphia. 

Pittsbnrg. 

Providence. 

Charieston. 

Sioux Falls. 

Knoxville. 

NashvlUe. 

Memphis. 

ParisT 

Dallas 

San Antonio. 

Bait Lake City. 

Rutland. 

Richmond. 

HarrlBOnburg. 

Taooma. 

Parkersborg. 

MUwaakee. 

lUdlson. 

GlieyeiiiM. 



CUSTOMS OFFICERS. 



197 



G0LLE0T0S8 OF INTESKAL REVENUE. 



Alabama... Jalian H. Bingham, Birmingham 

Alaska (See Oregon) 

Arizona <See New Mexico) 

ArlEanaas... Harmon L. Remmel, Little Rock 
California— 1.. John C. Lynch, San Francisco 

2 Henry C. Bell, Sacramento 

Colorado Frank W. Howbert, Denver 

Connecticat Thomas L. Lake, Hartford 

Dakota (See Nebraska) 

Delaware (See Maryland) 

Florida Joseph E. Lee, Jacksonville 

Georgia Henry A. Backer, Atlanta 

Idaho (See Montana) 

Illinois— 1 Fred E. Coyne, Chicago 

5 Aquilla J. Daugherty, Peoria 

8 Richard Yates, Springfield 

13 William H. Powell, East St. Louis 

Indian Territory (See Kansas) 

Indiana— 6 A. E. Nowlin, Lawrenceburg 

7 David W. Henry, Terre Hante 

Iowa— 3 John W. Patterson, Dubuque 

4 John M. Campbell,- Burlington 

Kansas.... Michael W. Sntton, Leavenworth 
Kentacky—2.. Edward T. Franks, Owensboro 

B Charles E. Sapp, Louisville 

< David N. Comingore, Covington 

7 Samuel J. Roberts, Lexington 

8. . . , , . .John W. Terkes, Danville 

Loiilnlntia Lewis J. Soner, New Orleans 

Mall]^^ ,, (See New Hampshire) 

Maryland ,BenJ. F. Partlett, Baltimore 

Mas^aarhufi^tts^ James D. Gill, Boston 

Mlr-hi^an— t Charles Wright, Detroit 

2 . . . ^ . , , „ Samuel M. Lemon, Grand Rapids 
M]ci,neM)tn....Fred Von Banmbach, St. Paul 

MlRfliHslppi (See Louisiana) 

MlsftjuH— 1 Henry C. Grenner, St. Louis 

2 Frank E. Kellogg, Kansas City 

Montana Charles M. Webster, Helena 

Nebraska Jacob E. Houtz, Omaha 



Nevada * (See California) 

New Hampshire.... J. A. Wood, Portsmouth 

New Jersey— 1 Isaac Moffett, Camden 

2 H. C. H. Herold, Newark 

New Mexico.... Alex L. Morrison, Santa Fe 

New York— 1 Frank R. Moore, Brooklyn 

2 Charles N. Treat, New York city 

8 Ferd Eldman, New York city 

14 John G. Ward, Albany 

21 Charles E. Cole, Syracuse 

28 Archie D. Sanders, Rochester 

North Carolina— 4... Ed C. Duncan, Raleigh 

5 Herschel S. Harkins, Ashevllle 

North Dakota ,.. ^S^^ v.-— ^a) 

Ohio— 1 Bernh:ini U^rtisiiji > atl 

10 Goat*fi» ]\ UiiM.i.j, L-ii!do 

11 John iCritrMl, in, i :hiLlkr<^r:he 

18 Frjiiik Mi.ruril, (Jlev^lund 

Oklahoma (See Kansas) 

Oregon David M. Dunn, Portland 

Pennsylvania— 1. .P. A.McOlain, Philadelphia 

9 Henry L. Hershey, Lancaster 

12 Thomas Penman, Scranton 

23 James S. Fruit, Pittsburg 

Rhode Island (See Connecticut) 

South Carolina.... E. A. Webster, Columbia 

South Dakota (See Nebraska) 

Tennessee— 2 A. J. Tyler, Knoxvllle 

6 David A. Munn, Nashville 

Texas— 3 Webster Flanagan, Austin 

4 Philemon B. Hunt, Dallas 

Utah (See Montana) 

Vermont (See New Hampshire) 

Virginia— 2 James D. Brady, Richmond 

6 Park Agnew. Alexandria 

Washington (See Oregon) 

West Virginia.... A. B. White. Parkersburg 

Wisconsin— 1 Henry Fink, Milwaukee 

2 James G. Monahan, Madison 

Wyoming (See Colorado) 



OnSTOKS OFFICERS. 



Alabama— Mobile J. W. Burke 

Alaska— Sitka J. W. Ivey 

Arizona— Nogales H. K. Chenowlth 

California— San Francisco J. p. Jackson 

San Diego W. W. Bowers 

Los Angeles J. C. CUne 

Eureka S. A. Campbell 

Ckmnecticut- Bridgeport F. J. Navamore 

Hariford J. H. Blaklesby 

New Haven J. W. Mix 

New London T. O. Thompson 

Stonlngton C. T. Stanton 

Delaware— Wilmington W. H. CJooper 

Dlst. of Columbia— Washington.. W. B. Todd 

Florida— Apalachicol a W. B. Sheppard 

Femandina J. W. Howell 

Pensacola J. B. "Stlllman 

St. Angnstine T. B. George 

Jacksonville W. H. Lucas 

Cedar Keys S. P. Anthony 

Key West O. W. Allen 

Tampa M. B. Macfarlane 

Georgia— Brunswick H. T. Dunn 

Savannah J. H. Devaux 

St. Bfarys Budd Coflfee 

minoiB— Chicago W. P. Nixon 

Louisiana— New Orleans.... A. T. WImberly 

Brashear J. A. Thornton 

Maine— Houlton T. H. Phalr 

Bangor .^...A. R. Day 

Bath O. Moulton, Jr. 

Belfast J. H. Harrlman 



Port. Collectors. 

Castlne G. M. Warren 

Ellsworth Henry Whiting 

Machias J. K. Ames 

Kennebunk Edwin Parsons 

Eastport G. A. Curran 

Portland W. F. Milliken 

Saco F. H. Oaks 

Waldoboro F. B. Wright 

WlBcasset D. H. Moody 

York E. H. Banks 

Maryland— Annapolis L. S. Clayton 

Baltimore W. F. Stone 

Crlsfield J. C. Tawes 

Massachusetts— Barnstable T. H. Hallet 

Boston G. H. Lyman 

Edgartown C. H. Marchant 

Fall River .Tohn Desmond 

Gloucester F. C. Richardson 

Marblehead C. H. Bateman 

Nantucket C. E. Smalley 

New Bedford Z. W. Pease 

Newburyport U. P. Mackintosh 

Plymouth D. W. Andrews 

Salem John Daland 

Michigan— Grand Haven G. A. Farr 

Detroit J. T. Rich 

Marquette J. Q. Adams 

Port Huron A. R. Avery 

Minnesota— St. Paul John Peterson 

Duluth L. M. Willcutts 

Mississippi— Shuldsboro J. P. Walworth 

Natchez David King 



198 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Port. ^ Collector*. 

Vlcksburg J. H. Short 

Montana— Great Falls D. G. Browne 

New Hampshire— Port8moath..R. N. BIwell 

New Jersey— Bridgeton G. W. McCowan 

Jersey City M. I. Fagen 

Trenton R. Billingham 

Somers Point Walter Fifleld 

Camden F. F. Patterson 

Tuekerton .' 8. P. Bartlett 

Newark G. L. Smith 

Perth Amboy Robert Carson 

New York— Buffalo H. W. Brendel 

Cape Vincent W. J. Grant 

Plattsburg W. C. Wltherbee 

Dunkirk John Bourne 

Rochester ftenry Harrison 

New York Geo. R. Bidwell 

Niagara Falls James Low 

Ogdensburg C. A. Kellogg 

Oswego J. H. Cooper 

Sag Harbor Peter Dlppel 

North Carolina— Beaufort C. D. Jones 

Newbem Mayer Hahn 

Edenton K. R. Pendleton 

Wilmington * J. C. Dancy 

North Dakota— Pembina N. E. Nelson 

Ohio— Cleveland C. F. Leach 

Toledo J. H. Puck 

Sandusky E. H. Zurhorst 



Port . Collectors. 

Oregon— Astoria John Fox 

Portland I. B. Patterson 

Coos Bay John Morgan 

Yaquina C. B. Crosno 

Pennsylvania— Philadelphia... 0. W. Thomas 
Erie B. B. Brown 

Rhode Island— Bristol C. D. Eddy 

Newport J. H. Cozzens 

Providence E. H. Wilson 

South Carolina— Beaufort Robert Smalls 

Charleston J. R. Talbert 

Georgetown A. M. Hamby, Jr. 

Texas— Brownsville C. H. Maris 

Eagle Pass C. C. Drake 

Galveston F. L. Lee 

El Paso Moses Dillon 

Corpus Christl J. J. Haynes 

Vermont— Burlington Olin Merrill 

Newport Z. M. Mansur 

Virginia- Alexandria M. L. King 

Cape Charles City C. G. Smithers 

Norfolk R. G. Banks 

Petersburg William Mahone 

Richmond J. S. Bethel 

Tappahannock T. C. Walker 

Newport News J. W. Elliott 

Washington— Port Townsend..F. D. Huestis 

Wisconsin— Milwaukee C. B. Roberts 



8TJRVEY0B8 OF 0TX8T0KS. 



Port. Surueyors. 

California— San Francisco J. S. Spear, Jr. 

Colorado— Denver C. H. Brickenstein 

Georgia— Atlanta C. C. Wimbish 

Illinois— Galena R. S. Bostwick 

Peoria R. W. Burt 

Cairo T. C. Elliott 

Rock Island R. G. Pearce 

Indiana— Evansville W. S. Vielo 

Indianapolis A. A. Young 

Michigan City C. J. Rabb 

Iowa— Burlington O. H. Ross 

Sioux City J. H. Bolton 

Dubuque J. M. Lenihan 

Council Bluffs L. M. Shubert 

Des Moines L. Redmon 

Kentucky— Ix)ulsville C. M. Barnett 

Paducah J. R. Puryear 

Louisiana— New Orleans F. W. Gibson 

Maine— Portland W. H. Anderson 

Maryland— Baltimore J. B Hanna 

Massachusetts— Boston J. J. McCarthy 

Springfield H. L. Hines 



Port. SiMTveyon. 

Michigan— Grand Rapids J. A. Coye 

Missouri— St. Louis C. H. Smith 

St. Joseph W. L. Buechle 

Kansas City W. L. Kessinger 

Nebraska— Omaha ^ — Cadet Taylor 

Lincoln C. H. Morrill 

New York-New York S. C, Croft 

Albany William Barnes, Jr. 

Port Jefferson G. F. Bayles 

Syracuse J. F. Nash 

Patchogue S. O. Weeks 

Greenport.. ....J. A. Bassarear 

Ohio— Cincinnati L. Vorgt 

Columbus E. J. Miller 

Pennsylvania— Pittsburg P. M. Lytle 

Tfennessee— Nashville J. W. Dillin 

Memphis James Jeffreys 

Knoxvllle E. W. Adkins 

Chattanooga T. B. Stapp 

West Virginia— Wheeling.... C. H. Sensensy 
Wisconsin— Lacrosse Robert Calvert 



DISTRICT STJPEBVIS0S8 OF THE TWELFTH CENSUS. 



DiBt. ALABAMA. 

1. J. W. Goldsby, Mobile. 

2. A. Stelnhart, Greenville. 

3. A. E. Stratton, Troy. 

4. J. J. Sims, Silver Run. 

5. B. B. Smyer, Birming- 

ham. 

6. J. B. Long, Jasper. 

7. D. S. Jones, Moody. 

8. W. W. Simmons, Court- 

land. 

ALASKA. 
Northern— 

S. C. Dunham, Circle City. 
Southern— 

W. A. Kelly, Sitka. 

ARIZONA. 
1. F. A. Trltle, Prescott. 



ARKANSAS. 
C. Rembert, Helena. 
J. B. Baker, Melbourne. 
W. B. Moss, Jasper. . 
J. T. O'Hair, Little Rock. 
G. M. French, Hot Springs. 
W. F. Avera, Camden. 

CALIFORNIA. 
C. C. Plehn, Berkeley. . 
J. D. Mackenzie, San Jose. 
S. H. Olmsted, San 

Rafael. 
T. W. O'Neill, Sacra- 
mento. 
A. M. Drew, Fresno. 
F. F. Davis, Los Angeles. 

COLORADO. 
F. S. Tesch, Denver. 



2. W. H. Brisbane, 
ville. 



Lead- 



CONNECTICDT. 
1. S. A. Eddy, Canaan. 

DELAWARE. 

1. J. S. Willis, Milford. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

1. H. Dingman, Washington. 

FLORIDA. 

1. R. Tumbull, Montlcello. 

2. J. M. Cheney, Orlando. 

GEORGIA. 

1. H. Blun, Jr., Savannah. 

2. H. W. Hopkins, Thomas- 

ville. 

3. H. Wetteroth, Amerlcus. 



DISTRICT SUPERVISORS OP THE TWELFTH CENSUS. 



199 



4. M. L. Covington, Carroll - 

too. 

5. J. W. Anderson, Coving- 

ton. 

6. J. M. Strickland, Thomas- 

ton. 

7. G. D. Anderson. Marietta. 

8. E. L. Campbell. Eudora. 

9. J. H. Witzel, Blue Ridge. 

10. E. D. Smythe, Augusta. 

11. A. Akerman, Dublin. 

HAWAII. 

I. A. T. Atkinson, Honolulu. 

IDAHO. 
1. W. H. Savidge, Boise. 
ILLINOIS. 

1. G. P. Gilbert, Chicago. 

2. W. Jackson, Shabbona. 

3. H. C. Burchard, Freeport. 

4. W. C. Galloway, Aledo. 

6. W. E. Birkenbeuel, La- 
Salle. 

6. J. B. FIthian, .Toliet. 

7. E. S. Swlgart, Champaign. 

8. G. De F. Kinney, Peoria. 

9. G. M. Finlay, Augusta. 
10. T. Worthington, Jackson- 
ville. 

II. E. D. Bllnn, Lincoln. 

12. J. M. Truitt, Hillsboro. 

13. P.W. Booth, Marshall. 

14. T. G. RIsley. Mt. Carmol 

15. H. J. Schmidt. Naahvlllo. 

16. J. C. Willis. Metropolis. 

INDIANA. 
1. C. O. Covert, Kvansville. 
2* J. C. Billheimer, Wash- 
ington. 

3. J. D. Poutch, New Albany 

4. C. W. Lee, Sugar Branch 

5. I. L. Wimmer, Rockville 

6. J. F. Thompson, New 

7. V. G. Clifford. Indianap- 

olis. 

8. A. L. Sharpe. Blnffton. 

9. A. E. Bradshaw. Delphi 

10. E. N. Norris, Valparaiso. 

11. O. A. Somers, Kokomo. 

12. S. A. Wood, Angola. 

13. D. B. J. Schafer, South 

Bend. 
INDIAN TERRITORY. 
1. W. H. Darrough, Wyan 
dotte. 

IOWA. 

1. J. W. Rowley, Keosauqua. 

2. C. D. Eaton, Wilton Jet. 

3. J. W. Krapfel, Waterloo 

4. G. H. Markley, Lansing. 

5. J. W. Doxsee, Montlcello 

6. A. H. Fortune, Bloom- 

field. 

