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Full text of "Chicago daily news national almanac for .."

REMOTE STORAGE 



THE UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

LIBRARY 




HISTORICAL 8URVX 





[THIRTY-THIRD YEAR] 

-3 1C AJlf k 



THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS 



ALMANAC 

AND YEAR-BOOK 



FOR 



1917 



COMPILED BY JAMES LANGLAND, M. A. 



ISSUED BY 

I 

THE CHICAGO DAILY NEWS COMPANY 

[Copyright, 1916, by The Chicago Daily News Company.] 





PREFACE. 

Many things of more than ordinary importance occurred in 
1916 concerning which information will often be required in 
the months and years to come. To a large extent this infor- 
mation will be found in the present issue of the Almanac and 
Year-Book. It is not possible to enumerate here all the sub- 
jects dealt with in the volume, but the following may be men- 
tioned: 

The European war, with its tremendous battles on land and 
sea, its huge cost in men and money, its cabinet upheavals and 
its diplomatic disputes. Much space is devoted to telling the 
year's developments in this mighty struggle. 

The awakening of America to its lack of national defense. 
All the essential facts in the "preparedness" campaign are 
given. Congress passed bills intended to strengthen the army 
and navy. These and other measures in the same direction are 
given either in full or in slightly condensed form. 

The railway eight hour controversy. The Adamson law and 
the circumstances under which it was passed aroused wide- 
spread comment, and the indications are that the matter will 
continue to be a topic of discussion for some time to come. 
Th^ inlands of the railroad brotherhoods, the position taken 
; 'resident Wilson and the action taken by congress are 
given in detail. 

The presidential campaign. The story of each national 
party convention is told, each party platform is published in 
full, and comprehensive election tables from every state in the 
union are presented. 

The Mexican-American crisis. The events which brought 
the two countries to the verge of war are described. 

To make room for data relating to these and innumerable 
other matters, the size of the book has been increased by 
thirty-two pages. The index has also been amplified. 












Germany 157 

Gettysburg Park 69 

Gifts and Bequests 400 

Gifts to Education 145 

Gin Produced 152 

Glacier Park 69 

Gold Coinage by Nations 329 

Gold Coinage, U. S.. by Yrs. 331 
Gold Coinage, World, by Yrs. 331 

Gold, Fineness of 123 

Gold, Imports, Exports 83 

Gold, London Price 329 

Gold Produced by States 330 

Gold Produced, by Years.... 330 

Gold, StocK of. in U. S 330 

Gold, World Production 329 

Golf 365, 672 

Good Templars 315 

Goritz, Capture of 530 

Government Expenses 336 

Government Finances 337 

Government, 111. Cities 566 

Government. National 277 

Government of Cities 123 

Government of Illinois 542 

Government of Philippines.. 190 

Governors of States 420 

Govt. Officials in Chicago... 624 
Government Officials, U. S. 277 
Government Printing Office. 280 

Government Receipts 336 

Governments, Foreign 154 

Governments in Chicago 541 

Governors Impeached 336 

Governors of Illinois 564 

Grace, Days of S8 

Grain Inspectors, Illinois 548 

Grain Standards Act 193 

Grand Army, Illinois 565 

Gfand Army of Republic 319 

Granite City Manufactures. 576 

Grant, General, Park 69 

Graphite Production 57 

Gravity. Specific. Table....". 36 

Great Britain 154 

Great Britain, Wealth 121 

Greece 158 

Greece and the War 531 

Greek Calendar 16 

Greeks in United States.... 97 

Gregory, T. W.. Portrait 276 

Grindstones Produced 57 

Growth U. S. Population... 89 

Guam 394 

Guam, Population 86 

Guard, National, by States. 343 
Guard, National, Called Out 537 
Guard, National Composit'n 219 
Guard, National, Illinois... 5S9 

Guatemala 162 

Gum, Money Spent for 53 

Gunboats, U. S 351 

Gypsum Produced 57 

Haiti 163 

Haiti, Treaty with 163 

Hall of Fame, American 68 

Hammond Library 640 

Hammond Torpedo 204 

Hangings in Cook County.. 606 

Harbor Bureau 613 

Harvard-Yale Races 374 

Harvest Moon 29 

Harvest, Wheat. Calendar.. 137 

Hawaii National Park 69 

Hawaii Park Act 195 

Hawaii, Population 86, 101 

Hawaii. Territory 394 

Hay Army Bill Fight 203 

Hay Army Bill. Text of.... 204 

Hay Crop by States 134 

Hay Crop by Years 131 

Health Department 615 

Health. State Board 548 

Heavens, Chart of 24 

Hebrew Calendar 16 

Height Famous Structures.. 126 



Heights, Normal ............. 37 

Hibernians. Ancient Order.. 315 
High Buildings, Chicago.... 643 

High Buildings, New York 67 
High School Colors ......... 686 



Highest and Lowest Places 
Highest Mountains .......... 

Highest Points in States... 
Highway Dept., Illinois ____ 

Hill, J. J., Death of ...... 

Historical Association, Am. 
Historical Events, Recent.. 



Historical Society Library.. 639 
Historical Society, National. 327 
Historical Society. State... 569 

Hockey 371 

Holidays in United States... 74 

Holland 160 

Home, National Soldiers' 341 

Homeopathic Med. Ass'n. 111. 569 

Homeopathicians, Soc. of 327 

Homeopathy, Am. Institute. 325 

Homes in United States 107 

Homes. State, Value 121 

Honduras 162 

Hoof and Mouth Disease.... 164 

Hop Crop of World 130 

Hops, International Trade.. 138 

Horse Racing 361 

Horse Racing. Chicago 672 

Horses in United States.... 136 
Horseshoers, Examiners of.. 549 
Horticultural Society, 111.... 548 

Hospital, County 604 

Hospital Ships, U. S 352 

Hospitals, Insane in 110 

Hospitals of Chicago 663 

Hospitals, State. Value 121 

Hot Springs Reservation 69 

Hotels in Chicago 66! 

Hottest Days in Chicago... 6.3 

House Number System 726 

House of Representatives. 286, 290 

House, Speakers of 412 

Houston, D. F., Portrait... 276 

Humane Association. Am 327 

Humane Officers, Illinois.... 549 
Humane Society. Illinois.... 569 
Hungarians in United States 97 

Hungary 156 

Hunter's Moon 29 

Hunting Accidents 421 

Hydrographic Office, Chicago 624 
Hymns, National j.... 467 

Idaho, State Officers 430 

Idaho. Vote of 4RO 

Ice Skating 378 

Ice Skating, Chicago 671 

Illinois Assessment 599 

Illinois Centennial 564 

Illinois Charities Com 547 

Illinois Charity Dependents 606 
Illinois Cities, Government.. 566 
Illinois Cities. Population... 563 

Illinois Civil List 546 

Illinois Congressional Dists.. 558 
111. Counties, Facts About.. 578 

Illinois County Officers 551 

111. Equal Suffrage Ass'n... 677 
Illinois Farm Property 540 



Illinois, Government of. 
Illinois, Governors of 



... 542 

534 



. 595 
573 
569 
56!* 
546 



Illinois Legislative Vote 

Illinois Manufactures 

Illinois National Guard 

Illinois Naval Reserve 

Illinois Officials 

Illinois Officials, Portraits.. 545 

Illinois. Paupers in ........... 542 

Illinois, Population ........... 556 

Illinois Primary Law ......... 576 

111. Rep. Woman's League. 696 
Illinois Senatorial Dists.. 561. 562 
Illinois Senators, 111 ......... 578 

Illinois State Associations.. 569 
111. State Cent. Committees 570 



Illinois State Boards 550 

Illinois, State Officers... 433, 546 

Illinois University 546 

Illinois, Vote of 480 

Illinois Vote, Popular 579 

111. Weights, Measures 577 

Illiteracy in United States 112 
Illiterate Minors. Chicago.. 714 

Immigration Bureau 279 

Immigration Bureau. Chicago 624 

Immigration Law 299 

Immigration Statistics 124 

Impeachment Cases 336 

Imports by Articles 78 

Imports by Continents 85 

Imports by Countries 83 

Imports by Groups 81 

Imports by Years 82 

Imports, Chicago 690 

Imports, Duties Collected 85 

Imports, Gold, Silver 83 

Imports of Merchandise 78 

Improvements. Board Local. 614 

Immigrants, Destination 124 

Income Tax. British 401 

Income Tax Rates 179 

Income Tax Receipts 396 

Index, Previous Issues 748 

India 154 

India, Wealth of 121 

Indian Affairs, Office 280 

Indian Population (1910) 91 

Indian Population (1915) 126 

Indian Reservations 126 

Indian Rignts Ass'n 328 

Indiana, State Officers 434 

Indiana. Vote of 433 

Industrial Board, Illinois.... 550 

Industries, Chicago 574 

Industries. Illinois 573 

Industries in U. S 415 

Industries, Mobilization pf... 227 

Industries, Persons in 123 

Infant Mortality, Associa- 
tion, Study 326 

Infantile Paralysis 398 

Infusorial Earth Produced.. 57 
Inheritance Tax. Illinois...'.' 572 

Inheritance Tax, U. S 180 

Inmates Illinois Charitable 

Institutions 606 

Insane in Hospitals 110 

Insane, Statistics of .'. 110 

Inspectors Steam Vessels, 

Chicago 624 

Institute Arts, Letters 407 

Institute Criminal Law, 111. 569 
Instructors in Universities.. 146 

Insurance, Marine 49 

Insurance Statistics 41 

Intercollegiate Pro. Ass'n.. 328 
Internal Revenue Depart- 
ment, Chicago 624 

Internal Revenue 'Receipts. 394 
Internal Revenue Receipts, 

Chicago 692 

International Date Line 33 

International Disputes, So- 
ciety for Settlement 534 

International Reform Bureau 328 
Interest, Points of, Chicago. 734 

Interest Tables 37 

Interior Department 286 

Interior, Secretaries of 77 

Interstate Commerce Com... 280 
Interurban Lines, Chicago... 740 

Inventions, American 47 

Inventions. Foreign 47 

Investment Bankers' Ass'n.. 328 

Iowa. State Officers 436 

Iowa, Vote of 434 

Ireland. Revolt in 481 

Irish in United States 97 

Iron, Pi?. Produced 57 

Iron Rails Produced 59 

Irrigation Statistics 71 

Italian Campaign 530 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Italian-Turkish War 422 

Italians in United States... 97 

Italy 158 

Italy, Earthquake in 65 

Italy, Navy of 346 

Jacksonville Manufactures.. 576 

Japan 160 

Japan, Navy of 346 

Japanese in United States. 97 
Japanese Population, U. S. 91 
Japanese-Russian Treaty.... 256 

Japanese-Russian War 422 

Jersey City Fire 66 

Jewish Calendar 16 

Joliet Manufactures 576 

Joliet, 111.. Population 563 

Judges, Circuit, Chicago 623 

Judges, Circuit, U. S 281 

Judges. Illinois County o51 

Judges, Municipal 624 

Judges, Municipal, Vote.... 593 

Judges, Superior 623 

Judges, U. S. District 282 

Judicial Election, June 595 

Judiciary, Federal 281 

Jupiter in 1917 29 

Jupiter. Planet 25 

Jury Commission 603 

Jutland, Battle of 470 

Juvenile Court 623 

Kaiser Wilhelm Canal.. . 30 
Kankakee Manufactures.. 576 

Kansas State Officers 437 

Kansas, Vote of 436 

Kenesaw Monument Com. 549 
Kentucky, State Officers. 438 

Kentucky, Vote of 437 

Kewanee Manufactures... 576 

Khiva 161 

Kiel Canal 30 

King's Daughters and Sons. 309 

Kings. Pay of 422 

Kingston Earthquake 65 

Kitchener, Lord Death 470 

Knights of Columbus 315 

Knights of Pythias 314 

Knights Templars 313 

Kongo, Belgian 161 

Korea v 161 

Kronstadt Canal 30 

Kut-el-Amara Disaster 530 

Labor, Am. Federation 4">9 

Labor, Bureau of, Illinois.. 549 

Labor, Child, Law 192 

Labor Department 279 

Labor Federation. Chicago.. 647 
Labor, Illinois Federation.. 569 

Labor, Secretaries of 77 

Labor Statistics, Bureau.... 279 

Ladies of the G. A. R 320 

Ladies of the G. A. R., 111. 565 

Lake Mohonk Conference 3 "8 

Lake Trade, Chicago 688 

Lakes. Area and Depth 53 

Land Banks, Federal 241 

Land Office. General 280 

Land per Inhabitant 103 

Lands, Farm, Value 139 

Lands, Irrigated 71 

Lands, Public 142 

Lane, F. K., Portrait 276 

Language. Population by.... 100 
Lansing on Mexican Crisis.. 535 
Lansine, Robert, Portrait... 276 

Lard, Prices 738 

LaSalle Manufactures 576 

Lassen Park Act 19 r . 

Lassen Volcanic Park 69 

Latitude of Chicago 642 

Laundries, Steam 198 

Law Examiners. Illinois 546 

Law Institute Library 640 

Law and Order Assn's 630 

Laws, Building, Commission 549 



Laws,. Commis'n on Uniform 546 
Laws Passed by Congress.. 179 

Lead Produced 57 

League Am. Municipalities.. 328 

League to Enforce Peace 325 

Learned Societies in Chicago 653 

Learned Societies, U. S 326 

Leelanaw Case..... 499 

Legal Holidays 74 

Legations, Foreign in U. S. 296 
Legislation by Congress.... 179 
Leglislative Reference Bur.. 546 
Legislative Voters' League. 696 
Leglisature, 111.. Members.. 552 
Leglisature, Spec'l Sessions. 541 

Legislature, Vote on 595 

Legislatures of States 420 

Length of Chicago 642 

Lent Begins 15 

Lewis Institute Library 640 

Liberia .". 161 

Libraries in Chicago 638 

Library Ass'n, American 326 

Library Ass'n, Illinois 569 

Library Extension, Illinois.. 547 
Library. Historical, Illinois.. 547 
Library, Municipal Refer'ce 615 

Library of Congress 73 

Library, State 547 

License Rates. Chicago 694 

License Receipts, Chicago... 621 
Licenses, Saloon, in Cities.. 126 

Life Insurance 41 

Life Saving Service 52 

Life Tables. U. S 42, 43 

Light, Boston, Anniversary.. 353 
Lighting, Street, Chicago... 674 

Lighthouses, Bureau of 279 

Lights. Street, in Chicago... 642 

Lime Produced 57 

Limitations, Statute of 38 

Lincoln Homestead 69 

Lincoln Homestead Act .,195 

Lincoln Manufactures 576 

Lincoln Memorial Commiss'n 43 

Lincoln Park 654 

Liquor Consumed 152 

Liquor Traffic in Cities 126 

Liquors Produced 152 

Live Stock Breeders' Ass'n.. 548 
Live Stock C'missioners, 111. 548 
Live Stock on Illinois Farms 569 
Live Stock, U. S. (1916) . . . ' 136 
Live Stock, U. S., Value.... 119 

Living, Cost of 397 

Loan Associations 100 

Loan. Federal Farm, Act.... 241 

Local Election Calendar 599 

lodge (Mexico) Resolution.. 153 

Lodging House Inspection 549 

Lodging House. Municipal... 617 

Longitude of Chicago 642 

Losses in Spanish-Am. War. 325 
Louisiana, State Officers.... 439 

Louisiana, Vote of 438 

Loyal Legion 320 

Lusitania Disaster 302 

Lutheran Denomination 307 

Lynchings in U. S 273 

Maccabees 315 

Machinery, U. S.. Value 119 

Madagascar 161 

Mails, Interference with.... 505 

Maine, State Officers ,439 

Maine, Vote of 439 

Maize, Milo 141 

Males of Militia Age 94 

Malt Liquor Consumed 152 

Manchester Ship Canal 30 

Manganese Ore Produced... 57 

Manitoba, Crops of 130 

Manufactures, Chicago 574 

Manufactures, Illinois 573 

Manufactures, Illinois Cities 575 

Manufactures in U. S 415 

Manufacturing. Persons in. 123 



Maple Sirup and Sugar 132 

Maps, Bureau of % . 614 

Marine Corps Increase 233 

Marine Corps Reserve 232 

Marine Corps Train. Camps 233 

Marine Disasters 399 

Marine Engineers, Society... 327 
Marine Hospital, Chicago... 624 

Marine Insurance 41 

Marine. U. S.-, Law 187 

Mariner's Measure 48 

Marshal. IT. S., Chicago 624 

Marshall, T. R., Portrait. ~. 276 

Marshals, U. S 283 

Marriage Anniversaries 45 

Marriage Laws 68 

Marriage Statistics 66 

Married Population 95 

Mars in 1917 29 

Mars, Planet 25 

Martinique, Eruption in 65 

Maryland. State Officers 440 

Maryland, Vote of 439 

Masonic Bodies 313 

Massachusetts, State Officers 441 

Massachusetts, Vote of 440 

Mathematical Ass'n, Am 327 

Mathematical Society, Am.. 326 

Mattoon Manufactures 576 

Mayflower Descendants. Soc. 322 
Mayor, Vote for, Since 1871. 580 

Mayor's Office 612 

Mayors of Chicago 651 

Mayors of Large Cities 419 

Mayors, Terms. Pay 125 

May wood Public Library 640 

McAdoo, Wm. G., Portrait.. 276 
McKinley Souvenir Dollar... 197 

McKinley Tariff 177 

McLeniore Resolution 475 

Measures and Weights 35 

Mechanical Engineers, Am. 

Society 327 

Mechanics, United Am 316 

Medal of Honor Act 196 

Median Lines, Population.89, 90 

Mediation. Board of 328 

Medical Ass'n, American 326 

Medical School, Gifts for.... 720 
Medico- Psychological Ass'n.. 326 

Memphis. Wreck of 172 

Mendelssohn Club 653 

Merchantmen, Armed, and 

Submarines 491 

Merchandise, Exports 79 

Merchandise, Imports 78 

Merchant Marine. U. S.... 50 

Mercury in 1917 28 

Mesa Verde Park 69 

Message, President's 417 

Messages, Telegraph, Sent... 46 

Methodist Church 304 

Metric Measures 35 

Metropolitan Districts 86 

Mexicans in United States. 97 

Mexico 161 

Mexico and United States. 535 
Mexico, Lodge Resolution. ..' 153 
Mexico, Relief, U. S. Citi- 
zens 197 

Mica Produced 57 

Michigan Copper Production 142 

Michigan, State Officers 442 

Michigan, Vote of 441 

Microscopical Society, Am... 326 
Midshipmen. Increase of.... 234 
Milan Cathedral. Height.... 123 
Military Acad. Cadets, More 233 

Military Academy, U. S 344 

Military Expenses Act 196 

Military Training Camps 203 

Military Training League.... 325 

Militia Age, Males of 94 

Militia and Array 343 

Militia Bureau, War Dept. 222 

Militia, Drafting. Act 196 

Militia, Naval, by States.... 343 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Militia, U. S.. Called Out.. 537 

Milk. Pasteurization 62 

Milk Production 170 

Mills Tariff 177 

Mine Disasters in 1916 400 

Minn Inspectors, State 550 

Mine Rescue Station Com.. 550 
Mineral Paints Produced.... 57 
Mineral Waters Produced... 57 

Miners' Examining Board 550 

Mines, Accidents in 59 

Mines. Bureau of 280 

Mines in United States 58 

Mining Board. Illinois 550 

Mining Disasters, Great.... 299 
Mining Engineers. Am. Inst. 32'3 
Mining Investigation Com'... 550 
Ministers, United States.... 293 

Minnesota, State Officers 444 

Minnesota, Vote of 442 

Minors, Employment of... . 714 

Mints, U. S. Coinage 345 

Mississippi Centennial 197 

Mississippi, State Officers . 445 

Mississippi. Vote of 444 

Missouri, State Officers... . 446 

Missouri, Vote of 445 

Mobilization of Industries... 227 

Modern Woodmen 314 

Mohammedan Calendar 16 

Molasses Production 131 

Molde Fire 85 

Moline Manufactures 576 

Monetary Units 331 

Money and Finance 329 

Money, Coins, U. S 178 

Money in Circulation. U. S. 352 

Money per Capita, World 331 

Money of the World 331 

Monroe Doctrine 153 

Months, Flower Symbols.... 109 

Months, Gem Symbols 109 

Montana, State Officers 446 

Montana. Vote of 446 

Montenegro 158 

Monuments, Chicago 716 

Monuments, National 69 

Moon, Light and Dark 26 

Moon's Positions 25 

Morocco 161 

Morrison Tariff 177 

Mortality Statistics. Chicago 675 
Mortality Statistics, U. S... 117 

Mortality Tables 42, 43 

Mother Tongue. Popul'n by 100 

Mother Tongues, Illinois 599 

Mothers, Congress of 328 

Motor Racing 386 

Motorcycle Records 388 

Motorcycling. Chicago 671 

Motoring , 671 

Motors, Rules for 686 

Mottoes, State 284 

Mount Rainier Park 69 

Mountains, High, in U. S 165 

Mountains. Highest 70 

Mules in United States 136 

Multiplication Table 45 

Municipal Court 624 

Municipal League, National 328 

Municipal Pension Fund 637' 

Municipal Reference Library 640 
Municipal Voters' League.... 696 
Municipalities. League Am.. 328 

Munitions Plants Board 227 

Munitions. Tax 182 

Museum, Field 649 

Music in Chicago 652 

Music Publishing 75 

Music Teachers' Ass'n, 111. .569 
Mystic Shrine, Nobles 314 

National Council of Women. 328 
National Defense Movement. 199 
National Guard. Composition 219 
National Education Ass'n... 327 
National Naval Volunteers.. 232 



National Park Service 195 

National Parks 63 

National Security League... 324 

National Union 315 

National Wealth, U. S 119 

Nations. Wealth of 121 

Nativity of Population 99 

Naturalists, Am. Society 327 

Naturalization, Bureau 279 

Naturalization Laws 411 

Nature Study Society, Am.. 32G 

Naval Academy, U. S 344 

Naval Appropriations 204 

Naval Architects, Society 327 

Naval Coast Reserve.... 232 

Naval Consulting Board 347 

Naval Flying Corps 230 

Naval Losses in War 471 

Naval Militia by States 343 

Naval Pay Table 345 

Naval Reserve Flying Corps 232 

Naval Reserve Force 231 

Naval Reserve, Illinois 569 

Naval Volunteer Reserve 232 

Iaval Volunteers, National. 232 

Navigation, Bureau of 279 

Navies Compared 346 

Navies of the World 347 

Navies, Personnel of 347 

Navies, Principal 346 

Navy and Naval Militia... J 343 

Navy Bill in Congress 203 

Navy Department. 278 

Navy League, Mid- West 566 

Navy League of U. S 325 

Navy Medal of Honor Act... 196 

Navy, Officers of 348 

Navy, Secretaries of 77 

Navy. United States 348 

Navy. U. S., Act to Increase 229 
Navy Yards. Additional.. 230, 233 

Nebraska, State Officers 448 

Nebraska, Vote of 447 

Necrology 402 

Negro Life Table 43 

Negro Population 91 

Negroes in Cities 91 

Netherlands 160 

N. Hampshire, State Officers 448 



New Hampshire, Vote of.. 
New Jersey, State Officers. 

New Jersey, Vote of 

New Mexico, State Officers 

New Mexico. Vote of 

New York, Big Buildings in 



New York, Population by 

Boroughs 105 

New York. State Officers.... 452 

New York. Vote of 450 

Nevada, State Officers 448 

Nevada, Vote .of 448 

New Zealand. Wealth , 121 

Newberry Library 639 

Newspaper Publishers' Ass'n 398 

Newspaper Publishing 75 

Newspapers in America.... 41 

Newspapers in Chicago 642 

Nicaragua 162 

Nicaragua Canal Treaty.... 127 

Nicknames, State 108 

Nitrate Supply 228 

Nobel Prize Winners 318 

Nobles of Mystic Shrine.... 314 
Nominating Conventions, Na- 
tional 249 

Noon, Sidereal 26 

Normal Schools. Illinois 546 

Normal University. Illinois. 546 
North America. Population. 102 
N. Carolina. State Officers.. 45., 

North Carolina, Vote of 452 

North Dakota. State Officers 453 

North Dakota. Vote of 453 

Northwestern Univ. Libraries 640 

Norway 158 

Norwegians in U. S 97 

Note, Am., on Deportations 483 



Noted Dead 300 

Numerals, Roman, Arabic... 85 

Numismatic Society, Am 326 

Nurseries, Day, in Chicago. 664 
Nurses, Examiners, Illinois. 549 
Nut Production 141 

Oak Park Library 640 

Oak Park Manufactures 576 

Oat Prices, Chicago 740 

Oat Crop by States 133 

Oat Crop of World 129 

Oat Crop by Years 131 

Obituary 402 

Oceans, Area and Depth.... 53 

Ocean Steamships. Great 248 

Oceania, Population 102 

Occupations in U. S 122 

Officers, Regimental 340 

Officials, Chicago 611, 612 

Officials, Cook County 603 

Officials, Govt., in Chicago. 624 
Officials, Government, U. S. 277 

Officials, Illinois 546 

Officials. Terms of 692 

Oglesby Monument Com 549 

Ohio, State Officers 455 

Ohio, Vote of 453 

Oil Cake. Internat'l Trade.. 137 

Oil Inspector 617 

Oil, Petroleum, Produced... 51 

Oilstones Produced 57 

Oklahoma, State Officers 456 

Oklahoma, Vote of 455 

Old Chgo. Business Houses 641 
Old Residents of Chicago.. 698 

Olympian Records 383 

Ontario Forest Fires 67 

Opera in Chicago 652 

Ophthalmological Soc., Am.. 326 
Optometry, State Board, 111. 54? 
Orders Conferred on Chi- 

cagoans 6S, 4 

Oregon, State Officers 456 

Oregon, Vote of 456 

Oriental Society, Am 326 

Orphans, French, Relief for 531 

Osteopathic Ass'n. Am. ., 326 

Owners in Industries 123 

Oxford-Cambridge Races 374 

Packing in Chicago 732 

Packing, Pork, Statistics... 41 

Palm Sunday 15 

Panama 162 

Panama Canal 54 

Panama Canal Tolls 55 

Panama Canal Traffic 56 

Panama Canal Zone 394 

Panama Railroad 56 

Panama Zone Population 86 

Panics, Theater 49 

Paper, Manufacture of 312 

Paper, Printing, Duties.... 184 

Parades, Preparedness 202 

Paraguay 162 

Paralysis, Infantile "398 

Parcel Post Rates 413 

Pardons. State Board 550 

Park Areas by Wards 658 

Park, Nat'l, Service Act.... 195 

Parks and Boulevards 654 

Parks. National 69 

Parks. Small. Chicago 657 

Party Conventions. 1880-1916, 269 

Party Lines in Congress 423 

Passengers. Ocean 124 

Pasteurization of Milk 62 

Patent Office 280 

Patent Office Statistics 63 

Patents. Applications for.. 63 
Patriotic Education Society. 325 

Patriotic Societies 319 

Patriotic Societies, Illinois.. 565 

Paupers, Age of 109 

Paupers, Foreign Born 109 

Paupers in Almshouses 109 



10 



ALMANAC AND YEAE-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Paupers in Illinois ........... 542 

Paymaster's Bureau ......... 613 

Payne- Aldrich Tariff ......... 177 

Pea Crop of World ......... f 130 

Peace, League to Enforce.. 325 
Pedestrianism ............... 390 

Pediatric Society, Am ....... 326 

Pekin (111.) Manufactures... 576 
Pelee. Mont, Eruption ...... 65 

Penitentiaries, State ......... 550 

Penitentiary Building Com.. 550 
Pennant Winners, Baseball.. 355 
Pension Commission, 111.... 550 

Pension Fund, Municipal ____ 637 

Pension Office ................ 280 

Pension Statistics ............ 534 

Pennsylvania, State Officers 458 
Pennsylvania, Vote of ...... 457 

Peoples Gas Co. Finances... 732 
Peoria, 111., Population ...... 564 

Peoria Manufactures ......... 576 

Periodical Publishing ......... 75 

Periods of Time ............. 15 

Persia ........................ 161 

Persia, Sinking of ........... 473 

Peru .......................... 162 

Petroleum Produced ........ 51, 57 

Pharmacy, Board of. 111 ____ 548 

Phila. City Hall, Height.. 126 
Philatelic Society, National 327 
Philippine War .......... . ____ 422 

Philippines ................. . 393 

Philippines, Gov't of ........ 190 

Philippines. Population ...... 86 

Philological Ass'n, Am ...... 326 

Philosophical Society, Am.. 327 
Phosphate Rock .............. 57 

Physical Society, Am ........ 327 

Physician, County ............ 604 

Physicians, Society, Am ____ 327 

Pig Iron Produced ........... 57 

Pioneers, Deaths of ......... 702 

Pioneers of Chicago .......... 698 

Pioneers, Societies of ........ 649 

Pistol Shooting ............... 391 

Planets, Pacts About ........ 29 

Planets, Positions of ........ 25 

Planets, Visibility of ........ 30 

Platforms, National Party.. 357 
Platinum Produced ........... 57 

Platt National Park ......... 69 

Playgrounds, Chicago ........ 658 

Playground Association ...... 328 

Poets Laureate, English.... 118 

Points of Interest, Chicago.. 734 
Polar Record .................. 167 

Police Chiefs, Chicago ....... 716 

Police Department ........... 616 

Police Depts. of Cities. ...". 125 

Police Districts. Stations... 678 
Police, Work of .............. 678 

Police Work, by Years ....... 6SO 

Policewomen In Cities ....... 126 

Poliomyelitis ................. 398 

Polish Kingdom Restored... 528 
Political Ass'ns. Chicago... 696 
Political Committees, Nat'l 270 
Political Equality League, 
Chicago ..................... 696 

Political Record of States. 273 
Political Science. Am. Acad. 326 
Political Science As., Am.. 327 
Polo .......................... 391 

Poorhouses, Paupers in ____ 109 

Popular Vote for President. 424 
Population by Age ........... 94 

Population by Color ......... 91 

Population by Continents ... 102 



Population by Divisions 
Population by Language 



88 
... 100 



Population by Nativity ..... 99 

Population by Sex ........... 92 

Population by Voting Age... 93 
Population, Center ........... 89 

Population, Chgo, by Wards. 658 
Population, Cities, World.. 116 
Population, Colored .......... 86 



Population Cook County 567 

Population Estimates (1917).. 86 
Population, Foreign Born... 95 
Population. Growth, U. S... 89 

Population, Illinois 556 

Population, Illinois Cities... 563 
Populat'n, Increase by Color 92 
Population, Indian (1915).... 126 
Population, Marital Condit'n 95 
Population, Median Lines... 89 
Population, Minor, Chicago. 712 

Population of Chicago 567 

Population of World 102 

Population per Sq. Mile 103 

Population, Rural 101 

Population, School Age 144 

Population Statistics, U. S.. 86 

Population, Urban 101 

Population, U. S. Cen. Yrs. 87 

Population. White v 86 

Pork, Mess, Prices 738 

Pork Packing Statistics 41 

Porto Rico 393 

Porto Rico, Population 101 

Ports, Distances Between... 114' 

Ports, Principal 51 

Portugal 159 

Portugal Enters War........ 484 

Portuguese in U. S 97 

Postage Rates 413 

Postal Information 413 

Postal Savings Amendment 196 
Postal Savings Banks, U. S. 333 
Postal Statistics, Chicago.... 646 
Postal Statistics. National.. 73 

Postal Statistics, U. S 534 

Postmasters-General 77 

Postmasters Large Cities 419 

Postmasters- of Chicago 663 

Postoffice, Chicago 645 

Postoffice Department 279 

Postoffice Inspector, Chicago 624 

Postoffices of Nations 73 

Potato Crop by States 134 

Potato Crop by Years 131 

Potato Crop of World 130 

Potato, Sweet, Crop, by 

States 134 

Poultry Ass'n. State 548 

Power Boat Racing 377, 671 

Precipitation, U. S 353 

Precious Stones Produced 57 

Preparedness Confer'ce Com. 325 

Preparedness Movement , 199 

Preparedness Parades 202 

Preparedness Tour, Wilson.. 202 

Presbyterian Church 305 

President, Popular Vote.... 424 
Presidential Primary. 111... 581 

Presidential Succession 72 

Presidents and Cabinets 76 

President's Message 417 

Presidents, Salaries of 406 

Presidents, Where Buried... 108 

Presidents, University 146 

Press Association, Illinois... 569 

Press, The Associated 398 

Prices, Wholesale 397 

Primary, April. Illinois 581 

Primary Law, Illinois 576 

Primary, Presidential, 111.... 581 

Primary, Sept., Illinois 581 

Primary, Sept.. Chicago and 

Cook County 598 

Printing Industry 75 

Printing Office. Government. 280 

Printing Paper Duties 184 

Printing, Supt., Illinois 549 

Prisoners in United States.. Ill 

Prisons, State, in U. S Ill 

Prisons, State. Value 121 

Probate Court 623 

Professors in Universities... 146 

Progress of Chicago 630 

Progress of United States.. 392 
Progressive Nat'l Convent'n 253 
Progressive Platform 250 



Prohibition Ass'n, Intercol.. 328 
Pro. Committee, Cook Co.... 571 
Prohibition Committee, 111.. 570 
Prohib. Nat'l Committee 272 
Prohibition Nat'l Convent'n 255 

Prohibition Platform 264 

Prohibition States .. 418 

Property, Value, U. S 119 

Properties of States 121 

Propositions, Vote on 594 

Prosecuting Attorney 613 

Protestant Episcopal Church 304 

Provence, Loss of the 472 

Public Debt 337 

Public Domain 142 

Public Health Ass'n, Am.. 327 

Public Library 638 

Public Safety. Bureau 616 

Public Service Dept 614 

Public Welfare Departm't.. 616 
Public Works Department.. 614 
Public Utilities Com., 111.... 547 
Publishers' Ass'n, Newspaper 398 

Publishing Industry 75 

Pugilism 372 

Pumice Produced 57 

Pullman Public Library. .. 640 
Pullman Co. Statistics.. .. 170 
Pulse at Different Ages .. 153 
Pupils in Schools, U. S .. 143 

Punishment. Capital 406 

Pyramid, Great, Height. .. 126 
Pyrite Produced 57 

Quarries, Accidents in 69 

Quarries in United States. 58 

Quartz Produced 57 

Quicksilver Produced 57 

Quincy. 111., Population 564 

Quincy Manufactures 576 

Race, Population by 92 

Racing. Automobile 386 

Racing, Horse 361 

Racing, Power Boat 377 

Racing, Yacht 376 

Racquets .., 383 

Radium, Sources of 16 

Railroad Accidents 171 

Railroad Expenses 168 

Railroad Mileage 168 

Railroad Revenues 168 

Railroad Speed Table 45 

Railroad Statistics 168, 169 

Railroad Taxes 168 

Railroad Tunnels, Long 36 

Railroad Wrecks in 1916 400 

Railroads, Electric 171 

Railroads of Nations 73 

Railroads, U. S., Value 119 

Rails, Steel. Iron, Produced 59 
Railway Eight Hour Day 

Board 240 

Railway Eight Hour Dispute 235 
Railway Mail Service, Chi.. 624 

Railway Station. New 734 

Railways. World's 50 

Rainfall, United States 353 

Real Estate Transfers 740 

Real Property, U. S., Value 119 

Reaumur Thermometer 45 

Receipts, Chicago 688 

Receipts, Government 336 

Receipts, Illinois 577 

Reclamation Projects 71 

Reclamation Service 280 

Recorders, Illinois 551 

Recorder's Office 603 

Recreation Association 328 

Redfleld, W. C., Portrait.... 276 
Red Cross, Am. National.... 327 

Red Men, Order of 314 

Reference Bureau, Legisl'e.. 546 
Reform Bureau, Internat'L. 328 

Reformatory, State 550 

Regimental Officers. U. S... 340 
Registrar of Titles 603 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



11 



Registration, Chicago 583 

Registration Trade-Marks 63 

Relief Flood Victims 197 

Relief, Mexico, U. S. Citiz's 197 

Religions of World 309 

Religious Associations 303 

Religious Education Ass'n... 308 

Religious Statistics 309 

Representation in Congress.. 274 

Representatives. Illinois 554 

Representatives, State, Vote 596 

Representatives, U. S 286 

Rep. Committee, Cook Co... 570 
Republican Committee, 111.. 570 
Republican Nat'l Convention 249 

Republican Platform 357 

Reservations, Indian 126 

Reserve Corps. Enlisted 218 

Reserves, Naval 231 

Restraints on Commerce 509 

Retaliatory Duties ~. 186 

Revenue Cutter Service 62 

Revenue Cutters 53 

Revenue, Emergency, Act... 179 

Revenues, National 72 

Review, Board of , 604 

Review of War 528 

Revolt in Ireland 480 

Rhode Island, State Officers 458 

Rhode Island, Vote of 458 

Rice Crop of World 130 

Rivers, Longest 115 

Rice Crop by States 135 

Rice, International Trade... 138 

Rifle Shooting 388, 671 

Rivers and Harbor Bureau.. 613 
Rivers and Lakes Com., 111.". 549 
Road Expenses, Cook County 609 
Roads. Federal Funds for.. 246 

Rock Creek Park 69 

Rock Island Manufactures... 576 

Rockefeller Foundation 393 

Rockford Manufactures 576 

Rockford. 111., Population.... 564 

Rocky Mountain Park 69 

Roller Skating 385 

Roman Numerals 85 

Roque 390 

Rosin. International Trade.. 138 
Rouen Cathedral. Height.... 126 

Roumania 159 

Roumania Crushed 531 

Roumania Enters War 484 

Roumanians in United States 97 

Rowing 373 

Royal and Select Masters... 313 

Royal Arcanum 314 

Royal Arch Masons 313 

Royal League 315 

Rubber, Internat'l Trade.... 138 

Rulers, Foreign 154 

Rules of Road 686 

Rum Produced 152 

Running, Long Distance 382 

Rural Population 101 

Russia 159 

Russia, Navy of v 346 

Russian Calendar 16 

Russian Offensive 530 

Russians in United States.. 97 

Russo-Japanese Treaty 256 

Russo-Japanese War 422 

Rye Crop by States 133 

Rye Crop by Years 131 

Rye Crop of World 129 

Ryerson Library 639 

Safety Council, National 328 

Sage Foundation 391 

Sakura Eruption 65 

Salaries, Chicago Employes.. 617 
Salaries, Chicago Teachers.. 634 

Salaries, Cook County 605 

Salaries of Presidents 406 

Saloniki Campaign 531 

Saloon Licenses in Cities.... 126 
in Chicago 642 



Saloons in Cities 

Salt Produced 

Salvation Army 

Satm-a, American 

Sanitary District, Chicago... 

San Francisco Fire ,.. 

Santa Ysabel Massacre 

Santo Domingo 

Santo Domingo. Disturbance 

Saskatchewan, Crops 

Saturn, Planet 

Sault Ste. Marie Canals 

bault Ste. Marie Canal Traf. 
Savings Banks by States.... 

Savings Banks, Foreign 

Savings Banks. Postal, Chi.. 

Savings-Bauks Statistics 

Savings Banks, U. S. Postal 

Savings, Postal, Act 

School Attendance 

School Attendance, Chicago. 

School Census 

School Finances, Chicago.... 

School Salary Schedule 

School Statistics, Chicago... 

School Statistics, U. S 

School Supts., Illinois 

Schools. County Supt 

Schools, High, United States 

Schools, Normal, U. S 

Schools of Chicago 

Schools. Private, U. S 

Schools, Professional 

Schools, State, Value 

Science, Am. Ass'n, Advmt. 

Scotch in United States 

Scottish Rite Masons 

Scouts, Boy, Incorporated... 
Seaports, Distances Between 

Seaports of World 

Seas, Area and Depth 

Seasons, The 

Secret Service, U. S., Chi... 

Secret Societies 

Secretaries of Agriculture... 

Secretaries of Commerce 

Secretaries of Interior 

Secretaries of Labor 

Secretaries of Navy 

Secretaries of State 

Secretaries of Treasury 

Secretaries of War 

Secretary of War Resigns.... 
Security League, Chi. Branch 
Security League, National... 

Seed Production 

Senat'l Dists., Cook Co.. .560, 

Senatorial Dists., Ill 561, 

Senators, State, Illinois 

Senators, State, Vote 

Senators. United States.. 285, 

Senators, U. S., from 111 

Sequoia Park 

Serbia 

Settlements, Social 

Sex, Population by 

Shackleton Expedition 

Sheep by States 

Sheep in U. S. (1916) 

Sheriff Vote for, Since 1900. 

Sheriffs, Cook County 

Sheriffs, Illinois 

Sheriff's Office 

Sherman Antitrust Law 

Shiloh Park 

Ship Canals. Great 

Shipping Board, U. S 187, 

Shipping Data 

Shipping, Disasters to 

Shipping Terms 

Shipbuilding. World's 

Shipments. Chicago 

Ships Built in United States 

Ships Built, World 

Ships of U. S. Navy 

Ships, World's 

Shirt Industry 



120 



394 



Shooting, Pistol ............... 391 

Shooting, Rifle ............... S8& 

Shooting, Trap ................ 334 

Short Ballot Organization... 32g 
Siam ......................... 161 

Sicily, Earthquake ........... 65 

Sidereal Noon ................. 2ft 

Signals, Weather..; .......... 44 

Signs of the Zodiac ....... .... 31 

Silk. Raw, Crop of World... 130 
Silver, Bullion Value ......... 331 

Silver Coinage by Nations... 32ft 
Silver Coinage, U. S., by Yrs. 331 
Silver Coinage, World, by Yrs. 331 
Silver, Commercial Ratio.... 322 

Silver, Imports, Exports ..... 83: 

Silver, London, Price ........ 33a 

Silver Produced by States... 330 
Silver Produced by Years.... 330 

Silver, Stock of, in U. S.. 330 
Silver, World Production ____ 329 

Single Persons. Population of 95 
Single Tax Club .............. 696 

Sirap. Maple, Production.... 132 

Skager-Rak, Battle of ....... 470t 



Skat 



385, 



Skating, Ice 378 

Skating, Roller 385. 

Ski Jumping 391 

Ski Jumping. Chicago 67ft 

Slate Industry 19& 

Slate Produced 57 

Slocum, General, Wreck 302 

Smelters, Accidents in 59 

Smithsonian Institution 421 

Smoke Inspection Dept 617 

Social Science, Am. Acad... 326 

Social Settlements 665 

Soc. Committee Cook Co 571 

Socialist Committee, 111 470 

Soc.-Lab. Nat'l Committee.. 272 
Socialist Lab. Nat'l Conv'n. 256 

Socialist-Labor Platform 268 

Socialist Nat'l Committee... 271 
Socialist Nominations, Nat'l. 256 

Socialist Platform 266 

Societies, Fraternal 313 

Societies, Learned, U. S 326 

Societies, Patriotic 319 

Societies, Religious 303 

Society of the Cincianati.... 322 

Sociological Society. Am 327 

Soldiers' Home 341 

Soldiers in U. S. Wars 341 

Somme, Battle of 529 

Sons of America 315 

Sons of Am. Revolution 322 

Sons of Am. Revolution, 111.. 565 

Sons of St. George 316 

Sons of the Revolution 323 

Sons of Revolution, Illinois.. 565 

Sons of Veterans 320 

Sons of Veterans, Illinois 563 

South Africa, Union of 156 

South Africa, Wealth of 121 

South America, Population.. 102 
South American Republics... 161 
South Carolina, State Oflicers 459 

South Carolina, Vote of 458 

South Dakota, State Oflicers. 459 

South Dakota, Vote of 459 

South Parks. 



Sovereigns, Pay of 422 

Spain 159 

Spaniards in United States.. 97 

Spanish- American War 422 

Spanish-Am. War, Order 322 

Spanish War Veterans. 111... 565 

Speakers of House 412 

__. Specific Gravity Table 36 

688! Speed, Railroad, Table 45 

50 I Spirits Consumed 152 

50 Spirits Produced 152 

349 Spiritualists' Association.... 309 

50 Sporting Records Begin 354 

65 I Sports, Chicago 666 



12 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Spring Begins 15 

Springfield, 111., Population.. 564 

Springfield Manufactures 576 

St. Ignatius Library 640 

St. Paul's Cathedral, Height 126 

St. Peter's Cathedral, Height 126 

St. Pierre, Destruction 65 

St. Stephen's Church, Height 126 

Standards, Bureau of 278 

Standards, Grain, Act 193 

Standards of Time 32 

Stars, Brightest 27 

Stars, Number of 56 

State Ass'ns in Chicago 609 

State Boards 550 

State Department T 277 

State Flowers 108 

State Mottoes 284 

State Nicknames, Flowers... 108 

State Prisons in U. S Ill 

State, Secretaries of 76 

Statehouses. Value 121 

Stations, Elevated Roads.... 720 

Stations, Railroad, in Chi... 647 

Statistical Association, Am. 327 

Statistics, Bureau of 615 

States, Area of 102 

States, Assessed Valuations. 408 

State's Atty. Vote Since 1900 580 

State's Attorneys, Chicago.. 682 

State's Attorneys, Illinois... 652 

State's Attorney's Office .... 603 

States, Capitals. Etc 420 

States, Debts of 401 

States, Facts About 421 

States, Highest Points 115 

States, Pglitical Record .... 273 

States, Population (1917) 86 

States, Public Property 121 

Steam Laundries 198 

Steamboat Inspection Service 279 

Steamship Disasters, Great.. 302 

Steamships, Great Ocean.... 248 

Steel Production, Crude 416 

Steel Rails Produced 59 

Stefansson Expedition 166 

Stockyards, Facts About 710 

Stone Produced 57 

Storage Space, Ship 48 

Storms in 1916 400 

Strassburg Cathedral, Height 126 

Streator Manufactures 576 

Street Grades 674 

Street Lighting. Chicago 674 

Street, Longest, in Chicago.. 642 

Street Numbering Guide 726 

Street Railway Chronology.. 677 

Street Railway Earnings.... 539 

Streets. Bureau of 614 

Students, University 145, 146 

Submarine Crisis, Wilson 

Speech on 478 

Submarine E-2. Explosion... 165 

Submarine, Promise, German 492 

Submarine Visits U. S 474 

Submarine Warfare 473 

Submarines and Armed Mer- 
chantmen 491 

Submarines, Harboring of... 527 

Subtreasury, United States.. 624 

Subway Plan, Chicago 600 

Succession, Presidential 72 

Suez Canal 30 

Suffrage Association. Ill 677 

Bnflrage Ass'n. Woman 408 

Suffrage Law, Illinois 577 

Suffrage, Qualifications 409 

Suffrage, Woman 408 

Sugar, Beet, Production 132 

Sugar, Cane and Beet 131 

Sugar Crop of World 130 

Sugar, Free. Repeal 197 

Sugar, Internationa! Trade.. 138 

Sugar, Maple, Production 132 

Sully's Hill Park 69 

Sulphur Produced.. 57 

Summer Begins 15 



Sun. Facts About 

Sun. The 

Sunday School Ass'n, Illinois 
Sunday School Union, Am... 
Supt. Public Service, County 

Superior Court 

Supervising Engineers 

Supplies, City, Dept. of 

Supply Ships, United States. 

Supreme Court, Illinois 

Supreme Court, U. S 

Surgeons, Am. College 

Surgeons, Orificial. Ass'n 

Surgical Association, Am.... 

Surveyor, County 

Sussex Case 

Sweden 

Swedenborgian Church 

Swedes in United States 

Swimming ,.... 

Swimming, Chicago 

Swine in United States 

Swiss in United States 

Switzerland 

Symphony Orchestra, CM.... 



