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Full text of "Chicago daily news national almanac for .."

rtEMOTE S i OKAGc. 



LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



31 
D1-4- 



LLINOIS MISIOKICAX, 




THE DAILY NEWS 

ALMANAC 



AND 



POLITICAL REGISTER 



FOR 




COMPILED BY GEO. E. PLUMBE, A. B., LL. B. 



NINTH YEAR. 



ISSUED BY 
THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS COMPANY. 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY AT CHICAGO, ILL.. 
BY THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS CO. SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $1.00 PER YEAR. 

NO. I. VOL. IX. JANUARY, 1893. 
ENTERED AT THE CHICAGO POSTOFFICE AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER. 



PREFACE. 



The year 1892 marks an epoch in the political history of the United 
States, the elections of the year showing a wider and more radical change in 
the political sentiment of this country than any preceding one. The election 
tables of the Almanac for 1893, covering more than 100 pages, give the vote 
in every county (state and territorial), showing exactly where the change of 
political opinion has been most pronounced. The table of exports and 
imports by articles for two years enables one to see at a glance the effect of 
the new tariff legislation on our trade and commerce. A brief history is 
given of all the presidential nominating conventions and caucuses since 
Washington. Details of the settlement of our difficulties with Chile and Italy, 
the progress of the Bering sea dispute and our retaliation on Canada are full 
of interest. Short sketches of men who became prominent last year and the 
letters of acceptance from the four presidential candidates are new features in 
this issue. The World's-Fair matter has been compiled with careful discrimi- 
nation and will be found of general interest and value. A large assortment 
of census and other statistics bearing on Indian schools, silver, gold, pen- 
sions, education, churches, government receipts and expenditures, the liquor 
traffic, banks, the currency and a great variety of other subjects of value to 
every intelligent citizen, are to be found in the present volume. 

THE DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893 is replete with new and 
fresh material. Its aim is to be fair, accurate and strictly non-partisan and 
no pains or expense have been spared to maintain the high reputation it has 
already made for completeness and trustworthiness. 

CHICAGO, January 15, 1393. 






REMOTE STOAG 



Chicago Daily News Almanac 
1893. \^|ms 

NOTE. The time given in this Almanac is local mean time, except when otherwise indicated. 


ECLIPSES. 
In the year 1893 there will be two eclipses both of the Sun. 
1. A Total Eclipse of the Sun, April 16, 9:32 o'clock in the forenoon. Invisible In North 
America. Visible in South America, Atlantic Ocean, Africa, and parts of Europe and Asia. 
2. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, October 9. Visible to the western halves of North and 
South America, the West Indies, the extreme northeastern tip of Asia and Eastern Pacific 
Ocean. Invisible east of a line drawn through Bismarck, N. D., Omaha, Memphis and Sapelo 
Island, Ga. The Dath of the annulus being in the Pacific Ocean, occurring as a partial eclipse, 
in standard time, as follows: 


PLACE. 


Begins. Ends. Digits Eclipsed. 




H. M. H. M. 

13 A. 1 56 A. 2 
11 47 M. 1 51 A. 3 
2 27 A. 3 31 A. 1 
OTA. 2 9 A. 3 
10 19 M. 55 A. 5 ' 
10 25 M. 37 A. 4 
10 33 M. 1 13 A. 6 
10 28 M. 54 A. 5 


Salt Lake City 




Santa Fe 




Portland Ore 


San Diego 


Virginia City Nev 




THE FOUR SEASONS. 


SEASON. Begins. Lasts. 


D. H. M. 
Winter . ... December 21 1892, 3*25 AM 89 45 


Spring . . .. March 20 1893, 4:10 AM ... 92 19 54 


Summer June 21, 1893, 12:04 A M. . 93 14 53 


Autumn September 22. 1893. 2:57 T>.M 89 17 ss 


Winter December 


22,1893, 8:55 A.M. Tropical Year, 365 5 30 




EMBER 
February 22, 24, 25 


DAYS. 


May 24 26 27 


December 20 22 23 i 






MORNING STARS. 

Venus, until May 2. 
Mars, after September 3. 
Jupiter, after April 27 until November 18. 
Saturn, until March 29 after October 8. 
Mercury, until February 16, after March 31 
until June 4, after August 8 until Septem- 
ber 20, after November 26. 


EVENING STARS. 

Venus, after May 2. 
Mars, until Septembers. 
Jupiter, until April 27, after November 18. 
Saturn, after March 29 until October 8. 
Mercury, after February 16 until March 31,- 
after June 4 until Augusts, after Septein- '> 
ber 20 until November 26. 


PLANETS BRIGHTEST. 

Mercury March 10, July 15, November 1, setting then just after the Sun; also May 2, 
August 28. December 18, rising then just before the Sun. Saturn, March 29. Mars, May 21. 
Jupiter, November 18. Venus, December 6. 


CHURCH DAYS AND CYCLES OF TIME. 


Sexagesima Sunday Feb. 5 
Quinquagesima Sunday Feb. 12 


Trinity Sunday May 28 
Corpus Christ! June 1 




Hebrew New Year (5654) Sept 11 






Purim Mar. 2 


Christmas Dec 25 


Mid-Lent Sunday Mar 12 


Dominical Letter A 




Solar Cycle 26 
Lunar Cycle (or Golden Number) 13 


Good Friday Mar.31 




Roman Indiction 6 




Epact (Moon's Age, Jan. 1) 12 
Julian Period 6606 




A.scension Day May 11 


Year of the World (Septuagint) 7401-7402 
Dionysian Period 222 ! 


First day of Pentecost May 21 



Boon's pfjases. 


1893. 




i). 


EASTERN TIME. 


CENTRAL TIME. 


MOUNTAIN TIME. 


PACIFIC. 


January. 


Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon 


2 
8 

17 
25 
31 


H. M. 

8 41 morn. 
5 28 eve. 
8 28 eve. 
1 27 morn. 
9 11 eve. 


H. Mi 
7 41 morn. 
4 28 eve. 
7 28 eve. 
27 morn. 
8 11 eve. 


H. M. 

6 41 morn. 
3 28 eve. 
6 28 eve. 
11 27 eve.* 
7 11 eve. 
*24th. 


H. M. 

5 41 morn. 
2 28 eve. 
5 28 eve. 
10 27 eve.* 
6 11 eve. 
*24th. 


February 


Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 


8 

it; 

2H 


3 12 eve. 
11 16 morn. 
9 14 eve. 


2 12 eve. 
10 1 6 morn. 
8 14 eve. 


1 12 eve. 
9 16 morn. 
7 14 eve. 


12 eve. 
8 16 morn. 
6 14 eve. 


March. 


Full Moon.'... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 


10 
17 
24 


11 8 morn. 
12 13 eve. 
11 33 eve. 
4 23 eve. 


10 8 morn. 
11 13 morn. 
10 33 eve. 
3 23 eve. 


9 8 morn. 
10 13 morn. 
9 33 eve. 
2 23 eve. 


8 8 mom. 
9 13 morn. 
8 33 eve. 
1 23 eve. 


1 


Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 


'23 
30 


2 18 morn. 
6 35 morn. 
9 34 morn. 
26 morn. 
6 23 eve. 


1 18 morn. 
5 35 morn. 
8 34 morn, 
ll 26 eve.* 
5 23 eve. 
*22d. 


18 morn. 
4 35 morn. 
7 34 morn. 
10 26 eve.* 
4 23 eve. 
*22d. 


11 18 ev.* 
3 35 morn. 
6 34 morn. 
9 26 eve.f 
3 23 eve. 
*22d. tSlst. 


1 


Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon 


8 

V"; 


9 24 eve. 
6 46 eve. 
9 52 morn. 
10 22 morn. 


8 24 eve. 
5 46 eve. 
E52 morn. 
22 morn. 


7 24 eve. 
4 46 eve. 
7 52 morn. 
8 22 morn. 


6 24 eve. 
3 46 eve. 
?52 morn. 
22 morn. 


1 


Last Quarter. 

New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 


7 
14 
20 
29 


e43 morn. 
51 morn. 
9 37 eve. 
1 25 eve. 


7 43 morn, 
ll 51 morn. 
8 37 eve. 
25 eve. 


6 43 morn. 
10 51 eve.* 
7 37 eve. 
11 25 morn.t 
*13th. tlst. 


5 43 morn. 
9 51 eve.* 
6 37 eve. 
10 25 morn.t 
*13th. t7th. 


jj 

3 

1-9 


Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 


i 

20 

28 


5 5 eve. 
7 47 morn. 
2 morn. 
3 10 morn. 


4 5 eve. 
6 47 morn. 
11 2 eve.* 
2 10 morn. 
*19th. 


3 5 eve. 

5 47 morn. 
10 2 eve.* 
1 10 morn. 
*19th. 


2 5 eve. 

4 47 morn. 
9 2 eve.* 
10 morn. 
*19th. 


August. 


Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 


\l 

27 


11 23 eve. 
3 48 eve. 
4 52 morn. 
3 43 morn. 


10 23 eve. 
2 48 eve. 
3 52 morn. 
2 43 morn. 


9 23 eve. 
1 48 eve. 
2 52 morn. 
1 43 morn. 


8 23 eve. 
2 48 eve. 
1 52 morn. 
43 morn. 


September. 


Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon 


3 

1? 

25 


4 41 morn. 
2 5 morn. 
11 19 eve. 
3 23 eve. 


3 41 morn. 
1 5 morn. 
10 19 eve. 
2 23 eve. 


2 41 morn, 
5 morn. 
9 19 eve. 
1 23 eve. 


1 41 morn. 
11 5 eve.* 
8 19 eve. 
23 eve. 
*9th. 


October. 


Last Quarter. 
New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 


17 

HI 


10 19 morn. 
3 27 eve. 
6 20 eve. 
28 morn. 
42 eve. 


9 19 morn. 
2 27 eve. 
5 20 eve. 
1 28 morn. 
4 42 eve. 


8 19 morn. 
1 27 eve. 
4 20 eve. 
28 morn. 
3 42 eve. 


7 19 morn. 
27 eve. 
3 20 eve. 
11 28 eve.* 
442 eve. 
1th. 


November 


New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon.... 
Last Quarter. 


8 

S 

30 


7 57 morn. 
44 eve. 
1 8 eve. 
4 8 eve. 


6 57 morn. 
11 44 eve. 
8 eve. 
3 8 eve. 


5 57 morn. 
12 44 morn.* 
11 8 morn.t 
2 8 eve. 
*15th. t22d. 


4 57 eve. 
9 44 morn.* 
10 8 morn.t 
1 8 eve. 
*15th. t22d. 


1 December 


New Moon... 
First Quarter. 
Full Moon 
Last Quarter. 


iS 

22 
29 


40 morn. 
21 morn. 
11 36 eve. 
6 18 eve. 


1 40 morn. 
4 21 morn. 
10 36 eve. 
5 18 eve. 


40 morn. 
5 21 morn. 
9 36 eve. 
4 18 eve. 


1 1 40 eve.* 
2 21 morn. 
8 36 morn. 
3 18 eve. 
*7th. 



1st MONTH. JANUARY. 81 DAYS. 


I 

h 6 * 


January is named from Janus, 
au ancient Roman divinity, and 
was added to the Roman Calen- 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N.Y., Pa., 

S.Wis., S.Mich., 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E.NewYork, 


^M 


n|55 


dar 713 B. c. 


N. 111.. Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn.. Or. 


0^ 





Br 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 1 Moon 
sets. R.&S 


Sun Sun 
rises sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.&S 










H M 


H.M.! H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M.I H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


1 


i 


SUN. 


Slaves emancipated, 1863. 


7 30 


4 30 


6 51 


7 18 


52 


643 


7 41 


4 27 


7 15 


a 

3 


2 
3 


Mo. 
Tu. 


Bragg defeated, 18t>2. 
Battle of Princeton, 1777, 


730 

7 30 


440 

441 


rises 
5 50 


7 18 
7 17 


1 


rises 
617 


7 41 
741 




rises 
5 50 


4 


4 


We. 


Battle of Stone River, 1863. 


7 30 


442 


7 5 


7 17 


54 


7 21 


7 41 


4 30 


7 6 


5 


5 


Th. 


Arnold burns Richmond, 1781. 


7 30 


443 


8 16 


7 17 




837 


7 41 


4 31 


8 21 


6 

7 
8 


6 

8 


Fri. 
Sat. 
SUN. 


Great earthquake in N.E.,16tJ3. 
Battle Springfield, Mo., 1863. 
Battle of New Orleans, 1815. 


lie 

7 _'!! 


4 44 
4 45 
446 


o 27 
10 33 
11 36 


7 16 


i 


941 
1043 
1144 


7 41 
7 41 

741 


4 32 
4 33 
4 35 


9 32 
10 41 
11 48 


9 


B 


Mo. 


Ft.Sunbury,Ga.,captured, 1779. 


1 -;' 


447 


morn 


7 16 


1 "V + 


morn 


7 40 


4 36 


morn 


10 


10 


Tu. 


Florida seceded, 1861. 




448 


038 


7 16 


5 6 


042 




4 37 


51 


13 


11 
12 
13 


ffi- 

Fri. 


Alabama seceded, 1861. 
Lincoln's 1st speech in cgs,1848. 
Ft. Fisher attacked, 186o. 


?! 


449 
4 50 
4 51 


140 
243 
347 


7 16 
7 15 
7 15 


5 3 


1 41 
41 
41 


738 


4 41 


1 55 
3 1 
4 


14 


14 


Sat. 


Gen. Braddock sails, 1755. 


7 27 


453 


451 


7 15 


5 4 


443 


7 38 


442 


5 12 


15 


15 


SUN. 


Ft. Fisher captured, 1865. 




454 


552 


7 15 


5 5 


5 42 


7 :>7 


4 43 


6 14 


}? 


It; 
17 


Mo. 
Tu. 


Amnesty bill passed, 1872. 
Morgan defeats Tarleton,1781. 


7 26 


4 55 
4 56 


646 

sets 


7 14 
7 14 


i ? 


636 

sets 




18 


7 9 

sets 


18 


is 


We. 


Battle of Frederickstown,1813. 


7 25 




5 29 


7 13 


5 8 


5 54 


7 S r ) 


447 


5 29 


19 


L9 


Th. 


Battle of Mill Springs, 1862. 


7 24 


4 57 


6 41 


7 13 


5 9 


7 2 


7 35 


449 


6 43 


20 


20 


Fri. 


Battle of Somerset, N. J., 1777. 


7 24 


5 


7 53 


7 12 


5 10 


8 10 


7 34 


4 50 


7 58 


21 




Sat. 


Jackson enters N.Orleans,1813. 


723 


5 1 


9 4 


7 12 


5 11 


9 19 


7 33 


451 


9 12 




-;-, 


SUN. 
Mo. 


Stone fleet sunk Charrst'n,1861 
Massacre River Rasin, 1813. 


722 


5 2 
5 4 


10 16 


711 
7 11 


5 13 
5 14 


1027 
11 34 




4 53 
4 54 


10 27 
11 41 


AA 


> j 


Tu. 


Rhoddy driv'n fr'm Tenn.,1864 


7 21 


o 5 


morn 


710 


515 


morn 


7 30 


456 


morn 


25 





We. 


Orizaba taken, 1848. 


721 


5 6 


042 


7 9 


5 16 


044 


7 29 


4 57 


58 


26 
27 


]i; 

27 


Th. 
Fri. 


Webster's reply to Hayne,1830 
New Providence taken, 1778. 


!8 


5 7 
5 9 


1 59 
3 17 


7 9 


5 17 

5 18 


1 58 
3 12 


11? 


4 58 
5 


2 18 
3 39 






Sat. 


First nat'l bank atPhila., 1783. 


717 


5 10 


4 22 


7 8 


5 19 


424 


7 26 


5 1 




30 


lii 


SUN. 

Mo. 


British take Augusta.Ga., 1779. 
Constitution amended, 1865. 


716 
716 


511 
5 13 


541 
630 


7 6 


520 
521 


530 
628 


7 24 


5 3 
5 4 


6 4 

7 


31 


31 


Tu. 


Naval battle off Charl'sfn.1863. 


714 


5 14 


rises 


7 5 


522 


rises 


7 23 


5 6 


rises 


sd MONTH. FEBRUARY. ss DATS. 


CM 




S 


8 a 


February is named from Roman 
divinity Februus(Pluto), orFeb- 
rua (Juno), and was added to 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.,l?.Y.,Pa., 
S.Wls. S. Mich., 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 


St.Paul.N.E. 
Wls. and Mich., 
N.E.NewYork, 


5j 


> 


^ts? 


Roman Calendar about 713 B. c. 


N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


* 


S 


Q 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun! 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


SuniMoon 
sets. R.& s. 


32 
33 


1 

2 


We. 
Th. 


Battle of Cowan's Ford, 1781. 
Mexican cession of 1848. 


13 
12 


ii? 


? 5 ? 


? t 


5 24 
5 25 


6 15 


H.M. 

17 22 
7 20 


5 7 
5 9 


H. M. 

5 57 
7 12 




3 


Fri. 


Battle of Dover, 1862. 


7 11 


5 18 


815 


7 2 


526 


o 07 




5 10 


8 21 


35 


4 


Sat 


Clinton reaches N. Y., 1776. 


7 10 


519 


9 20 


7 I 


527 


Q OO 


7 18 


5 12 




36 


5 


SUN: 


Med'ling w'h sl'v'ryill'gal,1836 


7 9 


5 20 


10 24 


7 


5 28 


i | j -! j 


7 17 


5 13 


10 36 


37 


6 


Mo. 


Treaty with France. 1778. 


7 8 


5 22 


11 27 


6 59 


5 30 


11 29 


7 15 


5 15 


11 41 


38 


7 


Tu. 


Jeff Davis' case dismissed,1869. 


7 7 


5 23 


morn 


6 58 


5 31 


morn 


7 14 


5 16 


morn 


39 


8 


We. 


Conf 'derate gov'tformed,1861. 


7 5 






6 57 


5 32 


029 


7 12 


5 18 


047 


40 


9 


Th. 


Conf 'derate congress met, 1861 


7 4 


5 26 




6 56 




1 30 




5 19 


1 52 


41 
42 


10 
11 


Fri. 
Sat. 


Battle Hornet & Resolute,1813. 
Lincoln left for Wash'n, 1861. 


7 3 
7 1 


r> L'A 


39 


6 55 

I! f>4 


5 35 


if! 


' 8 


5 20 


2 58 
4 1 


43 


1'2 


SUN. 


First fugitive slave law, 1793. 


7 


5 30 


4 37 


6 53 


5 36 


426 


' 6 


- ''> 


5 


44 


13 


Mo. 


Massacre of Glencoe, 1691. 




5 31 


5 29 


6 52 


5 37 


5 18 


7 5 


h L'b 


5 50 


46 


15 


Tu. 
We. 


Pickens routs the British,1778. 
Battle of Ft. Donelson, 18R2. 


6 56 




ill 


6 50 




6 2 
6 40 


7 3 
7 1 


.- _'; 

5 27 


6 31 

7 4 


47 


it; 


Th. 


Hessian troops hired, 1776 


6 55 


5 35 


sets 


6 48 


5 40 


sets 


7 




sets 


48 


17 


Fri. 


Treaty of Ghent ratified, 1815. 


6 53 


5 36 


6 51 


6 47 


5 41 


7 6 


6 58 


- -^|| 


6 57 


49 


18 


Sat. 


Lee com. -in-chief, 1864. 


l> 5-2 


5 37 


8 3 


6 46 


5 42 




657 


- j i 


8 13 


50 


19 


SUN. 


First nat'l thanksgiving. 1795. 


6 50 


5 38 


9 17 


6 45 


5 43 


Q On 


6 55 


r ) 33 


930 


51 


20 


Mo. 


Braddock arrives in Va.. 1755. 


6 49 


5 40 


10 32 


(i 43 


5 44 


1036 


3 53 


5 3f, 


10 48 


52 

i! 


| 

23 


Tu. 
We. 

Th 


Silver remonetized, 1878. 
Battle of Ogdensburg. 1813. 
Battle of Buena Vista. 1847. 


647 
646 
644 


5 41 
5 43 


11 49 
morn 
1 7 


642 


5 46 

ill 


11 49 
morn 
1 3 


6 52 

b a 


5 36 

.-> 3s 
5 39 


morn 
7 


55 


24 


Fri 


Johnson impeached. 1868. 


643 


5 45 


223 


( j -^ ^ 


2 49 


15 


647 


5 41 


O *{ 


56 


jr. 


Sat. 


Conscription bill passed, 1863. 


6 41 


5 46 


3 32 


t> S7 




*>., 


645 


5 42 


3 56 


57 


26 


SUN. 


Nashville surrendered, 1862. 


6 40 


547 


432 


6 35 


5 51 


4 25 


643 


5 44 


4 54 


58 


o- 


Mo 


Battle of Morris Neck. 1776. 


638 


5 48 


5 21 


634 


5 52 


5 11 


6 42 


5 45 


5 10 


59 


28 Tu. 


Private'r Nashville dest'd.1863 


6 36 


5 50 


5 59 


6 33 


5 53 


5 51 


16 40 


5 47 


6 15 



3d MONTH. MARCH. 31 DAYS. 


iz 





H 


March was named from Mars, 
the god of war. It was the 
first month of the Roman year. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.,^.Y.,Pa., 
S.Wis., S.Mich., 
N. 111., Ind.. O. 


St. Louis, S. 111., | 
Va., Ky.,Mo., 1 
Kan., Col., Cal.,1 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 
Minn., Or. 


Q H 






AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S.j 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.& S. 


60 


1 


We. 


Articl's of conf ed. ratifl'd, 1781 


3 '35 


5'5l 


H.M. 

6 29 


* 




H. M. 

6 22 


6' 38 


5'48 


H. M . 

6 40 


61 




Th. 


Grant made lieut.-gen., 1864. 


6 33 


5 52 


rises 


6 30 


5 55 


rises 


6 36 


5 49 


rises 


62 


'-> 


Fri. 


Battle of Brier Creek, 1779. 


6 32 


5 53 


7 3 


6 28 


5 56 


7 13 


6 34 


5 50 


7 11 


63 


4 


Sat. 


First congress meets, 1789. 


3 30 


5 54 




627 


5 57 


8 16 


ti 33 


5 52 


8 19 






SUN. 


Boston massacre, 1770. 




-, :,( 


9 13 


625 


558 


917 


6 31 


5 53 


9 26 


()f> 


(', 


Mo. 


Battle of Pea Ridge, 1862.- 


3 27 


5 57 


10 16 


6 24 


5 59 


10 16 


6 29 


5 54 


10 32 


66 


17 


Tu. 


Bible society formed, 1804. 


1 ' ' "i 


5 58 


11 20 


6 22 


6 


11 17 


6 27 


5 55 


11 39 


67 


8 


We. 


Stamp act passed, 1776. 


6 23 


5 59 


morn 


321 


3 1 


morn 


6 25 


5 57 


morn : 




9 


Th. 


Monitor-Merrimac battle, 1862. 


6 21 


6 








10 


6 24 


5 58 


046: 




10 


Fri. 


M'Clel'n crosses Potomac, 1862 


6 20 


6 1 


1 27 


3 1 


5 3 


1 13 


6 22 


6 


1 49 




11 


Sat. 


Conf ed.constit'n adopted, 1861. 


6 19 


3 3 


2 26 


> 1 ( 


6 4 


214 


620 


6 1 


2 48 






SUN. 


Grant made com.-in-chief ,1864 


6 16 


6 4 


3 20 


6 15 


6 5 


3 8 


6 19 


6 2 


3 42 


72 


1:1 


Mo. 


Red river expedition, 1864. 


6 15 


6 5 


4 6 


6 13 


5 6 


3 55 


6 18 


6 4 


426 


73 


14 


Tu. 


Newbern captured, 1862. 


5 13 


6 6 


445 


6 12 




435 


6 14 


6 5 


5 2 


74 


15 


We. 


Island No. 10 bombarded, 1861. 




r f 


5 17 


6 10 


5 8 


5 9 


6 12 


6 7 


5 36 


75 


16 


Th. 


Battle of Guilford, 1781. 


8 9 


3 S 


5 44 


6 9 


6 9 


5 40 


6 10 


6 8 


5 54 


76 


17 


Fri. 


Boston evacuated, 1776. 


6 8 


3 1C 


sets 


6 7 


6 10 


sets 


6 8 


6 9 


sets 


77 


18 


Sat. 


Stamp act repealed, 1776. 


6 6 


6 11 


6 58 


6 6 


6 10 


7 8 


6 6 


6 10 


7 10 




19 


SUN. 


Patent for Conn, issued. 1631. 




3 Y< 


8 15 


6 4 


6 11 




6 5 


6 12 


8 20 


80 


$ 


Mo. 
Tu. 


Washington ent'rs Boston,1776 
Battle of Henderson. 1864. 


6 1 




9 34 

10 54 


i ? 




10 52 


6 1 


6 13 
6 14 


9 52 
11 15 


81 


22 


We. 


Stamp act signed, 1765. 


5 59 


3 It 


morn 


6 


6 14 


morn 


5 59 


6 15 


morn 


82 


23 


Th. 


Battle of Winchester, 1862. 


5 57 


6 16 


13 


5 58 


6 15 


7 


5 57 


6 17 


036 




24 


Fri. 


Attack on Peekskill, 1777. 


5 56 


6 17 




5 57 




1 17 


5 55 


6 18 


1 50 


84 




Sat. 


Hudson river discovered. 1609. 


5 54 


6 18 


2 29 


5 55 


6 17 


2 18 


5 53 


6 20 


2 52 


85 




SUN. 


Forrest beat'n at Paducah,1864 


5 52 


6 20 


3 20 


5 54 


6 18 


3 10 


5 51 


6 21 


3 41 


m j 




Mo. 


Tanning, Tex., massacre, 1836. 


5 50 


6 21 


4 1 


5 52 


6 19 


3 53 


5 49 


6 22 


4 18 


87 


2S 


Tu. 


Seminole treaty. 1833. 


5 49 


6 22 


433 


5 51 


6 19 


4 27 


547 


623 


4 47 


88 




We. 


Vera Cruz capitulates, 1847. 


5 47 


6 23 


4 58 


5 49 


6 20 




5 46 


6 25 


5 8 


1? 


30 
31 


Th. 
Fri. 


Battle of Somerset, Ky., 1863. 
Treasury bldgs burned, 1833. 


iti 


11 


5 19 
5 38 


5 48 
5 46 


6 21 

2" 


540 


5 44 
5 42 


6 26 
627 


5 25 

5 42 


4th MONTH. APRIL. 30 DAYS. 


5ri 


_c 


gj 


April was named from ajWere [^cago, Iowa, 
(to open), the season when buds g \v'is S Mich 


Kan.' Col'., Cal. 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wis. and Mich. 
N.E. New York, 


^K 


t* 


* 


open. 


N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 





C 


Q^ 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.& S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 1 


91 


1 


Sat. 


Battle Five Forks, 1865. 


5 42 


6 26 


rises 


i5 44 


6 23 


rises 


5 40 


6 2"( 


rises 


92 




SUN. 


Battle at Selma. Ala., 1865. 




6 28 


8 4 


5 43 


6 24 


8 6 


5 38 


6 30 


8 19 


93 
94 
95 


4 
5 


Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 


Richmond evacuated, 1865. 
First newspaper in U. S., 1704. 
Yorktown besieged, 1862. 


5 36 


6 29 
6 30 
6 31 


19 8 
10 12 
11 16 


5 42 
5 40 
5 39 


625 

ti 26 
6 27 


9 7 
10 7 
11 9 


5 36 
534 
5 32 


3 31 


10 32 

11 33 






Th. 


1st house of rep.organiz'd,178&. 


5 33 


6 32 


morn 


5 37 


6 28 


morn 




> ' "t 


morn 


97 


Y 


Fri. 


Battle of Shiloh, 1862. 


5 31 


6 33 


17 


5 36 


li 2S 


7 


5 28 


; 36 


39 


( )H 


( s 


Sat. 


Island No. 10 taken, 1862. 




6 34 


1 12 


5 34 


6 29 


1 


5 26 


6 38 


1 34 


99 

100 


fi 

10 


SUN. 

Mo. 


Civil rights bill passed. 1866. 
Battle of Ft. Pulaski. 1862. 


5 28 


i 


\& 


5 33 
5 31 




1 48 
2 30 


5 25 
5 23 


; 39 
640 


2 20 
2 59 


101 


11 


Tu. 


Ft. Sumter bombarded, 186L 


5 25 


6 38 


3 15 


5 30 


(3 32 


3 6 


3 21 


6 41 


3 30 


102 


12 


We. 


Lee surrenders, 1865. 


5 23 


6 39 


3 43 


5 29 


6 33 


3 37 


3 19 


6 42 


3 55 


103 
104 


13 

14 


Th. 
Fri. 


Civil war begins. 1861. 
Battle of Monks' Corners. 1780. 


m 


16 40 
6 41 


4 8 
431 


5 27 
5 25 


6 34 

(3 35 


4 6 
432 


5 18 
5 16 


6 44 
3 45 


4 17 
4 36 


105 


15 


Sat. 


Lincoln dies, 1865. 


5 18 


6 42 


454 


5 24 




4 58 


5 14 


6 46 


456 


106 


16 


SUN. 


Porter passed Vicksburg, 1863. 


5 17 


6 43 


sets 


5 23 


6 37 


sets 


5 12 


647 


sets 


107 


17 


Mo. 


Death of Franklin, ITiJO. 


5 15 


6 44 


8 29 


!5 21 


6 37 


8 29 


5 11 


6 48 


8 49 


108 


is 


Tu. 


Ride of Paul Revere, 1775. 


5 14 


6 45 


9 53 


5 20 




9 49 


5 9 


6 50 


10 16 


109 


19 


We. 


Battle of Lexington, 1775. 


5 12 


6 46 


11 12 


5 19 


( 1 ' !' * 


11 4 


5 8 


6 52 


11 36 


110 


21 


Th. 


Gen. Lee resigns U. S. A., 1861. 


5 10 


648 


morn 


5 18 


6 40 


morn 


5 6 


6 53 


morn 


111 


21 


Fri. 


Battle of San Jacinto, 1836. 


5 9 


6 4>; 


21 


5 16 


6 41 


10 


5 4 


654 


044 


112 
113 
114 


24 


Sat. 
SUN. 
Mo. 


Paul Jones at Whitehav'n,1778 
Battle bet. Lee & Marion, 1781. 
Ranger takes the Drake, 1778. 


5 7 
5 6 
5 4 


6 51 

6 52 


1 18 
235 


5 15 
5 13 

5 12 


6 42 
643 
6 44 


1 7 

IS 


5 2 
5 1 

4 59 


6 55 
6 57 

6 58 


1 39 

118 


115 


25 


Tu. 


U.S.land office estab'sh'd, 1812. 


5 3 


6 53 


3 2 


5 11 


6 45 


2 57 


4 57 


6 59 


3 13 


116 
117 

118 


2t 
27 
2s 


We. 

Th. 
Fri. 


New Orleans taken, 1862. 
Habeas corpus suspend'd,1861. 
Battle of Saugatuck riv'r, 1777. 


5 1 
5 

4 59 


6 54 

6 55 
6 5! 


3 25 

! 4 i 


5 10 
5 8 
5 7 


6 46 
6 46 

6 47 


3 23 
3 49 
4 7 


4 55 
4 54 
4 52 


7 

? i 


3 32 
3 50 
4 5 


119 


2! 


Sat. 


Md. d'cides ag'nst seces'n,l861. 


4 57 


6 5s 


4-22 


5 6 


6 48 


4 29 


4 51 


7 4 


422 


120 


30 


SUN. 


Washington inaugurated,1789. 


4 56 


6 59 


4 42 


5 5 


6 49 


4 46 


4 49 


7 5 


4 39j 



5tliMOXTH. MAY. 31 DAYS. 


5* 





8d 


May is from the Latin llaius^ 
the growing month. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.,N.Y., Pa., 

8. Wis., S.Mich. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., MO., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 


<F 


^ 


r* H 




N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


& 





^ 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun Sun 
ises sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

K.& S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.&S. 










[.M. H.M. 


H.M. 


M M 




H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


121 


1 


Mo. 


Battle of Port Gibson, 1863. 




7 Q 


rises 


>' 4 




rises 


148 


7 t. 


rises 


122 




Tu. 


Battle of Chancellorsville, 1863 


t 53 


7 1 


9 5 


5 2 


3 50 


859 


4 46 


7 8 


9 26 


1 23 


3 


We. 


First call for 3-year men, 1861. 


4 52 


7 2 


10 7 


} 1 


j 52 


9 57 


4 45 


7 9 


10 29 


124 


4 


Th. 


Grant crosses the Rapid'n,1864 


450 


3 


11 4 






10 52 


4 43 


711 


11 26 


125 


5 


Fri. 


Yorktown evacuated, 1862. 


449 


4 


11 55 


4 59 


3 54 


11 4 


4 42 


7 12 


morn 


12ti 


6 


Sat. 


Ark. and Tenn. secede, 1861. 


448 


5 


morn 


4 ~>s 


i 55 


morn 


441 


7 13 


16 


127 

128 




SUN. 
Mo. 


Baton Rouge, La., capt'r'd,1862 
Battle of Palo Alto, 1846. 


447 
446 


6 

8 


039 
1 16 


4 57 
4 56 


6 55 
6 56 


027 
1 6 


4 39 

4 38 


7 14 
7 16 


58 


129 


() 


Tu. 


Battle of Resaca, Mex., 1846. 


4 44 


9 


1 45 


4 55 


3 57 


1 38 


4 36 


7 17 


1 58 


130 
131 


10 

11 


We. 
Th. 


Jeff Davis captured, 1865. 
Battle of Charl'st'n Neck,1779. 


443 
4 42 


7 10 
7 11 


2 10 
233 


4 54 
4 53 




2 6 
233 


4 35 
434 


7 18 
7 19 


2 41 


132 


12 
13 


Fri. 
Sat. 


Crown Point taken, 1775. 
War declar'd ag'nst Mex., 1846 


4 41 
4 40 


7 12 
7 13 


255 
3 17 


4 52 
4 51 


7 5 C 
7 1 


2 57 
3 23 


4 33 
4 31 


7 20 
7 21 


2 59 
3 18 


134 


14 
15 


SUN. 

Mo. 


Cape Cod discovered, 1602. 
Ft. Gran by taken, 1781. 




lit 


3 42 
4 11 


4 50 
449 


7 2 
7 3 


II? 


4 30 


7 22 
7 23 


H 


LS6 


16 


Tu. 


Lincoln nominated, 1860. 


4 37 


7 16 


sets 


449 


7 4 


sets 




7 24 


sets 


137 


17 


We. 


First national fast, 1776. 




7 17 


10 4 


448 


7 4 


9 54 




7 25 


10 28 


138 


18 


Th. 


Grant invests Vicksburg, 1863. 


4 35 


7 18 


11 8 


448 


7 5 


10 57 


4 26 


7 27 


11 31 


139 


19 


Fri. 


The "dark day," 1780. 


434 


7 19 


11 53 


447 


7 6 


1149 


4 25 


7 28 


morn 


140 


_'(> 


Sat. 


Mecklenburg declaration,1775 


4 3^ 


7 20 


morn 


446 


7 7 


morn 






18 


141 
142 


21 
22 


SUN. 

Mo. 


Ft. Galphin taken, 1781. 
Brooks assaults Sumner, 1850. 


432 


111 


n 


445 
4 45 




029 
1 2 


4 2^ 

4 22 


7 31 


53 
1 19 


143 


23 


Tu. 


Settlem'nt at Jamestown, 1607. 


431 


7 23 


131 


444 


7 *~ 


1 29 


422 


7 32 


1 40 


144 


24 


We. 


Banks evac's Strasburg, 1862. 


4 3t 


7 24 


1 51 


443 


7 10 


1 51 


4 21 


7 33 


1 57 


145 


_T, 


Th. 


Battle of Spottsylvania, 1864. 




725 


2 10 


443 


7 11 


2 13 


4 20 


7 34 


2 13 


146 




Fri. 


Last confeds. surrender, 1865. 


4 2 


726 




442 


7 12 


234 


4 19 




2 28. 


147 
148 


-,- 


Sat. 
SUN. 


Fts. Erie & George aban'd,18l3. 
Battle of Dallas, Ga., 1864. 


4 21 
4 21 


11? 


3 1C 


4 42 

441 


151 


2 58 
3 23 


4 18 
4 18 


7 37 


2 46 
3 6 


149 


' > ( i 


Mo. 


Battle of Waxhaw, 1780. 


427 


728 


3 34 


441 


7 14 


3 51 


4 17 


7 38 


3 28 


150 


fiii 


Tu. 


Corinth taken, 1862. 


4 26 


7 29 


rises 


441 


7 15 


rises 


4 16 


7 39 


rises 


151 


31 


We. 


Battle of Fair Oaks, 1862. 


426 


7 30 


3 59 


440 


7 15 


847 


416 


7 40 


9 21 


GtliMOXTH. JUNE. 30 DAYS. 


s 


6 
S 

-- 


?s 


June traced to Juno, the queen 
of heaven, who was thought to 
preside over marriages. 


S. e Wi8.,S.Mich! 
N. 111., Ind. O. 


St. Louis, S. 111.. 
Va , Ky., Mo., 
Kan , Col., Cal.. 
Ind., Ohio. 


St Paul, N.E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 
Minn., Or. 


$ 


ft 


a 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Suni Sun 
rises sets. 


Moon 

K.&S. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 

rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


152 


1 


Th. 


Battle of Cold Harbor. 1864. 


1 


7 30 


H.M. 

9 52 


4' 40 


7'l*6 


H.M. 

939 


Tl5 


7'4l 


H. M. 
10 13 


153 


2 


Fri. 


Battle Lake Champlain,1813. 


425 


7 31 


10 38 


4 39 


7 16 


10 25 


4 15 


7 41 


10 57 


154 


3 


Sat. 


Lee assumes command, 1862. 


424 


7 32 


11 15 


4 39 


7 17 


11 4 


4 14 


7 42 


11 32 


155 


4 


SUN. 


War declar'd ag'nst Mex. 1842 


424 


7 32 


11 46 






11 38 


4 14 


7 43 


morn 


156 





Mo. 


Battle of Piedmont, 1864. 


4 24 


7 33 


morn 


4 39 


7 18 


morn 


4 14 


7 44 





157 


6 


Tu. 


Confeds. sur. Memphis, 1862. 


4 23 


7 34 


13 


4 38 


7 19 


8 


4 13 


7 44 


24 




7 


We. 


Fenians raid Canada, 1866. 


4 23 


7 34 


036 


4 38 


7 19 


034 


4 13 


7 45 


44 


159 


8 


Th. 


Battle of Chattanooga. 1862. 


4 23 


7 35 


057 


4 38 


7 20 


058 


4 12 


7 45 


1 2 


160 
161 
162 


9 
10 
11 


Fri. 
Sat. 
SUN. 


Battle of Big Bethel, 1861. 
Ward'cl'd ag'nst Tripoli, 1801. 
Walker landsin Nicar'g'a,l855 


23 


7 3(5 

11? 


|3jj 


438 


7 20 

11! 


1 22 
1 48 
2 19 


4 12 
4 12 
4 12 


II? 

747 




163 




Mo. 


Grant crosses C'kah'miny, 1864 


22 


7 37 


283 


4 38 


7 22 


2 57 


4 11 


7 48 


2 34 


164 




Tu. 


Fugitive slave lawrep'l d.1863. 


4 22 


7 38 


3 20 


438 


7 22 


3 43 


4 11 


7 48 


3 14 


165 
166 


14 
15 


We. 
Th. 


National flag adopted, 1777. 
Wash'n takes command, 1775. 


22 
22 


7 38 
7 38 


sets 
948 


4 38 

4 3S 


7 23 
7 23 


sets 
937 


411 
4 11 


7 49 
7 49 


sets- 
10 9 


167 


16 


Fri. 


Mississippi discovered, 1698. 


4 22 




10 32 




7 23 


1023 


4 11 


7 50 


10 50 




17 


Sat 


Battle of Bunker Hill. 1775. 


4 22 


7 S c 


11 6 


4 38 


7 24 


11 


4 11 


7 50 


11 20 


168 


18 


SUN. 


Can. evac't'dbyAm'ric'ns.l776 


4 23 


7 39 


11 33 


4 3g 


7 24 


11 30 


411 


7 51 


11 43 


170 


19 


Mo. 


War decl'd ag'nst Engl'd,1812. 


423 


7 40 


11 55 


438 


7 24 


11 55 


411 


7 51 


morn 


171 

172 
173 


20 
21 
22 


Tu. 
We. 
Th. 


Battle of Stony Ferry, 1779. 
Petersburg captured, 1864. 
Ewell crosses Potomac. 1863. 


423 

23 


7 4C 


morn 
015 
034 


438 


7 25 


morn 
17 
39 


4 11 
4 11 
4 12 


7 51 
7 51 
7 52 


82 
19 
35 


174 


23 


Fri. 


Great Eastern at N. Y., 1860. 


24 


7 4f 


053 


4 39 


7 25 


1 2 


4 12 


7 52 


52 


175 


24 


Sat. 


Harrison warns Tecums'b.,1811 


4 24 


7 40 


1 14 


439 


7 25 


1 26 


412 


7 52 


1 11 


176 
177 
178 
179 

180 


25 
26 

1 


SUN. 
Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 
Th. 


Custer massacre, 1876. 
Seven days' bat.les began. 1862 
Morm'ns mobb'd,Carth'ge, 1857 
1st coloni'l assembly m'ts, 1619 
Howe reaches Sandy Ho'k.1776 


424 
4 25 
4 25 

25 


7 40 

its 

7 40 
7 40 


I 3 ! 

241 
3 23 

rises 


440 
440 
441 
441 
441 


725 
725 


1 54 
227 

349 

rises 


4 12 
4 13 
4 13 
4 14 
414 


7 52 
7 52 
7 52 
752 
7 52 


1 33 
2 
2 33 
3 15 
rises 


181 


30 


Fri. 


Gulteau hanged, 1882. 




7 40 


9 16 


4 42 


7 25 


9 6 


4 15 


7 52 


9 35 



7th MONTH. JULY. 31 DAYS. 


g 


6 
55 

f 


?S 


July named In honor of Julius 
Caesar, who was born on the 12th 
of July. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.,N.Y., Pa., 
S.Wis., S.Mich., 
N 111., Ind., 0. 


St. Louis, 8. 111., 
V&., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, JT. E. 
Wls. and Mich., 
N.E.NewYork, 
Minn., Or. 


-v^ 


Q 


ta^ 




Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


Sun 


Sun 


Moon 








AMERICAN HISTORY. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 


rises 


sets. 


R.&S. 


182 


1 


Sat. 


Battle of Gettysb'gbeg'n, 1863. 


f 27 


7'40 


H. M. 
949 


?'4 M 2 


725' 


H. M. 

9 40 


4 '15 


?!' 


H. M. 




2 


SUN. 


Garfleld assassinated. 1881. 


4 27 


7 40 


10 16 


4 43 


7 25 


10 10 


4 16 




10 28 


1 84 


3 


Mo. 


Massacre of Wyoming, 1778. 




7 40 


1040 


443 


7 25 


1037 


4 16 


7 50 


1049 


1 ^ '"> 


4 


Tu. 


Vicksburg surrendered, 1863. 


4 ^9 


7 39 


11 1 


4 44 


7 25 


11 1 


4 17 


7 50 


11 7 


186 


5 


We. 


Battle of Carthage, Mo., 1861. 


429 


7 39 


11 22 


444 


7 25 


11 28 


4 18 


7 50 


11 25 




6 


Th. 


Battle of Jamestown, 1781. 


4 29 


7 39 


11 43 


445 


7 24 


11 50 


4 19 


7 49 


11 43 






Fri. 

Sat. 


Lincoln's murder'rs hung, 1865 
Wash'n chosen as capital, 1792 


4 30 
4 31 




morn 
7 


445 
446 


7 24 
7 24 


morn 
18 


419 
4 20 


Jtl 


morn 
5 




i) 


SUN. 


Surrender of Pt. Hudson, 1863. 


4 32 


7 38 


035 


4 47 


7 24 


51 


421 


7 48 


031 




10 


Mo. 


Fr'nch allies land, N'port,1780. 


4 33 


7 37 


1 10 


447 


7 23 


1 31 


4 22 


7 47 


1 4 




11 


Tu. 


Battle of Rich Mo ntain, 1861. 


4 33 




1 57 


4 48 




2 22 




7 47 


1 51 




12 


We. 


Norwalk, Conn., burned, 1779. 


434 


7 36 


2 6 


4 48 


7 22 


3 24 


4 23 


7 46 


2 50 


194 
195 


13 
14 


Th. 
Fri 


Draft riots in N. Y., 1863. 
econd great flre.Chicago, 1875 


435 

436 


7 11 


sets 
9 1 


4 49 
4 50 


7 21 


sets 
8 53 


4 L'ti 


7 46 
7 45 


sets 
9 16 


196 


15 


Sat. 


Battle of Baylor's Farm. 1864. 


437 


7 34 


9 32 


451 


7 21 


9 28 


4 26 


7 44 


9 44 




16 


SUN. 


Wayne takes Stony Point,l779. 


438 




9 57 


4 51 




9 55 


4 27 


7 43 


10 5 


199 


17 
18 


Mo. 
Tu. 


Emancipation bill signed, 1862. 
Maximilian shot, 1867. 




7 32 


10 18 
1038 


4 52 
4 -'>3 


7 19 


10 19 
10 42 




7 42 


10 23 
1040 


200 


19 


We. 


Morgan defeated, 1863. 


4 40 


7 32 


1057 


454 


7 18 


11 35 


430 


7 41 


10 56 


201 


20 


Th. 


Confed. cong. Richmond, 1861. 


4 41 


7 31 


11 17 


4 54 


7 18 


11 28 


431 


7 40 


11 14 




21 


Fri. 


Battle of Bull Run, 1861. 


4 42 


7 30 


11 40 


4 55 




11 54 


4 32 


7 39 


11 34 


203 




Sat. 


Gen. M'Clell'n takes com., 1861 


443 




morn 


4 55 


7 17 


morn 






morn 


204 


23 


SUN. 


Gen. Grant dies, 1885. 


4 44 


7 28 


7 


4 56 


7 16 


25 


4 34 


7 38 







) j 


Mo. 


Mormons arrive in Utah, 1847. 


445 


7 27 


039 


4 57 


7 15 


1 


435 


7 37 


31 


206 


IT. 


Tu. 


Battle of Lundy's Lane, 1814. 


446 


7 26 


1 19 


4 58 


7 14 


1 43 


436 


7 36 


1 11 




_>; 


We. 


Halleck sup's McClellan, 1862. 


4 47 


7 25 


2 7 




7 14 


2 34 


437 


7 35 


2 


"'( l^s 


_>7 


Th. 


Atlantic cable laid, 186tt. 


4 48 




3 3 


4 59 


7 13 


3 30 


439 


7 33 


2 58 


'>()<) 


'S 


Fri. 


Battle at Atlanta, 1864. 


4 49 


7 23 


rises 


5 


7 12 


rises 


440 


7 32 


rises 


210 


" * 


Sat. 


The Alabama starts out, 1862. 




7 22 


8 20 


5 1 


7 11 


8 13 


441 


731 


8 33 


211 


id 


SUN. 


Petersb'g mine explod'd, 1864. 


451 


7 21 


8 45 


5 2 


7 10 


8 41 


442 


7 30 


8 55 


212 


11 


Mo. 


Lafayette made maj.-gen., 1777 


4 52 


7 20 


9 7 


5 3 


7 9 


9 6 


4 3 


7 20 


9 13 


8th MONTH. AUGUST. 31 DATS. 


AT OK 1 
fKAB. 


c 
S 


g 


August was named In honor 
of Augustus Caesar, he having 
been made consul in this month. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.,N. Y.,Pa., 
S.Wis., S.Mich., 
N. 111., Ind., 0. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va.., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col.. Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wls. and Mich., 
N.E.NewYork, 
Minn., Or. 


-N S~l 


* 


& 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


SuniMoon 
sets.'R.&s. 


213 


1 


Tu. 


Clerm'nt's trip on Huds'n, 1807 


4 '53 


7 19' 


H. M. 

9 27 


H.H. 

5 4 


7 -I 8 


H. M. 
9 26 


H.H. 

4 44 


H.H. 


1H. M. 
9 31 


214 




We. 


Battle of Ft. Stephenson, 1813. 


454 


7 18 


943 


5 5 


7' 1 


9 54 


4 45 


7 26 


9 49 


215 


*-$ 


Th. 


Col'mbus sails from Sp'n, 1492. 


4 55 


7 16 


1010 


5 6 


7 6 


820 


446 


7 25 


10 9 


216 


4 


Fri. 


Col. Isaac Hayne hang'd, 1781. 


456 


7 15 


1036 


5 7 


7 5 


50 


447 


7 24 


1032 


217 

218 


5 
6 


Sat. 
SUN. 


Farrag'tent'rs M'bile bay. 1864 
Ram Arkansas explod'd, 1862. 


4 57 


7 14 
7 13 


11 8 
1143 


5 7 
5 8 


7 4 
7 3 


11 27 
morn 


448 
4 50 


7 22 
7 21 


11 2 
11 42 


219 


7 


Mo. 


Lafayette departs, 1825. 


4 59 


7 11 


morn 


5 9 


7 2 


12 


4 51 


7 19 


morn 


221 





Tu. 
We. 


Battle of Mackinaw, 1814. 
Battle of Cedar Mount'n, 1862. 


5 
5 1 


7 10 
7 9 


041 
147 


iiS 


7 1 
7 




452 
4 53 


718 
7 16 


35 
1 43 


222 


10 


Th. 


Battle of Wilson Creek, 1861. 


5 9 


7 7 


3 1 


5 11 


6 58 


3 29 


4 54 


7 15 


3 


223 


11 


Fri. 


Bat.Sulphur Bridge Sps., 1864. 


5 3 


7 6 


sets 


5 12 


6 57 


sets 


4 56 


7 13 


sets 


224 
225 


12 
13 


Sat. 
SUN. 


King Philip shot. 1675. 
Mosby's atk.on Sheridan, 1864. 


5 4 
5 5 


7 4 
7 3 


IS 


5 13 
5 14 


6 56 
6 55 


7 54 


4 57 


7 12 
7 10 


8 7 
8 27 


226 


14 


Mo. 


Death of Farragut, 1870. 


5 6 


7 2 


840 


5 15 


654 


Q ^O 


4 59 


7 8 


8 43 


2*27 


15 


Tu. 


Lafayette visits the U. S.,1824. 


5 7 


7 


8 59 


5 15 


6 52 


() ~ 


5 


7 7 


8 59 


228 


it; 


We. 


Battle of Bennington, 1777. 


5 8 


6 59 


9 19 


5 16 


6 51 


9 29 


5 2 


7 5 


9 17 


230 


17 

is 


Th. 
Fri. 


Anti-Neb, con. Saratoga, 1854. 
Panic of 1873 began. 


5 10 
5 11 


6 57 
6 56 


9 41 
10 6 


88 


Si8 


9 34 
10 23 


i ! 


7 4 
7 2 


936 
10 


231 


19 


Sat. 


Battle of Bluelicks, Ky., 1782. 


5 12 


6 54 


10 37 


5 19 


6 48 


10 58 


5 5 


7 


10 29 


232 
233 
234 


pY 

22 

'"/'' 


SUN. 
Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 


Battle of Fallen Timb'rs, 1794. 
Lawrence, Kas., sacked, 1863. 
Att'ck on Ft. Sumter rep., 1863. 
Ft. Morgan surrenders, 1864. 


5 13 
5 14 
5 15 
5 16 


6 53 
651 

50 

6 4S 


11 14 
11 59 
morn 
52 


5 19 
5 20 

i! 


646 
645 
6 44 
643 


11 38 
morn 


5 6 
5 8 
5 9 
5 10 


6 59 
6 57 
6 56 
S 54 


11 6 
11 51 
morn 
45 


239 


25 

_r, 
I>7 


Th. 
Fri. 
Sat. 
SUN. 


British capt're Washing'n.1814 
Battle Ream's Station, 1864. 
Stamp-act riot Boston, 1768. 
Battle of Long Island, 177& 


III 

519 
5 20 


li 46 
6 45 
6 43 
641 


1 53 
rises 


5 23 

11 


641 
6 37 


2 19 
3 25 
4 32 
rises 


5 11 
5 12 
5 14 


6 49 
6 47 


1 48 
3 
412 
rises 


240 


2S 


Mo. 


Post-car serv.C.&N. W.Ry, 1864 


5 21 


6 40 


7 33 


5 27 


6 35 


7 33 


5 16 


6 45 


7 36 


241 


'21* 


Tu. 


Second battle Bull Run, 1862. 






7 52 


5 28 


6 34 


7 57 


5 17 


6 43 


7 54 


li 


31 


We. 
Th. 


Americ'ns evacuate R. I., 1778. 
French fleet arrives. 1781. 


5 24 


6 35 


m 


5 28 
5 29 


632 
6 31 


8 23 
8 52 


5 18 
5 20 


6 41 
6 40 


8 14 
8 36 



9tn MONTH. SEPTEMBER. so DAYS. 


si 


lYMO. 


Sg 


September, from Septem (sev- 
enth), as It was the seventh 
Roman month. 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N.Y.,Pa., 
S.Wls.. S. Mich. 
N. 111., Ind., O. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 

Kan!, Co'l., Cal, 
Ind., Ohio. 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wls. and Mich., 
N.E.NewYork, 
Minn., Or. 


a** 


Q 


Q 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 

sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
seta. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


244 


1 


Fri. 


Battle of Chantilly, 1862. 


H.M. 

5 25 


|.M 


H.M. 


H.M. 

5 30 


B.M. 


H. M. 

9 27 


5^ 


?* 


H. M. 


245 

246 




Sat. 

SUN. 


Atlanta surrenders, 1864. 
Tre'ty of peace. U.S. & G. B.,'83 




3 30 


9 47 
1034 


5 31 


; ' r '6 


10 9 
11 


ill 


3 34 


9 40 
10 27 




4 


Mo. 


Chicago lighted with gas, 1850. 


5 29 


3 28 


11 33 


5 32 


6 25 


morn 


5 24 


6 32 


11 28 


348 


5 


Tu. 


Lee invades Maryland, 1862. 


5 30 


6 26 


morn 


5 33 


5 23 


2 


5 26 


6 30 


morn 


249 




We. 


Mayflower sails, 1620. 




6 24 


043 






112 


5 27 


6 28 


40 


251 





Th. 

Fri. 


Ft. Wayne captured. 1863. 
Battle of Molino del Rey, 1847. 


] -jq 


6 23 
6 21 




\ ii 


; I'M 


2 26 
3 38 




6 26 
6 24 


1 59 
3 18 


252 


9 


Sat. 


Geneva award paid, 1873. 


5 S4 


619 


432 


5 :-;; 


6 17 


449 


o 31 


622 


436 


253 


10 


SUN. 


Perry's vict. in Lake Erie, 1813 


~) S"> 


6 18 


sets 


5 37 


6 16 


sets 


5 32 


6 21 


sets 


254 


11 


MO. 


Battle of Brandywine, 1777. 


5 36 


6 16 


7 1 


5 38 


6 14 


7 6 


5 34 


6 19 


7 3 


255 
256 


li 




Battle of Chapultepec, 1841. 
Gen. Wolf killed, 1<59. 




6 14 
6 12 


7 22 




6 12 
6 11 


7 30 
7 54 




6 17 
6 15 




257 


14 


Th!' 


City of Mexico taken, 1847. 




611 


Q G 


5 41 


6 9 




o 37 


6 13 


8 1 


25.x 


15 


Fri. 


Delegates adopt consti'n, 1787. 




6 9 


835 


542 


6 8 


O KK 


5 39 


611 


8 28 


259 


16 


Sat. 


Battle of Winchester, 1864. 


5 41 


6 7 


9 9 


5 43 


6 6 


9 32 


5 40 


6 9 


9 1 


260 


17 


SUN. 


Battle of Antietam, 1862. 


5 42 


6 5 


9 50 


544 


6 5 


10 16 


5 41 


6 7 


9 42 


263 

264 


21 


Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 
Th. 


Fugitive slave law signed,1850 
Battle of luka, 1862. 
Battle of Lexington, Va., 1861. 
Battle of Fishers Hill, 1864. 


5 43 
5 44 
5 46 

5 47 


6 2 
6 

5 58 


10 40 
1138 
morn 
043 


5 45 
5 45 

5 46 
5 47 


6 3 

1 I 

5 59 


11 7 
morn 

? i 


5 42 
543 
5 45 

5 46 


6 5 
6 3 
6 1 
5 59 


10 33 
11 33 
morn 
40 


265 


22 


Fri. 


Arnold's treason, 1780. 


5 48 


5 56 


1 52 


5 48 


5 57 


214 


5 47 


557 


1 52 


266 


_':; 


Sat. 


PaulJones' victory, 1779. 


5 49 


5 55 


3 2 


5 49 


5 56 


321 


5 48 


5 55 


3 5 


267 


24 


8UX. 


Monterey captured, 1846. 


5 50 


5 53 


4 12 


5 49 


5 54 


427 


5 49 


5 53 


4 18 


270 
271 


Z 

27 
_'s 


Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 
Th. 


Philadelphia captured, 1777. 
Harrison leaves Vincen'es,1811 
Battle of Pilot Knob, 1864. 
Detroit retaken. 1813. 


5 51 

il 

5 54 


5 51 
49 
48 
546 


rises 
6 19 
643 
7 10 


5 50 
5 51 
5 52 

5 r.3 


5 53 
5 51 
5 49 
5 48 


rises 
6 26 

?8 


5 51 

m 

5 54 


ii 
ill 


rises 
6 19 
6 41 
7 6 


272 


29 


Fri. 


Andre convicted, 1780. 


5 55 


5 44 


7 45 


5 54 


546 


8 6 


5 55 


5 44 


7 39 


273 


:-!ii 


Sat. 


Congress meets at York, 1777. 


5 56 


5 43 


8 30 


5 55 


5 45 


8 56 


5 57 


5 42 


8 24 


10th MONTH. OCTOBER. 31 DAYS. 


h 

Op! 


c 
S 

(H 


H 


October was formerly the 
eighth month, and hence the 
name from Octem (eighth). 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb., N.Y., Pa., 
S.Wls., S.Mich. 
N. 111.. Ind., O. 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


St.Paul.N.E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.E. New York, 
Minn., Or. 


Q?H 


n 


Q 


AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 

rises 


Sum Moon 
sets. R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&8. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.&8. 






~~ 




H.M. 


H.M.iH. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


274 

275 


i 


SUN. 

Mo. 


Jacks' n removes TJ.S.deps,1833 
Andre hung as a spy, 1780. 


11 


5 41 
539 


1033 


5 57 


543 
5 42 


955 
11 2 


il 


540 
5 38 


9 21 
10 29 


276 


i 


Tu. 


Harrison at Terre Haute, 1811 


6 


537 


11 47 


5 58 


5 40 


morn 


6 


5 36 


11 45 


277 


4 


We. 


Battle of Germantown, 1777. 


3 1 


536 


morn 


5 58 


5 39 


14 


6 2 


5 34 


morn 


278 




Th. 


Tecumseh killed, 1813. 


3 ^ 


534 










6 3 


5 33 


11 4 




I 


Fri. 


Peace proclaimed, 1783. 






2 17 


6 


~i S* 


2 36 


6 5 


5 32 


2 29 


281 




8 


Sat. 
SUN. 


Bristol, R. I., bombarded, 1775. 
First great Chicago fire, 1871, 


3 i 


29 


437 


6 2 


5 34 
5 33 


3 44 
447 


5 ti 
3 7 


5 29 
5 27 


3 35 
445 




9 


MO. 


Battle of Strasburg. Va., 1864. 


6 7 


5 27 


5 41 


6 3 


5 31 


5 51 


6 8 


5 25 


5 5 


283 


10 


Tu. 


Naval academy opened, 1845. 


6 8 


5 25 


sets 


6 4 




sets 


6 10 


5 24 


sets 


284 


11 


We. 


! Battle Lake Champlain.1776. 


6 9 


5 24 


6 9 


6 5 


"5 "'S 




3 11 




6 4 




12 


Th. 


Battle of Resaca. Ga., 1864. 


6 10 


5 22 


635 


6 6 


5 27 








6 29 


-> ( S(J 


13 


Fri. 


Battle of Queenstown, 1812. 


6 11 


5 21 


7 6 


6 7 


5 25 




3 1^ 




6 54 


2S7 


14 


Sat. 


Declaration of rights, 1774. 


6 19 


5 19 


7 44 


6 8 


5 24 


8 8 


6 15 


5 6 


7 35 




15 


SUN. 


Great bank panic, 1857. 


6 14 


5 17 


831 


6 9 


5 21 


8 58 


s ie 


5 15 


8 26 


290 
291 


It 
17 
18 


Mo. 
Tu. 
We. 


Harper's F. arsen'l capt., 1859. 
Burgoyne's surrender, 1777. 
Treaty with Seminoles, 1820. 


615 
6 Ifc 


5 16 
5 14 
5 13 


926 
10 27 
1132 


6 10 
6 11 
612 


ili 

519 


9 53 
1053 
11 56 




5 13 
5 11 
5 9 


10 28 
11 31 


292 


19 Th. 


Cornwallis surrenders, 1781. 


6 IS 


5 11 


morn 


6 13 


5 17 


morn 


r or 


5 7 


morn 


293 


20 


Fri. 


Grant relieves Ros'ncr'ns, 1863 


6 1 


5 10 


040 


6 14 


5 16 


1 1 


6 23 


5 6 


042 


1M 


21 
22 


Sat. 
SUN. 


Earthquake at San Fran., 1868 
Hessians arrive, 1776. 


6 21 
6 2S 


5 8 
5 7 


1 50 
300 


6 li 


5 15 
5 14 


2 7 
3 15 


6 2f 


5 4 
5 2 


i s a 


296 
297 


2:-; 
24 


Mo. 
Tu. 


Topeka convent'n meets, 1855. 
Zagonyi'sch'ge, Springf d, 1861 


6 2i 


5 5 
5 4 


4 13 
527 


6 \l 


88 


4 24 
533 


6 12 


5 

458 


424 
5 40 


'>98 


25 


We. 


i British evacuate R. I.. 1779. 


6 2 


5 2 


rises 


6 1 


5 9 


rises 


6 3( 


4 57 


rises 


i 2'. 9 
300 


2l 

27 


Th. 
Fri. 


Secession agreed upon, 1860. 
Ram Albemarle sunk, 1864. 


6 2f 
6 2 


5 1 
5 


5 41 
6 24 


6 20 
6 21 


5 8 
5 7 


6 1 

648 




456 
454 


if? 


301 
302 


2s 
2! 


Sat. 

SUN. 


I Erie canal completed, 1825. 
McClellan dies, 1885. 


6 2 
6 3C 


4 53 
4 57 


7 17 
8 22 


6 2. 
6 23 


5 6 
5 < 


832 
o o2 


63^ 


4 53 

4 52 


7 11 
8 18 


303 301 Mo. 


San Fran, bay discovered, 17C9 


63$ 


456 


9 34 


6 24 


5 J 


10 o 


6 37 4 50 


937 


304'31Tu. i Gen. Scott retires. 18K1. 


6 3314 54 10 33 6 24 5 2 


11 17 


6 39 4 48 10 53 



ii tii MONTH. NOVEMBER. so DAYS. 


Sri 


6 


n 


November, from JVocem(nlne), 
as it was formerly the ninth 


Chicago, Iowa, 
1. W'ls., S Y Mich! 


St. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo., 
Kan., Col., Cal., 


St. Paul, N. E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
N.B. New York, 


^ w 


^ 


52 


month. 


N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


Q 


P 




AMERICAN HISTORY. 


Sun 
Isee 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


SunlMoon 
sets. R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 

R.&S. 










H.M. 


H.M. 


H. M. 


H.M. 


5.M. H. M. 


H.M. 


H.M. 


H M. 


H 


1 

2 


We. 
Th. 


Bat. French Creek, N. Y., 1813. 
Washington's farewell, 1783. 


> 3 


452 


morn 
8 


M 


1 1 


morn 
028 


640 
6 41 


ifi 


morn 
10 


307 


3 


Fri. 


Battle of Opelousas, La., 1863. 


3 36 


4: 50 


1 19 


6 28 


459 


1 35 


6 43 


4 44 


1 24 


308 


4 


Sat. 


George Peabody died, 1809. 


3 3 


449 


227 


629 


4 58 


2 39 


644 


443 


2 34 




5 


SIX. 


Battle near Nashville, 1862. 


3 3S 


448 


3 34 


6 30 


4 57 


342 


6 46 


441 


3 44 


310 
311 
312 


tj 

7 


Mo. 
Tu 
We. 


Brownsville, Tex., taken. 1863. 
Battle of Tippecanoe, 1811. 
Confed. envoys taken, 1861. 


3 4C 


if? 

445 


440 
546 
sets 


iii 

6 34 


4 56 
455 
454 


445 
546 
sets 


18 

6 50 


4 40 
439 
438 


4 52 
6 
sets 


313 
314 


10 


Th. 
Fri. 


Battle of Tafladega, Ga., 1813. 
Burnside takes command,1862. 


3 44 
6 45 


4 44 
442 


5 6 
5 43 


635 
3 36 


453 

452 


526 

6 7 


651 
6 53 


436 
4 35 


4 59 
5 35 


315 


1 ! 


Sat. 


Cherry Valley massacre, 1778. 


647 


441 


6 26 




4 51 


652 


654 


434 


6 18 


316 
317 
318 


12 
L3 

14 


SL'N, 
Mo. 
Tu. 


Montreal taken, 1775. 
Provisional govt. in Tex.. 1835. 
U. 8. Christian com. org., 1861. 


11 


440 
440 
439 




3 40 


450 
450 
449 


7 44 
9 44 


6 55 
657 

6 58 


433 
4 32 
430 


7 10 
8 10 
9 17 


319 


15 


We. 


Articles conf'n adopted, 1777. 


6 52 


438 


1022 


641 


448 


1047 


7 


429 


10 25 


320 


it; 


Th. 


Manistee lost, 1883. 


6 53 


437 


11 32 


6 42 


447 


11 51 


7 1 


4 28 


11 35 


321 


17 


Fri. 


Battle Knoxville, Tenn., 1863. 


6 54 


436 


morn 


6 43 


447 


morn 


7 2 


4 27 


morn 




is 


Sat. 


Standard time adopted, 1883. 


655 




04C 


6 45 


4 46 


55 


7 4 


426 


46 


';>*; 


lit 


SUN. 


Gettysb'g cem. dedicated, 1863. 


3 57 


43E 


1 49 


6 46 


446 


2 1 


7 5 


426 


1 58 


324 


20 


Mo. 


British take Ft. Lee, 1776. 




434 


3 C 


6 47 


445 


3 8 


7 7 


425 


3 12 


325 


21 


Tu. 


Surrender Fredricksburg, 1862. 


6 5* 


433 




3 48 


445 


420 


7 8 


424 


431 




22 

i!:i 


We. 
Th. 
Fri. 


Ft. George captured, 1780, 
Fight at Chattanooga, 1863. 
Battle Columbia, Tenn.. 1764. 


7 
7 s 


43 
4 35 


65* 
rises 


3 51 


444 
4 44 
4 43 


5 30 
6 55 
rises 


7 12 


toe 
25 
422 


5 54 

7 20 
rises 


;;2<" 


2:, 


Sat. 


Ft. Duquesne taken, 1755. 


7 ^ 


4 31 


6 5 


6 52 


4 43 


6 34 


7 14 


421 


6 


330 
331 


20 
27 


SL'N. 

Mo. 


Sojourner Truth died, 1883. 
Utah declar'd in rebellion,1857 


7 5 
7 6 


431 
430 


7 20 
8 3i 


6 53 
6 54 


443 
442 


7 49 
9 4 


7 15 
7 16 


420 
420 


Ii? 






Tu. 


Ft. Rosalie massacre, 1729. 


7 7 


t30 




6 55 


442 


1017 




419 


9 57 


'>'!') 


*)( ) 


We. 


Savannah, Ga., taken, 1778. 


7 8 


2< 


11 1( 


6 56 


441 


11 27 


719 


4 19 


11 14 


334 


f;o 


Th. 


Battle of Franklin, Tenn.,1863. 


7 9 


429 


morn 


657 


441 


morn 


720 


418 


morn 


istb MONTH. DECEMBER. 31 DAYS. 


Srf 





SM 


December, from Decem (ten), 
the Roman Calender terming it 


Chicago, Iowa, 
Neb.,N.Y., Pa., 

S Wis., S.Mich., 


s t. Louis, S. 111., 
Va., Ky., Mo.. 
Kan., Col., Cal.J 


St. Paul, N.E. 
Wis. and Mich., 
NE New York, 


^H 


* 


^w 


the tenth month. 


N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Or. 


P^ 


P 


P 


AMERICAN BISTORT. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


Sun 
rises 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
R.&S. 


335 


3 


Fri. 


Habeas corp. re-estab., 1865. 


Wo 


4'28 


H. M. 
020 


3 '58 


iii 


H. M. 
033 


7 21 


4 '18 


H.M. 
26 






Sat. 


Execution John Brown, 1859. 


1 11 


4 28 


1 27 


3 59 


441 


1 36 


7 22 


4 18 


1 36 


ills 


4 


SIN. 
Mo. 


Revolutionary army dis., 1783. 
Senate exp' Is Breck'nri'ge,1861 


7 12 
713 


428 

428 


11? 


659 

7 


441 
441 


2 38 


7 23 
7 25 


4 17 
4 17 


2 44 
3 51 


;::;; 


5 


Tu. 


Worcester, Mass., taken, 1786. 


7 14 


428 


442 


7 1 


4 41 


4 41 


7 26 


4 16 


4 59 


340 





We. 


Anti-slavery soc, org., 1833. 


7 15 


428 


547 


7 2 


4 41 


542 


727 


4 16 


6 6 


341 


7 


Th. 


Bat. Prairie Grove, Ark., 1862, 


7 16 


428 


651 


7 3 


441 


643 


7 28 


4 16 


7 12 


342 
343 


1 


Fri. 
Sat. 


British take N'port, R. I., 1776. 
Battle of Great Bridge, 1775. 


7 17 

; is 


428 
4 28 


sets 
5 11 


7 4 
7 5 


441 
441 


sets 
539 


7 29 

7 29 


4 16 
4 16 


sets 
5 5 


344 
345 


10 
11 


SL'N. 

Mo. 


Savannah besieged, 1864. 
Burnside cross's Rap'nock. 1862 




4 28 


7 9 


I ? 


111 


6 34 


7 31 


4 16 
4 16 


6 2 

7 6 


346 


12 


Tu. 


Battle Franklin, Tenn., 1862. 


7 21 


428 


8 15 


7 7 


441 


8 38 


7 32 


416 


8 15 


347 


i:: 


We. 


Ft. McAllister taken, 1864. 


7 21 


428 


9 21 


7 8 


442 


9 40 


7 33 


4 16 


9 22 


348 


14 


Th. 


Kan.-Neb. bill submitted. 1R53. 


7 25 




1027 


7 8 


442 


1042 


7 33 


4 17 


10 31 


349 


15 


Fri. 


Hartford convent'n me'ts,l8l4 




4 2 


11 33 


7 9 


442 


11 45 


7 34 


4 17 


11 40 


350 


10 


Sat. 


Boston " tea party," 1773. 


7 2*" 


4 2 


morn 


7 10 


4 42 


morn 




4 17 


morn 


351 


17 


SL'N. 


Battle Goldsboro, N.C., 1863. 


7 24 


429 


040 


7 10 


443 


048 


7 36 


417 


50 


352 


IS 


Mo. 


Battle Mississiniwa, Ind., 1812. 


7 2i 


430 


150 


7 11 


443 


1 56 


7 36 


4 18 


2 3 


353 


lit 


Tu. 


Am. army at Vall'y For'e, 1777. 




A or 


O p 


7 11 


444 


3 8 


7 37 


4 18 


3 22 


354 


20 


We. 


Battle Dranesville, Va., 1861. 


7 2( 


4 31 


425 


712 


444 


424 


7 37 


4 19 


4 46 


355 
356 


di 


Th. 
Fri. 


Sherm'n reaches Savan'h, 1864 
The embargo act passed, 1807. 


7 26 
7 27 


4 31 
432 


547 

7 8 


7 12 
7 13 


445 
4 45 


? 4 




4 19 
4 20 


6 11 
7 33 


357 


23 


Sat 


Washington resigns, 1783. 


7 27 


432 


rises 


7 13 


446 


rises 


7 3 C 


4 20 


rises 


358 


24 


SI'N 


Treaty of Ghent, 1814. 


72? 


4 33 




7 14 


446 


6 39 


7 40 


4 21 


6 1( 


359 


25 


MO 


Amnesty proclaimed, 1868. 




4 34 


7 3 


7 14 


447 


7 56 


7 40 


4 21 




360 


26 


Tu. 


Battle of Trenton, 1776. 


7 2* 


4 34 


8 5^ 


7 14 


4 48 


9 12 


7 41 


4 22 


8 5( 


361 
362 


27 


We 
Th. 


Washingt'n made dictat'r,1776 
Mason and Slidel sur., 18B3. 


7 28 
7 2S 


4 35 
43G 


10 6 
11 16 


7 15 
7 15 


4 48 
4 49 


10 21 
11 26 


7 41 
7 41 


4 23 

4 24 


10 12 
11 24 


363 


Of 


Fri. 


Battle Mossy Cre'k,Tenn., 1863 


7 2S 


4 36 


morn 


7 16 


449 


morn 


7 41 


4 24 


morn 


364 


3( 


Sat 


Mexican Gadsden cession, 1853 


7 3C 


437 


24 


7 16 


4 50 


31 


7 41 


4 25 


35 


365 


31 


SL'N 


Battle of Quebec, 1775. 


7 3f 


438 


1 30 


7 16 


4 51 


1 16 


7 41 


4 21 


1 47 



8. &eatJ2*&eference Calendar n 

For ascertaining any day of the week for any given time within two hundred years from the 
introduction of the New Style, 175** to 1952 Inclusive. 


YEARS 1753 TO 1952. 


1 
4 


1 


1 


1 

3 


1 


1 


5 
1 



s 
2 


I 


w 

O 


j 

f^ 


i 


1761 
1801 

TTt^T 
1802 


1767 
1807 


1778 
1818 


1789 
1829 


1795 
1835 


1846 
1847 


1857 
1903 

1858 
1909 


1863 
1914 


1874 
1925 

1875 
1926 


1885 
1931 

1886 
1937 


1891 
1942 

1897 
1943 


7 


7 


5 


1 


3 


6 


2 


4 


7 


2 


1773 
1813 


1779 
1819 

1774 
1825 


1790 
1830 


1841 


1869 
1915 


5 


1 


1 


4 


6 


2 


4 


7 


3 


5 


1 


8 


1757 
1803 

175T 

1805 


1763 
1814 


1785 
1831 


1791 
1842 


1853 

1799 
1850 
1901 


1859 
1910 

1861 
1907 

1862 
1913 

1865 
1911 


1870 
1921 


1881 
1927 

1878 
1929 

1879 
1930 


1887 
1938 

1889 
1935 

1890 
1941 


1898 
1949 

1895 
1946 


G 


2 


2 


5 


7 


3 


5 


1 


4 


6 


2 


4 


1765 
1811 

1766 
1817 


1771 

1822 


1782 
1833 


1793 
1839 


1867 
1918 

1873 
1919 


2 


5 

G 
3 


5 
6 

3 


1 


3 


6 
7 


1 


4 


7 


2 
3 


5 


7 


1755 
180(5 


1777 
1823 


1783 
1834 


1794 
1845 


1800 
1851 
1902 


1947 

1899 
1950 


3 


2 

6 


4 


2 


5 
2 


1 


6 


1 
5 


1753 
1809 

TfoT 
1810 


1769 
1815 


1775 
1826 


1786 
1837 


1797 
1843 


1854 
1905 


1871 
1922 


1882 
19?3 


1893 
1939 


7 


1 


4 


G 


5 


7 


3 


1759 
1821 


1770 
1827 


1781 
1838 


1787 
1849 


1798 
1855 


1866 
1906 


1877 
1917 


1883 
1923 


1894 
1934 


1900 
1945 
1951 


1 


4 


4 


















6 


















LEAP YEARS. 




29 
IT 






















T 


T 


T 






~3~ 


6 






T 

4 


1764 


1792 


1804 
1808 
1812 




1832 


1860 




1 




1928 . 




7 


5 


7 


1 


4 


1768 


1796 




1836 


1864 


1895 
189f 




1904 


1932 


5 


1 


2 


5 


7 
"5" 
~3 
1 
7~ 


3 

T 
6 
T 

o 


ft 


1 


! 


6 


2 


1772 




1840 


1868 


1908 


1936 


3 


G 


7 


3 


3 

1 
G 


6 
4 

"2 


t 


7 

T 

3 


2 


1776 
1780 






1816 
1820 
1824 




1844 
1848 
jgv> 


1872 
1876 
1880 





1912 
1916 
1920 


1940 

1944 
1948 


1 
8 


4 
2 
j 


5 

3 


1 
6 


7 \ 

T 


1760 

1 




178) 


\ 


1828 
2 




1 


156 


1884 
3 






1924 
4 


1952 


2 
5 


5 


6 


2 


4 
t 


7 


I 


5 


1 


3 

7 


6 


1 


Monday.... 1 
Tuesday.... 2 
Wednesday 3 
Thursday.. 4 
Friday 5 
Saturday... 6 
Sunday 7 
Monday.... 8 
Tuesday. ... 9 
WednesdaylO 
Thursday.. 11 
Friday 12 
Saturday. .13 
Sunday.... 14 
Monday.... 15 
Tuesday. ...16 
Wednesday!? 
Thursday.. 18 
Friday 19 
Saturday... 20 
Sunday... 21 
Monday 22 
Tuesday.. ..23 
Wednesday24 
Thursday. .25 
Friday 26 
Saturday... 27 
Sunday 28 
Monday 29 
Tuesday.... 30 
WednesdaySl 


Tuesday.... 1 
Wednesday 2 
Thursday.. 3 
Friday 4 
Saturday... 5 
Sunday.. . 6 
Monday.. . 7 
Tuesday.. . 8 
Wednesday 9 
Thursday .10 
Friday 11 
Saturday. .12 
Sunday.. .13 
Monday.. .14 
Tuesday.. .15 
Wednesdayle 
Thursday .17 
Friday 18 
Saturday. .19 
Sunday.. .20 
Monday.. .21 
Tuesday.. .22 
Wednesday^ 
Thursday .24 
Friday 25 
Saturday. .26 
Sundry.. .27 
Monday.. .28 
Tuesday.... 29 
WednesdaySO 
Thursday.. 31 1 


Wednesday 1 
Thursday.. 2 
Friday 3 
Saturday... 4 
Sunday.... 5 
Monday 6 
Tuesday.... 7 
Wednesday 8 
Thursday.. 9 
Friday 10 
Saturday... 11 
Sunday.... 12 
Monday.... 13 
Tuesday.... 14 
WednesdaylS 
Thursday.. 16 
Friday 17 
Saturday... 18 
Sunday.... 19 
Monday 20 
Tuesday.... 21 
Wednesday22 
Thursday.. 23 
Friday 24 
Saturday... 25 
Sunday 26 
Monday.... 27 
Tuesday.... 28 
Wednesday29 
Thursday.. 30 
Friday 31 


Thursday.. 1 
Friday 2 
Saturday... 3 
Sunday.... 4 
Monday 5 
Tuesday.... 6 
Wednesday 7 
Thursday.. 8 
Friday 9 
Saturday... 10 
Sunday 11 
Monday.... 12 
Tuesday.... 13 
Wednesdays 
Thursday.. 15 
Friday 16 
Saturday... 17 
Sunday 18 
Monday.... 19 
Tuesday.... 20 
Wednesday21 
Thursday.. 22 
Friday 23 
Saturday... 24 
Sunday.... 25 
Monday.... 26 
Tuesday.. ..27 
Wednesday28 
Thursday.. 29 
Friday 30 
Saturday... 31 


Friday 18 

Saturday... 2 , 
Sunday. ... '3] 
Monday.... 4 r 
Tuesday.... 5 1 
Wednesday 6 ' 
Thursday.. 7 
Friday 8f 
Saturday... 9 
Sunday 10 
Monday.:..!] ' 
Tuesday.... 12 
Wednesdays ' 
Thursday.. 14'] 
Friday 15|i 
Saturday... 16 < 
Sunday 17 3 
Monday.... 18 ' 
Tuesday.... 19 " 
Wednesday20! r 
Thursday. .21 1 
Friday 225 
Saturday... 23 , 
Sunday. . . .24 1 
Monday.... 25 r 
Tuesday.... 26 "< 
Wednesday27 r 
Thursday. .281 
Friday 29 
Saturday... 30 i 
Sunday 31 I 


Saturday.. : 
Sunday. . . ' 
Monday. . . J 
Tuesday... < 
Wednesday 5 
Fhursday. 6 
Friday ', 
Saturday.. * 
Sunday. . . { 
Monday... 10 
Tuesday... 1: 
Vednesdayl2 
Thursday. 13 
Friday 14 
Saturday.. 15 
Sunday... 16 
Monday... r 
^uesday... 18 
>Vednesdayl9 
rhursday..20 
^rlday 21 
Saturday... 22 
Sunday 23 
Monday 24 
ruesday....25 
Vednesday26 
rhursday..27 
>iday 28 
>aturday...29 
Sunday 30 
londay 31 


Sunday.... 1 
Monday.... 2 
Tuesday.... 3 
Wednesday 4 
Thursday.. 5 
Friday 6 
Saturday... 7 
Sunday.... 8 
Monday.... 9 
Tuesday.... 10 
Wednesdayll 
Thursday.. 12 
Friday 13 
Saturday... 14 
Sunday 15 
Monday 16 
Tuesday... .17 
WednesdaylS 
Thursday.. 19 
Friday 20 
Saturday.. 21 
Sunday 22 
Monday 23 
Tuesday.... 24 
Wednesday25 
Thursday.. 26 
Friday 27 
Saturday. ..28 
Sunday 29 
Monday.... 30 
Tuesday.. ..31 


NOTE. To ascertain any day of the week tirst look in the table for the year required and 
under the months are figures which refer to the corresponding figures at the head of the 
columns of days below. For Example: To know on what day of the week July 4 will be in the 
year 1893, In the table of years look for 1893, and in a parallel line, under July, is figure 6, which 
directs to column 6, in which it will be seen that July 4 falls on Tuesday. 
*1752 same as 1772 from Jan. 1 to Sept. 2. From Sept. 14 to Dec. 31 same as 1780 (Sept. 3-13 were 
omitted). This Calendar is from Whitaker's London Almanack, with some revisions. 



12 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE, WITH RATE OF DTITY, 

For the twelve months ending June 30. 1892, compared with the corresponding period of 1891. 
(Corrected to July 27, 1892.) 
Abbreviation: n. e. a., not elsewhere specified. 


IMPORTS FREE OF DUTY. 


Quantities. 


Values. 




1892. 
132 
3,312 
4,316 


189L 
2,740 
6,444 
9,606 


1892. 

$27,077 
1,307,587 
112,134 
229,081 
1,675,879 


1891. 
*49,326 
2,OJ9,155 
127,221 
279,408 
2,465,110 




Sheep . . . No 


All other, including fowls 


Total 






Articles, the growth, produce and manufacture of the 
United States; returned Spirits, distilled.. ..proof gals. 
All other .... . . 


918.304 


1,791,591 


1,079,385 
3,268,459 
4,347,844 


2,044,925 
2,421,354 
4,466,279 


Total 






Art works the production of American artists 






306,069 
387,509 
256,346 
279,680 

1,880,668 


395,858 
253,410 
274,389 
296,038 

1,655,514 


Asphaltum or bitumen crude ... tons 


103,157 
52,119 


70,153 
57,245 


Bark, hemlock cords 


Bolting cloths . 


Books, maps, engravings, etchings and other printed 
matter, n. e. s 






Chemicals, Drugs and Dyes, n. e. s. Alizarine, natural or 
artificial, including extract of madder Ibs. 


4,838,270 
24,813,171 

3,434,875 
230,039 


3,404,931 
21,579,102 

2,901,783 
86,399 


1,029,143 
2,216,525 

301,385 

55,883 


667,362 
2,197,507 

301,070 
19,779 




Barks Cinchona or other, from which quinine may be 
extracted . Ibs 


Cochineal Ibs. 


Dyewoods Logwood . . tons 


60,297 


84,155 


l,23S,f9:> 
145,009 
1,378,601 


1,842,885 
167,550 
2,010,435 


Another . ... 


Total 






Gums Arabic . Ibs 


415,807 
1,956,987 
25,819,473 
6,310,266 


938,839 
1,716,1671 
29,889,719 
6,253,38( 


61,550 
447,634 
1,069,043 
1,079,614 
3,431,705 
6,089,54^ 


116.190 

4*;ao60 

1,505,218 
1,076,740 
3,740,706 
6,906,914 


Camphor, crude. ... Ibs 


Gambier or terra japonica . Ibs 


Shellac . .. Ibs 


Allother Ibs. 


Total 






Indigo Ibs 


2,461,667 
98,659,583 
110,748,289 
2,16^,074 
587,118 


2,089,007 
55,307,911 
107,475,715 
1,885,100 
389,497 


1,772,507 
1,601,028 
1,839,640 
436,241 
1,029,203 


1,600,630 
896,597 
1,429,509 
362.800 
981,632 


Licorice root . Ibs 


Lime, chloride of, or bleaching powder.. .. Ibs 


Mineral waters, all not artificial gals 




Potash Chlorate of Ibs. 
Muriate of Ibs 


3,575,342 
70,413,810! 
14,254,514 
16,804,813 


2,395,062 
75,573,414 
8,930,546 
9,969,273 


353,763 
1,094,122 
435,839 
504,959 
2,388,683 


238,840 
1,172,879 
277,768 
328,387 
2,017,874 


Nitrate of or saltpeter crude Ibs 


Allother Ibs 


Total 


Quinla, sulphate of, and all alkaloids or salts of cin- 


2,853,871 
109,863 
109,419 
242,639 


3,a32,173 
100429 
120,804 
170,923 


572,078 
2,976,816 
2,524,406 
803,696 
4,512,851 
31,528,232 


833,260 
2,923,374 
2,451,513 
594,744 
5,444,714 
31,639,714 


Soda, nitrate of tons 


Sulphur, or brimstone crude tons 


Vanilla beans. .. Ibs 


Allother . 


Total chemicals, drugs, etc 






Chicory root, raw unground Ibs 


5,492,732 
21,955,874 
632,942,912 


1,864,821 
21,5S9,S40 
519,528,432 


93,179 
3,221,041 
126,801,607 
1,368,244 
3,215.303 

1,109,429 


35,512 

2,817.168 
96,123,777 
1,249,008 
2,825,004 

804,626 
1,053,964 

543.760 


Cocoa, or cacao, crude, and leaves and shells of Ibs. 
Coffee Ibs 


Cork wood, or cork bark, unmanufactured 


Cotton, unmanufactured Ibs 


28,625,509 


20,908,817 


Diamonds and other precious stones, rough or uncut, in- 
cluding glaziers' and engravers' diamonds not set, and 
jewels to be used in the manufacture of watches 


Eggs doz 




7 007 826 


Farinaceous substances, and preparations of (sago, tapi- 
oca, etc.), n. e. s 






244,897 


Fertilizers Guano tons 
Phosphates, crude or native tons 


4,158 
26,040 


10,615 
34,171 


61,264 
163,558 
1,206,403 
1,431,285 


185,7 ?1 
29d.540 
1,0*3,073 
1,525,384 


Allother 


Total 






Fish, n. e. s. Fresh other than shellfish Salmon Ibs. 
Allother Ibs 




341,000 
12 77o 777 




82,327 
218,0o9 
250,386 


Total 








Fruits, including Nuts, n. e. s. Bananas 






5,000,632 
917,564 
1 209 119 


5,854,752 
918,233 
1 246 074 


Cocoanuts 
Currants Ibs. 


3fi.fifi5.82H 


3319S14T1 









IMPORTS OP MERCHANDISE. 13 


IMPORTS FREE OF DUTY. 


Quantities. 


Valuts. 


Dates . . Ibs 


1892. 
17,084,557 


1891. 
18,239,057 


1892. 
$551,629 
1,970,634 
9,649,578 


1891. 
$613,845 
1,789,910 
10,422,814 


All other 


Total 












3,352,429 
1,685,562 

1,897,190 


2,822,166 
2,265,714 

1,549,725 








Hats, bonnets, and hoods, materials for, composed of 
straw, chip, grass, palm leaf, willow, osier, sparterre, 
or rattan, n. e. s 






Hides and skins, other than fur skins Goat skins 






11.509,127 
15,149,006 
26,b58,133 


11,433,745 
16,497,014 
27,930,759 i 


All other ... 






Total 






Household and personal effects, and wearing apparel in 
use, and implements, instruments, and tools of trade 
of persons arriving from foreign countries and of 
citizens of the United States dying abroad 






2,921,893 


2,920,050 


India Rubber and Gutta-Percha, crude Gutta-percha.. Ibs. 


308,239 
39,976,205 
40,284,444 


960,835 
33,712,089 
34,672,924 


114,874 
19,718,216 
19333,090 


164.524 
17,856,280 ; 
18,020,804 


Total Ibs. 


Iron and Steel, manufactures of, n. e. s. Needles, hand 






337,272 
170,084 
507,356 


235,132 
68,218 
303,350 








Total 






Ivory Animal Ibs. 


2H,438 
8,552,976 


243,236 
7,178,146 


893,139 
114,753 

1,637,473 


886,302 
76,887 

1,489,093 


Matting for floors, manufactured from round or split 
straw, including Chinese matting 


Oils n e s Fixed or expressed ... . . Ibs 


32.532,437 
2,491,700 


18,816,943 
2,347,685 


1,872,017 
1,457,227 
8,329,244 


1.081,2651 
1,288,167 
2.369,432 




Total 








250,416 
9,656,761 
9,907,177 


214,803 
8,953,608 
9,168,411 








Total 






Paper Stock Crude Rags other than woolen Ibs 


117,931,075 


121,058^12 


Si! 

5,448,263 


2,059,447 
2,960,086 
5,019,533 




Total 






Platinum unmanufactured..... Ibs 


3,915 
13,511 


6,118 
10,136 


505,205 
726,648 
1,485,044 


925,066 
509,809 
880,304 




Seeds, n. e. s 




191,221 

7,521,342 
1,121,486 
8,834,049 


82,053 

4,917,688 
1,266,888 
6,266,629 


97,673 
24 321 494 


62,146 
17,994,654 
1,019,282 
19,076,031 


Raw or as reeled from the cocoon Ibs 




'640',158 
25,059,325 


Total Ibs. 


Spices. Unground Nutmegs Ibs. 


1,580,605 
14,799,322 
14,511,451 
30,891,378 


1,327,135 
13,564,58.' 
13,732,261 
28,623,979 


750.813 
1,069,268 
920,006 
2,740,087 


686,019 
1,338,637 
864,495 
2,889,151 




Total Ibs 


Sugar n e s, and Molasses Molasses gals 


22,448,213 

293,134.261 
3248494502 


16,058,172 

323,056,481 
10886785r 


2,877,746 

8,081,170 

95,761,312 
106.720,228 


1,954,957 

8,870,309 
34,508,507 
45,333,773 


Sugar, not above No. 16, Dutch standard in color, and 
tank bottoms, melada, etc. Beet sugar Ibs. 




Total 


Tea Ibs. 


90,079,039 


83,453,33* 


14,373,222 


13,828.993 


Textile Grasses or Fibrous Vegetable Substances, and 
Manufactures of, n. e. s. Unmanufactured Istle or 
Tampico fiber tons 


4,499 
88,564 
44,574 
48,273 
12,824 
198,734 


3,877 
100,228 
35,331 
39,213 
18,913 
197,562 


294,703 
3,021,174 

6,672,279 
5,218,465 
1,271,501 
16,478,122 


353,181 

2,644,968 
6,218,254 ! 
4,454,573 
1,634,723 
15,305,699 










Total tons 




5,121,105 
43,908,652 


5,141,559 
39,787,622 


161,449 

8,667,870 
5.569,651 


167,452 
7,977,545 
5,276,972 


Tin in bars, blocks, pigs, or grain, or granulated Ibs. 


Wood, unmanufactured, n.e.s 


Articles Admitted Free Under Reciprocity Treaty with 
Hawaiian Islands Rice Ibs 


7,489,700 


7,840,900 
55,379 
232,594390 


367,533 


415,630 
6,018 
10,326,318 
1,496 
10,749,462 




. Sugar, not above No. 16, Dutch standard in color Ibs. 
All other 









Total , 






367,533 


All other free articles , 






9,163,806 

458,000,772 


9,401,154 
366,241.352 


Total free of duty 









14 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


IMPORTS DUTIABLE. 


Quantities. 


Values. 


Sate of Duty. 




1892. 
2,026 
10,762 
376,496 


1891. 
9,652 
16.093 
336,159 


1892. 

$2o,3<59 

1448381 

1,328,396 
78,747 
2,575,813 


1891. 
$53,652 
I,l!.ii99 
1 ,091.985 
78,519 
2,480,255 


... . ......20* 
30 each 
11.50 each 
3c Ib 


Horses Mo 


Sheep No. 


All other including live poultry 


Total 






" 15 jg 


Art Works, n. e s. Paintings, in oil or water 






2,030,599 

2,115,417 
242,564 


2,014,510 

2,571,889 
284,348 


Books, maps, engravings, etchings, photo- 
graphs, and other printed matter, n. e. s. 
Brass, and manufactures of 






.. .20* 






l^c Ib. to 4J* 
.. . .30c bu. 
.. . .15c bu. 
. . . .15c bu. 
1C Ib. 
.. . .10c bu. 
. . . .25c bu. 
25* 

lOc Ib 


Breadstuffs Barley bu. 


3,146,33? 
15,290 
20:208 
496,333 
83,537 
2,459,602 


5,078,733 
2,111 
9,692 
578,809 
140,737 
545,968 
8,413 


27^942 
67.507 
1,955,786 
4,231 

965,327 
4,631,809 


3,222.593 

S 

31,089 
98,227 
431,940 
43,180 

650,713 
4,484,449 




Oats , bu. 


Oatmeal Ibs 


Rye bu. 


Wheat. . .. bu. 


Wheat flour brls. 


All other breadstuffs, and preparations of, 
used as food, n. e. s 


Total 






Bristles Ibs 


1,495,003 


1,404,832 


1,455.058 
797,905 
1,317,177 
3,855,572 

1,614,226 
831,810 

326,142 


2.0*"tuil 
4,021,998 

1,673,864 
99^686 

274,409 
220,743 
567,035 
181,316 
15,724 
1,874,700 
4382917 




40* 


Buttons and button forms 






Various 
20% 


Cement .... Ibs 


1074768441 


1123127819 


Chemicals, Drugs, Dyes, and Medicines, n. e. 
s. Coal-tar colors and dyes 


....36* 




14,197,549 
4,237,368 
'"79,466 


13,975,577 

^$ 

74,462 
6,110,211 
804,259 
78,743,976 
354.744,a35 
18,136,888 
11,944,272 


IJtfc Ib 


Logwood and other dyewoods. extracts 


10* 


Opium, crude Ibs. 
Opium, prepared for smoking Ibs. 
Potash nitrate of or saltpeter crude Ibs 


.. Free 


547,528 


$12 Ib. 
Free 


Soda Bicarbonate orsupercarbonate of. Ibs. 
Caustic . ... Ibs 


3,401.455 
64,741,106 
^Ood.SOr 
21,348,570 
10,311,774 


167,631 

216,668 
4,585,578 
14,433,308 


...Iclb. 


...Iclb. 


Sal soda and soda ash Ibs. 


^clb. 




118,713 
245,53h 
5,125,674 
15,677,317 


.Various 




4-10c Ib. 


Allother 


25* 
$3 ton! 


Total 






Clays or earths of all kinds, including china 
clay, o. kaolin ton s 


67,186 


58,753 


523,367 


437,226 


Clocks and Watches, and Parts of Clocks, 
and parts of 






195,890 

1,734,648 
1,930,538 


300,492 

1,984,414 
2,284,906 


45$ 


Watches, and parts of, and watch mater- 






25* 


Total 








Coal, bituminous tons 
Coffee (under section 3, tariff act of October 
],1S90) Ibs. 


1,333,024 

7,268,876 
9.676,138 


1,055,069 
7,862,777 


4,373,079 
1,240,323 
748,932 


3,588,273 
526,563 


75cton 

J*clb. 
...l^clb. 


Copper, and Manufactures of Ore (fine 
copper contained therein) Ibs. 


Pigs, bars, ingots, old and other unmanu- 


3,440,691 


1,036,620 


299,048 
97,806 
396.854 


82,644 
120,545 
203,189 




*.45*; 


Total, not including ore 






Various 

Various 
Various 


Corsets 








262.504 


Cotton, Manufactures of Cloth Not 
bleached, dyed, colored, stained, painted, 
or printed sq. yards 


1,572,224 

32,403.238 
33,975,462 


1,802397 

31,055,214 
32,857,611 


140,001 

4,505,666 
4.645,667 


170,423 

4,237,221 
4,407.644 


Bleached, dyed, colored, stained, painted. 


Total sq. yards 


50* 


Clothing, ready made, and other wearing 
apparel, not including knit goods 






1,261,848 
5,829,246 

11,252,695 

664,836 
4,669,433 
28.323,725 


1,201,278 
6,738,775 

10,589,490 

857,645 
5,917,792 
29,712,624 


Knit Goods Stockings, hose, half hose, 
shirts, drawers, and all goods made. 
fashioned,or shaped on knitting machines 
or frames, or knit by hand 






35* 
60* ! 


Laces, edgings, embroideries, insertings, 
neck Turnings, ruchings, trimmings, tuck- 
ings, lace window curtains, and other 
similar tamboured articles 






Thread (not on spools), yarn, warps or warp 
yarn . . .. Ibs 


1,426.585 


1,686,039 


lOc Ib 


Allother 


Various 


Total manufactures 







IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 15 


IMPORTS DUTIABLE. 


Quantities. 


Values. 


Rate of Duty . 


Earthern, Stone, and China Ware China, 
porcelain, parian, and bisque, earthen, 
stone, and crockery ware Not decorated 


1892. 


1891. 


1892. 

$1,894.537 
16,343,613 
469i313 
a707.463 


1891. 

$1,691,831 
4954320 
735,237 
8,381,388 


... 55$t 








60 
Various 

5cdoz. 

...10 to 50% 
50$ 
&clb. 
Various 

lOcbox 

lb. 
Ib 


All other 






Total 






Eggs .... doz 


4,188,492 


1,225,217 


522,240 

904,659 
1,8X3,354 


131,631 

1,775,924 
1,343,669 


Feathers, natural, crude, dressed, colored, 
or manufactured 


Feathers and flowers, artificial 






Fish Fresh Salmon Ibs 


1,096,017 


503,7i*8 


105,450 
403,345 

1,201,149 

449,567 
66,456 
1,178,722 
883,265 

MU 

237,078 
4,585,450 


48,307 
336,619 

1,089,975 

527,113 
101.49? 
922,099 

WMS 

oUolx 

274,449 
4,794,242 


All other ... . 


Cured or preserved Anchovies and sar- 






Cod, haddock, hake and pollock, dried. 


10.390,068 

3,103,925 


12,982,019 

4,299,41)3 
128^35 

IKS 




Pickled or salted . brls 


Ib. 
Ib. 


Mackerel, pickled or salted . .brls. 


Salmon, pickled or salted . Ibs. 


Ib. 


All other 


..Iclb. 


Total 






Flax, Hemp, Jute, and other Vegetable Sub- 
stances, and Manufactures of Unman- 
factured Flax . . tons 


5,812 
5,187 


6,331 
11,484 


' 


1,656,779 
1,731,396 
1,217,890 

1,374,941 
5,981,006 


Hemp, and substitutes for tons 


$25 ton 
Various 

Free 


jute tons 


41,476 

14,737 
74^028 


Sisal grass and other vegetable substances 
tons 






Total unmanufactured tons 


12,999 


2,645,972 


Various 
l^clb. 
2^clb. 
, 3c Ib. 


Manufactures of Bags and bagging 






1.412,399 
7,064,335 
99,551 
641,865 
17,067,067 
26,285,217 


820,506 

"SB 

1,025,884 
16,526,109 
24,024.094 


Burlaps (except for bagging for cotton). . . 
Cables, cordage and twine Ibs 


'1,007,678 
4,146,242 




759,155 
9.481,717^ 


Yarns or threads ... Ibs, 


All other 


Various 

2^clb. 
Various 
Various 

-::::::8gffi: 


Total manufactures 






Fruits, including nuts, n. e. s. Figs Ibs. 


8,338,759 


9,201,565 


511,142 
4,548.263 
1,210,338 
437,271 
964,309 
1,234,828 
538,3% 
1,028,671 
822,460 
11,295,588 


697,562 
4,351,971 
2,339,98~ 
2,054,480 
2,018,87'. 
1,289,137 
762,335 
931,007 
1,114,959 
15,560,322 










10,869,797 
20,687,640 


34,281,322 
39,572,655 


Raisins Ibs. 




..w% 

Various 
.... 5c Ib 


All other fruits 








7,629,392 


6,812,061 


All other 


Various 
20 to 35 % 
Various 
Various 

Various 
Various 
Various 
Various 


Total 






Furs and manufactures of fur 
Glass and glassware Bottles, vials, demi- 
johns, carboys and jars, empty or filled. . 
Cylinder, crown and common window glass, 
unpolished Ibs. 






6,844,74b 


7,006,683 


72,682,127 

476,588 
4,103,216 
1,084,433 
2,475.530 
309,765 


58,932,738 

288,965 
5,101,371 
1,895,520 
3 611 61L 


826,457 
1,674,679 

158,464 
I,549,9o8 
56,162 
887,626 
119,201 
3,485,093 
8,757.6*0 


926,010 
1,475,338 

91,248 
1,912,391 
78,030 
1,351,808 
183015 
2,346,472 
8,364,312 


Cylinder and crown glass, polished Un- 


Silvered . sq feet 


Plateglass Fluted,rolledorrough..sq.feet 
Cast polished, unsilvered sq. f eet 


Cast, polished, silvered .. sq. feet 


'445;58b 


Various 
Various 

Various 
55 % 
$4 ton 


All other 


Total 












114,102 


143,019 
672,935 
445,461 


Hats, bonnets and hoods, and materials for. 
Hay tons 






79,715 

240,493 
l,363,6ir 
2;496,224 


58,242 


715,151 

48,840 
143,245 

883,701 

61,276 

371,581, 

2.592,461 


Hides and skins other than fur skins (under 
section 3, tariff act of October 1, 1890) 
Goatskins Ibs 


15clb. 


All other ..Ibs 






Hops. . . Ibs 


4,019,603 


1,797.40 
J 354,645 
2,430,159 


India rubber and gutta-percha.manufactures 
of Gutta-percha 


3056 


India rubber 
Iron and steel and manufactures of Iron 
ore tons 


1,003.88" 


955,517 


75cton 


Pig iron tons 


82,89 
38,769 


81,910 
5T..558 


1,812,675 
543.882 


2,018,9o7 
815,399 


3-10clb. 
3-lOclb. 


Scrap iron and steel, fit only to be manu 
f actured tons 



16 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


IMPORTS DUTIABLE. 


Quantities. 


Values. 


Rate of Duty. 




1892. 
46,656,617 

299 

1,058,657 
2,440,608 

81,563,726 
32,448^22 

18,176,202 
97,111,641 

7,872,137 

1.802.551 
1,036,010 


1891. 

43,287,778 

134 

26,646,549 
7,186,342 

70,286.561 

25,089,455 
036489074 
112,982,750 

11,607,306 

2,120,152 
1,145,286 


1892. 

$853,297 

10,014 

31,840 
69,665 

1,666,214 
840,521 
12,315,292 
1,761,776 

552,624 
110,000 
62,049 

1,207,020 
8U554 
647,751 
2,891,371 


1891. 
$821,613 

3,479 

413,524 

144,408 

1,656,720 

35,746>20 
2,124,143 

747,309 
134,128 
86,587 
1,458,779 
144,488 
1,070,779 
2,721,530 

2,314!051 
53,241,022 


8-10clb. 


Bars, railway, of iron or steel, or in part of 
steel tons. 


6-10clb. 

Various 
Iclb. 


Hoops or ties for baling purposes, barrel 
hoops, and hoop or band iron or steel, 


Hoop, band or scroll iron or steel Ibs. 
Ingots, blooms, slabs, billets and bars of 
steel, and steel in forms n. e. s Ibs. 
Sheet, plate and taggers' iron or steel. .Ibs. 
Tin plates, terne plates and taggers' tin.lbs. 


Various 
22-lOclb. 
22-10clb. 
6-10clb.i 


Wire and wire rope and strand, iron or 
steel .Ibs. 






iii.'.'ie-iocib.': 

Various 
Various 
.35cto$2doz. 


Chains '. Ibs. 


Files, file blanks, rasps and floats 
Firearms 






Machinery 












2,966,338 
28,423,883 


45 < 


Total, not including ore 






50* 


Jewelry, manufactures of gold and silver, 
and precious stones Jewelry, and manu- 






615,112 

12,354,420 
3,653,378 


1,363,892 

12,476,976 

2,560,686 


Preoious stones, n. e. s., and imitations of, 






Various 
10* 


Lead, and manufactures of 






Leather, and Manufactures of Leather- 






24,101 

1,199,954 
3,497,879 

2,090,673 
6,812,607 


21,896 

890,729 
3,474,735 

1,932,222 
6,319,582 


Calf skins, tanned or tanned and dressed, 














10</ ! 


Upper leather, dressed, and skins, dressed 






3i* 


Total leather 






.Various 


Manufactures of Gloves, of kid or other 






5,830,380 
657,334 
6,487,714 


5,627,964 
735,757 
6,363,721 








Total manufactures 






Malt Barley bu. 


5,165 


123,083| 


6,148 


78,433 


Malt Liquors In bottles or j ugs gals. 


1,155,554 
1,774,027 
2,929,581 


1,265,934 
1,817,043 
3,082,977 


1,122,151 
587,809 
1,709,960 


1,146,817 
618,885 
1,765,702 


40cgal. 
30cgal. 

Various 
Various 


Total gals 


Marble and Stone, and Manufactures of- 






909,216 
476,585 
1,385,801 


797,629 
565,084 
1,362,713 


Stone,and manufactures of, including slate 
Total 










Metals, Metal Composition, and Manufact- 






790,459 
5,784,024 
6,574,483 


766,361 
6,456,309 
7,222,67C 


Allother 






... 45* 


Total 






. 20* 








246,664 
1,027,212 

144,493 
12,136 

45,118 

876,613 
367,523 
218,588 
1,664,471 


116,103 
1,444,755 

125,284 
5,531 
49,098 

733,489 

iS 

1,532,462 


Musical instruments 






45 


Oils, n. e. s. Animal or rendered Whale 


306,815 
34,543 

828.038 

706,486 
374,416 
922,180 


320,515 
19,3(r 
1,148,76" 

605,509 
451.075 

1,111,848 


Free 
25* 






35cgal. 
Various 1 

25* ' 


Vegetable Fixed or expressed Olive, 
salad gals, 




Volatile or essential Ibs 


Total 


Various 
Various 

....35clb. 


Paints and colors. '. 






1,372,052 
3,342,304 

464,855 
418,221 


1,439,127 
3,031,454 

444,964 
a'52,684 


Paper, and manufactures of 






Perfumeries, cosmetics and all toilet prep- 






Pipes and smokers' articles 






Provisions, Comprising Meat and Dairy 
Products Meat products-Meat and meat 
extracts 






430,048 
15,386 
16,549 
l,238.16b 


521,322 
66,385 
58,541 

1,358.752 


All other . 






25* 


Dairy products Butter. . . . Ibs 


113,837 

8.305,285 


880,728 
8.863.640 


""6clb 


Cheese Ibs 


6clb. 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 17 


IMPORTS DUTIABLE. 


Quantities. 


Values. 


Hate of Duty. 


Milk 


1892. 


1891. 


1892. 
$95,947 
1,796,096 


1891. 
1103,891 
2,108,891 


3olb. 


Total 






2clb. 

8 to 12c 100 Ibs. 
30cbu. 
Various 

..Sc.oz. &60fc 
60% 


Rice n e s. Rice Ibs. 


77.622,464 
62,871,382 
40.493,846 


25,263,163 
81,259,519 
206,522,682 


1,565,914 
1,097,436 
2,663,350 


2,754,502 
1,389,408 
4,143,910 


Rice flour, rice meal and broken rice... .Ibs. 
Total Ibs. 


Salt Ibs. 




ill.586.163 


713,901 


928.889 




285,140 


1,515,546 


319.418 
460,375 
779,793 


1,667,552 
718,374 
2,385,926 


Allother 


Total 






Silk, Manufactures of Clothing, ready- 
made and other wearing apparel 






2,351,797 
9,892,241 

4,391,257 
1,644,769 
12,892,831) 
31,172,894 


2,212,971 
10,417,698 
3,181,374 
1,834.487 






















All other 






20;i3;613 
37,880,148 


Various 

15clb. 
2056 


Total 






Soap Fancy, perfumed and all descriptions 
of toilet soap Ibs. 


8iO,018 


677,503 


301,621 
310,595 
612,216 


277,336 
301,98ti 
679,322 


All other 


Total 






4clb 
$2.60 gal. 
Various 


Spices, n. e. s Ibs. 


2,1381,248 


1,769,626 


307,738 


262.682 


Spirits Distilled Brandy proof gals. 


H 

1,320,126 


443,278 
1,218.802 
1,662,080 


889,883 
980,464 
1,870,347 


1,139,315 
1,070,421 
2,209,736 




Total proof gals. 


Sugar, Molasses and Confectionery Mo- 
lasses gals, 




4,490,912 

335,937.899 
1498992996 
76,296 
106,972 
4,033,171 




698,197 

9,361.968 
42,499,253 
2,945 
6998 
151,918 
71.233 
52,792,512 


Free 
.. ..5elb 


Sugar, Dutch standard in color Not above 
No. 13. and tank bottoms, sirups, melada. 
etc. Beet sugar Ibs. 






Cane and other -. Ibs. 






Above No. 13 and not above No. 20 Ibs. 






All above No. 16 Ibs 


14,880,402 


566,331 
97,741 
664,072 




Total 






fSlb 


Tobacco and Manufactures of Leaf Suit- 


3.073,175 
18,912,526 
21,985,701 


32,277 
23,028,731 
23,061,008 


2,197,394 
8,133,780 
10,331,174 


30,336 
13,253,826 
13,284,162 


Other Ibs 


$4.50 lb.& 25* 
40clb. 

40cbu. 
.26cbu. 


Total leaf Ibs. 


Manufactures of-Clgars, cigarettes and 
cheroots Ibs 


663,311 


885,139 


2,834,847 
2,928!851 


3,386,89< 

3,478,979 


Allother 


Total manufactures 






Toys 

Vegetables Beans and peas bu. 


874,05C 
186,871 


1,656,7"68 
5,401,912 


2,475,971 
957,824 
186,006 
421,292 
563,297 
754,808 
2,883,227 


2,279,121 
2,078,571 
2797,927 
511,163 
1,020,194 
668.519 
7,076,374 


Potatoes bu 




Allother In their natural state 






OC J ] 








je2r 


Total 






....fSdoz. qts. 
SOcgalJ 
$1.60 case , 

Free 
1056 ; 


Wines Champagne and other sparkling.doz. 
Still Wines In casks gals 


319,592 


400,084 

3,860,503 
348,666 


4,571,816 
2.464,235 
1,908,203 
8.944,254 


5,615,872 
2,641,816 
1,749,872 
10,007,060 


In bottles duz 


Total 


Wood, n. e. s., and Manufactures of Un- 
manufactured 






56,152 
66,824 

7,543,229 
732,191 
1,328,529 

574,439 
1,820.143 
2,163,541 
14,275.048 


11,292 
72,347 

8,412,842 
553,285 
1,110,382 

451,034 

1,902,689 
2,097,343 
14,611,214 


Timber, hewn and sawed, squared or sided 
Lumber Boards, planks, deals and other 
sawed lumber .. M ft 






663,253 
363,027 


757,244 
260,652 


$1 M. 


Shingles . . ...M 


..20and30cM. ! 
Varioua 

35^ 


Other lumber 


Manufactures of Cabinet ware or house 








41,118 


43,315 


Various i 
Varioui 


Allother 


Total 






. . . .lie Ib. 


Wool, Hair of the Camel, Goat, Alpaca and 
other Like Animals, and Manufactures 
of Unmanufactured Class one Ibs 
Class two Ibs 


50,262,796 
5,713,237 


32,230,935 
6,667,023 


9,523,773 
1,342,064 


6 919 913 


1,551,490 


12clb, 



18 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



IMPORTS DUTIABLE. 



Quantities. 



Values. 



Rate of Duty. 



1892. 



Class three Ibs. 

Total unmanufactured , . . . .Ibs. 

Manufactures of Carpets and carpeting 

sq . yards 

Clothing, ready-made, and other wearing 
apparel, except shawls and knit goods. . . 

Cloths.... .. f.....lbs. 

Dress goods, women's and children's 

sq. yards 

Knit fabrics 

Rags, mungo, flocks noils, shoddy and 

wastes Ibs. 

Shawls 

Yarns Ibs 

Allother.. 

Total manufactures 

Zinc or Spelter, and Manufactures of In 

blocksor pigs and old Ibs. 

Manufactures of 

Total 

All other dutiable articles 

Total value of dutiable merchandise. 
Total value of merchandise free of 

duty 

Total value of imports of merchan- 
dise 



48,670,672 129,303,648 



13,813,276 



1,267,128 



494,980 



1891. 



1892. 
$8,822,271 
19,688,108 



12,109,825 
86,644,093 



1,285,657 

1,477,452 
12,765,044 

16,474,601 
1,162,853 



1,185,591 
2,604,693 



1,541,836 



83,356 
18,212 
43,568 



1891. 
$9,759,969 
18,231,372 



1,373,162 

1,856,476 
12,035,075 

18,242,991 

1,249,459 



429,870 
718,-- 



87,825 

353,305 

745298 

1,213,844 

35.565,879 41,060,080 



.Various 

Various 

Various 

Various 

Various 

Various 

Various 

Various 

Various 



78,7 
50,7 



8,760 
,777 
129,537 



6,465.878| 7.611,146 



369,400,801|478,674344 

458,000,772366,241 

327,401,573844,916,1981 



RECAPITULATION 

Of values of imports of merchandise, by groups, according to degree of manufacture and uses . 
For fiscal year ending-June 30, 1892. 



GROUPS. 



1892. 



1891. 



FREE OF DUTY. 

Articles of food, and live animals 

Articles in a crude condition which enter into the various 
processes of domestic industry 

Articles wholly or partially manufactured, for use as mate- 
rials in the manufactures and mechanic arts 

Articles manufactured, ready for consumption 

Articles of voluntary use, luxuries, etc 

Total free of duty .. 

DUTIABLE. 

Articles of food, and live animals 

Articles 1n a crude condition which enter into the various 
processes of domestic industry... 

Articles wholly or partially manufactured, for use as mate 
rials in the manufactures and mechanic arts 

Articles manufactured, ready for consumption , 

Articles of voluntary use, luxuries etc , 

Total dutiable , 

FREE AND DUTIABLE. 

Articles of food, and live animals 

Articles in a crude condition which enter, into the various 
processes of domestic industry 

Articles wholly or partially manufactured, for use as mate- 
rials in the man uiactures and mechanic arts 

Articles manufactured, read y for consumption 

Articles of voluntary use, luxuries, etc 

Total imports of merchandise 



Dollars. 
267,077,005 

157,935,294 

17,545,782 

ll.f>'.'5,isr, 
3,847,505 



458,000,772 
36,442,753 
45,463,896 

65,567,122 
121,363,560, 



369,400301 
303.519,758 



83.112,904 
132,957,748 
104,411,975 



827.401,573 



Per Ct. 



Dollars. 



58.31 187,794,52 
34.49 148,580,653 



15,104,319 
10.213,537 
4,548,324 



3.83 

2.53 

.84 



100.00 
9.87 
12.31 

17.74 94,028,20? 

32.86 126,777,787 
27.22 112,781,906 



366,241,352 
97,084,778 
48,002,166 



100.00 478,674,844 
36.69284,879,298 
24.58 196,582,818 

10.04 109,132,526 
16.07 136,"" 
12.62 117, 



100.00844,916,196 



Per Ct. 
51.28 

40.67 

4.12 
2.79 
1.24 



100.00 



10.03 

19.64 
26.49 
23.56 



100.00 
83.72 



12.91 
16.21 
13.89 



100.00 



EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE. 

[Abbreviation: n. e. s., not elsewhere specified.] 



ARTICLES. 



Quantities. 



Valuet. 



1892. 1891 



Agricultural Implements Mowers and reapers,and parts of 

Plows and cultivators, and parts of 

All other, and parts of 

Total 

Animals-Cattle No. 

Hogs Nc. 

Horses No. 



394, H07 
31.963 
3,199 



1892. 

$2,372.938 

397,735 

1,024,810 

3,794.983 



1891. 

$1,579,976 

59(5,728 

1,042,426 

3.219,130 



374,^35,0^51 

608,7081 



95,654 
3,110 



30,445.249 

1,146.630 

784,908 



EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 19 


ARTICLES. 


Quantities. 


Values. 


Mules No. 


1892. 
1,992 
46,960 


1891. 
2,184 
60,947 


1892. 

$241,071 
161,105 
24,161 
36.498.221 


1891. 
$278,668 
261.109 
18,532 
32,935,086 


Sheep No. 




Total 












422,238 
239,871 
220,953 
218,639 

1,943,228 

628,750 


406,374 
241,882 
219,903 
835,710 

1,820,470 

296,349 








Blacking . .. 












Books, maps, engravings, etchings and other printed 
matter . . . 






Brass, and manufactures of 






Breadstuff's Barley . .... bu. 


2,800,075 
14,449,625 
75,451,849 
287,607 
9,435,078 
20,907,662 
12,040,716 
4,543 
157.280,351 
15,196,769 


973,062 
15,541,655 
30768213 
318,329 
953,010 
7,736,873 
332,739 
4,254 
55,131,948 
11,344,304 


1,751,445 
775,596 
41,590,460 
919,961 
3,842,559 
555,957 
11,432,160 
22,461 
161.399,132 
75,362,283 
1,711,103 
299,363,117 


669,203 
838,848 
17,052,687 
946,977 
405,708 
221,316 
212,161 
18,185 
51,420,272 
54.705,616 
1,030,6=3 
128.121,656 


Bread and biscuit . ... . . Ibs. 


Corn bu. 


Cornmeal brls. 


Oats bu 


Oatmeal Ibs 


Rye bu 


Rye flour. . . . brls 


Wheat bu. 


Wheat flour brls. 


All other breadstuffs, and: preparations of, used as food. 
Total .. ... 






Bricks Building M 


4,723 


6,133 


34,288 
53,414 
87,702 


52,830 
46,345 
99,175 


Fire . . .. M 


Total 












218,133 
181,110 
165,933 
1,944,170 


172,191 
150,609 
149,112 
2,015,870 
2,885,250 
841,075 








Candles . Ibs 


1,715,130 


1,546,079 




Cars, passenger and freight, for steam railroads No. 
Casings for sausages 


1,680 


3,902 


Chemicals, Drugs, Dyes, and Medicines Acids 






107,480 
99,566 
597,016 
803,529 

' 

3,044,631 
6,693,855 


121,851 
24,432 
660,590 
959,992 
1,880,728 
178,581 
2,719,180 
6,545,354 


Ashes, pot and pearl . Ibs 


1,307,634 


430,582 


Dyes and dyestuffs 


Ginseng Ibs. 


228,916 


283,000 








All other 






Total 






Clocks and watches (Jiocics, and parts of 






1,020,873 
208,743 
1,229,616 


1,304,457 
275,707 
1,580,164 


Watches, and parts of .. 






Total 






Coal Anthracite tons 


811,034 
1,697,739 
2,608,773 


924,312 
1,474,727 
2,399,039 


3,425,349 
5,223,809 
8,649,158 


3,796,495 
4,594,531 
8,391,026 


Total tons 


Coffee and cocoa, ground or prepared, and chocolate.. . . 






70,651 
6,036,777 


86,936 
7,260,893 


Copper and Manufactures or Ore tons 


42,984 


38,562 


Ingots, bars, and old . Ibs 


56,453,736 


34,554,517 


6,934,349 
292,043 
7,226,392 


isst 

4,614,597 


All other manufactures of . 


Total, not including ore 






Cotton and Manufactures of Unmanufactured- 
Sea Island... . }}^ les 


22,866 
9,074,686 
5.868,545 
2926145125 
5,891,411 
2935219811 


37,678 
14,588,092 
ft.783,101 
2892770703 
5,820,779 
2907358795 


1,591,464 
256,8691777 
258,461,241 


3,062,968 
287,649,930 
290,712,898 


Other... }|> ale8 


(Ibs... 
Total unmanufactured j bales 


Manufactures of Cloths Colored yards 


40,815,450 
142,938,871 
183.754.321 


39,016,682 
135,529,590 

174.546.272 


2,484,360 
8,673,663 
11,158,023 


2,590,934 
9,277,112 

11,868,046 


Uncolored yards 


Total yards 


Wearing apparel 






433,102 
1,635,152 
13,226,277 


278,109 
1,458,642 
13,604,857 


All other manufactures of 






Total manufactures 






Earthen, Stone, and China Ware Earthen and stone ware 
Chinaware 






223,607 
13,824 
237,431 


146,194 
13,332 
159,526 






Total 






Eggs do/ 


183,063 
251,104 


363,116 
231,915 


32,374 

2,657,120 


64,259 
2.182,274 


Fertilizers tons 


Fish Fresh, other than salmon . Ibs 


1,414,019 

14,435,878 


868,796 
17,313,170 


66,498 
765,199 


40,084 
890,277 


Dried, Smoked, or Cured Codfish, including haddock, 
hake^ and pollock Ibs. 



20 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


ARTICLES. 


QuanWifi. 


Values. 


Herring Ibs. 


1892. 
3,279,263 

"IS 

2,700 
30,315 
18,215,025 


1891. 
3,777,535 

** 

3,012 
30,085 
22,367,225 


1892. 
$82,772 


1891. 
$105,260 
80,844 
37,128 
12,352 
147,319 
2,096,957 

139,392 
817,108 
337,893 
208,014 
4,996,621 


Other Ibs. 


85,353 
47,108 
11,481 
158,162 
1,738,465 
78,680 
146,06" 

217',34i 
4,522,763 


Pickled Mackerel brls. 


Herring brls. 


Other brls. 




Other 








Shellfish Oysters 


















Total 












498,459 
660,493 
621,479 
218,232 
1,998,663 


133,880 
892,379 
336,029 
142,452 
1,504,740 


Cordage Ibs, 


7,603,329 


8,992,834 


Twine 


All other .. . 






Total 






Fruits Including Nuts Apples dried . Ibs, 


26,042,003 
938,743 


6,973, 16b 
135,207 


1,288,102 
2.407,956 
1,558,820 
214,738 
1,095,845 
60,684 
6,626,145 


409,605 
476,897 
703,880 
93,996 
699,798 
50,617 
2,434,793 






Other .... 












Nuts . 






Total 






Furs and fur skins 






3.586,33! 


3,236,705 


Glass and Glassware Window glass 






10,238 
932,064 
942,302 


11,244 
857,130 

868,374 


All other 






Total 






Glucose or grape sugar Ibs 


""fflH 


158,149,427 
9861552 


2,272,779 
66,403 
1.298,598 


1,394,131 
110,292 
2,038,886 


Glue Ibs. 


Grease, grease scraps, and all soap stock 


Gunpowder and other Explosives Gunpowder Ibs. 


903,077 


733,834 


108,27t> 
764,354 
872,630 


88,676 
906,870 
995,546 


All other 


Total 






Hair, and manufactures of 






370,16$ 
582,838 
1,211,621 

2,420',505 


394,544 
470,228 
1,333,655 
83,325 
2,327,474 
91,493 




-35;26i 


28,066 




Honey . ... 






Hops Ibs 


12,604,686 
3l!352 


8,736,680 
34,862 


Ice tons 


India Rubber and Gutta-Percha, Manufactures of Boots 
and shoes . pairs 


231,105 


175,627 


183,570 
1,232,497 
1,416,067 


141,679 
1,094,764 
1,236,443 


Allother 


Total , 






Ink, printers', and other ... 






1*M 

1,388,117 


122,*3u 
1,575,444 


Instruments and apparatus for scientific purposes, includ- 
ing telegraph, telephone, and other electric 






Iron and Steel, and Manufactures of Pig iron tons 


15,910 
193,818 

2,854,8'J5 
11,728 


13,435 
201,971 
2,400,335 
13,020 


289,915 
4,145 
80,698 
103,228 
789,146 
140,865 
853,628 
25,381 
2,309,688 
10,229,293 
273,191 

160,239 
16,641 
8,048 
409,220 
8,007 
259,531 
1,900,444 
325,417 
3,133,992 
6,380 
1,717,715 
227,257 
568,485 
230,041 
852,659 
8,877,676 
28800930 


221,342 
6,170 

96,586 
106,152 
857,230 
146,324 
859,123 
29,247 
2,014,882 
9,831,908 
283,839 

136.858 
44,048 
5,349 
285,740 
6,373 
536,105 
1.844,290 
304,026 
2,883,577 
2,362 
2,424,303 
217387 
669,851 
248,600 
859,870 
3,988,012 
28909614 


Bar iron Ibs 


Car wheels No 


Castings, n. e. B , 








Ingots, bars, and rods of steel Ibs. 


966,336 


597,535 


Locks, hinges, and other builders' hardware 


Machinery, ii.e.s 






Nails and Spikes Cut . Ibs 


12,197,669 

2,056,267 
472,401 
243,616 


11,723,727 

1,768,433 
1,168,741 
144,978 


Wire, wrought, horseshoe, and all other, including tacks 
.....Ibs 


Plates and Sheets Of iron .... Ibs 


Of steel Iba 


Printing presses, and parts of 


Railroad Bars or Rails Of iron tons 


277 

7,983 


190 
15,691 


Of steel tons 


Saws and tools 


Scales and balances 






Sewing machines, and parts of 






Steam Engines and Parts of Fire engines No 


2 
197 
3WJ 


d 

267 


Locomotive engines No 


Stationary engines No 


Boilers, and parts of engines 


Stoves and ranges, and parts of 







All other manufactures of iron and steel 


26,059,010 


25,000,507 


Total 







BXPOBTS OF MERCHANDISE. 21 


ARTICLES. 


Quantities. 


Values. 




1892. 


1891. 


1892. 
$1,026,188 

538,304 

166,078 


1891. 
1832,440 

509,518 
182,412 


Lamps, chandeliers and all devices and appliances for 






Lead, and manufactures of 






Leather, and Manufactures of Leather Buff, grain, splits 






3,880,475 

249.2W 
5.783,555 
605.094 
914,974 
251.269 
400,175 
12,084,781 


5,161,211 

3&4,770 i 
fi.1*.3fi2 
329,102 
651,343 
260233 
343,826 
13,278.847 








Sole Ibs 


37,053,381 


37,501,278 


All other 




745,112 


551,733 




All other 






Total 






Lime and cement brls. 


70,240 


90.21S 


115,205 


148,938 


Malt Liquors In bottles doz. 


402,365 
260,724 


413.278 
242,991 


589,784 
68,150 
657,934 


602,641 
69,602 
672,243 


Not in bottles gals. 


Total 


Marble and Stone, and Manufactures of Unmanufactured 
Manufactures of Roofing slate, 






169,777 
57,514 
480,245 
707,536 


191,520; 
84,408 
569,226 
845,154 






All other 






Total 






Matches 






73,66t 


73,220 




11,856 
858 


14,498 
692 


772,582 
246,425 
145,649 
1,164,656 


954,507 
214,309 

157,573 
1,326,389 


Pianofortes .No 


All other, and parts of 


Total 






aval Stores Resin brls 


1,950.214 
22,377 
8.739 
13,176,470 


1,790.251 
17,265 
8,54] 
12,243,621 


3,418,459 
52,417 
18,336 
4,500,721 
7,989,933 


3,467,199 
39,094 i 
17,180 
4,668,140 '< 
8,191,613 


Tar brls. 


Turpentine and pitch ... brls. 


Turpentine, spirits of gals. 


Total ... 


Oil cake and oil-cake meal Ibs. 


826.398,719 


633,344.851 


9,713,204 


7,452,094 


Oils Animal Lard gals. 


901,575 
140.655 
829,173 
278,954 
2.150,357 


1,092,448 
62,552 
1,404,769 
512,253 
3.072,022 


496,601 
103.031 
234,937 
144,119 

978,688 


562.9S6 
46,866 i 
354,337 
317,594 
1,281,783 


Other whale and fish .. . gals. 


Other. gals 


Total animal gals 


Mineral, crude, Including all natural oils, without re- 
gard to gravity gals. 


103^92,767 


91,415,095 


5,101,840 


5,876,452 


Mineral, Refined or Manufactured -Naphthas, including 
all lighter products of distillation gals 


12,727,978 
omm58 
33,591,076 

13^70 


12,171,147 

571,11H.8G5 
33,514,730 

38,066 


912.921 
33.541,2-24 
5,203,350 

46,657 
39,704,152 


993,056 
40,221,201 i 
4,858,603 

77,422 
46,150,282 




Lubricating and heavy paraffin oil gals 


Residuum, including tar, and all other from which the 
light bodies have been distilled ... . brls 


Total refined or manufactured . . .< 


Vegetable Cottonseed gals 
Linseed gals 


13,859.278 
112,386 
54,987 


11,003,160 
76,789 
45,321 


4,9S2,285 
54,020 
156,418 
68,501 
73,731 
5,334,955 


3.975,305 
48.267 
120.831 i 
65,1041 
93,429 
4,302,936 i 


Volatile or Essential Peppermint Ibs 


Other 


Allother 






Total vegetable 






Ore. gold and silver bearing 






S9,325 
709,857 


34,5421 
690,698 


Paints and painters' colors 






Paper, and Manufactures of Paper hangings 






61,360 
99,870 
1,221.021 
1.382,251 


93,788 

115,020 i 
1,090,351 
1.299,169 


Writing paper and envelopes 






Allothlr 






Total 






Paraffin and paraffin wax Ibs 
Perfumery and cosmetics 


61,998.867 


66,366,003 


3.965,263 
404,706 
369.478 


3,714,649 j 
450.663 
414.719 


Plated ware 






Provisions, Comprising Meat and Dairy Products Meat 
Products Beef Products Beef canned Ibs 


87.028.084 
22Q5417 

70,304.736 
953,713 
89.780.010 
507.9l9.a30 
7ti.856.55y 
377,746 
80.336,481 
460,04n,77t 
101.463 


109^85,727 
194,045,638 

90.->r,.97i 
1,621.833 
111.689.251 
514,675.55- 
84,410,108 
818.875 
81.317,364 
498.343,92- 
1 199.395 


7.876,454 
18463.73! 

3.987.821 

92,524 
4,425.630 
39.334.933 
7,757,717 
S0,24b 
4.792,049 
38,201.621 
9.022 


9.068.906 
15.322.054 j 
5.048.788 ; 
147,518 1 
5.501,049 
37,404,989 
8,245.685 
56,358 
4,787,343 
34,414,323 
18,959 


Beef, fresh Ibs 


Beef salted or pickled Ibs 


Beef , other cured Ibs 


Tallow Ibs 


Hog Products Bacon Ibs 


Hams Ibs 


Pork, fresh Ibs 


Pork, pickled Ibs 


Lard Ibs 


Mutton Ibs 



22 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


ARTICLES. 


Quantities. 


Values. 


Oleomargarine Imitation butter Ibs. 


1892. 
1,610,837 
91,581,703 


1891. 
1,986,743 
80,231,035 


1892. 
$195,587 

9 'iffl 

1,220,205 
2.445.878 
7,676,657 
236,358 
140,362.159 


1891. 

$255,024 
17,859,130 
15,808 
1,007,757 
2,197,106 
7,405,376 
261,298 
139,017,471 


The oil Ibs. 










Dairy Products Butter . ...Ibs. 


15,047,246 
82,100 221 


15,187,114 
82,133,876 


Cbeese Ibs. 


Milk 


Total , 






Quicksilver Ibs. 


306,047 


157,055 


149,79* 


88,359 


Seeds Clover .. Ibs, 


19,532,411 
12.149,261 
8,613,187 


20,773,884 
10,108,014 
144,848 
8,757,788 


1,636.671 
86,549 
3,915,547 
381,651 
231,864 
6,252.282 


1,575,039 
85,315 
184,564 
370,151 
285,830 
2,500,899 


Cotton . Ibs. 


Flaxseed or linseed bu. 


Timothy Ibs. 


All other 


Total 






Silks, manufactures of 






152,15( 


92,071 








99,914 
963,293 
1,063,207 


86,704 
1,050,559 
1,137,263 


Other Ibs 


24,150,465 


25,750,671 


Total 


Spermaceti and spermaceti wax Ibs. 


273,981 


207,574 


90,845 


71,202 


Spirits, Distilled Alcohol, including pure, neutral, or 
cologne spirits. .. proof gals 


1,440,221 
216,727 
773,713 
744,172 
128,273 
47,724 
3,350,830 


418,935 

i.Jl:tl 

239,995 
54,656 
29,631 
1,904,972 


475,939 
178,292 
t913 
330 
045 

Ml 

2,401,117 


180,293 
111,657 
1,230,994 
1260,871 
82.671 
20,939 
1,887,431 


Brandy proof gals 


Rum proof gals 


Whisky Bourbon proofgals, 




All other proof gals. 


Total proofgals; 


Starch ... Ibs. 


19,881,027 


12,883,821 


612,531 
592,020 
47,912 
65,853 


475,817 
560.456 
28,310 
78,844 


Stationery, except of paper . . 


Stereotype and electrotype plates 






Straw and palm leaf, manufactures of - 






Sugar and Molasses Molasses and sirup gals. 
Sugar, brown .* Ibs 


9,343.034 
245,783 
14,604,608 


4,495,475 

*&& 


1,057,216 
8,682 
665,477 
204,609 
1,935,984 


768,306 
11,235 
6,138,746 
181,501 
7,099,788 


Sugar, refined Ibs 


Candy and confectionery 


Total 






Tin, manufactures of 






225,113 

20,303,245 
366,800 
20,670,045 


249336 

20,710,911 

322,848 
21,033,759 


Tobacco, and Manufactures of Unmanufactured Leaf 
. . Ibs 


240.716,150 
14,715,927 
255,432,077 


236,969,589 
12,263,016 

249,232,605 


Stems and trimmings Ibs. 


Total manufactured Ibs 


Manufactures of Cigars ...M 
Cigarettes M 


3,017 
306,545 


3,875 
319,013 


83,544 
1,018,427 
2,967,409 
4,069,380 


96,356 
1,008,657 
8,079,700 
4.186,713 


All other 


Total manufactures 






Toys 






124,869 
171,804 
293,053 


61,166 

202,5-20 
203,285 


Trunks, valises, and traveling bags 






Varnish gals. 


2i&ase 


153,365 


Vegetables Beans and pease bn, 
Onions , . bu. 
Potatoes bu 


637,972 
59,842 
557,022 


261,063 
57,182 
341,189 


945,767 
58,12] 

1,898,145 


473,0136 
79,993 
S16;482 
286,321 
180,173 
1,335,975 


Vegetables, canned 


All other, including pickles 






Total 






Vessels Sold to Foreigners Steamers tons 
Sailing vessels . tons 


149C 
1,065 
2,555 


681 
24 
705 


246,200 
11,685 
257,885 


92,922 
500 
96,422 


Total tons 


Vinegar gals. 
Wax, bees Ibs 


71.890 
127.47X) 
82,797 


68,733 
120,548 
159.822 


11,690 
31,898 
427,462 


10,489 
30,027 
717 230 


Whalebone Ibs. 


Wine In bottles .. . doz 


15,054 
655,795 


11,409 
543.292 


67,686 
371,344 
439,030 


52,392; 
319,085 
371,477 


Not in bottles gals 


Total 


Wood, and Manufactures of Firewood cords 


423 


2,061 


1,604 


7,026 


Lumber Boards, deals, and planks ...Mfeet 
Joists and sea ntling Mfeet 


592,586 
16,131 


613,406 
11,324 


9,672.493 
228,513 
88,222 

'S 

87.992 


9,916,945 

60,'502 
20,799 
13,479 
116868 


Hoops and hoop poles 


Laths M 


7,533 

640 
31,198 


7,976 
1,352 
42,463 


Palings, pickets, and bed slats M 


Shingles M 



EXPORTS OP MERCHANDISE. 23 


ARTICLES. 


Quantities. 


Values. 




1892. 


1891. 


1892. 

$195,618 
600,822 
2,214,148 
1,034,062 
2,673,154 
9831571 
1,923,604 
295,918 
202,589 
290,113 
1 3,0-30,146 
356,55 
1,827,470 

25,788,967 


1891. 

"igffi 

2,404,213 

886,133 
2,549,411 
1,227,960 ! 
2,274,102 
338,263' 
140,670 
240,430 
2,956,114 
3871823 
1,924,022 
26,263,014 i 


Other No 


412,30 


316,245 










Timber Sawed . .. M f 


t 235,56( 
t 6,736,44< 


214,615 
6,900,07* 




cubic fee 




Manufactures of Doors, sash, and blinds 






Moldings, trimmings, and other house furnish 


























All other ... 






Total, not Including firewood 






Wool, and Manufactures of Wool, raw Ibs 


. 202,45f 


291,925 


30,664 


39,423 


Carpets yard 


11,441 


26,711 


9,378 
24,443 
268,985 
64,931 
367,737 


18,475 i 
519,198 


Flannels and blankets 








All other manufactures of , 






Total manufactures 






Z inc, and Manufactures of Ore or oxide ton 


J 2,51< 


4.08* 


114,639 


142,011 j 


Pigs, bars, plates, and sheets Ibs 


11,769,04 


1,577,08* 


642,883 
122,684 
765,567 

1.034,242 

1,852,857 
1015732011 


Sj 

131,732 

535,308 
2,130,331 

872,270,283 








All Articles not Elsewhere Enumerated Unmanufact 
ured articles 






Manufactured articles 






Total value of exports of domestic merchandise... 






COMPARATIVE SUMMARY 

Of the values of the principal articles and classes of merchandise Imported and exported dur- 
ing the twelve months endlnjr June 30, 1892, inclusive, showing increase or decrease in the 
values of each class imported and exported in 1892, as compared with the averages of like 
periods of the preceding five years. 


IMPORTS FREE OF DUTY. 


1891. 


Ave. of 
the 
preced- 
ing five 
periods. 


1892. 


1892 compared with 
ave. oSflvtyeart. 


In- 
crease. 


De- 
crease. 


Animals, n. e. e 


82,465,110 
4466279 
895,858 
1,655,514 
31,639.714 
2,817,168 
9c5, 123,777 
1.249.008 
2,825.004 
543,760 
1,525,384 
10,422,814 
2,822,166 
2,265,714 

1,549,725 

'8861302 
1,489,093 
2,369,432 
8,968,606 
5,019,688 
19,076,081 
2,889,151 
45,333,773 
13,828.993 

15,306,699 
7.977,545 
5.276,972 
26.196,562 


$3,143,119 

6,454,798 
427,687 
1,175,792 
2",556,495 
2,238,759 
73,194,264 
1.136,596 
1,388,193 
844,376 
1,438,528 
f.,75U.474 
2,300,829 
2,419,893 

1,549,725 

24,619,767 
2,sl;i,SSu 
15,017,298 
699,436 
1,489,093 
1,942,813 
6,513,549 
5,241,933 
20.461.S64 
3,100,313 
17,7U2.S21 
13,786,723 

4,201,181 
7,515,441 
4,329,332 
15,195,279 


$1,675,879 
4,347,844 
806,069 
1,880,668 
31,528,232 
3,221,041 
126,801,607 
1,363,244 
3,215,303 
244,897 
1,431,285 
9,649,578 
3,352,429 
1,685,562 

1,897,190 

26,658,133 
2,921,893 

19,833,090 
893,139 
1,637,473 

3,329,244 
9,656,761 
5.4!8.2f3 
25,059,325 
2.740,087 
106,720.228 
14,373,222 

16,478,122 

8,667,870 
5,ott>,651 
15,406,443 




$1,467,240 
2.106,954 
121,618 


Articles, the growth, etc., of the U. S., returned 
Art works, the production of American artists. 




"$704,876 
3,971,737 
982,282 
53,607,343 
231,648 
1.877410 




Cocoa, or cacao, crude, and leaves and shells of 
Coffee . 






Cork wood or cork bark, unmanufactured 







599,479 
7,243 

"'784,33i 








2,890,104 
1,061,600 






Hats, bonnets and hoods, materials for, etc., 
n e s . .. . .. 


347,465 
2,038,366 
108,013 
4,815,792 
193,703 
148,380 
1,386,431 
3,143,212 
206,33!) 
4,597,461 


Hides and skins, other than fur skins 
Household and personal effects, etc 
















Oils n e s 








Silk unmanufactured 


""360226 




Sugar and molasses, n. e. s 


89,017,407 
586)499 

12,276,941 
,152,429 
1,240,319 
213,164 


Tea 
Textile grasses or fibrous vegetable substances, 






Tin, bars, blocks or pigs, grain or granulated. . . 
Wood unmanufactured, n. e. s 







All other free articles 


Total free of duty . 


366,241,352 273,337,961 


458.000,772 


184,662.811 





24 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 




1891. 


Ave. of 
the 
preced- 
ing five 
periods. 


1892. 


1892 compared with 
ave. of five years. 




In- 
crease. 


De- 
crease. 


Animals, n. e. s 


$2,480,255 

2,014,510 
2.571,889 
3,222,583 

1,261,856 
1,357,938 
4,021,998 
15,677,317 
2,284,906 
3,588,273 
29,712,624 
8,381,388 
3,119,493 
4,794,242 
5,981,006 
24,024,094 
15,560,322 
7,006,683 
8,364,312 

672,935 
445,461 

1,797,406 
2,430,159 

35,746,920 
17,494,102 

13,830,868 
2,560,88(5 
12,683,303 
1,765,702 
1,362,713 
7,222,670 
1,444,755 
1532462 
1,439,127 
3,031,454 
2,108,891 
4,143,910 
928,889 

J& 

2,209,736 

52,792,512 
13,284,162 
3.478,979 
2,279,121 
7,076,374 
10,007,060 
14,611,214 
18,231,372 
41,060,080 
15,309,853 


$3,808,665 

1,826,344 

2,798,023 
6,165,114 
623,779 
1,263,708 
2,133,452 
14,084,836 
2,082,777 
3,233,492 
28,858,955 
6,803,157 
2,316,063 
3,655,044 
15,230,318 
24,765,225 
14,557372 
5,463,141 
7,721,073 

3,884,982 
888,342 
1,685,732 
2,057,984 

22,757,591 
24,341,256 

fftSR 

11,917,482 
1,434,864 
1.122,997 
4,197,092 
1,658,010 
1,340,013 
1307200 
2,563,944 
1,958,023 
2,665,880 
1,083,588 
2,664,158 
35,277,641 
2,053,060 
73,558,215 
12,266,674 
3,661,094 
1,911,517 
4,703,464 
8.193,214 
11,773,843 
16,756,333 
48,565,913 
16,629,842 


$2,575,813 

2,030,599 

2,115,417 
1,592,040 
3,039,769 
1,455058 
3,855,572 
14,433,308 
1,930,538 
4,370,995 
28,323,725 
8,707,463 
2.738,013 
4.585,450 
2,<545,972 
26,295,217 
11,295,588 
6,844,74(3 
8,757,650 




$1,232,852 

'"682,666 
4,573,074 


Art worts, n. e. s. Paintings, in oil or water 


$204,255 


Books and other printed matter, n. e. s 


I BreaUstuffs Barley... 




