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Full text of "Chicago daily news national almanac for .."

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[TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR] 



THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS 



ALMANAC 

AND YEAR-BOOK 



FOR 



ion 



9 



COMPILED BY JAMES LANGLAND, M. A. 



ISSUED BY 
THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS COMPANY 

[Copyright, 1910, by The Chicago Daily News Co.] 






PREFACE. 



Among other matters of special interest contained in the 
present issue of The Daily News Almanac and Year-Book 
mention may be made of the following: 

The new postal savings bank law of the United States. 
This is regarded as one of the most important pieces of legis- 
lation in recent years, for which reason the text of the act is 
given in full. 

The amendments to the interstate-commerce law, includ- 
ing provisions for a commerce court to supplement the work of 
the commission. 

Details of the old-age and industrial pension systems of 
various countries of the world. In view of proposed state and 
national legislation on this subject it is believed that the infor- 
mation given is timely and suggestive. 

Results of the thirteenth decennial census of the United 
States, showing the growth of population in the various states 
and territories and in the principal cities. The county popula- 
tion will be found in the election tables. 

State, congressional and local elections in 1910, showing a 
marked reversal of political sentiment in many parts of the 
country. 

These are but a few of the many new and old features 
which should make The Daily News Almanac and Year-Book 
for 1911 a reference work of exceptional value. It may also be 
noted that in the effort to add to the general usefulness and 
comprehensiveness of the book it has been found necessary to 
increase its size by thirty-two pages, making the total in this 
issue 640. 



INDEX 1911. 



Note^Table of contents of pre- 
vious issues of The Daily News 
Almanac and Year-Book begins 
011 page 626. 



Page. 

Abyssinia 127 

Academy, French 92 

Academy of Design, National. 556 
Academy of Fine Arts, Chicago 546 

Academy of Sciences 552 

Academy of Sciences Library. 510 
Academy of Sciences, Nat'l... 201 

Accident, Railroad, Law 44 

Accidents, Football 408 

Accidents, Fourth of July 174 

Accidents, Hunting 491 

Accidents, Miscellaneous 344 

Accidents, Railroad, Statistics 339 
Accountants, Examiners of... 462 

Adams Park 500 

Administration, State Board of 461 

Administrator, Public 475 

Admission of Territories 42 

Aeronautical Progress 314 

Afghanistan 126 

Africa t 127 

Ages, Population by 433 

Agricultural Institute, Rome. 132 

Agricultural Statistics 141 

Agriculture, Department of.. 256 
Agriculture, Secretaries of.. 113 

Agriculture, State Board 459 

Airship Passenger Service 319 

Alabama, Vote of 354 

Alaska, Territory of 116 

Aldermen, Board of 483 

Aldermen, Vote for 403 

Aldine Square .. 500 

Algeria , 127 

Alleys. Length of..... 626 

Aluminum Produced 177 

Amateur Musical Club 495 

Ambassadors, American 270 

Ambassadors to U. S '273 

American Antiquities 87 

American Bible Society 193 

American Federation of Labor 195 
American Republics, Bureau. 179 

American Tract Society 193 

American Trotting Derby 227 

America's Cup, The 233 

Amphion Singing Club 495 

Amundsen Expedition 175 

Amy L. Barnard Park 500 

Anatomists, Ass'n of Amer. . 201 

Andrew. A. P.. Sketch 333 

Anglo- Boer War, Chronology. 68 

Animals. Farm 144 

Annexation. Vote 404 

Antarctic Exploration 175 

Anti-Cruelty Society 608 

Antietam Park 87 

Antimony Produced 177 

Antiquities, American 87 

Antlsaloon Campaign, Chicago 520 
Anti-Saloon League, Illinois. 608 

Antitrust Law. Sherman 70 

Apollo Musical Club 495 

Appeals, Circuit Courts of 257 



Page. 

Appellate Court, 1st District. 476 
Apportionment, Congressional. 269 
Appropriations by Congress. .. 45 

Appropriations, Chicago 494 

Appropriations, Cook County. 479 

Appropriations, Illinois 465 

Arabic Numerals 62 

Arbitration, Hague Court of. 66 
Arbitration In Fisheries Case. 69 

Arbitration, Record of 70 

Arbitration, State Board 461 

Arbor Rest 500 

Arcade Park 500 

Archaeological Society of Am. 201 

Archbishops, Catholic 188 

Archdiocese of Chicago 189 

Archer Point 500 

(Archery 250 

Architect, County 474 

Architect, State 461 

Architects, American Inst 200 

Architects, Examiners. State. 461 
Architectural Club, Chi. ..554, 568 

Arctic Exploration 175 

Area, Chicago, Growth of 516 

Area of Chicago 491 

Area of Cities 320 

Area of Oceans and Lakes 86 

Area of United States 324 

Argentina 127 

Arizona, Admission of 42 

Arizona, Vote of 355 

Arkansas, Vote of 355 

Armenian Massacres 71 

Armies of World 282 

Armour Square 498 

Army and Navy Union 210 

Army of the United States... 275 

Army Pay Table 280i 

Army, Strength of 280 

Arrivals, Vessel, Chicago 524 

Arsenals, United States 76 

Art Clubs, Chicago 558 

Art Commission, State 462 

. 76 
. 546 



Art Galleries, Leading. 
Art Institute, Chicago., 

Art League, Municipal 501 

Artists, Societies of 558 



Arts. American Federation of 556 

Asbestos Produced 177 

Ashland Boulevard 499 

Asia 126 

Asiatic Association. American 200 

Asphaltum Produced 177 

Assay Offices. United States.. 256 

Assembly, Illinois, 47th 448 

Assessment, Chicago 522 

Assessment, Cook County 522 

Assessment. Illinois 470 

Assessors, Board of 474 

Assets, Fixed. Chicago 494 

Assoc'ted Fraternities of Am. 206 

Associated Press, The 201 

Associations, Illinois 470 

Associations. National 556 

Astronomical Soc. of America 201 

Asylums in Chicago 618 

Asylums in United States 137 

Athletic Association, Chicago. 554 

Athletic Records 217 

Athletic Records in 1910 221 

Athletic Records, World's 220 



Page. 

/Atlantic Fisheries Dispute 69 

Atlantic Voyages, Fastest 329 

Attorney, City 484 

Attorneys, City, Since 1837... 495 

Attorney, Prosecuting 484 

Attorneys-General 113 

Attorneys, U. S. District/ 259 

Austin Park... <* 500 

Australia 122 

Austria-Hungary 122 

Automobile Club, Chicago 554 

Automobile Fares 570 

Automobile Races 235 

Autumn Begins 13 

Aviation Accidents 316 

Aviation Meets 315 

Aviation. Progress of 311 

Aviation Records 3i6 

Avondale Park.". BOO 



Ballinger-Pinchot Controversy 311 

Ballinger, R. A., Portrait 252 

Ballooning sis 

Balloon Racing 319 

Bankers' Association, Amer.: 556 
Bankers' Association, Illinois 470 
Banking, Amer. Institute of. 556 

Banking, Growth of 156 

Banking Power of U. S 156 

Banking Statistics 155 

Banks, Foreign Postal Savings 155 

Banks, National 155 

Banks of Chicago 511 

Banks, Postal Savings, Law. 40 

Banks, Principal Foreign 155 

Banks, Savings of U. S 156 

Banks, Savings, Statistics.... 157 

Bank Statistics. Chicago 512 

Baptist Brotherhood 558 

Baptist Denomination 192 

Baptist Ministers' Conference 558 

Baptist Social Union 558 

Bar Association, American... 200 

Bar Association, Chicago 568 

P>ar Association, Illinois .470 

Barbers' Examining Board 462 

Barley Crop by Years 143 

Barley Crop of World 149 

Barometer. Wind, for Lakes. 176 

Bartzen, P., Portrait 473 

Barytes Produced 177 

Baseball 221 

Baseball, College 225 

Basket Ball 250 

Bathing Beaches 501 

Baths. Free Public.... 558 

Battle Ship Fleet. Cruise of.. 162 
Battle Ships. United States.. 29 

Bauxite Produced ,,. 177 

Beef Packing. Chicago ,... 584 

Beet Sugar Production. ...,.,. 148 
Belden Avenue Triangle ....... 500 

Belgium 123 

Benevolent Institutions, U. S. 137 

Benevolent Societies 2i>2 

Bequests. Notable, in 1910.... 33j 
Berger, V. L., Sketch 3& 



1 93602 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



Page. 

Bessemer ,- J ark 498 

Bible Sociaty, American 193 

Bible Society, Am., Chicago.. 558 
Bibliographical Soc., Chicago. 568 

Bickerdike Square 500 

Billiards 249 

Biological Chemists, Am. Soc. 200 

Bird Reserves 173 

Birth Rates 139, 140 

Birth Stones 182 

Bishops, Catholic 188 

Bishops, Episcopal 189 

Bishops, Methodist 190 

Bjorgvin Singing Society 495 

Bjornson, B., Death of 68 

Blair, F. G., Portrait 458 

Blackstone Point 500 

Blind in United States 445 

Blind Minors, Chicago 586 

Board of Health, State 460 

Board of Trade 558 

Boat Racing 241 

Boer War, Chronology 68 

Boiler Inspection, Department 486 

Bokhara 126 

Bolivia 127 

Bond and Stock Commission.. 39 

Bonds, City Hall, Vote on 403 

Borax Produced 177 

Botanical Society of America 201 

Boulevards, Chicago 497 

Bowling 246 

Braga, T., Sketch 333 

Brazil 127 

Bridges, Closed Hours on 596 

Bridges in Chicago.... 576 

British Elections 116 

Brooklyn Handicap 227 

Brotherhood of Andrew and 

Philip 193 

Broward, N., Sketch 333 

Brundage, E. J., Portrait 482 

Brussels Exposition Fire 53 

Buckwheat Crop by Years 143 

Bnena Circle 500 

Building Associations 120 

Building Department 485 

Builders' Club 554 

Building Statistics, Chicago... 503 
Buildings, Notable, Chicago.. 574 

Bulgaria 123 

Burke, John, Sketch 333 

Bushel Weights 181 

Busse, F. A., Portrait 482 

Butter, International Trade.. 146 
Butter, Production 164 



Cab and Carriage Fares 570 

Cabinets of United States 112 

Cables, World's 59 

Calabrian Earthquake 86 

Calendar for 1911 15 

Calendar for 1912 31 

Calendar, Ready-Reference 21 

Calendars, Various 14 

California, Vote of 356 

Calumet Club 554 

Calumet Park 498 

Cambridge-Oxford Races 243 

Camera Club, Chicago 554 

Campaign Contributions 43 

Campaign Costs 268 

Campbell, M., Portrait 482 

Campbell Park.... 499 

Canada 121 

Canadian Crops 146 

Canal Commissioners, Illinois. 461 

Canal, Hennepin 94 

Canal, New York 94 

Canal, Panama 63 

Canals, Great Ship 94 

Canals in United States 93 

Canvassing Board, State 46S 

Capital Punishment 136 



Page. 

Capitals of States 328 

Capitol in Washington 264 

Cardinals, College of 189 

Car Ferry Wreck 345 

Carnegie Peace Fund 451 

Carroll, W., Portrait 482 

Cartago Earthquake 140 

Carnegie Foundation 86 

Carnegie Hero Fund 83 

Carnegie Institution 132 

Casa Grande Park 87 

Casting. Fly and Bait 231 

Casualties, Fourth of July 174 

Casualties, Miscellaneous 344 

Catholic Associations 189 

Catholic Bishops 188 

Catholic Church Statistics 189 

Catholic Woman's League 558 

Cattle Prices 58 

Caxton Club.. 554 

Cemeteries, Chicago 491 

Cemeteries, Location of 540 

Cemeteries, National 336 

Cement Produced 177 

Census, School, Chicago 578 

Census, Thirteenth 432 

Centenarians, Deaths of 274 

Central American States 128 

Cervenka, J. A., Portrait 473 

Chaco Canyon 87 

Chamizal Arbitration Com'n.. 132 

Chancery, Masters in 476 

Championships, All-Around.... 220 

('Championships, Nat. Amateur 219 

Charcot Expedition 175 

Charitable Institutions, State. 461 

Charities Commission, Illinois 461 

Charities Conference, Illinois. 470 

Charities Conference, Nat'l... 556 

Charities, Cook County 481 

Charity Organizat'ns. Chicago 508 

Charter Movement, Chicago... 544 

Chattanooga Park 87 

Checkers 251 

Cheese, International Trade.. 147 

Cheese Production 164 

Chemical Society, American.. 200 

Chess 250 

Chicago Appropriations 494 

Chicago, Archdiocese of 189 

Chicago Ass'n of Commerce... 492 

Chicago at a Glance 491 

Chicago Club 654 

Chicago Debt 494 

Chicago Election Returns 394 

Chicago Federation of Labor.. 197 

Chicago Finances 493 

Chicago Grain Statistics 530 

Chicago, Growth in Area 516 

Chicago Officials 483 

Chicago Points of Interest 536 

Chicago, Population of 491 

Chicago, Progress of 572 

Chicago Yacht Club 554 

Chicagoans, Death of 349 

Ohicagoans, Old 618 

Chickamauga Park 87 

Chiefs of Police, Chicago 540 

Children, Heights and Weights 201 

Children's Home Society 556 

Chile 128 

China 126 

China, Disturbances in 332 

Chinese Calendar 14 

Chinese Railway Loan 327 

Cholera, Epidemic of 131 

Chopin Singing Society 46 

Christian Association, Nat'l... 558 

Christian Endeavor t'nion 194 

Christian Endeavor, Illinois.. 558 

Christian Science Church 194 

Chronological Cycles 13 

Church Days 29 

Church Membership. Chicago.. 512 

Church of New Jerusalem 193 

Church Property, Value 187 

Churches, Number in Chicago 491 

Churches. Statistics of 185 

Cincinnati, Society of 211 



Page. 

Cinder Cone 87 

Circuit Court, Cook County... 476 

Circuit Courts of Appeals 257 

Circuit Courts, United States. 257 

Circulation Statement 159 

Circulat'n Tables, Dally News 625 
Cities, Amer., Population of 438 

Cities, Distances Between 184 

Cities, Largest in World 308 

Cities, Statistics of 320 

Cities Under Commissions 72 

Citizens' Association 534 

Citizens' League, Chicago 608 

Citizens' Clubs, Federation of 534 
Citizeiship Congress, Chicago 534 
Citizenship in United States. 103 

City Clerk's Office 484 

City Clerks Since 1837 516 

City Club, Chicago 534 

City Debts 322 

City Offices, Directory of 487 

City Valuations 322 

Civic Federation, Chicago 534 

Civic Federation, 111. Branch. 470 
Civic Federation. National.... 556 
Civil Engineers, Am. Society 201 

Civil List, Chicago 483 

Civil List, Cook County 474 

Civil List, Illinois 459 

Civil List, United States 253 

Civil Service Ass'n, Illinois.. 470 
Oevil Service Com., Chicago.. 486 
Civil Service Com., Cook Co.. 474 
Civil Service Com., Illinois... 462 

Civil Service Com., U. S 256 

Civil Service League, Chicago. 534 
Civil Service Reform Ass'n... 534 
Civil Service, United States.. 85 

Civil War Survivors 326 

Civil War, Troops In 66 

Claims, Court of 257 

Clay Products 177 

Clearances. Vessel, Chicago... 524 

Clearings, Chicago Bank 512 

Clemens, Samuel, Death of... 170 

Clerk, County,, Vote for 398 

Clerk, Crim. Court. Vote for 400 

Clerk, Probate, Vote for 400 

Cliff Dwellers' Club 554 

Climatological Ass'n, Amer... 200 
Climatology, United States... 327 

Clubs. Chicago 554 

Coal Industry, Illinois 466 

Coal Production in U. S 177 

Coast Line of United States.. 269 

Coffee Consumed in U. S 174 

Coffee Consumed, Per Capita. 162 

Coinage by Nations 151 

Coinage Mints. United States. 256 

Coinage of the World 153 

Coinage, Per Capita 162 

Coins of the United States.... 178 

Coins, Value of Foreign 179 

Coins, Value of Rare 154 

Coleman, W. A., Portrait 482 

Collector, City 484 

College Colors 90 

College, Electoral 107 

College Statistics 407 

Colleges, American 301 

Colleges, Medical, In U. S.... 300 

Colombia 128 

Colonial Club of Chicago 554 

Colonial Wars, Society of 211 

Colonies of Nations 129, 130 

Color, Population by 433 

Colorado Point 600 

Colorado. Vote of 357 

Colors, College 90 

Colors. High School 90 

Columbia Yacht Club 554 

Columbus Circle 500 

Comet A of 1910 32 

Comet, Halley's 32 

Commerce, Chicago Ass'n of.. 492 

Commerce Court Law 34 

Commerce Court. Members.... 440 

Commerce Department 255 

Commerce, Secretaries of 113 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Page. 

Commercial Club 554 

Committees, Cook Co. Pollt.. 298 
Committees, Illinois Political. 297 

Committees, Political 295 

Commission Form of Gov't Act 46 
Commission-Governed Cities... 72 

Commissions, International 132 

Commodities, Prices of 58 

Compensation, Bureau of 485 

Comptroller, City 484 

Comptroller, County 474 

Concordia League 558 

Confederate Veterans, United 210 

Congregational Churches 191 

Congregational Club, Chicago 558 
Congregat'nal Ministers' Union 558 
Congregat'nal Sun. Sch. Ass'n 558 
Congress, Appropriations by.. 45 

Congress, Library of 264 

Congress Park 500 

Congress, Party Lines In 114 

Congress Rules Contest 33 

Congress, 61st, Members 261 

Congress, 61st, Work of 33 

Congress, 62d, Members 265 

Congressional Apportionment. 269 
Congressional Dists., Cook Co. 472 
Congressional Districts, 111... 454 
Conjugal Condition, Popul'n.. 437 

Connecticut, Vote of 357 

Connery, F. D., Portrait 482 

Conservation Ass'n, National. 310 

Conservation Bonds 43 

Conservation Congress 31 1 

Conservation of Resources 310 

Constellations of Zodiac 28 

Constitution, United States... 440 

Consuls, American 271 

Consuls In Chicago 274 

Consumption, Deaths from... 139 

Contributions, Campaign 43 

Conventions, National 107 

Cook County Elections 394 

Cook County Finances 480 

Cook County Forest Preserves 503 
Cook Co. For. Preserve, Vote 403 

Cook County Officials 473, 474 

Cook Co. Political Committees 298 
Cook Co. Senatorial Dists.471, 472 
Cook, Fred'k A., Discredited. 175 

Copper Produced 177 

Copyright Laws, U. S 79 

Corn Consumed Per Capita... 162 

Corn Crop by States 148 

Corn Crops by Years 143 

Corn Crop of World 142 

Corn, International Trade 146 

Corn Prices, Chicago 530 

Cornell Square 498 

Coroner's Office 475 

Corporation Counsel 484 

Corporation Tax Receipts 172 

Correction, House of 486 

Correct'n, House of. Statistics 530 

Corundum Produced 177 

Costa Rica 128 

Costa Rica, Earthquake in... 140 

Cost of Living, High 53 

Cotton Consumed Per Capita. 162 

Cotton Crop by States 160 

Cotton Crop by Years 144 

Cotton for Mill Use 149 

Cotton, International Trade.. 147 

Cotton, Spindles, World's 150 

Council, City 483 

Counties, 111., Facts About... 447 

County Agent's Office 475 

County Attorney's Office 475 

County Clerk 474 

County Commissioners 474 

County Com'rs, Vote for.. 400. 402 

County Court 476 

County Democracy 53 1 

County, Department Directory 475 

County Hospital 475 

County Officers, Illinois..: 467 

County Snpts., Ass'n of 470 

Court of Commerce, Law 34 

Court of Commerce, Members 440 



Page. 

Court, Municipal 477 

Court of Claims 257 

Court of Claims, Illinois 459 

Court of Customs Appeals.... 257 
Court, United States Supreme 257 
Courts, Circuit, United States 257 
Courts, Federal, in Chicago... 476 

Courts In Cook County 476 

Crater Lake Park 87 

Crerar Library, The John 509 

Crescent Park 500 

Cribs, Waterworks 492 

Cricket 237 

Crime, Statistics of 135 

Criminal Court 476 

Criminal Law, Internat'l Com. 556 
Criminal Statistics, Chicago.. 560 

Crops, Farm, by Years 143 

Crops In Canadian Northwest. 146 

Crops of 1910 146 

Crops, Value of 144 

Cruce. Lee, Sketch 333 

Cruise of Battle Ships 162 

Cruisers, United States 290 

Crystalline Quartz Produced.. 177 

Cuba 128 

Customs Appeals, Court of 257 

Customs Duties 60 

Customs Revenue Per Capita.. 162 

Cycles, Chronological 13 

Cycling Club, Chicago 554 



Daily News Circulation 625 

Dalai Lama Deposed 119 

Danbury Hatters' Case Ill 

Dates of Historical Events 71 

Daughters of Revolution 212 

Dauphin Park 500 

Davis, Abel, Portrait 473 

Davis Square 498 

Days of Grace 183 

Deaf In United States 445 

Deaf Minors, Chicago 586 

Death Penalty In U. S 136 

Death Rates, Chicago 514 

Death Rates, Foreign 138 

Death Rates, United States. 138 

Death Roll of 1910 346 

Deaths from Violence 138 

Deaths of Noted Persons 73 

Debt, Chicago 494 

Debt of Cities 322 

Debt, Public 158 

Debt. Public, Analysis of 159 

Debt, Public, by Years 159 

Debt. Public, Per Capita 161 

Debts, National 160 

Decorations for Chlcagoans . . . 552 

DeKalb Square 500 

Delaware, Vote of 357 

Democratic County Committee 298 
Democratic Nat'l Committee.. 295 

Democratic Platform 108 

Democratic State Committee. 297 

Deneen, C. S., Portrait 458 

Denmark 123 

Denominations, Statistics of. 186 

Density of Population 436 

Dental Association, State 470 

Dental Examiners. State 461 

Dependencies of Nations 130 

Dermatological Ass'n, Am 205 

Devil's Tower !>7 

Derby, English 227 

Dialect Society, American 200 

Diamonds, World's Famous.. 182 

Dickinson, J. M., Portrait 252 

Dickinson Park 500 

Diplomatic Service, U. S 270 

Directory City Departments.. 4S7 

Directory County Depts 475 

Disbursements. Government... 161 

Dispensaries in Chicago 608 

Dispensaries In United States 137 



Page. 

Distances Between Cities 184 

Distances in Chicago 540 

Distances Seen on Lakes 88 

Distances to Seaports 184 

District Attorneys, U. S 259 

District Court Judges... 258 

Divorce, Causes for 134 

Divorce Statistics 133 

DIx, John A., Sketch 333 

Diamonds, Weights of 92 

Disasters to Shipping 93 

Douglas Boulevard 499 

Douglas Monument Park 500 

Douglas Park 499 

Drago Doctrine 68 

Drainage District 526 

Drexel Boulevard 498 

Dreyfus Case 71 

Drought in 1910 84 

Duties Collected 97 

Duties, Customs 60 



E 



Eagles, Fraternal Order of... 205 
Earthquake in Southern Italy 134 
Earthquakes, Great Modern.. 86 

East End Park 500 

Easter Sunday Dates 14 

Eastern SIflr, Order of 203 

Eberhart, A. O., Sketch 333 

Eclectic Medical Association. 201 

Eclipses in 1911 29 

Economic Ass'n, American 200 

Ecuador 128 

Eddy, Mary Baker, Death of. 408 

Edge water Country Club 554 

Edison Park (Annexation Vote 403 

Education Board, General 74 

Education, Board of 504 

Education, Bureau of U. S... 256 

Education, Statistics of 405 

Educational Ass'n, National.. 201 
Educational Commission, 111.. 462 

Edward VII., Death of 67 

Efficiency, Public, Committee. 532 

Egypt 127 

Eldred Grove 500 

Election Calendar, General... 89 

Election Commissioners 486 

Election, Presidential, 1912 106 
Election Returns, General 354 

Elections, Chicago 394 

Elections, Cook County 394 

Electoral College 107 

Electoral Districts, Illinois... 452 

Electoral Vote by States 90 

Electric Railroads 340 

Electrical Engineers, Am. Inst. 200 

Electrical Units 180 

Electricity, Department of 486 

Elections, British 116, 268 

Electro-Therapeutic Ass'n 200 

Elevated Railroad Stations.... 542 
Elevation, Highest, in States 154 

Elevation of Chicago 491 

Elks, Order of 205 

Ellis Park 500 

El Morro Monument 87 

Ember Days 29 

Employes, Civil Service. U. S. 85 
Employes on City Pay Rolls.. 487 

Employers' Liability Act 44 

Employers' Liability Com., 111. 469 
Employers' Liability Law. ,111. 46 

Englewood Club 554 

Englewood Woman's Club 554 

Engineer, City 485 

Engineers, Board of Examin'g 486 
Engineers, Superv'g, Traction. 485 
Engineers. Western Society of 568 

Entomologist, State 460 

Epidemic of Cholera 131 

Episcopal Church 189 

Epworth League 5">s 

Equal Suffrage Ass'n. Illinois. 470 



c 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Page. 

Equalization, Board of 460 

Equinox, Vernal 28 

Eras of Time 13 

Esperanto Simplified 82 

Eugenie Triangle 500 

European Languages 52 

Evans, W. A., Portrait 482 

Evanston Historical Society.. 510 

Evanston Public Library 509 

Events of 1910 343 

Events, Recent Historical 71 

Executive Department, 111 459 

Executive Department, Wash. 253 

Expenditures, Chicago 493 

Expenditures, Government 161 

Expenditures, Illinois 481 j 

Expenditures, National 160 

Exploration, Polar 175 

Ex|M>rt8 by Continents 98 

Exports by Countries 99 

Exports by Groups 98 

Exports of Merchandise 96 

Exports Per Capita 162 

Exports, Value, by Years 100 

Exposition Commissioners 132 

Express Business in U. S 70 



Factory Inspectors, State 460 

Failures in United States 168 

Fall Begins 13 

Fame, American Hall of 274 

Family, League for Protect'n 556 

Fares, Legal, in Chicago 570 

Farm Crops by Years 143 

Farm Property, Value of 144 

Farmers' Institute. Illinois... 460 
Farms in the United States.. 144 

Farms, Value of Medium 170 

Farragut Yacht Club 554 

Federal Civil Service 85 

Federal Council of Churches. 194 

Federal Prisons 137 

Feeble-Minded In U. S 445 

Feldspar Produced 177 

Fernwood Park 500 

Field Museum 556 

Field Museum Library 510 

Field Museum Site 52 

Finances, Chicago 493 

Finances, Cook County 480 

Finances, U. S., Per Capita.. 161 

Financial Statistics 151 

Fine Arts Academy. Chicago.. 546 
Fine Arts Commission Law... 44 

Fire Chiefs, Chicago 550 

Fire Department 486 

Fire Engines, Location 534 

Fire Insurance 283 

Fire-Insurance Patrols 534 

Fire Losses, Chicago T03 

Fire Losses in 1910 343 

Fire Marshal, State 462 

Fires. Forest, in 1910 216 

Fires, Theater, List of 173 

Fish and Game Laws 169 

Fish Commissioners, Illinois.. 460 

Fish Furniture Store Fire 134 

Fisheries Commission 132 

Fisheries Dispute Award 69 

Flag-Day Association, Am 213 

Flax Production 148 

Flaxseed Production 148 

Flood in Paris 92 

Floods and Storms 344 

Florida, Vote of 358 

Flour, International Trade.... 148 

Flowers. State 179 

Fluorspar Produced 177 

Fly and Bait Casting 231 

Folks. H., Sketch 333 

Food Commissioner, State 460 

Football Accidents 408 

Football Results 226 



Page. 

Forecasts, Weather 176 

Foreign-Born in Cities 435 

Foreign-Born Populat'n, U. S. 433 

Foreign Governments. * < 121 

Foreign Minors, Chicago 582 

Foreign Money, Valu 179 

Foreign Service, Veterans of. 213 

Foreign Wars, Order of 211 

Forest Fires in 1910 216 

Forest Preserve, Map 502 



Forest Preserve, Cook County 503 
For. Preserve, Cook Co., Vote 403 

Forester, City 487 

Foresters, Ind. Order of 203 

Forestry Association, Amer... 200 

Forestry Service, Work of 306 

Forests, National 309 

Fort Massac Trustees 463 

Fortnightly Club 568 

Forty Club 554 

Foss, E. N., Sketch 333 

Fountains in Chicago 536 

Fourth of July Casualties 174 

France 123 

Franklin Boulevard 499 

Fraternal Congress, National. 205 

Fraternal Societies 202 

Fraternal Union of America.. 204 
Fraternities, Assoc'd of Am.. 206 

Free List for Travelers 77 

Free Public Baths 558 

Freier Saengerbund 495 

Fuller, Chief Justice, Death of 78 

Fuller's Earth Produced 177 

Futurity Stakes 227 



Gage Park 

Galleries, Art, Leading 

Game and Fish Laws 

Game Preserves, National 

Gardens, Zoological 

Gardner, W., Sketch 

Garfleld Boulevard 

Garfield Park 

Garnet Produced 

Garnishment Law, Illinois 

Gas, Natural. Produced 

Gatun Dam 

Gaynor, Mayor, Att. to Kill.. 

General Education Board 

Geological Commission, 111 

Geological Society of America 

Geological Survey 

Geographic Society, Chicago.. 
Geographic Society, National. 
Geographical Society, Amer... 

George V., Accession of 

Georgia, Vote of 

German Universities 

Germania" Club 

Germania Maennerchor 

Germany 

Gettysburg Park 

Gifts, Notable in 1910 

Giia Cliff Dwellings 

Glacier National Park 

Glacier Park 

Glidden Tour 

Gods, Greek and Roman 

Gold Coinage of World 

Gold Imports and Exports 

Gold, Fineness of 

Gftlrt Production by States.... 

Gold Production by Years 

Gold Production, World's 

Gold Stock In United States. 

Golf 

Good Roads Movement 

Government Disbursements... 
Government Officials. 



Gov't Officials in Chicago 

Government Receipts 

Governments, Foreign 

Governors of Illinois 



497 

76 
169 
173 
173 
334 
4!>S 
499 
177 
170 
177 

63 
251 

74 
463 
201 
256 
568 
201 
200 

C7 
358 
305 
534 
495 
123 

87 
331 

87 

44} 

87 
235 I 

65' 
153 

98 

92 
152 
151 
151 
152 
2::s 
515 
101 
253 
508 
161 
121 
453 



Page. 

Governors of States 328 

Governor's Parkway 500 

Grain Inspectors, Illinois 460 

Grain Statistics, Chicago 530 

Grace, Days of 183 

Gran Quivira Monument 87 

Grand American Handicap 245 

Grand Army of the Republic. 208 

Grand Boulevard 498 

Grand Canyon Monument 88 

Grand Prix de Paris 228 

Grant, General, Park 87 

Grant Park 497 

Graphite Produced 177 

Graves, H. S., Sketch 334 

Gravity, Specific 181 

Great Britain 121 

Greece 124 

Greek and Roman Gods 65 

Greek Church Calendar 14 

Green Bay Triangle 500 

Grindstones Produced 177 

Gross Park 500 

Groveland Park 500 

Growth, Territorial, U. S 106 

Gruetli Maennerchor 495 

Guam, Island of 116 

Guatemala 128 

Gypsum Produced 177 



Hague Court of Arbitration.. 66 

Hague Peace Conferences 66 

Haul 129 

Hall of Fame, American 274 

Halley's Comet 82 

Hamilton Club 554 

Hamilton Park 498 

Hamliu Park 497 

Hammond Library 510 

Handel Musical Club 495 

Harbor Commission. Chicago. 538 

Harbor Lights, Chicago 548 

Hai-ciin Square 498 

Hardinge, C., Sketch 334 

Harmon, J., Sketch 334 

Ha ruga ri Maennerchor 495 

Harvard- Yale Races 242 

Harvest Calendar 146 

Hatters' Case, Danbury Ill 

Hawaii, Territory of 115 

Hawaii, Vote of 359 

Hawaiian Islands, Population 430 

Hay Crop by Years 143 

Health Department, City 484 

Health, State Board of 460 

Heavens, Chart of 24 

Hebrew Calendar 14 

Heights of Children 201 

Heights of Adults 132 

Hemp Production 149 

Henley Regatta 243 

Hennepin Canal 94 

Hero Fund, Carnegie 83 

Hibernians, United Order of. 205 

Higgins Road Triangle 600 

High Buildings, Chicago 574 

High Cost of Living 53 

High-School Colors 90 

High-School Records 218 

High Schools, Statistics of... 406 

Highest Points in States 154 

Highest Structures 131 

Highway Commission, State.. 462 
Historical Association. Am... 200 

Historical Events. Recent 71 

Historical Library, Illinois... 459 
Historical Society Library... 610 

Historical Society. State 470 

Hitchcock, F. II., Portrait.... 252 

Hoffman, P. M., Portrait 473 

Holden Park 600 

Holidays, Legal 91 

Hr.-lland 126 

Holstein Park 491 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



Page. 

Homestead Law Ill 

Honduras 128 

Homeopathy, Am. Institute. . . 200 
Homes, Charitable, Chicago.. 618 
Hookworm-Disease Commission 116 

Hop Production 148 

Eoran, James, Portrait 482 

Horse Racing 227 

Horses, Record Sales of 227 

Horticultural Society, Illinois 460 

Hospital, County 475 

Hospitals in Chicago 608 

Hospitals in U. S 137 

Hospitals, State 461 

Hot Springs Park 87 

Hot Weather in 1910 84 

House-Number System 526, 527 

Hughes, C. E., Sketch 334 

Humane Society, Illinois 470 

Humboldt Park 498 

Humboldt Park Boulevard 499 

Humorists, American Press... 556 

Hungary 122 

Hunting Accidents 491 

Hutchins, H. B., Sketch 334 

Hyde-Swope Murder Case Ill 



Idaho, Vote of 360 

Ido, Rules of 82 

Illinois Appropriations 463 

Illinois Assessments 470 

Illinois Athletic Club 664 

Illinois Congressional Dist's.. 454 
Illinois Counties. Facts About 447 

Illinois County Officer* 467 

Illinois County Population.... 446 
Illinois Electoral Districts... 452 

Illinois, Government of 453 

Illinois, Governors of 453 

Illinois Legislation 46 

Illinois Manufactures 466 

Illinois Measures 180 

Illinois Mineral Output 463 

Illinois Officials 459 

Illinois Political Committees. 207 

Illinois Primary Law 47 

Illinois Senatorial Dists...455, 456 
Illinois State Associations.... 470 

Illinois Tax Commission 456 

Illinois, Vote of 360 

Illiterate Minors in Chicago. 586 

Immigration Commission 78 

Immigration Law Amended.. 44 

Immigration Law, U. S 78 

Immigration Statistics 216 

Import Duties 60 

Imports by Continents 98 

Imports by Countries 99 

Imports by Groups 98 

Imports, Chicago 524 

Imports of Merchandise 95 

Imports Per Capita 162 

Imports, Value by Years 100 

' Improvements, Board of Local 485 

Income-Tax Amendment 328 

Income-Tax Resolution, 111... 52 

Independence Platform 110 

Independence Boulevard 499 

Independence Square 500 

Ind. Order Free Sons of Israel 204 
Index to Prior Issues Almanac 626 

India 121 

India Rubber, Tvade in 147 

Indian Affairs, Office of 256 

Indiana, Vote of 362 

Indians in United States 436 

Indian Reservations 436 

Indian Rights Association 556 

Industrial Club 5b4 

Industrial Insurance 165 

Industrial Peace Foundation.. 72 

Industries, Leading 163 

Infusorial Earth Produced 177 

Inheritance Tax Laws 119 



Page. 

Initiative and Ref. Vote 403 

Insane in Foreign Lands 445 

Insane Population 445 

Insurance, Industrial 165 

Insurance, Social, Internat'l.. 556 

Insurance Statistics 283 

Intercollegiate Championships 217 

Interior Department 256 

Interior, Secretaries of 113 

Internal Revenue, Chicago.... 544 
Internal Revenue Per Capita. 162 

Internal Revenue Receipts 171 

Internal Revenue Taxes 172 

International Commissions 132 

International Language 82 

Interest Tables 182 

Interstate-Commerce Com. 256, 440 
Interstate Law Amendments.. 34 
Interstate Law, Message on.. 33 
Interurban Lines, Chicago. 340, 341 

Iowa, Vote of 364 

Irish Choral Society 495 

Irish League of America 556 

Irish Music Club 495 

Iron, Pig, Produced 177 

Iroquois Club 554 

Irrigated Areas of U. S 251 

Irrigation, Bonds for 43 

Irving Park 500 

Italy 124 

Italy, Earthquakes in 86, 134 



Jackson Boulevard 499 

Jackson Park 497 

Japan 126 

Japan Annexes Korea 129 

Japanese-Russian Agreement... 52 

Japanese-Russian War 68 

Jefferson Park 499, 500 

Jeffries-Johnson Fight 232 

Jewel Cave Monument 88 

Jewish Calendar 14 

Judge, County, Vote for 400 

Judge, Probate, Vote for 400 

Judiciary, Federal 257 

Judges, Municipal Court, Vote 401 

Junger Maennerchor 495 

Junior Order U. A. Mechanics 204 

Jury Commission 474 

Justice, Department of 256 

Jute Production 149 

Juvenile Court 476 

Juvenile Court Statistics 477 

Juvenile Delinquents 136 



Kansas, Vote of 366 

Kedzie Park 500 

Kentucky Derby 227 

Kentucky, Vote of 367 

Kenwood Club 554 

Kenwood Country Club 564 

Khiva 126 

King's Daughters and Sons... 193 

Kings, Pay of 324 

Kingston Earthquake 86 

Kinzie Pi.rkway 500 

K.1ellander, J., Portrait 482 

Kilo Club 554 

Knights and Ladies of Honor 205 

Knights of Honor 204 

Knights of Pythias 203 

Knights Templars 202 

Knox, P. C., Portrait 252 

Kongo 127 

Koraleski, F. W. Portrait 473 

Korea 126 

Korea. Annexation of 129 

Kosciuszko Triangle 600 



Page. 
Labor Commissioners, Illinois. 460 

Labor Department 255 

Labor Office, International 556 

Labor Organizations, Chicago. 197 
Labor Organizations in U. S.. 195 

Labor, Secretaries of 113 

Labor Union Pensions 165 

Ladies of the G. A. R 210 

Lake Shore Playground 497 

Lake Trade, Chicago 524 

Lakes, Areas of 86 

Lakes, Distances Seen On.... 88 

Lakes, Military Dept. of 279 

Lakes-to-Gulf Association 313 

Lakes-to-Gulf Waterway Plan 313 

Lakewood Point 500 

Land Office, General 256 

Lands, Public 341 

Language, International 82 

Languages Spoken 52 

Lassen Peak Monument 88 

Latitude of Chicago 491 

Law and Order Leagues 608 

Law Examiners, Illinois 469 

Law Institute Library 610 

Laws, New Illinois 46 

Laws, Uniform, Commission.. 462 

Lead Produced 177 

Learned Societies, Chicago 568 

Ijearned Societies of America. 200 

Legal Holidays in U. S 91 

Legations, Foreign, in U. S... 273 

Legislation, Illinois 46 

Legislative Voters' League 634 

Legislatures of States 328 

Legislature, Illinois, Members 448 

Legislature, Vote On 449 

Length of City 491 

Lewis and Clark Cavern 88 

Lewis Institute Library 510 

Liability Act, Employers' 44 

Liberia 127 

Liberian Commission Report.. 328 

Library Association, Am 568 

Library Association, State... 470 

Library Club, Chicago 568 

Library Extension Commission 462 
Library, Historical, Illinois.. 459 

Library of Congress 264 

Libraries, Chicago 609 

License Rates, Chicago 513 

License Receipts, Chicago 494 

License Receipts of Cities 321 

Life Insurance 283 

Life-Saving Service, U. S 289 

Lighting, Street, in Chicago.. 492 
Lighthouse Establishment, U.S. 90 

Lighthouses, Bureau of 45 

Lights, Harbor, Chicago 548 

Lights, Number in Chicago... 491 

Lily Gardens 600 

Limitations. Statute of 183 

Lincoln Club 554 

Lincoln Homestead Trustees.. 463 

Lincoln Park 497 

Lincoln Park, Map of 496 

Liquors Consumed in U. S 174 

Liquors Consumed Per Capita 162 
Liquors Produced in U. S.... 174 

Literary Club, Chicago 568 

Live Stock Commissioners, 111. 460 

Live Stock of the World 144 

Live Stock Statistics 547 

Living, High Cost of 63 

Loan Associations 120 

Lockouts. Statistics of ... 336 

LodgingHouse, Mun., Statistics 512 

Longitude of Chicago 491 

Lorlmer Investigation 404 

Louisiana, Vote of 368 

Loyal Legion, Order of 212 

LTimber Industry 342 

Luther League of Chicago 558 

Lutheran Woman's League 55S 

Lutheran Denomination 193 

Lutheran Ministers' Ass'n 558 

Lynchiogs in U. S 289 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR. 1911. 



M 

Page. 

Maccabees, Knights of 205 

MacVeagb, Franklin, Portrait 252 
MagerstaUt, E. J.. Portrait.. 482 

Mall Time from Chicago 666 

Mall Time frcm New York... 568 

Mail Statistics, Chicago 566 

Mall, U. 8., Statistics 330 

Maine, liaising the 45 

Maine, Vote of 369 

Manchurian Neutralization 327 

Manganese Ore Produced 177 

Manufactures, Chicago 650 

Manufactures, Illinois 466 

Manufactures In Cities 164 

Manufactures in U. S 163 

Map, Bureau of... 485 

Marathon Racing 225 

Marine Corps Pay Table 293 

Marine Disasters in 1910 343 

Marine Corps, U. S 288 

Marine Insurance 283 

Mark White Square 498 

Marls Produced 177 

Marquette Club 554 

Marquette Park 497 

Marriage Laws 133 

Marriage Statistics 133 

Marshall Boulevard 499 

Marshals, U. S 260 

Maryland, Vote of 369 

Masonic Grand Lodges 202 

Masons, Royal Arch 202 

Masters in Chancery 476 

Massachusetts, Vote of 369 

Mathematical Society, Am 200 

Mayoralty Elections, Chicago. 53S 
Mayors' Association, Illinois.. 470 

Mayor's Office 483 

Mayors of Chicago 538 

Mayors of Large Cities 339 

McCullough, J. S., Portrait... 458 

McGovern, F. E., Sketch 334 

McKinlsy Park 497 

Measures and Weights 180 

Meat Trust, SuUs Against.... 345 
Mechanical Engineers, Am. Soc. 201 

Medical Association, Am 200 

Medical Association, State 470 

Medical Colleges in U. S 300 

Medicine, American Academy 200 
Medico-Psychological Ass'n... 200 

Men of the Year 333 

Mendelssohn Club 495 

Merchandise. Imports of 95 

Merchandise, Exports of 96 

Merchant Marine, U. S 93 

Merrick Park 500 

Mesa Verde Park 87 

Message, President's 409 

Mess Pork Prices, Chicago 532 

Methodist Church ? 190 

Methodist Social Union 558 

Metric System 180 

Mexican War Survivors 326 

Mex Ico 127 

Mexico, Disturbances In , .. 491 

Meyer, G. Von L., Portrait.. 252 

Mica Produced 177 

Michigan .Avenue Boulevard.. 498 

Michigan, Vote of 370 

Microscopical Society, Am 200 

Mid-Day Club 554 

Midway Plaisance 497 

Miles, Length in Feet of 313 

Military Academy, II. S 57 

Military Dept. of Lakes 279 

Militia, Illinois 457 

Militia in States 281 

Militia. "Naval 281 

Miller. A. W., Portrait 473 

Mine Disasters in 1910 344 

Mine Rescue Stations 46 

Mineral Paints Produced 177 

Mineral Products of IT. S 177 

Mineral Waters Produced 177 

Minerals in Illinois 463 



Page. 

Miners Killed in U. S 140 

Mines, Bureau of, U. S 45, 256 

Mining Engineers, Am. lust.. 200 

Mining Inspectors, State 460 

Mining Investigation Cornmis'n 462 

Ministers, American 270 

Ministers to U. S 273 

Minnesota, Vote of 371 

Mississippi, Vote of 373 

Missouri, Vote of 374 

Mitchell, E. E., Portrait 4o8 

Mohammedan Calendar 14 

Monazite Produced 177 

Money and Finance 151 

Money (Coins) of the U. S 178 

Money, Foreign, Value 179 

Money of the World 153 

Money Order Rates 117 

Money Per Capita 161 

Monetary Commission 57 

Monroe Doctrine, The 66 

Montana, Vote of 375 

Montenegro 124 

Montezuma Castle 88 

Montrose Point 500 

Monuments in Chicago 536 

Morocco 127 

Mortality of Wage Earners.. 140 
Mortality Statistics 1 , Chicago. 514 
Mortality Statistics, U. S.... 138 

Mothers' Congress 556 

Mothers' Congress, Illinois... 470 

Motor Cycling 237 

Motor Races 235 

Mountains, Highest 282 

Mount Rainier Park 87 

Mount Olympus Reserve 88 

Muir Woods Reserve 88 

Mukuntuweap Reserve " 88 

Alullaney, B. J., Portrait 482 

Municipal Art League 501 

Municipal Court 477 

Municipal Court Judges, Vote 401 

Municipal Voters' League b34 

Municipalities, Am. League... 556 

Murphy, J. B., Sketch 334 

Museums, Art, Leading 76 

Musical Clubs, Chicago 195 

Myrtle Grove DOO 

Mystic Shrine, Order of 202 

Mystic Workers of World 205 



N ' 



Nagel. Charles, Portrait 252 

Natiorml Banks 155 

National Conventions 107 

National Fraternal Congress. 205 

National Guard, Illinois 457 

National Parks in U. S 87 

National Union 203 

Nativity of Minors. Chicago.. 582 

Natural Bridges Reserve 88 

Natural Gas Produced 177 

Naturalists. Am. Society of.. 201 

Naturalization Laws 104 

Nature Study Society, Am 200 

Na va jo Reserve 88 

Naval Architects, Society of. 201 
Naval Expenditures of Powers 283 

Naval Officers 284 

Naval Officers, Retired 283 

Naval Reserve, Illinois 457 

Navies Compared 283 

Navies of World 282 

Navy and Naval Militia 281 

Navy Department 254 

Navy, Increase of 45 

Navy of United States 281 

Navy League of United States 213 

Navy Pay Table 293 

Navy, Secretaries of 113 

Navy. Ships of 290 

Nebraska. Vote of 375 

Necrology of 1910 346 

Negroes in United States 436 



Page. 

Netherlands 126 

Nevada, Vote of 376 

Newark Fire Horror 345 

New Hampshire, Vote of 377 

Newberry Library 509 

New Jersey, Vote of 377 

New Mexico, Admission of 42 

New Mexico, Vote of 377 

Newspaper Club, Chicago 554 

Newspapers of United States. 201 

New York Barge Canal 94 

New York, Pop. by Boroughs. 440 

New York, Vote of 378 

Nicaragua J28 

Nicaragua, Revolutions in.... 131 

Nicknames, State 179 

Nightingale, Florence, Death of 76 

Nike Club 554 

Nobel Prize Winners 294 

Normal Schools, Illinois 459 

Normal University, Illinois... 459 

North Carolina, Vote of 380 

North Dakota, Vote of 381 

Northwestern Game Laws 169 

Northwestern Univ. Library.. 510 

Norton, C. D., Sketch 334 

Norwegian Singing Society 495 

Noted Dead 73 

Numerals, Arabic and Roman. 62 
Numbering System, House. 526, 527 
Numismatic Society, American 200 
Nurseries in United States... 137 
Nurses, Examiners of 462 



Oakland Park 500 

Oakley Boulevard 499 

Oak Park 500 

Oak Park Club 654 

Oaks Club 554 

Oat Crop by Years 143 

Oat Crop by States 145 

Oat Crop of World 149 

Oats, Prices of, Chicago 530 

Obituary List 346 

Oceans, Areas of 86 

Oceans, Average Depth 105 

Occupat'nal Diseases. Com. .111. 462 
Occupational Dis., Com., Int'l 556 
Occupations in United States. 332 
Occurrences During Printing. 268 
O'Connell, W. L.. Portrait... 473 

Odd Fellows, Order of 203 

Officials, Chicago 483' 

Officials, Cook County 474 

Officials, Government 253 

Officials, Gov't, In Chicago 503 

Officials, Illinois 459 

Officials, Terms of 106 

Officers of Navy 284 

Officers of the Army 275 

Officers, Retired Army 277 

Officers, Retired Naval 288 

Ogden Arrow 500 

Ogden Park 498 

Oslesby, J. G., Portrait 458 

Ohio. Vote of 381 

Oil Cake, International Trade 146 

Oil Inspector's Office 487 

Oilstones Produced 177 

Oklahoma, Vote of 383 

Old-Age Pensions 165 

Old Chicagoans 618 

Old Residents, Chicago 588 

Olson, Harry. Portrait 482 

Ophthalmological Soc'y, Am.. 200 

Orchestral Association 495 

Orders for Chicagoans 552 

Oregon Cave Reserve 88 

Oregon, Vote of 384 

Oriental Society. American... 200 

Oriflclal Surgeons, Ass'n 200 

Orphanages in United States. 137 
Orthopedic Association, Am... 200 
Osborn, C. S., Sketch 334 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 







Page. 
Outer Belt Park System, Map 602 

Owens, J. E., Portrait 473 

Oxford-Cambridge Races 243 



Pacing Records 230 

Pacing Records, One M.lle 230 
Packers, Proceedings Against. 345 

Packing in Chicago 634 

Packing, Pork, Statistics 137 

Palace of Peace 66 

Palmer Park 498 

Panama Canal 63 

Panama Canal Suits 319 

Panama Canal Zone 116 

Panama Railroad 65 

Panama Republic 128 

Pan-American Union 179 

Paraguay 128 

Parcels Post Exchanges 118 

Pardons. State Board of 461 

Paris, Flood In 92 

Park Commission, State 462 

Parks, Chicago 497 

Parks in Cities 824 

Parks, National. In U. S 87 

Parks, Small, Chicago 600 

Parole Law Invalid 470 

Party Lines in Congress 114 

Party Pluralities 105 

Passenger Statistics, Railway 337 

Passport Regulations 150 

Patent Office 256 

Patent Office Statistics 81 

Patents, Applications for 81 

Patriotic Order Sons of Am... 204 

Patriotic Societies 208 

Patterson Park 500 

Paupers in United States 445 

Pavements of Chicago 526 

Paymaster's Bureau 484 

Peace Commission, Universal. 44 
Peace, Industrial, Foundation. 72 
Peace Movements, Survey of.. 66 

Peace Palace 66 

Peace Union, Universal 656 

Peary, Robert E., Honored... 175 

I edestrianism 225 

Pediatric Society, American.. 200 

Penitentiaries In U. S 137 

Penitentiary Com'rs, Illinois. 461 

Pennsylvania, Vote of 384 

Pension Office 256 

PerMon Statistics, D. S 325 

Pensions. Old-Age 1C5 

Pensions Per Capita 161 

People's Platform 108 

Per Capita Statistics, U. S... 161 

Percy, L., Sketch 335 

Pere Marquette Car Fer. Wrk. 345 

Persia 127 

Peru 128 

Petrified Forest Reserve 88 

Petroleum, Crude, Produced... 130 

Petroleum Produced 177 

Pharmacy, State Board of.... 461 
Philatelic Society. Chicago... 668 

Philippine Islands 115 

Philippine War, Chronology... 68 
Philippine War, Losses in.... 32 

Philippine War, Troops in 66 

Philippines, Army of 213 

Philosophical Society, Am 200 

Philological Society, American 200 

Phosphate Rock Produced 177 

Physical Society. American... 200 

Physician. County 475 

Physicians, Am. Ass'n of 201 

Pickwick Country Club 654 

Pig Iron Production 177 

Pinchot-Ballinger Controversy 311 

Pinnacles Reserve 88 

Pioneers, Chicago 688 

Pioneers, Deaths of 694 



Page. 

Pioneers, Societies of 654 

Pistol Shooting 244 

Planetary Conjunctions 26 

Planets, Facts About 25 

Planets, Movements of 23 

Planets, The, in 1911 22 

Planets, Visibility of 25 

Platforms, Party 108 

Platinum Produced 177 

Platt National Park 87 

Playgoers' Club 654 

Playground Ass'n of America. >6 

Playgrounds, Chicago 500, 501 

Plumbers, Board of Examin'g 485 

Points of Interest, Chicago t>36 

Police Chiefs, Chicago 640 

Police Department 486 

Police Department, Work of.. 560 

Police of Cities 322 

Police Stations 560 

Policemen in Chicago 491 

Polish Frederick Chopin Club. 495 
Political Associations, Chicago 634 

Political Committees 295 

Political Equality League 634 

Polo 251 

Pool 250 

Population by Ages 433 

Population by Color 433 

Population by Conjugal Cond'n 437 

Population by Literacy 433 

Population by Sex 433 

Population, Center of 431 

Population, Density of 436- 

Population, 111., by Counties. 146 
Population of American Cities 438 

Population of Chicago 491 

Population of United States.. 430 

Population of World 437 

Population. Urban 437 

Population, U. S., Foreign 433 

Population, U. S., Growth of. 432 
Pork, Mess, Prices in Chicago 532 

Pork Packing, Chicago 634 

Pork-Packing Statistics 137 

Porto Rico Population 430 

Porto Rico 116 

Portugal 124 

Portugal, Revolution in.. 131 

Postage Rates 117 

Postal Savings Bank Law 40- 

Postal Savings Banks, Foreign 155 

Postal Stations. Chicago 664 

Postal Statistics, Chicago 666 

Postal Statistics, U. S 330 

Postmasters' Ass'n, Illinois.. 470 

Postmasters-Generai 113 

Postmasters of Large Cities.. 331 

Postoffice. Chicago 664 

Postoffice Clerks' Ass'n, 111.. -170 

Postofflce Department 255 

Postofflces of World 120 

Possessions, Noncontiguous.... 115 

Potato Crop by Years 143 

Potter, F. W., Portrait 458 

Powell, I. N., Portrait 2 

Power- Boat Racing 237 

Precious Stones in U. S 177 

Presbyterian Brotherhood 658 

Presbyterian Church 190 

Presbyterian Ministerial Ass'n 558 

Presbyterian Social Union 658 

Preserves. Game, National 173 

Presidential Election 1912 106 

Presidential Succession 114 

Presidential Vote 105 

Presidential Vote, 1908 354 

Presidential Vote, Illinois..... 466 

Presidents, Burial Places 313 

Presidents of United States.. 112 

President's Message 409 

Presidents, Salaries of 157 

Presidents, University 301 

Press Association, Illinois 470 

Press Club 554 

Press, The Associated 201 

Prices of Stocks 352 

Prices, Relative 58 

Prices, Wholesale 66 



Page. 

Primaries, Chicago Spring 404 

Primary Election Laws, 111... 463 

Primary Law, Illinois 47 

Principals of Chicago Schools. 504 
Printing Office, Government.. 256 
Prison Association, National.. 656 

Prison Commission 132 

Prisoners in United States.... 135 

Prisons, State 137 

Probate Court 476 

Progress of Chicago 572 

Progress of United States 150 

Prohibition County Committee 299 
Prohibition Nat'l Committee.. 296 

Prohibition Platform 109 

Prohibition State Committee.. 298 

Property in U. S., Value 214 

Propositions, Vote on 403 

Protective Associations 08 

Public Administrator 475 

Public Debt Statement 168 

Public Domain, The 341 

Public Efficiency Committee.. 632 

Public Health Ass'n, Am 200 

Public Library 609 

Public Works Department 485 

Pugilism 232 

Pullman Park 500 

Pullman Public Library 610 

Pulse at Different Ages 264 

Purcell, W. E., SketcB 335 

Pyrlte Produced 177 



Q 



Juadrangle Club 654 

Qualifications for Suffrage 102 

Juicksllver Produced 177 



Racing, Horse 227 

Rackets 251 

Railroad Accident Law 44 

Railroad Accident Statistics.. 339 
Railroad Commissioners, 111... 461 

Railroad Loan, Chinese 327 

Railroad Passenger Stations.. 642 

Railroad Pension Systems 165 

Railroad-Rate Law. 34 

Railroad Statistics 337 

Railroad, Street, Statistics... 518 

Railroad Track Elevation 608 

Railroad Wrecks in 1910 844 

Railroads by Countries 120 

Railroads, Electric 340 

Railroads, World's 59 

Railway Gardens 600 

Rainbow Bridge Reserve 88 

Raymer, W. J., Portrait 482 

Ready-Reference Calendar 21 

Real-Estate Transfers, Chicago 612 

Receipts at Stockyards 547 

Receipts, Chicago 493 

Receipts, Government 161 

Receipts, Illinois 481 

Receipts, Shipments, Chicago. 644 

Reclamation Service 256 

Recorder, Cook County 474 

Red Cross Society 656 

Referendum League 634 

Reform Bureau, International. 656 

Reformatory, State 461 

Registrar of Titles 474 

Registration, Chicago 672 

Regular Army and Militia 281 

Relay Races, Franklin Field. 220 
Relief, International Com. on. 65ff 

Religions of the World 19 

Religious Bodies, Census of.. 187 

Religious Education Ass'n 194 

Religious Societies, Chicago... 658 

Religious Statistics 185 

Representatives, Apportion m't 269 



10 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAK-BOOK FOB 1911. 



Page. 

Representatives, Illinois 448 

Representatives, 111., Vote on 449 
Republican County Committee 298 
Republican Nat'l Committee.. 295 

Republican Platform 110 

Republican State Committee.. 297 

Reserves, Bird 173 

Reserves, Forest. 310 

Reserves, National 88 

Retired List, Army 277 

Retired List, Naval 288 

Revenue, U. S. Government.. 161 

Revenues, National 160 

Review, Board of 474 

Revolution in Portugal 131 

Revolutions in Nicaragua 131 

Revolver Shooting 244 

Rhode Island, Vote of 385 

Rice Crop of World 147 

Rice Production by States.... 147 

Rice Triangle BOO 

Rifle Shooting ;... 243 

Rivers, Longest 105 

Roads, Good, Movement 515 

Rock Creek Park 87 

Roller Skating 251 

Roman and Greek Gods 65 

Roman Catholic Bishops 188 

Roman -Numerals 62 

Rome Exposition Commission. 132 

Roosevelt's African Trip 75 

Roque 251 

Rose, James A., Portrait 458 

Rosin, International Trade 147 

Rotary Club 554 

Roumanla 125 

Rowing 241 

Fowing Records 243 

Royal and Select Masters 203 

Royal Arcanum 203 

Roval League 205 

Rules. House, Contest Over... 33 

Running Records, Best 228 

Russell Square 498 

Russia 125 

Russia, Cholera In 131 

Pusslan Calendar 14 

Russo-Japnnese Agreement.... 52 

Russo-Japanese War 68 

Rutherford Park 500 

Rve Crop by Years 143 

Ryo Crop of World 149 

Ryerson Library 510 



Saddle nnrt Cycle Clnb 5B4 

Safety Appliance Act 45 

Sage Foundation 72 

St. Ignatius College Library.. 510 
St. Jonn River Commission... 132 

Salaries City Officials 488 

Salaries Cook County Officials 478 

Salaries of Presidents 157 

Salaries of Teachers 507 

Saloons, Campaign Against... b20 

Saloons in Chicago 495 

Salt Produced 177 

Salvador 128 

Salvation Army 194 

Sanders, J. Y., Sketch 335 

San Francisco Earthquake 86 

Sarltary District 526 

Sanit'y Trustees, Vote lor.401, 403 

Santo Domingo 129 

fault Ste. Marie Canal Traffic 17 
Savings Banks, Foreign Postal 155 

Savings Banks In TT. S 156 

Savings Banks of World 156 

Savings Deposits in Nat. Uks. 157 
Savings Banks, Postal. Law.. 40 

Savings Banks Statistics 157 

Sayre Park BOO 

Schoonhofen Place 500 

Schmidt. W. E.. Portrait 473 

School Census, Chicago 678 



Page. 
School Exp'dltures Per Capita 162 

School Statistics, Chicago 508 

Fchool Statistics, U. S 405 

Schools, Chicago 604 

Schools, Sunday, In U. S 188 

Science, Am.Ass'n forAdvan't 200 
Sciences, National Academy of 201 

Scott Antarctic Expedition 175 

Sculling . 243 



Seaports, Distances to 184 

Seaports, Principal 88 

Seas, Average Depth K-5 

Seasons, The 13 

Secretaries of State 112 

Select Knights of America... 204 
Senatorial Dists., Cook Co... 471 
Senatorial Dlsts., Illinois.. 455, 45C 

Senators, Illinois 448 

Senators, Illinois, Vote on 449 

Senators In 61st Congress 261 

Senators In 62d Congress 265 

Senators, D. S., Illinois 465 

Sequoia Park 87 

Servia 125 

Settlements, Social, Chicago.. 596 

Seward Park 497 

Sewers, Bureau of 485 

Sewers, Mileage of 491 

Sex, Population by 433 

Shedd's Park 499 

Sbeep In United States 149 

Sheriff's Office 475 

f'herlff. Vote for 294 

Sherman Antitrust Law 70 

Sherman, J. S., Portrait 252 

Sherman, L. Y., Portrait 458 

Pherman Park 497 

Ship Canals, Great 94 

Shipments, Chicago 644 

Shipping, Disasters to 93 

Shipping, World's 342 

Shipping, United States 93 

Ships of United States Navy. 290 

C-hips, World's 69 

Shipwrecks In 1910 343 

Shiloh Park 87 

Shingles, Production of 342 

Shooting 243 

Shorthand Speed Records 225 

Shoshone Cavern Reserve 88 

Slam 127 

Sicilian Earthquake 86 

Siderial Noon 28 

Sidewalks, Mileage of *91 

Silk, Raw. Production 147 

Silver Bullion, Value of 154 

Silver Coinage of World 153 

Silver, Commercial Ratio 154 

Silver Imports and Exports... 98 

Silver, Price of Bar 152 

Silver Production by States... 152 
Silver Production by Years... 151 
Silver Production, World's.... 151 
Silver Stock In United States 152 

Single Tax Club 534 

Sitka Reserve 88 

Sixtv-First Congress, Members 61 
Sixty-Second Congress, Mem.. 1^5 

Skat 249 

Skating 248 

Ski Jumping 261 

Smithsonian Institution 62 

Smoke Inspection Department. 486 

Smyth, T. A., Portrait 473 

Soapstone Produced 177 

Social Justice League 656 

Social Science, Am. Academy 200 

Social Science Ass'n, Am 200 

Social Settlements, Chicago... 696 
Socialist County Committee.. 300 
Soc. -Labor Party. Com.. Nat'l 297 

Socialist- Labor Platform 108 

Socialist National Committee. 297 

Socialist Platform 108 

Socialist State Committee.... 298 

Societies, Learned 200 

Societies, Learned, Chicago... 568 

Societies, National 656 

Societies, Patriotic 208 



Page. 

Society of the Cincinnati 211 

Society of War of 1812 12 

Soldiers in U. S. Wars 66 

Sons of American Revolution. 212 

Sons of Veterans 213 

Sons of the Revolution '.. 212 

South Africa, Union of 122 

South American Republics 127 

South Carolina. Vote of 386 

South Dakota, Vote of 386 

South End Woman's Club 654 

South Parks 497 

South Shore Country Club.... 654 

Southern Club 654 

Sovereigns, Pay of an 

Spain j25 

Spain, Church and State In.. 294 

.Spain, Military Plot In 164 

Spalding, A. G., Sketch 335 

Spanish-American War 68 

Spanish- American War, Order 210 
Spanish-Am. War, Troops In.. 66 

Spanish War, Losses In 32 

Spanish- War Veterans 210 

Special Park Commission COO 

Specific Gravity, Table 181 

Speakers of the House 269 

Spirits Consumed Per Capita. 162 

Spirits Produced In U. S 174 

Sporting Records Begin 217 

Spring Begins is 

Standard Club 554 

Standards of Time 30 

Stanton Park 497 

Stars, Brightest 27 

istars, Number of 23 

State Boards Ex Offlclo 463 

State Department 253 

State Flowers 179 

State Historical Society 470 

State Nicknames.. 179 

State Prisons, Location 137 

State's Attorneys' Ass'n, 111.. 470 

State's Attorney's Office 475 

States, Facts About 329 

States, Governors of 328 

States In Union 73 

States, Past Polities of 114 

Stations. Elevated Railroad... 642 

Stations. Police 660 

Stations, Railroad 642 

Statistical Association, Am.. 201 

Statistics, Bureau of 486 

Statues In Chicago 630 

Stead, W. H., Portrait 458 

Steamship Records, Atlantic.. 329 

Steamships, Great Ocean 164 

Steel Corporation, U. S 201 

t teel. Crude, Production 98 

Steward. Le Roy T., Portrait. 482 
Stock and Bond Commission.. 39 

Stock Record 352 

Stockyards Calamity 268 

Storms and Floods .344 

Street Grades, Chicago 552 

Street Lighting, Chicago 492 

Street, Longest, In Chicago... 491 

Street-Rallway Accounts big 

Street-Railway Chronology.... 668 

Street-Rallway Engineers 485 

Street-Railway Franchises.... 676 
Streets, Alleys, Pavements... 626 

Streets. Bureau of 485 

Strikes, Statistics of 336 

Strikes, Sympathetic, Unlawful 332 

Structures, Highest 131 

Stubbs. W. R., Sketch ,... .535 

Students In Universities 301 

Suburban Handicap 227 

Succession, Presidential 114 

Suffrage Association, Illinois. 470 
Suffrage, Qualifications for... 102 
Sugar Consumed Per Capita.. 162 

Sugar Production of U. S 142 

Sugar Production of World.... 148 

Sully's Hill Park 87 

Summer Begins 13 

Sun, Eclipses of 29 

Sunday Evening Club 55? 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



11 



Page. 

Sun. School Ass'n, Cook Co.. 558 
Sunday School Ass'n, Illinois. 558 

Sunday School Union 194 

Sunday Schools in U. S 188 

Supt. County Institutions 474 

Supt. of Schools. Cook Co 474 

Superintendent Public Service 474 

Supt. Schools, Vote for 400 

Superior Court, Cook County. *76 
Superior Judges, Vote for 399 

Supplies, Department of 486 

Supreme Court, Illinois 459 

Supreme Court, United States <!57 
Surgical Association, American 201 
Surgical Inst. for Children.... 462 

Surveyor, County 475 

Svlthlod Singing Club 495 

Swanson, C. A., Sketch 335 

Sweden 125 

Swedenborgian Church 193 

Swedish Club of Chicago 654 

Swedish Glee Club 495 

Sweitzer, B. M., Portrait 473 

Swimming 247 

Switzerland 125 



Taft. W. H.. Portrait 252 

Talc Produced 177 

Target Shooting 245 

Tariff and Living Cost 54 

Tariff Commission, D. S 62 

Tariff Laws, Synopsis 62 

Tax Commission, Illinois 456 

Tax Rate, Cook County 522 

Tax Reform Ass'n, Illinois... 570 

Taxes, Internal Revenue 172 

Taxlcab Fares, Chicago 470 

Tea Consumed in U. S 174 

Tea Consumed Per Capita.... 162 
Teachers' Association, State.. 470 

Teachers In Chicago 586 

Teachers, Salaries of 507 

Teachers, Societies of 610 

Telegraph, Interstate, Law.... 37 
Telegraph Statistics, U. S.... 282 

Telegraphs, World's 59 

Telephone, Interstate, Law... 37 
Telephone Ordinance and Rates 516 

Telephone Statistics 160 

Tener, J. K., Sketch JJ5 

Tennessee, Vote of 387 

Tennis 210 

Terms of Officials 106 

Terrell, J. M., Sketch 335 

Territorial Growth, D. S 106 

Territories In Union 78 

Teutonla Maennerchor 495 

Texas, Vote of 387 

Textile Fibers, Production.... 149 

Theater Fires. List of 173 

Theaters, Chicago 520 

Thermometers Compared 181 

Time, Eras of 13 

Time, Foreign Standards 31 

Time, Standard, Man 31 

Time, Standard, Table 30 

Time Standards 30 

Tire Widths, Chicago 668 

Tobacco Crop by States 148 

Tobacco Crop by Years 144 

Tobacco Crop of World 148 

Tobin, E. J.. Portrait 473 

Tokyo Fair Commission 132 

Tolstoy, Death of 342 

Tonnage In Foreign Trade 98 

Tonnage, Vessel, Chicago 624 

Ton to Reserve 88 

Town and Country Clubs 654 

Track-Elevation Department.. 485 

Tract Society, American 193 

Tract Society, Chicago 558 

Traction. Board of, Engineers 485 

Trade. Board of 658 

Travelers, Free List for 77 



Page. 

Treasurer, City 484 

Treasurer, County 474 

Treasurer, County, Vote 398 

Treas., State, Vote In Cook Co. 398 
Treasurers, City, Since 1837... 652 

Treasury Department 53 

Tribe of Ben Hur 204 

Troops In United States Wars 66 

Trotting Records, Best 229 

Trotting Records, One Mile... 230 
TschaJkovsky, N., Acquitted.. 481 
Tuberculosis, Deaths from 139 
Tuberculosis Institute, Chi... 608 

'.' umacacorl Reserve 88 

Tunis 127 

Tunnels Under River 503 

Tunnels, Water 492 

Turin, Exposition Commission :02 

Turkey 126 

Turpentine, Internat'l Trade. 146 

Tutuila, Island of 116 

Twain, Mark, Death of 170 

Twentlefh Century Glut 554 



Union C'nb ...................... 654 

Union League Club ........... .664 

Union of South Africa ........ 122 

Union Park .................... 499 

Union Printers' Club .......... 664 

Union. States In ............... 78 

Union Stock Yards Statistics. 647 
Union Veteran Legion ........ 210 

Unitarian Church ............... 192 

Unitarian Sunday School Soc. 658 
United Christian Platform.... 108 

United Confederate Veterans.. 210 
United Societies, Chicago ..... 634 

United Soc. of Chr. Endeav. 194 
United States, Area of ........ 324 

United States Constitution... MO 
United States, Population of. 430 
United States, Progress of... ItO 
United States Steel Corpor'n. 201 
United Workmen, An. Order.. 204 
Universal Club ................. 664 

Universal Peace Commission.. 44 
Universities, American ........ SOl- 

Universitles, German .......... 305 

University Club ................ 654 

University of Chicago Library 510 
University Trustees, Illinois . 439 
Upham, F. W., Portrait ....... 473 

Urban Population .............. 437 

Uruguay ....................... 128 

h, 



Utah, Vote of 



389 



Valuation. Chicago 622 

Valuation, Cook Connty 622 

Valuation, Illinois 470 

Valparaiso Earthquake 86 

Venezuela 128 

Vermont. Vote of 390 

Vernon Park 499 

Vessels Built in United States 93 

Veterinarian, State 461 

Vice Commission 608 

Vicksburg Monument Com 462 

Vicksburg Park 87 

Virginia. Vote of 390 

Visibility on Lakes 88 

Volunteers of America 194 

Vote, Electoral, of States 90 

Vote for Illinois Governors.... 464 
Vote for Sheriffs, Cook Co.... 464 

Vote for State Treasurers 464 

Vote for State's Attorneys 464 

Vote of States 354 

Vote on Annexation 404 

Vote, Popular, Illinois 464 

Vote. Presidential 105 



Page. 

Vote, Presidential, 1908 334 

Vote, Presidential, Illinois... 465 
Voting Machine Comrniss'ners 461 

Voting Qualifications 102 

Voyages, Fastest Acr. Atlantic 329 

W 



Wage Earners, Mortality of.. 140 

Wages, Tables of 183 

Walsh, F. J., Portrait 473 

Wanda Singing Society 495 

War Department 253 

Ward, Boundaries, Chicago... 548 
Wards and Aldermen, Chicago 524 
Warehouse Commissioners. 111. 461 
Wars, Chronology of Recent.. 68 

Wars, Survivors of 328 

Wars, U. S., Troops In 66 

Washington Boulevard 499 

Washington Park 497 

Washington Square 500 

Water Bureau 485 

Waterfalls, Famous 132 

Waterways Com., Internat'l.. 132 
Waterways Commiss'n Report 312 
Waterworks System, Chicago. 492 
Wayman, J. E. W., Portrait. 473 

Waupanseh Club 554 

Weather, Chicago 532 

Weather Forecasts & Signals 176 

Weather, Hot. in 1910 84 

Weather. United States 327 

Weber, W. H., Portrait 473 

Webb, T. J., Portrait 473 

Wedding Anniversaries 213 

Weights and Measures 180 

Weights and Measures, Dept. . 487 

Weights, Bushel 181 

Weights of Adults 132 

Weights of Children 201 

Welles Park 497 

Wellman's Flight in Dirigible 318 

West Chicago Parks 498 

West End Woman's Club 554 

West Point Academy 57 

West, Roy O., Portrait 473 

Western Avenue Boulevard... 498 
Western Society of Engineers 568 
West'n Soc. of Engineers Lib. 510 

Weston's Great Walk 225 

West Virginia, Vote of 392 

Wheat Consumed Per Capita.. 162 

Wheat Crop by States 145 

Wheat Crop by Years 143 

Wheat Crop of World 141 

Wheat Harvest Calendar 141 

Wheat, International Trade... 14 
Wheat, Prices of, Chicago.... 630 

Wheeler Reserve 88 

Whist 249 

White House Expenses 213 

White-Slave Traffic Act 44 

Whitman, J. L., Portrait 482 

Wholesale Prices 56 

Wicker Park 499 

Wickersham, G. W., Portrait. 252 

Width of City 491 

Wilson, James, Portrait 253 

Wilson, W. H., Portrait 481 

Wilson, W., Sketch 335 

Wind Barometer for Lakes 176 

Wind Cave Park 87 

Wines Consumed In U. S 174 

Winter Begins 13 

Wireless on Ships 45 

Wisconsin, Vote of 392 

Wolf, Adam, Portrait 473 

Woman's Aid Club 654 

Woman's Athletic Club 654 

Woman's City Club 554 

Woman's Club, Chicago 554 

Woman's Suffrage Association 556 
Women, National Council of.. 556 

Women's Suffrage 10} 

Woman's Chr. Temp. Union... 656 
Woman's Chr. Temp. Un., 111. 470 



12 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Page. 

Woman's Cbr. Temp. Un., 111. 470 
Women's Clubs, Federation... 556 
Women's Clubs. Fed. of 111.. 470 

Women's Relief Corps 209 

Women's Trade Union League 476 
Women's Trade Union, Nat'l. 522 
Wood Pulp, Internat'l Trade. 147 

Woodland Park BOO 

Woodlawn Park Club 554 

Woodlawn Woman's Club 554 

Woodmen, Mod., of America.. 203 

Woodmen of the World 204 

Wool Consumed Per Capita... 162 

Wool In United States 149 

Wool, International Trade.... 147 
World, Population of 437 



Page. 

Wrecks, Railroad, In 1910 344 

Wrestling 232 

Wyoming. Vote of 394 



Yachting 233 

Yale-Harvard Races 242 

Yellowstone Park 87 

Yosemlte Park 87 

Young Fortnightly Club 554 

Young, L., Sketch 335 

Y. M. O. A., Chicago 558 



Page. 

Y. M. C. A., Chicago, Gifts to 331 
Y. M. C. A., United States... 194 
Young People's Chr. Union... 193 



Zimmer, M., Portrait 473 

Zinc Produced 177 

Zionist Congress 74 

Zodiac, Signs of the 28 

Zoological Gardens 173 

Zoological Park, Washington.. 87 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



American Steel & Wire Co... 563 

Arnold Company, The 559 

Babcock, Rushton & Co 525 

Baker, Alfred L.. & Co 523 

Bartell Bros 581 

Blatchford, E. W., & Co 593 

Burr, George H., & Co 619 

Case, J. I., Threshing Machine 

Company 567 

Chapln, S. B., & Co 517 

Chicago City Railway Co 598 

Chicago Portland Cement Co. 571 
Chicago Reduction Company.. 595 
Chicago Railways Company... 610 

Clark, A. O., & Co 566 

Corn Exchange National Bank. 

Inside Back Cover 

Cutler Hammer Mfg. Co 589 

Eckhart, B. A., Milling Co... 541 

Eckhart, John W., & Co 551 

Elgin National Watch Co 528 

Elmcs, Charles F., Engineer- 
Ing Works 581 

Emrath, Louis 579 

Ewen, John M., Company 575 

Federal Life Insurance Co... 631 



Fiduciary Company, The 583 

Graham & Sons...., 525 

Greenebaum Sons, Bank 515 

Hoe, R., & Co 640 

Illinois Brick Company 609 

Illinois Improvement & Bal- 
last Co 453 

Illinois Tunnel Co 535 

Jackson, George W., Inc 565 

Jelke, John F., & Co 545 

Jenney, Mundie & Jensen 539 

Karpen, S., & Bros 537 

Kellogg Switchboard & Sup- 
ply Co 587 

Lackner & Butz 517 

Lamson Bros. & Co 523 

Link-Belt Company 671 

Marsh & McLennan 

Inside Front Cover 

Marshall- Jackson Company 585 

Meacham & Wright Company. 577 
Merchants' Loan & Trust Co. 

Outside Back Cover 

Monon Route 557 

Merrill, George H., Company. 
Opposite Title Page 



Municipal Engineering & Con- 
tracting Co 669 

Nelson, H. P., Company 619 

Northwestern Terra Cotta Co. 579 
Northwestern Trust and Sav- 
ings Bank 521 

O'Connell, Win. L., Cereal Co. 533 

Patterson & Davidson 531 

Phillips, Getschow Co 579 

Pierce, Richardson & Neiler.. 551 

Puhl-Webb Company 561 

Rittenhouse & Embree Co 591 

Rossiter, Edgar A 619 

Samuel Bingham's Son Mfg. 

Company 697 

Sears, Roebuck &tCo 573 

Selig Polyscope Company 620 

Shankland. E. C. & R. M.... 537 
Thomas Elevator Company.... 609 

Townsend, J. J., & Co 521 

Union Stock Yards 547 

Wagner, E. W., & Go 553 

Walker, H. H., & Co 531 

Waller Coal Company 581 

Western Vaudeville Managers' 
Association 649 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS 
ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK 

1911. 

Astronomical calculations prepared by Berlin H. Wright, De Land, Fla., and expressed in mean local 
time unless otherwise indicated. 



THE SEASONS AND SUN'S APPARENT PATH THROUGH THE ZODIAC. 
Sun enters. Central standard time. 

Sign. Constellation. D. H. M. I>. H. M. 

December 22, 11 04 a. m., 1910 Winter begins and lasts 89 42 south of equator. 



January 
February 
March 
April 
May 
June 
July 
August 
September 23, 
October 24 r 
November 23, 
December 22, 
D. H. 



20. 
19, 
21, 
20, 
21, 
22. 
23, 
24. 



7 35 a. m., 1911 

12 a. m., 1911 

11 46 a. m., 1911 Spring begins and lasts 92 19 42 north of equator 

11 28 p. m., 1911 

8 12 a. m,, 1911 

7 28 a. m., 1911 Summer begins and lasts 93 14 42 north of equator. 

6 20 p. m., 1911 

1 30 a, m., 1911 

10 10 p. m.. 1911 Autumn begins and lasts 89 18 35 south of equator. 

6 46 a. m., 1911 

3 48 a. m., 1911 

4 45 p. m., 1911 Winter begins. Tropical year 365 5 41 

M. D. H. M, 



178 19 17 south of equator. 



93 

18G 
178 



42 
42 
24 north of equator. 



7 15 7 longer north of the equator than 
south of It, owing to the slower motion of the earth (sun's apparent motion) when at and near aphelion 



ERAS OF TIME. 
The Gregorian year 1911 corresponds to the following eras. 
From July 4 the 130th year of the independence of 

tile United States. 

The year 8020 of the Greek church beginning Jan. 14. 
The year 2571 (nearly) of the Japanese era begin- 
ning Jan. 30. 



The year 7419-20 of the Byzantine era; year 7420 

begins Sept. 1. 
The first day of January, 1911, is the 2,419.038th 

day since the beginning of the Julian period. 



CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 



Dominical or Sunday letter.. A Solar cycle 

Golden number 12 Roman indiction 

Epact (moon's age, Jan. 1).. 30 Julian period 

EXPLANATORY NOTE The Dominical letter or 
letters (two for leap year), or Sunday letters. 
Indicate the day of the year on which the first 
Sunday occurs, the first seven letters of the al- 
phabet being used. Thus, for 1910, the Dominical 
letter is B. the second letter of the alphabet, and 
hence the second day of the year will De the first 
Sunday of the year. In leap years two letters are 
used, the first being for January and February, 
and the latter, being the preceding letter, an- 
swers for the last ten months, in order to main- 
tain the cycle. The rule for obtaining the Do- 
minical letter for any year is somewhat compli- 
cated and for that reason is omitted here. The 
Golden Number is that number of a cycle of nine- 
teen years which shows how many years have 
elapsed since the new moon fell on Jan. 1, for in 
nearly nineteen years the solar and lunar years 
nearly come together. The chief use of this cycle 
is in fixing the date of Easter, and in this same 
connection is used the Epact. The Solar Cycle 
is the number of years that have elapsed since 
the days of the week fell on the same days of 
the year, or when there will, therefore, be a recur- 



6624 



Dionysian period 240 

Jewish lunar cycle 9 



rence of the Dominical or Sunday Letter. This 
would be the case every seven years but for leap 
year, hence four times seven is the cycle, or 
twenty-eight years. It is the remainder found by 
adding nine to the year and dividing the sum by 
twenty-eight. The Roman Indiction is a cycle of 
fifteen years and is of no utility except to chro- 
nologers. It is the remainder found by adding 
three to the year and dividing by fifteen. The 
Julian Period is a cycle of 7,980 years and is the 
product of the three cycles. Golden Number (19), 
Solar Cycle (28) and Roman Indiction (15). and 
hence shows the time when these cycles will co- 
incide, or begin at the same time. The first of 
this cycle will be completed in the year 2267; it 
Is the year + 4713. The Dionysian Period is a 
cycle of 532 years and is called the great Paschal 
cycle, being the product of a completed solar and 
lunar cycle (28X19). It is the remainder found 
by adding 457 to the year and dividing by 532, 
and with the Julian Period is chiefly used by 
chronologers. The Jewish Lunar Cycle is always 
three less than the Golden Number and Is used 
by the Jews in fixing the time of their festivals. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



JEWISH OR HEBREW CALENDAR YEAR 6671-72 A. M. 



The year 5671 is the 9th of the 299th cycle of 19 years. 


Year. 


Number. 


Name. Day. 


Fasts and feasts. Gregorian date. 


5671. . . . 


4 


.Tebet 


1... 


.. Rosh-Chodesh Saturday-Sunday. Dec. 31, 1910, Jan. 1, 1911 


5671.... 


4 


.Tebet 


10... 


. . .Fast of Tebet Tuesday, January 10, 1911 


5671. .. 


5 


.Sh'vat 


1... 


. . .Rosh-Cnodesh Monday, January 30, 1911 


5671.... 


6 


.A liar 


1... 


...Rosh-Chodesh Tuesday-Wednesday, Feb. 28, March 1, 1911 


5671.... 


6 


.Adar 


13... 


. . .Fast of Esther Monday, March 13, 1'Jll 


5671.... 


6 


. Aclur 


..14 and 15... 


...Purim Tuesday, Wednesday, March 14-15, lull 


5671.... 


7 


.Nissan 


1... 


. . . Rosh-Chodesh Thursday, March 30. 191 1 


5671.... 


7 


.Nissan 


15... 


. . . First day of Passover Thursday, April 13. lull 


5671.... 


8 


.lyar 


1... 


. . . Rosh-Chodesh Friday. Saturday. April 28, 29, 1911 


5671. .. 


8 


.lyar 


18... 


. . .Lag B'Omer Tuesday, May 10, lyil 










33d day of Omer. 


5671.... 


... 9 


.Sivan 


1... 


. . . Rosh-Chodesh Sunday, May 28, 1911 


5671.... 


u 


Sivan , 


6... 


. . . First day of Pentecost Friday, June 2. 1U1 1 


5671.... 


10 


.Tammuz.. 


, 1... 


. . .Rosh-Chodesh Monday-Tuesday, J une 2t>-27, 1911 


5671.... 


10 


.Tammuz .. 


17... 


...Fast of Tammuz Thursday, July 13. 1911 


5671.... 


11 


.Av or Ab .. 


1... 


,.. Rosh-Chodesh Wednesday. July 2ti, lull 


5671.... 


11 


.Avor Ab... 


9... 


...Fast of Av Thursday. August 3, 1911 


5671.... 


12. ... 


.Kllul , 


1. . 


. . .Rosh-Chodesh Thursday-Friday. August 24-25. 1911 


5672.... 


1 


.Tishri 


, 1... 


. . .1st day of New Year. . .Saturday, September 23, or at sunset of 










September 22. 1911 


5672.... 


1 


.Tishri 


3... 


. . .Fast of Gedaliah Monday, September 25, lull 


5672 ... 


1 


.Tishri 


10... 


. . . Yom Kippoor Monday , October 2, 1911 


5672.... 


1 


.Tishri 


, 15... 


. . .First Day of Tabernacle Saturday. October 7, 1911 


6672.... 


1 


Tishri 


21... 


. . .Hoshannah-Rabbah Friday, October 13, 1911 


5672.... 


1. ... 


.Tishri 


22... 


. . .Sh'mini-Atseres Saturday , October 14. lull 


5672 ... 


1 


.Tishri 


23... 


. . .Simchas-Torah Sunday, October 15, 191 1 


6672.... 


2 


, .Chesvan... 


1... 


. . .Rosh-Chodesh Sunday-Monday, October 22-23. 191 1 


5672.... 


3 


.Kislev 


1... 


. . .Rosh-Chodesh Wednesday, Thursday, November 22, 2 >, 1911 


6672. . . . 


3 


.Kislev 


25... 


. . .First day of Chanukah Saturday, December 16, lull 


5672.... 


4 


.Tebet 


1... 


. . .Rosh-Chodesh Thursday-Friday. December 21-22, lull 


5672.. . 


4 


..Tebet.. 


10... 


. . . Fast of Tebet Sunday, December 31, 191 1 


5 672.... 


5 


.Sh'vat 


1... 


...Rosh-Cbodesh Saturday, Jan. 20, 1912 



GREEK CHURCH AND RUSSIAN CALENDAR- A. D. 1911. A. M. 8020. 



New 
style. 


Old 
style. 


HOLY DAYS. 


New 
style. 


Old 
style. 


HOI.Y DAYS. 


Jan. 11 


Jan. 1 


Circumcision. 


June 4 


May 22 


Pentecost. 


Jan. 19 
Feb. 12 


Jan. 6 
Jan. 30 


Tneophany (Epiphany). 
Septuagesima Sunday. 


July 12 
Aug. 14 


June 29 
Aug. 1 


Peter and Paul, Chief Apostles. 
First Day of Theotokos. 


Feb. 15 


Feb. 2 


Hypopante (Purification). 


Aug. 19 


Aug. 6 


Transfiguration. 


Feb. 19 


Feb. 6 


Carnival Sunday. 


Aug.28 


Aug. 15 


Repose of Theotokos. 


Mch. 1 


Feb. 16 


Ash Wednesday. 


Sept.12 


Aug. 30 


St. Alexander Nevsky.* 


Mch. 5 


Feb. 20 


First Sunday in Lent. 


Sept.21 


Sept. 8 


Nativity of Theotokos. 


April 7 


Mch. 25 


Annunciation of Theotokos. 


Sept.27 


Sept. 14 


Exaltation of the Cross. 


April 9 


Mch. 27j Palm Sunday. 


Oct. 14 


Oct. 1 


Patronage of Theotokos. 


Apr. 14 


April ll Great (Good) Friday. 


Nov. 28 


Nov. 15 


First Day of Nativity. 


Apr. 16 


April 3 


Holy Pasch (Easter). 


Dec. 4 


Nov. 21 


Entrance of Ttieotokos. 


May 6 


Apr. 23 


St. George. 


Dec. 2] 


Dec. 8 


Conception of Theotokos. 


May 22 


May 9 


St. Nicholas. 


1911. 






May 25 


May 12 


Ascension. 


Jati. 7 


Dec. 25 


Nativity (Christmas). 


May 27 


May 14 


Coronation of Emperor.' 


Jan. 14 


Jan. 1 


Circumcision. 



Peculiar to Russia. 



CHINESE CALENDAR YEAR 4608. 



1st month begins January 30 

3d month begins. March 1 

3d month begins March 30 

4th month begins April 29 



6th month begins June 26 

6th month begins July26 

7th month begins August 24 

8th month begins September 22 



9th month begins October 22 

10th month begins November 21 

llth month begins December 20 

12th month begins. ..January 19, 1912 



5th month begins May 28 

The year 1HI1 corresponds nearly with the Chinese year 4608. or the forty-eighth year of the seventy-sixth 
cycle of sixty years; is a leap year, the sixth month being duplicated, and contains 384 days. 

MOHAMMEDAN CALENDAR-- YEAR 1329-30. 



Year. 

132U.. 
1829 


No. 
. 1.. 
. 2. 


-MONTH > 
Name. 
Muharrem 
....Saphar 


Begins. 
January 2. 1' 
February 1. 


Lasts 
Days. 

)11. ..30 


Year 

1329. . 
1329.. 


No. 
. 8... 
. 9... 


MONTH , 
Name. 
...Sheban 
Ramadan (fasting). 


Lasts 
Begins. Days. 
..July 28 29 
..August 26 80 


5329. . 
1829 


. 3.. 
4 


....Rabial 
....Rabia II 


March 2 
April 1 


30 
. 29 


1329.. 
1329 


.10... 
11 


...Schawall 


.September 25 29 
. October 24 30 


1329 


5 




... . April 30 


30 


1329 


12 




November 23 29 


1329. 


. 6. 


Jombadi 11 


May 30 


29 


i330 


1 




..December 22 30 


1829.. 


. 7.. 


....Rajeb.. 


June 28 


30 


1330.. 


. 2... 


...Saphar 


..January 21, 1912. .29 



The year 1329 is the 9th of the 45th cycle of 30 years. 

EASTER SUNDAY DATES. 

1907 March 31 1 1909 April! I 1911 April 16 I 1913 March 23 I 1915 .April I 

1908 April 19 I 1910 March 27 I 1912 April 7 (1914 April 12 I 1916 April 23 

The time of the celebration of the principal cnnrch days which depend upon Easter is as follows: 



Days. Before Easter. 

Septuagesima Sunday 9 weeks 

First Sunday In Lent 6 weeks 

Ash Wednesday (beginning of Lent) 46 (lays 

Palm Sunday 8 day's 



Days". After Easter. 

Rogation Sunday 5 weeks 

Ascension Day (Holj Thursday) 40 days 

Pentecost (WMfimnBay) .;-...;. ..-..; .7 weeks 

Tfliflty Snnfflyi ....8 weeks 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



15 



D First Quar., 8th. 
Full Moon. 14th. 



MONTH 
MONTH- 



1 01 1 ii HAVQ 5 Last Quar., 22(1. 
f *sr** UAIS. * N Moon, 30th 





a 


n 




| 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis, S. 111.. 


St. Paul, N. E. 




j 


H 




<; 






Neb.. N.Y.. Pa., 


Va.. Ky., Mo.. 


Wia. and Mich.. 


H 


w 







J 




MOON 


S. Wis., S. Mich., 


Kas., Col., Cal., 


N. E. New York. 




fc 


PN 


DAY 

OF 


Oi 

00 


SUN AT 

NOON 


IN 

ME- 


N. 111.. Ind.. O. 


Ind.. Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 


O 


M 


O 


WEEK 


55 


MARK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 




|M 






O 




IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


^ 




^ 




O 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 













S 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D 


H. M. 8. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


1 


305 


1 


SUNDAY . . 


f 25 


12 3 26 


1 1 


728 


439 


527 


710 


451 


540 


739 


429 


514 


2 


3(54 


2 


Monday 


* 8 


12 3 54 


152 


728 


440 


631 


716 


452 


642 


739 


430 


620 


3 


3(53 


3 


Tuesday 


-C 20 


12 4 22 


242 


728 


442 


739 


710 


453 


748 


738 


431 


730 


4 


3(52 


4 


Wednesday 


- 3 


12 4 50 


330 


728 


443 


848 


716 


453 


854 


738 


432 


842 


5 


3(51 


5 


Thursday... 


- 16 


12 5 17 


416 


728 


444 


956 


716 


454 


10 


738 


433 


953 


6 




6 


Friday 


- 30 


12 5 44 


5 2 


728 


445 


11 7 


716 


455 


11 8 


738 


434 


11 5 




359 


7 


Saturday. . . 


K 13 


12 6 11 


547 


727 


446 


morn 


716 


456 


morn 


738 


435 


morn 


8 




8 


SUNDAY.. 


27 


12 6 37 


635 


727 


447 


14 


716 


457 


12 


737 


436 


16 


9 


357 


9 


Monday 


11 


12 7 2 


725 


727 


448 


127 


716 


458 


123 


737 


437 


132 


10 


350 


10 


Tuesday.... 


26 


12 7 27 


820 


727 


449 


241 


716 


459 


235 


737 


438 


248 


11 


355 


11 


Wednesday 


10 


12 7 51 


920 


727 


449 


358 


716 


5 1 


348 


737 


439 


4 9 


12 


354 


12 


Thursday . . 


25 


12 8 15 


1023 


726 


450 


516 


715 


5 2 


5 4 


730 


440 


529 


13 


353 


13 


Friday 


10 


12 8 38 


1129 


720 


451 


630 


715 


5 3 


616 


730 


441 


644 


14 


352 


14 


Saturday. .. 


25 


12 9 


morn 


720 


452 


rises 


715 


5 4 


rises 


730 


442 


rises 


15 


351 


15 


SUNDAY .. 


9 


12 9 22 


33 


726 


454 


547 


715 


5 5 


558 


730 


444 


536 


16 


350 


10 


Monday.... 


% 23 


12 9 43 


132 


720 


455 


7 1 


714 


5 6 


7 9 


735 


446 


652 


17 


349 


17 


Tuesday 


a 7 


12 10 4 


226 


725 


456 


814 


714 


5 7 


820 


734 


447 


8 9 


18 


348 


18 


Wednesday 


ft 20 


12 10 23 


315 


724 


458 


921 


713 


5 8 


924 


734 


448 


919 


19 
20 


347 
341! 


19 

20 


Thursday.. . 
Friday 


TIP 3 

W 16 


12 10 42 
12 11 1 


4 1 

443 


723 
722 


459 
5 


5? II 


713 

712 


5 9 
510 


1027 
1129 


733 
732 


449 
450 


1026 
1133 


21 


345 


21 


Saturday... 


np 28 


12 11 18 


525 


722 


5 1 


morn 


712 


512 


morn 


731 


452 


morn 


22 


344 


22 


SUNDAY . 


- 10 


12 11 35 


6 6 


721 


5 2 


31 


711 


513 


27 


730 


454 


36 


23 




23 


Monday 


* 22 


12 11 51 


648 


720 


5 3 


135 


711 


514 


128 


729 


455 


141 


24 


342 


24 


Tuesday. . . . 


m 3 


12 12 7 


733 


720 


5 4 


238 


710 


515 


229 


729 


456 


247 


25 


341 


25 


Wednesday 


m 15 


12 12 21 


820 


710 


5 5 


341 


710 


516 


330 


728 


457 


352 


2(i 


340 


26 


Thursday... 


m 27 


12 12 35 


9 9 


719 


5 6 


443 


7 9 


516 


430 


727 


458 


456 


27 


339 


27 


Friday 


if 9 


12 12 48 


10 1 


718 


5 7 


542 


7 9 




528 


720 


459 


556 


28 


338 


28 


Saturday. . . 


* 22 


12 13 1 


1053 


717 


5 8 


634 


7 8 


5 18 


620 


725 


5 1 


648 


29 


337 


29 


SUNDAY.. 


* 4 


12 13 12 


1146 


716 


6 9 


718 


7 8 


5 19 


7 6 


724 


5 3 


731 


30 


330 


30 


Monday 


5 17 


12 13 23 


ev. 37 


715 


511 


sets 


7 7 


520 


sets 


723 


5 5 


sets 


31 


335 


31 


Tuesday ... 


- 


12 13 33 


127 


715 


512 


640 


7 6 


521 


647 


722 


5 6 


633 



First Quar.. 6th. 
i Full Moon. 13th. 



2d MONTH. FEBRUARY, 1911. 28 DAYS. 



Last Quar., 20th. 
i New Moon, 28th. 



M 


tt 


a 

H 











Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis, S. 111., 


St. Paul, N. B. 


3 


<! 


B 




4 






Neb., N.Y.. Pa., 


Va., Ky., Mo.. 


Wis. and Mich.. 


H 


K W 


o 


DAY 


d 




MOON 


S. Wis., S. Mich., 


Kas., Col., Cal., 


N. E. New York. 


h 


fc 


fc 


OF 


00 


8UN AT 

NOON 


IN 

ME- 


N. 111., Ind.. O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 


O 


" 


o 


WEEK. 


fi 


MARK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


^ 


B 


^, 









IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


^ 


^ 


^ 




O 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


_0 





O 




S 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D. 


H. M. S. 


B.M. 


H. M. 


H. M~ 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


32 
33 


334 

333 


1 
2 


Wednesday 
Thursday . . 


- 13 
" 27 


12 13 41 
12 13 49 


n 


714 

712 


hi 


748 
856 


7 5 
7 4 


522 
523 


752 
858 


721 
720 


5 7 
5 8 


744 
855 


4 


332 


3 


Friday 


y 10 


12 13 57 


346 


711 


515 


10 7 


7 3 


525 


10 6 


719 


5 10 


10 8 


5 


331 


4 


Saturday... 


X 24 


12 14 3 


433 


710 


517 


1117 


7 2 


526 


1114 


717 


511 


1121 


36 


330 


5 


SUNDAY.. 


T 8 


12 14 9 


521 


7 9 


519 


morn 


7 1 


527 


morn 


716 


512 


morn 


37 


329 


6 


Monday 


T 22 


12 14 14 


613 


7 8 


520 


29 


7 


528 


23 


715 


614 


36 


38 


328 


7 


Tuesday . . . 


6 


12 14 17 


7 9 


7 6 


521 


146 


650 


529 


137 


713 


5 15 


155 


39 


327 


8 


Wednesday 


W 20 


12 14 21 


8 9 


7 5 


523 


3 


658 


530 


249 


712 


516 


3 12 


40 


32(5 


9 


Thursday... 


H 5 


12 14 23 


912 


7 4 


524 


413 


657 


532 


4 


710 


518 


427 


41 


325 


10 


Friday 


H 19 


12 14 24 


1015 


7 3 


525 


520 


656 


533 


5 6 


7 9 


520 


534 


42 


324 


11 


Saturday .. 


8 3 


12 14 25 


1116 


7 2 


526 


626 


055 


534 


613 


7 7 


522 


640 


43 


323 


12 


SUNDAY.. 


17 


12 14 25 


morn 


7 1 


527 


rises 


654 


535 


rises 


7 5 


523 


rises 


44 


322 


13 


Monday 


a i 


12 14 24 


12 


7 


528 


550 


653 


536 


5 57 


7 4 


524 


5 43 


45 


321 


14 


Tuesday ... 


a 15 


12 14 23 


1 3 


659 


530 


7 2 


651 


538 


7 6 


7 3 


526 


657 


46 


320 


15 


Wednesday 


a 28 


12 14 20 


151 


658 


532 


8 9 


050 


539 


8 11 


7 2 


527 


8 8 


47 


319 


1(5 


Thursday .. 


IV 11 


12 14 17 


235 


656 


533 


913 


649 


540 


912 


7 1 


529 


9 14 


48 


318 


17 


Friday 


np 24 


12 14 14 


318 


654 


534 


1018 


(548 


541 


1015 


659 


531 


1028 


49 


317 


18 


Saturday . . 


- 6 


12 14 9 


4 


652 


536 


1121 


646 


542 


11 15 


657 


532 


11 27 


60 


310 


19 


SUNDAY.. 


" 18 


12 14 4 


442 


(i 50 


538 


morn 


045 


544 


morn 


655 


5 34 


morn 


51 


315 


20 


Monday 


= 30 


12 13 58 


526 


649 


539 


26 


644 


545 


17 


054 


535 


34 


52 


314 


21 


Tuesday ... 


m 11 


12 13 62 


612 


647 


540 


129 


043 


646 


1 18 


652 


536 


140 


63 


313 


22 


Wednesday 


m 23 


12 13 45 


7 1 


646 


541 




641 


5 47 2 22 


650 


538 


250 


64 


312 


23 


Thursday.. 


if 


12 13 37 


751 


645 


543 


3 31 


640 


548 


317 


648 


539 


340 


55 


311 


24 


Friday 


f 17 


12 13 29 


844 


44 


544 


426 


639 


549 


412 


647 


5 40 


441 


66 


310 


25 


Saturday.. . 


f 30 


12 13 20 


936 


643 


545 


513 


38 


550 


5 


040 


542 


527 


57 


; ;i )'. t 


20 


SUNDAY.. 


* 13 


12 13 10 


1028 


641 


546 


553 


636 


551 


540 


644 


543 


6 4 


68 


30s 


27 


Monday 


-5 26 


12 13 


11 19 


639 


547 


627 


635 


551 


617 


043 


545 


630 


69 


307 


28 


Tuesday 


- 9 


12 12 50 


ev. 8 


038 


548 


sets 


634 


552 


sets 


641 


546 


sets 
















1 


















For far western points within any of the above zones of latitude add 2 nain. for each hour of longitude to 
the moon's rising, setting and southing. 
For far eastern points subtract 2 min. for each hour of longitude from moon's rising, setting and southing 



10 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



$ First Quar., 7th. 
Full Moon, 14th. 



3d MONTH. MARCH, 1911. 31 DAYS. 



<T Last Quar., 22d. 
New Moon, 30th. 



P5 


P5 


B 

f-l 





Q 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis. S. 111.. 


St. Paul. N. B. 


<; 


3 


B 




4) 






Neb., N.Y., Pa.. 


Va.. Ky., Mo., 


Wis. and Mich.. 




w 







J 




MOON 


S. Wis.. S. Mich., 


Kas.. Col., Cal., 


N. B. New York, 


* 


t* 


a 


DAY 


fi 


SUN AT 


IN 


N. 111.. Ind.. O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 


h 


fc 


Es, 


OP 


00 


NOON 


ME- 











M 

QD 


O 


WEEK. 


fc 


MARK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


h 


ft 


(X 









IAN 


Sun 


Sun 


seta 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


< 


< 


<) 




O 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


Q 


Q 


Q 




% 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D. 


H. M. 8. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


60 


306 


1 


Wednesday 


- 23 


12 12 38 


055 


636 


550 


643 


632 


554 


646 


639 


548 


641 


(51 


305 


2 


Thursday . . 


X 6 


12 12 27 


142 


635 


551 


755 


631 


555 


755 


638 


549 


755 


62 


304 


3 


Friday 


X 20 


12 12 15 


229 


634 


553 


9 7 


630 


556 


9 4 


636 


550 


9 9 


63 


303 


4 


Saturday. . . 


T 4 


12 12 2 


318 


632 


554 


1021 


628 


557 


1015 


634 


5 52 


1027 


64 


302 


5 


SUNDAY.. 


T 19 


12 11 49 


4 9 


630 


556 


1135 


626 


558 


1126 


632 


53 


1143 


65 


301 


6 


Monday .... 


tf 3 


12 11 35 


5 5 


628 


557 


morn 


624 


559 


morn 


630 


555 


morn 


60 


300 


7 


Tuesday 


tf 17 


12 11 21 


6 3 


626 


558 


53 


623 


6 


42 


628 


556 


1 4 


67 


'_'!)'.) 


8 


Wednesday 


1 


12 11 1 


7 4 


624 


559 


2 6 


621 


6 1 


153 


627 


557 


220 


68 


298 


9 


Thursday .. 


x 15 


12 10 52 


8 6 


622 


6 


314 


619 


6 2 


3 


625 


558 


328 


69 


297 


10 


Friday 


V 29 


12 10 36 


9 6 


620 


6 1 


411 


618 


6 3 


358 


623 


6 


425 


70 


296 


11 


Saturday. . . 


8 13 


12 10 21 


10 2 


618 


6 3 


459 


617 


6 4 


447 


621 


6 2 


511 


71 


295 


12 


SUNDAY.. 


8 27 


12 10 5 


1054 


617 


6 4 


536 


616 


6 5 


526 


619 


6 3 


545 


72 


294 


13 


Monday.... 


10 


12 9 49 


1142 


615 


6 6 


607 


614 


6 6 


6 


617 


6 4 


613 


73 


293 


14 


Tuesday 


fl 23 


12 9 32 


morn 


613 


6 7 


rises 


613 


6 7 


rises 


615 


6 5 


rises 


74 


292 


15 


Wednesday 


HP 6 


12 9 15 


27 


611 


6 7 


6 58 


612 


6 7 


658 


613 


6 6 


658 


75 


291 


16 


Thursday . . 


HP 19 


12 8 58 


111 


610 


6 8 


8 2 


610 


6 8 


759 


611 


6 7 


8 4 


76 


290 


17 


Friday 


* 1 


12 8 41 


153 


6 9 


6 9 


9 6 


6 8 


6 9 


9 1 


6 9 


6 8 


911 


77 


289 


18 


Saturday. . 


= 14 


12 8 23 


236 


6 7 


610 


1010 


6 6 


610 


10 3 


6 7 


6 9 


10 18 


78 


288 


19 


SUNDAY.. 


=* 26 


12 8 6 


319 


6 5 


611 


1116 


6 4 


611 


11 6 


6 5 


610 


1126 


79 


287 


20 


Monday 


m 7 


12 7 48 


4 5 


6 4 


612 


morn 


6 3 


612 


morn 


6 3 


611 


morn 


80 


286 


21 


Tuesday 


m 19 


12 730 


452 


6 2 


613 


18 


6 2 


613 


6 


6 1 


613 


30 


81 


285 


22 


Wednesday 


* i 


12 7 12 


542 


6 


614 


119 


6 1 


614 


1 6 


6 


615 


133 


82 


284 


23 


Thursday... 


* 13 


12 6 54 


633 


558 


615 


216 


6 


615 


2 1 


558 


616 


230 


83 


283 


24 


Friday 


if 25 


12 6 35 


726 


556 


616 


3 6 


559 


616 


253 


556 


617 


321 


84 


282 


25 


Saturday. . . 


8 8 


12 6 17 


817 


554 


617 


348 


557 


617 


335 


554 


619 


4 1 


85 


281 


26 


SUNDAY.. 


* 21 


12 5 59 


9 8 


553 


619 


425 


555 


618 


415 


552 


620 


438 


80 


280 


27 


Monday.... 


- 4 


12 540 


957 


552 


620 


454 


552 


619 


446 


550 


621 


5 2 


87 


279 


28 


Tuesday 


17 


12 5 22 


1045 


551 


621 


519 


550 


620 


514 


548 


622 


524 


88 


278 


29 


Wednesday 


X 1 


12 5 4 


1133 


550 


622 


542 


549 


621 


540 


546 


624 


544 


89 


277 


30 


Thursday . . 


X 15 


12 4 46 


ev. 20 


548 


624 


sets 


548 


622 


sets 


544 


626 


seta 


90 


276 


31 


Friday 


X 30 


12 4 27 


110 


546 


625 


8 3 


546 


623 


758 


543 


627 


8 7 



First Quar., 6th. 
i Full Moon, 13th. 



4th MONTH. APRIL^ 1911. 30 DAYS. 



( Last Quar., 21st. 
New Moon, 28th. 





* 


K 




H 
O 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis. S. 111., 


St. PauL. N. B. 


<J 


3 


fc 




<j 






Neb., N.Y., Pa.. 


Va., Ky., Mo.. 


Wis. and Mich.. 


i 


w 
KJ 


O 




c 




MOON 


S. Wis., S. Mich.. 


Kas., Col.. Cal.. 


N. E. New York. 


t* 


H* 

55 


S 


DAT 

OP 


m 

m 


SUN AT 


IN 

ME- 


N. 111.. Ind.. O. 


Ind.. Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 


o 


M 


o 


WEEK. 


Z 


NOON 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 




S 






o 


MARK. 


IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


2 


c 


r* 1 




o 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


Q 


Q 


Q 




H 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D. 


H. M. 8. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


91 


275 


1 


Saturday .. 


T 14 


12 4 9 


A Q 


544 


626 


921 


545 


624 


913 


542 


628 


928 


92 


274 


2 


SUNDAY . . 


T 29 


12 3 51 


257 


543 


627 


1038 


543 


625 


1028 


540 


629 


1049 


93 


273 


3 


Monday 


W 13 


12 3 33 


356 


541 


628 


1154 


542 


626 


1142 


538 


630 


morn 


94 


272 


4 


Tuesday.... 


W 28 


12 3 16 


458 


539 


629 


morn 


540 


626 


morn 


536 


631 


7 


95 


271 


5 


Wednesday 


12 


12 2 58 


6 1 


537 


630 


1 7 


539 


627 


53 


534 


632 


121 


96 


270 


B 


Thursday... 


K 26 


12 2 40 


7 1 


535 


631 


2 9 


537 


628 


155 


532 


634 


224 


97 


2(59 


7 


Friday 


8 10 


12 2 23 


758 


533 


632 


259 


536 


629 


246 


530 


635 


312 


98 


268 


8 


Saturday . . 


8 23 


12 2 6 


850 


531 


633 


339 


534 


630 


329 


528 


636 


350 


99 


267 


9 


SUNDAY . . 


6 


12 1 49 


939 


529 


634 


410 


533 


631 


4 2 


526 


637 


418 


100 


2(>6 


10 


Monday.... 


19 


12 1 32 


1024 


527 


635 


436 


531 


632 


431 


524 


639 


441 


101 
102 


21 ',5 
264 


11 
12 


Tuesday.... 
Wednesday 


HP 2 
HP 15 


12 1 16 
12 1 


11 7 
1149 


526 
524 


if? 


458 
5 19 


529 

528 


633 
634 


455 
519 


523 

521 


640 
641 


5 
519 


103 


2(53 


is 


Thursday . . 


HP 27 


12 44 


morn 


523 


638 


rises 


526 


635 


rises 


519 


642 


rises 


104 


262 


14 


Friday 


= 10 


12 28 


31 


521 


639 


758 


524 


636 


751 


518 


643 


8 4 


105 


261 


15 


Saturday... 


- 22 


12 13 


1 14 


520 


640 


9 2 


523 


636 


853 


517 


645 


911 


106 


260 


16 


SUNDAY.. 


HI 4 


11 59 58 


159 


519 


642 


10 7 


522 


637 


956 


515 


646 


1018 


107 


25! 


17 


Monday 


m 15 


11 59 43 


246 


517 


643 


1110 


521 


638 


1057 


513 


647 


1124 


108 


258 


18 


Tuesday.... 


m 27 


11 59 29 


335 


516 


644 


morn 


519 


639 


1153 


511 


648 


morn 


109 


257 


19 


Wednesday 


* 9 


11 59 16 


425 


514 


645 


7 


518 


640 


morn 


5 9 


649 


22 


110 


256 


20 


Thursday.. 


if 21 


11 59 2 


517 


512 


646 


59 


517 


641 


45 


5 7 


651 


114 


111 


255 


21 


Friday 


* 3 


11 58 49 


6 8 


510 


647 


145 


516 


642 


132 


5 4 


653 


159 


112 


254 


22 


Saturday .. 


* 16 


11 58 37 


658 


5 9 


648 


222 


515 


642 


210 


5 2 


654 


834 


113 


253 


23 


SUNDAY... 


-6 29 


11 58 25 


747 


5 7 


649 


253 


514 


643 


244 


5 


656 


3 2 


114 


252 


24 


Monday.... 


- 12 


11 58 13 


835 


5 5 


650 


320 


5 13 


644 


313 


459 


657 


327 


115 


251 


25 


Tuesday 


- 25 


11 58 2 


921 


5 4 


652 


343 


511 


645 


339 


458 


658 


347 


116 


250 


26 


Wednesday 


x 9 


11 57 52 


10 8 


5 3 


653 


4 6 


5 9 


646 


4 5 


457 


659 


4 7 


117 


249 


27 


Thursday.. 


X 24 


11 57 42 


1057 


5 2 


654 


430 


5 7 


646 


431 


456 


7 


429 


118 


248 


28 


Friday 


T 8 


11 57 32 


1148 


5 


655 


454 


5 5 


647 


459 


454 


7 1 


450 


119 


247 


29 


Saturday... 


T 23 


11 57 23 


ev. 43 


459 


656 


sets 


5 4 


649 


sets 


452 


7 8 


sets 


120 


246 


30 


SUNDAY.,. 


W 8 


11 57 14 


142 


457 


667 


934 


5 3 


650 


o 99 

y 66 


450 


7 4 


946 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



17 



$ First Quar., 5tb. 
Full Moon, 13th. 



5th MONTH. MAY, 1911. 31 DAYS. 



Last Quar., 21st. 
I New Moon, 28th. 



d 


: 


K 




5 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis. S. 111.. 


St. Paul, N. E. 


w 


^ 


^ 




3 






Neb.. N.Y.. Pa., 


Va.. Ky.. Mo., 


Wis. and Mich.. 


B 


S< 


O 




j 




MOON 


S. Wis., S. Mich.. 


Kas., Col., Cal., 


N. E. New York. 




% 


fci 


DAY 

OP 


O-i 


SUN AT 

NOON 


IN 

ME- 


N. 111.. Ind.. O. 


Ind.. Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 


O 


H 


O 


WEEK. 


- 


MARK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


(H 


^ 


H 




o 




IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 




5 






o 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


O 


q 







^ 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con. D. 


H. M. S. 


H M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


121 


245 


1 


Monday.... 


W 23 


11 57 6 


248 


456 


658 


1039 


6 2 


651 


1030 


449 


7 5 


1049 


122 


244 


2 


Tuesday . . . 


8 


11 56 59 


350 


455 


659 


12 


5 1 


652 


1146 


448 


7 6 


morn 


123 


243 


3 


Wednesday 


K 22 


11 56 52 


454 


454 


7 


morn 


5 


653 


morn 


446 


7 7 


15 


124 


242 


4 


Thursday . 


8 6 


11 56 45 


553 


453 


7 2 


56 


459 


654 


43 


444 


7 8 


110 


125 


241 


5 


Friday 


8 20 


11 56 40 


648 


452 


7 3 


141 


458 


655 


130 


443 


710 


1 53 


126 


240 


6 


Saturday... 


fl 3 


11 56 34 


737 


450 


7 4 


214 


457 


656 


2 5 


442 


711 


222 


127 


239 


7 


SUNDAY.. 


fl 16 


11 56 29 


823 


449 


7 6 


241 


456 


657 


23b 


440 


712 


247 


128 


238 


8 


Monday 


a 29 


11 56 25 


9 6 


448 


7 6 


3 4 


455 


658 


3 1 


439 


713 


3 7 


329 


237 


9 


Tuesday 


HP 12 


11 56 21 


947 


446 


7 7 


324 


454 


659 


323 


438 


714 


325 


130 


236 


10 


Wednesday 


TV 24 


11 56 18 


1029 


445 


7 8 


343 


453 


7 


345 


437 


716 


341 


131 


235 


11 


Thursday .. 


- 6 


11 56 16 


1111 


444 


7 9 


4 3 


452 


7 


4 7 


436 


717 


359 


132 


234 


12 


Friday 


- 18 


11 56 14 


1155 


442 


710 


424 


451 


7 1 


431 


435 


718 


417 


133 


233 


13 


Saturday . . 


m o 


11 56 12 


morn 


441 


711 


rises 


450 


7 2 


rises 


434 


719 


rises 


134 


232 


14 


SUNDAY .. 


m 12 


11 56 11 


41 


440 


712 


859 


449 


7 3 


847 


432 


720 


912 


135 


231 


15 


Monday.... 


m 24 


11 56 11 


129 


439 


713 


10 


448 


7 3 


947 


431 


721 


1015 


136 


230 


16 


Tuesday 


* 6 


11 56 11 


220 


438 


714 


1055 


448 


7 4 


1041 


430 


723 


11 10 


137 


-"-'it 


17 


Wednesday 


x- 18 


11 56 12 


3 11 


437 


716 


1142 


447 


7 6 


1129 


429 


724 


11 57 


138 


228 


18 


Thursday .. 


r 30 


11 56 13 


4 2 


436 


716 


morn 


446 


7 6 


morn 


428 


725 


morn 


13S 


227 


19 


Friday 


* 12 


11 56 15 


452 


435 


717 


21 


445 


7 7 


9 


427 


726 


33 


140 


226 


20 


Saturday . . 


5 24 


11 56 18 


540 


434 


718 


55 


444 


7 8 


43 


426 


727 


1 3 


141 


225 


21 


SUNDAY.. 


- 7 


11 56 21 


627 


434 


719 


120 


444 


7 9 


112 


425 


728 


128 


142 


224 


22 


Monday.... 


- 20 


11 56 25 


713 


433 


720 


144 


443 


710 


139 


424 


729 


149 


143 


223 


23 


Tuesday.... 


X 4 


11 56 29 


758 


432 


721 


2 7 


443 


711 


2 4 


423 


730 


2 9 


144 


222 


24 


Wednesday 


X 18 


11 56 34 


844 


431 


722 


228 


442 


712 


22S 


422 


731 


228 


145 


221 


25 


Thursday .. 


T 2 


1 1 56 39 


933 


430 


723 


253 


442 


713 


256 


421 


732 


250 


146 


220 


2(5 


Friday 


T 17 


11 56 45 


1026 


429 


724 


319 


441 


713 


325 


420 


734 


3 12 


147 


219 


27 


Saturday... 


H 2 


11 56 51 


1123 


428 


725 


351 


441 


714 


4 


419 


735 


342 


148 


218 


28 


SUNDAY.. 


17 


11 56 58 


ev.26 


427 


726 


sets 


440 


715 


sets 


418 


736 


sets 


149 


217 


29 


Monday .... 


H 2 


11 57 5 


132 


426 


727 


940 


439 


716 


926 


417 


737 


955 


150 


216 


30 


Tuesday 


:K 17 


11 57 13 


238 


426 


728 


1044 


439 


717 


1031 


416 


738 


1059 


151 


215 


31 


Wednesday 


8 2 


11 57 21 


342 


426 


729 


1136 


438 


717 


1125 


416 


739 


1149 



"5 First Quar., 3d. 
Full Moon, llth. 



6th MONTH. JUNE, 1911. 30 DAYS. 



Last Quar., 19th. 
i New Moon, 26th. 





a 


H 
EH 





u 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis, S. 111.. 


St. Paul, N. B. 


* 


2 


I 




i 






Neb.. N.Y., Pa.. 


Va.. Ky., Mo.. 


Wis. and Mich.. 


a 


W 







d 




MOON 


S. Wis., S. Mich., 


Kas., Col., Cal., 


N. B. New York, 


P 


&H 

k 


?! 


DAY 

OF 


M 




SUN AT 

NOON 


IN 

ME- 


N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 


o 





o 


WEEK. 


ft 


MARK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


l_ 


t/3 
H 


^< 




O 




IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


< 


4 


<( 




o 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


Q_ 


Q 


P 




N 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










ConD. 


H. M. 8. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


152 


214 


1 


Thursday.. 


8 16 


11 57 30 


440 


425 


729 


morn 


438 


718 


morn 


415 


740 


morn 


153 


213 


2 


Friday 


8 30 


11 57 39 


533 


425 


730 


15 


438 


719 


6 


415 


741 


25 


154 


212 


5 


Saturday . . 


13 


11 57 48 


621 


425 


730 


44 


438 


719 


37 


414 


741 


51 


155 


211 


4 


SUNDAY./ 


fl 26 


11 57 58 


7 5 


425 


731 


1 9 


437 


720 


105 


414 


742 


112 


156 


210 


5 


Monday.... 


HP 9 


11 58 8 


747 


424 


731 


130 


437 


720 


129 


414 


742 


132 


157 


209 


6 


Tuesday 


TIP 21 


11 58 18 


828 


424 


732 


151 


437 


721 


1 52 


413 


743 


150 


158 


208 


7 


Wednesday 


= 3 


11 58 29 


910 


424 


733 


210 


437 


721 


213 


413 


743 


2 6 


159 


207 


8 


Thursday... 


= 15 


11 58 40 


953 


424 


733 


230 


436 


722 


236 


413 


744 


224 


160 


206 


9 


Friday 


* 27 


11 58 51 


1038 


423 


734 


253 


436 


722 


3 2 


413 


744 


245 


161 


205 


10 


Saturday . . 


m. 9 


11 59 3 


1126 


423 


734 


321 


436 


723 


331 


412 


745 


3 10 


162 


204 


11 


SUNDAY.. 


m 21 


11 59 15 


morn 


423 


735 


rises 


436 


724 


rises 


412 


746 


rises 


163 


203 


12 


Monday 


? 3 


11 59 27 


15 


423 


736 


848 


436 


724 


834 


412 


747 


9 3 


164 


202 


18 


Tuesday.... 


* 15 


11 59 39 


1 6 


423 


737 


940 


436 


725 


926 


412 


747 


954 


165 


201 


14 


Wednesday 


f 27 


11 59 51 


158 


423 


737 


1022 


436 


725 


10 9 


412 


748 


1035 


166 


200 


15 


Thursday . . 


* 9 


12 4 


248 


423 


738 


1056 


436 


725 


1045 


412 


749 


11 7 


167 


199 


16 


Friday 


* 21 


12 16 


337 


423 


738 


1126 


436 


726 


1117 


412 


750 


1135 


168 


198 


17 


Saturday .. 


- 3 


12 29 


423 


423 


739 


1148 


436 


726 


1142 


412 


750 


11 54 


160 


197 


18 


SUNDAY.. 


- 16 


12 42 


5 8 


423 


739 


morn 


436 


726 


morn 


412 


751 


morn 


170 


196 


19 


Monday... 


- 29 


12 55 


553 


423 


739 


11 


436 


726 


8 


412 


751 


14 


171 


195 


20 


Tuesday ... 


K 13 


12 1 8 


637 


423 


739 


32 


436 


726 


31 


412 


751 


33 


172 


194 


21 


Wednesday 


M 26 


12 1 21 


723 


424 


740 


53 


436 


726 


55 


412 


751 


51 


173 


193 


22 


Thursday. . 


T 11 


12 1 34 


812 


424 


740 


117 


437 


727 


122 


413 


751 


112 


174 


192 


23 


Friday 


T 25 


12 1 47 


9 5 


424 


740 


1 45 


437 


727 


153 


413 


751 


137 


175 


191 


24 


Saturday... 


W 10 


12 2 


10 4 


424 


740 


221 


437 


727 


232 


413 


751 


210 


176 


190 


25 


SUNDAY.. 


W 25 


12 2 13 


11 8 


424 


740 


3 8 


437 


727 


321 


413 


751 


255 


177 


189 


2(5 


Monday 


K 11 


12 2 26 


ev.16 


425 


740 


sets 


438 


727 


sets 


413 


751 


sets 


178 


188 


27 


Tuesday 


K 26 


12 2 39 


123 


425 


740 


923 


438 


727 


910 


414 


751 


936 


179 


187 


28 


Wednesday 


8 11 


12 2 51 


225 


425 


740 


10 8 


438 


727 


957 


414 


751 


1019 


180 


186 


29 


Thursday . . 


25 


12 3 4 


322 


425 


740 


1042 


439 


727 


1035 


414 


751 


1050 


181 


185 


30 


Friday 


O !> 


12 3 16 


414 


426 


740 


1111 


440 


727 


11 6 


415 


761 


1116 



18 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAU-BOOK FOR 1911. 



$ First Qnar, 3d. 
Full Moon, llth. 



7th MONTH. JULY, 1911. 31 DAYS. 



Last Quar. 18th. 
i New Moon 25th. 



P5 


'Pi 


m 

H 




S 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis. S. 111., 


St. Paul, N. E. 


j 


< 






5 






Neb., N. Y., Pa., 


Va., Kv., Mo., 


Wis. and Mich.. 


w 


w 

IJH 







C 




MOON 


S. Wis., S. Mich., 


Kas., Col., Cal., 


N. E. New York. 


h 

CM 


fc 


55 

tw 


DAY 

OF 


PJ 
pa 


SUN AT 

NOON 


IN 

ME- 


N. 111., Ind., O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 







IH 





WEEK. 


ft 


MARK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


(H 


[H 


|M 




o 




IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


4 


J 


4 




o 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


a 


Q 


Q 




54 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D. 


H. M. S. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


182 


184 


1 


Saturday . . 


n 22 


12 3 28 


5 1 


427 


740 


1135 


440 


727 


1132 


416 


751 


1137 


183 


is:: 


'2 


SUNDAY.. 


HP 5 


12 3 40 


544 


428 


740 


1154 


440 


727 


1154 


417 


751 


1154 


184 


1K2 


3 


Monday 


HP 18 


12 3 51 


627 


429 


740 


morn 


441 


727 


morn 


418 


751 


morn 


185 


181 


4 


Tuesday 


= 


12 4 2 


7 9 


429 


740 


15 


441 


727 


18 


4 18 


751 


12 


186 


ISO 


5 


Wednesday 


= 12 


12 4 13 


751 


430 


740 


35 


442 


727 


40 


419 


751 


29 


187 


179 


6 


Thursday . . 


= 24 


12 4 23 


836 


431 


739 


47 


443 


726 


54 


420 


760 


39 


188 


178 


7 


Friday 


m 6 


12 4 33 


922 


432 


739 


123 


443 


726 


135 


421 


750 


1 13 


189 


177 


8 


Saturday... 


m is 


12 4 43 


1011 


432 


739 


153 


444 


726 


2 5 


421 


750 


141 


190 


176 


9 


SUNDAY.. 


m so 


12 4 52 


11 2 


433 


739 


232 


444 


725 


246 


422 


749 


218 


191 


175 


10 


Monday 


* 12 


12 5 1 


1154 


433 


738 


320 


445 


725 


334 


422 


749 


3 5 


192 


174 


11 


Tuesday 


f 24 


12 5 10 


morn 


434 


737 


rises 


44'5 


724 


rises 


423 


748 


rises 


193 


173 


12 


Wednesday 


6 


12 5 18 


45 


435 


737 


858 


446 


724 


846 


424 


747 


910 


194 


172 


13 


Thursday . . 


* 18 


12 5 25 


134 


435 


736 


927 


447 


724 


918 


424 


746 


936 


195 


171 


14 


Friday 


- 


12 5 35 


222 


436 


736 


953 


4 47 


723 


947 


425 


746 


10 


19(5 


170 


15 


Saturday... 


- 13 


12 5 39 


3 7 


436 


735 


1015 


448 


723 


1011 


426 


745 


1020 


197 


Kill 


16 


SUNDAY.. 


- 26 


12 5 46 


351 


437 


734 


1035 


449 


722 


1033 


427 


744 


1037 


198 


1C.S 


17 


Monday .... 


K 9 


12 5 51 


434 


438 


734 


1057 


450 


721 


1058 


428 


743 


1056 


199 


1G7 


18 


Tuesday 


H 22 


12 5 57 


519 


439 


733 


1119 


451 


721 


1123 


429 


742 


1115 


200 


16(5 


19 


Wednesday 


T 6 


.12 6 1 


6 5 


439 


733 


1145 


451 


720 


1152 


430 


742 


1139 


201 


105 


20 


Thursday.. 


T 20 


12 6 6 


655 


440 


732 


morn 


452 


720 


morn 


431 


741 


morn 


202 


1(54 


21 


Friday 


4 


12 6 9 


749 


441 


731 


16 


453 


719 


25 


432 


740 


6 


203 


K;:; 


22 


Saturday... 


W 19 


12 6 12 


849 


442 


730 


56 


454 


719 


1 8 


433 


739 


43 


204 


162 


215 


SUNDAY.. 


K 4 


12 6 15 


954 


443 


729 


146 


454 


718 


159 


434 


738 


131 


205 


161 


24 


Monday.... 


K 19 


12 6 17 


11 1 


444 


728 


253 


455 


717 


3 7 


435 


787 


238 


200 


1(50 


25 


Tuesday 


4 


12 6 18 


ev. 6 


445 


727 


sets 


456 


716 


sets 


436 


736 


sets 


207 


15<) 


26 


Wednesday 


19 


12 6 19 


1 6 


446 


726 


838 


457 


715 


829 


437 


735 


847 


208 


158 


27 


Thursday . . 


fl 3 


12 6 20 


2 1 


447 


725 


9 9 


458 


714 


9 3 


438 


734 


915 


209 


157 


28 


Friday 


a 17 


12 6 20 


251 


448 


724 


934 


459 


713 


930 


439 


733 


937 


210 


15(5 


29 


Saturday .. 


HP 1 


12 6 18 


338 


449 


723 


957 


459 


712 


957 


440 


732 


958 


211 


155 


30 


SUNDAY.. 


TIP 14 


12 6 17 


421 


450 


722 


1017 


5 


712 


1019 


441 


731 


1015 


212 


154 


31 


Monday 


Irpp 27 


12 6 15 


5 4 


451 


721 


1038 


5 1 


711 


1042 


442 


730 


1038 



"$ First Qnar., 1st. 
Full Moon, 9th. 



8th MONTH. AUGUST, 1911. 31 DAYS. 



Last Qnar., 17th. 
i New Moon, 23d. 
First Quar., 31st. 



pj 


a 


B 
f-i 











Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis, S. 111., 


St. Paul, N. B. 


4] 


3 


fe 




"1 






Neb., N.Y., Pa., 


Va., Ky., Mo.. 


Wis. and Mich.. 


W 


W 


O 




J 




MOON 


S. Wis., S. Mich., 


Kas., Col., Cal., 


N. E. New York. 


X 


H 


S 


DAY 


cu 


SUN AT 


IN 


N. 111., Ind.. O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 




fc 




OP 


00 


NOON 


ME- 








O 





O 


WEEK. 


<z, 


MARK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


>< 


00 


^ 




O 




IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


4 


4 


j 




O 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


G 


Q 


o 




S 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Oon.D. 


H. M. 8. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


B. M. 


B. M. 


B. M. 


B. M. 


B. M. 


B. M. 


213 


153 


1 


Tuesday ... 


= 9 


12 6 12 


548 


452 


719 


11 


5 2 


710 


11 7 


443 


729 


1053 


214 


i 52 


2 


Wednesday 


= 21 


12 6 8 


632 


453 


718 


1125 


5 2 


7 9 


1134 


444 


727 


1115 


215 


151 


3 


Thursday . . 


m 3 


12 6 4 


718 


454 


717 


1154 


5 3 


7 8 


morn 


445 


725 


1142 


216 


150 


4 


Friday 


m 15 


12 6 


8 6 


454 


716 


morn 


5 4 


7 7 


6 


446 


724 


morn 


217 


149 


5 


Saturday... 


m 26 


12 5 54 


857 


455 


715 


29 


5 5 


7 6 


42 


447 


722 


15 


218 


148 


(i 


SUNDAY.. 


if 8 


12 5 48 


948 


456 


714 


115 


5 6 


7 5 


129 


449 


720 


1 


219 


147 


7 


Monday 


* 20 


12 5 42 


1040 


457 


713 


2 6 


5 7 


7 4 


220 


450 


719 


151 


220 


146 


8 


Tuesday.... 


* 3 


12 5 35 


1130 


159 


712 


3 5 


5 7 


7 3 


318 


451 


718 


251 


22 1 


145 


9 


Wednesday 


* 15 


12 5 27 


morn 


5 


710 


rises 


5 8 


7 2 


rises 


453 


717 


rises 


222 


144 


10 


Thursday... 


* 27 


12 5 19 


18 


5 1 


7 9 


757 


5 9 


7 1 


749 


454 


715 


8 4 


223 


143 


11 


Friday 


- 10 


12 5 10 


1 5 


5 2 


7 7 


321 


510 


7 


816 


4 55 


714 


826 


224 


142 


12 


Saturday.: 


- 23 


12 5 1 


1 50 


5 3 


7 6 


842 


511 


659 


839 


456 


713 


844 


225 


141 


13 


SUNDAY.. 


H 6 


12 4 51 


234 


5 4 


7 5 


9 2 


512 


657 


9 2 


458 


712 


9 2 


j"i; 


140 


14 


Monday 


H 19 


12 4 40 


318 


5 5 


7 4 


923 


513 


655 


926 


459 


710 


920 


227 


139 


15 


Tuesday.... 


T 3 


12 4 29 


4 3 


5 6 


7 3 


951 


514 


654 


956 


5 


7 9 


945 


228 


138 


16 


Wednesday 


T 16 


12 4 17 


451 


5 7 


7 2 


1015 


515 


653 


1024 


5 2 


7 8 


10 6 


229 


137 


17 


Thursday . . 


V w 


12 4 5 


542 


5 8 


7 1 


1051 


516 


651 


11 2 


5 3 


7 6 


1039 


230 


136 


18 


Friday 


V 15 


12 3 53 


639 


5 9 


659 


1136 


516 


650 


1149 


5 4 


7 4 


1122 


231 


13.-) 


19 


Saturday... 


V 29 


12 3 40 


740 


510 


657 


morn 


517 


649 


morn 


5 5 


7 2 


morn 


232 


134 


20 


SUNDAY.. 


K 14 


12 3 26 


844 


511 


655 


33 


518 


648 


47 


5 6 


7 1 


18 


233 


133 


21 


Monday 


K 28 


12 3 12 


948 


5 12 


653 


142 


519 


646 


1 55 


5 7 


7 


127 


234 


132 


2 a 


Tuesday 


13 


12 2 58 


1050 


513 


651 


259 


520 


644 


3 10 


5 8 


658 


247 


235 


131 


23 


Wednesday 


27 


12 2 43 


1147 


514 


650 


4 7 


521 


643 


416 


5 9 


656 


358 


236 


130 


24 


Thursday . . 


a 12 


12 2 27 


ev. 39 


515 


649 


sets 


522 


642 


sets 


510 


654 


sets 


237 


129 


25 


Friday 


f> 25 


12 2 12 


127 


5 16 


647 


757 


523 


640 


755 


611 


652 


759 


238 


128 


20 


Saturday... 


HP 9 


12 1 55 


213 


517 


645 


818 


524 


639 


819 


512 


650 


817 


239 


127 


27 


SUNDAY.. 


HP 22 


12 1 39 


257 


518 


644 


840 


525 


637 


844 


514 


648 


837 


240 


126 


28 


Monday 


e 5 


12 1 22 


341 


520 


643 


9 1 


526 


636 


9 7 


5 l(i 


646 


855 


241 


!_'.') 


V9 


Tuesday 


" 17 


12 1 4 


425 


521 


641 


924 


527 


635 


933 


5 17 


645 


915 


242 


124 


30 


Wednesday 


* 29 


12 47 


511 


522 


639 


952 


5 28 


634 


10 3 


518 


643 


941 


243 


123 


31 


Thursday . 


m 11 


12 28 


559 


523 


637 


1025 


5 '.'S 


633 


1038 


1 5 19 


641 


1012 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



19 



Full Moon, 8th. gth MONTH QFPTF MRFP 1 011 in nAV New Moon, 22d. 
. yth ONTH - Ol^r 1 I^lUDE,!*, IV 11. 30 DAYS ^ First Quar., 30th. 



Last Quar., 15th. 



pj 


a 


B 
H 




B 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis, S. 111., 


St. Paul, N. E. 


< 


j 


fc 




< 






Neb., N.Y., Pa.. 


Va.. K.Y., Mo., 


Wls. and Mich., 


w 

tX 

fu 


B 

2 


O 

S 

6) 


DAT 

OF 


, 

00 


SUN AT 

NOON 


MOON 

IN 

ME- 


S. Wis., S. Mich., 
N. 111.. Ind.. O. 


Kas., Col., Cal., 
Ind., Ohio. 


N. E. New York. 
Minn., Ore. 


o 




O 


WEEK. 


a 


MARK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


)M 


R 


!* 









IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


! 


i 







o 

M 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


Q 


Q 


Q 




S 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D. 


H. M. S. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


244 


122 


1 


Friday 


m 23 


12 010 


649 


524 


636 


11 7 


529 


632 


1121 


520 


639 


1052 


245 


12] 


2 


Saturday... 