7. S. C. Smith, Winterset. 

8. P. M. Kyte, Osceola. 

9. P. F. Everest, Council 

Bluffs. 
10. J. T. Drug, Stratford. 
U. W. E. Hamilton, Odebolt. 

KANSAS. 

1. A. J. White, Todd. 

2. J. M. Humphrey, Ft. Scott. 

3. Asa Smith, Parsons. 

4. C. S. Briggs, Carbondale. 
B. W. H. Smith, Marysville. 
6. C. W. Landis, Osborne. 



Diit. 

7. J. C. O. Morse, Hutchin- 
son. 

KENTUCKY. 

1. A. C. Moore, Marion. 

2. E. M. Flack, Hopkins- 

ville. 

3. H. Morris, Glasgow. 

4. W. N. Foster, Greens- 

bnig. 

5. C. K. raroh, Louisville. 

6. R. H. Elliston, Williams- 

town. 

7. E. Balnbrldge, Owenton. 

8. .John Bright, Stanford. 

9. C. G. McAllister, Ow- 

ingsvflle. 
30. H. S. Howes. Palntsvllle. 
11. J. G. Forester, Harlan. 
LOUISIANA. 

1. A.. E. Livaudals, New 

Orleans. 

2. P. H. Segura.^Ncw Iberia. 

3. W. Clegg. Lafayette. 

4. W. B. Peyton, Keatchle. 

5. C. W. Phillips, Lonewa. 

6. J. Yoist, New Roads. 

MAINE. 

1. J. A. Place, South Ber- 

wick. 

2. E. P. Spofford, Deer Isle. 

MARYLAND. 

1. O. L. Quinlan, Baltimore 

2. B. G. Stevens, Willlston. 

3. W. T. S. Rollins, Seat 

Pleasant. 

4. A. H. Harrington, Fred- 

erick. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 
1. H. G. Wadlin, Boston. 
MICHIGAN. 

1. F. L. Brooke, Detroit. 

2. F. R. Metcalf, Adrian. 

3. C. H. Gurney, Hillsdale. 

4. B. S. Wing, Hastings. 

5. E. M. Allen, Portland. 

6. E. V. Chllson, Lansing. 

7. G. H. Brown, Port Huron 

8. O. L. Sprague, Owosso. 

9. J. K. Flood, Hart. 

10. C. R. Jackson, East 

Tftwfls 

11. 0. L. Rarden, Greenville. 

12. R. J. Bates, Ironwood. 

MINNESOTA. 

1. L. D. Frost, Winona. 

2. J. G. Hamlin, Blue Earth. 

3. H. B. Wakefield, Hutch- 

inson. 

4. E. Yanish, St. Paul. 

5. C. S. Cairns, Minneapolis. 

6. A. N. Dare, Elk River. ' 

7. E. E. Adams, Fergus 

Falls. 
MISSISSIPPL 

1. H. E. Pitts, Aberdeen. 

2. W. A. McDonald, Holly 

Springs. 

3. C. Banks, Clarksdale. 

4. G. E. Galceran, Sturges. 

5. R. M. Bourdeaux, Merid- 

ian. 

6. W. H. Mounger, Enter- 

prise. 

7. W\ E. MoUIson, Vicks- 

burg. 



MISSOURI. 
S. J. Harrison, Hannibal. 
J. Broaddus, Chlllicothe. 
J. P. Reed, Liberty. 
E. E. E. McJimsey, 

Marysville. 
G. J. Baer, Kansas City. 
J. M. Pidcock, Greenfield 
H. H. Parsons, Marshall. 
J. W. Vosholl, Linn. 

C. A. Davault, Parber. 

P. W. RauchensteIn, 

Clayton. 
J. S. HIggins, St. Louis. 
B. T. Walker, Dexter. 

B. J. Morrow, Neosho. 

MONTANA. 
J. E. RIckards, Butte. 

NEBRASKA. 
P. W. Miller, Falls City. 
W. E. Peebles, Pender. 
T. B. Hibbert, Adams. 
I. D. Evans, Kenesaw. 
J. T. Mallalieu, Kearney. 
NEVADA. 

E. W. Tremont, Eureka. 
NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

D. P. Healy, Manchester. 
NEW JERSEY. 

J. H. Weastell, Jersey 

City. 
S. A. Smith, Newark. 
J. M. Denton, Paterson. 

C. S. Tunis, New Bruns- 
wick. 

W. L. James, Riverton. 

John Blowe, Camden. 
NEW MEXICO. 

P. Sanchez, Santa Pe. 
NEW YORK. 

C. S. Wilbur. New York. 

W. B. Atterbury, Brook- 
lyn. 

J. L. Williams, Pough- 
keepsle. 

M. A. Heeran, Rensselaer. 

F. S. Steenberge, North 
Bangor. 

P. A. Weed, Potsdam. 
W. B. Collins, Glovers- 

ville. 
J. R. Stevens, Cohoes. 
F. D. Cole, Cairo. 
Edgar M. Gordon, Port 

Jervis. 
J. Schnell, Binghamton. 
J. T. Roberts, Syracuse. 
J. Batchelor, Utica. 
R. J. Myers, Auburn. 
W. S. Hodgman, Painted 

Post. 
J. A. Warren, Predonla. 
J. A. Hamilton, Buffalo. 
Albert J. Slalght, West 

Sparta. 
19. J. W. Hannan, Rochester. 
NORTH CAROLINA. 

1. W. Martin, WlUlamston. 

2. A. M. Moore, Greenville. 

3. D. J. Lewis, WhitevIUe. 

4. J. J. Jenkins, Pittsboro. 

5. J. T. B. Hoover, Oxford. 

6. W. B. Steele, High Point. 

7. G. A. Blngbam, Salisbury. 

8. O. P. Pool, Taylorsvllle. 

9. J. A. Hendricks, Marshall. 



200 



CHICAGO DAILY NBWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



Diit. NORTH DAKOTA. 
1. A. H. Langhlin, Lisbon. 

OHIO. 

1. G. Stoddard, Wyoming. 

3. F. P. Richter, HamUton. 
8. W. Binkley, Sidney. 

4. D. p. Hester, V^ Wert. 

5. £. Q. Crane. Batavia. 

6. S. w. Dnrflinger, London. 

7. W. T. Hoopes, Marys- 

▼lUe. 

8. R. J. West, Toledo. 

9. W. S. Lambert, Soatb 

Webster. 

10. O. E. VoUenweider, Me- 

Arthur. 

11. H. A. Williams, Golnm- 

bus. 

12. A. Klskadden, TifBn. 

13. L. B. Fanver, Elyria. 
U. F. M. Martin. CaldweU. 
16. I. H. Gaston, St. Clairs- 

ville. 

16. J. W. Little, Akron. 

17. W. M. Hostetter, Lisbon. 

18. C. F. Brotberton, Ashta- 

bula. 

19. E. Batt, Cleveland. 

OKLAHOMA. 
1. I. G. Oonkling, Bnld. 
OREGON. 

1. O. B. Winn, Albany. 

2. G. F. Telfer. Portland. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

1. U. D. Beaston, Philadel- 
phia. 

3. D. S. Talbot, Westchester. 

3. H. G. Seip, Easton. 

4. J. R. Edwards, Scranton. 
6. O. H. Ainey, Montrose. 

6. C. A. Durant, Wilkes- 

barre. 

7. H. G. ReitEol, Mahanoy 

City. 

8. A. F. Shenok, Lancaster. 

9. J. M. Barnett, New 

Bloomfield. 

10. H. A. Reed, Sunbury. 

11. M. H. Stebbins, Wells- 

boro. 



DM. 

12. C. A. Zerbe, Lewistown. 

13. 6. B. Scnll, Somerset. 

14. J. L. AUiston. Pufixsu 

taw ney 

15. W. B. Sterrett, Titus- 

ville. 

16. G. W. Youngson, Parnas- 

sus. 

17. F. M. Fuller. Unlontown. 

18. J. M. Esler. Tarentum. 

19. J. A. McMillan, Harlans- 

burg. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1. G. H. Webb, Providence. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1. J. W. Wheeler, Charles- 

ton. 

2. S. A. Pearce, Columbia. 
8. D. H. Russell. Anderson. 

4. G. W. Shell, Laurens. 

5. T. J. Cunningham, Clow- 

ney. 

6. L. J. Breeden, Bennetts- 

▼iUe. 

SOOTH DAKOTA. 

1. J. U Burke, Hot Sl - 

2. D. WiUiams. Webster. 

TENNESSEE. 

1. J. S. Hill, Morristown. 
S. J. R. Penland, KnoxviUe. 

5. B. W. Mattson, Chatta- 

nooga. 
4. G. H. Morgan. Cookeville 

6. J. J. Jones, Fayettevllle. 

6. P. P. Pickard, Waverly. 

7. A. M. Hughes, Columbia, 

8. D. A. McDougal, Savan* 

nab. 

9. J. D. Senter, Humboldt. 
10. T. F. Tobin, Memphis. 

TEXAS. 

1. John B. Stephens, Mount 

Pleasant. 

2. R. M. Kelso, Denton. 

3. W. D. Bell, Quanah. 

4. S. M. Vernon, Brown 

wood. 

6. W. G. Robinson, San An- 
tonio. 

6. K. S. Fisher, Ennis. 



DM. 

7. J. S. Bums, Tyler. 

8. B.W. Smith, Nacogdoches. 

9. D. R. Emerson, Marlin. 

10. E. R. McLean, Austin. 

11. H. Settle, Galveston. 

12. T. H. Dwyer, Brenham. 

13. J. O. Luby, San Diego. 

UTAH. 
1. A. Pratt, Salt Lake City. 

VERMONT. 

1. W. B. Gates, Burlington. 

VIRGINIA. 

T. Scarburg, Accomack. 

E. Smith, Suffolk. 

P. Snead, Etna Mills. 

R. Lasslter, Peters- 
burg. 

M. Hirt, Rocky Mount. 

C. Carrington, Houston. 

M. Stock, Winchester. 
. R. Campbell, Warren- 
ton. 

. W. Blankenship, Bris- 
tol. 

T. Hubard, Boiling. 



1. G. 

2. H. 
8. C. 

4. F. 

5. C. 

6. C. 

7. J. 

8. R, 

9. G 
10. R. 



WASHINGTON. 
1. J. B. McMUian, Fairha 

▼en. 
3. A. Mires, Bllensburg. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

1. H. W. Harmer, Clarks 

burg^ 

2. L. C. Powell, Fairmont. 

3. E. L. Dunn, Red Sulphar 

Springs. 

4. T. A. Brovni. Elisabetb. 

WISCONSIN. 

1. A. J. Turner, Portage. 

2. R. Meyer, Jr., Lancaster. 
8. A. A. Loper, Rlpon. 

4. A. G. Wright, Mllwaokee. 

5. E. Mclntyre, Waldo. 

6. F. S. Baldwin, Waupaca. 

7. C. S. Van Auken, La 

Crosse. 

8. J. W. Miller, Wausan. 

9. J. B. Jensen, Ellsworth. 

WYOMING. 
1. C. W. RIner, Cheyenne. 



COPPER PBODUCTIOH IK TEE UHITED 8TATE& 



1861 900 

1862 1,100 

1868 2,0^ 

1864 2,350 

1855 3,000 

1866 4,000 

1857 4,800 

1868 6,600 

1860 6,800 

1880 7,200 

1861 7,600 

1863 9.000 

1868 8,800 

1864 / 8.000 

1866 8,600 

1866 8,900 



[Tons of 2,2<10 pounds.} 

1867 .^ 10,000 

1868 11,600 

1860 12,600 

1870 12,600 

1871 13,000 

1872 12,600 

1873 16,600 

1874 17,600 

1876 18,000 

1876 19,000 

1877 21,000 

1878 21,600 

1879 23,000 

1880 27.000 

1881 32.000 

1882 40,467 



IgS 61,574 

1884 64,708 

1886 74,068 

1886 70,430 

1887 81,017 

1888 101,064 

1^ 10l,3» 

1800 115,966 

1891 126,839 

1892 154.018 

1898 I47!0«l 

1»* 168,130 

lSI:::::::::::::::::.:::::g;S 

iwr mm 

1888 ^,790 



UKITJ3U STATES DlPTXfMATiC AMD COiNSL'LAH. SKRViJJK. 



£01 



?InitflJ Stales Qiplamatir anH Consular Sfrtirr, 

BIPLOKATIO BEKYICE-OCT. 1, 1S99, 
£7xplSDatloii^A. Vi, nnil I'.. Anili[i.r*s,)ti!nr EJCira-mMiiuiry und I'lL^^niiintiintlriLry; E- E. nnJ 
Mk k,j Envoy KitrtKjrdiimry atid Mlntsttir b*lenip<jlt!!riLmi'^^ M. k.^ Minister IttiblLi^iiL; 
ii. tt. and C. G., Minister Ue'^tilent nnd €oniiuHieiiHrai> 



Ci>irsTKV. 



AnRtria-Hniiirary „. 



BplKlDin.., 
UatWJiL.... 
BroxU 



Clille.. 



Colombia. ,i. '■-...■ 

OofiLa Rtoft, NiPuraguLi 
p.n4l ^alviidor 

Don mark . . , 

UunuinLcan Heijubtic. — 

Edn adur. , . # 

Rff? pt... 

^&iic« * - 



iiejtrvnentii. ttvc* 



Sinm}*i9i AyTBH 'Ort-^on 

Uucini m AyrL-^K J Li>n!:iJiLnq,. . 
Vk'ij [ia Ilndlnnb. . 



VLonnEi. 
Ylunna.. 
BruAi^oU. 



Wni* p. UirA, fi. K. & M. t*„, . 

Kraiicjoi s S . ,k"i in, ■ f- . ;^ e f . n f T .OK. 

A. c. HftiTi!*. e: K .t M. I' 

Cha.^. V.lli'V^ilSl^ii.H,nf L.., 

[.t^-Carn . W . H . i t y L' I L I u r. N T . At 

Ji. ToWTirtOmU iC. K. Jt M. P. . . 

<1, H.BridK«?iuaiKK. K.&M.P. j^» i ««„.,►,,,. 

Ctiaa. P. ilrytiJi, E. E- & TA. P. klodu Jimolrf 

Thus. i\ Ltavi'^(iTi , Sit. tj r l^i^jj., Riu do Janelru., 

H,.lanj«3 A 8JiiiHt<in.MN Alti 

M. [4. WHsim. K. E-A M IV, .SfinUiis^t 

11. .1 . JjL^uderjn k, H<;<i- of Li^k.. .Saiitf agu 

E, II T'litLfiT, 1-1. E. ^ M. t' J Peking. 

II. Ct. Sqiiiiv^. Sue. of l^% .,.Pii^klliB ..+ ..._... 
W.K L^n in I i lnu«;:jiiei!«,tif I J!K' P*-^fe^l njif ■ * 



Lr^cii ( if>n. ]App' tctl from .[Salu ri/. 



mm 

12.1IUU 



PlH.GoluuibLa' 



PennHyLTanin 
'EHnoJft.... 
llllnuig.... 
ovraHt, ,,1, 



Lt, A- L Ki y, Niiv. Atlr. 



'IVkli^K- .- 

Ritpota. 

l^itcEiira 

lMiiTi:i,^na....„^, 

Co|.>u[3baffen. .. 
il'ori-ua-Prlnt'e 

Uiilw.*..-* 

Oii-iro *,.„.*►... 



GGTmanj , 



Qr«Ht Britain . 