Allother 


2,415,990 
191,350 
1,722,120 
348,472 

"1,137,563 


1 Bristles 


'"152,239 
"'535,236 




Chemicals, drugs, dyes and medicines, n. e. s 


Clocks and watches, and parts of 


Coal bituminous 




' Earthen stone and china ware 


"3SB 

930,406 
"1,529,992 

"1,381,605 
1,036,577 


i Feathers and artificial flowers 




Fish 




Flax hemp jute, etc. Unmanufactured 


12,584,346 


Manufactures of 


' Fruits, including nuts, n. e. s 


3,262,284 


Furs and manufactures of 


1 Glass and glassware 




Hats, bonnets and hoods, and materials for, 


3,884,982 

m 


Ha n.e.s.. ........................................... 


715,151 

883,701 
2,592,461 

12,315,292 
16,108,591 

12,969,532 

3,653,378 
13,300,321 
1709960 
1,385,801 
6,574,483 
1027212 




Hops 
Iron and steel Iron ore 


"'534,477 


Manufactures of Tin plates, terne plates 
and taggers' tin 


10,442,299 
8,232,665 


Allother . .. 




Jewelry, manufactures of gold and silver, and 
precious stones . 


477.852 
2,626,978 
1,382,839 
275,096 
262,804 
2,377,391 


Lead and manufactures of 




Leather, and manufactures of 






" 630,798 




Metal metal compositions etc n. e. s.. 


Musical instruments , 


Oils, n e. s 


1,664,471 
1,372,052 
3,342,304 
1,796,096 
2,663,350 
713,901 
779,793 
31,172,894 
1,870,347 
664,072 
10,331,174 
2,928,851 
2,475,971 
2,883,227 
8,944,254 
14,275.048 
19,688,108 
35,565,598 
15,440,474 


324,458 
64,852 
778,360 


Paints and colors. .."... 


'"i6i',927 
2,530 
369,687 
1,884,365 
4,104,747 
182,713 
72,894,143 
1,936,500 
732,243 

' 1,820,237 


Paper, and manufactures of 


Provisions, comprising meat and dairy products 
Rice 


Salt . 


Seeds 




Silk, manufactures of 




Spirits, distilled 





Sugar and molasses, n. e. s., and confectionery. 
Tobacco Leaf 




Manufactures of 


"'564,454 


Toys 


Vegetables . . . 


Wines 


751,046 
2,501,205 
SJBtfTS 


Wood, n. e. s., and manufactures of 


Wools Unmanufactured 


'l3,obb',3i5 

1,189,368 


Manufactures of 


All other dutiable 


Total value of Imports of merchandise. . 
Per cent of free of duty 


478,674,844 
844,916,196 
43.35 

3,219,130 

30,445,249 
2,489,837 

1,820,470 

18,599,664 
106,125,888 
3,396,104 

4,901,120 

6,545,354 
1,580,164 
8,391,026 
7,2(50,893 
4,614,597 
290,712,898 
13,604,857 
2,182,274 


485,789,066 
759,127.027 
36.01 

3,097,134 

19,814,602 
1,871,692 

1,740,040 

26,036,202 
109,814,578 
4,126,139 

3,417,895 
5,857,413 
1,510.574 
6,551,860 
5,518,199 
3,031,853 
241.739,155 
12,351,862 
1,488,417 


369,400,801 
827,401,573 
55 36 

3,794,983 
35099095 
1,399,126 

1,943,228 
42,510.421 
236J6L415 
20,091,281 

3,264,435 

6,693,855 
1,229,616 
8,649,158 
6,036,777 
7,226,392 
258.461.241 
13,226,277 
2,657 120 


68,274,546 


116,388,265 




DOMESTIC EXPORTS. 
Agricultural implements 


697,849 
15,284,493 

203,188 
16,474,219 
126.946,83? 
15,965,142 

"'836,442 

' 2,097,298 
518,578 
4,194,539 
16,722,086 
874,415 
1 168703 




Animals Cattle 


"'472,566 


All other 


Books, maps, engravings, and other printed 
matter 


Breadstuff's Corn and corn meal 


Allother 


153,460 
"'280,958 


Carriages, horse cars, and cars for steam rail- 


Chemicals, drugs, dyes, and medicines 


Clocks and watches 


Coal 


Copper Ore 




Manufactures of . 


Cotton Unmanufactured.. .. 





Manufactures of 


Fertilizers 





THE PUBLIC DEBT. 



2 5 



DOMESTIC EXPORTS. 



1891. 



Ave. of 

the 

preced- 
ing five 
periods. 



1892. 



1SC2 compared with 
ave. of five years. 



In- De- 

crease, crease. 



Fish 

Flax, hemp, and jute, manufactures of. 
Fruits, including nuts 



Furs and fur skins. 

Grease, grease scraps, and all soap stock 

Hides and skins, other than furs 

Hops 

India rubber and gutta-percha, manufactures of 
Instruments and apparatus for scientific pur- 
poses 

Iron and steel, and manufactures of (not in- 
cluding ore) 

Leather, and manufactures of 

Marble and stone, and manufactures of 

Musical instruments 

Naval stores (rosin, tar, turpentine pitch, and 

spirits of turpentine) 

Oil cake and oil-cake meal 

Oils Animal 

Mineral Crude 

Refined or manufactured 

Vegetable 

Paper, and manufactures of 

Paraffin and paraffin wax 

Provisions, Comprising Meat and Dairy Prod- 
uctsMeat products 

Dairy products 

Seeds.... 

Soap 

pirits, distilled 

ugar and molasses 

Tobacco Unmanulactured 

Manufactures of 

Vegetables 

Wood, and manufactures of 

All other articles 



$4,996,621 
1,501,740 
2,434,793 
3,236.70,1 



1,333,655 
2.327,474 
1,236,443 

1,575,444 

28,909,614 

13,278,847 
845,154 



8,191,613 

7.452,094 
1.281,783 
ri.S7rt.452 
46,150,282 
4,302,936 
1,299.169 
3,714,649 

129,153,691 



$5.030. If6 
1,607,473 
3,549,219 
4,503.519 
1,229,653 
1,102,213 
1, 503,981 
971,934 

1,070,478 

21,865,887 

11,296,991 

733.68 1 

1,038,994 

6,678,478 
7,222,711 
1,340,463 
5,Hrt9,242 
43,772,923 
3.186,432 
1,182,798 
2,470,784 



$4,522,763 
1,998,663 
6,626,145 
3,5S6,339 
1,298.598 
1,211,620 
2,420.502 
1,416,067 

1,388,117 

28,800,930 

12,084,781 

707,536 

1,164,656 

7,989,933 

9,713.204 

978,688 

5,101,840 

39.704,152 

5,334,955 

UW2.251 

2,965,263 



3,076,926 

"'68,945 
109,407 
916,521 
444,133 

317,639 



$.507,403 
"917,180 



787,790 
"130,662 



1,311,455 

2,490,493 



26,148 



2,500,899 
1.137,263 
1,887,431 



102,165,563 130,003,266 

10.35S.893 



9,863,780 10,883,596 



21,033,759 
4,185,713 
1.335,975 
26.270,040 
18,597,676 



2,487,478 
949,786 

6i682|2)4 
21,859,749 
3,726,442 
1.338,592 
24.834.(>56 
16,545,361 



1.063,207 
2,401,117 
1,935,984 
20,670, 



2,148,523 
199,453 
494,479 

27,837,703 

' 3,764',864 
113,421 
918,893 



361,775 

567,402 

4,068,771 



524,703 



3,746,280 



21,849,302 



559,533 

954,311 

5,303,941 



Total value of exports of domestic 

merchandise 

FOREIGN EXPORTS. 

Total value of exports of foreign 
merchandise 



872,270.283 766,946.319 1015732011 248,785,662 



12,210,527 12,423,a56 14,546,019 2,122,663 



THE PUBLIC DEBT. 

Analysis of the principal of the public debt of the United States, etc., 1867-1892. 



JULYl 



Debt on 
which in- 
terest has 

ceased. 



Debt bear- 
ing no 
interest. 



Outstanding 
principal. 



Cash in the 
treasury. 



Principal of 
debt less cash 
in treasury. 



Popula- 
tion 
of the 
United 
States. 



1867.. 



1870 

1871 

1872...., 

1873 

1874 

1875...., 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879. .. 
1880.... 
1881.... 
1882.... 
1883.... 
1884.... 
1885.... 
1886.... 
1887.... 



1890. 
1891. 
1892. 



Dollar^ 
1,840,615.01 



5,260, 181.0U 
3,708,641.00 
1,943,902.26 



Dollars. 
428,218,101.20 
1,197,340.89 408,401,782.61 
421,131,510.55 
430^08,084.42 
416,565,680.06 



7,926,797.26 430,530,431.52 



51,929,710.26 
I 3,216,590.26 



472,069,332.94 
509,543,128.17 



11,425,820.26 498,182,411.69 

3,1102,420.26 465,807,196.89 

.6,648,860.26 476,764,031.84 

5.594,560.26 455,875,682.27 

37.015,630.26 410,835,741.78 

7,r,21,455.26 388,800,815.37 

6,723,865.26 422,721,954.32 

.6,260,805.26 438,241,788.77 



7,831,415.26 



538,111,162.81 



19,656,205.26 584,308,868.31 



4,100,995.26 
9,704,445.26 
6,115,165.26 



663,712,927.88 
619,344,4(58.52 
629,795,077.37 



2,498,095.2fl 739,840,389.32 



1,911,485.26 

1,815,805.2* 
1,614,705.26 
2.7S5.875.26 



787.287,446.97 
825,011,289.47 
933,852,766.35 
880.403,635.3" 



Dollars. 

2,678,126,103.87 
2,611,687,851.19 
2,588, 452,213.94 
2.480,672,427.81 
2,353,211,332.32 
2,253,251,328.78 
2,234,482,993.20 
2,251,690,468.43 
2,232,284,531.95 
2,180,395,067.15 
2,205,301,392.10 
2,266,205.s'.c ) ...:: 
2.245,495,072.04 
2,120.415,370.63 
2.069.013,569.58 
1.918.312,994.03 
1,884,171.728.07 
1.830,528,923.57 
1.863.964.873.14 
1.775,063,013.78 
1,657.602,592.63 
1.6^.858,984.58 
1.619,052.922.23 
1.552.140,204.7: 
1,545,996,691.61 
1.558,464,144.63 



Dollars. 
169,974,892.18 
130,834.437.96 
155,680,340.85 
149,502,471.60 
106,217,263.65 
103,470,798.43 
129,020,932.45 
147,541,314.74 
142,243,361.82 
119,469,726.70 
186,025,960.73 
256.823,612.08 
249,080.167.01 
201,088,622.88 
249,363,415.35 
243,289.519.78 
345.389,902.92 
391,985.928.18 
488.612,429.23 
492,917,173.34 
48->.433,917.21 
629,854.089.85 
643,113,172.01 
661,355,834.20 
694,083,839.83 
126,692.377.03 



Dollars. 
2,508,151,211.69 
2.480.853,413.23 
2.432,771.873.09 
2,331,169,956.21 
2.246.994,068.67 
2.149.780,530.35 
2,105,462,060.75 
2.104,149,153.69 
2.090,041,170.1? 
2,060,92.1,340.45 
2,019,275.431.37 
1.999,382,280.45 
1,996,414.905.0? 
1.919,326,747.75 
1.819 650,154.21 
1.675.023,474.25 
1,538,781.825.15 
1,438,542.995.3! 
1,375,352,443.9: 
1,282,145.840.4' 
1,175.168.675.42 
1,0)3.004.894.7: 
975,939,750.22 
924,465.218.53 
851,912,751.78 
785,4S7.',M>1 



36,211,000 



Dols. 
69.26 
67.10 
64.43 
60.46 
56.81 
52.96 
50.52 
49.17 
47.56 
45.66 
43.56 

2 

38.27 

35.36 

31.72 

28.41 

25.90 

24. 

21.95 

19.25 

16.94 

15.92 

14.22 

13. 

12. 



Dots. 

3.84 



2.56 
2.35 
2.31 
2.20 
2.11 
2.01 
1.99 

1:3 

1.46 
1.09 



26 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES AT EACH CENSUS, FROM 1850 TO 1890. 


[From the reports of the Superintendents of the Census.] 


STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


1890. 


1880. 


1870. 


1860. 


1850. 


Alabama 
Arkansas 


1 

31 

29 

8 

12 
42 
3 
8 
10 
19 

y 

i 

6 
9 
20 

1 

41 
26 
44 

33 

18 
1 
16 
39 
4 
38 

J 

':; 

37 
13 

7 

n 

15 
34 
2s 
14 

43 


1,513,017 
1,128,179 
1,208,130 
412,198 
746,258 
168,493 
391,422 

li8 U'! 

o4,ooD 

3,826,351 
2,192,404 
1,911,896 
1,427,096 
1,858,635 
1,118,587 

JB& 

2,238,943 

2,093,889 
1,301,82* 
1.289,000 
2,679,184 

' 45,'761 
376,530 
1,444,933 
5,9;)7,853 
1,617,947 
182,719 
3,672,316 
313,767 
5,258,014 
345,506 
1,151,149 
328,808 

l,655',9fi 
349&W 
762,794 
1,696,880 
60,705 


17 

f t 

35 

28 
37 
34 
13 


1,262,505 

1461608 
269,493 
1,542,180 


16 

2*5 

24 

25' 
34 


996,992 
484,471 
560,247 
398ft 
537,454 
125,015 
187,748 
1,184,109 


13 
2o 
26 

'24' 
32 
31 
11 


964,201 
435,450 
379,994 
34,277 
460.147 

iiS 

1,057,286 


12 
M 

29 


771,623 

209,897 
92,597 


California 




Connecticut .... 


21 

\ 


370,792 
91,532 
87445 
906,185 


Delaware 


Florida 


Georgia 




Illinois 


4 
6 
10 

20 
8 
22 

1 

26 
18 
5 


a077,871 

1,978.301 
1,624,615 
996,096 
1,648,690 
939,946 

'780!773 
1,131,597 
2,168,380 


4 
6 
11 
29 

8 

7 
13 

28 
18 
5 


2,539,891 

1,680,637 
1,194,020 
364,399 
1,321,011 
726,915 
626,915 
780,894 
1,457,351 
1,184,059 
439706 
827,922 
1,721,295 


4 

6 
20 
33 
9 
17 

19 

14 

8 


1,711,951 

1,350,428 
674,913 
107,206 
1,155,684 
708,002 
628,279 
687,049 
1,231,066 
749,113 
172,023 
791,305 
1,182,012 


11 

7 
27 


851,470 
988,416 
192,214 


Indiana 


Iowa 


Kansas 


Kentucky 


,1 

16 
17 

6 
20 
33 
15 
13 


982,405 
517,762 
583,169 
583,034 
994,514 
397,654 
6,077 
606526 
682,044 










Michigan 


Minnesota 


Mississippi 


Missouri 




Nebraska 


30 
38 
31 
19 

15 


452,402 
62,266 
346,991 
1,131,116 
5,082,871 
1,399,750 


35 

Si 

17 
1 
14 


122,993 
42,491 
318,300 
906,0% 
4,382,759 
L071.361 


35 

3(i 

1 
12 


28,841 
6,857 
326,073 
672,035 

3,880,735 
992,622 






Nevada 


19 
1 
10 




New Hampshire 


317,976 

489,555 
3,097,394 
869,039 


New Jersey. .. 


New York 


North Carolina 


North Dakota. 


Ohio .... 


3 

1 

33 
21 


v&jin 


i 

32 
22 


2,665,260 
90,923 
3,521,951 
217,353 
705,606 


3 
ft 



18 


2,339,511 
52,465 

2,906,215 

703,'708 


3 

32 
2 

28 
14 


1,980,329 
13,294 
2,311,786 

MS 


Oregon. .. . . 


Pennsylvania 


Rhode Island 
South Carolina 


South Dakota 


Tennessee . 


12 
11 

n 

14 


1,542,359 

1,591,749 
332,286 
1,512,565 


9 
19 
30 
10 


1,258,520 

818,579 
330,551 
1,225,163 


10 
23 

28 
5 


1,109,801 
604,215 
315,098 
1,596,318 


5 
26 

23 
4 


'S 

314,120 
1,421,661 


Texas 


Vermont. . 


Virginia 


Washington 


West Virginia 


29 
16 


618,457 
1,315,497 


27 
15 


442,014 
1,054,670 












15 


775^81 


24 


305,391 


Wyoming . . 


The States 


















1111 


61,908,906 




49,371,340 




38,155,505 




31,218,021 




23,067,262 


Alaska 


















Arizona 


4 


59,620 


1 
8 


40,440 
135,177 
177,624 
32,610 


| 

7 


9,658 
14,181 
131,700 
14,999 










Dakota .... 


6 
2 


7tl 






District of Columbia . 


1 


230,392 


2 


51,687 


Idaho 


Indian 




















7 
4 


39,159 
119,565 


I 


20,595 
91,874 










New Mexico 


3 
5 
2 


153,593 
61,834 
207,905 


1 


93,516 


1 


61,547 


! Oklahoma 


Utah 


2 
5 
9 


143,963 
75116 
20,789 


3 
5 

10 


86,786 
23,955 
9,118 


3 
5 


40,273 
11,594 


3 


11,380 


Washington 


Wyoming 










The Territories. 




713,344 




784,443 




402,861) 





225,300 





124,614 


On public ships in service of 
the United States 
























The United States 




62,622,250 




50,155,783 


.... 


38,558,371 


.... 


31,443,321 




23,191,876 


Per cent of gain 




24.8 


30.08 


22.65 


35.11 


35.83 




NOTE. The narrow column under each census year shows the order of the states and 
territories when arranged according to magnitude of population. 
Population of Alaska and Indian Territory not yet reported. 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES. 27 


POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES AT EACH CENSUS, FROM 1790 TO 1840. 
[From the reports of the Superintendents of the Census.] 


STATES AND 
TERRITORIES. 


1840. 


1830. 


1820. 


1810. 


1800. 


1790. 




12 




590,756 
97,574 


1") 

27 


309,527 
30;388 


19 
25 


127,901 
14,255 














Arkansas 
California. .. 


























Colorado 


























Connecticut 
Delaware 


20 
28 

27 
9 


309,978 
78,085 
54,477 
691,392 


M 

24 
25 
10 


297,675 
76,748 
34,730 
516,823 


14 

M 


275.148 

72,749 


9 

19 


261,942 

72,674 


8 
17 


251,662 
64,273 


8 

it; 


237,964 
59,096 


Florida 




11 


340,985 


11 


252,433 


12 


162,686 


13 


82,548 


Idaho 


Illinois 


14 

10 

28 


476,183 
685.866 
43,112 


20 
13 


157,445 
343,031 


24 

18 


55,162 
147,178 


23 
21 


12,282 
24,520 


'id' 








Indiana 


5,641 






Iowa 




























Kentucky 


6 

19 

u 

16 

J 


779,828 
352,411 
501,793 
470,019 
737,699 
212,267 


6 

19 
12 

'1 

M 


637,917 
215,739 
399.455 
447,040 
610,408 
31,639 


8 

17 
12 
10 

7 
M 


564,135 
152,923 
298,269 
407,350 
523,159 
8,765 


7 
18 
14 
8 
5 
24 


406,5ii 

472,040 
4^762 


9 


220,955 


14 


73,677 






14 
7 
5 


151,719 
341,548 
422,845 


'{ 


96,540 

319,728 
378,787 




Massachusetts 
Michigan 










Mississippi 


17 

It! 


375,651 
383,702 


22 

21 


136,621 
140,451 


21 
23 


75,448 
66,557 


1 


40,352 
20,845 


19 


8,850 


















Nebraska 


























Nevada . ... 


























New Hampshire . . 
New Jersey 
New York 
North Carolina... 
North Dakota 


22 

18 
1 
7 


234,574 
373,306 

2,428,921 
753,419 


18 
14 

5 


269,328 
320,823 

1,918,603 
737,987 


15 
13 
1 
4 


244,022 
277,426 
1,372,111 
638,829 


16 
12 
2 
4 


214,460 
245,562 


15 

3 
4 


183,858 
211,149 
589,051 
478,103 


10 
9 
5 
3 


141,885 

184,139 
340,120: 
393,751 


Ohio 


3 


1,519,467 


4 


937,903 


5 


581,295 


13 


230,760 


18 


45,365 






Oregon 




Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina... 
South Dakota 


2! 

11 


1,724,033 
108,830 
594,398 


2 
23 
9 


1,348,233 
97,199 
581,185 


3 

20 

8 


1,047,507 
83,015 
502,741 


3 

1 


810,091 
76,931 
415,115 


,1 

6 


602,36^ 
69,122 
345,591 


2 
15 

7 


434,373 

68,82o 
249,073 


Tennessee 
Texas . 


5 


829,210 


7 


681,904 


9 


422,771 


10 


261,72" 


15 


105,602 


17 


35,691 


Vermont 
Virginia . .. 


21 
4 


291,948 
1,239,797 


'I 


280,652 
1,211,405 


it; 

2 


iJKS 


15 


217,895 
974,600 


13 

1 


154,465 
880,200 


12 
1 


85,425 
747,610 




West Virginia 




























29 


30,945 






















Wyoming 






















The States 
Alaska 




17,019,641 





12,820,868 




9,600,783 




7,215,858 




5,294,390 


.... 


~~ 




















































Dakota 


























Dist. of Columbia. 
Idaho 




43,712 


1 


"jBiKi 


1 


33,039 


1 


24,023 


1 


14,093 


















































































































Utah . 


























Washington. 




















































The Territories 

On public chips in 
service of U.S... 

United States. 
Percent, of gain.. 




























43,712 




39,834 


.... 


33.039 




24,023 




14,093 








6,100 




5,318 




{ 














17,039,453 




12,866,020 




9,633,8221 





7,239,881 




5,308,483 




3,929,214 


3352 


32.51 


33.06 


36.38 


35.10 






NOTE. The narrow column under each census year shows the order of the states and 
territories when arranged according to magnitude of population. 
Population of Alaska and Indian Territory not yet reported. 



28 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


ELEMENTS OF POPULATION-CENSUS 1890. 


Table showing number of males and females, with the number of females to 100,000 males; 
also the number of native and foreign born, with the number of foreign born to 100,000 native 
born. 


STATES AND TER- 
RITORIES 


Males. 


Females. 


Females to 
10J,000 
Males. 


Native 
Born. 


Foreign 
Born. 


Foreign 
Born to 
Each 100,- 
OOJ Native 
Born. 


United States... 

North Atlantic Div. 
Maine 


32,067,880 

8,677,798 

332,590 
186.566 
169,327 
1,087,709 
168,025 
369,538 
2,976,893 
730,819 
2,666,331 

4,418,7*69 

85,573 
515,691 

109,584 
824,278 
390,285 
799,149 
572,337 
919,925 
201,947 

11,594,910 

1,855,736 
1,118,347 
1,972,308 
1,091,780 
874,951 
695,321 
994,453 
1,385,238 
101,55)0 
180,250 
572,824 
752,112 

5,593,877 

942,758 
891,585 
757,456 
649,687 
559,350 
1,172,553 
34,733 
585,755 

1,782,526 

87,882 
39,343 
245,247 
83,055 
36,571 
110,463 
29,214 
51,290 
217,562 
181,840 
700,059 


30,554,370 

8,723,747 

328,496 
18J,964 
163,095 
1,151,234 
177,481 
376,720 
3,020,960 
724,114 
2,591,683 

4,439,151 

82,920 

526,099 
120,808 
831,702 
372,509 
818,798 
578,812 
917,428 
189,475 

10,767,369 

1,816,580 
1,074,057 
1,854,043 
1,002,109 
811,929 
606,505 
917,443 
1,298,946 
81,129 
148,558 
486,086 
674,984 

5,379,016 

915,877 
875,933 
755,561 
639,913 
559,237 
1,063,970 
27,101 
542,424 

1,245,087 

44,277 
21,362 
166,951 
70,538 
23,049 
97,442 
16,547 
33,095 
131,828 
131,927 
508,071 


95,280 

100,530 

98,769 
101,821 
96,320 
105,840 
105.628 
101,944 
101,480 
100,457 
97,200 

100,461 

96,900 
102,135 
110,242 
100,901 
95,445 
102,459 
101,131 
99,729 
93,824 

92,863 

97,890 
96,040 
94,004 
91,787 
92,797 
87,227 
92,256 
93,410 

84',858 
89,745 

96,159 

97,149 
98.244 
99,750 
- 98,496 
99,980 
90,654 
78,027 
92,603 

69,850 

50,382 
54,297 
68,075 
84,929 
63,025 
88,212 
56.641 
64,525 
60,593 
72,551 
72,575 


53,372,703 

13,513,368 

582,125 
304,190 
288,334 
1,581,806 
239,201 
562,657 
4,426,803 
1,115,958 
4,412,294 

8,649,395 

155,332 
948,ft>4 
211,622 
1,637,606 
743,911 
1,614,245 
1,144,879 
1,825,216 
368,490 

18,302,165 

3,213,023 

2,0U'. 
2,984,0<M 
1,550,009 
1,167,681 
834,470 
1,; 587,827 
2,444,315 
101,258 
237,753 
85(5,368 
1,279,258 

10,651,072 

1,799,279 

1,747,489 
1,498,240 
1,281,648 
1,068,840 
2,082,567 
59,094 
1,113,915 

2,256,703 

89,063 
45,792 
328,208 
142,334 
40,825 
154,841 
31,055 
66,929 
259,385 
256,450 
841,821 


9,249,547 

3,888,177 

78,961 
72,340 
44,088 
657,137 
106,305 
183,601 
1,571,050 
328,975 
845,720 

208,525 

13,161 
94,296 
18,770 
18,374 
18,883 
3702 
6,270 
12,137 
22,932 

4,060,114 

459,293 

146,205 
842,347 
543.880 
519,199 
467,356 
324,069 
234,8f.9 
81,461 
91,055 
202,542 
147,838 

321,821 

59,356 
20,029 
14,777 
7,952 
49,747 
152,956 
2,740 
14,264 

770,910 

43,096 
14,913 
83,990 
11259 
18,795 
53,064 
14,706 
17,456 
90,01)5 
57,317 
366,309 


17.330 

33,773 

13,564 
23,781 
15,291 
41,643 
44,442 
32,631 
35,489 
29,479 
19,167 

2,411 

8,473 
9,946 
8,870 
1,122 

2 *8 

548 
665 
6,223 

22,184 

14,295 
7,145 
28,229 
35,089 
44,464 
56.006 
20,410 
9,609 
80,449 
38,298 
23,651 
11,557 

3,021 

3.299 
1,146 
986 
620 
4,654 
7,345 
4,637 
1,281 

34,161 

48,388 
32,567 
25,590 
7,910 
46,038 
34,270 
47,355 
26,081 
34,699 
22,350 
43,614 


New Hampshire. 


Massachusetts.... 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 
New York 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 

South Atlantic Div. 

Delaware 
Maryland 


Dis. of Columbia. 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
North Carolina... 
South Carolina... 
Georgia 


Florida 


North Central Div . 
Ohio 


Indiana 


Illinois 


Michigan 
Wisconsin 
Minnesota 




Missouri 
North Dakota 
South Dakota 
Nebraska 


South Central Div. . 

Kentucky 
Tennessee 
Alabama 


Mississippi 
Louisiana 






Arkansas 

Western Division.. 

Montana 
Wyoming 


Colorado 
New Mexico 
Arizona 
Utah 


Nevada 
Idaho 
Washington 


California 



URBAN" POPULATION. 29 


URBAN POPULATION. 

[Census of 1890.] 
The following table gives the results In detail by States and Territories for each geo- 
graphical division, both as regards number of cities and population, in the following order 
as regards size: 25,000 and over, 8,000 and under 25,000,4,000 and under 8,000, 2,500 and under 
4,000, 1,000 and under 2.500: 


STATES AND TER- 
RITORIES. 


TOTAL. 


25,000 AND 
OVER. 


8,000 AND 
UNDER 
25,000. 


4,030 AND 
UNDER 

8,000. 


2,500 AND 
UNDER 

4,000. 


1,000 AND 
UNDER 
2,500. 


Oit- 
ies. 


Popula- 
tion. 


Cit- 
ies. 


Popula- 
tion. 


Cit- 
ies. 


Popu- 
ation. 


Cit- 
ies. 


P(pu- 
ation. 


Cit- 
ies. 


Popu- 
ation. 


Cit- 
ies. 


Popu- 
lation. 


United States.. 
North Atlantic Div 
Maine 


,715 
,481 

192 
104 
1M 

25fi 
32 
124 
255 

325 

270 

12 
34 
1 
43 
24 
44 
37 
54 
21 

.375 

226 
136 
241 
150 
113 
67 
135 
126 
8 

S 

101 
375 

tv 
53 
41 
40 
27 
1H 

33 
214 

14 

g 


26,109,074 
12,168,521 

507,103 
300,807 
251,079 
2,176,938 
342,122 
682,416 
4.125.782 
933,006 
2,849,268 

1,966,336 

82,444 
530,105 
230,392 
311,529 
104,627 
156,385 
154,366 
306,429 
90,059 

8,699,300 

1,679,025 
704,231 
1,958.948 
858,314 
668,636 
509,936 
541,071 
981,869 
20,646 
44330 
353,103 
378,691 

1,917,195 

412,525 
304,843 
186,802 
114,004 
314,515 
464,32" 
10,214 
109,965 

1,357,722 

50.080 
29,65b 


124 

56 

1 
1 


13,989,568 
7,138,650 

36,425 
44,126 


324 
143 

7 
4 
2 
31 
8 
13 
33 
13 
32 

26 
"3 


4,294,817 
1,876,733 

93,921 
58.932 
26,350 
409.731 
112,792 
173,247 
446,349 
160,549 
394,862 

345,944 

"si'.oio 


457 
201 

18 
7 
8 
55 
7 
20 
38 
10 
38 

25 

1 


2,514,911 
1,110,343 

95,922 
41,126 

48,285 
294.3i9 
37,764 
114,188 
205,600 
56.533 
216,556 

134,226 

4,010 
11,796 


617 
243 

24 

16 
14 
47 
6 
29 
34 
13 
60 

58 

1 
7 


1,918,169 
752,530 

72,336 

48,295 
42,428 
144,554 
17,675 
90,735 
105,770 
41,947 
188,790 

176,410 

3,061 
20,934 


2,193 

838 

142 

76 
92 
107 

A 

137 
34 
183 

151 

9 
21 


,391,609 
,290,265 

208,499 
108,328 
134,016 
173,084 
14,112 
92,206 
214,535 
53,614 
291,871 

235,736 

13,942 
31,896 


New Hampshire. 
Vermont 


Massachusetts... 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 
New York 


16 
2 
4 

13 
7 
12 

10 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


1,155.200 

159,779 
212,040 
3,153,528 
620,363 
1,757,189 

1,074,020 

6L431 
434,439 
230,392 
116,259 
34,522 


New Jersey 
Pennsylvania.... 

South Atlantic Div 


Maryland 


Dist. of Columbia 
Virginia 


{ 

i 

3 

116 

20 
14 
21 
16 
1 

1 
I 


105,706 
18,516 
62,544 
23,960 
57,147 
47.031 

1,544,053 

251,372 

178,76; 

205!780 
194,988 
38,306 
124,148 
66,933 


7 

1 

2 

172 

41 

19 
23 
19 
18 
6 
11 
21 


26,739 
13,968 
34,515 
5,544 
27,380 
10,274 

950,593 

228,542 
106,567 
119,513 
106.436 
98.280 
85,776 
64,933 
107,825 
10,643 


11 
5 
6 
11 
10 
7 

212 

37 
26 
32 
24 

1 

16 

"'6 
6 
16 

65 

10 

9 



21 
11 
4 

39 
( 


34,017 
14,369 
18,700 
34,363 
30,923 
20,053 

667,472 

115,213 

82.906 
102,514 
77,763 
45,632 
37.958 
71,601 
49,117 

' 18,378 
17863 
48,527 

200,054 

31,104 
21,179 
28,318 
18,731 
22,681 
62,506 
2,788 
12,747 

121,703 

14,230 
3.406 
17,318 
3,785 
3,152 
5,699 
7,513 


18 
14 

26 

S 

839 

119 
73 
162 
87 
63 
44 
89 
81 
6 
10 
39 
66 

239 

87 

38 
22 
28 
17 
71 

24 
126 
f 
16 

6 
1! 

11 
6 
43 


28,808 
23,262 
40.626 
35,544 
48,957 
12,701 

1,287,339 

175,928 
114,192 
250,966 
128,020 
100,178 
66,887 
135,307 
121,184 
10003 
16,275 
61,909 
106.490 

377,909 

55,812 
e38,872 : 
34,5t>7 
44,033 
27,338 
112.201 
3,275 
36,806 

200,360 

11,293 

8,172 
2*3,900 
13,218 
9,622 
22,744 
5,017 
3,485 
24,855 
9,044 
66,010 


West Virginia . . . 
North Carolina. . 
South Carolina. 
Georgia 


1 


54,955 
142,022 


Florida 


North Central Div. 
Ohio , 


36 

9 
4 

4 

2 
3 
4 


4,249,843 

907,970 
221,802 
1,172,368 
340,315 
229,558 
331,009 
145,082 
636,810 


Indiana 


Illinois 


Michigan 


Wisconsin 
Minnesota . ... 




Missouri 
North Dakota 
South Dakota 
Nebraska 






1 


10,177 


13 
I 


195,606 
69,323 

825,811 

198,500 
169,763 
57,254 


| 

24 

5 

1 


63,442 
96,556 

321,278 

77,954 
32,574 
31,881 
34,098 
22,457 
92,965 


10 
34 

9 
c 
6 
3 
..... 

1 
] 

25 


14,283 
57.795 

192,143 

49,155 
17,455 
34,782 
17,137 

"64,274 
4,151 
5,189 

127,606 

'"6,388 
15,792 
6,185 
5,150 
9,724 


Kansas 


South Central Div. 

Kentucky 
Tennessee 
Alabama 
Mississippi 
Louisiana 
Texas 


1 
4 


242,039 
132,381 


Oklahoma ... . 


Arkansas 


1 
9 


25,874 
701,244 


15 


29,349 

206,809 

24,557 

11,690 
46,082 


Western Division . 
Montana 


Wyoming 






Colorado 
New Mexico. .. 


21 

8 


212,805 
23,188 
17924 




106,713 








Utah... 


19 

2< 
16 
76 


97,899 
21,041 
3,48o 
152,033 
94,137 
655,474 




44,843 




14,88S 
8,51 


Nevada 


Idaho 
Washington. .. 






; 


78,843 
46,385 
424,460 




19,922 
10,532 
70,62 


1( 


22,100 
11.313 
50,954 


& 


6,313 
16,863 
43,424 


Calif ornia..,.. . 



30 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


POPULATION BY SEX AND NATIVITY. 
[Census of 1890.] 


STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Total 
Population. 


SEX. 


NATIVE AND FOR- 
EIGN BORN. 


Male. 


Female. 


Native. 


Foreign. 


United States 


62,622,250 

17,401,545 

(561,086 
376,530 
332,422 
2,238,943 
345.506 
746,258 
5,997,853 
1,444,933 
5,258,014 

8,857,920 

168,493 
1,042,390 
230,392 
1,655,980 
702:794 
1,617,947 
1,151,149 
1,837,353 
391,422 

22,362,279 

3,672,316 

2,192,404 
3,82*3.351 
2,093,8ti'.l 
1,686880 
1,301,826 
1,911,896 
2,679,184 
182,719 
328,808 
1,058,910 
1,427,096 

10,972,893 

1,858,635 
1,767,518 
1,513,017 
1.289.600 
1.118.587 
2,235,523 
61 834 
1,128,179 

3,027,613 

132,159 

60,705 
412,198 
153.593 
59,620 
207,905 
45,761 
84,385 
349,390 
31b,767 
1,208,130 


32,067,880 

8,677,798 

332,590 

186,566 
16-9,327 
1 ,08 1 ,709 

2,976&*3 
720,819 
2,666,331 

4,418,769 

85,573 
515,691 

799J49 
572,337 
919,925 
201,947 

11,594,910 

1,855,736 
1,118,347 
1,972,308 
1.091,780 
874,951 
695,321 
994,453 
1,35238 
101,590 
180.250 
572,824 
752,112 

5,593,877 

942,758 
891,585 
757,456 
649,087 
559,350 
1,172,553 
34,733 
585,755 

1,782,526 

87,882 
39,343 
245,247 
83,055 
36,571 
110,463 
29,214 
51,290 
217.562 
181,840 
700,059 


30,554,370 

8,723,747 

328,496 
189,964 
163,095 
1,151,234 
177,481 
376,720 
3,020,9W 
724;il4 
2,591,683 

4,439,151 

82,920 

526,099 
120,808 
831,702 
372,509 
818.798 
578,812 
917,428 
189.475 

10,767,369 

1,816,580 
1,074,057 
1,854,043 
1,002,109 
811,929 
606,505 
917,443 
1,293,946 
81129 
148,558 
486,086 
674,984 

5,379,016 

915,877 

875,933 
755,561 
639,913 
559,237 
1,018,970 
27,101 
542,424 

1,245,087 

44,277 
21,362 
166,951 
70,538 
23,049 
97,442 
16,547 
33,095 
131,828 
131,927 
508,071 


53,372,703 

13,513,368 

582,125 
304,190 
288,334 
1,581,80(3 
239,201 
562,657 
4,426,803 
1,115,958 
4,412,294 

8,649,395 

155,332 

948,094 
211,622 
1,637,606 
743,911 
1,614,245 
1,144,879 
1,825,216 
368,490 

18,302,165 

3,213,023 

2,046,199 
2,964,004 
1,550,009 
1,167,681 
834,470 
1,587,827 
2,444,315 
101,258 
237,753 
856,368 
1,279,258 

10,651,072 

1,799,279 

1,747,489 
1,498,240 
1.281,648 
1.IK8.S40 
2,082,567 
59,094 
1,113,915 

2,256,703 

89,063 
45,792 
328,208 
142,334 
40,825 
154,841 
31,055 
66,929 
258,885 
256,450 
841,821 


9,249,547 

3,888,177 

78,961 
72,340 
44,088 
657,137 
106,305 
183.W1 
1,571,050 
328,975 
845,720 

208,525 

13,161 
94,29*3 
18,770 
18,374 
18,883 
3,702 
6,270 
12,137 
22,932 

4,060,114 

459,293 
146,205 
842,347 
543/80 
519,199 
467,356 
324,009 
234,869 
81,461 
91,055 
202,542 
147,838 

321,821 

59,356 
20,029 
14,777 
7,952 
49,747 
152,956 
2,740 
14,264 

770,910 

43.096 
14,913 
83,990 
11,259 
18,795 
53,064 
14,706 
17,456 
90,005 
57,317 
366,309 


North Atlantic Division 
Maine 


New Hampshire 
Vermont 


Massachusetts 


Rhode Island 


Connecticut . 


New York 


New Jersey 




South Atlantic Division 


Delaware. . ., 


Maryland 


District of Columbia 


Virginia . , 


West Virginia . . 


North Carolina 


South Carolina 


Florida 


North Central Division 


Ohio 


Indiana 


Illinois 
Michigan 


Wisconsin 


Minnesota 


Iowa . 


Missouri 




South Dakota 


Nebraska 




South Central Division 








Mississippi 










Western Division 






Colorado 


New Mexico 




Utah 


Nevada 


Idaho 


Washingion 




California . 





POPULATION BY COLOR AND NATIVITY. 31 


POPULATION BY COLOR AND 


NATIVITY. 


ICensus of 1890.] 


STATES AND TER- 
RITORIES. 


*&$? 


NATIVE WHITE. 


Foreign 
White. 


Total 
Colored.* 


Total. 


Native 
Parents. 


Foreign 
Parents. 


United States 
North Atlantic Div. 

Maine 
New Hampshire.. 
Vermont 
Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 
New York 


54,963,890 

17,121,981 

659,263 
375,840 
331,418 
2,215,373 

1, 1 396|581 
5;i48,257 

5,592,149 

140,066 
826,493 
154,695 
1,020,122 

1,056,882 

978!357 
224,949 

21,911,927 

3,584,805 

2,146,736 
3,7fi8,472 
2,072,884 
1,680,473 
1,296,159 
1.901,086 
2,528,458 
182,123 
327290 
1,046,888 
1,376,553 

7,487,576 

1,590,462 

1,336,637 

1,745,935 

58,826 
818,752 

2,870,257 

127,271 
59,275 
404,468 
142,719 
55,580 
205,899 
39,084 
82,018 
340,513 
301,758 
1,111,672 


45,862,023 
13^47,115 

1,561 ',870 
231,832 
550,283 

4,'304,668 
5,389,833 

126,970 

732,706 
136,178 
1,001,933 
711 225 
1,061,720 

986,466 

206,771 

17,858,470 

3,126,252 
2,000, 7a3 
2,927,497 
1,531,283 
1,161,484 
829,102 
1,577,154 

MM 

236,447 
844,644 
1,228,923 

7,168,997 

1,531,222 

1,31(5,738 
819,114 
537,127 
509,555 
1,594,466 
56,117 
804,658 

2,197,608 

86,941 
44,845 
321,962 
131.859 
38,117 
153,766 
27,190 
66.554 
254,319 
263,996 
818,119 


34,358,348 
8,891,405 

Sao 

137,550 
357,235 
2,520,807 
696,718 

5,067,379 

109,355 

576,285 
107,309 
976,758 
670,214 

'SitS 

946,782 
190,998 

12,250,155 

2,334,517 
1,697,998 
1,882,693 
917,6-93 

$88. 

1,063967 
1,856,477 
37,428 
127,232 
594,224 
992,326 

6,661,648 

1,406,918 

1,283,481 
796,421 

' 5U554 
780,950 

1,487,761 

55,982 
30,325 
242,148 
119,320 
24,090 
68,452 
14,784 
45,400 
185,562 
203.9H9 
497,729 


11,503,675 

4,355,710 

73,865 
50,015 
62,149 
606,440 
94,282 
193,048 
1,837,453 
371,878 
1,066,580 

322,454 

17,615 
156421 
28,869 
25,175 
41,011 

5,608,315 

791,735 
302,735 
1,044,804 
613;590 
720,835 
518,151 
513,187 
437699 
63,347 
109,215 
250,420 
236,597 

507,349 

124,304 
t257 
693 
16,773 
96,465 
185,586 
4,563 
23,708 

709,847 

30,959 
14,520 
79314 
12,539 
14,027 
85,314 
12,406 
21,154 
68,757 
49,967 
330,390 


9,121,867 

3,874,866 

78,695 
72,196 

183455 
1,5H6,692 
327,985 
843,589 

202,316 
13,096 

S 

18,189 
18,852 
3,662 
6,143 
11,892 
18,178 

4,053,457 

458,553 
146,003 
840,975 
541,601 
518,989 
467,057 
323,932 

'fill 
90,843 
202,244 
147,630 

318,579 

59,240 

19,899 
14,604 
7,724 
48,840 
151,469 
2,709 
14,094 

672,649 

40,330 
14,430 
82,506 
10,860 
17,463 
52,133 
11,894 
15,464 
86,194 
47,822 
293,553 


7,638,360 

279,564 

1,823 
690 
1,004 
23,570 
7,647 
12,820 
73,901 
48,352 
109,757 

3,265,771 

28,427 
215,897 
75,697 
635,858 
32,717 
562,565 
689.141 
858,996 
166,473 

450,352 

87,511 

45,668 
57.879 
21,005 
6,407 
5,667 
10,810 

m ^ 

1,518 
12,02-2 

60,543 

3,485,317 

268,173 
430,881 
679.2J9 
744,749 
660,192 
489,588 
3,008 
309,437 

157,356 

4,888 
1,430 
7,730 
10,874 
4,040 
2,006 
6,677 
2i367 
8,877 
12,009 
96,458 


New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 

South Atlantic Div. 

Delaware 
Maryland 


Dis. of Columbia.. 
Virginia 
West Virginia.... 
North Carolina... 
South Carolina... 


Florida 


North Central Div.. 
Ohio 


Indiana 
Illinois 


Michigan 


Wisconsin 
Minnesota 


Missouri ... 


North Dakota.. . 
South Dakota... . 
Nebraska 


South Central Div.. 

Kentucky 
Tennessee. .. 


Alabama 
Mississippi 
Louisiana 


Oklahoma 
Arkansas 

Western Div 


Montana 


Wyoming 


Colorado 


New Mexico 
Arizona... 


Utah 


Nevada. 


Idaho 
Washington 
Oregon 


California 




"Including Chinese, Japanese and civilized Indians. 



32 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


PERCENTAGE OF POPULATION BY COLOR AND NATIVITY. 


[Censuses of 1880 and 1890.] 


STATES AND TERRI- 
TORIES. 


1890. 


I860. 


S 


NATIVE WHITE. 


M 

| 



i 


1 

2 


1 


.S 
1 

f 

i 




1 


S 
3 


*i 
P 


i! 
P 


United States 
North Atlantic Division.... 
Maine 


Per 
cent. 

87.80 

98.39 

99.72 
99.82 
99.70 
98.95 
97.79 
93.28 
98.77 
96.65 
97.91 

63.13 

83.13 
79.29 
67.14 
61.00 
95.71 
65.23 
40.13 
53.25 
57.47 

97.99 

97.62 
97.92 
98.49 
99.00 
99.62 
99.56 
99.43 
94.37 
99.67 
99.54 
98.86 
96.46 

68.24 

85 57 


Per 
cent. 
73.24 

76.12 

87.82 
80.64 
86.46 
69.76 
67.10 
73.74 
72.66 
73.95 
81.87 

60.85 

75.36 
70.29 
59.10 
60.50 
93.24 
65.00 
39.60 
52.60 
52.83 

79.86 

85.13 
91.26 
76.51 
73.13 
68.85 
63.69 
82.49 
85.63 
55.15 
71.91 
79.76 
86.11 

65.34 

82.38 
74.49 
54.14 
41.65 
45.55 
71.32 
90.76 
71.32 

72.58 

65,78 
73.87 
78.11 
85.85 
63.93 
73.96 
59.42 
78.87 
72.79 
80.93 
67.72 


Per 
cent. 
54.87 

51.09 

76.65 
67.36 
67.76 
42.67 
39.81 
47.87 
42.03 
48.22 
61.58 

57.21 

64.90 
55.28 
46.57 
58.98 
87.86 
64.55 
38.67 
51.53 
48.80 

54.78 

63.57 
77.45 
49.20- 
43.83 
25.76 
23.89 
55. Co 
69.29 
20.48 
38.69 
56.11 
69.53 

60.71 

75.69 
72.61 
52.64 
40.35 
36.93 
63.02 
83.38 
69.22 

49.14 

42.36 
49.95 
58.75 
77.69 
40.40 
32.92 
32.31 
53.80 
53.11 
65.01 
41.20 


Per 
cent. 
18.37 

25.03 

11.17 
13.28 
18.70 
27.09 
27.29 
25.87 
30.63 
25.73 
20.29 

3.64 

10.46 
15.01 
12.53 
1.52 
5.38 
0.45 
0.93 
1.07 
4.03 

25.08 

21.56 
13.81 
27.31 
29.30 
43.09 
39.80 
26.84 
16.34 
34.67 
33.22 
23.65 
16.58 

4.63 

6.69 
1.88 
1.50 
1.30 
8.62 
8.30 
7.38 
2.10 

23.44 

23.42 
23.92 
19.36 
8.16 
23.53 
41.04 
27.11 
25.07 
19.68 
15.92 
26.52 


Per 

cent. 
14.56 

22.27 

11.90 
19.18 
13.24 
29.19 
30.69 
24.54 
26.11 
22.70 
16.04 

2.28 

7.77 
9.00 
8.04 
1.10 
2.47 
0.23 
0.53 
0.65 
4.64 

18.13 

12.49 
6.66 
21.98 
.87 
.87 
16.94 
8.74 
44.52 
27.63 
19.10 
10.35 

2.90 

3.19 
1.13 
0.96 
0.60 
4.37 
6.78 
4.38 
1.25 

22.22 

30.52 
23.77 
20.01 
7.07 
29.29 
25.08 
25.99 
18.32 
24.67 
15.24 
24.30 


Per 
cent. 
12.20 

1.61 

0.28 
0.18 
0.30 
1.05 
2.21 
1.72 
1.23 
3.35 
2.09 

36.87 

16.87 
20.71 
32.86 
38.40 
4.29 
34.77 
59.87 
46.75 
42.53 

2.01 

2.38 
2.08 

!: 

0.38 
0.44 
0.57 
5.63 
0.33 
0.46 
1.14 
3.54 

31.76 

14.43 
24.38 
44.90 
57.75 
50.08 
21.90 
4.86 
27.43 

5.20 

3.70 
2.36 
1.88 
7.08 
6.78 
0.96 
14.59 
2.81 
2.54 
3.83 
7.98 


Per 
cent. 
86.54 

98.39 

99.68 
99.78 
99.68 
98.92 
97.62 
98.08 
98.68 
96.54 
97.99 

61.26 

81.96 
77.51 
66.44 
58.24 
95.81 
61.96 
39.28 
52.97 
52.92 

97.68 

97.49 
98.00 
98.48 
98.63 
99.55 
99.50 
99.38 
93.29 
*98.50 


Per 
cent. 
73.46 

79.03 

90.64 
86.46 
87.36 
74.13 
70.92 
77.25 
74.90 
76.97 
84.29 

59.01 

75.52 

68.68 
56.88 
57.27 
92.86 
61.69 
38.53 
52.30 
50.06 

80.91 

85.16 
90.72 
79.54 
75.02 
68.74 
65.24 
83.28 
83.54 
*60.49 


Per 
cent. 
13.08 

19.36 

9.04 
13.32 
12.32 
24.79 
26.70 
20.83 
23.78 
19.57 
13.70 

2.25 

6.44 
8.83 
9.56 
0.97 
2.95 
0.27 
0.75 
0.67 
2.86 

16.77 

12.33 
7.28 
18.94 
23.61 
30.81 
34.26 
16.10 

15! 


Per 

cent. 
13.46 

1.61 

0.32 
0.22 

l'.08 
2.38 
1.92 
1.32 
3.46 
2.01 

38.74 

18.04 
22.49 
33.56 
41.76 
4.19 
38.04 
fO.72! 
47.03 
47.08 

2.32 

2.51 
2.00 
1.52 
1.37 
0.45 
0.50 
0.62 
6.71 
*1.50 

"6!58 
4.41 

33.84 

16.47 
26.16 
47.55 
57.64 
51.60 
24.78 


New Hampshire 


Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 


Connecticut 


New York 






South Atlantic Division. . . . 




District of Columbia 
Virginia 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 
South Carolina 


Georgia 


Florida 


North Central Division 
Ohio 


Indiana 


Illinois 








Iowa 


Missouri 
North Dakota 




99.42 
95.59 

66.16 

83.53 
73.84 
52.45 
42.36 
48.40 
75.22 


77.90 
84.55 

63.12 

79.92 
72.76 
51.70 
41.57 
42.79 
68.08 


21.52 
11.04 

3.04 

3.61 
1.08 
0.75 
0.79 
5.61 
7.14 




South Central Division 




75.62 
55.10 
42.25 
49 "ft 


Alabama .... 


Mississippi 


Louisiana 




78.10 
95.14 
72.57 

94.80 

96.30 
97.64 
98 12 




Arkansas 


73.71 
91.21 

90.36 
93.50 
98.35 
90.93 
86.94 
98.93 
86.01 
88.97 
89,46 
93.31 
88.72 


72.44 
68.75 

66.13 
69.79 
78.21 
84.28 
51.45 
68.74 
53.56 
68.73 
73.08 
81.33 
63.55 


1.27 
22.46 

24.23 
23.71 
20.14 
6.65 
35.49 
30.19 
32.45 
20.24 
16.38 
11.98 
25.17 


26.29 
8.79 

9.64 
6.50 
1.65 
9.07 
13.06 
1.07 
13.99 
11.03 
10.54 
6.69 
11.28 


Western Division 


Montana ... 


Wyoming 


Colorado 


New Mexico 


92.92 
93.22 
99.04 
85.41 
97.19 
97.46 
96.17 
92.02 




Utah 


Nevada 


Idaho 


Washington 


Oregon 


California 




*Dakota Territory. 



VOTING AGES. 33 


VOTING AGES-MALES 21 YEARS 


AND OVER. 


[Census of 1890. j 
The results of the census of 1890 regarding males of voting age, classified by native and 
foreign born, and white and colored, are presented by states and territories in the follow- 
ing table. 


STATES AND TERRI- 
TORIES. 


All Classes. 


Native 
Born. 


Foreign 
Born. 


Aggregate 
White. 


Total 
Colored. 


United States .... 


16,940,311 
5,055,239 

201,241 
118.135 
101,697 
6K5,C09 
100,017 
234,092 
1,769,649 
413,530 
1,461,869 

2,015,578 

47,559 

270,738 
64,505 
378,782 
181,400 
342,653 
235,606 
398.122 
96,213 

6,202,901 

1,016,464 
595IOK6 
1,072,663 
617,445 
461,722 
376,036 
520,332 
705,718 
55,959 
96,765 
301,500 
383,231 

2,512,704 

450,792 
402,476 
324,822 
271,080 
250,563 
535,942 
19,161 
257,868 

1,153,889 

65.415 
27.044 
164,920 
44,951 
23,696 
54,471 
20,951 
31,490 
146,918 
111,744 
462,289 


12,591,852 
3,375,389 

170,771 
92,088 
82,011 
407,915 
59,832 
145,673 
1,084,187 
2K8.483 
1,064,429 

1,913,400 

41,407 

228,149 
55,263 
367,469 
171,611 

85^561 

4,281,800 

797,623 
521,708 
682,346 
369,128 
217,338 
154,727 
364,662 
584,981 

83! 

205,625 
310,166 

2,348,167 

420,976 
391,429 
316,697 
266,049 
225,212 
460,694 
17,502 
249,608 

673,096 

35,442 
17,852 
114,580 

ii 

10',181 
19,785 
88,968 
74,329 
230,154 


4,348,459 

1,679,850 

30,470 
26,047 
19,686 
257.094 
40,185 
78,419 

145|047 
397,440 

102,178 

6,152 
42,589 
9,242 
11,313 
9,789 
2,081 
3,406 
6,954 
10,652 

1,921,101 

218,841 
73,358 
390,317 
248,317 
244,384 
221,309 
155,670 
120,737 
36,314 
42,914 
95,875 
T3,065 

164,53? 

29,816 
11.047 
8,125 
5,031 
25,351 
75,248 
1,659 
8,2CO 

480,793 

29,973 
9,192 
50,340 
6,757 
10,031 
24,525 
10,770 
11,705 
57,950 
37,415 
232,135 


15,199,856 
4,966,161 

200,609 
117,889 
101.369 
657,042 
97,756 
220,116 
1,745,418 
398,9*56 
1,426,996 

1,338,368 

40,007 
218,843 
46,159 
248,035 
172,198 
233,307 
102,657 
219,094 
58,068 

6,076,292 

990,542 
581,987 
1,054,463 
611,008 
459,893 
374,027 
517,006 
667,451 
55,769 
96,177 
297,281 
370,688 

1,773,347 

387,371 
310,014 
184,059 
120.611 
130,748 
434,010 
18,238 
188,296 

1,045,688 

61,948 
26,050 
161,015 
41,478 
21,160 
53,235 
17,002 
29,525 
141,934 
102.113 
390,228 


1,740,455 

89,078 

632 
246 
328 
7,967 
2,261 
3,976 
24,231 
14,564 
34,873 

677,210 

7,552 
51.895 
18,346 
130,747 
9,202 
109,346 
132,949 
179,028 
38,145 

126,609 

25,922 
13,079 
18,200 

L829 
2,009 
3,326 
38,267 
190 
588 
4,219 
12,543 

739,357 

63,421 
92,462 
140,763 
150,469 
119,815 

'923 
69,572 

108.201 

3,467 
994 
3,905 
3,473 
2,536 
1.236 
3,949 
1,965 
4,984 
9631 
72,061 


North Atlantic Division 


Maine 


New Hampshire 
Vermont 


Massachusetts. 


Rhode Island 


Connecticut 
New York 






South Atlantic Division .... 




Maryland 
District of Columbia 


Virginia 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 


South Carolina 




Florida 


North Central Division 
Ohio 




Illinois 


Michigan . .. 


Wisconsin . 


Minnesota 




Missouri 


North Dakota .... . 


South Dakota 


Nebraska 




South Central Division 








Mississippi 


Louisiana 






Western Division 




Colorado 
New Mexico 




Utah 


Nevada 


Idaho 






California 



34 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


FAMILIES AND PERSONS TO A FAMILY. 

[Census of 1890.] 
In 1860 and 1S50 the number of families given Is for the free population only, as at those 
censuses the families of the slave population were not returned. 


STATES AND TERRI- 
TORIES. 


NUMBER OF FAMILIES. 


PERSONS TO A FAMILY. 


1890. 


1880. 


1870. 


1860. 


1850. 


1890. 


1880. 


1870. 


1860. 

5.28 
5.17 

5.20 
4.72 
4.94 
4.90 
4.96 
4.85 
5.12 
5.16 
5.64 

5.40 
5.82 

g 

5.49 

"5!29 
5.14 
5.41 
6.21 

5.34 

5.39 
5.43 
5.43 
5.17 
5.26 
4.61 
5.44 
5.56 

*3.90 

4.86 
4.43 

5.51 

5.59 
5.59 
5.48 
5.63 
5.04 
5.49 

"b.ti 
4.33 


1850. 

5.55 
5.45 

5.64 
5.15 
6.36 
5.16 
5.23 
5.05 
5.46 
5.60 
6.66 

5.61 

S.78 
5.64 
5.75 
5.67 

' '5. '50 
5.36 
5.72 
6.29 

5.69 

5.68 
6.76 
6.71 
6.48 
6.30 
5.98 
5.73 
5.89 


United States 
North Atlantic Div.. 
Maine 


12,690,152 
3,712,242 

150,355 
87,348 
75,869 
479,790 
75,010 
lfe,89C 
1,308.015 
308.339 
1,061,626 

1,687,767 

*4,578 
202,179 
43,967 
304,673 
140,a59 
30(5,952 

8& 

80;059 
4,598,605 

-785,291 
467,146 
778,015 
455,004 
335,456 
247,975 
388,517 
528,29o 
38,478 
70,250 
206,820 
297,358 

2,071,120 

354,463 
334,194 
287,292 
241.148 
214,123 
411,251 
15.029 
21.'5,6;0 

620,418 

27.501 
12.065 
84,271 
35,504 
13,495 
38,816 
10,170 
18.113 
70,977 
63,791 
245,710 


9,945,916 
3,023,741 

141,843 
80,286 
73,092 
379,710 
60,259 
136,885 
1,078,905 
232,309 
840,452 

1,463,361 

28,253 
176,318 
34,896 
282,355 
111.732 
270,994 
1202.062 
303.0M) 
54,691 

3,389,OH 

641,907 
391,203 
591,934 
336.973 
251,530 
143,374 
310,894 
403, 18f 

\ *31,20d 
89.135 
197,679 

l,697,55t 

302,631 
286,539 
248,961 
215,055 
192,838 
297,259 

""] 54,275 
372.247 

9,931 

4,604 
41,260 
28.255 
9,536 
28,373 
15,158 
7,774 
16,380 
33,468 
177,508 


7,579,363 
2,497,494 

131,017 
72,144 
70,462 
805,534 
46,133 
114,981 
898,772 
183,043 
675,408 

1,132,621 

22,900 
140,078 
25,276 
231,574 
78.474 
205,970 
1151,105 
237,850 
39,394 

2,480,311 

521,981 
320,160 
474,533 
24l,00ti 
200,155 
82,471 
222,430 
316,917 

3,090 
25,075 
72,493 

1,242,411 

232.797 
231,365 
202.704 
166,828 
158,099 
154,483 

"'96,135 
226,526 

7,058 
2,248 
9.358 
21,449 
2,290 
17,210 
9.881 
4,104 
5,673 
18.501 
128,752 


5,210,934 
2,048,315 

120,863 
69,018 
63,781 
251,287 
35,209 
94,831 
758,420 
130,348 
524,558 

652,396 

18,9fi6 
110278 
12,888 
201,523 


3,598,240 
1,582,978 

103,333 
62,287 
58,573 
192,675 
28,216 
73,448 
566,869 
89,080 
408,497 

537,857 

15,439 
87,384 
8.343 
167,530 


4.94 
4.69 

4.40 
4.31 
4.38 
4.67 
4.61 
4.50 
4.59 
4.69 
4.95 

5. 25 

4.87 
5.16 
5.24 
5.44 
5 43 
5.27 
5. IP 
5.22 
4.89 

4.8 r 

4.68 
4.69 
4.92 
4.60 
5.03 
5.25 
14.92 
5.07 
U.75 
(4.68 
5.12 
4.80 

5.30 

5.24 

5.29 
5.27 
5.35 
5.23 
5.44 
4.11 
5.28 

4.88 
4 81 


5.04 
4.80 

4.58 
4.32 
4.55 
4.70 
4.59 
4.55 
4.71 
4.87 
5.10 

5.19 

5.19 
5.33 
5.09 
5.36 
5.54 
5.17 
4.93 
5.09 
4.93 

5.12 

4.98 
5.06 
5.20 
4.86 
5.23 
5.45 
5.23 
5.38 
*4.33 

5.08 

5.04 

5.25 

5.45 
5.38 
5.07 
5.2fi 
4.87 
5.35 

' '5.'2fl 
4.75 
3 94 


5.09 
4.92 

4.78 
4.41 
.69 
.77 
.71 
.67 
.88 
.9^ 
5.21 

5.17 

5.46 
5.57 
5.21 
5.29 
5.63 
5.20 
4.67 
4.98 
4.77 

5.23 

5.11 
5.25 
5.35 
4.91 
5.27 
5.33 
5.37 
6.43 

*4.59 
4.91 
5.03 

5.18 

6.67 
5.44 
4.92 
4.96 
4.61 
5.30 

' '5.'04 
4.8t 
2 92 


New Hampshire... 
Vermont 
Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 
New York 




Pennsylvania. 
South Atlantic Div.. 

Delaware 
Maryland 
District of Columbia 
Virginia 
West Virginia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia 
Florida 


125,090 
58,642 
109,919 
15,090 

1,683,190 

434.134 
248,664 
315.539 
144,761 
147,473 
37,319 
124,098 
192,073 

1,241 
5,931 
81,957 

684,024 

166.321 
149,335 
96,603 
63,015 
74,725 
76,781 

'"57,244 
143,009 


105,451 
52,937 
91,666 
91107 

934,873 

348.514 
171,564 
149,153 
72,611 
57,608 
1,016 
33,517 
100,890 


North Central Div... 
Ohio 


Indiana 
Illinois 


Michigan 


Wisconsin 


Minnesota 




North Dakota 
South Dakota 
Nebraska 


5.70 

5.80 

5.87 
5.81 
5.69 
5.04 
5.44 

"s.ii 

4.18 


499,767 

- 182,920 
130,004 
73,786 
52,107 
54,112 
28,377 

'"28,46i 
42,765 


South Central Div. . . . 

Kentucky 
Tennessee 


Mississippi 


Texas 


Oklahoma 


Arkansas 
Western Division 


Wyoming 
Colorado 
New Mexico 







5.03 

89 


4.52 
4 71 


4.06 
4 26 






20,881 
'"9,666 


13,502 
'"2,322 


.33 
.42 
.36 
.50 


4.23 
4.24 
5.07 

4.11 


4.28 
4.22 
5.04 
4.30 


4.48 
4.' 96 


4.56 

"4.'90 


Utah 


Nevada 
Idaho 






.66 
.95 
.92 
.92 


4.19 
4.59 
5.22 
4.87 


3.65 
4.22 
4.91 
4.35 


"i.'ii 

4.74 
3.85 


"b'M 
3.77 




2,798 
11.063 
98,767 


2,374 
24,567 


Oregon 
California 


Dakota Territory. 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 35 


STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 

School enrollment as superior, secondary, elementary, and commercial schools, reported to 
July 1, 1891. [Subject to revision.] 


STATES AND TER- 
RITORIES. 


PUBLIC. 


PRIVATE (INCLUDING PAROCHIAL 
AND COMMERCIAL SCHOOLS). 


j 


l! 

I 


4 

K 

&* 


Element- 
ary, i 


~j 

1 


< 


If 


Element- 
ary. 


Commer- 
cial 

Xiiionls. 


United States 
North Atlantic Di v. . . . 
Maine 


12,728,417 
3,078.829 

140,650 
59,947 
66,720 
373,087 
52,974 
127,303 
1,049.952 
234,964 
973,232 

1,758,384 

t434 
' C.> 
906 
343,970 
194,356 
326,8(5 
203,980 
344,062 
91,723 

5,022,284 

793,093 
509,1355 
781,004 
430,665 
354,675 
284,368 

67J492 
241,446 
401,464 

2,349,614 

408.208 
456,242 
306,350 
351,919 
125,159 
477.320 
579 
223,837 

519,306 

16,980 
7J34 
66,173 
18,249 
7,861 
36,730 
7,524 
14,311 

*8 

63.987 
223,749 


45,840 
15,325 

837 
134 
1,112 
1,438 
200 
420 
6,141 
266 
4,779 

5,213 


277,049 
88,954 

15,299 
3.283 
2.432 
25,476 
1.728 
*4,063 
20,729 
t4.147 
til. 797 

24,350 

i9,124 
11,773 
382 
}7.210 

* 

115,402 

36,755 
t5,152 
17,902 
16,908 
10,634 
3,711 
t!74 
DOT 
B553 

m 

6.400 
8,168 

40,938 

2,098 
982 
966 
697 
1,306 
132.157 


12,405,528 
2,974,550 

124,514 

56.530 
63,176 
346,175 
51,046 
122.820 
1,023.082 
230,551 
956,656 

1,728,821 

31,106 
182,933 
35,059 
333,442 
191,699 
325,963 
196,343 
341,252 
91,024 

4,888,835 

760,947 
502,561 
761,566 
410,412 
341,868 
278,865 
490,093 
615,730 
35,061 
65,919 
234,319 
391,504 

2,304,087 

405,677 
454.750 
303,713 
350,581 
123,625 
444,264 
579 
220,598 

509,235 

16.853 
6.962 
64,041 
18,215 
7,833 
36.242 
7,088 
14.311 
9u? 
55,212 
63,032 
218,543 


U9M54 
468,573 

10,536 
10,053 
7,239 
66,423 
10,954 
24,126 
185.764 
43,658 
109,820 

179,111 

2,837 
26,879 
8,755 
19,558 
5,067 
40,656 
19,454 
50,143 
5,762 

563,845 

99.816 
44,218 
111,193 
48,385 
72,947 
40,779 
43,287 
61,362 
2,402 
3,611 
15,085 
20,760 

212,316 

40.559 
49,733 
24,445 
24,164 

28,379 
30,524 
1,203 
13,309 

67,309 

g 

7,228 
4,984 
987 
10,880 
456 
1,104 
730 
4,371 
4,689 
30,046 


99,565 
36,268 

1,140 

493 
483 
8,018 
684 
1,939 
12,646 
1,839 
9,026 

12,394 

82 
3,359 
1.388 
2.043 

yo 

2,090 
997 
2,010 
65 

33,815 

11.001 
2,569 

7,787 

'a 

1,034 
2.837 
4,676 
31 
154 
416 
859 

14,381 

4,043 
3.957 
1,433 
1,152 
1,512 
2,117 

""i67 
2,707 
17 

198 

16 

""277 


277,241 
72,682 

3,057 
2.097 
2,642 
8,273 
1,608 
2,737 
27,573 
6,308 
18,387 

39,256 

482 
4,394 
2;i21 
6,06? 
1,293 
10,361 
6,084 
7,087 
1,367 

83,02^ 

18,554 
8,814 
11,287 
4,126 
3,365 
3,579 
11,565 
11,774 
405 
1,010 
1,772 
6,772 

61,627 

10,082 
17,481 
6,456 
7,006 
6,868 
10,126 
53 
3,555 

20.653 

449 
134 
2,338 
1,65 
225 
2,180 
79 
259 

'"2,247 
2.031 
9,054 


1,034,382 
333,413 

5,288 
7,357 
4,006 
46,518 
7,775 
18,603 
136.354 

123,292 

2.273 
17,622 
4,243 
11,043 
2,995 
28,205 
12,373 
40,208 
4,330 

408,152 

61.051 
30,370 
86.535 
38,848 
66,736 
34.217 
25,021 
40,164 
1,891 
2^88 
10,529 
10,502 

129,983 

25,402 
27,253 
16,359 
15,626 
19.269 
15.798 
1,150 
9,126 

39,542 

552 

197 
4,101 
8,311 
720 
8,340 
377 
8(5 
730 
1,634 
2.210 
16,525 


79,966 
26,210 

1,051 
106 
108 
3,614 
887 
847 
9,191 
2,007 
8,399 

4,169 

"T,504 
1,003 
405 
419 


;N ew Hampshire 
Vermont 


Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 
New York 
New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 

South Atlantic Div.. . . 
Delaware 


Maryland 


7 U 
MS 

550 
427 
883 
234 

18,047 

891 
1,652 
1,536 
3,345 
2,173 

s 
^ 

625 
727 
1,792 

4,539 

433 
510 
1,671 
641 
228 
899 


District of Columbia 
Virginia 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia 


838 


Florida 


North Central Div. . . 
Ohio 


38,855 

9,210 
2,465 
5,584 
3,840 
1966 
1,949 
3,864 
4,748 
75 
159 
2.3C8 
2,627 

6,325 

1,032 
1,042 
197 

380 
730 
2,483 

" '461 

4,407 
485 
""69i 

42 
83 

""424 

84 
2,698 


Indiana 


Illinois 


Michigan 






Missouri . . . 


North Dakota 
South Dakota 
Nebraska 


Kansas 


South Central Div 
Kentucky 






Mississippi 


Texas 
Oklahoma 
Arkansas 


157 
2,716 


2,782 
7,355 

127 
133 

'I? 

""iis 

363 


Western Div 
Montana 




39 

as 

17 
28 
70 
73 


Colorado 
New Mexico 
Arizona 


Utah 


Nevada 


Idaho 


Alaska 
Washington 
Oregon 






' ' ' "66 
364 
1,769 


oi 

62 
1,519 


427 
393 
3,6,7 


California 




Partly estimated. fPartial reports. ^Reported studying "higher branches." Ilncluding 
those reported studying either algebra or geometry. In Greer country, claimed by Texas. 



36 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


STATISTICS OF EDUCATION. 

Parochial schools, by states and communions, In the census year, reported to July 1, 1891. 
[Subject to revision.] 


STATES AND TER- 
RITORIES. 


737182 
272890 

ti 

3,071 
38,240 
6,995 
15,380 
109522 
27,827 
61,921 

27.534 

1,711 

14,288 
3,252 
2,240 
1,519 
1,539 
658 
934 
1.393 

383587 

60,552 

-V..SI7 
81,638 
37.328 
65,043 
33.266 
23,099 
33,622 
1.803 
2,179 
9,567 
9,183 

36,667 

13,258 
2,391 
1,150 
2,237 
10.339 
5,120 
2,172 

16,504 

384 
191 
2,493 
571 
518 
666 
325 
914 
616 
9,826 


3 
1 

567555 
253462 

4,015 
5,879 
3,071 
38.071 
6,965 
14,808 
98,551 
26,176 
55,926 

23,077 

1,711 

12,964 
3,050 
1,630 
1,354 
308 
410 
380 
1,270 

243342 

51,790 

17,467 
52.548 
24,007 
36,797 
14,060 
13,365 
22,921 
245 
641 
3,778 
5,723 

32,270 

12,777 

2 -?i? 

2,064 
8,890 
3,76* 
1,716 

15,404 

350 
191 
2,410 
571 
518 
383 
325 
672 
499 
9,485 


Lutheran. 


1 

^ 


** Pro estant Episco- 
I \ Pot- 


1 

241 
61 


| 
I 

g! 
|| 

fc 


German Presbyte- 
rian. 


Holland Christian 
Reformed. 


Mennonite. 


1 Moravian or United 
Brethren. 


Dutch Reformed. 


United States. 


141388 
13,716 


15,218 
1,615 


2,190 
484 


1,160 
536 


1,311 


610 


341 
303 


North Atlantic Div 
Maine 






New Hampshire 
Vermont 


40 




































93 
"30 
514 
8,293 
776 
3,970 

1,271 


'"955 
"'660 








76 










Rhode Island 
Connecticut 
New York 














to 
1,446 
259 
792 

2,808 
















' "ei 

180 


148 
30 
306 


79 
333 
98 

148 








3 


New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 

South Atlantic Div 
Delaware 








'm 

50 


Marvland 


760 
53 




564 
















District of Columbia.. 
Virginia 




149 



















503 
35 
















West Virginia 
North Carolina 
South Carolina 
Georgia . 


















998 












50 






68 
491 


180 


















1,629 


359 










Florida. . . . 


38 
122463 

8,145 
7,713 
24,203 
11,503 
26,394 
18,305 
8,427 
6,756 
1,535 
1,457 
5,193 
2,832 

3,316 

188 

1,213 
1,155 
434 

622 


13,235 

617 

772 
4,135 
636 
1,133 
738 
903 

*g 


554 











North Central Div 
Ohio 


1,311 


610 


46 


38 


99 
212 




256 










""38 


Illinois 




229 
73 


71 


202 
1 109 







Michigan 


Wisconsin 


130 
:- 




fS 


24 










Minnesota 






46 




Iowa 
Missouri 




'S 


168 
18 




35 














North Dakota 
South Dakota 














20 










61 


Nebraska 


260 
159 

368 

38 






213 


78 




45 




Kansas . 








469 




South Central Div 
Kentucky 


620 
255 




26 


67 




















Alabama 




279 
















Mississippi 




50 
















Louisiana 


169 
161 






* 


67 










Texas 


14 
22 




26 




















Western Div 
Montana 




427 




51 




- 








34 
































83 


















New Mexico 






































Utah 


12 




271 
















Nevada 
















Washington 


120 
66 
341 




122 
















Oregon 
California 


51 

































CHILDREN OF SCHOOL AGE. 37 


CHILDREN OF SCHOOL AGE. 

Aggregate number of persons from 5 to 20 years, both inclusive. [Census of 1890.] 


STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


All Classes. 


Native Born. 


Foreign Born. 


r 


Total Colored. 


United States 


22,447,392 

5,481,205 

201,851 
106,611 
101,457 
650,870 
105,534 
221,245 

l,79l',710 

3,581,513 

57,496 
370,892 
74,176 
671,779 

771,027 
155,676 

7,949,333 

1,271,031 

785,172 
1,323,030 
703,684 
603,846 
454,804 
701,182 
1,008,935 
59,324 
113,900 
384.255 
540,170 

4,523,731 

727,061 
72(1,872 
639,494 
559,101 
455,234 
924,142 
21,642 
476,185 

911,610 
30,240 

1 13^150 
52,543 
18,284 
79,937 
12,391 
27,257 
97,863 
103,365 
360,289 


21,103,353 

4,887,970 

183,478 
87,891 
94,641 
537,974 
84,507 
192,834 
1,623,488 
417,457 
1,665,700 

3,557,501 

55,834 
380,303 
72,870 
670,050 
303,775 
672.954 

769!885 
150,922 

7,344,397 

1,217,414 
771,433 

1,198,449 
606,436 

375,170 

986,747 
40,057 
96,416 
347,072 
518,164 

4,481,704 

722,697 
718,790 
637,445 
558,678 
451,712 
896,771 
21,337 
474,274 

831,781 

25,896 
14,196 
103,345 
51,228 
14,806 
72,982 
11,668 
25,553 
86,771 
97,208' 
828,128 


1,344,039 
593,235 

1121896 
21,027 
28,411 

2 I?:! 

126,010 

24,012 

1,662 
10,589 
1,306 
1,729 
1,894 
451 
485 
1,142 
4,754 

604,936 

tta 
739 
124,581 
97,248 
73,129 
79,634 
44,860 
22,188 
19,267 
17,484 
37,183 
22,006 

42,027 

4,364 
2,082 
2,049 
423 
3,522 
27,371 
305 
1,911 

79,829 

4,344 
2,095 
9,805 
1,315 
3,478 
6,955 
723 
1,704 
11,092 
6,157 
32,161 


19,250,565 

5,398,070 

201^11 
108,380 

101,120 
644,404 
103,393 
217,416 
1,816,489 
449,797 
1,757,760 

2,161,370 

46,941 

288,237 
47,557 
394,332 
292.820 
420,897 

SIS 

851967 

7,784,863 

1,240,823 
768,625 
1,303,549 
696,678 

601,390 
452.897 
697,416 
950,879 
59,121 
113,407 
380,294 
519,784 

3,020,730 

620,144 
538.36JL 
342,741 
227,064 
221,301 
707,828 
20,596 
342,695 

885,532 

29,545 
16,083 
111,463 
48,658 
17,389 
79,575 
11,191 
27,056 
95,819 
102,046 
846,707 


3,196337 

83,135 

540 
231 
337 
6,466 
2,141 
3,829 
20,446 
15,195 
33,950 

1,420,143 

10,555 

82,655 
26,619 
277,447 
12,849 
252,508 
313,249 
374,552 
69,109 

164,470 

30,208 
16,547 
19,481 
7,006 
21456 
1,907 
3,766 

" 

493 
3,961 
20,386 

1,503,001 

106,917 
182,511 
296,753 
332,037 
233,933 
216,314 
1,046 
133,490 

26,078 

695 

208 

yen 

s -a, 

362 

"* 

f;iS 

18,582 


North Atlantic Division 
Maine 


New Hampshire 


Vermont 


Massachusetts 






New York 


New Jersey 


Pennsylvania 

South Atl antic Div i sion 
Delaware 


Maryland 


District of Columbia 


Virginia 




North Carolina 


South Carolina 


Georgia 


Florida 


North Central Division . . 


Ohio 




Illinois 


Michigan 




Minnesota 


Iowa 


Missouri 
North Dakota 








South Central Division 




Alabama 


Mississippi ^... 














Wyoming 
Colorado 






Utah 


Nevada . . . 


Idaho 


Washington 


Oregon , 
California 



38 CHICAGO DA1LT NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


MILITIA AGES-MALES 18 TO 44 YEARS. 

[Census of 1890.J 

The following table gives, by states and territories, the number of males of the militia 
ages, that is. from 18 to 44 years, both Inclusive, classified by native and foreign born, and by 
white and colored, as follows: 


STATES AND TERRITORIES. 




All Classes. 


1 

Native 
Born. 


Foreign 
Born. 


Aa ws e 


Total 
Colortd. 


United States 


13,230,168 
3,798,522 

133,169 
79,878 
67,203 
499,312 
75,317 
163.866 
1,325,619 
313,683 
1,140,476 

1,617,981 

36,076 
205,816 
47,623 
295,340 
117,334 
273,834 
196,059 
336.295 
79,604 

4,835,926 

767,975 
455,823 
852,635 
4*52,765 
347,469 
304,268 
399,687 
566,448 
48,608 
79,219 
255,665 
295,364 

2,061,560 

361,137 
824,214 
265,025 
228,7<;4 
205,215 
447,413 
15.084 
214,708 

916,179 

55,490 
24,614 
140,441 
36.065 
19,226 
45,139 
14,606 
24,088 
124.860 
8S.049 
343,001 


10,424,086 

2,677,078 

112,305 
59,193 
55,435 
314,684 
46,347 
110,580 
885,128 
218,112 
875,294 

1,563,647 

32,334 

184,005 
43,458 
289,863 
142,640 
272,786 
194,444 
332,267 
71,850 

3,648,599 

652,587 
423,785 
599,307 
295,122 
208,209 
148,691 
311808 
502,201 
18,398 
47,903 

1,968,044 

347,924 
318,394 
260,20!) 
2-26,314 
193,147 
397,893 
13,990 
210,173 

566,718 

30,618 
16,897 
100,193 
31.287 
11,383 
30,064 
7,512 
16,817 
77,096 
60.497 
184,354 


2,806,082 
1,121,444 

20.864 
20,685 
11,768 
184,628 
28.970 
53,285 
440,491 
95,571 
265,182 

54,334 

3,742 
21,811 
4,165 
5,477 
4,694 
1,048 
1,615 
4,028 
7,754 

1,187,327 

115,388 
321038 
2.53,328 
167,643 
139,260 
155,577 
87,879 
64,247 
30,210 
31.316 
68,939 
41,502 

93,516 

13,213 
5,820 
4,816 
2,450 
12,068 
49,520 
1,094 
4,535 

349,461 

24,872 
7,717 
40,248 
4,778 
7,843 
15,075 
7,094 
7,871 
47,764 
27,552 
158,047 


11,803,964 
3,724,649 

132.688 
79,685 
66,956 
492,707 
73.588 
160,770 
1,305,633 
301,741 
1,110,881 

1,061,556 

30,081 
164,862 
32,883 
191.440 
138,771 
188,104 
85,088 
183,684 
46,643 

4,733,348 

747,748 
445,292 
837,597 
457.992 
346,058 
302,457 
397,013 
534,225 
48,429 
78,774 
251,741 
286,022 

1,456,800 

309,360 
249.595 
153,738 

100,864 
108,179 
862,829 
14,480 
157,755 

827,611 

52,679 
28,716 
137,122 
33,130 
16,842 
44,138 
11,625 
23,594 
120,609 
79,972 
284,184 


1,426,204 
73,873 

481 
193 
247 
6,605 
1,729 
3,095 
19,986 
11,942 
29,595 

556,425 

5,995 
40.954 
14,740 
103,900 
8,563 
85,730 
110,971 
152,611 
32,961 

102,578 

20,227 
10.531 
15,038 
4,773 
1,411 
1,811 
2,674 
32,223 
179 
445 
3,924 
9,342 

604,760 

51,777 
74,619 
111,287 
127,900 
97,036 
84,584 
604 
56,953 

88,568 

2,811 
898 
3,319 
2,935 
2.384 
1,001 
2,981 
1,094 
4,251 
8,077 
58,817 


North Atlantic Division 


Maine 






Massachusetts . . . 


Rhode Island 


Connecticut. . .. 


NewYork 


New Jersey 




South Atlantic Division 
Delaware 


Maryland 
District of Columbia 


Virginia 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 


South Carolina 


Georgia ... 


Florida 


North Central Division 
Ohio 




Illinois 


Michigan 


Wisconsin 






Missouri 


North Dakota. 


South Dakota 


Nebraska 


Kansas 


South Central Division 


Kentucky 


Tennessee. 


Alabama 


Mississippi 


Louisiana 


Texas 


Oklahoma. .. . .... 


Arkansas. 


Western Division 






Colorado 


New Mexico. 


Arizona 
Utah 




Idaho 


Washington . . 


Oregon 
California 



NATIONAL NOMINATING CONVENTIONS. 39 


POPULATION ACCORDING TO DENSITY--1890. 

The following table presents In detailed form, by states, the extent of settled area and the 
area in each of the density groups. Areas in square inilea of the different classes of settle- 
ment in 1890, by states. 


STATES AXD TERRITORIES. 


Total 
area of 
setW'm't. 


2 to 6 to 
sq.mile. 


6 to Mto 
sq.mile. 


18 to 45 to 
sq.mile. 


45 to 90 to 
sq.mile. 


Above 90 
to sq. 
mile. 


Total . . . 


1,947,285 
51,540 
24,645 
53,045 
96,604 

Kg 

,,960 

41,070 
58,980 
39,143 
56,000 
35,910 
55,475 
80,971 
40,000 
45,420 
25,729 
9,860 
8,040 
57,430 
56,259 
46,340 
68,735 
46,796 
63,061 
11,948 
8,828 
7^455 


592,037 


393,943 
9,472 


701,845 
37,717 


235,148 
4,351 


24,312 


Alabama 




24,645 


! Arkansas 


23,212 

28,716 
9,439 


29,833 
10,181 
1,243 






California 


57,657 
57,810 




50 


Colorado 




Connecticut 


4,072 
1,150 


773 
""65 


Delaware 






810 


District of Columbia. ... 






Florida 


18,688 
1,166 
37,233 


20,451 
16,153 
1,910 


1,931 
35,040 




Georgia 


6,621 




Idaho 




Illinois 


41,890 
12,484 
50,167 
32,449 
25,1,9 
18,319 
6,703 
2,900 
959 
16,844 
20,622 
35,502 
52,765 


14,110 
23.426 
1,062 
1,109 
12,491 
816 
2,806 
6,123 
4,149 
13,806 

83l 

1,030 





Indiana 






Iowa 




8 

1,643 
18,490 
6,596 






24,920 






717 
187 


Louisiana 


7,608 
9,624 


Maine . ... 


Maryland . ... 


J 


! Massachusetts 






Michigan 


12,349 

9,871 


13,651 
25,766 
10,007 
14,892 
855 
17,040 
1,208 
886 


Minnesota 


Mississippi 


Missouri 




48 




45,941 
26,801 
10.022 

708 


Nebraska 


19 fg 

5,245 
1,550 






Nevada 






New Hampshire 


3l055 


'"2,856 


I New Jersey 


New Mexico 


45,589 
46,580 

88 


46,189 
44,985 
1,085 
30,170 
43,848 
41J50 


35,625 
1,427 

'"17,886 


9,064 

1,887 
6,313 
9,138 


New York 


13.172 
38,060 


28.266 
4,207 


1,828 


North Carolina 


North Dakota. 




Ohio 


s 

2,047 
10,617 


87,744 


1,400 


Oklahoma. 






Oregon 


39,124 


5,018 








23,692 
320 
6,241 


10,676 
765 


j Rhode Island 






South Carolina 


'"19,843 


369 
23,150 
4,114 
40,813 

6 
ASS 

9190 
14,360 


23,560 
1,355 
24,985 

Kg 

41 

1LW 

20,672 


South Dakota. 




Tennessee 


12,651 




I Texas . 


150,810 
27,580 
9,135 


69,755 
20,421 




! Utah 






i Vermont 


918 
7,121 





Virginia 


SI 

24,645 
61,148 
22,852 


"'22,262 

8,4i6 

22,852 






West Virginia 


3,689 
7,302 




i Wisconsin. 


404 


I Wyoming 


Up to and including 1880 the country had a frontier of settlement, but at present the unset- 
tled area has been so broken into by isolated bodies of settlement that there can hardly be said 
to be a frontier line. 


NATIONAL NOMINAl 

Synopsis of all presidential nomic 
It is not necessary to go very lar back In our 
history to find the origin of our nominating 
conventions. The constitution of the United 
States provided only for the election of the 
president and vice-president, and the idea 
was that electors should be chosen by the 
people of the states, who would not only name 
the candidate but elect him to his high office. 
In the choice of our first president this idea 
was for the first and only time carried out, 
and without being nominated Washington 
was chosen president by the first electoral 
college of tha country. The number of elect- 
oral votes cast in 1789 was 69, all of which 
were cast for Washington. John Adams 


ING CONVENTIONS. 

ating conventiono from 1789 to 1893. 
received the next highest number, 34, and 
was declared vice-president. During the next 
four years the number of electoral votes in- 
creased very largely, being 132 at the second 
presidential election. All of these were cast 
for Washington, while John Adams received 
77 votes for the vice-presidency. The retire- 
ment of Washington in 17911-7 opened the doors 
for a host of presidential candidates, there 
being no other man whom the people could 
unite on with so much unanimity. Upon open- 
ing the returns for the election of Washing- 
ton's successor for the term beginning March 
4, 1797, there were found to be no less than thir- 
teen distinguished names among those voted 



40 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



for for the presidential office. These were 
John Adams, Jefferson, Thomas Pinckney, 
Burr, Samuel Adama, Ellsworth, Jay, Clinton, 
Johnstoue, Iredell, Henry, C. C. Pinckney 
and Washington. At this election the number 
of electoral votes had increased to 139, of 
which John Adams received 71 and Thomas 
Jefferson the next highest number, 68. 

1800. 

The era of "republican simplicity" was now 
passing away. The gratitude that impelled 
the unanimous election of Washington was 
felt in regard to no other man, and the ac- 
knowledged leadership which put forward 
Adams and Jefferson as the two candidates In 
the third general election was no longer rec- 
ognized. Hence the date 1800 became an era 
in our political history, as It was the time of 
the institution of the nominating caucus. 
This congressional caucus, which enjoys the 
honor of being the first, was held In Phila- 
delphia during the year, and after a good deal 
of discussion resulted in the nomination of 
Jefferson for president and Burr for vice- 
president. The presidential contest this year 
was between these two on one side and Adams 
and Pinckney on the other. The electoral vote 
was 138, and stood 73 each for Jefferson and 
Burr, 65 for Adams, 64 for Ptnckney, and 1 f or 
John Jay No choice was made and the elec- 
tion went to the house of representatives, 
which, after balloting thirty-six times, during 
six days, resulted in the election of Jefferson 
and Burr. In 1804 the contest lay between 
Jefferson and Pinckney for president and 
Clinton and King, both of New York, for vice- 
president. Though there must have been a 
caucus nomination there is no record of such 
an event. The electoral vote was 176, of 
which Jefferson and King received 162 and 
Pinckney and Clinton 14. 

1808. 

Toward the close of Jefferson's administra- 
tion the legislature of Virginia fell into dis- 
cord in regard to the respective claims of 
Madison and Monrpe for the next presidential 
term and a republican congressional caucus 
was held in Washington in January, 1808, to 
decide which should be nominated. There 
were 136 republican members of congress, of 
whom 94 attended the caucus and agreed to 
nominate Madison. No record exists of the 
manner in which the opposition made their 
nominations, but the opposing candidate was 
Pinckney. The electoral vote was 175, of 
which Madison received 122, Pinckney 47, and 

linton 6. The latter for vice-president re- 
ceived 113 ballots, the scattering votes being 
divided among a number of rival aspirants. 

1812. 

In May, 1812, a congressional caucus nomi- 
nated Madison for a second term. This year 
however, memorable for the first feeble atr 
tempt at a nominating convention. The op- 
position had been growing in strength and 
called a convention to meet in New York in 
September, 1812. Eleven states were repre- 
sented at this first convention, and DeWitt 

linton of New York was placed in nomina- 
tion, a movement which received the warm- 

st support from the legislature of that state. 
The records do not show that any candidate 
for vice-president was nominated at this con- 
vention. The election resulted in the choice 
of Madison. The electoral vote numbered 217, 
of which Madison, for president, received 128 
and Clinton 89, while for vice-president Gerry 
received 131 and Ingersoll 86. Madison en- 
tered upon his second term March 4, 1813, but 
there is no record of his having taken the oath 
of office. 



1816. 

In 1816, just before the close of Madison's 
second term, the republican congressional 
caucus again met and nominated James Mon- 
roe for president. There were 119 votes in the 
caucus, of which Monroe received 65 and 
Crawford of Georgia 54. The opposition fed- 
eralists were considerably disorganized at this 
time, since no record exists of any nomina- 
tion, though their ticket was represented by 
Rufus King of New York. It hardly seems 
possible for a convention to have been held of 
which no records remain, and the more rea- 
sonable supposition is that King presented 
himself as a candidate at the request of his 
friends. His efforts were in vain, for he was 
badly beaten. The number of electoral votes 
cast at the election was 217, of which Monroe 
received 183 and King 34. The contest for vice- 
president was more lively, as five candidates 
contested the election. Harper received 4 
votes, Ross 5, Marshall 4, Howard 22 and 
Tompkins 183. 

1820. 

In 1820 the federalists were so much scat- 
tered and so unable to rally their forces that 
in effect no opposition was made to the nomi- 
nation or election of Monroe to his second 
term. The electoral vote numbered 235, of 
which Monroe received 231 and John Quincy 
Adams received 1. As before, five men en- 
tered the lists for the vice-presidency. Harper 
and Rush each received 1 vote, Rodney 4, 
Stockton 8, and Tompkins 218. 

1824. 

In 1824 the caucus feature began to be very 
displeasing to the republicans in general and 
great numbers of them gave previous notice 
that they would not be governed by the dic- 
tates of the caucus. There were at this time 
216 members of congress who were counted as 
republicans, yet the caucus which nominated 
Crawford was composed of only sixty-six 
members, and in consequence of the slim at- 
tendance and the non-concurrence of the party 
the nomination of Crawford was very gener- 
ally repudiated by the republicans. Three 
other candidates were brought into the field 
by legislative and popular nominations An- 
drew Jackson, John Q. Adams and Henry Clay 
while six nominations for the vice-presi- 
dency were made. The number of electoral 
votes in the contest of 1824 was 261, of which 
Jackson received 99, Adams 84, Crawford 41, 
and Clay 37. For vice-president Calhoun re- 
ceived 182 votes, Sandford 3'J, Macon 24, Jack- 
son 81, Clay 9, and Van Buren 2. No election 
having been made, the contest went to the 
house of representatives and Adams was 
elected by the vote of thirteen states. This 
"scrub race," as it was called, put an end to 
the caucus system. 

1828. 

As soon as the contest of 1824 was decided 
the legislature of Tennessee announced Jack- 
son as a candidate for the next term. He was 
opposed by Adams, but no record exists as to 
the manner of the latter's nomination. Cal- 
houn, Rush and Smith were candidates for the 
vice-presidency, but how they were desig- 
nated as such is not known. The contest was 
a spirited one, and resulted in Jackson's elec- 
tion by a large majority. There were 261 elect- 
oral votes, or which Jackson received 178 and 
Adams 83. For vice-president Calhoun re- 
ceived 171, Rush 83, and Smith 7. 

1832. 

We now come to what may properly be re- 
garded as the convention period of American 
politics, which has continued down to the 



NATIONAL NOMINATING CONVENTIONS. 



present time. The first regular national 
nominating convention of which any record 
can be found met in Philadelphia in Septem- 
ber, 1830. It was called the United States 
anti-masonic convention, and was composed 
of ninety-six delegates, \vho represented New 
York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont, 
Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, 
Delaware, Ohio, Maryland, and Michigan terri- 
tory. Francis Granger of New York was 
president, but no business was transacted 
except to issue a call for another convention 
of persons opposed to secret societies, to be 
held at Baltimore. In compliance with this 
call the national anti-masonic convention 
assembled at Baltimore Sept. 26, 1831. There 
were 112 delegates present, every state being 
represented, but only New York, Massachu- 
setts and Pennsylvania had the full number 
of delegates allowed. This movement had its 
origin in the excitement caused by the alleged 
killing of Morgan for disclosing the secrets of 
freemasonry. John C. Spencer of New York 
was chosen president. The convention nomi- 
nated William Wirt of Maryland for presi- 
dent, and Amos Bllmaker of Pennsylvania 
for vice-president. 

In May, 1832, the first national democratic 
convention was held in Baltimore. The party 
was entirely satisfied with Jackson, and there 
could be no organized opposition to his re- 
nomination, and so it was unanimously con- 
firmed by the convention. The real purpose 
of the convention was the nomination of a 
vice-presidential candidate, the party having 
fallen out with Calhoun. At this convention 
Gen. Robert Lucas of Ohio presided, and the 
regular proceedings began with the adoption 
of the famous two-thirds rule, which has been 
affirmed in every national democratic conven 
tion from that day to this. Delegates to the 
number of 313 were present. Martin Van 
Buren was nominated for vice-president, re- 
ceiving 203 votes. 

The republicans recognized the fact that 
conventions were to be the popular means for 
nomination of candidates, and accordingly 
met in convention at Baltimore Dec. 12, 1831. 
James Barbour was chosen president. There 
were 157 delegates present, representing 
seventeen states and the District of Columbia. 
No formal declaration of principles was made, 
but an address was published dealing with 
the shortcomings of Gen. Jackson, in which 
he and his administration were severely criti- 
cised. The unanimous vote of the convention 
was cast for Henry Clay as the candidate for 
the presidency, and for John Sergeant for 
vice-president. The address of the conven- 
tion recommended another convention of 
"young men of the republican party," and in 
pursuance thereof a convention was held May 
11, 1832, in Washington. William C. Johnson 
was chairman, but as the nominations of the 
party had been made the preceding autumn 
nothing was left for the convention to do ex- 
cept to pass resolutions, which it did, in favor 
of industrial protection and internal improve- 
ments, and against the rotation in office prin- 
ciple lately promulgated by Jackson. 

In the contest of 1832 there were twenty 
other candidates who ran without having 
regular party nominations. In the election 
the electoral votes numbered 288; for presi- 
dent Wirt received 7, Floyd 11, Henry Clay 
49, and Jackson 219. For vice-president 
Ellmaker received 7 votes. Lee 11, Wilkins 
30, Sergeant 49, and Van Buren 189. 
1836. 

The years 1835 and 1836 saw the convention 
system fairly under way. There were two 
nominating conventions held. The demo- 
cratic national convention assembled in 
Baltimore in May, with representatives from 



twenty-one states. Andrew Stevenson pre- 
sided and for the first time there was a long 
list of honorary vice-presidents. Only one 
ballot for the presidential nomination was 
taken, which resulted in the unanimous choice 
of Martin Van Buren. The ballot for vice- 
president resulted in 87 votes for Rives and 
178 for R. M. Johnson. No platform was 
adopted by the convention. 

A whig state convention held in Harrisburg, 
Pa., in the latter part of 1835, by acclamaticn 
nominated William Henry Harrison and 
Francis Granger for the national ticket, and a 
democratic anti-masonic convention held 
soon after in the same city ratified the nom- 
ination of Harrison, but substituted John 
Tyler in place of Granger for the vice-presi- 
dency. A number of other nominations were 
made by state legislatures and other bodies, 
whose records have been lost. There were in 
all five candidates for president and in the 
election Mangum received 11 votes, Webster 
14, White 26, Harrison 73, and Van Buren 176. 
For vice-president there were four candidates. 
Smith received 23 votes, Taylor 47, Granger 
77, and Johnson 147. 

1840. 

The years 1839 and 1840 saw three conven- 
tions, the first of which was also the first 
abolition convention ever held in the United 
States. Its session began at Warsaw, N. Y., 
Nov. 13, 1839, and lasted several days. Distinct 
abolition principles were announced in its 
platform and James G. Birney was nominated 
for president, Francis J. LeMoyne for vice- 
president. Although these candidates de- 
clined the nominations, they received 7,609 
votes in the northern states. 

The whig national conven tion met at Harris- 
burg, Pa., Dec. 4, 1839. Twenty-one states were 
represented by 254 delegates, and James 
Barbour presided. Balloting was carried on 
in the committee of the whole for several 
days, but no result was reached until the Scott 
delegates went over to Harrison. The first 
ballot in the convention resulted in 16 votes 
for Winfield Scott, 90 for Henry Clay, and 148 
for William Henry Harrison. There was no 
contest over the vice-presidency, John Tyler 
being the unanimous choice of the conven- 
tion. 

The national democratic convention assem- 
bled at Baltimore June 5, 1840. Delegates from 
twenty-one states were present and William 
Carroll presided. Van Buren was unani- 
mously nominated for president, but when the 
question of vice-president arose the dissen- 
sion was so serious that no choice was made, 
but the designation of a candidate was left 
to the people. In this election the number of 
electoral votes was 294, of which Van Buren 
received 60 and Harrison 234. There were four 
candidates for vice-president. Polk received 
1 vote, Tazewell 11, Johnson 48, and Tyler 
234. 

1844. 

The canvass of 1844 was preceded by three 
national conventions. The liberal party na- 
tional convention began at Buffalo, N. Y., 
Aug. 30, 1843. It was virtually the abolition 
party under a new name and adopted an ex- 
tended declaration of belief embodying the 

i principles of abolitionism afterward openly 
expressed by the republican party. Leicester 
King presided, and the nominees were James 
G. Birney for president and Thomas Morris 
for vice-president. 

The whig national convention assembled in 
Baltimore May 1, 1844, and was composed of 
delegates from every state in the union. Am- 

| brose Spencer was president and Henry Clay 
was nominated for president without a dis- 

1 senting voice. The choice of a vice-president 



i'2 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



was more difficult and three ballots were 
taken before a choice was made. On the last 
jallot Frelinghuysen received 155 votes, Davis 

I. and Fillmore 40. 

The democratic national convention met in 
Baltimore May 27, 1844. The two-thirds rule 
was responsible for the convention being a 
hot one. Nine ballots were taken, there De- 
ng f onr candidates on the first. Of the votes 
cast Van Buren received 146, Cass 93, Johnson 
29, and Buchanan 4. There was not much 
change in the balloting until the eighth, when 
Van Buren received 104. Cass 114, Buchanan 
2, Calhoun 2, and Polk 44. This was the first 
ballot in which Folk's name was mentioned. 
On the ninth ballot Polk received 233 votes, 
Van Buren 2, and Cass 29. Silas Wright was 
nominated for vice-president, but he declined 
and George M. Dallas was substituted. The 
result was the election of Polk, he receiving 
170 electoral votes and Clay 105. 

1848. 

Three conventions preceded the contest of 
this year. The democratic convention was 
beld in Baltimore May 27, 1848. There was 
considerable trouble at the outset with the 
credentials of the delegates who claimed 
recognition. New York sent two delegations. 
3ne commonly known as ''barnburners" and 
the other as "hunkers." The convention 
sought to please all by admitting both, but 
neither delegation was satisfied unless the 
others were excluded, and accordingly both 
withdrew. Andrew Stevenson presided. Four 
ballots were taken, the candidates being Cass, 
Woodbury, Buchanan, Calhoun, Dallas, | 
Worth and Butler. Cass began with 125 votes 
on the first ballot and ran up to 179 on the ! 
fourth, and was nominated. Three ballots 

ere taken for vice-president, on the first of 
which William O. Butler received 114 and 
Jefferson Davis 1, the remainder being scat- 
tered among several candidates. Butler 
gained on the second and was nominated on 
the third ballot. The "barnburners," who 
bolted the convention, were so incensed at the 
nomination of Cass and Butler that they 
called a convention at Utica.N. Y., June 22. 
Samuel Young presided, and Van Buren was 
made the nominee for president and Henry 
Dodge for vice-president. 

The whig national convention met in Phila- 
delphia June 7, 1848. John M. Morehead pre- 
sided. The candidates were Taylor, Clay, 
Scott, Webster, Clayton and McLean, and 
four ballots were taken. The number of votes 
was 270, and on the last ballot Taylor, who 
had started with 111, received 171, and was 
declared the nominee. Fillmore was nomi- 
nated on the second ballot for vice-president. 

Aug. 9, 1848, a free-soil convention assem- 
bled at Buffalo, having representatives from 
eighteen states. Charles Francis Adams pre- 
sided, and Van Buren and Adams were made 
the nominees of the convention. In a long 
platform the convention protested vigorously 
against the action of the whig and democratic 
conventions and demanded the freedom of 
the slaves in the style used later by the aboli- 
tionists. Nothing came of the movement and 



the greatest curiosities in American politics 
and s given complete: 



BALLOTS. 



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4 

5 

6 

7 



9 

10 

11 

12,.... 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

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20.... 

21 

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41 

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44 

45 

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48 

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The persistence of the solitary voter who 
voted forty-eight times for Daniel S.Dickinson 
and the introduction of Franklin Pierce's name 
on the thirty-fifth ballot, which resulted in 
nomination on the forty-ninth, has no paralle 
in the history of American political conven 
tions. William R. King was nominated on 
the second ballot for vice-president. 

The whigs met at Baltimore June 16 and an 
uproarious session of six days followed. There 
were no sudden or startling changes, as in the 



Van Buren and Adams received no votes at democratic convention, but the gain of the 
the fall election. The electoral vote in 1848 I successful candidate was slow and gradual 



was 290, of which Taylor secured 163, and Cass 
127. 

1852. 

The campaign of 1852 was a spirited one and 
opened in a spirited way. The democratic 
convention met in Baltimore June 1 and was 
presided over by John W. Davis of Indiana. 
There were ten candidates, and forty-nine 
ballots were taken before a candidate was 
nominated. Trie ballot sheet is called one of 



The candidates were Scott. Webster and Fill 
more and the number necessary to a choice 
was 147, Scott began with 131 votes and in 
creased his number slowly until the fifty 
third ballot, when he had 159. Fillmore began 
with 133 and ended with 112. Webster begac 
wi:h 29 and ended with 21. William A. Gra 
ham was nominated on the second ballot fo 
vice-president. 

The free-soil democrats held their con 
vention at Pittsburg Aug. 11, Henry Wil 



NATIONAL NOMINATING CONVENTIONS. 



43 



son presiding. All the free and several 
of the slave states were represented. 
John P. Hale and George W. Julian were 
nominated for president and vice-president 
respectively but at the subsequent election 
received no electoral votes. The number of 
electoral votes was 296 and of these Pierce 
and King received 254, while Scott and Graham 
received only 42. In this contest Pierce and 
King carried all the states except Tennessee, 
Kentucky, Massachusetts and Vermont. 

1856. 

Four conventions were held in 1856, The 
first in order was that of the American na- 
tional council which met in Philadelphia Feb. 
19 and was presided over by E. B. Bartlett. 
Three days were spent In adopting a platform, 
which was mainly a "know-nothing," anti- 
administration declaration. A president was 
nominated on the first ballot, which stood: 
Fillmore 179, Law 24, Raynor 14, McLean 13, 
Davis 10, and Houston 10. Andrew J. Donelson 
was nominated for vice-president on the first 
ballot. 

The democrats met at Cincinnati June 
2, John E. Ward presiding. Pro-slavery and 
state-rights resolutions of the strongest 
character were adopted and seventeen ballots 
were taken before a nomination was made. 
The candidates were Buchanan, Pierce, Cass 
and Douglas. Buchanan began with 135 
votes and gained steadily to 296, a unanimous 
nomination. Pierce began with 122 and fell 
off gradually until the last ballot. Douglas 
began with 33 votes, rose to 121, and on the 
last ballot had 3^ votes. The highest vote 
received by Cass was 7. Ten candidates 
sought the vice-presidential nomination, but 
on the second ballot all withdrew except 
Breckenridge, who was unanimously nom- 
inated. 

The first republican national convention 
assembled in Philadelphia June 17, Henry S. 
Lane of Indiana being chosen presiding 
officer. The platform was decidedly anti- 
slavery. An informal ballot for president was 
taken to test the preferences of the delegates, 
and showed 359 votes for John C. Fremont, 
against 1% for McLean. The nomination of 
Fremont was at once declared unanimous. 
An informal ballot for vice-president was 
taken, which resulted as follows: Henry C. 
Carey received 3 votes, S. C. Pomeroy 8, John 
A. King 9, Henry Wilson 9, A. C. M. Pennington 
1, N. P. Banks 46, W. F. Johnston 2, J. R. 
Giddings 2, Jacob Collamer 15, Cassius M. 

Slay 4, Charles Sumner 35, Thomas Ford 7. 
avid Wilmot 43, Abraham Lincoln 110, and 
William L. Dayton 259. The latter was unani- 
mously nominated, but this informal ballot 
will always be memorable as showing the 
popularity of Mr. Lincoln at this early day. 

The whigs met at Baltimore Sept. 17, 
Edward Bates presiding. The platform dep- 
recated the reign of strong partisan feeling 
and advocated peace and quiet. Fillmore 
and Donelson were unanimously nominated, 
but in the subsequent election carried only 
Maryland. 

Of the 296 electoral votes Buchanan and 
Breckenridge received 174, Fremont and Day- 
ton 114, and Fillmore and Donelson 8. 

1860. 

The year 1860 marks a new era in American 
politics and the conventions of this year 
show the great upheaval that had taken place 
In the minds of the people. An account of 
the conventions of this year is given more in 
detail for this reason. The national demo- 
cratic convention met at Charleston April 23. 



Every state in the union was represented by 
full delegations, but the party dissensions in 
Illinois and New York caused the sending of 
two delegations from each of these states, 
^rancis B. Flournoy was chosen temporary 
chairman. The exclusion of the "Wood 5 ' 
delegation from New York and the admission 
of the Douglas delegation from Illinois In- 
flamed the southern members of the conven- 
tion at the very start and much angry debate 
followed. Caleb Cushing was chosen perma- 
nent chairman and a platform committee 
was selected, it being insisted that a platform 
was necessary before a candidate was nomi- 
nated. The platform committee wrangled 
four days and were unable to agree and ac- 
cordingly four platforms were submitted to 
the convention from which to select one. The 
platform presented by the majority of the 
committee declared "that congress had no 
power to abolish slavery in the territories; 
that the territorial legislature had no power 
to abolish slavery in the territories, nor to 
prohibit the introduction of slavery therein, 
nor any power to destroy or impair the right 
of property in slaves by any legislation what- 
ever;" and "that it is the duty of the federal 
government to protect the right of persons 
and property on the high seas, in the terri- 
tories or whereve/ else its jurisdiction ex- 
tends." These ultra pro-slavery declarations 
were dissented from by others of the com- 
mittee who, headed by Henry B. Payne, 
brought in a minority report, reaffirming the 
Cincinnati platform of 1856, which advocated 
the non-interference of congress with slavery 
in the territories and declared that slavery 
was a question of property as such should be 
decided by the Supreme court and pledged 
the democracy to abide by the decision of 
that court. '1 his minority report was signed 
by members of the committee from Maine, 
New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, 
Connecticut, New Jersey, Ohio, Indiana, Illi- 
nois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, 
New York and Pennsylvania. A third report 
was presented by Gen. B. F. Butler, which in- 
dorsed the Cincinnati platform with some 
trivial alterations. A fourth report was pre- 
sented by J. A. Bayard, which also affirmed 
the Cincinnati platform with the proviso that 
all citizens had equal rights in the territories. 
These reports were all sent back to the com- 
mittee and on the next day Mr. Avery 
brought in a modified platform from the 
majority. This asserted the rights of the 
slave-holders in the territories and when a 
sufficient number of inhabitants were in any 
territory the same should be admitted as a 
state without taking the slavery question 
into consideration at all. The minority re- 
port was brought in by Mr. Samuels of Iowa 
and embodied the same measures that were 
urged by the three minority reports pre- 
viously submitted. The majority report was 
adopted by the convention by a vote of 165 to 
138. This action of the convention was bit- 
terly resented by the southern delegates and 
the delegation of Alabama offered a protest 
to the proceedings and afterward withdrew 
from the convention. The delegations from 
Florida, Mississippi and Texas followed the 
lead of Alabama. Parts of the delegations 
from Louisiana, South Carolina, Arkansas, 
Delaware and North Carolina also withdrew. 
After the withdrawal of these delegates the 
convention proceeded to ballot for president. 
The full convention contained 303 members, 
but a large number had withdrawn, so that a 
two-thirds vote of 202 members would be diffi- 
cult for any one candidate to secure. The 
two-thirds rule prevailed and the result was 
that no nomination was made at Charleston. 
Fifty-seven ballots were taken, however, the 
candidates being Douglas, Guthrie, Hunter. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



Dickinson, Andrew Johnson, Lane, Jefferson 
Davis, Toucy and Pierce. The candidate who 
bad the highest vote was Douglas, who re- 
ceived 152& The convention adjourned to 
meet at Baltimore on the 18th of June. At the 
appointed time full representations were pres- 
ent from all those states which had not with- 
drawn from the Charleston convention, and 
the delegations that ha-d left that convention 
were excluded from this. Enraged at this ex- 
clusion of the seceding delegates the delega- 
tions from Virginia, North Carolina, Tennes- 
see, California and Delaware, together with 
portions of the delegations from Maryland, 
Kentucky, Massachusetts and Missouri, re- 
tired from the convention. Mr. Cushing, the 
chairman, also retired and Gen. Todd of 
Ohio was chosen in his place. Balloting for 
president began, Douglas, Breckenridge and 
Guthrie being placed in nomination. Two 
ballots were taken. On the first Breckenridge 
received 5 Guthrie 10 and Douglas 173^. On 
the second Guthrie received 5^, Breckenridge 
7^i and Douglas 181^. After the second bal- 
lot Douglas was unanimously nominated. 
Fitzpatrick was nominated for vice-president, 
but declined, and Herschel V. Johnson of 
Georgia was substituted. 

The seceders from the Baltimore conven- 
tion met in that city June 28. In all, twenty- 
one states were fully or in part represented, 
but there were no delegates from Connecticut, 
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, New 
Hampshire, New Jersey, Ohio, Rhode Island, 
South Carolina or Wisconsin. Caleb Cushing 
presided. The two-thirds rule was adopted 
and the delegates who had been refused ad- 
mission to the regular convention were urged 
to unite with this body. The Avery platform, 
upon which the Charleston convention had 
split, was unanimously adopted. One ballot 
was taken for president, John C. Breckenridge 
receiving 105 votes, being the whole number 
of delegates present. Joseph Lane of Oregon 
was nominated on the first ballot for vice- 
president. 

The band of seceders from the Charleston 
convention met at Richmond June 11 and 
organized by choosing John Erwin as chair- 
man. Delegates were present from Alabama, 
Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, 
Georgia, South Carolina, Florida, Tennessee 
and Virginia. This convention did nothing 
more than ratify the nominations of Brecken- 
ridge and Lane made by the Baltimore 
seceders. 

A constitutional union convention was held 
at Baltimore May 9. It promulgated strictly 
union and constitutional principles. The 
candidates for president were John Bell, Sam 
Houston, John M. Butts, John McLean, J. J. 
Crittenden, Edward Everett, W. L. Goggin, 
W. A. Graham, W. L. Sharkey and W. C. 
Rives. Bell and Everett were unanimously 
nominated. 

The republican national convention met 
in Chicago May 1(>. It was called to order by 
David Wilmot and was composed of delegates 
from all the free states, together with repre- 
s -ntatives from Delaware, Maryland, Vir- 
ginia, Kentucky, Kansas, Nebraska and 
Missouri. George Ashmun of Massachusetts 
was chosen permanent chairman. The ma- 
jority rule in nominating candidates was 
adopted. The platform adopted boldly de- 
clared the condition to which the country had 
been reduced was due to the continued years 
of democratic rule and promulgated repub- 
lican doctrines in regard to slavery in the 
territories. The eighth plank in the platform 
was specially directed against slavery and 
declared it to be a shameless institution and 
that it should not be spread in the territories 



of the United States. The candidates for 
president were many, including Seward, 
Lincoln, Wade, Cameron, Bates, McLean, 
Reade, Chase. Dayton, Sumner, Fremont, 
Callamer, and C. M. Clay. The result of the 
balloting was as follows: 





1. 


2. 


3. 


Seward 


1731^ 


igii^ 


180 


Lincoln 


102 


181 


231^ 


Wade 


| 






Cameron 


5QU 






Bates 


y* 


35 


2 


McLean 


12 


g 


5 


Reade. 


1 






Chase 


49 


42U 


24 !*> 


Dayton 


14 


10 


1 


Sumner 








Fremont . 


1 






Callamer.. 


10 






Clay 




2 


1 



After the third ballot Lincoln lacked only 
2^ votes of a nomination. A change of 4 
votes in Ohio from Chase to Lincoln made his 
nomination assured. Changes rapidly fol- 
lowed until the nomination was made unani- 
mous. The balloting for vice-president was: 



Clay 

Banks 

Reeder 

Hickman 

Hamlin 

Read 

Davis, 

Dayton 

Houston 



" 



SS 



194 
1 



The whole number of electoral votes was 315, 
of which Lincoln and Hamlin received 180, 
Breckenridge and Lane 72, Bell and Everett 
39, and Douglas and Johnson 12. 

1864. 

The war was in progress in 1864 and the 
nominating conventions were few and devoid 
of any interest except such as arose from the 
question of preservation of the union. 

The republicans met in Baltimore June 7, 
William Dennison of Ohio presiding. 

There was a very full representation of 
delegates, many being admitted from the 
states actually in rebellion. The convention 
was unanimously in favor of Lincoln's re- 
nomination and on the first ballot he received 
497 votes, being the entire vote of the conven- 
tion except 22 votes from Missouri, which 
were given toGen.Grant. The vice-presidential 
candidates were Hamlin, L. H. Rosseau, D. S. 
Dickinson and Andrew Johnson. As the first 
ballot was taken every one perceived the 
great numerical strength of Johnson and he 
was nominated on the first ballot. 

The democrats met in Chicago Aug. 19. 
Horatio Seymour was the permanent presi- 
dent. The attendance of delegates was by no 
means full and little interest was manifested 
in the convention either by the people or the 
delegates. George B. McClellan was nomin- 
ated for president on the first ballot, receiv- 
ing 202}^ votes, while Seymour received 23^. 
The candidates for vice-president were Pen- 
dleton, Guthrie, D. W. Voorhees, G. W. Cass, 
August Dodge, J. D. Catron. Powell and 
Phelps. Before the second ballot all had 
withdra wn, leaving Mr. Pendleton a clear field, 
and he was nominated. The number of elect- 



NATIONAL NOMINATING CONVENTIONS. 



oral votes was 331 and of these Lincoln and 
Johnson received 212 and McClellan and Pen- 
dleton 21. 

1868. 

The republicans led off in the conventions 
of the year, meeting at Chicago May 20, with 
Gen. Hawley as presiding officer. There was 
only one sentiment in the party regarding a 
presidential candidate and Gen. Grant 
received every vote in the convention on the 
first ballot. For the vice-presidency there was 
more difference of opinion. Colfax, Wade, 
Hamlin, Fenton, Wilson, Curtin, Kelly, Har- 
lan, Pomeroy, Speid, and Cresswell all sought 
the nomination. Five ballots were taken and 
Colfax was unanimously nominated on the 
fifth. 

The democrats met in the city of New York 
on July 4. Horatio Seymour presided. There 
were a large number of aspirants for the 
presidential nomination, including Hancock, 
Hendricks, Seymour, English, Doolittle, John- 
son, Chase, McClellan, Field, Hoffman, Blair 
and Pendleton. Twenty-two ballots were 
taken and Seymour was nominated while 
seated in the chair guiding the deliberations 
of the convention. Frank P. Blair was nom- 
inated on the first ballot for vice-president. 

The number of electoral votes was 294, of 
hich Grant and Colfax received 214 and Sey- 
mour and Blair 80. 

1872. 

The first convention of the year was that of 
e national prohibition party. This party 
had been organized at a meeting called for 
that purpose at Chicago Sept. 1, 1869. The 
name first adopted was the anti-dramshop 
party, but before the meeting adjourned the 
name was changed. The party convention 
met at Columbus, O.. Feb. 22, 1872. The Rev. 
John Russell called the convention to order; 
the Hon. Henry Fish was chosen temporary 
and the Hon. S. P. Chase permanent chair- 
man. The platform declared for prohibition 
in the sale of intoxicating liquors and for 
suffrage without regard to "color, race, for- 
mer social condition, sex or nationality." 
The subject of nominations was referred to a 
committee of thirteen, who reported the 
name of James Black of Pennsylvania for 
president and that of the Rev. John Russell 
of Michigan for vice-president. 

The chief interest, however, In the cam- 
paign of 1882 centered in the liberal repub- 
lican movement. This movement originated 
n Missouri in 1870, its chief instigators being 
^arl Schurz and B. Gratz Brown. It consisted 
of moderate democrats and disgruntled re- 
publicans, who united in a state campaign in 
support of the "libera. ticket." A mass state 
convention was called by the republican wing 
of the party to meet at Jefferson City Jan 24 
1872, and at this meeting nearly every county 
n the state was represented It closed its 
proceedings by issuing a call for a national 
convention at Cincinnati on the first Monday 
n May "to take such action as their convic- 
tions of duty and of public exigencies may 
require." Jan. 9 the democratic state central 
committee of Missouri issued an address 
"avoring the making of no nominations in 
872 and the support of the candidate of 
;he disaffected republicans. On May 1 a 
large convention of liberal republicans as- 
sembled in Cincinnati and organized by mak- 
ng Carl Schurz of Missouri the permanent 
!hairman. A platform was adopted which 
was believed to be broad enough to accom- 
modate democrats as well as republicans. 
Without the formal naming of candidates the 



balloting for president began. Six ballots 
were taken, with the following result: 



BALLOTS. 



306 



IV.I 



14881 
15f>44 
141 

91 

19 



1()0 92fc 95 62 



Before the sixth ballot was announced Min- 
nesota changed 9 votes from Trumbull to 
Greeley. Pennsylvania changed her vote to 50 
for Greeley and 6 for Davis. Indiana changed 
her 27 19 Adams. Other changes followed and 
the chairman announced the result as 482 for 
Greeley and 187 for Adams. For vice-president 
B. Gratz Brown was nominated on the second 
ballot, receiving 495 against 175 for G. W. 
Julian, 75 for S. C. Walker, 3 for T. W. Tiptpn, 
and 8 for John M. Palmer. Many of the liberal 
republicans were dissatisfied with the nomina- 
tion of Greeley, and a meeting was held in 
New York May 30, composed of such persons. 
In compliance with the views of this meeting 
a conference was subsequently held on June 
20 of persons invited. The invitation to this 
conference was signed by Carl Schurz, Jacob 
D. Cox, William Cullen Bryant, Oswald Otten- 
dorfer. David A. Wells, and Jacob Brinkerhoff. 
A series of resolutions was adopted, and 
William S. Groesbeck of Ohio was nominated 
for president and F. L. Olmsted of New 
York for viee-president. During the ex- 
citement of this canvass this ticket was lost 
sight of and at the ensuing election received 
no votes. 

The republicans assembled in Philadelphia 
June 5. Morton McMichael was made the tem- 
porary and Thomas Settle the permanent 
chairman. The demand of the party was 
unanimously for Gen. Grant for a second term 
and he was renominated by acclamation. For 
the vice-presidency Henry Wilson received 
364^ votes to 312J6 for Schuyler Colfax and Mr. 
Wilson was nominated. 

The democrats met at Baltimore July 9 and 
were presided over by James R Doolittle. 
Resolutions were adopted that were in 
harmony with the Cincinnati platform of the 
liberal republicans. There were 7:32 delegates 
in the convention, and the vote, in the nom- 
inating of a candidate for the presidency, 
stood as follows: Horace Greeley 686, James 
A Bayard 15, Jeremiah Black 21, William S. 
Groesbeck 2, blank 8. Mr. Greeley received 
more than two-thirds and was declared 
the nominee. B. Gratz Brown received 713 
votes for vice-president. 

Some democrats who were opposed to the 
nomination of Greeley met in Louisville Sept. 
3 to nominate a so-called "straight-out" dem- 
ocratic ticket The convention was called to 
order by Blanton Duncan, and James Lyons 
was made the permanent chairman. The 
platform declared that "we proclaim to the 
world that principle is to be preferred to 
power; that the democratic party is held 
together by the cohesion of time-honored 
principles, which they will never surrender 



46 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 18U3. 



in exchange for all the offices which presi- 
dents can confer. The pangs of the minori- 
ties are doubtless excruciating, but we 
welcome an eternal minority under the ban- 
ner inscribed.wlth our principles, rather than 
an almighty and everlasting majority pur- 
chased by their abandonment. >r Charles 
O'Conor of New York was nominated for the 
presidency and John Quincy Adams of 
Massachusetts for the vice-presidency. Mr. 
O'Conor persistently refused to be a candi- 
date, and Mr. Adams consented only on the 
condition that Mr. O'Conor withdraw his 
declination. This was not done, and a small 
number of votes was given for the ticket in 
the country. 

There were 349 votes in the electoral college, 
of which Grant and Wilson received 286, 
Thomas A. Hendricks 42, B. Gratz Brown 18, 
Charles J. Jenkins 2, and David Davis 1. Mr. 
Greeley died after the election and the dem- 
ocrats scattered their votes. 

1876. 

Four tickets were in the field in the cam- 
paign of 1876. The national prohibition re- 
form party assembled at Cleveland May 17. 
Over 100 delegates were present, representing 
the states of Connecticut, Illinois, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Massachu- 
setts, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsyl- 
vania, and Wisconsin. The Rev. H. A. 
Thompson was permanent chairman. The 
Hon. Green Clay Smith of Kentucky was 
nominated for president and the Hon. G. T. 
Stewart of Ohio was nominated for vice-presi- 
dent At the ensuing election no electoral 
votes were cast for the nominees. 

A convention of independents, commonly 
called the national greenback convention, as- 
sembled at Indianapolis May 17. Nineteen 
states were represented by 239 delegates. The 
platform demanded "the immediate and un- 
conditional repeal of the specie resumption 
act of Jan. 14, 1875, and the rescue of our in- 
dustries from the ruin and disaster resulting 
from its enforcement." Peter Cooper of New 
York was nominated for president and New- 
ton Booth of California for vice-president. 
Mr. Booth subsequently declined, and Samuel 
F. Gary of Ohio was substituted in his place. 
No electoral votes were given the candidates. 

The republicans met in Cincinnati June 14, 
and organized their convention by electing 
Edward McPherson chairman. There were a 
number of candidates for the presidential 
nomination, and seven ballots were taken, 
with the following result: 



BALLOTS. 



4 

S..., 



293 



351 



113995811 



111 
121 

126 84 71 
114 82 69 
111 
21 



!:> fis 
^4 71 
s:i ,:'.) 
8150 



William A. Wheeler was then nominated 
for vice-president. 



The democratic national convention met in 
St. Louis June 28 and was organized by the 
choice of John A. McClernand as chairman. 
The platform was called the reform platform 
because it proposed to reform all the alleged 
abuses which had grown up under the re- 
publican rule. One of the planks denounced 
"the present tariff levied upon nearly 4,000 
articles as a masterpiece of injustice, inequal- 
ity, and false pretense. It yields a dwindling, 
not a yearly rising revenue. It has impover- 
ished many industries to subsidize a few. It 
prohibits imports that might purchase the 
products of American labor. It has degraded 
American commerce from the first to an in- 
ferior rank on the high seas. It has cut down 
the sales of American manufacture at home 
and abroad and depleted the returns of 
American agriculture an industry followed 
by half our people. * * * It pro- 
motes fraud, fosters smuggling, enriches dis- 
honest officials and bankrupts honest mer- 
chants. We demand that all custom-house tax- 
ation shall be for revenue only." There were 
738 delegates. The vote for presidential candi- 
date stood: First ballot. Samuel J. Tilden 
404J^, William Allen 54, A. G. Thurman 3, 
Thomas A. Hendricks 140K T, F. Bavard 33, 
Joel Parker 18, W. S. Hancock 75, M. 'Broad- 
head 16. The second ballot stood: Tilden 5X5, 
A len 54, Thurman 2, Hendricks 85, Bayard 4, 
Hancock 58; necessary for a choice 492. Mr. 
Hendricks was nominated for vice-president. 

There being a dispute over the electoral 
votes of Florida, Louisiana, Oregon and South 
Carolina, they were referred by congress to 
an electoral commission composed of eight 
republicans and seven democrats, which by a 
strict party vote awarded 185 electoral votes 
to Hayes and Wheeler and 184 to Tilden and 
Hendricks. 

1880. 

Gen. Grant returned to the United States 
from a trip around the world late in 1879. He 
had everywhere been received with a dis- 
tinguished consideration that was gratifying 
to the pride of the American people. His re- 
turn under these circumstances caused his 
name to be connected with the republican 
nomination for the presidency for a third 
term. No sooner was this done than a strong 
opposition to his nomination appeared in the 
republican party. So strong was this senti- 
ment that a republican anti-third term con- 
vention was held in St. Louis on May 
6, presided over by J. B. Henderson, at 
which strong resolutions were adopted oppos- 
ing the nomination of Gen. Grant. In many 
states, notably New York, the sentiment in 
favor of Grant was equally prominent. 
The national convention met in Chicago 
June 2 and a six days' session followed. 
George F. Hoar was both temporary and per- 
manent president of the convention. A long 
controversy ensued over the power of state 
conventions to name delegates from the con- 
gressional districts and bind their action by 
instructions. Several days were spent in de- 
bating this question, and it was finally decided 
that state conventions had not the power to 
bind district delegates by instructions. This 
decision resulted in the loss of many votes for 
Gen. Grant. The platform did not differ 
greatly from previous party utterances. The 
fifth plank, however, contained this sentence: 
"We affirm the belief, avowed In 1876, that the 
duties levied for purposes of revenue should 
so discriminate as to favor American labor." 
This was all that was said regarding a tariff. 
The first ballot for president was taken on the 
7th, the fifth day of the convention, and be- 
fore a nomination was made 36 ballots were 
necessary. The vote in detail was as follows: 



NATIONAL NOMINATING CONVENTIONS. 



47 



BALLOT. 



J 

2!"" 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7.... 



9334 

94 32 31 
98 32 31 

95 32 31 

!>:,:;} u 



9.i 31 



91 32 31 



91 

90 31 
92 31 



32 10 
*MO 
.,.33 10 
89 31 33 10 



8831 

s-, :;i 
9031 



9631 
9731 



9331 



11811 
11811 



119 



107 



32 31 



;.- KI 
3510 
3fi 10 
35 

1,0 
93 31 36 10 
31 35 10 

116 12 35 



110 11 44 



3010 
10 
10 
10 
10 
1U 
10 
10 



96 31 32 10 

93 31 V) 10 



3510 
*J10 
-(610 
3610 
3510 



30 
23 
5.. 



Besides these 1 vote was cast for Harrison 
on the third ballot, 1 for Hayes on each of the 
tenth, eleventh, twelfth and thirteenth bal- 
lots, 1 for McCrary on the thirteenth and 1 
for Hartranft on each of the nineteenth, 
twentieth, twenty-first and twenty-second bal- 
lots. Chester A. Arthur was nominated on 
the first ballot for vice-president. 

The greenback or national greenback-labor 
party took an active part in the canvass, its 
convention being held at Chicago on the 9th 
of June. The first ballot for a presidential 
candidate was informal and resulted as fol- 
lows: James B. Weaver 224}^, Herrick B. 
Wright 12o^, Stephen B. Dillage 119, B. F. But- 
ler 95, Solon Chase 39, E. P. Ahls 41, and Alex- 
ander Campbell 21. By a change of votes be- 
fore a result was announced Gen. Weaver was 
unanimously nominated. Gen. James B. 
Chambers was nominated for vice-president. 

The prohibitionists met at Cleveland June 
17. The number of delegates present was 142. 
The Rev. A. A. Miner was chosen permanent 
chairman. Neal Dow of Maine and A. H. 
Thompson of Ohio were nominated for presi- 
dent and vice-president by a rising vote. 

The democratic convention was held at Cin- 
cinnati June 22. It was expected that Mr. Til- 
den would be the nominee, but two days prior 
to the meeting of the convention he pub- 
lished a letter withdrawing his name. Gen. 
Stevenson was chosen permanent chairman. 
The platform declared for "no sumptuary 
laws, separation of church and state, common 
schools fostered and protected, home rule, 
honest money, consistency of gold and silver 
and paper convertible into coin on demand, 
the strict maintenance of the public faith, 



state and national, and a tariff for revenue 
only." Three ballots were taken, resulting as 
follows: 



Bayard 

Tilden. 

Thurc 

Field. 

Randj 

Englii 

Morri: 

Seym< 

Payne. 

Ewing 





1. 


2. 


3. 


ck 


171 


320 


705 


icks 


491^ 


31 


30 


d 


153H 


111 


? 






g 


1 


lan 


68^ 


50 






3r 


65J6 




11... 


6 


1283^ 




h 


1 


19 






62 








g 








81 








So 






llan.... 


3 







William H. English was chosen for vice- 
president on the first ballot. 

The result of the election was: Garfleld and 
Arthur 214 electoral votes and Hancock and 
English 155 electoral votes. 
1884. 

The republican national convention met in 
Chicago June 3. John B. Henderson was 
chosen permanent chairman. The platform 
was reported by William McKinley, Jr., of 
Ohio, and contained the first declaration in 
favor of a protective tariff ever made by the 
party. It was as follows: 

"It is the first duty of a good government 
to protect the rights and promote the inter- 
ests of its own people. The largest diversity 
of industry is most productive of general 
prosperity and of the comfort and independ- 
ence of the people. We therefore demand 
that the Imposition of duties on foreign im- 
ports shall be made, not for revenue only, but 
that in raising the requisite revenues for the 
government such duties shall be so levied as 
to afford security to our diversified industries 
and protection to the rights and wages of the 
laborer, to the end that active and intelligent 
labor, as well as capital, may have its just re- 
ward and the laboring man his full share In 
the national prosperity." 

The balloting for a presidential candidate 
followed the adoption of the platform and 
resulted as follows: 



James G. Elaine 

Chester A Arthur 

G.F.Edmunds , 

John A. Logan.... 

John Sherman 

J. R. Hawley 

Robert T. Lincoln. 
W. T. Sherman 



541 



Gen. Logan was npmlnated for vice-presi- 
dent without opposition. 

The democrats met in Chicago July 8, Will- 
iam F. Vilas of VVisco sin being the presiding 
officer. The platform stated : "Wo therefore 
denounce the abuses of the existing tariff, and, 
subject to the pendlnylimitations, wedemand 
that federal taxation shall be exclusively for 
public purposes and shall not exceed the 
needs of the government economically admin- 
istered." The platform was very long. Gen. 
Butler submitted a minority report, which 
was a formal and explicit declaration in favor 
of a protective tariff, but the report was 
rejected by a vote of 97V* yeas to 714^ nays. 
Two ballots were taken for presidential nomi- 
nee, which stood as follows: 



48 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



Grover Cleveland 

T. F. Bayard 

Joseph McDonald 

S.J.Randall 

A. G. Thurman 

J. G. Carlisle 

George Hoadly 

T. A. Hendricks 

S. J. Tilden 

R. P. Flower 



Mr. Hendricks was nominated for vice- 
president. 

The prohibition convention assembled at 
Pittsburg July 23, there being 410 accredited 
delegates present from thirty-one states and 
territories. Samuel Dickie of Michigan was 
chosen permanent cha'rman. John P. St. 
John of Kansas was nominated for president 
and William Daniel of Maryland for vice- 
president. The platform demanded prohibi- 
tion in the manufacture and sale of intoxi- 
cants, the ballot for women, and arraigned 
both the old parties for the ills that beset the 
people. 

A national convention of the anti-monopoly 
party met in Chicago May 14 and nominated 
Benjamin F. Butler for president. The 
national greenback-labor party met at Indian- 
apolis May 27, and was presided over by 
Gen. J. B. Weaver. Gen. Butler was asked if 
he would accept the presidential nomination 
from the party, and, responding in the affirma- 
tive, he was nominated on the first ballot. 
Absalom M. West was selected for the vice- 
presidency. The platform favored substitut- 
ing greenbacks for national bank notes, the 
destruction of "land, railroad, money and 
other gigantic corporate monopolies," and 
favored raising the revenues by duties on 
luxuries. The electoral college had 401 votes, 
of which Cleveland and Hendricks received 
219, and Blaine and Logan 182. 
1888. 

The democratic convention met in St. Louis 
June 5. and organized with Patrick A. Collins 
for permanent chairman. For some time be- 
fore the meeting the renomination of Mr. 
Cleveland was conceded, and the only inter- 
est centered in the vice-presidency. For the 
second office only two names were before the 
convention Isaac P. Gray of Indiana and 
Allen G. Thurman of Ohio. Mr. Thurman 
was nominated on the first ballot, receiving 
690 votes to 105 for Mr. Gray and 25 for John 
C. Black of Illinois. 

The republicans met at Chicago June 19. 
In the early part of the year it seemed prob- 
able that Mr. Blaine would be the nominee of 
the convention, but on the 12th of February, 
in a letter addressed by him to B. F. Jones, 
dated in Florence, he said that as personal 
reasons would prevent him from entering the 
contest his name "would not be presented to 
the convention." No serious efforts had been 
made in behalf of any candidate except John 
Sherman, whose nomination had been urged 
by the Ohio state convention in July, 1887. 
After the letter of Mr. Blaine other state con- 
ventions recommended the nomination of 
"favorite sons." May SO Mr. Blaine wrote 
another letter in which he said that he could 
not accept the nomination without showing 
bad faith toward those candidates who, 
relying oniliis former letter, were already in 
the field, and therefore he could not accept at 
all. The convention organized by choosing 
John M. Thurston temporary and M. Estee 
for permanent chairman. The platform was 
presented on the third day. On the tariff the 
platform said: "We are uncompromisingly in 



favor of the American system of protection: 
we protest against its destruction as proposed 
by the president and his party. They serve 
the interests of Europe; we will support the 
interests of America. We accept the issue 
and confidently appeal to the people for their 
judgment. The protective system must be 
maintained." Eight ballots were taken in 
nominating a presidential candidate, as 
follows: 



Alger 

Depew 

Gresham 

Hawley 

Phelps 

Sherman 

Lincoln 

Allison 

Fitler 

Harrison 

Ingalls 

Rusk 

Blaine 

McKinley 

Foraker 

Douglas 



1. 2. 



8411 



329 249 244 235 2& 244 230 118 



108 113 



3.14. 



12 -1 !: 143137 120 100 



94 -210 212 231 279 544 



The vice-presidency went to Levl P. Morton 
on the first ballot. 

The prohibitionists met at Indianapolis 
May 30 and organized by choosing H. C. 
Delano for temporary and Gen. St. John 
for permanent chairman. Gen. Clinton B. 
Fisk was nominated for president and 
John A. Brooks for vice-president. Consider- 
able discussion arose over the platform, espe- 
cially upon the subject of woman suffrage, 
which was decided in favor of unlimited suf- 
frage. 

The united labor party held its conven- 
tion May 15 at Cincinnati, 274 delegates 
being present. This party was formed Feb. 22, 
1887, at a convention held in the same city, to 
which delegates had been invited from the 
labor and farmer organizations, including 
knights of labor, wheelers, the corn-growers, 
the homesteadry, farmers' alliances, green- 
backers and grangers. The convention nomi- 
nated A. J. Streeter of Illinois for president 
and C. E. Cunningham of Arkansas for vice- 
president. The platform, after reciting the 
hardships of farmers and laborers, declared 
against land monopoly, for government own- 
ership of railroads, postal savings banks, free 
coinage of silver, arbitration in strike dis- 
putes, a service pension bill, a graduated 
income tax, popular election of senators, ex- 
clusion of the Chinese and female suffrage. 

The union labor convention was held in 
Cincinnati May 16. The party was made up 
from the greenbackers, farmers' organizations 
and other labor reformers. The convention 
consisted of ninety delegates, representing 
nine states. Robert H. Cowdrey of Illinois 
was nominated for president and W. H. T. 
Wakefleld of Kansas for vice-president. The 
platform demanded public ownership of land, 
taxing of land according to value instead of 
area, government ownership of railroads and 
telegraphs, reduction in hours of labor, sim- 
plification of court proceedings, and de- 
nounced both the old parties as "hopelessly 
and shamelessly corrupt." 

The national convention of the American 
party was held at Washington Aug. 14, 126 
delegates being present, more than half of 
whom were from New York. The opposition 
to the dictation of New York led to the with- 
drawal of twenty-five delegates from other 
states. James L. Curtis of New York was 
nominated for president and James R. Greer 



NATIONAL NOMINATING CONVENTIONS 


49 


of Tennessee for vice-president. The nlat- 


was nominated on the first ballot. 


905 votes 


form demanded full citizens 


hip as a c 


ualitica- 


being cast; of these Har 


rison ha 


1 535 1-6, 


tion ior voting, a protective 


tariff, re 


striction 


McKinley 182, Blaine 181 &4J 


Reid 4, 


and Lin- 


of immigration, repeal of naturalization laws, 
and denial of the right of aliens to hold real 


colnl. 
The democrats met in 


Chicago 


June 21. 


estate. 






W. C. Owens was made tern] 


jorary ar 


id W. L. 


Several minor conventions 


werehel 


3 during 


Wilson permanent chairm 


an. The 


conven- 


the year. The first of these 


was the it 


dustrial 


tion was In many respects i 


i peculia 


r one In 


reform convention, held at 


Washing 


.on Feb. 


the history of party meeting 


?s. It wa 


s evident 


22, which nominated Alber 


t E. Red 


stone of 


before the convention tht 


it Mr. C 


leveland 


California for president an 


I John t 


olvin of 


was the choice for a larg< 


3 maioril 


v of the 


Kansas for vice-president. The new party 
had no support at the polls and cut no figure in 
politics. The national equal rights party was 
another political nonentity. It held a conven- 
tion at Des Moines, Iowa, May 15, and'nomi- 
nated Mrs. Belva A. Lockwood for oresident 


rank and file of the democratic party and that 
he was opposeed by the politicians of his 
party, the bitterest opposition to him being in 
his own state. The regular delegation from 
that state was unanimous for David B. Hill's 
nomination and in favor of anv candidate to 


and A. H. Love for vice-pre 


sident. JS 


Ir. Love 


beat Cleveland. Only one ^ 


ote was 


taken In 


declined and Charles S. Well 


s was sub 


stituted. 


the convention. The nun- 


her of ( 


lelegates 


A demand for woman su 


iTrage an 


d equal 


was 910. The vote stood: Cle 


veland 61 


7J4 Boies 


rights of man and woman 


was the 


only im- 


103, Hill 114, Gorman 36^, C 


irlisle 14 


Steven- 


portant feature of the platf 


orm. Th 


e green- 


son 16%, Morrison 3, Camp 


bell 2, I 


Lussell 1, 


backers met at Cincinnati St 


>pt. 12, bu 


t as only 


Whitney 1, and Pattisonl. 


The vot< 


; on vice- 


eight delegates were present no nominations 
were made. There were 401 votes in the elect- 


president stood: Stevenson 402, Gray 343, 
Mitchell 45, Morse 86, Watterson 26. Cockran 5. 


oral college, and of these Hai 


rison and 


Morton 


Tree 1, and Boies 1. 






received 233 and Cleveland a 


nd Thura 


aan 168. 


The prohibitionists met a 


t Cincinu 


atl June 








29. Gov. St. John was te 


mporary 


and Eli 


1892. 






Hitter was permanent chi 


lirman. 


The im- 


The republicans led off ir 


i the con 


mentions 


portant question before th 


e conven 


tion was 


of 1892, meeting at Minn< 


'upolis 


June 7. 


that of fusion with some ( 


)f the nei 


v parties, 


J Sloat Fassett was chose 


n tempoi 


ary and 


but the idea met with no 


favor. Ci 


en. John 


William McKinley permj 


ment cl 


lairman. 


Bidwell was nominated on 


he first b 


allot, the 


Preceding the convention the exciting ques- 
tion had been as to whether Mr. Blaine would 


vote standing: Bidwell 590, Demorest 139, 
Stewart 179. The vote for vice-oresidential 


accept the nomination if te 


ndered li 


im. He 


candidate stood: Cranflll 


386. Lev 


-rine 380. 


had previously addressed a note to Mr. Clark- 
son saying his name would not go before the 
convention, but his friends declared he would 


Satterlee 26, Carskadon 21. Before the"vote 
was announced enough changes were made to 
give Cranflll 416, or nine more than enoueh. 


accept the nomination if 


.endered 


to him. 


Bidwell and Cranfill were d 


eclared t 


he nomi- 


There was no other name i 


nentione( 


1 for the 


nees of the party. 






nomination except that c 


f Mr. E 


Garrison. 


The people's party convei 


ition met 


at Oma- 


Mr. Elaine's resignation of the secretaryship 
of state was deemed to answer the question 


ha July 4. The permanent chairman was H. 
L. Loucks of South Dakota. Only one ballot 


of his acceptance in the affirmative. A ques- 
tion arose early in the convention wnich 


was taken for president and was as 
Weaver 995, Kyle 265. J. G. Field v 


follows: 
ras nom- 


settled the strength of the ti 


vo f actioi 


is. Two 


inated for vice-president on 


the first 


ballot. 


reports from the committ< 


>e of ere 


dentials 


A convention of socialists 


} was hek 


I in New 


were presented. The Harrison men favored 
the majority report, the Blaine men the min- 


York Aug. 28. The nominee for president was 
Simon Wing of Massachusetts and for vice- 


ority report, the former of which was adopted. 
The platform re-affirmed the doctrine of ultra- 
protection and will be found complete among 
the national platforms. President Harrison 


president Charles H. Matchett of New York. 
The platforms of all national conventions 
held this year will be found complete else- 
where. 


FOREIGN IMMIGRATION, 


Statement showing by nationalities the number of immigrants arriving in the United States 




during the fiscal years 1892 and 1891. 








FISCAL YEARS. 




FISCAL 


YEARS. 


COUNTRIES. 


1892. 


1891. 


COUNTRIES. 


1892. 


1891. 


Austria-Hungary : 






Poland 


33,160 


27,491 


Bohemia. ... 