? 5 


11 59 51 


741 


525 


634 


1157 


529 


630 


morn 


521 


638 


1142 


246 


120 


3 


SUNDAY . . 


r 17 


11 59 32 


832 


526 


632 


morn 


530 


629 


11 


523 


636 


ruorn 


247 


119 


4 


Monday 


f 29 


11 59 13 


923 


527 


630 


53 


531 


627 


1 7 


524 


634 


39 


248 


118 


5 


Tuesday 


* 11 


11 58 53 


1012 


528 


629 


157 


532 


625 


2 9 


525 


632 


144 


241) 


117 


6 


Wednesday 


23 


11 58 33 


11 


529 


627 


3 1 


533 


623 


321 


526 


630 


251 


250 


116 


7 


Thursday .. 


- 6 


11 58 13 


1146 


530 


625 


411 


534 


622 


417 


528 


628 


4 3 


251 


115 


8 


Friday 


- 19 


11 57 53 


morn 


531 


624 


rises 


535 


621 


rises 


529 


626 


rises 


252 


114 


9 


Saturday . . 


H 2 


11 57 32 


30 


532 


622 


7 7 


536 


619 


7 6 


530 


6 24 


7 7 


253 


113 


10 


SUNDAY.. 


X 16 


11 57 11 


115 


533 


620 


728 


537 


617 


730 


531 


622 


726 


254 


112 


11 


Monday 


K 30 


11 56 50 


2 


534 


618 


752 


537 


615 


757 


532 


620 


747 


255 


111 


12 


Tuesday.... 


T 13 


11 56 30 


248 


535 


616 


818 


538 


614 


826 


533 


618 


810 


250 


110 


13 


Wednesday 


T 27 


11 56 8 


339 


536 


615 


850 


539 


613 


9 


534 


617 


839 


257 


109 


14 


Thursday... 


V 11 


11 55 47 


434 


537 


613 


932 


540 


612 


945 


535 


615 


918 


2f)8 


108 


15 


Friday 


tf 25 


11 55 26 


533 


538 


611 


1024 


541 


610 


1038 


536 


613 


10 9 


259 


107 


10 


Saturday .. 


K 10 


11 55 5 


635 


539 


6 9 


1129 


542 


6 8 


1143 


537 


611 


1114 


260 


106 


17 


SUNDAY... 


H 24 


11 54 44 


738 


541 


6 7 


morn 


543 


6 6 


morn 


539 


69 


morn 


261 


105 


18 


Monday 


8 


11 54 23 


839 


542 


6 6 


40 


544 


6 4 


52 


541 


6 7 


27 


262 


104 


19 


Tuesday 


22 


11 54 1 


93t3 


543 


6 4 


155 


545 


6 3 


2 5 


542 


6 5 


144 


2(33 


103 


20 


Wednesday 


Ci 6 


11 53 40 


1029 


544 


6 2 


312 


546 


6 1 


319 


543 


6 8 


3 4 


264 


102 


21 


Thursday... 


20 


11 53 19 


11 18 


545 


6 


426 


547 


6 


430 


544 


6 1 


421 


265 


101 


22 


Friday 


HP 4 


11 52 58 


ev. 4 


546 


559 


sets 


547 


559 


sets 


546 


6 


seta 


260 


100 


23 


Saturday . . 


HP 17 


11 52 37 


49 


547 




641 


548 




644 


547 


558 


639 


267 


99 


24 


SUNDAY.. 


TIP 30 


11 52 16 


133 


548 


5 56 


7 2 


549 


555 


7 7 


548 


556 


657 


268 


98 


25 


Monday 


= 12 


11 51 56 


218 


549 


554 


725 


550 


553 


733 


549 


554 


717 


969 


97 


26 


Tuesday 


* 25 


11 51 35 


3 3 


550 


552 


751 


551 




8 1 


550 


552 


740 


270 


96 


27 


Wednesday 


m 7 


11 51 15 


351 


551 


550 


822 


552 


5 50 


834 


552 


5 50 


8 10 


271 


95 


28 


Thursday . . 


m 19 


11 50 55 


441 


552 


549 


9 1 


553 


549 


914 


553 


548 


8 46 


272 


94 


29 


Friday 


* i 


11 50 35 


532 


553 


547 


946 


554 


547 


10 


554 


546 


931 


273 


93 


30 


Saturday... 


* 13 


11 50 15 


623 


554 


545 


1041 


555 


545 


1055 


555 


544 


1026 



Full Moon, 7th. 
Last Quar., 14th. 



10th MONTH. OCTOBER, 1911. 31 DAYS. fSSJtSSS'.ffi 



fji 


pi 


B 

M 




B 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis, S. 111., 


St. Paul, N. B. 


9 


2 


fc 




3 






Neb.. N.Y.. Pa.. 


Va.. Ky., Mo.. 


Wis. and Mich.. 


s 


w 


O 




j 




MOON 


S. Wls., S. Mich., 


Kas., Col.. Cal., 


N. E. New York. 


t- 


^ 


E 


DAY 


Bj 


SUN AT 


IN 


N. 111., Ind.. O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 






fc 


OP 


x 


NOON 


ME- 












o 


WEEK. 


fc 


MARE. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


i* 





(H 









IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


4 


4 


! 




O 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


jL 


S 


__ 




S 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D. 


H. M. 8. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


274 


92 


1 


SUNDAY . . 


* 25 


11 49 55 


714 


556 


544 


1140 


556 


543 


1153 


557 


542 


11 27 


275 


91 


2 


Monday.... 


* 7 


11 49 36 


8 4 


557 


542 


morn 


556 


542 


morn 


558 


540 


morn 


276 


90 


3 


Tuesday . . . 


* 19 


11 49 17 


852 


558 


540 


45 


557 


541 


56 


559 


539 


34 


377 


89 


4 


Wednesday 


- 2 


11 48 58 


938 


559 


538 


152 


558 


540 


2 1 


6 


538 


144 


278 




5 


Thursday... 


- 15 


11 48 40 


1023 


6 


537 


3 1 


559 


538 


3 6 


3 1 


536 


255 


279 


87 


6 


Friday 


- 28 


11 48 22 


11 8 


6 1 


535 


4 9 


6 


536 


412 


6 2 


534 


4 6 


280 


86 


7 


Saturday... 


H 11 


11 48 4 


1154 


6 2 


533 


518 


6 1 


534 


518 


6 4 


532 


518 


281 


85 


8 


SUNDAY.. 


H 25 


11 47 47 


morn 


6 3 


532 


rises 


6 2 


533 


rises 


6 5 


530 


rises 


282 


84 


9 


Monday.... 


T 9 


11 47 30 


42 


6 4 


530 


620 


6 3 


531 


627 


6 6 


528 


6 13 


283 


83 


10 


Tuesday.. . 


T 23 


11 47 14 


133 


6 5 


528 


651 


6 4 


529 


7 1 


6 7 


526 


641 


284 


82 


11 


Wednesday 


8 


11 46 58 


228 


6 7 


526 


731 


6 5 


528 


743 


6 8 


524 


718 


285 


81 


12 


Thursday... 


W 22 


11 46 43 


327 


8 


525 


820 


6 6 


527 


834 


6 10 


522 


8 5 




80 


13 


Friday 


H 6 


11 46 28 


429 


6 9 


523 


920 


6 7 


526 


935 


612 


520 


9 5 


287 


79 


14 


Saturday... 


K 21 


11 46 13 


632 


610 


521 


1029 


6 8 


524 


1042 


613 


519 


1015 


288 


78 


15 


SUNDAY.. 


5 


11 45 59 


633 


611 


519 


1143 


6 9 


523 


1154 


614 


517 


1132 


289 


77 


16 


Monday.... 


19 


11 45 46 


731 


612 


518 


morn 


610 


522 


inorn 


610 


516 


morn 


290 


76 


17 


Tuesday.... 


2 


11 45 33 


824 


613 


517 


58 


611 


520 


1 7 


6 17 


514 


50 


291 


75 


18 


Wednesday 


16 


11 45 21 


913 


614 


516 


211 


612 


519 


217 


618 


512 


2 6 


292 


74 


19 


Thursday.. 


29 


11 45 10 


959 


615 


515 


319 


613 


518 


322 


619 


510 


316 


293 


73 


20 


Friday 


TIP 13 


11 44 59 


1043 


616 


5 13 


430 


614 


517 


430 


621 


5 8 


430 


294 


72 


21 


Saturday . . 


HP 25 


11 44 49 


1127 


618 


5 11 


536 


615 


516 


534 


622 


5 7 


538 


295 


71 


22 


SUNDAY.. 


~ 8 


11 44 39 


ev.ll 


619 


5 9 


sets 


616 


514 


sets 


624 


5 5 


sets 


296 


70 


23 


Monday 


=> 21 


11 44 30 


56 


621 


5 7 


553 


616 


513 


6 2 


625 


5 3 


544 


297 


G9 


24 


Tuesday 


m 3 


11 44 22 


144 


622 


5 6 


622 


6 17 


511 


633 


627 


5 2 


610 


298 


08 


25 


Wednesday 


m 15 


11 44 14 


232 


624 


5 4 


655 


618 


510 


7 8 


628 


5 1 


641 


299 


07 


26 


Thursday .. 


m 27 


11 44 8 


323 


25 


5 2 


739 


619 


5 8 


753 


630 


459 


724 


300 


06 


27 


Friday 


> 9 


11 44 1 


414 


626 


5 1 


828 


620 


5 7 


843 


631 


457 


812 


301 


65 


28 


Saturday... 


if 20 


11 43 56 


5 5 


627 


5 


926 


621 


5 6 


940 


6 32 


455 


912 


302 


04 


29 


SUNDAY... 


* 2 


11 43 51 


555 


628 


459 


1029 


622 


5 5 


1041 


633 


454 


1017 


303 


03 


30 


Monday 


* 14 


11 43 47 


643 


629 


458 


1135 


023 


5 4 


1145 


634 


453 


1125 


304 


62 


31 


Tuesday 


* 27 


11 43 41 


729 


630 


457 


morn 


624 


5 3 


morn 


636 


451 


morn 



M 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC JND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Full Moon, 6th. 11*1, MONTH 
Last Quar. ,13th. llth W< rH> 



1O11 in nAV<: New Moon, 20th 
, J.yi.1. 30 DAYS. $ First Quar. 28th 





a 


a 

H 




i 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis, S. 111., 


St. Paul, N, K. 


< 


^ 


i 




8 






Neb., N.Y., Pa., 


Va., Ky., Mo., 


Wis. and MiCh., 


w 


w 

Ex 


o 




j 




MOON 


S. Wis., S. Mich., 


Kas., Col., Cal., 


N. E. New Yortt, 




r" 

z 


fc 


DAY 

OP 


m 

00 


Stm AT 
NOON 


IN 
ME- 


N. 111., Ind.. O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn.i Ore. 




m 


o 


WEEK. 


fe 


MARK, 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


bM 


5 


^, 




i 




IAN 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Snn 


Snn 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


5 


^ 


< 




o 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 




a 


O 




S 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D. 


H. H. 6. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. H. 


H. H. 


H. H. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


305 


61 


1 


Wednesday 


- 9 


1143 42 


814 


631 


455 


041 


626 


5 1 


048 


638 


449 


034 


306 


60 


2 


Thursday . . 


- 22 


11 43 40 


858 


633 


454 


148 


627 


5 


153 


639 


448 


144 


307 


59 


3 


Friday 


X 6 


11 43 39 


943 


634 


453 


256 


628 


459 


257 


640 


447 


254 


308 


58 


4 


Saturday. . . 


X 19 


11 43 39 


1030 


635 


452 


4 5 


629 


458 


4 4 


641 


445 


4 6 


309 


57 


5 


SUNDAY . . 


T 4 


11 43 40 


1120 


636 


450 


515 


630 


457 


512 


642 


443 


518 


310 


56 


6 


Monday 


T 18 


11 43 42 


morn 


637 


449 


rises 


631 


456 


rises 


644 


442 


rises 


311 


55 


7 


Tuesday 


V 3 


11 43 44 


14 


638 


448 


626 


632 


455 


537 


645 


441 


514 


312 


54 


8 


Wednesday 


V 18 


11 4347 


114 


639 


447 


612 


633 


454 


626 


646 


440 


558 


313 


53 


9 


Thursday... 


H 2 


11 43 51 


217 


640 


446 


711 


634 


453 


727 


647 


439 


6 56 


314 


52 


10 


Friday 


tt 17 


11 43 66 


323 


641 


445 


818 


635 


453 


832 


648 


438 


8 4 


315 


51 


11 


Saturday .. 


8 1 


11 44 2 


426 


643 


444 


933 


637 


452 


945 


650 


436 


921 


316 


50 


12 


SUNDAY.. 


8 16 


11 44 9 


526 


644 


443 


1048 


638 


451 


1057 


652 


435 


1039 


317 


49 


13 


Monday.... 


8 29 


11 44 17 


621 


645 


442 


morn 


639 


450 


morn 


653 


434 


11 55 


318 


48 


14 


Tuesday.... 


13 


11 4425 


711 


646 


441 


2 


640 


450 


8 


655 


433 


morn 


319 


47 


15 


Wednesday 


26 


11 44 34 


757 


648 


440 


113 


641 


449 


116 


656 


432 


1 9 


320 


46 


16 


Thursday . . 


TIP 9 


11 44 44 


841 


649 


439 


219 


642 


449 


220 


658 


431 


218 


321 


45 


17 


Friday 


TIP 22 


11 4456 


924 


651 


438 


326 


643 


448 


325 


659 


430 


328 


322 


44 


18 


Saturday .. 


*= 4 


11 45 7 


10 7 


652 


438 


432 


644 


447 


427 


7 


430 


436 


323 


43 


19 


SUN DAY . . 


= 17 


11 45 20 


1051 


654 


437 


539 


645 


447 


632 


7 2 


429 


546 


324 


42 


20 


Monday 


= 29 


11 45 34 


1137 


655 


437 


644 


646 


446 


635 


7 3 


428 


654 


325 


41 


21 


Tuesday 


m 11 


11 4548 


ev.26 


656 


436 


sets 


647 


445 


sets 


7 6 


427 


sets 


326 


40 


22 


Wednesday 


m 23 


11 46 3 


116 


657 


435 


534 


648 


445 


548 


7 6 


426 


5 19 


327 


39 


23 


Thursday.. 


if 5 


11 46 19 


2 7 


658 


434 


621 


649 


444 


636 


7 7 


426 


6 6 


328 


38 


24 


Friday 


if 17 


11 46 36 


259 


659 


433 


717 


650 


444 


729 


7 9 


425 


7 2 


329 


37 


25 


Saturday. . . 


if 29 


11 46 53 


349 


7 


433 


817 


651 


443 


830 


710 


424 


8 4 


330 


36 


26 


SUNDAY.. 


* 11 


11 47 12 


437 


7 1 


432 


921 


652 


443 


932 


7U 


423 


911 


331 


35 


27 


Monday 


* 23 


11 47 31 


523 


7 3 


431 


1024 


653 


442 


1032 


712 


422 


1016 


332 


34 


28 


Tuesday ... 


- 5 


11 47 60 


6 7 


7 4 


431 


1133 


654 


442 


1138 


713 


422 


1127 


833 


33 


29 


Wednesday 


17 


11 48 11 


650 


7 5 


431 


morn 


655 


442 


morn 


714 


421 


morn 


334 


32 


30 


Thursday . 


X 


11 48 32 


733 


7 6 


431 


37 


656 


442 


40 


715 


421 


34 



f5S:,&h. 12* MONTH. DECEMBER, 1911. 31 DAYS. 





a 


I 




H 
u 






Chicago, Iowa, 


St. Louis, S. 111.. 


St. Paul, N. E. 



-- 


< 


K 




4 






Neb., N.Y., Pa., 


Va.. Ky., Mo., 


Wis. and Mich., 


H 


S 







f 




MOON 


S. Wis.. S. Mich., 


Kas., Col., Cal., 


N. E. New York. 


> 


^* 


S 


DAT 


M 


SUN AT 


IN 


N. 111., Ind.. O. 


Ind., Ohio. 


Minn., Ore. 


fc. 


y. 


fc 


OF 


to 


NOON 


ME- 











H 





WEEK. 


S5 


MAKK. 


KID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


** 


;* 


^M 




O 




1A.N. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


seta 


4 


< 


< 




O 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


0_ 


3 


_a_ 




m 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D. 


H. H. S. 


H. H. 


H. H. 


H. H. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


335 


31 


i 


Friday 


X 14 


11 48 54 


818 


7 7 


431 


144 


657 


441 


144 


716 


421 


144 


33(3 


30 


2 


Saturday. . . 


X 27 


11 49 16 


9 5 


7 8 


430 


253 


658 


441 


251 


717 


420 


255 


337 


29 


3 


SUNDAY.. 


T 11 


11 49 39 


957 


7 9 


430 


4 5 


659 


441 


4 


718 


420 


4 10 


338 


28 


4 


Monday.... 


T 26 


11 50 3 


1054 


710 


430 


622 


7 


441 


514 


719 


419 


631 


339 


27 


5 


Tuesday 


W 11 


11 50 27 


1156 


711 


429 


641 


7 1 


441 


631 


720 


419 


653 


340 


26 


6 


Wednesday 


W 26 


11 50 52 


morn 


712 


429 


rises 


7 2 


441 


rises 


722 


419 


rises 


341 


25 


7 


Thursday .. 


K 11 


11 51 17 


1 3 


713 


429 


6 


7 3 


441 


614 


723 


419 


545 


342 


24 


8 


Friday 


H 26 


11 51 43 


211 


714 


429 


716 


7 4 


441 


728 


724 


419 


7 3 


343 


23 


9 


Saturday .. 


8 11 


11 52 9 


315 


715 


429 


834 


7 5 


441 


844 


725 


419 


824 


344 


22 


10 


SUNDAY.. 


26 


11 52 36 


414 


716 


429 


950 


7 6 


441 


957 


726 


419 


942 


345 


21 


11 


Monday .... 


10 


11 53 3 


6 7 


717 


429 


11 3 


7 6 


441 


11 7 


727 


419 


1058 


346 


20 


12 


Tuesday 


O 23 


11 53 31 


555 


718 


429 


morn 


7 7 


441 


morn 


728 


419 


morn 


347 


19 


13 


Wednesday 


TIP 6 


11 53 59 


640 


719 


429 


11 


7 8 


442 


13 


729 


419 


10 


348 


18 


14 


Thursday... 


TP 19 


11 54 27 


723 


720 


429 


117 


7 9 


442 


116 


730 


420 


118 


349 


17 


15 


Friday 




11 54 56 


8 6 


721 


430 


224 


7 9 


442 


221 


731 


420 


227 


350 


16 


16 


Saturday .. 


e 14 


11 55 25 


850 


721 


430 


330 


710 


443 


324 


732 


420 


336 


351 


15 


17 


SUNDAY.. 


= 26 


11 55 54 


935 


721 


430 


436 


710 


443 


427 


732 


420 


445 


352 


14 


18 


Monday 


m 8 


11 56 24 


1022 


722 


431 


541 


711 


443 


630 


733 


421 


652 


353 


13 


19 


Tuesday.... 


m 20 


11 56 54 


1111 


723 


431 


645 


712 


444 


632 


734 


421 


658 


354 


12 


20 


Wednseday 


> 2 


11 57 23 


ev. 2 


723 


432 


744 


712 


444 


730 


734 


421 


759 


355 


11 


21 


Thursday... 


if 14 


11 57 53 


53 


724 


432 


sets 


713 


444 


sets 


735 


422 


sets 


356 


10 


22 


Friday 


* c 


11 58 23 


144 


724 


433 


6 9 


713 


445 


622 


735 


422 


555 


357 


9 


23 


Saturday . 


* 7 


11 58 54 


233 


725 


434 


713 


714 


445 


724 


736 


423 


7 1 


358 


8 


24 


SUNDAY.. 


* 19 


11 59 24 


319 


725 


434 


818 


714 


446 


826 


736 


424 


8 9 


359 


7 


25 


Monday 


- 1 


11 59 54 


4 3 


725 


435 


921 


714 


446 


927 


737 


425 


915 


360 


6 


26 


Tuesday 


14 


12 24 


446 


726 


435 


1025 


715 


447 


1029 


737 


426 


1021 


361 


5 


27 


Wednesday 


- 26 


12 53 


528 


726 


436 


1130 


715 


448 


1131 


737 


426 


1129 


862 


4 


28 


Thursday . . 


X 9 


12 1 23 


610 


726 


437 


morn 


715 


449 


morn 


738 


427 


morn 


363 


3 


29 


Friday 


X 22 


12 1 52 


654 


727 


438 


34 


716 


450 


33 


738 


428 


35 


364 


2 


30 


Saturday... 


T 6 


12 2 22 


742 


727 


438 


143 


716 


451 


139 


739 


429 


147 


365 


1 


31 


SUNDAY.. 


T 19 


12 2 51 


834 


728 


439 


256 


716 


451 


249 


739 


429 


3 3 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



21 



A READY-REFERENCE CALENDAR. 

For ascertaining any day of the week for any given time within two hundred years from the Introduction of 

the New Style, 1752 to 1962 inclusive. 



YEARS 1753 TO 1952. 


S 

1-3 


a 


| 


c. 


1 


0> 

a 
s 

"-a 


> 
"a 
-: 


ti 

s 


& 

'S; 







| 


| 


1761 
1801 


1767 
1807 


1778 
1818 


1789 
1829 


1795 
1835 


1846 


1857 
1903 


1863 
1914 


1874 
1925 


1885 
1931 


1891 
1942 


4 


7 


7 


3 


5 


1 


3 


G 


2 


4 


7 


2 


1762 
1802 


1773 
1813 


1779 
1819 


1790 
1530 


1841 


1847 


1858 
1909 


1869 
1915 


1875 
1926 


1886 
1937 


1897 
1943 


5 


1 


1 


4 





2 


4 


7 


3 


5 


1 


3 


1757 
1803 


1763 
1814 


1774 
1825 


1785 
1831 


1791 
1842 


1853 


1859 
1910 


1870 
1921 


1881 
1927 


1887 
1938 


1898 
1949 


6 


2 


2 


5 


7 


3 


5 


1 


4 


6 


2 


4 


1754 
1805 


1765 
1811 


1771 
1822 


1782 
1833 


1793 
1839 


1799 
1850 
1901 


1861 
1907 


1867 
1918 


1878 
1929 


1889 
1935 


1895* 
1946 


2 


5 


5 


1 


3 


6 


1 


4 


7 


2 


5 


7 


1755 
1806 


1766 
1817 


1777 
1823 


1783 
1834 


1794 
1845 


1800 
1851 
1902 


1862 
1913 


1873 
1919 


1879 
1930 


1890 
1941 


1947 


3 





(3 


2 


4 


7 


2 


5 


1 


3 


6 


1 


1758 
1809 


1769 
1815 


1775 
1826 


1786 
1837 


1797 
1843 


1854 
1905 


1865 
1911 


1871 
1922 


1882 
1933 


1893 
1939 


1899 
1950 


7 


3 


3 


3 


1 


4 


G 


2 


5 


7 


3 


5 


1753 
1810 


1759 
1821 


1770 
1827 


1781 
1838 


1787 
1849 


1798 
1855 


1866 
1906 


1877 
1917 


1883 
1923 


1894 
1934 


1900 
1945 
1951 


1 


4 


4 


7 


2 


5 


7 


3 


G 


1 


4 


G 


LEAP YEARS. 




29 










































1764 


I 1792 1804 


1832 


1860 1888 1928 


| 713 |4|7 1 2| 5 1713 |6 1 1 |4|6 


1768 


I 1796 1808 


183 


1864 1892 1904 1932 |5|1|2|5|7|3|5|1|4|6|2|4 


1772 
1776 


1 
1 


. . . 1812 
.... 1816 


1840 1868 1896 1908 1936 |3|6|7|3I5|1|3|6I2|4|7|2 
1844 1872 1912" 1940 |1|4|5|1|3|6|1I4|7|2|5|7 


1780 
1756 


l 1820 

1 1784 1824 


1848 1876 1916 1944 |6|2I3|6|1|4|6|2|5|7|3|5 
1852 1880 1920 1948 |4|7|1|4|6|2|4|7|3|5|1|3 


1760 


1 1788 1828 


1856 1884 1924 1952 


2I5|6|2|4|7|2|5|1|3|6|1 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


- 7 


Mond 

Tnesc 
WedD 
Thun 
Frida 
Satur 
SUNI 
Mond 
Tuesc 
Wedt 
Thun 
Frida 
Satur 
SUNI 
Mond 
Tuesc 
Wedr 
Thurf 
Frida 
Satur 
SUNI 
Mond 
Tuesc 
Wedc 
Thun 
Frida 
Satur 
SUNI 
Mond 
Tuest 
Wedr 


ay .... 
lay..... 
esday. 
iday... 

day.... 
)AY... 

ay 

ay 
esday. 
iday. . . 

day.... 
)AY... 

ay 

ay 
esday. 
iday. . 

Jay".'.;! 
>AY... 
ay 
lay .... 
esday. 
day... 

y 


1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
ti 
7 
8 
9 

11 
2 
3 
14 
5 
ti 
7 
8 
19 
JO 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
) 
U 


Tuesday 1 
Wednesday. 2 
Thursday... 3 
Friday 4 
Saturday... 5 
SUNDAY... 6 
Monday.... 7 
Tuesday.... 8 
Wednesday. 9 
Thursday... 10 
Friday ll 
Saturday . . .12 
SUNDAY.... 13 
Monday 14 
Tuesday 15 
Wednesday.16 
Thursday... 17 
Friday 18 
Saturday.... 19 
SUNDAY ...20 
Monday 21 
Tuesday 22 
Wednesday.23 
Thursday. . .24 
Friday 25 
Saturday 26 
SUNDAY... 27 
Monday 28 
Tuesday ....29 
Wednesday .30 
Thursday... 31 


V 

T 
F 

S 
S 
IV 
1 
V 
T 
F 
S 
S 
M 
T 
V 
T 
F 
S 
S 

1 
1 
T 

T 
t 

8 
S 
X 
T 
V 
T 
I 


Wednesday. 1 
liursday ... 2 
riday 3 
aturday.... 4 
UNDAY... 6 
onday 6 
uesday .... 7 
Wednesday. 8 
hursday... 9 
rlday 10 
aturday.. ..11 
UN DAY... 12 
onday 13 
uesday 14 
Wednesday .15 
hursday ...16 
riday 17 
aturday.... 18 
DNDAY...19 
[onday 20 
uesday 21 
Wednesday .22 
hursday ...23 
rlday .24 


Thursday... 1 
Friday 2 
Saturday.... 3 
SUNDAY... 4 
Monday G 
Tuesday .... 6 
Wednesday. 7 
Thursday ... 8 
Friday S 
Saturday.... 10 
SUNDAY ...11 
Monday 12 
Tuesday lii 
Wednesday.14 
Thursday ...15 
Friday 16 
Saturday.... 17 
SUNDAY. ..18 
Monday 1 
Tuesday 2C 
Wednesday .21 
Thursday ...22 
Friday 23 
Saturday.... 24 
SUNDAY.... 25 
Monday 2f 
Tuesday 27 
Wednesday .28 
Thursday... 29 
Friday 30 
Saturday.... 31 


Frid 

Satu 
SUN 
Mon 
Tues 
Wed 
Thu 
Frid 
Satu 
SUN 
Mon 
Tuei 
Wed 
Thu 
Frid 
Satu 
SUIs 
Mon 
Tue 
Wed 
Thu 
Frid 
Satu 
SUN 
Mon 
Tue 
Wed 
Thu 
Frid 
Satu 
SUN 


tty 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
10 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
2t> 
27 
28 
21) 
30 
31 


Saturday.... 1 
SUNDAY... 2 
Monday 3 
Tuesday 4 
Wednesday. 5 
Thursday... 6 
Friday 7 
Saturday 8 
SUNDAY... 9 
Monday 10 
Tuesday 11 
Wednesday. 12 
Thursday. ...13 
Friday 14 
Saturday.... 15 
SUNDAY ...16 
Monday 17 
Tuesday.... 18 
Wednesday. 19 
Thursday... 20 
Friday 21 
Saturday.... 22 
SUN DAY ...23 
Monday 24 
Tuesday 25 
Wednesday.2ti 
Thursday ...27 
Friday 28 
Saturday 29 
SUNDAY.. ..30 
Monday 31 


SUNDAY... 1 
Monday 2 
Tuesday 3 
Wednesday. 4 
Thursday... 6 
Friday 6 
Saturday.... 7 
SUNDAY... 8 
Monday 9 
Tuesday 10 
Wednesday.il 
Thursday ...12 
Friday 13 
Saturday.... 14 
SUNDAY ...15 
Monday 16 
Tuesday 17 
Wednesday.18 
Thursday ...19 
Friday 20 
Saturday.... 21 
SUNDAY. ..22 
Monday 23 
Tuesday ....24 
Wednesday .25 
Thursday... 26 
Friday 27 
Saturday ...28 
SUNDAY ...29 
Monday 30 
Tuesday 31 


rday.... 
DAY... 
day 
day.... 

nesday. 
rsday... 

ay 

rday.... 
DAY... 
day 
iday 
nesday. 
rsday... 

ay 

rday.... 
DAY... 
day 
iday 
nesday. 
rsday... 
ay 


rday.... 
DAY... 
day 
sday 
nesday. 
rsday... 
ay 
rday.. . . 
DAY... 


aturday 25 
UNDAY...26 
onday 27 
uesday 28 
fednesday.29 
hursday... 30 
riday 31 


day... 
)AY... 
ay.... 
lay.... 

esday. 


NOTE To ascertain any day of the week first 
took in the table for the year required and under 
tlie months are figures which refer to the corre- 
sponding figures at the head of the columns of 
days below. For example: To know on what 
day of the week July 4 was in the year 1895, in the 
table of years look for 1895, and In a parallel 


line, under July, is figure 1, which directs to 
column 1, in which it will be seen that July 4 
falls on Thursday. 
*1752 same as 1772 from Jan. 1 to Sept. 2. From 
Sept. 14 to Dec. 31 same as 1780 (Sept. 3-13 were 
omitted). This Calendar is from Whitaker's Lon- 
don Almanack, with some revisions. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



THE PLANETS. 



MERCURY (B) will be brightest: 

(a) As an evening star April 1-10 and Dec. 4-10 
setting about In. 15m. after the sun, being at 
greatest angular distance east of the sun April 
14 (19) and Dec. 7 (21). At the April date he 
will be in X directly south of Alpha Arietis and 
the- lire of stars in the horn of the Ram, and 
in December in ? near the end of the handle 
of the milkmaid's dipper. On April 10 b will be 
4 south of 8 and on Sept. 24 B will be 
6 north of 9. 

(b) As a morning star Feb. 1-6 and Sept. 23-30, 
rising about Ih. 15m. before the sun, being at 
greatest angular distance west of the sun Feb. 2 
(25) and Sept. 25 (18). When brightest in Feb- 

* ruary the milkmaid's dipper in ;* will be about 
10 west of him, and In September the Sickle In 
fi will be about 15 degrees west of him. The 
absence oi the moon on the" February and Sep- 
tember periods will render those dates still more 
favorable. 

VENUS (9), the "queen of beauty," and whose 
sign is a looking glass, will be a most attractive 
celestial object nearly all of the year. Twice she 
will be at fcer very brightest first, Aug. 8-12, as 
an evening star, and again after passing between 
the earth and sun (inferior conjunction) as a morn- 
ing star, Oct. 21-25. (See Table of the Planets and 
Chart of Visibility of the Planets.) Venus not 
only attains a greater degree of brilliancy than 
any of the other planets, but at such times, and 
for about 'a month before and after, she will show 
a large crescent phase like the moon between new 
and the quarters. At the October date she will 
shine with unusual splendor, in the absence of the 
moon, and will cast a distinct shadow. While the 
annexed figure shows all the various phases through 
which the planet passes, the telescope shows the 
boundaries away from the sun to be irregular. 
The light will blend off and the margins will be 
more or less jagge'd, owing to the refraction of the 
sunlight in the planet's atmosphere and the irreg- 
ularities of her surface, mountains, etc. The dis- 
covery of theso phases was the work of the first 
telescope in the hands of Galileo, though their 
existence was believed earlier. 



Towards the Sun 

N 




of 



oo 



Venus 




As seen In the morning 
west of sun. 



As seen in the evening 
east of sun. 



Explanation : 
A Fifteen <iays before superior conjunction or 

June 20, 1912. 
B At greatest elongation (angular distance) west 

of the sun, Nov. 26, 1911. 
O When brightest as a morning star, Oct. 21-25, 

1911. 

D Just after inferior conjunction, Sept. 20, 1911. 
15 Fifteen days after superior conjunction, or July 

20. 1912. 
F At greatest eloi-gation east of the sun, July 7, 

19H. 
G When brightest as an evening star, Aug. 8-12, 

1911. 
H Just before inferior conjunction, Sept. 10, 1911. 

In following tho course of the planets the reader 
will do well to use the other aids in this almanac 
"Chart of the Heavens." "Table of the Rising, 
Southing and Setting of the Planets," etc. Locate 
the planets In the zodiac on the chart and then 
follow them in their course past the stars, noting 



when they are in conjunction with the moon, stars 
or other planets. 

ITINERARY OF THE PRINCIPAL PLANETS. 

At the beginning of the year 9 will be found 
5 north oi milkmaid's dipper in * ; Jan. 
11 just south of the brightest star in -6 and on 
the boundary between ? and *; cf 3 Feb. 1, 9 
3 37' north; Feb. 8 in - 10 south of the i on the 
equator of the heavens; Feb. 26 on the prime 
meridian OL the heavens 15 south of the square 
of Pegasus; cr 3 March 2, 9 2 2' north; enters 
K March 26-29; April 1, O 1 3, 9 14' north and 
occ-.ilted; April 15 5 south of the Pleiades; April 
26, 7 north of Aldebaran, the lucida of the 
Hyades; May 1, o- 3, 9 1 29' south; May 7, 
in "astern w and due north of Orion's belt 24; 
May 15 in line northward with the bright stars 
in the feet of the twins (v.) with the brightest 
star of tho heavens (Slrius) due south of her 
about 40". Note that an immense diamond is 
formed by Venus on the north, Sirius on the south, 
Betelguese on the west and Procyou on the east 
a most striking figure in the evening skies west 
of the meridian. May 29-30 between Castor and 
Pollux in K 011 the north and Procvon on the 
south, but nearest the former and 3 north of 
<V: June 12-13 in on northern edge of the group 
or dim stars called Praesepe; June 29 rf 3, 9 
3 40'; July 5-6 less than 1 north of Regulus 
In the end of the handle of the Sickle; brightest 
Ang. 8-12 when about 15 east of Regulus near 
the middle of where she soon becomes station- 
ary with respect to the stars and then begins to 
move back westward, or retrogrades. She may be 
seen in the daytime in July and August by know- 
ing just where to look for her. Becomes invisible 
early in September, being at inferior conjunction 
Sept. 15. When next seen she will appear in the 
east in the morning, west of the sun; <t B, Sept. 
24, being 10" south of a ; stationary again early 
in October in eastern O; occulted by 3 Nov. 16; 
advances past the stars of up, passing about 4 
north of Spica the last of November and through 
the square of = the last of December. 

MARS (<?) will be brightest as an evening star 
Nov. 24-25, being a morning star until Aug. 8 and 
afterward an evening star to the end of the 
year. At the beginning of the year he will be in 
m.low in the east at dawn and! about 5 north of 
Antares; rf 3 Jan. 26; Feb 1. 3 north of the 
milkmaid's dipper in ^; d 3 Feb. 24, rf v 
March 11; March 15 in about 5 south of 
the bright stars in the head of the goat; <f I 
March 25; last of April in - 10 south of the 
A ; o" 3 April 23 and May 22; June 1 on first me- 
ridian of the heavens; a 3 20th. On the 15th of 
July he will be about 10 south of the bright: 
stars in T; Aug. 8 at western a and rf b Aug. 
16; last of August 8" south of Pleiades; last of 
September close to and north of the Hyades. Sta- 
tionary middle of October in V, retrogrades very 
slowly back to the Pleiades *Dec. 1, being at f 
Nov. 26, when he will rise at sunset, pass the 
meridian at midnight and set at sunrise, being 
then and for some time before and after that date 
an all-night star. 

Several new canals were discovered on Mars in 
190S. evidently the works of the Martians within 
the past few years; snow storms were also ob- 
served on Mars by Prof. Lowell of Flagstaff, 
Ariz. 

JUPITER (a) v:ll be at f April 30, when he 
will be brightest and an evening and all-night 
etar. Inasmuch as a requires twelve of our years 
in which to make a revolution about the sun and 
pass all the stir.s of the zodiac his movement 
from time to time will be very slight as 'compare-.! 
to that of the planets whose orbits are interior to 
his. as he traverses only one sign in a year. He is 
still in * and during the first days of February 
he will be very close (1 north) to the brightest 
star in that constellation Alpha Librae, situated 
on the ecliptic and being the southwest star of the 
square of Libra. The last of November he will 
pass out of and east of the square and at the 
close of the year be about 8 east of its 'eastern- 
most star. (See Tables of Occupations, Con June- 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



tions. etc.) Of the seven satellites known to be- 
long to Jupiter or.ly four can be easily seen by 
the aid of small glasses. Those satellites do not 
undergo the same changes in brilliancy that our 
moon does owing to the fact that a is a semi- 
sun and his moons are supplied in part by him- 
self, while our moon borrows her entire supply 
of light from the sun. (See the following tables.) 

SATURN (b), will be brightest Nov. 9 as an 
evening and all-night star, and will be very bright 
for a considerable time before and after that 
time. Inasmuch as two and one-half years are 
required foi- him to pass through one sign or con- 
stellation it is evident we can scarcely detect any 
charge In position with respect to the stars from 
month to month. He is in T. Of his large fam- 
ily of satellites ten in all only one (Titan), is 
ordinarily visible with a three-inch telescope, but 
the wonderful ring system is always visible in 
such an instrument except when the earth is 
crossing their plane, every fifteen years. Eash 
year, however, the earth attains a maximum ele- 
vation above thei? plane and at such times the 
ring system is best observed. This occurs in 
August, about the time of the western quadrature 
of b . From August on he will be only a few de- 
grees west of the Pleiades and Hyades, 

URANUS (8) will be brightest July 20 and will 
not be near any bright or conspicuous star. Per- 
haps the best time for an amateur to locate this 
planet will be at its close conjunction with <? 
March 11, when 6 will be seen for several 'days 
only one-third of a degree (or about one-half the 
moon's apparent dit meter) north of d 1 . To see this 
planet with the unaided eye is a test of good eye- 
sight. 



NEPTUNE (<r)i the outermost known of our 
planetary family, will be brightest Jan. 11, in H, 
a few degrees south of Castor and Pollux. It Is 
stated that a good opera or Held glass will show 
V at the time of <? or when brightest, provided 
one knows just where to look. Look for it on a 
line from Castor to Proeyon and nearly midway 
between those stars with a fine cluster of dim 
stars just to the west. 

MORNING STARS WEST OF SUN. 
MERCURY See "Planets Brightest." 
VENUS, until S>;pt. 14. 
MARS, until Aug. 8. 

JUPITER, until Feb. 3 and after Nov. 18. 
SATURN, from May 1 to Aug. 13. 

EVENING STARS EAST OF SUN. 
MERCURY See "Planets Brightest." 
VENUS, after Sept. 14. 
MARS, after Aug. 8. 
JUPITER, from Feb. 3 to Nov. 18. 
SATURN, until May 1 end 1 after Aug. 13. 

PLANETS BRIGHTEST. 
MERiOUUY (B), Feb. 1-5 and Sept. 23-30 as a 

morning star, rising about Ih. 15m. before the 

snn; also April 1-10 and Dec 4-10 as an evening 

star, setting Ih. 15m. after the sun. 
VENUS (9), Aug. 8-12 as an evening star and 

Oct. 21-25 as a morning star. 
MARS (<?). Nov. 24 25, all night. 
JUPITBR. (a), April 30. all night. 
SATURN (b). Nov. 9, all night. 
URANUS (8). July 20, all night. 
NEPTUNE (V), Jan. 11, all night. 



MERIDIAN PASSAGE, RISING AND SETTING OF TEE PLANETS. 
Mean time. All p. m. figures are in black type. 



MONTH. 
DAY. 


VENUS 9 


MARS <? 


JUPITER a 


SATURN b 


In 
Merid- 
ian. 


South- 
ern 
states. 


North- 
ern 
states. 


In 
Merid- 
ian. 


South- 
ern 

states. 


North- 
ern 
states. 


In 

Merid- 
ian. 


South- 
ern 
states. 


North- 
ern 
states. 


In 
Merid- 
ian. 


South- 
ern 

states. 


North- 
ern 

states . 


jan. i.. 


H. M 
041 
56 
1 08 
1 19 
1 27 
1 33 
1 38 
1 43 
1 49 
1 57 
2 05 
2 15 
2 27 
2 39 
2 50 
3 01 
3 09 
3 12 
3 13 
3 09 
3 01 
2 45 
2 24 
1 52 
1 03 
05 
11 05 
10 14 
937 
9 14 
858 
8 50 
8 47 
8 46 
8 48 
8 52 
8 58 


Sets. 
H. M. 
5 44 
6 05 
6 25 
6 47 
7 06 
7 24 
7 38 
7 56 
8 13 
8 33 
8 51 
9 10 
9 28 
944 
9 53 
10 01 
10 01 
9 56 
9 48 
931 
9 16 
8 49 
8 19 
7 32 
Invi 
(finf.o- 
Uises. 
4 13 
3 32 
3 08 
2 55 
2 50 
2 53 
3 01 
3 11 
3 23 
3 36 


Sets. 
H. M. 
6 15 
5 39 
6 03 
6 30 
6 56 
7 15 
7 38 
8 01 
8 26 
8 51 
9 13 
9 37 
9 59 
10 16 
10 25 
10 31 
10 28 
10 17 
1005 
9 42 
9 24 
8 51 
8 17 
7 37 
sible 
15th 
Rises. 
4 13 
3 31 
3 05 
2 53 
2 50 
2 58 
3 08 
3 23 
3 39 
3 58 


H. M. 

9 46 
9 38 
9 29 
9 20 
9 12 
904 
8 58 
8 50 
842 
831 
8 22 
8 12 
8 01 
7 50 
7 38 
7 24 
7 11 
6 59 
6 45 
6 31 
6 17 
6 00 
5 45 
5 28 
507 
4 46 
4 22 
3 54 
3 21 
2 43 
1 54 
1 03 , 
08 
11 07 
10 16 
9 29 
8 48 


Rises. 
H. M. 
4 38 
4 34 
4 26 
4 19 
4 11 
401 
3 54 
3 42 
3 30 
3 14 
300 
2 44 
2 27 
2 09 
1 51 
1 29 
1 11 
OS2 
30 
11 
11 53 
11 31 
11 12 
10 51 
10 26 
10 02 
9 36 
9 07 
8 32 
7 54 
706 
6 14 
Sets. 
6 05 
5 13 
4 24 
3 43 


Rises. 
H. M. 
5 05 
503 
4 57 
4 50 
4 42 
431 
4 93 
4 08 
3 55 
3 36 
3 19 
3 00 
2 40 
2 19 
1 57 
1 32 
1 10 
049 
23 
01 
11 41 
11 16 
10 56 
10 30 
10 04 
9 39 
9 12 
8 42 
8 05 
7 27 
6 38 
5 47 
Sets. 
6 31 
5 39 
4 50 
4 09 


H. M. 
7 50 
7 16 
6 42 
6 03 
5 26 
449 
4 18 
3 38 
2 57 
2 10 
1 27 
43 
11 55 
11 10 
10 26 
9 39 
8 57 
8 15 
7 35 
6 56 
6 19 
5 38 
5 03 
4 29 
3 51 
3 18 
2 45 
2 14 
1 42 
1 11 
38 
07 
11 37 
11 07 
10 36 
10 06 
9 35 


Rises. 
H. M. 
221 
1 48 
1 16 
38 
001 
11 29 
10 58 
10 17 
9 36 
8 48 
8 05 
7 19 
Sets. 
443 
4 01 
3 14 
2 33 
1 51 
1 11 
32 
11 50 
11 09 
10 33 
9 58 
9 19 
8 44 
8 09 
7 37 
7 04 
6 31 
Invi 
d G 

Rises. 
5 53 
5 23 

4 54 
424 


Rises. 
H. M. 
238 
2 06 
1 32 
55 
18 
11 46 
11 15 
10 34 
9 53 
9 05 
8 25 
7 36 
Sets. 
428 
3 46 
3 00 
2 19 
1 37 
57 
18 
11 36 
10 54 
10 18 
9 42 
9 02 
8 24 
7 52 
7 19 
6 45 
6 11 
sible. 
18th 
Rises. 
6 16 
5 48 
5 16 
4 49 


H. M. 
7 12 
6 33 
5 55 
5 13 
4 36 
4 01 
3 31 
2 55 
2 20 
1 42 
1 07 
33 
11 59 
11 24 
10 50 
10 12 
9 37 
9 02 
8 27 
7 51 
7 15 
6 34 
5 57 
5 22 
4 36 
3 56 
3 16 
2 35 
1 54 
1 12 
25 
11 39 
10 56 
10 14 
9 32 
8 51 
8 10 


Sets. 
H. M. 
1 37 
58 
17 
11 35 
10 59 
10 24 
9 55 
9 20 
8 46 
8 09 
7 36 
Invi 
<t 
Rises. 
4 53 
3 39 
3 03 
2 28 
1 52 
1 15 
39 
002 
11 24 
10 49 
10 03 
9 23 
8 44 
8 03 
7 22 
6 41 
5 45 
Sets. 
5 34 
4 51 
409 
3 28 
2 45 


Seta. 
H. M. 
1 47 
1 08 
027 
11 46 
11 10 
10 36 
10 07 
9 32 
9 05 
8 22 
7 50 
sible. 
1st 
Rises 
4 38 
3 23 
2 46 
2 11 
1 35 
58 
21 
11 44 
11 06 
1031 
9 45 
9 05 
8 26 
7 45 
705 
6 24 
5 34 
Sets. 
5 50 
508 
425 
3 44 
301 




21 


Keb. 1 


11 


21 


Men. 1 


11 


21 


April 1 




21... 


May 1. . 


it:. 


21 




Jl 


21 


July 1 .. 


juiy i i... 


21 




11 :: 


21 


Sept. 1... 


it:: 


21 


Oct 1... 


it::::::::::: 


21 


Nov. 1 


11 


21 


Dec. 1 


11 


21 


31 



NUMBER OF THE STARS. 



According to tl'.e best astronomers the number 
of stars that can be seen by a person of average 
eyesight Is only about 7.000. The number visible 



through the telescope has been estimated by J. E. 
Gore at 70,000,000 and by Profs. Newcomb and 
Young at 100.000,000. 



24 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



CHART OF THE HEAVENS. 




Scale of Magnitudes. 



EXPLANATION The chart of the heavens 
shows all the bright stars and groups visible In 
the United States. Canada. Mexico, Cuba and 
Hawaii. Stars of the third magnitude are some- 
times shown in order to complete a figure. 

If a bright uncharted body be seen near the 
"ecliptic circle" it must be a planet. To locate 
the planets or moon, refer to the tables "posi- 
tion of planets" and "moon's place" In the 
almanac pages, find the proper signs on the chart 
on the "ecliptic circle" and an inspection of that 
part of the heavens, comparing with the chart, 
will serve to identify the planet and all the sur- 
rounding objects. 

Because of the earth's motion from west to 
east (opposite to the direction of the arrow in the 
chart), the stars rise 4m. earlier each day or 30m. 
per week, or 2h. a month. The chart shows the 



position at 9 p. m. Then If the position for any 
other hour be desired, as for 7 p. m., count back 
one month, or ahead one month for 11 p. m., and 
so on for any hour of the night. 

A circle described from the zenith on the 
"zenith circle" for the desired latitude with a 
radius of 90 (see graduated meridian) will show 
what stars are above the horizon. Thus Capella 
is near the overhead (zenith) point on latitude 40 
north Jan. 15. 9 p. m., as will be Algenib in the 
handle of the Big Dipper at 3 a. m. Then from 
Capella or Algenib all the surrounding visible 
groups can be identified. The "pointers" being 5 
apart and always In sight may be used as a conven- 
ient unit of measure; also when visible the Belt of 
Orion. 3, or the sides of the square of Pegasus. 
The observer is always supposed to stand under 
the overhead point and to face south and north 
alternately. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



25 



VISIBILITY OF THE PRINCIPAL PLANETS, 1911. 



Date 


Q Ve n u s 


CC Mars 


T/ Ju 


pitcr 


Ij Saturn 


Eve. 

Star 


Morn, 
Star 


Eve. 

Star 


Morn. 
Star 


Eve. 
Star 


Morn. 
Star 


Eve. 
Star 


Morn. 

Star 


Jan. .. 






































i 




























v ; 


















J 














































1 




























\ 












! 














i? ?| 








:: i 








*:: 






















j 




























| 












S 
















i 
Feb. 1" 

21 




























































a 
















si 




| 






i 


a 











> 


: 














r 








-r 
































f 


































. 




-_> 
















? 


























-} 












p 












1 












\ 














Mch. i " 

21 




in 
















w 






.:-: 


VJ 














i 




tn 










: : 














| 












1 
















tvi 
























llt 














^ 




tii 










? 






































1 | 




T 


SB 












X 








j; 














1 




X 








| 






































7* 




1 

Apr. I" 

21 




*- 


,;st : 












** 








H 


















I'- 






1 




















] 












\ 








P 









8 












tt 








u 


















ll 


























a 












i 








Vi 


::-.* :::.; 














o 








O 



























B 


ri 


?f 


it 


gi 


t 








| 






4 


n> 


f] 


5 




| 






i | 


1 

May 11 

' 21 




i 


1 




















tn 1 


























































^ 






n 






2 


1 












Ul 








" 


















5 




\ 




















| 






.... 










1 










1 





















5 


















1 




































\ 










1 
June H 










































I 








\ 
















/ 








*7 
















u. 








1 




























1 
















1 














/ 






. 




irt 
























1 




































I 








1 














/ 






















\ 




if 




i 

July "1 
* 21 






1 
























































( 












-. 




.:':'. 














::: :,.': 


G 


i 


ffl 














































| 






















u- 




















I 


?.EA 






































r 








\ 








/ 


t. 


a 






: 




O 






:*;; 


1 






\ 




i i 


Aug.n 


8 


?ipht< 










~ 


















































z 
























1 


. 


>st 
















W. 





/ 










I 




1 


~t 
w 




\ 












3 








ffl 






W, 


D, 










: -/i-. 










\ 




































1 


















l/> 








< 








| 








y- 




Sept."] 










;\ 














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.> 


s. 


/ 












| 






























w 






| 










j 




- 










k 














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Ul 






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: 










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ii 


if 





i 




/I 


s 


t> 


e 











- 


, 




















x 






\ 






















/ 














II 


Oct. 1 1 

21 














V 


































i 




i~ 






\ 










| 










/ 
















V' 






























/ 


















1 












\ 


















/ 
















V T 


B 




# 


tt 


IS 


t 




Y 




































te 








\ 








U. 








z 


















I 


Nov. ' ' 


























' 


/ 




















\ 




t> 








3 








U 


























3 


















\ 






























1 
? 






In 


v 


is 


it> 


r 








' 




f 




B 


ri 


B 


11 


e 


51 






& 




- 












G 


r. 


k 


7. 


W 


/ 




B 


ri 


R 


11 


e: 


5t 








H 






















\ 




















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i 
Dec. J! 

31 




















f 






\ 






















/ 




1 










s 






111 
























r 










- j : 






II:- 








i 


















/ 






a 












1 




Z: 






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/ : 








1 














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9 


1 






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i; 




















\ 














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3 












Y""l> 








S 














/ 





EXAMPLES Venus will be east of the sun, an 
evening star, and increasing her angular distance 
from the sun until July 7, and will be brightest 
Aug. 10, when much nearer the sun After this 
she approaches the sun and decreases In bright- 
ness to Invisibility Sept. 15, when at inferior 
conjunction, or exactly between the earth and 
sun. She reappears, shortly after her conjunc- 
tion, west of the sun as a morning star and again 
widens her distance from the sun until Nov. 26, 
being brightest Oct. 22. Thus It will be seen that 



ehe may bo at her brightest twice in one year, 
but never when farthest from the sun as In the 
case of the superior planets. 

Mars starts in the year as a morning star and 
gradually grows in brightness as he recedes from 
the sun until Nov. 25, when he will be at oppo- 
sition, or 180 from the sun, rising at sunset and 
shining all night. He will begin to be seen in 
the evening hours Aug. 9, and by about Dec. 1 he 
may very properly be called an "all-night star," 
appearing equally in the evening and morning hours. 



Name. 
Sun 



FACTS ABOUT THE 

Dlam- Distance Period 

eter. from of rev. 

Miles. sun. Miles. Days. 

.866,400 



Mercury 8^030 36,000,000 

Venus 7.700 67,200,000 225 

Earth 7,918 92,900,000 365 

Mars 4,230 141,500,000 687 

Jupiter 86,500 483,300,000 4,333 

Saturn 73,000 886,000,000 10,759 

Uranus 31,900 1,781,900,000 30,687 

Neptune 34,800 2,791,600,000 60,181 

The sun's surface Is 12,000 and its volume 
1,300.000 times that of the earth, but the mass 
Is only 332,000 times as great and Its density 
about one-quarter that of the earth. The force 
of gravity at the surface of the sun Is twenty- 
seven times greater than that at the surface of 
the earth. The sun rotates on Its axis once In 
25.3 days at the equator, but the time Is longer 
at the higher latitudes, from which fact It Is 
presumed that the sun Is not solid, at least as 
to Its surface. 

THE EARTH AND THE MOON. 

Earth The equatorial diameter of the earth Is 



SUN AND PLANETS. 

7,926.5 miles and the polar diameter 7,899.5 miles; 
equatorial circumference, 25,000. The linear ve- 
locity of the rotation of the earth on its ails 
at the equator is 24,840 miles a day, or 1,440 
feet a second; Its velocity in Its orbit around the 
sun is approximately nineteen miles per second, 
the length of the orbit being about 560,000,000 
miles. The superficial area of the earth accord- 
Ing to Encke, the astronomer, is 197,108,580 square 
miles, of which two-thirds Is water and one- 
third land. The planetary mass Is about 256,- 
000.000 cubic miles. 

Moon The moon has a diameter of 2,162 miles, 
a circumference of about 6,800 miles and a sur- 
face area of 14,685,000 square miles. Her mean 
distance from the earth is 23S.840 miles. The vol- 
ume of the moon Is about l-49th that of the earth 
and the density about 3 2-5 that of water. The 
time from new moon to new moon is 29 days 12 
hours 44.05 minutes. The moon has no atmos- 
phere and no water and Is a dead world. 
VELOCITY OP LIGHT. 

Light travels at the rate of 186,300 miles per 
second. It requires 8 minutes and 8 seconds for 
light to come from the sun to the earth. 



26 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAE-BOOK FOE 1911. 



PLANETARY CONJUNCTIONS OR NEAR APPROACHES. 



1 


WITH OTHER PLANETS 
and 6 January 4 


AS 


FOLLOWS: 
Dist. apart 

Dfg. Mm. 

B 1 58 N 





and 9 January 5 








..B 


2 


50 


N 


9 


and 6 Januarys 








...9 





41 


S 


rf 


and 8 March 11 








...<f 


(1 


23 


S 


g 


and b March 29 








..9 


I 


25 


N 


B 


and b April 10 








..B 


4 


41 


N 


U 


and b May 28 








...B 


1 


35 


S 


9 


and 7 May 29 








...9 


1 


51) 


N 


rf 


and b August 16 








..d 1 


II 


21 


N 




add 9 September 24 










9 


26 


JS 




WITH THE MOON 


AS 


FOLLOWS: 


Wash 


time. Dist. 


apart 




















b 


January 9 


(1 


4 


a. 


m. 


1 


(M 


S 


a 


Jan nary 23 


II 


411 


a. 


m. 





57 


N 


t 


J anuary 26 


5 


2t; 


P- 


m. ' 


I 


B 


N 


9 


January 81 


. 9 


55 


a. m. 3 


3V 


M 


b 


Februarys 


7 


35 


a. 


m. 


1 


U 


S 


9} 


February lit 


1 


lit; 


P- 


m. 


1 


81 


N 


d 1 


February 24 


ft 


U2 


P- 


in. 


1 


35 


N 


9 


March 2 


(1 


4 ( ) 


P- 


m. 


2 


211 


N 


b 


March 4 


ft 


14 


P- 


m. 


1 


B 


S 


a 


March 18 




IN) 


P- 


m. 


1 


47 


N 




March 25 


. (i 


55 


P- 


m. 


4 


15 


JS 


b 


April 1 


ti 


IK; 


a. 


m. 


1 


58 


S 


9 


April 1 


II 


K 


P- 


m. 





14 


N 


Tt 


April 14 


11 


58 


P- 


m. 


1 


41 


N 




April 23 


8 


(tt 


P- 


m. 


3 


M 


N 


b 


April 28 


9 


38 


P. 


in. 


1 


17 


8 


9 


May 1 


8 


(12 


a. 


m. 


1 


21) 


8 


a 


May 11 


II 


44 


p. 


m, 


1 


1!) 


N 


rf 1 


May 22 


K 


4(> 


p- 


m. 


1 


1!) 


N 


b 


May 2ti 


2 


07 


p- 


m. 


1 


88 


H 


9 


May 30 


11 


41 


P- 


m. 


2 


B 





91 


June 7 


11 


58 


p. 


m, 


1 


00 


N 


rf 


June 20 


7 


36 


p. 


m. 


(1 


9 


N 


b 


June 23 


5 


30 


a. 


m. 


8 


IK 


S 


9 


June 29 


11 


.')!) 


a. 


m. 


3 


4U 


8 


Tt 


July 5... 


. 4 


13 


n 


m. 


1 


n 


N 


if 


July 19 




23 


p 


m. 


2 


0(1 


S 


b 


July 20 


ti 


(l:i 


P- 


m. 


8 


in 


8 


9 


July 28 


4 


10 


P- 


m. 


6 


47 


S 


a 


August 1.: 


. 2 


02 


P- 


m. 


1 


13 


N 


b 


August 17 




54 


u. 


m. 


4 


n 


S 


4 


August 17 


. 3 


(13 


n 


m. 


3 


41 


S 


9 


August 25 


ti 


43 


P- 


m. 


1(1 


23 


H 


a 


August 29 


4 


52 


a 


m. 


1 


41 


N 


b 

d 1 


September 13 
September 14 


, 8 
7 


If.) 
31 


a. m. 
a. m. 


4 
4 


a 

82 






Wash. time. Diat. apart 

Ueg. Mm. 

9 September 21. 6 03 a.m. 13 14 8 

a September 25 10 57 p.m. 

b October 10 1 20 p.m. 

October 12 44 a.m. 



9 October 18 1 33 p.m. 



2 11 N 
4 27 8 
4 21 8 



39 S 



a October 23 '6 23 p.m. 2 4fl N 



Novembers 7 03 p. m. 

Novembers 3 42 a.m. 



4 18 8 
2 53 S 



. November 16 1 50 p. m. 1 13 _ 

a November 20 1 89 p. m. 3 07 N 

b December 4 2 30 a, m. 4 05 S 

d 1 December 4 10 47 p. m. 50 8 

9 December 16 9 50 a. m. 3 39 N 

a December 18 7 51 a. m. 8 35 N 

b December 31 10 50 a. m. 4 01 S 

d 1 January 1, 19i2 3 02 a. m. 01 S 

NOTE The distance apart is between centers as 
seen from center of earth. It should be borne in mind 
that the bodies are not always nearest when in d, but 
the above data will enable the absolute identification 
of these planets on or near these dates and when the 
d occurs in the daytime. The planets 8 , 6 and v 
are ignored in this connection as usually the 3's light 
will render the last two invisible and generally 8 will 
be too near the sun to be seen. 

PLANETARY CONFIGURATIONS. 
Jan. 11.. W <P O 



Jan. 16.. 
Jan. 20.. 
Feb. 3... 
April 30. 
Mayl... 
July 21.. 
July 29. . 



D b o Eastern 
D a O Western 



D a O Eastern 



Aug. 8.... D d 1 o Western 

Aug. 13... a b o " 

Aug. 16... cT d 1 b 

Sept. 15.. a 1 o Inferior. 

Nov. 10 . . <p b o 

Nov. 18... a 1 a o 

Nov. 24... f c? O 

Nov. 26.. . 9 gr. el. W, Of O 



OCCULTATIONS. 



Limits between 

Januarys 9 b at midnight 90+ and 19+ 

January 23 3 at midnight 20 and 90 

Februarys b 7 34 a.m. 904- and 43+ 

July 5 a 4 13 a.m. 18 and 90 

August 1 a 2 02 p. m. 45 and 90 

November 16 9 1 50 p. m. 88+ and 80+ 

December4 <? 10 47 p.m. 90+ and 13+ 

January 1, 1912 e? 3 01 a.m. 45+ and 31 

NOTE The occultation will only be visible within 
the given parallels of latitude when both the planet 
and moon are above the horizon after dark at the 
time of cf in H. A. given. See table of cf with 3 for 
the distance apart of centers. 



SITUATION OF THE PLANETS TOR THE SUNDAYo: ALSO MOON'S POSITION TOR THE YEAR 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mch. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Venus 


D.Con. 
1 f 


D.Con. 
5 * 


D.Con. 
6 K 


D.Con. 
2 T 


D.Con. 
7 


D.Con. 
4 H 


D.Con 

2 8 


D.Con. 

6 fi 


D.Con. 
3 ft 


D.Con. 
1 O 


D. Con. 
5 ft 


D.Con. 
3 


Mars 


8 m 


12 if 


12 if 


9 * 


14 - 


11 K 


9 K 


13 T 


10 V 


8 V 


12 V 


10 T 




15 ~ 


19 - 


19 ~ 


16 - 


21 * 


18 - 


16 - 


20 = 


17 = 


15 - 


19 - 


17 8 


Saturn 


22 T 


26 T 


26 T 


**H T 


28 T 


25 T 


23 T 


27 T 


24 T 


22 T 


26 T 


-'4 T 


Uranus 


f 






30 * 






30 if 






29 if 




31 ? 




12 


9 


6 


2-30 


28 


25 


24 


21 


17 


12 


i 


K 


3 Apogee 


24 


21 


21 


18 


15 


11 


8 


I 


2-29 


27 


24 


21 


3 Highest (o) 
3 Lowest (w) 
3 at w 


13 
26 
23 


9 
23 
19 


8 
22 
18 


5 
18 
15 


2-29 
16 
12 


26 
12 

8 


22 
9 
5 


19 
6 
1-28 


18 
S 
25 


12 

2-27 
22 


9 
23 
18 


6t 
21 
15 


3 at a 


10 


6 


5 


1-29 


26 


22 


20 


16 


12 


9 


5 


3-30 


3on Equator 


6-19 


3-16 


3-15-30 


12-26 


9-23 


5-20 


3-17-30 


13-26 


9-23 


6-19 


3-16 


1-13-28 



Moon lowest of the year June 11. tMoon highest of the year December 5. 

Explanation of signs: TAries. tf Taurus, w Gemini. Cancer. ft Leo. TJ> Virgo. = Libra. mScorplo 
* Sagittarius. Capricornus. -Aquarius. xPisces. The place indicated for the planets is for the 1st, 2d 
d, 4th and 5th Sundays of each month, in the order of the planets. 



NOTE The moon will run "high" from "lowest" 
to "highest," and run "low" from "highest" to 
"lowest." The full moon will be highest of the 
year nt meridian passage Dec. 16 and lowest June 
22. She will begin to run lower March 21 and de- 
crensc in altitude until June 22 and then increase 
(run higher) until Dec. 21, after which she will 
gradually get lower until June 22. This is be- 
cause the full moon must always be on the oppo- 



site side of the earth from the sun, and hence 
when the sun is lowest In declination the moon 
must be highest and when the sun is highest the 
moon must be lowest. The inclination of the 
earth's axis to the plane of the ecliptic (sun's 
apparent path) being 23% and that of the moon 
being 5 to the ecliptic it follows that the total 
swing from highest to lowest must be (23Vj-i5) 
X2=57, 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



27 



THE BRIGHTEST STARS. 



NAME. 


Constellation OT group. 


Magni- 
tude. 


Bight 
ascension. 
Siderial 
time. 
H. M. 


Declina- 
tion. 

Deg. Mln. 


For 
meridian 
passage. 
.Mn. time. 
H. M. 


For rising 
& setting. 
Mn. time 

Lat.40. . 
H. M. 






2.1 


01 


4-28 36 


03 


7 52 


Caph 


Cassiopeia 


2.4 


04 


-j-58 40 


04 








2 8 


(9 


4-14 41 


08 


6 51 


Alpha 


Pheenix 


3.0 


21 


43 19 


21 


2 25* 


Schedir 




2.3 


35 


+56 30 


35 




Diphda 




2 2 


39 


18 39 


38 


4 53 


Gamma 


Cassiopeia 


2.3 


51 


J60 14 


60 




Mirach 


Andromeda 


2.2 


1 05 


35 09 


1 04 


8 29 


Caph (Polaris) 


Ursa Minor 


2.2 


1 27 


88 50 


1 24 








0.4 


1 34 


57 41 


1 34 


* 






2 8 


1 00 


-4-20 22 


1 49 


7 14 


Almaach 
Humul 


Andromeda 
Aries 


2.2 
2.1 


1 58 
2 02 


4-41 54 
4-23 03 


1 57 
2 01 


9 21 
7 26 


Mira 




2.1 


2 14 


- 3 26 


2 13 


5 48 






2 6 


2 58 


4- 3 44 


2 56 


6 13 


Algol 


Perseus 


2.6 


3 02 


+40 37 


3 00 


9 10 


Maf ak 


Perseus 


1.9 


3 18 


--49 33 


3 18 




Alcyone 


Taurus (bull; 


3.1 


3 42 


--23 50 


3 41 


7 29 






1.0 


4 31 


--16 20 


4 29 


6 68 


Capella 


Auriga 


0.1 


5 10 


--45 55 


5 09 


10 14 


Kigel 


Orion 


3 


5 10 


8 18 


5 09 


5 31 


Bl Nath 


Taurus 


1.8 


5 21 


+28 32 


5 19 


7 52 


Mintaka 


Orion 


2.3 


5 27 


22 


5 26 


5 59 


AlNilam 


Orion, 


1.8 


5 32 


1 15 


5 30 


5 56 


Phtet .... 




2.7 


5 36 


34 08 


5 35 


3 37* 


Salph 


Orion 


2.3 


5 43 


9 42 


5 42 


5 26 


Betelgeuse 


Orion 


0.9 


5 50 


+ 7 24 


5 49 


6 26 


Menkalina 




2.0 


5 53 


4-44 56 


5 51 


9 53 






0.8 


6 22 


52 39 


6 21 


* 


Al Hena 


Gemini (twins) 


2.0 


6 33 


+16 29 


6 31 


6 59 


Sirius 


Canis Major 


1.4 
1.5 


6 41 
6 55 


16 3<i 
28 51 


6 40 
6 54 


5 01 
4 07 


Castor 


Gemini...*. 


1.9 


7 29 


+32 05 


7 27 


8 11 




Canis Minor 


X).6 


7 35 


+ 5 27 


7 33 


6 19 


Pollux 


Gemini 


1.2 


7 40 


4-28 16 


7 38 


7 50 


Beta 


Cancer (crab) 
Hydra 


3.8 
2 1 


8 12 
9 23 


+ 9 28 
8 16 


8 10 
9 21 


6 33 
5 31 




Leo 'lion) 


1.3 


10 04 


+12 25 


J 01 


6 44 


Bia 




1.6 


10 42 


59 13 


!0 39 





Dubhe 


Ursa Major 


2.0 


10 58 


+02 14 


ID 5tj 




Denebola 


Leo 


2.2 


11 44 


4-15 04 


ll 42 


6 54 


Acrux 


Southern Cross 


0.9 


12 22 


62 36 


] 2 19 


* 


Beta 


Corvus (crow) 


2.8 


12 30 


22 54 


12 27 


4 35 


Splca 




1.1 


13 20 


10 42 


13 ig 


5 23 


Agena 


Cen taurus 


0.7 


13 57 


59 56 


13 54 


* 


Arcturus 


Bootes 
Centaurus 


0.2 
0.2 


14 12 
14 33 


+19 39 
60 28 


14 09 

1 1 30 


7 12 






2.9 


14 46 


15 40 


U 43 


5 04 


Kochab 


Ursa Minor 


2.2 


14 51 


+74 31 


14 48 




Alpecca 
Unuk 


Northern Crown 
Serpent Bearer 


2.3 

2.7 


15 31 
15 40 


+27 01 
+ 6 42 


15 28 
15 37 


7 44 

6 23 


Ant ares 
Rutillcus 


Scorpion, 
Hercules 


1 2 
2.8 


16 24 
16 2ti 


-26 14 
+21 41 


16 20 
16 23 


4 20 
7 20 


Ktamin 


Dragon 


2.5 


17 64 


+51 30 


17 51 




Vega 


Lyre 


0.2 


18 34 


+38 42 


18 30 


8 54 


Delta 


Sagittarius 


2.3 


18 50 


26 25 


18 46 


4 19 


Altair 


Eaile 


0.9 


19 46 


+ 8 38 


19 43 


6 30 






3.7 


20 13 


12 49 


20 09 


5 65 


Deneb 


Cygnus (swan) 


1.4 


20 38 


+44 58 


20 35 


9 56 


Alderamin 


Cephus 


2.6 


21 16 


+62 13 


21 12 




Beta.. 
Kni, 


Aquari us 


2.9 
2 4 


21 27 
21 40 


5 58 
+ 9 28 


21 23 
21 36 


5 39 

6 33 


Alpha 


The Crane 


1.9 


22 33 


47 24 


21 58 


1 21* 


Fomalhaut 
Markab 


Pisces Aust, 
Pegasus 


1.3 
2 5 


22 53 
23 00 


30 06 
t!4 44 


22 48 
22 66 


4 00 
6 63 


Iota 


Pisces 


4.3 


23 53 


5 09 


23 31 


6 17 



Explanation By the absolute scale of magnitudes 
stats brighter than Aldebnran and Altair are indi- 
cated by fractional or negative quantities, thus 
Vega 0.2 and Sirius 1.4. As the magnitudes in- 
crease the brilliancy decreases, each increase of a 
unit being equal to a decrease of ubout two and 
one-half in brightness. 

To ascertain when any star or constellation will 
be on the upper meridian add the number opposite 
in the column "For Meridian Passage" to the fig- 
ures in the following table "Sidereal Noon," taking 
not^ whether such figures be "Morn." or "Eye." If 
Morn, and the sum is more than 12h. the result will 
be Eve. of s.ime day: if Kve. and tho sum is more 
than 12h. the result will be Morn, of the'next day. 
Having found the time of meridian passage, for the 
rising subtract and for the setting add the numbers 
opposite the star in the column headed "For Rising 



and Setting" and observe the direction as to Morn, 
and Eve. given for the meridian passage. Those 

marked ( ) in the last column are clrcumpolar 

and do not rise or sot in the latitude of New York 
city. Stars having an asterisk (*) in the last col- 
umn are only to be seen in the far south and then 
when near the meridian, as the vapors of the horizon 
will prevent seeing them when they rise or set. 
To tell how high from the nearest point of the 
horizon a star will be at its meridisn passage, 
subtract the star's declination from 90" and if tho 
result is less than the latitude of the place of 
the observer that star will neither rise nor set, 
but is circumpolar, and the difference between that 
result and. Hie latitude shows the star's altitude 
above the north point of the horizon or below the 
southern horizon. Or (90 Dec.) lat., = alt. or 
elevation of the star above the nearest point of 



28 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAE-BOOK FOR 1911. 



the horizon at meridian passage for stars of south, 
dec. Examples : 

Sidereal noon. Oct. 30, 9:28 p.m. 

Foiualhaut "In Merid." col., 22:48 

32:16 
Subtract, 24:00 

8:16 p.m. of the 31st, 
time of merid- 
ian passage. 
Fomalhaut its. and set. col., 4:00 

12:16 = 0:16 a. m. of 
Nov. 1, the time 
of setting. 



Fomalhaut dec... 00 s. 90 30, =60 40, = 20. 
Altitude of Fornall-aut in latitude 40 at its me- 
ridian passage. To measure celestial distances 
with the eye keep in mind that one-third of the 
distance from the zenith to the horizon is 30. 
For smaller measurements use the "pointers" in 
the "hi? dipper/' which are nearly 5 apart a 
convenient celestial yardstick because always to 
be seen. In the case of a star whoso dec. is such 
as to bring it nearer to the zenith than to a 
horizon at meridian passage, it will be more con- 
venient to use its zenith distance as a means of 
locating it. The difference between the latitude 
and dec. is this zenith distance. If the dec. is 
greater thnn the latitude then such difference is 
to be counted northward, otherwise southward 
from the zenith. 



SIDEREAL NOON OR MERIDIAN PASSAGE OF THE VERNAL EQUINOX. 
(For use in connection with the star table. See note under same.) 





Jan. 


Feb. 


March. 


April. 


May. 


June 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


1... 


H. M. 
519 


H. M. 
3 17 


H. M. 
1 27 


H. M. 
11 25 


H. M. 

9 27 


H. M. 
7 25 


H. M. 

5 27 


H. M. 

3 26 


H. M. 

1 24 


H. M. 
11 22 


H. M. 
9 20 


H.M. 
7 22 


2 


5 15 


3 13 


1 23 


11 21 


9 23 


7 21 


5 24 


3 22 


1 20 


11 18 


9 16 


7 18 


3 


5 11 


3 9 


1 19 


11 17 


9 19 


7 18 


5 20 


3 18 


1 16 


11 14 


9 12 


7 14 


4 


5 7 


3 5 


1 15 


11 13 


9 16 


7 14 


5 16 


3 14 


1 12 


11 10 


9 8 


7 10 


5 


5 3 


3 2 


1 11 


11 10 


9 12 


7 10 


5 12 


3 10 


1 8 


11 6 


9 4 


7 6 


6. 


59 


2 58 


1 7 


11 6 


9 8 


7 6 


5 8 


3 6 


1 4 


11 2 


9 


7 2 


7 .. 


56 


2 54 


1 4 


11 2 


9 4 


7 2 


5 4 


3 2 


1 


10 58 


8 56 


6 58 


8 


52 


2 50 


1 


10 58 


9 


6 58 


5 


2 58 


56 


10 54 


8 52 


6 54 


9 


48 


2 46 


56 


10 54 


8 56 


6 54 


4 56 


2 54 


52 


10 50 


8 48 


6 51 


10 


44 


2 42 


52 


10 50 


8 52 


6 50 


4 52 


2 50 


48 


10 46 


8 45 


6 47 


11 


40 


2 38 


48 


10 46 


8 48 


6 46 


4 48 


2 46 


44 


10 42 


8 41 


6 43 


12 


36 


2 34 


44 


10 42 


8 44 


6 42 


4 44 


2 42 


40 


10 39 


8 37 


6 39 


13.... 


32 


2 30 


40 


10 38 


8 40 


6 38 


4 40 


2 38 


37 


10 35 


8 33 


6 35 


14 


28 


2 26 


36 


10 34 


8 36 


6 34 


4 36 


2 34 


33 


10 31 


8 29 


6 31 


15 


24 


2 22 


8 32 


10 30 


8 32 


6 30 


4 32 


2 31 


29 


10 29 


8 25 


6 27 


16- .. 


20 


2 18 


28 


10 26 


8 28 


6 26 


4 28 


2 27 


25 


10 23 


8 21 


6 23 


17.... 


16 


2 14 


24 


10 22 


8 24 


6 23 


4 25 


2 23 


21 


10 19 


8 17 


6 19 


18 


12 


2 10 


20 


10 18 


8 20 


6 19 


4 21 


2 19 


17 


10 15 


8 13 


6 15 


19 


g 


2 6 


16 


10 14 


8 17 


6 15 


4 17 


2 15 


13 


10 11 


8 9 


6 11 


20 




2 3 


12 


10 11 


8 13 


6 11 


4 13 


2 11 


9 


10 7 


8 5 


6 7 


21 





1 59 


9 


10 7 


8 9 


6 7 


4 9 


2 7 


5 


10 3 


8 1 


6 3 


</2 


3 57 


1 55 


5 


10 3 


8 5 


6 3 


4 5 


2 3 


11 57 


9 59 


7 57 


5 59 


23 


3 53 


1 51 


?1 


9 59 


8 1 


5 59 


4 1 


1 59 


11 53 


9 55 


7 53 


5 65 


24 


3 49 


1 47 


57 


9 55 


7 57 


5 55 


3 57 


1 55 


11 49 


9 51 


7 49 


5 52 


25 


3 45 


1 43 


11 53 


9 51 


7 53 


5 51 


3 53 


1 51 


11 45 


9 47 


7 46 


5 48 


26 


3 41 


1 39 


11 49 


9 47 


7 49 


5 47 


3 49 


1 47 


11 41 


9 44 


7 42 


5 44 


27 


3 37 


1 35 


11 45 


9 43 


7 45 


5 43 


3 45 


1 43 


11 38 


9 40 


7 38 


5 40 


28 


8 33 


1 31 


11 41 


9 39 


7 41 


5 39 


3 41 


1 39 


11 34 


9 36 


7 34 


5 36 


29 


3 29 




11 37 


9 35 


7 37 


5 35 


3 37 


1 35 


11 30 


9 32 


7 30 


5 32 


30 


3 25 




11 33 


9 31 


7 33 


5 31 


3 33 


1 32 


11 26 


9 28 


7 26 


5 28 


31 


3 21 




11 29 




7 29 




3 30 


1 28 




9 24 




5 24 





























Note Full-faced type are p. m. All others are a. m. 



THE SIGNS AND CONSTELLATIONS OF THE ZODIAC. 



Until recently '.t was taken for granted that the 
present relationship between signs and constella- 
tions of the zodiac was generally understood, as 
all astronomical textbooks mention their disagree- 
ment and explain the cause. The numerous letters 
of inquiry concerning differences between this data 
in this almanac and certain others show the 
necessity for this note of explanation. 

Thousands of years ago when the zodiac, that 
belt of the heavens about 16 in width within 
which move the moon and planets, was formed and 
divided into twelve parts or seasons called sicns, 
each containing certain star groups called constel- 
lations, each was given the name of an object or 
animal which never did bear any relationship to 
the configuration of the stars in that group or 
division, but which did or is supposed to have 
reference to certain astronomical or other facts. 
Thus Libra, =, the scales or balance, comes at 
the autumnal equinox when there is an equilibrium 
or balance between the length of day and night 
the world over. Aquarius, -, the water-bearer, 
and whose sign is the Egyptian sign for running 
water, comes at the season of greatest rains in 
Egypt, and so on. 

Since the time when these divisions were made 



and named, owing to the precession of the equi- 
noxes, resulting from the differing polar and equa- 
torial diameters of the earth, the signs have 
moved back west nearly a whole division or con- 
stellation and where T was the first, x now Is. 
Hence, though the. sun now enters the sign T 
March 20, it is a month later when he enters the 
constellation T. It must be apparent, therefore, 
that any supposed influence or relationship which 
early astrologers attributed to the position of the 
pun, moon or planets when in certain of these 
divisions can no long?r exist, as the sign now- 
only represents that space or division of the zodiac 
where the .controlling constellation was 2,000 or 
more years ago, but is not now. Nevertheless 
some almanacs still give the signs for the moon's 
place, which is very misleading to those who at- 
tempt to follow her in her course among the stars. 
Hence, this almanac gives the constellation and 
discards the aneic nt picture of the disemboweled 
man as relics of the age of superstition. The sign 
is retained for sun's place in connection with the 
seasons and sun's path through the zodiac each 
month because of its relationship to the equinoxes 
and solstices. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



ECLIPSES IN 1911. 



There will be two eclipses this year and botTi 
of the sun, as must always be the case where 
but two occur. They are as follows: 

I. Total April 28, partially visible in the "United 
States as a small eclipse upon the sun's southern 
limb. The total phase will only be visible in the 
southern Pacific ocean and islands. The sun will 
get more or less eclipsed throughout Central Amer- 
ica, southern Mexico and in eastern United States 
east of a line from near Plttsburg, Pa., to near 



Matagorda bay, Texas. Washington, D. C., ia on 
the northern Atlantic boundary of the area of 
visibility. No part of the eclipse will be visible 
north of a line from Portland, Ore., through Mil- 
waukee and Pittsburg to Washington, D. C. 
Therefore the eclipse will be very small in the 
western and middle states, west of the above 
mentioned line from Pittsburg to Matagorda bay, 
being largest in the extreme southwest. More 
particularly visible as follows: 




The figure shows 1, 2, 3 and 4 digits 

Begins. 

Chicago 6:10 p. m. 

St. Louis 5:43 p. m. 

San Diego 3:11 p. m. 

Ban Francisco 2:52 p. m. 

Los Angeles 3:08 p. m. 

Charleston 6:14 p. m. 

New Orleans 5:22 p. m. 

Birmingham 5:39 p. m. 

Raleigh 6:23 p. m. 

Little Rock 5:34 p. m. 

Ohattanoogi 5:62 p. m. 

Louisville 5:56 p. m. 

Minneapolis } contact of limbs. 
II Annular, Oct. 22, Invisible In America. 



eclipsed on the southern limb of the sun. 

Size. Correction for 

Digits. 
0.5 
1.5 
4.0 



Ends. 
P:15 p. m. 
6:23 p. m. 
4:46 p. m. 
4:15 p. m. 
4:29 p. m. 



3.0 
3.9 



sta.ulard time, 
sub. 10m. central 
add 1m. central 
sub, llm. Pacific 



add 10m. 
sub. 6m. 



Pacific 
Pacific 



sun sets eclipsed 2.0 at sunset (I) add 20m. eastern 

sun sets eclipsed 2.0 at sunset (D) add 20m. central 

sun sets eclipsed 2.8 at sunset (D) sub. 13m. central 

eun sets eclipsed 1.3 at sunset (I) add 15m. eastern 

sun sets eclipsed 3.0 at sunset add 9m. central 

sun sets eclipsed 1.7 at sunset (D) sub. 19m. central 

sun sets eclipsed 0.9 at sunset (D) sub. 18m. central 

(I) indicates increasing at sunset. 
(D) Indicates decreasing at sunset. 



FIXED AND MOVABLE FEASTS OE CHTTRCH DAYS. 1911. 



New Year's day (circum.)..Jan. 1 

Conv. of St. Paul Jan. 25 

Purification B. V. M Feb. 2 

Septuagesima Sunday Feb. 12 

St. Valentine Feb. 14 

Sexagesima Sunday Feb. 19 

Quinquagesima Sunday Feb. 26 

Sbrove Tuesday Feb. 28 

Ash Wed. (Lent begins).. March 1 

Quadragesima Sunday March 5 

St. Patrick's day March 17 

Annunciation (Lady day) March 25 

Mid-Lent Sunday March 26 

Palm Sunday April 9 

Good Friday. April 14 



Easter Sunday April 16 

Low Sunday (St. George) April 23 

St. Mark April 2& 

Philip and Jam?s .May 1 

Rogation Sunday May 21 

Ascension (Holy) Thursday. May 25 
Whitsunday (Pentecost)... June 4 

Trinity Sunday June 11 

Corpus Chrlstl June IB 

Nat. John the Baptist.... June 24 

Peter and Paul June 29 

Mary Magdalen July 22 

St. James July 25 

Transfiguration Aug. 6 

St. Bartholomew Aug. 24 



Exalt. Holy Cross Sept. 14 

St. Matthew Sept. 21 

Michaelmas Sept 29 

St. Luke Oct. IS 

Simon and Jude Oct. 28 

Halloween Oct. 31 

All Saints Nov. 1 

Thanksgiving Nov. 30 

St. Andrew Nov. 30 

Advent Sunday Dec. 3 

St. Thomas Dec. 21 

Christmas day Dec. 25 

St. Stephen Dec. 26 

(St. John the Evangelist.. Dec. 27 
Holy Innocents Dec. 28 



Wednesday, 
Saturday 



1 f 

M 



EMBER DAYS. 

1st Sunday in Lent March 8. 10, 11 

Pentecost Juna 7. , 10 

September 14 September 20, 22, 23 

December 13 December 20, 22, 23 



30 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



TIME AND STANDARDS OF TIME. 



Various kinds of time are in use in this coun- 
try: 

1. Astronomical Time or Mean Solar Time 
This la reckoned from noon through the twenty- 
four hours of the day and is used mainly by 
astronomical observatories and in official astronom- 
ical publications. It is the legal time of the 
Dominion of Canada, though "standard" and 
"mean" time are in general use there as in this 
country. 

2. Mean Local Time This is the kind that waa 
in almost universal use prior to the introduction 
of standard time. This time is based upon the 
time when the mean sun* crosses the meridian 
and the day begins at midnight. When divided 
into civil divisions years, months, weeks, days, 
etc. it is sometimes called civil time. 

3. Standard Time For the convenience of the 
railroads and business in general a standard of 
time was established by mutual agreement in 1883 
and by this calculation trains are now run and 
local time is regulated. By this system the 
United States, extending from 65 to 125 west 
longitude, is divided into four time sections, each 
of 15 of longitude, exactly equivalent to one 
I'.cur (7% or 30m. on each side of a meridian), 
commencing with the 75th meridian. The flrst 
or eastern section includes all territory between 
the Atlantic coast and an irregular line drawn 
from Buffalo to Charleston, S. C.. the latter city 



being its southernmost point. The second or cen- 
tral section includes all the territory between 
this eastern line and another irregular line ex- 
tending from Bismarck. N. D.. to the mouth of 
the Rio Grande. The third or mountain section 
includes all the territory between the last-named 
line and nearly the western borders of Idaho, 
Nevada and Arizona. The fourth or Pacific sec- 
tion includes all the territory of the United States 
between the boundary of the mountain section 
and the Pacific coast. Inside of each of these 
sections standard time is uniform and the time 
of each section differs from that next to it by 
exactly one hour, as shown on the map. 

Owing to the eccentricity of the earth's orbit 
and the inclination of the equator to the ecliptic, 
the apparent motion of the sun is retarded or 
accelerated according to the earth's place in its 
orbit. Hence, to take the actual sun as a guide 
would necessitate years, days and their subdi- 
visions of unequal length. Therefore an imag- 
inary or "mean sun" was invented. The differ- 
ence between apparent and mean time is called 
the "equation of time" and may amount to a 
quarter of an hour in twenty-four hours. It la 
the difference between the figures in "Sun at 
noon mark" column in calendar and twelve hours. 
The figures on a correct sun dial give the ap- 
parent time. 



The following is the table of times, based upon 
Canada : 



STANDARDS OF TIME. 

the meridians used by the United States and 



NAME OF TIME. 


Degrees. 


Central meridian 
from Greenwich. 


Nearest place.' 




60 








75 


5 hours west 


Between New York and Philadelphia 




90 








106 


7 hours west 


Denver, Col. 


Pacific .... 


120 






Sitka 


135 






Tahiti 


150 


10 hours west 


y> degree west of the island of Tahiti. 


Hawaiian 


157 


10 hrs. 31 min. west. 


Near center of Molokai. 



It is obvious that to express the time of rising 
and setting of the sun and moon in standard time 
would limit the usefulness of such data to the 
single point or place for which it was computed, 
while In mean time it is practically correct for 
places as widely separated as the width of tbe 



continent (see note at bottom of February cal- 
endar), and persons having obtained the mean 
time by the rising or setting of the sun or moon 
may easily ascertain the correct standard time 
of any event by making use of the following ta- 
ble and map: 



To obtain standard time, add 
Standard Correc- 

or tlon, 

City. division. Min. 

Albany, N. Y. Eastern. .Sub. 5 
Austin, Texas Central.. .Add 31 
Baltimore, Md. Eastern. Add 6 
Baton Rouge, La. Cent. .Add 4 
Bismarck. N. D. Cent. .Add 43 
Boston. Mass. Eastern. .Sub. 16 
Buffalo, N. Y. Eastern.. Add 16 
Burlington, Iowa Cent.. Add "5 

Cairo. 111. Central Sub. 3 

Charleston, S. C. East.. Add 20 
Chicago, 111. Central.... Sub. 10 
Cincinnati, O. Central. .Sub. 22 
Cleveland, O. Central. ..Sub. 33 
Columbia. S. C. Eastern.Add 24 
Columbus. O. Central... Sub. 28 

Dayton, O. Central Sub. 23 

Denver, Col. Mountain.. Add 
Des Moines. la. Central. Add 14 
Detroit, Mich. Central. .Sub. 28 
Dubuque, Iowa Central. .Add 3 
Duluth. Minn. Central. .Add 9 

Erie, Pa. Central Sub. 39 

Evansville. Ind. Central. Sub. 10 
Ft. Gibson, Ch. N. Cent. Add 21 
Fort Smith. Ark. Cent. .Add 19 
Fort Wayne, Ind. Cent. Sub. 20 
Galena, 111. Central Add 2 

ealveston. Tex. Central. Add 19 
r. Haven, Mich. Cent. Sub. 15 



STANDARD TIME TABLE, 
or subtract the figures given to 
Standard Correc- 
or tion, 

City. division. Min 

Harrisburg, Pa. Eastern.Add 7 
Houston. Tex. Central. .Add 21 
Huntsville. Ala. Cent.. .Sub. 12 
Indianapolis, Ind. Cent. .Sub. 16 
Jackson, Miss. Central. .Add 1 
Jacksonville. Fla. Cent. Sub. 33 
Janesville, Wis. Cent. . .Sub. 4 
Jefferson City, Mo. Cent. Add 9 
Kansas City, Mo. Cent. .Add 19 
Keokuk. Iowa Central. ..Add 6 
Knoxville, Tenn. Cent. .Sub. 2i 
LaCrosse, Wis. Central.. Add 5 
Lawrence. Kas. Central. Add 21 
Lexington, Ky. Central.. Sub. 23 
Little Rock. Ark. Cent.. Add 9 
Louisville. Ky. Central.. Sub. 13 
Lynchburg, Va. Eastern.Add 17 
Memphis, Tenn. Cent... Sub. 
Milwaukee, Wis. Cent. ..Sub. 8 
Mobile. Ala. Central.... Sub. 8 
Montgomery. Ala. Cent.. Sub. 15 
Nashville. Tenn. Cent. ..Sub. 13 
N. Haven, Conn. East. . Sub. 8 
New Orleans. La. Cent. .Add 
New York. N. Y. East. Sub. 4 
Norfolk. Va. Eastern. .'..Add 5 
Ogdensburg, N. Y. East. Add 2 
Omaha, Neb. Central Add 21 



local time. 

Standard Correc- 
or tion, 

City. division. Min. 

Pensacola, Fla. Central. Sub. 11 
Philadelphia, Pa. East. .Add 1 
Pittsburg. Pa. Eastern.. Add 20 
Portland. Me. Eastern. .Sub. 19 
Providence. R. I. East.. Sub. 11 

Quincy, 111. Central Add 6 

Raleigh, N. C. Eastern.. Add 15 
Richmond. Va. Eastern.Add 10 
Rochester, N. Y. East.. Add 11 
Rock Island. 111. Cent. ..Add 3 
S. Francisco, Cal. Pac. Add 10 
Santa Fe.N.M. Mountain. Add 4 
Savannah, Ga. Central. .Sub. 36 
Shreveport, La. Central. Add 15 
Springfield. 111. Central.. Sub. 2 

St. Joseph, Mo. Cent Add 19 

St. Louis, Mo. Central.. Add I 
St. Paul. Minn. Cent. ..Add 12 
Superior City, Wis. Cent. Add 8 
Syracuse, N. Y. East. . .Add 5 

Toledo. O. Central Sub. 2fl 

Trenton. N. J. Eastern. Sub. 1 

rtica. N. Y. Eastern Add 1 

Washington, D. C. East. Add 8 
Wheeling, W. Va. East.. Add 23 
Wilmington, Del. East.. Add 2 
Wilmington. N. C. East. Add 13 
Yankton. S. D. Central. Add 29 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 




All the calculations in The Daily News Alma- 
nac and Year-Book are based upon mean or clock 
time unless otherwise stated. The sun's rising 
and setting are for the upper limb, corrected for 
parallax and refraction. In the. case of the moon 
no correction is needed, as in the sun, for "par- 
allax and refraction": with her they are of an 
opposite nature and just balance each other. The 
figures given, therefore, are for the moon's cen- 
ter on a true horizon such as the ocean affords. 

The calculations in each of the geographical 
divisions of each calendar page will apply witn 
sufficient accuracy to all places In the contiguous 



North American zones Indicated by the headings 
of the divisions. 

The heavy dotted lines show the arbitrary (stand- 
ard) divisions of time in the United States. The 
plus and minus marks on either side of the me- 
ridian lines show whether It is necessary to add to 
or subtract from the mean time of points east or 
west of these lines to arrive at actual standard 
time. Example: Chicago is 2% east of the 90th 
meridian, therefore Chicago local time 2% x 4 
= 10 to be subtracted from mean time to = stand- 
ard time, and for Boston standard (eastern) time, 
16m. must be subtracted from mean time. 



FOREIGN STANDARDS OF TIME. 





Central 
meridian. 


Fast orslow 
on 
Greenwich. 




Central 
meridian. 


Kastorslovr 
on 
Greenwich. 




Degrees. 
135 east 


H.M.S. 

9 00 00 fast 


West Australia 


Degrees. 
120 east 


H. M. 

8 00 fast 







00000 


South Australia 


142!^ east 


9 30 fast 




G4-j_ west 


35138.8slow 


New Zealand 


172)1 east 


11 30 fast 




8i-(- west 


52415 slow 


Victoria 






Natal 


30 east 


2 00 00 fast 


New South Wales 









22% east 


1 30 00 fast 


Queensland 








15 east 


1 00 00 fast 




J 




Egypt 


30 east 


20000 fast 


Eastern Europe 


30 east 


2 00 fast 



'1 n Spain the hours are counted from to 21, avoiding the use of a. m. and p. m. 
CALENDAR FOR 1912. 



JAN... 

FEB... 
MAR... 


S 

14 
21 

28 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


s 


APRIL 

MAT... 

JUNE... 


s 

7 
14 
M 

>S 


M 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


T 

2 
9 
1C 
23 
30 


W 

8 

10 
17 
24 


T 


F 

5 
12 

19 
2(3 


S 

<; 

Hi 
20 
27 


JULY.. 

AUG. . . 
SEPT.. 


S 


JI 


T 


W 


T 


F 


s 


OCT 


S 


X 


T 


W 


T 


F 


8 


1 

8 

15 

22 
2U 


2 

9 
Ifi 
2:i 

; 


1 

X 
17 
"A 
3! 


4 
11 

is 

i-> 
1 

8 
15 

-'.' 
29 

'7 

14 
21 
28 


5 

12 
19 
> 

2 
9 
10 

23 

1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


H 
W 
20 
27 

8 
10 
17 

24 

2 

9 
Ifi 

2:i 




4 

11 
18 
25 


'7 
14 

21 

2S 


1 

8 
15 


29 


2 
9 
Ifi 

:>:; 
30 


3 
10 
17 
2 
31 


4 
11 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 

20 


(< 
i:> 

21 

2; 






1 

8 
15 

'22 
29 


2 

9 
10 
23 

30 


3 

10 
17 
24 

31 


4 

11 
18 
25 

1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


5 
12 

19 
20 

2 
9 
IB 
M 
30 


NOV.... 


fi 
13 
20 
27 


il 
21 

28 


1 
8 
15 
22 

29 


2 
9 

Hi 
-.':; 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

11 

IS 
25 

1 

8 
15 
>'. 
29 


1 
8 
15 
,".' 
211 


2 
9 
10 
23 
80 


I 

10 
17 
21 
31 


4 

11 

IS 

25 


6 

I 1 .' 
19 
20 


t; 

13 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 

2s 


B 

12 
19 

y, 


6 

l:i 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 
28 


4 

11 
18 
25 


5 
12 

19 

2t; 


ti 
i;> 
20 

27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


DEC.... 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 

11 

18 
25 


5 
12 

19 
20 


fi 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 


4 
11 
18 
25 


5 
12 
19 

20 




Hi 
M 
27 


2 

!! 

Ifi 

>:<, 
3.) 


3 

10 
17 
24 


4 

11 

is 
25 


5 

12 
19 
.'(> 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 
15 
2> 
29 


2 

..) 

Hi 
2i 
30 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 
11 

18 
25 


5 

12 
19 
2ti 


6 

13 
20 
27 


7 
14 
21 

28 


1 

8 
15 

22 
21) 


2 

a 

10 
23 
30 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

11 

18 
25 


5 
12 
19 

20 


ti 
13 
20 
27 


7 
14 

21 
28 
















1 























CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK EOR 1911. 



HALLEY'S COMET. 



HaJley's comet, which was first seen on Its recent 
approach to the earth by Prof. Max Wolff of 
Heidelberg, Germany, Sept. 11, 1909, and was suc- 
cessfully photographed by Prof. S. W. Burnham 
of the Yerkes observatory at Williams Bay, Wis., 
Sept. 15, 1909, could be seen with ordinary opera 
glasses in March, 1910. It was not, however, un- 
til the latter part of April that it could be seen 
with the naked eye. Prom that time until May 
18 it continued to increase in brilliancy and was 
a striking object in the heavens during the hours 
Immediately preceding sunrise. It was seen a lit- 




RALLEY'S COMET AS SEEN MAY 6, 1910. 
Prom a photograph taken by Prof. E. E. Barnard 

at the Yerkes observatory, Williams Bay, Wis. 

Exposure of forty minutes from 2:40 a. in. to 3:20 

a. in. 

tie north of east In the eastern sky, the head 
pointing in the direction of the sun. In the smoke- 
obscured atmospheres of large cities like Chicago 
and New York the view was not satisfactory 
either then or later, except on rare occasions, and 
many persons were disappointed at the appearance 
of the comet. Elsewhere the sight was a fine one 
and was witnessed nightly by thousands in all 



parts of the country. Some astronomers were i- 
clined to think that the comet had diminished in 
size and brilliancy since its appearance seventy- 
five years before, but others were of a contrary 
opinion. 

Much speculation waa indulged in as to what 
would happen when the earth passed through tho 
comet's tail about May 18 and stories about deadly 
cyanogen go.s and showers of meteors caused some 
terror among the uninformed. Newspapers print- 
ed columns of interviews with astronomers and 
other scientists on the subject and the public gen- 
erally was deeply interested in the matter. Great 
preparations were made at the various observY- 
tories for the event, but the results, from a 
scientific as well as popular point of view, were 
disappointing. Nothing of a startling nature hap- 
pened. An auroral display and a few meteors 
were reported, but these were not out of the ordi- 
nary. Experts differed in their opinions as to just 
when the earth passed through the comet's tail, 
nnd some of them held that owing to an unexpect- 
ed curvature of the tail the earth missed coming 
in contact with the gaseous substance altogether. 
At the Yerkes observatory the astronomers were 
quoted as saying that the tail was much spread 
out, causing the earth to occupy about thirty hours 
to make the passage through it instead of four or 
five hours as originally calculated. At the Lick ob- 
eervatory the tail of the comet was seen in the 
cast on the morning of the 18th and the same fact 
was rej>orted from other points. This was ex- 
plained by some on the theory that the length of 
the tail and its curvature caused it to extend 
aronnd the globe, making the end visible in the 
eastern sky while the head and other end were 
in the west. 

For some days after the transit the tail seemed 
1o have disappeared partly if not wholly, but it 
soon reappeared and in the latter days of May and 
the first part of June the comet and its appendage 
were clearly visible in the western sky just after 
sunset. In some localities where the atmosphere 
was clear the spectacle was even more striking 
than that presented when the comet was seen in 
the eastern sky. The orbit of the celestial visitor 
caused it to recede rapidly and by the end of 
June it was no longer visible without the use of 
telescopes. 

COMET A OF 1910. 

On the morning of Jan. 17, 1910, a new comet 
was discovered by an observer named Drake at 
Johannesburg, South Africa. It was five or ten 
degrees south, southwest of the sun, which it was 
rapidly approaching, and was visible to the naked 
eye. Other observers in various parts of the world 
found it easily on the following nights, those at 
Williams Bay, Wis., seeing it Jan. 19. It was 
photographed readily, as it was sufficiently bright 
to be seen without the use of magnifying glasses. 
Astronomers at Flagstaff, Ariz., reported that 
the comet showed light hydrocarbon bands with a 
pair of Intensely bright sodium lines. The tail 
appeared to be about forty-three degress in length. 
The comet was \isible in the western sky until 
the first part of February, when it swiftly disap- 
peared. It was not Identified as having been seen 
before 1910. 

Meteorites were reported Feb. 4 to have fallen 
near Florence, Italy. A large meteor also fell 
near Quincy, 111. 

Jan. 28 the observatory at Manila. P. I., discov- 
ered a new comet near Venus. Feb. 23 Prof. 
Pidoux of the Gemva observatory in Switzerland 
claimed to have found a new comet near Halley's 
anrt traveling much faster. Aug. 8, the Rev. Joel 
H. Metcalf of Taunton, Mass., discovered a comet 
of the eighth magnitude. 

AMERICAN LOSSES IN SPANISH AND PHILIP- 
PINE WARS. 

From wounds or disease. 

Officers. En. men. 

May 1. 1898, to June 30, 1899 224 6,395 

June 30. 1899, to July 1, 1900 74 1,930 

July 1, 1900, to Juae 30. 1901 67 1.9SJ 






CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



WORK OF THE 61ST CONGRESS SECOND SESSION. 



Session began Dec. 6, 1909; ended June 25, 1910. 

Total appropriations, $J. 027, 901,629. 

Act to establish postal savings banks; passed by 
senate March 5; by house June 9; approved 
June 21. 

Act to establish a commerce court and to amend 
ths Interstate-commerce law; passed by house 
May li); by senate June 3; approved June 18. 

Acts providing for the admission ot Arizona and 
New Mexico Into the union as states; passed by 
house Jan. 17; senate June 16; approved June 20. 

Act authorizing the secretary of the interior to 
make temporary withdrawals of public lands in- 
aid of national conservation; passed by house 
March 8, by senate March 10; approved March 15. 

Act amending immigration law so as to provide for 
the suppression of the "white slave" traffic; 
passed by house Jan. 12; by senate Feb. 11; ap- 
proved March 26. 

Act amending law relating to employers' liability 
to their employes in certain cases; passed by 
house Feb. 23; by senate April 1; approved 
April 5. 

ct supplementary to law requiring safety appli- 
ances on railroads; passed by house Dec. 15; by 
senate Feb. 21; approved Arril 14. 
ct to protect the seal fishems of Alaska; passed 
by senate March 23; by house April 18; approved 
April 21. 

ct requiring railroads to report all accidents to 
the interstate-commerce commission; passed by 
house Dec. 15; by senate April 7; approved May 6. 
ct providing for the raising of the Maine in Ha- 
vana harbor; passed by house March 23; by sen- 
ate May 4; approved May 9. 

ct to establish the Glacier National park in 
Montana; passed by senate Feb. 9; by house 
April 13; approved May 11. 

ct to establish, for the protection of miners, a 
bureau of mines in interior department; passed 
by house Jan. 25; by senate May 2; approved 
May 16. 

ct establishing a committee of fine arts to ad- 
vise as to statues, fountains and monuments in 
the District of Celumbia; passed by house Feb. 
9; by senate May 3; approved May 17. 
ct providing for publicity of campaign contribu- 
tions; paired by house April 18; by senate June 
22; approved June 25. 

ct authorizing president of the United States to 
make withdrawals of public lands in certain 
cases to preserve reservoir sites and water pow- 
ers on government land; passed by house April 
20; by senate June 15; approved June 25. 
ct authorizing issue of $20,000,000 in bonds to be 
used by the president In completing Irrigation 
projects now under way; passed by house June 
21; by senate June 22; approved June 25. 
.ct prohibiting transportation for Immoral pur- 
poses of women and girls; passed by house Jan. 
26; by senate June 25; approved June 25. 
ict making appropriations for the navy and au- 
thorizing the construction of two battleships; 
passed by house April 8; by senate March 24; 
approved June 21. 

ct reorganizing lighthouse service and providing 
for a bureau of lighthouses in the department of 
commerce and labor; passed by house May 2; by 
senate May 12; approved June 17. 

MESSAGE ON INTERSTATE LAW. 
Jan. 7, 1910, President Taft sent to congress a 
ial message recommending certain amendments 
jj the interstate-commerce law and suggesting the 
deral incorporation of industrial companies in 
dor to make effective the laws against trusts 
nl monopolies. To bring about a systematic 
il scientidc enforcement of the commerce law .'ie 
(commended the establishment of a court of the 
initod States, composed of five judges designated 
l>r such purpose from among the Circuit judges. 
* re known as the "United States Court 'of 
ommerce." such court to be clothed with ex- 

usivo original jurisdiction over the following 

as-ses of cases: 

!1. All cases for the enforcement, otherwise than 

aM indication i:iid collection of a forfeiture or 

Dally, or by Infliction of criminal punishment, 



of an order of the interstate-commerce commission 
other than for the payment of money. 

2. All cases brought to enjoin, set aside, annul 
or suspend any order or requirement of the intet' 
state-commerce commission. 

3. All such cases as under section 3 of the act 
of Feb. 19, 1903, known as the "Elkins act," are 
authorized to be maintained in a Circuit court of 
the" United States. 

4. .All such mandamus proceedings as under the 
provisions of section 20 or section 23 of the inter- 
state-commerce law are authorized to be main- 
tained in a Circuit court of the United States. 

The president further recommended that the in- 
terstate-commerce law be so amended) as to author- 
ize the commission to act on its own initiative as 
well as upon the conlplaint of an individual in in- 
vestigating the fairness of any existing rate or 
practice and also to give It the power to pass upon 
the classification of commodities for the purpose 
of fixing rates. It should also be empowered, 
whenever any proposed increase of rates is filed, 
at oi-ce to enter upon an investigation Into the 
reasonableness of such change, and, if necessary, 
to postpone the effective date of such Increase for 
a period not exceeding thirty days; if the increase 
is found to be unreasonable, the commission may 
then forbid it or fix the maximum beyond which 
it shall not be made. 

Legislation to prevent the overissue of stocks and 
bonds by interstate carriers and the further ac- 
quisition by railroad companies of the stock of 
competing lines was recommended. The president 
also suggested the passage of laws for additional 
safety appliances on freight trains and to facili- 
tate the bringing of suits by employes against In- 
terstate-commerce employers. 

In order to secure the compliance of the trusts 
nnd business combinations with the antitrust 
statute and to offer them a. means of changing the 
character, organization and extent of their busi- 
ness so as to bring it within the lines of the law, 
under federal control and supervision, without 
creating great financial disturbance, the president 
recommended the enactment by congress of a gen- 
eral law for the formation of corporations to en- 
gage in trade and commerce between the states. 
Such law, he suggested, should be drawn so as to 
protect the corporations from undue Interference 
by the states and regulate their activities In such 
manner as to prevent the recurrence, under na- 
tional auspices, of those abuses which had arisen 
under state control. 



CONTEST OVER HOUSE RULES. 

Wednesday, March 16, 1910, Representative 
Crumpacker of Indiana called up in the house a 
Joint resolution >>nlars:ing the scope of inquiry of 
the schedules relating to the thirteenth decennial 
census so as to secure information respecting the 
nationality and mother tongue of all persons born 
In foreign countries or of foreign parentage. Ob- 
jection to the consideration of the resolution was 
made on til? ground that it was not in order on 
calendar Wednesday, when no other business than 
the call of the committees could be considered. 
Mr. Crumpacker maintained that the resolution 
was privileijjd under the constitution and that 
therefore It was In order on any day. In this po- 
sition he was sustained by Speaker Cannon, who, 
however, was overruled by the house by a vote 
of 183 to 111. 

Oc the following day. March 17, Mr. Crumpacker 
again called the resolution up for consideration 
and the same point of order was made against it. 
The speaker instead of ruling submitted to the 
house the question: Is the joint resolution called up 
by the gentleman from Indiana in order as a ques- 
tion of privilege, the rule prescribing the order of 
business to the contrary notwithstanding? On this 
a demand for the previous question was made, but 
the bouse by a vote of yeas 137 and nays 142 
refused to order it. The house then by a vote of 
202 yeas to 72 nays declared that the resolution 
was in order and it was passed. 

On the same day Representative George W. Nor- 
ris of Nebraska prevented a resolution, "privileged 
by the constitution," to amend the rules of the 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



house so aa to make the committee on rules consist 
of fifteen members, nine to be chosen by the ma- 
jority party and six by the minority party, and ex- 
clutlirg the swaker from membership on the com- 
mittee. Thi.; proposition, which was supported by 
ihe so-called 'insurgent" republicans and the dem- 
ocrats, caused a heated controversy, lasting from 
Thursday until Saturday aiternoon. It was main- 
tained by the advocates of the resolution that un- 
der the old system the speaker, through a commit- 
tee on rules appointed and dominated by himself, 
exercised "inordinate and tyrannical power" In 
shaping or preventing legislation, and that the 
real question at issue was whether that power 
should be limited or contirued. It was further 
argued that a committee on rules elected In the 
manner proposed would be more truly representa- 
tive of all the congressional districts and more 
amenable to the will of the majority. The "regu- 
lar" republicans, on the other hand, insisted that 
the old rules had been evolved in the course of 
time, because they had been found necessary In 
order to transact business in the house; that they 
were not and could not be enforced except by the 
will of the majority: that they had been adopted 
and used by democratic as well a=i republican 
congresses, and that they had been fairly and im- 
partially enforced by Speaker Cannon. 

The point of order having been made that the 
resolution was not a privileged one under the con- 
stitution, the speaker, basing his decision upon a 
ruling made by Samuel J. Randall in 1878, sustained 
the i>oint of order. Mr. Norris appealed from the 
decision and moved the previous question. After 
a ir.otion to lay the appeal on the table had been 
voted down (yeas 164, nays 182) the previous ques- 
tion was ordered by a vote of yeas 182, nays 161. 
and the house refused to concur in the decision of 
the speaker by a vote of 160 yeas to 182 nays. The 
question th'.-n recurring to the adoption of the 
resolution, Mr. Norris offered the following sub- 
stitute: 

"Resolved. That the rules of the house of repre- 
sentatives be amended as follows: 

"1. In rule X, paragraph 1, strike out the 
words 'on rules to consist of five members.' 

"2. Add new paragraph to rule X. as follows: 

" 'Paragraph 5. There shall be a committee on 
rnles, elected by the house, consisting of ten mem- 
bers, six of whom shall be members of the ma- 
jority party and four of whom shall be members 
of the minority party. The speaker shall not be a 
member of the committee and the committee shall 
elect Its own chairman from its own members.' 

"Resolved, further, That within ten days after 
the adoption of this resolution there shall be an 
election of this committee, and immediately upon 
Its election the present committee on rules shall 
be dissolved." 

The resolution as amended by the substitute 
was adopted, yeas 190, nays 157. The fallowing 
republicans voted for the resolution, the remainder 
of the affirmative vote consisting of democrats: 



Ames (Mass.). 
Barnard (Iowa). 
Gary (Wis.). 
Cooper (Wis.). 
Davidson (Wis.). 
Dawson (Iowa). 
Davis (Minn.). 
Fish (N. Y.). 
Foelker (N. Y.). 
Fowler (N. J.). 
Gardner (Mass.). 
Good (Iowa). 
Gronna- (N. D.). 
Haugen (Iowa). 
Hayes (Cal.). 
Hinshaw (Neb.). 
Hollingsworth (O.). 
Rowland (O.). 
Hubbard (Iowa). 
Johnson (0.). 
Kendall (Iowa). 
Kinkaid (Neb.). 



Kopp (Wis.). 
Kustermann (Wis.). 
Lenroot (Wis.). 
Lindbergh (Minn.). 
Madison (Kas.). 
Martin (S. D.). 
McLaughlin (Mich.). 
Miller (Minn.). 
Morse (Wis.). 
Murdock (Kas.). 
Nelson (Wis.). 
Norris (Neb.). 
Packett (Iowa). 
Parsons (N. Y.). 
Poindexter (Wash.). 
Plumley (Vt.). 
Steenerson (Minn.). 
Taylor (O.). 
Townsend (Mich.). 
Volstead (Minn.). 
Woods (Iowa). 



After announcing the vote the sneaker made a 
brief statement In which he said that there were 
two courses open for him to pursue one was to 
resign and permit the new combination of demo- 



crats and Insurgents to choose a speaker in har- 
mony with its aims and purposes. The othi-r was 
for that combination to declare a vacancy in the 
office of speaker and proceed to the election of a 
new speaker. The first course he declined to pur- 
sue, because it might endanger tli'i final passage 
of all legislation necessary to redeem republican 
pledges and because he was not conscious of hav- 
ing done any political wrong. 

"There has been much talk on the part of the 
minority ami the insurgents," said Mr. Cannon in 
conclusion, "of the 'czarism' of the speaker, cul- 
minating In the action taken to-day. The real 
truth is that there Is no coherent republican ma- 
jority in the house of representatives. Therefore, 
the real majority ought to have the courage of Its 
convictions and logically meet the situation that 
confronts it. 

"The speaker does now believe, and has alxvays 
believed, that this Is a government through parties, 
and that parties can act only through majorities. 
The speaker has always believed in and bowed to 
the will of the majority In convention, in caucus 
and in the legislative hall, and to-day profoundly 
believes that to act otherwise is to disorganize 
parties, is to prevent coherent action In any leg- 
islative body, is to make impossible the reflection 
of the wishes of the people in statutes and in 
laws. 

"The speaker has always said that, under the 
constitution, it Is a question of the highest priv- 
ilege for an actual majority of the house at any 
time to choose a new speaker, and again notifies 
the house that the speaker will at this moment 
or lit any other time while he remains speaker 
entertain, In conformity with the highest consti- 
tutional privilege, a motion by any member to 
vacate the office of the speakership and choose a 
new speaker; and, under existing conditions, would 
welcome such action upon the part of the actual 
majority of the house, so that power and respon- 
sibility may rest with the democratic and in- 
surgent members, who, by the last vote, evidently 
constitute a majority of this house. The chair ia 
now ready to entertain such motion." 

Mr. Burleson (dem.) of Texas offered a resolu- 
tion that the office of speaker of tbi house of rep- 
resentatives be declared vacant and that the 
house proceed at once to the election of a new 
speaker. The motion was voted down, nays 192, 
yeas 155. Of those voting yea the following were 
republicans: Cary (Wis.), Cooper (Wis.), Davis 
(Minn.), Gronna (N. D.), Lenroot (Wis.), Lind- 
bergh (Minn.), Murdock (Kas.), Nelson (Wis.), 
Poindexter (Wash.). 

Acting under the Norris resolution a caucus of 
the republican members of the house was held 
March 23, and the following were chosen to repre- 
sent the majority on the new committee on rules: 

Walter I. Smith, Iowa. 

John Dalzell, Pennsylvania. 

Sylvester C. Smith, California. 

George P. Lawrence, Massachusetts. 

J. Sloat Fassett, New York. 

Henry S. Boutell, Illinois. 

At a caucus cf the democratic members held 
March 24 the following were chosen to represent 
the minority: 

Champ Clark, Missouri. 

Oscar W. Underwood, Alabama. 

Lincoln Dixon, Ir.diana. 

John J. Fitzgerald, New York. 

By a resolution unanimously adopted March 25 
the men named at the party caucuses were mauo 
the committee on rules of the house. 

COMMERCE COURT AND RAILROAD-RATE 
LAW. 

An act to create a commerce court and to amend 
Ihe act entitled "An act to regulate commerce." 
approved Feb. 4. 1887, as heretofore amended, anil 
for other purposes. 

Be it enacted, etc., that a court of -the United 
States is hereby created which shall be known as 
the Commerce court and shall have the jurisdiction 
now possessed by the Circuit courts of the United 
States and the judges thereof over all cases of the 
following kinds: 

1. All cases for the enforcement, otherwise than 
by adjudication and collection of a forfeiture or 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



35 



penalty or by infliction of criminal punishment, of 
uy order of the interstate commerce commission 
other than for the payment of money. 

2. Cases brought to enjoin, set aside, annul or 
suspend in whole or in part any order of the in- 
terstate commi-rL'U commission. 

3. Such cases as by section 3 of the act entitled 
"An act to further regulate commerce with for- 
eign nations and among the statas," approved 
Feb. 19, 1903, ar.> authorized to be maintained in 
a Circuit court of the United States. 

4. All suoh mandamus proceedings as under the 
provisions of section 20 or section 23 of the act en- 
titled "An act to regulate commerce," approved 
Feb. 4, 1887, as amended, are authorized to be 
maintained in a Circuit court of the United States. 

Nothing contained in this act shall be construed 
as enlarging the jurisdiction now possessed by the 
Circuit courts of the United States or the judges 
thereof that is hereby transferred to and vested 
in the Commerce court. 

The jurisdiction of the Commerce court over 
oases of the foregoing classes shall be exclusive, 
but this act shall not affect the jurisdiction now 
possessed by any Circuit or District court of the 
United States over cases or proceedings of a kind 
not within the above enumerated classes. 

COMPOSITION OF COUBT. 

The Commerce court shall be a court of record 
and shall have a seal of such form and style as 
the court may prescribe. The said court shall be 
composed of nve judges, to be from time to time 
designated and assigned thereto by the chief jus 
tice of the United States, from among the Cir- 
cuit judges of the United States, for the period of 
five years, except that in the first instance the 
court shall be composed of the five additional Cir- 
cuit judges to be appointed as hereinafter pro- 
vided, who shall be designated by the president to 
serve for one, two, three, four and five years, re- 
spectively, in order that the period of designation 
of one of said judges shall expire in each year 
thereafter. In case of the death, resignation or 
termination of assignment of any judge so desig- 
nated the chief justice shall designate a Circuit 
.ludee to fill the vacancy so caused to serve during 
the unexpired period for which the original desig- 
nation was made. After the year 1914 no Circuit 
judge shall be redesignated to serve in the Com- 
merce court until the expiration of at least one 
year after the expiration of the period of his last 
previous designation. The judge first designated 
for the five-year period shall be the presiding 
judge of said court, and thereafter the judge 
senior in designation shall be the presiding judge. 

Each of the judges during the period of his 
service !n the Commerce court shall, on account 
of the regular sessions of the court being hold in 
the city of Washington, receive In addition to his 
salary as Circuit judge an expense allowance at 
the rate of $1,500 per annum. 

The president shall, by and with the advice and 
consent of the senate, appoint five additional Cir- 
cuit judges, no two of whom shall be from the same 
judicial circuit, who shall hold office during good 
behavior and who shell be from time to time 
designated and assigned by the chief justice of 
the United States for service in the Circuit court 
of any district or the Circuit court of appeals 
for any circuit or in the Commerce court. 

The associate judges shall have precedence and 
shall succeed to the place and powers of the pre- 
siding judge whenever he may be absent or in. 
capable of acting. In the order of the date of their 
designations. Four of said judges shall constitute 
a quorum, and at least a majority of the court 
shall concur in all decisions. 

The court shall also have a clerk and a mar- 
shal, with the same duties and powers, so far as 
they may b.> apprcpriate and are not altered by 
rule of the court, as are now possessed by the 
clerk and marshal, respectively, of the Supreme 
court of the United States. The offices of the 
clerk and marshal of the court shall be In the 
city of Washington in the District of Columbia. 
The judges of the court shall appoint the clerk 
and marshal, and may also appoint, if they find 
it necessary, a deputy clerk and deputy marshal, 
and such clerk, marshal, deputy clerk and deputy 
mar&hal shall hold office during the pleasure of 



the court. The salary of the clerk shall be $4,000 
per annum; the salary of the marshal $3,000 per 
annum; the salary of the deputy clerk $2,500, and 
the salary of the deputy marshal $2,500 per an- 
num. The said clerk and marshal may, with the 
approval of the court, employ all requisite assist- 
ance. 

The costs and fees in said court shall be estab- 
lished by the court in a table thereof, approved 
by the Supreme court of the United .States, with- 
in four months after the organization of the 
court, but such costs and fees shall in no case 
exceed those charged in the Supreme court of the 
United States and shall be accounted for and paid 
Into the treasury of the United States. 

Tiie Commerce court shall be always open for 
the transaction of business. Its regular sessions 
shall be held in the city of Washington, in the 
District of Columbia, but the powers of the court 
or of any judge thereof, or of the clerk, marshal, 
deputy clerk or deputy marshal, may be exercised 
anywhere in the United States, and for expedition* 
of the work of the court and the avoidance of 
undue expense or inconvenience to suitors the 
court shall hold sessions in different parts of the 
United States as may be found desirable. The 
actual and necessary expenses of the judges, clerk, 
marshal, deputy clerk and deputy marshal of 
the court incurred for travel and attendance else- 
where than in the city of Washington shall be 
paid upon the written and Itemized certificate of 
such Judge, clerk, marshal, deputy clerk or deputy 
marshal by the marshal of the court, and shall be 
allowed to him In the statement of his accounts 
with the United States. 

The United States marshals of the several dis- 
tricts outside of the city of Washington in which 
the Commerce court may hold its sessions shall 
provide, under the direction and with the approval 
of the attorney-general of the United States, such 
rooms- in the public buildings of the United States 
as may be necessary, but in case proper rooms 
cannot be provided in such public buildings, said 
marshals, with the approval of the attorney-gen- 
eral of the United States, may then lease from 
time to time other necessary rooms for the court. 

If. at any time, the business of the Commerce 
court does not require the services of all the 
judges, the chief justice of the United States 
may. by writing, signed by him and filed in the 
department of justice, terminate the assignment of 
any of the judges or temporarily assign him for 
service in any Circuit court or Circuit Court of 
Appeals. In case of illness or other disability of 
any judge assigned to the Commerce court the 
chief justice of the United States may assign any 
other Circuit judge of the United States to act in 
his place, and may terminate such assignment 
when the exigence therefor shall caase, and any 
Circuit Judge so assigned to act in place of such 
judge shall, during his assignment, exercise all 
the powers and perform all the functions of such 
Judge. 

JUBISDICTION. 

In all cases within Its jurisdiction the Commerce 
court and each of the judges assigned thereto 
shall, respectively, have and may exorcise any and 
ell of the powers of a Circuit court of the United 
.States and of the Judges of said court, respective- 
ly, so far as the same may be appropriate to the 
effective exercise of the jurisdiction hereby con- 
ferred. The Commerce court may issue all writs 
and process appropriate to the full exercise of 
its jurisdiction and powers and may prescribe the 
form thereof. It may also, from time to time, 
establish such rules and regulations concerning 
pleading, practice or procedure in cases and mat- 
ters within its jurisdiction as to the court shall 
seem wise and proper. Its orders, writs and 
process may run, be served and be returnable any- 
where in tn United States, and the marshal and 
deputy marshal of said court and also the United 
States marshals and deputy marshals in the sev- 
eral districts of the United States shall have like 
powers and be under like duties to act for and in 
behalf of said court as pertain to United States 
marshals and deputy marshals generally when act- 
Ing under like conditions concerning suits or mat- 
ters in the circuits of the United States. 

The Jurisdiction of the Commerce court shall be 



36 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Invoked by filing In the office of the clerk of the 
court a written pitltiou, setting forth briefly and 
succinctly the facts constituting the petitioner's 
cause of action and specifying the relief sought. 
A copy of such petition shall forthwith be served 
by the marshal or a deputy marshal of the Com- 
merce court or by the proper United States mar- 
shal or deputy marshal upon ever}' defendant 
therein named, and when the United States is a 
party defendant the service shall be made by fil- 
ing a copy of said petition in the office of the 
secretary of the interstate commerce commission 
and in the department of justice. Within thirty 
days after the petition Is served, unless tbat time 
is extended by order of the court or a judge 
thereof, an answer to the petition shall be filed 
In the clerk's office and a copy thereof mailed 
to the petitioner's attorney, which answer shall 
briefly and categorically respond to the allega- 
tions of the petition. No replication need be 
filed to the answer, and objections to the suf- 
ficiency of the petition or answer as not setting 
forth a cause of action or defense must be taken 
at the final hearing or by motion to dismiss the 
petition based on said grounds, which motion 
may be made at any time before answer Is filed. 
In case no answer shall be filed as provided 
herein the petitioner may apply to the court on 
notice for such relief as may be proper upon the 
facts alleged In the petition. The court may, by 
rule, prescribe the method of taking evidence In 
cases pending In said court, and may prescribe 
that the evidence be taken before a single judge 
of the court, with power to rule upon the admis- 
sion of evidence. Except as may be otherwise 
provided in this act or by rule of the court the prac- 
tice and procedure In the Commerce court shall 
conform as nearly as may be to that in like cases 
In a Circuit court of the United States. 

The Commerce court shall be opened for the 
transaction of business at a date to be fixed by 
order of -the said court, which shall be not later 
than thirty days after the judges thereof shall 
ha*e been designated. 

APPEALS. 

Sec. 2. That a final judgment or decree of the 
Commerce court may be reviewed by the Supreme 
court of the United States if appeal to the Su- 
preme court be taken by an aggrieved party with- 
in sixty days after the entry of said final judg- 
ment or decree. Such appeal may be taken In like 
manner as appeals from a Circuit court of the 
United States to the Supreme court, and the Com- 
merce court may direct the original record to be 
transmitted on appeal instead of a transcript 
thereof. The Supreme court may affirm, reverse 
or modify the final judgment or decree of the Corn- 
mercy court as the case may require. 

Appeal to the Supreme court, however, shall In 
no case supersede or stay the judgment or decree 
of the Commerce court appealed from, unless the 
Supreme court or a justice thereof shall so direct, 
and appellant shall give bond in such form and of 
such amount as the Supreme court or the justice 
of that court allowing the stay may require. 

An appeal may also be taken to the Supreme 
court of the United States from an interlocutory 
order or decree of the Commerce court granting 
or continuing an injunction restraining the en- 
forcement of an order of the Interstate commerce 
commission, provided such appeal be taken within 
thirty days from the entry of such order or decree. 

Aopeals to the Supreme court under this section 
shall have priority in hearing and determination 
over all other causes except criminal causes in 
that court. 

Sec. 3. That suits to enjoin, set aside, annul or 
suspend any order of the Interstate commerce 
commission shall be brought In the Commerce 
coiKt against the United States. The pendency 
of such suit shall not of itself stay or suspend 
the cperatien of the order of the Interstate com- 
merce commission, but the Commerce court. In Its 
discretion, may restrain or suspend, in whole or 
in part, the operation of the commission's order 
pending the final hearing and determination of 
the suit. No order or Injunction so restraining or 
suspending an order of the interstate commerce 
commission shall be made by the Commerce court 
otherwise than upon notice and after hearing, ex- 



cept that, in cases where irreparable damage would 
otherwise ensue to the petitioner, said court or a 
judge thereof may, on hearing after r.ot less than 
three days' notice to the interstate commerce 
commission and the attorney-general, allow a 
temporary stay or suspension in whole or in part 
of the operation of the order of the interstate 
commerce commission for not more than sixty 
('ays from <he date of the order of such court or 
judge, pending application to the court for Its 
order or injunction, in which case the said order 
shall contain a specific finding, based upon the 
evidence submitted to the judge making the order 
and identified by reference thereto, that such irrep- 
arable damage would result to the petitioner and 
specifying the nature of the damage. The court 
may, at the time of hearing such application, upon 
a like finding, continue the temporary stay or sus- 
pension in whole or in part until its decision upon 
the application. 

Seo. 4. That all cases and proceedings in the 
Commerce court which but for this act would be 
brourl't by or against the interstate commerce 
commission shall be brought by or against the 
United States, and the United States may Inter- 
vene in any case or proceeding in the Commerce 
court whenever, though it has not been made a 
party, public interests are Involved. 

Sec. 5. That the attorney-general shall have 
charge and control of the Interests of the govern- 
ment in all cases and proceedings In the Com- 
merce court and in the Supreme court of the 
United States upon appeal from the Commerce 
court, and If In his opinion the public Interest re- 
quires it he may retain and employ in the name 
of the United States, within the appropriations 
from time to time made by the congress for such 
purposes, such special attorneys and counselors at 
law" as he may think necessary td .assist in the 
discharge of any of the duties Incumbent upon 
him and his subordinate attorneys, and the attor- 
ney-general shall stipulate with such special at- 
torneys and counsel the amount of their compen- 
sation, which shall not be In excess of the sums 
appropriated therefor by congress for such pur- 
poses, and shall have the supervision of their 
action; provided that the Interstate commerce 
commission and any party or parties In interest 
tc the proceedings before the commission, in which 
an order or requirement Is made, may appear as 
parties thereto of their own motlou and as of 
ri;;ht, and be represented by their counsel. In any 
suit wherein is Involved the validity of such 
order or requirement or any part thereof, and the 
interest of such party, and the court wherein Is 
pending such suit may make all such rules and 
orders as to such appearances and representations, 
the number of counsel and all matters of pro- 
cedure and otherwise as to subserve the ends of 
juatice and speed the determination of such suits; 
provided further, that communities, associations, 
corporations, firms and Individuals who are inter- 
ested in -the controversy or questio'n before the 
interstate commerce commission or in any suit 
which may be brought by any one under the terms 
of this act or the acts of which it is amendatory 
or which are amendatory of it, relating to action 
of the Interstate commerce commission, may inter- 
vene in said suit or proceedings at any time after 
the institution thereof, and the attorney-general 
shall not dispose of or discontinue said suit or 
proceeding over the objection of such party or 
intervenor aforesaid, but said intervenor or In- 
tervtnors may prosecute, defend or continue said 
suit or proceeding unaffected by the action or 
noraction of the attorney-general of the United 
States therein. 

Complainants before the Interstate commerce 
commission interested In a case shall have the 
right to appear end be made parties to the case 
and be represented before the courts by counsel 
under such regulations as are now permitted in 
similar circumstances under the rules and prac- 
tice of equity courts of the United States. 

Sec. 6. That until the opening of the Commerce 
court, as in section 1 hereof provided, all cases 
and proceedings of which from that time the 
Commerce court Is hereby given exclusive Juris- 
diction may be brought In the same courts and 
conducted in like manner and with like effect as 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



.-57 



is now provided by law, and If any such case or 
proceeding shall tnve gone to final judgment or 
decree before the opening of the Commerce court, 
appeal may be taken from such final judgment or 
decrte in like manner and with like effect as is 
now provided by law. Any such case or proceed- 
ing within the jurisdiction of the Commerce court 
which may have been begun In any other court 
as hereby allowed before the said date shall be 
forthwith transferred to the Commerce court, if 
it has not yet proceeded to final judgment or de- 
cree In such other court, unless it has been finally 
submitted for the decision of such court, in which 
case the cause shall proceed In such court to final 
judgment or decree and further proceeding there- 
after, and appeal may be taken direct to the Su- 
preme court, and If remanded such cause may be 
sent back to the court from which the appeal was 
taken or to the Commerce court for further pro- 
ceeding, as the Supreme court shall direct, and all 
previous proceedings in such transferred case 
shall stand and operate notwithstanding the trans- 
fer, subject to the same control over them by the 
Commerce court and to the same right of subse- 
quent action In the case or proceeding as If the 
transferred case or proceeding had been originally 
tegun In the Commerce court. The clerk of the 
court from which any case or proceeding is so 
transferred to the Commerce court shall transmit 
to and file in the Commerce court the originals of 
all papers filed in such case or proceeding and a 
certified transcript of all record entries in the 
case or oroceeding up to the time of transfer. 

It shall be the duty of every common carrier 
subject to the provisions of this act. within sixty 
days after the taking effect of this act, to designate 
in writing an agent in the city of Washington-, 
District of Columbia, upon whom service of all 
notices and processes may be made for and on 
behalf of said common carrier in any proceeding 
or fcuit pending before the interstate commerce 
commission or before said Commerce court, and 
to file such designation in the office of the secre- 
tary of the interstate commerce commission, which 
designation may from time to time be changed 
by like writing, similarly filed, and thereupon 
service of all notices and processes may be made 
upon such common carrier by leaving a copy there- 
of with such designated agent at his office or 
usual place of residence in the city of Washing- 
ton, with like effect as if made personally upon 
such common carrier, and In default of such desig- 
nation of such agent, service of any notice or 
other process in any proceeding before said inter- 
state commerce commission or Commerce court 
may be made by posting such notice or process in 
the office of the secretary of the interstate com- 
merce commission. 

TELEGRAPH AND TELKPHONB MITES. 

>Sec. 7. Section 1 of the act to regulate com- 
merce, approved Feb. 4, 1887, as heretofore amended, 
is amended so as to make the provisions of the 
law applicable to telegraph, telephone and cable 
companies (whether wire or wireless) engaged in 
sending messages from one state, territory or dis- 
trict of the United States to any other state, ter- 
ritory or district of the United States or to any 
foreign country, \vho shall be considered and held 
to be common curriers within the meaning and 
purpose of this act. 

"All charges made for any service rendered or 
to be rendered In the transportation of passengers 
or property and for the transmission or messages 
by telegraph, telephone or cable shall be Just and 
reasonable, and every unjust and unreasonable 
charge for such service or any part thereof Is 
prohibited and declared to be unlawful. Pro- 
vided, that messages by telegraph, telephone or 
cable, subject to the provisions of this act. may 
be classified into day. night, repeated, letter, 
commercial, press, government and such other 
classes as are just and reasonable, and different 
rates may be charged for the different classes of 
messages; and, provided further, that nothing In 
this act shall be construed to prevent telephone, 
telegraph and cable companies from entering into 
contracts with common carriers for the exchange 
of services." 

Sec. 8. Section 4 of the act is amended so as 
to make It unlawful for any common carrier to 



charge any greater compensation as a through 
route than the aggregate of the intermediate rates 
subject to the provisions of this act. No rates or 
charges lawfully existing at the time of the pas- 
sage of this amendatory act shall be required to 
be changed by reason of the provisions of this 
section prior to the expiration of six months after 
the passage of this act, nor In any case where ap- 
plication shall have been filed before the com- 
mission, in accordance with the provisions of this 
section, until a determination of such application 
by the commission. 

Whenever a cairler by railroad shall in com- 
petition with a water route or routes reduce rates 
on the carriage of any species of freight to and 
from competitive points It shall not be permitted 
to increase such rates unless after a hearing by 
the interstate commerce commission it shall be 
found that such proposed increase rests upon 
changed conditions other than the elimination of 
water competition. 

Sec. 9. Four new paragraphs are added to sec- 
tion 6 of this act: The commission may reject any 
schedule which does not give lawful notice of it8 
effective date. In case of failure on the part of 
any carrier to comply with any order or regula- 
tion made by the commission, such carrier shall 
be liable to a fine of $500 for each offense and $25 
for each day of the continuance of the offense. If 
any common carrier, after a written request by 
any person or company for a written statement of 
the rate or charge applicable to a described ship- 
ment between stated places under the tariffs to 
which such carrier is party, shall refuse or omit 
to make such statement within a reasonable time 
or shall misstate in writing the applicable rate, 
and If the person or company making such request 
suffers damages by reason of such refusal or 
omission or in consequence of the misstatement 
made, the carrier shall be liable to a penalty of 
$250. It shall be the duty of every carrier by 
railroad to keep posted in every station where 
freight is received the name of an agent resident 
in the place where the station is located, to whom 
application may be made for the information i>y 
this section required to be furnished on written re- 
quest. 

Sec. 10. Section 10 of the act, as heretofore 
amended, 'Is amended so as to make the third par- 
agraph read: 

"Any person, corporation or company or any 
agent or officer thereof, who shall deliver property 
for transportation to any common carrier subject 
to the provisions of this act, or for whom, as con- 
signor or consignee, any such carrier shall trans- 
port property, who shall knowingly and willfully, 
directly or Indirectly, himself or by employe, 
agent, officer or otherwise, by false billing, false 
classification, false weighing, false representation 
of the contents of the package or the substance 
of the property, false report of weight, false 
statement or by any other device or means, 
whether with or without the consent or connivance 
of the currier, its agent or officer, obtain or attempt 
to obtain transportation for such property at less 
than the regular rates then established and In 
force on the line of transportation, or who shall 
knowingly and willfully, directly or indirectly, 
himself or by employe, agent, officer or otherwise, 
by false statement or representation as to cost, 
value, nature or extent of injury or by the use 
of ;my false bill, bill of lading, receipt, voucher, 
roll, account, claim, certificate, affidavit or deposi- 
tion, knowing the same to be false, fictitious or 
fraudulent, or to contain any false, fictitious or 
fraudulent statement or entry, obtain or attempt to 
obtain any allowance, refund or payment for dam- 
age or otherwise in connection with or growing 
out of the transportation of or agreement to trans- 
port such property, whether with or without tha 
consent or connivance of the carrier, whereby the 
compensation of such carrier for such transporta- 
tion, either before or after payment, shall in fact 
be made less than the regular rates then estab- 
lished and in force on the line of transportation, 
shall be deemed guilty of fraud, which Is hereby 
declared a misdemeanor, and shall, upon convic- 
tion thereof In any court of the United States 
of competent jurisdiction within the district in 
which such offense was wholly or In part com- 



38 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



mitted, be subject to a fine of not exceeding 
$5,000 or imprisonment in the penitentiary for a 
term of not exceeding two years or both, in the 
discretion of the court; provided, that the pen- 
alty of imprisonment shall not apply to artificial 
persons." 