Ki.'V. 
KU'niiae ]>. (Jbuahltti, Inl 
(JtisLs. B. }liirt, E. E. LtM. P. 
C MeNally, yuc. of Ia'h:.. 
W. L. Mtfrry, B. E. ^ M. P. . 
Kufua A. LiLntti a&i!. Qt l-cu^ 
L. a, s^w«(isimn Br P., & M- P 
Win. h'. Ptiwidl. Cbiiivti d'A 
A. hL S:m] pison. E. E. dt, M . P 
John a. LoiKT, Ajjt. A C.t J. . 

UoriLiW I 'nrton A. K^ & P , Paris . . . . 

1 1 snrv Vlg^Diiud, Hiici. of LeUr. i PhHb 

H. fr\ l<ldrly. 2d iik-u. uf !*«, . . . ., 1 Pur[H 

!^. Merri ll. 3d Htc, tif Lcir. . . . . i Pnrls , . . , 

Cai>t. A. itoKiTH^ MIL ALSru.lK' PhHj* 

Lttnit. Wm. S. Siib^. N A J'liiri,?* 

AudrftwD, WbdBi A. P a P U< rJin ... 
Jobn B^ Jiu^kflon. Sl^u. inl Psh. l^^Tiin., ,. 
(J«o. M. Msk, 4d Sue, u£ Em, , Ik^rJIn.. . 

P. It. llt>iltfeJ[«irtei:,, iBftlin... 

Cutn dr, P\ Si . Fl si 1 bur. N a v. A \l. 1 B^i r] i m. . . 

Ciipt. JI. T. Alltin, M\l. Att. . -f 

1 fl.t::hntitti, A. R, AP........ Loiidun. 

" LiLniiloii. 

rAiiiduii.. 

ljun<toii. 



Honduras... 
ttalr ........ 



Jftpat] , 



Kor«a. 

Liberia ....... 

Heiico 



ParainiftT »"'i Drtiirday. 
Persia 



Wa^biujjflon 

lOWIL ,, .i 

tuwa ..,...,,. 
tieM York... 



rbtna^ 

W, V(rik;ni1ti, 

raLirtirnla 

r:ilifurnJa..r, 
MErniGfliitu,... 
Nuw jt^raey.,, 

Arl^nna 

FI'Midi*. 

Pfuw Vtirk^.., . 

liOuUSanri 

iNbldli ,. 

Nuw YurlJ .... 

Nt:w Ytjrk.. .. 
New JcreiBy.. 

iddd.. 

Ma.'iiii&cbuif^tfi. 



fiiiatutnula. . 

Rome, 

Ucin](}., 



Henry Wuue, Sue. vf Em.... 

Juhn U, C)irL«r, Sid Sl^c, uf EftJ. 

J, lL€bLjaLu^Jr.,Ma*ie ,* 

l.tuuii. John C. Col woll, N. A . Lonc^oh. ,. . 

MjiJ,Gun.S,.S.Hnmnur.Mil, A tt- I Jindon , 

A.S, Hardy, E E.M P.Jtr.G.'AlbEinB 

W. a. llLiiiMr.lL. E. A M P (iiiatuojiilrt 

A.H,Buaupru,.Si'r. !.0Ji^v<:.(i rJiJO-Lf inula,, .,. 
. Wm, P, PowvEl. P. E a >i. P Pnrt-aii'Prtiicu 

, Wk«. Unnicr, Kl. E. A^M, P.., 

. Wm. K. Urapur, A. K. A P 

Ij. M. [ddtniffi, s^ec. uf Km 

H,C,r;irHons,Jr.-2d Sue. of Km. 

Cttpt.a.P. Ht^rlVfiii, Mil. Alt . 

I.»t.t -u in. W. H . Bi'rjl 1 1 c r . N v . A U 
. Alfrud E, riisukn E. K. & U, P. 

J, H, Horod.SuR.of IjejL' 

H. Wilson, ad Weo.of Lefl..,. 

JX A. Koy, Nav. AU 

Itacisrorrl.H \Ti1lf*r, .Ir., tnt... 
, H. N. AlU-M. .M. II, AiP.ti...,. 

VY. tV SLmi I H, ^uu. nf Leg 

Pjinf; Kyeotf Sinl, Int ., 

Ve lln Vuna. irit .., 

.0. L«.W.rtmiLb,M. i.l.&G.a.. 

.r. B. t^purKOon* B*!0, of Lflff...'iMnnTOTin 
. Powell CI aj'tnn, A . 15. & P. . , . iMexico.. , 

P. It. MCtlrMfry, Srio. of Lbr:. . MtiXb^o... 

Wm. Heimke. 3d See. of Leg. Meslnfi, 

.Stanford No wul,E. E,^M.P.Tlni HucnjR... 

Mi\J .Jivs. N. Wlieelan, Mil. AtL , 

. Wm. K. KiDidh FC. E, & M. P., Moatevldeo.. . . 
, H, W. Howon. M. R. & C. a . .iTeherun ..,,..,, 

John Tyler. Int . . . , Tehpmn. . . . 

. LB. Dudley, K, 13. AM. P..., Uma 

jBicharil R. IJ^oUl. Sue. of Loe. Lima 



1.31X1 



New Vrtrlc. ... 
IM?:i,Cfduiuhht 
MrirylHiNl ... 
New Y«JTk.... 
PuniiSylTanla.,.,. .. .. 

Penrii^ylvanla..,. 

N.Manrptibtre; £l..'*Ki 
KuciT.iiuky ,.,,1 KMHtJ 
New Vi^rk.... :!.iJiKi 



lil.tXXl 

6.1 no 
la.ixKi 



KMXIO 
I^.IXHI 



a.iNxi 

ILl.iJCNI 

l7.fi(X> 

2,1XI> 
1,'JIXI 



IT.f^l 

^j.ixi^ 



Rome. 
Home 
Tokyo (Yodo),. 
Tokyo (Vudoj.. 
Tokyo (Vtidu).. 
Tokyo CYedol . 
Tokyo (Vedo>,. 

Sooul....,,. 

aeouL, ,,,.. 

tsuool 
Seoul 
MoiiroTla.,....^ 



.Vi'^Wilrrsi^y,. 
Kt'ntucky _, 
Ma^^aebns't^ 
New York.... 



CJcrorjDla.. 

Indiana....... 

lltiTiolis ...X... 
Tenne!^&ee.,. 
Nniflf YoTte.„. 
Ohio...,..,, 



Korea.... ... 

KOT*?fl.. 

M. Camilna. 

Kentucky 

Arkanfias,..,. 
Mltdiiaran...,, 
New York.... 
xMliiDC^ta..., 



WlHConjilQ. .. 
New York,;. 

Pumla 

CAUfnrnla.. 
EV!nuBylTEinia 



io.iix> 



LHUU 

3,51X1 

IRXI 



4 mi 

ITJitXi 

2,tS0 

7,nUll 



MMXl 

1U,0lKi 

L50a 



riUCAt^O lUrLY NIHIVS almanac for 19M. 



J^'NITKD STATES UrPLOMATEC SEHYICK.^CdNTl.VTTttD. 



ColTSfTltV- 



furtiipal .,....,_ 

UuAf^ln 



SJain ...... 



^wiiKo limit] ,._..,..■ 



Hi'itresitntativtf. 



J- SS. trwin. E. IS. * M, P, . . 
A. S. llntdy, E, B., M, P 

Cn^jwer, A. K, A P [.' 

If- H. 1>. Plercp. Wnc. of Ktn 
J.ii 13T. W.S Sims. Nnv.AU,.. 
Hiinulioii Kioif. M. li. & 0. (j 

Hum amy Hlorer, K, E.& M. P 
stjintini srckels. Sec ...... 



Turkey 



rericiEuela . 



J.<j,A, ijt'ifil'jrniUi.K. h' (Jt M f 
lt*r l.L J. li\VLniiiius.M[( Mt 
tKcmr K. SlTiui'i, K, K. it M P 
li. t;, (in scum. Hitc, t)f Lcif^.. 

A. A. fiJirfiiuiit', lnl,"M'..[ 
J^ I . Ljuiii.is. B. B, A: M, P. 



/^rjcmiun, \Aititf«il from 



Uwihtm *.... luTfft..., 



i^l.Pt^ttjrjPhurK 
St. Fttteniburjf, 
St. l-'utorisburij. 

Batiiukok 

Banifkuk... 

Matlrm .,. 



Srookholm.*. 
. HprTie ..., . ., 
, Heme 

. Cun^stnntiiinple 

CiiracfaH.... , 

Caracfta..^. 



N.H a [lips hi re 

OhVo.'.'.'..]"] 
Sew York,. 

MaiQe"!!!^!.. 

Turkpj^.... 
MiirTlaail . 



Satflfif, 



"im' 
mo 






^ gO^SU LS-BEHlaAX AgB COMBTrXS, AQEZTTS AND CONfiUULa AGENTS. 



ri..^rE. 



A m B JWTiN E HVA'lin LI U- 

Buei}t>i» Ayrefj ., 

Bab1n Ijjmica ^^ "" 

Conittj^n .^ ^ / *'"' 

A L- f^T U I A 'li jfNiiA ilY- 

hJuajB., 



HLj.lu?nbt3ri£. Flif!jc<mja , 

iiJihLa ,,.,..,,. ,__^ 

Ti'Juni^. Aiifithti._.... W,\[ 

Vienna, AuHtrJii 

Hrunfi.„... ., , , ' 

Jnimitnirk.... ly,', 

BRl^jJUM-AiJtwerfj ,. , 

Bni^JHWln ,,.,... , 

iflmrlerol ^ ," '' 

Ghent,..:..,,,. 

J^M>|se.....„..,,,, , , " '" * 

„ ViTTiers. ...-.1. ,^^ ,V ' 

H^l¥^^'A t^iii^ijs... :..„..;;. 

BkAJ^JL-Biihla ..,,./ 

Armaju " 

Para ,,., , 

ManaitB _ " 

Mjinmhaci " " 

Perntimbuco..., 

reikfii ,., \^ 

Nata] , -....■- 

HUj <itj Ja no i ro„ ...■■■; ^ ^ . ,' ' ' ', 
SanlMB .,_ "' 

. . r r .' i' " ^* "?" '1 "^ '^' ^ "^ "i ■. '. 1 ] . ;; ; ;; 

f f 1 1 Lig— ADkil'agHiiia 

A riCH , 

JyTikfu^,„. ,1 

Vklparnifio ,.....,.[" 

CfciiaGm. ,.,. 

t^*rT>n(jl ,,._ .--H.^ 

Puntii AfieiHiH,,... '■'.'■'"■■' 

,/ra]f!ttl]uUTJ(). _ 

cHiNA-Amor..:::.:;:.::."" 

CujitOd , 

tlhefin} \']\\.] " '■ 

CJiSnfclahft, ,.., ;.\, 

' Cbnniyrlcluif ,^ , 

Fuchau...., ..,...' " 

Hankriw ,.,,.VV. 

Niuchwang "" " 

tihuntfhal »„...._ //, 

TlenUlrt ' ■■ 



.'i>flniel Mayor..,.,. 

, I VVtilT^if T. J otteg. ., . , , AcL 

. Juhn M . Tboiua 7. . 

JJ. M^Ayrea ,,.. 

. Fi-iiht njer n^eKU'T 

L (Jlovtinm t;i>lktSf'lK.AiirT 
, Hufffj fifjitzi'lmuiin...... . 

. K. W Miililii ,..^ 

. i-vj^ukT \Xiii 

H;r.<lorlrk W riL^ssfelil. .! 

, riii-j Hajli'v Iliii-st . 
Ull.KE:Kii^Sr.M,n.|lur.',AX^r 

..Ajiifii^i. liurp-»Lr...,.,AML 
ii*/itri:€i b\ LI riiotd. _.,,.,. 
VVvl'*'!? >\^ UotisfiTeit,..., 
J. Hslj«rULie3<i„,,.,.Airt 
H. Lti Bort 

A. A, wijiiiiow,...,,..:::: 

Henry Ik^dt., Akt 

(iiimi'doZaJltig.,.....,..*, 

11. W. b^irnim 

lAi Ia H cshmld t, , A it t . 

.| uhn C. iteil in u.u Aijt , 

Luii F rm ?1, SjwiCyg,, Atrt. 

U tJolrlisolitnta:.,, 

Aiit^jrilu K, it)t FriJia^Aa^t! 

Ctiarlts (iuljle Airt 

A. Bamjen, ,.,... _,.A|fL. 

EuiTL-iiB t^eeK*:r .7., 

J*?iin Zinateii. Ajft 



-l/ipofnfftj/rftm. 



WeK£ Vli-plnjB _ 

ArKentim; . . . , 

Ark^eutlDu 

OhIu„,., ......,, 

M]i9FiiLefauBett« 

Auatrli-Hiinj^rtry . 
WyuminK,... .....,.,., 

Iowa*.,,;, .,,... 

Wiseofiftin........ 

Iowa ^ 

JJlhtHot f.if CoJiunbiu, 
AufliriurHnniiary..., 
A 1 1 ?jt riu-n II uitary , , . . . 

rountcticrut ,.,„ 

I'eiinKyH'iVniii,,... 

NtJiv York...., 

<'i!lciritdw*,, ,,„. 

IinJhina..., ,,,*.„.,.., 

(ietiunjiy ,^, „ _' 

Bolivia.;. .,.. 

LndLmia..... ., . 

.HmztL ,„.,, , 

, MihfliitBSppt,.,...^ 

Ndw York ,.. 



SttUira^ 



12,500 



Fftea 
Peea 









4 J "fKW V t'fokr^r, , 

- Cbark^sC. CJn2(,<nc*., 

. J- W. Lut* 

, JoeepJi W. Merriujq. 

John J", CaplRH. 

Jwha (7. MtmiTiij 

, J. IL j>awns, .,, 

Moritit Jir.iun. ....... 

JnhtitK Hmith...,..., 
Anstm fl Jidingoo.,, 
Kdward Bei11o*...„, 
Jnhn Fotvier_ .._.,. 
WlUltnnManlB...... 

Sarnunl L. (imeey... 
I^ftH.Wileoi,. ..... 

JkJ. 6\ Bnnrttnel..... 

Jchtir;o<Jt[T3uw....... 

J. W. Haij3j|iiifi„.. 



A^r. 



Atrt, 
A^r 
Aurt. 
A^, 



LTnU«d Statijs.'. 

New Hajupsklre...... 

Bro-^ll ..... ^,, 

Bru.iil„... ..,,.,..:"■■' 

Braail , ;" 

lilinola ,..,.,.... 



Bimll ,,„ 

Bhode Island.... 

UhJOn., 

Mafifljichnaettfi,, 

t>retfoii.., , 

rtiile...,.,,,..,. 

Child , 

Ctine..*„ „ 

fhile 

Coinrada...,.,... 
Pennsylvania ... 
Ma^fiacibii^sttA... 

New Yiirk ,. 

IJtilftwait^.. 

Mas^fbusjtittB .. 

IMinolB.,.,.. 

ChJaa .,,,, 

MinneHota,,,, „, 
CaUfornlft., 






1.£00 



2.010 



'im" 



fi,«ii 



Fern 
t^ea 

aXMJQ 



F«ea 

a,jsflo 



UNITED STATES CONSULAR SERVICE. 



203 



UNITKD RTATES CONSULAR 8K:UVl€^.-Cr^^'Tt^*l KD. 



COJ-OMBIA- 

BarniEitjurUa 

Rlu Up^liu , 

Bogota 

tiutilirUUULIIfflL, , 

Call ......... ... 

Cucutji..,. 

UOUElA.r.,.. 