Talc Produced 57 

"Tanks" in Battle 474 

Tariff Commission Law 183 

Tariff Legislation 177 

Tariff Rates 173 

Tax Amendment, Vote on... 597 
Tax Association, National... 328 
Tax, Corporation, Rect-ip s.. 396 

Tax, Income, Rates 179 

Tax, Income, Receipts 396 

Tax. Inheritance, Illinois ... 572 

Tax. Inheritance, U. S 180 

Tax, Munitions 182 

Tax Rates, Chicago 674 

Taxes, Amusement, U. S. ... 183 
Taxes, Special, U. S.... ... 183 

Taxes. War, Continued 197 

Taxicab Fares 682 

Tea Consumed 152 

Tea, International Trade 138 

Teachers in Schools, U. S... 143 

Teachers' Salaries 634 

Teachers, Societies Chicago. 740 
Telegraph Statistics, U. S... 46 

Telegraph Systems. U. S 46 

Telegraphs of Nations 73 

Telegraphs. World's 50 

Telephone Finances, Chicago 645 

Telephone Statistics 47 

Temperance, Board of 327 

Temperature, United States. 353 

Tennessee, State Officers 460 

Tennessee, Vote of 439 

Tennis 3G7, 672 

Terms of Officials 692 

Terne Plate Production 145 

Texas Bicentennial 197 

Texas, State Officers 462 

Texas, Vote of 460 

Theater Fires, List 49 

Theaters in Chicago 662 

Thermometers Compared 45 

Time, Difference in 33 

Time, Eras of 15 

Time, Foreign Stamfords 34 

Time, Map. United Stau^.. 33 
Time, Standard, Zones. M.ip 33 

Time, Standards of 32 

Tin Plate Production 145 

Tin Produced 57 

Tires, Width Required 686 

Titanic, Wreck of 302 

Tobacco Crop by States 1:5 

Tobacco Crop by Years 131 

Tobacco Crop of World 130 

Tobacco, International Trade 137 

Tonnage by Seaports 51 

Tonnage, Vessel, Chi. IMst.. 688 

Torpedo Boats, II. S 350, 351 

Torpedo, Hammond 204 

Town Officers Cook Co 610 



29 Tract Society. American 303 

28 Tractors, Armored 475 

Trade Agreements 177 

Trade. Chicago Board of.... 702 
Trade Commission, Federal.. 280 
623 Trade, Domestic, U. S 172 

614 Trade in Farm Products 137 

615 Trade-Marks 63 

Trading with Enemy Act.... 521 

546 Training Camps, Army 218 

281 Training Camps, Marine..... 233 

326 Training, Military, League.. 325 
Transportation Plan, Chi.... 600 

327 Transports. United States... 352 

604 Trap Shooting 384 

485 Trap Shooting, Chicago 670 

159 Treasurer, City 613 

Tieasurer. County 603 

97 Treasurers, Chicago 675 

378 Treasury Department 277 

Treasury, Secretaries of 76 

136 Treaty, Haitian 163 

97 Treaty, Nicaragua Canal.... 127 

160 Treaty, Russo-Japanese 256 

652 Tribe of Ben-Hur 315 

Troops in U. S. Wars 341, 

Tuberculosis, Ass'n for Study 327 

Tuberculosis Sanitarium 544 

Tunis 161 

Tunnels, Freight. Under Chi. 572 

Tunnels, Railroad, Long 36 

Tunnels Under River 710 

Turkey 160 

Turkey, Earthquake in 65 

Turkish-Balkan Wac. 422 

Turkish-Italian W T ar 422 

Turks in United States 97 

Turpentine. Internat'l Trade 138 



U-53. Exploits of 474 

Underwood Tariff 177 

Unemployment, State Com.. 550 

Uniform, Protection of 228 

Union of South Africa 156 

Union Railway Station. New 734 

Union Stockyards 710 

Unitarian Church 307 

United Confederate Veterans 321 

United Societies 696 

United Spanish Veterans... . 321 
United Workmen, Order... . 316 

United States, Area 102 

United States Army 339 

United States Civil Service . 64 

U. S. Consular Service 294 

United States and Mexico. . 535 



U. S. Military Academy... 



. 344 



U. S. Mortality Statistics. . 117 

U. S Naval Academy 344 

United States Navy 348 

U. S. Population 86, 87 

U. S., Progress of 392 

U. S. Shipping Board 187 

U. S in Various Lan<ruages. 328 

United States, Wealth of... 119 

Universal Mil. Train. League 325 

Universities, American, List. 146 

University of Chi. Library... 639 

University of Illinois 546 

Universities, Foreign 145 

Universities. Statistics 144 

Urban Population 101 

Uruguay 162 

Utilities, Public, 111. Com... 547 

Utah. State Officers 463 

Utah, Vote of 462 

Valparaiso Earthquake 65 

Valuation, Assessed, States.. 408 

Valuation, Chicago 674 

Van Dyke, Minister. Resigns 534 
Vegeta'ble Canning Industry. 336 

Venezuela 162 

Venizelists in War 531 

Venus in 1917 28 

Venus, Planet 25 

Verdun, Fight for 528 



A7.MAXAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



13 



Vermont Maple Sugar 132 

Vermont, State Officers 463 

Vermont, Vote of 463 

Vernal Equinox 26 

Vessel Tonnage of Ports 51 

Vessels Built in U. S 50 

Vessels, Merchant. U. S 50 

Vesuvius. Eruption 65 

Veterinarian. State 549 

Vicksbnrg Park 69 

Villa. Pursuit of 536 

Virginia Library 640 

Virginia. State Officers 464 

Virginia, Vote of 463 

Visibility on Lakes 541 

Vocations in United States.. 122 
Voyages, Atlantic, Fastest.. 127 

Volunteers of America 309 

Vote, Cook Co., Since 1884... 579 
Vote, Electoral, by States.. 423 

Vote, Illinois, Since 1880 579 

Vote for Illinois Officers 597 

Vote. Popular 424 

Vote by Precincts, Chicago.. 583 
Vote for President, Chicago. 583 
Vote for President, Cook Co. 591 

Vote on Propositions 594, 595 

Voting. Qualifications for 409 

Voting Age, Men of 93 

Wage Earners in Industries. 123 

Wages. Table of 38 

Walking Records 390 

War, European 468 

Air, War in 482 

America. Plots in 483 

Americans on Merchantmen 475 

Angheliki Case 473 

Appam Case 500 

Armed Merchantmen 491 

Armenian Campaign 530 

Armies of Belligerents 468 

Aulaunia Case 473 

Austrian Emperor Dies 469 

Austro-Italian Campaign. .. 530 

Batavier V. Case 473 

Bayo Case 473 

Belgian Deportations 4*2 

Berwindvale Case 473 

Blacklisting 521 

Brindisi Sunk 473 

Cabinet Changes 483 

Casement, Roger, Executed 4S1 

Casualties in War 468 

Chantal Case 473 

Charles I., Emperor '.. 463 

Chemung Case 473 

Chronology 532 

Clan MacFailane Case 473 

Columbian Case... 473 

Commerce, Restraints on... 509 

Congress. Action in 475 

Cost of War 4G9 

Cymric Case 473 

Dates Important Events... 532 

Dead, Noted, in War 4<0 

Declarations of War 468 

Deportation of Civilians... 4*2 

Deutschland, Voyage of 473 

Diplomatic Correspondence 4S r ) 

Dubrovnik Case 473 

Francis Joseph, Death of.. 469 

French Deportations 4S2 

Fryatt. Execution 474 

Gallipoli Evacuated 530 

German Submarine Promise 489 

Germany Offers Peace 531 

Gore Resolution 477 

Goritz, Capture of 530 

Greece Divided in Policy.. 5TI 

Harboring Submarines 527 

Hovering of Warships 523 

Ireland, Revolt in 480 

-Italian- Austrian Campaign. 530 

Jutland, Battle of 470 

Kelvina Case 473 

Killed in War 468 



Kitchener, Death of 470 

Koenigin Wilhelmina Case. 473 

Kut-el- Amara Disaster 53C 

Laiiao Case 473 

Letimbro Case 473 

Losses in War 468 

Mails, Interference with... 503 

Maloja Case 473 

McLemore Resolut ion 475 

Manchester Engineers Case 473 

Marina Case 473 

Merchant Vessels Sunk 473 

Merchantmen, Armed... 4"75, 492 

Mercury Case 473 

Mesopotamian Campaign... 530 

Mira Case 473 

Nations Involved 468 

Naval Battle, Great 470 

Naval Losses 471 

Navies of Belligerents 468 

Noted Dead in War 470 

Palermo Case 473 

Peace Offer by Germany.. 531 

Persia Case 473 

Plots in America 480 

Polish Kingdom Restored.. 528 
Populat'n Warring Nations 468 

Portugal Declares War 484 

President to Congress 478 

Provence, Loss of 472 

Restraints on Commerce... 509 

Review of War 528 

Rio Branco Case 473 

Roumania Enters War 484 

Roumanian Campaign 531 

Saloniki Campaign 531 

Santanderino Case 473 

Skager-Rak, Battle of 470 

Somme, Battle of 529 

Submarine, Commercial 473 

Submarines, Harboring 527 

Submarine on Am. Coast... 474 
Submarine Promise, Germ. 492 

Submarine Warfare 473 

Sussex Case 473 

Sussex Torpedoing 485 

"Tanks" in War 474 

Tractors, Armored 47 1 

Trading with Enemy Act.. 521 

Tubantia Case 473 

U-53, Exploits of 474 

Venizelists in War 51 

Verdun. Struggle for., 528 

Warships. Hovering of 523 

Warships Lost 471 

Wilson Speech in Congress 478 

Zent Case 473 

Zeppelin Raids 482 

War Department 277 

War of 1812, Society 323 

War of 1812. Society, Illinois 565 
War Preparedness Campaign 109 

War. Secretaries of 76 

War Taxes Continued 197 

Wards and Aldermen, Chi... 675 

Wards, Areas of 6";8 

Wards, Chicago 628. 6J9 

Wards. Parks and Populat'n 658 

Warehouse Act. U. S 194 

Wars, Chronology. Recent... 422 

Wars. U. S., Troops in 341 

Warship Tonnage of Powers. 346 
Warships, Cost Maintaining. 315 

Warships, Hovering of 523 

Warships, United States 349 

Wash'n Monument, Height.. 126 
Washington, State Officers... 465 

Washington, Vote of 464 

Water. Bureau of 614 

Water Rates, Chicago 60 

Water Survey, Illinois 549 

Water Tunnels, Chicago 650 

Waterfalls. Famous 34 



i Waterways Com., Illinois 

j Waterworks System, Chicago 630 

I Waukegan Manufactures 576 

Wealth, National, U. S 119 



Wealth of Nations 121 

Wealth, U. S., by Divisions. 120 
Wealth, U. S., Classification 120 

Weather Bureau, Chicago 624 

Weather, Chicago 673 

Weather Forecasts 44 

Weather. United States 353 

Wedding Anniversaries 45 

Weights and Measures 35 

Weights, Department of 617 

Weights, Measures, Illinois,. 577 

Weights, Normal 37 

Weights of Materials........ 48 

Welland Canal 30 

Welsh in United States 97 

West Chicago Parks 655 

West Indies. Danish, Sale... 420 

West Point Academy 344 

West Point Cadets, Increase 233 
West Virginia, State Officers 465 

West Virginia, Vote of 465 

Western Economic Society... 327 
Western Soc. Engineers' Lib. 6c9 
Western Union Statistics.... 46 

Wheat Crop by States 132 

Wheat Crop of World 128 

Wheat Crop by Years 130 

Wheat Harvest Calendar 137 

Wheat, International Trade. 137 

Wheat, Prices 73S 

Whisky Produced 152 

Whist 391 

Widowed Population 95 

Width of Chicago 642 

Wilson Letters to Garrison.. 200 
Wilson on R. R. 8-IIour Day 236 
Wilson Preparedness Tour... 202 
Wilson Speech on Submarine 

Crisis 478 

Wilson Tariff 177 

Wilson, W., Portrait 276 

Wilson. W. B.. Portrait 276 

Wind Barometer 543 

Wind Cave Park 69 

Wines Consumed 152 

Wines Produced 152 

Winter Begins 15 

Wireless System, U. S 46 

Wisconsin, State Officers 467 

Wisconsin. Vote of 466 

Woman. First, in Congress.. 539 

Woman Suffrage 408 

Woman Suffrage Ass'n 408 

Woman Suffrage Law, 111 577 

W. C. T. U., Illinois 569 

W. C. T. U., National 328 

Woman's Party Convention.. 256 
Woman's Party, Cook Co.572. 696 
Woman's Party Nat'l Com... 272 

; Woman's Party Platform 269 

Woman Police in Cities 126 

Woman's Press Ass'n, 111... 569 

Woman's Relief Corps 320 

Woman's Relief Corps. 111.. 565 
Women. National Council of 328 
Women's Clubs, Fed., 111.... 569 
Women's Clubs. Gen. Fed... 327 
Wood Pulp, Internat'l Trade 138 
Wood Pulp. Manufacture of. 312 

Woodmen. Modern 314 

Woodmen of the World 314 

Wool, International Trade... 13S 

Wool Produced by States 135 

Work of Congress 179 

Workers by Age and Sex 122 

World Family. Story of 28 

World, Fast Trips Around... 40 

World, Population of 102 

World's Athletic Records.... 383 

World's Shipbuildins 414 

Wreck of the Memphis 172 

Wrecks. Great Steamship 302 

Wrecks, Marine 398 

Wrecks. Railroad, in 1916.... 400 

Wrestling 391 

Wrestling. Chicago 671 

Wyoming, State Officers 467 



14 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Wyoming, Vote of 467 

Yachting. Chicago 668 

Yachting ? 376 

Yale-Harvard Races 374 

Yellowstone Park 69 



Yosemite Park 

Y. M. C. A 

Young People's Union 

Yuan Shih-kai. Death of 165 Zoologists, Am Society 

Zeppelin Raids on England 482 | Zoological Park '. 



Zinc Produced 

Zodiac, Signs of the.... 
Zoological Gardens. 



. 57 
. 31 

. 161 

. 327 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Albaugh-Dover Co ............ 715 

American Film Co., Imp ____ 691 

American Steel Foundries.. 733 
Arnold Company. The ....... 699 

Baker, Alfred L., & Co.... 681 

Bank: Des Plaines State... 677 
Banking: George H. Burr & 

Co ........................... 681 

Banking: Graham & Sons.. 679 
Banking: The Corn Exchange 

National Bank .............. 

............. Inside Back Cover 

Banking: Central Trust Com- 

pany of Illinois ............ 

............ Inside Back Fly Leaf 

Banking: The Merchants 

Loan and Trust Co ........ 

.... Outside Back Cover 

Barnhart Brothers & Spindler785 
Bartell Brothers .............. 733 

Baseball Park: Comiskey... 705 
Becker, A. G., & Co ........ 683 

Belting: Fensholt & Fechner 703 
Billiards: The Brunswick- 

Balke-Collender Co ..... 718,719 
Bingham's Son, Sam'l, Mfg. 

Co .......................... 739 

Blatchford. E. W., Co ...... 747 

Blue Printing: Crofoot, Niel- 

ron & Co ................... 703 

Brick: Illinois Brick Co.... 713 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender 

Co ....................... 718, 719 

Burr, George H., & Co ..... 681 

Castings: The National Mal- 

leable Castings Company.. 717 
Castings, steel: American 

Steel Foundries ............. 733 

Central Trust Company of 

Illinois.. Inside Back Fly Leaf 
Chapin, S. B., & Co ........ 679 

Chemical Co., Dearborn ..... 725 

Chicago. North Shore & Mil- 

waukee R. R ............... 723 

Chicago Surface Lines.... 727-731 

Chicago Telephone Company 

........ .................. 741-745 

Chicago Elev'd Railroads, 721, 722 
Childs, S. >., & Company.. 707 
Clement, Curtis & Co ....... 681 

Coal: Waller Coal Company 709 
Coffee, roasted: Puhl-Webb 

Company ................... 689 

Comiskey* Baseball Park... 705 
Commercial Paper: A. G 

Becker & Co 
Commercial Paper: Curtis &, 

Sanger ..................... 683 



Commonwealth Edison Co.. 



Congress Hotel and Annex. 
Corn Exchange National 
Bank ........ Inside Back Cover 

Crofoot, Nielson & Co ...... 703 

Curtis & 'ganger .............. 683 



Cusack, Thos., Company 693 

Dearborn Chemical Company 725 

Des Plaines State Bank 677 

Eclipse Printing Company... 701 
Eckhart, B. A., Milling Co. 71"i 
Electrical Supplies: Com- 
monwealth Edison Co 725 

Elevated Railroads, Chi- 
cago 721, 722 

Elmes, Charles F., Engineer- 
ing Works 709 

Engineering: Chas. F. Elmes 709 
Engineering: The Arnold Co. 690 
Engineering, Etc.: Link-Belt 

Company 733 

Engraving: S. D. Childs & 

Co 707 

Fensholt & Fechner 703 

Film: American Film Co., 

Inc 691 

Foundry: The Western Foun- 
dry Co 711 

Graham & Sons. Bankers 679 

Grain Merchants: J. Rosen- 

baum Grain Co 713 

Hay, Grain, Feed: Kemper 

Bros. Co 709 

Heating: Phillips-Getschow 

Co 1 713 

Hotel: Congress 707 

Illinois Brick Company 713 

Illinois Life Insurance Co.. 

Outside Front Fly Leaf 

Insurance: Illinois Life In- 
surance Company 

Outside Front Fly Leaf 

Insurance: Marsh & McLen- 
nan Inside Front Cover 

Jelke. John F., Company... 687 

Kemper Bros. Co 709 

Link-Belt Company 733 

Lussky, White & Coolidge, 

Inc 699 

Margarine: John F. Jelke 

Company 687 

Marsh & McLennan 

Inside Front Cover 

Marshall-Jackson Company.. 768 
McGarry, John A.. & Co.... 711 
Merchandise. General: Sam- 
uel Phillipson & Co 703 

Merchants Loan and Trust 

Company.. Outside Back Cover 
Metals, Stereotype, Etc.: E. . 

W. Blatchford Co 747 

Milling: B. A. Eckhart Mill- 
ing Co 715 

Mills Novelty Company .... 

Inside Front Fly Leaf 

Milwaukee Electric R. R.... 723 
National Malleable Castings 

Company 717 

Oils: Bartell Brothers 733 

Oliver Typewriter Company 
...Opposite Inside Back Cover 



Paving: John A. McGarry 
& Co 711 

Phillips-Getschow Co 713 

Printers' Rollers: Sam'l 
Bingham's Son Mfg. Co 739 

Printing: Eclipse Printing 
Co. 



701 



Printing: Regan Printing 

House 735 

Printing: S. D. Childs & Co 707 
Publicity: Thos. Cusack Co 693 

Pugh Stores Company 695 

Puhl-Webb Company 689 

Pure Products, Pugh's 695 

Regan Printing House 735 

Registering of Titles: Tor 

rens System, Etc 736 737 

Rosenbaum. J.. Grain Co.. 713 

Russell, Brewster & Co 679 

Samuel Phillipson & Co 703 

Slnrn & Smith 717 

Smith Form-a-Truck Com- 
pany 697 

Stationery and Printing: 

Marshall-Jackson Company 768 
Stocks and Bonds: Russell, 

Brewster & Co 679 

Stocks, Bonds, Etc.: S. B. 

Chapin & Co 679 

Stocks, Bonds, Etc.: Clem- 
ent, Curtis & Co 681 

Stocks, Bonds. Grain: Al- 
fred L. Baker & Co 681 

Street Car Lines, Surface.. 

727-731 

Surgical Instruments: Sharp 

& Smith 717 

Swinehart Tire & Rubber 

Co 701 

Teaming: The A. T. Wil- 

lett Company 685 

Telephone Company, Chi- 
cago 741-745 

Tires and Rubber: Swine- 
hart Tire & Rubber Co.... 701 

Torrens System 736, 737 

Tractors: Albaugli -Dover Co. 715 
Trucks: Smith Form-a- 
Truck Company 697 

Type: Barnhart Brothers & 

Spindler 735 

Typewriters: The Oliver 

Typewriter Company 

..'Opposite Inside Back Cover 
Upholstery, Draperies. Etc.: 
Lussky. White & Coolidge, 

Inc 699 

Violano-Virtuoso 

Inside Front Fly Leaf 

Waller Coal Co 709 

Western Foundry Company, 

The 711 

Willett Company, The A. T. 685 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK 
FOR 1917 



Astronomical calculations prepared by Berlin H. Wright, DeLand, Fla. 



All the calculations in this Almanac and Year- 
Book are based upon mean or clock time unless 
otherwise stated. The sun's rising and setting 
are for the upper limb, corrected for parallax 
and refraction. In the case of the moon no cor- 
rection is needed, as in the sun, for "parallax 
and refraction"; with her they are of an oppo- 



site nature and just balance each other. The 
ngures given, therefore, are for the moon's cen- 
ter on a true horizon such as the ocean affords. 
Ihe calculations in each of the geographical 
divisions of each calendar page will apply with 
sufficient accuracy to all places in contiguous 
zones indicated by the heading of the divisions. 



BEGINNING AND LENGTH OF SEASONS. 



Sun enters: Constel- 
Sign.Long. lation. Date. 



Eastern 
time. 



Central 
time. 



* 270 

T 

90 

= 180 

K> 270' 



D. H. M. 



Dec. 21.. 10:59 p. m. 9:59 p. m. 1916 Winter begins and lasts 89 '39 

X Mar. 20.. 11:38 p. m. 10:38 p. m. 1917 Spring begins and lasts 9^ 19 36 

June 21.. 7:14 p. m. 6:14 p. m. 1917 Summer begins and lasts .'."..'9314 47 

TO" Sept. 23.. 10:01 a. m. 9:01 a. m. 1917 Autumn begins and lasts 89 18 45 

* Dec. 22.. 4:46 a. m. 3:46 a. m. 1917 Winter begins. Tropical year.... 365 5 47 



ERAS OF TIME. 



The Gregorian year 1917 corresponds to the 
following eras: 

The latter part of the 141st and the beginning 
of the 142d year of the independence of the 
United States. 

The year 1335-36 of the Mohammedan era ; the 
year 1336 begins Oct. 17. 

The year 4614 (nearly) of the Chinese era, be- 
ginning now, Jan. 1. 

The year 2229 of the Grecian era. 

The year 5677-78 of the Jewish era ; the year 
5678 begins at sunset Sept. 16. 

The year 7425-26 of the Byzantine era, begin- 
ning Sept. 1. 



The year 2577 of the Japanese era. 

T1 i? ye ^o 6630 of the Julian P eriod - and Jan. 1 
is the 2,421.230th day since the beginning of 
the Julian period. 

CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES. 

Dominical or Sunday letter Q 

Epact of moon's age, Jan. 1 6 

Lunar cycle or golden number 18 

Solor cycle 

Roman indiction 15 

Dionysian period ' ' 246 

Jewish lunar cycle " 

Julian period " ' AC 



CHURCH CALENDAR FOR 1917. 



Jan. 1 New Year's day (Cir- 
cumcision). 

Jan. 6 Epiphany (12th day). 

Jan. 14 Greek Church New 
Year's day. 

Jan. 25 Conversion of St. Paul. 

Feb. 2 Purification B. V. M. 

Feb. <i Septuagesima Sunday. 

Feb. 11 Sexagesima Sunday. 

Feb. 18 Quinquagesima Sunday. 

Feb. 21 Ash Wednesday (Lent 
begins). 

Feb. 25 Quadragesima Sunday. 

Men. 17 St. Patrick's day. 

Men. 18 Mid-Lent Sunday. 

Mch. 25 Passion Sunday. 

Mch. 25 Annunciation (Lady 
day). 

April 1 Palm Sunday. 

April 6 Good Friday. 

April 8 Easter Sunday. 

April 15 Low Sunday. 

April 23 St. George. 



April 25 St. Mark. 

May 1 Philip and James. 

May 13 Rogation Sunday. 

May 17 Ascension (Holy Thurs- 
day). 

May 27 Pentecost (Whitsun- 
day). 

June 3 Trinity Sunday. 

June 7 Corpus Christi. 

June 11 St. Barnabas. 

June 24 Nativity of John the 
Baptist. 

June 29 Peter and Paul. 

July 15 St. Swithin's day. 

July 22 Mary Magdalen. 

July 25 St. James. 

Aug. 6 Transfiguration. 

Aug. 7 Name of Jesus. 

Aug. 15 Feast of Assumption 
B V. M. 

Aug. 24 St. Bartholomew. 

Aug. 29-St. John the Baptist. 

EMBER DAYS. 



Sept. 8 Nativity of Mary. 
Sept. 14 Exaltation of Holy 

Cross. 
Sept. 17 Jewish New Year's 

day. 

Sept. 21 St. Matthew. 
Sept. 29 Michaelmas. 
Oct. 17 Mohammedan New 

Year's day. 
Oct. IS St. Luke. 
Oct. 28 Simon and Jude 
Oct. 31 Halloween. 
Nov. 1 All Saints' day. 
Nov. 2 All Souls' day. 
Nov. 25 St. Catherine. 
Nov. 29 Thanksgiving day. 

Nov. 30 St. Andrew 

Dec. 2 First Sunday in Advent. 

Dec. 8 Conception B. V. M. 

Dec. 25 Christmas. 

Dec. 26 St. Stephen. 

Dec. 27 St. John the Evangelist, 

Dec. 28 Holy Innocents. 



Wednesday, 
Friday 

and 
Saturday 



after 



f 1st Sunday in Lent 

Pentecost 



f Pentecost 

1 Sept. 14.. 
( Dec. 13.. 



Feb. 28, March 2 and 3 

May 30, June 1 and 2 

Sept. 19, 21 and 22 

Dec. 19. 21 and 22 



16 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



JEWISH OR HEBREW CALENDAR, YEAR 5677-78 A. M. 



Year. 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5677... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 

5678... 



No. 
4.. 
5.. 
6.. 
6.. 
6.. 
7.. 
7.. 



The year 5677 is the loth year of the 299th cycle of 19 years. 
Month- 



Name. 
Tebet 
Sh'vat 
Adar . 
Adar . 
Adar . 
Nissan 

Nissan 15., 

lyar 1.. 

lyar 18.. 

lyar 18.. 



Day. Fast or festival. Gregorian date. 

....10.. Fast of Tebet Thursday, Jan. 4, 1917 

1.. Rosh-Chodesh Wednesday, Jan. 24, 1917 

1.. Rosh-Chodesh Thursday-Friday, Feb. 22-23, 1917 

....13.. Fast of Esther Wednesday, March 7, 1917 

..14-15.. Purim Thursday-Friday, March 8-9,1917 

.... 1.. Rosh-Chodesh Saturday, March 24, 1917 

1st day of Passover Saturday, April 7,1917 

Rosh-Chodesh Sunday-Monday, April 22-23, 1917 

Lag B'Omer Thursday, May 10, 1917 

33d day of Omer Thursday, May 10, 1917 

Sivan 1.. Rosh-Chodesh Tuesday, May 22,1917 

Sivan 6.. 1st day of Pentecost Sunday, May 27, 1917 

Tammuz 1 . . Rosh-Chodesh Wednesday-Thursday, June 20-21, 1917 

Fast of Tammuz *Saturday, July 7, 1917 

Rosh-Chodesh Friday. July 20, 1917 

Fast of Av *Saturday, July 28,1917 

Rosh-Chodesh Saturday-Sunday, Aug. 18-19, 1917 

1.. 1st day of New Year tMonday, Sept. 17, 1917 

3.. Fast of Gedaliah Wednesday, Sept. 19, 1917 

10.. Yom-Kippoor Wednesday, Sept. 26.1917 

15.. 1st day of Tabernacles Monday, Oct. 1, 1917 

Tishri 21.. Hoshannah-Rabbah Sunday. Oct. 7, 1917 

Tishri 22.. Sh'mini Atseres Monday, Oct. 8, 1917 

Tishri 23.. Simchas-Torah Tuesday, Oct. 9, 1917 

Chesvan 1.. Rosh-Chodesh Tuesday- Wednesday, Oct. 16-17,1917 

Kislev 1.. Rosh-Chodesh Thursday-Friday, Nov. 15-16,1917 

Kislev 25.. 1st day of Chanukah Monday, Dec. 10,1917 

Tebet 1.. Rosh-Chodesh Saturday-Sunday. Dec. 15-16, 1917 

Tebet 10.. Fast of Tebet Tuesday, Dec. 25, 1917 

Sh'vat 1.. Rosh-Chodesh Monday, Jan. 14, 1918 

"Observed the following day. tBegins at sunset Sept. 16. 



Tammuz 17. 

Av 1. 

Av 9. 

Ellul 1. 

Tishri 
Tishri 
Tishri 
Tishri 



GREEK CHURCH OR RUSSIAN CALENDAR, A. D. 1917, A. M. 8026. 



New style. 
Jan. 14.... 
Jan. 19.... 
Feb. 11.... 
PeO. 15.... 
Feb. 21.... 
Feb. 25.... 
Apr. 1... 
Apr. 6... 
Apr. 8... 
May 6.... 
May 17.... 
May 27.... 
May 27.... 



Holy days. Old style. 

Circumcision Jan. 1 

Epiphany (Theophany) Jan. 6 

Carnival Sunday Jan. 29 

Hypopante (Purification) Feb. 2 

Ash Wednesday Feb. 8 

First Sunday in Lent Feb. 12 

. Palm Sunday Mar. 19 

.Great (Good) Friday Mar. 24 

.Holy Pasche (Easter) Mar. 26 

St. George Apr. 23 

Ascension (Holy) May 4 

Coronation of Emperor* May 14 

Pentecost May 14 



New style. Holy days. Old style. 

June 12. ... Holy Ghost May 30 

July 12.... Peter and Paul, Chief Apostles. June 29 

Aug. 19 Transfiguration Aug. 6 

Aug. 28 Repose of Theotokos Aug. 15 

Sept. 12.... St. Alexander Nevsky* Aug. 30 

Sept. 21.... Nativity of Theotokos Sept. 8 

Sept. 27.... Exaltation of Theotr.kos Spt. 14 

Oct. 14 Patronage of Theotokos Oct. 1 

Nov. 28.... 1st day of Nativity Nov. 15 

Dec. 4 Entrance of Theotokos Nov. 21 

Dec. 22 Conception of Theotokos Dec. 19 

Jan.7.1918.. Christmas Dec. 25 

Jan.14.1918. Circumcision Jan.1.1918 



^Observed only in Russia. 



MOHAMMEDAN CALENDAR YEAR 1335-36. 
The year 1335 is the 15th year of the 45th cycle of 30 years. 



Year. ftoT 
1335.... 4. 
1335.... 5.. 
1335.... 6. 
1335.... 7. 
1335 . . , 8 . 


-Month ^ 
Name. 
Rabia II .. 


Lasts, 
Begins. days. 
Jan 25 29 


Year. 
1335.. 
1335.. 
1336.. 
1336.. 
1336.. 


f Month , 
No. Name 
.ll....Dulkaeda 
.12....Dulheggia 
. 1 Muharrem 
. 2 Saphar .. 
. 3.... Rabia I.. 


Begins. 
Aug. 19.. 
Sept. 18.. 
Oct. 17.. 


Lasts, 
davs. 

3a 

........29 
30 


..Jomhadi I 
..Jomhadi II.. 
..Rajeb 
. . Sheban 


Feb. 23 
Men. 25 
April 23 
May 23 
ting) June 21 


..30 

'.'.30 
..29 
30 


Nov 
Dec 


16.. 
15.. 
14, 1 


29 
30 
)18 29 


1335 


9 




1336.. 


. 4.. 


Rabia II 


1335... 


10. 




July 21 


29 













RADIUM AND SOURCES OF SUPPLY. 



[From report of United 

Radium is a metal and is described as having 
a white metallic luster. It has been isolated 
only once or twice and few people have seen 
it. Radium is ordinarily obtained from its ores 
in the form of hydrous sulphate, chloride or 
bromide, and it is in the form of these salts 
that it is usually sold and used. These are all 
white or nearly white substances, whose appear- 
ance is no more remarkable than common salt 
or baking powder. Radium is found in nature 
in such exceedingly small quantities that it is 
never visible even when the material is ex- 
amined with a microscope. Ordinarily radium 
ore carries only a small fraction of a grain per 



States geological survey.] 

ton of material, and radium will never be 
found in large quantity because it is formed 
by the decay of uranium, a process which is 
wonderfully slow, and radium itself decays and 
changes to other elements so rapidly that it is 
impossible for it to accumulate naturally in 
visible masses. Minerals that carry radium, 
however, are fairly easy to determine. One of 
them, pitchblende, as generally found, is a 
black mineral about as heavy as ordinary iron, 
but much softer. The principal radium mineral, 
carnotite, has a bright canary yellow color 
and is generally powdery. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1917. 



17 



Full Moon, 8th. - . , TA1MTTADV 1O1*7 vi <n a ~, New Moon, 23d. 
Last Quar., 16th. 1st Month. JAJNUAKl, IVl/. 31 Days, f First Soar./ 29th. 



365 
34 

g 

U 
300 

359 

35S 

:;.-.: 

356 

:;.-,-, 

354 
353 
352 
351 
350 
349 
348 
347 
34H 
346 
344 
343 
42 




StTN AT 

NOON 
MARK. 



3 27 
12 13 37 



MOON 
IN 

ME- 

RIJ>- 
1AN. 



LI 12 



72i 



Sewiork, Chicago, [St. Louis, S. Mo., 
owa, Neb., Wyo.JIS. 111., Ind., Kas., 
)re., N.Mo., Ohio. Okla., Col., Utah, 
J a., N. J., Mass.. Cal., Ky., Va., 
Conn., R. I. Md.. Del. 



Moon 
Sun Sun sets 
and 



728 
728 
728 
728 
728 
728 
727 
727 
727 
727 
727 
727 
727 
727 
727 
726 
725 
724 
723 
722 
22 



720 
719 
719 
718 
717 
716 
715 
715 



439 
440 
442 



li 



St. fSLVLl, MlCh., 

Wis., Minn.,N.D., 
S. D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
S T . Y., Vt., N. H. 



Moon 
Sun Sun sets 
ises. sets, and 



716 



7 7 
7 6 



514 



520 
521 



524 
622 



21] 



Sun 



H. M. 

739 
739 



738 
738 
737 
737 
737 
737 
736 
736 
736 
736 
735 
734 
734 
733 
732 
731 
730 
729 
729 
728 
727 
726 
725 
724 
724 
723 
722 



Sun 

sets. 

H. M. 
429 
430 



435 
436 
437 



442 
444 
446 
447 
448 



454 

455 

56 

57 



5 6 



Moon 
sets 
and 

rises. 



H. M. 
117 
226 
336 
440 



rises 

IJ 

i 

1 



seta 
7 7 



11 

""12 
125 

233 



Full Moon, 6th. 2 fl Month FFRPTTAPV 1 01 7 28 Davs New M <*> n 21st. 
Last Quav., 14th. 2d Month - T r,UKUAJ\ I , IVl/. 28 Days. ^ First Quaf ^ ^^ 



DAY 

OP 

WEEK. 



32 
33 

34 !33i_ 

3C 1331 

36 330 

37 329 

38 !328 



40 326! 

41 325 1 

42 324 1 

43 323 12 Monday... 

44 322;i3;Tuesday .. 

45 .' 321 14 1 Wednesday 

46 320 lo^Thursday. 

47 J319 16 Friday 

48 318,17 Saturday.. 

49 |317 18 SUNDAY. 

50 316;l9iMonday... 

51 315 20 Tuesday... 

52 !314 21jWednesdaj 
63 !313 22lThursday . 




311 



312 23 (Friday 



24!Saturday.. 



310 25 [SUNDAY.. 
309 26 Monday... 
308 27 Tuesday .. 
J307 28 VVednesda] 



SUN AT 
NOON 
MARK. 



MOON 
IN 
ME- 
RID- 
IAN. 



.New York, Chicago 
Iowa, Neb., Wyo., 
Qre., N.Mo., Ohio 
Pa., N. J., Mass. 
Conn., R. I. 



Sun 

rises. 



and 

rises. 



t. Louis, S. Mo., 

S. 111., Ind., Kas., 

Okla., Col., Utah 

Cal.. Ky., Va., 

Md., Del. 



Sun 



654 



644 



634 



Sun 



522 
523 
525 
526 
527 



545 



552 



Moon 



1 



St. Paul, Mich., 
is., Minn.,N.D M 
S. D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
N. Y., Vt., N. H. 



Sun 
rises. 



Sun 



H. M 



721 

720 

719 

717 

716 

715 

713 

712 

710 

7 9 I 520 

7 7 522 

7 5 523 

7 t iii 

7 2 

7 1 

659 

657 

655 

654 

652 

650 | 

648' 

647 

its 

643 
641 



531 
532 
534 



Moon 
sets 
and 

rises. 



H. M. 

518 

628 
rises 
6 4 



357 
450 
529 
6 4 
seta 



11 



lit 



18 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



I 



S Full Moon, 8th. 
- Last Quar., 16th. 



MARCH, 1917. 31 Days. 



New Moon, 22d. 
First Quar., 30th. 



87 



_-; 21 



281 

280 27 



DAY 

OF 

WEEK. 



1 Thundiy .. 

Friday 

Saturday. . . 

SUNDAY . 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday . . 

"'riday 

Saturday.. 

SUNDAY.. 

Monday 

13 Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday... 

''riday 

Saturday... 
UNDAY.. 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 
22 Thursday . . 

Friday 

aturday . . 

SUNDAY.. 

Honday 

Tuesday 

rVednesdiiy 
Thursday... 

riday 

Saturday... 



Oon.D 

v 26 
8 
* 19 
1 
13 
25 
C 7 
a 19 
j> l 

UP 13 

nr 26 
9 
22 

6 



18 



if 16 

if 30 
-C 15 
-6 30 

- 15 

- 29 
X 14 
X 28 
T 12 
T 26 
x Q 
V 22 
H 4 
16 
a 28 



SUN AT 
NOON 
MARK. 



12 7 



12 4 17 



MOON- 
IN 
ME- 
RID- 
IAN. 



724 



.Nevvlork, Chicago 
Iowa, Neb., Wyo., 
Ore., X.Mo., Ohio 
Pa., N. J., Mass., 
Conn., R. I. 



Sun Sun 
rises, sets. 



558 
556 
554 
553 
552 
551 
550 
548 
546 



614 
615 



624 
625 



Moon 



and 
rises. 



H. M. 

2 5 
256 
336 
415 

447 



rises 



1012 
1121 



128 
220 
3 9 
348 
422 
452 
521 
sets 
829 
941 
1049 
1151 

""47 
134 
213 



t. 1X)U1S, ft. MO. 

S. 111., Ind. T Kas. 

Okla., Col., Utah 

Cal., Ky., Va., 

Md.. Del. 



Sun 



6 
559 
557 
555 
552 
550 
549 
548 
546 



Sun 



620 
621 



Moon 
sets 
and 
rises. 



bt. I'aul, Alien., 
Wis.,Miim..X.D.. 
S. D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
N. Y.. Vt.. X. H. 



Moon 
Sun Sun sets 
ises sets, and 



H. M. 

39 

88 

36 

634 

632 

30 

28 

27 

625 

15 23 

621 

619 

617 

615 

613 

611 

6 9 

7 

3 

6 1 



558 
556 
555 
552 
550 
548 
546 
544 
543 



it! 

550 
552 



6 7 
6 8 



615 
616 
617 
619 
620 



624 
626 
627 



H. M. 

315 
354 
430 
459 
522 
542 
rises 



919 
1026 
1137 

' ' ' 45 
147 
238 
325 



455 
521 
sets 
840 



10 
1 6 
1 52 

'> 29 



Full Moon, 7th. ..-. __ 1, 
Last Quar., 14th. * th Month ' 



APRIL, 1917. 30 Days. f 



New Moon, 21st. 
First Quar., 29th. 



9'J 



110 



264 



856 
255 
264 

253 
114 252 
111 



11! 



DAY 

OP 

WEEK. 



13 
14 

260 16 
17 

18 



1 SUNDAY.. 

2 ;Monday 

3 Tuesday 

4 Wednesday 

5 [Thursday.. 

6 Friday 

7 Saturday... 
SlSUNDAY.. 
9 ,Monday 

10 Tuesday 

11 Wednesday 
12iThursday 



19 



Friday 

Saturday .. 
SUNDAY... 
Monday... 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 
Thursday.. 



Friday.... 
Saturday... 
SUNDAY... 
Monday 

24 (Tuesday.... 

25 (Wednesday 

26 (Thursday . 

27 Friday 

28 Saturday.. 

29 SUNDAY.. 

30 Monday.... 



MOON 
IN 
ME- 
RID- 
IAN. 




647 
7 28 



.\e\viork, Chicago, 
towa, Neh., Wyo., 
Dre., X.Mo., Ohio 

., N. J., 

Conn., R. 



Sun 
rises. 



H. M. 

544 
543 
541 
5 39 
537 
535 
533 
531 
529 
527 
526 
524 
523 
521 
520 
519 
517 
516 
514 
512 
5 10 
5 9 
5 7 
5 5 
5 4 
5 3 
5 2 
5 
459 
457 



Sun 



637 



Moon 
sets 



rises. 



l>ouis, S. Mo., 

S. 111., Ind., Kas., 

Okla., Col., Utah 

Cal., Ky., Va., 

Md.* Del. 



Sun 

rises. 



540 



534 






515 



5 5 



Sun 



626 



631 



637 



642 
643 



646 
647 



Moon 
sets 
and 

rises. 



H. M. 
2 42 

337 
4 3 
427 
450 
rises 

8 

9 7 
1013 
1115 

. 

141 
218 
250 
319 

4 18 

451 

sets 

928 

1027 

1116 



40 



St. i'aul, Mich., 
,Vis., Minn.,N.D. 
S D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
N. Y.. Vt., N. H. 



Sun 
rises. 



542 
540 
538 
536 
534 
532 
530 
528 
526 
524 
523 
521 
519 
518 
517 
515 
513 
511 

I? 

5 4 
5 2 
5 

459 

458 
457 
456 

m 

450 



Sun 



630 
631 
632 
634 



637 
639 



643 
645 
646 



54 
56 



Moon 
sets 



rises. 



H. M. 
3 
325 
346 



445 

rises 

8 16 

927 

1036 

11 40 



1 22 

2 56 
321 
345 
410 
437 
sets 

dfi 

1140 



126 
1 49 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



19 



Full Moon, 6th. 
Last Quar., 13th. 



5th Month. MAY, 1917. 31 Days. 



New Moon, 20th. 
First Quar., 28th. 



DAY OF YEAR. | 


- 
^ 
;j 
tn 
53 

H* 
X 

245 
244 
243 
242 
241 
240 
J3H 
23* 
J37 
236 
235 
234 

230 
229 
228 
-'-7 
226 
225 
224 
223 
222 
221 
220 
219 
L'ls 
217 
216 
215 


3 


DAY 

OF 

WKEK. 


MOON'S PLACE 


SUN AT 

NOON 
MABK. 


MOON 

IN 

ME- 
RID- 
IAN. 


New York, Chicago, 
Iowa, Neb., Wyo., 
Ore., N.Mo., Ohio, 
Pa.. N. J., Mass., 
Conn., R. I. 


St. Louis, 
S. 111., Ind. 
Okla., Col. 
Cal., Ky. 
Md., D 


5. Mo., 
, Kas., 
Utah, 


St. Paul, Mich., 
Wis., Minn.,N.D., 
S. D., Mont., N. 


Va., 
el. 


Idaho, Wash., N. 
N. Y., Vt., N. H. 


Sun 
rises. 

H. M. 

456 
455 
454 
453 
452 
450 
449 
448 
446 
445 
444 
442 
441 
440 
439 
438 
437 
436 
435 
434 
434 
433 
432 
431 
430 
429 
428 
427 
426 
426 


Sun 
sefts. 


Moon 
sets 
and 
rises. 


Sun 
rises. 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets 
and 
rises. 


Sun 
rises. 


Sun 
sets. 


Moon 
sets 
and 
rises. 


121 

m 

124 
125 
126 
127 

131 
132 
133 
134 
165 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 

in 
if- 

148 
149 
150 
151 


i 
2 
3 
4 

5 

7 

8 

9 

ii 1 
1 

15 
1<5 

17 
18 
19 

sy 

22 
23 

24 
25 
26 

30 
31 


Tuesday.... 
Wednesday 
Thursday . 
Friday 
Saturday . 
SUNDAY. 
Monday ... 
Tuesday .... 
Wednesday 
Thursday .. 
Fridav 
Saturdry .. 
SUNDAY. 
Monday 
Tuesday.... 
Wednesday 
Thursday .. 
Friday 
Saturday... 
SUNDAY.. 
Monday 
Tuesday ... 
Wednesday 
Thursday . 
Friday 
Saturday... 
SUNDAY.. 
Monday 
Tuesday.... 
Wednesday 
Thursday." 


Con. D. 
11 
23 

TIP 18 

:j| 

m 12 
m 25 

x- 9 

f 23 
* 7 

? 2 i 

- 20 

X 4 
X 18 
T 2 
T 16 
T 29 
V 12 

2 7 5 
H 20 
2 
14 
25 
7 
19 
HP 1 
IP 1 i 


H. M. 8. 

11 57 3 
1 1 56 55 
1 1 56 48 
1 1 56 40 
11 56 36 
1 1 56 3 i 
11 5626 
11 5622 
11 56 19 
11 56 16 
11 56 14 
11 56 12 
11 56 11 
11 56 11 
11 56 11 
11 56 11 
11 56 13 
It 56 15 
1 1 56 17 
11 56 20 
11 56 24 
1 1 56 28 
1 1 56 32 

1 1 56 43 
11 56 49 
1 1 56 56 
11 57 3 
11 57 10 
11 57 18 
1 1 57 ?6 


H. M. 

933 
1017 
11 i 

1156 

"if 

250 
349 
446 
540 
631 

949 
1041 
1135 
1230 
125 
219 
3 9 
356 

726 
8 9 


H. M. 

658 

? 6 o 9 

?! 

7 4 

?! 

7 8 

?i 

711 
712 
713 
7 4 

?? 

7 1 
720 
721 
722 

III 

727 
728 

7 29 


H. M. 

2 6 
228 
251 
3 15 
340 
411 
rises 
913 
1013 

11.1 

""23" 
54 
122 

148 

247 
320 
359 
sets 
913 
10 2 
1041 

Hi! 

7' 
30 
52 
1 J6 


H. M. 
5 2 
5 1 
5 
459 
458 
457 
456 
455 
454 
453 
452 
451 
450 
449 
448 
448 

ni 

445 
444 
444 
443 
443 
442 
442 
441 
441 
440 
439 
439 
438 


H. M. 

655 
656 
657 

7 
7 1 
7 2 
7 3 
7 3 

710 
711 
712 
713 
713 

715 
716 

717 

7 17 


H. M. 
2 4 
228 
252 
317 
343 
417 
rises 
9 7 
10 7 

i?il 


H. M. 
449 
448 
446 
444 
443 
442 
440 
439 
438 
437 
436 
435 
434 

if! 

430 

429 
428 
427 
426 
425 

til 

422 
421 
420 
419 
418 
417 
416 
416 


H. M. 

H 

7 8 
7 

1! 

717 
718 
719 
720 
721 
723 
724 
725 
726 
727 

735 
736 


H. M. 

m 

249 
3 9 
331 
359 
rises 

ilft 

1121 
12 

-33 

IB 

211 

I 3 ! 

343 
sets 
932 
1019 
1056 
1125 
1152 


20 
51 
121 

h 

324 
4 4 

ri 

956 

83 

""5" 

29 
53 

117 


1 12 



Full Moon, 5th. 
Last Quar., 12th. 



6th Month. JUNE, 1917. 30 Days. 



New Moon, 19th. 
First Quar., 27th. 





i 




R 






.New York, Chicago, 


St. Louis, S. Mo., 


St. Paul, Mich., 


C3 


4* 


H 










Iowa, Neb., Wyo., 


S. 111., Ind., Kas., 


Wis., Minn.,N.D. 


2 


3 


g 




1 






Ore., N.Mo., Ohio, 


Okla., Col., Utah, 


S. D., Mont., N. 


H 

S" 

& 


fc 




DAY 

OF 


03 


SUN AT 
NOON 


MOON 
IN 

ME- 


Pa., N. J., Moss., 
Conn., R. I. 


Cal.. Ky., Va., 
Md.. Del. 


Idaho, Wash., N. 
N. Y., Vt., N. H. 





'"' 





WKEK. 


^ 


MARK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


H 


t, ' 


^ 







IAN. 


Sun 


Sur. 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


<* 


^4 


5 


O 






rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


O 


Q 





^ 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 








Oon.D. 


H. M. S. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


152 


214 


1 Friday 


W 26 


1 1 57 35 


855 


425 


729 


140 


438 


718 


143 


415 


740 


1 33 


IS 


213 
212 


2 'Saturday .. 
3 |S UN DAY... 


= 10 

^ 23 


11 57 44 
11 57 53 


945 
1039 


425 

425 


730 
730 


2 9 
42 


438 

438 


719 
719 


212 
247 


415 
414 


741 


228 


155 


211 


4 Monday 


m 7 


11 58 3 


1137 


425 


731 


24 


437 


720 


329 


414 


7 42 


3 9 


156 


210 


g 


Tuesday 


m 21 


11 58 13 




424 


731 


rises 


437 




rises 


414 


7 42 


rises 


157 
15* 
159 
160 


209 

18? 

206 


9 


Wednesday 
Thursday... 
Friday 
Saturday . . 


* 5 
* 19 
* 4 
* 18 


1 1 58 24 
11 58 35 
11 58 46 
11 58 57 


'"38" 

11 

334 


424 
423 


732 
733 
733 
734 


857 
944 
1022 
1056 


437 
437 
436 
436 


722 


851 
939 
1018 
1054 


413 
413 
413 
413 


743 
743 
744 
744 


915 
959 
1033 
11 4 


161 


205 
204 


10 
11 


SUNDAY.. 

Monday ... 




11 59 9 
11 59 21 


428 
518 


423 
423 


734 
735 


1125 
11 52 


436 


724 


118 


til 


745 
746 


1128 
1152 


163 


203 


12 


Tuesday 


X 1 


11 59 33 


6 7 


423 


736 




4 ' ) 1 ) 


7 24 




412 


747 




164 


202 


13 


Wednesday 


X 15 


11 59 45 


656 


423 


737 


"'26' 


436 


725 


""21* 


412 


747 


""16 


165 


201 


14 


Thursday . . 


X 28 


11 59 48 




423 


737 


49 


436 


725 


52 


412 


748 


41 


166 


200 


15 


Friday 


T 12 


12 11 


8 36 


4 23 


738 


1 22 


436 


725 


128 


412 


749 


1 11 


167 


199 


16 


Saturday .. 


T 25 




9 28 


423 


738 


159 


436 




2 4 


412 


750 


144 


169 


198 
197 


17 

18 


SUNDAY.. 
Monday... 