8,496 


11,758 


Russia (except Poland) 


84,259 


47,401 


Hungary 


37,301 


28,366 


Sweden and Norway 


57,153 


4^,392 


Other Austria (except 






Switzerland 


7,402 


6,811 


Total 


80,165 


71,039 


United Kingdom: 
England and Wales 


50,182 


53,787 








Scotland 
Ireland 


11,505 
55,381 


12,554 
55,634 


Denmark 


10,478 
6 519 


10,637 
6 763 


Total 


117,068 


121,975 


Germany 
Italy 


130,'622 
60,944 


113,531 
75,143 


All other countries 


24,291 


20,107 


Netherlands 


fc 7,259 


5,206 


Total 


619,320 


555,4% 


NOTE. Immigrants from the British North American Possessions and Mexico are not 


included in the statistics of 


immigra 


.ion owing to the absence of law pro 


viding fo 


the col- 


lection of accurate data in 


regard t 


lereto. The arrivals of immigrants i 


n thecus 


toms dis- 


tricts above specified comprise about 99 per cent of the entire immigration into the country. 



50 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1898. 


VALUATION OF PROPERTY, 

[Census of 1890. ] 
Statement showing bv states and geographical divisions the assessed valuation of real 
and personal property in the United States separately for 1890 and 1880, also the true valuation 
of all property by states, with per capita of such value, as estimated by the tenth census for 188(): 


GEOGRAPHICAL 
DIVISIONS. 


ASSESSED VALUATION IN DETAIL. 


ESTIMATED 
TRUE VALUA- 
TION FOR 1880. 


Seal. 


Personal. 


Amount. 


Per 
capi- 
ta. 


1890. 


1880. 


1890. 


1880. 


Total 


$18,933,013,124 
8,569,663,427 

233,946,082 
125,389,477 
118,119,8t;6 
1,600,137,807 
243,081,296 
259,616,538 
3,393,166,871 
560,633,849 
2,035,571,641 

1,482328,627 

59,307,521 
352.352,993 
141,609,891 
296,186,129 
121,202,865 
138,784,514 
88,113,453 
225,054,915 
60,774,816 

5,612,608,192 

551,701,870 
586,833,31? 
769,975,564 
464,782,237 
4il6.2fl9.896 
376,181,27 

lUUTSJlT 
115,360,973 
241,842,798 

1,724,348,612 

376,788,792 
2112870.813 
146,4*51.799 
tll6,697,035 
159,619^75 
520,873,971 


$13,036,766,925 
6.206,124,741 

173,856,242 
122,733,124 
71,436.623 
1,111,160,072 
188,2-24,459 
228.791,267 
2,329,282,359 

1,183,368,001 

50,302,739 
368.442.913 
87,980,356 
233,601,599 
105,000.306 
101.709,326 
77,461,670 
139,983,941 
18,885,151 

4,044,978,179 

1,093,677,705 
538,683,239 
675,441,053 
432,861,884 
344,788,721 
203,446.781 
297,254,342 
381,985.112 
6,912,307 
6,421,611 
55,073,375 
108,432,049 

1,001,205,256 

265.085,908 
195,044,200 
177,374,008 
79,469,530 
122.362.297 
205.508,924 


$5,718,572,341 
2,055,365,729 

75,183,019 
127,332,539 
53,163,677 
553,996,819 
78:633,207 

9vatt#R 

382,159,067 
127,675,338 
557,874,695 

652,448,660 

14,826,880 
176,176,496 
11,697,650 
96,610,480 
4S,725,222 

78,012,743 

61,975,198 
152,311,869 
16,152,122 

1,909,381,248 

545,833,185 
294,985,778 

157'.tW2J64 
128.108,482 
92.201,847 
154.513.865 
166,330,777 
23,021.867 
31,113,870 
69.409,332 
106,617,146 

627,942,796 

135,826,714 

54,637,292 
50,618,642 
49,767,877 
74,700,905 
198,390,331 


$3,866,226,618 
1,351,804,174 

62,122,474 
42.022,057 
15,370,152 
473,596,730 
64.312,214 
98,888,118 
322,657.647 
]-).sso.72:; 
143,451,059 

481,442,189 

9,643,904 

128,864,762 
11,421,431 

74,853,536 
34,622,399 
54.390.87fi 
5fi.09S.46. 1 > 
9il.4SS.t^s 
12,053,158 

1,421,746,704 

440.682,803 
189.131.892 
211,175,341 
84,804.475 
94,183,030 
54,581,900 
101.416,909 
150.SHMW) 
1,874,265 
5,113,347 
35,512,407 
62,459,640 

361,568,929 

85,478,063 
16,1:54,338 
45,493.220 
31,158.599 
87.^.142 
114,855,591 


$43,642.000,000 
17,533,000,000 

511,000,000 
363,000,000 
302,000:000 

6,308:000:000 
1,305,000,000 
4,942,000,000 

3,759,000,000 

136,000,000 
837,000,000 

46i:ooo;<joo 

322,000,000 

60fi,ooo.ooo 

120,000,000 
16,186,000,000 
3,238,300,000 

1:580,'000,000 
1,139,000,000 
792,000,000 
1,721.000,000 
1,; 562,000,000 
49.000,0110 
09,000,000 
385,003,000 
760,000,000 

3,882,000,000 

902,000,000 
705,000,000 

428,000^)00 
K54.IHO.OUU 
382400,000 
825,OJO,000 


$370 
1,209 

787 
1,040 
909 
1,471 
1,447 
i:251 
1,241 
1,154 
1,154 

495 

928 

S:>5 
1,239 

566 
329 
323 
393 
445 

932 

1,013 
850 
1,043 
905 
866 
1,014 
1.059 
720 
1,328 
702 
851 
763 

435 

547 

457 
339 
313 
406 
618 


North Atlantic 
Maine 








Rhode Island 




New York 






South Atlantic 






District of Columbia. . . 
Virginia 




North Carolina 


South Carolina 




North Central 
Ohio 




Illinois 


Michigan 


Wisconsin 


Minnesota 


Iowa 


Missouri 
North Dakota 


South Dakota 


Nebraska 




South Central 


Kentucky 


Tennessee 


Alabama 
Mississippi 


Lousiaaa. 


Texas 


Oklahoma . . . 




111,033^27 
1,544,064,266 

55,278,685 
10,487.779 
155.879,914 
30.094,00? 
10,174,476 
*8i,flBMH 
16,934,721 
16,531.849 
166,455,761 
107,640,361 
889,300,661 


55,760,388 
699,090,749 

5,077,162 

4.485.291 
35,604.197 
4,783,764 
3,922,961 
14.779,344 
17,941,030 
2.297.52*- 
H.335,923 
82,58i.i6 
466,273,585 


64,001,035 
473,433,908 

51,114,207 

20,943,716 
33,031,411 
15,347,003 
11,260,291 
20,072,69$ 
7,728;6W 
9.049,456 
37,260,189 
58,385,370 
209,240,903 


30,648,976 
249,664,622 

13,532,640 
9,136,538 
38,807.496 
6,574,642 
5,347,253 
9,995,935 
11.350,429 
4,143,350 
12.474,770 
19,937,118 
118,304,451 


286,000,000 
2,282,000,000 

40,000.000 

54,000.000 
240,00 >,( WO 
49.000.000 
41,000,000 
114,000,000 
150.000,000 
29.OoO.000 
62.000.000 
154,000.000 
1,343.000,000 


356 
1,291 

1,022 
2.59t! 
1.235 
410 
1.014 
792 
2,506 
890 
825 
882 
1,553 


Western . 


Montana 






New Mexico 


Arizona , 
Utah... 


Nevada 


Idaho 


Washington 


Oregon 
California 


Real and personal property not separately reported in all counties and the division is 
approximated by the Census O'ffice. fReal estate for 1891. 



SALES OF MALT LIQUORS. 51 


SALES OF MALT LIQUORS FOR 1892. 

The Brewers' Journal for July publishes the following statistics, compiled from the 
books of the commissioner of internal revenue, of the sales of malt liquors in the various 
states and territories and in the leading cities of the country for the year 189:.', as compared 
with the six years preceding. The sales in Kansas still continue to decrease. Maine and Ver- 
mont still have no sales to be recorded. For the first time we are able to obtain figures of the 
decrease in the Dakotas under the prohibitory law nearly 75 per cent, with a slight reaction 
In 1892. Iowa, in response to the ferocious attack that has been made upon her prohibitory 
law, shows an increase. The theory that "beer drives out whisky" receives a forcible illus- 
tration in Kentucky, where there has been a considerable decrease. We give the figures as 
they are furnished by the liquor-trade organ: 


STATES AND TERRI- 
TORIES. 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


Incr'se* 
over 'i>l. 


Alabama 


Barrels. 
7,156 
355 
14227 
605.988 
99,590 
124,852 
42,394 
21,290 
67.717 
10,642 

197.372 
17.482 
261,821 
140.616 
396,348 

ssj.2*; 

420,691 
301,040 
1,17(1882 
21.795 
84838 
7,025 
332,960 

"Sffi 

>4S.27I 
1,742,566 
31,870 
2.0JUW1 
57,951 
14.082 
20,124 
31,781 
22,490 
34,060 
20,652 
74,875 
1.450.961 
2,948 
20589,029 

367.960 
385,033 
811,084 
1.018.863 
365.635 
873.995 
871.876 
241,847 
222,740 


Barrels. 
12,740 
414 
909 
572,114 
117,921 
144,061 
46,884 
27,517 
83,442 
4,570 
5,382 
LKKSfB 
428^668 
183,464 
16,488 
280.120 
131,873 
435,084 
990,670 
4641227 
325.439 
13S7.H20 
24.254 
108.756 
7.123 
305.920 
1,171,349 
5.987 
7.370.139 
1,928.257 
43.318 
2,297.085 
65,(i80 
15,253 
30,640 
38,257 
27,650 
35,530 
21,280 
93,138 
1,605.144 
2,316 
22,460,345 

376,430 
431,057 
906,953 
1,179,777 
427.472 
1,172.827 
983,281 
274.9LI8 
252,331 


Barrels. 
14,900 
472 
730 
632,529 
142,587 
176.459 
47.902 
33,914 
93,219 
3,221 
5,656 
1,8*8.697 
4T,9.<#5 
174,339 
15,285 
302,895 
122,860 
497306 
1,010.576 
526.226 
317.642 
1,539,752 
26,437 
124,158 
7,598 
353,505 
1312^66 

5:008 

7.890,181 
2,201,689 
49,654 
2.4 ( .i.::s 
75,754 
13,810 
3(5.571 
49,714 
31,425 
49,160 
26,483 
103.370 
1,697,740 
2,450 
24,569,682 

379,178 
481.943 
867,039 
1,327,358 
B8fi 
1,366.769 
LtWUXtt 
332.155 
277,592 


Barrels. 
18,075 
708 
834 
72fV>ll 
163^14 
189.878 
39,763 
34,779 
105,017 
12.160 
5.850 
2,002.858 
485.995 
112,470 
6,700 
294.947 
135,407 
518,414 
1,017,191 
519,913 
313,074 
1,649,112 
32.180 
136,681 
9,576 
327,193 
1,353,615 
5,625 
8.131I.2S2 
2,113,772 
63.802 
23fi4!i24 
74,378 
9,911 
45,193 
54,196 
31,441 
47,390 
41.091 
100.315 
1,789.513 
2.517 
25,098,765 

385,988 
515.965 
873,974 
1.340.449 
466,206 
1.490.S50 
1,049.979 
320.008 
261,913 
196.457 
1.364.980 
889467 
182.579 
4.253.759 
1.296.458 
'289,784 
427,926 
478.432 
1,496.527 
187,364 
230,472 
194,133 


Barrels. 
30,713 
773 
682 
724.018 
179,934 
211,451 
32,386 
94,756 
110,447 
32,565 
6,193 
2,182.678 
491087 
88,266 
2,700 
308,436 
194,637 
541,641 
953,467 
540.426 
325,819 
1,801.1593 
33,233 
129,916 
5.879 
397,98:5 
1,498.288 
5.985 
a435.111 
2,301.413 
87,782 
2.(55s. I!).') 
80,266 
9,685 
62,013 
66,685 
32,782 
50,490 
68,815 
115,877 
1,981.201 
2.593 
26.820,953 

393.707 
537,993 
833,278 
1,508,144 
492.870 
1,67=1685 
1,115.053 
8564584 
278,953 
200,916 
1.527.0.-52 
l.uj;;.5-.'4 
206.121 
4.257,978 
1.458.846 

SK:W 

427,533 
479.217 
1.6U215 
202,870 
246,488 
194/147 


Barrels. 
39.095 
1,186 
459 
767,289 
203,707 
224,271 
9,444 
45,561 
112329 
51,728 
5.864 
2,608,916 
563,572 
105,948 
24)50 
855384 
216,565 
554324 
990,435 
604,557 
364433 
2,038.393 

S 
lj tl 

9.0*8. 101) 
2.<\W* 
94,190 
3,118,248 
101379 
9,040 
86,121 
84,300 
38,915 

1331266 
2,403.640 
1399 
30.021,079 

395,303 
540,951 
865,416 
1,702,106 
390X83 
2,034.1**; 
1,254848 
439.064 
320.898 
231,718 
1.877.157 
1015.542 
199059 
4.448.314 
1,705.915 
433.443 
514.080 
509.234 
1,824.950 
235,707 
276,069 
215,4ft; 


Barrels. 
35.950 
1290 
360 
776,050 
196,212 
235,346 
10,218 
46,277 
129377 
52,161 
6,063 
2/5SOU 
570,017 
1K523 
1,650 
338,3(50 
253,027 
595,070 

I.OW.KV, 

648,365 
385,489 

2,014.086 

n,;.>0; 

1384B8 

5301 
435,928 
1,757,633 
6,319 
9,512^49 

2j;v.2i6 

94,149 

3,129,733 
119307 

39373 
58,716 
130,465 
133.846 

2,605.' x* 
3,041 
31,474,519 

408,429 
583.495 
961,344 
1,787,154 
(521.927 
2.^5,525 
1,281.473 
458,736 
355,411 
217.498 
2.023.100 
1,151,137 
251.542 
4.495.519 
1,716,502 
481.409 
591.505 
615.849 
1.838.122 
239.032 
280.65)7 
207.836 


Barrels. 
3.145 
104 

8 

-7,495 
11,075 
774 
716 
17,048 
433 
199 
270, 4 4S 
6,445 
8,580 
-400 
-17,034 
36.462 
40,746 
105.531 
42308 
21,tti6 
-24312 

-as 

-864 
70,648 
14*283 

-4Si 
424.4401 
13,537] 

ii 

18,428 
769 
13^592 
29,136 
958 
216 
818 
580 
202,048 
1,642 
1453,440 

iF,rs 

42514 
S&928 

S5.;':;s; 
31.138 
240.S' 
26,625 
19.672 
34518 
-14420 
145.943 

45;42t 
47.205 
10^74 

-2.m 

77^15 
6^515 
lft.172 
3325 
4.618 
-7^70 


Alaska 




California 


Colorado .... 


Connecticut. . . 


Dakotas 
Delaware 


District of Columbia 




Idaho 


Illinois 


Indiana 


Iowa 


Kansas 








Massachusetts 


Michigan 


Minnesota 
Missouri 
Montana 






New Hampshire 


New Jersey 
New Mexico 
New York 


Ohio 






Rhode Island 


South Carolina 


Tennessee 


Texas 


Utah 


Virginia 




West Virginia 


Wisconsin .. 


Wyoming 
Totals 


CITIES. 
Albany N Y 


Baltimore, Md 
Boston '- f ass 


Brooklyn, N. Y 
Buffalo,N. Y 
Chicago 111 


I Cincinnati, 6 


1 Cleveland, O 


Detroit Mich 


Louisville Kv 


Milwaukee Wis 


1,115,102 
694,006 

'3.662.214 
1.306,405 
195.541 
2S'..5.v> 
353.260 
1,079,392 


1,21*812 
791,765 

'4\bb3,560 
1.37 1.387 
247,162 
323.383 
316.479 
14253,305 


1,286,721 
878,869 

'4,'24t,79i 
1.409,478 
304.304 
341.796 
407,675 
1,407,744 


Newark.N J 
NewOrleans. La 
New York city 


Philadelphia. Pa 
Pittsburg,Pa 
Rochester. N. Y 


fan Francisco, Cal 


t Louis Mo 


Svracuse, N. Y .. 


jToledo.O 
JTrov N. Y 


200,405 


214,959 


236,895 


* Numbers marked with a minus sign ( ) Indicate a decrease. 



52 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


MINERAL PRODUCTS. 

[Census of 1890.] 
Total mineral production of the United States for 1889, with values and amounts of increase 
or decrease of 1889 over 1880. 


PRODUCTS. 


PRODUCTION 
FOR 1889. 


INCREASE OR DE- 
CREASE IN 18S9 COM- 
PARED WITH 1880. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Grand total 




1587,230,662 

269,590,487 
807,640,175 

10,000,000 

120,000,000 

6H.3U6.H8.S 
3'2.8S;,744 
2<i.907,8i!i 
16,137,689 
5,791,824 
1,190,500 
151,598 

94,346,809 

65.879,514 
a42,809,70ti 
26,963,340 
33,217,015 
21097099 




f217,911,662 

79,550.622 
134,361.040 
4,000,000 

30,684,431 
27,196,988 
-3,113,256 
15,416,609 
6,355,189 
3,514,392 
607,280 
-13,386 

40,903,091 
23,682,836 
24,453,651 
2,780,107 
14,217,015 
21,097,099 
3,147,293 
-34,154 
-641.UOO 
1,813,953 
1,248,458 
593,862 
364,118 
22-2,767 
327,926 
154,144 
167,097 
197,119 
26,313 
10,915 
76.285 
436.044 
88,807 
-30,863 
29,835 
22862 
24,980 
20,630 
2,192 
77,825 
10.000 
7,092 
-13,150 
2,600 
-2,512 
435,121 
-60,413 
164,845 
2.500 
-22,288 
1(15,043 
189,440 
243 


Total value of metallic products 






Total value of non-metallic products 
Total value of mineral products unspecified.... 








METALLIC. 
Pig iron, value at Philadelphia, long tons 
Silver, coining value, troy ounces () 


7,603,642 
51,354,851 
1,590,869 
231,246,214 
182.967 
58,860 
26,484 
252.663 
47,468 

$ 

85,383,059 
40,714,721 


4,227,730 
21.034,851 
-150,631 
170,766.214 
85,142 
35,621 
-33,442 

-SS 

,:;; 

47,140,418 
15,134,532 


Gold, coining value, troy ounces (6) 


Copper, value at New York city, pounds (c) 


j Lead, value at New York city, short tons 


Zinc, value at New York city, short tons. . . . 


Quicksilver, value at San Francisco, flasks (d).... 
Nickel, value at Philadelphia, pounds (e) 


Aluminum, value at Pittsburg, pounds 


1 Antimony, value at San Francisco, short tons (/). 
Platinum, value (crude) at San Francisco, troy oz. 

NON-METALLIC (SPOT VALUES). 
Bituminous coal, long tons (g) 


Pennsylvania anthracite, long tons (ft) 
Building stone 


Petroleum, barrels (i) 


&5,i(53,5i3 

68,474,668 


8,877,390 
40,474,668 


Lime barrels (j) 


Natural gas 


Cement, barrels (fc) 


'5501245 
12,780,471 
16,970 
267,769 
8,000,000 
32,307 
24,197 
51,735 
93,705 
19,161 
418,891 
2,245 
156,265 


5.000,000 
4,195,412 
3,159,000 
2,937,776 
1,748,458 
1,357,600 

w& 

463,766 
240.559 
171,537 
202,119 
106,313 
125.667 
105,565 
63,956 
188,807 
49,137 

39,370 
30,000 
50,000 
20,000 
31,092 
7850 
8,000 
1800 
635,578 
439,587 
35,155 
2,500 
23,372 
231,708 
244,170 
243 


4,927,057 
2,044,505 

'IB 
""SS 

177,769 

*w 

18,436 
51,291 
91,705 
839 
14,201 
1,201 
843,735 


Salt, barrels (1). 


Limestone for iron flux, long tons.. 


Phosphate rock, long tons (?) 


Mineral waters, gallons sold 








Minerafpaints long tons (n) .. . 




Asphaltum short tons .' 


Pyrites, long tons 


Crude barytes, long tons 






Marls, short tons (p) .... 


Precious stones, gold quartz, jewelry, etc 


Flint, long tons 


11,113 
9,500 


31 

""**K8 

-288 

- 
ffl 

900 
-120 
273,561 


Fluorspar, short tons 




ovaculite pounds . 


5,982,000 
6,97C 
2,000 
49,500 
2,000 
13,955 
115C 
1,OOC 

294,344 


Feldspar long tons .... 


Chromic iron ore, long tons 


Mica, pounds 


Slate tround as pigment, long tons 




Sulphur short tons 


Rutile pounds 


Asbestos short tons 






Millstones 




50,666 

3! 

19,636 




50,000 

& 

31 


Infusorial earth short tons 




Fibrous talc 


Lithographic stone, short tons 


a $1 .2929 per troy ounce ft SB20.CT18 per troy ounce, c Including copper made from imported 
pyrites, d Of 76.5 avoirdupois pounds net. e Including nickel in copper-nickel alloy and in 
exported ore and matte, except for 1881. for which no returns are available for matte. / Part 
of the antimony for 1889 was valued at Philadelphia, g Except for 1880 and 1889 this includes 
brown coal and lignite and anthracite mined elsewhere than in Pennsylvania, h For 188.) and 
1889 this includes all anthracite, i Of 42 gallons, j Of 200 pounds, k Of 300 pounds for nat- 
ural cement and 4U) pounds for artificial Portland. / Of 280 pounds net. m Except for 1889 
this represents only the South Carolina product, n Ocher and metallic oaint. o Refined 
corundum from 1881 to 1888, both inclusive, p Except for 1888 and 1889 this includes only New 
Jersey marls, q Including cobalt oxide in exported ore and matte. Decrease. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS. . 53 


BONDED INDEBTEDNESS. 

[Census of 1890.] 
National, state, and classes of the local bonded debt of the United States, and the amount, 
average interest rate, and per capita interest charge ttereon for 1890. 


DIVISIONS. 


Amount nf 
-Principal. 


Annual 
Interest 
Charge. 


Av- 
age 
Rate of 
Interest 


Interest 
Charge 
Per 
Capita,. 


Total 


$1,954,581,509 

711,313,110 
t224, 175,044 
^133,834,557 
777,784,463 
70,772,387 
36,701,948 

11608,775,947 

**58.225,268 
26,147,237 
tt487,382,465 
27,349.872 
9,671,105 

#15,787,025 

#2,748,800 
273,100 
11,069,259 
1,695,866 


$94,539,379 

28,997,603 
10,278,526 
7,654,399 
41,316,643 
4,093,409 
2,198,799 

31,018,325 

2,718,325 
1,163,489 

M27J63 

531,851 

782,248 

83,435 
13,254 
592,286 
93,273 


4.85 
4.08 

t$ 

5.31 
5.78 
5.99 

5.10 

4.69 
4.45 
5.17 
5.22 
5.50 

4.99 

3.15 

4.85 
5.35 
5.50 


$1.51 

0.46 
0.16 
0.12 
2.01 
0.10 
0.04 

1.78 

8:5? 

2.48 
0.20 
0.03 

1.18 

0.13 
0.02 
2.62 
0.21 




State 


County ... . 


Municipal (places having 4.000 or more population). 
Municipal (places having less than 4,000 population). 
School district 


North Atlantic Division , 


State 


County 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 
Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School district . 


Maine . . . 


State 


County 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4 000 population) 


School district 


New Hampshire 


7,759,669 

2,520,600 
370;300 
3,819,050 
867.388 
182,331 

3,005,132 


414,122 

148,066 
17,181 
194,290 
45,104 
9,481 

147,887 


5.34 

5.88 
4.64 
5.09 
5.20 
5.20 

4.92 


1.10 

0.39 
0.05 
1.35 
0.19 
0.03 

0.44 


State 




Municipal (4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4 000 population) 


School district 




State 


County 










Municipal (4,000 or more population) . 


1,523,326 
1,378,971 
102,835 

0128,726,511 

a28,251,288 
3,01o,000 

fc95,.vii),7t;;i 
1,918,460 


70,092 
72,396 
5,399 

6,231,016 

1,345,114 
110.095 
4,681,802 
94,005 


4.60 

4.85 

4.76 

3.65 
4.91 
4.90 


0.94 
0.28 
0.02 

2.78 

0.60 
0.05 
2.52 
0.25 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School district 


Massachusetts 


State 


County 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 


Municipal Hess than 4,000 population) 
School district 


Rhode Island 


14,255,130 
1,283,000 


706,162 
76,980 


4.95 
6.00 


2.04 
0.22 


State 


County 




12,703,250 
149,000 
119,880 

C21, 842,642 
c3,740,200 


615,738 
7,450 
5,994 

1,023,135 
122,200 


4.68 
3.27 


2.00 
0.20 
0.02 

1.37 
0.16 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School district 




State .... 


County 


Municipal (4,(00or more population) 
Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


14,754,704 
1,737,378 
1,610,360 

d255,540,154 
e6,652,100 


730,201 
88,606 
82,128 

12,800,176 
378,090 


4.95 
5.10 
5.10 

5.01 

5.68 


1.37 
0.41 
0.11 

2.13 

0.06 


School district 


New York 


State 


*f5,333,?16 bears no Interest, t $4,953,788 bears no interest. J. $2,554 bears no interest $377374 
bears no interest. ir$597,333 bears no interest. ** $237 ,080 bears no interest, ft $300 'J.V5 bears ao 
interest, it $!o,500 bears no interest. $500 bears no interest. || || $lw,833 bears 'no interest, 
a $5,000 bears no interest, b $175,833 bears no interest, c $200 bears no interest. d$99,860 bears 
no interest. $60 bears no interest. 



54 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


DIVISIONS. 


Amount of 
Principal. 


Annual 
Interest 
Charge. 


Av- 
erage 
Rate uf 
Interest 


Interest 
Charge 
Per 
Capita. 




$9,940,386 
*222.854,880 
14,922,542 
1,170,186 

153,620,690 

1,196,300 
4,642,149 
143,701,618 
2,488,144 
1,592,479 

i!08,238,994 

11,832,920 
?;905.302 
1181,415,615 
2,192,123 
4,893,034 

**169,961,476 

**88,304,737 
7,335,968 
72319189 
1,953,283 
18,299 

2,789,700 

f.60,000 
545,400 
1,455,900 
128,400 


$436,849 
11,161,289 
764,034 
59,914 

3,134,726 

71,778 
269,641 
2,568,873 
136,848 
87,586 

5,T78,853 

492,662 
316,469 

4,562,326 
126,047 
281,349 

8,526,775 

4,031,257 
435,646 
3,939,506 
119,405 
961 

132,350 

23,525 

27,086 
74,998 
6,741 


I* 

5.12 
5.12 

5.85 

6.00 
5.81 

fc8 

5.50 
5.35 

4.21 
4.00 
5.61 
5.75 
5.75 

5.13 

4.77 
5.94 
5.45 
6.11 
5.25 

4.74 

3.56 

4.97 
5.15 
5.25 


$0.07 
2.93 
0.35 
0.01 

2.17 

0.05 
0.19 
3.07 
0.23 
0.06 

1.10 

0.09 
0.06 
1.93 
0.04 
0.05 

0.96 

0.46 
0.05 
2.98 
0.02 




Municipal (less than 4 000 population) 


School district 




State .. .... 


County 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) - 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population ) 
School district 


Pennsylvania 


State . 


County 


Municipal (4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 
School district 


South Atlantic Division 


State 


County 




Municipal (less than 4 01)0 population) 


School district 


Dela ware 


0.79 

0.14 
0.16 
1.15 
0.07 


State 




Municipal (4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 






1149,979,040 

m S! 
rS8 


2,492,464 

385,666 
40.432 
2,061,567 

4,799 


5.12 

4.24 

4.84 
5.33 
5.50 


2.39 

0.37 
0.04 
4.32 
0.01 






Municipal (4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School district 




#19,781,050 
48,430,156 

31,219,080 
1,862,611 
14,753,056 
595,409 


855,401 
2,538,255 

1,521,414 
108,186 
872,930 
35,725 


4.32 
5.24 

4.87 
5.81 
5.92 
6.00 


3.71 
1.53 

0.92 
0.07 
3.51 
0.03 


Virginia 


State 




Municipal (4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less i ban 4,000 population) 
School district 


West Virginia 


2,420,071 

135,511 
1,071,661 
1,011,600 
183.000 

18,299 

10,992,899 

7,703,100 
1,322,826 
172745C 
239,523 


135,218 

8,131 
65,039 
51,479 
9,608 
961 

597.214 

397,804 
83.077 
99.567 
16,766 


5.59 

6.00 
6.07 
5.09 
5.25 
5.25 

5.43 

5.16 
6.28 
5.76 
7.00 


.18 

0.01 
0.09 
0.77 
0.01 

0.37 

0.25 
0.05 
1.03 
0.01 


State 




Municipal (4 000 or more population) . . 


Municipal (less than 4.0 X) population) 


School district 


North Carolina 


State 




Municipal (4.000 or more population) 
Municipal (less than 4.000 population) 
School district 


South Carolina 


5513,103,794 

6,801,119 
1,035,050 

4,975,425 


668,099 

378,656 
(K),748 
201,871 


5.25 

5.91 
6.74 
4.06 


0.58 

0.33 
0.06 
2.39 


State 


County 


Municipal (4.000 or more population) 


* $99,200 bears no interest, t $7.000 hears no interest. 1 1212,440 bears no interest. $134,220 
bears no intere-t. $78,220 bears no interest. ** 5,780,104 bears no interest, ft $1,270,475 bears 
no interest, ii $100 bears no interest. 5390,189 bears no interest. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS. 55 


DIVISIONS. 


Amount of 
Principal. 


Annual 
Interest 
Charge. 


Av- 
erage 
fate of 
Merest 


InUreit 
Charge 
Per 
Capita. 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population^ 


$292,200 


117,824 


8.10 


$0.02 


School district 


Georgia , 


*20,180,851 

*10,369,340 
356,500 
9,181,350 
283,661 


959,828 

380,660 
23,025 
538,414 
17,729 


5.31 

4.62 
6.46 
5.86 
6.25 


0.52 

0.21 
0.01 
2.38 
0.01 


State . ... 


County . . ... 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population). .. 


School district 


Florida 


2,283,915 

IBB 

558,000 
143,840 


147,946 

80,000 
19,053 
38,680 
10,213 


6.48 

S3 

6.93 
7.10 


0.38 
0.20 


State 




Municipal (4,000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4 000 population) 


School district 


North Central Division 


1309,223,928 

$27,003,540 
66,162,027 
11156,614,019 
34,192,549 
25,251,793 

**73,079,918 

**2,796,666 
7,882,066 
56,442,383 
2,714,492 
3,244,312 

1123,740,202 

tt8,540,615 
6081,996 
7,925,850 
1,191,741 


17,302,710 

1,045,701 

3,8H7,234 
8,771,864 
2,071,761 
1,546,150 

4,182,848 

83,700 
422,887 
3,318,732 
162,870 
194,659 

1,126,583 

273,825 
329,586 
451,668 
71,504 


5.60 

3.88 
5.85 
5.60 
6.06 
6.12 

5.72 

S.OO 
5.3 1 ! 

5.8 
6.00 
6.00 

4.75 

3.21 
5.42 

5.70 
6.00 


0.77 

0.05 
0.17 
1.30 
0.13 
0.07 

1.14 

0.02 
0.12 

IS 

0.05 
0.51 

0.12 
0.15 
0.89 
0.04 


State 




Municipal (4 OOOor more population) 


Municipal ( less than 4,000 population) 


School district 


Ohio 


State . 




Municipal '4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 
School district 




State ... 


County 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School "district ft '....',..'. 


Illinois 


40,747,799 

019,500 
10,942,312 
20,030,438 
6,572,152 
3,183,39? 

012,131,607 

631,993 
1,284,500 
7,454,788 
1,494.829 
1,865,497 

C8,314,022 


2,428,929 


5.96 


0.63 


State 


County 


624,519 
1,194,688 
410,760 
198,962 

684,145 


5.71 
5.96 
6.25 
6.25 

5.65 


o.ie 

0.74 
0.18 
0.05 

0.33 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 
Municipal (less than 4 000 population) 






State 




73,810 
415,436 
86,700 
108,199 

461,672 


5.75 
6.57 
5.80 
5.80 

5.55 


0.04 

8:& 

0.05 
0.27 


Municipal (4,0t)0or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School district 




State 






1,532,247 
c5,639,084 

830,788 
311,903 

28,331,219 

4,365,000 
13,233,815 

16,424,39( 
2.241,592 

2,0ti6,422 


91,382 
304,586 
47,770 
17,934 

1,413,910 

194,425 
184,651 
797,893 
123,288 
113,653 


5.9b 
5.40 
5.75 
5.75 

4.99 

4.45 
5.71 

4.86 
5.50 
5.50 


0.05 
0.58 
0.04 
0.01 

1.09 

0.15 
0.14 
1.97 
0.14 
0.09 


Municipal (4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 
School district 




State . . 




Municipal (4.000 or more population) 
Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School district 


*S2.119,340 bears no interest. tW,448 bears no interest. i 174,773 bears no interest. $2,554 
bears no interest. 8 $17,121 bears no interest. **$!'>.(iG5 bears no interest. tt$16,615 bears no 
interest, # Included with municipal debt. $19,500 bears no interest. U 11 This amount bears 
no interest. a $31,993 bears no interest. 6 This amount bears no interest. c 52,500 bears no 
interest, d $2,554 bears no interest. 



56 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


DIVISIONS. 


Amount of 
Principal. 


Annual 
Interest 
Charge. 


Av- 
erage 
Rate of 
Interest 


Interest 
Charge 
Per 
Capita. 


Iowa . 


$10,404,518 


$579,248 


5.57 


$0.30 


State 




3,239,551 
4,780,736 
1,163,008 
1,221,223 

*47,827,83S 

8,533,000 
9,137,716 
25,611,821 
3,079,750 
1,465,551 

3,328,612 

606,300 
985.8116 
398,000 
283,411 
1,055,095 

6,250,160 

860,200 
2,229,077 
366,000 
691,630 
2,103,253 

15,557,792 

449,267 
5,463,315 
4,766.700 
2.230,298 
2,648,212 

39,510,241 

801,000 
14,149,62 

6',086,'92s 
tl 18,696.525 

f45,546,769 
18,271,538 
51,693.140 
2,966,735 
220,343 

J21,4T4,998 

J680.394 
5,832,627 
14,496,640 
296,465 
168,872 

26,199,476 

16,6136,908 
2,014,491 
7,200,477 
347,600 


175,548 
266,607 
66,873 
70,220 

2,488,276 

336,980 
553.324 
1,325.254 

184,785 
87,933 

224,996 

28,284 
72,351 
27,320 
20,547 
76,494 

400,465 

39.566 
139,892 
22^70 
49,106 
149,331 

925,663 

35,941 
343,039 
258,850 
131,588 
156,245 

2,385,975 

52,980 
856,245 
388,260 
715.970 
372,520 

6,408,062 

2,179.038 
1,156,193 

2,868,877 
190,479 
13,475 

1,213,009 

30,440 
350,478 
804,171 
17,788 
10,132 

1,106,757 

552,434 
120,469 
412,129 
21,725 


5^75 
5.75 

5.20 

3.95 

6.06 
5.18 
6.00 
6.00 

6.76 

4.67 
7.34 
6.86 
7.25 
7.25 

6.41 

4.60 
6.28 
6.17 
7.10 
7.10 

5.95 

8.00 
6.28 
5.43 
5.90 
5.90 

6.04 

6.61 
6.05 
5.73 
6.12 
6.12 

5.44 

4.88 
6.33 
5.55 
6.42 
6.12 

5.65 

4.52 
6.01 
5.55 
6.00 
6.00 

4.37 

3.50 

5.98 
5.72 
6.25 


0.09 
0.80 
0.04 
0.04 

0.93 

0.13 
0.21 
1.63 
0.10 
0.03 

1.23 

0.15 
0.40 

o!i-2 

0.42 
1.22 

0.12 
0.43 
2.22 
0.15 
0.45 

0.87 

0.03 
0.32 
0.95 
?.17 
.15 

1.67 

8$ 

1.74 
0.59 
0.26 

0.58 

0.20 
0.11 
2.15 
0.02 




Municipal (less than 4 000 population) 


School district . .. 


Missouri 


State 


County . .. 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 


Municipal ( less than 4,000 population) 


School district 


North Dakota 


State 






Municipal (less than 4 OOU population) .... 


School district . 




State . ...... 


County . . 


Municipal (4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) ... 


School district 


Nebraska . * 


State 


County 






School district 


Kansas 


State 




Municipal (4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,OiJO population) 
School district 


South Central Division 


State 


County 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 
Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School district 




0.65 

0.02 
0.19 
2.47 
0.01 
0.01 

0.63 

0.31 
0.07 
1.88 
0.01 


State 


County 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 
Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 
School district 


Tennessee 


State 




Municipal (4 000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4 030 population) 


School district 




15,683,641 

9,237,700 
1,355,OOC 
4,739,74 


685,920 

350,450 
89,97b 
225,300 


4.37 

3.79 
6.64 
4.75 


0.45 

0.23 

0.06 
1.82 


State 


County 
Municipal (4,000 or more population) 


* $14,621 bears no interest. t $856,831 bears no interest. J 16,394 bears no interest. 
$847.500 bears no interest. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS. 57 


DIVISIONS. 


Amount of 
Principal. 


Annual 
Interest 
Charge. 


Av- 
erage 
Rate of 
Interest 


Interest 
Charge 
Per 
Capita. 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


$351,200 


$20,194 


5.75 


$0.01 






*3,229,785 

*902,437 
1,164,988 
837,960 
324,400 


193,400 

47,515 
78,719 
47,053 
20,113 


5.99 
5.28 

S3 

6.20 


0.15 

0.04 
0.06 
0.92 
0.02 


State 




Municipal (4.000 or more population) 
Municipal (less than 4.000 population) 


School district 




28,133,222 
11,759,500 

wKB 


1,728,859 
816,637 

.ftffi 


6.15 

6.94 
8.00 
5.56 


1.56 
0.73 

""s.'is 


State 


County 




Municipal (less than 4 000 population) . . 


School district 












20,490,673 

4,237,730 
83<&41 

7.804,100 
1,578,020 
33,982 


1,270,339 

256,062 
449,445 
456,022 
106,516 
2,294 


6.20 

6.04 
6.57 

its 

6.75 


0.57 

Ml 

1.57 
0.05 


State .. . 


County .... 


Municipal (4,000 or more population). 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School district 


Oklahoma . 


State 






























Municipal (less than 4 000 population) 










School district . . 












3,486,730 

2,092.100 
1,021,091 
287,000 
69,060 
17,489 

136,608,523 

15,094,730 
15,917,787 
9.745,650 
4.309,948 
1,540,408 

2,213,046 


209,778 

125,500 
63,386 
15700 
4,143 
1,049 

2,285,904 

304,205 

1,031,837 
559,499 
284,001 
106,362 

144462 


6.02 

6.00 
6.21 
5.47 
6.00 
6.00 

6.25 

5.98 
6.48 
5.74 
6.59 
6.90 

6.51 


0.19 

0.11 
0.06 
0.26 


State 




Municipal (4,000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 






Western Division 


0.76 

0.10 
0.34 
0.54 
0.14 
0.04 

1.09 


State 


County 


Municipal (4.000 or morepopulation) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population) 


School district 


Montana 


State 


County 


1,148,000 

174ioOC 
32,000 


111,954 

18,165 
5,130 
8,913 

72,192 

20,032 
38,060 
11,780 
2,320 


6.56 
6.07 

l:i 

6.29 

6.26 
6.12 
6.77 
7.25 


0.85 
0.74 
10.05 
0.07 

1.19 

10.33 
0.63 
0.65 
0.05 




Municipal (less than 4 000 population) 


School district 




State 


County.... 


Municipal (4,000 or more population) 


Municipal (less than 4,000 population)... 


School district 


Colorado 


5,593,180 

150.000 
2,874,921 
1.272,000 
1,042,633 
253,626 

2,595,988 

720.000 


381,069 

5,250 
204,641 
70.738 
80,804 
19,656 

171,1% 

46.400 


6.81 

3.50 
7.12 

5.56 
7.75 
7.75 

6.59 
6.44 


0.92 

0.01 
0.50 
0.42 

1 

1.11 
0.30 


State 


County 




Municipal (less thar 4 000 population) 


School district ... . 


New Mexico 


State 


* 12,937 bears no interest. t$5,OuO bears no interest. 



58 CHICAGO DAILY 


NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


DIVISIONS. 


Amount of 
Principal. 


Annual 
Interest 
Charge. 


Av- 
erage 
Rate of 
Interest 


Interest 
Charge 
Per 
Capita. 


Count 












$1,763,371 


$115,224 


6.53 


$0.75 


Municipal (4,000 or more popuiati 
Municipal (less than 4,000 popula 
School district 


on). .. 






tion) . 






93,247 
19,370 

2,320,508 

633,000 
1,517,600 
28,000 
115,675 
26,233 

673,000 


7,926 
1,646 

170,997 

45,780 
110,400 

I0!l22 
2,295 

33,880 


8.50 
8.50 

7.37 

7.23 
7.27 
8.57 
8.75 

8.75 

5.03 


0.05 
0.01 

2.87 

0.77 
1.85 
0.47 
0.19 
0.04 

0.16 




















State 












County 












Municipal (4,000 or more popuiati 
Municipal (less than 4,000 populat 
School district . 


3n) 






ion).. 












Utah 












State 
































Municipal (4,665 or more po'puiati 
Municipal (less than 4,000 popula 
School district , 


3n) . . . 






1888 


32,500 
' 1,380 


5.00 
6.00 


0.47 
0.01 


tion) 












Nevada 












857,622 

182,000 
660,822 


62,826 

7,280 
54,538 


7.33 

4.00 

8.26 


1.37 

0.16 
1.19 


State , . .. 
























Municipal (4,000 or more popuiati 
Municipal (less than 4,000 populat 
School district - - - 








ion) . . 




















15,300 
1,112,057 

146,715 
853,700 


1,008 
81,236 

10,672 
631207 


6.59 

7.31 

7.27 
7.40 


6:62j 

0.96 

0.13 
0.75 


Idaho . 












State 












County 












Municipal (4,000 or more popuiati 
Municipal (less than 4,000 populat 
School district 


on)... 






ion).. 




















111,642 

140',OOC 
30,000 
291,362 

"as 

500E 
862,050 
432,000 
186,020 

8,830,10C 

2,465.393 
504.809 


7,357 

77,502 
10,500 

9.8 

2,475 
24,037 

82,140 
71 
300 
44,688 
25,920 
11,161 

1,008,684 
158,220 
302823 
369,428 
147,924 
30,289 


6.59 

5.91 
3.50 

5$ 

8.25 

8.25 

5.53 
7.00 
6.00 
5.18 
6.00 
6.00 

5.83 
6.00 
6.65 
5.85 
6.00 
6.00 


0.09 

0.22 
0.03 
0.09 

8:8? 

0.07 
0.26 














State 












County 












Municipal (4,000 or more popuiati 
Municipal (less than 4,000 populat 
School district - - 


an)... 






ion).. 
























State 
























""6i65 
0.11 
0.04 

0.83 
0.13 
0.25 

MB 


Municipal (4,000 or more populate 
Municipal (less than 4,000 populat 


>n) 






ion).. 












California . 












State 












County 












Municipal (4.000 or more populatk 
Municipal (less than 4.000 populat 
School district 


m)..., 






ion).. 










*$5,000 bears no interest. 

MONEY IN CIRCTTLATION PER CAPITA. 
Computed by the Director of the Mint. 


COUNTRY. 


Oold. 


Sil- 
ver. 


Pa- 
per. 


To- 
tal. 


COUNTRY. Gold. 


Sil- 
ver. 


Pa- 
per. 


To- 
tal. 


Austria 


$1.00 
25.00 
10.66 


$2.25 
1.75 
9.02 
3.53 
1.11 
.17 
1.00 
2.14 
18.30 
4.48 
2.62 
1.82 


$6.50 

"8!S5 

8 ;g 

.67 
20.00 

' 2i72 
3.12 
1.57 

G.36 


$9.75 
26.75 
28.53 
3.64 
13.56 
.84 
31.00 
16.43 
44.55 
18.02 
18.HO 
9.09 


Sg 

Me: 
Net 
Nor 
For 
Riu 
Spa 
Sou 
Swi 
Tui 
: Uni 


y $451 


$1.94 
1.25 
4.31 
14.44 
1.16 
2.00 
.53 
6.91 
.71 
5.00 
1.36 
7.33 


$6.81 
1.40 
.17 
8.89 
3.14 
1.20 
1.20 
5.22 
8.57 
4.67 

"e!78 


$13.26 
4.90 
4.91 
28.88 
8.02 
11.20 
11.20 
17.69 
10.56 
14.67 
2.88 
25.17; 


Australia 


an 2 25 


tico 43 


British India 


herlands 5.55 
way and Sweden. . 3.72 
tugal 8 00 




3.56 


Central America 




10.00 
14.29 
23.53 
10.42 
14.41 
.91 




Egypt 


in 5.56 
th America 1.29 
tzerland 5 00 




Germany 


Great Britain 


key 1 52 


Greece 


ted States 11.06 



THE SETTLEMENT WITH ITALY. 



COAL PRODUCT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

[Census of 1890.] 

The following table gives, by states and territories, the total production of coal in the 
United States for the year 1889, together with the wages, cost, capital, etc. 



STATES AKD TERRI- 
TORIES. 



Grand total 

BITUMINOUS. 

Alabama 

Arkansas 

California and Oregon. . 

Colorado 

Georgia and N. Carolina. 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Indian Territory 

Iowa 

Kansas and Nebraska.. 

Kentucky 

Maryland 

Michigan 

Missouri 

Montana 

New Mexico 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Pennsylvania 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wyoming 



Total 

ANTHRACITE. 
Pennsylvania 

Colorado, New Mexico 
and Rhode Island. . . 

Total 414 45,600,487 



12,552141.229,513 



299,559 $109,130,928 $146,536,280 5342.757,929 $160,226,323 



25,977,106 

2,113,292 

324,157 

342,796 

682,408 

2,254.48(5 

4,841,796 

1323,956 




THE SETTLEMENT WITH ITALY. 



Our difficulty with Italy, growing out of the 
massacre of eleven Italians in the jail at New 
Orleans on the 15th of March, 1891, was dis- 
cussed in the Daily News Almanac of 1892 
(page 35), the record closing with the trans- 
mission to the secretary of state of the report 
of the grand jury of New Orleans, which fully 
investigated the matter. This was on the 19th 
of May, 1891. 

Early in 1892 a marked Improvement took 
place In the attitude of Italy toward the 
United States, although our government did 
nothing more than maintain the respectful 
dignity It had assumed from the first. No 
notice was taken of the affront offered by Italy 
to the United States by the recall of Baron 
Fava.the Italian minister at Washington. Mr. 
Porter, our minister to Rome, came home on 
a leave of absence In the summer, but it was 
distinctly given out that such absence from 
Italy was not a retaliation for the recall of 
Baron Fava. The United States left freely 
open the way of mending the breach between 
the two countries when Italy should move in 
that direction. The first step taken by Italy 
was in October, 1891, when she voluntarily 
opened her markets to American pork, which 



had for a long time been excluded from the 
country. This was followed by a very pleas- 
ant reference to Italy by President Harrison 
in his message to congress in December 1891, 
which, being noted by the Italian premier, 
Rudini, on the 10th of December, brought out 
from him in the chamber of deputies a state- 
ment of confidence that the questions at 
issue between Italy and the United States 
would soon be amicably settled. 

The feeling between the two countries con- 
tinued to grow more friendly during the year, 
which resulted in a correspondence between 
the two governments that has resulted in a 
complete restoration of the amicable rela- 
tions that preceded the cause of the trouble. 
The government of the United States volun- 
tarily took the initiative in closing the breach, 
and without committing itself to the recogni- 
tion of any claim for indemnity, but simply 
as an act of justice and from motives of 
comity, placed in the hands of the Marquis 
Imperial!, the Italian charge d'affaires at 
Washington, the sum of 125.000 francs, or 
$25,000, for distribution among the heirs of the 
three Italians who were killed at New Orleans 
and were found to be subjects of the Italian 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



government. It is understood the money was 
taken from the annual appropriation of 
$80,000 to enable the president to provide for 
unforeseen emergencies in the diplomatic 
and consular service, so that it was unnec- 
essary to call upon congress for a specific ap- 
propriation. By this action on the part of the 
United States government the disagreeable 
complications in the relations of the two gov- 
ernments were removed and the diplomatic 
relations between them restored to the ami- 
cable status existing before the New Orleans 
tragedy. Minister Porter returned to Rome 
and a minister from Italy took up his post 
at Washington. The full text of the corre- 
spondence on the subject is given below in 
the following letters: 

ELAINE'S LETTER. 

Department of State,. Washington, D. C., 
April 12, 1892. Sir: I congratulate you that 
the difficulties existing between the United 
States and Italy, growing out of the lament- 
able massacre at New Orleans in March of 
last year, are about to be terminated. The 
president, feeling that for such an injury 
there should be ample indemnity, instructs 
me to tender you 126,000 francs. The Italian 

vernment will distribute this sum among 

e families of the victims. 

While the injury was not inflicted directly 
by the United States, the president neverthe- 
less feels that it is the solemn duty as well as 
the great pleasure of the national govern- 
ment to pay a satisfactory indemnity. More- 
over, the president's instructions carry with 
them the hope that the transaction of to-day 
may efface all memory of the unhappy trag- 
edy; that the old and friendly relations of 
the United States and Italy maybe restored, 
and that nothing untoward may ever again 
occur to disturb their harmonious friendship. 

I avail myself of this occasion to assure you 
that your prolonged service at this capital as 
charge d'affaires has been marked by every 
quality that renders you grateful and accept- 
able to the government of the United States, 
and to renew to you the assurance of my high 
consideration. JAMES G. ELAINE. 

To Marquis Imperial!, charge d'affaires of 
Italy. 

ITALY'S ANSWER. 

Washington, D. C., April 12, 1832. His Ex- 
cellency James G. Elaine, Secretarv of State- 
Mr. Secretary of State: You were pleased 
to inform me, by your note of to-day, that the 
federal government had decided to pay to 
Italy, by way of indemnity, the sum of ~~ 



go 
th 



francs, to be distributed by the Italian 
government among the families of the royal 
subjects who were victims of the massacre 
which took place March 15, Ib91, in the city of 
New Orleans. Your excellency also expressed 
the hope that the decision reached by the 
president would put an end to the unfortu- 
nate incident to which the deplorable occur- 
rence gave rise, and that the friendly rela- 
tions between the two countries would be 
firmly established. 

After having taken note with much pleasure 
of the language used by the president in his 
message of December last, and after having 
fully appreciated the words of regret and cen- 
sure uttered with so much authority by the 
chief magistrate of the republic, and likewise 
the recommendations to congress that were 
suggested to his lofty wisdom by the unhappy 
incident, the government of his majesty is 
now glad to learn that the United States ac- 
knowledges that it is its solemn duty and at 
the same time a great pleasure to pay an 
indemnity to Italy. 

The king's government does not hesitate to 
accept the indemnity without prejudice to the 
judicial steps which it may be proper for the 
parties to take, and considering the redress 
obtained sufficient, it sees no reason why the 
relations between the two governments, 
which relations should faithfully reflect the 
sentiments of reciprocal esteem and sym- 
pathy that animate the two nations, should 
not again become intimate, cordial and 
friendly, as they have traditionally been in 
the past, and as it is to be hoped they will ever 
be in the future. 

In bringing the foregoing to your knowl- 
edge, in virtue of the authorization given me 
by his excellency, the Marquis di Kudini, 
president of the council, minister of foreign 
affairs, in the name of the government of his 
majesty, the king of Italy, my august sover- 
eign, I have the honor to declare to your 
excellency that the diplomatic relations be- 
tween Italy and the United States are from 
this moment fully re-established. I hasten, 
moreover, in obedience to instructions re- 
ceived, to inform you that, pending the minis- 
ter's return to this capital, I have taken 
charge of the royal legation in the capacity of 
charge d'affaires. Be pleased to accept, etc., 

IMPERIALI. 

Both the United States minister, the Hon. 
A. G. Porter, and the Italian minister, Baron 
Fava, have returned to their respective posts. 
The former arrived in Rome May 31, 1892, and 
the latter in Washington May 15, 1892. 



MEN OF THE YEAR 189*. 
Brief sketches of men prominent in 1892. 



BENJAMIN HARRISON. 
REPUBLICAN NOMINEE FOR THE PRESI- 
DENCY. 

Benjamin Harrison, twenty-third president 
of the United States, was born in North Bend, 
O., Aug. 20, 1833. He is the grandson of Will- 
iam Henry Harrison, ninth president of the 
United States. He attended school near Cin- 
cinnati, and was graduated at Miami univer- 
sity. He studied law and was admitted to the 
bar, after which he was appointed crier in the 
federal court at Cincinnati, which brought 
him $2 a day during term time. 

In 1854 he removed to Indianapolis, Ind., in 
which city he has since resided. He continued 
the practice of his profession, and in 18t)0 was 
elected reporter of the Supreme court. Upon 
the breaking out of the war he recruited the 
70th Indiana regiment and became its colonel. 



He served with distinction for two years, when 
the war department detailed him for special 
service in Indiana. In five weeks be com- 
pleted the work and was given the command 
of a brigade and transferred to Nashville. 
After Sherman reached Savannah Gen. Harri- 
son was ordered to join him, which he did at 
Goldsboro, N. C., where he remained until the 
close of the war. He was mustered out of 
the service in June, 1865, with the rank of 
brigadier-general. Returning to civil life, 
Gen. Harrison became a member of the law 
firm of Porter, Harrison & Fishback. In 18W> 
he was candidate for governor on the repub- 
lican side, but was defeated. He was appointed 
on the Mississippi river commission in 1879. 
Mr. Harrison was elected United States sena- 
tor for Indiana in 1880 as the successor of 
Joseph E. McDonald, and took his seat on 
March 4, 1881. His term of service expired 



MEN OF THE YEAR. 



61 



March 3, 1887. In the republican national 
convention in June. 1888, there were fourteen 
candidates voted for on the first ballot, Gen. 
Harrison receiving 83 votes. On the eighth 
ballot Gen. Harrison received 544 votes and 
became the nominee of his party. At the 
November election following he received the 
electoral vote of every northern state except 
Connecticut and New Jersey, 233, defeating Mr. 
Cleveland, who received lt!3. He was inaug- 
urated president March 4, 1889. At the re- 
publican national convention at Minneapolis 
in 1892 Gen. Harrison was renominated by his 

WHITELAW REID. 

REPUBLICAN NOMINEE FOB THE VICE-PRESI- 
DENCY. 

Whltelaw Reid was born in Xenia, O., in 
October, 1837. His parents gave him a good 
education. At 15 he entered the Miami uni- 
versity at Oxford, Butler county. O., where 
he was graduated in 185(5. He began the active 
duties of life as principal of the graded schools 
in South Charleston, Clark county, in the 
same state, but did not continue in this occu- 
pation long. In 1857 he bought the Xenia 
News, and did such good work on that journal 
as to give it a reputation wide as the state. 
This led to his engagement by the Times and 
Gazette of Cincinnati and the Herald of 
Cleveland as their Columbus correspondent. 
The war gave him an opportunity of distin- 
guishing himself as a correspondent at the 
front. He served the Cincinnati Gazette in 
this capacity and in 1862 became a stockholder 
of that journal, the publication of which he 
assisted in subsequently in the capacity of as- 
sociate editor. His connection with the New 
York Tribune began with his being the editor 
in charge of its Washington bureau. He 
ventured upon the publication of a volume in 
the year 1805. It was entitled "After the War 
- A Southern Tour," and recorded observa- 
tions made in company with Chief Justice 
Chase on an extensive range of travel. Reid 
published another book in 1868, "Ohio in the 
War," a work of considerable length and 
value. He became permanently an editor on 
the staff of the Tribune in 1870, and when 
Horace Greeley was a candidate for the pres- 
idency assumed the position of managing 
editor. Mr. Reid is a wealthy man. He mar- 
ried the daughter of D. O. Mills, many times a 
millionaire, and lives in fine style in an aris- 
tocratic up-town district in New York. Presi- 
dent Harrison appointed Mr. Reid minister 
to France, and he has proved a successful and 
exceedingly popular diplomate. In the spring 
of 1892 Mr. Reid returned from France, having 
resigned his position in Paris. 

GROVER CLEVELAND. 
PRESIDENT-ELECT OP THE UNITED STATES. 

Grover Cleveland, twenty-second president 
of the United States, was born at Caldwell, 
N. J., March 18, 1837. His educational oppor- 
tunities were at that time limited, and when 
14 years old he removed with his parents to 
Fayetteville, N. Y., where he began his career 
as clerk in a store. Then came an opportu- 
nity for Grover to attend a local academy, 
and it was here he received training that 
later in life led him to adopt the legal profes- 
sion. Drifting westward, he became a student 
in a law office at Buffalo, N. Y., and in May, 
1859, he was admitted to the bar. His industry 
and evident ability led to his appointment as 
assistant district attorney when only 25 years 
of age. He made such a record while in that 
office that his name became a synonvm for 
industry and honesty. Then followed in se- 
quence of official terms of office his election 
to the posts of sheriff of Erie county in 1870, 



mayor of Buffalo in 1881, governor of New 
York in 1882, president of the United States in 
1884. 

His first Waterloo came in 1888, when, nom 
inated for a second term at the white house 
by the St. Louis convention, he was defeated 
by President Harrison by sixty-five electoral 
votes. During the earlier part of his admin- 
istration Mr. Cleveland was wedded to Miss 
Frances Folsom of Buffalo, N. Y. The story 
of how the ex-president wooed and won his 
bride is somewhat romantic. She was the 
daughter of Cleveland's former law partner. 
It is said that Miss Folsom became engaged 
to Mr. Cleveland about the time he began 
his term as president. He had always held 
her in fond regard since the -,ime he trotted 
her on his knee when she was a little girl. He 
treasured her picture all through the days of 
his bachelorhood. Frances Folsom Cleveland 
added vastly to the luster of Grover Cleve- 
land's administration, endearing herself 
almost to the extent of being idolized by a 
large part of the American people. In Octo- 
ber, 1891, a daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Cleveland. 

A. E. STEVENSON. 

THE VICE-PRESIDENT-ELECT OP THE UNITED 

STATES. 

Mr. Stevenson was born in Christian county, 
Ky., Oct 28, 1835, but belongs to an old North 
Carolina family. His father was of Scotch- 
Irish parentage, and during his residence in 
Kentucky was a planter. In 1853 the family 
removed to Bloomington, this state, and there 
Mr. Stevenson commenced the study of law 
in the office of R. E. Williams. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1S58, and soon after went 
to Metamora, Woodford county. He settled 
in that place for ten years. From 1861 to 1863 
Mr. Stevenson was a master in chancery, and 
from 1864 to 1868 was state's attorney. In 1868 
he returned to Bloomington and formed a law 
partnership with the Hon. James S. Ewing. 
He was presidential elector in 1864, and ten 
years later was nominated for congress from 
the Bloomington district, at that time con- 
sidered reliably republican by 3,000 majority. 
To the surprise of the republicans this 
majority was decreased 1,285. Again in 1876 
Mr. Stevenson received a second nomination, 
and while the party lines were more tightly 
drawn in the presidential election he was 
def3ated by only 250 plurality. Two years 
later he carried every county- in the district. 
His own county, that had given Hayes and 
Garfleld 2,000 majority, gave him a majority. 
In 1880 at another presidential election Mr. 
Stevenson was defeated by only 200 votes. In 
1882, when the state had been redistricted by 
the republican legislature and not a doubtful 
county was supposed to be left in the Bloom- 
ington district, Mr. Stevenson, who had ac- 
cepted a renomination, was defeated by only 
350 votes. At the following election the old 
opponent of Mr. Stevenson was elected by 
2,700 majority. He was a delegate to the 
democratic national convention of 1884, and 
after the election of Grover Cleveland was 
appointed first assistant postmaster-general. 
Later he resumed the practice of law in 
Bloomington. Mr. Stevenson was a delegate 
to the present convention and chairman of 
the Illinois delegation. In 1866 Mr. Stevenson 
was married to Miss Letitia Green, daughter 
of Dr. Louis Green, president of Center 
college, Danville, Ky., and an eminent 
Presbyterian minister. 

GEN. JAMES B. WEAVER. 
THE PEOPLE'S PARTY NOMINEE FOR THB 

PRESIDENCY. 

James B. Weaver was born in Dayton, O., 
June 12, 1833. was graduated at the law school 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



of the Ohio university at Cincinnati in 1854. 
enlisted as a private at the beginning of the 
war and advanced in rank with a rapidity 
equaled in very few cases. He was elected 
first lieutenant of company G of the 2d Iowa 
infantry, attained the rank of major Oct. 3, 
1868, and as both his colonel and lieutenant 
were killed at the battle of Corinth he was 
made colonel. Finally he was brevetted briga- 
dier-general "for gallantry on the field, to 
date from March 13, 1863." 

In 1866 he was elected district attorney of 
the 2d judicial district of Iowa, and in 1867 was 
appointed assessor of internal revenue for 
the 5th district of the state, an office he held 
for six years. He then edited the Iowa Trib- 
une of Des Moines and was elected as an 
independent republican to the XLVIth con- 
gress. Men of his way of thinking, however, 
were even then organizing a new party, and 
in 1880 he became the greenbackers' candidate 
for president. Excluding doubtful and fusion 
tickets, he received 307,740 votes. He then re- 
sumed private life and professional duties 
for a time, but In 1884-6 was re-elected to con- 
gress. 

No man in th? Lth congress was better in- 
formed on parliamentary rules, as he conclu- 
sively proved by holding the house In a dead- 
lock for several days on a question regarding 
the Oklahoma reservation. Even then he 
was regarded as a sort of stormy petrel in 
politics, not a straight-out democrat, and cer- 
tainly not a republican. In his first campaign 
he scarcely had the backing of any party, and 
his nomination was, In the politician's phrase, 
"decidedly irregular," yet he made a cross- 
roads canvass among the farmers and defeated 
one of the brainiest republicans in the state. 

In 184 the republican candidate, Capt. 
Frank T. Campbell, was a national banker; 
so the old greenbackers rallied to Gen. 
Weaver, and in 1886 something else handi- 
capped the republicans. Seeing him thus vic- 
torious in a confessedly republican district. 
the country began to look on Gen. Weaver as 
a mascot, but in 1888 the republicans suc- 
ceeded in uniting on a strong man and re- 
manded the general to private life and peo- 
ple's party politics. 

GEN. JAMES FIELD. 

THE PEOPLE'S PARTT NOMINEE FOB VICE- 
PRESIDENT. 

Gen. James Field, the vice-presidential 
nominee of the people's party, was born in 
ulpepper county, Virginia, in 1826, and spent 
his boyhood there. He was educated a lawyer. 
and became a democrat of "the old-fashioned 
kind," as he puts It. In 1859 he was appointed 
ommonwealth attorney for Culpepper 
ounty. At the opening of the war, in April 



of 1861, he resigned his position and volun- 
teered with the Culpepper minute-men. That 
company became noted for having a rattle- 
snake for its emblem and "Don't Tread on 
Me" for its motto. The company marched to 
Harper's Ferry and assisted in the capture of 
the federal arsenal. 

Gen. Field was promoted from the ranks to 
major in the Virginia forces and subsequently 
was assigned to a position on the staff of Gen. 
A. P. HiU. He was in the service from April 
7, 1861, to the surrender at Appomattox, and 
won distinction for his gallantry. He was 
wounded at the first battle of Cold Harbor in 
862 and again at Slaughter's Mountain (an 
ngagement known in the north as the battle 
of Cedar Creek) on Aug. 9. 1862. As a result of 
the latter he lost his right leg below the knee, 
and now uses an artificial limb and a crutch. 
He was out of active service until May, 1863. 
when he rejoined the army at Fredericksburg. 
He was with the army in the Gettysburg cam- 



paign, returned with it to Virginia, and was 
continuously in service till the close of the 
war. 

After Lee's surrender Gen. Field resumed 
the practice of law. In 1877 he was appointed 
by the governor of Virginia to fill an unex- 
pired term as attorney-general of the state, 
and in November of that year he was elected 
to congress for a full term of four years 
beginning January 1, 1878. Since 1882 he has 
been a practicing lawyer and a farmer, resid 
ing on a considerable estate in Albemarle 
county. 

Though never a member of an alliance, a 
grange or any other industrial organization. 
Gen. Field has since 1885 proclaimed from the 
stump throughout Virginia that redress for 
the grievances of the people could only be had 
through a reform organization. He held that 
the influence of the party caucus had grown 
superior to the will of the constituents of the 
party and, therefore, unwise legislation could 
neither be repealed nor prevented; therefore, 
a new party was a necessity. Gen. Field is a 
baptist, and has for some time been at the 
head of the state organization of that church 
in Virginia. 

GEN. JOHN BIDWELL. 

PROHIBITION CANDIDATE FOR THE PRESI- 
DENCY. 

John Bidwell was born in Chautauqua 
county, New Fork, Aug. 5, 1819. In 1829 his 
parents removed to Erie county. Pa., and in 
1831 again removed to Ashtabula county, 
Ohio, where he was educated at Kingsville 
academy. During the winter of 1838-9 he 
taught school in Darke county, and subse- 
quently for two years in Missouri. In 1841 he 
emigrated to California, being one of the first 
to make the journey overland, which, at that 
time, occupied six months. On the Pacific 
coast he had charge of Bodega and Fort Russ, 
and also of Gen Sutler's Feather river pos- 
sessions. He served in the Mexican war 
until its close, rising from second lieutenant 
to major. He was among the first to discover 
gold on Feather river in 1848. In 1849 he was a 
member of the state constitutional conven- 
tion and during the same year became a 
member of the senate of the new state. He 
was one of a committee appointed to convey 
a block of gold-bearing quartz from California 
to Washington in 1850. In 1860 he was a dele- 
gate to the famous democratic national con- 
vention at Charleston. Since then he has 
been brigadier-general of the state militia. In 
1864 he was elected to congress and served 
from Dec. 4, 1865, to March 3, 18CT. He was a 
delegate to the national convention of his 
party in 1866. In 1875 he was candidate for 
governor of California, but was defeated. 

J. B. CRANFILL. 

PROHIBITION NOMINEE FOR THE VICE- 
PRESIDENCY. 

Mr. Cranflll was born in Parker county, 
Texas, in 1857. He was raised on a farm, but 
studied medicine and became a physician. 
He started the Gatesville Advance, which he 
published until 1886. In August of that year 
he called the first prohibition party conven- 
tion ever held in Texas. 

In December, 1886, Dr. Cranflll moved to 
Waco. Soon thereafter the great campaign 
for constitutional prohibition began in Texas, 
and Dr. Cranflll took a position at once as the 
leading journalist on that side of the issue 
and his paper was regarded as the principal 
exponent or the amendment in Texas. The 
amendment having failed. Dr. Cranfill sold his 
paper in 1888 and began work as financial 
secretary of Baylor university at Waco. In 



MEN OF THE YEAR. 



October, 1889, he was elected to the superin- 
tendency of baptist mission work In Texas, 
and this placed him at the head and front of 
this great denomination in his native state. 
Under his administration the mission work of 
the state was doubled, and he has the distinc- 
tion of having been the leader of the largest 
state mission work ever done tn the history of 
the United States. In January. 1890, Dr. 
Cranflll was ordained as a baptist preacher 
by the First Baptist church at Waco. In 
March, 1892, he resigned his position as super- 
intendent of missions to take charge with the 
Rev. M. V. Smith. D. D., of the Texas Baptist 
Standard, which is the leading baptist news- 
paper in Texas. This position he at present fills. 

GEORGE SHIRAS, JR. 

JUSTICE OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME 

COURT. 

George Shiras, jr., Is 60 years old. He was 
born in Pittsburg, Pa., In 1832. descends 
from a well-known pioneer family and is a 
cousin of ex-Secretary Blaine. His father 
was a brewer and owned a brewery at the 
Point. It is a landmark and still stands. In 
1840 the elder Shiras retired from business, 
having amassed a comfortable fortune. He 
turned his attention to the education of his 
children. Early in life the future Supreme 
court justice showed that he was possessed of 
an unusual order of Intellect. His mother 
was a daughter of Dr. Francis E. Herron, the 
first pastor of the First Presbyterian church . 

Mr. Shiras is a graduate of Yale, of the class 
of 1853, taking the Greek prize. He was a 
classmate of Chauncey M. Depew and Presi- 
dent White of Cornell. He returned to Pitts- 
burg and began to read law with Judge 
Hopewell Hepburn of the District court. 
Judge Hepburn was considered one of the 
legal lights of his time. After becoming a 
member of the bar young Shiras went into 
partnership with Judge Hepburn for a few 
years. 

About 1860 Mr. Shiras, who had acquired 
considerable prestige as a lawyer by that 
time, started out for himself. His career 
since has been an almost unbroken series of 
legal triumphs. He has figured in dozens of 
cases that have been recorded as precedents. 

His practice has been along many lines, and 
he has frequently argued in the court to 
which he has been called. 

Mr. Shiras has been engaged in much im- 
portant litigation. In the case of Hartupee 
vs. the City of Pittsburg Mr. Shiras repre- 
sented the city. A late case in which Mr. 
yhiras was engaged was that of the Junction 
railroad, in which the Supreme court affirmed 
that railroad's right to c: oss the tracks of the 
Allegheny Valley railroad at 43d street. Mr. 
Shiras acted as counsel for the Monongahela 
Navigation company in its case against the 
government which asked for the condemna- 
tion of lock No. 7. In the riot case of 1877 of 
Gibson against Allegheny county for indem- 
nity on goods destroyed during the riot Mr. 
Shiras was one of the counsel for the county. 

Mr. Shiras is the forty-sixth citizen ap- 
pointed to the associate justiceship of the 
Supreme court of the United States since its 
organization in 1789. In that time there have 
been eight chief justices. The first appoint- 
ment to the bench from Pennsylvania was 
James Wilson, the second Henry Baldwin of 
Pittsburg, the third Robert Cooper Grier, the 
fourth W. Strong, and Mr. Shiras is the fifth 
from Pennsylvania. 

ANDREW D. WHITE. 

UNITED STATES MINISTER TO ST. PETERS- 
BURG, RUSSIA. 

Andrew Dlckson White, sclwlar, educator, 
philanthropist, publicist and diplomatist, is a 



native of New York state, having been born 
in Homer, Cortland county, Nov. 7. 1832. 
When 7 years of age he removed with his 
family to Syracuse, where his boyhood and 
youth were passed. His father was an enter- 
prising business man, a banker and railroad 
operator. In 1849 young Andrew entered 
Hobart college at Geneva, remained one year 
and then entered the class of 1853 at Yale, 
which numbered among its members Edmund 
Clarence Stedman, George W. Smalley and 
Isaac H. Bromley. Upon the completion of 
his college course he went abroad to study, 
remaining nearly three years in the College of 
France and the University of Berlin. He was 
for several months an attache of the United 
States legation at St. Petersburg during the 
period embracing the most stirring events of 
the Crimean war. He returned to America in 
1856, and the following year became professor 
of history and English literature in the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. In 1861 he resigned the 
professorship and went abroad for health and 
study, remaining two years. 

In 1863 Mr. White was elected a state senator 
from the district comprising the counties of 
Onondaga and Cortland, N. Y. In 1865 he was 
re-elected. It was while in the senate in 1864 
that he met Ezra Cornell. The latter was 
wealthy and determined to found a college 
"where any man could be educated in any 
study" at Ithaca, N. Y. Mr. White aided him 
in obtaining a state charter for the college 
and then a United States land grant of 990,000 
acres for its endowment. 

Mr. White was elected the first president of 
the university, and sketched the plans upon 
which it was founded. He gave all his 
strength, mental and physical, to the school 
for many years. 

After twenty years of service as president of 
Cornell, Mr. White resigned in 1885. He is 
still identified, however, with the university 
as a trustee. During the last fifteen years of 
his term as president of the college he found 
time in which to serve his country in diplo- 
matic labors. In 1871 he was one of the United 
States commissioners to Santo Domingo. The 
same year he was also chairman of the 
republican state convention. In 1879 he was 
appointed minister to Germany by President 
Grant. He was held in esteem by the German 
government at Berlin and was a man of influ- 
ence. He was a delegate-at-large to the 
national republican conventions of 1872, 1876 
and 1884. Last September he was prominently 
mentioned for governor before the New York 
convention which nominated J. Sloat Fassett. 

GEN. EUGENE A. CARR. 

THE NE\V% BRIGADIER-GENERAL OF THE 
ARMY. 

Gen. Carr was born March 20, 1830, in Erie 
county, New York. He was appointed as a 
cadet at the military academy in September, 
1846. He- was commissioned in the regular 
service as second lieutenant June 30,1851; as 
first lieutenant of cavalry March 3. 1S55; as 
captain 4th cavalry June 11, 1858; as major 5th 
cavalry July 17. 1862; as lieutenant-colonel 4th 
cavalry Jan. 7, 1873, and as colonel 6th cavalry 
April 29, 1879. During the war Gen. Carr re- 
ceived the following brevets in the regular 
service: That of lieutenant-colonel Aug. 10, 
1861, for gallant and meritorious service in the 
battle of Wilson Creek, Mo.; that of colonel 
May 18, 1863, for gallant and meritorious serv- 
ice in the action of the Black River Bridge, 
Miss.; that of brigadier-general March 13, 1865, 
for gallant and meritorious service in the 
capture of Little Rock, Ark., and that of 
major-general March 13, 1865, for gallant and 
meritorious service during the war. The 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 18i>3. 



record of Gen. Carr has been a long, faithful 
and active one, and from its beginning, with 
two expeditions to the Rocky mountains in 
1852-8, through several Indian engagements in 
1800, down to and including the war of the 
rebellion, his services as an officer of the 
army have been of the highest order. During 
the war of the rebellion Gen. Carr partici- 
pated in many of the battles of the union 
army, and displayed daring, coolness and 
judgment which won for him the praise of his 
senior officers and the gratitude of the people 
of the north. 

Since the war Gen. Carr has led several suc- 
cessful expeditions against the Indians in the 
southwest and northwest, For these opera- 
tions he received joint resolutions of thanks 
from the legislatures of Nebraska and Colo- 
rado. He served in the regular army in Ari- 
zona several years and in the northwest un- 
der Gen. Merntt in 1876. During the railway 
riot in Chicago in 1877 he commanded a cav- 
alry battalion. In the fall of 1879 he was pro- 
moted to the colonelcy of the 6th cavalry, 
then stationed in New Mexico. The 6th cav- 
alry is now stationed at Fort Niobrara. 

Up to date Gen. Carr has held twenty-nine 
commands ranking higher than his command 
at the time. He was four times wounded and 
participated in thirty-eight battles, of which 
sixteen were with Indians and fourteen since 
the close of the rebellion. 

When the Sioux outbreak of February, 1891, 
occurred Gen. Carr and his regiment were 
stationed at San Francisco, but such was his 
record as an Indian fighter that as soon as the 
outbreak assumed importance he was ordered 
to the scene with his men, and to him was 
largely due the favorable termination of the 
outbreak. 

AUGUSTUS G. WEISSERT. 

COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OP THE GRAND ARMY 

OF THE REPUBLIC. 

Augustus Gordon Weissert was born at Can- 
ton, O., Aug. 17, 1844. He attended the schools 
at Racine, Wis., the state of his adoption. 
Graduating from the Racine high school he 
entered the University of Michigan. He was 
distinguished in his studies and bore off the 
degree of LL. D. He was admitted to prac- 
tice in Wisconsin, and was winning fame at 
the Milwaukee bar when the war broke out. 
As soon as the tocsin sounded he enlisted in 
the 8th Wisconsin infantry, the " Live-Eagle " 
regiment of history, and shared its fortunes 
till the battle of Nashville. There he was 
grievously wounded, receiving a bullet just 
over the knee, which he still carries. Conva- 
lescing sufficiently to rejoin his regiment, he 
did so on crutches. After four years' gallant 
service he was brevetted captain from the 
date of the battle of Lake Chicol, Ark., June 6, 
1864, for meritorious service in that fight and 
at the battle of Nashville on Dec. 15 following, 
and for extraordinary bravery throughout the 
Red river expedition. He refused the tender 
of a West Point cadetship by reason of his 
wound. He joined the Grand Army of the Re- 
public at Madison, Wis., in 1866, and has filled 
creditably every position from comrade and 
officer of the day up to department com- 
mander. He has since been called upon to ad- 
minister the office of commander-in-chief . He 
was chairman of the executive council of the 
citizens' committee that made the twenty- 
third national encampment at Milwaukee a 
success. At the Detroit encampment he re- 
ceived the second highest number of votes for 
the office to which he has been elected. In the 
capacity of senior vice-commander he visited 
all the departments of the east in company 
with Commander-in-Chief R. A. Palmer. Just 
now he is a member of E. B. Wolcott post of 
Milwaukee. 



ABRAHAM J. SEAT. 
GOVERNOR OF OKLAHOMA TERRITORY. 

The appointment of Judge Abraham Jeffer- 
son Seay as governor of Oklahoma territory 
gives general satisfaction, and he has been 
congratulated heartily by men of all parties, 
who have long admired him for his energy 
and probity of character. Gov. Seay was born 
in Amherst county, Virginia, Nov. 28, 1832. 
When he was 3 years old his parents 
moved to Osage county, Missouri. His early 
education was very limited, and when he 
reached the age of 21 he could scarcely more 
than read and write. He started out with a 
determination to win, however, and surely he 
has succeeded. Working by the day he earned 
sufficient money to pay nis way through the 
Steeleville (Mo.) academy, and then studied 
law in the same town, paying his way by his 
own exertions. He was admitted to the bar 
three days before the firing on Fort Sumter, 
and, though most of his people sided with the 
confederacy, he soon enlisted in the union 
army and marched away for four years of 
hard work and fighting. He entered as a pri- 
vate, but in August, 1864, he was mustered out 
a colonel of the 32d infantry, Missouri volun- 
teers. He then began the practice of law at 
Steeleville, and in the course of time was 
county attorney, circuit attorney and circuit 
judge, sitting on the bench in the latter 
capacity twelve years. All the time he was an 
active republican, on the stump in every cam- 
paign, and twice ran for congress against 
Richard Bland, the great silver champion. In 
May, 1890, he was appointed associate justice 
of the Supreme court of Oklahoma, and until 
appointed governor filled that position with 
honor to himself and satisfaction to the peo- 
ple of the territory. 

BISHOP W. PERKINS. 
UNITED STATES SENATOR FROM KANSAS. 

Bishop W. Perkins was born at Rochester, 
O., Oct. 18, 1832. He was educated in the public 
schools and at Knox college, Galesburg, 111. 
After leaving college he went to Colorado, 
and on his return in 1862 enlisted in company 
D, 83d Illinois volunteer infantry. He served 
as sergeant and lieutenant, and in December, 
1863, was appointed adjutant of the 16th Colo- 
rado infantry. Later he was assigned to duty 
as captain of company C of the same regi- 
ment. He served as judge-advocate on the 
staff of Gen. Gillem, and also in the same 
position on the staff of Gen. Steadman; was 
mustered out at Nashville in May, 1866; re- 
turned to Illinois, and resumed the study of 
law, reading with O. C. Gray at Ottawa. 

After being admitted to the bar in 1867 he 
located at Pierceton, Ind., wheie he remained 
until he went to Oswego, Kas., in April, 1869. 
The same year he was appointed county 
attorney and the following year probate 
judge, which office he held till Feb. 1, 1873, 
when he was elected judge of the llth judicial 
district. He was re-elected in 1874 and 1878. 
and in November, 1882, was elected a member 
of congress. He was appointed United States 
senator Jan. 1, 1892, to succeed Preston B. 
Plumb, deceased. 

Mr. Perkins is a republican, sincere in his 
convictions and aggressive in his expressions. 
He was a delegate to the Chicago convention 
i n 1880. He was elected member of congress 
from the 3d district, and was re-elected for 
three successive terms, but met defeat a year 
ago at the hands of the Farmers' alliance. 
He was editor and proprietor of the Oswego 
Register from 1871 until appointed district 
judge in 1873. 



THE BERING SEA DISPUTE. 



THE BERING SEA DISPUTE. 



Our account of the differences in connec- 
tion with the seal fisheries between the 
United States and Great Britain in the 
Daily News Almanac for 1892 (page 44) closed 
with the agreement between the two countries 
for the appointment of a joint high commis- 
sion which should settle finally the matter in 
dispute. 

Considerable delay took place in the sign- 
ing of the treaty for a joint commission, and 
it was not until Feb. 29, 1892, that it was for- 
mally signed, but it was not ratified by the 
United States senate until a month later. The 
number of arbitrators was increased from five 
to seven. The joint commission spent several 
months in Bering sea gathering all the infor- 
mation possible to bear on the proposed arbi- 
tration. It was expected that the four com- 
missioners would be able to f ormul ate a joint 
report that would be accepted by the board of 
arbitration as an ultimate criterion of all 
points raised regarding the seal industry. 
The report of the commission was not satis- 
factory, and no agreement between the two 
countries was arrived at. It was shown, how- 
ever, that since Alaska came into the posses- 
sion of the United States the number of seals 
had gradually diminished, and this decrease 
was shown to be due to the destruction of the 
animals by sealers. There was a disagree- 
ment as to the source of this destruction, the 
United States commissioners charging it to 
the deep-sea killing carried on by Canadian 
sealers, while the British representatives at- 
tributed it to the killing of seals permitted 
under contract by the United States treasury. 

A new difficulty now arose, for it was ap- 
parent that whatever might be the result 
reached by the commissioners or arbitrators it 
could not be reached in time to be operative 
during the sealing season which was ap- 
proaching. Steps were at once taken by the 
United States to secure a continuance or the 
modus vivendi, which would expire on the 1st 
of May, 1892. To protect our own rights the 
president issued on the 19th of February. 1892. 
a proclamation warning all persons of their 
liability to arrest and punishment if they 
should be found sealing in Bering sea in viola- 
tion of the laws of the United States. 

The British government opposed the re- 
newal of the modus vivendi as requested by 
the United States. Lord Salisbury based his 
refusal upon the rep9rt of the British com- 
missioners that sealing in the open sea 
would not endanger the destruction of the 
species, and he objected to another year's 
suspension of the industry which was impor- 
tant to Canada. Lord Salisbury, however, 
proposed that sealing should be prohibited 
within thirty miles of the Pribilof islands and 
that the catch by Americans in those islands 
should be limited to 30 000 seals. On the 29th 
of February, 1893, a treaty was signed in Wash- 
ington by Mr. Elaine on the part of the United 
States and Sir Julian Pauncefote on the part 
of Great Britain, by which the whole contro- 
versy was relegated to an international arbi- 
tration commission to be composed of seven 
members. On the 8th of March the treaty 
was sent to the senate for ratification, but 
the president and his cabinet decided to main- 
tain its demand for a renewal of the modus 
vivendi. The points to be submitted to arbi- 
tration were set out in the sixth article of the 
treaty as follows: 

1. What exclusive jurisdiction in the sea 
known as the Bering sea. and what exclusive 
rights in the seal fisheries therein did Russia 
assert and exercise prior and up to the time 
of the cession of Alaska to the United States? 

2. How far were these claims of jurisdiction 



as to the seal fisheries recognized and con- 
ceded by Great Britain? 

3. Was the body of water now known as 
Bering sea included in the phrase "Pacific 
ocean" as used in the treaty of 1825 between 
Great Britain and Russia, and what rights, if 
any, in Bering sea were held and exclusively 
exercised by Russia after said treaty? 

4. Did not all the rights of Russia as to juris- 
diction and as to the seal fisheries in Bering 
sea east of the water boundary, in the treaty 
between the United States and Russia of the 
30th of March, 18CT, j>ass unimpaired to the 
United States under that treaty? 

5. Has the United States any right, and if so 
what right, of protection of property in the 
fur seals frequenting the islands of the 
United States in Bering sea when such seals 
are found outside the ordinary three-mile 
limit? These points were to be decided by 
seven arbitrators, two to be named by the 
president, two by the queen, one by the presi- 
dent of the French republic and one each by 
the king of Italy and the king of Sweden and 
were to meet in Paris. 

The treaty did not touch the question of 
damages for illegal sealing on the one hand 
or for illegal seizure of vessels on the other. 
This, however, was settled by an agreement 
between Mr. Blaine and Lord Salisbury under 
which the claims for damages followed the 
award of the commission. No answer had 
been returned to our demand for a renewal of 
the modus vivendi of March 8 and on the Kith 
Lord Salisbury's attention was again called 
to the subject. On the 19th of March Lord 
Salisbury replied, declining to renew the 
modus vivendi for various reasons. The 
president on the 22d of March replied very 
vigorously to Lord Salisbury and declared 
that the United States should insist upon the 
right to prevent deep-sea sealing as a matter 
of "honor and self-respect." He further said : 
"If her majesty's government proceeds during 
the sealing season upon the basis of its con- 
tention as to the rights of the Canadian seal- 
ers no choice is left this government but to 
proceed upon the basis of its confident con- 
tention that pelagic sealing in Bering sea is 
an infraction of its jurisdiction and property 
rights." For a time it looked as if the differ- 
ences between the United States and Great 
Britain would become serious and it was not 
until Lord Salisbury's reply to the president's 
note of the 22d, which was received on the 
26th, that matters assumed a more pacific ap- 
pearance. In this note Lord Salisbury ex- 
pressed a willingness to agree to a renewal of 
the modus vivendi on the condition that the 
nation which was defeated in the arbitration 
should pay to the other such damages as 
might be assessed by the commission as a 
result of a suspension of sealing. The ques- 
tion of damages was settled to the satisfac- 
tion of both governments and on the 18th of 
April Secretary Blaine and Sir Julian Paunce- 
fote concluded a new modus vivendi provid- 
ing for a close season, as did that of 1891, but 
including the agreements as to damages, and it 
was sent to the senate April 19, 1892. 

Briefly stated, these articles prohibit the 
British and Americans from seal-killing in 
Bering sea and islands, save 7.000 seals to be 
taken on the islands for the subsistence of 
the natives during the arbitration, provide 
for the seizure of offending vessels and per- 
mit the residence of British agents on the 
islands during the season. Articles 3 and f> 
read as follows: 

"Article 3. If the result of the arbitration 
be to affirm the right of British sealers to 
take seals in Bering sea within the bounds 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



claimed by the United States under its pur- 
chase from Russia, then compensation shall 
be made by the United States to Great Britain 
for th'j use of her subjects for abstaining 
from the exercise of that right during the 
pendency of the arbitration upon the basis of 

uch a regulated and limited catch or catches 
as in the opinion of the arbitrators might 
have been taken without an undue diminu- 
tion of the seal herds, and on the other hand, 

f the result of the arbitration shall be to 
deny the right of British sealers to take seals 
within the said waters, then compensation 
shall be made by Great Britain to the United 
States (for itself, its c!tizens and lessees) for 
this agreement, to limit the island catch to 
7,500 seals upon the basis of the difference 
between their number and such larger catch 
as in the opinion of the arbitrators might 
have been taken without an undue diminu- 
tion of the seal herd. The amount awarded, 

f any, in either case shall be such as, under 
all the circumstances, is just and equitable 
and shall be promptly paid. 

"Article 6. This convention may be re- 
nounced by either of the high contracting 
parties at any time after the 31st day of 



October, 1893, on giving to the parties two 
months' notice of its termination and at the 
expiration of this notice the convention shall 
cease to be in force." 

The seventh and last article simply provides 
for the exchange of ratifications as early as 
possible. 

The ratification of the treaty of arbitration 
and the modus Vivendi were exchanged in 
London May 7. 

Of the seven arbitrators mentioned in the 
treaty six have already been chosen. The 
United States arbitrators are Justice John M. 
Harlan of the United States Supreme court 
and Senator John T. Morgan of Alabama. 
The British arbitrators are Lord Hannen and 
Sir John S. D. Thompson, Canadian minister 
ofjustlce. 

The counsel of the United States consists of 
Edward J. Phelps of Vermont, ex-minister to 
Great Britain, and Judge Henry W. Blodgett 
of Chicago. The British government will be 
represented by Mr. C. Robinson of Toronto, 
Canada, and Sir W. H. Cross, member of the 
British parliament. France selected as arbi- 
trator Senator Baron de Courcelles and Italy 
Marquis Visconti Venosta. 



THE DIFFICULTY WITH CHILE. 



A very grave trouble, that at one time 
.hreatened war between the United States 
and Chile, was settled during the last year 
with great credit to our own government. 
During the Chilean rebellion the insurgents 
conceived a great dislike of the United states 
for the supposed complicity of Mr. Egan, the 
United States minister at Valparaiso, with 
Balmaceda, the president of Chile. The 
defeat of the president and his subsequent 
suicide intensified the dislike of the successful 
.nsurgents against the United States. The 
United States man-of-war Baltimore was dis- 
patched to Valparaiso to protect American 
interests in that country. The Baltimore was 
therefore in the harbor at Valparaiso by 
virtue of that general Invitation which 
nations are held to extend to the war vessels 
of other powers with which they have friendly 
relations. The vessel reached the harbor of 
Valparaiso Sept. 14, 1891, and the city officials 
extended the hospitalities of the city to its 
officers and crew, as is customary. The inci- 
dents that led to the difficulty are given in 
detail in the message of the president to con- 
gress Jan. 26, 1892, as follows: 

"On the 16th of October last Capt. Schley, 
commanding the United States steamship 
Baltimore, gave shore leave to 117 petty 
officers and sailors of his ship. These men 
left the ship about 1:30 p. m. No incident of 
violence occurred; none of our men was 
arrested; no complaint was lodged against 
them; nor did any collision or outbreak occur 
until about 6 o'clock p. m. Capt. Schley states 
that he was himself on shore and about the 
streets of the city until 5:30 p. m.; that he met 
very many of his men who were on leave; 
that they were sober and were conducting 
themselves with propriety, saluting Chilean 
and other officers as they met them. Other 
officers of the ship and Capt. Jenkins of the 
merchant ship Keweenaw corroborate Capt. 
Schley as to the general sobriety and good 
behavior of our men. The sisters of charity 
at the hospital to which our wounded men 
were taken, when inquired of, stated that 
they were sober when received. If the situa- 
tion had been otherwise we must believe that 
the Chilean police authorities would have 
made arrests. 

"About 6 p. m. the assault began, and it Is 
remarkable that the investigation by the 



judge of crimes, though so protracted, does 
not enable him to give any more satisfactory 
account of its origin than is found in the 
statement that it began between drunken 
sailors. Repeatedly in the correspondence it 
is asserted that it was impossible to learn the 
precise cause of the riot. The minister of for- 
eign affairs, Matta, in his telegram to Mr. 
Montt, under date Dec. 31, states that the 
quarrel began between two sailors in a tavern 
and was continued in the street, persons who 
were passing joining in it. The testimony of 
Talbot, an apprentice who was with Riggin, is 
that the outbreak in which they were involved 
began by a Chilean sailor spitting in the face 
of Talbot, which was resented by a knock- 
down. It appears that Riggin and Talbot 
were at the time unaccompanied by any oth- 
ers of their shipmates. 

"These two men were immediately beset by a 
crowd of Chilean citizens and sailors, through 
which they broke their way to a street car and 
entered It for safety. They were pursued, 
driven from the car, and Riggin was so seri- 
ously beaten that he fell in the street ap- 
parently dead. 

"There is nothing in the report of the Chilean 
investigation made to us that seriously im- 
peaches this testimony. It appears from Chil- 
ean sources that almost instantly, with a sud- 
denness that strongly implies premeditation 
and preparation, a mob, stated by the police 
authorities at one time to number 2,000 and at 
another 1,000, was engaged in the assault upon 
our sailors, who are represented as resisting 
'with stones, clubs, and bright arms.' The 
report of the intendente of Oct. 30 states that 
the fight began at 6 p. m. in three streets, 
which are named, that information was re- 
ceived at the intendencia at 6:15, and that the 
police arrived on the scene at 6:30, a full half 
hour after the assault began. At that time, he 
says, a mob of 2.000 men had collected and 
that for several squares there was the appear- 
ance of ' a real battlefield.' 

"The scene at this point is very graphically 
set before us by the Chilean testimony. The 
American sailors, who, after so long an ex- 
amination, have not been found guilty of any 
breach of the peace so far as the Chilean 
authorities are able to discover, unarmed and 
defenseless, are fleeing for their lives, pursued 
by overwhelming numbers and fighting only 



THE DIFFICULTY WITH CHILE. 



to aid their own escape from death or to 
succor some mate whose life is in greater 
peril. Eighteen of them are brutally stabbed 
and beaten, while one Chilean seems, from 
the report, to have suffered some injury; but 
how serious or with what character of weapon, 
or whether by a missile thrown by our men or 
by some of his fellow-rioters, is unascer- 
tained." 

In the Chilean investigation that followed 
that government made the most strenuous 
efforts to show that the difficulty was brought 
on by the sailors, but the great preponderance 
of evidence shows that the assault was com- 
mitted by an excited mob of Chileans actuated 
solely and only by a hatred of the uniforms 
the men wore and of the flag under which 
they served. 

The judicial inquiry in Chile terminated 
Jan. 8, 1892, having been instituted Oct. 17, 1891. 
It was presided over by Judge Henry Foster 
of the Criminal court of Valparaiso. This 
court reported: "1. That the incident origi- 
nated in a brawl between intoxicated sailors 
of both nations. The riot grew in proportions 
on account of the special ward in which it 
occurred, full of houses of bad reputation and 
sailors. 2. The policemen from the first 
moment did all they were expected to do to 
suppress the riot. The correct course of the 
police has been acknowledged by every one of 
the witnesses and of the American sailors, 
except two. 3. Only one isolated shot was 
fired. It was from a revolver. The police are 
armed with carbines." 

There is a wide difference between the find- 
ings of the Chilean court and the result of the 
inquiry by the officers of the Baltimore. The 
report or the medical officer of the vessel 
states that Riggin was killed by a rifle ball, and 
there was abundant evidence to prove that the 
attack was premeditated and that the sailors 
were assaulted in six different places at about 
the same time. Capt. Schley states that in an 
interview with Judge Foster soon after the 
riot the latter said that the riot was caused by 
the hatred that the lower class of Chileans 
had for Americans because of the belief that 
the Americans had aided or sympathized with 
Balmaceda through the Chilean struggle. 
Chile made no offer to apologize for the un- 
justifiable affront to the dignity of the United 
states, but after three months of delay made 
the claim that the chain of legal formalities 
was not yet complete, but that other links still 
remained in the shape of a trial before the 
judge of crimes on the indictments of some 
men who had been arrested for the riot. 

President Harrison therefore decided that 
the time had come when further delay in a 
reparation on the part of Chile could not be 
permitted. Such was the condition when con- 
gress convened. The publication in Chile of 
that part of his message to congress that bore 
on this matter aroused considerable resent- 
ment in Chile, and on Dec. 1 1, 1891, the then min- 
ister of foreign affairs. Senor Manuel Matta, 
not only stated that the American minister 
and consul at Valparaiso had concealed testi- 
mony which might have cleared up the matter, 
but he also addressed a circular to the 
Chilean legations in the United States and 
Europe accusing the American minister and 
the American naval officers of making reports 
to Washington that were deliberately false 
and of engaging in intrigues for creating 
trouble between the two countries. 
THE MATTA CIRCULAR. 

The premier's circular was as follows : 

"Having read the portion of the report of 
the secretary of the navy and of the message 
of the president of the United States I think 
proper to inform you that the statements on 
which both report and message are based are 
erroneous or deliberately incorrect. With re- 



spect to the persons to whom an asylum has 
been granted, they have never been threat- 
ened with cruel treatment, nor has it been 
sought to remove them from the legation, nor 
has their surrender been asked for. Never 
has the house or the person of the plenipoten- 
tiary, notwithstanding indiscretions and de- 
liberate provocations, been subjected to any 
offense, as is proved by the eleven notes of 
September, October and'November. 

"With respect to the seamen of the Balti- 
more there is, moreover, no exactness or sin- 
cerity in what is said at Washington. The 
occurrence took place in a bad neighborhood 
of the city, the maintop of Valparaiso, add 
among people who are not models of distire- 
tion and temperance. When the police and 
other forces interfered and calmed the tumult 
there were already several hundred people 
there and it was ten squares or more from 
the place where it had begun. 

"Mr. Egan sent, on the 26th of October, a 
note that was aggressive in purpose and viru- 
lent in language, as is seen by the copy and 
the note written in reply on the 27th. 

"On the 18th the preliminary examination 
had already been commenced; it had been de- 
layed owingto the non-appearance of the offi- 
cers of the Baltimore and owing to undue pre- 
tensions and refusals of Mr. Egan himself. 
No provocation has ever been accefted or in- 
itiated by this department. Its attitude, while 
it has ever been one of firmness and prudence, 
has never been one of aggressiveness, nor 
will it ever be one of humiliation, whatever 
may be or has been said at Washington by 
those who are interested in justifying their 
conduct or who are blinded by erroneous 
views. 

"The telegrams, notes and letters which 
have been sent to yott contain the truth, the 
whole truth, in connection with what has 
taken place in these matters, in which ill-W!ll 
and the consequent words and pretensions 
have not emanated from this department. 
Mr. Tracy and Jlr. Harftson have beeti led 
into error in respect to our people and goTern- 
ment; the instructions (recommending) impar- 
tiality and friendship have not been complied 
with, either now or before. If no -official 
complaint has baen made against the minister 
and the naval officers it is because the facts, 
public and notorious both in Chile and the 
United States, could not, although they were 
well proved, be urged by our confidential 
agents. Proof of tbis is furnished by the de- 
mands of Balmaceda and the concessions 
made in June and July, the whole Itata case, 
the San Francisco at Quintero and the cabfe 
companies. The statement that the North 
American seamen were attacked in various 
localities at the same time is deliberately in- 
correct. 

"As the preliminary examination is not yet 
concluded it is not yet known who and how 
many the guilty parties are. You no doubt 
have the note of Nov.!), written in reply to Min- 
ister Egan, in which 1 request him to furnish 
testimony which he would not give, although 
he had said that he had evidence showing who 
the murderer was and who the other guilty 
parties of the 16th of October were. That and 
all other notes will be published here. You 
will publish a translation of them in the 
United States. Deny In the meantime every- 
thing that does not agree with these state- 
ments, being assured of their exactness, as we 
are of the right, the dignity, and the final suc- 
cess of Chile, notwithstanding the intrigues 
which proceed from so low (a source) and the 
threats which come from so hi<rh (a source)." 

This circular was permitted to go for a month 
unnoticed and it was not until it had been 
transmitted to the Chilean congress and had 
been officially published hi the newspapers. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



becoming thus a public document, that our 
government felt called upon to accord to it 
the notice it demanded. No other document 
in all the correspondence was so fraught with 
danger. Its reflections upon the honor of the 
American civil and naval officers in Chile and 
ts language concerning President Harrison 
and Secretary Tracy aroused universal indig 
nation in the United States. The government 
of Chile saw that the circular was a great mis- 
take and it was withdrawn. 

On Jan. 21, 1892. the ultimatum of the United 
States was served by Secretary Blaine on the 
Chilean government through its representative 
in Washington, Senor Pedro Montt. The 
same day Minister Egan was cabled full in- 
formation of the status of affairs. 

THE ULTIMATUM. 

The ultimatum contained three specific de- 
mands: 

_. That an apology should be given for the 
murderous assault upon the sailors of the 
Baltimore in the streets of Valparaiso. 

2. That an indemnity should be given to the 
sailors who had been injured and to the fami- 
lies of those who had been killed. 

3. That the insulting circular of Minister 
Matta should be absolutely withdrawn. 

No answer having been received up to noon 
of Jan. 25, four days after the ultimatum had 
been delivered, the president sent to congress 
the whole volume of official correspondence 



relating to the subject matter of the dispute. 
The next day it came up for consideration. A 
note of explanation and apology from the 
Chilean government,in reply to the ultimatum 
of Jan. 21, had actually been sent on the very 
day that the president sent his message to 
congress. It had not, however, been received 
by the president, nor had our government any 
indication of its character. Chile's answer to 
the ultimatum .of the United States proved 
satisfactory to our government. It contained 
a complete apology for the Baltimore incident, 
and its whol e tone gave evidence of the anxi- 
ety of Chile to end the difficulty on terms ac- 
ceptable to the United States. All the de- 
mands of the ultimatum were unconditionally 
granted; the Chilean authorities offered to 
leave to the United States Supreme court the 
question of reparation to the victims of the 
mob in Valparaiso. The offensive Matta circu- 
lar and the demand for Mr. Egan's recall were 
withdrawn with adequate expressions of re- 
gret and with an emphatic declaration that 
Chile desired none but the most friendly re- 
lations with the United States. This concilia- 
tory reply disposed of all the points at issue, 
and the president, in transmitting it to con- 
gress Jan. 28. 1892, intimated that further ne- 
gotiations might now be safely committed to 
the executive branch of the government. 

Seventy-five thousand dollars were paid by 
Chile to be distributed among the heirs of the 
two sailors who were killed and to compensate 
those who were injured. 



UNITED STATES AND CANADA-RETALIATION. 



On the 20th of June, 1892, the president sent 
to congress a message recommending retalia- 
tion on the Dominion of Canada for an unjust 
discrimination against American vessels nav- 
igating Canadian canals. On the 21st of July 
following congress passed an act authorizing 
the president to retaliate on Canada for such 
discrimination, and on the 20th of August the 
president issued the following proclamation: 
THE PRESIDENT'S PROCLAMATION. 

Whereas, By an act of congress, approved 
July 26, 1892, entitled "An act to enforce 
reciprocal commercial relations between the 
United States and Canada, and for other pur- 
poses," it is provided "that, with a view of 
securing reciprocal advantages for the citi- 
zens, ports and vessels of the United States 
on and after the 1st day of August, 1892, 
whenever and so often as the president shall 
be satisfied that the passage through any 
canal or lock connected with the navigation 
of the St. Lawrence river, the great lakes, or 
the waterways connecting the same, of any 
vessels of the United States, or of cargoes or 
passengers in transit to any port of the United 
States, is prohibited or is made difficult or 
burdensome by the imposition of tolls or oth- 
erwise, which, in view of the free passage 
through the St. Mary's Falls canal now per- 
mitted to vessels of all nations, he shall deem 
to be reciprocally unjust and unreasonable, 
he shall have the power and it shall be his 
duty to suspend by proclamation to that effect 
for such time and to such extent, including 
absolute prohibition, as he shall deem right, 
the right of free passage through the St. 
Mary's Falls canal so far as it relates to the 
vessels owned by the subjects of the govern- 
ment so discriminating against the citizens, 
ports or vessels of the United States or to 
any cargoes, portions of cargoes or passen- 
gers in transit to the ports of the government 
making such discrimination, whether carried 
in vessels of the United States or of other 
nations. In case and during such suspension 



tolls shall be levied, collected and paid as 
follows, to-wit: Upon freight of whatever 
kind or description, not to exceed $2 per ton; 
upon passengers, not to exceed $5 each, as 
shall be from time to time determined by the 
president. 

Provided, That no tolls shall be charged or 
collected upon freight or passengers carried 
to and landed at Ogdensburg or any port west 
of Ogdensburg and south of a line drawn from 
the northern boundary of the state of New 
York through the St. Lawrence river, the 
great lakes, and their connecting channels, to 
the northern boundary of the state of Minne- 
sota. 

Sec. 2. All tolls so charged shall be collected 
under such regulations as shall be prescribed 
by the secretary of the treasury, who may 
require the master of each vessel to furnish a 
sworn statement of the amount and kind of 
cargo, the number of passengers carried, and 
the destination of the same, and such proof of 
the actual delivery of such cargo or passen- 
gers at some port or place within the limits 
above named as he shall deem satisfactory, 
and until such proof is furnished such freight 
and passengers may be considered to have 
been landed at some port or place outside of 
those limits, and the amount of tolls which 
would have accrued if they had been so 



delivered shall constitute a lien, which may 
be enforced against the vessel in default 
wherever and whenever found in the waters 



of the United States; and 

Whereas. The government of the Dominion 
of Canada imposes a toll amounting to 20 
cents a ton on all freight passing through the 
Welland canal in transit to a port of the 
United States and also a further toll on all 
vessels of the United States and on all passen- 
gers in transit to a port of the United States, 
all of which tolls are without rebate; and 

Whereas, The government of the Dominion 
of Canada, in accordance with an order in 
council April 4, 1892. refunds 18 cents per ton 
of the 20-cent toll at the Welland canal on 



UNITED STATES AND CANADA-RETALIATION. 



wheat. Indian corn, peas, barley, rye, oats, 
flaxseed and buckwheat, upon condition that 
they are originally shipped tor and carried to 
Montreal or some port east of Montreal for 
export, and that if trans-shipped at inter- 
mediate points such trans-shipment is made 
within the Dominion of Canada, but allows 
no such nor any other rebate on said products 
when shipped to a port of the United States 
or when carried to Montreal for export if 
trans-shipped within the United States; and 

Whereas, The government of the Dominion 
of Canada, by said system of rebate and 
otherwise, discriminat* s against the citizens 
of the United States in the use of said Welland 
canal in violation of the provisions of article 
27 of the treaty of Washington, concluded 
May 8. 1871 ; and 

Whereas, Said Welland canal is connected 
with the navigation of the great lakes, and I 
am satisfied that the passage through it of 
cargoes in transit to ports of the United 
States is made difficult and burdensome by 
said discriminating system of rebate and 
otherwise, and is reciprocally unjust and un- 
reasonable; now, therefore, I, Benjamin 
Harrison, president of the United States of 
America, by virtue of the power to that end 
conferred upon me by said act of congress, 
approved July 20, 1892, do hereby direct that 
from and after Sept. 1, 1892, until further 
notice, a toll of 20 cents per ton be levied, 
collected, and paid on all freight of whatever 
cind or description passing through the St. 
Mary's Falls canal in transit to any port of 
the Dominion of Canada, whether carried in 
vessels of the United States or of other 
nations, and to that extent I do hereby sus- 
pend from and after said date the right of free 
passage through said St. Mary's Falls canal pf 
any and all cargoes or portions of cargoes in 
transit to Canadian ports. In testimony 
whereof, etc. BENJAMIN HARRISON. 

HISTORT OF THE DIFFICULTY. 

May 30, 1890, the steamer J. R. Langdon, of 
.he Ogdensburg Transit company, left Chicago 
with 36,500 bushels of corn destined for export 
bo foreign countries via Montreal. The grain 
was to be trans-shipped at Ogdensburg, instead 
Kingston, as it had been from time im- 
memorial. On the St. Lawrence river route, 
by which grain is sent to foreign countries, 
he transfer from lake vessels to St. Lawrence 
iver barges, which are shallow enough to 
jass through the St. Lawrence river canals, 
las been made for many years at Kingston, 
t was the principal industry of that Canadian 
own on the north shore of Lake Ontario. 
The grain was transferred from lake vessels 
,o river barges by means of floating elevators. 
When there were no barges at hand the lake 
vessels had to wait until some came back from 
Montreal. When the barges reached Mont- 
p eal before the ocean steamers had arrived 
which were to take the grain across the 
Atlantic the barges lay ar<5und Montreal 
larbor until the ocean steamers were ready, 
t was a primitive way of handling grain, but 
he Canadians, whose conservatism is pro- 
-erbial, were indisposed to adopt any other. 

It was in the spring of 1890 that the Ogdens- 
>urg Transit company, which had built ele- 
vators and followed the modern methods in 
he grain trade at Ogdensburg. a town farther 
lown on the St. Lawrence river, entered the 
leld as a competitor in the Montreal grain 
,rade. From the first shippers took most 
dndly to Ogdensburg as the place of transfer, 
t enabled them to have their boats unloaded 
juickly, and the grain -was held in elevators 
until the ocean steamer which was to take it 
Tom Montreal was about ready to receive it. 
Lake vessels made the run of sixty miles Irom 
Kingston to Ogdenshurg without extra charge 



owing to the rapidity with which they could 
be unloaded at the latter point. St. Lawrence 
river barges, which were compelled to pass 
Ogdensburg on their way to Kingston, saved a 
tow of 120 miles by stopping at Ogdensburg 
and taking their grain from there. The charges 
by the new route were made the same as from 
Kingston. During 1890 450,414 bushels of corn 
and 25,000 bushels of oats were sent abroad 
over the St. Lawrence river route which was 
transferred at Ogdensburg. The Canadian 
government at the beginning of the trade by 
Ogdensburg allowed that city the same ad- 
vantages as it had been giving Kingston. On 
the grain which was bound for export by the 
way of Montreal a rebate of 18 cents of the 29 
cents per ton canal tolls levied at the Welland 
canal was allowed and a "let-pass" was issued 
permitting the grain to go through all the 
lower Canadian canals to Montreal without 
further toll. 

The initial season of the Ogdensburg route 
indicated plainly that Kingston would soon 
lose her grain trade. At this juncture the 
Canadian elections came on. Sir John Mac- 
donald's home borough was Kingston. He 
pledged his constituents, if they gave him 
their votes, so to manipulate canal tolls that 
Kingston would no longer fear the deadly 
competition of the American port of Ogdens- 
burg. He kept his promise, and an order in 
council was issued in the spring of 1891 that 
canal tolls would no longer be rebated on the 
grain trans-shipped from lake vessels to river 
barges unless at a Canadian port. This mani- 
fest discrimination against Americans in the 
use of Canadian canals on the same terms as 
all other nations has never been explained. 
It was a high-handed act taken by the Domin- 
ion cabinet because it was thought that the 
American city of Ogdensburg could not help 
herself. Kingston did not make a move to in- 
troduce modern methods in the handling of 
her grain trade. She relied solely upon the 
puissance of Sir John Macdonald, whom she 
had returned to parliament and to power. 

The Ogdensburg people did not give up the 
struggle. Shippers were anxious to send their 
grain by that route, and with the belief that 
the American government would come to 
their aid they kept on in the Montreal grain 
trade during the spring of 1891. The full Wel- 
land canal tolls were paid by the Ogdensburg 
people and the St. Lawrence river canal tolls 
were also paid on this grain. It was hoped 
that the American government would make a 
stand against the discrimination and that the 
tolls would be finally rebated. When Septem- 
ber came and not a move had been made, the 
Ogdensburg people gave up the contest. Up 
to that time in 1891 they had handled from 
Chicago 321,495 bushels of corn and 206.418 
bushels of wheat. This business had been 
done at a heavy loss. 

It was nearly six months after Ogdensburg 
had retired from the Montreal grain trade 
that President Harrison finally saw the dis- 
crimination of which the Canadians were 
guilty. Then came his message to congress 
advising retaliation on Canadian commerce 
passing through the American canal at Sault 
Ste. Marie, Mich., and Senator Davis' bill put- 
ting retaliatory measures into effect. 

The retaliation was a body blow to the Can- 
adians. If they insist upon continuing the or- 
der in council which has driven Ogdensburg 
from the grain trade, the losses of the Cana- 
dian marine will be beyond computation. The 
great bulk of the wheat raised in Manitor>a 
find* its way to Lake Superior ports and is 
from there shipped by wat^r to the lower 
lakes. A heavy toll at Sault Ste. Marie will 
drive all this grain to American ports and it 

ill then be shipped in American vessels in 
bond throu-rh t!ie United Stnt s. Tho Cana- 



70 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



Jian Pacific operates a line of passenger 
steamers between Owen sound and Georgian 
Day and Port Arthur, its port on Lake Supe- 
rior. The Grand Trunk has lines of steamers 
mnning from Surma to Lake Superior. Nine- 
-enthsof all the business done by Canadian 
ressels either originates on Lake Superior or 
s freight sent to Lake Superior ports. Every 



one of the craft engaged in the traffic must 
pass through the American canal at Sault Ste. 
Marie. A prohibitory toll, such as the presi- 
dent is empowered to levy, will drive the Can- 
adian vessels out of business altogether. 
Even a moderate toll, with the keen competi- 
tion now existing in the carrying trade, will 
give traffic to American vessels. 



IMPORTANT LEGISLATION. 



While a large number of bills were intro- 
luced into the ffrst session of the Llld con- 
jress that convened in December, 1891, few 
of much importance were passed. This 
vas, in part, owing to the fact that while the 
louse of representatives was strongly demo- 
cratic the senate was republican and each 
jrevented the other from passing measures of 
i radical nature. The following were the 
nost notable measures passed: 

TO ENCOURAGE AMERICAN SHIPPING. 

This bill authorized and directed the secre- 
ary of the treasury to grant registers, as ves- 
iels of the United States, to such foreign-built 
teamships now engaged in freight and pas- 
lenger business and sailing in an established 
ine from a port in the United States, as are 
>f a tonnage of not less than 8,000 tons and 
capable of a speed of not less than twenty 
mots per hour, according to the existing 
nethod of government test for speed, of 
vhich not less than 90 per centum of the 
hares of the capital of the foreign corpora- 
ion or association owning the same was 
>wned Jan. 1, 1890, and has continued to be 
>wned until the passage of this act by citizens 
if the United States, including as such citi- 
ens corporations created under the laws of 
my of the states thereof, upon the American 
iwners of such majority interest obtaining a 
ull and complete transfer and title to such 
teamships from the foreign corporations 
wning the same : Provided, That such Amer- 
can owners shall, subsequent to the date of 
,his law, have built, or have contracted to 
juild, in American shipyards, steamships of 
in aggregate tonnage of not less in amount 
ban that of the steamships so admitted to 
egistry. Each steamship so built or con- 
racted for to be of a tonnage of not less than 
,000 tons. 

Sec. 2. That the secretary of the treasury, 
n being satisfied that such steamships so ac- 
quired by American citizens, or by such corpor- 
tion or corporations as above set forth, are 
uch as come within the provisions of this 
act, and that the American owners of such 
steamships, for which an American registry 
s to be granted under the provisions hereof, 
have built or contracted to build in American 
shipyards steamships of an aggregate tonnage 
as set forth in the first section hereof, shall di- 
rect the bills of sale or transfer of the foreign- 
auilt steamships so acquired to be recorded in 
the office of the collector of customs of the 
proper collection district, and cause such 
steamships to be registered as vessels of the 
United States by said collector. After which 
each of such vessels shall be entitled to all the 
fights and privileges of a vessel of the United 
States, except that it shall not be employed in 
the coastwise trade of the United States. 

Sec. 3. That no further or other inspection 
shall be required for the said steamship or 
steamships than is now required for for- 
eign steamships carrying passengers under 
the existing laws of the United States, and 
that a special certificate of inspection may be 
issued for each steamship registered under 
this act; and that before issuing the registry 
to any such steamship as a vessel of the 
United States the collector of customs of the 
proper collection district shall cause such 



steamships to be measured and described in 
accordance with the laws of the United States, 
which measurement and description shall be 
recited in the certificate of registry to be is- 
sued under this act. 

Sec. 4. That any steamships so registered 
under the provisions of this act may be taken 
and used by the United States as cruisers or 
transports upon payment to the owners of the 
fair actual value of the same at the time of the 
taking, and if there shall be a disagreement as 
to the fair actual value at the time of taking be- 
tween the United States and the owners, then 
the same shall be determined by two impartial 
appraisers, one to be appointed by each of the 
said parties, who, in case of disagreement, 
shall select a third, the award of any two of 
the three so chosen to be final and conclusive. 
[Approved May 10, 1892.] 

EXCLUSION OF THE CHINESE. 

Sec. 1 continues all acts prohibiting Chinese 
immigration for ten years. 

Sec. 2 provides for the removal of all Chinese 
not here lawfully to the country of which they 
are citizens. 

Sec. 3 makes it obligatory on the Chinaman 
arrested here to establish, by affirmative evi- 
dence, his right to be here. 

Sec. 4 provides for punishing those not law- 
fully here by confinement at hard labor for 
one year. The other sections provide as fol- 
lows: 

Sec. 5. That after the passage of this act on 
an application to any judge or court of the 
United States on the first instance for a writ of 
habeas corpus, by a Chinese person seeking to 
land in the United States, to whom this priv- 
ilege has been denied, no bail shall be allowed, 
and such application shall be heard and de- 
termined promptly without unnecessary delay. 

Sec. 6. And it shall be the duty of all Chi- 
nese laborers within the limits of the United 
States, at the time of the passage of this act, 
and who are entitled to remain in the United 
States, to apply to the collector of internal 
revenue of their respective districts, within 
one year after the passage of this act, for a cer- 
tificate of residence, and any Chinese laborer, 
within the limits of the United States, who 
shall neglect, fail, or refuse to comply with 
the provisions of this act, or who, after one 
year from the passage hereof, shall be found 
within the jurisdiction of the United States 
without such certificate of residence, shall be 
deemed and adjudged to be unlawfully within 
the United States, and maybe arrested by any 
United States customs official, collector of in- 
ternal revenue or his deputies, United States 
marshal or his deputies, and taken before a 
United States judge, whose duty it shall be to 
order that he be deported from the United 
States as hereinbefore provided, unless he 
shall establish clearly to the satisfaction of 
said judge, that by reason of accident, sick- 
ness or other unavoidable cause, he has been 
unable to procure his certificate, and to the 
satisfaction of the court, and by at least one 
credible white witness, that he was a resident 
of the United States at the time of the pas- 
sage of this act; and if upon the hearing it 
shall appear that he is so entitled to a certifi- 
cate, it shall be granted upon his paying the 
cost. Should it appear that said Chinaman 



IMPORTANT LEGISLATION. 



71 



had procured a certificate which has been lost 
or destroyed, he shall be detained and judg- 
ment suspended a reasonable time to enable 
him to procure a duplicate from the officer 
granting it, and in such cases the cost of said 
arrest and trial shall be in the discretion of 
the court. And any Chinese person other than 
a Chinese laborer having a right to be and re- 
main in the United States, desiring such cer- 
tificate as evidence of such right, may apply 
for and receive the same without charge. 

Sec. 7. That immediately after the passage 
of this act the secretary of the treasury shall 
make such rules and regulations as may be 
necessary for the efficient execution of this 
act, and shall prescribe the necessary forms 
and furnish the necessary blanks to enable 
collectors of internal revenue to issue the cer- 
tificates required hereby and make such pro- 
visions that certificates may be procured in 
localities convenient to the applicants; such 
certificates shall be issued without charge to 
the applicant and shall contain the name, age, 
local residence and occupation of the appli- 
cant, and such other description of the appli- 
cant as shall be prescribed by the secretary of 
the treasury, and a duplicate thereof shall be 
filed in the office of the collector of internal 
revenue for the district within which such 
Chinaman makes application. 

Sec. 8. That any person who shall knowingly 
and falsely alter or substitute any name for 
the name written in such certificate or forge 
such certificate, or knowingly utter any forged 
or fraudulent certificate, or falsely personate 
any person named in such certificate, shall be 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon convic- 
tion thereof shall be fined in a sum not ex- 
ceeding $1,000 or imprisoned in the penitentiary 
for a term of not more than five years. 

Sec. 9. The secretary of the treasury may 
authorize the payment of such compensation 
in the nature of fees to the collectors of inter- 
nal revenue, for services performed under the 
provisions of this act in addition to salaries 
now allowed by law as he shall deem neces- 
sary, not exceeding the sum of $1 for each cer- 
tificate issued. [Approved May 5, 1892.] 

CANADIAN RETALIATION. 

This act provides that, with a view of secur- 
ing reciprocal advantages for the citizens, 
ports and vessels of the United States, on and 
after the 1st day of August, 1892, whenever and 
so often as the president shall be satisfied that 
the passage through any canal or lock con- 
nected with the navigation of the St. Law- 
rence river, the great lakes or the waterways 
connecting the same, of any vessels of the 
United States or of cargoes or passengers in 
transit to any port of the United States, is pro- 
hibited or is made difficult or burdensome by 
the imposition of tolls or otherwise which, in 
view of the free passage through the St. Mary's 
Falls canal, now permitted to vessels of all 
nations, he shall deem to be reciprocally un- 
just and unreasonable, he shall have the 
power, and it shall be his duty, to suspend, by 
proclamation to that effect, for such time and 
to such extent (including absolute prohibition) 
as he shall deem just, the right of free passage 
through the St. Mary's Falls canal, so far as it 
relates to vessels owned by the subjects of the 
government so discriminating against the 
citizens, ports or vessels of the United States or 
to any cargoes, portions of cargoes or passen- 
gers in transit to the ports of the government 
making such discrimination, whether carried in 
vessels of the United States or of othor nations. 

In such case and during such suspension 
tolls shall be levied, collected and paid as fol- 
lows, to-wit: Upon freight of whatever kind 
or description, not to exceed f2 per ton; upon 
passengers, not to exceed >5 each, as shall be 
from time to time determined by the presi- 
dent: Provided. That no tolls shall be charged 



or collected upon freight or passengers car- 
ried to and landed at Ogdensburg or any port 
west of Ogdensburg and south of a line drawn 
from the northern boundary of the state of 
New York through the St. Lawrence river, the 
great lakes and their connecting channels to 
the northen boundary of the state of Minne- 
sota. 

Sec. 2. All tolls so charged shall be collected 
under such regulations as shall be prescribed 
by the secretary of the treasury, who may re- 
quire the master of each vessel to furnish a 
sworn statement of the amount and kind of 
cargo and the number of passengers carried 
ana the destination of the same, and such 
proof of the actual deliveiy of such cargo or 
passengers at some port or place within the 
limits above named as he shall deem satisfac- 
tory; and until such proof is furnished such 
freight and passengers may be considered to 
have been landed at some port or plaee out- 
side of those limits, and the amount of tolls 
which would have accrued if they had been 
so delivered shall constitute a lien, which may 
be enforced against the vessel in default 
wherever and whenever found in the waters of 
the Uni ted States. [Approved July 26, 1892.] 

INDIAN-WAR PENSIONS. 

This act provides that the secretary of the 
interior be, and he is hereby, authorized and 
directed to place on the pension roll the 
names of the surviving officers and enlisted 
men, including marines, militia,and volunteers 
of the military and naval service of the 
United States, who served for thirty days in 
the Black Hawk war, the Creek war, the 
Cherokee disturbances, or the Florida war 
with the Seminole Indians, embracing a period 
from 1832 to 1842, inclusive, and were honorably 
discharged, and such other officers, soldiers, 
and sailors as may have been personally 
named in any resolution of congress, for any 
specific service in said Indian wars, although 
their term of service may have been less than 
thirty days, and the surviving widows of such 
officers and enlisted men: Provided, That 
such widows have not re-married : Provided 
further, That this act shall not apply to any 
person not a citizen of the United States. 

Sec. 2. That pensions under this act shall be 
at the rate of $8 a month, and payable from 
and after the passage of this act, for and 
during the natural lives of the persons en- 
titled thereto. 

Sec. 3, That before the name of any person 
shall be placed on the pension roll under this 
act proof shall be made, under such rules and 
regulations as the secretary of the interior 
may prescribe, of the right of the applicant to 
a pension; and any person who shall falsely 
and corruptly take any oath required under 
this act shall be deemed guilty of perjury; 
and the secretary of the interior shall cause 
to be stricken from the pension roll the name 
of any person whenever it shall be made to 
appear by proof satisfactory to him that such 
name was put upon such roll through false 
and fraudulent representations, and that such 
person is not entitled to a pension under this 
act. The loss of the certificate of discharge 
shall not deprive any person of the benefits of 
this act, but other evidence of service per- 
formed and of an honorable discharge may 
be deemed sufficient. 

Sec. 4. That this act shall not apply to any 
person who is receiving a pension at the rate 
of $8 a month or more, nor to any person re- 
ceiving a pension of less than $8 a month, ex- 
cept for the difference between the pension 
now received (if less than $8 a month) and 18 
a month. 

Sec. 5. That the pension laws now in force, 
which are not inconsistent or in conflict with 
this act, are hereby made a part of this act, 
so far as they may be applicable thereto. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



Sec. 6. That section 4716 of the revised sta- 
tutes is hereby repealed, so far as the same 
relates to this act or to pensioners under this 
act. [Approved July 27, 185)2.] 

IX AID OF THE WORLD'S FAIR. 

This act is as follows: "That for the pur- 
pose of aiding in defraying the cost of com- 
pleting in a suitable manner the work of prep- 
aration for Inaugurating the World's 
olumbian Exposition, authorized by the act 
of congress approved April 25, A. D. 1890, to be 
d at the city of Chicago, in the state of 
nois, there shall be coined at the mints of 
the United States silver half-dollars of the 
egal weight and fineness, not to exceed 
i,000,000 pieces, to be known as the Columbian 
mlf-dollar, struck in commemoration of the 
World's Columbian Exposition, the devices 
and designs upon which shall be prescribed by 
;he director of the mint, with the approval of 
the secretary of the treasury; and said silver 
coins shall be manufactured from uncurrent 
ubsidiary silver coins now in the treasury, 
and all provisions of law relative to the 
coinage, legal-tender quality, and redemption 
of the present subsidiary silver coins shall be 
applicable to the coins issued under this act, 
and when so recoined there is hereby appro- 
priated from the treasury the said 5,000,000 of 
touvenir half-dollars, and the secretary of the 
.reasury is authorized to pay the same to the 
World's Columbian Exposition, upon esti- 
mates and vouchers certified by the president 
of the World's Columbian Exposition, or in 
his absence or inability to act, by the vice- 
president, and by the director-general of the 
World's Columbian Commission, or in his 
absence or inability to act, by the president 
thereof, and the secretary of the treasury, for 
labor done, materials furnished, and services 
performed in prosecuting said work of pre- 
paring said Exposition for opening as pro- 
vided by said act approved April 25, 1890; and 
all such estimates and vouchers shall be 
made in duplicate, one to be filed with the 
secretary of the treasury, the other to be re- 
tained by the World's Columbian Exposition. 
Provided, however. That before the secretary 
of the treasury shall pay to the World's 
Columbian Exposition any part of the said 
5.000,000 silver coins, satisfactory evidence 
shall be furnished him showing that the sum 
of at least $10,000,000 has been collected and 
disbursed as required by said act. And pro- 
vided, That the said World's Columbian Expo- 
sition shall furnish a satisfactory guaranty to 
the secretary of the treasury that any further 
sum actually necessary to complete the work 
of said Exposition to the opening thereof has 
been or will be provided by said World's 
Columbian Exposition; but nothing herein 
shall be so construed as to delay or postpone 
the preparation of the souvenir coins herein- 
before provided for. And there is hereby 
appropriated, out of any moneys in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated, the sum of 
$50,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary 
to reimburse the treasury for loss on the re. 
coinage herein authorized." 

Section 2 provides that the cost and expenses 
of maintaining the fair shall be paid out of 
the funds of the World's Columbian Exposi- 
tion. 

Sec. 3 provides for 50,000 bronze medals and 
50,000 diplomas to be awarded exhibitors. 

Sec. 4 is as follows: "That it is hereby de- 
clared that all appropriations herein made for, 
or pertaining to, the World's Columbian Ex- 
position are made upon the condition that the 
said exposition shall not be opened to the 
public on the first day of the week, commonly 
called Sunday; and if said appropriations be 
accepted by the corporation of the State of 
Illinois, known as the World's Columbian Ex- 



position, upon that condition, it shall be, and 
it is hereby made the duty of the World s 
Columbian Commission, enacted by the act of 
congress of April 25, 1890, to make such rules or 
modification of the rules of said corporation 
as shall require the closing of the Exposition 
on said first day of the week, commonly called 
Sunday." [Approved Aug. 6, 1892.] 

HOURS OF DAILY SERVICE. 

This act provides that the service and em- 
ployment of all laborers and mechanics who 
are now or may hereafter be employed by 
the government of the United States, by the 
District of Columbia, or by any contractor or 
sub-contractor upon any of the public works of 
the United States or of the said District of Co- 
lumbia, is hereby limited and restricted to 
eight hours in any one calendar day, and it 
shall be unlawful for any offlcer of the United 
States government or of the District of Colum- 
bia or any such contractor or sub-contractor 
whose duty it shall be toemploy, direct, or con- 
trol the services of such laborers or mechanics 
to require or permit any such laborer or me- 
chanic to work more than eight hours in any 
calendar day except in case of extraordinary 
emergency 

Sec. 2. That any officer or agent of the gov- 
ernment of the United States or of the District 
of Columbia, or any contractor or subcontract- 
or whose duty it shall be to employ, direct or 
control any laborer or mechanic employed 
upon any of the public works of the United 
States or of the District of Columbia, who shall 
intentionally violate any provision of this act, 
shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and 
for each and every such offense shall, upon 
conviction, be punished by a fine not to exceed 
$1,000, or by imprisonment for not more than 
six months, or by both such fine and imprison- 
ment, in the discretion of the court having 
jurisdiction thereof. 

Sec. 3. The provisions of this act shall not be 
so construed as to in any manner apply to or 
affect contractors or sub-contractors.or to limit 
the hours of daily service of laborers or me- 
chanics engaged upon the public works of the 
United States or of the District of Columbia 
for which contracts have been entered into 
prior to the passage of this act. [Approved 
Aug. 1, 1892. 

GRANTING PENSIONS TO ARMY NURSES. 

This act provides that ail women employed 
by the surgeon-general of the army as nurses, 
under contract or otherwise, during the late 
war of the rebellion, or who were employed as 
nurses during such period by authority which 
is recognized by the war department and who 
rendered actual service as nurses in attend- 
ance upon the sick or wounded in any regi- 
mental post, camp or general hospital of the 
armies of the United States for a period of 
six months or more and who were honorably 
relieved from such service and who are now 
or may hereafter be unable to earn a support, 
shall, upon making due proof of the fact 
according to such rules and regulations as the 
secretary of the interior may provide, be 
placed upon the list of pensioners of the 
United States and be entitled to receive a 
pension of $12 per month, and such pension 
shall commence from the date of filing of the 
application in the pension office after the 
passage of this act : Provided, That no person 
shall receive more than one pension for the 
same period. No fees for prosecuting claims 
of this character are allowed. [Approved 
Aug. 5, 1892.] 

PRESIDENTIAL SUCCESSION. 

This act provides that the secretary of agri- 
culture shall be next after the secretary of 
the interior in the presidential succession. 



THE PRICE OF SILVER. 



THE PRICE OF SILVER IN PENCE AND FRACTIONS. 

[From Gold and Silver, by John S. Hanson.] 

The price of silver is made in London and is quoted for an ounce of silver, English stand- 
ard, which is .925 fine and contains 444 grains of pure silver. The American standard ounce 
is .900 fine and contains 432 grains of pure silver. The "fine" ounce is, of course, 1000 fine and 
contains 48U grains of pure silver. The American silver dollar is 412}^ grains standard, or 
371J4 grains pure, and the dollar of fractional silver 385.8 grains standard, or 347.22 grains pure. 
To make the bullion value of a silver dollar equal to the par value, silver would have to be 
quoted at 59 pence per ounce, English standard, making the fine ounce worth $1.2929+, and the 
American standard ounce worth $1.164+. The following table shows the value of the three 
different standard ounces and of the silver dollar and a dollar of subsidiary silver coin at 
different prices ranging from 30 to 60 pence in London, and also at one penny and fractions 
thereof: 



PENCE. 



English 
oz., 444 
Grains. 



American 
oz., 432 
Grains. 



Fine 
oz.,480 
Grains. 



Silver Dol- 
lar, 371% 
Grains. 



Subsid 
iary 

Silver, 
347.22 

Grains. 



34.. 
35.. 



71.0255 



Cents. 

50.8646 
52.5601 
54.2556 
55.9511 
57.6466 
59.3421 
61.0376 
62.7330 
64.4285 
66.1240 
67.8195 
69.5150 
71.2105 
72.9060 
74.6015 
76.2970 
77.9924 



81.3834 



49 

50 

51... 



84.7744 



Rfc:::::::: 

55 

56 

57 , 



88.1654 
89.8608 
91.5563 
93.2518 
94.9473 



Values based on one penny sterling and 
fractions thereof 
1-16 



100. 
10U 



0.5069 



8-ie:: 
lie:: 



0.2466 



.3563 
.4796 



U059 
J.2119 
).3179 



.7417 

.8477 
.9537 



.2716 
.3775 



.5895 

.6954 



From the above the bullion value may be calculated at any price without trouble. As, for 
instance, if silver were quoted in London at 40 7-16 pence, the value of a silver dollar and of a 
dollar of fractional silver would be as follows: 

Silver Dollar. Dollar of Subsidiary Silver. 

40 pence 67. 8195 cents. 63.4297 cents. 

7-16 pence 7418 cents. .6938 cents. 

40 7-16 pence. 68.5613 cents. 64. 1235 cents. 

The bullion value of a silver dollar, with silver quoted in London at 40 7-16 pence per ounce, 
is 68.56 cents and of one dollar of fractional silver 64.12 cents. 



74 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



PRODUCTION OF GOLD AND SILVER, 1861-1891. 



YE A its. 



WORLD'S PRODUC- 
TION. 



Gold. 



Silver. 



UNITED STATES' PRO- 
DUCTION. 



Gold. 



1852.. 
1853.. 

1854., 
1855.. 

IS:: 

I860.. 
1861.. 
1862.. 
1863. . 
1864.. 



1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 



1891. 





67,753.000 




1,538,300 



5.36 to 1 
4.87 to 1 

4.16 tol 
5.08 to 1 
4.79 to 1 
4.40 to 1 
4.87 to 1 

5.21 to 1 

5.22 to 1 
5.46 tol 
5.96 to 1 
6.70 to 
7.28 to 

7.17 to 
6.85 to 
7.20 to 
7.77 to 

8.23 to 
8.50 to 
9.05 to 

10.94 to 
12.68 to 
13.61 to 
12.60 to 
13.19 to 
13.51 to 
11.36 to 
12.77 to 
14.lt to 
14.53 to 
15.83 to 
18.05 to 
19.32 to 1 
16.59 to 1 
17.47 to 1 
18.16 to 1 
18.79 to 1 
20.42 to 1 
20.64 to 1 
22.98 to 1 
23.44 tol 



TOTAL SUPPLY OF GOLD AND SILVER IN THE UNITED STATES. 



JUNE 30. 



Gold Coin 

and 
Bullion. 



Silver Dol- 
lars and 
Bullion. 



Fractional 
Silver Coin. 



Total 

Sitvr Coin 
and Bullion. 



Total Gold 
and Silver. 



Ratio of 
SUver to 

Gold. 
Percent 



1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 



1884. 

1885. 
[886. 
L837 

i.m 

1890. 



1892, Jan. 



$213,119,977 
245,741,837 
351,841,206 
478,484,538 
506,757,715 
542,732,0*53 
545,500,797 



316.269,079 

41,27<>,356 



590.774,461 
654,520.335 
705.818,855 
fi80,3,505 
185,5(58.029 
646,591,928 
686,845.930 



95,297,083 
122,788,544 
152.047,685 
180,306,614 
208,538,967 
237,191,906 
277,445.767 
310,166,459 
343.947,093 
385,718.063 
437,388,320 
465,513,208 





$301.274,884 

363.2U8.178 

500.366,884 

65H.8fS.682 

709,S74,a39 

775.740.048 

801,068,939 

872,175.823 

908.087,30* 

1,007.513,901 

1,092,:*!. 690 

1.100.612,434 

1,158,774.948 

1,161,927,867 

1,228,925,293 



41.3 
47.8 
42.2 
36.7 
40.1 
42.9 

83 

52.8 
53.9 
54.7 
61.8 
66.6 
79.7 
78.9 



GOLD AND SILVER. 



RANGE IN PRICE OF SILVER. 

The following table shows the range of silver quotations since 1840 in London, the chief market 
of the world, and the dollar value and the ratio of silver to gold: 



YEAR. 



1. 

S 



YEAR. 



5 



15.62 
15.70 
15.87 
15.93 
15.85 
13.92 
15.90 

!!: 

15.78 

15.70 

15.46 

15.59 

15.133 

15.33 

15.38 

15.38 

15.27 

15.38 

15.1! 

15. 

15. 

15.35 

15.37 

15.37 

15.44 



1870. 
1871. 

1873. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876, 
1877, 
1878, 



1*4. 



f 1.339 



.826 



.322 
.M 

.ara 

.24ti 

.156 

.201 

.152 

.123 

.145 

.138 

1.136 

1.110 

1.113 

1.065 

1.009 

.978 

.940 

.986 

1.016 



15. 43 
15.57 
15.59 
15.60 
15.57 
15.57 
15.63 
15.92 
16.17 
16.59 
17.88 
17.22 
17.94 
18.40 
18.05 
18 16 
18.19 
18.64 
18.57 
19.41 
20.78 

t.13 
.90 
.09 
19.75 
20.09 



GOLD AND SILVER IN CIRCULATION IN THE UNITED STATES. 



JUNE 30. 



Gold 
Coin. 



Gold Cer- 
tificates. 



'4 $24,897,660 
" 15,279,820 
7,9(3,900 
5,759,521 
6,029,020 
59,807,37U 
71,146,640 



Total 
Gold. 



Silve 
Dollars. 



*7,OSO 
414,480 

233,659,679 20, 110;557 5,7 

321,072.39729,442.412 39,110,729 

363,280.34532, " 

404,460,865 

411,770,84340 

468.398,141 39,086,969 101,530,946 



Silver 
Certifi- 
cates. 



Silver 
Treas- 
ury 
Notes. 



Subsid- 

ary Sil 

ver. 



Total 

Stivsr. 



584,739,7 

110,505,362 

#5,095,779 

315,312,877 

358.251,325 

344,653,495 

340,624,203 



67 

54,511,'788 



166,184,65350.3 

75,797,50360.2 



341,668,411126,729,730 



357,936,337 
376,419,229 



76,044.375 
.225,437 



1890 

1891 

1892, Jan 1 , 



392,065,238119,887,370 
376.559, 185 116,792,759 
(573,950,606 131,380,019 
408,073,806120,840,399 
407.999,1801148.106,113 



433,980,712 
467,644,66* 



,651, . 
,890,201 

,086,969 
52,846,142 
55,044,362142,118.017 



52,839,364 121 
6MTO.949 139,289, 



. 

37.8 



96,427.011 
01,530.946 
88,116.225 



511,952,608 55,667,218 200,387,376 
493,351,944 54,258,719 257,102.445 
505,330,62561,808,703297.210.043 
528,914,205 57.683,041 107,364,148 MQ,468, 166 

556,105.299 62,326,191 320,817,56^75,296,057 



,746,43539.7 
. ...778,01944.4 
43,702,921184,320,836 ~ 
46,156,255187, 
48,570,305245,' 



39.3 



50,354,635 
51,472,1" 



BE 06, 



'.8 
73.5 

54,688.630|413;707,376|81.8 



u: (62J 



58.290.924463,801,27887 
.776,830521,216,646&B.7 



BROKERS' TECHNICALITIES. 



A bull is one who operates to raise the value 
of stocks, that he may buy for a rise. 

A bear is one who sells stocks for future de- 
livery, which he does not own at time of sale. 

A corner is when the bears cannot buy or 
borrow the stock to deliver in fulfillment of 
their contracts. 

Overloaded is when the bulls cannot take 
and pay for the stock they have purchased. 

A out and call is when a person gives so much 
per cent for the option of buying or selling 
so much stock on a certain fixed day, at a 
price fixed the day the option is given. 



Short is when a person or party sells stocks 
when they have none and expect to buy or 
borrow in time to deliver. 

Long is when a person or party has a plenti- 
ful supply of stocks. 

A pool or ring is a combination formed to 
control the price of stocks. 

A broker is said to carry stocks for his cus- 
tomer when he has bought and is holding it 
for his account. 

A wash is a pretended sale by special agree- 
ment between buyer and seller for the pur- 
pose of getting a quotation reported. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



COINS OF THE UNITED STATES. 
GOLD. 



DENOMINATIONS. 



Double eagle. 



Eagle 

Half -eagle 

Three dollars... 
Quarter-eagle... 
Dollars 



1850 

r,;i5 

1795 
1854 
1796 
1849 



$1,103,292,980 

202,173,470 

191,704,755 

1,619,37(5 

28,57 






516. 

258. 

129. 
77.4 
64.5 
25.8 



270. 
135. 



67.5 



513.42 
256.71 
128.36 
77.02 
64.18 
25.67 



50 years. 
35 years. 
20 years. 

' is 'years'. ' 



All gold coins of the United States aue worth their face value in pure gold. The alloy is 
never reckoned. 

SILVER. 



DENOMINATIONS. 



Coinage 

Com- 
menced. 



Coinage 
Ceased. 



Amount Coined, 
from 179i to 
June 30, 1891. 



Standard 
Weight, 
Grains. 



Amount for Which a 
Legal Tender. 



Standard dollars 

Trade dollars 

Dollars 

Half-dollars 

Quarter-dollars.. 
Twenty cents.... 

Dimes 

Half-dimes 

Three cents.. 



1878 
1873 
1794 
1794 
1796 
1875 
1796 
1795 
1851 



1878 
1873 



1873 
1873 



$405,644.668.00 

35,965,924.00 

8,045,838.00 

122,911.410.00 

39,029,500.00 

271,000.00 

24,348,461.00 

4,880,219.40 

1,282,087.20 



412.5 

420. 

412.5 

192.9 
96.45 
77.16 
38.58 
19.29 
11.52 



Unlimited. 
Not a legal tender. 
Unlimited. 
Ten dollars. 
Ten dollars. 
Five dollars. 
Ten dollars. 
Five dollars. 
Five dollars. 



'MINOR COINS. 



DENOMINATIONS. 



Coinage 

Com- 
menced. 



Coinage 
Ceased. 



Coined to 
June, 1891. 



Standard 
Weight. 



Legal 
Tender 
For. 



Dura- 
tion 
Allowed. 



Five cents 

Three cents 

Two cents 

Cent 

Half-cent 



1864 
1793 
1793 



1872 



1857 



$11,521,234.55 

941,349.48 

912,020.00 

9,733,854.61 

38^28.11 



77.: 



98. 
18. 



25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 
25 cents. 



'No allowance for abrasion. 



GOVERNMENT PAPER CURRENCY IN CIRCULATION. 



JUNE 30. 



* Paper 
Currency 

Circulation 



Secured by Coin and 

Bullion in 
United States Treasury. 



Gold. 



Silver. 



Ratio to Paper 
Currency in 
Circulation. 



Gold. 



PerCent. Per Cent 



Silver. 



$345,810,655 
317,338,412 
:i41.IV48,'.)26 
372.997,173 
384,790,537 
455,670,233 



559,479,313 
487,973,299 
560.010,673 
628.972,558 
690.975,135 



813,746,984 
887.252.095 




$15.059,828 
33.239,917 
49,549,851 
65,854.671 
90,384,724 
11(5,396,235 
139,616,414 
169,451.998 
184.345,764 
222,401.405 
254,499.241 



323,909,360 
379,705,279 
403,187,017 



37.1 
42.6 
36.9 
43.7 
38.6 
43.5 
42.1 
44.1 
47.7 
49.6 
49.9 
43.9 
42.1 
29.3 
31.4 



4.3 
10.5 
14.5 
17.6 
23.5 
25.5 
28.7 



40.5 
41.9 
42.4 
46.6 
45.4 



^National bank notes not included. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE GOVERNMENT. 77 


RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES OF THE GOVERNMENT, 1862-92. 
REVENUE BY FISCAL YEARS. 


YEAR 


Customs. 


Internal 
Revenue, 


Direct 
Tax. 


Sales of 
Public 
Lands. 


MISCELLANEOUS SOURCES 


Total 
Revenue. 


Excess of 
Revenue 
Over Ordi- 
nary Ex- 
penditures 


Prem's on 
Loans anfl 
Sales of 
Gold Coin. 


Other Mis- 
cellaneous 
Items. 


1862... 
1863... 
1864... 
1865... 
1866... 
1867... 
1868... 

1872'. ! ! 
1873... 
1874. . . 
1875. . . 
1876. . . 
1877. . . 
1878. 
1879. . . 
1880... 
L881. . . 

1885! '. ! 
1886... 
1887. . . 
1888... 
1889... 
1890... 
1891... 
1892... 