OarlAKi^nii^.^ — 



li€K!4V.t del TOTO — 



Mcrtt'UliiH 

l-^innni II. ..... ..^ , .» 

(:OSTA JttCA-.Snn Jf.i^u.... . ....,, 

i'tiuui. Artiniis , ,.. _.^ 

DENMAKK AND lX>Mi.NM L\lH- 

St. TbtimasH W- L ...,..,.,, 

Krt'di^rlrlf^t prj .^. . 

DOM tS\t , V N 1 1 K P U B Lie- 

PULTIO ritltlL ,..,.-. * , 

Mi»fjLu <lirl!?U .,.*.-. .^--...j^-. 

Siiwuni:!-^. '- .,*.,,,. 

lianiu iNjmlQ^ct * - 

Aitun, .f - ..,*..... 

JS&GQTiE 

Snncliesi.. . .** .,,,.. 

HCDAliOH— 
Gnay OQulL , 

Ei»nierd.UliiB , 

BiuntifL,-. ' ... 

tSAWCS AND DOMINKVN.S— 
Aliten, Africa. 



4Uiten, Ai 
Beai^bf . 



I 



Ornn.H...... .K..,..«..K... 

Bordraiillt .4^^--.^^'^. 

PiiU ..,,. 

CalaiH .. 

Buul I tffii e-»UT^a*<! r 

Gofiif -J m Ji ar, Af itLl^ 

GniEiiibli}, . .H ..... P, 

^UAHaloiipe Isluid, W, 1...... 

C9berbi>ur|i. 

H^'nllf Uf. ........... 

Be i]fl«iS,.,. *.,.,.. ^ 

^KMnlo... ...*.. *.,*.., .,. 

I4l tUh^tu3B& "- ^ ^ - 

D^lfDAt:. . -* - . ■ ■ ' 

LlmrJXftOf.^.. .....«.., *.-.*. 

byois^.*..,. 

Uijuii ..*. 

M&rf«>ine«.,..,.^... .- ..,,... 

BiuUa.p... .,.„,,........, 

reti*t... »,.....,.,,...... 

Toulijij 

Wttrtin Itjuo, W, I *,... - 

KiLot fis ,.,..,..„.. 

Anir*fr», .........J.. 

UrvJ*L..,.„ 

IVOriont.... ....... .H. 

fll.Nasiaii'a..,,. ...... ............ 

Kice ...,. 

(^DtlKA. 

Meiiione t^. 

Wmam .,. 

N4iaiui>a« Ncvr €*iUMJtpalih, 

PftrJM.... „.,.........., ..J, 

aiii'iTtia ., 

TroyoHi,^* ...h .. 

B(.<ut.ni{x..».f, ....^.. .......... 

Catntry. 

iJimklrli....... 

Lllltv....... 

Bo^mti .. ....... . ., » *-w 

Ci^iiri^. ....,i>. , ... ,. *... 



KattiC* 



W. L E?haw . 



Appointed from. 



PpniiisjlvaDla.. 



Oulombla 

l^ennsyltfrtnla.... 

0^»]umbln. 

Utili4.'iJ J^Latee ... 

Wri.'.hltisrioij, 

<uNnubEa 

^riir.v.Uind 

t^'jEiiibylYunka . .. 

V'irjytlnia,.. 

t.''<jlDEubia 

rolombfa 

NoTtb Ciirohna.. 

Kaniuu.,..,. 

COAtA RlCJL 



J.C. MtNjLlly .„. 

a ttstave V ulkiu a ij . . . , A ȣt. 
W. A. Bmrntiy.. . ...... Avi 

P. Ttli Lrt^l J as t. J t . . . . A |/t . 

UoiLry* Hallaiii ...,..AN:t. 

Itiifaol Miu(j-)i£ia, 

li, ( ;. (.Irunifiu- — ... , Aur . 
Williuto VV^. tnt3[tH,.. .... 

l^ftVirl U. HsimS. ,. ...A(it. 

ThrjQijui IJf^i'mn.r- ,.,,..,., 
Ui^Keklnh A,i.J tidKcr.. ..... 

.luhu c Cutdttt'll 

Mux JilornjJasieii A»fl . 

J fM^lt^0T-1-^n... iJllnolfi.. 

MEihlnn VjU! Hurrifcf KlKvte Itilaud 

AinJw .r. fjlFii^kifVCjoil..'V^l. VV*3i*t liuHbs 

VVillluih K ^liAiTit}....Aift.|Wuiit IdJIo^. 

Thniaaa Slaipsoii.,.. ..... . Rhudf^ IhlutiJ 

I jiMac T. ("o M t . . Ai^'t . LkJtD] n lea n Hepiibllc. . 

Jvnit M. VJ.Uniin............||}iitultilcar] Uepublic. . 

V. L. MnswfeiL............ ^OUltJ...., 

..li.'liii lliii'ily. .....L.,..Ajjt.'.>laiifiapbVHOtts 

Kd w u ta C Ut<ed . . , . A vt . ' t ^1 > m 1 D k<a n K epublic . 
Jg^e A. Fueui«.,. A^t. IhJiLjitiltrati Kepublic. . 

Perry M. Dt Tjeun. .. ...... Georgia.. ,.. 



Ft^rilmaiid SorvuL.. 
Pedro A. Miprtfira . . 



.AjzL. 



Cburles T. findlet. 

K. L. U. JWriwom Aii"^^. 

Aiitututi Fi^Lix < Jarla'. A(:rt. 
lien J. A, CDiii?ei*tltt, . . AjiL. 

AlbUin w.TotjririBt,. 

■1, MorHSi t'lmt Airt. 

.r. It. MIln^T 

WilliuNj 1 1 Hie Ajfl. 

I'i.'tHH- Miii.kijinil. 

Ci. H, j^ FuJersua.. 

U K. Ayatft.,.,,. 

AlexaiLdor M. Tlm^-liarii,.. 
K.J. E. RlilntifTlllo.Anl. 
Kf'nry M. Hiird3f......Aj<l. 

lilniff-r. Kulliiird ...... Atft. 

I U> II b I 'tj d M 1 1 li 1 ti>n , . . A Kt . 

tkM>. II. jQt'kAon ,, 

Elii^Q Jouard ,A(Zt. 

Walter T.tJHain,.... 

Jobn C.Cuvtfn 

Ernest Ifciiintitte, ..... Ac! I. 

R. P. jikliintT 

Slnion rmiTiiani Ahi. 

L,. H. NabrntuiK.. . . . . , .AkI. 

IjOuSBJ.B..|4iaTe,..,A|irL, 
tl. L. JJarU*........u....... 

J. I. Britain . . 

Ja]:ef°i H. Ludt^au Agt. 

A. Pitol. .AKt. 

L. PffJJITJl ..,..,.,. — 

T. Sinnkey 

TIartdd yi. Vnn Biiren..... 
I'hUtpT. nkldtttr, ...A(jt. 

Au. Ifinard , . . . Afst. 

Enjile Uc ]ir>ih A|^t. 

rViii Ifi. vvihicr ..,. 

.IntiH K. f iiMvdy , ........... 

W.4. Priuktilt 

Cias ion h aUjj t Attt . 

Williani IV Ar well .... 

ManBDiellkei' A^. 

BenjHmin Morel . .... Airt. 



CAlffomlfl , 

AJxiTla^. 

Algerja.... 

Aliiterla 

.>fcw Yark 

Svw TTork 

LmUana 

.Noi Lh l.'andJEia 

OpiliLH.H.!tlCUl. 

iJJsrrietQf rulumbla. 

IliJMOh 

lViEi]:!iylTaiiiliL 

Pr:iii«^ 

t'raiioe 

h'r&Eice 



Haiml le BourfrEH-Hbt... Am. 



Efliiador.. 
Plraadur.. 



Coil b^L'ttcut 

Now York 

New Vi.Tlt.. 

Oblo......... 

Kraace 

Obic* 

CtjrtleiL.. 

Fraa^ 

Knmee.... 

Vk im!iy [vania 

Ohio 

KriHHiO 

l-Yanco 

liVani^i^ 

Knini'* 

New Jt^rae^ 

rrance 

Pritdeta . . . , , 

Mormeo..... 

Nuw Jtjrf^iy., 

Indiana. 

yowJcreoy 

Frain». 

Ditftrlct of Crjluiubia. . 

I'^PlTlL* 

Fnj.i3«e 

Pranfie.... 

Pennsylvania 

Francs 



Salary. 



12,000 
"2,066" 



Fees 
"8,666" 



4.000 
2.000 



1.&00 
2,500 



Fees 



Fees 
1,500 



3.000 



Fees 



3,000 
Fees 



Fees 
1,5(jO 
LSOO 
3,500 



1,600 
2.500 



2,500 



1,500 
1,000 



Fees 
6.000 
2,000 



2,000 



204 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



UNITED STATES CONSULAR SERVICE.-CONTINUBD. 



Place. 



Name. 



Appointed from. 



Salary. 



Saigon, Cochin China 

St. Bartholomew, W. I 

St. Etlenne 

St. Pierre, Mlquelon 

Tahiti*, Society Islands 

Tamatave, Madagascar 

Tunis, Africa 

GERMANY— 

Alx-la-Cbapelle 

Annaberg 

Eibenstook 

Bamberg 

Barmen 

Berlin 

Sorau 

BrempTt.,..,-,., 

I \ ra.kc iLnd N ti rilenhamm 

nr\sriiur haven & l^eestomunde. 

Brtis.1 Ail. 

Brti iia wtok., . . * 

Cbmnnitz. .. .,». 

C^tbiirK ^ 

S.inriWjcrw , 

ri-l.i 



Edward Schneegans.. 

R. Burton Dluzey 

Hilarys. Brunot 

C. M. Freeman 

Jacob L. Doty 

M. W.Glbbs 

B.L.Barryte,V.C.... 



Saigon 

Pennsylvania ... 

Pennsylvania 

New Hampshire. . 

New York 

Arkansas 

Colorado , 



rri^ft'itl...,. 

Drtsileu,. .*..* 

Uu KBoldurf . .* 

KsAea.. , .,, 

Fratikfort.... 

Cosael . * * , * ^ » 

t^rijim] IHch V7ul bach 

Pretburtf, Budcm., , 

(i liiuab£iu 

Hamburg , ^ 

KteL„...... 

Liit>e«li - 

UiUi?tmttt*J mvi Cuxhaven. 

T lannvcr 

Lve&L.... 

Lefps^c: .....** 

ClOTO. »,*... 

Mauri ebnrit 

Mttin)(,,H... ...,► 

MuDnbolm.. .., 

NtiUHtadi 

MuEikb *...,.* 

AuKiEburg X 

Nurenit>er]f , 

I'taiieii 

MsrluiBukLtBben 

^oJLngva *..... 

htaUEri ►..».,.*..* 

Uunilg'^..,,....' 

Kunigislxir^ 

f^uJneitiuiirla. ., 

Btutt^ii^rt. 

W«imar.... 

yAtUiii,.. 

GHEAJ^ BiUTAiN AND DO- 
MINI ON S- 
Adviii Aroblii,... 

Hod^Lda... 

Amberatbui^. Oiii 

AnUiiUft, W. J.. 

Montserrat. 

Husoau, Du]iMh>ica 

Auckland, ^. Si 

UhrlBtchureb ... 

fjunedln 

MrJti>£HU1tL.... 

VVelUn^ttin... 

BftfbddoB. W. 1 

t^u Liicjm.K,*., 

bit. Vlni^nt 

Bjli hfirat A/riiaft 

Beif »4KtM Irclnnd 

Hiiiiynittna 

Lonaondt*rry 

huj^iin,.,H ► 4. 

BeLiire. Hotidumti 

BtiUevUlti. Out.... 



F. M.Bmndage 

J.F. Winter 

B.L. Harris , 

Louis Stem 

MaxBouchseln 

F. H. Mason, C.G 

William B. Murphy. .Agt 

Louis Lange. Jr 

Wllhelm Clemens. . . .Agt 

J. H. Schnabel Agt, 

C. W. Erdman 

T.J.Albert 

Jair^sO. Monahan , 

O.J. -i.i^l„> 

V. K. Ji>y..... Agt. 

Job 1 1 A. Hnrnes. 

JullM[lPljl.'i]l'i 

ChaiJ»-i L Cole 



Pennsylvania... 

Illinois 

Illinois 

Minnesota 

Illinois 

Ohio 

North Carolina . 

Illinois 

Germany , 

Grermany 

Kentucky 

Maryland 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Illinois 

Illinois 

Iowa 

Pennsylvania.. . , 



Fees 
12,000 
Fees 
1,000 
2,000 
Fees 

2.500 
2,500 



1,500 
3,000 
4,000 



2,500 



2,0U0 
2,500 
2,000 



F. Asthorver, Jr Agt. 

R. Guenther, C. G 

Gustav C. Kothe Agt. 

Ernest Grebert Agt. 

E. T. Leifleld 

G«orge Sa wter , 

HughPltcairn 

August Sartorl Agt, 

Jacob Meyer, Jr Aitt. 

Johann G. F. Starke. Agt. 

Wm. K. Anderson 

M.J. Baehr , 

B.H. Warner, Jr 

Charles Neuer Agt. 

Henry W. Diederich. . , 

W. Schumann 

Walter J. Hoffman 

Leopold Blum Agt. 

J. H. Worman 

G. Oberndorf Agt. 

Gustave C. B. Weber 

Thomas W. Peters 

Oscar Malmros. Agt. 

E. Z. Brodowski 

J.E. Kehl 

Philipp Albrecht Agt 

A. Eckhardt Agt. 

Ludwig Agt. 

Edward H. Ozmun 

Thomas E. Moore 

WilUam K. Herzog 



Germany 

Wisconsin 

Kansas 

Germany , 

Connecticut , 

Connecticut , 

Pennsylvania 

Germany 

Germany 

Germany 

Michigan 

Nebraska 

Maryland 

New York 

District of Columbia. . 

New York 

District of Columbia. . 

Germany 

New York 

New York 

Ohio 

District of Columbia. . 

Minnesota 

Illinois 

Ohio 

Germany 

New York 

Germany 

Minnesota 

District of Columbia. . 
Illinois 



2,0U0 
2.000 
3,000 
2.000 



3,000 



1.500 
2.000 
2,5tt) 



LfiOO 
1.500 
2,U0O 



2,000 
2,500 
1,600 



2,000 



aooo 

2,500 



2,000 
1,000 



E. S. Cunningham 

Vittorio Cremasche. .Agt. 

C.W.Martin 

H. M.Hunt 

Richard Hannan Agt. 

H. A. Frampton Agt. 

Frank Dillingham 

Robt. Pitcaithly Agt. 

W.G.Neill Agt. 

Robert Wy les Agt. 

John Duncan Agt. 

S. A. Macallister 

William Peter Agt. 

E. A. Richards Agt. 

Henry Goddard 

William W. Touvelle 

John G. Ballentine. . AKt. 
P. T. Rodger Agt. 

F. W. Magahan Agt. 

W.L.Avery 

M.J.Hendrick > 



Tennessee 

Arabia 

Michigan. 

Illinois 

Antigua 

Dominica 

California 

New Zealand . 
New Zealand . 
New Zealand . 
New Zealand . 

Delaware 

St. Lucia 

St. Vincent.... 



2.500 
2.000 
1,500 



Fees 



1,500 
1,500 



2,000 



2,000 



Ohio 

Ireland 

Ireland 

Ireland 

Montana... 
New York.. 



Fees 
3,000 



1,500 
Fees 



UNITED STATES CONSULAR SERVICE. 