Ses. 11. Section 13 of the act is amended so as 
to provide that the interstate commerce commis- 
sion shall have the same powers and authority to 
proceed with any inquiry instituted on its owii 
motion as though It had been appealed to by com- 
plaint or petition under any of the provisions of 
the act, including the power to make and enforce 
any order or orders in the case, or relating to 
the matter or thing concerning which inquiry Is 
had excepting orders for the payment of money. 

BATE BEGULATIONS. 

Sec. 12. Section 15 of the act, as heretofore 
amended, is further amended so as to read as 
follows : 

"That whenever, after full hearing upon a com- 
plaint made as provided in section 13 of this act 
or after a full hearing under an order for investi- 
gation and hearing made by the commission on its 
own initiative (either in extension of any pending 
complaint or without any complaint whatever), 
the commission shell be of opinion that any Indi- 
vidual or joint rates or charges whatsoever de- 
manded, charged or collected by any common car- 
rier or carriers subject to the provisions of thl 
act for the transportation of persons or property 
or for the transmission of messages by telegrapb 
or telephone as defined in the first section of 
this act, or that any Individual or Joint classi- 
fications, regulations or practices whatsoever o! 
such carrier or carriers subject to the provisions 
of this act are unjust or unreasonable or unjustly 
discriminatory or unduly preferential or prejudicial 
or otherwise in violation of any of the provisions 
of this act, the commission is hereby authorized 
and empowered to determine and prescribe what 
will be the .lust and reasonable Individual or joint 
rate or rates, charge or charges, to be thereafter 
observed In such case as the maximum to be 
charged and what individual or jo:nt classifica- 
tion, regulation or practice is just, fair and rea- 
sonaHe to be thereafter followed, and to make an 
order that tbe carrier or carriers shall cease and 
desist from such violation to the extent to which 
the commission flnds the same to exist, and shall 
not thereafter publish, demand! or collect any rate 
or charge for such transportation or transmission 
In excess of the maximum rate or charge so pre- 
scribed and shall adopt the classification and shall 
conform to and observe the regulation or practice 
so prescribed. All orders of the commission, ex- 
cept orders for the payment of money, shall take 
effect within such reasonable time, not less than 
thirty days, and shall continue In force for such 
period of time not exceeding two years, as shall 
be prescribed In the order of the commission, un- 
less the same shall be suspended or modified or 
set aside by the commission, or be suspended or set 
aside by a court of competent jurisdiction. When- 
ever the carrier or carriers, in obedience to such 
order of the commission or otherwise, in respect to 
joint rates, fares or charges, shall fall to agree 
among themselves upon the apportionment or di- 
vision thereof the commission may, after hearing, 
mak-? a supplemental order prescribing the just 
and reasonable proportion of siich joint rate to be 
received by each carrier party thereto, which order 
shall take effect as a part of the original order. 

"Whenever there shall be filed with the com- 
mission any schedule stating a new individual or 
joint rato. fare or charge or any new Individual 
or ioint classification, or any new individual or 
joint regulation or practice affecting rate, fare or 
charge, the commission shall have, and It la 
hereby given, authority, either upon complaint or 
upon its own initiative without complaint, at 
once, and if it so orders, without answer or other 
formal pleading by the interested carrier or car- 
riers, but upon reasonable notice, to enter upon 
n hearing concerning the propriety of such rate, 
fare, charge, classification, regulation or prac- 
tice, and pending such hearing and the decision 
thereon the commission upon filing with snch 
schedule and delivering to the carrier or carriers 
affected thereby a statement in writing of its 



reasons for such suspension may suspend the oper- 
ation of such schedule and defer the use of such 
rate, fare, classification, regulation or practice, 
but not for a longer period than 120 days beyond 
the time when such rate, fare, charge, classification, 
regulation or practice would otherwise go into ef- 
fect, and after full hearing, whether completed 
before or after the rate, charge, classification, 
regulation oi 1 practice goes into effect, the com- 
mission may make such order in reference to such 
rate, charge, classification, regulation or practice 
as would be proper In a proceeding initiated after 
the rate, fare, charge, classification, regulation 
or practice had become effective; provided, that if 
any such hearing cannot be concluded within the 
period of suspension, as above stated, the inter- 
state commerce commission may, in its discretion, 
extend the time of suspension for a further 
period not exceeding six months. At any hear- 
ing involving a rate increased after Jan. 1, 1910, 
or of a rate sought to be increased after the pas- 
sage of this act, tte burden of proof to show that 
the proposed increased rate is just and reasonable 
shall be upon the common carrier, and the com- 
mission shall give to the hearing and decision of 
such questions preference over all oilier questions 
pending before It and decide the same as speedily 
is possible. 

THROUGH BOTJTES. 

"The commission may also, after hearing, on a 
complaint or upon its own initiative without 
oomplaint, establish through routes and Joint 
classifications ' and may establish joint rates aa 
the maximum to be charged and may prescribe 
the division of such rates as hereinbefore provided 
and the terms and conditions undei 1 which such 
through routes shall be operated, whenever the 
carriers themselves shall have refused or neglected 
to establish voluntarily such through routes or joint 
classifications or 1 joint rates, and this provision shall 
apply when one of the connecting carriers is a water 
line. The commission shall not, Ijowever, establish 
any through route, classification or rate between 
street electric passenger railways not engaged in 
the general business of transporting freight in ad- 
dition to their passenger and express business and 
railroads of a different character, nor shall the 
eommission have the right to establish any 
through route, classification, rate, fare or charge 
when the transportation is wholly by water, and 
any transportation by water affected by this act 
shall be subject to the laws and regulations appli- 
cable to transportation by water. 

"And in establishing such through route the com- 
mission shall not require any company, without Ita 
consent, to embrace in such route substantially lesa 
lhan the entire length of Its railroad and of any 
intermediate railroad operated In conjunction and 
iinder a common management or control therewith 
which lies between the termini of such pro.xned 
through route, unless to do so would make such 
through route unreasonably long as compared with 
another practicable through route which could 
otherwise be established. 

"In all cases where at the time of delivery of 
property to any railroad corporation being a com- 
mon carrier, for transportation subject to the 
provisions of this act to any point of destination, 
between which and the point of such delivery fo~ 
shipment two or more through routes and through 
rates shall have been established as in this act 
provided, to which through routes and through 
rates such carrier is a party, the person, firm or 
corporation making such shipment, subject to such 
reisonable exceptions and regulations as the inter- 
state commerce commission shall from time to 
time prescribe, shall have the right to designate 
in writing by which of such through routes such 
property shall be transported to destination, and 
it shall thereupon be the duty of the initial 
carrier to route said property and issue a through 
bill of lading therefor as so directed, and to 
transport said property over its own line or 
lines and deliver the same to a connecting line 
or lines according to such through route, and 
It shnll be the duty of each of said connecting 
carriers to receive said property and transport 
it ever the said line or lines and deliver 
the Kame to the r.ext succeeding carrier or con- 
signee according to the routing Instructions in 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



39 



paid bill of lading; provided, however, that the 
shipper shall in all instances have the right to 
determine, where competing lines of railroad con- 
stitute portions of a through line or route, over 
which of said competing lines so constituting a 
portion of said through line or route his freight 
stall be transported. 

"It shall be unlawful for any common carrier 
subject to the provisions of this act or any officer, 
agent or employe of such common carrier, or for 
ai;y other person or corporation lawfully author- 
ized by such common carrier to receive* informa- 
tion therefrom, knowingly to disclose to or permit 
to be acquired by any person or corporation other 
than the shipper or consignee, without the con- 
sent of such shipper or consignee, any information 
concerning the nature, kind, quantity, destination, 
consignee or routing of any property tendered or 
delivered to such common carrier for interstate 
transportation, which information may be used to 
the detriment or prejudice of such shipper or 
consignee or which may improperly disclose his 
business transactions to a competitor; and it shall 
also be unlawful for any person or corporation to 
solicit or knowingly receive any such information 
which may be so used; provided, that nothing in 
this net shall be construed to prevent the giving 
of such information In response to any legal 
j.rotess issued under the authority of any state 
or federal court or to any officer or agent of the 
government of the United States or of any state 
or territory, in the exercise of his powers, or to 
any officer or other duly authorized person seeking 
such information for the prosecution of persons 
charged with or suspected of crime; or informa- 
tion given by a common carrier to another carrier 
or its duly authorized agent, for the purpose of 
adjusting mutual traffic accounts in the ordinary 
course of business of such carriers. 

"Any person, corporation or association violating 
any of the provisions of the next preceding para- 
graph of this section shall be deemed guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and for each offense, on conviction, 
shall pay to the United States a penalty of not 
more than $1,000. 

"If the owner of the property transported under 
this act directly or indirectly renders any service 
connected with such transportation or furnishes 
any instrumentality used therein, the charge and 
allowance therefor shall not be more than is just 
and reasonable, and the commission may, after a 
hearing on complaint or on its own initiative, de- 
termine what is a reasonable charge as the maxi- 
mum to be paid by the carrier or carriers for the 
services so rendered or for the use of the instru- 
mentality so furnished, and fix the same by appro- 
priate order, which order shall have the same 
force and effect and be enforced in like manner 
as the orders above provided for under this sec- 
tion. 

"The foregoing enumeration of powers shall not 
exclude any power which the commission would 
otherwise have in the making of an order under 
the provisions of this act." 

Sec. 13. Section 16 of. the act, as heretofore 
amended, is further amended so as to permit the 
filing of petitions for damages in state courts of 
general jurisdiction, as well as in the Circuit 
courts of the United States. Every order of the 
commission shall be served upon the designated 
I'getit of the carrier in the city of Washington or 
in such other manner as may be provided by law. 

If any carrier fails or neglects to obey any order 
of the commission other than for the payment of 
money, while the same is in effect, the interstate 
commerce commission or any party injured there- 
by, or the United States, by its attorney-general, 
may apply to the Commerce court for the enforce- 
ment of such order. If, after hearing, that court 
determines that the order was regularly made and 
duly served and that the carrier is in disobedience 
of the same, the court shall enforce obedience to 
&ueh order by a writ of injunction or other proper 
process, mandatory or otherwise, to restrain 
such carrier, its officers, agents or representatives' 
from further disobedience of such order or to en- 
join upon, it or them obedience to the same. 

Sec. 14. Section 20 of the act, as heretofore 
amended, is further amended by providing that 
the detailed reports required from the carriers 



subject to the act shall contain statistics for the 
twelve mouths ending June 30 in each year or 
Dec. 31, if the commission by order substitute 
that period for the year ending June 30. 

Sec. 16. Nothing in the act shall undo or impair 
any proceedings heretofore taken by or before the 
interstate commission. 

STOCK AND BOND COMMISSION. 

Sec. 16. That the president is hereby authorized 
to appoint a commission to investigate questions 
pertaining to the issuance of stocks and bonds by 
railroad corporations, subject to the provisions of 
the act to regulate commerce, and the power of 
congress to regulate or affect the same and to fix 
the compensation of the members of such commis- 
sion. Said commission shall be and is hereby author- 
ized to employ experts to aid in the work of inquiry 
and examination, and such clerks, stenographers 
and other assist.-ints as may be necessary, which 
employes shall be paid such compensation as the 
commission may deem just and reasonable upon a 
certificate to be issued by the chairman of the 
commission. The several departments and bureaus 
of tiie government shall detail from time to time 
such officials and employes and furnish such infor- 
mation to the commission as may be directed by 
the president. For the purposes of its investiga- 
tions the commission shall be authorized to incur 
and have paid upon the certificate of its chair- 
man such expenses as the commission shall deem 
necessary; provided, however, that the total e- 
penses authorized or incurred under the provisions 
of this section for compensation, employes or 
otherwise shall not exceed the sum of $25,000. 

[The following were appointed Sept. 3, 1910, as 
members of the stock and bond commission author- 
ized by this section: Dr. Arthur T. Hadley, pres- 
ident of Yale university, chairman; Frederick N. 
Judson, St. Louis, Mo. ; Frederick Strauss, New 
York, N. Y. ; Walter L. Fisher, Chicago, 111. ; 
Prof. H. B. Meyer, Madison, Wis.] 

Sec. 17. That no interlocutory injunction sus- 
pending or restraining the enforcement, operation 
or execution of any statute of a state by re- 
straining the action of any officer of such state 
in the enforcement or execution of such statute 
shall be issued or granted by any Justice of the 
Supreme court or by any Circuit court of the 
United States or by any judge thereof or by any 
district judge acting as circuit judge, upon the 
ground of the uncqnstitutionality of such statute 
unless the application for the same shall be pro- 
xented to a justice of the Supreme court of the 
United States or to a circuit judge or to a district 
judge acting as circuit judge, and shall be heard 
and determined by three judges, of whom at least 
one shall be a justice of the Supreme court of the 
United States or a circuit judge, and the other 
two may be either circuit or district judges, and 
unless a majority of said three judges shall con- 
cur in granting such application. Whenever such 
application as aforesaid is presented to a justice 
cf the Supreme court of the United States or to 
a judge be shall immediately call to his assistance 
1o hear and determine the application two other 
judges; provided, however, that one of such three 
judges shall be a justice of the Supreme court of 
the United States or a circuit judge. Said appli- 
cation shall not be heard or determined before at 
loast five days' notice of the hearing has been 
given to the governor and to the attorney-general 
of the state and to such other persons as may be 
defendants in the suit; provided, that if of opin- 
ion that irreparable loss or damage would result 
to the complainant unless a temporary restraining 
order is granted, any justice of the Supreme 
court of the United States or any circuit or dis- 
trict judge may grant such temporary restraining 
order at any time before such hearing and de- 
termination of the application for an Interlocutory 
injunction, but such temporary restraining order 
shall only remain in force until the hearing and 
determination of the application for an interlocutory 
injunction upon mtice as aforesaid. The hearing 
upon such application for an interlocutory injunc- 
tion shall bo given precedence and shall be In 
every way expedited and be assigned for a hear- 
ing at the earliest practicable day after the ox- 
jMration of the notice hereinbefore provided for. 
An appeal may be taken directly to the Supreme 



40 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



court of the United States from the order granting 
or denying, after notice and hearing, an inter- 
locutory injunction in such case. 

Sec. 18. That this act shall take effect and be 
in force from and after the expiration of sixty 
days after its passage, except as to sections 12 
and 16, which sections shall take effect and be In 
force immediately. (Approved June 18, 1910.) 

POSTAL SAVINGS BANK LAW. 
(Text in full.) 

An act to establish postal savings depositories 
for depositing savings at interest with the secur- 
ity of the government for repayment thereof and 
for other purposes. 

Bo it enacted by the senate and house of repre- 
sentatives of the United States of America in 
congress assembled, that there be and is hereby 
created a board of trusttes for the control, super- 
vision and administration of the postal savings 
depository offices designated and established under 
the provisions of this act, and of the funds re- 
ceived as deposits at such postal savings depos- 
itory offices by virtue thereof. Said board shall 
consist of the postmaster-gt-neral, the secretary of 
the treasury and the attorney-general, severally, 
acting ex offlcio, and shall have power to make ail 
necessary and proper regulations for the receipt, 
transmittal, custody, deposit, investment and re- 
payment of the funds deposited at postal sav- 
ings depository offices. 

The board of trustees shall submit a report to 
congress at the beginning of each regular session 
showing by states and territories (for the preced- 
ing fiscal year) the number and Barnes of post- 
offices receiving deposits, the aggregate amount of 
deposits made therein, the aggregate amount of 
withdrawals therefrom, the number of depositors 
in each, the total amount standing to the credit 
of all depositors at the conclusion of the year, 
the amount of such deposits at interest, the 
amount of interest received thereon, the amount 
of interest paid thereon, the amount of deposits 
surrendered by depositors for bonds issued by 
authority of this act and the number and amount 
of unclaimed deposits. Also the amount invested 
in government securities by the trustees, the 
amount of extra expense of the postoffice depart- 
ment and the postal service incident to the oper- 
ation of the postal savings depository system, 
the amount of work done for the savings depos- 
itory system by the postofflce department and 
postal service in -the transportation of free mnil 
and sll other facts which it may deem pertinent 
and proper to present. 

Sec. 2. That the postmaster-general is hereby 
directed to prepare and issue special stamps of 
the necessary denominations for use, in lieu of 
penalty or franked envelopes, in the transmittal 
of free mail resulting from the administration of 
this act. 

Sec. 3. That said board of trustees is hereby 
authorized and empowered to designate such post- 
offcf-s as it may select to be postal savings de- 
pository offices, and each and every postofflce so 
designated by order of said board is hereby de- 
clared to be n postal savings depository office 
within the meaning of this act and to be author- 
ized and required to receive deposits of funds 
from the public and to account for and dispose 
of the same, according to the provisions of this 
act and the regulations made in pursuance there- 
of. Each postal savings depository office shall be 
kept open for the transaction of business during 
Buch hours as the postmaster-general, with the 
approval of the board of trustees, shall direct. 

ACCOUNTS AND PASS BOOKS. 

Sec. 4. That accounts may he opened and de- 
posits made in any postal savings depository es- 
tablished under this act by any person of the 
age of 10 years or over, in his or her own name, 
and by a married woman in nor own name and 
free from any control or interference by her 
husband, but no person shall at the same time 
havr> more than one postal savings account in his 
<ir her own right. 

Sec. 5. That the postmaster at a postal savings 
depository office shall, upon the making of an ap- 
plication to open an account under this act and 



the submission of an initial deposit, deliver to the 
depositor a pass look free or cost, upon which 
shall be written the name and signature or mark 
of the depositor and such other memoranda as 
may be necessary for purposes of identification, 
in which pass oook entries of all deposits and 
withdrawals shall be made in both figures and 
writing; provided, that the postmaster-general 
may, with the approval of the board of trustees, 
adopt some other device or devices in lieu of a 
pass book as a means of making and preserving 
evidence of deposits and withdrawals. 

Sec. 6. That at least $1 or a larger amount in 
multiples thereof must be deposited before an ac- 
count Is opened with the person depositing the 
same, and $1 or irultiples thereof may be depos- 
ited after such account has been opened, but no 
one shall be permitted to deposit more than $100 
in any one calendar month; provided that in or- 
der that smaller amounts may be accumulated for 
.deposit any person, may purchase for 10 cents from 
any depository office a postal savings card to which 
may be attached specially prepared adhesive 
stamps, to be known as "postal savings stamps," 
and when the stamps so attached amount to $1 or 
a larger sum in multiples thereof, including th 
10-cent postal savings card, the same may be 
presented as a deposit for opening! an account, and 
additions may be made to any account by means 
of such card and stamps in amounts of $1 or 
multiples thereof, and when a card and stamps 
thereto attached are accepted as a deposit the post- 
master shall immediately cancel the same. It la 
hereby made the duty of the postmaster-general 
to prepare such postal savings cards and postal 
savings stamps of denominations of 10 cents and 
to keep them on sale at every postal savings de- 
pository office, and to prescribe all necessary rule* 
and regulations for the issue, sale and cancella- 
tion thereof. 

Sec. 7. That interest at the rate of 2 per 
centum per annum shall be allowed and entered 
to the credit of each depositor once in each year, 
the same to be computed cm such basis and under 
Kucii rules and regulations as the board of trus- 
tees may prescribe, but interest shall not be com- 
muted or allowed or. fractions of a dollar. Provid- 
ed, that the balance to the credit of any one per- 
son shall never be allowed to exceed $500, exclu- 
sive of accumulated interest. 

Sec. 8. That any depositor may withdraw the 
whole or any part of the funds deposited to his or 
her credit, with the accrued Interest, upon demand 
and under such regulations as the board of trus- 
tees may prescribe. Withdrawals shall be paid 
from the deposits in the state or territory, so far 
as the postal funds on deposit in such state or ter- 
ritory may be sufficient for the purpose, and, so 
far as practicable, from the deposits in the com- 
munity in which the deposit was made. No bank 
in which postal savings funds shall be deposited 
shall receive any exchange or other fees or compen- 
sation on account of the cashing or collection of 
any checks or the performance of any other serv- 
ice in connection with the postal savings deposi- 
tory system. 

DISPOSAL OP FUNDS. 

Sec. 9. That postal savings funds received un- 
der the provisions of this act shall be deposited 
in solvent banks, whether organized under na- 
tional or state laws, being subject to national or 
state, supervision and examination, and the sums 
deposited shall bear interest at the rate of not 
less than 2% per centum per annum, which rate 
shall be uniform throughout the United States and 
territories thereof, but 5 per centum of such funds 
shall be withdrawn by the board of trustees and 
kept with the treasurer of the United -States, who 
shall be treasurer of the board of trustees, in 
lawful money as a reserve. The board of trustees 
shall take from such banks such security in pub- 
lic bonds or other securities, supported by the tax- 
ing power, as the board may prescribe, approve 
and deem sufficient and necessary to insure the 
safety and prompt payment of such deposits on 
demand. The funds received at the postal savings 
depository offices in each city. town, village and 
other locality shall be deposited in banks located 
therein (substantially in proportion to the capital 
and surplus of each such bank) willing to receive 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



41 



each deposits under the terms of this act and the 
regulations made by authority thereof, but the 
amount deposited iu any one bank shall at no 
time erceed the amount of the paid-in capital and 
one-half the surplus of such bank. If no such 
bank exists in any city, town, village or locality, 
or if none where such deposits are made will re- 
ceive such deposit on the terms prescribed, then 
Buch funds shall be deposited under the terms of 
this act in the bank most convenient to such 
locality. If no such bank in any state or terri- 
tory is willing to receive such deposits on the 
terms prescribed, then the same shall be deposited 
with the treasurer of the board of trustees, and 
shall be counted in making up the reserve of 5 per 
centum. Such funds may be withdrawn from the 
treasurer of said board of trustees and all other 
postal savings funds or any part of such funds may 
be at any time withdrawn from banks and savings 
depository offices for the repayment of postal sav- 
ings depositors when required for that purpose. Not 
exceeding 30 per centum of the amount of eucn 
funds may at any time be withdrawn by the trus- 
tees for investment in bonds or other securities 
of the United States, it being the intent of this 
act that the residue of such funds, amounting to 
f.9 per centum thereof, shall remain on deposit In 
the banks in each state and territory willing to 
receive the same under the terms of this act, and 
t-ii.-ill be a working balance and also a fund which 
may be withdrawn for investment In bonds or 
other securities of the United States, but only by 
direction of the president, and only when. In his 
judgment, the general welfare and the Interests 
of the United States so require. Interest and 
profit accruing from the deposits or Investment of 
postal savings funds shall be applied to the pay- 
ment of interest due to postal savings depositors 
as hereinbefore provided, and the excess thereof, 
If any, shall be covered into the treasury of the 
United States as a part of the postal revenue; 
provided, that postal savings funds In the treas- 
ury of said board shall be subject to disposition as 
provided in this act, and not otherwise; and pro- 
vided further, that the board of trustees may at 
any time dispose of bonds held as postal savings 
Investments and use the proceeds to meet with- 
drawals of deposits by depositors. For the pur- 
poses of this act the word "territory," as used 
herein, shall be held to Include the District of 
Columbia, the District of Alaska and Porto Rico, 
and the word "bank" shall be held to include 
savings banks and trust companies doing a bank- 
ing business. 

UNITED STATES BONDS. 

Sec. 10. That any depositor In a postal savings 
depository may surrender his deposit or any part 
thereof, in sums of $20. $40, $60, $80, $100 and 
multiples of . $100 and $500, and receive in Hen of 
euch surrendered deposits, under such regulations 
as may be established by the board of trustees, 
the amount of the surrendered deposits In United 
States coupon or registered bonds of the denomi- 
nations of $20, $40, $60, $80, $100 and $500, which 
bonds shall bear Interest at the rate 2% per 
centum per annum, payable semiannually and be 
redeemable at the pleasure of the United States 
after one year from the date of their issue and 
payable twenty years from such date, and both 
principal and interest shall be payable In United 
States gold coin of the present standard of value: 
provided, that the bonds herein authorized shall 
be issued only (first) when there are outstand- 
ing bonds of the United States subject to call. 
In which case the proceeds of the bonds shall be 
applied to the redemption at par of outstanding 
bonds of the United States subject to call, and 
(second) at times when under authority of law 
other than that contained in this act the govern- 
ment desires to issue bonds for the pur- 
pose of replenishing the treasury, in which case 
the issue of bonds under authority of this act 
shall be In lieu of the Issue of a like amount of 
bonds Issnable under authority of law other than 
that contained In this act: provided further, that 
the bonds authorized by this act shall be Issued 
by the secretary of the treasury under such regu- 
lations as he may prescribe; and provided further. 
that the authority contained In section nine of 
this act for the investment of postal savings 



funds in United States bonds shall include the 
authority to invest in the bonds herein author- 
ized whenever such bonds may be lawfully issued; 
and provided further, that the bonds herein auth- 
orized shall be exempt from all taxes or duties of 
the United States, as well as from taxation in any 
form by or under state, municipal or local au- 
thority; and provided further, that no bonds author- 
ized by this act shall be receivable by the treas- 
urer of the United States as security for the is- 
sue of circulating notes by national banking asso- 
ciations. 

Sec. 11. That whenever the trustees of the pos- 
tal savings fund have in their possession funds 
available for investment in United States bonds 
they may notify the secretary of the treasury of 
the amount of such funds in their hands which 
they desire to invest in bonds of the United 
States subject to call, whereupon, if there are 
United States bonds subject to call, the secretary 
of the treasury shall call for redemption an 
amount of such bonds equal to the amount of the 
funds In the hands of the trustees which the 
trustees desire to thus invest, and the bonds so 
called shall be redeemed at par with accrued In- 
terest at the treasury of the United States on and 
after three months from the date of such call, 
and Interest on the said bonds shall thereupon 
cease: Provided, that the said bonds when re- 
deemed shall be reissued at par to the trustees 
without change 5n their terms as to rate of inter- 
est and date of maturity; and provided further, 
that the bonds so reissued may. In the discretion 
of the secretary of the treasury, be called for re- 
demption from the trustees in like manner as they 
were originally called for redemption from their 
former owners whenever there are funds in the 
treasury of the United States available for such 
redemption. 

Sec. 12. That postal savings depository funds 
shall be kept separate from other funds by post- 
masters and other officers and employes of the 
postal service, who shall be held to the same ac- 
countability under their bonds for such funds as 
for public moneys, and no person connected with 
the postofllce department shall disclose to any 
person other than the depositor the amount of any 
deposits, unless directed so to do by the postmas- 
ter-general. All statutes relating to the safe- 
keeping of and proper accounting for postal re- 
ceipts are made applicable to postal savings funds 
and the postmaster-general may require postmas- 
ters, assistant postmasters and clerks at postal 
savings depositories to give any additional bond 
he may deem necessary. 

COMPENSATION OF POSTMASTERS. 

Sec. 13. That additional compensation shall be 
allowed postmasters at postoflices of the fourth 
class for the transaction of postal savings de- 
pository business. Such compensation shall not 
exceed % of 1 per centum on the average sum 
upon which interest is paid each calendar year 
on receipts at such postofflce, and shall be paid 
from the postal revenues, but postmasters, assist- 
ant postmasters, clerks or other employes at post- 
offices of the presidential grade shall not receive 
any additional compensation for such service. 

Sec. 14. That the sum of $100,000 is hereby ap- 
propriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, or so much thereof as may 
be necessary, to enable the postmaster-general and 
the board of trustees to establish postal savings 
depositories in accordance with the provisions of 
this act, including the reimbursement of the sec- 
retary of the treasury for expenses incident to 
the preparation, issue and registration of the 
bonds authorized In this act, and the postmaster- 
general Is authorized to require postmasters and 
other postal officers and employes to transact. In 
connection with their other duties, such postal 
savings depository business as may be necessary, 
and be is also authorized to make and with the 
approval of the board of trustees to promulgate 
and from time to time to modify or revoke, subject 
to the approval of said board, such rules and reg- 
ulations not In conflict with law as he may deem 
necessary to carry the provisions of this act Into 
effect. 

Sec. 15. That all the safeguards provided Dy 
law for the protection of public moneys and all 



42 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



statutes relating to the embezzlement, conversion, 
improper handling, retention, use or disposal of 
postal and money-order funds and the punishments 
provided for such offenses are hereby extended 
and made applicable to postal savings depository 
fuiids and all statutes relating to false returns of 
postal and money-order business, the forgery, 
counterfeiting, alteration, improper use or hand- 
ling of postal and money-order blanks, forms, 
vouchers, accounts and records, and the dies, 
plates and engraving's therefor, with the penalties 
provided in such statutes, are hereby extended 
and made applicable to postal savings depository 
business, and the forgery, counterfeiting, altera- 
tion, improper use or handling of postal savings 
depository blanks, forms, vouchers, accounts and 
records and the dies, plates and engravings there- 
for. 

Sec. 16. That the faith of the United States ia 
solemnly pledged to the payment of the deposits 
made in postal savings depository offices, with 
accrued interest thereon as herein provided. 

Sec. 17. That the final judgment, order or de- 
cree of any court of competent jurisdiction ad- 
judicating any right or interest in the credit of 
tny sums deposited by any person with a postal 
savings depository if the same shall not have been 
appealed from and the tim~ for appeal has ex- 
pired shall, upon submission to the postmaster- 
general of a copy of the same, duly authenticated 
in the manner provided by the laws of the United 
States for the authentication of the records and 
JudU-ial proceedings of the courts of any state or 
territory or of any possession subject to the juris- 
diction of the United States, when the same are 
proved or admitted within any other court within 
Ihe United States, be accepted and pursued by 
the board of trustees as conclusive of the title, 
right, interest or possession so adjudicated and 
any payment of said sum in accordance with such 
order, judgment or decree shall operate as a full 
and complete discharge of the United States from 
the claim cr demand of any person or persons to 
the same. [Approved, June 25, 1910.] 

ADMISSION OF NEW MEXICO AND ARIZONA. 

The qualified electors of the territory of New 
Mexico are authorized to vote for and choose dele- 
gates to form a constitutional convention for the 
purpose of framing a constitution for the proposed 
state of New Mexico. The convention shall con- 
sist of 100 delegates apportioned equitably among 
the several counties of the territory in accordance 
with the voting population, as shown by the vote 
for delegate in congress at the election of 1908. 

Within thirty days after the approval of this 
act the governor of the territory shall order an 
election of such delegates on a day specified, not 
earlier than sixty nor later than ninety days after 
the approval of the act. The election shall be 
conducted under the same rules as obtain in other 
elections in the territory. The delegates elected 
shall meet in the hall of the house of representa- 
tives in the capital of New Mexico at noon on 
the fourth Monday after their election and they 
shall receive compensation for the period they are 
actually in session, but not for more than sixty 
days in all. After organization they shall de- 
clare on behalf of the! people of the proposed state 
that they adopt the constitution of the United 
States, whereupon the convention shall form a 
constitution and provide for a state- government. 
The constitution shall be republican in form and 
make no distinction in civil or political rights on 
account of race or color, and shall not be repug- 
nant to the constitution of the United States and 
the principles of the declaration of independence. 

And the convention shall provide by an ordi- 
nance irrevocable without the consent of the peo- 
ple of the United States and of the said state: 

1. That perfect toleration of religious sentiment 
shall be secured, that polygamy and the sale of 
liquor to Indians shall be forever prohibited. 

2. That the people of the proposed state do 
agree and declare that they forever disclaim all 
right and title to the ungranted public lands lying 
within Its boundaries and to Indian lands acquired 
from the United States; that lands and other 
property belonging to nonresident citizens shall 
never be taxed at a higher rate than the lands 



and prooerty of residents; that no taxes shall be 
imposed upon lands or property of the United 
States. 

3. That the debts of the territory and of the 
counties thereof shall be assumed and paid by the 
state. 

4. That provision shall be made for the estab- 
lishment and maintenance of a system of public 
schools, open to all the children of the state and 
free from sectarian control, and that they shall 
be conducted in English. 

5. That the state shall never enact any law 
restricting the right of suffrage on account of 
race, color or previous condition of servitude, and 
that ability to read, write, speak and understand 
the English language sufficiently well to conduct 
the duties of the office without the aid of an in- 
terpreter shall be a necessary qualification for all 
state officers and members of the state legislature. 

6. That the capital of the state shall, until 
changed by the electors of the state voting at an 
election provided by the legislature for that pur- 
pose, be in the city of Santa Fe, but no election 
shall be called prior to Dec. 31, 1925. 

7. That there be and are reserved to the United 
States, with the full acquiescence of the state, all 
the rights and powers for carrying out the provi- 
sions of the act appropriating the receipts from 
the sale of public latods in certain states and ter- 
ritories to the construction of irrigation works. 

8. That when Indian lands are allotted, sold or 
disposed of, they shall be subject fo,r a period of 
twenty-five years to the laws of the United States 
prohibiting the introduction of liquor into the In- 
dian country. 

9. That the state and its people consent to all 
the provisions of this act concerning the lands 
granted or confirmed to the state, to the terms 
upon which they are made and the means of en- 
forcing such terms, as in this act provided. 

When the constitution shall be formed the con- 
vention shall provide for its submission to the 
people of New Mexico for ratification at an elec- 
tion to be held on a day not earlier than sixty 
nor later than ninety days after the convention 
adjourns. The returns shall be canvassed on the 
third Monday after the election. If the constitu- 
tion is rejected the governor shall order the con- 
stitutional convention to reassemble at a date not 
later than twenty days after he receives the docu- 
ments showing the rejection of the constitution 
and thereafter a new constitution shall be framed. 

When the constitution and such provisions there- 
of as have been separately submitted shall have 
been ratified by the people of New Mexico, a cer- 
tiflel copy of the same shall be submitted to the 
president of the United States and to congress for 
approval. If congress and the president approve 
the constitution and the separate provisions, or, 
if the president approves the same and congress 
fails to disapprove it during the next regular ses- 
sion thereof, then the president shall certify such 
facts to the governor of New Mexico, who shall 
within thirty days order an election for state and 
county officers, members of the legislature, mem- 
bers of congress and such other officers as are 
provided for in the state constitution. 

When the election has been held, the governor 
shall certify the result to the president of the 
United States, who thereupon shall issue his proc- 
lamation announcing the result of the election. 
Upon the issuance of this proclamation the pro- 
posed state of New Mexico shall be deemed ad- 
mitted by congress into the union on an equal 
footing with the other states. 

The usual provisions are made for setting aside 
certain lands for school and university purposes. 
The state, when admitted, shall constitute one 
judicial district, which shall be attached to the 
eighth judicial circuit. The Circuit and District 
courts shall be held at the capital of the state. 

The sum of $100.000 is appropriated for defraying 
the expenses incident to the elections and con- 
vention provided for in the act. 
ARIZONA. 

The sections of the act relating to the admission 
of Arizona are similar in nearly all respects to 
those concerning Now Mexico. The delegates to 
the constitutional convention shall number fifty- 
two. The capital shall be at Phoenix until changed 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



43 



at an election, which, however, cannot be held 
prior to Dec. 31, 1925. (Approved June 20, 1910.) 

PUBLICITY OF CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTIONS. 

The terra "political committee" in this act shall 
include the national committees of all political 
parties and the national congressional campaign 
committees of all political parties and all com- 
mittees, associations or organizations which shall 
in two or more states influence the result or at- 
tempt to influence the result of a congressional 
election. 

Kver"y political committee as defined in this act 
shall have a chairman and a treasurer. It shall 
be the duty of the treasurer to keep a detailed 
and exact account of all money or its equivalent 
received by or promised to such committee or any 
member thereof or by or to any person acting 
under its authority or in its behalf, and the name 
of every person, firm, association or committee 
from whom received and of all expenditures, dis- 
bursements and promises of payment or disburse- 
ment made by the committee or any member 
thereof, or by any person acting under its autho--- 
ity or in its behalf and to whom paid, distributed 
or disbursed. No officer or member of such com- 
mittee or other person acting under its authority 
or in its behalf shall receive any money or its 
equivalent or expend or promise to expend any 
money on behalf of such committee until after a 
chairman or treasurer of such committee shall 
have been chosen. 

Every payment exceeding $10 must be evidenced 
by a receipted bill stating the particulars of ex- 
pense and every such record or receipt shall be 
preserved for fifteen months after the election to 
which it relates. 

Whoever, acting for such political committee, 
whether a member thereof or otherwise, receives 
any contribution, payment, loan, gift, advance, 
deposit or promise of money or its equivalent 
shall, on demand, and in any event within five 
days after the receipt of such contribution, render 
to "the treasurer of the committee a detailed ac- 
count of the same, with the name and address 
from whom received, and the treasurer shall enter 
Ilie same in a ledger or record kept by him for 
that purpose. 

The treasurer of every such committee shall, 
within thirty days after the election at which 
representatives in congress were chosen in two or 
more states, file with the clerk in the house of rep- 
resentatives at Washington, D. O., an itemized, 
detailed statement, sworn to by the treasurer and 
conforming to the following section of this acr. 
The statement shall be preserved for fifteen 
months and shall be a part of the public records 
of his office and shall be open to public inspection. 

The statements required by the preceding section 
of the act shall include: 

1. The name and address of each person, firm, 
association or committee who or which has con- 
tributed, promised, loaned or advanced to such 
political committee, or any officer, member or 
agent thereof, either in one or more items, money 
or its equivalent of the aggregate amount or value 
of $]00 or more. 

2. The total sum contributed, promised, loaned 
or advanced to such political committee or to any 
officer, member or agent thereof, in amounts less 
than $100. 

3. The total sum of all contributions, promises, 
loans and advances received by such political com- 
mittee or any officer, member or agent thereof. 

4. The name and address of each person, firm, 
association or committee to whom such political 
committee or any officer, member or agent thereof 
has disbursed, distributed, contributed, loaned, ad- 
vanced or promised any sum of money or its 
equivalent of the amount or value of $10- or more 
and the purpose thereof. 

5. The total sum disbursed, distributed, contrib- 
uted, loaned, advanced or promised by such po- 
litical committee or any officer, member or agent 
thereof, where the amount or value of such dis- 
bursement, distribution, loan, advance or promise 
to any one person, firm, association or committeft 
in one or more, items is less than $10. 

6. The total sum disbursed, distributed, contrib- 
uted, loaned, advanced or promised by such polit- 



ical committee or any officer, member or agent 
thereof. 

Every person, firm, association or committee, 
except political committees as hereinbefore de- 
fined, that shall expend or promise any sum of 
money or other tiling of value amounting to $50 
or more for the purpose of influencing or control- 
ling in two or more states the result of an elec- 
tion at whiqh representatives to the congress of 
the United States are elected, unless he or It 
shall contribute the same to a political commit- 
tee as hereinbefore defined, shall file the state- 
ments of the same under oath in the office of the 
clerk of the house of representatives at Washing- 
ton, D. C., which statements shall be held by the 
clerk in all respects as required by this act. 

Any person may in connection with such elec- 
tion incur and pay from his own private funds for 
the purpose of influencing or controlling in two or 
more states the result of an election at which rep- 
resentatives to the congress of the United States 



sions of this actr. 

Nothing contained in this act shall limit or af- 
fect the right of any person to spend money for 
proper legal expenses in maintaining or contesting 
the results of any election. 

Every person willfully violating any of the pro- 
visions of this act shall upon conviction be fined 
not more than $1,000 or imprisoned not more than 
one year or both. [Approved June 25, 1910.] 

IN AID OF CONSERVATION. 

BONDS FOB IRRIGATION PKOJECTS. 

To enable the secretary of the interior to com- 
plete government reclamation projects heretofore 
begun, the secretary of the treasury is authorized 
to transfer from time to time to the credit of the 
reclamation fund authorized by the act of June 17. 
1902, such sum or sums, not exceeding in the ag- 
gregate $20,000,003. as the secretary of the interior 
may deem necessary to complete such reclamation 
projects and such extensions thereof as he may 
deem proper and necessary for the successful and 
profitable operation thereof, or to protect water 
rights pertaining thereto claimed by the United 
States. Such sum or sums are appropriated but no 
part of the appropriation shall be expended upon 
any existing project until it shall have been ex- 
amined and reported upon by a board of engineers 
of the army designated by the president, and until 
it shall be approved by the president. No portion 
of the appropriation shall be expended upon any 
new project. 

To provide the money for such advances to the 
reclamation fund, the secretary of the treasury is 
authorized to issue certificates of indebtedness, in 
denominations of $50 or multiples of that sum, 
redeemable at any time three years after date of 
issue and to bear interest not to exceed 3 per 
cent per annum. All citizens of the United States 
are to be given an equal opportunity to subscribe 
for the bonds. [Approved June 25, 1910.] 

WITHDRAWALS OP PUBLIC LANDS. 

The president may, at any time in his discre- 
tion, withdraw from settlement, location, sale or 
entry any of the public lands of the United States, 
including Alaska, and reserve the same for water- 
power sites, irrigation, classification of lands or 
other ptiMic purposes to be specified in the orders 
of withdrawals and such withdrawals shall remain 
in force until revoked by him or by an act of 
congress. All lands so withdrawn shall at all 
times be open to exploration, discovery, occupation 
and purchase, under the mining laws of the 
United States, so far as the same apply to min- 
erals other than coal, oil, gas nnd phosphates. 
Hereafter no forest reserve shall be created or 
any additions be made to those now existing in 
Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Colorado or 
Wyoming, except by act of congress. [Approved 
June 26, 1910.] 

TEMPORARY WITHDRAWALS OF PUBLIC LANDS. 

To aid in carrying out the purposes of section 4 
of the act of Aug. 18, 1894, making appropriations 
for the sundry civil expenses of the government 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



and for other purposes, it shall be lawful for the 
secretary of the Interior, upon application by the 
proper officer of any state or territory to which 
the section applies, to withdraw temporarily from 
settlement or entry areas for which the state or 
territory proposes to make application, pending the 
investigation and survey preliminary to the filing 
of maps and plats and application for segregation 
by the state or territory. If the state or territory 
does not present its application for segregation 
and maps and plats within one year after such 
temporary withdrawal the lands shall be restored 
to entry. [Approved March 15, 1910.] 

WHITE-SLAVE TRAFFIC ACT. 
Any person who shall transport or assist In any 
way in transporting, in interstate or foreign com- 
merce, any woman or girl for any immoral pur- 
pose shall be deemed guilty of a felony, and, upon 
conviction, shall be punished by a fine of not ex- 
ceeding $5,000 or by imprisonment of not more 
than flve years, or by both. Any person who 
shall knowingly induce any woman or girl under 
18 years of age to go from one state to any other 
state for an immoral purpose, and in furtherance 
of that purpose shall induce her to be carried as 
a passenger upon the line of any interstate rail- 
road, shall be deemed guilty of a felony, and, on 
conviction, be punished by a fine of not more than 
$10,000, or by imprisonment for a term of not more 
than ten years, or by both. The commissioner- 
general of immigration of the United States 5s 
designated as the authority to receive and central- 
ize information concerning the procuration of alien 
women and girls for immoral purposes, to exercise 
Bupervision over such women, establish their 
Identity and ascertain from them who Induced 
them to leave their native countries. Any person 
harboring for immoral purposes any alien woman 
or girl within three years after she shall have 
entered the United States must file with the com- 
missioner-general of Immigration a statement giv- 
ing all the facts as to port of entry, name, age, 
nationality, parentage, etc. Any such person fall- 
ing to file such statement' shall be deemed guilty 
of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of not more 
than $2,000 or by imprisonment of not exceeding 
two years, or by both. [Approved June 25, 1910.] 

IMMIGRATION LAW AMENDED. 

Section 2 of the act of Feb. 20, 1907, to regulate 
the immigration of aliens into the United States 
is amended so as to include among the excluded 
classes women and girls of immoral character or 
who are brought to this country for immoral pur- 
poses. Section 3 of the same act is amended so 
as to provide for the prosecution and punishment 
of any person importing any alien for immoral 
purposes and for the deportation of such alien. 
[Approved March 26, 1910.] 

EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY. 

The act entitled "An act relating to the liabil- 
ity of common carriers by railroad to their em- 
ployes in certain cases," approved April 22, 1908, 
is amended in section 6 so that the section reads: 

"That no action shall be maintained under this 
act unless commenced within two years from the 
jay the cause of action accrued. Under this act 
an action may be brought in a Circuit court of 
the United States, in the district of the residence 
of the defendant, or in which the cause of action 
arose, or in which the defendant shall be doing 
business at the time of commencing such action. 
The jurisdiction of the courts of the United States 
under this act shall be concurrent with that of 
the courts of the several states, and no case aris- 
ing under this act and brought in any state court 
cf x>mpetent jurisdiction shall be removed to any 
court of the United States." 

The act is further amended by adding the fol- 
lowing section: 

"That any right of action given by this act to 
a person suffering injury shall survive to his or 
her personal representative, for the benefit of the 
surviving widow or husband and children of such 
employe, and. if none, then of such employe's par- 
ents, and. if none, then of the next of kin de- 
pendent upon such employe, but in such cases 



there shall be only one recovery for the same In- 
jury." [Approved April 5, 1910. J 

COMMISSION CREATED. 

Resolved, That a commission be created consist- 
ing 1 of two members of the senate, to be appointed 
by the president of tho senate, and two members 
of the "house, to be appointed by the speaker 
thereof, together with two persons to be selected 
by the president of the United States, for the 
purpose of making a thorough investigation of the 
subject of employer's liability and workman's com- 
pensation, said commission to report through the 
president to congress not later than the first Mon- 
day in December, 1911. [Joint resolution, approved 
June 25, 1910.] 



RAILROADS TO REPORT ACCIDENTS. 
It shall be the duty of the general manager, 
superintendent or other proper officer of every 
common carrier engaged in interstate commerce to 
niake to the interstate-commerce commission, at 
its office in Washington, a monthly report, under 
oath, of all collisions, derailments or other acci- 
dents resulting !n injury to persons, equipment or 
roadbed, arising from the operation of such rail- 
road. Any common carrier failing to make such 
report within thirty days after the end of any 
month shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor 
end upon conviction shall be punished by a fine 
of not more than $100 for each offense and for 
every day during which it fails to make such re- 
port after the time specified. The interstate-com- 
merce commission shall have power to Investigate 
railroad accidents, and when It deems it of public 
Interest make reports giving the causes and mak- 
ing such recommendations as it may deem fit. 
Such reports shall be made public. [Approved 
May 6. 1910.] 

COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS. 
There Is created a permanent commission of fine 
arts to be composed of seven well-qualified judges 
of the fine arts, who shall be appointed by the 
president and shall serve four years each. Thi' 
duty of the commission shall be to advise upon 
the location of statues, fountains and monuments 
in the District of Columbia and upon the selection 
of models for statues, fountains and monuments 
erected under the authority of the United States 
end upon the selection of artists for the execution 
of the same. The commission shall also advise 
generally upon questions of art when required to 
do so by the president of the United States or by 
any committee of either house of congress. The 
commission shall have a secretary and such other 
assistance as the commission may authorize. To 
meet the expenses made necessary by the act an 
expenditure of not exceeding $10.000 a year is 
authorized. [Approved May 17, 1910.] 

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK. 

The tract of land In northern Montana lying be- 
tween the international boundary on the north, 
the Flathead river on the west, the middle fork 
of the Flnthead river and the Great Northern 
right of way on the south and the Blackfeet In- 
dian reservation on the east is withdrawn from 
settlement or disposal under the laws of the 
United States and is set anart as a public park 
or pleasure grouml for the benefit and enjoyment 
of the people of the United States under the name 
of "The Glacier National Park." The park shall 
be under the exclusive control of the secretary of 
the interior. [Approved May 11, 1910.] 

[The new national park covers the main range 
of the Rocky mountains between the Great North- 
ern railroad and Canada and includes some of the 
finest mountain scenery in the United States. The 
Sperry glacier and Lakes McDonald and St. Mary 
nre among the interesting features.] 

UNIVERSAL PEACE COMMISSION. 
Resolved. That a commission of flve members be 
appointed by the president of the United States to 
consider the expediency of utilizing existing In- 
ternational agencies for the purpose of limiting 
the armaments of the nations of the world by In- 
ternational agreement and of constituting the com- 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAE-BOOK FOR 1911. 



45 



btned navies of the world an international force 
for the preservation of universal peace and to 
consider and report upon any other means to di- 
minish the expenditures of government for mili- 
tary purposes and to lessen the probabilities of 
war: Provided, That the total expense authorized 
by this joint resolution shall not exceed the sum 
of $10,000 and that the said commission shall be 
required to make final report within two years 
from the date of the passage of this resolution. 
[Joint resolution approved June 25, 1?10.] 



BUREAU OP LIGHTHOUSES. 
There shall hereafter be in the department of 
commerce and labor a bureau of lighthouses and a 
commissioner of lighthouses, to be appointed by 
the president at a salary of $5,000 per annum. 
There shall also be a deputy commissioner at a 
salary of $4,000 per annum, a chief clerk, a chief 
constructing engineer, a superintendent of naval 
construction and such other employes as may from 
time to time be authorized by congress. All the 
employes of the old lighthouse board, except army 
and navy officers, are transferred to the new bu- 
reau. The commissioner of lighthouses, with the 
approval of the secretary of commerce and labor, 
as soon as practicable, shall rearrange the ocean, 
gulf and lake coasts of the United States, Porto 
Rico and the naval station in Cuba into not ex- 
ceeding nineteen lighthouse districts with an in- 
spector for each. [Approved June 17, 1910.] 

BUREAU OP MINES. 

There is established In the department of the In- 
terior a bureau to be called the bureau of mines 
and a director of the bureau, who shall be thor- 
oughly equipped for the duties of the office by 
technical education and experience. He Is to be 
appointed by the president and Is to have an an- 
nual salary of $6,000. It Is the province and duty 
of the bureau to Investigate mining methods, espe- 
cially In relation to the safety of miners, and the 
best means of preventing accidents. The secretary 
of the interior Is authorized to transfer to the 
new bureau from the United States geological sur- 
vey the supervision of the Investigations of struc- 
tural materials, the analyzing and testing of 
coals, lignites and other mineral fuel substances, 
and the investigation as to the causes of mine 
explosions. [Approved May 16, 1910.] 



RAISING THE MAINE. 

The secretary of war and the chief of engineers 
are authorized to provide with all convenient 
speed for the raising or the removal of the wreck 
of the United States battle ship Maine from the 
harbor of Havana. Cuba, and for the proper inter- 
ment of the bodies therein in Arlington cemetery, 
and the secretary of war is directed to remove the 
mast of the Maine and place the same on a proper 
foundation in Arlington National cemetery at or 
near the spot where the bodies of those who died 
through the wreck are interred: Provided, however, 
That the consent In proper form of the republic 
of Cuba shall be first obtained. The sum of $100,- 
000 is appropriated for the work. [Approved May 

9, 1910.] 

INCREASE OF THE NAVY. 

For the purpose of further Increasing the naval 
establishment, the president Is authorized (In 
naval appropriation bill) to have constructed two 
first-class battle ships to cost, exclusive of armor 
and equipment, not exceeding $6,000,000 each; two 
fleet colliers of fourteen knots trial speed when 
carrying not less than 12,500 tons of cargo and 
bunker coal, to cost not exceeding $1.000.000 each; 
four submarine torpedo boats to cost in the aggre- 
gate not exceeding $2,000,000, and six torpedo-boat 
destroyers having the highest practicable speed 
and to cost In all not to exceed $750,000 each. 
[Approved June 24, 1910.] 

SAFETY APPLIANCE ACT. 

This supplements the "safety appliance" acts of 
-March 2, 1893, April 1, 1896, and March 2, 1903, by 
requiring all cars to be provided with sill steps 
and efficient hand brakes. All cars requiring se- 
cure ladders and secure running boards must be 
eqnip'ped with such ladders and running boards 
and all cars having ladders must also be equipped 
with secure hand holds or grab irons on their roofs 
at the top of such ladders. [Approved April 14, 
1910. ] 

WIRELESS APPARATUS ON STEAMSHIPS. 

From and after July 1, 1911, every ocean-going 
steadier, foreign as well as American, carrying 
fifty or more persons, including passengers and 
crew, must be equipped with an efficient apparatus 
for radio-communication (wireless telegraphy), in 
charge of a person skilled In the use of such ap- 
paratus, bofore It Is permitted to leave any port 
of the United States. [Approved June 24, 1910.] 



APPROPRIATIONS BY 61ST CONGRESS-SECOND SESSION. 



TITLE OP ACT. 


Reported 
to house. 


Passed 
bouse. 


Reported 
to senate. 


Passed 
senate. 


Law 

1910-n. 


Law 

1209-10. 


Agriculture 


$13,417,136.00 

95,322,707.55 
3.986.981.41 
10,285,907.09 
5,617,200.00 
8,513,757.90 
33.897,815.00 
1,855,249.87 
129,037,602.93 
155,fi74.000.00 
239.812,195.00 
36.173.84fi.50 
111,804,838.82 


$13,330,276.0T 
95,297,707.5. r i 
3.731,981.41 
10.258,067.91 
5.B17,200.00 
8.798,478.00 
33.aT3.295.00 
1.855.249.87 
127.839,602.98 
155.C74.000.00 
243.907,020.01! 
85.881,746.60 
112.302.541.8i 


f!3,512.636.00 
95.410.5fi7.55 
4,119.481.41 
10.946.9ffl.99 
5.817.200.00 
9.920.934. (8 
34.<V44.357.00 
1.85fi.49.87 
130.737,934.38 
155.758,000.00 
743.907 .020.00 
41.732.313.50 
117.408.970.02 


113,522.636.00 
95,440.567.55 
4,166.081.41 
11.012.960.99 
5.S17.200.00 
9,981.984.68 
34.207,017.00 
1.856.649.87 
13Ui79.85438 
155.758.000.00 
243.907,020.00 
41,819,113.50 
117,618.320.02 


$13,487,636.00 
95,440.567.50 
4,116,081.41 
10.608,045.99 

5.617.2(10.00 
9 266..v.>s.no 
34.158,767.00 
1.856,249.87 

I3i.s50,s>4.38 

155.758.000.00 
243.907.020.00 
41.329.113.50 
114.080.101.82 


$12,995,036.00 
10U95.&83.34 
3,613,861.67 
10.609,531.49 
8.170.111.00 
11,854,982.48 
32,007.019.00 
2.631,521.33 
136,935.19(1.05 
160.908.000.00 
234.IW2.370.00 
9.435,750.00 
137.696,623.36 




District of Columbia 
Fortification 


Indian 
Leeisl ative, etc 
Military academy 
Navy 


Postofflce 
River and harbor 
Sundry civil 


Total 
Urgent deficiency, 1910 
Deficiency, 1910 


844,399,238.97 
5.013.836.03 
5,737,412.09 


847.807,167.07 
5,11,325.78 
6,364.601.47 


S65.203.025.40 
5.713.124.79 
7,946.946.58 


866.737,355.40 
5.768.409.65 
8.338.490.14 


860,976.165.52 
5.767,699.22 
6.954,986 58 


862,735,918.72 
} 20,310,339.92 


Total 


855,150,487.09 


859,188,094.27 


878.863,096.77 


880.844,255.19 


873,698.851.32 
2.500,000.00 
20.000.000.00 


883.046.258.64 
1,259.515.96 




Advances to reclamation fnnd. . . . 




















896 198 851 32 


884.305.774.60 
160,096,082.52 


Permanent annual 










130.934,595.12 


Grand total 










1,027,133.446.44 


1,044,401.857.1 



Miscellaneous appropriations (thirteenth census, etc., for 1910), first session, 61st congress, $11,261,410.76. 
TOTALS FOR LAST SIX CONGRESSES. 



Congress. Years. 



Amount. 



55th 1899-1900 $1,566,890,016.28 

56th 1901-1902 1,440,489,438.87 



Years. Amount. 
.1903-1904 $'.,553,683.002.57 
58th 1905-1906 1,600,053,544.80 



Congress. 
**, 



Congress. Years. Amount. 

59th 1907-1908 $1 .799.537,864.70 

60th 1908-1909 2,052,411,841.'i9 



46 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



ILLINOIS LEGISLATION IN 1910. 



[Summary of important laws passed by the 46ta 
Dec. 14, 1909, and euding March 2, 191C.] 

EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY COMMISSION. 
A commission of twelve members is created, to 
b" known as the ciuploj ers' liability commission, to 
be apuointed by the governor and to consist of six 
employers of labor and six persons who are eitner 
employes or ar..> known to represent the Interests 
of workmen. The duty of the commission shall be 
to investigate the problems of industrial accidents, 
and especially the law of liability for injuries or 
death suffered in the course of industrial employ- 
ment in this state and other states and countries, 
and to inquire into the most equitable method 
of providing for compensation for such accidents. 
It -shall report its conclusions to the governor and 
submit drafts of such bill or bills as may be 
deemed appropriate. The members are to be paid 
at the rate of $5 a day each while actually en- 
gaged in the work of the commission. [Approved 
March 10, 1910.] 

MINE-RESCUE STATIONS. 

Fo- the purpose of fighting mine flres and saying 
lives and property jeopardized by flies, explosions 
or other accidents in the coal mines, in Illinois, 
there shall be constructed and maintained at pub- 
lic expense three rescue stations to serve the 
Northern, central and southern coal fields of the 
state. The governor shall appoint a commission of 
seven members, including two coal-mine operators, 
two coal miners, one state mine inspector, one 
representative of the University of Illinois mining 
department and one representative of the federal 
organization for the investigation of mine acci- 
dents. The members, except state and federal of- 
ficers, are to be paid $10 per day 1 for services ren- 
dered, not to exceed twenty-five days in any one 
year, and all the members are to be paid their ac- 
tual e>- penses. The commission shall secure by 
purchase or otherwise sites for the rescue stations, 
temporary and permanent quarters and suitable 
equipment for the work, the cost of the service to 
July 1. 1911, not to exceed $75,000. The state archi- 
tect shall furnish plans for the buildings required 
by the commission. The commission shall appoint 
a' manager for the three stations and the manager 
shall appoint for each station a superintendent 
and im assistant, each appointee serving for two 
years. The manager shall receive $250 a month, the 
superintendents $125 a month each and the as- 
sistants $75 a month each, all having their 
traveling expenses paid. Whenever the manager or 
the superintendent at any station shall be notified 
that an explosion or accident requiring his services 
has occurred at any mine in the state, he shall 
proceed immediately -with suitable equipment and 
superintend the work of the rescue corps in sav- 
ing life and property; he shall have authority over 
the mining property to such an extent as is neces- 
sary for the protection of human life during such 
time as the rescuers are under ground. [Approved 
March 4, 1910. J 

COMMISSION FORM OF GOVERNMENT. 
The act entitled "An act to provide for the in- 
corporation of cities and villages" is amended 
by adding an article to be known as article XIII. 
It provides that all cities and villages of Illinois 
not exceeding 200.000 in population may adopt the 
municipal form of government by proceeding as re- 
quired by the amended law. Whenever the elec- 
tors of any city or village equal in number to 
one-tenth of the votes cast for all the candidates 
for mayor or president Of the board of trustees at 
the last preceding city or village election shall 
petition tho judge of the County court of the 
county in which the city or village, or the greater 
part of it. is located to submit to a vote the 
proposition for the commission form of govern- 
ment, it shall be the duty of the judge to submit 
such proposition to a special election to be held 
within sixty days, or to a general election if it 
occurs within that time. If a majority of the 
votes cast upon such proposition shall be in favor 
of its adoption, the provisions of the act shall 



general assembly at the special session beginning 

thereby be adopted by such city or village and 
shall be in full force and effect. 

ELECTION OF OFFICERS. 

On the third Tuesday in April, 1911. and quad- 
rennially thereafter, there shall be held a general 
municipal election at which there shall be elected 
a mayor and four commissioners without regard to 
wards. All divisions into wards of such munici- 
palities as adopt the act shall be discontinued 
and the officers shall be nominated and elected at 
largs. The mayor and commissioners elected under 
the provisions of this act shall be known as the 
council and shall 'hold their respective offices for 
the term of four years. Vacancies are to be filled 
by appointment by the remaining members of the 
council. All candidates to be voted for at elec- 
tions at which a mayor and four commissioners 
are to he elected shall be nominated by a primary 
election from the city or village at large. Candi- 
dates for these offices are required to file prior tc' 
such primary election statements that they are duly 
qualified to hold such offices and petitions from at 
least twenty-five qualified voters requesting such 
candidacy. The ballots at the primary shall have 
no party, platform or principle designated, nor 
shall any circle be printed at the head. The two 
candidates receiving the highest number of votes 
for mayor shall be the candidates whose names 
shall be placed upon the ballot at the election 
and the eight candidates receiving the highest 
number of votes for commissioners, or all such 
candidates if less than eight, shall be placed upon 
the ballot for commissioners at such municipal 
election. Names of candidates may be written in 
the blanks provided for the punwse on the mu- 
nicipal election ballots. The ballots to be used at 
the election are lo be similar to those at the 
primary and are to be without party designations 
and without a circle at the head. The names are 
lo be arranged alphabetically with squares oppo- 
site each, the words "Vot* for one" appearing 
above the list of candidates for mayor and "Vote 
for four" above the list of candidates for commis- 
sioners. 

POWEBS OF THE COTJNCIL. 

Every city or village adopting the commission 
form of government shall be governed by a coun- 
cil, consisting of the mayor and four commission- 
ers, each of whom shall have the right to vote on 
all questions coming before the council. Three 
members shall constitute a quorum. The mayor 
shall preside at all meetings. He shall have no 
power to veto any measure, motion, resolution r 
ordinance, but all such measures must be signed 
by him or by two commissioners inn be recorded. 
The council shall have and exercise all the execu- 
tive and legislative pcwers and duties now had 
and exercised by the mayor, city council, presi- 
dent and board of trustees of villages, board of 
library trustees, city clerk, city attorney, city en- 
gineer, city treasurer, city comptroller and all 
other executive, legislative and admiristrative of- 
ficers in cities and villages incorporated under the 
general incorporation law of Illinois, except that 
the board of local improvements shall remain a 
teparate and distinct body. Certain park ind 
driveway officers and school officials are also ex- 
cepted. The executive and administrative powers, 
authority and duties shall be distributed among 
five departments, as follows: 

1. Department of public affairs. 

2. Department of accounts and finances. 

3. Department of public health and safety. 

4. Department of streets and public improve- 
ments. 

5. Department of public property. 

The mayor shall be commissioner of public af- 
fairs and superintendent of that department, and 
the council shall designate by a majority vote one 
commissioner to be commissioner of accounts and 
finances, who shall be superintendent of that de- 
partment; one to be commissioner of public health 
find safety, who shall be superintendent of that 
department; one to be commissioner of streets and 
public improvements, who shall be superintendent 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAE-BOOK FOE 1911. 



47 



of that department, and who, ox offlcio, shall be 
coronissioner of public works; and one to be com- 
missioner of public property, and as such to re 
superintendent of that department. The council 
may, in its discretion, elect a city clerk, corpora- 
tion counsel, city attorney, treasurer, comptroller, 
city physician, chief of police, flre chief, harbor 
master, market master, three librnry trustees and 
the necessary officers to till the cilices created by 
the local improvement act; provided, that the 
commissioner of streets shall be ex officio the com- 
missioner of public works and a member of the 
board of local improvements. Any officer or em- 
ploye elected or appointed by the council may be 
removed by a majority vote of tne council. The 
council sliall have the power, by ordinance, to 
create, fill and discontinue offices and employment 
other thim those herein prescribed recording to the 
needs of the city or village. 

civil, SEBVICB. 

In all cities and villages which have adopted or 
may hereafter adopt the civil-service act, the 
council shall not have the power to appoint or 
discharge any employe except in accordance with 
that act. The council shall have the right to ap- 
point the heads of all principal departments, sub- 
ordinate to the departments, provided for by the net. 

SALARIES. 

The mayor and each of the commissioners shall 
have an office in the municipal building or rooms, 
and shall devote such time to the duties of their 
respective offices as a faithful discharge thereof 
may require. In cities of 20,000 population they 
shall give at least six hours daily to their official 
duties. Their annual salaries shall be fixed by 
the council according to the population of the city 
or village, the salary of the mayor ranging from 
|50 to $6,000 a year and the salary of each com- 
missioner from $40 to $5,000 a year. 

MEETINGS AND ORDINANCES. 

Regular meetings of the council shall be held 
once a week. The mayor shall preside and shall 
supervise all departments. The commissioner of 
accounts and finance shall be vice-president of the 
council, and in case of vacancy in the office of 
mayor or in his absence shall act as mayor. Every 
ordinance appropriating any money or ordering any 
street improvement 01 sewer or making any con- 
tract or granting any franchise shall remain on 
file for public inspection, in its complete form, at 
least one week before its final passage. 

Every grant of any franchise to use the street?, 
alleys or public places for railways, gas. water- 
works, electric light or other public utilities with- 
in the city or village must be approved by a 
majority of the electors voting thereon at a gea- 
eral or special election. 

BECALL OF ELECTIVE OFFICERS. 
Every incumbent of an elective office is subjest 
to recall and remeval at any time by the elec- 
tors. The procedure to effect a removal is sub- 
stantially as follows: A petition signed by elec- 
tors equal in number to 75 per cent of the total 
vote for mayor at the last preceding general mu- 
nicipal election shall be filed with the city or 
village clerk,, which petition shall contain a gen- 
eral statement in not more than 200 words of tho 
ground on which the removal or recall Is sought. 
All objections to such petition shall be filed and 
determined within ten days after the filing of the 
same. The petition being sufficient, the clerk 
Bhall immediately submit the samo to the coun- 
cil and the council shall fix the date for holding 
an election to fill the vacancy caused by the recall 
or removal. If the officer sought to be recalled 
shal' resign within five days after the petition 
is filed, the council shall appoint his successor 
and no election shall be held. No recall petition 
shall be filed against any officer until he has been 
In office at least a year. 

INITIATIVE. 

Any proposed ordinance may be submitted to the 
ccurcil by petition signed by electors equal In 
number to 25 per cent of all the votes cast for the 
candidates for mayor at the last preceding ije.n- 
eril municipal election. The council shall either 
pa^js such ordinance within thirty flays or, if so 
requested in the petition, submit the proposition 



to a general or special election. If a majority 
of the electors vote in favor of the ordinance it 
shall become a valid and binding ordinance, which 
cannot be repealed except by a vote of the people. 

REFERENDUM. 

No ordinance passed by the council, except when 
otherwise required by the general laws of the 
state or by the provisions of this act, except an 
ordinance for the immediate preservation of the 
public peace, health or safety, which contains a 
statement of its urgency, shall go into effect until 
thirty days from its final passage, and if within 
that time 'a petition signed by electors equal In 
number to at least 10 per cent of the entire vote 
cast for all the candidates for mayor at the last 
preceding general election, protesting against the 
passage of such ordinance, be p-esented to the 
council, the ordinance shall be suspended from go- 
ing into operation, and it shall be the duty of the 
council to reconsider such ordinance, and If the 
same is not entirely repealed the council shall 
submit the ordinance to the voters for approval or 
rejection by a majority vote. [Approved March 
9, 1910.] 



PRIMARY-ELECTION LAW. 

[House bill No. 40. Approved March 9, 1910.'] 

Section 1 provides that the nomination of all 
candidates for all elective state, congressional, 
county, city and village (including officers of the 
Municipal court of Chicago), town and judicial of- 
ficers, members of the state board of equalization, 
clerks of the Appellate courts, trustees of sani- 
tary districts and for the election of precinct and 
state central commit teemen, by all political par- 
ties, shall be made in the manner provided in 
this act. The act does not apply to the nomina- 
tion of candidates for electors of president and 
vice-president of the United States, trustees of 
the University of Illinois or to township and 
school elections. 

Sec. 2. Political parties which at the general 
election mxt preceding a primary polled more 
than 2 per cent of the entire vote cast within the 
state, congressional district, county, city, village, 
town or other political subdivision are declared to 
be political parties within such divisions and shall 
nominate all candidates provided for in the act 
under the provisions thereof. 

Sec. 3. In determining the total vote of a party 
the test shall be the total vote cast by such party 
for its candidate who received the greatest num- 
ber of votes. 

?ec. 4. This specifies how certain words and 
phrases used in the act shall be construed. 

Sec. 5. The primary shall be held at the regular 
polling places established for general elections. 

DATES OF PRIMARIES. 

Sec. 6. A primary shall be held on the second 
Tuesday in April in every year in which officers 
are to be voted for on the first Tuesday after the 
first Monday in November of such year, for the 
nomination of candidates for such offices as are to 
be voted for at such November election, and shall 
be known as the April primary. 

A primary shall be held on the second Tuesday 
In April in any year in which the judges of the 
Supreme court, judges of the Circuit court and 
judges of the Superior court of Cook county fire 
to be elected on the first Monday of June of such 
year for the nomination of candidates for such of- 
fices, respectively. 

A primary shall be held on the last Tuesday In 
February in each year for the nomination of such 
officers as are to be voted for on the first Tuesday 
of April of such year. 

A primary shall be held on the second Tuesday 
in March in each year for the nomination of su :h 
officers as are to be voted for on the third Tues- 
day in April of such year. 

A primary for the nomination of all other of- 
ficers, nominations for which are required to be 
made ui'der the provisions of the act. shall be 
held three weeks preceding the date of the gen- 
eral election for such offices, respectively. 

The polls shall be open from 6 o'clock a. m. to 
5 o'clock p. m. 

Sec. 7. Any person entitled to vote at such 
primary shall be entitled to absent himself from 



48 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



his work for two hours between the opening and 
closing of the polls without incurring loss of 
wages or salary, providing application, shall have 
been made on the preceding day. The employer 
may specify the hours. 

COMMITTEES. 

Sec. 8. The following committees shall consti- 
tute the central or managing committees* of each 
political party. A Etate central committee, a con- 
gressional committee for each congressional dis- 
trict, a county central committee for each coun- 
ty, a city central committee for each city or vil- 
lage and a precinct committee for each precinct. 
A political party may, however, elect or appoint 
other committees in accordance with its practice. 

Sec. 9. (1) The state central committee shall 
be composed of one member from each congres- 
sional district and shall be elected as follows: 
At the April primary each primary elector may 
vote for one candidate of his party for member ot 
the state central committee for the congressional 
district in which he resides. The state central 
committee of each political party shall be com- 
posed of members elected from the several con- 
gressional districts of the state and of no others. 

(2) At the April primary each primary elector 
may write or attach in the space left on the pri- 
mary ballot for that purpose the name of one 
qualified primary elector of his party In the pre- 
cinct for member of his political party precinct 
committee. The one having the highest number of 
votes shall be such coinmitteeman. 

(3) The county central committee of each polit- 
ical party shall consist of the various precinct 
committees of such party in the county. 

.(4) The congressional committees of each polit- 
ical party shall be composed of the chairman of 
the county central committee of each of the coun- 
ties composing the congressional district, except 
that in congressional districts wholly within tho 
territorial limits of one county or partly within 
two counties, the members of the precinct com- 
mittees residing within the congressional district 
shall compose the congressional committee. 

(5) The city central committee of each political 
party shall be composed of the precinct committee- 
men of such party residing in such city. 

(6) Each committee shall have the powers usu- 
ally exercised by such committees not inconsistent 
with the provisions of this act. 

(7) The old political committees are recognized, 
and authorized to continue their duties until the 
new committees are chosen. 

CONVENTIONS. 

Sec. 10. (a) On the first Monday after the April 
primary the county central committee of each po- 
litical party shall meet at the county seat and 
organize, such meeting to be called the county con- 
vention. The county cenvention of each political 
party shall choose delegates to the congressional 
and state conventions of its party. Only precinct 
cominitteemen residing within a congressional dis- 
trict shall take part in the selection of delegates 
to a congressional convention. Each delegate to 
the county convention shall have one vote and one 
additional vote for each fifty or major fraction 
thereof of his party as cast in his precinct at ihe 
last general election. 

(b) All congressional conventions shall be held 
on the first Wednesday after the first Monday 
next succeeding the April primary. The congres- 
sional convention of each political party shall have 
power to select delegates to national nominating 
conventions and to recommend to the state conven- 
tion of its party the nomination of candidate or 
candidates from such congressional district for 
elector or electors of president a.nd vice-president 
of the United States. 

(c) All state conventions shall be held on the 
first Friday after the first Monday next succeed- 
ing the April primary. The state convention of 
each political party shall have power to make 
nominations of candidates for tho electors of 
president and vice-president of the United States, 
and for trustees of the University of Illinois, to 
adopt any party platform and 1 to select delegates 
and alternates to the national nominating cou- 
vtentions. 

(d) Each convention may perform all other func- 



tions' Inherent to such political organization and 
not Inconsistent with this act. 

(e) At least thirty-three days before the April 
primary the state and congressional committees, re- 
spectively, of each political party shall file a call 
for the state and congressional conventions, giving 
the time and place and the number of delegates to 
which each county or political subdivision is en- 
titled. 

Sec. 11. In cities having minority representation 
in the city council, the city central committee 
shall, at least thirty days prior to the primary, 1x 
the number of candidates for alderman in each 
of the wards of their city to be nominated by 
their party at the primary- for the nomination of 
candidates for city offices. In all primaries for the 
domination of candidates for aldermen under 
minority representation, each qualified minority 
elector may cast as many votes for one candidate 
as there are candidates to be nominated, or may 
distribute the same among the candidates as ho 
shall see fit, and the candidate highest In votes 
shall be declared nominated. 

Sec. 12. At least twenty days before each pri- 
mary the county clerk or the city, village or town 
or other clerk whose duty it is to give notice of 
general elections, shall prepare and post notices 
as to the time and place of holding such primary, 
the hours during which the polls are open, the of- 
fices for which candidates are to be nominated and 
the political parties entitled to participate therein. 

PRIMARY JUDGES AND CLERKS. 

Sec. 13. The judges of general elections are con- 
stituted the judges of primary elections. 

Sec. 14. It is made the duty of judges of general 
elections to act as judges of primary elections un- 
til their successors are appointed. 

Sec. IB. If one of the primary judges be absent 
or refuses to act. the judges present shall appoint 
some qualified elector to act in his place; if two 
judges are absent the vacancies shall be filled in 
the same manner; if all three judges are absarit, 
the primary electors present shall select three of 
their number to act as judges. 

Sec. 16. The primary judges in each precinct, 
except in cities having a board of election com- 
missioners, shall select three electors to serve as 
primary clerks, but not more than two persons of 
the same political party shall serve as clerks in 
the same precinct. In cities having election com- 
missioners, the regularly appointed clerks of elec- 
tion shall act as primary clerks. 

Sec. 17. This prescribes the form of oath to be 
taken by primary judges and clerks. 

Sec. 18. In the absence of a notary public or 
justice of the peace the judges may administer the 
oath to each other and the clerks. 

Sec. 19. Primary judges and clerks, except as 
otherwise provided, shall have the same powers 
and perform the same duties as judges and clerks 
of general elections. 

Sec. 20. Primary judges and clerks shall receive 
the same pay as judges and clerks under the elec- 
tion laws of the state. 

CHALLENGEBS. 

Sec. 21. The precinct committeeman of eaeli 
party may appoint in writing two party agents or 
representatives with alternates to act as chal- 
lengers for their respective parties. Such chal- 
lengers shall be protected in the discharge of their 
duties by the judges and shall be permitted to re- 
main within the polling place in such a position 
as will enable them to see each person as he of- 
fers to vote. 

POLLING BOOTHS. 

Bee. 22. The officers whose duty it Is to provide 
polling places for general elections shall provide in 
each such place properly equipped booths for the 
primary elections, enabling voters to prepare their 
ballots screened from observation. Ballot boxes 
are to be in plain view. The voting booths shall 
be not less than one for every seventy-five voters 
or fraction thereof. No person shall do any elec- 
tioneering on primary day within any polling place 
or within 100 feet of any such polling place. 

Sec. 23. Primary ballot boxes shall be furnishe'.T 
in the same manner and of the same style as 
those used at general elections. 

Sec. 24. All the necessary primary poll booka 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



40 



and other supplies shall be furnished by the same 
authorities who furnish such supplies at general 
elections. 

Sec. 25. The expense of conducting primaries 
shall be paid by the same authorities as in the 
case of elections. 

Sec. 26. This prescribes the form of the primary 
poll books. 

Sec. 27. (Prescribes the form of the tally sheets. 
PETITIONS. 

Sec. 28. The name of no candidate for nomina- 
tion for state central committeemau shall be placed 
on the primary ballot unless a petition for nomi- 
nation shall have been filed on his behalf. The 
form of the petition is prescribed in detail. Pe- 
titions for nomination shall be signed: 

(a) If for a state office, by not less than 1.000 
nor more than 2,000 primary electors of his party. 

(b) If for a congressional office, by at least 
one-half of 1 per cent of the qualified primary 
electors of his party in his congressional district. 

(c) If for a judicial office, by at least one-half 
of 1 per cent of the qualified electors in the dlc- 
trict 

(d) If for a county office, by at least one-half 
of 1 per cent of the qualified primary electors of 
his party cast at the last preceding general elec- 
tion In his county; If for the nomination for 
county commissioner of Cook county, then by at 
least one-half of 1 per cent of the qualified pri- 
mary electors of his party in his county in tho 
division in which such person Is a candidate for 
nomination. 

(e) If for a city or village office, to be filled by 
the electors of the entire village, by at least one- 
half of 1 per cent of the qualified primary electors 
of his party in his city or village? it for alderman, 
by at least one-half of 1 per cent of the voters of 
his party in his ward. 

(f) If for state central commJtteeman, by it 
least 100 of the primary electors of his party of 
his congressional district. 

(g) If for a candidate for trustee of a sanitary 
district, by at least one-half of 1 per cent of the 
primary electors of his party from such sanitary 
district. 

(h) If for a candidate for clerk of the Appel- 
late court, by at least one-half of 1 per cent of 
the primary electors of his party of the district. 

(i) If for any other office, by ut least ten pri- 
mary electors of his party of the district or divi- 
sion for which nomination is made. 

Sec. 29. Any candidate for United States sen- 
ator may have his name printed upoo the primary 
ballot of his party by filing with the secretary of 
state not less than thirty days prior to the April 
primary a petition signed by not less than 3,000 
primary electors, nor more than 5,000 members of 
the party of which he is a candidate. The vote 
upon candidates for United States senator, however, 
shall be for the sole purpose of ascertaining the 
sentiment of the voters of the respective parties 
in the state as a whole and not by senatorial dis- 
tricts. 

Sec. 30. This prescribes the manner of filing all 
petitions for nominations. Where the nomination 
is for a state, congressional, judicial or Appellate 
court office or for any office in a district involving 
more than one county, the petition is to be filed 
with the secretary of state; in other cases it is to 
be filed with the county, city or village clerk, as 
the case may be. 

Sec. 31. Not less than twenty days prior to the 
primary the secretary of state shall certify to the 
county clerk of each county the names of all can- 
dates whose petitions have been filed with him 
and who are to be voted for in such county. 

PRIMARY BALLOTS. 

Sec. 32. The county clerk and the city, village 
and town clerk, as the case may be, shall prepare 
and have printed the primary ballot of each polit- 
ical party for each precinct in his respective- 
county, city, village or town. 

See. 33. It is made the ditty of the county clerk 
of each county to have printed upon the primary 
ballot of each party for each precinct in his coun- 
ty the name of each candidate whose petition has 
been filed in his office or whose name has been 
certified to him In- the secretary of state. It 



shall be the duty of the city, village or -town 
clerk, as the case may be, to have printed upon 
the primary ballot the name of each candidate 
whose petition has been filed In his office. 

Sec. 34. The primary ballot of each political 
party shall be printed upon paper of uniform qual- 
ity and size, but the primary ballot of no two 
parties shall be of the same color. 

Sec. 35. This prescribes the arrangement of 
names on the primary ballots, the manner In 
which they are to be printed and other details. 
The name of each office to be filled shall be print- 
ed in capital letters and in the order of its im- 
portance, beginning with that of United Statea 
senator. The names of candidates are to be ar- 
ranged in the order in which their petitions were 
filed. 

Sec. 36. This prescribes the designating worda 
to be printed on the back of each primary ballot. 

Sec. 37. Specimen ballots of each political party 
are to be delivered to primary judges not less than 
five days before the opening of the primary, which 
ballots shall be posted at the polling place. They 
are to be different in texture and color from the 
official ballots. 

Sec. 38. The official primary ballots are to be 
delivered to the primary judges not less than 
twelve hours before the opening of the polls, 100 
ballots being supplied for each 50 votes at the* 
preceding election. 

Sec. 39. The official ballots shall be put in sep- 
arate staled packages with marks on the outside 
showing for what precinct they are intended and 
the number of ballots inclosed. A receipt for the- 
same shall be given by the primary judge to whom 
they are delivered. 

Sec. 40. The officer charged with printing the 
primary ballots shall keep on hand an extra supply 
of ballots for each party and upon a written re- 
quest by the judges shall furnish as many extra 
ballots as may be required. 

METHOD OF VOTING. 

Sec. 41. The opening of the polls shall be pro- 
claimed by one of the primary judges. Half an 
hour before the closing of the polls proclamation 
shall be made in like manner that the polls will 
be closed in half an hour. 

Sec. 42. .Before the voting begins the ballot box 
shall be opened and shown to those present to be 
empty, after which it shall be locked and the key 
delivered to one of the primary judges. 

Sec. 43. Every person having resided in the 
state one year, in the county ninety days and in 
the prtcinct thirty days next preceding the pri- 
mary, who was an elector in this state on the 
first Jay of April, 1848, or obtained a certificate 
of naturalization in this state prior to Jan. 1. 
1870, or who shall be a male citizen of the United 
States above the age of 21, shall be entitled to 
vote at such primary. The following regulations 
shall be applicable to such primaries: 

No person shall be entitled to vote at a primary 

(a) Unless he declares his party affiliations aa 
required by this act; 

(b) Who shall have signed the petition for 
nomination of a candidate of any party with 
which he does not affiliate, when such candidate is 
to be voted for at such primary; or 

(d) If he shall have voted at a primary of an- 
other political party within a period of two years 
next preceding such primary. Participation in a pri- 
mary of a political party which is such within a 
city only and is entitled to make nominations for 
city offices only shall not disqualify such elector 
from participating in other primaries of his party. 
In cities having a board of election commissioners 
only voters registered as herein provided shall be 
entitled to- vote at such primary. The registration 
books prepared for and used at the election then 
next preceding shall be used for the primary, and 
any person therein registered shall be entitled to 
vote at the primary unless he shall have removed 
from the precinct or become otherwise disquali- 
fied. Any person whose name is not on the regis- 
try books who is or shall at or before the primary 
become a primary elector in the precinct in which 
he desires to vote, shall be entitled to vote l>y 
filing with the election commissioners, twenty daya 
before the primary, an affidavit or affirmation 
specifying the facts. His name shall then be 



50 



CIIICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



placed in the original registration looks. Any pri- 
mary elector may, on the eleventh and twelfth days 
immediately preceding the primary, file an appli- 
cation to ha/ve the name of any person entered on 
the registration books by affidavit erased there- 
from on the ground that he is not a legal pri- 
mary elector of the precinct. Rules for passing 
upon such applications by the election commis- 
sioners and by the County court upon the applica- 
tions of persons whose names have been stricken 
from the registry lists are given. The section 
concludes : 

"It is the intent and meaning of this section 
that all primary electors in any and all precincts, 
not already registered, in which they are or will 
be legally qualified to vote on the day of the pri- 
mary, may be given an opportunity to have theii 
names placed upon the registry books of the pre- 
cinct in which they are, or will be, qualified to 
vote on the day of the primary, and this section 
shall be liberally construed to effectuate such In- 
tent." 

[The primary law of 1908 was declared invalid 
by the state Supreme court in part because of its 
registration requirements, which, it was asserted, 
deprived constitutionally qualified voters of their 
right to vote at primaries.] 

\Sec. 44. Any person desiring to vote at a pri- 
mary shall state his name, residence and party 
affiliations to the primary judges, one of whom 
shall announce the same in a distinct tone of 
voice. If the person is not challenged he shall 
be given a ballot of his party. If a person Is chal- 
lenged he shall not be given a ballot until he shall 
have established his right to vote. 

Sec. 45. Whenever a person offering to vote at 
a primary Is challenged he shall make an affidavit 
showing that he is qualified to vote. He must 
also present the affidavit of one householder in the 
precinct declaring that the person so challenged Is 
duly qualified. The forms of these affidavits are 
giv^n. 

Sec. 46. Prescribes the manner In which a pri- 
mary elector is to mark his ballot. This is done 
In the usual way by making a cross in the square 
in front of the name of each candidate of the 
voter's choice for each office to be filled. 

Sc. 47. Before leaving the booth, the primary 
elector shall fold his ballot so as to ' conceal the 
marks thereon and hand it to the primary judge, 
who shall deposit it in the ballot box. The pri- 
mary clerk snail then enter In the primary poll 
book the name of the primary elector, his resi- 
dence and party affiliation. 

Sec. 48. Any elector unable to read English or 
who is physically unable to mark his ballot shall, 
upon request, be assisted in the same manner as 
is provided for by the general election laws. 

Sec. 49. After the opening of the polls no ad- 
journment shall be taken until the canvass of all 
the votes is completed and the returns are sealed. 

CANVASS OF VOTES. 

Sec 50. The returns shall be canvassed in the 
room where the primary is held and the primary 
judges shall not allow the ballot box, ballots, poll 
book or tally sheets to be removed until the can- 
vass is completed. 

Sec. 51. Relates to defective, unused and spoiled 
ballots and their disposition. 

Sec. 62. This relates to the method of canvass- 
ing the primary votes. 

Sec. 53. As soon as the ballots have been can- 
vassed, the primary clerks shall foot up the tally 
sheets so as to show the total number of votes 
cast toe each candidate and certify the same to 
r-e correct. Thereupon the primary judges shall 
enter the result in the poll books in a form which 
is specified. 

Sec. 54. After the votes of a political party have 
been counted, the tally sheets footed and the entry 
made in the poll book the ballots shall be strung 
upon a strong thread, separately for each politi- 
cal party in the order read, and shall then be 
sealed in an envelope, properly indorsed. 

Soc. 55. The poll books, tally sheets and ballots, 
enveloped, sealed and indorsed, shall be put into 
the hrnds of the primary judges, who shall, with- 
in forty-eight hours thereafter, deliver them to 
the clerk from whom the primary ballots wore ob- 



tained and who shall keep the same for three 
months. 

CERTIFICATES OF NOMINATION. 

Sec. 56. As soon as the complete returns are de- 
livered to the proper clerk they shall be can- 
vassed by the proper authorities. Each of the 
canvassing boards shall make proclamation of the 
results of the primary for each political party and 
issue the necessary certificates*, which shall be 
filed with the secretary of state or the proper 
clerk, as the case may be, who shall, within one 
<lay thereafter, issue a certificate of nomination 
to each of the candidates so proclaimed nominated 
except United States senator. 

Sec. 58. The person receiving the highest num- 
ber of votes at a primary as the candidate of a 
party for the nomination for an office shall be the 
candidate of that party for such office and his 
name shall be placed on the official ballot at the 
next election, where there are two or more per- 
sons to be nominated for the same office or board 
the requisite number of persons receiving the 
highest number of votes shall be nominated and 
placed on the official ballot. In the case of nomi- 
nations for members of the board of assessors, 
where five are to be elected, four of whom are 
to be elected from any one city and the city has 
the requisite number, then the candidate for nom- 
ination living outside such city having the largest 
number of votes of his party shall be nominated. 
The person receiving the highest number of votes 
of his party for state central committeeman of his 
congressional district shall be declared elected. In 
the case of a tie the canvassing board shall deter- 
mine by -lot who shell be nominated or elected. 

Sec. 69. When the nomination is made for an 
office to be filled by the electors of an entire 
county and where it is the duty of the county 
clerk to prepare the official ballot for election, it 
shall be the duty of the county clerk to place 
upon the official ballot the names of all candi- 
dates nominated for office, as shown by the cer- 
tificate of the canvassing board, and the names 
of all candidates certified to him by the secretary 
of state. When the nomination is made for an of- 
fice to be filled by the electors of an entire city 
or village, including alderman, it shall be the 
duty of the city or village clerk to place upon the 
official ballot the names of all candidates nomi- 
nated for office as shown by the certificate of the 
canvassing board. When the nomination is made 
for an office to be filled by the electors of an en- 
tire town it shall be the duty of the town clerk 
to placa upon the official ballot die names of all 
candidates nominated for office as shown by the 
certificate of the canvassing board. Not less than 
f.fteen days before an election to fill any office 
the secretary of state shall certify to the county 
clerk of each county within which any of the 
electors may, by law, vote for such candidates for 
such offices, the name and description of each per- 
son nominated for such office, as shown by the 
certificate of the canvassing board on file in his 
office. 

SPECIAL ELECTION PRIMARIES. 

Sec. (SO. Whenever a special election shall be 
necessary the provisions of this act shall be appli- 
cable to the nomination of candidates to be voted 
for at such special election. The officer or board 
or commission whose duty it is, under the genera) 
election laws of the state, to call an election, shall 
fix a date for the primary for the nomination of 
candidates to be voted for at such special election. 
Fifteen days' notice must be given of such pri- 
mary. In case a candidate nominated under the 
provisions of this act shall die before election or 
decline the nomination, or should the nomina- 
tion become vacant for any other reason, the man- 
aging committees of the respective political parties 
for the territorial area in which such vacancy oc- 
curs shall fill the vacancy. 

Sec. 61. In cities having a board of election 
commissioners the duties herein imposed upon the 
county, city or village clerk, as the case may be, 
shall be discharged by such board of election com- 
missioners. 

CONTESTS. 

Sec. 62. Any candidate whose n.imo appesrs nnon 
the primary ballot of miv potttlert! party may 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



51 



contest the election of the candidates nominated 
by his party, on the fac"e of the returns, if he so 
desires, by filing a petition setting forth the 
grounds of the contest with the clerk of the 
County court or the clerk of the Circuit court, 
according to the office involved, which petition 
shall be verified by attjdavit and filed within five? 
days after the completion of the canvass. Notice 
must be given to the proper canvassing board of 
the pendency of the contest. Authority and juris- 
diction are vested in the County court and the 
Circuit court and the judges thereof to hear and 
finally determine such contests. 

iSec. 63. Nothing in the act shall be construed 
to prevent the nomination of independent candi- 
dates by petition, as is now or may hereafter be 
provided by law. 

Sec. 64. No spirituous, malt, vinous or Intoxi- 
cating liquor shall be sold or given away, nor 
shall any saloon or barroom be open OB primary 
day. 

Sees. 65 to 78 inclusive provide for the punish- 
ment of persons guilty of acts that are In viola- 
tion of the primary law. In general the penalties 
are the same as those provided in the general 
election law. 

iSec. 79. This repeals all acts or parts of acts 
In conflict with the present primary law. 

Sec. 80. The invalidity of any portion of this 
act shall not affect the validity of any other por- 
tion thereof which can be given effect without 
guch invalid part. 

PRIMARY ELECTIONS SENATORIAL 
DISTRICTS. 

Senate bill No. 53. Approved March 9, 1910. 

Seetbn 1. The nomination of all candidates for 
members of the general assembly by all political 
parties and the election of senatorial committee- 
men shall be made in the manner provided in this 
net and not otherwise. 

.Sec. 2. The term "political party" as usFd in 
this act shall mean a political party which at 
the next preceding election for governor polled at 
least 2 per cent of the entire vote cast in the 
state. 

Sec. 3. The words "senatorial office" or "sena- 
torial officer" shall be construed as state senator 
and representatives in the general assembly. 

Sec. 4. A primary shall be held, on the second 
Tuesday in April of ev^ry year in which officers 
are to be voted for on the first Tuesday after the 
first Monday in November, for the nomination of. 
candidates for members of the general assembly 
and shall be known as the April primary. 

SENATORIAL COMMITTEES. 

Sec. 5. There shall be constituted a senatorial 
committee for each senatorial district, but this 
shall rot prevent a political party from choosing 
any other committees in accordance with its prac- 
tice. The senatorial committee of each political 
party shall be elected as follows: 

(a) In senatorial districts comprising three or 
more counties tho committee shall be composed of 
one member from each county, and at the primary 
each elector may vote for one candidate of his 
party residing In his county for member of the 
committee. 

(b) In districts comprising two counties the 
committee shall be composed of three members. 
two of whom shall be elected from the county in 
which such political party at the general election 
for state and county officers polled the larger 
numba.- of votes. Each primary (lector residing 
In such county casting the highest vote may vote 
for two candidates of his party, residing in his 
county, for members of the committee; in the 
other county each elector may vote' for one 
member. 

(c) In districts composed of one county or a 
portion of one connty or portions of two counties 
the committee shall be composed of three mem- 
bers, and each primary elector may vote for threo 
candidates of his party. Within thirty days after 
its election the senatorial committee shall meet 
and organize. 

PETITIONS. 

Sec. 6. The various political party committees 
now in existence are recosnized and shall per- 



form the duties herein prescribed until cornmit- 
teeiuen are chosen in accordance with the pro- 
visions of this act. The name of no candidate for 
nomination for senatorial committeeman shall be 
printed upon the primary ballot unless a petition 
for nomination shall have been filed on his be- 
half, signed as follows: 

(a) If for a senatorial office, by at least one 
half of 1 per cent of the qualified primary electors 
in his district. 

(b) If for a senatorial committeeman, by at 
least ten of the primary electors of his party of 
the county where the district is coextensive with 
one county or is composed of more than one 
county, but In case .the district is wholly within 
one county or partly within two counties than 
such petition shall be signed by ten of the pri- 
mary electors of his party of his senatorial dis- 
trict. 

See. 7. All petitions for nomination shall be 
filed as follows: 

(1) Where the petition Is for a senatorial of- 
fice, such petition shall be filed with the secretary 
of state not more than sixty nor less than thirty 
days prior to the primary. 

(2) Petitions of candidates for senatorial com- 
mitteemen shall be filed with the county clerk 
within the same limits <Z tnu.> us above. 

(3) The secretary of state and the various 
clerks with whom such petitions are fllcd shall 
indorse thereon the flay tm.l hour DJ wbiob i-ucli 
petition was filed. 

(4) Petitions for nomination or for committee- 
man may be withdrawn from the flies by written 
request filed with the secretary of state not less 
than twenty-five or with the proper clerk not less 
than twelve days prior to the primary. 

CEHTIFICATION OF CANDIDATES. 

Sec. 8. Not less than twenty days prior to the 
primary the secretary of state shall certify to the 
county clerk of each county the names of all 
candidates for senatorial offices a? specified in 
the petitions on file with him, which are to be 
voted for in such county, stating in such cer- 
tificate the political affiliation of each candidate. 
The names of the candidates shall be certified in 
the order in which they shall appear on the pri- 
mary ballot in accordance with the order in 
which the peitlons shall have been filed. 

Sec. 9. The county clerk of each county or the 
board of election commissioners, as the case may be, 
shall prepare and have printed the primary ballot 
of each political party for each precinct In his 
county, and the names of all candidates certified 
to the county clerk by the secretary of state and 
of all candidates for senatorial committeeman 
whose petitions have been filed In said office 
shall be placed on the same ballot as the candi- 
dates for other offices for nominations to be voted 
on at the same primary election, properly ar- 
ranged, however, under the name of each office. 
Below the name of the office of representative In 
the general assembly shall be printed in small let- 
ters the directions to the voters, "Vote for one, 
two or three." 

Sec. 10. The secretary of state shall, in his 
certificate to the county clerk, certify the position 
which the names of candidates for senatorial of- 
fices shall occupy upon the primary ballot with 
reference to the position of candidates for other 
offices. The names of the candidates for senato- 
rial committeemen shall be placed on the primary 
ballot immediately after the names of the candi- 
dates for senatorial offices, In the order In which 
their petitions were filed with (the county clerk. 

CUMULATIVE VOTING. 

Sec. 11. At least thirty-three days prior to the 
April primary the senatorial committee of each 
political party shall meet and fix the number of 
candidates to be nominated by tholr party at the 
primary for representative in the general assem- 
bly. A copy of such resolution shall within n> 
dnys thereafter be filed with the secretary of 
state nd with the county clerk of each county in 
the senatorial district. In all primaries for the 
nomination of candidates for representatives In 
the general assembly each elector may cast three 
votes for one candidate or may distribute the 
same or equal parts thereof among two candidates 



52 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



or three candidates, as he shall see fit. And the 
said candidate or candidates for nomination high- 
est iu votes shall be declared nominated for the 
office to be filled. 

CANVASS OP VOTES. 

Sec. 12. The votes for the nomination of candi- 
dates for representative in the general assembly 
shall be canvassed in the following manner: 

(1) (When a cross is placed in each of thp 
squares preceding the names of three candidates 
and the ballot for representative is not otherwise 
marked it shall be counted as one vote for each 
candidate. 

(2) When a cross is placed in each of the 
squares preceding the names of two candidates it 
shall be counted as one and one-half votes for 
each of such candidates. 

(3) When a cross is placed in the square before 
the name of one candidate it shall be counted us 
three votes for such candidate. 

(4> When the ballot has been marked so as to 
indicate an intention to cast more than three 
vote for the nomination of candidates for repre- 
sentatives such ballot shall not be counted. The 
requisite number of persons receiving the highest 
number of votes as candidates of their party in 
any county or senatorial district, as the case may 
be, shall be declared elected senatorial committee- 
men. 

Sec. 13. Except as herein otherwise expressly 
provided, each and all of the provisions of any act 
relating to the holding of primary elections by 
political parties, passed by this extraordinary ses- 
sion of the general assembly, and acts hereafter 
passed amendatory thereof, shall, so far as the 
same may be applicable, apply to and govern pri- 
mary elections held under the provisions of this 
act. The returns of such primary shall be made 
to the county clerk or the board of election com- 
missioners, as the case may be, and shall be can- 
vassed and certified as other returns made to the 
county clerk or board of election commissioners. 
as the case may be. The county canvassing board 
or the board of election commissioners, as the 
crse may be, shall issue a certificate of election 
to the requisite number of persons of each politi- 
cal party shown by the returns to be elected 
members of the seratorial committee. Tabulated 
returns of the primary for the nomination of can- 
didates for senatorial offices shall be made to the 
secretary of state, canvassed by Ibe state primary 
carcassing board, proclamation of the result 
thereof made and certificates of nomination is- 
sued, as in case of other tabulated statements of 
returns made to the secretary of state, and the 
pains and penalties prescribed in the' acts last re- 
ferred to shall apply to all elections held under 
this act. 

Sec. 14. Nothing In this act contained shall be 
construed to prevent the nomination of independ- 
ent candidates by petition, as is now or may here- 
after be provided uy law. 

FIRE FIGHTING EQUIPMENT IN COAL MINES. 
The act specifies the fire fighting equipment and 
other means for the prevention and controlling of 
fires in coal 'mines. Among the things which must 
be provided by the owners or operators are water 
supplies, water pipes and hose, automatic sprin- 
klers, chemical fire extinguishers, telephones and 
electric gong signals. [Approved March 8, 1910.] 

FIELD MUSEUM SITE. 

There is given and conveyed to the Field Museum 
of Natural History that portion of the submerged 
lauds under Lake Michigan, in the city of Chi- 
cago, described as follows: Beginning at the cen- 
ter of Congress street extended 100 feet from Ibe 
east line of Grant park, extending thence south 
1.000 feet; thence east 950 feet; thence north 
2.000 feet; thence west 950 feet; thence south 1.000 
feet to the place of beginning. The same is con- 
veyed to the Fiild Museum of Natural History, 
with authority to create an island in Lake Michi- 
gan on the submerged land described, to be used 
by it as a permanent site for its museum. It is 
provided that the museum shall be open free to 
the public on at least three days Jn the week. If 
the building is not erected before Jan. 1, 1925, 
then the title shall revert to the state of Illinois. 



The museum is prohibited from selling or sub- 
letting any of the land. [Approved March 8, 1910.] 

INCOME~TAX. 
(Senate joint resolution No. 7.) 

Whereas, the congress of the United States has 
propos'.-d to the several states the following 
amendment to the federal constitution, viz.: 

"Article XVI. The congress shall have power 
to lay and wllect taxes on incomes, from what- 
ever sources derived, without apportionment among 
the several states and without regard to anj 
census or enumeration." 

Therefore, be it resolved by the senate, the 
house of representatives concurring therein, That 
the state of Illinois, by its legislature, ratifies 
and assents to this amendment. 

Adopted by the senate Feb. 9, 1910. 

Concurred in by the house Marca 1, 1910. 

RUSSO-JAPANESE AGREEMENT. 
Signed in St. Petersburg, July 4, 1910. 

The imperial government of Japan and the im- 
perial government of Russia, sincerely attached 
to the principles established by the convention 
conducted between them on the 17th of July, 1907, 
and desirous to develop the effects of that conven- 
tion with a view to the consolidation of peace in 
the extreme east, have agreed to complete the 
said arrangement fay the following provisions: 

Article 1. With the object of facilitating com- 
munication and developing the commerce of na- 
tions, the two high contracting parties mutually 
engage to lend each otber their friendly co-opera- 
tion with a view to the amelioration of their re- 
spective railway lines in Manchuria and the im- 
provement of the connecting service of the said 
railways and to abstain from all competition 
prejudicial to the realization of this object. 

Art. 2. Kach of the high contracting parties 
engages to maintain and respect the status quo in 
Manchuria resulting from the treaties, conventions 
and other arrangements concluded up to this day 
between Japan and Russia or between either of 
these two powers and China. Copies of the afore- 
said arrangements have been exchanged between 
Japan and Russia. 

Art. 3. In case that any event arises of a 
nature to menace the status quo heretofore men- 
tioned the two high contracting parties shall in 
each case enter into communication with each 
other in oflder to arrive at an understanding as 
to the measures they may judge !t necessary to 
take for the maintenance of the said status quo. 



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Italian 

Portuguese . 



EUROPEAN 

1801. 
Persons. 
. 20,520.000 
, 31,450.000 
. 30,320.000 
. 30,770,000 
. 26,190,000 
. 15,070.000 
. 7,480,000 



LANGUAGES SPOKEN. 



1890. 
Persons. 

111,100,000 
51,200,000 
75,200,000 
75,000,000 
42,800,000 
33,400,000 
13,000,000 



Ratio. 

1801. 1890. 

12.7 27.7 

19.4 12.7 

18.7 18.7 

19.0 18.7 

16.2 10.7 

9.3 8.3 

4.7 3.2 



Total 161.800.000 401,700.000 100.0 100.0 

The above is the latest estimate made by Mnlhall. 
Assuming that the annual increase in the number 
of persons speaking each language has been main- 
tained since 1890 the ratio in 1908 was: English. 
30.7; French, 11.4; German, 18.7: Russian, 18.6: 
Spanish, 9.6 ; Italian, 8.1 ; Portuguese. 2.9. 

FIRE IN BRUSSELS EXPOSITION. 

Through a fire which started in the Belgian sec- 
tion of the Brussels international exposition Sun- 
day evening. Aug. 14, 1910, damage estimated at 
between $6,000,000 and $10.000,000 was caused. The 
principal losses were sustained in the British and 
Belgian sections, but the goods in other sections 
were also damaged by smoke and water. The 
grounds were crowded with people at the time, and 
a panic ensued, in which two lives were lost and 
many persons injured. A large number of valuable 
works of art were destroyed and the archives of 
the exposition were burned. The fire originated 
from crossed electric wires leading Into the post- 
office in the Belgian building. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



THE HIGH COST OF LIVING. 



The steady advance In the cost of many of the 
necessaries of life led to much discussion in 1910 
as co the cause or causes. Dissatisfaction on the 
part of the consuming public was expressed in a 
meat boycott and in various other ways. Respond- 
ing to the general demand for congressional ac- 
tion of some kind, the United States senate in Feb- 
ruary appointed a select committee with Instruc- 
tions to make an exhaustive investigation into the 
cost of living and any increase in the same since 
1900. This committee was composed of the follow- 
ing senators: Henry Cabot Lodge, Massachusetts, 
chairman; Jacob H. Gallinger, New Hampshire; 
Porter J. McCumber, North Dakota; Reed Smoot, 
Utah; Coe I. Crawford, South Dakota; James P. 
Clarke, Arkansas; Joseph H. Johnston, Alabama; 
Ellison D. Smith, South Carolina. The last three 
are democrats and the others republicans. The 
committee heard a large number of witnesses en- 
gaged in the wholesale and retail grocery trade, 
the wholesale and retail meat trade, the raising 
of cattle and sheep and the production of grain, 
cotton and wool. It also heard representatives of 
many other industries and examined numerous con- 
sular and other reports. 

The committee, which was officially known as 
the ''select committee on wages and prices of com- 
modities," presented majority and minority reports 
to the senate June 23. The members divided on 
political lines, the majority report being signed by 
the republican senators and the minority by the 
democratic senators. Following Is a brief synopsis 
of the majority report: 

WHOLESALE PRICES. 

The advance In prices has been world-wide, al- 
though farm and food products have advanced 
much more rapidly than manufactured articles. 
Prices appear to have advanced more rapidly In 
the United States and Canada than in the united 
kingdom, France, Germany, Austria, Italy and 
Bulgaria. While the prices of manufactured arti- 
cles have ia many instances remained unchanged, 
the quality or grade has deteriorated. The price 
of furniture, for instance, has remained about the 
same, but the quality of cheap and medium-priced 
furniture has declined. The report quotes from 
the bulletin of the United States bureau of labor 
on wholesale prices, a summary of which Is glveii 
In this Issue of The Daily News Almanac and 
Year-Book, and then, proceeds: 

"Among the many causes contributing to the ad- 
vance in prices may be enumerated: 

"Increased cost of production of farm products 
by reason of higher land values and higher wages. 

"Increased demand tor farm products and food. 

"Shifting of population from food-producing to 
food-consuming occupations and localities. 

"Immigration to food-consuming localities. 

"Reduced fertility of land resulting in lower 
average production or Increased expenditures for 
fertilization. 

"Increased banking facilities In agricultural lo- 
calities, which enable farmers to hold their crops 
and market to the best advantage. This results in 
steadying prices, but also tends to advance prices. 

"Reduced supply convenient to transportation of 
such commodities as timber. 

"Cold-storage plants which result in preventing 
extreme fluctuations of prices of certain commodi- 
ties with the seasons, but by enabling the whole- 
salers to buy and sell at the best possible advan- 
tage tend to advance prices. 

"Increased cost of distribution. 

"Industrial combinations. 

"Organizations of producers or of dealers. 

"Advertising. 

"Increased money supply. 

"Overcapitalization. 

"Higher standard of living." 

The general wholesale price level In the United 
States represented by 257 commodities advance-! 
14.5 per cent during the period from 1900 to 1909. 

Commodities. Per cent. 

Farm products advanced 39.8 

Food, etc., advanced 19.7 

Lumber and building materials advanced 19.6 

Miscellaneous commodities advanced 14.7 



Cloths and clothing advanced 120 

Fuel and lighting advanced 6.9 

House- furnishing goods advanced 5.3 

Metals and implements advanced 3.6 

Drugs and chemicals declined 2.9 

Another grouping of commodities shows the fol- 
lowing percentages above 1900: 

Products of the forest 40.3 

Products of the farm, crude 36.1 

Products of farm, manufactured 24.2 

Products of mines and wells 13.5 

Products of manufacture 6.7 

Products of fisheries 5.1 

The testimony of all witnesses familiar with 
farm conditions is to the effect that the cost of 
production of farm products has risen very rapidly 
In the last ten years; wages of farm hands have 
increased on an average about 60 per cent, and the 
original investment necessary to secure land has 
practically doubled in that period. In many locali- 
ties the crop average can be maintained only by 
the use of expensive fertilizers, by rotation of 
crops or by allowing the ground to lie fallow. The 
supply of available government land for general 
farming has been materially reduced. The cost of 
producing live stock has increased with the dis- 
appearance of the range. 

"The assumption seems fair that for the prod- 
ucts of the forest and of the farm the available 
supply is not keeping pace with the demand, while 
for manufactured articles the supply has practical- 
ly kept pace with the demand. So far as the prod- 
ucts of the forests are concerned, the supply In 
the United .States is diminishing and the cost of 
production and marketing has Increased. The farm 
products are being produced on much more expen- 
sive land and farm wages have Increased more rap- 
idly than have those of any other group of work- 
ers." 

RETAIL PRICES. 

"Retail prices in the United States In the spring 
of 1910 were for manj* articles at the highest point 
reached in many years. As compared with the 
spring of 1900 prices for bacon were more than 70 
per cent higher, ham was 33 per cent higher, flour 
was about 50 per cent higher, butter about 45 per 
cent higher and eggs 100 per cent higher. 

"Furniture was about the same as In 1900. 
Earthenware was slightly lower. Shoes and cloth- 
ing were considerably higher. 

"The United States bureau of labor compilation 
of retail prices of food includes thirty of the most 
important articles for the years 1890 to 1907. This 
compilation has not been extended beyond 1907, but 
for that year the thirty articles, when given a 
weight according to consumption In a wage-earner's 
family, showed an advance In 1907 of 19.3 per cent 
over 1900." 

Retail prices for a few important articles of 
food in typical stores In large eastern cities for 
April, 1903, and April, 1910, and the increase In 
prices during the period between those dates are 
shown in the table at top of next page. 

WAGES AND HOURS OF LABOR. 

"Wag<>s have not advanced as rapidly as have 
prices and practically all the labor difficulties 
which have been the subject of mediation in the 
United States during the last two or three years 
have had as their basis the advanced cost of liv- 
ing. In the United States wages have advanced 
much more rapidly than they have in European 
countries. AVages in the United States advanced 
In about the same degree as did prices until 1907. 
Owing to t'ue Industrial depression of 1908, follow- 
in? the financial panic of 1907, wages dropped con- 
siderably, and in 1909 hardly more than regained 
the high point reached in 1907. Wages at the 
present time are r.ot on as high a level as are 
food prices. Salaries have advanced but very lit- 
tle during the last ten years. 

"Hours of labor in practically all wage occupa- 
tions have been reduced. The United States bu- 
reau of labor compilation of wages and hours of 
labor has not been continued later than 1907. In 
1007 wages per hour were 22.1 per cent above 1900. 



54 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



ARTICLE. 


UNIT. 


RETAIL, PRICE. 


INCREASE. 


1910. 


1903. 


Amount. 


Per 
cent. 


Flour and meal- 
Golden Gate, Minnesota patent 


^-barrel bag, 
5-lb. bag 


$0.86 
.15 

.22 
.BO 
.12T 
.22 
.22 

.35 
.33 

.26 

.28 

.25 

.42 
.30 
.69 


$0.57 
.12 

.19 
.21 
.12 
.15 
.16 

.27 
.25 

.25 
.25 

.16 

.18 
.16 
.33 


$0.29 
.03 

.03 
.09 
.007 
.07 
.06 

.08 
.08 

.01 

.03 

.09 

.24 
.14 

.36 


50.9 
25.0 

15.S 
42.9 
5.{ 
46.7 
37.5 

29.6 
32.0 

4.0 
12.0 

56.3 

133.3 

87.1 

109.5 


Rye 


Meats- 
Sirloin roast beef 


Pound 






Rib steak 


Pound 


Bacon, Mb. strips 




Bacon, breakfast 


Pound 


Butter- 
Golden Gate creamery 


Pound 




Pound 


Sugar- 
Brown, light 


5-lb. bag... 


Granulated 


5-lb. bag 


Cornmeal 
Yellow or white 


7-lb. package. 
Dozen 


Eggs- 
Fresh 


Ordinary 


Dozen 


Lard 


3-lb. pail 



Hours of labor during the same period were re- 
duced 3.7 per cent. The decline In hours of course 
affected the weekly earnings of employes for the 
reason that the large majority of wage earners 
are employed either on the piece basis or at an 
hourly rate. From 1900 to 1907 full time weekly 
tariiings advanced 17.6 per cent, while wholesale 
prices of commodities advanced 17.2 per cent, or 
In almost exactly the same proportion." 

The following table, based upon figures supplied 
to the senate committee by B. M. Craig, secretary 
of (he Building Contractors' council of Chicago, 
shows for the building trades the rate of wages 
per hour In Chicago, New York and San Francisco 
in 1902 and 1910 and the per cent of Increase ID 
rates of wages per hour during the period from 
J902 to 1910: 



greatest advance the products of the forests and 
the products of the farm are those for which 
there has been practically no change in the tariff 
for the last ten years. Neither have there been 
any changes during the last twenty years which 
could in any way account for the increase lii 
price. The tariff acts of 1894, 1897 and 1909 have 
made no changes which to any appreciable degree 
measure the changes in price which have taken 
place. 

"The tariff act of 1909 made no marked changes 
in 'farm products and foodstuffs,' the articles 
grouped by the tariff acts under schedule G, 'ag- 
ricultural products and provisions," and schedule 
E, 'sugar, molasses and manufactures of.' 

"Where alterations were made in rates they 
were chiefly in the direction of reductions. Yet 



Bricklayers 

Stone masons 

Structural iron Belters.. 
Ornamental iron setters. 

Plasterers 

Tile setters 

Plumbers 

siteamfitters 

Gasfltters 

Carpenters 

Painters 

Stonecutters 

Electricians 

Sheet metal workers 

Marble setters 



Chicago 

1902. 1910. Inc. 
Cts. Cts. Pei ct. 
60 67% 12.5 

67% 12.5 

65 



New York San 

1902. 1910. Inc. 1902. 
Cts. Cts. Perct. Cts. 



Francisco 
1910. Inc. 
Cts. Perct. 
87% 16.7 
87% 16.7 
62% 66.7 




62% 75 



71.4 
37.5 
20.0 



THE TARIFF. 

"The tariff seems to have been no material fac- 
tor in causing the advance in prices during the 
last decade. The greatest advances have been made 
in commodities upon which the tariff has little or 
110 effect, and the absolute removal of the tariff 
on n;any of these commodities could not have af- 
forded relief at the present time, for the reason 
that prices of these commodities, with a few ex- 
ceptions, were as high or higher in other countries 
than in the United States. 

"The advance in prices during the last ten yeai-s 
appears to have no relation to tariff legislation. 
Beginning with January, 1900, wholesale prices in 
general declined slightly, and the decline continue<i 
through July, 1901. Beginning with August, 1901, 
prices advanced very slowly through March, 1903, 
and then remained steady through May, 1905. 
Beginning with June, 1905. there was a marked in- 
crease through October, 1907. Beginning with No- 
vember. 1907, prices began to decline and the de- 
cline continued through August, 1908. Beginning 
with September, 1P08, prices steadily advanced un- 
til the highest point during the ten years was 
reached in March, 1910. 

"The groups of articles which have shown the 



such changes as have been made in the tariff In 
these schedules have apparently had no effect on 
prices, as almost without a single exception the 
prices have advanced materially since the passage 
of the act without any distinction as to whether 
the tariff was increased or decreased. 

"The fact that exports of products of the farm 
and of the forests continue in such large quanti- 
ties indicates that the price movement is due not 
to the tariff but to a world-wide movement upward 
in the prices of such commodities. 

"Lumber has steadily advanced since 1900, and 
the price in 1909 was 41.8 per cent above the price 
of 19CO. yet with this advance other countries have 
been demanding our lumber in increasing quan- 
tities. 

"Material decreases were made by the tariff of 
1909 on articles grcnped under schedule D, 'wood 
r.nd manufactures of,' but they seem to have had 
no appreciable effect upon lumber prices, as they 
have continued upward, even though lumber is im- 
ported in large quantities." 

COMBINATIONS AND ASSOCIATIONS. 

"Under this subject are grouped industrial com- 
binations, popularly referred to as trusts, trade 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



55 



agreements, producers' associations, wholesale deal- 
ers' associations and retail dealers' associations. 
The prices of many of the trust-produced commod- 
ities have not advanced as rapidly as have other 
commodities. In some cases whore trust-produced 
commodities have advanced greatly the advance 
appears to be due largely to other causes, such as 
short supplies. 

"Whilt- industrial combinations may result in 
economies of production and distribution the fact 
that competition is either wholly or partly re- 
moved leads to abases. In some cases where no 
actual combination of producing establishments un- 
der one head has been made, trade agreements do 
exist which operate to fix prices in restraint of 
trade fully as much as an actual trust. The ef- 
fect of all such organizations as the Elgin board 
of trade is to advance prices." 

The western meat packers were not examined by 
the committees for the reason that they were un- 
der investigation at the time by grand juries. 

THE GOLD SUPPLY. 

"The proposition that the increase in the gold 
supply has uffected prices rests of course on the 
sound economic theory that a marked increase Jn 
the monetary standard of value cheapens the 
standard, and by cheapening it increases the 
amount which must be paid for a commodity. It 
is because the general trend of world prices has 
seemingly responded to the contraction or expan- 
sion of the world's supply of currency that the 
conclusion is reached that the present abnormal 
production of gold is a positive factor in forcing 
up the level of the world's prices and in prevent- 
ing their decline. It is not contended that this 
increase is the dominant or even a principal cause 
of the rise of prices, but it undoubtedly has exert- 
ed a positive effect by cheapening the standard of 
price and at the same time enormously Increasing 
the amount of credit based upon gold." 

THE LABOR UNIONS. 

"Labor unions have not been apparently a seri- 
ous factor in contributing toward advancing prices. 
Of course, the general tendency of labor unions is 
to increase wages and reduce hours, and in thia 
way they may have indirectly affected prices by 
securing for the wage earners higher pay and 
shorter hours and thus raising the standard of 
living and placing them in a position to secure 
better homes and better home surroundings, arti- 
cles of necessity of a higher grade and In greater 
quantities, and more articles usually classed as 
luxuries." They may also have attracted an in- 
creasingly large number of persons from agricul- 
tures into industrial employment, thus increasing 
the cost of food production on the farm. 
COST OF DISTRIBUTION. 

"The expenses of distributing food products by 
wholesalers and retailers have increased by reason 
of the increase in rents, taxes, wages and cost of 
horses and horse feed." Putting up articles In 
fancy packages, the use of trading stamps and the 
giving of prizes have also contributed to advance 
prices. 

COLD STORAGE. 

"Cold storage plants have tended to level prices, 
although they have enabled the dealers to take 
the best possible advantage of conditions both in 
purchasing when prices are low and selling when 
prices are high. Kggs have shown a greater ad- 
vance since 1900 fhan has any other article of 
food This probably Is due largely to supply and 
demand, but also in part to the fact that the cold 
storage has artificially forced up the price. The 
committee has recommended to congress a bill 
limiting the time food products may be kept In 
cold storage." 

SANITARY REGULATIONS. 

"Many regulations looking toward improving tlie 
quality of food and protecting the health of con- 
sumers have been passed by United States, state 
and local authorities during the last ten years. 
These regulations have been beneficial, but the ef- 
fect of all of them is to advance prices to a 
greater or less degree." Examples of such laws 
are the pure-food and meat and dairy Inspection 
laws. 



OVERCAPITALIZATION. 

"Overcapitalization of transportation and indus- 
trial companies, has the effect of advancing prices. 
Increase of capital usually results in a greater 
amount of dividends. Increased dividends must 
mean increased earnings and the increased earn- 
ines come from the consumer.'' 

IMMIGRATION. 

"The number of immigrants arriving In the 
United States from 1900 to the present time was 
8.202,288. More than 80 per cent of the total were 
at the most productive period of life, but only a 
very small percentage of this enormous number of 
people have entered agricultural pursuits. Practi- 
cally all have entered industrial pursuits and by 
reason of becoming consumers instead of produc- 
ers of food have contributed In no small way to- 
ward advancing the prices of food products." 
HIGHER STANDARD OF LIVING. 

"The standard of living has steadily advanced 
and consumers are demanding a much higher grade 
of article than ten years ago. This advance in the 
standard of living has been a material factor in 
Increasing prices. In clothing and shoes the effort 
to keep up with the changing styles adds materially 
to expenditures." 
FREIGHT RATES ON COMMODITIES OF LIFE. 

Tables furnished by the interstate commerce com- 
mission are given to show that there has been a 
substantial increase in the freight rates from St. 
Louis, Chicago, St. Paul and Duluth to New York . 
and from New York to western points. 

MINORITY REPORT. 

The minority repo.rt, signed by Senators John- 
ston, Clarke and Smith, after reviewing and criti- 
cising the findings of the majority members of the 
committee, concludes as follows: 

"We find the three substantial causes for the 
advance In prices are: 

"(1) The tariff. 

"(2) Trusts, combines and monopolies. 

"(3) Increased money supply. 

"We are without sufficient data to apportion the 
degree of responsibility among these three causes, 
but that the first two are the chief malefactors 
we have no doubt, and they are of our own crea- 
tion." 

Some of the points made by the minority mem- 
bers are these: 

The high price of land is not a cause, but the 
effect of the high price of farm products. 

There has been an increased demand for farm 
products, but the supply has also increased. 

The migration of men to food-consuming locali- 
ties should be attributed to the rapidly increasing 
demand for men in the city shops and to better 
social, school and church privileges in the cities. 

As to the increased cost of distribution, "our In- 
vestigations do not show that there has been any 
notable increase in railroad freights since 1900." 

"We do not dissent from the conclusions of the 
majority on this subject (overcapitalization) if the 
public are permitted to be taxed to pay dividends 
on watered stocks." 

"Perhaps less than 3 per cent of our people In- 
dulge in the use of luxuries to any appreciable ex- 
tent. This small number could raise the general 
level of prices but little more than a man could 
raise himself by his boot straps. The great ad- 
vances have been mainly in bacon, beef, mutton 
and cotton goods, and they have increased vastly 
more than in tea, silk goods, champagne, silver- 
ware, diamonds and jewelry." 

"It Is difficult to understand how any one can 
favor high rates of duty if he does not honestly 
belU-ve that it will increase the prices to be real- 
ized by the manufacturers producing the article af- 
fected, by diminishing or destroying competition 
and thus necessarily increasing the cost to the 
consumer." 

"The cost of production is necessarily enhanced 
by the fact that the producer must, under this 
tariff scheme, pay higher prices for his clothing, 
household goods, implements, machinery and other 
highly protected articles of necessity." 

"If the purpose of the Payne-Aldrich bill was 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



not to increase the profit to the manufacturer and 
cost to the consumer, we are unable to compre- 
hend why the tariff on certain sawed lumber 
should have been increased 50 per cent, on shingles 
66 per cent, corrugated iron and steel 115 per cent, 
iron and steel wire (of a certain size) coated witn 
zinc or tin 553 per cent, razors 67 per cent, buck- 
wheat flour 25 per cent, biscuits 125 per cent, 
stockings from 20 to 30 per cent and on certain 
cheap cotton cloth 460 per cent." 

MEAT BOYCOTT OF 1910. 

In Cleveland, O., Jan. 16, 1910, some 460 superin- 
tendents and foremen employed by manufacturing 
concerns signed a pledge to abstain from meat for 
thirty days, or for sixty days if prices should not 
fall within a month. Many others joined in the 
movement and in a short time 25,000 persons had 
signed the pledge. As this meant that at least 100, 000 
residents of Cleveland had ceased eating meat the 
effect on the butchering industry was immediate. 
Several of the companies concerned discharged 
many of their employes, as they had no work for 
them. The price of meat went down a little, but 
as the cost of other commodities decreased to some 
extent at the same time the fall may not have 
been due entirely to the boycott. This spread to 
other "cities, including Pittsburg, Baltimore, New 
Orleans, New York, Chicago, Milwaukee and Bos- 
ton. The Anti-Food Trust league, formed in Wash- 
ington some time before the boycott began, re- 
ceived a large number of applications for member- 
ship and by the end of January had more than 
200. COO on its list. The movement came to its cli- 
max soon after and then collapsed, without having 
had any permanent effect on meat prices. 

WHOLESALE PRICES, 1909-10. 

[From bulletin No. 87 of the bureau of labor, 

Washington, D. O.] 

Wholesale prices in 1909, as measured by the 
prices of 257 commodities included in the investiga- 
tion, advanced 3 per cent over the wholesale prices 
In 1908, but with this advance they were still 2.3 
per cent below the high average of 1907 prices. 
Wholesale prices in 1909 were 14.5 per cent higher 
than in 1900; 41 per cent higher than in 1897, the 
year of lowest prices in the twenty-year period 
from 1890 to 1909; 12 per cent higher than in 1890 
and 26.5 per cent higher than the average price 
for the ten years. 1890 to 1899. 

The highest point reached in 1907 was in the 
month of October, from which month there was a 
general decline until August, 1908. Beginning with 
September. 1908, there has been an increase with- 
out a break in any month up to March, 1910. 
Wholesale prices in March. 1910, were higher than 
at any time in the preceding twenty years, being 
7.5 per cent higher than in March, 1909; 10,2 per 
cent higher than in August, 1908; 21.1 per cent 
higher than the average yearly price of 1900; 49. L 
per cent higher than the average yearly price of 
1897, and 33.8 per cent higher than the average 
price for the ten years. 1890 to 1899. 

Comparing 1909 with 1908, the group of commodi- 
ties showing the greatest increase in price was: 
Farm products, 15 per cent. The other groups 
showing an Increase were: Food, etc., 3.4 per cent; 
cloths and clothing 2.3 per cent; lumber and build- 
Ing materials. 4 per cent; drugs and chemicals, 1.8 
per cent; miscellaneous, 5 per cent. Groups snow- 
ing a decrsase were: Fuel and lighting, 1.1 per 
cent; metals and implements, 5 per cent; house- 
furnishing goods, 2 per cent. 

The following table shows the average wholesale 
rricos of certain commodities in the calendar year 
J909 and the month of March, 1910. The quotations 
are from New York, Chicago and a few other pri- 
mary markets: 

FARM PRODUCTS. 

March, 

Commodity. 1909. 1910. 

Barley, choice to fancy, bu $0.67 JO. 69 

Cattle, steers, choice, 100 Ibs 7.33 8.19 

Cattle, steers, good. 100 Ibs 6.45 7.42 

Corn. cash, bu 67 .62 

Cotton, upland, middling, Ib 12 .15 

Flaxseed, No. 1, bu 1.56 2.14 

Hay, timothy, No. 1, ton 13.45 17.05 



Commodity. 1909. 

Hides, green, salted, Ib .................. 16 

Hogs, heavy, 100 Ibs ...................... 7.57 

Hogs, light, 100 Ibs ...................... 7.36 

Hops, New York state, choice, Ib ....... 20 

Horses, draft, good, per head .......... 203.17 

Mules. 16 hands, per head ............ ...209.76 

Oats cash, bu ............................. 48 

Poultry, live, fowls, Ib ................... 16 

Rye, No. 2 cash, bu ....................... 78 

Sheep, wethers, good, 100 Ibs ............ 5.43 

Sheep, wethers, plain, 100 Ibs ........... 5.26 

Tobacco, hurley, good leaf, 100 Ibs ..... l^.eo 

Wheat, cash ............................... 1.20 

FOOD, ETC. 
Beans, medium, choice, bu .............. 2.45 

Bread, crackers, oyster. Ib ............... 06 

Bread, crackers, soda. Ib ................. 06 

Bread, loaf (New York Market), Ib ...... 04 

Butter, creamery, Elgin. Ib .............. 29 

Canned corn, No. 2, dozen cans .......... 91 

Canned peas. No. 2, dozen cans ........ -. 1.40 

Canned tomatoes. No. 3, dozen cans ..... 96 

Cheese, New York state, cream, Ib ..... 15 

Coffee, Rio. No. 7, Ib ..................... 08 

Eggs, frosh, fancy, dozen ................ 31 

Fish, cod, dry, quintal .................. 7.02 

Fish, herring, split, brl ................. 7.07 

Fish, mackerel, salt, brl ................ 10.19 

Fish salmon, canned, 12 cans .......... 1.70 

Flour, buckwheat, 100 Ibs ............... 2.36 

Flour, rye, brl ............................ 4.49 

Flour, wheat, spring, brl ................ 6.76 

Flour, wheat, winter, brl ............... 5.45 

Fruit, apples, evaporated, Ib ............. 08 

Fruit, currants, in brls., Ib .............. 06 

Fruit, prunes, in boxes, Ib..: ............ 05 

Fruit, raisins, California, box .......... 1.27 

Glucose, 100 Ibs ........................... 2.47 

Lard, prime, Ib ............................ 12 

Meal, corn, fine white, 100 Ibs .......... 1.62 

Meal, corn, fine yellow, 100 Ibs ........ 1.61 

Meat, bacon, short clear sides, Ib ....... 12 

Meat, bacon, short rib sides, Ib ......... 11 

Meat, beef, fresh, Ib ...................... 11 

Meat, beef, salt, extra mess, brl ...... 11.02 

Meat, beef, salt, hams, brl ............. 25.11 

Meat, hams, smoked, Ib .................. 13 

Meat, mutton, dressed, Ib ................ 09 

Meat, pork, salt, mess, brl .............. 21.34 

Milk, fresh, quart ......................... 03 

Molasses, New Orleans, gal ............. 35 

Poultry, dressed, fowl, Ib ................ 16 

Rice, domestic, Ib ......................... 06 

Salt. American, brl ........................ 82 

Soda, bicarbonate of, Ib .................. 01 

Spices, pepper, Hi .......................... 07 

Starch, pure corn, Ib ...................... 06 

Sugar, granulated, Ib ...................... 05 

Tallow. Ib .................................. 06 

Tea, Formosa, fine, Ib .................... 23 

Vegetables, cabbage, ton ................ 26.17 

Vegetables, onions, brl .................. 3.09 

Vegetables, potatoes, bu .................. 69 

Vinegar, cider, gal ........................ 18 

CLOTHS AND CLOTHING. 
Bags, 2-bnshel, Amoskeag, each .......... 19 

Blankets, all wool. 5 Ibs. to pair. Ib.. 1.00 
Blankets, cotton. 2 Ibs. to pair, Ib ...... 50 

Boots and shoes, men's brogans, pair.. 1.20 
Boots and shoes, men's calf shoes, pr.. 2.95 
Boots & shoes, women's solid grain, pr. 1.04 
Broadcloths, first quality, yard .......... 2.02 

Calico, American, prints, yard ........... 05 

Cotton flannels, 3% yds. to Ib., yard... .06 

Cotton thread, 6-cord. 200-yd. spls., spool .04 
Carpets, Brussels, yard .................. 1.19 

Carpets, ingrain, yard .................... 53 

Carpets, Wilton, yard .................... 2.22 

Cotton yarns, cones, 22-1, Ib ............. 23 

Denims, Amoskeag. yard .................. 13 

Drillings, brown, yard .................... 07 

Flannels, white, yard ..................... 46 



Ginghams, Amoskeag, yard ............... 06 

Horse blankets, wool, Ib .................. 75 

Hosiery, men's cotton 1/4 hose, 12 prs.. .81 
Hosiery, women's cotton hose, 12 pairs 1.77 
Leather, harness, oak, Ib ................. 38 

Leather, sole, hemlock, Ib ................ 25 



1910. 

.14 

10.61 

10.40 

.33 

230.50 

.212.50 

.45 

.18 

.79 

8.37 

8.27 

15.50 

1.19 

2.34 

.07 

.07 

.04 

.31 

1.00 

1.40 

.90 

.17 

.08 

.24 

7.00 

7.60 

12.50 

1.67 

2.00 

4.42 

5.59 

5.35 

.08 

" .06 

.05 

1.20 

2.17 

.14 

1.72 

_ 1.72 

.15 

.14 

.11 

14. 7Z 

25.00 

.17 

.13 

27.02 

.04 

.37 

.19 

.05 

.87 

.01 

.08 

.06 

.05 

.07 

.24 

24. j2 

...... 

.32 
.16 

.20 

1.00 

.55 

1.17 

3.05 

1.05 

2.06 

.06 

.07 

.04 

1.20 

.53 

2.23 

.25 

.15 

.08 

.47 

.07 

.77 

.82 

1.77 

.39 

.25 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAK-BOOK FOR 1911. 



57 



Commodity. 1909. 1910. 

Overcoatings, covert cloth, yard 2.02 2.02 

Overcoatings, kersey, yard : 1.79 1.92 

Print cloths, yard 03 .04 

Sheetings, bleached, Atlantic, yard..., .21 .22 

Sheetings, bleached. Pepperell, yard... .25 .28 

Sheetings, brown, Indian Head, yard.. .07 .08 

Shirtings, bleached, fruit of loom, yd.. .09 .10 

Shirtings, bleached, Wamsutta, yard... .11 .12 

Silk, raw, Italian, Ib 4.38 3.86 

Silk raw, Japan, Ib 3.84 3.32 

Suitings, clay worsted, 12-oz., yard 1.24 1.60 

Suitings, indigo blue, wool, yard 1.57 1.66 

Suitings, serge, yard 1.07 1.17 

Tickings, Amoskeag, yard 12 .14 

Trouserings, worsted, yard 2.48 2.59 

Underwear, shirts, drawers, wool, doz. 27.00 27.00 

Women's dress goods, poplar cloth, yd.. .19 .20 

Wool, Ohio, fine fleece, scoured, Ib 74 .70 

Worsted yarns, Ib 1.31 1.27 

FUEL AND LIGHTING. 

Candles. 14 oz., Ib 07 .07 

Coal, anthracite, broken, ton 4.20 4.20 

Coal anthracite, chestnut, ton 4.82 4.95 

Coal, anthracite, egg, ton 4.79 4.95 

Coal, anthracite, stove, ton 4.82 4.95 

Coal, bituminous, ton 3.05 3.00 

Coke. Connellsville, ton 2.02 2.55 

Matches, parlor, 144 boxes lafO 1.50 

Petroleum, crude, brl O6 1.40 

Petroleum, refined, gal 08 .08 

METALS AND IMPLEMENTS. 

Augers, extra, 1 inch, each 37 .33 

Axes, M. O. O., Yankee, each 67 .62 

Bar iron, common, Ib 01 02 

Barb wire, galvanized, 100 Ibs 2.36 2.33 

Chisels, 1 inch, each 33 .25 

Copper, ingot, Ib 13 .13 

Copper, sheet, hot rolled, Ib 18 .19 

Copper, wire, bare, Ib 15 .15 

Doorknobs, steel, pair 40 .40 

Files, 8 inch, dozen 93 .93 

Hammers, Maydole, No. 1%, each 47 .47 

Lead, pig, Ib 04 .95 

Lead, pipe, 100 Ibs 4.82 5.46 

Locks, common mortise, each 16 .15 

Nails, 8 penny, fence, 100 Ibs 1.87 1.95 

Pig iron, Bessemer, ton 17.41 18.60 

Pig iron, foundry, No. 1, ton 17.81 18.50 

Planes, Bailey, No. 5, each 1.53 1.53 

Saws, crosscut, Disston No. 2, each 1.60 1.60 

Shovels, Ames, No. 2, dozen 7.62 7.84 

Silver, bar. fine, oz 52 .52 

Spelter, western, Ib 05 .06 

Steel billets, ton 24.62 27.60 

Steel rails, ton 28.00 28.00 

Tin, pig, Ib 30 .33 

Tinplates, domestic, 100 Ibs 3.74 3.84 

Trowels, M. O. O., brick, each 34 .34 

Vises, solid box, FO Ib., each 4.60 4.60 

Wood screws, 1 inch, gross 12 .15 

Zinc, sheet, 100 Ibs 6.64 7.13 

LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIALS. 

Brick, common, M 6.39 6.00 

Carbonate of lead, Ib 06 .07 

Cement, Portland, brl 1.41 1.43 

Doors, white pine, each 1.77 1.81 

Hemlock, M feet 20.68 21.00 

Lime, common, brl 1.04 1.04 

Linseed oil, raw, gal 58 .77 

Maple, hard, M feet 31.00 31.00 

Oak. white. M feet 48.42 55.00 

Oak, white, quartered, M feet 84.33 88.00 

Oxide of zinc. Ib 05 .05 

Pine white, boards, M feet 37.10 38.10 

Pine, yellow, flooring M feet 45,83 46.50 

Pine, yellow, siding. M feet 33.04 31.00 

Plate glass, polished, sq. ft..: 20 .25 

Poplar, M feet 57.62 59.00 

Putty, Ib 01 .01 

Rosin, good, strained, Ib 3.50 4.55 

Shingles, cypress, M 3.27 3.85 

Spruce, M feet 25.25 25.00 

Tar, brl 1.64 2.00 

Turpentine, spirits of, gal 49 .63 

Window glass, firsts. 60 sq. ft 2.32 2.88 



DRUGS AND CHEMICALS. 

Commodity. 1909. 1910. 

Alcohol, grain, gal ....................... 2.62 2.61 

Alcohol, wood, gal ......................... 50 .50 

Alum, lump, Ib ............................ 02 .02 

Brimstone, crude, ton .................... 22.00 22.00 

Glycerin, refined, Ib ....................... 17 .20 

Muriatic acid, Ib .......................... 01 .01 

Opium, natural, Ib ........................ 4.61 6.46 

Quinine. American, oz ..................... 14 .14 

Sulphuric acid, Ib ......................... 01 .01 

HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS. 