$49,056,398 
69,039,642 
102,316,153 
84,928,261 
179,046.652 
176,417,811 
164.464,600 
180.048,427 
194,538,374 
206,270,408 
216,370.287 
18s.0s'..;>2:; 
163,103,834 
157,167,722 
148,071,985 
130.956,493 
130.170,680 
137,250,048 
186.J22,i Ni5 
198,159,676 
220,410,730 
214,706,497 
195,067,490 
181,471.939 
192,905,023 
217,286,893 
219,091,174 
22rt.S-J2.742 
229,668,584 
219,522,205 
177.452,964 




$1,795,332 
1,485,104 
475,649 
1,200,573 
1,974,754 
4,200,234 
1,788,146 
765,686 
229,103 
580,355 


$152,204 
167,617 
588,333 
996,553 
665,031 
1,163,576 
1,348,715 
4,020.344 
360,482 
2,388,647 
2,575,714 
2.882,312 
1,852,429 
1,413,640 
1,129,467 
t254 
74:-i 
781 
1,016,507 
2,201,863 
4,753,140 
7,955,864 
9,810,705 
5,705,986 
5,630,999 
9,254.286 
11,202,017 
8,038,6'.2 
6,358,272 


$68,400 
603,345 
21,174,101 
,683,447 
,083,056 
,787,830 
29,203,629 
13,755,491 
15.295,644 
8,892,840 
9,412,638 
11,560,531 
5.037,665 
3,979,280 
4,029,281 
405,777 
317,102 
1,505,048 
110 


$915,122 
.3.741,794 
30,331,401 
25,441.556 
29.036,314 
15,037,522 
17,745,404 
13,997,339 
12,942,118 
22,093,541 

17,161,270 

17,075,043 
15,431,915 
17,456,776 
18,031,655 
15.til4.728 
20,585,697 
21,978,525 
25,154,851 
31,703.643 
30,796,695 
21.9S4.882 
24,014,055 
20.9S9.528 
26.005.815 
24,674,446 
24,297,151 
24,447,419 
23.374.457 
20,251.872 


$51,987,455 
112,697,291 

264,626,772 
333,714,605 
558,032,620 
490.634,010 
405.638.083 
370,943,747 
411,255,478 
383,323,945 
374.lc6.868 
333,738 ( 205 
2S9.478.755 
288,000.051 
287,483,038 
26H.000.5S7 
257,763,879 
273,827,184 
333,526,611 
360,782,293 
403,525,259 
398.287.582 
348.519,870 
323,690,706 
336,439,727 
371403278 
379,266.075 
387.050.059 
403.080,982 
392,612.447 
554,397,784 


*$422,774^63 
* 602,043,434 
* 600,695,870 
".ltKl,.S40,619 
37,223,203 
133,091 ,335 
28,297,798 
48,078,469 
101,601,917 
91,146 757 
96,588,905 
43,392,959 
2,344,882 
13,376,658 
29,022,242 
30,340,578 
20,799,552 
6,879,301 
65,883,653 
100,069,405 
145,543,811 
132,879,444 
104,393,<;26 
63,463,771 
93,956,589 
103,471,098 
111,341,274 
87,701,081 
85,040.272 
26838542 
9,914,454 


$37,640,788 
109,741,134 
209,464^16 

309,226,813 
266.027,537 

191,087,589 
158,35(5,461 
184.8W.T5r, 
143,098,154 
130,642,178 
113,72914 
102,400,785 
110,007,494 
116,700,732 
118,630,408 
110,581,625 
113,561,611 
124.009,374 
lK5,2ti4.:w; 
146,497,595 
144,720,369 
121,586,073 
112.WS.7-V, 
1K80.VJ36 
118.823.391 
124.2W.f72 
130,881,514 
142,606,705 
145.686.249 
133,971,072 


315,255 




93,799 






31 
1,517 
160,142 
108,157 
70,721 

168,246 
32,892 
1,566 

























EXPENDITURES BY FISCAL YEARS. 


YEAR 


CIVIL AND MISCELLANEOUS 


War 
Depart- 
ment. 


Navy 
Depart- 
ment. 


Indians. 


Pensions. 
\ 


Interest 
on Public 
Debt. 


TotalOrdi- 
nary Ex- 
penditures 


Prem. on 
loan<>,Pur- 
cfias? of 
Bonds,etc. 


Other Civil 
and Mis- 
cellaneous 
Items. 


1862 




$21,408,491 
23,256,965 
27.505.5!.0 
43,047.658 
41,066,962 
51,110,224 
53.OOH.sK 
56,474,062 
53.237,462 
60.481.916 
60,984,757 
73,328,110 
69,641,593 
71,070,703 
66,958,374 
56,252,067 
53,177,704 
65.741.555 
54,713,530 
64.416,325 
57.219,751 
68;678,022 
70.920,434 
87.494,258 
74,166.930 
85,264,826 
72,952,261 
80,6(54,064 
81,408,256 
110,048,167 
99,846,988 


$394,368,407 
59!.2Ste,60l 
690,791343 

l,031.32o.:-u;i 
284.449,702 
95,224,416 
12.V24iJ.M9 
78.501,991 
57,655,675 
35.799.5192 
35,372,157 
46,323,138 
42.315,927 
41,120,646 
38,070,889 
37,082,736 
32.154.148 
40,425,661 
38,116,916 
40,466,461 
43.570.41U 
48,911,383 
39,429,603 
670,578 
324,153 
561,026 

Ks.522.436 

44,435,271 
44,582.838 
48.720,085 
46,895.456 


$42,668,277 
63.221,964 
85,725,995 
122,612,945 
43,324,119 

S:SJ 

20,000,758 
21,780,230 
19,431,027 
21,249,810 
23,526,257 
30,932.587 
21,497.626 
18.963.310 
14,959.935 
17,365.301 
15.125,127 
13,536,985 
15,686,672 
15,032,046 
15.283.437 
17.292,601 
16.021,080 
13,907,888 
15,141,127 
16.926,438 
21,378,809 
22,006,206 
26,113,896 
29,174,139 


$2,273,223 
3.154.357 
2,629,859 
5,116,837 
3,247,065 

7,'042>23 
3,407,938 
7,426,997 
7,061,729 
7,051,705 

&9G6I558 
5,277,007 
4.629,280 
5.206,109 
5,945,457 
6,514,161 
9,736,747 
7,362,590 
6,475,999 
6,552,495 
6,099.158 
6,194,523 
6,249,308 
6,892,208 
6,708,047 
8,527,469 
11,150,578 


$853,095 
1,078,992 
4.983,924 
16,338,811 
15,605,352 
20,936,552 
23,782,387 
28,476,662 
28,340,202 
34,443,895 
28.533.403 
29.35-.U27 
29.033.415 
29.456,216 
28,257,396 
27.9-W.752 
27,137,019 
35,121,482 
56,777,174 
50,059,280 
61.345.194 
66,012,574 
55,429.228 
56,102.267 
&UU4.8H4 
75.029.102 
Su.2KS.-W 
87,624,779 
106.936,855 
124.415,951 
134.583,053 


$13,190,324 

24,729,847 
53.685.422 
77.81)7.712 
133,067,742 
143,781.592 

130,694,'243 

129,235,498 
125.576,566 
117,357,840 
104.750.688 
107,119,815 
103.093.545 
100,243,271 
97,124,512 
102,500,875 
105,327.949 
95.757,575 
82.508,741 
71,077,207 
59,160,131 
54,578,378 
51.3*5.256 
50.580,146 
47,741,577 
44,715,007 
41.001,484 
36.099.284 
37,547,135 
23,378,116 


$474,761,819 
714,740.725 
865,322.642 
1,297.555.224 
520,809,417 
357.542,675 
377,340,285 
322,865.278 
309,653,561 
292,177,188 
277,517,963 

258^4591797 
238,660,009 
j:>i.'.)(;.:;-.'7 
266.947,883 
267.642,958 
260,712,888 
257,981,440 
265,408,138 
244,126.244 
260,226,935 
242.4s:u:;S 
267,932,180 
267.924>01 
229,288,978 
318,040.711 
365,773.'." >5 
345,023,330 


1863 




1864... 
1865... 
1866.. 
1867. . . 
1868... 
1869. . . 
1870. . . 
1871... 
1872... 
1873... 
1874... 
1875 




$1,717,900 
58,477 
10,813,349 
7,001,151 
1,674,680 
15.996,556 
9,016,795 
6.958,267 
5,105.920 
1,395,074 


1876 




1877 




1878. . . 
1879. . . 
1880... 
1881... 

1882... 




li06li249 


1883 




1884 




1885... 
1886. . 
1887... 
1888... 
1&9... 
18M... 
1891. . 
1892 . 








8,270,842 
17,292,363 
20,30' ,244 
10,401,221 


* Expenditures in excess of revenue. 



78 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



NATIONAL BAKKS. 

Number and authorized capital of banks organized and the number and capital of banks 
closed in each year ended Oct. 31 since the establishment of the national-banking system: 



YEAR. 



NET YEARLY 




Totals 

Deduct dec 

Total net inc 



*Two banks restored to solvency, making 3,788 banks now running. 

tThe total authorized capital stock on Oct. 31 was $693,868,665; the paid-in capital, $692,812,- 
330, including the capital stock of liquidating and insolvent banks which have not deposited 
lawful money for the retirement of their circulating notes. 

Semi-annual duty collected from national banks for the fiscal years from 1864 to 1891: 



FISCAL YEAR. 



OnCirculation. 



On Deposits. 



On Capital. 



Total. 



1864 

1865 

1866 

1867 



1870. . 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 



1885 

1886 

1887.... 




f95.911.87 
1.087,530.86 
2.633,102.77 
2,650.180.09 
2,564,143.44 
2,614.553.58 
2,614,767.61 

3,196,569.29 
H.2U.I.967.72 
3,514,265.39 
3,505.129.64 
3.451.965.38 
3.273,111.74 



4,058,710.H1 
4,940.945.12 
5.521.927.47 
2,773,790.46 



$18.432.07 
133.251.15 
406.947.74 
321,881.36 
306.78 U',7 
312,918.68 
375,962.26 
385.292.13 
389,356.27 
454.891.51 
469.0J8.II2 
507,417.76 
632.29U.16 
660.784.90 
560.29t5.Si 
401,920.61 
379,424.19 
431,233.10 
437.774.90 
269,976.43 



2.592.021.33 



1891.. 



2.044.922,75 
1.616,127.53 
1,410,331.84 
1,254.839.65 
1.216.104.72 
1.331.2S7.-,V. 



$167,537.26 
1.954.029.60 
5.146,835.81 
5.840.)S.23 
5.817.268.18 

S.N^.SSS.W 

5,940.474.00 
6,175,154.67 
6.703.910.67 
7.004.646.93 
7.1188.498.85 
7.306.134.04 
7.229.221.56 
7,013,707.81 
6.781,455.65 
6,721,236.67 
7.591.770.43 
8.493.552.55 
9.1.50,684.35 
6,175,773.62 
3.024.668.24 
2.794.584.01 
2.592,021.33 
2.044,1122.75 
1,616,127.53 
1,410,331.84 
1.254.839.65 
1.216,104.72 
1,617,664.64 



Total 



S72,670,412JO 



$60,940,067.16 



$7,&,887.74 



$141.742,744.58 



BANK CAPITAL IN THE UNITED STATES. 79 


BANK CAPITAL IN THE TTNITED STATES. 


Table showing, by states and territories, the capital of the national banks on July 12, 1892, 
and of the state, stock savings, and private banks and loan and trust companies at date of 
latest reports: 


STATES AND 
TERRITORIES. 


National 
Banks. 


State 
Banks. 


Stock 
Savings 
Banks. 


Private 
Banks. 


Loan 
and 
Trust 
Com- 
panies. 


Total. 


Maine 


$11.010,000 
6,217,500 
7,160.000 
99.042.500 
20,277,050 
23,024.370 








$1,008,900 


$12.018.900 
6,217.500 
7,885,000 
107.317,500 
23,547,545 
26,475,970 










Vermont 
Massachusetts 





$725,000 








8,275,666 
2.353.820 
1,111,600 


Rhode Island 


$916,675 

z&Qjm 






Connecticut 






Total Eastern States 
New York 






1(56,731,420 

85.666.000 
14,456,645 
71.234,190 
2.133,985 
16.804,9t>0 
2.827,000 


3,256,675 

32.303,700 
1.735,850 
8.45t5.86U 
680.000 
1,612,200 


725,000 




12,749,320 

25,fi50,000 
1.470,000 
21,313,678 
500,000 
1, 500,000 
3,250,000 


183,462,415 

144.447,003 
17.662.495 

104.08.Vsr,!) ! 
3.313.985 
20,519,326 
6,111,525 


J827.243 


New Jersey . . . 




Pennsylvania 


1,069,706 


1,981,435 


Delaware 


Marviand 


410.542 
34,525 


191,624 


District of Columbia 


Total Middle States 
Virginia 






193,122,840 

4,656,300 

2,736.000 
2.588.500 
1.623.000 
4.538,800 
1.330,000 
3.919.000 
1.165,000 
4,435,000 
26,202.800 
1. (500,000 
15,409.400 
10,473.953 


44,788,610 
6,138,147 

L533!027 
5,^61,595 
238,550 
748,050 
3.115.836 
2,820,121 
450,000 
1,223.894 
19,220.852 
4,017,967 


1,514,773 


3,000,302 
220,540 


53,713,678 


t 296,140,203 

11.014,987 
4,179.537 
5.002,800 
3.874.387 
11.405.9S4 
1.699,876 
5,426,140 
4,280,836 
7,355,121 
29,661,426 
2.858,'.W ; 
34.630. 252 
15,170,370 


West Virginia 


iob,6oo 

40.000 
718,360 
568,709 
20,000 
275,000 




North Carolina 


251.800 




South Carolina 




336.880 
91,326 

484,090 




Florida 




Alabama 




Mississippi 




Louisiana 


100,000 
139,350 
35,038 






Texas 


2,869,276 




Arks nsas 




Kentucky 








678,450 






Total Southern States.. . 
Missouri 






80,697.753 

24,140,000 

43,797,800 
13,428,000 
38.856,000 
15,034,000 
7,442,150 
14.325.000 
15,166,000 
12,667.100 
13,473.600 


48.934,076 

18,265,545 

6,492,605 
3,586,700 
6,565,500 
2,016.000 
6,286.900 
7,430,200 
8,631.000 
7,953,353 
*14.032,650 


2,674,907 


4,253,912 

1,160,860 
3.665,283 
8,070.353 
4,599,741 
772,<;04 
1,367,365 
5,404,914 
674,443 
2,824,004 




136,560,648 

46,616,405 
65,852. 21 rj i 
20,085,053 
60,853,241 
26.751,014 
15,096,415 
34,586,152 
28,267,379 
23,444,457 
27,506,250 


3,050,000 

"4,710,666' 
730,000 


Ohio 


1,896,575 


Indiana 


Illinois 


6.122,666 
8,198.410 


Michigan 






5,304,000 
225,000 


2,122,038 
2,570,936 




Kansas 


Nebraska 




Total Western States 








198,329,650 

282.000 
4,415.000 
8.985.000 
2.800.000 
625.000 
4.740,000 

llosaOOO 
2.405,000 
2,660.000 
7,640.000 
270,000 
8,225.000 
175000 


81,260,453 


21,745,985 


23,539,566 


14,182,974 


339,058,628 

282,000 
5,898.8 >4 
11,296.175 
5,486.617 
697.500 
6.437,000 
1,412.900 
1.285,000 
3,855,838 
4.705.685 
10.5fl5.H60 
551,064 
63,765,01)1 
257.050 
324,540 




1,342,000 
1.185.775 
1,369,720 




141,824 
525,400 
307,850 
72,500 
90,000 
240.900 
10.000 
511.024 
155,544 
93,860 




Colorado 


600,000 
1,009,047 




Utah 


Idaho 




607,000 
32,000 
145,000 
879,814 
1,890,141 
2,002.100 
281.0M 
45,776,743 













New Mexico 


80.000 


North Dakota 
South Dakota 




"'860,666' 


Washington 










8,197,763 


"S 


:::::::::::: 






324,540 






Total Pacific States 
Total United States 


45.796,540 

684.678,203 


55,511,357 
283.751,171 


10.746.810 
87,407,475 


3,796,447 
34.590,227 




115,851.154 

1,071,073,048 


80,645,972 


Includes all banks other than national. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



MONEY IN CIRCULATION. 



Statement showing the amounts of gold and silver coins and certificates, United States notes 
and national bank notes in circulation Dec. 1, 1892. 



General Stock, 

Coined or 

Issued. 



In Treasury. 



Amount in 
Circulation 
Dec. 1, 1892. 



Amount in 
Circulation 
Dec. 1, 1X91. 



Sold coin 

Standard silver dollars 

Su bsidiary silver 

Jold certificates 

Silver certificates 

Treasury notes, act July 14, 1890 

United States notes 

Currency certificates, act June 8, 1872.. 

National bank notes 

Total... 



$577,983.121 
417,1 22,885 
77,475,318 
142,821, 689 
326,251,304 

8,500,000 
173.(>14,37U 



$167,615,258 
354,536.029 
10,960,183 



$410,367.863 
62,586,806 
66,515.135 



2,786,471 

1,919,154 

12,908,139 

270,000 



323.464,833 
118,877,559 
333,772,877 

smooo 

167,786.384 



$405,981,402 
62,697,204 
62,845.437 
142,649,969 
320,873,610 
70.983,286 
333,364.309 
9,765.000 
168,151,853 



$2,191,246,816 



$576,456,550 



$1,614,790,266 



$1,577,262,070 



Population of the United States Dec. 1, 
MONEY 



1892, estimated at 66,111,000; circulation per capita, $24.42. 
IN THE TREASURY . 



:omparative statement of changes in money and bullion in treasury during November. 1892. 

In Treasury In Treasury I 



Nov. 1, 1892. 



Dec. 1, 1*92. 



Decrease. 



Increase. 



5old coin 

Standard silver dollars 

Subsid iary si 1 ver 

Treasury notes, act July 14, 1890 

United States notes 

National bank notes 

Total 

Gold bullion 

Silver bullion 

Grand total 

Net increase 



$166,135,247 
354,740,380 
11,499,579 
2,043,810 
14,600,782 
7,208,009 



$167,615,258 

354,536,029 

10,960,183 

1,919,154 

12,908,139 



$204,351 



$1,480,011 



124,656 
1,692,643 



78,126,222 
89.372,154 



$553,767,249 
79,983,208 
92,999.927 



1,856, 
3,627,773 



$728,726,183 



$726,750,384 



$3,940,569 



$6,964.770 
3,024,201 



d certificates held in cash 

Silver certificates held in cash 

urrency certificates held in cash. 



. .$] 9,632,830 
.. 2,786,471 
. . 270,000 



Decrease since Nov. 1, 1892 

Increase since Nov. 1,1892 

Decrease since Nov. 1, 1892 



. $3,549, 160 
. 488,699 
. 290,000 



IMPORTS AND EXPOJRTS OF MERCHANDISE. 

The following tables exhibit the value of merchandise, imported into and exported from the 
United States, by months, during the fast six years: 



EXPORTS. 



1886. 



1887. 



1888. 



1889. 



1890. 



1891. 



November 

December 



January 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October.. . 




$75,574.442 
73,229,551 

1888. 
(3.051.010 
56,684.923 
50,749.429 
48,844,265 
47,087,190 
44.626,710 
45,223.289 
46.703,062 
51.934,584 
74.i 



$76.378.609 
85,757.590 



73,479,999 
59.862.147 



58.787,462 
52,165,979 
48.267,571 
52,258,219 
5H.724.5S1 
'4.996.083 
97,828,446 



$93.713.826 
96,901,340 

1890. 
75,211, 638 
70,477.886 
72.625.922 
63.528.315 
57,456,628 
53,111.350 
54,444.832 
56,189.845 
68,693,137 
98,328,646 



S8S.9SS.C47 
98,451,752 

1891. 
82.629.991 
74.876,317 
75.314.326 
70.906.J)76 
58.062,107 
57.594.734 



$110,103,537 
119,935,896 

1892. 
100.138,336 
86.638.137 
81,829,702 
75,954,962 
(59.703,479 



72.685.541 
82,854,085 
102.877,243 



58.401,758 

64.846,682 
62,909,5< ; 8 
87,494.297 



Total. 



$724.605,230 



$678.428.844 



$798,627.380 



J860,677,315 



$927.910,612 



$982,844,C)85 



IMPORTS. 

November 

December 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Total 



1886. 
$54.091.175 
56.278,102 

1887. 
51,951,153 
59.155,768 
62,894,014 
6il.581.185 
58.665,627 
61.232,444 
5fi.593.226 
65,733,871 
56,017,376 
60.963.257 



1887. 



52,111,228 

1888. 
58,513.504 

66,855,848 
63.041.249 

60.805,282 
w.4s-.'.r,<)8 
62,920.246 



62,086,944 
66.402.687 
65,555,529 
68,734,872 
61,209,191 



$707,157,198 



58,395.479 
54,193,215 
66.359,522 



65.067,718 
53,685.848 
68,749,155 



8722,978245 



$766,092,450 




$64,218.078 



1891. 

G2.3oo.fi(3 

15.979,569 
77,634,836 
81,275,106 
71,993,623 
73.462,225 
67.042.OC-a 
65,953.360 
61.504,737 



$819,002322 



1891. 

$('4,890.507 
69,448,02;i 
1892. 
62.719.550 
(3,383,270 
86,570.533 
76,341.449 
68.696.171 
72,016,568 
71.526,895 
77.200,025 
72,914.503 
79,098,462 

$866305:956 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE UNITED STATES. 



81 



CLIMATOLOGY OF THE UNITED STATES. 

The following tables of average temperatures and rainfall, highest and lowest tempera- 
tures, and average number of cloudy days, based upon observations of fourteen or less years, 
at selected stations in the several states and terntpries of the United States, was compiled 
f rom the records of the Weather Bureau for the Chicago Daily News Almanac by the United 
States Weather Office at Chicago, 111. 







fill: 






1 



B2J2JKS2SS8S!^i-82SBJ28SS8fiSSa.SSSSaSi-a8Ja J'o. of Years. 



I Maximum. 






25i3; 



Tear. 



Minimum. 



Tear. 



Average Preciptta- 
j twn. 



.,^C7,4^*-co*n*.*-ito-3i**>. Average Cloudiness. 
. '^ 'oo *- CD wUbilj 'coble-* Scale of to 10. 




52~P lc<=: g: : B&: s; g 

!lliHliP liiliifel 



I III! If 

54 Sg.^1 P! : 




Wsi SK 

f ! ! 5J8! It! 

; sEri 



gg^aS .JSSgg5S < >gSgg5gggSSiSggo a gSS8SgSi3S | So. of Yean. 






Maximum. 



Tear. 



Minimum. 



Tear. 



tion. 



Precipita- 



Average Cloudiness. 
Scale of to 10. 



82 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 




MARRIAGE 


LAWS. 


In all the states and territories, except the Dakotas, Idaho, New Jersey, New Mexico, 
New York, South Carolina and Wisconsin, a marriage license is required to be procured from 
some officer designated by law, for which fees are exacted. 


STATES 

AND 

TERRITORIES. 


AGES. 


Prohibited 
Degrees. 


Void or 
Voidable 
Marriages.* 


Other Prohibited 
or Punishable 
Marriages. 


M 

no 

'Si 

M< 

3d 

1 


i- 
rs 

;;; 

ir- 

! 


P 

mi 
C< 
M 
w 
Bel 






t- 
tttl 
ii- 
it 
'd 

Jto 




Alabama 


17 


14 

14 
15 

12 
12 

16 
12 


21 

18 

21 
21 

21 
21 
21 


18 

it; 

18 

18 

18 
21 
18 


Ancestors, descend- 
ants, brothers, sis- 
ters.uncles.aunts, 
nephews, nieces, 
step-relatives. 

Ancestors, descend- 
ants, brothers sis- 
ters.uncles. aunts, 
nephews, nieces, 
first cousins. 
Same as Arizona... . 

Same as Arizona, 
except as to first 
cousins. 

Same as Arizona... . 
Same as Alabama.. 

Same as Alabama . . 

Same as Alabama. 
Within the Leviti- 
cal degrees. 
Within the Leviti- 
cal degrees, and 
step-relatives. 
Same aa California. 
Same as Arizona .. . 
Not nearer of kin 
than second cou- 
sin. 

Same as Alabama . . 

Same as Arizona . . . 
Same as Alabama.. 

Same as Alabama, 
except as to step- 
relatives. 
Same as Alabama . . 

Same as Alabama.. 

Same as Alabama . . 
Same as Alabama.. 




tUnder age of con- 
sent; marriage of 
woman by force, 
menace or duress; 
white and negro 
to 3d generation. 
tMarriage of wom- 
an by force, men- 
ace or duress; 
false personation. 

t. 

White and Mon- 
golian. 

tMarriage of wom- 
an by force or 
fraud, 
t. 

Pauper. 

tFalse personation. 

Marriage of woman 
by force, menace 
or duress. 
tSame as Iowa. 

Same as Iowa. 

Clandestine mar- 
riage of woman 
under 16. 
Same as Iowa. 


White and negro or 
Mongolian; impotent. 

White and negro or mu- 
latto, mentally or phy- 
sically incapable,f orce 
or fraud. 
tWhite and negro or 
mulatto, under age, 
insane, force or fraud, 
impotent. 
White and negro or mu- 
latto. 

Marriages attempted to 
be celebrated by un- 
authorized person. 
tWhite and negro or 
mulatto, insane. 
t. 
tWhite and colored. 

tWhite and colored, 
force, fraud, impo- 
tent, insane. 
Same as California. 
Insane or idiotic 
tWhite and one-eighth 
negro; underage; phy- 
sically or mentally in- 
capable. 
tUnder age, insane, im- 
potent. 

Incapable from want of 
age or understanding. 
tWhite and negro or 
mulatto; insane, idiot- 
ic, force, fraud; under 
age. 
tForce or fraud; mis- 
take in person. 

White and negro, mulat- 
to or Indian; insane; 
under age. 
tWhite and negro, or 
person of negro de- 
scent to the third gen- 
eration, 
tlnsane, idiotic; under 
age. 

Unsane. idiotic; under 
age; force or fraud: 
impotent. 


Arkansas ... 
California 

Colorado 
Connecticut 
Delaware 


17 

18 

tH 
t!4 

IS 
*14 


Dist. Columbia. 
Florida 


21 

18 
21 
21 

21 


21 
18 

16 

18 
IS 

18 


Georgia 


17 


14 


Idaho 


Illinois 
Indiana 


17 

18 

16 
IB 


14 
18 

14 
1 


Iowa 


Kansas 


Kentucky 

Louisiana 
Maine 


16 

14 
U4 

tu 

t!4 
18 


14 

11 

12 

12 
16 


21 

21 
21 
21 

21 


21 

21 
18 
16 

18 


Maryland 

Massachusetts. 
Michigan 


For foot-notes see next page. 



MARRIAGE LAWS. 83 


STATES 

A XI) 

TERRITORIES. 


AGES. 


Prohibited 
Degrees. 


Voider 
Voidable 
Marriages.* 


Other Prohibited 
or Punishable 
Marriages. 


Mi- 
nors 
Capa- 

!,!> of 
Mar- 
rying. 


Pa- 
rental 
Con- 
sent 
req'd 
BfVw 


^ 
~ 

* 


Female 


% 


^ 


Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 
Montana 

Nebraska 
Nevada 


is 

tu 

15 
18 

IS 
18 

14 
U4 

18 

18 

16 

18 

18 

is 

W 

t!4 

[S 

18 

JI4 
16 

14 

tu 

14 

i!4 

14 
is 
is 


15 
12 

a 

i; 

16 
16 

13 
12 

15 
16 

14 

15 

16 
Ifi 

a 
a 


21 

.'1 
B 

n 

21 
21 

21 
21 

18 

18 

21 
21 

21 
21 


18 

18 

IS 
18 

18 
18 

15 
18 

18 

15 

18 

18 

21 

c-h 

Hi 
15 

'is 
18 

18 
21 

18 

21 

18 
21 


Not nearer kin than 
first cousin. 

Same as Alabama.. 

Same as California. 
Same as Indiana.. . . 


[Force or fraud ; incapa- 
ble from want of age 
or understanding. 
[White and quarter ne- 
gro. 
tWhite and negro 


False personation. 

Same as Iowa. 
fUnder age; false 
personation ; same 
as Iowa. 

Same as Iowa;white 
and black, mulat- 
to. Indian and 
Chinese. 

* tUnder age. 

Idiot, lunatic. 

Same as Iowa;white 
and negro to third 
generation. 

*t Force of female; 
under age. 

t. 


Same as California. 
Same as Indiana 

Same as Alabama, 
and first cousins. 
Same as Alabama .. 

Same as California. 
Ancestors, descend- 
ants, brothers, sis- 
ters. 
Same as Minnesota. 

Same as Arizona, 
and including all 
cousins. 
Same as Indiana 
Same as Minnesota. 

Same as Alabama . . 
Same as Alabama.. 
Same as Alabama .. 

See North Dakota.. 

Same as Alabama.. 
Same as Alabama.. 

Same as Arizona... . 
Same as Alabama. . 
Same as Alabama .. 

Same as Indiana 
and step-relatives 
Same as Alabama. . 
Same as Minnesota 
Same as Arizona.. . 


fWhite and quarter ne- 
gro; insane, idiotic; 
under age; force or 
fraud, impotent, 
tlncapable from want 
of age or understand- 
ing; fraud. 

tJ. 

flmpotent; under age; 
force of female. 
Under age. 
tSame as Nevada; force 
or fraud; impotent. 

tWhite and negro or 
Indian to third genera- 
tion; under age; men- 
tally or physically in- 
capable. . 
tSame as Michigan. 


NewHamps'ire 
New Jersey 

New Mexico.... 
New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota.. 
Ohio 




tWhite and quarter ne- 
gro, Chinese, or Kan- 
aka, or more than half 
Indian; force: fraud; 
want of age or under- 
standing. 

tidiot, lunatic. 
tWhite and Indian, ne- 
gro, mestizo, or half- 
breed ; fraud or force. 
See North Dakota 

White and colored; im- 
potent or other imped- 
iment to contract. 
tWhite and Mongolian 
or negro; under age; 
force or fraud. 
tUnderage; idiot, luna- 
tic; force or fraud; 
physical incapacity. 
tWhite and colored; in- 
sane; under age; phy- 
sical incapacity. 
Force; same as Nevada. 

tSame as Virginia. 
tSame as Minnesota, 
tlnsane. idiot; under 
age; force or fraud. 


Pennsylvania.. 
Rhode Island . 
South Carolina 

South Dakota.. 

Tennessee 
Texas 


15 

n 

14 

B 

12 
12 

12 

12 
U 

It 


18 

'ii 

21 
21 

21 

21 

21 
21 
21 


Utah 
Vermont 
Virginia 


Washington... 

West Virginia. 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 


* Besides prohibited degrees, t Also bigamous. t At common law: no statutory provision. 
il Where party marries with knowledge that former husband or wife is living. Also Croatan 
Indian and negro to third generation, c But license may issue to a woman over 18 if she has 
no parent or guardian living in the United States. 



84 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



DIVORCE LAWS. 



CAUSES FOB ABSOLUTE DIVORCE. 

Adultery, In all the states and territories, 
excepting South Carolina, which has no 
divorce laws. 

Impotency, in all excepting Arizona, Cali- 
fornia, Connecticut, the Dakotas, Idaho Iowa. 
Louisiana, New Mexico, New York, South 
Carolina, Texas and Vermont. 

Willful abandonment or desertion, in all-ex- 
eept New York, North Carolina and South 
Carolina. Period: Six months, in Arizona; 
one year, in Arkansas, California, Colorado, 
he Dakotas, Florida, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, 
Louisiana, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Ore- 
gon, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin and Wy- 
oming; two years, in Alabama, District of 
Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, 
Mississippi, Nebraska, Pennsylvania and 
Tennessee; three years, in Connecticut, Dela- 
ware, Ge9rgia, Maine, Maryland, Massachu- 
setts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New 
Jersey, Ohio, Texas, Vermont and West Vir- 
ginia; five years, in Rhode Island, or shorter 
term (in discretion of court), and Virginia. 

Habitual drunkenness, in all except Mary- 
land, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, 
Pennsylvania, South Carolina. Texas, Ver- 
mont, Virginia and West Virginia. In Arizona 
divorce is granted for this cause to the wife 
only. 

Cruelty, inhuman treatment, etc., in all ex- 
cept Maryland, New Jersey. New York, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West 
Virginia. In Alabama. Kentucky and Tennes- 
see divorce is granted for this cause to the 
wife only. 

Conviction of felony or infamous crime, 
sentence to imprisonment, imprisonment, in 
all except the District of Columbia, Florida. 
Maine, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, 
North Carolina and South Carolina. 

Failure or neglect of husband to provide for 
wife. Period: Six months, Arizona; one year, 
California, Colorado, Dakota, Idaho, Nevada 
and Wyoming; two years, Indiana; three 
years, Delaware and New Hampshire; time 
not specified, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, 
Nebraska, New Mexico, Rhode Island, Tennes- 
s, Utah, Vermont, Washington and Wis- 
consin (in discretion of court). 

Disappearance, absence without being heard 
from, Connecticut and Vermont, seven years; 
New Hampshire, three years; Rhode Island. 

Other causes are as follows: Voluntary 
separation. Kentucky and Wisconsin; having 
former wife or husband living, Arkansas. 
Colorado, District of Columbia, Florida, Illi- 
nois, Kansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, 
New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Tennes- 
see; joining a religious sect which believes 
marriage unlawful, Kentucky. Massachusetts 
and New Hampshire; indicted for felony 
and is a fugitive from justice, Louisiana and 
Virginia; husband indicted for felony and 



flees the state, North Carolina; refusal of 
wife to "remove with her husband to this 
state," Tennessee; indignities rendering con- 
dition intolerable or life burdensome, Arkan- 
sas, Missouri, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennes- 
see, Washington and Wyoming; conduct 
rendering it unsafe for wife to live with 
husband, Tennessee; turning wife out ol 
doors, Tennessee; habitually violent and 
ungovernable temper, Florida; attempt by 
either party upon life of other, Illinois, Louis- 
ana and Tennessee ; gross neglect of duty, Kan- 
sas and Ohio; wife "given to intoxication." 
Wisconsin; husband a vagrant under the 
statutes, Missouri and Wyoming; insanity or 
mental Incapacity at time of marriage. Dis- 
trict of Columbia, Georgia and Mississippi; 
insanity, permanent and incurable, occurring 
subsequent to marriage, Arkansas; incurable 
chronic mania or dementia, having existed 
ten years or more, Washington; any cause 
rendering the marriage originally void, Mary- 
land and Rhode Island; or voidable, Rhode 
Island; marriage within prohibited degrees, 
Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, New Jersey and 
Pennsylvania; marriage by force, duress or 
fraud, Connecticut, Georgia, Kansas, Ken- 
tucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Washington; 
marriage solemnized while either party was 
under the age of consent, Delaware; when 
one of the parties has obtained a divorce in 
another state, Florida, Michigan and Ohio; 
public defamation, Louisiana; any other 
cause deemed by the court sufficient and 
when the court shall be satisfied that the 
parties can no longer live together, Washing- 
ton. 

PREVIOUS RESIDENCE REQUIRED. 

Five years, Massachusetts (if when mar- 
ried both parties were residents, three years); 
three years, Connecticut, New Jersey; two 
years. District of Columbia. Florida, Indiana, 
Maryland, Michigan (when the cause for 
divorce occurred out of the state, otherwise 
one year), North Carolina, Tennessee, Ver- 
mont; one year, Alabama (abandonment, 
three years), Arkansas (if cause occurred 
out of the state, plaintiff must have been a 
resident of the state at time of occurrence), 
Colorado, (unless cause for divorce occurred 
within the state, or while one or both of the 
parties resided in the state); Illinois (same as 
Colorado) Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky (if cause 
occurred out of the state, plaintiff must have 
been a resident of the state at time of occur 
rence), Maine, Minnesota. Mississippi (in case 
of desertion, two years); Missouri (same as 
Colorado), Montana, New Hampshire. Ohio. 
Oregon. Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Utah, 
Virginia, Washington, West Virginia. Wis- 
consin; six months. Arizona, California, 
Idaho. Nebraska. Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, 
Wyoming; ninety days, the Dakotas. 



SHEEP PER SQUARE MILE. 

[From official records so far as available.] 



COUNTRIES. 



United Kingdom 

New South Wales 1890 
New Zealand....! 1891 

Victoria 

France 

Germany 1883 

Denmark .J1888 



Sheep. 



33,533,988 
55,S>,431 
18,117,186 
12,736,143 
21,658,416 
19.189,715 
1.225.1% 



Square 
Miles. 



121,562 
310,700 
104,471 

87,884 

a i4,i lib 

208,587 
14,638 



Sheep 
per Sq. 
Mile. 



275.9 
180.2 
173.4 
144.9 
106.1 

92.0 

83. 



COUNTRIES. 



Argentina 1890 70,461.665 

Netherlands 1888 778,000 

Belgium 1880 365,400 

Queensland 1890 18,007,234 

Russia in Europe 

and Poland . . , 

United States. . . . '1892 1 44.9as,365 



Sheep. 



Square 
Miles. 



1,125.086 
12.741 
11,373 



1,951,249 
2.900.170 



Sheep 

per Sq 

Mile 



62.6 
61.1 
32.1 
26.9 

24.7 
15.5 



RELIGIOUS. 85 


2&cltgt0us. 

STATISTICS OF CHTTRCHES 

[Census of 1890.] 


DENOMINATIONS. 


Number of Or- 
ganizations. 


CHURCH 
EDIFICES. 


HALLS, ETC. 


Value of Church 
Property. 


Communicants 
or Members. 


Number. 


it 


Number. 


O"v 



OQcS 


Church of the New Jerusalem . . 


154 

30 
28 
106 
6 
18 
143 
4 
40 
63 

425 
83 
94 

870 

52 

109 
10,221 
14 
12 
1 
6 


87 
3 
27 

1 

78 
3 
13 

1 

34 



114 
785 
52 


"SB 

12,055 
80,286 
5,855 
2,250 
21,467 
1,960 
3,600 
46,005 
1,925 
200 
13,605 

92,102 
23,925 
31,615 

245,781 
35,175 


70 

soS 

281 
5 
19 
18 
1 
4 
8 

"'38 
24 

178 
2 
4 

83 

A 

1,469 

1 


7,165 
350 
86,801 
34,705 
775 
1,830 
575 

""400 
700 

i',ii5 

980 

28,075 
300 
715 

5,970 

7,423 
69,159 


$1,386,455 
66,050 
37,350 
465,605 
61,400 
16,790 
264,010 
14,550 

137!OUO 

'600 
57,750 

825,506 
1,615.101 
' 681,250 

4,614,490 
1,187,450 


7,095 
1,394 
8,662 
25,816 
1,147 
1,018 
9,128 

695 
2,080 

144,352 

8455 
11,781 

187,432 

36,156 
2279 
6,250,045 
10.850 
13,504 
100 

17',078 

10,101 
2,038 
1209 
1,655 
5,670 
471 
610 

1,113 
61,101 
8,089 
452,725 
16,492 

3,415 

18,214 
340 
22,511 

21,773 

1,728 
1,600 
352 
250 
200 
21 
25 

164,640 
37,457 
317.145 
357,153 


i Catholic Apostolic Church 


i Salvation Army 


Advent Christian Church 


Evangelical Adventlsts 


Life and Advent Union 


Seventh-Day Baptists . ... 


Seventh-Day Baptists (German) 
General Six Principle Baptists 


Christian Church, South 




Theosophical Society 


Brethren in Christ 


Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day 
Saints 


Reformed Episcopal Church 


Moravian Church 


German Evangelical Synod of North 


German Evangelical Protestant Church 
of North America..... 


Plymouth Brethren. . ..: 




8,765 
13 
23 
1 


3,366,633 
5,228 
3,150 
75 


118,381,516 
63,300 
220,000 
5,000 


Greek Catholic (Uniates) 


Russian Orthodox .... 


Greek Orthodox 


Armenian 


Old Catholic 


4 
8 
246 
5 
97 

1 

34 
45 
18 
15 

'1 

45 
720 
128 

2 1S 

40 

294 
4 

479 

431 

15 
7 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1,424 

414 
1,995 
1,934 


3 


700 


2 
8 
29 

""33 
20 


150 
3.600 
1,030 

""960 


13,320 


Reformed Catholic 




197 
5 
61 
1 
1 
29 

3 
'I 

34 
854 
95 
4,124 
341 

27 

183 
5 

338 

122 

16 
22 

1 
1 


70,605 
60C 
15,430 
200 
225 
7,465 

13 'S8 

4,120 

a 

10,625 
353,586 
32.740 
1,160,838 
86,254 

7,161 

68,000 
1,150 
115,530 

30,790 
5,650 

MB 

500 
500 


317,045 
4,500 
76,450 
1,500 

&R 
"SS 

8,015 

11,350 
10,540 
39,600 
1,121,541 
145,770 
6,468,280 
393,250 

54,440 

234,450 
15,300 
643,185 

226,285 

36,800 
15,000 

io',ooc 




Amish Mennonite Church 


Old Amish Mennonite Church 


Apostolic Mennonite Church 


Reformed Mennonite Church 
General Conference Mennonites 
Church of God in Christ 


5 
2 

4 

1 

1 

8 

180 
37 
31 
213 

13 
105 


i 

150 

40 

""660 
15,048 
4,455 
2,200 
18,483 

1,883 
14,705 


Old (Wisler) Mennonites . 


Bundes Conference der Mennonlten 
Brueder-Gemeinde 


Defenseless Mennonites 
Mennonite Brethren in Christ 


Brethren or Dunkards (Conservative). . . 
Brethren or Dunkards ( Progressive). . . . 
African Methodist Episcopal Church 
Wesleyan Methodist Connection 
African Union Methodist Protestant 
Church 


Independent Churches of Christ in 
Christian Union .... 


Temple Society 


Church of God 


129 
254 


13,840 
15,370 


Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of 


Communistic Societies: 
Society of Shakers 


Amana Society 






Bruederhoef Mennonite Society 








Society of Altruists 












Lutheran Bodies: 


1,322 
379 
1,512 
1,531 


471,819 
138,453 
577,190 

443. 1ST 


2S 
367 
67 


10,730 
4,2'>5 
30,904 

4,3<>2 


8,919,170 
1,114,065 

10,996,786 
7,804:318 


United Synod in the South 




Sy nodical Conference 



86 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


CHURCH STATISTICS CONTINUED. 


DENOMINATION'S. 


Number of Or-\ 
ganizations. 


CHURCH 
EDIFICES. 


HALLS, ETC. 


Value of Church 
Property, 


Communicants 
or Members. 


Number. 


It 

II 





9k 

11 

I! 


Independent Lutheran Bodies: 
Joint Synod of Ohio etc 


421 
27 
175 
489 
65 
131 
23 
50 
13 
21 
11 
1,122 
112 
4,868 

572 

1J B 

316 
217 

794 
201 
52 
9 
334 
25,861 
7,246 
1,281 
2,310 
84 

si 

29 
25 
4 

6,717 
2,391 
187 
238 
2,791 
866 
31 
116 
115 
33 
4 

1 


443 
25 
99 
275 
53 
74 
23 
33 
4 
19 
8 
668 
87 
4,736 

669 
1,304 
106 

122 
179 

725 
213 
52 

5 
30 
22,844 
5,324 
962 
1,899 
78 
35 
418 
1 
25 

6.063 
2.288 
189 
192 
2,008 
831 
23 
116 
115 
33 
] 

1 


149.338 
5.793 
30.500 
78,988 
14,613 
14.760 
7,560 
5.700 
1,300 
5,300 
1,915 
185.242 
27,634 
1,553,080 

257.922 
534.254 
33,755 

46.837 
92,397 

215,431 
72.568 
13.169 
1,050 
20,450 
(5,302,708 
1,609,452 
301,<S2 
479,335 
20,930 
11500 
94,627 
200 
3,100 


10 
2 
75 
182 
12 
42 

'i 

'"393 

14 

456 

8 
61 
4 

193 

38 

90 
4 

1 
4 

307 
2,873 
1,141 
218 
425 
11 
7 
555 
23 


785 
275 
4.436 
12,115 
5TO 
2,175 

""480 

750 

"29485 
1.685 
42,646 

751 
6,504 
200 

24,847 
3,630 

7.085 
325 

50 
72.522 
275.444 
139.325 
24,725 
24,885 
1,670 
250 
27,865 
1,445 


$1,639,087 
84,410 
214,395 
806,825 
164,770 
129,700 
111,060 
44,775 
7,200 
94.200 
12.898 
1,544,455 
530,125 
4,335,437 

10,340,159 

7,975,583 
428,500 

2.802,050 
6,952,225 

2.795,784 
l,6il,850 
67,000 
16,700 
573,650 
96,723,408 
12,206,038 
1,637,202 
4,785,680 
29K99S 
187.600 
644.673 
1.400 
8,300 

74,455.200 
8,812,152 
625,875 
202,961 
3,515,511 
5,408,084 
29,200 
211,850 
1,071,400 
469,000 


69,505 
4.242 
14,730 
55.452 
11.482 
10.181 
7,010 
3,493 
1,991 
5.580 
1,385 
119,972 
18,096 
512,771 

92,970 
204,018 
12,470 

57.597 
72,8'.)9 

80,655 
21,992 
4.329 
282 
45,030 
2,240,354 
641,051 
90,718 
133,313 
4,764 
2,279 
28,991 
647 
525 
1,064 

788,224 
179,721 
12.722 
13,439 
164,940 
94,402 
1.053 
8,501 
10,574 
4,602 
37 

600 


Buffalo Synod 


Hauge's Synod 


Norwegian Church in America 


Michigan Synod 
Danish Church in America 


Danish Church Association 


Iceland! c Sy nod 






United Norwegian Church of America 
Independent Congregations 




Reformed Churches: 
Reformed Church in America . .. 


Reformed Church in the United States 
Christian Reformed Church 


Jews: 
Orthodox Jewish Congregations 




Friends: 


Hicksite 


Wilburite 


Primitive 


Spiritualists 


Methodist Episcopal 


Disciples of Christ 


Christians, or Christian Connection 
Evangelical Association 


Primitive Methodist 
Union American Methodist Episcopal. . . 
Seventh-Day Adventists 


Church of God (Seventh-Day Adventist) 
United Zion's Children 


Society for E thical Culture 
Presbyterian Bodies: 
Presbyterian in the United States of 


5 

556 
143 
14 
37 
551 
50 
8 
5 
3 
1 
3 


6,260 

57.805 
19,895 
1,266 
3,645 
91,288 
5,530 
345 
540 
600 
100 


2,225,044 
690,843 
44,445 
53.914 

662,807 
264,298 
4,849 

'200 
800 


Presbyterian in the United States 
Welsh Calvinistic Methodist 
Cumberland (colored) 
Cumberland Presbyterian 


United Presbyterian .. 


Associate Church of North America. 


Reformed Presbyterian (Synod) 
Reformed Presbyter'n (General Synod) 
Reformed Presbyterian (Covenanted) 
Reformed in the United States and 


75.000 








The census bureau has issued ten b 
are combined in the foregoing table. It 

ROMAN CATHOLIC CH 

Cardinal, Janu 
A] 
Archdioceses. Names. 
St Louis Mo Peter Richard Kei 


ulletin; 
is ther 

URCH 

>s Gibb 
1CHBI 

irick. 

. 
iams. 


5 giving partis 
efore incomple 

OF THE TJ1 

ons, Baltimore 

SHOPS. 

Archdioceses 
Portland, Ore 
New York, N. 
New Orleans, 
San Francisco 
St. Paul, Mini 
Milwaukee, W 


1 statistics c 
te as to sevei 

flTED STA1 
, Md. 

Nt 
?pn W. E 
Y M. A 


f churches, which 
al denominations. 

mS. 

imes. 
. Gross. 
Corrigan. 
cis Jaussens. 
ck W. Riordan. 
Ireland, 
erick Katzer. 


Cincinnati O William H. Elder. 


Chicago 111 Patrick A. Feehar 


La Fran 


Boston Mass John Joseph Will 


Cal Patr 
i John 
is Fred 


Santa Fe N. M J. B. Salpointe. 


Philadelphia, Pa Patrick John Ryan. 



RELIGIOUS. 



87 



Dioceses. Names. 

Springfield, Mass T. D. Heaven. 

Savannah, Ga Thomas A. Becker. 

Lincoln, Neb Thomas Bonacum. 

Tucson, Ariz T. Bourgade. 

Manchester, N. H D. M. Bradley. 

Boston, Mass John Brady. 

Dallas, Tex Thomas Brennan. 

Helena, Mont JohnB. Brondel. 

Cheyenne, Wyo M. F. Burke. 

Santa Fe, N. M P. L. Capelle. 

New York, N. Y J. J. Conroy. 

Davenport, la Henry Cosgrove. 

Winona,Minn J. B. Cotter. 

Wilmington, Del A. A. Curtis. 

Burlington, Vt L. De Goesbraind . 

Natchitoches, La Anthony Durier. 

Fort Wayne, Ind Joseph Dwenger. 

Kansas City, Kas L. M. Fink. 

Little Rock, Ark E. Fitzgerald. 

Detroit, Mich J. S. Foley. 

Ogdensburg, N. Y Henry Grabriels. 

Galveston, Tex N. A. Gallagher. 

Boise City, Idaho A. J.Glorieux. 

St. Paul, Minn Vacant. 

Belmont,N. C Leo Haid. 

Providence. R.I M. J. Harkins. 

Portland, Me J. A. Healy. 

Dubuque, la John Hennessy. 

Wichita, Kas John J. Hennessy. 

Natchez, Miss Thomas Heslin. 

Kansas City, Mo. John J. Hogan. 

Cleveland, O I. F. Horstmann. 

Belleville, 111 John Janssen. 

Vancouver, Wash A. B. Junger. 

Wheeling, W. Va J.J. Kain. 

Washington, D.C J.J. Keane. 

Syracuse, N. Y P. A. Ludden. 

Louisville, Ky W. G. McCloskey. 



BISHOPS. 

Diocese*. Names. 

Brooklyn, N.Y C. E. McDonnell. 

Duluth, Minn James McGolrick. 

Harrisburg, Pa Thomas McGovern. 

Hartford, Conn L. S. McMahon. 

Albany, N. Y F. McNeirny. 

Rochester, N. Y B. J.McQuaid. 

Covington, Ky C.P.Maes. 

Sacramento, Cal P. Manogue. 

Sioux Falls, S. D Martin Marty. 

Denver. Colo N. C. Matz. 

Guthrie. Oklahoma T. Meerschaert. 

Green Bay, Wis S. Messmer. 

Burlington, Vt J. S. Michaud. 

St. Augustine, Fla John Moore. 

Los Angeles, Cal Francis Mora. 

Erie, Pa Tobias Mullen. 

San Antonio, Tex J. C. Neraz. 

Charleston, S. C H. P. Northrop. 

Trenton, N. J M. J. O'Farrelf. 

Scranton, Pa W.O'Hara. 

Mobile, Ala J. O'Sullivan. 

Pittsburg, Pa R. Phelan. 

Nashville, Tenn J. Rademacher. 

Grand Rapids, Mich...J. H. Richter. 

Alton, 111 James Ryan. 

Buffalo, N.Y S.V. Ryan. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. .L. Scanlan. 

Omaha, Neb R. Scannell. 

La Crosse, Wis J. Schwebach. 

Collegeville, Minn Vacant. 

Fargo, N. D John Shanley. 

Peoria, 111 J. L. Spalding. 

Richmond , Va A. Van de Vy ver. 

Laredo, Tex P. Verdaguer. 

Marquette, Mich John Vertin. 

Columbus, O J. A. Watterson. 

South Orange, N. J....W. M. Wigger. 
St. Cloud, Minn Otto Zardetti. 



PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHTTRCH. 



Dioceses. Bishops. Residence. 

Alabama.... R.H.Wilmer Mobile. 

Assistant.. H. M. Jackson Montgomery. 

Ar. & N. M..J. M. Kendrick Santa Fe. 

Arkansas.... H. M. Pierce Little Rock. 

California- 
North J. H. Wingfleld Benicia. 

South W.I. Kip San Francisco 

Assistant.. W. F. Nichols San Francisco 

Colorado- 
Eastern... . J. F. Spalding Denver. 

Western... W. M. Barker 

Connecticut. John Williams Middletown. 

Delaware.. . .L. Coleman Wilmington. 

Florida- 
Northern.. E. G. Weed Jacksonville. 

Southern.. W. C. Gray 

Georgia C K. Nelson Atlanta. 

Illinois- 
Chicago. ..W. E. McLaren Chicago. 

Spr'gfield. .G. F. Seymour Springfield. 

Quincy ....Alex. Burgess Peoria. 

Indiana D.B.Knickerbocker.Indianapolis. 

Iowa W. S. Perry Davenport. 

Kansas E. S. Thomas Topeka. 

Kentucky . .T. U. Dudley .Louisville. 

Louisiana ..J N. Gallaher New Orleans. 

Assistant.. David Sessions New Orleans. 

Maine H.A. Neely Portland. 

Maryland .. . W Paret Baltimore. 

Easton . . . . W. F. Adams Easton. 

Mass Phillips Brooks Boston. 

Michigan- 
Eastern...^ F. Davies Detroit. 

Western.. .G. DeN Gillespie. .Grand Rapids 
Northern.. Wm. Reed Thomas. 

Minnesota... H. B. Whipple Faribault. 

M.N.Gilbert, asst. St. Paul. 

Mississippi.. H. M. Thompson. . .Jackson. 

Missouri D. S. Tuttle St. Louis. 

W.Missouri .E. R. Atwill Kansas City. 

Montana L. R. Brewer Helena. 

Nebraska.. . .G. Worthington Omaha. 

The Platte. .A. N. Graves Kearney. 



Dioceses. Bishops. Residence. 

N. Hampsh.W. W. Niles Concord. 

New Jersey. J. Scarborough Trenton. 

Newark.. . .T. A. Starkey Newark. 

New York. . .H. C. Potter NewYorkCity 

Central F. D. Huntington. .Syracuse. 

Albany.... W C. Doane Albany. 

Long Id... A. N. Littlejohn.... Brooklyn. 
Western. . . A. C. Coxe Buffalo. 

N. Carolina.. T. B. Lyman Raleigh. 

E. Carolina..A. A. Watson Wilmington. 

N. Dakota... W. D. Walker Fargo. 

Ohio- 
Northern. .W. A. Leonard.. 
Southern. .T. A. Jaggar. : . .. 
B. Vincent, asst. 

Oklahoma- 
Indian T..F. K. Brooke 

Oregon B. W. Morris 

Penn 
Phila O. W. Whitaker. 

Pittsburg.. . .C. Whitehead Pittsburg. 

Central. . . .M. A. De W. Howe.. Reading. 

N. A. Rulison, asst. Bethlehem. 

Rhode Isl'd.T. M. Clark Providence 

S. Carolina. .W. B. W. Howe.. 

S. Dakota ... W. H. Hare .... 



..Cleveland. 
..Cincinnati. 
..Cincinnati. 

..Brooke. 
. .Portland. 

.Philadelphis 



Tennessee . .C. T. Quintard 
Texas ....... A.Gre 



..Charleston. 
,. Sioux Falls. 
..Sewanee. 
.Austin. 



exas ....... A.Gregg 

Western.. . J. S. Johnson ....... San Antonio. 

Northern. . A. C. Garrett ........ Dal las. 

Utah ......... A.Leonard .......... SaltLakeCity 

Vermont .. . . W. H. A. Bissell. . . .Burlington. 

Virginia ..... F. McN. Whittle.... Richmond. 

A.M.Randolph,as't.Richmond. 
W. Virginia. G. W. Peterkin ..... Parkersburg. 

Wisconsin 

Milw'kee.. Isaac L. Nicholson. Milwaukee. 

F. du Lac. Charles C. Grafton.Fond du Lac. 
Washingt'n. J. A. Paddock ....... Tacoma. 

Spokane... L. H.Weils ......... 

Wyo. Idaho.E. Talbot ............ Laramie Citv. 

Africa 

C. Palmas.S. D. Ferguson 



88 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



REFORMED EPISCOPAL CHTIRCH. 



Synods. is?iops. Residence. 

Chicago Charles E. Cheney-Chicago. 

N.Y.&Penn.W. R. Nicholson.... Philadelphia. 

Pacific Edward Cridge Victoria, B. C. 

Northwest . .Samuel Fallows. . . .Chicago. 



Bishops. Residence. 

Thomas Bowman St. Louis, Mo. 

Randolph S. Foster Boston. Mass. 

Stephen M. Merrill Chicago, 111. 

Edward G. Andrews New York, N. Y. 

Henry JV^Warren Denver, Col. 



Synods. Bishops. Residence. 

3uth* P. F. Stevens Charleston. 

Duth 3. A. Latane Baltimore. 

anada Thos. W. Campbell.Toronto. 

* For colored parishes and congregations. 
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Bishops. Residence. 

John M. Walden Cincinnati, O. 

Willard F. Mallalieu Buffalo, N. Y. 

Charles H. Fowler Minneapolis, Minn. 

John H. Vincent Topeka, Kas. 

James W. Fitzgerald New Orleans, La. 

Isaac W. Joyce Chattanooga,Tenn. 

John P. Newman Omaha, Neb. 

Daniel A. Goodsell San Francisco, Cal. 



Cyrus D. Foss Philadelphia. Pa 

John F. Hurst Washington, D. C. 

William X. Ninde Detroit, Mich. 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 

Moderator, Rev. William C. Young, D. D., LL. D., Danville, Ky. 
Stated Clerk. Rev. W. H. Roberts, D. D., Cincinnati, O. 
Permanent Clerk, Rev. W. E. Moore, D. D., Columbus, O. 
THE BOARDS OF THE CHURCH. 



Home Missions, Rev. John Hall, D. D., LL. D., 

president, New York. 
Foreign Missions, Rev. John D. Wells, D. D., 

president, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Education, Rev. G. D. Baker, D. D., president, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Publication and Sunday-School Work, Hon. 

R. N. Wilson, president. Philadelphia, Pa. 



Church Erection, Rev. S. D. Alexander, D. D., 

president, New York. 
Ministerial Relief, George Junkin, LL. D.. 

president,Philadelphia. Pa. 
Freedmen, Rev. E. P. Cowan, D. D., president. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
Aid for Colleges, Rev. Herrick Johnson, D. D., 

LL. D., president, Chicago, 111. 
CONGREGATIONAL CHTIRCH. 



A. B. C. F. M., R. S. Storrs, D. D., LL. D., presi- 
dent, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

College and Education Society, Hon. Nathaniel 
Shipman. president, Hartford, Conn. 

Congregational Association, Hon. Rufus S. 
Frost, president, Chelsea, Mass. 

Church Building Society, W. M. Taylor, D. D., 
LL. D., president, New York. 



Home Missionary Society, Gen. O. O. Howard. 

president, Amnerst, Mass. 
Missionary Association, Merrill E. Gates, LL. 

D., president, New York. 
Sunday-School and Pub. Society, S. B. Capen, 

president. Boston, Mass. 
New West Education Commission, W. E. Hale, 

president, Chicago. 



BAPTIST DENOMINATION. 
Missionary Union, Augustus H. Strong, D. D., I Home Mission Society, Hon. E. Nelson Blake 

president, Rochester, N. Y. I president, Arlington. Mass. 

Publication Society, S. A. CrozJer, president, Historical Society, Hon. J. L. Howard, Hart- 
Upland. Pa. I ford. Conn. 

Education Society.Rev. R. M. Dudley, president, Georgetown. Ky. 



Judge Jonathan Haralson, pres., Selma, Ala. 

Foreign Mission Board, H.H.Harris, D.D.. LL.D., 
president, Richmond, Va.; H. A. Tupper, 
D.D., corresponding secretary, Richmond, Va. 



SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION. 



Home Mission Board, Hon. J. D. Stewart, pres- 
ident; 1. T. Tichenor, D. D., corresponding 
secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS. 



There is no national holiday that Is. one by 
order of an act of congress. The different 
states have set apart certain days as legal 
holidays as follows: 

New Year's Day (Jan. 1) All the states ex- 
cept Delaware, Massachusetts, New Hamp- 
shire and Rhode Island. 

Jan.. 8. Louisiana. 

Jan. 19 (Lee's Birthday) Georgia and Vir- 
ginia. 

Feb. 12 (Lincoln's Birthday)-Illinois. 

Feb. 22 (Washington's Birthday )-All the 
states except Arkansas, Delaware, Iowa, 
Mississippi and Vermont. 

Mardi-Gras Alabama and Louisiana. 

March 2 (Anniversary of Texan Independ- 
ence) Texas. 

March 4 (Firemen'sAnniversary) Louisiana. 

State election day (First Wednesday in 
April) Rhode Island. 

Good Friday Alabama, Louisiana, Mary- 
land, Pennsylvania and Tennessee. 

April 21 (Anniversary of the Battle of San 
Jacinto) Texas. 

April 26 (Memorial Day) Alabama and 

May 10 (Memorial Day) North Carolina. 

May 20 (Anniversary of the Signing of the 
Mecklenburg Declaration) North Carolina. 

May 30 (Decoration Day) Arizona, Califor- 
nia, Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Illinois, In- 



diana, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Michi- 
gan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada 
New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York 
North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Penn- 
sylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, Ver- 
mont, Wisconsin, Washington and Wyoming. 

June 3 (Jeff Davis' Birthday) Florida. 

July 4 In all the states. 

July 24 (Pioneers' Day) Utah. 

Sept. 4, 1893 (Arbor Day)-Colorado, Con 
necticut, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, 
Maine, Massachusetts, Montana, Nebraska, 
New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, South Dakota and Washington. 

Oct. 31 (Admission Anniversary) Nebraska. 

November (General Election Day) Arizona, 
California, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, 
Maryland, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New 
Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North 
Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, South Carolina, South 
Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wis- 
consin and Wyoming. 

November, Last Thursday of (Thanksgiving 
Day) All the states except Alabama, Louisi- 
ana and Mississippi. 

Dec. 25 (Christmas) In all the states. 

Arbor Day In Idaho, Kansas, Rhode Isl 
and and WVoming is appointed by the gov 
ernor In Nebraska it is April 22, in California 
Sept. 9 and in Colorado it is the third Friday 
in April. 



MILITARY SOCIETIES. 



89 



IHtlitarg Societies of tfje fottefc States. 



SOCIETY OF THE CINCINNATI. 



The Order of Cincinnati was instituted at 
the cantonments of the continental army on 
the Hudson river May 10, 1783. Membership 
is restricted to the eldest male descendant of 
an original member or to the eldest male de- 
scendant of any continental or French officer 
of the revolution who was qualified by his 
service to become an original member. There 
are seven state societies, there having been 
originally thirteen. Gen. Washington was 
the first president-general and Alexander 
Hamilton was the second. Ex-Secretary of 
State Fish is the ninth. The number of mem- 
bers May, 1890, was 439. Among the honorary 
members are President Harrison, President- 
elect Cleveland, Maj. -Gen. Howard and Maj.- 
Gen. Schofield. 

General Officers. 

President-General, Hon. Hamilton Fish, LL. 
D., of New Yrk, New York city. 

Vice-President-General, Hon. Robert M. Mc- 
Lane of Maryland, Baltimore. 

Treasurer-General, Mr. John Schuyler of New 
York, New York city. 

Assistant Treasurer-General, Dr. Herman Bur- 
gin of New Jersey, Germantown, Pa. 



Secretary-General, Hon. Asa Bird Gardiner, 
LL. D., of Rhode Island, Garden City, N. Y. 

Assistant Secn-tary-General, Thomas P. Lown- 
des, Charleston, S. C. 

State Societies. 

Massachusetts Organized June 9, 1783; "Wins- 
low Warren, president. 

New York Organized June 9, 1778; Hon. Ham- 
ilton Fish, LL. D., president, New York city. 

Pmnsj/twmia-Organized Oct 4, 1783; Hon. 
William Wayne, president, Paoli, Chester 
county, Pa. 

Maryland Organized Nov. 21. 1783; Hon. Rob- 
ert Milligan McLane, president, Baltimore, 

Rhode Island Organized June 24, 1783; Hon. 
Nathaniel Greene, president, Newport, R. I. 

Ntw Jersey Organized June 11, 1783; Hon. 
Clifford Stanley Sims, president, Mount 
Holly, N. J. 

Smith Ca < olina Organized Aug. 29, 1783; Rev. 
Charles Cotesworth, Pinckney, D. D., presi- 
dent, Charleston, S. C. 

Franc^ Organized at Paris Jan. 7, 1784; rein- 
stituted July 1, 1887; Marquis de Rocham- 
beau, president, 51 Rue de Naples, Paris. 



SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. 

[Organized June 29, 1876.] 



General Officers. 

Elected April 30, 1892. 

President-General-Gen. Horace Porter, 15 

Broad street, New York city. 
Honorary Vice-President-General Chauncey 

M. Depew, LL. D., New York city. 
Honorary Vice-President-General Hon. 

Thomas F. Bayard, Wilmington, Del. 
Honorary Vice-President-General Gen. Brad- 

ley T. Johnson, Baltimore, Md. 
Vice'President-General Jonathan Trumbull, 

Norwich, Conn. 
Vice-President-General Gen. J. C. Breckin- 

ridge, U. S. A.. Washington city. 
Vice- President-General Hon. Henry M. Shep- 

ard, Chicago, 111. 
Vice-President-General Theodore S. Peck, 

Burlington, Vt. 
Vic r -President-General Paul Revere, Morris- 

town, N. J. 
Secretary-General A. Howard Clark, Smith- 

sonian institution, Washington city. 
Treasurer-General C. W. Haskins, 2 Nassau 

street, New York city. 
Registrar-General Q. Brown Goode, Wash- 



ington city. 
istbrian-Ge 



Histbrian-General Henry Hall.NewYork city. 
Suraeon-General Aurelius Bowen, M. D., Ne- 

braska. 
Ch'tplain-G neral-The Rt.-Rev. Charles Ed- 

ward Cheney, D. D.. Chicago, 111. 

State Societies and Officers. 
Alabama J. F. Johnson; president, Birming- 

ham. 
Arkansas S. W. Williams, president, Little 

Rock. 
California John W. Moore,U. S. N., president, 

Mare Island navy yard. 
Connecticut Jonathan Trumbull, president, 

Norwich* 
Delaware Hon. Thos. F. Bayard, president, 

Wilmington. 



District of Columbia Gen. A. W. Greely, pres- 
ident, Washington. 

Illinois H. M. Shepard, president, Chicago. 

Indiana-W. E. Niblack, president, Indianap- 
olis. 

Kansas A very Washburn, president, Topeka. 

Kentucky John W. Buchanan, president 
Louisville. 

Louisiana W. H. Jack, president, Natchi 
toches. 

Maine J. E. DeWitt, president, Portland. 

Maryland Bradley T. Johnson,president, Bal 
timore. 

Massachusetts IS. S. Barrett, president, Con 
cord. 

Michigan IL. B. Ledyard, president, Detroit 

Minn'sota Albert Edgerton, president, St 
Paul. 

Missouri Nathan Cole, president, St. Louis. 

Nebraska W. W. Copeland, president, Omaha 

New Hampshire Hon. George C. Gilmore, 
president, Manchester. 

New Jersey- John Whitehead, president, Mor 
ristown. 

New York Chauncy M. Depew, president, 
New York city. 

Ohio Gen. Henry M. Cist, president, Cincin 
nati. 

Oregon and Washington Col. Thomas M. An- 
derson, president, Vancouver barracks, 
Washington. 

Rhode Island Alfred Stone, president, Prov 
idence. 

South Carolina J. P. Richardson, president, 
Columbia. 

TennessfeD. C. Kelly, president, Nashville 

Vermont Hon. Levi K. Fuller, president, 
Brattleboro. 

Virginia W. W. Henry, president, Richmond 

West Virginia J. J. Jacob, president, Wheel- 
ing. 

Wisconsin Don J. Whittemore, president. 



90 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



General Officers. 

General President John Lee Carroll, Md. 

General Vice-President . . . . William Wayne, Pa. 

General Treasurer R. M. Cadwalader, Pa. 

General Secretary J. M. Montgomery, N.Y. 

General Asst. - Secretary. f. M. Cheeseman, N.Y. 
General Chaplain. . . .D. C. Weston, D. D., N.Y. 
There are sir other state societies of the 
Sons of the Revolution now organized and 
others are being formed. The Pennsylvania 
society numbers 420 members and the officers 
are: President, William Wayne; vice-presi- 
dent, Richard M. Cadwalader; secretary, Dr. 
George H. Burgin. Tne District of Columbia 
society numbers 104 members and the officers 
are: President, Gov. John Lee Carroll; vice- 
president, T. B. M. Myers; secretary, Arthur 
H. Dutton. The Iowa society has been formed 
under the presidency of the Rt.-Rev. Will- 



SONS OF THE REVOLUTION. 
[Organized 1875.] 



iam Stevens Perry, bishop of Iowa, and flour- 
ishing societies have been organized in Massa 
chusetts, Georgia and New Jersey. 

[These two societies (Sons of the American 
Revolution and Sons of the Revolution) are 
alike in their aims and objects. These are 
fostering among themselves and their 
descendants the patriotic spirit of the men 
who in the naval, military or civil service of 
the colonies assisted in advancing the inde 
pendence of the United States, and to collec 
and preserve the history of the revolutionary 
war and to promote intercourse and fraternal 
feeling among the members. Eligibility to 
membership in each is confined to male de- 
scendants from an ancestor who as a soldier, 
sailor or civil official assisted in establishing 
American independence during the war of the 
revolution.] 



MILITARY ORDER OF THE LOYAL LEGION OF THE TJNITED STATES. 
[Instituted 1865.] 
R. B 



Commander-in-Chief'Bvt. Maj.-Gen. 

Hayes, U. S. V., Fremont, Ohio. 
Senior Vice-Commandtr~in-Chief Rear- Ad- 

miral J. J. Almy,U. S. N., Washington. D. C. 
Junior Vicc-Cominander-in-Chief-Col. Nelson 

Cole. U. S. V., St. Louis, Mo. 
Recorder-in-Uhief Bvt. Lieut.-Col. J. P. Nich- 

olson, U. S. V., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Commanderies. 

Pennsylvania Bvt. Maj.-Gen. D. McM. Gregg, 
". S. v., commander; Bvt. Lieut.-Col.John P. 
icholson, D. S. V., recorder, Philadelphia. 
u York Bvt. Maj,-Gen. Wager Swayne, 
. S. A.,commander; Bvt. Lieut.-Col. Charles 
. Swift, U. S. V., recorder. New York. 



Maine Bvt. Brig.-Gen. T. W. Hyde, U. S. V., 
commander; Bvt. Maj. H 
U. S. V., recorder, Portland. 



vt. Maj. Henry S. Burrage, 
r, Portland. 
Massachusetts Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Thomas Sher- 



in,U.S.V.,commander;Col. Arnold A.Rand, 

U. S. V., recorder, Boston. 
California First Lieut. Samuel W. Backus, 

U. S.V.,commander; Bvt. Lieut.-Col.William 

R. Smedberg,U. S. A. recorder,San Francisco. 

Wisconsin Bvt. Lieut.-Col. Joseph McC. Bell, 

. S.V., commander; Capt. A. Ross Houston, 

_ . S. V.. recorder, Milwaukee. 
Ilinois Capt. Eugene Cary. U S. V., com- 

mander; Lieut.-Col. Chas. W.Davis, U. S. V., 

recorder, Chicago. 
District of Columbia Co}. Redfleld Proctor, 

U. S. V., commander; Bvt. Maj. William P. 

Huxford, U. S. A., recorder, Washington. 
Ohio Maj.-Gen. Jacob D. Cox, U. S. V., com- 



mander; Capt. Robert Hunter, U. S. V., re- 
corder, Cincinnati. 

Michigan Bvt. Brig.-Gen. William H. With 
ington, U. S. V., commander; Bvt. Col. 
James T. Sterling, U. S. V.. recorder, Detroit 

.Minnesota- Bvt. Maj.-Gen. Wesley Merritt, U 
S. A., commander; Bvt. Maj. George Q 
White, U. S. A., recorder, St. Paul. 

Oregon Col. Daniel B. Bush, U. S. V., com 
mander; Capt. Gavin E. Cankin, U. S. V,, 
recorder, Portland. 

Missouri Maj. Charles E. Pearce, U. S. V., 
commander; Capt. William R. Hodges, U. S. 
V., recorder, St. Louis. 

Hebrafka Bvt. Gen. John B. Brooke, TJ. S. A., 
commander; Maj. Horace Ludington, U. S. 
V., recorder, Omaha. 

Kansas Capt. George R. Peck, TJ. S. V., com- 
mander; Capt. Forrest H. Hathaway, U. S. 
A., recorder, Fort Leaven worth. 

Iowa Capt. Charles E. Putnam, U. S. V., 
commander; Capt. Voltaire P. Twombly, U. 
S. V., recorder, Des Momes. 

Colorado Bvt. Col. George B. Randolph, U. 
S. V., commander; Bvt. Capt. James R. 
Saville, U. S. V., recorder, Denver. 

Indiana-Maj.-Gen. Lewis Wallace, U. 8. V., 
commander; First Lieut. Benjamin B. Peck, 
U. 8. V., recorder, Indianapolis. 

Wnshington Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Luther P. Brad- 
ley, U. S. A., commander; First Lieut. Alan- 
son B. Case, U. S. V., recorder/Tacoma. 

Vermont Brig.-Gen. Stephen Thomas, U. S. 
V., commander; First Lieut. William L. 
Greenleaf, U. 8. V., recorder, Burlington. 



GRAND ARMY OF THE REPTIBLIC. 

[Organized 1866.] 



Pommander-in-ChiefA. G. Weissert. Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

Senior Vice- Commander-in- Chief R. A. War- 
field, San Francisco, Cal. 
unior Vife-Commander-in-Chi'f Peter B. 
Ayars, Wilmington, Del. 

'iirgt on-General William C. Wile, Danbury, 
Conn. 

?haplain-in- Chief D. R. Lowell, Ft. Riley, 
Kas. 

Adjutant-General E. B, Gray, Milwaukee. 
Wis. 

u irtermaster-GencralJohn Taylor, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Inspector-General George L. Goodale, Med- 
ford, Mass. 
The headquarters of the Grand Army of the 

Republic are established at 450 Broadway, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 



Department Commanders. 

Alabama William Snyder, comdr., Birming- 
ham; W. J. Pender, A. A. G., Birmingham. 

Arizona Ed Schwartz, comdr., Phoenix; C. D. 
Belden, A. A. G., Phoenix. 

Arkansas Wm. H. H. Clayton, comdr., Eu- 
reka Springs; S. K. Robinson. A. A. G., Fort 
Smith. 

California J. B. Fuller, comdr, Marysville; 
T. C. Masteller, A. A. G., San Francisco. 

Colorado and Wyoming 3ohn C. Kennedy, 
comdr., Denver; J. W. Anderson, A. A. G., 
Denver. 

Connecticut B. E. Smith, comdr., Williman- 
tic; John H. Thacher, A. A. G., Hartford. 

Dela iva re G. W. Stradley, comdr., Bridge- 
ville; E. A. Finley, A. A. G., Wilmington. 

Florida J. De V. Hazzard, comdr., Eustis; 
T. S. Wilmarth, A. A. G., Jacksonville. 



MILITARY SOCIETIES. 



91 



Georgia T. F. Gleason, comdr., Savannah; 

Henry Burns, A. A. G., Macon. 
Idaho A. O. Ingalls, comdr., Murray; William 

King, A. A. G M Murray. 
Illinois Edwin Harlan, comdr , Marshall; F. 

W. Spink, A. A. G.. Chicago. 
Indiana J. B. Cheadle, comdr., Frankfort; 

Irvin Robbins, A A. G., Indianapolis. 
Indian Territory R. H. Hill, comdr.. Musko- 

gee; A. W. Robb, A. A. G., Muskogee. 
Iowa J. J. Steadman, comdr.. Council Bluffs; 

M. M. Leonard. A. A. G., Des Moines. 
Kansas A. R. Green, comdr., Lecompton; A. 

B. Campbell, A. A. G., Topeka. 
Kentucky E. H. Hobson, comdr., Greensburg; 

J. T. Russell, A. A. G., Greensburg. 

Louisiana and Mississipi-i A. s. Badger, 
comdr.. New Orleans; C. W. Keeting, A. A. 
G., New Orleans. 

Maine Isaac Dyer, comdr.. Skowhegan; C. F. 
Jones, A. A. G., Skowhegan. 

M iryland W. A. Bartlett, comdr., Baltimore; 
L. M. Zimmerman, A. A. G., Baltimore. 

Massachusetts J. K.Churchill, comdr., Wor- 
cester; H. O. Moore, A. A. G. Boston. 

Michigan H. S. Dean, comdr., Ann Arbor; 

C. V. R. Pond, A. A. G., Ann Arbor. 
Minnesota L. M. Lange, comdr., Marshall; J. 

L. Brigham. A. A. G., St. Paul. 
Missouri C. W. Whitehead, comdr., Kansas 

City; T. B. Rodgers, A. A. G., St. Louis. 
Montana 3. J. Sloane, comdr., Missoula; J. J. 

York, A. A. G., Butte. 
Nebraska C. J. Dillworth, comdr., Hastings; 

J. W. Bowen, A. A. G., Lincoln. 
New Himpshire Daniel Hall, comdr., Dover; 

James Mi not. A. A, G.. Concord. 
New Jersey- R A. Donnelly, comdr., Trenton; 

B. W. Mains, A.^A. G., Trenton. 



New Mexico S. W. Dorsey, comdr., Raton; T. 
W. Collier, A. A. G., Raton. 

New YorkT. L. Poole, comdr., Syracuse; W. 
A. Wallace, A. A. G., Albany. 

North Dakota S G. Roberts, comdr., Fargo; 
E. C. Geary, A. A. G., Fargo. 

Ohio Isaac F. Mack, comdr., Sandusky; J. B. 
Davis, A. A. G., Sandusky. 

Oklahoma- D. F. Wyatt, comdr.. Kingfisher; 
J. P. Jones, A. A. G , Hennessey. 

Oregon H. H. Northup, comdr., Portland; R. 
S. Greenleaf, A. A. G., Portland. 

Pennsylvania J . P. Taylor, comdr., Reeds- 
ville; S. P- Town, A. A. G., Philadelphia. 

Potomac A. F. Densmore, comdr., Washing- 
ton; A. Hendrlcks, A. A. G., Washington. 

Rhode Island-D. S. Ray, comdr., E. Provi- 
dence; E. F. Prentiss, A. A. G., Providence. 

South Dakota J . B. Hart, comdr.. Aberdeen; 
John Ackley, A. A. G., Aberdeen. 

Tennessee H. C. Whitaker, comdr., New 
Market; Frank Seaman, A. A. G., Knoxville. 

Texas O. G. Peterson, comdr., Springtown; 



J. C. Bigger, A. A. G., 
UfrhJ. R. Elliott, comdr., Ogden; C. M. 

Brough, A. A. G., Ogden. 
Vermont Hugh Henry, comdr., Chester; B. 

Cannon, Jr.. A. A. G.. Bellows Falls. 
Virginw and North Cirolin-i Edgar Allen, 

comdr., Richmond; W. N Eaton, A. A. G.. 

Portsmouth. 
Washington and Al sk i J. S. Brown, comdr., 

Spokane; A. J. Smith, A. A. G., Spokane. 
West Virginia C. E. Anderson, comdr., Wes- 

ton; T. C. Miller, A. A. G., Fairmont. 
Wisconsin C. B. Welton, comdr., Madison; 

J. H. Whitney, A. A. G., Madison. 



SONS OF VETERANS. 



Officers of Commandery-in-Chief. 

Command* r-in-Chief Marvin E. Hall, Hills- 
dale, Mich. 

Senior Vice-Comma nder-in- Chief George W. 
Pollitt. Paterson, N. J. 

Juntor Vice-Commander-in-chief John W. 
Miller, Helena, Mont. 

Adjutant-General Elias P. Lyon, Hillsdale, 
Mich. 

Quarter master-General R. Loebenstein, 84 La- 
Salle street, Chicago, 111. 

Division Commanders. 

Alabama and Tennessee W. D Good, Green- 
ville, Tenn. 

Arkansas I^ewis E. Finney, Huntington. 

California Thomas M. Gilbert, Fresno. 

Colorado Abraham L. Fugard, Pueblo. 

Connecticut A. E. Chandler, Norwich. 

Florida J. W. V. R. Plummer. Key West. 

Illinois Edward A. Wells, Murphysboro. 

Indi ina Newton J. McGuire, Rising Sun. 

loica Lewis A. Dilley, Davenport. 

Kansas Frank A. Agoew. Newton. 

Kent ucfey-W. R. Heflin, Maysville. 

Maine F. E. Fairtield, Augusta. 

Maryland Robert W. Wilson, Baltimore. 

Massachusetts Walter H. Delano, Canton. 

Michigan -Frank M. Gier, Hillsdale. 

Minnesot 'Francis G. Drew, Minneapolis. 

Missouri E. W. Raymond, St. Louis, 904 Olive 
street. 

Montana W. S. Votaw, Helena. 



Nebraska P. A. Barrows, St. Edwards. 
New Hampshire Frank C. Smith, Lebanon. 
New Jersey Louis L. Drake, Elizabeth. 
New York Winfleld S. Oberdorf, Dansville. 
Ohio Filmore Musser, Portsmouth. 
Oregon C. E. Drake, Portland. 
Pennsylvania Walter E. Smith, Allentown. 
Rhode Isl nd-T. M. Sweetland. Pawtucket. 
South Dakota T). L. Printup, Britton. 
Vermont Frank L. Greene, St. Albans. 
Wa*hittgton Harry Rosenhaupt, Spokana. 
W'st Virginia G. Ed. Sylvis, Wheeling. 
Wisconsin R. L. McCormick, Hayward. 

All camps in the territories of Idaho and 
Utah are under the jurisdiction of the com- 
mander of the division of Montana. All 
camps in the territories of Arizona, New 
Mexico and Wyoming are under the jurisdic- 
tion of the commander of the division of Col- 
orado. All camps in Texas are under the 
jurisdiction of the comjiander of the division 
of Arkansas. All camps in the states of 
Louisiana, Mississippi and Georgia are under 
the jurisdiction of the commander of the di- 
vision of Alabama and Tennessee. All camps 
in Virginia, North and South Carolina and 
Delaware are under the jurisdiction of the 
commander of the division of Maryland. All 
camps in Canada are under the jurisdiction of 
the commander of the division of Vermont. 
All camps in Alaska are under the jurisdiction 
of the commander of the division of Wash- 
ington. 



SOCIETY OF THE WAR OF 1812. 



A society with this title was founded by 
veterans of the war in Philadelphia. Pa., in 
1854. It has been inactive for some years and 
until recently. The present officers are: Pres., 
John Cadwalader, Pa.; Vice-Prcs'ts. Rear-Ad- 
miral Roe, U. S. N.; Col. M. 1. Ludington, U. S. 
A.; Edward Trenchard, N. Y.; John Biddle 
Porter, Pa.; Appleton Morgan, N. Y.; Regis- 



trar, A. J. Reilly, Pa.; Ex.-Com., Capt. H. H. 
Bellas, U. S. A.; James Glentworth, Pa.; C. H. 
Murray, N. Y.; H. M. Hoyt,W. Va.; A. Nelson 
Lewis, Pa.; R. W. Wilcox, M. D., N. Y.; H. D. 
Warren. Mass.; W. E. Bullus, Pa.; D. M. Ho- 
bart, Pa.; Sec., P. S. Hay, Philadelphia, Pa., 
the present headquarters, where the general 
meeting the society is held annually, Feb. 18. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



HISTORY OF THE TTNTTED STATES FLAG. 



The quartermaster-general of the army has 
ssued the following bulletin regarding the 
history of the American flag: 

The American congress, in session at Phila- 
delphia, established by its resolution of June 
14,1777, a national flag for the United States 
of America. The resolution was as follows: 

"Resolved, That the flag of the thirteen 
united states be thirteen stripes, alternate 
red and white; that the union be thirteen 
tars, white in a blue field, representing a new 
constellation." 

Although nearly a year previous, July 4, 
776, these thirteen united states had been de- 
jlared independent, this resolution is the first 
egislative action recorded relating to a nation- 
al flag for the new sovereignty. 

The use of thirteen stripes was not a new 
feature, as they had been introduced (in alter- 
nate white and blue) on the upper left-hand 
corner of a standard presented to the Phila- 
delphia Light Horse by its captain in the early 
part of 1775, and moreover the union flag of the 
ihirteen united colonies raised at Washing- 
;on's headquarters, at Cambridge, Jan. 2, 1776, 
iad the thirteen stripes just as they are this 
day; but it also had the crosses of St. George 
and St. Andrew on a blue ground in the cor- 
ner. There is no satisfactory evidence, how- 
ever, that any flag bearing the union of the 
stars had been in public use before the reso- 
ution of June, 1777. 

It is not known to whom the credit 
of designing the stars and stripes is due. It 
is claimed that a Mrs. John Ross, an uphol- 
sterer, who resided on Arch street, Philadel- 
phia, was the maker of the first flag combining 
the stars and stripes. Her descendants assert 
that a committee of congress, accompanied by 
General Washington, who was in Philadelphia 
n June, 1776, called upon Mrs. Ross and en- 
gaged her to make the flag from a rough draw- 
ing which, at her suggestion, was redrawn by 
General Washington, with pencil, in her back 
parlor, and the flag thus designed was adopted 
by congress. Although the resolution estab- 
lishing the flag was not officially promul- 
gated by the secretary of congress until Sept. 
3, 1777, it seems well authenticated that tne 
stars and stripes were carried at the battle of 
the Brandy wine, Sept. 11. 1777, and thencefor- 
ward during all the battles of the revolution. 

Soon after its adoption the new flag was 
hoisted on the naval vessels of the United 
States. The ship Ranger, bearing the stars 
and stripes and commanded by Captain Paul 
Jones, arrived at a French port about Dec. 1, 
1777, and her flag received on Feb. 14, 1778, the 
first salute ever paid to the American flag by 
foreign naval vessels. The flag remained un- 
changed for about eighteen years after its 
adoption. By this time two more states (Ver- 
mont and Kentucky) had been admitted to the 
union, and on Jan. 13,1794,congress enacted that 
from and after the 1st day of May, 1795, the 
flag of the United States be fifteen stripes, al- 
ternate red and white; that the union be fif- 
teen stars, white in a blue field. 

This flag was the national banner from 1795 
to 1818, during which period occurred the war 
of 18l2.with Great Britain. By ISl^flve addition 
al states (Tennessee, Ohio, Louisiana, Indi 
ana and Mississippi) had been admitted to 
the union, and therefore a further change in 
the flag seemed to be required. After consid- 
erable discussion in congress on the subject, 
the act of April 4, 1818 was passed, which pro- 
vided: 

"1. That from and after the 4th day of July 
next the flag of the United States be thirteen 



horizontal stripes, alternate red and white; 
that the union have twenty stars, white in a 
blue field. 

2. That on the admission of every new 
state into the union one star be added to the 
union of the flag and that such addition shall 
take effect on the 4th of July next succeeding 
such admission." 

The return to the thirteen stripes of the 1777 
flag was due in a measure to a reverence for 
the standard of the revolution, but it was also 
due to the fact that a further increase of the 
number of stripes would have made the width 
of the flag out of proportion to its length un- 
ess the stripes were narrowed, and this would 
mve impaired their distinctness when seen 
from a distance. A newspaper of the time 
said: 

"By this regulation the thirteen stripes will 
represent the number of states whose valor 
and resources originally effected American in- 
dependence, and the additional stars will 
mark the increase of the state since the pres- 
ent constitution." 

No act has since been passed by congress 
altering this feature ef the flag, and it is 
the same as originally adopted, except as to 
the number of stars in its union. In the war 
with Mexico the national flag bore twenty 
nine stars in the union; during the late civi 
war thirty-five, and since July 4, 1891, forty 
four stars. In none of the acts of congress re- 
lating to the flag has the manner of arranging 
the stars been prescribed, and in consequence 
there has been a lack of uniformity In the 
matter, and flags in use by the public gener 
ally may be seen with the stars arranged in vari 
ousways. The early custom was to insert the 
stars in parallel rows across the blue field, and 
this custom has, it is believed, been observed 
in the navy at least since 1818, at which time 
the president ordered the stars to be arranged 
in such manner on the national flag used in 
the navy. In the army, too, it is believed, the 
stars have always been arranged in horizon ta 
rows across the blue field, but not always ii 
vertical rows; the effect however being about 
the same as in the naval flag. Hereafter 
there will be no difference in the arrangement 
between the army and navy, as an agree 
ment nas been arrived at between the war 
and navy department on the subject. Since 
July 4, 1891, the arrangement of stars in the flag 
of the army and ensigns in the navy is as fol- 
lows: 



The national flags hoisted at camps or forts 
are made of bunting of American manuf act 
ure. They are of the following three sizes 
The storm and recruiting flag, 8 feet in length 
by 4 feet 2 inches in width; the post flag 
measuring 20 feet in length by 10 feet in width 
the garrison, measuring 36 feet in length by 
20 feet in width (this flag is hoisted only on 
holidays and great occasions). The union is 
one-third of the length of the flag and extends 
to the lower edge of the fourth red stripe 
from the top. The national colors carried bj 
regiments of infantry and artillery and the 
battalion of engineers, on parade or in battle 
are made of silk and are 6 feet 6 inches lonp 
and 6 feet wide and mounted on staffs. The 
field of the colors is 31 inches in length anc 
extends to the lower edge of the fourth red 
stripe from the top. 



THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. 



National (Kobernmettt. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

President, Benjamin Harrison (Ind.).... $50,000 

Priv. Sec., Elijah W. Halford (Ind.) ....... 5.000 

Vice-President, Levi P. Morton (N. Y.).... 8,000 

U.S.Dist. Marshal,!). M. Ransdell (Ind.). . . 6,000 

DEPARTMENT" OF STATE. 

Secretary. John W. Foster (Ind.) .......... 8.000 

Asst. Secretary, W. F. Wharton (Mass.). . . 4,500 
Second Asst. Sec., Alvey A. Adee (D. C.). 3,500 
Third Asst. Sec., W. M. Grinnell (N. Y.). . 3,500 
Solicitor, F. C. Partridge ( Vt.) ............. 3,500 

Chief Clerk, Sevellon A. Brown (N. Y). . . 2,750 
Chief of Diplomatic Bureau, Thomas W. 

Cridler(W. Va.) ............................ 2,100 

Chief of Con. Bureau,Y.O. St. Clair (Md.) 2,100 
C hief of Bureau of Indexes and Archives, 

JohnH. Haswell (N.Y.) .................. 2,100 

C hief of Bureau of Accounts, Francis J. 

Kieckhoefer (D. C ) ....................... 2,100 

Chief of Bureau of Statistics, Michael 

Scanlan (N. Y.) ............................ 2.100 

Chief of Bureau of Rolls and Library, 

A.'H. Allen (N. C.) ........................ 2,100 

Translator, Henry L. Thomas (N. Y.) ..... 2,100 

Clerk to S-c. of State, L. A. Dent (D. C.)... 2.000 
Passport Clerk, Henry P. Randolph (Va.) 1,800 

TREASURY~DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, Charles Foster (O.) .............. 8,000 

Priv. Sec., Robert J. Wynne ............... 2,400 

Asst. Sec., G. M. Lambertson (Neb.) ....... 4,500 

Asst. Sec., John H. Gear (Iowa) ............ 4,500 

Asst. Sec., O. L. Spalding (Mich.) .......... 4,500 

Chief Clerk, Fred A. Stocks (Kas.) ......... 3,000 

Chief ofAppt. Z>ic.,Daniel Macauley (Ind.) 2,750 
Chief of Warrants Div., W. F. Maclennan. 2,750 
Chief Pub. Money sDiv., Eugene B. Daskam 2,500 
Chief of Cus.Div., JohnM. Comstock(N.Y.) 2,700 



. 

Acting Chief of Rev., Marine Div., L. G. 
Shepard (Mass.) ........................... 

Chief of Stationery, Printing and Blanks 
' 



2,500 
2,500 



Div.,'A. L. Sturtevant 
Chief of Loans and Currency Div., An- 
drew T. Huntington (Mass.) ............. 2,500 

Chief of Misc. Div., J. A. Tomson (Ind.).. 2,500 
Supervising Spec'lAgt., A. K.Tingle (Ind.)$8day 
Government Actuary, Jos. S. McCoy (N.J.) 1,800 

Supervising Architect's Office. 
Supervising Architect,!?. J. Edbrooke (111.) 4,500 

Bureau of Engraving and Printing. 
Chief, W. M. Meredith (111.) ................ 4,500 

Asst. Chief, Thomas J.Sullivan ............ 2,250 

Supt. Engraving Div., Geo. W. Casilear... 3,600 

Office Steamboat Inspector. 
Supervising Inspector, James A. Dumont. 3,500 

Bureau of Statistics. 
Chief, S. G. Brock (Mo.) .................... 3,000 

Life-Saving Service. 

n'lSupt., S. I. KimbalKMe.) ............ 4,000 
si., Horace L. Piper (Me.) ................ 2.500 

Comptrollers. 

First Comptroller, Asa C. Matthews (111.). 5,000 
Deputy. John R. Garrison ................... 2,700 

Second Com.pt., B. F. Gilkeson (Pa.) ........ 5,000 

Deputy, E. N. Hartshorn (O.) ............... 2,700 

Commissioner of Customs. 
Commissioner, S. V. Holliday (Pa.) ....... 4,000 

Deputy, H. A. Lockwood .................... 2,250 

Register of the Treasury. 
Register, Wm. S. Rosecrans ................ 4.000 

Asst., H. H. Smith (Mich.) .................. 2,250 

Auditors. 
First Auditor, Geo. P. Fisher (Del.) ...... 3,600 

Deputy, A. F. McMillan (Mich.) ............ 2.250 

Second Auditor, J. N. Patterson (N. H.).. . 3.600 



Deputy, J. B. Franklin (Kas.) $2,250 

Third Auditor, W. H. Hart (Ind.) 3,600 

Deputy, Augustus Shaw (Ind.) 2,250 

Fourth Auditor, J. R. Lynch (Miss.) 3,600 

Deputy, Andrew J. Whittaker (111.) 2,250 

Fifth Auditor, Ernest G. Timme (Wis.).. 3,600 

Deputy, J. Lee Tucker (N.Y.) 2,250 

Sixth Auditor, Thos. B. Coulter (O.) 3,600 

Deputy, J. I..Rankin (Pa.) 2,250 

Treasurer of the United States. 

Treasurer, Enos H. Nebeker (Ind.) 6,000 

Asst. Treas., James W. Whelpley 3, 

Supt. Nat. Bank Red. Div.,Thos. E. Rogers 3,500 
Comptroller of the Currency. 

Comptroller, A. B.Hepburn (N. Y.) 5.000 

Deputy, Robert M. Nixon (Ind.) 2,800 

Commissioner of Internal Revenue. 

Commissioner, J. W. Mason ( Va.) 6,000 

Deputy, G. W.Wilson (O.) 3,200 

Director of the Mint. 

Director, E. O. Leech (D. C.) 4,500 

Bureau of Navigation. 
Commissioner, Edward C. O'Brien (N. Y.) 3,600 

United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Superintendent, T. C. Mendenhall (Ind.).. 6,000 

Marine Hospital Service. 
Supervising Surg.-Gen., Walter Wyman.. 4,000 

WAR DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, Stephen B. Elkins (W. Va.).... 8,000 

Priv. Sec.. S. D. Miller (Ind.) 2,000 

Asst. Ace. .L. A. Grant (Minn.) 4,500 

Chief Clerk, John Tweedale (Pa.) 2,750 

Headquarters of the Army. 
Major- General, J. M. Schofleld. 
Asst. Adjt.-Gen'l, Bvt. Brig-Gen. T. M. Vincent. 
Aids-de-Camp, Capt. C. B. Schofleld, 1st Lt. T, 

H. Bliss and 2d Lt. R. McAuliff Schofleld. 
Chief Clerk, J. B. Morton. 

Adjutant-General's Department. 
Adjt.-Gen'l, Brig.-Gen. R. WillJams (Va.). 
Assistants, Bvt. Brig.-Gen. S. Breek, Maj. W. J. 

Volkmar, Maj. Theo. Schwan, Maj. A. Mc- 

Arthur. Jr., Bvt. Lieut.-Col. J. C. Gilmore. 

Chief Clerk, R. P. Thian $2,000 

Inspector-General's Department. 
Inspector- Gen' I, Brig.-Gen. J. C. Breckinridge. 
As*ts., Lt.-Col. H. W. Lawton, Maj. J. P. Sanger. 
Chief Clerk, W. H. Orcutt. 

Quartermaster's Department. 
Quarterm.-Gen'l, Brig.-Gen. K. N. Batchelder. 
Assts., Bvt. Brig.-Gen. M. I. Ludington, Maj. Jas. 

Gilliss, Capt. W. S. Patten Capt. C. P. Miller 

Capt. O. F. Long. 
Chief Clerk, J. Z.Dare. 
Depot Quartermaster, Lt.-Col. G. H. Weeks. 

Subsistence Department. 
Commissary- Gen' I, Brig.-Gen. B. DuBarry. 
Assistants, Col. M. R. Morgan, Maj. John F. 

Weston, Capt. E. E. Dravo. 
Chief Clerk, Wm. A. DeCaindry. 
Depot Commissary, Capt. F. E. Nye. 

Medical Department. 

Surgeon- Gen' I. Brig.-Gen. Charles Sutherland 
Assts., Lt.-Col. C. R. Greenleaf , Bvt. Lt.-Col. J.S 

Billings, Maj . Chas. Smart, Capt. J . C. Merrill 

Capt. H. O. Perley. 
Chief Clerk, George A. Jones. 
Attending Surgeons, Col. A. Heger, Maj. E. B 



Pay Department. 
Paymaster-Gen' I, Brig.-Gen. William Smith. 
Assts., Lt.-Col. W. R. Gibson, Maj.W. F. Tucker 

(Post Payne). Maj. J. C. Muhlenberg. 
Chief Clerk,G. D. Hanson. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



Corps of Engineers. 

Chief of Engineers. Brig.-Gen. T. L. Casey. 

Assistants. Maj. H. M. Adams, Capt. Thos. 
Turtle, Capt J. G. D. Knight. 

Chief Clerk. Wm. J. Warren. 

Sec. to Lighthouse Board. Capt. F. A. Mahan, 
Public Buildings and Grounds. 

Officer in Charge, Col. O. H. Ernst. 
Ordnance Department. 

Chief of Ordnance, Brig.-Gen. D. W. Flagler. 

Assistants, Capt. Chas. S. Smith^Capt. Rogers 
Birnie, Capt. V. McNally, Capt. C. W. Whip- 
pie, Capt. Charles Shaler. 

Chief Clerk, John J. Cook. 

Judge-Advocate General's Department. 

Judge-Advocate Gen,'t.,Col.G.N.Lieber (acting). 

Assistant. Lieut.-Col. Wm. Winthrop, deputy. 

Chief Clerk, J. N. Morrison. 
Signal Office 

Chief Signal Officer, Brig.-Gen. A. W. Greely. 

Assistants. Capts. Robert Craig and Charles 
E. Kilbourne. 

Chief Clerk. Otto A. Nesmith. 

Publication Office-War Records 

Board rf Publication, Maj. Geo. B. Davis, L. 
J. Perry, J. W. Kirkley. 

Assistants, Capt. T. T. Knox, Capt. J. A. Bu- 
chanan, Capt. C. D. Cowles, Capt. Frank 
Taylor. Lt. A. C. Macomb, Lt. J. H. Duval. 

Agent Collection Confed. Rec., M. J. Wright. 

NAVY DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, B. F. Tracy (N. Y.) S8.000 

Private Secretary, Henry W. Raymond 2,250 

Asst. Secretary, J. R. Soley (Mass.) 4.500 

Chief Clerk, John W. Hogg (Md.) 2,500 

Bureau Yards and Docks. 
Chief, Commodore N. H. Farquhar. 
Bureau of Navigation. 
Chief. Commodore Francis M. Ramsay. 
Commander, C. M. Thomas. 
Lieutenant-Commander, E. B. F. Heald. 
Lteute "ants, R. F. Mulligan, T. D. Griffin, 

J. A. Dougherty. 

Nautical Almanac. 

Superintendent, Prof. Simon Newcomb. 
Assistants, Prof. H.D. Todd, Prof. W. W. Hen- 

drickson. G. W. Hill, Dr. J. Morrison. 

Office Naval Intelligence. 
Chief Intelligence Officer, Commander F. B. 

Chadwick. 
Lieuts., G. H. Peters, F. Singer, Chas. E. Fox, 

J. T. Newton, Benj. Tappan. 
Ensigns, Edward Simpson. Marbury Johnson. 
Asst. Engineer, W. H Allerdice. 

Library and War Records. 
Acting Supt.. Lieut.-Commander F. M. Wise. 
Lieutenant, Prof. E. K. Rawson. 

Officers on Duty in the Hydrographic Office . 
Acting Hydrographer, Lieut.-Commander Rich- 

ardson Clover. 
Lieuts., R. G. Davenport, I. M. Robinson. J. E. 

Craven, H. M. Witzel. 
Ensign, L. S. Van Duser. 

Naval Observatory. 
Superintendent, Capt. F. V. McNair. 
Commander, Joshua Bishop. 
Lieutenant, H. Taylor. 
Ensigns. Thos. Snowden, W. B. Hoggart, J. A. 

Hoogewerff. 
Professors of Mathematics, William Harkness, 

J. R. Eastman, Edgar Frisby, S. J. Brown. 

Bureau of Ordnance. 
Chief, Commodore W. H. Folger. 
Lieut.-Commander, Albert R. Conden. 
Limits., Prof. P. R. Alger, Frank F. Fletcher. 
Kossuth Niles. A. E. Culver. 



Bureau of Equipment. 
Capt., George Dewey. 
Lieut.-Commander, Charles P. Hutchins. 
Ensign, W. H. G. Bullard. 

Bureau of Construction and Repairs. 
Chief Constructor, T. D Wilson. 
Naval Constructors, Philip Hichborn, Joseph 
J. Woodward. 

Office of Judge-Advocate General. 
Judge- Advocate Gen'l, Capt.S. C. Lemly, U. S. N. 
First Lieut.. C. H. Lanchheimer, United 

States Marine Corps. 
Ensign, W. B. Hoggart. United States Navy. 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. 
Chief Surgeon, Gen. J. M. Browne. 
Surgeon, J. C. Boyd. 
Special Duty Surgeon, W. A. McClurg. 

Bureau of Supplies and Accounts . 
Paymaster-General, Edwin Stewart. 
Asst. Paymasters, E. B. Rogers, A. P. L. Hunt. 

Naval Examining Board. 
Rear-Admiral J. A. Greer, Capt. C. S. Norton, 

Commander S. W. Terry. 
Medical Directors. W. T. Hord, Richard C. 

Dean, Michael Bradley. 

Bureau of Steam Engineering. 
Engineer-iti-Chief, George W. Melville. 
Chief Engineers, E. D. Robie, N. P. Towne, 

H. Webster. 
Passed Asst. Engineers, J. H. Perry, F. H. 

Bailey, I. N. Hollis, W. M. McFarland, F. M. 

Bennett. 
Asst. Engineers, G. R. Salisbury, W. W. 

White, H.G.Leopold. 

Retiring Board. 

Admiral James A. Greer, Pres.; Capt. C. S. 
Norton, Commander S. W. Terry, Medical 
Directors W.T. Hord,R. C. Dean, M. Bradley. 

State, War and Navy Department Building. 

Supt., Thomas Williamson, Chief Engineer. 

Assistant, J. S. Ogden, 1st Assistant Engineer. 
Board of Inspection and Survey. 

President, Rear- Admiral G. E. Belkirch. 

Members, Comdr. P. H. Cooper; Lt.-Comdr. J. 
M. Hamphill; Chief Engineer, W. G. Buch- 
ler; Naval Constructor, John F. Hanscom; 
Lieutenant, L. L. Reamy. 

Naval Dispensary, 
Surgeon, P. M. Rixey. 
Passed Asst. Sin g., Frank Anderson. 

Museum of Hygiene . 
Medical Director, P. S. Wales. 
Passed Asst. Surg., S. H. Griffith. 

Navy Pay Office. 
Pay Director, Edward May. 
Headquarters of United States Marine Corps. 
Col. Commandant, Charles Heywood. 
Adj. and Inspector, Maj. Aug. S. Nicholson. 
Ouartermas'er, Maj. H. B. Lowry. 
Paymaster, Maj. Green Clay Goodloe. 

Marine Barracks, Washington, D . C . 
Captain, D. Pratt Mannix. 
First Lieut., S. W. Quackenbush. 

POSTOFFICE DEPARTMENT. 

Postmaster-Gen., John Wanamaker (Pa.)..$8,000 

Chief Clerk, W. B. Cooley (Pa.) 2.500 

Stenographer, John B. Minick (Mich.) 1,800 

Asst. Atty.-Gen., James N. Tyner (Ind.)... 4.000 

Law Clerk, Ralph W. Haynes (111.) 2.500 

Appointment Clerk, James A. Vose (Me. ) . 1,800 
&upt. and Disbursing Clerk, Theodore 

Davenport (Conn . ) 2.100 

Topographer, Charles Roeser, Jr. (Wis.)... 2.50U 



THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. 



95 



OFFICE FIRST ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

First Asst. P. M.-G., vacant $4,000 

Chief Clerk, B.C. Fowler (Md.) 2,000 

Supt. Div. P. 0. Sup., E. H. Shook (Mich.). 2,000 
Supt.Div.Free Delivery. W.J.Pollock(Kas.) 3,000 
Asst. Supt. Div. of Free Delivery, Wm. 

Helm (Wis.) 4,000 

Chitf Division of Salaries and Allowances, 

Albert H.Scott (Iowa) 2,200 

Supt. Money Order System, Charles F. 

McDonald (Mass.) 3,500 

Chief Clerk Money Order System, James T. 

Metcalf (Iowa) 2,000 

Supt. Dead Letter Office, David P. Leib- 

hardt(Ind.) 2,500 

Chief Clerk Dead Letter Office, Waldo G. 

Perry (Vt.) 1,800 

Chief Div.of Correspondence, J.R.Ash(Pa.) 1,800 

OFFICE SECOND ASMSTANT PU.-TM ASTKIM. ENERAL. 

Second Asst. P. M.-G..3. Lowrie Bell(Pa.) 4,000 

Chief Clerk, George F. Stone (N. Y.) 2,000 

Supt.Railway Adjustments, J.H.Crew (O.) 2,000 
Chief Div. of Inspection, John A. Chap- 
man (111.) 2,000 

Chief Div. Mail Equipment, R. D. S. Tyler 

(Mich.) 1,800 

Gen. Supt. Railway Mail Service, James 

E. White (111.) 3,500 

Asst. Gen. Supt. Railway Mail Service, 

William P. Campbell (III.) 3,000 

Chief Clerk Railway Mail Service, Alex- 
ander Grant (Mich.) 2,000 

Supt. Foreign Mails, N. M. Brooks (Va.). . 3,000 
Chief Clk. For'n Mails. G.M.Drake (Tenn.) 2,000 

OFFICE THIRD ASSISTANT POSTMASTER-GENERAL. 

Third Asst. P. M.-G., Abraham D. Hazen 
(Pa.) 4,000 

Chief Clerk, Madison Davis (D. C.) 2,000 

Chief Div. Postage Stamps, E. B. George 
(Mass.) 2.550 

Chief Div. Finance, A.W.Binehamtmch.) 2,000 

OFFICE FOURTH ASSISTANT POSTMASTEfC-GENERAL. 

Fourth Asst. P.M.-G., E. G. Rathbone (O.) 4,000 

Chief Clerk, P. H. Bristow (Iowa) 

C hief Div.of Appointm'ts.G.G.Fentondnd.) 2,000 
Chief Div. of Bonds and Commissions, 

Luther Caldwell (N. Y.) 2,000 

ChiffDiv. of P. O. Inspectors and Mail 

Depredations, M. D. Wheeler (N. Y.).... 3,000 
Chief Clerk, James Maynard (Tenn) 2.000 

INTERIOR DEPARTMENT. 

Secretary, John W. Noble (Mo.) 8,000 

First Asst. do., George Chandler (Kas.). . . 4,500 

Asst. do., Cyrus Bussey (N. Y.) 4,000 

Chief Clerk, Edward M. Dawson (Md.).... 2.500 

Appt. Clerk, A. C. Tonner (O.) 2,000 

General Land Office 

Commissioner, W. M. Stone (Iowa) 5,000 

Asst. do.. Vacant 3,000 

Chief Clerk, Manning M.Rose (O.) 2,500 

Office of Indian Affairs. 

Commissioner, T. J, Morgan (R. I.) 4,000 

Asst.do.,n.V. Belt(Md.) 3.000 

Supt. Indian Sc7u>ote,D.Dorchester(Mass.) 3,500 

Pension Office. 

Commissioner, Green B. Raum (111.) 5,000 

First Deputy do., Andrew Davidson (N. Y.) 3,600 
Second Dermty do.,Chas.P. Lincoln(Mich.) 3.600 

Chief Clerk, A. W. Fisher (N. C.) 2.250 

Medical Referee, Thomas D. Ingram (Pa.) 3,000 

Office of Commissioner of Railroads . 
Commissioner, Horace A. Taylor (Wis.).. 4,500 

Patent Office. 

Commissioner, Wm. E. Simonds (Conn.). . . 5.000 

Asst., Nathaniel L. Frothingham (Mass.). . 3,000 

Chief Clerk, Joseph L. Bennett (Conn.) .... 2,250 

Office of Education. 

Commissioner, W. T. Harris (Mass.) 3,000 

Chief Clerk, J. W. Holcombe 1,800 

Geological Survey. 

Director, John W. Powell (111.) 6.000 

Chief Clerk, Henry C. Rizer (Kas.) 2,400 



Census Office. 

Superintendent. R. P. Porter (N. Y.) $6,000 

Chief Clerk, A. F. Childs (O.) 2,500 

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE. 

Atty.-Gen., W. H. H. Miller (Ind.) 8,000 

Solicito--Gen., C. H. Aldrich (111.) 7,000 

Asst. Atty.-Gen., William A. Maury (D.C.) 5.000 

Asst., J. B. Cotton (Me.) 5.000 

Asst., A. X. Parker (N. Y.) 5,000 

Asst. (Dept. of Int.), G. H. Shields (Mo.).. 5,000 

Asst. (P. O. Dept.), J. N. Tyner (Ind.) 4.000 

Asst. Atty.-Gen., L. W. Colby (Neb.) 5,000 

Solicitor of Int. Rev. (Treas. Dept.), Al- 

phonsoHart(O.) 4,500 

Solicitor for Dept. of State, Frank C. Par 

tridge (Vt.) 3,500 

Law Clerk and Examiner of Titles, A. J. 

Bentley(O.) 2,750 

Chief Clerk and Supt. of Building, Cecil 

Clay (W.Va.) ....... . 2.500 

Gen. Agent, E. C. Foster (Iowa). . . .$10 per diem 
Jlppt.andDisburs'g Cflc.,F.A.Branagan(O.) 2,000 
Atty. in Charge of Pardons, Charles F. 

Scott (W. Va.) 2,400 

Solicitor of Treas. (Treas. Dept.), W. P. 

Hepburn (Iowa) 4.500 

Asst. Solicitor. F. A. Reeve (Tenn.) 3,000 

Chief Clerk Solicitor's Office (Treas. Dept.), 

Charles E. Vrooman (Iowa) , 2,000 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

Secretary. J.M. Rusk (Wis.) 8,000 

Asst. Secy.. Edwin Willits (Mich.) ......... 4,500 

Chief Clerk. Henry Casson (Wis.) 2,500 

Chief of Weather Bureau, Mark W. Har- 
rington (Mich.) 4,500 



Chief of Bureau of Animal Industry, D. 
E. Sain '" _~ ^ 

Chemist, H. W. Wiley find.) . ... ... 2.500 



mon (N. J.). 
Statistician, J. R. Dodge (O.) 



3.000 
2.500 



,. . 

Entomologist, C. V. Riley (Mo.) 2,500 

Botanist, George Vasey (111.) 2.500 

Ornithologist, C. Hart Merriam (N. Y.). . . . 2.500 
Chief of Div.of Forestry,B.E.Fernow(N.Y.) 2.000 

Pomnlogist, H. B. Van Deman (Kas.) 2,500 

Chief of Div. of Vegetable Pathology, B. T. 

Galloway (Mo.) 2,000 

Microscopist, Thomas Taylor (Mass.) 2,500 

Director Office of Experiment Stations, A. 

W.Harris (Pa.) 2.500 

Chief Div. of Accounts, B. F. Fuller (111.).. 2,500 
Chief Div. of Records and Editing, Geo. 

Wm. Hill (Minn.) 2,500 

Chief Div. of Illustrations and Engrav- 

inqs, George Marx (Pa.). 2,000 

Horticulturist, etc., Wm. Saunders (D. C.). 2.500 

* 

INDEPENDENT DEPARTMENTS. 

Government Printing Office . 
Public Printer, Frank W. Palmer (111.).. 4,500 

Chief Clerk. W. H. Collins (N. Y.) 2,400 

Foreman of Printing, H. T. Brian (Md.). . 2,100 
Foreman of Binding, Jas. W. White(D.C.) 2,100 

United States Civil-Service Commission. 
Ctommfssioners,Theodore Roosevelt(N .Y.), 

C. Lyman (Conn.), G. D. Johnston (La.). . 3.500 
Chief Examiner, W. H. Webster (Conn.) 3.000 

Secretary, John T. Doyle (N. Y.) 2,000 

Department of Labor. 

Commissioner, Carroll D. Wright(Mass.). 5,000 
Chief Clerk, Oren W. Weaver (Mass.).. .. 2,500 
Disbursing Clerk, Charles E. Morse (Pa.) 1,800 

Interstate Commerce Commission. 
William R.Morrison, Chairman (111.).... 7.500 

Wheelock G. Veazey (Vt.) 7,500 

Martin A. Knapp (1ST. Y.) 7.500 

James W. McDill (Iowa) 7,500 

Judson C. Clements (Ga.) 7.500 

Edward A. Moseley, Secretary (Mass.). . . . 3,500 



96 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



MAJOR-GENERALS, $7,500. 
O. O. Howard, comdg Dept. of the East, New 

N. A. Miles, comdg Dept. Missouri,Chicago. 111. 
BRIGADIER-GENERALS, $5,500. 



D. G. Swaim, under suspensi__ 

T. H. Ruger.comdgDept. California, San Fran- 

cisco. Cal. 

A. W. Greely. chief signal officer, Washington. 
W. Merritt, comdg Dept. Dak., St. Paul, Minn. 
J. R. Brooke, comdg Dept. Platte,Omaha,Neb. 
Thos. L. Casey, Engs., Washington, D. C. 
J. C. Breckenrldge, inspector-general, Wash- 

ington. 

Wm. Smith, paymaster-general. Washington. 
R. N. Batchelder, Q. M. G., Washington. 
A. McD. McCook, comdg Dept. Arizona, Los 

Angeles, Cal. 
Charles Sutherland, surg.-gen., Washington, 

D. C. 
Daniel W. Flagler, chief of ordnance, Wash- 

ington, D. C. 
Frank Wheaton, comdg Dept. Texas, San An- 

Robert'williams, adjt.-gen.,Washington, D. C. 
Eugene A. Carr, awaiting orders. 
John P. Hawkins, com.-gen. of sub. 

COLONELS, $4,500. 
W. R. Shatter, 1 Inf., comdg Angel Isl., Cal, 

E. S. Otis, 20 Inf., supt. Recruiting Service, New 
York city. 

C. H. Tompkins, assistant Q. M. G., Governor's 

Island, N. Y. 
W. P. Carlin, 4 Inf., comdg Ft. Sherman, Idaho. 



las,Utah. 



J. D. Bingham, Q. M. D., Chicago. 111. 

M. M. Blunt, 16 Inf., comdg Fort Doug 

P. T. Swaine, 22 Inf., comdg Ft. Keogh, Mont. 

G. N. Lieber, asst. judge-advocate gen., Wash- 

ington, D. C. 

H. C. Merriam, 7 Inf., comdg Ft. Logan, Col. 
Z. R. Bliss, 24 Inf., comdg Ft. Bayard, N. M. 
J. W. Forsyth, 7 Cav., comdg Ft. Riley, Kas. 
T. M. Anderson, 14 Inf., Vancouver, Wash. 
G. H. Mendell, Engs., San Francisco, Cal. 
H. L. Abbot, Engs., New York. 
E. F. Townsend, 12 Inf., comdg Ft. Leaven 

worth 



R. E. AJBrofton, 15 Inf., comdg Ft.Sheridan.Ill. 
Rodney Smith, Pay Dept., New York city. 
J. M.Whittemore,Ordnance Dept., Dover, N.J. 
W. P. Craighill, Engs., Baltimore, Md. 
Chuncey McKeever, A. G. D., Chicago, 111. 
J. F. Wade, 5 Cav., comdg Ft. Reno, Ind. Ter. 
C. E. Compton, 4 Cav., Highland Park, 111. 
C. Page, Med. Dept., Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 
C. B. Comstock, Engs., New York city. 
E. C. Mason, 3 Inf., Ft. Snelling, Minn. 
H. W. Closson, 4 Art., Ft. McPherson, Ga. 
O. M. Poe, Engs., Detroit, Mich. 
N. W. Osborne, 5 Inf., St. Augustine, Fla. 
R. P. Hughes, insp.-gen., Governor's Isl., N. Y. 
~ *I. D., Jeffersonville, Ind. 



Henry C. Hodges.Q, 

M. Bryant, 13 Inf., Ft. Supply, I. T. 

W. A. Rucker, Pay Dept., St. Louis, Mo. 

L. L. Langdon, 1 Art., Ft. Hamilton, N. Y. 

E. M. Heyl, I. G. D., Chicago. 111. 

H. M. Lazelle, 18 Inf., Ft. Clark, Tex. 

A. R. Buffington, comdg Rock Isl. Arsl., Ill 

G. D. Ruggles, A. G. D., Governor's Isl., N. Y. 

D. C. Houston, Engs., New York. 

J. M. Wilson, supt. M. Acad., West Point, N. Y. 

O. H. Ernst, supt bldgs, Washington, D. C. 

J. R. Smith, Med. Dept, Los Angeles, Cal. 



General and field officers United States Army on the active and retired lists, with their 
sta.ions or address and yearly pay. (Arranged according to rank.) 

ACTIVE LIST. 

MAJOR-GENERAL, $7,500, 

J. M. Scaofleld, Commanding Army, Washington, D. C. 

J. K. Mizner. 10 Cav., Washington, D. C. 
C. G. Bartlett, 9 Inf., Madison Bks, N. Y. 
M. A. Cochran. 6 Inf., Ft. Thomas. Newport, Ky. 
M. R. Morgan, Sub. Dept. Washington. D. C. 
T. M. Vincent, A. G. Dept., Washington, D. C. 
B. J. D. Irwin, Med. Dept., Chicago, 111. 
J. J. Coppinger, 23 Inf., comdg Ft. Sam Hous- 
ton, Tex. 

Alfred Mordecai,Ord.,Springfield Armory, D. C. 
A. K. Arnold, 1 Cav., comdg Ft. Grant, Ariz. 
J. J.Van Horn, 8 Inf., comdg Ft. McKinney. 

G. G^ Huntt, 2 Cav., comdg Ft. Wingate, N. M. 
I. D. DeRussy, 11 Inf., comdg Whipple Bks, 



Ariz. 
L. L. Livingston,! 
Bks, D. C. 



Art., comdg Washington 



W. M. Graham, 5 Art., comdg Presidio S.F..Cal. 
J. Biddle, 9 Cav., comdg Ft. Robinson, Neb. 
J. 8. Poland, 17 Inf., comdg Ft. D. A. Russell, 

Wyo. 
C. T. Alexander, Med. Dept., N. Y. city 

E. P. Pearson, 18 Inf , comdg Ft. Marcy, N. M. 
Horace Jewett, 21 Inf., Ft. Niagara, N. \ . 
Caleb H. Carlton, 8 Cav., Ft. Meade, S. Dak. 
Joseph C. Bailey, Med. Dept. San Antonio, Tex. 
John C. Bates, 2 Inf., Ft. Omaha. Neb. 

Fred C. Ainsworth, Rec. and Pen. Office, 

Washington, D. C. 

Richard Lodor, 2 Art., Ft. Adams. R. I. 
Andrew S. Burt, 25 Inf., Ft. Missoula. Mont. 
Oliver D. Greene, A. G. Dept., San Francisco 

David S. Gordon, 6 Cav., Ft. Niobrara, Neb. 
Anson Mills. 3 Cav., Ft. Walla Walla, Wash. 
Simon Snyder, 19 Inf., Ft. Wayne, Mich. 
Charles H. Alden, Med. Dept., St. Paul, Minn, 
John G. Chandler, Q. M. Dept., San Francisco 
Cal. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONELS, $4,000. 
C. G. Sawtelle, Q. M. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 
G. H. Elliot, Engs., Nashville, Tenn. 
H. M. Robert, Engs., Washington, D. C. 
M. I. Ludington, Q. M. D., Washington, D. C. 
J. M. Moore, Q. M. D., Army Bldg., N. Y. City. 
J. M. Wilson, Engs., West Point, N. Y. 
J. W. Barlow, Eng., Nogales, Ariz. 
Wm. Winthrop, dep. judge-advocate general, 

Washington, D. C. 
T. F. Barr, dep. judge-advocate general, Gov 

ernor's Isl., New York. 
P. C. Hains, Engs., Portland, Me. 
G. L. Gillespie, Engs., Army Bldg, N. Y. city. 
W. R. Gibson, Pay Dept., Washington, D. C. 

F. H. Parker, Ord. D.,Watervliet Arsenal.N.Y. 
C. R. Suter, Engs., St. Louis, Mo. 

Samuel Breck, A. G.D., Washington, D. C. 
H. C. Wood, A. G. D., New York city. 
J. P. Martin, A. G. D., San Antonio, Tex. 

G. B. Dandy, Q. M. D., San Antonio, Tex. 
J. A. Smith, Engs., Cleveland, Ohio. 



S. M. Mansfield, Engs., Boston, Mass. 
W. R. King, Engs., comdg Willet's Po 
R. H. Hall, 6 Inf., Army Bldg, N. Y. ci 
W. H. Penrose, 16 Inf.. Ft. Douglas, Utah. 



G. H. Burton, insp.-genl., San Francisco, Cal. 

G.H. Weeks, Q. M. D., Washington, D. C. 

A. T. Smith, 8 Inf., David's Island, N. Y. 

C. M. Terrell, Pay Dept., San Antonio, Tex. 

R. T. Frank, 2 Art., Ft. Monroe, Va. 

H. W. Lawton, insp -gen., Washington, D. C. 

W. B. Hughes, O. M.D., Omaha, Neb. 

H. S. Hawkins, 23 Inf., San Antonio, Tex. 

J. P. Farley, Ord. Bd., Frankford Arsenal, Pa. 



THE ARMY. 



97 



C. C. Byrne, Med. Dept, Vancouver Bks, Wash. 
J. P.Wright, Med. Dept., San Francisco, Cal. 

D. Parker, 13 Inf., Ft. Sill, I. T. 

H. C. Corbin, A. G. D., Washington, D. C. 

W. H. H. Benyaurd, Engs., San Francisco, Cal. 

F.L.Town,Med.Dept. Ft. Porter, N. Y. 

D. Bache, Med. Dept., Omaha, Neb. 
T. H. Stanton, Pay Dept, Omaha, Neb. 

E. V. Sumner, 8 Cav., Ft. Meade, S. Dak. 
J. S. Casey, 1 Inf., Benicia Bks, Cal. 
A.G.Robinson, Q. M. D.,Vancouver Bks, Wash. 
T. C. Sullivan, Sub. Dept., Chicago, 111. 

W. L. Kellogg, 5 Inf., Jackson Bks, La. 
M. Barber, Adjt.-Gen. Dept., St. Paul, Minn. 
L. S. Babbitt. Ord. Dept., Benicia Arsenal, Cal. 
G. M. Sternberg, Med. Dept., Army Building, 

New York city. 

Jacob F. Kent. 18 Inf., St. Paul, Minn. 
W.A. Marye,Ord.Dept.,Ft.Monroe Arsenal, Va. 
Samuel Ovenshine, 15 Inf., Ft. Sheridan. 111. 
Samuel S. Sumner, 6 Cav., Ft. Niobrara, Neb. 

C. R. Greenleaf, Med. Dept., Washington, D. C. 
John H. Page, 22 Inf., Ft. Keqgh, Mont. 

G. K. Brady, 17 Inf., Ft. D. A.Russell, Wyo. 
David Perry, 10 Cav., Ft. Custer, Mont. 
J. N. Andrews, 25 Inf., Ft. Buf ord, N. Dak. 

E. C. Bainbridge, 3 Art., Washington Bks.,D.C. 
William H. Forwood, Med. Dept., Soldiers' 

Home, D. C. 

John B. Parke, 2 Inf., Columbus Bks, Ohio. 
H. E. Noyes, 2 Cav., Ft. Huachuca, Ariz. 

F. L. Guenther, 5 Art., Alcatraz Island, Cal. 

H. A. Theaker, 14 Inf., Vancouver Bks, Wash. 
W. J. Lyster, 21 Inf., Ft. Sidney, Neb. 
Ely McClellan, Med. Dept., Chicago, 111. 

D. D. Van Valzah, 24 Inf., Ft. Bayard, N. M. 
Charles A. Wikoff, 19 Inf.. Ft. Wayne, Mich. 
Edward Moale, 3 Inf , San Francisco, Cal. 
Garnett J. Lydecker, Engs., Louisville, Ky. 
Henry C. Cook. 4 Inf., Ft. Spokane, Wash. 
Guy V. Henry, 7 Cav., Ft. Myer, Va. 

John W.Clous,Dept. J.A.Gen.,West Point,N.Y. 
William D. Wolverton, Med. Dept., Ft. Omaha, 

Neb. 

John W. Barrlger, Sub. Dept., St. Louis, Mo. 
Jacob Kline, 9 Inf., Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 
Evan Miles. 20 Inf., Ft. Assiniboine, Mont. 
William H. Powell, 11 Inf., New York city. 
C. B. McLellan, 1 Cav., Ft. Apache, Ariz. 
A. C. Wildrick, 1 Art., Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y. 
Daniel W. Benham, 7 Inf., Omaha, Neb. 
M. V. Sheridan, A. G. Dept., Omaha, Neb. 
R. F. Bernard, 9 Cav., Ft. Robinson, Neb. 
L. H. Carpenter, 5 Cav., Ft. Riley, Kas. 
Thomas Wilson, Sub. Dept., Army Building, 

New York city. 

S. B. M.Young, 4 Cav., Jefferson Bks, Mo. 
S. M. Mills, comdt. of cadets, West Point,N.Y. 
Edgar R. Kellogg, 10 Inf., San Diego Bks, Cal. 
Edward W. Whittemore, 12 Inf., Washington, 

D. C. 

G. A. Purlngton. 3 Cav., Ft. Mclntosh, Tex. 
Albert Hartsuff, Med. Dept., Ft. Omaha, Neb. 
J. G. C. Lee, Q. M. D., Los Angeles, Cal. 

A.C. M.Pennington, 4 Art.,Governor's Isl.,N.Y. 

MAJORS, $3,500. 

G. E. Glenn, Pay Dept., St. Paul. Minn. 

~. P. Canby, Pay Dept., Los Angeles, Cal. 
,. W. Candee, Pay Dept., Detroit, Mich. 

A. B. Carey, Pay Dept., Boston, Mass. 

F. M. Coxe, Pay Dept., Portland, Oregon. 

A. E. Bates, Pay Dejrt., New York city. 

Charles I. Wilson, Pay Dept., San Francisco, 
Cal. 

W. H. Eckles, Pay Dept., Atlanta, Ga. 

J. R. Roche, Pay Dept., St. Louis, Mo. 

A. S. Towar, Pay Dept., Santa Fe, N. M. 

W. M. Maynadier, Pay Dept.,San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Arthur, Pay Dept., St. Paul, Minn. 

J. V. D. Middleton, Surgn, Presidio, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

J. H. Janeway, surgn, Philadelphia, Pa. 

H. R. Tilton, surgn, Ft. Wayne, Mich. 

S. M. Horton, surgn, San Diego Bks, Cal. 



J. C. G.Happersett, Med.Dept., Ft.Keogh, Mont. 

A. A. Woodhull, surgn. Hot Springs. Ark. 

J. S. Billings, surgn, Washington, D. C. 

J. B. Keef er, Pay Dept,, New York city. 

J. W. Wham, Pay Dept.. Vancouver Bks..Wash. 

C. C. Sniffln, Pay Dept., San Antonio, Tex. 
J. R. Gibson, surgn, David's Island, N. Y. H. 

D. L. Huntington, surgn, Los Angeles, Cal. 
W. E. Waters, surgn, Columbus, Ohio. 

Isaac Arnold,Jr., Ord. Dept.,Col.Arsenal,Tenn. 
G. W. Baird, Pay Dept. , Chicago. 111. 
G. F. Robinson, Pay Dept., Los Angeles, Cal. 
W. E. preary, Pay Dept., San Antonio, Tex. 
Clifton Comly, Ord.Dept., Governor's Isl.,N. Y. 

F. S. Dodge, Pay Dept., Walla Walla, Wash. 
Chas. McClure, Pay Dept., Vancouver Bks., 

Wash. 

J. S. Witcher, Pay Dept., Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Amos Stickney, Engs., Cincinnati, O. 
Jas. Gilliss, Q. M. D., Washington, D. C. 

C. H. Whippe, Pay Dept., New York city. 
W. H. Comegys, Pay Dept., Omaha, Neb. 
J. M. Brown, surgn, Ft. Meade, S. Dak. 

J. R. McGinnis, Ord. Dept., Kennebec Arsenal, 

Me. 

Van B. Hubbard, surgn, Ft. Spokane, Wash. 
A. J. McGonnigle, Q. M. D.. Baltimore. Md. 
W. F. Tucker, Pay Dept., Washington, D. C. 
John Brooke, surgn, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 
J. C. Muhlenburg, Pay Dept., Washington. D.C. 
Alexander Mackenzie, Engs., Rock Island, 111. 
O. H. Ernst, Engs., Col. and Supt. Pub. Bldgs, 

Washington, D. C. 
W. H. Gardner, surgn, Angel Island, Cal. 

D. P. Heap, Engs., Tompkinsville, N. Y. 
Charles Smart, surgn, Washington, D. C. 
William Ludlow, Engs., Detroit, Mich. 
W. A. Jones, Engs., St. Paul, Minn. 

G. R. Smith, Pay Dept., Leavenworth, Kas. 
A. N. Damrell, Engs., Mobile, Ala. 

F. H. Phipps. Ord. Dept., comdg Allegheny Ar- 
senal, Pa. 

J. P. Baker, Pay Dept., Santa Fe, N. M. 

D. G. Caldwell, surgn, Madison Bks, N. Y. 
C. J. Allen, Engs., Galveston, Tex. 

J. W. Scully, Q. M. D., Atlanta, Ga. 

P. J. A. Cleary, surgn, Ft. McPherson, Ga. 

C.W. Raymond, Engs., Philadelphia, Pa. 

A. M. Miller, Engs., Custom House. St.Louis, Mo. 

M. B. Adams, Engs., Burlington, Vt. 

W. H. Bell, Sub. Dept.. Denver. Col. 

E. B. Kirk, Q. M. D., Buffalo, N. Y. 
M. P. Miller, 5 Art., Ft. Monroe, Va. 

J. I. Rodgers, 1 Art., San Francisco, Cal. 

R. S.Vlckery, surgn, Ft. Monroe, Va. 

A. S. Kimball, Q. M. D., St. Louis, Mo. 

C. B.Throckmorton, 2 Art, Ft. Schuyler, N.Y. 

W. R. Livermore, Engs., Boston, Mass. 

W H. Heuer, Engs., San Francisco, Cal. 

W. S. Stanton, Engs., Wilmington, N. C. 

J. M. Bacon, 7 Cav., Omaha, Neb. 

T. H. Handbury, Engs., Portland, Oregon. 

Thomas Ward, A. A.G.,VancouverBks.,Wash. 

Henry Lippincott, surgn.. Ft. Adams, R. I. 

J. H. Gilman, Sub. Dept., Chicago, 111. 

Henry McElderry, surgn., Omaha, Neb. 

Thomas McGregor, 2 Cav., Ft. Bowie, Ariz. 

E. A. Koerper. surgn., Willitt's Point, N. Y. 

A. F. Rockwell, Q. M. D.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
S. M. Whitside, 7 Cav., Ft. Riley. Kas. 

E. B. Williston, 3 Art., Chicago. 111. 

W. J. Volkmar, A. G. D., Washington, D. C. 

Wm. Sinclair, 2 Art., Ft. Warren. Mass. 

G. C. Smith. Q. M. D.. Chicago, 111. 

J. W. Reilly, Ord., Dept., Watertown Arsenal, 

Mass. 

Henry Carroll, 1 Cav., Ft. Apache. Ariz. 
Calvin DeVVitt, surgn., San Antonio. Tex. 

B. F. Pope, surgn.. Whipple Bks., Ariz. 
J. H. Bartholf, surgn.. Plattsburg, N. Y. 
J. P. Kimball, surgn.. Ft. Clark, Tex. 

E. Adam, 6 Cav., Belleville, 111. 

J. F. Randlett, 9 Cav.. Ft. Duchesne. Utah. 

T. Schwan, A. A. G., Berlin. Germany. 

H. M. Cronkite, surgn., B't. Trumbull, Conn. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



J. C. Post, Engs., U. S. Legation, London, Eng. 

J. F. Gregory, Milwaukee, Wis. 

R. M. O'Reilly, Med. Dept.. Washington. D. C. 

C. L. Heizman. Med. Dept., Ft. Douglas, Utah. 

J.A.Kress.Ord.Dept.,St. Louis Powd. Depot,Mo. 

H. M. Adams, Engs., Washington, D. C. 

H. C. Hasbrouck. 4 Art., Ft, Monroe, Va. 

J. M. Hamilton, 1 Cav., Ft. Assiniboine, Mont. 

R. H. White, surgn., Jefferson Bks., Mo. 

J. B. Rawles, 4 Art., Atlanta, Ga. 

W. L. Haskin, 1 Art., comdg Ft. Columbus, N. Y. 

Theo. A. Baldwin. 7 Cav., Ft. Riley, Kas. 

T. C. Tupper, 6 Cav., Ft. Niobrara.'Neb. 

John V. Furey, Q. M. D., St. Paul, Minn. 

A C. Girard, Med. Dept., Ft. Sheridan, 111. 

J. B. Girard. Med. Dept., Benicia Bks.. Cal. 

C. E. L. Davis, Engs., Washington, D. C. 
W. F. Randolph, 3 Art., Ft. Riley. Kas. 

J. V. Lauderdale. Med. Dept.. Ft. Ontario, N. Y. 
A. R. Chaffee. 9 Cav.. Los Angeles. Cal. 
J. B. Quinn, Engs., New Orleans, La. 

D. W. Lockwood. Engs., Cincinnati, O. 

S. T. Gushing, Sub. Dept,. Ft.Leavenworth. Kas. 

L. C. Forsyth, Q. M. D.. St. Louis. Mo. 

J. K. Corson, Med. Dept.. Washington Bks.. D. C. 

T.McCrea,5 Art.. Vancouver Bks..Washington. 

M. Cooney, 4 Cav., Ft. Walla Walla.Wash. 

P. D. Vroom, insp.-genl.. San Antonio. Tex. 

K. Hunter, judge-advocate, San Francisco. 

G. B. Davis, judge-advocate,Washington, D. C. 

J. Jackson. 2 Cav., Portland. Oregon, 

J. Egan, 1 Art., Ft. Wadsworth, N. Y. 

J. P. Sanger, insp.-genl., Washington, D. C. 

C. E. Munn, Med. Dept., Mt. Vernon Bks, Ala. 

L. T. Morris, 3 Cav., B r t. Ringgold, Tex. 

C. Ewen, Med. Dep., Ft. Walla Walla- Wash. 

E. Woodruff, Med. Dept., Ft. Hamilton. N. Y. 
R. Comba, 9 Inf., Madison Bks, N. Y. 

A. MacArthur, Jr., A. A. G., Washington, D. C. 
E. H. Ruffner, Engs.. Buffalo, N. Y. 
W. Matthews. Med. Dept., Ft. Wingate. N. M. 
C. D. Viele. 1 Car.. Ft. Grant, Ariz. 
John D. Hall. Med. Dept., Ft. Sherman. Idaho. 
W. A. Elderkin. Sub. Dept.. Los Angeles. Cal. 
C. B. Penrose, Sub. Dept.. Baltimore. Md. 
J. H. Lord, Q. M. D., San Francisco, Cal. 
W. A. Rafferty, 2 Cav.. Ft. Wingate. N. M. 
P. F. Harvey, Med. Deo.. Ft. Keogh. Mont 
S. T. Norvell, 10 Cav., Ft. Custer, Mont. 
Wirt Davis, 5 Cav.. St. Paul. Minn. 
H. C. Egbert, 17 Inf., Ft. D. A. Russell. Wyo. 
C. E. Dutton, Ordnance, San Antonio, Tex. 
E. B. Atwood, Q. M. D.. Boston. Mass. 
E. M. Coates, 19 Inf., Ft. Mackinac. Mich. 
W. Nash, Sub. Dept., Vancouver Bks. Wash. 
J. C. Gilmore. A. G. D., Washington. D. C. 
J. G. Butler. Ord. Dept.. Augusta Arsenal, Ga. 
Henry Wagner. 5 Cav.. Ft. Sill, Ok. Ter. 
H. H. C. Dunwoody, Sig. Corps. Wash., D. C. 
C. B. Byrne, Med. Dept., Ft. Assiniboine, Mont. 
G. M. Randall. 4 Inf.. Chicago. 111. 
J. Henton. 23 Inf.. Ft. Bliss. Tex. 
Cullen Bryant, Ord. Dept., Watervliet Ar- 
senal, N. Y. 



C. C. C. Carr, 8 Cav., Ft. Leavenworth. Kas. 
C. K. Winne, Med. Dept., Ft, Snelling. Minn. 
J. H. Bradford, 11 Inf., Whipple Bks. Ariz. 
T. E. Wilcox, Med. Dept., Ft. Huachuca. Ariz. 
V. Havard, Med. Dept., Ft. D. A. Russell. 

Wyo. 

W. S. Worth, 2 Inf.. Ft. Omaha, Neb. 
W. M. Wherry, 6 Inf., Newport Bks, Ky. 

E. G. Fechet, 6 Cav. Ft. McKinney. Wyo. 
J. H. Patterson, 3 Inf., Ft. Snelling, Minn. 

J. Van R. Hoff, Med. Dept., Ft. Columbus, N. Y. 
H. B. Freeman. 16 Inf., Ft. Douglas. Utah. 
A. B. Wells, 8 Cav., Ft. Meade. S. Dak. 
C. M. Bailey, 15 Inf., Ft. Sheridan. 111. 
J. W. Powell, Jr., 21 Inf., Ft. Porter, N. Y. 

F. G. Smith, 2 Art., Ft. Adams. R.I. 

G. W. Adair, Med. Dept., Ft, Robinson, Neb. 
J. M. Marshall. Q. M. D., Helena, Mont. 

J. G. Ramsay. 3 Art,, Ft. McHenry. Md. 
L. Wheaton, 20 Inf., Ft. Assiniboine. Mont. 
J. W. French, 14 Inf., Vancouver Bks. Wash. 
Almon L. Varney, Ord. Dept., Indianapolis 

Arsenal, Ind. 
Paul R. Brown, Med. Dept., Ft. Supply, Ind. 

Ter. 

Charles Bentzoni, 1 Inf.. Angel Island. Cal. 
John C. Mallery. Engs.. St. Augustine. Fla. 
Wm. B. Kennedy. 4 Cav., Boise Bks. Idaho. 
Aaron S. Daggett, 13 Inf.. Ft. Sill, Ok. Ter. 
Edward B. Moseley, Med. Dept., Washington, 

San'foi-d C. Kellogg. 4 Cav., Washington. D. C. 

Charles S. Ilsley, 9 Cav., Ft. Robinson, Neb. 

John O. Skinner, Med. Dept.. Woolford, Md. 

Charles P. Eagan, Sub. Dept., San Francisco, 
Cal. 

S. W. Groesbeck. judge-adv.. Chicago, 111. 

Thomas E. Rose. 18 Inf.. Ft. Clark. Tex. 

Myles Moylan, 10 Cav.. Ft. Assiniboine. Mont. 

John Simpson. Q. M. Dept., Philadelphia. Pa. 

Geo. B. Russell. 5 Inf.. Mt. Vernon Bks, Ala. 

Chambers McKibbin, 25 Inf., Ft. Missoula, 
Mont. 

E. H. Liscum, 22 Inf., Ft. Keogh, Mont. 

Theo. J. Wint. 10 Cav.. Ft. Buford. N. Dak. 

Aug. A. DeLoffre, Med. Dept., Columbus Bks, 
Ohio. 

Jos. T. Haskell. 24 Inf., Ft. Huachuca. Ariz. 

John A. Darling. 5 Art., Presidio, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

James H. Gageby, 12 Inf.. Ft. Sully. S. Dak. 

Charles C. Hood. 7 Cav., Ft. Logan, Col. 

Moses Harris, 8 Cav., Ft Yates. N. Dak. 

Francis Moore, 5 Cav.. Ft. Supply. Ind. Ter. 

John F. Weston, Sub. Dept.. Washington. D. C. 

H. W. Wessells. Jr.. 3 Cav.. Eagle Pass. Tex. 

Francis E. Lacey, 8 Inf.. Ft. Washakie, Wyo. 

Clinton B. Sears, Engs.. Duluth. Minn. 

Aug. H. Bainbridge, 10 Inf., Ft. Stanton. N. M. 

Alex. I. B. Keyes. 3 Cav., Ft. Ringgold. Tex. 

Louis M. Maus, Med. Dept,. Whipple Bks. Ariz. 

C. F. Humphrey. Q. M. Dept.. Omaha. Neb. 

Geo. B. Rodney, 4 Art,, Ft. McPherson, Ga. 



RETIRED LIST. 



MAJOR-GENERALS. $5,625. 

D. E. Sickles, 23 5th-av.. New York city. 
J. C. Robinson. Binghamton, N. Y. 

S. S. Carroll. Takoma, D. C. 

BRIGADIER-GENERALS. 14,125. 
Francis Fessenden, Portland, Me. 
Eli Long. Plainneld. N. J. 
R. W. Johnson, St. Paul, Minn. 
T. J. Wood. Dayton. O. 
M. D. Hardin. Chicago. 111. 
P. St. G. Cooke. Detroit. Mich. 
Joseph Holt. Washington, D. C. 
W. A. Hammond. Washington, D. C. 

E. D. Townsend. Washington. D. C. 
N. W. Brown, Washington, D. C. 
D. H. Rucker, Washington. D. C. 
Rufus Ingalls. New York citv. 

H. G. Wright, Washington, D. C. 



C. C. Augur, Washington. D. C. 
Robert Murray, New York city. 
John Newton, New York city. 
O. B. Wilcox, Washington, D. C. 
J. C. Duane, New York city. 

A. Baird, Washington, D. C. 

W. 8. Rosecrans, Washington, D. C. 
R. C. Drum, Bethesda, Md. 
Wm. B. Rochester, Washington, D.C. 
S. B. Holabird, Washington, D. C. 
R. Macfeely, Washington, D. C. 

B. H. Grierson, Jacksonville, 111. 
John Moore, Washington. D. C. 
Stephen V. Benet, Washington, D. C. 
John Gibbon, Washington, D. C- 
David S. Stanley, New York city. 

J. C. Kelton, Soldiers' Home, Washington, D. C. 
August V. Kantz, Washington, D. C. 
Beekman DuBarry, Washington, D. C. 



THE ARMY. 



COLONELS, $3,375. 
M. B.Walker, Kenton, O. 
Theodore Tates, Milwaukee, Wis. 
J. R. Lewis, Atlanta, Ga. 
I. S. Catltn, 25 Court-st.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wager Swayne, 195 Broadway, N. Y. city. 
H. B. Carrington, Hyde Park, Mass. 

0. L. Shepherd, 2013 Lexington-av., N. Y. city. 
L. P. Graham, Washington, D. C. 

E. W. Hinks, Cambridge, Mass. 

T. F. Rodenbough, 1 E. 55th-st., New York city. 

R. L. Kilpatrick, Springfield, O. 

A. J. McNett, Belmont, N. Y. 

John Pulford, Detroit. Mich. 

R. S. Granger, Zanesville, O. 

Abner Doubleday, Mendham, N. J. 

R.H.K. Whiteley,721 Madison-av.,B'tlmore,Md. 

Horace Brooks, New York city. 