205 



UNITED STATES CONSULAR SERVICB.-CONTINUED, 



PliAOJS. 



Deseronto 

Napanee 

Plcton 

Trenton 

Birmingham, England 

Kidderminster 

Kedditch 

Wolverhampton 

Bombay, India 

Karachi 

Bradford, England 

Bristol. England 

f7 I'^TI^'^'^t'^^ 

Hr. -!.■•■.. - i^nt.^ 

Cnk'uitii, 1ml[i]L- 

Akyalt .- 

Basseim^H'.- ,. 

Chita^unK 

Madrafl , 

MflulmeLs..... 

Rangoon- 

CnitipbclitOQ^N. B 

UntbuTSt 

-CftpcTown, Afrii-a 

IHirhai)^ Nn.tnL 

Klist LiOTldOtl 

Kirabtrley - 

rortEMmtiRih. 

Cardiff, Walu8.,,, 

Newport 

Ceylun, Indlirt 

|Vih>f rt*MiMfU' 

Chr,f-- r.-M.vn. l\E.l 

AIL.^:- -i. 

€leorgetown 

Sooris 

Snmmerside 

Chatham, Ont 

Chandiere Junction, Ont. . 
Coaticook, Que 

Hereford 

Lineboro 

Potton 

Stanstead 

ColllDgwood, Ont 

Barrie 

Lindsay 

Owen Sound 

Parry Sound 

Cork (Queenstown) ., . 

Waterford 

Dawson City, N. W. T 

Demerara, Guiana 

Cayenne, B. A 

Paramaribo 

Dublin, Ireland 

Athlone 

Limerick. 

Dundee, Scotland 

Aberdeen 

Dunfermline, Scotland 

Kirkcaldy 

Edinbuitth 

Galashiels 

Falmouth, England 

Scilly Islands 

Fort Brie, Ont 

Gaspe Basin, Que 

Paspebiac 

Gibraltar, Spain 

Glasgow, Scotland 

Greenock 

Troon. 

Goderich, Ont 

Clinton.. 



Guelph, Ont . . 
Halifax) N.S.. 



Brldgewater.. 

Urerpooi 

Jiwienbuiw... 
I, Bern 



Charles A. Milliner... Agt. 
William Temple ton., Agt. 
Jacob F. BeriUKer — Agt. 
Stephen J. Young.... Agt. 

Marshall Halstead 

James Morton Agt. 

H. C. Browning Agt. 

John Neve Agt. 

W.T. B'ee C. 

A. H. R. Armstrong.. Agt. 
Erastus Sheldon Day...C. 

Lorln A.Lathrop C. 

Arnold Henry Palin,Agt. 

C.W.Merriman C. 

Robert F. Patterson ... .C. 
Charles Findlay Agt. 



Name. 



R. A. Mactaggart Agt, 

Henry Scott Agt. 

W. J. Davidson Agt, 

John Young Agt, 

James S. Benedict 

Benedict C. Mullins..Agt 

J.G. Stowe C.G, 

A. H. Renne Agt, 

William H. Fuller. . . Agt. 
Gardner Williams. ...Agt, 
John A. Chabaud....Agt, 

Daniel T. PhUlips C 

William E. Heard... Agt, 

William Morey 

E. Bretscher Agt. 

Delmar J. Vail 

Albert Glidden Agt 

A. J. McDonald Agt, 

Caleb C. Carlton Agt 

John Gaflney Agt, 

C. E. Monteith 

J. M. Rosse C. A 



John R. Nichols..... .Agt. 

Hoel 8. Beebe Agt. 

Chandler Bailey Agt. 

B. F. Butterfleld Agt. 

William Small 

A. E. H, Creswlcke. ..Agt. 
Jas. M. Knowlson — Agt. 
Wm. T. Robertson... Agt. 

Walter R. Foot Agt. 

Daniel Swiney 

Wm. H. Farrell Agt. 

J.C. McCook 

G. H. Moulton 

L. Lalanne Agt. 

Arthur Deyo Agt. 

J. Wllbour 

John Burgess Agt. 

Edmund Ludluw Agt. 

John C. Higgins 

Andrew Murray Agt. 

John N. McCunn 

Andrew Innes Agt. 

R. Fleming 

John Stalker Agt. 

Howard Fox 

John Banfield, Jr ...Agt. 

Ossian Bedell 

AlmarF. Dickson 

Daniel Bisson Agt. 

Horatio J . Sprague 

Samuel M. Taylor 

James A. Love Agt. 

Peter H. Waddell. .. Agt. 

Robert S. Chilton 

A. O. Pattison Agt. 

Charles N.Daly 

John G. Foster 

William H. Owen. . . .Agt. 

Jason M.Maok Agt. 

Daniel M. Owen Agt. 

W.M.Greene 



Appointed from. 



Salary. 



Canada 

Canada 

Canada 

Canada 

New York.... 

England 

England 

England 

Ohio 

India 

Connecticut. . 

California 

England 

Wisconsin.... 
Tennessee.... 
India 



$2,500 



2,000 



3.000 
1,500 



1.500 
5,000 



India., 

India 

India 

India 

New York 

New Brunswick 

Missouri 

New Brunswick 

Cape Colony 

Cape Colony 

Cape Colony 

Illinois 

Wales 

Maine 

Ceylon 

Vermont 

Prince Edward Island.. 
Prince Edward Island.. 
Prince Edward Island.. 
Prince Edward Island.. 

Idaho 

New York 



3,000 



2,000 
'l,666' 



1,500 



Canada 

Canada 

Vermont 

Vermont , 

District of Columbia.. 

Canada , 

Canada 

Canada 

Canada 

Ohio 

Ireland 

Pennsylvania 

Colorado 

Guiana , 

New York 

Rhode Island 

Ireland 

Ireland 

Delaware -. 

Scotland , 

Wisconsin 

Scotland , 

Ohio 

Scotland 

England 

ISngland 

New York 

Massachusetts 

Canada , 

Massachusetts 

Ohio 

Scotland 

Scotland 

District of Columbia. . . 

Canada 

New Jersey 

Vermont 

Nova Scotia 

Nova Scotia 

Nova Scotia. 

Rhode Island 



2,000 
Bees 
1,600 



2,000 



2,000 



3.000 
3,000 



2,000 



2,500 
■2.666*" 



2,500 
Fees 



1.500 
1,000 



1.500 
3,000 



1.500 



1,500 
3,500 



2,000 



CilirACiO DiJLY NKWS ALMANAC FOlt I'tm. 



UXITED WTATKS CtJNSU^r^AJl KliRV^lOK,^ONri3JtiKD. 



Pt.ACE. 



llniiillUm, Out 

BrHTillord.,-.^. ,--,--♦- -, 

(ititi * 

Piirti L.... . ... . 

H"iMirl, TnHiuuntft, ,,, 

I . Jl I ] I M ■(■'?i t < 1 1 1 . , . , , , . i -n . , . . f 

Hi Tii^hn iri|if, 'S'hiiiii ....... 

i I [J iMcrsrli>UI , t£rii£lrtHil .... . 

Hull, Kiiwlanci .,..,iWi][iiini l\ Wmylh,. 



A'ftiJif!, 



iLH Ittjwltt. A^t. 

J . ftyiTMJn * 

VViu. W. Hume Ami 

AU*xttr!ilpr H. Webtitt'r 

IjlncJ^uy TuMciuk Ai£l. 






lOUEii A. Lk'tlt 

CM. Fa t4 It h ti rflf I'D . H 
.. ..efl A. Xgn<^!i... 

MitritfL^K Hht Il.lj. KUUtlBtlJdL.. 

I'uri Miiniut^..,.,... iL. IK Bnk€T> Jr...... 

I ^ irt >i iiri n K, U, Baker, . , . , . ... 

!<T. Aiinp JiarK,.., ... ...... |K. \V. 1 larriB. ........ 

^i\ vMijiiiLh-tn^^lar' ^ 'l^h. i^. Parnuhf^nsHj'n . 



Ai^t 



KiiiiZHtfiii, lint. 

liiinainn^iie.. ,. ...... 

Tje«<l.i. Kii^liiiKl. 

LlTRrp'OnL t<lit^lufi>l 

ilolvhtuiL,. 

wi, Mi^lL"ir»,...K....... 

London , l^nKl'L'i'f^- -^'^ ^ >- ' - - - ■ 

i.K*vt'r T ........ . 

[<r»iii1nn, t}»i 

MjlUi^ i l.4lUlbLlV. 

MiiTirhcML' r, Kuwliiml 

Mi.i^liicMirtiu, Aui^trnUri . . 

Arli'luklt].. ^.. ,. ........^. 

Alhsin^.,.,.., .. ,. ,. 

Krontiamip. . , ^ , 

MiMl.'Ei-tl. N. ll.... ........ ,. 

Ni.^wc-iL'il |i' . . ■ t, 

^l'\^•\\\hl\^■\^^ .,...,,.,,,.... ..i.,. . 

M^iiiLri'iil, Que.*..*.,.. ... ........ 

LuU'aii .,.,,„„,..,..,.,.. 

Or<jnvMl0 ...h.. ,, .... 

Hetnriitntffor4^-. 4-. , 

lliiiirinuchpn. 

Mnrrft^buTu.Ont 

t.VuriiwiiJ! M -T. , - . T. . 

Nn?isnii ., ►.. .-r ...H .. 

AlltL^rt Town 

IHI ri mi iru Town.. . . _ 

< ri PViTixfr'ft 1 f uThitr. , . . 

<iri*i.'i] 'rurt tt) ( 'iijf 

MliltlOVrtOWR ,- ,.r.. 

Nc w r a H t Uhj ii-'L' > I i«i K riff I »]14 L . , 

rarUnJtj 

W. irnrUe[»ioL ......_,... 

WUndpr] a.in\ ......»,...,. 

Ki?waii*(.]e, N.S- W,,.. ..... 

BrlRbnrta ...-,.. 

Tow navUEr.., ..►,.. 

NtntfHi'H h!illH«Odt.......H ..... 

rtt.CniheriEPS . ..... ... 

Ni^ttin^tiaED, ^hKtuitd. .......... 

liiTfiy .....„......* 

r.olit'^l^r ........^.....^.... 

ikriLlta. Out.. 

N< in b Baj-. N Ipbsiui;.. ..,-.. 

ftiifUniry , . 

WjuilmuE$h$ia^ ,.,,., 

OttttWJi.OdU,..,.-* .,,.... 

ATTLtirlor. ............. — ....... 

PulmerstiSii, OlQt.. 

Wlartttn 

Wtncham. 

Plynnjulh, Ka^lund 

piiriuioutb. ... . , , 



-., A>£l. 

MriMinlllY. TwUclien,... 

K. R Ahboir...... Ant. 

r^pwlfi l>!3ctfr 

JaniGH RoTl4 

Ulrhard 1). E(f>li<?rLEi^.A)iL. 
.\*ihn ilammUl ..... ..Af!i. 

Wmiadi M, U5!lw>r»a 

t\ W. l*n'fi£<nit........A|2l, 

11. W.^LiIvprt... ............ 

J. H. ripoui. ,Jr 

WnUani K.OrJniu'H .,.„., 

.r^jEiii l-". ISra.v ..... , . . , . 

Tbaili^ji A. Mi]i[>li>..Aut. 

Knint U-JJyiriL'b .\(2i. 

A. D. A Hon AkI. 

(t, tit-^uteSspaebur . . . . 

H. Il.r'rth.,.. Ant. 

(;. V. Mc^[JiPri)«jf ...,AtiL 

Jithn L. Bitt.intft^r,... 

T hi nuns j^ r.a |i tt? (.Mil . . , A irt , 
Ali?x, LtLd>mitJ ....... Aj^T:, 

W. W. Wark A*.^. 

.liHhn [>lnoeo A^i 

.Solin E. Unmlkiin.., 

llJivicl A, Kiimk AkI. 

ThMiunwJ. Malfttin 

.1. *t. Maura. Aici, 

N. E. U. Mlldrtl.......AMl^ 

Abupr W. tj}ri[flii...,.AKi 
K.tTvard W. HcilJt^I. ..A*.^L. 
l>adLE:l IJ. HHrKt'iit,. .. Aifl- 

Hi'metj W, MetLair 

T. ?^. Htn»ni! ,.At,'1, 

Hitiia V. tiialst^n ..Aiit- 

Thoft. A. Horan .A^t. 

K W. <iortltiff 

VVtn. .1, WearhornL.A^t. 
.Jtihn I[ HifjrerEr,... ...Agl. 

H W. Rnisii 

L, II. (N-lliird ...A(it. 

H LV MuFarliind , 

Cb im . K. K lid wt»!i . , , . A « t . 

S. S. J^art.ridKe ...A«t. 

K.A. WrtkfHeld 

rhiiilpl.L McKlhiwii. . A\ilr 
W, P. .Martin......... Airt. 

li. r, Wbitt.. Axt. 

mar] PS K^ Turner 

C. H.San^Tor 

Loion 9, Hant 

J. H. Tibuando. Apt. 

H.O. Bt.41 aIi. 

.Joicepb G, BtepbenB. 

.la!*t>ef BH.Tt]ett Apt. 

William Carey ...Aifi. 

E. B. Rt?noaf A^rt. 

N. R. Bbytier 



Appiftutrd /itHif . 



Sii4tjn^. 



GuernBey.... 

Pdrt Antonio^ Jamaica ^ 

Port HupH. Ont. ........... . . , ..l I Farrv 1M>| IL , 

k^tjOTboroi)*(h ....... iFraiife J.Bt?M...., ...Agt. 

Port LoiiU, MauKttUA Aohn P. Crnupbpr 

Port K.O wan* Oni " - " " 

Port giirti1a,Ont 

Pc^rt StftDlQy, F. L... 
Prescotti Out 



tieoriEe R. KRiniasUii.. 
NeaTMcMUian.. ....... 

John K. Rowtii.. 

GrenTtlln.TamQs....... 



Mlehl^n.............. 

CAiindifc' ..^ --. 

<^iinadii..*.... 

Canuda ...«*... .... 

rfWibHiiia... 

I'UJ^niH.iiIa... ....... 

rjilirtiraia...,...,, 

^^hio ....,,.,.... 

Mi'iHiiiirl!. ..... — 

I } I ^t r Ic't of Co I uDi UIu . . 
.tiimau'a... ...*..... ^* 

rluijiafcjt ..... 

.fitmMlra — 

.lamaica. 

.^Itirylu II ►!.,.... 

.iHitiaJcn ............... 

.iaruau'a . . 

~ ijui^f ana....... ...... - 

Caniifli*,.. 

Ubodo ibldad 

Oh^ei ,....,..,... 

Kln^ynd... »...-.. 

Ki>j;LLinr1..... 

^I iif^^n* "li usf tl.^ ........ . 

Kimlui^L..^.^... ....... 

uhhi 

ManP.'iar^Hu^tt^.. ... . ... 

Ni^w Y^trfe... — ..,..., 

Niirtli Daknui. 

K'ltjth AiistrnMu 

Wt'nt AiiMriiHa ,. 

VVVtrl Anal miiii. ....... 

fUjhi 

Nt*w llrutujwit'fc ...... 

N«w BniJiJ^wJt'k ...^... 

Mti1J^Oll^l..... 

rauadii.... 

(*iinadJ*.,...,.....s-.... 

( iiniida 

il^auada .. ... 

Kcntmky.... 

('anada..... 

(Hiin 

Hftliamaii, ............. 

Bahanms..... 

BiL^amiui 

B.I banian ....... ....v..,, 

Ba^iamas. 

ME4liie... 