Earthenware, plates, white, doz ......... 46 .46 

Earthenware, cups and saucers, gross. 3.39 3.39 

Furniture, bedroom sets, each ........... 10.87 ll.aO 

Furniture, chairs, maple, doz ............ 9.00 9.00 

Furniture, chairs, kitchen, doz...! ..... 5.58 5.50 

Furniture, tables, kitchen, doz .......... 18.00 19.50 

Glassware, nappies, doz ................... 11 .11 

Glassware, pitchers, doz ................. 1.00 .80 

Glassware, tumblers, common, doz ...... 13 .12 

Table cutlery, knives, forks, gross ..... 5.00 5.00 

Woodenware. pails, doz .................. -1.92 1.90 

Woodenware, tubs, nest of 3 ............ 1.65 1.66 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Cottonseed meal, ton ..................... 32.04 36.00 

Cottonseed oil, gal ......................... 44 .55 

Jute, raw, Ib ............................... 03 .03 

Malt, western, bu ......................... 79 .83 

Paper, news, Ib ............................ 02 .02 

Paper, Manila wrapping, Ib .............. 05 .05 

Proof spirits, gal ......................... 1.36 1.35 

Rope, Manila, Ib ........................... 08 .08 

Rubber, Ib ................................. 1.48 1.96 

Soap, castlle, Ib ........................... 10 .11 

Starch, laundry, Ib ......................... 04 .04 

Tobacco, plug, Ib .......................... 47 .47 

Tobacco, smoking, granulated. Ib ....... 60 .60 

NATIONAL MONETARY COMMISSION. 

Appointed under the act to amend the national 
banking laws approved May 30, 1908. 

Senator Nelson W. Aldrich of Rhode Island, 
chairman; Representative Edward B. Vreeland or 
New York, vice-chairman; Senator Julius C. Bur- 
rows of Michigan, Senator Eugene Hale of Maine, 
Secretary of State Philander C. Knox of Pennsyl- 
vania, Henry M. Teller of Colorado, Senator Her- 
rando D. Money of Mississippi, Senator Joseph W. 
Bailey of Texas, Senator Theodore E. Burton of 
Ohio, Robert W. Bonynge of Colorado, and Repre- 
sentatives John W. Weeks of Massachusetts, Syl- 
vester C. Smith of California, Lemuel P. Padgett 
of Tennessee, George F. Burgess of Texas and Ar- 
sene P. Pujo of Louisiana. 

Secretary Arthur B. Shelton, 1712 R street, 
Washington, D. C. 

Assistant to the Commission Prof. A. Piatt An- 
drew. , __ 



STATES MILITARY ACADEMY. 
x West Point. N. Y. 

The United States military academy is a school 
for the practical and theoretical training of ca- 
dets for the military service of the United States. 
Upon completing the course satisfactorily cadets 
are eligible for promotion and commission as sec- 
ond lieutenants In any arm or corps of the army 
in which there may be a vacancy the duties of 
which they may have been Judged competent to 
perform. The maximum number of cadets at pres- 
ent permitted by law Is 521. The corps of cadets 
consists of one from each congressional district. 
one from each territorv. one from the District nt 
Columbia, two from each state at large and forty 
from the United States at large, all appointed by 
the president. _ 

TRAFFIC OF SATJLT STE. MARIE CANALS. 
1907. 1908. 1909. 

Steamers .............. 17,246 12,553 16,463 

Sailing vessels ......... 2,303 1,355 1,787 

Jnregistered .......... 889 1,273 984 



Total 20,437 15,685 19,204 

Net registered tonnnge.44,087,974 31,091,730 46,751,717 

Net freight tonnage. ..58,217.214 41,390,557 57,895,149 

Passengers, number 62.758 53,287 69,948 



58 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



RELATIVE PRICES OF COMMODITIES. 



In this table, prepared by the department of la- 
bor In Washington, the average wholesale price 
In New York and other primary markets of each 
article for Ihe years 1890-1899, inclusive, is taken as 



the base price and is represented by 100. The relative 
price is the average wholesale price for each year 
from 1898 to 1909. inclusive, compared with the base 
price. The relative price in March, 1910, is added. 



YEAR. 


CATTLE AND CATTLE PRODUCTS. 


DA IKY PRODUCTS. 


Cattle. 


Beef, 
fresh. 


Beef, 
hams. 


Beef, 
mess. 


Tallow. 


Hides. 


Milk. 


Butter. 


Cheese 


1898 


102.2 
113.2 
111.3 
116.6 
139.5 
105.8 
110.9 
111.2 
114.2 
122.9 


101.3 
108.3 
104.3 
102.1 
125.9 
101.7 
106.1 
104.0 
101.2 
114.7 
129.5 
133.1 
142.1 


118.8 
125.6 
114.2 
112.6 
118 
117.2 
123.5 
121.6 
119.2 
144.0 
153.2 
138.8 
138.2 


114.2 
115. 9 
121.7 
116.3 
147.1 
113.1 
109.4 
125.0 
110.3 
122.5 
164.5 
137.5 
183.6 


81.8 
104.1 
111.5 
119.1 
144.6 
117.2 
105.5 
103.2 
119.3 
142.8 
126.7 
136.6 
162.8 


122.8 
131.8 
127.4 
132.0 
147.8 
124.8 
124.4 
152f6 
164.7 
155.3 
142.6 
175.8 
152.1 


93.7 
00.4 

107.5 
102.7 
112.9 
112.9 
107.8 
113.3 
118.0 
131.4 
129.0 
132.5 
147.1 


86.8 
95.8 
101.7 
97.7 
112.1 
105.7 
98.4 
112.8 
113.1 
128.5 
122 1 
131.7 
148.1 


83.3 
108.9 
114.3 
102.4 
114.1 
123.3 
103.2 
122.8 
133.Q 
143.3 
138-2 
150.5 
174. 


1899 


11)00 


1901 ... 


VT02 


1903 


1904 .... 


1905 


190(j ...: 


1907 


1908 


127.1 
137.1 
155.3 


1909 


1910 (March).... 



YEAH. 


HOGS AND HOG PRCUCTS. 


SHEEP AND SHEEP 
PRODUCTS. 


Hogs. 


Bacon. 


Hams. 

smoked. 


Mess pork. 


Lard. 


Sheep. 


Mutton. 


Wool. 


18S8 


85.6 
91.8 
115.5 
134.5 
155.2 
137.2 
116.7 
120.2 
142.2 
130.2 
129.5 
169.1 
238.0 


89.4 
85.8 
111.5 
132.3 
159.0 
142.1 
115.1 
119.0 
139.9 
140.7 
133.1 
173.4 
219.8 


82.0 
93.8 
104.2 
109.2 
123.1 
129.2 
108.9 
10B. 3 
125.5 
132.4 
114.3 
133.1 
176.8 


84.8 
80.3 
107.5 
134.2 
154 2 
143.1 
120.6 
123.9 
150.5 
151.0 
137.3 
183.5 
232.3 


84.4 
85.0 
105.5 
135.3 
161.9 
134.1 
111.8 
113.9 
135.6 
140.7 
138.8 
178.7 
219.3 


104.9 
104 3 
112.0 
92.0 
103.2 
98.4 
109.1 
131.5 
132.6 
129.9 
111.0 
121.7 
189.4 


98.0 
94.3 
96.4 
89.5 
97.9 
98.7 
103.2 
113.9 
120.7 
116.0 
114.5 
119.2 
175.7 


108.3 
110.8 
117.7 
96.6 
100.8 
110.3 
115.5 
127? 
121 i 
121.9 
118? 
126'fi 

mi 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1M03 


1904 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 (March)... 



YEAR. 



1898 

1899 

1900 

1901. 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 (March'.., 



CORN, ETC. 



Corn. 



82.6 
87.6 
100.2 
130.6 
156.9 
121.1 
182.6 
131.7 
121.8 
138.8 
179.9 
175.5 
164.2 



Glu- 
cose. 



91.8 
95.6 
104.9 
116.0 
153.6 
129.7 
126.3 
125.1 
142.9 
159.4 
186.2 
174.4 
153.0 



Meal. 



83.7 
91.2 
97.0 
115.5 
148.2 
124.7 
129.5 
128.4 
122.5 
131.5 
156.4 
156.7 
167.1 



FLAXSEKD, 
ETC. 



Flax- 
seed. 



99.8 
104.0 
145.7 
145.8 
135.0 

94.1 

99.6 
107.6 

99.1 
106.1 
108.0 
140.6 
192.7 



Lin- 
seed 
oil. 



86.5 
94.1 
138.7 
140.0 
130.8 
91.9 
91.7 
103.1 
89.3 
95.7 
9ti.5 
127.9 
109.8 



RYE AND 
RYE FLOUR. 



Rye. 



93.8 
104.4 

97.9 
100.8 
102.5 

97.5 
133.4 
134.5 
115.5 
1*5.4 
148.0 
148.0 
149.6 



Rye 
flour. 



92.9 
99.4 
103.3 
100 1 
1U3.8 
94.9 
131.1 
134.7 
115.9 
138.7 
142. 8 
135.2 
133.4 



WHEAT AND 
WH'T FLOUR. 



Wheat Wneat 
11 flour. 



117.8 
94.7 
93.7 
95.7 
98.7 
105 1 
138.3 
134.5 
105.6 
120.8 
131.8 
159.7 
158.1 



BREAD, ETC. 



Wheat Crack- 
flour. 



109.0 
87.9 
88.3 
87.4 
89.7 
97.1 
125.4 
122.2 
96.8 
108.6 
118.8 
138.6 
135.4 



ers. 



Loaf 
bre'd 



107.3 
99.1 
102.7 
108.2 
108.2 
101.3 
103.4 
113.8 
112.1 
112.1 
112.1 
112.8 
120.7 



100.8 
100.8 
100.8 
100.8 
100.8 
100.8 
106.0 
110.9 
110.9 
110.9 
114.5 
117.1 
117.9 



COTTON AND COTTON GOODS. 



Cotton, 
upland, 
mld'ling 



Bags, 
2-bushel 
Am'sk'g 



Calico, 
Cocheco 

prints. 



Cotton 
flannels. 



Cotton 
thread. 



Cotton 
yarns. 



Denims, 



Drill- 
ings. 



Ging- 
hams. 



Ho- 
siery 



1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 (March). 



76.9 
84.7 
123.8 
111.1 
115.1 
144.7 
155.9 
123.1 
142.0 



153.0 
134.8 
156.0 
193.8 



95.6 
103.4 
112.6 
101.0 
102.4 
104.2 
128.4 
109.6 
129.1 



138.5 
134.3 
134.6 
143.0 



81.4 
87.3 
94.9 
90.4 
90.4 
91.1 
95.7 
93.5 
99.5 
121.0 
104.3 
97.1 
114.6 



81.0 
88.0 
101.6 
95.4 
96.1 
106.8 
125.6 
119.7 
128.2 
139.5 
119.2 
108.4 
128.9 



98.4 
98.4 
120.1 
120.1 
120.1 
120.1 
120.1 
120.1 
120.1 
134.8 
131.7 
126.4 
126.4 



90.8 
88.5 
115.5 
98.3 
94.0 
112.9 
119.5 
105.7 
120.8 
133.9 
108.8 
118.6 
131.9 



85.9 
85.8 
102.6 
100.2 
100.6 
108.0 
116.6 
103.7 
118.1 
132.3 
111.1 
119.9 
143.7 



86.8 
88.5 
105.0 
102.2 
102.0 
109.6 
126.7 
125.8 
138.8 
147.2 
130.8 
139.7 
151.4 



83.1 
89.7 
96.3 
92.3 
99.2 
101.8 
99.9 
93.4 
104.7 
122.0 
101.5 
107.2 
124.5 



83.4 
82.5 
87.3 
85.9 
85.2 
90.1 
89.2 
87.5 
89 7 
97.4 
89.5 
92.3 
93.4 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



50 



RELATIVE PRICES OF COMMODITIES. CONTINUED. 



YEAR. 


COTTON AND COTTON GOODS. 


WOOL AND WOOLEN GOODS. 


Print 
cloths. 


Sheet- 
ings. 


Shirt- 
ings. 


Tick- 
ings. 


Wool. 


Blan- 
k'ts,all 
wool. 


Broad- 
cloths. 


Car- 
pets. 


Flan- 
nels. 


Horse 
blan- 
kets. 


1898 


72.6 
96.3 
108.6 
99.3 
108.9 
113.3 
117.3 
110.0 
127.7 
167.4 
118.0 
126.5 
145.3 


86.7 
92.2 
105.9 
101.8 
101.4 
110.6 
121.1 
113.5 
122.4 
132.2 
120.0 
119.6 
134.7 


83.8 
87.8 
100.4 
98.9 
98.8 
103.2 
104.7 
Ml. 2 
111.1 
137.4 
120.0 
116.4 
126.6 


84.3 
87.0 
102.2 
95.5 
99.0 
104. 1 
114.3 
102.1 
119.0 
129.4 
106.0 
111.3 
132.0 


108.3 
110.8 
117.7 
9P.6 
100.8 
110.3 
1155 
127.3 
121.1 
121.5 
118.3 
126.5 
123.3 


107.1 
95.2 
107.1 
101.2 
101.2 
110.1 
110 1 
119.0 
122.0 
119.0 
113.1 
119.0 
131.0 


98.2 
98.2 
108.0 
110.3 
HO.b 
110.3 
110.5 
115.2 
116.6 
116.6 
115.6 
116.6 
118.9 


100.2 
99.4 
102.7 
101.9 
102.5 
108.6 
110.0 
115.7 
117.7 
123.2 
118.9 
116.8 
117.3 


97.8 
99.5 
108.7 
100.8 
105.8 
114.3 
117.6 
118.4 
122.4 
123.1 
122.4 
121 .9 
124.4 


93.5 
94.2 
118.7 
109.9 
109.9 
117.8 
122.2 
130.9 
135.3 
130.9 
136.5 
126.5 
135.3 


1899 .. 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904..., 


1905 


1906 


1907... 


1908.... 


B09 


1910 (March) 


YEAR. 




WOOL AND WOOLEN GOODS. 


HIDES, LEATHER, 
BOOTS AND SHOES. 


PETROLEUM. 




Over- 
coat- 
ings 
(all 
wool). 


Suitr 
ings. 


Under- 
wear 

(all 
wool). 


Dress 
goods 
(all 
wool). 


Wor- 
sted 
yarns. 


Hides. 


Leath- 
er. 


Boots 
and 
shoes. 


Crude. 


Re- 
fined. 


1898 


97.1 
100.6 
116.1 
105.3 
105.3 


103.4 
106.1 
115.8 
KM. 9 
105.8 
109.0 
109.0 
122.7 
134.8 
133.1 
127.6 
135.1 
142.2 


92.7 
100.4 
100.4 
100.4 
100.4 
100.4 
100.4 
100.4 
115.8 
115.8 
115.8 
115.8 
115.8 


88.5 
102.7 
118.7 
107.9 
109.8 
114.4 
115.6 
129.7 
134.1 
130.9 
127.0 
133.4 
140.7 


100.5 
106.7 
118.4 
102.2 
111.7 
118.0 
116.5 
124.7 
128.5 
127.9 
117.6 
130.2 
128.7 


122.8 
131.8 
127.4 
132.0 
142.8 
124.8 
124.4 
152.6 
164.7 
155.3 
142.6 
175.8 
152.1 


104.4 
109.3 
113.2 
110.8 
112.7 
112.0 
108.5 
112.1 
120.4 
124.0 
119.4 
126.8 
128.9 


96.3 
96.8 
99.4 
99.2 
'.IS. 11 
100.2 
101.1 
107.4 
121.8 
125.9 
121.3 
128.1 
128.8 


100.2 
142.1 
14ft.5 
132.9 
185.9 
174.5 
178.8 
152.1 
175.5 
190.5 
195.6 
182.7 
153.8 


99.5 
118.0 
132.6 
119.3 
118.8 
142.8 
140.6 
126.6 
131.8 
139.1 
143.1 
133.7 
127.4 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


110.2 
110.3 
118.2 
126.1 
124.8 
122.6 
109.8 
114.0 


1904 


1905 
1906 


1907 


1908 
1909 


1910 (March) 



SUMMARY OT RELATIVE PRICES OF COMMODITIES, 1898 TO 1910, BY GROUPS. 
Average price for 1890-1890100. 



YEAR. 


Farm 
prod'cts. 


Food, 
etc. 


Cloths 
and 
clothing 


Fuel 
and 
lighting 


Metals 
and 
imple- 
ments. 


Lumber 
and 
building 
material 


Drugs 
and 
chemi- 
cals. 


House- 
furnish- 
ing 
goods. 


Mis- 
cella- 
neous. 


AH 1 
com- 
mod- 
ities. 


1898 


96.1 


94.4 


96 7 


95 4 


86.4 


95 8 


106 4 


92.0 


92.4 


93.4 


1899 


100.0 


98.3 


106.8 


105.0 


114.7 


105.6 


111.3 


95.1 


97.7 


101.7 


1900 


109.5 


104.2 


101.0 


120.9 


120.5 


115.7 


115.7 


106.1 


109.8 


110.5 


1901 


116 9 


105.9 


102 


119 5 


111.9 


116.7 


115.2 


110.9 


107.4 


108.5 


1902 


130.5 


111.3 


107 1 


134 3 


117.2 


118.8 


114.2 


112.2 


114.1 


112.9 


1903 


118.8 


107.1 


10ti.6 


149.3 


117.6 


121.4 


112.6 


113.0 


113.6 


113.6 


1904 


126.2 


107.2 


109.8. 


132.6 


109.6 


122.7 


110.0 


111.7 


111.7 


113.0 


1905 . 


124.2 


108.7 


112.0 


128.8 


122.5 


127.8 


109.1 


109.1 


112.8 


115.9 


1906 


123.6 


112.6 


120.0 


1Z9.5 


135.2 


1-10 1 


101.2 


111.0 


121.1 


122.4 


1907 


137.1 


117.8 


126.7 


135.0 


143.4 


146.9 


109.6 


118.5 


127.1 


129.5 


1908 


133.1 


120.6 


116. 9 


130.8 


125.4 


133.1 


110.4 


114.0 


119.9 


122.8 


1909 


153.1 


124.7 


119.6 


129.3 


124.8 


138.4 


112.4 


111.7 


125.9 


126.5 


1910(March) 


181.1 


130.9 


126.4 


130.3' 


128.9 


151.3 


116.4 


109.7 


132.2 


138.8 



WORLD'S SHIPS, RAILWAYS, TELEGRAPHS AND CABLES. 

[Report of the bureau of statistics, Washington, D. C.] 
Development by decades of carrying power, commerce and means of communication from 1800 to 1905. 



YEAR. 


Popu- 
lation. 


OOMMEKCE. 


CARRYING POWER. 


Rail- 
ways. 


Tele- 
graphs 


Cables 


Total. 


Per 
capita. 


Sail. 


Steam. 


Total. 


1800 


Mil- 
lions. 

640 
780 
' 847 
950 
1,075 


Mil- 
lionsof 
dollars 
1,479 
1,659 
1,981 
2,789 
4.049 


Dol- 
lars. 

2.31 
2.13 

2.34 
2.93 
3.76 


Thou- 
sand 
tons. 
4,026 
5,814 
7,100 
9,012 
11,470 


Thou- 
sand 
tons. 


Thou- 
sand 
tons. 

4,02G 


Thou- 
sand 
miles. 


Thou- 
sand 
miles. 


Thou- 
sand 
miles. 


1820 


0.02 
.11 
.37 

.8t> 


5,894 
7,528 
10,482 
14.KE 








1830 .. 


0.2 
5.4 
24.0 
67.4 
139.9 
224.9 
390.0 
500.0 
550.0 






1840 






1850 . 


5 

100 
281 
440 
768 
1.180 
1.300 


1-40 

m 

16 
49 
132 
200 
200 


I860 


1.205 
1,310 
1.439 


7,246 
10,663 
14.701 
17,519 
20.105 
22.500 


6.01 
8.14 
10.26 
11.80 
13.33 
14.06 


14.890 
12.900 
14,400 
12,640 
8,119 
6.037 


1.7 

3.0 
5.9 
9.0 
14.7 
18.6 


21,730 
25,100 
37,900 
48,800 
66.800 
80,400 


1870 


1880 


1800.... 


1.488 
1.500 
1,600 


1900 
1905 



60 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



UNITED STATES CUSTOMS DUTIES. 



Following are the existing tariff rates placed by 

the Payno-Aldrich act on articles in common use 

or of extensive importation. The chief items on 

the free list are included. Amounts given in dol- 
lars and cents are specific and the percentages 

ore nd valorem duties. The abbreviation "n. s. 

p." ine.-iris not specially provided toi: 

Agricultural implements, 15%. 

Albums, 35%. 

Alcohol, $2. GO proof gal. 

Aluminum, crude, 7c ib. ; plates, etc., lie Ib. 

Ammonia, l%c a Ib. to 5c Ib. 

Animals, n. s. p., 20%; cattle, less than 1 year 
old. $2 per head; other cattle, value $14 or less, 
$3.75 head; value over $14, 27%%; swine, $1.50 a 
head; horses and mules, value $150 or less, $30 a 
head; value over $150, 25%; sheep, 1 year or more 
old, $1.50 a head; under 1 year, 75c head. 

Apples, green, 25c bu. ; dried, 2c Ib. 

Art, works of, such as painting and statuary, 15%; 
more than twenty years old, free. 

Bacon and hams, 4c 11). 

Barley, 30c bu. of 48 Ibs. ; malt, 45c bu. of 45 Ibs. 

Barrels, casks, empty, 30%. 

Baskets, 35% to 40%. 

Bay rum. $1.75 gal. 

Beaded fabrics, not wool, 60%; wool, 55c Ib. and 
60%. 

Beads, not strung, 35%; in jewelry, 60%. 

Beans. 45c.bu. of 60 Ibs. 

Beef, frosff, l^c Ib. 

Beets, 25%; sugar beets, 10%. 

Birds, free; dressed for ornaments, 60%. 

Biscuits, bread, n. s. p., 20%. 

Blacking. 25%. 

Blank books, n. s. p., 25%. 

Blankets, 22c Ib. and 30% to 44c Ib. and 55%. 

Bone, manufactures of, n. s. p., 35%. 

Books, 25%; printed more than twenty jears, free. 

Boots and shoes (leather), Uffo. 

Bor.ix, ic Ib. 

Bottles, glass, ornamented, 60%. 

Braids, wool. 55c Ib. and 60%; silk, cotton, flax, 
60%; grass, straw, 15% to 20%. 

Brick, lire, $1.25 ton to 35% 

Bristles, 7%c Ib. 

Bronze, manufactures of, 45%. 

Brushes, 40%. 

BucKwheat, I5c bu of 48 Ibs. 

Buggies, carriages, 45%. 

Butter and substitutes for, 6c Ib. 

Buttons, l-12c to l%c per line per gross and 15%; 
buttons, n. s. p., 50%. 

Cabbages, 2c each. 

Cameras, 45%. 

Camphor, 6c Ib. 

Carbons for electric lights, 35c to 65c per 100 ft.; 
carbon pots, 20%. 

Cards, playing. lOc per pack and 20%. 

Carpets, Axminster, moquette, chenille. Saxony, 
Wilton, Tournay, 60c sq. yd. and- 40%; Brussels, 
44c sq. yd. and 40%; velvet and tapestry velvet, 
40c sq. yd. and 40%; tapestry Brussels, 28c sq. 
yd. and 40%; thrte-ply Ingrain, 22c sq. yd. and 
40%; two-ply ingrain, 18c sq. yd. and 40%; woven 
whole for rooms, lOc sq. yd. and 40%; carpets of 
wool, flax or cotton and mats and rugs of cot- 
ton, 50%. 

Cash registers, 30%. 

Castor oil. 35c gal. 

Cement, hydraulic, in barrels, 8c 100 Ibs.; In bulk, 
7c 100 Ibs.; oth;r cement, 20%. 

Chalk, prepared, Ic Ib. ; manufactures of, n. s. p., 
25%. 

Charcoal, 25%. 

Charts, paper, n. s. p., 25%. 

Cheese, 6c Ib. 

China, decorated, 60%; not decorated, 55%. 

Chloroform, lOc Ib. 

Chocolate or cocoa, value not above 15c Ib., 2%c 
Ib. ; above 15c and not above 24c Ib., 2%c Ib. 
and 10%; above 24c and not above 35c Ib., Be Ib. 
and 10%; above 35c Ib., 50%. 

Cider, 5c gal. 

Cigars, cigarettes, $4.50 Ib. and 25%. 

Clocks, n. s. p., 40%. 

Clothing, cotton, 50%; wool, 44c Ib. and 60%; 
silk, 60%. 



Coal, bituminous, 45c ton; anthracite, free. 

Cod liver oil, 15c gal. 

Coffee, free. 

Coke, 20%. 

Collars and cuffs, cotton, 45c doz. and 15%; linen 
40c doz. and 20%. 

Colors, paints, etc., n. s. p., 30%. 

Combs, norn, 50%. 

Confectionery, n. s. p., 4c Ib. and 15% to 50%. 

Copper, manufactures, 45%; plates, sheets, 2c Ib. ; 
ore, free. 

Cork, bark and manufactures of, n. s. p., 30%. 

Corn, 15c bu. of 56 Ibs. 

Cornmeal, 40c 100 Ibs. 

Cotton, raw,, free; cloth, Ic to 8c sq. yd.; hand- 
kerchiefs, 4%c and 10%; hosiery, 70c to $2 doz. 

pairs and 15%; shirts, drawers, 60c doz. and 15% 
to $2.25 doz and 35%; thread, colored, 6c to 67c 
Ib. ; not colored, 2^c to 28c Ib. 

Currants, dried, 2c Ib. 

Damask, cotton table, 40%. 

Diamonds, in rough, free; cut, but not set, 10%, 
set, 607o. 

Drugs, crude, free; advanced in value by treat- 
ment, V4c Ib. and 10%. 

Dyewoods, crude, free; extracts of, n. s. p., 
%c Ib. 

Earthenware, plain, 25%; ornamented, 40%. 

Eggs, 5c doz. 

Embroideries, lace. 60%. 

Engravings, n. s. p., 25%. 

Envelopes, plain, 20%; other, 35%. 

Etchings, paper, 25%. 

Fans, palmleaf, free; all other 50%. 

Feathers, plain, 20%; dressed, colored, 60%. 

Fertilizers, free. 

Figs, 2%c Ib. 

Fish, American fisheries, free; n. s. p., %c Ib. ; 
halibut or salmon, Ic Ib. ; herrings, pickled, %c 
Ib. ; ditto, fresh, %c Ib. ; fish packed In tins, 
etc., l#c to lOc per package, according to size; 
caviar, 30%. 

Flax, manufactures of, n. s. p., 45%; straw, $5 a 
ton; not hackled, Ic Ib. ; hackled, 3c Ib. ; tow, 
$20 ton. 

Flaxs'.-ed, 25c bu of 56 Ibs. 

Flour, wheat, 25%. 

Flowers, artificial, 60%. 

Furniture (wood), 35%. 

Fur, manufactures of, prepared for use as ma- 
terial, 35%: wearing apparel, B0%. 

Glass, common wii.dow, I'/ic to 4'/4c Ib.. according 
to value and size; glassware, n. s. p., 60%; crown, 
polished, 4c to 15c sq. ft.; cast plate, lOc to 25 
sq, ft. 

Gloves, leather, $1.25 to $4.75 doz. pairs; silk, cot- 
ton, fur, 50%. 

Glucose or grape sucrar, 1V-C Ib. 

Glue, 2V a c Ib. to 15c Ib. and 20%. 

Jlycerln, crude, Ic Ib. ; refined. 3c Ib. 

Gold, manufactures, 45%; Jewelry, 60%; gold leaf, 
35c 100 leaves. 

Grass fibers, manufactures, n. s. p., 45%. 

Grindstones, $1.75 ton. 

Guns, 25% to $6 and 35%. 

Gutta-percha, manufactures of, n. s. p.. 35%. 

Hair, human, not manufactured, 20%; manufac- 
tured, 35%; hair for mattresses, 10%. 

Handkerchiefs, silk. 50% to 60%; linen, 50% to 55%. 

Harness, leather, 2C%. 

Hats and caps, fur, $1.50 to $7 doz. and 20%; other 
material, 45% to 60%. 

Hay, $4 ton. 

Hemp, tow, $2.50 ton; hackled. $45 ton; manufac- 
tures, n. s. p., 45%. 

Hides, raw, free. 

Honey, 20c gal. 

Hooks and eyes, metallic, 4'/&c Ib. and 15%. 

Hops, 16c Ib. 

Horn, manufactures, n. s. p., 40%. 

India rubber, manufactures of, n. s. p., 35%. 

Ink, 25%. 

Iron, ore, 15c ton; in pigs, wrought and cast, $1 
ton; bar, n. s. p., 6-10c Ib. ; manufactures of, 
n. s. p., 45%; b<nms, girders, 3-10c to 4-lOc Ib. ; 
hoop, band or scroll, n. s. p.. 3-lOc to 6-10c Ib. ; 
railway bars, T-rails. 7-40c Ib. ; cast iron pipe, 
%c Ib. ; malleable castings, n. s. p., 7-10c Ib. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



61 



Ivory, manufactures of, 35%; unmanufactured, free. 

Jollies, 35%. 

Jet, manufactures of, n. s. p., 60%. 

Jewelry, 60%. 

Jute, manufactures of, n. s. p., 45%. 

Knives, pocket, 40% to 75c doz and 25%. 

Lace, manufactures of, n. s. p., 60%. 

Lard, lM>c Ib. 

Laths, 20c per 1,000. 

Lead, manufactures of, n. s. p., 45%; in any form, 

n. s. p., 2%c Ib. 

Leather, n. s. p., 15%; grain, buff and split, 7%%. 
Lime, 5c 100 Ibs. 

Linen, manufactures of, n. s. p., 45%. 
Linoleum, 8c sq. yd. and 15% to lOc sq. yd. and 

20%. 

Linseed, 25c bu. of 56 Ibs.; oil, 15c gal. of 7% Ibs. 

Liquors, ale, portor, stout, l>eer, in bottles or jugs, 
45c gal.; !n bulk, 23c gal.; brandy, n. s. p., 
$2.60 proof gal.; cordials, liqueurs, bitters, n. s. 
p., $2.60 proof gal.; champagnes and other 
sparkling wines in bottles of 1 pint to 1 quart, 
$9.60 Joz. ; whisky, gin and other spirits, $2.00 
proof gal. 

Macaroni, etc., l%c Ib. 

Manila cables and cordage, %c Ib. 

Maple sirup and sugar, 4c Ib. 

Maps, paper, n. s. p., 25%. 

Marble, in blocks, rough, 65c cubic ft.; manufac- 
tures of, n. s. p., 50%. 

Marmalade, Ic Ib., 35%. 

Matches, friction, per gross of 144 boxes, 100 
watches to the box, in bulk, %c per 1,000; wax 
and tapers, 35%. 

Matting, rattan, 6c sq. yd.; mats of same, 4c sq. 
ft.; oilcloth, 6c sq. yd. and 15% to lOc sq. yd. 
ami 15%. 

Meats, prepared or preserved, n. s. p., 25%. 

Medicinal preparations, n. s. p., 25%; containing 
alcohol, 55c Ib. 

Meerschaum, crude, free; pipes, 60%. 

Mica, unmanufactured, 5c Ib. and 20%; manufac- 
tured. lOc Ib. and 20%. 

Milk, fresh, 2c gal.; preserved, condensed, 2c Ib.; 
cream, 5c gal. 

Mineral waters, in bottles of 1 pint to 1 quart, 
30o doz.; in bottles of more than 1 quart, 24c 
cal.; in bulk, 8c gal. 

Mirrors, 45%. 

Molosses. 20% to 6c gal., according to test. 

Music, in books or sheets, n. s. p., 25%. 

Musical instruments, 45%. 

Mutton, IM-c Ib. 

Nails, wire, 4-lOc to %c Ib. ; cut nails and spikes, 
4-10c Ib. ; horseshoe, n. s. p., I'/fcc Ib. 

Naphtha, free. 

Needles, n. s. p., 2E%; for machines. $1 per 1,000 
and 25%; latch, $1.15 per 1,000 and 35%. 

Nickel, in pigs, etc., 6c Ib. ; sheets, 35%; manu- 
factures of, 45%. 

Nippers and pliers, 8c Ib. and 40%. 

Nuts, n. s. p., lc Ib. ; peanuts, unshelled, %c Ib. ; 
peanuts, shelled, lc Ib. ; almonds, shelled, 6c Ib. ; 
almonds, unshelled, 4c Ib. ; filberts and walnuts, 
unshelled, 3c ib. ; shelled, 5c Ib. ; Brazil, palm, 
cocoanut, free. 

Oats, 15c bu. ; oatmeal, lc Ib. 

Oilcloth, for floors, n. s. p., 6c sq. yd. and 15% to 
ICc sq. yd. and 15%. 

Oil, fish, 8c gal.; castor, 35c gal.; cod liver, 15c 

fal.; flaxseed, linseed, poppyseed, 15c gal.; pf., 
y>e Ib. ; fusel, %c Ib. ; hempseed, rapeseed, lOc 
gal.; olive, n. s. p., 40c gal.; peppermint, 25c Ib. ; 
petroleum, naphtha, free. 

Onions, 40c bu. 

Opera glasses, 45%. 

Opium, $1.50 Ib.; dried, $2 Ib.; with less .than 9% 
of morphia, $6 Ib. ; derivatives of, $1.50 oz. ; liquid 
preparations of. 4C%. 

Ore, iron, 15c ton; lead-bearing, l^c Ib. on lead 
contained; zinc, %c to lc on zinc contained; gold, 
silver, nickel, tin, free. 

Oysters, free. 

Paintings, n. s. p., 15%; more than twenty years 
old. free. 

Paints, colors, pigments, n. s. p., 30%. 

Palm leaf, manufactures of, n. s. p., 35%. 

Papjr, printing, 3-10c Ib. to 8-lOc Ib. ; valued above 
5c Ib., 15%; writing, 3c Ib. and 15%; manufac- 
tures of, n. s. p., 35%s wood pulp, ground, %c 



Ib. ; chemical, l-6c Ib. ; paper stock, free. 
Pease, greeu, 25c bu. of 60 Ibs. 
Pencils, lead, 45c gross and 25%; slate, 3c per 100; 

covered with wood, 35%. 
Pens, metallic, except gold, I2c gross. 
Pepper, uuground, free; ground, 2V4C to 3c Ib. 
Perfumery, alcoholic, 60c Ib. and 50%; nonalco- 
holic, 60%. 

Pewter, manufactures of, n. s. p., 45%. 
Phonographs, 45%. 
Phosphorus. I8c Ib. 
Photographic lenses, n. s. p., 45%; dry plates or 

films, n. s. p., 2f%, 
Photograph?, printed more than twenty years, free; 

other, on paper, 25%. 
Pickles, n. s. p., 40%. 
Pineapples, in bulk, $8 per 1,000. 
Pins, not jewelry, 35%. 
Pipes, clay, 15c gross to 50c gross and 25%.; other. 

n. s. p., 60%. 

Plants, nursery stock, n. s. p., 25%. 
Plasters, curative, court, 25%. 

Porcelain ware, decorated, 60%; not decorated, 55% 
Pork, fresh, l%c Ib. 
Potash, crude, free. 
Potatoes. 25c bu. of 60 Ibs. 
Poultry, live, 3c Ib. ; dressed, 5c Ib. 
Powder, gun, 2c Ib. to 4c Ib. 
Precious stones, cut but not set, 10%; set, 60%; 

imitations, not set, 20%. 
Presses, printing, 30%. 
Pulp (see paper). 
Quicksilver, 7c Ib. 
Radium, free. 

Rags, wool, lOc Ib. ; other, free. 
Raisins, 2%c Ib. 
Rattan, rough, fcee; manufactures of, 45%; chair 

cnr-e, 10%. 

Rice, cleaned, 2c Ib. ; uncleaned, l^c Ib. 
Rubber, crude, free; manufactures of, n. s. p., 40%. 
Rye, lOc bu. ; flour, l^c Ib. 
Saccharine, 65c Ib. 
Salt, in bags, barrels, etc., lie per 100 Ibs.; in 

bulk, 7c per 109 Ibs. 
Sausages, fiologna, free; other, 25%. 
Saws, hand, 25%. 
Scissors and shears, 15c doz. and 15% to 75c doz. 

and 25%. 

Screws, 3c to Iflc Ib. 
Sculptures, n. 8. p., 15%; more than twenty years 

old, free. 

Seeds, n. s. p., lOc Ib. 
Sewing machines, 30%. 
Sheep, 1 year old or more, $1.50 head; less than 1 

year, 75c head. 
Shingles, 50c per 1,000. 
Silks, yard, 45c 10 60c Ib. ; clothing, 60%; spun in 

skeins, 35%; skeins not wound or advanced in 

manufacture, free. 
Silver, bullion, free; manufactures of, n. s. p., 

45%; silver leaf, lOc 100 leaves. 
Skins, n. s. p., free. 

Slate and manufactures of, n. s. p., 20%. 
Snuff, 55c Ib. 
Soap, n. s. p., 20%; castile, l^c Ib. ; medicated, 20c 

Ib. ; fancy, perfumed, 50%. 
Spectecles, 20c doz. and 15% to 50%. 
Spices, n. s. p., 3c Ib. ; mustard, lOc Ib. ; sage, lc 

Ib. ; pepper, grourd, 2%c Ib. ; cinnamon, clove, 

.nutmeg, pepper, cassia, unground, free. 
Sponges, 2%; manufactures of, n. s. p., 30%. 
Starch, from potatoes, l%c Ib. ; all other, lc Ib. 
Stockings, cotton, n. s. p., 30%; other cotton, 70c 

doz. pairs to 55%. 
Steves, 45%. 

Straw, $1.50 ton; manufactures of, n. s. p., 35%. 
Sugars, not above No. 16 Dutch standard, 95-100e 

Ib., and for every degree above 75 polariscope 

test, 35-lOOOc Ib.; above No. 16, 1 91-lOOc Ib.; 

saccharine, 65c Ib. ; sugar candy, n. s. p., 4c Ib. 

and 15% to 50%. 
Swords, 50%. 
Tallow, %c Ib. 
Tar and pitch free. 
Tea, free. 
Telescopes, 45%. 

Thread, cotton, on spools, 6c doz. ; flax, lOc Ih. 
Tiles, plain, 4c sq. ft.; glazed, etc., 8c sq. ft. to 

lOc sq. ft. and 25%; quarry, 45%; mantels, etc., 

of tiling, C0%. 



62 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Tin, in ori-, bars, blocks, pig, free; in plates, 

1 2-10c Ib. : manufactures of, 45%. 
Tob.-icco, wrapper, unstemmed, $1.85 Ib. ; stemmed. 

$2.50; filler, unstemmed, 35c Ib. ; stemmed, 50<: 

lit.; snuff, 55c Ib. ; cigars, cigarettes, $4.50 Ib. 

and 25%; tobacco, n. s. p., 55c Ib. 
Toothpicks, wood, 2c 1,000. 
Turpentine, spirits of, free. 
Twine, binding, free. 

Type metal, l^c Ib. on lead; new type, 25.%. 
Typesetting machines, 30%. 
Varnishes, 25%. 
Vegetables, preserved or prepared, n. s. p., 40%, 

in natural state, n. s. p., 25%. 
Vinegar. iy>c pf. gal. 
Watch mov'cmets, 70c each to $3 each and 25%; 

cases, 40%. 

Waterproof cloth, lOc sq. yd. and 20%. 
Wax. vegetable or mineral, free. 
Whalebone, unmanufactured, free; manufactured, 

n. s. p., 35%. 
Wheat, 25c bu. ; wheat flour, 25%. 



, 35%. 
to 40%; fencing, 



Willow, manufactures of, n. s. j 

Wire, except gold and silver, 35? 
%c Ib. 

Wood, manufactures of, n. s. p., 35%- sawed lum- 
ber, n. s. p., $1.25 per 1,000 ft.; timber, hewn 
but not sawed, M>c cubic ft. ; cabinet woods, un- 
manufactured, 15%; veneers, 20%; ties, poles, 
10%.; fence posts, free; logs and unmanufactured 
timber, pulp woods, firewood, free. 

Wool, class 1. lie Ib. ; class 2, I2c Ib. ; class 1, 
washed, 22c Ib. ; scoured, 33c Ib. ; class 2, scoured, 
36c Ib. ; class 3, 4c to 7c Ib. ; woo! on skin, Ic 
Ib. less than on cut wool of same class; blankets, 
22c Ib. and 30% to 44c Ib. and 55%; cloths, knit 
fabrics, n. s. p., 33c Ib. and 50% to 44c Ib. and 
55%; dress goods, women's and children's, 7c sq. 
yd. and 50% '.o lie sq. yd. and 55%; clothing, 
ready made, 44c Ib. and 60%. 

Zinc, manufactures of, n. s. p., 45%; ore, with less 
than 10% zinc, free; with more than 10%, %c to 
Ic Ib. 



UNITED STATES TARIFF COMMISSION. 
Appointed Sept. 11, 1909. 



Prof. Henry C. Emery, Yale university, New 
Haven, Conn. 

James B. Reynolds, assistant secretary of the 
treasury, Washington, D. C. 

Alvin H. Sanders, editor Breeders' Gazette, Chi- 
cago. 

The appointment of the commission was author- 



ized in the second section of the Payne-Aldrlch 
tariff law of 1909, the last sentence in the section 
reading: "To secure the information necessary in 
carrying out the provisions of this section the 
president is authorized to employ such persons as 
may be required." The maximum compensation of 
each member of the commission is $7,500. 



SYNOPSIS OF TARIFF 

Morrison Bills First bill presented to 48th con- 
gress during Chester A. Arthur's administration; 
proposed a horizontal reduction of 20 per cent 
with free Iron ore, coal and lumber; defeated in 
house April 15, 1884. by vote of 159 to 155; house 
heavily democratic and senate republican. Second 
bill presented to 49tli congress during Grover 
Cleveland's first administration; similar to first 
bill, proposing free wool, salt and lumber; de- 
feated in house June 17, 1886. by a vote of 157 to 
140: house democratic, senate republican. 

Mills Bill Presented to 50th congress during 
Cleveland's first administration; provided for free 
lumber and wool, reduction on pig iron and abo- 
lition of specific duties on cotton; passed by house 
July 21, 1888, by vote of 162 to 149, but failed in 
senate; house democratic, senate republican. 

McKinley Bill Passed by 51st congress during 
Benjamin Harrison's administration: became law 
Oct. 6, 1890; high protective measure, though re- 
mitting duties on sugar and providing for reci- 
procity treaties: both houses of congress repub- 
lican. 

Wilson Bill Passed by 53d congress during 
Cleveland's second administration; became law 
Aug. 17, 1894, without th president's signature; 



LEGISLATION SINCE 1884. 

both houses democratic: measure reduced duties 
in some cases and made additions to free list, 
notably wool. 

Dingley Bill Passed by 54th congress during Mc- 
Klnley's administration; approved July 24. 1897; 
passed by house 205 yeas to 122 nays, 27 members 
not voting; passed by senate 38 yeas to 28 nays, 
23 not voting; house contained 206 republicans and 
134 democrats and senate 46 republicans and 34 
democrats; measure raised rates to produce more 
revenue, but was similar In many respects to the 
McKinley act. 

Payne-Aldrich bill passed at extra session of 61st 
congress In first year of President William H. 
Taft's administration; approved Aug. 5, 1909; 
passed the house by a vote of 217 to 161 and the 
senate by n vote of 45 to 34. The conference vote 
in the house was 195 yeas to 183 nays, twenty re- 
publicans voting in the negative and two demo- 
crats in the affirmative. In the senate the vote on 
the final conference report was 47 to 31, seven re- 
publicans voting Rgainst it. In general the re- 
vision of the Dingley act was in the direction of 
lower duties, but there were some increases. The 
law Is given practically in full in The Daily Newtr 
Almanac and Year-Book for 1910. 



THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION IN WASHINGTON, 



The Smithsonian institution was established by 
statute in 1846, under the terms of the will of 
James Smithson. who bequeathed his fortune in 1826 
to the United States for the "increase and diffu- 
sion of knowledge among men." From the income 
of the fund a building, known as the Smithsonian 
building, was erected in Washington, E>. C., on 
land given by the United States. Tltc institution 
is legally an establishment havinsc as its members 
the president and vice-president of " the United 
States, the chief .lustice and the president's cabi- 
net. It is governed by a board of regents consist- 
ing of the vice-presid*Bt. the chief justice, three 
members of the United States senate, three mem- 
bers of the house of representatives and six citi- 
zens appointed by joint resolution of congress. It 



is under the immediate direction of the secretary 
of the Smithsonian institution, who is the execu- 
tive officer of the board and the director of the in- 
stitution's activities. The institution aids investiga- 
tors by making grants for research and exploration, 
providing for lectures, initiating scientific projects 
and publishing scientific papers. It has adminis- 
trative charge of the national museum, the national 
gallery of art, the international exchange service, 
the national zoological park, the astrophysical ob- 
servatory and the regional bureau for the interna- 
tional catalogue of scientific literature. The insti- 
tution's original endowment of $541.000 has been 
increased by gifts and accumulated interest to 
$987,000. yielding an annual income of $58.375. The 
secretary' of the institution is Charles D. Walcott. 



ROHAN AND ARABIC NUMERALS. 



I... 
II.. 
HI. 
IV. 



V 5 
VI 6 


IX 
X 


9 
10 


D 
M 


BOO 
.1000 


VII 7 
VIII... 8 





50 
100 


MCMX 


1910 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



c:? 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



OANAL STATISTICS (OFFICIAL). 
Length from deep water to deep water 50.5 miles. 
Length on lnnd-40.5 miles. 
Length at summit level 31.7 miles. 
Bottom width of channel Maximum, 1,000 feet; 

minimum (in Culc-bra eut), 360 feet. 
Depth Minimum, 41 feet; maximum. 45 feet. 
Summit level 83 feet above mean tide. 
Locks in pairs 12. 
Locks, usable length 1.000 feet. 
Locks, usuble width 110 feet. 
Gatun lake, area 164 square miles. 
Gatun lake, channel depth 85 to 45 feet. 
Concrete required 5,000,000 cubic yards. 
Time of transit through canal 10 to 12 hours. 
Time of passage through locks 3 hours. 
Length of relocated Panama railroad 46.2 miles. 



Canal zone, area About 448 square miles, 
^anal zone area owned by United 
322 square miles. 



d States About 



French buildings acquired 2,150. 

French buildings used 1,537. 

Value of utilized French equipment $1,000,000. 

Canal force, average at work About 39,000. 

Estimated total cost of canal $375,000,000. 

Work begun by Americans May 4, 1904. 

Length of canal in use in August, 191010.5 miles. 

Probable date of completion Jan. 1, 1915. 
CANAL COMMISSION. 

Lieut. -Col. Geoflse W. Goethals, U. S. A., chair- 
man and chief engineer. 

Lieiit.-Col. David Du B. Gaillard, U. S. A., corps 
of engineers. 

Lieut. -Col. William L. Slbert, U. S. A., corps of 
engineers. 

Col. William C. Gorgas, U. S. A., medical de- 
partment. 

Harry H. Rousseau, IT. S. N.. civil engineer. 

Lieut. -Col. H. F. Hodges, U. S. A. 

Maurice H. Thatcher, civilian. 

Headquarters of commission in Panama. 

As chairman, Lieut. -Col. Goethals receives a sal- 
ary ol $15,000 annually. Lieut. -Cols. Gaillard and 

Sibert and Civil Engineer Rousseau $14,000 ach 

and Dr. Gorgas, Col'. Hodges and Mr. Thatcher 

$10,<KK> each. 

CIVIL ADMINISTRATION. 

Head of Department Maurice H. Thatcher, Ancon. 

Chief Clerk G. A. Ninas. Ancon. 

CANAL ZONE JUDICIARY. 

Chief Justice Supreme Court H. A. Gudger. 

Associate Justice Wesley M. Owen, Ancon. 

Associate Justice Lorin C. Collins. Empire. 
The salary of the chief justice is $6,500 a year 

and of the associate justices $6,000 each. 
SANITATION. 

Chief Col. W. C. Gorgas. 

Assistant Lieut. -Col. John L. Phillips. 

General Insi>ector Maj. Robert E. Noble. 
CHRONOLOGY. 

First exploration of route, 1527. 

Advocated by Humboldt 1803. 

Panama railroad built 1850-1855. 

Panama Canal company formed by De Lesseps 1879. 

Work on canal begun Feb. 24, 1881. 

Canal company failed Dec. 11, 1888. 

De Lesseps and others sentenced to prison for 
fraud Feb. 9, 1893. 

New French canal company formed October, 1894. 

De Lesseps. died Dee. 7, 1894. 

Hay-Pauncefote treaty superseding the Clayton- 
Buhver treaty signed Nov. 18, 1901; ratified by 
senate Dec. 16; ratified by Great Britain Jan. 
20. 1902. 

Canal property offered to the United States for 
$40.000,000 Jan. 9. 1902; accepted Feb. 16, 1903. 

Bill authorizing construction of canal passed by 
house of representatives Jan. 9, 1902; passed by 
senate June 19. 1902: approved June 28. 1902. 

Canal treaty with Colombia signed Jan. 22. 1903; 
ratified by senate March 17, 1903; rejected by 
Colombia Aug. 12, 1903. 

Revolution in Panama Nov. 3, 1903. 

Canal treaty with Panama negotiated Nov. 18, 
1903; ratified by republic of Panama Dee. 2. 1903; 
ratified by United States senate Feb. 23, 1904. 



Canal commissioners appointed Feb. 29, 1904. 

Papers transferring canal to the United States 
signed in Paris April 22, 1904. 

Bill for government of canal zone passed by the 
senate April 15, 1904; passed by the house April 
21; approved April 26. 

Canal property at Panama formally turned over 
to the United States commissioners May 4, 1904. 

President outlines rules for the government of the 
canal zone and war department takes charge of 
the work May 9, 1904. 

Gen. George W. Davis appointed first governor of 
canal zone May 9, 1904. 

John F. Wallace appointed chief engineer May 
10, 1904; resigned June 29. 1905. 

Republic of Panama paid $10,000,000 May 21, 1904. 

First payment on $40.000,000 to French canal com- 
pany made May 24, 1904. 

Lorin C. Collins appointed Supreme court judge 
for canal zone June 17, 1905. 

New commission with Theodore P. Shonts as chair- 
man named April 3, 1905; Shonts resigned March 
4, 1907. 

John F. Stevens appointed chief engineer June 29, 
1905; resigned Feb. 26. 1907. 

Lieut. -Col. George W. Goethals appointed chief en- 
gineer Feb. 26. 1907. 

PLAN OF THE CANAL. 

The entire length of the Panama canal from 
deep water in the Atlantic to deep water in the 
Pacific is F0.5 miles. Its length on land is 40.5 
miles. In passing through the canal from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific, a vessel will enter a 
channel with a bottom width of 500 feet in Limon 
bay and follow tbis for about seven miles to 
Gatun, where it will enter a series of three locks 
in flight and be lifted eighty-five feet to the level 
of tte Gatun lake. It will sail at full ocean 
speed through this lake, in a channel varying from 
1,000 to 500 feet in width, for a distance of about 
twenty-four miles, to Bas Obispo, vyhere it will 
enter the Culebra cut. It will sail through the 
out. a distance of about nine miles, in a channel 
with a bottom width of 300 feet, to Pedro Miguel. 
There it will enter a lock and be lowered 30% 
feet, to a small lake at an elevation of 54% feet 
above sea level, and will sail through this for 
about 1% miles to Miraflores. There it will enter 
two locks in series and be lowered to sea level, 
passing out into the Pacific through a channel 8% 
miles in length, with a bottom width of 500 feet. 
The depth of the approach channel on the Atlan- 
tic side, where the tidal oscillation does not ex- 
coed iy 3 feet, will be 41 feet at mean tide, and on 
the Pacific side, where the maximum oscillation is 
23 feet, the depth will be 45 feet at mean tide. 

GATUN DAM. 

Tiie Gatun dam, which will form Gatun lake by 
Impounding the waters of the Chagres river and 
other streams, will be nearly 1% miles long, meas- 
ured on its crest, nearly half a mile wide at its base, 
about 400 feet wide at the water surface, about 
100 feet wide at the top, and its erect, as planned, 
will be at an elevation of 115 feet above mean 
sea level, or 30 feet above the normal level of the 
lake. The interior of the dam will be 'formed of 
a natural mixture of sand and clay, dredged by 
hydraulic process from pits above and below the 
dam, and placed between two large masses of 
rock and miscellaneous material, obtained from 
steam-shovel excavation at various points along 
the canal. The top and up-stream slope will be 
riprapped. The spillway is a concrete lined open- 
ing, 1.200 feet long and 300 feet wide, cut through 
a hill of rock nearly in the center of the dam, 
the bottom of the opening being ten feet above sea 
level. During the construction of the dam, all 
the waters discharged from the Chagres river and 
its tributaries will flow through this opening. 
Wh^n the lake is formed, the spillway will be 
closed with a concrete dam. fitted with gates and 
machinery for regulating the water level of the 
lake. 

The water level of. Gatun lake, extending through 
the Culebra eut, will be maintained at the south 
end by aa earth dam connecting the locks at 
Pedro Miguel with the high ground to the west- 



C4 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 







GATUN DAM, SPILLWAY AND LOCKS ON PANAMA CANAL. 



ward, about 1,700 feet long, with its crest at aii 
elevation of 105 feet above mean tide. A small 
lake between the locks at Pedro Miguel and Mira- 
flores will be formed by dams connecting the walls 
of Miraflores locks with tho high ground on either 
Bide. The dam to the westward will be of earth, 
about 2.700 feet long, having its crest about 15 feet 
above the water in Miraflores lake. The east 
dam will be of concrete, about 500 feet long, and 
will form a spillway for Miraflores lake, with 
crest gates similar to those at the spillway of 
the Gutun dam. 

GATUN LAKE. 

Gatun lake will cover an area of 164 square 
miles, with a depth in the ship channel varying 
from 85 to 45 feet. Throughout the first 16 miles 
from Gatun the width of the channel will be 
1.000 feet; then for 4 miles It will be 800 feet and 
for 4 miles more, 500 feet, when the entrance to 
Culebra cut, at Bas Oblspo, will be reached. The 
watel level in the cut will be that of the lake 
and the bottom width of the channel will be 300 
feet. 

CANAL ZONE. 

The canal zone contains about 448 square miles. 
It begins at a point three marine miles from mean 
low-water mark in each ocean and extends for five 
miles on each side of the center line of the route 
of the canal. It includes the group of islands in 
the Bay of Panama named Perico, Naos, Culebra 
und Flamenco. The cities of Panama and Colon 
are excluded from the zone, but the United 
States has the righf to enforce sanitary ordinances 
and maintain public order there in case the re- 
public of Panama should not be able to do so. 
Of the 448 square miles in the zone the United 
States owns 322 and private persons 126. The pri- 
vate property may, however, be acquired at any 
time by the United States by purchase or by the 
exercise of the right of eminent domain. 
THE LOOKS. 

There will be twelve locks in the canal, all in 
duplicate; three pairs in flight at Gatun, with a 
combined lift of 85 feet; one pair at Pedro Miguel, 
with a lift of 30% feet, and two pairs at Mira- 
flores, with a combined lift of 54% feet at mean 
fide. The dimensions of all are the same a usa- 
ble length of 1,000 feet and a usable width of 



110 feet. Each lock will be a chamber, with walls 
and floors of concrete and water-tight gates at 
each end. 

The side walls will be 45 to 50 feet wide at the 
surface of floor; will be perpendicular on the 
face and will narrow from the point 24% feet 
above the floor until they are 8 feet wide at the 
top. The middle wall will be 60 feet wide, ap- 
proximately l feet high, and each face will be 
vertical. At a point 42% feet above the surface 
of the floor and 15 feet above the top of the mid- 
dle culvert, this wall will divide into two parts, 
leaving a space down the center much like the 
letter "U," which will be 19 feet wide at the bot- 
tom. In this center space, which will be 44 feet 
wide at the top, will be a tunnel divided into 
three stories or galleries. The lowest gallery will 
be for drainage; the middle for the wires that 
carry the electric current to operate the gate and 
valve machinery, which will be installed in the 
center wall, and the upper will be a passageway 
for the operators. The lock chambers will be filled 
and emptied through lateral culverts in the floors, 
connected with main culverts, 18 feet in diameter, 
in the walls, the water flowing in and out by 
gravity. 

The lock gates will be steel structures, 7 feet 
thick, 65 feet long and from 47 to 82 feet high. 
They will weigh from 300 to 600 tons each. For 
the entire canal 92 leaves will be required, the 
total weighing 57,000 tons. Intermediate gates will 
be used in the locks to save water and time, if 
lesired. in locking small vessels through, the gates 
being so fixed as to divide the locks into chambers 
600 and 400 feet long, respectively. Of the vessels 
navigating the high seas, 95 per cent are less than 
600 feet long. In the construction of the locks 
it Is estimated that there will be used approxi- 
mately 4,500,000 cubic yards of concrete. 

No vessel will be permitted to enter or pass 
through the locks under its own power. Electric- 
ity will be used to tow all vessels into and 
through the locks, and to operate all gates and 
valves, power being generated by water turbines 
from the head created by Gatun lake. The time 
required to pass a vessel through all the locks 
is estimated at three hours, one hour and a half 
in the three locks at Gatun and about the same 
time in the throe locks on the Pacific side. The 



CHTCAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



65 



time of the passage of a vessel through the entire 
canal is estimated as ranging from ten to twelve 
hours, according to the size of the ship and the 
rate of speed at which it can travel. 

CANAL EXCAVATION TO JULY 31, 1910. 

Cu. yds. 

By French companies 78,146,960 

French excavation useful to canal 29,908,000 

By Americans 

Dry excavation 70,178,614 

Dredges 42,956,592 

Total 113,135,206 

May 4 to Dt>c. 31, 1904 243,472 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1905 1,799,227 

Jan 1 to Dec. 31, 1906 4,948,497 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1907 15,765,290 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1908 37,116.735 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1909 35.096,166 

Jan. 1 to July 31, 1910 18,165,819 



The gold force is made up of the officials, cleri- 
cal force, construction men and skilled artisans 
of the isthmian canal commission and the I'anama 
railroad. Practically all are Americans. The sil- 
ver force represents the unskilled laborers of the 
commission and the railroad. Of these about 5.000 
nre Europeans, mainly Spaniards, with a few 
Italians and other races. The remainder somo 
20,000 a'-e West Indians, about 4,000 of whom are 
employed as artisans receiving 16, 20 and 25 cents, 
and a small number 32 and 40 cents, an hour. The 
standard rate of the West Indian laborer is 10 
cents an hour, but a few doing special work are 
paid 16 and 20 cents, The larger part of the 
Spaniards are paid 20 cents an hour. 

SUBSISTENCE DEPARTMENT. 

The subsistence department is divided into two 
branches commissary and hotel. It does about 



TOTAL BY DIVISIONS AND AMOUNT TO BE EXCAVATED. 



Amount excavated. 
Cubic yards. Total. 



Amount to be excavated. 
Cubic yards. Total. 



tlantic 

Dry excavation.. 

Dredges 

. 'ntral 

Oulebra cut 

AH other points. 
Pacific- 
Dry excavation.. 

Dredges 

Grand totals... 



7,162,572 



50,448,871! 
9,686,as3 



26,256,405 
60,135,459 



1.110,482 
15,990,458 



17,100,940 



23H:759 \ 26 - 743 - 342 
113,135.206 



3,499,559 



15,312.061 
69,402,560 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 

APPBOPBIATIONS. 

Payment to New Panama Canal com'y-HO,000,000.00 

Payment to republic of Panama 10,000,000.00 

Appropriation for 1902 10,000,000.00 

Appropriation for 1906 11,000,000.00 

Deficiency for 1906 6,990,786.00 

Appropriation for 1907 25,456,415.08 

Appropriation for 1908 27,161.367.50 

Deficiency for 1908 12,178,900.00 

Appropriation for 1909 29,187, OOO.OJ 

Deficiency for 1909 5,458,000.00 

Appropriation for 1910 33,638,000.00 

Deficiency for 1910 76,000.00 

Appropriation for 1911 37,855,000.00 

Total 248,001,468.58 

EXPENDITURES TO M.UICH 1, 1910. 

Construction and engineering 63,143,128.14 

Construction and engineering, plant 22,471,687.32 

Sanitation 10,884,410.18 

Civil administration 3,926,853.36 

Panama railroad second main track 1.107,910.78 

Panama railroad relocated line 4,354,137.56 

Purchase and repair of steamers 2.555,009.17 

Zone water works and sewers 3,270,248.92 

Zone roadways 1,429,752.65 

Loans to Panama Railroad company 3,718,567.03 

Construction and repair of buildings... 9,574,865.12 

Miscellaneous 3,960,658.21 



Total 130,397,228.44 

Thrre have been expended for pavements, water 
works, sewers, etc.. In the cities of Panama and 
Colon about $2.500.000. and work under an addi- 
tional appropriation of $800,000 was in progress in 
these cities in 1910. making $3.300.000 In all. This 
sum will be returned to the United States treas- 
ury by water rates collected by the United States 
for a period of fifty years. 

CANAL FORCE. 

On March 23. 1910, the total force of the Isthmian 
cana! commission and Panama railroad company 
actually at work was 38,732, divided as follows: 

Gold. Silver. Total. 

Isthmian canal commission 4.499 26.217 30.716 

Panama railroad, proper 557 3.336 3,893 

Panama railroad relocation 158 3,000 3;i58 

Panama railroad commissary 216 750 965 



Total 



.5,429 33,303 38,732 



$7,000,000 worth of business a year. It feeds, 
clothes and provides with necessities approximately 
50,ODO persons. The department is self-sustaining. 
It has thirteen general stores in as many canal- 
zone villages and three camps on the relocated 
line of the railroad. No goods are sold for cash, 
only coupons issued to emplojes being accepted In 
payment for purchases. 

PART OF CANAL COMPLETED. 
In August 5% miles of the canal at the Atlantic 
entrance wore opened to navigation for the sand 
and rock fleet of the Atlantic division. This sec- 
tion, added to the five miles at the Pacific en- 
trance open to vessels of all kinds, made the total 
of the canal in use 10% miles. 

PANAMA RAILROAD. 

The Panama railroad and the steamships run in 
connection with it between New York and Colon 
are owned and operated by the United States gov- 
ernment. When the canal was purchased from the 
new French canal company the railroad and steam- 
ship property was included among the assets. It 
practically parallels the route of the canal nearly 
the whole distance. Since it was acquired by the 
Americans the line has been almost completely re- 
located to correspond with changes in the route 
and plan of the canal. It is 46% miles long and 
runs between the cities of Colon and Panama. 



ROMAN AND 
Roman. 

Apollo 

A urora 

Rolus 

Bacchus.. 

Bellona 

Oeres 

Cupid 

Cybele 

Diana 

Juno , 

Jupiter 

Man? 

Mercury 

Minerva 

Neptune 

Pluto 

Saturn 

Venus 

Vesta 

Vulcan 



GREEK GODS 

Greek. 
. Apollon 

..Eos. 



. Eolus 

Dyonysus.. 

. Enyo 

. Demeter... 
. Eros . 



Rhca 

.Artemis 

. Hera.. 

. .Zeus . 



Ares 

. Hermes 

. Atlu-na 

. Poseirlon.. . 

..Hades 

. Kronos 

.Aphrodite. 

. Hestia 

. Hepbestus 



AND GODDESSES. 
Divinity of. 

The sun. 

The dawn. 

The winds. 

Wine. 

War. 

Harvest. 

Love. 

Nature. 

The chase. 

Heaven. 

Heaven. 

War. 

Commerce. 

Wisdom. 

Sea. 

Lower world. 

Agriculture. 

Love. 

Purity. 

Fire. 



66 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



CHRONOLOGICAL SURVEY OF PEACE MOVEMENTS. 

Compilod by Charles E. Beals, field secretary ofthe American Peace society. 



New York Peace society, organized 1815, first in 
the world. 

Many state societies organized in quick succession. 

A national organization, the American Peace so- 
ciety, formed in 1828, in which the state societies 
merged themselves. 

Peace movement spread rapidly until the time 
of the Crimean war, American civil war, etc. 

Great peace jubilees held throughout the country 

International Law association organized, 1873. 
Interparliamentary union formed, 1889. 
International peace bureau established in Berne, 

1891 

First Lake Mohonk arbitration conference, 1895. 

American Society of International Law organ- 
ized. 1906. 

Intercollegiate Peace association, 1605. 

Association for International Conciliation, 1907. 

Peace day, ISth of May (Hague day). 

Peace Sunday, the Sunday before Christmas. 

American Society for the Judicial Settlement of 
International Disputes, 1910. 

INTERNATIONAL PEACE CONGRESSES. 

First series: 1. London, 1843; 2. Brussels, 1848: 
3, Paris 1849; 4. Frankfort, 1850; 5, London, 1851; 
6, Edinburgh, 1853. 

Second series: 1, Paris, 1889; 2, London, 1890; 3, 
Rome, 1891; 4. Berne, 1892; 5. Chicago. 1893; 6. 
Antwerp, 1S94; 7. Budapest, 1896; 8. Hamburg, 1897; 
9. Paris 1900; 10. Glasgow, 1901; 11. Monaco, 1902; 
12, Rouen, 1903; 13, Boston, 1904; 14, Lucerne, 1905; 
15, Milan, 1906; 16, Munich, 1907; 17, London, 1908. 

NVTIONAL PEACE CONGRESSES IN THE 
UNITED STATES. 

First: New Yopfc in 1907. 

Second: Chicago in 1909. 
INTERGOVERNMENTAL PEACEMAKING. 

Joint disarmament by Great Britain and United 
States along 'Canadian border, 1817 to present time. 

Central American High Court of Nations estab- 



lished. 
"Pan-American congress, 



1889, led to establish- 



ment of International Bureau of American Repub- 
lics, 1890. 

Pacific settlement of over 600 international dis- 
putes. 

The statue of The Christ of the Amies, commem- 
orating joint disarmament of Chile and Argentina, 
erected, 1904. 

Many international bureaus (e. g. the Universal 
Postal union) already in actual operation, 1909. 

Over eighty arbitration treaties now in effect, 
1909. 

HAGUE PEACH CONFERENCES. 

First Hague conference, May 18, 1899, of twenty- 
six nations. 

Second Hague conference, June 15, 1907, of forty- 
four nations. 

Third Hague conference, to be held about 1915. 

THB HAGUE COUBT OF ARBITRATION. 

The permanent court of arbitration at The 
Hague, instituted July 29, 1899, consists of from 
one to four representatives of the governments 
participating In The Hague peace conference of 
1899 or signing the convention providing for the 
court. The members of the court from the greater 
powers are as follows: 

France Leon Bourgeois, A. Decrals, Baron D'Es- 
tournelles de Constant, Louis Renault. 

Germany E. F. Sieveking, Herr Kriege, Herr 
von Matitz, Herr von Bar. 

Great Britain Sir Edward Fry, Viscount Selby, 
Bir E. Satow, Sir Charles Fitzpatrick. 

Italy Jean B. P. Guarnasehelli, Auguste Pier- 
antoni, Guido Fusinato, Angelo Majurana. 

Japan Itchiro Mctono, Henry Willard Denison. 

United States Melville W. Fuller, John W. 
Griggs, George Gray, Oscar S. Straus. 

Secretary Gen. -Baron Michaels van Derduynen. 

April 24, 1903. Andrew Carnegie gave to the gov- 
ernment of the Netherlands the sum of $1,500,000, 
to be used In the construction of a "palace of 
peace" at The Hague. The corner stone of this 
structure was laid July 30, 1907, at Zorgvllet In 
the wooded park stretching from The Hague to 
Scheveningen. 



TROOPS ENGAGED IN UNITED STATES WARS. 

Military and naval forces employed by the government since 1775. 



War. Date. 

Revolution 1775-83 

Northwestern Indian 1790-95 

France 1798-1800 

Tripoli 1801-05 

Indian (Harrison) 1811-13 

War of 1812 1812-15 

Creek Indian 1813-14 

Seminole 1817-18 

Winnebago (Wis. ) 1827 

Sac and Fox (111.) 1831 

Black Hawk 1832 

Cherokee removal 1833-39 

Seminole ( Fla. ) 1835-42 

Sabine Indian 1836-37 

Creek (Ala. ) 1836-37 

"Patriot" (frontier) 1838-39 

Seminole (Fla. ) 1842-58 

Mexico 1846-48 



Total. 

309,791 

8.983 

4,593 

3.330 

910 

576,622 
13,781 
6,911 
1,416 

'"6,'465 
9,494 
41.122 
4,429 
13,418 
1,500 

'iiz.m 



War. Date. 

Cayuse Indian (Ore.) 1848 

Texas Indian 1849-58 

Apache (Utah) 1849-55 

California Indian 1849-56 

Utah Indian 1851-58 

Oregon. Washington Indian 1851-66 

Coma nche 1854 

Seminole ,...1855-58 

Civil war .1861-68 

Spanish-American 1898-99 

Philippine 1899-1902 

Pekin (China) expedition 1900-01 



Total. 

1,116 

4,243 

2,561 

265 

540 

3,145 

503 

2,687 

2,778,304 

312,523 

140,038 

6,913 



THE MONROE 

The "Monroe doctrine" was enunciated by Presi- 
dent Monroe in his message to congress Dec. 2, 
1823. Referring to steps taken to arrange the 
respective rights of Russia, Great Britain and the 
United States on the northwest coast of this con- 
tinent, the president went on to say: 

"In the discussions to which this interest has 
given rise, and in the arrangements by which they 
may terminate, the occasion has been deemed 
proper for asserting, as a principle in which the 
rights and interests of the United States are In- 
volved, that the American continents, iiy the free 
and independent condition which they have as- 
sumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be con- 
sidered as subjects for future colonization by any 
European power. * * * We owe it, therefore, 
to candor and to the amicable relations existing 



Total 4,371,839 

The total in this table includes re-enlistments. 
The total number of individuals is estimated at 
3,304,993, of whom 2,213,363 served in the civiJ war. 

DOCTRINE. 

between the United States and those powers to 
declare that we should consider any attempt on 
their part to extend their system to any portion 
of this hemisphere as dangerous to our peace and 
safety. With the existing colonies or dependen- 
cies of any European power we have not inter- 
fered and shall not interfere. But with the gov- 
ernments who have declared their independence 
and maintain it, and whose independence we have, 
on great consideration and on just principles ac- 
knowledged, we could not view any interposition 
for the purpose of oppressing them or controlling 
In any other manner tneir destiny by any Euro- 
pean power in any other light than as the mani- 
festation of an unfriendly disposition toward the 
United States." 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1611.. 



DEATH OF EDWARD VII. AND ACCESSION OF GEORGE V. 



Edward VII., king of Great Britain and Ireland 
ajid emperor of India, died in Buckingham palace, 
London, at 11:45 p. m., Friday, My 6, 1910. The 
Immediate cause of his death was heart failure 
following an attack of bronchitis. He had for 
some years suffered from emphysema, with an at- 
tendant bronchial catarrh and with digestive dis- 
turbances, which undermined his naturally strong 
constitution. The political crisis in the kingdom 
brought on by the dispute between the house of 
commons and the house of lords over the budget 
also gave him much anxiety and prooably affected 
his health to some degree. To obtain relief he 
went to Biarritz early In March, but while there 
had a severe bronchitic attack. Recovering from 
this he returned to London April 27 and resumed 
his n-gular duties. 

Saturday. April 30, he felt a little unwell and 
went to Sandringnam. Sunday he attended 
church, but In the afternoon spent some time in 
the open air and contracted a slight chill. Mon- 
day he returned to London, and though feeling out 
of sorts kept a dinner engagement. Tuesday and 
Wednesday he continued at worK in spite of th-. 
admonitions of his medical advisers, receiving of- 
ficial visitors and giving audiences. He suffered 
from coughing and difficulty in breathing, espe- 
cially at night. The physicians, Drs. Francis 
Henry Laklng, James Reid and R. Douglas Powell, 
recognized the gravity of his condition and Queen 
Alexandra, who was on the continent, was sent 
for. She arrived on the afternoon of Thursday, 
and Ihe fact that the king did not meet her at 
the railway station as usual was the first indica- 
tion to the public that his illness was serious. 
Even on that day his majesty continued to 'trans- 
act public business, though he was confined to his 
room. Thursday evening the physicians with his 
consent issued the following bulletin: 

"The king is suffering from an attack of bron- 
chitis and has been confined to his room for two 
days. His majesty's condition causes some 
anxiety." 

In the early hours of Friday morning. May 6, 
the king had several severe attacks of dyspnoea, 
and when the physicians visited him they found 
that the gravity of the symptoms had Increased. 
They Issued a bulletin at 11 a. m., stating, "The 
king has passed a comparatively quiet night, but 
the symptoms have not Improved and his majes- 
ty's condition gives rise to grave anxiety." The 
king rose in the morning -and dressed, but spent 
mosfc^of the time seated In his chair. At noon 
his condition grew worse and ho had several 
fainting spells. He had retained full control of 
his senses until then, and in reply to some sug- 
gestion said: "No, il shall not give In; I shall go 
on; I shall work to the end. These were his 
last conscious words. 

Oxygen was freely administered, but without 
avail. His periods of unconsciousness became more 
prolonged, and at 6 p. m. the physicians issued 
the following bulletin : 

"The king's symptoms have become worse dur- 
ing the day and his majesty's condition Is now 
critical." 

Late In the evening he was put to bed, having 
been permitted to remain seated in his chair to 
ease his breathing. He did not regain con- 
sciousness, and at 11:45 p. m. the end came after 
a prolonged period of perfect calm. The news e<f 
the king s death was told to the world In the fol- 
lowing bulletin, signed by the physicians already 
nanvd and also by Dr. Bertrand Dawson: 

"His majesty the king breathed his last at 
11:45 to-night in the presence of her majesty 
Queen Alexandra, the prince and princess of Wales, 
the princess royal (duchess of Fife), the Princess 
Victoria and the Princess Louise (duchess of 
Argyll)." 

Mourning for the king was heartfelt and gen- 
eral. n< t only throughout the great empire over 
which ho had reigned for nearly a decade, but in 
all parts of the civilized world, where It was felt 
that in his death the cause of International 
peace had lost one of its most powerful and ear- 
nest advocates. Messages of sympathy and condo- 
lence were received by Gi> x n Alexandra and the 



royal family from the rulers and presidents of 
all nat'ons, including one from PreKideut Taft of 
the United States. The latter appointed Formet 
President Roosevelt, then in Europe, to attend the 
funeral as the special representative of the United 
States. 

Wednesday, May 18, the body of Kind Edward 
was removed' with simple but impressive ceremo- 
nies frcm Buckingham palace to Westminster 
hall, wiiere It lay in state. It was viewed by hun- 
dreds of thousands, who passed the coffin in an 
unbroken stream until the doors were finally 
closed. Friday, May 20, the body was taken to 
Paddington station and thence conveyed to Wind- 
sor, where the funeral services were conducted by 
the archbishop of Canterbury in St. George's 
chapel. Later the royal remains were entombed in 
the Albert Memorial chapel. 

The tribute paid to the dead king on the day of 
the fui.tral in London was perhaps the most re- 
markable In the history of England. In the pro- 
cession from Westminster hall to the railway sta- 
tion the rulers of cine European nations, members 
of all the leading royal families, diplomats, mil- 
itary and naval leaders and many other distin- 
guished persons followed the gun carriage on which 
the coffin rested. The three miles of streets 
through which the cortege moved, between solid 
lines of red-coated soldiers, standing with rifiea 
reversed and the regimental colors dipped to the 
ground, were thronged with such a mass of silent, 
somberly clad people as had- seldom If ever be- 
fore been seen in London. 

CHRONOLOGY. 

Following is a brief chronology of the life of 
King Edward VII.: 

Born Nov. 9, 1841. 

Visited tinted States, 1860. 

Married to Princess Alexandra March 10, 1863. 

Visited India, 1875-1876. 

Succeeded to the throne Jan, 22, 1901. 

Crowned Aug. 9, 1992. 

Died May 6, 1910. 

ACCESSION OF GEORGE V. 

George Frederick, prince of Wales, succeeded to 
the throne immediately upon the death of his father, 
Edward VII. He assumed the title of George V. 
In accordance with an old custom his first of- 
ficial act was to send to the lord mayor of London 
a telegram announcing King Edward's death. 

Saturday, May 7, at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, 
George V. took the oath and was formally declared 
king of Great Britain and Ireland and emperor of 
India, the ceremony taking place In the throne- 
room of St. James' palace In the presence of the 
Brivy council, under the presidency of the earl of 
rewe. Following custom, the members of the 
council were first formally notified of the death of 
King Edward VII. and of the accession of George 
V. A committee then informed his majesty of what 
had been done, whereupon he entered the council 
chamber and made an address, in which he spoke of 
the death of his father and declared that to en- 
deavor to follow in King Edward's footsteps and at 
the same time to uphold the constitutional govern- 
ment of the realm would be the earnest object of 
his life. The proclamation of his majesty's ac- 
cession was signed by Prince Christian and all 
the other privy councilors present and by the 
lord mayor and the representatives of the city. 
His majesty took the usual oath for the security 
of the church of Scotland, and the councilors wei-e 
all resworn. The king then received the coun- 
cilors, who kissed hands on Doing presented, and 
the ceremony came to an end. 

Monday, May 9, the medieval ceremony of pro- 
claiming the accession of the new king by hert>lds 
and pursuivants In the various centers of London 
took piece. The first proclamation was made in 
Friary court at St. James' palace at 9 o'clock in 
the morning and was witnessed from one of the 
windows by the new king and queen and also by 
their children. In the quadrangle of the court 
were a guard of honor of the 1st life guards, 
members of the army headquarters staff In full 
uniform and a large concourse of spectators. At 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



the appointed time the officials of the Oollege of 
Arms stepped through an open window on to the 
terrace on the western side of the court. The 
duke of Norfolk was earl marshal; Sir Alfred 
Scott-Gatty, garter king of arms; W. H. Weldon, 
norroy king of arms; W. A. Lindsay, Windsor 
herald, and II. F. Burke. Somerset herald. The 
four pursuivants, Rouge Dragon, Portcullis, Rouge 
Croix and Blue Mantle, were R. Green, Joseph 
Watkin, A. 'Cochrane and G. W. Wollaston. As 
they took their places on the center of the balcony 
the' two mace bearers and the royal trumpeters 
stood to the right and left. After the trumpeters 
had sounded a fanfare the earl marshal and the 
garter king of arms advanced and the latter read 
the proclamation: 

"That the high ar.d mighty prince, George Fred- 
erick Ernest Albert, is now, by the death of our 
late sovereign of hpppy memory, become our only 
lawful and rightful liege lord George V., by the 
grace of God king of the united kingdom of Great 
Britain and Ireland and of the British dominions 
beyond the seas, defender of the faith, emperor 
of India, to whom we do acknowledge all faith and 
constant obedience, with all hearty and humble 



affection, beseeching God, by whom kings and 
queens do reign, to bless the royal Prince George 
V. with long and happy years to reign over us." 

As Sir Alfred Scott-Gatty finished the reading 
he and the earl marshal raised their hats and 
the former called out loudly, "God! save the king!" 
A royal salute was fired, the royal standard was 
raised above Marlborough house and the band 
played the national anthem, the spectators join- 
ing in and singing the words. Similar ceremonies, 
though less elaborate, took place at Charing Cross, 
Temple Bar and the Royal exchange. The proc- 
lamation was read on the same day In various 
places throughout the whole empire. 
CHRONOLOGY. 

Born June 3, 1865. 

Became heir-presumptive, 1892. 

Married Princess Mary of Teck. 1893. 

Opened Australian parliament, May 9, 1901. 

Madi! prince of Wales, 1901. 

Appointed vice-admiral, 1903. 

Visited India, 1905. 

Succeeded to throne, May 6, 1910. 

Date fixed for coronation, June 22, 1911. 



CHRONOLOGY OF RECENT WARS. 



SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR. 1898. 

Maine blown up Feb. 15 

Diplomatic relations broken April : 

Cuban blockade declared April ' 

War declared by Spain April 24 

War declared by United States April 25 

Dewey's victory at Manila May 1 

Hobson's Merrlmac exploit Junes 

U. S. army corps lands In Cuba June 21 

Battle at El Caney and San Juan July 1 

Cervera's fleet destroyed . July 3 

Santiago d Cuba surrenders July 17 

Peace protocol signed Aug. 12 

Surrender of Manila Aug. 13 

Peace treaty signed in Paris Dec. 12 

PHILIPPINE WAR. 1899 1902. 

Hostilities begun Feb. 4, 1899 

Battles around Manila. Feb. 4-7, 1899 

Battle at Pasig March 13, 1899 

Santa Cruz captured April 25, 1899 

San Fernando captured May 5, 1899 

Battle of Bacoor June 13, 1899 

Battle of Imus June 16, 1S99 

Battle of Colamba July 26, 1899 

Battle of Calulut Aug. 9, 1899 

Battle at Angeles Aug. 16, 1899 

Maj. John A. Logan killed Nov. 11, 1899 

Gen. Gregorio del Pilar killed Dec. 10, 1899 

Gen. Lawton killed Dec. 19, 1899 

Taft commission appointed Feb. 25, 1900 

Aguinaldo captured March 23, 1901 

End of the war April 30. 1902 

Military governorship ended July 4, 1902 

ANGLO-BOER WAR. 1899-1902. 

Boers declare war Oct. 10, 1899 

Boers invade Natal Oct. 12, 1899 

Battle of Glencoe Oct. 20, 1899 

Battle of Magersfonteln Dec. 10, 1899 

Battle of Colesburg Dec. 31. 1899 



Spion Kop battles Jan. 23-25, 

Kimberley relieved Feb. 15, 

Gen. Cronje surrenders Feb. 27, 

Ladysmith relieved March 1, 

Mafeklng relieved May 17, 

Johannesburg captured May 30, 

Orange Free State annexed May 30, 

Pretoria captured June 4, 

South African Republic annexed Sept. 1, 

Gen. Methuen captured March 7, 

Treaty of peace signed May 31, 

RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR. 1904-1905. 

Hostilities begun by Japan Feb. 8, 

War declared Feb. 10, 

Petropavlovsk sunk April 13, 

Battle of the Yalu May 1, 

Battle shjp Hatsuse sunk May 15, 

Cruiser Yoshlno sunk May 15, 

Nanshan hill battles May 21-27, 

Dalny captured May 30, 

Vafangow battle June 14, 

Kniping captured July 8, 

Port Arthur Invested July 20-31, 

Newehwang evacuated.. July 25, 

Haicheng evacuated Aug. 3, 

Port Arthur naval battle Aug. 10, 

Battle of Liaoyang Aug. 26-Sept. 4, 

Battle of Sha river Oct. 12-19. 

Dogger bank affair Oct. 22, 

203 Meter hill captured Nov. 30. 

North Keekwan captured Dec. 18. 

Elirlungshan captured Dec. 25. 

Sungshushan captured Dec. 31, 

Port Arthur surrendered Jan. 1-2, 

Battle of Heikoutal Jan. 27-Feb. 4, 

Battle of Mukden Feb. 24-March 12, 

Battle of Sea of Japan Mnv 27-28, 

Roosevelt peace proposal June 7. 

Sakhalin captured July 31, 

Portsmouth peace conference Aug. 9-29, 

Peace treaty signed Sept 5, 



1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1900 
1902 
1901 



DEATH OF BJORNSTJERNE BJORNSON. 



Bjorestjerne BJornson, the Norwegian novelist, 
poet, dramatist, orator and advocate of universal 
peace, died in Paris, France, April 26, 1910, after 
an illness extending over more than a year. He 
was brought to Paris in November. 1909, to be 
treated for arterio-sclerosis, from which he was 
suffering, but failed to receive any permanent ben- 



efit. In February. 1910. he seemed to he nt death's 
door, but rallied and passed the crisis for the 
time being. His body was brought to Norway on 
the cruiser Norge and the funeral took place in 
Ohristiar.ia May 3 Bjornson was 77 years old at 
the time of his death. 



THE DRAGO DOCTRINE. 



When In the winter of 1902-03 Germany, Britain 
and Italy blockaded the ports of Venezuela in at- 
tempt to make the latter country settle up Its 
debts Dr. L. F. Drago, a noted jurist of Argen- 
tina, maintained that force cannot be used by one 
power to collect money owing to Its citizens by 



another power. Prominence was given to the con- 
tention by the fact that it was officially upheld 
by Argentina and favored by other South Amer- 
ican republics. The principle embodied has be- 
come generally known as the "Drago doctrine." 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



ARBITRATION OF FISHERIES DISPUTE. 



The historic Atlantic fisheries controversy, which 
for 130 years had been a source of annoyance to 
the United States and Great Britain, was sub- 
mitted to the International court of arbitration at 
The Hague. June 1, 1910. and the decision an- 
nounced Sept. 7 following. The dispute arose chief- 
ly over the Interpretation of the treaty between 
the two countries In 1818, but Its earliest origins 
dated back to conditions created by the treaty of 
1783. The clause In the treaty of 1818, which caused 
the greater part of the trouble, was as follows: 

"That the Inhabitants of the United States shall 
have forever, in common with the subjects of his 
Britannic majesty, the liberty to take fish of ev- 
r-ry kind on that part of the southern coast of 
Newfoundland extending from Cape Ray to the 
Ramea islands, on the western and northern coast 
from Cape Ray to the Quirpon Islands, on the 
shores of the Magdalen islands and also on the 
coasts, bays, harbors and creeks from Mount Joli 
en the southern coast of Labrador to and through 
the straits of Belleisle, and thence northwardly in- 
definitely along the coast, without prejudice, how- 
ever, to any of the exclusive rights of the Hud- 
son's Bay company." 

In return for these privileges the United States 
i enounced forever the right to fish within three 
marine miles of the coasts of British North Amer- 
ica not included within the above. The main 
source of trouble was the difference of opinion as 
to the right of Americans to obtain supplies of the 
bait fishes herring, capelln and squid in the coast 
waters of Newfoundland, where alone they are to 
be had. This right was denied by Newfoundland. 
Great Britain and Canada became Involved In the 
dispute and It was finally decided In January, 1909, 
to submit the whole matter to the court of arbi- 
tration at The Hague, in accordance with the prin- 
ciples of the convention for the settlement of in- 
ternational disputes, signed by many of the pow- 
ers Oct. IS, 1907. 

The cause was considered by the following arbi- 
trators: Prof. H. Laramasch of Austria, presi- 
dent: Dr. Luis Drago of Argentina, Jhr. M. A. F. 
de Savornln Lohman of Holland, Sir Charles Fitz- 
patrick of Great Britain and Judge George Gray 
of the United States. 

The counsel on behalf of the United States were 
Chandler I'. Anderson of New York, agent; Elihu 
Root, senator from New York; George Turner of 
Spokane. Wash.; Samuel J. Elder of Boston, 
Muss. ; Dr. James Brown Scott, solicitor of the 
state department; Charles B. Warren of Detroit, 
Mich., and Robert Lansing of Watertown, N. Y. 

The counsel on behalf of Great Britain were A. 
B. Aylesworth. minister of justice of Canada, 
agent: Sir William Robinson. K. C. . attorney-gen- 
eral for England; Sir Robert Flnly, K. C., for- 
mer attorney -general for England; Sir H. Erie 
Richards, K. C., of England; John S. Ewart. 
K. C., of Canada: George W. Shepley, K. C.. of 
Canada; W. N. Tilley of Canada; Sir Edward Mor- 
ris. K. C., premier of Newfoundland; Sir Jame^ 
Wirter, K. C., former attorney-general of New- 
founlland, and D. Morlson, K. C., attorney -general 
of Newfoundland. 

Seven main questions were submitted for the de- 
cision of the arbitrators. The questions and flnd- 
ligs were as follows: 

1. Must any reasonable regulations made by 
Great Britain. Canada and Newfoundland In the 
form of municipal laws, ordinanaes or rules, nec- 
essary for the preservation of the fisheries and the 
maintenance of public order and morals and equl- 
talili- as between local fishermen and inhabitants of 
th.> United States, be subject to the consent of th<> 
United Stales? 

The right of Great Britain to moke regulations 
for the preservation of the fisheries without the 
consent of the United States Is affirmed and is de- 
clared to he inherent to the sovereign rights of 
Great Britain. Both parties agree that the reason- 
ableness of the existing regulations should be sub- 
mitted to nn impartial commission of experts. If 
the United States object to any new regulation it 
shall not come Into operation with respect to the 
Inhabitants of the United States until a permanent 



mixed fishery commission has decided upon Its rea- 
sonableness. 

2. Have the inhabitants of the United States, 
while exercising the liberty to take fish on the 
treaty coasts, referred to In the first article of the 
tre.ity of 1818, a right to employ, as members of 
the lishing crews of their vessels, persons not in- 
habitants of the United States? 

The tribunal is of opinion that the inhabitants 
of the United States while exercising the liberties 
referred to in the said article have the right to 
employ, as members of the fishing crews of their 
vessels, persons rot inhabitants of the United 
States. But, in view of preceding considerations, 
the tribunal, to prevent any misunderstanding aa 
to the effect of its award, expresses the opinion 
that noninhabitants employed as members of the 
fishing crews of United States vessels derive no 
benefit or immunity from the treaty. 

3. Can the liberties to "take fish" and to "dry 
and cure fish" in the places referred to In the 
treaties be subjected, without the consent of the 
United States, to the requirement of entry or re- 
port at custom horses or the payment of light, 
harbor or other dues, or to any similar condition? 

The tribunal decides and awards as follows: The 
requirement that an American fishing vessel should 
report, if proper conveniences for doing so are at 
hand, is not unreasonable. But the exercise of the 
fishing liberty by the inhabitants of the United 
States should not be subjected to Ihe purely com- 
mercial formalities of report, entry and clearance 
at a custom house, nor to light, harbor or other 
dues not imposed upon Newfoundland fishermen. 

4. Can restrictions be imposed upon American 
fishermen making the exercise of the privileges 
granted them by the treaty to enter certain bays 
or harbors for Shelter, repairs, wcod and water 
conditional upon the payment of light, harbor, or 
other dues, or entering or reporting at custom 
houses, or any similar conditions? 

It Is decided and awarded that such restrictions 
are not permissible. It seems reasonable, however. 
In order that these privileges accorded by Great 
Britain on these grounds of hospitality and hu- 
manity should not bo abused, that the American 
fishermen entering such bays for any of the four 
purposes aforesaid and remaining more than forty- 
eight hours therein should be required, if thought 
necessary by Great Britain or the colonial govern- 
ment, to report either in person OP by telegraph at 
a custom house or to a customs official, if reason- 
ably convenient opportunity therefor is afforded. 

5. What is a "bay" within the meaning of the 
treaty? 

The tribunal decides and awards: In case of 
bays three marine miles are to be measured from 
a straight line drawji across the body of water at 
the place where it ceases to have the configuration 
and characteristics of a bay. At all other places 
the three marine miles are to be measured follow- 
ing the sinuosities of the coast. Considering that 
the tribunal cannot overlook that this answer to 
question five, although correct in principle and the 
only one possible In view of the want of a suffi- 
cient basis for a more concrete answer. Is not en- 
tirely satisfactory as to Its practical applicability 
and that it leaves room for doubts and differences 
in practice: therefore, the tribunal considers it its 
duty to render the decision more practicable and 
to remove the danger of future differences by ad- 
joining to it a recommendation in virtue of the 
responsibilities imposed by article IV. of the spe- 
cial agreement. Considering, moreover, that in 
treaties with France, with the North German con- 
federation and the German empire and likewise in 
the North sea convention. Great Britain has adopt- 
ed for similar cases the rule that only bays of ten 
miles width should be considered as those wherein 
the fishing is reserved to nationals, and that In 
the course of negotiations between Great Britain 
and the United States a similar rule has been on 
various occasions proposed and adopted by Great 
Britain in instructions to the naval officers sta- 
tioned on these coasts, and that though these cir- 
cumstances are not sufficient to constitute this a 
principle of law. It seems reasonable to propose 
this rule with certain exceptions, all the more that 



70 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAB-BOOK FOB 1911. 



this rule with such exceptions has already formed 
the basis of an agreement between the two powers. 

6. Does the treaty give the inhabitants of the 
United States the same liberty to take fish in the 
bays, harbors and creeks of Newfoundland as it 
does in the bays, harbors and creeks of Labrador? 

The tribunal is of opinion that American inhabi- 
tants are entitled to fish in the bays, creeks and 
harbors of the treaty coasts of Newfoundland and 
the Magdalen islands, and it is so decided and 
awarded. 

7. Are the inhabitants of the United States, 
whose vessels resort to the treaty coasts for the 
purpose of exercising the liberties referred to in 
article I. of the treaty, entitled to have for those 
vessels, when duly authorized by the United States 
In that behalf, the commercial privileges on the 
treaty coasts accorded by agreement or otherwise 
to United States trading vessels generally? 

The tribunal is of opinion that the inhabitants 
of the United States are so entitled in so far as 
concerns this treaty, there being nothing In Its 
provisions to disentitle them, provided the treaty 
liberty of fishing and the commercial privileges 
are rot exercised concurrently, and it is so decid- 
ed and awarded. 

The document is signed by the five arbitrators, 
Dr. Drago, however, stating his dissent from the 
majority In respect to the 'findings in reply to the 
fifth Question. 



BECOBD OF DECISIONS. 

Decisions have been rendered by the permanent 
court of arbitration at The Hague as follows: 
Oct. 14, 1902 In the matter of the case of the 

Pious fund of the Californias between the United 

States and Mexico. 
Feb. 22, 1904 Bespecting the preferential claims 

of the creditor nations of Venezuela under the 

protocols of May 7, 1903. 
May 22, 1905 In the difference between France, 

Germany and Great Britain on the one hanrt and 

Japan on the other, respecting leases held in 

perpetuity. 

Mav 22. 1909 In the matter of the Casablanca dis- 
pute between France and Germany. 
Aug. 8, 1909 In the matter of the dispute between 

Great Britain and France, respecting the right 

of certain Muscat dhows to fly the French flag. 
Oct. 23, 1909 Bespecting .the maritime boundary 

between Norway and Sweden. 
Sept. 7, 1910 In the North Atlantic fisheries case 

between the United States and Great Britain. 

There Is pending before the same tribunal the 
arbitration of the differences between the United 
States on behalf of the Orinoco Steamship com- 
pany and Venezuela under the protocol of Feb. 
13, 1909. 



THE SHERMAN ANTITRUST LAW. 

Passed by the 51st congress and approved July 2, 1890. 



Section 1. Every contract, combination In the 
form of trust or otherwise, or conspiracy in re- 
straint of trade or commerce among the several 
states or with foreign nations Is hereby declared 
to be Illegal. Every person who shall make any 
such contract or engage in any such combination 
or conspiracy shall be deemed guilty of a misde- 
meanor, amd, on conviction thereof, shall be pun- 
ished by fine not exceeding $5,000 or by imprison- 
ment not exceeding one year, or by both said pun- 
ishments. In the discretion of the court. 

Sec. 2. Every person who shall monopolize or 
attempt to monopolize or combine or conspire with 
any person or persons to monopolize any part of 
the trade or commerce among the several states or 
with foreign nations shall be deemed guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and on conviction thereof shall be 
punished by fine not exceeding $5,000 or by im- 
prisonment not exceeding one year, or by both said 
punishments. In the discretion of the court. 

Sec. 3. Every contract, combination In form of 
trust or otherwise, or conspiracy in restraint of 
trade or commerce in any territory of the United 
States or of the District of Columbia, or in re- 
straint of trade or commerce between any such 
territory and another, or between any such 
territory or territories and any state or states or 
the District of Columbia or with foreign nations, 
or between the District of Columbia and any state 
or states or foreign nations, is hereby declared 
illegal. Every person who shall make any such 
contract or engage in any such combination or 
conspiracy shall be deemed guilty of a misdemean- 
or, and on conviction thereof shall be punished by 
fine not exceeding $5,000 or by Imprisonment not 
exceeding one year, or by both said punishments, 
in the discretion of the court. 

Sec. 4. The several Circuit courts of the United 
States are hereby invested with jurisdiction to 
prevent or restrain violations of this act; and It 
shall be the duty of the several district attorneys 
of the United States, in their respective districts, 
under the direction of the attorney-general, to in- 
stitute proceedings In equity to prevent and i - e- 
strain such violations. Such proceedings may be 
by way of petition setting forth the case and pray- 



ing that such violation shall be enjoined or other- 
wise prohibited. When the parties complained of 
shall have been duly notified of such petition the 
court shall proceed, as soon as may be, to the 
hearing and determination of the case; and pend- 
ing such petition and l>efore final decree the court 
may at any time make such temporary restraining 
order or prohibition as shall be deemed just in the 
premises. 

Sec. 5. Whenever it shall appear to the court 
before which any proceeding under section 4 of 
this act may be pending that the ends of justice 
require that other parties should be brought be- 
fore the court, the court may cause them to be 
summoned, whether they reside in the district in 
which the court la held or not; and subpoenas to 
that end may be served in any district by the 
marshal thereof. 

Sec. 6. Any property owned under any contract 
or by any combination or pursuant to any con- 
spiracy (and being the subject thereof) mentioned 
in section 1 of this act and being in the course 
of transportation from one state to another or 
to a foreign country shall be forfeited to the 
United States and may be seized and condemned 
by like proceedings as those provided by law for 
the forfeiture, seizure and condemnation of prop- 
erty imported into the United States contrary to 
law. 

Sec. 7. Any person who shall be injured in his 
business or property by any other person or cor- 
poration by reason of anything forbidden or de- 
clared unlawful by this act may sue therefor in 
any Circuit court of the United States in the dis- 
trict in which the defendant resides or is found, 
without respect to the amount in controversy, 
and shall recover threefold the damages by him 
sustained and the cost of suit, including a reason- 
able attorney's fee. 

Sec. 8. That the word "person" or "persons" 
wherever used In this act be deemed to include 
corporations and associations existing under or 
authorized by the laws of either the United States, 
the laws of any of the territories, the laws of 
any state or the laws of any foreign country. 



EXPRESS BUSINESS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

[Beported by federal census bureau.] 



Number companies 

Mileage operated 

Mileage on railroads 

Mileage on water lines. 
Mileage on stage lines.. 



1907. 

34 

235.903 

216,973 

17,796 

1,134 



1890. 

18 

174,059 

160,122 

10,882 

3,055 



1907. 



Value of equipment $9,641,443 

Number of employes 79,284 

Expenditures $115,033,204 

Beceipts $128,117,176 

Money orders issued 14,014,960 



1890. 

$5,074,045 

45,718 

$45,783,123 

4, 5981567 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



71 



DATES OF RECENT 
Agulnaldo captured, March 23, 1901. 
Alaska boundary award made, Oct. 17, 1903. 
Albert I. ascended throne of Belgium Dec. 17, 1909. 
Alfonso XIII. ascended throne of Spain May 17, 
1902; attempted assassination of, In Paris, June 

I. 1906. 

Amundsen, Roald, completes northwest passage, 

Anarchists pardoned by Altgeld, June 26, 1893. 
Andree began arctic balloon trip, July 11, 1897. 
Anglo-American arbitration treaty signed, Jan. 

II. 1897. 

Anglo-Boer war began, Oct. 10. 1899; ended, May 
31. 1902. 

Anglo-Japanese treaty signed, Jan. 30, 1902. 

Armenian massacres began in 1890; culminated 
In 1895, 1896 and 1897. 

Australian commonwealth inaugurated. Jan. 1, 
1901. 

Baltimore fire, Feb. 7, 1904. 

Battle ship cruise, American, Dec. 16, 1907, to 
Feb. 22, 1909. 

Bennington gunboat disaster, July 21, 1905. 

Bering sea seal treaty signed, Nov. 8, 1897. 

Bismarck resigned chancellorship, March 18, 1890; 
died. July 30, 1898. 

Borda, president, assassinated, Aug. 25, 1897. 

Bosnia and Herzegovina annexed by Austria, Oct. 
6. 1908. 

Boxer outbreak in China began. May, 1900. 

Boyertown (Pa.) theater fire and panic, Jan. 13, 
1908. 

Brazil proclaimed a republic, Nov. 15, 1889. 

Bulgaria proclaims Independence, Oct. 5, 1908. 

Cable. Pacific, laying of begun at San Francisco, 
Dec. 14, 1902. 

Campanile in Venice fell, July 14, 1902. 

Carlos I., king of Portugal, assassinated, Feb. 1, 
1908. 

Carnot, president, assassinated, June 24, 1894. 

Caroline Islands bought by Germany, Oct. 1, 
1899. 

Chelsea (Mass.) fire, April 12, 1908. 

Cherry (111.) mine disaster, Nov. 13, 1909. 

Cholera epidemic In Hamburg, Germany, August, 
1892. 

Christian IX., king of Denmark, died, Jan. 29, 
1906. 

Cleveland, Grover, died June 24, 1908. 

Coal (anthracite) strike began. May 12. 1902; 
ended. Oct. 21, 1902. 

Corinth ship canal open. Aug. 6. 1893. 

Crib disaster, Chicago, Jan. 20, 1909. 

Cronln murder. May 4, 1889. 

Cuba under sovereignty of United states, Jan. 1, 
1899. 

Cuban constitution signed, Feb. 21, 1901. 

Cuban-United States reciprocity treaty ratified 
March 19, 1903; bill to carry treaty into effect 
passed by congress Dec. 16, 1903. 

Cuban republic inaugurated, May 20, 1902; Pres- 
ident Paluia and cabinet resigned and American 
control established Sept. 29, 1906; Gen. Jose 
Miguel Gomez elected president, Nov. 14, 1908; 
American control relinquished, Jan. 28, 1909. 

Cuban revolt began, Feb. 24, 1895. 

Czolgosx, McKinley's assassin, tried and sen- 
tenced, Sept. 24, 1901; executed, Oct. 29, 1901. 

De Lesseps, Ferdinand, convicted of Panama 
fraud. Feb. 9, 1893. 

Delhi coronation durbar began, Dec. 29. 1902. 

Del.vannis, Grecian premier, assassinated June 13, 
1905. 

Dewey's victory at Manila, May 1, 1898. 

Dingley tariff bill signed, July 24, 1897. 

Dom Pedro exiled from Brazil, Nov. 16, 1889. 

Dreyfus, Capt.. degraded and sent to Devil's is- 
land, Jan. 4. 1895; brought back to France, 
July 3. 1899; new trial begun. Aug. 7; found 
guilty. Sept. 9; pardoned, Sept. 19, 1899; re- 
stored to rank in army, July 12, 1906, by de- 
cision of Supreme court of France; decorated 
with cross of Legion of Honor, July 21. 1906. 
Earthquake In India, April 4. 1905; In Calabria, 
Italy. Sept. 8. 1905. and Dec. 28. 1908. (See also 
San Francisco, Valparaiso, Kingston and Messina.) 
Edward VII. proclaimed king, Jan. 24. 1901; 
crowned. Aug. 9, 1902. 



HISTORICAL EVENTS. 
Elizabeth, empress of Austria, assassinated. Sept. 

10, 1898. 

Emmanuel III., king of Italy, crowned. Aug. 11, 

1902. 
Fallieres. C. A., elected president of France, Jan. 

17, 1906. 

Field, Marshall, died. Jan. 16, 1906. 
Formosa transferred to Japan, June 4, 1895. 
Frederick VIII. succeeded to throne of Denmark, 

Jan. 29. 1906. 

Galveston tornado, Sept. 8. 1900. 
General Slocum disaster. June 15, 1904. 
Gladstone resigned premiership, March 2, 1894; 

died, May 19, 1898. 
Goebel, Gov. William, shot, Jan. 30. 1900; died, 

Feb. 3. 
Greco-Turkish war began, April 16, 1897; ended, 

May 11, 1897; peace treaty signed, Sept. 18, 1897. 
Harriman, E. H., died, Sept. 9, 1909. 
Harrison, Benjamin, died, March 13, 1901. 
Harrison, Carter, Sr., assassinated, Oct. 28, 1893. 
Hawaii made a republic, July 4, 1894; annexed to 

United States, Aug. 12, 1896; made a territory, 

June 14. 1900. 
Hay-Pauncefote isthmian-canal treaty signed, Nov. 

18, 1901. 

Homestead (Pa.) labor riot, July 6, 1892. 

Hugo, Victor, centenary celebration begun in 

Paris, Feb. 26, 1902. 

Humbert, King, assassinated, July 29, 1900. 
Idaho admitted as a state, July 3, 1890. 
Irish land-purchase law In force, Nov. 1, 1903. 
Iroquois theater fire, Dec. 30, 1903; lives lost, 575. 
Italian army routed in Abyssinia, March 1, 1896. 
Italian prisoners lynched in New Orleans, March 

14. 1891. 

Ito, Prince, assassinated, Oct. 26, 1909. 
Jameson raiders in Transvaal routed, Jan. 2, 1896. 
Japan, battle of Sea of, May 27-28, 1905. 
Japan declared war on China, Aug. 1, 1894; war 

ended, April 17. 1895. 
Japan-Russia war began, Feb. 7, 1904; ended 

Sept. 5, 1905. 

Johnstown flood, May 31, 1889. 
Ketteler, Baron von, killed in Pekin, June 30, 1900. 
Kingston (Jamaica) earthquake and fire, Jan. 14. 

1907. 

Kishinev massacre, April 20, 1903. 
Koch's lymph cure announced, Nov. 17, 1890. 
Kongo. Free State annexed by Belgium Aug. 20, 
-1908. 

Kossuth, Louis, died, March 20, 1894. 
Lawton, Gen. H. 'W., killed. Dec. 19, 1899. 
Leiter wheat deal collapsed. June 13, 1898. 
Leopold II., king of Belgium, died, Dec. 17, 1909. 
Liliuokalani, queen of Hawaii, deposed Jan. 16, 

1893. 

Luiz Philippe, crown prince of Portugal, assassi- 
nated Feb. 1. 1908. 

Madagascar annexed to France, Jan. 23, 1896. 
Maine blown up, Feb. 15. 1898. 
Marconi signals letter "S" across Atlantic, Dec. 

11, 1901. 

Messina destroyed by earthquake, Dec. 28, 1908. 
Meyerbeer centenary celebrated in Berlin, Sept. 

5, 1891. 

Morocco conference began, Jan. 16, 1906. 
Mukden, battle of. Feb. 24-March 12, 1905. 
McKinley. President, shot by anarchist, Sept. 6, 

1901; died, Sept. 14, 1901. 
Nansen arctic expedition started, July 21, 1893; 

returned, Aug. 13, 1896. 
Nicholas II. proclaimed czar of Russia, Nov. 2, 

1894; crowned. May 26, 1896; attempted assassi- 
nation of, Jan. 19, 1905. 
Norge disaster. June 28, 1904. 
North Collinwootl (O.) school disaster, March 4, 

1908. 
North pole reached by Commander Robert E. Peary, 

April 6, 1909. 

Norway dissolved union witli Sweden. June 7, 190o. 
Oklahoma and Indian territory admitted to union 

as state of Oklahoma, Nov. 16, 1907. 
Omdurman, battle of. Sept 4. 1898. 
Oscar II., king of Sweden, died Dec. 8, 1907. 
Panama canal property bought by the United 

States. Feb. 16. 1903. 



72 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



Panama fraud trials In Paris, Jan. 10 to March 
21, 1893 

Panama revolution, Nov. 3, 1903. 

Pan-American congress, first, began, Oct. 2, 1889; 
second, Oct. 23. 1902. 

Paris flood, Jan. 20-Feb. 1, 1910. 

Peace conference called by czar, Aug. 24, 1898; 
opened at The Hague, May 18, 1899; closed. 
July 29, 1899; second peace conference, June 15- 
Oct. 18, 1907. 

Pekin captured by the allies. Aug. 15, 1900. 

Philippine-American war began, Feb. 4, 1899; 
ended. April 30, 1902. 

Philippines ceded to the United States, Dec. 10, 
1898. 

Pope Leo XIII. died, July 20, 1903. 

Pope Pius X. elected, Aug. 4, 1903. 

Port Arthur captured by the Japanese from Chi- 
nese, Nov. 21, 1894; from Russians. Jan. 1, 1905. 

Porto Rico ceded to the United States, Dec. 10, 
1898. 

Porto Rico hurricane. Aug 8, 1899. 

Portugal, King Carlos and Crown Prince Luiz of, 
assassinated. Feb. 1, 1908. 

Postage between United States and Britain re- 
duced to 2 cents. Oct. 1. 1908. 

Pretoria captured by the British. June 4, 1900. 

Pullman strike began, May 11, 1894; boycott be- 
gan, June 26; rioting in Chicago and vicinity, 
June and July; strike and boycott ended, August. 

Rhodes. Cecil, died, March 26. 1902. 

Roentgen ray discovery made public, Feb. 1, 1896. 

Roosevelt. Theodore, became president of United 
States, on death of McKinley, Sept. 14. 1901; 
elected to same office, Nov. 8, 1904. 

Russia-Japan war began, Feb. 7, 1904; ended, 
Sept. 5, 1905. 

Salisbury, Premier, resigned. July 13, 1902; died, 
Aug. 22, 1903. 

St. Louis cyclone, May 27. 1896. 

St. Petersburg riots, Jan. 22, 1905. 

St. Pierre, Martinique, destroyed, May 8, 1902. 



San Francisco earthquake and fire. April 18-20, 

1906. 

San Juan and El Caney, battles of. July 1. 1S98. 
Santiago de Cuba, naval battle of, July 3, 1898. 
Santiago de Cuba surrendered, July 17, 1898. 
Schley inquiry ordered, July 26, 1901; began, Sept. 

20; ended, Nov. 7; verdict announced, Dec. 13. 
Schurz. Carl, died. May 14, 1906. 
Sergius, Grand Duke, assassinated. Fob. 17, 1905. 
Servia, king and queen of, assassinated, June 11, 

1903. 

Shah of Persia assassinated, May 1, 1896. 
Simplon tunnel completed, Feb. 25, 1905. 
Spanish-American war began, April 25, 1898; peace 

protocol signed, Aug. 12, 1898; Paris peace treaty 

signed, Dec. 12; peace treaty ratified, Feb. 6, 

1899. 
Springfield (111.) riots and lynchings, Aug. 14-15. 

1908. 
Stone, Ellen M., captured by brigands, Sept. 3, 

1901; released, Feb. 23. 1902. 
Taft. William H., elected president of the United 

States, Nov. X 1908. 
Transvaal republic annexed to Great Britain, Sept. 

1, 1900. 
Turkey, sultan of. proclaimed constitution, July 

24, 1908; Sultan Abdul Hamid deposed April 27, 

1909. 

Utah admitted as a state. Feb. 4. 1896. 
Valparaiso earthquake, Aug. 16, 1906. 
Venezuelan blockade by England. Germany and 

Italy began in first part of December, 1902; 

ended. Feb. 13. 1903. 

Vesuvius, s^eat eruption of, April 1-10. 1906. 
Victoria, queen of England, died. Jan. 22, 1901. 
Wilhelmina proclaimed queen of Holland, Aug. 31, 

1898. 

Windsor hotel, New York, burned. March 17, 1899. 
World's Fair in Chicago opened, May 1, 1893; 

ended. Oct. 30. 1893. 

Wyoming admitted as a state, July 10, 1890. 
Yalu, battle of, Sept. 17, 1894. 



CITIES GOVERNED BY COMMISSIONS. 



In August, 1910. the following cities had adopted 

the commission plan of government: 

California Berkeley, Riverside, San Diego. 

Colorado Colorado Springs, Grand Junction. 

Idaho Boise, Lewiston. 

Iowa Burlington, Cedar Rapids, Des Moines, Keo- 
kuk, Sioux City. 

Kansas Abilene. Anthony, Coffeyville. Emporia,, 
Hutchinson, Independence, lola, Kansas City, 
Leavenworth, Marion, Newton, Parsons, Pills- 
bury, Topeka, Wellington, Wichita. 

Massachusetts Chelsea, Gloucester, Haverhill. 

Minnesota Mankato. 

Missouri St. Joseph. 

New Mexico Roswell. 



North Carolina Charlotte. 

North Dakota Bismarck. Mandan, Mir.ot. 

Oklahoma Ardmore. Enid, Tulsa. 

South Carolina Columbia. 

South Dakota Chamberlain, Del Rapids, Pierre, 
Sic.ux Falls. 

Tennessee Bristol, Clnrksville, Memphis, Richard 
City. 

Texas Austin. Beaumont. Corpus Christi. Dallas, 
Denlson. El Paso. Fort Worth. Galveston, Green- 
ville. Houstqp, Kenedy, Marshall. Orange, San 
Antonio. Sherman. Waco. 

Washington Tacoma. 

West Virginia Bluefield, Huntington. 

Wisconsin Enu Claire. 



FOUNDATION FOE THE PROMOTION OF INDUSTRIAL PEACE. 

Established in 1907. 



In 1906 President Theodore Roosevelt was award- 
ed tde Alfred B. Nobel peace prize and at his sug- 
gestion an act was passed by congress ' March 2, 
1907. establishing the Foundation for the Promotion 
of Industrial Peace. To this organization he turned 
over the money received from the Nobel committee 
to be used as the nucleus of a fund the income of 
which is to be used in promoting an annual confer- 
ence in Washington between representatives of 
capital and of labor with a view to bringing about 
a better understanding between employers and em- 



ployes, thus promoting industrial peace. The chief 
justice of the United States, the secretary of agri- 
culture and the secretary of commerce and labor, 
and their successors in office, and four persons ap- 
pointed by the president of the United States to 
represent capital, labor and the general public, are 
the trustees. The trustees are authorized to pay 
over the funds from time to time to a committee 
of nine members, known as "the industrial peace 
committee." whose duty It is to make arrange- 
ments for the conferences. 



THE SAGE 

March 12, 1907, Mrs. Russell Sage of New York 
announced that she had set aside the sum of $10,- 
000,000 to be known as the Sage foundation and to 
be devoted to the improvement of the social and 
living conditions in the United States. As trustees 
she appointed Robert W. DeForest, Cleveland H. 
Dodge, Daniel C. Gilman, John M. Glenn. Miss 
Helen Gould. Mrs. William B. Rice and Miss 
Louise L. Schuyler. 
Following is a part of the statement given out 



FOUNDATION. 

by Mrs. Snjre as to the object of the gift: "I 
have set aside $10.000,000 for the endowment of 
this foundation. Its object is the improvement 
of social and living conditions in the United 
States. The means to that end will include re- 
search, publication, education, the establishment 
and maintMiance of charitable and beneficial ac- 
tivities, agencies and institutions and the aid of 
any such activities, agencies and institutions al- 
ready established," 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Tli 



DEATHS OF NOTED MEN AND WOMEN U890-1909). 



Aldrich, T. B., March 19, 1907. 
Alexander III., Nov. 1, 1894. 
Allen, Grant, Oct. 25, 1895. 
Allison, W. B., Aug. 4. 1908. 
Altgeld, John !>.. March 12, 1902. 
Andrassy, Count, Jan. 30, 1900. 
Anthony, Susan B., March 13, 1906. 
Armour, I'hilip D., Jan. 6, 1901. 
Arnold, Edwin, March 25, 1904. 
Astor, John Jacoh, Feb. 22, 1890. 
Audi-mi, Edmond, Aug. 19, 1901. 
Barnum. P. T.. April 7, 1891. 
Bartholdi, F. A., Oct. 4, 1904. 
Becquerel, A. H., Aug. 25, 1908. 
Beit, Alfred, July 16, 1906. 
Bellamy, Edward, May 22, 1898. 
Belmont, August. Nov. 24, 1890. 
Belmont, O. H. P., June 10, 1908. 
Besant, Sir Walter, June 9, 1901. 
Bismarck, Prince, July 30, 1898. 
Black, William, Dec. 10, 1898. 
Blackie, J. S., March 3. 1895. 
Blalne, James G., Jan. 27,, 1893. 
Blavatsky, Madiimo, May 9, 1891. 
Blouet, Paul, May 24, 1903. 
Bonheur, Rosa, May 25, 1899. 
Booth, Edwin, June 7, 1893. 
Brahms, Johannes. April 2, 1897. 
Breton, Jules A., July 5, 1906. 
Bristow. Beni. H., June 22, 1896. 
Brooks, Phillips. Jan. 23. 1893. 
Brough, Lionel, Nov. 8, 1909. 
Buck, Dudley, Oct. 6, 1909. 
Bulow, Hans von, Feb. 13, 1894. 
Burdett-Coutts, Baroness, Dec. 

30, 1906. 

Butler. Gen. B. F.. Jan. 11, 1893. 
Campbell-Bannerman, H., April 

22, 1908. 

Carlos I., Feb. 1, 1908. 
Carnot, President, Jnne 24, 1894. 
Carte, D'Oyly, April 3, W. 
Casimir-Perier, March 12, 1907. 
Cervera, P., April 3, 1909. 
Chllds, George W., Feb. 3, 1894. 
Christian IX., Jan. 29, 1906. 
Cleveland, Grover. June 24, 1908. 
Constant, Benjamin, May 26, 1902. 
Cooke, Jay. Feb. 16. 1905. 
Coppee, Francois, May 23, 1908. 
Coquelin, B. C., Jan. 26, 1909. 
Coquelin, E. A. H., Feb. 8, 1909. 
Corbin, Austin, June 4, 1886. 
Corning, Erastus, Aug. 30. 1S9C. 
Crawford, F. M., April 9, 1909. 
Croke, Archbishop. July 22, 1902. 
Crook, George, March 19. 1890. 
Cummings, Amos J., May 2, 1902. 
Curie, Pierre, April 19, 1906. 
Curtin, Jeremiah, Dec. 14, 1906. 
Curtis, George W..' Aug. si. 1892. 
Curzon, Lady, July 18, 1906. 
Cuyler, T. L., Feb. 26, 1909. 
Daly. Augustin, July 7, 1899. 
Dana, Charles A., Oct. 17, 1897. 
Davis, George R., Nov. 25, 1899. 
Davis. Mrs. Jefferson, Oct. 16. 1906. 
Davis. Winnie, Sept. 18, 1898. 
Davitt, Michael, May 31, 1906. 
De Martens, F., June 20, 1909. 
Dingley, Nelson, Jan. 13, 1899. 
Donnelly, Ignatius, Jan. 2. 1901. 
Douglass, Frederick, Feb. 20, 1895. 
Drachman, Holger, Jan. 15, 1908. 
Drexel, Anthony J., June 30, 1893. 
Drummond, Henry, March 11. 1897. 
Du Maurier, George, Oct. 8. 1896. 
Dumas, Alexandre, Nov. 27, 1S9T. 
Dunbar, Paul L., Feb. 9, 1906. 
Dvorak. Antonin, May 1, 1904. 
Edwards, Amelia B., April 15,1892. 
Eggleston, Edward, Sept. 3. 1902. 
Elizabeth, Empress, Sept. 10, 1898. 
Emmett, "Fritz," June 15. 1891. 
English, William II., Feb. 7, 1896. 
Evarts, William M., Feb. 28. 1901. 
Fair, James G., Dec. 28, 1894. 
Falrchlld. Lucius, May 23, 1896. 



Faithfull. Emily, June 1, 1895. 
Farjeon, B. L.. July 23, 1903. 
Faure, Felix, Feb. 16, 1899. 
Fenn, G. M., Aug. 27, 1909. 
Field, Cyrus W.. July 12. 1892. 
Field, Eugene, Nov. 4, 1896. 
Field. Kate. May 18, 1896. 
Field, Marshall, Jan. 16, 1906. 
Field, Richard M., Nov. 11, 1902. 
Field. Stephen J.. April 9. 1899. 
FIsk, Clinton B.. July 9, 1890. 
Frederick, ex-Empress, Aug. 5, 

1901. 

Froude, James A., Oct. 20, 1891. 
Gary, Joseph E.. Oct. 31, 1906. 
George. Henry. Oct. 29, 1896. 
Gilder, R. W., Nov. 18, 1909. 
Gilmore, Patrick S., Sept. 24, 1892. 
Gladstone, Win. E., May 19. 1898. 
Gladstone, Mrs. W. E., June 13, 

1900. 

Goode, George B., Sept. 6, 1896. 
Florence. Win. J., Nov. 19. 1891. 
Flower, Roswell P.. May 12. 1899. 
Forbes. Archibald, March 30, 1900. 
Fremont, John C., July 13, 1890. 
Could, Jay, Dec. 2, 1892. 
Gounod. Charles F., Oct. 18, 1893. 
Gr.ay. Elislia, Jan. 21. 1901. 
Gresham. Walter Q., May 28. 1895. 
Grieg, Edward, Sept. 4, 1907. 
Hale, Edward E., June 10, 1909. 
Ilalevy, Ludovic, May 8, 1908. 
Halstead, Murat, July 2, 1908. 
Hamilton, Gail, Aug. 17, 1898. 
Hampton, Wade, April 11. 1902. 
Hanlon, Edward, Jan. 4, 1908. 
Hanna, Marcus A., Feb. 15, 1904. 
Harper, William R.. Jan. 10. 1906. 
Harriman, E. H., Sept. 9, 1909. 
Harris, Joel Chandler. July 3, 1908. 
Harris, William T., Nov. 5, 1909. 
Harrison, Bonj.. March 13. 1901. 
Harrison. Carter. Sr., Oct. 28. 1893. 
Hatch, Rufus, Feb. 23, 1893. 
Hay, John, July 1. 1905. 
Hayes, Rutherford B., Jan. 17. 

1893. 

Hearn, Lafcadio, Sept. 26, 1904. 
Heilprin, Angelo, July 17, 1907. 
Henderson, David B., Feb. 2S, 

1906. 

Herne, James A.. June 2, 1901. 
Hewitt, Abram S.. Jan. 18. 1903. 
Hilkoff, M., March 21, 1909. 
Hitchcock, E, A., April 9, 1909. 
Hitt. Robert R., Sept. 20, 1906. 
Hoar, George F., Sept. 30, 1904. 
Hoe. Robert, Sept. 22, 1909. 
Hobart, Garret A., Nov. 21, 1899. 
Holman, W. S.. April 22, 1897. 
Holmes, Mary Jane, Oct. 6, 1907. 
Holmes. Oliver W.. Oct. 7. 1894. 
Howard, O. O., Oct. 26, 1909. 
Humbert. King, July 29, 1900. 
Huntington, C. P., Aug. 14, 1900. 
Huxley, Thomas H., June 29, 1894. 
Ibsen. Henrik, May 23, 1906. 
Ignatieff, N. P., July 4, 1908. 
Ingalls, John J., Aug. 16, 1900. 
Ingersoll. Robert G.,July 21,1899. 
Irving, Henry, Oct. 13, 1905. 
Ito, Prince, Oct. 26, 1909. 
Jefferson. Joseph, April 23. 1905. 
Jewett, Sarah O., June 24, 1909. 
Joachim, Joseph, Aug. 15, 1907. 
Jokai, Mauru's, May 5, 1904. 
Johnson, Eastman, April 5, 1906. 
Johnson, J. A., Sept 21, 1909. 
Joubert, Gen., March 27, 1900. 
Judd, Orange, Dec. 27, 1892. 
Judge, Wm. Q.. March 22. 1896. 
Kelvin, Lord, Dec. 17, 1907. 
Kjelland. Alexander, April 6, 1906. 
Kossuth. Louis. March 20. 1894. 
Kruger, Paul. July 14, 1904. 
Kwang-Hsu, Nov. 14, 1908. 
Langley, Samuel P., Feb. 27, 1906. 



Larcom, Lucy, April 17, 1893. 
Lawton, H. W., Dec. 19, 1899. 
Leo XIII., July 20, 1903. 
Leopold II., Dec. 17, 1909. 
Li Hung Chang, Nov. 7. 1901. 
Logan, Olive, April 23, 1909. 
Lombroso, C., Oct. 19, 1909. 
Lorimer, George C., Sept. 8, 1904. 
Lossing, Benson J., June 3, 1891. 
Lowell, James R.. Aug. 12, 1891. 
Lucca, Pauline, Feb. 28, 1908. 
Manning, Cardinal, Jan. 14, 1892. 
Mansfield, Richard, Aug. 30, 1907. 
Maratzek, Max. May 14, 1897. 
Marryat, Florence, Oct. 27, 1899. 
Marsh, O. C., March 18. 1899 
Mathews, William Feb. 15, 1909. 
Maupassant, De, July 6. 1893. 
Medill, Joseph. March 16, 1899. 
Meissonier, Jnn. 31, 1891. 
Mendes, Catulle, Feb. 8, 1909. 
Menzel, Adolf, Feb. 9, 1905. 
Meredith, George, May 18, 1909. 
Michel, Louise, Jan. 9, 1905. 
Millais, Sir John. Aug. 13. 1896. 
Mills, L. L., Jan. 18, 1909. 
Modjeska, Helena, April 8, 1909. 
Moody, Dwight L., Dec. 22, 1899. 
Morrison, W. R., Sept. 29, 1909. 
Most, Johann, March 17, 1906. 
Moulton, Louise C., Aug. 10, 1908. 
McArthur, John; Mav 15. 1906. 
McOlure, A. K., June 6, 1909. 
McCosh. James, Nov. 16, 1894. 
McKinley. William, Sept. 14, 1901. 
McVicker, Jas. H.. March 7, 1895. 
Newcomb, Simon, July 11, 1909. 
Nye, Edgar W., Feb. 21, 1896. 
Ochiltree, Thos., Nov. 26, 1902. 
Oliphant, Mrs. M., June 25, 1897. 
O'Reilly, John Boyle, Aug. 11. 

1890. 

Oscar H., Dec. 8, 1907, 
"Ouida" (Louise de la Ramee), 

Jan. 24. 1908. 

Palma, Tomas E., Nov. 4, 1908. 
Palmer-, John M., Sept. 25. 1900. 
Palmer, Potter, May 4, 1902. 
Parker, Joseph, Nov. 28, 1902. 
Parkman, Francis, Nov. 8. 1893. 
Pastor, "Tony," Aug. 26, 1908. 
Pierrepout, Edwards, March 6. 

1892. 

Pingree, Hazen S., June 18, 1901. 
Play fair, Lyon, May 29, 1898. 
Poole, William F., March 1. 1894. 
Porter, Noah, March 4, 1892. 
Potter, Henry C., July 21, 1908. 
Pullman. George M., Oct. 19, 1S97. 
Randall, Samuel J., April 13, 1898. 
Reclus, Elisee, July 4, 1905. 
Reed, Thomas B., Dec. 7, 1902. 
Remenyi, Edouard. May 15, 1898. 
Remington, F., Dec. 26, 1909. 
Renan, Joseph Ernst. Oct. 2, 1892. 
Rhodes-, Cecil, March 26, 1902. 
Ridpath. John C.. July 31, 1900. 
Ristori. Adelaide, Oct. 9, 1906. 
Robson, Stuart, April 29, 1903. 
Rogers, H. H., May 19, 1909. 
Rojestveusky, S., Jan. 14, 1909. 
Root, George F., Aug. 6, 1895. 
Rosewater, Edward, Aug. 21, 1906. 
Rubinstein, Anton G., Nov. 20, 

1894. 

Ruskin, John, Jan. 20. 1900. 
Russell. Sir Chas.. Aug. 10, 1900. 
Russell, Wm. H., Feb. 10, 1907. 
St. Gaudens, Augustus, Aug. 3, 

1907. 

Sagasta, Praxedes M., Jan. 5, 1903. 
Sage, Russell. July 22, 1906. 
Salisbury, Lord. Aug. 22, 1903. 
Salvini. Alexandre. Dec. 14, 1896. 
Sampson, Wm. T., May 6. 1902. 
Sankey, Ira D., Aug. 13, 1908. 
Sarasate, Pablo de, Sept. 20, 1908. 
Sardou, Victorien. Nov. 8, 190S. 



74 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Schlietnann. H., Dec. 25, 1890. 
Schurz, Carl, May 14, 1906. 
Seidl. Anton, March 29, 1898. 
Sherman, John, Oct. 22, 1900. 
Sherman, Gen. W. T.. Feb. 14, 

1891. 

Sigel. Franz, Aug. 21, 1902. 
Smiles, Samuel, April 16, 1904. 
Smyth, J. M., Nov. 4, 1909. 
Spencer. Herbert, Dec. 8, 1903. 
Sprague O. S. A., Feb. 20, 1909. 
Spreckels, Claus, Dec. 26, 1908. 
Stanford, Lelan(j, June 20, 1893. 
Stanley, Henry M., May 10, 1904. 
Stanton, Elizabeth C., Oct. 26, 

1902. 

Stedman, Edmund C., Jan. 18, 1908. 
Stockton, Frank It., April 20, 1902. 
Strakosch, Max, March 17, 1892. 
Strauss, Johann, May 3, 1899. 
Sullivan, Sir Arthur, Nov. 22, 1900. 



Suppc, Franz von, June 21, 1895. 
Sutro, Adolph, Aug. 8, 1898. 
Swinburne, A. C., April 10, 1909. 
Swing, David, Oct. 3, 1894. 
Taine, Hippolyte A., March 5, 

1893. 

Talmage, T. DeWitt, April 12. 1902. 
Tennyson, Alfred, Oct. 6, 1892. 
Terry, A. H., Dec. 16, 1890. 
Thaxter, Celia L., Aug. 27, 1894. 
Thurman, Allen G., Dec. 12. 1895. 
Tilton, Theodore, May 25, 1907. 
Tisza, Koloman de. March 23, 1902. 
Tourgee, Albion: May 21. 1905. 
Tscliaikowsky, Nov. 5. 1893. 
Tsu-Hsi. Nov. 15, 1908. 
Tuley, Murray F.. Dec. 25, 1905. 
Tyndall. John. Dec. 4, r 1893. 
Vanderbllt, Cornelius, Sept. 12, 

1899. 



Verdi, Giuseppe, Jan. 27, 1901. 
Verne, Jules, March 24, 1905. 
Victoria. Queen. Jan. 22. 1901. 
Vilas, William F., Aug. 27, 1908. 
Villard. Henry, Oct. 12, 1900. 
Virchow, Rudolph, Sept. 5, 1902. 
Voorhees, D. W., April 10, 1897. 
Waite. C. B., March 25, 1909. 
Wheeler, Joseph, Jan. 25, 1906. 
Whitney, Wm. C., Feb. 2, 1904. 
Whittler, John G., Sept. 7, 1892. 
Wilde, Oscar, Nov. 30, 1900. 
Wilhelmj, August, Jan. 23, 1908. 
Willard. Frances E.. Feb. 17, 1898. 
Wilson, Augusta E., Aug. 9, 1909. 
Windom, William. Jan. 29, 189). 
Wright, Carroll D., Feb. 20, 1909. 
Yates, Edmund H., May 20. 1894. 
Yerkes. Charles T.. Dec. 29. 1900. 
Zola, Emile. Sept. 29. 1902. 



THE GENERAL EDUCATION BOARD. 
Organized Feb. 27, 1902. 



Chairman Frederick T. Gates. 

Treasurer George Foster Peabody. 

Secretary Wallace Buttrick. 

Other members Robert C. Ogden, Walter H. 
Page, J. D. Rockefeller, Jr., Albert Shaw, Starr 
J. Murphy, Hugh H. Hanna, E. Benjamin Andrews, 
Edwin A. Alderman, Hollis B. Frissell, Harry 
Pratt Judson, Charles W. Eliot, Andrew Carnegie. 

Offices 2 Rector street. New York city. 

The general education board was Informally or- 
ganized Feb. 27, 1902, at the suggestion of John 
D. Rockefeller's committee on benevolence and was 
given a charter by congress and formally organized 
In January, 1903. The plan was designed and 
adapted to assist Mr. Rockefeller in distributing 
his gifts to education and to afford a medium 
through which other men of means might contrib- 
ute to the same end. The board, a few days after 
its Initial meeting, received from Mr. Rockefeller 
the sum of $1.000.000, the use of which was to be 
confined to the study and promotion of education 
In the southern states. An office was opened in 
New York city April 1, 1902, and work was begun. 
The board in co-operatlou with the department of 
agriculture took steps to educate the farmers of 
the south In scientific farming and up to the sum- 
mer of 1908 had established about 15,000 demonstra- 
tion farms under the supervision of eighty-nine 
agents In Alabama. Mississippi, Georgia, South 
Carolina. North Carolina, Virginia and Florida. 
The board also. In co-oneration with the state uni- 
versities of Virginia. North and South Carolina, 
Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee and Florida and the 
department of education In Louisiana has estab- 
lished more than 500 high schools. About $700.000 
of the original sum given by Mr. Rockefeller has 
been expended In this way, about half being for 
.schools for colored people. 

June 30, 1905. the board was notified that Mr. 
Rockefeller would donate $10,000.000, the principal 
of which was to be held in perpetuity as a founda- 
tion for education, the income to be used for the 
benefit of institutions of learning in such manner 
as might be deemed best adapted to promote a 
comprehensive system of higher education in the 
United States. This sum was paid in cash Oct. 



1, 1905. and the board in accepting It designated 
it as "The John D. Rockefeller Foundation for 
Higher Education." After due consideration the 
board adopted the following principles as defining 
its general policy: "To co-operate sympathetically 
and helpfully, with the religions denominations ; to 
choose the centers of wealth and population as the 
permanent pivots of an educational system ; to 
mass its funds on endowments, securing in this 
work the largest possible local co-operation." 

Feb. 7, 1907, the following letter was received 
from John D. Rockefeller, Jr. : 

"Gentlemen: My father authorizes me to say 
that on or before April 1, 1907, he will give to the 
general education board Income-bearing securities, 
the present market value of which is about $32,- 
000.000, one-third to be added to the permanent en- 
dowment of the board ; two-thirds to be applied to 
such specific objects within the corporate purposes 
of the board as either he or I may from time to time 
direct, any remainder not so designated at the 
death of the survivor to be added also to the per- 
manent endowment of the board." 

July 7, 1909, Mr. Rockefeller, through his son, 
John D. Rockefeller, Jr., notified the board that 
he had decided to give $10,000,000 additional to 
the permanent fund, the income to be devoted to 
present needs of great importance. The board was 
also authorized to distribute the principal of the 
fund, and all other endowment funds hitherto con- 
tributed by Mr. Rockefeller, whenever In the dis- 
cretion of the members or their successors it 
should be deemed advisable to do so. 

In the northern states the board devotes Itself 
exclusively to the promotion of higher education, 
having always in view the desirability of aiding 
such institutions as, taken together, will constitute 
an adequate system of higher education for each 
of the several states, thus seeking to correct and 
prevent duplication and waste and securing the 
highest efficiency. In the southern states its work 
for the colleges Is similar to that in the north, but 
in addition it seeks to promote public high schools, 
to promote elementary education by increasing the 
productive efficiency of rural life and to aid in de- 
veloping schools for the training of leaders among 
the colored people. 



NINTH ZIONIST CONGRESS. 



The ninth Zionist congress was hold In Hamburg, 
Germany, Dec. 26-31, 1909, with 350 delegates 
from all parts of the world in attendance. It was 
decided by resolution to gradually transfer all 
Zionist capital to Palestine, and to make Palestine 
the only center for its financial and industrial 
operations. It was announced by Dr. Max Nordau 
that the executive committee adhered to the orig- 
inal or Basle plan, making the return of the Jew- 
ish people to the holy land conditional upon the 
consent of the Turkish government that they be 
allowed to form n nationality within the Ottoman 
empire like the other nationalities there and to be 
rocognized as such. The recent changes in Turkey, 



it was assorted, had not made it necessary to 
alter the terms of the old programme "a publicly 
recognized, legally assured home for the Jewish 
people in Palestine." Encouraging reports were 
received as to the progress of Jerusalem school 
for trades arid art, established some years azo. 
and as to the prospects of the proposed technical 
institute at Haifa and the laboratory for scien- 
tific agricultural research at Zikhron Jacob, Pales- 
tine. 

Of the previous Zionist congresses six were held 
in Bn?le, Switzerland, one in London, England, 
and one in The Hague, Holland. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



75 



THEODORE ROOSEVELT'S RETURN FROM AFRICA. 