J. J. Reynolds, Washington, D. C. 

Joseph Roberts, Philadelphia, Pa. 

T. G. Pitcher, Washington, D. C. 

P. R. DeTrobriand, New Orleans, La. 

DeL. Floyd-Jones, New York city. 

1. N. Palmer. Washington, D. C. 

G. A. Woodward, Washington, D. C. 

James Oakes. Washington, D. C. 

Edmund Schriver, Salem, N. Y. 

Stewart Van Vliet, Washington, D. C. 

J. E. Smith, 376 Warren-av., Chicago, 111. 

_. L. Crittenden, Sea Side, N. Y. 

P. V. Hagner, Washington, D. C. 

J. B. Fry, 30 E. 3d-st, New York city. 

G. O. Haller, Seattle, Wash. 

C. L. Kilburn, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

W. S. King, 4042 Chestnut-st., Philadelphia,Pa. 

A. P. Howe, Cambridge, Mass. 

Joseph Conrad, Washington, D. C. 

John F. Head, Washington, D. C. 

Z. B. Tower, New York city. 

James Van Voast, 123 E. 3d-st., Cincinnati, O. 

Galusha Pennypacker, Philadelphia, Pa. 

G.W- Getty, Forest Glen, Md. 

F. T. Dent, Denver, Col. 

W. F. Raynolds, Detroit, Mich. 

John Campbell, Cold Spring, N. Y. 

Charles C. Gilbert, Louisville, Ky. 

John P. Hatch, Hyattsville, Md. 

John E. Summers, Omaha, Neb. 

J. D. Wilkins, Washington, D. C. 

Fitz-John Porter, 5 W. 39th-st., New York city. 

C. S. Stewart, Cooperstown, N. Y. 

J. N. G. Whistler, Ridgelawn, Mont. 

Luther P. Bradley, Tacoma, Wash. 

J. Hamilton, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

W. B. Royall, Washington, D. C. 

C. L. Best, Newport, R. I. 

J. S. Mason, Washington, D. C. 

M. D. L. Simpson, Winnetka, 111. 

E. I. Baily, San Francisco. 

R. Saxton, Washington, D. C. 

N. B. Sweitzer, Washington, D. C. 

Daniel McClure, Louisville, Ky. 

J. C. Tidball, 122 W. 45th-st., New York city. 

A. J. Smith, St. Louis, Mo. 

J.G. Parke, Washington, D. C. 

T. A. McParlin, Washington, D. C. 

N. A. M. Dudley, Roxbury, Mass. 

D. L. Magruder, Philadelphia, Pa. 
A. Beckwith, St. Louis, Mo. 

A. K. Smith, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 
A. L. Hough, New York city. 
W. D. Whipple. Norristown, Pa. 
Henry M. Black, Chicago, 111. 
Elmer Otis, San Diego, Cal. 
A. G. Brackett, Washington. D. C. 
Geo. Stoneman, Buffalo, N. Y. 

D. R. Clendennin, Oneida, 111. 

R. I. Dodge, Sackets Harbor, N. Y. 
H. G. Gibson, Washington, D. C. 
Alex. Piper, New York city. 
J. G. Tilford, New York city. 
H. R. Mizner, Detroit, Mich. 

E. P. Vollum, London, Eng. 
Chas. H. Smith, Washington, D. C. 
John J. Upham, St. Augustine, Fla. 



Wm. H. Jordan, Astoria, Oregon. 
Geo. B. Sanford, Litchfleld, Conn. 
Albert P. Morrow, Denver, Col. 
Geo. M. Brayton, Ft. Wayne, Mich. 
Basil Norris, San Francisco, Cal. 
George Bell, Washington, D. C. 
George L. Andrews, Washington, D. C. 
Anthony Heger, Washington, D. C. 
Alex. J. Perry. Washington, D.T. 

PROFESSORS. 

(With the retired pay of colonel.) 
Wm. H. C. Bartlett, Yonkers, N. Y. 
George L. Andrews, Auburndale, Mass. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONELS, $3,000. 

D. Woodruff, Trenton, N. J. 
A. A. Gibson, Fryeburg, Me. 
T. E. Maley, Englewood, 111. 
Thomas Shea, Lexington, Ind. 
G.W. Glle, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Robert Avery, 98 2d place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

S. B. Hayman, Houstonia, Mo. 

Alex. Montgomery, Cobourg, Ontario, Can. 

L. C. Bootes, Wilmington, Del. 

F. O.Wyse, Pikesville, Md. 

Joseph Stewart, Berkley, Cal. 

J. B. M. Potter, Kingston, B. I. 

A. W. Evans, Elkton, Md. 

A. J. Dallas, Orlando, Fla. 

J. J. Dana, Washington, D. C. 
H. L. Chipman, Detroit, Mich. 
C. A. Reynolds, Baltimore, Md. 

E. Collins, Milton, Mass. 

H. B. Burnham, Richmond, Va. 
W. H. Johnson, Portland, Ore. 

B. C. Card, Washington, D. C. 
L. Smith, S. Norwalk. Conn. 



J. Green, Boise City, Idaho. 

shingto 
Louis Merrill. Philadelphia, Pa. 



G. A. Forsyth, Wa 



. 
ton, D. C. 



B. E. Fryer, Kansas City. Mo. 
Edmond Butler, Miles City, Mont. 
James C. McKee, Butler, Pa. 

J. S. Fletcher, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Geo. E. Head, Ft. Meade, S. Dak. 
Edward C. Woodruff, Morristown. N. J. 
Eugene B. Beaumont, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
John A. Wilcox, St. Joseph, Mo. 

MAJORS, 12,825. 

Wm. Austine, Brattleboro, Vt. 

W. F. Edgar, Los Angeles, Cal. 

J. H. McArthur, 2813 Indiana-av., Chicago, 111. 

Albert Tracey, Portland, Me. 

J. C. Clark, Jr.. Haverford, Pa. 

Hugh B. Fleming, Erie, Pa. 

W. B. Lane, Ft. Robinson, Neb. 

F. E. Prime, Litchfield, Conn. 

R. M. Morris.Vineyard Haven, Mass. 

J. E. Burbank, Maiden, Mass. 

H. M. Enos,Waukesha.Wis. 

R. C. Walker, Paris, France. 

T. S. Dunn, Santa Monica, Cal. 

A. E. Latimer, Bronxville, N. Y. 
Robert Nugent, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
H. A. Hambright. Lancaster, Pa. 
P. W. Stanhope, Waldron, 111. 

E. D. Judd, Hartford, Conn. 
Wm. Hawley, San Jose, Cal. 
H. C. Bankhead, Bayonne, N. J. 
J. H. Eaton, Portland, Oregon. 
James McMillan, Washington, D. C. 
T. C. H. Smith, Nordhoff, Cal. 
Frank Bridgman, Washington, D. C. 
T. J. Eckerson, Portland, Oregon. 
Wm. P. Gould, Vincennes, Ind. 

C. J. Sprague, Oakland, Cal. 

B. P. Runkle, San Francisco, Cal. 
E. R. Warner, Montrose, Pa. 

D. Madden. St. Louis. Mo. 
H. B. Reese, Lancaster. O. 
Passmore Middleton, Pewer Valley, Ky. 
Julius H. Patzki, Asheville, N. C. 



100 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 18S3. 



Geo. K. Sanderson, Rockport. Tex. 

Robt. H. Montgomery, Washington, D. C. 

Daniel N. Bash, Denver, Col. 

A. B. Kauffman, Webster Grove, Mo. 

J. H. Belcher, Denver, Col. 

Wyllys Lyman. Washington, D. C. 

D. R. Larned, Portland, Oregon. 
Gaines Lawson, Washington, D. C. 
DeWitt C. Poo*>, Washington, D. C. 
L. E. Campbell, Denver, Col. 

H. F. Brewerton, Governor's Island, N. r. 
H. G. Litchfleld, New York city. 

E. Bentley, Little Rock, Ark. 

F. W. Benteen, Atlanta, Ga. 

A. Pleasonton, Washington, D. C. 
A. B. Gardiner, Garden City, N. Y. 
C. J. Dickey, Beaver, Pa. 



F. T. Bennett, San Francisco, Cal. 
W. Webster, Baltimore, Md. 

W. F. Smith, Wilmington. Del. 
A. Sharp, West Duluth, Minn. 
C. H. Hoyt, abroad. 

G. M. Wheeler, Washington, D. C. 
Gerald Russell, Denver, Col. 

W. G. Wedemeyer, Los Angeles, Cal. 

F. E. DeCourcy, New York city. 

F. W. Elbrey, Sandy Spring, Md. 

W. 8. Tremaine. Buffalo, N. Y. 

L. Y. Loring, San Diego, Cal. 

J. B. Irvine, Los Angeles. Cal. 

P. P. G. Hall, Philadelphia, Pa. 

H. G. Thomas, Portland, Me. 

T. S. Klrkland, Washington, D. C. 

C. W. Foster, St. Louis, Mo. 



NTTMBERS AND STATIONS OF REGIMENTS. 



FIRST CAVALRY. Hdqrs C, E, F, H and K,Ft. 
Grant, Ariz.; B and I, Ft. Bayard, N. M.; D, 
Ft. Apache. Ariz.; G, San Carlos, Ariz.; D, 
Ft. Custer, Mont.; A, Ft. Myer, Va. 

SECOND CA\ALRY. Hdqrs A, C, D, G, H 
and L, Ft. Wingate, N. M. ; B and I, Ft. Bowie, 
Ariz.; E and K, Ft. Huachuca, Ariz.; G, San 
Carlos, Ariz.; F, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 

THIRD CAVALRY. Hdqrs A and G, Ft. Mc- 
Intosh, Tex.; H, Eagle Pass, Tex.; B, Ft. 
Brown, Tex.; C and I, Ft. Ringgold, Tex.; E, 
Ft. Hancock, Tex. ; D and K, Ft. Sam Houston, 
Tex.; L, Ft. Meade, S. Dak.; F, Ft. Riley, Kas. 

FOURTH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs A, D, H and L, 
Ft. Walla Walla, Wash.; E. Vancouver Bks., 
Wash.; F, Boise Bks., Idaho; G, Ft.Sherman, 
Idaho; B, I and K, Presidio, San Francisco, 
Cal.; C, Ft. Bidwell. Cal. 

FIFTH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs B, C, E, G and L, 
Ft. Reno, Oklahoma; A, Ft. Supply, Ind. 
Ter.; D, F and H, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma; I, Ft. 
Leavenworth, Kas. 

SIXTH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs A, E, F, G, K and 
L, Ft. Niobrara, Neb.; B. Ft. Washakie. Wyo.; 
C and H, Ft. McKinney, Wyo.; D, Ft. Yellow- 
stone, Wyo. 

SEVENTH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs A, C, D, E, G, 
I and H, Ft. Riley, Kas.; L. Ft. Sill, Okla- 
homa; B and K, Ft. Sheridan, 111.; F, Ft. 
Myer, Va. 

EIGHTH CAVALRY. Hdqrs A, B, C, D, E. I 
and K, Ft. Meade, S. Dak.; F and G, Ft. 
Yates, N.Dak.; L, Ft. Keogh.Mont.; H, Ft. 
Myer, Va. 

NINTH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs A, D, E, F, G 
and 1, Ft. Robinson, Neb.; B and H, Ft. Du- 
chesne, Utah; C, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas.; K, 
Ft. Myer, Va. 

TENTH CAVALRY.-Hdqrs A, B, E, G and 
K, Ft. Custer, Mont.; C and F, Ft. Assini- 
boine, Mont.; D, Ft.. Keogh, Mont.; H, Ft. 
Buford,'N. Dak.; I, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 

FIRST ARTILLERY-Hdqrs A, G. I and K, 
Ft. Hamilton, N. Y.; B, Hand M. Ft. Colum- 
bus. N. Y.; C, D and L., Ft. Wadsworth, 
N. F.; E, Ft. Sheridan, 111.; F, Ft. Monroe, Va. 

SECOND ARTILLERY-Hdqrs C. G and M. 
Ft. Adams. R. I.; A and F, Ft. Riley. Kas.; 
B and D, Ft. Warren. Mass.; E. Ft. Preble, 
Me.; I, Ft. Monroe. Va.: H and L, Ft. Schuy- 
ler, N. Y.; K, Ft. Trumbull, Conn. 

THIRD ARTILLERY-Hdqrs A, C, E, H. K 
and L. Washington Bks. D. C.; B and M, Ft. 
Monroe. Va.; D, G and I. Ft. McHenry, Md.; 
F, Ft. Sam Houston, Tex. 

FOURTH ARTILLERY. -Hdqrs A, C, E, G, I, 
K, L and M, Ft. McPherson, Ga.; D, Ft. Bar- 
rancas, Fla.; B. Ft. Adams, R.I. ; F, Ft. Riley, 
Kas. ;H, Ft. Monroe, Va. 



FIFTH ARTILLERY.-HdqrsB, D, F, H,K and 

L, Presidio, San Francisco; E and I, Alcatraz 

Isl., Cal.; A and C, Ft. Canby. Wash.: M, Ft 

Mason, Cal.; G, Ft. Monroe, Va. 
FIRST INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, B, D, G and H, 

Angel Isl., Cal.; C, E and F, Benicia Bks, Cal. 
SECOND INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, B, C, D, E, F, 

G, H and I, Ft. Omaha, Neb. 
THIRD INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, B, C, D, E, F, G 

and H, Ft. Snelling, Minn. ; I, Ft. Sully, S. Dak. 
FOURTH INFANTRY Hdqrs A, D, F and H, 

Ft. Sherman, Idaho; B, E, G. and I, Ft. Spo- 
kane, Wash.; C, Boise Bks, Idaho. 
FIFTH INFANTRY. Hdqrs D and E. St. 

Francis Bks, Fla.; A, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas.; 

B and H. Jackson Bks, La.; C and G. Mt. 

Vernon Bks, Ala. ; F, Ft. Sam Houston, Tex. 
SIXTH INFANTRY. Hdqrs B. C, D, F, G and 

H, Ft. Thomas, Ky.; A, Ft. Wood, N. Y.; E, 

Newport Bks, Ky. 
SEVENTH INFANTRY. Hdqrs A. B, C, D, E 

and F, Ft. Logan, Col.; G, Camp Pilot Butte; 

H, Ft. Leavensworth, Kas. 
EIGHTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, E and H, 

Ft. McKinney, Wyo.; Cand D. Ft. Robinson, 

Neb.; F and I, Ft. Washakie, Wyo.; B and G, 

Ft. Niobrara, Neb. 
NINTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs B, C, D, E, F 

and G, Madison Bks, N. Y.; A, Ft. Ontario. 

N. Y.; H, Plattsburg Bks, N. Y. 
TENTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs B and D, Ft. 

Marcy, N. M.; A and F, Ft. Leavenworth, 

Kas.; C, San Diego Bks, Cal.; G, Ft. Reno, 

Oklahoma Ter.; E, Ft. Stanton, N. M.; H, Ft. 

Wingate, N. M. 
ELEVENTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, C, D 

and G, Whipple Bks, Ariz.; B and E, San 

Carlos, Ariz.; F, H and I, Ft. Apache, Ariz. 
TWELFTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs E and G, Ft. 

Leavenworth, Kas.; B, C and D, Ft. Sully, S. 

Dak.; A, F and H, Ft. Yates, N. Dak.; I, Mt. 

Vernon Bks, Ala. 
THIRTEENTH INFANTR Y.-Hdqrs B, E and 

H. Ft. Supply, Ind Ter.; A, C, D and G, Ft. 

Sill, Okl. Ter.; F, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas.; G. 

Ft. Reno, Okl. Ter. 
FOURTEENTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, B, C, 

D, E and G, Vancouver Bks, Wash.; F, Ft. 
Townsend, Wash.; H, Ft. Leavenworth, Kas. 

FIFTEENTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, B, C, D, 

E, F, G and H, Ft. Sheridan. 111. 
SIXTEENTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, B, C, D, 

E, F, G, H and I, Ft. Douglas, Utah. 
SEVENTEENTH INFANTRY. Hdqrs A. B, 

C, D, E, F, G and H, Ft. D. A. Russell, Wyo. 
EIGHTEENTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A. B, C, 

D, G and H, Ft, Clark, Tex.; E, Ft. Ringgold, 
Tex.; F, Ft. Mclntosh, Tex. 



THE NAVY. 



101 



NINETEENTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, E, G 
and H, Ft. Wayne, Mich.; B, D and F, Ft. 
Brady, Mich.; C, Ft. Mackinac, Mich. 

TWENTIETH INFANTRY. Hdqrs A, B, D, 
E, F, G and H, Ft. Assinlboine, Mont.; C and 
I, Camp Poplar River, Mont. 

TWENTY-FIRST INFANTRY. Hdqrs A, C, 
and E, Ft. Niagara, N. Y.; B and H, Ft. Por- 
ter, N. Y.; D, F, G and I, Ft. Sidney, Neb. 

TWENTY-SECOND INB'ANTRY. Haqrs A, 
B. C. D, F, G and H, Ft. Keogh, Mont.; I, Ft. 
Yates, N. Dak.; E, Ft. Pembina, N. Dak. 



General officers of the United States navy on the active and retired lists, with their stations 
or addresses and yearly pay. (Arranged according to rank.) 

ACTIVE LIST, 



TWENTY-THIRD INFANTRY.-Hdqrs A, C, 

E, F, G and H, Ft. Sam Houston, Tex.; B 

and D, Ft. Bliss, Tex. 
TWENTY-FOURTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs D, 

E, F and G, Ft. Bayard, N. M.; A, B, C and 

H, Ft. Huachuca, Ariz. 
TWENTY-FIFTH INFANTRY.-Hdqrs F, G 

and H, Ft. Missoula, Mont.; B, C and E, Ft. 

Buford, N. Dak.; A and D, Ft. Custer, Mont. 
ENGINEERS' BATTALION Hdqrs A. B. C 

and D, Willitt's Point, N. Y.; E, West Point, 

N. Y. 



REAR-ADMIRALS, $6,000. 
Bancroft Gherardl, comdg Special Squadron. 
Geo. E. Belknap, president Board Inspection. 
David B. Harmony, comdt Asiatic Station. 
A. E. K. Benham, comdg South Atlantic Sta- 
tion. 

John Irwin, comdt Mare Island. 
James A. Greer, chairman Lighthouse Board. 

COMMODORES, $5,000. 

Aaron W. Weaver, comdt Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
James H. Gillis, member Lighthouse Board. 
George Brown, leave of absence. 
John G. Walker, comdt Atlantic Station. 
F. M. Ramsay, chief Bureau of Navigation. 
Joseph S. Skerrett. comdg Pacific Station. 
Joseph Fyfle, comdt Naval Station, New Lon- 
don. 
O. F. Stanton, governor Naval Home, Phila- 

Henry Er'ben, comdt Navy Yard, New York. 
Richard W. Meade, special duty, World's Ex- 
position. 

CAPTAINS, $4,600. 

Chas. C. Carpenter, comdt Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, N. H. 

William A. Kirkland, comdt Navy Yard, 
League Island. 

Edward E. Potter, comdg Minnesota. 

Lester A. Beardslee, comdg Naval Station, 
Port Royal. S. C. 

Thomas O. Self ridge,comdt Navy Yard.Boston. 

Jos. N. Miller, comdg Receiving Ship Vermont. 

Montgomery Sicard. comdg Miantonomah. 

Edmund O. Matthews, Board of Inspection 
Survey. 

Charles S. Norton, member Examining Board. 

R. L. Phythian. Naval Acad., Annapolis, Md. 

Rush R. Wallace, comdg Receiving Ship 
Franklin. 

Francis M. Bunce, comdg Training Station, 
Newport, R. I. 

Byron Wilson, president Board of Inspection, 
New York. 

Frederick V. McNair. supt Naval Observatory. 

John A. Howell. president Steel Board. 

Allen V. Reed, comdt Naval Yard, Pensacola, 
FJa. 

George Dewey. chief Bureau Equipment. 

Henry L. Howison. Navy Yard, Mare Island. 

Albert Kautz, Navy Yard, Boston. 

Alfred T. Mahan, president Naval War Col- 
lege. 

George C. Remey, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
N. H. 

Norman H. Farquhar, chief Bureau Yards and 
Docks. 

Theodore F. Kane. Navy Yard, New York. 

Gilbert C. Wiltae, comdg Boston. 

J. O'Kane, comdg Wabasfi. 

J. C. Watson, comdg San Francisco. 



H. B. Robeson, waiting orders. 

W. Whitehead, Navy Yard. League Island. 

W. S. Schley, lighthouse inspector. 

Silas Casey, comdg Newark. 

William T. Sampson, Navy Yard, Washington. 

B. J. Cromwell, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 

J. W. Philip, Cramps' Ship Yard, Philadelphia. 

Henry F. Picking, comdg Charleston. 

F. Rodgers, special duty, New York. 

John F. McGlensey, comdg Chicago. 

Louis Kempff, special duty, San Francisco. 

F. G. Higginson, comdt Atlanta. 

Geo. W. Sumner, Navy Yard, New York. 
B. F. Day, waiting orders. 
Wm. R. Bridgman, comdg Baltimore. 
A. H. McCormick, comdg Lancaster. 
Charles S. Cotton, comdg Receiving Ship In- 
dependence. 

John R. Bartlett, waiting orders. 
Albert S. Barker, comdg Philadelphia. 

COMMANDERS, $3,500. 
James D. Graham, under suspension. 
Oliver A. Batcheller, special duty. New York. 
Silas W. Terry, member Examining Board. 
Merrill Miller, Naval Home, Philadelphia. 
John J. Read, lighthouse inspector. 
Edwin T. Woodward, lighthouse inspector 
Henry L. Johnson, comdg Mohican. 
George W. Wood, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
M. L. Johnson, waiting orders. 
E. M. Shepard, lighthouse inspector. 
Robley D. Evans, secretary Lighthouse Board. 

G. W. Coffin, leave of absence. 
Henry Glass, Navy Yard, Mare Island. 
Philip H. Cooper, Board of Inspection. 
Henry C. Taylor, special duty, Europe. 
Geo. H. Wadleigh, Navy Yard, Boston. 
A. S. Crowninshield, comdg Kearsarge. 
Frank Wildes, comdg Yorktown. 

James H. Sands. Navy Yard, Washington. 

Yates Stirling, leave of absence. 

William C. Wise, lighthouse inspector, St. 

Louis. 
Purnell F. Harrington, lighthouse inspector, 

Philadelphia. 

William Bainbridge Hoff, special duty,Europe. 
Nicoll Ludlow, lighthouse inspector. 
Francis A. Cook, Navy Yard, Boston. 
Colby M. Chester, Naval Academy. 
Charles E. Clark, Navy Yard, Mare Island. 
Charles J. Barclay, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 

"V TT 

Joseph's. Coghlan,Navy Yard, League Island. 
Charles V. Gridley, comdg Marion. 
Charles D. Sigsbee, comdg Portsmouth. 
Richard P. Leary, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 
William H. Whiting, comdg Alliance. 
D. W. Mullan, lighthouse inspector. 
N. Mayo Dyer, Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H. 
Francis M. Green, comdg Nautical School- 
ship Saratoga. 



102 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



Charles O'Neil, spec'l duty. Navy Yard, Boston. 

Caspar F. Goodrich, comdg Constellation. 

Bowman H. McCalla, leave of absence. 

French E. Chadwick. Navy Department. 

Theodore F. Jewell, comdg Torpedo Station. 

William M. Fclger. chief Bureau of Ordnance. 

Horace Elmer, Navy Yard, New York. 

Benj. P. Lamberton, Bureau of Yards and 
Dwks. 

John Schouler, leave of absence. 

Francis W. Dickins, Navy Yard, Washington. 

George F. F. Wilde, lighthouse inspector. 

Charles H. Davis, special duty. 

Charles J. Train, lighthouse inspector. 

B. White, comdg Concord. 

Oscar F. Heyerman, Navy Yard, New York. 

George W. Pigman, comdg monitors, Rich- 
mond, Va. 

T. Nelson, comdg Adams. 

F. McCurley, under suspension. 

John McGowan, jr., comdg St. Mary's. 

James G. Green, lighthouse inspector. 

Geo. E. Wingate, comdg Michig an. 

Joshua Bishop, Naval Observatory. 

John K.Winn.charge Naval Station.Key West. 

Charles H. Rockwell, comde St. Louis. 

James M. Forsyth, Naval Home, Philadelphia. 

Geo. A. Converse, Bureau Ordnance. 

Royal B. Bradford, comdg Bennington. 

George R. Durand, comdg Alert. 

Francis M. Barber, comdg Monocacy. 

Timothy A. Lyons, comdg Monongafiela. 

John S. Newell, naval inspector electric light- 
ing. 

Joseph E. Craig, Naval Academy. 

Charles M. Thomas, Bureau Navigation. 

Albert S. Snow, leave. 

George C. Reiter, comdg Thetis. 

R. D. Hitchcock, leave. 

Willard H. Brownson. comdg Dolphin. 

Henry E. Nichols, waiting orders. 

William W. Mead, comdg Essex. 

Edwin S. Houston, comdg Dale. 

Edwin Longnecker, comdg Rcfnger. 

George E. Ide, member Board Inspection, 
New York. 

George M. Book, Navy Yard, New York. 

Thomas Perry, lighthouse inspector, San 
Francisco. 

Charles H. Stockton, special duty. 

Louis Kingsley. Navy Yard, Boston. 

John J. Brice, lighthouse inspector. 

Oscar W. Farenholt. lighthouse inspector. 

William B. Newman, lighthouse inspector. 

Andrew J. Iverson, waiting orders. 

Edward T. Strong, leave of absence. 

Robert E. Impey, leave of absence. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS, $3,000. 
Z. L. Tanner, comdg Fish Commission 

steamer Albatross. 
Samuel Belden. comdg Yantic. 
E. W. Watson, U. S. steamer Richmond. 
John F. Merry. Nau. School-ship Enterprise. 
William W. Rhoades, Naval Station, Port 

Royal. 
John C. Morong, member Board Inspection, 

San Francisco. 

William H. Webb, U. S. steamer Atlanta. 
William C. Gibson, comdg Fern. 
W. A. Morgan, Navy Yard, Pensacola. 
Washburn Maynard. comdg Pinta. 
Henry W. Lyon, Torpedo Station, Newport, 

James H. Dayton, U. S. steamer Vermont. 

Asa Walker, Mianlonomah. 

M R. S. Mackenzie, comdg Petrel. 

Charles S. Sperry. Chicago. 

Frank Courtis. Steel Board, Navy Dept. 

William W. Reisinger, U. S. steamer Dale. 

John C. Rich, waiting orders. 

Wm. T. Burwell, Navy Yard, Norfolk. 

John J. Hunker, comdg Palos. 

Franklin Hanford, Navy Yard, New York. 

Frederick W. Crocker, Navy Yard, Boston. 



Robert M. Berry, lighthouse inspector. 

Samuel W. Very, Mohican. 

Henry N. Manney, Naval Home, Philadelphia. 

Chapman C. Todd. Minnesota. 

Joseph N. Hemphill, Board Inspection and 
Survey. 

Abraham B. H. Lillie, U. S. S. Baltimore. 

William T. Swinburne, Boston. 
j William H. Emory. U. S. Legation, London. 
I Charles T. Hutchins. Bureau of Equipment. 

Seth M. Ackley. Coast-Survey Office. 

William W. Gillpatrick, Naval Academy. 

Benjamin S. Richards, Navy Yard, New York. 

Benjamin F. Tilley. San Fi'itncisco. 

Harry Knox, Naval Academy. 

Clifford H. West, asst. lighthouse inspector. 

John P. Merrell, Naval Academy. 

Joseph G. Eaton, Monongahtla. 

William I. Moore. Coast-Survey. 

Charles Belknap, Torpedo Station. 

F. P. Gilmore, waiting orders. 

Eugene H. C. Leutze. Navy Yard, Washington. 

Uriel Sebree, asst. lighthouse inspector. 

Albert R. Couden, Bureau Ordnance. 

Edwin C. Pendleton, ordnance duty, Navy 
Yard, Washington. 

W. Swift, leave of absence. 

H. B. Mansfield, Navy Yard, New York. 

Robert E. Carmody, Navy Yard, Washington. 

E. D. F. Heald, Bureau of Navigation. 
F". M. Symonds. Michigan. 

Edward P. Wood, Concord. 

Walter Goodwin. U. S. S. Lancaster. 

Albert Ross, leave of absence. 

R. Clover, hydrographer Bureau Navigation. 

J. M. Miller. U. S. S. Monocacy.. 

F. M. Wise, Library War Records. 
John B. B. Bleecker, Essex. 
Andrew Dunlap, Bennington. 

R. Rush, leave of absence. 
Edward H. Gheen. leave of absence. 
W. L. Field. Charleston. 

Medical Corps. 

MEDICAL DIRECTORS. $4.400. 

(With relative rank of captain.) 

J. M. Browne, chief Bureau Medicine and 

Surgery. 

William T. Hord, president Board of Exam- 
iners. 

Albert L. Gihon. Navy Yard. New York. 
Richard C. Dean, member Examining Board. 
Albert C.Gorgas.Naval Hospital. Philadelphia. 
D. Bloodgood. Naval Laboratory. New York. 

D. Kindleberger. special duty. Philadelphia. 
Chris. J. Cleborne, Naval Hospital, Chelsea, 

Mass. . 
M. Bradley, member Medical Examining 

Board. 

Philip S.Wales.Museum Hygiene.Washington. 
Newton L. Bates, waiting orders. 

E. S. Bogert, Naval Hospital, New York. 
Walter K. Sconeld, leave of absence. 
Grove S. Beardsley, Navy Yard. Washington. 

D. C. 

Henry M. Wells, Naval Hospital, Washing- 
ton. D. C. 

MEDICAL INSPECTORS. $4,400. 
(With relative rank of commander.) 
John H. Clark, waiting orders. 

A. A. Hoehling, member Examining Board. 
New York. 

W. K. Van Reypen, U. S. Str. San Francisco. 
Thomas C. Walton. Naval Academy. 
Charles H. White, leave. 

B. H. Kidder. Naval Station, Port Royal. 
George W. Woods, Naval Hospital. Mare 

Island. 

F. L. DuBois, Philadelphia. 

George H. Cooke. U. S. Str. Baltimore. 
Thomas N. Penrose, Naval Hospital. Norfolk. 
George R. Brush, Navy Yard. New York. 



THE NAVY. 



103 



D. McMutrie, Lancaster. 
Edward Kershner. leave. 
J. Kufus Tryon, Chicago. 
W. H. Jones, Navy Yard, League Island. 

Pay Corps. 

PAY DIRECTORS, $4,400. 
(With relative rank of captain.) 

James Fulton, Naval Academy. 

C. Schenck, general storekeeper, Naval Acad- 
emy. 

Chas. H. Eldredge, Xavy Pay Office, Norfolk. 

Wm. W. Williams, waiting orders. 

Edward May. Pay office, Boston. 

H. M. Denniston, Navy Pay Office, Philadel- 
phia. 

Ambrose J. Clark, Navy Pay Office, New York. 

George Cochran, leave. 

J. A. Smith, general storekeeper, Washington. 

R. Washington, general inspector, Pay Corps. 

R. Parka, general storekeeper, League Island. 

Frank C. Cosby, special duty. 

Edwin Stewart, chief Bureau Supplies and 
Accounts. 

PAY INSPECTORS. $4,400. 
(With relative rank of commander.) 

John H. Stevenson, Settling Accounts. 

Thomas T. Caswell, Naval Pay Office, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Ambrose J. Clark, Navy Pay Office, New York. 

George Cochran. leave. 

Joseph A. Smith, general storekeeper, Wash- 
ington. 

Luther G. Billings, Washington, D. C. 

Arthur J. Pritchard, Pay Office, Baltimore, 
Aid. 

Albert S. Kenny, storekeeper, Navy Yard, 
New York. 

James E. Tolfree, Minnesota. 

G. A. Lyon, Navy Pay Office, San Francisco. 

Edward Bellows, Walpole, N. H. 

Geo. W. Beaman, Navy Yard. Mare Island. 

Arthur Burtis, Navy Yard. New York, 

Edwin Putnam. Navy Yard, Boston. 

W. Goldsborough, fleet paymaster, Pacific 
Station. 

Engineer Corps. 
CHIEF ENGINEERS, $4,400. 

Alexander Henderson, Navy Yard, Boston. 

Edward D. Robie, special duty. 

John W. Moore, Navy Yard, Mare Island. 

Thos. Williamson, supt. State, War and Navy 
Department Building. 

Charles H. Baker, Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va. 

G. F. Kutz. Union Iron Works, San Francisco. 

Andrew J. Kiersted, special duty, Philadel- 
phia. 

William W. Dungan, Navy Yard, New York. 

Jacjison McElmell, pres. Board of Examiners, 
Philadelphia. 

Jas. W. Thomson, Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia. 

B. B. H. Wharton, Lancaster. 

Philip Inch, leave of absence. 

William G. Buehler, member Board Inspec- 
tion and Survey. 

Samuel L. P. Ayres, Navy Yard, New York. 

Elijah Laws, Brooklyn Steam-Engine Works. 

Edward Farmer, Navy Yard. Portsmouth. 

Henry W Fitch. Naval Academy. 

Louis J. Allen. Chicago. 

David Smith, member Steel Inspection Board. 

G. W. Melville, chief Bureau Steam Engineer- 
ing. 



Fletcher A. Wilson, San Francisco. 

Albert S. Greene, U. S. S. Charleston. 

Robert Potts. Baltimore. 

Joseph Trilley, San Francisco, Cal. 

Ezra J. Whi taker, Philadelphia. 

Peter A. Rearick, special duty, Richmond, Va. 

Augustus H. Able, rework. 

William S. Smith, Marion. 

George W. Magee, Miantonomoh. 

Frederick G. McKean, Boston. 

Isaac R. McNary, Navy Yard, New York. 

Alfred Adamson, waiting orders. 

George J. Burnap, Navy Yard, Mare Island. 

Cipriano Andrade,Cramp & Sons.Philadelphia. 

G. M. L. Maccarty, special duty. Thurlow, Pa. 

Henry D. McEwan, member Board of Exam- 
iners, Philadelphia. 

Albert W. Morley. Quintard Iron Works. 

Robert B. Hine, sick leave. 

John Lowe, Cramp & Sons. Philadelphia. 

Lewis W. Robinson, World's Exposition, Chi- 
cago. 

Wm. H. Harris. Wabash. 

John A. Scot, Concord. 

John L. D. Borthwick, Michigan. 

Charles J. MacConnell, Richmond. 

George W. Stivers, Navy Yard, New York. 

W. W. Heaton, City Point Works, Boston. 

B. C. Gowing, under suspension. 
Absalom Kirby, Navy Yard, Washington 
George E. Tower, Kearsargr. 

Jas. Entwhistle, Bath Iron Works, Bath, Me. 
N. P. Towne, Bureau Steam Engineering. 
Hugh H. Cline, Atlanta. 
R. Aston, Bennington. 
Jas. H. Chasmar, special duty, New York. 
E. A. Magee. Navy Yard, New York. 
W. A. Windsor, special duty, Dubuque. Iowa. 
G. W. Roche, Columbia Iron Works, Balti- 
more, Md. 
H. S. Ross, Essex. 

C. R. Roelker, special duty. 
John D. Ford, Alert. 

John L. Hannum, U. S. S. Vermont. 

A. C. Engard, U. S. S. Mohican. 

J. H. B. Smith, Columbia Iron Works. 

Marine Corps. 

COLONEL COMMANDANT, $3,500. 
Col. Charles Heywood. 

GENERAL STAFF. 
Augustus S. Nicholson, major ad jutant and 

inspector, Washington, D. C. 
Green Clay Goodloe, major and paymaster, 

headquarters Washington. D. C. 
Horatio B. Lowry. major and quartermaster, 

headquarters Washington. D C. 
Richard S. Collum, captain and assistant 
quartermaster, headquarters M. C. Philadel- 
phia. 

Capt. Frank L. Denny, assistant quartermas- 
ter, Washington, D. C. 

COLONEL, $3,500. 
J. Forney, Marine Bks.Navy Yard. Mare Id.,(ftl. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONELS, $3,000. 
McLane Tilton, Marine Bks, Navy Yard, Nor- 
folk. Va. 
John H. Higbee, Marine Bks,Portsmouth,N. H. 

MAJORS, $2,500. 
R. W. Huntington, waiting orders. 
Henry A. Bartlett. Mare Island. Cal. 
Percival C. Pope, Boston, Mass. 



REAR-ADMIRALS, $4,500. 
Thomas O. Self ridge, Washington, D.C. 
Samuel Phillips Lee, Silver Springs, Sligo, Md. 
Melancton Smith, South Oyster Bay, N. Y. 
Joseph F. Green, Brookline, Mass. 
Thornton A. Jenkins, Washington, D. C. 



RETIRED LIST. 



Augustus L. Case, Washington, D. C. 
John J. Almy, Washington, D. C. 
Roger N.Stembel, Washington, D. C. 
George B. Balch, Baltimore, Md. 
Thomas H. Stevens, Washington. D. C. 
Aaron K. Hughes, Washington, D. C. 



104 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



Edmond R. Colhoun, Washington, D. C. 
Robert W. Shufeldt, Washington. 
Alexander C. Rhind, New York. 
Daniel L. Braine, New York, 
rhomas S. Phelps, Washington, D. C. 
2arl English, Culpepper, Va. 
Francis A. Roe, Washington, D. C. 
amuel R. Franklin, Washington, D. C. 
Walter W. Queen, Washington, D. C. 
John L. Worden, Washington, D. C. 
lenry Walke, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Daniel Amraen, Beltsville, Md. 
lohn M. B. Clitz, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

D. McN. Fairfax, Hagerstown, Md. 
John C. Febiger. Easton, Md. 

eirce Crosby, Washington, D. C. 
iVm. G. Temple, Washington, D. C. 
Fohn H. Upshur, Washington, D. C. 
Edward Y. McCauley, Philadelphia, Pa. 
John H. Russell, Washington, D, C. 
3. P. Luce, Newport, R. I. 
Jas. E. Jouett, Washington, D. C. 
Li. A. Kimberly, West Newton. Mass. 

COMMODORES, $3,750. 
Lewis C. Sartori, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Albert G. Clary, leave of absence. 
Wm. E. Hopkins, Fresno City, Cal. 
Oscar C. Badger, Washington, D. C. 
Wm. D. Whiting, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Somerville Nicholson, Washington, D. C. 
William K. Mayo, Washington, D. C. 
Samuel Lockwood, Flushing, N. Y. 
Henry Bruce, Boston, Mass. 
William P. McCann, Washington, D. C. 

CAPTAINS, $3,375. 
Milton Haxtun, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
S. Livingston Breese, Washington, D. C. 
Henry Wilson, New York. 
Francis S. Haggerty, New York city. 
Thomas G. Corbin, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Mathias C. Marin, Newport, R. I. 
Edward C. Bowers, Waterf ord, Conn. 
Francis Lowry, Burlington, Vt. 

COMMANDERS, $2,625. 
W. M Gamble, Morristown. N. J. 
Thos. L. Swann, sick leave. 
H. DeH Manley, Media, Pa. 
George M. Bache, Washington, D. C 
Smith W. Nichols, Dorchester, Mass. 
Edward Hooker, Brooklyn, N. Y, 
Greenleaf Cilley, leave of absence. 
Bayse N.Wescott, Philadelphia. Pa. 
C. A. Schetky, Haddonfleld, N. J. 
Geo. T. Davis, Asheville, N. C. 

LIEUTENANT-COMMANDERS, $2,250. 
Antotne R. McNalr, Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 
Charles E. McKay, New York. 
Henry C. Tallman, leave, New York. 
Francis O. Davenport, Detroit, Mich. 
Frederick I. Naile, Norristown, Pa. 
Gouverneur K. Haswell, Short Hills, N. J. 
Edward M. Stedman, Colorado Springs, Col. 
^crates Hubbard, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Leonard Chenery, New York. 

E. L. Amory, Boston, Mass. 
E. B. Thomas, Asheville. N. C. 
Isaac Hazlitt. Morristown, O. 
Frederick A. Miller, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Wm. P. Randall, New Bedford, Mass. 
Charles H. Craven, Washington, D. C. 

LIST OF NAVAL STATIONS, 
North Atlantic Station. 

PHILADELPHIA (1st rate). Capt., A. S. Bar- 
ker; Lt.-Comdr., L. C. Logan; Lieuts., J. C. 
Fremont, H. H. Hosley, P. V. Lansdale, J. B. 
Briggs, A. A. Ackerman; Ensiyns., P. Will- 
iams, H. J. Ziegemeur, M. L. Miller, L. A. 
Bostwick, M. E. Reed, Irving Blount, W. N. 
McKelvy, R. J. Hartung, D. W. Blamer, L. G. 
Smith, L. H. Gross; Med. Insp., F. L. DuBois; 



Charles E. Hawley, leave, Europe. 
Francis H. Sheppard. St. Andrews, Fla. 
George F. Morrison.Washington. D. C. 
Charles W. Tracy, Portsmouth, N. H. 
David C. Woodrow, Cincinnati, O. 
Wesley W. Bassett, Washington, D. C. 

MEDICAL DIRECTORS, $3,300. 
Wm. S. W. Ruschenberger, Philadelphia, Pa. 
David Harlan, Churchville, Md. 
William Grier, Washington, D. C. 
Samuel Jackson, Washington, D. C. 
Thomas J. Turner, Coldwater. Mich. 
John Y. Taylor, Washington, D. C. 
Philip Lansdale, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Phineas J. Horwitz, Philadelphia, Pa. 
F. M. Gunnell, Washington, D. C. 
Samuel F. Coues, Cambridge, Mass. 
Edward Shippen, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Jacob S. Dungan, San Francisco, Cal. 
George Peck, Elizabeth, N. J. 

MEDICAL INSPECTORS, $3.300. 
Thomas Walter Leach. New Market, N. H. 
William E. Taylor, Vallejo, Cal. 
John C. Spear, Norristown, Pa. 
Henry C. Nelson, Westminster, Md. 
Somerset Robinson, Paso Robles, Cal. 
Archibald C. Rhoades, New York. 
A. S.Oberly, Avon, Conn. 

PAY DIRECTORS, $3,300. 
Horatio Bridge, Washington, D. C. 
James H.Watmough, Washington, D. C. 
Thomas H. Looker, Washington, D. C. 
Chas. W. Abbot, Warren, R. I. 
J. S. Cunningham, leave. 
Alexander W. Russell, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Augustus H. Gilman, Portland, Me. 

C. P. Wallach, Norfolk. Va. 

PAY INSPECTORS, $3,300. 
Francis H. Swan, Brookline, Mass. 
Charles F. Guild, Jamaica Plains, Mass. 

CHIEF ENGINEERS. $3,300. 
Benj. F. Isherwood, New York City. 
William H. Shock,Washington, D. C. 
Theodore Zeller, New York City. 
Geo. Sewell, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jas. W. King, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Henry H. Stewart, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Edwin Fithian, leave of absence. 
Wm. S. Stamm, Philadelphia, Pa. 
F. C. Dade, Philadelphia, Pa. 

D. B. Macomb, Boston, Mass. 
S.' D. Hibbert, Wallingford, Pa. 

Wm. H. Rutherford, Washington, D. C. 
Henry Mason, Plymouth, Conn. 
John Johnson, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Edward B. Latch, Overbrook, Pa. 
George W. Sensner, Washington, D. C. 
Geo. R. Johnson, Washington, D, C. 
Chas. H. Loring, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Marine Corps. 
COLONEL, $2,625. 
Matthew R. Kintzing, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONELS. 
John L. Broome, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Geo. W. Collier, Greencastle, Pa. 

MAJOR, $1,875. 
William B. Slack, Trenton, N. J. 

VESSELS AND OFFICERS. 

Asst. Surg., R. Boyd; Pay Insp., L. G. Bill- 
ings; Chief Eng., E. J. Whitaker; Paym., 
G. E. Hendee; P. A. Engs., W. N. Little, 
R. G. Denig; Chaplain, C. H. Parks. 
KEARSARGE-Cbmdr, A. S. Crowninshield : 
Lieuts., J. E. Roller, Charles T. Forse, B. T 
Walling, William Wender; Ensigns, S. R 
Hurlbut, F. B. Sullivan. J. L. Latimer; P. A. 
Surg., A. G. Cabell; Asst. Surg., A. R. Alfred; 



THE NAVY. 



105 



Paym., J. E. Cann; Chief Eng., George E. 
Tower; Asst. Eng., W. P. Winchell; Lieut. 
Mar., C. L. A. Ingate. 

CONCORD Comdr., Edwin White: Lieut.- 
Comdr., E. P. Wood; Lieuts., V. L. Cottman, 
A. W. Grant, G. P. Colvocoresses; Ensigns, 
J. Straus, W. A. Edgar. Marbury Johnston, 
L. H. Chandler, W. H. McGrann; Surg. R. C. 
Persons; Paym., 3. A. Ring; Chief Eng., 
John A. Scott; P. A. Eng., E. R. Freeman; 
Asst. Eng., H. P.Norton. 

South Atlantic Station. 

ESSEX-Cwmir., W. W. Mead; Lieut. -Comdr., 
J. V. B. Bleecker; lAeuts., C. K. Curtis, G. F. 
W. Holman, F. A. Wilner, J. T. Newton; 
Ensigns, W. R. M. Field, W. O. Hulme, C. 
M. Stone; P. A. Surg., Oliver Diehl; Paym., 
W. W. Barry; Chief Eng., H. S. Ross; Asst. 
Eng., O. W. Koester; Lieut. Mar., H. C. 
Haines. 

YANTIC-Cwndr., ; Lieut-Comdr., S. 

Belden; Lieuts., R. Mitchell. A. Mertz, W. 
McLean; Ensigns, L.A. Kaiser, C.P. Plunket, 
F. H. Brown, G. G. Mitchell; P. A. Surg., 
W. H. Rush; Asst. Paym., H. E. Jewett; P. A. 
Eng., George Cowie. 

Pacific Station. 

SAN FRANCISCO Capt., J. C. Watson; Lieut.- 
Comdr., B. F. Tllley; Lieuts., J. F. Moser, 
A. G. Berry, W. C. Babcock, T. M. Potts, 
L. M. Garrett; Ensigns, H. K. Berham, 
John n. Dayton, J. B. Chase; Med. Insp., 
W. K.Van Reypen; P. A. Surg., J. M. Edgar; 
Asst. Surg., James Stoughton; Pay Insp., W. 
Goldoborough; Chief Eng., F. A. Wilson; P. 
A. Engs., E. T. Warburton, George Mc- 
Elroy; Asst. Engs., R. B. Higgins, W. W. 
Bush; Copt. Mar., W. S. Muse. 

BOSTON Capt., G. C. Waltse; LieutrComdr., 
W. T. Swinburne; Lieuts., E. K. Moore, L. 
Young, C. Laird, A. Gleaves, W. R. Rush; 
Ensign, L. C. Bertolette; Surg., A. F. Magru- 
der; P. A. Surg., T. C. Craig; Paym., I. 
Goodwin Hobbs; Chief Eng., F. G. McKean; 
P. A. Eng.,G. S. Willits; Asst. Eng., R. E. 
Carney; Lieut. Mar., H.L. Draper. 

CHARLESTON Capt., Henry F Picking; 
Lieut.-Comdr., W. L. Field; lAeuts., N. J. K. 
Patch, J. J. Hunker, E. F. Qualtrough, 
J.H. Glennon, V. 8. Nelson, J. A. Norris; 
Ensigns, F. B. Bassett, J. A. Hoogewerff, 
M. T. Coleman; Surg., J. B. Parker; P. A. 
Surg., A. M. D. McCormick; Paym., C.W. 
Slamm; Chief Eng., A. L. Greene; P. A. Eng., 
F. W. Bartlett; Asst. Engs., H. W. Jones, 
L. McNulton; Lieut. Mar., J. E. Mahoney; 
Chap., Frank Thompson. 

BALTIMORE, \&g-SMp-Kear- Admiral, Ban- 
croft Gherardi; Copt., W R. Bridgman; 
Lieut.-Comdr., A. B. H. Lillie; Lieuts., Henry 
McCrea, R. M. Doyle-G. Blocklinger, J. J. 
Knapp; Ensigns, B. W. Wells, L. R. De- 
Steigner, F. H. Schofield, M. M. Taylor; Med. 
Imp., G. H. Cooke; P A. Surg., Stephen S. 
White; Asst. Surg., M. R. Pigott; Paym., W. 
W.Woodhull; Chief Eng., Robert Potts; P. 
A. Eng., R. T. Hall; Asst. Engs., W. B. Day, 

A. Harbroth; Chap., Joseph P. Mclntyre. 
PINTA Lieut.-Comdr., W. Maynard; Lieuts., 

David Peacock, J. E. Craven; Ensigns, W.W. 
Gilmer, R. E. Coontz; P. A. Surg., L. W. 
Atlee; Asst. Surg., L. H. Stone; Asst. Paym., 
T. S. Jewett; P. A. Eng., G. N. Ransom; 
Lieut. Mar., J. H. Pendleton. 
YORKTOWX-if (?<., C. J. Boush, D. Ken- 
nedy, W. P. Conway, T. E. D. W. Veeder, 

B. A. Fiske; Ensigns, R. H. Jackson, B. F. 
Hutchinson, J. H. Ried; Surg., G. E. H. 
Harmon; P. A. Paym., J. R. Martin; Chief 
Eng., A. B. Bates; Asst. Engs., C. E. Ram- 
mell, C. H. Hayes. 



Asiatic Station. 
LANCASTER. Flag-Ship Rear-Admiral, D. 

B. Harmony; Flag-Lieut., J. R. Self ridge; 

Secy., Lieut. R. H. Minor; Capt., A. H. Mc- 

Cormick: Lieut.-Comdr., W. Goodwin; 

Lieuts., W. E, Sewell, D. Daniels; Ensigns, 

W. Truxton, E. W. Eberle, . . Long; Med. 

Insp.. D. McMurtrie; P. A. Surgs.,TS. W. 

Auzal, I. W. Kite; Paym., L. A. Frailey; 

Chief Eng., B. B. H. Wharton; P. A. Eng., R. 

Inch; rapt. Mar., George F. Elliott. 
MARION-' omdr., C.V. Gridley; Lieuts., A. G. 

Rogers, E. B. Barry, A. McCrackin, H. H. 

Barroll; Ensigns, G. R. Slocum; W. M. 

Crose, W. B. Franklin; Surg., F. B. Stephen- 



MONOCACY-Comdr.. F. M. Barber; Lieut.- 

Comdr., 3. N. Miller; Lieut., John Garvin; 

Ensigns, G. W. Logan, Guy W. Brown, J. P. 

McGuinness. E. T. Pollock; P. A. Surg., P. 

Leach; Astt. Surg., George Rathganger; P. 

A. Paym., A. Peterson; P. A. Eng., 3. P. S. 

Lawrence; Asst. rng., J. L. Wood. 
PALOS Lieut- Comdr., John J. Hunker; 

Ensigns, A. T. Long, G. B. Bradshaw; P. A. 

Surg., J. S. Sayre; P. A. Eng., W. C. Eaton. 
PETREL Lieut.-Comdr , M. R. S. MacKenzie; 

Lieuts., N. T. Houston, J. M. Orchard, F. H. 

Lefavor, J. G. Quinby; Ensigns, H. A. Bisp- 

ham, M. L. Bristol, F. Marble, W. B. Pratt; 

P. A. Surg., O. D. Norton; P. A. Paym., R. 

T. M. Ball; P. A. Eng., 3. R. Edwards. 
ALERT Comdr., George R. Durand: Lieuts., 

R. Wainwright, D. H. Mahan, W. H. Allen, 

James P. Parker; Ensigns, S. M. Strite, 

C. B. Morgan, A. B. Hoff; P. A. Surg., F. W. 

Olcott; P. A. Paym., L. C. Kerr; Chief Eng., 

John D. Ford. 

., J. C.Rich; Lieuts., 



S. P. Comly, R. Henderson, C. C. Marsh, 
M. L. Wood; Ensigns, J. C. Drake, T. Wash- 
ington, F. Boughter, C. Davis, C. T. Vogelge- 
sang; Surg., J. C. Wise; P. A. Paym.,0.. 
Frazer; P. A. Eng., H. M. Stevenson; Asst 
Eng., H. Hall. 

TJ. S. Naval Hospital, Yokohama. 
In Charge, Surg. F. Rogers. 
Passed Asst. Paym., C. M. Ray. 

Squadron of Evolution. 

CHICAGO. Flag-Ship- Rear-Admi ral, J. G 
Walker; Flag-Lieut., S. A. Staunton; Secy., 
E. E. Capehart; Capt., J. F. McGlensey; 
Lieut.-Comdr., C. S. Sperry; Lieuts., A.P 
Nazro, T. G. C. Salter, C. J. Badger, T. S 
Rodgers; Ensigns, G. R. Marvell, T. G 
Dewey, A. L. Morton, Charles B. McVoy 
Med. Insp., J. R. Tryon; P. A. Surg., J. 
Urie; Asst. Surg., J. M. Whitfleld; Paym, 
E. N. Whitehouse; Chief Eng., L. J. Allen.; 
P. A. Engs., A. B. Canaga, F. H. Eldridge; 
Asst. Eng., C. N. Offley; Chap., F. F. Sher- 
man; Capt. Mar.,E. P. Meeker. 

ATLANTA-Ca^., F. J. Higginson; Lieut.- 
Comdr., W. H. Webb; Lieuts.,H. S. Waring, 
J. C. Wilson, W. G. Cutler, H. N. Hodges; 
Ensigns, C. B. Brittain, W. A. Snow, George 
W.Williams; Surg., N. M. Fere 
Surg., A. R. Wentworth; Paym 
Griffing; Chief Eng., H. H. Cline; P. A. Engs. 
C. W. Rae, W. M. Parks; First Lieut. Mar. 
P. St. C Murphy. 

BBNNINGTON-Comar., R. B. Bradford; 
Lieut.-Comdr., Andrew Dunlap; Lieuts., C 
E. Colahan, T B. Howard, F. W. Coffin, 
Harry Phelps; Ensigns, 3. M. Ellicott, F. W. 
Jenkins, S. E. Kittelle, W. J. Terhune; 
Surg., Thomas H. Streets; Paym., L. G 
Boggs; Chief Eng., R. Aston; Asst. Engs. 
B. C. Bryan, H. O. Stickney; Second Lieut 
Mar., 3. A. Lejeune. 



106 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



. . 

ll; Paym., T. S. Thompson; Chief Eng., 
. H. Able; P. A. Engs., R. 1. Reid, Stacy 
otts; Asst. Enff., L. I). Miner; First Lieut. 
ar., S. W. Quackenbush. 



NEWARK Rear- Admiral, A. B. K. Benham; 
Capt., Silas Casey, Lieut. -Cornclr., J. E. Pills- 
bury: L/euts., B. Tappan, J. B. Bernadou, 
W. H. Turner; C. H. Lyman, B. B. Under- 
wood; Flag Lieut., W. Kilburn; Ensigns, 

B. C.Decker, C. A. Bland, W. H. Faust, N. C. 
Twening; Sura., G. A. Bright; P. A. Surg., 
G. McBickerall; Asst. Surg., C. D. W. Brown- 
ell; Paym., T. S. Thompson; Chief Eng 
A. H 

Potts 

Mar., S. W. Quackenbush 

Receiving Ships. 
DALE. At Washington, D. C.Comdr., B. S. 

Houston; Lieut.-Comdr., W. W. Reisinger; 

Lieut. ,B.W. Hodges; Si/ >.</., E.H. Green; P. A. 

Paym., C. W. Littlefleld; Chap.,W. G. Isaacs. 
WABASH. Boston, Mass. Capt., J. O'Kane; 

Lieut., N. J. L. T. Halpine; Surg., G. P. 

Bradley; P. A. Surg., J. W. Baker; Paym., 

.]. MacMahon; chap.,J. S. Wallace. 
VERMONT. New York-CajBt., J. N. Miller; 

Lieut.-Comdr., J. H. Dayton; Lieuts., H. 

Minett, W. P. White, R. O. Bitler; Surg., 

H. J. Babin; P. A. Surg., G. T. Smith; Asst. 

Su gs., Henry LaMotte, C. H. T. Lowndes; 

Paym., J. Furey; Chief Eng., 3. L. Hannum; 

Chap., D. McLaren; Capt. Mar., S. Mercer. 
MINNESOTA (Receiving Ship for Boys). New 

York Capt., E. E. Potter; Lieut.-Comdr., 

C. G. Todd; Lieuts., A. D. Speyers, W. J. 
Lears; Ensign, John L. Percell; Surg., E. Z. 
Derr; Asst. Surgs., George A. Lung, H. D. 
Wilson; Pay Insp., James B. Tolfree; P. A. 
Enq., H. Main; Chap., S. D. Boorom. 

ST. LOUIS. League Island, Pa. Comdr., 
C. H. Rockwell; Lieut., C. S. Richman; P. A. 
Surg., H. N. T. Harris; Asst. Sura., L. W. 
Spratling; Paym., Henry C. Machette; Chap., 

T; A. GUI. 

FRANKLIN. Norfolk, V&.-Capt., R. R. Wal- 

lace; Lieut.-Comdr., G. A. Bicknell; Lieut., 

W. P. Day; P. A. Snrg., E. R. Stitt; Asst. 

Surg., J. S. Hope; P. A. Eng., Henry T. 

Cleaver; Paym., D. A. Smith; Chap., W. F. 

Morrison. 
INDEPENDENCE. Mare Island, Cal.-Capt., 

C. S. Cotton; Lieuts., T. S. Phelps, W. D. 

Rose, C. A. Clark; P. A. Surg., R. Ashbridge; 

Paym., J. B. Redfleld; P. A. Eng., R. T. Hall. 

Training Squadron. 
RICHMOND- Capt., F. M. Bunce; Lieut- 

Cmdr., E. W. Watson; Lieuts., G. A. 

Calhoun, C. A. Foster, A. W. Dodd; Ensigns, 

W. H. Whittlesey, Miles C. Gorgas; Surg., 

C. A. Siegfried ; P. A. turg., W. F. Arnold; 

Asst. Surg., M. W. Barnum; P. A. Paym 

John ~ 

nell 

Chap. 
MONONGAHELA Lieut.- Comdr.. J.G.Eaton, 

Lieuts., York Noel, F. W. Kellogg, C. 

Thomas, W. W. Kimball, A. N. Wood; En- 

signs, E. H. Durell, W. W. Phelps, T. P. 

Magruder, Matt H. Signer, John R. Edle; 

Surg., A. F. Price; Asst. Surg., S. G. Evans; 

Paym., S. R. Colhoun; Chap., F. B. Rose. 
PORTSMOUTH- Comdr., C. D. Sigsbee; 

Lieuts., F. H. Delano, A. C. Dillingham, H. 

Hutchins, H. M. Witzel, C. H. Harlow, H. G. 

Dresel; Ensigns, D. W. Beswick, W. D. Mc- 



n. surg., M. w. Barnum; r. A. *aym., 
in Corwine; Chief Engs., C. J. MacCon- 
1, A. B. Bates; J*. A. Eng., R. T. Hall; 
ip., W. O. Holway; Lieut. Mar., R.Dickins. 



Dougall, G. L. Sermier, Claude Bailey, W. A. 

Moffett; Surg., H. Wells; Asst. Paym., J. Q. 

Lovell. 

Special Service. 
YEWS -Lieut.-Comdr., W. C. Gibson; Asst. 

Surg., F. G. Brathwaite; P. A. Eng., J. P. 

Mickley. 
VESUVIUS-Lieuts., S. Schroeder,G.C.Hanus, 

H. M. Dombaugh; Ensign, J. F. Hubbarrl; 

Asst. Surg., W. C. Braisted; P. A. Eng., W. 

S. Moore. 
MI ANTON OMOH rap*., M. Sicard; Lieut. 

Comdr., Asa Walker; Lieuts., W. B. Caper- 
ton, J. A. Rodgers, C. D. Galloway, F. E. 

Beatty; Ensign, L. S. Van Duzer; ,*ury., 
; As ' 



J. M. Flint 

Payi 

W.I 

W. H. Chambers. 



st. Surg., N. J. Blackwood; 



iym., H. T. B. Harris; Chief Eng., George 
W. Magee; P. A. Eng., F. C. Bieg; Astt.Eng., 



MICHIGAN Comdr., G. E. Wingate; Lieut.- 
Comdr., E. W. Sturdy; Lieuts., G. H. Stafford, 
C. R. Rees, J. N. Helm; Ensign, V O. Chase ; 
Surg., L. B. Baldwin; P. A. Paym., James H. 
Chapman; Chief Eng., J. L. D. Borthwick. 
THETIS-Comdr., G. C. Reiter; Lieuts., J. H. 
Moore. B" E. Sawyer, W. B. Bronaugh, F. H. 
Sherman, F. M. Bostwiok; Ensigns, Stokely 
Morgan, C. F. Hughes, S. S. Robison; Asst. 
Surg., John E. Page; P. A. Eng., William 
Rowbotham. 

Nautical School Ships. 

ST. MARY'S. New York- Corner., J. Mc- 
Gowan. Lieuts., W. J. Barnette.T.M.Brum- 
ley. Lopez; Surg., R. Whiting. 
SARATOGA. Philadelphia, Pa.-Comdr. F. M. 
Green; Lieut.. B. O. Scott; Ensigns, W. S. 
Sims, J. F. Luby; P. A. Surg., J. M. Steele. 

Fish Commission Service. 

ALBATROSS Lt.-Comdr. Z. L. Tanner comdg. 
FISH-HAWK-zew. Robert Black comdg. 

Special Duty. 
Ch'n Lighthouse Board Rear- Admiral J. A. 

Greer. 
Hydrographic Insp.Lt.-Comdr. S. M. Ackley. 

Navy Yards and Stations. 
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H., Capt. C. C. 
Carpenter comdt.; no receiving ship attached. 
Navy Yard, Boston, Mass., Capt. T. O. Self- 
ridge comdt.; receiving ship Wabash, Capt. 
J. O'Kane comdg. Torpedo Station, New- 
port, R. L, Comdr. T. F. Jewell in charge. Naval 
Station, New London, Conn., Com. J. Fyffe, 
Navy Yard, New York, Com. H. Erben; 
receiving ship Vermont, Capt. J. N. Miller 
comdg. Navy Yard, League Island, Pa., Cant. 
W. A. Kirkland comdt.; receiving ship Ht. 
Louis, Comdr. C. H. Rockwell comdg. Navy 
Yard, Washington, D. C., Capt. W. T. Sampson 
comdt.; receiving ship Dale, Comdr. B. T. 
Houston comdg. Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va., 
Com. A. W. Weaver., comdt.; receiving shin 
Franklin, Capt. R. R. Wallace, comdg. Navai 
Station. Port Royal, S. C.. Capt. L. A. Beards- 
lee. Naval Station, Key West, Fla., Comdr. 
3. K. Winn comdg. Naval Station, Pensacola, 
Fla. Capt. A. V. Reed comdg. Navy Yard, 
Mare Island, Cal., Rear-Admiral John Irwin, 
comdt.; receiving ship Independence, Capt. 
C. S. Cotton comdg. 



PUBLIC 

Under the 24th section of the act of March 3, 
91 , six forest reservations have been created 
by presidential proclamation, embracing in 
the aggregate an estimated area of 3.252,2tK) 
acres. These reservations are as follows: 
White River timber land reserve, lying in 
Routt, Rio Blanco, Garfleld, and Eagle coun- 
ties, Colorado, em bracing 1,198,080 acres; Pike's 
Peak timber land reserve, situated in El Paso 
county, Colorado, embracing 184,320 acres; 
Plumb Creek timber land reserve, lying in 



FORESTS, 

Douglas county. Colorado, embracing 177,700 
acres; Pecos River forest reserve, situated in 
Santa Fe, San Miguel. Rio Arriba. and Taos 
counties, North Mexico, embracing 311,040 
acres; Bull Run timber land reserve, lying in 
Multnomah, Wasco, and Clackamas counties, 
Oregon, embracing 142,080 acres, and Yellow- 
stone National Park timber land reserve lying 
on the north and east of the Yellowstone Na- 
tional Park in Wyoming, embracing 1,239,040 
acres. 



RAILWAY MILEAGE OF THE WORLD. 107 


RAILWAY MILEAGE OF THE WORLD FOR 1890. 


COUNTRIES. 


Length 
of Line. 
(Miles.) 


Square 
Miles of 
'1 crritory. 


Length of 
Line uer 
It, Sq. 
Miles of 
Territory. 


Number of 
Inhabitants. 


Length of 
Line per 
10,(XM) 
Inhab- 
itants. 




25,969 

16,467 
19,939 
22.586 
18,728 
8,117 
3.215 
1,887 
1,929 
6,127 
1,280 
1,223 
971 
4,915 
327 

a 

3 


208,672 

261,206 
121.436 
204.155 
2,080,540 
114,372 
11,387 
13,742 
15,942 
198,404 
34,315 
14,784 
125,604 
173.932 
18,760 
49,254 
24,974 

106,034 
425 


12.44 

6.30 
16.42 
11.06 
0.90 
7.10 
28.23 
13.73 
12.10 
3.09 
3.73 
8.27 
0.77 
2.83 
1.74 
3.2! 
1.76 

1.03 
16.00 


48,512,000 

42,087.000 
38.584,000 
38,219,000 
9t),OW.OOO 
30,947,000 
6,094.000 
4,762,000 
2,934,000 
17,545,000 
4,307,000 
2,172.000 
1.978.000 
' 4,774,000 
2,09(5,000 
5.376.000 
2,187,000 

7,641,000 
311,000 


5.35 

3.91 
5.17 
5.91 
1.95 
2.62 
5.28 
3.96 
6.57 
3.49 
2.97 
5.63 
4.91 
10.30 
1.56 
2.94 
2.01 

1.44 

2.19 


Austria and Hungary, including 
Bosnia 
Great Britain and Ireland 
France 




Italv 


Belgium 
Netherlands 


Switzerland 


Spain 








Sweden. 


Servia 


Roumania 


Greece 


Turkey in Europe Bulgaria and 


Malta, Jersey and Man 


Total Europe 
United States 


136,865 

163,597 
13,322 
115 

559 
5,344 


3,777,938 

2970,000 
3,084,410 
42J30 

172,117 
751,349 


3.62 

5.51 
0.43 
0.27 

0.32 
0.71 


356,526,000 

*62,947,714 
4,390,000 
198,000 

2,900,000 
11.601,000 


3.84 

25.90 
30.35 
5.81 

1.93 

4.61 
22.30 
0.58 

!: 

1.16 

0.14 
3.96 
13.47 
4.52 
6.84 
7.09 
3.78 
0.89 
1.66 
0.79 


British America (Canada). 


Newfoundland 
Central America (Guatemala, Sal- 
vador, Costa Rica, Nicaragua and 
Honduras) 
Mexico 


Total North America 
United States of Colombia 


182,937 

231 

1,056 
441 

71 
11 
5,779 
5,129 
149 
470 
1.926 
994 
106 
167 
22 


7,020,606 

464,397 
45,857 
594,208 

17,447 
3,706 
3,218,159 
1,076,708 
97,697 
72,143 
299,536 
405.030 
515,001 
115,646 
85,383 


2.61 

0.05 
2.30 
0.07 

0.41 

0.30 
0.18 
0.48 
0.15 
0.65 
0.64 
0.25 
0.02 
0.14 
0.03 


82,036,714 

4,000,000 
1.522,000 
2,239,000 

610,000 

785,000 
14,602,000 
3.80S.OOO 
330,000 
687.000 
2.715,000 
2.630,000 
1.190,000 
1,005.000 
278,000 


Cuba 


Venezuela 


Republic of Santo Domingo (eastern 
part of the island of Hayti) 
Porto Rico 


Brazil 


Argentine Republic 
Paraguay 




Chile^ 


Peru 


Bolivia 


Ecuador ... . 


British Guiana 


Total South America 


16,552 
15,837 

g 


907 
124 
52 


7,010,918 

1,455,066 
24.743 
214,191 
636,2 '5 
50,836 
147,606 
1,553,534 
23,199 


0.24 

1.09 
0.73 
0.42 

" i!57 
0.61 
0.01 
0.22 


36,401,000 

255,648,000 
2.863.(iOO 
430.000 
8,000,000 
21,998.000 
39,607.000 
381,555,000 
2,017,000 


4.55 

0.62 
0.63 
20.70 
0.01 
0.36 
0.23 


British India. 


Ceylon 


Russia (Transcaspian district) 
Persia 
Dutch (East India) 






Cochin China and Pondichery 
Total Asia 


0.26 


18,798 

1,923 

1.785 
234 
50 


4,105,380 

229,245 
217,357 
18.7W) 
121,822 


0.46 

0.84 

. 0.82 
1.25 
0.04 


712,118,000 

5,317.000 
1,377,000 
481,000 
610,000 


0.26 

3.62 
12.96 
4.86 
0.82 
5.13 

28.78 
20.47 
20.07 
54.23 
50.69 
24.83 
112.95 






Natal. 


South African Republic 
Total Africa 


3,992 

1,905 

2,288 
2,252 
1,757 
2,063 
375 
497 


587,184 

104,220 
87,854 
309,070 
903,163 
668.0.50 
26,364 
975.615 


0.68 
1.83, 

:$ 

0.19 
0.31 
1.42 
0.05 


7.785,000 

662.000 
1.118,000 
1,122,000 
324,000 
407.000 
151,000 
44,000 


New Zealand 




New South Wales 


South Australia 




Tasmania 


Western Australia 
Total Australia 


11,187 


3,074,336 


0.36 


3,828,000 


29.09 


Grand total 


370,281 


25,57.3K2 


1.45 


1,198,694,714 


3.09 


Including Indians not taxed. 



108 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



HOW TO ESCAPE CHOLERA. 



The New York department of health has 
Issued some general directions as to food and 
attention to person believed to be essential in 
a time of cholera epidemic. The recommen- 
dations are as follows: 

Healthy persons "catch" cholera by taking 
into their systems through the mouth, as in 
their food or drink, or from their hands, 
knives, forks, plates, tumblers, clothing, etc.. 
the germs of the disease, which are always 
present in the discharges from the stomach 
and bowels of those sick with cholera. 

Thorough cooking destroys the cholera germs; 
therefore, 

Don't eat raw, uncooked articles of any 
kind, not even milk. 

Don't eat or drink to excess. Use plain, 
wholesome, digestible food, as indigestion 
and diarrhea favor an attack of cholera. 

Don't drink unboiled water. 

Don't eat or drink articles unless they have 
been thoroughly and recently cooked or 
boiled, and the more recent and hotter they 
are the safer. 

Don't employ utensils in eating or drinking 
unless they have been recently put in boiling 
water; the more recent the safer. 

Don't eat or handle food or drink with un- 
washed hands or receive it from the un- 
washed hands of others. 

Don't use the hands for any purpose when 
soiled with cholera discharges; thoroughly 
cleanse them at once. 

Personal cleanliness and cleanliness of the 
living and sleeping rooms and their contents 
and thorough ventilation should be rigidly 



enforced. Foul water-closets, sinks, Croton 
faucets, cellars, etc., should be avoided, and 
when present should be referred to the health 
board at once and be remedied. 

The successful treatment and the preven- 
tion of the spread of this disease demand 
that its earliest manifestations be promptly 
recognized and treated; therefore, 

Don't doctor yourself for bowel complaint, 
but go to bed and send for the nearest phy- 
sician at once. Send for your family phy- 
sician; send to a dispensary or hospital; send 
to the health department or send to the near- 
est police station for medical aid. 

Don't wait, but send at once. If taken ill in 
the street seek the nearest drug store, dispen- 
sary, hospital or police station and demand 
prompt medical attention. 

Don't permit vomit or diarrheal discharges 
to come In contact with food, drink or cloth- 
Ing. These discharges should be received in 
proper vessels and kept covered until removed 
under competent directions. Pour boiling wa- 
ter on them, put a strong solution of carbolic 
acid in them not less than one part of acid to 
twenty of hot soapsuds or water. 

Don't wear, handle or use any articles of 
clothing or furniture that are soiled with 
cholera discharges. Pour boiling water on 
them or put them into it and scrub them with 
the carbolic acid solution mentioned above, 
and promptly request the health board to re- 
move them. 

Don't be frightened, but do be cautious and 
avoid excesses and unnecessary exposures of 
every kind. 



THE NAMES OF COINS. 



The florin, one of the most famous of mod- 
ern coins, originated in Florence. Some say 
that it gave toe name to the city, while others 
assert that it was first so called because it 
had on it a fleur-de-lis, from the Italian flor- 
one or "flower," for the same reason that an 
English silver piece is called a "crown." or 
certain gold pieces in France indifferently a 
"Napoleon" or a "Louis," or the ten-dollar 
gold piece in America an "eagle." 

For several hundred years and down to a 
comparatively recent date money was coined 
at from twenty-five to thirty different cities in 
France that had inherited the privilege. Now 
all French money is coined at the Paris mint. 

Few French gold pieces are, however, in 
circulation, except those bearing the head of 
Napoleon III., and silver pieces of the same 
coinage are almost as common. French sil- 
ver coins wear admirably and pieces of the 
reign of Charles X., Louis XVIII. and Na- 
poleon I. are very common. 

The standard coins on the continent are in 
France, the franc; in Spain, the peseta; in 
Italy, the lira; in Holland and Austria, the 
florin; in Germany, the mark; in Russia, the 
ruble. 

Belgium and Switzerland use 'the French 
name for the piece of twenty sous. Each of 
these pieces is, like the American dollar, 
divided into one hundred parts, called kopeck 
in Russia, pfennig in Germany, kreutzer in 
Austria, cent in Holland, and in Italy, France 
and Spain by the word meaning hundredth. 

The word shilling is of German derivation, 
like penny, which comes from the German 
"pfennig." The word "crown" comes from 
the image placed on the coin. The name 
franc was given by King John, who first 
coined these pieces in 13ttO. 

They bore the motto "Le Roi Frank" (king 
of the Franks) and were of two kinds, one 
representing the king on horseback, the 
other on foot. 



The franc was formerly also called the livre 
(pound), though the connection with any 
special weight is not evident. The name of 
the German coin, mark, meaning a weight of 
eight ounces, was formerly hi general use in 
Europe. 

The name of the Italian coin that corre- 
sponds with the franc (lira) also means pound. 
The coins in present use in Spain have their 
names from other sources. The five-cent 
piece, which corresponds with the American 
dollar, is called escude (shield). 

"Peseta," the name of the small coin repre- 
senting the monetary standard, means simply 
"little piece." "Ruble" is from the word 
meaning "to cut." and was so called because 
originally the coin was made with an orna- 
mental edgs. 

Few persons have ever troubled themselves 
to think of the derivation of the word dollar. 
It is from the German thai (valley) and came 
into use in this way some three hundred years 
ago. There is a little silver mining city or 
district in northern Bohemia called Joachims- 
thai, or Joachim's Valley. 

The reigning duke of the region authorized 
this city in the sixteenth century to coin a sil- 
ver piece which was called "Joachimthaler." 
The word "joachim" was soon dropped and the 
word "thaler" only retained. 

The piece went into general use in Germany 
and Denmark, where the orthography was 
changed to "daler," whence it came into En- 
glish and was adopted by the Americans with 
still further changes in the spelling. The Mex- 
ican dollar is generally called "piastre" in 
France and the name is sometimes applied to 
the United States dollar. 

The appellation is incorrect in either case, 
for the word piaster or piastre has for the last 
fifty years been only applied with correctness 
to a small silver coin used in Turkey and Egypt 
which is worth from 5 to 8 cents. 



FIFTY-SECOND CONGRESS. 



109 



Congress. 

From March 4, 1891, to March 4, 1893. 
Salary of Members, $3,000 and mileage. 

SENATE. 
LEVI P. MORTON, Vice-President, Presiding. | C. F. MANDERSON, Neb., President pro tei 

Republicans, 47; Democrats, 38; ALLIANCE, 3. 
ALABAMA. 

John T. Morgan !Selma 1895 

James L. Pugh Eufaula 1897 

ARKANSAS. 
James H. Berry Bentonville... 



James K. Jones ............ Washington ...... 1897 

CALIFORNIA. 
Charles N. Felton ........ .San Francisco. . . .1893 

Leland Stanford ........... San Francisco. . . .1897 

COLORADO. 
Edward 0. Wolcott ........ Denver ........... 1895 

Henry M. Teller ............ Central City ..... 1897 

CONNECTICUT. 
Joseph R. Hawley .......... Hartford ......... 1893 

Orville H. Platt ............ Meriden .......... 1897 

DELAWARE. 

Anthony Hiffgins ........... Wilmington 

George Gray ............... Newcastle 

FLORIDA. 
Samuel Pasco .............. Monticello 

Wilkinson Call ............ Jacksonville 

GEORGIA. 



1895 
1893 



1893 
1897 



Alfred H. Colquitt ......... Atlanta 

John B.Gordon ............ Atlanta 



1895 
1897 



IDAHO. 

George L. Shoup ............ Salmon City ..... 1 

Fred T. Dubois ............. Blackf oot ......... 1 

ILLINOIS. 



Shelby M. Cullom ........... Springfield 

John M. Palmer ........... Springfield 

INDIANA. 
Daniel S. Turpie ........... Indianapolis. . 

Daniel W. Voorhees ...... Terre Haute 

IOWA. 
James F. Wilson ........... Fairfleld 

William B. Allison ........ Dubuque 

KANSAS. 
Bishop W.Perkins ......... Oswego 



1895 

1897 



. 1893 
1897 



1895 
1897 



1895 



WILLIAM A. PEPPER Topeka 1897 

KENTUCKY. 

John G. Carlisle Covington 1895 

Joseph C. S. Blackburn . . .Versailles 1897 

LOUISIANA. 

Edward D. White New Orleans 1897 

MAINE. 

William P. Frye Lewiston 1895 

Eugene Hale Ellsworth 1893 

MARYLAND. 

Arthur P. Gorman Laurel 1893 

Charles H. Gibson Easton 1897 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

George F. Hoar Worcester 1895 

Henry L. Dawes Pittsfleld 1893 

MICHIGAN. 

James McMillan Detroit 1895 

Francis B, Stockbridge Kalama/oo 1893 



MINNESOTA. 

William D. Washburn Minneapolis 1895 

Cushman K.Davis St. Paul 1893 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Edward C. Walthall Grenada 1895 

James Z. George Carrollton 1893 

MISSOURI. 

Francis M. Cockrell Warrensburg. . . .1893 

George G. Vest. Kansas City 1897 

MONTANA. 

William F. Sanders Helena 1893 

Thomas C. Power Helena 1895 

NEBRASKA. 

Charles F. Manderson. . . .Omaha 1F95 

Algernon S. Paddock Beatrice 1893 

NEVADA. 

William M. Stewart Carson City 1893 

John P. Jones Gold Hill 1897 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

William E. Chandler Concord 1895 

Jacob H. Gallingcr Concord 1897 

NEW JERSEY. 

John R. McPherson Jersey City 

Rufus Blodgett Long Branch 

NEW YORK. 

Frank Hiscock Syracuse 

David B. Hill Elmira 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Matt W. Ransom Weldon 1895 

Zebulon B. Vance Charlotte 1897 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Lyman R. Casey Jamestown 1893 

Henry C. Hansbrough Devil's Lake 1897 

OHIO. 

John Sherman Mansfield 1893 

Calvin S. Brice Lima 1897 

OREGON. 



Joseph Dolph Portland 

John H. Mitchell Portland 



.is 1 .*? 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Matthew S. Quay Beaver 1893 

James D. Cameron Harrisburg 1897 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Nathan F. Dixon Westerly 1895 

Nelson W. Aldrich Providence 1893 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

MATTHEW C. BUTLER.... Edgefleld 1895 

John L. M. Irby Laurens 1897 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

....1895 
....1897 
TENNESSEE. 

Isham G. Harris Memphis 1895 

William B. Bate Nashville 1893 

TEXAS. 

Richard Coke Waco 1895 

Roger Q. Mills Corslcana 1893 



Richard F. Pettigrew Sioux Falls 

JAMESH. KYLE Aberdeen 



110 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



VERMONT. 

Redfleld Proctor Proctor 1893 

Justin 8. Morrill Strafford 1897 

VIRGINIA. 

Eppa Hunton Warrenton 1895 

John W. Daniel Lynchburg 1893 

WASHINGTON. 

John B. Allen Walla Walla 1893 

'Watson C. Squire Seattle 1897 



WEST VIRGINIA. 
John E. Kenna ............ Charleston ....... 1895 

Charles J. Faulkner ...... Martinsburg ...... 1893 

WISCONSIN. 
Philetus Sawyer ........... Oshkosh .......... 1893 



William F. Vilas ........... Madison .......... 1897 

WYOMING. 
Joseph M. Carey ............ Cheyenne ........ 1895 

Francis E. Warren ........ Cheyenne ........ 1893 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
CHARLES F. CRISP, Georgia, Speaker. 

Republicans, 88; Democrats, 234; FARMERS' ALLIANCE, 8; vacant, 2; whole number, 332. 
Those marked * served in the List House. Those marked t served in a previous House. 
Those marked $ were unseated by the List House. 



ALABAMA. 

1. Richard H. Clarke* Mobile. 

2. Hilary A. Herbert* Montgomery. 

3. William C. Oates* Abbeville. 

4. Louis W. TurpinJ Newbern. 

5. James E. Cobb* Tuskegee. 

fi. John H. Bankhead* Fayette C. H. 

7. William H. Forney* Jacksonville. , 

8. Joseph Wheeler* Wheeler. 

ARKANSAS. 

1. William H. CateJ Jonesboro. 

2. Clifton R. Breckinridget..Pine Bluff. 

3. Thomas C. McRae* Prescott. 

4. William L. Terry Pulaski. 

5. Samuel W. Peel* Bentonville. 

CALIFORNIA. 

1. Thomas J. Geary Santa Rosa. 

2. A. Caminetti Jackson. 

3. S. G.hiLborn Oakland. 

4. John T. (Jutting San Francisco. 

5. Eugene F. Loud San Francisco. 

6. William W. Bowers San Diego. 

COLORADO. 

Hosea Townsend* Silver Cliff. 

CONNECTICUT. 

1. Lewis Sperry Hartford. 

2. Washington F. Willcox*. .Chester. 

3. Charies A. Russell* Killingly. 

4. Robert E. De Forest Bridgeport. 

DELAWARE. 

John W.Casey Milford. 

FLORIDA. 



Pensacola. 



1. Stephen R. Mallory Pensa 

2. Robert Bullock* Ocala. 

GEORGIA. 

1. Rufus E. Lester* Savannah. 

2. Henry G. Turner* Quitman. 

3. Charles F. Crisp* Americus. 

4. Charles L. Moses Turin. 

5. Leoriidas F. Livingston... Atlanta. 

6. James H. Blount* Macon. 

7. R. William Everett Fish. 

8. Thomas G. Lawson Eatonton. 

9. Thomas E. Winn Laurenceville. 

10. Thomas E. Watson Thomson. 

IDAHO. 

Willis Sweet* Moscow. 

ILLINOIS. 

1. Abner Taylor* Chicago. 

2. Lawrence E. McGann Chicago. 

3. Allan C. Durborow. Jr Chicago. 

4. Walter C. Newberry Chicago. 

5. Albert J. Hopkins* Aurora. 

6. Robert R. Hitt* Mount Morris. 

7. Thomas J. Henderson* Princeton. 

8. Lewis Steward Piano. 

9. Henry W. Snow Sheldon. 

10. PkiltpS. Post* Galesburg. 

11. Benjamin T. Cable Rock Island. 



12. Scott Wike* Pittsfleld. 

13. William M. Springer*. . ..Springfield. 

14. Owen Scott Bloomington. 

15. Samuel T. Busey Urbana. 

16. George W. Fithian* Newton. 

17. Edward Lane* Hillsboro. 

18. William S. Forman* Nashville. 

19. James R. Williams* Carmi. 

20. George W. Smith* Murphy sboro. 

INDIANA. 

1. William F. Parrett* Evansville. 

2. John L. Bretz Jasper. 

3. Jason B. Brown* Seymour. 

4. William S. Holman* Aurora. 

5. George W. Cooper* Columbus. 

6. Henry U. Johnson Richmond. 

7. William D. Bynum* Indianapolis. 

8. Elijah V. Brookshire* Crawfordsville. 

9. Daniel Waugh Tipton. 

10. David H. Patton Remington. 

11. Augustus N.Martin* Bluffton. 

12. Charles A. O. McClellan*.Auburn. 

13. Benjamin F. Shively* South Bend. 

IOWA. 

1. John J. Seerley Burlington. 

2. Walter I. Hayes* Clinton. 

3. David B. Henderson* Dubuque. 

4. Walt H. Butler West Union. 

5. John T. Hamilton Cedar Rapids. 

6. Fred E. White Webster. 

I.John A. T.Hull Des Moines. 

8. James P. Flick* Bedford . 

9. Thomas Bowman Council Bluffs. 

10. Jonathan P. Dolliver* Fort Dodge. 

11. George D. Perkins .Sioux City. 

KANSAS. 

1. Case Broderick Holton. 

2. Edward H. Funston* lola. 

3. BENJAMIN H. CLOVER. ..Cambridge. 

4. JOHN G.OTIS Topeka. 

5. JOHN M.DAVIS Junction City. 

6. WILLIAM BAKER Lincoln. 

7. JEREMIAH SIMPSON Medicine Lodge. 

KENTUCKY. 

1. William J. Stone* Kuttawa. 

2. William T. Ellis* Owensboro. 

3. Isaac H. Goodnight* Franklin. 

4. Alex. B. Montgomery* Elizabethtown. 

5. Asher G. Caruth* Louisville. 

6. Worth W. Dickerson* Williamstown. 

7. Wm. C. P. Breckinridge*. Lexington. 

8. James B. McCreary* Richmond. 

9. Thomas H. Paynter* Greenup. 

10. John W. Kendall Prestonburg. 

11. John H. Wilson* BarboursviTle. 

LOUISIANA. 

1. Adolph Meyer New Orleans. 

2. Matthew D. Laganf New Orleans. 

3. Andrew Price* Thibodeaux. 

4. Newton C. Blanchard* Shreveport. 

5. Charles J. Boatner* Monroe. 

6. Samuel M.Robertson* Baton Rouge. 



FIFTY-SECOND CONGRESS. 



Ill 



MAINE. 

1. Thomas B. Reed..* Portland. 

2. Nelson Dingley, Jr.* Lewiston. 

3. Seth L. Milliken* .Belfast. 

4. Charles A. Boutelle* Bangor. 

MARYLAND. 

1. John B. Brown Centreville. 

2. Herman Stump* Bel Air. 

3. Harry W. Rusk* Baltimore. 

4. Isidor Raynerf Baltimore. 

5. Barnes ComptontJ Laurel. 

6. William M. McKaig Cumberland. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. Charles S. Randall* New Bedford. 

2. Elijah A. Morse* Canton. 

3. John F.Andrew* Boston. 

4. Joseph H. O'Neil* Boston. 

5. Sherman Hoar Waltham. 

6. Henry < abot Lodge* Nahant. 

7. William Cogswell* Salem. 

8. Moses T. Stevens North Andover. 

9. George Fred Williams.. . .Dedham. . 

10. Joseph H. Walker* Worcester. 

11. Frederic S. Coolidge Ashburnham. 

12. John C. Crosby Pittsfleld. 

MICHIGAN. 

1. J. Logan Chipman* Detroit. 

2. James S. Gorman... Chelsea. 

3 James O'Donnell* Jackson. 

4. Julius C. Burrows* Kalamazoo. 

5. Charles E. Belknap* Grand Rapids. 

6. Byron G. Stout Pontiac. 

7. Justin R. Whiting* St. Clair. 

8. Henry M. Youmans Saginaw. 

9. Harrison H. Wheeler Ludington. 

10. Thomas A. E. Weadock..Bay City. 

11. Samuel M. Stephenson* Menominee. 

MINNESOTA. 

1. William H. Harries Caledonia. 

2. John Lind* New Ulm. 

3. Orrin M. Hall Red Wing. 

4. James N. Castle Stillwater. 

5. KITTEL HALVORSEN North Fork. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1. John M. Allen* Tupelo. 

2. JohnC. Kyle Sardis. 

3. Thomas C. Catchings*....Vicksburg. 

4. Clarke Lewis* Macon. 

5. Joseph H. Beeman Eley. 

6. Thomas R. Stockdale* Summit. 

7. Charles E. Hooker* Jackson. 

MISSOURI. 

1. William H. Hatch* Hannibal. 

2. Charles H. Mansur* Chillicothe. 

3. Alexander M. Dockery*. .Gallatin. 

4. Robert P. C. Wilson* Platte City. 

5. John C. Tarsney* Kansas City. 

6. John T. Heard* Sedalia. 

7. Richard H. Norton* Troy. 

8. John J. O'Neillt St. Louis. 

9. Seth W. Cobb St. Louis. 

10. Samuel Byrns Potosi. 

11. Richard P. Bland* Lebanon. 

12. David A. De Armond Butler. 

13. Richard W Fyanf Marshfleld. 

14. Marshall Arnold Benton. 

MONTANA. 

William W. Dixon Butte City. 

NEBRASKA. 

1. William J. Bryan Lincoln. 

2. WM. A. MCKEIGHAX Red Cloud. 

3. O. M. KKM Broken Bow 

XKVADA. 

Horace F. Bartine* Carson City. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1. Luther F. McKinneyt Manchester. 

2. Warren F. Daniell Franklin. 



NEW JERSEY. 

1. Christopher A. Bergen* Camden. 

2. James Buchanan* Trenton. 

3. Jacob A. Geissenhainer*. Freehold. 

4. Samuel Fowler* Newton. 

5. Cornelius A.Cadmus Paterson. 

6. Thomas Dunn English Newark. 

7. Vacant. 

NEW YORK. 

1. James W. Covert* Long Island City. 

2. Vacant. 

3. William J. Coombs Brooklyn. 

4. John M. Clancy* Brooklyn. 

5. Thomas F. Magner* Brooklyn . 

6. John R. Fellows New York city. 

7. Edward J. Dunphy* New York city. 

r. Campbellf.. -New York city. 
9. Amos J. Cummings* New York city. 



8. Timothy J. Campbellf. 
J. Cummings* 
10. W. Bourke Cocsranl 

DeWitt Warner 



11. J. I 

12. Jos 



.New York city 
.New York city, 
ph J. Littfe New York citv 

13. Ashbel P. Fitch* New York city. 

14. William G. Stahlnecker*.Yonkers. 

15. Henry Baconf Goshen. 

16. John H. Ketcham* Dover Plains. 

17. Isaac N. Cox Ellenville. 

18. John A. Quackenbush* Stillwater. 

19. Charles Tracey* Albany. 

20. John Sanford* Amsterdam . 

21 . John M. Wever Plattsburg. 

22. N. M. Curtis Ogdensburg. 

23. Henry W. Bentley Booneville. 

24. George Van Horn Cooperstown. 

25. James J. Belden* Syracuse. 

26. George W. Ray\ Norwich. 

27. Sereno E. Payne* Auburn. 

28. H. H. Rockwell Elmira. 

29. John Raines* Canandaigua. 

30. Henry S. Greenleaft Rochester. 

31. James W. Wadsivorthf Genesee. 

32. Daniel N. Lockwoodf Buffalo. 

33. Thomas L. Bunting Hamburgh. 

34. Warren B. Hooker Fredonia . 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

1. William A. B. Branch Washington. 

2. Henry P. Cheatham* Littleton. 

3. Benjamin F.Grady Wallace. 

4. Benjamin H. Bunn* Rocky Mount. 

5. Archibald H.A.Williams. Oxford. 

6. Syndenham B. Alexander.Charlotte. 

7. John S. Henderson* Salisbury. 

8. William H. H. Cowles*. .Wilkesboro. 

9. William T. Crawford Waynesville. 

NORTH DAKOTA. 

Martin N. Johnson Petersburg. 

OHIO. 

1. Bellamy Storer Cincinnati. 

2. John A. Caldwell* Cincinnati. 

3. George W. Houk . Dayton. 

4. Martin K. Gantz Troy. 

5. Frederick C. Lay ton Wapakoneta. 

6. Dennis D. Donovan Deshler. 

7. William E. Haynes* Fremont. 

8. Darius D. Hare Upper Sandusky 

9. Joseph H. Outhwaite*. . .Columbus. 

10. Robert E. Doan Wilmington. 

11. JohnM. Pattison Milford. 

12. William H. Enochs Ironton. 

13. Irvine Dungan Jackson. 

14. James W.Owens* Newark. 

15. Michael D. Harter Mansfield. 

16. Lew's P. Ohlinger Wooster 

17. Andrew J. Pearson Woodsfleld. 

18. Joseph D. Taylor* Cambridge. 

19. Ezra B. Taylor* Warren. 

20. Vincent A. Taylor Bedford. 

21. Thomas L.Johnson Cleveland. 

OREGON. 

Binger Hermann* Roseburg. 



112 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

1. Henry ff. Bingham* Philadelphia. 

2. Charles O'Neill* Philadelphia. 

3. William McAleer Philadelphia. 

4. John E. Reyburn* Philadelphia. 

5. Alfred C. Harmer* Philadelphia 

6. John B. Robinson Media. 

7. Edwin R. Hallowell Willow Grove. 

8. William Mutchler* Easton. 

9. David B. Brunner* Reading. 

10. Marriott Brosius* Lancaster. 

11. Lemuel Amerman Scranton. 

12. George W. Shonk Plymouth. 

13. James B. Reilly* Pottsville. 

14. John W. Rife* Middletown. 

15. Myron B. Wright* Susguehanna. 

16. Alnert C. Hfrpkins Lock Haven. 

17. Simon P. Wolverton Sunbury. 

18. Louis E. Atkinsisn* Mifflintown. 

19 Frank E. Beltzhooverf. . . .Carlisle. 

20. Edward Scull* Somerset. 

21. George F. Huff Greensburg. 

22. John Dalzell*. Pittsburg. 

23. William A. Stone Allegheny City. 

24. William A. Sipe Pittsburg. 

25. Eugene P. Gifiespie Greenville. 

26. Matthew Griswold Erie. 

27. Charles W. Stone* Warren. 

28. George F. Kribbs Clarion. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1. Oscar Lapham* Providence. 

2. Charles H. Page Scituate. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1. William H. Brawley Charleston. 

2. George D. Tillman* Clark's Hill. 

3. George Johnstone Newberry. 

4. George W. Shell Laurens. 

5. John J. Hemphill* Chester. 

6. J. L. McLaurin Bennettsville. 

7. William Elliotttt Beaufort. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 

1. John A. Pickler* Faulkton. 

2. John L. Jolly Vermllllon. 

TENNESSEE. 

1. Alfred A. Taylor* Johnson City. 

2. John C. ffouk Knoxville. 

3. Henry C. Snodgrass Sparta. 

4. Benton McMillln* Carthage. 

5. James D. Richardson* . .Murfreesboro. 

6. Joseph E. Washington . .Cedar Hill. 

7. Nicholas N. Cox Franklin. 

8. Benjamin A. Enloe* Jackson. 

9. Rice A. Pierce* Union City. 

10. Jostah Patterson Memphis. 



TEXAS. 

1. Charles Stewart* 

2. John B. Long 

3. C. Buckley Kilgore* 

4. David B. Culberson* 

5. Joseph W. Bailey 



6. Joseph Abbott* 

7. William H. Grain* 

8. Littleton W.Moore* 

9. E. L. Antony 

10. Joseph D. Savers* 

11. Samuel W. T. Lanham*.. 



.Houston. 
.Rusk. 

.Will's Point. 
.Jefferson. 
.Gainesville. 
.Hillsboro. 
.Cuero. 
.La Grange. 
.Cameron. 
Bastrop. 
.Weatherford. 



VERMONT. 

1. H. Henry Powers Morrisville. 

2. William W, Grout* Barton. 

VIRGINIA. 

1. William A. Jones Warsaw. 

2. John W. Lawson Isle of Wight. 

3. George D. Wisett Richmond. 

4. James F. Epes Blackstone. 

5. Posey G. Lester* Floyd C. H. 

6. Paul C. Edmunds* Halifax C. H. 

7. Charles T. O'Ferrall* Harrisonburgh. 

8. E. E. Meredith Brentsville. 

9. John A. Buchanan* Abingdon. 

10. Henry St. G. Tucker* Staunton. 

WASHINGTON. 

John L. Wilson* Spokane Falls. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

1. John O. PendletonJ Wheeling. 

2. William L. Wilson.* Charleston. 

3. John D. Alderson* Nicholas C. H. 

4. James A. Capehart. . Point Pleasant. 

WISCONSIN. 

1. Clinton A. Babbit Beloit. 

2. Charles Barwig* Mayville. 

3. Allen R. Bushnell Madison. 

4. John L. Mitchell Milwaukee. 

5. George H. Brickner* Sheboygan Falls. 

6. Lucas M. Miller Oshkosh 

7. Frank P. Coburn West Salem. 

8. Nils P. Hauaen* River Falls. 

9. Thomas Lynch Antigo. ^ 

WYOMING. 

Clarence D. Clark* Evanston. 

TERRITORIES. 

ARIZONA Marcus A. Smith,*Tombstone. 
NEW MEXICO Antonio Joseph,*Ojo Caliente. 
OKLAHOMA D. A. Harvey, Oklahoma City. 
UTAH John T. Caine,*Salt Lake City. 



RECAPITULATION. 



R. D.FA 



States. 

Alabama 8 .. 

Arkansas 5 .. 

California 42.. 

Colorado 1 . . 

Connecticut 1 3 .. 

Delaware 1 .. 

Florida 2 .. 

Georgia .. 10 .. 

Idaho 1 .. .. 

Illinois 6 14 .. 

Indiana 2 

Iowa 6 

Kansas 2 

Kentucky 1 

Louisiana 

Maine 4 



R. D.FA 

Maryland C . 

Massachusetts 5 7 .. 

Michigan 4 7 .. 

Minnesota 131 

Mississippi 7 .. 

Missouri 14 .. 

Montana 1 .. 

Nebraska 12 

New Hampshire 2 .. 

New Jersey 2 4 .. 

Nevada 1 .. .. 

New York 11 22 .. 

5 North Carolina 1 8 .. 

North Dakota 1 .. .. 

Ohio 7 14 .. 

Oregon 1 .. .. 



Pennsylvania 18 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 2 

Tennessee 2 

Texas 

Vermont 2 

Virginia 

Washington 1 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 1 

Wyoming 1 



Totals. 
Vacant... 



D.FA 

':: 



FIFTY-SECOND CONGRESS. 



113 



SENATORS (Alphabetically Arranged). 



Aldrich, N. W Rhode Island 


George, James Z Mississippi 
Gibson, C. H Maryland 


Peffer, W. A Kansas 
Perkins B W Kansas 


\llison William B Iowa 


Pettigrew. R. F. . South Dakota 
Platt, Orville H Connecticut 
Power, T. C Montana 
Proctor, Redfleld Vermont 
Pugh, James L Alabama 


Bate W B Tennessee 


Gorman, Arthur P... Maryland 
Gray, George Delaware 
Hale, Eugene Maine 


Berry, James H Arkansas 
Blackburn, J. C. S Kentucky 
Blodgett, Rufus New Jersey 
Brice, Calvin S Ohio 
Butler. M. C South Carolina 
Call, Wilkinson Florida 
Cameron, J. D Pennsylvania 


Hansbrough, H. C...N. Dakota 
Harris, Isham G Tennessee 
Hawley, Jos. R Connecticut 
Higgins, Anthony Delaware 
Hill, David B New York 
Hiscock, Frank Neic York 
Hoar, George F. .Massachusetts 


8uay,M. S Pennsylvania 
ansom, Matt W.-.^V. Carolina 
Sanders, W F Montana 


Sawyer, Philetus Wisconsin 


Carlisle, J. G Kentucky 
Casey L R North Dakota 




Squire W C Washington 


Chandler.W. E.. New Hampshire 
Cockrell, F. M Missouri 
Coke, Richard Texas 


Irby, J. L. M South Carolina 
Jones, James K Arkansas 
Jones, John P Nevada 
Kenna, John E.. West Virginia 
Kyle J H South Dakota 


Stanford, Leland California 
Stewart, W.M Nevada 


Stockbridge, F. B. . . . Michigan 
Teller, Henry M Colorado 


Colquitt, Alfred H Georgia 
Cullom, Shelby M Illinois 
Daniell, John W Virginia 
Davis C K Minnesota 


Turpie D S Indiana 


Manderson Chas. F... Nebraska 
McMillan, James Michigan 
McPherson,John IL.New Jersey 
Mills, Roger Q Texas 
Mitchell, John H Oregon 
Morgan, John T Alabama 


Vance, Z . B North Carolina 
Vest George G ...Missouri 


Dawes, Henry L. Massachusetts 
Dixon, N. F Rhode Island 
Dolph Joseph Oregon 


Vilas W. F Wisconsin 


Voorhees, D. W Indiana 
Walthall. E. C Mississippi 


Dubois, F. T Idaho 


Warren, F. E Wyoming 


Faulkner, C. J. . . . West Virginia 
Felton, C. N California 
Frye, William P Maine 
Ga'llineer. J. tl.Netc Hampshire 


Morrill, Justin S Vermont 
Paddock, A. S Nebraska 
Palmer, John M Illinois 
Pasco. Samuel Florida 


Washburn, W. D Minnesota 
White, E. D Louisiana 
Wilson James F Iowa 


Wolcott. E. O Colorado 



REPRESENTATIVES (Alphabetically Arranged). 

Abbott, Joseph Texas Bushnell. A. R Wisconsin Doan, K. E Ohio 

Alderson,J. D....West Virginia Butler, W. H Iowa Dockery, A.M Missouri 

Alexanders. B N.Carolina Bynum, W. D Indiana Dolliver, J. P Iowa 

Allen, J. M Mississippi Byrns, S Missouri Donovan, D. D"..: Ohio 

Amerman, L Pennsylvania Cable, B. T Illinois Dugan, 1 Ohio 

Andrew, J. F... .Massachusetts Cadmus, C. A New Jersey Dunphy,E. J New York 

Antony, E. L Texas Caldwell, J. A Ohio Durborow, A. C.,Jr Illinois 

Arnold, Marshall Missouri Caminetti. A California Edmunds, P. C Virginia 

Atkinson, I,. E.... Pennsylvania Campbell, T. J New York Elliott, W South Carolina 

Babbitt, Clinton Wisconsin Capehart, J West Virginia Ellis, W. T Kentucky 

Bacon, Henry New York Caruth, Asher G Kentucky English, T. D New Jersey 

Bailey, J. W Texas Castle, J. N Minnesota EnToe, Benj. J Tennessee 

Baker, William Kansas Catchings, T. C Mississippi Enochs, W. H Ohio 

Bankhead, John U... Alabama Cate, W. H Arkansas Epes, J. F Virginia 

Bartine, H. F Nevada Causey, J. W .Delaware Everrett, R^W Georgia 

New York 



Barwig, Charles Wisconsin 



Cheatham, H. P....N. Carolina 



Beeman, J. H Mississippi Chipman, J. Log&n... Michigan Fitch, Ashbel P New York 

Belden, James J New York Clancy, J. M New York Fithian, G. W Illinois 

Belknap,C. E Michigan Clark, C.D Wyoming Flick, J. P Iowa 

Be\tzhoo-ver.F.E..Pennsyh'ania Clarke, R. H Alabama Forman, W. S Illinois 

Bentley, H. W New York Clover, B. H Kansas Forney, W. H Alabama 

Bergen, C. A Neio Jersey Cobb,J. E Alabama Fowler, S NewJersey 

Bingham, H. H... Pennsylvania Cobb, S. W Missouri Funston, E. H Kansas 

Blanchard, N. C Louisiana Coburn, F. P Wisconsin Fyan, R. W Missouri 

Bland, R. P Missouri Cockran. W. B New York Gantz, M. K ....Ohio 

Blount, J. H Georgia Cogswell, Wm ..Massachusetts Geary, T. J California 

Boatner, C. J Louisiana Compton, B Maryland Geissenharner, J. A. .New Jersey 

Boutelle, C. A Maine Coolidge. F.S.... Massachusetts Gillispie, E. P.. .Pennsylvania 

Bowers. W. W Colorado Coombs, W. J New York Goodnight, I . H Kentucky 

Bowman. Thomas Iwra Cooper, G. W Indiana Gorman.J. S Michigan 

Branch, W. A.B....N. Carolina Covert, J. W New York Grady. B. F lorth Carolina 

Brawley, W. H S. Carolina Cowles, W. H. H. . . .N. Carolina Greenleaf. H. S New -York 

Breckinridge, C. R.... Arkansas Cox, I. N New York Griswold, M. R ...Pennsylvania 

Breckinridge,W C.P.Kentucky Cox. N. N Tennessee Grout, W.W ...Vermont 

Bretz, J.L, Indiana Grain, W. H Texas Hall, O. M Minnesota 

Brickner. G. H Wisconsin Crawford, W. T N. Carolina Hallowell, E. N ... Pennsylvania 

Broderick, C Kansas Crisp, C. F Georgia Halvorson. K Minnesota 

Brookshire, E. "7" Indiana Crosby. J. C .Massachusetts Hamilton. J. T towa 

Brosius, M Pennsylvania Culberson, D. B Texas Hare, D. D Ohio 

Brown, J. B Indiana Cummings, A. J NewYork Harmer, A. C Pennsylvania 

Brown. J. B Mainland Curtis, N. M New York Harries. W. H Minnesota 

Brunner, D. B Pennsylvania Cutting, J. T California Harter. M. D Ohio 

Bryan. W. J Nebraska Dalzell. John Pennsylvania Hatch, W. H Missouri 

Buchanan, J. A Virginia Daniell. W. Y . .New Hainpshire Haugen, N. P Wisconsin 

Buchanan, J New Jersey Davis, John Kansas Hayes, Walter I Iowa 

Bullock, R, Florida DeArmond, D. A Missouri Haynes, W. E Ohio 

Bunn. B. H N. Carolina DeForest. R. E... ..Connecticut Heard, J. T Missouri 

Bunting, T. L New York Dickerson, W. W. . . .Kentucky Hemphill, J. J S. Carolina 

Burrows-, J. C Michigan Dingley. X.. Jr Maine Henderson. D. B loica 

Bussey. S. T Illinois Dixon,"W. W Montana Henderson. J. S.... A'. Carolina 



Fellows, J. R. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



REPRESENTATIVES CONTINUED. 

Henderson, T. J Illinois McClellan, C. A.O Indiana Simpson, J Kansas 

Herbert, H. A Alabama McCreary, J. B ^Kentucky Sipe, W. A Pennsylvania 

Hermann, Binger Oregon McGann, L. B llinois Smith, G. W Illinois 

Hilborn, S. G California McKaig, Wm. M Maryland Snodgrass. H. C Tennessee 

Hitt. R. R Illinois McKeighan, W. A Nebraska Snow, H. W Illinois 

Hoar, S Massachusetts McKinney, L. F. .N.Hamp .shire Sperry, L Connecticut 

Holman, W. S Indiana McLaurin, J. L S. Carolina Springer, W. M Illinois 

Hooker, Charles E.. Mississippi McMillan. B Tennessee Stahlnecker, AY. G....Neio York 

Hooker, W.B Neu York McRea. Thomas G.... Arkansas Stephenson, S, M Michigan 

Hopkins, A. G.... Pennsylvania Newberry, W. C Illinois^ Stevens, M. T.... Massachusetts 

Hopkins, A. J Illinois Norton. R. H Missouri*. Stewart, C Texas 

Houk, G. W Ohio Oates, W. C Alabama ,Stew&rt, L Illinois 

Houk, John C Tennessee O'Donnell, J Michigan ', Stockdale, T. R Mississippi 

Huff, G. F Pennsylvania O'Farrell, C. T Yirginiai Stone, Chas. W... Pennsylvania 

Hull, J. A. T Iowa Ohlinger, L. P Ohio; Stone, W. A Pennsylvania 

Johnson, H. U .Indiana O'NeiT, J. H Massachusetts' Stone, W. J Kentucky 

Johnson, T. L Ohio O'Neill, C Pennsylvania Storer, B Ohio 

Johnson, M. H.... North Dakota O'Neill, J. J Missouri] Stout, B. G Michigan 

Johnstone, G South Carolina Otis, J. G Kansas Stump, H Maryland 

Jolley, J. L South Dakota Outhwaite, J. H Ohio Sweet, Willis Idaho 

Jones, W. A Virginia Owens, J. W Ohio Tarnsey, J. C Missouri 

Kem, O. M Nebraska Page, C. H Rhodelsland Taylor, A Illinois 

Kendall, J. W Kentucky Parrett, W. F Indiana Taylor, A. A Tennessee 

Ketcham, J. H New York Patterson, J. Tennessee Taylor.E. B Ohio 

Kilgore, C. B Texas Pattison, J. M OfcioiTaylor, JosephD Ohio 

Kribbs. G. F Pennsylvania Patton, D. H Indiana \ Taylor, V. A Ohio 

Kyle, J. C Mississippi Payne, S. E New York Terry, W.L Arkansas 

Lagan. M. D Louisiana Paynter, T. H Kentucky Tillman, G. D S. Carolina 

Lane, Edward Illinois Pearson, A. J Ohio Townsend, H Colorado 

Lanham, S. W. T Texas Peel, S. W Arkansas Tracey, C New York 

Lapham, O Rhode Island Pendleton, J. O..West Virg nia Tucker, H. S. G Virginia 

Lawson, J. W ^Virginia Perkins, G. D Iowa Turner, H. G Georgia 

Lawson, T. G Georgia Plckler,J. A South Dakota Turpin, L. W Alabama 

Layton, F.C Ohio Pierce, R. A Ten nesset Van Horn, G New York 

Lester, P. G Virginia Post, Philip S Illinois Wadsworth. J. W.... New York 

Lester.R. E Georgia Powers, H. H Vermont Walker, J. H..... Massachusetts 

Lewis, Clark Mississippi Price, Andrew Louisiana Warner, J . D New York 

Lind, John Minnesota Quackenbush, J. A.. .New York Washington, Jos. E.. Tennessee 

Little, J.J New Fork Raines, J New York, Watson, T. E Georgia 

Livingston, L. F Georgia Randall-C. S. . ..Massachusetts Waugh, D Indiana 

Lockwood,D.N New York Ray, G. W New ForfciWeadcock, T. A.E....JrtcAin 

Lodge, H. C Massachusetts Rayner, I Mai ylandW ever. J. M New York 

Long, J. B Texas Reed, T. B Maine] Wheel er, H. H Michigan 

Loud, E. F California Reilly, J. B Pennsi/fcantai'Wheeler, J Alabama 

Lynch, T Wisconsin Reyburn,J. E Pennsy lvania\ White, F. E Iowa 

Magner, T. F New York Richardson, J. D Tennesseel Whiting, Justin R. .. .Michigan 

Mallory, S.R ...Florida Rife. J. W Pennsy lvania]W\^e, Scott Illinois 

Mansur, Charles H.... Missouri Robertson, S. M Louisiana Wilcox, W. F Connecticut 

Martin, A. N Indiana Robinson, J. B... Pennsylvania Williams, A. H. A. .N. Carolina 

Meredith, E. E Virginia Rockwell, H. H New York Williams, G. F... Massachusetts 

Meyer,A Louisiana Rusk, H. W Maryland Williams, J. R Illinois 

Miller. L. M Wisconsin Russell, C. A Connecticut Wilson, J. H Kentucky 

Milliken, S. L Maine Sanford. J New FonfciWilson, J. L. Washington 

Mitchell, J.L Wisconsin Savers, J. D Texas \ Wilson, R. P. C Missouri 

Montgomery, A. B. .. Kentucky Scott, O Illinois i Wilson. W.I West Virginia 

Moore. L. W Texas Scull, Edward.... Pennsy Ivania \ Winn, T. E Georgia 

Morse, E. A Massachusetts Seerley, J. J JmcaiWise, G.D Virginia 

Moses, C. L Georgia Shell, C. W South Carolina] Wolvorton, S. P. .Pennsylvania 

Vlutchler, W Pennsylvania Shively, Benj. F Indiana I Wright, M. B Pennsylvania 

McAleer.W Pennsylvania Shouk, G. W Pennsj/JfaniaiYoumans, H. M Michigan 



TERRITORIAL DELEGATES. 



iaine, J. T Utah \ Joseph. A... 

Barvey, D. A Oklahoma | Smith, M. A. 



New Mexico 
Arizona 



CAPACITY OF NOTED CHURCHES, THEATERS, OPERA HOUSES, HALLS, ETC. 

St. Peter's, Rome 54,000;St. Mark's, Venice 7,500j St. Charles Theater, New 

Milan Cathedral 37,000| Auditorium, Chicago 4.500 Orleans 

St. Paul's, Rome 32,OOOjStadt Theater, New York. 3,000 Imperial, St. Petersburg.. 



.London 25,600 Boston Theater, Boston. .. 2 

_>t. Petronio, Bologna 24,400 Academy of Music, Phila. 2, 

Florence Cathedral 24,300|Covent Garden, London.. 2,684 

Antwerp Cathedral 24.000 Music Hall, Boston 2.585 



I La Scala, Milan 

McVicker's Theater, Chi- 



2,178 
2,1H) 
2,113 



cago 

Academy of Paris 



Orleans 
Central Music Hall, Chi- 
cago. 



St,SophiVs,Const'ntin'ple.23.000 Carlo Felice, Genoa 2.5CO Grand Opera Hall, New 

St. JoWs, Lateran 22,900 Academy of Music, N. Y.. ' 

S^otre Dame, Paris 21.000 Haymarket Theater, Chi- 

Cathedral, Pisa 13,000 cago 2,475 

St. Stephen's, Vienna 12.400 Columbia Theat'r,Chicago 2,400 Grand Opera House,N. Y. 

St. Dominic's, Bologna.. . .12,000 Alexander. St. Petersburg 2.332J Booth's Theater, N. Y 

St. Peter's, Bologna ll,400:Opera House. Munich 2,307, Opera House. Detroit 

Cathedral, Vienna 11,000 San Carlos. Naples 2,240 Grand Opera House, Chi- 

Gilmore's Garden, N. Y... 8,443lOpera House, Chicago 2.2001 cago 



2,052 
2,000 



1,807 
1,790 



FIFTY-THIRD CONGRESS. 



115 



Congress. 

(Unofficial.) 
From March 4, 1893, to March 4, 1895. 



SENATE. 
A. E. STEVEXSOX, Vice-President, Presiding. | 



President pro tern. 



Republicans, 41; Democrats, 42; PEOPLE'S PARTY, 5. 



ALABAMA. 
John T.Morgan ........... Selrna .............. 1895 

James L. Pugh ........ ...Eufaula ........... 1897 

ARKANSAS. 
James H. Berry .......... Bentonvllle ....... 1895 

James K. Jones ........... Washington ...... 1897 

CALIFORNIA. 

Leland Stanford .......... San Francisco. 

Stephen M. White ....... Los Angeles 

COLORADO. 
Edward O. Wolcott ...... Denver 

Henry M. Tetter ........... Central City 

CONNECTICUT. 

OrviM". H. Platt ........... Meriden ........... 1897 

Joseph R. Haivley ......... Hartford .......... 189J 

DELAWARE. 
Anthony Higgins .......... Wilmington ....... 1895 

George Gray ............... Newcastle ......... 189.) 

FLORIDA. 
Wilkinson Call ............ Jacksonville ...... 1897 

A Democrat .................................... 1899 



.1897 
1899 



1895 
1897 



GEORGIA. 

Alfred H. Colquitt Atlanta 1895 

John B.Gordon Atlanta 1897 



IDAHO. 

George L. Shoitp Salmon City . . . 

FredT. Dubois Blackfoot 

ILLINOIS. 

Shelby M. Cuttom Springfield 

John M. Palmer Springfield 

INDIANA. 

Daniel W. Voorhees Terre Haute... 

Daniel S. Turpie Indi anapolis . . . 

IOWA. 

James F. Wilson Falrfleld 

William B. Allison Dubuque 

KANSAS. 

WILLIAM A. PEFFEK Topeka 

JOHXMAHTIN Topeka 

KENTUCKY. 

William Lindsay Frankfort 

Joseph C. S. Blackburn . . Versailles 

LOUISIANA. 

Donelson Caffery... 



.1895 



.1897 

.1897 



.1895 

.IV.'T 



..1897 



.1895 
.1897 



Edward D. White Is ew Orleans. . 

MAINE. 

William P. Frye Lewiston 

Eugene Hale Ellsworth 

MARYLAND. 

Charles H. Gibson Easton 

Arthur P. Gorman* Laurel 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

George F. Hoar Worcester 

Henry C. Lodge Nahant 



.1885 

.1897 



.mo 



.1897 
.1899 



.1895 
1899 



MICHIGAN. 
James McMillan .......... Detroit 



1896 
1899 



Francis B. Stockbridge Kalamazoo: 

MINNESOTA. 
WiUiam D. Washburn... Minneapolis ...... 1895 

Cttshman K. Davis ........ St. Paul ............ 1899 

MISSISSIPPI. 
James Z. George .......... Carrollton ........ 1899 

Edward C. Walthall ...... Grenada ....... 1895 



MISSOURI. 

George G. Vest Kansas City. . . 

Francis M. Cockrell Warrensburg. 

MONTANA. 

Thomas C. Power Helena 

A Republican 

NEBRASKA. 

Charles F. Manderson Omaha 

WILLIAM V. ALLEN Madison 



NEVADA. 
John P. Jones ...... : ....... Gold Hill 

WILLIAM M. STEWART.. Carson City 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
William E. Chandler ..... Concord 
Jacob H. Gallinger ........ Concord 

NEW JERSEY. 
John R. McPherson ...... Jersey City 

James Smith, Jr .......... Newark 

NEW YORK. 
David B. Hill .............. Elmlra 

Edward Murphy, Jr ...... Troy 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
Matt W. Ransom ......... Weldon 

ZebulonB. Vance ...... Charlotte 

NORTH DAKOTA. 
H C. Hansbrough ......... Devil's Lake 

A Republican 

OHIO. 
Calvin S. Brice ............ Lima 

John Sherman ............. Mansfield 

OREGON. 
Joseph Dolph ............... Portland 

John H. Mitchell .......... Portland 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
James D. Cameron ....... Harrlsburg 

Matthew S. Quay .......... Beaver 

RHODE ISLAND. 
Xathan F. Dixon ......... Westerly 

A Republican 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
Matthew C. Butler ........ Edgefleld 

JohnL M. Irby ........... Laurens 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 
Richard F. Pettigrew ..... Sioux Falls 
JAMES H. KYLE ......... Aberdeen 



1897 
1899 



1895 
1897 



1895 
1899 



1897 
1899 



1895 
1897 



1897 
1899 



1897 
1899 



1895 
1897 



1897 
1899 



1895 
1899 



1895 
1897 



1895 
1897 



116 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



.18% 



TENNESSEE. 

Isham G. Harris Memphis 1895 

William B. Bate Nashville 1899 

TEXAS. 

Richard Coke Waco 

Roger Q. Mills Corsicana 

VERMONT. 

Justin S. Morrill Strafford 

Redfleld Proctor Proctor 

VIRGINIA. 

Eppa Hunton Warrenton 

John W. Daniel Lynchburg 



WASHINGTON. 

Watson O. Squire .......... Seattle ....... '.....1817 

A Republican .................................. 1899 



WEST VIRGINIA. 

Johnson W. Camden ...... Parkersburg ...... 1895 

Charles J. Faulkner ...... Martlnsburg ..... 1809 

WISCONSIN. 

William F. Vilas ......... Madison ....... 1897 

John L. Mitchell .......... Milwaukee ........ 1899 

WYOMING. 

Joseph M. Carey .......... Cheyenne ......... 1895 

A Republican .................................. 189.) 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
Republicans, 129; Democrats, 216; PEOPLE'S PARTY. 8; Vacant, 2. 

served in the LHd House. Those marked with a t sarved in a pre- 



Those marked with a 
vious Congress. 

ALABAMA. 

1. Richard H. Clark* Mobile. 

2. Jesse F. Stallings Greenville. 

3. William C. Gates* Abbeville. 

4. Gaston A. Robbins Selma. 

6. James E. Cobb* Tuskegee. 

6. JohnH. Bankhead* Fayette C. H. 

7. W. H. Denson Gadsden. 

8. Joseph Wheeler* Wheeler. 

9. Louis W. Turpin* Newbern. 

ARKANSAS. 

1. P. D. McCulloch, Jr Marianna, 

2. Clifton R. Breckinridge*..Pine Bluff. 

3. T. C. McRae* Prescott. 

4. William L. Terry* Little Rock. 

5. H. A. Dinsmore Fayetteville. 

6. Robert Neill Batesville. 

CALIFORNIA. 

1. Thomas J. Geary* Santa Rosa. 

2. Anthony Caminetti* Jackson. 

3. S. G. Hilborn Oakland. 

4. J. G. McGuire San Francisco. 

5. Eugene F. Loud* San Francisco. 

6. Marion Cannon Ventura. 

7. William W. Bowers* San Diego. 

COLORADO. 

1. LAKE PENCE. Denver. 

2. JohnC. Bell Montrose 

CONNECTICUT. 

1. Lewis Sperry* Hartford. 

2. James E. Pigott New Haven. 

3. Chart 's A. Russell* Killingly. 

4. Robert E. De Forest* Bridgeport. 

DELAWARE. 

John W. Causey*., Milford. 

FLORIDA. 

1. Stephen R. Mallory* Pensacola. 

2. Charles M. Cooper Jacksonville. 

GEORGIA. 

1. Rufus E. Lester* Savannah. 

2. Benjamin E. Russell Bainbridge. 

3. Charles F. Crisp* Americus. 

4. Charles L. Moses* Turin. 

5. L. F. Livingston* Cora. 

6. Thomas B. Cabaniss Forsyth. 

7. John W. Maddox Rome. 

8. Thomas G. Lawson* Eatonton 

9. Farish Carter Tate Tate. 

10. John C. C. Black Augusta. 

11. Henry G. Turner* Quitman. 



IDAHO. 

Willis Sweet* Moscow. 

ILLINOIS. 

At Large. John C. Black. . . .Chicago. 
Andrew J. Hunter Paris. 

1. J. Frank Aldrich Chicago. 

2. Lawrence E. McGann*. . . .Chicago. 

3. Allan C. Durborow, Jr.*. . .Chicago. 

4. Julius Goldzier Chicago. 

5. Albert J. Hopkins* Aurora. 

6. Robert R. ffitt* Mount Morris. 

7. Thomas J. Henderson* Princeton. 

8. Robert A. Childs Hinsdale. 

9. Hamilton K. Wheeler Kankakee. 

10. Philip S. Post* Galesburg. 

11. Benjamin F. Marsht Warsaw. 

12. John J. McDonald Mount Sterling. 

13. William M. Springer* Springfield. 

14. Benjamin 1: t*'urik Bloomington. 

15. Joseph O. Cannon^ Danville. 

16. George W. Fithian*.... 

17. Edward Lane* 

18. William S. Forman*.. . 

19. James R. Williams*... 

20. George W. Smith* 



...Newton. 

...Hillsboro. 

...Nashville. 

...Carmi. 

...Murphysboro. 

INDIANA. 

1. A. H. Taylor Petersburg. 

2. John L. Bretz* Jasper. 



3. Jason B. Brown*. 

4. William S. Holman* . 

5. George W. Cooper*... 

6. He*i.ry U. Johnson*... 

7. William D. Bynum*. . 

8. Elijah V. Brookshire* 

9. Daniel Waugh* 

10. Thomas Hammond. . . 

Augustus N. Martin*. 
C.F.McNagny 



II: 



.Seymour. 
..Aurora. 
..Columbus. 
..Richmond. 
..Indianapolis. 
..Crawfordsville. 
..Tiptou. 
..Hammond. 
..Bluffton. 
..Columbia City 



13. Charles G. Conn Elkhart. 

IOWA. 

1. John H. Gear\ , Burlington . 

2. Walter I. Hayes* Clinton. 

3. David B. Henderson* Dubuque. 

4. Thomas Updegraffi McGregor. 

5. Kobert G. Cousins Tipton. 

6. JohnF. Lacy\ Oskaloosa. 

7. John A. T. Hull* Des Moines. 

8. William P. Hepburn* Clarinda. 

9. A. L. Hager Greenfield. 

10. Jonathan P. Dollirer* Fort Dodge. 

11. George D. Perkins* Sioux City. 

KANSAS. 
At Large W. A. Harris Linwood. 



1. Case Broderick* 



.Holton. 



FIFTY-THIRD CONGRESS. 



117 



2. Edward H. Funston* lola. 

3. T. J. Hudson Fredonia. 

4. Charles K. Curtis Topeka. 

5. JOHN DAVIS* Junction City. 

6. WILLIAM BAKER* Lincoln. 

7. JEREMIAH SIMPSON* Medicine Lodge. 

KENTUCKY. 

..Kuttawa. 
..Owensboro. 
..Franklin. 
...Elizabethtown. 
Louisville. 



1. William J. Stone*.. 

2. William T.Ellis*... 

3. Isaac H. Goodnight 

4. A. B. Montgomery* 

5. Asher G. Caruth 



...Newport. 
...Lexington. 
...Richmond. 
...Greenup. 



6. Albert S. Berry 

7. W. C. P. Breckinridge*. 

8. James B. McCreary*... 

9. Thomas H. Paynter*... 

10. Marcus C. Lisle Winchester. 

11. Silctf- Adams Liberty. 

LOUISIANA. 
1. Adolph Meyer* New Orleans. 



3. Andrew Price* ............. Thibodeaux. 

4. Newton C. Blanchard* ____ Shreveport. 

5. Charles J. Boatner* ....... Monroe. 

6. Samuel M.Robertson* Baton Rouge. 

MAINE. 

1. Thomas B. Heed* ........... Portland. 

2. Nelson I>ingley,Jr.* ....... Lewiston. 

8. SethL. Milliken* ........... Belfast. 

4. Charles A. Boutelle* ........ Bangor. 

MARYLAND. 

1. Robert F. Brattan ......... Princess Anne. 

2. J. F. C. Talbottf ............ Towson. 

3. H. Welles Rusk* .......... Baltimore. 

4. Isidor Rayner* ............. Baltimore. 

5. Barnes Compton* .......... Laurel. 

6. William M. McKaig ....... Cumberland. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

1. Ashley R. Wright ........... Pittsfleld. 

2. Frederick H. Gillett ....... Springfield. 

3. Joseph H. Walker* ......... Worcester. 

4. Lewis A. Apsley ............ Hudson. 

5. Moses T. Stevens' ......... Andover. 

6. William Cogswell* ......... Salem. 

7. Henry Cabot Lodge* ....... Nahant. 

8. Samuel W. McCall ......... Boston. 

9. Joseph H. O'Neil* ......... Boston. 

10. Michael J. McEttrick ...... Boston. 

11. William F. Draper ......... Hopedale. 

12. Elijah A. Morse* ........... Canto'n. 

13. Charles S. Randall* ........ New Bedford. 



MICHIGAN. 
J. L. Chipman* ............ Detroit. 

James S. Gorman* ......... Chelsea. 

Julius C. Burrows* ........ Kalamazoo. 

Henry F. Thomas .......... Allegan. 



Darius D. Aitken Fowlerville. 

Justin R. Whiting* St. Clair. 

W. S. Union Saginaw. 

John W. Moon Muskegon 

T. A. E. Weadock* Bay City. 

John Avery Greenville. 

Samuel M. Stephenson* Menominee. 



MINNESOTA. 

1. James A. Tawney Winona. 

2. James T. Me deary Mankato. 

3. O. M. Hall* Red Wing. 

4. Andrew R. Kiefer St. Paul. 

5. Loren Fletcher Minneapolis. 

6. M. R. Baldwin Duluth. 

7. H. E. BOEN Fergus Falls. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

1. John M. Allen* Tupelo. 

2. JohnC. Kyle* Sardis. 

3. T. C. Catchings* Vicksburg. 



4. H. D. Moneyt Carrollton. 

5. John S. Williams Yazoo City. 

6. Thomas R. Stockdale* Summit. 

7. Charles E. Hooker* Jackson. 



MISSOURI. 

William H. Hatch* Hannibal. 

Uriel S. Hall Hubbard. 

Alexander M. Dockery*..Gallatin. 



Daniel D.Buvnes... 

John C. Tarsney* 

David A. De Armond*. . . , 

John T. Heard* 

Richard P. Bland* 

Beauchamp Clark 

Richard Bartholdt 

Charles F. Joy 

SethW. Cobb* 

Robert W. Fyan* 

Marshall Arnold* 

Charles H. Morganf 



t. Joseph. 
..Kansas City. 
.Butler. 
.Sedalia. 
..Lebanon. 
.Bowling Green. 
..St. Louis. 
..St. Louis. 
..St. Louis. 
..Marshfleld. 
..Benton. 
.Lamar. 



MONTANA. 
Charles S. Hartman Bozeman. 



NEBRASKA. 

1. William J. Bryan* Lincoln. 

2. D. Mercer Omaha. 

3. George D. Meiklejohn Fullerton. 

4. E. J. Hainer Aurora. 

5. W. A. McKEiGHAN* Hastings. 

6. O. M. KEM* Broken Bow. 

NEVADA. 

FRANCIS NEWLANDS Reno. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

1. Henry W. Blair\ Manchester. 

2. Henry M. Baker Bow. 

NEW JERSEY. 

1. Henry C. Louclenslager Woodbury. 

2. John J. Gardner Atlantic City. 

3. Jacob A. Geissenhainer*. Freehold. 

4. Johnston Cornish Washington. 

5. Cornelius A. Cadmus* Paterson. 

6. Thomas D.English* Newark. 

7. George B. Fielder Jersey City. 

8. John T.Dunn Elizabeth. 

NEW YORK. 

1. James W. Covert* Long Island City 

2. John M. Clancy* Brooklyn. 

3. Joseph C. Hendrix Brooklyn . 

4. William J. Coombs* Brooklyn. 

5. John H. Graham Brooklyn. 

6. Thomas F. Magner* Brooklyn. 

7. Franklin Bartlett New York city. 

8. Edward J. Dunphy* New York city. 

9. Timothy J. Campbell*.... New York city. 

10. Daniel E. Sicklest New York city. 

11. Amos J. Cummings* New York city. 

12. W. Bourke Cockran* New York city. 

13. John D. Warner* New York city. 

14. John R. Fellows* New York city. 

15. Ashbel P. Fitch* New York city. 

16. William Ryan Port Chester. 

17. Francis Marvin Port Jervis. 

18. Jacob LeFever New Paltz. 

19. Charles D. Haines Troy. 

20. Charles Tracey* Albany. 

21. S. J. Schermerhorn Schenectady. 

22. Newton M. Curtis* Ogdensburg. 

23. John M. Werer* Plattsburg. 

24. Charles A. Checkering Copenhagen. 

25. J. f>. Sherman^- Utica. 

26. George W. Ray* Norwich. 

27. James J. Belden* Syracuse . 

28. Sereno E. Payne* Auburn. 

t Charles W. Gillett Addison. 
James W. Wadsworth* Geneseo. 

31. JohnR. Van Voorhisf Rochester. 

32. Daniel N. Lockwood* Buffalo. 

33. Charles Daniels Buffalo. 

34. Warren B. Hooker* Fredonia. 



118 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

1. William A. B. Branch* Washington. 

2. F. A. Woodward Wilson. 



3. Benjamin F. Grady*. 

4. Benjamin H. Bunn*.. 

5. Thorn is Settle 

6. S. B. Alexander* 

7. John S. Henderson*. 

8. W. H. Bower 

9. William T. Crawford' 



Albertson. 
.Rocky Mount. 
.Reidsville. 
.Charlotte. 
.Salisbury. 
.Cilley. 
.Waynesville. 



NORTH DAKOTA. 
Martin N. Johnson* Petersburg. 

OHIO. 

1 . Bellamy Storer* Cincinnati. 

2. John A.Caldwell* Cincinnati. 

3. George W. Houk* Dayton. 

4. Frederick C. Layton* Wapakoneta. 

5. Dennis D. Donovan* Desnler. 

6. G. W. Hulick Batavia. 

7. George W. Wilson London. 

8. Luther M. Strong Kenton. 

9. B. F. Richie Toledo. 

10. William H. Enochs* Ironton. 

11. Charles H. Orosvenor\ Athens. 

12. Joseph H. Outhwaite*.... Columbus. 

13. Darius D. Hare* Upper Sandusky. 

14 Michael D. Harter* Mansfield. 

In. H. C. Van Voorhis Zanesville. 

16. A. J. Pearson* Woodsfleld. 

17. James A. D. Richards New Philadelp'a. 

18. G. P. Ikirt East Liverpool. 

19. Stephen A. Northway Jefferson. 

20. William J. White Cleveland. 

21. Thomas L. Johnson* Cleveland. 

OREGON. 

1. Binger Hermann* Roseburg. 

2. W.R. Ellis Heppner. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

At Large. William Lilly Mauch Chunk. 

Alexander McDowell. Sharon. 

1. Henry H. Bingham* Philadelphia. 

2. Charles O'Neil* Philadelphia. 

3. William McAleer* Philadelphia. 

4. John E. Keyburn* Philadelphia. 

5. Alfred C. Harmer* Philadelphia. 

6. John B. Robinson* Media. 

7. I. P. Wanger Norristown. 

8. William Mutchler* Easton. 

9. Constantino J. Erdman. . .Allentown. 

10. Marriott Brosius* Lancaster. 

11. Joseph A. Scranton\ Scranton. 

12. William H. Hines Wilkes-Barre. 

13. J.B. Reillv* Pottsville. 

14. Enhraim M. Wornner Lebanon. 

15. Myron B. Wright* Susquehanna. 

16. Albert C. Hopkins* Lock Haven. 

17. Simon P. Wolverton* Sunbury. 

18. Thaddeus M. Mahon Chambersburg. 

19. Frank E. Beltzhoover*. . . .Carlisle. 

20. Josiah D. fficks Altoona. 

21. Daniel B. Seiner Kittanning. 

22. John Dalzell* Pittsburg. 

23. William A. Stone* Allegheny City. 

24. W. A. Sipe Pittsburg. 

25. Thf/mas W. Phillips New Castle. 

26. Joseph C. SIbley Franklin. 

27. Charles W. Stone* Warren. 

28. George F. Kribbs* Clarion. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

1. No election. 

2. No election. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

1. William H. Brawley* Charleston. 

2. W. J. Talbert Columbia. 

3. A. C. Latimer Belton. 

4. George W. Shell* Laurens. 



5. T. J.Strait 

6. John L. McLaurin 

7. George W. Murray 



.Lancaster. 

.Bennettaville. 

.Sumter. 



SOUTH DAKOTA. 

At Large John A. Pickler*. . .Faulkton. 
W. . Lucas Hot Springs. 

TENNESSEE. 

1. Alfred A. Taylor* Johnson City. 

2. John C. Houk* Knoxville. 

3. Henry C. Snodgrass* Sparta. 

4. Benton McMillin* Carthage. 

5. James D.Richardson* Murfreesboro' 

6. Joseph E. Washington*. .Cedar Hill. 

7. Nicholas N. Cox* Franklin. 

8. Benjamin A. Enloe* Jackson. 

9. J. C. McDearman Dyersburg. 

10. Josiah Patterson* Memphis. 

TEXAS. 

1. J. C. Hutchison 

2. S. B. Cooper 

3. C. B. Kilgore* 

4. David B. Culberson*. . 

5. Joseph W. Bailey* 

6. Joseph Abbott* 

7. George C. Pendleton . 

8. C. K.Bell 

9. Joseph D. Bayers*. ... 

10. Walter Gresham 

11. William H. Grain* 

12. T. M. Paschal 

13. J.V.Cockrell 



..Houston. 

..Woodville. 

..Will's Point. 

. .Jefferson. 

..Gainesville. 

..Hillsboro. 

..Belton. 

..Hamilton. 

..Bastrop. 

. .Galveston. 

..Cuero. 

.. Castro ville. 

..Anson. 



VERMONT. 

1. H. Henry Powers* Morrisville. 

2. W. W. Grout* Barton. 

VIRGINIA. 

1. William A.Jones* Warsaw. 

2. D. G. Tyler Sturgeon Point. 

3. George D. Wise* Richmond. 

4. James F. Epes* Nottoway C. EL 

5. Claude A. Swanson Chatham. 

6. Paul C.Edmunds* Houston. -v-- 

7. Charles T. O'Ferrall* Harrisonburg. 

8. E. E. Meredith* Brentsville. 

9. James W. Marshall New Castle. 

10. Henry St. G. Tucker* Staunton. 

WASHINGTON. 

At Large John L. Wilson*... Spokane Falls. 
William H. Doolittle Tacoma. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 

1. J. O. Pendleton* Wheeling. 

2. William L. Wilson* Charlestown. 

3. J. D. Anderson* Nicholas C. H. 

4. James Capehart* Point Pleasant. 

WISCONSIN. 

1. H.A. Cooper Racine. 

2. Charles Barwig* Mayville. 

3. John W. Baucock Necedah. 

4. John L. Mitchell* Milwaukee. 

5. George H. Brickner* Sheboygan Falls. 

6. Owen A. Wells Fond du Lac. 

7. George S.Shaw Eau Claire. 

8. Lyman E.Barnes Appleton. 

9. Thomas Lynch* Antigo. 

10. Nils P. Haugen* River Falls. 

WYOMING. 
Henry A. Coffeen , Sheridan. 

TERRITORIES. 

ARIZONA Marcus A. Smith* Tombstone. 
NEW MEXICO Antonio Josephs* OjoCaliente. 
OKLAHOMA Dennis Fdnn Guthrie. 
UTAH J. L. Rawlins Salt Lake. 



JUDICIAL. 119 


APPORTIONMENT OP REPRESENTATIVES 
Under each census since the formation of the government. 


STATES. 


J 


Under Consti- 
tution. Ratio 
30,0"0. 


first Census. 
Katio 33,1,00. 


P'econd Census, 
lia.io 33,ooo. 


Thir r l C fl nU8. 
Ratio 35,000. 


Fourth Census. 
Ratio 40,ooo. 


N 

s 

<t 

r 


Sixth Census. 
Ratio 70,&s0. 


Seventh Census. 
Ratio 93,423. 


Eighth Census. 
Ratio 127,381. 


Ninth Census. 
Ratio 131,426. 


Tenth Census. 
Ratio 151,911. 


Eleventh Cen's. 
Ratio 173,901. 




1819 










3 


5 


I 


7 


6 

3 
3 


8 

2 

9 


8 
5- 
6 
1 
4 

1 

20 
13 
11 

,? 

6 
4 

6 
12 

'I 

7 
14 
1 
3 
1 
2 
7 
84 
9 
1 
21 

1 

7 
2 
10 
11 

'? 

4 

9 

1 

332 


9 
6 
7 
2 
4 
1 
2 
11 

^ 

13 
11 
8 
11 
6 
4 
6 
Li 
12 
7 
7 
15 
1 
6 
1 
2 
8 
34 
9 

J 

2 
30 
2 
7 
2 
10 
13 

1 

4 
10 
1 




1836 












1850 
















1876 




















5 

1 


I 


7 
1 


I 


6 
1 


? 


i 


4 
1 
1 
8 


i 


Delaware 




Florida 


1845 






3 


2 


4 


6 


7 


9 


8 


Idaho 


1890 


Illinois 


1818 
1816 













1 
3 


3 

7 


it 


9 
11 
2 


14 
11 
6 

8 

5 

i 

6 
2 
5 
9 


>! 

3 
10 

11 
9 

3 
6 

13 




1846 










Kansas 


1861 


















1792 




2 


6 


10 


12 
3 
7 
9 
13 


13 
3 
8 
8 
12 


10 

4 

1 


10 

i 

11 

4 
7 


Louisiana 
Maine .** 


1812 
1820 









6 
8 


:! 


9 
17 


! 


Massachusetts.... 


'1837' 


Minnesota 


1858 
1817 














Mississippi 










i 


i 

2 


4 

5 




1821 












1890 










Nebraska 


1867 


















1 

31 
7 


3 
7 
33 
8 


Nevada 


1864 


















New Hampshire... 




3 

1 


4 
5 
10 
10 


5 

6 
17 

12 


J 

13 


6 

j 

13 


| 

40 
13 


J 

9 


1 


New York 




North Carolina 
North Dakota 


'1889 


Ohio ... 


1802 








6 


14 


19 


21 


21 
1 
25 

1 


19 

4 

4 


$ 

27 
2 
5 




1859 












8 
1 
5 


13 
2 

6 


18 
2 
8 


23 
9 


1 

9 


1 

9 


24 


Rhode Island 








South Dakota 


1889 


Tennessee 
Texas . .. 


1796 
1845 








3 


6 


9 


13 


11 


10 

J 


8 
4 
3 
11 


" 

3 

9 


Vermont 


1791 




3 


4 
22 


6 
23 


2 


5 


4 
15 


Virginia 




10 


Washington 


1889 




1863 




















3 

8 




1848 
1890 
















3 


6 


















Total 






105 


141 


181 


213 


240 


223 


234 


243 


203 




65 


356 


STTPRE1 
Chief Ju 
Justices S. J. Field Califo 
JohnM. Harlan Kenti 
Horace Gray Massa 
Samuel Blatchford New 1 
Clerk- 
Salaries: Chi< 
Marshal J. M. Wright, Kentu 

CIRCTJ] 

FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT N 
Boston, Mass. Districts ol 
Hampshire, Massachusetts, 
Ci'cutt Jud -LeB. B. Colt 
Julys, 1884. 


IE COURT 
nice MELV 
rnia... . 


Judicial. 




D STATES 

Illinois, 185 
i ni a r 


B. 
..MIsi 

..Kan 

..Mid 


issipj 
sas .. 
ligan 
oaylv 

' Yorl 

[T. 
Distr 

t en 
f.Y... 

y26, ] 


i 1888 


OF 1 

ILLB 

1863 
1877 
1881 
1882 
nnev, 
0,500; 
3,5001 

OF1 

Circu 
ray, 
Jew 
and. 
L, 


HE TTNITE 
W. FULLER 
L. Q. C. L 
David J.I 
Henry B. 
Geo. Shin 
D C 


icky 


Jrewe 
Brow 
is Jr 


p 

Q 


lf-89 
1890 


chusetts. . . 
fork 
J. H. McKe 
if Justice, $ 
cky $ 

[T COURTS 

(Salaries of 
r. Justice G 
Maine, I 
Rhode Isl 
Bristol, R 


...Pen 


Miia.. 
c 


..1892 
$4,500 

istice 
Ver- 

udrjes 
,1882; 


issii 


$6,000 
i, New 

^iRCrj 
city. 
wYor 
cuse, I 
rk, Ma 


Justices, $10,000; Clerk 
Reporter J. C. B. Davii 

HE TTNITED STATES 

It Judges, $6,000.) 
SECOND JUDICIAL ( 
Blatchford, New York 
mont, Connecticut, Ne 
Wm. J.Wallace, Syra 
E. H. Lacomb, New Yo 


Mr. Ji 
ictsol 
cuit J 
\pril l 

887. 



120 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Shiras, Pittsburg, Pa. Districts of New Jer- 
sey, Pennsylvania, Delaware. Circuit Judge 
Marcus W. Acheson, Pittsburg, Pa., Feb. 3, 
1891. 

FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Chief Jus- 
tice Fuller.Washington.D.C. Districts of Mary- 
land, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, 
South Carolina. Circuit Judge Hugh L. Bond, 
Baltimore, Md., July 13, 1870. 

FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Lamar. Districts of Georgia, Florida, Alabama, 
Mississippi. Louisiana. Texas. Circuit Judge- 
Don A. Pardee, New Orleans. La., May 13, 1881. 

SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Brown, Dec. 18, 1889. Districts of Ohio, Michi- 



gan, Kentucky, Tennessee. Circuit Judge H. 
E. Jackson, Nashville, Tenn., April 12, 1886. 

SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Harlan, Chicago, 111. Districts of Indiana, Illi- 
nois, Wisconsin. Circuit <7d.<7 Walter Q. 
Gresham, Chicago, 111., Dec. 9, 1884. 

EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Brewer, Keokuk, Iowa. Districts of Minnesota, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Iowa, 
Missouri, Kansas. Arkansas. Nebraska, Colo- 
rado. Circuit Judge W. H. Sanborn, St. Paul, 
Minn., March 17, 1892. 

NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. Mr. Justice 
Field, San Francisco, Cal. Districts of Califor- 
nia, Montana, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Ne- 
vada. Circuit Judge J. McKenna, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., March 17, 1892. 



UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURTS OF APPEALS. 



FIRST CIRCUIT. Judges, Horace Gray, Cir- 
cuit Justice; Le Baron B. Colt, W. L. Putnam, 
Circuit Judges; Thomas L. Nelson, Nathan 
Webb, George M. Carpenter, Edgar Aldrich, 
District Judges. Clerk, J. G. Stetsin. Boston, 

SECOND CIRCUIT. Judges, Samuel Blatch- 
ford. Circuit Justice; William J. Wallace, E. H. 
Lacombe, Nathaniel Shipman, Circuit Judges. 
Clerk, J. A. Shields. New York city, 

THIRD CIRCUIT. Judges, Geo. Shiras, Jr., 
Circuit Justice: M. W. Acheson, G. M. Dallas, 
Circuit Judges; William Butler, District Judge. 
Clerk, W. V. Williamson. Philadelphia. 

FOURTH CIRCUIT Judges, Melville W. Ful- 
ler, Chief Justice United States; Hugh L.Bond, 
Nathan Goff, Circuit Judges; John J. Jackson, 
District Judge. Clerk, H. T. Milony. Rich- 
mond, Va. 

FIFTH CIRCUIT. Judges, L. Q. C. Lamar, 
Circuit Justice; D. A. Pardee, Circuit Judge; 



Robert A. Hill, A. P. McCormick, District 
Judges. Clerk, James M. McKee. New Or- 
leans, La. 

SIXTH CIRCUIT. Judges, Henry B. Brown, 
Circuit Justice; H. E. Jackson, W. H. Taft, 
Circuit Judges. G. R. Sage, District Judge. 
Clerk, W. S. Harsha. Cincinnati, O. 

SEVENTH CIRCUIT. Judges, J. M. Harlan. 
Circuit Justice; W. Q. Gresham. W. A. Woods. 
Circuit Judges; P. S. Grosscup, District Judge. 
Clerk, O. T. Morton. Chicago, 111. 

EIGHTH CIRCUIT. Judges, D. J. Brewer, 
Circuit Justice; H. C. Caldwell, W. H. Sanborn, 
Circuit Judges; A. M. Thayer, District Judge. 
Clerk, J. D. Jorden. St. Louis, Mo. 

NINTH CIRCUIT. Judges, Stephen J. Field, 
Circuit Justice; Joseph McKenna, William B. 
Gilbert, Circuit Judges; James H. Beatty, Dis- 
trict Judge. Clerk, F. D. Monckton. San 
Francisco. 



UNITED STATES COURT OF CLAIMS. 

(Judges' salary, $4,500.) 
Chief Justice WILLIAM A. RICHARDSON, Massachusetts, 1885. 

Judges Chas. C. Nott. . . New York 1865 I John Davis DistrictColumbia 1885 

Lawrence Weldon Illinois 18831 S. J. Peelle Indiana 1892 

Chief Clerk Archibald Hopkins, Massachusetts. 1873, $3,000. 

JUDGES OF THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS. 



DISTRICTS. 



ALABAMA-N. and Middle Dist... 

Southern District 

ALASKA 

ARKANSAS^Eastern District 

Western District 

CALIFORNIA-Northern District 

Southern District 

COLORADO.., 

CONNECTICUT 

DELAWARE 

FLORIDA Northern District.... 

Southern District 

GEORGIA Northern District.... 

Southern District 

IDAHO 

ILLINOIS Northern District ... 

Southern District 

INDIANA 

IOWA Northern District 

Southern District 

KANSAS 

KENTUCKY 

LOUISI ANA Eastern District 

Western District 

MAINE 

MARYLAND 

MASSACHUSETTS 

MICHIGAN Eastern District.... 

Western District 

MINNESOTA 

MISSISSIPIM-(T\vo Districts).. 
MISSOURI Eastern District.. .. 

Western District 



Name. 



John Bruce 

H. T. Toulmin 

Warren Truitt 

John A. Williams 

Isaac C. Parker 

Wm. W. Morrow 

Erskine M. Ross. . . . 

Moses Hallett 

W.K.Townsend 

LeonardE. Wales.... 

Charles S wayne 

James W. Locke 

Wm. T. Newman.. . 

Emory Speer 

James H. Beatty .... 

P. S. Grosscup 

Wm. J. Allen 

John H. Baker 

Oliver P. Shiras 

John S. Woolsen 

Cassius G. Foster.... 

John W. Barr 

Ed ward C. Billings... 

Aleck Boarman 

Nathan Webb 

Thomas J. Morris 
Thomas L. Nelson... 

Henry H. Swan 

Henry F. Severens.. 
Rensselaer R. Nelson 

Henry C. Niles 

Amos M. Thayer 

John F.Phillips..., 



Montgo 
Mobile 
Sitka. 



Sesidence. 



ery. 



Mar. 



Little Rock. . . . 

Fort Smith 

San Francisco. 
Los Angeles. . . 

Denver 

New Haven.. . 
Wilmington... 
Jacksonville.. . 

Key West 

Atlanta 

Savannah 

Hailey 

"hicago 

pringfleld 

Goshen 

Dubuque 

Mt. Pleasant. . 

Topeka 

Louisville 

New Orleans... 

Shreveport 

Portland 

Baltimore 

Worcester 

Detroit 

Kalamazoo 

St. Paul 

Kosciusko 

St. Louis 

Kansas City... 



Sept. 
Mar. 
Sept. 
Tan. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
May 
Feb. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



Date of | Sal- 
Commission.\ ary. 



1892 $5.000 



April 
Mar. 
Aug. 
Jan. 
Mar. 
April 
Feb. 
May 
Jan. 
July 
Jan. 
Jan. 
May 
June 
Jan. 
Feb. 
June 



22,1890 
24, 1875 
18, 1891 
i:i. IS.ST 
20, 1877 
28,1892 
20,1884 
17, 1889 

1, 1872 
13, 1887 
,1885 

4,1892 
....1892 



14, 1882 
11,1892 
10, 1874 
16,1880 
10, 1876 



24, 1882 
1, 1879 
10, 1879 

t i" 

25,1886 
ll', 1892 



PRODUCTION OF VARIETIES OF IRON ORE. 121 


JUDGES OF THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTS .--Continued. 


DISTRICTS. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Date of 
Commission. 


Sal- 
ary. 


MONTANA 


Hiram Knowles 
Elmer S. Dundy 
Thomas P. Hawley. 
Edgar Aldrich 


Helei 

Omah 
Carso 
Little 
Trent 
Utica 
New^ 
Brool 
Newt 
Greer 
Fargc 
Cleve 
Leba 
Porth 
West 
Pittsl 
Provi 
Charl 
Sioux 
Chatt 
Memj 
Shern 
Austi 
Dalla 
Bratt 
Norfo 
Harri 
Seatt 
Parke 
Milwj 
Madis 
Cheyt 


m 
a. . , 


Feb. 21,1890 
April 9,1868 
Sept 9. 1890 
Feb. 20,1891 
Oct. 18, 1889 
May 4, 1882 
June 2, 1881 
Mar. 9, 1865 
Feb. 21,1882 
June 7,1872 
Feb. 25, 1890 
Jan. 16, 1890 
Mar. 20,1883 
Mar. 9,1859 
Feb. 19, 1879 
Feb. 23,1892 
Dec. 16, 1884 
Jan. 13, 1887 
Jan. 16, 1890 
May 27, 188( 
June 17, 1878 
May 27, 1890 
June 25,1888 
Mar. 17,1892 
Mar. 16,1877 
Jan. 14, 1874 
Mar, 3, 1883 
Feb. 25, 1890 
Aug. 3, 1861 
July 2, 1888 
Oct. 30, 1877 
Sept. 22, 1890 


5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5000 
5,000 
5,000 
5000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5.00J 
5,000 


NEBRASKA 


NEVADA... 


n Citj 
ton... 
on 

York'i 
rtyn.. 
ern... 




NEW HAMPSHIRE.... 


3i't y :::: 


NEW JERSEY 
NEW YORK Northern District. . . 
Southern District. . 


E.T. 

Alfre 
Addis 
Charl 
Augu 
Kobe 
Alfre 
A. J. 
Georj 
Matt! 
Willii 
Josep 
Georj 
Chas 
Alons 
Davit 
EliS. 
Davu 
Thou 
John 
Hoyt 
Robe 
John 
C. H. 
John 
Jame 
Roma 
John 


Greene 
d C. Cox 
on Brow 
es L. Be 
stus S. S 
rt P. Die 
dD. Th 
Ricks... 
;e R. Saf 
lew P. E 
imButU 
h Bufflr 
re M. Ca 
H. Simc 
-o J. Edj 
1 M. Kej 
Hammc 
1 E. Bry 
as M. M 
B. Rect 
H. Whe 
rt W. Hu 
Paul 


e. . .. 
rn 

nedict. 
eymou 
k 


Eastern District 


N. CAROLINA Eastern District.. 
Western District 


tsboro 


NORTH DAKOTA 


amas.. 
?e 


OHIO Northern District 


land 


Southern District.. 


OREGON 


eady. . 
r 


in<l. . . 
Chest 
)urg. . 
dence 
eston. 
Falls 
anoog 
his 


er 


PENNSYLVANIA-Eastern Dist.. 
Western District 


gton.. 
rpentei 
mton . 
?erton. 

nd.'.!." 
ant 
axey. 
or 

eler... 
ghes.. 


RHODE ISLAND... 




SOUTH CAROLINA.. , 




SOUTH DAKOTA... 


a 


TENNESSEE-E. and Middle Dists 
Western District 


TEXAS Eastern District 


ian 


Western District. 


a 

3 

leborc 
Ik. ... 
sonbu 
e 




Northern District... 


VERMONT.... 


t.".'!!!! 


VIRGINIA-Eastern Distric 
Western District 


rg.. ,.'.'.. 


WASHINGTON 
WEST VIRGINIA 
WISCONSIN-Eastern District .... 
Western District 


Hanford 
J. Jackson 
s G. Jenkins... 
nzo Q. Bunn... 
A. Riner 


rsbur 
lukee 
on... 
>nne. 


g 




WYOMING 


PRODUCTION OF VARIETIES OF IRON ORE. 

Census of 1890. 


TATES 

AND TERRITORIES. 


Brnwn 
Hematite. 


Bed 

Hematite. 


Magnetite. 


Carbonate. 


Total Pro- 
duction 18b9. 


Total 


Tons. 

2,523,087 

' 379,334 
100,421 

88,251 
18,061 

235,057 
10,479 
25,212 


Pr 

Cent. 
100.00 
17.38 
15.03 
3.98 

3.50 
0.72 

9.32 

0.42 
1.00 


Tons. 
9,056,288 

'1,190,985 
4,821 


Per 

Cent. 
100.00 
62.38 
13.15 
0.05 


Tonn. 
>,506,415 


Per 
Cent. 

100. (XI 
17.26 


Tons. 
432,251 


Per 

Cent. 

(KJ.IX 
2 98 


Tons. 
14,518,041 


Per 

Cent. 
100.00 


Percent of total output... 
Alabama 






1,570,319 

mise 

88,251 
29,380 

258,145 
24,072 
77,487 
5356,188 
864,508 
265,718 
415,510 
36,050 
1,247,537 
254,294 
25,283 
1,560,234 
473,294 
13,000 

511,255 

837,399 


10.82 
0.75 

0.61 
0.20 

1.78 
0.17 
0.53 
40.34 
5.95 
1.83 
2.86 
0.25 
8.59 
1.75 
0.18 
10.75 
3.26 
0.09 

3.52 

5.77 


Colorado 


3,894 


0.15 






Connecticut, Maine, and 
Massachusetts 


Delaware and Maryland.... 
Georgia and North Caro- 
lina 










11,319 
52,275 


2.02 

ii'69 


12,963 
12,089 


0.14 
0.14 


10,125 
1,504 


0.40 
0.06 


Idaho and Montana 
Kentucky 


Michigan 


332,257 


13.17 


5.272,915 

8t>4,508 
265,318 


58.22 
9.55 
2.93 


250,997 

415,5i6 
80,003 
927,269 


10.01 










400 


0.02 


"iti.'fxs 

1.20 
37.00 








New Mexico and Utah 
New York 


4,033 
30,374 

26,283 
496.555 
174.192 
13,OOU 

487.208 
101.970 


0.16 
1.20 

"i!6i 

19.fi* 
6.90 
0.51 

19.31 
4.04 


2,017 
224,438 

162,957 
299,102 


0.02 

2.48 

1.80 
3.30 


"65,456 
254,294 


is.'w 

58.83 


Ohio 
Oregon and Washington.... 


860,916 


34.35 


39,806 


9.21 


Tennessee 


Virginia and West Vir- 
ginia 


8,74(1 
735.4:*) 


0.10 
8.12 


6,200 


0.25 


9,101 


2.11 


Wisconsin , . 


Indiana and Vermont 










Output in 1880 .... 


1,919,122 


a;. 95 


2,243,49f. 


31.51 


5,134,276 


29.97 


823,471 


11.57 


7,120,362 




Percentage of total out- 




Amount of increase or 




*G03,965 


*31.47 


*6,812,795 


*303.67 


*372.139 


*17.44 


t391,220 


47.51 


*7,397,679 


*031.98 


Percentage of increase or 
decrease 


Increase. tDecrease. 



122 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 18a'?. 



STATE AND TERRITORIAL GOVERNMENTS. 




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QUALIFICATIONS FOR SUFFRAGE. 



123 



QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED FOR SUFFRAGE IN EACH OF THE 44 STATES. 






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124 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FDR 1893. 


SSnitco States diplomatic ano Consular 5-erbice. 

DEC. 1, 1892. 

Explanation E. E. anc 1 M. P., Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary; M. 
R., Minister Resident; M. R. and C. G., Minister Resident and Consul-General. 


COUNTRY. 


Representative. 


Location. 


App' ted From 


Salary. 


Argentine Republic 
Austria-Hungary 


J. R. G. Pitkin, E. E.& M. P 
Geo. W.Fishback, Sec.of Leg 
F. D. Grant, E. E. & M. P 
A. C. Coolidge. Sec. of Leg.. 
E. H. Terrell, E. E. & M. P.. 
F.J. Grant, E. E. & M. P 
E. H. Conger, E. E. & M. P 
C.F. Maskell, Sec. of Leg.. 
P.Egan, E. E. & M. P 
F. R. McCreery, Sec. of Leg 
Charles Denby, E. E & M. P. 
Howard Martin, Sec. of Leg. . 
C. Denby, Jr., 2d Sec. of Leg. . 
Fleming D. Cheshire, Int 
J. T. Abbott, E. E. & M. P 
J.Coughlin, Sec. of Leg. &C.G 
R. C. Shannon, E. E. & M. P. 
Clark E. Carr, E. E. & M. P.. . 
R. B. Mahany, E. E. & M. P.. . 
F.J. Coolidge, E.E.&M. P.. 
Henry Vignaud, Sec. of Leg. 
Augustus Jay, 2d Sec. of Leg. 
W.W. Phelps, E. E. &M. P.. 


Buenos Ayres. 
Buenos Ayres. 
Vienna 


Louisiana 
Missouri 
New York.... 
Massachus'ts 
Texas 


$10,000 
1. 500 
12,000 
1,800| 
7,500 
5,000 ! 

1,500 
12,000 
2,625 
1,800 
3,000 
10,000 

5', 000 
17,500 
2,625 

i||8 

2,625 
2,000 
6,500 
10,000 

5, *000 
10. 000 
12,000 
1.800 
12,000 
2,625 
1,800 
2,500 
7,500 
1.500 
1,000 

4,000 




Vienna 
Brussels . 


Bolivia 


La Paz 


Washington- 
Iowa 
Maryland 
Nebraska 
Michigan 
Indiana 
New York.... 
Indiana 


Brazil 


Rio de Janeiro. 
Rio de Janeiro- 
Santiago 
Santiago 
Pekin 
Pekin . . 


Chile 


China 


Colombia 


Pekin... 


Pekin 


Bogota 
Bogota 
Managua 


N.Hampshire 
New York.... 
New York. . . . 


Costa Rica 


Denmark 




Ecuador 


Quito 
Paris. 


New York. . . . 
Massachus'ts 
Louisiana 
New York.... 
New Jersey.. 
Kentucky 
New Jersey. . 
Illinois 
Maryland.... 
Ohio 
California.... 
California.... 
Virginia 
Maine 
Pennsylvania 
California.... 
Pennslyvania 
New York.... 
California.... 
Ohio 
Indiana 
Japan 
Massachus'ts 
Ohio 


France 


Germany 


Paris 
Paris 
Berlin 


Great Britain 


C. Coleman, Sec. of Leg 


Berlin..., 


J. B. Jackson, 2d Sec. of Leg. 
R. T. Lincoln, E. E. & M. P.. 
Henry White, Sec. of Leg. . . . 
L. Anderson, 2d Sec. of Leg. . 
Truxton Beale, E. E. & M. P.. 
R. Pacheco, E. E. & M. P 
S.Kimberly,Sec.of Leg.&C.G. 
John L. Stevens, E. E. & M.P. 
J. S. Durham, Min.Res. &C.G. 
R. Pacheco. E. E. & M. P 
W. Potter, E. E. &M. P 
H. R. Whitehouse. Sec.of Leg 
F. L. Coombs, E. E. & M. P.. . 
Edwin Dun, Sec. of Leg 
J. R. Herod, 2d Sec. Leg. ... 
Willis N. Whitney, Int ... 
Aug. Heard, M. R. <KC. G 
H. N. Allen, Sec. of Leg 
Hong Woo Kwan, Int. 


Berlin 




Greece .. 


London 
London 
Athens 
Guatemala 
Guatemala 
Honolulu 
Port-au-Prince 
Guatemala.. .. 
Home 
Rome 
Tokio (Yedo)... 
Tokio (Yedo)... 
Tokio (Yedo)... 
Tokio (Yedo)... 
Seoul 


Guatemala 


Hawaiian Islands 
Hayti 




Italy 
Japan 


Korea 
Liberia ... 


Seoul 
Seoul 


KimKyengHa, Int 
W. D. McCoy, M. R. & C. G.. 
T.Ryan, E.E.&M. P 
C. A. Dougherty, Sec. of Leg 
S. R. Thayer, E.E.&M.P... 
R. C. Shannon, E. E. & M. P. 
George Maney, E. E. & M. P. 
W.R.Sperry, M.R.&C.G.. 
John Hicks E E & M P 


Seoul 
Monrovia 


Indiana 


Mexico 
Netherlands 


Mexico 
Mexico 


Kansas 
Pennsylvania 
Minnesota,... 
New York.... 
Tennessee. .. 
Delaware 
Wisconsin.... 
Pennsylvania 


17. 500 
1,800 
7,500 
10. 000 
7,500 
5.000 
10, 000 
1,500 
5,000 
6,500 
17,500 
2.625 
10.000 
5,000 
6.500 
5.000 
12,000 
1.800 
7.500 
5,000 
10,000 
1,800 
3.000 
7,500 
1,500 


The Hague .... 
Managua 
Montevideo 


Nicaragua 
Paraguay and Uruguay.. 
Persia 


Peru 






R. R. Neill, Sec. of Leg. . 
M R & C G 


-.ima 


Roumania 
Russia 


Truxton Beale, E.E. & M. P 
A. D. White, E. E. & M. P 
G. C. Webb, Sec. of Leg . . 
R. C. Shannon, E. E. & M. P. 
J. S. Durham, Ch'ged' Affair's. 
Truxton Beale. E. E. & M. P. 
S. H.Boyd, M.R.&C.G.. . 
A. L. Snowden, E. E. & M. P. 
H. R. Newberry, Sec. of Leg.. 
W.W.Thomas, J.-..E.E.&M P. 
P.C. Cheney, E.E.&M.P.... 
D. P. Thompson, E.E. & M.P. 
H. R. Newberry, Sec. of Leg. 
A. A. Gargiulo, Int 
W. L. Scruggs. E. E. & M. P. 
R. M. Bartleman, Sec.of Leg. 


Athens 
St. Petersburg. 
St. Petersburg. 
Managua 
Port-au-Prince. 
\thens 
Bangkok 
Madrid 
Madrid 
Stockholm 
Berne 
Constantinople 
Constantinople 
Constantinople 
Caracas.., 
Caracas 


California 
New York.... 
New York.... 
New York 
Pennsylvania 
California 
Missouri 
Pennsylvania 
Michiean 
Maine 
N.Hampshire 
Oregon 
Dist.Col'mbia 
Turkey 
Georgia 
Massachus'ts. 


Salvador . . . 


Santo Domingo . 


Servia 


Siam 


Spain 

Sweden and Norway 
Switzerland 




Venezuela 





DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE. 125 


CONSULS-GENERAL AND CONSULS, AGENTS AND CONSULAR AGENTS. 


PLACE. 


Name. 


State. 


Salary. 


Fees 'ft*. 


ARGENTINE REPUB- 
LIC Buenos Ayres.. 
AUSTR1A-HUNGARY- 
Buda-Pesth, Hungary. . . 
Prague, Austria 
Reichenberg, Bohemia.. 
Trieste Austria 


Edward L. Baker 

Edward P. T. Hammond. 
William A. Rublee 
John B Hawes 


Illinois 
Maryland 


$2,500 

Fees 
3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
3,500 

2,000 
3,000 
2,500 
1,000 
1.500 
1,500 

5,000 
1,500 


$1,047 

1^003 
6,837 

AS40 
2,635 
917 

m 

26-2 
6,972 


Wisconsin 


California 


James F. Hartigan 
(ulius Goldschmidt 

Felix A. Mathews 
George F Lincoln... .... 
George W. Roosevelt.. .. 
John B. Osborne 


District of Columbia. . . . 
Wisconsin 


Vienna, Austria 
BARB ART STATES- 
Tangier 


California 
Connecticut 
Pennsylvania 


BELGIUM-Antwerp. . . . 
Brussels 


Ghent 


Pennsylvania. 


Liege .. . 


Nicholas Smith 
William O Thomas 


New York 


BRAZIL Bahia 


Para 


Tames M. Avers 
Sdwin Stevens 


Ohio 


Rio Grande do Sul 
Rio de Janeiro 
Santos 
CHILE Coquimbo 
Iquique 


Maryland 


Oliver H Dockery 


North Carolina 


Sdwin A. Berry 
William C. Tripler 
Joseph W. Merriam 


Florida 


New York 
Massachusetts 
Massachusetts 
Michigan 


Fees 
Fees 
1,000 

Fees 
S.OOO 
3,000 
3,000 
Fees 
2,500 
5,000 
3,500 

2,000 
2,000 
Fees 
3,000 
Fees 
4,000 
2,000 




""i'si 

'3,083 


kmn F. Van Ingen 
William B. McCreery 
Edward Bedloe 




CHINA Amoy 


Pennsylvania 
Wisconsin 




Chefoo 


W R Fuller 










396 
233 


Fuchau 


Samuel L. Gracey 


Massachusetts 
Ohio 


Hankow 


Henry W. Andrews 










24 
6,024 
1,215 

5,309 

"'i',i90 
1,246 

""568 


Shanghai 


\ oseph A. Leonard 
William Bowman 




Tien-Tsin 


Kentucky 


COL.OMBIA 
Bari-anquilla 


lohnson Nickeus 


North Dakota 


Jeremiah Coughlin 
Clavton I Croft 


New York 




North Dakota 


Colon (Aspinwall) 
Medellin 


William W. Ashby 


Virginia . . 






Thomas Adamson 
Beckford Mackey 

William H. Bradley 
Samuel B Horne. 


Pennsylvania 


COSTA RICA San Jose.. 
DENMARK AND DOMIN- 
IONS Copenhagen... . 
St. Thomas, W. I 
ECUADOR-Guayaquil . . 
FRANCE AND DOMIN- 
IONS Algiers Af 


South Carolina 
Illinois 




William B. Sorsby 




Fees 
3,000 
Fees 
1.500 
Fees 
1,500 

'iffi 

2,500 
2,500 
1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
Fees 
5,000 
2,000 
Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
2,000 




Charles T. Grellet. 
Horace G. Knowles 




244 
&989 

'"i',69'4 
158 
92 
1,976 
2,017 
13,464 
5,106 
474 
480 
115 

'3,753 
3,379 
1,349 

'3,022 


Bordeaux 
Cayenne, Guiana 
Cognac 


Delaware 


WilliamS. Preston 
Peter Strickland 
Charles Bartlett 
Oscar F. Williams 
Walter T. Griffln 
Edmund B. Fairfleld 
Charles B Trail 


New York 
Massachusetts 
Maine 
New York 
New York 


Goree-Dakar, Af 
Guadeloupe Island, W.I 
Havre 




Michigan 


Marseilles 


Maryland 


Martinique, W. I 
Nantes 


Alfred B. Keevil 
Hermel de S. Dupin 
Wm. Harrison Bradley. . . 
L. Le Mescam 




New York 
Illinois 


Nice 


Noumea, N.C 




Paris 


Adam E King 


Maryland 




Alton Angier 
William P. Atwell 
Charles P. Williams 
Aimee Fonsales 
R. Burton Dinzey 
Francis B. Loomis 




Roubaix 


District of Columbia.... 
New York 
France 
Pennsylvania 
Ohio 


Rouen 


Saigon, Cochin China... 
St. Bartholomew, W. I. 
St.Etienne 








Fees 
1,000 

3,000 

2,500 
2,500 
Fees 
3,000 

4,000 


1,763 
345 


Tahiti, So'c. Islands 
FRIENDLY AND NAVI- 
GATORS' ISLANDS- 
Apia 




New York 






GERMANY- 
Aix la Chapelle 






2,758 
7,957 

i' 12J42 
12,755 1 


Annaberg 
Bamberg 
Barmen 
Berlin 


Daniel B.Hubbard 


Massachusetts 


Smith Carolina . 


Adolph G Studer llowa 


Williamllayden Edwardslohio 



126 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


PLACE. 


Name. 


State. 


Salary. 


Fees '9.'. 




Hugo M Starkloff .... 


Missouri 


$2,500 
1,500 


$2,877 




Charles W. Erdman 
Cyrus W, Field 


Kentucky..., 




New York 
Illinois 
South Carolina 


2,500 
2,500 
2,000 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
Fees 
3,000 
Fees 
Fees 
2,500 
1,500 
2,000 
2.000 
1,500 
2,500 
1,500 
2,500 
Fees 
2,000 
1,000 
2,000 

Fees 
1,500 
1,500 


1,535 

""4,648 
5,277 
4,012 

338 

6,770 
4869 
1,676 
8,637 
2,418 
7,351 






William D. Warner 
Evans Blake .. .. 


Crefeld 


Illinois. . .. 




Aulick Palmer 


District of Columbia 
Minnesota 




Soren Listoe 


Erfurt 


Thomas Ewing Moore 
Frank H. Mason 


District of Columbia 
Ohio 

Illinois 


Frankfort 


Glauchau 
Hamburg 


Sidney P. Townshend 
Charles F. Johnson 
Edmund Johnson 
Henry W. Diederlch... . 
Albert H. Washburn... . 
John F. Winter 


Maryland 


Ohio 
New Jersey .... 


Kehl 




Indiana 


Magdeburg 


M assachusetts 


Mannheim 


Illinois 


3,422 
5,738 
1,849 
4,303 
7,322 
12,903 
1,184 
2,951 

" "679 


Mayence 


James H. Smith 


District of Columbia 
New York 


Munich 


Frederick W.Catlin... . 
William J. Black 
Thomas W. Peters 
David S. K. Buick 
James C. Kellogg 
F C Gottschalk 




Delaware 
Wyoming 


Plauen 


Sonneberg 


Oregon 


Stettin 


Louisiana 


Stuttgart 


California 


GREAT BRITAIN AND 
DOMINIONS- 
Aden Arabia 


Dwight Moore . . . 


M assachusetts 


Amherstburg, Canada. 
Antigua, W. I 


James W.Hine 


Michigan 






Auckland N Z 


John Darcy Connolly 
Edward A Dimmick 


California 


1,500 
1,500 
Fees 
3,000 
2.000 
Fees 
1,500 
2,500 
Fees 


676 

""995 

9^943 
300 
16,805 
1 120 
975 


Barbadoes, W. I 
Bathurst Africa . 


Massachusetts .. 






Belfast Ireland 


Samuel G. Ruby 
James Leith 
Samuel H. Deneen 
William K. Sullivan 
Adam Everly .. 


Iowa 




Belleville, Canada 
Bermuda (Hamilton). . . 
Birmingham, England.. 
Bombay, India 


Illinois 


Illinois 


Pennsylvania 


Henry Ballantine 
John A. Tibbits 


District of Columbia 
Connecticut 


Bradford, England 
Bristol. England 
Brockville, Canada 
Calcutta, India 
Cape Town, Africa 
Cardiff Wales 


Lorin A. Latbrop.... 


California 


James F. Ellis..., 


Wisconsin 


Samuel Merrill 


Indiana 


George F. Hollis 


Massachusetts 


-i RT)A 




Walter E. Howard 


Vermont 


l',500 
1.500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,500 
Fees 
2,000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,500 
2,000 
Fees 
1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
3,000 
1,500 
1,500 
3,500 
2,000 
Fees 
5,000 
2.500 
Fees 
1,500 
3,000 
2,000 
2,500 
Fees 
5,000 
5,000 
1,500 
1,500 
3,000 
4,500 


587 

894 

2,795 
303 

'"l,350 
295 
769 
1,374 
7,244 
2,872 
270 
524 

383 
11,435 

"Tjb'i 

""708 




William Morey 
Isaac C. Hall 
William H. H. Webster... 
Henry L.Arnold 


Maine 

Massachusetts . 


Charlottetown, P. E. I.. 
Chatham, Canada 
Clifton, Canada 
Coaticook, Canada 
Collingwood, Canada. ... 
Cork (Queenstown) 
Demerara. Guiana 
Dublin, Ireland.. 
Bundee, Scotland 


Xew York.... 


New York... 


Alfred W. Street 
Hermen Pref ontaine 


New York..., 


New York.... 


John J. Platt 
Philip Carroll . 


Ohio 

New York 


Alexander J. Reid 
Arthur B. Wood 
James D. Reid 


Wisconsin 


New York 


unfermline, Scotland. 
Falmouth, England 
Ft. Erie, Canada 
Gaspe Basin, Canada... 
Gibraltar, Spain 


New York 


Howard Fox 


England . . 


Ossian Bedell 


New York 


Almar F. Dickson 


Massachusetts 


Horatio J. Sprague 
Levl W Brown 


Massachusetts 


Glasgow, Scotland 
Goderich, Canada 
Guelph, Canada. 


Ohio 


R. S Chllton 


District of Columbia. . . . 
New York 
Maine 
Ohio , 
Tasmania .... 


Loton S. Hunt 
Wakefleld G. Frye 
William Monaghan 
Alexander G. Webster 
Oliver H. Simons 
William P. Smyth 


Halifax, N. S 


Hamilton, Canada. 
Hobart, Tasmania 
Hong Kong, China 
Huddersfield, England.. 
Hull, England .. ... 


Colorado 


8,065 


Missouri 
District of Columbia.... 
Louisiana 
Minnesota 
Maryland 


Byron G. Daniels 
Marshall H. Twitchell.... 
William R. Estes... 


'i?i 
"W 


Kingston, Canada 
Kingston, Jamaica 
Leeds, England 
Leith (Edinburgh) 
Levuka, F. I 


Francis H. Wlgfall 


Wallace Bruce .. 


New York . . 


Andrews A. St. John 
Thomas H. Sherman 
John C. New 
Hiram Z. Leonard 
John Worthington 
William F. Grinnell 
George H. Wallace 
Joseph H. Bush 


Pennsylvania 
District of Columbia 
Indiana 


Liverpool, England 
London, England 
London, Canada 


' 62,446 
849 
57 
20,553 




Malta (Island) 


New York 
New York 


Manchester, England.. 
Melbourne. Australia.. 
Melbourne, Australia... 
Moncton.N. B ... 
Montreal, Canada 
Morrisburerh. Canada... . 


Missouri 








James S. Benedict 
Charles L Knapp. 


New York. . . 


Fees 
4,000 
1,500 


778 
3,968 
459 


New York... 


Seward S. Crapser 'New York 



DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE. 127 


PLACE. 


Name. 


State. 


Salary. 


Fees '92. 




Thomas J. McLain 


Ohio 


$2,000 
1,500 
Fees 
2,500 
3,000 
Fees 
1,500 


$789 
3,297 
2,583 
10,546 
6,501 

""il2 


Newcastle, England 
Newcastle, N. S. W 
Nottingham, England.. 
Ottawa, Canada 
Palnierston, Canada 
Pictou,N. S 


Horace W. Metcalf 
George T. Baggs 


Maine. 


Maryland 


JohnL. McKim 
Richard G. Lay 
HarryP Dill 
Alonzo Spencer 


Delaware 
District of Columbia.... 
Maine 
New York 


Pictou, N. S 


John R. Noonan 




Plymouth, England 
Port Hope, Canada 
Port Louis, Mauritius.. 
Port Rowan, Canada... 


Thomas W. Fox 
Norton McGiffin 
Thomas T. Prentis 


England 


Fees 
1,500 
2,000 
Fees 
1,500 


8 4 ?i 

""504 


New York 


Vermont ... 




Port Sarnia, Canada.. . 
Port Stanley, F. I 
Pt.Stanley& St.Thomas, 
Canada 


Samuel D. Pace 
Henry S. Lasar 


Michigan.... 


Missouri 


1,500 




Ferdinand A. Husher 
George R. Wright. . . 
Frederick M. Ryder 
Louis H Kuderling 


Minnesota 


2,000 
1 500 


2,472 


Prescott, Canada...- 
uebec Canada . 


New York 


Connecticut. 


1,500 
Fees 

1,'50C 
Fees 
Fees 
1,500 
Fees 
2,OOC 

1,*50C 
Fees 
1,500 
Fees 
2,000 
1,500 
2,000 
Fees 
2,500 
1,000 
Fees 
2,500 
1,500 
Fees 
1,500 
1,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
6,500 
Fees 

2,000 
1,000 
5,000 

4,000 
1,000 


496 

276 

m 

101 


aultSte.Marie,Canada 
Sheffield, England 
Sherbrooke, Canada 
Sierra Leone, Africa. . 


Wisconsin . .. 


Benjamin Folsom 


New York 


James A. Wood 


New Hampshire 


Bolding Bowser 


Connecticut.. . . 


Singapore, S S 


Rounsevelle Wildman. . . . 
Jasper P. Bradley 
Stephen W. Parker 


Idaho 
West Virginia 


Southampton, England 
St. Christopher, W. I .... 
St. George's, Bermuda. . 
St. Helena (Island) 
St. Hyacinthe, Canada. 
St John N B 


Georgia 


J,003 
3 

899 
163 
575 

"'4,446 

"3$ 

2,923 




James B. Coffin 
Edward W Wlllett 




California 


Mason D Sampson 


Kansas 


St Johns N F 


Thomas N Molloy 


New York 


St. Johns, Canada 
St. Stephen, N. B 
Stanbridge, Canada 
Stratford, Canada 
Swansea, Wales 
Sydney, N. S. W 
Three Rivers, Canada.. 
Toronto, Canada 
Trinidad, W. I 


Henry C Fisk 


Vermont . .. 


Albert E Neill 


Maine 


WillardFarrington 
Woolman J. Holloway.... 
Charles M. Holton 
William Kapus 


Vermont 


Indiana 


Washington 


Oregon 
Sew York 


Nicholas Smith 




Issourt 


William P. Pierce. . . . 
William Burgess. 


Georgia 


New Jersey 
New York 


Turk's Is'land, W. I.... 
Vancouver, B. C 
Victoria, B.C 





Frank H Pierce 


New Hampshire 


Levi W.Myers 




1,259 
1,776 
I,8u4 

""434 
660 


Wallaceburgh, Canada. 
Waubaushene, Canada 
Windsor Canada 


[saac G Worden 


Michigan 


Reuel W. Soule 
Charles D. Joslyn 


Maine 
Michigan 

District of Columbia 
Minnesota 


Windsor N. S 


Edward Young 


Winnipeg, Manitoba. . . 
Woodstock N B 


James W. Taylor 
Walter T. Townshend... 
Gren ville James 


Maryland 
District of Columbia 
California . 


Yarmouth, N.S 


"'1,062 


GREECE Athens 




Patras 


Edward Hancock 

Samuel Kimberly 
Stanislas Goutler 


Greece 

Virginia 
Pennsylvania 


GUATEMALA 


HAYTI Cape Haytien. 






HAWAIIAN ISLANDS^- 


Henry W. Severance 
William C. Burchard 
James J Peterson 


California 


3,476 


HONDURAS Ruatan. . . . 


United States 


West Virginia 


2,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
2,000 
3,000 
Fees 
1,000 
4,000 
3,000 
3,000 
5,000 
7,500 
4.000 

2.000 
Fees 
2,000 
Fees 


2 

'"i',519 
2,314 
3,297 
8,273 

2^401 
8> 671 

1} 
9 -JJ? 

4,880 
"'43 

'"50 
"i',293 


ITALY Castelammare . . 


Alf red M Wood 


New York 
District of Columbia.... 
Pennsylvania 


Carl Bailey Hurst 




James Verher Long 




James Fletcher 


Iowa 




RadciiffeH. Ford 
Darley R Brush 


Maine 
South Dakota 




Milan 


George W Pepper . . . 


Ohio 


Naples 
Palermo 


John S. Twells 
Horace C. Pugh 


Pennsylvania 
[ndiana 






St Leger A Touhay 


District of Columbia 
district of Columbia 
Washington 




Henry A. Johnson 
Willard D. Tillotson 
W H Abercrombie 


J A PA N Kanagawa 
Nagasaki 
Osaka and Hiogo 
KONGO STATE Boma. 
KOREA-Seoul 
LIBERI A-Monrovia 
MADAGASCAR- 


New Jersey 


Enoch J. Smithers 
R. Dorsey Mohun 
Augustine Heard 
William D McCoy 


Delaware 


District of Columbia 




John L. Waller 
Louis S. Maguire. 
James F. McCaskey 
William Hoimke 


Kansas 


MASK AT-Maskat 
MEXICO Acapulco 
Chihuahua 


United States 


Ohio 





128 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


PLACE. 


Name. 


State. 


Salary 


Fees '92. 


Durango 


J ohn S. McCaughan 


Iowa. . 


Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
1,500 
Fees 
$1 500 


""$415 
305 


Ensenada 








j. Alexander Forbes 
James Viosca 


California 


La Paz 


California 




John B. Richardson 
Richard Lambert 
Edward H. Thompson.. 
Richard Guenther 
Delos H. Smith 
Warner P. Sutton 
Archibald J. Sampson 
Eugene O. Fechet 
John Woessner 


Kansas 
California 


M H7.il 1 1 11 11 


Merida 


Massachusetts 


Mexico 


Wisconsin 


4,000 
1,500 
2,500 
2 50( 
2ioOO 
Fees 
Fees 
1,500 
Fees 
3,000 

1,500 
1,000 
Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
2,000 
Fees 
2.000 
2,000 
1,500 
5,000 
3,500 

1,500 
1,500 

5!ooo 

Fees 
1,000 
1,000 
6,500 
Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
Fees 
2,000 
Fees 
3,000 
Fees 

2,000 

Fees 
Fees 


'"2,423 

808 
3,206 
1,053 
218 


Nogales 




Nuevo Laredo 




Paso del Norte 
Piedras Negras 
Saltlllo 


Colorado 


Michigan . 


Texas 


San Bias 








Adam Lieberknecht 
John Drayton 
William W. Apperson. 


Illinois 


Tuxpan 
Vera Cruz 


South Carolina 






NETHERLANDS AND 
DOMINIONS- 


Theodore M. Schleier 
Bradstreet S. Rairden 
Leonard B. Smith 


Tennessee 
Maine 






"'2,061 

""386 
4,653 




Maine 


Padang, Sumatra . 
Paramaribo, Guiana.... 
Rotterdam 
St Martin W.I 






William Wyndham 




Walter E. Gardner 
D. C. Van Romondt 
William Newell 


Wisconsin ... 


St. Martin 
Washington 


NICARAGUA-Managua. 
San Juan del Norte 
PARAGUAY-Asuncion.. 
PERSI A-Teheran 
PERU Callao 


Sigmund C. Braida 


New Jersey 




Edmund Shaw 


Indian Territory 


No fees 


Watson R. Sperry 
\quilla J. Daugherty 


Delaware 
Illinois 


PORTUGAL AND DO- 
MINIONS- 


Rhode Island 
Minnesota 
New York 


289 
207 


Funchal, Madeira 


JohnF.Healey 
George S Batcheller 


Loanda, Africa 
Mozambique, Africa. .. 
Santiago, Cape Verde . . 
ROUMANIA Bucharest. 
RUSSIA- Archangel 


Hell Chatelain 


New Jersey 


2 
""22 


W. Stanley Hollis 


Massachusetts 
Massachusetts 


Henry Pease 


Truxton Beale 


California 


Ferdinand Lindes 






James C. Chambers 


New York 


336 
81 








Nicholas Wertheim 
Thomas E. Heenan 


Germany 


Odessa 


Minnesota 


""384 


Riga 


Niels P. A. Bornholdt... 
John M. Crawford 


Denmark 


St. Petersburg 


Ohio 




85 


SALVADOR- 


James W Love 


Nebraska . . . 


SANTO DOMINGO- 
Puerto Plata .... 


Thomas Simpson 


Rhode Island 


145 


Samana 






Santo Domingo 


Campbell L. Maxwell 


Ohio'.... 


1,500 




SERVIA Belgrade 


California 
Missouri 

Spain 


6,500 
5,000 

Fees 
'AOOO 
1,500 
1,500 
1,500 
Fees 
2,500 
Fees 
1,500 
Fees 




SI AM Bangkok 
SPAIN AND DOMINIONS 
Alicante 


Sempronius H. Boyd 
William L. Giro 




William B. Dickey 
Herbert W. Bowen 


-,ouisiana 


1,102 
315 
380 

""545 

"i'.iVi 




New York 


Cadiz 


Robert W.Turner 
S. P. C. Henriques 
C. Molina 
rlenry A. Ehninger 
Jose de Carricarte 


Kansas 
New York 
Spain 
New York 
Spain 


Cardenas, Cuba 
Carthagena 


Cienfuegos,Cuba 














Havana, Cuba 
Madrid 


iamon O. Williams 


New York 


Fees 
1,500 
2,000 
3,000 
Fees 

Fees 
Fees 
2,500 
Fees 

Fees 
1,000 


""i'53 




Malaga 


Thomas M. Newson 


Minnesota 


Manila, Philippines. 


"i'.oYo 
""390 

270 


Matanzas, Cuba . 


Elias H Cheney 


New Hampshire 
New York 


Nuevitas 
Sagua la Grande, Cuba.. 
San Juan, P. R 
San Juan de los Reme- 
dies, Cuba. 


Richard Gibbs 


Daniel M. Mullen- 


Massachusetts 
Virginia 


Lewin R Stewart 


James H Springer 




Santander 


Clodomiro Perez 


Spain 
New York 




Santiago de Cuba 
Teneriffe, Canary Isl.. . . 
SWEDEN-NORWAY 


1,165 


Philibert Lallier 




Frederick G. Gade 
ierliard Gade 


Norway 


998 

1.114 


Christiania.Norwav 


Norway 



FOREIGN LEGATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



129 



PLACE. 



Name. 



State. 



Salary. 



Fees '92. 



Gothenburg, Sweden. . . 

Stockholm, Sweden 

SWITZERLAND-Basle. 

Berne 

Genera 

Horgen 

St. Gall 

Zurich 

Zurich 

TURKEY AND DOMIN- 
IONS Bagdad. 

Beirut, Syria 

Cairo, Egypt 

Constantinople . 

Jerusalem, Syria 

Sivas 

Smyrnji 
URUGU A Y Coloiila.' '.'..', 

Montevideo 

Paysandu 

VENEZUELA 

Ciudad Bolivar 

La Guayra 

Maracaibo 

Puerto Cabello 

ZANZIBAR-Zanzibar . . . 



Charles H. Shepard... 

Joseph E. Hay den 

George Gifford 

J.E.Hinnen 

Roland J. Hemmick... 
Charles A. Votriede.. . 
Samuel H. M. Byers.. 

George L. Catlin 

Emil J. Constam 



W. Tweedie 

Erhard Bissinger 

B.C. Little 

William B. Hess 

Selah Merrill 

MiloA.Jewett 

William C. Emmet. . . . 
Benjamin D. Manton. 

Frank D. Hill 

John G. Huf nagel 



Peter Scandella 

Philip C. Hanna 

E. H. Plumacher . . . 
William G. Riley... 
Charles W. Dow... 



Massachusetts 

District of Columbia. 
Maine 



Pennsylvania 

Ohio 

[owa 

New Jersey 



$1,512 
"3,588 

""568 

868 

8,826 



New York 

Kansas 

Indiana 

Massachusetts. 
Massachusetts. 
New York.. 



2,000 



354 



Rhode Island.. , 

Minnesota 

Maryland 



New York 

Iowa 

Tennessee 

Virginia 

Massachusetts. 



1,452 
75 



1,454 



1,500 
Fees 



rise, 



FOREIGN LEGATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



COUNTRIES. 



Name. 



Hank. 



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC Senor Don Vicente G. Quesada,.... 
AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 

BELGIUM 

BRAZIL 



Senor Don Juan S. Attwell. 

Chevalier de Tavera 

Mr.de Mezey 

Mr. Alfred Le Ghait 

Baron Raoul de Vriere. 



Senhor Salvador de Mendonca 



E. E. and M. P. 

Sec. Leg. & Charge d' Afs. ad int. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Coun'l'rof Leg.&C.d'Afs.ad int. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Second Secretary. 

E. E. and M. P. 



nor Alfredo de M. G. Ferreira Second Secretary. 



CHILE 

CHINA 



COLOMBIA.... 



COSTA RICA. 
DENMARK... 
FRANCE 



GERMANY. 



GREAT BRITAIN 



Senhor Mario de Mendonca 

Senor Don Anibal Cruz 

Senor Don Guillermo Amunategui 

Mr. Tsui Kwo Yin 

Mr. PungKwang Yu. 

Mr. Wang Hung Ting 

Mr. Ho Shen Chee 

Senor Don Jose M. Hurtado 

Senor Don Julio Rengifo 

Senor Don Joaquin B. Calvo 

Count de Sponneck 

Mr J. Patenotre 

Mr. Paul Desprez 

Mr. Maurice J. Depret 

Le Commandant Lottin 

Mr. Jules Bceuf ve 

Dr. von Holleben 

Baron von Ketteler 

Lieut. Heese 

Mr. von Mutzenbecher 

Mr.P. W. Buddecke 

Mr. C. von der Weth. 



Sir J. Pauncefote,G.C.M.G.,K.C.B. 
Hon. Michael H. Herbert. 
Hon. Alan Johnstone. . 



Mr. Cecil A. Spring Rice 

Mr. Edmund Fraser 

Mr. Arthur Robert Peel 

Capt. W. H. May, R. N. 



Second Secretary. 

1st Sec. & Charge d'Afs. ad int. 

Second Secretary. 

E. E. and M. P. 

First Secretary. 

Secretary. 

Translator and Attache. 

E. E. and M. P. 

ec. Leg. & Charge d' Afs.ad int. 

lharge d'Affaires ad interim. 

!. E. and M. P. 
E.E.andM. P. 

Conn'l'r & Charge d'Afs ad int. 
Third Secretary. 
Military Attache. 
Chancellor. 
E. E. and M. P. 

Sec. Leg. & Charge d'Afs ad int. 
Attache. 
Attache. 

Chancellor of Legation. 
Assistant Chancellor. 
E. E. and M. P. 

Secretary & Charge d'Affaires. 
Second Secretary. 



HAYTI. 



HAWAII 

ITALY 



JAPAN 



KOREA. 



Second Secretary. 

Third Secretary. 

Third Secretary. 

Naval Attache. 

Second Naval Attache. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Secretary of Legation. 

E. E. and M. P. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Sec.Leg. and Charge d'Affaires. 

Attache. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Secretary of Legation. 

Counselor of Legation. 

Naval Attache. 

Mr. K. Nakayama...'... Chancellor. 

Mr. Pak Chung Yang E. E. and M. P. 

Mr. Ye Cha Yun . . . I Sec. Lear.and Charge d'Affaires. 



Capt. Gerald Chaus Langley, R. N 

Mr. Hannibal Price , 

Mr. John Hurst 

Dr. J. Mott Smith 

Baron de Fava. . 



Marquis Imperial! di Francavilla. 

Signer Mario Ruspoli 

Mr. Gozo Tateno 

Mr. Tsunejiro Miyaska 

Mr. Durham W. Stevens 

Lieut. S. Nakamura, I. J. N 



130 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



COUNTRIES. 



Name. 



Rank. 



MEXICO... 



NETHERLANDS. .. 
NICARAGUA... 



PERU., 



PORTUGAL. 

RUSSIA .. 



3PA1X... 



SWEDEN AND NORWAY 

SWITZERLAND 

TURKEY 

VENEZUELA... 



Senor Don Matias Romero 

Senor Don Cayetano Romero 

Senor Don Miguel Covarrubias 

Senor Don Enrique Santibanez 

Senor Don Edmundq J. Plaza 

Senor Don A. L. Grajeda 

Mr. G. de Weckherlin 

Senor Don Horacio Guzman 

Senor Don Roman Mayorga 

Dr. Don Pedro A. del Solar 

Dr. Don Jose Maria Yrigoyen 

Senhor Thomaz de Souza Roza. . . . 

Mr. Charles de Struve 

Baron Gustave Schilling. 

Mr.P. Botkine 

norDonEnrique Dupuy de Lome E 
nor Don Jose Felipe Sagrario . . . F 
mor Don Manuel Multedo 

Senor Don Rodrigo de Saavedra. . 

Senor Don Perez Seoane 

Senor Capt. Don M. del Carre 

Mr. J. A. W. Grip 

Baron H. J. Beck-Friis 

Mr. Alfred de Claparede 

Dr. Charles C.Tavel 



Mavroyeni Bey. . . 

Mgrditch Effendi Norighlan 

Senor Don Nicanor Boiet-Peraza.. 

Senor Don Leopoldo Terrero 

Senor Don N. Bolet-Monagas 



E. E. and M. P. 

First Sec.andCharge d' Affaires. 

Second Secretary. 

Second Secretary. 

Third Secretary. 

Third Secretary. 

E. E. and M. P. 

E. E. and M. P.. 

Secretary of Legation. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Sec. Leg. and Charge d'Affaires. 

E. E. and M. P. 

E. E.andM. P. 

First Secretary. 

Second Secretary. 

E. E. and M. P. 

First Sec.and Charge d'Affaires. 

Third Secretary. 

Attache. 

Attache. 

Military Attache. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Secretary of Legation. 

E. E. and M. P. 

Sec. Leg. and Charge d'Affaires, 

E. E. and M. P. 

First Secretary. 

E. E.andM. P. 

First Secretary. 

Second Secretary. 



FOBEIGN CARRYING TRADE. 

Values of the imports and exports of the United States carried in American vessels and 
n foreign vessels during each fiscal year from 1857 to 1892 inclusive, with the percentage car- 
ried in American vessels. 



YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 



IMPORTS. 



In American 
Vessels. 



EXPORTS. 



In American 
Vessels. 



In Fore.'gn 
Vessils. 



1857.. 

1858.. 

1859... 

I860. 

1861. . 

1 ->... 

1863... 



1251,214,857 
2*3,491,288 
249,617,953 
279.0ftt.aj2 
179,972,733 
125,421,318 
132,127,891 



IN;:., 
isa&i 



1870... 
1871,.. 
1872... 
1873... 
1874... 
1875... 
1876... 
1877... 
1878... 
1879... 
1880... 
1881... 
182... 
1888... 
1884... 



. 

93.017,756 
213,671.466 
180,625,3t;8 
175.016,348 
153,154.748 
199,732,324 
190318,461 
168,044.7d9 
171,566,758 
174,424.216 
156.385,066 
167.fiS6.4f57 
164.826.214 
166.551,624 



237,442,730 




109.029.209 
116.955.324 
96.962.lt 19 
104.418,210 
98,652,828 
82.001. f.'.'l 
78,406.686 
72.991,253 
67,332,175 
83.022.1 US 
75.382.012 
78.968.047 
79,226,390 



70.50 
73.70 



65.20 
50.00 
41.40 
27.50 
27.70 
32.20 
33.90 
35.10 
33.10 
35.60 
31.20 
28.50 
25.80 
26.70 
25.80 
33.10 
26.50 
25.90 
22.60 
17.18 
16.22 
15.40 
15.54 
16.60 
14.76 
15.01 
13.80 
13.44 
13.70 
12.81 
11.94 
12.32 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



131 



platforms. 

TTTTERANCES OF NATIONAL CONVENTIONS, 1892. 



Republican. 
Adopted at Jfinneapolis June 9. 

The representatives of the republicans of 
the United States assembled in general con- 
vention on the shores of the Mississippi river, 
the everlasting bond of an indestructible 
republic, whose most glorious chapter of 
history is the record of the republican party, 
congratulate their countrymen on the majes- 
tic march of the nation under the banners 
inscribed with the principles of our platform 
of 1888, vindicated by victory at the polls and 
prosperty in our fields, workshops and mines, 
and make the following declaration of prin- 
ciples: 

VVe reaffirm the American doctrine of pro- 
tection. We call attention to its growth 
abroad. We maintain that the prosperous 
condition of our country is largely due to the 
wise revenue legislation of the republican 
congress. 

We believe that all articles which cannot be 
produced in the United States, except luxuries, 
should be admitted free of duty, and that on 
all imports coming in competition with the 
products of American labor there should be 
levied duties equal to the difference between 
wages abroad and at home. 

We assert that the prices of manufactured 
articles of general consumption have been re- 
duced under the operations of the tariff act 
of 1890. 

We denounce the efforts of the democratic 
majority of the house of representatives to 
destroy our tariff laws by piecemeal, as is man- 
ifested by their attacks upon wool, lead and 
lead ores, the chief products of a number of 
states, and we ask the people for their judg- 
ment thereon. 

We point to the success of the republican 
policy of reciprocity, under which our export 
trade has vastly increased, and new and en- 
larged markets have been opened for the 
products of our farms and workshops. We 
remind the people of the bitter opposition of 
the democratic party to this practical business 
measure, and claim that,executed by a repub- 
lican administration, our present laws will 
eventually give us control of the trade of the 
world. 

DECLARATION FOR BIMETALLISM. 

The American people, from tradition and 
interest, favor bimetallism, and the republic- 
an party demands th use of both gold and 
silver as standard money, with such restric- 
tions and under such provisions, to be deter- 
mined by legislation, as will secure the main- 
tenance of the parity of values of the two 
metals, so that the purchasing and debt-pay- 
ing power of the dollar, whether of silver, 
gold or paper, shall be at all times equal. The 
interests of the producers of the country, its 
farmers and its workingmen, demand that 
every dollar, paper or coin, issued by the 
government shall be as good as any other. 

We commend the wise and patriotic steps 
already taken by our government to secure an 
internati9nal conference to adopt such meas- 
ures as will insure a parity of value between 
gold and silver for use as money throughout 
the world. 

We demand that every citizen of the United 
States shall be allowed to cast one free and 
unrestricted ballot in all public elections, and 
that such ballot shall be counted and returned 
as cast; that such laws shall be enacted and 
enforced as will secure to every citizen, be he 
rich or poor, native or foreign born, white or 
black, this sovereign right guaranteed by the 



constitution. The free and honest popular 
ballot, the just and equal representation of all 
the people, as well as their just and equal pro- 
tection under the laws, are the foundation of 
our republican institutions, and the party will 
never relax its efforts until the integrity of 
the ballot and the purity of elections shall be 
fully guaranteed and protected in every state. 
We denounce the continued inhuman out- 
rages perpetrated upon American citizens for 
political reasons in certain southern states of 
the union. 

FOREIGN RELATIONS. 

We favor the extension of our foreign com- 
merce, the restoration of our merchant ma- 
rine by home-built ships and the creation of a 
navy for the protection of our national inter- 
ests and the honor of our flag; the mainte- 
nance of the most friendly relations with all 
foreign powers, entangling alliances with 
none; and the protection of the rights of our 
fishermen. 

We reaffirm our approval of the Monroe 
doctrine and believe in the achievement of 
the manifest destiny of the republic in its 
broadest sense. 

We favor the enactment of more stringent 
laws and relations for the restriction of crim- 
inal, pauper and contract immigration. 

We favor efficient legislation by congress to 
protect the life and limb of employes of 
transportation companies engaged in carrying 
on interstate commerce, and recommend 
legislation by the respective states that will 
protect employes engaged in state commerce, 
in mining, and in manufacturing. 

The republican party has always been the 
champion of the oppressed and recognizes the 
dignity of manhood, irrespective of faith, 
color, or nationality; it sympathizes with the 
cause of home rule in Ireland and protests 
against the persecution of the Jews in Russia. 

The ultimate reliance of free popular gov- 
ernment is the intelligence of the people and 
the maintenance of freedom among men. 
We therefore declare anew pur devotion to 
liberty of thought and conscience, of speech 
and press, and approve all agencies and in- 
strumentalities which contribute to the edu- 
cation of the children of the land, but while 
insisting upon the fullest measure of religious 
liberty we are opposed to any union of church 
and state. 

OPPOSITION TO TRUSTS. 

We reaffirm our opposition declared in the 
republican platform of 1888 to all combina- 
tions of capital, organized in trusts or other- 
wise, to control arbitrarily the condition of 
trade among our citizens. We heartily in- 
dorse the action already taken upon this sub- 
ject and ask for such further legislation as 
may be required to remedy any defects in 
existing laws and to render their enforcement 
more complete and effective. 

We approve the policy of extending to 
towns, villages, and rural communities the ad- 
yanUiges of the free delivery service now en- 
joyed by the larger cities of the country, and 
reaffirm the declaration contained in the re- 
publican platform of 1888. pledging the reduc- 
tion of letter postage to one cent at the earli- 
est possible moment consistent with the main- 
tenance of the postoffice department and th 
highest class of postal service. 

MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS. 

CIVIL SERVICE We commend the spirit 
and evidence of reform in the civil service 
and the wise and consistent enforcement by 
the republican party of the laws regulating 
the same. 



132 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



NICARAGUA CANAL The construction of 
the Nicaragua canal is of the highest impor- 
tance to the American people, but as a meas- 
ure of national defense and to build up and 
maintain American commerce it should be 
controlled by the United States government. 

TERRITORIES We favor the admission of 
the remaining territories at the earliest 
practicable date, having due regard to the in- 
terest of the people of the territories and of 
the United States. All the federal officers ap- 
pointed for the territories should be selected 
from bona fide residents thereof and the right 
of self-government should be accorded as far 
as practicable. 

ARID LANDS We favor cession, subject to 
the homestead laws, of the arid public lands 
to the states and territories in which they lie, 
under such congressional restructions as to 
disposition, reclamation, and ocupancy by set- 
tlers as will secure the maximum benefits to 
the people. 

THE COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION The 
World's Columbian Exposition is a great 
national undertaking and congress should 
promptly enact such reasonable legislation in 
aid thereof as will insure a discharging of the 
expense and obligations incident thereto, and 
the attainment of results commensurate with 
the dignity and progress of the nation. 

INTEMPERANCE We sympathize with all 
wise and legitimate efforts to lessen and pre- 
vent the evils of intemperance and promote 
morality. 

PENSIONS Ever mindful of the services 
and sacrifices of the men who saved the life 
of the nation, we pledge anew to the veteran 
soldiers of the republic a watchful care and 
recognition of their just claims upon a grate- 
ful people. 

HARRISON'S ADMINISTRATION We com- 
mend the able, patriotic and thoroughly 
American administration of President Har- 
rison. Under it the country has enjoyed re- 
markable prosperity and the dignity and honor 
of the nation at home and abroad have been 
faithfully maintained, and we offer the record 
of pledges kept as a guarantee of faithful per- 
formance in the future. 

Democratic. 

Adopted at Chicago June 22. 
The representatives of the democratic party 
of the United States, in national convention 
assembled, do reaffirm their allegiance to the 
principles of the party as formulated by 
Jefferson and exemplified by the long and 
illustrious line of his successors in democratic 
leadership, from Madison to Cleveland; we 
believe the public welfare demands that these 
principles be applied to the conduct of the 
federal government through the accession to 
power of the party that advocates them; and 
we solemnly declare that the need of a return 
to these fundamental principles of free popu- 
lar government, based on home rule and in- 
dividual liberty, was never more urgent than 
now, when the tendency to centralize all 
power at the federal capital has become a 
menace to the reserved rights of the states 
that strikes at the very roots of our govern- 
ment under the constitution as framed by the 
fathers of the republic. 

FEDERAL CONTROL OF ELECTIONS. 
We warn the people of our common country, 
jealous for the preservation of their free in- 
stitutions, that the policy of federal control of 
elections to which the republican party has 
committed itself is fraught with the gravest 
dangers, scarcely less momentous than would 
result from a revolution practically establish- 1 
ing monarchy on the ruins of the republic. It ! 
strikes at the north as well as the south, and j 
injures the colored citizen even more than the ; 



white; it means a horde of deputy marshals at 
ever poll ing place armed with federal power, 
returning boards appointed and controlled by 
federal autnority, the outrage of the electoral 
rights of the people in the several states, the 
subjugation of the colored people to the con- 
trol of the party in power and the reviving of 
race antagonisms, now happily abated, of the 
utmost peril to the safety and happiness of 
all; a measure deliberately and justly de- 
scribed by a leading republican senator as 
" the most infamous bill that ever crossed the 
threshold of the senate." Such a policy, if 
sanctioned by law, would mean the dominance 
of a self-perpetuating oligarchy of office- 
holders, and the party first intrusted with its 
machinery could be dislodged from power 
only by an appeal to the reserved right of the 
people to resist oppression which is inherent 
in all self-governing communities. Two years 
ago this revolutionary policy was emphatically 
condemned by the people at the polls, but in 
contempt of that verdict the republican party 
has defiantly declared in its latest authorita- 
tive utterance that its success in the coming 
elections will mean the enactment of the force 
bill and the usurparion of despotic control 
over elections in all the states. 

Believing that the preservation of republic- 
an government in the United States is depen- 
dent upon the defeat of this policy of legal- 
ized force and fraud, we invite the support of 
all citizens who desire to see the constitution 
maintained in its integrity with the laws pur- 
suant thereto which have given our country a 
hundred years of unexampled prosperity; and 
we pledge the democratic party, if it be in- 
trusted with power, not only to the defeat of 
the force bill, but also to relentless opposition 
to the republican policy of profligate expendi- 
ture which, in the short space of two years, 
squandered an enormous surplus and emptied 
an overflowing treasury, after piling new bur- 
dens of taxation upon the already overtaxed 
labor of the country. 

PROTECTION DENOUNCED. 

We denounce republican protection as a 
fraud; a robbery of the great majority of the 
American people for the benefit of the few. 
We declare it to be a fundamental principle of 
the democratic party that the federal govern- 
ment has no constitutional power to impose 
and collect tariff duties except for the pur- 
pose of revenue only, and we demand that the 
collection of such taxes shall be limited to the 
necessities of the government when honestly 
and economically administered. 

We denounce the McKinley tariff law 
enacted by the LI congress as the culminat- 
ing atrocity of class legislation; we indorse 
the efforts made by the democrats of the pres- 
ent congress to modify its most oppressive 
features in the direction of free raw materials 
and cheaper manufactured goods that enter 
into general consumption, and we promise its 
repeal as one of the beneficent results that 
will follow the action of the people in intrust- 
ing power to the democratic party. Since the 
McKinley tariff went into operation there 
have been ten reductions of the wages of 
laboring men to one increase. We deny that 
there has been any increase of prosperity to 
the country since that tariff went into opera- 
tion, and we point to the dullness and distress, 
the wage reductions and strikes in the iron 
trade, as the best possible evidence that no 
such prosperity has resulted from the Mc- 
Kinley act. 

We call the attention of thoughtful Ameri- 
cans to the fact that after thirty years of 
restrictive taxes against the importation of 
foreign wealth, in exchange for our agricul- 
tural surplus, the homes and farms of the 
ci.mntj-y have lu-coma burdened with a real- 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



133 



estate mortgage debt of over 82.500.000.000. 
exclusive of all other forms of indebtedness; 
that in one of the chief agricultural states of 
the west there appears a real-estate mortgage 
debt averaging $K>5 per capita of the total 
population; and that similar conditions and 
tendencies are shown to exist in other agri- 
cultural exporting states. We denounce a 
policy which fosters no industry so much as it 
does that of the sheriff. 

TRADE RECIPROCITY. 

Trade interchange on the basis of reciprocal 
advantages to the countries participating is a 
time-honored doctrine of the democratic 
faith, but we denounce the sham reciprocity 
which juggles with the people's desire for en- 
larged foreign markets and freer exchanges 
by pretending to establish closer trade rela- 
tions for a country whose articles of export 
are almost exclusively agricultural products 
with other countries that are also agricultural 
while erecting a custom-house barrier of pro- 
hibitive tariff taxes against the richest coun- 
ries of the world that stand ready to take, our 
entire surplus of products and to exchange 
therefor commodities which are necessaries 
and comforts of life among our own people. 

TRUSTS AND COMBINATIONS. 
We recognize in the trusts and combinations 
hich are designed to enable capital to secure 
more than its just share of the joint product 
of capital and labor a natural consequence of 
the prohibitive taxes which prevent the free 
competition which is the life of honest trade, 
but believe their worst evils can be abated by 
law, and we demand the rigid enforcement of 
the laws made to prevent and control them, 
together with such further legislation in re- 
straint of their abuses as experience may 
show to be necessary. 

LANDS FOR ACTUAL SETTLERS. 
The republican party, while professing a 
policy of reserving the public land for small 
holdings by actual settlers, has given away 
the people's heritage till now a few railroad 
and non-resident aliens, individual and corpo- 
rate, possess a larger area than that of all our 
farms between the two seas. The last demo- 
cratic administration reversed the improvi- 
dent and unwise policy of the republican 
party touching the public domain, and re- 
claimed from corporations and syndicates, 
alien and domestic, and restored to the people 
nearly one hundred million (100.000,000) acres 
of valuable land to be sacredly held as home- 
steads for our citizens, and we pledge our- 
selves to continue this policy until every acre 
of land so unlawfully held shall be reclaimed 
and restored to the people. 

COINAGE. 

We denounce the republican legislation 
known as the Sherman act of 1890 as a cowardly 
makeshift fraught with possibilities of danger 
in the future, which should make all of its 
supporters, as well as its author, anxious for 
its speedy repeal. We hold to the use of both 
gold and silver as the standard money of the 
country, and to the coinage of both gold and 
silver without discriminating against metal or 
charge for mintage, but the dollar unit of 
coinage of both metals must be of equal in- 
trinsic and exchangeable value or be adjusted 
through international agreement or by such 
safeguards of legislation as shall insure the 
maintenance of the parity of the two metals 
and the equal power of every dollar at all 
times in the markets and in the payment of 
debts; and we demand that all paper currency 
shall be kept at par with and redeemable 
in such coin. We insist upon this policy as 
especially necessary for the protection of the 
farmers and laboring classes, the first and 



most defenseless victims of unstable money 
and a fluctuating currency. 

REPEAL OF STATE BANK TAX DBMANDED. 
We recommend that the prohibitory 10 per 
cent tax on state bank issues be repealed. 

CIVIL-SERVICK REFORM. 

Public office is a public trust. We reaffirm 
the declaration of the democratic national 
convention of 1876 for the reform of the civil 
service, and we call for the honest enforce- 
ment of all laws regulating the same. The 
nomination of a president, as in the recent 
republican convention, by delegations .com- 
posed largely of his appointees, holding office 
at his pleasure, is a scandalous satire upon 
free popular institutions and a startling 
illustration of the methods by which a presi- 
dent may gratify his ambition. We denounce 
a policy under which the federal office-holders 
usurp control of party conventions in the 
states, and we pledge the democratic party to 
reform these and all other abuses which 
threaten individual liberty and local self- 
government. 

FOREIGN POLICY. 

The democratic party is the only party that 
has ever given the country a foreign policy 
consistent and vigprous. compelling respect 
abroad and inspiring confidence at home. 
While avoiding entangling alliances, it has 
aimed to cultivate friendly relations with 
other nations and especially with our neigh- 
bors on the American continent whose destiny 
is closely linked with our own, and we view 
with alarm the tendency to a policy of irrita- 
tion and bluster which is liable at any time to 
confront us with the alternative of humilia- 
tion or war. We favor the maintenance of a 
navy strong enough for all purposes of 
national defense and to properly maintain 
the honor and dignity of the country abroad. 

THB OPPRESSED IN RUSSIA AND IRELAND. 

This country has always been the refuge of 
the oppressed from every land exiles for con- 
science's sake and in the spirit of the found- 
ers of our government we condemn the op- 
pression practiced by the Russian government 
upon its Lutheran and Jewish subjects and we 
call upon our national government, in the in- 
terest of justice and humanity, by all just and 
proper means to use its prompt and best ef- 
forts to bring about a cessation of these cruel 
persecutions in the dominions of the czar and 
to secure to the oppressed equal rights. 

We tender our profound and earnest sympa- 
thy to those lovers of freedom who are strug- 
gling for. home rule and the great cause of 
local self-government in Ireland. 

IMMIGRATION. 

We heartily approve all legitimate efforts to 
prevent the United States from being used as 
the dumping-ground for the known criminals 
and professional paupers of Europe; and we 
demand the rigid enforcement of the laws 
against Chinese immigration and the importa- 
tion of foreign workmen under contract to de- 
grade American labor and lessen its wages, 
but we condemn and denounce any and all at 
tempts to restrict the immigration of the in 
dustrious and worthy of foreign lands. 
PENSIONS. 

This convention hereby renews the expres 
sion of appreciation of the patriotism 01 the 
soldiers and sailors of the union in the war 
for its preservation, and we favor just and 
liberal pensions for all disabled union sol- 
diers, their widows and dependents, but we 
demand that the work of the pension office 
shall be done industriously, impartially and 
honestly. We denounce the present adminis- 
tration of that office as incompetent, corrupt, 
disgraceful and dishonest. 



134 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



WATERWAY IMPROVEMENTS. 

The federal government should care for and 
improve the Mississippi river and other great 
waterways of the republic, so as to secure for 
the interior states easy and cheap transporta- 
tion to tidewater. When any waterway of the 
republic is of sufficient importance to demand 
aid of the government, such aid should be ex- 
tended upon a definite plan of continuous 
work until permanent improvement is secured. 

NICARAGUA CANAL. 

For purposes of national defense and the 
promotion of commerce between the states, 
we recognize the early construction of the 
Nicaragua canal and its protection against 
foreign control as of great importance to the 
United States. 

THE WORLD'S FAIR. 

Recognizing the World's Columbian Exposi- 
tion as a national undertaking of vast im- 
portance, in which the general government 
has invited the co-operation of all the powers 
of the world, and appreciating the acceptance 
by many of such powers of the invitation so 
extended and the broad and liberal efforts 
being made by them to contribute to the grand- 
eur of the undertaking, we are of opinion 
that congress should make such necessary 
financial provision as shall be requisite to the 
maintenance of the national honor and public 
faith. 

THE SCHOOL QUESTION. 

Popular education being the only safe hasis 
of popular suffrage, we recommend to the sev- 
eral states most liberal appropriations for the 
public schools. Free common schools are the 
nursery of good government, and they have 
always received the fostering care of the 
democratic party, which favors every means 
of increasing intelligence. Freedom of educa- 
tion, being an essential of civil and religious 
liberty as well as a necessity for the develop- 
ment of intelligence, must not be Interfered 
with under any pretext whatever. We are 
opposed to state interference with parental 
rights and rights of conscience in the educa- 
tion of children as an infringement of the fun- 
damental democratic doctrine that the largest 
Individual liberty consistent with the rights 
of others insures the highest type of American 
citizenship and the best government. 

ADMISSION OF THE TERRITORIES. 

We approve the action of the present house 
of representatives in passing bills for admit- 
ting into the union as states the territories of 
New Mexico and Arizona, and we iavor the 
early admission of all the territories having 
the necessary population and resources to 
entitle them to statehood, and while they re- 
main territories we hold that the officials 
appointed to administer the government of 
any territory, together with the District of 
Columbia and Alaska, should be bona fide 
residents of the territory or district In which 
their duties are to be performed. The demo- 
cratic party believes in home rule and the 
control of their own affairs by the people of 
the vicinage. 

PROTECTION OF RAILWAY EMPLOYES. 
We favor legislation by congress and state 
legislatures to protect the lives arid limbs of 
railway employes and those of other iiazard- 
ous transportation companies, and denounce 
the inactivity of the republican party, and par- 
ticularly the republican senate, for causing the 
defeat of measures beneficial and protective 
to this class of wage-workers. 

THE SWEATING SYSTEM DENOUNCED. 

We are in favor of the enactment by the 
states of laws for abolishing the notorious 
sweating system, fur abolishing contract con- 



vict labor and for prohibiting the employmeni 
in factories of children under 15 years of age 

SUMPTUARY LAWS. 

We are opposed to all sumptuary laws as an 
interference with the individual rights of the 
citizen. 

AND ON THIS THE PARTY STANDS. 

Upon this statement of principles and pol 
cles the democratic party ask the intelligent 
judgment of the American people. It asks a 
change or adminstration and a change of party 
in order that there may be a change of system 
and a change of methods, thus assuring the 
maintenance unimpared of institutions under 
which the republic nas grown great and power- 
People's Party. 
Adopted at Omaha July 4. 

Assembled upon the 116th anniversary of the 
declaration of independence, the people's 
party of America in their first national con- 
vention, invoking upon their action the bless- 
ing of Almighty God, puts forth, in the name 
and on behalf of the people of this country, 
the following preamble and declaration of 
principles: 

PREAMBLE. 

The conditions which surround us best justi- 
fy our co-operation. We meet in the midst of a 
nation brought to the verge of moral, political, 
and material ruin. Corruption dominates the 
ballot-box, the legislatures, the congress, and 
touches even the ermine of the bench. The 
people are demoralized; most of the states 
have been compelled to isolate the voters at 
the polling places to prevent universal intim- 
idation or bribery. The newspapers are 
largely subsidized or muzzled; public opinion 
silenced; business prostrated; our nomes 
covered with mortgages; labor impoverished, 
and the lands concentrating in the hands of 
the capitalists. The urban workmen are de- 
nied the right of organization for self-protec- 
tion; imported pauperized labor beats down 
their wages; a hireling standing army, un- 
recognized by our laws, is established to shoot 
them down, and they are rapidly degenerating 
into European conditions. The fruits of the 
toil of millions are boldly stolen to build up 
colossal fortunes for a few, unprecedented in 
the history of mankind; and the possessors of 
these, in turn, despise the republic and en- 
danger liberty. From the same prolific womb 
of governmental injustice we breed the two 
great classes tramps and millionaires. 

The national power to create money is ap- 
propriated to enrich bondholders; a vast pub- 
lic debt payable in legal tender currency has 
been funded into gold-bearing bonds, thereby 
adding millions to the burdens of the people. 

Silver, which has been accepted as coin 
since the dawn of history, has been demone- 
tized to add to the purchasing power of gold 
by decreasing the value of all forms of pro- 
perty as well as human labor and the supply 
of currency is purposely abridged to fatten 
usurers, bankrupt enterprise and enslave in- 
dustry. A vast conspiracy against mankind 
has been organized on two continents and it is 
rapidly taking possession of the world. If not 
met and 9verthrown at once it forebodes ter- 
rible social convulsions, the destruction of 
civilization or the establishment of an abso- 
lute despotism. We have witnessed for more 
than a quarter of a century the struggles of 
the two great political parties for power and 
plunder, whi le grievous wrongs have been in- 
flicted upon the suffering people. We charge 
that the controlling influences dominating 
both these parties have permitted the existing 
dreadful conditions to develop without ser- 
ious effort to prevent or restrain them. 
Neither do they now promise us any substan- 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



135 



tial reform. They have agreed together to ig- 
nore in the coming campaign every issue but 
one. They propose to drown the outcries of a 
plundered people with the uproar of a sham 
oattle over the tariff, so that capitalists, cor- 
porations, national banks, rings, trusts, wat- 
ered stock, the demonetization of silver and 
the oppressions of the usurers may all be lost 
sight of. They propose to sacrifice our homes, 
lives and children on the altar of Mammon; 
to destroy the multitude in order to secure 
corruption funds from the millionaires. 

Assembled on the anniversary of the birth- 
day of the nation, and tilled with the spirit of 
the grand generation who established our in- 
dependence we seek to restore the govern- 
ment of the republic to the hands of "the 

lain people," with whose class it originated. 

Te assert our purposes to be identical with 
the purposes of the national constitution "to 
form a more perfect union, establish justice, 
insure domestic tranquility, provide for the 
common defense, promote the general welfare 
and secure the blessings of liberty for our- 
selves and our posterity." 

We declare that this republic can only en- 
lure as a free government while built upon 
the love of the whole people for each other 
and for the nation; that it cannot be pinned 
together by bayonets; that the civil war is 
over and that every passion and resent- 
ment which grew out of it must die with it, 
and that we must be in fact, as we are in 
name, one united brotherhood of freemen. 

Our country finds itself confronted by con- 
ditions for which there is no precedent in the 
history of the world. Our annual agricultural 
productions amount to billions of dollars in 
value, which must within a few weeks or 
months be exchanged for billions of dollars of 
commodities consumed in their production; 
the existing currency supply is wholly inade- 
quate to make this exchange; the results are 
falling prices, the formation of combines and 
rings, the impoverishment of the producing 
class. We pledge ourselves that if given 
power we will labor to correct these evils by 
wise and reasonable legislation in accordance 
with the terms of our platform. 

We believe that the powers of government, 
in other words, of the people, should be ex- 
panded (as in the case of the postal service) 
as rapidly and as far as the good sense of an 
intelligent people and the teachings of expe- 
rience shall justify, to the end that oppres- 
sion, injustice and poverty shall eventually 
cease in the land. 

Wuile our sympathies as a party of reform 
are naturally upon the side or every proposi- 
tion which will tend to make men intelligent, 
virtuous and temperate, we nevertheless re- 
gard these questions important as they are 
a& secondary to the great issues now pressing 
;or solution, and upon which not only our 
ndividual prosperity but the very existence 
of free institutions depend; and we ask all 
men to first help us to determine whether we 
are to have a republic to administer before 
we differ as to the condition upon which it is 
to be administered; believing that the forces 
3f reform this day organized will never cease 
o move forward until every wrong is reme- 
lied and equal rights and equal privileges 
securely established for all the men and 
women of this country. We declare there- 
"ore: 

DECLARATION OP PRINCIPLES. 

1 That the union of the labor forces of the 
United States this day consummated shall be 
permanent and perpetual may it spirit into 
ill hearts for the salvation of the republic 

nd the uplifting of mankind. 

2. Wealth belongs to him who creates it, and 
svery dollar taken from industry without an 
equivalent is robbery. "If any will not work 



neither shall he eat." The interests of rural 
and civic labor are the same; their enemies 
are identical. 

3. We believe that the time has come when 
the railroad corporations will either own the 
people or the people must own the railroads, 
and should the government enter upon the 
work of owning and managing any or all rail- 
roads, we should favor an amendment to the 
constitution by which all persons engaged in 
the government service shall be placed under 
a civil-service regulation of the most rigid 
character so as to prevent the increase of the 
power of the national administration by the 
use of such additional government employes. 

FINANCE AND CURRENCY. 

We demand a national currency, safe, 
sound and flexible, issued by the federal 
government only, a full legal-tender for all 
debts, public and private, and that without 
the use of banking corporations, a just, equi- 
table, and efficient means of distribution 
direct to the people, at a tax not to exceed 2 
per ceng; per annum to be provided as set forth 
in the sub-treasury plan of the Farmers' alli- 
ance, or a better system; also by payments in 
discharge of its obligations for public improve- 
ments. 

1. We demand free and unlimited coinage of 
silver and gold at the present legal ratio of 
16tol. 

2. We demand that the amount of circula- 
tion medium be speedily increased to not less 
than K>0 per capita. 

3. We demand a graduated income tax. 

4. We believe that the money of the country 
should be kept as much as possible in the 
hands of the people, and hence we demand 
that all state and national revenues shall be 
limited to the necessary expenses of the 
government, economically and honestly ad- 
ministered. 

5. We demand that postal savings banks be 
established by the government for the safe 
deposit of the earnings of the people and to 
facilitate exchange. 

TRANSPORTATION". 

Transportation being a means of exchange 
and a public necessity, the government should 
own and operate the railroads in the interest 
of the people. 

(a) The telegraph and telephone, like the 
>ostoffice system, being a necessity for the 
ransmission of news, should be owned and 
operated by the government in the Interest of 
the people. 

LAND OWNERSHIP. 

The land, including all the natural sources of 
wealth, is the heritage of the people and should 
not be monopolized for speculative purposes, 
and alien ownership of land should be pro- 
hibited. All land now held by railroads and 
other corporations in excess of their actual 
needs, and all lands now owned by aliens, 
should be reclaimed by the government and 
held for actual settlers only. 

A SUPPLEMENTAL PLATFORM. 

The following supplementary report of the 
committee on resolutions was presented at a 
later session: 

Your committee on platform and resolutions 
beg leave unanimously to report the follow- 
ing: 

WHEREAS, Other questions have oeen pre- 
sented for our consideration, we hereby sub- 
mit the following, not as a part of the plat 
's party, but as resolution 
sentiment of this conven- 
tion: 

Resolved, (1) That we demand a free ballot 
and a fair count in all elections; and pledge 
ourselves to secure it to every legal voter, 
without federal intervention, through the 



form of the people's party, but as resolutions 
expressive of the sentim 



136 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



adoption by the states of the unperverted 
Australian or secret ballot system. 

Resolved, (2) That the revenue derived from 
a graduated income tax should be applied to 
the reduction of the burden of taxation now 
levied upon the domestic industries of this 
country. 

Resolved, (3) That we pledge our support to 
fair and liberal pensions of ex-union soldiers 
and sailors. 

Resolved, (4) That we condemn the fallacy 
of protecting American labor under the pres- 
ent system, which opens our ports to the 
pauper and criminal classes of the world and 
crowds out our wage-earners; and we de- 
Dounce the present ineffective laws against 
contract labor and demand the further re- 
triction of undesirable emigration. 

Resolved,, (5) That we cordially sympathize 
nth the efforts of organized workmgmen to 
_horten the hours of labor, and demand a rigid 
enforcement of the existing eight-hour law 
on government work and ask that a penalty 

lause be added to the said law. 

Resolved, (6) That we regard the mainte- 
nance of a large standing army of mercen- 
aries, known as the Pinkerton system, as a 
menace to our liberties and we demand its 
abolition: and we condemn the recent inva- 
ion of the state of Wyoming by the hired 
assassians of plutocracy, assisted by federal 
officers. 

R solved, (7) That we commend to the 
;houghtful consideration of the people and 
the reform press the legislative system known 
as the ab initio ad referendum. 

Resolved, (8) That we favor a constitutional 
provision limiting the office of president and 
vice-president to one term and providing for 
;he election of senators of the United States 
by a direct vote of the people. 

Resolved, (9) That we oppose any subsidy or 
national aid to any private corporation for 

any purpose. 

Prohibition. 
Adopted at Cincinnati June 30. 

The prohibition party, in national conven- 
tion assembled, acknowledging Almighty God 
as the source of all true government and his 
aw as the standard to which all human en- 
actments must conform to secure the bless- 
ngs of peace and prosperity, presents the fol- 
owing declaration of principles: 

PROHIBITION OP LIQTJOR TRAFFIC. 

1. The liquor traffic is a foe to civilization, 
the arch-enemy of popular government and a 
public nuisance. It is the citadel of the forces 
that corrupt politics, promote poverty and 
crime, degrade the nation's home life, thwart 
the will of the people and deliver our country 

nto the hands of rapacious class interests. 
All laws that under the guise of regulation 
legalize and protect this traffic or make the 
government share in its ill-gotten gains are 
" vicious in principle and powerless as a rem- 
edy " 

We declare anew for the entire suppression 
of the manufacture, sale, importation, expor- 
tation and transportation of alcoholic liquors 
as a beverage by federal and state legislation 
and the full powers of the government should 
be exerted to secure this result. Any party 
that fails to recognize the dominant nature of 
this issue in American politics is undeserving 
of the support of the people. 

. WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE. 

2. No citizen should be denied the right to 
vote on account of sex and equal labor should 
receive equal wages without; regard to sex. 

AS TO MONEY. 

3. The money of the country should be issued 
by the general government only, and in suffi- 
cient quantities to meet the demands of 



business and give full opportunity for the 
employment of labor. To this end an increase 
in the volume of money is demanded, and no 
individual or corporation should be allowed 
to make any profit through its issue. It 
should be made a legal tender for the payment 
of all debts, public and private. Its volume 
should be fixed at a definite sum per capita 
and made to increase with our increase in 
population. 

THE TARIFF. 

4. Tariff should be levied only as a defense 
against foreign countries which levy tariff 
upon or bar out our products from their mar- 
kets, revenue being incidental. The residue 
of means necessary to an economical adminis- 
tration of the government should be raised by 
levying a burden on what the people possess 
-nstead of upon what we consume. 

CONTROL OF RAILROADS. 

5. Railroad, telegraph, and other public cor- 
porations should be controlled by the govern- 
ment in the interest of the people and no 
higher charges allowed than necessary to give 
fair interest on the capital actually invested. 

IMMIGRATION LAWS. 

6. Foreign immigration has become a burden 
upon industry, one of the factors in depress- 
ing wages and causing discontent, therefore 
our immigration laws should be revised and 
strictly enforced. The time of residence for 
naturalization should be extended and no 
naturalized person should be allowed to vote 
until one year after he becomes a citizen. 

ALIEN LAND-OWNERS. 

7. Non-residents should not be allowed to 
acquire land in this country, and we favor the 
limitation of individual and corporate owner- 
ship of land. All unearned grants of lands 
to railroad companies or other corporations 
should be reclaimed. 

THE RECENT LYNCHING8. 

8. Years of inaction and treachery on the 
part of the republican and democratic parties 
have resulted in the present reign of mob law. 
and we demand that every citizen be pro- 
tected in the right of trial by constitutional 
tribunals. 

ONE DAY OF REST. 

9. All men should be protected by law in 
their right to one day's rest in seven. 

FAVORING ARBITRATION. 

10. Arbitration is the wisest and most eco- 
nomical and humane method of settling na- 
tional differences. 

SPECULATION IN MARGINS. 

11. Speculations in margins, the cornering of 
grain, money and products, and the formation 
of pools, trusts, and combinations for the 
arbitrary advancement of prices should be 
suppressed. 

PENSIONS. 

12. We pledge that the prohibition party if 
elected to power will ever grant just pensions 
to disabled veterans of the union army and 
navy, their widows and orphans. 

THE SCHOOL QUESTION. 

13. We stand unequivocally for the Ameri- 
can public school and opposed to any appro- 
priation of public moneys for sectarian 
schools. We declare that only by united sup- 
port of such common schools, taught in the 
English language, can we hope to become and 
remain an homogeneous and harmonious peo- 
ple. 

ARRAIGNMENT OF THE OLD PARTIES. 

14. We arraign the republican and democrat- 
ic parties as false to the standards reared by 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



137 



their founders; as faithless to the principles 
of the illustrious leaders of the past to whom 
they do homage with the lips; as recreant to 
the "higher law," which is as inflexible in 
political affairs as in personal life; and as no 
longer embodying the aspirations of the 
American people or inviting the confidence 
of enlightened, progressive patriotism. Their 
protest against the admission of "moral 
issues" into politics is a confession of their 
own moral degeneracy. The declaration of 
an eminent authority that municipal misrule 
is "the one conspicuous failure of American 
politics" follows as a natural consequence of 
such degeneracy, and is true alike of cities 
under republican and democratic control. 
Each accuses the other of extravagance in 
congressional appropriations and both are 
alike guilty. Each protests when out of pow- 
er against the infraction of the civil-service 
laws, and each in power violates those laws in 
letter and spirit. Each professes fealty to the 
interests of the toiling masses but both covert- 
ly truckle to the money power in their admin- 
istration of public affairs. Even the tariff 
issue as represented in the democratic Mills 
and the republican McKinley bill is no longer 
treated by them as an issue upon great and 
divergent principles of government, but is a 
mere catering, to different sectional and class 
interests. The attempt in many states to 
M-restthe Australian ballot system from its 
true purpose and to so deform it as to render 
it extremely difficult for new parties to exer- 
cise the rights of suffrage is an outrage upon 
popular government. The competition of 
both the parties for the vote of the slums and 
their assiduous courting of the liquor power 
and subserviency to the money power has re- 
sulted in placing those powers in the position 
of practical arbiters of the destinies of the 
nation. We renew our protest against these 
perilous tendencies and invite all citizens to 
join us in the upbuilding of a party that has 
shown in five national campaigns that it pre- 
fers temporary defeat to an abandonment of 
the claims of justice, sobriety, personal 
rights and the protection of American homes. 

National Socialists. 
Adopted at Xew York Aug. 28. 

1. Reduction of hours of labor in production. 

2. The United States shall obtain possession 
of the telegraphs, telephones, and all other 
means of public transportation. 

3. The municipalities to obtain the local rail- 
roads, ferries, waterworks, gas works, electric 
plants and all industries requiring municipal 

4. The public land to be declared ineligible. 



Revocation of all land grants to corporations 
or individuals the conditions of which have 
not been complied with. 

5. The incorporation by the states of local 
trades unions which have no national organiz- 
ation. 

6. The United States to have the exclusive 
right to issue money. 

7. Congressional legislation. providing for the 
scientific management of the waterways and 
prohibiting the waste of natural resources of 
the country. 

8 Inventions to be free to all, the inventors 
to be remunerated by the Union. 

9 Progressive income tax and tax inherit- 
ance, the smaller income to be exempt. 

10. School education of all children under 
fourteen years of age to be compulsory, gra- 
tuitous and accessible to all by public assist- 
ance in meals, clothing, books, etc., where 



11. Repeal of pauper, tramp, conspiracy and 
sumptuary laws ; unabridged right of combina- 
tion. 

12. Official statistics concerning the condi- 
tion of labor. The prohibition of the employ- 
ment of children of school age, and of the 
employment of female labor in occupations 
detrimental to health or morality Abolition 
of the convict labor contract system. 

13. All wages to be paid in lawful money of 
the United States. Equalization of woman's 
wages to those of men where equal service is 
performed. 

14. Laws for the protection of life and limb 
in all occupations, and an efficient employers' 
liability law. 

POLITICAL DEMANDS. 

1. The people to have the right to propose 
laws and to vote upon all measures of import- 
ance according to the referendum principle. 

2. Abolition of the presidency, vice-presi- 
dency and senate of the United States. An 
executive board to be established, whose 
members are to be elected, and may at any 
time be recalled by the house of representa- 
tives, as the only legislative body. The states 
and municipalities to adopt corresponding 
amendments of the constitution and statutes. 

3. Municipal self-government. 

4. Direct vote and secret ballots in all elec- 
tions. Universal and equal right of suffrage 
without regard to color, creed or sex. Election 
days are to be legal holidays. The principle 
of minority representation to be introduced. 

5. All public officers to be subject to their 
constituencies. 

ft. Civil and criminal law throughout the 
United States. Administration of justice free 
of charge. Abolition of capital punishment. 



STATE PLATFORMS OF 1892. 



Illinois Republicans. 
Adopted at Springfleld May 4. 

The republicans of Illinois in state qonven- 
tion assembled, pledging anew their devotion 
to those principles of government which 
under republican auspices have achieved 
such signal triumphs in the promotion of the 
public welfare, do hereby declare: 

We recognize in the present unexampled in- 
dustrial prosperity of the nation the most 
forcible demonstration of th wisdom of the 
policy of the protection of the republican 
party as expressed in the McKinley tariff law, 
and pledge our unfaltering support for such 
further national legislation as shall under 
changing economic conditions or the republi- 
can doctrine of reciprocity further stimulate 
industrial activity and guarantee to American 
workingmen immunity to the utmost from 



of 



the cheapening and degrading influence 
free-trade foreign competition. 

We heartily indorse the wise, patriotic and 
thoroughly American administration of Presi- 
dent Harrison, and we hereby instruct the 
delegates at large from this convention to the 
national republican convention at Minne- 
apolis to give their support and votes for his 
renomination for president of the United 
States. We express our admiration of the 
prudent and brilliant conduct of the state 
department by Secretary Blaine and commend 
the vigor and wisdom which has characterized 
the navy and other departments of the federal 
government. 

We arraign the democratic party for its 
treachery to the cause of honest money and 
indorse the republican defense against the 
spoliation and degradation of our national 
currency in the threatened free coinage of 



138 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



silver at a fictitious face value. We favor 
such measures as shall by international con- 
ference and agreement permit the restoration 
of silver to a parity in recognition and value 
in the monetary systems of the world. 

We condemn the crimes perpetrated against 
the ballot in the suppression of the vote of 
the colored citizens of the south and the dem- 
ocratic defense in congress of such crimes as 
expressed in the virulent opposition to 
remedial legislation. We demand that con- 
gress, subordinate to the federal constitution, 
hall obey its emphatic mandate not only to 
pass but to enforce laws protective of the 
suffrage rights of all American citizens. 

We earnestly favor legislation, national and 
state, whichshall protect natural competition 
in trade and suppress "trusts" and other 
forms of iniquitous industrial tyranny. We 
commend the anti-trust legislation of the last 
congress and favor such governmental super- 
vision and control as shall subordinate all 
corporations to the public welfare, and to this 
end demand proper amendment and rigorous 
enforcement of the interstate-commerce act 
and the establishment by the government of 
a postal telegraph and telephone system 
under the direct control of the government in 
connection with the postal department. 

"n view of the inestimable value of the 
services rendered by the department of agri- 
culture we urge the establishment of a depart- 
mentof labor,having jurisdictionof measures 
Tor promoting the dignity and effectiveness of 
labor and the conservation of the best inter- 
ests of American workingmen in all occupa- 
tions, including the enactment of laws which 
shall lessen the hours of the working day. 

We heartily approve the immigration laws 
enacted by the last congress and demand such 
further legislation as shall most effectively 
exclude paupers, criminals, " contract labor " 
and other elements hostile to the welfare of 
the American people and the genius of Amer- 
"can institutions. 

The gratitude of the American people to the 
union heroes of the civil war has repeatedly 
been expressed by the enactment of pension 
laws which testify to continued republican 
support of such further legislation as patriot- 
ism shall in the full measure of its devotion be 
able to bestow upon its scarred defenders, their 
widows and orphans. 

We indorse the invulnerable administration 
of Gov. Fifer and testify our appreciative rec- 
ognition of its wisdom, its fidelity to the peo- 
ple and its loyalty to his party and personal 
pledges. We indorse the official record and 
faithful services of Senator Cullom and the 
Illinois republican representatives in congress. 

Upon the important subject of education we 
declare : 

That since the success of universal suffrage 
and of popular government requires universal 
intelligence, therefore the free common 
schools of Illinois are the chief bulwarks of 
the commonwealth and the safeguards of lib- 
erty. That the education in elementary 
branches of each child in the state should be 
required by law. That all persons and those 
standing in the parental relation should be 
left absolutely free to choose in what schools 
and in what manner they will educate their 
children. That in no case shall school officers 
or civil authorities be given authority by law 
to interfere with private or parochial schools. 

In pursuance of these principles we pledge 
ourselves to repeal the present compulsory 
school act and in lieu thereof to enact a law 
in harmony with the view herein stated. 

We favor protection against every form of 
convict labor and demand such legislation as 
shall give full force and effect to the constitu- 
tional provisions relating thereto; we demand 
the prohibition of the employment of young 



children in factories and mines; protection of 
the employes in factories, mines, in the rail- 
way service and other hazardous occupations, 
from every danger that can be removed or 
diminished; the arbitration of differences be- 
tween employer and employe. We declare 
our opposition to any system which directly 
or indirectly fosters the so-called truck store 
system, or which compels workingmen to ac- 
cept payment for their labor in merchandise, 
and we favor such constitutional amendment 
as may be required for legislative prohibition 
of the said system and for the enforcement of 
weekly payments to employes. 

We demand the adoption of a system of 
uniform rates of appraisement of real and 
>ersonal property to the end that equal and 
_ust corresponding taxation shall prevail and 
the existing inequalities be removed. We de- 
mand a more stringent enforcement of the 
law and supplemental legislation, if need be, 
to secure the proper listing and appraisement 
of all property subject to taxation. 

We regard with much gratification the en- 
actment under a republican administration of 
a ballot reform law and the protection it af- 
fords as demonstrated by experience of the 
rights of voters and the purity of our election. 

We favor the addition of two delegates at 
arge to the state central committee. 

Illinoii Democrats. 
Adopted at Springfield April 26. 

The democracy of Illinois, in convention 
assembled, reaffirms its devotion to demo- 
cratic principles and pledges itself to untiring 
effort for their supremacy. It believes that 
the powers delegated by the people should be 
strictly construed; that the autonomy of the 
states and their rights of local self-government 
and home rule should be zealously guarded as 
essential to the preservation of our form of 
government; that no money should be taken 
from the people under any pretext for other 
than public purposes ; that the strictest econ- 
omy should be exercised in all governmental 
expenditures, whether local, state, or national, 
and that legislation should be confined to 
the legitimate objects of government. 

We recognize that the tariff is a tax and 
that all taxation ia a burden. Where it is im- 
posed justly and fairly to meet the necessary 
expenditures of an economical and prudent 
administration of public affairs it will be 
cheerfully borne by the people. When levied 
upon the suggestion of private greed to pro- 
mote monopoly and extortion, to build up the 
fortunes of a few beneficiaries and favored 
classes at the expense of the general welfare, 
it is leavened with injustice and oppression 
and a burden, is intolerable to freedom and in- 
consistent with every principle of sound gov- 
ernment. 

The republican party has sought to fasten 
an iniquitous and oppressive system of taxa- 
tion upon the American people. The effect of 
its legislation on this subject is to fetter trade 
and commerce, those swift agencies of civil- 
ization, and disorganize and disarrange every 
element of industry, to foster injurious com- 
binations, and enhance the prices of the neces- 
saries of public life, and to demoralize the 
public confidence. 

We indorse to the fullest extent the patri- 
otic administration of Grover Cleveland, and 
declare without reservation our full and com- 
plete approval of the views contained in his 
message to congress on the tariff in 1887. 

We demand an immediate revision of the 
tariff, free raw material, a reduction in the 
duties on the necessaries of life, and such 
changes in the shipping and navigation laws 
as shall restore the American merchant ma- 
rine and the supremacy of the American fiag 
on the high seas. 



PARTF PLATFORMS. 



139 



We reiterate our allegiance to the historic 
policy of the democratic party in favor of 
honest money, the gold and silver coinage pro- 
vided by the constitution of the United States 
and of a currency convertible into such coin- 
age without loss to the holder, and we recom- 
mend an invitation by our government to the 
commercial powers of the world for an inter- 
national conference for the purpose of fixing 
a ratio between the values of gold and silver, 
so that parity may be maintained between the 
two metals and all mints be thrown open to 
free coinage. 

We denounce the reckless extravagance of 
the billion-dollar congress, controlled by a re- 
publican majority, and distinguished only by 
the passage of the oppressive McKinley bill 
and the wicked waste of the people's money. 

We believe firmly that public officers should 
be faithful servants of the people, and that in 
every instance of appointment to office the 
test should be rather capacity for efficient 
public service than past or prospective politi- 
cal activity. 

We are proud of our common school system 
and pledge ourselves to uphold and improve 
it. for free Institutions cannot exist without 
universal education. 

We denounce the republican party for 
enacting a law which tends to bring the cause 
of popular education Into disrepute; a law 
which takes from the parent the right to edu- 
cate his child according to the dictates of his 
conscience; a law which creates a state inqui- 
sition over schools toward which the state 
contributes nothing; a law which gives the 
absolute power to every local school board, 
no matter how ignorant or spiteful its actions, 
to harass and persecute a large class of people 
who are among our best citizens and who do 
their full duty, both toward the state and 
their children, and who, by their labor, their 
patriotism and intelligence, have contributed 
very much to our prosperity and greatness. 

Such a law is further to be condemned as an 
invasion of that religious liberty guaranteed 
by the constitution, and in effect amounts to 
an interference by the state with the church. 
This law is antagonistic to democratic institu- 
tions and we demand its unconditional repeal, 
and we pledge our candidates for the legisla- 
ture to vote and work to that end. 

We favor the election of United States sen- 
ators by a direct vote of the people. 

We denounce the creation of trusts which, 
however disguised, have for their end the 
stifling of competition and the control of pro- 
duction and prices, with a view of oppressing 
the people; and we demand from our legisla- 
ture the passage of stringent laws to aid the 
judicial branch of the state in stamping out 
such iniquitous devices of monopolists to de- 
fraud the people. 

We believe that in a free country the cur- 
tailment of the absolute rights of the individ- 
ual should only be such as is essential to the 
peace and good order of the country. 

The limit between the proper subjects of 
governmental control and those which can be 
more fittingly left to the moral sense and self- 
imposed restraint of the citizen should be 
carefully kept in view. Thus laws unneces- 
sarily interfering witb the habits and customs 
of any people which are not offensive to the 
moral sentiment of the civilized world, and 
which are consistent with good citizenship 
and public welfare, are unjust and vexatious. 

The constitution of this state provides 
"That it shall be unlawful for the commis- 
sioners of any penitentiary or other reforma- 
tory institutions in the state of Illinois to let 
by contract to any persons or corporation the 
labor of any convict confined within such in- 
stitution. We denounce the present repub- 
lican state administration for its gross viola- 



tion of this provision of the constitution and 
for unlawful methods to evade and nullify 
the same. 

We favor the prohibition of child labor witb 
all its debasing consequences. 

We favor the establishment of boards of 
arbitration, that will adjudicate all contro- 
versies between capital and labor, so that pro- 
tracted strikes, with their ruinous conse- 
quences, may be averted, and we believe the 
great moral influences a just and equitable 
ruling would have on questions at issue would 
genera ly lead to a speedy adjustment. 

We demand the protection of life and prop- 
erty of American citizens at home as well as 
abroad, regardless of race, color or previous 
condition. 

We favor all laws that can be enacted under 
the present constitution that will prohibit the 
truck system, enforce weekly payment of 
wages in cash, and fair weights and measures 
wherever used infixing compensation. And 
if the present constitution will not admit of 
the enactment and enforcement of such laws, 
then we favor an amendment to the constitu- 
tion under which laws can be enacted. 

We congratulate the democracy of Illinois 
and the whole country under the great tri- 
umph achieved by the democrats of Illinois in 
the election of that grand man, patriot, sol- 
dier and statesman, Gen. John M. Palmer, to 
the senate of the United States, and should it 
be deemed expedient to come to the great 
west for a candidate for the presidency to 
lead the democratic hosts to victory, we com- 
mend him to the favorable consideration of 
the national democratic convention and in- 
struct our delegates to that convention to 
present his name and use all honorable means 
to secure his nomination. 

Resolved, That the delegates chosen by this 
convention to the democratic national con- 
vention are hereby instructed to cast the vote 
of the state as a unit on all questions and 
candidates in accordance with a vote of a ma- 
jority thereof. ^_ 

Illinois People's Party. 
Adopted at Danville May 19. 

The people's party of the state of Illinois, 
through its regularly elected delegates, as- 
sembled in convention at Danville, makes this 
official declaration of its principles, purposes 
and demands: 

Resolved, That we reaffirm the declaration 
of principles adopted by the St. Louis confer- 
ence of Feb. 22, and pledge our entire loyalty 
to it. 

Resolved. That we demand the immediate 
and condign punishment of all officials who 
shall attempt to interfere with, the constitu- 
tional right of free speech, free press or free 
public assemblage. 

Resolved, That we demand the enactment of 
adequate laws providing for the actual at- 
tendance in school of all children of school 
age for a term not less than four months of 
each year, and to this end we are in favor of 
free text books. 

Resolved, That we condemn and denounce 
those hard and oppressive conditions of life 
produced by unjust laws which drive men to 
crime and then use their labor to crush out 
honest industry, and we charge both the old 
parties with directly conniving at a flagrant 
and open violation of the amendment to the 
constitution overwhelmingly adopted by the 
people forbidding contracts for convict labor 
and recognizing the cruelty of confinement of 
men without employment. Therefore 'ire de- 
mand that all convicts in this state hereafter 
be employed in the winter months in prepar- 
ing material for, and in the summer months 
in making, permanent roads and other state 



140 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 181)3. 



improvements, and we f uther demand that all 
ailroads in this state be required by law to 
arry men and material for this purpose at 
ctual cost of transportation. 
Jfesolved, That we condemn in unmeasured 
erms the practice of both republican and 
emocratic officers of the state in appropriat- 
ng the interest on the public funds to tneir 
wn private uses, and demand that accumula- 
ions of all state funds be covered into the 

r jfesolve'd, That our state constitution be so 
.mended as to permit the enforcement of the 
aw providing for a weekly pay day and the 
.bolition of the truck store system. 

Resolved, That we demand that the legisla- 
ure submit to a vote of the people as a sepa- 
ate issue the subject of an amendment to 
tie state constitution allowing to women the 
ull right of suffrage. 

Resolved, That our present system of minor- 
ty representation falls far short of tne object 
ought to be attained by the same, and we rec- 
mmend the favorable consideration of the 
uota system of representation to the people 
f this state. 

Resolved, That we condemn the extortions 
f the corporation known as the Union stock- 
ards of Chicago, and we condemn the exist- 
nce by law of boards of trade that deal in 
ptions on the necessaries of life, and de- 
mand that they be abolished. 

Resolved, That we denounce the projected 
ncrease of the regular army and regard the 
ormation of permanent forts and garrisons 
lear the great centers of population as a men- 
,ce to our free institutions. 

Resolved, That we recognize in the employ- 
ment of private standing armies in the inter- 
st of corporations and great monoplies a 
erioua menace to the liberties of the people, 
and demand that the Pinkerton and like 
orces be disbanded. 

Illinois Prohibition. 
Adopted at Springfield June 1. 
We, the prohibitionists of Illinois, in con- 
vention assembled, acknowledging Almighty 
Jod as the source of all just power in govern- 
ment, do declare and adopt the following as 
our platform of principles upon which we 
appeal to the intelligent and patriotic voters 
)f the state of Illinois for their suffrages in 
he approaching election : 
More than a billion of dollars are expended 
annually by the victims of strong drink for 
ilcoholic beverages. No equivalent is re- 
vived for the money thus expended. Alcohol 
s neither a food nor a heat producer. It 
elves nothing of economic value in return for 
josi, -The money spent for these beverages 
, ports a population of about four millions of 
^people who are living, and ma^otjiem be- 
coming rich, upon the .profits of this traffic 
without returning anything to society for 
what they receive. Consumers who are non- 
producers always impoverish society. Were 
this whole business abolished the victims 
the traffic could pay the hundred million of 
dollars which the government receives there- 
from and have at least nine hundred million 
of dollars left with which to purchase the 
necessaries of life. 

The farmers of our country get less than 
$20.000,000 annually for all the produce fur 
nished the distiller and lose hundreds ol 
millions which would be spent for bread 
meat and other products ot the farm were i 
not for the liquor traffic, which is a prolific 
source of pauperism -and hard times. The 
liquor traffic is a relent-less foe of the laborim 
classes. The use of alcoholic beverages no 
only produces poverty and disease, but 1 
everywhere the enemy of society as a prc 



3ucerof domestic infelicity, social impurity 
ind all kinds of private and public vice. The 
gal prohibition of the importation, rnanu- 
acture and sale of alcoholic beverages is, 
here fore, the imperative duty of government, 
tate and national. 

The power conferred. upon municipalities in 
>ur state to license dramshops, while the 
armer is disfranchised and yet has to pay his 
hare of the tax used by the saloon, is an un- 
ust discrimination against the farmer. All 
aws that license crime are wrong in principle 
and vicious in practice. High license is a legal- 
zed monopoly; it is a system of bribery by 
which the state "justifies the wicked for a 
eward." It cloaks an evil with the garb of 
espectability and gives sanction to a great 
rime. We agree with the Supreme court of 
he United States in deny ing the right of legis- 
ature to bargain away the public health or 
he public morals, and we therefore deny the 
ight of any legislative body to injure the 
ublic health or morals by legalizing the liquor 
raffle. Such legislation is usurpation. 

We declare in favor of a loyal and steadfast 
maintenance of our American public school 
ystem as an institution vital to the public 
wellbeing and the preservation of our repub- 
ican institutions. We denounce any attempt 
o appropriate any portion of the public funds 
or sectarian purposes, as well as all plans of 
>artnership or association between our public 
chool officials and any religious sect in the 
work of instruction. We denounce the demo- 
ratic and republican parties of Illinois for 
heir cowardly and unpatriotic proposal tosur- 
ender our present compulsory education law, 
and we avow our purpose to maintain the law 
as it stands, with all its provisions intact. We 
"urther declare in favor of the state f urnish- 
ng all school text books free of cost. 

Suffrage should not be made to depend upon 
any distinction of race, color or sex. 

We declare ourselves opposed to the alien 
ownership of land or mines, and to the un- 
imited acquisition thereof by individuals or 
corporations, and we are in favor of the for- 
'eiture of all unearned land grants in the 
hands of railroad corporations. 

We declare that all money should be issued 
by the government directly to the people with- 
out the intervention of banks, and to be a full 
.egal tender for all debts both public and pri- 
vate. To this end we favor an open mint for 
the unlimited coinage of gold and silver, the 
products of the mines of the United States, on 
ike terms, and if the difference between the 
value of gold and silver bullion and gold and 
silver coin at the rate of one to sixteen is so 
large as to endanger the circulation of either 
coin, we then favor an equitable adjustment 
of the ratio between the coin values of gold 
and silver, to the e_n4*halj6both coins may pass 
current At par. 

We declare in favor of the control of rail- 
roads, telegraph and telephone lines by the 
government, so as to limit earnings to a rea- 
sonable return on the cash value of the prop- 
erty. 

We declare that all articles, the like of 
which cannot be successfully produced in this 
country, together with all raw materials no 
coming into injurious com petition with Ameri 
can producers, should be placed upon the 
free list, and that the burden of taxation 
should be removed from the necessaries and 
imposed upon the luxuries of life. 

We declare that taxation to be just must be 
uniform as to person and property. The pres 
ent system of taxation by which all notes 
bonds and mortgages held by non-residents o: 
the state, as well as many held by residents o 

the state, escape taxation, while the debto 

who holds mortgaged real and personal prop 

erty is compelled to pay taxes upon the ful 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



141 



value thereof without deducting the amount 
of the mortgaged debt, is unjust, and we de- 
mand that our tax laws be revised aud amend- 
ed to the end that all notes, bonds and mort- 
gages or other written evidence of indebted- 
ness secured by mortgage shall be listed for 
taxation in the township, county and state 
where the mortgaged property is situated and 
that any of such notes, bonds or mortgages or 
other evidences of indebtedness not so listed 
shall be uncollectible in any court. We de- 
mand a graduated tax upon incomes. 

We declare against the pernicious system of 
speculating in margin, cornering of grain or 
gambling in money, land produce or anything 
else and we favor such legislation as will ef- 
fectually prohibit the same and thereby turn 
all legitimate trade into natural and lawful 
channels. 

We declare in favor of a service pension for 
all honorably discharged union soldiers, based 
on a monthly allowance of 1 cent for every 
day of service actually rendered. 

We are in favor of the election of United 
States senators by direct vote of the people. 

We declare in favor of a restrictive immi- 
gration law, so framed as to exclude the pau- 
per, the criminal, the insane and the anarch- 
ist. We further declare in favor of requiring 
of each Immigrant to this country upon land- 
ing upon our shores an oath of allegiance to 
the constitution of the United States. 

We also demand the suppression of all 
trusts and combinations which are designed 
to enrich the few at the expense of the many : 
the reduction of the contract rate of interest 
to 6 per cent; that the interest arising from 
the funds of the state be turned into the 
treasury and the infamous truck system be 
rendered impossible by adequate legislation. 

We also declare in favor or a civil Sabbath 

.w and the enforcement thereof: securing to 
the laborer one day in seven for rest. 

With the foregoing purposes and principles 
we say : be buried forever the grudges of sec- 
tional and civil war: we know no north, no 
south, no east, no west, but one country under 
one flag and one constitution, and we. there- 
fore, ask all citizens of every legitimate and 
helpful business or occupation, regardless of 
former party affiliations, to unite with us at 
the ballot box on the above declaration and 
platform, with malice toward none and 
charity for all. % 

Indiana Republican. 
Adopted, at Ft. Wayne June 28. 

The republicans of Indiana heartily approve 
the declaration adopted by the republican na- 
tional convention at Minneapolis. As citizens 
of Indiana we congratulate the people of the 
state upon the nomination for president of 
the United States of Benjamin Harrison. 

The administration of the national govern- 
ment under his leadership has been marked 
by such wisdom and patriotism as to impress 
the whole country and give abundant assur- 
ance that its continuance will add luster to 
the American nation and increase the com- 
fort of the American home. We commend 
the candidates of the republican party of the 
nation as worthy of the suffrages of an in- 
telligent and patriotic people. 

The democratic party has often demon- 
strated its incapacity for governing in both 
national and state affairs. In Indiana, be- 
lieving that it was intrenched behind a gerry- 
mander of surpassing iniquity, it has shown a 
reckless disregard of the people's interest and 
welfare, imposing intolerable burdens without 
benefit. We therefore condemn the demo- 
cratic management of our state affairs as in- 
competent, wasteful, and in the interest of 
puny managers, and in this connection direct 



attention especially to the subjects hereafter 
mentioned. 

Debt and democracy are synonymous terms 
with the taxpayers of Indiana. Unparalleled 
extravagance in public expenditures has 
marked the course of the democracy in 
Indiana during the past decade, until the state 
is burdened with a debt of $9,000,000. The cur- 
rent expense of the state government has in- 
creased by reckless management. The bur- 
dens thus imposed have become too oppressive 
to be endured. Our progress as a people has 
become greatly impeded, and the credit of the 
state will soon become seriously impaired un- 
less radical changes in the conduct of our 
public business are speedily introduced. Re- 
lief lies with the people, and we invite the 
voters of all political opinions to unite in 
turning out of power the party that has al- 
ways been false to its pledges of economy and 
reform. 

We arraign the democratic party of Indiana 
for enacting an unequal and uniust tax law. 
It imposes upon the farmer, laborer and 
householder an excessive and unjust share of 
public burden; it creates a great number of 
unnecessary officers hitherto unknown to law. 
To the burden of taxation, already too heavy, 
it adds more than $100.COO for the fees, salaries 
and expenses of these offices and officers. 
We demand its speedy revision. We pledge 
ourselves to enact such amendments to the 
present tax law as shall relieve the farm and 
the home from the unjust taxation now borne 
by them; which shall place a just share of the 
public burden on capital and provide a more 
simple and less expensive system. 

We condemn the action of the last demo- 
cratic legislature in largely increasingthe fees 
and salaries of the state and county officers. 
It made many sinecures by providing for the 
performance of official duties by deputies, 
paid out of the public funds. 

The law passed by the last democratic as- 
sembly apportioning the state for legislative 
and congressional purposes was designed and 
wickedly framed so as to deny to many coun- 
ties and localities fair and equal representa- 
tion in the legislative department of the state 
and nation; to place and retain under demo- 
cratic control in this state all its public insti- 
tutions and affairs and to give that party an 
increased and unfair representation in con- 
gress and the legislature. Such a policy is 
dangerous and destructive of all good govern- 
ment and merits the condemnation of all 
patriotic people. And we now pledge the re- 
publican party to continue the war against 
this dishonest policy of the democratic party 
until the state shall be honestly apportioned 
by giving to each county and locality its fair 
and equitable representation in proportion to 
its numbers. 

We denounce the purpose of the democratic 
party, clearly avowed in the national plat- 
form, to repeal the law imposing a 10 per cent 
tax on state bank issues, and thus remove the 
only barrier to a return of the system of 
"wildcat" money which once disgraced our 
state and largely impoverished our people. 

The democratic party deserves the emphatic 
condemnation of every citizen of the state for 
its refusal to place our benevolent institu- 
tions upon a nonpartisan basis, when murder, 
cruelty, debauchery, fraud and incompetency 
mark that party's management of those in- 
stitutions, and for still persisting in retaining 
partisan control of the helpless and unfortu- 
nate that they may be made the coin in pay- 
ment for party s'ervices. We therefore de- 
mand an absolute non-partisan management 
of the benevolent and reformatory institu- 
tions of the state, through boards whose mem- 
bers shall be appointed by the governor from 
the different political parties of the state, to 



14U 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1S93. 



that end that they may be relieved from the 
present profligate management. 

We favor the enactment by congress of a 
law thrice recommended by President Harri- 
son compelling the use of standard safety car- 
couplers for the protection of the lives and 
inibs of employes engaged in interstate com- 
merce. The people in the employ of railroad 
companies in this state form a large percent- 
age of its population and are jusMy entitled to 
such legislation as will placj them on an 
equality with such corporations before the 
law, and we are opposed to railways main- 
taining insurance companies by coercing their 
mployes to become members of them. The 
mployers of labor should be liable in dam- 
ages for injuries to persons or destruction of 
life where the employer is more at fault than 
the employe. We also favor a law governing 
convict labor in the penal institutions of the 
state that will work the loast possible Injury 
to free labor. We are in sympathy with all 
well-directed efforts of laboring men to im- 
prove their condition, by united action or 
otherwise, and pledge ourselves to give them 
such legislation as will tend to advance the 
nterests of wage-workers. 

We most heartily indorse the generous pen- 
ilon laws enacted by republicans in congress 
and congratulate the country that during the 
administration of President Harrison no pen- 
ion bill has been vetoed. We demand that 
uitable and proper provisions be made for 
he care and maintenance of indigent soldiers 
and their wives and widows, to the end that no 
oldier, or the wife or widow of a soldier, 
shall ever be an inmate of a poorhouse in the 
tate of Indiana; and that such provisions bo 
made that the soldier when overtaken by pov- 
erty and adversity shall not in his declining 
years be separated from the wife of his 
youth. We therefore advocate the establish- 
ment by the state in connection with the Indi- 
ana department of the Grand Army of the 
Republic of a suitable state soldiers' home for 
the care and maintenance of indigent soldiers 
and their wives and widows, upon the plan 
recommended by the Grand Army of the Re- 
public. 

The people of Indiana cherish the memory 
of Alvin P. Hovey. He was a native of this 
state, and with only such opportunities as 
were open to all, arose to high position in the 
state and nation and distinguished himself as 
a jurist, soldier and statesman. The repub- 
licans of Indiana lament his death as the loss 
of a trusted leader and statesman who 
crowned a long and useful career by a courag- 
eous and manly defense of the constitution 
he helped to frame and of the just powers of 
the suite's chief executive. 
We tender to that eminent republican lead- 
r James G. Blaine, and to the members of 
lis family, our sincere sympathy, and with 
them mourn the loss of those who so recently 
formed part of their family circle. 

Indiana Democrat. 
Adopted at Indianapolis April 21. 
The democracy of Indiana, in convention 
assembled, reaffirms its devotion to the time- 
honored principles of its historic party. It be- 
lieves that the powers delegated by the people 
should be strictly construed: that the auto- 
nomy of states and the rights of local self- 
government and home rule should be zeal- 
ously guarded; that no money should be 
taken from the people under any pretext for 
ot'ier than public purposes; that the strictest 
economy should be exercised in all govern- 
ment expenditures, whether local, state or 
national; that legislation should be confined 
to the legitimate objects of government: that 
public office Is a solemn "uMic trust. It is un- 



compromisingly opposed to the enlargement 
and concentration of federal powers; to the 
usurpation by the central government of the 
functions of the states; to subsidies in every 
form; to every species of class legislation and 
government partnership with private enter- 
prise; to the whole theory of paternalism. 
We believe that in a free country the curtail- 
ment of absolute rights of the individual 
should only be such as is essential to the 
peace and good order of the community, and 
we regard all legislation looking to the in- 
fringement of liberty of person or conscience 
not absolutely necessary to the maintenance 
of public order as vicious in principal and 
demoralizing in practice. 

We arraign the administration of Benjamin 
Harrison for its subserviency to the interests 
of the money power which created it and its 
indifference to the welfare of the people; for 
its brazen violation of its solemn pledges to 
the country to elevate and purify the public 
service; for its shameless prostitution of the 
public patronage to the vilest partisan pur- 
poses, as illustrated by the Bale of a cabinet 
office to John Wanamaker, by the employment 
of the pension bureau as a party machine, and 
by the promotion of William A. Woods to a 
high post in the federal judiciary as a reward 
for his services in saving the "blocks of five" 
conspirators from the penitentiary; for its 
contemptuous repudiation of its promises to 
the veteran soldiers of the union; for its 
wicked attempt to fasten upon the country the 
odious and un-American force bill, intended to 
deprive the people of the right to regulate their 
own elections; for its weak and demagogical 
policy, which has exhibited the American gov- 
ernment to the world as a bully toward the 
feeble and a truckler to the powerful. 

We favor such a radical and comprehensive 
measure of tariff reform as shall relieve the 
necessities of the people and the crude mater- 
ial of our manufactures from federal taxa- 
tion. We condemn the so-called reciprocity 
policy as a transparent attempt to impose on 
the American people the shadow of commer- 
cial freedom for its substance in order to per- 
petuate the existing svstem of licensed spolia- 
tion for the benefit of trusts and monopolies, 
which are the chief support of the republlcian 
party. 

We believe that there should be kept In con- 
stant circulation a full and sufficient volume 
of money, consisting of gold, silver and legal 
tender paper currency at par with each other. 
We favor the election of United State sena- 
tors directly by the people and commend 
Senator Turpie for his efforts in congress to 
secure this great reform. We Indorse the 
course of our distinguished senators, Daniel 
W. Voorhees and David Turpie. 

We most heartily applaud the action of our 
two last legislatures in passing the school- 
book laws, thereby giving the people of Indiana 
a complete series of school text-books equal 
to those formerly used, at one-half the old 
trust prices. We pledge ourselves to resist 
every attempt of the schoolbook combine to 
regain their control of Indiana, and by that 
means bring about frequent expensive 
charges in books, of which the people justly 
complained in former years. 

We approve the Australian election system 
introduced in Indiana by the democratic 
party. It has stood the test of experience 
and we are in favor of maintaining it in the 
act. 

This convention hereby renews the expres- 
sion of appreciation of the patriotism or the 
union soldiers of Indiana in the war for the 
preservation of the union, and we favor just 
and liberal pensions for all disabled soldiers, 
their widows and dependents, and most hearti- 
ly indorse the action of the Grand Army of the 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



143 



Republic looking to the establishment of a 
state home where crippled and indigent sol- 
diers may pass their few remaining days with 
their wives. But we demand that the work of 
the pension office shall be done industriously, 
impartially and honestly. We denounce the 
administration of that office by the present 
commissioner, Green B. Raum. as incompe- 
tent, corrupt, disgraceful and dishonest, and 
we demand his immediate removal from office. 

We heartily indorse the new tax law as a 
wise and beneficent act, by which the increased 
revenues necessary for the support of the state 
government are raised entirely from the cor- 
porations of the state, that had heretofore 
unjustly escaped their fair proportion of taxa- 
tion. We commend the legislature for ref us- 
ng to adopt Gov. Hovey's recommenda- 
tion to increase the state levy from 12 cents 
to 25 cents on the $100 and for meeting the 
necessary expenses of the state's benevolent 
'nstitutions by a levy of 6 cents on the $100. 

We denounce the infamous conspiracy of 
the republican county commissioners, town- 
ship trustees and other officials of Indiana, 
who, for the purpose of creating unfair prej- 
udice against ihe new tax law, have wanton- 
ly and needlessly increased the local taxes in 
the forty-six counties controlled by them 
more than $1,250.000 a sum greater than the 
total increase of state taxes in the entire 
state. We call on the tax-payers of those 
counties to rebuke at the polls those local of- 
ficials who have put this needless and oppress- 
ive burden upon them. That the law is in 
the interest or the masses is attested by the 
fact that corporate wealth has arrayed itself 
against it and is now engaged in a desperate 
struggle in the courts for its overthrow. 

Inasmuch as the exemption of the green- 
back currency from taxation by national law 
is not only unjust in principle but also is the 
occasion of much fraudulent evasion of local 
tax laws, and inasmuch as inter-state trans- 
portation companies are exempted from 
equitable taxation by the constitutional pow- 
ers conferred on congress, we demand that 
the Indiana senators and representatives in 
congress use their influence to secure the 
passage of laws making greenbacks taxable 
as other money and making inter-state com- 
merce taxable on the same terms as the 
domestic commerce. 

We congratulate the tax-payers of Indiana 
on the adoption by the last legislature of the 
system of paying public officials stated sal- 
aries instead of giving them power to com- 
pensate themselves by fees and perquisites. 

We reaffirm our unswerving devotion to the 
interests of public education, not only as 
identified with the common-school system but 
also in connection with the higher institutions 
of learning, free public libraries and all other 
legitimate means for promoting and preserv- 
ing the virtue and intelligence of the people. 

The democratic party stands by its record as 
the friend of the masses as against the 
classes, and calls the attention of the laboring 
men of Indiana to the fact that it has given to 
them the eight-hour law. the law to prevent 
blacklisting, the law prohibiting "pluck-me" 
stores, the law for the protection of miners, 
and laws which make it impossible for Pink- 
erton detectives to arrest or slay laboring 
men in Indiana because of their efforts toward 
self-protection. For twenty-five years the re- 
publican party has legislated for the rich and 
powerful and in the interest of corporate 
wealth. The democratic party pledges itself 
to remedy the evils growing out of such class 
legislation and in all future contests to stand 
by the great producing masses, whose toil and 
self-sacrifice are at the foundation of all nat- 
ural wealth. We commend the organizations 
of the industrial classes for self-protection 



against trusts, combines and monopolies, and 
call the attention of the farmers and laborers 
to the fact that every evil complained of by 
them is the result of republican legislation. 
Resolved, That this convention indorses the 
ise and patriotic administration of Groyer 
Cleveland; that the presidential campaign 
of 1892 should be conducted on the issue of 
tariff reform as defined in the presidential 
message of 1887; that upon this issue Mr. Cleve- 
land is the logical candidate of the demo- 
cratic party. 

Resolved, That the democratic party of In- 
diana expresses its unalterable confidence in 
and attachment to its gallant leader, Isaac P. 
Gray; that it holds him to be worthy of any 
honor in the gift of the American people, and 
that his name be presented to the convention 
by the delegation this day appointed, and in 
the event that the national convention deems 
the nomination of Mr. Cleveland Inexpedient, 
the delegation is Instructed to use every hon- 
orable effort to secure the nomination of ex- 
Gov. Isaac P. Gray for the presidency. 

Indiana People's Party. 
Adapted at Indianapolis May 27. 
Preamble In view of the great social, indus- 
trial and economic revolution now dawning 
on the civilized world, and the new and living 
issues confronting the American people, and 
recognizing that in all ages and all civiliza- 
tions the great middle class has been the bul- 
wark of civil liberty the breakwater against 
fanaticism, whether in church or state; and 
as the life cf this republic, the spirit of civil 
and religious liberty, must find their "city of 
refuge" m the homes and their citadel of 
safety in the hearts of the great middle class 
of our people, the people's party believes the 
time has arrived for a crystallization of the 
reform forces of our state. Therefore, we 
invite all persons who are desirous of better- 
ing their condition to join with us in eradi- 
cating the evils which are now so rapidly 
destroying the body-politic. 

Finance We demand a national currency, 
safe, sound and flexible, issued by the general 
government only, a full legal tender for all 
debts, public and private, and that without 
the use of banking corporations; a just, equi- 
table and efficient means of distributing 
direct to the people at a tax not to exceed 2 
per cent, to be provided as set forth in the 
sub-treasury plan of the Farmers' alliance or 
some better system; also by payments in dis- 
charge of its obligations for public improve- 
ments. 

We demand the free and unlimited coinage 
of silver, and condemn President Harrison for 
calling the international monetary conference 
and inviting other nations to assist us in fixing 
a value on our silver. We regard it as an 
effort to demonetize the silver dollar by an 
international agreement. 

We demand that the amount of the circulat- 
ing medium be speedily increased to not less 
than $50 per capita. 

We demand a graduated income tax. 

We believe that the money of the country 
should be kept as much as possible in the 
hands of the people, and hence we demand 
that all national and state revenues shall be 
limited to the necessary expenses of the gov- 
ernment, economically and honestly adminis- 
tered. 

We demand that postal savings banks be es- 
tablished by the government for the safe de- 
posit of the earnings of the people and to 
facilitate exchange. 

Transportation Transportation being a 
means of exchange and a public necessity, the 
government should own and operate the rail 
roads in the interest of the people. 



144 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



The telegraph and telephone, like the post- 
ffice system, being a necessity for the trans- 
nission of news, snould be owned and oper- 
ited by the government in the interest of the 

Land The land, including all the natural 
lources of wealth, is the heritage of the peo- 
>le and should not be monopolized for specu- 
ative purposes; an alien ownership of land 
ihould be prohibited; all lands now held by 
ailroads and other corporations in excess of 
heir actual needs and all lands now owned 
>y aliens should be reclaimed by the govern- 
nent and held by actual settlers "only. 

State Demands We demand that our 
present election law be so amended as to al- 
ow all political parties representation on the 
election boards. 

We demand that the state be redistricted 
with absolute fairness, and that in making up 
the representative, senatorial and congres- 
sional districts no efforts be made to disfran- 
jhise any class of citizens. 

We demand an amendment of the present 
tax law to the extent that all property be 
valued for the purpose of taxation according 
;o the net receipts derived therefrom. 

We demand that all official fees be covered 
into the public treasury and officers be paid 
what their services are worth in the open 
market. 

We demand that county superintendents be 
elected by a vote of the people. 

We demand that the office of county assess- 
or be abolished and that the township assess- 
ors constitute the county board of equaliza- 
tion. 

We demand such revision of the law for the 
isting of property for taxation that shall 
compel all property, both real and personal, 
to be listed at a fair cash value and proper 
;redit be given for all bona-flde indebtedness. 

Resolved, We demand that the government 
ssue legal-tender notes and pay the union 
?oldiers the difference between the price of 
the depreciated money in which they were 
paid, and gold. 

Resolved, That we favor the enactment of 
aws under which the people may vote period- 
cally upon doctrine and policies, without the 
ntervention of parties or candidates, the re- 
sults of these elections to be considered as 
nstructions to our legislative servants, and to 
be enforced by impeachment when such in- 
structions are disregarded. 

Our national convention is respectfully 
asked to adopt this plank. 

Resolved, That the right to vote is inherent 
n citizenship without regard to sex. 

Resolved, That excessive wealth and ex- 
treme poverty are the two great causes of 
intemperance. We believe that in the proper 
distribution of the wealth of the country by a 
correct adjustment of our medium of ex- 
change intemperance would be greatly re- 
duced 

Indiana Prohibitionists. 
Adopted at Indianapolis May 26. 

Believing in Almighty God as the Ruler of 
the nations, and recognizing the people as the 
true source of political power, and affirming 
that all legislation should be in the interest 
of all the people, and appealing to the patriot- 
ism of our citizens, the prohibition party of 
Indiana adopts the following platform: 

1. We declare that the traffic in alcoholic 
beverages should be made a public crime and 
adequately punished as such, and that the 
manufacture, importation, exportation and 
transportation of such beverages should be 
prohibited by law. 

2. Believing that all class legislation is wrong 
and that "equal rights to all and special privi- 
leges to none" should be the motto of our 



government in all its relations to the people, 
therefore we declare that the general govern- 
ment, without the intervention of banks, 
should issue the circulating medium of a suf- 
ficient volume for the transaction of the busi- 
ness of the country in a manner which will be 
ust to the debtor as well as the creditor class. 
Said circulating medium to consistof gold and 
silver coin and United States treasury notes, 
each to be a full legal tender for all debts, 
public and private, and each to be taxable. 

3. We favor the government control in the 
nterest of the people, to the extent of owner- 
ship, if necessary, of the public means of 
transportation and communication. 

4. We favor such a graduated system of 
taxation as will place the burdens of govern- 
ment in just proportions upon the wealth of 
the country, and the removal of all tariff from 
the necessaries of life. 

5. That we recognize the W. C. T. U. as a 
faithful and powerful influence in the work 
of moral reforms, the purification of P9litics 
and perpetuation of our civil and religious 
' berty, and declare that all restrictions on 
suffrage should apply equally to both sexes. 

6. We favor the passage of laws prohibiting 
the alien ownership of lands, and that all 
lands now held by railroads and other corpo- 
rations in excess of their actual needs be re- 
claimed by the government, in accordance 
with the principles of justice, and held for 
actual settlers. 

7. Our immigration laws should be so re- 
vised as to exclude from our shores all dis- 
eased persons, paupers and criminals. The 
time of residence for naturalization should 
be extended, and no naturalized person 
should vote within two years after such nat- 
uralization. 

8. All official fees should be covered into the 
public treasury, and officials be paid reason 
able salaries for services actually rendered. 

9. We favor the election of United States 
senators by direct vote of the people. 

10. We favor the establishment of postal 
saving banks by the general government. 

11. The speculation in margins, the corner- 
ing of grain, money and products, for the arbi- 
trary control of production and prices, should 
be prohibited. 

12. We denounce as infamous the so-called 
"age of consent" laws, and declare for the re- 
moval of all such means of defense for the 
violation of chastity. 

13. We favor the enactment of laws prohib- 
iting the employment of children under 15 
years of age in factories, mines and work 
shops. 

14. We favor the abolition of contract con 
vict labor. 

15. Every honorably discharged union sol 
dier and sailor of the war merits and sho'uld 
have a pension, based upon service and dis 
ability, without regard to rank. 

16. With full faith in our cause, as embodied 
in the foregoing platform, we invite the co- 
operation of all voters of this country in 
securing such reforms. 

Iowa Republicans. 
Adopted at Des Jfmnes June 29. 

Resolved, That the republican party of 
Iowa in convention assembled hereby rati- 
fies in terms of unqualified approval the 
nomination of Gen. Benjamin Harrison and 
the Hon. Whitelaw Reid as our standard-bear 
ers in the national campaign. The prosperity 
of the nation under the able and patriotic 
administration of President Harrison com 
mands the admiration of all good citizens. 

Resolved, That the platform enunciated by 
the republican national convention is broad 
enough, strong enough, and all-sufficient 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



145 



the basis of union in the contest before us. 
While we unhesitatingly ratify and indorse 
that platform in all its parts we point with 
special pride to the attitude upon the tariff 
'ssue. the silver problem, the temperance 
question, and its demands for a pure and un- 
trammeled ballot. 

Resolved, That we denounce the democratic 
party for Its declaration in its recent national 
convention in Chicago in insisting upon the 
abolition of the national tax on the issue of 
state banks. That after more than a quarter 
of a century of continuous prosperity with a 
sound currency under the wise and benefi- 
cent system evolved and maintained by the 
republican party, we condemn and denounce 
the attempt to reinstate wildcat money and 
worthless bank notes, which at one time 
ruined all financial interests of the country. 

Iowa Democrats. 
Adovted at Davenport Aug. 18. 

1. The democrats of Iowa in convention as- 
sembled heartily indorse the platform of 
principles enunciated at the national conven- 
tion held at Chicago and the nomination of 
Grover Cleveland and Adlai E. Stevenson for 
president and vice-president. The adminis- 
tration of Grover Cleveland of the high of- 
fice of president for four years was wise, 
C9urageous, honest, and conservative, and 
his nomination for the third time by the rep- 
resentatives of the national democracy gives 
special force to the reforms suggested in his 
official messages and his public utterances. 
We haii the opportunity for a full discussion 
and a determination by ballot of the para- 
mount issues which the national platform 
and the candidates suggest to wit. radical 
reform of the tariff and the maintenance 
and perpetuity of the doctrine of local self- 
government; and we pledge our earnest and 
united support to these principles. 

2. We renew with pride and pleasure our 
commendation of Gov. Horace Boies. His 
faithful, honorable, and wise administration 
of the office intrusted to his care merits the 
approval of every patriotic citizen within the 
state. 

3. We recognize the effort of the popular 
branch of the congress of the United States 
to secure a reform of the tariff, and we con- 
demn the republican senate for its failure to 
consider measures passed by the popular 
branch, particularly when the people them- 
selves had declared against the high protec- 
tion policy represented by the McKinley bill 
by an overwhelming majority in the election 
of 1890. The failure of the republican national 
administration and the republican senate to 
bow to the verdict of the people at the polls 
is a denial of the right of the popular sover- 
eignty such as was not contemplated by the 
founders of the republic, and such as would 
not be tolerated in any other civilized country 
on the globe. 

4. We are in thorough sympathy with the 
multitude of honest toilers throughout the 
land, and we observe with deep solicitude the 
conflicts between capital and labor which 
manifest themselves in the ever-increasing 
number and scope of lockouts and strikes. 
These conditions are chargeable to the policy 
of the republican party, which has for its 
object the disbursement of taxes among the 
favored few and the maintenance of privi- 
leged classes at the expense of the masses. 

o. We reiterate the principles enunciated in 
the platforms of the democracy of Iowa in 
1889 and since that time touching the regula- 
tion of the liquor traffic, and commend the 
democratic members of the last general 
assembly for their honest efforts to secure a 
reform in legislation upon this question. The 

10 "" 



doctrine of license and local option, as 
declared by the democratic party of this 
state, has in two successive state elections 
been approved by a majority of voters; and 
with the continued approval of the people we 
pledge ourselves to the enactment of laws 
which shall give the people in their respect- 
ive localities the management and control of 
this traffic. 

6. The present system of managing our 
state institutions through separate boards of 
trustees has led to extravagance, both in 
their construction and their maintenance, 
until more than two-thirds of the entire reve- 
nues of the state are annually absorbed by 
them. This system was the natural out- 
growth of conditions which left the state in 
the exclusive control of one political party 
for more than a third of a century, and re- 
quired of such party that it furnish places 
for a worse than useless number of ambitious 
partisans We demand the abolition of these 
separate boards of trustees and the substitu- 
tion therefor of a single board of control, non- 
partisan in its character, impartial as between 
the several institutions, and thoughtful of 
their interests and those of the state alike. 

7. We declare our purpose to nominate can- 
didates for the United States senate in gen- 
eral convention, and demand such a change 
in our national constitution as will permit 
the election of the same by a direct vote of 
the people. 

8. We insist on just and equal taxation for 
state and local purposes, and hence we hail 
with joy the efforts now made and making to 
change our present cumbersome and incon- 
gruous system for raising the necessary reve- 
nue to a general and harmonious plan that 
shall rest on proper and correct principles. 

9. Recognizing their vast importance to all 
interests, we are heartily in favor of the 
movement for better roads which has been 
successfully inaugurated in 9ur state and 
commend the same to the active support of 
the public. 

10. We denounce as un-American any soci- 
ety or organization that is pledged to deprive 
any citizen of his right to vote or hold office 
on account of his religious beliefs or nation- 
ality. 

Iowa People's Party. 
Adopted at Des Moines June 7. 

We demand a national currency, safe, sound 
and flexible, issued by the general govern- 
ment only, a full legal tender for all debts, 
public .and private, and that without the use 
of banking corporations, a just, equitable and 
efficient means of distribution direct to the 
people at a tax not to exceed 2 per cent be 
devised, as set forth in the sub-treasury plan 
of the Farmers' alliance, or some better sys- 
tem; also by payments in the discharge of its 
obligations for public improvements. 

We demand the free and unlimited coinage 
of silver. 

We demand that the amount of circulating 
medium be speedily increased to not less than 
$50 per capita. 

We demand a graduated income tax. 

We believe that the money of the country 
should be kept as much as possible in the 
hands of the people, and we demand that all 
state and national revenues shall be limited 
to the necessary expenses of the government 
economically and honestly administered. 

We demand that postal savings banks be 
established by the government for the safe 
deposit of the earnings of the people and to 
facilitate exchange. 

The land, including all the natural sources 
of wealth, is the heritage of all the people 
and should not be monopolized for specula- 
tive purposes, and alien ownership of land 



146 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



should be prohibited. All lands now held by 
railroads and other corporations in excess of 
their actual needs and all lands now owned 
by aliens should be reclaimed by the govern- 
ment and held for actual settlers only. 

Transportation being a means of exchange 
and a public necessity, the government should 
own and operate the railroads in the interest 
of the people. The telegraph and the tele- 
phone, like the postal system, being a neces- 
sity for the transmission of news, should be 
owned and operated by the goverment in the 
interest of the people. 

The following resolutions were passed as an 
expression of the sentiments of your commit- 
tee: 

Resolved, That we condemn the nine mem- 
bers of congress who, elected on expressed 
and implied pledges to secure to our people 
the free and unlimited coinage of silver, 
basely betrayed the trust reposed in them and 
violated their pledges by their votes. And 
that we condemn President Harrison and his 
administration for calling an international 
monetary conference and inviting other na- 
tions to assist us in fixing a value on our 
silver. We regard this as an effort to demon- 
etize the silver dollar by and with the aid of 
the enemies of our flag and our free institu- 
tions. 

Resolved, By the people's party of Iowa in 
state convention assembled, that we take de- 
light in saying to the Omaha convention that 
we have in Iowa a man under whose leader- 
ship her citizens would delight to go forth to 
battle in the coming struggle for industrial 
emancipation; a man whom we believe the 
whole country would delight to honor namely, 
Gen. James B. Weaver; and while we thus de- 
clare ourselves as his supporters for the ex- 
alted position, we as unhesitatingly yield to 
the wisdom of the national convention and as 
firmly pledge ourselves to the nominee of its 
choice. 

Iowa Prohibition. 

Adopted at Des Moines June 1. 

The prohibition party in the state of Iowa 
in convention assembled, acknowledging 
Almighty God as the source of all power in 
government, and the holy scriptures as the 
basis of all civil law, do hereby declare: 

That we favor the absolute prohibition of 
manufacture, transportation and sale of alco- 
holic liquors as a beverage. 

We demand the right of suffrage to all 
natural-born or properly naturalized citizens 
without regard to sex. 

We favor arbitration as the method of 
settlement of all local, inter-state and inter- 
national difficulties. 

We demand that the American laborer shall 
be protected from competition with foreign 
and home criminal labor, and that all labor- 
ers shall receive equal pay for equal work in 

We demand that educational and moral 
qualification shall be added to a residence of 
five years in the United States as a condition 
of naturalization. 

That this convention oppose the opening of 
the gates of the Columbian Exposition on 
the sabbath day. 

Michigan Republicans. 

Adopted at Detroit April 14. 

The republicans of Michigan feel a common 

pride with their compatriots throughout the 

union over the continued gratifying success 

of the great principles which have inspired its 

energy and controlled its actions since the 

organization of the party. We review with 

profound satisfaction the record it has made 

in the past and its unparalleled achievements, 



so conducive to and so manifestly indicative 
of the broad character of national states- 
manship. Admiration of this uninterrupted 
progress under its auspices toward an ideal 
government of the people, by the people 
and for the people is not less thorough 
nor more gratifying than are the bright 
prospects of further advantage and future 
triumphs. 

We most heartily indorse the glorious work 
of the republican majority in the List 
congress of the United States, and will do all 
in our power to uphold and sustain the vic- 
tories already won for the grand triple policy 
of protection, reciprocity and honest money. 

In the language of the republican platform 
of 1888, we demand effective legislation by con- 
gress to secure the 1 integrity and purity of 
national elections, and that our representa- 
tives in the United States congress do ah in 
their power to secure a law which will give to 
every elector a free ballot and to every vote a 
fair count. 

We heartily approve of the forceful, fearless 
and dignified policy of the administration of 
President Benjamin Harrison, wbo has been 
so ably assisted in all his sagacious and loyal 
endeavors by that noble patriot and states- 
man, James G. Blaine, in the promulgation of 
true and progressive American principles. 

While the republicans of Michigan recognize 
the sterling worth and ability of our distin- 
guished fellow-citizen, Gen. llussell A. Alger. 
whose claims to recognition as a presidential 
standard-bearer have been familiar to the 
people of this nation since his name was first 
presented to the convention at Chicago in 
1888, we can safely leave to the collective judg- 
ment of the representatives of the party at 
Minneapolis in June next the selection of a 
leader who will head the triumphant march 
of our hosts to victory at the polls in Novem- 
ber, pledging to the nominee of the conven- 
tion our unqualified co-operation and un- 
swerving devotion. 