V 21 


12 49 


10 22 
11 16 


423 
423 


739 


239 
327 


436 
436 


726 


m 


412 
412 


750 
751 


22 


170 


196 


19 


Tuesday . . 


H 3 


12 1 3 


1210 


423 


7 39 


sets 


436 


7 26 


sets 


412 




sets 


171 


195 


20 


Wednesday 


H 16 


12 1 16 


1 1 


423 


7 39 


837 


436 


7 26 


832 


412 


751 


853 


172 


194 


21 


Thursday . . 


K 28 


12 1 29 


150 


424 


740 


914 


436 


726 


910 


412 


751 


927 


173 


193 


22 


Friday 


10 


12 1 42 




424 


740 


944 


437 


727 


940 


413 


751 




174 


192 


23 


Saturday... 


22 


12 1 55 


3 19 


424 


740 


10 9 


437 


727 


10 7 


413 


761 


10 16 


175 


191 


24 


SUNDAY.. 


a 3 




4 


424 


740 


1034 


4 37 


727 


1032 


413 


751 


10 37 


176 


190 25 

189126 


Monday 
Tuesday... 


fl 15 


12 2 21 
12 2 33 


5 21 


424 
425 


740 
740 


lift 


437 
438 


727 


10 55 
1119 


413 
413 


751 
751 


11 15 


17^ 




27 


Wednesday 


ip 9 


12 2 46 63 


425 


740 


1141 


438 


7 27 


1144 


414 


751 


1136 


179 


1S7 


28 


Thursday 


TO? 00 


12 2 58 


6 46 


'425 






438 


7 27 




4 14 


7 51 


11 58 


180 


186 


29 


Friday... 


"A 

4 


12 3 11 


733 


425 740 


...... 


439 


727 


10 


414 


751 




181 


185 


3 > Saturday.. . 


= 18 1 12 3 22 


825 


4 26 1 7 40 


38 


440 


727 


42 


415 751 


" " 25 



20 



ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOK 1U17. 



fFull Moon, 4th. -,, -_, TTTT V 1O1V <n T)nv< New Moon, 18th. 
Last Quar., llth. 7th Month. JULrl, IVl/. 31 Days. $ First Quar., 27th. 


H 


S{ 

<- 


F 




H 






A e\v York, Chicago, 
Iowa, Neb., WTO., 


.St. L.ouis, S. Mo., 
S. 111., Ind., Kas., 


St. Paul, Mich., 
\Vis., Minn.,N.D., 


w 
I* 


a 

t* 

fc 


x 

o 


DAY 

OF 


I 


Srx AT 
NOON 


MOON 

IN 

ME- 


Ore., N.Mo., Ohio, 
Fa.. N. J., Mass., 
Conn., R. I. 


Okla., Col., Utah, 
Cal., Ky., Va., 
Md., Del. 


S. D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
X. Y., Vt., N. H. 





M 





WEEK. 


t. 


MAKK. 


RU>- 




i Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


t- 


^ 


JM 




5^ 




1AN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 




- 












rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


D 


d 


fi 




S 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










Con.D. 


H. M. S. 


H. M. 


a. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


182 


184 


1 


SUNDAY.. 


m i 


12 3 34 


920 


427 


740 


115 


440 


727 


120 


416 


751 


59 


183 


183 


2 


Monday 


ni 15 


12 3 16 


1020 


428 


740 


2 


440 


727 


2 6 


417 


751 


142 


184 




3 


Tuesday 


m 29 


12 3 57 


1122 


429 


740 


256 


441 


727 


3 2 


418 


751 


237 


185,181 


4 


Wednesday 


' 14 


12 4 8 




429 


740 


rises 


441 


727 


rises 


4 18 


751 


rises 


186 


180 5 


Thursday .. 


if 29 


12 4 18 


""23" 


430 


740 




442 


727 


8 15 


419 


751 


833 


187 


179 6 


Friday 


* 13 


12 4 28 


123 


431 


739 


856 


443 


726 


853 


420 


750 


9 5 


188 


178 7 


Saturday... 


* 28 


12 4 38 


219 


432 


739 


9 27 


444 


726 


925 


421 


750 


932 


189 


177 8 


SUNDAY.. 


- 13 


12 4 43 


312 


432 


739 


956 


444 


726 


956 


421 


750 


957 


190 


176 9 


Monday 


- 27 


12 4 57 


4 3 


433 


739 


1024 


445 


725 


1025 


422 


749 


1021 


191 


175 10 
174 11 


Tuesday.... 
Wednesday 


Y 12 
X 25 


12 5 6 
12 5 14 


453 
542 


433 
434 


738 
737 


1052 
11 22 


446 
446 


725 
724 


Hit 


422 
423 


748 
748 


tttt 


193 


173 12 


Thursday .. 


T 9 


12 5 22 


633 


435 


737 


1158 


447 


724 




421 


747 


1144 


194 


172 13 


Fridav 


T 22 


12 5 29 


7 25 


4 35 


7 36 




4 47 


7 24 


'2* 


424 


7 46 






171 14 


Saturday.. 


V 5 




818 


436 


736 


o'g' 


4 48 


723 


44 


425 


746 


22 




170 15 


SUNDAY. 


V 18 


12 543 


911 


436 


735 


124 


449 


723 


130 


426 


745 


1 5 




169 16 


Monday ... 


V 30 


12 5 49 


10 5 


437 


734 


2 15 


450 


722 




427 


744 


1 56 


198 


168 


17 


Tuesday... 


H 12 


12 5 55 


10 56 


438 


734 


3 12 


451 


721 


3 18 


428 


743 


254 


199 


167 


18 


Wednesday 


24 


12 6 


1146 


439 


733 


4 11 


451 


721 


416 


429 


742 


356 


200 


166 


19 


Thursday . 


C 


12 6 4 


1232 


439 


?3 3 


sets 


452 


720 


sets 


430 


741 


sets 


201 


165 


20 


Friday 


18 


12 6 8 


1 16 


440 


32 


813 


453 


720 


810 


431 


740 


821 


20*J 


164 21 


Saturday .. 


30 


12 6 12 




441 


731 


833 


454 


719 


836 


432 


739 


842 


2()'"$ 


16322 


SUNDAY.. 


a 12 




g 39 


442 


730 


9 


454 


7 19 


859 


433 


738 


9 1 


205 


162 23 
161 24 


Monday 
Tuesday ... 


a 24 
np 6 


12 6 18 


359 


443 

444 


729 
728 


III 


455 
456 


?!? 


925 
946 


434 
435 


737 
736 


923 
939 


206 
207 
jos 
209 


160 25 
159 26 

158 27 
157! 28 


Wednesday 
Th u rsday . . 
Friday 
Saturday... 


i* 18 

np 30 

= 13 
= 26 


12 6 19 
12 6 20 
12 6 20 
12 6 19 


441 
526 

7 ( 


445 
446 
44'/ 

448 


?!? 

725 
724 


!s! 

1112 
1151 


457 
458 
459 
459 


?5i 

714 
713 


1012 
1039 
1117 
1156 


436 
437 
438 
439 


735 
734 
733 
732 


10 1 
1023 
1057 
1134 


210 156 29 iSUNDAY .. 


m 9 




8 * 


449 


7 23 




5 


7 12 




440 


731 




211J155 30 Monday .... 


m 23 


12 6 15 


9 I 


450 


722 


40 


5 




"" 46" 


441 


730 


'"-22 


212 154: ;>1 iTuesriHV 


* 7 


12 6 13 




451 


721 


1 41 


5 1 


7 11 


147 


442 


730 


122 


fS!fe&. ,. AUGUST, 1917. 31 Ba y , f^rJS: 



p YEAR. || 


IN YEAR.II 


v MONTH! 


DAY 

OF 


: s PLACE 


SI T XAT 
NOON 


MOON 

IX 

ME- 


N*W York, Chicago, 
ovva, Nob., Wvo., 
On-., N.Mo., Ohio, 
'a.. N. J., Mass., 
Conn., R. I. 


St. Louis. S. Mo., 
S. 111., Ind., Kas., 
Okla., Col., Utah, 
Cal.. Ky., Va., 
M<1.. Del. 


St. Paul, Mich., 
VVis., Miim..N.D., 
S. D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
X. Y., Vt.. N. H. 





00 





WEEK 


55 


MA UK. 


RID- 






Moon 






Moon 






Moon 


^H 




^ 




O 




IAN. 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


Sun 


Sun 


sets 


^j 


<* 


^ 




O 






ises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


rises. 


sets. 


and 


O 


Q 







S 










rises. 






rises. 






rises. 










3on.D. 


H. 11. S. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


H. M. 


I. M. H M. 


H. M. 


213 

214 


153 
152 


i 

2 


Wednesday 
Thursday... 


S 2 ? 


12 610 
12 6 6 


11 4 


4 52 
4 53 


?!! 


250 
rises 


5 2 
5 2 


710 
7 9 


256 
rises 


443 

444 


729 
727 


234 
rises 


2151151 


3 


Friday.... 


* 22 


12 6 1 


" "3" 


454 


717 


724 


5 3 


7 8 


722 


445 


725 


731 


216150 4 Saturday... 
217149 5JSUNDAY.. 
218148; 6 Monday 
219|147| 7 Tuesday.... 
220146 8 (Wednesday 
221 145 9 Thursday .". 


- 7 
- 22 
X 7 
X 21 
T 5 
T 19 


12 5 53 
12 5 51 

12 5 22 


59 
153 

428 
520 


454 
4 f>5 
4 56 
457 
459 
5 


716 
715 
714 


756 
825 
854 

m 


5 4 
5 5 
5 6 

i ? 

5 8 


7 7 
7 6 
7 5 

?! 


755 
825 
855 


446 
447 
449 
450 
451 
453 


724 
722 
720 
719 
718 
717 


946 
1022 


222 144 

223 143 


lOlFriday 
lllSaturday... 


V 15 


12 5 14 
12 5 4 


614 

7 8 


5 1 
5 2 


7 9 
7 7 


1122 

...... 


5 9 
510 


? j 


1128 


454 
4 55 


715 
714 


114 


224 142 


12 SUNDAY.. 


tf 27 


12 4 55 


8 1 


5 3 


7 6 




511 


659 


'""is 


456 


713 




225 141 
226 140 


13 (Monday .... 
14 (Tuesday.... 


H 9 
H 2J 


12 4 45 
12 4 34 


853 
943 


5 4 
5 5 




1 6 
2 4 


5 12 
513 




112 
2 9 


4 r,s 

459 


712 
710 


""48 
148 


227 139 


15 Wednesday 






1030 


5 6 


7 3 


3 4 


514 


654 


3 9 




7 9 


2 51 


228: 138 


16 Thursday .. 


S 15 


12 4 11 


1115 


5 7 


7 2 


4 4 


515 


653 


4 8 


5 2 


7 8 


354 


229 137 


17 Friday 


27 


12 3 59 


1157 


5 8 


7 1 


5 3 


516 


651 


5 5 


5 3 


7 6 


455 


230 1 136 


18 [Saturday. 


P 


12 3 46 


1238 


5 9 




sets 


516 


6 50 


sets 


5 4 


7 4 


sets 


231 


135 
134 
133 


19 ISUNDAY . 
20 Monday .. . 
21 Tuesdav.. 


2 l 
HP 15 


12 3 33 
12 3 19 
12 3 5 


118 
159 
240 


5 10 

511 
5 12 


6 53 


728 

in 


517 
518 
519 


111 

646 


728 
743 
817 


5 5 
5 6 

5 7 


7 2 
7 1 
7 


728 
739 
8 8 


234 132 22 


Wednesday 


up 27 


12 2 50 


3 23 


5 13 


6 51 


8 40 


5 20 


6 44 


8 43 


5 8 


658 


830 


235 1 131! 23 
236|130 24 


Thursday . 
Friday 


- 9 

~ 22 


12 2 35 
12 2 19 


4 9 


5141650 
515 649 


911 
946 


521 
5 22 


643 
642 


915 




656 
654 


857 
930 


237 129 * > 5 


Saturdav... 


m 5 12 2 3 


551 


516 


647 


1031 


5 23 


640 


1037 


511 


652 


1013 


238 128:26 


SUNDAY.. 


m 18 


12 1 46 


6 48 


517 


645 


1125 


5 24 


639 


1131 


512 




11 7 


239 127i 27 


Monday 


y 2 


12 1 29 


747 


518 


644 




5 25 


637 




514 


6 48 




240126 


28 


Tuesday 


y 16 


12 1 12 


846 


520 


643 


""so" 


526 


636 


""36 


516 


6 46 


""is 


2411125 


29 


Wednesday 


* 30 


12 54 


945 


521 


641 


139 


527 


635 


144 


517 


645 


124 


242 124 30 Thursday.. 
243 123 31 Friday 


* 15 
- 1 


12 36 
12 18 


1042 
1137 


522 
5 23 


639 

6 38 


257 
4 15 


528 634 
5 28 1 6 33 


3 1 

417 


5 18 
519 


643 
641 


246 
4 8 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



21 



Full Moon, 1,30. flth nT , fll 

Last Quar., 8th. 9th Month - 



New Moon > 16th - 

Firgt Quar ^ 24thi 



247 
248 
249 



250 116 



251 



252 114 



253 
254 
255 



122 

121 
120 
119 
118 

\\l 



115 



108 

259 107 

260 10* 
105 

32 104 

263 103 

264 102 

265 101 
26i> 100 
267 



270 
271 

273 



109 14 



DAY 
OF 

WEEK. 



Saturdaj 
SUNDA1 
Monday 
4 Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday... 

Friday 

Saturda^.. 
SUNDAY.. 
Monday... 



Tuesday... 
Wednesday 
Thursday- 
Friday 

Saturday . 
SUNDAY. 
Monday... 



le 

17 
18 
19 
20 

21 Friday..:.. 

22 Saturday.. 

23 'SUNDAY. 

24 Monday... 
2 

2 

27 Thursday.. 

28 Friday ..... 

29 Saturday.. 

30 [SUNDAY . 



Wednesdaj 
Thursday . 



4 Monday... 

5 Tuesday . . 

6 Wednesdaj 



;ou.D 
- 16 
X 1 
X 16 
T 

T 
T 
V 1 
W 24 
H 6 

K 18 

30 
11 

8 24 
ft 6 
ft 18 



- 24 
X 



SUN AT 

NOON 

MARK. 



MOON 
IN 
ME- 



>ewYork, Chicago, 
Iowa, Neb., Wyo., 
., N.Mo., Ohio 
Pa., N. J., Mass. 
Conn., R. I. 



Sun 
rises. 



Sun 
sets. 



529 



534 
535 



543 



5f>4 



627 



618 
616 



545 



Moon 
rises 
and 



53 
157 
256 
355 
453 
551 
sets 
645 
715 
748 
829 
920 
1017 
1124 



150 
3 6 
421 
rises 



st. Louis, s. Mo., 

3. 111., Ind., Kas., 

Okla., Col., Utah, 

Cal., Ky., Va., 

Md., Del. 



Sun 



a. M. 

529 
529 
530 
531 
532 
533 
534 
535 



538 
539 
540 
541 
542 

I!! 

545 
546 
547 
547 
548 
549 
550 
551 
552 
553 
554 
5 55 



Sun 



614 



550 



Moon 
rises 
and 

sets. 



St. faul, Mich., 
Vis., Minn.,N.D., 
S. D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
. Y., Vt., N. H. 



Sun 
rises. 



535 



553 
554 
555 



Sun 



617 
615 



6 

558 



548 
546 
544 



Moon 
rises 
and 
sets. 



H. M. 

rises 
650 
71V 
74( 



I'll 

""38 
145 
248 
350 



732 
812 
9 1 



3 1 
420 

rises 



Sh. 



10th Month. OCTOBER, 1917. 31 Days. 



First Quar., 23d. 
Full Moon, 30th. 



276 
277 

278 
279 
280 
281 



285 
286 
287 



291 
292 
293 
294 
295 



DAY 

OP 

WEEK. 



Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday- 
Thursday. .. 

5 Friday 

6 Saturday... 

7 (SUNDAY.. 

8 Monday 

9 Tuesday 

10 Wednesday 

11 Thursday.. 

12 Friday 

13 (Saturday .. 

14 [SUNDAY 

15 iMonday 

16 iTuesday.. . 

17 [Wednesday 

18 (Thursday .. 

19 Friday 

20 .Saturday... 

21 SUNDAY... 

22 Monday 

23 Tuesday.... 

24 [Wednesday 

25 Thursday.. 
2(3 Friday 

Saturday . 
'SUNDAY.. 
.Monday 
^Tuesday ... 
31 !Wedresdav 



K 18 



SUN AT 

NOON 
MARK. 



MOON 
IN 
ME- 
RID- 
IAN. 



New York, Chicago, 
Iowa, Neb., Wyo., 
On-., N.Mo., Ohio, 
I'a.. N. J., Mass., 
Conn., R. I. 



Sun 

rises. 



6 3 



611 
612 
(J 13 
614 
615 
616 
618 
619 
621 
822 
624 
625 
626 
627 
628 
629 
(i 30 



Sun 



519 



Moon 

rises 

and 



t. LiOuis, a. MO. 
S. 111., Ind., Kas. 
Okla., Col., Utah 

Cal.. Ky., Va., 
Md., Del. 



Sun- 



558 



Sun 



540 



559 538 
5 36 



619 



Moon 
rises 
and 
sets. 



DC. Irani, Mich., 
Wis., Minn.,N.D., 

S. D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
N. Y., Vt., N. H. 



Sun 



559 
6 
3 1 
6 2 



6 7 
6 8 
610 



Sun 
sets. 



539 
538 
536 



524 
522 

517 
516 
514 
512 
510 



5 5 
5 3 
5 2 



ill 

454 
453 
451 



Moon 
rises 
and 

sets. 



H. M. 



742 
834 



40 
141 

244 



549 
sets 
536 
613 



314 
432 
550 
rises 
5 31 



22 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



,4 6 S 



llth Month NOVEMBER, 1917. 30 Days. | 



r., 21st. 
i. 28th. 



DAY 

OF 

WEEK. 



StTN AT 

NOON 
MARK. 



MOON 
IN 

ME- 

HID- 
IAN. 



York, Chicago 
Iowa, Neb., Wvo., 
Ore., N.Mo., Ohio 
Pa., N. J., Mass. 
Conn., R. I. 



Sun 
rises 



.Sun 
sets. 



Moon 
rises 
and 
sets. 



St. Louis. S. Mo., 

S. 111., Ind., Kas., 

Okla., Col., Utah 

Cal.. Ky., Va., 

Md., Del. 



Sun 



Sun 



Moon 
rises 
and 



St. Paul, Mich., 
Wis., Minn.,N.D., 

S. D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
N T . Y., Vt., N. H. 



Sun 
rises. 



Sun 



Moon 
rises 
and 
sets. 



305 
30b 
307 



311 



314 

||i 

318 
319 
320 
321 



324 
325 
326 



35 



Thursday.. 

Friday 

Saturday . 
SUNDAY 
Monday ... 
Tuesday... 
Wednesdaj 
Thursday . 

Friday 

Saturday . 
11 SUNDAY. 



Monday... 
Tuesday... 
Wednesdaj 
Thursday . 

Friday 

Saturday. . 
-UNDAY. 
Monday... 



20 Tuesday.. 



21 



30 



Wednesday 
Thursday 

riday 
Saturda 
SUNDA 
Monday.... 
Tuesday.... 
Vednesday 
Thursday . . 

riday ...... 



ay.. 
Y. 



Con.D 
15 

28 
11 



H 23 
5 
17 
29 
11 
S) 23 

Si? 
TS 

~ 25 



,K 18 

* 2 

* 16 
30 

:y 

X 13 
M 27 
V 11 
V 25 
W 9 



11 45 56 
11 46 11 
11 46 27 
11 46 44 
11 47 2 
11 47 21 
11 47 40 
11 48 
11 48 21 
1 1 4 42 



646 



652 
H53 
654 
655 

H56 



446 
445 



443 
442 



Wfr 

639 
640 
641 
642 
644 
H 45 
646 
647 
648 
6 50 

655 
656 
658 



7 2 
7 3 

U 

7 7 
7 9 
710 
711 

?JI 

714 
715 



H. M. 

449 
448 

III 

443 
442 
441 

436 



431 
430 

ll 

427 
426 
426 



422 
421 
421 



a. M. 
622 
720 



ill 

337 
443 
548 
655 
sets 

y 

8 2 



rises 

5 & 

6 5 



Sfe. 



DECEMBER, 1917. 



31 
80 

29 

339 2 

LI 



34! 
34! 
350 



53 



356 
357 
858 



863 
364 
H65 



DAY 
OF 

WEEK. 



Saturday . 
SUNDAY . 
Monday ... 
Tuesday... 
Wednesday 
Thursday- 
Friday 

Saturday . 
SUNDAY . 
Monday... 
Tuesday... 
Wednesday 
Thursday.. 

Friday 

Saturday . 
SUNDAY. 
Monday... 
Tuesday... 
Wednesda 
Thursday . 

Friday 

Saturday.. 
SUNDAY. 
Monday.... 
Tuesday.. . 
Wednesday 
Thursday . 

Friday 

Saturday.. 
SUNDAY. 
Monday... 



SUN AT 

NOON 

MARK. 



11 54 13 
11 54 42 



V ISC 

HIS 



/xorK.uhicago 
owa, Neb., Wyo., 
)re. f N.Mo., Ohio 
a., N. J., Mass. 
Conn., R. I. 



Moon 
Sun Sun rises 
ises. sets, and 



7 9 
710 

12 
13 
714 
715 
716 
717 
718 
719 
720 
721 
721 
721 
722 
722 
723 
724 
724 
725 
725 
725 
26 
26 
26 
727 
727 
728 



29 



37 



51. LXJU1S, &. MO. 

111., Ind., Kas., 
Dkla., Col., Utah 
Cal.. Ky., Va., 
Md., Del. 



Sun 
ises. 



Sun 



Moon 
rises 
and 
sets. 



or. faul, Alich., 
IVis., Minn.,N.D., 

S. D., Mont., N. 
Idaho, Wash., N. 
M. Y., Vt., N. H. 



Sun 
ises. 



i. M. 

716 

m 

19 
720 
722 
723 
724 
725 
726 
727 
728 
729 
730 
731 
732 
732 
33 
34 
34 
735 
735 
736 
736 
737 
737 
737 
738 
738 
739 
739 



Sun 



421 

420 



419 



419 
4 19 
420 
420 
4 20 
420 
421 
421 

422 
423 



427 



Moon 
rises 
and 
sets. 



H. M. 

is 

917 
1020 

11 19 

""23 
124 
227 
331 



651 
sets 
549 



1048 

Til 

234 
348 
457 



I'll 
II 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



A READY-REFERENCE CALENDAR. 

For ascertaining any day of the week for any given time within two hundred years from the introduc- 
tion oS. the New Style. *1752 to 1952 inclusive. 



YEARS 1753 TO 1952. 



Shi & 

sMs 



JSS 



1767 
1807 



1789 
1829 



1795 
1835 



1846 



1863 1874 
1914 1925 



1891 
1942 



351 



72 



111 



ill 3 



13 



1779 
1819 



1841 1847 



1869 1875 
1915 1926 



1886 U 
1937 11 



1462 



735 



13 



1763 
1814 



1774 
1825 



1785 
1831 



1791 
1842 



1853 



1910 



1870 1881 

1921 1927 1938 1 1949 



735 



24 



1754 



1765 
1811 



1771 
1822 



1782 
1833 



1793 
1839 



VS& 

1901 



1861 
1907 



1867 1878 1889 1895 2 
1918 1 1929 1 1935 1946 I 



13 



61 



4712 



57 



1755 
1806 



1766 
1817 



1777 
1823 



1783 
1834 



1794 

1845 



1800 
1851 
1902 



1913 



1873 
1919 



1 1879 1890 
11930 194111947 



3 616 2 



513 6 



1768 
1809 



1769 
1815 



1775 
1826 



1786 
1837 



1797 l 
1843 I 



1854 
1905 



1865 
1911 



1871 
1922| 



73 



46 



73 



1753 
1810 



1759 

1821 



1770 

1827 



1781 
1838 



1787 
1849 



1798 
1855 



1866 
1906 



1877 
1917 



1883 
1923 



1894 
1934 



1 4 



LEAP YEARS. 



1764 1 1792 1804 1832 1860 1888 | 1928 1 |7|3|4|7|2|5|7|3|6|1|4|6 


1768 1796 1808 183< 1864 1892 I 1904 1 1932 |5|1|2|5|7|3|5|1|4|6|2|4 


1772 1812 1840. 1868 1896 ! 1908 1 1936 |3|6|7|3|5|1|3|6|2|4|7|2 


1780 1820 1848 1876 1 1916 1 1944 1 6 | 2 1 3 6|l|4j6l2|5|7|3|6 


1756 1784 1824 18.>2 1880 1 1920 1 1948 I 4 I 7 i 1 I 4 | 6 I 2 I 4 I 7 1 3 I 5 I 1 I 3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


Monday ... 1 
Tuesday.... 2 


Tuesday 1 
Wednesday. 2 


Wednesday. 1 
Thursday ... 2 


Thursday... 1 
Friday 2 


Friday 1 


Saturday.... 1 
SUNDAY... 2 


SUNDAY... I 
Monday 2 


Saturday 2 


Wednesday 3 


Thursday... 3 


Friday 3 


Saturday.... 8 


SUNDAY... 3 Monday 3 


Tuesday 8 


Thursday.. 4 
Friday 5 


Friday 4 
Saturday... 5 


Saturday.... 4 
SUNDAY... 5 


SUNDAY... 4 
Monday 5 


Monday 4 Tuesday.... 4 
Tuesday.... 5 Wednesday. 5 


Wednesday. 4 
Thursday... 6 


Saturday... 6 SUNDAY... 6 


Monday 6 


Tuesday .... 6 


Wednesday. 6 


Thursday... 6 


Friday 6 


SUNDAY.. 7 
Monday 8 
Tuesday 9 


Monday 7 
Tuesday 8 
Wednesday. 9 


Tuesday 7 
Wednesday. 8 
Thursday... 9 


Wednesday. 7 
Thursday... 8 
Friday 9 


Thursday... 7 
Friday 8 
Saturday.... 9 


Friday 7 
Saturday 8 
SUNDAY... 9 


Saturday.... 7 
SUNDAY... 8 
Monday 9 


Wednesday. 10 


Thursday... 10 


BMday 10 


aturday....lO 


SUNDAY... 10 


Monday 10 


Tuesday ....10 


Thursday. . .11 1 Friday .."... .11 


Saturday.... 11 


UNDAY. ..11 


Monday 11 


Tuesday 11 


Wednesday.il 


Friday 12 (Saturday ...12 


SUNDAY... 12 


Monday 13 


Tuesday ....12 


Wednesday. 12 


Thursday ...12 


Saturday. . . . 13 1 SUNDAY.. . .13 
SUNDAY ... 14 | Monday 14 


Monday 13 
Tuesday 14 


Tuesday 13 
Wednesday.14 


Wednesday.13 
Thursday ...14 


Thursday.... 13 
Friday 14 


Friday 13 
Saturday.... 14 


Monday 15 
Tuesday 16 


Tuesday 15 
Wednesday .16 


Wednesday .15 
Thursday ...16 


Thursday ...15 
Friday 16 


Friday 15 
Saturday.... 16 


faturday 15 
UNDAY.. .16 


SUN DAY ...15 
Monday 16 


Wednesday.17 


Thursday... 17 


Friday 17 


Saturday.... 17 


SUNDAY ...17 


Monday 17 


Tuesday 17 


Thursday. .18 


Friday 18 


Saturday.... 18 


SUNDAY... 18 


Monday 18 


Tuesday 18 


Wednesday.18 


Friday 19 


Saturday.... 19 


SUNDAY. ..19 


Monday 19 


Tuesday ....19 


Wednesday.il) 


Thursday... 19 


Saturday 20 


SUNDAY... 20 


Monday 20 


Tuesday 2(] 


Wednesday .20 


Thursday... 20 


Friday 20 


SUNDAY... 21 
Monday.,... 22 
Tuesday . . . .23 


Monday 21 
Tuesday 22 
Wednesday.23 


Tuesday 21 
Wednesday. 22 
Thursday... 23 


\Vednesday.21 
Thursday... 22 
Friday 23 


Thursday... 21 
Friday 22 
Saturday.... 23 


Friday 21 
Saturday 22 
SUNDAY ...23 


taturday 21 
UNDAY. ..22 
Monday 23 


Wednesday .24 


Thursday... 24 


Friday 24 


Saturday. ...24 


SUNDAY ...24 


Monday 24 


Tuesday ....24 


Thursday... 25 


Friday 25 


Saturday.... 25 


SUNDAY.. ..25 


Monday 25 


Tuesday . . . .25 


Wednesday.25 


Friday 26 Saturday.... 26 


SUN DAY... 26 


Monday 26 


Tuesday ... .26 


Wednesday.26 


Thursday... 26 


Saturday . . .27 i SUNDAY. . .27 
SUNDAY. . .28 ! Monday 28 
Monday ... .29 iTuesda'y . . . .2!) 


Monday 27 
Tuesday ....28 
Wednesday.29 


Tuesday 27 
Wednesday.28 
Thursday... 29 


Wednesday .27 
Thursday. . .28 
Friday 29 


Thursday. .27 
Friday 28 
Saturday.. .29 


Friday 27 
Saturday ...28 
SUNDAY. ..29 


Tuesday ... .30 i Wednesday .30 


Thursday... 30 


Friday 3C 


Saturday.. ..30 


SUNDAY.. .30 


Monday 30 


Wednesday.31 Thursday. . .31 


Friday 31 


Saturday.... 31 


SUNDAY.... 31 


Monday... .31 


Tuesday 31 



NOTE To ascertain any clay of the week first 
look in the table for the year required and under 
tlie months are figures which refer to the corre- 
sponding figures at the head of the columns of 
days below. For example: To know on what 
nay of the week July 4 was in the year 1895, in the 
table of years look for 1895, and in a parallel 



line, under July, is figure 1, which directs to 
column 1. in which it will be seen that July 4 
falls on Thursday. 

'1752 same as 1772 from Jan. 1 to Sept. 2. 
From Sept. 14 to Dec. 31 same as 1780 (Sept. 
3-13 were omitted). This Calendar is from Whit- 
akr's London Almanack, with some revisions. 



24 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 191' 



CHART OF THE HEAVENS. 




EXPLANATION The chart of the heavens shows 
all the bright stars and groups visible iu th'e 
United States, Canada. Cuba and Hawaii. Stars 
of the third magnitude are sometimes shown iu 
order to complete a figure. 

If a bright, uncharted body be seen near the 
"ecliptic circle" it must be a planet. To lo- 
cate the planets or moon refer to the monthly 
calendar pages in this almanac, find the proper 
signs on the chart in the "ecliptic circle" and 
an inspection of that part of the heavens, com- 
paring with the chart, will serve to identify 
the planet and all surrounding objects. 

Because of the earth's motion from west to 
east (opposite to the direction of the arrow in 
the ch?rt), the stars rise 4 m. earlier each day 
or 30 m. per week or 2 hrs. a month. The 
chart shows the position at 9 p. m. Then if the 



position for any other hour be desired, as for 
7 p. m., count ahead one mouth, or back one 
month for 11 p. m., and so on lor any hour of 
the night, holding the month desired in front 
as the face looks eitfcer to the north or south 
with name down. 

A circle described from the zenith on the 
"zenith circle" for tne desired latitude with a 
radius of 90 degrees (see graduated meridian) 
will show wtoat stars are above the horizon. 
Thus Capella is near the overhead (zenith) point 
on latitude 40 degrees north Jan. 15, 9 p. m., 
as will be "big dipper" at 3 a. m. Then from 
Capella or two stars all the surrounding visible 
groups can be identified. The "pointers," being 
5 degrees apart and always in sight, may be used 
as a convenient unit of measure : also wlion 
visible, the "belt of Orion." 3 degrees, or the 
sides of the "square or fegasus." 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



POSITIONS OF THE PRINCIPAL PLANETS, 1917. 
Mean time. 



DAY. 



"" ,5 

?] 

Feb 1 
11 
21 

Men. 1 



Apri r 



21 

June 1 
11 

July ~j 

21 

Aug. 1 
11 



21 

Oct. 1 
11 
21 

Nov. 1 
11 
21 

Dec. 1 
11 
21 
31 



Right 
ascen 
sion. 



Hours 



XVI 

XV11 
XVIII 



XX 
XX 

xxi 



III^ 
iv 

vi% 

VII 
VIII 



Xll 

xii* 

XIII 

IV 
% 

xvim 

XVIIlfc 



xx 

XX 

XXI 

XXI 



South- 
ern 
states. 



MARS.C? 



Right 
ascen- 
sion. 



Hours. 



XXI 

....Invisible.... 



51 

39 

35 

14 

12 Ev, 

11 44 

11 27 

11 5 



JUPITEH.3 



Right 
ascen- 
sion. 



Hours. 



North 

era 
states 



South- 
ern 

states. 

H.M 

Set*. 

Morn. 
1 20 
43 
8 
Eve. 

10 54 

10 24 
9 59 
9 29 

Is? 

7 59 
....Invisible... 



H. M. 

I Sets. 

1 Morn. 

I 1 25 
O 50 
17 
Eve. 
11 6 
10 35 
10 10 



SATUKN.b 



South- 
ern 

states. 

H.M. 

Rises, 
Eve. 
6 25 
Sets. 



Rises. 

Morn. 
2 54 
2 20 
1 46 
1 12 
37 

Eve. 

11 23 

10 45 

10 
9 27 
8 47 




NOTE The column "Right Ascension" shows 
the position of the planet in the ecliptic as it 
moves past the stars and corresponds to longi- 
tude on the earth. Both must have a starting 
point and longitude is reckoned by general con- 
sent from Greenwich, England, while right as- 
cension is measured from tl>e first point of the 
sign Aries (constellation Pisces) which the 
prime meridian of the heavens, connecting the 
poles, passes through. The reader will see 
these hours from to 24 laid off and marked 
by Roman letters, as in the above table, in 
the outer space on the Chart of the Heavens. 



Example: It is desired to know the place of 
Venus May 16. By the above table her place on 
May 11 is 111% hours and on May 21 IV% hours, 
which point on the chart margin connect with 
the pole star, by a straight edge, as a ruler or 
envelope margin, and where the line intersects 
the ecliptic circle, there you will find Venus at 
the time given, which in this case is about mid- 
way between the Pleiades and the Hyades, two 
prominent objects. Again on July 26 her R. A. 
is IX% hours, which falls just to the right or 
west of the brilliant Regulus in the Sickle, in 
the constellation Leo. 



POSITIONS OF PLANETS ON SUNDAYS OF EACH MONTH IN 1917. 



PLANETS. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


Apr. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Venus 1st Sunday., 


Ccn. 

Tfi 


Con. 

J -5 


Con. 


Con. 
X 


Con. 
T 


Con. 
tt 


Con. 

v 


Con. 
Q 


Con. 
TIP 


Con. 


Con. 
m 
* 


Con. 
X -0 


Mars 2d Sunday 


5 


$ - 


_ 


x 


T 


T 


# 


H 










O 


Jupiter, 3d Sunday ... .. 


X 
jt 


X 
H 


T 


T 


T 


T 



tf 


V 


v 




tf 



V 




tf 




Uranus. 5th Sunday 








5 






-6 




c 






* 



MOON'S POSITIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE EARTH AND SUN FOR 1917. 





23 


20 


21 


IT 


13 


s 


6 


3 


1-29 


W 


24 


18 




5 


i "s 


28 


24 


22 


17 


15 


11 




5 


1-29 


26t 




19 


l(j 


15 


n 


9 


5* 


-29 


26 


22 


19 


16 


n 




g 


5 


3-81 


27 


24 


20 


17 


14 


16 


7 


3-30 ' 


28 


Asc. Node 


22 


19 


18 


14 


11 


r 


4 


1-28 


24 


21 


17 


15 



*Lowest of the entire year. tHighest of the 
entire year. At the time of full moon in 
December the moon will be 57 higher up from 
the southern horizon at its meridian passage 
than it will be in June when full. This great 
swing of our luminary of the night is readily 
understood when we remember that the full 
moon must always be on the opposite side of 
the earth from the sun, or just 180 from the 
sun. Hence, when the sun is highest in June, 
that full moon which falls nearest the summer 



solstice, June 21, will be the lowest, which thig 
year is June 5 or July 5 and conversely at the 
winter solstice. Of course, these conditions will 
be reversed south of the equator. The differ- 
ence in the swing from lowest to highest may 
be 57, the inclination of the sun's apparent 
path around the earth being 23%, which being 
multiplied by 2 equals 47. Then, the inclination 
of the moon's orbit to the ecliptic being about 
5, there may be 10 more difference, or 57 
in all. 



26 



ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



CHART SHOWING LIGHT AND DARK MOON IN 1917. 



Jan. Feb.IMeh.IADf. I Mail 




June I Jalu 



Auq 




DCC. 



Mate vl Mo 



Ev. 



EvMc 



Explanation: The small divisions are of three 
hours each and each month shows the relative 
amount of moonlight in the twelve hours from 
6 p. m. to 6 a. m. Allowance should be made 
for the increase of days' length in summer and 



decrease in winter mouths. Thus, Jan. 1 the 
moon will shine until midnight; all night- on 
the 7th ; after 9 p. m. on the 12th ; after mid- 
night on the 15th ; after 3 a. m. on the 19th, 
and not at all on the 23d. 



SIDEREAL NOON OR MERIDIAN PASSAGE OF THE VERNAL EQTTINOX. 
For use in connection with star table. See note under same. 



Day. Jan. Feb. March. April. May. June. July. Aug. 




8 20 

NOTE-Black figures 



H.M. 



Sept. 



Oct. 




Nov. Deo. 



H.M. 



are p. m.; all others a. m. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



27 



THE BRIGHTEST STARS. 


NAME. 


Constellation 
or group. 


Magni- 
tude, 
(v.: va- 
riable.) 


Right 
ascension. 
Sidereal 
t me. 


Declina- 
tion. 


For upper 
meridian 
passage. 
Mn. time. 


For rising, subtract. 
For setting, add.t 


For 
lat. 
30 N. 


For 
lat. 
40 N. 


For 
lat. 
50 N. 


Alpheratz 


Andromeda 
Cassiopeia 
Pegasus 


2.1 
2.4 
2.8 
3.0 
2.3v 
2.2 
2.3 
2.2 
2.4 
2.2 
0.4 
2.8 
2.2 
2.1 
2.1 v 
2.6 
2.6 v 
1.9 
3.1 
1.0 
0.1 
0.3 
1.8 
2.3 
1.8 
2.7 
2.3 
0.9 
2.0 
0.8 

-W 

1.5 
1.9 
0.5 
1.2 
3.8 
2.1 
1.8 
1.6 v 
2.0 
2.2 
1.6 
2.8 
2.4 
1.1 
0.7 
0.2 
0.2 
2.9 
2.2 
2.3 
2.7 
2.9 
1.2 
2.8 
2.5 
0.1 
2.1 
0.9 
3.7 
1.4 
26 
2.9 
2.4 
1.9 
1.3 

4.3 


H. M. 

4 
4 
9 
21 
35 
39 
51 
5 
20 
27 
34 
50 
1 58 
2 2 
2 14 
2 58 
3 2 
3 18 
3 42 
4 31 
5 10 
5 10 
5 21 

5 32 
5 36 
5 43 
5 50 
5 53 
6 22 
6 33 
6 41 
6 55 
7 29 
7 35 
7 40 
8 12 
9 23 
10 4 
10 42 
10 58 
11 44 
12 22 
12 30 
13 20 
13 20 
13 57 
14 12 
14 33 
14 46 
14 51 
15 31 
15 40 
16 
16 24 
16 26 
17 54 
18 34 
18 50 
19 46 
20 13 
20 38 
21 lt> 
21 27 
21 40 
22 33 
22 53 
23 
23 35 


-Deg. Min 

-pJ8 36 
+58 40 
+14 41 
43 19 
+56 30 
-18 39 
+60 14 
+35 9 
+59 46 
+88 50 
-57 41 
+20 22 
+41 54 
+23 3 
- 3 26 
+ 3 44 
+40 37 
+49 33 
+23 50 
+16 20 
+45 55 
8 18 
+28 32 
22 
- 1 15 
-34 8 
-9 42 
+ 7 24 
+44 56 
-52 39 
+16 29 
16 3t> 
-28 51 

+ 5 27 
+28 15 
+ 9 28 
- 8 16 
+12 25 
-59 13 
+62 14 
+15 4 
62 36 
-22 54 
+5 22 
-10 42 
-59 56 
+19 39 
-0 28 
-15 40 

$ 3 ! 

+ 6 42 
19 34 
-26 14 
+21 41 
+51 30 
+38 42 
26 25 
+ 8 38 
-12 49 
+44 58 
+62 13 
-5 58 
+ 9 28 
47 24 
-30 6 
+14 44 
+ 5 9 


H. M. 

3 
4 
8 
21 
35 
38 
50 
4 
19 
24 
34 
49 
57 
2 1 
2 13 
2 56 
3 
3 18 
3 41 
4 29 
5 9 
5 9 
5 19 
5 26 
5 30 
5 35 
5 42 
5 49 
5 51 
6 21 
6 31 
6 40 
6 54 
7 27 
7 33 
7 38 
8 10 
9 21 
10 1 
10 39 
10 56 
1 42 
12 1H 
12 27 
13 18 
13 18 
13 54 
14 9 
14 30 
14 43 
14 48 
15 28 
15 37 
15 57 
16 20 
16 23 
17 51 
18 30 
18 46 
19 43 
20 9 
20 35 
21 12 
21 23 
21 36 
21 58 
22 48 
22 56 
23 31 


H. M. 

7 18 


H. M. 

7 52 


H. M. 

8 39 


Caph 
Algenlb 


6 39 
3 51* 
9 56 
20 


6 51 
2 25* 


7^18 


Alpha 


Schedir 
Diphda 
Gamma 
Mirach 


Cassiopeia 
Cetus (whale) ... 
Cassiopeia 
Andromeda 
Cassiopeia 
Ursa Minor 
Eridanus 
Aries (ram) T . . . . 
Andromeda 
Aries T 
Cetus 
Cetus 
Perseus 
Perseua 
Taurus (bulli^.. 
Taurus V 
Auriga. 


4 53 


4 36 


7 37 


'8"29' 


9 48 


Delta 


Polaris 










1 37* 
6 54 
8 
7 1 
5 51 
6 12 
8 
8 52 
7 3 
6 39 
8 28 
5 45 
7 18 
6 2 
6 1 
4 30 
5 42 
6 22 
8 22 
2 46* 
6 44 
5 25 
4 51 
7 30 
6 17 

Jl? 

5 45 

6 34 
1 3* 


7 14 

9 21 
7 26 
5 51 
6 13 
9 10 

"7"29" 
6 58 
10 14 
5 31 
7 52 
6 2 
6 1 
3 37* 
5 26 
6 26 
9 ^53 

6 59 
5 1 
4 7 
8 11 
6 19 
7 50 
6 33 
5 31 
6 44 


7 52 

" *8" '6 
5 '46 
6 20 


Sheratau 
Almaacli 


Hamel 


Mira 
Menkar 
Algol 


Marfak . 


'"s'iz 

7 26 
5"27 

M 

!! 

5 17 
6 42 

7 27 
4 45 
3 20 
9 19 
6 30 
8 42 
6 50 
5 24 
7 4 
* 


Alcyone 


Aldebaran 
Capella 
Rigel 


Orion 


El Nalh 


Taurus tf 
Orion 
Orion 
Columba (dove).. 
Orion 
Orion 


Mintaka . 


AINilam 
Phaet 


Saiph 
Betelgeuse 
Menkal iiiii 


Canopus 
Alhena. 


Artcus 
Gemini (twins) K 
Canis Major 
Canis Major 
Gemini H 
Canis Minor 
Gemini M 
Cancer (crab) , 
Hydra 


Sirius.. 


Adhara 


Castor 




Pollux 
Beta.. 


Alphard 


Regulus 
Eta 


Leo (lion) f> 
Argus 


Dubhe 
Denebola 


Ursa Major 
Leo o 
Southern Cross . 
Corvus (crow) 
Ursa Major 
Virgo (virgin) V 
Centaurus 


6 41 
1 0* 
5 9 


6 ^54 
4 35 


7 18 

* 

4 13 


Acrux 


Beta 
Mizar 


Spica, 


5 40 
1 9* 
6 42 
52* 
5 27 


5^23 

7 12 

* 

5 4 


""b'iz 

7 ^45 
4 47 


Ago n u , 


Arcturus 
Bengula 
Alpha.. .. 


Bootes. . 


Centaurus.. 


Libra (scales) =. 
Ursa Minor 
Northern Crown. 
terpent Bearer., 
corpion TTI 
Scorpion in. 
Hercules 


Kochab 


Alpha 


7 13 
6 20 
5 16 
4 58 
6 58 
9 8 
7 52 
4 58 
6 24 
5 35 
8 22 


7 44 
6 23 
k 4 54 
4 20 
7 20- 


8 34 
6 35 
4 24 
3 42 

7 57 


Unuk. 


Beta 
Antares 


Rutilicus 






Vega 


Lyra .... 


8 54 
4 19 
6 30 
5 19 
9 56 


10 52 
3 38* 
6 45 
4 56 


Delta 


Sagittarius y 
Eagle... 
Capricorn 
Cygnus (swan)... 
Cephus 
Aquarius - 


Altair 
Alpha.. 


Deneb 
Alderamin 
Beta 




5 41 
6 26 
3 26* 
4 46 
6 39 
6 If, 


5 43 
6 33 
1 21* 
4 

6 52 
6 17 


6^50 

3 11 
7 16 
6 28 


Eni 


Alpha 




Fomalhaut 


Pisces Austraies. 
Pegasus 
Pisces x 


Markab . 


Iota 



Explanation : Bv the absolute scale of magni- 
tudes stars brighter than Aldebaran and Altair 
are indicated by fractional or negative quanti- 
ties: thus Vega 0.2 and Sirius 1.4. As the 
magnitudes increase the brilliancy decreases, 
each increase of a unit being equal to a decrease 
or about two and one-halt In brightness. 

To ascertain when any star or constellation 
Will be on the upper meridian add the number 
opposite in the column "For Meridian Passage" 
to the figures in the table on the following page. 
"Sidereal Noon," taking note whether such fig- 
ures be "Morn." or "Eve." If "Morn." and the 
sum is more than I2n. tne result will be Eve. of 
same day; if "Eve." and the sum is more than 



the result will be Morn, of the next day 
Having found the time of meridian passage, for 
tne rising subtract ana ror tne setting add the 
numbers opposite tne star in the column headed 
"For Rising and Setting" (t) and observe the di- 
rections as to Morn, and Eve. given for the 

meridian passage. Those marked ( ) in the 

last columns are circumpolar. Stars having an 
asterisk (*) in the last columns are to be seen 
only in the far south and then when near the 
meridian, as the vapors of the horizon will pre- 
vent seeing them wnen they rise or set. To tell 
how high ur from the nearest point of the hori- 
zon a star will oe at its meridian passage SUD- 
tract the star's declination from 90 and if the 



28 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



result is less tnan tne latitude or the place of 
tne observer that star will neither rise nor set. 
out is circumpoiar, and tne unterence between 
tnat result ana tne latitude snows tne star's 
altitude above the north point of the horizon or 
below the southern horizon. Or (90 dec.) lat. 
=alt. or elevation ot the star above the nearest 
point of the horizon at meridian passage for 
stars of a southern declination. Examples: 
Sidereal noon, Oct. 30, 9:27 p. m. 

Fomalhaut "in Meria." col., 22: 48 
32:15 
Subtract. 24:00 

8:15 p.m. of the 31st. 
lime of merid- 
ian passage. 

Fomalhaut ris.and set.col.add 4:00 for lat. 40 N. 
12:15 = 0:15 a. m. of 
Nov.l. the time 
of setting. 



Fomalhaut, dec. 30 S. 90 30 = 60, 
40 = 20, altitude of Fomalhaut in latitude 40 
at its meridian passage. To measure celestial 
distances with the eye keep in mind that one- 
third of the distance from the zenith to the 
horizon is 30. For smaller measurements use 
the belt of Orion, 3 long, or the sides of the 
Square of Pegasus; the "pointers" in the "biff 
dipper," which are nearly 5 apart a convenient 
celestial yardstick because always to be seen. 
In the case of a star whose dec. is such as to 
bring it nearer to the zenith than to a horizon 
at meridian passage, it will be more convenient 
to use its zenith distance as a means of locat- 
ing it. The difference between the latitude and 
dec. is this zenitn distance. If the dec. is 
greater than the latitude then such distance is 
to be counted northward, otherwise southward 
from the zenith. 



STORY OF OTTR WORLD 

THE SUN In tracing the relationship, origin 
and age of living and fossil forms, present con- 
ditions form the basis of all work. So, likewise, 
in world study or astronomy. We know that 
the sun is a dark body surrounded by an en- 
velope of burning gases, in which are all the 
elements that enter into the earth's structure. 
Therefore, in the "beginning" of Genesis the earth 
and sun were one and likewise all the other 
members of this world family, and a knowledge 
of our natural laws is the key tliat opens the 
door and reveals to us conditions that obtain 
in other worlds, their weight, size, distance, 
etc. The bright solar envelope is torn asunder 
with convulsions, revealing the dark interior 
(sun spots), large enough to roll a dozen earths 
into, and when these are largest and most numer- 
.ous, about every eleven years, the earth trembles 
in sympathy, evident in earthquakes, volcanic 
activity and unusual meteorological conditions. 
Such was the year 1915. 