Theodore Roosevelt, former president of the 
United States, terminated his hunting trip in the 
wilder part of Africa when he arrived at Khar- 
tum March 14, 1910. He and his son Hermit were 
extremely successful in getting specimens of gamo 
for the Smithsonian and other institutions, and 
among the animals secured were some that wer>? 
rew to science or very rare. Following is a list of 
the larger game killed by Mr. Roosevelt: 



Lions 7 

Rhinoceroses 16 

Giraffes 7 

Wildebeests 8 

Thompson's gazelle 1 

Hippopotami 6 

Python 1 

Ostrich U 

Leopards 2 

Hartebeest 1 

Bohor 1 

Impalla 1 

Waterbuck 



Buffaloes 7 

Elands 3 

Topi 4 

Elephants 9 



Zebra 

Oryx 

Bushbuck 

Oribl 

Kob , 

Sables . . . 
Sitatunga 



Bongos 2 



Animals killed by Kcrmit Roosevelt: 

Buffaloes 3 

Monkeys 2 

Topi 3 

Rhinoceroses 3 

Elephants 2 



Lions 10 

Cheetah 7 

Giraffes 2 

Wildebeest 1 

Leopard 1 

Hippopotami 3 

The Roosevelt party arrived at Gondokoro, Sudan, 
on the upper Nile, Feb. 17, and after a hunting 
expedition in the neighborhood, departed on the 
government steamer Dal for Khartum, which city 
was reached March 14. Here the former president 
and his son were met by Mrs. Roosevelt and Miss 
Ethel Roosevelt and were welcomed by the Sudan 
government officials. After a brief stay the party 
proceeded by steamer and train down the valley 
of the Nile, stopping at various points along the 
route to visit ancient temples and monuments, 
and arrived at Cairo March 24. Great crowds had 
assembled near the railroad station and in the 
streets through which Mr. Roosevelt was conduct- 
ed, and he was made the subject of one of the 
greatest popular demonstrations ever witnessed in 
the Egyptian capital. Upon the invitation of tho 
University of Cairo he made an address to the 
students there MarclL28, and in the course of his 
remarks denounced the assassination Feb. 20 of 
Butro.- Pasha, prime minister of Egypt, by a na- 
tionalist party fanatic named Wardant. This 
aroused the nationalists to a frenzy and caused a 
demonstration against Mr. Roosevelt in front of 
the hotel in which he was stopping. The speech 
also created a stir in Great Britain, where opinion 
as to its Judiciousness was divided. 

ARRIVAL IN EUROPE. 

Mr. Roosevelt sailed from Alexandria, Egypt, 
March ?0, for Naples, Italy, where he arrived Sat- 
urday morning, April 2. The following day he 
went to Rome, where it was announced that ar- 
rangements for an audience with the pope had fallen 
through because Mr. Roosevelt did not desire to 
comply with conditions limiting his freedom of 
conduct. Monday, April 4, the former president 
was cordially received by King Victor Emmanuel 
in the Quirinal. 

After spending some time at Porto Maurizio with 
relatives, Mr. Roosevelt and family proceeded to 
Venice, where he met the duke of the Abruzzl 
and many others. Then he went on to Vienna, where 
he was received with royal honors by Emperor 
Francis Joseph. The latter gave a dinner, April 
16, at the Schoenbrunn palace in Mr. Roosevelt's 
honor, at which many members of the cabinet 
and court officials were present. April 18 and 19 
Mr. Roosevelt spent at Budapest, Hungary, where 
he was the guest of Count Apponyi and others. 
His welcome here was as hearty as he experienced 
on his whole trip, the Magyars doing all in their 
power to honor and please him. 

On the morning of April 21 Mr. Roosevelt 
reached Paris and was heartily received by Presi- 
dent Fallieres. the press and the people. The 
event of his s-tay in the French metropolis was his> 
lecture at the Sorbonne on the subject, "The 
Duties of Citizenship." It was delivered before 



the French Academy April 23. in the presence of 
3,000 auditors. On Monday, the 25th, he was re- 
ceived by the municipality of Paris, and the fol- 
lowing two days were spent by him in sightseeing 
and in attending a military review and an avia- 
tion meet. Thursday, April 28, he reached Brus- 
sels, Belgium, where he dined at the palace with 
King Albert and attended a reception by the 
burgomaster. 

IN SCANDINAVIA. 

From Belgium Mr. Roosevelt and his party went 
to Holland, visiting Amsterdam, The Hague and 
Haarlem. Queen \N ilhelmina and the prince con- 
sort, as well as ;!! the people of the Netherlands, 
showed the former president, wh'> is partly of 
Dutch descent, every honor in their power. Con- 
tinuing his journey, Mr. Roosevelt arrived in 
Copenhagen, Denmark, May 2, and was cordially 
greeted by Crown Prince Christian in the absence 
of King Huakon. After receiving many courtesies, 
official and private, and a visit to Elslnore, he 
proceeded to Christiania, Norway, arriving there 
May 4. King Haakon and Queen Maud gave him 
an esptcially warm welcome, as did the Norwegian 
people generally, though they were in mourning for 
the recent death of Bjornstjerne Bjornson. Thurs- 
day, May 5, he delivered his Nobel peace prize 
lecture on "International Peace" before an audi- 
ence of 1,800 persons, including the king and 
queen. In the state theater. The following day 
the University of Norway bestowed upon him the 
honorary degree of doctor of philosophy. In spite 
of the death of King Edward in London on the 
night of May 8, Mr. Roosevelt received a popular 
welcome in Stockholm, where he arrived on the 
morning of the 7th. Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf 
did the royal honors in the absence of the king, 
who was in Franco. 

IN GERMANY AND ENGLAND. 

Great preparations had been made by Emperor 
William to welcome and entertain Mr. Roosevelt 
in Berlin, where the former president arrived on 
the morning of May 10, but the plans had to be 
modified on account of the death of the kaiser's 
uncle, King Edward. However, much of the pro- 
gramme was carried through, the main features 
being a sham battle at Doberitz and a lecture by 
the visitor at the University of Berlin, which con- 
ferred upon him the honorary degree of doctor of 
philosophy. The emperor showed Mr. Roosevelt 
many and unusaal courtesies, accompanying him 
personally at the maneuvers, attending his lecture 
on "The World Movement" and honoring him in 
other ways. 

Before leaving Berlin, May 15, Mr. Roosevelt was 
appointed a special envoy of the United States to 
attend the funeral of King Edward. On his arrival 
in London, May 16, he was cordially but, of 
course, very quietly received. He was the subject 
of much private hospitality and was received by 
King George V. and by Alexandra, the queen 
mother. He attended the funeral of Edward VII. 
May 20, and passed the time quietly until May 31, 
when he was presented with the freedom of the 
city of London at the Guildhall. On this occasion 
he made a speech with reference to the British 
policy in Egypt, which caused much comment by 
its frankness. He intimated that, while Grent 
Britain had given Egypt the best government the 
country had had in 2.000 years, it had erred in 
Ihe direction of timidity and sentimentality. 

June 7 Mr. Roosevelt delivered the Romanes lec- 
ture at Oxford university, taking as his subject 
"Biological Analogies in History." The degree of 
doctor of civil law was conferred upon him by 
the university. 

RETURN HOME. 

June 10 Mr. Roosevelt and family-sailed for home 
on the Kaiserin Auguste Victoria, and arrived in 
New York Saturday morning. June 18. The wel- 
come given the former president here by hundreds 
of thousands of his fellow citizens has never been 
surpassed in the history of the country. The 
features were a naval parade in the harbor, an 
official welcome by Mayor William J. Gaynor of 
New York at the Battery and a ride through the 
center of the city, with members of the old rough 
riders' regiment as escort. At the conclusion of 



76 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



the welcoming ceremonies Mr. Roosevelt and his 

family proceeded to their home in Oyster Bay, L. I. 

CHRONOLOGY OF TRIP. 

1909. 

March 23 Sails from New York. 

April 5 Arrives at Naples, Italy. 

April 6 Visits ruins or Messina with King Vic- 
tor Kmmannel. 

April 21 Arrives at Mombasa, Africa. 

April 23, 1909, to March 14, 1910 Hunts in British 
and German East Africa. 
1910. 

Fob. 17 Arrives at Gondokoro, on the Nile. 

March 14 Arrives at Khartum and meets family. 

March 24 Reaches Cairo, Egypt, 

March 28 Makes speech at University of Cairo 
on Egyptian question. 

March 30 Sails fiom Alexandria, Egypt. 

April 2 Arrives at Naples, Italy. 

April 3 Arrives in Rome. 

April 4--Is received by King Victor Emmanuel. 

April 7 At Spezia, Italy. 

April 11-13 At Porto Maurizlo, Itfcly. 

April 14 In Venice, Italy. 

April 15-17 In Vienna, Austria; calls on Emperor 
Francis Joseph. 

April 18-19 In Budapest, Hungary; guest of 
Count Apponyi and others. 

April 21 Arrives in Paris, France: dines with 
President Fallieres; visits tomb of Napoleon. 

April 23 Lectures at Sorbonne on "The Duties 
of Citizenship." 



April 25 Is received by the municipality of 
Paris. 

April 28 Reaches Brussels, Belgium; dines with 
King Albert. 

April 29-May 1 In Holland; guest of Queen Wil- 
helmina. 

May 2 In Copenhagen, Denmark; guest of Crown 
Prince Christian. 

May 4 Arrives in Christiania, Norway; welcomed 
by King Haakon and Queen Maud. 

May 5 Delivers Nobel prize lecture in state 
theater Christiania, on the subject, "International 
Peace. 

May 7-8 In Stockholm, Sweden; welcomed by 
Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf. 

May 10-15 In Germany; guest of Emperor Wil- 
liam at Potsdam and at Doberitz, where sham bat- 
tle is fought; delivers lecture at the University of 
Berlin (May 12) on "The World Movement." 

May 16 Arrives in London; reception quiet on 
account of death of King Edward. 

May 20 Attends King Edward's funeral as rep- 
resentative of the United States. 

May 26 Receives degree of LL. D. from Cam- 
bridge university. 

May 31 Makes speech in Guildhall, London, 
criticising English policy in Egypt. 

Jnne 7 Delivers Romanes lecture at Oxford 
university; subject, "Biological Analogies in His- 
tory." 

June 10 Sails for America. 

June 18 Welcomed in New York; goes to home 
at Oyster Bay, L. I. 



LEADING ART GALLERIES OF THE 'WORLD. 

The following list Includes only the principal collections of paintings and sculptures readily ac- 
cessible to the public in Europe and America. 



EUROPE. 

ATJSTKA-HUNGABY. 

Academy of Art, Vienna. 
Albertina, Vienna. 
Imperial art gallery, Vienna. 
Liechtenstein gallery, Vienna. 
National gallery, Budapest. 

BELGIUM. 

Museum, Antwerp. 
Palace of Fine Arts, Brussels. 
Mcsee Wiertz, Brussels. 

DENMARK. 

Thorvaldsen museum, Copenha- 
gen. 

Ny-Carlsberg G-lyptothek, Copen- 
hagen. 

National art gallery.Copenhagen. 

FBANCX. 

Louvre,* Paris. 
Luxembourg Paris. 
Museum, Versailles. 

GERMANY. 

National gallery, Berlin. 

Old and New museums, Berlin. 

Pergamon museum, Berlin. 

Emperor Frederick museum, Ber- 
lin. 

Dresden gallery.* Dresden. 

Old and New Pinakothok,* Mu- 
nich. 

Glyptothek, Munich. 



HOLLAND. 

Ryk's museum, Amsterdam. 
Fodor museum. Amsterdam. 
Six Collection, Amsterdam. 
Townhall, Haarlem. 
Lakenbal, Leyden. 
Boymans museum, Rotterdam. 
Mauritshuis, Tiie Hague. 

ITALY. 

Vatican,* Rome. 
Uffizi gallery.* Florence. 
Pit! gallery.* Florence. 
Brera gallery, Milan. 
Poldi museum, Milan. 
National museum. Naples. 
Academy of Fine Arts, Venice. 
NORWAY. 

National gallery', Christiania. 

KUS3IA. 

Hermitage, St. Petersburg. 

SPAIN. 

Museo del Prado,* Madrid. 
Museo Provincial, Seville. 

SWEDEN. 
National gallery, Stockholm. 

UNITED KINGDOM. 

British museum, Loiidon. 
National gallery,* London. 
Dore gallery, London. 
Walker art gallery. Liverpool. 
Art galleries, Glasgow. 



AMERICA. 
CANADA. 

Fraser institnte, Montreal. 
The Basilica, Quebec. 

MEXICO. 

National museum, City of Mex- 
ico. 

UNITED STATES. 

Chicago, 111. 
iciunati, O. 
cester, Mass. 
jPittsburg. Pa. 
Ty, Washing- 




, Milwaukee, 

Ion, public lib 

New York, N. T. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art,* 

New York, N. Y. 
Museum of Art, Toledo, O. 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 

Mass. 
Museum of Fine Arts, St. Louis, 

Mo. 
New York Historical society, 

New York. N. Y. 
P< nnsylvania Academy of Fine 

Arts. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Of first rank. 



DEATH OF FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE. 



Florence Nightingale, widely known for her 
work as a nurse in the Crimean war, died in Lon- 
don, England. Aug. 14, 1910. She was named aftor 
the city of Florence, Italy, where she was born 
May 12, 1820. Her father, a wealthy Englishman, 
gave her a classical education, and following a 
natural inclination she made a study of nnnrttag 
In England and Germany. She proceeded to the 
Crimea in 1854 end worked so energetically in 



nursing and caring for the wounded and sick 
British soldiers that her health was broken a*id 
she became an invalid for the rest of her life. 
Subsequently a testimonial offering In the shape 
of $250.000 was given her, and she used the money 
in establishing the Nightingale honr? for the train- 
ing of nurses. In 1908 the freedom of tffe city of 
Loud in was conferred upon her. 



UNITED STATES ARSENALS. 



The largest of the United States arsenals are 
located at Rock Island, 111., and Springfield. Mass. 
Others are at Pittsburg, Pa.: Augusta, Ga.; 
Benicia. Cal.; Columbia. Tenn.; Fort Monroe. Va.; 
Philadelphia. Pa.; Indianapolis, Ind.; Governor's 
Island, N. Y. ; Jefferson barracks. Mo. ; Sandy 



Hook, N. J.; San Antonio. Tex.; Dover, N. J. ; 
Watert&wn, Mass.. and Watervliet. N. Y. Some of 
the above are merely powder depots, the principal 
manufacturing plants being at Rock Island. Spring- 
field and Watervliet. The navy yards are also 
arsenals. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



77 



WHAT TRAVELERS MAY TAKE TO AMERICA. 
[Treasury department's "Notice to Passengers," Feb. 4, 1910.] 



Paragraph 709, appearing Jn the free list of the 
present tariff act. governing passengers' baggage, 
Is as follows: 

"Wearing upparel, articles of personal adornment, 
toilet articles and similar personal effects of per- 
sons arriving in the United States; but this ex- 
emption shall only Include such articles as ac- 
tually accompany and are in the use of, and as 
are necessary and appropriate for the wear and 
use of such persons, for the immediate purposes of 
the journey and piesent comfort and convenience, 
and shall not be held to apply to merchandise or 
articles intended for other persons or for sale; 
provided, that in case of residents of the United 
States, returning from abroad, all wearing ap- 
parel and other personal effects taken by them out 
of the United States to foreign countries shall be 
adio.itted free of duty, without regard to their 
value, upon their identity beins established, under 
appropriate rules and regulations to be prescribed 
by ihe secretary of the treasury, but no more 
than $100 in value of articles purchased abroad 
by such residents of the United States shall be 
admitted free* of duty upon their return." 

Foreigners are entitled to bring in free of duty 
sucn articles as are in the nature of wearing ap- 
parel, articles of personal adornment, toilet arti- 
cles and similar personal effects accompanying the 
passenger and necessary and appropriate for his 
or her wear and use for the purposes of the jour- 
ney and present comfort and convenience, and are 
not intended for other persons nor for sale, with- 
out regard to the $100 limitation. 

Citizens of the United States may have this 
privilege provided it is shown to the collector's 
representative on the pier, subject to the collec- 
tor's approval, that they are bona-fide residents of 
a foreign country. 

BAGGAGE DECLARATION. 

Passengers should observe that on the sheet 
there are two forms of declaration: the one print- 
ed in black is for returning residents of the 
United States; the one in red, for all persons 
other than residents of the United States. 

The senior member of a family, if a passenger. 




for the entire family. 

" ould state the fact in 
?s In order that an ex- 
heir baggage may be 



may make decla 

Ladies trav< " 
their declara 
peditious 
made. 

The exact nuii^l .^Bces of baggage, includ- 
ing all trunks, ^H IKxes, packages and hand 
of all descfl)Braccompanying the passen- 
must be statecr in the declaration, 
'he forms above mentioned will be distributed 
to passengers during the early part of the voyage 
by an officer of the ship. When a passenger has 
prepared and signed the declaration he must de- 
tach and retain the coupon at the bottom of the 
form and return the form to the officer of the 
ship designated to receive the same. Declarations 
spoiled in the preparation must not be destroyed, 
but turned over to the purser, who will furnish a 
new blank to the passenger. 

After all the baggage and effects of the passen- 
ger are landed upon the pier the coupon which 
has been retained by the passenger must be pre- 
sented at the inspector's desk, whereupon an in- 
spector will be detailed to examine the baggage. 



pier their signatures to their declarations. 

Passengers who for any reason desire the ex- 
amination of their baggage postponed may have 
all or any part thereof sent to the appraisers' 
store by making a request therefor to the officer 
taking their declaration. 

RESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 
Residents of the United States must declare all 
wearing apparel, jewelry and other articles, 
whether used or unused, on their persons, in their 
clothing or in their baggage, which have been ob- 
tained abroad by purchase or otherwise, with the 
foreign cost or- value of the same. They shall 
state, as well, all wearing apparel, jewelry or 
other articles taken out of the United States 
which have been remodeled or Improved while 



abroad so as to increase their value, the said 
statement to include the cost of such improvement. 
By stating the value of all declared articles In 
United States money, and packing the same so as 
to be easily produced for examination (and in one 
trunk if practicable), passengers will expedite the 
appraisement and passing of the same ui>on the 
pier. Whenever practicable, passengers should pre- 
sent the original receipted bills for foreign pur- 
chases. 

Residents of the United States are allowed $100 
worth of articles in the nature of personal ef- 
fects at their present foreign value, free of duty, 
provided they are not intended for other persons 
or for sale or to be used in business and are prop- 
erly declared. 

Use does not exempt from duty wearing apparel 
or other articles obtained abroad, but such arti- 
cles will be appraised at their present value. 

Residents or the United States may also bring 
with them free of duty all wearing apparel and 
other personal effects taken by them out of the 
United States which ha^e not been remodeled or 
improved abroad so as to increase their value. 

Residents of the United States must not deduct 
the $100 exemption from the value of other arti- 
cles obtained abroad by purchase or their wearing 
apparel or otherwise. Such deduction will be made 
by customs officers on the pier. 

OTHER GOODS. 

^Household effects of persons or families from 
foreign countries will be admitted free of duty If 
actually used abroad by them not less than one 
year and not intended for any other person nor 
for sale. Such effects should be declared whether 
the passenger be a foreigner or resident of the 
United States. 

Articles intended for other persons, for use In 
business, theatrical apparel, properties and scen- 
eries must .(Iso be declared by passengers, wheth- 
er foreigners or residents. 

CIGARS AND CIGARETTES. 

All cigars and cigarettes must be declared, and 
are not included within the $100 exemption. Each 
passenger over 18 years of age is entitled J.o 
bring in free of duty and internal-revenue tjix 
either fifty cigars or 300 cigarettes for his or her 
bona-flde individual personal consumption. 

Passengers dissatisfied with values placed upon 
dutiable articles by the customs officers on the 
piers may demand a re-examination, but applica- 
tion therefor should be immediately made to the 
officers there in charge. If, for any reason, this 
course Is impracticable, the packages containing 
the articles should be left in customs custody and 
application for reappraisement made to the collec- 
tor of customs, in writing, within two days after 
the original appraisement. No request for reap- 
praisement can be entertained after the articles 
have been removed from customs custody. 

Government officers are forbidden by Inw to ac- 
cept anything but currency in payment of duties, 
but, If requested, will retain baggage on the piers 
for twenty-four hours to enable the owner to se- 
cure the currency. 

Passengers are advised that to offer or give gra- 
tuities or bribes to customs officers is a violation 
of law, and customs officers who accept gratuities 
or bribes will be dismissed from the service, and 
all parties guilty of such offense are liable to crim- 
inal prosecution. 

Any discourtesy or incivility on the part of cus- 
toms officers should be reported to the collector 
at the custom house, to the deputy collector or 
the deputy surveyor at the pier or to the secre- 
tary or the treasury. 

BAGGAGE IN BOND. 

Upon application to the customs officer In charge 
on the pier, baggage intended for delivery at 
ports in the Unittvl States other than the ix>rt of 
arrival or in transit through the United States TO 
a foreign country may be forwarded thereto with 
out the assessment of duty at the arrival, by the 
various railroads and express companies, whose 
representatives will be found on the pier. Passen- 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



gers desiring to have their baggage forwarded In 
bond should indicate such intention before the ex- 
amination of their baggage and state the value 
thereof in their declarations. 

SEALSKIN GARMENTS. 

An act of congress expressly forbids the Impor- 
tation of garments made In whole or in part of 



the skins of seals taken in the north Pacific ocean, 
and unless the owner Is able to establish by com- 
petent evidence that the garments are not prohib- 
ited they cannot be admitted. 

Articles obtained abroad and not declared are 
subject to seizure, and the passenger Is liable to 
criminal prosecution. 



IMMIGRATION LAW OF THE TOTTED STATES. 



The immigration law provides for a poll tax 
of $4 for every alien entering the United States. 
This tax Is not levied upon aliens who shall enter 
the United States after an uninterrupted resi- 
dence of at least one year, immediately preceding 
such entrance, in Canada, Newfoundland, Cuba 
or Mexico, nor upon aliens In transit through the 
United States, nor upon aliens arriving in Guam, 
Porto Rico or Hawaii. 

Whenever the president shall be satisfied that 
passports issued by any foreign government to 
Its citizens to go to any country other than the 
United States or to any insular possession of the 
United States, or to the, canal zone, are being 
used for the purpose of enabling the holders to 
come to the continental territory of the United 
States to the detriment of labor conditions there- 
in, the president may refuse to permit such citi- 
zens of the country Issuing such passports to en- 
ter the continental territors- of the United Stated 
from such other country or from such insular pos- 
sessions or from the canal zone. 

The following classes are excluded from admis- 
sion into the United States: All idiots, imbe- 
ciles, feeble-minded persons, epileptics, insane 
persons and persons who have been Insane within 
five years: persons who have had two or more at- 
tacks of insanity at any time previously; paupers; 
persbns likely to become a public charge; profes- 
sional beggars: persons afflicted with tuberculosis 
or with a loathsome or dangerous contagious dis- 
ease: persons who have committed a felony or 
other crime involving moral turpitude; polyga- 
mists or persons who believe in the practice of 
polygamy: anarchists or persons who believe In 
or advocate the overthrow by force or violence of 
the government of the United States, or of all 
governments, or of aH forms of law, or the assas- 
sination of public officials; prostitutes, or women 
and eirls coming into the United States for any 
Immoral purpose: contract laborers who have been 
Induced to migrate to this country by offers of 
employment or in consequence of agreements of 
any kind, verbal or written, express or implied, 
to perform labor In this country of any kind, 
skilled or unskilled: any person whose ticket or 



passage is paid for with the money of another, 
or who is assisted by others to come, unless It 
is satisfactorily shown that such -person does not 
belong to one of the foregoing excluded classes 
and that said ticket or passage was not paid for 
by any corporation, society, municipality or for- 
eign government, directly or Indirectly: all chil- 
dren under 16 years of age unaccompanied by one 
or both of their parents, at the discretion of the 
secretary of commerce and labor. Nothing in the 
act shall exclude, if otherwise admissible, persona 
convicted of an offense purely political, not in- 
volving moral turpitude. Skilled labor may be 
imported if labor of like kind unemployed cannot 
be found in this country. The provisions of the 
law applicable to contract labor shall not be held 
to exclude professional actors, artists, lecturers, 
singers, clergymen, professors for colleges or sem- 
inaries, persons belonging to any recognized 
learned profession or persons employed strictly as 
personal or domestic servants. 

It is unlawful to assist or encourage the Im- 
portation or migration of any alien by promise 
of employment through advertisements printed in 
any foreign country. This, however, does not ap- 
ply to states or territories advertising the In- 
ducements they offer to immigration thereto. 

All aliens brought to this country in violation 
of law shall be immediately sent back by the 
owners of the vessels bringing them. Any alien 
entering the United States in violation of law 
and such as become public charges from causes 
existing prior to their landing shall be deported 
at any time within three years after their arrival. 

No person who disbelieves In or who is opposed 
to all organized government, or who is a member 
of or affiliated with any organization entertaining 
and teaching such belief in ^r opposition to all 
organized government, or who advocates or teaches 
the duty, necessity or propriety of the unlawful 
assaulting or killing of-, anr officer or officers, 
either of specific individuals or of officers gener- 
ally, of the government of fbe United States, or 
of any other organized government, because of 
his or their official character, shall be permitted 
to enter the United States. 



Senator William P. Dilllngham of Vermont, 
chairman; Senators Henry Cabot Lodge of Mas- 
sachusetts and Le Roy Percy of Mississippi; Rep- 
resentatives B. F. Howell of New Jersey, William 
S. Bennett of New York and John L. Burnett of 



NATIONAL IMMIGRATION COMMISSION. 
Office In senate annex, Washington, D. C. 

Alabama; Jeremiah W. Jenks. Charles P. Neill, 
commissioner of labor, and William R. Wheeler, 



San Francisco. Cal. 

Secretaries Morton E. Crane. W. W. Husband 
and C. S. Atkinson, Washington, D. C. 



DEATH OF CHIEF JUSTICE FULLER. 



Melville Weston Fuller, chief justice of the 
United States Supreme court, died at his summer 
home at Sorrento, Me., July 4, 1910. Though 77 
vears of age he was in excellent health up to the 
hour of his death, which was caus;?d by a sudden 
attack of hart disease. He was born in Augusta, 
Me., Feb. 11, 1833, and came to Chicago in 1856. 
His education was obtained in the public schools. 



Rowdoln college and the Harvard law school. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1855 he practiced his pro- 
fession with succ-ss until April, IS8S. when Presi- 
dent Grover Cleveland appointed him chief jus- 
tice of the United States Supreme court. In poli- 
tics he was a democrat. He was buried in Grace- 
land cemetery, Chicago. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES IN THE UNION. 



There are forty-six states In the union and five 
territories, the latter including Arizona, New Mex- 
ico, Hawaii, the District of Columbia and Alaska. 
The first three are 'regularly organized territories, 
each with a governor and legislative assembly. 
The District of Columbia is governed by three com- 
missioners appointed by the president of the 



United States under laws passed directly by con- 
gress. Alaska has a governor appointed by the 
president, but has no legislature. It is under the 
direct control of congress. Porto Rico, the Phil- 
Jppines and other island possessions of the United 
States are not technically territories, each having 
a speciaJ form of government. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1011. 



79 



COPYRIGHT LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES. 
Approved March 4, 1909. 



The act to amend and consolidate the acts re- 
specting copyright, in force July 1, 1909, provides 
that any person entitled thereto, upon complying 
with the provisions of the law, shall have the ex- 
clusive right (a) to print, reprint, publish, copy 
and vend the copyrighted work; (b) to translate the 
copyrighted work or make any other version of It 
if it be a literary work; to dramatize it if it be a 
nondramatic work; to convert it into a novel or 
other nondramatic work if it be a drama; to ar- 
range or adapt it if it be a musical work; to fin- 
ish it if it be a model or design for a work of art; 
(c) to deliver or authorize the delivery of the 
copyrighted work if it be a lecture, sermon, ad- 
dress or similar production; (d) to perform the 
copyrighted work publicly if it be a drama or, u 
It be a dramatic work and not reproduced in 
copies for sale, to vend the manuscript or any rec- 
ord thereof; to make or to procure the making of 
any transcription or record thereof by which it 
mny in any manner be exhibited, performed or 
produced, and to exhibit, perform or produce it 
In any manner whatsoever; (e) to perform the 
x>pyrighted work publicly for profit if it be a mu- 
sical composition and for the purpose of public 
performance for profit and to make any arrange- 
nent or setting of it in any system of notation or 
any form of record in which the thought of au 
author may be read or reproduced. 

So far as they secure copyright controlling the 
parts of instruments serving to reproduce mechan- 
ically the musical work the law includes only com- 
positions published after the act went into effect; 
it does not include the works of a foreign author 
or composer unless the country of . which he is a 
citizen or subject grants similar rights to Amer- 
ican citizens. Whenever the owner of a musical 
copyright has used or permitted the use of the 
copyrighted work upon the part of instruments 
serving to reproduce mechanically the musical 
work, any other person may make a similar use of 
the work upon the payment to the owner of a roy- 
alty of 2 cents on each such part manufactured. 
The reproduction or rendition of a musical com- 
position by or upon coin-operated machines shall 



not be deemed a public performance for profit un- 
less a fee is charged for admission to tl 
where the reproduction occurs. 



the place 



The works for which copyright may be secured 
include all the writings of an author. 

The application for registration shall specify to 
which of the following classes the work in which 
copyright is claimed belongs: 

(a) Books, including composite and cyclopedic 
works, directories, gazetteers and other compila- 
tions. 

(b) Periodicals, including newspapers. 

(c) Lectures, sermons, addresses, prepared for 
oral delivery. 

(d) Dramatic or dramatic-musical compositions. 

(e) Musical compositions. 

(f) Maps. 

(g) Works of art; models or designs for works 
Of art. 

(h) Reproductions of a work of art. 

(1) Drawings or plastic works of a scientific or 
technical character. 

(J) Photographs. 

(k) Prints and pictorial illustrations. 

These specifications do not, however, limit the 
subject matter of copyright as defined in the law 
nor does any error in classification invalidate the 
copyright protection secured. 

Copyright extends to the work of a foreign author 
or proprietor only in case he is domiciled in the 
United States at the time of the first publication 
of his work or if the country of which he is a citi- 
een grants similar copyright protection to citizens 
of the United States. 

Any person entitled thereto by the law may se- 
cure copyright for his work by publication thereof 
with the notice of copyright required by the act, 
and such notice shall be affixed to each copy pub- 
lished or offered for sale in the United States. 
Such person may obtain registration of his claim 
to copyright by complying with the provisions of 
the act, including the deposit of copies, whereupon 
the register of copyrights shall Issue to him a cer- 



tificate as provided for in the law. Copyright mar 
also be had of the works of an author of which 
copies are not reproduced for sale by the deposit 
with claim of copyright of one complete copy, if it 
be a lecture or similar production, or a dramatic 
or musical composition; of a photographic print if 
it be a photograph, or of a photograph or other 
identifying reproduction thereof if it be a work of 
art or a plastic work or drawing. 

After copyright has been secured there must be 
deposited in the copyright office in Washington, 
D. C., two complete copies of the best edition 
thereof, which copies, if the work be a book or pe- 
riodical, shall have been produced in accordance 
with the manufacturing provisions of the act, or if 
such work be a contribution to a periodical for 
which contribution special registration is requested 
one copy of the issue or issues containing such 
contribution. Failure to deposit the copies within 
a given time after notice from the register of 
copyrights makes the proprietor of the copyright 
liable to a fine of $100 and twice the retail price 
of the work and the copyright becomes void. 

The text of all books and periodicals specified in 
paragraphs (a) and (b) above, except the original 
text of a book of foreign origin in a language 
other than English, must in order to secure pro- 
tection be printed from type set within the limits 
of the United States, either by hand, machinery or 
other process, and the printing of the text and the 
binding of the books must also be done within the 
United States. An affidavit of such manufacture is 
required. 

The notice of copyright required consists either 
of the word "copyright" or the abbreviation 
"copr.," accompanied by the name of the copyright 
proprietor, and if the work be a printed literary, 
musical or dramatic work, the notice must also in- 
clude the year in which the copyright was secured 
by publication. In the case, however, of copies of 
works specified in paragraphs (f) to (k) inclusive 
(given above) the notice may consist of the letter 
C inclosed within a circle, accompanied by the ini- 
tials, monogram, mark or symbol of the copyright 
proprietor, provided his name appears elsewhere on 
the copies. In the case of a book or other printed 
publication the notice shall t>e applied on the title 
page or on the page immediately following, or if a 
periodical either upon the title page or upon the 
first page of text of each separate number or un- 
der the title heading; or if a musical work upon its 
title page or the first page of music. 

Where the copyright proprietor has sought to 
comply with the law with respect to notice, the 
omission of such notice by mistake from a particu- 
lar copy or copies shall not invalidate the copy- 
right or prevent recovery for infringement against 
any person who, after actual notice of the copy- 
rlgbt, begins an undertaking to infringe it, but 
shall prevent the recovery or damages against an 
innocent infringer who has been misled by the 
omission; of the notice. 

In the case of a book in English published abroad 
before publication in this country, the deposit in 
the copyright office within thirty days of one copy 
of the foreign edition, with a request for the res- 
ervation of the copyright, secures for the auth 
or owner an ad Interim copyright for thirty days 
after such deposit is made. 

The copyright secured by the act endures for 
twenty-eight years from the date of the first publi- 
cation. In the case of any posthumous work, peri- 
odical, encyclopedic or other, composite work upon 
which the copyright was originally secured by the 
proprietor thereof, or of any work copyrighted by a 
corporate body, or by an employer for whom such 
work is made for hire, the proprietor of such copy- 
right shall be entitled to a renewal of the copy- 
right in such work for the further term of twenty- 
eight years when application for such renewal shall 
have been made within one year prior to the ex- 
piration of the original term. In the case of any 
other copyrighted work, including a contribution by 
an individual author to a periodical or to a cyclo- 
pedic or other composite work when such contribu- 
tion has been separately copyrighted, the author of 
such work, if living, or the heirs, executors or 
next of kin, if the author be dead, shall be en- 



80 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



titled to a renewal of the copyright for a further 
term of twenty-eight years. In default of such ap- 
plication for renewal the copyright in any work 
shall end at the expiration of twenty-eight years. 

If any person shall infringe the copyright in any 
work protected under the copyright laws of the 
United States, such person shall be liable: 

(a) To an injunction restraining such infringe- 
ment; 

(b) To pay to the copyright proprietor such dam- 
ages as the copyright proprietor may have suffered 
due to the infringement, as well as all the profits 
which the inf ringer shall ha^e made from such In- 
fringement, and in proving profits the plaintiff 
shall be required to prove sales only and the de- 
fendant shall be required to prove every element 
of cost which he claims, or in lieu of actual dam- 
ages or profits such damages as to the court shall 
appear to be just, and in assessing such damages 
the court may, in its discretion, allow the amounts 
as hereinafter stated (in numbered paragraphs), but 
in the case of a newspaper reproduction of a copy- 
righted photograph such damages shall not exceed 
the sum of $200 nor be less than $50, and such dam- 
ages shall in no other case exceed the sum of $250 
and shall not be regarded as a penalty: 

1. In the case of a painting, statue or sculpture, 
$10 for every infringing copy made or sold by or 
found in the possession of the infringer or his 
agents or employes; 

2. In the case or any work enumerated in the list 
(given above) of works for which copyright may be 
asked, except a painting, statue or sculpture, $1 for 
every infringing copy. 

3. In the case of a lecture, sermon or address, 
$50 for every infringing delivery. 

4. In the case of dramatic or dramatico-musical 
or a choral or orchestral composition, $100 for the 
first and $50 for every subsequent infringing per- 
formance; in the case of other musical composi- 
tions, $10 for every infringing performance. 

(c) To deliver up on oath all articles alleged to 
Infringe a copyright. 

(d) To deliver up on oath for destruction all the 
Infringing copies or devices, as well as all plates, 
molds, matrices or other means for making such In- 
fringing copies, as the court may order. 

(e) Whenever the owner of a musical copyright 
has used or permitted the use of the copyrighted 
work upon the parts of musical instruments serv- 
ing to reproduce mechanically the musical work, 
then in case of infringement by the unauthorized 
manufacture, use or sale of interchangeable parts, 
such as disks, rolls, bands or cylinders for use in 
mechanical music-producing machines, no criminal 
action shall be brought, but In a civil action an 
Injunction may be granted upon such terms as the 
court may impose and the plaintiff shall be en- 
titled to recover in lieu of profits and damages a 
royalty as provided in the act. 

Any person who shall willfully and for profit In- 
fringe any copyright, or willfully aid or aoet such 
infringement, shall be deemed guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be pun- 
ished by imprisonment for not exceeding one year 
or by a fine of not less than $100 nor more than 
$1,000 or both, in the discretion of the court. It is 
provided, however, that nothing in the act shall 
prevent the performance of religious or secular 
works, such as oratorios, cantatas, masses or octavo 
choruses by public schools, church choirs or vocal 
societies, provided the performance is for chari- 
table or educational purposes and not for profit. 

Any person who shall fraudulently place a copy- 
right notice upon any uncopyrighted article, or 
shall fraudulently remove or alter the notice upon 
any copyrighted article, shall be deemed guilty of 
a misdemeanor and shall be subject to a fine of 
not less than $100 nor more than $1,000. Any per- 
son who shall knowingly sell or issue any article 
bearing a notice of United States copyright which 
has not been copyrighted in this country, or who 
shall knowingly import any article bearing such 
notice, shall be liable to a fine of $100. 

During the existence of the American copyright 
In any book the importation of any niratical 
copies thereof or of any copies not produced in ac- 
cordance with the manufacturing provisions of the 
copyright law, or of any plates of the same not 
made from type set in this country, or any copies 



produced by lithographic or photo-engraving proc- 
ess not performed within the United States, is pro- 
hibited. Except as to piratical copies this does 
not apply. 

(a) To works in raised characters for the blind; 

(b) To a foreign newspaper or magazine, al- 
though containing matter copyrighted in the 
United States printed or reprinted by authority of 
the copyright owner, unless such newspaper or 
magazine contains also copyright matter printed 
without such authorization; 

(c) To the authorized edition of a book in a for- 
eign language of which only a translation Into 
English has been copyrighted in this country; 

(d) To any book published abroad with the au- 
thorization of the author or copyright proprietor 
under the following circumstances: 

1. When imported, not more than one copy at a 
time, for individual use and not for sale, but such 
privilege of importation shall not extend to a for- 
eign reprint of a book by an American author 
copyrighted in the United States; 

2. When imported by or for the use of the 
United States; 

3. When Imported, for use and not for sale, not 
more than one copy of any such book in any one 
Invoice, in good faith, by or for any society or in- 
stitution incorporated for educational, literary, 
philosophical, scientific or religious purposes, or 
for the encouragement of the fine arts, or for any 
college, academy, school or seminary of learning, 
or for any state, school, college, uni/crsity or free 
public library in the United States; 

4. When such books form parts of libraries or 
collections purchased en bloc for the use of socie- 
ties, institutions or libraries, or form parts of the 
library or personal baggage belonging to persons or 
families arriving from foreign countries and are 
not Intended for sale. 

No criminal actions shall be maintained under 
the copyright law unless the same be* begun within 
thrae years after the cause of action arose. 

Copyright may be assigned, mortgaged or be- 
queathed by will. , 

There shall be appointed by the librarian of con- 
gress a register or copyrights at a salary of $4,000 
a year and an assistant register at $3,000 a year. 

These with their subordinate assistants shall per- 
form all the duties relating to the registration ofr 
copyrights. The register of copyrights shall keen 
such record books in the copyright office as are re- 
quired to carry out the provisions of the law, and 
whenever deposit has been made in the copyright 
office of a copy of any work under the provisions 
of the act he shall make entry thereof. 

In the case of each entry the person recorded at) 
the claimant of the copyright shall be entitled to 
a certificate of registration under seal of the copy- 
right office. 

The register of copyrights shall receive and the 
persons to whom the services designated are ren- 
dered shall pay the following fees: For the regis- 
tration of any work subject to copyright, $1, which 
sum is to include a certificate of registration under 
seal: Provided, that in the case of photographs the 
fee shall be 50 cents where a certificate is not de- 
manded. For every additional certificate of regis- 
tration made, 50 cents. For recording and certify- 
ing any instrument Of writing for the assignment 
of copyright or license, or for any copy of such 
certificate or license, duly certified, if not over 300 
words In length, $1; if more than 300 and less than 
1,000, $2; if more than 1,000 words in length. $1 
additional for each 1,000 words or fraction thereof 
over 300 words. For recording the notice of user 
or acquiescence specified in the act, 25 cents tor 
each notice of not over fifty words and an addi- 
tional 25 cents for each additional 100 words. For 
comparing any copy of an assignment with the 
record of such document in the copyright office and 
certifying the same under seal. $1. For recording 
the extension or renewal of copyright, 50 cents. 
For recording the transfer of the proprietorship of 
copyrighted articles. 10 cents for each title of a 
book or other article in addition to the fee for 
recording the instrument of assignment. For any 
requested search of copyright office records, indexes 
or deposits, 50 cents for each full hour consume-i 
in making such search. Only one registration at 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



81 



one fee shall be required in the case of several 
volumes of the same book deposited at the same 
time. 



For copyright blanks and additional information 
as to copyright regulations address the register of 
copyrights, library of congress, Washington, D. C. 



APPLICATIONS 
[Condensed from Rules of Practice 

A patent may be obtained by any person who has 
Invented or discovered any new and useful art, ma- 
chine, manufacture or composition of matter, or 
any new and useful improvement thereof not 
previously patented or described in this or any 
other country, for more than two years prior to his 
application, unless the same is proved to have been 
abandoned. A patent may also be obtained for 
any new design for a manufacture, bust, statue, 
alto-relievo or bas-relief; for the printing of 
woolen, silk or other fabrics; for any new im- 
pression, ornament, nattern, print or picture to 
l>e placed on or woven into any article of manu- 
facture; and for any new, useful and original shape 
or configuration of any article of manufacture, 
upon payment of fees and taking the other neces- 
sary steps. 

Applications for patents must be in writing, in 
the English language and signed by the inventor 
If alive. The application must include the first 
fee of $15, a petition, specification and oath, and 
drawings, model or specimen when required. The 
petition must be addressed to the commissioner 
Of patents and must give the name and full ad- 
dress of the applicant, must designate by title the 
Invention sought to be patented, must contain a 
reference to the specification for a full disclosure 
of such invention and must be signed by the appli- 
cant. 

The specification must contain the following in 
the order named: Name and residence of the ap- 
plicant with title of invention; a general statement 
of the object and nature of the invention; a brief 
description of the several views of the drawings 
(if the invention admits cf such illustration); a 
detailed description; claim or claims; signature of 
Inventor and signatures of two witnesses. Claims 
for a machine and its product and claims for a 
machine and the process in the performance of 
which the machine is used must be presented in 
separate applications, but claims for a process and 
its product may be presented in the same appli- 
cation. 

The applicant. If the inventor, must make oath 
or affirmation that he believes himself to be the 
first inventor or discoverer of that which he seeks 
to have patented. The oath or affirmation must 
also state of what country he is a citizen and 
where he resides. In every original application 
the applicant must swear or affirm that the inven- 
tion has not been patented to himself or to others 
with his knowledge or consent in this or any for- 
eign country for more than two years prior to his 
application, or on an application for a patent filed 
In any foreign country by himself or his legal rep- 
resentatives or assigns more than seven months 
prior to his application. If application has been 
made in any foreign country, full and explicit de- 
tails must be given. The oath or affirmation may 



FOR PATENTS. 

in the United States patent office.] 
be made before any one who is authorized by the 
laws of his country to administer oaths. 

Drawings must be on white paper with India 
ink and the sheets must be exactly 10x15 Inches 
In size, with a margin of one inch. They must 
show all details clearly and without the use ot 
superfluous lines. 

Applications for reissues must state why the 
original patent is believed to be defective and tell 
precisely how the errors were made. These applica- 
tions must be accompanied by the original patent 
and an offer to surrender the same; or, if the orig- 
inal be lost, by an affidavit to that effect and 
certified copy of the patent. Every applicant whose 
claims have been twice rejected for the same rea- 
sons may appeal from the primary examiners to 
the examiners in chief upon the payment of a fee 
of $10. 

The duration of patents is for seventeen years 
except in the case at design patents, which may 
be for three and a naif, seven or fourteen years, 
as the inventor may elect. 

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claims to inventions to prevent the issue of patents 
to other persons upon the same invention, without 
notice to caveators, may be filed upon the payment 
of a fee of $10. Caveats must contain the same 
information as applications for patents. 

Schedule of fees and prices: 

Original application $15.00 

On Issue of patent 20.00 

Design patent (3V6 years) 10.00 

Design patent (7 years) 15.00 

Design patent (14 years) 30.00 

Caveat 10.00 

Reissue 30.00 

First appeal 10,00 

Second appeal 80.00 

For certified copies of printed patents: 

Specifications and drawing, per copy $0.06 

Certificate 26 

Grant 60 

For manuscript copies of records, per 100 

words 10 

If certified, for certificate 25 

Blue prints of drawings, 10x15, per copy 26 

Blue prints of drawings, 7x11, per copy 16 

Blue prints of drawings, 5x8, per copy 05 

For searching records or titles, per hour 60 

For the Official Gazette, per year, In United 

States 5.00 

PATENT OFFICE STATISTICS. 



Xr. Applications. Issues. 

1898 35,842 

1899 41.443 

1900 41,890 

1901 46,449 

1902 46,641 

1903 50,213 



22,267 
25.527 
26,499 
27,373 
27,886 
31,699 



Yr. Applications. Issues. 



1904 52,143 

1905 54,971 

1906 56,482 

1907 57.679 

1908 60,142 

1909 64,408 



30,934 
30,399 
31.965 
36.620 
33,682 
37,421 



REGISTRATION OF TRADE-MARKS. 



Vnder the law passed by congress Feb. 20, 1905, 
and effective April 1. 1905. citizens of the United 
States, or foreigners living in countries affording 
similar privileges to citizens of the United States, 
may obtain registration of trade-marks used in 
commerce with foreign nations, or among the sev- 
eral states, or with Indian tribes, by complying 
with the following requirements: First, by filing 
In the patent office an application therefor in 
writing, addressed to the commissioner of patents, 
signed by the applicant, specifying his name, domi- 
cile, location and citizenship; the class of mer- 
chandise and the particular description of goods 
comprised In such class to which the trade-mark Is 
appropriated; a statemevit of tho mode In which 
the same is applied and affixed to goods, and the 
length of time during which the trade-mark lias 
been used. With this statement shall be filed a 
drawing of the trade-mark, signed by the appli- 
cant or his attorney, and snch number of speci- 
mens of the trade-mark as may be required by 



the commissioner of patents. Second, by paying 
into the treasury of the United States the sum or 
$10 and otherwise complying with the requirements 
of the law and such regulations as may be pre- 
scribed by the commissioner of patents. 

The application must be accompanied by a written 
declaration to the effect that the applicant believes 
himself to be the owner of the trade-mark sought 
to be registered and that no other person or cor- 
poration has the right to use it; that such trade- 
murk is in use and that the description and draw- 
ing presented are correct. Trade-marks consisting 
of or comprising immoral or scandalous matter, 
the coat of arms, flag or other insignia of the 
United States or of any state or foreign nation 
cannot be registered. Fees for renewal of trade- 
marks and for filing opposition to registration are 
$10 each; for appeals from examiners to the com- 
missioner of patents. $15 each. 

Further information may be had by applying to 
the commissioner of patents, Washington, D. C. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOIl 1011. 



ESPERANTO SIMPLIFIED, OR IDO. 

By E. F. McPike and O. H. Mayer. Chicago representatives of the "Delegation for the Adoption 
of an International Auxiliary Language." 



Esperanto, the proposed international auxiliary 
language, published in 1887 by Dr. L. Zamf:nhof, 
an oculist of Warsaw, Poland, was welcomed by 
many, as it became more generally known in 1004, 
1905 and 1906; but the practical application of the 
language to many topics, as well as a thorough 
theoretical examination, brought out a number of 
defects. An international committee of eminent 
philologists, logicians, linguists and men of science, 
representing the "Delegation for the Adoption of 
an International Auxiliary Language," and com- 
prising the representatives of 310 societies of all 
countries and 1,250 members of academies and uni- 
versities, met In Paris in October, 1907, and, as 
says the Scientific American supplement of June 
18, 1910, in a long editorial, after an exhaustive 
study of all international language projects pub- 
lished heretofore, and especially ot Esperanto, 
"succeeded not only in recognizing, but also in 
correcting In a competent manner, the errors of 
Esperanto, with the result that we are to-day In 
possession of a language which. In respect of facil- 
ity, lucidity, variety and elgance or expression, 
represents the pinnacle of Internalonal speech. 
The new language, whose official name is 'Interna- 
tional Language of the Delegation.' is often called 
!n short 'Ido' that is. a descendant, because it 
sprang from Esperanto." 

The following are the chief alterations effected: 

1. All accented letters done away with, making 
it possible to print the language anywhere, while 
preserving phonetic spelling and often restoring the 
international orthography. 

2. Suppression of a few grammatical rules that 
were unnecessary and very troublesome for most 
nations, and chiefly for people with little knowl- 
edge of grammar (accusative, agreement of the ad- 
jective). 

3. Word-building made regular, this being tha 
only means to prevent the Influx of national idioms 
and to give a solid basis to the scientific and, tech- 
nical vocabulary, without which the International 
language cannot obtain a footing In the world of 
science". 

4. The vocabulary made richer by the adoption 
of new roots, carefully selected according to the 
principle of the maximum of internationality. 

All tlw words ire formed from International 
roots, 1. e., roots found in most European lan- 
guages, so that they are known without study by 
every fairly educated man. It is not a new lan- 
guage to learn; it Is the quintessence of Euro|K>au 
languages. But It Is easier beyond comparison 
than any of the latter, on account of Its absolute 
simplicity and regularity. It Is learned by read- 
Ing; when you can read it you can write It; when 
you can write it you can speak it. And It has 
been proved by experience that people from the 
most different countries pronounce it so nearly 
alike as to make any difference trifling and by no 
means troublesome. 

Although but two and a half years before the 
public, Ido counts already twelve magazines and 
150 propaganda societies in many countries. Its 
directing committee is headed by the chemist, 
Prof. Ostwald of Leipsic (Nobel prize In 1909). the 
ph3'sicist; Prof. Pfaundler of Graz. member of the 
Imperial Academy of Sciences of Vienna, and Prof. 
Ixirenz of the Technical University of Frankfort- 
on-the-Main; Its academy Is headed by the philolo- 
gist, Prof. .Tespersen of Copenhagen, member of 
the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences, and the 
philosopher. Dr. L. Couturat of Paris, sometime 
professor at the University of Toulouse. 

GRAMMAR OF IDO. 

Alphabet No silent letters; all letters always 
pronounced us In alphabet, c = ts; g as In go; 
s as in so; x = ks; 1 as in jam (may also be 
pronounced as it is in French); sh as In ship; ch 
as in church; qu as in quality; y as in yes; r 
trilled or clearly pronounced. Vowels as In Scotch, 
Italian or German; a nearly as in father; e nearly 
as In set; 1, between ee In sheep and 1 In ship; 



o as in no; u like o in do. After a or e, u => 
short oo (au = something like ow In cow; eu = 
something like eh-oo, in one syllable and with 
the eh longer than the oo). 

Tonic accent or stress On syllable before last; 
in the infinitive, on last syllable (ar, Ir, or), y Is 
not a vowel and cannot be accented; bona filyo 
devas amar sua patro. 

Article The = la, always. A or an, not trans- 
lated. 

Noun Singular in -o, plural in -I. 

Adjective In -a, Invariable (may be dropped for 
e-uphony). 

Personal pronouns Me = I, me; tu = you (famil- 
iar, 2d pers. sing.); vu = you (polite, sing.); 11 = 
lie, him; el = she. her; ol = it; Di = we, us; 
\i = you (plural); II = they, them. (When neces- 
sary; 111, masc.; eli, fern.; oil, neut., = they). 

Possessive pronouns Mea = mine, my; tna = 
your, yours (familiar, sing.); vua = your, yours (po- 
lite, sing.); sa = his, her, hers, its (when dis- 
tinction is not necessary); nia = our, ours; via = 
your, yours (plural); lia = their, the-irs (in gen- 
eral). 

When used alone (1. e., without a noun), plural: 
mei, tui, etc. 

When distinction between his. her, Its, their, 
is necessary, use lisa = his; elsa = her. hers; 
olsa = Its; ilia = their (belonging to men); ella 
= their (belonging to women); olia = their (be- 
longing to things). 

Reflexive pronoun Su = himself, herself. Itself, 
themselves; sua = his own, her own, its own, 
their own. Plural: sui. 

Demonstrative pronouns lea = this; ita = that; 
lei = these; Itl = those; ico = this (thing); ito 
= that (thing). The initial i may be dropped; 
ca. ta, co, to, etc. 

With distinction of gender. "Ilca = this (masc.); 
elca = this (fern.): olca = this (thing); llta = 
that (masc.); elta = that (fern.); olta = that 
(thing). 

(Plural (when used without a noun) Ilci, eld, 
olci, ilti, etc. 

Relative and Interrogative pronouns Qua (sing.) 
s= wbo, what, which (person); qui (plural) = who, 
what, which (persons); quo (neut.) = which 
(tiling), what: that. 

Accusative When the direct object precedes the 
subject it takes a final -n; la humo, quan vu 
vidis = the man v/hom you saw, the manl you saw. 

Verb The conjugation consists of tenses only; 
person and number are only Indicated by the sub- 
ject. 

Terminations of the chief tenses: 

Active Passive 
Infinitive. Indicative.Participle.Participle. 

Present -ar -as -anta -ata 

Past -Ir -is -inta -ita 

Future ... -or -os -onta -ota 

Conditional, -ns; imperative, -ez. 

The verb "to be" (es-ar) is used to form all 
tenses ,'n the passive voice and the compound 
tenses in the active voice: 

Past perfect Me esis aminta, "I had loved." 

Future perfect Me esos aminta, "I shall have 
loved." 

Conditional perfect Me esus aminta, "I should 
have loved." 

It will be noticed that the verb "to have" is 
tot used as an auxiliary. 

In the passive voice, the compound forms in -ata 
(esas araata, esis amata. esos amata, etc.) may 
be shortened into amesas, amesis. amesos, amesus, 
amesar, amesez. E. g., me amesus, "I should be 
loved" (me esus amata). 

Adverbs Derived adverbs end in -e. This -e re- 
places the -a or -o of the adjective or noun, bon-a 
= good, bon-e = well; nokt-o = night, nokt-e 
= by night. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



83 



TEE CARNEGIE HERO FUND. 



April 15, 3904, Andrew Carnegie placed In the 
hands of a commission the sum of $5,000,000 to be 
known as "the hero fund." Its purpose is to re- 
ward with medals and money the men and women 
who perform heroic deeds, or, in case they lose 
their lives, to care for those dependent upon them. 
Widows are given support until they remarry and 
children are given allowances until they are 16 
years of age. Only such as follow peaceful voca- 
tions on sea or land In the United States and Can- 
ada are eligible to become beneficiaries of the 
fund. The first awards of medals and money were 
made in May, and others in October, 1905. The 
tames of the recipients with the reason for the 
award in each case will be found in The Daily 
News Almanac and Year-Book beginning with the 
volume for 1906. 

AWARDED NOV. 3. 1909. 

Halley M. Woods, aged 38, merchant, saved Nellie 
B. Dana and others from drowning In flood at 
Athens, O., March 14, 1907; silver medal and $1,000. 

Ray V. Vincent, aged 23, coal miner, saved James 
lA. Bolin and others from drowning at Athens, O., 
March 14, 1907; bronze medal and $1,000. 

James C. McMichael, aged 52, watchman, assisted 
in attempting to save Nancy J. Simmons and 
others from drowning at Athens, O., March 14, 
1907; silver medal. 

Amanson Lewis. Jr., aged 30, stationary engineer, 
assisted !n attempt to save Nancy J. Simmons and 
others from drowning at Athens, O., March 14, 
1907; silver medal and $1,000. 

William A. Casley, aged 39, superintendent, 
helped to save Alvin L. Downard and others from 
drowning at Athens, O., March 14, 1907; bronze 
medal and $1,000. 

Edward Swett, aged 33, painter, helped to save 
Lycia S. Young and others and died! in attempting 
to save Ira C. Young and others in the Athens (O.) 
flood March 14, 1907, silver medal and $20 a month 
for support of father and mother. 

Alonzo Barnes, aged 40. painter, helped to save 
Lydia S. Young and others from drowning at 
Athens, O., March 14, 1907; bronze medal and 
$1,000. 

Charles F. Bearhs, aged 48, driver, died while 
assisting in attempt to save Ira C. Young and 
others from drowning at Athens, O., March 14, 
1907; silver medal to next of kin. 

Carl J. Hibbard, aged 2t, machinist, helped to 
save Mary EL Dana from drowning at Athens, O., 
March 14, 1907; silver medal and $1,000. 

Otto Barth, aged 47, miller, died in attempting 
to save John P. Dana and others from drowning 
at Athens, O., March 14, 1907; silver medal and $25 
a month to widow. 

Pascal L. Traglio, aged 46, painter, helped to 
save Minerva M. C&rsey and others from drowning 
at Athens, O., March 14, 1907; bronze medal and 
$1.000. 

Frederick L. Guenther, aged 42, contractor, helped 
to save Minerva M. Carsey and others from drown- 
ing at Athens, O., March 14, 1907; bronze medal 
and $1,000. 

Walter O. Allen, aged 26, student, helped to 
save James N. Carsey and Noah H. Martin from 
drowning at Athens, O., March 14, 1907; bronze 
medal and $1,000. 

Harry G. Seevers, aged 26. coal miner, helped to 
pave J. N. Carsey and N. H. Martin from drown- 
ing at Athens, O., March 14, 1907; bronze medal 
and $1,000. 

Theodore H, Homer (colored), aged 32, saved 
Freddie Berger, aged 8, from a runaway in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., Aug. 2, 1908; bronze modal and $500. 

William F. Sayle, aged 15, schoollwy, saved Ethel 
H. Aldrich and Russell R. Dyer from drowning at 
North Attleboro, Mass., Jan. 17, 1908; bronze medal 
mid $2,000. 

Jchn F. Conroy, aged 28, physical instructor, 
saved Walter Scully, aged 10, from drowning at 
Manchester. Mass., Aug. 28. 1908; bronze medal. 

Timothy J. Martd-n, aged 25, machinist, helped 
to save Joseph Fizko, aged 10. from drowning at 
Thomaston, Conn., Jan. 9, 1909; bronze medal and 
$1,000. 

Albert K. Sweet (colored), aged 20, machinist, 



attempted to save Ragnhlld, Lilly and Axel Han- 
son, children, and filbert W. Johnson from drown- 
ing at Narwood, R. I., Feb. 17, 1909; lironze medal. 

Harry F. Kenusru, aged 35, laborer, attempted 
to rescue David B. Blair, aged 13, from electric 
shock at Chester, Pa., Feb. 27, 1909; bronze medal. 

Aint-rt Guildoo, aged 14. schoolboy, rescued Min- 
nie M. Lower*, aged 13, from a mad dog at Wam- 
pum, Pa., March 16, 1909; bronze medal and $2,000. 

John A. iCamerou, aged 26, Janitor, saved Martha 
W. Donnelly from burning in Cincinnati, O., Oct. 
29. 1908; bronze medal and $1,000. 

William G. Buley, aged 38, stationary engineer, 
saved Hannah A. Lewis from being run over by a 
train at Aldan, Pa., April 16, 1908; bronze medal 
and $1,750. 

Frank H. Terry, aged 14, student, saved Fred O. 
Claus from drowning at Paulsboro, N. J., July 14, 
1908. 

George E. MoCue (colored), aged 26, porter, saved 
Jacquelyn M. Herman, aged 2, from being run 
over by a train at Garden City, Kas., Nov. 19, 
1908; bronze medal end $500. 

Robert Dowling, aged 38, machinist, saved Mali- 
Ion R. Potts and tried to save two others from 
suffocation at Elizabeth, N. J., Dec. 9. 1905; bronze 
medal and Jl.OOO. 

Lin wood E. Clark, aged 19, student, saved Edgar 
V. Bump from burning at Wilton, Me., Dec. 23, 
1908; bronze medal and $2,000. 

Ralph H. Reeder, aged 25, superintendent, saved 
Bessie , L. Lewis and Katheriue M. Cain from 
drowning at Bordentown, N. J., July 6, 1908; 
bronze medal. 

Henry R. Berry, aged 25, laborer, died In at- 
tempting to save Carl G. Britton, aged 12, from 
drowning at Cambridge, O., June 13, 1909; bronze 
medal and S25 a irontu to widow. 

Frederick E. Foss, aged 38, lineman, died at- 
tempting to save William Quann from electric 
shock at Somerset, Mass., Nov. 16, 1908; bronze 
medal and $25 u month to mother. 

Patrick Casey, aged 25, pipefitter, died attempt- 
ing to save William B. Jones from suffocation by 
gas at Youngstown, O.. April 29, 1909; silver medal 
and $50 a month to widow and $5 a month fof son. 

Robert L. Troscher, aged 18, wireman, attempted 
to save Patrick Casey and William B. Jones from 
suffocation by gas at Youngstown, O., April 29, 
1909; bronze medal and $1,000. 

Stephen Borovsky, aged 34, foreman, attempted 
to save Patrick Caey from suffocation at Youngs- 
town, O., April 29, 1909; bronze medal and $500. 

Harry D. Thompson, .aged 43, master mechanic, 
attempted to save William B. Jones from suffoca- 
tion at Youngstovn, O., April 29, 1909; bronze 
medal and $500. 

Hubert Backus, sped 29, stationary engineer, at- 
tempted to save William B. Jones from suffocation 
at Youngstown, O., April 29, 1909; bronze medal 
and $500. 

Bertha Rattenbury, aged 15, student, saved Abi- 
gail Wellner from drowning at Charlottetown, P. 
E. I., Aug. 6, 1909; silver medal and $2,000. 

Ithamer C. Sapp, aged 41, farmer, saved William 
C. Whitney from burning at Westerville, O., Nov. 
17. 1S07; silver medal and $3.100. 

Clarence M. Thompson, aged 49. farmer, attempt- 
ed to save Eugene G. Davis- and Nelson O. Thomp- 
son from suffocation in a well at Cimarron, Kas., 
May 18, 1909; silver medal and $1,000. 

William F. Bayless. aged 23. farmer, saved Clar- 
ence M. Thompson from suffocation at Cimarron 
Kas., May 18, 1909; silver medal and $1,000. 

George A. Lowry, aged 52, inventor, attempted 



to save Annie L. Pollard from drowning at Pablo 

Aug. 22, 
William M. Edwards, aged 25, longshoreman. 



. 
Beach, Fla.. Aug. 22, 1908; silver medal 



rescued Lucius Hubbard from burning in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., June 20, 1908; silver medal and $1.000. 

Jesse O. Stewart, aged 23, farmer, savod Otis 
E. Nichols and Spencer Bullard from suffocation 
by gas in a well at Brownwood, Tex., April 26. 
1909; silver medal and $1,000: 

Clemmie C. Lebns, aged 26, housewife, died at- 
tempting to save Mazel Ellis an! Kathryu E. 
Weaver from drowning at Henrietta, Tex., April 
29, 1909; silver medal. 



84 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



Herbert L. Mitchell, aged 44, clergyman, died 
attempting to save Clarence B. BlaUeslee from 
drowning at Fishers Island. N. Y., Aug. 3. 1903; 
silver medal, $300 to pay debt and $70 a month to 
widow and $5 additional a month for each child. 

Charles W. Hammond, aged 44, laborer, died at- 
tempting to savo Archibald C. Reynolds from 
drowning at .Sydney, Me., April 1. 1909; silver 
medal and $20 a month to widow and $5 a month 
for 'ach of four cMldron. 

Ignatius J. Raif, aged 22, blacksmith, died res- 
cuing Adolph Reiss. aged 5. from electric shock at 
Houston, Tex., April 30, 1909; silver medal and $40 
a mouth to widow and $5 a month for each of two 
children. 

Michael Donlon, aged 35, porter, died saving 
Malvina and Delclna F. Gauthier from being run 
over by a train at Meriden, Conn., Jan. 2, 1909; 
silver medai. 

Michael J. Duffy, aged 55, special officer, died 
attempting to save Emma C. Conklin, aged 65, 
from being run over by a train at Hallstead, Pa.. 
Jan. 11, 1909; silver medal and $40 a month to 
widow. 

Francis G. Stewart, aged 50, crossing watchman, 
died saving G. Cary Bercaw, aged 6, from being 
run over by a train at Hammond, La., April 13, 
1908; silver medal. 

Matthew J. Kelly, aged 31, died attempting to 
save John A. McCue from suffocation by gns in 
Pittslmrg, Pa., Aug. 4, 1909; silver medal and $50 a 
month to widow, vith $5 a month for son. 

AWARDED JAN. 19, 1910. 

Francis T. Smith, aged 43, engraver, saved Mary 
Cunningham from drowning at George's Mills, N. 
H., Aug. 23, 1909; bronze medal. 

Thomas J. Caniff, aged 43, tool setter, rescued 
John E. Ross, Jr., and Edward A. Saum from 
electric shock at Waterbury, Conn., Sept. 12, 1905; 
bronze medal. 

George F. Burba, aged 44, editor, saved Cath- 
erine Murty, aged 12. from drowning at Sny.ler- 
ville, O., Aug. 12, 1909; bronze medal. 

Oscar H. Thomas, aged 29, salesman, saved Al- 
fred H. Smith, aged 7, from drowning at Milford, 
Conn., Dec. 7, 1907; bronze medal ami $1.000. 

James W. Marrinan. aged 16, student, saved 
Neil E. Duffy, aged 4, from being run over by 
train at Woburn, Mass., June 12, 1909; bronze 
medal and |2.000. 

Frank B. Well, aged 21, school teacher, saved 
Charles I. Fisher, Olive M. McCally and Cora B. 
Butterfleld from burning at Walker, Iowa, Nov. 
1, 1908; bronze medal and $2,000. 

Anthony J. Langhammer, aged 18, machinist, 
saved Edward Yung, aged 10, from drowning at 
Dayton, Ky., Aug. 8, 1909; bronze medal and $2,000. 

Charles W. Weld, aged 21, salesman, saved J. 
Chase Harbaugh from drowning at Waterloo, Iowa, 
Aug. 1, 1908; bronze medal. 

John A. Grady, aged 30, fisherman, helped save 
Arthur Nystrom and Herman Peterson from drown- 
ing at Souris, P. E. I.; bronze medal and $500. 

Duncan J. Campbell, aged 24, lineman, helped 
save Arthur Nystrom and Herman Peterson from 
drowning at Souris, P. E. I.; bronze medal and $500. 

Cornelius H. Bertram!, aged 17, office boy. died 
attempting to save Charles Zimmerman from drown- 
ing at New York, N. Y., Aug. 8, 1909; bronze 
medal and $1,000 to father. 

Charles P. McCrory, aged 19, clerk, died at- 
tempting to save John A. Altenbaugh, Jr., from 
drowning at Sandy Creek. Pa., Aug. 4. 1909; bronze 
medal and $3,000, with $20 a month additional for 
five years to father. 

Edith M. Grigor. aged 36, school teacher, died 
attempting to save James C. Morrison, aged 7. from 
drowning at We-itvorth, N. H., Aug. 13, 1907; sil- 
ver medal to father. 

Jesse E. Patterson, photographer, attempted to 
save Minerva M. Carrey and nine others from 
drowning at Athens, O., March 14, 1907; silver 
medal and $500. 

Matthew Walsh, aged 45. laborer, died as result 
of attempting to save James E. Kelly from suffo- 
cation by g-JS in manhole in Boston, Mass.. Aug. 
12. 1909; silver medal and $25 a month to widow, 
with $5 a month for each of five children. 

Humphrey J. Moynihan, aged 51, inspector, saved 



James E. Kelly and Thomas Bragan from suffoca- 
tion by gas in Boston, Aug. 12, 1909; silver medal 
and $1,000. 

CARNEGIE HERO FUND COMMISSION, 1909. 
President Cvwrles L. Taylor. 
Vice-president W. J. Holland. 
Treasurer J. H. Reed. 
Secretary and manager F. M. Wilmot. 
Members William L. Abbott, Taylor Allerdice, 

Albert J. Barr, Edward M. Bigelow, W. W. 

Blackburn, Joseph Bufflngton, A. C. Dinkey, 

Ralph M. Dravo, R. A. Franks, W. N. Frew. W. 

J. Holland, Thomas Lynch, Thomas N. Miller. 

Thomas Morrison, F. C. Perkins, H. K. Porter, 

J. H. Reed, W. L. Scaife, W. H. Stevenson, 

Charles L. Taylor, F. M. Wilmot. 
Office In Carnegie building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Up to Jan. 31, 1910, the commissioners had made 
336 awards. These included 13 sold medals, 148 
silver medals and 175 bronze medals. A total of 
4.621 cases had been considered. The sum of $248,- 
406.54 had been paid to heroes and their depend- 
ents, the amounts paid on pension allowances being 
included. Besides this $124.462.06 had been given 
to funds for the relief of sufferers In the Grover 
factory disaster at Brockton, Mass., the California 
earthquake disaster, the Monongah mines disaster, 
the Darr mine disaster and the Lick Branch mine 
disaster. 

Acts for which awards for heroism had been 
made up to Jan. 31 1910: 



Saving or attempting 
save from 


ta 

208 
35 

30 
22 
9 
7 
6 
6 
2 
ive 

1 


Being run over by 
street car 


3 

1 
1 

336 
t 

2 

a 

19 
36 

50 
2 
42 
9 
2 
2 
5 
I 
1 

a 

a 
i 

9 

10 

336 




Suffocation by gas 
Being run over by 
train 


Quarrv explosion 
Suicide 


Automobile 






Electric shock 
Mine explosion 


Sawmill belting 


Total 


Mad dog 


By states awards h 
Jan. 31, 1910: 
Alabama 


been made as follows 
Nebraska 


Cal if ornla 


5 
11 
1 
4 
1 
3 
16 
6 
9 

s 


New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New York 
Ohio 


Connecticut 
Dist. of Columbia 
Florida 


Georgia 
Idaho 
Illinois 


Oregon 
Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 




South Carolina 








Texas 




6 
2 
6 
1 
33 
9 
5 
1 
8 


Utah 


Louisiana 
Maine 


Vermont 
Virginia 


Massachusetts 
Michigan 
Minnesota 
Mississippi 


West Virginia 


Wisconsin 
Canada 

Total 









HOT WEATHER AND DROUGHT IN 1910. 

The summer of 1910 was warm and dry throughout 
the greater part of the United States, the heat 
and drought resulting in considerable damage to 
crops and in extensive forest fires In Wisconsin, 
Michigan. Minnesota. Idaho and Montana. The 
spring was rather late and cold in the north cen- 
tral states, though on the southern Pacific slope 
it was unusually warm. In Los Angeles, Cal., the 
thermometer registered 100 degress above zero April 
23, the warmest weather experienced there at that 
time of year since the government began keeping 
a record." It began to get warm in the Mississippi 
valley in June and culminated in a general "not 
wave" !n the third week of July. On the 25th 
niul 26th of that month the thermometer ranged 
from 90 to 109 degrees above, the highest temper- 
atures being registered in Oklahoma, Missouri, 
Kansas, Texas, Arkansas and Colorado. In Chi- 
cago. July 24. it was 97 degrees above. The heat 
continued with brief interruptions well into August. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



UNITED STATES CIVH SERVICE. 
Civil-service act approved Jan. 16, 1883. 



Officers Three commissioners are appointed by 
the president to assist him in classifying the gov- 
ernment offices and positions, formulating rules and 
enforcing the law. Their office is in Washington, 
D. C. The chief examiner Is appointed by the 
commissioners to secure accuracy, uniformity and 
justice in the proceedings of the examining boards. 
The secretary to the commission is appointed by 
the president. 

General Rules The fundamental rules governing 
appointments to government positions are found in 
the civil-service act itself. Based upon these are 
many other regulations formulated by the commis- 
sion and promulgated by the president from time 
to time as new contingencies arise. The present 
rules were approved March 20, 1903. and went into 
effect April 15. 1903. In a general way they re- 
auire that there must be free, open examinations 
of applicants for positions in the public service ; ' 
that appointments shall be made from those graded 
highest in the examinations ; that appointments to 
the service in Washington shall be apportioned 
among the states and territories according to popu- 
lation ; that there shall be a period (six months) 
of probation before any absolute appointment is 
made ; that no person in the public service is for 
that reason obliged to contribute to any political 
fund or Is sub.lect to dismissal for refusing to so 
contribute: that no person in the public service 
has any right to use his official authority or influ- 
ence to coerce the political action of any person. 
-Applicants for positions shall not be questioned as 
to their political or religious beliefs and no dis- 
crimination shall be exercised against or in favor 
of any applicant or employe on account of his re- 
ligion or politics. The classified civil service shall 
include all officers and employes in the executive 
civil service of the United States except laborers 
and persons whose appointments are subject to 
confirmation by the senate. 

Examinations These are conducted by boards of 
examiners chosen from among persons In govern- 
ment employ and are held twice a year In all the 
states and territories at convenient places. In Illi- 
nois, for example, they are usually held at Cairo, 
Chicago and Peoria. The dates are announced 
through the newspapers or by other means. They 
can always be learned by applying to the commis- 
sion or to the nearest postofflce or custom house. 
Those who desire to take examinations are advised 
to write to the commission In Washington for the 
"Manual of Examinations." which is sent free to 
all applicants. It is revised semiannually to Jan. 
1 and July 1. The January edition contains a 
schedule of the spring examinations and the July 
edition contains a schedule of the fall examina- 
tions. Full Information Is given as to the methods 
and rules governing examinations, manner of mak- 
ing application, qualifications required, regulations 
for ratine examination papers, certification for 
and chances of appointment, and as far as possible 
It outlines the scope of the different subjects of 
general and technical examinations. These are 
practical in character and are designed to test the 
relative capacity and fitness to discharge the duties 
to be performed. It is necessary to obtain an aver- 
age percentage of 70 to be eligible for appoint- 
ment, except that applicants entitled to preference 
because of honorable discharge from the military 
or naval service for disability resulting from 
wounds or sickness incurred in the line of duty 
need obtain but 65 per cent. The period of eligi- 
bility is one year. 

Qualifications of Applicants No person will be 
examined who is not a citizen of the United States ; 
who is not within the aee limitations prescribed ; 
who is physically disqualified for the service which 
he seeks : who has been guilty of criminal, infa- 
mous, dishonest or disgraceful conduct ; who has 
been dismissed from the public service for delin- 
quency and misconduct or has failed to receive ab- 
solute appointment after probation ; who is addict- 
ed to the habitual use of Intoxicating liquors to 
excess, or who has made a false statement In his 
application. The age limitations in the more im- 
portant branches of the public service are : Post- 
offlce. 18 to 45 years : rural letter carriers, 17 to 55 : 



Internal revenue, 21 years and over; railway mall, 
18 to S5 ; lighthouse, 18 to 50 ; life saving, 18 to 45 ; 
general departmental, 20 and over. These age lim- 
itations are subject to change by the commission. 
They do not apply to applicants of the preferred 
class. Applicants for the position of railway mail 
clerk must be at least 5 feet 6 inches in height, 
exclusive of boots or shoes, and weigh not less 
than 135 pounds in ordinary clothing and have no 
physical defects. Applicants for certain other po- 
sitions have to come up to similar physical re- 
quirements. 

Method of Appointment Whenever a vacancy ex- 
ists the appointing officer makes requisition upon 
the civil-service commission for a certification of 
names to fill the vacancy, specifying the kind of 
position vacant, the sex desired and the salary. 
The commission thereupon takes from the proper 
register of eligibles the names of three persons 
standing highest of the sex called for and certifies 
them to the appointing officer, who is required to 
make the selection. He may choose any one of 
the three names, returning the other two to the 
register to await further certification. The time 
of examination is not considered, as the highest 
in average percentage on the register must be cer- 
tified first. If after a probationary period of six 
months the name of the appointee is continued on 
the roll of the department In which he serves the 
appointment is considered absolute. 

Removals No person can be removed from a 
competitive position except for such cause as will 
promote the efficiency of the public service and for 
reasons given In writing. No examination of wit- 
nesses nor any trial shall be required except in 
the discretion of the officer making the removal. 

Salaries Entrance to the department service is 
usually in the lowest grades, the higher grades be- 
ing generally filled by promotion. The usual en- 
trance grade Is about $900. but the applicant may 
be appointed at $840, $760 or even $600. 



EMPLOYES IN THE FEDERAL CIVIL SERVICE. 
June 30, 1909. 

IN WASHINGTON. 

White House 43 

State department 199 

Tieasury department 7,900 

War department 2,236 

Navy department 1,019 

Postafflce department 1,665 

Interior department 5,779 

Department of justice 1,207 

Department of agriculture 2,760 

Department of commerce and labor 1,860 

Interstate-commerce commission 560 

Civil-service commission 160 

Smithsonian Institution 439 

State, war and navy department building 231 

Isthmian canal commission 149 

Government printing office 4,091 

Total 30,298 

OUTSIDE WASHINGTON. 

Treasury department- 
Supervising architect 222 

Custodian and janitor service 3,184 

Mints and assay offices 1,193 

Subtreasury service 389 

Public health and marine-hospital service.. 2.891 

Lite-saving service 2,289 

Cisterns service 7,557 

Internal-revenue service 3,722 

Miscellaneous 462 

War department 

Suartermaster's department 7,643 

rdnance department 5,659 

Engineer department 12,413 

Miscellaneous 2,084 

Navy department 

Trade and labor positions 21,000 

Exclusive of trade and labor positions 2,371 

Postoffice department 

Inspection service and stamp agencies 415 

Postofflce service 93,994 

Fourth-class postmasters 62,942 



86 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Rural free delivery service 40,257 

Railway mail service 16,087 

Interior department 

Land service 1,175 

Pension-agency service 5,123 

Indian service 6,007 

Reclamation service 843 

Miscellaneous 188 

Department of justice 1,991 

Department of agriculture 8,519 



Department of commerce and labor 

Lighthouse service 7,067 

Immigration service 1,537 

Steamboat-inspection service 303 

Miscellaneous 1.232 

Civil-service commission 33 

Isthmian canal service 25,635 



Total 337,496 

Grand total 367,794 



THE CARNEGIE FOUNDATION FOE THE ADVANCEMENT OF TEACHING. 



In April, 1905, Andrew Carnegie transferred to a 
board of trustees $10,000,000 in United States Steel 
corporation fifty-year bonds bearing 5 per cent in- 
terest, the purpose of the trust fund thus created 
being to provide retiring allowances or annuities to 
teachers In the higher institutions of learning in 
the United States, Canada, and Newfoundland under 
such regulations as the trustees might decide to be 
wise. Schools below the rank of college and insti- 
tutions directly under the control of religious de- 
nominations are excluded from the benefits of the 
fund. State universities were also originally ex- 
cluded from the benefits of the fund, but March 31. 
1908, Mr. Carnegie, at the request of the National 
Association of State Universities, admitted them 
and at the same time added to the foundation $5,- 
000,000 in 5 per cent bonds, making the fund $15,000.- 
000 In all. The stite universities of Wisconsin, 
Michigan, Minnesota and Missouri were admitted 
in 1909. 

The policy of the board has been to confer the 
retiring allowances through the institutions them- 
selves rather than to individual teachers', on the 
principle that the annuity must come as a right 
and not as a charity. The professors in the accept- 
ed institutions receive retired pay in due course 
and under established rules. Allowances are grant- 
ed, on the basis of age, service and disability. Any 
person 65 years of age who has had not less than 
fifteen years of service as professor or not less 
than twenty-five years of service as instructor or 
as instructor and professor, and who is at the time 
a professor or an instructor in an accepted insti- 
tution, shall be entitled to an annual retiring al- 
lowance, computed as follows: 

(a) For an active pay of $1.200 or less an allow- 
ance of $1,000, provided no retiring allowance -shall 
exceed 90 per cent of the active pay. . 

(b) For an active pay greater than $1,200 the 
retiring allowance shall equal $1,000. increased by 
$50 for each $100 of active pay in excess of $1,200. 

(c) No retiring allowance shall exceed $4,000. 



Any person who has had twenty-five years of 
service as a professor or thirty years of service 
as professor and instructor and who is at the time 
either a professor or an instructor in an accepted 
institution, shall, in the case of disability unfit- 
ting him for the work of a teacher, as proved by 
medical examination, be entitled to a retiring al- 
lowance computed as follows: 

(a) For an active pay of $1,200 or less a retiring 
allowance of $800, provided that no retiring allow- 
ance shall exceed 80 per cent of the active pay. 

(b) For an active pay greater than $1,200 the 
retiring allowance shall equal $800, increased by 
$40 for each $100 in excess of $1,200. 

(c) For each additional year of service above 
twenty-five for a professor or thirty for an in- 
structor the retiring allowance shall be increased 
by 1 per cent of the active pay. 

(d) No retiring allowance shall exceed $4,000. 

At the beginning of 1910 the foundation was pay- 
ing 318 pensions, the cost being $466.000. The pro- 
fessors receiving these pensions came from 139 col- 
leges, distributed over forty-three states of the 
union and provinces of Canada. Following were 
the officers of administralion in 1910: 

President Henry Smith Pritchett. 

Treasurer Thomas Morrison Carnegie. 

Secretary John Gabbert Bowman. 

Trustees Charles C. Harrison, chairman: David 
Starr Jordan, vice-chairman; Charles F. Thwing, 
secretary; Hill McClelland Bell, Nicholas M. But- 
ler. Thomas M. Carnegie. Kdwin B. Craichead. 
William H. Crawford. Goorge H. Denny. Robert 
A. Franks, Arthur Twining Hadley, Charles C. 
Harrison, Alexander C. Humphreys. Henry C. 
King, Thomas McClelland, Samuel B. McCormick, 
William Peterson, Samuel Plantz. Henry S. Pritch- 
ett, Ira Remsen. Jacob Gould Schurman. Laurenus 
C. Seelye. William F. Slocum, Frank A. Vander- 
lip, Charles R. Van Hise. Woodrow Wilson. 

Omce 576 5th avenue, New York, N. Y. 



GREAT EARTHQUAKES IN MODERN TIMES. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Date April 18, 1906. 



Lives lost 452. 

Persons injured 1,500. 

Persons made homeless 265,000. 

Property loss $350.000.000 (estimated). 

Loss of insurance companies $132,823,067.21. 

Buildings destroyed 60,000. 

Blocks or squares burned 453. 

Area of burned district 3.96 square miles. 

Relief appropriation by congress $2,500,000. 

Relief subscription $11,000.000. 

VALPARAISO, CHILE. 
Date Aug. 16, 1906. 
Lives lost 1.500. 
Property loss $100,000,000. 

KINGSTON. JAMAICA. 
Date Jan. 14, 1907. 
Lives lost 1,100. 
Persons injured 2,000. 



Sq. miles. 
Oceans- 
Antarctic 5,731.350 

Arctic 4,781,000 

Atlantic 34,801,400 

Indian 17,084,000 



Property loss $25.000.000. 

Buildings destroyed 6,000. 

Area of ruined district 50 acres. 

Area affected by earthquake 300 acres. 

Duration of first shock 38 seconds. 

Duration of fire after earthquake 40 hours. 



SICILY AND CALABRIA. 

Date Dec. 8, 1908. 

Day of week Monday. 

Hour 5:23 a. m. 

Duration of shock 35 seconds. 

Lives lost 76,483. 

Persons injured 95,470. 

Persons made homeless 1,100,000. 

Property destnoyed (No estimate attempted). 

Region affected Northeastern Sicily and southwest- 
ern Calabria. 

Chief cities and towns destroyed or damaged In 
Sicily: Messina. Faro. Santa Teresa, Scalleta. In 
Calabria: Reggio, Galileo, San Giovanni, San 
Eufemia, Pellaro, Palmi, Cannitello. 



AREAS OF 

S 
Pacific 
Lakes Baikal... 
Chad 


OCEANS 

q. miles. 
57,699,630 
13,000 
50,000 
9,960 
10,000 


AND GREAT LAKES. 

So., miles. 
Great Slave... 12,000 
Huron 23 son 


Michigan . . . 
Nyassa 
Ontario 


22.450 
12,000 
7,240 


Erie 


Great Bear .. 



Superior 

Tanganyika .. 
Victoria Nyan- 



Sq. miles. 



Winnipeg 



31,200 
15.000 



26,500 
9.000 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



NATIONAL PARKS IN THE UNITED STATES. 
(Under supervision of the secretary of the Interior.) 



NAME. 


Location. 


Created. 


Acres. 




Maryland 
Arizona 
Georgia and Tennessee 
Oregon 
California 
Pennsylvania 


Aug. 20,1890 
June 32,1892 
Aug. 18,181(0 
May 22. 1002 
Oct. 1,1890 
Feb. 11. 1895 
May 11, 1910 


a 

480 
6.195 
159,8t>0 
2.560 
877 






Crater Lake 


General Grant 








June In, 1880 . 


912 
42,876 
207.360 
848 
1,606 
160.000 
3.000 
960 
1.238 
10,522 
2,142.720 
967.680 
170 


Mesa Verde 
Mount Rainier.. . . 


Colorado 
Washington 


June 29, 1906 
May 22, 1899 


Platt 


Oklahoma 
District of Columbia 
California 


June 29, 1906 
Sept. 27. 1890 
Oct 1 1890 


Rock Creek 


sshuoh 


Tennessee 


Dec. 27, 1894 


Sully's Hill 


North Dakota 
Mississippi 
South Dakota 


June 4, 1904 
Feb. 21, 1899 
Jan. 9, 1908 


Vicksburg 
Wind Cave 


Yellowstone 


Montana and Wyoming 


March 1,1872 




California " . .. 


Oct 1 1890 


Zoological.... 


District of Columbia. . . 


March 2. 1889.... 



NOTES ON NATIONAL PARKS. 

Antletam Battla field of the civil war in Washing- 
ton county. Maryland. 

Casa Grande Ruin Remains of a large prehistoric 
building near Florence, Ariz. 

Ohickamanga and Chattanooga Battlu fields of the 
civil war In the vicinity of Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Crater Lake Park contains remarkable mountain 
lale and tfne scenery in the Cascade range, Kla- 
rnath county, Oregon; may be reached from Kla- 
in.ith Falls or from Medford on the Southern 
Pacific road. 

General Grant In Fresno and Tulare counties, Cal- 
ifornia; forest and mountain scenery; reached 
from ganger on the Southern Pacific line. 

Gettysburg -Battle field of the civil war in south- 
eastern Pennsylvania. 

Glacier Tract of mountainous country in northern 
Montana with glaciers, lakes, forests and peaks. 

Hot Springs Reservation Tract of land in Garland 
county, Arkansas, noted for its springs of warm 
mineral waters. 

Mesa Verde In tBe extreme southwestern part of 
Colorado; contains pueblo and other ruins; 
reached from Mancos on the Rio Grande South- 
ern road. 

Mount Rainier Mountain district in southern Wash- 
ington; reached from Ashford on the Tacoma 
Eastern railroad and from Fairfax on the North- 
era Pacific road. 

Platt Tract of land containing sulphur springs In 
Murray county, Oklahoma; reached by Santa Fe 
and St. Louis & San, Francisco railroads. 

Rock Creek Park in outskirts of Washington, D. C. 

Sequoia Mountain tract in Tulare county, Cali- 
fornia containing forest of big trees; reached 
from Visalia. 

Shiloh Battle field of civil war In Hardin county, 
southern Tennessee. 

Sully's Hill On the shore of Devil's lake, Nortu 
Dakota; contains elevation on which Gen. Alfred 
Sully witii a few men withstood a band of In- 
dians for several days in 1863; reached from 
Devil's Lake, Narrows and Toklo stations on the 
Great Northern railroad. 

Vlcksburg Battle field of civil war near city of 
same name in Mississippi. 

Wind Cave Canyon and extensive cave in Ouster 
county, South Dakota, twelve miles from Hot 
-Springs, on the Northwestern and Burlington 
roads; in Black Hills region. 

Yellowstone Famous park in Wyoming, Montana 
and Idaho containing geysers and many other 
natural phenomena as well as beautiful moun- 
tain, lake and river scenery; reached from sta- 
tions on the Northern Pacific, Burlington and 
Oregon Short Line roads. 

Yosemite Splendid valley In the Sierras in Marl- 
posa county. California; reached from Merced on 
the Sante Fe and Southern Pacific roads by way 
of the Yosemite Valley railroad. 

Zoological Park in Washington, D. C., devoted to 



the zoological collection of the government; ad- 
Joins Rock Creek park. 

PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES. 
By law approved June 8, 1906, entitled "An act 
for the preservation of American antiquities," the 
president of the United States is authorized, in 
his discretion, to declare by proclamation historic 
landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures and 
other objects of historic or scientific interest that 
are situated upon lands owned or controlled by 
the United States to be national monuments. Un- 
der such authority the following, monuments have 
been cveated: 



Name and state. 



Year. Acres. 



Chaco canyon, N. M 1907 20,520 

Cinder cone,* Cal 1907 6,120 

Devil's tower, Wyo 1906 .,152 

El Morro, N. M . 1906 160 

Gila cliff dwellings,* N. M 1907 160 

Gran Quivira, N. M 1909 160 

Grand Canyon,* Ariz 1908 818,560 

Jewel cave,* S. D 1908 1,280 

Lassen peak,* Cal 1907 1,280 

Lewis and Clark cavern, Mont 1908 160 

Montezuma castle. Ariz 1906 160 

Mount Olympus,* Wash 1909 610,560 

Muir woods, Cal 1908 295 

Mukuntuweap, Utah , 1909 15,360 

Natural bridges, Utah 1909 2,420 

Navujo, Ariz 1909 600 

Oregon caves,* Ore 1909 480 

Petrified forest. Ariz 1906 60,766 

Pinnacles,* Cal 1908 2,080 

Rainbow bridge, Utah 1910 160 

Shoshone cavern, Wyo 1909 210 

Sitka, Alaska 1910 57 

Tonto,* Ariz 1907 640 

Tumacacorl, Ariz 1908 10 

Whaler,* Col 1908 300 

*Admlnlstered by department of agriculture; oth- 
ers by interior department. 

NOTES ON NATIONAL MONUMENTS. 

Chaco canyon- -Located in San Juan and McKinley 
counties, New Mexico; contains extensive pre- 
historic communal or pueblo ruins. 

Cinder cone An elevation In Lassen county in 
northern California: is of importance as illus- 
trating volcanic activity in the vicinity 200 years 
ago. 

Devil's tower A lofty and isolated rock in Crook 
county, Wyoming; Is an extraordinary example, 
of the effect of erosion in the higher mountains. 

El Morro An elevation near Wingate station on 
the Santa Fe railroad In New Mexico; contains 
prehistoric ruins and interesting rock Inscriptions. 

Gila cliff dwellings In the Mogollon mountains, 
New Mexico; known also as the Gila Hot Springs 
cliff houses; are among the best preserved re- 
mains of the cliff dwellers of the southwest. 

Gran Quivira Rulred town not far from Manzauo 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



In the central part of New Mexico; remains of 
large cathedral uiul chapel and of many houses 
thought to date from prehistoric times. 

Grand canyon In northwestern Arizona; greatest 
x-oded canyon \vithin the United States. 

Jevel cave A natural formation of scientific in- 
terest within the Black Hills national forest in 
Cutter county. South Dakota. 

Lassen peak In national forest of same name In 
Shasta county, northern California; marks the 
southern terminus of the long line of extinct 
volcanoes in the Cascade range, from which one 
of the greatest volcanic fields In the world ex- 
tends. 

Lewis and Clark cavern An extraordinary lime- 
stone cavern near Limespur, Jefferson county, 
Montana. 

Montezuma castle Large prehistoric ruin or cliff 
dwelling on Beaver creek, Arizona. 

Mount Olympus Mountain in the state of Wash- 
Ing; has extensive glaciers and on its slopes are 
the breeding grounds of the Olympic elk. 

Muir woods In Marin county, California; an ex- 
tensive growth of redwoocl trees of great age and 
size; land presented to the government by Wil- 
liam Kent of Chicago. 

Mukuntuweap Canyon in southwestern Utah through 
which flows the north fork of the Rio Virgin or 
Zion river; an extraordinary example of canyon 
erosion. 

Natural bridges Rock formations in southeastern 
Utah extending over streams or chasms; have 
loftier heights and greater spans than any other 
similar formations known; reserved as extraordi- 
nary examples of stream erosion. 

Navajo Within the Navajo Indian reservation In 



Arizona; includes a number of prehistoric cliff 
dwellings and pueblo ruins new to science. 

Oregon caves Within the Siskiyou national forest 
in Oregon; caves are of natural formation and of 
unusual scientific interest and importance. 

Petrified forest Deposits of fossilized or mineral- 
ized wood in Gila and Apache counties, Arizona. 

Pinnacles A scries of natural formations ot rock 
with a number of caves underlying them; located 
within Pinnacles national forest in California. 

Rainbow bridge An extraordinary natural bridge 
in southeastern Utah, having an arch which in 
form and appearance is much like a rainbow; Is 
309 feet high and 278 feet span; of scientific in- 
tei-est as an example of eccentric stream erosion. 

Shoshone cavern A cave in Big Horn county, Wy- 
oming, of unknown extent, but of many wind- 
ings and ramifications and containing vaulted 
chambers of large size, magnificently decorated 
with sparkling crystals and beautiful stalactites, 
and containing pits of unknown depth. 

Sitka Tract of anout flfttf-seven acres within pub- 
lic park, near Sitka. Alaska; battle ground of 
Russian conquest of Alaska in 1804; site of for- 
mer village of Kiki-Siti tribe, the most warlike 
of Alaska Indians; contains numerous totem 
poles constructed by the Indians, recording the 
genealogical history of their several clans. 

Tonto Comprises two prehistoric ruins of ancient 
cliff dwellings in Gila county, Arizona. 

Tumacacori Ruin of an ancient Spanish mission of 
brick, cement and mortar in Santa Cruz county, 
Arizona. 

Wheeler Volcanic formations illustrating erratic 
erosion; in Rio Grande and Cochetopa national 
forests ill southwestern Colorado. 



PRINCIPAL SEAPORTS OF THE WORLD. 



Vessel tonnage* movement In the foreign trade at 
the principal ports of the world. From reports 
compiled by the bureau of statistics, department 
of commerce and labor, Washington, D. C. 
Port. Year. Entered. Cleared. 
Aden, Arabia 1907 3,233,827 3,229,380 


Port. 
Hull England 


Year. 
. . . 1908 


Entered. 
3,249,121 


Cleared. 
2,8lS.239 




. . . 1908 


5,333,826 
7,973,123 
11.194,073 
6,773,130 
53.1,200 
4,401,173 
1.357.948 
2.683.875 
5,118,699 
826.220 
2.017.854 
12.528.723 
1,439.092 
2.274,625 
1.920.167 
1.251.920 
3.377.451 
8,595.314 
1.476.110 
905.596 
2.407.039 
4.332.018 
*13.933.205 
842.919 
1.257.143 
2.587.992 
4.036.752 
1.749.000 
1.703.123 
639,775 


5,226.076 
6.901,594 
8,487.841 
6,785.000 
196,419 
4.418.616 
1.361.689 
2.685,269 
5,190,967 
1,170,423 
2,168,816 
11,866.413 
1,407,157 
2.225.386 
2,068.524 
1.323.283 
3.362.052 
8.002.307 
1,477,648 
868.937 
2.390.733 
4,090,027 

' 75o!i29 
1.238.718 
2.493.433 
4.027.000 
1.720,000 
1,755.341 
639,156 




...1908 


London England 


...1908 


Marseilles, France 


...1907 


Alexandria, Egypt 1908 3,535,164 3,552,483 


Melbourne Australia 


...1908 


Antwerp Belgium 1908 11 044 361 11 084 004 




1908 


Baltimore Md 1909 1,102,479 1,102,226 


Montreal, Canada 


...1909 


Barcelona Spain 1907 1,932,467 1,444,923 




...1908 


Bilbao, Spain 1907 2,389,109 2,248,632 




...1907 


Bombay, India 1907 1,780,944 1,505,789 


Newcastle, Australia.... 


...1908 


Bordeaux, France 1907 1,342,303 1,312,117 
Boston Mass ... 1909 2852016 1981,812 


New Orleans. La 
New York N Y 


. . .1909 
1909 


Bremen Germany 1908 1,190,612 1,132,781 


Odessa, Russia 
Philadelphia, Pa 


...1907 
...1909 


Bremerhaven, Germany 1908 2,038,973 1,964.920 
Buenos Aires, Arg. Rep. ...1907 4,743,585 3,983,133 
Calcutta India .. .. 1907 1,618,390 1,492,191 


Puget Sound. Wash 


...1909 


Riga Russia 


...1907 


CapoTown, Cape Good Hopel908 1,709.062 1,600,824 
Cardiff, Wales 1908 6,027,897 8,850,000 


Rio de Janeiro. Brazil.. 
Rotterdam, Holland 


...1907 
...1908 


Colombo Ceylon 1908 6,527,286 6,543,62,5 
Constantinople, Turkey.... 1907 *14,985.000 
Copenhagen. Denmark 1907 2,984,000 3,198.000 
Dunkirk. France 1907 1,705.520 1,935,469 
Galveston, Texas 1909 1.094.400 1,339,337 


St. Petersburg, Russia. 
San Francisco. Cal 
Santos, Brazil 
Shanghai, China 
Singapore, Straits Sts. . 
Sydney, Australia 


...1907 
...1909 
...1907 
...1906 
...1908 
...1908 
...1908 


Genoa, Italy 1907 5,469.397 5,234.215 
Gibraltar 1908 4 586 142 4 5iO 859 


Glasgow, Scotland 1908 1,944,520 J,118.366 
Hambur" Germany 1908 10 895 113 10 75fi 913 


Trifste Austria 


...1908 


Valetta Malta 


1908 


Havana, 'Cuba 1908 4.250,095 4.223.979 
Havre, France 1907 3,318,:6 3.163.8S3 
Hongkong (Victoria).... 1908 10,042,992 10.fl3S.857 
*Total entere 


Valparaiso, Chile 
Verti Cruz, Mexico 
Vladivostok, Russia 


...1905 
...1908 
. . . 1907 


1 and cleared. 





DISTANCE 



[From 

Height, Dist., 
feet, miles. 



5 

10 
15 
20 
25 
30 
85 
40 
45 
50 



2.96 
4.18 
5.12 
5.92 
6.61 
7.25 
7.83 
S.37 
8.87 
9.35 



"List of 


Lights f 


ind Fog 


Height, 


Dist., 


Height, 


feet. 


miles. 


feet. 


70 


11.07 


250 


75 


11.46 


300 


80 


11.83 


350 


85 


12.20 


400 


90 


12.55 


450 


95 


12.89 


500 


100 


13.23 


550 


110 


13.87 


600 


120 


14.49 


650 


130 


15.08 


700 



OF VISIBILITY OF OBJECTS ON THE LAKES. 

nd Fog Signals" issued by the United States lighthouse board.] 



Dist., 
miles. 
20.92 
22.91 
24.75 
26.46 
28.06 
29.58 
31.02 
32.40 
33.73 
35.00 



Height, Dist., 
feet, miles. 
55 9.81 

60 10.25 

65 10.67 



Height, 
feet. 
140 
150 
200 



Dist.. Height, 
feet. 
800 
900 
1,000 



miles. 

15.65 
16.20 
18.71 



Dist., 

miles. 
37.42 
39.69 
41.88 



The distances of visibility given in the above 
t.ible are those from which an object niay be seen 
by an observer whose eye is at the lake level; 
In practice, therefore, it is necessary to add to 
these a distance of visibility corresponding to the 
height of the observer's eye above lake level. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



89 



ELECTION CALENDAR. 



GENERAL STATE ELECTIONS. 
(Gubernatorial If not otherwise specified.) 

Alabama Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 3, 

1914. 

Arkansas Biennially; second Tuesday in Septem- 
ber. Next election Sept. 10, 1912. 

California Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 
3, 1914. 

Colorado Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Connecticut State officers, except attorney-general, 
biennially; attorney-general quadrennially. Next 
election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Delaware- Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 
B. 1912. 

Florida Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 5, 
1912. 

Georgia Biennially, first Monday in October. Next 
election Oct. 7, 1912. 

Idaho Biennially. Next" election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Illinois Governor, lieutenant-governor, secretary of 
state, auditor and attorues'-general every fourth 
year. Next election Nov-. 5, 1912. State treasurer 
biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Indiana Governor, every fourth year. Next elec- 
tion Nov. 5, 1912. Other state officers biennially. 
Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Iowa Governor, lieutenant-governor, superintendent 
of instruction, one justice of the Supreme court 
anil one railroad commissioner biennially. Next 
election Nov. 5, 1912. Other state officers bienni- 
ally in the alternate years. Next election Nov. 
7. 1911. 

Kansas Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Kentucky Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 
7, 1911. 

Louisiana Every fourth year; third Tuesday in 
April. Next election April 16, 1912. 

Maine Biennially; second Monday in September. 
Next election Sept. 9, 1912. 

Maryland Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 
7, 1911. 

Massachusetts Annually. Next election Nov. 7, 
nil. 

Michigan Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Minnesota Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Mississippi Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 
7. 1911. 

Missouri Principal state officers every fourth year. 
Next election of governor, lieutenant-governor, 
secretary of state, auditor, treasurer and attor- 
ney-general Nov. 5, 1912. 

Montana Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 5, 
1912. 

Nebraska Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Nevada Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 3, 
1014. 

New Hampshire Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 

1912. 

New Jersey Governor every third year, other offi- 
cers appointed. Next election Nov. 4, 1913. 

New York Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

North Carolina Every fourth year. Next election 
Nov. 5, 1912. 

North Dakota Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Ohio Governor, lieutenant-governor, state treasurer 
and attorney-general biennially. Next election 
Nov. 8, 1911. Secretary of state and dairy and 
food commissioner biennially. Next election Nov. 
5, 1912. Auditor every fourth year. Next elec- 
tion Nov. 7, 1911. 

Oklahoma Every three years. Next election Nov. 4, 
1913. 

Oregon Every fourth year: first Monday in June. 
Next election June 1, 1914. 

Pennsylvania Governor, lieutenant-governor and 
secretary of internal affairs every fourth year. 
Next olertion Nev. 3, 1914. State treasurer bien- 
nlnily. Next election Nov. 7, 1911. Other officials 
appointed. 

Rhode Island Annually. Next election Nov. 7, 1911. 



South Carolina Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 

1912. 
fouth Dakota Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 

1912. 

Tennessee Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 
Texas Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 
Utah -Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 
Vermont Biennially; first Tuesday in September. 

Next election Sept. 3, 1912. 
Virginia Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 

4, 1913. 

Washington Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 

5, 1912. 

West Virginia Every fourth year. Next election 

Nov. 5, 1912. 

Wisconsin Biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 
Wyoming Every fourth year. Next election Nov. 

3, 1914. 



CHICAGO, COOK COUNTY AND ILLINOIS. 

FIRST TUESDAY IN Al'lUL. 

Aldermen in Chicago (one from each ward) annu- 
ally. Next election April 4. 1911. 

Mayor quadrennially, treasurer and city clerk bi- 
ennially. Next election of mayor April 4, 1911; 
of treasurer and city clerk April 4, 1911. 

Town officers, officers In cities containing one or 
more towns and officers in villages whose bound- 
aries coincide with the boundaries of a town, an- 
nually. Next election April 4, 1911. 

THIBD TUESDAY IN APRIL. 

Officers of cities organized under the general law 
(except such as contain within their limits one 
or more townships) annually. Next election April 
18, 1911. 

Officers of villages organized under the general law 
(except where territorial limits coincide with the 
territorial limits of a township) annually. Next 
election April 18, 1911. 

FIRST MONDAY IN JUNE. 

Judges of the Circuit court (fourteen in Cook county) 
every sixth year, counting from 1873. Next elec- 
tion in 1915. 

One judge of the Superior court of Cook county 
every sixth year, counting from 1897. Next elec- 
tion in 1915. 

Judges of the Supreme court of the state, 5th dis- 
trict, every ninth year, counting from 1873 (next 
election In 1918) . from the 4th district every 
ninth year, courting from 1876 (next election in 
1912); from the 1st. 2d, 3d. 6th and 7th districts 
every ninth year, counting from 1879 (next elec- 
tion in 1915). 

FIRST TUESDAY AFTER FIRST MONDAY IN NOVEMBER. 

Presidential electors, governor, lieutenant-governor, 
secretary of state, auditor, attorney-general, state 
senators in even-numbered districts, members of 
the state board of equalization, clerk of the Su- 
perior court and recorder of deeds in Cook 
county, clerks of the Circuit courts, state's at- 
torneys, county surveyors and county coroners 
every fourth year, counting from 1872. Next elec- 
tion Nov. 5, 1912. 

State treasurer, representatives in congress, repre- 
sentatives in the general assembly and three 
trustees of the University of Illinois every sec- 
ond year, counting from 1872. Next election NOT. 
5. 1912. 

Clerk of the state Supreme court every sixth year, 
counting from 1902. Next election Nov. 3. 191i. 

Clerks of the Appellate courts every sixth year, 
counting from 1878. Next election Nov. 3. 1914. 

Clerk of Criminal court every fourth year, count- 
ing from 1886. Next election Nov. 3, 1914. 

Superintendent of public Instruction, state senators 
in odd-numbered districts, clerk of the Criminal 
court In Cook county, county clerks, county 
judges, county treasurers, county superintendents 
of schools and sin riffs every fourth year, count- 
Ing from 1874. Next election Nov. 3. 1914. 

President and fifteen members of the Cook county 
board biennially. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Five members of the board of assessors in Cook 



90 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



county every second year as terms (six years) 
expire. Two will be elected Nov. 5, 1912. 

Three members of the board of review In Cook 
county every second year as terms (six years) 
expire. Next election Nov. 5, 1912. 

Eleven judges of the Superior court of Cook county 
as terms (six years) expire. Four will be elected 
Nov. 7, 1911, one in 1913 and six in 1916. 



Nine sanitary district trustees in Cook county as 
terms expire. Three are elected every other year. 
Next election Nov. 5, 1912. Next president to be 
elx:ted in 1916. 

Twenty-seven judges, one chief justice, one clerk 
and one bailiff of the Municipal court as terms 
expire. Nine judges and the chief justice, clerk 
and bailiff will be elected Nov. 5, 1912. 



ELECTORAL VOTE BY STATES (1896-1908'. 



STATE. 


1908. 


1904. 


1900. 


189G. 


STATE. 


1908. 


1904. 


1900. 


1896. 


tf 
H 


L 

a" 


Roose- 
velt, R. 


Q 


|j? 


i 


i~ 


d' 
oS 

fcx 

PQ" 


CJ 

9 

H 


3 
a" 


i . 

T *- 

5 


p 

*1 


3 


a 

i 


ll' 


a 


Alabama 
Arkansas 




11 




11 




H 
A 




11 
8 
1 
4 


Nevada 




3 


3 
4 






8 




3 


New Hampshire 


4 




4 




4 


California 


10 


"5' 


10 
5 
7 




9 


4 


8 


New Jersey 
New York 


12 




12 
88 




10 

'-iti 




10 






7 




fl 




g 


North Carolina 




V 




y 




1 1 




1 


Delaware 


8 




3 




S 








North Dakota 


I 




4 




;-( 




i 


Florida 




(j 




f> 




4 




4 

13 
8 


Ohio 















n 




Georgia 
Idaho., 


"y 


U 


"V 


13 




13 




Oklahoma 




7 














Oregon 


4 




4 




4 




4 




Illinois 
Indiana 
Iowa 
Kansas 
Kentucky 
Louisiana 


27 
15 
18 

10 


'is' 

q 


27 
15 
13 
10 


'is' 
q 


24 
15 
13 

10 


'is' 

8 


24 
15 
13 

'12 


'io' 
i 

8 


Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 


34 
4 




34 
4 




B 

4 




32 
4 




Sou th Carolina 




9 




q 




q 




9 

12 
15 
3 


South Dakota 


4 




^ 




4 






Tennessee. 




1? 




ii 




12 




Texas 




IS 




18 




U 




Maine 


1? 




i 




g 




H 


Utah 


i 




i 




8 








2 
1(5 
14 

11 


6 

in 


i 

Ki 
14 
11 


7 

iii 


8 
15 
14 
9 




8 










4 




4 




4 


Massachusetts 
Michigan 
Minnesota 


' 'q' 


15 
14 
9 


'9 
17 
3 

8 


Virginia 


"V 


12 




12 


"4 


12 




12 
4 


West Virginia 


7 




7 




i 




6 


Wisconsin 
Wyoming 


13 
3 




13 
8 




12 




12 


"'3 

171 


Missouri, 


18 




18 






17 




Montana 


g 




S 






R 




Total 


m 


its 


m 


140 


va 


153 


271 


Nebraska 




8 


8 




8 







Amherst Purple and white. 
Beloit Old gold. 
Bowdoin White. 
Brown Brown and white. 
Columbia Light blue and white. 
Cornell Carnelian and white 
Dartmouth Green. 
Harvard Crimson. 
Indiana Crimson and cream. 
Iowa Scarlet and black. 
Iowa State Cardinal and gold. 
Johns Hopkins Black and old gold. 
Lake Forest Red and black. 
Leland Stanford Cardinal. 
Northwestern Royal purple. 



COLLEGE COLORS. 

Oberlin Crimson and gold. 

Princeton Orange and black. 

Purdue Old gold and black. 

University of Chicago Maroon. 

University of Illinois Orange and navy bine. 

University of Michigan Maize and blue. 

University of Minnesota Old gold and maroon. 

University of Notre Dame Gold and -blue. 

University of Pennsylvania Red and blue. 

University of Rochester Dandelion yellow. 

University of Wisconsin Cardinal. 

Vassar Rose and gray. 

Williams Royal purple. 

Yale Blue. 



Austin Red and white. 

Bowen, James H. Purple and 

gold. 

Calumet Maroon and light blue. 
Carl Schurz Purple and gold. 
Crane, Richard T. Crimson and 

royal blue. 
Curtis, George W. Red and green. 



CHICAGO HIGH SCHOOL COLOBS. 

Englewood Purple and white. 
Farragut Red and white. 
Hyde Park Blue and white. 
Jefferson Purple ani gold. 
Lake Old blue and gold. 
Lake View Red and white. 
Lane Technical Myrtle green and 
old gold. 



Marshall Maroon and old gold. 
McKinley Orange and black. 
Medill Maroon and white. 
Phillips. Wendell Red and black. 
South Chicago Purple and gold. 
Tuley Old gold and blue. 
Waller, Robert A. Royal blue 
and yellow. 



UNITED STATES LIGHTHOUSE ESTABLISHMENT 
[From report of light-house board for the year 1909.] 



There are under control of the United States 
lighthouse establishment the following aids to nav- 
igation : 

lighthouses and beacon lights 1,580 

Light vessels in position 53 

Light vessels for relief 12 

Gas-lighted buoys . 162 

Fog signals 505 

Post lights, about 2,333 

Day marks 1,063 

Buoys on station 5,810 

There are 3,137 light keepers, assistant keepers 
and laborers attending lights and 2,062 other em- 
ployes connected with the service. The main items 
of regular expenses in 1909 were as follows: 



Supplies of Mghthouses $553, 96S 

Repairs of lighthouses 745,695 

Salaries of Keepers 1,063,342 

Expenses of light vessels 678,672 

Expenses of buoyage 564,871 

Elxpenses of fog signals 175,299 

Lighting of rivers 346,449 

There are, of course, many other items of ex- 
pense not enumerated in this list, such as for new 
lighthouse sites and new undertakings of various 
kinds. The total expense in 1909 was $6,183,608.18. 

The executive members of the lighthouse board 
in 1909 were: Capt. Adolph Marix, U. S. N.; Capt. 
H. T. Mayo, U. S. N.; LJeut.-Col. Thomas L. 
Casey, U. S. A. The secretary of commerce and 
labor is ex-offlcio president of the board. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK VOR 1911. 



01 



LEGAL HOLIDAYS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



Alabama Jan. 1 ; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday) ; Feb. 
22 ; Mardi Gras (the day before Ash Wednesday, 
first day of Lent); Good Friday (the Friday 
before Easter) ; April 26 (Confederate Memorial 
day); June 3 (Jefferson Davis' birthday); July 
4; Labor day (first Monday in September); 
Thanksgiving day (last Thursday in November); 
Dec 25 

Alaska Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30 (Memorial day); 
July 4; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Arizona Jan. 1 ; Arbor day (first Monday In Feb- 
ruary); Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; general elec- 
tion day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Arkansas Jan. 1. Feb. 22 ; July 4 ; Thanksgiving 
day; Dec. 25. 

California Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; July 4 ; 
Sept. 9 (Admission day) ; Labor day (first Mon- 
day in September) ; general election day In No- 
vember ; Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 25. 

Colorado Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; Arbor and School day 
(third Friday in April); May 30; July 4; first 
Monday in September ; general election day ; 
Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 25 ; every Saturday aft- 
ernoon from June 1 to Aug. 31 in the city of 
Denver. 

Connecticut Jan. 1 ; Feb. 12 (Lincoln's birth- 
day) ; Feb. 22; Good Friday; May 30; July 4; 
Labor day (first Monday in September) ; Thanks- 
giving day ; Dec. 25. 

Delaware Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 30; 
July 4 ; first Monday in September ; Thanksgiving 
day; Dec. 25. 

District of Columbia Jan. 1; Feb. 22; March 4 
(Inauguration day) : May 30; July 4; first Mon- 
day in September; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Florida Jan. 1 ; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday) ; Arbor 
day (first Friday in February); Feb. 22; April 
26 (Confederate Memorial day) ; June 3 (Jeffer- 
son Davis" birthday) ; July 4 ; first Monday In 
September ; Thanksgiving day ; general election 
day; Dec. 25. 

Georgia Jan. 1 ; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday) ; Feb. 
22; April 26 (Confederate Memorial day); June 
3 (Jefferson Davis' birthday) ; July 4 ; first 
Monday in September ; Thanksgiving day ; Arbor 
day (first Friday in December) ; Dec. 25. 

Idaho Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; Arbor day (first Friday 
after May 1 ) ; July 4 ; first Monday in Septem- 
ber ; general election day ; Thanksgiving day ; 
Dec. 25. 

Illinois Jan. 1 ; Feb. 12 (Lincoln's birthday) ; 
?eb. 22; May 30; July 4: Labor day (first Mon- 
day in September) ; Oct. 12 (Columbus day) ; 
general, state, county and city election days ; 
Saturday afternoons ; Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 
25 ; Arbor, Bird and Flag days are appointed by 
the governor. 

Indiana Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; first 
Monday In September ; general election day ; 
Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 25. 

Indian Territory July 4 ; Dec. 25. 

Iowa Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; July 4 ; first 
Monday in September ; general election day ; 
Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 25. 

Kansas The only holidays by statute are Feb. 
12 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; Labor day (first Mon- 
day in September) and Arbor day ; but the "days 
commonly observed in other states are holidays 
by common consent. 

Kentucky Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; first Monday 
In September ; Thanksgiving day ; general elec- 
tion day ; Dec. 25. 

Louisiana Jan. 1; Jan. 8 (anniversary of the bat- 
tle of New Orleans) ; Feb. 22; Mardi Gras (day 
before Ash Wednesday) ; Good Friday (Friday 
before Easter); April 26 (Confederate Memorial 
day) ; July 4; Nov. 1 (All Saints' day) ; general 
election day ; fourth Saturday In November ( La- 
bor day, in the parish of New Orleans only) ; 
Dec. 25 ; every Saturday afternoon in New Or- 
leans. 

Maine Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; Good Friday ; May 30 ; 
July 4; Labor day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 
Maryland Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; July 4 ; 
first Monday in September; Sept. 12 (Defenders' 
day); general election day; Dec. 25; every Sat- 
urday afternoon. 
Massachusetts Feb. 22; April 19 (Patriots' day); 



May 30; July 4; first Monday in September; 
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Michigan Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; July 4 ; first 
Monday in September ; Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 

Minnesota Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; Good Fri- 
day (Friday before Easter); May 30; July 4; 
first Monday in' September; Thanksgiving day; 
general election day ; Dec. 25 ; Arbor day (aa 
appointed by the governor). 

Mississippi First Monday in September; by com- 
mon consent July 4, Thanksgiving day and Dec. 
25 are observed as holidays. 

Missouri Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; La- 
bor day ; general election day ; Thanksgiving day ; 
Dec. 25 ; every Saturday afternoon in cities of 
100,000 or more inhabitants. 

Montana Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Arbor day (third 
Tuesday in April); May 30; July 4; first Mon- 
day in September; general election day; Thanks- 
giving day ; Dec. 25 ; any day appointed by the 
governor as a fast day. 

Nebraska Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Arbor day (April 
22); May 30; July 4; first Monday in Septem- 
ber ; Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 25. 

Nevada Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; July 4 ; Thanksgiving 
day; Dec. 25. 

New Hampshire Feb. 22 ; fast day appointed by 
the governor ; May 30 ; July 4 ; first Monday In 
September ; Thanksgiving day ; general election 
day ; Dec. 25. 

New Jersey Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 30; 
July 4 ; first Monday in September ; general elec- 
tion day ; Thanksgiving and fast days, and every 
Saturday afternoon. 

New Mexico Jan. 1 ; July 4 ; Thanksgiving and 
fast days; Dec. 25; Decoration, Labor and Ar- 
bor days appointed by the governor. 

New York Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 30; 
July 4 ; first Monday in September ; general elec- 
tion day ; Thanksgiving and fast days ; Dec. 25 ; 
every Saturday afternoon. 

North Carolina Jan. 1 ; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday) ; 
May 10 (Confederate Memorial day); May 20 
(anniversary of the signing of the Mecklenburg 
declaration of independence) ; July 4; state elec- 
tion day in August ; first Thursday in Septem- 
ber (Labor day); Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25; 
every Saturday afternoon. 

North Dakota Jan. 1 ; Feb. 12 ; Feb. 22 ; May 
30; July 4; Arbor day (when appointed by the 

governor) ; general election day ; Thanksgiving 
ay ; Dec. 25. 

Ohio Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; July 4 ; first 
Monday in September ; general election day ; 
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 2o; every Saturday aft- 
ernoon In cities of 50,000 or more inhabitants. 

Oklahoma Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; July 4 ; gen- 
eral election day ; Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 25. 

Oregon Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; first Saturday 
in June ; July 4 ; first Monday in September ; gen- 
eral election day; Thanksgiving day; public fast 
day; Dec. 25. 

Pennsylvania Jan. 1 ; Feb. 12 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; 
Good Friday ; July 4 ; first Monday in Septem- 
ber ; general election day ; Thanksgiving day ; 
Dec. 25 ; every Saturday afternoon. 

Philippines Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Thursday and Fri- 
day of Holy week ; July 4 ; Aug. 13 ; Thanksgiv- 
ing day; Dec. 25; Dec. 30. 

Porto Rico Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; Good Friday ; May 
30; July 4; July 25 (Landing day) ; Thanksgiv- 
ing day ; Dec. 25. 

Rhode Island Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; second Friday In 
May (Arbor day) ; May 30; July 4 ; first Monday 
In September ; general election day ; Thanksgiv- 
ing day ; Dec. 25. 

South Carolina Jan. 1 ; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday) ; 
Feb. 22; May 10 (Confederate Memorial day); 
June 3 (Jefferson Davis' birthday) : general elec- 
tion day ; Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 25. 26, 27. 

South Dakota Same ns in North Dakota. 

Tennessee Jan. 1; Oood Friday; May 30; July 4; 
first Monday In September ; general election day ;. 
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25; every Saturday after- 
noon. 

Texas Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 (Arbor day) ; March 2 
(anniversary of Texas independence) ; April 21 



92 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAE-BOOK FOB 1911. 



(anniversary of battle of San Jacinto) ; July 4 ; 
first Monday in September ; general election day ; 
appointed fast days ; Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 25. 

Utah Jan. 1; Feb. 22; April 15 (Arbor day); 
May 30; July 4; July 24 (Pioneer day); first 
Monday in September ; Thanksgiving day and ap- 
pointed fast days : Dec. 25. 

Vermont Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; July 4 ; Aug. 
16 (Bennington Battle day); Labor day; Thanks- 
giving day ; Dec. 25. 

Virginia Jan. 1; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday); Feb. 
22 ; July 4 ; first Monday in September ; Thanks- 

fiving and appointed fast days ; Dec. 25 ; every 
aturday afternoon. 

Washington Jan. 1 ; Feb. 12 (Lincoln's birth- 
day) ; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; first Monday 
in September ; general election day ; Thanksgiving 
day; Dec. 25. 



West Virginia Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 
30 ; July 4 ; Labor day ; general election day ; 
Thanksgiving day ; Dec. 25. 

Wisconsin Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; July 4 ; 
first Monday in September ; general election day ; 
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Wyoming Jan. 1 ; Feb. 12 ; Feb. 22 ; May 30 ; 
July 4 ; first Monday in September ; general elec- 
tion day; Dec. 25. 



The national holidays, such as July 4, New 
Year's, etc., are such by general custom and ob- 
servance and not because of congressional legisla- 
tion. Congress has passed no laws establishing 
holidays for the whole country. It has made La- 
bor day a holiday in the District of Columbia, but 
the law is of no effect elsewhere. - 



DESTRUCTIVE FLOOD IN PARIS. 



Paris, France, was visited by the most destruc- 
tive flood in the history of the city between Jan. 
?0 and Feb. 5, 1910. The Seine rose thirty-one feet 
?ix Inches u'>ove the normal level tit Font Royal, 
or nearly a foot higher than in 1615, the year of 
the worst previous flood. The total damage to 
property in the city and country was roughly esti- 
mated at $200,000.000 and between 150,000 and 
200,000 persons were made temporarily homeless. 
Snows and long-continued rains had saturated the 
valleys of the Maine and the Seine and the nar- 
row channel of the latter river, which runs 
through the heart of Paris, was unable to carry 
awuy the immense volume of water poured into it. 
The result was that the lower parts! of the city to 
the extent of many square miles on each side of 
tbe t-tream and several of the suburbs were inun- 
dated, the houses in some instances being com- 
pletely submerged. Few lives were lost, soldiers 
and policemen rescuing those who were in peril. 
The rise of the water was comparatively slow, al- 
lowing nearly everybody not only to reach places of 
safety but to save considerable personal property. 

Much of the damage done was caused by the 
backing up of the water in the sewers, flooding 
cellars, destroying pavements and weakening the 
foundations of buildings. In the Seine the water 
rose almost to the roof of the bridge arches and the 
danger of collapse was so great that eight of the 
twenty-four bridges had to be temporarily closed 
to traffic. The docks were badly washed out and 
a great deal of property along the quays was car- 
ried away. For a time it was feared that some 
of the historic and monumental buildings of Paris, 
such as the Louvre, the opera houae. Sainte Chap- 
elle, Notre Dame cathedral and the Madeleine, 
would be irreparably damaged, but fortunately this 
did not prove to be the case. No art treasures of 
any ' kind were lost. The basements of the public 
building? on the Isle de la Cite were flooded and 



the old Latin quarter and the Champs de Mars 
were submerged. The Place de la Concorde and a 
portion of the Champs Elysees were made impass- 
able and one side of the Place de 1'Opera in the 
very center of the city had to be roped off on ac- 
count of the caving in of the sidewalk. The sink- 
ing of pavements on account of the collapse of 
sewers was common and many thoroughfares had 
to be closed. A great part of the subway system 
was put out of commission and transportation from 
one part of the city to another was made even 
more difficult by the flooding of many of the street- 
car and omnibus routes. Railroad lines also suf- 
fered severely and suburban traffic was brought 
almost to a standstill. The St. Lazare station 
could scarcely be approached, and only the Gare 
du Nord was unaffected. This crippling of the 
railroad communications made the bringing in of 
provisions) difficult and for a few da3's the prospect 
of famine prices for food was faced. Fortunately 
the situation in this respect did not become se- 
rious. 

Electric and gas-lighting plants were interfered 
with and the postal service was disorganized- 
Telegraph lines were crippled in some directions, 
but communication with the outside world was 
kept open by means of roundabout lines. Some of 
the hospitals were flooded to such an extent that 
the patients had to be removed at the cost of 
much suffering. Distress among those who were 
compelled to leave their homes was great until 
relief measures could be taken to provide food 
and shelter. The Red Cross society, the Associa- 
tion of French Women, the local and national 
authorities and individuals worked energetically 
and successfully to help the destitute, special at- 
tention being given to women and children. By 
Feb. 7 the contributions from foreign sources 
amounted to more than $800,000 and this sum was 
largely increased later on. 



MEMBERS OF THE FRENCH ACADEMY. 



Name. Elected. 

Ollivier. Emlle. b. 1825 1870 

Mezieres. Alfred, b. 1826 1874 

Haussonville, Comte de, b.1843.1888 

Claretie, Jules, b. 1840 1888 

Freycinet, Charles de, b. 1828.. 1890 

Lotl-Viaud. Pierre, b. 1850 1891 

Lavisse, Ernest, b. 1842 1892 

Thureau-Dangan, Paul, b. 1837.1893 

Houssaye, Henri, b. 1848 1894 

Bourget, Paul, b. 1852 1894 

Lemaitre, Jules, b. 1853 1895 

France. Anatole. b. 1844 1896 

Mun, Albert, Comte de, b. 1841.1897 

The Academie Francaise, or French academy, 
was instituted in 1635. It is a part of the Insti- 
tute of France and Its particular function is to 



Name. Elected. 

Hanotaux, Gabriel, b. 1853.... 1897 

Lavedan, Henri, b. 1859 1898 

Deschanel, Paul, b. 1856 1899 

Hervieu, Paul, b. 1857 1899 

Faguet. Emile. b. 1841 1900 

Rostand, Edmond, b. 1868 1901 

Vogue, Charles de, b. 1829.... 1901 

Bazin. Rene. b. 1853 1903 

Masson. Frederick, b. 1847.... 1903 

Lamy, Etienne, b. 1845 1905 

Barres. Maurice, b. 1862 1906 

Ribot, Alexandre, b. 1842 1905 

Donnay. Maurice, b. 1866 1907 

conserve the French language, 
and encourage genius. 



Name. Elected. 

Segur, Marquis Anatole de, 

b. 1825 1907 

Barboux, Henri, b. 1834 1907 

Charmes, Francis, b. 1848 1908 

Poincare, Henri, b. 1850 1908 

Riehenin, Jean, b. 1849 1908 

Doumlc, Rene, b. 1860 1909 

Prevost, Marcel, b. 1862 1909 

Aicard, Jean, b. 1848 1909 

Brieux, Eugene, b. 1858 1909 

Poincare, Raymond, b. 1850.. .1909 
Duchesne, Mgr., b. 1848 1910 

foster literature 



WEIGHTS OF DIAMONDS AND FINENESS OF GOLD. 



The weight of diamonds and other precious 
tones is expressed in carats, grains and quarter- 
giains. The grains are pearl grains, one of which 
is equal to four-fifths of a troy grain. Four quar- 
ter-grains make one grain and four grains make 
one carat. A carat is therefore equal to four- 
flftlis of four troy grains, or 3.2, 



g 
is 



The fineness of gold Is also expressed In carats. 
Pure gold is said to be twenty-four carats fine. If 
It contains eight parts of a baser metal or alloy 
It Is only sixteen carats fine. The carats therefore 
Indicate the proportion of pure gold to alloy. Most 
of the gold used by je,welers is about fourteen 
(units fine, having ten parts of alloy. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



93 



MERCHANT MARINE OF THE UNITED STATES. 
[From the reports of the bureau of navigation.] 



YKAK. 


IN FOREIGN 
THADE. 


IN COASTWISE 
TRADE. 


WHALE 
FISHERIES. 


COD 

AND 

MACK- 

KUKI. 
FlSH- 
KIUKS. 


Total. 


Annual 
inc. (+) 
or 
<Jec.( ) 


Steam. 


Total. 


Steam. 


Total. 


Steam. 


Total. 


1860 
1870 


Tons. 
97.296 
192,544 


Tons. 
2,379,396 
1,448,846 


Tons. 
770,641 
882,551 


Tons. 

2.644.867 
2.638.247 


Tons. 


Tons. 
166.811 
67,954 
38.408 
18,638 
9,899 
9,534 
9.320 
9,512 
10,140 
10,763 
11,020 
9.680 
9,655 
8,962 


Tons. 
162,764 
91.4I50 
77,538 
68,367 
51,629 
62,444 
66,633 
57,532 
57,603 
60,342 
61,439 
57,047 
53,515 
50,208 


Tons. 

5,353,868 
4,246.507 
4.01,8,034 
4,424.497 
5.1K4.839 
5.524,218 
5.797,902 
6.087,345 
6,291,535 
6,456,543 
6,674,969 
6,938,794 
7,365,445 
7,388,755 


Per 


cent. 
-4.06 
-2.41 
-2.43 
-2.71 
-6.18 
-6.98 
-4.96 
- 4.99 
-3.25 
-2.62 
-il.38 
-3.95 
-6.16 
-0.32 


1880 
1890 


146,604 
192,705 
337.356 
426,259 
455,017 
523.602 
549.938 
596,594 
586,749 
598,155 
595,147 
575.226 


1,314,402 
928.01)2 
816,796 
879,51)5 
873,235 
879,264 
888,628 
913.750 
928.466 
861,466 
930,413 
878,523 


1.064.954 
1.661.458 
2.289,825 
2.491.231 
2.718.049 
2.880.678 
8,041.362 
3.140.314 
8,884,002 
3.664.210 
4,099,015 
4,157,557 


2,037,686 
3,409,435 
4.286,516 
4.582,645 
4,858.714 
5,141,037 
5,335.164 
5,441,688 
5,674,044 
6,010.601 
6.371.862 
6,451.042 




4,925 
8,986 
3.468 
3.808 
3.808 
4,218 
4,626 
4,536 
3,970 
3.590 
3,300 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


]<IOt 


1905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 



VESSELS BUILT IN THE UNITED STATES. 
[From the reports of the bureau of navigation.] 



YEAR. 


NewRngland 
coast. 


On entire 
seaboard. 


Mississippi 
and tribu- 
taries. 


On great 
lakes. 


Total. 


Iggo 


No. 
208 
199 
201 
225 
203 
170 
193 
146 
106 
151 
130 


Tons. 

78,577 
72,179 
82,971 
75,851 
66,973 
51,417 
119,377 
32,311 
44,428 
70,903 
27,237 


No. 

756 
1.107 
1,094 
1,197 
1,038 
878 
823 
850 
815 
1,034 
866 


Tons. 

169,091 
249.006 
291,516 
290,122 
288.196 
208,288 
230.716 
146.883 
219,753 
266,937 
131.748 


No. 
104 
215 
311 
161 
150 
187 
178 
167 
165 
207 
207 


Tons. 
16,506 
14.173 
22,888 
9,836 
11,112 
10,821 
6,477 
6,591 
7,288 
6,114 
5.940 


No. 
191 
125 
175 
133 
123 
119 
101 
204 
177 
216 
174 


Tons. 

108,526 
180,611 
169,085 
168,873 
13o,844 
159,433 
93,123 
265,271 
244 291 
341,165 
100,402 


No. 
1.051 
1,447 
1,580 
1.491 
1,311 
1,184 
1,102 
1,221 
1,157 
1,457 
1.247 


Tons. 

294.123 
31)3,790 
4*1489 
468,831 
43^.152 
878,542 
3:50,316 
418.745 
471.332 
614,216 
238,090 


iyoo . 


1901 . 


1902 


1903 


1904 ... 


1905 ; 


1806 


1<J07 


1908 . 


190SI 



DISASTERS TO SHIPPING. 

On and near the coasts and on the rivers of the United States and American vessels at sea and on 
the coasts of foreign countries. 



YEAR. 


Wrecks* 


Lives 
lost. 


Loss on 
vessels. 


Loss on 
cargoes. 


YEAR. 


Wrecks* 


Lives 
lost. 


Loss on 
vessels. 


Loss on 
cargoes. 


1888 
1889 


1.534 
1.526 
1.470 
1,475 
1,556 
1,481 
1,653 
1,496 
1,892 
1.206 
1,191 


553 
656 
556 
4 IS 
646 
401 
803 
704 
369 
299 
743 


$6,811,440 

9,578,195 
7,653.480 
li,034,(R5 
7,386.675 
7,763,995 
8,576.885 
7.530,540 
6.485,595 
6,442,175 
10.72H.250 


$3,571.290 
2,446,605 
2,172.595 
2,593,010 
2,577,870 
2,003,855 
-2,158,655 
1,944,810 
2,018.140 
1.731,766 
1,740,615 


1899. . . . 
1900 


1,574 
1,234 
1,265 
1,359 
1,172 
1.182 
1,209 
1,326 
1,670 
1,341 
1,317 


742 
252 
437 
531 
351 
1,454 
267 
499 
624 
374 
403 


$8,932.835 
7.186,990 
6,965,100 
8,824.820 
6.820,790 
7,011,775 
8,187,500 
10.089,610 
13,709,915 
9,555,825 
9,239,690 


$2,451,905 
3,350,500 
2,119.335 
' 2,309,335 
1,601,520 
1.722,210 
2,263,795 
2,245,305 
3,062.110 
2,152,15* 
3.323,225 


1890 


1901... 


1891 


1902.... 


1892 


1903. . . . 


1893 


1904.... 


1894 


1905. . . . 


1895 . . 


1906 


1896 


1907 


1897 


1908. . . . 


1898 


1909 



*Total or partial. 



CANALS IN THE UNITED STATES (1906). 
[From census bureau report.] 

Length Width (feet). Depth Locks 



State and name. 

Alabama Black Warrior 1889 91.00 

Coosa 1888 25.00 





1829 


29 63 60 






1847 


9 00 150 1 


)6 11 




1900 


34.00 244 1 


i8 22 




1894 


2.00 


2 




1848 


96 00 60 




Illinois and Mississippi 
Illinois (LaSalle-Grafton) . 


1895 
1889 


4.50 
227 00 


7 
7 




1893 


12 00 


8 ' 




1877 


12.00 250 


5 


Canalized rivers 




1,520.40 






. ... 1889 


27 00 







1889 


213 00 


5 




1889 


200 00 


5 


Louisville and Portland 


1830 


2.40 .... 


12 


Kouah .. 


1896 


29.50 


6 



(feet). 


(No.). 


Cost.* 


6.5 


7 


$2,223,883 


4 


3 


1,040,928 


5 


2 


684,110 


10 


3 


6,000,000 


11 


1 


2,090,263 


22 




52,697,495 


2 


"i 


100,000 


8 


18 


9,194,498 


7 


3 


547,230 


7 


4 


2,963,706 


8.5 


1 


130,000 


5 


3 

138 


4,666,889 
42,886,978 


6 


3 


1,091,108 


5 


7 


661,635 


5 


11 


2,798,922 


12 


4 


5,856,230 


6 


1 


104,899 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK Port isn. 



State and name. 
Louisiana Campany's 


Length Width (feet). Depth 
Op'd. (miles). Surf ace.Bottom. (feet) 
1847 95.00 60 45 5.5 


Locks 
. (No.). Cost.* 
1 snn nun 


Harvey's 


1830 


5.35 


70 


65 


6 


1 


400 000 


New Basin 
Old Basin 
Maryland Chesapeake and Ohio 
Michigan Lake Superior 
St. Clair Flats 
St. Mary's 
New Jersey Delaware 


1900 
1835 
, 1794 
1850 
1873 
1889 
1855 
1838 


7.00 
7.50 
7.00 
185.00 
7.75 
1.19 
1.60 
66.00 


100 
100 
60 
68 
120 

'ieo 

60 


85 
90 
40 
31 


6 
' 9 
7 
6 
20 
20 
25 
9 


1 

'is 

"i 

4 


350,000 
2,000,000 
150,000 
14,000,000 
4,246,728 
1,035,577 
8,000,000 
5,113,749 


New York Black river 


1836 
1849 


106.00 
42.00 


60 
42 


30 
28 


5 
4 


32 
109 


6,000,000 
3.964,000 


Champlain 
Delaware and Hudson 
Erie and branches 
Oswego 
North Carolina Fairfleld 


1839 
1822 
1828 
1825 
1828 
1868 


24.77 
81.00 
9.00 
355.13 
38.00 
4.00 


70 

60 
50 
70 
70 
26 


56 
35 
30 
56 
56 
26 


7 
6 
7 
7 
7 
7 


10 
23 
10 
72 
18 


2,232,632 

65,000 
65,402,033 
6,161,793 
60,000 




1882 


6.00 






5 




35 000 


Ohio Miami 
Muskingum 


1835 
1840 


269.00 
70.00 


50 


35 


5 
7 


95 
10 


8,062,680 
2 121 738 


Ohio and branches 
Oregon Columbia 


1835 
1889 


326.00 
4.50 


40 


26 


4 
8 


144 
2 


7,904,971 
3 816 394 


Government canals 
Portland General Electric 


1873 


78.19 
0.75 


75 


55 


6 


12 
5 


26,524,588 
750,000 


Yamhill 


1900 


18.00 






6 


1 


202,620 


Pennsylvania Allegheny . . 
Lehigh Coal .. 