Michigan Democrats. 
Adopted at Grand Rapids Aug. 17. 

We congratulate the -country and the demo- 
cratic party on the nomination made at Chi- 
cago of Grover Cleveland and Adlai E. Steven- 
son for president and vice-president respect- 
ively, as it gives assurance of a repetition of 
the wise statesmanship and economical ad- 
ministration with which the country was 
blessed from 1885 to 1889, and we pledge them 
our hearty support. 

We commend the honest, faithful and eco- 
nomical administration of Gov. Edwin B. 
Winans, who has set an example well worthy 
of emulation by his successor and of well- 
earned gratitude of the people of the state. 

The democratic party is the only party 
founded upon the principles of the immortal 
declaration of American independence and 
the constitution of the United States, whereby 
all citizens are regarded as equal before the 
law, and the rights of freedom of speech, free- 
dom of the press, freedom of action and free- 
dom of conscience, or religious freedom are 
fully guaranteed and maintained, so far as 
the exercise thereof does not interfere with 
the constitutional and legal rights of others, 
and no abridgments of such rights shall be 
tolerated. It has always been the friend and 
defender of the masses of the people against 
the encroachments upon their rights and 
privileges by the self-constituted aristocracy 
of the land. It believes that a people least 
governed is the best governed; that the intel- 
ligence and patriotism of the masses is a suf- 
ficient and sure guaranty to the stability of 
the national union of the states and the safety 
and peace and prosperity of its citizens. That 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



147 



the civil authorities of the state are the con- 
stitutional conservators of the peace and that 
the military should only be called into requisi- 
tion in cases of great emergency, aud then 
only as aids and subordinates to the civil 
authorities, and we denounce the employment 
by urivate individuals and corporations of 
armed bodies of men, no matter under what 
pretense, as a menace to the peace and wel- 
fare of the country and states, and we de- 
mand at the hands of our legislators the 
enactment of such laws as will in the future 
prohibit the employment and use of such 
forces, and severe punishment therefor, to the 
end that Pinkertonism and kindred organiza- 
tions may be relegated to obscurity and dis- 
grace. 

We denoxmce the McKinley tariff law as the 
culminating atrocity of class legislation. It 
has not increased the price of the products of 
our farms nor increased the wages of labor 
and we indorse the action of the present 
democratic congress in attempting to repeal 
its most oppressive features. 

Resolved. That we condemn the republican 
party for demonetizing and degrading silver, 
and thus bringing upon the country the train 
of evils resulting therefrom, and would com- 
mend to our representatives in congress the 
fact that a large majority of the people of 
this state are in faror of restoring silver to 
its time-honored and rightful place as the coin 
of the nation, co-equal with gold. We demand 
that henceforth the issuing of all circulating 
medium be made under acts of congress 
through the national treasury In such 
amounts as the business wants of the country 



require. 

WH! 



HE RE AS. Recent labor troubles at Home- 
stead and elsewhere have caused general dis- 
aster and great injustice; and 

WHEREAS. This convention desires to affirm 
the democratic doctrine that all such disputes 
should be settled by fair and judicial arbitra- 
tion; therefore. 

Resolved. That it is the duty of the state 
legislature to establish a proper tribunal, with 
power to summon defendants before it, adjust 
all disputes and enforce its judgments by 
proper process; that we pledge the democracy 
of the state of Michigan to the establishment 
of such a tribunal, where laboring men and 
labor organizations can have a fair hearing 
and proper redress. 

For the better protection of our mines and 
mining laborers we favor the amendment of 
existing laws relating to mine inspectors so as 
to provide for the election of such officers by 
direct vote of the people. 

R -solved. That the action of Gov. Winans in 
recommending to the legislature in special 
session a commission to devise means for the 
mprovement of our country roads meets with 
our hearty commendation and that we hope 
that the next legislature will take prompt 
action upon this subject. 

WHEUEAS The present methods adopted in 
the management of our penal and reforma- 
tory institutions, whereby the goods produced 
by the employment of convict labor are 
brought In ruinous competition with the prod- 
ucts of law-abiding citizens engaged in 
legitimate enterprises, which competition is 
destructive of the interests of the workmen 
and mechanic as well as the capital employed; 
therefore be it 

Resolved. That we heartily recommend the 
adoption of such legislation as will change 
tlie present system, under which the prisoners 
of the state are employed, by diverting from 
the legitimate avenues of trade the proceeds 
of their labor either by engaging them in con- 
structing the highways of the state or such 
other manner as the legislature may d5em 
best calculated to render their operations 



least harmful to the success of honest labor 
or least dangerous to the existence of legiti- 
mate established industries. 



Michigan People's Party. 

Ado ted at Jacksvn A'tg.3. 

Resolved, That in order to vouchsafe to the 

people liberty of thought and conscience, and 

speech and press, we demand : 

1. The absolute and continued separation of 
church and state. 

2. That there shall be no appropriation of 
either state or municipal funds, or property, 
to any religious, sectarian or religio-politico 
institutions. 

3. That all schools for the general education 
of the young shall be under the supervision 
and inspection of the state. 

Resolved, That a private army is a standing 
menace to the liberty of the American people; 
and we denounce that band of mercenaries 
known as Pinkertons. 

Resolved, That the system of employing 
convicts in our penal institutions, in any in- 
dustry that enters into competion with free 
labor, should be abolished. 

Resolved, That our convict labor should be 
employed in improving our public highways. 

Resolved, That all manufactured articles 
should bear the name of the manufacturer, 
and that the destroying, defacing, or covering 
up In any way the name of the manufacturer 
shall be deemed a misdemeanor. 

Resolved, That as the proprietors of manu- 
facturing institutions and mines are attempt- 
ing to make inop rative the Australian or 
secret-ballot system by compelling their em- 
ployes to work on election days, we demand 
that all election days be made legal holidays. 

Resolved, That mine inspectors should be 
elected by the people instead of by the board 
of supervisors who are now controlled by the 
mining corporations. 

Resolved, That all lands sold for delinquent 
taxes shall be purchased by the state; the 
title, after a reasonable time, if not redeemed, 
to become absolute and held for actual set- 
tlers in limited quantities. 

Resolved, That the people should have the 
right to propose laws and to vote upon all 
legislative measures of importance; and we 
demand the initiative and the referendum. 

Resolred, That we are in favor of eoual suf- 
frage with an educational qualification. 

And finally we declare ourselves uncom- 
promisingly opposed to all monopolistic trusts 
and combines of whatever nature they may 

Resolved, That in cases of difficulty between 
employers and employes we favor its submis- 
sion to arbitration. 

Michigan Prohibitionists. 
Adopted at Oivosso Aug. 11. 

We favor and when we come into power 
will establish a practical and efficient system 
of the civil service, based upon the present 
system. 

WHEREAS, Many young men, whose habits 
are not formed and who have anxious parents 
deeply interested in their welfare, enlist in the 
service of the state and attend the annual en- 
campment of our state troops, we believe it to 
be the duty of our state authorities to sur- 
round all young men in such service with 
moral influences. We therefore regard with 
abhorrence the act of our state government in 
providing for the sale of intoxicating liquor to 
the troops while in the service of the state. 
Akin to this is the equally burning disgrace of 
permitting the debauching of the youth of our 
state and nation in attendance at our state ed- 
ucational institution by the refusal of both 



148 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 18D3. 



old party legislatures to protect them from the 
open saloon and brothels at the very doors of 
these. We call upon all voters to help in oust- 
ing from power parties who now, by permitting 
such outrages, have proved themselves trai- 
tors to the best home and moral interests of 
the state. 

All pay for public services should be reason- 
able salaries and not by fees, and where fees 
are exacted they should be covered Into the 
public treasury. 

The granting of passes by railroads to pub- 
lic officers should be prohibited and their 
acceptance should be made a misdemeanor. 

We further favor a graduated income tax. 

We render the White Rose league our sin- 
cere thanks for Its efficient aid in the prohibi- 
tipn party work and rejoice in its rapidly 
widening nfluence in the state and nation. 

We arraign for public condemnation the 
pusillanimous and truckling utterances of the 
democratic and republican national platforms 
on the liquor question. The anti-sumptuary 
declaration of one and the expression of sym- 
pathy for temperance by the other are equally 
unmeaning and misleading and show the 
utter weakness of such old organizations. It 
is equally apparent that the newly launched 
craft, the so-called people's party, after 
numerous fruitless attempts to indorse prohi- 
bition as an issue, has already fatally stranded 
on this rock. 

Recognizing the vital importance of the 
thorough organization of the prohibition 
students of our land, we heartily indorse the 
[nter-Collegiate Prohibition Association of the 
United States, organized at Cincinnati last 
June, and we commend its work to the con- 
sideration and support of all true prohibi- 
tionists. 

We repudiate the principle of local option 
as a humiliating and degrading compromise 
with wrong, and a base subterfuge used by 
dominant parties, in league with the saloon 
power, to quiet an awakening public con- 
science and yet retain the temperance voters 
n the rural districts without alienating the 
ilum votes of the city 

Property covered by delinquent taxes, after 
ample time for redemption, should revert to 
he state and not be sold to speculators. 

We Insist upon the right of the state to re- 
quire that all of its youth be educated in the 
3Ommon branches of the English language, 
and that all schools, public and private, shall 
>e under state inspection and supervision, and 
that no public aid shall be granted to any edu- 
cational institution not maintained by the 
tate. 

The right of suffrage should be granted to 
ill citizens, regardless of sex. 

No person should hereafter be given the bal- 
ot who is unable to read and write the official 
anguage of our country. 

The chairman of the 6th district moved that 
;he resolutions be read by their title the sec- 
ond time, and that those planks which the con- 
ention was satisfied with remain and those 
not favorably considered be changed. 

Minnesota Republicans. 
Adopted at St. Paul July 28. 
The republicans of Minnesota, through their 
lelegates in convention assembled, do affirm 
ind declare as follows: 

1. We indorse and approve the platform of 
;he republican national convention adopted 
it Minneapolis June 10, 1892. 

2. We indorse the wise, pure, firm and in- 
;ensely American administration of President 
Harrison. 

3. From its very infancy and for upward of 
a, third of a century our state has been man- 
aged and guided by men and principles of the 



republican party. During that period the 
state has grown from a mere outpost of 
scattered settlements to a commonwealth of 
1.500,000 souls, prosperous and aggressive and 
equal in moral, intellectual and commercial 
vigor to the best of the older states. Such a 
people,so prosperous and so growing,have not 
been badly governed. Our state administra- 
tions have been clean, able, and always loyal 
to the best interests of the people. The ad- 
ministration of Gov. William R. Merriam has 
been in no way inferior to those of his pred- 
ecessors, and may justly be regarded as a 
model of faithfulness to a great public trust. 

4. Recognizing that in some states force and 
fraud are used to defeat the expression of the 
will of the people, the republicans of Minne- 
sota are in favor of all wise means to secure 
to every citizen a free ballot and a fair count. 

5. Trusts and combinations to control and 
unduly enhance the price of commodities are 
a great evil, the outgrowth of human cupid- 
ity, and exist in all civilized communities, 
regardless of tariff laws. We are opposed to 
the same and are in favor of all proper legis- 
lation to eradicate and repress the evil. In 
this connection we refer with pride to the 
establishment and maintenance at the state 
prison at Stillwater of the manufacture of 
binding twine, which has been the means of 
protecting and defending our farmers against 
one of the great trusts and monopolies. 

6. We believe in protecting the laboring 
man by all necessary and judicious legisla- 
tion, and to this end we favor the enactment 
of suitable laws to protect the health, life and 
limb of all employes of transportation, min- 
ing and manufacturing companies while en- 
gaged in the service of such companies; (2) 
the establishment in some form of boards or 
tribunals of conciliation and arbitration for 
the peaceful settlement of all disputes and 
disagreements between capital and labor, 
touching wages, hours of labor and such 
questions as pertain to the safety and physical 
and moral well-being of the laborer; () the 
exclusion from our shores, by suitable laws 
and regulations, of all paupers, criminals, con- 
tract labor and other dangerous classes; and 
(4) the preservation of the public domain for 
actual and bona-flde settlers under the home- 
stead law. 

7. The farmers of this state, who constitute 
the chief element of our productive wealth- 
creating population, are entitled to the cheap- 
est and best facilities for storing, shipping 
and marketing their products, and to this end 
we favor such laws as will eive them cheao, 
safe and easily obtainable elevator and ware- 
house facilities and will furnish them prompt- 
ly and without discrimination, at fair and 
reasonable rates, proper transportation facili- 
ties to all accessible markets. 

8. Railroad, telegraph and telephone com- 
panies and all corporations or individuals 
charged with and performing any public serv- 
ice or employment are amenable to public 
control, and we favor the enactment and en- 
forcement of such laws as will compel them to 
render the best and most approved service at a 
fair, just and reasonable rate, without dis- 
crimination as to persons or places. 

9. The convention approves and readopts the 
resolutipns passed by the last republican state 
convention, urging upon congress the passage 
of the Washburn-Hatch anti-option bill. 

10. Realizing the importance to the people 
of good public highways, we are In favor of 
the enactment of laws for the systematic im- 
provement and maintenance of the same. 

11. The debt of this nation to the men who 
preserved it cannot be computed from the 
standpoint of dollars and cents. A nation's 
gratitude is theirs, and in proof thereof the 
republican party of Minnesota, not grudgingly. 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



149 



but heartily, cordially and earnestly favors a 
system of pensions so liberal as to properly 
provide for the living and tenderly protect 
from want the widows and orphans of the 
dead. Andwe rejpicethat the nation's growth 
and great prosperity of the government they 
served warrant us in making this pledge. 

12. We recommend the work and the object 
of the State League of Republican clubs and 
advise a continuance of the same. 

IS. The republicans of the state are heartily 
in favor of the protection of its farmers so 
far as consistent with its general interest. 

14. W HEUE AS.The republicans of Minnesota, 
recognizing the conspicuous ability and fidel- 
ity of Senator Cushman K. Davis, have mani- 
fested substantial unanimity in demanding 
his re-election to the position he has so ably 
filled; and, 

WHEREAS, Notable precedents are on rec- 
ord for the nomination by state conventions 
of men who are evidently the popular choice 
for United States senator, thus making them 
the recognized candidates of the party for 
that high office; therefore, 

Resolved, That this convention hereby pre- 
sents the name of Cushman K. Davis as .the 
chosen nominee and candidate of the repub- 
lican party of the state of Minnesota for re- 
election to the United States senate by the 
legislature of 1893. 

Minnesota Democrats, 
Adopted at Minneapolis Aug. 3. 

The democratic party of Minnesota gath- 
ered in delegate convention mingle their 
rejoicing with that of their fellows in the 
nation that the earnest voice of the rank and 
file of the party was heard and obeyed by the 
national convention and found expression in 
the nomination of the able and courageous 
Cleveland for our leader, and in the bold, ex- 
plicit declaration that republican protection 
is a fraud, as a proof of which we point to 
Homestead, where the militia of the state is 
keeping peace in a quarrel over the spoils 
between the real and the supposed benefi- 
ciaries of protection. 

We denounce the rapacious and conscience- 
less combination which has grown up in the 
state. With the connivance of republican 
legislatures our grain markets have been 
monopolized and our farmers robbed of the 
fruits of their hard labors. We reaffirm our 
belief that the combination rests upon the 
fact that the railroads of this state have 
abjured one of their primary functions, the 
provision of suitable means for handling 
grain, and have given the same over to the 
control of private persons; and we again 
declare our belief that the remedy, simple, 
but efficacious, lies in legislation requiring the 
roads to resume this proper function, thus 
giving to every station a free and open market. 

We recognize the great conspicuous fact 
that the property of our government rests 
upon labor, and that all legislation should be 
shaped, so far as possible, to relieve it of all 
unjust burdens and secure it its just share of 
the benefit of our general prosperity. 

We are opposed to state interference with 
parental rights and rights of conscience in the 
education of children as an infringement of 
the fundamental democratic doctrine that the 
largest individual liberty consistent with the 
rights of others insures the highest type of 
American citizenship and best government. 

We again call the attention of the voters to 
the manifest injustice and inequality of our 
tax laws, under which wealth easily evades 
its share of the public burdens and compels 
moderate accumulations to bear the part it 
shirks. And we again invite the coming leg- 
islature to a serious consideration of the sub- 



ject, to the end that a just, evenly bearing 
system may be adopted. 

The democratic party has always been and 
is to-day the consistent opponent of all legis- 
lation the result of which is to create law- 
made wealth, which impoverishes the poor 
and those of moderate means in order to 
enrich the few. We condemn all use of the 
taxing powers for this purpose. We call the 
attention of the people of this state to the 
fact that the mineral wealth at the northern 
part of this state is not bearing its just share 
of the public burdens. The non-resident mill- 
ionaires who own iron mines whose value is, 
at a moderate estimate, $2,000,000, under our 
present statutes pay less than $9 per annum 
in taxes. In exchange for the votes of 2,000 
employes, coerced into voting the republican 
ticket, the republican party has covenanted 
to perpetuate this system and to deliver to 
these men the government of one of the 
counties of this state. We demand that this 
condition of things be rectified. 

We denounce all bounties and exemptions, 
and demand that all taxes to be raised in this 
state shall be as nearly equal as may be and 
that all property on which taxes are to be 
levied shall have a cash valuation and be 
equalized and uniform. 

Ard we call upon all good citizens without 
distinction of party to join with us in defeat- 
ing the proposed constitutional amendment 
known as chapter 2 of the general laws of 
1891, to be voted upon this fall, which seeks to 
perpetuate this unjust system of taxation; 
and while it pretends to levy taxes upon 
sleeping cars it repeals the existing constitu- 
tional tax of 3 per cent upon the gross earn- 
ings of our railroads, now realizing for the 
state a revenue of $725,000 and annually in- 
creasing and places the rate of taxation upon 
the earnings of such railroads at the caprice 
of the legislature. 

We especially call attention to and de- 
nounce the form of the ballot for this pro- 
posed amendment to be voted upon at the 
coming election, which is known as "senate 
file No. 124," as being especially designed to 
mislead the voters, and we call upon all hon- 
est citizens to assist in rebuking such "trickery. 

Resolved, That we are in favor of a radical 
chnge in the laws of this state, and demand 
such legislation as will provide for intelligent 
and economical supervision of the building 
and maintenance or our country roads. 

Resolved, That for the better security of our 
government we recommend an amendment 
to the federal constitution extending the 
presidential term to six years and making a 
president ineligible to re-election. 

We favor also the election of president and 
vice-president and senators of the United 
States by a direct vote of the people. 

Believing the contract system in force in the 
state penitentiary to be wrong in principle, 
prejudicial to the interests of the state, the 
welfare of the convicts and an injustice to 
honest labor, we demand its discontinuance 
at the expiration of the present contracts, and 
that the legislature prohibit any future con- 
tracts and provide for the employment by 
the state and for the state of all convicts and 
persons confined in the penal and reformatory 
institutions of the state. 

Minnesota Prohibitionists. 
Adopted at St. Paul June 1. 
Recognizing the necessity of Divine guid- 
ance to a wise administration and believing 
that all government should be conducted for 
the common welfare of the people, we make 
the following declaration of principles: 

The overshadowing question of the times is 
the suppression of the liquor traflQc. The 



150 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



organized liquor traffic Is the most formidable, 
insidious and dangerous of all foes of good 
government, social order and material pros- 
perity. 

We therefore demand the repea 1 by the 
state of all laws licensing, permitting the 
traffic in intoxicants or deriving any revenue 
therefrom, and the absolute prohibition of 
their manufacture and sale for beverage pur- 
poses. 

We also demand the entire prohibition by 
the federal government within its jurisdiction 
of the importation, exportation and manu- 
facture of intoxicants and all traffic therein 
for beverage purposes, and also the rei>eal of 
all federal laws storing or taxing intoxicants, 
or licensing or permitting their manufacture, 
importation or sale for beverage purposes or 
deriving any revenue therefrom, and the 
enactment of adequate laws preventing tbe 
transportation thereof into states having pro- 
hibitory laws to be used contrary to the laws 
of such states. 

We believe that all laws legalizing the 
saloon are in direct conflict with the objects 
set forth in the preamble to the constitution 
of the United States and of the several states, 
and such laws should be and we believe will 
be declared void. 

We believe in the political equality of all 
men and women and in the right and duty of 
all citizens of proper age possessed of ade- 
quate intelligence and education (not disqual- 
ified by crime) to share in the honors and 
responsibilities of government, including the 
elective franchise, without distinction of race 
or sex; but suffrage should be based upon 
full citizenship and a proper educational qual- 
ification. We favor the Australian system, so 
framed as to insure equal justice to all polit- 
ical parties and a free official ballot at public 
expense; and we denounce the political chi- 
canery of the old-party legislators in certain 
states that seek, by incorporation of unjust 
features into the system, to disfranchise 
voters of weaker organizations, or so discrim- 
inate against them as to render it extremely 
difficult for them freely to exercise their right 
of suffrage. 

We favor the election of president, vice- 
president and United States senators by direct 
vote of the people. 

We demand the abolition of official patron- 
age and the wretched "spoils of office" system, 
and the placing of the civil service upon a 
basis of merit alone, under supervision of a 
competent pan-partisan commission; the inhi- 
bition of all class legislation, and of the im- 
provident granting away (or leasing) of 
people's franchises, the public domain, the 
state mineral lands or other resources of the 
people; the suppression of lotteries, of gam- 
bling in options, futures, produce and stocks, 
and of all combinations for the control of pro- 
duction, transportation or the people's 
markets. 

Money should be in gold and silver, and of 
treasury notes redeemable in gold or silver, at 
the option of the government; and all money 
should be equally a legal tender for all pur- 
poses. It should be issued by the general 
government only, and the volume of the cur- 
rency should be increased to an amount suffi- 
cient to meet all the demands of the nation's 
business and to relieve all embarrassing 
monetary stringency. 

The accumulation of vast fortunes, the 
centralization of wealth into a few hands, the 
enormous increase of corporate wealth and 
power and the acquisition of vast possessions 
in lands should be discouraged as against 
public policy; and alien ownership thereof, 
land monopolies and the holding of land-* by 
railroad corporations free from taxation 
should be prohibited. The public lands 



shouM be appropriated in limited quantities 
to actual settlers only, and the distribution 
of real estate in small holdings in fee among 
the people should be aided and encouraged 
by the government, as a promotive of good 
citizenship and the general public welfare. 

Every one enjoying the protection of gov- 
ernment should share in the burdens of tax- 
ation for its support in proportion to his abil- 
ity to bear them and to the magnitude of his 
material interests protected; and to permit 
the wealthy to evade this duty of fealty is to 
encourage the malign spirit of disloyalty and 
oppression. 

We favor a graduated tax annually by the 
government upon all incomes above a reason- 
able exemption and upon the corporate prop- 
erty of every corporation exceeding such 
amount not already so taxed; and we favor 
such amendment of the state laws as wiL 
effectually subject all private property in 
excess of a reasonable exemption, including 
that of railroad companies, to a just propor- 
tion of all taxes. 

We are opposed to all covert indirect taxa- 
tion permitting the ostensible payer thereol 
to exact it again, with additional and often 
oppressive tribute, from the consumers of the 
necessaries of life; except only such duties 
upon imports as are made expedient or neces- 
sary by the conditions of discriminating tariffs 
imposed by foreign governments, and of dif- 
ferences of wages and cost of production ; and 
the duties so imposed should be adjusted 
from time to time by a permanent pan-par- 
tisan commission .of expert business men 
upon the basis of an equitable adjustment of 
those differences only, and in the spirit of 
true reciprocity with all nations, and not with 
such countries as promise special advantages 
to favored classes. 

Railroads should be made in the fullest 
sense public highways, and should be con- 
trolled in their management and rates, foi 
the equal interest of all people, on the basis 
of a reasonable compensation to transporta- 
tion companies in view of their actual neces- 
sary investments (not including any watered 
stock), and the state should in due time be- 
come the owner of the railroads as highways. 

We also favor the establishment and con- 
trol by the federal government of a general 
postal telegraph and telephone system, and of 
postal savings banks, under the management 
of the postoffice department, in the interest 
of the people. 

We demand the complete suppression of 
polygamy, the social evil, and the indecent 
publication of scandalous details of immor- 
ality and crime; the entire equality of the 
sexes before the law and in the field of indus- 
try, the vijdlant protection of womanly virtue, 
the increasing of the "age of consent" to 16 
years; rigid and humane restriction and 
regulation in the employment of child labor; 
enforced, radical, hea'thful and just reform 
in labor employments, wherever needed In the 
promotion of justice, health and good morals; 
the settlement of disputes between capital 
and labor, or between employers and em- 
ployes, by arbitration upon principles of 
mutual justice and equity. 

We believe in the maintenance and con 
stant improvement of free public schools, 
with free text-books, for universal and man- 
datory education of the youth, including 
scientific instruction in the nature and evil 
effects of alcohol upon the human system; the 
complete separation of the public schools and 
all educational funds from the use or the con- 
trol of every religious secc or association; the 
protection alike of all sects by equal laws, 
with entire freedom of faith and worship, and 
the preservation and the guaranty to all per- 
sons of a weekly sabbath day or rest, in ac- 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



151 



cordance with their own conscientious views 
as to the day to be observed. 

As a check upon the corrupting power of 
the monied lobby and the alarming venality 
of municipal and legislative bodies, we favor 
a judicious referendum system in state and 
municipal legislation touching police regula- 
tions and the political, economical and indus- 
trial interests of the people. 

We denounce the barbarous practice of 
banging, shooting and burning supposed 
criminals without trial by jury, especially as 
now practiced on the colored citizens of this 
country. 

Minnesota People's Party. 
Convention at St. Paul July 14. 

The convention Indorsed the platform 
idopted by the Omaha convention, which will 
be found among the national platforms. 

Nebraska Republicans. 
Adopted at Lincoln Aug. 4. 
The republicans of Nebraska, in convention 
assembled, affirm their faith in the principles 
enunciated in the platform adopted by the 
national republican convention at Minneap- 
jlis, and most heartily indorse the wise, clean, 
ind truly American administration of Presi- 
lent Harrison. The party is the friend of 
abor in the factory, mill, mine and on the 
farm; it will at all times stand ready to adopt 

y measure that may improve its condition 
r promote its prosperity. 

We deplore the appearance of any conflict 
between labor and capital. We denounce the 
agitation of demagogues, designed to foment 
conflicts, and we most earnestly disapprove 
the use of private armed forces in any troubles 
to settle them. We believe that an appeal to 
Law and its officers is ample to protect prop- 
erty and preserve the peace, and favor the es- 
tablishment in some form of boards of tribu- 
nals of conciliation and arbitration for the 
peaceful settlement of all disputes between 
capital and labor and such questions as pertain 
to the safety and physical and moral well-being 
of the workingmen. We believe in protect- 
ing the laboring men by all necessary and judi- 
cious legislation, and to this end we favor the 
enactment of suitable laws to protect health, 
life and limb of all employes of transporta- 
tion, mining and manufacturing companies 
while engaged in the service of such com- 
panies. * * * 

The farmers of this state, who constitute 
the chief element of our productive, wealth- 
creating population, are entitled to the 
cheapest and best facilities for storing, 
shipping and marketing the products, and to 
this end we favor such laws as will give them 
cheap, safe and easily obtainable elevator 
and warehouse facilities, and will furnish 
them promptly and without discrimination, 
at a just and equitable rate, proper transpor- 
tation facilities for accessible markets. We 
demand the enactment of laws regulating the 
rates charged by express companies within 
the state, to the end that such rates may be 
reasonable. * * * 

We favor the adoption of the amendment 
to the constitution providing for an elective 
railroad commission, empowered to fix local 
passenger and freight rates. * 

We are in favor of the postal telegraph 
and postal savings banks systems and free 
delivery. * * * 

Trusts and combinations to control and 
unduly enhance the price of commodities are 
a great evil, and we favor all proper legisla- 
tion to eradicate and repress them. * * " 

The revenue laws of this state should be 
carefully revised by a commission of compe- 
tent persons, representing the prominent in- 



dustries of the state, to the end that all prop- 
erty rightfully subject to taxation may be 
made to pay its just proportion of the public 
revenues. * * * 

The debt of this nation to the men who pre- 
served it can never be paid in dollars and 
cents. The republican party of Nebraska 
cordially and earnestly favors a system of 
pensions so liberal as to properly provide for 
the living and tenderly protect from want 
the widows and orphans of the dead. 

Resolved, That we indorse the movement 
inaugurated by the American College League, 
and pledge our hearty support toward 
advancing the college movement in Nebraska. 

Nebraska Democrats. 
Adopted at Lincoln Aug. 31. 

The democracy of Nebraska, in convention 
assembled, hereby renew their devotion and 
fealty to the principles and policies of popular 
government as exemplified by the record of 
the democratic party si nee the d ay s of Thomas 
Jefferson. We cordially indorse the demo- 
cratic platform adopted at the Chicago con- 
vention, emphasizing its utterances upon the 
question of protection and the passage of a 
force bill. 

We congratulate the people of the country 
on the nomination of Grover Cleveland and 
Adlai B. Stevenson. 

Railroads and all other corporations of what- 
soever kind must be held subservient to the 
law-making power of this state, and within 
constitutional limitations, railroads and all 
other corporations in Nebraska are and must 
continue amenable to legislative restrictions 
and regulations. To better effect a reconcili- 
ation between popular and corporate interests 
in Nebraska, and for the purpose of establish- 
ing justice and maintaining an identity of in- 
terests between the common carriers and the 
people of this state, and between servants and 
masters, we recommend the adoption of the 
constitutional amendment now pending creat- 
ii% a board of railway commissioners elected 
by the people of the state. We favor reason- 
able and just laws regulating railroad charges. 

We believe that senators of the United 
States should be chosen by direct vote of the 
people and we favor the election of presi- 
dential electors by congressional districts. 

We denounce the republican party for its 
system of contract convict labor, whereby it 
has given to a single individual the monopoly 
of all the cheap convict labor of this state 
and brought it into direct competition with 
the honest toilers of the state. And not con- 
tent with fastening it upon the people for ten 
years, this party has leased it for another 
ten years before the expiration of the first 
term. 

We condemn the giving of bounties and 
subsidies of every kind as a perversion of the 
taxing power. 

The state of Nebraska has and exercises 
the right of regulating the sale of intoxica- 
ting drinks in the interests of good order 
throughout the entire commonwealth, but the 
prohibition of the manufacture and sale of 
such drinks within the state is contrary to 
the fundamental principles of social and 
moral conduct. 

We are in thorough sympathy with the toil- 
ing interests of the country and we observe 
with deep solicitude the conflict between 
capital and labor and charge these conditions 
to the vicious legislation enacted by the 
republican party for the purpose of disbursing 
taxes among the favored few and the mainte- 
nance of the privileged classes. 

We denounce the employment of Pinkerton 
hirelings as arbiters of contests between 
capital and labor and are in favor of a law 



152 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



making compulsory the settlement by arbitra- 
tion of all disputes between corporations and 
their employes. 

The democracy of Nebraska demands an 
open and fair discussion before the public of 
all political questions and denounces as un- 
democratic and un-American any attempt to 
deprive our citizens of their political rights or 
privileges, as such, because of their race or 
religious belief. 

We congratulate the people of the state up- 
on having secured tne Australian ballot, by 
means of which every citizen is insured the 
right to cast his vote according to his own 
judgment, free from intimidation and corrup- 
tion." 

The following supplementary resolutions 
were handed in by the committee. 

Resolved, That we indorse the course of Hon. 
W. J. Bryan in congress and point with pride 
to him as a resolute and brilliant champion 
of the masses against the classes. 

Resolved. That we indorse the economy ex- 
ercised by Gov. James E. Boyd in the manage- 
ment of the public institutions under his con- 
trol. 

Resolved, That the splendid efforts of the 
New York World and the Omaha World- 
Herald in aid of the western campaign fund 
are warmly appreciated by the democracy of 
Nebraska in convention assembled, and we do 
cordially commend their work in that behalf. 

Nebraska People's Party. 
Adopted at Kearney Aug. 3. 

Resolved, That we heartily indorse the plat- 
form adopted at Omaha. Neb.. July 4, 1892, and 
pledge to it our unanimous support. 

Resolved, That we fully indorse the course 
of Hon. O. M. Kem in congress. 

We further offer this additional preamble 
and resolution; 

WHERAS, An armed force, equipped for 
battle and provisioned for a siege, did on the 
6th of July last invade the town of Home- 
stead and massacre several of its inhabitants, 
having been hired for this purpose by a cor- 
poration without color of law or authority, 
and 

WHERAS, They have not been arrested, but 
are still at large, and their hired mercenaries 
were allowed to disperse under the protection 
of law which they had criminally violated; 
and 

WHERAS, The sufferers from this wicked 
conspiracy are now being persecuted by its in- 
famous authors and abettors, therefore 

Resolved, That we tender our heartfelt 
sympathy and aid to the relatives, friends 
and fellow-sufferers of the victims of this mur- 
derous conspiracy. 

2. That we demand the trial and just punish- 
ment of its instigators. 

3. That we denounce the policy of political 
parties which has brought this foul blot on 
our fair country, has fostered monopolies, 
has concentrated wealth in the hands of the 
few, has left but a pittance for the laborer, 
and put him in the hands of merciless and 
greedy employers, trained assassins and 
military forces. 

4. That we pledge our sacred honor to use 
every lawful and honorable means to hurl 
from power and office the men and the politi- 
cal parties who enslave labor, crown capital, 
and who use law and fraud and violence to 
make our land the home of the serf and the 
millionaire. 

5. That we recommend that for the "mar- 
tyrs of Homestead" memorial services be 
held throughout the country by every organi- 
zation of the people's party on a day ap- 
pointed by the national campaign committee 
and the several state committees, and that 



the banners of that day be inscribed with the 
names of the ''martyrs" as follows: Martin 
Foy, David P. Davis, Peter Ferris, Jules 
Markow^ky, John E. Morris. Henry Strieger, 
Joseph Tupper. Thomas Wayne, Thomas 
Weldon, and stars for the unknown. 

Nebraska Prohibitionists. 
Adopted at Hastings Aug. 18. 

The prohibitionists of Nebraska, in conven- 
tion assembled, acknowledge their responsi- 
bility to God and to their fellow-men for an 
honest and conscientious exercise of the 
elective franchise. 

Our government through the rule of corrupt 
parties has formed a partnership with the 
wicked for gain, and an alliance with the 
strong against the weak. 

Immense revenues are derived from popu- 
lar vices, and the vicious class, augmented by 
the sanction of government, is made the tool 
of organized wealth to fasten the chains of 
slavery upon the industrial masses. 

To break this unholy alliance should be the 
first object of every good citizen, and this 
cannot be accomplished by any party that 
fears to antagonize the saloon vote. 

We therefore most cordially invite all good 
citizens to unite with us in support of the 
following propositions: 

1. The traffic in intoxicating liquors as a 
beverage is a public nuisance, and the govern- 
ment has no right to authorize or sanction it. 
It is a leech on the material prosperity of the 
nation unequaled by any of the day. It is the 
power in the hands of corrupt politicians by 
which their unworthy ends in government are 
attained. It is the cause of all causes in pro- 
ducing discord, crime, misery, want and 
degradation in the domestic and social world. 
It is a deadly foe to all morality, purity and 
virtue, and good government demands its im- 
mediate siippression by law. 

2. The right of suffrage is inherent in citi 
zenship, regardless of sex. 

3. The money of the country should be 
issued by the general government only, and 
in sufficient quantity to meet the demands of 
business and give full opportunity for the em- 
ployment of labor. To this end an increase 
in the volume of money is demanded. No 
individual or corporation should be allowed 
to make any profit through its issue. It should 
be made a legal tender for the payment of all 
debts, public and private. Its volume should 
be fixed at a definite sum per capita and made 
to increase with our increase of population. 

4. Railroads, telegraphs and other public 
corporations should be controlled by the gov- 
ernment in the interest of the people and no 
higher charges allowed than necessary to give 
fair interest on the capital actually invested. 

5. The real estate of the nation should be 
preserved for its citizens only. Non-resident 
alien ownership should be absolutely prohib- 
ited and all unearned and forfeited land 
grants should be reclaimed by the govern- 
ment. 

6. All trusts should be prohibited and sup- 
pressed and all corporations should be con- 
trolled by the government so as to protect the 
rights of individual citizens. 

7. Tariff should be levied only as a defense 
against foreign governments that discrimi- 
nate against us or bar out our products from 
their markets, revenue being incidental. The 
residue of income necessary to an economical 
administration of government should be 
raised by levying the burden on what the 
people possess instead of on what they 
consume. 

8. No alien should be allowed to vote until 
he becomes a citizen of the United States. 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



153 



9. The election of United States senators 
should be by direct vote of the people. 

10- Every honorably discharged soldier, 
sailor and marine merits and should receive 
a just pension, based upon disabilities and 
time of service. 

11. All persons should be protected by law 
in their right to one day of rest in seven. 

12. Believing that a vote for the candidates 
of a party is the only true test of party fealty, 
we ask the suffrages of the electors upon the 
principles here enunciated. 

South Dakota Republicans. 
Adopted at Madison July 22. 

We, the republicans of South Dakota, in con- 
vention assembled, reaffirm the principles 
enunciated in the platform adopted by the 
national republican convention held at Min- 
neapolis in June last, and most heartily in- 
dorse the administration of President Harri- 
son; and we recognize with pleasure the serv- 
ices rendered by our republican senator and 
representatives in congress. 

We cordially approve of and indorse the able 
and efficient administration of our state gov- 
ernment. 

We favor the use of both gold and silver as 
standard money, under such legislative regu- 
lations as will secure the parity of values of 
the two metals. And we recommend the steps 
already taken by our government to insure 
this important object by an international 
monetary conference. 

The republican party is the friend of the 
working classes, opposed to all legislation hos- 
tile to their interests, and ready at all times to 
adopt any measure that may improve their 
condition or improve their material prosper- 
ity. We deplore the occurrence of any con- 
flicts between labor and capital. We denounce 
the agitation of demagogues designed to fo- 
ment and intensify these conflicts, and we 
most earnestly disapprove of the use of private 
armed forces in any attempt to settle them. 
We believe that an appeal to the law and its 
officers is amply sufficient to protect property 
and preserve the peace, and a reference to 
legally created or amicably chosen boards of 
arbitration the best method of adjusting all 
disagreements out of which these conflicts 
have arisen. 

We hail the advent of better times in our 
beloved country, when the operation of re- 
publican tariff legislation is looking to the 
establishment of new industries in our midst 
and the removal hither of many manufactur- 
ing institutions from the old world; when our 
reciprocity treaties have whitened the seas 
with the sails of our new and enlarging com- 
merce; when the splendid diplomacy of our 
state department has secured the acquaint- 
ance of European nations with the American 
hog, as it is now acquainting them with the 
valuable uses of American corn; when the 
Providence of God and the industry of man 
unite in promising us an abundant harvest; 
when our mines are increasing their output 
of gold, silver, copper, tin and other valuable 
metals, and peace and good-will prevail among 
our people. And we denounce the declarations 
from the platform of the people's party con- 
vention recently held at Omaha, as follows: 

"We meet in the midst of a nation brought 
to the verge of moral, political and material 
ruin; corruption dominates the ballot-box, the 
legislature, congress, and touches even the 
ermine of the bench; the people are demoral- 
ized; most of the states have been compelled 
to isolate the voters at the polling places to 
prevent universal intimidation or bribery," 
etc. 

These statements are more than false; they 
are seditious, scandalous, and appeal to the 



prejudices and passions of unthinking men, 
and are a slander upon a free, intelligent, self- 
governed people. 

Experience has amply justified the wisdom 
of the national government in adopting recip- 
rocal trade relations with foreign powers. 
This policy has very largely augmented the 
exportations of our manufactured wares and 
agricultural products, as shown by the un- 
precedented record of the last year, during 
which time our export trade reached the enor- 
mous total of $2,000.000,000. 

We urge upon the general government such 
legislation as will secure to the several states 
for agricultural purposes the arid lands 
within their borders, and we urge upon our 
senators and representatives in congress to 
continue their best efforts to secure from the 
general government liberal aid for the 
establishment of a system of irrigation by 
the means of artesian wells. 

We demand such legislation by our general 
and state government as will prevent dealings 
in options of agricultural products, by specu- 
lators, and the forming of combinations and 
trusts. 

We commend the present administration in 
Its management of the affairs of the general 



policy 

cratic administration to annoy such settlers 
by delay and vexatious litigation. 

The surviving soldiers of the civil war are 
justly entitled to the grateful care of the 
national government which these heroes' 
valor preserved from extinction, and we cheer- 
fully pledge our support to all laws made in 
recognition of their patriotic sacrifices. 

Our revenue laws should be carefully re- 
vised by a commission of competent persons 
representing the principal industries of the 
state, to the end that all property rightfully 
subject to taxation may be made to pay its 
just proportion of the public revenues. 

Recognizing the great value and wise econ- 
omy of well-constructed hiehwavs. we sug- 
gest to the thoughtful consideration of our 
people the adoption of such methods on 
road improvement as will insure the building 
of durable and substantial roadways, wher- 
ever required, in all sections of the state. 

We are in favor of the postal telegraph and 
postal savings-bank system, also of rural free 
delivery. 

We are in favor of laws governing the rates 
charged by the express companies within this 
state, to the end that such rates may be re- 
duced. 

We favor the election of railroad commmis- 
sloners by the people, and we demand the en- 
actment of a law conferring upon said commis- 
sioners power to establish local passenger and 
freight rates. We favor the enactment 01 such 
laws for the regulation of railroads within 
this state as will insure absolute equality to 
all classes of patrons and to all localities. 

South Dakota Democrats. 
Adopted at Chamberlain Sept. 1. 

The democracy of South Dakota, in conven- 
tion assembled, reaffirms its devotion to the 
party as enunciated in the platform of the 
national democracy at its convention in the 
city of Chicago June 21, 1892. 

We commend the action of that convention 
in selecting as our standard-bearer in the 
coming national contest that fearless and 
matchless leader, Grover Cleveland, and in 
the selection of Adlai E. Stevenson as the 
candidate for the vice-presidency. 

We denounce the action of the favored 
beneficiaries of the class legislation of the 
republican party in usurping governmental 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



functions by the employment of Pinkerton 
assassins to take the places of the duly con- 
stituted authorities of the state and nation, 
and we favor such legislation as shall prevent 
such lawlessness in the future. 

We demand that the school funds of our 
state be loaned to the people of the state upon 
r.m.jle security, at a reasonable rate of 
interest, and we denounce the action of our 
republican legislature and state officers in 
depriving the mass of the people of the use of 

uch funds under proper safeguards and 
regulations. 

We are opposed to all sumptuary legislation 
either by state or national government. 

We are in favor of a resubmission to a vote 
of the people of article 21 of the constitution 
relating to prohibition. Until constitutional 
prohibition is repealed, we advocate such a 
modification of the present prohibitory law as 
will best promote the welfare and good morals 
of our people. 

Believing that unnecessary taxation is un- 
just taxation, we pledge the democracy if 
intrusted with powertoa rigid and economical 
administration of the trust reposed in them 
by the people. 

We invite the co-operation of all good citi- 
zens in assisting the democracy In rescuing 
the state and nation from misrule and in re- 
storing the government to the control of the 
people, to the end that it may be administered 
n the interest of the many and not of the few. 

South Dakota People's Party. 
Adopted at RedfieM June 22. 

We declare our allegiance to the St. Louis 
platform and adopt the demands therein con- 
tained as tlu platform of our party. We stand 
by the record of the independent party of the 
south upon all minor questions. We favor a 
constitutional amendment incorporating the 
referendum and initiative in our state consti- 
tution. The committee respectfully submitted 
the following resolution: 

We oppose the further sale of our school 
ands. We favor the assessment of mort- 
gages to the holders thereof and the exemp- 
tion of a like amount from the assessment of 
the mortgagors; that we favor the enactment 
of legislation for the protection of mine, rail- 
way and manufacturing employes and their 
indemnification for injuries received not re- 
sulting from their own carelessness. We 
favor the reduction of the maximum rate of 
nterest to 8 per cent. We demand of con- 
gress the total extinction of the plutocracy's 
private armed murderers and thugs, known as 
the "Pinkertons," by whom private citizens 
and innocent women and children have been 
murdered at various places in the nation. We 
nlso demand that the existence of such pri- 
vate armies be made treason and felony. We 
h jartily indorse the action of the Hon. J. H. 
Kyle, our representative in the United States 
senate, and promise him our earnest support 
in all his efforts for the emancipation of labor 
from the power of money to oppress. We are 
unspeakably proud of the fact that 170 dele- 
gates to this convention are representative of 
that noble host that riskod life and limb in 
defense of their country, and we rejoice that 
sectionalism is to become a thing of the past 
among the industrial forces of our common 
country. 

We arraign both old parties for their dis- 
crimination against old soldiers and in favor 

of landholders. 

Wisconsin Republicans. 
Adopted at Milwaukee Aug. 17. 

The republican party of Wisconsin, in con- 
vention assembled, affirms: Its approval and 
support of the pUitform promulgated by the 



national republican convention at Minne- 
apolis; its unqualified approval of the splen- 
did administration of President Harrison; its 
unqualified opposition to the proposition 
announced in the democratic national plat- 
form to repeal the tax levied by the federal 
law on the circulation of state banks, a policy 
which, if effected, would again flood the 
country with wildcat money and again sub- 
ject people to the annoyance and losses con- 
sequent upon a fluctuating, uncertain and 
depreciated currency; it denounces as with- 
out foundation and intended only to mislead 
the voters of Wisconsin the statement so 
often made by the democratic press that 
republican success in this state involves a 
surrender or compromise of whatever rights 
the courts may hold to exist in favor of the 
state upon the bonds of ex-state treasurers, 
and pledges itself if it shall be intrusted with 
executive and legislative power in the state to 
enforce fully the rights of the people in the 
premises. It favors such amendment of the 
jaw authorizing and regulating the deposit at 
interest in the banks in the state of surplus 
moneys belonging to the people as shall, with- 
out impairing in any wise the security to be 
given by such banks on such deposits, invite 
competition among them, to the end that the 
highest rate of interest attainable may be 
secured for the people upon the people's 
money; that the localities on which such 

to the favoritism of state officers, and that the 
people may more fully know of the disposi- 
tion of such surplus moneys. It reaffirms and 
unqualifiedly indorses the declaration of the 
republican convention held in this city in May 
last upon the educational question, so called, 
as correctly and fully defining the position of 
the republican party of this state. It 
denounces the outrageous partisanship of the 
democratic majority at the late extra session 
of the legislature in forcing the enactment 
without legislative consideration, delibera- 
tion or fair opportunity for debate or amend- 
ment of the present so-called apportionment 
law, in defiance of , the plain provisions of the 
constitution as expounded by the Supreme 
court and in disregard of the rights of the 
people. It denounces the parsimony of the 
democratic party of this state in its refusal to 
make adequate appropriation of money for a 
fit representation by the state at the World's 
Columbian Exposition, and calls attention 
with shame to the action of the democratic 
majority in congress in refusing to grant 
liberal appropriation to aid in carrying on to 
a successful end that great national exhibi- 
tion of the wealth, progress and civilization of 
the world, and more especially of the United 
States. It declares now as heretofore its devo- 
tion to all the industries of the state.and its pur- 
pose in the future as in the past to foster and 
protect by all proper and necessary legislation, 
and denounces all attacks upon them made or 
attempted by the democratic administration 
of this state. 

It believes that laws should be enacted and 
enforced guaranteeing to every citizen equal 
civil and political rights without discrimina- 
tion as to creed. We denounce and condemn 
the cruel and barbarous treatment of Ameri- 
can citizens of the southern states as tending 
to corrupt good government and contrary to 
the spirit of the constitution of the United 
States. 

Wisconsin Democrats. 
Adopted at Milwaukee Aug. 31. 

Two years ago the democratic convention 
charged the republican party with extrava- 
gance, corruption and unjustifiable interfer- 
ence with individual and constitutional rights, 
and denounced that party for permitting state 



PARTV PLATFORMS. 



155 



treasurers to appropriate the interest earned 
by state funds, declaring that the interest on 
these funds is the money of the people. 

We pledge the democratic party to honesty 
and economy in administration. 

To a repeal of the republican assault upon 
individual rights. 

To the payment into the treasury of the in- 
terest earned by state moneys; and 

To the prosecution of suits to recover to the 
people the interest money already misappro- 
priated. 

We present to the people of Wisconsin the 
record of the performance of party pledges. 

Economy ana business methods have char- 
acterized every branch of the state govern- 
ment, and the profit results to the tax-payers. 

Already more than $00,000 has been saved in 
administrative and legislative expenses. 

The cost of maintaining the several state 

istitutions has also been economized more 
than I52.0JO, and their efficiency has been 
greatly improved. 

As a result the democratic treasurer will 
have on hand at the close of his term a gen- 

ral fund of more than $300,000, instead of the 
deficiency which existed two years before. 

Interest to the amount of more than $42,000 
on bank deposits has accrued and been 
promptly covered into the treasury. 

The trust funds have been promptly invested 
for the benefit of the schools, instead of being 
h3ld in banks to enrich office-holders and 
party politicians, and as a result the interest 
earnings of these funds already exceed those 
of the last administration by more than $64,OK). 

Suits have been vigorously prosecuted to 
establish the right of the people to the inter- 
est earned by their money in the treasury, 
and that right has been adjudged and liability 
fastened upon the last two state treasurers to 
the amount of more than $350,OUO for in- 
terest money misappropriated by them; and, 
upon th.e same basis of computation, an ag- 
gregate liability will result in the actions now 
pending of more than 725,000. 

The Bennett law has been repealed and the 
democrats of Wisconsin have shown their loy- 
alty to the cause of popular education in 
practical form by adding over $100,000 to the 
school-fund inco'me, and by increasing the 
appropriations to the state university over 
565.000 a year for the next six years. 

We are opposed to and will combat the ab- 
horrent doctrine of centralization and pater- 
nalism and all mischievous meddling with 
rights of conscience and religion, especially in 
the care and education of children. 

We oppose sumptuary laws as unnecessary 
and unwise interference with individual lib- 
erty. 

We pledge the democratic party anew to 
continued honesty and economy in the ad- 
ministration of the government. 

The record of the present administration is 
a sufficient assurance that no relinquishment 
of the rights of the people against the de- 
faulting treasurers need be feared at the 
hands of the democratic party. 

We indorse the action of the national dem- 
ocratic convention in nominating Cleveland 
and Stevenson for president and vice-presi- 
dent, and give cheerful allegiance to the prin- 
ciples enunciated by the Chicago platform. 

Wisconsin People's Party. 
Adopted at Milwauke: May 24, 1892. 
The people's party of Wisconsin calls atten- 
tion to the fact that both old parties, having 
fully accomplished all the objects for which 
they organized, have outlived their usefulness 
and have sunk to the level of office-hunt nig 
syndicates. This is conclusively proved by 
their platforms and tactics, which, with the 



exception of a difference of 5 per cent on the 
tariff, consist mainlv in personal vilification 
and mutual abuse. The people's party submits 
that there are questions of tar greater impor- 
tance than the tariff, which amounts to.*3.30 per 
capita per annum, and that this question has 
very little bearing on economic conditions. It 
is a matter of notorious fact that under the 
existing system wealth accumulates in the 
hands of non-producers in free-trade countries 
and that labor endures unnecessary hardships 
in protected countries. The worst oppressive 
and unjust legislation has centralized the 
means of production, exchange and transpor- 
tation in the hands of favored classes, who by 
special and unnatural privileges are enabled 
to deprive or restrict the many of equal rights 
and opportunities. This system makes life to 
all men one continued struggle for existence; 
each man is arrayed against his brother and 
no one is sure that his life will not end in the 
poorhouse. 

The people's party was formed to abolish 
this unnatural and barbarous struggle and 
sacure to all men and women equal rights and 
equal opportunities. The platform adopted 
by the great industrial conference at St. Louis, 
Feb. 22-24, 1892, as below, is hereby adopted as 
part of the state platform of Wisconsin: 

We demand a national currency, safe, sound 
and flexible, issued by the general govern- 
ment only, a full legal tender for all debts, 
public and private, and that without the use 
of banking corporations, a just, equitable 
and efficient means of circulation, direct to 
the people, at a tax not to exceed 2 per cent, 
as set forth in the sub-treasury plan of the 
farmers' alliance, or some better system; 
also by payments in discharge of its obliga- 
tions or for public improvements. 

We demand the free and unlimited coinage 
of silver. 

We demand that the amount of the circula- 
tion be speedily increased to not less than $50 
per capita. 

We demand a graduated income tax. 

We believe that the money of the country 
should be kept as much as possible in the 
hands of the people, and hence we demand 
that all national and state revenues shall be 
limited to the necessary expenses of the gov- 
ernment, economically and honestly adminis- 
tered. 

We demand that postal savings banks be 
established by the government for the safe de- 
posit of the earnings of the people and to 
facilitate exchange. 

The land, including all the natural resources 
of wealth, is the heritage of the people and 
should not be monopolized for speculative 
purposes, and alien ownership of land should 
be prohibited. All land now held by railroads 
and other corporations in excess of their act- 
ual needs and all lands now owned by aliens 
should be reclaimed by the government and 
held for actual settlers only. 

Transportation being the means of exchange 
and a public necessity, the government should 
own and operate the railroads in the interest 
of the people. 

The telegraph and telephone, like the post- 
office system, being a necessity for the trans- 
mission of news, snould be owned and oper- 
ated by the government in the interest of the 
people. 

In addition we make the following demands: 

1. All public improvements, necessities and 
conveniences shall be owned and controlled 
by the public and not be exploited for private 

2. We demand the establishment of the 
initiative and the referendum, by which the 
people will be enabled to vote down obnox- 
ious laws and remove dishonest and inefficient 



156 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 18)3. 



officials, thus placing the veto power in the 
hands of the people, where it belongs. 

3. The extraordinary increase in the jnven- 
tion of labor-saving machinery requires a 
material reduction in the hours of labor in 
industrial pursuits. In the growth of monop- 
oly the agricultural and industrial classes 
have received no benefit from labor-saving 
machinery. It has cheapened production 
only to benefit the monopolists. 

4. A revision of the patent laws giving in- 
ventors a premium for their inventions, and 
then giving its free use to all the people, will 
prevent the system of monopoly now existing 
and stop the robbery of both inventors and 
'he people. 

5. Arbitration should be generally intro- 
duced to take the place of strikes and other 
injurious means of settling labor disputes; 
child labor should be prohibited in factories, 
mines and workshops; no more contractors 
be permitted to prevent the reformation of 
convicts or undersell honest manufacturers, 
by the contracting for the labor of prisoners; 
convicts should be employed in building 
roads, or other work that will not enter the 
market and depress the price of better goods; 
proper measures be provided for the safety 
of people working in mines, manufactories 
and buildings, and the contract system be 
abolished on public work. 

Wisconsin Prohibition. 
Adopted at Madison June 1. 
Realizing that the great danger in American 
politics to-day is the corrupt influence of the 
saloon system and the overreaching of the 
masses by the few in their desire for wealth, 
and that this is made feasible largely through 
a prostitution of the functions of govern- 
ment, the prohibition party of Wisconsin, 
assembled in state convention this 1st day of 
June, 1892, acknowledging our reliance upon 



divine Providence and the sovereignty of 
American citizenship, do demand: 

1. That the traffic in intoxicating liquors as 
a beverage be forever prohibited and sup- 
pressed, and that all laws making either the 
federal, state or municipal government part- 
ner in its profits be repealed. 

2. That all money necessary for the steadily 
growing trade of the nation be issued directly 
by the federal government, in such form and 
upon such basis as shall give an ample cir- 
culating medium that shall be legal tender for 
all debts. 

3. That the great lines of transportation and 
communication, including the telegraph and 
telephone, be controlled by the government; 
and we favor also an extension of the free 
mail delivery system. 

4. That residence within the nation for such 
time and education to such extent as will 
insure intelligent citizenship and the ability 
to exercise suffrage for the good of the voter 
and of the state precede the right of fran- 
chise, and that no other restriction should be 
placed upon the ballot. 

5. That our present laws relating to high- 
ways be amended, to the end that the people 
may by a new system of supervision be given 
thoroughly constructed and permanent public 
roads. 

6. That our tariff laws be so changed that no 
special privileges be granted to one class of 
citizens at the expense of any other, and that 
the poor be relieved from any unjust taxes 
that they are now compelled to pay. 

7. We favor a liberal public education in 
the English language enforced and supervised 
by the state. 

8. Believing that the time has come when 
good men ought to unite and make a great 
national party that shall be dominated by the 
intelligence, morality and patriotism of the 
nation, we invite and urge all voters of the 
state to join with us in the present campaign 



LETTERS OF ACCEPTANCE. 
Replies of the presidential candidates in accepting their nominations. 



PRESIDENT HARRISON'S LETTER. 
WASHINGTON, D. C., Sept. 3. The Hon. W. 
McKinley, Jr.. and Others Gentlemen : I 
now avail myself of the first period of relief 
from public duties to respond to the notifica- 
tion which you brought to me on June 20, of 
my nomination for the office of president of 
the United States by the republican national 
convention recently held at Minneapolis. I 
accept the nomination, and am grateful for 
the approval expressed by the convention of 
the acts of the administration. I have 
endeavored without wavering or weariness, 
so far as the direction of public affairs was 
committed to me. to carry out the pledges 
made to the people in 1888. If the policies of 
the administration have not been distinct- 
ively and progressively American and republi- 
can policies, the fault has not been in the 
purpose but in the execution. I shall speak 
frankly of the legislation of congress and of 
the work of the executive departments, for 
the credit of any successes that have been 
attained is in such measure due to others- 
senators and representatives, and to the effi- 
cient heads of the several executive depart- 
mentsthat I may do so without impropriety. 
A vote of want of confidence is asked by our 
adversaries; and this challenge to a review of 
what has been done we promptly and gladly 
accept. The great work of the List congress 
has been subjected to the revision of a demo- 
cratic house of representatives and the acts 
of f he executive department to its scrutiny 



and investigation. A democratic national 
administration was succeeded by a republi- 
can administration and the freshness of the 
events gives unusual facilities for fair com- 
parison and judgment. There has seldom 
been a time, 1 think, when a change from the 
declared policies of the republican to the 
declared policies of the democratic party 
involved such serious results to the business 
interests of the country. A brief review of 
what has been done and of what the demo- 
cratic party proposes to undo will justify this 
opinion. 

DEVISED THE PRESENT CURRENCV. 
The republican party during the civil war 
devised a national currency consisting of 
United States notes issued and redeemable by 
the government, and of national bank notes 
based upon the security of United States 
bonds. A tax was levied upon the issues of 
state banks, and the intended result, that all 
such issues should be withdrawn, was real- 
ized. There are men among us now who 
never saw a state bank note. The notes fur- 
nished directly or indirectly by the United 
States have been the only and the safe and 
acceptable paper currency of the people. 
Bank failures have brought no fright, delay 
or loss to the bill holders. The note of an in- 
solvent bank is as good and as current as a 
treasury note for the credit of the United 
States is behind it. Our money is all national 
money I might almost say international, for 
these bills are not only equally and indis- 



LETTERS OF ACCEPTANCE. 



157 



criminately accepted at par in all the states, 
but in some foreign countries. The demo- 
cratic party, if intrusted with the control of 
the government, is now pledged to repeal the 
tax on state bank issues, with a view to 
putting into circulation again, under such 
diverse legislation as the states may adopt, 
a flood of local bank issues. Only those who 
in the years before the war experienced the 
inconvenience and losses attendant upon the 
use of such money can appreciate- what a re- 
turn to that system involves. The denomina- 
tion of a bill was then often no indication of 
its value. The bank detector of yesterday 
was not a safe guide to-day as to credit or 
values. Merchants deposited several times 
during the day lest the hour of bank closing 
should show a depreciation of the money 
taken in the morning. The traveler could 
not use in a journey to the east the issues of 
the most solvent banks of the west, and in 
consequence a money-changer's office was the 
Familiar neighbor of the ticket office and the 
lunch counter. The farmer and the laborer 
found the money received for their products 
or their labor depreciated when they came to 
make their purchases, and the whole business 
of the country was hindered and burdened. 
Changes may become necessary, but a 
national system of currency, safe and ac- 
ceptable throughout the whole country, is the 
fruit of bitter experiences, and 1 am sure our 
people will not consent to the reactionary pro- 
posal made by the democratic party. 

IMPORTANCE OF REGAINING MARITIME 
POWER. 

Few subjects have elicited more discussion 
or excited more general interest than that of 
a recovery by the United States of its appro- 
priate share of the ocean-carrying trade. This 
subject touches not only our pockets but our 
national pride. Practically all the freights for 
transporting to Europe the enormous annual 
supplies of provisions furnished by this coun- 
try and for the large return of manufactured 
jroducts have for many years been paid to 
'oreign ship-owners. Thousands of Immi- 
grants annually seeking homes under our 
Bag have been denied a sight of it until they 
entered Sandy Hook, while increasing thou- 
ands of American citizens, bent on European 
ravel, have each year stepped into a foreign 
urlsdiction at the New York docks. The mer- 
2handise balance of trade which the treasury 
books show is largely reduced by the annual 
tribute which we pay for freight and passage 
money. The great ships, the fastest upon the 
sea, which are now in peace profiting by our 
rade, are in a secondary sense warships of 
heir respective governments and in time 
if war would, under existing contracts with 
;hose governments, speedily take on the guns 
"or which their decks are already prepared 
ind enter with terriole efficiency upon the 
work of destroying our commerce. The undis- 
puted fact is that the great steamship lines of 

urope were built up and are now in part sus- 
ained by direct or indirect government aid, 
he latter taking the form of liberal pay for 
carrying the mails or of an annual bonus 
?iven in consideration of agreements to con- 
itruct ships so as to adapt them for carrying 
in armament and to turn them over to the 
jovernmenton demand, upon specified terms, 
't was plain to every intelligent American that 
f the United States would nave such lines a 
limilar policy must be entered upon. The List 
songress enacted such a law and under its ben- 
eficent influence sixteen American steamships 
of an aggregate tonnage of 57,400 tons and cost- 
ng $7,400.000 have been built or contracted to 
36 built in American shipyards. In addition 
to this it is now practically certain that we 
shall soon have, under the American flag, one 



of the finest steamship lines sailing out of 
New York for any European port. This con- 
tract will result in the construction in Ameri- 
can yards of four new passenger steamships 
of :iO,OUO tons each, costing about $8,000.000, 
and will add to our naval reserve six steam- 
ships, the fastest upon the seas. 

A special interest has been taken by me in 
the establishment of lines from our South 
Atlantic and Gulf ports ; and, though my expec- 
tations have not yet been realized, attention 
has been called to the advantages possessed 
by these ports, and when their people are 
more fully alive to their interests 1 do not 
doubt that they will be able to secure the capi- 
tal needed to enable them to profit by their 
great natural advantages. The democratic 
party has found no place in its platform for 
any reference to this subject and has shown 
its hostility to the general policy by refusing 
to expend an appropriation made during the 
last administration for ocean mail contracts 
with American lines. The patriotic people, 
the workmen in our shops, the capitalists 
seeking new enterprises must decide whether 
the great ships owned by Americans which 
have sought American registry shall again 
humbly ask a place in the English naval re- 
serve; the great ships now on the designers' 
tables go to foreign shops for construction 
and the United States loses the now brighten- 
ing opportunity of recovering a place com- 
mensurate with its wealth, the skill of its con- 
structors, and the courage of its sailors in 
the carrying trade of all the seas. 

THE BENEFITS OF RECIPROCITY. 

Another related measure as furnishing In- 
creased ocean traffic for our ships and of great 
and permanent benefit to the farmers and 
manufacturer as well ia the reciprocity policy 
declared by section 3, of the tariff act of 1890 
and now in practical operation with five of 
the nations of Central and South America, San 
Domingo, the Spanish and British West India 
islands and with Germany and Austria, under 
special trade arrangements with each. The 
removal of the duty on sugar and the continu- 
ance of coffee and tea upon the free list, while 



vantage to the countries exporting these arti- 
cles as to suggest that in consideration thereof 
reciprocal favors should be shown in their tar- 
iffs to articles exported by us to their mar- 
kets. Great credit is due to Mr. Elaine for the 
vigor with which he pressed this view upon 
the country. We have only begun to realize 
the benefit of these trade arrangements. The 
work of creating new agencies and of adapt- 
ing our goods to new markets has necessarily 
taken time, but the results already attained 
are such, I am sure, as to establish in popular 
favor the policy of reciprocal trade based upon 
the free Importation of such articles as do not 
injuriously compete with the products of our 
own farms, mines or factories, in exchange 
for the free or favored introduction of our 
products into other countries. The obvious 
efficacy of this policy in increasing the foreign 
trade of the United States at once attracted 
the alarmed attention of European trade Jour- 
nals and boards of trade. Tne British Board 
of Trade has presented to that government a 
memorial asking for the appointment of a 
commission to consider the best means of 
counteracting what is called "the commercial 
crusade of the United States." 

At a meeting held in March last of the As- 
sociated Chambers of Commerce of Great 
Britain the president reported that the exports 
from Great Britain to the Latin American 
countries during the last year had decreased 
$23,750.000, and that this was not due to tern- 



158 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1KB. 



porary causes, but directly to the reciprocity 
policy of the United States. Germany and 
France have also shown their startled appre- 
ciation of the fact that a new and vigorous 
contestant has appeared in the battle of the 
markets and has already secured important 
advantages. The most convincing evidence 
of the tremendous commercial strength of our 
position is found in the fact that Great Brit- 
ain and Spain have found it necessary to make 
reciprocal trade agreements with us for their 
West India colonies and thatGermany andAus- 
tria have given us importantconcessions in ex- 
change for the continued free importation of 
their beet sugar product. A -few details only 
as to the increase in our trade can be given 
here. Taking all the countries with which 
arrangements have been made, our trade to 
June 30, 18 2, had increased 23.78 per cent. 
With Brazil the increase was nearly 11 per 
cent; with Cuba, during the first ten months, 
our exports increased $5.702.193, or 54.8 percent 
and with Porto Rico, $590,599, or 34 per cent. 
The liberal participation of our farmers in 
the benefits of this policy is shown by the fol- 
lowing report from our consul-general at Ha- 
vana under date of July 26th last: 

"During the first half of 1891 Havana re- 
ceived 140.05t> bags of flour from Spain, and 
other ports of the island about an equal 
amount, or approximately 280,112 bags. Dur- 
ing the same period Havana received 13,97(5 
bags of American flour, and other ports ap- 
proximately an equal amount, making about 
28,000 bags. But for the first half of this year 
Spain has sent less than 1,000 bags to the whole 
island and the United States has sent to 
Havana alone 168.487 bags and about an equal 
amount to other ports of the island, making 
approximately 337.000 for the first half of 1892." 

Partly by reason of the reciprocal trade 
agreement, but more largely by reason of the 
removal of sanitary restrictions upon Ameri- 
can pork, our exports of pork products to 
Germany increased during the ten months 
ending June 30 last $2,025,074, or about 32 per- 
cent. The Briti h Trade Journal of London, in 
a recent issue, speaking of the increase of 
American coal exports and of the falling off 
of the English coal exports to Cuba, says: 

" It is another case of American competition. 
The UnitedStatesnowsuppliesCuba with about 
150,000 tons of coal annually, and there is every 
prospect of this trade increasing as the forests 
of the island become exhausted and the use 
of steam machinery on the estates is devel- 
oped. Alabama coal especially is securing a 
reputation in the Spanish West Indies, and 
the river and rail improvements of the South- 
ern States will undoubtedly create an import- 
ant gulf trade. The new reciprocity policy by 
which the United States is enabled to import 
Cuban sugar will, of course, assist the Ameri- 
can coal exporters even more effectively than 
the new lines of railway. 

THE ENEMY PLEDGED TO KILL THIS. 
The democratic platform promises a repeal 
of the tariff law containing this provision and 
especially denounces as a sham reciprocity 
that section of the law under which these 
trade arrangements have heen made. If no 
other issue were involved in the campaign this 
alone would give it momentous importance. 
Are the farmers of the great grain growing 
states willing to surrender these new, large 
and increasing markets for their surplus? 
Are we to have nothing in exchange for the 
free importation of sugar and coffee and at 
the same time to destroy the sugar planters 
of the south, and the best sugar industry of 
the northwest, and of the Pacific coast; or are 
we to have the taxed sugar and coffee, which 
a " tariff for revenue only " necessarily in- 
volves, with the added loss of the new 



markets which have been opened ? As I have 
shown, our commercial rivals in Europe do 
riot regard this reciprocity policy as a " sham," 
but as a serious threat to a trade supremacy 
they have long enjoyed. They would rejoice 
and if prudence did not restrain, would illumi- 
nate their depressed manufacturing cities- 
over the news that the United States had 
abandonded its system of protection and 
reciprocity. They see very clearly that re- 
striction of American products and trade and 
a corresponding increase of European pro- 
duction and trade would follow, and I will not 
believe that what is so plain to them can be 
hidden from our own people. 

The declaration of the platform in favor of 
"the American doctrine of protection" meets 
my most hearty approval. The convention 
did not adopt a schedule but a principle that 
is to control all the tariff schedules. There 
may be differences of opinion among pro- 
tectionists as to the rate upon panicular arti- 
cles necessary to effect an equalization be- 
tween wages abroad and at home. In some 
not remote national campaigns the issue has 
been or, more correctly, has been made to 
appear to be between a high and a low pro- 
tective tariff both parties expressing some 
solicitous regard for the wages of our work- 
ing people and for the prosperity of our do- 
mestic industries. But, under a more cour- 
ageons leadership, the democratic party has 
now practically declared that if given power 
it will enact a tariff law without any regard to 
its effect upon wages or upon the capital in- 
vested in our great industries. The majority 
report of the committee on platform to the 
democratic national convention at Chicago 
contained this clause: 

'That when custom-house taxation is levied 
upon articles of any kind produced in this 
country the difference between the cost of 
labor here and abroad, when such a differ- 
ence exists, fully measures any possible bene- 
fits to labor and the enormous additional im- 
positions of the existing tariff fall with crush- 
ing force upon our farmers and workingmen." 

Here we nave a distinct admission of the 
republican contention that American work- 
men are advantaged by a tariff rate equal to 
the difference between home and foreign 
wages and a declaration only against the 
alleged "additional impositions" of the exist- 
ing tariff law. 

DEMOCRATIC FREE-TRADE POLICY EXPOSED. 

Again this majority report further declared: 
"But in making reduction in taxes it is not 
proposed to injure any domestic industries, 
but rather to promote their healthy growth. 
* * * Moreover, many industries have come 
to rely upon legislation for successful contin- 
uance, so that any change of law must be at 
every step regardful of the labor and the cap- 
ital thus involved." 

Here we have an admission that many of 
our industries depend upon protective duties 
"for their successful continuance" and a dec- 
laration that tariff changes should be regard- 
ful of the workmen in such industries and of 
the invested capital. The overwhelming re- 
jection of these propositions, which had before 
received the sanction of democratic national 
conventions, was not more indicative of the 
new and more courageous leadership to which 
the party has now committed itself than the 
substitute which was adopted. This substi- 
tute declares that protective duties are un- 
constitutionalhigh protection, low protec- 
tion all unconstitutional. A democratic 
congress holding this view cannot enact, 
nor a democratic president approve, any 
tariff schedule, the purpose or effect of 
which is to limit importations or to give 
any advantage to an American workman 



LETTERS OF ACCEPTANCE. 



or producer. A bounty might, 1 judge, be given 
to the importer under this view of the consti- 
tution in order to increase important importa- 
tions, and so the revenue for "revenue only" 
is the limitation. Reciprocity, of course, 
falls under this denunciation, lor its object 
and effect are not revenue, but the promotion 
of commercial exchanges, the profits of which 
go wholly to our producers. This destructive. 
un-American doctrine was not taught or held 
by the historic deaiocratifl statesmen whose 
fame as American patriots has reached this 
generation certainly not by Jefferson nor 
Jackson. This mad crusade against American 
shops, the bitter epithets applied to American 
manufacturers, the persistent disbelief of 
every report of the opening 9f a tin-plate mill 
or of an inc~ease of our foreign trade by reci- 
procity, are as surprising as they are discredit- 
able. There is not a thoughtful business man 
in the country who do;>s not know that the 
enactment into law of the declaration of the 
Chicago convention on th3 subject of the 
tariff would at once plung'3 the country into a 
business convulsion such as it has never seen; 
and there is not a thoughtful workingman who 
does not know that it would at once enor- 
mously reduce the amount of work to be done 
in this country by the increase of importations 
that would follow, and necessitate a reduction 
of his wages to the European standard. If 
anyone suggests that this radical policy will 
not be executed if the democratic party at- 
tains power what shall be thought of a party 
that is capable of thus trifling witli great inter- 
ests? 

CALAMITY HOWLER VS. TRADE REPORTER. 

The threat of such legislation would be only 
less hurtful than the fact. A distinguished 
democrat rightly described this movement as 
a challenge to the protected industries to a 
flght of extermination, and another such 
rightly expressed the logic of the situation 
when he interpreted the Chicago platform to 
be an inv.tation to all democrats, holding 
even the most moderate protection views, to 
go into the republican party. 

And now a few words in regard to the ex- 
isting tariff law. We are fortunately able to 
judge of its influence upon production and 
prices by the market reports. The day of the 
prophet of calamity has been succeeded by 
that of the trade reporter. An examination 
into the effect of the law upon the prices of 
protected products and of the cost of such 
articles as enter into the living of people of 
small means has been made by a senate com- 
mittee composed of leading senators of both 
parties, with the aid of the best statisticians, 
and the report, signed by all the members of 
the committee, has been given to the public. 
No such wide and careful inquiry has ever 
been before made. These facts appear from 
the report: 

1. The cost of articles entering into the use 
of those earning less than SB1.0UO per annum 
has decreased, up to May, 1892, 3.4 per cent, 
while in farm products there has been an 
increase in prices, owing in part to an in- 
creased foreign demand and the opening of 
new markets. In England during the same 
period the cost of living increased 1.9 per 
cent. Tested by their power to purchase 
articles of necessity, the earnings of our 
working people have never been as great as 
they are now. 

2. There has been an average advance in 
the rate of wages of .75 of 1 per cent. 

3. There has been an advance in the price of 
all farm products of 18.67 per cent, and of all 
cereals 33.9:) per cent. 

The ninth annual report of the chief of the 
bureau of labor statistics of the state of New 
York, a democratic officer, very recently 



issued, strongly corroborates as to that state 
the facts foun by the senate committee. 
His extended inquiry shows that in the year 
immediately following the passage of the 
tariff act of 189J the aggregate urn paid in 
wages in that state was J;.377,975 in excess and 
the aggregate production J31.31o.130 in excess 
of the preceding year. 

NOT BURDENS BUT ADVANTAGES. 

In view of this showing of an increase in 
wages, of a reduction in the cost of articles of 
common necessity and of a marked advance 
in the prices of agricultural products it is 
plain that this tariff law has not imposed bur- 
dens, but has conferred benefits upon the 
farmer and the workingman. 

Some special effects of the act should be no- 
ticed. It was & courageous attempt to rid our 
people of a long-maintained foreign monop- 
oly on the production of tin-plate, pnarl but- 
tons, silk plush, linens, lace, etc. Once or 
twice in our history the production of tin- 
plate had been attempted and the prices ob- 
tained by the Welsh makers would have en- 
abled our mak rs to produce it at a profit. 
But the Welsh makers at once cut prices to a 
point that drove the American beginners out 
of the business and when this was accom- 
plished again made their own prices. A cor- 
respondent of the Industrial World, the offi- 
cial organ of the Welsh tin-plate workers, 
published at Swansea, in the issue of June 
10, 1892, advises a new trial of these methods. 
He says: 

"Do not be deceived. The victory of the re- 
publicans at the polls means the retention of 
the McKinley bill and means the rapidly ac- 
cruing loss of the 80 per cent of the export 
American trade. Had there been no demo- 
cratic victory in 18i)0 the spread of the tin- 
plate manufacture in the United States would 
have been both rapid and bona flde. * * * 
It Is not yet too late to do something to re- 
duce the price of plates. Put them down to n 
shillings per box of 100. 14x20, fu'l weight basis. 
Let the workmen take half-pay for a few 
months and turn out more, then let the mas- 
ters forego profits for the same time." 

And again that paper says: "It is clearly the 
Interest of both (employer and workman) to 
produce these plates, tariff or no tariff, at a 
price that will drive all competit.on from the 
field." 

But, in spite of the doubts raised IT the elec- 
tions of 1890, and of the machinations of foreign 
producers to maintain theirmonopoly, the tin- 
plate industry has been established in the 
United States, and the alliance between thj 
Welsh producers and the democratic party 
for its destruction will not succeed. The offi- 
cial returns to the treasury department of tho 
production of tin and terne-plates in the 
United States during the last fiscal year show 
a total production of 13.240.830 pounds, and a 
comparison of the first quarter, 8^5,922 pounds, 
with the last, 8,000,000 pounds, shows the rapid 
development of tha industry. Over 5,000.000 
pounds during the last quarter were made 
from American black plates, the remainder 
from foreign plates. Mr. Ayer, the treasury 
agent in charge, estimates as the result of 
careful inquiry that tho production of the cur- 
rent year will be 100.000.000 pounds, and that by 
the end of the vear our production will be at 
the rate of 200,000.000 pounds per annum. 

WHAT THE M'KIXLEY BILL HAS DONE. 
Another Industry that has been practically 
created by the McKinley bill is the making of 
pearl buttons. Few articles coming to us from 
abroad were so distinctly the product of starv- 
ation wages. But without unduly extending 
this letter I cannot follow in detail the influ- 
ences of the tariff law of 1890. It has trans- 



160 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1803. 



planted several important industries and 
established them here, and has revived or en- 
larged all others. The act gives to the miners 
protection against foreign silver-bearing lead 
ores, the free introduction of which threat- 
ened the great mining industries of the Rocky 
Mountain states, and to the wool-growers pro- 
tection for their fleeces and flocks, which nas 
saved them from a further and disastrous de- 
cline. The House of Representatives at its 
last session passed bills placing these ores and 
wool upon the free list. The people of the 
West well know how destructive to their pros- 
perity these measures would be. 

This tariff law has given employment to 
many thousands of American men and women 
and will each year give employment to in- 
creasing thousands. Its repeal would throw 
thousands out of employment and give work 
to others only at reduced wages. The appeals 
of the free-trader to the workingman are 
largely addressed to his prejudices or to his pas- 
sions and not infrequently are pronouncedly 
communistic. The new democratic leader- 
ship rages at the employer and seeks to com- 
municate his rage to the employe. I greatly 
regret that all employers of labor are not just 
and considerate and that capital sometimes 
takes too large a share of the profits. But I 
do not see that these evils would be amelior- 
ated by a tariff policy the first necessary effect 
of which is a severe wage-cut and the second 
a large diminution of the aggregate amount 
of work to be done in this country. 

If the injustice of his employer tempts the 
workman to strike back he should be very 
sure that his blow does not fall upon his own 
head or upOn his wife and children. The 
workmen in our great industries are, as a 
body, remarkably intelligent and are lovers 
of home and country. They may be roused 
by injustice or what seems to them to be such 
or be led for the moment by others into acts of 
passion; but they will settle the tariff contest 
in the calm light of their November firesides 
and with sole reference to the prosperity of 
the country of which they are citizens and of 
the homes they have founded for their wives 
and children. 

No intelligent advocate of a protective tar- 
iff claims that it is able of itself to maintain 
a uniform rate of wages without regard to 
fluctuations in the supply of and demand for 
the products of labor, but it is confidently 
claimed that protective duties strongly tend 
to hold up wages and are the only barrier 
against a reduction to the European scale. 

IT HAS BENEFITED THE SOUTH. 

The southern states have had a liberal par- 
ticipation in the benefits of the tariff law and, 
though their representatives have been gen- 
erally opposed to the protection policy, I re- 
joice that their sugar, rice, coal, ores, Iron, 
fruits, cotton cloths and other products have 
not been left to the fate which the votes of 
their representatives would have brought 
upon them. In the construction of the Nica- 
ragua canal, in tue new trade with South and 
Central America, in the establishment of 
American steamship lines, these states have 
also special interests and all these interests 
will not always consent to be without repre- 
sentation at Washington. 

Shrewdly but not quite fairly our adversaries 
speak only of the increased duties imposed 
upon tin, pearl buttons and other articles by 
the McKinley bill, and omit altogether any 
reference to the great and beneficial enlarge- 
ment of the free list. During the last fiscal 
year $458,000,772 worth of merchandise or 55.35 
per cent of our total importations came in 
free (the largest percentage in our history), 
while in 1889 the percentage of free importa- 
tions was only 34.42 p*er cent The placing of 



sugar upon the free list has saved to the con- 
sumer in duties in fifteen months, after pay- 
ing the bounties provided for. $87.000,UOO. This 
relief has been substantially felt in every 
household, upon every Saturday's purchase 
of the workingman. 

One of the favorite arguments against a pro- 
tective tariff is that it shuts us out from a par- 
ticipation in what is called, with swelling 
emphasis, " the markets of the world." If this 
view is not a false one how does it happen 
that our commercial competitors are not able 
to bear with more serenity our supposed sur- 
render to them of the "markets of the world," 
and how does it happen that the partial loss 
of our market closes foreign tin-plate mills 
and plush factories that still have all other 
markets? Our natural advantages, our pro- 
tective tariff and the reciprocity policy make 
it possible for us to have a large participation 
in the "markets of the world" without open- 
ing ur own to a competition that would 
destroy the comfort and independence of our 
people. 

DECLARES FOB HONEST MONEY. 

The resolution of the convention in favor of 
bimetallism declares, I think, the true and 
necessary conditions of a movement that has, 
upon these lines, my cordi.il adherance and 
support. I am thoroughly convinced that the 
free coinage of silver at such a ratio to gold 
as will maintain the equality in their commer- 
cial uses of the two coined dollars would con- 
duce to the prosperity of all the great produc- 
ing and commercial nations of the world. The 
one essential condition is that these dollars 
shall have and retain an equal acceptability 
and value in all commercial transactions. 
They are not only a medium of exchange, but 
a measure of values; and when unequal 
measures are called in law by the same name 
commerce is unsettled and confused and the 
unwary and ignorant are cheated. Dollars of 
unequal commercial value will not circulate 
together. The better dollar is withdrawn and 
becomes merchandise. The true interest of 
our people, and especially of the farmers and 
working people, who cannot closely observe 
the money market, is that every dollar paper 
or coin issued or authorized by the govern- 
ment shall at all times and in all its uses be 



this subject independently of other nations we 
would greatly promote their interests and in- 
jure our own. 

The monetary conditions in Europe within 
the last two years have, I think, tended very 
much to develop a sentiment in favor of a 
larger use of silver, and I was much pleased 
and encouraged by the cordiality, promptness, 
and unanimity with which the invitation of 
this government for an international confer- 
ence upon this subject was accepted by all the 
powers. We may not only hope for but expect 
highly beneficial results from this conference, 
which will now soon assemble. When the re- 
sult of the conference is known we shall then 
be able intelligently to adjust our financial 
legislation to any new conditions. 

In my last annual message to congress I 
said: 

" I must yet entertain the hope that it Is 
possible to secure a calm, patriotic consider- 
ation of such constitutional or statutory 
changes as may be necessary to secure the 
choice of the officers of the government to 
the people by fair apportionments and free 
elections. I believe it would be possible to 
constitute a commission, non-partisan in its 
membership and composed of patriotic, wise, 
and impartial men. to whom a consideration 
of the questions of the evils connected with 



LETTERS OP ACCEPTANCE. 



161 



our election systems and methods might be 
committed with a good prospect of securing 
unanimity in some plan for removing or 
mitigating those evils. The constitution 
would permit the selection of the commission 
to be vested in the Supreme court, if that 
method would give the best guarantee of im- 
partiality. This commission should be 
charged with the duty of inquiring into the 
whole subject of the law of elections as re- 
lated to the choice of officers of the national 
government, with a view to securing to every 
elector a free and unmolested exercise of the 
suffrage and as near an approach to an 
equality of value in each ballot cast as is 
attainable. * * * Tbe demand that 
the limitations of suffrage shall be found in 
the law, and only there, is a just demand and 
no just man should resent or resist it." 

INSISTS ON A FREE BALLOT. 

It seemed to me that an appeal to our 
people to consider the question of readjust- 
ing our legislation upon absolutely fair non- 
partisan lines might find some effective re- 
sponse. Many times I have had occasion 
to say that laws and election methods de- 
signed to give unfair advantages to the party 
making them would some times be used to 
perpetuate in power a faction of a party 
against the will of the majority of the people. 
Of this we seem to have an illustration in the 
recent state election in Alabama. There was 
no republican ticket in the field. The contest 
was between white democrats. The Kolb 
party say they were refused the represen- 
tation guaranteed by law upon the election 
boards; and that when the courts by man- 
damus attempted to right this wrong, the ap- 
peal could not be heard until after the election 
made the writs ineffectual. Ballot boxes were 
thrown out for alleged irregularities, or de- 
stroyed, and it is asserted on behalf of one- 
half, at least, of the white voters of Alabama, 
that the officers to whom certificates have been 
given were not honestly elected. There is no 
security for the personal or political rights. 
The puwer of the states over the question of 
the qualification of electors is ample to pro- 
tect them against the dangers of an ignorant 
or depraved suffrage, and the demand that 
every man found to be qualified under the 
law shall be made secure in the right to cast 
a free ballot and to have that ballot honestly 
counted cannot be abated. Our old republican 
battle cry, "A free ballot and a fair count," 
comes back to us, not only from Alabama 
but from other states and from men who, 
differing from us widely in opinions, have 
come to see that parties and political debate 
are but a mockery if, when the debate is end- 
ed, judgment of honest majorities is to be 
reversed by ballot-box frauds and tally-sheet 
manipulations in the interest of the party or 
party faction in power. 

These new political movements in the states 
and the recent decisions of some of the state 
courts against unfair apportionment laws en- 
courage the hope that the arbitrary and 
partisan election laws and practices which 
have prevailed may be corrected by the states, 
the law made equal and non-partisan, and the 
elections free and honest. The republican 
party would rejoice at such a solution, as a 
healthy and patriotic local sentiment is the 
best assurance of free and honest elections. 
I shall again urge upon congress that provis- 
ion be made for the appointment of a non- 
partisan commission to consider the subject 
of apportionments and elections in their rela- 
tion to the choice of federal officers. 

THE CIVIL-SERVICE SYSTEM. 

The civil-service system has been extended 
and the law enforced with vigor and impar- 



tiality. There has been no partisan juggling 
with the law in any of the departments or 
bureaus, as had before happened, but appoint- 
ments to the classified service have been 
made impartially from the eligible lists. The 
system now in force in all the departments 
has for the first time placed promotions 
strictly upon the basis of merit, as ascertained 
by a daily record, and the efficiency of the 
force thereby greatly increased. 

The approval so heartily given by the con- 
vention to all those agencies which contribute 
to the education of the children of the land 
was worthily bestowed and meets my hearty 
approval, as does also the declaration as to 
liberty of thought and conscience, and the 
separation of church and state. The safety of 
the republic is in intelligent citizenship; and 
the increased interest manifested in the states 
in education, the cheerfulness with which 
the necessary taxes are paid by all classes, 
and the renewed interest manifested by the 
children in the national flag are hopeful indi- 
cations that this coming generation will direct 
public affairs with increased prudence and 
patriotism. Our interest n free public schools 
open to all children of suitable age is supreme 
and our care for them will be jealous and 
constant. 

The public-school system, however, was not 
intended to restrain the natural right of the 
parent, after contributing to the public-school 
fund, to choose other educational agencies for 
his children. I favored aid by the general gov- 
ernment to the public schools, with a special 
view to the necessities of some of the south- 
ern states. But it is gratifying to notice that 
many of these states are, with commendable 
liberality, developing their school systems 
and increasing their school revenues to the 
great advantage of the children of both races. 

The considerate attention of the farmers of 
the whole country is invited to the work done 
through the state and agricultural depart- 
ments in the interest of agriculture. Our pork 
products had for ten years been not only ex- 
cluded by the great continental nations of 
Europe, but their value discredited by the 
reasons given for this exclusion. All pre- 
vious efforts to secure the removal of these re- 
strictions had failed, but the wise legislation 
of the Fifty-First congress, providing for the 
inspection and official certification of our 
meats and giving to the president power to 
forbid the introduction into this country of 
selected products of such countries as should 
continue to refuse our inspected meats, ena- 
bled us to open all the markets of Europe to 
our products. 

The result has been not only to sustain 
prices by providing new markets for our sur- 
plus, but to add 50 cents per 100 pounds to the 
market value of the inspected meats. Under 
the reciprocity agreement special favors have 
been secured for agricultural products, and 
pur exports of such products have been greatly 
increased, with a sure prospect of a further 
and rapid increase. The agricultural depart 
ment has maintained in Europe an agent 
whose special duty it is to introduce there the 
various preparations of corn as articles of 
food, and his r :work has been very successful. 

The department has also sent skilled veteri- 
narians to Liverpool to examine in connec- 
tion with the British veterinarians the live 
cattle from the United States landed at tha 
port, and the result, in connection with the 
sanitary methods developed at home, has been 
that we hear no more about our cattle bein^; 
infected with pleuro-pneumonia. The judi 
cious system of quarantine lines has prevented 
the infection of northern cattle with the 
Texas fever. The tariff bill of 1890 gives bet- 
ter protection to the farm products subject to 
foreign competition than they ever had before 



162 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



and the home markets for such products have 
been enlarged by the establishment of new 
industries and the development of others. We 
may confidently submit to the intelligent and 
candid judgment of the American farmer 
whether in any corresponding period as much 
has been done to promote his interests, and 
whether in a continuance and extension of 
these methods there is not a better prospect 
of good to him than in the invitation of the 
democratic party to give our home market to 
foreign manufacturers and to abandon the 
reciprocity policy, and better also than the 
radical and untried methods of relief proposed 
by other parties which are soliciting his sup- 
port. 

SHIP CANAL A NECESSITY. 

I have often expressed my strong convic- 
tion of the value or the Nicaragua ship canal 
to our commerce and to our navy. The proj- 
ect is not one of convenience but of neces- 
sity. It is quite possible, I believe, if the 
United States will support the enterprise, to 
secure the speedy completion of the canal 
without taxing the treasury f9r any direct 
contribution, and at the same time to secure 
to the United States that influence in its man- 
agement which is imperative. 

It has been the purpose of the administra- 
tion to make its foreign policy not a matter of 
partisan politics but of patriotism and na- 
tional honor, and I have very great gratifica- 
tion in being able to state that the democratic 
members of the committee of foreign affairs 
responded in a true American spirit. I have 
not hesitated to consult freely with them 
about the most confidential and delicate af- 
fairs, and I frankly confess my obligation for 
needed co-operation. They did not regard a 
patient but firm insistence upon American 
rights and upon immunity from insult and in- 
jury for our citizens and sailors in foreign 
sorts as a policy of "irritation and bluster." 
rhey did not believe, as some others seem to 
believe, that to be a democrat one must take 
he foreign side of every international ques- 
ion if a republican administration is con- 
ducting the American side. I do not believe 
;hat a tame submission to insult and outrage 
by any nation at the hands of any other can 
sver form the basis of a lasting friendship 
the necessary element of mutual respect will 
be wanting. 

MINISTER EGAN'S COURSE JUSTIFIED. 

The Chilean incident, now so happily and 
honorably adjusted, will, I do not doubt, place 
our relations with that brave people upon a 
more friendly basis than ever before. This 
already appears in the agreement since nego- 
tiated by Mr. Egan for the settlement by com- 
mission of the long-unsettled claims between 
he two governments. The work of Mr. Egan 
las been highly advantageous to the United 
states. The confidence which I refused to 
withdraw from him has been abundantly 
ustifled. 

In our relations with the great European 
jowers the rights of the United States and of 
aur citizens have been insisted upon with 
Irmness. The strength of our cause and not 
he strength of our adversary has given tone 
o our correspondence. The Samoan question 
ind the Bering sea question, which came over 
"rom the preceding administration, have been, 
he one settled and the other submitted to ar- 
bitration upon a fair basis. Never before, 1 
"hmk, in a like period have so many impor- 
ant treaties and commercial agreements been 
concluded, and never before I am sure have 
the honor and influence, national and com- 
mercial, of the United States been held in 
higher estimation in both hemispheres. 

The union soldiers and sailors are now vet- 



erans of time as well as of war. The par- 
allels of age have approached close to the 
citadels of life and the end for each of a 
brave and honorable struggle is not remote 
Increasing infirmity and years give the minor 
tone of sadness and pathos to the mighty ap- 
peal of service and suffering. The ear that 
does not listen with sympathy and the heart 
that does not respond with generosity are 
the ear and heart of an alien and not of an 
American. Now soon again the surviving 
veterans are to parade upou the great avenue 
of the national capital and every tribute of 
honor and love should attend the march. A 
comrade in the column of the victors' parade 
in 18f>5, 1 am not less a comrade now. 

I have used every suitable occasion to urge 
upon the people of all sections the considera 
tion that no good cause can be promoted 
upon the lines of lawlessness. Mobs do not 
discriminate and the punishments inflicted 
by them have no repressive or salutary in- 
fluence. On the contrary, they beget revenges 
and perpetuate feuds. It is especially the 
duty of the educated and influential to see 
that the weak and ignorant when accused of 
crime are fairly tried before lawful tribunals 
The moral sentiment of the country should be 
aroused and brought to bear for the sup- 
pression of these offenses against the law and 
social order. 

CARE IN RECEIVING IMMIGRANTS. 

The necessity for a careful discrimination 
among the immigrants seeking our shores be- 
comes every day more apparent. We do not 
want and should not receive those who by 
reason of bad character or habit are not 
wanted at home. The industrious and self- 
respecting, the lovers of law and liberty, 
should be discriminated from the pauper, the 
criminal, and the anarchist, who come only to 
burden and disturb ou communities. Every 
effort has been made to enforce the laws and 
some convictions have been secured under 
the contract-labor law. 

The general condition of our country is one 
of great prosperity. The blessing of God has 
rested upon our fields and upon our people. 
The annual value of our foreign commerce 
has increased more than $400.00(3,000 over the 
average for the preceding ten years, and 
more than $210.000.000 over 1890, the last year 
unaffected by the new tariff. Our exports in 
1892 exceeded those of 1890 by more than $172,- 
000.000, and the annual average for ten years 
by $265.000.000. Our exports of breadstuff's in- 
creased over those of 1890 more than $144.000,- 
000; of provisions over $4.000,000, and of manu- 
factures over $8,000.000. The merchandise bal- 
ance of trade in our favor in 1892 was $202.944.- 
342. No other nation can match the commer- 
cial progress which those figures disclose. 
Our compassion may well go out to those 
whose party necessities and habits still com- 
pel them to declare that our people are op- 
pressed and our trade restricted by a pro- 
tective tariff. 

It is not possible for me to refer even in the 
briefest way to many of the topics presented 
in the resolutions adopted by the convention. 
Upon all that have not been discussed I have 
before publicly expressed my views. A 
change in the personnel of a national admin- 
istration is of comparatively little moment. If 
those exercising public functions are notable, 
honest, diligent and faithful, others possess- 
ing all these qualities may be found to take 
their places. But changes in the laws and 
in administering policies are of great mo- 
ment. When public affairs have been given a 
direction and business has adjusted itself to 
those lines, any sudden change involves a 
stoppage and new business adjustments. If 
the change of direction is so radical as to 



LETTERS OF ACCEPTANCE. 



163 



bring the commercial turn-table into use, the 
business changes involved are not readjust- 
ments but reconstructions. 

A PROGRAMME OP DEMOLITION. 

The democratic party offers a programme of 
demolition. The protective policy to which 
all business, even that of the importer, is 
now adjusted, the reciprocity policy, the new 
merchant marine, are all to be demolished 
not gradually, not taken down, but blown up 
To this programme of destruction it has added 
one constructive feature, the re-establish- 
ment of state banks of issue. The policy of 
the republican party is. on the other hand, 
distinctively a policy of safe progression and 
development of new factories, new markets 
and new ships. It will subject business to no 
perilous changes, but offers attractive oppor- 
tunities for expansion upon familiar lines. 
Very respectfully yours, 

BENJAMIN HARRISON. 



MR. CLEVELAND'S LETTER. 

To the Hon. William L. Wilson and Others, 
Committee, Etc. Gentlemen: In responding 
to your formal notification of my nomination 
to the presidency by the national democracy I 
hope I may be permitted to say at the outset 
that continued reflection and observation 
have confirmed me in my adherence to the 
opinions which I have heretofore plainly and 
publicly declared touching the questions in- 
volved in the canvass. 

This is a time, above all others, when these 
questions should be considered in the light af- 
torded by a sober apprehension of the princi- 
ples upon which our government is based and 
a clear understanding of the relation it bears 
to the people for whose benefit it was created. 
We shall thus be supplied with a test by which 
the value of any proposition relating to the 
maintenance and administration of our gov- 
ernment can be ascertained and by which the 
justice and honesty of every political ques- 
tion can be judged. If doctrines or theories 
are presented which do not satisfy this test 
loyal Americans must pronounce them false 
and mischievous. 

PROTECTION OF THE PEOPLE. 

The protection of the people in the exclu- 
sive use and enjoyment of their property and 
earnings concededly constitutes the especial 
purpose and mission of our free government. 
This design is so interwoven with the struct- 
ure of our plan of rule that failure to protect 
the citizen in such use and enjoyment, or their 
unjustifiable diminution by the government 
itself, is a betrayal of the people's trust. 

We have, however, undertaken to build a 
great nation upon a plan especially our own. 
To maintain it and to furnish through its 
agency the means for the accomplishment of 
national objects, the American people are 
willing, through federal taxation, to surrender 
a part of their earnings and income. 

BURDEN OP TARIFF TAXES. 

Tariff legislation presents a familiar form 
of federal taxation. Such legislation results 
as surely in a tax upon the daily life of our 
people as the tribute paid directly into the 
hand of the tax-gatherer. We feel the bur- 
den of these tariff taxes too palpably to be 
persuaded by any sophistry that they do not 
exist or are paid by foreigners. 

Such taxes, representing a diminution of 
the property rights of the people, are only 
justifiable when laid and collected for the 
purpose of maintaining our government and 
furnishing the means for the accomplish- 
ment of its legitimate purposes and functions. 
This is taxation under the operation of a 



tariff for revenue. It accords with the pro- 
fessions of American free institutions and its 
justice and honesty answer the tests supplied 
by a correct appreciation of the principles 
upon which these institutions rest. 

This theory of tariff legislation manifestly 
enjoins strict economy in public expenditures 
and their limitation to legitimate public uses, 
inasmuch as it exhibits as absolute extortion 
any exaction, by way of taxation, from the 
substance of the people beyond the necessi- 
ties of a careful and proper administration of 
government. 

DOGMA OF THE REPUBLICANS. 
Opposed to this theory the dogma is now 
boldly presented that tariff taxation is justifi- 
able for the express purpose and intent of 
thereby promoting especial interests and en- 
terprises. Such a proposition is so clearly 
contrary to the spirit of our constitution, and 
so directly encourages the disturbance by 
selfishness and greed of patriotic sentiment, 
that its statement would rudely shock our 
people if they had not already been insidiously 
allured from the safe landmarks of principle. 
Never have honest desire for national growth, 
patriotic devotion to country, and sincere re- 
gard for those who toil been so betrayed to 
the support of a pernicious doctrine. In its 
behalf the plea that our infant industries 
should be fostered did service until dis- 
credited by our stalwart growth; then fol- 
lowed the exigencies of a terrible war, which 
made our people heedless of the opportuni- 
ties for ulterior schemes afforded by their 
willing and patriotic payment of unprece- 
dented tribute; and now, after a long period 
of peace, when our overburdened countrymen 
ask for relief and a restoration to a fuller en- 
joyment of their incomes and earnings, they 
are met by the claim that tariff taxation for 
the sake of protection an American system, 
the continuance of which is necessary in order 
that high wages may be paid to our working- 
men and a home market be provided for our 
farm products. 

SHOULD NO LONGER DECEIVE. 

These pretenses should no longer deceive. 
The truth is that such a system is directly 
antagonized by every sentiment of justice 
and fairness of which Americans are pre- 
eminently proud. It is also tru^ that while 
our workingmen and farmers can the least 
of all our people^defend themselves against 
the harder home life which such tariff taxa- 
tion decrees, the workingman suffering from 
the importation and employment of pauper 
labor instigated by his professed friends, and 
seeking security for his interests in organized 
co-operation, sti'l waits for a division of 
the advantages secured to his employer 
under cover of a generous solicitude for his 
wages, while the farmer is learning that the 
prices of his products are fixed in foreign 
markets, where he suffers from a competition 
invited and built up by the system he is asked 
to support. 

The struggle for unearned advantage at 
the doors of the government tramples on the 
rights of those who patiently rely upon 
assurances of American equality. Every 
governmental concession to clamorous favor- 
ites invites corruption in political affairs by 
encouraging the expenditure of money to 
debauch suffrage in support of a policy 
directly favorable to private and selfish gain. 
This, in the end. must strangle patriotism and 
weaken popular confidence in the rectitude of 
republican institutions. 

QUESTION OF MORALS INVOLVED. 
Though the subject of tariff legislation in- 
volves a question of markets, it also involves 



164 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOK 1893. 



question of morals. We cannot with im- 
aunity permit injustice to taint the spirit of 
-ight and equity, which is the life of our re- 
3ublic; and we shall fail to reach our national 
iestiny if greed and selfishness lead the way. 
Realizing these truths the national democ- 
acy will seek by the application of just and 
ound principles to equalize to our people the 
ilessings due them from the government they 
upport, to promote among our countrymen a 
closer community of interests, cemented by 
mtriotism and national pride, and to point 
jut a fair field where prosperous and dive rai- 
led American enterprise may grow and thrive 
n the wholesome atmosphere of American 
ndustry, ingenuity and intelligence. 

STILL FOB TARIFF REFORM. 

Tariff reform is still our purpose. Though 
we oppose the theory that tariff laws may be 
passed having for their object the granting of 
Jiscriminating and unfair governmental aid 
;o private ventures, we wage no exterminat- 
ng war against any American interests. We 
)elieve a readjustment can be accomplished, 
n accordance with the principles we profess, 
without disaster or demolition. We believe 
ihat the advantages of freer raw material 
should be accorded our manufacturers, and we 
sontemplate a fair and careful distribution of 
necessary tariff burdens, rather than the pre- 
sipitation of free trade. 

IMPOSSIBLE FREE TRADE. 

We anticipate with calmness the misrepre- 
sentation of our motives and purposes, insti- 
gated by a selfishness which seeks to hold in 
unrelenting grasp its unfair advantage under 
present tariff laws. We will rely upon the 
ntelligence of our fellow-countrymen to re- 
ject the charge that a party comprising a ma- 
jority of our people is planning the de- 
struction or injury of American interests, 
and we know they cannot be frightened by the 
specter of impossible free trade. 

FEDERAL POWER IN ELECTIONS. 

The administration and management of our 
government depend upon popular will. Fed- 
eral power is the instrument of that will- 
not its master. Therefore the attempt of the 
opponents of democracy to interfere with and 
control the suffrage of the states through fed- 
eral agencies develops a design which no ex- 
planation can mitigate, to reverse the funda- 
mental and safe relations between the people 
and their government. Such an attempt cannot 
fail to be regarded by thoughtful men as 
proof of a bold determination to secure the 
ascendency of a discredited party in reckless 
disregard of a free expression of the popular 
will. To resist such a scheme is an impulse of 
democracy At all times and in all places we 
trust the people. As against a disposition to 
force the way to federal power we present to 
them as our claim to their confidence and 
support a steady championship of their 
rights. 

SOUND AND HONEST MONET. 

The people are entitled to sound and honest 
money, abundantly sufficient in volume to 
supply their business needs. But whatever 
may be the form of the people's currency, na- 
tional or state whether gold, silver or paper 
it should be so regulated and guarded by 
governmental action, or by wise and careful 
laws, that no one can be deluded as to the cer- 
tainty and stability of its value. Every dollar 
put into the hands of the people should be of 
the same intrinsic value or purchasing power. 
With this condition absolutely guaranteed 
both gold and silver can be safely utilized 
upon equal terms in the adjustment of our 
currency. 



In dealing with this subject no selfish scheme 
should be allowed to intervene and no doubt- 
ful experiment should be attempted. The 
wants of our people, arising from the deficien- 
cy or imperfect distribution of money circu- 
lation, ought to be fully and honestly recog- 
nized and efficiently remedied. It should, 
tiowever, be constantly remembered that the 
inconvenience or loss that might arise from 
such a situation can be much easier borne 
than the universal distress which must follow 
a discredited currency. 

CIV1L-SEEVICE REFORM. 

Public officials are the agents of the people. 
It is therefore their duty to secure for those 
whom they represent the best and most 
efficient performance of public work. This 
plainly can be best accomplished by regarding 
ascertained fitness in the selection of govern- 
ment employes. These considerations alone 
are sufficient justification for an honest ad- 
herence to the letter and spirit of civil-service 
reform. There are, however, other features 
of this plan, which abundantly commend it. 
Through its operation worthy merit in every 
station and condition of American life is 
recognized in the distribution of public em- 
ployment, while its application tends to raise 
the standard of political activity from spoils- 
hunting and unthinking party affiliation to 
the advocacy of party principles by reason 
and argument. 

PENSION ROLL OF HONOR. 

The American people are generous and 
grateful, and they nave impressed these char- 
acteristics upon their government. Therefore 
all patriotic and just decisions must command 
liberal consideration for our worthy veteran 
soldiers and for the families of those who 
have died. No complaint should be made of 
the amount of public money paid to those 
actually disabled or made dependent by reason 
of army service. But our pension roll should 
be a roll of honor, uncontaminated by ill 
desert and unvitiated by demagogic use. This 
is due to those whose worthy names adorn the 
roll and to all our people who delight to honor 
the brave and the true. It is also due to those 
who in years to come should be allowed to 
hear, reverently and lovingly, the story ol 
American patriotism 'and fortitude illustrated 
by our pension roll. The preferences accorded 
to veteran soldiers in public employment 
should be secured to them honestly and with 
out evasion, and, when capable and worthy, 
their claim to the helpful regard and gratitude 
of their countrymen should be ungrudgingly 
acknowledged. 

WHOLESOME PARENTAL AUTHORITT. 

The assurance to the people of the utmos 
individual liberty consistent with peace and 
good order is a cardinal principle of ourgov 
ernment. This gives no sanction to vexatious 
sumptuary laws which unnecessarily interfere 
with such habits and customs of our people as 
are not offensive to a just moral sense and are 
not inconsistent with good citizenship and the 
public welfare. The same principle requires 
that the line between the subjects which are 
properly within governmental control anc 
those which are more fittingly left to parenta 
regulation should be carefully kept in view 
An enforced education, wisely deemed a 
proper preparation for citizenship, should not 
involve the impairment of wholesome pa- 
rental authority nor do violence to the house- 
hold conscience. Paternalism in government 
finds no approval in the creed of democracy 
It is a symptom of misrule, whether it is man 
ifestedin unauthorized gifts or by an unwar 
ranted control of personal and family affairs 



LETTERS OF ACCEPTANCE. 



165 



REGULATION OF IMMIGRATION. 

Our people, still cherishing the feeling of 
human fellowship which belonged to our be- 
ginning as a nation, require their government 
to express for them their sympathy with all 
those who are oppressed under any rule less 
free than ours. 

A generous hospitality, which is one of the 
most prominent of our national characteris- 
ics, prompts us to welcome the worthy and 
ndustrious of all lands to home and citizen- 
ship among us. This hospitable sentiment is 
not violated, however, by careful and reason- 
able regulations for the protection of the 
public health, nor does it justify the reception 
of immigrants who have no appreciation of 
pur institutions and whose presence among us 
is a menace to peace and good order. 

NICARAGUA SHIP CANAL. 

The importance of the construction of the 
Nicaragua ship canal as a means of promot- 
'ng commerce between our states and with 
x>reign countries, and also as a contribution 
by Americans to the enterprises which 
advance the interests of the world of civiliza- 
tion, should commend the project to govern- 
mental approval and indorsement. 

NATIONAL PRIDE IN THE WORLD'S FAIR. 

Our countrymen not only expect from those 
who represent them in public places a sedu- 
lous care of things which are directly and 
palpably related to their material interests, 
but they also fully appreciate the value of 
cu'tivating our national pride and maintain- 
ing our national honor. Both their material 
nterests and national pride and honor are 
nvolved in the success of the Columbian 
Exposition, and they will not be inclined to 
condone any neglect of effort on the part of 
their government to insure in the grandeur 
of this event a fitting exhibit of American 
growth and greatness and a splendid demon- 
stration of American patriotism. 

RECORD AS A PUBLIC SERVANT. 

In an imperfect and incomplete manner I 
have thus endeavored to state some of the 
things which accord with the creed and inten- 
tions of the party to which I have given my 
life-long allegiance. My attempt has not been 
to instruct my countrymen or my party, but 
to remind both that democratic doctrine lies 
near the principles of our government and 
tends to promote the people's good. I am 
willing to be accused of addressing my coun- 
trymen upon trite topics and in homely fash- 
ion, for I believe that important truths are 
found on the surface of thought and that 
they should be stated in direct and simple 
terms. Though much is left unwritten, my 
record as a public servant leaves no excuse 
for misunderstanding my belief and position 
on the questions which are now presented to 
the voters of the land for their decision. 

Called for the third time to represent the 
party of my choice in a contest for the su- 
premacy of democratic principles, my grate- 
ful appreciation of its confidence less than 
ever effaces the solemn sense of my respon 
sibility. 

If the action of the convention you repre- 
sent shall be indorsed by the suffrages of my 
countrymen I will assume the duties of the 
great office for which 1 have been nominated, 
knowing full well its labors and perplexities, 
and with humble reliance upon the divine 
Being, infinite. in power to aid and constant in 
a watchful care over our favored nation. 
Yours very truly, 

GROVER CLEVELAND. 

Gray Gables. Sept. 26. 1892. 



GEN. WEAVER'S LETTER. 

To the People of the United States: Having 
been nominated respectively for the offices of 
president and vice-president of the United 
States by the national convention of the peo- 
ple's party, which assembled at Omaha July 4, 
1892, we take this method of formally notify- 
ing the public of our acceptance of the nomi- 
nations and of our appreciation of the honor 
conferred upon us by the action of the con- 
vention. We are heartily in accord with the 
platform of principles adopted by that con- 
vention, and if elected will endeavor to faith- 
fully carry out the demands in letter and 
spirit. 

We have been requested by the national 
committee to visit the various states of the 
union so far as it shall be within our power, 
and to address the people upon the political 
situation and the issues presented in the plat- 
form. We are now in the discharge of that 
duty, having already, one or both of us, visited 
fifteen states in the northwest and south, and 
if health and strength are spared we intend to 
continue the work until the campaign is 
closed. We have been received with marked 
cordiality. The enthusiasm everywhere is 
without parallel and extends to every part of 
the union we have visited. 

FREELY AND WITHOUT RESERVE. 

By contact with the people we have become 
acquainted with their wants and sufferings 
and have been brought face to face with the 
manifold perils which so seriously threaten 
our civilization and the overthrow of popular 
government. We wish to express our judg- 
ment freely and without reserve in order that 
we may stand acquitted before our f ellowmen 
and our own conscience touching the whole 
matter. 

The people are in poverty. Their substance 
is being devoured by heartless monopolists, 
trusts, pools and money sharks. Labor is 
largely unemployed, and where vrork is ob- 
tainable the wages paid are for the most part 
unremunerative and the products of labor 
not paying the costs of production. This is a 
matter of serious concern to the whole people. 

OLD PARTIES AND MONOPOLY. 

The leaders of the heretofore dominant 
parties are every where controlled byihegreat 
monopoly and money centers and manifest 
utter disregard for the wants and wishes of 
the people. The parties are hostile camps ar- 
rayed on sectional lines and the present bit- 
terness and the cruelties of the past; every 
four years discussing the issues of the late 
war, which should long since have been 
allowed to pass from the political discussions 
of the day. Notwithstanding the bitterness 
existing between the old parties they vie with 
each other in their subservience to capital- 
istic and corporate greed. They are incapa- 
ble of dealing sincerely with the vast prob 
lems evolved by the growth of the last quar- 
ter of a century. 

Upon the general economic questions of the 
age they are practically the same in purpose, 
differing just enough to enable them to carry 
on a sham battle, while the work of robbery 
and spoliation proceeds unabated. In the 
meantime the farmers and planters north and 
south and wage-earners everywhere are pro- 
scribed, maltreated, brought into competition 
with convict labor, and in many instances 
shot down by hired mercenaries acting under 
orders of arrogant corporations which, have 
unblushingly usurped the functions of gov- 
ernment and presumed to act in its stead. 
These corporations dominate the daily press 
and control the lines of daily communication 
with the people. 



166 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



DISHONESTY IN ELECTIONS. 

We hold that the right of a free ballot and 
a fair count are rights preservative of all 
rights, and upon their inviolability rests the 
perpetuity of free institutions and repre- 
sentative government. We are pained to dis- 
cover in the public mind of the southern 
states through which we have passed a wide- 
spread loss of confidence on the part of the 
people in the integrity of the judges of elec- 
tions in receiving the ballots of the people 
and counting them for the candidates of 
their choice. We think that this evil must be 
corrected by the intelligence and integrity of 
the people of the country, otherwise scenes 
of violence and perhaps bloodshed may fol- 
low these efforts of parties in charge of the 
ballot-boxes to defraud the will of the voter. 
They will lead to a serious collision, and that 
quickly. 

After consultation with the people we be- 
lieve it to be true, beyond reasonable question, 
that the majority of white voters are with the 
people's party in every southern state thus far 
visited, and our information leads us to be- 
lieve that the same thing is true in the other 
states. The white people are leaving the old 
parties and casting their lots with us, and our 
numbers are constantly increasing. 

KOLB WAS COUNTED OUT. 

We are informed by a large number of in- 
telligent and reputable people that in the 
recent state election in Alabama Capt. Kolb 
was chosen governor by over 40,OUO majority, 
and yet his opponent was counted in by a 
majority of 10,000. County tickets throughout 
the state were counted out and others counted 
in. By the same unblushing methods we are 
informed that in the state electian which oc- 
curred in Arkansas on Sept. 5 at least 50,000 of 
the qualified voters of the state were deprived 
of the right of suffrage, that the returns were 
inaccurate, that at this election the people's 
party, a party polling a large vote, was denied 
representation in the appointment of judges 
and commissioners by whom the election was 
to be conducted. In consequence of these 
methods the will of the legally authorized 
voters of the state has been defeated. 

FRAUDS AND IRREGULARITIES. 

The only thing that our friends in that state 
have to guide them is in the few counties where 
they were able to force an honest count. In 
every one of these counties our vote ran fully 
up to expectations. In Washington, Independ- 
ence, White, Clark, Nevada, Crawford, Se- 
bastian and Scott, populous white counties.the 
people's party polled an immense vote, their 
ticket leading the republican largely and was 
about equal with the democratic. We believe 
that a fair count would have shown similar 
conditions throughout the state. 

These frauds and irregularities in the state 
referred to, though local, are yet matters 
worthy of the serious consideration of the 
people of the whole United States. The de- 
plorable condition of affairs cannot be reme- 
died from without. The solution must come 
from the people within these states, support- 
ed by a healthy public sentiment everywhere, 
and we believe it to be the duty of all people 
without regard to section to stand by these 
noble people of the south who have risen up 
to demand good government and honest 
elections. 

NEITHER OLD PARTY TRUSTED. 
After an experiment of many years it is ap- 
parent that neither the republican party nor 
the democratic party can or will accomplish 
the much-desired end to wit. the restoration 
of the ballot to a fair and honest basis in the 
states of the union. The people's party alone 



can secure the desired end. If the people of 
the whole country who desire honest elections 
and the repeal of class laws will rally to the 
support of this great industrial movement, 
and place the party in power under whose 
banner the white people of the south are now 
marshaling themselves, this vexed question 
will be settled forever. 

It is certain that the people of the south will 
not join the ranks of the republican party. It 
is equally certain that the republicans will not 
unite with the democratic party. The people's 
party affords the only solution of these impor- 
tant matters 
INDUSTRIAL AND FRATERNAL MOVEMENT. 

All who desire the revival of business; all 
who wish for the return of prosperity to our 
country; all who desire to relieve the de- 
pressed industries and wage-workers of our 
common country; all who desire an adequate 
increase of our currency and the free coinage 
of silver; all who desire the abolition of banks 
of issue and the constitutional control of the 
great instruments of commerce by the g9v- 
ernmentof the United States; all who desire 
that the laws of taxation shall be equitably 
adjusted to the property of the country; all 
who desire that the public domain shall be 
sacredly held in trust for the people; all who 
desire that the highways between the states 
shall be rendered subservient to the popular 
good, and, finally, all who desire the restora- 
tion of fraternity among the people and the 
obliteration of sectional animosities, shoxild at 
once regard it as their conscientious duty to 
align themselves under the banner of this 
great industrial and fraternal movement. 

JUSTICE AND GOOD GOVERNMENT. 



It seems to us to be quite impossible that 

e liberty and justice loving people of this 

country should longer cast their ballots for 



the corporations and money-changers. It 
would seem impossible that they should re- 
fuse to make common cause with the fair- 
minded majority of the people of the south 
who have risen up to demand justice and 
good government in their respective states. 
And it further seems quite impossible that 
the producers and laboring people of the 
United States shall deliberately go to the polls 
in November and cast their votes in harmony 
with the corporations and money power who 
have systematically and cruelly robbed them 
for so many years, vote in harmony with their 
despoilers, who made war against even their 
right to organize for the protection of them- 
selves and families. 

With the aggressions of capital on the one 
hand and the overthrow by fraud of free 
elections on the other, how is it possible 
for our civilization to last? The new party 
has its face turned to the glorious future. Its 
sublime mission is to usher in an era of fra- 
ternity and justice among men. In the pres- 
ence of such an opportunity to emancipate 
our country from misrule of every kind let 
party lines be forgotten and let the generous 
flame of a common patriotism nerve every 
heart and move every soul. 

JAMES F. WEAVER. 

JAMES G. FIELD. 

GEN. BIDWELL'S LETTER. 
Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen of the Com- 
mittee: By your polite letter of this date, 
which I have the honor to receive at your 
hands, I am formally notified that the na- 
tional prohibition convention, in session in 
the city of Cincinnati, adopted a platform of 
principles for the coming political campaign, 
and thereupon conferred upon me the distin- 
guished honor of its nomination for president 
of the United States. 



LETTERS OF ACCEPTANCE. 



167 



In accepting the nomination, which I do with 
misgivings as to my ability to meet the just 
expectations of the people, permit me to 
thank you, gentlemen, for the courteous and 
kindly manner in which you have been pleased 
to discharge the trust assigned you, and 
through you to embrace the occasion to ex- 
press to the members of the convention and 
the friends of prohibition and reform through- 
out the country whom you represent my grate- 
ful acknowledgment. 

It is scarcely necessary to add that I am 
overwhelmed with a keen sense of the re- 
sponsibility which I assume. 

Mistakes are possible, but I trust the cause 
may not suffer in my hands. All I have to 
plead is unswerving devotion to those great 
principles and needed reforms which have 
Drought into existence the prohibition party 
of the nation. 

Those who witnessed the convention in Cin- 
cinnati need not be reminded that some- 
thing of unusual moment had aroused the na- 
tion and brought together a representative 
body of men and women the equal of which 
for intelligence and patriotic earnestness has 
seldom if ever been seen at any former 
period. 

In 1776 our fathers made proclamation of the 
birth of the nation. Now. having grown to be 
one of the greatest powers of the earth, the 
freest and best government ever devised, the 
hope of the world, the "grandest government- 
al fabric of human invention." our beloved 
American nation is. in the minds of most 
thoughtful and intelligent people, drifting un- 
mistakably toward decay, if not to sure and 
swift destruction. 

Prohibition comes, therefore, to proclaim, 
as we believe, the only way of salvation. 

AN IMMEASURABLE EVIL. 

There are well-founded apprehensions that 
this nation which we love this mighty em- 
pire of sovereign states cannot survive unless i 
redeemed from the dangers that jeopard its ! 
existence, prominent among which are that I 
immeasurable evil, the monster liquor traffic. ! 
and the numerous forms and phases of the 
monopolistic combinations, creating immense 
wealth in the hands of a few and impoverish- 
ng the many. The same causes and processes 
which have created increasing numbers of 
millionaries will, if unchecked under the rule 
of the old political parties, in time turn over 
the entire nation into the hands of an aristoc- 
racy of monster billionaires. 

Labor creates the wealth of the country. 
Without labor there can be no development 
of resources, no national prosperity. The 
iquor traffic robs, impoverishes, and demoral- 
zes labor, thereby sapping the very founda- 
tions of the national fabric. 

The liquor traffic is an enormous incubus 
upon the nation, amounting in cost and con- 
sequences to the annual sum of not less than 
$2.UUO.OOO,000 four times the amount requisite 
to pay the annual expenses of the national 
government, even under the recent expensive 
administrations. 

But it is not necessary further to enumerate. 
Suffice it to say, the liquor traffic is a standing 
curse a danger to public health; the prolific 
source of untold political corruption, crimes, 
diseases, degradation and death; a public 
nuisance and a public immorality. In a word, 
it is an unmitigated and measureless evil 
without a redeeming feature. 

Every consideration of justice, the public 
welfare, protection to labor, all cry out j 
against this great wrong. The only adequate' 
remedy lies in the entire overthrow of the 
liquor traffic in every state and territory. 

The liquor power leads, corrupts and domi- 
nates both the old political parties. Without 



the liquor support neither could make 
another political fight or win a victory. 

The prohibition party asks the intelligent 
and patriotic people of this nation this ques- 
tion: Are not these charges true? And, if 
true, have you not a right to ask : How can 
any good man consistently support the infa- 
mous saloon business by longer clinging to 
the destinies of those parties? 

PROTECT THE HOME. 

The family is the unit of civilized govern- 
ment. Protect the home and the nation will 
be protected. 

In the name of right and humanity, then, let 
not free, enlightened and Christian America 
longer injure and degrade woman by with- 
holding from her that which is her inaliena- 
ble right; that which will elevate American 
womanhood; that which will enlarge her use- 
fulness; that which will impart to her greater 
ability to be the helper and co-worker with 
man under all circumstances and conditions; 
that which alone will make woman man's 
equal before the law and place in her hands 
the most efficient weapon with which to de- 
fend her rights and protect her home. I 
allude, of course, to that priceless heritage, 
the ballot. 

In doing this Americans should lose no time. 
Americans, of all people under the sun, are 
the most nearly ready. 

Our women know what the ballot is and its 
power; they are, as a class, intelligent, virtu- 
ous, self-reliant, womanly and modest. 

If we delay England will take the lead In 
the emancipation of woman. 

The nation that first gives woman equal 
rights with man will earn a crown of imper- 
ishable glory. 

The old parties, controlled as they are by 
the liquor power and by vast monopolistic 
and other influences, cannot, dare not even 
propose, much less seriously purpose, to over- 
throw the saloon, grant equal suffrage, or do 
any other act in the direction of a beneficent 
reform antagonistic to these controlling in- 
fluences. 

They need them this year for re-election, 
they will need them next time, and so on as 
long as they have an existence. Powerful 
political parties invariably become corrupt 
and utterly helpless to right themselves. The 
only real service they can do is to go out of 
existence. It is a singular phenomenon that 
good men will remain in affiliation with such 
parties and thus lend aid and comfort to the 
liquor business. 

THE MONEY QUESTION. 

The financial question in our platform is 
briefly and fairly stated and broad enough to 
satisfy all reasonable men in these words: 
"The money of the country should consist of 
gold, silver and paper." Also that it be "is- 
sued by the government only." It should, of 
course, be in sufficient quantity to meet all 
demands, and the volume be so increased 
and adjusted as at all times to respond to the 
conditions of the country. 

Of all the forms used by men to overreach 
each other in the scramble for wealth there 
is none more oppressive and blighting to labor 
and business generally than the monopoly of 
money. Combinations to lock up capital with 
the view to raise the rate of interest or to re- 
duce the price of labor or commodities should 
be made illegal. 

Take farmers, for example. As a class they 
are compelled to be and as a rule are frugal. 
Yet there is little doubt that the mortgage f 
which cover their farms indicate with almost 
unerring certainty the overcharge of interes 
they are obliged to pay. 

The legal rate of interest should be made 



108 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



low and reasonable for the benefit of all 
classes, occupations and industries, and be 
uniform in all the states. No man ought to be 
compelled to pay exorbitant interest because 
he is poor. If his security is doubtful, exact- 
ing from him high interest will not increase 
his ability to pay. As a matter of 



who honestly and promptly pay should have 
the benefit of the legal low rate of interest, 
if combinations may be formed ad libitum to 
accumulate and hoard the wealth of the 
country they will soon have it in their power 
to stop the very wheels of progress to exer- 
cise dangerous control over legislatures, 
courts, and congresses, if not virtually to dic- 
tate all the affairs of the nation. 

In a wide sense all who pursue useful occu- 
pations, professions or callings are 1'aborers. 
In the busy hive of national industry there is 
a place for the merchant, the mechanic, the 
doctor, the teacher, the learned professor, the 
lawyer, the legislator in a word, for all who 
in any manner perform useful or valuable 
service. 

In the common conception of the term 
laborers (which I may use) it is usually ap- 
plied to those who labor with their hands. 
Happily, in this land of freedom and equal 
rights all labor is regarded as honorable, and 
none more useful than manual labor. 

RESTRICTION OF IMMIGRATION. 

In order to relieve the labor of the country 
of its abnormal and often congested condi- 
tion there should be the earliest possible re- 
vision and restriction of the immigration and 
naturalization laws of the United States. 
These laws, so inimical to American labor and 
the best interests of all, if not purposely en- 
acted, have doubtless been kept in force for 
partisan considerations for fear of detriment 
to partisan interests till our country has be- 
come the almost daily scene of riots, lawless- 
ness and bloodshed, and not infrequently on 
such a scale as to portend, if permitted to go 
unchecked, the possible subversion of all 
authority. The discord between capital and 
labor cannot safely be allowed to continue. 
No matter what the cause, it is imperative to 
remove it. 

The general welfare and even the fate of 
the nation demand that a remedy be found 
and applied, whether by arbitration or other- 
wise. Tribunals of adequate jurisdiction can 
be provided to decide all differences between 
men or bodies of men, be they large or small, 
capitalists and laborers or employers and the 
employed. 

Labor itself has the deepest interest in the 
general welfare. All its hopes are insepara- 
bly associated with the prosperity and des- 
tiny of the nation. All intelligent and patri- 
otic Americans concede that the laboring 
classes and all classes have the right to ask 
and to receive ample and adequate protection 
under just and equal laws. 

Intelligent laboring men, being in the ma- 
jority at the polls, must bear in mind their 
own responsibility in making the laws to 
which they themselves and all others are 
bound to yield obedience. 

That capital sometimes overreaches and 
oppresses labor is doubtless true. There 
seems to be no limit to human greed. 

That labor is sometimes unreasonable and 
even vicious is also probably true. But law- 
lessness and lawless combinations of men. 
the only effects of which are to enervate and 
destroy, must at once be put under the ban of 
severe public disapprobation if this country 
is to prosper. 

In the national hive there should be no 
drones. There should be room and there is 
room for all to labor, and all ought to have 
and must have the right to labor. It is a 



duty and a right that all men have, to earn 
their bread and support their families. If it be 
necessary to have organizations as a defense 
against capital or competing labor, such 
organizations should be authorized and regu- 
lated by law. 

PARTY POSITION ON TARIFF. 

Whatever tariffs may do they do not seem 
adequately, if at all, to protect labor. Except 
the partial effort to check the introduction of 
Mongolians our ports are open to all the 
world to come and compete with American 
labor. There is no tariff on labor. 

We must concede that all nations have the 
right to levy tariffs. As Americans we are in 
favor of protecting all American interests. 
The tariff proposed by the democratic party 
and that of the republican party differ only in 
degree both are sufficiently high to be 
termed protective. 

To the objection that tariffs bear unequally 
that is to say, that under them the rich pay 
comparatively nothing and the masses nearly 
all the revenue so derived to support the 
national government must be added the fur- 
ther objection that they are blinding and 
deceptive. 

Under the present tariff there is not a man 
in the United States who can tell what he 
pays toward the support of the national gov- 
ernment. Impressed with this fact, which all 
intelligent citizens ought to know and all the 
people must sooner or later learn, the tariff 
is doubtless destined to undergo constant and 
numerous revisions by congress in the impos- 
sible effort to equalize all its burdens and 
benefits. 

Our national convention wisely justifies 
tariff as a defensive measure, which prac- 
tically can but mean reciprocity. 

In a country of such vast and varied re- 
sources as ours such a tariff system could not 
fail to yield a very considerable revenue. 

A further provision of the platform con- 
tains a measure of revenue of such tran- 
scendent importance as to commend itself to 
the favor of all classes, and especially the 
masses, in these words: "The residue of 
means necessary to an economical adminis- 
tration of the government should be raised 
by levying a burden on what the people pos- 
sess instead of upon what they consume." 

The platform fairly, and as I think with 
great wisdom, embraces the policy of laying 
the burden of public revenue where it justly 
belongs and precisely where the ability lies 
to pay namely, "on what the people possess"; 
in other words, on their wealth, the value of 
which will generally be measured in dollars 
by the revenue or net income it yi3lds to the 
possessor. 

WHY AN INCOME TAX IS FAVORED. 

An income tax can do no injustice, work no 
oppression, for where there is no income there 
will be nothing to pay; the rich will pay most 
and the poor least or nothing. This mode of 
revenue is no experiment in this country. 
During the great rebellion when every source 
of revenue was strained to sustain the armies 
of the union an income tax was resorted to 
and it worked like a charm. 

It helped then to save the union and will 
help to save the nation now in another rebel- 
lionthe classes against the masses. 

Some men, of course, will always try to 
evade the payment of their just taxes. But 
no honest man, I think, can ever make any 
reasonable objection to a well regulated in- 
come tax. 

The effect of this mode of raising national 
revenue cannot fail to be beneficent. It will 
relieve the poor without oppressing the rich. 
Perhaps no other measure possible to be de- 



LETTERS OF ACCEPTANCE. 



169 



vised will work greater reform or give greater 
impetus to general prosperity than a wisely 
regulated income tax. One of its results would 
be to favor the equal distribution of wealth; 
it would go far to heal the growing discord be- 
tween labor and capital. 

A further important effect to flow from a 
revenue system based on "what the people 
possess instead of upon what they consume" 
would be that it would at once become to the 
interest of all, rich and poor alike, to align 
themselves on the side of the strictest econ- 
omy in all branches of the public service. 

There is perhaps no one issue in all the 
broad array of prohibition principles em- 
braced in our national platform of more vital 
concern to the material prosperity of our 
whole country than that of transportation. 
Hence we declare in favor of government 
control of "railroad, telegraph and other pub- 
lic corporations" in the interest of all the peo- 
ple. If railroads cannot otherwise be so con- 
trolled, then it becomes the imperative duty 
of government to acquire and exercise abso- 
lute ownership, especially of the great trunk 
lines, for we mean practical and efficient con- 
trolnothing less. 

So essential is this instrumentality to our 
national life and prosperity in this stage of 
rapid transit that whatever powers own and 
control the railways of the United States, in- 
timately associated as they are with other 
great monopolistic interests, will have it with- 
in their sway virtually to own and control the 
government. 

DANGER FROM CORPORATIONS. 

It is well known that .railways and their 
natural affiliations (the great moneyed and 
other corporate powers) have already a most 
dangerous influence in all elections and in 
every department of the government. They 
are absolutely corrupting. We boast that ours 
is the freest and best government, and so it is. 

But the question comes home to every 
thoughtful mind: Is it safe for the people to 
surrender their rights into the hands of great 
corporations? 

The transportation question has and ever 
will have an important effect in adding 
strength to the bonds of the national union 
by multiplying the facilities for travel and 
the commingling of the people of all sections, 
thereby dissipating prejudices, forming and 
connecting friendships, unifying the people in 
anguage, in national spirit and love of coun- 
iry through the constant medium of more in- 
timate, social and business relations. 

For these considerations transportation 
must be controlled owned if necessary by 
the government of the United States. 

The general diffusion of morality and intelli- 
gence is essential to the preservation of the 
rights and liberties of the people. One state 
constitution has it in these words: 

"A general diffusion of knowledge and intel- 
gence being essential to the preservation of 
the rights and liberties of the people, the leg- 
islature shall encourage by all suitable means 
the promotion of intellectual, scientific, 
moral and agricultural improvement." 

Another state constitution has the same 
declaration, thus: " Knowledge and learning 
zenerally diffused throughout the community 
being essential to the preservation of a free 
government, it shall be the duty of the general 
assembly to encourage by all suitable means 
moral, intellectual, scientific and agricultural 
improvement." 

We have, therefore, ample reason for the 
conclusion that this free popular government 
this mighty empire of sovereign states can 
only be preserved on the basis of morality and 
intelligence. 

The demand is therefore imperative that 



ample means of education upon such basis be 
provided at the public expense and placed 
within the reach of every child in the nation. 
The transcendent importance of the common 
school cannot be too firmly emphasized. 

PROMOTION OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Our national convention has therefore 
wisely made prominent in its platform the 
American public school, which should be, If 
possible, the most prevalent and conspicuous 
object in the nation. Over it the flag of free- 
dom should ever be unfurled, for it should be 
a school of patriotism as well as of intelli- 
gence and morality. The teachings of the 
American public school should be in accord 
with Americin ideas with American civil- 
ization, which of course is a Christian civil- 
ization, but they must be strictly absolutely 
non-sectarian. The standard of morality 
must accord with our civilization and per- 
vade all the books and teachings of the pub- 
lic school, which must not in any phase be a 
school of immorality. 

Complaint has been made from various 
sources that American public schools are god- 
less and immoral and therefore not good 
enough to suit some people. The remedy is to 
make them good enough. Place them on a high 
moral standard. Eliminate from the public 
school every feature that has the slightest 
tendency to immorality; ever bearing in 
mind that under our form of government the 
conditions essential to OUT existence as a na- 
tion make it imperative that our public 
schools ~G free from every sectarian influence. 

In the interest of national unity there 
should be a national language and that, of 
course, the English. 

No other should be the language of the 
public school. A knowledge of the national 
language so far as to read and write the same 
fairly well should, in addition to good moral 
character, be made a condition of naturaliza- 
tion and the inestimable right of suffrage. 

Taking our rank as we do foremost among 
Christian nations, we ought not as a nation to 
ignore the Christian sabbath. The closing of 
the World's Fair on Sunday is important to 
show to the world America's rank among the 
nations. 

THE TRIALS OP THE TIMES. 

This magnificent republic, with an area 
equal to that of all Europe, with a population 
already of nearly 05,000,000, with industries 
and resources vast, varied and almost limit- 
less; and with more than a century of unex- 
ampled prosperity and remarkable history.and 
destined in the providence of God, as we be- 
lieve, to become the leading power of the 
world, is even yet regarded by other nations 
as in the experimental stage. The enemies of 
free government still predict and doubtless 
hope to see America's downfall. America 
was never more on trial than she is to-day. 

Dangers are ever present. The eyes of the 
world are upon us to see whether or not Amer- 
ica possesses in a measure equal to or greater 
than monarchies the elements of strength 
and perpetuity to carry our government 
through all present and possible emergencies. 

The same patriotism and wisdom that laid 
the foundation will be required to preserve 
the temple of liberty. Our foes are more 
numerous than at the beginning and our dan- 
gers are multiplied. Eternal vigilance was 
never more necessary. The important ques- 
tion of the hour is: How can this republic be 
tided over all the dangers that threaten and 
bepreserved to bless the world? 

The far-seeing patriot makes answer: Ban- 
ish alcohol and make the nation sober. Make 
the people intelligent, moral and law-abiding. 

Control all monopolies in the interest of the 



170 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



people. Banish anarchy, punish all crimes, 
suppress all lawless combinations. Restrict 
foreign immigration. Rest the right of suf- 
frage and citizenship on the sure basis of 
morality and intelligence. 

Teach all children in the American public 
school the sacredness of the ballot, of obe- 
dience to law, of willing submission to right- 
ful authority and the settlement of differ- 
ences betwet n men by arbitration. 

That all great national questions must be 
settled, and all dangers averted, and all need- 
ful reforms achieved by the same sacred 
principle of unreserved acquiescence in the 
majority rule. Majorities make the laws. 
Majorities repeal them. 

We fondly believe ours to be the best 
government the world has seen. On the 
principle stated of adhering sacredly to 
obedience to law and the arbitrament of all 
questions to majorities there can be no reason 
why our free popular government may not, 
under the blesslngof God, endure till the close 
of time. The principle is of such vital 
moment that we cannot begin too soon to 
make it a feature in the curriculum in all 
American public schools. 

Making this the inflexible rule of our faith 
and practice, this proud republic, with all its 
vast concerns, may be easily held together by 
the bonds of common interest, even were our 
boundaries enlarged and our population and 
our national affairs indefinitely multiplied. 

THE PROHIBITION PLATFORM IS COMPLETE. 

The principles of our prohibition platform, 
as far as I have been able to refer to them, are 
ample to show that they cover as entirely as 
ought to be desired in a brief outline of party 
policy many if not the most of the promi- 
nent problems pressing for solution at the 
present hour. 

Our platform warrants unyielding opposi- 
tion to all speculations in margins to ''the 
cornering of grain, money and products," to 
'pools, trusts," etc., and by implication to lot- 
teries and all modes of gambling, public and 
private. 

But further allusion to 9ur principles is not 
necessary. We cover a wider field than any 
othtr political party. We claim that ours is 
the only party that promises anything what- 
ever in the line of real reform. 

In 1776 we needed immigration. The com- 
plaint against England was that immigration 
had been obstructed. But times have changed. 

We make no war against foreigners as such. 



This is a world of competition. Each nation 
is competing with all other nations. Some 
are favored nations. Ours is one. All the 
world has been and still is coming to us. 

But we must now begin to close the doors in 
self-defense. We do not want the world 
faster than we can Americanize the world 
We have already quite enough of imported 
nihilism, anarchism and pauperism. 

We do not ask foreigners coming to this land 
pt freedom to change their faith. We do not 
intend to protestantize or Romanize or in 
any manner sectarianize them. But we d( 
insist that they shall not destroy our liberties 
by any attempt to foreignize or anarchize us 
or our government; that they should appreci- 
ate our liberties and privileges; that as a con- 
dition of citizenship they should learn to 
speak our national language and to read and 
write it fairly well. 

UNDENOMINATIONAL AND NON-SECTIONAL. 

Our safety and our future demand that our 
government shall never in any manner be- 
come denominational or sectional. 

Unfortunately, at present, labor in this 
country is divided against itself. Banish the 
saloon, restrict immigration, and relief will 
soon follow. 

Prohibition is the greatest friend of labor. 
No other can achieve in full measure entire 
relief. 

We propose to make labor moral, intelligent 
and united in the eommon prosperity. 

To save and perpetuate this nation our hope 
is in the masses in the labor and not mon- 
opolies. 

Wealth is boundless in its ambition to gain 
wealth, and would if it could monopolize the 
very earth. Therefore, we say that the hope 
of this nation is in the many and not in the 
few the many are they who labor. 

Our appeal is to the good and intelligent 
voters of all political parties. 

Religious denominations are all invited to 
unite in conquering our country for temper- 
ance. They can vie with each other in bene- 
ficent rivalry. Their field is our whole country 
and the world. We appeal to the courageous 
young manhood of the nation before it casts 
its first ballot and to the older and veteran 
voters before they cast their latest and per- 
haps their last vote to vote against the 
saloon; that is to say, vote with the prohibi- 
tion party, for that is the only political party 
that dares oppose the liquor power. 

JOHN BIDWELL. 



THE PROTECTIVE TARIFF ON INTOXICATING LIQUORS. 

The following table, from the annual report of the chief of the United States Bureau of 
Statistics in regard to imported merchandise, for the year ended June 30, 1891, gives the value 
of alcoholic liquors imported into this country since 1880 and the amount of customs revenue 
from the same under our protective tariff system: 



YEAR ENDED 
JUNE 30. 



1881 

1882 



1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 



is 1 .' I. 



MALT LIQUORS. 



DISTILLED 
SPIRITS. 



Values. 



$678.507 
748.270 



937.806 
1,146,797 
1.119,200 
1.111.407 
1.20(5,267 
1,2K7,H09 
1,353.890 
1,322 
1.456., 
1,738,607 



Values. 



91.751.134 

2.234,223 
2.215.064 
2.303.176 



1,87:1926 
1,82(5,089 
1.909,909 
1.972.287 
1.902,880 
2,171,935 
2,221,149 



$2,788,531 
2,9(55,707 
3.161.522 
3.374,507 
3.141.381 
2.943,773 
2,834,690 
2,939,923 
2.981,772 
2,943,243 
3,129,424 
3,437,571 



WINES. 



$5,649.033 
(5,519.994 
7.238,530 

10.2S3.693 
4,805,040 
6,340.415 
6.753,472 
7,013,737 
7.310.190 
7,713.650 
8.78(5.623 
9,592,660 



$,3,091,926 
3.376.90(5 
3.604.929 
5.367.451 
2.5S9.255 
3.6(55,792 
3.774,349 
3.848,183 
4.014.806 
4,179.815 
4.6*52,004 
5,229.834 



TOTAL LIQUORS. 



Values. 



$8,078,674 
9,302,487 
10.391.400 
13.733.WK 
7.911.309 
9.325,7 
9785,788 
10,190,946 
10,636.367 
10,938,790 
12.415,441 
13,552,416 



Ordinary 



$6,163.753 
6.663.656 
7.183,653 
9.253,341 
6.263,887 
7,156,564 
7,194.147 
7,402,243 
7,(563,244 
7,786,400 
8.518.0S1 
9,503,327 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 171 


Political Committees. 

1892 TO 1896. 


STATB. 


NATIONAL REPUBLICAN. 

Headquarters New York City. 
Chairman, Thomas H. Carter. 
Secretary, L. E. McComas. 
Treasurer, C. N. Bliss. 


NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC. 

Headquarters New York City. 
Chairman, William Harrity. 
Secretary, S. P. Sheerin. 
Treasurer, R. B. Roosevelt. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Alabama . . 


Wm.Youngblood.. . 
E. T. Hatch 
W. Griffith 
Powell Clayton 
M. H. DeYoung 
J. F. Saunders 
S. Fessenden 
B. J. Lay ton 
P. H. Carson 


Birmingham 
Sitka 


Henry D. Clayton . . . 
A. K. Delaney 
C. M. Shannon 
U.M. Rose 
M. F. Tarpey 
C. S. Thomas 
Carlos French 
L. C. Vandergrifth.. 
J. E. Norris 


Bufaula. 
Juneau. 
Clifton. 
Little Rock. 
Alameda. 
Denver. 
Seymour. 
Wilmington. 
Washington. 
Monticello. 
Atlanta. 
Blackfoot. 
Rock Island. 
Logansport. 
McAllister. 
Davenport. 
Leavenworth. 
Louisville. 
Rapides. 
Bath. 
Laurel. 
Boston. 
Detroit. 
St. Paul. 
Oxford. 
St. Louis. 
Helena. 
Lincoln. 
Virginia City. 
Franklin. 
New Brunswick. 
Albuquerque. 
Buffalo. 
Weldon. 
Graf ton. 
Lima. 
Oklahoma City. 
Portland. 
Philadelphia. 
Newport. 
Greenville. 
Rapids City. 
Memphis. 
Houston. 
Salt Lake City. 
Burlington. 
Sandy. 
Tacoma. 
Piedmont. 
Milwaukee. 
Saratoga. 


Alaska 


Arizona 
Arkansas 
California. 
Colorado 


Tucson 
Eureka Springs.. 
San Francisco 


Connecticut.. . 
Delaware 
Dist. Columbia. 
Florida 


Stamford 
Georgetown 
Washington 
St. Augustine 
Atlanta 
Salmon City 
Chicago 
Connersville 
Ardmore 


Georgia 
Idaho 
Illinois 
Indiana 
Indian Ter 
Iowa 


W. W. Brown 
George F. Shoup.... 
W.J.Campbell 
J N Huston 


Clark Howell, Jr.... 
F. W. Beane.... 
Ben. T. Cable 
S P Sheerin 


J S Hammer 


E.N. Allen 
J.J. Richardson 
Charles W. Blair .... 
Thomas H. Sherley. 