During total eclipses of the sun opportunity 
is afforded to steal many of his secrets, es- 
pecially in such eclipses as are of T longest 
totality, as in 1933, 1980. 2009 and 2038, which 
leaves much time for gain in knowledge and 
improvement in apparatus. 

MERCURY Because of his nearness to the sun, 
this planet is invisible most of the time, and is 
therefore the least known of our family of naked- 
eye worlds. Special endeavor must always be 
made to see him, by knowing the time and place 
to look, and then he shows up gloriously. This 
year the conditions will be most favorable near 
the "break o' day," Feb. 1-10 and Oct. 1-10 and 
near the close of twilight, Jap. 1-10, April 5-15 
and Dec. 15-20 ; always seek him near the sun- 
rise point of the horizon in the morning and 
the sunset point in the evening. When an un- 
usually bright "star" is seen at these times 
and places the observer may be certain of 
having seen the youngest of our world family 
to whom no descendants or moons have been 
vouchsafed, so far as we know. 

VENUS The goddess of beauty will not, how- 
ever, attract much attention until the evenings 
of fall and winter, being invisible the latter 
part of April when hidden from us by the sun 
and only dimly visible for weeks before inii 
after N that, owing to her great distance from 
us and~ proximity to the sun. Indeed, she will 
appear seventeen times larger in December than 
in May, even though at the first date she will 
present quite her full phase, while at the last 
date she will only show a thin crescent or new 
moon phase. (See the annexed cut and explana- 
tion.) 

At the beginning of the year Venus will be 
in Scorpio and about 10 northeast of the red 
star Antares ; enters the western boundary of 
the Milky Way about Jan. 8, emerging on its 
eastern side on the 20th and at the end of the 
handle of the Milkmaid's Dipper; 1 north of 
moon Jan. 21 and less than 3 south of Mer- 
cury Jan. 30. On Feb. 20 the moon will over- 



FAMILY FOR A. D, 1917. 

take her while in Capricornus, just south of 
the two bright stars in the horns of the Goat, 
and pass 3 to the south of her, her phase being 
nearly like A of E in above cut. We will pass 
on over the period when she is unfavorably 
situated and pick up her course from July 1, 
when she will be found midway between 
Prsesepe the Beehive and Pollux in Gemini, 
close to Saturn (1 north) July 4 and in line 
with Castor and Pollux 5 northwest of her, 
setting at 9 p. m. with Procyon 15 southwest 
and Sirius 15 still further southwest ; July 26 
a little north of Regulus, in the end of the 
handle of the Sickle in Leo, making an attrac- 
tive grouping of interesting objects. Praesepe, 



Toward the Sun 
N 




As seen in the morning As seen in the evening 
west of sun. east of sun. 

A. April 11, 1917 About fifteen days before 
superior conjunction with the sun. 

B. April 21, 1918 At greatest angular dis- 
tance west of the sun. 

C. March 16, 1918 When brightest as a morn- 
ing star. 

D. In February, 1918 Just after inferior con- 
junction with the sun. ^ 

E. About May 11 Fifteen days after superior 
conjunction with the sun. 

F. About Nov. 30 When at greatest angular 
distance east of the sun. 

G. Jan. 5, 1918 When brightest as an evening 
star. 

H. Feb. 3, 1918 A week before inferior con- 
junction with the sun. 



or the Beehive, which is easily visible to the 
naked eye on a line joining Venus and Regulus, 
becomes beautiful under the slightest optical aid, 
bringing out a wealth of glittering suns. This 
is only one of the numerous "island universes" 
of the heavens, similar to the Galaxy, or Milky 
Way. Imagine our own sun and family in the 
midst of such a group of suns each far brighter 
than our brightest stars or planets, satellites, 
comets, etc., with their ever recurring phe- 
nomena. This group has been repeatedly mis- 
taken for a comet and early observers called 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



29 



it the "Nebula of Cancer," but even a good 
night glass causes its filmy appearance to dis- 
appear and brings out the swarms of twinkling 
suns. 

The latter part of August Venus will be 10 
south from Denebola in Leo and 6 north of 
the moon Aug. 20; by the 10th of September 
she will be less than 2 north of Spica Virginis 
and 4 north of the moon Sept. 19 and 30 south 
of Arcturus on the 20th, entering the Square of 
Libra Oct. 1. In this vicinity will be found the 
Northern Crown and 15 to the left of it and 
on a line connecting it with Vega Lyra is to 
be seen, as a dim patch of light, another vast 
"island universe" in the constellation Hercules. 
This is the largest and richest of the naked-eye 
star groups and one which, before the time of 
telescopes, was supposed to be a great nebula. 
Even a small instrument will so bring out its 
glories as to compel exclamations of wonder. 

By Oct. 15-20 Venus will have passed into Scor- 
pio close to and north of Antares and completes 
her circuit of the heavens, being close to the 
moon Oct. 19 (an occultation in southern lati- 
tudes). During November she passes through the 
constellation Sagittarius just above or north of 
the Milkmaid's Dipper, and will be 4 south of 
the moon Nov. 18; will reach her greatest angular 
distance from' the sun (47 18') Nov. 30, when a 
line from the north star through the Great Cross 
to Aquila and extended 30 will reach her. Note 
that the "Apex of the Heavens" is shown on 
the chart between Lyra and the Great Cross. 
It is about this point that our family is re- 
volving. She will be in line with Polaris, Deneb 
and Job's Coffin Dec. 10 and 30 south of the 
last, finally attaining her greatest brilliancy and 
passing 5 south of the moon Dec. 31. 

MARS Will not be a conspicuous object at 
any time during the year, because of his near- 
ness to the sun not in real but angular dis- 
tance (see chart). Being in conjunction with 
the sun Feb. 28, he will be quite invisible in 
February and March. When first easily seen, 
in June, he will be in close company with 
Jupiter, being nearest him June 8. when only 
^4 north of him, rising about 3 a. m., with the 
Pleiades just north of them ; 10 north of the 
moon July 16 and passing just north of Aldeb- 
aran in the Hyades near the end of July ; 
Aug. 1 midway between Betelgeuse and Capella 
and Aug. 14 % north of the moon; Aug. 20 
in line with Sirius and Castor, forming a neat 
triangle with Castor and Pollux ; 3 north of 
the moon Sept. 11 and Sept. 20 in the Beehive ; 
4 north of Saturn Oct. 1 a beautiful sight 
just east of the Beehive ; last of October just 
north of Regulus ; 5 north of moon Oct. 10 ; 6 
north Nov. 8 and 8 north Dec. 7. He begins 
to rise before midnight about Dec. 1 and hence 
then becomes an evening star, but will not be 
at his brightest until March, 1918. 

JUPITER Will be on the meridian about 7 
p. m. Jan. 1 and may be found about 10 south- 
east of Algenib at the southeast corner of the 
Great Square of Pegasus and 30 directly south 
of the only naked-eye nebula the "Great Nebula 
of Andromeda," easily to be seen when well 
above the horizon in the absence of the moon, 
on a line connecting Jupiter with the base of 
Cassiopeia's Chair. With a moderate glass, stars 
may be seen shining through its filmy mass. 
Such was the mass of all the matter now em- 
bodied in our world family many millions of 
years ago, or in the "beginning" of the Mosaic 
account of creation. Along from the middle to 
the last of June, after Jupiter has passed the 
sun and is to be seen on the other (west) side 
of him, as a morning star, he will be about 
midway between the Pleiades and Hyades and 
the latter part of August 5 north of Aldebaran. 
He will go a little farther east until midway 
between Aldebaran and El Nath and then retro- 
grade or go back westward until the end of the 
' year. His visible near approaches to the moon 
will be as follows: Jan. 1 and 29, Feb. 25, March 
25, April 22, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 7, Oct. 5, 
Nov. 1 and 28 and Dec. 25, in all of which he 
will be from 3 to 6 south ; at east quadrature 



Sept. 3 and at opposition, or 180 from the sun, 
Nov. 29. 

SATURN Will appear to the best advantage 
at or near the beginning of the year and at its 
close, being in both instances an all night star 
and rising near sunset (see chart). No use to 
seek him in July or August. Jan. 1 he will be 
in Gemini and about 5 south of Pollux and 
in line with that star and Castor, with the Bee- 
hive a few degrees east. He will be retro- 
grading, or going west past the stars, until 
April, when he will be between Procyon and 
Pollux, and he will advance the remainder of 
the year. His close approach to Mars was men- 
tioned under that head. Castor is the finest 
double star in the northern heavens. Extra 
good eyesight, unaided, shows the companion 
star and the slightest optical aid brings it out 
plainly. 

His near approaches to the moon will be as 
follows: Jan. 9, 1 north; Feb. 5, March 4 and 
31, % north ; April 28, 1 north ; May 25, 1% 
north; Oct. 10. 3& north; Nov. 6 and Dec 4, 
4 north. 

No attention is given to Uranus or Neptune, 
as the latter is never to- be seen except with 
a good telescope and knowledge of place, and 
the former is only just discernible to the normal 
eye when at his very brightest and no moonlight. 

FACTS ABOUT THE SUN AND PLANETS. 

Name> D j^ i e 8 ter ' i<*neefrom Period of 



7,918 92900 000 365 
4,230 141,500,000 687 
86,500 483,300,000 4.333 

Saturn 73,000 886,000,000 10.759 

Lranus 31.900 1,781,900,000 30687 

Neptune 34,800 2,791,600,000 60,181 

Ihe sun's surface is 12,000 and its volume 
1,300,000 times that of the earth, but the mass is 
only 332,000 times as great and its density about 
one-quarter that of the earth. The force of 
gravity at the surface of the sun is twenty-seven 
times greater than that at the surface of the 
earth. The sun rotates on its axis once in 25.3 
days at the equator, but the time is longer' in 
tue higher latitudes, trom which fact it is pre- 
sumed that the sun is not solid, at least as to 
its surface. 

THE EARTH AND THE MOON. 

Earth The equatorial diameter of the earth is 
7,926.5 miles and the polar diameter 7.899.5 
miles; equatorial circumference, 25,000. The lin- 
ear velocity of the rotation of the earth on its 
axis at the equator is 24,840 miles a day. or 1 440 
leet a second; its velocity in its orbit around 
tne sun is approximately nineteen miles per sec- 
ond, the length of the orbit being about 560 000 - 
000 miles. The superficial area of the earth, 
according to Encke, the astronomer, is 197.108.580 
square miles, of which two-thirds is water and 
one-third land. The planetary mass is about 
256.000,000 cubic miles. 

Moon The moon has a diameter of 2,162 miles, 
a circumference of about 6,800 miles and a sur- 
face area of 14,685,000 square miles. Her mean 
distance from the earth is 238.840 miles. The 
volume of the moon is about l-49th that of the 
earth and the density about 3% that of water. 
The time from new moon to new moon is 29 
days 12 hours 44.05 minutes. The moon has no 
atmosphere and no water and is a dead world. 

Light travels at the rate of 186.300 miles per 
second. It requires 8 minutes and 8 seconds for 
light to come from the sun to the earth. 

HUNTER'S AND HARVEST MOON. 

The full moon nearest to Sept. 21 is popularly 
known as the "harvest moon. This is because 
the moon then rises, for several consecutive eve- 
nings, at nearly the same hour, giving an un- 
usual number of moonlight evenings. This is the 
most noticeable in the higher latitudes and quite 
disappears at the equator. 

The "hunter's moon" is the first full moon 
following the harvest moon. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



VISIBILITY OF THE PRINCIPAL PLANETS IN 1917. 




Copyright, 1909, by Berlin HW-igbt, DeLandjr la. 

Explanation: The light spaces show the ap- 
proximate time and extent of visibility and, with 
the superior planets, the degree of brilliancy 
also. Thus Venus will be two hours or 30 de- 
grees west of the sun Jan. 1 ; invisible the 
latter part of April and first part of May 
and 3 hours or 45 degrees east of sun the last 
of November ; Jupiter invisible in May, rising 
with the sun, and brightest (180 degrees from 
the sun) in November and December, setting 
at sunrise an all night star. 
THE PLANETS. 

As Morning Stars West of the Sun Mercury, 
Feb. 1-10 and Oct. 1-10, rising near the break 
of day near the sunrise point of the horizon. 
Yenus, until April 26 or as long as visible. 
Mars, from Feb. 28 to Dec. 12. Jupiter, from 
May 9 to Sept. 3. Saturn, from July 27 to Nov. 7. 

Brightest or Best Seen Mercury, within the 
time limits given when an evening or morning 



star. Venus, best seen in November, December 
and January, 1918. Mars, at the close of the 
year. Jupiter, in November and December. 
Saturn, in January. Uranus, in August. Neptune, 
in January. 

As Evening Stats East of the Sun Mercury, 
Jan. 1-10, April 5-15 and Dec. 15-25, setting at 
or near the close of evening twilight, near the 
sunset point of the horizon. Venus, after April 
26. or from time when first visible. Mars, until 
Feb. 28 and after Dec. 12. Jupiter, until May 
9 and after Sept. 3. Saturn, until July 27 and 
after Nov. 7. 

Invisible or Very Dim Mercury, at a'll other 
times not included within the dates given above 
when an evening or morning star. Venus, in 
April and May. Mars, in February and March. 
Jupiter, from April 25 to May 20. Saturn, in 
July and August. Uranus and Neptune, always. 

All Night Stars or Planets Jupiter, in Novem- 
ber and December. Saturn, in January. 



GREAT SHIP CANALS OF THE WORLD. 



Opened, 

Canal. year. 

Cape Cod 1914 

Corinth (Greece) 1893 

Kronstadt-St. Petersburg (Russia) 1890 

Elbe and Trave (Germany) 1900 

Kaiser Wilhelm or Kiel (Germany)t 1895 

Manchester ship (England) 1894 

Panama (U. S.) 1914 

Sault Ste. Marie (U. S.)... 



Sault Ste. Marie (Canada). 

Suez (Egypt) 

Welland (Canada) 



1855 
1895 
1869 
1887 



Length, 
miles. 



16 

41 

61 

35.5 

50.5 
1.6 
1.11 

90 

26.75 



Depth, 
feet. 
25 
26.25 

20.50 

10 

45 

26 

45 

22 

29.25 

31 

14 



Width, 

feet. 

150 

72 
220 

72 
150 
120 
300 
100 
142 
108 
100 



Cost. 

$12,000,000 
5,000,000 
10,000,000 
5,831,000 
94,818,000 
75,000,000 
375,000,000 
10,000,000 
2,791.873 
100,000,000 
25,000,000 



*At the bottom. tRebuilt. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1317. 



There will be seven 
greatest number possible 



ECLIPSES IN THE YEAR 1917. 

eclipses this year the I of the 19th and 
in any one year visible in 



four of the sun and three of the moon, as fol- 
lows: 

I. Total of the moon Jan. 8, wholly visible 
throughout North America and partially in 
South America ; the beginning will be visible 
in central and western Europe, northwest Africa 
and the central and eastern Pacific region ; 
the ending in northeast Asia and east Australia. 

NORTH 




Eclipse Juu. 8, 1917. 

As shown in the cut the moon will pass from 
west to east through the shadow of the earth 
while at her descending node, so that she will 
make her exit from the shadow nearly her en- 
tire diameter farther south than when she 
entered it, causing her to be more than totally 
eclipsed, or 16.4 digits, 12 digits being taken 
as the moon's apparent diameter. The different 
phases of the eclipse will be visible as follows: 
Washington.* Eastern. t 

Partial begins at (a) :42 a. m. :50 a. m. 

Total begins 1:52 a. m. 2:00 a. m. 

Middle at (b) 2:37 a. m. 2:45 a. m. 

Total ends 3:21 a. m. 3:29 a. m. 

Partial ends at (c) 4:31 a. m. 4:39 a. in. 

Partial begins Central.f Mountain.f 

at (a) 11:50 p. m.(7th) 10:50 p. m.(7th) 

Total begins 1:00 a. m. 12:00 p. m. 

Middle at (b)... 1:45 a. m. 12:45 p. m. 

Total ends 2:29 a. m. 1:29 a. m. 

Partial ends at (c) 3:39 a. m. 2:39 a. m. 

*Mean time. fStandard time. For intercolo- 
nial or Atlantic time add one hour to eastern 
standard time and for .Pacific time subtract one 
hour from mountain standard time. 

II. Partial of the sun Jan. 23, visible more 
or less in eastern Europe, western Asia and 
northern Africa. 

III. Partial of the sun June 18-19, more or 
less visible in northern and central Asia and 
British America. In the United States on the 
Pacific coast the sun will rise more or less 
eclipsed on its northern limb on the morning 



a very small eclipse will be 
northern Idaho, northern Oregon, 



Washington and northwestern Montana. No 
part of the eclipse will be visible south of a 
line from Boise, Idaho, to Helena, Mont. 

IV. Total of the moon July 4 ; invisible in 
the United States. The beginning visible in 
Africa and partially so in Asia and Europe; 
the ending in Europe, Africa and South America. 

V. Partial of the sun July 18, very small 
and around the south polar regions. 

VI. Annular of the sun Dec. 14, visible as a 
partial eclipse at sunrise on the coast of Ar- 
gentina and southern Brazil and at sunset in 
southern Australia. The path of the annular 
phase cuts the south pole. 

VII. Total of the moon Dec. 28, wholly visible 
throughout North America and the beginning in 
South America. Size 12.1 digits, or a trifle 
more than total, as shown in the cut. 




Eclipse of the moon Dec. 28, 1917. 
The moon will be at her descending node at 
the time of this eclipse and hence will be far- 
ther south at the end than she was at the 
beginning of the eclipse, as shown. The time 
of the various phases will be as follows: 

Washington.* Eastern.f 

Partial begins 2:57 a. m. 3:05 a. m. 

Total begins 4:30 a. m. 4:08 a m. 

Middle 4:38 a. m. 4:46 a. m. 

End of total 4:47 a. m. 4:55 a. m. 

End of partial 6:19 a. m. 6:27 a. m. 

Central, f Mountain, f 

Partial begins 2:05 a. m. 1:05 a. m. 

Total begins 3:08 a. m. 2:08 a. m. 

Middle 3:46 a. m. 2:46 a. m. 

End of total 3:55 a. m. 2:55 a. m. 

End of partial 5:27 a. m. 4:27 a. m. 

*Mean time, t Standard time. For intercolo- 
nial or Atlantic time add one hour to eastern 
standard time and for Pacific time subtract one 
hour from mountain time. 



SIGNS AND CONSTELLATIONS OF THE ZODIAC. 



Until recently it was taken for granted that 
the present relationship between signs and con- 
stellations of the zodiac was generally under- 
stood, as all astronomical textbooks mention 
tneir disagreement and explain the cause. The 
numerous letters of inquiry concerning differ- 
ences between the data in this almanac and cer- 
tain others show the necessity for this note of 
explanation. 

Thousands of years ago when the zodiac, that 
belt of the heavens about 16 in width within 
which move the moon and planets, was formed 
and divided into twelve parts or seasons called 
signs, each containing certain star groups called 
constellations, each was given the name of an 
object or animal which never did bear any rela- 
tionship to the configuration of the stars in that 
group or division, but which did or is supposed 
to have reference to certain astronomical or 
other facts. Thus Libra ^ . the scales or bal- 
ance, comes at the autumnal equinox when there 
is an equilibrium or balance between the length 
of day and night the world over. Aquarius. 
-, the water-bearer, whose sign is the Egyptian 
sign for running water, comes at the season 
of greatest rains in Egypt, and_so on. 



Since the time when these divisions were made 
and named, owing to the precession of the equi- 
noxes, resulting from the differing polar and 
equatorial diameters of the earth, the signs have 
moved back west nearly a whole division or con- 
stellation and where T was the first, X now is 
Hence, though the sun now enters the sign T 
March 20. it is a month later when he enters the 
constellation T . It must be apparent, therefore, 
that any supposed influence or relationship which 
early astrologers attributed to the position of 
the sun, moon or planets when in certain of 
these divisions can no longer exist, as the sign 
now only represents that space or division of th 
zodiac where the controlling constellation was 
2,000 or more years ago, but is not now. Never- 
theless, some almanacs still give the signs for 
the moon's place, which is very misleading to 
those who attempt to follow her in her course 
among the stars. Hence, this almanac gives the 
constellation and discards the ancient picture of 
the disemboweled man as relics of the age of 
superstition. The sign is retained for sun's olace 
in connection witn tne seasons and sun's patn 
through the zodiac each month because of Its re- 
lationship to the equinoxes and solstices. 



32 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



TIME AND STANDARDS OF TIME. 



Various kinds of time are in use in this coun- 
try: 

1. Astronomical Time or Mean Solar Time This 
is reckoned from noon through the twenty-four 
hours of the day and is used mainly by astro- 
nomical observatories and in official astronomical 
publications. It is the legal time of the domin- 
ion of Canada, though "standard" and "mean" 
time are in general use there as in this country. 

2. Mean Local Time This is the kind that was 
in almost universal use prior to the introduction 
of standard time. This time was based upon the 
time when the mean sun* crossesxthe meridian, 
and the day begins at midnight. When divided 
into civil divisions years, months, weeks, days, 
etc. it is sometimes called civil time. 

3. Standard Time For the convenience of the 
railroads and business in general a standard of 
time was established by mutual agreement in 
1883 and by this calculation trains are now run 
and local time is regulated. By this system the 
United States, extending from 65 to 125 west 
longitude, is divided into four time sections, each 
of 15 of longitude, exactly equivalent to one 
hour (7% or 30m. on each side of a meridian), 
commencing with the 75th meridian. The first or 
eastern section includes all territory between the 
Atlantic coast and an irregular line drawn from 
Buffalo to Charleston. S. C., the latter city being 



its southernmost point. The second or centra! 
section includes all the territory between this 
eastern line and another irregular line extending 
from Bismarck. N. D., to the mouth of the Rio 
Grande. The third or mountain section includes 
all the territory between the last named line and 
nearly the western borders of Idaho, Nevada and 
Arizona. The fourth or Pacific section includes 
all the territory of the United States between 
the boundary of the mountain section and the 
Pacific coast. Inside of each of these sections 
standard time is uniform and the time of each 
section differs from that next to it by exactly 
one hour, as shown on the map. 

*Owing to the eccentricity of the earth's orbit 
and the inclination of the equator to the eclip- 
tic, the apparent motion of the sun is retarded 
or accelerated according to the earth's place in 
its orbit. Hen-ce, to take the actual sun as a 
guide would necessitate years, days and- their 
subdivisions of unequal length. Therefore an im- 
aginary or "mean sun" was invented. The dif- 
ference between apparent and mean time is 
called the "equation of time" and may amount 
to a quarter of an hour in twenty-four hours. It 
is the difference between the figures in "Sun at 
noon mark" column in calendar and twelve hours. 
The figures on a correct sun dial give the ap- 
parent time. 



STANDARDS OF TIME. 

The following is the table of times, based upon the meridians used by the United States and 
Canada: 



NAME OF TIME. 


Degrees. 


Central meridian 
from Greenwich. 


Nearest place. 


Intercolonial or Atlantic 


60 


4 hours west 


About 3Hj degrees east of Halif ax, N.S. 




75 




Between New York and Philadelphia 




90 




St Louis and New Orleans 




105 


7 hours west... 


Denver Col 


Pacific 


120 


8 hours west 


l^a degrees east of Sacramento. Cal. 


gitka 


135 


9 hours west 


% degree east of Sitka. Alaska. 


Tahiti ... 


150 


10 hours west 


\6 degree west of the island of Tahiti 


Hawaiian 


157^ 


10 hrs. 31 mm. west. 


Near center of Molokai. 



It is obvious that to express the time of rising 
and setting of the sun and moon in standard 
time would limit the usefulness of such data to 
the single point or place for which it was com- 
puted, while in mean time it is practically cor- 
rect for places as widely separated as the width 



of the continent, and persons having obtained 
the mean time by the rising or setting of the 
sun or moon may easily ascertain the correct 
standard time of any event by making use of 
the following "table and map: 



To obtain standard time, add 
Standard Correc- 

or tion. 

City. division. Min. 

Albany, N. Y. Eastern. .Sub. 5 
Austin. Texas Central.. .Add 31 
Baltimore. Md. Eastern. Add 6 
Baton Rouge, La. Cent. .Add 4 
Bismarck. N. D. Cent. .Add 43 
Boston. Mass. Eastern. .Sub. 16 
Buffalo. N. Y. Eastern.. Add 16 
Burlington, Iowa Cent.. Add 5 

Cairo. 111. Central Sub. 3 

Charleston. S. C. East.. Add 20 

Chicago, 111. Central Sub. 10 

Cincinnati. O. Central. .Sub. 22 
Cleveland. O. Central. ..Sub. 33 
Columbia. S. C. Eastern.Add 24 
Columbus. O. Central... Sub. 28 

Dayton, O. Central Sub. 23 

Denver. Col. Mountain.. Add 
Des Moines, la. Central. Add 14 
Detroit. Mich. Central. .Sub. 28 
Dubuque, Iowa Central. .Add 3 
Duluth. Minn. Central.. Add 9 

Erie, Pa. Central Sub. 39 

Evansville. Ind. Central. Sub. 10 
Ft. Gibson, Ch. N. Cent. Add 21 
Fort Smith. Ark. -Cent. .Add 19 
Fort Wayne, Ind. Cent .-Sub. 20 

Galena. 111. Central Add 2 

Salveston. Tex. Central. Add 19 
Gr, Haven. Mich. Cent. Sub. 15 



STANDARD TIME TABLE. 

or subtract the figures given to 
Standard Correc- 
or tion. 

City. division. Min. 
Harrisburg. Pa. Eastern.Add 7 
Houston. Tex. Central. .Add 21 
Huntsville. Ala. Cent.. .Sub. 12 
Indianapolis, Ind. Cent.. Sub. 16 
Jackson, Miss. Central.. Add 1 
Jacksonville, Fla. Cent. Sub. 33 
Janesville, Wis. Cent. . .Sub. 4 
Jefferson City, Mo. Cent. Add 9 
Kansas City, Mo. Cent. .Add 19 
Keokuk. Iowa Central. ..Add 6 
KnoxviUe, Tenn. Cent. .Sub. 24 
LaCrosse, Wis. Central.. Add ft 
Lawrence, Kas. Central. Add 21 
Lexington. Ky. Central.. Sub. 23 
Little Rock, Ark. Cent.. Add 9 
Louisville. Ky. Central.. Sub. IS 
Lynchburg. Va. Eastern.Add 17 
Memphis, Tenn. Cent... Sub. 
Milwaukee. Wis. Cent. ..Sub. 8 
Mobile. Ala. Central.... Sub. S 
Montgomery. Ala. Cent.. Sub. 15 
Nashville. Tenn. Cent... Sub. 13 
N. Haven, Conn. East. .Sub. 8 
New Orleans. La. Cent.. Add 
New York. N. Y. East. Sub. 4 
Norfolk. Va. Eastern. . ..Add 5 
Ogdensburg, N. Y. East. Add 2 
Omaha. Neb. Central Add 24 



local time. 

Standard Correc- 
or tion, 

City. division. Min. 

Pensacola. Fla. Central. Sub. 11 
Philadelphia, Pa. East. .Add 1 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Eastern.. Add 20 
Portland, Me. Eastern. .Sub. 19 
Providence, R. I. East.. Sub. 14 

Quincy, 111. Central Add 6 

Raleigh, X. C. Eastern.. Add 15 
Richmond. Va. Eastern.Add 10 
Rochester. N. Y. East.. Add 11 
Rock Island. 111. Cent... Add 3 
S. Francisco, Cal. Pac..Add 10 
Santa Fe.N.M. Mountain. Add 4 
Savannah, Ga. Central. .Sub. 36 
Shreveport, La. Central. Add 15 
Springfield. 111. Central.. Slib. 2 

St. Joseph, Mo. Cent Add 19 

St. Louis. Mo. Central.. Add 1 
St. Paul. Minn. Cent... Add 12 
Superior City, Wis. Cent. Add 8 
Syracuse. N. Y. East.. .Add 5 

Toledo. O. Central Sub. 2fl 

Trenton. N. J. Eastern. Sub. 1 

Utica. N. Y. Eastern Add 1 

Washington, D. C. East. Add 8 
Wheeling, W. Va. East. .Add JJ3 
Wilmington. Del. East. . Add 2 
Wilmington. N. C. East.Add 18 
Yankton. S. D. Central. Add 29 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 




The heavy dotted lines show the arbitrary 
(standard) divisions of time in the United States. 
The plus and minus marks on either side of the 
meridian lines show whether it is necessary to 
add to or subtract from the mean time of points 
east or west of these lines to arrive at actual 



standard time. Example: Chicago is 2% east of 
the 90th meridian; therefore Chicago local time =; 
2% X 4 = 10 to be subtracted from mean time to = 
standard time, and for Boston standard (eastern) 
time. 16m. must be subtracted from mean time. 



DIFFERENCE IN TIME. 



When it is 12 o'clock noon Monday in New York, 
X. Y., or other places having eastern time, the 
corresponding time in the cities named below is: 
Aden, Arabia .................. 8:00 p.m., Monday 

Amsterdam, Holland .......... 5:20 p. m. 

Apia, Samoa ................... 5:33 a. m. 

Berlin, Germany .............. 5:53 p. m. 

Bern. Switzerland ............. 5:29 p. m. 

Bombay, India ................. 9:51 p. m. 

Bremen. Germany ............. 5:33 p. m. 

Brussels, Belgium ............ 5:17 p.m. 

Calcutta, India ............... 10:53 p. m. 

Chicago. Ill .................... *ll:00a. m., 

Christiania, Norway 

City of Mexico, Mexico 

Colon. Panama 

Constantinople. Turkey 

Copenhagen. Denmark 

Denver, Colorado ............. flO:00 a. m. 

Dublin. Ireland ................ 4: 34 p.m. 

Edinburgh, Scotland .......... 4:47 p. m. 

Hamburg, Germany ........... 5:10 p. m. 

Havana. Cuba ................. 11:30 a. m. 

Havre, France ................. 5:00 p. m. 

Hongkong, China .............. 12:37 a. m. 

Honolulu. Hawaii ............. 6:29 a. m. 

NOTE The place where "the day begins" or 
where dates are changed by navigators is at or 
near the 180th degree of longitude. Here an 
irregular line has been drawn from north to 
south which is called the "international date 
line." It is not straight because in case it 



Monday 
5:33 a. m., Tuesday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Monday 



5:42 p. m. 
10:24 a. m. 
11:40 a.m. 

6:56 p. m. 

5:40 p. m. 



Lisbon, Portugal 5:00p. m.. Monday 

Liverpool. England 4:48 p. r., Monday 

London, England 5:00 p. m., Monday 

Madrid, Spain 4:45 p. m.. Monday 

Manila. Philippines 1:03 a. m., Tuesday 

Melbourne, Australia 2:39 a. m., Tuesday 

Paris, France 5:09 p. m., Monday 

Pekin, China 12:45>a. m.. Tuesday 

SPetrograd. Russia 7:01 p. m., Monday 

Pretoria, South Africa 6:55 p. m., Monday 

Rome. Italy 5:49 p. m., Monday 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 2:07 p. m., Monday 

San Francisco. Cal 9:00 a. m., Monday 



12:35 p. m.. Monday 
7:58 a. m., Monday 



6:12 p. m., Monday 
3:04 a. m., Tuesday 
>:17 p. m., Monday 
2:18 a. m., Tuesday 



San Juan, Porto Rico... 

Sitka. Alaska 

Stockholm, Sweden 

Sydney. New South Wales.. 

The Hague, Holland 

Tokyo. Japan 

Valparaiso, Chile 12:13 p. m., Monday 

Vienna. Austria 6:05 p. m., Monday 

Yokohama, Japan 2:19 a. m., Tuesday 

*Same in all places having central time, fin 
all places having mountain time. Jin all places 
having Pacific time. St. Petersburg; name offi- 
cially changed in 1914. 

crossed an island it would have different dates 
on each side of the line. The date line was 
located in the mid-Pacific by general agreement 
because it would cause the least confusion and 
because it was twelve hours from Greenwich. 



COAST LINE OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Atlantic coast ............... 1,773 

ulf coast ................... 1.607 



Porto Rico 
Pacific coast 



269 



In nautical miles. 

Hawaiian islands 628 

Guam K<\ 

Midway 



20 
............. 83 

Alaska ...................... 4.123; Northern lakes and rivers.. 3.041 



1,571 Sanioah islands ............. 



Western rivers 4.344 

Total ...17,539 

Philippines .11.444 

Grand total... 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



1850 March 31 1884 


EASTER SUNDAY DATES. 

April 13 1918 Afnrpti 31 1!)33 


April 21 


1851 . .Anril 20 


1885 


..April 5 


1919... \pril 20 


1936.... 
1937.... 
1938... 
1939 


April 12 
March 28 
April 17 
April 9 


1852. .. . 
1853. .. . 

1854. .. . 
1855. .. . 
1856. .. . 
1857. .. . 
1858. , 


.. ..April 11 
.. .March 27 
.. ..April 1C 
April 8 
.. .March 23 
.. ..April 12 
April 4 


1886 
1887 
1888 


April 25 
April 10 
...April 1 


1920 April 4 
1921 March 27 


1922 ...April 16 


1889 


April 21 


1923 April 1 


1940 




1890 . . 


April 6 


1924 . April 20 


1941 




1891 


March 29 


1925. April 12 


1942 


April 5 


1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 


April 17 
April 2 
March 25 
April 14 


1926 April 4 
1927 April 17 


1943.... 
1944.... 
1945.... 
1946.... 
1947.. 


April 25 
April 9 
April 1 
April 21 
April B 


1859 


\pril 24 


1860 

1861 


April 8 
March 31 


1928 \pril 8 


1929 March 31 


1862 


\pril 20 


1896 


April 5 


1930 April 20 


1863 


April 5 


1897 


April 18 


1931.. \pril 5 


1948 


March 28 


1864 


March 27 


1898 


April 10 


1932 .. March 27 


1949 


April 17 


1865 


Anril Ifi 


1899 . . . 


April 2 


1933 .. April 16 


1950... 


April 9 


1866 April 1 


1900 


...April 15 


1934.. .. . \pril 1 


1867 April 21 


1901 
1902 
1903 


April 7 
March 30 
...April 12 


The earliest date on which Easter Sunday has 
fallen wilhin a century was March 22, 1818. As 
will be seen from the above table, it fell on 
March 23 in 1856 and 1913. The time of the cele- 
bration of the principal church days which de- 
pend upon Easter is as follows: 
Days. Before Easter. 
Septuagesima Sunday 9 wppkn 


1868 April 12 
1869 March 28 


1870 April 17 


1904 


...April 3 


1871 April 9 


1905 


April 23 


1872 March 31 


1906 


April 15 


1873 April 13 


1907 . 


March 31 


1874 \pril 5 


1908. 


April 19 




1909. ... 
1910 


April 11 
March 7 


1876 April 16 
1877 April 1 


First Sunday in Lent 


fi wppks 


1911. ... 


April 16 


Ash Wednesday (beginning of Lent) 46 davs 


1878 April 21 
1879 \pril 13 


1913 


March 23 


Rogation Sunday 


After Easter. 


1880 March 28 
1881 April 17 


1914 
1915 


April 12 
April 4 


Ascension Day (Holy Th 
Pentecost (Whitsunday) . 
Trinity Sunday... 


ursday) 




1882 April 9 
1883... ...March 25 


1916 
1917... 


April 23 
...April 8 






...8 weeks 



CALENDAR FOR 1918. 



JAN... 
FEB... 


S 


31 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


APRIL 
MAY... 


7 
14 

21 

28 


1 

8 
15 
22 
29 


2 
9 

it; 
2:; 

30 

7 
14 
21 
28 


3 
10 
17 
24 

1 

8 
15 
22 

29 

'5 

12 
19 

26 


4 

11 

18 
25 

2 

9 
16 
23 
30 

' 

13 
20 
27 


5 
12 
19 

2H 

3 
10 
17 
24 
31 

'7 
14 
21 
28 


8 



13 
20 
27 

4 
11 
18 
25 

1 
8 
15 

22 

29 


JULY.. 
AUG... 

SEPT.. 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


8 


OCT 
NOV.... 


S 










'6 

i:: 

.'I) 

21 

3 
10 
17 
24 


'f 
14 

','1 
28 

'4 

11 
18 
25 


1 
8 
15 
22 

29 

i! 

26 


2 

9 
16 
23 
30 

'6 
13 
20 
27 


3 
10 
17 
24 
31 

'7 
14 
21 

28 

7 
14 
21 

28 


4 
11 

18 
25 

1 

8 
15 

22 

1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


5 
12 
19 
26 

2 
9 
16 
23 

2 
9 
l(j 
23 
30 


'7 

14 
21 

28 

4 

11 
18 
25 

1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


1 
8 
15 
22 
29 

"b 
12 

19 
26 

2 
9 
16 
23 

30 


2 

9 
16 

2:i 
30 

'6 
13 
20 
27 

3 

10 
17 
24 


3 

10 
17 
24 
31 

'? 
14 

21 

28 

4 

11 

18 
25 


4 

11 
18 
25 

1 
8 
15 
22 

29 

5 
12 
19 
26 


5 

12 
19 

26 

2 
9 

16 
23 
30 

6 
13 
20 
27 


6 

13 

2(i 
27 

1 

17 

24 
31 

14 
21 

28 


'6 
i:; 
20 
27 


14 
21 

28 


1 
8 
15 
22 
29 


2 

9 
16 

23 
30 


3 4 

1011 
1718 
24 25 
31 -. 


JUNE 


5 
12 

19 

,'t; 


6 
13 
20 
27 


DEC.... 


8 

10 
17 
24 

1 
8 
15 
22 

29 


4 

11 

18 
25 


5 

12 
19 

2fi 


6 
13 

20 
27 


7 8 
1415 

2122 
2829 




3 
10 
17 
24 
11 


4 
11 
18 
2o 


5 
12 
19 
26 


6 
13 
20 
27 




2 

9 
16 

IS 


3 
10 
17 
24 


4 

11 
18 
25 


2 

9 
16 

30 


1 

10 
17 
24 
31 


4 

11 
18 
25 


5 6 
1213 
19 20 
2627 













FOREIGN STANDARDS OF TIME. 





Central 
meridian. 


Fast or slow 
on 
Greenwich. 




Central 
meridian. 


Fast or slow 
on 
Greenwich. 




Degrees. 
135 east 


H.M.S. 

9 00 00 fast 


West Australia 


Degrees. 
120 east 


H. M. 

8 00 fast 


Soain* 


o 


00000 


South Australia 


1425-6 east 


9 30 fast 




64-j- west 


35138 8 slow 


Xew Zealand 


172}^ east 


11 30 fast 




8l4- west 


52415 slow 


Victoria .... 






Natal 


30 east 


2 00 00 fast 


New South Wales... 


j 






22^ east 


1 30 00 fast 


Queensland 


\ 150 east 




Mid-Europe 


15 east 


1 00 00 fast 




1 




Egypt 


30 east 


20000 fast 


Eastern Europe 


30 east 


200 fast 



*In Spain the hours are counted from to 24, avoiding the use of a. m. and p. m. 



FAMOUS WATERFALLS OF THE WORLD. 



Height 
Name and location. in feet. 

Gavarnie, France 1.385 

Grand. Labrador 2,000 

Minnehaha. Minnesota 50 

Missouri, Montana 90 

Montmorenci, Quebec 265 

Multnomah, Oregon 850 

Murchison, Africa 12o 

Niagara, New York-Ontario 164 
Rjukan, Norway 780 



Height 

Name and location. in feet. 
Schaffhausen, Switzerland.. 100 
Skjaeggedalsfos, Norway.... 530 

Shoshone, Idaho 210 

Staubbach, Switzerland 1,000 

Stirling, New Zealand 500 

Sutherland, New Zealand... 1,904 
Takkakaw. Brit'h Columbia. 1,200 

Twin, Idaho 180 

Yellowstone (upper). Montana 110 



Height 

Name and location. in feet. 
Yellowstone (lower), Montana 310 

Ygnassu, Brazil 210 

Yosemite( upper). California 1,436 
Yosemitef middle). California 626 
Yosemite( lower), California. 400 

Vettis, Norway 950 

Victoria, Africa 400 

Voringfos, Norway 600 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES USED IN THE UNITED STATES. 



LONG MEASURE. 

12 Inches = 1 foot. 

3 feet = 1 yard = 36 inches. 

5^ yards = 1 rod 16^ feet. 
40 rods = 1 furlong = 660 feet. 

8 furlongs = 1 mile = 5.280 feet. 



MARINERS' MEASURE. 

6 feet = 1 fathom. 

120 fathoms = 1 cable length. 

7J^ cable lengths = 1 mile. 
5,280 feet = 1 statute mile. 

6,080 feet = 1 nautical mile. 

3 marine miles = 1 marine league. 



LIQUID MEASURE. 
gills =lpint. 
pints = 1 quart, 
quarts = 1 gallon, 
gallons =1 barrel, 
barrels = 1 hogshead, 



144 
9 

3Qi 
160 
640 

36 



SQUARE MEASURE. 

square inches 1 square foot, 
square feet = 1 square yard. 
'. square yards = 1 square rod. 
square rods 1 acre, 
acres = 1 square mile, 

square miles = 1 township. 



CUBIC MEASURE. 
1,728 cubic inches = 1 cubic foot. 
27 cubic feet = 1 cubic yard. 
128 cubic feet = 1 cord of wood or stone. 
1 gallon contains 231 cubic inches. 
1 bushel contains 2,150.4 cubic inches. 
A cord of wood is 8 ft. long, 4 ft. wide & 4 f t.high 



DRY MEASURE. 
2 pints = 1 quart. 
8 quarts = 1 peck. 
4 pecks = 1 bushel. 



CIRCULAR MEASURE. 

60 seconds = 1 minute. 

60 minutes = 1 degree. 

860 degrees = 1 circle. 

1 degree = 00 geographic miles. 

1 geographic mile = 1.1527 statute miles. 

1 degree of the equator = 69.124 statute miles. 



APOTHECARIES' WEIGHT. 

20 grains = 1 scruple 
3 scruples = 1 dram. 
8 drams = 1 ounce. 

12 ounces = 1 pound. 



AVOIRDUPOIS WEIGHT. 
27 11-32 grains = 1 dram. 
16 drams 1 ounce. 
16 ounces = 1 pound. 
2,000 Ibs. = 1 short ton. 

2,240 Ibs. = 1 long ton. 



THOY WEIGHT. 

24 grains =1 penny- 
weight. 

20 penny w's =! ounce. 
12 ounces -=1 pound. 



TIME MEASURE. 

60 seconds = 1 minute. 

60 minutes = 1 hour. 

24 hours = 1 day. 
365 days => 1 year. 
100 years = 1 century. 



CLOTH MEASURE. 

'l\i inches 1 nail. 
4 nails = 1 quarter 
4 quarters - 1 yard. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

3 inches=l palm. 

4 inches=l hand. 
6 inches=l span. 

18 inches=l cubit. 
21.8 inches=l bible cubit. 
214 feet =1 military pace. 



SURVEYORS' MEASURE. 

7.92 inches =1 link. 
25 links =1 rod. 

4 rods =1 chain. 
10 chains =1 furlong. 

8 furlongs =1 mile. 



COUNTING. 

12 things=l dozen. 
12 dozen =1 gross. 
12 gross =1 great 

20 things =1 score. 



STATIONERS' TABLE. 

24 sheets = 1 quire. 
20 quires = 1 ream. 

2 reams = 1 bundle. 

5 bundles = 1 bale. 



SIZES OF BOOKS. 

Pages. Leaves. Sheet 



Folio. 

Quarto (4to) ... 

Octavo (8vo.) 16 

Duodecimo (12mo.). 24 



12 



Octodecimo (18mo.). 36 18 



THE METRIC SYSTEM. 

The metric system is in general use in all the 
principal nations of Europe and America with 
the exception of Great Britain, Russia and the 
United States, where it is authorized but not 
compulsory. Its use for scientific purposes is 
common throughout the world. 

WEIGHTS. 

Milligram (.001 gram) .0154 grain. 
Centigram (.01 gram) = 
Decigram (.1 gram) = 

Gram = 

Decagram (10 grams) = 
Hectogram (100 grams) 
Kilogram (1.000 grains) 
Myriagram (10,000 grams) = 

Suintal (100,000 grams) 
illier or tonneau ton( 1,000,000 grams)=2,204.6 Ibs. 

DRY. 

= .061 cubic inch. 

= .6102 cubic inch. 

6.1022 cubic inches. 
= .908 quart. 

9.08 quarts. 

2.838 bushels. 

= 1.308 cubic yards. 

LIQUID. 

= .0388 fluid ounce. 
= .338 fluid ounce. 
= .845 gill. 
= 1.0567 quarts. 
= 2.6418 gallons. 
26.417 gallons. 



.1543 grain. 

1.5432 grains. 

15.432 grains. 

.3527 ounce. 

3.5274 ounces. 

2.2046 pounds. 

22.046 pounds. 

220.46 pounds. 



Milliliter (.001 liter) 

Centiliter (.01 liter) 

Deciliter (.1 liter) 

Liter 

Decaliter (10 liters) 

Hectoliter (100 liters) 

Kiloliter (1,000 liters) 



Milliliter (.001 liter) 

Centiliter (.01 liter) 

Deciliter (.1 liter) 

Liter 

Decaliter (10 liters) 

Hectoliter (100 liters) 

Kiloliter (1,000 liters) 



- 264.18 gallons. 
LENGTH. 

Millimeter (.001 meter) = .0394 inch. 
Centimeter (.01 meter) = .3937 inch. 
Decimeter (.1 meter) = 
Meter = 

Decameter (10 meters) 
Hectometer (100 meters) 
Kilometer (1,000 meters) = 



3.937 inches. 
39.37 inches. 
393.7 inches. 
328 feet linch. 
.62137 mile (3,280 ft. 

10 inches). 
6.2137 miles. 



Myriameter(10,000meters)= 

SURFACE. 

Centare (1 square meter) = 1,550 sq. inches. 
Are (100 square meters) = 119.6 sq. yards. 
Hectare ( 10,000 sq. meters)*- 2.471 acres. 

METRIC EQUIVALENTS. 
1 grain = 0.06480 gram. 

1 ounce = 28.3495 grams. 



1 pound 

1 dram (apoth.) 

1 scruple (apoth.) 

1 quart (dry) 

Ipeck (dry) 

1 bushel 

1 quart (liq.) 

1 gallon 

1'inch 

linch 

linch 

Ifoot 

lyard 

Imile 

1 sq. inch 

1 sq. foot 

1 sq. yard 

1 sq. mile 

1 acre 

1 cubic inch 

1 cubic foot 

1 cubic yard 



= 0.45359 kilogram. 

= 3.6967 grams. 

= 1.2322 grams. 

= 1.1012 liters. 

= 8.8098 liters. 

= 0.35239 hectoliter. 

= 0.94636 liter. 

= 3.78543 liters. 

= 25.4001 millimeters. 

= 2.54001 centimeters. 

= 0.0254 meter. 

= 0.3048 meter. 

= 0.9144 meter. 

= 1.6093 kilometers. 

= 645.16 sq. millimeters. 

= 0.0929 sq. meter. 

= 0.8361 sq. meter. 

= 2.5900 sq. kilometers. 

= 0.4017 hectare. 

= 16.387 cubic millimeters. 

= 0.02832 cubic meter. 

= 0.7646 cubic meter. 



ELECTRICAL UNITS DEFINED. 

Ohm Unit of resistance; represents resistance 
offered to an unvarying electric current by a 
column of mercury at the temperature of ice, 
14.5421 grams in mass, of a cross-sectional area 
of 1.00003 square millimeters and of the length 
of 106.3 centimeters. 

Ampere Unit of current; decomposes .0009324 of 
a gram of water in one second or deposits sil- 
ver at the rate of .001118 of a gram per second, 
when passed through a solution of nitrate of 
silver in water. 

Volt Unit of electromotive force ; one volt 
equals one ampere of current passing through 
a substance having one ohm of resistance. 

Coulomb Unit of quantity; amount of electricity 
transferred by a current of one ampere in one 
second. 

Farad Unit of capacity; capacity of a con- 
denser charged to a potential of one volt by 
one coulomb. A microfarad is one-millionth of 
a farad. 

Joule Unit of work; equivalent to energy ex- 
pended in one second by one ampere current in 
one ohm resistance. 

Watt Unit of power; equivalent to work done 
at the rate of one joule per second. A kilo- 
watt is 1,000 watts. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



STATUTORY WEIGHTS OF THE BUSHEL. 



STATE OR 
TERRITORY. 


Wheat. || 


P 


2 


Barley. || 


Buckwheat. 


Shelled corn. _ II 


Corn on cob. I 


Cornmeal. 


G 

ci 

M 


Potatoes, Irish. 


Potatoes, sweet. 


Carrots. II 


Onions. 


Turnips. 