EnirltLnd , 

EtL^lauil 

Knfiland.... .., 

iniouis 

ueenaliHml. ........... 

UfipriF^lDTjd 

L"w Vturfc... .,,.,.. 

Outario... ,...■,....,,.. 

Iowa 

Kn^land... ., ..... 

Kfifzland 

Malnti ......... ........ 

CapadJa......... 

CHniiJii..... ...... ...... 

CaiiHda. 

rcinneyUrut. ........ 

Ccmuiictl cub. ...,.....*. 

New Vork, ......,, 

Canada 

Canada. ............. .. 

IntVlanR,..*.....,.,..,. 

LiioiclantL........... .. 

Knt^^and .,*. 

jL'raey...... .....*.. 

PtiDnEiylTBJiIfl.. . , , . . „. 

MalEic. *.z 

Canada.............. ... 

CHlLfornlft ,/.,. 

ailcbiiiaJi. ...... .....*.,. 

Mkblijfan.. ........... 

Iowa ...,...„. 

N*jw York 



Fees 



6m) 



IJOI 

'2m' 



&Mi& 



Liu 
l,6fii 



Ffes 



tm 



troo 



2mi 



FteB 



ItM" 



Vees 



a,(i» 






^ 



F«*« 
J.EIO 



UNITED STATES CONSUL AR ^KRVtCE. 



UNITISI) STATlilSt CUNHUIMK **KFtVlCK.-CtlNriMl."fKIi. 



Place, 



Wdj. W. Hoiiry...... 

C. A. UounlnmiiM..., 
.tiis. Hsivtu ....,.,.., 

CJiarLea C. tiftf^iyes . 



AKt, 



Qutibtie........ ,,. 

KimotiEjkL Qnciliec 

Bfc, Chrlstoplier, W, I. 

Norifl , 

Bt, (jcnr^c'i, Bon" a tin 
gt. IJiitanii riulaniJi... 

Sorel ,,H*.H... 

Wau*'rloo,-..-*t 

St. Jtihn. N. B ,.,, 

riiinpothella IslanU. . 

Frerit'riotcpu ,^^. 

Grariicl Monaa. . ...... 

Bt. Jobd'ft, N- r.. -»*.,.. 

Bt, Jfllin's^ Qaeboc.... 

P^tLbiim 

Sli. Bteptipn, N.H 

t^i. Andrijw. ^... 

CoiirtrletiJ. ' H'. W. BiLby , , . Airt- 

SnuVl Ste- Maria, UhIl . . . , (ti. w. Sbifttjs 

t^JmUlDld, Knt^land ,,..----.-!.ltini<j» J4ihri^t.n>i 

EiirDsli^y Itubort. r>. JVLa.i1iJJtii>n , A^'t^ 



NtlWil- 



It. r*, rnoloy 4... . ,.. 
J, M. Aiithiwr 

Arthur sdi. Nf>wi'.l!., 
Ifn B. Alyi^r;! 

Aumcf^ T. JSharltJ*v., 
Wlljriini A. FriibHL-r. 

Kil.MlMikeu Aiii. 

Mfvrtin rl . Carter 

i^hiirloHi n^nl 

Will Earn L, Mir»LiLiiv]..ALf(. 
JiLMiry rri.vic Ajii 

Chiuicji A. MiirulluMj^li.. 
f^eorize II. ^Lit^kiiuir. .A^t 
M. .1. Burke 



,AkT, 
Apit. 

Afcr. 

Aift 



AitiktittlM fPftm, 



Vermont 

MiiUie, -,.,,, 

illlmda^. 

t^t. UhrlEStijpber. 



Sfiw V< irk... ...... 

RbUik' lb^lanc.L,,.. 

laUEMliI ,,... 

(.^iiriHjdu. ., K^..., 

InilLiinoi ,. . K4. . 

Jfevv HruiijiwlL^lc.. 

Nt^w Bnin^Vk'k'k. - 
New BrLiivsvrieh.^, 
IViiiiJsylviuilii...,, 

Kvvf Viirk-.K 

t,Hil'bLH" 

|QiH'tht'e,.,„T....r. 

.Mil Erie. .,.„h 

New HrudSTfk^lL..., 
IIEJhOlR 



\V. K. tiiv«ii Ai£L nidlriul uf ToluuiliiB 



W, Ar3>nJ..,.,.,.,.A^;L 

.r.T. Wmiams 

It. A. MifstiJfy 

nr.ru WtrhiiSt' ,..,A^l. 

-Ir E. Unftkiy. ,„ ;Oiil(i .. ,. 

W, ,1, M iiln,., ' Eiiifland 

A. C. jIij?j|£S>... I'jn^liLml 



Kii m II ml MaonnibfT,. A^t. 
WilEliim A.KjQyndldH.Atft. 
JiuiiL'b ^. ltelt^ai\.r,.Ai(t. 

A Ah Seyfert,,,..,,... 

A It* J anrtor B. .Ifi^sku. . ..... 

tirumh VV. I'reti?... 

VV, Boweii Apt. 

M. S, Kcl waj. , A^ 

(rPfirny K, West. 



BhorbmokOt Que 

OoQkHtiJro^ — 

Ui}giuitl(;...r,H-- 

!*ierra Loodc, Afridn. . . . . , 

!S!njzapore, ».»....,..,,,..- 
I'lMumiT .X...... .,- 1... . -- ►. 

:?i"Niiti.iiiiiiUm, KuK'tiii'l '■ 

t'HirlhltlOUtb .. ,. .... ^-^.. 
\Vryiin>utb. .. ^i....- . + - . -» 

I'ljJI't'EllieVLllQ .. ., ., 

i<'rul L^bjabunif . i 

piatttia.. ..,./, . .-. 

KtraLfurd, Ont.. 

Surm Fiji iHliindl! . . . , . 

biwaDJsea ,,_„+... 

Jiiiinflly. -..,,, 

MHford HiLveo. 

Bydner.N.S , 

Arlcb&t *.,,..,..,.......,,, 

Cape Caaeso. ,.,,....... 

IriKiljjburg. 

PitttTu ..r. -, ► 

Tort Uavrkfiburj A Miili^r i vv>. , 

F'lij^^wuph and VVaNace. ........ 

t^j-dmy.N.:^. VV 

Nh irf Ik ItlaiKl * , .- 

Thrf ti Bi vers, Qop. . . , 

Artbabaaka r. 

Toronuj, Oiil..,,.,t....T---.^- .. 

i>*b*wa *..-,►. 

Trinldftd, W. I 

tircaada ,,„^t..x.h, 

iStarutiron&rH-* *, . ,. 

Tuiifttltllt Erijsslnnd .. . . - ...... 

I'urkslflland. W, L .,.„_, 

Otx^kbura Haf bur, ■ 

Salt Ca?..,,,.,,,. ............... 

VanoouTCTi B, C-h ^ r 

BoBKlBJld .....,.., ..,r,...,- --.- 

Ciunberland*,. -.-.....- 

Vlctorta^B. G.,..*..,. 

Cbamoinna ., 

NaDALmD ,„. .^.. ..... ... 4. 

WaLlHceburgli* Out 

Wtedaor, N.S., .,...-,.-- .- 

Ckeverle.. .4,.^,.- 

KkDiEHp^irt 

Jfurrsboro ^4* -f - ■ 

RdTsrHebert. *... J 

WindBOr, Ont... ...-..* f. . 

Wlmntoeg, Man. „...-.,.... W. H, N, Graham,, 

DBlOTftftio. Albf?rtM. ]Ierron..-.Aift. 

Elsersoa....... .h, ^ ,. . OuTican AlrArtbur.. .Afftr 

tfort WllUamt ODt tr. \v, Jarvla .H..,Atirt, 

GrpttlL, .^^ . .,.. ,^ ,**»,! Bnc.jcli Wtnklor.. . . . . . Afzt. 



Mi('h1};ii 
■'[iElL^llhrn 



CJiietkbii -. 

Nnrth CtifuHim- --.,-. 

Alnbliina..^ 

HimJtvS t^i.'itr.ltitiJt^tils.. 



H. Btntit 4|ft 

Allrt?rt W.Hart Ajit 

ll.C. V. l*Vatt4?.....A>rt 

John R. Davlejq .Aitl. 

Aldxitnilpr Burn . . . . . . Apt. 

CulirjHl W. Morrlu.. .A*ft. 

iri^urife W, BiilL... 

IsjHie Rolitnjjon, . ..... Ajrt. 

Ut>iHlii J. 1 j^doQi. 

A n hii r PollTiiii. Airt . 

WiiFinnil^SuwelL. ,...,. 
W. P'.at<jrlckt!r,.,,...A|et, 

Alvin^mitb . . 

P. J. Iiuan .,.,Azt. 

Ert WHPrl Kef^ns Agt. 

Win. Barriaon BfadlL^y... 



Siif4ir]f. 



Fees 












2,EXK> 



8vUUJ 



Ftieis 



1*?tinbiiR H.nunhaTnAfft- Turks I^itLad.. 
ntina-l F. irarHmt . A^t. Turks laliinil.. 

I J. Kdwin Dudley Massatt] ufiettH. 

F. il. Blocht>erffiir — Afft, ( irci>2un 

Geofffct W. CHiitQn...A>n. Britlali Columbia., 
AbraUam K. Smitk. ....... lIUnfijH . . 

J, S. tiLbbou .Agt^ A labamfl 

, _ „_„ Micblgan,. ._ 

J. T. Hoke ... Wesit Vlrffinla 

J.G. BurtBesB,.,. ,,,, A(rt. " " ., 

A, Fp Bnrrten .,. , . Ajft. 

L.H.Mokfl.. ....... ..Apt. 

J, C. Gordon., ..„,,, -Apt, 
H. C. Morrlp 



CJimbce l.....^ 

(jix^bei- .................. 

Wuat Vir»rlnrtt 

h'\}\. 

WffHiin^Lh ,. 

Walpifl 

W'alL^?i 

iitHrHf't of ('olumbbi..,. 

NlHVLl fil'Mliia... ,,. 

:N^,va Hcniia ....... 

\<.ivu ^iinMEi, 

fivviv KrfHia ...,.,,..,. 

Nova Sc<>tka 

Nova Hcot1a,,,,,-t - 

Wci^blnptun ..H. 

New huuth WaJiusj 

Maine , 

Quebec .-,....,,. 

Oblti.. .................. 

Unlaflo.., 

Obio 



Tobagc^ * 
UllnoFfl . 



Nova Suotid. 
Nova Scotia . 
NoTa i^cntla , 
Sova Bcoda . 
MIcbtiraa..,., 

Indiana. 

Manitoba 

Marfltobit.,... 
OntarLu. ...... 

MitnJtobaH.... 



Fttesi 



hm 






FeeH 



2.(m I 



i.uiju 



1.500 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



UNITKD STATES CONSULAR SERVICB.— CoNTINlTBD. 



Letbbrldin?: 

^ i hrt h p< t rtal , A -"Sri ill tm^ „ . , 

Rat l*url.U4CUi. Unt ....«.^, 

WlH^HlOC^H N. B .....»..,. 

KilmUhtiUfii. ., . . , * . ^. , 

Yarniuutli* M. S. ._ , * , _.*„,., ^ 

Atjiia[H>nES. . . . . . » 

BurrLnniton . . > , r . . , 

Dl\ihy „„...„.,„...... 

MtiL^Umrnc^ ..,,«,,,,. ,^ . 

UREKCK-AtbenH *. 

inrtvufi — *."^ 

Curlu -- , --. 

KalaTitnla.. ., 

Za,nt.Q ,.*, *,... 

(jJUATKMALA-rJtiiistiiialm.... 

CbaraiHTlci*. ►,,,*, 

LLvingHtijn ...... ^ .. i^ ..> , 

(Jpns ,...., ^,..... »,.... 

<Jiii:']tftlt«endiTiKJ:i 

^Aii jQsu Ue u imti^mifihu 

FIAITJ-Cape Hft^thri .*..-, 

(iirmilvfB...... »„....,... 

Port tie Pais. .^.. .. ., 

J'ort-Bii't'rlnOft ,,, . ...... 

AUX CATtJB -..**.....,, P^ .H 

Jii^Miel 

.Irrrtill^.p... ., .,.H . 

MLILL|£4JAI1il} .,,H 

1 t Ul t^ifttVO... 

S(. Man' .., 

HAWAII Tlonnlnlw 

nos LH H AS -T(inuL*l|;jiH»a 

Am^palii...... 

IVlbit *..,. .,. ., 

Nittaomo , . 

Puerm 0"Tt«£. 

8ftn -luttticlttt. . ... p. .,.,.,,*.. . 

Waa Pi-dn.) J^nlii 

Tr«j£lUg„...... .,..,...,.... 

Utitlii ..... PP,., 

tioaacca ...-,., .* , . . 

liliq.Ul.Q ..,,...... — 

[TALV- ^ ^ 

Citetol I AW arc ill Stubl*. .......... 

&i)TrPOli> , , . 

Ctttonia...... 

Florene* ,..,.....,.,.* 

Bolutoia. .- ....p,...H,. 

Qennft ., 

Sun IlecDO... ,♦..,.... 

LeL'li^riu, . .....*, *.*,., * p .*,...*.. . 

Currarti 

Mf^^e^iniL ,....,.,. 

Rej^#lo, Calabrtn. 

Milan 

Npiplea 

Sktl 

RW11....-.P 

PfllBrtno 

CftFlnl... ...... 

G LT>!ontL ............... 

X.uLCuLll... , 

Trapani 

Rome 

Ancona 

Cagllarl 

CI vtta Vecchia 

Turin 

Venice 

JAPAN-Nagasakl 

Tamsul, Formosa. 

Osaka and Hiogo (Kobe) 

Yokohama 

KOREA— Seoul 

LIBERIA— Monrovia 

Cape Coast Castle 

MASKAT-Maskat 



F. W. Downer Agt. 

W. H. Dorsey Agt. 

Gkjorge B. Friable.... Agt. 

Frank C. Denison 

J. Adolpbe Guy Agt. 

Radcliffe H. Ford 

Jacob M. Owen Agt. 

T. W. Robertson Agt. 

William B. Stewart. .Agt. 
T. Rowland White... Agt. 

D. E. McGinley 

M. T. Sourmely Agt. 

A.C. Yat«s 

Charles E. Hancock. Agt. 
D. A. Pantasopoulos.Agt. 

Alfred L. Crowe Agt. 

A. M. Beaupre 



Carl Abegg Agt. 

John B. Terres. 



Name. 



Frank C. Dennis Agt, 

Samuel Wolf ord 

G.A.Morrill Agt. 

Upton Lorentz Agt. 

L. W. Llvlng8;.on 



Henry E. Roberts.... Agt. 

Jean B. Vital Agt. 

L. Treband Rouzier..Agt. 
Francis W. Mitchell. Agt. 

L. Kampmeyer Agt. 

Charles Miot Agt. 

William Haywood, 

F.H. Allison 

William Heyden Agt. 

Louis Bier Agt. 

John E.Foster Agt. 

William B.Alger.. .Agt. 

E. B. DickaaoQ Agt. 

J. M. Mitchell, Jr Agt. 

J. T. Glynn Agt. 

B. Johnston, 



William Bayly Agt. 

William C. wlldt....Agt. 



J( !- t'U E, flayden 

A. <; Siuder Agt. 

A llf ini;:artner , 

E. <■. (.'mmer , 

Ciirlt^ tinrdlni Agt. 

jAriit'^ KIt'trher 

AUinri xMiiogllo Agt. 

Jonii^^ A. Hinlth 

UUksu Booeacci Agt. 