J. S. Clarkson 
Cyrus Leland, Jr 
Wm. C.Bradley.... 
Albert H Leonard. . 
J. H.Manlay 
James A. Gary 
W. M. Crane 
George L. Maltz.... 
R. G. Evans 


Kansas 
Kentucky 
Louisiana 


Leaven worth 
Lancaster 
Shreveport 


Maine 


Arthur Sewall 


Maryland 
Massachusetts.. 
Michigan 
Minnesota 
Mississippi 
Missouri 


Baltimore 
Dalton 
Detroit 
Minneapolis 
Vicksburg 
St. Louis 


A. P. Gorman 
Josiah Quincy 
D. J. Campau.. 
Michael Doran 


James Hill 


Charles B.Howry... 
John G. Prat her 
A. G. Davidson 
Tobias Castor 
R. P. Keating 
A. W. SullOway 
Miles Ross 


R. C. Kerens 
Alex. C.Botkin 
E. Rosewater 
Wm. E.Sharon 
P. C. Cheney 


Nebraska 
Nevada 


Helena 
Omaha 

Virginia City 
Concord 


New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New Mexico 


G. A. Hobart 
Thos. B. Catton 


Paterson 




N . B. Ferguson 


North Carolina. 
North Dakota . . 
Ohio 
Oklahoma Ter. . 
Oregon 
Pennsylvania. . . 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina.. 
South Dakota . . 
Tennessee 


Wm.A. Sutherland. 
Henry C. Cowles 
H. C. Hansbrough . . 
W. M. Hand 
C. M. Barnes 
Jos. C. Simon 
David Martin 
Isaac M. Potter 
E. M. Brayton 


Rocneste* 
States vi lie 
Devil's Lake.. .. 
Mansfield 
Guthrie 
Portland 
Philadelphia.. .. 
Providence 


W. F. Sheehan 
W. M. Ransom 
Wm. C. Leistikow. . . 
Calvin S. Brice 
T. M, Richardson.... 
E. D. McKee 
William F. Harrity.. 
S. R. Honey 
M. D. Donaldson 
J. M. Woods 


A. B. Kittredge 
Geo. W. Hill.. 


Sioux Falls 
Dandridge 
Galveston 
Wheeling 
Manchester 
Petersburg 
Tacoma 
Wheeling 
Milwaukee 
Cheyenne 


H. Cummings 


Utah 


N.W. Cuney 
0. J.Salisbury 
Mason S. Coburn.... 
Wm. Mahone 


0. T. Holt 
S.A. Merritt 
B. B. Smalley 
B. B. Gordan 
H. C. Wallace 


Vermont 
Virginia 
Washington 

West Virginia.. 


Nelson Bennett 
N. B. Scott 
Henry C. Payne 
J. M. Carey 


John Sheridan 


Wyoming 


B.C. Wall 
Wm. L. Kuykendall. 


STATE. 


NA TIONAL PR OHIBITION. 

Headquarters New York City. 
Chairman Samuel Dickie. 
Vice-Chairman John P. St. John. 
Secretary W. T. Wardwell. 
Treasurer -8. D. Hastings. 


NATIONAL PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

Headquarters St. Louis. 
Chairman H. E. Taubeneck. 

Va^at ,,-iea i J- H . TumCP. 

Secretaries } L j McPar i in . 
Treasurer M.. C. Rankin. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Alabama 
Arkansas 


J.C.Orr 
L. F. Whitten 

Geo. C. Christian. ..'. 


Hartsell 
Jasper 

Eureka Springs. 


John F.Ware 
J. C. Manning 
Geo. F. Gaither 
U. W. Dollison 
J.M. Pittman 
E.R.Ray 


Birmingham. 
Birmingham. 
Walnut Grove. 
Rector. 
Prescott. 
Eureka Springs. 





172 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


NATIONAL COMMITTEES-CONTINUED. 


STATE. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Name. 


Residence. 




Chauncey H.Dunn.. 
esse Yarnell 


acramento 
Loa Angeles 

'ueblo 
Denver 

Hartford 
East Hampton... 


H. R. Shaw 


Warm Springs. 
irimes. 
,os Angeles. 
Montrose. 
'ueblo. 
Denver. 
Hartford. 
Seymour. 
Naugatuck. 

Vasbington. 
Washington. 
Washington. 
Molino. 
Seville. 
)cala. 
jaGrange. 
"hompson. 
Cameron, 
i'armington. 
Weiser. 
Shoshone. 
Marshall. 
Chicago, 
'ittsfleld. 
^rre Haute. 
Fountaintown. 
)elphi. 
tfarshalltown. 
Mystic. 
Sargeant's Bluff. 
England. 
}lay Center. 

Marion. 
Carlisle. 
Scott's Station. 
Pineville. 
Grand Cane< 
Welsh. 
Rockland. 
Ellsworth. 
Augusta. 
Hyattsville. 
Woodstock. 
?ederalsburg. 
Boston, 
^harlestown. 
Danvers. 
Petersburg. 
Schoolcraft. 
Detroit. 
Hastings. 
Sauk Center. 
Minneapolis. 
Batesville. 
Crystal Springs. 
Pontotoc. 
Butler. 
Tarkie. 
Shelbina. 
Butte City. 
Glendive. 
Helena. 
Stromsburg. 
Sidney. 
Omaha. 

Concord. 

Bridgeton. 
New York City. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lockport. 
New York City. 
Nunda. 
Madison. 
Asheville. 


Colorado 
Connecticut 

)elaware 
Dist. Columbia.. 

Florida.. 


esse Poundstone. . . 
E. M. Hamilton 
. G. Berry 
. A. Wayland 
)r. Alex. Coleman. . 
Robert Pyne 
Alford S. Hough ton. 
I.C.Baldwin 
Vacant. 
Lee Crandall 
Annie L. Diggs 
Dr. T. A. Bland 
. S Harvey 


. J. Keator 
H. E. Singletary 

Allen B. Lincoln 
Henry B. Brown 

j. H. Register 
H. B. Moulton 
amuelH. Walker.. 

P. A. Duckworth .... 

Sam W. Small. D. D.. 
Frank J. Si bley 

W. Th os. Smith 

as. B. Hobbs 
D.H. Harts 

Mrs. H. M. Gougar. . 
John Ratliff 

R. M. Dihel . . . 
S. A. Gilley 

John P St John 


Washington 
Washington 

Orlando 
Atlanta 


Georgia 


P.L.Jenkins 

\ H. Lytle . . 


. H. Turner 


Idaho 


Demorest 
daho Falls 

Chicago . 


.H.Ellington 
. F. Brown 
A.T.Lane 
.H.Anderson 
D. R. Munro.. . 


Illinois 


I. E. Taubeneck.. . 
Eugene Smith 
. D.Hess 
M C Rankin 




Lincoln 




Marion. 

Vashington 
Marengo 


3. A. Robinson 
rrazier Thomas 
W.H. Calhoun 
W. S. Scott 
A. J. Westf all 




S. H. Snyder 
W.D.Vincent 
J. w. Layburn 


Kentucky 
Louisiana 
Maine 


M. V.B.Bennett.... 

. W. Sawyer 
Rev. Dr. Young 

John N. Pharr 
J.A.Parker 


Columbus 

jouisville 
Millersburg 

Berwick 
Baton Rouge 

Bangor 
Auburn 


A. H.Cardin 
J.G.Blair 
T. B. Scott . 


G. W. Bruce 
T. J. Guise 
I. J. Mills..., 


Volney B. Cushing. . 
N. F. Woodbury 

Sdwin Higgins 
Levin S. Melson 

Jas. H. Roberts 
Aug. R. Smith . 


H S Hobbs 


Maryland 
Massachusetts.. 
Michigan 


Henry Betts 
5. W. Boynton 
N. A. Dunning 
M.G.Elzey 
3.8. Heffon 
G. F. vVashburn 
E G Brown 


Baltimore 
Bishopville 

Cambridge 


Samuel Dickie 
Albert Dodge 

W. J.Dean 
J. P. Pinkham. . 


Albion 
Grand Rapids.... 

Minneapolis 
Minneapolis 

Columbus 


:*eter Gardener 
J.O.Zabel 
H. I.Allen 
Ed. S. Greece 
[gnatius Donnelly.. . 
K. Halverson 
H. B. Martin 


Minnesota 
Mississippi 
Missouri 
Montana 


J.McCaskill 
John A. Brooks 
E.M.Gardner 
C. E. Bentley 


G. W. Dyer..., 


Kansas City 
Bozeman 

Lincoln 
Norfolk 

Reno 
Lancaster 
Nashua. 
Montclair 
Haddonfleld 

New York 
Troy 


T.J. Millsap 
N.J.Bradford 
M.V.Carroll 
A.. Rozelle 


D. M. Gooch 
C. W.Hanscon 
J.W.Allen 


Nebraska 

Nevada 
N. Hampshire. 

New Jersey 
New York 
N.Carolina 


J. H. Boucher 
L. D. Chamberland. 
L. C. Stockton 
V. O. Strickler 
Vacant. 
L. B. Porter 

John Wilcox 
J. R. Buchanan 
John W.Hayes 
L. J. McParlin 
E -A. Hicks 


F.P. Wigton 

E.W.Taylor 
D. C.Babcock 
J.M.Fletcher 
Robt.J.S. White... 
W. H. Nicholson . . . 

Wm.T. Ward well.. 
H. Clay Bascom.... 

J. A. Stikeleather. . 
T. P.Johnson 


Olin... 
Salisbury 


L. C.Roberts 
W. R.Lindsay 
Thos. B. Long 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 173 


NATIONAL COMMITTEES-CONTINUED. 


STATB. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Name. 


Residence. 


North Dakota.. 
Ohio 


3. E. Saunders 
H H Mott 


Jamestown 
Graf ton. 


WalterMuir 
W. T. McCulloch 
H.Michaelson 
3ugo Pryer 
M. W. Wilkins 


3unter. 
Jessie. 
Bismarck. 
Cleveland. 
Cincinnati. 
Wellston. 
Suthrie. 
Sdmond. 
Dover. 
Portland. 
Gold Hill. 
Le Grande. 
Danville, 
tfew Castle. 
Washington. 

Huron. 

Webster, 
tledwood. 
Memphis. 
Memphis. 
Nashville. 
Comanche. 
San Antonio. 
Sulphur Springs. 

Belona. 
Brandon. 
Bland C. H. 
Pullman. 
Seattle. 
Tacoma. 
Parkersburg. 
Clarksburg. 
Terra Alto. 
Milwaukee.. 
Viroqua. 
Superior. 
Rock Creek. 


L.B.Logan 


Alliance 
Cincinnati 




Mrs. M. M. Brown. . . 




J.C.H.Cobb 
P. O. Cassidy .. 


Oregon 


Mrs. N.S. Dygert.... 
I. H. Amos 

A. A. Stevens 
S. W. Murray 

G. H. Slade 
Thos. H. Peabody... 
J. F. Prince 
A. R.Cornwall 
H. H. Roser 

Jas. A. Tate 


Portland 


P. M. Gilbert 


B. F.Mauk 


Joe Waldrop 
J. W.Marksberry.... 
Chas E Fitch 


Pennsylvania. . . 

Rhode Island.... 

S. Carolina 
S.Dakota 

Tennessee 


Portland 


Tyrone 
Milton 

Providence ; 
Westerly 
Columbia 
Aberdeen 
Watertown 

Fayettville 


V. A.Letier 
Jed H. Leslie . 


J. B. Aikin 


Vacant. 

Vacant. 
A.. Wardall 


A.M.Allen 
Fred Zipp 


W. F. Gwynne 
W. E. Wilkes 
L K Taylor 




A. D. Reynolds 

James B. Cranflll.... 
E. C Heath 


Bristol 

Waco 
Rockwall 


Thos. Gaines 
R. W. Coleman 
J.H. Davis 


Vermont 
Virginia 

Washington 
West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 


C. W. Wyman 


Brattleboro 
St. Johnsbury . . . 
Staunton 
Staunton 

Seattle 


Vacant. 
J. H. Hobson 


W.T.Stafford 
W. W.Gibbs 
J.W.Newton 

E. B. Suttoit 


S. H. Newberry 
C. W. Young 
M.F.Knox 
D. B. Hanna 
S. H. Piersol 


D. G. Strong, D, D. . . 
T. R. Carskadon 


Walla WaUa 
Keyser 


Frank Burt 

Samuel D. Hastings. 
E. W. Chafln../ 


Mannington 
Madison 


Jno. E. Staley 
N. W. Fitzgerald.... 
Robt. Schilling 
C.M.Butt 
Henry O'Brien 
Wm. Taylor 


Waukesha 
Laramie 


O. S. Jackson 


M. J. Waage 


Laramie , 


CHAIRMEN OF STATE COMMITTEES. 


STATE. 


REPUBLICAN. 


DEMOCRATIC. 


Name. 


Address. 


Name. 


Address. 


Alabama 
Arkansas 
California 
Colorado 
Connecticut 
Delaware 
Florida 


R. A. Moseley. Jr.... 
Henry M. Cooper... 
F. H. Myers 
W. H. Griffith 
H. E. Benton 
James H. Wilson. . . 
Dennis Egan 
A. E. Buck 
t.dgar Wilson 
James H. Clark 
J. K. Goudv 
James E. Blythe... 
J M. Simpson 
John W. Yerkes.... 


Montgomery 
Little Rock 
San Francisco 
Denver 
New Haven 
Wilmington 
Jacksonville 
Atlanta 


A.G. Smith 
J. W. House 
Max Popper. 


Montgomery. 
Little Rock. 
San Francisco. 
Denver, 
tligganum. 
^eaford. 
Tampa. 
Atlanta. 
Boise City. 
Monmouth. 
Indianapolis. 
Fail-field, 
lola. 
New Castle. 
Baton Rouge. 
Alfred. 
Laurel. 
Boston. 
Detroit. 
St. Paul. 


Frank P. Arbuckle. . 
Clinton B. Davis 
W. H. Stevens 
S. M. Sparkman 
W.Y.Atkinson 
Phil.Tillinghast.... 
DelosP. Phelps.... 
Thomas Taggart.... 
[Charles D. Fullen.. 
W. C. Jones 
John Carroll 
John S. Lanier 
John B. Donovan... 
Barnes Compton 
Josiah Quincy 
Daniel J. Campau.. 
Lewis Baker 


Georgia 


Boise City 


Illinois . . 




Indiana 


Indianapolis 
Des Moines 
Topeka 
Danville 


Kansas 
Kentucky 
Louisiana 
Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts. 
Michigan 
Minnesota 


J.H. Manley 
Harry M. Clabaugh. 
E. S. Draper 
James McMillan 
Robert Jamison 


Augusta 
Baltimore 
Boston 
Detroit 


St. Paul 



174 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


CHAIRMEN OF STATE COMMITTEES.-COXTIXUED. 


STATE. 


Name. 


Address. 


Name. 


Address. 


Mississippi 
Missouri 


J.M. Matthews.... 
J. H. Bothwell 
Lee Mantle. 

A V. <~!su1v ... 




Q O Eckford 


Aberdeen. 
St. Louis. 
Butte City. 
Omaha. 
Virginia City. 
Manchester. 
Trenton. 
Troy. 
Raleigh. 
Fargo. 
Lima. 
Portland. 
Allentown. 
Providence. 
Yankton. 
Laurens. 
Waco. 
Nashville. 

Chariot tesville. 
Tacoma. 
Charleston. 
Milwaukee. 
Cheyenne. 


Sedalia 
Butte City 
St PauL 


C.C.Maffltt 
W. R. Kenyon , 


Montana 
Nebraska 


Euclid Martin 
John H.Dennis 
John P. Bartlett..... 
Allen L. McDennott 
Edward Murphy, Jr. 
F. M. Simmons 
D.W.Maratta 
C D Crites 


Vevada K Ktrnthp-r 


Virginia City 
Concord 


N. Hampshire.. 
New Jersey 
New York 
North Carolina. 
North Dakota... 
Ohio 


S. S. Jewett 


Franklin Murphy... 
William Brookfield.. 
J B Eaves 




New York City.. 
Statesville 
Fargo 
Columbus 
Portland 
Philadelphia 
PawtUQket. . 


B. F.Spalding 
Charles W.F. Dick.. 
W.L Boise 


Oregon 


D. R. Murphy 
J. Marshall Wright. 
Franklin P. Owen. . . 
Otto A. Peemiller . . . 
J. L. M. Irby 
Walter S. Baker 
W. H. Carroll 

Basil B.Gordon 
Henry Drum 
William E. Chilton.. 
IE C Wall 


Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island . . 
South Dakota.. 
South Carolina. 
Texas 


Frank Reeder 
A. K.Goodwin 
J.M. Green... 


Chamberlain 
Orangeburg 
Fort Worth 
Nashville 
Barton 
Petersburg 
Tacoma : 
Wheeling 
Milwaukee I 


B.A.Webster 
N B Moore 


Tennessee 


J. W. Baker 
F.W.Baldwin 
William Mahone.... 
P.C.Sullivan 
W.M. O. Dawson.... 
H C Thorn 


Virginia 


Washington 
West Virginia. . 
Wisconsin 


Wyoming 


Willis Van Devanter 
T. J. Wolfley 
J.P.Jones 


Cheyenne 
Pho3mx 

Hennessy.. 


A.L. New 


Oklahoma.. .. 


Utah 


C. W. Bennett 


Salt Lake Citv... 


STATE 


PROHIBITION. 


PEOPLE'S. 


Name 


Address. 


Name. 


Address. 


Alabama 


Benjamin W. Eddy. 
W. W. Wallace 
J.M. Glass 


Birmingham 
Little Rock. 


George F. Gaither. . 
Thomas Fletcher... 
E. M. Wardall 


Walnut Grove. 
Little Rock. 
Monrovia. 
Denver. 
Hartford. 

Jacksonville. 
Atlanta. 
Boise City. 
Milton. 
Arcana. 
Des Moines. 
Enterprise. 
Frankfort. 
New Orleans. 
Rockland. 

Greenville. 
Forestville. 
Pontotoc. 
Butler. 
Butte. 
Lincoln. 

Raleigh. 
Niagara. 
Canton. 
Portland. 
Indiana. 

Huron. 
Nashville. 
Fort Worth. 

Richmond. 
Tacoma. 
Parkersburg. 

Sundance. 


Arkansas 
California 


Pasadena 


Colorado 
Connecticut 
Delaware .... 




Dr. A. Coleman 
Robert Pyne 


Allen B.Lincoln.... 
C. H. Register 
E. H. Padget 


Hartford 
Smyrna 
Palatka 


Col. S.S.Harvey.... 
M. D. Irwin 
D. L. Badley 
William Hess 
Joshua Strange 
R.G. Scott 
J W. Breidenthal... 
Barry South 
T A Clayton 


Florida 


Georgia . . . 


Dr. J. O. Perkins 
N.H.Clark 
George W.Gere 
Dr. Homer J. Hall.. . 
Isaac T. Gibson 
Dr. W.J.Newton.... 
E. J.Polk 
John N. Pharr 


Atlanta 
Idaho Falls 
Champaign 
Franklin 


i dans. .:::::::.. 

Illinois 
Indiana 
Iowa, 


Salem 
Ottawa 
Louisville- 


Kansas 


Kentucky 
Louisiana 
Maine .. 


Berwick 


Volney B. Gushing. . 
Edwin Higgins 
\V. H. Partridge 
Charles P.Russell.. 
W. M. Lawrence 
Henry Ware 
D. Ward Kins.... 


Bangor 


H S.Hobbs 


Maryland 
Massachusetts- 
Michigan 


Baltimore 


Dr. A.N.Nichols.... 
Thomas J. Meighen. 
C. W. Bolton 
M.V.Carroll 
T. B. Sullivan 
George W.Blake.. . 

S. Otho Wilson 
William Barry 
H. F. Barnes 


Boston 

Detroit 


Minnesota 
Mississippi. 
Missouri 


Minneapolis 
Pass Christian... 
Maitland 
Bpzeman 


Montana !C. C- Fuller 
Nebraska .. .'A. Roh*rt 


Nevada 


Jacob Stiner 
J.M.Fletcher 
Robert J. S. White.. 
F E Baldwin 


Reno 
Nashua 


N.Hampshire.. 
New Jersey 
New York 


New York City.. 
Elmira 


North Carolina. 
North Dakota.. 
Ohio 
Oregon 
Pennsylvania . . 
Rhode Island.. 
South Dakota.. 
Tennessee 
Texas 


Edwin Shaver 
E. E. Saunders 
L. B. Logan 
G. M.Weister 
H. D. Patton 
H. S. Woodworth.... 
J. A. Lucas 


Salisbury 
Jamestown 
Alliance 


Portland 


W. II. Galvini 
R. A. Thompson .... 

A. L. Peterman 
J. H. McDowell 
H. S. P. Ashby 

C. H. Piereon 
S. L-Herren 
S. H. Piersol 

W. R. Richardson... 


Lancaster 
Providence 
Watertown .... 
Nashville 
Rockwall 
Vergennes 
Staunton 
Seattle 
Wheeling 
Madison 1 
Uva ' 


Geo. W. Armistead.. 
E.C. Heath 
F. H. Shepard.... 


Vermont 


Virginia 
Washington 
West Virginia. . 
Wisconsin 
1 Wvoming 


W.W. Gibbs 
Clark Davis 


N W. Beck 


Prof. C. F. Cronk.... 
Rev. D. T,. Rader 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 175 


CHAIRMEN OF COUNTY COMMITTEES-ILLINOIS. 


COUNTY. 


REPUBLICAN. 


DEMOCRATIC. 


Name. 


Address. 


Name. 


Address. 


Adams 
Alexander 
Bond 


T.M.Rogers 
John F. Rector 


Quincy 
Cairo 


C.S.Hearn 
Reed Green 


Quincy. 
Cairo. 
Belvidere. 
Greenville. 
Versailles. 
Princeton. 
Hardin. 
Savanna. 
Virginia. 
Champaign. 
Taylorvifle. 
Marshall. 
Louisville. 
Carlyle. 
Charleston. 
Chicago. 
Robinson. 
Toledo. 
Malta. 
Clinton. 
Tuscola. 
Downer's Grove. 
Paris. 
Albion. 
Altamont. 
Vandalia. 
Paxton. 
Canton. 
Benton. 
Shawneetown. 
Whitehall. 
Morris. 
McLeansboro. 
Carthage. 
Elizabethtown. 
Biggsville. 
Kewanee. 
Watseka. 
Murphysboro. 
Newton. 
Mount Vernon. 
Jerseyville. 
Galena. 
Vienna. 
Batavia. 
Kankakee. 
Yorkville. 
Galesburg. 
Waukegan. 
Ottawa. 
Bridgeport. 
Amboy. 
Pontiac. 
Lincoln. 
Decatur. 
Macomb. 
Woodstock. 
Bloomington. 
Carlinville. 
Edwardsville. 
Foxville. 
Varna. 
Havana. 
Metropolis. 
Petersburg. 
Aledo. 
Waterloo. 
Hillsboro. 
Jacksonville. 
Sullivan. 
Oregon. 
Peoria. 
Pinckneyville. 
Monticello. 
Pittsfleld. 
Golconda. 
Mound Citv. 


C N Smith 


Boone 


D. D. Sabin 
JohnC. Rickey 
Josiah H.Henderson 
L A DeLong 


Belvidere 
VIount Sterling... 
Princeton 
Gilead 
Shannon 
Beardstown 
Champaign 
Taylorville 
Marshall 
lola 


M.M. Sharp 
B.L.Rowland 
John H.Bryant 
Chas. Watson 
W.W. Haven 
John Dirreen 




Bureau 
Calhoun 


Sarroll 
ass 
Champaign 
Christian 
Clark 
Clay . . . 


1. B. Parkinson 
C. B. Jones 
F. K. Robeson 
J.R. Smith 
W.L.Athon 
H E Watson 


J. R. Trevett 
T.F.Russell 
W. A. Snipe 
O. C.Gaston 
J. J. McGaffigan. . . 
W.M.Ashmore. . . 
Walter S. Bogle. . . 
E. E. Newlin 
Jeff. Tossey 
B. B. Smiley 
J.C.Myers 


Clinton 


John J. Randall 
William Burgess .... 
D. H. Kochersperger 
Alfred H. Jones 
C. Hanker 
F. B.Stephenson 
R. A. Lemon 
A.C.Sluss 
T.M.Hull 
Hiram Sycan 
H.J. Strawn 
JbhnR. Snook 
D.M.Clark 
P A Coal 


Carlvlc 
Mattoon 


Coles 


Cook 


Chicago 


Crawford.. .... 
Cumberland 
DeKalb 


Robinson 
Toledo 
Sycamore 
Clinton 
Tuscola 
Wheaton 


DeWltt 
Douglas 
DuPage 
Edgar 


M. B. Downer 
H S Tanner 


Paris 
Albion 
Altamont 
Vandalia 
Gibson City 


Edwards 
Efflngham 
Fayette 
Ford 


H. T. Dwyer 
T. G. Boyer 
J.H.Webb 


Franklin 
Fulton 


E Dillon 


M Walker 


P. J. Kinney 
Tesse B. Bartley 
E A Doolittle 


Vermont 
Shawneetown 
Carrolton 
Morris 
McLeansboro 
Carthage 
Elizabethtown.. 
Oquawka 
Cambridge 
Watseka 
Murphysboro 
Newton 
Mount Vernon.. 
Jerseyville 
Galena 


D. M. Browning 
W.R. McKernon.... 
J C Bowman .... 


Gallatln 


Greene 


Grundy 
Hamilton 
Hancock 


C.M.Stephen 
J. F.Anderson 
J. MackSholl 
H. M. Windets 


E. L. Clover 
R. B. Cully 
J.F.Scott 
W.R. Martin 
Thos. N. Baird 
E.D.Mayhew 
VV. H.Harry 
I.W.Andrews 
B. F.Harrah. 
A. C. Tanner 
D. J Murphy 
C. Scheerer 


Hardin 


Henderson 
Henry 
Iroquois 
Jackson 


B. A. Hail 
A. R. Mock 
John S. Dai-rough . . . 
Robert J.McElvain. 
Otis Yelvington 
S.H.Watson 
J. H. Duffield 


Jasper 


Jefferson 
Jersey 


Jo Daviess 


J.B.Ginn 
W. Y.Smith 
M. O. Southworth.. 
T. Frank Leonard. . . 
W. R.Newton 
W. F. Inness 
D.L.Jones 
Henry W.Johnson.. 
H. B. Andrews 
Dr. T. H. Stetler 
A McKay 


Vienna 


T B Powell 


Kane 


John Miller 


Kankakee 
Kendall 
Knox 
Lake 
LaSalle 
Lawrence 
Lee 
Livingston. 


Kankakee 
Yorkville 
Galesburg 


C. F. Smith 
William Crimmins. . 
A. J. Ostrander 
J. H. Quinlan 
J. F. Reed 


Waukegan 
Ottawa 
Lawrenceville .. 
Paw Paw 


W. B. Finley 
G. E. Young 
W. E. Baker 
T. T. Beach 
H. C. Montgomery . . 
H. R. Bartleson 
J . A. Duffleld 


Logan 


R C Maxwell 


Lincoln 
Decatur 


Macon 
McDonough 
McHenry 
McLean 


R. P.Lytle 
E. O. Cole 


L.T Hoy.' : 
A. T. Barnes 
W. B. Dugger 
C. N.Travous 
J. D.Telford 
H.J. DuPue 
I. R. Brown 
D. W. Hellem 
Frank E. Blane 
J. S. Cummins 
John Moeller 


Woodstock 


Bloomington 


J. J. Pitts 


Macoupin 
Madison 
Marion .... 


Carlinville 
Edwardsville 
Salem 
Lacon 
Havana 
Metropolis 
Petersburg 
Aledo 


F. W. Burton 
W. R. Prickett 
J.W.Finn 
S. A. Stateler 
J. Hartsell 
F. A. Truesdale 
H. M. Levering 
G. C. Scott 


Marshall 
Mason 
Massac 


Menard 


Mercer 
Monroe 
Montgomery 
Morgan 
Moultrie 


Waterloo 
Hillsboro 


D.M. Hardy 
B. A. Hendricks 
P. P. Thompson 
I. J. Martin 


S. H. McLean 
John A. Ayers 
J. A. Gregory 
H. A. Smith 
Isaac Taylor 
A.H. Evans 
Seymour Marquiss. . 
A. G. Crawford 
A. W. Walker 
E.W. McClelland.... 


Jacksonville 
Lovington 
Oregon 


Ogle 


J.C.Seyster 
P F Harmon 


Peoria 
Perry 
Platt 


Peoria 
Tamarga 
Deland .... 


C. R. Hawkins 
F. V. Dilatush 
Ed. Doocy 


Pike 
Pope 


Pittsfleld 


Golconda 
Mound Citv 


J.R. Smith 


Pulaskl 


F. Schoenfleld 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



ILLINOIS. -CONTINUED. 



COUNTY. 



Name. 



Address. 



Name. 



Address. 



Putnam 

Randolph 

Richland 

Rock Island . 

St. Clair 

Saline 

Sangamon . . 

Schuyler 

Scott 

Shelby 

Stark 

Stephenson.. 

Tazewell 

Union 

Vermilion 

Wabash 

"Warren 

Washington.. 

Wayne. 

White 

Whiteside.... 

Will 

Williamson... 
Winnebago... 
Woodford. . . 



J.B.Albert 

James L. Skelly 

R.T.Fry 

B. C. Keator 

Chas. Becker 
James E. Jobe. . 
George N. Black 
F. A. Warden... 
John B. Myer... 

W.H.Reem 

James Kinney 

James Musser 

J. Merriam... 

David R. Sanders.. . 

W. R. Jewell 

Thomas Stone 

Edgar McDill 

H. N. Renter 

R.D.Adams 

Ross Graham 

Frank D. Ramsay. . 

H.N.Snap 

J.C.Mitchell 

S. N. Jones 

E. A.Wilcox... 



Florid 

Sparta 

Olney 

Rock Island.... 

Belleville 

Harrisburg 

Springfield 

Rushville 

Winchester.... 

Shelby ville 

Toulon 

Orangeville 

Atlanta 

Jonesboro 

Danville 

Mount Carmel. 

Monmouth 

Nashville 

Fail-field 

Carmi 

Morrison 

Joliet 

Marion 

Rockford 

Minonk 



J. H. Seaton 

E. B. McGuire 

H.G.Morris 

T. S. Silvis 

R. D. W. Holder. . 
W. A. Berry 
R. M. Ridley... 
George Dyson.. 

J. H. Dyer 

W. E. Walker. 

P.M. Blair 

Fred J. Kunz. . 
Thos. Cooper.. 
W. C. Lence.... 
Jno. Beard. 
Samuel Seitz... 

J. H.Pattee 

David Luhe., 

AdamRinard 

R. L. Organ 

H.B.Wilkinson.. 

Jno. Arnold 

W. H. Warder 

C. M. Have* 

Thomas Cribben. 



.. Hennepm. 
..Sparta. 
..Olney. 
.. Rock Island. 
.. Belleville. 
.. Harrisburg. 
.. Springfield. 
.. Rushville. 
.. Winchester. 
.. Shelby ville. 
.. Toulon. 
. . Freeport. 
.. Pekin. 
.. Jonesboro. 
. . Danville. 
. . Mount Carmel. 
.. Monmouth. 
.. Nashville. 
Fairfield. 
.. Carml. 
.. Morrison. 
.. Lockport. 
.. Marion. 
. . Rockford. 
...El Paso. 



COUNTY. 



Adams 

Alexander .. 

Bond 

Boone 

Brown 

Bureau 

Calhoun 

Carroll 

Cass 

Champaign.. 
Christian.... 
Clark 

Hay 

linton 

oles 

look 

Crawford 
Cumberland. 

DeKalb 

DeWitt 

Douglas 

DuPage 

Edgar 

Edwards 
Emngham... 

Fayette 

Ford 

Franklin .... 

Fulton 

Gallatin 

Greene 

Grundy 

Hamilton .. 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Henderson. 

Henry 

Iroquois 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jefferson 

Jersey 

Jo Daviess. . 

Johnson 

Kane 

Kankakee.. . 

Kendall 

Knox 

Lake 

LaSalle 

Lawrence... 



PROHIBITION. 



Name. 



Lucien Cover 
vl. Easterday.... 
Wm.N. Donnell. 

G. F. Winne 

John A. Bond 

E. S. Phelps 

A. C.Wilson.... 
T.M. Glotfelty... 
3. H. Petefish... 
J. B. McKinley 
Wm. H. Dalby.. 
Jacob S. Lycan. 

J.C.Craig 

rid win Case 

Albert Button. . 
Rev. H. S. Taylor 
J. L. Buchanan. 
J. B. Cartmill... 

H.P. Hall 

W.H. McFarland 

A. C. Wiseman 

B. Loveless 

L. L. Snedeker... 
Wm. Lankford.. 



Henrv B. Keplev Effingham 

J. D. Collins Vandalia . 

Jennings 

A. T. McGuire. 
W. R. Bonham 

L. L.Orr 

John Kaser 

Wm.A.Walley 

J.C. Asher 

T.H.Gillis 

John Erwood.. 
Marvin McKim 
P. E. Walline. . 
G. B. Winters.. 
J. L. Meads.... 
J. W. Honey... 

C. C. Hoit 

J. H. Belt 

W. S. Smith.... 
James Slack 



A. M. C. Todson. 



Address. 



Quincy. 

Cairo. 

Greenville. 

Belvidere. 

Mounts terling 

Princeton. 

Batchtown. 

Lanark. 



Yir 
Chi 



ginia. 



Champaign. 

Taylorville. 

Marshall. 

lola. 

Carlyle. 

Hutton. 

Englewood. 

Duncanville. 

Toledo. 

Sycamore. 

Clinton. 

Camargo. 

Wheaton. 

Paris. 

Bone Gap. 



COUNTY. 



Piper City. 

Benton. 

Ipava. 

Snawneetown 

Carrollton. 

Morris. 

McLeansboro. 

Bowen. 

Elizabethtown 

Disco. 

Cambridge . 

Onarga. 

Ava. 

Newton. 

Mount Vern on 

Jerseyville. 

Pleasant Val'y 

Vienna. 



Elgin. 



E.E.Day Kankakee. 

John Fitzgerald. Yorkville. 
A. D. Metcalf . . . . Oneida. 

L. B. Morse Liberty ville. 

J. H. Morphia.... Grand Ridge. 
iSamuel England Lawrenceville 



Lee 

Livingston.. 

Logan 

Macon 

Macoupin 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Mason 

McDonough.. 
McHenry... 

I McLean 

|Menard 

Mercer 

Monroe 
Montgomery. J 

Morgan 

Monltrie 

Ogle 

Peoria 

Perry 

Piatt 

Pike 

Pope 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Richland 

Rock Island. . 

St. Clair 

Saline 

Sangamon.. . . 

Schuyler 

Scott 

Shelby 

Stark 

Stephenson. 

Tazewell 

Union 

Vermilion 

Wabash 

Warren 

Washington- 
Wayne 

White 

Whiteside.... 

Will 

Williamson.. 
Winnebago . . 
Woodford.... 



PROHIBITION. 



Name. 



ighby Ta 



. A. Lawton 
William Estes... 
Dr.W.W.Houser) 
W C. Outten... 

J.C.Abbott 

L. C. Springer 
W. H. Young... 

D. M. Dunlap... 
G. C. McFadden. 
L. F. Gumbart.. 

E. B. Smith 

J. R. Haldeman 

A. G. Hurd 

R. M. Pinkerton 
John Anderson. 

. R. Glenn 

J. Y. Lambert. 

C. A. Smith 

F.W.March. .. 
Stephen Martin. 

L. Willou 
S. B. Priestly. 
Wm. H. Dean... 
J. D. Feezer 

E. D. Trover 
Henry Gardner. 

R. H. Gault 

H. R. Bullard... 

H. L. Bullen 

W. Harding 

W. R.Tate 

J. F. Fagan 

Dr. J. N. Speed. 
W.W.Pontius.. 

J.T. Killam 

J. M. Jones 

T. D. Wilcoxon. 
D.W.Puterbaugh 

Wm. Rhodes 

Hiram Wood 
Wm. H. Hughes 
R. H. Riggle.... 

T. A. Watts 

Silas Johnson 
3. M. Beck 

F. E.Andrews... 
H. E.Baldwin... 
F. M. Goodall.... 

R. J. Hazlett 

Carl Johann 



Address. 



Dixon. 

Pontiac. 

Lincoln. 

Decatur. 

Chesterfield. 

Edwardsville. 

Salem. 

Henry. 

Havana. 

Macomb. 

Ridgefleld. 

formal. 

Petersburg. 

Viola. 

Ames. 

Hillsboro. 

Jacksonville. 

Dalton City. 

Daysville. 

Peoria. 

.moroa. 
Bement. 
Sriggsville. 
Ozark. 
Mound City. 
Florid. 
Sparta. 
Olney. 
Moline. 
Lebanon. 
Eldorado. 
Springfield. 
Rushville. 
Alsey. 
Tower Hill. 
LaFayette. 
Freeport. 
Lilly. 
Anna. 
Danville. 
Mount Carmel 
Cameron. 
Nashville. 
Long Prairie. 
~armi. 
Sterling. 
Jo'iet. 
Marion. 
Rockford. 
Eureka. 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 177 


STATE 


CENTRAL COMMITTEES. 


ILLINOIS. 




DISTRICT. 


REPUBLICAN. 

Headquarters Chicago, 
Chairman-J. H. Clark. 
Secretary -T '. N. Jamieson. 
Treasurer E. G. Keith. 
At Large -Edward H. Morris, Chica- 
go; Houston Singleton, Decatur. 


DEMOCRATIC. 
HeadquartersChicago. 
Committee Not Organized. 
At Large Delos B. Phelps, Mon- 
mouth; Samuel B. Chase, Chicago; J. 
P. Mahony, Chicago; Thos. Gahan, 
Chicago; P. C. Haley, Joliet; Frank 
Flavell.Mt.Carmel; W. J. Broderick, 
East St. Louis. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 
2d , 


T. N. Jamieson 
James L. Monaghan 
J ames H. Burke . . . 
James Pease 
W. S. Frazier 


Chicago 
Chicago 


John P. Llendecker. 
William J. O'Brien.. 

C.F.Clark 
D. J. Hogan. . 


Chicago. 
Chicago. 

Chicago. 
Geneva. 
Freeport. 
Sterling. 
Streator. 
Watseka. 
Peoria. 
Rock Island. 
Pittsfleld. 
Taylorville. 
Decatur. 
Tuscola. 
Olney. 
Sullivan. 
Alton 
Mt. Vernon. 
Carbondale. 


3d 


Chicago 


4th 
5th 


Chicago. 


Aurora 
Rockf ord 
Sterling 
Ottawa 


6th 


Geo. S. Roper 
J. F.Utley 
Thos. C. Fullerton . 
J.B.Wilson 
I C Edwards 


Charles Nieman 
C. C. Johnson 
D. Heenan 


7th 
8th.. 


9th. . 


Hickman 


Edwin Beard 


10th 


Peoria 
Macomb 
Winchester 
Springfield 


Frank J. Quinn 
J. W.Potter 
E. F. Binns 


llth 


W.H. Mainline 
A. P.Grout 
Lincoln Dubois 
W. F. Calhoun 
James H.Clark 
A. H. Jones 
D M Clark 


12th 
13th 
14th 
15th. 


Wm. T. Vandener. . . 
Theodore Nelson 
W. B. Brinton 
W. F. Beck... 


Mattoon 
Robinson 
Vandalia 
East St. Louis. . . 


Ifith 
17th 


John H Baker 


18th 


J. B. Messick 
James S.Martin... , 
W.C. S.Rhea 


Lucas Pf eiffenberg'r 
Dr. Walter Watson . 
W.M.Barr 


19th 


20th 


Marion 


DISTRICT. 


PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters Champaign. 
Cf>.airmanGeo. W. Gere. 
Sees. A. H. Harnley, A. E. Wilson 
Treasurer J. B. Hobbs. 


PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

Headquarters Chicago. 
Chairman William Hess. 
Secretary D. B. Bird. 


Members. 


Address. 


|r Members. 


Address. 


1st. 


H. S. Taylor 

Wm.Bentley 
C L. Stevens 


Englewood 


Phil. Hawley.... 


Grand Crossing. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 

Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
Chicago. 
South Elgin. 
Geneva. 
Aurora. 
Milledgeville. 
Rockford. 
Hanover. 
Dixon. 
Dixon. 

Rockford. 
Warren. 
Cornell. 
Cornell. 
Cullom. 
Galesburg. 
Rapatee. 
Pratford. 
Macomb. 
Rushville. 
Aledo. 
Milton. 
Roodhouse. 
Versailles. 
Rosemond. 
Jacksonville. 
Springfield. 
Atlanta. 
Macon. 
Clinton. 


2d 


Chicago 
Chicago 


F J Schulte 


Robert H. Howe 
Vacant. 
J. G. Ogden 


3d 


4th 
5th 


J.B. Hobbs 
C. W. Bailey 
J. W. Hart 
F. E. Andrews 


Chicago : 
Geneva 
Rockf ord 
Sterling 

Streator 
Eureka 

Abingdon 


C. G. Dixon 


A.JW. Simpson 
D.B.Bird 
E. J. Lindholm 
Harry Cannavan 
V. W. Payton 
A. B. Alexander 
A. H. Shank 
S.H. Bashor 
Calvin Countryman. 
\. A. Hammond 
C. Eggleston 
C. C. Edwards 
J.C. Fusby 


6th 
7th 


8th 
9th 

10th 


E. L.Donagho 
W. H.Boies 

J. G. Evans 


Calvin Countryman. 
Charles Boon 


C.A. Windle 
A. N. McCord 


D. H. Harshburg .... 
Fohn Blane 
M. M. Johnson 
W. W.Searl 


llth 


L. F. Gumbart 
H.S. Wells 
R. H. Patton 
A. F. Smith 


12th 
13th 


Quincy 
Springfield 


E. W. Dace 
A. P. Petrie 
William Hess 


C. J.Crist 
William Perry 


J. W. McElroy 


14th 


Decatur 


Alex. Platte 
John Alsbary 


W. B. Stroud 
Thomas Davis 
G. W. Huffman 



178 CHICAGO DAILT NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


ILLINOIS. CONTINUED. 


DISTRICT. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


15th 

16th . . . 


Geo. W. Gere 

Hale Johnson 
H. B. Kepley 

A. J. Meek 


Champaign 
Newton 


John F. Boyer 
C. B. Fenton 


Kansas. 
Danville. 
Danville. 
Robinson. 
Nokomis. 
Womac. 
Vera. 
Collinsville. 
Waterloo. 
Nashville, 
Iron. 
Opdyke. 
Kinmundy. 
Campbell's Hill. 
Cairo. 
New Burnside. 


Jesse Harper 
J.O.Gordon 


17th 


Effingham 


A. J. Holcomb 
W.N.Culp 
John Boarz 


18th 
19th 


Marissa 


John Kramer 
T. J. McCaffrey 
G. W. Wickline 
James Cobbel 
DeWitt Anderson. . . 
James Tellford 
Thos. J. Cross 


McLeansboro 
St. Johns 


20th 


S.B.Evans 




P. J. Luby 


W. J.Casper 


INDIANA. 


. REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters Indianapolis. 
Chairman John K. Gowdy. 
Secretary-Y. M. Millikan. 
Treasurer Horace McKay. 
Executive Committee R. B. F. Pierce, Indianapolis; 
.T. B. Homan, Danville; W. T. Durbin, Anderson; 
Moses G. McLain, Indianapolis; W. W. Milford, In- 
dianapolis; George Knox, Indianapolis; George M. 
Young. Vincennes; A. P. Hendrickson, Indianapolis; 
E. H. Tripp, North Vernon; A. A. Winslow, Ham- 
mond. 


DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters Indianapolis. 
Chairman Thomas Taggart. 
Secretary J. L. Reiley. 
Treasurer J. R. Wilson. 
Executive Committee Charles L. 
Jewett, Samuel E. Morss, Charles B. 
Stuart, Anthony Stevenson, James H. 
Rice, James Murdock, Henry C. Berg- 
hoff, George W. Geiger, John E. Lamb. 
James L. Reach, August Kiefer; S. P. 
Sheerin, member national committee. 


DISTRICT. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


J. A. Hemenway 
J. C. Bilheimer 
S. E. Carter 
A. E. Nowlin 
Jesse Overstreet... . 
George W. Cromer 
C. S. Wiltse 
N.Filbeck 
C.C.Shirley 
Charley Harley... 
George Osborne. . . 
D N Foster 


Boonville 
Washington 
Seymour 
Lawrenceburg . . . 
Franklin 
Muncie 
Indianapolis 
Terre Haute 
Kokomo 
Delphi . . 


August Brentano 
Wm.M. Moss 
M. Z. Stannard 
W. H. O'Brien.... 
Willis Hickam .. . 


Evansville. 
Bloomfield. 
Jeffersonville. 
Lawrenceburg. 
Spencer. 
Union City., 
Indianapolis. 
Brazil. 
Frankfort. 
Rochester. 
Peru. 
Fort Wayne. 
South Bend. 


2d 


3d 
4th 

5th 


6th . . 


Charles Buchanan.. 
Thomas Taggart 
James M. Hoskins.. 
David F. Allen 
Henry A. Barnhart. 
Jerome Herff 
W. W. Rockhill 
Emmett F. Marshall 


7th 
8th 
9th 

10th 


llth 




12th 


Fort Wayne 
South Bend 


13th 


A. L. Brick 


PROHIBITION. 

Headquarters Indianapolis. 
Chairman Homer J. Hall. 
Secretary M.. E. Shiel. 
Treasurer A. W. Hilliker. 
At LargeMrs. Helen M. Gougar. Lafayette; Miss 
Mary Hadley, Bloomingdale; Mrs. Mary E. Balch, 
B'rankfort; Mrs. R. T. Brown, Indianapolis. 
Executive Committee Dr. Homer J. Hall. Franklin; F. 
T. We Whirter, Indianapolis; C. W. Culbertson, Shelby- 
vllle; Jos. P. Allen, Greencastle; A. L. Sharp, Ko- 
komo; Miss Mary Hadley, Bloomingdale. 


PEOPLE'S. 

Headquarters Indianapolis. 
Chairman Joshua Strange. 
Secretary Henry Vincent. 
Treasurer L. H. Johnson. 
Executive Committee J. Strange, 
Arcana; H. Vincent, Indianapolis; 
Lewis H. Johnson, Gessie. 


DISTRICT. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


James McCormick.. 
H. S. Bonsib 
W. S. Ferrier 


Princeton 
Vincennes 
Charlestown. ... 
Greensburg 
Greencastle 
Dalton 
Indianapolis. ... 
Bloomingdale ... 
Kokomo 
Idaville 
Wabash 
Fort Wayne 
Nappanee 


F. H. Thurman 
E. A. Riggins 


Grandview. 
Raglesville. 
Breckenridge. 
Osgood. 
Bud. 
New Castle. 
Indianapolis. 
Terre Haute. 
Tipton. 
Delphi. 
Arcana. 
Fort Wayne. 
South Bend. 


2d 


3d 


J. S. Pfrimer 
Theodore H. Hartley 
J.Y. Demaree 
W. W. Prigg 
Wm. Johnson 
J. P.Harrah 
A. G. Burkhart 
Frasier Thomas 
Joshua Strange 
George Japp 
J. Maughermar 


4th 


S.V. Wright 
Joseph P.Allen... . 
B. B. Beeson 
Robert Denny 
Daniel G. Carter.... 
A.L. Sharp 
J. H, McCulley 
David Frame 


5th 


6th . . 


7th... 


8th... 


9th 
10th ,. 
llth 


12th . 


B. B. Fowler 
Rev. G. S.V. Howard 


13th 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 179 


IOWA. 


DISTRICT. 


REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters Ties Moines. 
Chairman James E. Blythe. 
Secretary E. J. Salmon. 


DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters Des Moines 
Chairman C. D. Fullen. 
Secretary J. E. Seevers. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 




C. M. Junkin... 


Fairfleld 


Charles D. Fullen.... 
Fred A. Lischer 
J J Dunn 


Fairtield. 
Davenport. 
Dubuque. 
West Union. 
Garrison. 
Oskaloosa. 
Des Moines. 
Leon. 
Atlantic. 
Algona. 
Sheldon. 


2d 
3d 


J.M. Kemble 
W. H. Norris.... 


Muscatine 
Manchester. . 
Mason City... . 
Marshalltown . 
Newton 
Des Moines.. 
Centerville 
Atlantic 


J.B. Blythe 


T. R. Stam 
John I '.MI un 


5th 


J. G. Brown 


6th 
7th 


E. J. Salmon 
W. S. H.Matthews.. 
L C. Mechem 
N.N.Jones 
M. K. Whelan 
H.G. McMillen 


J.E. Seevers 
E.H. Hunter 
E. W. Curry 


8th 


9th 
10th 


Charles F. Chase.... 
James Taylor 


Estherville 
Rock Rapids 


nth 


Fletcher Howard 


DISTRICT. 


PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters Des Motnes. 
Chairman Isaac T. Gibson. 
Secretary R. S. Beall. 


PEOPLE'S PARTY. 

Headquarters Des Moines. 
Chairman R. G. Scott. 
Secretary J. Bellangee. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st .. 


Isaac T. Gibson 
Rev. S. A. Gilley .... 
C.H. Selleck 
C. R. McFariin 
H. D. Smith 
Rev. J. L. Scott. . .. 
Harmon Cook 
R S Beall 


Salem 
Marengo 


L.C. Elrick 
C. A. Dutton.. . . 
L. R. Ward.... 
John Mahara. 
L. S. Wood 
A. J. Blakeley 
J. Bellangee . . 
Capt. J. A. Ray... . 


Kilbourne. 
Calamus. 
Lament. 
Charles City. 
Marion. 
Grinnell. 
Des Moines. 
Van Wert. 
Glenwood. 
West Side. 
Merrill. 


2d 
3d 
4th 
5th 
6th 


Dows 


Burchinal 
Monticello 
Montezuma 
De Soto 
Mt. Ayr 


7th 

8th 


9th 


Rev A B. Banner. . 


Stuart 


J. B. LaChapelle.... 


10th. 
llth 


N. A. Evans 
J.Marshall Brown .. 


Glidden 


James Isbell 
C. W. Leekly 


Sioux City 


MICHIGAN. 


DISTRICT. 


REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters Detroit. 
Chairman James McMillan. 
Secretary V? . R. Bates. 
Treasurer G. S. Wright. 


DEMOCRATIC. 

Headquarters Detroit. 
Chairman D. J. Campau. 
Secretary F. H. Hosford. 
Treasurer Fred Marvin. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


H.M. Duffleld 
Charles Wright 


Detroit 


S Dow Elwood. 


Detroit. 
Detroit. 
Jackson. 
Hudson. 
Charlotte. 
Quincy. 
Allegan. 
Dowagiac. 
Grand Rapids. 
Holland. 
Fowlerville. 
Mason. 
Port Huron. 
Bad Axe. 
Caro. 
Owosso. 
Ludington. 
Manistee. 
Bay City. 
Cheboygan. 
Mt. Pleasant. 
LeKoy. 
Sault Ste. Marie. 
Menominee. 


2d 

3d 


Detroit . 


James H. Pound 
Clarence H. Bennett 
Orrin R. Pierce 
Samuel Robinson... 
Henry D. Pessell.... 
Rich'd L. Newnham. 
Frank W.Lyle 


H. A. Conant 
A. W.Smlth 
D. B. Ainger 


Monroe 


Adrian 


Charlotte 
Battle Creek 
Cassopolis 
Sturgis 
Grand Rapids 
Ionia 
Flint 
Pontiac 


4tn 


Fred. M. Wadleigh.. 
Harsen D. Smith .... 
F. W. Wait 
Wm. Aid en Smith... 
Geo. W.Webber 
H. R. Lovell 
F B Galbraith 


5th 


Thomas F. Carroll. . 
Geo. P. Hummer 
F. G. Rounsville 
Charles C. Casterlin. 
Hiel B. Buckeridge.. 
Frank W.Hubbard. 
Henry N. Montague. 
Wm. A.Woodard.... 
D. W. Goodenough. . 
Andrew J. Dovel 
George Washington. 
Chas. A. Gallagher. . 
D. S. Partridge 
George R. Andrews.. 
IWm.B.Cady 
Jacob Leison. 


6th 

7th . . 


M. N. Mugan 


PortSanilac 
Lapeer. . 


8th 
9th 
10th 
llth 


W. B.Williams.... 
F. C. Stone 
Geo. A. Steele 
H.W.Carey.... 
John Cole 
H. H. Aplin 
Wm. A. French 
Ren Barker 


Saginaw 
St.Johns 
Eastlake 
Fremont 
West Bay City. . . 
Bell :......... 
Reed City 
Greenville 
Ishpemlng 
Bessempr 


12th 


W. D. Johnson 
H.O. Young 
M. M. Riley 



180 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



MICHIGAN. -CONTINUED. 



DISTRICT. 



PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters Detroit. 
Chairman Chas. P. Russell. 
Secretary Brent Harding. 
Treasurer W . C. Clemo. 



Members. 



Address. 



PEOPLE'S. 

Hea'quarters-Schoolcraft. 
Chairman A.. W. Nichols. 
Secretary H. I. Allen. 
Treasurer B. S. Ashley. 



Members. 



Address. 



2d 

3d 

4th 

5th 

6th... 



9th.. 
10th. 
llth. 
12th, 



Gideon Vivier....... 

Chas. K. Perrine . . . 

D. W. Grandon 

O.W.Hoyt 

Dr. B. G. Bruce 

Rev. M. A. Jacokes. 

A. M. Bldredge 

B.A.Richards 

Albert Dodge 

Geo. R. Malone 



Rev. John Russell. 
John S. Parker .... 
A.D.Livey 

Dr. J. F. A. Raider 
Rev. S. Steel 



Detroit- 



Jackson 

Adrian 

Coldwater. . . 
Albion 



Middleville.. 
Lawrence . . . 

Saranac 

Grand Kapids 
Lansing 



New Haven... 
New Haven.. . 
Saginaw 

Newaygo 

Northport 



A. W. Dodge 

O. M. Brownson 

Harvey B. Hatch.... 



Morley 

Evart 

Marquette . 



Edward S. Grece.. 
Harry D. Lindley.. 
M. G. Loennecker . 
Byron S.Ashley... 

Chas. E. Barnes 

Leroy E. Lockwood. 

John A. Dunning 

Albert E. Beebe 

Frank De Barr 

Benona A. Blakeney Gr 
Frank D. Baker.... ~ ' 

Elias F. Spross 

AlfredPagett 

William Smafleld . 
Daniel Thompson. 

Edward Brown 

Austin S. Randall. 
Milton H. Nichols. 
John H. Belknap . . 

PaulMarrin 

William T. Pitt. . . . 
Frank H. Olmstead.. 

Win. L. Hagen 

Wm. M. Miller.... 



Detroit. 

Detroit. 

Jackson. 

Jackson. 

Battle Creek. 

Coldwater. 

Cassopolis. 

Mendon 

Grand Rapids. 

Grand Haven. 

Flint. 

Okemos. 

Ubly. 



Peck 

Brant. 

St. Johns. 

Forman. 

White Cloud. 

Omer. 

Midland. 

Ithaca. 

Mt. Pleasant. 

Lake Linden. 

Manistique. 



MINNESOTA. 



REPUBLICAN. 

Headquarters St. Paul. 

Chairman Robert Jamison. 

(Secretary Tarns Bixby. 

Executive Committee Robert Jamison, Tarns 
Bixby, H. F. Brown, F. G. Ingersoll, F. E. 
Kenaston, H. B. Strait, N. Kingsley. 



DEMOCRATIC. 

Headquarters St. Paul 

Chairman Lewis Baker. 

Secretary P. J. Smalley. 

Treasurer- -Crawford Livingston. 

At Large Lewis Baker, St. Paul; F. W. 
M. Cutchen, St. Paul; F. G. Winston, Minne- 
apolis; Titus Marek, Minneapolis; H. C. 
Stivers, Brainerd. 



Members. 



Address. 



Members. 



Address. 



Robert Jamison 

N. Kingsley 

C. L. Roos 

Fred Von Baumbach 

M. D. Flower 

H. F. Brown 

B. D. Smith 

H.B. Strait 

R. E. Thompson 
A. T. Koerner. . 
M. S. Converse.. 
F. E. Kenaston. 

Tarns Bixby 

Y. G. Ingersoll 

John Waite 

J. G. Nelson 

W.H. Feller 

J. M.Diment 

E. E. Corliss 

W.R.Edwards 

Joseph Sellwood.. 

H. J. Miller 

J. J.Howe 



Minneapolis. 

Austin. 

New Ulm. 

Alexandria. 

St. Paul. 

Minneapolis. 

Mankato. 

Shakopee. 

Preston. 

Litchfield. 

Detroit. 

Breckenridge. 

Red Wing. 

St. Paul. 

Long Prairie. 

Stillwater. 

Elgin. 

Owatonna. 

Fergus Falls. 

Tracy. 

Duluth. 

Luverne. 

Brainerd. 



Owen Austin 

Dan Aberle 

Chris H. Heffron 

John Coleman 

R.O. Craig 

JohnC. Wise 

1 A. Moody 

ieorge A. DuToit 

Michael Mullen 

James D. Sheedy 

Morris Thomas 

J.M. Spicer 

James Manning 

James E. O'Brien 

Werner Hempsted 

Charles Cater 

Crawford Livingston 

Lars M.Rand 7.. 



Hastings. 

St. Paul. 

Rochester. 

Anoka. 

Janesville. 

Mankato. 

Sauk Rapids. 

Chaska. 

New Ulm. 

Austin. 

Duluth. 

Willmar. 

Worthington. 

Crookston. 

Brainerd. 

Herman 

Ramsey county. 

Hennepin county. 



PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters Minneapolis. 
Chairman W. M. Lawrence. 
Secretary W. W. Satterlee. 
Treasurer D. W. Edwards. 



PEOPLE'S.. 
Headquarters St. Paul. 
Chairman T. J. Meighen, Forestville. 
Secretary Louis Hanson, Sabin. 
Treasurer C. N. Perkins, Stewart. 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 



181 



MINNESOTA.-CONTINUED. 



Members, 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


P. P. Pinkham... 


Minneapolis. 


C. T. Sheldon 




T. S Rimestead 


Minneapolis. 


James Munro 


Thielmanton. 


D W Edwards 




J J Mooney 






St Paul 


L Montgomery 




D W Doty 


St Paul 


Gilbert Pish 




N. R Foss . .. 


St Paul. 


J P. Sheppard 


Lakeside 


George F.Weils 


Hamline. 


S. Rasmusson 


St Paul 


Robert Taylor 


Kasson 


A.Richmond 


Stillwater. 


F. L. Hampson. . . 


Ada. 


O. A. Lindberg 


Blomford. 


E. L. Curial 


Anoka. 


John Gruenberg.. .. 


Minneapolis. 






E F Clark 








C F Grave 








M. Wesenberg 


Duluth 






C. F. Bohall 


West Union 






J. T. Plant 


Santiago. 






E. E. Lommen 


Crookston. 






L. B. Cantleberry 


Villard. 



NEBRASKA. 



DISTRICT. 


REPUBLICAN. 

Headquarters Lincoln. 
Chairman A. E. Cady. 
Secretary-?. M. Cooke. 
Treasurer W. F. Bechel. 


DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters Omaha. 
C hairman Euclid Martin. 
Secretary J. B. Sheean. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st.. . 


F. W. Samuelson.... 
M. H. Christy 
John C. Watson 
Orlando Tefft 
P. J. Hall 
W. F. Bechel 
Geo. A. Bennett 
W. G. Whitmore 
C. C.McNish 
W. E. Peebles 
Geo. Copeland 
C.B.Marr 
A.A.Welch 
E. T.Hodsdon 
J.L. McDonald 
T.J. Smith 
H. Chapman . 


Hum bolt 


Robert Clegg... 


Falls City. 
Tecumseh. 
Nebraska City. 
Plattsmouth. 
Wahoo. 
Omaha. 
Omaha. 
Omaha. 
West Point. 
Ponca. 
Greeley Center. 
Fremont. 
Wayne. 
Howells. 
O'Neill. 
Rushville. 
Broken Bow. 
Kearney. 
St. Paul. 
Clarks. 
Seward. 
Lincoln. 
Lincoln. 
Beatrice. 
Friend. 
Fairbury. 
McCool. 
Fairfleld. 
Superior. 
Hastings. 
Orleans. 
Imperial. 
Sidney. 


2d 
3d... 


Sterling 
Nebraska City... 
Avoca 
Memphis 
Omaha 
Omaha 


C.W.Pool 
C. M. Hubner 


4th 


F J Morgan 


5th 
(5th 


H. Gilkenson 
Euclid Martin 
J. B. Sheean . . 


7th ... 


Valley 
Wisner 


C.V.Gallagher 
M.J.Hughes 
T.J. Sheibley 
E. F.Cashman 
John Dern 


8th 


Fender 


9th 


Elgin 


10th 
llth 

12th .. 




Wayne 


Frank Dearborn 
H. E. Phelps 
C. C. McHugh 
S.V. Pitcher 
H.E. O'Neill 
J. F. Crocker 
C. V Manett 
S. E. Starrett 
R. E. Dunphy 
J.W Keenan 
A. J Sawyer 
D W Cook 


Schuyler.- 
Atkinson 
Ainsworth 
Ansley 
Kearney 
St. Paul 
Central City .... 
Linwood 
Lincoln 
Davey 


13th 


14th 
15th. .. 


i;th 


J. T. Mallalieu 
A. E. Cady 
C. Hostetter 
W. Husenetter 
C. E. Magoon 
J.M.Meyers 
J. C. Burch 


17th 
18th 


19th 


20th 


21st.... 


22d 

23d... 


T. C. Callinan 
C. L. Richards . 


Friend 


J.J.Holland 
J. D.Hubbell 
Thos Smith 


Hebron 


24th 


C. A.McCloud 
W. H. Streeter 
J. B. McGrew 
A.V. Cole 
Geo. P. Rhea 
A. R. Cruzen 
H. L.Gould 


York 


25th 


C J Furer 


26th 


Bloomington 
Juniata 
Holdrege 
Curtis 
Ogalalla 


F J. Bradshaw 
A. S. Campbell 
J. W. Ferrefl 
Jacob Biglsr 
J. J.McIntosh 


27th 
28th 
29th 
30th 



Chairman Geo. W. Blake. 



PEOPLE'S PARTY. 
Headquarters Lincoln. 



Secretary-C. H. Pirtle. 



COUNTIES. 



Adams 

Antelope.. 
Banner.... 

Blaine 

Boyd 

Boone . 
Box Butte 

Brown 

Buffalo 

Butler.... 



Members. 



Address. 



A. C. Tompkins. . Hansen. 
J. D. Hattield.... Neligh.. 

J. A. Burton 'Harrisburg. 

W. A. McCormick Brewster. 
Thos. Leathwood Grand Rapids 



J. B. Bomer.. 
F. N. Sands... 
C. W. Potter. 

A.Eddy 

H.R.Craig... 



Loretta. 
Alliance. 
Ainsworth. 
Gibbon. 

...IU1 



CO UNTIES. 



Jefferson..., 

Johnson 

Kearney 
Keya Paha, 

Keith 

Knox 

Lancaster.. 

Lincoln 

Logan 

Loup 



Members. 



Joseph Krebeck 
W. P. Brooks... 
J. S. Canaday... 

Ralph Lewis 

V.S.Abraham.. 
Chas. Crockett.. 

J. F. Bishop 

H. D. Rhea 



C.S.Weils 

SaulMarsters... 



Address. 



Fairbury. 
Cook. 
Minden. 
Springview. 
Ogalalla. 
Niabrora. 
Lincoln. 
North Platte 
rGandy. 
aylor. 



. r 
. I T 



182 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


NEBRASKA CONTINUED. 


COUNTIES. 


Members. 


Address. 


COUNTIES. 


Members. 


Address, 


Burt 
Cass 
Cedar. ..'. 


C.B. Grimn 
G. 8. Cpton 
Julius B. Betts... 
Andrew Nicol 
W. Boynton 
J. R. Ayer 
D.A.Morris 
O. Nelson 
T. H. Tibbies. . . . 
E. P. Campbell . . 
John Gribble 
J. W.Rowland... 
R.D.V.Carr 
W. L. Herrington 
J.F.Hall 


Oakland. 
Union. 
Wausa. 
Imperial. 
Weyerts. 
Crookston. 
Fairfleld. 
Schuyler. 
Bancroft. 
Broken Bow. 
Dakota City. 
Crawford. 
Lexington. 
Chappal. 
Waterbury. 
North Bend. 
Omaha. 
Benkleman. 
Geneva. 
Campbell. 
Stockville. 
Cambridge. 
Beatrice. 
Burwell. 
Hilton. 
Greeley Cent. 
Cameron. 
Aurora. 
Alma. 
Estell. 
Culbertson. 
Agee. 
Elba. 


Madison 
Merrick 


A. B. Bender.... 
L. F. Kennedy... 
Geo. Godfrey .... 
W. P. Hatton.... 
T. G. Ferguson... 
I. D. Kemmerer.. 
Eugene Munn.... 
C. N. Mayberry. . 
W.S.Hampton.. 
G. A. Porter 
L. C. Barr 


Clarrion. 
Central City. 

Fullerton. 
Stella. 
Nelson. 
Swift. 
Mayberry. 
Grant. 
Plainview. 
Holdrege. 
Columbus. 
Osceola. 
Indianola. 
Verden. 
Bassett. 
Friend. 
8. Omaha. 
Wahoo. 
Gering. 
Seward. 
Hay Springs. 
Austin. 
Ft. Robinson. 
Stanton. 
Hebron. 
Thedford. 
Ord. 
Blair. 
Winside. 
Cowles. 
Ono. 
York. 


McPherson. . . 


Cnase 
Cheyenne .... 
Cherry 
Clay 
Colfax 
Cuming 
Custer 


Nemaha 
Nuckolls 
Otoe 


Pawnee 


Perkins 


Pierce 


Dakota 
Dawes 
Dawson 
Deuel 


Phelps 


Platte 
Polk 
Red Willow . . 
Richardson. . . 
Rock 
Saline 


J. C. Swartsley... 
W. E. Hurst 
I. N. Smith 
Geo. Watkins.... 
W.F.Phillips... 
James G. Hodges 
R. M. Carpenter. 
F. E. Way 
Wenzel Hiersche 
M. Mehan 
E. R.Vanlennep. 
J. Vandergrift. . . 
M. J. Beber 
Elmer Porter. . . . 
D. W. Davidson.. 
C. C. Wright 
D.McCall 
L. R. Fletcher . . . 
H. B. Miller 
C.H.Teel 
R. H. Shapland. . 
J. D. P. Small.... 


Dixon 


Dodge 


Chas. 8. Fowler. . 
D. C. Deaver 
A. B. Starkey.... 
Wm. Waite 
H. W. Harvey.... 
W.A. Bradbury. 
W. J.Holley 
Daniel Freeman. 
T. W. Bartley.... 
W. H. Stone 
P.H.Barry 
E. 8. Lee . 


Douglas 
Dundv 
Fillmore 


Sarpy 


Saunders. ... 
Scots Bluff... 
Seward 
Sheridan.... 
Sherman 
Sioux 
Stanton 


Franklin 
Frontier 
Furnas 
Gage 


Garfleld 


Gosper 
Greeley. 
Hall...; 


Thayer 
Thomas 
Valley 
Washington. 
Wayne 
Webster 
Wheeler .... 


Hamilton 
Harlan 


F.M.Howard.... 
Dr. 8. Saddler. . . . 


Hayes 


John M. Daniels. 
J.W.Benjamin.. 
John A. Hopkins. 
D. F. Rawlings... 


Hitchcock 
Holt 
Howard 


York 


PROHIBITION. 

Headquarters Lincoln. 
Chairman A. Roberts. Secretary J. I. Fredericks. Treasurer L. S. Parker. 


COUNTIES. 


Members. 


Address, 


COUNTIES. 


Members. 


Address. 


A.dams 


E. T. Cassell 


Hastings. 
Oakdale. 
Banner. 
Brewster. 
St. Edwards. 
Nonpareil. 
Alfred. 
Long Pine. 
Gibbon. 
Brainerd. 
Tekamah. 
Plattsmouth. 
St. James. 
Potter. 
Valentine. 
Edgar. 
Schuyler. 
Oakland. 
Lee Park. 
Crawford. 
Gothenberg. 
North Bend. 
Rowanda. 
Springbank. 
Omaha. 
Benkleman. 
Geneva. 
Franklin. 
Stockville. 
Hendley. 
Beatrice. 
Homerville. 
Hyanis. 
Wood River. 
Aurora. 
St. Paul. 
Fairbury. 


Johnson 


L. 8. Parker 
W H Vanlise 


Tecumseh. 
Minden. 
Paxton. 
Kimball. 
Creighton. 
Lincoln. 
North Platte. 
Norfolk. 
Central City. 
Fullerton. 
Auburn. 
Hardy. 
Unadilla. 
Burchard. 
Venango. 
Holdredge. 
Monroe. 
Osceola. 
McCook. 
Falls City. 
Bathurst. 
Milligen. 
Papillion. 
Ashland. 
Milford. 
Gordon. 
Loup City. 
Harrison. 
Stanton. 
Chester. 
Pender. 
Herman. 
Wayne. 
Blue Hill. 
Bartlett. 
York. 


Antelope 
Banner 
Elaine 
Boone 


A. J. Leach 
J. R. Harner 
W.M.Scott 
Joel Warner 
A. Sherwood 
Wm. Alfred... 


Keith . . 


E C Rice 


Kimball 
Knox 
Lancaster .... 
Lincoln 
Madison 
Merrick 


L Coryell 


R.H. Mason 
A, Roberts 
E. Smith 
H. J. Cole.. . 


Box Butte 
Boyd...., 


Brown 


J. F. Ingalls 
Wm. Boone 
F. M. Reynolds.. 
Dr. W. L. Pierce. 
P. P. Gass 
Wm. H. Carter... 
O. E.Andrews. .. 
J. W. Tucker 
Wm. Carr 
G. B. Robinson.. 
J. Lungren 
J. L. H. Knight. . 
O.T Moore 
Jonas Adling.... 
D. M. Strong 
N. J. Slater 
E. Andrews 
S.W. Woodbey.. 
Philip Marshall.. 
J.B.Lewis 
H. Whitmore .... 
F. F. Marble 
M. Meacham 
A. L. Greene 
J. O. Parkyn 
P. Malwood 
J.G.Wright 
H. C. Wood 
M.C.Kendall.... 
P. Speenburgh... 




A. Fitch, Jr 
M. I. Brower 
G. B. Beveridge.. 
C. A. Thompson.. 
J. H. Currie 
S.S.Stewart 
8. A. Beck 
E. T. Shields 
E. A. Gerard 
J. P. Heald... 


Butler 
Burt 
Cass 
Cedar 
Cheyenne .... 
Cherry 
Clay. 
Colfax 
Cuming 
Custer 
Dawes 
Dawson 


Nemaha 
Nuckolis 
Otoe 
Pawnee.; 
Perkins 
Phelps 
Platte 


Polk.... 


Red Willow . . 
Richardson... 
Rock 
Saline 
Sarpy 
Saunders 
Seward 
Sheridan 
Sherman 
Sioux 


W.O. Norval 
C. E. Smith 
Chas. Shultz 
G. L. Blanvelt. .. 
A. W. Gird 
L 8 Sears 


Dodge 

Deuel 


Dixon 


Douglass 
Dundy 
Filmore 
Franklin 
Frontier 
Furnas 
Gage 


L. D. Lanne 
H. P. Reynolds.. 
J. W. Long 
Rev.E. E. Rorick 
D. C. Winship.... 
O. L. Brown 
J. W. Miller 
M. Cameron 
W.O. Gamble.... 
W. W. Hogate... 
John Savidge.... 
G. D. Stromire. . . 


Stanton 
Thayer 
Thurston 
Washington.. 
Wayne 
Webster 
Wheeler 
York 


Gosper 


Grant 
Hall 


Hamilton .... 
Howard...... 
Jefferson 





POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 



183 



NORTH DAKOTA. 



REPUBLICAN. 
Headquarters F&rgo. 

Chairman ~B. F. Spalding. Secretary- M. H. Jewell. 

At Large Alexander Hughes, Bismarck. 



DISTRICT. 


Members. 


Address. 


DISTRICT. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


Judson LaMoure 
Grant S.Hager.. 
H A Libby ... 


Pembina. 
St. Thomas. 
Park River. 
Ardock. 
Larimore. 
Grand Forks. 
Grand Forks. 
Hillsboro. 
Fargo. 
Casselton. 
Buffalo. 
Wahpeton. 
Cogswell. 
Lisbon. 
Valley City. 
Hope. 


17th 


T. J. Baird.... 


Lakota. 
Langdon. 
Cando. 
Fort Totten. 
Towner. 
New Rockf d 
Jamestown. 
Grand Rapids 
Ellendale. 
Ashley. 
Bismarck. 
Devil's Lake. 
Mmot. 
Mandan. 
Gladstone. 


2d . 


18th 
19th 


P. McHugh 
A. B. McDonald.. 
Frank Palmer. . . 
R. A. Fox 
C.J. Maddox 
S. L. Glasspell.... 
C.S.Deisem 
Thomas Sefton. 
J. H. Wishek.... 
M.H.Jewell 
J. F. Cowan 
John McJannet. 
R M Tuttle 


3d .. 


4th.. . 


G, R. Jacobi 
0. A. Wilcox. . . . 
M. F. Murphy... 
John P. Bray ... 
R. T. Kingman. 
B. F. Spalding... 
S.J. Small 
S. G. More 
B. F. Lounsbury. 
G S. Montgom'ry 
A. H. Laughlin . . 
A. H. Gray 
J. J. Wamburg... 


20th 


5th 


21st 
22d 


tith 


7th 


23d 


8th . 


24th 
25th 


9th 


10th 
llth 
12th.... 


26th . . . 


27th 
28th 
29th 


13th 


14th 


30th 


15th 
16th 


31st 




R. J. Turner 





DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters Grand Forks. 



Chairman D. W. Maratta. 



Secretary-Willis A. Joy. 



Members. 



Address. 



Members. 



Address. 



G B. Vallandigham 

Wm. Braithwaite 

H. R. Shellenberger 

J.G.Greig 

J. C. Williamson 

W.J.Mooney 

C. A. Kent 

Wm. L. Yeater 

D. W. Maratta 

Frank Bieber 

Richard Mares 

Daniel Y. Stanton 

W. H. B. Eisenhuth 

Geo. F. LaShell 

J.M.Gagan 

Willis A.Joy 

M. L. McCormack 

G. L. Virge 

F. M. Kinter 

W. A. Fridley 

L.M. Wallm 

J. A. T. Bjersen 

P. C. Causey 



Valley City. 

Bismarck. 

Minnewaukon. 

Bottineau. 

Medora. 

Langdon. 

Ellendale. 

Williamsport. 

Fargo. 

Casselton. 

Wheatland. 

New Rockford. 

Carrington. 

Larimore. 

Grand Forks. 

Grand Forks. 

Grand Forks. 

Cooperstown. 

La Moure. 

Steele. 

Washburn. 

Ashley. 

Causey. 



Chas. Adler 

E. W. Conmy 

m. Murchie 

A. Bigelow 

.W.McGillic 

Reuben Noble 

M. L.Engle 

Geo. P. Garred 

W.H.Makee 

T.S.Hunt 

Wm.Ray 

Geo. Sanger 

W. C. Ferman 

E. J. Schwellenbach 

Budd Reeve 

Geo. L. Ellsberry 

James Bell 

A. C. Sanford 

C.D.Lord 

J. H. Schofleld 

John A. Ely 

W.N.Dwyer 



Lakota. 

Pembina. 

St. Thomas. 

Rugby. 

Mandan. 

Devil's Lake. 

Englevale. 

Wahpeton. 

Dunseith. 

Sherbrook. 

Dickenson. 

Bentley. 

Forman. 

Jamestown. 

Buxton. 

Cando. 

Minto. 

Sykeston. 

Park River. 

Minot. 

Towner. 

Napoleon. 



INDEPENDENT PROHIBITION. 

Headquarters J amestown. 
Chairman E. E. Saunders. Secretary T. F. HOT. 

At Large Rev. C. A. Macnamara, Reynolds; Rev. G. J. Omland, Park River; M. H. Kiff, 
Tower City; E E. Saunders. Jamestown; Torger . Hov, Hillsboro. 



DISTRICT. 



Members. 



Address. 



DISTRICT. 



Members. 



Address. 



1st 

2d 

3d. .. 



H. H.Mott 

A. J. Garver.... 
A. M. Barnum. 



Graf ton. 

Leeds. 

Mayville. 



Vivian Morgan.. 

D. Carlton 

Ed. R. Bonney... 



Barrie. 
Oriska. 
Dickinson. 



184 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



SOUTH DAKOTA. 



REPUBLIC AN. 

Headquarters Chamberlain. 



Chairman 3. M. Greene. 



Secretary J. H. SCriven. 



COUNTY. 



Members. 



Address. 



COUNTY. 



Members. 



Address. 



Aurora. 

Beadle 

BonHomme.. 

Brooklngs 

Brown 

Brule 

Buffalo 

Butte 

Campbell. 
Charles Mix. . 

Clark 

Clay 

Codington 

Custer 

Davison 

Day 

Deuel. 



Douglas 

Edmunds 

Fall River... 

Faulk 

rant 

Hamlin 

Hand 

Hanson 

Hughes 



John Rogers 

R.Lowry 

J. B. Elliott 

W. H. Roddle 

Ira Bains 

J. M. Greene. 
S. B. Moulton 
G. B. Hare... 
H. W. Sager.. 
Thos. Elfes.. 

E. F. Conklin 

J. A. Barnsbuck. 
J. L. Robinson... 
G. A. Siddons.... 

J.H. Scriven 

A. E.Raynes.... 
H.A. Whiting... 
E. S. Johnson . . . 
A. B. Chebbuck . 

C. G. Fargo 

M. P. Springer... 
J. L. Lockhart. . . 
A. H. Carnahan. 
J.H. Baldwin.... 

F. B. Smith 

C. E. DeLand.... 



Plankinton. 

Huron. 

Tyndall. 

Brookings. 

Aberdeen. 

Chamberlain. 

Gann Valley. 

Belle Fourche 

Mound City. 

Castalia. 

Clark. 

Vermillion. 

Watertown. 

Hermosa. 

Mitchell. 

Andover. 

Clear Lake.. 

Armour. 

Ipswich. 

Hot Springs. 

Faulkton. 

Millbank. 

Estelline. 

St. Lawrence 

Alexandria. 

Pierre. 



Hutchinson. 

Hyde 

Jerauld 

King' bury. ., 

Lake 

Lawrence..., 

Lincoln , 

McCook , 

McPherson. , 
Marshall...., 

Meade 

Miner , 

Minnehaha. 

Moody 

Potter 

Roberts 

Sanborn .... 

Spink 

Stanley 

Sully 

Turner 

Union 

Walworth. .. 
Yankton .... 



H. A. Williams... 
J. K. Sedgwick... 
O.G. Woodruff... 

3. J. Benke 

!. Guerner 

. W.Goff 

R. E. Grimshaw . 

W. B. Wait 

F.E. Smith 

G. Kennedy... 
J. W. Banberry.. 
J. J. Davenport.. 

R. S. Person 

C. JC. McKinney.. 
G. A. Pettigrew. . 
S. C. Leppelman. 
H.S.Morris... 
H. C Warner. 
L. S. Cooper... 
F.G. Fisher... 
B. P.Hoover.. 

W.Elliott 

F. M. Gilmore. 

F. Griffin 

L. B. French. . 



Olivet. 

Highoiore. 

Alpena. 

Arlington. 

Iroquois. 

Madison. 

Deadwood. 

Lennox. 

Montrose. 

Eureka. 

Brltton. 

Sturgis. 

Howard. 

Sioux Falls. 

Flandreau. 

Gettysburg. 

Wilmot. 

Sanborn. 

Tulare. 

Fort Pierre. 

Fairbank. 

Parker. 

Elk Point. 

Bangor. 

Yankton. 



DEMOCRATIC. 

Headquarters Yankton. 

Chairman Otto Peemiller. Secretary J&. M. O'Brien. 



Members. 



Address. 



Members. 



Address. 



L. Lovinger 

H.C. Hinckley 

S. W.Treesh 

C.Keith 

Isaac Brown 

F. B. Smith 

S. Winter 

S.Rab 

D.Sayre 

J.E.Horton 

E.M.Nelson 

F. E. Strawder 

J.Kimball 

J.W.Martin 

B. F.Tunley 

J.D. Lawler 

Sullivan 

Law 

Baird 

F. M. Hopkins 

R. F.Connor , 

J. J. Conway 

J. Douglass 

J. W. Catlett 

A.J.Baldwin 

P. F. Wickem 

J. F. Kernan 

A.F.Grimm 

L. E. Whitcher 

G. D. Cannon 



j. u. . 
D. F.! 
T.J.] 
J.C. ] 



White Lake. 

Huron. 

Scotland. 

Volga. 

Aberdeen. 

Hecla. 

hamberlain. 
Gann Valley. 
Belle Fourche. 
Mound City. 
Edgerton. 
Clark. 
Vermillion. 
Watertown. 
Custer City. 
Mitchell. 
Andover. 
Clear Lake. 
Armour. 
Roscoe. 
Hot Springs. 
Orient. 
Millbank. 
Estelline. 
St. Lawrence. 
Alexandria. 
Pierre. 
Parkston. 
Highmore. 
Alpena. 



C. F. Zimmerman. 
J.J. Fitzgerald.... 

W.S. Elder 

F. P. Smith 

L.C.Hayes 



.,. C. Hi 

r. T. sc 



belter. 



G. Tammen 

A.H. Marsh...... 

J.D. Hale 

P. Kreuscher 

A. D. Tinsley 

D. J. Conway 

M.E.Cogley 

James Philip 

J. J. McNamara 

D.M.Boyle 

B. Arnold 

C. G.Le Blono.. 

E.Cook 

C.Car 

W.J. Leitch 

H. C.Walsh 

R. E. Murphy.... 

D. F. Cailen 

J. B. Bender 

F. M. Stover 

|T. T. Brady 

F. Winterbottom 
B.M. O'Brien.... 



[roquois. 

Vladison. 

Deadwood. 

Canton. 

L. B. Agency. 

Bridgewater. 

Eureka. 

Britton. 

Tilford. 

Canova. 

Sioux Falls. 

Sioux Falls. 

Flandreau. 

Philip. 

Rapid City. 

Gettysburg. 

Bovine. 

Hatch City. 

Wilmot. 

Woonsocket. 

Mellette. 

Redfleld. 

Fort Pierre. 

Fort Bennett. 

Little Brule. 

Centerville. 

Beresford. 

Bangor. 

Yankton. 



POLITICAL COMMITTEES. 185 


WISCONSIN. 


DISTRICT. 


REPUBLICAN. 
Hcadquarters^-Milwaukee. 
Chairman H.. C. Thorn. 
Secretary H. H. Rand. 


DEMOCRATIC. 
Headquarters Milwaukee. 
Chairman E. C. Wall, Milwaukee. 
Secretary W. A. Anderson,LaCrosse. 
Treasurer- J. L. Mitchell.Milwaukee. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


1st 


M.T. Park 


Elkhorn.. 




J. E. Dodge 


Racine. 
Lake Geneva. 
Juneau. 
Madison, 
Mineral Point. 
Richland Center. 
Milwaukee. 
Milwaukee. 
Milwaukee. 
Sheboygan. 
Manitowoc. 
Fond du Lac. 
Eau Claire, 
Alma. 
Kewaunee. 
Wood. 
Wausau. 
Oconto. 
Dunn. 
Douglas. 


2d 


H. C Martin 


Darlingto 
Watertov 
Madison. 
Richland 
Sauk Citj 
Milwauki 
Milwauke 
Sheboyga 
Oconomo 
Montello. 






Jesse Stone 


rn 

Center. 
r 
$e 
e 


J. E. Malone 
Burr W- Jones.. . . 
Judge Mclllon.. . . 
George E. Tate . . 
John Johnston. . 
J. W. Murphy 


3d 




W.M. Fogo 
Paul Lachm und 
H. C. Payne 
Chris. Paulus 
J.R.Riess 
O.L. Rosenkrans.... 
E.A.Bass 
J. S.Anderson 
J.T. Barber 
D. J. McKenzie 
E. W. Arndt 
g""\ R. Gardner 
. T. Wheelock 
G. W. Hanley 
Martin-Fattison 
B. P. Millard 


4th 


5th 


n 
woe 


H. J. Killilea 


6th 
7th 


Frank Gottsacker. . 
Joseph Vilas 
Samuel Smead 
T. F.Frawley 
Robert Lees 


Manitowoc 
Eau Claire 
Alma 
DePere 
Centralia 
Medford 


8th 
9th 


John Wattawa 
W.J.Jones 
Louis Marchetti 
L. S. Bailey 
John R. Matthews. . 
W. D. Dwyer 


10th 


Marinette 
West Superior... 
Chippewa Falls.. 


DISTRICT. 


PROHIBITION. 
Headquarters Madison, 
Chairman C. F. Cronk, Madison. 
Secretary J. B. Sjmith, Madison. 
Treasurer S. D. Hastings, Madison. 


PEOPLES. 
Headquarters M \ Iwaukee. 
Chairman Robert Schilling. 
Secretary Eugene Low. 
Treasurer J. H. Pollock. 


Members. 


Address. 


Members. 


Address. 


rst 
2d 


J.C.Martin 
T W North 


Mineral 1 
Lake Gen 
Lake Mill 
Pardeevil 
Lancaste 
Fennimoi 

Milwauke 
Fond du J 

Berlin ... 
Ripon.... 
LaCrosse 
Independ 
Clintonvi 
Fort Hov 
Marinette 
Marinette 
West Sup 
Louisvilfi 


Point. . . 
eva 
s 
le 


3. H. Pollock 


Racine. 
Dane. 
Vernon. 
Milwaukee. 
Ozaukee. 
Calumet. 
LaCrosse. 
Portage. 
Marinette. 
Barren. 


C.H. Potter 
Chris Ellefson 


R Fargo. . 


3d 


W. C.English 


O. EJ. Stone.. .. 




4th 


F. A. Nelson 
R. H. Sabin... 


e 

e 
Lac 

ence '.'.'. 
lie .. 


Robert Schilling 
Peter Haan 
C. Hatch 


5th 


[. D. Mishoff..... 


A F Collins 


6th 
7th . ... 


Chas. Kalmarton 
W.H. Higgs 
W.H.Clark 
Gilbert Shepard 
G. A. Markham 
C. A. Spiver 


C. H. Van Wormer. . 
Peter Peterson 


gth 


9th 


C. W. Loomis 
C Prescott 


rard 


10th 


H Donaldson 




C. L. Brekken 


A. F. McKay 
F. T.Vasey 


erlor... 


THE NATIONAL LEAGUE FOR THE PRO 
President Wm. H. Parsons. 
Vice-President William Strong. 
General Secretary James M. King. 
Treasurer William Fellowes Morgan. 
Law Committee William Allen Butler, Dor- 
man B. Eaton, Cephas Brainerd, Henry E. 
Howland and Stephen A. Walker. 
Offices 140 Nassau street, New York. 
The league, which is entirely non-partisan 
and unsectarian, was incorporated Dec. 24, 
1889, under an act of the New York legisla- 
ture. Its objects are " to secure constitu- 
;ional and legislative safeguards for the pro- 
tection of the common-school system and 
other American institutions and to promote 
aublic instruction in harmony with such insti- 
tutions and to prevent all sectarian or denomi- 
national appropriations of public funds." As an 
mportant step to this end the league proposes 
to secure the passage of the following amend- 
ment to the constitution of the United States: 
"No state shall pass any law respecting an 


TECTION OF AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS, 
establishment of religion or prohibiting the 
free exercise thereof or use its property or 
credit or any money raised by taxation or au- 
thorize either to be used for the purpose of 
founding, maintaining or aiding by appropri- 
ation, payment for services, expenses or oth- 
erwise, any church, religious denomination or 
religious society, or any institution, society or 
undertaking which is wholly or in part under 
sectarian or ecclesiastical control." 
It will also endeavor to secure similar 
amendments to the state constitutions. 
The league has been in active operation 
since May, 1890, and already has many thou- 
sands of adherents distributed throughout 
every state and territory. Many religions and 
patriotic organizations have formally ap- 
proved its principles. 
State leagues are being organized and local 
secretaries appointed in all the states, and cor- 
respondence and co-operation is invited from 
thoughtful citizens throughout the country. 



186 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


RAILROAD BUILDING, 

Number of miles of railroad in operation in each state and territory of the United States dur- 
ing the years ended Dec. 31, 1860, 1870, 1880, and from 1887 to 1891, inclusive. 
[From Poor's Railroad Manual.] 


STATES AND GROUPS 

Of STATES. 


1860. 


1870. 


1880. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


New England. 
Maine 


472 

661 
554 
1,264 
108 
601 
3,660 


786 
736 
614 
1,480 
136 
742 
4,494 


1,005 
1,015 
914 
1,915 
210 
923 
_6j977 

5,991 
1,684 
6,191 
275 
1,040 
15,181 

5,792 
3,938 
4,373 
7,851 
3,155 
25,109 


1,182.03 
1,072.92 
938.25 
3,067.60 
213.97 
987.16 
6,461.93 


1,321.34 
1,079.49 
958.55 
2,074.32 
214.21 
1,006.46 
6,654.37 


1,340.11 
1.123.I8 
960.59 
2,082.85 
212.43 
1,010.79 
6,730.45 


1,377.47 

1,146.89 
988.45 
2,036.69 
234.43 
1,000.64 
6,840.57 


1,383.26 
1,144.88 
1,OJ1.91 
2,100.32 
223.48 
1,006.54 
6,860.39 


New Hampshire 


Vermont 


Massachusetts. 


Rhode Island 


Connecticut 


Total 


Middle Atlantic. 
New York 


2,682 
560 
2.598 
127 
886 
6,353 


3,928 
1,125 
4,656 
197 
671 
10,577 


7,510.36 
1,955.11 
8.U8.83 
.305.42 
1,172.86 
20.66 
19,033.24 


7.595.54 
1,980.73 
8,224.51 
314.77 
1,183.40 
20.66 
19,319.61 


7.708.87 
2,035.52 
8,421.82 
314.54 
1,225.19 
20.66 
19,726.60 


7,745.85 
2,062.81 
8,700.58 
314.95 
1,270.04 
20.66 
20,114.89 


7,765.22 
2,132.41 
8,919.98 
3.12 
1,269.44 
20.66 
20,427.83 


New Jersey 


Pennsylvania 


Delaware 


Maryland ) 
District of Columbia. . . j 
Total 


Central Northern. 
Ohio 


2,946 
779 
2,163 

2 

9,583 

1,379 
352 
937 
973 
1,420 
402 
5,463 


3,538 
1,638 
3,177 
4,823 
1,525 
14,701 


7,563.16 
6,319.59 
5,798.91 
9,617.93 
5,163.40 
34,523.02 


7,636.27 
6,499.45 
5,890.26 
9,900.50 
5,329.62 
35,256.10 


7,792.85 
6.918.40 
6,003.76 
9,964.63 
5,477.63 
36,175.27 


7,987.99 
7,103.15 
1,106.19 
10,129.65 
5,614.95 
36,944.93 


8,167.63 
7,187.44 
6,1:35.25 
10,189.38 
5,785.61 
37,465.31 


Michigan 


Indiana 
Illinois 


Wisconsin 


Total 


South Atlantic. 
Virginia 


1,486 
387 
1,178 
1,139 
1,845 
446 
6,481 


1,893 
691 
1,486 
1.427 
2,459 
518 
8,474 


2,774.50 
1,22(5.49 
2.325.16 
1,844.55 
3.498.53 
2,095.21 
13,764.44 


2,931.22 
1,294.34 
2,528.58 
2,083.77 
3,928.42 
2.249.78 
15,016.11 


3,202.75 
1,327.89 
2,844.13 
2,129.37 
4,268.20 
2,377.55 
16,149.89 


3,367.65 
1,433.30 
3,128.17 
2,296.65 
4,592.83 
2,489.52 
17,308.12 


3,573.64 
1,547.11 
3,205.46 
2,491.06 
4,870.25 
2,566.87 
18.254.39 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 


South Carolina. 
Georgia. 


Florida 


Total. :... 


Qulf and Miss. Valley. 
Kentucky 


534 
1,253 
743 
BSSt 
335 
3,727 

817 

38 
307 


1,017 
1,492 
1,157 

990 
450 
5,106 

2,000 
2.56 
711 
1,501 
157 


1,530 
1.843 
1,843 
1,127 
652 
6,995 

3,965 
859 
3,244 
3,400 

MS 

289 
14,085 


2,281.60 
2,262.39 
2,602.42 
2,159.48 
1,456.26 
10,762.15 


2,584.93 
2,467.64 
2,985.64 
2,250.92 
1,507.07 
11,796.20 


2,776.88 
2,648.20 
3,145.69 
2,379.18 
1,654.09 
12,622.04 


2,946.38 
2,798.98 
3,422.20 
2,4^0.85 
1,749.95 
13,388.36 


2,962.45 

2.996.20 
3,576.47 
2,440.39 
1,880.01 
13,855.52 








Louisiana 


Total 


Southwestern. 
Missouri 


5,640.44 
1.968.63 
7,979.47 
8,194.78 
3,773.14 
1,237.99 

886.87 
29,681.32 


5,900.89 
2,045.67 
8,210.57 
8,754.83 
4,038.04 
1,321.48 
975.17 
31,246.65 


5,978.41 
2,140.54 
8.498.31 
8.810.27 
4,097.37 
1,326.28 

1,155.14 
32,006.32 


6,142.02 
2,213.44 
8,709.85 
8,900.11 
4,291.11 
1,388.77 
1,260.65 
32,905.95 


6,178.45 
2,304.95 
8,812.67 
8,890.87 
4,441 .a3 
1,423.82 
1,272.08 

33,324.17 




Texas 


Kansas 


Colorado 




New Mexico 




Indian Territory ) 






Total 


1,162 


4,625 


Northwestern. 
Iowa 


655 


2,683 

*% 

65 

459 


5,400 
3,151 
1,953 
1,225 

512 
106 
12,347 


8,332.09 
5,052.02 
4,767.42 
4,314.12 

876.74 
1.687.23 
25,039.62 


8,364.59 
5,375.45 
4,979.51 

4,465.49 

901.70 
1,803.73 
25,890.47 


8,436.02 
5,482.34 
5,124.20 
5 2,055.73 
1 2,480.92 
950.50 
2,001.19 
25,530.90 


8,416.14 
5,545.35 
5,407.47 
2,116.49 
2,610.41 
1,002.93 
2.195.58 
27,249.37 


8,436.51 
5,670.88 
5.430.49 
2,222.77 
2.699.92 
1,048.71 
2,290.82 
27,800.10 


Minnesota 






North Dakota ) 




SouthDakota $ 




Montana 




Total 


655 


5,004 


Pac:flc. 
California 


23 


925 
159 


2,195 

508 

349 
842 
206 
5,128 


3.656.38 
1.290.61 
1,036.60 
947.73 
1,060.03 
1,134.26 
847.68 
9,973.29 


4.126.19 
1,412.01 
1,319.02 
947.73 
1.094.83 
1,153.12 
867.92 
10,920.82 


4.202.11 
1,413.68 
1,705.57 
916.18 
1,094.81 
1,211.73 
929.09 
11,473.17 


4,330.45 
1,455.53 
1,998.65 
923.18 
1,094.81 
1,265.49 
946.11 
12,020.22 


4.484.63 
1,503.52 
2,309.23 
923.18 
1,079.57 
1,335.66 
959.68 
12,613.47 




Washington 




Nevada 




593 






Utah 




257 


Idaho 




Total 


23 


1,934 


United States 


30,G26 


52,922 


98,296 


149,239.01 


156,100.33 


161,396.64 


166,817.41 


170,601.18 



CIVIL LISTS. 



187 



Ctbil Etsts. 

CITY OF CHICAGO. 
City Government. 

Mayor Hempstead Washburne, Rep $7,000 

City Clerk James R. B. Van Cleave, Rep. 3,500 
Deputy City Clerk Isaac N. Powell, Rep.. 2,500 
City Treasurer Peter Kiolbassa, Dem. . . . Int. 

City Attorney Geo. A. Trude, Dem 5.000 

City Comptroller Horatio N. May, Rep.. 5,000 

Coms'r Pub. Wks Vacant 5,000 

Corporation Counsel John S. Miller, 

hep 6,000 

General Superintendent of Police Robert 

W. McClaughry, Rep 4,500 

Fire Marshal Denis J. Swenie, Dem 4,500 



Board of Aldermen. 



. , ...... , 

City Collector Franz Am berg, Rep ........ 4,000 

Coms'r of Health John D. Ware, Rep.... 4,000 

Commissioner of Buildings Louis O'Neill, 

Hep ..................... .. .................. 4,000 

City Sealer Weights and Measures Thos. 

N. Jamieson, Rep .......................... Fees 

Prosecuting Attorney -Chas. A. Dibble.... 4,000 

City Physician- Alfred H. Cotton, Rep... 2,500 
Inspector of Gas Homer B. Galpin, Rep.. 2,400 
Inspector of (Hls-Wm. T. Ball, Rep ........ Fees 

Inspector of Steam oilersJohn D. Pick- 

ham, Rep .................................... Fees 

Supt. of Water Office TZ. 3. Dwyer, .ffej>...L3,000 
Sergeant-at-Arms City Council Jos. A. 

Haberkorn, Dem .......................... 1,500 

Superintendent House of Correction-Mar*. 

L. Crawford, Dem .......................... 4,000 

5,000 
Rep.... 3,000 

Sup't of Schools A. G. Lane, Rep ........ 4,000 

Superintendent Special Assessments J S. 

Sheahan, Dem .............................. 3,500 

City Electrician John P. Barrett .......... 4,000 



. , 

City Engineer L. H. Clarke, Rep 
Sup 't of Streets James H. Burke, 



Republicans, 31 ; Democrat!, 36. 

1 John J. Coughlin. .John R. Morris. 

2 D. J. Horan John W. Woodard. 

3 E. J. Marrenner. ..L. B. Dixon. 

4 M. B. Madden John W. Hepburn. 

5 John Vogt Patrick J. Wall. 

6 Henry Stuckart. . . Wm. J. O'Brien. 

7 John A. Cooke William J. Murphy. 

8 Wm. Loeffler Martin Morrison . 

9 Fred Rohde Joseph E. Bidwill. 

10 C. C. Schumacher. John F. Dorman. 

. . George B. Swift... . William D. Kent. 

. .Robert L. Martin. .Daniel W. Mills. 

. . Chas. F. Swigart.. .Martin Knowles. 

. .James Keats Phillip Jackson. 

. .James Reddick Harold Michaelsen. 

. .Peter J. Ellert Stanley H. Kunz. 

. . J. N. Mulvihill S. M. Gosselin. 

. . Wm. F. Mahoney. .John J. Brennan. 

. .John Powers Michael J. O'Brien. 



12... 
13... 
14... 
15. . . 

M;... 



19.. 



Albert Pothoff Wm. C. Pflster. 

21 J H.Ernst John McGillen. 

22 Arnold Tripp Edw. Muelhoefer. 

23 John R. Larson Vacant. 

24 L. L. Wadsworth. Peter J . Biegler. 

25 Austin O. Sexton. .F B. Brookman. 

26 H.J.Lutter Patrick F. Haynes. 

27 F. F. ffaussen MathewJ. Conway. 

28 Daniel Ackerman.F. N. McCarthy. 

29 Thomas Gahan. ...Thomas Carey. 

30 John F. Kenny AdamRauen. 

31 Edwin J. Noble Edwin Plowman. 

32 James R. Mann. . . . William R. Kerr. 

33 C. H. Howell Ernst Hummell. 

34 J.A. Bartine John O'Neill. 



COOK COTTNTY, ILLINOIS. 



Probate Judge. C. C. Kohlsaat, R .......... $7.000 

County Judge, Frank Scales, D ............ 7,000 

Judges Superior Court, Joseph E. Gary It, 
Henry M. Shepard D, Jonas Hutchin- 
son D, George H. Kettelle D, Philip 
Stein D, Jame"s Goggin D, W. G. Ewing D, 



Gogg 

G. F. Sugg D, Theodore Brentano R, each 7,000 
Judges'* terms expire as follows: Gary, 
1895; Shepard, 18t5; Brentano, 1898; Ket- 
telle, 1899; Stein, 1899; Goggin, 1899; 
Ewing, 1899; Sugg, 1899. 
Judges Circuit Court, Murray F. Tuley, 
chief justice, D; Samuel P.McConnell D, 
T. G. Windes D, Lorin C. Collins, Jr., R; 
R. S. Tuthill R, R. W. Clifford D, O. H. 
Horton R, A.X.Waterman R,E.F.Dunne 
Z>,Francis AdamsD, Frank BakerD,each 7,000 

(Terms expire June, 1898.) 
Judges Appellate Court, Shepard, Gary 
and Waterman of the Circuit and Su- 
perior Courts .............................. 

State's Attorney, Jacob J. Kern, D ......... 6,600 

County Attorney, James Maher. D ........ 4,000 

County Physician, M. E. McGrath, D ...... 2.000 

County Agent James O'Brien. D .......... 2,000 

Superintendent of Schools, O. T. Bright, D ..... 

Coun ty Clerk, Henry Wulff. R .............. 2,000 

Chief Deputy, S. W. Riderberg, R .......... 2,500 

General Superintendent, Dr. B. Brown. D. 2,500 
Warden County Hospital, John Ernst. D. . 2.000 
Clerk of County Court, Henry Wulff, R, . . 3,000 

STATE OF ILLINOIS. 
Executive Department. 
Gov., John P. Altgeld, D., Cook county . .$6,000 



Chief Deputy, Henry Esdohr $2,500 

Clerk Superior Court, S. D. Griffin 5,000 

Chief Clerk, James J . Healey 2,500 

Clerk Appellate Court, T. G. McElligott. .Fees 

Deputy, James J. I. O'Toole 1500 

Clerk Circuit Court, F J. Gaulter 5,000 

Clerk Criminal Court, John C. Schubert. . 5,000 

Principal Deputy, John E. Dunn 2,500 

Clerk Probate Court, Roger Sullivan 5,000 

Chief Clerk, John W. McCarthy 2,500 

Coroner, James McHale 5,000 

Chief Deputy, William E. Quinn 2,500 

County Surveyor, G. C. Waterman Fees 

Recorder of Deeds, S. B. Chase 6,000 

Chief Deputy, Theodore Nelson 2,500 

County Treasurer, Charles Kern 4,OOC 

Principal Normal School, F.W. Parker. . . . 5,000 

Sheriff, James H. Gilbert 6,000 

Chief Deputy, Henry F. Stephens 2,500 

Jailer,Wm.J. Morris 2,000 

County Commissioners City: George 

Edmanson, James A. O'Connell, C. J. 

Bryne, J. G. Panoch, F. E. Coyle, D. E. 

Root, Martin Emerich, M. J. Kelley, 

Henry Ebertshaeuser, J. S. Clark. 

County: F.A.Hoffman, N. A. Cool, O. 

D. Allen, G. Struckman, J. " " 



($1,871.40 each). George 
President ($2,371.40). 



M. Green 
Edmanson, 



Clerk County Board and Deputy Comp- 
troller, Daniel D. Healy 3,000 



Lieut. -Gov., Jos. B..Gill,D.,Jackson county 1,000 
Sec. of State, W. H. Hinrichsen, D., Mor- 
gan county , 3,500 

Auditor, David Gore, D., Macoupin county 3,500 
Treas., R. N. Ramsay, D., De Witt county. 3,500 
Sup. of Pub. Inst'n., Henry Raab, D., St. 

Clair county 3,500 

Atfy-Gen., M. T. Moloney, D., LaSalle 
county 3.500 



The Supreme Court. 

The Supreme court consists of seven judges, 
elected for a term of nine years, one from 
each of the seven districts into which the 
state is divided. The election is held in June 
of the year in which any term expires. 

The state is divided into three grand divis- 
ions, southern, central and northern, in 
which the terms of the court are held. One 
clerk for each of the three grand divisions is 
elected for a term of six years. 



188 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 



The court sits at Mount Vernon, Springfield 
and Ottawa, 

Di3t (Salary $5,000.) Term Expires 

1. David J. Baker ............ Cairo ..... June, 1897 

2. John Scholfleld ........... Marshall.. " 1897 

3. Jacob W.Wilkin ......... Danville.. 1897 

4. Simeon P. Shope ......... Lewistown " 1894 

5. Alfred M. Craig .......... Galesburg " 1900 

6. Joseph M. Bailey ......... Freeport.. " 1897 

" 



7. Benjamin D. Magruder. . Chicago .. 
Reporter Norman L. Freeman. 



1897 



Clerks Northern Grand Division, A. H. Taylor. 
Southern Grand Division, Frank W.Havill. 
Central Grand Division, E. A. Snively. 

Terms of Court Northern Grand Division, 
OTTAWA; March and October. Southern 
Grand Division, MOUNT VERNON; May and 
November. Central Grand Division, SPRING- 
FIELD; January and June. 

Board of Equalization of Assessments. 
Term of office four years. Present term begins 
rest August 8, 1893. 

1. George F. McKuight, R ....... Auburn Park. 

2. Edward F. Cullerton, D ....... Chicago. 

3. John J. Dah Imann, D .......... Chicago. 

4. Josephs. Martin, D ........... Chicago. 

5. George W. Eldredge, R ........ Richmond. 

6. Charles A. Works, R ........... Rockford. 

7. Thomas P. Pierce, R .......... Kewanee. 

8. R. W. Willett, R ................ Yorkville. 

9. John H. Collier, J? .............. Gibson City. 

10. Cyrus Bocock, R ................ Bradford. 

11. Mansfield M. Sturgeon, R ..... Rock Island. 

12. Campbells. Hearn, J> ......... Qulncy. 

13. Edward Scott, D ............... Jacksonville. 

14. Robert C. Maxwell, R ......... Lincoln. 

15. Joseph C. Glenn, R ............ Mattoon. 

16. John J. Funkhouser, D ...... Burnt Prairie 

17. David B. Owen. D ............. Brownstown. 

18. Joseph F. Long, D .............. New Douglas. 

19. Silas Biggerstaff, D ............ Belle Prairie. 

20. Jesse Bishop. R ................ Marion. 

The Auditor of Public Accounts, ex officio, 
Springfield. 



rest. Board of Agriculture. 

1. J. Irving Pearce.... Chicago... 

2. John P. Reynolds.. Chicago... 

3. J. Harley Bradley. Chicago... 

4. Wm. Stewart Chicago... 

5. Byron F. Wyman.. Sycamore.. 

6. A. B. Hostetter 

7. Samuel Dysart. 



Term Expir 

Jan., 18 



8. W. D. Stryker. . 

9. John Virgin.... 



Mt. Carroll... 
Frank. Grove 
Plainfleld.... 

Fairbury 

Canton 



10. D. W. Vittum 

11. E.B.David Aledo 1895 

12. W. H. Fulkerson... Jersey ville.. 

13. J.W.Judy Tallula 

14. Sheridan W.Johns. Decatur 

15. E. E. Chester Champaign.. 

16. James K. Dickerson Lawrencev'e 

17. W. A. Young Donaldson... 

18. Edward C. Pace .... Ashley 

19. B. Pullen Centralia.... 

20. J. Moodv Richart.. Carbon dale.. 
Ex-President, LaFayette Funk. Shirley. 
President, David Gore, Carlinville. 
Secretary, Wilson C. Garrard, Springfield. 

Board of Education. 
(State Normal University, at Normal.) 

Term Expires 

Ella F. Young Chicago March, 1895 



Matthew P. Brady. . . . Chicago 

Richard Edwards .... Carlinville. . . 

P. R. Walker Rockford .... 

Ruf us Cope Flora 

B. L. Dodge Oak Park 

Geo. B. Harrington.. Princeton 

Ira C. Mosier Essex 

John D. Benedict. . . . Danville 

William H. Green Cairo 

E. A. Gastman Decatur 



1895 
lCi 
1895 



Term Expires 

E. C. Rossetter., Kewanee March, 1897 

W. R. Sandham Wyoming " 1897 

Robert F. Evans Bloomineton. " 1897 

The Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
ex officio, Springfield. 

University Of Illinois. Term Expires 

N. W. Graham Carbondale.. March, 1897 

John H. Bryant Princeton 1897 

Richard P. Morgan. . D wight 1897 

Emory Cobb Kankakee.. . 1893 

George R. Shawhan. Urbana 1893 

W.W.Clemens Marion 1893 

Francis M. McKay... Chicago 1895 

Alex. McLean Macomb 1895 

Samuel A. Bullard... Springfield... 1895 

Ex-Officio Members The Governor; the Pres- 
ident of the State Board of Agriculture; the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

President, Samuel A. Bullard. Springfield. 

Secretary, W. L. Pillsbury, Urbana. 

Treasurer, John W. Bunn, Springfield. 

Southern Normal "University. 
Located at Carbondale. 

(NO Compensation.) Term Expires 

Edward C. Fitch Albion Sept 30, 1895 

Emil Schmidt Nashville.... " 1^95 

Thomas S. Ridgway.. Shawneetown " 1893 
Ezekiel J. Ingersoll.. Carbondale.. " 1897 
Samuel P. Wheeler. . Springfield . . " 1897 
The Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
ex officio, Springfield. 

Principal, Robert Allyn, Carbondale. 

Railroad and "Warehouse Commissioners. 

(Salary $3,500 a year.) Term Expires 

John R. Wheeler Chicago Jan. 1, 1893 

Isaac N. Phillips Bloomington. " 1893 

Jonathan C. Willis... Metropolis... " 1893 
Secretary, J. H. Paddock, Springfield, $2,500. 

Commissioners of Public Charities. 

(No Compensation . ) Term Expires 

J. L. R. Wadsworth.. Collinsville... April, 1892 

John M. Gould Moline " 1803 

Charles G. Trusdell.. Chicago " 1894 

A.T.Barnes Bloomington. " 1895 

J. C. Corbus Mendota " 1S96 

Secretary, Fred. H. Wines, Springfield, $2,5uO. 
Canal Commissioners, 

(Salary $5 a day.) Term Expires 

John C.Ames Streator April 1, 1893 

Louis Hutt Chicago " 1893 

Clarence E. Snively. Canton " 1893 

Clerk, Wm. Milne, Lockport. 

Commissioners Illinois State Penitentiary, 
Prison located at Joliet. 
(Salary $1,500 a year.) Term Expires 

Samuel H. Jones Springfield Janl, LS93 

CharlesBent Morrison " 1895 

A.S.Wright Woodstock.... " 1891 

Warden, Henry D. Dement, Joliet, $2,500. 
Holding over. 

Commissioners Southern Illinois Penitentiary. 
Prison located at Chester. 

(Salary $1,500 a year.) Term Expires 

JohnJ.Brown Vandalia Dec. 30, 1894 

James A. Rose Golconda 1892 

JosephB. Messick....E. St. Louis.. " 18% 
Warden, E. J. Murphy, Menard P. O., $2,500. 

Board Of Health. Term Expires 

Benjamin M.Griffith. Springfield.. .Dec. 30, 1896 

Wm. R. Mackenzie . . Chester " 1895 

William A. Haskell. Alton...-. " 1894 

A.L.Clark Elgin " 1893 

Reuben Ludlam Chicago " 1892 

F. W. Reilly Chicago " 1898 

Daniel H.Williams.. Chicago " 1897 

Secretary, F. W. Reilly, So.OOO. 



CIVIL LISTS. 189 


*R. N. Lawrer 
Chas. R. E. K 
C. Stoddard S 
Charles A. Ki 
C. B. Rohlam 
Secretary. C. 
"Holding ov 

Liv 

(Salary $ 
R. N. McCaul 
Edwin Watts 
Hiram McCh< 

Secretary 

Francis A. Pr 
Wm. P. Boyd 
Thomas N. Ja 
Louis C. Hog 
Hamer Green 
Secretary 

Trustee 

Arthur Edwa 
H. W. Beckwi 
W. L. Gross.. 
Secretat 


Dental Examin 
(Salary $5 a da 
ice Lincoln 
Dch.... Chicag< 
mith.. Chicag 
tchen. Rockfo 
1 Alton 
Stoddard Smith 
er. Chicago. 
e-Stock Commis 
5 a day and exp 
ey Olney. 
Springl 
jsney. ..Geneva 
I. C. P. Johnson 
Board of Pharm 
ickett.. Carbon 
Arcola 
meson. Chicag 
an Englew 
Bloomi 


;rs. 

y.) Term Expires 

July 1,1891 


S. 

Sjf 

Pist 

1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 

E. 
Uo 
W 
( 
Sp 

He 
Da 
Et 
W 
Pa 


Fish Comrr 
P. Bartlett Qt 
orge Breuning . . . . Ce 
K. Fairbank Cl 
Secretary, S. P. B 
lolds over. 

Inspectors of 
(Salary $1,81 
Quinton Clark Br 
Thomas Hudson.. Gi 
James Freer P 
Walton Rutledge. Al 
JohnG.Massie....Mi 

Commission 
(No compens 
D. Blinn Li 


LissionerS. Term Expire* 

incy . . . July 1, 1893 


ntralia " 1892 
Licago " 1891 
artlett, Quincy. 

3oal Mines. 

a year.) Term Expires 
aid wood. . . .Oct. 1, 1893 
ilva " 1893 


> " 1892 
-) . . " 1893 


rd " 18<J4 
1895 


, 103 State street, 
sioners. 

enses.) Term Expires 

April, 1894 
leld.... " 1892 
i " 1893 


oria " 1893] 
ton " 1893 
irissa " 1893 

of Claims. 

ation.) Term Expires 

ncoln July 1,1893 
ilrfield " 1893 
atseka " 1893 
af Public Accounts, 

Dr Statistics. 

' for 30 days.) Term Expires 

Jline Sept 1 1893 


, Springfield. 

ley. Term Expires 

dale.. Dec. 30, 1891 
" 1892 
o " 1893 
ood... " 1894 
ngton. " 1895 
Springfield. 

al Library. 

Term Expires 

J) July 1,1893 
e " 1893 
leld... " 1893 
Springfield. 


bley D. Adams ... Fs 
Ison S. Kay W 


^lerk, the Auditor 
ringfleld. 
Bureau of Lab 
(Salary $5 a daj 
nry A.-Ainsworth. M 
vid Ross Og 


1, Frank Fleury 
s of the Historic 

rds Chicagc 
th Danvfl 
Springl 


Ipshv " ISttt 


helbert Stewart... Decatur " 1893 
P. Rend Chicago " 1893 
trick H. Day Springfield . . " 1893 
Secretary, John S. Lord, Springfield. 


"y, W. L. Gross, 
OFFICIAL LIE 


T OF ILLINOIS COTTNTY OFFICERS FOR 1893. 


COUNTIES. 


County Seat. 


County Clerk. 


Circuit Clerk. 


State's Attorney. 


Adams 
Alexander... 
Bond 
Boone 


8uincy 
airo 


Willis Haselwood... 
Sidney B. Miller.... 
Alfred Adams 
Charles M. Keeler.. . 


Benjamin Heckle. . . 
Edmund S. Dewey. . 
Ward Reid 
AdelbertC. Fassett. 
Burrell R. Badgett. . 
Henry Fuller 
Francis I. Bizaillion 
John S. Grove 
Henry F. Kors 
William G. Brown .. 
W. B. Cashier 


Albert Akens. 
William N. Butler. 
Fred W. Fritz. 
Robert W. Wright. 
Alexander Hedrick. 
Watts A. Johnson. 
T. J. Selby. 
Ralph E. Eaton. 
Reuben R. Hewitt 
Lewis A. Smyres. 
Joseph C. Creighton. 
Thomas L. Orndorff. 
Harvey W. Shriner. 
M. P. Murray. 
John H. Marshall. 
Jacob J. Kern. 
Fernando W. Lewis. 
Wm. H. McDonald. 
Henry S. Early. 
John Fuller. 
John H. Chadwick. 
John H. Batten. 
Alfred Tanner. 
Halbert J. Strawn. 
Rufus C. Harrah. 
James M. Albert. 
A. L. Phillips. 
William F. Spiller. 
P. W. Gallagher. 
Wm. R. McKernon. 
Thomas Henshaw. 
Samuel C. Stough. 
Isaac H.Webb. 
William H. Hartzell. 
R. F. Taylor. 
Elmer U. Overman. 
Emery C. Graves. 
James W. Kern. 
John M. Herbert. 
Charles A. Davidson. 
Albert Watson. 
Harrison W. Pogne. 
Thomas H. Hodson. 
George B. Gillispie. 
Frank W. Joslyn. 
Hiram L. Richardson. 
Albert M. Sweetland. 
Eugene W. Welch. 


Greenville.... 
Belvidere 


Brown 
Bureau.. 
Calhoun 
Carroll 
Cass 
Champion.. . 
Christian.... 
Clark 
Clay 
Clinton 
Coles 
Cook 


Mt. Sterling... 
Princeton 
Hardin 


Wilson M.Reid 
Orin Wilkinson 
Charles A. Watson. 
Fred S. Smith 
John F. Robinson... 
Jas. S. McCullough. 
Charles Whitmer... 
William S. Lowry.... 
Wm. Brissenden 
John C. Lampen 
Ed Anterburn 
Henry Wulff. 
Albert W. Jones 
Abraham I. Rhue. . . 
Albert S. Kinsloe. .. 
James M. Green 
John W. King 
Milton S.Ellsworth 
Keefer Laufman 
Frank Woodham 
John Le Crone 
George B. Muck 
William B. Flora.... 
James M . Joplin 
Joseph Harmison... 
Silas Cook 
Michael J. Carmody 
James McNamara.. 
John Judd 


Mt. Carroll.... 
Virginia 
Urbana 
Taylorville.... 
Marshall 
Louisville 
Carlyle 
Charleston 
Chicago 


Harry W.Redman.. 
John Murvin 


H. A. Niehoff 
William F. Purill... 
t^rank J. Gaulter. . . 
Thomas J. Newlin.. 
Ebenezer Stewart.. 
S. T. Armstrong 
William O.Rogers.. 
Daniel A. Conover. . 
Albert H. Wiant.... 
James L.Vance 
Edwin J.Wilson 
Henry Hubrich 
Benj. F.Williams... 
Oscar H. Wylie 
George B.Shaw 
J. D. Breckenridge. . 
R. L. Millspaugh 
John A. Pellett 
Joseph H. Pettit.... 
Hiram L. Maulding. 
Thomas F.Dunn.. 
MilasFerrell 
Harry F. McAllister 
Lewis H. Patten.... 
Frank I. Mann 
Robert W. Watson . 
Isaiah Stewart 
Wm. V. Satterfleld.. 
Ludovic Laurent 
John C. O'Neill 
LeviJ. Smith 
Charles A. Miller ... 
Sidney R. Durfee... 
Avery N. Beebe 
Samuel V. Stuckey.. 


Crawford.... 
Cumberl'nd. 
DeKalb 
DeWitt 
Douglas 
DuPage 
Edgar 


Robinson 
Toledo 
Sycamore 
Clinton 
Tuscola 
Wheaton 
Paris 


Edwards 
Effingham .. 
Fayette 
Ford 
Franklin .... 
Fulton 
Gallatin 
Greene 
! Grundy 


Albion 
Effingham ... 
Vandalia 
Paxton 
Benton 
Lewistown 
Shawneeto'n .. 
Carrollton 
Morris 


Hamilton.... 
Hancock 
Hardin 
Henderson.. 
Henry 
Iroquois 
Jackson 
Jasper 
Jefferson 
Jersey 
Jo Daviess . . 
Johnson 
Kane 
Kankakee... 
Kendall 
Knox 


McLean sboro. 
Carthage 
Elizabethto'n. 
Oquawka 
Cambridge 
Watseka 
Murphysboro.. 
Newton 
Mt. Vernon ... 
Jersey ville ... 
Galena 
Vienna 
Geneva 
Kankakee 
Yorkville 
Galesburgr 


JohnF. Scott 
Thomas R. Wooley. 
Sumner H. McMillan 
Frank G. Welton.... 
J. Warren Gregory. . 
Edward Crawford.. . 
H.K.Powell 
Allen C. Tanner 
Daniel J. Murphy. . 
William Rippin 
William H. Thomas 
Arthur M. Beaupre. 
Wm. F. Kenaga 
William Hill 
MosesO. Williamson 



190 CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 1893. 


ILLINOIS COUNTY OFFICERS.-CONTINUED. 


COUNTIES. 


County Seat. 


County Clerk. 


Circuit Clerk. 


State's Attorney. 


Lake 


Waukegan 




William M. Ragan.. . 
Daniel A. Maher 
Benjamin R. Fisher 
Ira W. Lewis 
Hugh Thompson 
August P. Kuemmel 
EdmistonMcClellan 
John Homer 
Robert Hagnauer. . . 
Isaac B. Betts 
Crawford N. Ong 
William M. Duffy.... 
S. Bartlett Kerr 
C.S.Churchill 
Webster P. Morse... 
James H. Leaton 
T. C. Bennett 
William McManus.. 
John Wiesenborn... 
Emery Wright 
John F. Clark 
Samuel D. Patterson 
Charles M. Gale 
James E.Pillsbury.. 
Albert A. Driemeyer 
Robert Hudgen 
George W. Archer . . 
H. Clanahan 


C. T. Heydecker. 
Vincent Duncan. 
John E. McLaughey. 
C. B. Morrison. 
Edgar P. Holly, 
tdward G. King. 
Isaac R. Mills. 
Kdward C. Knotts. 
Elliott Breese Glass. 
Charles E. Jennings. 
Thomas F. Clover. 
Edgar B. Wright. 
Douglas W. Helm. 
Theodore B. Switzer. 
Adelbert B. Coon. 
John A. Sterling. 
Charles Nusbaum. 
James M. Brock. 
Joshua Wilson. 
Thomas M. Jett. 
Felix D. McAvoy. 
Jonathan Meeker. 
Delos W. Baxter. 
Richard J. Cooney. 
Charles D. Kane. 
Harry H. Crea. 
Averill Beavers. 
David G. Thompson. 
Lewis M. Bradley. 
James E. Taylor. 
Reuben J. Goddard. 
H. G. Morris. 
Charles J. Searle. 
Marion S. Whitley. 
James M. Graham. 
David H. Glass. 
Thomas J. Priest. 
William O. Wallace. 
J. Hamilton Rennick. 
Martin W. Schaefer. 
Oscar E. Heard. 
Gurdon F. Saltonstall. 
A. Ney Sessions. 
S. G. Wilson. 
M. H. Mundy. 
Chas. A. McLaughlin. 
Charles T. Moore. 
Frank B. Hanna. 
Francis M. Parish. 
Walter Stager. 
Edward C. Aken. 
John W. Peebles. 
Arthur H. Frost. 
Thomas Kennedy 


LaSalle 
Lawrence.... 
Lee 
Livingston.. 
Logan 
Macon 
Macoupin... 
Madison 
Marion 
Marshall.... 
Mason 
Massac 
McDonough. 
McHenry 
McLean 
Menard 
Mercer 
Monroe 
Montgom 'ry 
Morgan 
Moultrie 
Ogle 


Ottawa 
Lawr'nceville 
Dixon 
Pontiac 
Lincoln 
Decatur... ..... 


Patrick Finlen 




Carl Busse 
Jas. H. Thompson. 
John C. George 
Jeremiah Matthews 
George P. Hardy.. 
John B. Vaughn. . . 
Hartly Lanham 
Samuel J. Smith.. . 
John Hartley 
Edward D. Terrell 
Samuel Atwell 
John E. Lane 
William Avery 
Robert Maxton 
Harvey M. Levering 
James S. Sexton 
Paul C. Brey 


Carlinville.... 
Bdwardsville. 
Salem 
Lacon 
Havana 
Metropolis.... 
Macomb 
Woodstock.... 
Bloomington . 
Petersburg 
Aledo 
Waterloo 
Hillsboro 
Jacksonville.. 
Sullivan....... 
Oregon 
Peoria 
Pinckneyville 
Monticello 
Pittsfleld 
Golconda 
Mound City... 
Hennepin 
Chester 


B. A. Hendricks 
John C. Williams.... 
Silas D. Stocks 
James C. Fesler 
James E.Walsh 
Ralph G. Williams.. 
Andrew L. Rodgers. 
Virgil A. Grimes.... 
Penn V. Trovillion.. 
E.W. McClelland.... 
Amos T. Purviance. 
Isaac C. Beare 


Peoria 
Perry 


Piatt 
Pike 
Pope 


Pulaski 
Putnam 
Randolph.... 
Richland.... 
Rock Island. 
Saline . 


Benjamin L. Ulm... 
Jefferson Durley 
Wallace Snook 
George A. Keller.... 
George W. Gamble.. 
John H.Lee 
Edward Cahill 
N. S. Montgomery.. . 
John T. Johnson 
Thomas H. Graham. 
James Kinney 


Olney 
Rock Island... 
Harrisburg . . . 
Springfield 
Rushville 
Winchester... 
Shelbyville... 
Toulon 


A.J. Keefer 
Hjalmar Kohler 
James H. Pearce 
Simon M. Rogers 
Adolph P.Rodewald 
Samuel Berry 
Alfred F.Allen 
Joseph Chase 
Philip Rheim 


Sangamon.. . 
Schuyler 
Scott 
Shelby 
Stark 


St. Clair 
Stephenson . 
Tazewell 
Union 
Vermilion .. 
Wabash 
Warren 
Washington. 
Wayne 
White 
Whiteside .. 
Will 
Williamson. 
Winnebago.. 
Woodford... 


Belleville 
Freeport 
Pekin 
Jonesboro 
Danville 
Mt. Carmel.... 
Monmouth 
Nashville 
Fairfleld 
Carmi 
Morrison 
Joliet 
Marion 


Thomas May, Jr 
Wilbur F. Goddard. 
A. L. Champion 
WtlltemH. Peak 
Martin J. Barger 
George C. Harvey.. . 
L. O. Tourtellott 
Thomas J. Vernor... 
Samuel H.Ray 
George R. Williams. 
Lauren E. Tuttle. . . 
Frank V. Bogart 
Henry C. Jones 
Lewis F. Lake 
George Jeck 


H. Poffenbarger 
Adolph Fehrman 
J.Henry Hilboldt... 
Walter C. Tuttle.... 
Sebastian Weigand. 
Wm. H. Sexton 
Henry F. Reuter. . . . 
Frank M. Brock 
William P. Tuley.... 
Edwin W. Payne 
Henry H. Stassen . . 
James C.Mitchell... 
Marcus A. Norton.. 
Thomas A.Huxtable 


Rockford 
Metamora. ... 


AMERICAN 

The greatest cataract in the world is the 
Falls of Niagara, where the water from the 
great upper lakes forms a river of three- 
quarters of a mile in width, and then being 
suddenly contracted plunges over the rocks 
in two columns, to the depth of 170 feet each. 
The greatest cave in the world is the Mam- 
moth cave in Kentucky, where any one can 
make a voyage on the waters of a subter- 
ranean river and catch flsh without eyes. 
The greatest river in the world is the Missis- 
sippi 4.100 miles long. The largest valley in 
the world is the valley of the Mississippi; it 
contains 500.000 square miles and is one of the 
most fertile and profitable regions of the 
globe. The greatest city park in the world is 
in Philadelphia; it contains over 2,900 acres. 
The greatest grain port in the world is 
Chicago. The largest lake in the world is 
Lake Superior, which is truly an inland sea, 


WONDERS. 

being 430 miles long and 1.000 feet deep. The 
longest railroad in the world is the Pacific! 
railroad, over 3,000 miles in length. The 
greatest natural bridge in the world is the i 
Natural Bridge over Cedar creek, in Virginia; 
it extends across a chasm 80 feet in width; 
and 250 feet in depth, at the bottom of which 
the creek flows. The greatest mass of solid 
iron in the world is the Iron mountain of 
Missouri; it is 350 feet high and two miles in 
circuit. The best specimen of Grecian archi- 
tecture in the world is the Girard college for 
orphans, Philadelphia. The largest aqueduct 
in the world is the Croton aqueduct in New 
York; its length is forty miles and a half 
and it cost $12,500.000. The largest deposits of 
anthracite coal in the world are in Pennsyl- 
vania, the mines of which supply the market 
with millions of tons annually and appear to 
be inexhaustible. 



ILLINOIS STATE LEGISLATURE. 



191 



Elltnots State ^Legislature. 

1892-1893. 



List of Members of the Thirty-Eighth General Assembly, 
Session Begins Jan. 4, 1893. 



SENATE 
Republicans, ?2. 
Dist. Name. Postoffice. County. 

1. E. T. Noonan... Chicago Cook. 

2. C. P. Johnson... Chicago Cook. 

3. George Bass Chicago Cook. 

4. Moses Salomon.Chicago Cook. 

5. J. P. Mahoney . .Chicago Cook 

6. H. C. Bartling . .Chicago Cook. 

7. Jno. Humphrey..Or[&nd Cook. 

8. Reub. W. Coon. . Waukegan .. .Lake. 

9. Philip Knopf. .. .Chicago Cook. 

10. David Hunter... Kockford Wlnnebago. 

LI. Emil Thiele Chicago Cook. 

'2. H. F. Aspinwall.Freeport Stephenson. 

3. J. F. O'Malley.. Chicago Cook. 

4. Henry H. Evans. Aurora Kane. 

15. Jno. W. Arnold..Lockport Will. 

"6. G.R.Letourneau.Kankakee. .. .Kankakee. 

7. Daniel D.Htmt.DeKalb DeKalb. 

8. Chas. Bogardus..Paxton Ford. 

9. V. S. Ferguson... Sterling Whiteside. 

20. C. N. Barnes Lacon Marshall. 

21. W. F. Crawford.. Taylor Ridge.Rock Island. 

22. Thomas Hamer.. Vermont Fulton. 

23. A. J. O'Conor... LaSalle LaSalle. 

24. Orville F.^rry-Carthage Hancock. 

25. Louis Zearing. . .Ladd Bureau. 

26. J. M. Niehaus. . .Peoria Peoria. 



(by Districts). 

Democrats, 29. 
Dist. Name. Postoffice. County. 

27. Perry Anderson. Alexis Warren. 

28. V. E. Howell Bloomington.McLean. 

29. H. Manecke. . . .Oakley Macon . 

30. H. M. Dunlap... Savoy Champaign. 

31. Oeo. E. acon.. Paris Edgar. 

32. Isaac B. Craig. .Mattoon. 

33. S.W.Wright, Jr.. Sullivan. 

34. A. A. Leeper.. . .Virginia , 

35. Albert W. Wells.Quincy. . . . 

36. Harry Higbee..Pittsfleld... 

37. Sy IvesterAllen . Oxville 

38. H. W. Wall Staunton .. . 

39. B. F. Cald well.. Chatham ... 

40. G. W. Paisley.. .Hillsboro Montgomery. 

41. J. W. Coppinger. Alton Madison. 

42. Thos. E. Ford. . . Carlyle Clinton. 

43. W. M. Farmer.. Vandalia Fayette. 

44. W. A. Mussett . .Gray ville 

(White Co.).Edwards. 

45. A. J. ReavilI....Flat Rock.... Crawford. 

46. J. R. Campbell.. M'Leansboro.Hamilton. 

47. Peter Seibert... Fay etteville.. St. Clair. 

48. A. L. Brands Pr.duRocher.Randolph. 

49. T.H. Sheridan. .Golconda Pope. 

50. Reed Green Cairo Alexander. 

51. P. T. Chapman.. Vienna Johnson. 



...Coles. 

...Moultrie. 

...Cass. 

...Adams. 

...Pike. 

..Scott. 

..Macoupin. 

..Sangamon. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES (by Districts). 



Republicans, 75. 

Dist. Name. Postoffice. County. 

1. Jas. O'Connor. . .Chicago Cook. 

Wm. Burke Chicago Cook. 

W. W. Wheelock.Chicago Cook. 

2. M. Mclnerney. .Chicago Cook. 

C. S. Deneen Chicago Cook. 

R. McMurdy. . . .Chicago Cook. 

3. Stephen D.May. Chicago Cook. 

James E. Bish.. Chicago Cook. 

Wm. H. King. . .Chicago Cook. 

4. J. E. McGinley.. Chicago Cook. 

J. F. Gleeson... Chicago Cook. 

John Meyer Chicago Cook. 

5. Ed. J. Novak.. . .Chicago Cook. 

Ed. J. Hayes Chicago Cook. 

Aug. W. Nohe. . .Chicago Cook. 

6. Jas. H. Farrell. .Chicago Cook. 

E. H. Griggs. . . .Chicago Cook. 

G. Langhenry. . .Chicago Cook. 

7. C. E. Crafts Austin Cook. 

Robt. H. Muir. . .Clyde Cook. 

Wm. Thiemann.ltasca 

(DuPage Co.).Cook. 

8. J. C. Donnelly. .Woodstock. . .McHenry. 

Robt. J. Beck Chemung McHenry. 

George Reed Belvidere Boone. 

9. B. M. Mitchell. .Chicago Cook. 

J. A. O'Donnell. Chicago Cook. 

D. A. Campbell.. Chicago Cook. 



10. Jas. P.Wilson.. . Woosung Ogle. 

P. H. Ta/&o....Lindenwood..Ogle. 

L. M. Noling Rockford Winnebago. 



11. Bryan_Con way.. Chicago Cook. 

!cook 



H. P. Carmody .Chicago.... 

Wm. E.Kent Chicago 

12. J. N. Brandt.... Polo 



J. C. McKenzie. .Elizabeth 

Dan'l S. Berry. .Savanna. . 

13. Wm.H.Lyman-.Chicago... 

J.A.KwasigrochChicago Cook. 

S. E. Erickson.. Chicago Cook. 



.Carroll. 
.Jo Daviess. 
.Carroll. 
.Cook. 



Democrats, 78. 

Dist. Name. Postoffice. County. 

14. L. M. Dearborn Aurora Kane. 

E. C Hawley... Dundee Kane. 

Chas. P. Bryan.. Elmhurst DuPage. 

15. C. Wilkening... .Crete Will. 

David Forsythe.Elwood Will. 

Fred Wilke Beech er Will. 

16. F. P. Morris Watseka Iroquois. 

D. H. Paddock. .Kankakee. . . .Kankakee. 
Alba M. Jones. . .Milford Iroquois. 

17. E. L. Henning . .Piano Kendall. 

C. F. Meyer Kirkland DeKalb. 

C. T. Cherry Oswego Kendall. 

18. Jas. A. Smith. . .Chatsworth. ..Livingston. 

R. C. Straight.. Fairbury Livingston. 

B. A. Gower Odell Livingston. 

19. C. C. Johnson. . .Sterling Whiteside. 

W. I. Guffln Paw Paw Lee. 

John Dyer Fulton Whiteside. 

20. Wm.A. Moore.. Morton Tazewell. 

S. H. McClure. . .Eureka Woodford. 

Oscar Painter. . .Metamora Woodford. 

21. J. H. Mulligan. .Kewanee Henry. 

William Payne. Osborn Rock Island. 

R. F. Seals Oneida 

(Knox Co.).. Henry. 

22. S. E. Carlin Canton Fulton. 

J. L. Hastings.. Galesburg Knox. 

F. Murdoch Oneida Knox. 

23. M. O'Loughlin.. Seneca LaSalle. 

Louis Rohrer. ..Somonauk LaSalle. 
17. S. Ellsworth..T)eer Park. . . .LaSalle. 

24. Wm. H. Myers. .Terre Haute.-Henderson. 
N. H. Guthrie...Aledo Mercer. 

J. 0. Anderson. . Decorra Henderson. 

25. Michael Barton. SpringValley. Bureau. 

A. W. H<rpkins... Gran ville Putnam. 

Geo. Murray . . . .Elmira Stark. 

26. Peter Cahill . . . .Brimfleld Peoria. 

John Holmes. . . Alta Peoria. 

Wm. O. Clark... Peoria Peoria. 

27. T. J. Sparks Bushnell......McDonough. 



192 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC FOR 



County. 
IcD enough. 



Dist. Name. Postoti ., 

Lmiis Kaiser Bushnell Me] 

D. C. Hanna Monmouth. . .Warren. 

28. B. J.Claggett... Lexington.... McLean. 

f. G'Connell. . . .Bloomington. McLean. 
. Stubblefleld. . .McLean McLean. 

29. L. B. Stringer. . .Lincoln Logan. 

W. S. Smith Mount Zion..Macon. 

T. N. Leavitt. . . .Maroa Macon. 

30. T. B. Carson. . . .Urbana Champaign. 

John Cufsey Farmer City.. De Witt. 

Jas.A. Hawks. . . Atwood Piatt. 

31. R. L. McKin lay. Paris Edgar. 

T. L. Spellman. .Danville Vermilion. 

J. P. Fletcher . . .Ridge Farm. .Vermilion. 

32. J. Park McGee. .Tuscola Douglas. 

Chas. flanker.. . .Toledo Cumberland. 

W. H. Wallace. .Humboldt... .Coles. 

33. Philip Wiwi Montrose Effingham. 

L. S. Baldwin. . .Windsor Shelby. 

A. Campbell Effingham Effingham. 

34. B. P. Preston.... Littleton Schuyler. 

R. S. Carter Petersburg. ..Menard. 

Homer J. Tice. . .Greenview. ...Menard. 

35. Mitchell Dazey.Lima Adams. 

J. W. Bonney. . .Quincy Adams. 

G. C. McCrone. .Quincy Adams. 

36. Ernst Meyer Deer Plain... Calhoun. 

F. W. Rottger...Mt. Sterling.. Brown. 
Augustus Dow. .Pittsfleld Pike. 

37. Thos. F. Ferns. . Jerseyville. . .Jersey. 

N. L. Jones Carrollton . ...Greene. 

O. A. Snedcker. .Jerseyville.. .Jersey. 

38. W. L. Mounts.. Carlinville. ..Macoupin. 
J. T. McMillan.. Jacksonville-Morgan. 
S. McKnight Girard Macoupin. 

39. E. L. Merritt.,.. Springfield.... Sangamon. 
L. StA.Whitley.Springfleld. ...Sangamon. 
H. Clay TFt7s07i..Springfield... .Sangamon. 

40. W. S. Parrott. . .Litchfield Montgomery. 
A. B. Herdman.Morris'nville.Christian. 

C. A. Ramsey. . .Hillsboro Montgomery. 

41 Michael J. Gill-Alton Madison. 

C.A.Ambrosius.Collinsville . .Madison. 

T. T. Ramey. . . .Brooks Madison. 

42. J . J. Anderson . .Nashville Washington 



Dist. Name. 



Postoffice. County. 



C. W. Seawell.. Greenville Bond. 
G. S. Caughlan. .Trenton ...... Clinton. 

43. Jas. H. Watson. Wood Lawn. Jefferson. 

D. W.Holstlaw.Iuka ......... Marion. 

R. T. Higgins...V&udal[& ..... Fayette. 

44. Capt.T.Taggart.Cisne ......... Wayne. 

T. H. Creiffhton.. Fairfield ..... Wayne. 

J. D. Edmiston.Olney ......... Richland. 

45. Lawr'nceKelly.Martinsville. Clark. 
Jas. P. Warren. Rose Hill ... Jasper. 

E. Callahan Robinson _____ Crawford. 

46. J. Edwin Black. Bridgeport. . Lawrence. 
J. Zimmerman. .Mt. Carmel. . Wabash. 
JohnS. Martin.. Bridgeport. . Lawrence. 

47. W.H.Snyder.Jr. Belleville ... St. Clair. 
Jos. E. Miller. . . Belleville ... St. Clair. 
Fred.S.Weckler. Darmstadt .. .St. Clair. 

48. Jos. W. Drury . . Waterloo ..... Monroe. 
Jos. L. Murphy. Pinckn'yville Perry. 

J. J. Douglas. . .Chester ...... Randolph. 

49. H. R. Fowler... Elizab'hto'n..Hardin. 
-F..4.. .A rmstmnsr.MassacCreek.Massac. 
A. W. Lewis Harrisburg. ..Saline. 

50. Philip H. Kroh.Anna ......... Union. 



Wm. C. Dean...Ava 
Walter Warder.Ca.iro 
51. S. H. Goodall... Marion 
John H.DuncanMarion 
R. M. Johnson . .Levings 



Jackson. 

Alexander. 

Williamson. 

Williamson. 

Pulaski. 



SENATE. 

Republicans 22 

Democrats 29 

Total "51 

HOUSE. 

Republicans 75 

Democrats 73 

Total 153 

JOINT ASSEMBLY. 

Republicans 97 

Democrats 107 

Total ,...204 



STATE LEGISLATTJRE--1892-1893. --Alphabetically Arranged. 
SENATE. 



Name. Dist. , Name. 

Allen, Sylvester 37|Craig, I. B 

Anderson, Perry 27iDunlap, H. M 

Arnold, J. W 15 Evans, H. F... 

Aspinwall. H.T 12 Farmer, W. M 

Bacon, G. E SliFerguson, V. S 

Barnes. C. N 20 Ford, T. E 

Bartling, H. C 6 Green. R 

Bass, George 3 Hamer. T 

Berry. O. F 24 Higbee. H 

Bogardus, Chas 18 Howell, V. E 

Brands, A. L 48 Humphrey, J 

Caldwell, B. F 30 Hunt. D. D 

Campbell, J.R 46 Hunter, D 

Chapman. P. T Sl'Johnson, C. P 

Coon. W.R 8 Knopf. P 

8oppinger. J. W 41 Leeper. A. A 
rawford, W. F 21iLetourneau, G. R... 



Dist.\ Name. 

... 32'Mahoney, J. P.... 

... 30 Manecke,M 

... 14 Mussett, W. A.... 

...43 Niehaus, J.M 

,... 19 Noonan, E. T.... 
.... 42 O'Conor, A. J... 
....50 O'Malley, J. F.... 
.... 22 Paisley, G. W... 

... 36 Reavill, A. J 

28 Salomon, M 

... 7 Sheridan. T. H... 

...17 Seibert, P 

.... 10 Thiele, E 

... 2 Wall.H. W 

... 9; Wells, A. W... 
... 34j Wright, S. W., Jr. 
... 16 Zearing. L 



Dist 
.... 5 
.... 29 
.... 44 
.... 26 

... 1 



HOUSE. 



Name. 

Ambiosius, C. A. 
Anderson, J. J... 
Anderson. J. O.. 
Armstrong, F. A. 
Baldwin. L.S.... 

Barton. M 

Beals, R. F 

Beck, R. J 

Berry, D. S 



Dist. Name. 

... 41 Bish, J. E...... 

... 42 Black. J. E.... 

...24 Bonney, J. W. 
... 49 Brandt, J. N... 
... 33 Bryan, C. P.. 



25 Burke, W 1 

21Cahill, P 26 

8 Callahan, E 45 

12|Campbell, A 



Campbell, D. A. 
Carlin, S. E. 



Carmody, H. P. 
Carson, F. B... 

Carter, R. S 

Caughlan, G. S. 
Cherry, C. T. . . . 

Clark, W.O 

33Claggett, B.J... 



Dist. 
.... 9 
.... 22 
.... 11 



| ILLINOIS STATE LEGISLATURE. 193 


HOUSE. CONTINUED. 


1 Name. Dist. 
Con way, B . . 11 


Name. Dist. 
Kent WE 11 


Name. Dist. 
O'Donnell J A 9 


Crafts, C. E. . 7 


King W H. 3 


O'Loughlin M 23 


j Creighton, T. H 44 


Kroh P. H . . 50 


Paddock D H 16 


Cusey, J 30 


Kwasigroch, J. A 13 


Painter O .... 20 


i Dazey M 35 






Dean W C 50 


Leavitt T N 29 


Payne W 21 


Dearborn, L. M 14 
Deneen, C. S 2 
Donnelly, J. C 8 


Lewis, A. W 49 
Lyman. W. H 13 
McClure, S H.. .. 20 


Preston, B. P 34