1 

S3 


* 

1 


a 




Apples. || 


Dried apples. || 


Dried peaches. 


c 
ci 

& 

I 


X 

ci 

~ 


1 

a. 
S 
3 


Millet. 


Timothy seed. 


1 

i 

| 

5 


Hungarian gr. seed 


United States 
Alabama 


GO 
;u 
HI 
en 
no 

fKJ 
60 

GO 


56 

->6 

'.6 
->r 

14 

;>ti 

56 


H2 
32 
82 

32 
32 

32 

32 


48 
47 



50 
48 
48 


42 

52 

40 

J5 


5t; 

54 
66 

52 
5t', 
56 

50 


70 
70 
70 


48 
46 

48 
50 


20 


GO 

til) 


55 





!! 


55 


.. 


GO 
GO 
60 


60 
60 

GO 




24 


38 


50 


50 






































00 


50 




57 


57 




50 


24 


33 





50 




50 


60 


14 




California 


20 


60 
60 


54 


50 


57 

52 






61) 














44 




t5 
45 


14 




Connecticut 


50 


60 


00 


GO 


48 


25 


33 




55 




District of Columbia 
Florida 






"V 






56 








tin 




































1.0 

t,0 

GO 


Of) 

56 

ati 


32 

32 

32 


48 
47 

4S 


52 


66 

5ti 
66 


70 
iO 


48 
48 


20 
20 


t;o 

10 


W 
55 




56 
57 


54 

55 




00 
GO 


GO 


48 


24 
24 


33 
33 


48 


56 


44 


50 


45 


14 




Georgia 
Hawaii 


Idaho 
Illinois 


t>0 
GO 
tiO 

S 

GO 
tiu 
t;o 


all 
ati 
5ti 
56 
5f 
at 
at 
50 


ati 
:;; 
::.' 
32 
82 
32 
32 

: ''"; 


4s 
48 
48 
48 
48 
47 
48 
48 


42 

52 
50 
52 
50 

5t; 

48 


OG 

oti 
56 
56 

ati 
66 

50 

oti 


70 

t;s 
70 
70 
70 


48 
50 

50 
50 


20 

20 
20 
20 


t>0 

t;o 
oo 

60 

t;o 

60 


50 
5f 
4t 
50 
55 


M 


57 

4S 
57 
57 
57 


oa 
55 

55 

60 


60 


60 
60 
60 
60 

60 


00 
00 


4a 
50 

48 
48 


28 

24 
25 
24 
24 
24 


28 
33 
33 
33 
33 
30 


40 
4ii 
40 
50 
45 


at) 
50 

50 
5C 
50 


44 
44 
44 
44 
44 


50 

ail 

50 

no 

50 


45 
45 
45 
45 
45 


14 
14 
14 
14 
14 


50 

50 
50 
50 






Kentucky 




Maine 




W 




c,o 

r,t; 




50 


52 


50 


GO 


60 


00 


44 














46 


























Massachusetts 
Michigan 


ggggggggggggggggg 


5t 

at 
at 
at 
at 

a( 
5t 
at 
at 
at 
5t 
5( 
at 
51 
at 
at 

5t 


32 
32 
32 
:.2 
32 
32 
32 
:i2 
:;ti 
112 
32 
32 

1 

:;2 

32 
32 


48 
48 
48 
-is 
48 
-IS 
48 

48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
48 
4ti 
47 
48 


48 
4S 
50 
-IS 
52 
52 
52 

50 

48 
50 
42 
50 
42 
42 
48 
48 


5(i 
56 
5ti 
56 
ati 
56 
56 
56 
56 
50 
50 
66 
56 
ati 
66 
at! 
56 


70 
70 
72 
70 
70 
70 

70 

(is 
70 


50 
50 

48 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 


20 

20 
20 
20 
20 

20 


t;o 
60 

i;o 

60 

t;o 
(id 
tiO 
CO 
tit) 
W 


54 

5t 
.-,: 

t;t 
5f 

50 

54 
54 


50 
45 

50 
50 

50 


52 
54 
52 

57 
57 
57 
57 

57 
57 


58 

55 
42 

.50 
55 


50 
50 


tiO 

GO 
60 
GO 
60 

GO 
60 

f,2 
60 
GO 


60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
60 
til) 


48 
48 
50 

48 
45 

50 

48 


25 

22 
28 
26 
24 


33 
28 
28 
33 

33 


40 

40 
46 


66 

56 

50 
56 
50 
50 

55 
55 

Vi 


44 
50 
44 
44 
44 
44 


50 
48 
50 
50 

50 


45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 

45 


U 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 


50 

48 
50 
48 
50 
50 


Minnesota 
Mississippi 


Missouri 






24 

25 
25 


33 

33 
33 


40 


New Hampshire 
New Jersey 


New York 
North Carolina 
North Dakota 
Ohio 




20 

20 


60 
60 

t;o 
till 


4t 
50 
4b 


50 


52 
55 
52 


60 

t;o 

60 


60 
56 
60 


tiO 
GO 
CO 


00 
00 
60 










56 


44 


50 
50 


45 
45 
1 


!! 


50 


50 


24 


SB 





50 

"iC 




Oregon 


45 


28 


28 
















Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina 
South Dakota 








'lli 






50 




















70 


50 
18 


20 


00 


54 


50 


50 


50 


50 


60 


00 


48 


25 


33 


40 


56 


44 


50 


45 




50 


r.u 
60 
60 

till 
t;n 
60 

(H) 

t;u 


5t 
5t 
at 
at 

51 

B 


32 

32 
32 
32 
3D 
32 
32 
:;2 


48 

i 

4S 
48 
48 
48 

48 


42 

50 
42 
4S 
52 
42 
52 
50 


56 
.v; 
56 

5t; 

all 

56 

5t; 

5c 


70 
70 
iO 

70 


50 


20 

20 
20 


00 
60 
60 
60 
oti 
60 


4 
51 
55 

5b 


50 
50 


52 

5.; 

57 
52 
57 


60 

all 
55 
til) 
55 


60 
50 

00 


00 
till 
60 
62 
GO 


GO 
00 

60 

GO 

[00 


50 
45 
46 

45 
50 


24 
28 

28 
28 

25 

:a 


20 
28 

40 

28 
33 

33 


40 


50 
5G 
56 

56 
56 
56 

50 


44 
44 

44 
44 


50 
50 

50 
50 


-12 
45 
45 
45 
45 

45 
45 


ii 
u 


48 

48 

48 
4s 


Texas 


Vermont 


Virginia 


Washington 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin.. 








Ml 












GO 
CO 


70 


50i20 


f,0 


54 


50 


57 


-12 


50 



NOTE Rye meal takes 
in the District of Colu 
Massachusetts. New Yc 
Wisconsin. The metric 
Philippines and Porto R 

TABLE OF SPEC 
Compared v 
Water, distilled.... 100) 
Water, sea 103 
Alcohol 84 


48 pounds to the bushel 
mbia and 50 in Maine, 
rk. Rhode Island and 
system is used in the 
ico. 

IFIC GRAVITY. 

ith water. 
Iron, cast 721 
Ivory 183 
Lead 1,135 


LONGEST RAILWAY 1 

Railway and country. 
Simplon, Switzerland-Italy 
St. Gothard, Switzerland-Italy. 
Loetschberg, Switzerland 


UNNE 

Miles. 
...12 
... 9 
9 


Mont Cenis, France-Italy 


... 7 


Arlberg, Austria 
Ricken, Switzerland 
Tauern, Austria 
Ronco, Italy .. 


.. 6 

,,, 5 
. 5 
5 


Ash 84 
Beech 85 
Beer 102 
Brass 840 
Butter 94 
Cedar 81 


Maple 
Marble 
Milk, cow's 
Milk goat's 


. . . lUb 
75 
. . 270 
... 103 


Tenda, Italy 
Transandine. Chile-Argentina . . . 
Karawanken, Austria 
Hoosa-c, United States 


6 
... 5 

. . 4 
... 4 


Oak 
Oil, olive 


, , 117 
92 


Borzallo, Italy 
Severn, England 


... 4 
... 4 


Chalk 279 
Cider 102 
Coal 130 
Copper 895 
Cork 24 


Opium 

Platina . . . 


134 

2 150 


Turchina, Italy 

Wocheiner. Austria 
Mont d'Or, France-Switzerland . 
Albula, Switzerland 
Totlev, England 


... 4 
... 3 
... 3 
... 3 
... 3 
... 3 


Porcelain 


226 


Silver .... 


1 047 


Steel 


783 


Diamond 353 
Fbony 133 






Peloritana, Sicily 


Tin :..:::::: 

Turpentine 
Walnut 
Wine 


. . . 729 
... 99 
... 67 




3 


Fir ... 55 




3 


Glass 289 


Woodhead, England 
Cascade, United States 
Khojak, Baluchistan 
Snoaualmie. United States... 


... 3 
... 2 
... 2 
. 2 


Gold 1.926 


Ice 92 
Indigo 77 


Zinc 


. 691 







Yards. 
458 
564 

55 

1,730 
404 
673 
546 
277 

56 

1,683 

1,320 

700 

636 

10 

1,647 

1,320 

1,150 

950 

686 

516 

62 

17 

1,080 
769 
487 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



37 



SIMPLE INTEREST TABLE. 

NOTE To find the amount of interest at 2V- per cent on any given sum. divide the amount given for 
the same sum in the table at 5 per cent by 2; at 3^ per cent divide the amount at 7 per cent by 2, etc. 









09 


















02 


3 
















TIME. 


a 


d 
a 
c* 


5 

CO 


1 

a 


OS 

C 


a 
o 


1 


1 

X 


a 


a 

2 


S 

a 
g 


1- 


1 


a 


a 


1 


i 

w 


9 

K 


Amt. 


Interest. 
3 


































1 


3 




4 




























] 


i 


1 


2 


4 


(1 


5 






























2 


2 


3 


5 




6 
























i 




1 


2 


2 


3 


g 




7 
























i 




i 


2 


3 


4 


7 




3 
4 






















1 


i 




i 

2 


2 
2 


2 
. 3 


3 
4 





jo 


5 






















j 


i 


2 


3 


3 


4 


5 


10 




6 
























i 


2 


3 


4 


j 


g 


12 




7 
























i 


2 


4 


5 


6 


7 


14 




3 
4 






















j 


i 
j 


2 


2 
3 


3 
4 


4 
5 


5 
g 


9 
12 


13 


5 
























i 


3 


4 


5 


g 


g 


15 




g 




















1 


1 


9 


3 


5 


g 


g 


9 


18 




7 


















1 


1 


1 


2 


4 


5 


7 


9 


11 


21 




3 
4 






















1 


t 


2 


3 
4 


4 
5 


g 


6 


12 
16 


$4 


5 






















1 


>> 


3 


5 


7 


g 




20 




g 
















1 






1 


') 


4 


g 


g 


10 


12 


24 




7 














1 


1 






2 


2 


5 


7 


9 


12 


14 


2g 




3 






















] 


1 


2 


4 


5 


7 


g 


T^ 




4 






















] 


1 


3 


5 


g 


g 


10 


20 


|5 


5 






















1 


9 


4 


g 


g 


10 


13 


25 
















1 


1 








> 


g 


5 


g 


10 


13 


15 


30 




::::::::::::: 












1 


1 


1 






2 


a 


6 


9 


12 


15 


18 


35 




3 ,.... 
4 












1 


1 


1 
1 


I 




1 
2 


2 

9 


g 


7 
10 


10 
13 


12 
16 


15 
20 


30 
40 


110 












1 


1 


1 


1 


i 




!{ 


4 


g 


13 


17 


21 


25 






m 






1 


1 


] 


1 


1 


2 


9 


2 


g 


T 


10 


15 





25 


30 


fifl 




7 






1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


4 


t; 


12 


18 


23 


29 


35 


70 




3 

4 






.... 


1 


1 


1 


1 
? 


1 
? 


1 
9 


2 
3 


4 
^ 


B 

s 


12 
16 


19 

25 


25 


31 
41 


38 
50 


1 00 


125 






1 


1 






? 


) 


| 


i 


3 


7 


10 


21 


31 


42 


52 


63 


1 2S 




6 ... . 




1 


1 


o 





T 


g 


s 






f 


11 


25 


38 


50 


63 


75 


1.50 








1 


1 


2 


2 


3 




4 


4 


5 


10 


15 


29 


44 


58 


73 


88 


1.75 




3 . . 




1 


1 


-i 


9 


9 


| 


T 


1 


4 


B 


U 


25 


37 


50 


,..) 


75 


1 50 




4 ... 




1 


1 


| 


1 


s 


^ 


| 


8 


g 


11 


it; 


33 


50 


67 


S" 


1 00 


a m 


150 


5 . 


1 


1 


I 




T 


4 


| 


g 





7 


1 1 


i 


42 




83 


1 04 


1.25 


2.50 




6 ... 


1 


2 


1 







5 







s 


g 


17 


X 


50 


we 


.00 


1.25 


1.50 


3.00 




7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


B 


6 


7 


8 


9 




19 


29 


58 


88 


.17 


1.46 


1.75 


3.50 




3 


1 


1 





-( 


i 


5 


8 


j 


7 


g 


14 


'T 


50 


75 


00 


1 25 


1 50 






4 


1 


? 


\ 


4 


B 


g 


s 


g 


111 


11 


9-) 




66 




.33 


1.67 


2.00 


4.00 


flOO 


5 




3 


4 


H 


7 


8 






13 


14 


28 


42 


83 


1 25 


.67 


2.08 


2.50 


5.00 




g 


2 


3 


T 


7 


B 


10 


12 


IS 


u 


17 


S3 


50 


1.00 


1 50 


2.00 


2.50 


3.00 


6.00 




7 


2 


4 


tj 


8 


10 


12 


14 


Iti 


18 


19 


39 


58 


1.17 


1.75 


2.33 


2.92 


3.50 


7.00 



COMPOUND INTEREST ON ONE DOLLAR. 



Tears. 3%. 
1 1 03 


4%. 5%. 6%. 7%. 
1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 
1.06 1.07 1.09 1.10 
1.08 1.10 1.12 1.14 
1.16 1.13 1.15 1.18 
1.12 1.15 1.19 1.22 
1.14 1.18 1.22 1.27 
1.17 1.21 1.26 1.31 
1.19 1.24 1.30 1.36 
1.21 1.28 1.34 1.41 
1.24 1.31 1.38 1.45 
1.26 1.34 1.42 1.51 
1.29 1.37 1.46 1.56 
1.31 1.41 1.51 1.61 
1.34 1.44 1.55 1.67 
1.37 1.48 1.60 1.73 
1.39 1.52 1.65 1.79 

RMAL HEIGHTS AN! 

Height. Weight. 
5 ft. 4 in.... 149 pounds 
5 ft. 5 in 152 pounds 
5 ft. 6 in 155 pounds 
HEIGHTS AND WEK 
Height.Weight, 
Ibs. 
2 years.. 3 ft. in. 32 
3 years.. 3 ft. 4 in. 36% 
4 years.. 3 ft. 6 in. 41 
5 years.. 3 ft. 8 in. 45 


Years. 3%. 
9 1.30 


4%. 5%. 6%. 7%. 
1.42 1.55 1.70 1.85 
1.45 1.59 1.75 1.92 
1.48 1.63 1.80 1.98 
50.50 131.50 340.00 868.00 

BLES AT INTEREST. 
Interest. 
Simple. Comp'd. 
Rate. Years. Years. 
4% 22.22 15.75 
5 20 00 14.21 


1% .; io4 


gi i 32 


2 1 06 


10 . 1 34 


2% . . 1 07 


100 19 25 


3 1 09 


WHEN MONEY DOT? 
Interest. 
Simple. Comp'd. 
Rate. Years. Years. 
1 . .. 100.00 69.68 
1% 66 66 46 56 


8% 110 


4 1 12 


4% 1 14 


5 1 lg 


B% 1.17 
6 1 19 


6% 1 21 


2 50.00 35.00 
2% 40.00 28.07 
3 33.33 23.45 
3% 28 57 20 15 


5% 18.18 12.94 
6 16.67 11.90 


7 1.23 
7% 1.24 
8 1 26 


6% . 1538 11.00 


7 14 29 10.24 


8% 1 28 


4 25 00 17 67 


7% 13 33 9 58 


NO 

Height. Weight. 
5 ft. 1 in.... 128 pounds 
5 ft. 2 in 135 pounds 
6 ft. 3 in.... 142 pounds 

Height.Weight, 

At birth.l ft. 1 in. 8 
6 months2 ft. 0% in. 16 
1 year... 2 ft. 5 in. 24 
1% years2 ft. 8% in. 28 


WEIGHTS OF ADTJI 

Height. Weight. 
5 ft. 7 in 158 pounds 
5 ft. 8 in 166 pounds 
5 ft. 9 in 173 pounds 
3HTS OF CHILDREN. 
Height.Weight, 
Ibs. 
6 years.. 3 ft. 10 in. 49 
7 years.. 4 ft. in. 52Ms 
8 years.. 4 ft. 2 in. 56% 
9 years.. 4 ft. 4 in. 62 


TS, 

Height. Weight. 
5 ft. 10 in.... 181 pounds 
5 ft. 11 in.... 186 pounds 
6 ft. in.... 190 pounds 

| Height.Weight, 
Ibs. 
10 years.. 4 ft. 6 in. 68 
11 years.. 4 ft. 8 in. 74 
12 years.. 4 ft. 10 in. 80 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



DAYS OF GRACE, INTEREST AND STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS. 



STATE. 


sl 

I 


INTEREST. 


LIMITATIONS. 


STATE. 


C5 

,1 

01 

K 

a 


INTEREST. 


LIMITATIONS. 


a* 

I 


1 

X 

w 


J 
1 s 


d 

i 

o 

fc 


1 

3 

3 


3 

"3 2 


, 

o 

1 

K 

w 


J 

I 9 


1 



to 


1 
% 


Alabama.... 


Yes 

Yes 
Yes 
No 
No 
No 
NO 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 

8 

No 
Yes* 
No 
Yes* 
No 
No 
Yes 
No 


P.O.. 

8 

c, 

6 
7 
8 
6 
6 
6 
8 
7 
7 
5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 
6 
ft 
7 
6 
6 


p.p. 

12 
10 
12 
Any 
Any 

6 
10 
10 

i! 

8 
8 
10 

I 

A= ? 
An. 

1 

8 


*& 

10 
10 

J 


Yrs. 
t6 
6 
5 

1 


Y f 

3 
3 
4 
6 
6 
3 
3 
2 
4 
4 
5 
6 
5 

5 
3 

3 6 

6 
6 
6 
A 
5 


Montana . . . 


No 
No 
No 
No* 

Y N a S 
No 
Yes* 
No 
No 
Yes 
Yes 
No 
Yes* 
Yes* 
Yes 
No 
Yes* 
No 
NO 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 


P.ct. 
8 
7 
7 
6 
6. 
6 
6 
6 
7 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

7 
6 
6 
8 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
8 


P.ct. 

A ,s r 

Any 

6 
12 
6 
6 
12 
8 
10 
10 
6 

T 

10 
12 
6 
6 
12 
6 
10 
12 


Yrs. 
10 

20 
20 

10 
10 

5 

10 

& 

i 

10 
10 
8 
8 
20 
6 
10 
20 
21 


Yrs. 

8 
5- 
4 
6 
6 
6 
6 
3 
6 
15 
5 
6 
6 

I 

6 
6 
4 
6 
6 

10 
6 
5 


Yrs. 
5 
4 
4 
6 
6 
4 
6 
3 

1 

3 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
2 
4 
6 
2 

1 

6 

8 


Alaska 


Nebraska 


Arkansas 
Arizona 
California 
Colorado 
Connecticut 
Delaware 
Dlst. of Columbia. 
Florida 


Nevada 


New Hampshire. . 
New Jersey 
New Mexico 
New York 


12 
20 
7 
6 
20 
20 
20 
5 
15 
10 
20 
12 
20 
10 
10 
7 
10 


1 

3 
5 

10 
10 
10 
5 
15 
5 
6 
3 
6 
6 
6 
6 
10 


North Carolina. . . 
North Dakota 
Ohio 


Georgia 


1 Oklahoma 


Idaho 


Oregon 
Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina.... 
South Dakota 
Tennessee 


Illinois 


Indiana 
Iowa 


Kansas 


Kentucky 


Louisiana 


Texas . .... 


Maine 


Utah 


Maryland 


Vermont 
Virginia 


Massachusetts.... 
Michigan 


Minnesota 
Mississippi 
Missouri 


West Virginia.... 
Wisconsin 


Wyoming 



*Sight, yes; demand, no. tUnderseallO. tNo law. Negotiable notes 6, nonnegotiable 17 



TABLE OF MONTHLY WAGES. 



DATS. 


$10 


$11 


$12 


$13 


$14 


$15 


$16 


$17 


$18 


$19 


$20 


$21 


$22 


$23 


$24 


$25 


1 


38 


42 


46 


50 


54 


58 


62 


65 


69 


73 


77 


81 


85 


88 


92 


96 


2 
3 
4 


.77 
1.15 
1 54 


.85 
1.27 
1.69 


.92 


1.00 
2'00 


1.08 
1.62 
2.15 


1.15 
1.73 
2 31 


1.23 
1.85 
2 46 


1.81 
1.96 
2 62 


1.38 
2.08 
2 77 


1.46 
2.19 
2 92 


1.54 
2.31 
3 08 


1.62 
2.42 
3 23 


1.69 
2.54 


1.77 
2.65 
3 54 


1.85 
2.77 
3 69 


1.92 
2.88 
3 85 


5 


1 92 


2 12 


2 31 


2 50 


2 69 


2 88 


3 08 


3 27 


3 46 


3 65 


385 


4 04 


4 23 


4 42 


4 62 


4 81 


g 


2 31 


2 54 


2 77 


3 00 


8 23 


3 46 


3 69 


3 qa 


4 15 


4 38 


4 62 


4 85 


5 08 


5 31 


5 54 


5 77 


7 


2 69 


2 96 


3 23 


3 50 


3 77 


4 04 


4 31 


4 58 


4 85 


5 12 


5 38 


6 65 


5 92 


6 19 


6 46 


6 73 


8 


3 08 


3 38 


3 69 


4 00 


4 31 


4 62 


4 92 


5 23 


5 54 


5 85 


6 15 


6 46 


6 77 


7 08 


7 38 


7 69 


i:::::::::::::: 


3.46 
3 85 


3.81 
4.23 


4.15 
4 62 


4.50 
5.00 


4.85 
5 38 


5.19 

5 77 


5.54 
6 15 


5.88 
6 54 


6.23 
6 92 


6.58 
7 31 


6.92 


7.27 
8 08 


7.62 
8 46 


7.96 
8 85 


8.31 
9 23 


8.65 
9 62 


11 


4 23 


4 65 


5 08 


5 50 


5 92 


6 35 


6 77 


7 19 


7 62 


8 04 


8 4fi 


888 


9 31 


9 73 


10 15 


10 58 


12 


4 62 


5 08 


6 44 


6 00 


6 46 


6 92 


7 38 


7 85 


8 31 


8 77 


9 23 


9 69 


10 15 


10 62 


11 08 


11 54 


13 


5 00 


5 50 


6 00 


6 50 


7 00 


7 50 


8 00 


8 50 


9 00 


9 50 


10 00 


10 50 


11 00 


11 50 


12 00 


12 50 


14 


5 38 


5 92 


6 46 


7 00 


7 54 


8 08 


8 62 


9 15 


9 69 


10 23 


10 77 


11 31 


11 85 


12 38 


12 92 


13 46 


pj~ 

17.... 


5.77 
6.15 
6.54 


6.35 
6.77 
7.19 


6.92 

7.38 
7.85 




8.08 
8.62 
9.15 


8.65 
9.23 
9.81 


9.23 
9.85 
10 46 


9.81 
10.46 
11.12 


10.38 
11.08 
11.77 


10.96 
11.69 
12.42 


11.54 
12.31 
13.08 


12.12 
12.92 
13 73 


12.69 
13.54 
14.38 


13.27 
14.15 
15 04 


13.85 
14.77 
15.69 


14.42 
15.38 
16 35 


18 


6.92 


7.62 


8.31 


9.00 


9.69 


10.38 


11.08 


11.77 


12.46 


13.15 


13.85 


14.54 


15.23 


15.92 


16.62 


17.31 




7.31 
7 69 


8.04 
8 46 


8.77 
9 23 


9.50 
10 00 


10. 23 

10 77 


10.96 
11 54 


11.65* 
12 31 


12.42 
13 03 


13.15 
13 85 


13.88 
14 62 


14.62 

15 38 


15.35 
16 15 


16.08 
16 92 


16.81 
17 69 


17.54 
18 46 


18.27 
19 23 


|1 


8.08 
8.46 


8.88 
9 S1 


9.69 
10.15 


M 


11.31 
11 85 


12.12 
12 69 


12.92 
13 54 


13.73 
14 38 


14.54 

15 23 


15.35 
16 08 


16.15 
16 94 


16.96 
17 77 


17.77 

18 62 


18.58 
19 46 


19.38 
20 31 


20.19 
21 15 


23 

1:::::::::::::: 


8.85 
9.23 
9.62 


9.73 
1C. 15 
10.58 


10.62 
11.08 
11.54 


11.50 
12.00 
12.50 


12.38 
12.92 
13.46 


13.27 
13.85 
14.42 


14.15 
14.77 
15.38 


15.04 
15. bit 
16.35 


15.92 
16.62 
17.31 


16.81 
17.54 

18.27 


17.69 
18.46 
19.23 


18.58 
19.38 
20.19 


19.46 
20.31 
21.15 


20.35 
21.23 
22.12 


21.23 
22.15 
23.08 


22.12 
23.08 
24.04 



TABLE OF YEARLY WAGES. 



Per 

year. 


Per 
month. 


Per 

week. 


Per 
day. 


Per 
year. 


Per 

month. 


Per 
week. 


Per 

day. 


Per 
year. 


Per 
month. 


Per 
week. 


Per 
day. 


S" 


$1.67 
2.08 


m -I 


$0.05 
.07 


$100 is 
105 


$8.33 
8.75 


$1.92 
2.01 


$0.27 
.29 


$180 is 
185 


$15.00 
15.42 


$3.45 
3.55 


$0.49 
.51 


30 


2.50 


.58 


.08 


110 


9.17 


2.11 


.30 


190 


15.83 


3.64 


.52 


35 


2.92 


.67 


.10 


115 


9.58 


2.21 


.32 


195 


16.25 


3.74 


.53 


40 


3.33 


.77 


.11 


120 


10.00 


2.30 


.33 


200 


16.57 


3.84 


.55 


45 


3.75 


.86 


.12 


125 


10.42 


2.40 


.34 


205 


17.08 


3.93 


.56 


50 


4.17 


.96 


.14 


130 


10.83 


2.49 


.36 


210 


17.50 


4.03 


.58 


55 


4.58 


1.06 


.15 


1:55 


11.25 


2.59 


.37 


215 


17.92 


4.12 


.59 


60 


5.00 


1.15 


.16 


140 


11.67 


2.69 


.38 


220 


18.33 


4.22 


.60 


55 


5.42 


.25 


.18 


145 


12.08 


2.78 


.40 


225 


18.75 


4.31 


.62 


70 
75 


5.83 
6.25 


.34 
.44 


.19 
.21 


150 
155 


12.50 
12.92 


2.88 
2.97 


:8 


230 
235 


19.17 
19.58 


4.41 
4.51 


.63 
.64 


80 


6.67 


.53 


.22 


160 


13.33 


3.07 


.44 


240 


20.00 


4.60 


.66 




7. OS 


.63 


.23 


165 


13.75 


3.16 


.45 


245 


20.42 


4.70 


.67 


90 


7.50 


.73 


.25 


170 


14.17 


3.26 


.47 


250 


20.83 


4.79 


.69 




7.92 


1.82 


.26 


175 


14.58 


3.36 


.48 











ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



ACCUMULATION OF ANNUITY OF $1 AT COMPOUND INTEREST. 


Yrs. 


2%% 


3% 


VA% 


4% 


4%% 


5% 


6% 


1 


1 00000 


1 00000 


1.00000 


1.00000 


1.00000 


1.00000 


1.00000 


2.. 


2.02500 


2.03000 


2.03500 


2.04000 


2.04500 


2.05000 


2.06000 


3 


3.07563 


3.09090 


3.10623 


3.12160 


3.13703 


3.15250 


3.18360 


4. 


4.15252 


4.18363 


4.21494 


4.24646 


4.27819 


4.31013 


4.37462 


5. 


, 5.25633 


5.30914 


5.36247 


5.41632 


5.47071 


5.52563 


5.63709 


6 


6 38774 


6.46841 


6.55015 


6.63298 


6.71689 


6.80191 


6.97532 


7 


7 54743 


7.66246 


7.77941 


7 89829 


8.01915 


8 14201 


8.39384 


8 


8.73612 


8.'89234 


9!05169 


9.21423 


9.38001 


9.54911 


9.89747 


9.... 


9.95452 


10.15911 


10.36850 


10.58280 


10.80211 


11.0^656 


11.49132 


10 


11.20338 


11.46388 


11.73139 


12.00611 


12.28821 


12.57789 


13.18079 


11 


12 48347 


12.80780 


13.14199 


13.48635 


13 84118 


14 20679 


14.97164 


12 


13.79555 


14.19203 


14.60196 


15.02581 


15.46403 


15.91713 


16.86994 


13 


15.14044 


15.61779 


16.11303 


16.62684 


17.15991 


17.71298 


18.88214 


14 


16.51895 


17.08632 


17.67699 


18.29191 


18.93211 


19.59863 


21.01507 


15 


17.93193 


18.59891 


19.29568 


20.02359 


20.78405 


21.57856 


23.27597 


16 


19.38022 


20.15688 


20.97130 


21.82453 


22.71934 


23.65749 


25.67253 


17 


20.86473 


21.76159 


22.70502 


23.69751 


24.74171 


25.84037 


28.21288 


18.... 


22.38635 


23.41444 


24.49969 


25.64541 


26.85508 


28.13238 


30.90565 


19 


23.94601 


25.11687 


26.35718 


27.67123 


29.06356 


30.53900 


33.75999 


20 


25.54466 


26.87037 


28.27968 


29.77808 


31.37142 


33.06595 


36.78559 


21 .. 


27 18327 


28.67649 


30.26947 


31.96920 


33 78314 


35 71925 


39 99273 


22 


28.86286 


30.53678 


32.32890 


34.24797 


36i30338 


S8.50521 


43.39229 


23 


30 58443 


32.45288 


34 46041 


36.61789 


38.93703 


41.43048 


46.99583 


24 


32.34904 


34.'42647 


36'. 66653 


39.'08260 


41.68920 


44.50200 


50.81558 


25 


34.15776 


36.45926 


38.94986 


41.64591 


44.56521 


47.72710 


54.86451 


26 


36.01171 


38.55304 


41.31310 


44.31174 


47.57064 


51.11345 


59.15638 


27 


37 91200 


40.70963 


43.75906 


47 08421 


50.71132 


54.66913 


63 70577 


28 


39.85980 


42!93092 


46."29063 


49'. 96758 


53.99333 


58.40258 


68.52811 


29 


41.85630 


45.21885 


48.91080 


52.96629 


57.42303 


62.32271 


73.63980 


30 


43.90270 


47.57542 


51.62268 


56.08494 


61.00707 


66.43885 


79.05819 


31. 


46.00027 


50.00268 


54.42947 


59.32834 


64.75239 


70.76079 


84.8016S 


32 


48.15028 


52.50276 


57.33450 


62.70147 


68.66625 


75.29883 


90.88978 


33 


50 35403 


55.07784 


60.34121 


66 20953 


72.75623 


80.06377 


97.34316 


34. 


52.61289 


57.73018 


63!45315 


69.85791 


77.03026 


85.06696 


104.18375 


35 


54.92821 


60.46208 


66.67401 


73.65222 


81.49662 


90.32031 


111.43478 


36 


57.30141 


63.27594 


70.00760 


77-59831 


86.16397 


95.83632 


119.12087 


37 


59 73395 


66.17422 


73.45787 


81.70225 


91.04134 


101.62814 


127.26812 


38 


62 22730 


69.15945 


77^02889 


85.97034 


96.13820 


107.70955 


135.90421 


39 


64 78298 


72 23423 


80 72491 


90.40915 


101.46442 


114.09502 


14s!o5846 


40 


67.40256 


75140126 


84^55028 


95.'02552 


107.'03032 


120.'?9977 


154i76197 


41 


70.08762 


78.66330 


88.50954 


99.82654 


112.84669 


127.83976 


165.W4768 


42 


72.83981 


82.02320 


92.60737 


104.81960 


118.92479 


135.23175 


175.95054 


43 


75 66081 


85.48389 


96.84863 


110.01238 


125.27640 


142.99334 


187.50758 


44 


78 55232 


89.04841 


10l'.23833 


115.41288 


131.91384 


151.14301 


199.75803 


45 


81 51613 


92.71986 


105.78167 


12L02939 


138.84997 


159' 70016 


212!74351 


46 


84.55403 


96.50146 


110.48403 


126.87057 


146.09821 


168.68516 


226.50812 


47 .. 


.. ..87 66789 


100.39650 


115.35097 


132.94539 


153.67263 


178.11942 


241.09861 


48.. 


90 85958 


104.40840 


120^38826 


139.26321 


161.58790 


188.02539 


256.56453 


49 


94.13107 


108.54065 


125^60185 


145.83373 


169.85936 


198.42666 


272.95840 


50. ,, 


97.48435 


112.79687 


130.99791 


152.66708 


178.50303 


209.34800 


290.33590 






PRESENT 


VALUE OF 


AN ANNUITY OF $1. 


Yrs. 


VA% 


3% 


3%% 


4% 


4V 2 % 


5% 


6% 


1. 


97561 


0.97087 


0.96618 


0.96154 


0.95694 


0.95238 


94S4C 


2 


1.92742 


1.'91347 


1.' 89969 


1.88609 


1.87267 


l! 85941 


1.83339 


3 


2.85602 


2.82861 


2.80164 


2.77509 


2.74896 


2.72325 


2.67301 


4 


3.76197 


3.71710 


3.67308 


3.62990 


3.58753 


3.54595 


3.46511 


6 


4 64583 


4.57971 


4.51505 


4.45182 


4.38998 


4.32948 


4.21236 


6 


5 50813 


5.41719 


5.32855 


5 24214 


5.15787 


5 07569 


4 91732 


7 


6.34939 


6.'23028 


6J1454 


6.00205 


5.89270 


5.78637 


5.58238 


8 


7.17014 


7.01969 


6.87396 


6.73274 


6.59589 


6.46321 


6.20979 


9 


7 97087 


7 78611 


7 60769 


7.43533 


7.26879 


7.10782 


6.80169 


10 


8.75206 


8.53020 


8.31661 


8.1.090 


7.91272 


7.72173 


7.36009 


11... 


9.51421 


9.25262 


9.00155 


8.76048 


8.52892 


8.30641 


7.88687 


12 


10 25776 


9.95400 


9.66333 


9 38507 


9.11858 


8.86325 


8 38384 


13 


10.98319 


10.63496 


lo'. 30274 


9.98565 


9.68285 


9.39357 


8.85268 


14 


, 11.69091 


11.29607 


10.92052 


10.56312 


10.22283 


9.89864 


9.29498 


15. 


12.38138 


11.93794 


11.51741 


11.11839 


10.73955 


10.37966 


9.71225 


16.. 


13.05500 


12.56110 


12.09412 


11.65230 


11.23402 


10.83777 


10.10590 


17 


13.71220 


13.16612 


12.65132 


12.16567 


11.70719 


11.27407 


10.47726 


18 


14 3T336 


13.75351 


13.18968 


12.65930 


12.15999 


11.68959 


10.82760 


19 


14 97889 


14' 32380 


13.70984 


13 13394 


12.59329 


12 08532 


11.15812 


20 


15.58916 


14.'87747 


14.'21240 


13.59033 


13.00794 


12.46221 


11.46992 


21 


16.18455 


15.41502 


14.69797 


14.02916 


13.40472 


12.82115 


11.76408 


22. . 


16 76541 


15.93692 


15.16712 


14.45112 


13.78442 


13.16300 


12.04158 


23 


17 33211 


16.44361 


15.62041 


14.85684 


14.14777 


13.48857 


12.30338 


24 


17 88499 


16.93554 


16.05837 


15.24696 


14.49548 


13.79864 


12.55036 


25 


18 4 9 438 


17.41215 


1(5*48151 


15.62208 


14.82821 


14.09394 


12 78336 


26 


18.95061 


1?'. 87684 


16'. 89035 


15.98277 


15.14661 


14.37519 


13.00317 


27 


19 46401 


18.32703 


17.28536 


16.32959 


15.45130 


14.64303 


13.21C53 


28... 


19.96489 


18.76411 


17.66702 


16.66306 


15.74287 


14.89813 


13.40616 


29... . 


20 45355 


19.18845 


18.03577 


16.98371 


16.02189 


15.14107 


13.59072 


30 


20 93029 


19.60044 


18.39205 


17.29203 


16.28889 


15.37245 


13.76483 


31 


21 39541 


2o'. 00043 


18.73628 


17.58849 


16.54439 


15.59281 


13.929W) 


32 


21 84918 


20.38877 


19.06887 


17.87355 


16 78889 


15.80268 


14.08404 


33 


, 22.29188 


20! 76579 


19'. 39021 


18.14765 


17.02286 


16.60255 


14.23023 


34 


2 9 72379 


21.13184 


19 70068 


18.41120 


17.24676 


16 19290 


14 36814 


35 


...23.14516 


21.48722 


20'.OOCG6 


18.' 66461 


17.46101 


16.37419 


14.49825 



40 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



3% 3V 2 % 4% 4y 2 % 5% 

23.55625 21.83225 20.29049 18.90828 17.66604 16.54685 

37 23.95732 22.16724 20.57053 19.14258 17.86224 16.71129 

38 24.34860 22.49246 20.84109 19.36786 18.04999 16.86789 

39 24.73034 22.80822 21.10250 19.58448 18.22966 17.01704 

40 25.10278 23.11477 21.35507 19.79277 18.40158 17.15909 

41 25.46612 23.41240 21.59910 19.99305 18.56611 17.29437 

42 25.82061 23.70136 21.83488 20.18563 18.72355 17.42321 

43 26.16645 23.98190 22.06269 20.37079 18.87421 17.54591 

44 26.50385 24.25427 22.28279 20.54884 19.01838 17.66277 

45 26.83302 24.51871 22.49545 20.72004 19.15635 17.77407 

46 27.15417 24.77545 22.70092 20.88465 19.28S37 17.88007 

47 27.46748 25.02471 22.89944 21.04294 19.41471 17.98102 

48 27.77315 25.26671 23.09124 21.19513 19.53561 18.07716 

49 28.07137 25.50166 23.27656 21.34147 19.65130 18.16872 

'50 28.36231 25.72976 23.45562 21.48218 19.76201 18.25593 

55 29.71398 26.77443 24.26405 22.10861 20.24802 18.63447 

60 30.90866 27.67556 24.94473 22.62349 20.63802 18.92929 

5 31.96458 28.45289 25.51785 23.04668 20.95098 19.16107 

70 32.89786 29.12342 26.00040 23.39451 21.20211 19.34268 

75 33.72274 29.70183 26.40669 23.68041 21.40363 1948497 

80 34.45182 30.20076 26.74878 23.91539 21.56534 19.59646 

85 35.09621 30.63115 27.03680 24.10853 21.69511 19.68382 

ANNUITY WHICH $1 WILL BUY FOB YEARS GIVEN. 

Yrs. 2%% 3% 3%% 4% 4Vo% 5% 

1 1.02500 1.03000 1.03500 1.04000 1.04500 1.05000 

2 51883 .52261 .52640 .53030 .53410 53780 

3 35014 .35353 .35693 .36035 .36377 .36721 

4 26582 .26903 .27225 .27549 .27874 .28201 

.21525 .21835 .22148 .22463 .22779 .23097 

.18155 .18470 .18767 .19076 .19388 .19702 

.15760 .16051 .16354 .16661 .16970 .17282 

.13947 .14246 .14548 .14853 .15161 .15472 

.12546 .12843 .13145 .13449 .13757 .14069 

10 11426 .11723 .12024 .12329 .12638 .13950 

11 10511 .10808 .11109 .11415 .11725 .12039 

12 09749 .10046 .10348 .10655 .10967 .11283 

13 09105 .09403 .09706 .10014 .10328 .10646 

14 08554 .08853 .09157 .09467 .09782 .10102 

15 08077 .08377 .08683 .08994 .09311 .09634 

16 07670 .07961 .08268 .08582 .08902 .09227 

17 07293 .07595 .07904 .08230 .08542 .08880 

18 06967 .07271 .07582 .07899 .08224 .08555 

19 06676 .06981 .07294 .07614 .G7941 .08275 

20 06415 .06722 .07036 .07358 .07688 .08024 

21 06179 .06487 .06804 .07128 .07460 .07810 

22 05965 .06275 .06593 .06930 .07255 .07597 

23 05780 .06081 .06402 .06731 .07068 .07414 

24 05591 .05905 .06227 .06559 .06899 .07247 

25 05428 .05743 .06067 .06401 .06744 .07095 

26 05277 .05594 .05921 .06257 .06602 .06956 

27 05138 .05456 .05785 .06124 .06472 .06829 

28 05009 .05329 .05660 .06001 .06352 .06712 

29 04889 .05211 .05545 .05888 .06241 .06605 

30 04778 .05102 .05437 .05783 .06139 .06505 

31 04674 .05010 .05337 .05686 .06044 .06413 

32 04577 .04905 .05244 .05595 .05956 .06328 

33 04486 .04816 .05157 .05510 .05874 .06249 

34 04401 .04732 .05076 .05431 .05798 .06176 

35 04321 .04654 .05010 .05358 .05727 .06107 

36 04245 .04580 .04928 .05289 .05661 .06043 

37 04174 .04511 .04861 .05224 .05598 .05984 

38 04107 .04446 .04798 .05163 .05540 .05928 

39 03044 .04384 .04739 .05106 .05486 .05876 

40 > 03984 .04326 .04683 .05052 .05434 .05828 

41 03927 .04271 .04640 .05002 .05386 .05782 

42 03873 .04219 .04590 .04954 .05341 .05739 

43 03822 .04180 .04533 .04909 .05298 .05699 

44 03773 .04123 .04488 .64866 .05258 .0-"662 

45 03727 .04079 .04445 .04826 .05220 .05626 

4G .. .. .03683 .04036 .04405 .04788 .05184 .05593 

47 03641 .03996 .04367 .04752 .05151 .05561 

48 03601 .03958 .04331 .04718 .05119 .05532 

49 03562 .03921 .04296 .04686 .05089 .05504 

50 03526 .03887 .04263 .04655 .05060 .05478 

55... 03365 .03735 .04121 .04523 .04939 .05367 

60 .. ,. .03225 .03613 .04009 .04420 .04845 .05283 

65 03128 .03515 .03919 .04339 .04773 .05219 

70 03040 .03434 .03846 .04275 .04717 .05170 

75 02965 .03367 .03787 .04223 .04672 .05132 

80 02903 .03311 .03738 .04181 .04637 .05103 



14.62099 
14.73678 
14.84602 
14.94907 
15.04630 
15.13802 
15.22454 
15.30617 
15.38318 
15.45583 
15.52437 
15.58903 
15.65003 
15.70757 
15.76186 
15.99054 
16.16143 
16.28912 
16.38454 
16.45585 
16.50913 
16.54805 



1.06000 
.54544 
.37411 
.28859 
.23740 
.20336 
.17914 
.16104 
.14702 
.13587 
.12679 
.11928 
.11296 
.10758 
.10296 
.09895 
.09544 
.09326 
.08962 
.08718 
.08500 
.08305 
.08128 
.07968 
.07823 
.07690 
.07570 
.07459 
.07358 
.07265 
.07179 
.07100 
.07027 
.06920 



.06786 
.06736 
.06689 
.06645 
.06606 
.06568 
.06533 
.06501 
.06470 
.06441 
.06415 
.06390 
.06366 
.06344 
.06254 
.06188 
.06139 
.06103 
.06077 
.06057 



FASTEST TRIPS AROUND THE WORLD. 

Made by John Henry Mears in 191335 days 21 , Made by Henry Frederick in 190354 days 7 
hours 36 minutes. hours 20 minutes. 

Made by Andre Jaeger^Schmidt in 191139 days Made by Nellie Ely (Mrs. Nellie Seaman) in 
42 minutes 38 seconds. I 1889 72 days 6 hours 11 minutes. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



41 



LIFE INSURANCE IN THE UNITED STATES. 



YEAR. 


ORDINARY. 


INDUSTRIAL. 


TOTAL. 


Policies. 


Amount. 


Policies. 


Amount. 


Policies. 


Amount. 


1850 

i 

900 
910 
914 








29,407 
fO.OOO 
839,226 
679.690 
1.319.561 
3.176,051 
6.954.119 
9.045,081 


$68,614.189 
180.000.000 
2.262.847.0(10 
1.564. 183.532 
3.620.057.4:^ 
7.093, 152.380 
13,227,213. 1H8 
17.425.501.137 






























236.674 

ll.219.2M 

23,034,463 
30,537,592 


""$20'.533,469 
429.521,128 
1.4f 58.936.366 
3.177.047 874 
4,140,151,191 


5,203,090 
14,395.347 
29.988,582 
39.582.673 


ti,584,7i7',66i 

4.049.578.567 
8.562,138,746 
16,404,261.042 
21,565,652,328 


































Total 
income. 


poH^hoWers. Assets. 


Liabilities. 


Surplus. 


L890 
1900 

1910 
L914 








J196.938.069 
400.257.6fti 
781.011.249 
9*5.037,362 


$90.007,820 $770,972,061 
168,687,601 1,742.414,173 
387,302.073 3,875,877.059 
509.455.142 4.935,252,793 


$678,681.309 
1.493.378,709 
3.325.878.366 
4.364.563.505 


$92.290,752 
249.OiS5.464 
549.998.H93 
570,689,288 




















FERE AND MARINE INSURANCE. 


CASUALTY AND MISCELLANEOUS INSURANCE. 


I 

890 
L900 
1910 
1914 


Corn- 
pa- Incc 
nies. 


PAYMENTS TO POLICY- 
me HOLDERS. 


YEAR. 


Com- 
panies. 


Payments 
Income, to policy- 
holders. 


Losses. 


Dividends 


Total. 

$80,768.012 
116,753.281 
187.499.024 
240.812.150 


580 $157,8 
493 198,3 
597 381.5 
596 430.8 


57,983 $75,334.517 
12.577 108.307,171 
45,814 166,789.763 
73.256 224.639.583 


$5,334,495 
8,446.110 
20,709.261 
16.172,567 


1890 




34 
62 
177 

188 


$9.758,413 $2,933,306 
32,309.619 10,166.796 
111.041.748 41,465.472 
1 62.029 86 71.341.1-61 


1900 




1910 
1914 



PORK PACKING STATISTICS. 

Season from Nov. 1 to March 1. 



CITY. 


1914-15 


19] 3-14 


1912-13 


1911-12 


1910-11 


1909-10 


1908-09 


1907-08 


1906-07 

No. hogs 
2,403,739 
226.988 
M0.486 
1,135,931 
69.381 
453,463 
687.274 
656.636 


Chicago 


No. hogs 
2.871.328 
225,673 

684.247 
1,100.581 
24.763 
765.820 
789.423 
771.990 


No. hogs 

2,349,614 
187,547 
519,188 
991.624 
54,452 
513.556 
814.451 
720.368 


No. hogs 
2.364.363 
212,072 
571.773 

1,099.985 
50.692 
513.637 
809.443 
890.850 


No. hogs 
2,638.044 
262.249 
629.208 
1,393.875 
70,100 
551.619 
949.232 
1,021,198 


No. hogs 
2.067.995 
206.562 
418.743 
919,932 
58,190 
415.191 
574.619 
720,596 


No. hogs 
2,063.544 
196.471 
469.081 
985.118 
69.853 
365.823 
531.049 
705.368 


No. hogs 
2,640.765 
245.323 
703.235 
1,520.481 
96,606 
583.338 
700.772 
884.937 


No. hogs 
2,570,475 
297,472 
747,074 
1,365,221 
83.647 
684.060 
742.734 
706.029 


Cincinnati . 


Indianapolis 


KansasClty 
Louisville 
'Milwaukee 


Omaha 


St. Louis 



'Includes Cudahy. 



NEWSPAPERS IN THE UNITED STATES (1916.) 





[From 


Ayer's 


America) 


State or territorv. 


Daily. Weekly. 


Total. 