1903 
1821 


26.00 
108.00 


"44 


'is 


6 
6 


3 

91 


1,124,768 
7,066,459 


Monongahela 


' 1888 


89.00 






5.4 


12 


3,954,466 


Ohio 


1885 


36.50 






6 


6 


4,668,561 


Schuylkill 


1826 


89.88 


58 


40 


6 


65 


11,018,875 


South Carolina Congaree 


1906 


2.00 






5 


1 


221,238 


Esterville-Miaini 


1906 


5.00 


90 




6 




172,175 


Fenwick's Island 


1906 


0.33 


90 




7 




50,000 


Tennessee Cumberland 


1889 


76.50 






6 


3 


2,232,637 


Tennessee 


1889 


18.00 






5 


2 


3,191,726 


Texas Galveston 


1853 


29.50 


37V 2 




3 




369,698 


Morgan 


1876 


5.43 


180 




17 




271,975 


Morris 


1873 


9.00 


100 


60 


8 




125,000 


Port Arthur .'.... 


1899 


7.13 


183 


75 


25 




803,490 


Virginia Albemarle 


1860 


14.00 


80 


45 


10 


1 


1,151,849 


Lake Drummond , 


1794 


23.00 


70 


40 


9 


2 


3,301,000 


West Virginia Great Kanawha 


1889 


90.00 






6 


10 


4,165,650 


Little Kanawha 


1889 


48.00 


.... 




4 


5 


519,107 


Monongahela 


1899 


41.00 






7 


7 


1,719,587 


Wisconsin Fox 


1856 


160.40 






6 


27 


3,149.295 


Sturgeon bay 


1881 


1.36 


160 




21 




504.596 


Total 




3,644.60 








934 


283,208,863 


'Including 


improvements, flncluded in 


Erie. 











NOTB The above list, it will be noted, includes a 
number of canalized rivers, and does not include 
canals completed since 1906. 

THE HENNEPIN CANAL. 

Preliminary surveys begun 1871. 

Excavation begun 1892. 

Work completed 1907. 

Canal formally opened Oct. 24, 1907. 

Length of main channel 75 miles. 

Length of feeder 29.3 miles. 

Total length 104 miles. 

Depth 7 feet. 

Width at bottom 52 feet. 

Width at water line 80 feet. 

Locks on main canal 32. 

Locks on feeder 1. 

Total cost $7,500,000. 

The Hennepin, or, more comprehensively, the 
Illinois and Mississippi canal, extends from the 
Illinois river near Hennepin to the Mississippi 
three miles below Rock Island. The navigable 
feeder extends from Rock river at Sterling and 



Rock Falls to the main line near Sheffield and la 
of the same size and just as navigable as the 
main line. Water is forced into it by a dam a 
Quarter of a mile long at Sterling. 



NEW YORK STATE BARGE CANAL. 

Total length 442 miles. 

Width From 122 to 160 feet. 

Depth From 12 to 20 feet. 

Locks 61. 

Excavation 175,000,000 cubic yards. 

Cost $101,000,000. 

Work on the New York state barge canal, or sys- 
tem of canals, according to estimates, will be com- 
pleted in 1916. The main waterway will follow the 
line of the present Erie canal in most places from 
the Hudson river at Waterford. Saratoga county, 
to Tonawanda and Lake Erie; another division will 
connect the Hudson with Lake Clmmplain, while a 
third branch will run from the main canal at 
Three Rivers Point to Lake Ontario. The waterway 
will be wide and deep enough to accommodate steam 
barges with a maximum capacity of 1,800 tons each. 



GREAT SHIP CANALS OF THE WORLD. 



CANAL. 


Open'd 


L'ngth 


Depth. 


Wdth* 


Cost. 


Corinth (Greece) 


Year. 

1893 


Miles. 
4 


Feet. 
26 25 


Feet. 
72 


15,000.000 


Kronstadt-St. Petersburg ( Russia) , 


1890 


16 


20.50 


220 


10.000.000 


Elbe and Trave (Germany) 


1900 


41 


10 


72 


5,831.000 


Kaiser Wilhelm (Germany) 


1895 


61 


29.50 


72 


37.128,000 


Manchester ship (England)... 


1894 


35.5 


26 


120 


75.000.000 


Sault Ste. Marie (U. S.) 


1855 


1.6 


22 


100 


10.000.000 


Sault Ste. Marie (Canada) 


1896 


i.n 


20.25 


142 


2,791.873 


Suez (Egypt) 


1869 


90 


31 


108 


100 000 000 


Welland (Canada) 


1887 


26.75 


14 


100 


25.000.000 



At the bottom. 



CH'CAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 
Fiscal years ended June 30. 



ARTICLES IMPORTED. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 






$4,777,458 
91,527 
672,934 


""6.62i',877 
9,530.767 


$5,037,671 


""55.552 

700,772 
8,849,068 


$7,839,670 
1,432 
45830 
503.98S 
21.088.720 
1,122,085 
712,551 
2,851,416 
985,638 
1,230.471 
1,067.911 
798.385 
8,500.579 
3.111.872 
1.732.200 
1.055.645 
002,833 
90.'.I64 2 ! I 




1,682,774 
8,046,llb 


176443 




644,374 


Ore, regulusor metal Ibs 




Art works 




4.310,767 
1.L15.800 

566,506 
2,500.134 




3,797.1(8 


Asbestos, unmanufactured tons 


""iii',482 
1,046 


41,176 
128,050 
MM 


1,021.390 
606,091 
2,905,391 
773,743 
611,085 
777,357 
470.500 
9,454,414 


47.510 
146,371 
1,473 


Automobiles No. 


Parts of 


490,905 
542,812 
733.798 
427,496 
7,138,214 










Bones, unmanufactured 








Brass, for remanuf acture Ibs 


2,640,258 


3,731,150 


6,504,212 






2,614,783 


2,090,157 
1,681,640 
652,961 
1,973,472 
74,642,945 
715,131 
1,680,100 
471,133 
2,451,009 


2,884,372 


2,583,482 
1,430,321 
766,901 
712.628 
80,599,808 
339.795 
1,715,078 
468,51)7 
2.0S8.034 
3.498.480 
14.850.328 
372,195 
79,112,129 
6,538,597 
2,159,191 
29.271.S14 
2,016,551 
1.025,639 
13,622,802 
62.010.286 
4.761,116 
19.313.585 
29,373,070 
9,809.028 
11.660,084 
5.995,599 
29,748.353 
49,312.392 
12,333.596 
31,110,683 
11,653,586 
9,432.993 
5,262,190 
1,246,054 
3,750,524 
5,403,044 
78,487.324 
1.301,956 
1,337,099 
4.542.657 
64,710.370 
1.463,589 
2,711,691 
22.439,787 
2,077,500 
609,062 
816,001 
725,873 
4,617,716 
13,933,134 
1,243,657 
1,581,815 
3,29U.5T>7 
8.968.SOS 
6.S07.357 
J. 243,856 
2,544.222 
1.894,810 
18,237,706 
1,689,090 
3,638.034 
5,626,624 
903,705 
17,259,195 
1,425.613 
964,123 
1,942,906 
1,766,168 
1,463,717 
731,795 
4,698,033 
428,121 


3,992,520 










673,437,777 

""2',756',452 

243,847 


192,374,732 

'"1,519,673 
252,838 


163.101,780 


Chemicals, drugs and dyes 


1,291.300 
287,12b 


279.372 
I,919,6tl8 
701.852 
1,869.102 
4.460.919 
11,376.061 
316.118 
69.191.353 
6,515,313 
2,757.192 
30.887.841 
3.152.280 
1.619.111 
16.810.138 
6(1,473, 143 
10.232,'XH 
29.540.07 4 
47.7911.801 
11,021.126 
ll.992.tt'>;} 
8.371.883 
32,418,S39 
67,624.245 
13.835,968 
37.423,827 
15.589.258 
11.008.386 
6,553.764 
1,165.534 
6,019.476 
7,950,530 
112,247,836 
1,605,432 
1,499,354 
5.090,2!)4 
106,8t;i,496 
1,234.914 
6.763,394 
38,502,457 
1.597,268 
1.101,924 
1,576,023 
1,584,295 
3,915,252 
16,865,937 
1.592,073 
1,926.714 
2,424,759 
11.043,454 
10.099.079 
1,347,862 
H,618,746 
1.834,640 
24.299,589 
1,914.985 
6.20fi,877 
6.033,075 
1,920,801 
17,536,755 
1,214.792 
1.040.750 
2,348.079 
2.809.2I10 
1,894.266 
1,058,C47 
4,361,237 
395,963 






Watches and parts of 






""l',624,79i 

108,668,070 
1,107.203 
871,469.016 
898.172 
26.949 
247,996,570 




1,981,467 
82.831,242 
1,016,990 
890.tUO.057 
271,017 


5,123,862 
14.257,250 
311,661 
67,688,106 
7,057,060 


1,227,858 
129,854.749 
1.287,109 
1,049,868,768 
320,217 
28,276 
220,853,988 






Coffee Ibs 


Copper Ore tons 






145,033,236 


24,361.902 

2,092.732 


Cork, wood or bark 


Manufactures of 


"n,072,855 


2.156,274 
14.1T2.241 
68.379.781 
4.452.320 
9.312,095 
16,7U,137 
13,427,969 
10.755,954 
4,970,461 
35,493,083 
54.467.572 
12,179 095 


"S&si&oU 


"86,037',69i 


Manufactures of 
Diamonds, uncut 
Cut but not set 
Total diamonds, precious stones, etc 


Earthen, stone and china ware 
Leathers, natural and artificial. 
Fertilizers ; 




Fibers Unmanulactured tons 


303,484 


845,445 


306,431 


Manufactures of 
Fish 


Fruits and nuts 




37,354,742 






Furs Undressed 




9,580,323 
6,337,826 
6,570,123 
774.249 
2,770,658 






Manufactures of 








Glass and glassware 






Grease and oils (free) 








Hair, unmanufactured 




Hats, bonnets, etc., and materials for 




4,852,548 
54.770,13*; 
1,265,382 


444',554,325 


"608,619.628 


Hides and skins Ibs 


282,764,925 


Hide cuttings, raw 


Hops Ibs 


8,493,265 

""m,378 

"'37i'.344 

14.536.288 


1,989.261 
4,446,187 
39,250.088 
2,050,135 
2,949.462 
27,607,909 
1,148,620 
375,535 
946.402 
126.515 
4,453,355 
14,127,347 
1.773,018 
1,585,152 
4,333.044 
8,757,320 
6.768,637 
1,400,213 
2,391,140 
2,102,313 
16.886.481 
1,738,257 
3.675.926 
6,036,693 


7,386,574 

'"1,015,647 

""766,726 
20,002,909 


3,200,560 

'"i38i',676 

692.476 
27,066,716 


Household goods, etc 
India rubber Unmanufactured 
Manufactures of 
Iron Ore tons 


Iron and steel, manufactures of 
Ivory A nimal Ibs 


Vegetable .Ibs 


Jewelry 


Other manufactures of gold and silver 








Lead and manufactures of .>, . . . . Ibs 


194,962.047 
""218,494 
"5l',H4.ii2 


231,926,416 
""165,061 
"43,435',748 

"6,306,329 


210,853,263 


Leather and manufactures of 
Manganese, ore and oxide tons 


237,037 
"33,578,542 

"4,848,6i5 


Marble and stone 
Matting and mats sq yds 


Meat and dairy products 






Musical Instruments 




Oil cloths ,.. MI vils 


6,114,568 


Oils of all kinds 


Paints, pigments and colors 




Books and other printed matter 




"37,055,628 


' 92,9ii',5i4 










18,259,751 
1,120,3% 
1,032,285 
2.003,973 
1,645,844 
1,206,016 
612,971 
4,798,553 
480,4(18 


Perfumeries, cosmetics, etc 












Plants, trees, shrubs, etc 
Platinum ot 


'"54,768 
13,398 
48,871 
212,783,392 
354,42(1.565 


""88.327 
15,992 
66,113 
222,900.422 
274,455,157 




118,860 
21,696 
80.210 

225.400.54J 

296^200273 


Plumbago tons 


Quebracn wood tons 


Rice, rice flour Ibs 


Salt Ibs 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 
IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE CONTINUED. 



ARTICLES IMPORTED. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Shells, unmanufactured 
Silk Unmanufactured 
Manufactures of 
Soap 




1,132.515 
64,546,611 
32,967,874 
761,745 
3,591,537 
3,464,671 
6.400,606 
10,746,527 




5.958.019 
1.889,765 
79,899.655 
30.718.582 
990.138 
5,348,606 
3.215,407 
7,676,825 
12 276 613 




14.693.776 
1.827.199 
67.115.177 
32.888.459 
746.721 
3.483.459 
3.263.953 
7.112.887 
13.007.293 
106.349.005 
2.626.705 
13.671.946 
30.869.532 
27,751.279 
4.082.582 
6.585.781 
8.273,571 
51.422.504 
51.220.844 
23.5152,175 




42,124,812 
7,525,106 
3,956,908 


78.201,943 
6,90f,105 
4,787,325 


43,793.258 
7,312.748 
4.382,067 




Distilled K^ls 


Wines 


Sugar Ibs 


3,371,997,112 

713.788 
94.149,564 
77,296,059 
32.056,043 


80,258,147 
$2,687.626 
16.309.870 
25,295,061 
22.870,328 
4,397,585 


4.189,421,618 
661.269 
114.916.520 
91,122,372 
41,736,098 


9fi.554.99S 
3.462.213 
1S.562.I~6 
2t),007.216 
25.400.919 
3.685180 


4.094,545,936 

729.502 
85,626,370 
101,134.508 
46,838.330 




Tea... Ibs 


Tin Ibs 


Tobacco Lieaf Ibs 


Manufactures of 


Toys 




7.206.423 




4,869,097 




Vegetables 




8,289,068 




12,999.797 




Wood and manufactures of 




43.527,982 
211664,938 
19,387.978 




43.690,427 
45.171,994 
18.102,461 




Wool Unmanufactured Ibs 


125,960,524 


266,409,304 


263,939,584 


Manufactures of 


Total value merchandise* 




525,603.308 
668,738.484 




599.556.639 
712,363.585 




756,161,396 
801,658.592 


( nut. 
Total value imports* 




1,194.341.792 




1,311,920.224 




1,557.819,963 


Includes all articles specified and unspecified in above table. 



EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE. 
Fiscal years ended June 30. 



ARTICLES EXPORTED. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Agricultural implements 
Animals Cattle. ...No. 


""S49',2i6 
30,818 
19,000 
6,609 
101,000 


$24.344,398 
29,339,134 
307,202 
2,612,587 
990.667 
589,285 
110,489 


'"287^2 
18,655 
21,616 
3,432 
67,656 


$25.694,184 
18.046,976 
144,605 
3,386,617 
472,017 
365,155 
114.122 


"'139,430 
4.410 
28,910 
4,512 
44,517 


$28,124,033 
12,200.154 
46,955 
4,081,157 
614.094 
209,000 
158.756 


Hogs No. 


Horses No. 


Mules No. 


Sheep No. 


Allother 


Total animals, including fowls 




34,101,2S 




22,645,43 




17.447,735 

1.065,695 
4,355,561 
3,052,527 
767.151 
103,138 
25.427,993 
1,147,568 
794.367 
521.658 
168.666 
15.240 
47.806.598 
47,621.467 


Art works 




549.407 
3.701,871 
3,205,528 
766,170 
94.638 
33,942,197 
2,053,447 
624,5*59 
705.853 
2,184,335 
16,521 
99.736,767 
64,170,508 




494.50!) 
3,510,276 
4,672.166 
710.687 
137,413 
25,194,466 
1,549.010 
804,759 
516,524 
1,049,809 
14,600 
68,094,447 
51,157.366 




Brass 




'"6,5861393 

12,606,614 
186.702 
35,853,412 
452.907 
1,510.320 
14.822.944 
1,272,559 
3,857 
66,923,244 
10,521.161 


""4,3U'.566 

13,064,693 
158,160 
36.802.374 
331,531 
1,685.474 
15,538,535 
219.756 
3,751 
46,679,876 
9,040.987 


Breadstuffs Barley bu 


4,349,078 
13,052.074 
116,127 
52,445,800 
654,515 
1,158,622 
24,484,199 
2,419,958 
4,105 
100,371.057 
13,927,247 


Bread and biscuit Ibs 




Corn bn 


Cornmeal brlB 


Oats bu 


Oatmeal Ibs 


Rye bn 


Rye flour brls 


Wheat bu 


Wheat flour brls 


Total breadstuffs (all kinds) 




215,260.588 
713.911 
22,072.902 
551,643 
1,470,317 
20,873,155 
2,848,725 
39.355,759 
2,718,385 
4.314,020 
474,451 
1.808.131 
104,064.580 
437,788,202 
25,177,758 




159,929,221 
795,999 
15,392,817 
587,859 
1,143,657 
19.131,811 
2,517,332 
37.316.795 
2,752,275 
3,729,840 
155,776 
1,417,791 
85,290.186 
417.390,665 
Jl.878.566 
1,656,384 




133,191,330 
1,341,273 
20,630.859 
1,189.080 
2,292.376 
21,415.935 
2,588.931 
40,512,546 
3,077.372 
5,703 786 
196,348 
1.304.887 
88,004.397 
450,447,243 
33,397,097 
1,746,260 
901,53- 
1,260.486 
3.352,663 
8,700,640 
5,088,484 
439.045 
9,652.088 
18.885.654 
14.501,635 
2,805401 
3,415.220 
261,756 
4,612.426 
1,142,845 
1.070.907 


Cars, automobiles, cycles, etc 










945,421 


827,971 

' '11,888,0$ 
765,532 
28,630.278 
986,100 
71,200 

t44V,985.202 


1,715,169 

"l3367',072 

872,013 
45,514,438 
1,210,886 
51,445 

3,206' 708,226 








Coal tons 


12,722.735 

763.809 
35,356,109 
4,301,029 
81,465 


Coke tons 


Coffee Green Ibs 


Roasted Ibs 


Copper Ore tons 


Manufactures of 




3.816,998,693 


Manufactures of 






Earthen, stone and china ware 
Eggs doz 


7,590,977 


1,145,679 

1,540,014 
3,705.517 


"6,207.151 


803,635 
1.199,522 
3,478,714 
9,283,416 
5,431.890 
560.814 
6.113,052 
10.568,080 
9,207,770 
2,173,193 
2.346,089 
244.Y51 
4,814.901 
968.749 
1,147,753 


5,325,936 






1,222,951 


10,970.931 
4,982.324 
710.905 


1,105,367 


1,020,587 


Fibers, bass, cordage, twine 
All other. . 






Fish 




5.685.916 










14,338,864 






Furs and fur skins 




7,712,8901 










2,505,417 






Glucose and grape sugar Ibs 


129,686,834 
2,917.173 


2,540,640 
289,441 
5,762,709 
1,165,475 
1,4(8,010 


112,224,504 
2,340,426 


149,820,088 
2,488,205 


Glue Ibs 




Hair and manufactures of. 
Hay tons 


" -; n.28i 


'"ei'.eii 




55.007 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



97 



EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE.-CONTlNrED. 



ARTICLES EXPORTED. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 


Quant's. 


Values. 




14.S50.454 
22,920,480 


1,536,225 
2,903.167 
7,573,570 
11,578,010! 

183.982,182 


12,858.975 
10,4,0.884 


1,271,190 

1.271.629 
7,432.832 
8,927,294 
144,951 ,357 


14,035,07o 
10,589,254 


1,738.216 
2,062.140 
10.175,634 
12.535,643 
179,133,186 


Hops Ibs 


India rubber, manufactures of 
Instruments, scientific, etc 
Iron and steel (except ore) 


Jewelry 




1,496,686 




1,259,790 
1,715.939 
42,974,795 




1,411,388 
2,273,355 
52,646.755 
1.447.989 
1.678,452 
7,733,751 
2,783,701 
1,779,615 
18.381,050 
17,837,375 
459,843 
120,888 
$4,421.844 
43.301,156 
6,887,738 
213,477 
14,655.052 
599,548 
627,669 
4.503,339 
1.030,031 
1,361,833 
785,771 
441,017 
1,023,033 


Lamps, chandeliers, etc 
Leather and manufactures of 




1,827,216 
40.088,019 






Marble and stone 
Meat and dairy products -Beef , canned.. .Ibs 
Beef, fresh Ibs 


'"23,376,447 
201,154,105 
47.898,067 

91.:97,5J7 
241, J 89,9! !9 
221,1 69,034 
4,157,022 
16,3V4,4<>8 
149,505.93? 
603.413,770 
73,181,210 
1,185,040 
215,479,532 


1,248.990 
2,467,875 
20,339.377 
3,319,950 
5 399,219 
25,481,240 
25.107,059 
532,442 
1,551,450 
113,332,634 
54,789.748 
6,035,318 
117,088 
19,578,222 
881,792 
909,472 
3,959,384 
1.265,283 
2.059,228 


'"14,895,527 

122,952,071 
44,789,063 
53,332,707 
244,578,074 
212.170,224 
5.759,930 
9.555.315 
52,354,980 
528,722,933 
75.18li.19J 
1,498,674 
182,874,304 


1,195,759 
1,645,822 
12.65)8,594 
3,472,307 
3,000,306 
25,920,490 
23,526,307 
620.193 
938,025 
$4,599.431 
52.712,569 
6,115,307 
141,654 
19,420,376 
848,644 
997,655 
3,520,191 
1,060,222 
1 783 331 


'"14,804.596 
75.729.060 
30,871,313 
29,379,992 
152,163,107 
146,885,385 
4,062,022 
1,029.278 
40,031,599 
862,927,671 
74,556,603 
1,989,472 
129,510,307 


Beef, cured Ibs 


Tallow Ibs 




Hams Ibs 


Pork, canned Ibs 


Pork, fresh Ibs 


Pork, pickled Ibs 




Lard compounds Ibs 


Mutton Ibs 


Oleo oil and oleomargarine 1 bs 






8,367,495 


8,:,38,658 


5,072,255 
35,418,957 


Sausage casings Ibs 


Other meat products Canned 
All other 






Butter .Ibs 


6.463,061 
8,439,031 


1,407.962 
1,092,053 
2,455,186 


5,981,265 
6,822,842 


1,268,210 
857,091 
1,375,104 


3.140,545 

2,846,709 
13,300,518 




Milk, condensed 1 bs 
Total in cat a M il dairy products 
Musical instruments 
Naval stores (rosin, tar, etc.) 
Nickel, oxide and matte Ibs 


9,148,482 
1,691.550.533 
1,205,308 
1,443,537,568 


192.802,708 
3,371,521 
21,041,599 
2,948,058 
21,806,701 
012,336 
104,116,440 
19,633,967 


"10,613,776 
1,969,748,762 
1,176,124 
1,561,671,336 


166.521,949 
2,619,772 
15.101,147 
3,395,174 
25,836,1.34 
589,003 
105,999,037 
23,098,050 
3,959,080 
14,014,584 




130,632,783 
3,182,343 
18,681,902 
4.532,897 
19,251,012 
903,001 
99.090,212 
l(i,479,301 
4,726,565 
16,083.271 
3.720,052 
4,765,155 
3,485,418 
1,097,593 
3,020,540 
951,183 
:,S78,006 
224,911 
1,274,773 
7,873,036 
38.115,386 
4.803,101 
1,670,046 
4,207,319 
78,813,803 
2,379.360 
1.078,381 




13,652,407 

1,341,514,280 
2,216,713 
1,546,067,984 






Mineral gals 


Vegetable 


Paints, pigments and colors 
Paper and manufactures of 




4,001,824 
14,171.759 






178,709,678 


8,740.929 


82,075,726 


3,706.383 
4,184,716 


101,934,500 


Photographic goods 


Seeds 




8,083,688 
720,368 
3,407,220 




5,250,623 
84 if ,894 
3 472 431 




Silk, manufactures of 




Soap 








Spirits Malt liquors 
Distilled. . .gals 


""l',507',237 


1,020,172 
1,816,287 
225,990 
1,142,054 
3,361,611 


""1.509.132 


1.010,787 
1,883,967 
201,418 
780,155 
5,468,502 
30.902,900 
4,701,617 
1,098,187 


1,637,636 


Wines 


Starch Ibs 


48,125,851 


33,228,278 


51,534,570 


Sugar and molasses 


Tobacco Unmanufactured .. . ..Ibs 


330,812,658 


34.727,157 
4,736,522 
733,274 


287,900,946 


357,196,074 


Manufactured 
Toys 


Vegetables 




3,895,294 
81,521,305 
2,261,919 

1.006.032 




3.760,466 
67,867,432 
1.976.007 
1,470,661 




Wool and manufactures of 




Zinc and manufactures of 
Total value exports of domestic mer- 
chandise* % . . 
Total value exports of foreign mer- 
chandise 
Total value exports except gold and 
si Iver 






1,834,786,357 
25,986,989 




1,638,355,593 
24,655,511 




1,710,083,998 
34,900,722 






1,860.773,346 




1.063.011,104 




1.744.984,720 



Including articles not specified in above table. 

DTJTIES COLLECTED ON IMPORTS, 1907, 1908, 1909. 
On principal articles or groups of articles Imported! Into the United States for consumption. 



Articles. 


1907. 
$403 195 


1908. 
$660,115 
1.738,112 
6,703,211 
34,599,772 
7,708,893 
372,244 
18,241,668 
1,818.565 
7,720.237 
1,342,548 
3,285,921 
9.331,328 
1,813,267 
4,506.444 
1,823,977 
2,156,447 


1909. 
$686,969 
2,600,797 
7,360,396 
33,060,402 
5,922,309 
366,708 
18,071,454 
1,968,657 
6,173,136 
l,99t.,337 
2,614,745 
8,216,063 
2,987.962 
4,966,476 
1,791,770 
2,283,186 


-Articles. 
Spirits, distilled. . 
Wines 


3907. 
..$7,917,114 
6 042 510 


1908. 1909. 
$7,680,984 $8,808,226 
5,185,373 5,050,118 
2,190,534 2,319,909 
621,702 521,939 
2,924,958 2.875,092 
1,542,469 1,642,929 
16,493,078 16,186,131 
50,162,157 56,406,484 
22,160.090 23,269,458 
2,515,618 1,701,002 
2,722,852 4,955,805 
4,059,682 4.033,289 
11.420,611 17,082,990 
17,424,734 16,278,828 
t Unmanufactured. 


Breadstuflfs 
Chemicals . 


1.457,441 


7,522,515 


Oils . 


. 1 985 737 


Cotton* 


38,999,267 




627 bll 


Earthenware 
Fibcrst 


8,024,207 




2 710 657 


401,344 


Rice 


1 254 297 


Fibers}: .... 


21,755,818 


Silk* 


''0 230 402 


Fish 


1,910,301 




60 284 059 


Fruits 


6.992,667 




26 125 037 


Fun* 


1.S35 508 


Toys 


2 425 444 


Glass* 


a 9!>n 7x 




1 898 658 


Iron and steel* 11.930,389 
Jewelrv :< S2S 495 


Wood* 


. . 4,385 039 


Woolt . . . 


16 562 748 


Leather* . . 


6,133,538 


Wool} 


19 995! OfiR 


Malt liquors 
Meat, dairy 


1 838 190 


Including manufactures of. 
^Manufactured. 


products 2,236,451 



98 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



SUMMARY OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 
Fiscal years ended June 30 



GHOUPS 


1908 


1909. 


1910. 


JM PORTS 

Free of dutv Foodstuff? in crude condition and foot] 
animals 


Dollars 

116.509,73f 
5.4(18,98" 
276.329,018 
84,720.745 
35.961.124 


Per ct 
22.1" 
104 
52.5" 
16.12 
6.84 
1.2h 


Dollars. 
131.620,840 
5.177,207 
329,0(57,111 
95,078.909 
32,722.571 
5.890.001 


Per ct. 
21.95 

.8f 
54.89 
15.86 
5.46 
.98 


Dollars. 
118,009,399 
5,1119.293 
439.296.043 
122.618.842 
63.026.617 
7,591,202 


Per ct 

15.61 
.74 
58.10 
16.21 
8.34 
1.00 


Foodstuffs partly or whollv manufactured 
Crude materials for use fn manufacturing . 
Manufactures for further use in manufacturing 
Manufactures readv for consumption 


Miscellaneous. . 


6.613.65* 


Total free of duty. .1 
Dutiable Foodstuffs In crude condition, and food 
animals 


525,603,308 

29067.691 
141,539.881 
87.153,240 
111.527,664 
295.H56.a8 
3.793,206 


loo. w 

4.35 
21.17 
13.03 
16.68 
44.21 
.56 


599,556,639 

32,489,834 
180^88,718 

122,29X148 
127,022.713 
266.383,664 
3.651.513 


100.00 

4.56 
22.54 
17.17 
17.83 
37.39 
.51 


756,161,396 

30,078.875 
171,545,229 
128,851.687 
165.300.10i 
302.148,459 
3,734,237 


100.00 

3.75 
21.40 
16.07 
20.62 
37.69 
.47 


Foodstuffs partly or wholly manufactured 


Crude materials for use in manufacturing 


Manufactures for further use in manufacturing 
Manufactures ready for consumption 


Miscellaneous 


Total dutiable 


668738,484 

145,577.477 

147.008.870 
363,482,258 
196,248,409 
331.617.92b 
10,406.902 


100.00 

12.19 
12.31 
30.43 
16.43 

27.77 

.87 


712,363,585 

164,110.674 

165.700.920 
451,359.259 
222.101.622 
299,1 0(1.235 
9.541.514 


100.00 

12.51 
12. 63 
34.40 
16.94 
22.80 
.72 


801,658,592 

148.088,274 
177,1(54,522 
568.147,730 
287.918,947 
365.175,076 
11.325.439 


100.00 

951 

11.37 
36.47 
18.48 
23.44 
.73 


Free and dutiable Foodstuffs in crude condition, 
and food animals 


Foodstuffs partly or wholly manufactured 


Crude materials for use In manufacturing ,.. 


Manufactures for further use in manufacturing 
Manufactures ready for consumption 


Miscellaneous 


Total imports of merchandise 


1,194,341,792 


100.01) 
44.01 


1,311,920,224 


100.00 
45 70 


1,557,819,988 


100.00 
48.54 


Per cent of free 


Duties collected from customs 


286,113,130 




300,711,934 




332785323 


Remaining in warehouse at the end of the month 










EXPOBTS. 

Domestic Foodstuffs in crude condition, and food 
animals 


Dollars. 

189.051.8-34 
331,961,663 
556,081,462 
261.105,883 
489,469,958 
6.515,567 


Per ct. 

10.30 
18.10 
30.33 
14.23 
26.68 

.36 


Dollars. 

135,693,409 
302.u55.S4l 
520.907,436 
231.186,607 
440,229,407 
7,783.393 


Per ct. 

8.28 
18.47 
31.80 
14.11 

26.87 
.47 


Dollars. 

109,645,628 
259,121.650 
565,027.301 
267,447,844 
500.861.219 
7,980.35(1 


Per ct. 

6.41 
15.15 
33.04 
15.64 
29.29 
.47 


Foodstuffs partly or wholly manufactured 


Crude materials for use in manufacturing 
Manufactures for further use in manufacturing 
Manufactures ready for consumption 


Miscellaneous , 


Total domestic 
Foreign Free of duty . . . 


,834,786,857 
12.082,152 

13,904.837 


100.00 
46.49 
53.51 


1,638,355,593 
11.664,525 

12.990.986 


100.00 
47.30 
62.70 


1,710,083,998 
20.845.498 
14,055.224 


100.00 
59.73 
40.27 


Dutiable 


Total foreign 


25,986.989 


100.00 


24,655.511 


100.00 


34.900,722 


100.00 


Total exports 
Wvoooo nf 5 imports... 


,860,773,346 




1,663,011,104 




1,744,984,720 




of } exports... 
Total imports and exports 


666,431,554 




351,090,880 




187,164,732 




5,055,115.138 




2,974,931.328 




3.302,704.708 





GOLD AND SILVER. 


TONNAGE. 


METAL. 


1909. 


1910. 


VESSELS. 


1909. 


1910. 




$44.033,989 
91,531.818 

43.954.810 
55.r>82,792 


W3.339.90n 
118,563.215 
45,217,194 

55.286.861 


Entered Sailing 


2.527.662 
36,530,476 
2.502.612 
35.693.869 


2,558.373 
37.677.433 
2.802.751 
37.103,107 


Ex ports 






Cleared Sailing 


Exports 


Steam 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE BY CONTINENTS (1902-1910). 

Fiscal years ended June 30. 



CONTINENT. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


Imports Europe 


$475161941 
151,076.524 
119,785.756 
143,849.112 
13.447,615 


$547226887 
189.736.475 
107.428,323 
168.745.901 
12,581.651 


$498697379 
198.778,952 
120.364.113 
163,820.151 
9,426,776 


$540773092 
227,229,145 
150.795.800 
187.371.412 
11.343,622 


$633282184 
235.S54.719 
140.422.876 
204.8tS.329 
12,628,735 


$747291255 
263.576,349 
160,165.537 
242,260.820 
21,127.464 


$608014147 
238.815.89S 
124.998,590 
206.222.182 
16.2SI0.675 


$654322918 
253.999.920 
163.878.724 
224.610.035 
15.108.627 


$806271380 
306.767,486 
196,164,786 
231,126.597 
17.489.739 


North America 


South America 


Asia and Oceania 
Africa 


Total 


903,320,948 
1008033981 
203.971.080 
38.048,617 
98.202.118 
3Ji.468.605 


1025719237 

1029256657 
215.482.769 
41,137,872 
95,827,528 
38,436.853 


991.087,371 
1057930131 

234.909,959 
50.755,027 
93.002.028 
24,2:50.126 


1117513071 
1020972641 

260.570.235 
56.894.131 
161.584,056 
18,540.603 


1226563843 
1200179235 
308.381.969 
75,159,781 
140.581.154 
19.562.3til 


1434421425 
1298452380 
349.840.641 
82.157.174 
133.88SJ.857 
16,511,026 


1194341792 
1283600155 
324.ti74.660 
83.583,919 
143.574.047 
20.340 5tS 


1311920224 
1146755321 
309.475.694 
76.561.680 
113.182.975 
17.03o.434 


1557819988 
1115914551 
385.520,0(8 
93,246.820 
111.751,900 
18.551,380 


Exports Europe 


North America 


Souta America 


Asia and Oceania . 


Africa 


Total , 


1381719401 


1420141679 


14*50827271 


1518561666 


1743864500 


1880851078 


1860773346 


1663011104 


1744984720 



Calendar year. 

1870 68,739 

1880 1,247.335 

1890 4,277,071 



CRUDE STEEL PRODUCTION OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Tons. | Calendar year. *Tons. | Calendar year. 'Tons^ | Calendar year. 



1900 .".... 10,188.32911903 14.534.9"8 

1901 13-.473.595 I 1904 13.859.8S7 I 

1902 14,947,250 I 1905 20,023,9471 

Tons of 2,240 pounds. 



Tons. 

1906 23.398,136 

1907 23,362,594 

K08 14,023,247 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1911. 



99 



VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHANPISE B7 COUNTRIES, 
fiscal jearsl908-iP10 



COUNTRY. 


1SIPOKTS. 


EXPORTS. 


1908. 


1909. 


1010. 


1908. 


1909- 


1910. 




$15 4? r > 659 
S4.BS1 

19,895.677 

1 272 938 


fl5.43fi.587 
35.720 
27.393.918 
190.825 
1.IV25.408 
108.Ii87.337 
145,525.828 
19.604 
2.382.202 
63.210 
49.287,894 
10.352 
26.086.3% 
4.643.609 
6.240.562 
9,340 
11.051,571 
Ml ,691 
14.077.064 
4.486.142 
23.831.492 
6.393,468 
208.612.758 


117 40S.91C 
86,875 


$16,174.738 
211.92 > 
52,940,514 

2T.54l'.69t 
116.123.468 
276,922.081 
371.365 
1.290.804 
22.908 
54.217.394 
548.859 
102.206,184 
6.841,6% 
3,086,072 
447,759 
16,342,377 
3,806 
21.90ti.379 
9,671.810 
646,840 
1.418.024 
580.663.522 


$14 226 703 


$14,962.731 
184.234 
41,116.585 
128,111 
13.644,903 
117.627.466 
249.555.9-26 
228,019 
429.670 
3.106 
53,467.053 
303,009 
84,937.878 
5,949,330 
3.223.855 
479,364 
16.789.930 
4.273 
18,964.403 
5,991,896 
756.770 
1.613,168 
505.552.871 


Azores and Madeira islands 


166.100 
45,093.003 
92,887 
17.522.113 
108.764.262 
235.324.140 
491.888 
1,237.297 
28,982 
58,509,595 
608.280 
95.012,3!* 
5,806,113 
3,901.405 
647,046 
15,633.175 
5.310 
19.679.OOJ 
6,731,304 
750.736 
1.896.249 
514.627.365 


Belgium , 


40.059.281 
385.<i67 
2.198.334 
132.363.84f 
168,806.237 
9.494 
2.643.005 
140.23; 
49.868.367 
16,351 
31 ,713.766 
6,551,985 
6 507 733 








101 if >9 541 


Germany 
Gibraltar 


142,935.54? 
11.048 
3 019.9ft 
56,774 






Italy 


44,844.174 
4.584 

20,305,864 
3.668.909 
4.967.922 
11.135 
11,113.421 
52,353 
14,152.712 
4.B33.672 
24.698,03t 
4.554.509 
190,355.475 


Malta Gozo etc 








Roumania 


36.181 
16.196.154 
1.067.008 
18,453.278 
6,830.477 
25,209.159 
3.689.769 
271,029,772 


Russia in Europe 
Servla 


Spain. . 




Switzerland .... . 


Turkey in Europe 


United kingdom 


Total Europe 
Nortt America Berirnda 


608,014,147 
455,546 
737.389 
75,131 .666 
1.1(9.060 
4.405,165 
1890,189 
2,268.070 
1.160.832 
1,469,344 
981.715 


654,322,918 
477.705 
848.925 
79.317.055 
1,148.075 
2.709,994 
3.148.489 
2.150.752 
1.004,811 
1.K76.994 
970.137 


806,271,380 
691,523 
1,066.409 
95.128,310 
1,229.688 
3,641,298 
1,832.324 
2.012,225 
I,321.7fi7 
2.229,189 
1.176.393 


1,283,600,155 
957.066 
1.299,145 
167.035,947 
3,587,748 
2,696.744 
1.730.700 
1.768.995 
1.574.879 
18.232,666 
1.357,297 


1,146,755,321 

1.163.62f 
1.081 .898 
163.448.65fi 
3,939.643 
2.307.096 
1.7 06. 156 
1.499.632 
1.355.287 
16.797.530 
1.462.135 


1,135,914,651 
1.320,959 
1,211.852 
215,990,021 
4.074,802 
3.050.510 
1,959,246 
1,605.493 
1,690.792 
20,596,371 
1,316.957 


British Honduras . .. 




Kewfcnndland and Labrador 


Central American States Costa Rica 
Guatemala 




Nicaragua 




Salvador 


Total Central American States 


12.675.293 
46,945,690 
137 
12,129,350 

83.284,692 
592.292 
361,966 
60,111 
689,045 
4,583.661 


11.661.177 
47,712,214 
1.551 
11,410.019 
96.772.193 
221.457 
249.823 
49.899 
525.947 
3,653.880 


12,213,196 

58 7% 943 


27,361,281 
55,509,604 
45.687 
12,475,383 
47,161.306 
727,193 
706.210 
1.455,701 
3,649,172 
2.V03.276 


25,127.836 
49,793,323 
34,311 
11.715,654 
43,913.356 
693,681 
635.827 
1,411,204 
3,937.359 
2,579,320 


30,219,369 
68,193.704 
39,246 
11,277,963 
52,858,758 
749,174 
658.146 
1,318.224 
4,498,449 
3.106.402 






' 12,'655 
11.154.683 

122,528,0:i7 
403.926 
346.589 
43,232 
790.579 
2.462.716 


West Indies British 


Cuba 




Dutch 


French . . 


Haiti 


Santc Domingo 


Total West Indies 
Total North America 


101,701,117 


112.833.218 


137,729.762 


68.878.241 


64,886.401 


74.467,116 


238,815,898 
11,024,098 
384 
74.577.864 
14.777.811 
6,380,755 
2,401.188 
16,916 
1230.828 
780.369 
33,136 
14,645 
6.670,616 
1.364,796 
6.725.184 


253.999,920 
22,230.182 
138 
98,053.229 
13.712,373 
7,010.304 
2,730.872 
1.499 
$791,349 
865.743 
39,728 
16,777 
6.386.544 
3.726,877 
8,313,609 


306,767,486 
33,463,264 
189 
108,154,491 
20,921.326 
7,485,141 
2,859,714 


324,674.719 
31,858,155 
1.226,238 
19.490.077 
9,194,650 
3.452.375 
1,909.126 
606 
$1,988.385 
645.417 
331.174 
100.568 
6,959.579 
3,868.661 
2,555.863 


309,475,694 
33.712.505 
792.<>91 
17,527.692 
5.466,286 
3,679.070 
I,849,(i57 
1,433 
$2.009.988 
612.087 
371.615 
52.268 
4,557.864 
3,360.313 
2,568,211 


385.520,069 
40.694,941 
603,721 
22,897.890 
8,304,246 
3,979.886 
2.215,951 
1,142 
$1,884,881 
685,889 
300,273 
61,142 
4.548.053 
4,272,145 
2.797,210 


Sonth America Argentina 


Bolivia 


Brazil.... 


Chile 


Colombia .. .. 


Kcuador .'... 


Falkland islands 


Guiana British.. 


$567,793 
925,782 
21.171 
29.170 
-7.621,497 
7.413,896 
6,701,352 


Dutch 


French 


Paraguay 


Peru 


Uruguay 


Venezuela 


Total South America 
Asia Ader . 


124,998,590 
1,615.261 
26,030,922 
28,169 
14,400 


163,878,721 
1.768,945 
28,798.723 
19,819 


196,164.786 
2.068.220 
29,990.370 
36,146 
6,442 
1,244.360 
20.610 


83.583,874 
1,097.277 
22,343,657 
7,641 


73.561,680 
1,446,670 
19,420,024 


98.24H.820 
531,784 
16,320.612 
3,492 
65.030 
345,551 
235.768 


Chinese empire 


China ( leased territory ) British 
French 


German 
Japanese 


536,329 


624,038 
142 


470.731 

8.198.896 


323,615 
205,294 


Total China 
Bast Indies British India 


26.599.820 
44.465,898 

13,185.276 
3,838.613 


29,442,722 
43,547.347 
15.719,858 
4.640,691 


31.297,928 
45.320,268 
18.654,702 

6.773.643 


31.020.925 
9.238.202 
2,439,239 
209.417 


19.948.933 
8,372,137 
1.590,431 
293.062 


16,970,453 
7.581.233 
1,709,045 
204.738 


Straits Settlements 


Other Bri tish f. 


Total British 
Dutch 


61.489,287 
14,095,364 


63,907,896 
22,967,601 


70,748,613 
10,651,935 


11,886,858 
2,181,952 
602.169 
8,975.161 
41.432.327 
1,563,113 
3,885 
2,072,915 
392.663 


10.255.630 
2,622,998 
614,946 
7.267,802 
26,691.613 
320.780 
1,159 
1,635,734 
364.029 


9,495,016 
2,241.225 

174,882 
6.467,165 
21,959.310 
442.066 
509,178 
1,039.881 
286,200 


French 


Hongkong 


2,129.256 
68,107,546 
3,045 
529,492 
341,627 
51,858 


1,769.019 
70,392,722 
2,879 
346,250 
793,345 
121,988 


2,333,231 
66,398.761 
20,176 
683,371 
1,181,058 
125,882 


Japan 


Korea . . 


Persia 


Russia, Asiatic 


Siam 



100 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS BY COUNTRIES.-CoNTlNUED. 



COUNTRY. 


IMPORTS. 


EXPORTS. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


1908. 


1909. 


1910. 


Turkey in Asia 
Other Asia 


6.205,061 


6,035,iO 


8,514,132 
3,495 


555,376 
211 


621,893 


744.504 
14S 




181.167,616 

11.186,663 
3.040,168 
66.208 


197.548,027 

13.973,219 
2,847.655 
107,21ti 


194,026,802 

14,806,764 
4.168,125 
165.321 


101,784,832 

28.280,661 
6.502.362 
141, 730 


71,792,187 

24,077,260 
5.463,547 
130,566 


60,861,813 

27,696,557 
5.577.0S8 
122.987 


Dceania British Oceania: 
Australia and Tasmania 


All other - 


Total British 


14.293,044 
543,193 
54.406 
10.164.223 


16,928.090 
669,036 
30.896 
9,433.986 


19.140,210 
603.418 
38,270 
17,317.897 


34,.<24,753 
346.504 
56,212 
11.461,732 


29.671.373 
397.740 
132,234 
11,189,441 


33,396,632 
544.436 
116.374 
16.832.645 


French Oceania.., 




Philippine islands 




25,054.866 
4,016 


27.062,008 


37,099,795 


46,789,201 


41,390,788 
342 


50,890,087 


Africa Abyssinia 


British Africa West 


91.271 
1,760,350 
655,534 


196.185 
1.689.570 
856,613 


227,108 
2.178,174 

803,612 


2.085.046 
7,847.045 
354.637 


1,997.245 
7.298.954 
515.441 


2.241,448 
9.614.406 
601.133 




East 


Total British 


2,507.155 
83,521 
498,045 


2,742,368 
80,642 
549,513 
208,302 


3.20S.8U4 
125.958 
726,970 
433,098 


10,286,728 
(85.591 
1,545.145 
120.064 
17,435 
242 
58,432 
15.979 
8.468 
5,463,949 
9,139 
2,126,383 
3.010 


9.811,640 
386,468 
1,609,083 
160,149 
1.845 
3,130 
56,165 
16,640 
62.101 
3.611.167 
22,897 
1,293,807 


12,456.987 
284,749 
1,275.393 
200.465 
3.688 
26.339 
84.869 
7.731 
60,373 
3,138,775 
14,934 
982,845 
14.232 




^-aiin-ry .... 












17,782 
73 
4,378 
192.017 
106,061 




Liberia 


1.035 
1.907 
262.396 
67,935 


m 

6,626 
475.215 

239.996 












12,863,051 
1.614 


11,200,841 
6.650 


12,176,108 
96.662 


Tripoli 


Total Africa 


16.290,675 


15,108,627 


17.489.739 20.340.565 


17,035,434 


18,551.380 


Grand total*. 


1,194.341.792 


1,311,920.224 


1.557.819.988 1.860.773.346 


1,663.011,104 


1.744984,720 



TOTAL VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS INTO AND FROM THE UNITED STATES. 
From Oct. 1. 1789, to June 30. 1910. 



FISCAL YEAR.* 


MERCHANDISE. 


SPECIE. 


MDSE. AND SPECIE COMBINED. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Sxc'ssof 
imports 
rom.)or 
exports 
(italics). 


Imports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Exports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Total 
imports. 


Total 
exports. 


Excess of 
imports 
(rom.) or 
exports 
(italics). 


1790 


$23,000.000 
29,200,000 
31.500.000 
31.100,000 
34,600,000 
69,756.268 
81,486,164 
75,379,406 
68.551.700 
79,069,148 
91,252,768 
111,363.511 
76.333.333 
6 1.666.666 
85.000.000 

rm.tw.m 

129.410,001 

138.500,000 
56.990,000 
59.400,000 
85.400.000 
53.400.000 
77.030.000 
22.005.000 
12.'.)65.000 
113,041.274 
147.103,000 
SK).250.00C 
121.750,000 
87.125,000 
74.450,000 
54.520,834 


$20.205,156 
19,012,041 
20.753,098 
26.109,572 
33,043,725 
47.989.872 
58.574.625 
51,294,710 
61,327,411 
78.K65.522 
70,971,780 
9li.020.513 
71,957.144 
55800033 


$2,794.844 
10,187,969 
10,74(5.902 
4.990.428 
1,556,275 
21.766,396 
22.861,539 
24,084.696 
7,224.289 
403.62K 
20.280.988 
18,342.998 
4.376. 189 
8.866.633 
7,300,926 
25.033.979 
27,873,037 
38.156,850 
34,559,040 
7,193,767 
18,642,030 
7,916,832 
38.502.764 
5,851,017 
6,037,559 
00,483,521 
65,182,948 
11.578.431 
28.468,867 
16.982.479 
4,758,331 
75,489 
18.521,594 
4.155.328 
3,197,067 
649,023 
5,202,722 
2.977,009 
16,998,873 
345.736 
8,949.779 






$23,000.000 
29.200.000 
31.500.000 
31,100.000 
34,600,000 
69.756,268 
81,436,164 
75.379.406 
68,551,700 
79,069.148 


$20.205.156 
19.012.041 
20.753,098 
26,109.572 
33.043.725 
47.989,872 
58,574,625 
51,294.710 
61.327,411 
78,665,ft22 
7(1.971.780 
93.020.513 
71,957,144 
55,800,033 
77.699.074 
95.566.0,'! 
101.536,963 
108,343.150 
22.430.960 
52,203,233 
66,757,970 
61.316,832 
38.527.236 
27,856.017 
6.927.441 
52,557,753 
81,920.052 
87.671,569 
93,281.133 
70,142.521 
69.691,661* 
65.074.382 
72,160,281 
74.699.030 
75.986,657 
99.535,388 
77,595,352 
82.324.827 
72.264.686 
72,358.671 
73.849,50S 


$2.794,844 
10,187,959 
10,746,902 
4,990,428 
1,556.275 
21.766,396 
22,861,539 
24,084,696 
7,224,289 
403,626 
20,280,988 
18,342,998 
4.376,189 
8,866.633 
7.300,928 
25.033,979 
27.873,037 
30,156,850 
34.559.040 
7,196,767 
18,642,030 
7,916.832 
38,502,764 
6,851,017 
6,037,559 
60.483.521 
65,182,948 
11.578,431 
28.468.867 
16.982,479 
4,758,331 
2.48,658 
11.081.260 
2,880,237 
4,561,485 
3,195,313 
7,379,126 
2,840,769 
16,245,138 
2,133,856 
2,972,588 


1791 
1792 
1793 
1794 






1795 





.; 


1798 


1797 
1798 






1799 






1800 
1801 
1802 
1803 


Specie inc 
merchan 
tol 


u'ded with 
Jise prior 
Bl. 


91.252,768 
111.363.511 
76.333.333 
64.868,886 
85.0UO.OOO 
120,600.000 
129.410.000 
138,500,000 
56.990.000 
59,400.000 
85. 400.000 
53.400.000 
77.030.000 
22.005.000 
12.965.000 
113,041.274 
147,103,000 
99.250.000 
121.750.000 
87,125.000 
74.450,000 
62.585,724 
83.241.541 
77,579.267 
80,548.142 
96,340.075 
84,974.477 
79,484,088 
88.501t.824 
74.492.527 
70.876.920 


1804 


77 6<)9 074 


1805 


95.566.021 
101,536,963 
108.343.150 
22,430,960 
52,203. 233 
66,757,970 
61,316,832 
38.527.236 
27&T6.017 
6.927.441 
52,557,753 
81,1)20,052 
87,671.569 
93.281.133 
70,142,521 
69.691,669 
54,596.32; 
61,350,101 
68.326.043 
68.972.105 
90,738.333 
72.890.788 
74,309.94- 
64,021.210 
67,434.651 
71.670,735 


1806 


1807 


1808 
1809 
1810 






1811 
1812 
1813 




I:;::;:::;: 1 


1814 
1815 
1816 






1817 
1818 
1819 
1820 






1821 


$8.064,890 
8,889,848 

5.097.896 
8.378.970 
6.150.765 
6.880.966 
8,151.130 
7,489.741 
7,403.612 
8,155.964 


$10.478,059 
10,810.180 
6,372.987 
7,014.552 
8,797.055 
4,704,563 
8,014.880 
8.243,476 
4,924.020 
2,178.773 


1822 


79,871,695 
72.481,371 


1823.. . 


1824..., 


72.169,172 
90.189.310 
78,093.611 


1825.... 


1826 


1827 


71.332.938 
81.020.083 
67.088.915 
62,720,95fc 


1828 


1829 


1830 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



101 



TOTAL VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORT8.-CONTINUED. 



FISCAL YEAR.* 


MERCHANDISE. SPECIE. 


MDSE. AND SPECIE COMBINED. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Exc'ssof 
Imports 
(rom.)or 
exports 
(Italics). 


Imports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Exports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Total 
Imports. 


Total 
exports. 


Excess of 
imports 
(roman) or 
exports 
(italics). 


1831 


195,885,179 
95.121.702 
101.1M7.94H 
108.60!),700 
136.764.295 
170,579,154 
180.472.80J 
95,970.288 
156,490,951 
U8,258.70t 
122,957,544 
90.075,071 
42,488,464 
102.tW4.BOti 
113.184,322 
117,914.065 
122,424,349 
148.638.644 
14 l,2l 16. 199 
173 509.52ti 


$72.295,652 
81.520.003 
87.528,732 
102.2tW.215 
115,215,802 
124.338,704 
111.443,127 
104,978,570 
112,251,673 
123,668,932 
111.817.471 
99,877,995 
82.825.689 
105,745. 832 
100.040,111 
109.583.248 
150,741.598 
138.190.515 
140,351,172 
144.375.726 
188,915.259 
106,984.231 
203,489,282 


23.589,5:27 
13.001.159 
13.519,211 
6.349,485 
21,548,493 
52.240.450 
19,029,li7b 
9,008.2H2 
44,245,285 
25.4M.226 
11.140.073 
3,802,924 
40.392,225 
3,141,226 
7,144,211 
8,3130,817 
34.3J7.249 
10,448,129 
855.027 
29.133,800 
21,856.170 
40,456,107 
60.287,983 
60.760.030 
38.899,205 
29,212,887 
54,004,582 
8,672,620 
as,431.290 
20.040.002 
69.756.709 
1.313.284 

39.371, as 

157.009,295 
72,716.277 
85,952,544 
101.254.955 
75,4813.541 
131.388.as2 
43.180.t>4U 
77.403,506 
182.417.491 
119.65ti.288 
18.876.698 
19.502.725 
79.643,481 
151.152.094 
257.814.234 
264,661,666 
167,683.912 
259.712,718 


17,305,945 
5,907,504 
7,070,368 
17,911,632 
13.131,447 
13,400.881 
10,516,414 
17,747,110 
6,595,176 
8.882,813 
4.988.633 
4,087,016 
22,320,335 
6,8130,429 
4,070.242 
3,777,732 
24,121.289 
6,300,284 
6,651,240 
4,628,792 
6,453,503 
5.505,044 
4,201,382 
6,768,587 
8,059.812 
4,207,032 
12.4til.799 
19.274,496 
7,434.789 
8,550.135 
40.339,611 
10.415,052 
9,584,105 
13,115.612 
9,810,072 
10,700,092 
22,070.475 
14,188.368 
19,807,870 
20.419,179 
21,270,024 
13,743.689 
21,480,937 
28.454,906 
20.900,717 
15.936,681 
40.774,414 
29.821.314 
20.290.000 
93.034.310 
110,575.497 


I9.014.a31 
5,656.340 
2,611,701 
2,076.758 
6,477,775 
4,324,336 
5,976,249 
3.508,040 
8,770,743 
8.417,014 
10,034,332 
4,813,539 
1,520,791 
5.454,214 
8,000,495 
3,905,268 
1,907,024 
15,841,616 
5,404,648 
7,522,994 
29,472.752 
42,674.135 
27,486.875 
41.281,504 
56,247,343 
45,745,485 
69.136.922 
52,033.147 
63,887.411 
60.546.239 
29,791.aSO 
36,887.040 
64,156,611 
105,396.541 
67.IU3.226 
86.044.071 
60.808,372 
93,784,102 
57.1138,380 
58,155,660 
98,441,'.)88 
79,877,534 
84.008.574 
66,630.405 
92,1:32.142 
66,506,302 
50.162.237 
S3,740,125 
24.997.441 
17,142.919 
19,400,847 


$103,191,124 
101,029.200 
108,118,311 
136,621,832 

149,895,742 
189.980,0:35 
140.989,217 
113,717.404 
102.092,132 
107.141,519 
127,940.177 
100,102,087 
64,753,799 
108.435,0:35 
117,254.564 
121,691,797 
140.545,638 
164,998.928 
147,857.439 
178.138.318 
216.224,932 
212.SW5.442 
2457,978,647 
304,562.381 
201,408,520 
814,639,942 
360,890,141 
282,613.150 
338,708,130 
362.100,254 
335,050,153 
205,771,729 
252.919.920 
329.5ti2.895 
248.555,652 
445,512,158 
417,831.571 
371,624,808 
437.314,255 
462,377,587 
541.493.708 
640,338,76 
063,617,147 
595.861.248 
553,900.153 
476.077,871 
492.097.540 
406.872.846 
400.073,775 
700,989,050 
763,240,125 
707.111,964 
751,070,305 
705,123,955 
620,709,052 
874,029,790 
752.490.5tiO 
783,295,100 
774,094,725 
823.280,735 


$31. 310,583 

87,170.943 
90,140.433 
104,336.973 
121.693.577 
128,663,040 
117,419.376 
108.486,610 
121.028,410 
132,085.940 
121.851.803 
104,691,534 
84.346.480 
111.200.040 
114,640,006 
113,488.516 
158,048,622 
154,032.131 
145,755,820 
151,898.720 
218.388.011 
209,668,366 
230,970,157 
278,325,268 
275.156.846 
326.904,908 
362,960,082 
324.644,421 
350,789,402 
400.122,290 
249,344,913 
227,558,141 
208.121,058 
264,234.5:29 
233.672,529 
434.903,593 
355,374.513 
375,737,001 
343,256,077 
450,927,4:34 
541,262,106 
524.055,120 
607.088,490 
652,913,445 
605,574,853 
596,890,973 
658,037.457 
728,605,891 
735,436,882 
852,781,57; 
921,784.193 
799,956.736 
855,659,735 
807,040,992 
784,421,280 
751,988,240 
752,180,902 
742.368.690 
839,042.908 
909,977,104 
993,434.452 
1,113,284,034 
997,083 357 


*21. 880.541 
13.852,323 
17.977.878 
22.184.359 
28,202,165 
61.310.996 
23,509,841 
6,230,788 
41,003,716 
24,944,427 
6,094,374 
4,529.447 
19,592,681 
2,765,011 
2,607,958 
8,203,281 
12,102,984 
966,797 
2,101,619 
26,239,598 
2,163,079 
3,287,076 
37.002,490 
20,237.113 
13,688,320 
12,324.966 
2,070,5ft 
42,031,271 
18,021,332 
37,956,042 
80,305,240 
21,786,412 
15,201,138 
65.328,368 
14,883,123 
10,608.566 
62,457,068 
4,112,193 
94,058,178 
11,450,153 
231,542 
116.283,046 
56.528,651 
67,052,137 
61,668,700 
120,213,102 
166,539,917 
261,733,046 
269,363,107 
91,792,521 
168,544,068 
32,847,772 
103,989,430 
102,523.037 
163,651,628 
77.958,448 
309,658 
40,926,410 
64,948,183 
86,690,369 
112,258,809 
216,227,032 
86,314,802 
278,839,605 
132,736,028 
213,531,630 
273,023,365 
534.624.851 
504,086,295 
569.691,446 
679,625,475 
49fi.436.285 
425,617,778 
473.848,406 
461.357.605 
520.079,041 
397,111,029 
603.790,662 
410,346.691 
272.357,705 


1832 
1833 


1834 


1835 


1836 


1837 


1838 


1839 


1840 


1841 


1842 


1843 .. 


1844 


1845. . . . 


1846 


1847 


1848 


1849. . . . 


1850 


1851 ... 


210,771,429 
207 440398 


1852 


1853 


203,777,265 


1854.... 


297.803,794 
257,808,708 
310.432.310 
348.428,342 
263,338,654 
881,888,841 
35:3.016.119 
289.310.542 
189,350,677 
243,335.815 
316.447,283 
238.745.580 
434.812,00t; 
895,761,096 
357.4IW.440 
417,506,379 
4,i5.958,408 


237.043,764 
218.909,503 
281.219.423 
293,823.700 
272,011,274 
292.903.051 
3133.570,057 
219.553.833 
190.670.501 
203,964,447 
158,837.988 
100,029,308 
348.859.52--' 
294.500,141 
281,952,899 
286.117,697 
392.771,768 
442,820.178 
444.177.586 
522,479,922 
580,283.040 
513,442,711 
540,384.671 
602.475,220 
694.805,766 
710,439,441 
835.038.658 
902,377,346 


ia->5.... 


185fi .. 


1857..., 


1858 


1859.... 


I860. . . . 


1861... 


ists ... 


1863 

1864.... 


1865.... 


1866. . . . 


1867..., 


1868 . 


1869 .. 


1870 


1871... 


5:20,223,084 
626.595,077 
042,130.210 
507,406,342 
638,005,4811 
400.741,190 
451,323,120 
437.051.532 
445.777,775 
607,954,746 
042.0t>4,628 


1872 


1873 . 


1874 


1875. . . . 


1876. . . . 


1877.... 


1878 


1879 ... 


1880. . . . 


1881... 


1882. . . . 


724.tVW.574 
723.180.914 
607,097.093 
577,527,329 
886,486,186 
692.319.768 
723,957,114 
745,181,662 
789.310,409 


750.542,257 
823,8139,402 
740.513,609 
742,189.755 
679.524,830 
710,183,211 
695.954.507 
742,401,375 
857,828,084 
884,480.810 
1,030,278,148 
847,665.194 
892,140.572 
807,538.105 
882,600.938 
1,050,993,556 


25,902,683 
100.658,488 
72.815,916 
164.662.426 
44.088.694 
23.H63.443 
28.002.tW7 
2.730.277 
68,518375 
39,564,614 
202.875,686 
18.7:35.728 
237.145.950 
75,568,200 
102.882.264 
286363.144 
615.432.676 
529.874^13 
544,541,898 
664.592*26 
478,398,453 
394,422.442 
469,739,900 
401.048,595 
517,300,657 
446,429,653 


42,472,390 
28,489,391 
37,420,262 
43.242.323 
38.593.656 
60.170,792 
59.1337,980 
28.903,073 
33.976,326 
30,259,447 
09,054.540 
44.367,633 
85,735,071 
50.595.939 
02.302,251 
115.548,007 
151.319.455 
119.629.659 
79,829.486 
102,437.708 
80,253.508 
69,145.518 
120,824.182 
81.1S3.820 
140,t!t>4,270 
157,456,873 
192,995,418 
87.958,799 
88,557.103 


49,417.479 
31,820,333 
67,133,383 
42.231.525 
72.4t.41t 
35.99! .0-91 
40,414,1813 
96,641.533 
52,148,420 
108,953,1)42 
83,005,88t 
149.418.ltS 
127,429,320 
113,763,767 
172,951.017 
102.308,218 
70.511.630 
93.841,141 
104.979.a34 
117,470,357 
98,301.341) 
91 340854 


1883. . . . 


1884. . . . 


1885 , 


1886 


1887.... 


1888.... 


1889 


1890 


1892 ... 


827.402.402 
8tki.400.922 
054.994,022 
731.969.905 
779,724,674 
704,730.412 


897.057.002 
910,708.555 
740,730.293 
788,565.904 
842,026.925 
880,278.41'. 
767.3ti9.109 
816,778,148 
929.770.670 
925,809.871 
983,574,45b 
1,094,804.755 
1,117,911,553 
1,1118,040,897 
1,307.228.113 
1.591,878.298 
1,387,337,210 
1,399,879,023 
l,Wi,377,09I 


1893 . 


1894.... 


1.019.569,898 
921,301,932 
1.055.558.555 
1.153.301,774 
1.301,993.960 
1,320,864,443 
1,499.402,116 
1,606,235,348 
1,480,020,741 
1,520.482,533 
1,591,759,959 
1.660,004,502 
1,847,307,154 
1,988,989,327 
1,991,127,472 
1.810,225.714 
1.918.734.7Sth 


1895 
1896 


1897 


1898 
1809. . . . 


6IO.04y.ti54 
0'.I7, 148.489 


1,231,482.330 
1.227.023.302 


1900 . 
1901 . . 


849,941,184 
823,172.105 
9W3.320.948 
,020,719,237 
9SU.087.371 
.117,513,071 
.220,503,843 
,434,421,425 
,194,341.7!2 
.311,920.224 
.557.819.988 


1,394, 483,082 
1,487,704.991 
I,3S1,719.401 
1,420.141.079 
UOO.827.271 
1,518.501,606 
1.743,864.500 
1,880.853,078 
1,800,773, '346 
1.063.011,104 
1.744.9S4,720I 


1902 

nil 


1904 
1905 


130,932,688 
141.442,83b 
103,442.li54 
108,138,249 
130,354.12t 
147,214,011 
173.aiO,07t 


1906.... 


1907.... 


1908 
1909.... 


666.431,554 
351,090,880 
187.164.732 


1910.,,....., 



*Fiscal year ended Sept. 30 prior to 1843; since that date ended June 30. 
NOTB Merchandise and specie are combined In I showing the total Inward and outward movement 
the columns at right of table for the purpose ot | of values by years. 



102 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



QUALIFICATIONS FOR SUFFRAGE. 



REQUIREMENTS 

FOR VOTERS IN THE 

VARIOUS STATES. 



2y. 



Yes. 



30d30dNo.. 
SO d Yes. 



90 d 30 d 10 d Yes. 



ALABAMA Citizens of pood char- 

acter and understanding, or al- 

iens who have declared inten- 

tion; must show poll-tax receipt. 
ARKANSAS Like Alabama, ex- 

cept as to "good character." 
CALlFORNIA-Citizens by nativ- 

ity; naturalized for 90 days, or 

treaty of Queretaro. 
COLORADO-Citizens, male or fe- 1 y 

male, or aliens who declared in- 

tention 4 months before offer 

Ing to vote. 
CONNECTICUT Citizens who 1 y ..... 6m Yes. 

can read English. 
DELAWARE Citizens paying $1 1 y. 3 m .... 30 d No 

registration fee. 
FLORIDA Citizens of United 1 y. 6 m . . .,30 d Yes 

States. 
GEORGIA Citizens who can read ly. 6m ........ (a) 

and have paid all taxes since 1877. 
IDAHO Citizens, male or fe- 6m30d3 m 10 d Yes 

male. 

ILLINOIS-Citizens of U. S. 1 y . 90 d 30 d 30 d Yes 

INDIANA Citizens, or aliens who 6m iOd >Od)dNo, 

have declared intention and re- 

sided 1 year in United States. 
IOWA Citizens of United States. 6m60dlOdlOd 
KANSAS Citizens; aliens who 6m30d30d lOd 

have declared intention; women 

vote at municipal and school 

elections. 

KENTUCKY Citizens of U. S. ly. 6m60d80d 
LOUISIANA Citizens who are2y.ly ..... timYes. 

able to read and write, who own 

1300 worth of property or whose 

father or grandfather was en- 

titled to vote Jan. 1, 1867. 
MAINE Citizens of the United 3m 3 m3m 3m Yes 

States. 
MARYLAND Citizens of United 1 y.|6 m 6 m 1 d. Ye 

States who can read. 
MASSACHUSETTS-Citizenswho ly. 6 m6 m 6 m Yes 

can read and write English. 
MICHIGAN Citizens, or aliens 6m 20 d 20 d 20 d Yes 

who declared intention prior to 

May 8. 18D2. 
MINNESOTA Citizens of the 6 m 30d30d30d (d) 

United States. 
MISSISSIPPI Citizens who can 2y. ly. ly. ly. Yes 

read or understand the constitu- 

tion. 
MISSOURI Citizens,oralienswho 1 y. <!0d60d60d (e) 

have declared intention not 

Jess than 1 nor more than 5 years 

before offering to vote. 
MONT AN A Citizens of U. S. 1 y . HO d 30 d 30 d Yes 
NEBRASKA Citizens, or aliens 6m 40 dlOdlOd (b) 

who have declared intention 

30 days before election. 
NEVADA Citizens of Un 

States. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE-Citizens 
United States. 

NEW JERSEY Citizens of Unit- ly. 
ed States. 

NEW YORK Citizens who have ly 
been such for 90 days. 

NORTH CAROLINA Citizens of 2 y 
United States who can read. 

NORTH DAKOTA Citizens, orly. 
aliens who have declared inten 
tion 1 year and not more than ( 
prior to election, and civilized 
Indians. 



PREVIOUS 
RESIDENCE 
REQUIRED. 



30d 



U)d30d30dYes 
Yes 
Yes 



30 d 

4m 

DOil 



Yes. If convicted of treason, embezzlement of public 
funds, malfeasance in office or other peniten- 
tiary offenses, idiots or insane. 

Yes. Idiots, insane, convicts until pardoned, nonpay- 
ment of poll tax. 

Yes. Chinese, insane, embezzlers of public moneys, 
:onvicts. 

Persons under guardianship, insane, Idiots, pris- 
oners convicted of bribery. 



(b) 
W 



(c) 



Yes 

Yes 
(a) 



Excluded from 
voting. 



Yes. Convicted of felony or other infamous crime 

unless pardoned. 
Yes. Insane, idiots, felons, paupers. 

Yes. Persons not registered, insane or under guard- 
an, felons, convicts. 

No.. Persons convicted of crimes punishable by im- 
prisonment, insane, delinquent taxpayers. 

Yes. Chinese, Indians, insane, felons, polygamists, 
jigamists, traitors, bribers. 

Yes. Convicts of penitentiary until pardoned. 

Yes. Convicts and persons disqualified by judgment 
of a court, United States soldiers, marines and 
sailors. 

Yes. Idiots, insane, convicts. 

Yes. Insane, persons under guardianship, convicts, 
bribers, del' rauders of the government and per- 
sons dishonorably discharged from service of 
United States. 

Treason, felony, bribery, idiots, insane. 
Idiots, insane, all crimes punishable by impris- 
onment, embezzling public funds unless pardoned. 



Yes. Paupers, persons under guardianship, Indians 

not taxed. 
Yes. Persons convicted of larceny or other infamous 

crime, persons under guardianship, insane, idiots. 
Yes. Paupers (except United States soldiers), persons 

under guardianship. 
Yes. Indians holding tribal relations, duelists and 

their abettors. 

Yes. Treason, felony unless pardoned, Insane, persons 

under guardianship, uncivilized Indians. 
Yes. Insane, idiots, felons, delinquent taxpayers. 

Yes. Paupers, persons convicted of felony or other 
infamous crime or misdemeanor or violating 
right of suffrage, unless pardoned; second con- 
viction disfranchises. 

Yes. Indians, felons, idiots, insane. 

Yes. Lunatics, persons convicted of treason or felony 
unless pardoned, United States soldiers and sailors. 

Yes. Insane, idiots, convicted of treason or felony, nn- 

amnestied confederates against the United States, 

Indians and Chinese. 
Yes. Paupers (except honorably discharged soldiers), 

persons excused from paying taxes at their own 

request. 
Yes. Paupers, insane, idiots and persons convicted of 

crimes which exclude them from being witnesses 

unless pardoned. 
Yes Convicted of bribery or any infamous crime unless 

pardoned, betters on result of election, bribers for 

votes and the bribed. 
No.. Idiots, lunatics, convicted of felony or other infa- 
mous crimes, atheists. 
Yes Felons, idiots, convicts unless pardoned, United 

States soldiers and sailors. 



(a) Registration required in some counties, (b) In 
all cities, (c) In the cities of first, second and third 



class, (d) Required in cities of 1.200 inhabitants Or 
over, (e) In cities of 100,000 population or over. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



103 



QUALIFICATIONS FOR SUFFRAGE.-CONTIN0ED. 





PREVIOUS 










RESIDENCE 


_ 


i 








Q 






REQUIREMENTS 


" ^ u 




<s 




FOK VOTERS IN THE 








*-> 


Oj 


2 


Excluded from 


VARIOUS STATES. 




X 




c 


U, 

9 




voting. 




| 


s 


c 
f 


1- 


00 

"5 











o 





E 




rt 






00 





H 


04 


pa 


M 




OHIO - Citizens of the United 


iy. 


30 d 


20 a 


^0(1 


(b) 


Yes. 


Idiots, insane, United States soldiers and sailors. 


States. 














felons unless restored to citizenship. 


OKLAHOMA Citizens of the 


ly. 


lira 


30(1 


iOd 




Yes. 


Felons, paupers, idiots and lunatics. 


United States and native Indians 
















OREGON White male citizens, 


(i in 








No.. 


Yes. 


Idiots, insane, convicted felons, Chinese, United 


or aliens who have declared in- 














States soldiers and sailors. 


tention 1 year before election. 
















PENNSYLVANIA Citizens at 
least 1 month, and if 22 years old 


iy. 






2 m 


Yes. 


Yes. 


Persons convicted of some offense forfeiting right 
of suffrage, nontaxpayers. 






must have paid tax within 2 yrs. 


2y. 




6 m 




(c) 


Yes. 




RHODE ISLAND Citizens Of 














Paupers, lunatics, idiots, convicted of bribery or In- 


United States. 














famous crime until restored. 


SOUTH CAROLINA Citizens of 


2y. 


iy. 


4 111 


4 m 


Yes. 


No.. 


Paupers, insane, idiots, convicted of treason, duel- 


United States who can read. 














ing or other infamous crime. 


SOUTH DAKOTA - Citizens, or 


BID 


30(1 


10(1 


IOd 


(d) 


Yes. 


Persons under guardian, idiots. Insane, convicted 


aliens who have declared inten- 














of treason or felony unless pardoned. 


tion. 
















TENNESSEE Citizens who have 


ly. 


(i m 






/-\ 


Yes. 


Convicted of bribery or other infamous crime, fail- 


paid poll tax preceding year. 
TEXAS Citizens, or aliens who 


iy. 


(im 


ti in 






Yes. 


ure to pay poll tax. 
Idiots, lunatics, paupers, convicts, United States 


have decl ared intention t> months 














soldiers and sailors. 


before election. 
















UTAH Citizens of United States. 


iy. 


4m 




JOd 






Idiots, insane, convicted of treason or violation of 


male or female. 














election laws. 


VERMONT - Citizens of United 


ly. 


i m 


ill) 


irn 


Yes. 


Yes. 


Unpardoned convicts, deserters from United States 


States. 














service during the war, ex-confederates. 


VIRGINIA Citizens of United 


iy. 


i y. 


iy. 


iOd 


Yes. 


No.. 


Idiots, lunatics, convicts unless pardoned by the 


States of good understanding 














legislature. 


who have paid poll tax for three 
















years and all ex-soldiers. 
















WASHINGTON Citizens of Unit- 


iy. 


.X)d 


iOd 


*)d 




Yes. 


Indians not taxed. 


ed States. 
















WEST VIRGINIA Citizens of 


iy. 


.*)d 


10 (i 




No.. 


Yes. 


Paupers, idiots, lunatics, convicts, bribers, United 


the state. 














States soldiers and sailors. 


WISCONSIN Citizens, or aliens 


iy. 


IOd 


10(1 


IOd 


(a) 


Yes. 


Insane, under guardian, convicts unless pardoned. 


who have declared intention. 
















WYOMING Citizens, male or fe- 


iy. 


JOd 


10 d 


IOd 


Yes. 


Yes. 


Idiots, insane, felons, unable to read the state con- 


male. 














stitution. 



(o) In cities of 3,000 population or over. (6) In cities 
of not less than 9.000 inhabitants, (c) Nontaxpayers 
must register yearly before Dec. 31. (d) In towns hav- 
ing 1,000 voters and counties where registration has 
been adopted by popular vote, (e) All counties hav- 
ing 50,000 inhabitants or over. (/) In cities of 10,000 or 
over. 

NOTE The word "citizen" as used In above table 
means citizen of the United States in all cases. 



As shown In the above table women have full 
suffrage in Colorado, Idaho, Utah and Wyoming. 
In a more or less limited form, relating to taxa- 
tion and school matters, woman suffrage exists In 
Arizona, California, Delaware, Idaho, Illinois, In- 
diana, Iowa. Kansas. Kentucky, Louisiana, Massa- 
chusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebras- 
ka. Nevada. New Hampshire. New Jersey, North 
Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, 
Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin. 



CITIZENSHIP IN THE UNITED STATES. 



All persons born or naturalized In the United 
States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof are 
citizens of the United States and of the state 
wherein they reside. (Fourteenth amendment to 
the constitution.) 

All persons born In the United States and not 
subject to any foreign power, excluding Indians 
not taxed, are declared to be citizens of the United 
States. (Sec. 1992, U. S. Revised Statutes.) 

All children heretofore born or hereafter born out 
of the limits and Jurisdiction of the United States, 
whose fathers were or may be, at the time of their 
birth, citizens thereof, are declared to be citizens 
of the United States: but the rights of citizenship 
shall not descend to children whose fathers never 
resided in the United States. (Sec. 1993, U. B. 
Revised Statutes.) 

Any woman who Is now or may hereafter be 
married to a citizen of the United States and who 
might herself be lawfully naturalized shall be 
deemed a citizen. (Sec. 1995. U. S. Revised Stat- 
utes.) 

Children born in the United States of alien par- 
ents are citizens of the United States. 

When any alien who has formally declared his 
Intention of becoming a citizen of the United 



States dies before he is actually naturalized the 
widow and children of such alien are citizens. 

Children of Chinese parents who are themselves 
aliens and incapable of becoming naturalized are 
citizens of the United States. 

Children born in the United States of persons 
engaged in the diplomatic service of foreign gov- 
ernments are not citizens of the United States. 

Children born of alien parents on a vessel of a 
foreign country while within the waters of the 
United States are not citizens of the United 
States, but of the country to which the vessel be- 
longs. 

Children born of alien parents in the United 
States have the right to make an election of na- 
tionality when they reach their majority. 

Minors and children are citizens within tin* 
meaning of the term as used in the constitution. 

Deserters from the military or naval service of 
the Unlt<>d States are liable to loss of citizenship. 

Any alion being a free white nerson, an alien of 
African nativity or of African descent may become 
an American citizen by complying with the nat- 
uralization laws. 

"Hereafter no state cour* or court of the United 
States shall admit Chinese to citizenship; and all 
laws in conflict with this act are repealed." (Sec. 
14, act of May 6, 1882.) 



104 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



The courts have held that neither Chinese. Jap- 
anese, Hawaiians, Burmese nor Indians can be nat- 
uralized. 

The naturalization laws apply to women as well 
as men. An alien woman who marries a citizen, 
native or naturalized, becomes a naturalized citi- 
zen of the United States. 

Aliens may become citizens of the United States 
by treaties with foreign powers, by conquest or by 
special acts of congress. 

In an act approved March 2, 1907, it Is provid- 
ed that any American citizen shall have expatria- 
ted himself when he has been naturalized in any 
foreign state in conformity with its laws, or vshen 
he has taken an oath of allegiance to any foreign 
state. 

When any naturalized citizen shall have resided 
for two years in the foreign state from which he 
came, or five years in any other foreign state, it 
shall be presumed that he has ceased to be an 
American citizen, and the place of his general 
abode shall be deemed his place of residence dur- 
ing said years; provided, however, that such pre- 
sumption may be overcome on the presentation of 
satisfactory evidence to a diplomatic or consular 
officer of the United States, under such rules and 
regulations as the department of state may pre- 
scribe; and, provided also, that no American citi- 
zen shall be allowed to expatriate himself when 
this country is at war. 

Any American woman who marries a foreigner 
shall take the nationality of her husband. At the 
termination of the marital relation she may re- 
sume her American citizenship, if abroad, by reg- 
istering as an American citizen within one year 
with a consul of the United States, or by return- 
ing to reside in the United States, or, if residing 
in the United States at the termination of the 
marital relation, by continuing to reside therein. 

Any foreign woman who acquires American citi- 
zenship by marriage to an American citizen shall 
be assumed to retain the same after the termina- 
tion of the marital relation if she continue to re- 
side in the United States, unless she makes form- 
al renunciation thereof before a court having ju- 
risdiction to naturalize aliens, or, if she resides 
abroad, she may retain, her citizenship by register- 
ing as such before a United States consul within 
one year after the termination of such marital re- 
lation. 

A child born without the United States, of alien 
parents, shall be deemed a citizen of the United 
States by virtue of the naturalization of or re- 
sumption of American citizenship of the parent; 
provided that such naturalization or resumption 
takes place during the minority of such child; and, 
provided further, that the citizenship of such mi- 
nor child shall begin at the time such minor child 
begins to reside permanently in the United States. 

All children born outside the limits of the 
United States, who are citizens thereof in accord- 
ance with the provisions of section 1993 of the Re- 
vised Statutes of the United States (see above), 
and who continue to reside outside of the United 
States, shall, in order to receive the protection of 
the government, be required, upon reaching the 
age of 18 years, to record at an American con- 
sulate their intention to become residents and re- 
main citizens of the United States and shall fur- 
ther be required to take the oath of allegiance to 
the United States upon attaining their majority. 



NATURALIZATION LAWS. 
Approved June 29, 1906. 

Exclusive jurisdiction to naturalize aliens resi- 
dent in their districts is conferred upon the United 
States Circuit and District courts and all courts 
of record having a seal, a clerk and jurisdiction 
in actions in law or equity or both in which the 
amount in controversy is unlimited. 

An alien may be admitted to citizenship in th 
following manner and not otherwise: 

1. He shall declare on oath before the clerk of 
the proper court at least two years before his ad- 
mission, and after he. has reached the age of IS 
years, that it is bona fide his intention to become 
a citizen of the United States and to renounce 
allegiance to any foreign state or sovereignty. 



Such declaration shall set forth the same facts 
as are registered at the time of his arrival. 

2. Not less than two years nor more than seven 
after he has made such declaration he shall file 
a petition, signed by himself and verified, in which 
he shall state his name, place of residence, occu- 
pation, date and place of birth, place from which 
he emigrated, name of the vessel on which he ar- 
rived; the time when and the place and name of 
the court where he declared his intention of be- 
coming a citizen; if he is married, he shall state 
the name of his wife, the country of her nativity 
and her place of residence at the time the peti- 
tion is filed, and if he has children, the name, 
date and place of birth and place of residence of 
each child living. The petition shall also set forth 
that he is not a disbeliever in or opposed to organ- 
ized government or a member of any body of per- 
sons opposed to organized government, and that 
lie Is not a polygamist or a believer in polygamy; 
that he intends to become a citizen of and to 
live permanently in the United States, and every 
other fact material to his naturalization and re- 
quired to be proved upon the final hearing of his 
application. The petition shall be verified by the 
affidavits of at least two credible witnesses who 
are citizens. At the time of the filing of the peti- 
tion there shall be also filed a certificate from the 
department of commerce and labor stating the 
date, place and manner of his arrival in the 
United States and the declaration of intention of 
such petitioner, which certificate and declaration 
shall be attached to and be a part of his petition. 

3. He shall, before he is admitted to citizen- 
ship, declare on oath in open court that he will 
support the constitution of the United States, 
and that he absolutely renounces all allegiance to 
any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty. 

4. It shall be made apparent to the satisfaction 
of the court admitting any alien to citizenship 
that immediately preceding the date of his appli- 
cation he has resided continuously within the 
United States five years at least, and within 
the state or territory where such court Is at 
the time held one year at least, and that during 
that time he has behaved as a man of good moral 
character, attached to the principles of the consti- 
tution. In addition to the oath of the .applicant, 
the testimony of at least two witnesses, citizens 
of the United States, as to the facts of residence, 
moral character and attachment to the principles 
of the constitution shall be required. 

5. He must renounce any hereditary title or 
order of nobility which he may possess. 

6. When any alien, who has declared his inten- 
tion, dies before he is actually naturalized the 
widow and minor children may. by complying 
with the other provisions of the act, be natural- 
ized without making any declaration of intention. 

Immediately after the filing of the petition the 
clerk of the court shall give notice thereof by 
posting in a public place the name, nativity and 
residence of the alien, the date and place of bis 
arrival in the United States and the date for the 
final hearing of his petition and the names of the 
witnesses whom the applicant expects to summon 
In his behalf. Petitions for naturalization may 
be filed at any time, but final action thereon shall 
be had only on stated days and in no case until 
at least ninety days have elapsed after the filing 
of the petition. No person shall be naturalized 
within thirty days preceding a general election 
within the territorial jurisdiction of the court. 

No person who disbelieves in or who is opposed 
to organized government, or who is a member of 
or affiliated with any organization entertaining 
and teaching such disbelief in or opposition to or- 
ganized government, or who advocates or teaches 
the duty, necessity or propriety of the unlawful 
assaulting or killing of any officer or officers of 
the government of the United States, or of any 
other organized government, because of his or 
their oSicial character, or who is a polygamist. 
shall be naturalized. 

No alien shall hereafter be naturalized or ad- 
mitted as a citizen of the United States who 
cannot speak the English language. This require- 
ment does not apply to those physically unable 
to comply with it: or to those making homestead 
entries upon the public lands of the United States 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



105 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE (1828-1908). 



YB. 


Candidate. 


Party. 


Popular 
vote. 


IVr 
cent. 


Elec- 
toral 
vote. 


YR. 


Candidate. 


Party. 


Popular 
vote. 


Per 
cent 


Elec 
toral 

vote. 


1828 
1S','S 
is:;- 
1832 

is:;-.' 
is:;-j 
is:u; 
is;*; 

ISitl 

is*; 

1836 
1840 
1840 
1840 
1844 
1844 
1844 
1848 
1S4S 
1848 
1852 

isx 1 

1852 

is.v; 
is, 
is.y, 
i-t>i 

IS60 

18t 
I860 
1864 
lst,4 
1868 

IS6S 

1S7-J 
1872 
1872 
1872 

i.sTt; 
is7t; 

IST6 

is:.; 

1876 
1880 
1S80 
1880 


Jackson 


Democrat.. 
Federal 
Democrat.. 
Whig 
Whig. 
Anti-M 
Democrat.. 
Whig 
Whig 
Whig 
Whig 
Democrat. . 
Whig 
Liberty 
Democrat. . 
Whig 
Liberty 
Whig 
Democrat. . 
Free Soil . . . 
Democrat. . 
Whig 
Free Soil... 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
American.. 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Union 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Democrat. . 
Ind. Dem... 
Republican 
T'mpera'ce 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Greenback. 
Prohibition 
American.. 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Greenback. 


647,231 
509,097 
687,502 
530,189 

\ 33,108 
761,549 

736,656 

1,128,702 
1,275.017 
7,059 
1,337,243 
1,299.068 
62,300 
1,360,101 
1,220.544 
291,263 
1,601,474 
1,380,678 
156,149 
1,838,169 
1,341,264 
874,534 
1,375,157 
845.763 
1,866.352 
589.581 
1,808,725 
2.216,067 
2.709,613 
3.015,071 
2,834,079 
29,408 
3,597,070 
5.608 
4,284.885 
4,033,950 
81,740 
9,522 
2,636 
4,442,035 
4,449,053 
307.306 


55.97 
44.03 
54.96 
42.39 
2.65 
50.83 

49.17 

46.82 
52.89 
.39 
49.55 
48.14 
2.31 
47.36 
42.50 
10.14 
51.03 
43.99 
4.98 
45.34 
33.09 
21.57 
29.40 
IS. OS 
39.91 
12.61 
55.06 
44.94 
47.33 
52.67 
43.83 
.45 
55.63 
.09 
50.94 
47.95 
.97 
.11 
.03 
48.23 
48.31 
3.34 


178 
83 
219 
49 
11 

170 
73 
26 
14 
11 
60 
234 

'"iio 

105 

107 

"'254 
42 

'"iii 

114 
8 
12 
72 
180 
39 
21 
216 
80 
214 
*66 

'"292 

"'184 
185 

'"i55 
214 


ISSfl 
KSO 
1884 

ISS4 
1SS4 
bst 
1SSS 
1SSS 
1SX8 
1888 
1888 
189'J 
1-W 

1892 
1S92 

ISjki 
IS'.Hi 
K>ii 

IS96 
1900 
1900 
11HHI 
1900 
1900 
1900 
Ml 
UK iO 
I'.KU 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 

unis 
in is 

1908 
1 90* 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1908 


Dow 


Prohibition 
American.. 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Greenback. 
Prohibition 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Union Lab. 
Prohibition 
United Lab 
Democrat. . 
Republican 
Prohibition 
People's 
Socialist.... 
Republican 
Democrat. . 
Prohibition 
National... 


10,487 
707 
4,911,017 
4,848.334 
133,825 
151,809 
5,540,050 
5,444,837 
146,897 
250,125 
2,808 
5,554,414 
5,190,802 
271,058 
1,027,329 
21,164 
7,035,638 
6,467.946 
141.676 
13,969 
36,454 


.11 
.01 

48.89 
48.27 
1.33 
1.51 
48.66 
47.82 
1.29 
2.20 
.03 
46.04 
43.02 
2.24 
8.51 
.19 
50.88 
46.77 
1.03 
.10 
27 


'"2i9 

182 

'"i68 
233 

' ' '277 
145 

" "22 

'"271 
176 


Phelps 
Cleveland 
Blaine 


Jackson 
Clay 
Floyd 
Win 
Van Buren 
Harrison 
White 
Webster 
Manotim 
Van Buren 
Harrison 


Butler 




Cleveland 




Flsk 




Cleveland 
Harrison 
Bidwell 


Polk 


Weaver 


Clay 
Birney 
Taylor 


Wing 


McKlnley 
Bryan , .. 




Van Buren 
Pierce 
Scott 
Hale 


Bentley 


Matchett 


Palmer 
McKinley. 


Nat. Dem... 
Republican. 
Democrat . . 
Prohibition 
People's 
Soc. Dem... . 
Soc. Lab 
United Chr. 
Union R.... 
Republican 
Democrat . . 
Prohibition 
Socialist 
People's 
Soc. Lab 


131,529 
7,219,530 
6,358.071 
209.166 
50.232 
4,76b 
32,751 
518 
5,098 
7,628,834 
5,084,491 
259.257 
402.460 
114,753 
33,724 


.95 
51.69 
45.51 
1.49 
.37 
.67 
.23 
.01) 
.04 
56.41 
37.60 
1.91 
2.98 
.85 
.25 


'"292 
155 

'"336 

Mil 


Buchanan 




Woolley 


Fillmore 
Douglas 
Breckinridge... 


Barker 
Debs 
Malloney 


Bell 
McClellan 


Ellis 




Parker 




Grant 


Debs 


Greeley 
O'Conor. 


Watson 
Corregan 




Continental 
Republican 
Democrat... 
Prohibition 
Socialist.... 
People's 
Ind'p'nd'ce. 
Soc. Lab.... 
Untd. Chr.. 


too 

7.679,006 
6.409.106 
252,ti83 
420,820 
28,131 
83,562 
13,825 
461 


.00 
51.58 
43.05 
1.69 
2.83 
.19 
.56 
.10 
.00 


'"321 
162 


Black 


Taft 
Bryan 
Chiitin 


Tilden 






Debs 


Smith 


Walker 




Hancock 
Gartield 


Gillhaus 
Turney 


Weaver 



Owing to the death of Mr. Greeley. the 66 electoral votes were variously cast. Thomas A. 
received 42, B. Gratz Brown 18, Horace Greeley 3, Charles J. Jenkins 2. David Davis 1. 

PARTY PLURALITIES AND TOTAL VOTE. 



Year. 
1828 


Republican 


Democratic. 
138.134 
157.313 
24,893 

' 38', 175 

' 226!796 
496,905 


Total vote. 
1,156,328 
1,250.799 
1,498,205 
2,410,778 
2,698,611 
2,871,928 
"3.138.301 
4.053.967 
4.676,863 
4.024,792 
5.724.684 


Year. 
1872 


Republican. Demo( 
762,931 


ratic. Total vote. 
6,466,165 
935 8,412,733 
9,209,588 
683 10,044,985 
713 11.384,216 
612 12,064,767 
13,827,212 
13,970.134 
13,524,349 
t!4,887,B94 


1832 




1876 


260 


1836 




1880 


7,018 


1840 


146 315* 


1884 


62 


1844 




1888 


95 


1848 . 


139,557* 


1892 


363 


1852 




1896 


567,692 


1856 




1900 


861.459 


I860 


491 195 


1904 


2 544.343 


1864 


407 342 


1908 


1,269,900 


1868... 


305.458 







Whig, tlncludes 461 votes cast for United Christian party. 



Feet. 

Antarctic ....' 10.800 

Arctic 5,160 

Atlantic 12.200 

Indian 11.136 



The mean depth of all the oceans and seas Is 
estimated to be from 2 to 2% miles. The greatest 
depth reported Is 31,614 feet, or nearly 6 miles. 



LONGEST RIVERS OF THE WORLD. 

Miles In 
length. 

_ 2.600 

Niger 2.600 

Yenisei 2,500 

Volga 2,323 



AVERAGE DEPTH OF OCEANS AND SEAS. 
Feet. 

Pacific 12.960 

Baltic 122 

Bering 900 

Caribbean 7,614 



River. 
Mississippi- 
Missouri . . . 


Miles in 
length. 

4,194 


River. 
Yangtsekiang . 
LaPlata 


Miles In 
length. Ri 
3.000 Meh 
2,950 Nigc 


Nile 


3 670 




2,860 Yen 




3,300 




2,300 Volj 


Ob 


3,235 


Amur 


2,700 











Miles In 
River. length. 

Hwangho 2,300 

Yukon 2,050 

Colorado 2.000 

Indus 2,000 



Feet. 
China 402 
Japan 7,320 
Mediterranean 4,560 

near the island of GUI 
greatest known depth i 
feet, off the coast of P( 


Mexico. Gulf of.. 
North 
Okhotsk 


Feet. 
. 4,632 
. 300 
5,040 


im in the Pacific, 
n the Atlantic Is 
>rto Rico. 


The 

27,366 



106 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION OF 1912. 



The nest president and Ylce-president of the 
Dnttod States will be chosen Nov. 5, 1912. As is 
well known, these officials are not elected directly 
by the people, but by electors, who are voted for 
on t'a-2 party tickets on the date named. The 
electors chosen will meet Monday, Jan. 13, 1913. 
in their respective states and vote by ballot for 
president and vice-president of the United States. 
The result will be transmitted to the president of 
the senate in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 12, 
1913, the electoral votes will be opened and count- 
ed in the presence of both houses of congress and 
the result announced by the president of the senate. 

While the president and vice-president are thug 
formally elected in 1913, the actual choice is made 
in 1912. In the spring and summar of that year 
national party conventions will be held for the 
nomination of candidates for president and vice- 
president of the United States for the term be- 
ginning March 4, 1913. These conventions are not 
provided for by the constitution, but it has become 
the invariable rule that the candidates presented 
by them are voted for by the presidential electors. 
The latter are nominated at the state party con- 
ventions or primaries and are elected on the first 
Tuesday after the first Monday of every fourth 
year preceding the end of the presidential term. 
Each state is entitled to as many electors as It 
has senators and representatives. No senator or 
representative or person holding an office of trust 
or honor under the United States may be an 
elector. The twelfth amendment to the constitu- 
tion prescribes how the electors shall meet and; 
cast tl eir ballots and how congress shall count 
the votes. The article is as follows: 

"The electors shall meet in their respective 
states and vote by ballot for president and vice- 
presidort, one of whom at least snail not be an 
inhabitant of the same state with themselves; 
they shall name in their ballots the person voted for 
as president, and in- distinct ballots the person 
voted for as vice-president, and they shall make 
distinct lists of all persons voted for as president 
and of all persons voted for as vice-president, and 
of the number of votes for each, which list they 
shall sign and certify and transmit, sealed, to the 
seat of the government of the United States, di- 
rected to the president of the senate. 



"The president of the senate shall, in the pres- 
ence of the senate and house of representatives, 
open all the certificates and the votes shall then 
be counted; the person having the greatest number 
of votes for president shall be the president, it 
such number be a majority of the whole number 
of electors appointed; and if no person have such 
majority, then from the persons having the high- 
est numbers, not exceeding three, on the list of 
those voted for as president, the house of rep- 
resentatives shall choose immediately by ballot 
the president. But in choosing 'he president the 
votes shall be taken by states, the representation 
from each state having one vote; a quorum for 
this purpose shall consist of a member or members 
from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of 
all the states shall be necessary to a choice. And 
if the house of representatives shall not choose a 
president, whenever the right of choice shall de- 
volve upon them, before the 4th 'lay of March next 
following, then the vice-president shall act as 
president, as in the case of the death or other 
constitutional disability of the president. 

"The person having the greatest number of votes 
as vice-president sliall be the vict -president, if 
such number be a majority of the whole number 
of electors appointed, and if no person have a ma- 
jority, then from the two highest numbers on the 
list the senate shall choose the vice-president; a 
quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds 
of the whole number of senators, and a majority of 
the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. 
But no person constitutionally ineligible to the of- 
fice of president shall be eligible to that of vice- 
president of the United States." 

Section 5, article II., of the constitution pre- 
scribes the qualifications of the president as fol- 
lows: 

"No person except a natural born citizen or a 
citizen of the United States at the time of the 
adoption of the constitution shall be eligible to the 
office of president; neither shall any person be 
eligible to that office who shall net have attained, 
to the age of 35 years and been fourteen years a 
resident within the United States." 

The qualifications of the vice-president are the 
same as those of the president. 



TEEMS OF ELECTIVE OFFICIALS. 

In Illinois. Cook County and Chicago. 



Office. Years. 

State Representatives 2 

Senators 4 

Governor 4 

Lieutenant-governor 4 

Secretary of state 4 

Treasurer 2 

Auditor 4 

Attorney-general 4 

Supt. public instruction 4 

University trustees 4 

Members board equalization 4 

Judges Supreme court 9 

Clerk Supreme court 6 

Appellate court clerks 6 

Cook County Commissioners 2 
Pres. county commissioners 2 
Sheriff 4 



Office. Years. 

Treasurer 4 

Coroner 4 

State's attorney I 

Superintendent of schools 4 

County clerk 4 

Recorder 4 

County judge 4 

Probate judge 4 

Clerk Probate court 4 

Circuit court judges fl 

Clerk Circuit court 4 

Judges Superior court 6 

Clerk Superior court 4 

Clerk Criminal court 4 

Assessors 8 

Members board of review 6 

Chicago Mayor 4 



Office. Years. 

Aldermen 3 

City clerk S 

City treasurer 2 

Municipal court judges o 

Chief justice Municipal court.. 6 

Clerk Municipal court 6 

Bailiff Municipal court; 6 

Sanitary district trustees B 

President sanitary board e 

County officers throughout the 
state are elected for four years. 
Township officers, such as super- 
visors, assessors, collectors and 
town clerks, are elected for one- 
year terms. Highway commis- 
sioners are elected for three 
years. 



TERRITORIAL GROWTH OF THE UNITED STATES. 



ACQUISITION. 


Year ac- 
quired. I] 


Area in 
sq. miles- 


Price 
paid. 


ACQUISITION. 


se 00 5|Yearac-| 
i S "! quired, : 


Area in 
sq. miles. 


Price 
paid. 


Eriginal territory 


18(13 
ISI'.I 
1845 
1850 
1848 

1853 

1ST.7 


827,844 
1,182,752 
59.268 
371.063 
96.707 
522,568 

45.535 

590.884 


' 127,267,621 
6,489,768 
Annexed 
16.000.0UO 
15,000,000 

10.000.000 
7.000,000 


Hawaii.. 


6.449 

3.600) 
114,000 } 
2n 
400 


Annexed 

*20,000,000 


Porto Rico ) 


Florida . 


Philippine islands > 


Texas 










Wake island 


Annexed 
Annexed 

100,000 


Gadsden purchase (from 
Mexico) 
Alaska 




1900 
1900 


70 


Cagayan de Jolo ) 
Sibutu 5 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



107 



NATIONAL NOMINATING CONVENTIONS SINCE 1880. 



Place and date of each and names of nominees 
for president and vice-president in the order named: 

1880 Democratic: Cincinnati, O., June 22-24; 
Winfield S. Hancock and William H. English. 

Republican: Chicago. 111.. June 2-8; James A. 
Garfield and Chester A. Arthur. 

Greenback: Cuicago. 111., June 9-11; James B. 
Weaver and B. J. Chambers. 

Prohibition: Cleveland. O., June 17; Neal Duw 

and A. M. Thompson. 

1884 Democratic: Chicago, 111., July 8-11; Grover 
Cleveland and Thomas A. Hemlrieks. 

Republican: Chicago. 111., June 3-ti; James G. 
Blalne and John A. Logan. 

Greenback: Indianapolis, Ind., May 28-29; Ben- 
jamin F. Butler and Alanson M. West. 

American Prohibition: Chicago, 111., June 19; 
Samuel C. Pomeroy and John A. Couant. 

National Prohibition: Plttsburg. Pa., July 23; 
John P. St. John and William Daniel. 

Anti- Monopoly: Chicago. 111.. May 14; Benja- 
min F. Butler and Alanson M. West. 

Equal Rights: San Francisco. Cal., Sept. 20; 
Mrs. Belva A. Lockwood and Mrs. Marietta L. 
Stow. 

1888 Democratic: St. Louis, Mo., June 5; Grover 
Cleveland and Allen G. Thurrnan. 

Republican: Chicago. 111., June 19; Benjamin 
Harrison and Lev! P. Morton. 

Prohibition: Indianapolis, Ind., May 20; Clinton 
B. Fisk and John A. Brocks. 

Union Labor: Cincinnati, O.. May 15; Alson J. 
Streeter and Samuel Evans. 

United Labor: Cincinnati. O.. May 15; Robert 
H. Cowdrey and W. H. T, Wakefleld. 

American: Washington. D. C., Aug. 14; James 
L. Curtis and James R. Greer. 

Equal Rights: Des Moines. Iowa. May 15; Mrs. 

Belva A. Lockwood and Alfred H. Love. 
1892 Democratic: Chicago. 111., June 21; Grover 
Cleveland and Adlai E. Stevenson. 

Republican: Minneapolis. Minn., June 7-10; Ben- 
jamin Harrison and Whitelaw Reid. 

Prohibition: Cincinnati. O., June 29; John Bid- 
well and J. B. Cranflll. 

National People's: Omaha, Neb., July 2-5; 
James B. Weaver and James G. Field. 

Socialist-Labor: Ntw York. N. Y., Aug. 28; 

Simon Wing and Charles H. Matchett. 
1896-^DemocTatlc: Chicago, 111.. July 7; William 
J. Bryan and Arthur Sewall. 

Republican: St. Louis. Mo., June 16; William 
McKinley and Garret A. Hobart. 

People's Party: St. Louis. Mo., July 22; Wil- 
liam J. Bryan and Thomas E. Watson. 

Silver Party: St. Louis. Mo.. July 22; William 
J. Bryan and Arthur Sewall. 

National Democratic: Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. 
2: John M. Palmer and Simon B. Buckner. 

Prohibition: Plttsburg, Pa., May 27; Joshua Lev- 
ering and Hale Johnson. 



National Party: Pittsburg. Pa.. May 28; Charles 
E. Bent ley and James H. Southgate. 

Socialist-Labor: New York. N. Y., July 6; 
Charles H. Matchett and Matthew Maguire. 

1900 Democratic : Kansas City, Mo., July 4-0; 

William J. Bryan and Adlai E. Stevenson. 
Republican: Philadelphia, Pa., June 19-21; Wil- 
liam McKinley and Theodora Roosevelt. 
People's Party: Sioux Falls, S. D.. May 9-10; 

Willium J. Bryan and Adlai E. Stevenson. 
People's Party (Middle-of-the-Road) : Cincinnati. 

O., May 9-10; Wharton Barker and Ignatius 

Donnelly. 
Silver Republican: Kansas City, Mo., July 4-6; 

William J. Bryan nnd Adlai E. Stevenson. 
Prohibition: Chicago. 111., June 27-28; John Q. 

Woolley and Henry B. Metcalf. 
Socialist-Labor: New York. N. Y., June 2-8; 

Joseph P. Malloney and Valentine Rommel. 
Social Democratic Party of the United States: 

Rochester. N. Y., Jan 27; Job Harriman and 

Max S. Hayes. 

Social Democratic Party of America: Indianap- 
olis. Jnd., March 6; Eugene V. Debs and Job 

Harriman. 
Union Reform: Baltimore, Md., Sept. 3; Seth 

W. Ellis and Samuel T. Nicholson. 

1904 Democratic: St. Ixrais, Mo., July 6-9; Alton 
B. Parker and Henry G. Davis. 

Republican: Chicago. 111., June 21-23; Theodore 
Roosevelt and Charles W. Fairbanks. 

People's party: Springfield. 111.. July 4-6; 
Thomas E. Watson and Thomas H. Tibbies. 

Prohibition: Indianapolis. Ind., June 29-July 1; 
Silas C. Swallow and George W. Carroll. 

Socialist-Labor: New York. N. Y., July 3-9; 
Charles H. Corregan and William W. Cox. 

Socialist-Democratic Party of America: Chicago, 
111., May 1-6; Eugene V. Debs and Benjamin 
Hanford. 

Continental: Chicago. 111.. Aug. 31; Charles H. 
Howard and George H. Shibley. (Nominees 
declined and Austin Holcomb and A. King 
were substituted by 'the national committee.) 
1008 Republican : Chicago, June 16-19; William 
H. Taft and James S. Sherman. 

Democratic: Denver. July 7-10; William J. Bry- 
an and John W. Kern. 

Socialist: Chicago. May 10-18; Eugene V. Debs 
and Benjamin Hanford. 

Prohibition: Columbus, O., July 15-16; Eugene 
W. Chafin and Aaron S. Watkins. 

Independence: Chicago, July 27-28; Thomas L. 
Hlsgen and John Temple Graves. 

People's: St. Louis, April 2-3; Thomas E. Wat- 
son and Samuel W. Williams. 

United Christian: Rock Island. 111.. May 1; 
Daniel Braxton and L. S. Coflin. 

Socialist-Labor: New York, July 2-5: Martin R. 
Preston and Donald L. Munro. (Preston de- 
clined and August Gillhaus was named in his 
place.) 



THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE. 



The president and vice-president of the United 
States are not elected directly by the people, but 
by the members of an electoral college who are 
voted for at th regular presidential elections. 
Each state is entitled to as many representatives 




states, based upon the"apportfouuieut 01 representa- 
tives made by congress under the census of 1900: 



State. 
Alabama 
Arkansas 


Electoral 
vote. 
11 
9 


State. 
Kentucky 
Louisiana 


Electoral 
vote. 
13 
, . . 9 

1 


State. 
New Hampshire 
New Jersey ... 
New York .... 


Electoral 
vote. 
4 
IS 
39 


Y State. 
Tennessee .... 


Electoral 
vote. 
18 


Texas 
Utah 


18 
3 


California 


. 10 


Colorado 
Connecticut . . 
Delaware 
Florida 
Georgia 
Idaho 
Illinois 
Indiana 
Iowa 
Kansas 


B 
'7 

'.'. '.'.'.'. 13 
3 
27 
15 
13 
10 


Maryland .. ... 
Massachusetts 
Michigan 
Minnesota 
.Mississippi ... 
Missouri 
Montana 
Nebraska 
Nevada 


S 
16 
14 
11 
10 
]8 
3 
8 
3 


North Carolina 
North Dakota 
Ohio 


12 
4 
23 


Vermont 
Virginia 


.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' 12 
S 


Oklahoma 
Oregon 
Pennsylvania .. 


7 
4 
34 
4 


West Virginia 
Wisconsin .... 


7 


IS 
S 


Total 


ji 


South Carolina 
South Dakota 


9 


4 


Necessary to choice... 24 J 





108 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



NATIONAL PARTY PLATFORMS OF 1908. 
[For full text see The Daily News Almanac and Year-Book for 1909, page 195.] 



PEOPLE'S. 
Adopted at St. Louis. April 3. 
The people's party advocates the issuance of 
money direct by the government to the people 
without the intervention of the national banks, 
to be distributed through federal and internal im- 
provement: the public ownership of railroads and 
other public utilities; homesteading of land; the 
parcels post; governmental regulation of corpora- 
tions by a general law regulating corporations do- 
ing an interstate business; initiative and referen- 
dum: direct vote for all public officers, with the 
power of recall; federal statute recognizing the 
principle of the initiative and referendum; giving 
the people power of instructing their national rep- 
resentatives in congress; abolition of child labor; 
the eight-hour day; an employers' liability law; 
condemnation of federal injunctions and gambling 
on futures. 

UNITED CHRISTIAN. 
Reaffirmed at Rock Island.' 111., May 1. 
The platform of the united Christian party la 
based on the ten commandments and the golden 
rule and favors direct primary elections, the in- 
itiative, referendum, recall, uniform marriage and 
divorce laws, equal rights for men and women, 
government ownership of coal mines, oil wells and 
public utilities; the regulation of trusts and the 
election of the president and vice-president and 
senators of the United States by the direct vote of 
the people. 

SOCIALIST. 
Adopted at Chicago, May 17. 

"We advocate and pledge ourselves and our 
elected officers to the following programme: 

"1. The immediate government relief for the un- 
employed workers by building schools, by reforest- 
ing of cutover and waste lands, by reclamation of 
arid tracts, and the building of canals, and by ex- 
tending all other useful public works. All persons 
employed on such works shall be employed directly 
by the government under an eight-hour workday 
and at the prevailing union wages. The govern- 
ment shall also loan money to states and munici- 
palities, without interest, for the purpose of carry- 
ing on public works. It shall contribute to the 
funds of labor organizations for the purpose of 
assisting their unemployed members, and shall 
take such other measures within its power as will 
lessen the widespread misery of the workers 
caused bv the misrule of the capitalist class. 

"2. The collective ownership of railroads, tele- 
graphs, telephones, steamship lines and all other 
means of social transportation and communication, 
and all land. 

"3. The collective ownership of all industries 
which are organized on a national scale and in 
which competition has virtually ceased to exist. 

"4. The extension of the public domain to in- 
clude mines, quarries, oil wells, forests and water 
power. 

"5. The occupancy and use of land to be the 
sole title to possession. The scientific reforestation 
of timber lands and the reclamation of swamp 
lands. The land so reforested or reclaimed to be 
permanently retained as a part of the public do- 
main. 

"6. The absolute freedom of press, speech and 
assemblage. 

"7. The improvement of the industrial condition 
of the workers 

(a). By shortening the workday In keeping with 

the increased productiveness of machinery. 

(b) By securing to every worker a rest perio-1 
of not less than a day and a half in each week. 

(c) By securing a more effective inspection of 
workshops and factories. 

(d) By forbidding the employment of children 
under 16 years of age. 

(e) By forbidding the interstate transportation 
of the products of child labor, of convict labor 
and of all uninspected factories. 



(f) By abolishing official charity and substitut- 
ing in its place compulsory insurance against un- 
employment, illness, accidents, invalidism, old 
age and death. 

"8. The extension of inheritance taxes, gradu- 
ated in proportion to the amount of the bequests 
and to the nearness of kin. 
"9. A graduated income tax. 
"10. Unrestricted and equal suffrage for men and 
women, and we pledge ourselves to engage in an 
active campaign in that direction. 

"11. The initiative and referendum, proportional 
representation and the right of recall. 
"12. The abolition of the senate. 
"13. The abolition of the power usurped by the 
Supreme court of the United States to pass upon 
the constitutionality of legislation enacted by con- 
gress. National laws to be repealed or abrogated 
only by act of congress or by a referendum of the 
whole people. 

"14. That the constitution be made amendable by 
a majority vote. 

"15. The enactment of further measures for gen- 
eral education and for the conservation of health. 
The bureau of education to be made a department. 
The creation of a department of public health. 

"16. The separation of the present bureau of la- 
bor from the department of commerce and labor, 
and the establishment of a department of labor. 

"17. That all judges be elected by the people for 
short terms, and that the power to issue injunc- 
tions shall be curbed by immediate legislation. 
"18. The free administration of justice." 

SOCIALIST LABOR. 
Adopted at New York city, July 5. 
The socialist labor party at its national conven- 
tion in New York city, July 2-5, 1908, reaffirmed the 
platform adopted in 1904. This, in substance, ad- 
vocates the ending of the present struggle between 
the capitalist and laboring classes by placing the 
land and the means of production, transportation 
and distribution into the hands of the people as a 
collective body and substituting the co-operative 
commonwealth for the present state of planless pro- 
duction, industrial war and social disorder a com- 
monwealth in which every worker shall have the 
free exercise and full benefit of his faculties, mul- 
tiplied by all the modern factors of civilization. 

DEMOCRATIC. 
Adopted at Denver, July 10. 

The platform denounces the waste of the people's 
money through extravagant appropriations by con- 
gress and the increase in the number of office- 
holders. It charges that the house of representa- 
tives has ceased to be a deliberative and legislative 
body, responsive to the will of the majority of its 
members, and has come under the absolute domina- 
tion of the speaker. It pledges the democratic 
party to the enactment of a law preventing cor- 
porations from making campaign contributions and 
any individual from contributing an amount above 
a reasonable maximum and providing for the pub- 
lication of contributions. It opposes the extension 
of the powers of the general government by judi- 
cial construction and Insists that federal remedies 
for the regulation of interstate commerce and for 
the prevention of private monopoly shall be added 
to, not substituted for, state remedies. 

"We favor immediate revision of the tariff by the 
reduction of Import duties. Articles entering into 
competition with trust-controlled products should 
be placed upon the free list and material reduc- 
tions should be made In the tariff upon the neces- 
saries of life, especially upon articles competing 
with such American manufactures as are sold abroad 
more cheaply than at home ; and graduate reduc- 
tions should be made in such other schedules as 
may be necessary to restore the tariff to a revenue 
basis. We demand the immediate repeal of the 
tariff on wood pulp, print paper, lumber, timber 
and logs and that these articles be placed upon the 
free list. 

"A private monopoly Is Indefensible and Intoler- 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



109 



able. Wo, therefore/ favor the vigorous enforcement 
of the criminal law against guilty trust magnates 
and officials, and demand the enactment of such ad- 
ditional legislation as may be necessary to make it 
impossible for a private monopoly to exist in the 
United States. Among the additional remedies we 
specify three: First, a law preventing a duplica- 
tion of directors among competing corporations ; 
second, a license system which will, without abridg- 
ing the right of each state to create corporations. 
or its right to regulate as it will foreign corpora- 
tions doing business within its limits, make it nec- 
essary for a manufacturing or trading corporation 
engaged in interstate commerce to take out a fed- 
eral license before it shall be permitted to control 
as much as 25 per cent of the product in which it 
deals, the license to protect the public from watered 
stock and to prohibit the control by such corpora- 
tions of more than 50 per cent of the total amount 
of any product consumed in the United States ; 
and third, a law compelling such licensed corpora- 
tion to sell to all purchasers in all parts of the 
country on the same terms, after making due allow- 
ance for cost of transportation. 

"We assert the right of congress to exercise com- 
plete control over interstate commerce and the right 
of each state to exercise like control over commerce 
within its borders. We demand such enlargement 
of the powers of the interstate-commerce commis- 
sion as may be necessary to compel railroads to 
perform their duties as common carriers and pre- 
vent discrimination and extortion. We favor the 
efficient supervision and rate regulation of rail- 
roads engaged in interstate commerce, and to this 
end we recommend the valuation of railroads by 
the interstate-commerce commission, such valuation 
to take into consideration the physical value of the 
property, the original cost, cost of production and 
all elements of value that will render the valuation 
fair and just. We favor such legislation as will 
prohibit the railroads from engaging in business 
which brings them into competition with their 
shippers, also legislation preventing the overissue 
of stocks and bonds by interstate railroads and leg- 
islation which will assure such reduction in trans- 
portation rates as conditions will permit, care be- 
ing taken to avoid reductions that would compel 
a reduction of wages, prevent adequate service or 
do injustice to legitimate investment. We favor 
such legislation as will increase the power of the 
interstate-commerce commission, giving to It the 
Initiative with reference to rates and transporta- 
tion charges put into effect by the railroad com- 
panies and permitting the interstate-commerce com- 
mission on its own initiative to declare a rate 
illegal and as being more than should be charged 
for such service. We further declare in favor of a 
law providing that all agreements of traffic or 
other associations of railway agents affecting in- 
terstate rates, service or classification shall be un- 
lawful unless filed with and approved by the inter- 
state-commerce commission. 

"We favor a postal savings bank, If the guaran- 
teed bank cannot be secured, and believe that it 
should be so constituted as to keep the deposited 
money in the community where the depositors live. 
But we condemn the policy of the republican party 
in proposing postal savings banks under a plan of 
conduct by which they will aggregate the deposits 
of rural communities and redeposit the same while 
under government charge in the banks of Wall 
street, thus depleting the circulating medium of 
the producing regions and unjustly favoring the 
speculative markets. 

"We favor an income tax as part of our revenue 
system, and we urge the submission of a constitu- 
tional amendment specifically authorizing congress 
to levy and collect a tax upon individual and cor- 
porate incomes, to the end that wealth may bear 
its proportionate share of the burdens of the fed- 
eral government. 

"Experience has proved the necessity of a modifi- 
cation of the present law relating to injunctions, 
and we reiterate the pledges of our national plat- 
forms of 1896 and 1904 in favor of the measure 
which passed the United States senate in 1896. but 
which a republican congress has ever since refused 
to enact, relating to contempts in federal courts 
and providing for trial by jury in caSes of indirect 



contempt. Questions of judicial practice have 
arisen, especially in connection with industrial dis- 
putes. We deem that parties to all judicial pro- 
ceedings should be treated with rigid impartiality 
and that injunctions should not be issued In any 
case in which injunctions would not issue if no 
industrial dispute were involved." 

The platform further pledges the democratic 
party to the enactment of a general employers' lia- 
bility law, to the creation of a federal department 
of labor, represented separately in the president's 
cabinet, to the upbuilding of the merchant marine 
without bounties and to the maintenance of an ade- 
quate navy. It favors a generous pension policy 
and advocates the organization of a national bureau 
of public health. 

'We favor the election of United States senators 
by direct vote of the people, and regard this reform 
as the gateway to other national reforms. 

"We earnestly favor the Immediate adoption of 
a liberal and comprehensive plan for improving ev- 
ery water course in the union which is justified by 
the needs of commerce, and, to secure that end, we 
favor, when practicable, the connection of the great 
lakes with the navigable rivers and with the gulf, 
through the Mississippi river, and the navigable 
rivers with each other, and the rivers, bays and 
sounds of our coasts with each other by artificial 
canals, with a view to perfecting a system of in- 
land waterways, to be navigated by vessels of 
standard draft. 

"We repeat the demand for internal development 
and for the conservation of our natural resources 
contained in previous platforms, the enforcement 
of which Mr. Roosevelt has vainly sought from a 
reluctant party ; and to that end we insist upon the 
preservation, protection and replacement of needed 
forests, the preservation of the public domain for 
homeseekers, the protection of the nation's natural 
resources in timber, coal, iron and oil against 
monopolistic control, the development of our water- 
ways for navigation and every other useful purpose, 
including the irrigation of arid lands, the reclama- 
tion of swamp lands, the clarification of streams, the 
development of water power and the preservation of 
electric power generated by this natural force from 
the control of monopoly ; and to such end we urg< 
the exercise of all powers, national, state and mu- 
nicipal, both separately and In co-operation. 

"We condemn the experiment in imperialism as an 
inexcusable blunder which has Involved us in an 
enormous expense, brought us weakness instead o 
strength, and laid our nation open to the charge 
of abandoning a fundamental doctrine of self-gov- 
ernment. We favor an immediate declaration o 
the nation's purpose to recognize the independence 
of the Philippine islands as soon as a stable gov- 
ernment can be established, such independence to 
be guaranteed by us as we guarantee the Independ- 
ence of Cuba, until the neutralization of the islands 
can be secured by treaty with other powers. In 
recognizing the independence of the Philippines our 
government should retain such land as may be nec- 
essary for coaling stations and naval bases. 

PROHIBITIONIST. 
Adopted at Columbus, O., July 16. 
The prohibition party of the United States, as- 
sembled in convention at Columbus. O., July 15-16, 
1908, expressing gratitude to Almighty God for the 
victories of our principles in the past, for en- 
couragement at present and for confidence in early 
and triumphant success in the future, makes the 
following declaration of principles and pledges their 
enactment into law when placed in power : 

1. The submission by congress to the several 
states of an amendment to the federal constitution 
prohibiting the manufacture, sale, importation, ex- 
portation or transportation of alcoholic liquors for 
beverage purposes. 

2. The immediate prohibition of the liquor traffic 
for beverage purposes in the district of Columbia, 
in the territories and all places over which the 
national government has jurisdiction ; the repeal of 
the internal revenue tax on alcoholic liquors and 
the prohibition of interstate traffic therein. 

3. The ejection of United States senator's by di- 
rect vote of the people. 



110 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1011. 



4. Equitable graduated income and inheritance 
taxes. 

5. The establishment of postal savings banks and 
the guaranty of deposits In banks. 

6. The regulation of all corporations doing an 
interstate-commerce business. 

7. The creation of permanent tariff commissions. 

8. The strict enforcement of law instead of offi- 
cial tolerance and practical license of the social 
evil which prevails in many of our cities, with its 
unspeakable traffic in girls. 

9. Uniform marriage and divorce laws. 

10. An equitable and constitutional employers' 
liability act. 

11. Court review of postoffice department deci- 

12." 'The prohibition of child labor in mines, work- 
chops and factories. 

13. Legislation basing suffrage only upon intelli- 
gence and ability to read and write the English 
language. 

14. The preservation of the mineral and forest 
resources of the country and the improvement of 
the highways and waterways. 

REPUBLICAN. 
Adopted at Chicago, June 18. 

"The republican party declares unequivocally for 
a revision of the tariff by a special session of con- 
gress immediately following the inauguration of 
the next president, and commends the steps already 
taken to this end in the work assigned to the ap- 
propriate committees of congress which are now 
investigating the operation and effect of existing 
schedules. In all tariff legislation the true prin- 
ciple of protection is best maintained by the impo- 
sition of such duties as will equal the difference 
between the cost of production at home and abroad, 
together with a reasonable profit to American in- 
dustries. We favor the establishment of maximum 
and minimum rates to be administered by the pres- 
ident under limitations fixed in the law, the maxi- 
mum to be available to meet discriminations by for- 
eign countries against American goods entering their 
markets and the minimum to represent the normal 
measure of protection at home ; the aim and pur- 
pose of the republican policy being not only to pre- 
serve, without excessive duties, that security against 
foreign competition to which American manufactur- 
ers, farmers and producers are entitled, but also 
to maintain the high standard of living of the 
wage earners of this country, who are the most 
direct beneficiaries of the protective system. Be- 
tween the United States and the Philippines we 
believe in a free interchange of products with such 
limitations as to sugar and tobacco as will afford 
adequate protection to domestic interests. 

"We approve the emergency measures adopted by 
the government during the recent financial disturb- 
ance, and especially commend the passage by con- 
gress at the last session of the law designed to 
protect the country from a repetition of such strin- 
gency. The republican party is committed to the 
development of a permanent currency system, re- 
sponding to our greater needs, and the appointment 
of the national monetary commission by the pres- 
ent congress which will impartially investigate all 
proposed methods insures the early realization of 
this purpose. 

"We favor the establishment of a postal savings 
bank system for the convenience of the people and 
the encouragement of thrift. 

"The republican party passed the Sherman anti- 
trust law over democratic opposition, and enforced 
It after democratic dereliction. It has been n 
wholesome instrument for good in the bands of a. 
wise and fearless administration. But experience 
has shown that its effectiveness can be strength- 
ened and its real objects better attained by such 
amendments as will give to the federal government 
greater supervision and control over, and secure 
greater publicity in, the management of that class 
of corporations engaged in interstate commerce 
having power and opportunity to effect monopolies. 

"We approve the enactment of the railroad rate 
law and the vigorous enforcement by the present 
administration of the statutes against rebates and 
discriminations, as a result of which the advan- 



tages formerly possessed by the large shipper over 
the small shipper have substantially disappeared, 
aud in this connection we commend the appropria- 
tion by the present congress to enable the inter- 
state-commerce commission to thoroughly investigate 
and give publicity to the accounts of interstate 
railroads. We believe, however, that the inter- 
state-commerce law should be further amended 
so as to give railroads the right to make and pub- 
lish traffic agreements subject to the approval of 
the commission, but maintaining always the prin- 
ciple of competition between naturally competing 
lines and avoiding the common control of sucU 
lines by any means whatsoever. We favor such 
national legislation and supervision as will prevent 
the future overissue of stocks and bonds by inter- 
state carriers. 

"The republican party will uphold at all times the 
authority and integrity of the courts, state and 
federal, and will ever insist that their powers to 
enforce their process and to protect life, liberty 
and property shall be preserved inviolate. We be- 
lieve, however, that the rules of procedure in the 
federal courts with respect to the issuance of the 
writ of injunction should be more accurately de- 
fined by statute and that no injunction or tempo- 
rary restraining order should be issued without 
notice, except where irreparable injury would re- 
sult from delay, in which case a speedy hearing 
thereafter should be granted. 

"We indorse the movement inaugurated by the ad- 
ministration for the conservation of natural re- 
sources ; we approve all measures to prevent the 
waste of timber ; we commend the work now going 
on for the reclamation of arid lands, and reaffirm 
the republican policy of the free distribution of the 
available areas of the public domain to the landless 
settler. No obligation of the future is more insist- 
ent and none will result in greater blessings to pos- 
terity. In line with this splendid undertaking is 
the further duty, equally imperative, to enter upon 
a systematic improvement upon a large and compre- 
hensive plan, just to all portions of the country, 
of the waterways, harbors and great lakes, whose 
natural adaptability to the increasing traffic of the 
land is one of the greatest gifts of a benign Provi- 
dence. 

"We adhere to the republican doctrine of encour- 
agement to American shipping and urge such legis- 
lation as will revive the merchant marine prestige 
of the country, so essential to national defense, the 
enlargement of foreign trade and the industrial 
prosperity of our own people. 

"We reaffirm our former declarations that the 
civil-service laws enacted, extended and enforced 
by the republican party shall continue to be main- 
tained and obeyed. 

"We commend the efforts designed to secure 
greater efficiency in national public health agencies 
and favor such legislation as will effect this pur- 
pose. 

"In the Interest of the great mineral industries 
of our country we earnestly favor the establishment 
of a bureau of mines and mining. 

"We favor the immediate admission of the terri- 
tories of New Mexico and Arizona as separate 
states in the union." 



INDEPENDENCE. 
Adopted at Chicago, July 28. 

"As of first importance, in order to restore the 
power of government to the people, to make their 
will supreme in the primaries, in the elections and 
in the control of public officials after they have 
been elected, we declare for direct nominations, 
the initiative and referendum and the right of 
recall. 

"Representative government is made a mockery 
by the system of modern party conventions domi- 
nated by bosses and controlled by cliques. We de- 
mand the natural remedy of direct nominations by 
which the people not only elect but. which is far 
more important, select their representatives. 

"We believe in the principles of the initiative and 
referendum and we particularly demand that no 
franchise grant go into operation until the terms 
and conditions have been approved by popular vote 
in the locality interested. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Ill 



"We demand for the people the right to recall 
public officials from the public service. The power 
to make officials resides In the people and In thorn 
also should reside the power to unmake and remove 
from office any official who demonstrates his unfit- 
ness or betrays the public trust. 

"Of next importance in destroying the power of 
selfish special Interests and the corrupt political 
bosses whom they control is to wrest from their 
hands their main weapon, the corruption fund. , 
We demand severe and effective legislation against 
all forms of corrupt practices at elections and ad- 
vocate prohibiting the use of any money at elec- 
tions except for meetings, literature and the nec- 
essary traveling expenses of candidates. 

"From the foundation of our government down to 
1872 the federal judiciary act prohibited the Issue 
of any injunction without reasonable notice until 
after a hearing. We assert that In all actions 
growing out of a dispute between employers and 
employes concerning terms or conditions of employ- 
ment no Injunction should issue until after a trial 
upon the merits, that such trial should be had before 
a jury and that In no case of alleged contempt 
should any person be deprived of liberty without 
a trial by jury. 

"The independence party declares that the right to 
Issue money is inherent in the government and H 
favors the establishment of a central governmental 



bank through which the money so issued shall be 
put into general circulation. 

"We demand a revision of the tariff, not by the 
friends of the tariff, but by the friends of the peo- 
ple, and declare for a gradual reduction of tariff 
duties with just consideration for the rights of the 
consuming public and of established industry. 
There should be no protection for oppressive trusts 
which sell cheaply abroad and take advantage of 
the tariff at home to crush competition, raise 
prices, control production and limit work and 
wages. 

"The parcels post system should be rapidly and 
widely extended, and government postal savings 
banks should be established where the people's de- 
posits will be secure, the money to be loaned to 
the people In the locality of the several banks and 
at a rate of Interest to be fixed by the govern- 
ment." 

The platform also favored the passage of an ex- 
clusion act to protect American workingmen from 
competition with Asiatic cheap labor; the building 
of a navy strong enough to protect at the same 
time both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the 
United States; the building of a ship canal from 
the lakes to the gulf; the protection of American 
citizens abroad; the popular election of United 
States senators and of judges, both state and fed- 
eral, and a graduated income tax. 



DECISION IN THE DANBTTRY HATTERS' CASE. 



In the United States Circuit court in Hartford, 
Oonn., Fob. 4. 1910, a jury awarded I). E. Loewe 
& Co.. hat manufacturers in Danbury. Conn., $74,- 
000 damages in their suit against Martin Lawler 
and 240 other members of the local unions of the 
United Hatters of North America for conducting a 
boycott against the hats made by the firm. Judge 
J. P. Platt, who presided, instructed the jury to 
find for the plaintiff !u:d fix the amount of the 
damages. This was placed at the amount named, 
but as the Sbermam antitrust act, under which the 
fiction was brought, allows triple damages, the 
judge multiplied the $74,000 by three, making the 
total $222.000. 

The suit was originally brought in the Circuit 
court In 1903, when Loowe & Co. filed a bill al- 
leging tl'at the labor organization had undertaken 
to unionize the company's hat factory In Danbury, 
and, failing to do so, had gone on a strike. This 
ret was followed by the declaration of a boycott 
against the firm's hats wherever they were found, 



and as It controlled an extensive trade throughout 
many states the boycott, in the language of the 
bill, constituted a combination to l!mit and restrain 
interstate commerce. On a demurrer by the hat- 
ters' union, the Circuit court decided that the 
Sherman law was inapplicable and dismissed the 
case. The Court of Appeals, however, certified the 
suit to the United States Supreme court, and that 
tribunal, Feb. 3, 1908, reversed the decision of the 
Circuit court, deciding without a dissenting voice 
that boycotting, wlere it affected interstate com- 
merce, was in violation of tho Sherman antitrust 
act. (See The Dally News Almanac and Year-Book 
for 1909, page 256.) 

The case then went back to the Circuit court, 
and after a trial lasting eleven weeks resulted as 
stated a'x>ve. The suit was for $240, COO damages 
and was instituted by the Antiboycott society 
through Mr. Loewe. The hatters' union was sup- 
Dorted by the American Federation of Labor. 



THE HOMESTEAD IAW. 



Any person who Is the head of a family, or who 
is 21, years old and is a citizen of the United 
States" or has filed his declaration of intention to 
become such, and who is not the proprietor of more 
than 160 acres of land in any state or territory, is 
entitled to enter one-quarter section (160 acres) or 
less quantity of unappropriated public land under 
the homestead laws. The applicant must make af- 
fidavit that" he is entitled to the privileges of the 
homestead act and that the entry is made for his 
exclusive use and for actual settlement and culti- 
vation, and must pay the legal fee and that part 
of the commission required, as follows: Fee for 
160 acres, $10; commission, $4 to $12. Fee for 
eighty acres, $5: commission. $2 to $6. Within 
six months from the date of entry the settler must 
take up his residence upon the land and cultivate 
the same for five years continuously. At the ex- 



piration of this period, or within two years there- 
after, proof of residence and cultivation must be 
established by four witnesses. The proof of settle- 
ment, with the certificate of the register of the 
land office. Is forwarded to the general land office 
at Washington, from which a patent is issued. 
Final proof cannot be made until the expiration 
of five years from date of entry, and must be made 
within seven years. The government recognizes 
no sale of a homestead claim. After the expira- 
tion of fourteen months from date of entry the 
law allows the homesteader to secure title to the 
tract. If so desired, by paying for It in cash and 
making proof of settlement, residence and cultiva- 
tion for that period. 

The law allows only one homestead privilege to 
any one person. 



THE HYDE-SWOPE MURDER CASE, 



Col. Thomas H. Swope, a millionaire philanthro- 
pist of Independence, Mo., died under suspicious 
circumstances Oct. 3, 1909. He was attended by 
Dr. B. Clarke Hyde, husband of his niece. John 
G. I'axton, executor of Col. Swopc's estate, and 
MTS. I ogan Swopo, mother of Chrisman Swope, 
who died in December, 1909. Instituted an investi- 
gation, which resulted in the arrest of Dr. Hyde 
on the charge of causing the death of Col. Swope. 
Chemical analysis of a portion of the colonel's 



stomach disclosed strychnine. It also appeared 
that Dr. Hyde had purchased from another phy- 
sician an active typhoid culture. Tliis was con- 
nected with an epidemic of typhoid fever which 
occurred In the Swope family in December, 1909. 
The trial of Dr. Hyde began April 11, 1910. in 
Kansas Oity. Mo., and 1 ended May 16 in a verdcit 
of guilty. He was sentenced to life imprisonment 
in the state penitentiary. 



112 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



PRESIDENTS AND THEIR CABINETS. 



PRESIDENTS AND VICE-PRESIDENTS. 


Secretaries of 
state. 


Secretaries of the 
treasury. 


Secretaries of 
war. 