Cli:irl»'4M. Caughy 

Ni''olii Mll*ja. Agt. 

1^ iJliHiii Jar^is. 



A. Hmhi^t Byington 

NLcihulaa ^cuuck Agt. 

Tijmnso del Giudice Agt. 

CltUTCb Howe 

F. Crvicchlolo Agt. 

Fruniia ClOtta Agt. 

A rt h u r V erderame. ..Agt. 

IgniiKlo Mil) rone Agt. 

B (M tH>r d.? rastro 

A. P. Tiiiuiiialnl Agt. 

Alplii^neti Dol Agt. 

G IS r.^ a V Marsaniok. . .Agt. 

Purty McElrath 

Henry A. Johnson 

Chas. B. Harris 

James W. Davidson. Agt. 

Samuel S.Lyon 

John F. Gowey 

Horace N. Allen 

O.L. W.Smith 



A. Macklrdy, V. 



Appointed from. Salary. 



Montana . . . 
Assiniboia . 
Manitoba... 
Vermont... 



Maine 

Nova Scotia . 
Nova Scotia. 
Nova Scotia . 
Nova Scotia . 

Wisconsin 

Greece 

Virginia 

Greece 

Greece 

Greece 

Illinois 



Gautemala 

California 

California 

United StaU«. 
Florida 



Haiti 

Haiti 

Haiti 

Haiti 

Haiti 

Haiti 

Haiti 

Haiti ..: 

District of Columbia . 

New York 

Honduras 

Louisiana 

New York 

Massachusetts 

Texas 

Pennsylvania 

Louisiana 

Iowa 

Honduras 

Illinois 



District of Columbia.. , 

Iowa 

Ohio 

Wisconsin 

Italy 

Iowa 

Italy 

Vermont 

Italy 

Maryland , 

Italy 

New Hampshire , 

Connecticut 

Italy 

Italy 

Nebraska 

Italy 

Italy 

Italy 

Italy 

New York , 

Italy 

Italy 

Italy 

New York 

District of Columbia.. 

Indiana 

United States 

New Jersey 

Washington 

Ohio 

North Carolina 



Maskat . 



11,500 
'l,56o' 



6.a(J0 

lidoo' 



2.000 



1,000 



4.0U0 
2,000 



1.000 



1,500 



1.500 
1,500 



1,500 

lido' 



1,500 



1,500 
1,500 



2,000 



8,000 



1,000 
1,500 
3,000 



8,000 
4,000 
7,500 
4.000 



Fees 



UNITED STATES CONSULAR SERVICE. 209 


UNITED STATES CONSULAR SBRVICE.-CONTINUBD. 


Place. 


Name. 


Appointed from. 


Salary. 


MEXICO— Acapulco 


G. W. Dickinson 


New York 


S2.000 


San Benito 


L. R. Brewer Agt. 

Jervas Jefferls Agt. 

W. W.Mills 


United States 


Tebuantepec and Saltna Cruz 
Chihuahua 


Pennsylvania 




Texas 

Pennsylvania 


Fees 


Parrai 


James J. Long Agt. 

Charles W. landrick 

C. P. Snyder 


Ciudad Juarez 


Louisiana 


2.600 
2.000 


Ciudad Porflrio Diaz 

Sierra Mojada 




H. B. Haclsley Agt. 

W: N. Faulkner. 


Kentucky 


Durango. 


Texas 


Fees 


Toreon 






Ensenada 






Fees 
Fees 


I^Paz 






San Jose 


Abraham Kumitzky.Agt. 
P. M. Griffith 


Mexico 


Matamoras. 


Ohio 


1.500 


Mier 


Henry Vizcayo Agt. 

J.r'^<l?. Kaiser 


Mexico 


Mazatlan 


Illinois 


Fees 
4,000 


Mexico 


A wD.Barlow 

A 'i Raphall Agt. 


Missouri 


Aguas Calientes 


New York 




i>^vi^l,t F'urness Agt. 

W. ilfaden Agt. 

V> V 1 1 f I Gehren Agt. 


Mexico 




Puebla 


Texas 




Zacatecas 


Texas 




Monterey 


J. Iv I'ollard 


Ohio 




Victoria 


W P. Storms Agt. 

J K Uarnell 


New York 




Nogales 

Guaymas. 




1,500 


Iriii! M Crocker. Aflrt 


Iowa. 


Nuevo Laredo 

Progreso 


1. (lahone 


Virginia 


2,500 
1,500 


1 d H. Thompson — 

I ciat Agt. 

German Hahn Agt. 

C. B. Towle 


Massachusetts 


Campechl 


Mexico 


Lagunia de Terminos 


United States 




S^tnio 

Tampico 


New Hampshire 


Fees 

2,U00 


Samuel E. Magill 


Illinois 


San Luis Potosi 


J. H. Farwell 


Nebraska 


Tazpan 






Fees 
3,000 


Vera Cruz 


William W. Canada 

W. S. L nscott . . .• 


Indi ana 


Coatzaooalcos 


Kansas 


Frontera 


Michae Girard Agt. 

8. R. Gummere 


Mexico i 




MOROCCO-Tangier 

Casa Blanca 


New Jersey 


2,000 


John Cobb Agt. 

George Broome Agt. 

F. D. Hill 


United States 


Mogador 






NETHERLANDS AND DOMIN- 
IONS— Amsterdam 

Batavia, Java 


Minnesota 


1,500 
1,000 


Sidney B. Everett 


Massachusetts 


Macassar. Celebes. 


Knrl Aiier Agt. 

H J. P Haacke Agt. 

ArtliLji Thomson Agt. 

B. N rmell Agt. 

E n ^'heney 


Celebes 


Padaug, Sumatra , . 


Sumatra 




Samarang 


Java 




SoBrabaya 


Java.. .. 




Curacao, W.I .*.*.' 

Buen Ayre 


New Hampshire 

Curacao 


2.000 


LkhU wyk C. Boye....A!gt. 
BLriri.li s. P. Haacke. ... 

SHi'fh Iriotoe 

C. K Aia-T Agt. 

E A. :\liin Agt. 

Dii'l- ncn. Van Romondt 

J ■ 'i^ery. Agt. 

C onaldson 

H laziq Agt. 

J. aelly^ Agt. 

Ci lolmann — Agt. 
V\ nby 


Padang, Sumatra 


Sumatra 


Fees 
2.000 


Rotterdam 


Minnesota 


Flushing 

Schiedam 


Netherlands... 


Florida 




St. Martin, W. I 

St. Bustatius 

NICARAGUA— Managua 


St. Martin 


Fees 




New York 


2,000 


Corinto 


Nicaragua 


Matagalpa 


Georgia 




San Juan del Sur 


Nicaragua 




San Juan del Norte 


Mississippi 


2,000 


Blueflelds 

PARAGUAY-Asuncion 

PERSIA— Teheran 


»1 ' ncy Agt. 

J..t'L'i N ^iuffln 


Indiana 


Tennessee 


s 


B, \\ Howen 

WiiM-!. ». Dickey 

All.:d -At Agt. 

Enrique Meier Agt, 

John Ii\ Hopkins, Jr. Agt. 
Edward Gottfried. . . .Agt. 
William Balami Agt. 

Thomas C. Jones 


New York 


PERU— Callao .. . . 


Louisiana 




Peru 


Mollendo 


Peru 




Paita. 


Peru 




Truxillo 


Peru 






Peru 




PORTUGAL AND DOMINIONS- 


Kentucky 


1,500 
Fees 


Lisbon 


J.H.Thieriot 


New York 

Portugal 




F. J. Tavares Agt. 






Oporto 


William Stuve Agt. 

Joaquin T. O Neil. . . . Agt. 

W. B. DIepeveen Agt. 

James Mcintosh Agt. 

G H. Pickerell 


Portugal 




fletnbal 


Portugal 




IteiS. : .:.:::::.:::::::. 


Mozambique 






MozambiQue 




St. MlPhaArs Azores . 


Ohio 


1,600 


FaTxl 


M. Benarus Agt. 

James Mackay Agt. 


Azores 


1 Flores 


Azores 


-^^ "'- 



210 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 


UNITED STATES CONSULAR SERVICB.-CONTINUBD. 


Place. 


NavM. 


Aw(y^tedSrom. 


Salary. 


Sftn Jorffe... .... 


Joaquin J. Cardozo. . Agt. 
Henrique de Castro.. Agt. 

JoaoJ.Nunes Agt. 

C.J. Barbosa Agt. 

J. B. Gulmaraes Agt. 

W.G. Bozshall 


Azores 




Teroeira 


Azores 




Br&va . ... 






st^vinoent! !! ! !!.'!.'!!!!!!! 


C^pe Verde islands. .'.... 




Cape Verde Islands 




ROUMAN LA— Bucharest 


Roumania. 


16,500 
Fees 
Fees 


RUSSIA— Batam 


James C . Chambers 

Victor ForseiiiuV.'.'.'.Agt. 
C r.lwlnEkstrQm...Agt. 
T' "Tv.isSmith 


New York 


HelslDKf ora 


Russia 


Abo 


Russia 


WiborK 


Russia 




Moscow 


New Jersey 


Fees 
2,000 


Odessa 


TlMiiEiiie) E. Heenan....... 

Wpm It Martin. Act'g Agt. 
NJ. lA r, A. Bomholdt..... 

WilHjimR.HoUoway 

Pi' r t . r vv'igius. Agt. 

Hiik'Hi smlt Agt. 

Eiinmrni Von Glehn.Agt. 
R T tifeener *» 


Minnesota 


RnntolT an<l TajraproK. ,,.,.,,., 


Russia 


Riga. 


Russia 


^m 


St. Petersburg 


Indiana 


Cronstadt 


Russia 


Liban 


Russia 




Revel 


Russia 




• Vladivostok 


New York 


2,500 
Fees 
2,000 


Warsaw 


Joseph Rawlcz 


Russia 


SALVADOR -San Salvador 


John Jenkins 


Nebraska 


Acajutla 






LaLibertad 


A. Cooper Agt. 

John B. Courtade. . . .Agt. 
Luther W. Osbom 


Salvador 




La Union 


Salvador 




SAMOA-Apia , 

8BRVI A— Belirrade 


Nebraska 


3.000 
6.500 
5,000 

2,000 






81 AM— Bangkok 


II. King 


Michigan 


SOUTH AFRICAN REPUBLIC- 

Pretoria 


C E. Macrum 


Ohio 


Bloemfontein, O. F. S 


Alfred Elliott Agt. 




Johannesburg 


J. C. Manion Agt. 


New York 




SPAIN AND DOMINION8- 
Alicante 


H.C.Carey V. C. 

J.G.Lay.f 


Spain 


^^ 


Barcelona 


District of Columbia 


Bilbao 




Gijon 








Orao 
















Port Mabon 








San Feliu de Ouixols 








San Sabastian 








Santander 








Tarragona 









Torrevleja. 








Cadiz 

Huelva 


J. H. Carroll 


Spain 


1,500 


Jeres de la Frontera. 








Port St. Mary's 








sevuie :..:::.:: 








Carthagena 


Joseph Bowron 


Spain 


Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
1,500 


Corunna 






Madrid 


D. T. Reed 


New York 


Malaga 


Richard M. Bartleman .. . 
A. B. Carleton Agt. 


Vermont.... 


Almeiia Malaga 


portofMariSiia. :::::::::::: 






Grand Canar7(Canarv Islands) 
Lanzarotte (Canaryjslands) . . 















SWEDEN AND NORWAY- 
Bergen, Norway 


Victor E. Nelson 

ClR'is Bfirg Agt. 

C.y FideE Agt. 

Bi> hard Killengren..Agt. 

Ht'iirv IJ'TdewIch 

CUriHtl>i]f Kjrde Agt. 

Bc-nu' lii lehhardt.....Agt. 
R ti S ll'Tgh 


California 


Fees 


Drontheim 


Norway . . 


Stavanger 


Norway 




Tromso. 


Norway 




Ch rlstlanla. Norway 




1,000 


Arendal 


Norway .... 


Chrlstiansand 


Norway .' .' 




Gothenburg, Sweden 


North Dakota 


1,500 


Helslngborg 


Ljirs V \ rfe'lBi Agt. 

Pf-Ter yi* Flensburg. .Agt. 

Ert warrt W. Wlnslow 

ViL'lor Svensson Agt. 

H HMoraan 

J. Wbitj? Agt. 

G^*ll^k't*Glffo^d 




Malmo 


Sweden 




Stockholm, Sweden. 

. Sundsvaal 


Illinois : 

Sweden 


1,500 


SWITZERLAND-Aaranu 


Louisiana 


2,000 


Lucerne 


Michiffan 


Basle 


Maine '.'.'..'.". 


a,uoo 


Chaux-de-Fonds 


H UkH^Uel. Jr Agt. 

A ]^. Frankenthal. 




Berne 


MasaachusAtts 


1,500 


Geneva 


BiMiJ!itTiln II. Ridgely 

vniiiiKTi Cuenod Agt. 

J T -._-;i.A^ .7;.. 


Kentucky 


Vevev 


Switzerland 


St. Gall 




3,000 
2.000 


Zurich 


A..: I.ii iisrlmecht 

rSieinrich Langsdorf..Agt. 


Illinois 


Winterthur ^ 


Switzerland *.!*.!!!!'. ^ !!!! ! 











UNITED STATES QUNMULAK ISEUVlGK. 



UKITBD STATKB CONSUL A K SIiJHVICE.-CoNtIXued. 



PLlACK. 



jS^anuir 



L. W. Ofltjom.. 



W. R, T>iiviH...... 

Frcfleritik P'ocbtJ,.,r.Aiii, 
nSfhnrrt Vfti?rho , ►. .. A^t. 

K. liunior. V. 

,]ii(Ei>^;n HaiDilt'Oa A^., 



TONG A-NnltuJilofB ., ,, 

TUKKl&y AND DOMINIONS 
Aii^xEiDdretta ....,,,*... 

A leppo, .-,,,. ^ ■ ■ - 

M&rflLpt^^..- _..„.,.,. 

Baii^iMl .♦-...... 

^iLEEOtKll * — ' 

Boiriit, Syria H H. Huvtidftl 

DutiJOiHiiiA. < . r - ,Kiwif Mt'sliiilia Au'( . 

[{0,1 fa .t^*,^., ....... ... ^fUltUiyt^S^cliuiiiiichi^r Atrt. 

TTlpoli. ..*.*, * JriJ- llarrin ,.,Af,'i. 

CoVrfK Kiiyiit 'K. Wrtttfi, ac.G 

AleXfvndriJi.. ..,.--► iJarnes TIowilI, Aijt, 

Assioui ^B W. Khiiyat .,Aut 

Kent^b ^ . *. . I Ahclel K.M.clAmmiLn A^t, 

l.xixor .♦................-►-- ; Aly M<>uriwl. At-t. 

Maoaom-ah. „.,.,.,. ] [hrahlni S immd, . — . Ajjl. 

T> irt Said . . *.... jHiiniuf-'l <■». BnjftdtiiiiniAKt. 

f'hitr]i>s M. Ok'kSnscjii 

A. h. Caloki'dnos — Atft, 

Kranic Giilvort.. ^A>ft, 

rerifllett JL I^^^rq .AjyEt, 
LpoAk HarKbolK.. 



Attpttintfxi ftrtin. 



8UG?l 

Constacittnople 

C^ndla, Crete..., 

Dardadellea. 

SAlOTiika.. 

Kr^erum, Armenia, 

ttarput *,....♦.. 

J^rafialemiSrrfa, 



Nebtfifiko. . 