Alabama 


... 26 


178 


232 


Alaska 




15 


28 


Arizona 


, 18 


57 


81 


Arkansas 


... 31 


250 


308 


California 


... 166 


593 


967 


Colorado 


... 46 


312 


398 


Connecticut 


... 36 


85 


151 


Delaware 


4 


27 


35 


District of Columbia 


7 


22 


82 


Florida 


... 31 


158 


207 


Georgia 


... 26 


255 


356 


Hawaii 


6 


16 


35 


Idaho 


... 11 


138 


163 


Illinois 


... 173 


1,040 


1,770 


Indiana 


... 148 


495 


743 


Iowa 


... 64 


751 


941 


Kansas 


... 66 


627 


734 


Kentucky 


... 28 


212 


305 


Louisiana 


... 19 


153 


212 


Maine 


... 12 


97 


136 


Marvland 
Massachusetts 


17 
... 88 


113 

395 


180 
677 


Michigan 


... 78 


521 


715 




... 48 


648 


815 


Mississippi 


... 16 


183 


227 


Missouri 


... 87 


730 


977 


Montana 


... 20 


217 


255 


Nebraska 


... 28 


557 


649 


Nevada 


... 10 


28 


41 



Total. 
232 


State or territory. 
New Hampshire 


Daily. 
13 


28 


New Jersey 


. 47 


81 




7 


308 




207 


967 


North Carolina 


29 


398 


North Dakota 


10 


151 


Ohio 


178 


35 


Oklahoma 


.. .. 51 


82 




36 


207 
356 


Pennsylvania 


214 
. . 19 


35 


Porto Rico 


11 


163 

1 770 


Rhode Island ^.. 


13 
. . 16 


743 




17 


941 




17 


734 


Texas 


103 


305 


Utah 


7 


212 




9 


136 


Virginia 


31 


180 


Washington 


38 


677 


West Virginia 


... . 30 


715 




63 


815 




7 


227 
977 


Total in 1916 


2 494 


255 
649 


Total in 1915 


.. 2,661 


41 


Canada. 1916... 


.. 152 



Weekly. Total. 


76 


107 


270 


368 


103 


121 


1,062 


2,121 


198 


301 


347 


371 


666 


1,104 


498 


589 


222 


305 


807 


1,335 


8 


40 


9 


25 


21 


52 


110 


170 


366 


406 


228 


312 


830 


1,043 


78 


114 

Ufl 


168 


p 

254 


310 


408 


159 


204 


530 


681 


75 


9.1 



16,091 23,024 

17,380 >.4,724 
1,065 1M9 



42 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



UNITED STATES LIFE TABLES. 
[Computed by the bureau of the census.] 



Based on the estimated population July 1, 1910, 
of the original registration states and on the 
reported deaths in 1909, 1910 and 1911. Original 
registration states include Maine, New Hamp- 

BOTH SEXES, ONE YEAR INTERVALS. 



shire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 
Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Indiana and 
Michigan and the District of Columbia. 



Age 
interval 
Years. 
0-1 


.* No. 

living, t 
...100 000 


No. 
dying.* 
11,462 
2,446 
1,062 
666 
477 
390 
327 
274 
234 
204 
187 
180 
182 
193 
210 
232 
256 
285 
315 
344 
375 
398 
412 
418 
425 
432 
440 
451 
465 
479 
493 
511 
530 
550 
568 
588 

i: 

No. 
dying, t 
4,377 
1,131 
943 
801 


Exp't'n 
of life. 
Years. 
51.49 
57.11 
57.72 
57.44 
56.89 
56.21 
55.47 
54.69 
53.87 
53.02 
52.15 
51.26 
50.37 
49.49 
48.60 
47.73 
46.86 
46.01 
45.17 
44.34 
43.53 
42.73 
41.94 
41.16 
40.38 
39.60 
38.81 
38.03 
37.25 
36.48 
35.70 
34.93 
34.17 
33.41 
32.66 
31.90 
sFANT 
Exp't'a 
of life. 
Years. 
51.49 
53.76 
54.32 
54.78 


Age 
interval 
Years. 
36-37 


* No. 
living.f 

7 -> 539 


No. 
dying.t 
605 
617 
631 
644 
658 
674 
693 
716 
74C 
766 
795 
821 
846 
873 
897 
929 
970 
1,025 
1,084 
1,153 
1,225 
1,289 
1,346 
1,404 
1,462 
1,521 
1,587 
1,656 
1,718 
1.773 
1,826 
1,877 
1,928 
1.974 
2,013 
2,044 
IE MO 

No. 
dying.t 
705 
635 
579 
533 


Exp't'n 
of life. 
Years. 
31.16 
30.42 
29.68 
28.94 
28.20 
27.46 
26.73 
25.99 
25.26 
24.54 
23.82 
23.10 
22.39 
21.69 
2098 
20.28 
19.58 
18.89 
18.21 
17.55 
16.90 
16.26 
15.64 
15.03 
14.42 
13.83 
13.26 
12.69 
12.14 
11.60 
11.08 
10.57 
10.07 
9.58 
9.11 
8.66 
NTH IIS 
Exp't'n 
of life. 
Years. 
55.17 
55.51 
55.81 
56.08 


Age 
interval.* 
Years. 1 
72-73.. 


No. 

ving.t 
29,759 
27,694 
2i>,622 
23,552 
21,495 
19,467 
17,486 
15,566 
13,712 
11,926 
10,230 
8,665 
7,256 
6,001 
4,898 
3,944 
3,128 
2,439 
1,868 
1,402 
1,031 
742 
523 
361 
244 
161 
104 
65 
40 
24 
14 
8 
4 
2 
1 

No. 

livingt 
90,296 
89,804 
89,348 

88.927 


Exp't'n 
No. of life. 
dying.t Years. 
2,065 8.22 
2,072 7.79 
2,070 7.38 
2,057 6.99 
2,028 6.61 
1,981 6.25 
1,920 5.90 
1,854 5.56 
1,786 5.25 
1.696 4.96 
1,565 4.70 
1,409 4.45 
1,255 4.22 
1,103 4.00 
954 3.79 
816 3.58 
689 3.39 
571 3.20 
466 3.03 
371 2.87 
289 2.73 
219 2.59 
162 2.47 
117 2.35 
83 2.24 
57 2.14 
39 2.04 
25 1.95 
16 1.85 
10 1.76 
6 1.67 
4 1.59 
2 1.50 
1 1.41 
1 1.33 

Exp't'n 
No. of life. 5 
dying.t Years. 
492 56.33 
456 56.56 
421 56.76 
389 56.95 


1-2 


88 538 


37-38.... 
38-39.... 
39-40 


... 71,924 
. .. 71,317 
70 686 


73-74 
74-75 
75-76 


2-3 


86 092 


3-4 


85 030 


4-5 


8' 364 


40-41 


.. 70,042 


76-77 

77-78... 
78-79 


5-6 
6-7 


.. 83,887 
83 497 


41-42.... 
42-43.... 
43-44.... 
44-45 


... 69,384 
... 68,710 
. .. 68,017 
... 67,301 


7-8 


.. 83 170 


79-80 
80-81 
81-82 
82-83 
83-84 
84-85 
85-86 


8-9 


82 896 


9-10 


82 66? 


45-46. 


66 561 


10-11.... 


.. 82,458 


46-47.... 
47-48 . . 


... 65,795 
. 65,060 


11-12 


82 271 


12-13 


82 091 


48-49.... 


... 64,179 


13-14 


81 909 


49-50 
50-51.... 
51-52.... 
52-53 


... 63,333 
... 62,460 
... 61,563 
... 60.634 


14-15 


81 716 


86-87 


15-16. . 


. . 81 506 


87-88 


16-17 


81 274 


88-89 
89-90 


17-18.... 
18-19 


.. 81,018 
80 733 


53-54.... 
54-55.... 


... 59,664 
... 58,639 


90-91 


19-20.... 
20-21.... 
21-22.... 
22-23 
23 24 


.. 80.418 
... 80,074 
... 79,699 
... 79,301 
78 889 


55-56.... 
56-57... 
57-58.... 
58-59.... 
59-60.... 


... 57,555 
... 56,402 
... 55,177 
... 53,888 
... 52,542 


91-92 


92-93. 


93-94 
94-95 . . . 


95-96 
96-97 


24-25... 
25-26 


.. 78,471 
78 046 


60-61 


51 138 


61-62.... 
62-63 


... 49.676 
48 155 


97-98 
98-99 


26-27.... 
27-28.... 


... 77,614 
.. 77,174 


63-64.... 
64-65... 
65-66 . . . 


... 46,568 
... 44,912 
... 43 194 


99-100 
100-101 
101-102 
102-103 
103-104 
104-105 
105-106 
106-107 

TERVALS. 

Age 
interval.* 
Mouths. 
8-9 
9-10 


28-29.... 
29-30.... 
30-31.... 
31-32 


... 76,723 
... 76.258 
... 75,779 
75 286 


66-67.... 
67-68 


... 41,421 
... 39,595 


32-33.... 
33-34 


... 74,775 
74 245 


68-69 


37 718 


69-70... 


... 35,790 


34-35 


73 695 


70-71... 


... 33,816 


35-36 


73 127 


71-72... 


... 31,803 
^ITY, OJ 

* No. 
livingt 

... 92,748 


Age 
interval 
Months. 
0-1 


.* No. 
livingt 
100 600 


MORTAI 
Age 
interval 
Months. 
4-5 


1-2 


95 623 


5-6 

6-7 


... 92,043 
91 408 


2-3 


94 492 


10-11 
11-12... 


3-4... 


.. 93.549 


7-8... 


.. 90.829 



EXPECTATION OF LIFE BY SEX. 



Age 
int'val 
Years. 

0-1 . . 


White ^ 
* males. 
Years 
50.23 


fVhite fe- 
t males t 
. Years. 
53.62 
58.69 
59.24 
58.92 
58.35 
57.67 
56.93 
56.14 
55.31 
54.45 
53.57 
52.68 
51.79 
50 89 
5000 
49.12 
48.25 
47.39 
46.54 
45.71 
44.88 
44.07 
43.26 
42.47 
41.67 
40 88 
40.09 


Age 
int'val 
Years. 
27-28.. 
28-29.. 
29-30. . 
30-31... 
31-3? 


White 1 
.* males. 
Years 
... 37.21 
... 36.43 
... 35.65 
... 34.87 
34.10 


^hite fe- 
t males, t 
. Years. 
39.31 
38.52 
37.74 
36.96 
36.18 
35.40 
34.63 
33.86 
33.09 
32.33 
31.56 
30.80 
30.03 
29.26 
28.50 
27.73 
26.97 
26.21 
25.45 
24.70 
23.96 
23.21 
22.48 
21.74 
21.02 
20.29 
19.58 


Age 
int'val 
Years. 
54-55.. 
55-56.. 
56-57.. 
57-58.. 
58-59.. 
59-60.. 
60-61.. 
61-62.. 
62-63.. 
63-64.. 
64-65.. 
65-66.. 
6-67.. 
67-68.. 
R8-69... 
69-70.. 
70-71.. 
71-72... 
72-73.. 
73-74.. 
74-75.. 
75-76.. 
76-77.. 
77-78.. 
78-79. . 
79-80. . 
80-81.. 


White White fe- 
.* males.tmales.t 
Years. Years. 
... 17.68 18.87 
... 17.03 18.18 
... 16.39 17.50 
... 15.77 16.84 
... 15.16 16.19 
... 14.57 15; 55 
... 13.98 14.92 
... 13.41 14.31 
... 12.85 13.70 
... 12.31 13.11 
... 11.77 12.53 
... 11.25 11.97 
... 10.75 11.42 
... 10.25 10.89 
... 9.77 1037 
... 9.29 9.86 
... 8.83 938 
... 8.39 891 
... 7.95 8.46 
... 7.53 8.03 
... 7.13 7.61 
... 6.75 7.20 
... 6.38 6.80 
... 6.04 6.41 
... 5.71 604 
... 5.39 5.69 
... 5.09 5.35 


Age 
int'val. 
Years. 
81-82. . 
82-83. . 
83-84. . 
84-85. . 
85-86. . 
86-87. . 
87-88. . 
88-89. . 
89-90. . 
90-91. . 
91-92. . 
92-93. . 
93-94. . 
94-95. . 
95-96. . 
96-97. . 
97-98... 
98-99... 
99-100.. 
100-101. 
101-102. 
102-103. 
103-104. 
104-105. 
105-106. 
106-107. 


White White fe- 
* males.tmales.t 
Years. Years. 
.. 4.81 5.05 
.. 4.56 4.78 
.. 4.32 4.53 
.. 4.10 4.29 
.. 3.88 4.06 
.. 3.68 3.83 
.. 3.49 3.61 
.. 3.31 3.40 
.. 3.15 3.19 
.. 2.99 3.00 
.. 2.84 2.83 
.. 2.70 2.67 
.. 2.57 2.52 
.. 2.44 2.39 
.. 2.31 2.27 
.. 2.19 2.15 
.. 2.06 2.0E 
.. 1.93 1.94 
.. 1.80 1.84 
.. 1.68 1.74 
.. 1.56 1.65 
.. 1.45 1.55 
.. 1.34 1.46 
. . 1.25 1.37 
.. 1.15 1.29 
1.21 


1-2 


56 26 


2-3 
3-4 


... 56.88 
56.60 


4-5.. . 


56.05 


5-6 


55.37 


32-33... 
33-34.. 
34-35.. 
35-36.. 
36-37.. 
37-38... 
38-39.. 
39-40.. 
40-41.. 
41-4? 


... 33.33 
... 32.58 
... 31.82 
... 31.08 
... 30.34 
... 29.61 
... 28.88 
... 28.16 
... 27.43 
26 71 


6-7 


54 63 


7-8 


53 85 


8-9 
9-10.... 
10-11... 
11-12... 
12-13... 
13-14... 
14-15... 
15-16... 
16-17... 
17-18... 
18-19... 
19-20... 
20-21.. 
21-22.. 
22-23.. 
23-24.. 
24-25.. 
25-26.. 
26-27.. 


... 53.03 
... 52.19 
... 51.32 
... 50.44 
... 49.56 
... 48.67 
... 47.79 
... 46.91 
... 46.04 
... 45.18 
... 44.34 
... 43.52 
... 42.71 
... 41.92 
... 41.13 
... 40 36 
... 39.57 
... 38.79 
... 38.00 


42-43.. 
43-44.. 
44-45.. 
45-46.. 
46-47.. 
47-48.. 
48-49.. 
49-50.. 
50-51.. 
51-52.. 
52-53.. 
53-54.. 


... 25.99 
... 25.27 
... 24.56 
... 23.86 
... 23.16 
... 22.46 
... 21.77 
... 21.08 
... 20.39 
... 19.70 
... 19.02 
... 18.35 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



43 



Age 
int'val.t 
Years. 
0-1 


Males.! 
Years. 
. 34.05 
. 42.63 
44 55 


emales. 
Years. 
37.67 
45.15 
46.95 
47.12 
46.87 
46.42 
45.81 
45.13 
44.39 
43.62 
42.84 
42.06 
41.29 
40.56 
39.85 
39.13 
38.55 
37.95 
37.35 
36.75 
36.14 
35.53 
34.90 
34.27 
33.63 
32.97 
32.29 
31.61 


NEGRO I 

Age 
int'val.t Males.* 
Years. Years. 
28-29 28 RS 


3XPECT 

'emales. 
Years. 
30.94 
30.27 
29.61 
28.96 
28.33 
27.70 
27.07 
26.44 
25.81 
25.18 
24.56 
23.94 
23.34 
22.75 
22.16 
21.58 
21.00 
20.43 
19.86 
19.30 
18.75 
18.20 
17.65 
17.10 
16.55 
16.61 
15.48 
14.98 


A.TION 
Age 
int'val 
Years. 
56-57. 


OF LJF 

t Males.I 
Years. 
13 36 


E. 

^emales. 
Years. 
14.50 
14.05 
13.62 
13.20 
12,78 
12.37 
11.96 
11.56 
11.18 
10.82 
10.49 
10.17 
9.86 
9.54 
9.22 
8.89 
8.55 
8.21 
7.88 
7.55 
7.22 
6.91 
6.61 
6.32 
6.05 
5.81 
5.59 


Age 
int'val.t 
Years. 
83-84 


Males.I 
Years. 
4 84 


"emales. 
Years. 
5.40 
5.23 
5.09 
4.97 
4.86 
4.76 
4.64 
4.50 
4.34 
4.14 
3.92 
3.69 
3.45 
3.22 
2.99 
2.78 
2.58 
2.39 
2.21 
2.05 
1.89 
1.73 
1.59 
1.43 
1.32 
1.20 
1.08 


1-2 

2-3 


29-30. . 


... 27.94 


57-58.. 
58-59 


... 12.93 
12 bO 


84-85.... 
85-86.... 
86-87.... 


. 4.64 
. 4.48 
. 4 36 


30-31 


27 33 


3-4 


. 45 01 


31-32.. 
32-33.. 
33-34.. 
34-35.. 
35-36 


.... 26.74 
.... 26.16 
.... 25.58 
.... 25.00 
24 42 


59-60. 


. . 12.08 


4-5 


. 44. 7S 


60-61... 


... 11.67 


87-88.... 
88-89.... 
89-90.... 
90-91 


. 4.26 
. 4.18 
. 4.10 
. 4 01 


5-6 
6-7 


. 44.25 
. 43 62 


61-62. . 


. . li 27 


62-63... 
63-64 


... 10.88 
10 49 


7-8 


4 9 94 


8-9 


42 20 


36-37.. 
37-38.. 


.... 23.84 
.... 23.26 


64-65... 
65-66... 


... 10.11 
... 9.74 


91-92.... 
92-93.... 
93-94.... 
94-95.... 
95-96.... 
96-97.... 
97-98.... 
98-99.... 
99-100. . . 
100-101.. 
101-102.. 
102-103.. 
103-104 . . 
104-105.. 
105-108.. 
106-107.. 
107-108.. 
108-109 


. 3.89 
. 3.75 
. 3.57 
. 3.27 
. 3.15 
. 2.93 
. 2.72 
. 2.51 
. 2.32 
. 2.14 
. 1.97 
. 1.81 
. 1.66 
. 1.53 
. 1.40 
. 1.27 
. 1.16 


9-10 


. 41.44 


10-11 
11-12 
12-13 


. 40.65 
. 39.85 
39 05 


38-39.. 
39-40.. 
40-41 


.... 22.69 
.... 22.12 
21 57 


66-67 


9 38 


67-68 


9 02 


68-69... 
69-70. . . 
70-71 


... 8.67 
... 8.33 
8 00 


13-14 
14-15 


. 38.27 
37 51 


41-42.. 


. . . . 21 02 


4'M3 


20 48 


15-16 


36 77 


43-44.. 
44-45.. 
45-46 


.... 19.94 
.... 19.39 
18 85 


71-72. . 


.. 7 69 


16-17 


. 36 05 


72-73... 


... 7.39 


17-18 


35 37 


73-74... 
74-75... 
75-76... 
76-77... 
77-78.. 
78-79... 
79-80... 
80-81... 


... 7.11 
... 6.84 
... 6.58 
... 6.35 
... .15 
... 5.96 
... 5.76 
... 5.53 


18-19 
19-20 


. 34.71 
34 08 


46-47.. 
47-48 


.... 18.30 
17 75 


20-21 
21-22 
22-23 


. 33.46 
. 32.86 
32 26 


48-49 


. 17 22 


49-50.. 
50-51 


.... 16.71 
16 21 


23-24. . 


31 67 


51-52.. 
52-53.. 


.... 15.7?, 
.... 15.23 


24-25 
25-26 


. 31.06 
30 44 


53-54 


14 75 


81-82... 
82-83... 


... 5.29 
... 5.<ri 


26-27 
27-28 


. 29.81 
. 29.18 


54-55.. 
55-56.. 


.... 14.28 
.... 13.82 


109-110.. 






born alive dying in age interval. Ayerage 
length of life remaining to each one alive at 
beginning of age interval. 
AMERICAN TABLE OF MORTALITY. 
Used by insurance companies in computing expectation of life. 



Period of lifetime between two exact ages. 
tNumber of 100,000 persons born alive living at 
beginning of age interval. JNumber of 100,000 



Age. 


No. 
living. 
. 100 000 


No. Exp't'n 
dying, of life. 
749 48.72 
746 48.08 
743 47.45 
740 46.80 
737 46.16 
735 45.50 
732 44.85 
729 44.19 
727 43.53 
725 42.87 
723 42.20 
722 41.53 
721 40.85 
720 40.17 
719 39.49 
718 38.81 
718 38.12 
718 37.43 
718 36. V3 
719 36.03 
720 35.33 
721 34.63 
723 33.92 
726 33.21 
729 32.50 
732 31.78 
737 31.07 
742 30.35 
749 29.62 


Age. 
39 
40 


No. 
living. 
... 78,862 
78 106 


No. 
dying. 
756 
765 
774 


Exp't'n 
of life. 
28.90 
28.18 
27.45 


Age. 


No. 
living. 
. 43 133 


No. 

dying. 
2,243 
2,321 
2,391 
2.448 
2,487 
2,505 
2,501 
2,476 
2,431 
2,369 
2,291 
2,196 
2,091 
1,964 
1,816 
1,648 
1,470 
1,292 
1,114 
933 
744 
555 
385 
246 
137 
58 
18 
3 


Exp't'n 
of life. 
9.47 
8.91 
8.4S 
8.00 
7.55- 
7.11 
6.6& 
6.27 
5.88 
6.49 
5.11 
4.74 
4.39 
4.05 
3.71 
3.39 
3.08 
2.77 
2.47 
2.18 
1.91 
1.6<5 
1.42 
1.19 
.98 
.80 
.64 
.50 


11 


99 251 


69.... 
70... 


40,890 
38,569 


12 


98 505 


41 


. . . 77,341 


13 
14 


... 97,762 
97 022 


42 
43 

44 


... 76,567 
. . . 75,782 
74 985 


785 
797 
812 
828 
848 
870 
896 
927 
962 
1,001 
1,044 
1,091 
1,143 
1,199 
1,200 
1,325 
1,394 
1,468 
1,546 
1,628 
1,713 
1,800 
1,889 
1,980 
2,070 
2,158 


26.72 
26.00 
25.27 
24.54 
23.81 
23.03 
22.36 
21.63 
20.91 
20.20 
19.49 
18.79 
18.09 
17.40 
16.72 
16.05 
15.39 
14.74 
14.10 
13.47 
12.86 
12.26 
11.67 
11.10 
10.54 
10.00 


71 .. 


. 36 178 


72 


33 730 


15 


96 285 


73 


31 243 


16 
17 
18 


... 95,550 
... 94,818 
94,089 


45 


74,173 


74 


. 28 738 


'46 
47 
48 
49 


. . . 73,345 
.... 72,497 
.... 71,627 
... 70,731 




26,237 


76.... 
77 


23,761 
21 330 


19 
20 


... 93,362 
... 92,637 


78.... 


18,961 


21 


91 914 


50 
51 
52 


.... 69,804 
.... 68,842 
.... 67,841 


79.... 
80.... 
81.... 


16,670 
14,474 
12 383 


22 
23 


... 91,192 
... 90,471 


24 


... 89 751 


53 
54 


.... 66,797 
65 706 


82.... 
83 


10,419 
8 603 


25 
26 


. . . 89,032 
... 88 314 


65 
66 


.... 64,563 
.. . 63,364 


84 


6.955 


27 


87 596 


85 .... 
86 


5,485 
4 193 


28 
29 
30 


... 86,878 
... 86,160 
85 441 


57 
58 


.... 62,104 
60,779 


87 


3,079 


59 
60 


.... 59,385 
57 917 


88.... 
89 


2,146 
1 402 


31 
32 


. . . 84,721 
84 000 


61 
62 
63 


.... 56,371 
.... 54,743 
. 53 030 


90..,. 
91 


847 
462 


33 
34.. 


... 83,277 
82 551 


92.... 
93.... 
94 


216 
79 
21 


35 
36 


... 81,822 
. . 81 090 


64 
65 
66 


.... 51,230 
.... 49.341 
. 47 361 


37 
38 


... 80,353 
... 79,611 


95 .... 


3 


67 


... 45,291 



LINCOLN MEMORIAL COMMISSION. 



Chairman William Howard Taft, New Haven, 
Conn. 

Joseph G. Cannon, Danville, 111. 

George P. Wetmore, Newport, R. I. 

Samuel W. McCall, Winchester, Mass. 

Speaker Champ Clark, Washington, D. C. 

Senator Thomas S. Martin, Washington. D. C. 

Joseph C. S. Blackburn, Versailles, Ky. 

Special Resident Commissioner Joseph C. S. 
Blackburn. 

Secretary Henry A. Vale, 2415 20th street, 
Washington, D. C. 

Executive and Disbursing Officer Col. William 
W. Harts, U. S. A. 



The Lincoln memorial commission was created 
by an act of congress approved Feb. 9, 1911, to 
aevise and construct a memorial of Abraham 
Lincoln in the city of Washington, D. C. A de- 
sign submitted by Henry Bacon, a New York 
architect, was formally accepted by congress 
Feb. 9, 1913. The memorial, which will stand in 
Potomac park, is to be a colonnaded edifice 
containing a statue of Abraham Lincoln, a me- 
morial of the Gettysburg speech, a memorial of 
the second inaugural address and a symbol of 
the union of the states. Its cost is limited to 
$2.000,000. Ground was broken Feb. 12, 1914. The 
salary of the special resident commissioner is 
$5,000 a year. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



WEATHER FORECASTS AND SIGNALS. 



The operations of the weather bureau of the 
department of agriculture are based on observa- 
tions of the weather taken at about 200 observa- 
tories throughout the United States at the same 
moment of time and telegraphed daily to Wash- 
ington, D. C., and to other important cities. 
These observations, comprising barometric pres- 
sure, temperature, precipitation, winds and 
clouds, are entered upon outline charts of the 
United States by means of symbols, forming the 
"daily weather map," from which the forecasts 
are made. These forecasts are issued every day 
for every state in the union, and whenever nec- 
essary special warnings are sent -out of storms. 



frosts, cold waves, heavy snows and floods. In 
addition to the main office in Washington, there 
are subordinate forecast centers in Chicago, New 
Orleans, Denver, San Francisco and Portland, 
Ore. Weather forecasts for a week in advance 
are now sent out from Washington. 

The forecasts are first telegraphed to about 
2,300 principal distributing points, whence they 
are further disseminated by telegraph, telephone 
and through the mail by means of forecast cards, 
rural free delivery slips and newspapers. 

It is estimated that the total number of per- 
sons in the United States to whom the weather 
forecasts are available is more than 4.000,000. 



No. 1. 
White flag. 



P 



Clear or 
fair weather. 



No. 2. 
Blue flag. 



BLUE 



Rain or snow. 



No. 3 

White and blue 
flag. 



No. 4. No. 5. 

Black triangu- White flag with black 
lar flag. square in center. 





Local rain or 
snow. 

WEATHER FLAGS. 



Temperature. 



Cold wave. 



When No. 4 is placed above No. 1. 2 or 3 it 
indicates warmer; when below, colder: when not 
displayed, the temperature is expected to remain 



about stationary. During the late spring and 
early fall the cold-wave flag is used to indicate 
anticipated frosts. 






Small craft. Northwest winds. Suuthwest winds. Northeast winds. Southeast winds. "Hurricane" signal. 

STORM-WARNING FLAGS. 



Small craft warning A red pennant indicates 
that moderately strong winds are expected. 

Storm warnings A red flag with a black cen- 
ter indicates that a storm of marked violence is 
expected. The pennants displayed with the flags 
indicate the direction of the wind: Red, east- 
erly; white, westerly (from southwest to north). 
The pennant above the flag indicates that the 
wind is expected to blow from the northerly 
quadrants; below, from southerly quadrants. 



By night a red light indicates easterly winds and 
a white light above a red light westerly winds. 

Two red flags, with black centers, displayed 
one above the other, indicate the expected ap- 
proach of tropical hurricanes, and also of those 
extremely severe and dangerous storms which 
occasionally move across the lakes and northern 
Atlantic coast. Hurricane warnings are not dis- 
played at night. 



ABBREVIATIONS OF TITLES, DEGREES, ETC. 



Following is a list of some of the more com- 
mon abbreviations used after the names of per- 
sons to designate title, rank, degree, member- 
ship in societies, orders or public bodies, etc.: 

A. R. A. Associate of the Royal Academy. 

B. A. Bachelor of Arts. 
Bart. Baronet. 

B. D. Bachelor of Divinity. 

B. S. Bachelor of Science. 

C. B. Companion of the Bath. 

g. E. Civil Engineer. 
. I. E. Companion of Order of Indian Empire. 
C. J. Chief Justice. 

C. M. G. Companion of Order of St. Michael 
and St. George. 

C V O. Companion of Victorian Order. 

D. D. Doctor of Divinity. 
D. Sc. Doctor of Science. 

D g O. Distinguished Service Order. 

F. R. G. S. Fellow of the Royal Geographical 

Society. 

F. R. S. Fellow of the Royal Society. 
J. P. Justice of the Peace. 
K. C.- King's Counsel. 
K. C B. Knight Commander of the Bath. 



K. C. M. G. Knight Commander of Order of St. 
Michael and St. George. 

K. C. V. O. Knight Commander of the Vic- 
torian Order. 

K. G. Knight of the Garter. 

L. H. D. Doctor of Humanities. 

LL. B. Bachelor of Laws. 

LL. D. Doctor of Laws. 

Litt. D. Doctor of Literature. 

M. A. Master of Arts. 

M. C. Member of Congress. 

M. D. Doctor of Medicine. 

M. P. Member of Parliament. 

M V: O. Member of the Victorian Order. 

N. A. National Academician. 

O. M. Order of Merit. 

P. C. Privy Councilor. 

Ph. D. Doctor of Philosophy. 

R. A. Roval Academician. 

S. J. Society of Jesus. 

S. T. D. Doctor of Sacred Theology. 

U. S. A. United States Army. 

U. S. N. United States Navy. 

V C. Victoria Cross. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



45 



THERMOMETERS COMPARED. 
There are three kinds of thermometers, with 
varying scales, in general use throughout the 



world the Fahrenheit. Reaumur and centigrade. 
The freezing and boiling points on their scales 
compare as follows: 

Thermometer. Freezing pt. Boiling pt. 

Fahrenheit 32 degrees 2] 2 degrees 

Reaumur zero 80 degrees 

Centigrade zero 100 degrees 

The degrees on one scale are reduced to their 
equivalents on another by these formulas: 



Fahrenheit to Reaumur Subtract 32, multiply 
by four-ninths. 



Fahrenheit to Centigrade Subtract 32, multiply 



by five-ninths. 
Reaumur to 

fourths, add 32 
Reaumur to 

fourths. 



Fahrenheit -Multiply by nine- 
Centigrade Multiply by five- 
Centigrade to Fahrenheit Multiply by nine- 
fifths, add 32. 

Centigrade to Reaumur Multiply by four- 
fifths. 



COMPARATIVE SCALES. 



Cen 
C. F. 

30 equals 22.( 
29 equals 20.5 
28 equals 18.^ 
27 equals 16. ( 
26 equals 14.5 
25 equals 13. ( 
24 equals 11.: 
23 equals 9.4 
22 equals 7 ( 
21 equals 5.J 
20 equals 4.( 
19 equals 2.5 
18 equals 0." 
17 equals 1.4 
16 equals 3.5 
15 equals 5.( 
14 equals 6.J 
13 equals 8.( 
12 equals 10.4 
11 equals 12.5 
10 equals 14.C 

RAIL] 

Time 
I mile. Miles 
Mia. Sec. per hour. 

0:36 100.00 
0:37 97.30 
0:38 94.74 
0:39 92.31 
0:40 90.00 
0:41 87.80 
0:42 85.71 
0:43 83.72 
0:44 81.82 
0:45 80.00 
0"46 78 26 


tigrade to Fahrei 
0. F. 
9 equals 15.8 
8 equals 17.6 
7 equals 19.4 
> 6 equals 21.2 
5 equals 23.0 
4 equals 24.8 
3 equals 26.6 
2 equals 28.4 
1 equals 30.2 
equals 32.0 
1 equals 33.8 
2 equals 35.6 
3 equals 37.4 
4 equals 39.2 
5 equals 41.0 
) 6 equals 42.8 
7 equals 44.6 
8 equals 46.4 
9 equals 48.2 
10 equals 50.0 
11 equals 51.8 

ElOAD TRAIN ! 

Time 
1 mile. Miles 
in.Sec. per hour. 

:ll 60.70 
:12 50.00 
:13 49.31 
:14 48.65 
:15 48.00 
:16 47.37 
:17 46.74 
:18 46.15 
:19 45.57 
:20 45.00 
:21 44.44 
:22 43.90 
:23 43.37 
:24 42.86 
:25 42.35 
:26 41.86 
:27 41.38 
:28 40.91 
:29 40.45 
:30 40.00 
:31 39.56 
:32 39.13 
:33 38.71 


iheit. 
U. F. 

12 equals 53.6 
13 equals 55.4 
14 equals 57.2 
15 equals 59.0 
16 equals 60.8 
17 equals 62. 1 
18 equals 64.4 
19 equals 66.2 
20 equals 68.0 
21 equals 69.8 
22 equals 71.6 
23 equals 73.4 
24 equals 75.2 
25 equals 77.0 
26 equals 78.8 
27 equals 80.6 
28 equals 82.4 
29 equals 84.2 
30 equals 86.0 
50 equals 122.0 
100 equals 212.0 


Ream 
R. F. 
30 equals 35.5 
29 equals 33.2 
28 equals 31.0 
27 equals 28.7 
26 equals 26.5 
25 equals 24.2 
24 equals 22.0 
23 equals 19.7 
22 equals 17.5 
21 equals 15.2 
20 equals 13.0 
19 equals 10.7 
18 equals 8.5 
17 equals 6.2 
16 equals 4.0 
15 equals 1.7 
14 equals 0.5 
13 equals 2.7 
12 equals 5.0 
11 equals 7.2 
10 equals 9.5 


nur to Fahrenbe 
R. F. 
9 equals 11.7 
8 equals 14.0 
7 equals 16.25 
6 equals 18.5 
5 equals 20.7 
4 equals 23.0 
3 equals 25.2 
2 equals 27.5 
1 equals 29.7 
equals 32.0 
1 equals 34.2 
2 equals 36.5 
3 equals 38.7 
4 equals 41.0 
5 equals 43.2 
6 equals 45.5 
7 equals 47.7 
8 equals 50.0 
9 equals 52.2 
10 equals 54.5 
11 equals 56.7 


it. 
R. F. 

12 equals 59.0 
13 equals 61.2 
14 equals 63.5 
15 equals 65.7 
16 equals 68.0 
17 equals 70.2 
18 equals 72.5 
19 equals 74.7 
20 equals 77.0 
21 equals 79.2 
22 equals 81.5 
23 equals 83.7 
24 equals 86.0 
25 equals 88.2 
26 equals 90.5 
27 equals 92.7 
28 equals 95.0 
29 equals 97.2 
30 equals 99.5 
50 equals 144.5 
100 equals 257.0 


SPEED. 

Time 
1 mile. Mile* 
Min.Sec. per hour 

1:46 33.96 


MULTIPLICATION AND DIVISION TABLE 
1 23466789 10 


2 4 6 8 10 12 14 
3 6 9 12 15 18 21 
4 8 12 16 20 24 28 
5 10 15 20 25 30 35 
6 12 18 24 30 36 42 
7 14 21 28 35 42 49 
8 16 24 32 40 48 56 
9 18 27 36 45 54 63 
10 20 30 40 60 60 70 
11 22 33 44 55 66 77 
12 24 36 48 60 72 84 
13 26 39 52 65 78 91 
14 28 42 56 70 84 98 
15 30 45 60 75 90 105 
16 32 48 64 80 96 112 
17 34 51 68 85 102 119 
18 36 54 72 90 108 126 
19 38 57 76 95 114 133 
20 40 60 80 100 120 140 
21 42 63 84 105 126 147 
22 44 66 88 110 132 154 
23 46 69 92 115 138 161 
24 48 72 96 120 144 168 
25 50 75 100 125 150 175 
26 52 78 104 130 156 182 
27 54 81 108 135 162 189 
28 56 84 112 140 168 196 
29 58 87 116 145 174 203 
30 60 90 120 150 180 210 
31 62 93 124 155 186 217 
32 64 96 128 160 192 224 
33 66 99 132 165 198 231 
34 68 102 136 170 204 238 
35 70 105 140 175 210 245 
36 72 108 144 180 216 252 
37 74 111 148 185 222 259 
38 76 114 152 190 228 266 
39 78 117 156 195 234 273 
40 80 120 160 200 240 280 
41 82 123 164 205' 246 287 
42 84 126 168 210 252 294 
43 86 129 172 215 258 301 
44 88 132 176 220 264 308 
45 90 135 180 225 270 315 
46 92 138 184 230 276 322 
47 94 141 188 235 282 329 
48 96 144 192 240 288 336 
49 98 147 196 245 294 343 
50 100 150 200 250 300 350 


16 18 20 
24 27 30 
32 36 40 
40 45 50 
48 54 60 
66 63 70 
64 72 80 
72 81 90 
80 90 100 
88 99 110 
96 108 120 
104 117 130 
112 126 140 
120 135 150 
128 144 160 
136 153 170 
144 162 180 
152 171 190 
160 180 200 
168 189 210 
176 198 220 
184 207 230 
192 216 240 
200 225 250 
208 234 260 
216 243 270 
224 252 280 
232 261 290 
240 270 300 
248 279 310 
256 288 320 
264 297 330 
272 306 340 
280 315 350 
288 324 360 
296 333 370 
304 342 380 
312 351 390 
320 360 400 
328 369 410 
336 378 420 
344 387 430 
352 396 440 
360 405 450 
368 414 460 
376 423 470 
384 432 480 
392 441 490 
400 450 500 


1:47 33.64 
1:48 33.33 
1:49 33.03 
1:50 32.73 
1:51 32.43 
1:52 32.14 
1:53 31.86 
1:54 31.58 
1:55 31.30 
1:56 31.03 
1:57 30.77 
1:58 30.51 
1:59 30.25 
2:00 30.00 


0:47 76.59 
0:48 75.00 
0:49 73.47 
0:50... . 72 00 


0-51 70 59 


2:01 29.75 
2:02 29.52 
2:03 29.27 
2:04 29.03 
2:05 28.80 
2:06 28.57 
2:07 28.34 
2-08 28.12 


0:52 69.23 
0'53 . . 67 92 


0:54 66.66 
0:55 65.45 
0:56 64.29 
0'57 63 16 


0:58 62 07 


0:59 61.02 
1:00 60.00 
1:01 59 02 


:34 38.29 
:35 37.89 
:36 37.50 


2-09 27.91 


2:10 27.69 
2-11 27.48 


02 58 06 


;37 37.11 


2:12 27.27 
2-13 27 09 


03 57 14 


38 36 73 


:04 56.25 
:05 55.38 


:39 36.36 
:40 36.00 
:41 35.64 
:42 35.29 
:43 34.95 
1:44 34.61 
1:45 34.29 


2:14 26.87 


2:15 26.67 
2:16 26.47 
2:17 26.28 
2:18 26.06 
2:19 25.90 
2:20 25.72 


:06 54.55 


:07 53.73 
:08 52.94 
:09 52-. 17 


:10 51.43 


WEDDING ANNIVERSARIES. 

First Cotton. Fifteenth Crystal. 
Second Paper. Twentieth China. 
Third Leather. Twenty-fifth Silver. 
Fifth Wooden. Thirtieth Pearl. 
Seventh Woolen. Fortieth Ruby. 
Tenth Tin. Fiftieth Golden. 
Twelfth Silk and fine Seventy-fifth Diamond 
linen. 



40 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOB 1917. 



TELEGRAPH SYSTEMS OF THE UNITED STATES. 
[From reports of federal census bureau.] 



The figures are for the year ending Dec. 31, 
1912, and cover commercial operating companies 
only. 

LAND TELEGRAPH SYSTEMS. 

Number of companies or svstems 22 

Miles of pole line .' *247,528 

Miles of single wire owned and leased tl,814,196 

Number of messages $103,536,418 

Number of telegraph offices 30,781 

Income, total $56,293,469 

Telegraph traffic $52.337,211 

All other sources $3,956,258 

Net income for the year $3,431,044 

Expenses, total $52,862,425 

General operation and maintenance.. $39,067,011 

Interest and taxes $2,740,827 

All other expenses $11,054,587 

Assets, total $191,516,700 

Construction and equipment $143,910.631 

Stocks and bonds $17.122,592 

Cash and current assets $29.672.528 

Profit and loss deficit $810.949 

Liabilities, total $191,516.700 

Capital stock $104.274.435 

Funded debt $34.741.000 

Reserves $5,254.329 

Accounts payable $12,175,438 

Dividends, taxes and interest $1.460,733 

Sundries $23.447.146 

Profit and loss surplus $10,163.619 

Net surplus $9,352,670 

Capitalization Stock outstanding, par 

value $104,274.435 

Dividends on stock $3.139.861 

Funded debt $34,741.000 

Average number employes 35,639 

Salaries and wages $23,797,980 

*Exclusive of pole line who!ly used by rail- 
roads. tDoes not include 22,816 nautical miles of 
ocean cable operated by one land telegraph com- 
pany. Exclusive also of 314,329 miles of wire 
wholly owned and operated by railway com- 
panies for their own business. tDoes not include 
land messages sent over its 207 miles of leased 
land wire by a wireless company, nor ocean cable 
messages. Exclusive of ocean cable messages. 

WIRELESS TELEGRAPH SYSTEMS. 

Number of companies or systems 4 

Number of messages... *285.091 

Number of tower stations 74 

Income, total $669.158 



Net income $4.738 

Expenses, total $664,420 

General operations and maintenance.. $588,712 

Interest and taxes $7.826 

All other expenses $67,882 

Assets, total $10,377.197 

Construction and equipment $1,205,770 

Cash and current assets $9,171,427 

Liabilities, total $10.377.197 

Capital stock $9,602,570 

Floating debt and mortgages $18.483 

Accounts payable $583,160 

Profit and loss surplus $172,984 

Capitalization Stock outstanding, par 

value $9,602,570 

Average number employes 958 

Salaries and wages $393,606 

Includes 5,013 laud messages sent over a leased 
land wire by a wireless company doing land 
telegraph business also. 

OCEAN CABLE SYSTEMS (U. S.). 

Number of companies or systems* 

Nautical miles of ocean cable* 67,676 

Number of messages* 15,841,280 

Income, total $8.469.374 

Telegraph traffic $8,065,798 

All other sources $403.576 

Net income $2,952,847 

Expenses, total $5.516,527 

General operation $4.008.218 

Interest and taxes $1.214.554 

All other expenses $293.755 

Assets, total $107,583,155 

Construction and equipment $78.136.115 

Stocks and bonds, treasury stock, etc. $16,811,087 

Cash and current assets $12,635.953 

Liabilities, total $107.583.155 

Capital stock $55.489.400 

Funded debt and reserves $43.549.451 

Accounts payable $1,459,797 

Dividends due and sundries $587,229 

Profit and loss surplus $6.497.278 

Capitalization Stock outstanding, par 

value $55.489.400 

Dividends on stock $3.040,200 

Average number employes 1,656 

Salaries and wages $1,167,014 

*Includes returns for Western Union Telegraph 
company, but no segregation could be made of 
financial statistics or employes for the cable 
business of this company. tNumber for one com- 
pany estimated by company reporting. 



UNITED STATES TELEGRAPH STATISTICS (WESTERN UNION). 



YEAB. 


Miles of 
wires. 


Offices. 


Messages. 


Receipts. 


Expenses. 


Profits. 


*Toll. 
Cents. 


*Cost. 
Cents. 


1900 


t!53 


22900 


63167783 


$24 758 570 


$18 593 206 


$6165364 


30 8 


25.1 


1001 


766 


23238 


65657 049 


26 354 151 


19668903 


6685248 


30 9 


25.1 


1902 


984 


t567 


69 374 883 


28 073 095 


20780766 


7 292,329 


31.0 


25.7 


1903 


1 089212 


120 


69 790 866 


29 167 687 


20 953 215 


8 214 472 


31 4 


25 6 


1904 


1 155 405 


23 458 


67*903973 


29 249 390 


21 361 915 


7*887 475 


31 7 


26 1 


1905 


1 184 557 


23 814 


67 477 320 


29*033 635 


21 '845*570 


7 188065 


31 6 


27.3 


1906 


1 256 147 


24 323 


71 487 082 


30675655 


23*605 072 


7070583 


31 6 


27 6 


1907 


1 821 199 


24760 


74 804551 


32856406 


26 532 196 


6 324 210 


33.7 


30.2 


1908 


1 359,430 


23853 


62 371 287 


28 582 212 


25 179 215 


3 402997 


33.7 


34.3 


1909 .. 


1,382,500 


24 321 


68053439 


30 541 073 


t 193 966 


7,347,107 


34.1 


28 5 


1910 ... 


1,429,049 


24825 


75135,405 


33889.202 


614,302 


7,274.900 


35.2 


30.2 


1915 


1.553.593 


25.142 




52.475.721 


972.511 


11,503,180 







*Average per message. 

HIGHEST AND LOWEST CONTINENTAL ALTITUDES, 

In order to compare the elevations in the I ures, showing feet above and below sea level, 
United States with those in foreign countries must be considered as approximate only: 
the following list is given, but many of the fig- I 

Above sea Below sea 

Continent. Highest point. level (ft.). Lowest point. level (ft.). 

North America... Mount McKinley, Alaska 20,300.. Death Valley, California 276 

South America ... Mount Aconcagua, Chile-Argentina.. 23, 080.. Sea level 

Europe Mont Blanc, France 15,782.. Caspian sea, Russia 86 

Asia Mount Everest, India-China 29,002.. Dead sea, Palestine 1,290 

Africa Kibo Peak, German East Africa.... 19, 320.. Desert of Sahara 150 

Australia Mount Kosciusko, New South Wales 7,328.. Lake Torrens, South Australia... 25 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



47 



UNITED STATES TELEPHONE STATISTICS. 

[Government census report 1 * 
Miles 



Year. wire.Telephones. Messages.* 
Bell system... 1912 15,133,186 5.087.027 9.133.226.836 
1907 8,9*7,266 3.132,063 6.401,044.799 
1902 3,387.924 1.317.178 3,074.530,060 
Other systems.1912 5,115,140 3,642.565 4,602.431,409 
1907 4.052.098 2,986,515 3.999.3S9.159 
1902 1.512.527 1,053.866 1,996.024.493 
U't'd States. 1912 20,248.326 8.729,592 t!3.735, 658.245 
1907 12.999.364 6.118.578 tlO.400.433,958 
1902 4,900,451 2,371.044 5,070.554.553 
*The number of messages reported by the Bell 
telephone system includes only completed calls, 
while the figures for all other companies may 
Include some original calls not necessarily com- 
pleted: such as calls that the operator reports 
as "Line busy" or "Does not answer." tEx- 
clusive of companies with an annual income of 
less than $5.000. 

MAIL, TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE. 

The following figures compare the telephone 
traffic with messages sent by mail or by tele- 
graph in Europe and the United States in 1912. 
By mail is meant pieces of first class matter and 
by telephone the number of conversations: 

, Europe. N , United States. N 

Message. Number. Pet. Number. Pet. 

Mail 17,775,000,000 71.210,212.000,000 39.4 

Telegrams .... 388.000,000 1.5 113.000.000 .4 
Telephone 6,809.000,000 27.3 15,600.000.000 60.2 



Total 



.24,972,000.000 100.0 25,925.000.000 100.0 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM STATISTICS. 

[From annual report for years ending Dec. 31. 

1914 and 1915.] 

1914. 1915. 

Total miles pole lines 326,168 330,602 

Miles underground wire 9,760,165 10,536,837 

Miles submarine wire 35,809 36,314 

Miles aerial wire 7,679,620 7,932,394 

Total miles wire 17,475,594 18,505,545 



Total exchange circuits 2,972,901 

Number central offices 5,289 

Number Bell stations 5,763,008 



3,174,271 

5,300 

6,155,900 



1914. 



Number connected stations.... 2,885,985 

Total stations 8,648,993 

Employes 142,527 



1915. 
2,995,321 

9,151,221 
156,294 



Exchange connections daily. ..27, 049^225 25183!? 
Toll connections daily 798,949 

COMBINED BALANCE SHEETS. 



1907. 
Contracts and licenses. $9,078,000 

Telephone plant 502,987,900 

Supplies, tools, etc 17,165,200 

Receivables 29,584,500 

Cash 24,869,600 

Stocks and bonds 29,448,300 

Total assets 613,133,500 

Liabilities Capital stock. $291,095,400 

Funded debts 196,113,700 

Bills payable 45,175,700 

Accounts payable 19,436,600 



1915. 



$880,068,520 
15,951,582 
43,518.625 
45,716,330 
72,652,646 

1,057,907,703 



Total 551,821,400 

Employes' benefit fund 

Surplus and reserves... 61,312,100 




Total assets 613,133,500 1,057,907,703 

EEVEXrES AND EXPENSES. 

1907. 1915. 

Gross revenue $128, 579, 800 $239, 909, 649 

Expenses Operation 45,894,900 84,550,665 

Current maintenance ) ,. ..,,. ... ( 31,171,272 

Depreciation <J6,6-6,700 ( 4 4 i888> 7 2 

Taxes 4,873,400 13,117,253 



Total expenses 87,395,000 173,727,892 



Net revenue , 41,184,800 

Deduct interest 10,508, 500 



Balance net income 

Deduct dividends paid 



18,151,700 



66,181,757 
18,095,643 



48,086,114 
32,897,065 



Balance for surplus 12,524.600 15,189,049 



GREAT AMERICAN INVENTIONS IN LAST FIFTY YEARS. 
[Compiled by Franklin K. Lane, secretary of the interior.] 



Invention, inventor and date. 

Telephone Bell, 1876. 

Typewriter Sholes. 1878. 

Cash register Patterson, 1883. 

Incandescent lamp Edison, 1880. 