178" 


T. Jefferson 1789 
E.Randolph 1794 
T. Pickering 1795 


Alex. Hamilton. .1789 
Oliver Wolcott . . 1795 


Henry Knox...l789 
T. Pickering... 1795 
Jas. McHenry.. 1796 




.1789 






John Adams 
Thomas Jefferson 


.1797 
1797 


T. Pickering 1797 
John Marshall... 1300 


Oliver Wolcott... 1797 
Samuel Dexter . .1801 


Jas. McHenry.. 1797 
John Marshal 1.1800 
Sam'l Dexter.. 1800 
R. Griswold....l801 








.1801 


James Madison . . 1801 


Samuel Dexter.. 1801 
Albert Gallatin. . 1801 


H. Dearborn... 1801 




.1801 
180f 


George Clinton 


James Madison 
tGeorge Clinton 


180^ 

181 


Robert Smith.... 1809 
James Monroe.. .1811 


Albert Gallatin. .1809 
G.W.Campbell.. 1814 
A.J.Dallas 1814 
W. H. Crawford. 181B 


Wm. Eustis....l809 
J. Armstrong.. 1813 
.Tames Monroe. 18H 
W.H.Crawford 1815 


Elbridge Gerry 


181* 






*J ames Monroe 
Danie' D Tompkins 


.1817 

1817 


J.Q.Adams 1817 


W. H. Crawford. 1817 


Isaac Shelby... 1817 
Geo. Graham.. 1817 
J. C. Caihoun.. 1817 








Itf'n 


Henry Clay 1825 


Richard Rush. ...1825 


Jas. Barbour. ..1825 
Peter B.Porter.1828 


John C. Caihoun 


,182ft 




Andrew Jackson 
Wohn C. Callurtin 


1821 
.1829 
.1833 


M. Van Buren....l829 
E. Livingston 1831 
Louis McLane 1833 


Sam. D. Ingham.1829 
Louis McLane 1831 
W. J. Duane 1833 


JohnH. Eaten. 1829 
Lewis Cass 1831 
B. F. Butler 1837 






John Forsyth.... 1834 


Roger B. Taney.,1833 
Lev! Woodbury.,1834 






1887 


John Forsyth... 1837 


Lev! Woodbury..l837 


JoelR.Poinsettl837 


Richard M. Johnson 


18S7 


fWilllam H. Harrison 
John Tyler 


1H41 
1841 


Daniel Webster.. 1841 


Thos. Ewing 1841 


John Bell 1841 


John Tyler 


.184] 


Daniel Webster. . 1841 
Hugh 8. Legare..l843 
AbelP.Upshur.,1843 
John C. Calhoun.1844 


Thos. Ewing 1841 
Walter Forward. 1841 
John C. Spencer..l843 
Geo.M. Bibb 1844 


John Bell 1841 
John McLean.. 1841 
J. C. Spencer... 1841 
Jas.M. Porter.. 1843 
Wm. Wilkins.,1844 




IM: 


James Buchananl845 


Robt. J. Walker. 1845 


Wm. L. Marcy. 1845 


George M. Dallas 


184ft 


tZachary Taylor 
Millard Fillmore 


1H41 
,1849 


John M. Clayton.1849 


Wm .M.Meredith 1849 


G.W. Crawford.1849 


Millard Fillmore 


185(1 


Daniel Webster.. 1850 
Edward Everett.,1852 


Thomas Corwi n. . 1850 


C. M. Conrad. . .1850 




.1853 


W. L. Marcy.. .1853 


James Guthrie. ..1853 


Jefferson Davis 1853 


tWllliam R. King 


1853 






1KS7 


Lewis Cass 1857 


Howell Cobb 1857 


John B. Floyd. .1857 


John C. Breckinrldge 


.1857 


J.S. Black 1860 


Philip F.Thomas.lStiO 
John A. Dix 1861 


Joseph Holt.... 1861 


*t Abraham Lincoln 


i>i 


W. H. 8eward....l861 


Salmon P. Chase. 1861 
W.P. Fessenden.1864 
HughMcCulloeh.1865 


S. Cameron 1861 
E. M. Stanton.,1862 




1HC.1 


Andrew Johnson 


is5 


Andrew Johnson 


1865 


W. H.Seward....l865 


HughMcCulloch.1865 


E. M. Stanton..l865 
U. S. Grant 1867 
L. Thomas 1868 
J. M. Schofleld.1868 


'Ulysses S. Grant 


1Ht?l 


E. B.Washburne.1869 
Hamilton Fish... 1869 


Geo. S.Boutwell 1869 
W.A.Richardson.1873 
Benj.H.Bristow.1874 
Lot M. Merrill... 1876 


J. A. Rawlrns.,1869 
W.T.Sherman. 1869 
W.W. Belknap.1869 
Alphonso Taf 1. 1876 
J. D. Cameron. 1876 


Schuyler Colfax 


istw 




.1873 






Rutherford B. Hayes 
William A. Wheeler 


.1877 
.1877 


W. M. Evarts....l877 


John Sherman. .1877 


G.W. McCrary. 1877 
Alex. Ramsey. .1879 




18S1 


James G. Blaine,1881 


Wm. Windom....l881 


R. T. Lincoln. .1881 


Chester A. Arthur 


1881 




1881 


F. T. Frelinghuy- 
sen 1881 


Chas. J. Folger.. .1881 
W. Q. Gresham . .1884 
HughMcCulloch.1884 


R.T.Lincoln. ..1881 








1W 


Thos. F. Bayard. 1885 


Daniel Manning. 1885 
Chas.S.Fairchim.1887 


W.C. Endicott.1885 


tThos. A. Hendricks 


1885 




.1881) 


James G. Elaine. 1889 
John W. Foster .1892 


Wm. Windom....l88U 
Charles Foster... 1891 


R. Proctor 1889 
S. B. Blkins....l891 


LeviP.Morton 


1889 


Grover Cleveland 
Adlai E. Stevenson 


.1893 

, 1893 


W. Q. Gresham..l893 
Richard Olney. . .1895 


John G. Carlisle.. 1893 


D.S. Lament... 1893 


tWllliam McKinley 


1897 


John Sherman... 1897 
Wm. R. Day 1897 
John Hay 1898 


LymanJ. Gage.. 1897 


R. A. Alger 1897 
Elihu Root 1899 


tGarret A. Hobart 
Theodore Roosevelt 


.1897 

i'.HII 




.1901 


John Hayt. . ...1901 
ElihuRoot 1905 
Robert Bacon.. . .1909 


Lyman J. Gage.. 1901 
Leslie M.Shaw.. 1902 
G. B.Cortelyou.. 190-7 


Elihu Root 1901 
Wm. H. Taf t... 1904 
Luke E.Wrightl908 


Charles W. Fairbanks 


.191)5 






William H. Taf t 
James 8. Sherman 


.1909 
1909 


P.C. Knox 1S09 


F. MacVeagb 1909 


J. M.Dickinson. l'.)0!t 



Elected two consecutive terms. tDied while in office. ^Resigned. 



CHICAGO DAIUY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOIl 1911. 



113 



PRESIDENTS AND THEIR CABINETS.-CONTINUE1>. 



Secretaries of the 
navy. 


Secretaries of the 
interior.* 


Postmasters- 
general.t 


Attorneys- 
geueral. 


Secretaries of 
agriculture-^ 






Samuel Osgood 1789 
Timothy Pickeringl791 
Jos. Habersham....l795 


E.Randolph 1789 
Wm. Bradford.. .1794 
Charles Lee 1795 




Benjamin Stoddert. ...1798 




Jos. Uabersham 1797 


Charles Lee 1797 
Theo. Parsons. . .1801 




Benjamin Stoddert. ...1801 
Robert Smith ..1801 




Jos. Habersham...l801 
Gideon Granger... 1801 


Levi Lincoln 1801 
Robt. Smith 1805 
John Breck- 
inrldge 1805 




Jacob Crowninshield..l80o 


C.A.Rodney 1807 


Paul Hamilton . ..1809 




Gideon Granger... 1809 
R. J. Meigs, Jr 1814 


C.A.Rodney 1809 
Wm. Pinckney...l811 
William Rush.. ..1814 




William Jones . .. .1813 


B. W. Crowninshield. .1811 


B. W. Crowninshield..l817 
Smith Thompson 1818 




R. J.Meigs, Jr 1817 
John McLean 1823 


William Rush.... 1817 
William Wirt.... 1817 




8. L. Southard 1823 


S. L. Southard 1825 




lohn McLean 1825 


William Wlrt.... 1825 








Wm. T. Barry 1829 
Amos Kendall 1835 


John M. Berrien.1829 
Roger B.Taney. .1831 
B. F. Butler 1833 




LevlWoodbury 1831 


Mahlon Dickerson 1834 


Mablon Dickerson.... 1837 




AmosKen'dall 1837 
JohnM. Niles 1840 


B. F. Butler 1837 
Felix Grundy... .1838 
H. D. Gilpin 1840 


% 


George K. Badger 1841 




Francis Granger. ..1841 


J. J. Crittenden.1841 




George E. Badger 1841 
AbelP.Upshur 1841 
David Henshaw 1843 




Francis Granger. ..1841 
C. A. Wickliffe 1841 


J. J. Crittenden .1841 
Hugh S.Legare.. 1841 
John Nelson 1843 





Thomas W. Gilmer. . . .1844 
John Y. Mason 1844 


George Bancroft 1845 
John Y. Mason 1846 




Cave Johnson 1845 


John Y. Mason. .1845 
Nathan Clifford.. 184( 
1 saac Toucey 1848 






William B. Preston . . .1849 


Thomas Ewing 1849 


Jacob Collamer 1849 


Reverdy Johnson 1841 




William A. Graham... 1850 
John P. Kennedy 1852 


Thomas A.Pearce..l850 
T. M. T. McKernonl850 
A. H.H.Stuart.... 1850 


Nathan K. Hall.. ..1850 
Sam D. Hubbard.. .1852 


J. J. Crittenden..l850 





James C. Dobbin 1853 


Robt. McClelland. .1853 


James Campbell. . .1853 


Caleb Cushing. . .1853 




Isaac Toucey 1857 


Jacob Thompson. .1857 


Aaron V. Brown. .1857 
Joseph Holt 1859 


J.S. Black 1857 
Edw. M. Stan ton. ISO) 






Gideon Welles 1861 


Caleb B. Smith 1861 
John P. Usher 1863 


Montgomery Blair.1861 
William Dennison.1864 


Edward Bates... 1861 
Titian J. Coffey.. 1863 
James Speed 1864 




Gideon Welles 1865 


John P. Usher 1865 
James Harlan 1865 
O. H. Browning. . . .1866 


William Dennison.1865 
A.W.Randall 1866 


James Speed 1865 
Henry Stanbery .1866 
Wm. M. Evarts...l868 






Adolph E Borie 1869 


Jacob D. Cox. .18t?J 


J. A. J. Creswell...l869 
Jas. W.Marshall... 1874 
Marshall Jewell. . .1874 
James N. Tyner...l876 


E. R. Hoar 1869 
A. T. Ackerman..l870 
Geo. H. Williams . 187 
Edw. Pierrepont.1875 
Alphonso Taft...l87b 




George M. Robeson . . .1869 


Columbus Delano.. 1870 
Zach Chandler 1875 


R. W. Thompson 1877 
Nathan Goff. Jr 1881 


Carl Schurz 1877 


David M. Key 1877 
Horace Maynard. .1880 


Chas. Devens 1877 




W. H. Hunt 1881 


S. J. Kirkwood 188 1 


T.L. James 1881 


W. Mac Veagh.,.. 1881 




W. E. Chandler 1881 


Henry M.Teller. ... 1881 


T.O.Howe 1881 
W.Q.Gresham 1883 
Frank Hatton 1884 


B. H. Brewster.. .1881 






W.C. Whitney 1885 


L. Q. C. Lamar.....l885 
Wm. F. Vilas 1888 


Wm. F. Vilas 1885 
D.M.Dickinson 1888 


A.H. Garland.... 1885 


N. J. Colman.1889 


Benj. F.Tracy 1889 


John W. Noble 1889 


J. Wanamaker 1889 


W.H.H. Miller.. 1889 


J. M. Rusk ..1889 


Hilary A. Herbert.... 1893 


Hoke Smith 1893 
D. R. Francis 1896 


W. S. Bissell 1893 
W. L. Wilson 1895 


R.Olney 1893 
J. Harmon 1895 


J. 8. Morton.1893 


John D. Long 1897 


C.N. Bliss 1897 
E.A.Hitchcock 1898 


James A.Gary 1897 
Chas. E. Smith 1898 


J.McKenna 1897 
J. W. Griggs 1897 
P.C.Knox 1901 


J. Wilson 1897 


John D. Long. ... ...1901 
Wm. H. Moody 1902 


E.A .Hitchcock 1901 
J. R. Garneld 1907 


Chas.E. Smith 1901 
Henry C.Payne. ...1902 
Robt. J.Wynne 1904 
G.B.Cortelyou 1905 
G. v.L.Meyer 1907 


P.O. Knox 1901 
W.H. Moody 1904 
C.J.Bonaparte.. 1907 


J.Wilson 1801 


Paul Morton 1904 


C. J. Bonaparte 1905 


Victor H. Metcalf.. ..19W 
Truman II. Newberry 1908 


G. von L. Myer 190!) 


R. A. Ballinirer....l909 


F.H.Hitchcock.... 1909 


G.W.Wickersh'mlflOH 


J.Wilson 1H09 



Secretaries of Commerce and Labor y '(department established Feb. 14, 1903) George B. Cortelyou, 1903; 
Victor H. Metcalf, 1904-1906; Oscar S. Straus, 1907-1909: Charles Nagel, 1909. 

This department was established by an act of congress March 3, 1849. tNot a cabinet officer until 1S2'J 
^Established Feb. 11,1889. 



114 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



PAST POLITICAL COMPLEXION OF THE STATES. % 

R.. republican; W., whiff; D., democratic; U., union; A., American; A. M.. anti-Masonic; N. R.. national 
republican; P., populist. 















































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Indiana 


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In five states in 1892 the electoral vote was di- 
vided: California gave 8 electoral votes for 
Cleveland and 1 for Harrison and Ohio gave 1 
for Cleveland and 22 for Harrison; in Michigan, 
by act of the legislature, each congressional dis- 
trict voted separately for an .elector; In Oregon 
1 of the 4 candidates for electors on the people's 
party ticket was also on the democratic ticket; 
In North Dakota 1 of the 2 people's party elect- 



ors cast his vote for Cleveland, this causing the 
electoral vote of the state to be equally divided 
among Cleveland. Harrison and Weaver. Ih 1896 
California gave 8 electoral votes to McKinley and 
1 to Bryan; Kentucky gave 12 to McKinley and 
1 to Bryan. In Maryland in 1904 7 of the presi- 
dential electors chosen were democrats and 1 
republican. In 1908 Maryland elected 6 demo- 
cratic and 2 republican electors. 



PARTY LINES IN CONGRESS SINCE 1881. 



CONGRESS. 


Years. 


SENATE. 


HOUSE. 


CONGRESS. 


Years. 


SENATE. 


HOUSE. 


o. 



3 

a 


d 




a 

i 


a 
i 


6 

ti 


a 

o 
A 


I 

3f 
2fi 
29 
82 

29 
33 
43 


d 
d 


o, 

i 



o 

Q 


| 


47th.... 


1881-1888 

1888-1885 
18S5-1887 
18^7 1889 


37 
4ii 
42 
88 
89 
47 
88 
42 


38 
H 

84 
87 
87 
BO 

44 

N 


1 

"'a 

3 

5 


146 

121 
120 
153 
106 
8M 
126 
MB 


138 
198 
2CH 
Ki8 
159 
23(5 
230 
104 


10 

1 

4 

'"8 
8 


55th . . ... 


1897-1 89!) 
1899 1901 
1901 19U3 


46 
K 
66 

56 

88 

(il 
59 
49 


10 
11 
3 


208 

1W) 
198 
206 
260 
232 
219 
229 


131 
lt 
153 
174 

i:> 

1C4 
172 
KM 


'. 
9 
5 
2 

"'i 


48th 


5(!th, 


49th 


57th 


50th 


68th 


1903-1905 
1905-1907 
1',107-rJOu 
191)9-191 1 
1911-1913 


51st 


1889-1891 
1891-1893 
1893-1895 
1895- 18SI7 


69th 
(iOth 


52d 


5Hd 


tilst 


54th 


fi'd 



Socialist. 
ORDER OF PRESIDENTIAL SUCCESSION. 



In case of the removal, death, resignation or in- 
ability of both the president and vice-president, 
then the secretary of state shall act as president 
until the disability of the president or vice-presi- 
dent is removed or a president Is elected. The rest 
w'. the order of succession is: Secretary of the 



treasury, secretary of war, attorney-general, post- 
master-general, secretary of the navy, secretary of 
the interior, secretary of agriculture and secretary 
of commerce and labor. The acting president, In 
case congress is not in session, must call a special 
session, giving twenty days' notice. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1011. 



116 



NONCONTIGUOUS POSSESSIONS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. 

The Philippine islands were ceded to the United 
States by Spain Dec. 10, 1898. Maj.-Gen. Merritt 
was the flrst military governor. He was succeeded 
in August, 1S99, by Maj.-Gen. E. S. Otis, who in 
turn was followed in May, 1900, by Maj.-Gen. 
Arthur MacArthur. The last named remained in 
office until July 4. 1901, when the military author- 
ity was transferred to Gen. A. E. Chaffee. By order 
of the president Gen. Chaffee was relieved of his 
duties as military governor July 4, 1902, and the 
office terminated. The Philippine commission was 
at the same time made the superior authority. Sept. 
2 the islands were divided into three military de- 
partments, to be known as the department of Luzon, 
the department, of Visayas and the department of 
Mindanao. 

July 1, 1902, congress passed an act providing 
temporarily for the government of the Philippines, 
providing for the election by popular vote, two 
years after a census of the islands had been taken 
and published, of delegates to an assembly, consist- 
ing of not more than 100 members nor less than 
fifty, apportioned among the provinces as nearly 
as possible according to population. This assembly 
should, together with the Philippine commission 
appointed by the president of the United States, 
exercise the legislative i>ower heretofore exercised 
by the commission alone, the members of the com- 
mission acting as an upper house and the elected 
assemblymen as a lower house. The members of 
the assembly were to hold office two years and an- 
nual sessions of the legislature not exceeding ninety 
days in length were to be held. 

The first election was held July 30, 1907, when 
eighty members of the legislature were chosen, the 
total vote being 97,803. The first session was form- 
ally opened Oct. 16 by William H. Taft, United 
States secretary of war. the first civil governor of 
the islands after they came into American posses- 
sion. Sergio Osinena was elected president. 

OFFICIALS AND SALARIES The Philippine commis- 
sion consisted in October, 1910, of Prof. Dean C. 
Worcester of Michigan, W. Cameron Forbes of 
Massachusetts, Newton W. Gilbert of Indiana, 
Frank A. Branagan of Ohio, Charles B. Elliott of 
Minnc-sota. Eafael Palma, Gregorio Araneta, Jose 
E. Luzuriaga and Juan Sumulong of the Philip- 
pines. The officers in 1910 were. 

Governor-General W. Cameron Forbes. 

Vice-Governor Newton W. Gilbert. 

Secretary Interior Department Dean C.Worcester. 

Secretary Finance and Justice Gregorio Araneta. 

Secretary Public Instruction Newton W. Gilbert. 

Secretary of Commerce and Police Charles B. 
Elliott. 

Executive Secretary Frank W. Carpenter. 

Auditor William II: Clarke. 

Treasurer J. L. Barrett. 

Director of Education Frank E. White. 

Director-General of Posts C. M. Oottennan. 

Attorney-General Ignacio Villamor. 

Collector of Customs H. B. McCoy. 

Chief Justice Sifpreme Court CayetanoS. Arellano. 

The governor receives $20,000 a year ($15,000 as 
governor-general) and the other American commis- 
sioners receive $15,500 each ($10,500 being for their 
services as heads of departments). The commis- 
sioners not heads of departments get $7,500 each. 
The salaries of other leading officials are : Execu- 
tive secretary, $9.000 ; assistant executive secretary, 
$6,000 ; auditor. $6,000 ; collector of customs, $6,000 ; 
attorney-general, $6.000 ; chief Justice Supreme court, 
$10,000 : associate Justices, $10,000 ; superintendent 
of public education. $6.000 : director-general of 
posts, $6,000; treasurer, $7.000. 

AIIEA AND POPULATION The total land and water 
area of the Philippine archipelago is 832.968 square 
miles and the population 7.635.436. according to the 
census of 1903. Of the Inhabitants 6.987.686 are civ- 
ilized. The population of Manila in 1903 was 219.928. 
The population of the principal islands was : Bobol, 
243,148; Cebu. 592,247; Jolo, 44,718; Leyte, 357,641: 
Luzon, 3.798.507 ; Marinduque, 50.601 ; Mindanao, 
499,634, of whom 252,940 lire uncivilized ; Negros, 
460,776 (21,217 uncivilized) ; Panay, 743,646 (14,933 un- 
civilized) : Sr.mar, 222,690. 



PRODUCTS AND CLIMATE The chief products are 
hemp, sugar, coffee, tobacco leal, copra, cigars and 
indigo. Between 600,000 and 700,000 bales of hemp 
are exported annually. 

' The climate of the Philippine islands is consid- 
ered excellent for the tropics. The mean tempera- 
ture in Manila ranges from 77 in January to 83 in 
May. June, July, August and September are the 
rainy months, March, April and May the hot and 
dry, and October, November, December, January 
and February the temperate and dry. 

TKADE WITH THE UNITED STATES The shipments 
of merchandise from the United States to the 
Philippines in the fiscal year ended June 30, 1910, 
amounted in value to $16,768,909, as compared with 
$11,182,175 in 1909. The principal articles sent were: 
Breadstuffs, $1,395,824; cotton manufactures, $2,936,- 
i.98: iron and steel manufactures, $3,405,267; wood 
and manufactures of wood, $482,960. The Imports 
amounted in value to $17,317,897, as compared with 
$9,433,986 in 1909. The principal articles imported 
were: Unmanufactured manila, $10,435,743; sugar, 
$4,259,568. 

IMPOSTS AND EXPOBTS The total imports of the 
Philippine islands in the fiscal year 1909 amount- 
ed to $27,792,397; total exports, $30,993,563. 

ISLAND OF POETO EICO. 

Porto Eico, according to the decision of the 
United States Supreme court in the insular cases 
May 27, 1901, is a territory appurtenant and be- 
longing to the United States, but not a part of the 
United States within the revenue clause of the 
constitution. The island was ceded to the United 
States by Spain Dec. 10, 1898, and was under mili- 
tary rule until the Foraker law went into effect 
May 1, 1900. (For the provisions of that law see 
The Daily News Almanac for 1901.) In accordance 
with the third section of that act, the legislative 
assembly of Porto Eico having put into operation 
a system of local taxation to meet the necessities 
of government, President McKinley on the 25th of 
July, 1901 the anniversary of the landing of Amer- 
ican troops on the island in 1898 proclaimed free 
trade between the United States and Porto Eico. 

GOVERNMENT Civil government, under the provi- 
sions of the Foraker act, was established May 1, 
1900. The upper house consists of eleven members, 
six of whom are "cabinet" officers appointed by the 
president ; the lower house is made up of thirty-five 
delegates elected by the people every two years. 
The governor, who is appointed by the president, 
has practically the same duties as the governor of 
any other territory of the United States. The pres- 
ent officers are: Governor, Col. George E. Colton; 
acting secretary, M. Drew Carrel; treasurer, Sam- 
uel D. Gromer; commissioner of education, Edward 
Grant Dexter; resident commissioner in the United 
States. Tulio Larrinaga. 

AREA AND POPULATION The area of Porto Eico 
is about 3,600 square miles and the population, as 
shown by the census of 1910, Is 1,118,012. In 1900 
the population was 953.243. Of these 941,751 are 
natives. The whites number 589,426 and the col- 
crod 363,817., The colored are subdivided into 304,352 
mestizos. 59,390 negroes and 75 Chinese. By depart- 
ments the population in 1900 was: Aguadilla, 99,- 
645; Arscibo, 162,308; Bayamon, 147,681; Guayma, 
111.9S6; Humacao, 100,866; Mayaguez, 127,566; Ponce, 
203,191. The cities having more than 5,000 inhabi- 
tants are: San Juan, 32.048; Ponce. 27,952; Maya- 
guez. 15,187; Arecibo, 8,008; Aguadilla, 6,425; Yauco, 
6.108; Caguas, 5,450; Guayama, 5.334. 

COMMERCE For the year ended June 30, 1910, the 
total domestic exports from Porto Rico to foreign 
countries were $5,822,602, and to the United States, 
$26.391,338. Foreign imports amounted to $3,537,201 
nnd imports from the United States amounted to 
$23,272,170. Of the exports Spain took $1,058,197; 
Cuba. $2.468,689; France, $583,682; Germany, $259,508; 
Austria-Hungary. $833.604. 

The leading articles of export are coffee, oranges, 
brown sugar and tobacco. 



TEERITORY OF HAWAII. 
Annexed to the United States July 7, 1898. 
Created a territory June 14, 1900. 



116 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



Governor Walter F. Frear. 

Secretary Henry E. Cooper. 

POPULATION According to the federal census of 
1900 the total population of the territory is 154,001. 
In 1890 it was 89,990. The only largo city is Hono- 
lulu, which in 1900 had a population of 39,306. By 
island divisions the population is as follows : Ha- 
waii, 46,843 ; Kauai and Niihau, 20,734 ; Lanai and 
Maul, 25,416 ; Ouhu. 58,504 ; Molokai, 2,504. 
, COMMERCE WITH THE UNITED STATES The total 
value of the shipments of merchandise from Hawaii 
"to the United States for the twelve months ended 
June 30, 1910, was $46,161,288. Brown sugar was the 
principal item, amounting to 1,073,352,166 pounds, 
valued at $40,579,141. The other articles of impor- 
tance were: Coffee, $288,423; fruits, $1,775,050; raw 
woo<i, $203,649; rice, $269,157. The total value of the 
shipments of merchandise from the United States 
to Hawaii was $20,289,017. The principal articles 
were: Iron, steel and machinery, $3,229,969; leather 
and manufactures of, $379,058; oils, $1,593,051; pro- 
visions, $848,618; tobacco, $659,661; lumber and man- 
ufactures of wood, $1,418,628; wool, manufactures 
of, $265,279; -wines and liquors, $505,038. 



TERRITORY OF ALASKA. 

Purchased from Russia in March, 1867. 

Organized as noncontiguous territory July 27, 1868. 

Made a civil and Judicial district June 6, 1900. 

Governor Walter E. Clark. 

AREA AND POPULATION Area, 577,390 square miles ; 
population in 1900, 63,592 ; estimated population in 
1906. 82,516. 

COMMERCE WITH THE UNITED STATES The total 
value of the shipments of domestic merchandise 
from the mainland of the United States to Alaska 



in the year ended June 30, 1910, was $17,972,647. 
The principal articles were: Animals. $203,884; 
breadstuffs, $818,701; manufactures of cotton, $647,- 
596, eggs, $468,560; fruits and nuts, $469,777; manu- 
factures of iron and steel, $4,224,998: leather manu- 
factures. $329,412; meat and dairy products, $2,449,- 
943; wines and liquors, $654,821; vegetables, $586,997; 
wood and manufactures of, $775,982. Total value of 
shipments* of domestic merchandise from Alaska to 
the mainland, $12,349,462. The main articles were: 
Copper ore, $165,566; canned salmon, $9,435,946; 
whalebone, $136,520. 

GOLD SHIPMENTS (1909) From Alaskr. to the main- 
land. $18,275,434; from the mainland to Alaska, 
$637,015 in coin. The total sold and silver ship- 
ments, including foreign, to the United States were 
$22.279.073. 

PANAMA CANAL ZONE. 

Acquired by the United States Feb. 26, 1904. 
Area, 474 square miles. 



TUTUILA. 

Acquired by the United States January, 1900. 

Area, including Manua and several other small 
islands, 79 square, miles. 

Population, about 4.000. 

Pango-Pango harbor acquired by United States in 
1872. 

Naval Governor Capt. John F. Parker. 

GUAM. 

Ceded to United States by Spain Dec. 10, 1898. 
Area, about 200 square miles. 
Population, about 9,000. 

First American Governor Oapt. R. P. Leary.U.S.N. 
Governor (1910) Capt. Edward J. Dorn, U. S. N. 



AVALANCHES IN THE CASCADE AND SELKIRK MOUNTAINS. 



Warm weather in the latter part of February 
and the .early part of March, 1910, following a win- 
ter remarkable for its heavy snow, caused a num- 
ber of disastrous avalanches in the Cascade moun- 
tains 5n Idaho and Washington. Feb. 27 the min- 
ing towns of Maco and Burke and the camp of the 
Carbonate Hill Mining company at Mullan, all 
in the northern part of Idaho, were overwhelmed 
by avalanches of snow and rock. Twelve persons 
were killed at Mace, four at Burke and three at 
Mullan. Two were killed at Dorsey, Idaho, Feb. 
28. Aa many persons were reported missing, the 
number of actual fatalities was probably much 
larger ttan that giien. 

Early on the morning of March 1 two Great 
Northern trains were buried by an avalanche on 
the west slope of the Cascades, near the small 
station of Wellington. One was a passenger and 
the other a mail train, and most of the -victims 
were asieep in the coaches at the time the disas- 



ter occurred. They were hurled into a canyon 200 
feet det-p and covered with hundreds of tons of 
snow end rock. Only a few escaped, and these 
were severely injured. The dead, many of whom 
remained under the snow and wreckage for days, 
numbered 118. The property loss was $1,000,000. 

March 2 the Oriental limited train No. 2, east 
bound, on the Groat Northern road, ran into a 
landslide near Milan, a station twenty-two miles 
east of Spokane. The fireman was killed and a 
dozen persons ware badly Injured. 

March 5. while a large number of workmen were 
clearing the line of the Canadian Pacific railroad 
of the debris of a snowslide in Rogers pass, near 
Glacier, at the summit of the Selkirk mountains, 
British Columbia, they were overwhemed by a sec- 
ond slide. Ninety-two lives were lost, the victims 
being carried down into the valley and buried 
under tons of snow. 



BRITISH GENERAL ELECTIONS OF 1910. 



Following the formal dissolution of the second 
parliament of King Edward VII., Jan. 10, 1910, . 
election writs were issued to every constituency. 
Voting began almost immediately and continued 
through the greater part of the month, but the 
bulk of the polling took place Jan. 15, 17, 18 and 
19. The campaign was an extremely hard-fought 
one, both of the leading parties exerting their ut- 
most power to win. It had been expected that 
the chief issues would be the budget of 1909, with 
Us radical methods of taxation, and the veto power 
of the house of lords in the matter of financial 
legislation, but tariff reform was widely discussed 
and at times seemed to be the dominant question 



of the hour. Home rule for Ireland, votes for 
women, naval and military progress, old-age pen- 
sions, work for the unemployed, socialism and 
many other matters alsoi attracted more or less at- 
tention. With such a multiplicity of issues before 
it the British electorate divided almost evenly and 
failed to pass decisively upon any one of them. 
The liberals elected 275 members and the unionists 
273. This left the liberal government in the power 
of the Irish nationalists, who secured eighty-two 
members, and the labor party, with forty members, 
and it was freely predicted that the ministry would 
soon fall, necessitating another general election. 



HOOKWORM-DISEASE COMMISSION. 



Oct. 26, M09. John D. Rockefeller gave $1,000,000 
as a fund to be used in combating the ravages of 
the "hookworm" parasite in the southern states. 
The following gentlemen were designated to take 
charge of tho work: John D. Rockefeller, Jr.; Dr. 
William H. Welch, Dr. Simon Flexner. Dr. Charles 
W. Stile, Dr. Edwin A. Alderman. Dr. David F. 
Houston. Prof. P. P. Claxton. J. Y. Joyner. Wal- 
ter H. Page, Dr. H. B. Frissell, Frederick T. 
Gates, Starr J. Murphy. 



According to the medical authorities the "hook- 
worm" is a halrlike parasite causing a form of 
anaemia prevalent especially among the poor people 
of the south. Although less than half an inch in 
length it operates on its victims' intestines in 
such a way as to sap their vitality. It has a 
complete and well -developed set of organs and the 
female has the capacity of laying thousands of 
eggs. The parasite was discovered by Dr. Charles 
W. Stile in 1902 in a Washington hospital. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



117 



RATES OF POSTAGE AND MONEY ORDERS. 



The domestic letter rate Is 2 cents an ounce or 
fraction thereof, and it applies to the island pos- 
sessions of the United States Cuba, Canada, New- 
foundland Labrador, united kingdom, Germany 
(direct), Mexico, Shanghai, the Canal Zone and 
republic of Panama. The foreign letter ruto is 
9 cents an ounce or fraction thereof, and it applies 
to all other foreign countries than those named In 
the universal postal union. 

DOMESTIC. 

FIRST CLASS. Letters and all written or partly 
written matter, whether sealed or unsealed, and 
all other matter sealed or otherwise closed against 
Inspection, 2 cents per ounce or fraction thereof. 
Postal cards issued by the government sold at 1 
cent each; double, or reply cards, 2 cents each. 
Cards must not be changed or mutilated in any 
way and no printing or writing other than the ad- 
dress is allowable on the address side. "Private 
mailing cards" (post cards) require 1 cent postage. 

Among the articles requiring first-class postage 
are blank forms filled out In writing; certificates, 
checks and receipts filled out In writing; copy 
(manuscript or typewritten) unaccompanied by 
proof sheets; plans and drawings containing 
written words, letters or figures; price lists con- 
taining written figures changing individual Items; 
old letters sent singly or in bulk; typewritten mat- 
ter and manifold copies thereof, and stenographic 
notes. 

SECOND CLASS. All regular newspapers, maga- 
zines and other periodicals Issued at stated Inter- 
vals not less frequently than four times a year, 
when mailed by' publishers or news agents, 1 cent 
a pound or fraction thereof; when mailed by 
others. 1 cent for each four ounces or fractional 
part thereof. 

THIRD CLASS. 'Books, circulars, pamphlets and 
other matter wholly In print (not Included in sec- 
ond-class matter), 1 cent fo* each two ounces or 
fractional part thereof. The following named ar- 
ticles are among those subject to third-class rate 
of postage: Almanacs, architectural designs, blue 
prints, bulbs, seeds, roots, scions and plants, cal- 
endars, cards, press clippings with name and date 
of papers stamped or written" in, engravings, sam- 
ples of grain in its natural condition, imitation of 
bend or type written matter when mailed at post- 
office window in a minimum number of twenty 



identical copies separately addressed; insurance ap- 
plications and other blank forms mainly in print; 
printed labels, lithographs, maps, music books, 



, 

photographs, tags, proof sheets, periodicals having 
the character of books, anj publications which de- 
pend for their circulation upon offers of premiums. 

FOURTH CLASS. All matter not In the first, sec- 
ond or third class, which is not in its form or 
nature liable to destroy, deface or otherwise dam- 
age the contents of the mailbag or harm the per- 
son of any one engaged in the postal service, 1 
cent an oanee or fraction thereof. Included in 
fourth-class mail matter are the following articles: 
Blank books, blank cards or paper, blotters, playing 
cards, celluloid, coin, crayon pictures, cut flowers, 
metal or wood cuts, drawings, dried fruit, dried 
plants, electrotype plates, framed engravings, en- 
velopes, geological specimens, letterheads, cloth 
maps, samples of merchandise, metals, minerals, 
napkins, oil paintings, paper bags or wrapping 
paper, photograph albums, printed matter on other 
material than paper, queen bees properly packed, 
stationery, tintypes, wall paper and wooden rulers 
bearing printed advertisements. 

UNMAILABLE MATTER. Includes that which Is pro- 
hibited by law, regulation or treaty stipulation and 
that which by reason of illegible or Insufficient ad- 
dress cannot be forwarded to destination. Among 
the articles prohibited are poisons, explosives or 
inflammable articles, articles exhaling bad odors. 
vinous, spirituous and malt liquors, specimens of 
disease germs, lottery -letters and circulars, In- 
decent and scurrilous matter. 

SPECIAL DELIVERY. Any article of mallable mat- 
ter bearing a 10-cent special delivery stamp In 
addition to the regular postage is entitled to Im- 
mediate delivery on its arrival at the office of ad- 
dress between the hours of 7 a. m. and 11 p. m., 
If the office be of the free-delivery class, and be- 



tween the hours of 7 a. m. and 7 p. m.. If the of- 
fice be other than a free-delivery office. 

REGISTRATION. All mailable matter may be reg- 
istered at the rate of 10 cents for each package in 
addition to the regular postage, which must be 
prepaid. An indemnity not to exceed $50 will be 
paid for the loss of first-class registered matter, 
and 50 francs ($10) in case of the loss of a regis- 
tered article addressed to a country in the uni- 
versal postal union, under certain conditions. 

LIMITS or WEIGHT. No package of third or 
fourth class matter weighing more than tour 
pounds, except single books, will be received for 
conveyance by mail. The limit of weight does not 
apply to second-class matter mailed at the second- 
class rate of postage, or at the rate of 1 cent for 
each four ounces, nor is it enforced against matter 
fully prepaid with postage stamps affixed at the 
first-class or letter rate of postage. 

POST CARDS. A post cai-d must be an unfolded 
piece of cardboard not exceeding 3 9-16 by 5 9-lfl 
inches, nor less than 24 by 4 inches in size; It 
must be in form and Quality and weight of paper 
substantially like the government postal cards: it 
may be of any color not interfering with the leg- 
ibility of the address; the face of the card may be 
divided by a vertical line, the right half to be used 
for the address only and the left for the message, 
etc. ; very thin sheets of paper may be attached to 
the card, and such sheets may bear both writing 
and printing; advertisements may appear on the 
back of the card and on the left half of the face. 
Cards bearing particles of glass, metal, mica, sand, 
tinsel or similar substances are unmailable except 
In envelopes. 

MONET-ORDER FEES. For domestic money orders 
In denominations of $100 or less the following fees 
are charged: 

For orders for sums not exceeding $2.50 8c 

For over $2.50 and not exceeding $5 Be 

For over $5 and not exceeding $10 8c 

For over $10 and not exce ?ding $20 lOc 

For over $20 and not exceadlng $30 12c 

For over $30 and not exceeding $40 15c 

For over $40 and not exceeding $50 18c 

For over $50 and not exceeding $60 20c 

For over $60 and not exceeding $75 25c 

For over $75 and not exceeding $100 SOc 

SUGGESTIONS. Direct your mail matter to a post- 
office, writing the name of the state plainly, and if 
to a city, add the street and number or postofflce 
box of the person addressed. Write or print your 
name and address, and the contents, if a package, 
upon the upper left-hand corner of all mall matter. 
This will Insure the immediate return of all first- 
class matter to you for correction, if improperly 
addressed or Insufficiently paid; and If it is not 
called for at destination It can be returned to yon 
without going to the dead-letter office. If a letter, 
it will be returned free. Undelivered second, third 
and fourth class matter will not be forwarded or 
returned without a new prepayment of postage. 
When a return card aipsars on this matter either 
the sender or addressee Is requested to send the 
postage. Register all valuable letters and packages. 

FOREIGN. 

Mail matter may be sent to any foreign country 
subject to the following rates and conditions: 

REGISTRATION. Ten cents additional to ordinary 
postage on all articles to foreign countries. 

ON LETTERS. Five cents for each ounce or frac- 
tion thereof and 3 cents for each additional ounce. 
Double rates are collected on delivery of unpaid 
or short-paid letters. 

POST CARDS. Single, 2 cents each; with paid r- 
ply. 4 cents each. 

"PRIVATE MAILING CAnns" (Post Cards). Two 
cents each, subject to conditions governing domes- 
tic post cards. 

On newspapers, books, pamphlets, photographs. 
sheet musle, maps, engravings and similar printed 
matter. 1 cent for each two ounces or fraction 
thereof. Prepayment required at least In part. 

To CANADA (including Newfoundland, Labrador, 
Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Prince 
Edward island). Letters, 2 cents for each onnce 
or fraction thereof; postal cards, 1 cent each; 



118 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



books, circulars and similar printed matter, 1 cent 
for each two ounces or fraction thereof; second- 
class matter, same as in the United States; sam- 
ples of merchandise, 1 cent for each two ounces. 
Minimum postage, 2 cents. Merchandise, 1 cent 
for each ounce or fraction. Packages must not 
exceed four pounds in weight prepayment com- 
pulsory. 

CUBA. Rates of postage same as to the United 
States. 

To GREAT BRITAIN. Letter postage same as In 
United States. 

To GERMANY. Letter postage 2 cents per ounce 
when sent by direct steamer and not via Great 
Britain or France. 

To MEXICO. Letters, postal cards and printed 
matter, same rates as in the United States; sam- 
ples, 1 cent for each two ounces; 2 cents the least 
postage oc a single package; merchandise other 
than samples can be sent only by parcels post. 

To SHANGHAI, CHINA. Letters, 2 cents an ounce 
or fraction, thereof. 

LIMITS OF SIZE AND WEIGHT. Packages of sam- 
ples of merchandise to foreign countries must not 
exceed twelve ounces, nor measure more than 
twelve Inches In length, eight in breadth and four 
In depth; and packages of printed matter must 
not exceed four pounds six ounces. 

PARCEL POST EXCHANGES. 

Australia.* Danish West Indies (St. 

Austria.* Croix, St. John, St. 

Bahamas. Thomas). 

Barbados.* Denmark.* 

Belgium.* Dutch Guiana.* 

Bermuda. Ecuador.* 

Bolivia. France.* 

British Guiana. Great Britain.* 

Chile. Guatemala. 

Colombia.* Germany. 

Costa Rica. Honduras (British). 

Honduras (Republic of), 

Hongkong* Amoy, Canton, Cbangsha, Chefoo, Ching- 
Kiang, Foochow, Hangchow, Hankow, Hoiliao 
(Hoihow), Kiankiang, Kowloon. Liu Kung Tau, 
Nanking, Newchvang, Ningpo, Peking, Shanghai. 
Shanghaikwan. Shasi. Soochow, Swatow. Tientsin, 
Tongku, Weihaiwei, Wubu. 

Hungary.* Italy.* 

Ireland.* 

1. Italian offices in Ottoman empire (Turkey)* 
Bengazi (north Africa), Durazzo (Albania), Galata 
(Constantinople), Jerusalem (Palestine), Canea 
(Crete), Pera (Constantinople), Salonica (Rou- 
melia), Scutari (Asia Minor), Smyrna (Asia Min- 
or), Stamboul (Constantinople), Tripoli-in-Bar- 
bary, Valona (Albania). 

2. Italian colony of Erythrea (Africa)* Ady Caje, 
Adi Ugri, Agordat, Asmara, Assab, Keren, Ne- 

fasit. Mas?aua, Saganeiti. 

3. Italian protectorate of Benadir Brava, Giumbo, 
Merka. Mogadiscio. 

Japan.* 

In Manchuria Antoken. Bujun, Choshun. Dairen, 
Duisekklio, Daitoko, Furanten, Gaibei, Giukatpn, 
Gwaboten, Hishika. Honkeiko. Hoten, Howojio, 
Kaigen, Kaijio, Kinshu, Koshurei, Riojun, Riu- 
juton, Rioyo, Senkinsai, Shiheigai. Shinminfu, 
Shoto, Sokako, Sokaton, Taikozan, Tetsurei, Yen- 
dai, Yugafcujio. 

In Karafuto (Japanese) Sakhalin. 

Formosa.* I Korea.* 

Jamaica (including the Turks and Calco Islands). 

Leeward islands (Antigua), with Barbuda and Re- 
donda, St. Kitts, Nevis, with Anquilla, Dominica, 
Montserrat and the Virgin Islands). 

Mexico.* I Newfoundland. 

Netherlands.* I New Zealand. 

The Cook islands, including Altntaki, Atln, Hervey 
(Manual), Mangaia. Mauke, Mitiaro and Raroton- 
ga; also the islands of Palmerston (Avarau), Man- 
ahik, Penrhyn (Tongreva), Pukapuka (Danger), 
Rakaanga, Savage (Nlde) and Suwarrow. 

Nicaragua. Sweden. 

Norway.* Trinidad. 

Peru. Uruguay.* 

Salvador. Venezuela. 

Windward Islands (Grenada, St. Vincent, Grena- 
dines and St. Lucia). 
Unsealed packages of mallable merchandise may 



be sent to above named places subject to the con- 
ditions herein prescribed, viz. : 

Limit of weight 11 pounds 

Greatest length 3 feet 6 inches 

Greatest length and girth combined 6 feet 

Postage 12 cents a pound or fraction 

Except that parcels for Colombia and Mexico 
must not measure more than two (2) feet in length 
or more than four (4) feet in girth, and that par- 
cels for France must not weigh in excess of four 
(4) pounds and six (6) ounces. Also that parcels 
for Australia, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, For- 
mosa. Hongkong, Hungary, Italy (Italian offices in 
Turkey and Africa), Japan, Korea, Netherlands, 
Norway and Sweden must not exceed $80 in value, 
und that parcels for Ecuador and France must not 
exceed $50 in value. 

Uruguay will admit parcels for certain towns 
only; particulars at postoffico. 

When packages of merchandise intended for Mex- 
ico do not exceed four (4) pounds in weight, they 
may be sent under the same conditions applicable 
to packages of merchandise in the domestic mails 
1 cent for each ounce or fraction thereof, fully 
prepaid. 

Parcel-post packages for Barbados, Dutch Gui- 
ana, France, Great Britain, Ireland, Netherlands 
and Uruguay cannot be registered. 

A parcel when sent as parcel post must not be 
posted in a letter box, but must be taken to the 
foreign branch, general postofflce, or any postal 
station, and presented to the person in charge, be- 
tween the hours of 9 a. m. and 5 p. m., where a 
declaration of contents must be made, a record 
kept and a receipt given for the parcel. Packages 
for Dutch Guiana, France (special form), Nether- 
lands, Salvador and Uruguay require two declara- 
tions, and Venezuela three. 

INTERNATIONAL MONEY ORDERS. 
International money orders are issued payable In 
Africa, Algeria, Apia (Samoa), Arabia, Argentine 
Republic, Australia, Austria, Azores, Belgium, 
Beloochistan, Beirut, Bolivia, Borneo. Bosnia, 
British Bechuanaland, British Central Africa, Brit- 
ish East Africa, Bulgaria, Cape Colony, Caroline 
Islands, Cayman Islands, Ceylon, Chile, China, 
Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Crete, Cyprus, Danish 
West Indies, Denmark, Dutch East Indies, Egypt, 
Falkland Islands, Faroe Islands, Fiji Islands, Fin- 
land, Formosa, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Great 
Britain and Ireland, Heligoland, Herzegovina, Hol- 
land, Honduras, Hongkong, Hungary, Iceland, 
India, Italy, Jaffa, Japan, Jask (Persia), Java, 
Jerusalem, Kongo, Korea, Liberia, Luxemburg, 
Madeira, Malacca, Malta, Manchuria, Mauritius, 
Mexico, Monaco, Montenegro, Morocco, Mukho (Ko- 
rea), Netherlands, New Guinea, New South Wales, 
New Zealand, North Borneo, Northern Nigeria, 
Norway, Orange River Colony, Palestine, Panama, 
Peurhyn Island, Persia, Peru, Pescadores Islands, 
Portugal. Queensland, Rhodes, Rhodesia, Roumania, 
Russia, Sakhalin (Japanese), St. Helena, Salvador, 
Samos Island. San Marino, Savage Island, Servia, 
Seycheile Islands, Siam, South Australia. Spice 
Islands, Straits Settlements, Sumatra, Sweden, 
Switzerland. Tasmania, Tobago. Transvaal, Tripoli, 
Tunis, Turkey, Turks Island, Victoria, Wales, West- 
ern Australia, Zambesia, Zanzibar and Zululand 
(South Africa). 

Rates of fees for money orders payable In 
Apia, Austria, Belgium, Bolivia, Chile, Costa 
Rica, Denmark, Egypt, Germany, Hongkong, Hun- 
gary, Japan, Liberia, Luxemburg, Mexico, Nether- 
lands, New Zealand, Norway, Orange River Col- 
ony, Pern, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, Trans- 
vaal: 

Orders for $10 or less $0.08 

Over $10 and not exceeding $20 10 

Over $20 and not exceeding $30 15 

Over $30 and not exceeding $40 to 

Over $40 and not exceeding $50 K 

Over $50 and not exceeding $60 M 

Over $60 and not exceeding $70 J6 

Over $70 and not exceeding $80 40 

Over $80 and not exceeding $90 45 

Over $90 and not exceeding $100 50 

Fees collected on all other International money 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1611. 



119 



orders (see exceptions under head or domestic mon- 
ey order rates): 

Not exceeding $10.. $0.10 Not exceeding $60.. $0.60 
Not exceeding $20.. .20 Not exceeding $70.. .70 
Not exceeding $30.. .30 Not exceeding $80.. .SO 
Not exceeding $40.. .40 Not exceeding $90.. .90 
Not exceeding $50.. .BO Not exceeding $100. 1.90 

The maximum amount for which a single Inter- 
national money order may be drawn is. for orders 
payable In 
United Kingdom of Great Britain 

and Ireland 20 10s 8d=$100 

Cape Colony 20 10s 8d= 100 

New Zealand 20 10s 8d= 100 

Queensland 20 10s 8d= 100 

France, Algeria and Tunis Francs 515= 100 

Belgium Francs 515= 100 

Switzerland Francs 515= 100 

Italy Lire 515= 100 

Portugal Milreis 92 reis 590= 100 

Tiiu Netherlands Florins 246.91= 100 

Germany Marks 418.41= 100 

Sweden Kroner 371.75=100 

Norway Kroner 371.75= 100 

Denmark Kroner 371.75= 100 

Japan 100 

Honduras 100 



New South Wales 20 10s 8d= 100 

Victoria 20 10s 8d= 100 

Tasmania 20 10s 8d= 100 

Austria Crowns 490.20=> 100 

Hungary Crowns 490.20= 100 

South Australia 20 10s 8d= 100 

Luxemburg, Grand Duchy of Francs 515= 100 

Salvador 100 

Hongkong 100 

Kgypt 100 

Chile ~.. 100 

British Honduras 20 10s 8d= 100 

Mexico 100 

Russia 194 rubles 33 kopecks= 100 

Apia .418.41 marks= 100 

Greece Francs 515= 100 

Bolivia 100 

Costa Rica 100 

Liberia 100 

Transvaal 100 



Peru 



100 



The value of the British pound sterling In United 
States money is fixed by convention at $4.87; the 
German mark at 23.9 cents; French and Swiss 
franc and Italian lire at 19.42 cents; Swedish and 
Norwegian kroner at 27 cents; Netherland florin 
at 40% cents: Portugal milrels at $1.09; Russian 
ruble at 61.46 cents. 



AMERICAN INHERITANCE TAX LAWS. 



Collateral. Direct. 

Rates. Rates. Exemp- 

State. Per cent. Exemption. Per cent.tion. 

Arkansas 5 

California 1%-16 $500-$2,000 1-3 $4,000 

Colorado 3-6 500 2 10,000 

Connecticut 3 10,000 1-2 10,000 

Delaware 2 6 500 

Idaho 1%-15 600-2,000 1-3 4,000 

Illinois 2-6 500-2,000 1 20,000 

Iowa 5 1,000 

Kentucky 5 500 

Louisiana 8 6 2 10,000 

Maine 4 500 

Maryland 2% 500 

Massachusetts 3-5 1,000 1-2 10,000 

Michigan 5 100 4 1 2,000 

Minnesota l%-5 10,000 l%-5 10,000 

Missouri 5 

Montana 5 500 1 7,500 

Nebraska 2-6 500-2,000 1 10,000 

New Hampshire 6 

New Jersey 5 500 

New York 5 500 1 10,000 

North Carolina 1%-15 2,000 3-4 2,000 

North Dakota 2 25.000 

Ohio 5 $200 

Oregon 2-6 600-2,000 1 ">$5,000 

Pennsylvania 5 250 

South Dakota 2-10 100-500 1 6,000 

Tennessee 5 250 

Texas 2-12 500-2,000 

Utah 5 10,000 S 10,000 

Vermont 6 

Virginia 6 

Washington 3-12 1 10,000 

West Virginia 3-7% 1 20,000 

Wisconsin 1%-15 100-500 1-3 ^,000 

Wyoming 5 500 2 "10,000 

'Widows and (except In Wisconsin) minor chil- 
dren taxable only on the excess above $10,000 re- 
ceived by each. "Tax payable only by strangers in 
blood. 'Tax not payable when the property bore 
Its just proportion of taxes prior to the owner's 
death. 4 Applies to personal property only. "De- 
cedents' estates of less than $10,000 are also ex- 



empt. 'For the surviving husband or wife and 
children, if residents of Wyoming, $25,000. 

INHERITANCE TAX IN ILLINOIS. 

The Illinois law taxing gifts, legacies and Inheri- 
tances was passed by the legislature in 1895 and 
amended in 1901. Its constitutionality was con- 
tested, but the United States Supreme court in a 
decision rendered Jan. 19, 1903, held it to be valid. 

Under the provisions of this law all property, 
real, personal and mixed, which shall pass by will 
or by the intestate laws of the state from any 
resident of the state or any one whose property Is 
in this state to any person or persons is subject 
to a tax at the following rates : When the bene- 
ficial interests to any property or Income therefrom 
shall pass to any father, mother, husband, wife, 
child, brother, sister, wife or widow of the son or 
the husband of the daughter, or any adopted child 
or children, or to any lineal descendant born In 
lawful wedlock, the rate of tax shall be $1 on 
every $100 of the clear market value of such prop- 
erty received by each person and at the same rate 
for any less amount, provided that any estate which 
may be valued at less than $20,000 shall not be 
subject to any such tax ; and the tax is to be 
levied in the above cases only upon the excess of 
$20,000 received by each person. 

When the property passes to any uncle, aunt, 
niece, nephew or any lineal descendant of the 
same the rate shall be $2 on every $100 in excess 
of $2,000. 

In all other cases the rate shall be as follows: 
On each and every $100 of the clear market value 
of all property and at the same rate for any less 
amount; on all estates of $10,000 and less, $3; on 
all estates of over $10,000 and not exceeding $20,000, 
$4; on all estates over $20,000 and not exceeding 
$50,000, $5, and all estates over $50,000, $6; pro- 
vided, that an estate in the above case which may 
be valued at a less sum than $500 shall not be sub- 
ject to any tax. 

The total amount of inheritance taxes received 
by the state from Oct. 1, 1906, to Sept. 30, 1908, 
inclusive, was $782,743.49, of which Cook county 
paid $583,892.13. 



DALAI LAMA OF TIBET DEPOSED BY CHINA. 



Feb. 25. 1910, the Chinese foreign office issued a 
statement announcing that tup ijovernment hart 
deposed the dalal 'lama as head of the Tibetan 
government because he t'ad deserted his capital, 
Lassa, following an attempt by him to organize a 
general revolt. It was allei?ed that he had cir- 
culated rumors to the effect that China intended 
to exterminate lainaism and that British trade was 
Injuring Tibet. For this reason China sent 2,001 



soldiers to Lassa to preserve the peace and af- 
ford protection. The dalal lama secretly left 
Lassa Feb. 12 with his followers, whereupon China 
ordered the Tibetans to elect his successor. At 
the same time it issued a decree ordering the pro- 
tection of lamaisrr and the strict observance of 
treaties with foreign countries. The dalai lama 
fied to India after narrowly escaping capture by 
the Chinese. 



120 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



NATIONAL RAILWAY AND POSTAL STATISTICS. 
[From report prepared by bureau of statistics.] 



COUNTHV. 


ij 

1 

OJ 
(H 


Rail- 
ways. 


Post- 
offices. 


Printed 
matter 

sent.f 


Letters 
and cards 
sent. 


Val. domes- 
tic money 
and postal 
orders sent. 


Value for- 
eign mon- 
ey orders 
sent. 


Argentina 


1908 

i>.m 

I'.KIS 
I'M IS 


Miles. 
15,476 
16,213 
2,703 


No. 
2.527 
7.558 
2,075 
9.513 
5.618 
1,459 
198 
3,246 
2,068 
12,479 
73 


Number. 

245.129,775 
117,457,308 
38,191,858 
161,267,374 
88,870.311 
406,183,681 


Number. 
314,109,678 
311.034.408 
85,537,836 
1,0*1.594,128 
420,955.544 
272,894,944 


918,661,600 
126.023,233 
3a.022.960 
1.467,475.828 
1.068.218.784 
295,741,962 


$1,278.577 
41,223.131 
9.671,508 
306.617,897 
268.388,796 
37,991,060 




New Zealand 


Austria 


Hungary 


1'KIT 




Belgium 


I'.KIS 
UK IT 
1'JOS 
1908 
1908 
1'KIS 


2.913 
10.', 74 
11,940 
995 
22,966 


Bolivia 


Brazil .... 


197,505.000 
18.291.166 
79,541,000 


211,786,666 
27,793.558 
479,670,000 


7,420.241 
25.922,653 
36,577,552 


85,634 

11,004,606 
16,050,218 


Bulgaria 


Canada 






1908 




268 
80 
942 
3.493 
448 
447 
1,488 
81 
1,388 
12.827 
628 
384 
299 
551 
49,838 
156 
852 
66 
18.075 
9,652 
7,261 












r>" 












Chile 


I'.XIT 
1900 

r.MiT 

1908 
I'.KIS 
littS 
I90H 
1908 
I'.XIT 
1908 
I'.KIS 
1907 
I'.KIS 
1908 
1908 
1906 
I'.KIS 
I'.KIS 
I'.KIS 
1908 
11)08 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1908 
19US 

I'.HI; 

1908 
1908 

I'.KH; 

I'.KIS 
I'.KIS 

I 1 .**; 

1908 
I DOS 
1908 
19(18 
1908 
I'.KIS 
I'.KIS 

1908 
I'.KIS 
1908 
1908 
I'.KIS 
1908 

r.ir.' 

I'.KI- 
1908 
I'.KKi 


3.290 
3,746 
449 
2,330 
2,141 
324 
:;,503 
29.716 
2,000 
575 
1,084 
1,553 
36,680 
1,701 
771 
140 
30.576 
10,388 
4.898 
271 
459 
688 
818 
i4,857 
1,912 
3,223 
65 
1.607 
153 
34 
1.471 
1.690 
6(6 
1,995 
41,136 
2,057 
150 
379 
550 
9.227 
8,321 
2,763 
973 
23,205 
12.508 
234,011 
292 
200 
1,447 
637 
612.978 


3,003.868 
26,401,031 


37.671,713 
47.637,387 


17,1,60,965 
2,578,000 


1,311,382 


China 


Colombia 




Cuba .... 






3.819.213 
152,715,703 


1,153,069 
14,669,940 


Denmark 


141,298,746 


125.011,918 


Ecuador 


Egypt 


16,220,600 
1,536,790,063 
20.713,503 
6,911,224 
1.509.506 
949.203 
3,295,597,366 

" "li',399,566 
157,245 
89,549.949 
567,516,249 
195,255,976 


33,368.000 
1.819,877,091 

21.982,277 
16.832.934. 
9,008,707 
4,378,607 
4,040,617,077 

""15.285,693 
554,853 
691.979.673 
375.559,509 
1,173,232,475 


106.220,160 
2,197,699,642 

328,957.087 
21,193,210 
55,949 
76,664 
15,657,397, 164 
81.219,437 
16,212,387 


21,244,032 

84,712.863 
2.460,466 
12,780,462 
3,715,410 
10,162,505 
242,777,098 

""l,877,i92 


France 


Algeria 


Tunis 


Indo-China 


Colonies. N. E. S.* 


German empire 


Colonies 


Greece 


Haiti 


India, British 


567,824.725 
2,949,892,008 
15,529 


12,179,538 
53.814,671 
1,459,494 


Italy 


Japan 


Formosa 


Kongo 


50 
486 
116 
2,934 
1,445 
1,620 
17 
3,099 
221 
144 
416 
3,682 
402 
3,280 
13,983 
1,704 
81 
1,450 
113 
4,577 
3.U47 
4,098 
1.312 
23,738 
2.578 
60.144 
540 


52,598 
2,707,198 
5,234,947 
72,085,345 
239,120,237 
12,234,(H3 
181,383 
88,428,118 


411,363 
12.436,320 
12,165,380 
88,868.760 
207,707,991 
17,749,028 
398,518 
60.915.990 
6,455,823 


109.703 


305,131 




Luxemburg .. 


25,952,964 
136,898,830 

154.217.W4 
17,969,562 
Ml 7,999 
47,619,316 


38,816,422 
8,404,478 
15.941,954 
3,594,943 
1,014.947 
8,214,455 


Mexico 


Netherlands . .. 


East Indies 


West Indies, etc 


Norway 


Paraguay 


Persia 










Peru , 










Portugal 


37,083,249 

885,198 
71.541.631 
603.ltti.617 
55,144.919 
227,222 
9,715,154 


54,728.054 
4,901.993 
60.335,162 
909,083,350 
29,999.825 
177,445 
15,853,090 
8.887.952 


54,752,375 
1,445,972 
51.476,468 
6,643,462.276 
3,216,930 


2,069,008 
2,880,609 
31.676,4(3 
60,702,384 
1,565,362 


Colonies 


Roumania 


Russia 


Finland 




Servia 


31,414,422 


2,767,483 


giam 


Spain 


136.538.442 
186,488.720 
227,012,343 

4.069,777 
1,165.500.000 
18,272,872 
5,936,301,609 


158.763.730 
157,128.887 
252,211.515 
25,665,220 
3,767,400,000 
102,821,344 
7,947,130,717 






Sweden 


215,785.045 

737.006,298 
54.768,470 
405,747.202 
14,677,402 
491.074,844 
3,645,123 


15.295,809 

65,520,313 
2,184.320 
11.560.352 
55,402,490 
76,754,803 


Switzerland 


Turkey 


United kingdom 


Colonies, N. E. S.* 


United States 


Philippines 


Porto Rico 








Uruguay 


800 
230 
293,301 










Venezuela 
Total 


591,582 
16,028.471.303 


469,543 
25.035.355,933 


34,734,378,598 


1,556,257.221 



Not elsewhere specified, tlncluding newspapers and periodicals. 



State. 
California 


Number.M 
107 


BUILDING AND LO 

embership. Assets. 
31,142 $19,635,667 
2,891 1,898,830 
108,734 54,313,466 
120,078 34.131,416 
15,300 4,390,443 
33,629 8,908,118 
27,363 11,523,654 
9,429 3,869,142 
120,575 51,339,903 
39,182 15,056,493 
11,022 4,559,027 
21,698 9,300,661 
42.683 13.415.822 


AN ASSOCIATIONS. 
State. Number.! 


Membership 
7,250 
157,364 
121,711 
26,276 
2,600 
327,662 
389,446 
5,215 
11,230 
12,515 
314,594 


. Assets. 
1,978,127 
73,697,889 
46,994,128 
6,021,421 
1,497,822 
139,340,424 
158,510,745 
2,728,303 
4,113,884 
4,730,694 
125,042,740 


Connecticut 


13 




. .. 324 


Illinois 


617 


New York 


255 


Indiana 


342 




87 


Iowa 


48 


North Dakota . . 


. . 9 


Kansas 


68 


Ohio 


645 




63 




1 423 




35 




15 




137 


West Virginia.. 


. . 38 


Michigan 


58 


Wisconsin 


60 




67 




1 015 




123 


Total . 




Nebraska .. 


. 68 


...5.629 


1.959.579 


796.998.819 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



121 



JForetgn obernments. 



Kulers and cabinets of the leading countries, with the latest statistics of their area, population, exports 
and imports. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

heir-apparent, 



GOVERNMENT King, George V. ; 
Edvrard Albert, priiice of Wales. 

Prime Minister and First Lord of the Treasury 
*H. H. Asquith. 

Lord Chancellor *Lord Loreburn. 

Lord President of the Council 

Chancellor of Exchequer *David Lloyd-George. 

Home Secretary 'Winston Spencer Churchill. 

Foreign Secretary *Sir Edward Grey. 

Colonial Secretary and Lord Privy Seal *Earl of 
Crewe. 

Secretary for War *R. B. Haldane. 

Secretary for India *Viscount Morley. 

First Lord of Admiralty 'Reginald McKenna. 

Secretary for Ireland ''Augustine Birrell. 

Secretary for Scotland *Lord Pentlan (John Sin- 
clair). 

President of the Board of Trade 'Sydney C. 
Buxton. 

President of the Local Government Board *Jolm 
Burns. 

President of the Board of Agriculture * Earl Car- 
rington. 

President of the Board of Education Walter 
Runciman. 

Postmaster-General 'Herbert Louis Samuel. 

Lord Lieutenant of Ireland Lord Aberdeen. 

Chancellor of the Duchy 'Joseph A. Pease. 

Lord Advocate A. Ure. 

First Commissioner of Works *Lewis Harcourt. 

Attorney-GeneralSir W. S. Robsou. 

Solicitor-General Sir R. D. Isaacs. 

Solicitor-General for Scotland Arthur Dewar. 

Attorney-General for Ireland Redmond Barry. 

Solicitor-General for Ireland^Charles A. O'Connor. 

'Members of the cabinet. 

The British parliament, in which the highest leg- 
islative authority is vested, consists of the house 
of lords and the house of commons. The former In 
1909 had 618 members and the latter 670. The 
sessions usually last from February to August. 

AREA AND POPULATION The total area of Eng- 
land, Scotland. Ireland, Wales, the Isle of Man 
and the Channel islands is 121,390 square miles: 
the total for the British empire is 11,467,294 
square miles. The total population of the empire in 
1901 was 383,165,494. The population of the united 
kingdom April 1. 1901. when the last census was 
taken, was: England and Wales, 32,527,843; Scot- 
land. 4,472.103: Ireland, 4.458,775; -Isle of Man, 
54.752; Channel Islands. 95,618. Total, 41,976,827. 

The cities of England and Wales bavins more 
than 100,000 population each were In 1909: 



London 4,833,938 

Liverpool 760,351 

Manchester 655, 43b 

Birmingham .... 563,629 

Leeds 484.012 

Sheffield 470,958 

Bristol 377,642 

West Ham 321,767 

Bradford 293,983 

Newcastle 281,584 

Kingston-upon- 

Hull 275,552 

Nottingham 263,443 

Leicester 244,255 

Salford 241,960 

Portsmouth 214,726 

Cardiff 195,303 

Bolton 187,824 



Croydon 161,078 

Sunderland 159,378 

Oldham 143,301 

Blackburn 136,959 

Brighton 130,926 

Gateshead 131,024 

Derby ..' 129,411 

Southampton ... 124,667 

Plymouth 124.1SO 

Norwich 124,136 

Birkenhead 121,123 

Preston 118,519 

Halifax 111,911 

Burnley 106,267 

Middlesbrough .. 105,255 

Wolverhampton... 104.633 

Stockport 103,706 

South Shields... 117,627 



The figures given in the above table for London 
are for the inner or registration district alono. 
Including the outer belt of suburban towns, which 
are within the metropolitan police district, the 
population of "Greater London" on the 31st of 
March, 1901, was 6.581,372; estimate in July, 
1909. 7.429.740. 

Population of the chief cities in Scotland in 1909: 

Glasgow 872.021 I Dundee 169,409 

Edinburgh 355.366 I Paisley 91,930 

Aberdeen 181, dl8 I Leltb 85,721 



34,161 



Greenock .......... 72,300 i KUiaarnock 

Perth .............. 36,9061 

The total population of Ireland in 1901 wai 
4,458,775, against a total of 4,704,750 In 1891. 
showing a decrease of 245,675, or 5.2 per cent. The 
decrease in each of the four provinces was: Lein- 
ster, 41,297; Munster, 98.568; Ulster. 38,463; Con- 
naught, 69,87(5. 

Population of the chief cities of Ireland In 1901: 



Drogheda ....... 12,765 

Newry .......... 12.587 

Lurgan ......... 11.777 

Lisburn ......... 11,450 

Wexford ........ 11,154 

Sligo .......... 10,862 

Kilkenny ....... 10,493 



Dublin 379,801 

Belfast 348,870 

Cork 99,603 

Limerick 45,806 

Londonderry 39,873 

Waterford 27,947 

Gal way 13.414 

Dundalk 13.067 

The Dublin figures are for the metropolitan po- 
lice district. Belfast and Londonderry have in- 
creased in population in the last ten years at the 
rate of 27.8 and 20.1 per cent respectively. Dub- 
lin city shows an Increase of 7.6 per cent In the 
same period. 

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS The total exports of the 
British empire In 1909 were $4,688,682,000; of the 
united kingdom, $2,648,898,000; total imports of 
the empire. $5,264,731,900; or the united kingdom, 
$3,456.236,000. 

The total exports of the united kingdom to the 
United States in 1910 were $271,029,772; imports. 
$505,552.871. 

INDIA. 

GOVERNMENT Governor-general, Sir Charles Har- 
Oinge. Legislative authority vested in a coun- 
cil of sixty-eight members, thirty-six being official 
and thirty-two nonofficial. 

AREA AND POPULATION The total area of Brit- 
ish India is 1,097.901 square miles. The total pop- 
ulation according to the census of March 1, 1901, 
is 232,072,832, divided among the provinces as fol- 
lows: 



AJmer-Marwara 476,012 

Assam 30,961,459 

Bengal 50,722,067 

Berar 2,754,016 

Bombay presi- 
dency 18,559,561 

Burma 10,490,624 

Central prov- 
inces 9,237.654 



Population of the large cities: 



Coorg 180,607 

Madras 38,209,436 

Northwest 

province 2,125,480 

United prov- 
inces 47,691.782 

Punjab 20,330,339 

Baluchistan . . 308,246 
Andamans . . . 24,649 



Delhi 208,575 

Lahore 202,964 

Cawnpore 197,170 

Agra 188,022 

Ahmedabad . . . 185,889 

Mandalay 183,816 

Allahabad 172,032 



Calcutta 1,026,987 

Bombay 776,006 

Madras 509,346 

Haidarabad . . . 448,460 

Lucknow 264.049 

Rangoon 234,881 

Benares 209,331 

DOMINION OF CANADA. 

GOVERNMENT The Canadian parliament consists 
of 87 life senators and a house of commons of 221 
members, there being one representative for every 
25,367 of population, based upon the census of 
1001. The governor-general Is Earl Albert Henry 
George Grey, appointed In 1904, and the council 
Is made up of the following: Premier, Sir Wilfrid 
Laurier; secretary of state, Charles Murphy; minis- 
ter of trade and commerce, R. J. Cartwrlght; min- 
ister of justice, A. B. Aylesworth; marine and fish- 
eries. L. P. Brodeur: railways and canals. G. P. 
Graham: militia and defense. F. W. Borden; 
finance, 'W. S. Fielding; 'postmaster-general, Ro- 
dolphe Lemieux; labor, W. L. M. King; agricul- 
ture, S. A. Fisher; interior, Frank Oliver; public 
works, William Pugsley; customs, William Pater- 
son; inland revenue, W. Templeman. The govern- 
or-general gets a salary of $50,000 a year, the 
premier $12,000 and the other -ministers $7,000 
each. 

AREA AND POPULATION The total area of Can- 
ada is 3,745,574 square miles, of which 3.619.818 
is land area. Estimated iwpulatlon In Maroh, 
1910, 7,489,781. According to the fourth census, 



122 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



taken March 31, 1901, the total population then 
was 5,371,315. following were the returns for the 
several provinces: 

Yukon 27.219 

72.841 



Ontario 2,182,917 



Alberta 



Quebec 1.648,898 

Nova Scotia 459,574 

New Brunswick 331.120 

Manitoba 255,211 

Brit. Columbia 178,657 
Prince Edward 

Island 103,259 

Population of the principal cities in 1901: 



Saskatchewan.. 

Keewatln 

Mackenzie . . . . 

Ungava 

Franklin 



91,460 
9,800 
5,216 
5,113 



Montreal 267.730 

Toronto 208,040 

Winnipeg (1906).. 90,234 

Quebec 68.S40 

Ottawa 59,928 

Hamilton 52,631 

Halifax 40,832 

St. John 40,711 

London 37.9S1 

Vancouver 26.133 

Victoria 20,816 



Kingston 17,961 

Brantford 16,631 

Hull 13,988 

Calgary 12,142 

Charlottetown.. . 12,080 

Sherbrooke 11,765 

Edmonton (1906). 11,534 

Valleyfleld 11.053 

Sydney 9,908 

Moncton 9,026 

Brandon 5,738 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The total value of the 
Imports for the year ended June 30, 1909, was 
$369,766,000; exports, $279,212,000; imports from the 
United States (1910), $215,990,021; exports to the 
United States, $95,128,310. 

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA. 

July 9. 1900, the British parliament passed an 
act empowering the six provinces of Australia to 
form a federal union and Jan. 1, 1901, the new 
commonwealth was proclaimed at Sydney, N. S. W. 
Its first^ parliament was opened May 9. 1901, by 
the prince of Wales (now George V.), heir-appar- 
ent to the British throne, acting for his father, 
King Edward VII. In 1903 Bombala, N. S. W., 
was chosen as the permanent capital. 

GOVERNMENT The federal parliament is made up 
of a senate of thirty-six members, six from each 
original state, and a house of representatives of 
seventy-five members, apportioned as follows: New 
South Wales, 27; Victoria, 22; Queensland. 9; 
South Australia, 7; Western Australia, 5; Tas- 
mania. 5. The king is represented by the gov- 
ernor-general. He and the council of seven minis- 
ters exercise the executive power. The governor- 
general is paid a salary of $50,000 a year. The 
governor-general is the earl of Dudley. The minis- 
ters are: Alfred Denkin, external affairs and prime 
minister; P. M. Glynn, attorney-general; G. W. 
Fuller, home affairs; Sir J. Forrest, treasurer; Sir 
R. W. Best, trada and customs; Joseph Cook, de- 
fense; Sir John Quick, postmaster-general. 

AREA AND POPULATION The commonwealth has 
a total area of 2,974,581 square miles, divided 
among the states as follows: New South Wales, 
310,372; Victoria. 87.884: Queensland. 670,500; 
South Australia, 903.690; Western Australia, 975,- 
920; Tasmania. 26,215. 

The total population of the commonwealth as 
enumerated March 31, 1901, was 3,773,801, divided 
among the states as follows: 



West. Australia 184,124 
Tasmania 172,475 



Total 3.771.715 



New So. Wales. 1,354.84 

Victoria 1,201.070 

Queensland 496.396 

South Australia 362.004 

The total population in December, 1908, was es- 
timated at 4,275, E06. 

The population of Melbourne in 1901 was 493,956; 
Sydney (1900). 451,000; Adelaide (1900), 160,691, and 
Wellington (1899). 47,862. 

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS The total exports of the 
states in the commonwealth In 1909 were $306.- 
187.000; total Imports, $248,761.000. Australia In 
1910 exported merchandise valued at $14.806,764 to 
the United States and imported merchandise worth 
$27,696,557. 

UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA. 

Sept. 29, 1909, the British parliament passed nn 
act empowering the four self-governing colonies 
of South Africa Cape of Good Hope. Natal, Trans- 
vaal and Orange Free State to form a federal 
government to be known as the Union of South 
Africa. This was proclaimed May 31, 1910, at Pre- 
toria, the scat of government, other services tak- 
ing place at Cape Town, the seat of the legisla- 
ture. 



The executive government is vested in the king, 
represented by a governor-general, and an execu- 
tive council and in ten ministers of state. Legisla- 
tive power is vested in a parliament consisting of 
a senate and a house of assembly. The senate con- 
tains forty-two members, eight of whom are nomi- 
nated by the governor-general in council and thir- 
ty-two elected by the four provinces, each of which 
is entitled to eight senators. The assembly con- 
sists of 121 members, chosen in electoral divisions 
as follows: The Cape of Good Hope, 61; Natal, 
17; Transvaal, 36; Orange Free State, 17. Sena- 
tors are elected for ten years and assemblymen for 
five. The English and Dutch languages are both 
official. 

Governor-GeneralLord Herbert John Gladstone. 
Cabinet: Premier and minister of agriculture, Gen. 
Louis Botha; interior, mines and mining, Mr. 
Smuts; railways, Mr. Sauer; justice, Gen. Hert- 
zog; education, Mr. Malan; finance, Mr. Hull; 
lands, Mr. Fischer; native affairs, Mr. Burton; 
commerce and industries, Mr. Moor; public works, 
posta and telegraphs, Mr. Graaf; without portfolio. 
Dr. Gubbins. 

Area in square miles and population: 

Province. Area. Population. 

Cape of Good Hope 276.995 2,409,804 

Natal 45,832 1,206.386 

Transvaal 110,426 1,057,275 

Orange Free state 50,392 387,315 

Total 483,645 5,040,780 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The total Imports of the 
four states in 1909 were valued at $211,541,000. and 
the exports at $410,336,600. Exports to the United 
States in 1910, $2,178,174; imports, $9,614,406. 

AUSTRIA-HUNGARY. 

GOVERNMENT Emperor of Austria and king of 
Hungary, Francis Joseph I.; heir-presumptive (his 
nephew, son of the late Archduke Charles Louis), 
the Archduke Francis Ferdinand of Este. 

Joint or common ministry: 

Foreign Affairs Baron von Aehrenthal. 

War Baron Franz Schoenaich. 

Finance Baron Stephan Burian von Rajeci. 

Cabinet for Austria: 

Premier Baron Bienerth. 

Interior Baron Hardtl. 

Commerce Dr. Weisklrchner. 

Finance Ritter von Bilinski. 

Railways Herr Wrha.' 

Instruction Count Stuergth. 

Agriculture Josef Pop (acting). 

Justice Herr Hochenburger. 

National Defense Marshal von Georgl. 

Labor Councilor Ritt. 

Polish Minister Ritter von Duleba. 

Czech Minister Dr. Zasckek. 

German Minister Dr. Schrelner. 

Cabinet for Hungary: 

Premier and Minister of Interior Count Charles 
Khuen-Hedervary. 

Finance Dr. Ladislas Lukacs. 

Defense Samuel Hazai. 

Worship and Justice Dr. Francis Z. Szekely. 

Commerce Charles Hieronymi. 

Agriculture "Count Adalbert Serenyi. 

Education Count Johann Zichy. 

Minister at Court Count Alada Zlchy. 

The empire of Austria and the kingdom of Hun- 
gary are sovereign states, eacli with its own con- 
stitution, legislative bodies and system of admin- 
istration, co-ordinate in rank and mutually inde- 
pendent within the domain of home affairs. For- 
eign representation (embassies and consulates), the 
army and navy, customs (Import and export du- 
ties), and the administration of the annexed prov- 
inces (Bosnia and Herzegovina) are, however, con- 
ducted in common. Legislation on matters nffect- 
Ing the interests of the dual monarchy as a whole 
Is intrusted to the delegations two bodies of sixty 
members each, chosen from among members of ttic 
two legislative chambers of Austria and Hungary 
respectively. 

AII-A AND POPULATION Area of Austria, 115.903 
square miles; of Hungary, 125.430 square miles. 
The population of Austria in IftOl was 26.ino.7ns. 
The. population of Hungary in 1D01 was 19,254.559. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



123 



Total population lor both countries in 1901 was 
45,-405,265. Largest cities of Austria: 



Vienna (1909) 2,085,888 



Prague (1909).. 



233,649 



Trieste (1909).... 221,993 



Lemberg 159,877 Czernowitz 

Gratz 138,080 

Largest cities of Hungary: 

Budapest 732,322 

Szeged 102,091 

Szabadka 82,12: 



Poszony 65,867 



Brunn 

Cracow (1909) . . 

Pilsen 



109,346 
109,103 
68,079 
67,622 



Hodmezo Vasarholy 60,883 

Keeskemet 57,812 

Arad 66,260 



Temesvar 53,033 



Zagrab 61,002 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The value of the imports 
into the Austro-Huugarian customs territory in 1909 
was $564,555,000; exporrs, $469,627,000. Chief im- 
ports are cotton, coal, wool, maize, tobacco, coffee 
mid wines; principal exports, lumber and wood 
manufactures, sugar, eggs, barley, lignite, malt, 
leather, gloves and shoes. Imports from the United 
States in 1910, $14,962,731; exports to United States, 
$17,408,910. 

BELGIUM. 

GOVERNMENT King, Albert I. Cabinet: 

Premier and Minister of Interior and Agriculture 
M. Schollaert. 

War Gen. Hallebaut. 

Foreign Affairs M. Davignon. 

Finances J. Liebaert. 

Justice M. Lantsheere. 

Railroads M. Helleputte. 

Industry and Labor M. A. Hubert. 

Public Works M. Delbeke. 

Instruction and Fine Arts Baron Descamps. 

AREA AND POPULATION Total area, 11,373 square 
miles. Total population Dec. 30, 1900, 6,603,533; es- 
timated population, 1908, 7,386,444. Population of 
the iargst cities Dec. 31, 1908: 

Brussels (capital). 637,807 1 Liege 175,870 

Antwerp 314,135 1 Ghent 163,763 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The imports in 1909 
amounted to $658, Hi, 000 and the exports to $501,- 
203,000. The trade with the United States in 1910 
was: Imports, $41,116,585; exports, $40,059,281. 
Chief imports an; cereals, textiles, and metal 
goods; chief exports cereals, raw textiles, tissues, 
iron, glass, bides, chemicals and machinery. 

BULGARIA 

GOVERNMENT-^ King, Ferdinand, duke of Saxe-Co- 
burg-Gotha. Legislation is enacted by the "so- 
branje," a single chamber of 157 members elected 
for five years. Bulgaria in 1908 declared itself in- 
dependent of Turkey, under the suzerainty of 
which country it had been an autonomous princi- 
pality. 

AREA AND POPULATION Area, 24,380 square miles. 
Population Dec. J3, 1905, 4,035,623; in 1908, 4,158,409; 
population of Sofia, the capital, 100,000. 

IMPORTS AND KXPOHTS Exports in 1909, $21,- 
507,000; imports, $30,963,000. Exports to the United 
States in 1910, $385,667; imports, $128,111. The ex- 
ports ara mainly cereals and the imports textiles. 

DENMARK. 

GOVERNMENT King, Frederick VIII.; heir appar- 
ent. Prince Christian. Cabinet: 

Premier and Minister of Defense Klaus Berentsen. 

Foreign Affairs Count Ahlefeldt-Laurvigen. 

Home Affairs Jensen Svenderup. 

Agriculture Anders Nielsen. 

Instruction Jacob Appel. 

Commerce O. B. Muus. 

Finance Niels Neergaard. 

Justice Fritz Bulow. 

Legislative authority is vested in the landsthlng 
and folkething. The former, which is the upper 
house, has 66 members, twelve of whom are ap- 
pointed for life, the remainder being elected for 
terms of eight years. The folkething, or lower 
house, has 114 members, each elected for three 
years. 

AREA AND POPULATION Denmark's area is 15,592 
square miles and total population in 1906, 2,605,- 
268. Copenhagen, the capital, has a population of 
426,540 (without suburbs). 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS Total exports in 1908, 



$171,373,000; Imports, $197,667,500. The imports from 
the Lnited States in 1910 were $13,644,903-, exports, 
$2,198,334. Leading articles of export are butter, 
pork, eggs and 'lard; of import, textiles, cereals, 
wood, iron manufactures and! coal. 

FRANCE. 

GOVERNMENT President. Clement Armand Fal- 
lieres; term expires 1913. 

Premier and Minister of the Interior Aristide 
Briand. 

Justice Theodore Girard. 

Foreign Affairs Stephen Pichon. 

Education Maurice Faure. 

Finance L. Klotz. 

War Gen. Brun. 

Marine Admiral Boue de la Peyrere. 

Public Works M. Puech. 

Commerce Jean Dupuy. 

Colonies M. Morel. 

Agriculture Maurice Raynaud. 

Labor Louis Lafferre. 

Legislative authority is vested in the chamber of 
deputies and the senate. The former has 584 mem- 
bers, each of whom is elected for four years. The 
senate has 300 members elected for nine years. 
The presidential term is seven years. 

AREA AND POPULATION France has a total area 
of 207,054 square miles. The area of the French 
colonies and dependencies throughout the world Is 
4,367,746 square miles. Total population (1907) of 
France proper, 39,961,945. Population of the prin- 
cipal cities in 1906: 



Paris 2,763,393 



Marseilles 



S17.498 



Lyons 472,114 



Bordeaux 



251,917 



Lille 205,602 



Toulouse 149,438 



146; 788 
134,232 

Nantes 133,247 

Havre 132,430 



St. Etlenne 

Nice 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The total imports In 1909 
amounted to $1,152,715,000; exports, $1,063,746,000. 
Kxports to the United States in 1910, $132,363,346; 
imports from, $117,627,466. The chief exports are 
textiles, wine, raw silk, wool, small wares and 
leather; imports, wine, raw wool, raw silk, timber 
and wood, leather, skins and linen. 

GERMANY. 

GOVERNMENT Emperor and king of Prussia, Wll- 
helm II.; heir-apparent, Prince Friedrlch Wilhelm. 
Cabinet officers: 

Imperial Chancellor Dr. Theobald von Bethmann- 
Hollweg. 

Foreign Affairs Baron Alfred von Kiderlen- 
Wa.'diter. 

Interior Herr Klcmens Dalbruck. 

Navy Admiral Alfred von Tirpitz. 

Justice Dr. Arnold Nieberding. 

Colonies Herr von Lindequist. 

Treasury Herr Adolph Wermuth. 

Postal Affairs Dr. Reinhold Kraetke. 

Commerce Herr Reinhold Sydow. 

President of Imperial Railway Administration 
Dr. Friedrich Schulz. 

The Prussian minister of war. Gen. Josias O. O. 
von Heeringen, while nominally having jurisdiction 
over Prussian army affairs only, represents the im- 
perial government in the reichstag in military 
matters and is, for all practical purposes, German 
secretary for war. Of the various independent 
states of Germany only the kingdoms of Prussia, 
Saxony. Bavaria and Wurttemberg have their own 
ministers of war. 

Legislative authority is vested in a bundesrath, 
or senate, of 58 members, and a reichstajr. or 
house, of 397 members. The latter are elected for 
five-year terms on a popular franchise and the 
senators are appointed from the state governments 
for each session. 

AREA AND POPULATION The area of the states 
in the empire is 208,780 square miles; area of de- 
pendencies about 1,027,820 square miles; grand to- 
tal. 1,2:56.600 square miles. 

The last federal census was taken Dec. 1, 1905. 
According to this the population of the empire was 
60,641,278. The estlmntod population of the for- 
eign dependencies is 12,686,000. State population 
in 1905: 



Prussia 37,293.321 

Bavaria 6,524.372 

Wurttemberg.. 2,302,179 



Baden 2,010,728 

Saxony 4,508,601 

Hesse 1,209.175 



124 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1011. 



Mecklenburg- 
Schwerin . . . 625,045 
Oldenburg . . . 438, 806 
Brunswick . . . 485,958 
Saxe- Weimar.. 388,005 
Mecklenburg- 
Strelitz 103,451 
Saxe-Meiningen 268,916 
Anhalt 328,029 


Schwarzburg- 
Sond 85,152 
Reuss, junior 
branch 144,584 


The leading exports are currants, ores, olive oil 
and figs; imports, foodstuffs, textiles, coal and 
timber. 

ITAIY. 

GOVERNMENT King, Victor Emmanuel III.; heir 
to the crown, his son Humbert, prince of Pied- 
mont, born Sept. 16, 1904. 
President of Council and Minister of the In- 
terior Luigi Luzzatti. 
Foreign AP'airs Marquis A. di San Giullano. 
Grace and Justice Sig. Fani. 
Treasury Sig. Tedesco. 
Finance Sig. Facta. 
Wt.r Sig. Spingardi. 
Marine Admiral Leonard! Cattolica. 
Public Instruction Sig. Credaro. 
Public Works Sig. Sacchi. 
Agriculture, Industry and Trade Sig. Raineri. 
Ports and Telegraph Sig. Ciuffelli. 
AREA AND POPULATION The area of Italy is 
110,646 square miles. According to the census of 
I'eb. 9, 1901, the total population was 32,475.253. 
Estimated total population in 1909, 34,270,000. Pop- 
ulation of the principal cities: 
Naples 563,731 Genoa 234,700 
Milan 491,460 Florence 205.589 
Rome 462.783 Bologna . 152000 


Schautnburg- 
Lippe 44,992 


Reuss, elder 
branch 70.603 


Hamburg 874,878 
Lubeck 105,857 


Saxe-Coburg- 
Gotha 242,432 
Saxe-Altenburg 101,412 
Ldppe 145 577 


Bremen 263,440 
Waldeck 59,127 


Alsace-Lor. .. 1,814,564 


Schwarzburg- 
Rud 96,835 


Total 60,641,278 

nore than 150,000 inhab- 
le following: 

Essen . . 231,360 


German cities having i 
Hants in 1905 included tl 

Berlin . ...2,040,148 


Hamburg . . 802 793 


Stettin 224.119 


Munich 538,983 
Dresden 516,996 


Konigsberg . . . 223.770 
Bremen 214,861 


Leipzig 503,672 


Duisburg 192,346 


Breslau 470,904 


Dortmund 175.577 
Halle-on-Saul... 169.916 
Altona 168,320 


Cologne 428 722 


Frankfort a. M. 334,978 
Nurnberg 294,426 


Strassburg .... 167,678 
Kiel 163,772 


Dusseldorf 253.274 


Hanover 250,024 
Stuttgart 249,286 


Elberfeld 162.853 
Mannheim 163,603 
Danzig 159.648 
Barmen 156,080 


Turin 335,639 Venice 151,840 
Palermo .310,352 Messina 149,773 
IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The value of merchandisb 
exported in 1909 was $363,559,000; imported, $594,- 
269,000. The total value of the exports to the 
United States in 1910 'was $49,86S,?C7; imports 
from the United States, $53,467,053. Chief imports 
are coal, cotton, grain, silk, wool, timber, machin- 
ery, sugar and oil; chief exports, silk, wine, oil, 
coral, sulphur, hemp and iiax. 


Chemnitz 244,927 
Magdeburg 240,633 
Charlottenburg.. 239,559 
BXPOBTS AND IMPORTS- 
690,031,000; total imports, 
During the fiscal year 
many exported $168,806,23 
to the United States ai 
valued at $243,555,926. 


Rixdorf 153,513 


-Total exports (1909), $1,- 
$1,954,839,000. 
ended June 30, 1910, Ger- 
7 worth of merchandise 
id imported merchandise 



SOVEREIGNS OF STATES. 

Anhalt Duke. Friedrich. 

Baden Grand duke, Friedrich II. 

Bavaria King. Otto; prince regent. Luitpold. 

Brunswick Regent, Duke Johann Albrecht. 

Hesse Grand duke. Ernst Ludwig. 

Lippe Count, Leopold IV. 

Mecklenburg-Schwerin Grand duke, Friedrich 
Franz IV. 

Mecklenburg-Strelitz Grand duke. Adolph Fried- 
rich. 

Oldenburg Grand duke. Friedrich August. 

Prussia King, Wilhelm II. 

Reuss. Elder Branch Prince, Heinrich XXIV. 

Reuss, Younger Branch Prince, Heinrich XIV. 

Saxe-Altenburg Duke, Ernst. 

Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Duke. Charles Edward. 

Saxe-Meiningen Duke, Georg II. 

Saxony (grand duchy) Grand duke, Wilhelm 
Ernst. 

Saxony King. Friedrich August III. 

Schaumburg-Lippe Prince. Georg. 

Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt Prince, Gunther. 

Waldeck Prince, Friedrich. 

Wurttemberg King, Wilhelm II. 

GREECE. 

GOVERNMENT King, George I. ; heir-apparent, 
Prince Constantine, duke of Sparta. Cabinet: 

President of the Council and Minister of 'Finance 
M. Dragoumis. 

Foreign M. Kallergls. 

Worship and Instruction M. Panagiotopoulos. 

Marine dipt. Miaoulis. 

Interior M. Mavromatis. 

Justice M. Phikioris. 

Wur Col. Zorbos. 

Legislative authority is vested in one chamber, 
the "boul?," consisting of 235 members, each of 
whom is elected for four years. 

AREA AND POPULATION Total area. 25,014 square 
miles. Population in 1907, 2.631.922 (estimated). 
Athens in 1907 had 167,479 inhabitants; Piraeus, 
73.579. and Pntras, 37,724. 

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS The total exports In 190S 
amounted in value to $21,850,000; imports, $30,- 
257,000. Exports to the United States in 1910, 
$2,643,005; imports from the United States, $429,670. 



MONTENEGRO. 
King, Nicholas I. Area, 3,630 square miles; pop- 
ulation, 250,000; of the capital, Cettinje, 4,500. 
Total exports in 1907, $280,000; imports, $1,305,000. 
Montenegro has practically no trsde with the 
United States. Chief exports are sumac, smoked 
sardines, cattle, sheep, goats, cheese, olive oil, 
wine and tobacco. Imports include petroleum, salt, 
maize, cottons, hardware, sugar, coffee and rice. 

KORWAY. 

GOVERNMENT King, Haakon VII. ; crown prince, 
Olaf. 

Premier and Finance Gunnar Knudsen. 

Foreign Affairs W. Christophersen. 

Justice J. Castberg. 

Public Works N. C. Ihlen. 

Commerce (Vacancy). 

Defense H. D. Lowzow. 

Agriculture H. K. H. Foosnes. 

Legislative authority is vested in the storthing, 
consisting of 123 members elected for three years 
through universal suffrage by men and women. The 
storthing consists of two houses, the odelsthiug 
and the lagthing. The former is made up of 
three-fourths of the members of the storthing and 
the latter of one-fourth. 

AREA AND POPULATION The total area of Nor- 
way is 124,445 square miles. Total population in 
December, 1908, 2,352,786. Christiania in 1900 had 
a population of 227,626 and Bergen 72,151. 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The value of the imports 
in 1909 was $95,747,000; exports, $60,936,000. Exports 
to the United States in 1910, $6,551,985; imports, 
$5,94S,330. The chief exports are timl>er and wood 
manufactures, malty food, paper and minerals; 
imports, breadstuffs, groceries, yarn, textiles, ves- 
sels and machinery. 

PORTUGAL. 

GOVERNMENT President, Theophilo Braga. Cabi- 
net: 

Foreign Affairs Dr. Bernardino Machado. 
Justice Dr. Alfonso Costa. 
Interior Dr. Antonio Jose d' Almeida. 
Public Works Dr. Antonio t. Goes 
Finance Bazilio Telles. 
War Col. Barreto. 
Marine Amaro A. Gomes. 
(See "Revolution in Portugal," this volume.) 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



125 



Legislative authority is vested in the cortes, 
which consists of a house of peers and a house of 
commons, the former having 155 members and the 
latter 148. 

AREA AND POPULATION Total area, including 
Azores and Madeira. 35,490 square miles. Area of 
possessions in Africa and Asia, 801,060 square 
miles. The population of the home country with 
the Azores and Madeira in 1900 was 5,428,659; of 
the colonies in Africa and Asia, 9,216,707. In the 
same year Lisbon had a population of 356,009 and 
Oporto 167,955. 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS Total imports in 1908 
$72,637,650; total exports, $30,559,277. Imports from 
the United States in 1910, $3,223,855; exports to 
the United States, $6,507,733. The chief imports 
are foodstuffs, cotton, sugar, fish, wool, leather, 
coal and coflee; chief exports, wine, sardines, cop- 
per ore, olives and figs. 



GOVERNMENT King, Carol I.; heir-apparent, 
Ferdinand, prince of Roumania. 

Legislative authority is vested in a senate of 
120 members and a chamber of deputies of 183 
members elected for four years. 

A.UKA AND POPULATION The total area is 50,720 
square miles. The population in 1899 was 5,956,690; 
estimated in 1908, 6,771,722. Population of the prin- 
cipal towns in December, 1899: Bucharest, 282,071; 
Jassy, 78,067; Galatz, 62,678; Braila, 58,392. 

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS The value of the exports 
in 1908 was $72,789,500; of the Imports, $82,813,000. 
The chief exports are cereals and the leading im- 
ports are textiles. Exports to the United States 
in 1910, $36,181; imports from, $479,364. 

RUSSIA. 

GOVERNMENT Czar. Nicholas II.; heir-apparent, 
Grand Duke Alexis. 

Premier and Minister of the Interior M. Stoly- 
pin. 

Foreign Affairs M. Iswolsky. 

Finance M, Kokovtseff. 

Instruction M. Schwartz. 

Imperial House and Domains Gen. W. Freede- 
ricksz. 

Justice M. Scheglovitoff. 

Agriculture M. Krivoshein. 

Oo.nmerce M. Tivasheff. 

Railways M. Rukhloff. 

Controller M. Kharitonoff. 

Procurator of the Holy Synod M. Lukianoff. 

War Gen. Sukhomlinoff. 

Navy Admiral Voyevodsky. 

Minister of State for Finland Gen. Langhoff. 

Legislative authority is vested in the czar, douina 
and council of the empire. 

AREA AND POPULATION Area, 8,647,657 square 
miles. Total population in 1909, 160,095,200. Popu- 
lation of the principal cities: 
St. Petersburg. .1,678,000 
Moscow ....... 1,359.254 

Warsaw ....... 756,426 

Odessa ........ 449,673 

Lodz .......... 351,570 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The total value of the 
imports in 1909 was $406,051,000; of the exports, 
$703,682,000. The exports to the United States in 
1910 amounted in value to $17,377,212; imports from 
the United States, $17,829,811. The chief exports 
i're foodstuffs, timber, oil, furs and flax; imports 
raw cotton, wool, metals, leather, hides, skins and 
machinery. 

SERVIA. 

GOVERNMENT King, Peter I. (Karageorgevitch); 
heir-apparent, Prince Alexander (second son). Leg- 
islative authority Is vested In a single chamber, 
called "skupshtina," of 160 elected members. 

AREA AND POPULATION Area, 18.650 square 
miles; population Dec. 31, 1905, 2,688.025. The 
capital, Belgrade, has 80,747 inhabitants. 

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS Total value of exports in 
1908. $15,099,800; imports, $15,127,100. Exports 
to the United States in 1910. $1,067,008; imports, 
$4.273. The exports are mainly agricultural prod- 
ucts and animals, and the imports cotton and 
woolen goods and metals. 



Riga 


282,230 


Kiev ... 
Kharkov / . . . 
Vilna 


. 319,000 
. . 174,846 
162,633 


Kazan 


. . 143,707 



SPAIN. 

GOVERNMENT King, Alfonso XIII.; heir-apparent, 
Prince Alfonso. Cabinet: 

Premier Senor Canalejas. 

Foreign Affairs Senor Garcia Prieto. 

Finance Senor Cobian. 

War Gen. Aznar. 
< Marine Senor Arias Miranda. 

Public Works Seaor Calbaton. 

Public Instruction Count Romanones. 

Justice Senor Ruiz Valarino. 

AREA AND POPULATION Total area, 194,783 
square miles. Total population of Spain, census 
of 1900, 18,618,086; estimated Dec. 31, 1908, 
19,712,585. Population of large cities: 
Madrid 539,835 Carthagena 99,871 



Barcelona 533,000 

Valencia 213,530 

Seville 148,315 

Malaga 130.109 

Murcla 111.539 



Saragossa 99,118 

Bilbao 83,306 

Granada 75,900 

Cadiz 69,382 

Valladolid 68,789 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The exports of Spain in 
1909 amounted to $159,410,000; imports, $165,495,- 
000. Total exports to tihe United States in 1910, 
$18,453,278; imports. $18,964,403. Chief exports 
are wine, sugar, timber, animals, glassware and 
pottery; imports, cotton and cotton manufactures, 
machinery, drugs and chemical products. 

SWEDEN. 

GOVERNMENT King, Gustaf V.; crown prince, 
Gustaf Adolf. 

Minister of State Admiral A. Llndman. 

Foreign Affairs Count Taube. 

War Maj.-Gen. Olaf Malm. 

Finance C. J. G. Swartz. 

Marine Commodore Ehrensvard. 

Education P. E. Lindstrom. 

Interior Count Hugo Hamilton. 

Agriculture S. O. Nylander. 

Justice Albert Pettersson. 

Legislative authority is vested in a parliament 
of two chambers, the first of which has a mem- 
bership of 150 and the second 230. Members of 
the upper house are elected for nine years and 
those of the lower for three years. The first 
chamber Is elected by municipal representatives. 
To be eligible one must own real estate worth at 
least 80,000 crowns or pay taxes on an Income of 
at least 4,000 crowns. The second chamber con- 
stituents must have an income of at least 800 
crowns or own real estate worth at least 1,000 
crowns, 

AREA AND POPULATION The total area of Sweden 
Is 172,876 square miles. The population Dec. 31, 
1908, was 5,429,600. The population of the prin- 
cipal cities at the same time was: Stockholm, 
339,582; Gothenburg, 162.480: .Malmo, 81,120; 
Norrkoping, 45,416; Helsingborg, 32,432. 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The total exports in 
1908 were valued at $129,181.000; Imports, $163.- 
194,000. Exports to the United States in 1910, 
$6,830,477; imports, $5,991,896. The leading arti- 
cles of export are timber and machinery; of im- 
port, textile goods and foodstuffs. 

SWITZERLAND. 

GOVERNMENT President of Federal Council (1910) 
Robert Oomtesse. 

Vice-president M. Marc-Emile Ruchet. 

Legislative authority is vested In a state and a 
national council, the former having 44 and the 
latter 167 members. The national councilors are 
elected directly by the people; the state councilors 
are elected in some cantons by the people and In 
others by the cantonal legislature. The chief ex- 
ecutive authority is vested in the bundesrath. or 
federal council, one member of which Is the chief 
of one of the federal departments. Its decrees are 
enacted as a body. Its members are elected presi- 
dent in rotation. 

Switzerland owns its main railroads. Its tele- 
graph and telephone system and monopolizes the 
manufacture and sale of alcohol. 

AREA AND POPULATION Total area, 15,976 square 
miles. The population, according to the census ol 



126 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



Juno, 1903, was 3,f59,349. Population of the largest 
cities: 



Zurich 



.183,500 



Basel 129,600 

Geneva 121,200 



Bern 78,500 

Lausanne 60,000 

St. Gallen 55.400 



EXPORTS AND IMPORTS Total exports in 1909, 
$211,852,000; imports, $304,065,000. Exports to the 
United Slates in 1910, $25,209,159; imports, $756,770. 
The articles chieUy exported are cottons, silks, 
clocks and watches; imported, foodstuffs, silk, 
minerals and metals, clothing aud animals. 

THE NETHERLANDS. 

GOVERNMENT Queen, Wilhemina: prince consort. 
Henry of Mecklenburg-Schwerin; heir. Princess 
Juliana. Cabinet: 

Prime Minister and Minister of the Interior- 
Mr. Th. Heeniskerk. 

Foreign Affairs Jonkheer Mr. R. de Marees van 
Swiuderen. 

Agriculture, Commerce, Industry and Labor A. 
S. Talma. 

War W. Cool. 

Navy Capt. J. Wentholt. 

Justice Mr. T. Y. B. Nelissen. 

Finance M. J. C. M. Kolkman. 

Colonies J. H. de Waal Malefyt. 

W aterways Dr. L. H. W. Regout. 

Legislative authority is vested in the states-gen- 
eral, composed of two chambers, the first having 
50 members and the second 100. The latter are 
elected directly and the former by the provincial 
states. 

AREA AND POPULATION The area of Holland, or 
the Netherlands, is 12,648 square miles. The total 
population Jan. 1, 1910, was 5,853,037. That of the 
chief cities Dec. 31, 1908, was: 



Amsterdam 565,589 

Rotterdam 411,635 

The Hague (capi- 
tal) 259,012 



Utrecht 116,783 

Groningen 75,370 

Haarlem 70,348 

Arnhem 63,987 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS In 1908 Holland imported 
$1,129,576,569 worth of merchandise and e.\iorted 
$872,982,270. In 1910 the exports to the United 
States amounted to $31,713,766 and the imports *rom 
the same country to $84,937,878. Chief imports are 
iron and steel and their manufactures, textiles, 
coal, cereals and flour; exports, butter, sugar and 
cheese. 

TURKEY. 

GOVERNMENT Sultan, Mehmed V. Cabinet: 

Grand Vizier Hakki Pasha. 

Sheik-ul-Islam Husui Effendi. 

Minister of the Interior Talaat Bey. 

Foreign Affairs Rifaat Pasha. 

War Mahraud Shevket Pasha. 

Marine Admiral Halil Pasha. 

Finance pjavid Bey. 

Justice Nazim Pasha. 

President of the Council of State Raif Pasha. 

PuDlic Works Haladjian Effendi. 

Put.llc Instruction Emrullah Effendi. 

Agriculture, Mines and Forests Prince Mavro- 
gordi'to. 

Religious Foundation Sheref All Haidar. 

A constitutional form of government was adopt- 
ed July 24, 1908, with legislative authority vested 
In a parliament. 

AREA AND POPULATION The area of that part 
of Turkey under the direot control of the sultan 
Is 1,157,860 square miles; of the whole empire, 
Including tributary and subject states, 1,565,020 
square miles. The total population of all parts 
of the empire is 35,414,300, of whom 24,813,700 
are In Turkey proper. Constantinople has about 
1.203,000 inhabitants. 

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS The total exports In 
1906 amounted in value to $98,361,800 and the 
imports to $156,830,105. The exports to the United 
States in 1910 amounted to $8,815,651 in value and 
the imports to $2.357,672. The principal articles 
imported are cloth and clothing, sugar, coffee, 
flour, rice and manufactures of iron; exports, 
grapes, silk, grain, cocoon, wool, cotton, carpets, 
hides and skins. 



ASIA. 

AFGHANISTAN. 

Ameer, Habibullah Khan; population, about 
5,000,000; area, 250,000 square miles. No statin- 
tics as to imports and exports of Afghanistan are 
availablo. The chief productions are preserved 
fruits, spices, wool, silk, cattle and tobacco. 

BOKHARA. 

Ameer. Sayid Abdul Ahad; heir, Sayid Mir Alim 
Khan. The area of Bokhara is about 83,000 square 
miles and the population 1,250,000. The products 
are corn, tobacco, fruit, silk and hemp. Since 
1873 Bokhara has been a dependency of Russia. 
CHINA. 

GOVERNMENT Regent, Prince Chun; heir-apparent, 
Pu-Yi; president of foreign office, Prince Ching. 

AREA AND POPULATION Total area of China, 
with dependencies, 4,277,170 square miles; esti- 
mated population, 433,553,030. 

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS The total exports in 
1908 amounted to $178.564,924 and the imports to 
$254,625,671. During the fiscal year 1910 goods to 
the value of $16.970,453 were imported from the 
United States. The total exports in the same pe- 
riod to the United States amounted to $31,297,928. 
The articles imported from America consist main- 
ly of flour, kerosene, sago, india-rubber shoes, gin- 
seng, quicksilver, white shirting, drills and broad- 
cloth. Among the leading exports are tea, furs, 
wool, mats, fans, essential oils, straw braid, silks, 
hair, hides, hemp and sesamum seed. 

JAPAN. 

GOVERNMENT Emperor, Mntsuhito; crown prince, 
Yoshihito. Cabinet: 

Premier aud Minister of Finance Marquis Kat- 
sura. 

Foreign Affairs Baron Komura. 

War Gen. Baron Terauchi. 

Navy Vice- Admiral Saito. 

Justice Viscount Okabe. 

Education E. Komatsubara. 

Agriculture and Commerce Raron Oura. 

Interior Baron Ilirata. 

Communications Baron Goto. 

Legislative authority is vested In the emperor 
and the imperial diet. This consists of the house 
of peers and the house of representatives, the 
former having 364 and the latter 379 members. 

AREA AND POPULATION The total area of Japan 
is 161,210 square miles. The population accord- 
ing to the census of Dec. 31, 1908, was 49,581,- 
928, exclusive of Formosa, the Pescadores and the 
south half of Sakhalin. The total population is 
close to 53,000,000. Cities having more than 100,- 
000 inhabitants are: 



Tokyo (1908) 2,186,079 

Osaka 1,226,590 

442,462 



394.303 
378,23^ 



Kobe 378,197 

Nagasaki 176.480 



Hiroshima 



Kanafawa 
Kure 



142.763 
110,994 
100,679 



Kyoto 

Yokohama 

Nagoya .. 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The total imports in 1903 
amounted in value to $195,784,000; exports, $204.167,- 
000. In 1910 the imports from the United States 
were valued at $21,959.310 and the exports to the 
same country at $66,398,761. The chief exports are 
raw silk, cotton, yarn, copper, coal and tea; im- 
ports, sugar, cotton, iron and steel, machinery, pe- 
troleum and wool. 

KOREA. 

Emperor, Yi Chok; nominally an empire, but now 
a Japanese colony. Estimated area, 86.000 square 
miles. Population. 10,000,000 to 12,000.000. of whom 
5,608,151 werel liable to taxation in 1901. Seoul, the 
capital, has 196.646 inhabitants. Imports in 1908 
valui d at $20,512,761; exports, $7,056,655. Imports 
from the United States in 1910, $442.066; exports 
to, $20,176. The imports are chiefly cotton goods, 
metals, kerosene and silk goods; exports are rice, 
beai s, cowhides, ginseng and copper. 

KHIVA. 

Khan, Seyid Mahomed Rahim; heir-apparent, 
Asfendiar; area, 24,000 square miles; jx>pulation. 
800,000. Products are cotton and silk. Khiva is a 
Russian vassal state. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



PERSIA. 

Shah or emperor. Ahmed Mirza; regent, All Reza 
Khun, Azad ul Mulk. Under constitution granted 
in 1906 legislative authority is vested in a national 
council of 166 members and a senate of sixty mem- 
bers. The area of Persia is about 628,000 square 
miles and the population 9,500,000. Imports in 
1908-9, $33,523,560; exports, $29,358,630. Imports from 
the United States in 1910, $509,178; exports to, 
$6S3,371. Teheran, the capital, has a population of 
about 280,000. Chief among the products are silk, 
fruits, wheat, barley and rice. 
SIAM. 

King, Chowfa Maha Vajirvudh. Area, 195,000 
square miles; population is estimated at 6,686,846. 
Bangkok, the capital, has about 450,000 inhabitants. 
The imports in 1908-9 we^e $28,906,000 and the ex- 
ports $37,914,000. Imports from the United States 
in 1910, $286,200; exports to, $125,882. Chief among 
the exports are rice, teak and marine products; 
imports, cotton goods and opium. 

AFRICA. 

ABYSSINIA. 

Emperor, Menelik II. Total area of Abyssinia 
about 200,000 square miles; population. 10,000,000. 
The exports are coffee, hides and skine, gum, wax, 
gold and Ivory. 

ALGERIA. 

Algeria is a colony of France. Governor-General 
M. Jonnart. Area, 343,500 square miles; popu- 
lation in 1906, 5,231,850. Chief imports are cot- 
tons, skins and furs and woodwork; exports, wine, 
sheep and cereals. 

EGYPT. 

Khedive, Abbas Hilmi: heir-apparent, Mohammed 
Abdul Mounelm. Total area of Egypt, 400.000 
square miles; area of the Egyptian Sudan, 950,000 
square miles. The population of Egypt proper in 
1907 was 11,287,395; of the Egyptian Sudan, 10,- 
000,000. Population of Cairo, 654,476; Alexandria, 
332,246. Great Britain controls the state finances 
and is represented at Cairo by a "financial ad- 
viser," who sits in the council of ministers. The 
present adviser is Sir Eldon Gorst. The total ex- 
ports in 1909 were valued at $130,381,000 and 
the imports at $111,152,400. Imports from the 
United States in 1910, $982,845; exports to, $12,- 
176,108. The exports consist chiefly of cereals, 
raw cotton and provisions; imports, wool, coal, 
textiles and metal manufactures. 

KONGO. 

The Kongo was made a Belgian colony In 1908. 
The estimated area is 909,654 square miles and the 
negro population about 20,000.000. Europeans num- 
bered 2,938 in January, 1909. Among the leading 
articles of export are ivory, rubber, cocoa, palm 
nuts, palm oil, copal gum and coffee. Total im- 
ports in 1908, $11,771,900; exports, $20,047,800. 
LIBERIA. 

President Arthur Barclay. Legislative power is 
vested in a senate of nine members and a house 
of representatives of fourteen members. The total 
area of the republic is about 40,000 square mile* 
and the population 2.120,000. The exports In 1907 
were valued at $465.468 and the imports at $669,- 
143. Imports from the United States in 1910, $84,- 
869; exports to. $212. The chief exports are rub- 
ber, palm oil, cocoa, coffee, ivory, ginger and cam- 
wood. Imports are cottons, provisions, wood and 
iron manufactures and gin. 

MOROCCO. 

Sultan, Mulai Abd-el-Hafld. Area of Morocco 
about 219,000 square miles; population, 5,000,000. 
Total imports in 1908, $15,254,000; exports, $12.- 
423.300. Imports from the United States in 1910, 
$00,373: exports to, $475,215. The chief imports 
are cotton, sugar and tea; exports, eggs, almonds, 
goatskins, beans, peas, linseed, wool, wax and 
cattle. 

TUNIS. 

Bey, Sidi Mohammed; heir-presumptive, Sidi Mo- 
hammed Ben Mamoun Bey. Tunis is under the 
protectorate of France and that country is rep- 
resented by a resident-general. Total area, 50,000 
square miles; population In 1906 about 2,000,000, 



including 128,895 foreigners. Importu in 1908, 
$24,606,650; exports, $18,831,000. Chief exports 
are wheat, barley, olives and palms. 

UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA. 
(See Great Britain.) 

MEXICO. 

GOVERNMENT The republic of Mexico is divided 
into twenty-seven states, three territories and one 
federal district, each with a local government, but 
all subject to the federal constitution. Representa- 
tives are elected for two years each and are ap- 
portioned at the rate of one for each 40.000 inhab- 
itants; the senators, of whom there are fifty-six, 
are elected by the people in the same manner as 
representatives. The president holds office four 
years and may be elected for several consecutive 
terms. Gen. Porfirio Diaz is serving his eighth 
term, which expires in November, 1916. Following 
are the names of his cabinet officers: 

Senor Lie. Don Enrique C. Creel, secretary of 
state and of the department of foreign affairs. 

Senor Don Ramon Corral, secretary of the Inte- 
rior and vice-president. 

Senor Lie. Don Justino Fernandez, secretary of 
justice. 

Senor Lie. Don Justo Sierra, secretary of public 
instruction and fine arts. 

Senor Lie. Olegario Molina, secretary of encour- 
agement. 

Senor Leandro Fernandez, secretary of public 
works and' communication. 

Senor Lie. Don Jose Ives Limantoar, secretary of 
the treasury and of public credit. 

Seuor Gen. Don Manuel Gonzales Cosio, secretary 
of the army and navy. 

AREA AND POPULATION The total area, includ- 
ing islands, is 767,005 square miles. The popula- 
tion, according to the federal census of Oct. 28, 
1900. is 13,605,919. The population of leading 
cities of the republic follows: City of Mexico 
(capital), 368,777; Guadalajara, 101,413; Puebla, 
93,521; Monterey, 62,266; San Luis Potosi, 61,009; 
Saltillo, 40.441; Pachuca, 37,487; Aguas Callentes, 
35,052; Zacatecas, 32.856; Durango, 31,092; Toluca, 
20,893; Hermosillo, 17.617. 

COMMERCE The chief exports of Mexico are 
precious metals, coffee, tobacco, hemp, sisal, sugar, 
dyewoods and cabinet woods, cattle and hides and 
skins. In 1909 the total exports amounted to 
$115.089,000; total imports for the same year were 
$77,939,000. The trade of Mexico is chiefly with 
the United States, Great Britain, France, Ger- 
many and Spain. In 1910 the imports from the 
United States were $58,193,704; exports to, $58,- 
795,943. 

SOUTH AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 
ARGENTINA. 

President, Senor Saenz Pena; capital, Buenos 
Aires. Area. 1,135.840 square miles. Population 
(1908), 6,48y,023; Buenos Aires, 1,189,252. Total ex- 
port* In 1909, $397,350,528; imports, $302,756.095. Ex- 
ports to the United States in 1910, $33,463,264; im- 
ports, $40,694,941. Chief exports, sheep, wool, cat- 
tle, hides, frozen meats and wheat; Imports, ma- 
chinery, agricultural implements, railway cars, en- 
gines and supplies and manufactures of iron and 
steel. 

BOLIVIA. 

President, Senor Elidoro Villazon; capital, Sucre. 
Area. 605,400 square miles. Population (1908), 
2.049,083; LaPaz, 78,856; Chocachamba. 24.512; Sucre, 
23,416. Total exports in 1909, $17,514.000; imports, 
514.368.469. Exports to the United States in 1910, 
$189; imports, $603,721. Chief exports, silver, tin, 
copper, coffee, rubber; imports, provisions, cloth- 
ing, hardware, spirits, silks and woolens. 
BRAZIL. 

President, Marshal Hermes da Fonseca; capital, 
Rio de Janeiro. Ana, 3,218,991 square miles. Pop- 
ulation (1900), 17. 71,069. Rio de Janeiro <1909>, 
1,189,662; Sao Paulo (1902), 332,000; Bahia. 230.000; 
Pernambuco, 120.000. Exports (1909). $310 261.000; 
imports, $180.604.000. Exports to the United States 
in 1910, $108,154,491; imports, $22,897,850. Chief ex- 



128 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



ports, coffee, sugar, tobacco, cotton and rubber: 
imports, cotton goods, manufactures of iron and 
steel, furniture, mineral oils, breadstuffs and pro- 
visions. 

CHILEL 

President, Ramon Barros Luco; capital, Santi- 
ago. Area, 2S2.5SO square miles. Population in 

1908, 3,399,928; Santiago, 378,000; Valparaiso, 175,000; 
Concepcion, 60,676. Total exports in 1909, $111,846.- 
916; imports, $95,660,208. Experts to the United 
States in 1910, $20,921,326; Imports, $8,304,246. Chief 
exports, nitrate, wool, hides and leather: imports, 
sugar, coal, cotton goods, cashmeres, oil, galvan- 
ized iron. 

COLOMBIA. 

President, Carlos E. Restrepo; capital, Bogota. 
Area, 435.100 square miles. Population In 1908, 
4,303,000. Total exports (1909), $15,513,346; total im- 
ports, $10,561,047. Exports to the United States in 
1910, $7,485,141; imports, $3,979,886. Chief exports, 
gold, silver and other minerals, coffee, cocoa, cat- 
tle, sugar, tobacco and rubber; imports, manufac- 
tures of iron and steel, cotton goods. 
ECUADOR. 

President, Gen. Eloy Alfaro; capital, Quito. 
Area, 116,000 square miles. Population, 1,272,000; 
Quito, 50,841; Guayaquil, 51,000. Total exports in 

1909, $12,439,400; imports, $9,352,122. Exports to the 
United States in 1910, $2,859.714; imports, $2,215.951. 
Chief exports, coffee, cocoa, rice, sugar, rubber, 
cabinet woods, chemicals and minerals; imports, 
cotton, provisions, manufactures of iron' and steel, 
clothing and mineral oil. 

PARAGUAY. 

President, Sr. Don Emiliano Gonzalez Navero; 
capital, Asuncion. Area, 98,000 square miles. Pop- 
ulation (1905), 631,347. Asuncion (1905), 60,259. To- 
tal exports in 1909, $5,071,600, imports, $3.640,728. 
Exports to the United States in 1910, $29,170; im- 
ports, $61,142. Chief exports, mate (or Paraguay 
tea), tobacco, hides, timber, oranges; imports, cot- 
ton goods, machinery and provisions. 

PERU. 

President. Augusto B. Leguia; capital, Lima. 
Area, 695,733 square miles. Population, 4,000,000; 
Lima. 140,884; Callao, 31,000. Total exports in 1908. 
$27,750.000; imports. $25,000,000. Exports to the 
United States in 1910, $7,621,497; imports, $4,548,053. 
Chief exports, cotton, coffee, sugar, cinchona, India 
rublier, dies and medicinal plants; imports, wool- 
ens, cotton, machinery and manufactures of iron. 
URUGUAY. 

President, Dr. Clar.dio Williman; capital, Monte- 
video. Area. 72,210 square miles. Population (1908), 
1,042,668; Montevideo (1908), 316,000. Total exports 
in 1909, $47,621,291; imports, $38,643,035. Exports to 
the United States in 1910, $7,413,896; imports, $4.- 
272,145. Chief exports, animal and agricultural 
products; imports, manufactured articles. 
VENEZUELA. 

President. .Tuan Vicente Gomez; capital, Caracas. 
Area. 393,870 square miles. Population (1908). 2,664,- 
241; Caracas, 75,000. Total exports in 1909. $16.- 
629,063; imp.orts, $9,836.097. Exports to the United 
States in 1910, $6.701,352, imports, $2.797.210. Chief 
exports, coffee, hides, cabinet woods, rubber and 
chemicals; imports, machinery, manufactures of 
iron and steel, provisions, furniture and mineral 
wools. 

CENTRAL AMERICAN STATES. 
COSTA RICA. 

President, Don Ricnrdo Jiminez; capital. San 
Jose. Area, 18,400 square miles. Population (1907), 
361,176; of San Jose, 26,682. Total exports (1909). 
$8,176,257; imports, $6,109,938. Exports to the United 
States in 1910, $3,641.298; imports, $3,050,510. Chief 
exports, coffee and bananas; imports, cotton, ma- 
chinery, iro.n and steel manufactures, woolens and! 
worsteds. 

GUATEMALA. 

President, Manuel E. Cabrera; capital, Guate- 
mala de Nueva. Area, 48,290 square miles. Popu- 
lation, 1,882,992, of the capital, 125,000. Total ex- 
ports (1909), $10,079,219; Imports, $5,811,586. Exports 



to the United States in 1910. $1,832,324; imports, 
$1.959,246. Chief exports, coffee and bananas; im- 
ports, cotton and cereals. 

HONDURAS. 

President, Miguel R. Davila; capital, Tegucigalpa. 
Area, 46,250 square miles. Population, 500,136; Te/- 
gucigalpa, 34,692. Total exports (1909), $1.993,985; 
imports, $2,581,552. Exports to the United States 
in 1910, $2,012,255; imports, $1,605.493. Chief ex- 
ports, bananas, coffee, cattle, cocoanuts and wood; 
chief import, cotton. 

NICARAGUA. 

President, Gen. Juan J. Estrada; capital, Ma 
nugua. Area, 49,200 square miles. Population 600,- 
000; Managua, 34,872; Leon, 62,569. Total exports 
(1909), $3,600,000; imports, $3,500,000. Exports to the 
United States in IflO, $1,321,767; imports, $1,690,792. 
Chief exports, cattle and coffee; imports, flour, 
wine, beer, barbed wire, cotton goods, sewing ma- 
chines, kerosene, calico and tallow. 
PANAMA. 

President, -Dr. C. A. Mendoza; term expires Sept. 
SO, 1912. Independence- of Panama declared Nov. 3, 
1903; constitution adopted Feb. 13, 1904. Legisla- 
tive power is vested in a national -assembly com- 
posed of deputies elected by the people. The ratio 
of representation is one deputy for each 10,000 in- 
habitants. The term of office is four years. The 
area of the republic is 31,571 square miles and the 
]x>pulation about 4CO.OOO; city of Panama, 20,000. 
Total exports (1906), $1,502,475; imports, $8,756,308. 
The exports to the United States in the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1910, amounted to $2.229,189 and the 
imports to $20,596,371. The chief articles of export 
are bananas, rubber, coffee and pearls. 
SALVADOR. 

President, Gen. Fernando Figueroa; capital, San 
Salvador. Area, 7,225 square miles. Population 
(1906), 1,116.253; San Salvador, 59,540. Total exports 
(1909), $6,361,341; imports, $4,176,931. Exports to the 
United States in 1910, $1,176,393; imports, $1,316,957. 
Chief exports, coffee, indigo, sugar, tobacco and 
balsams; imoorts, cotton, spirits, flour, iron goods, 
silk and yarn. 

CUBA. 

GOVERNMENT President, Gen'. Jose Miguel Go- 
mez; vice-president, Alfredo Zayas; terms expire 
May 20, 1913. Cabinet officers: 

Secretary of State Justo Garcia Velez. 

Secretary of Promotion Marcelino Diaz de Ville- 
gas. 

Secretary of Justice Luis Octavo Divlno. 

Secretary of Interior Nicolas Albert!. 

Secretary of Public Works Benito Lagueruela. 

Secretary of Public Instruction Ramon Mesa. 

Secretary of Agriculture, Commerce and Industry 
Ortelio Foyo. 

Secretary of Sanitation Dr. Matias Duque. 

Under the constitution the legislative power Is 
exercised by two elective bodies the house of rep- 
resentatives and the senate, conjointly called con- 
gress. The senate is composed of four senators 
from each of the six provinces, elected for eight 
years by the provincial councilmen and by a dou- 
ble number of electors constituting together an 
electoral board. 

The house of representatives is composed of one 
representative for each 25,000 inhabitants or frac- 
tion thereof over 12,500, elected for four years by 
direct vote. One-half of the members of the house 
are elected every two years. The salary of mem- 
bers of congress is $3,600 a year. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE REPUBLIC The organiza- 
tion of the republic of Cuba, begun in 1900, was 
practically completed on the 20th of May, 1902. 
when the military occupation of the island by the 
United States came to an end and Gen. Tomas 
Estrada Palma was inaugurated as the first presi- 
dent. 

AREA AND POPULATION The total area of Cuba 
is 41,634 square miles. The population in 1907, 
when the last census was taken, was 2,048,980. 

Population of provinces (1907): 



Havana 538,010 

Santa Clara 457,431 

Oriente 455,086 



Pinar del Rio 240,372 

Matanzas 239,811 

Oamaguey 118,800 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



129 



Population 


of principal cities in 1907: 
302,526 rVilon 


.. 52,006 


HAITI. 
President, Gen. Antoine F. C. Simon. The area 
of Haiti is 10,204 square miles and the population 
about 2,029,700. Coffee, cocoa and logwood are the 
leading articles sold. Total exports (1909), $11.008,- 
483; imports, $5,712,513. Exports to the United 
States in 1910. X790.579: imnorts. X4.49R.44S. 




. . . 70,416 


Holquin 


.. 50,224 


Camaguey . . 


66,460 
64 385 


IMnar del Rio... 
Santa Clara 


.. 50,071 
.. 46,620 




54,900 




.. 43,300 


Santiago .. 


.. 53.614 


Gibaia .. 


.. 39,343 



About 70 per cent of the population is white. 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS The total imports in 1909 
(calendar year) amounted to $91,447,581 and the ex- 
ports to $124,711,069. The imports from the United 
States in 1910 were valued at $58,193,704 and the 
exports at $58,795,943. The principal articles of ex- 
port are sugar, tobacco and cigars, iron and man- 
ganese ore, fruit, coffee, cocoa, molasses and 
sponges; of import, animals, breadstuffs, coal and 
coke, Iron and steel, wood, liquor, cotton, chem- 
icals and vegetables. 

ANNEXATION OF 

The empire of Korea was formally annexed to 
Japan Aug. 29, 1910, when the treaty concluded be- 
tween the two governments was officially promul- 
gated. The document Is preceded by a declaration 
in which attention is called to the fact that the 
system of government prevailing in Korea had not 
proved equal to the preservation ofi order and tran- 
quillity and that fundamental changes in the actual 
regime were absolutely essential. The government 
of Japan further declares that foreigners resident 
in Korea will enjoy the same rights and immuni- 
ties as in Japan; that Japan, for a period of ten 
years, will levy upon goods imported into Korea 
from foreign countries or exported from Korea, and 
upon foreign vessels entering any of the open 
ports of Korea, the same import or export duties 
and the same tonnage dues as under the existing 
schedules; that Japan will also permit, for a pe- 
riod of ten years, vessels under the flags of pow- 
ers having treaties with Japan to engage in the 
coasting trade between the open ports of Korea 
and Japan, and that the existing open ports of 
Korea, with the exception of Masampo, will be 
continued as open ports and in addition Shin-Wiju 
will be newly opened. The text of the treaty follows : 

His majesty the emperor of Japan and his maj- 
esty 'the emperor of Korea, having in view the 
special and close relations between their respec- 
tive countries, desiring to promote the common 
weal of the two nations and to assure permanent 
peace In the extreme east, and being convinced 
that these objects can be best attained by the an- 
nexation of Korea to the empire of Japan, have 
resolved to conclude a treaty of such annexation, 
and have for that purpose appointed as their plen- 
ipotentiaries, that is to say: 

His majesty the emperor of Japan, Viscount 
Masakata Terauchl, his resident-general, and his 
majesty the emperor of Korea, Ye Wan Yong, his 
minister president of state, 

Who, upon mutual conference and deliberation, 
have agreed to the following articles: 

Article I. His majesty the emperor of Korea 
makes complete and permanent cession to his 
majesty the emperor of Japan of all rights of sov- 
eignty over the whole of Korea. 

Art. II. His majesty the emperor of Japan ac- 



SANTO DOMINGO. 

President, Gen. Ramon Caceres. The republic has 
an area of 18,045 square miles and a population of 
about 610,000. Santo Domingo, the capital, has 
18,626 inhabitants. In 1909 the exports amounted to 
$8,177,330 and the chief articles shipped were cof- 
fee, cocoa and muhogany; imports, $4,645.378. Ex- 
ports to the United States in 1910, $2,462,716; im- 
ports, $3,106,402. 



KOREA BY JAPAN. 

cepts the cession mentioned In the preceding arti- 
cle and consents to the complete annexation of 
Korea to the empire of Japan. 

Art. III. His majesty the emperor of Japan will 
accord to their majesties the emperor and ex- 
emperor and his imperial highness the crown 
prince of Korea and their consorts and heirs such 
titles, dignity and honor as are appropriate to 
their respective ranks, ano? sufficient annual grants 
will be made for the maintenance of such titles, 
dignity and honor. 

Art. IV. His majesty the emperor of Japan will 
also accord appropriate honor and treatment to 
the members of the imperial house of Korea and 
their heirs, other than those mentioned in the pre- 
ceding article, and the funds necessary for the 
maintenance of such honor and treatment will l>e 
granted. . 

Art. V. His majesty the emperor of Japan will 
confer peerages and monetary grants upon those 
Koreans who, on account of meritorious services, 
are regarded as deserving such special recognition. 

Art. VI. In consequence of the aforesaid annex- 
ation, the government of Japan will assume the 
entire government and administration of Korea and 
undertake to afford full protection for the persons 
and property of Koreans obeying the laws there in 
force and to promote the welfare of all such 
Koreans. 

Art. VII. The government of Japan will, so far 
as circumstances permit, employ in the public 
service of Japan In Korea those Koreans who ac- 
cept the new regime loyally and in good faith 
and who are duly qualified for such service. 

Art. VIII. This treaty, having been approved by 
his majesty the emperor of Japan rfnd his majesty 
the emperor of Korea, shall take effect from the 
date of Its promulgation. 

In faith whereof the respective plenipotentiaries 
have signed this treaty and have affixed thereto 

VISCOUNT MASAKATA TERAIK3HI, resident- 
general, the 22d day of the 8th month of the 
43d year of Meiji. 

YE WAN YONG, minister president of state, the 
22d day of the 8th month of the 4th year of 
Nung-hui. 



COLONIES AND MOTHER COUNTRIES COMPARED. 



COUNTRIES. 


No. of 
colo- 
nies. 


AREA IN SQUARE MILES. 


POPULATION. 


Mother 
country. 


Colonies. 


Total. 


Mother 
country. 


Colonles.t 


Total. 


Austria-Hungary...; 


1 
1 

4 
3 
27 
12 
52 
2 
4 
13 
9 
2 
3 
4 
7 


241.333 
11,373 
1,532.420 
15.593 
207,054 
208,780 
121.400 
110.550 
147,655 
12,648 
35,490 
8,647,657 
194.783 
1,157,800 
3.025,600 


19,702 
909,654 
2,744,7f,0 
86.634 
4,727,967 
1,027.820 
11,845,891 
175,500 
114.264 
783.602 
802,952 

lor.ooo 

80,580 
1,353,545 
716,555 


261,035 

921,027 
4,277,170 
102,226 
4.935,021 
1,236.600 
11,467.294 
286,050 
261.528 
796.250 
838,412 
8,754.657 
275.363 
2.511,405 
3,742,155 


45.405,267 

7.386.444 
407.253,030 
2.605.268 
39.252,345 
60.641.278 
45.008,423 
34,269.761 
49,581.928 
5.825.198 
5,423.132 
113,841,000 
19,712,58-, 
24,813,700 
*a8,043.455 


1.568,092 

20.000.01X) 
26.300.000 
120.890 
46,897.319 
14.007,09:2 
351.286.331 
950.000 
13.540,278 
3S.OJS.257 
9.144.316 
2,050.000 
291.946 
14.014,001 
8.849.448 


46,973,359 
27,386,444 
433,553,030 
2,726,158 
86.149.664 
75.248.370 
3%.294,752 
35.219,764 
63.122.206 
43.873,455 
14.567,448 
115.891.000 
20.004,531 
38.827,704 
96.892.903 


Belgi um 


China 


Denmark 




Germany 


Great Britain 


Italy 






Portugal 


Russia 


Spain , 




United States 



"Continental United States in 1909. tlncludes protectorates and dependencies of ail kinds. 



130 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



COLONIES AND DEPEH 

AUSTBIA-HUNOABY. 

Sq. miles. Population. 
Bosnia and Herzegovina 19,702 1,568,092 


DENCIES OF NATIONS. 
Sq. 

St. Helena 


miles. Population. 
47 3,558 
156 21,982 
30,000 1,252,000 
12,000 150,000 
68,000 348,000 
77,260 6,500.000 
1,600 678,016 
390 22,000 
110,426 1,269,951 
1,868 343,000 
169 5,300 
223.500 2.764,086 
285 130,792 
672 375,152 
1,020 250,000 

20,000 189,000 
560 65,446 
384,180 10,000,000 
322.450 120,000 
70,000 110,000 
191,130 8,000,000 
200 33,000 
- 250 2,646 
150 15,000 
1,000 37,000 
4,200 45,000 
33,700 1,000,000 

45,800 450,000 
129,700 400,000 

13,458 3,039,751 
86,000 10,000,000 
1,256 427,117 
50 55,410 
12,500 18,000 

4,065 523,635 
4,446 115,189 
1,863 36,858 
212,737 1,233,655 
72,010 851,905 
403 62,758 
46,060 78,124 
50,554 30,098,008 
43,864 407,908 
151,789 200,000 
16,301 112,216 
161,812 4,029,503 
17,698 308,600 

484.800 4,119,000 
1,480 147,424 
169 56,285 
293,400 3,120,000 
1,469 475,513 
13,940 820,000 
4 63,991 
360 42,103 
7,330 800,000 

83,000 1,250,000 
24,000 800,000 

780 21,946 

70.000 130,000 
9,800 140,000 

3,365 310,185 
180 63,424 
400,000 11,287,395 
950,000 2,363,000 

590,884 91,978 
210 9,000 
6,449 154,001 
474 




BELGIUM. 




Solomon islands 


CHINA. 

Chinese Turkestan 650,340 1,200,000 
Manchuria 363,610 16,000,000 


Somalilaud 


Soutl'ern Nigeria 
Straits Settlements 
Tonga islands 


Tibet 463,200 6,500,000 
DENMARK. 

Greenland 46,740 11,893 
Iceland 39,756 78,470 


Transvaal 
Trinidad and Tobago 
Turks and Caicos islands 
Uganda 


West Indies 138 30,527 

FRANCE. 


Windward islands 
Zanzibar 


Annam 52,100 6,128,000 
Cambodia 45,000 1,800,000 
Cochin China 20,000 2,968,600 


GERMANY. 

Bismarck archipelago 
Caroline Islands 


Comoro isles 620 86,000 
Guadeloupe 689 182,110 
Guiana 34,060 39,349 
India, French 196 277,000 
Kongo, French 669,280 5,000,000 
Laos 98,400 650,000 


German Southwest Africa 
Kaiser Wllhelm's Land 
Kamerun 
Klauchau Bay 
Marianne Islands 


Madagascar 226,015 2,701,000 
Martinique 378 182,000 
Mayotte 140 11,610 
New Caledonia 7,200 55,800 
Reunion 970 201,000 


Samoan islands 
Solomon islands 
Togoland 

ITALY. 

Eritrea 


St. Pierre and Miquelon 96 6,000 
Somali coast 5,790 180,000 
Tahiti, etc 1,544 30,000 


Somali lam 1 

JAPAN. 

Fo.-mosa 
Korea 


Tunis 45,779 1,500,000 
West Africa, French: 


K wantung 
Pescadores 
Sakhalin 


Guinea ) 1,498', 000 
Ivory coast (1,685,810 890,000 
Mauretania ( 400,000 


NETHERLANDS. 

Ball and Lombok 
Banca 


Senegal 1 915,000 
Upper Senegal-Niger / 4,415,000 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

Aden Perlm Socotra 10 387 55 974 


Borneo 
Celebes 
Curacao 


Dutch Guiana 


Ascension 34 120 


Java and Madura 


Australia . 3 065 120 4,625,306 


Molucca islands 


Bahamas ... 4404 60,309 


New Guinea 


Barbados 166 35,000 


Riau-Lingga archipelago 


Easutoland 10 290 348 850 


Sumatra 


Becnuanaland 275 000 134 100 


Timor 


Bermuda .-... 19 17,535 


PORTUGAL. 

Angola 


Borneo ind Sarawt k 73 206 660 000 


British Guiana 90 500 297,172 


Cape Verde Islands 


British Honduras 7 562 43 270 


Damao, Diu 


Brlt'h New Guinea 90 540 500 000 


East Africa 


Can.ida 3 745 574 6 945 000 


Goa 


Capo of Good Hope 276 990 2 507 500 


Guinea 


Cevlon 25 330 4 038 456 


Macao, etc 


Cyprus . . 3 580 258 997 


Prince's and St. Thomas 


East Africa protectorate 175,518 4,000,000 
Falkland islands 7500 2,289 


Timor 


RUSSIA. 

Bokhara 


Federated Malay States 26 380 965 850 


Fiji 7 740 130'981 


Khiva 


Gambia 3,619 154,330 


SPAIN. 

Fernando Po, etc 


Gibraltar ... . 2 18316 


Gold Coast 119260 1696970 


Rio de Oro and Adrar 


Hongkong 390 421 499 


Rio Muni, etc 


India 1,773,088 294 317,082 


TURKEY. 

Crete 


Jamaica 4,207 845,798 


Laboan 30 8,286 




Leeward islands 701 172,110 


Egypt 


Malta 117 212888 




Mauritius 835 380144 


UNITED STATES 

Alaska 


Natal 35,371 1,206,386 


Newfoundland-Labrador 162,734 233,012 




New Zealand 104 751 1 029 417 


Hawaii . . 


Northern Nigeria 256 400 7 614 751 




Nyasaland 43,608 997217 


Porto Rico 


3,435 953. 24S 
115,026 7,635,426 
77 5,800 

Gallons. 

6.31?,745.312 
6.976.004,070 
.. 7.542.044.118 


Orange Free State 50,392 466,380 


Philippines 


Rhodesia 439,575 1,604,875 


Samoan islands 


CRUDE PETROLEUM PRODUCl 
Year. Gallons. Year. Gallons. 
1887 2539971.672 1900 2.661,233.568 


SD IN THE UNITED STATES. 
Year. Gallons. Year. 
1903 4,219,376.154 1906... 
1904 4.916.663.6S2 1907... 
1905 5.658,138.360 1908... 


1898 2.325,297,786 1901 2,914,346.148 


1899 2.396,975,700 1902... ., 3,728,210,472 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



131 



REVOLUTION 

King Manuel II. of Portugal was deposed by a 
revolution in Lisbon and a republican government 
established Oct. 3-4, 1910. The royal family es- 
caped from the Necessidades palace to the Portu- 
guese royal yacht, Amelie, and proceeded to 
Gibraltar, whence the king later was conveyed to 
Kngland on the royal yacht Victoria and Albert. 