Ohlrt....... , 

HyrJa...... 

Tiirktjy . ., ►, 

Tiarkiiy..... 

(ireut Brlt4&ln.r. 
Souti) I>ukal4i... 

Syria. „ .. 

Sjrrln ...... 

N(jw Tork. 

Fgh nay Ivan La-. 

fvirypt - 

isttypt .... 

Eifypt ..tt - 

Euypt........... 

Etrypt 

EiiypU,.. 

Klfypt ..., 

New Vufk...... 

rrrrto 

Turktjy 

Turkt-y . - 

New lork^..^.. 



^olMrh Mt^rrlil . 



Vafa....... .> lH#. llardei£|ii,,...,..,...A«t. 

Mil" A. tlL'wptt... .,.,..... 
ti.Gr ytJtjphopoulo *. .AkI . 
I [ . Z. l^on ^irvfijnh.. . . . . A iit. 

K W. Lane ., 

Mlohtiel M. Fnltlfin--Ai?t 
Beiijainln n. Miinton — 

Alhcrt vr. Swalm .. 

John ti, Hiif uutful 



}4an)flDiin.. .,*.,,**, « 

TreblaondB .». . ^ h 

SmyroaH. . .....,..,. ..h.. ........ 

MltTlentJ...... »,-.... .«. 

URUtill AT-Colanlii. 

Honterlcleo ... - 

par SAqdu. ^ , , . . . . 

VENHZVHLA— La Wnayra . . . 

tlareelona,,.*.H.,. 

t'aTiicna..^,, 

c^arupainj ...,*., 

Ciudad BollTar. 

Ciiojana...... .....i, 

Mura<:albt> 

Cc*ro*... ...-- 

j^an Cristobal 

TcJTar ►,*.... 

Valoni 

Puerto CaboLlo. 

ValenPla 

7 ANZ I B A 11 -Zan thtiw....,.^, 



liznacloll. BalK.. Af^t 

nredericlc Dc Htjia .. .Airt. 

hiiin A. OTs\ni Aei.. 

Kubon H(*TtderBon...AKt. 
JoF^e U. N. Ui^mbfifff. A^L. 
EiiKene li. Piiimacber, . 
rlaifab I- Senior «....Afft 
Alex ander Urnte , , . . . Ajrl 
W.J.N-Mnche, ►.-*>..... 



L. T, KlIsiTOrtb,,,,.. 

O. ](. fietikBr 

R. R Mansfleld 



MaErmchiisottB. 

J??yrl& 

M a^sjarh u st i't>. , 

Turkey 

Turkey 

Ohio . 



Tork<fy.... 



lowa^. 
Mary land.. 



Vt^neaufla..... 
UiiHril Stales. 

V*HK'!llH^ISU,K.. 

Vi^nt'iftnt^hi...... 

VtfniriiiHa 

Vpnt^aiieta, 

Venezuela..... 
Germany 



Ohio.. , 

Venenntia,, 
TndJaaa....' 



Salart/. 



91 Mi 



\m 



um 



2j[NU 



Z,fiXi 



Ffpn 

i,:p(io 



SjTJOD 



L-tOU 



T^K«vy' 



FOHEIOn LEOATIOKS IH THE TTHTTED BTATEB. 



CorTTTHTiSS. 



AKG KNT INE RK PU B li I r 



A USTRLA'HONG A R r. . 



UELtnOM.. 



BOT.tTlA... 

UR>U:iL.., .*..*,.,. 



CHILE.. 



JlT. AfarMn «. ariQTOn... .► .. 

t^Dor AtLlcinlo del V^i8a,..,.-.x... 

roi. R. A. Day .... * 

M r. L, U. vrn Ht'nHpmir 

Bnron P R. Von Rk^rfenau, 

"*Jflut.-Conidr. X Bodler t . . 

:ouiit G. dB Ltclitijrvelde.. . .,.,.,♦. 

Mr.Gearpes AlJart. ...,.,,.., i..^.. 

f'enorLule PaK,..-..* ...,. 

Mr. 1. V. de AsaEa Braall 

^eoborMadQel deO. Lima 

Renor T>on rarloa >L VU'unn 

- Henor Don ICllodoro Inf u dte 

^L Senor Don M. Balm aeeda. ......... 

■ CHINA.. - , Mr. Wu Tloff'faDB 

^F ftlT. Shen Tnnp..........: 

r Mr, Gbow Tsz-chi 

1 Mr. CbwantfHal-kwan ,... 

I Mr. Cbuni;: Miio-yrw ... ..*..,.,,,. 

I COLOMBIA SenorJ^inrUmaco rflldcrCun...... 

I : COSTA Urc .\ SeuoT Don Joaqu In B. Calto.. . . . , . 

I DEN34 .\R.K.....,* *►.-,.--..- [Mr. C-f>nB.tant!n Bmn. ........ 

L I KCLiADMU......... H ,?*enOr Don L. F. Catbo,..,*. 

^^ I FRANCE........ Mr. J. CambOD.. ..,.». ,,» 

^ft I 'Mr. E.Tbiebaut...., .,, 

^B I rapi. P. YlKnaL.. ..t-^ -.^ 



Namr. 



Efink, 



K. E. ard M. P. 

Secret nry of LunaHon. 

Mmrary AtLacbe. 

B. E. and M. F 

Becret4jp¥ orLppatlon. 

Nayal Attache. 

E. E. ami M. P. 

Cou use I f >r ct f 1 je^ ga Hon, 

E E. and M, P. 

E. B. flml M. P. 

Ptrst Spt^rt tary. 

R.K.andM.P. 

Pi rat Secretary . 

Second Secretary, 

E. E. anil M. P. 

FlTsi Eiecretars'. 

i^ecand Secretary. 

Second Secretary. 

flee rotary Idterpreter. 

E. K,AiidM. P. 

E.E. andM.P. 

r.. E. andM.P. 

K. E, and M. P. 

A, E. and P. 

Pirat Secretary. 

Military Attache. 

Chancellor- 



212 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1900. 



FOREIGN LEGATIONS IN THE UNITED STATBS.-CONTlNinBD. 



COUNTRIES. 



Name. 



Rank. 



GERMANY 

GREAT BRITAIN. . 



GUATEMALA... 

HAITI 

ITALY 

JAPAN 

KOREA 

MEXICO 

NETHERLANDS 

NICARAGUA 

PARAGUAY 

PORTUGAL 

RUSSIA 

SIAM 

SPAIN.- 



SWEDEN AND NORWAY 

SWITZERLAND 

TURKEY 

URUGUAY 

VENEZUELA 



Herr yon HoUeben 

F. S. von Sternburg 

Count von Hacke 

Lt.-Comdr. von Rebeur-Paschwitz. 
Sir J. Pauncefote,G.C.B.,G.C.M.G. 

Mr. Gerard A. Lowther 

Mr. C. N. B. Eliot. 

Mr. Reginald Tower 

Mr. Robert Bromley 

Senor Don A. L. Arriaga 

Mr. J.N. Leger 

Baron de Fava 

Count Vinci 

Senor C. Romano 

Mr. Jutaro Komura 

Mr. T. J. Nakagawa 

M . Funakosbl 

Mr. Durham W. Stevens 

Mr. Chin Pom Ye 

Mr.TamE. Ye 

Senor Don Manuel de Azpiroz. . . . 

Senor Don Jose P. Godoy 

Senor Don Enrique Santibanea — 

Senor Don Rodrlgo de Azpiroz 

Mr. G. de Weckherlin 

Senor Don Luis F. Corea 

John Stewart .• 

Viscount de Santo-Thyrso 

Comte Cassini 

Mr. de Wollant 

Mr. Alex. Zelenoy 

Phva Prasiddhl 

Duke d' Arcos 

Senor Don Juan Riano 

Senor Don Luis Pastor 

Lt.-Col. Federloo de Monteverde.. 

Mr. A. Grip 

Mr. G. V. T. de Strale 

Mr. J. B. Ploda 

Mr. W.Deucher 

Ali Ferrouh Bey 

A.Rustem Bey 

Senor Don P. de Murguiondo 

Senor Don Jose Andrade 

Senor Don Jose Andrade Penny.. . 



A. E. and P. 

Counselor, First Secretary. 

Second Secretary. 

Attache. 

A. E. and P. 

Secretary of Embassy. 

Second Secretary. 

Second Secretary. 

Attache. 

E. E. and M. P. 

E. E. and M. P. 

A. E. and P. 
Secretary Embassy. 
Second Secretary. 

B. E. and M. P. 
First Secretary. 
Third Secretary. 
Counselor of Legation. 
E. E. and M. P. 
Secretary. 

A. E. and P. 
First Secretary. 
Second Secretary. 
Third Secretary. 
E. B. and M. P. 

B. E. and M. P. 
Consul-General. 
B. B. and M. P. 

A. B. and P. 
First Secretary. 
Second Secretary. 
E. B. and M. P. 
E. E. and M. P. 
First Secretary. 
Second Secretary. 
Military Attache. 
E. E. and M. P. 
Secretary of Legation. 
E. E. andM.P. 
Secretary Legation. 
~!. E. and M. P. 

First Secretary of Legation. 
Consul-General. 

B. B. and M. P. 
Secretary of Legation. 



HIOHEST POINTS IN THE UNITED STATES. 
[Computed by the United States G^eological Survey.] 



State or 

TERRIT'Y 

Alabama.. 
Alaska.... 
Arizona . . 
Arkansas. 
Callfo'nia 
Colorado.. 
Conne'e't. 
Delaware. 
D. of Col.. 
Florida... 
Georgia... 

Idaho 

Illinois... 
Indiana... 
Ind.Ter'y. 

Iowa 

Kansas. . . 
Kentucky 
Louisiana 
Maine — 
Maryland 

Mass 

Michigan. 

Minn 

Miss 

Missouri.. 



Name of place. 



Cheauha Mt. (Talladega Co) 

Mt. Logan 

San Francisco Mt 

Magazine Mt 

Mt. Whitney 

Blanca Peak 

Bear Mt 

Dupont 

Teniey 

Highland 

Enota Mi 

Meade Peak 

Warren 

Haley 

WichitaMts 

Ocheyedan 

Kanarado 

Big Black Mt. (Harlan Co.) 

Mansfield 

Katahdin Mt 

Great Backbone Mt 

Mt. Greylock 

Porcupine Mt 

Woodstock 

Pontotoc Bidge 

Cedar Gap 



Height. 



2,407 
19,600 
12 794 
2,8U0 
14,896 
14,464 
2.3^5 
282 
400 
210 
4,798 
10,541 
1,009 
1.140 
2,&X) 
1,654 
3,906 
4,100 
821 
5.200 
8,400 
8,585 
2,028 
1.826 
606 

i.ffrs 



State or 

TBRRIT'Y 

Montana.. 
Nebraska. 
Nevada... 

N.H 

N.J 

N. M 

New York 

N.C 

N. Dakota 

Ohio 

Okl'homa 
Oregon . . . 

Penn 

R. island.. 

S C 

s! Dakota 

Tenn 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont.. 
Virginia.. 

Wash 

West Va. . 
Wisc'nsn . 
Wyoming 



Name of place. 



Mt. Douglas 

White River Summit 

Wheeler Peak 

Mt. Washington 

Kittatinny Mountain 

Cerro Blanco 

Mt. Marcy (Adirondack) 

Mt. MitcheU 

Sentinel Butte 

Ontario 

Goodwin 

Mt. Hood 

Negro Mt 

DurfeeHill 

Rocky Mt. (Pickens Co.) .... 

Harney Peak 

Mt. Leconte 

North Ff anklin Mt 

Mt. Emmons. 

Mt. Mansfield 

Mt. Rogers (Grayson Co.).. . 

Mt. Ranter 

Spruce Mt. (Pendleton Co.) 

Summit Lake 

Great Teton 



HeigM. 



U,300 
4,876 

13,086 
6.286 
1.630 

14,209 
5,879 
6,708 
2.7W 
1,378 
2,586 

11,225 

2.826 

805 

fT 

13.691 
4.430 
6,719 

14,444 
4.860 

xm 



THE PENSION OFFICE. 



213 



THE PENSION OFFICE. 

NUMBER OF PENSIONS ALLOWED AND INCREASED DURING THE YEAR, 
With the annqal value of all pensions on the rolls. 



Year Enoed Junk 
30, 18i«. 



Pensions Allowed and Incubased 
during the year. 



Original. 



Annual 
value. 



Increa>8e, re- 

issv^eand 

additional. 



Annual 
value. 



Restoration 

and 

renewal. 



No. 



Annual 
value. 



Dropped 

FROM 
THE 

Rolls. 



No. 



Annual 
value. 



feC 



III 

III! 



Army, general law- 
Invalids 

Nurses 

Widows, etc 

Navy, seneral law- 
Invalids 

Widows, etc 

Army, act June 27,'SO 

Invalids 

Widows, etc 

Navy, act June 27, '90 

Invalids 

Widows, etc.. 

Army, war with 
Spain— Invalids . . 
Widows, etc 

Navy, war with Spain 

Invalids 

Widows, etc 

War of 1812- 

Survi vors. 

Widows 

War with Mexico- 
Survivors 

Widows 

Indian wars, 1882-12— 
Survivors ... 
Widows 



1,838 

16 

3,361 

137 



C226.276 

2,301 

492,766 



18,409 



17.5161519,513 
11,637 



14,569 

1 

135 

196 
5 

16,408 
130 



1,009 
463 



1^ 



86,956 
4,760 



25,456 
30,169 



l,21fi 
2,400 



tl.042.558 
96 
V 

19.170 
673 

896,877 
8,155 

21,655 
192 



1,620 



2.066 
85 



9283,678 

'9,544 

8,1 
120 

[92.359 
9,238 

6,195 



427 
13 



2,551 
40,659 



1,243 
21,792 



153 

8 



264 
154 



14,849 

828 

754 



Total . 



37,077 



3,659301 



32.148 



2.006,691 



3.9141 504,772 



13,704 

18 

6,371 



275 
107 



12,951 
7,380 



12,344.069 

2.692 

816,285 

48.857 
20,187 

1,489,495 
794,309 

77.631 
32,136 



2 

414 



837 
397 



376 
395 

4:},1S6 



4.')6 
60,262 



38,112 



36,09(> 
37.9J0 



316,83i 
853 



405.987 
124,127 



14,925 
6,139 



117 
165 



1 
1,998 



9,204 
8,175 



f53,325i876 

96.992 

14,062,864 

847.392 
452,1601 

44,639,5761 
13,211,516 

1,580.220 
641^3041 

25,2()4' 
29,881 

1,216 
2,400 

96 
288,440 

1,091,452 
786,308 

160,16(! 
374,>':HS 



Average annual value of each pension 

Average annual value of each pension under the general law 

Average annual value of each pension under act of June 27, 1890 
Average annual value of pension allowed on account of the war 



5.890.949 991,519 131 (;17,«.«1 



$i:«.74 

1(J6.70 

108.99 

with Spain 196.53 



NUMBER OF PENSIONERS ON THE ROLLS 
In each state and territory of the United States and in 



United States 


. No. 


Aui 


rifUt. 


Alabama 


3,692 


*i',*i 


I<K..91 


Alaska 


85 


SiJ 


,14 02 


Arizona 


651 


'.H i^^"m\ 


Arkansas 


10,472 




U^JXi 


California.... 


17,566 


iJJi-^t 


•^y.hl 


Colorado .... 


7^ 


I.iilL» 


;:i-.68 


Connecticut. 


12.058 


l.ri^t 


7:^.21 


Delaw