Talking machine Edison, 1878. 

Electric furnace reduction Cowles. 1885. 

Electrolytic alkali production Castner, 1890. 

Transparent photograph film Eastman, 1888. 

Motion picture machine Edison, 1893. 

Buttonhole sewing machine Reece, 1881. 

Carborundum Acheson, 1891. 

Calcium Carbide Willson, 1888. 

Artificial graphite Acheson, 1896. 

Split phase induction motor Tesla, 1887. 

Air brake Westinghouse, 1869. 

Electric welding Thomson, 1S89. 

Type bar casting Mergenthaler, 1885. 

Chainstitch shoe sewing machine French & 

Meyers, 1881. 

Single type composing machine Lanston, 18S7. 
Continuous process match machine Beecher, 1888. 
Chrome tanning Schulz, 1884. 
Disk plows (modern type) Hardy, 1896. 
Welt machine Goodyear, 1871. 
Electric lamp Brush, 1879. 
Recording adding machine Burroughs 1888. 
Celluloid Hyatt, 1870. 
Automatic knot tying harvester machine Apple- 

by, 1880. 
Water gas Lowe, 1875. 



Machine for making barbed wire Glidden, 1875. 
Rotary converter Bradley, 1877. 
Automatic car coupler Janney, 1873. 
High speed steel Taylor & White, 1901. 
Dry air process for blast furnace Gayley, 1894. 
Block signals for railways Robinson, 1872. 
Trolley car Van Depoele & Sprague, 1884-1887. 
Harveyized armor plate Harvey, 1891. 
Aeroplane Wright brothers, 1903-1908. 



IMPORTANT FOREIGN INVENTIONS. 

Electric steel Heroult, France, 1900. 

Dynamite Nobel, Sweden, 1867. 

Artificial alizarene (dye) Grabe and Lieberman, 
Germany, 1869. 

Siphon recorder Thompson, England, 1874. 

Gas engine, Otto cycle Otto, Germany, 1877. 

Wireless telegraphy Marconi, Italy, 1900. 

Smokeless powder Vielle, France, 1886. 

Diesel oil motor Diesel, Germany, 1900. 

Centrifugal creamer De Laval, Sweden, 1880. 

Manganese steel Hadfield, England, 1884. 

Electric transformer Gaulard and Gibbs, Eng- 
land. 1883. 

Cyanide process for extracting metal Arthur 
and De Forrest. 1888. 

Mantle burner Welsbach. Austria, 1890. 

By-product coke oven Hoffman, Austria, 1893. 

X-rays Roentgen, Germany, 1896. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 



SHIPPING MEASURE. 
One register ton=lOO cubic feet. 
One United States shipping ton=40 cubic feet or 

32.14 United States bushels or 31.16 imperial 

bushels. 



SHIPPING DATA, 

[Compiled by Charles H. Hughes.] 



From the table, average American coal stows 
43 cubic feet per ton of 2,240 pounds, so 
jLeoooo^igg tons the number she would carry. 

NOTE The following table is based on a ton 
of 2,240 pounds. If the cubic feet per ton of 



One British shipping tc 
imperial bushels or 33. 

MARINER'S 
6 feet=l fathom. 
120 fathoms=l cable len 
5,280 feet=l statute or 
6,080 feet=l knot or na 
3 knots=l league. 

CIRCULAR 

60 seconds=l minute. 
60 minutes=l degree. 
90 degrees=l quadrant. 
4 quadrants or 360 degr 

SHIPPING 
16 ounces=l pound. 
112 pound*=One hundre 
20 hundredweight or 2,2- 
WEIGHTS OF MATER 
CUBIC 
Material. Weight. 
Metals- 
Wrought iron 480 
Cast iron 451 


n=42 cubic feet or 32.72 
75 United States bushels. 
MEASURE. 

gth. 
land mile, 
utical mile. 

MEASURE. 

ees=l circumference. 
WEIGHT 

dweight. 
10 pounds=l ton. 

IALS IN POUNDS PER 
FOOT. 

Material. Weight. 
Juniper 35 


2,000 pounds is require 
given by .892: 
Cub. ft. 
Material. per ton. 
Apples in boxes 90 
Asphplt 17 


d, multiply the figures 

*Cub. ft. 
Material. per ton. 
Maize in bags 50 
Bulk ... 49 


Ballast, sand 19 
Barley in bulk 47 
Bags 59 


Marble 14 


Meat Beef, packed 
and frozen 93 
Hung in quarters 125 
Mutton . 110 


Beans in bags 68 


Beer in hogsheads. 54 
Bottles and cases 80 
Bran in bags 110 


Millet in bags . . 50 


Molasses in bulk... 25 
Oats in bags 78 
Bulk 60 


Compressed, bales 80 
Brandy in casks 80 
Bottled in cases.. 55 
Buckwheat in bags 65 
Butter in cases or 


Oatmeal in sacks... 65 
Oil Lubricating, in 
casks 6ft 


Oranges in boxes... 90" 
Paper in rolls..".... 120 
Peas in bags . 50 


Cement in casks... 46 
Coal (American, av- 
erage) . 43 


Potatoes in bags... 55 
Barrels 68 


Coffee in bags 61 


Rice in bags 48 


Cotton, pressed, in 
bales 130 


Sago 55 


Linden 37 


Salt in barrels .... 52 


Cast steel 490 
Nickel steel 491 


Locust 46 
Mahogany 51 


Iced 60 


Sugar in casks 60 


Brass 520 
Manganese bronze 535 
Copper 550 
Aluminum 160 
Lead .. . . 710 


Maple 42 
Oak (live) 69 
Oak (white) 48 
Poplar 30 
Spruce . 28 


Flour in barrels 60 
Bags 47 
Fuel oil 39 
Granite 14 


Tar in barrels 54 
Tea in chests 100 
Ties, railroad 50 
Water, fresh 36 


Gold (pure) 1,200 
Magnesium 109 
Mercury 846 
Nickel 548 


Sycamore 37 
Teak 51 
White Pine 35 
Yellow Pine 38 


Gravel 23 
Hay, compressed... 110 
Hams in barrels 70 
Hemp, American, 
in bales 105 
Herrings, in barrels 60 
Hides in bales 120 


Salt 35 
Wheat in bags 52 
Bulk 47 
Woods Sawn into 
planks 
Ash 39 
Beech 51 


Platinum 1,347 
Silver 655 

Tin . ..458 


Walnut 36 
Willow 34 

Miscellaneous 


Zinc 436 
Woods Apple 47 
Ash 45 


Common brick 113 
Cement 78 
Cellulose 7.5 


Ice 39 
Iron, pig 10 
Corrugated sheets 36 
Kegs of nails.... 20 
Jute, bale 58 


Elm 60 
Fir 65 
Mahogany 34 
Oak 39 


Beech 46 
Birch 41 


Concrete 130 
Granite 170 


Wool in bales 100 
*Ton of 2,240 pounds. 

[TIONS. 
lount of water displaced 
is floating in equilibrium 
it of the water she dis- 
it of the vessel herself 
i. 
bic feet when floating in 
5 (36 if in fresh water) 
f a ship and her cargo 
of salt water weighs one 
of fresh water the same 

steel vessel is calculated 
is, to the outside of the 
e is made as a rule for 
sll plating. For wooden 
s, lighters, etc.) the dis- 
to the outside of the 

rying capacity of a ves- 
3 of cargo and coal, 
ent is the measurement 
pounds occupying 100, 

measurement in register 
icity of the entire ship, 
surement in register tons 
nade, and is the volume 
>r cargo and passengers, 
ratio of the volume of 
rolume of a block having 
and draft as the vessel. 
>ck coefficients ranging 
fast passenger steamers 
about .65. 


Box 70 
Cedar 39 


Gypsum 140 


Pipes, diff't sizes 12 
DEFIN 
Displacement is the an 
by a vessel. If a vessel 
in still water, the weigl 
places equals the weigt 
with everything on boar 
The displacement in cu 
salt water divided by 3 
gives the total weight o 
in tons, as 35 cubic feet 
ton (2,240 pounds) and 36 
amount. 
The displacement of a 
to the molded lines (that 
frames) and no allowanc 
the thickness of the sh 
vessels (motor boats, tug 
placement is calculated 
planking. 
Dead weight is the cai 
sel and includes the ton 
Register ton measurem 
based on a ton of 2,24 
cubic feet. 
Gross tonnage is the 
tons of the interior caps 
Net tonnage is the mea 
upon which payment is i 
of the space available f< 
Block coefficient is the 
the displacement to the ^ 
the same length, breadth 
Cargo vessels have bl< 
from .75 to .85. while 
have block coefficients o 


Cherry 41 


Marble 170 


Chestnut 35 


Sand 110 


Cork 15 

Cypress 33 


Sandstone . 145 


Stone . . 180 


Dogwood 47 


Soapstone 170 


Ebony 76 


Soft coal 55 


Elm 38 


Hard coal 60 


Fir 37 


Ice . . 56 


Hackmatack 37 
Hemlock 24 


Fresh water 62.5 


Salt water 64 


Hickory .... 48 


Crude oil average 63.5 

US WEIGHTS. 
Material and unit. Lbs. 
Oats 32 


Holly . . 47 


MISCELLANEO 
Material and unit. Lbs. 
One keg nails 100 
One barrel flour. . . 196 
Pork or beef 200 
Salt 280 


Potatoes 60 
Rye . . 56 


Timothy seed.... 45 
Wheat 60 
One gallon mo- 
lasses 12 


One bushel oysters 80 
Clams 100 
Barley ... 48 


Beans 60 


Seven bags of 
sugar 2 240 


Buckwheat 48 
Castor beans 50 
Clover seed 60 
Corn (shelled).... 56 
Corn (on cob)... 70 
Malt 34 


Eleven bags of 
potatoes .... 2 240 


One bag of flour... 140 
One gallon of crude 
oil . . 8% 




JUIRED FOR DIFFER- 
CERIALS. 
las a capacity of 180,000 
coal. How many tons 


STORAGE SPACE REC 
ENT MA' 
Example A steamer I 
cubic feet for carrying 
will she carry? 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 19 J 7. 



If the length, width and draft of a vessel are 
multiplied by the block coefficient and tals pro.. 
uct divided by the weight of water per ton (36 
cubic feet for fresh and 35 for salt water per ton 
ol 2,240 pounds) the displacement of the vessel 
will be obtained. 

SHIPPING TERMS. 

f. o. b. steamer (free on board steamer); goods 
to be delivered on board steamer by seller at no 
extra charge to purchaser. 

f. a. s. steamer (free at side steamer); goods 
to be delivered at side of steamer by seller. 

f. f. a. steamer (free from alongside steamer); 
the seller pays lighterage charges in the port of 
destination from the steamer. 

c. i. f. (cost, insurance and freight); the goods 
are delivered to the purchaser with the insur- 
ance and freight paid by the seller. 

c. f. (cost and freight); the goods are deliv- 
ered to the purchaser with the freight paid by 
the seller, but no insurance. 

f. o. (free over side); the goods are delivered 
over the side of a vessel; that is, to a lighter or 
on to a pier, without any extra charge to the 
purchaser. 

Bill of lading (b. 1.) is a receipt for goods de- 
livered to a carrier for transportation. The bills 
of lading of some steamship companies contain 
the following clause: "Freight is to be consid- 
ered earned at time of receipt of shipment and is 
to be paid whether vessel or goods are lost or 
not." In foreign trade bills of lading are gen- 
erally made out in triplicate, one for the shipper, 
one for the consignee and one for the captain of 
the vessel. 

"With exchange" on a draft means that the 
party on whom the draft is drawn is to pay the 
cost of collection. 

Demurrage A charge for delay in loading or 
unloading a vessel. 

Lay days are the days agreed upon by the 
shipper and captain or agent of a vessel for 
loading and discharging a cargo, beyond which a 
demurrage will be paid to the owners of the ves- 
sel. Sundays and legal holidays do not count un- 
less the term "running days" is inserted, in 
which case all days are included. 

Manifest A document signed by the captain- of 
a vessel containing a list of the goods and mer- 
chandise on board with their destination, for the 
use of the custom nouse officials. Bv United 
States Revised Statutes 2807 it is required to 
contain the names of the ports of loading and 
destination, a description of the vessel and her 
port, names of owners and master, names of con- 
signees and of passengers and lists of the pas- 
senger's baggage and of the sea stores. 

Clearance papers When ready for sea the cus- 
tom officials must be provided with a detail 
manifest of the ship's cargo. If the port charges 
have been paid and her cargo is properly account- 
ed for, then the collector of the port will fur- 
nish the captaia with clearance papers, without 
which the vessel must not leave port. 

Drawbip.'c A refund of duties paid on imported 
material that is used in the manufacture of goods 
that are exported. The United States govern- 
ment allows the exporter the import duty paid, 
less 1 p-3r cent. 

Salvage The reward granted by law for saving 
life and property at sea. 

Jettison The throwing overboard of a part of 



(he cargo or any article on board of a ship for 
the purpose of lightening the ship in case of 
necessity. 

Bill of health A certificate stating that the 
vessel comes from a port where no contagious 
disease prevails, and that none of the passengers 
(if carried) nor the crew at the time of depar- 
ture was infected with any disease. 
MARINE INSURANCE. 

A contract of marine insurance is a contract of 
indemnity whereby the insurer undertakes to 
indemnify the insured in the manner and to the 
extent agreed against marine losses; i. e., the 
losses incident to marine adventure. 

Unless specially mentioned in the policy, goods 
are not insured until they are on board of the 
vessel which is to carry them. Below are brief 
outlines of clauses and terms occurring in poli- 
cies. 

General average Suppose a vessel springs a leak 
and to save her from sinking the captain throws 
overboard a portion of her cargo. The last ship- 
ment loaded on board is generally the first to 
come out. 

If the shipment is fjilly insured the underwrit- 
ers will pay the amount assessed against the 
goods, but whether the goods are insured or not 
the general average will make good to the owner 
the value of the goods which were jettisoned less 
the assessment which the owner is called upon 
to pay. It is safe to figure that all policies of 
insurance on goods cover and protect the mer- 
chant against assessments in general average. 

Thus a merchant can suffer considerable loss 
by reason of assessment levied against his goods 
in general average, although the goods arrive at 
their destination in a perfectly sound condition 
but such losses can be fully covered by insurance. 

Free of particular average (f. p. a.) Under 
American e-ontlitions it is understood that no 
claim for partial loss or damage will be allowed 
by the underwriters unless the loss or damage is 
caused by the vessel's having been burned, 
stranded, sunk or in collision. 

With average (w. a.) This means that no 
claim will be made on the underwriters for par- 
tial loss oaused by sea perils unless the damage 
amounts to 5 per cent or more of the value of 
the shipment. 

Free of all average (f. a. a.) This, as the 
clause signifies, means free of all average. 

Collision or ruling or running down clause (r. 
d. c.) This is a clause in which the underwrit- 
ers take a burden of a proportion, usually three- 
quarters, of the damage inflicted on other vessels 
by collision for which the insured vessel is held 
to blame. Sometimes this clause is extended to 
cover the whole of the assured's liabilities aris- 
ing out of the damage done to property by the 
collision of the insured vessel with another and 
the clause is then known as the "four-fourths 
running down clause." 

Incharmee clause This clause covers loss of 
or damage to hull and machinery through the 
negligence of master, mariners, engineers and pi- 
lots, or through explosions, bursting of boilers, 
breakage of shafts or through any latent defect 
in the machinery or hull, provided such loss or 
damage has not resulted from want of due dili- 
gence by the owners of the ship or by the man- 
ager. 



FATAL THEATER FIRES 
Theater or hall and date. Lives lost. 

Banquet theater, Oporto. March 21, 1888 200 

Earnsley, England (hall), Jan. 11. 1908 16 

Barraque theater, Belgium, Dec. 22, 1912 12 

Bologoe, Russia, March 6, 1911 120 

Cauonsburg, Pa., opera house, Aug. 26, 1911... 26 

Carlsruhe theater, St. Petersburg, 1847 200 

Central theater, Philadelphia, April 28, 1892... 6 

Conway's theater, Brooklyn. Dec. 5, 1876 295 

Exeter theater. England, Sept. 5, 1887 200 

Flores theater, Acapulco, Mex., Feb. 14, 1909.. 250 
Front Street theater, Baltimore. Dec. 8, 1895.. 23 



AND PANICS SINCE 1811. 

Theater or hall and date. Lives lost. 

Houston Street theater, New York, N. Y., 

Feb. 2, 1913 2 

Iroquois, Chicago, Dec. 30, 1903 575 

Italian hall. Calumet, Mich.. Dec. 24, 1913.... 72 

Lehman's theater, Petrograd, 1836 700 

Opera Comique. Paris, May 25, 1887 75 

Rhode'sopera house, Boyertown, Pa., Jan. 13. 1908. 170 

Richmond (Va.) theater, Lec. 26, 1811 70 

Ring theater, Vienna, Dec. 8, 1881 640 

Surabaya theater, Java, Jan. 26, 1914 75 

Vervins, France. March 9, 1913 10 

Villareal theater, Spain, May 27, 1912 80 



50 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



MERCHANT MARINE OF THE UNITED STATES. 
[From the reports of the bureau of navigation.] 



YEAR. 


Ix FOREIGN 
TKADE. 


IN COASTWISE 
TRADE. 


WHALE 
FISHERIES 


Cod and 
Mackerel 
Fish- 
eries. 


Total. 


Annual 
inc. (+) 
or 
dec.( ) 


Steam. 


Total. 


Steam. 


Total. 


Steam. 


Total. 




Tons. 
97.296 
192,544 
146,604 
192,705 
337.356 
538.468 
582,186 
616.053 
667.896 
720.609 
1,346.164 


Tons. 
2,379,396 
1.448.846 
1,314,402 
928.062 
816,795 
782,517 
863,495 
923,225 
1,019.165 
1,066,288 
1,862.714 


Tons. 
770,641 
882,551 
1.064.954 
1,661.458 
2,289,825 
4.330,8!*; 
4,505.567 
4,543,276 
4.646,741 
4,688,240 
4,578.567 


Tons. 
2.644.867 
2,638.247 
2,637,686 
3.409.435 
4.286.516 
6.668,966 
6,720.313 
6,737,046 
6.817.013 
6,818,863 
6,486,384 


Tons. 

'"4.925 
3.986 
3,509 
3.544 
3.653 
3,252 
4.265 
3,682 


Tons. 
166.841 
67,954 
38,408 
18,633 
9.899 
9,308 
9,176 
8,876 
8.611 
9,864 
8,829 


Tons. 
162,764 
91.460 
77,538 
68,367 
51.629 
47.291 
45,806 
45,036 
15,573 
26,700 
15,39? 


Tons. 
5.368,868 
4.246.507 
4.068,034 
4,424,497 
5.164.839 
7.508,082 
7.638,790 
7.714,183 
7,886,551 
7,928,688 
8,389,429 


P 1 


cent. 
-4.06 
r2.4l 
- 2.43 
-2.71 
-6.18 
- 1.61 
- 1.74 
-0.99 
- 2.23 
-2.23 
- 5.49 


I MY) 


1880 


1QOfl 


1900 


1910 


191 1 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 



VESSELS BUILT IN THE UNITED STATES. 



YEAR. 


New 
England 
coast. 


On entire 
seaboard. 


Mississippi 
and tribu- 
taries. 


On great 
lakes. 


Total. 


Sail. 


Steam. 


1890.... 
1900. . . . 


No. 
208 
199 
111 
94 
95 
95 
79 
89 


Tons. 
78,577 
72.179 
23,442 
23,653 
23,052 
27,131 
21,934 
18.551 


No. 

756 
1,107 
887 
1.004 
1,076 
1,022 
887 
777 


Tons. 
169,091 
249.006 
167,829 
190,612 
136485 
247.318 
251,683 
184.605 


No. 
104 
215 
193 
202 
205 
234 
133 
144 


Tons. 
16,506 
14.173 
5,488 
6,398 
5,286 
7,930 
8,018 
5.499 


No. 
191 
125 
281 
216 
224 
219 
131 
147 


Tons 

108,526 
130,611 
168,751 
94,157 
90,898 
90.907 
56.049 
16,467 


No. 
1.051 
1,447 
1,361 
1.422 
1,505 
1,475 
1,151 
1.157 


Tons. 
294.123 
393,790 
342.068 
291,162 
232.669 
346.155 
316.250 
225,122 


No. 
505 
504 
127 
82 
95 
72 
51 
51 


Tons. 

102,873 
116.460 
19,358 
10,092 
21,221 
28.610 
13.749 
8,021 


No. 
410 
422 
936 
969 
1,051 
1,004 

778 

751 


Tons. 
159,045 
202,528 
257.993 
227,231 
153.493 
243.408 
224.225 
154,990 


1910 


1913 

1915'.;!!'.'.;;; 



WORLD'S SHIPS, RAILWAYS, TELEGRAPHS AND CABLES. 

[Report of the bureau of statistics, Washington, D. C.] 
Development by decades of carrying power, commerce and means of communication from 1800 to 1914. 



YEAR. 


Popu- 
lation. 


COMMERCE. 


VESSEL TONNAGE. 


Rail- 
ways. 


Tele- 
graphs 


Cables 


Total. 


Per 

capita. 


Sail. 


Steam. 


Total. 




Mil- 
lions. 
640 
780 
847 
950 
1,075 
1,205 
1,310 
1.439 
1,488 
1,500 
1,616 
1,661 


Mil- 
lionsof 
dollars 
1,479 
1,659 
1,981 
2,789 
4,049 
7,246 
10,663 
14,761 
17,519 
20,105 
33,634 
37,760 


Dol- 
lars. 

2.31 
2.13 
2.34 
2.93 
3.76 
6.01 
8.14 
10.26 
11.80 
13.33 
20.81 
22.73 


Thou- 
sand 
tons. 
4,026 
6.814 
7,100 
9,012 
11,470 
14,890 
12.900 
14,400 
12,640 
8,119 
4,366 
3,686 


Thou- 
sand 
tons. 


Thou- 
sand 
tons. 
4 02(5 


Thou- 
sand 
miles. 


Thou- 
sand 
miles. 


Thou- 
sand 
miles. 




20 
111 

368 
864 
1,710 
3,040 
5.880 
8,295 

27J88 


5,834 
7,211 
9,380 
12,334 
16,600 
15,940 
20,280 
20,935 
21,975 
28.298 
31.074 










0.2 
5.4 
24.0 
67.4 
139.9 
224.9 
390.0 
500.0 
637.0 
703.5 












1850 


5 

100 
281 
440 
768 
1.180 
1.307 
1,489 


1^6 

I" 

49 
132 
200 
291 
335 


1860 




IKfifl 


IRQO 


1*400 


1910 


1914 



MERCHANT SHIPBUILDING, 1912 TO 
[From Lloyd's Register.] 



1916. 



Where built. No. 

United kingdom .................... 712 

British colonies .................... 84 

Austria-Hungary ................... 12 

Denmark ........................... 22 

France ............................. 80 

Germany ............................ 165 

Italy ................................ 27 

Japan ............................... 168 

Netherlands ........................ 112 

Norway ............................. 89 

Sweden ............................. 22 

United States: 

Coast ............................. 144 

Great Lakes ...................... . 30 

Other countries ..................... 52 



-1912 , 

Tons. 
1,738,514 
34,790 
38,821 
26,103 
110,734 
375,317 
25,196 
57,755 



50,255 
13,968 



194,273 
89,950 



No. 

688 
91 
17 
31 



152 
95 

74 
25 



Tons. 
1,932,153 
48,339 
61,757 
40,932 

176,095 

465,226 
50,356 
64,664 

104,296 
50,637 
18,524 

228,232 
48,216 
43,455 



1914 , , 


No. 


Tons. 


No. 


656 


1,683,553 


327 


80 


47,534 


31 


11 


*34,335 


t 


25 


32,815 


23 


33 


114,052 


6 


89 


*387,192 


t 


47 


42,981 


30 


32 


85,861 


26 


130 


118,153 


120 


61 


54,204 


59 


26 


15,163 


.27 


84 


162,937 


76 


10 


37,825 


8 


35 


*36,148 


10 




Total ............................. 1,719 2,901,769 1,750 3,332,882 1,319 *2,852,753 743 *1,201,638 

*Returns not complete. fReturns not available. European war would last three years led to an 
Late in 1915 and early in 1916 belief that the exceptional development of shipbuilding by the 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



51 



maritime powers not actively engaged in war. 
In the first six months of 1916 the United States 
launched and put into operation 192 ships of 
228,016 gross tons (each over 100 tons) more 
than the entire year's output for 1914 or 1915. 



On July 1, 1916, private American shipyards 
were building or had on order 385 steel merchant 
ships of 1,225,784 gross tons, indicating a total 
output by the United States for the twelve 
months of 351 steel ships of 672,106 gross tons. 



DISASTERS TO SHIPPING. 

On and near the coasts and on the rivers of the United States and American vessels at sea and 
on the coasts of foreign countries. 



YEAR. 


Wrecks* 


Lives 
lost. 


Loss on 
vessels. 


Loss on 
cargoes. 


YEAR. 


Wrecks* 


Lives 
lost. 


Loss on 
vessels. 


Loss on 
cargoes. 


1895.... 


1,496 


704 


$7,530,540 


$1,944,810 


1906.... 


1,326 


499 


$10.089,610 


$2,245,305 


1896 


1 392 


3li9 


6 485 595 


2018.140 


1907 


1 670 


624 


13 709 915 


3062 110 


1897 


1 206 


299 


6 442 175 


1,731,766 


1908 


1 341 


374 


9555825 


2 152,155 


1898. 


1 191 


743 


10 728 250 


1,740,515 


1909 


1 317 


403 


9491 635 


3 330,825 


1899.. 


1,574 


742 


8,932.835 


2,451,905 


1910.... 


1493 


403 


11 058,840 


2,565,580 


im.:.: :: 


1,234 


252 


7,186.990 


3.350,500 


1911 . . . 


1,227 


262 


9.565,995 


1,694,630 


1901.... 


1.313 


452 


7.094.345 


2,147,675 


1912.... 


1,447 


195 


8,213,375 


1,941,010 


1902... 


1,359 


531 


8,S2;>.920 


2,309,335 


1913 


1,265 


283 


8,338,935 


1,549,285 


1903 


1 704 


3 7 6 


7 Oil 775 


1 722 210 


1914 


1 210 


421 


11 437 3oO 


2 509 405 


1904 


1 182 


1454 


; e;28 556 


1 634 615 


1915 


1088 


277 


10 199560 


4013083 


iS.:::::: 


1.209 


267 


8,187.500 


2,263,795 


*Total or part 


al. 









PRINCIPAL SEAPORTS OF THE WORLD. 

[From statistical abstract of the United States.] 
NET VESSEL TONNAGE IN FOREIGN TRADE. 



Port. Year. Entered. Cleared. 
Adelaide, Australia 1913 608,000 379,000 
Aden Arabia 1914 3 925 000 3 919 000 


Port. Year. Entered. Cleared. 
Liverpool, England 1914 11,959,000 10,813,000 
London England 1914 13,006,000 10,453,000 


Alexandria Egypt 1913 2 641 000 1 856 000 


Marseilles France 1312 8 382 000 S 492 000 


Antwerp, Belgium 1912 13,*757,'oOO 13*722*000 
Baltimore Aid 1915 2 043 000 2 163 000 


Melbourne, Australia 1913 718,000 244,000 
Moji Japan . . 1914 5 084 000 5 006 000 


Barcelona,' Spain 1913 2,641,000 1,856,000 


Montevideo, Uruguay 1912 8,598,000 8,593,000 
Montreal, Canada .1915 2,000,000 2,031,000 
Nagasaki, Japan 1914 2 705 000 2 717 000 


Bilbao, Spain 1913 2,015,000 1,940,000 
Bombay, India 1913 2,174,000 1,695,000 
Bordeaux, France 1912 2,118,000 2,258,000 
Boston Mass 1915 2 464 000 1 660 000 


Naples Italy .... 1914 5 120 000 5 033 0(K) 


New Orleans, La 1915 3064000 3093000 


Boulogne, France 1912 2,940,000 2,938,000 
Bremen, Germany 1113 1,511,000 1,506,000 
Bremerhaven, Germanr-.1913 2,038,000 1,945,000 
Buenos Aires, Argentina. 1912 7,962,000 6,285,000 
Calcutta, India 1913 2,003,000 1,997,000 
Cape Town, U. of S. A.. 1313 2,542,000 2,226,000 
Cardiff Wales 1914 7 285 000 8 933 000 


New York, N. Y 1915 12,579,000 12,162,000 
Odessa, Russia 1913 1570000 1471000 


Petrograd, Russia 1913 2,441000 2500000 


Philadelphia, Pa 1915 1,909,000 1,756,000 
Piraeus, Greece 1914 4 067 000 4 055 000 


Port Natal, U. of S. A.. 1913 2,693,000 2,725,000 
Puget Sound Wash 1915 2 921 000 3 046 000 


Cherbourg, France 1912 4,139,000 4,140,000 
Colombo, Ceylon 1913 7,714,000 7,658,000 
Constantinople, Turkey.. 1913 14,319,000 
Copenhagen, Denmark.. ..1912 3,441,000 3,484.000 
Cork Ireland 1914 3 120 000 2,954,000 


Riga, Russia 1913 1670000 l'702*000 


Rio de Janeiro, Brazil... 1914 6,420,000 6,426,000 
Rotterdam, Holland 1913 12,308,000 12,261,900 
Sun Francisco, Cal 1915 1,228,000 1,359,000 
Santos, Brazil ... 1914 4341000 4353000 


Dunquerque, France 1912 1,979,000 2,001,000 
Fiume, Austria-Hungary. 1912 2,125,000 2,144,000 
Fren:antle, Australia 1913 934,000 844,000 
Galveston Tex 1915 1 562 000 1,958,000 


Shanghai, China 1914 9 398 000 9 553 000 


Singapore, Straits Sets.. 1913 8,636,000 8,618,000 
Southampton, England. ..1914 4,652,000 4,655,000 
Sydney Australia 1913 1 093 000 1 073 000 


Genoa, Italy 1014 5,336,000 5,119,000 
Gibraltar 1913 6 315 000 6,161,000 


Tampico, Mexico 1912 1,521,000 l,'516,'oOO 
Trieste, Austria-Hiingnrvl913 3.466,000 3,460,000 
Tyne Ports, England 1914 5,999,000 7,242,000 
\ alencia Soain 1913 1 705 000 1 5^3 oOO 


Glasgow Scotland 1914 3,012,000 3,987,000 


Hamburg, Germany 1913 12,997,000 13,192,000 
Havana, Cuba 1914 3,378,000 3,375,000 


ValetCa, Malta 1914 S^e'oOO s'^'OQO 
Vancouver, Canada 1^15 1 892 000 1 700 000 


Havre France 1912 4 444 000 4,584,000 


Hongkong-Victoria 1913 11,484,000 11,455,000 
Hull, England 1912 3,964,583 3,496,000 


Vera Cruz, Mexico 1912 l,*447,'oOO 1,'427*000 
Victoria, Canada 1915 2,011,000 2,097,000 
Vladivostok, Russia 1913 955,000 941,000 
Yokohama. Janan... 1014 3 QQ9 nnn Q sn^ nnn 


Kobe, Japan 1914 6,447,000 6,367,000 
Lisbon Portugal 1913 10 389 000 10 470,000 




CRUDE PETROLEUM PRODUC 

Year. Gallons. Year. Gallons. 
1900 2,661,233,568 1909 7.649.639,508 
1903. . 4219376154 1910 8,801,354.016 


ED IN THE UNITED STATES. 

, *Barrels , 
State. 1914. 1915. 
Kentucky 502 441 437 274 


1904 4.916,663682 1911 9.258.874.422 
1905 5.658,138,360 1912 9.328.755,156 


Louisiana . 14 309*435 18 191*539 


New York '938*974 '887*778 


1906 5,312.745,312 1913 10,434,741,660 
1907 6.976.004.070 1914 11,162,026,470 


Ohio 8536*352 7825*326 




1908 7,498148910 1915... . 16806372368 


Pennsylvania 8'l70*335 7*838*705 
Texas 20 068 184 24 942 701 


PRODUCTION BY STATES IN 1914 AND 1915. 
, *Barrels <. 
State. ^ 1914. 1915. 


West Virginia 9*680,'o33 9,*264,'798 
Wyoming ... 3 560 375 4 9 45 525 


Other states ' 7*792 ' 14*265 


California 99,775,327 86,591,535 
Colorado 2?? 773 208 475 


Total 265,762^535 281,104,104 


Illinois 21919*749 19 041 '695 


Indiana 1335456 '875*758 




Kansas . 3.103*585 2.823*487 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



UNITED STATES COAST GUARD. 
ADMINISTRATION, 1916-1917. 
Captain commandant Ellsworth P. Bertholf, 



General superintendent Sumner I. Kimball 
Chief of division of operations Oliver H. Maxan.. 
Assistant chief of division of operations Henry 

L. Gosling. 
Chief of division of material George H. Slay- 

baugh. 
Assistant chief of division of material Kendall 

J. Minot. 
Superintendent of construction and repair Senior 

Captain Howard Emery. 
Engineer in chief Charles A. McAllister. 
Inspector Senior Captain Daniel P. Foley. 
OPERATIONS IN 1915.* 

Lives saved 1,507 

Persons on board vessels assisted 10,952 

Persons in distress cared for 

Vessels boarded and papers examined 24,817 
Vessels seized or reported for viola- 
tion of law 772 

Fines and penalties incurred by ves- 
sels reported $220,500 

Regnttas and marine parades patrolled 

Derelicts removed or destroyed 

Vessels to which assistance was given 1,504 

Value of vessels assisted $10,927,730.00 

Value of derelicts recovered 161,000.00 

Appropriation for 1915 5,089,241.61 

Expended for maintenance and repairs 5,027,752.71 
*Fiscal year ended June 30. 

FUNCTIONS AND DUTIES. 
Under an act of congress approved Jan. 28, 
1915, it was provided that in lieu of the then 
existing revenue cutter service and life saving 
service there should be established an organiza- 
tion to be known as the coast guard which was 
to constitute a part of the military forces of 
the United States, operating under the secretary 
of the navy in time of war and under the treas- 
ury department in time of peace. The revenue 
cutter service had existed since 1790, while the 
life saving service had its beginning in 1848, 
although it was not made into a separate es- 
tablishment until June 18, 1878. The consolida- 
tion of the two services was completed in 1915. 
The coast guard being a part of the military 
forces of the government, the military system of 
the former revenue cutter service was utilized as 
a basis for the organization of the coast guard. 
The transfer of the personnel of the former life 
saving service to the coast guard was accom- 
plished by issuing appointments as commissioned 
officers, warrant officers and petty officers to the 
district superintendents, keepers and No. 1 surf- 
men, respectively, and regularly enlisting the 
surfmen. The total authorized complement of 
warrant officers, petty officers and men is 3,886. 
The pay of the commissioned personnel, except 
for the grade of district superintendent, corre- 
sponds with the pay and allowances of like rank 
in the army. The pay of warrant officers and 
enlisted men remains the same as before the 
consolidation of the services. Warrant officers 
are appointed by the secretary of the treasury 
and hold their appointments during good be- 
havior. Petty officers and other men are en- 
listed for periods of one year. Warrant and 
petty officers receive 10 per cent increase for 
every five years of service, not to exceed 40 per 
cent in all. Enlisted men receive an increase 
for each three years of continuous service up to 
and including fifteen years. 

The authorized commissioned personnel of the 
coast guard is 255, divided into the following 
grades : One captain commandant, 6 senior cap- 
tains, 31 captains, 37 first lieutenants, 42 second 
lieutenants, 42 third lieutenants, 1 engineer in 
chief, 6 captains of engineers, 28 first lieutenants 
of engineers, 22 second lieutenants of engineers, 
24 third lieutenants of engineers, 2 constructors 
with rank of first lieutenant, 1 district super- 
intendent with relative rank of captain, 3 dis- 
trict superintendents with relative rank of first 
lieutenant, 4 district superintendents with rela 



ive rank of second lieutenant, and 5 district 
superintendents with relative rank of third lieu- 
:enant. A coast guard academy is maintained 
n New London, Conn. June 30, 1915, there were 
seven cadets of the line and six cadets engineers 
it the academy. The school course extends over 
hree years and embraces instruction in profes- 
sional and academic subjects. Admission is by 
competitive examination and candidates must be 
not less than 18 nor more than 24 years of age. 
Candidates for the engineer corps must be not 
ess than 21 nor more than 26 years of age. 

By law the officers of the revenue cutter Bery- 
ce rank as follows: 

Captain commandant, -with colonel in army and 
captain in navy. 

Senior captain and engineer in chief, with lieu- 
tenant-colonel in army and commander in the 
navy. 

Captain and captain of engineers, with major in 
army and lieutenant-commander in navy. 

First lieutenant and first lieutenant of engi- 
neers, with captain in army and senior lieu- 
tenant in navy. 

Second lieutenant and second lieutenant of engi- 
neers, with first lieutenant in army and junior 
lieutenant in navy. 

Third lieutenant and third lieutenant of engi- 
neers, with second lieutenant in army and en- 
sign in navy. 

DUTIES OF COAST GUARD. 
In general the duties of the coast guard may 

be classified as follows: 

1. Rendering assistance to vessels in distress 
and saving life and property. 

2. Destruction or removal of wrecks, dere- 
licts and other floating dangers to navigation. 

3. Extending medical aid to United States 
vessels engaged in deep sea fisheries. 

4. Protection of the customs revenue. 

5. Operating as a part of the navy in time 
of war or when the president shall direct. 

6. Enforcement of law and regulations govern- 
ing anchorage of vessels in navigable waters. 

7. Enforcement of law relative to quarantine 
and neutrality. 

8. Suppression of mutinies on merchant vessels. 

9. Enforcement of navigation and other laws 
governing merchant vessels and motor boats. 

10. Enforcement of law to provide for safety 
of life on navigable waters during regattas and 
marine parades. 

11. Protection of game and the seal and other 
fisheries in Alaska, etc. 

12. Enforcement of sponge fishing law. 

In addition to the foregoing the services of 
the coast guard include many other things, such 
as warning vessels running into danger, medical 
and surgical aid to the sick and injured, recovery 
and burial of bodies cast up by the waters, 
extinguishing fires, maintenance of public order, 
acting as pilots in emergencies and furnishing 
transportation to other branches of the public 
service. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The equipment of the coast guard consists of 
twenty-four cruising cutters, eighteen harbor cut- 
ters and 279 coast stations. The stations are dis- 
tributed as follows: First district (Maine and 
New Hampshire), 15; second district (Massachu- 
setts), 32; third district (Rhode Island and 
Fishers island), 10; fourth district (Long 
island), 30; fifth district (New Jersey), 41; 
sixth district (coast between Delaware and 
Chesapeake bays), 19; seventh district (Virginia 
south of Chesapeake bay), 34; eighth district 
(South Csirolina, Georgia and east coast of Flori- 
da), 9; ninth district (coast of United States on 
Gulf of Mexico), 8; tenth district (Lakes Erie and 
Ontario and Louisville, Ky. ), 12; eleventh dis- 
trict (Lakes Huron and Superior), 19; twelfth 
district (Lake Michigan), 31; thirteenth district 
(California, Oregon, Washington and Nome, 
Alaska), 19. 

Following are the names, dates of construction 
(in parentheses), chief dimensions, tonnage, arma- 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



53 



tnent, speed and headquarters of the vessels of 
the coast guard: 

CRUISING CUTTEBS. 
Acushnet (1908) Length, 152 feet; beam. 29 feet: 

draft, 13 feet 9 inches; displacement, 800 tons; 

two one-pounder guns; speed, 12% knots; Woods 

Hole, Mass. 
Algonquin (1898) Length, 205 feet 6 inches; beam, 

32 feet; draft, 13% feet; displacement, 1,181 

tons; four six-pounder guns; speed, 16 knots; 

San Juan. P. It. 
Androscoggin (1908) Length, 210 feet; beam, 35 

feet 2 inches; draft, 17% feet; displacement, 

1,600 tons ; four six-pounder guns ; Portland, Me. 
Apache (1891) Length. 188 feet; beam, 29 feet; 

draft, 9 feet 3 inches; displacement, 700 tons; 

three three-pounder guns; Baltimore, Md. 
Bear (1874) Length, 198 feet; beam 28% feet; 

draft. 18 feet 2 inches; displacement 1,700 tons; 

speed, 8 knots; three six-pounder guns; San 

Diego, Cal. 
Gresham (1897) Length, 205% feet; beam, 32 

feet; draft, 12% feet; displacement, 1,090 tons; 

speed, 17 knots; four six-pounder guns; Bos- 
ton, Mass. 
Itasca (1893) Length, 189% feet; beam, 32 feet; 

draft, 13 feet 10 inches; displacement, 980 tons; 

speed, 14% knots; four six-pounder guns; prac- 
tice ship. 
McCulloch (1897) Length. 219 feet; beam, 32 feet 

6 inches; draft. 15 feet 11 inches; displace- 
ment, 1,400 tons; four six-pounder guns; San 

Francisco, Cal. 
Manning (1897) Length, 205 feet; beam, 32 feet; 

draft, 13 feet 9 inches; displacement, 1.15C 

tons; speed, 17 knots; four six-pounder guns; 

Astoria, Ore.- . 

Miami (1912) Length, 190 feet; beam, 32% feet; 

draft, 14 feet 1 inch; displacement, 1,300 tons; 

three six-pounder guns; speed, 12% knots; Key 

West, Fla. 
Mohawk (1902) Length, 205% feet; beam, 32 feet; 

draft. 12 feet 7 inches; displacement, 1,150 

tons; four six-pounder guns; New York, N. Y. 
Morrill (1889) Length 145 feet- 3 inches; beam, 24 

feet; draft. 9% feet; displacement, 420 tons; 

one three-pounder gun; Detroit, Mich. 
Onondaga (1898) Length, 205% feet; beam, 32 

feet; draft. 13 feet 2 inches; displacement, 

1,190 tons; four six-pounder guns; Norfolk, Va. 
Ossipee (1915) Length, 165 feet 10 inches; beam, 

32 feet ; draft, 11 feet 6 inches ; displacement, 

908 tons ; four rapid-fire six-pounder guns ; speed 

12% knots; Portland, Me. 
Pamlico (1907) Length, 158 feet; beam, 30 feet; 

draft, 5 feet 8 inches; displacement, 450 tons; 

two three-pounder guns: Newbern, N. C. 
St-minole (1900) Length, 188 feet; beam, 29% feet; 

draft, 11 feet 8 inches; displacement, 845 tons; 

nominal speed, 16% knots; four six-pounder 

guns; Wilmington, N. C. 
Seneca (1908) Length, 204 feet; beam, 34 feet; 

draft, 17 feet 3 inches; displacement, 1,445 tons; 

speed, 12% knots; four six-pounder guns; used 

exclusively as a derelict destroyer; New York, 



AREAS OF OCEANS 

Oceans Sq. miles. 

Antarctic .... 5,731.350 

Arctic 4,781,000 

Atlantic 34.801.400 

Indian 17,084,000 

Pacific 67.699.630 

Lakes Baikal... 13,000 

Chad 50,000 

Erie 9,960 

Great Bear .. 10,000 
Great Slave... 12,008 



Snohomish (1907) Length. 152 feet; beam, 29 feet; 
draft, 15 feet 5 inches; displacement. 880 tons; 
two one-pounder guns; used chiefly for life sav- 
ing purposes on north Pacific coast; Port An- 
geles. Wash. 

Tallapoosa (1915) Length, 165 feet 10 inches; 
beam, 32 feet ; draft, 11 feet 6 inches ; displace- 
ment, 912 tons ; speed, 12% knots ; oil burner ; 
four rapid-fire six-pounders ; Mobile, Ala. 

Thetis (1881) Length, 188% feet; beam, 29 feet; 
draft, 17 feet 10 inches; displacement, 1,250 
tons; three three-pounders; Honolulu, H. I. 

Tuscarora (1902) Length, 178 feet; beam, 30 feet; 
draft, 10 feet 11 inches; displacement, 740 
tons; one three-pounder gun; Milwaukee, Wis. 

Unalga (1912) Length, 190 feet; beam. 32% feet; 
draft, 14 feet 1 inch; displacement, 1,180 tons; 
speed, 12% knots ; three six-pounder guns ; 
Seattle, Wash. 

Windom (1896) Length, 170 feet 8 inches; beam, 
27 feet; draft, 9% feet; displacement, 670 tons; 

three three-pounder guns; Galveston, Tex. 

Yamacraw (1909) Length, 191 feet 8 inches; 
beam, 32%\ feet; draft, 1? feet; displacement, 
1,080 tons; four six-pounders; Savannah, Ga. 

HARBOR CUTTERS AND LAUNCHES. 

Alert (1907) Launch ; length, 61% feet; Mobile, 

Ala. 

Arcata (1903) Tug; length, 85 feet: displace- 
ment, 140 tons; Port Townsend, Wash. 
Calumet (1894) Harbor boat; length, 94V 2 feet; 

displacement, 170 tons; New York, N. Y. 
Davey (1908) Harbor vessel; length, 92% feet; 

displacement, 180 tons; New Orleans, La. 
Golden Gate (1896) Harbor vessel; length, 110 

feet; displacement, 240 tons; San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Guard (1914) Harbor craft; length, 67% feet; 

Mare Island navy yard. 
Guide (1907) Motor boat; length, 70 feet; New 

York, N. Y. 
Guthrie (1895) Harbor vessel; length. 88 feet; 

displacement, 150 tons; Baltimore, Md. 
Hartley (1875) Harbor vessel; length, 64% feet; 

displacement, 65 tons; San Francisco, Cal. 
Hudson (1893) Harbor vessel; length, 96% feet; 

displacement, 180 tons; New York, N. Y. 
Mackinac (1903) Harbor vessel; Jength, 110 feet; 

displacement, 240 tons; Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Manhattan (1873) Harbor vessel: length, 102 feet; 

displacement, 145 tons; New York, N. Y. 
Penrose (1883) Launch; length. 67- feet; Pensa- 

cola, Fla. 
Seout (1896) Steam launch; length, 63 feet; 

Seattle, Wash. 
Vigilant (1910) Motor launch; length, 45 feet; 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 
Winnisimmet (1903) Harbor vessel: length, 96% 

feet; displacement, 180 tons; Boston. Mass. 
Wissahickon (1904) Harbor vessel; length, 96% 

feet; displacement, 195 tons; Philadelphia, Pa. 

STATION SHIP. 
Coif ax Length, 179 feet 5 inches; beam. 25 feet; 

draft, 10 feet; displacement, 486 tons; used as 

station ship at service depot, Arundel Cove. Md. 



AND GREAT LAKES 
Sq. miles.. 
Huron . 23 800 


AVERAGE DEPTH 01 

Feet. 
Antarctic 10 800 


' OCEANS AND SEAS, 

Feet. 
Caribbean 7,614 


Michigan 2 450 


Arctic 5 160 


China 402 


Nyassa 12 000 


Atlantic 12 200 


Japan 7 320 


Ontario '. '. 7 240 


Indian 11,136 


Mediterranean .... 4.560 


Superior . 31 200 


Pacific 12,960 


Mexico, Gulf of... 4.632 


Tanganyika 15 000 


Baltic 122 


North 300 






Okhotsk 5 040 


za 26,500 
Winnipeg .... 9.00C 


The mean depth of al 
estimated to be from 2 


the oceans and seas Is 
bo 2% miles. 



MONEY SPENT FOR CHEWING GUM. 



In the last ten years, according to figures 
compiled by the department of commerce, the 
United States has spent for the chicle used in 
the manufacture of chewing gum nearly $35,000,- 
000. The normal annual imports of chicle amount 
to 7,000,090 pounds, costing about $2,500,000, to 
which are to be added American customs duties of 



some $750,000. Chicle is the dried milky juice 
of the sapodilla tree and it is imported chiefly 
from Mexico, British Honduras, Venezuela and 
the Central American republics. That imported 
from Canada comes from British possessions in 
the tropics. 



54 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 
CANAL STATISTICS (OFFICIAL). 
Length from deep water to deep water 50.5 miles. 
Length on laud 40.5 miles. 
Length at summit level 31.7 miles. 
Bottom width of channel Maximum. 1,000 feet: 

minimum (in Culebra cut), 300 feet. 
Depth Minimum. 41 feet; maximum. 45 feet. 
Summit level 85 feet above mean tide. 
Locks in pairs 12. 
Locks, usable length 1.000 feet. 
Locks, usable width 110 feet. 
Gatun lake, area 164 square miles. 
Gatun lake, channel depth 85 to 45 feet. 
Concrete required 5,000,000 cubic yards. 
Time of transit through canal 10 to 12 hours. 
Time of passage through locks 3 hours. 



Length of relocated Panama railroad 46.2 miles. 

Canal Zone area About 448 square miles. 

Canal Zone area owned by United States About 

322 square miles. 
French buildings acquired 2.150. 
French buildings used 1.537. 
Value of utilized French equipment $1.000.000. 
Canal force, average at work About 39.000. 
Estimated total cost of canal $375.000.000. 
PANAMA CANAL OFFICIALS.* 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Governor Maj. -Gon. G. W. Goethals. U. S. A. 

Executive Secretary C. A. Mcllvaine. 