The republicans in Portugal had been planning 
for months to overthrow the monarchy, but the 
actual revolution was brought about by the act of 
a fanatical royalist named Santos, recently re- 
leased from an insane asylum, who shot and mor- 
tally wounded Prof. Bombarda, whom he blamed 
for his detention. Bombarda was a well-known re- 
publican and his killing was denounced in the re- 
publican newspaper, Seculo, as a political assassi- 
nation, as the professor was one of the delegates 
recently elected to the cortes. Great excitement 
ensued, mobs' were formed and encounters with the 
poli2e occurred. The 1st battery of artillery seized 
their officers, tore down the royal flag and dis- 
tributed arms and ammunition among the people. 
Part of the 16th Infantry also mutinied and 
fought against the troops that remained loyal to 
the king. The republican forces were getting the 
worst of It when three Portuguese cruisers In the 
Tagus, the Adamastor, the San Rafael and the 
Dotu Fernando, came to their rescue, hoisting the 
red and green flag of the republic and shelling the 
royal palaces. The bombarument did little actual 
damage, but hastened the surrender of the royal- 
ists. The municipal guard and some of the other 
loyal soldiers held out until Wednesday morning, 
Oct. 5, when they surrendered. In the course of 
the fighting several hundreds of persons were 
killed or wounded, but no accurate figures were 
published. 

King Manuel, who a few hours before the revolt 
had banqueted President-elect Fonseca of Brazil, 
escaped from the Necessidades palace and was con- 
veyed In an automobile to Mafra, a town about 



IK PORTUGAL. 

eighteen miles northwest of Lisbon. Here he was 
joined by the Queen Mother Amelie and the Dow- 
ager Queen Maria Pia, who had fled from the 
Ajuda palace to Cintra. The Infante Alfonso, duke 
of Oporto, had embarked upon the royal yacht 
Amelie at Cascaes and brought the vessel around 
to Ericeira, a fishing village a few miles beyond 
Mafra. Here the royal fugitives embarked and 
went directly to Gibraltar and placed themselves 
under the protection of the British authorities. 

In the provinces, island possessions and colonies 
of Portugal the republicans assumed control al- 
most without opposition and within a few days 
after the events in Lisbon the revolution was com- 
plete throughout the country. The people In the 
capital, who had taken part in thy insurrection, 
disbanded voluntarily, order was quickly restored 
and business resumed. A provisional government 
was established with Theophile Braga, a poet and 
philosopher, as president, and the following as 
members of his cabinet: 

Minister of Justice Alfonso Costa. 

Minister of Foreign Affairs Bernadino Machado. 

Minister of Finance Bazlllo Telles. 

Minister of Public Works Antonio Luiz Gomes. 

Minister of War Col. Barreto. 

Minister of Marine Amaro Azovado Gomes. 

Minister of the Interior Antonio Almeida. 

Civil Governor of Lisbon Eusebio Leao. 

One of the first acts of the new government was 
to order the expulsion of many of the religious 
orders In Portugal and to substitute public for 
clerical schools. The announced policy of the new 
regime was to promote decentralization in the gov- 
ernment and colonial autonomy, to establish a sys- 
tem of secular education, to secure freedom of 
speech, to reform the finances and to separate the 
church and the state. It was also announced that 
governmental authority would be turned over to 
officials elected by the people within three months. 



EPIDEMIC OF CHOLERA IN EUROPE. 



Europe had an epidemic of cholera In 1910 more 
serious than any other of recent years. The dis- 
ease claimed thousands of victims In Russia and 
many In Italy, bub sporadic cases occurred in vari- 
ous parts of Austria-Hungary, Germany, Spain and 
England, while a few died on ships at sea. Sev- 
eral cases developed on vessels arriving in New 
York from Naples early in October. 

Cholera has existed In Russia for two or three 
years, but in a mild form compared to the out- 
break of 1910. Cases of the plague appeared early 
In the summer and as the season advanced they 
multiplied until In July. August and September 
they numbered between 150,000 and 260,000. Accu- 
rate statistics were not available for the entire 
empire, but such official figures as were made pub- 
lic showed that the mortality was very great. For 
example, the sanitary bureau reported that during 
the week of Aug. 7-13 there were 23,944 new cases 
and 10,723 deaths, bringing the total number of 
cases In Russia during the year up to that time to 
112,985. Th.-; disease was then raging not only In 
St. Petersburg. Moscow and other large cities, but 
in nearly all the provinces. Sept. 26 the reports of 
the sanitary bureau showed a total for the season 



of 182,327 oases, with 83,613 deaths. With the ad- 
vent of cooler weather In October the plague be- 
gan to decline. 

Outside of Russia the most serious development 
of the disease was In Naples, Italy. The first 
cases were reported about the middle of August 
in Barl and other towns In southeastern and south- 
ern Italy. The epidemic spread rapidly and soon 
reached Naples, though Its presence there was not 
officially admitted until Sept. 26. By the end of 
September there were a dozen deaths and a score 
or more of new cases dally in the southern capital. 
Thousands of people fled from the city and It was 
practically isolated. 

In the course of the summer cases of cholera 
were reported from other points in Europe as fol- 
lows: Tranl, Barletta, Andrla, Trinitapoli, Ca- 
nosa, Molfetta, Sptnazzola, .Margherlt, Savoia, San 
Fernandino, Corignola, Bitonto, province of Apulia, 
Leghorn, Turin, Rome and towns in Sicily, Italy; 
Spandau, Freiburg, Berlin and Danzig, Germany; 
Budapest. Hungary, and London, England. Except 
In Italy, however, the disease was promptly 
checked. 



REVOLUTIONS IN NICARAGUA. 



Jose Santos Zelaya, the despotic president of 
Nicaragua, resigned Dec. 16, 1909, and Dr. Jose 
Madriz was elected to succeed him. Zelaya fled 
to Mexico in January, 1910, and thence went to 
Belgium and finally to Spain. Dr. Madriz was op- 
posed by a large portion of the population and a 
revolution broke out almost, immediately after he 
assumed office. Warfare continued for several 



Structure. Feet. 
Amiens cathedral 383 


HEIGHT OF SOME F 

Structure. Feet. 
Eiffel tower 984 


&.MOUS STRUCTURES. 

Structure. Feet. 
Milan cathedral 360 
Pyramid, Great 451 
Rouen cathedral 464 
St. Paul's, London... 404 
St. Peter's, Rome 433 


Bunker Hill mon't 221 
Capitol, Washington. .288 
City hall. Phlla 535 
Cologne cathedral 512 


Florence cathedral 337 
Frlbourg cathedral 386 
Masonic Tern., Chi. ..354 
Metropol. bldg., N. Y.700 



months, the leader of the rebels. Gen. Juan J. 
Estrada, gradually driving the government troops 
from one stronghold to another, until Aug. 21, 
when Madriz gave up the struggle. The following 
day Gen. Estrada was proclaimed president of 
Klcnmna. Dr. Madriz' fall was due In part to 
his unfriendly attitude toward the United States. 



Structure. Feet. 

Singer bldg., N. Y....612 
Strassburg cathedral. .465 
St. Stephen's, Vienna.470 
Ward bldg., Chicago.. 394 
Washington mon'm't.556 



132 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON. 



The Carnegie Institution was endowed by Andrew 
Carnegie with $10,000,000 and incorporated under the 
laws of the District of Columbia, Jan. 4. 1902. It 
was. however, deemed advisable to have it incor- 
porated by act of congress, and this was effected 
May 18, 1904. Section 2 of the act specifies that 
the objects of the corporation shall be to encour- 
age, in the broadest and most liberal manner, in- 
vestigation, research and discovery, and the appli- 
cation of knowledge to the improvement of man- 
kind. The projects considered by the institute are 
chiefly of three classes, namely: 

First, large projects or departments of work, 
Whose execution requires continuous research by a 
corps of investigators during a series of years. 

Secondly, minor projects, which may be carried 
out by Individual experts in a limited period of 
time. 

Thirdly, research associates and assistants, aid 
being given to a few investigators possessing ex- 
ceptional abilities and opportunities for research 
work. 

An annual appropriation is made for the purpose 
of publishing the results of investigations made 
under the auspices of the institution, and for cer- 
tain works which would not otherwise be readily 
printed. These publications are not distributed 
gratis except to a limited list of the greater libra- 
ries of the world. 

Dec. 4. 1907. Andrew Carnegie added $2,000.000 to 
the endowment of the Institution, making the total 
$12.000.000. 

The following table shows the gross sums allotted 
to large projects since the organization of the in- 
stitution up to 1910: 

Botanical research $125,240.00 

Economics and sociology 150,000.00 

Experimental evolution 150,450.00 

Geophysical research 325,000.00 

Historical research 87,650.00 

Horticultural work (Burbank) 50,000.00 

Marine biology 93,700.00 

Meridian astrometry 80,000.00 



Nutrition research 207,585.70 

Solar observatory 581,500.00 

Terrestrial magnetism 295,000.00 

Total 2,146,125.70 

The total amount expended up to 1910 was 
$4,128,697.11. 

The larger projects now under way and the names 
of the department directors or investigators are 
as follows : 

Botanical research D. T. MacDougal. 

Economics and sociology Henry W. Farnam. 

Experimental evolution Charles B. Davenport. 

Geophysics Arthur L. Day. 

Historical research J. F. Jameson. 

Marine biology A. G. Mayer. 

Meridian astrometry Lewis Boss. 

Nutrition F. G. Benedict. 

Solar physics George E. Hale. 

Terrestrial magnetism A. L. Bauer. 

The officers are as follows : 

President of the institution Robert S. Woodward. 

Officers of the board of trustees John S. Bill- 
ings, chairman ; Elihu Root, vice-chairman ; C. H. 
Dodge, secretary. 

Executive committee William H. Welch, chair- 
man; John S. Billings, S. Weir Mitchell, Ellha 
Root, Robert S. Woodward, C. H. Dodge, C. D. 
Walcott, William Barclay Parsons. 

Trustees John S. Billings, John L. Cadwalader, 
Cleveland H. Dodge, W. N. Frew, Lyman J. Gage, 
Henry L. Higginson, Charles L. Hutchinson, Seth 
Low. S. Woir Mitchell. Andrew J. Montague, Wil-, 
liam W. Morrow, Elihu Root. William Barclay 
Parsons, Henry S. Pritchett, Martin A. Ryerson, 
Charles D. Walcott, Andrew D. White. Robert 8. 
Woodward, William H. Taft, William H. Welch. 

The administration building of the institution 
is located on the southeast corner of 16th and P 
streets, N. W., Washington, D. C. The institution, 
however, is neither a branch of nor subject to any 
special regulations of the United States govern- 
ment. Neither is it a college or a university, 
nor does it maintain a library or museum. 



Alaskan Boundary Delimitation Commissioner for 
the United States, O. H. Tittman; for Great 
Britain, Dr. Frederick King. 

.Intel national Waterways Members of commission, 
George Clinton, Oswald H. Ernst and Eugene E. 
Haskell for the United States; George C. Gib- 
bons, Louis A. Costa and William J. Stewart for 
Great Britain. 

Prison Commissioner on the part of the United 
States, Charles R. Henderson, University of Chi- 
cago. 

International Institute of Agriculture at Rome, 
Italy American member of permanent committee, 
David Lubin. 

Commissioners-General to the Tokyo Exposition 
Francis B. Loomis, Ohio; Frederick J. V. Skiff, 
Illinois; Francis D. Millet. New York; secretary, 
John Callan O'Laughlin, Washington, D. C. 

Commissioner-General to International Exposition 
of Art and History, Rome, 1911 Harrison S. 
Morris, Pennsylvania. 



INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS. 



Commissioner-General to International Exposition 
of Industry and Labor, Turin, Italy, 1911 Fran- 
cis B. Loomis, Ohio. 

International Fisheries Commission Commissioner 
for the United States, David Starr Jordan, Cali- 
fornia; for Great Britain, Edward E. Prince. 

United States and Mexican Water Boundary No 2 
Dupont circle, Washington, D. C. ; commissioner 
on the part of the United States, Brig.-Gen. An- 
son Mills; on the part of Mexico, Senpr Don 
Fernando Beltran y Puga; secretary of the United 
States commission, W. Keblinger; secretary of 
the Mexican commission, Senor Don Manuel W. 
Velarde. 

St. John River Joint Commission For the United 
States, George A. Murchie and Peter Keegan; 
for Great Britain, Alexander P. Barnhill and 
John King. 

Chamizal Arbitration Commission Agent of United 
States, William C. Dennis of Indiana; agent of 
Mexico, Joaquin D. Cassasus of Mexico. 



FAMOUS WATERFALLS OF THE WORLD. 



Height 
Name and location. In feet. 

Gavarnie, France 1,385 

Grand, Labrador 2,000 

Minnehaha, Minnesota 50 

Missouri, Montana 90 

Mon t morenci , Quebec 265 

Multnomah, Oregon 850 

Murchison, Africa 12o 

Niagara, New York-Ontario 164 
Rjukan, Norway 780 



Height 

Name and location. in feet. 
Schaffhausen," Switzerland.. 100 
Skjaeggedalsf os, Norway 530 

Shoshone, Idaho 210 

Staubbach, Switzerland 1,000 

Stirling, New Zealand BOO 

Sutherland, New Zealand.. .1,904 
Takkakaw. Brit'h Columbia. 1,200 

Twin, Idaho 180 

Yellowstone ( upper K Montana 110 



Height 

Name and location. in feet. 
Yellowstone(lower) .Montana 310 

Ygnassu, Brazil 210 

Yosemite( upper). California 1,436 
Yosemite( middle), California 626 
Yosemite( lower), California. 400 

Vettis. Norway 960 

Victoria, Africa 400 

Voringfos, Norway WO 



HEIGHTS AND WEIGHTS OF ADTJLTS. 



Height. Weight. 

5 ft. 1 In 128 pounds 

5 ft. 2 In 135 pounds 

6 ft. S In 142 pounds 



Height. 



Weight. 



. 
5 ft. 4 In ...... 149 pounds 



5 ft. 5 in 



152 pounds 



. 
6 ft. 6 in ...... 155 pounds 



Height. 
5 ft. 7 in.. 
5 ft. 8 In.. 



Weight. 
..158 pounds 
..166 pounds 



5 ft. 9 In 173 pounds 



Height. 
5 ft. 10 in.. 
5 ft. 11 in.. 



Weight. 

..181 pound* 
,186 pound* 



6 ft. in 190 pound* 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



133 



MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

[From report of federal census bureau.] 
MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE STATISTICS BY STATES. 



STATE OB TERRITORY. 


MARRIAGES. 


DIVORCES. 


Number, 

1887-1906. 


Annual average 
1898 to 1902. 


Annual average 
1888 to 1892. 


Number 

1887 
to 
1906. 


Annual averaget 
per 100.000 pop- 
ulation. 


Number 


Per 

10,000 
Pop. 


Number 


Per 

10,000 
Pop. 


1900. 


1890 


1880. 


1870 




372,525 
310,767 
189,539 
1)8.877 
136.984 
25,374 
50,244 
114,486 
401.268 
23,330 
801,717 
493.890 
67.412 
300.350 

275,062 

359.783 
243,881 
80.592 
195,875 
488,367 
424.U96 
242,147 
313500 


20,227 
10,902 
MM 
5,457 
7,034 
1.322 
3,114 
6,176 
21,640 
1,359 
44,858 
26,451 
4,847 
19.298 
14,112 
19,520 
13.421 
5,519 
10,740 
24.117 
23,008 
13.118 
17,574 
30,340 
2,188 
8.825 
527 
3,916 
15,042 
1,30? 
63,082 
17,142 
2,454 
37,979 
3,326 
3.499 


Ill 

129 
64 
101 
77 
72 
112 
117 
98 
84 

93 

105 
124 
86 
96 
91 
97 
79 
90 
86 
95 
75 
113 
98 
90 
83 
124 
95 
80 
67 
87 
91 
77 
91 
83 
85 
7tt 
87 


15,727 
13,217 
7,167 
4.261 
6.216 
983 
1,512 
4.314 
16,5 1 
705 
38,421 
22,453 
736 
16.474 
12,795 
15.399 
10.150 
5,726 
7,916 
21,031 
18,726 
10,275 
11,778 
25,700 
1,294 
8.337 
238 
3,720 
15,740 
1,018 
49,584 
13,074 
1,339 
32.984 
347 
2.801 
39,059 
3,214 


lOt 
117 
59 
103 
83 
58 
66 
110 
90 
80 
100 
102 
41 
86 
90 
83 
91 
87 
76 
94 
89 
78 
91 
96 
91 
78 
50 
99 
109 
64 
83 
81 
70. 
90 
44 
88 
74 
93 


22.807 
29,541 
2.3.170 
15,844 
9,224 
887 
2.1625 
7,586 
10,401 
3,205 
82,209 
60.721 
0,751 
34,874 
28,904 
30.641 
9,785 
14,194 
7,920 
22,940 
42,371 
15,046 
19,993 
54.766 
6,454 
16.711 
1,045 
8,617 
7,441 
2,437 
29,125 
7,047 
4,317 
63,982 
7.609 
10,145 
39.686 
6,953 


69 
130 
103 
158 
50 
16 
58 
79 
26 
120 
100 
142 
113 
93 
109 
84 
41 
117 
40 
47 
104 
55 
74 
103 
167 
82 
111 
112 
23 
73 
23 
24 
88 
91 
129 
134 
33 
47 


54 
90 
84 
197 
66 
18 
34 
57 
24 
93 
75 
104 
33 
67 
84 
58 
29 
88 
24 
32 
72 
41 
48 
71 
139 
71 
97 
100 
18 
46 
17 
12 
47 
64 
46 
108 
21 
32 


27 
53 
84 
138 
61 
10 
31 
53 
14 
58 
68 
70 


10 
24 
52 
60 
84 
7 
30 
23 
10 
67 
51 
69 






Colorado 






District of Columbia 


Florida 






Illinois..., 




Indian Territory 




60 
44 

35 
10 
78 
12 
30 
72 
27 
30 
40 
125 
43 
106 
85 
13 
12 
16 
6 
46 
48 


49 
51 
28 
6 
61 
12 
25 
47 
21 
12 
29 
73 
29 
99 
53 
9 

'i 
"37 






















579,807 
36,302 
170,820 
7,073 
77,764 
335,8U9 
25,025 
I,205,0i5 
313.725 
44,022 
727,408 
45,415 
67,475 














New York 




North Dakota 


Ohio 






92 
13 
30 
1 


80 
8 
25 




890,533 
72,836 


48,088 
3,726 








54,782 

390.9<JO 
620,445 
51,259 
58,472 
295,377 
87,182 
170,810 
337,583 
13,509 


3.094 
20,975 
34,9(6 
2,789 
2,977 
16,386 
7,747 
9.5b2 
10,802 
839 


77 
104 
115 
101 
87 
88 
92 
99 
81 
91. 


2,128 
17,432 
23.834 
2,127 
2,807 
12,818 
2,975 
6,692 
10,009 
426 


si 

99 
107 
101 
84 
77 
83 
88 
95 
68 


7,108 
30,447 
62,655 
4,670 
4,740 
12,129 
16,219 
10,308 
22,867 
1,772 


95 
89 
131 
92 
75 
38 
184 
64 
65 
118 


65 

62 
8J 
74 
49 
22 
109 
41 
51 
86 


48 
38 
49 
114 
47 
11 
75 
25 
41 
111 


25 
24 
21 
62 
50 
6 
88 
18 
38 
99 


Tennessee 




Utah 




Virginia 


Washington 


West Virginia 




Wyoming 


Total 


12,832.044 










915,625 







*No record kept. tFor the five years of which the year stated is the median year. 



MARRIAGE LAWS. 

Marriage may be contracted without the consent 
of parents by males who are 21 years of age or 
more. This is the rule in about all the states 
having laws on the subject. In Ariaona the age 
is 18. For females the age is 21 in Connecticut, 
Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island, South Dakota, Virginia, West Vir- 
ginia and Wyoming; 16 is the age in Arizona, 
Maryland and Nebraska and 18 in the other states. 
Marriages contracted before the age of consent 
are illegal in nearly all the states. 

Marriage licenses are required in all the states 
and territories with the exception of New Mex- 
ico, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ok- 
lahoma and South Carolina. 

Marriages between whites and negroes are pro- 
hibited by law in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, 
California. Colorado. Delaware, District of Co- 
lumbia, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Ken- 
tucky, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, 
Nevada. North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South 
Carolina. Tennessee. Texas, Utah, Virginia and 
West Virginia. Michigan specifically declares 
such marriages valid. 

Marriages between first cousins are prohibited 



in Arizona, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, 
Louisiana, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hamp- 
shire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, 
Pennsylvania, South Dakota and Wyoming. Step- 
relatives are not permitted to intermarry except 
in California, Colorado. Florida, Georgia, Idaho, 
Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, North Caro- 
lina. Oregon, Utah and Wisconsin. 
MARRIAGE RATES. 

For the year 1900 the marriage rate based on the 
total population of continental United States and 
including the total number of marriages reported 
was 90 per 10,000 population. In 1890 the rate was 
87 per 10,000 population. The rate in 1900 per 10,000 
unmarried population 15 years of age and over was 
312; In 1890 it was 304. 

DIVORCE RATES. 

The percentage of increase of divorces as com- 
pared with the percentage of increase in popula- 
tion is shown by the following figures: 

Di- In- Popu- In- 

Year. vorces. crease. lation. crease. 

1900 55,751 66.6 75,994,575 20.7 

1890 33,461 70.2 62,947,714 25.5 

1880 19,663 79.4 50,155,783 30.1 



134 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



CAUSES FOR DIVORCE. 
Summary of the laws in effect in various states and territories. 







d 




c 


i 


| 




NON- 


< 
wo 


I 


. 




t* 


o 





o 


0. . 


a. 






AGE. 


1- 


i, O^ 


a 


STATE OR TERRITORY. 


9 
O 


1 


3 C 

gs 


Ii 

0.0 

BQ 


it 

|i 


P 


1 


o 

"3 



f. 


CO O* 


III 


o 

8 


Alabama ". 


Ves.. 


2 yrs. 


Yes.... 


2 yrs 


Yes.... 


Yes.... 




17 


14 


Ito3y. 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Arizona 


Ves.. 


lyr- 


Yes.... 


Felony- 


Yes.... 


Yes.... 


1 yr.. 


18 


it; 


lyr..:. 


Yes. . 


Yes. 


Arkansas 


Yes.. 


lyr.. 


Yes.. . 


Felony. . 


Yes.... 


lyr.... 




17 


14 


lyr.... 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


California 


Yes- 


lyr- 


Yes 


Felony- 




lyr.... 


iyr.: 


18 


15 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Colorado 


Yes- 


lyr.. 




Felony.. 


Yes!::: 


lyr.... 


lyr- 






lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Connecticut 


Yes- 


3 yrs. 


Yes.::: 


Felony- 




H&b'].. 








3 yrs... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Delaware 


Yes. . 


3 yrs. 


Fraud. 


Felony.. 


Yes.::: 


Hab'l.. 


3 yrs. 


'is' 


ItJ 


Actual 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


District of Columbia 


Yes- 


2 yrs. 


No 


Felony. . 


Yes 


No 




16 


14 


3 yrs... 


Yes*. 


Yes. 


Florida . 


Yes- 


lyr.. 






Yes.... 


Yes.... 


i'yr- 






2 yrs... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Georgia 


Yes- 


3 yrs. 


Ves'.::: 


2 yrs 


Yes.... 


Hab'l. . 




'i-' 


'ii' 


lyr.... 


No... 


Yes. 


Idaho 


Yes- 


lyr.. 


Yes.... 


Felony. . 




1 yr 


iyr!.' 


18 


18 


D mos.. 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Illinois 


Yes.. 


2 yrs. 


Yes.... 


Felony.. 


Yes'.::: 


2 yrs... 




18 


Ifi 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Indiana ' 


Yes.. 


2 yrs. 


Yes- . . 


Feionyt 


Yes.... 


Hab'l.. 


2yrs. 


18 


It! 


2 yrs... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Iowa 


Yes- 


2 yrs. 


Yes.... 


Felonyt. 


Yes.. . . 


Hab'l. . 




16 


14 


lyr... 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Kansas 


Yes.. 


lyr.. 


Yes.... 


Felonyf. 


Yes.... 


Hab'l.. 


Yes.. 


15 


12 


lyr.... 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Kentucky 


Yes.. 


lyr.. 


Yes.... 


Felony. . 


Yes.... 


Yes.... 


lyr.. 


14 


12 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Louisiana 


Yes- 


Yes.. 


Yes.... 


Felony. . 


Yes. .. 


Hab'l.. 




16 


14 




Yes. . 


Yes. 


Maine 


Yes- 


3 yrs. 






Yes.. . . 


Hab'l.. 


Yes- 






iyr.::: 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Maryland 




3 yrs. 


Yes.:.: 




Yes.... 










2 yrs... 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Massachusetts 




3 yrs. 


Fraud. 


5 yrs 


Yes.... 


Hab'l'.'. 


Yes- 






3to5y. 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Michigan 




2 yrs. 


Yes.... 


3 yrs 


Yes.... 


Hab'l.. 


Yes.. 


'is' 


'it;' 


Ito2y. 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Mi nnesota 


Yes- 


1 yr.. 


Yes.... 


Yest 


Yes.... 


lyr.... 




18 


15 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Mississippi 


Yes- 


2 yrs. 




Felony- 


Yes.... 


Hab'l- 








Ito2y. 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Missouri 


Yes.. 


lyr.. 


Yes.::: 


Felony.. 


Yes 


lyr.... 




'is' 


12 


lyr.... 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Montana 
Nebraska 


Yes- 
Yes . 


lyr.. 
2 yrs. 


Yes.... 
Yes.... 


Felony. . 
3 yrs 


Yes 
Yes.... 


lyr.... 
Hab'l- 


Yes- 


18 
18 


it; 

16 


lyr.... 

timos.. 


Yes.. 
Yes- 


Yes. 
Yes. 


Nevada 


Yes.. 


1 yr.. 


Yes-.. 


Felony. . 


Yes.... 


Hab'l.. 


1 yr- 


18 


16 


6mos- 


Yes- 


Yes. 


New Hampshire 


Yes- 


3 yrs. 


Yes.... 


lyr...... 


Yes.... 


3 yrs... 


3 yrs. 


14 


13 


Actual 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


New Jersey. 


Yes.. 


2 yrs. 


Yes.... 




Yes 










2to3y. 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


New Mexico 


Yes.. 


lyr.. 


Yes.... 


Felony.. 


Yes.... 


Hab'l.'. 


Yes.! 


'is' 


'is' 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


New York 


Yes- 




Force- 




Yes.... 






18 


18 


lyr.... 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


North Carolina 


Yes.. 


2 yrs. 


Yes.... 


Feiony.. 


Yes.... 






Ifi 


14 


2 yrs. . 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


North Dakota 


Yes.. 


1 yr- Yes 


Felony.. 




iyr.':: 


i'yr.,' 


18 


15 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Ohio 


Yes.. 


3 yrs. Yes 


Felony.. 


Yes..!. 


3 vrs... 


Yes- 


18 


16 


lyr. .. 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Oklahoma 


Yes.. 


1 yr.. Yes.... 


Felony.. 


Yes.... 


Hab'l.. 


Yes.. 


18 


15 


lyr.... 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Oregon 


Yes.. 


1 yr- Yes 


Felony- 


Yes 


1 yr.... 




18 


15 


lyr.... 


Yes . 


Yes. 


Pennsylvania .*. . 


Yes.. 


2 yrs. Yes 


2 yrs 


Yes.... 










lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Rhode Island 


Yes- 


5 yrs 


Felony. . 


Yes.. . . 


Hab'lV. 


Yes- 






2 yrs... 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


South Carolina^ 




Yes 




















South Dakota 
Tennessee 


Yes.. 
Yes- 


1 yr-lYes.... 
2 yrs. Yes 


Felon v- 
Felony- 


Yes.... 
Yes.... 


lyr.... 
Hab'lt 


lyr.. 
Yes- 


18 


15 


lyr.... 
2 yrs... 


Yes- 
Yes.. 


Yes. 
Yes. 


Texas 


Yes.. 


3 yrs. Fraud. 


Felony- 




Hab'l.. 




'it;' 


'ii' 


6mos- 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Utah 


Yes- 


1 yr.. Yes 


Felony- 


Yes'.::: 


Hab'l.. 


Yes. . 


16 


14 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Vermont 


Yes.. 


3 yrs. 


Yes.... 


3 yrs 


Yes.... 




Yes.. 






lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Virginia 




3 yrs. 


Yes.... 


Yes 


Yes.... 






14 


'l2' 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Washington 


Yes- 


lyr- 


Yes- . . 


Yes 


Yes.... 


HaibiV. 


Yes- 






lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


West Virginia.: 


Yes. 


3 yrs. 


Yes.... 


Yes 


Yes.... 






'is' 


Iti 


lyr.... 


Yes.. 


Yes. 


Wisconsin 


Yes.. 


1 yr- 


Yes.... 


3 yrs 


Yes.... 


iyr'.::: 


Yes- 


18 


15 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yes. 


Wyoming 


Yes.. 


lyr.. 


Yes.... 


Yes 


Yes.... 


Hab'l.. 


lyr- 


18 


16 


lyr.... 


Yes- 


Yea. 



*Innocent party only. tSubsequent to marriage. JSouth Carolina has no divorce law, but marriages may 
be annulied. 

NOTE Consanguinity, infidelity and bigamy are causes for divorce in all states having divorce laws. 
Permanent insanity is cause for divorce in Idaho, Utah and Washington under certain conditions. 

CAUSES OF DIVORCES GRANTED, 1867-190G. 

Granted Granted Granted Granted 

wife. Cause. husband, wife. 

173,047 Neglect to provide 6 

211,219 Combination .of preceding causes.. 14,330 



Cause. husband. 

Cruelty 33,178 

Desertion 156,283 

Drunkenness 3,436 

Infidelity 90,800 



33,080 
62,869 



All other causes .................... 18,026 



34,664 
74,519 
40,078 



FISH FUKNITURE STORE FIRE. 



Twelve lives were lost in a fire in the Fish Fur- 
niture company's store, 1906-1908 Wabash avenue, 
Chicago, March 25, 1910. The victims, of whom ten 
were women and two men, were trapped on the 
sixth floor and eleven were burned to death. One 
young woman either jumped or fell, struck a can- 
opy in front of the store and was fatally in- 



jured, dying on the way to the hospital. The dis- 
aster was cause-.l by the explosion of a can of gas- 
oline, from which one of the employes was en- 
gaged in filling a number of patent cigar lighters 
on the fourth floor. There was a fire escape on the 
rear of th^ building by which several employes 
escaped, but there was none in front. 



EARTHQUAKE IN SOUTHERN ITALY. 



The southern part of Italy and 1 a part of Tuscany 
and Venetia \n the north were shaken by an 
earthquake about 3 o'clock on the morning of 
June 7, 1910. Nearly 100 persons were killed anil 
many others were severely injured, while the loss 
to property was estimated at several million dol- 



lars-. The largest number of casualties occurred 
at Calitri, where forty persons ,^ere killed and 
more than 100 injured. Half of the houses were 
destroyed. Great damage was done throughout 
the whole of the province of Avellino. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



135 



STATISTICS OF CRIME IN THE UNITED STATES. 

[From special reports by census bureau.] 



June 30, 1904, there were In the United States 
1,337 prisons of all kinds receiving persons sen- 
tenced for crime. The total number of Inmates 
on the same date was 81,772, or 100.6 per 100,000 of 



estimated population. Distributed by sex, color, 
nativity and race they were as follows for the 
main geographical divisions: 



DIVISION AND SEX. 


Aggre- 
gate. 


WHITE. 


COLORED. 


Total. 


Na- 
tive. 


For- 
eign 
born. 


Un- 
known 


Total. 


Negro. 


Mon- 
golian. 


Indian 


North Atlantic Males 


24,882 
2,507 


22,193 
2,156 


15.170 
1,193 


6,994 
960 


29 
3 


2,689 
351 


2,661 
349 


15 


13 
2 


Females 




27,389 
10.535 
15 


24,349 
2,758 
101 


16,363 
2,387. 
86 


7,954 
163 
10 


32 
208 
5 


3,040 

7,777 
514 


3,010 
7,767 
514 


15 
1 


15 
9 


South Atlantic Males 


Females 


Total. 


11,150 
20,361 
639 


2,859 
16.295 
398 
16,693 
4,297 
42 


2,473 
13,562 
309 
13,871 
3,839 
41 
3,880 
5,046 
97 


173 
2,556 
89 


213 
177 


8,291 
4,066 
241 


8,281 
3.832 
236 


1 
3 


9 
231 
5 




Females 


Total 


21,000 
14,055 
559 


2,645 

453 
1 


177 
5 


4,307 

9,758 
517 


4,068 
9,752 
517 
10,269 
414 
45 


3 


236 
6 


South Central Males 


Females 




Total 


14,614 
7,436 
183 


4,839 
6,737 
134 


454 
1,682 
37 


5 
9 


10,275 
699 
49 




6 
115 
3 


Western Males 


170 
1 


Females 


Total 


7,619 
77,269 
4,503 


6,871 
52.280 
2,831 


5,143 
40,004 

1,726 


1,719 
11,848 
1,097 


9 
428 
8 


748 
24,089 
1,672 


459 
24,426 
1,661 


171 
189 
1 


118 

374 
10 


Continental United States Males 


Females 


Total 


81,772 


55.111 


41,730 


12,945 


436 


26,661 


26,087 


190 


38 



PRISONERS BY STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



State or territory. 



Maine 496 

New Hampshire 416 

Vermont 274 

Massachusetts 6,684 

Rhode Island 604 

Connecticut .'... 1,125 

New York 9.862 

New Jersey 2,720 

Pennsylvania 6,208 

North Atlantic division 27.389 

Delaware 160 

Maryland 1.867 

District of Columbia 46 

Virginia 1,895 

West Virginia 1,139 

North Carolina 1,185 

South Carolina 1,045 

Georgia 2,679 

Florida 1,234 



No. Per 100.000 pop. 



South Atlantic division 11.150 

Ohio 3,363 

Indiana 2,138 

Illinois 3,180 

Michigan 1,995 

Wisconsin 1,366 

Minnesota 1,067 

Iowa 1,255 

Missouri 2,793 

North Dakota 203 

South Dakota 245 

Nebraska 519 

Kansas 2,876 



North central division 21,000 

Kentucky 2,221 

Tennessee 1,997 

Alabama 2,068 

Mississippi 1,238 

Louisiana 1,680 

Texas 4,504 

Oklahoma 22 

Arkansas 884 



South central division 14,614 

Montana 571 

Wyoming 230 

Colorado 1,022 



70.0 
97.7 
78.7 
187.2 
130.6 
115.4 
126.7 
131.9 
92.3 

121.6 
83.6 

149.7 
15.4 
97.9 

109.6 
59.1 
73.7 

108.8 

211.1 

100.5 
77.2 
80.7 
60.8 
78.8 
61.5 
55.2 
63.1 
85.1 
54.6 
57.9 
48.6 

193.3 

75.2 
98.1 
94.0 
105 6 
74.7 
112. S 
133.2 
4.2 
63.8 

95.7 
200.8 
219.5 
172.8 



State or territory. NO. Peri 

New Mexico 265 

Arizona 318 

Utah 223 

Nevada 129 

Idaho 196 

Washington 911 

Oregon 399 

California 3,355 



Western division 7.619 

Continental United States 81.772 

CLASSIFICATION OF CRIMES. 

Against society 

Against the person 

Against property 

Double crimes 

Unclassified 

Offense not stated 

CONVICTED OF HOMICIDE. 

Maine 44 

New Hampshire 23 

Vermont 15 

Massachusetts 120 

Rhode Island 24 

Connecticut 74 

New York 472 

New Jersey 121 

Pennsylvania 374 



North Atlantic division 1,267 

Delaware 16 

Maryland 124 

Virginia 261 

West Virginia 263 

North Carolina 263 

South Carolina 340 

Georgia 793 

Florida 304 



South Atlantic division 2.364 

Ohio 300 

Indiana 178 

Illinois 463 

Michigan 173 

Wisconsin 137 

Minnesota 101 

Iowa lie 

Missouri 333 

North Dakota 33 



136 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



State or territory. No. Pwioo.ooopop. 

South Dakota 28 6.6 

Nebraska 49 4.6 

Kansas 441 29.6 



8.4 
24.7 
17.7 
32.1 
26 8 
36.3 
29.4 
14.4 

~24.5 
34.8 
39.1 
23.2 
42.0 
59.1 

6.3 
49.6 
16.7 
14.0 

9.9 
25.3 

Western division 1,048 23.3 

Continental United States 10.774 13.S 

PRISONERS ACCORDING TO SENTENCE. 



North central division 2.852 

Kentucky 560 

Tennessee 376 

Alabama 628 

Mississippi 444 

Louisiana 540 

Texas 995 

Arkansas ' 

South central division 3,743 

Montana 5 9 

Wyoming 41 

Colorado 137 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

ttah 18 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington 82 

Oregon 45 

California 404 



Death 133 

Imprisonment Life 5,026 
Indeterminate ...12,352 
21 years and over 1,591 

20 years 1,405 

15 to 19 years 2,152 

10 to 14 years 5,192 

9 years 374 

8 years 1,190 

7 years 1,777 

6 years 1,464 



4 years 2,879 

3 years 5,457 

2^ years 902 

2 years 6.313 

\Vi years 1,284 

1 year 6,?5 - J 



At least 1 year. 43, 679 

Under 1 year 20,OS3 

Period not stated 499 

.All sentences 81,772 

years 6,446 

PRISONERS COMMITTED IN 1904. 

During 1904 a total of 149,691 prisoners were com- 
mitted in the United States on term sentences. 
Assuming that those enumerated on June 30. 1904 - 
namely. 81.772 represent the average number in 
prisons on any given date, it will be seen that 
the prison population on a fixed date constitutes 
about 54.6 per cent of the number committed on 
term sentences during a year. 

Of the prisoners committed in 1904 244 were for 
homicide, 1.484 for robbery and 7,161 for burglary. 
The distribution by color, sex. race and nativity 
was as follows: 

Total. 
White Native 86.833 

Native parentage 51,930 

Foreign parentage 24.448 

Mixed parentage 5.667 

Parentage unknown 4,788 

Foreign born 35,093 

Nativity unknown 3,167 



Male. Female 

80,967 5,866 
3.365 
1,817 
455 

220 



48.565 
22,631 
5,212 
4.559 
30,613 
3,090 



4,480 
77 



Total white 125,093 114.670 10,423 



Colored Negro 23,698 

Mongolian 186 

Indian 714 



20,865 
183 
647 



2,833 



Total colored 24,598 21,695 2,903 

Aggregate 149,691 136,365 13,326 

LITERACY. 

Of the prisoners committed In 1904 83 per cent 
were literate and 12.6 per cent illiterate; 1.1 per 
cent could read but not write and 18.0 per cent 
could neither read nor write. 



Country. Pet 

Mexico 1.4 

Norway 1.4 

Poland 3.0 

Russia 3.5 

Scotland 3.5 

Sweden 2.9 

Switzerland 0.5 

Other countries 4.2 



FOREIGN-BORN PRISONERS. 

Country. Pet 

Austria 2.9 

Canada 101 

Denmark 0.6 

England and Wales. 9.2 

France 1.0 

Germany 12.3 

Hungary 1.2 

Ireland 36.2 

Italy 6.1 

AGES OF PRISONERS COMMITTED IN 1904. 

Total. Male. Female 

10 to 14 years 695 

15 to 19 years. 13,886 

20 to 24 years 86,983 

25 to 29 years 23,278 

30 to 34 years 19.173 

35 to 39 years 17,460 

40 to 44 years 14.260 

45 to 49 years 10,415 

50 to 59 years 12.306 

60 to 69 years 5.069 

70 years and over 1.072 



642 
12,909 
24,647 
21,153 
17,245 
15.683 
12.850 

9.471 
11,335 

4,614 
943 



53 

977 

2,336 

2,125 

1,928 

1,777 

1,410 

944 

971 

455 

129 



All known ages 144.597 131,492 13,105 

MARITAL CONDITION. 

Of the prisoners committed In 1904 63.9 per cent 
were single. 26.1 married, 4.1 widowed, 0.5 di- 
vorced and 5.3 unknown. Of the male prisoners 
66.3 per cent were single and 24.2 per cent married, 
while of the female prisoners 39.1 per cent were 
single and 46.2 per cent married. 

OCCUPATION. 

Occupations. Pet. 

Professional 0.9 

Clerical and official ., 2.1 

Mercantile and trading 36 

Public entertainment O.T 

Personal service, police and military 1.8 

Laboring and servant 50.1 

Manufacturing and mechanical industry 23.7 

Agriculture, transportation and other outdoor.. .17.2 
All other occupations 0.9 

JUVENILE DELINQUENTS ENUMERATED 
JUNE 30. 1904. 

Total. Male. Female 

White Native 17.989 14.130 3.859 

Foreign born 1.874 1,562 312 

Nativity unknown 936 



Total white 19,872 15,695 4,177 

Colored Negro 3,112 2,433 679 

Mongolian 2 2 

Indian 48 47 1 

Total colored 3.162 2,482 680 

Aggregate 23,034 18,177 4,857 

JUVENILE DELINQUENTS COMMITTED DTJBING 1904. 

Total. Male. Female 



White Native 9,061 7,776 

Native parentage 4,440 3.812 

Foreign parentage 2.947 2,659 

Mixed parentage 1,145 969 

Parentage unknown 529 336 

Foreign born 1,116 1,020 

Nativity unknown 61 39 



1,285 
628 



176 
193 



Total white 10,238 8,835 

Colored Negro 1,550 1,294 

Mongolian 2 2 

Indian 24 23 

Total colored 1.576 1,319 



DEATH PENALTY IN THE UNITED STATES. 



Capital punishment prevails in all of the states 
and territories of the union except Michigan. Wis- 
consin. Rhode Island, Kansas and Maine. It was 
abolished in Iowa in 1872 and restored in 1878. It 



was also abolished in Colorado, but was restored in 
1901. In New York and Ohio execution is by elec- 
tricity. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1911. 



137 



STATE PRISONS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



Alabama Wetumnka. 

Alaska Sitka (U. S. jail). 

Arizona Florence. 

Arkansas Little Rock. 

California Folsora. 
San Quentin. 

Colorado Canon City. 

Connecticut Weathersfleld. 

Delaware Wilmington (work- 
house). 

District of Columbia U. S. Jail. 

Florida Tallahassee (commis- 
sion). 

Goorgia Atlanta (commission). 

Illinois Joliet, Chester. 

Idaho Boise. 

Indiana Michigan City. 
Indianapolis (women.) 

Icwa Fort Madison, Anamosa. 

Kansas Lansing. 

Kentucky Frankfort. 
Eddyvllle (branch). 

Louisiana Baton Rouge. 

Maine Thoroaston. 

Maryland-Baltimore. 



Massachusetts Charlestown. 
Bridgewater. 
South Frumingham (women). 

Michigan Jackson. 
Marquette (branch). 

M innesota Stillwater. 

Mississippi Jackson (commis- 
sion). 

Missouri Jefferson City. 

Montana Deer Lodge. 

Nebraska Lincoln. 

Nevada Carson Oity. 

New Hampshire Concord. 

New Mexico Santa Fe. 

New Jersey Trenton. 

New York Auburn. 
Dannemora (Clinton). 
Sing Sing (Ossining). 

North Carolina Raleigh. 

North Dakota Bismarck. 

Ohio Columbus. 

O klahoma Me Alester. 

Oregon Salem. 

Pennsylvania Philadelphia. 



Rhode Island Howard. 
South Carolina Columbia. 
South Dakota Sioux Falls. 
Tennessee Nashville. 

Petros (branch). 
Texas Huntsville. 

Rusk. 

Utah Salt Lake City. 
Veimont Windsor. 
Virginia Richmond. 
Washington Walla Walla. 
West Virginia Moundsville. 
Wisconsin Waiipun. 
Wyoming Rawllns. 

UNITED STATES PRISONS. 

Atlanta. Ga. Penitentiary. 

Fort Leavenworth, Kas. Peni- 
tentiary. 

McNeil's Island, vVash. Peniten- 
tiary. 

Marc: Island, Cal. Naval prison. 

Boston, Mass. Naval prison. 

Portsmouth, N. H. Naval prison. 



Allegheny (Pittsburg). 
THE AMERICAN PRISON ASSOCIATION. 

President T. B. Patton, Huntingdon, Pa. I Treasurer Frederick H. Mills, 97 Warren street. 

New York. N. Y. 



President T. B. Patton, Huntingdon, fa. 
General secretary Joseph P. Byers, box 15, station 
L, New York, N. Y. 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS IN THE UNITED STATES (1904). 



8TATB OR 

TERRITORY. 


Ii 


Hospitals.! 


Perman't I 
homes. 


Tempor'y 1 
homes. | 


For deaf 
and blind) 


Nurseries 


Dispensa- 
ries. 


STATE OK 
TERRITORY. 


Orphan- 1 
ages. 


Hospitals. 1 


Perman't 1 
homes. | 


Tempor'y 1 
homes. | 


For deaf 
and blind] 


Nurseries 


Dispensa- 1 
ries. Ii 




8 


9 

If 


4 


1 

1 


3 






Nebraska 
Nevada 


7 


17 


i 


4 


2 


1 






A b TtflflH 


5 
47 
10 

a 
i 

12 
7 
22 


5T 
32 
21 
3 
H 
IT 
17 
t; 


S 
27 
3 

23 
6 
12 
6 
10 
1 


2 
H 

8 
9 

1 

n 
i 


2 
3 
1 
4 






New Hampshire 


U 

ft 

t 


19 

48 
11 


13 
32 


3 
17 










i 

8 
1 


10 
2 
3 


New Jersey 


2 


13 


4 




New Mexico 




New York 


147 
16 
2 

105 
3 
5 
94 
12 
9 
2 
18 

n 

3 

5 
27 
9 
7 
15 


194 
21 

8 
74 

1 

a 

145 
9 
8 
8 
13 
31 
7 
9 

19 
28 
20 
43 
5 
14U3 


118 
4 
1 
41 


82 
4 
2 
27 
1 


16 
2 

5 
1 


62 
1 


40 
1 




North Carolina 


District of Columbia 


2 
1 
2 


i 

i 

2 


3 


North Dakota 


Ohio 
Oklahoma 


8 


7 






Oregon 


81 
8 
5 
1 
8 
12 

'"f 

21 
4 
2 

n 

i 

753 


4 
45 
6 
2 


2 

8 

1 

? 


"is 

8 


15 

i 


Illinois 


03 
3 

H 

12 
14 
26 
25 
10 
38 
52 

H 

Ki 

6 
:il 
1 


105 
2 
31 
41 
23 
29 
10 
12 
32 
93 
511 
44 
1 

M 

1C, 


42 
1 
19 
II 

14 

H 

14 
19 
73 
20 
10 
1 
2--' 
2 


22 


5 
1 





14 






Rhod e I sland 




8 
10 
4 
11 
4 

a 
n 

47 

a 

8 

2 
]4 
2 


2 
2 
2 
2 
S 
1 
4 
7 
3 
2 
2 
6 


2 
2 


6 
2 


South Carolina 




South Dakota 




Tennessee 
Texas 


6 

12 

1 

a 

5 
2 
9 


2 
3 
1 


1 


i 






1 

"*i 

20 
'" 




Utah 




"16 

13 
6 
3 


Vermont 
Virginia 








1 
1 
1 
8 


1 


9 


\} ' pVm*tf s" " * 






West Virginia 


1 






Wisconsin 


\f '^ -icfsfnni 


Wyoming 






Mi ssourf 
Montana 


5 


8 


Total 


1075 


^4T) 


Tl5 


~166 


166 


The cost of maintenance by classes of all in- 
stitutions included in the above table was in 
1903: Orphanages. $10,050,587; hospitals, $28,- 
200.869; permanent homes. $9,916,180; temporary 


homes, $3.039.035: Institutions for deaf and blind, 
$3.523.683; nurseries. $327,659: dispensaries, $519,- 
620: total, $55,577,633. 



PORK-PACKING STATISTICS. 
Season from Nov. 1 to March 1. 



CITY. 


1908-09 


1907-08 


1906-07 


1905-06 


1904-05 


1903-04 


1902-03 


1901-02 


1900-01 


1899-00 




No. hogs 
2.640.765 
245.323 
703.235 
1,520.481 

96,600 

583.338 
700.772 
884.937 


No. hogs 
2.570,475 

297.472 
747.074 
1.3K5.221 
83.647 
684.060 
742.734 
706.029 


No. hogs 
2,403.739 
226.988 
540.486 
1.135.931 
69.381 
453.4(3 
687.274 
656.636 


No. hogs 
2.592,866 
255,167 
600.423 
1.202.736 
154.767 
467.407 
800.470 
680.132 


No. hogs 
2.812.588 
268.269 
516.230 
1.231.408 
184.446 
394.425 
738.131 
761.982 


No. hogs 
2.925.960 
247.947 
479.380 
861.674 
126.251 
423.024 
746.596 
627.550 


No. hogs 
2.952.193 
220.617 
359.454 
743.85 
143.815 
295.407 
777.941 
503.823 


No. hogs 

3.433.905 
232.882 
476.568 
1.271. S6 
150.000 
32^.169 
938.787 
642.080 


No. hogs 

2.r70 095 

244.932 
434.250 
1.178.320 
143.982 
396.298 
786.156 
667.000 


No. hogs 
2.869.580 
270.460 
410.709 
959.aS4 
132.279 
339.016 
729.073 
613.653 


Cincinnati 
Indianapolis 
Kansas City 


Milwaukee 




St. Louis 


Includes Cudahy. 



138 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



Deaths per 1,000 of population in the registration 
areas of the United States: 
Annual av. 
1901 to 1905.1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 

Registration area 16.3 16.6 16.2 16.1 16.5 15.4 

Registration cities 17.2 17.5 16.9 17.2 17.6 16.2 

Registration states.. ..15.9 16.4 15.9 16.1 16.4 15.3 
Cities in registration 

states 17.4 17.9 17.2 17.8 18.0 16.5 

Rural part of registra- 
tion states 11.1 14.4 14.3 14.1 14.5 14.0 

Registration cities in 

other states 16.S 17.1 16.6 15.9 16.6 15.5 

The registration area includes seventeen states 
and the District of Columbia, containing 51.8 per 
cent of the total estimated population of conti- 
nental United States. The total number of deaths 
reported in this area in 1908 was 691,674. The esti- 
mated population ofl the area was 45,028,767 and the 
death rate was consequently 15.4 per 1,000 of popu- 
lation. 

PROPORTIONAL DEATHS BY SEXES AND 

AGES. 

Per 1,000 deaths. 
Annu-il av. 

1901 to 1905. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 

Male 536.2 537.3 536.9 544.4 547.3 643.0 

Female 463.8 462.7 463.1 455.6 452.7 457.0 

Under 1 year 189.3 186.6 193.5 202.3 190.8 197.3 

1 year 42.2 40.4 40.3 43.9 40.1 40.2 

2 years 18.9 17.7 17.7 18.5 17.5 18.0 

3 years 12.0 11.5 10.0 11.3 11.1 11.2 

4 years 8.9 8.5 7.9 8.2 7.9 7.9 

Under 5 271.3 264.6 270.2 284.1 267.5 274.5 

5 to 9 25.8 25.0 23.5 23.3 22.3 22.9 

10 to 14 16.4 17.0 16.2 15.9 15.3 15.3 

15 to 19 27.4 28.1 27.4 27.2 26.7 26.2 

20 to 24 42.0 42.1 41.4 40.7 40.6 39.2 

25 to 29 46.1 46.0 44.8 43.5 42.8 41.4 

30 to 34 45.6 45.8 44.9 43.3 43.9 42.0 

35 to 39... .. 47.8 48.0 48.2 46.8 47.8 45.1 

40 to 44 46.7 46.8 46.1 44.2 45.5 44.2 

45 to 49 45.4 46.2 47.6 46.7 47.5 47.3 

50 to 54 48.5 49.3 48.9 47.4 48.9 49.3 

49.6 49.6 48.6 50.0 50.2 
57.0 56.9 54.9 57.2 57.0 
57.5 58.7 57.8 60.4 60.0 
58.4 57.5 57.2 60.1 59.7 
50.2 51.2 50.9 53.0 54.1 
37.1 
19.3 

6.9 

2.0 

3.2 



UNITED STATES MOSTALITY STATISTICS. 
[From census bureau report, 1910.] 



55 to 59 49.2 

60 to 64 55.7 

65 to 69 57.4 

7C to 74 56.9 

75 to 79 49.9 

80 to 84 36.7 

85 to 89 18.8 

90 to 94 6.6 

95 and over 2.1 

Unknown 3.4 



36.5 
19.9 
6.6 
2.1 
1.9 



36.5 
19.9 
6.4 
2.1 
2.7 



39.0 
20.9 
6.8 
2.0 
1.8 



39.4 
21.4 
7.1 
2.2 
1.3 



CHIEF CAUSES OF DEATH IN THE UNITED 
STATES. 

Per 100,000 of population. 

Annual av. 
Diseases. 1901 to 1905. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 

Diabetes 11.6 12.9 13.0 12.0 13.9 13.9 

Old a"e 41.2 39.0 36.4 34.3 32.7 30.7 

Bronchitis 37.0 36.0 33.5 30.3 30.9 26.9 

Convulsions 22.6 20.5 19.8 18.1 16.9 14.3 

Paralysis 20.2 19.4 17.7 16.9 19.5 16.8 

Peritonitis 10.9 10.1 9.2 8.2 7.5 6.6 

Tuberculosis 169.9 177.3 168.2 159.4 158.9 149.6 

Pneumonia 126.2 135.7 115.7 110.8 120.8 98.8 

Heart disease 124.9 134.2 132.5 130.7 141.7 133.3 

Diarrhea, enteritis... 109.8 111.3 116.7 122.9 116.7 116.0 

Brisrht's disease 97.5103.8104.3 99.8105.5 97.3 

Apoplexy 70.0 71.9 72.2 71.8 75.4 72.1 

Cancer 68.3 70.6 72.1 70.8 73.1 74.3 

Broncho-pneumonia .. 33.1 36.9 34.4 38.2 40.4 37.2 

Tvphoid fever 32.2 31.9 28.1 32.1 30.3 25.3 

Meningitis 31.9 31.8 34.5 25.6 26.6 19.8 

Premature birth 30.9 34.3 32.9 34.8 36.5 36.5 

Diphtheria croup.... 29.7 28.5 23.8 26.3 24.3 22.3 
Congenital debility... 23.3 20.7 31.5 34.2 33.8 32.1 

Influenza 20.0 20.3 19.0 10.5 24.1 22.2 

Cirrhosis of liver.... 14.4 15.1 14.8 14.8 15.8 14.9 

Lack of care 12.4 14.5 3.0 0.9 0.3 0.3 

Gastritis 11.4 11.2 10.6 10.4 9.8 9.2 

Endocarditis 11.3 11.7 12.6 12.9 14.3 13.3 

Scarlet fever 11.1 10.9 6.8 7.9 10.3 12.4 

Appendicitis 11.0 11.9 12.0 11.4 11.2 11.7 

Whooping cough 11.0 6.6 10.7 15.4 11.6 11.0 



DEATHS FROM VIOLENCE IN THE UNITED 

STATES. 
Per 100,000 population in registration area. 

Annual av. 

Cause. 1901 to 1905. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 
Suicide 14.0 14.8 16.1 14.3 16.2 18.5 



Fractures 



8.4 



Dislocations 0.2 

Bums and scalds 8.3 

Heat, sunstroke 3.7 

Cold, freezing 0.6 

Lightning 0.3 



Drowning 



8.7 
0.1 
8.3 
0.7 
0.7 
0.2 



7.4 
0.1 
8.4 
2.6 
0.7 
0.2 



7.5 
0.1 
8.7 
1.9 
0.5 
0.4 



4.6 
0.1 
9.4 
1.4 
0.7 
0.3 



8.2 
t 

1.8 
0.5 
0.4 



10.3 10.2 10.0 10.7 10.3 10.4 



Gas poisoning 4.3 6.5 3.9 3.1 4.0 3.7 

Other poisoning 4.3 4.9 3.8 4.2 4.1 3.7 

Gunshot accidents.... 3.4 3.9 2.4 2.6 2.1 2.2 

Injuries by machinery 0.9 1.0 1.0 1.4 2.6 2.0 

Injuries in mines 1.0 1.0 1.5 3.7 5.1 4.3 

Railroad accidents.... 15.3 15.3 17.0 17.3 18.4 13.5 



Street-cat' accidents.. * * 
Injuries by vehicles. . 2.6 2.9 
Automobile accidents t t 

Suffocation 1.6 1.7 

Injuries at birth 5.0 5.7 

Homicide 2.9 2.8 

Other ext'nal violence 5.1 4.7 
Starvation, privation. 0.1 0.1 

All violence ... 107.3 110.6 111.9 120.9 125.8 116.4 

Included In railroad accidents. fNot reported 
separately. JLess than one-tenth. 



3.5 

1.6 

6.4 

4.6 
3.8 
0.1 



3.6 
3.7 
0.4 
1.8 
6.2 
5.1 
3.7 
0.1 



4.5 
4.3 
0.7 
1.7 
6.7 
6.5 
2.5 
0.1 



3.8 
4.3 
0.9 
1.6 
6.9 
6.7 
1.9 
0.1 



Indianapolis 
Jersey City 
Kansas City.. 
Louisville 



DEATH RATE IN AMERICAN CITIES. 

Per 1,000 of population. 
Annual av. 

1901 to 1905. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 1908. 

Boston 18.8 18.3 18.3 18.5 18.9 19.2 19.1 

Buffalo 15.5 16.0 16.0 15.6 16.6 17.1 15.9 

Chicago 14.3 15.3 13.8 13.8 14.2 15.3 14.0 

Cincinnati 19.3 18.8 20.8 19.2 20.8 18.5 18.5 

Cleveland 15.5 16.6 15.4 14.7 16.0 16.2 14.? 

Denver 19.3 18.4 19.6 19.2 21.1 23.5 23.6 

Detroit 15.2 15.8 14.9 14.4 17.0 16.5 15.6 

Fall River 20.3 22.2 19.6 19.9 19.7 22.5 22.1 

.15.2 15.8 16.3 14.1 14.6 15.2 13.5 

.19.3 18.7 20.8 19.0 19.5 19.5 17.8 

.17.2 17.4 19.7 16.9 15.3 18.0 16.8 

.18.6 18.6 19.8 18.1 18.2 18.1 16.0 

Memphis 18.3 17.8 19.5 17.9 17.6 19.0 17.5 

Milwaukee 13.2 13.5 13.6 13.0 14.5 14.4 13.6 

Minneapolis 10.2 10.4 9.6 9.4 10.3 10.4 10.3 

New Haven 17.5 17.0 17.2 18.7 19.1 18.6 16.9 

New Orleans 22.6 22.3 22.3 23.7 21.7 24.0 22.7 

New York 19.0 18.0 20.1 18.4 18.6 18.7 16.S 

Omaha 11.1 9.7 11.5 10.8 11.4 12.4 12.1 

Philadelphia 18.2 18.8 18.8 17.7 19.3 18.7 17.4 

Plttsburg 20.7 21.7 19.8 20.0 19.9 19.2 16.5 

Providence 18.8 20.6 18.5 17.5 18.7 19.3 16.8 

St. Louis 17.8 18.2 18.8 16.9 15.6 15.7 14.5 

St. Paul 10.0 9.7 10.0 10.0 10.3 10.6 10.1 

San Francisco 21.3 20.8 20.1 

Scranton 16.3 14.9 17.9 18.2 16.5 15.9 16.5 

Seattle 12.1 12.6 11.5 

Svracuse 14.5 14.3 15.2 15.5 15.5 15.9 16.5 

Toledo 14.1 14.7 13.7 13.7 14.7 14.7 14.0 

Washington 20.6 20.3 20.8 20.5 20.5 20.3 19.3 

DEATH RATES IN VARIOUS COUNTRIES. 

Number of deaths from all causes per 1,000 of 
population. 

Annual av. 

1901 to 1905. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907 

11.4 11.8 10.8 10.5 10.6 10.9 

24.1 23.8 23.7 25.0 t t 

Belgium 17.1 17.0 16.9 16.5 16.4 

Bulgaria 22.9 22.9 21.4 22.0 22.5 

Cevlon 26.7 25.9 24.9 27.7 34.3 

Chile 30.0 26.9 28.8 32.3 t 

Denmark 14.8 14.7 14.1 15.0 13.5 14.2 

Finland 18.6 17.9 17.7 18.4 17.5 t 

France 19.6 19.2 19.4 19.6 19.9 20.6 

flermanv . 19.9 20.0 19.6 19.8' 18.2 t 

Prussia' 19-6 19.7 19.2 19.6 17.9 17.8 

Hur.garv 26.2 26.1 24.8 27.8 24.8 25.2 

Italy ..' 21.8 22.2 20.9 21.9 20.8 20.S 

Jamaica 22.6 24.6 24.7 21.9 26.2 28.4 

Japan 20.4 20.0*21.2*21.9 t t 

Netherlands 16.0 15.6 15.9 15.3 14.8 14.6 

Norway 14.5 14.8 14.3 14.8 13.6*14.2 



Country. 
Australasia 
Austria 



t 
t 

30.1 
t 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



139 



Annual av. 
Country. 1901 to 1905. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 

Roumania 2i.5 24.8 24.4 25.0 23.9 26.3 

Servia 22.4 23.5 21.1 24.4 24.1 t 

Spain 26.1 25.0 *25.8 *25.9 *26.2 *24.0 

Sweden 15.5 15.1 15.3 *15.6 *14.4 *14.6 

Switzerland 17.7 17.6 17.8 17.9 17.0 T 

United kingdom 16.3 15.8 16.5 15.5 15.6*15.4 



Annual nv. 

Country. 1901 to 1905. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907. 

England and Wales. 16.0 15.4 16.2 15.2 14.4 15.0 

Scotland 16.9 16.6 16.9 15.9*16.0*16.2 

Ireland 17.6 17.5 18.1 17.1 17.0 17.7 

United States 16.3 16.1 16.6 16.2 16.1 16.5 

Based on provisional figures. fNo figures avail- 
able. 



DEATHS FROM TUBERCULOSIS. 
"Tuberculosis is easily the first in Importance 
among all the causes of death and far exceeds in 
its mortality any other of the infectious diseases 



with whose prevention and restriction public health 
services are concerned." (Extract from United 



States census report, 1909). 



NUMBER OF DEATHS.* 

Annual average. 
Form of disease. 1901 to 1905. 

Tuberculosis of lungs f.5,251 

Tuberculous meningitis 2. 90S 

Abdominal tuberculosis 1,946 

Other forms of tuberculosis 2,733 



1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


53,910 


58.763 


56,770 


65,341 


66,374 


67,376 


2.905 


3.025 


3,264 


3,938 


4,062 


4.218 


1,854 


2.098 


2,193 


2.663 


2,629 


2,723 


2,818 


2,911 


3,125 


3,570 


3,585 


3,97k 



Tuberculosis (all forms) 62,835 61,487 66,797 65,352 75,512 76,650 78,289 



193.2 189.0 201.6 193.6 

DEATHS BY STATES AND CITIES. 



tuberculosis, ac- 
ts shown in the 



following table 
tiont 



NUMBER PER 100,000 OP POPULATION.* 

Tuberculosis of lungs 169.9 165.7 177.3 168.2 

Tuberculous meningitis 8.9 8.9 9.1 9.7 

Abdominal tuberculosis 6.G 5.7 6.3 6.5 

Other forms of tuberculosis 8.3 8.7 8.7 9.3 

Tuberculosis (all forms) 

*In registration area. 

The mortality from all forms of 
cording to the returns for 1908, 

Registration area 173.9 

Registration cities 197.4 

Registration states 169.2 

Cities in registration states. 198. 3 
Rural part registr'n states.. 136.6 
Registr'n cities, other states. 195. 5 
Registration states: 

California 271.2 

Colorado .300.7 

Connecticut 156.7 

Indiana 162.8 

Maine 154.5 

Maryland 197.2 

Massachusetts 172.2 

Michigan 102.5 

New Hampshire 129.7 

New Jersey 187.0 



159.4 158.9 149.6 

9.6 9.7 9.4 

6.5 6.3 6.0 

8.8 8.7 8.9 



184.2 183.6 173.9 



New York 194.7 

Pennsylvania 143.1 

Rhode Island 206.5 

South Dakota 102.0 

Vermont 132.7 

Washington 167.3 

Wisconsin 107.9 

Registration cities (largest): 

Baltimore 249.9 

Boston 219.1 

Chicago 180.7 

Cincinnati 284.8 

Cleveland 142.4 

Denver 511.8 

Detroit 122.5 

Indianapolis 222.6 

Jersey City 241.1 



of deaths per 100,000 of popula- 

Kansas City 172.9 

Louisville 205.5 

Milwaukee 133.9 

Minneapolis 121.7 

New Orleans 298.3 

New York 234.4 

Omaha 108.9 

Philadelphia 234.1 

Pittsburg 139.2 

St. Louis 188.3 

St. Paul 111.8 

San Francisco * 

Scranton 100.8 

Toledo 155.9 

Washington . ' 264.0 

Population not estimated 



BIRTH RATE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Per 1,000 population with average annual excess of births over deaths per 1,000 mean population, 
1890-1900. From census report. 



Birth Ex- Birth 
rate cess of rate 
State. 1890. births. 1900. 
Connecticut 21.3 9.3 24.0 


Birth Ex- Birth 
rate cess of rate 
State. ' 1890. births. 1900. 
Ohio 24.2 12.4 23.1 
Pennsylvania 25.8 14.9 26.9 
South Dakota 31.8 24.3 30.8 
Wisconsin 27.1 22.8 27.4 


Birth Ex- Birth 
rate cess of rate 
State. 1890. births. 1900. 
Tennessee 30.8 15.2 30.7 
Texas 31.6 30.1 32.9 
Virginia 27.2 7.0 30.3 
West Virginia 30.7 28.4 32.3 
Southern dlv 30.1 19.8 31.5 
Arizona 17.2 12.3 26.9 
California 19.6 15.3 18.3 
Colorado 26.6 20.4 23.9 


Maine 17.6 2.1 21.1 
Massachusetts ....21.5 12.5 24.0 
New Hampshire... 18.0 0.7 21.3 
New York 23.3 13.6 24.2 


N'th'n-Cent. div.26.8 18.4 25.9 
Alabama 30.6 23.7 32.1 
Arkansas 34.3 25.5 32.4 
Delaware 2K.O 10.6 24.7 


Rhode Island 22.3 11.4 24.3 
Vermont 18.3 *1.5 21.3 

Northeast'n div.21.1 17.7 23.8 


Illinois 27.8 20.8 25.5 
Indiana 25.4 14.6 24.9 
Iowa 26.3 23.0 25.8 
Kansas 28.5 20.4 25.8 


Dist. Columbia.. 
Florida 
Georgia 
Kentucky 


.23.3 11.0 20.3 
28.7 22.3 30.9 
..30.6 20.7 32.1 
..29.6 16.8 30.6 


Montana 21.8 20.7 24.4 
Nevada 15.5 16.3 18.9 
New Mexico 33.0 14.7 33.6 


Michigan 24.9 18.9 24.3 
Minnesota 30.2 26.2 28.7 
Missouri 29.0 19.9 26.0 


Louisiana 
Maryland 
Mississippi 


..29.8 22.3 30.5 
..26.0 12.9 26.3 
..30.3 23.6 31.2 


Utah 81.2 31.8 35.2 


Washington 23.8 20.8 22.0 
Wyoming 21.7 21.1 24.2 


New Jersev 25.3 15.1 25.8 


North Carolina.. 
Oklnhnmu . 


..30.1 16.0 33.7 
.22.1 23.3 33.7 


Western div 22^9 liT? 22^8 
United Statesf..26.9 17.7 27.2 

rative purposes. The true annual 
1e whole of the United States, as 
atural increase of population be- 
)00, is within 2 per cent either way 
of mean population. 


North Dakota 36.5 27.3 33.6 South Carolina.. 

Decrease, tlncluslve of Indian Territory, not 
separately stated. 
NOTE Owing to imperfect data the above figures 
are only approximately correct, but being based on 
the same method of enumeration they are of some 


.31.3 15.7 34.3 

value for compa 
birth rate for t 
shown by the n 
tween 1890 and 1 
of 35.1 per 1,000 



140 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



DEATH RATE IN 1909. 
Per 1,000. 



United States 15.0 

Baltimore 18.7 

Boston 16.8 

Buffalo 15.2 

Chicago 14.6 

Cincinnati 16.4 

Cleveland 12.8 

Columbus 13.4 

Denver 17.0 



Detroit 14.0 

Fall River 19.1 

Indianapolis 14.3 

Jersey City 16.8 

Kansas City 14.4 

Milwaukee 13.6 

Newark 16.5 

New Haven 16.9 

New Orleans 20.2 



New York 16.0 

Bronx borough 15.9 

Brooklyn borough.. 15. 4 
Manhattan borough. 16.6 

Queen's borough 14.2 

Richmond borough. .18.1 

Paterson 15.3 

Philadelphia 16.4 

Pittsburg 15.8 



Providence 16.1 

Rochester 14.4 

St. Louis 15.8 

St. Paul 11.4 

Scranton 16.3 

St. Joseph 13.7 

Syracuse 14.5 

Toledo 14.6 

Worcester 15.5 



Country. 
England and 
Scotland 

Ireland 

Denmark . . . 

Norway 

Sweden 

Finland 

Austria 



BIRTH RATE IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 
Per 1,000 of population. By ten-year periods. 



1881-1890. 1891-1900. 

Wales.. 32.5 29.9 

32.5 30.2 

, 23.4 23.0 

...32.0 30.2 

30.8 30.3 

29.0 27.2 

34.9 32.2 

37.9 37.1 



Country. 



1881-1890. 1891-1900. 



Hungary 44.0 40.6 

Switzerland 28.1 28.1 

Germany 36.8 36.1 

Prussia 37.4 36.7 

Bavaria 36.8 36.5 

Saxony 41.8 39.5 

Netherlands 34.2 32.5 



Country. 



1881-1890. 1891-1900. 



Belgium 30.2 29.0 

France 23.9 22.2 

Portugal 33.0 30.6 

Spain 36.4 35.3 

Italy 37.8 34.9 

Servla 45.0 41.7 

Roumania 41.4 40.7 



BY DIVISIONS OF TIME. 

Assuming that the population of the United 
States is 87,000,000 and the death rate 16 per 1,000, 
the total number of deaths in a year Is 1,392,000. 
This is at the rate of 3.814 per day, 159 per hour 
and 2.6 per minute. With a birth rate of 34 per 
1,000, the total number of births In a year In the 
United States will approximate 2,958,000, or at the 
rate of 8,104 per day, 338 per hour and 5.6 per min- 
ute. 



DEATHS AND BIRTHS 

Assuming that the total population of the world 
Is 1,600,000,000 and the average annual death rate 
20 per 1,000 of population, the total number of 
deaths In a year Is about 32.000,000. This is at the 
rate of 87,671 per day, 3,653 per hour, 61 per minute 
and 1 per second. 

As the population of the world Increases by about 
7,000,000 per year," the total births must be that 
number In excess of the deaths, or about 39,000.000. 
This Is at the rate of 106,849 births per day, 4,452 
per hour, 74 per minute and 1.2 per second. 

MORTALITY OF WAGE EARNERS. 
Death rate per 1,000 employes in certain occupations In the United States In 1900. 

Diseases of 

Manufacturing and mechanical industries. of iSi 

Bakers and confectioners .............................. 2.50 

Blacksmiths .......................................... 2.13 

Boot and shoe makers ................................. 1.36 

Brewers, distillers and rectifiers ................. ~... 2.57 

Butchers ............................................... 2.88 

Cabinetmakers and upholsterers ..................... 3.59 

Carpenters and joiners ................................. 2.31 

Clgarmakers and tobacco workers ................... 4.77 

Compositors, printers and pressmen .................. 4.36 

Coopers ..................................... ........... 3.00 

Engineers and firemen (not locomotive) ............. 230 

Iron and steel workers ................................. 2.36 

Leather makers ....................................... 3.11 

Leather workers ....................................... 2.27 

Machinists ........................................... 1.96 

Marble and stone cutters .............................. 5.41 

Masons (brick and stone) ............................. 2.94 

Mill and factory operatives (textiles) ................ 2.08 

Millers (flour and grist) ............................. 1.99 

Painters, glaziers and varnishers .................... 3.19 

Plumbers and gas and steam fitters ................... 2.94 

Tailors ................................................ 2.18 

Tinners and tinware makers ........................ 3.65 

Agriculture, transportation and other outdoor 

classes. 

Draymen, hackmen, teamsters, etc ................... 2.61 

Farmers, planters and farm laborers ................. 1.12 

Miners and quarrymen ................................ 1.21 

Steam railroad employes ............................... 1.30 



system, 
1.61 
2.99 
1.50 
2.74 
2.30 
2.22 
2.45 
1.80 
1.31 
2.90 
2.09 

.92 
1.02 
2.68 
1.24 
1.10 
2.27 

.84 
4.47 
2.14 

.91 
1.43 
1.78 



.90 

2.71 

.39 

.96 



disease. 
1.02 
1.90 
1.46 
2.23 
1.78 
1.61 
2.24 
1.76 

.94 
2.72 
1.81 
1.02 
1.26 
2.11 
1.04 
1.60 
2.32 

.91 
3.81 
1.70 

.60 
1.29 
1.27 



.95 
2.63 
.57 
.89 



monii. 
1.17 
1.69 

.95 
2.40 
1.73 
1.74 
1.46 
2.16 
1.16 
2.09 
1.78 
1.82 
1.32 

.97 
1.10 
1.37 
2.30 

.81 
2.98 
1.54 
1.13 
1.13 
1.37 



1.48 
1.49 
.77 
.60 



"organs' 
1.46 
1.90 

.79 
2.57 
1.36 
1.57 
1.74 
1.68 

.94 
3.09 
1.67 

.77 

.84 
2.27 

.98 

.84 
1.83 

.57 
2.48 
1.83 

.88 
1.38 
1.32 



.90 
1.71 
.49 
.65 



.61 
1.00 
.33 
1.37 
.81 
.65 
1.18 
.70 
.50 
1.36 
1.84 
.79 
.60 
.97 
.71 
.99 
1.58 
.76 
1.98 
1.28 
.76 
.51 
.91 



1.34 

.84 
3.78 
4.10 



All 

causet 
12.3 
18.3 

9.4 
19.7 
16.1 
18.0 
17.2 
18.7 
12.1 
23.8 
15.7 
10.7 
12.3 
17.5 
10.5 
14.9 
19.9 

8.8 
26.6 
16.2 

9.1 
11.8 
14.5 



11.0 
17.6 
9.6 
10.8 



MINERS KILLED IN THE UNITED STATES. 



1890 701 

1891 1.076 

1892 859 

1893 965 

1894 957 



1,493 
1.594 
1,828 
1.794 
1.999 



EARTHQUAKE IN CARTAGO, COSTA RICA. 



1895 1.057 

1896 1,120 

1897 947 

1898 1,049 

1899 1.243 



1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 



1905 2.097 

1906 2.061 

1907 3.125 

1908 2.450 

1909 2,412 



Fifteen hundred persons were killed and many 
others injured by an earthquake in Cartago. Costa 
Rica. Wednesday. May 5, 1910. The heaviest shock 
occurred at 7 o'clock In the evening, and no one 
had time to escape into the streets. Railroad and 
telegraph lines were broken and the electric 
lights foil, leaving the city In darkness. Every 



house end building In the city was destroyed, In- 
cluding four churches and the palace of the Amer- 
ican peace court, the gift of Andrew Carnegie. 
No medical aid could be obtained until the follow- 
ing day and great suffering was the result. It was 
1he severest disaster of the kind In the history of 
Costa Rica. 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



141 



AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 
WHEAT CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED (1903-1909). 



COUNTRY. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1!K)7. 


1908. 


1909. 


United States 


Bushels. 
(537,822,000 

471.000 
22.58;!.00() 
41,381.000 
15.oflS.000 
1.238.000 
4,000.000 


Bushels. 
552,400,000 

371,000 
13.WW.OOO 
40,3!)7.000 
16,447,000 
' 968.000 
3.000.000 


Bushels. 
692,979,000 

405,000 
21.517.000 

55,7(il.OOO 
26,107.0(0 
2.307.000 

3,000.000 


Bushels. 
735,261,000 

407.000 
22.109,000 
61.250.000 
37,040,000 
3.SH,000 
3,000.000 


Bushels. 
634,087,000 

411,000 
18,019.000 
39,088.000 
27,692,000 
4.1t,00t> 
2,687,000 


Bushels. 
664,60-2.000 

349,000 
18,057,000 
50,2(59.000 
34.742.000 
6.842,000 
2.175,000 


Bushels. 
737,189,000 

395,000 
16.262,000 
52.706.000 
85,197,000 
9.579,000 
2.605,000 


Canada: 








Alberta 


Other 


Total Canada 


85,271,000 
30.493.000 


74,213,000 
9.393,000 


109.097.000 
9.710.000 


127,772,000 
8,000,000 


92,691,000 
9,000,000 


112,434,000 
8.000,000 


166,744,000 
8.000,000 


Mexico 




733,586,000 

103.759.000 
10.114,0(10 
5,240,000 


636,006,000 

129,672,000 
17.1148,000 
7.000.000 


811,786,000 

150,745,000 

12,089.000 
7,565,000 


871,033,000 

134,931.000 
12,157.000 

4,li06.000 


735,778,000 

155,993,000 
15.776,000 
6,867,000 


785,836,000 

192.489,000 
18,915,000 
7,430.000 


911,933,000 

161.672000 

20.0(10,0(10 
8.000,000 




Chile 


Uruguay 


Total South America 
Austria-Hungary : 


119,113,000 

40.198,000 
11)1.958,000 
14,(i04.000 
3,901,000 


154,620,000 

53.734,000 
137.078.000 
9.841.000 
3,753,000 


170,399,000 

54.531,000 
157.514,000 
13,077.000 
3.016.000 


151,694,000 

58,255.000 
197.409,000 
10.351,000 
2,693,000 


178,636,000 

52,369.000 
120,509.000 
10,170,000 
2,169,000 


218,834,000 

62.129.000 
152.205.000 
18.220,000 
3,0:23.000 


189,672,000 

58,468,000 
113,352,000 
11,662,000 
2.591.000 


Hungary proper 
Croatia-Slavonia 
Bosnia-Herzegovina 




220,721,000 

12,350.000 
35,551.000 
4,461.000 
130.000 
304.320.000 
ISO.O-'U.OOO 
8,000.000 
184.451.000 
200.000 
4.258,000 
307,000 
8.000.000 
73,700,000 

454,596,000 

111,255,001) 


204,406,000 

13.817,000 

42,24'.i.OOO 
4,302,000 
133.000 
298.826.000 
139.803.000 
8.000.000 
167,635.000 
200.000 
1,423,000 
212,000 
9,000,000 
53,738,000 

519,964,000 
21,241,000 
81,050,000 


228,138,000 

12.401.000 
34.949.000 
4,067.000 
129.000 
335.453.000 
135,947.000 
8,000.000 
160.o04.UOO 
200,000 
5,078,000 
329.000 
5,000.000 
103,328,000 

451.327,000 
20.2311,000 
96,708,000 


268,705,000 

12.964.000 
39.101l.000 
4,161.000 
150,000 
324.919,000 
144,754,000 
8,000.000 
176,464.000 
200.000 
4.942.000 
303.000 
9.000,000 
113,867,000 

344,765,000 
21,152,000 
85,046.000 


185,217,000 

15,835,000 
21545.000 
4,343,000 
135.000 
376.999,000 
127,843,000 
8.000.000 
177,543,000 
200.000 
5,325.000 
290,000 
6,000,000 
42,257,000 

340,416.000 
18,173.000 
79.181,000 


230,577,000 

13,963,000 
86,496,000 

4,318.000 
135.000 
317,7<>5.000 
138,142,000 
8.000.000 
152,236.000 
200.000 
5,121,000 
333.000 
5.000,000 
54,813,000 

383.016,000 
21,182,000 
81,964,000 


186,076,000 

15.506,000 

37.000,000 
4,000.000 
135.000 
356.571,000 
138.000.0UO 
8.000.000 
164,587,000 
-200.000 
5,000,000 
316,000 
5,000,000 
56,751,000 


Belgium 






Finland 






G reece 
Italy 












Russia: 
Russia proper 


Poland 




Northern Caucasia 


77.877,000 




Total Russia (European) 
Servia 


551,728.000 

10,885.000 
128,979.000 
5,538.000 
4,000,000 
26,000,000 

46,524.000 
1,528,000 
1,093.000 
1,176,000 


622,255,000 

11,676,000 
95,377.000 
5.135,000 
4,000,1100 
23,000,000 

35,624,000 
1,499,000 


568,274,000 

11.280.0CO 
92.504.000 
5.529.000 
4.000.000 
20,000,000 

57,124,000 
2,130.000 


450,963,000 

13.211,000 
140,656.000 
6,650000 
4000.000 
25.000,000 

57.583.000 
2,063.000 


437,773,000 

8,375.000 
100,331,000 
5.953,000 
4,000.000 
18,000,000 

53,855.000 
1,953,000 


489,162,000 

11.495.000 
119.970.000 
6,756,000 
3,527.000 
25,000,000 

51,371.000 
1,854.000 


711,479,000 

13,000,000 
114,105.000 
6,978.000 
3,568,000 
30,000,000 

60.241,000 
2,111.000 






Turkey (European) 


United kingdom: Great Britain- 


Scotland 


Wales 


919.000 
1,040,000 


1.20J.OOO 
1,430,000 


1,308.000 
1.527.000 


1,138,000 
1,367.000 


966.000 
1,4?8.0CO 


1,147,000 
1.809.000 


Ireland 




50,321,000 
t.830,526,000 

297,601,000 
2,477,000 

9,600.000 
179,000 


39,082,000 
1,747,262,000 

359,936,000 
2,176,000 

19,754.000 
190.000 


62,188,000 
1,797,326,000 

283.063,000 
2,441,000 

18,437,000 

200.000 


62,481,000 
1,810,550,000 

319.952,000 
2,410,000 

20,282.000 
178,000 


58,313,000 
1,606,603,000 

317.023,000 
2,636,000 

22,795,000 
200.000 


55,629,000 
1,678,933.000 

227.983.000 
2,601.000 

22,587,000 
200.000 


65.308,000 
1.951,583,000 

283.300.000 
2,600,000 

22,035,000 
200,000 


Total Europe 


British India 


Cyprus 


Japanese empire: 


Formosa 




9,779,000 
16,000,000 

20,925.000 
48,670,000 
64,000 


19,944,000 
16,000,000 

12,822,000 

31,590.000 
82,000 


18,637,000 
16,000.000 

25,491,000 
42,411,000 
109.000 


20,460,000 
16,000,000 

11,486.000 

45,833,000 
108.000 


22,995,000 
16,000,000 

27,085,000 
45,771.000 
63,000 


22,787.000 
16,000,000 

21,416,000 
55,755.000 
66,000 


22,235,000 
16,000,000 


Persia ' 


Russia: 


Sioeria 




Transcaucasia 




Total Russia (Asiatic) 


69,659,000 
35,000,000 
430.51(>,000 

34,035.000 
1.755.000 
25,000,000 
4.000 
294.000 
7.523,000 


44,494,000 
35,000,000 
477,550,000 

25.484,000 
2,000.000 
25,000,000 
7,000 
486,000 
10.519,000 


68,011,000 
35,000,000 
423,152,000 

25,579.000 
2,000,000 
25,000.000 
4,000 
483.001 
5,729,000 


57,427 ,000 
35.000,000 
451,249,000 

34.323,000 
2.000,000 
25,000,000 
8.000 
542.001 
4.906,000 


72,919,000 
35,000,000 
466,573,000 

31,261,000 
2.000,000 
25,000,001 
3.000 
500.000 
6,314,000 


77,237,000 
35,000,000 
381,608,000 

30.000.000 
l.'.tlO.OOO 
25,000,000 
3000 
5011,000 
2,838.000 


71,792,000 
35,000.000 
430,987,000 

34.769.000 
2.257.000 
25,000.0(10 
5.000 
500.000 
4,000.000 


Turkey (Asiatic), 


Total Asia 


Algeria 


Cape of Good Hope 


Egypt 


Natal 




Tunis 


Total Africa 


55.611,000 


63,496,000 


58.795,000 


66,779.003 


65,078.000 


<i0.257.000i 66.531. 000 



142 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



WHEAT CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED (1903-1909). -CONTINUED. 



COUNTRY. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


1909. 


Australia: 


Bushels. 

6,000 
1,636,000 
2.tioO.OOO 
6,555,000 
1,017.000 
905,000 


Bushels. 

2,514,000 

28,190,000 
29.425.00U 
13,826.000 
1,935,000 
792.000 


Bushels. 

2,217,000 

16,983.000 
21.666,000 
12,464,000 
2,077,000 
813,000 
56,216,000 
9.411.000 


Bushels. 

1,173.000 
21.391.000 
24,15t;,000 
20,778,000 
2,381,000 
801.000 


Bushels. 

1,144,000 

22,50ti,000 
23.331.000 
18,017.000 
2,845,000 
672,000 


Bushels. 

715,000 
9,444.0001 
12.482,000 
19,739.000 
3,018,000 
665,000 


Bushels. 

1.241,000 

15.971,000 
24,082.000 
20.009,000 
2,535.000 
825.000 


ew South Wales 


Victoria 






Tasmania 




12.768,000 
7.C93.000 


76.488.000 
8,140.000 


70,680,000 
7,013.000 


68.515,000 
5,782.000 


46.0(3.000 
6,743,000 


64,(>63,000 
9,049,000 


New Zealand 




20,461,000 
3,189,813,000 


84.628.000 
3.163,562,000 


65,626,000 
3,327,084,000 


77.693,000 
3,428.998,000 


74,297,000 
3,126,965,000 


51,806,000 
3,176,479,000 


73,712,000 
3.624.418,000 


Grand total 



CORN CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED (1902-1908). 



COUNTRY. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


United States ." 


Bushels. 
,523.648,000 
21,159.000 
78,099.000 


Bushels. 

2,244,177.000 
30.211,000 
90,879.000 


Bushels. 
2,467,481.000 

20,880,000 
88,131,000 


Bushels. 

2,707,994.000 
21.582.000 
85.000,000 


Bushels. 

2,927.416,000 
24,745.000 
70,000,000 


Bushels. 
2,592.320,000 
23,276.000 
70.000.0110 


Bushels. 
2.668,651,000 
22.868.000 
70,000.000 


Canada 
Mexico 


Total North America 
Argentina.... 


>,622,906,000 

84,018.000 
866,000 
5,060,000 


2,365,267,000 

148,948,000 
1,118,000 
5.289,000 


2,576,492,000 

175,189,000 
1.477,000 
3,035.000 


2,814,576,000 

140,708,000 
1.244.000 
4,417.000 


3,022.161,000 

194,912.000 

840.000 
3,226,000 


2,685,596,000 

71.768,000 
1.500,000 
5.359.000 


2,761,519,000 

136,057,000 
1,344.000 

6,000.000 


Chile 


Uruguay 


Total South America .... 


89,944,000 
13,462,000 


165,365,000 

16,056,000 
135.751.000 
23.776.000 
8.411,000 


179,701,000 

12,529,000 
59,400.0! X) 
11.364,000 
6.464.000 


146,369,000 

17.293,000 

94.045.000 
18,385.000 
9.584.000 


198,988,000 

18,177,000 

162,973.000 
25.689.000 
8.938.000 


78,627,000 

16.599.000 

155.619.000 
17.9iM.000 
6,468.000 


143,401,000 

15.170,000 

146,124,000 
20,536.000 
8.821.000 


Austria- Hungary : 




101,546,000 
15,255,000 

5.863.000 




Bosnia-Herzegovina 


Total Austria-Hungary 
Bulgaria 


139,12,000 

18.109.000 
24.928.000 
71.028.0W 
16.000,0001 
08,447,000 

40.377,000 


183,994,000 

22,836,000 
25.360.000 
88.990,000 
14,000.000 
80,272,000 

40,397,000 


89,757,000 

12,758,000 
19.482.000 
90.545.UOO 
15.000.000 
19,598,000 

18,966,000 
13,000 


139,307,000 

18.141,000 

24.030.0(10 
97.265,000 
15.000,000 
59,275,000 

22,533,000 


215,675.000 

27,780.000 
14,581.000 
93.0U8.00U 
11.023.000 
130,546.000 

59,320.000 


196,620,000 

14.080.000 
24.U27.00C 
88.513,000 
15.000.000 
57,576,000 

41,903,000 
1 000 


190.651,000 

20.717,000 
24.000,000 
95,953,000 

15.000.000 
78,892,000 

49,663,000 


France 


Italy 






Russia: 
Russia proper 


Poland 


Northern Caucasia 


8.042,000 


10,067.000 


6.951,000 


10.798,000 


11,181,000 


8,860.001; 


11,449.000 


Total Russia (European) 
Servia 


48,419,000 

18,396,000 
25,272.000 


50,464,000 

19,479.000 

18,759.000 


26,920,000 

9,498,000 
21.30U.OOO 


33,331,000 

21,431.000 

31,880.000 


70,501,000 

27,786.000 
18.714.000 


60,764,000 

17.691.000 
25,372,000 


61,112,000 

21,010.000 
20.115,000 


Spain. . : . . . 


Total Europe 


429,716,000 

556,000 
2,000,001 
IIO.UOO.OOO 
4 1430W 
200,000 


:>04,154,000 

435.000 
3,500,000 

30,000,OOC 
1,997,000 

184,000 


303,858,000 

391,000 
3,502,000 
30,000,000 
5.282.000 
189,000 


439,659,000 

490.000 
2,500.000 
30,000.001 
4,822.000 
320,000 


609,614,000 

544.000 
3,2UO.OOO 

30.00U,OOU 
3,845.000 
300.000 


489,643,000 

402,000 
3.550,000 

35.000.000 
2,984.000 
300,000 


527,450,000 

400.000 
1.758.000 
30,000.000 
4,593,000 
300,000 


Algeria 


Cape of Good Hope 




Natal 


Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 


Total Africa 


36,899,000 

7,256,000 
590,000 


36,116,000 

4,987,000 
627.000 


39,364,000 

9,972,000 
647,000 


38,128,000 

8.374,000 
506,000 


37,889,000 

8,608.000 
653,000 


42,236,000 

10,493,000 
419.001 


37,051,000 

8,388,000 
519.00U 


New Zealand 


Total Australasia 


7,846,000 
iU87.311.OOC 


6,614,000 
3,066.506,000 


10,519,000 
3.109,934,000 


8,880,000 
3,447,917,000 


9,261,000 
3,877,913.0a 


10,912,000 
3.307.014.000 


8,907,000 
3,478,328,000 


Grand total 



SUGAR PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES. 
In long tons. 



YEAR. 


Beet 

sugar. 


CANE SUGAR. 


Total. 


Louisiana. 


Other 
southern 
states. 


Porto 
Rico. 


Hawaii. 


Philip- 
pines. 


1900-1... 


76.859 
164,827 
194,782 
214,825 
216,173 
279,393 
431,796 
413,954 
380,254 
457,562 


270,338 
321,676 
829,226 

228,477 

335.000 

330,000 
230.UOO 
335,000 
860.000 

325,000 


2,891 
3,614 
3,722 
19,800 
15.000 
12,000 
13,000 
12.000 
15.000 
10,000 


80.000 
86.UOO 
85.0(iU 
130,000 
145,000 
213,000 
255,000 
200.000 
'215.000 
2SO,UUU 


321,461 

317,50!) 
391.062 
328,103 
380.576 
383,225 
390.000 
465.288 
465.000 
490,000 


56,400 
78.637 
90,000 
84.0UO 
10(5,875 
145,525 
150,500 
15.000 
150.000 
145.000 


806,949 
971.263 
1,093,792 
1.005,205 
1.198,624 
1.363.143 
1,470,296 
1,576.242 
1.575,254 
1.707,562 


1901-2 


1902-3 


1903-4 


1904-5 


1905-6. . . . 


1906-7.... 


1907-8.... 


1908-9 


1909-10 



CHICAGO D.AILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



143 



BEET SUGAR IN THE UNITED STATES. 



STATE AND YEAR. 


Factories 
in opera- 
tion. 


Area bar- 
vested. 


|*& 

2< 

2S 

5*0 


Beets 
worked. 


3. 

s|! 
3& 


Estimat'd 
average 
extrac- 
tion of 
sugar. 


Average 
sugar in 
beets. 


Average 
purity co- 
efficient 
of beets. 


Av. length 
of cam- 
paign. 


1909. 
California 


No. 
10 


Acres. 

siom 


Short 
tons. 
10.63 


Short 
tons. 

882,084 


Pounds. 
254,544,000 


Per 
cent. 
14.43 


Per 
cent. 
17.61 


Per 

cent. 
83.62 


Days 
102 




16 


121,698 


10.33 


1,256,771 


298.810,000 


11.89 


14.24 


80.51 


85 




3 


15.434 


10.60 


163,557 


39,988.000 


12.22 


15.98 


86.17 


88 


Michigan 


16 


112,232 


7.31 


819,923 


212,106,000 


12.93 


17.00 


86.21 


74 


Utah 


5 


31.293 


14.54 


455,064 


97,768.000 


10.74 


15.04 


84.22 


1S8 


Wisconsin 


4 


14,000 


10.21 


143,000 


34,340,000 


12.01 


15.88 


85.17 


63 


Ten states having one fac- 
tory each 


11 


42,605 


8.47 


360,000 


87,382.000 


12.10 


15.09 


83.21 


61 


Totals and averages 


65 


420.262 


9.71 


4,081.382 


1,024,938.000 


12.56 


16.10 


84. 1L 


83 


1908 


62 


.'UH 913 


9 36 


3,414,891 


851.768,000 


12.47 


15.74 


83 5 


74 


1907 


63 


370.894 


10.16 


3,767.871 


927.256.430 


12.30 


15.8 


83.6 


89 


1906 


63 


376,074 


11.26 


4,236.112 


967,224.000 


11.42 


14.9 


82.2 


105 


1905 


52 


307,364 


8.67 


2,665,913 


625,841,228 


11.74 


15.3 


83.0 


77 


1904 


48 


197.784 


10.47 


2,071,539 


484.226,430 


11.69 


15.3 


83.1 


78 


1903 


49 


242 576 


8 56 


2 076 494 


481.209,087 


11.69 


15.1 


* 


75 


1902 


41 


216,400 


8.76 


1,895,812 


436.811,685 


11.52 


14.6 


83.3 


94 


1801 


36 


175.083 


9.63 


1.685.689 


369.211,733 


10.95 


14.8 


82.2 


88 



No data. 



PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS OF THE UNITED STATES BY YEARS. 
[From tables prepared by the department of agriculture.] 







CORN. 






WHEAT. 






Acres. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


1899.... 


82,108,587 


2.078,143,933 


J629.210.110 


44,592,516 


547,303.846 


$319,545,259 


1900 


83,320.872 


2.105.102.516 


751.220.ftS4 


42.495,385 


522,229.505 


823.515,177 


1901 . 


91,349.928 


1 522 519,891 


921,555.768 


49.895.514 


748,460,218 


467.350.166 


1902.... 


94,043,613 


2.523,648.312 


1,017,017.349 


4ti.202.424 


670,063.008 


422.224.117 


1908 


88,001,998 


2,244,176,925 


952.868.801 


49.4S4.967 


637.821,835 


443,024.826 


1904 


92,231.581 


2.467,480,934 


1,087.461.440 


44.074.875 


652,399,517 


610,489 874 


1905 ... 


94.011.369 


2 707 993 540 


1.116,696.738 


47.854.079 


692.979,489 


618.372,727 


1906.... 


96,737,581 


2.927,416,091 


1,166.626,479 


47.31)5.829 


735.260.970 


490,332,760 


1907 


99.931.000 


2.592.320,0i 


1.336,901,000 


45,211.000 


634.087.000 


554,437.000 


1908 


101,788.000 


2,068.651,000 


1.616.145.000 


47.557,000 


664.602.000 


616.826.000 


190 


10S.771.OOl) 


2.772,376.000 


1.652.822,000 


46.723.000 


737,189.000 


730,046,000 






OATS. 






RYE. 






Acres. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


1899. . . . 


26,341.380 


796,177.713 


$198,167,975 


1,659.308 


23.961,741 


$12.214,118 


1900 .. 


27,364,795 


809,125,989 


208,669,233 


1,591,302 


23,995,927 


12,295,417 


M01 


28,541,476 


736,808,724 


293,658,777 


1,987.505 


30,344,a30 


16,909,742 


1902 


28.653,144 


987,842,712 


303.584,852 


1.978.548 


33,630,592 


17.080,793 


1903 


27.638.126 


784.094.199 


267,661,665 


1,906,894 


29,363,416 


15,993,871 




27.842.009 


894.595.552 


279,900,013 


1.792,673 


27,234,565 


18,745,543 


1906 


28.046.746 


953,216,197 


277,047,537 


1,662,508 


27,616,045 


16,754,657 


Ifi06 


30,958,7(8 


964,5)04,522 


306,292.978 


^,001,904 


33.374.833 


19.671 243 


1907 ... 


31,837,000 


754,443.000 


334,568,000 


1,926,000 


31.566.000 


23068000 


1908. . . . 


82,344,000 


807,156.000 


381,171,000 


1,948,000 


81.851.000 


23,465,000 


1909 


33.204.000 


1,007.353,000 


408,174,000 


2,006,000 


32.239.000 


23,809,000 






BARLET. 




] 


BUCKWHEA1 






Acres. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


1899 


2.878.229 


73.381,563 


$29,594,254 


670,148 


11,094,473 


$6 183 676 


1900 


2,894,282 


68,925,833 


24,075.271 


637,930 


9,566,9f>6 


5.341,413 


1901 


4,295,744 


109.932,924 


49,705,163 


811,164 


15.125,939 


8,523 317 


1902 


4.661,063 


134,954,023 


61,898.634 


804,889 


14,529.770 


8,654,704 


1903 


4.993,137 


131,861,391 


60.166,313 


804.393 


14,243,644 


8 650733 


1904.... 


5.145.878 


139,748.958 


58,651,807 


793.625 


15.008.X-i6 


9.390,768 


1905 


5,095,528 


136,651,020 


55,047.166 


760,118 


14,585.082 


8,565,499 


1906 


6,323,757 


178.916,484 


74.2J5.Se7 


789.208 


14,641,937 


8,727.443 


1907 


6,448.000 


153,597.000 


102,29(1.000 


800.000 


14.290.000 


9975000 


1908 


6,646,000 


166.756.000 


92.442,000 


803,000 


15874000 


12004000 


1909 


7.011.000 


170,284,0(0 


93.971.000 


834,000 


17,438.000 


12,188,000 


YEAR. 




POTATOES 






HAY. 






Acres. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Acres. 


Tons. 


Value. 


1899 


2,581,353 


228.783,232 


189,328.832 


41,328,462 


56,655.756 


Mil 926 187 


1900 , 


2,611,054 


210,926,897 


90.811,167 


39 132890 


50 110906 


445 538 870 


1901. 


2.S64 335 


187,598.087 


14JJ.979.470 


39 3911 508 


59 590 877 


506 191 553 


1902.... 


2.965,58? 


284,632.789 


134.111,436 


39,825,227 


59.857,576 


542,036.364 


1903.... 


2,916,855 


247.127,880 


151,638,094 


39,933,759 


61,305.940 


556376880 


1904... 


3.015,675 


332,830.300 


IS0.673.3H2 


39.998,602 


60 696,028 


529 107626 


1906 


2,996,757 


260,741,294 


160.821.080 


39 361 960 


00531 611 


519 959 784 


1906 


3,013.150 


308,038.382 


157,547 392 


42 476 224 


57 145 959 


592 539 671 


1907. . 


3 124,0ft) 


297.942.00U 


183880,000 


44 028000 


63677 000 


743 507 000 


1908 ... 


3 257,000 


278,985,000 


197 039 000 


46486000 


70798 000 


635423000 


1909 


3.525,000 


376.537.000 


206,545.000 


45.744,000 


64,938.000 


089,345;000 



144 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS OF TUB UNITED STATES. CONTINUED. 



YKAB. 




TOBACCO. 






COTTON. 




1899 


Acres. 
1,101,483 


Pounds. 

868,163,275 


Value. 

$56,933,003 


Acres. 

23,403,497 


Bales. 

9.142,838 


Value. 

$334,847.868 


1900 




* 




27,114.103 


10.401, 453 


511,098.111 


1901 


* 





* 


27.220,414 


10.662.W5 


418,358 366 


1902 


1.030,734 


821.823.963 


57,563.510 


25,758.139 


10,725.422 


458.0ol.005 


1903 


1,037.735 


S15.972 425 


55.514.627 


27,114,103 


10.1150.953 


55(9,694,724 


1904 


806.409 


B60,4f 1 0.739 


63,382,959 


28.016.893 


9,851.129 


576,499 824 


1905 


776,112 


633.033.719 


48.674.118 


80.053.739 


13,438,012 


561 100386 


1906 


796.099 


682,428,530 


68.232.647 


32.049.000 


W.273,809 


640311 538 


1907 


830.800 


698.126,000 


71.411,000 


31.311,000 


11.107.179 


613630436 


1908 


875,426 


718,061,380 


74,130,185 


32.444.000 


13.241,799 


588,814,828 


1909 


1.180,300 


949,ai7.000 


95.719.365 


30.780.000 


10.088.000 





AVERAGE FARM VALUE OF CROPS. 



DEC. 1. 


Wheat. 


Oats. 


Corn. 


Rye. 


Barley 


Buck- 
wheat. 


Pota- 
toes. 


Hay, 
per ton 


1898 . 


Cents. 
58.2 


Cents. 
25.5 


Cents. 
28.7 


Cents. 
46.3 


Cents. 
41.3 


Cents. 
45.0 


Cents. 
41.4 


Uoll'rs 
6.00 


1899 


58.4 


24.9 


30.3 


51.0 


40.3 


55.7 


39 


7 27 


1900 


61.9 


25.8 


35.7 


51.2 


40.8 


55 8 


43 ] 


8 89 


1901 
1902 


62.4 
63.0 


39.9 
30.7 


60.5 
40.3 


55.7 
50.8 


45.2 
45.9 


56.3 
59.6 


76.7 
47.1 


10.01 
9 06 


1903 


69.5 


34.1 


42.5 


54.5 


45.6 


60.7 


61.4 


9 08 


1904 
1905 


92.4 

74.8 


31.3 
29.1 


44.1 
41.2 


68.8 
61.1 


42.0 
40.3 


62.2 
58.7 


45.3 
61.7 


8.72 
8.52 


1906 


66.7 


31.7 


39.9 


58.9 


41.5 


59.6 


51.1 


10.37 


1907 


87.4 


4t.3 


51.6 


73.1 


66.6 


69.8 


61.7 


11.08 


1908 


92.4 


47.2 


60.6 


73.6 


55.4 


75.6 


70 6 


8 98 


1909 


82.4 


40.5 


59.6 


73.9 


55.2 


69.9 


54.9 


10.62 



FARMS IN THE UNITED STATES. 
[Federal census, 1900.) 



YKAB. 


Farms. 


Total. 


Improved. 


Unimproved. 


Average. 


Improved. 


1900. . . . 


Number. 
5.73D.65T 


Acres. 
841.201.546 


Acres. 
414.793,191 


Acres. 
426.408,355 


Acres. 
146.6 


Per cent. 
493 


1890 


4.5IH.IVJ1 


621218,019 


35V.616.755 


265,601,864 


136.5 


67 4 


1880 


4 onsixr? 


> 081.835 


284,771.042 


251 310 793 


1337 


53 1 


1870 


2.()59.!)85 


407.7:6,041 


188.921,099 


218,813,942 


1533 


46 3 


i860 


2,044.077 


407.212,5'i8 


163,110,720 


244,101.818 


199.2 


40 1 


i860 


1.449,073 


2!)3,560.614 


113,032.614 


180.528,000 


202.6 


38.5 



VALUE OF FARM PROPERTY AND PRODUCTS. 



YEAH. 


Total value. 


Land and 

buildings. 


Implements, 
machinery. 


Live stock. 


Products.* 


1900 
1890 


$20,514.001,838 
15.982,267.689 


$16.674,690.247 
13.279,252,649 


$761.261.550 
494.247,467 


$3.078,050.041 
12,208,767,573 


$4,739.118,752 
2 460 107 454 


1880 


12,101 001.538 


10,197.090,776 


406.520.055 


tl,500,384 707 


2 212 540 927 


1870 


11 124!58.747 


9,262.803,861 


336,878,429 


1,525 276 457 


+2 447 538 668 


I860 


7,980,493.063 


6,645,045.007 


246.118.141 


1,089,329,915 




1850 


3,967,343.580 


3,271.575,426 


151,587,638 


544,180.516 





For year preceding that designated. fExcluslve of stock on ranges. ^Includes betterment and addition 
to stock. 

NUMBER AND VALUE OF 
Animals. Number. Av. price. Total value. 

Horses 21.040,000 $108.19 $2,276,363,000 



Mules 4,123,000 119.84 494,095,000 

Milch cows 21,801,000 35.79 780.308,000 

Other cattle 47.279,000 19.41 917,453,000 

Sheep 57,216,000 4.08 233,664,000 

Swine... 47,782,000 9.14 436,603,000 

The total valut 1 of all the farm animals enumer- 
ated Jan. 1, 1910, was $5,138,486,000, as compared 
with $4,525,529,000 on Jan. 1, 1909; an increase of 
13.6 per cent. Th3 states having the largest num- 
ber cf farm animals of each kind in 1910 were: 

Horses Illinois, 1,655.000; Iowa, 1,447,000; Texas, 
1.369,000; Kansas. 1,187,000; Nebraska, 1,045,000; 
Missouri, 1,005,000. 



FARM ANIMALS (1910). 

Mules Texas, 702,000; Missouri, 344.000; Missis- 
sippi, 290,000; Tennessee, 290,000; Alabama, 253,000; 
Georgia, 248,000. 

Milch cows New York, 1,771,000; Iowa, 1,570000; 
Wisconsin, 1,506,000; Illinois, 1,232,000; Pennsylva- 
nia, 1,140,000; Texas, 1,137,000. 

Other cattle Texas, 7,131,000; Iowa, 3,611,000; 
Karsas, 3,260,000; Nebraska, 3,040,000; Missouri, 
2,165,000; Illinois, 1,974,000. 

Sheep Wyoming, 7,316,000; Montana. 5,747,000; 
New Mexico. 4,729,000; Idaho, 4,248,000; Ohio, 3,203,- 
000; Utah, 3,177,000. 

Swine Iowa, 6,485,000; Illinois, 3,772.000; Texas 
3,205,000; Nebraska, 3,201,000; Missouri, 2,714,000; 
Indiana, 2,578,000. 



LIVE STOCK IN THE- COUNTRIES NAMED. 

Country. Year. Cattle. Horses. Sheep. Swine. 

Canada 1909 7,234,084 2,132,489 2;705,390 2,012509 

Cuba 1909 2,968,867 499,560 700.000 

Great Britain ]909 7.020,982 1,552.993 27,618,419 2,380,887 

Iroland 1909 4,698,412 599.293 4,132.392 1,148,715 

Australia, commonwealth 1908-9 13.543,012 1,926,678 87,003,048 695,539 

LIVE STOCK OF THE WORLD (1910). 
[From the Crop Reporter, Washington, D. C.] 



Statistics of the world supply of live stock aro 
incomplete; large areas of Africa are unrepre- 
sented; the number of animals in China, Persia, 
Afghanistan. Korea. Bolivia, Ecuador, Salvador 
and several less important countries is unknown; 



for Brazil the number of cattle alone is estimated; 
in general, statistics of cattle, horses, sheep and 
swine are much more complete than those of other 
animals, as statements for the world. In some 
countries the latest available data relate to num- 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1911. 



145 



bers tor. years ago. Keeping in view these defi- 
ciencies !n data, estimates of the approximate num- 
ber of live stock in the world, so far as informa 
tion is available, are of interest. 

Sheep seem to be the most numerous of the large 
animals nt the world, with a total of about 580,- 
000, COO head. Australia ranks first, with alxnit 88,- 
000,000; Argentina second, with 67,000,000; United 
States third, with about 57,000,000; European Rus- 
sia and Asiatic Turkey each have approximately 
45,000.000; Great Britain, with 27,000,000 in 1908, 
has more sheep in proportion to its area than any 
other hnpovtant nation. 

The number of cattle enumerated or estimated, 
about 430,000.000, although smaller than that of 
sheep, is much ncore important, owing to their 
larger size. In total number of cattle, British 
India ranks first, with about 91,000,000 (including 
bu(T;<loes and buffalo calves); the United States 
ranks second, with aboat 70,000,000; Russia third, 
with about 3&, 000, 000; Argentina and Brazil each 
bave about 30,000,000, Germany about 20,000,000, 
Austria-Hungary 18.000,000 (in 1900). France 14.000,- 
000 an'l the united kingdom 12,000,000. The propor- 
tion of the total pumtk r of cattle which is beef 
cattle, work cattle or milch cows has not been 
estiirate'l. 

The United States Is pre-eminent as a swlne-pro- 
du( ing nation, being credited with approximately 
50.000.000 head out of a world supply of less than 
150.000,000. Germany ranks second, with about 22,- 
000,000; European Russia has about 11,000,000; 
France, 7,000,000; Austria had 5,000,000 In 1900 and 
Hungary 7,000.000 in 1S95. No other country is 
credited with as many as 5.000,000. 

Horses aggregate about 95,000.000: F.uropean Rus- 
sia and the United States have almost an equa 1 . 



number, between 20,000,000 and 25,000,000 head; Ar- 
gentina has about 8,000.000; Asiatic Russia is cred- 
ited with about 7,000,000, Germany, 4.000.000, France 
3.000,000, the united kingdom 2,000.000, Austria 
and Hungary each had about 2,000,000 in 1900 and 
18S5, respectively. 

Of the 7,500,000 mules that are estimated In the 
world more than half are In the United States; 
no other country is credited with 1,000,000; Spain 
conies nearest with about 810,000 in 1907. 

The number of asses in the world is estimated to 
be between 8.000,000 and 9,000,000; Asiatic Turkey 
Is credited with about 2,500,000; 1,300,000 were cred- 
ited to British India in 1907; 850,000 to Italy in 
1908, and 770,000 to Spain in 1907. 

Nearly 100.000,000 goats are estimated in the va- 
rious countries of the world; by far the largest 
number are in British India, nearly 30,000,000; 
Asiatic Turkey is credited with 9.000,000, the Cape 
of Good Hope with nearly 9,000,000, Algeria about 
4.000.000, Mexico 4,000,000 and Argentina 3,000,000 
(in 1907). 

About 15,000,000 buffaloes were reported In Brit- 
ish India in 1907, over 2,500,000 in Dutch East In- 
dies in 1905; minor countries bring the total num- 
ber estimated to o\er 21,000,000. 

The approximate number of camels In important 
countries, so far as estimates can be made, is: 
Asiatic Russia, 700.COO; British India, 450,000; Eu- 
ropean Russia, 225,000- Algeria, 200,000; Tunis, 
150,000; Sudan (Anglo-Egyptian, number assessed 
for tribute and tax in 1905), 132,000; Egypt, 40.000. 

Of the 900,000 leindeer reported from various 
countries, 350.000 were in Russia, 230,000 were in 
Sweden, 140.000 in Finland (in 1906) and 110,000 in 
Norway (1900). 



WHEAT AND OATS (1909). 



STATE OR 
TERRITORY. 


WHEAT (WINTER AND SPRING). 


OATS. 


Acres. 


Yield. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Acres. 


Yield. 


Bushels. 


Value. 




93.000 
Ifi.OCO 
151.1X10 
825.000 
365.000 


10.5 
25.0 
11.4 
14.0 
29.5 


1,029.000 
400.000 
1,721.000 
11.550000 
10,758,000 


$1,338.000 
556,000 
1.893.000 
12,820.000 
10.365,000 


270,000 
4.000 
164.000 
200,000 
196.000 
11.000 
4,000 
31 .00) 
350.000 
1:5.000 
4.346,000 
1.820.000 
4.300,000 
964.000 
173.000 
32.000 
124.000 
28,000 
7.000 
1.420.000 
2,788,000 
150.000 
690 000 
300,000 
2,473.000 
7,000 
14.000 
60,OTO 
24.000 
1,325.000 
196,000 
1.550,000 
1.370.000 
550.000 
288.1 00 
998.000 
2,000 
211,000 
1.450.000 
200.000 
615,000 
55,000 
81,000 
200,000 
202.000 
98,000 
2,280,000 
100.JOO 


16.5 
37.0 
22.8 
31.4 
38.0 
27.5 
25.5 
17.0 
19.0 
44.5 
36.6 
30.5 
27.0 
28.2 
22.3 
20.0 
37.0 
25.4 
31.0 
30.5 
33.0 
16.0 
27.0 
51.3 
25.0 
40.0 
,.5 
25.5 
40.0 
28.2 
16.5 
32.0 
32.5 
29.0 
37.8 
26.3 
25.0 
21.0 
30.0 
20.0 
18.7 
46.1 
32.2 
19.0 
49.0 
22.0 
35.0 
35.0 


4,445.000 
148.000 
3,739.000 
(.,280.000 
7,448,000 
302.000 
102.000 
527.000 
6,650.000 
7.788.000 
159,064,000 
55,510,000 
116,100.000 
27,185.000 
3,858.000 
640.000 
4.588.000 
711.000 
217.000 
43,310.000 
90.288.000 
2.400.000 
18.630.000 
15.390,000 
61,825,000 
280.000 
441.000 
1,530.000 
960.000 
37,365,000 
3.234.000 
49,600.000 
56,225.000 
15,950.000 
10,886,000 
25,948.000 
50,000 
4,431,000 
43.500.000 
4,000,000 
11,500.000 
2.536,000 
2.608.000 
3.800.000 
9,898,000 
2.156,000 
79.800,000 
3,500,000 


S3, 1! 8,000 
117.000 
2.206.000 
4.145,000 
3.947.000 
i 160,000 
49.000 
395,000 
4,722,000 
3,894.000 
60,444,000 
21.649,000 
40,635,000 
11,690.000 
1,968.000 
397,000 
2,661.000 
348000 
126,000 
17,757,000 
31.601,000 
1.632.000 
8,011,000 
6.464,000 
21,639,000 
165,000 
282.000 
765,000 
634,000 
18, '309.000 
2,134,000 
Ki.HU8.000 
23.U52.000 
7,337,000 
6,661,000 
12,974,000 
26.000 
3.MO.OOO 
14,790.000 
2.120.COO 
7,130,000 
1,319.000 
1.304.000 
2.052,000 
4,751,000 
1,164,000 
31.122,000 
1,750,000 


Arizona 


Arkansas 


Call f ornla 


Colorado 


Connecticut 




118,000 


14.0 


1,652.000 


1,718,000 


Florida 




245.000 
520,000 
1.810.000 

2,165.000 
144,000 

fi,045.(K)0 
670.000 


10.0 
27.5 
17.4 
15.3 
21.6 
13.0 
11.8 


2,450.000 
14,465,000 
31,494.000 
33.124.000 

3.110.000 
87.203,000 
7,906,000 


3,552,000 
12.584,000 
32,754.000 
36.436.000 
2.S1.(KX) 
83.715.000 
8,776,000 




Illinois 


Indiana 






Kentucky 






9,000 
770.000 
1.000 
775.000 
5,600.0110 
1,000 
1,943.000 
350.000 
2,640.000 
36,000 


25.5 
14.5 
25.0 
18.8 
16.8 
11.0 
14.7 
30.6 
16.7 
28.7 


230.000 
11,165.000 
25.000 
14,570.000 
T4,080.000 
11.000 
28,562,000 
10,764.000 
49.650,000 
1,033,000 


253.000 
12,282.000 
30.000 
16.318.000 
90,317.000 
13.000 
29.990.000 
9,364.000 
44,188.000 
1,074,000 




Massachusetts 










Nebraska 




New Hampshire 




110,000 

41. (KX) 
420,0(10 
570,000 
6,625,000 
1,480,000 
1.225000 
810.000 
1,545,000 


P. 9 
24.5 
21.0 
9.5 
13.7 
15.9 
12.8 
J9.8 
17.0 


1,989.000 

1.001.000 
KS20.000 
5.415,000 
90,762.000 
23.532,000 
15.680.000 
16,377.000 
26,265,000 


2.146,000 
1,175.000 
9.790.000 
fi.S7~.000 
83,501.000 
26.056,000 
15.837,000 
15.231,000 
28,629,000 


New Mexico 


New York 


North Carolina 
North Dakota 


Ohio 


Oklahoma 






Rhode Island 


South Carolina 


381,000 
3.375,000 
SOO.IXX) 
555.000 
235.000 
1.000 
790.000 
1.540,000 
370,000 
179.CPO 
80,000 


10.0 
14.1 
10.4 
9.1 
26.2 
25.0 
11.2 
2:1.2 
13.0 
14.7 
28.7 


3,810,000 
47,588,000 
8.WOOO 
5.050.000 
6,0110,000 
25.000 
8.848.000 
35,780.000 
4810.000 
3.484.000 
2.297,000 


5,563,000 
42,829,000 
9.568,000 
5,959,000 
5.481,000 
30,000 
10,175,000 
a3,275,000 
5.435,000 
3.345,000 
2,274.000 


Tennessee 


Texas 
Utah 




Virginia 




West Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 


United States... 


46.723.0, 


15.8 


737,189,000 


730,046,000 


33,204,000 


30.3 


1,007,353,000 


408,174,000 



146 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



GRAIN CROPS OF THE CANADIAN NORTHWEST. 
Bushels produced In 1908 and 1909. 



PBOVINCB. 


WHEAT. 


OATS. 


BARLEY. 


1908. 


1909. 


1908. 


. 1909. 


1908. 


1909. 




50,269,000 
34,742,000 

o,842,(ioo 


52,706.000 
85,197.000 
9.579.000 


47,506,000 
31,030,000 
24,227,000 


58.721.000 
97.533,000 
40,775,000 


17.093.000 
1,952.000 
3,881.000 


20.8t,000 
4,416.000 
5,999,000 




Alberta 


Total 


91,853.000 


147.482,000 


102,763,000 


197,029.000 


22,926.000 


31,358.000 



WHEAT HARVEST CALENDAR. 



January Australia, New Zealand, Chile, Argen- 
tine Republic. 

February and March Upper Egypt, India. 

April Lower Egypt, India, Syria, Cyprus, Per- 
sia, Asia Minor, Mexico, Cuba. 

May Texas. Algeria, Central Asia, China, Japan, 
Morocco. 

June California, Oregon, Mississippi, Alabama, 
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennes- 
see, Virginia, Kentucky. Kansas, Arkansas. Utah. 
Colorado, Missouri, Turkey, Greece, Italy, Spain, 
Portugal, south of France. 

July New England, New York, Pennsylvania, 

PRELIMINARY CROP ESTIMATES 

Winter wheat 458,294,000 bushels. I Corn 2,977,000,000 bushels. 
Spring wheat 233,475,000 bushels. I Oats 1,096,396,000 bushels. 



Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Iowa, Wiscon- 
sin, southern Minnesota, Nebraska, upper Canada. 
Roumania, Bulgaria, Austria, Hungary, south of 
Russia, Germany, Switzerland, south of England. 

August Central and northern Minnesota, Dako- 
tas. Manitoba, lower Canada, British Columbia, 
Belgium, Holland, Great Britain, Denmark, Poland 
central Russia. 

September and October Scotland, Sweden, Nor- 
way, north of Russia. 

November Peru, South Africa. 

December Burma, New South Wales. 



FOR 1910. 

I Rye 32,088.000 bushels. 
I Barley 158,138,000 bushels. 



INTERNATIONAL TRA 
Exports 
Country. Bushels. 
Argentina 133,610,895 
Australia 15,027,386 
lAustria-Hung'y. 14,720 
Belgium 24,178,475 
British India.. 4,289.344 
Bulgaria 7,818.338 
Canada 52,502,903 
Chile 4,946,419 


DE IN WHEAT (1908). 
Imports - 
Country. Bushels. 
Austria-Hung'y. 290.334 
Belgium 67.032,575 


Country. Bushels. 
British S. Africa 145,275 
Canada 6.812,833 
Cuba 3,153,495 
Denmark 10,445,555 


Country. Bushels. 
Norwav 809841 


Portugal 2,015!388 
Russia 343.072 
Spain 3 318 904 


Brazil 9,551,415 
Denmark 3,593.773 
France 2.752,415 
Germany 76,814,333 
Greece 6,638,757 
Italy 29,026,788 


Egypt 845.205 
France 9,629.979 
Germany 26,372295 


Sweden '488^077 
Switzerland ... 2,480.164 
United kingdom 68.186,271 
Other countries 3,671,563 


Italy 2987496 


Mexico ... . 179157 


Netherlands ... 25,261,400 


Total 189 410 729 








Netherlands ... 29.914.096 
Roumania 26,247,384 
Russia . . 53,928,000 


Netherlands ... 4o!l59Us3 
Portugal 4,604,041 
Spain 2,902,246 


INTERNATIONAL TRAH 
PENTIN 
Exports Gallons. 


El IN SPIRITS OF TUR- 
E (1908). 
Gallons. 


Servia 3,319,528 


Sweden 7,599,881 


United States. 92,779,509 
Other countries 10,379,838 


Switzerland ... 12,140,012 
Untd. kingdom. 168. 629,046 
Other countries 10,778,106 


Germany 433,239 
Netherlands .... 1.851,937 


Germany 10,088,871 
Italy 1,020.128 


Total 468,551,011 

INTERNATIONAL TRA1 

(1.9 
Exports 
Argentina 1,276,656 
Australia 1,191.861 
Austria-Hungary 408,453 


Total 443,832,729 


United States. ..19.433,181 
Other countries. 1.199,472 


New Zealand.... 138.80'i 


>E IN WHEAT FLOUR 

)8). 
Imports- 
Belgium 31,735 
Brazil 1,699,314 
China 1,194,514 




Total 27040928 


Switzerland .. . 503',873 
United kingdom 8.656,464 
Other countries. 996.370 


Imports- 
Argentina 446,967 
Australia 395,430 
Austria-Hung' ry 2.406,559 


Total 30,036,424 


Belgium 529,660 
British India.... 350,407 
Bulgaria 287,042 
Canada 1,747,163 
Chile 19,647 


Cuba 861,865 
Denmark 441.515 
Egypt 1,919,766 
Finland 1,022,029 
France 81,824 


INTERNATIONAL TRA1 
OIL-CAKE 1 
Exports Pounds. 
Argentina ... 31.866,797 
Austria-Hngy. 113,952.281 
Belgium 149.098,934 
British In.lia. 158.531,296 
Canada 41,743,700 
China 129.166.933 


>E IN OIL CAKE AND 
HEAL (1908). 
Imports Pounds. 
Austria-Hngy. 27.152,565 
Belgium 553.066.95S 
Canada 3,741,000 
Denmark ....1,036,950,572 
Dutch E. Ind. 21,089.491 
Finland 20,873,178 
France 200,278,415 
Germany 1,463,999.742 
Italy 10 834 835 


France 365,496 
Germany 1,702.862 


Germany 190,882 
Greece 24,953 


Italy 499,259 


Italy 18,021 


Netherlands .... 145,451 
Roumania 556.898 


Japan 352. 53T 
Netherlands .... 2,200,426 
Newfoundland . 366.237 
Norway 632.712 
Philippines 231,305 
Spain 171 
Sweden :. 120.137 
Trinidad-Tobago 230.994 
United kingdom. 7,358,072 
Other countries. 4,569,267 

Total ... ....23,548,276 

\DE IN CORN (1908). 
Exports^ 
United States.. 39,013,273 
Uruguay 88,659 
Other countries 5,881,329 


Servia 62.998 
United kingdom. 988.326 
United St:iti's..l3.013.025 
Other countries. 785.439 


Denmark .... 2.757,541 
Egypt 148.649.000 
France 329.693,063 
Germany .... 414.855,627 
Italy 47 744.617 


Japan . . 139 939 333 


Netherlands. 701.182.54S 
Sweden v 258,508,025 
Untd. kingdom 736,330.560 
Other countr's 162,678,933 


Total 24,469,940 

INTERNATIONAL TR, 

Exports- 
Argentina 67.390.728 
Austrla-Hung'v. 307,092 
Belgium 6.134.920 
Bulgaria 4.393.880 
Netherlands ... 6.957,524 
Roumania 28.959.000 
Russia 23.532,003 
Servia ., . 1.934.483 


Netherlands . 156,919,410 
Russia 1,378.461,689 
Untd. kingdom 36,910.720 
United States.l. 959.213,339 
Other countr's 104,230,46? 


Tolal 5.336,626,180 


Total 5,203,795.415 


INTERNATIONAL TRA 
Exports- 
Argentina 7 825 681 


5E IN BUTTER (1908). 
Exports 
Denmark 196 061 115 


Total 184 592 891 


Australia 51.193,311 
Austria-Hung'y 8,217,949 
Belgium 3,821.565 

(Hanfldn .. . K 9<U 144 


Finland 26.525,880 
France 43 951 344 


Imoorts 
Austria-Huug'y. 3,106,663 
Belciiim .. .. 19. 158.006 


Germany 480,167 

Ttnlv . S> KM KR 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1011. 



147 



Country. Pounds. 
Netherlands ... 72,911,951 
New Zealand... 25,756,752 
Norway 3,342,508 


Country. Pounds. 
Brit. S. Africa 7,445.08 
Denmark 4,376,175 
Dutch E. Indies 3,036,890 
Egypt 2,970,514 
France 12,374,543 
Germany 74,623,809 
Netherlands ... 2,396,806 
Russia 505,579 


Country. Pounds. 
French Guiana. 2,864,283 
French Kongo.. 4,061,352 
Germany 9,099,798 
Gold Coast Col. 3,549,548 
Ivory Coast 3,024,783 
Kamerun 2,677,117 
Netherlands ... 3,774,042 
Peru 6,677,097 


Imports 
Country. Pounds. 
Austria-Hung'y 4,237,504 
Belgium 17,783,480 
Oanada 1868569 


Russia 112,346,921 
Sweden 40,030,708 
United States.. 8,918,091 
Other countries 2,865,022 
Total 618936,765 


France 22,097,539 
Germany 32.498,112 
Italy 3,298.996 


Netherlands ... 6,522,685 


Imports 
Australia 40,874 


Sweden 275,628 
Switzerland ... 8,211,776 
Untd. kingdom. 465, 443, 216 
Other countries 17,538,153 
Total 614,359,965 


Senegal 2,293,164 
Singapore 5,422,133 


Russia 16,611,888 
United kingdom 24,253.000 
United States.. 76,289,474 
Other countries 11,344,457 


Belgium 10,998,273 
Brazil 4,122,64o 


Venezuela 700,984 
Other countries 24,064,267 


INTERNATIONAL TRA 
Exports 
Bulgaria 6,598,1.,9 
Canada 172.081,891 


DE IN CHEESE (1908). 
Austria-Hung'y 9,748,177 
Belgium 31,051,362 
Brazil 3,454,643 
Brit. .S. Africa 4,459,453 
Cuba 5,232,43S 


Total 217,582,135 

INTERNATIONAL TR 
Exports- 
Algeria 26,624,118 


Total 216,806,304 

ADE IN WOOL (1908). 
Imports 
Austria-Hung. 60,628,869 
Belgium 131,118,370 
British India 18,470,491 
Canada 4,468,680 


Germany . 3 387 843 


Argentina ... 386,994,937 
Australia .... 598,032,199 
Belgium 40,465,085 
British India 32,108,670 
Brit. S. Africa 122,443,992 
Chile 6,928,157 


Italy 43,711,481 


Denmark 1,686,536 


New Zealand... 31,449,376 
Russia 938,933 


France 50,011,189 


France 504,910,496 
Germany 430,576.566 
Japan 5,551,456 


Germany 45,689,689 


Switzerland ... 67,654,558 
United States.. 10,190,843 


Russia 3,069,588 


China 33,441,467 
France 72,337,175 


Netherlands . 31,714,118 
Russia 52,760,801 


Total 485,872,829 


Switzerland ... 6.564,703 
Untd. kingdom. 251, 908,608 
United States.. 33.793,726 
Other countries 19, 236, 65?. 


Netherlands.. 26,359,444 
New Zealand. 168,035,60' 
Peru 8 406 261 


Sweden 7,168,456 
Switzerland... 11,097,626 
Untd. kingdom 470,804,920 
United States 142,559,384 
Other c'ntries 49,487,750 


Imports 
Argentina 8,085,698 


Russia 13939541 


Spain 14 373 068 


TVital rtn 1'l Rfil 




INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ROSIN (1908). 
Exports f!nhn 3.709.909 


Untd. kingdom 38i311,'o9C 
United States 84,129,000 
Other c'ntries 77,480,629 


Total 1,921,317,983 




Austria-Hung'y 2,631,878 


Denmark 2,382,094 


Total 1,790,567,023 


Netherlands ... 86,768,63 
United States.. 728,330,680 
Other countries 34,070,205 


Germany 286,217,917 
Italy 38,811,048 


INTERNATIONAL TRAD 
Exports 
Austria-Hung. 177,828,338 
Belgium 64,463,780 
Canada 480,000,000 
Finland 140,860,769 


E IN WOOD PULP (1908). 
Austria-Hung. 6,486,202 
Belgium 265,428,111 
Denmark 75,010,059 
France 692,701.492 
Germany 99,261,783 


Japan 8,035,293 


Total 912,759,854 


Netherlands ... 98,809,593 


Imports 
Argentina 23,529,126 
Australia 18,015,312 


Spain 4,812,403 


Switzerland ... 4,626,620 
Untd. kingdom. 171, 698.688 
Uruguay 682.304 


Germany 281,362,458 
Norway 1 310 902 325 


Italy 135,943,606 


Austria-Hung'y 82,300,744 


Sweden l,242!85o',222 


Russia 48,932,844 


Canada 17.004,000 


Other countries 22,560,618 


Switzerland . 12,338,167 
United States 22,595,379 
Other c'ntries 56,805,575 


Sweden 6 448 409 


Chile 2,112,888 


Total 915,505,536 


Switzerland .. 20,914,147 
U. kingdom... 1,662,662, 400 
United States 500,969,689 
Other c'ntries 23,684,904 


INTERNATIONAL TRA 
Exports Bales.* 
Brazil 16,442 
British India... 1,423,637 
China 171,132 
Evpt .... 1,315,968 


DE IN COTTON (1908). 
Bales.* 
Canada 125,546 
France* 1,294,295 
Germany 2,189,209 
Italy 953,538 


Total 3,780,007,013 


Imports 
Argentina .... 39,930,837 


Total ..3 698 082 295 




RAW SILK PRODUCT] 

(19C 


ON OF THE WORLD 

8). 
Balkan states... 456, oeo 
Greece and Crete 143,000 
Caucasus 794,000 


France 213,791 


Japan 890,132 


Germany 248,768 
Netherlands .... 108,262 


Mexico 7,611 
Netherlands .... 243,184 


France 1,446000 


Spain 166,000 


Peru 56,910 


Spain 432.687 


Austria-Hungary 736.000 


Persia and 
Turkestan 1,160,000 
China 17 672 000 


United States... 9,152,070 
Other countries. 106,801 


Sweden 97,755 
Switzerland .... 107,309 
United kingdom. 3,702,357 
United States... 154,662 
Other countries. 308,399 


Syria and Cyprus 1,080,000 
Other Turkish 
provinces 320,000 
Salonica and 
Adrianople ... 628,000 




Total 12,903,470 


British India.... '55l!ooO 
Total 53 087 000 


Imports 
Austria-Hungary 816,141 
Belgium 226.183 


Total ... ...12.645.915 




Bales of 500 pounds gross weight. 


RICE PRODUCTION OF 

(19C 
State. Bushels. 
North Carolina. 13,000 
South Carolina.. 476,000 


THE UNITED STATES 
9). 
State. Bushels. 
Mississippi 30.000 
Louisiana 12.676.000 


INTERNATIONAL TRAI 

(19 
Exports Pounds. 
Angola 5.200.000 


>E IN INDIA RUBBER 

)8). 
Pounds. 
Brazil 84,231,126 


Belgian Kongo. 10,052.913 
Belgium 15.036,638 


Dutch E. Indies 14,068,081 
Ecuador 887,085 


Florida 25.000 


Arkansas 1,120,000 


Bolivia 4,008,415 1 France 13,045,487 




Totll 24,368,000 

y. Pounds. 
824.000.000 
Settlements.. 79.000.000 
1,109.978.000 
2,600,000 


Country. 
Ui-ited States 7 
Central America 


RICE CROP OF THE WORLD (1908). 
Pounds. Country. Pound. Countr 
10,300,000 French Indo-China.. 5.000,000,-OOS Siam ... 
9.400.000 Japanese empire 19.035,600,000 Straits ' 
i5.151.000 Java and Madura.... 6,877.000,000 Africa . 
53.985.000 Korea 3.200.000.000 Oceania 
96,436.000 Philippine islands... 534,000,000 
56,000,000 Caucasus and Turke- Total 
09,000.000 Stan .. 393.000,000 


South America 1 


British India 63 'Z 


108,725,450 000 


Ceylon . . ?. 





148 



CHICAGO DAILY NEWS ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1911. 



HOP PRODUCTION OF THE WORLD (1908). 



State or country. Pounds. 

New York 8,000,000 

California 12,000,000 

Oregon 13,000,000 

Washington 3,000,000 

Total United States... 36,000,000 

SUGAR 

Country. Tons.* 

Cane 

United States 1,105,000 

Central America 21,000 

Mexico 130,000 

Cuba * 1,700,000 

Other West Indies 316,000 

South America 684,000 

Europe (Spain) 16,000 

British India 1,800,000 

Formosa 130,000 

Java 1,185,000 



State or country. Pounds. 

Austria-Hungary 18,300,000 

Belgium 2,500,000 

France 3,000,000 

Germany 13,356,000 

Netherlands 158,000 

Russia 8,125,000 

PRODUCTION OF THE WORLD 
Country. Tons.* 

Philippines 145,000 

Africa 395,000 

Oceania 217,328 



Total cane sugar 

Beet- 
United States 

Canada 

Austria-Hungary 

Belgium 

France 



7,844,328 

457,562 

8,802 

1,260,000 

250.000 

825,000 



State or country. Pounds. 

England 24,022.000 

Total Europe 69,461,000 

Australia 1,534,000 

New Zealand 941,000 

Grand total .107,936,000 

(1909-10). 

Country. Tons.* 

Germany 2,040,000 

Netherlands 200,000 

Russia 1,150,000 

Other countries 460.000 

Total beet sugar 6,651,364 

Total cane and beet 14,495,692 

*Tons o2 2,240 pounds, except 

btet sugar in Europe, which is 

in metric tons of 2,204.622 pounds. 



FLAX CROP OF THE WORLD 
Country. Seed. bu. 
United States 25,805,000 
Canada 1 499 000 


(1908). 
Fiber, Ibs. 


Yield, 
State or ter. Acres. bu. Bushels. Value. 
Texas 8,150,000 15.0 122,250,000 92,910,000 
Utah 13,000 31.4 408,000 355,000 


Mexico 150,000 
South America 44,056,000 
Europe 21,237,000 


i'sSS'oSs'.OOO 
82,785,000 


Vermont 65,000 37.0 2,405,000 1,756,000 
Virginia 2,040,000 23.2 47,328,000 35,023,000 
Washington . 15,000 27.8 417,000 359,000 
W. Virginia.. 880,000 31.4 27,632,000 20,448,000 
Wisconsin ... 1,533,000 33.0 50,589,000 30,353,000 
Wyoming .... 5,000 28.0 140,000 109,000 


Asia 7,970,000 


Africa 12,000 




1,940,840,000 
S UNITED 

Bushels. 

... 166,000 
. . . 424,000 


FLAXSEED PRODUCTION OF THI 

STATES (1909). 
State. Bushels. State. 
Wisconsin 290,000 Nebraska ... 


Un. States... 108,771,000 25.5 2,772,376,000 1,652,822,000 


TOBACCO PRODUCTION OF THE UNITED 
STATES (1909). 
State. Acreage. Pounds. Value. 
New Hampshire 100 170,000 $25,000 


Iowa 382,000 Oklahoma .. 


72,000 


Missouri 232,000 Montana ... 
North Dakota... 22,340,000 


... 192,000 
39 466 000 


Massachusetts 4,400 7,040*000