Chief Division of Civil Affairs Crede II. Cal- 

houn. 
Chief Division of Police and Fire Capt. Harry 

D. Mitchell, U. S. A. 
District Attorney Charles R. Williams. 
Department Headquarters Balboa Heights, Canal 

Zone. 

DEPARTMENT OP OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Engineer of Maintenance Lieut.-Col. Chester 

Harding, U. S. A. 
Assistant to Engineer of Maintenance Lieut.-Col. 

Jay J. Morrow, U. S. A. 
Marine Superintendent Comdr. H. I. Cone, U. 

S. N. 
Resident Engineer, Division of Dredging W. G. 

Comber. 

Superintendent Mechanical Division D. C. Nut- 
ting, Jr.. U. S. N. 
Resident Engineer Building Division George M. 

Wells. 
Assistant Engineer Division of Fortifications 

Lieut. Creswell Garlington. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Chief Quartermaster Maj. W. R. Grove, U. S. A. 
Assistant Chief Quartermaster Capt. F, H. 

Smith. 
Headquarters Balboa Heights. 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT. 

Auditor H. A. A. Smith. 
Paymaster John H. McLean. 
Headquarters Balboa Heights. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Chief Health Officer Lieut. Col. Deane C. 

Howard, U. S. A. 

Superintendent Maj. A. E. Truby, U. S. A. 
General Inspector Maj. Elbert E. Persons, U. 

S. A. 
Headquarters Balboa Heights. 

WASHINGTON OFFICE. 

General Purchasing Officer and Chief of Office 

M-n. Earl I. Brown. 
Assistant to Chief of Office Ray L. Smith. 

COURTS. 

District Judge William H. Jackson. 
Marshal W. H. May. 
Headquarters Ancon. 

*Tlio Panama cnrnl commission went out of 
existence April 1, 1914, and was succeeded by the 
permanent organisation, with departments and 
officers as outlined above. 

CHRONOLOGY. 
First exploration of route 1527. 
Advocated by Haraholdt 1803. 
Panama railroad built 1850-1855. 
Panama canal compauy formed by DeLesseps 1879 
Work on canal begun Feb. 24. 1881. 
Canal company failed Dec. 11. 1888. 



De Lesseps and others sentenced to prison for 

fraud Feb. 9. 1893. 

New French canal company formed October, 1894. 
De Lesseps died De. 7. 1894. 
Hay-Pauncefote treaty superseding the Clayton- 

Bulwer treaty signed Nov. 18. 1901: ratified by 

senate Dec. 16: ratified by Great Britain Jan. 

20. 1902. 
Canal property offered to the United States for 

$40,000.000 Jan. 9. 1902: accepted Feb. 16. 1903. 
Bill authorizing construction of canal passed by 

house of representatives Jan. 9. 1902; passed by 

senate June 19, 1902; approved June 28. 1902. 
Canal treaty with Colombia signed Jan. 22, 1903; 

ratified by Senate March 17. 1903: rejected by 

Colombia Aug. 12. 1903. 
Revolution in Panama Nov. 3, 1903. 



. 
Canal treaty with Panama negotiated Nov. 18. 

1903: ratified by republic of Panama Dec. 2. 1903- 

ratified by United States senate Feb. 23. 1904! 
Canal commissioners appointed Feb. 29. 1904. 
Papers transferring canal to the United States 

signed in Paris April 22. 1904. 
Bill for government of Canal Zone passed by 

the senate April 15. 1904; passed by the house 

April 21: approved April 26. 
Canal property at Panama formally turned over 

to the United States commissioners May 4. 1904. 
Work begun by Americans May 4, 1904. 
President outlines rules for the government of 

the Canal Zone and war department takes 

charge of the work May 9. 1904. 
Gen. George W. Davis appointed first governor 

of Canal Zone May 9. 1904. 
John F. Wallace appointed chief engineer May 

10. 1904: resigned June 29. 1905. 
Republic of Panama paid $10.000.000 May 21. 1904. 
First payment on $40.000,000 to French canal com- 

pany made May 24. 1904. 
Lorin C. Collins appointed Supreme court judge 

for Canal Zone Juno 17. 1905. 
New commission with Theodore P. Shonts as 

chairman named April 3. 1905; Shonts resigned 

March 4. 1907. 
John F. Stevens appointed chief engineer June 

29, 1905: resigned Feb. 26. 1907. 
Lieut.-Col. Goorge W. Goethals appointed chief 

engineer Feb. 26. 1907. 
Gatun dam finished. June 14. 1913. 
Dry excavation completed. Sept. 10, 1913. 
First vessel lifted through Gatun locks. Sept. 

26. 1913. 

Garaboa dike blown up. Oct. 10. 1913. 
First vessels pass through Miraflores locks. Oct. 

Permanent organization of canal administration 

in effect April 1. 1914: Col. George W. Goe- 

thals first governor ; existence of isthmian ca- 

nal commission ended. 
First freight barges go through canal from ocean 

to ocean May 14. 1914. 
First steamship (the Cristobal) passes through 

canal Aug. 13, 1914. 

Canal opened for general traffic Aug. lo, 1914. 
Canal blocked by slides, September, 1915, to 

April, 1916. 

DESCRIPTION OF CANAL. 

The entire length of the Panama canal from 
deep water in the Atlantic to deep water in the 
Pacific is 50.5 miles. Its length on land is 40.5 
miles. In passing through the canal from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific a vessel enters a channel 
with a bottom width of 500 feet in Limon bay 
and follows this for about seven miles to Gatun. 
where it enters a series of three locks in flight 
and is lifted eighty-five feet to the level of the 
Gatun lake. It sails at full ocean speed through 
this lake, in a channel varying from 1.000 
to oOO feet in width, for a distance of about 
twenty-four miles, to Bas Obispo, where it en- 
ters the Culebra cut, which on April 28, 1915, was 
by executive order named tlie Gaillard cut in 
honor of Col. D. D. Gaillard, who died from 
disease contracted while a member of the isthmi- 
an canal commission. It sails through the cut 
distance of about nine miles, in a channel 
with a iKJttom width of 300 feet, to Pedro Mi- 
guel. There it enters a lock and is lowered 30% 
feet to a small lake at an elevation of- 54% 
feet above sea level, and sails through this for 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



55 



about 1% miles to Miraflores. There it enters 
two locks in series and is lowered to sea level, 
passing out into the Pacific through a channel 
8% miles in length, with a bottom width of 500 
feet. The depth of the approach channel on the 
Atlantic side, where the tidal oscillation does 
not exceed 1% feet, is 41 feet at mean tide, 
and on the Pacific side, where the maximum 
oscillation is 23 feet, the depth is 45 feet at 
mean tide. 

GATUN DAM. 

The Gatun dam. which forms Gatun lake by 
impounding the waters of the Chagres river and 
other streams, is nearly 1% miles long measured 
on its crest, nearly half a mile wide at its base, 
about 4UO feet wide at the water surface, about 
100 feet wide at the top and its crest is at an 
elevation of 115 feet above mean sea level, or 
30 feet above the normal level of the lake. The 
top and upstream slope are riprapped. The 
spillway is a concrete lined opening 1.200 feet 
long and 300 feet wide, cut through a hill of 
rock nearly in the center of the dam. the bot- 
tom of the opening being ten feet above sea 
level. It is fitted with gates and machinery for 
regulating the water level of the lake. 

The water level of Gatun lake, extending 
through the Gaillard cut, is maintained at the 
south end by an earth dam connecting the locks 
at Pedro Miguel with the high ground to the 
westward, about 1.700 feet long, with its crest 
at an elevation of 105 feet above mean tide. A 
small lake between the locks at Pedro Miguel 
and Mirallores is formed by dams connecting the 
walls of Miraflores locks with the high ground 
on either side. The dam to the westward is of 
earth, about 2.700 feet long, having its crest 
about 15 feet above the water in Miraflorea lake. 
The east dam is of concrete, about 500 feet long, 
and forms a spillway for Miraflores lake, with 
crest gates similar to those at the spillway of 
the Gatun dam. 

GATUN LAKE. 

Gatun lake covers an area of 164 square miles, 
with a depth in the ship channel varying from 
85 to 45 feet. Throughout the first 16 miles from 
Gatun the width of the channel is 1.000 feet: 
then for 4 miles it is 800 feet and for 4 miles 
more 500 feet, when the entrance to Culebrs 
cut, at Bas Obispo, is reached. The water level 
in the cut is that of the lake and the bottom 
width of the channel is 300 feet. 

THE LOCKS. 

There are twelve locks in the canal, all in du- 
plicate: throe pairs in flight at Gatun. with a 
combined lift of 85 feet: one pair at Pedro Mi- 
guel, with a lift of 30% feet, and two pairs at 
Miraflores. with a combined lift of 54% feet at 
mean tide. The dimensions of all are the same 
a usable length of 1.000 feet and a usable width 
of 110 feet. Each lock is a chamber, with walls 
and floors of concrete and water tight gates at 
each end. 

RULES FOR VESSELS. 

Prior to sending a vessel through the Panama 
canal its owner or agent must make a deposit 
with the government to cover its canal expenses. 
Usually this deposit is made with an assistant 
United States treasurer. When the ship enters 
the harbor at either terminal port it is boarded 
by officers who examine its bill of health and 
clearance, see that its certificate of canal meas- 
urement is properly made out and ascertain what 
it needs in matters of fuel, supplies, extra men 
to handle the lines during the passage of the 
locks, etc. In all stages of its transit of the 
canal the vessel must have on board a govern- 
ment pilot. There is no charge for this service. 
As soon as the vessel starts on its transit of 
the canal the fact is telephoned to all the sta- 
tions along the course so that there is exact 
knowledge at each station all the time of the 
status of the traffic. The course is equipped with 
all requisite signals and facilities for mooring, 
like sidings. 

The transit of the canal requires about ten 
hours, of which approximately three hours are 
spent in the locks. In the sea level channels 



and the Gaillard cut the speed is limited to six 
knots; through Gatun lake vessels may make 
ten, twelve and fifteen knots, according to the 
width of the channel. In the locks the vessels 
are under control of the lock-operating force. 
They are towed through the lock chambers by 
electric locomotives operating on tracks on the 
side walls. Six locomotives are used for the 
larger vessels, three on each wall. Two keep 
forward of the vessel, pulling and holding her 
head to the center of the chamber; two aft, hold- 
ing the vessel in check, and two slightly for- 
ward of amidships, which do most of the tow- 
ing. Except in the locks towing is not re- 
quired and vessels proceed under their power. 
Tug service for sailing ships is at the rate of 
$15 per hour. 

TOLLS. 

On merchant vessels carrying passengers or 
cargo, $1.20 per net vessel ton each 100 cubic 
feet of actual earning capacity. 

On vessels in ballast without passengers or 
cargo, 40 per cent less than the rate of tolls for 
vessels with passengers or cargo. 

Upon naval vessels other than transports, col- 
liers, hospital ships and supply ships, 50 cents 
per displacement ton. 

Upon army and navy transports, colliers, hos- 
pital ships and supply ships, $1.20 per net ton 
the vessels to be measured by the same rules 
as are employed in determining the net tonnage 
of merchant vessels. 

LABOR FORCE. 

June 21, 1916, the actual working force of the 
Panama canal was 19,527; of the Panama rail- 
road, 3,621, and of contractors, 314, a total ef- 
fective working force of 23,462; of these 19.97ft 
were silver and 3,492 gold employes, the latter 
being composed almost exclusively of white 
Americans. 

CANAL EXCAVATION TO JUNE 1. 1916. 

Cubic yards. 

By French companies 78,146.960 

French excavation useful to canal 29.908,000 

By Americans 

Dry excavation 130,378,364 

Dredges 118,141,979 

Total 248,520,343 

May to Dec. 31. 1904 243.472 

Jan. to Dec. 31. 1905 1.799.227 

Jan^ to Dec. 31, 1906 4.948.497 

Jan. to Dec. 31. 1907 15.765.290 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1908 37.116.735 

Jan. to Dec. 31. 1909 35.096.166 

Jan. to Dec. 31. 1910 31.437.671 

Jan. to Dec. 31. 1911 31.603.899 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31. 1912 30.269.349 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31. 1913 27.177.960 

Jan. 1 to July 31. 1914. 8.616.660 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1914 13,640,501 

Jan. 1 to Dec. 31. 1915 13,222,373 

Jan. 1 to May 31, 1916 6,199,197 

CANAL APPROPRIATIONS. 
Act of congress. Appropriation. Deficiency. 

June 28. 1902 *$40. 000. 000.00 

April 28. 1904 tlO.000.000.00 

June 28. 1902 10.000.000.00 

Dec. 21. 1905 11.000.000.00 

Feb. 27. 1906 $5.990.78a 

June 30. 1906 25.456.415.08 

March 4. 1907 27.161.367.50 

Feb. 15. 1908 12,178.900 

May 27, 1908 29.187.000.00 

Ma'rch4. 1909 33.638.000.00 5.4?8.00fr 

Feb. 25. 1910 76,000 

June 25. 19K> 37,855.000.00 

Special acts 21.411.56 

March 4. 1911 45.560.000.00 

Aug. 24. 1912 28.980.000.00 

June 23. 1913 16.265.393.00 

Aug. 1. 1914 20,718.000.00 2.724.350 

MarchS. 1915 16,940,000.00 

July 1, 1916 16,800,000.00 

Total 369,582,527.14 

Deficiency 



Grand total 396,010,563.14 



56 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



FORTIFICATIONS. 

March 4. 1911 $3,000,000 

Aug. 24, 1912 2.806,950 

June 23. 1913 4.870.000 

June 30, 1914 1,124,475 

March 3, 1915 2,639,048 

July 1, 1916 4,535,000 

Total .18,975,473 

TRAFFIC STATISTICS. 
Fiscal years ended June 30. 

*Per 
1915. 1916. cent. 

Number of vessels 1,088 787 72.3 

Net tonnage 3,843,035 2,479,761 64.5 

Tons of cargo... 4,969,792 3,140,046 63.4 

Tolls $4,343,383 $2,399,830 55.3 

*Per cent 1916 of 1915. 

The canal was closed from the middle of Sep- 
tember, 1915, to the middle , of April, 1916, by 
slides. There were thus only five months of 
the fiscal year 1916 in which the canal was in 
normal operation. 

During the fiscal year ending with the close 
of business on June 30, 1916, the total receipts 
from vessels passing through the canal were 
$2,399.830.42. The total amount expended for the 
operation and maintenance of the canal during 
the same time was $6,999,750.15. This left a 
deficit in the account of $4,599,919.73. In other 
words, for every $1 spent by the government for 
maintenance and operation it received back in 
tolls 34.28 cents. During the preceding fiscal 
year the tolls had exceeded the expenses by 
$276,656.38, which represented a profit of .67 per 
cent en the expenditure for operation for 
maintenance alone, not counting anything for 
interest on the money invested or for deprecia- 
tion of plant. 

It is to be noted that more than half of the 
total spent for operation and maintenance in 
the fiscal year 1916 was for dredging in the Gail- 
lard (formerly Culebra) cut, the sum spent for 
this purpose being $3,513,350.06. The increased 
cost in this matter was due to the slides on 
both banks of the canal north of Gold and 
Contractors' hills, which caused the suspension 
of traffic and a great falling off in the tolls 
collected for the year. 

The total toll collections from the beginning 
until July 1, 1916, amounted to $6,787,832.79; by 
months the tolls collected in the fiscal year 1916 
were: July, $573,365.67; August, $496,792.03; Sep- 
tember, $349,498.30; October and November, noth- 
ing; December, $10,826; January, $654.39; Febru- 
ary, $834; March, $418.80; April, $235,618.44; May, 
$368,023.79; June, $363,799. 

The vessels passing through the canal in each 
direction during the fiscal year 1916 were dis- 
tributed over the principal trade routes as 
follows: 

ATLANTIC TO PACIFIC. 

Net Tons 

Vessels, tonnage, cargo. 

United States coastwise.... 50 183,372 227,103 

U. S. to South and Central 

America 56 189,594 265,659 

U. S. to far east and Aus- 
tralia 99 437,333 706,896 

Atlantic terminus to South 

and Central America 73 121,845 75,351 

Europe to west coast North 

America 20 70,938 51,645 

Europe to west coast South 

America 14 45,826 45,070 

Miscellaneous 14 40,456 62,512 

Ballast 85 227,866 



Total 411 1. 308.230 1.434,236 

In 1915 530 1,884,728 2,125,735 



PACIFIC TO ATLANTIC. 

United States coastwise.... 41 167,594 217,285 

South and Central America 
to U. S 115 400,219 709,049 

Far east and Australia to 
U. S 20 76,136 109,213 

S. and C. America to At- 
lantic terminus 78 137,746 109,911 

West coast S. America to 
Europe 48 173,732 309,436 

West coast N. America to 
Europe 34 113,957 178,807 

Miscellaneous 15 56,099 72,109 

Ballast 25 46,048 



Total 376 1,171,531 1,705,810 

In 1915 558 1,958,307 2,844,057 

CHARGES FOR OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Items. 1916. 1915. 

Admeasurement of vessels. $7,905.40 $9,926.54 

Local inspection 4,075.36 3,926.98 

Aids to navigation 58,848.34 48.059.59 

Pilotage 41,342.29 61,513.50 

Harbor tugs balance 42,720.58 2,491.77 



Total marine division.... 154,891.97 125,918.38 

Lock operation Gatun locks 252,245.64 230,214.68 

Gatun spillway 17,132.45 12,112.20 

Pedro Miguel lock 146,640.41 167,199.07 

Pedro Miguel dam 91.59 42.00 

Miraflores locks, etc 202,700.49 218,047.00 

Miraflores dams, etc 3,482.43 10,052.62 



Total locks, etc 622,293.01 637,667.57 

Dredging 3,560,016.04 1,769,475.59 

Total operation, etc.* 4,550,159.33 2,742,722.56 

Proportion overhead expeAse2.449.590. 82 1,380,405.53 

Grand total .6,999,750.15 4,123,128.09 

Tolls .2,399,830.42 4,343,383.69 

Tolls in excess of ex- 
penses 220,255,60 

Expenses in excess of 
tolls 4,599,919.73 

*Includes miscellaneous expenses. 
NATIONALITY OF VESSELS USING CANAL. 

The number of vessels of various nations pass- 
ing through the canal from Aug. 15, 1914, to July 
1, 1916, was as follows: From the Atlantic to 
the Pacific American, 347 ; British, 418 ; Chilean, 
32 ; Danish, 21 ; Dutch, 16 ; French, 2 ; Honduran, 
3 ; Italian, 2 ; Japanese, 23 ; Nicaraguan, 1 ; Nor- 
wegian, 35 ; Panamanian, 6 ; Peruvian, 17 ; Rus- 
sian, 6 ; Swedish, 12 ; total, 941. From the Pa- 
cific to the Atlantic American, 362; British, 404; 
Chilean, 36 ; Danish, 21 ; Dutch, 6 ; French, 2 ; 
Honduran, 3 : Italian, 1 ; Japanese, 7 ; Nicaraguan, 
1 ; Norwegian, 51 ; Panamanian, 3 ; Peruvian, 16 ; 
Russian 1 ; Swedish, 19 ; Argentinan, 1 ; total, 934 ; 
the grand total of vessels passing through the 
canal in that period was 1,875. 
CANAL ZONE. 

The Canal Zone contains about 448 sauare 
miles. It begins at a point three marine miles 
from mean low water mark in each ocean and 
extends for five miles on each side of the center 
line of the route of the canal. It includes the 
group of islands in the Bay of Panama, named 
Perico. Naos. Culebra and Flamenco. The cities 
of Panama and Colon are excluded from the 
zone, but the United States has the right to en- 
force sanitary ordinances and maintain public 
order there in case the republic of Panama 
should not be able to do so. 

PANAMA RAILROAD. 

The Panama railroad and the steamships run 
in connection with it between New York and 
Colon are owned and operated by the United 
States government. It practically parallels the 
canal nearly the whole distance. It is 46% miles 
long and runs between the cities of Colon and 
Panama. 



NUMBER OF THE STARS. 

According to the best astronomers the number I through the telescope has been estimated by 
of stars that can be seen by a person of average J. E. Gore at 70,000,000 and by Profs. Newcomb 
eyesight is only about 7,000. The number visible '.and Young at 100,000,000. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



57 



MINERAL PRODUCTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 
[Prepared by the United States geological survey. Calendar years.J 



MINERALS. 


Unit of 
measure. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


Quantity 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Aluminum 
Asbestos 


Pounds 
Short tons. .. 
Short tons. .. 
Short tons. .. 
liongtons.. .. 
Bounds 
barrels 
Short tons. .. 
jOng tons. .. 
Short tons. .. 
Bounds 
Shorttons. .. 
Shorttons. .. 
Short tons. .. 
Shorttons 
Short tons 
Troy ounces.. 
Pounds 


65,607,000 
4,408 
449,510 
37.478 
159,865 
42,315 
83.351,191 

'75,322,855 
450.104,982 
,243,268,720 
992 
86,572 
116.545 
32.715 
4,182 
4.520.717 
3.543,771 


$11,907,000 
87.959 
4,620.731 
153,313 
768,932 
1,127,813 
67,461,513 
172.811.275 
177.622.626 
517,983.445 
205,139.338 
6,652 
520,562 
769,163 
305,522 
137,8()0 
93,451.500 
187,689 
916,339 
6,563,908 
125,446 
420.563.388 
37,385.550 
13,970,114 
15.723 
19.942 
282,823 
49,073 
10.069.588 
6.615,671 
84,563,957 
232.218 
163.802.334 
11,675,774 
45,778 
319.722 
86,687 
1.334,259 
191.685 
1.053,941 
9.402.772 
39.197,500 
6,043.318 
78.193,220 
5,256.422 
1.050,693 
124.800 
44,699,166 
2.243.630.326 


72,379,000 
1,100 
529.190 
45.298 
210.241 
58,051 
92.949,102 

"8Y.718',686 
478.523,203 
1,224,484,098 
957 
120,955 
115.580 
38,594 
5,308 
4,299,784 
5,064,727 


113,845.000 
11,000 

' 156^275 
997,698 
1,491,530 
93.001,169 
181.289.132 
195.181,127 
565.307.658 
189,795.035 
4,785 
776.551 
736.286 
369,750 
183,422 
88.884,400 
254.328 
855,627 
6,774.822 
285,821 
458.342.345 
38.405.840 
14.648,362 
40,480 
75.104 
353.517 
82,543 
9,543,306 
5,631.391 
87,846.677 
207,352 
237,121.388 
11,796,231 
46.530 
319,454 
55,408 
1,286,084 
668,011 
813,171 
10.123.139 
40.348,100 
6.175.476 
83.732.995 
5.479.849 
1,119,597 
36,970 
37.772,224 
2,445.805.017 


79,129,000 
1,247 
438,271 
51,547 
219,318 
62.400 
87,287,552 

''81,690.631 
422,703,970 
1,150.137,192 
485 
135,419 
95,116 
40*981 
4,231 
8.5?2,976 
5,220,539 


$14,522.700 
18,965 
3,647,592 
153,715 
1,069,194 
1,464,400 
80.533.203 
164,986.983 
188,181,399 
493.309,244 
152,968,246 
2,425 
629,873 
570,041 
403,646 
145,510 
94.531.800 
285:368 
1189,344 
6.895,989 
252,327 
298.777,429 
39.997,932 
13,247,676 
27.377 
218,497 
278,540 
51,416 
10,451,746 
4.892,328 
94.115,524 
167,948 
214.125,215 
9,608,041 
280,885 
124,651 
59,172 
1,283.346 
360,502 
811,680 
10,271,358 
40,067,700 
^5,706.787 

1,'043;801 

35.028.'636 
2,114.946.024 


Asphaltum 


Barytes (crude) 
Bauxite 


Borax 


Cement 


Clay products . 


Coal, anthracite. .. . 


Coal, bituminous 






Feldspar 
Fluorspar 
Fuller'searth 
Garnet (abrasive) 


Gold (coining value) 
Graphite (crystalline).. .. 
Grindstones. . 




Short t^ina 


2.500,757 


2,599,508 


2,476,465 


Infusorial earth. 




Iron (pig) 
Lead 


Long tons 
Short tons 
Short tons 
..ong tons 
jOng tons.... 
Bounds 
Shorttons.. . 
Shorttons.. . 
Gals. sold.. 


30.180,969 
415.395 
3,529,462 
1.164 
51.517 
845,483 
3,226 
181.154 
62.281,201 


30.388,935 
436.430 
3,595,390 
4.048 
1,700,677 
59,403 
5,322 
173,168 
57,867,399 

' 248,446,230 
3,111,221 
1,034 


22,263,263 
512,794 
3,380.928 
2.635 
98,265 
556,933 
3,730 
173,557 
54.358,466 


Lime 
Manganese ore 


Manganif erous ore 


Mica, sheet 


Mica, scrap 


Mineral paints 


Mineral waters. . . 


Natural gas . . . 


Oilstones 






Petroleum , 


Jarrels 
..ongtons... . 
Troy ounces . 


222,113,218 
2,973.332 
1,005 


265.762,535 
2,734,043 
6!324 


Phosphate rock 


Platinum 


Precious stones 


Pumice. .. 


Shorttons.. . 
_iOng tons . . . 
Shorttons.. . 
Flasks 


27,146 
350,928 
97,874 
25,064 
33.324,808 
63,766,800 


24,563 
341. H38 
204,759 
20,213 
34.399.298 
66,801,500 


27,591 
336,662 
153.401 
16,548 
34.804,683 
72,455,100 


Pyrite .. 


artz (silica).. 


icksilver.. 


It 




ver (commercial value) . 
ite 


Troy ounces. 


Stone 








Sulphur 


short tons . 


303,472 
92,403 
260,000 
323.90? 


311,590 
94,128 


327.634 
86,221 
20,000 
243,418 


Talc, soapstone 


Shorttons 
Bounds 
Shorttons 


Tin 


Zinc 
Total* .. 


337,252 



"Includes minerals not specified in list. 



COAL PRODUCTION BY STATES (1914). 


In tons of 2,240 pounds. Calendar year. 


ANTHRACITE. 


State. Tons. 


State. Tons. 
Pennsylvania. 81,090,631 


New Mexico.. 3,462,222 
North Dakota. 452,397 
Ohio 16,824,210 


BITL-MI 


XOCS. 


Oklahoma .... 3,561,262 


Alabama . . 


. 13,922,698 


Oregon 40,034 


Arkansas .. 


. 1,639,768 


Pennsylvania .132,127,941 


California . 


12,477 


South Dakota. 10.5SO 


Colorado . . 


. 7,295,142 


Tennessee .... 5.306,480 


Georgia 


148,659 


Texas . ... 2 074,797 


Illinois .... 


. 51,418,926 


Utah 2,770,568 


Indiana 


. 14,858,154 


Virginia 7,106,728 


Iowa 


. 6,652,698 


Washington .. 2,736,446 


Kansas 


. 6,125,882 


West Virginia. 64,024,666 


Kentucky .. 
Maryland . 


. 18,198,896 
. 3,690,667 


Wyoming 5,781,512 


Michigan . 


. 1,145,562 


Total bitu- 


Missouri 


. 3.514,268 


minous . . .377,414,259 


Montana . . 


. 2,504,619 


Grand total.458,504,890 


COAL PRODUCTION BY CALENDAR YEARS. 


Tons of 2,240 pounds. 


Year. Anthracite. Bituminous. 
1880.... 25 580 189 38 9 42 641 


1890. 41*489*858 99 377*073 


1900 51 309 214 189 480 097 


1905... .. 69.405.958 281.239.252 



Year. 



Anthracite. Bituminous. 



1906 63.698,803 306,084,481 

1907 76,487,860 352,408,054 

1908 74,384,297 296,903,826 

1909 72,443,624 338,987,997 

1910 75,514,296 372,339,703 

1911 80,859,489 362,195,125 

1912 75,398,369 401,803,934 

1913 81,780,067 427.190.573 

1914 81,090,631 377,414,259' 

PIGJ IRON PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED 

STATES. 
In tons of 2,240 pounds. Calendar year 1915. 



State. Tons. 

Alabama 2,049,453 

Colorado 271,921 

Connecticut .. 7,802 

Illinois 2,447,2i'0 

Kentucky 291,040 

Maryland 251,548 

Michigan 1,986,778 



New Jersey.... 2.104.7S 



State. Tons. 

Ohio 6,912,962 

Pennsylvania ..12,790,668 

Tennessee 177,729 

Virginia 251.345 

Wisconsin 372,966 



Total 29,916,213 

Total, 1914... 23,332,244 
NOTE In the foregoing table Colorado includes 
Missouri, Washington, California and Oregon; 
Connecticut includes Massachusetts; Kentucky 
includes Mississippi and West Virginia; Georgia 
includes Texas; Michigan includes Indiana; New- 
Jersey includes New York, and Wisconsin in- 
cludes Minnesota. 



58 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



MINES AND QUARRIES ] 
[From reports of census 
In 1909 in the United States, exclusive of 
Alaska, Hawaii, Porto Rico and other outlying 
noncontiguous territory, 23,682 operators conduct- 
ed 27,240 mines and quarries and 166,448 petrole- 
um and natural gas wells. Of the operators 3,749 
were engaged solely in development work upon 
which, in 1909, the sum of $31,548,736 was ex- 
pended. In Alaska in 1909 there were 673 opera- 
tors, who employed 8,025 persons, in the mining 
industry. The total expenses of these operators 
amounted to $13, 220, 200, while the capital invested 
was reported as $47,749,164. The total value of 
products was $16,933,427, of which amount $16,- 
327,752 consisted of gold and silver. In Hawaii 
and Porto Rico the total value of product for 
the eighteen operators reported was only $26,414. 
The total number of persons engaged in connec- 
tion with producing mines, quarries and wells, 
as reported on Dec. 15, 1909, or nearest repre- 
sentative day, was 1,139,332, of whom wage earn- 
ers numbered 1,065,283, proprietors and firm mem- 
bers 29,922 and salaried employes 44,127. In 
mines, quarries and wells for which development 
work only was carried on there was a total of 
27,616 persons, of whom 21,499 were wage earners. 
Of the total number of persons, 1,166,948, em- 
ployed in productive and nonproductive mines. 
1,158,775 were men 16 years of age and over, and 
8,173 were boys under 16 years of age. Distrib- 
uted by sex, 1,162,840 were male and 4,108 female, 
the latter being employed in supervisory and 
clerical capacities. 
The total capital invested in all mining enter- 
prises on Dec. 31, 1909, as reported, was $3.662,- 
627,064, of which $3,380,525,841 was invested in 
productive enterprises and $282,001,223 in those in 
which development work only was carried on. 

SUMMARY BY INDUSTRIES. 
Industry. Mines. Value Persons 
Fuels etc. Expenses, products, engaged. 
Coal, anth.... 423 $139,324,467 $149.180.471 178.004 
Coal, bitum..6,013 395,907,026 427,962,464 592,677 
Petrol' m and 
nat. gas 166,320 135,638,644 185,416,684 62,172 
Peat 10 96 034 109 047 203 


N THE UNITED STATES, 
bureau, 1912 and 1913.] 
Industry. Mines, Value Persona 
Monazite and etc. Expenses, products, engaged, 
zicron 4 $50.909 $64,472 34 
Oil, scythe and 
whet stones 45 99,259 206,028 232 
P-hosphate 
rock 153 7,421,430 10,781,192 8,573 
Prec'us stones 27 195,908 315,464 145 
Pumice 4 6 087 30 097 25 


Pyrite 12 734355 676*984 1160 


Quartz 14 155418 231*025 *208 


Sulphur 4 4,538,*389 4,432*. 066 460 
Talc and soap- 
stone 46 1036371 1174516 1452 


Tripoli . 7 42 493 66 557 ' 73 


Tungsten 116 365,780 563*. 457 227 
All other in- 
dustries* .. 27 740,874 778.938 560 


Total 1,042,642,6931,238,410,3221,139.332 
*Includes enterprises as follows: Antimony, 1; 
bismuth, 1; borax, 2; chromite, 2; manganiferous 
iron, 2; nickel and cobalt, 1; tin, 1. 
SUMMARY BY STATES. Value 
State. Mines. Wells. Expenses. product. 
Maine ......... 102 $1,876,341 $2,056,063 
N. Hampshire. 53 . 1 204 966 1 308 597 


Vermont 182 6*795*268 8*221*323 
Massachusetts. 147 2 987 175 3 467 888 


Rhode Island. 27 ... 673 877 '897*606 


Connecticut .. 75 1,158*, 491 1,375*765 
New York . 752 11,342 9,987,768 13,334,975 
New Jersey... 151 4,507,940 8,347.501 
Pennsylvania .3,000 59,780 300,977,955 349,059,786 
Ohio 964 35067 53852530 6376711 


Indiana 480 10*373 20*312*752 21*934'201 


Illinois .. 759 10*918 68*718*121 76*658*974 


Michigan 173 ' 21 5l',819*,838 67*,714',479 
Wisconsin 286 5,508,751 7,459,404 
Minnesota .... 250 38,574,180 58,664,852 
Iowa 431 13,694,714 13,877,781 


North Dakota. ' 53 6 *570*,140 *564*,812 
South Dakota. 43 3 5,154,263 6,432,417 
Nebraska . 20 260 049 322 517 


Kansas 582 3,402 15,831*787 18722*634 


Metals- 
Iron 483 74 071 830 106 947 082 55 176 


Delaware 9 .... 508 937 *516 213 


Maryland 173 5.006,157 5,782*,045 
Virginia 244 8,863,954 8,795,646 
West Virginia 718 15,146 71,347,631 76,287,889 
North Carolina 130 1416075 1358617 


Copper 368 107*679*212 134*616*987 55,258 


Precious metals 
Deep mines... 2, 845 68,764,692 83,885,928 37,755 
Placer mines. 880 6,810,482 10,237,252 5,436 
Lead and zincl,142 24,453,299 31,363,094 24,397 
Quicksilver... 12 718,861 868,458 640 
Manganese.... 8 21,725 20,435 65 
Building stone- 
Limestone ...1,916 23,875,507 29,832,492 41,029 
Granite .... 826 16192138 18997976 22,211 


South Carolina 32 1034823 1252*792 


Georgia 109 2,064,*236 2*.874*.595 
Florida 96 5 909 532 8 846 665 


Kentucky ... 442 1,109 ll',721J22 12*,100*,075 
Tennessee ... 365 1 11,969,257 12,692,547 
Alabama .... 302 22,442,278 24,350,667 
Arkansas .... 146 62 4,309,211 4,603,845 
Louisiana ... 2 246 6,641,555 6,547,050 
Oklahoma ... 212 12,113 21,071,609 25,637,892 
Texas 92 2279 8177783 10742150 


Sandstone ... 677 6,626,438 7,702,423 11,025 
Marble 108 4 842 835 6 239 120 6 649 


Slate 219 5*831*256 6*054 174 10 121 


Traprock .... 220 5,090,538 5,578,317 6,748 
Bluestone .... 637 1,182,873 1,588,406 3,020 
Miscellaneous 
Asbestos .... 20 72,747 65,140 88 
Asph'lt'mand 
bitum. rock 19 301,673 466,461 241 
Barytes 42 176,967 224,766 372 
Bauxite 10 316,221 670,829 726 
Buhr and mill 
stones 14 18,354 34,441 79 
Clay 336 2 289 198 2 945 948 4 351 


Montana 543 46,520,545 54*991*961 
Idaho 370 7,198,763 8,649,342 
Wyoming 95 21 9,053,467 10,572,188 
Colorado 1,575 76 38630288 45680135 


New Mexico... 285 5,553,423 5*.587*,744 
Arizona 251 28,608,216 34,217,651 
Utah 235 16,606,028 22,083,282 
Nevada 374 14,415,728 23,271,597 
Washington .. 170 7 800 722 10 537 556 


Oregon 161 1,223,468 l,*19l!512 
California .... 1,279 4,316 52,565,278 63,382,454 
Geographic divisions 
New England. 586 14,696,118 17,327,242 
Mid. Atlantic. 3,903 71,122 315,473,663 370,742,262 
East N.Central 2,662 56,379 200,211,992 237,534,170 
WestN. Centra; 2,603 3,450 101,600,234 130,252,533 
South Atlantic 1,652 15,146 96,151,345 105,714,462 
EastS.Ceutral 1,109 1,110 46,133,257 49,143,289 
WestS.Central 452 14,700 40,200,158 47,530,937 
Mountain 3,728 97 166,586,458 205,053,900 
Pacific 1,610, 4,316 61,589,468 75,111,522 


Corundum and 
emerv 6 7 459 18 185 19 


Feldspar 28 238,896 271,437 363 
Fluorspar ... 15 319,426 288,509 376 
Fuller's earth 21 274,776 315,762 380 
Garnet 4 98,206 101,920 120 
Graphite 20 328,690 344,130 436 
Grindstones... 25 339,261 413,296 430 
Gypsum 222 4 905 662 5 812 810 4 215 


Infusorial 


earth 16 61,083 75,503 99 
Magnesite ... 13 62,444 68,463 84 
Marl 3 17 812 13 307 38 


Total U. S.. 18,164 166,320 1,042,642,693 1,283,410,322 
The states leading in the number of persons 
engaged in mining, quarrying, etc., were: Penn- 
sylvania, 405,685; Illinois," 86,389; West Virginia, 
82,808; Ohio, 62,874; Michigan, 42.133; Alabama. 
32,643; Missouri, 32,462; Indiana, 31 292. 


Mica ... 78 182 828 206 794 608 


Mineral pig- 
ments 26 115,860 151.015 246 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



DISTRIBUTION OF M 
Figures, by leading states, for each of the 
nine leading mineral industries in 1909: 

ANTHRACITE COAL. p er 

State. Operators. Employes. Product, cent. 
Pennsylvania ..' 1S9 173,263 $148,957,894 99.9 

BITUMINOUS COAL. 
Pennsylvania .. 6S9 184.408 147,466,417 34.5 
Illinois 470 74 445 53 030 545 12 4 


INING INDUSTRIES. 
IRON. 

State. Operators. Employes. Product. 
Minnesota ... 20 16,218 $57.076.135 
Michigan 24 16,125 32,168,133 
Alabama 25 5,666 4,939,149 
New York .... 14 2,542 3,095,023 
Wisconsin .... 6 1,455 2,972,584 
PRECIOUS METALS DEEP MINES. 
Colorado 439 7 586 27,147,937 


Per 

cent 
53.4 
30.1 
4.6 
2.9 
2.8 

32.4 
21.2 
11.6 
10.2 
9.4 
7.3 

85.5 

71.9 
6.3 
3.4 
2.2 

15.9 
13.3 
12.1 
11.3 
8.9 
6.8 

14.9 
11.5 
9.3 
8.0 
7.5 
6.3 

78.7 
12.9 
8.0 

'ropro- 
tion.t 

S. 
1914. 
33 
1.015 
4,658 
men 


West Virginia.. 307 69,666 46,929,592 11.0 
Ohio 441 44 405 27 353 663 6 4 


Nevada 218 3*818 17,807.945 


California .... 395 6,622 9,690,956 
Utah 108 3,905 8,541,522 


Alabama 112 23,479 18,459,433 4.3 
Colorado 86 15 461 15 782 197 3 7 


Idaho 60 3 077 7 926,602 


Indiana 223 2 7 357 15 018*123 3 5 


South Dakota. 13 3,466 6,120,970 
PRECIOUS METALS PLACER MINES. 
California 392 3,073 8,751,032 
LEAD AND ZINC. 
Missouri ... 617 16319 22,565,528 


Iowa 258 17*623 12*682*106 30 


Kentucky 240 19,655 10*003*481 2.3 
Kansas 118 12 791 9 835 614 2 3 


Wyoming 35 7,839 9,'721,*134 2.3 
Washington .. 32 6,155 9,226,793 2.2 
Tennessee .... 85 11,154 6,688,454 1.6 
Oklahoma .... 56 8,814 6,185,078 1.4 
Missouri 173 9,526 5,881,034 1.4 
Montana 48 4,612 6,117.444 1.2 

PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS. 
Pennsylvania . 3,030 7,397 39,197,475 21.1 


Wisconsin 88 1,753 1,989,907 
Kansas 189 848 1,059,540 
Oklahoma 47 724 695,235 

LIMESTONE. 

Pennsylvania . 311 7,179 4,733,819 
Illinois 81 3 276 3,977,359 


Indiana 126 3,724 3,616,696 
Ohio 144 3,746 3,363,149 


California .... 339 7,007 29,310,335 15.8 
West Virginia 442 7,093 28,188,087 15.2 
Illinois 323 4,059 18,895,815 10.2 
Oklahoma .... 711 3.066 17,685,092 9.5 
Kansas 217 1,302 6,681,780 3.6 
Texas 163 1 405 6 391 313 3 4 


New York ... 127 3,104 2,656,142 
Missouri 144 2,437 2,027,902 


GRANITE. 

Vermont 51 2,035 2,829,522 


Massachusetts. 82 2,278 2,185,986 
Maine 85 2,132 1,761,801 
California .... 62 1,318 1,518,916 
Wisconsin 21 1,448 1,433,105 
N. Hampshire. 40 1,305 1,205,811 
PHOSPHATE ROCK. 
Florida 26 5 105 8 488 801 


COPPER. 
Montana 35 13,697 45,960,517 34.1 
Arizona 43 11,394 31,614,116 23.5 
Michigan 7 19,022 30,165,443 22.4 
California .._.. 2,510 10.104.373 7.5 


Tennessee 23 1,725 1,395,942 
South Carolina 5 1,307 862,409 

FARRIES AND SMELTERS. 
mines, interior department. 1 
FATALITIES IN METAL MINES. 
Propro- I 
Year.* No. tion.t Year.* No. 
1911 695 1913 683 


ACCIDENTS IN MINES, QI 
[From reports of bureau of 
FATALITIES IN COAL MINES. 
Propor- Proper - 
Year.* No. tion.t Year.* No. tion.t 
1902 1,724 3.38 19^9 2,642 3.96 
1903 1.926 3.48 1910 2,821 389 


1904 1,995 3.48 s L 2.656 3.65 
1905 2,232 3.63 1912 2,419 335 


ACCIDENTS AT SMELTING PLANT 
1913. 
Killed 47 


1906 2138 3.39 1913 2785 373 


1907 3 9 42 4 81 1914 2 454 3 22 


1908 2 445 3 60 


Seriously injured 746 


FATALITIES IN QUARRIES. 
1911 188 1.69 1913 183 1.72 
1912 213 1.88 1914 . 180 2.05 


Slightlv injured ... 3,507 


'Calendar years. Dumber killed per l.OC 
employed. 





MINERAL PRODUCTION OF ALASKA. 



The mineral production of Alaska in 1915 
amounted in value to $32,854,229, or $13,788,563 
more than in 1914 and far more than that of 
any previous annual output in the thirty-six 
years that mining has been carried on in the 
territory. The statistics for the year 1915 show 
that the value of the gold produced was $16,702,- 
144, copper $15,139,129 and silver $543,393. Tin, 
lead, antimony, marble, gypsum and a small 



amount of petroleum and coal brought the total 
value of the mineral products to $32,854,229. 
Since 1880 the territory has produced gold, sil- 
ver, copper, tin and other minerals to the 
value of $300,953,751. The gold production alone 
to the close of 1915 amounted to $260,858,943, of 
which $186,192,992 came from the .placers and the 
remainder from lode deposits. 



THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS DIAMONDS. 



Name. Carats. 

Cullinan 3,025 

D'Angleterre (blue) 44% 

Etoile Polaire 40 

Etoile du Sud 124 

Grand Due de Toscane. 133.16 
Great Mogul 279 3-15 



Name. Carats. 

Imperatrice Eugenie ... 51 

Kohinoor (1st cutting).. 279 

Kohinoor (2d cutting).. 106 1-16 

Loterie d'Angleterre ... 49 

Nassak 78% 

Orloff 194% 



Name. Carats. 

Pacha d'Egypt 40 

Regent 136% 

Sancy 53^ 

Shah 86 

Tiffany 969 

Tiffany (yellow) 125 



PRODUCTION OF IRON AND 



year. Iron. Steel. Total. 

1900 1,592 2,271,108 2,272,700 

1905 871 2,283,840 2,284,711 

1910 3,023,845 3,023,845 

1911 230 3,635,801 3,636,031 



STEEL RAILS IN THE UNITED STATES. 
Tons. 



Year. 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 



Iron. 
234 



Steel. 
2,822,556 
3,327,915 
3,502,780 
1,945,095 



Total. 

2,822,790 
3,327,915 
3,502,780 
1,945,095 



CO 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



COPYRIGHT LAWS OF 

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amended by the act approved Aug. 24, 1912, pro- 
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convert it into a novel or other nondramatic 
work if it be a drama; to arrange or adapt it if 
it be a musical work; to finish it if it be a 
model or design for a work of art ; (c) to deliver 
or authorize the delivery of the copyrighted work 
if it be a lecture, sermon, address or similar pro- 
duction; (d) to perform the copyrighted work 
publicly if it be a drama or, if it be a dramatic 
work and not reproduced in copies for sale, to 
vend the manuscript or any record thereof; to 
make or to procure the making of any transcrip- 
tion or record thereof by which it may in any 
manner be exhibited, performed or produced, and 
to exhibit, perform or produce it in any manner 
whatsoever; (e) to perform the copyrighted work 
publicly for profit if it be a musical composition 
and for the purpose of public performance for 
profit and to make any arrangement or setting of 
it in any system of notation or any form of 
record in which the thought of an author may 
be read or reproduced. 

So far as it secures copyright controlling the 
parts of instruments serving to reproduce me- 
chanically the musical work the law Includes 
only compositions published after the act went 
into effect; it does not include the works of a 
foreign author or composer unless the country of 
which he is a citizen or subject grants similar 
rights to American citizens. Whenever the owner 
of a musical copyright has used or permitted the 
use of the copyrighted work upon the part of in- 
struments serving to reproduce mechanically the 
musical work, any other person may make a sim- 
ilar use of the work upon the payment to the 
owner of a royalty of 2 cents on each such part 
manufactured. The reproduction or rendition of 
a musical composition by or upon coin-operated 
machines shall not be deemed a public perform- 
ance for profit unless a fee is charged for ad- 
mission to the place where the reproduction 
occurs. 

The works for which copyright may be secured 
include all the writings of an author. 

The application for registration shall specify 
to which of the following classes the work in 
which copyright is claimed belongs: 

(a) Books, including composite and cyclopedic 
works, directories, gazetteers and other compila- 
tions. 

fb) Periodicals, including newspapers. 

(c) Lectures, sermons, addresses, prepared for 
oral delivery. 

(d) Dramatic or dramatic-musical compositions. 



(e) Musical compositions. 
(Q " 



Maps. 

(g) Works of art ; models or designs for works 
of art. 

(h) Reproductions of a work of art. 

(i) Drawings or plastic works of a scientific 
or technical character. 

(1) Photographs. 

(k) Prints and pictorial illustrations. 

(1) Motion picture photo plays. 

(m) Motion pictures other than photo plays. 

These specifications do not, however, limit the 
subject matter of copyright as defined in the law 
nor does any error in classification invalidate the 
copyright protection secured. 

Copyright extends to the work of a foreign 
author or proprietor only in case he is domiciled 
In the United States at the time of the first pub- 
lication of his work or if the country of which 
he is a citizen grants similar copyright protec- 
tion to citizens of the United States. 

Any person entitled thereto by the law may 
secure copyright for his work by publication 
thereof with the notice of copyright required by 
the act, and such notice shall be affixed to each 
copy published or offered for sale in the United 



THE UNITED STATES. 

States. Such person may obtain registration of 
his claim to copyright by complying with the 
provisions of the act, including the deposit of 
copies, whereupon the register of copyrights shall 
issue to him a certificate as provided for in the 
law. Copyright may also be had of the works of 
an author of which copies are not reproduced for 
srJe by the deposit with claim of copyright of 
one complete copy, if it be a lecture or similar 
production, or a dramatic or musical composi- 
tion; of a title and description, with one print 
taken from each scene or act. if the work be a 
motion picture photo play; of a photographic 
print if it be a photograph; of a title and de- 
scription, with not less than two prints taken 
from different sections of a complete motion pic- 
ture, if the work be a motion picture other than 
a photo play, or of a photograph or other iden- 
tifying reproduction thereof if it be a work 
of art or a plastic work or drawing. 

After copyright has been secured there must 
be deposited in the copyright oflice in Washing, 
ton, D. C., two complete copies of the best edi- 
tion thereof, which copies, if the work be a book 
or periodical, shall have been produced in ac- 
cordance with the manufacturing provisions of 
the act, or if such work be a contribution to a 
periodical for which contribution special regis- 
tration is requested one copy of the issue or 
issues containing such contribution. Failure to 
deposit the copies within a given time after 
notice from the register of copyrights makes the 
proprietor of the copyright liable to a fine of 
$100 and twice the retail price of the work, and 
the copyright becomes void. 

The text of all books and periodicals specified 
in paragraphs (a) and (b) above, except the orig- 
inal text of a book of foreign origin in a lan- 
guage other than English, must in order to secure 
protection be printed from type set within the 
limits of the United States, either by hand, ma- 
chinery or other process, and the printing of the 
text and the binding of the books must also be 
done within the United States. An affidavit of 
such manufacture is required. 

The notice of copyright required consists either 
of the word "copyright" or the abbreviation 
"copr.," accompanied by the name of the copy- 
right proprietor, and if the work be a printed 
literary, musical or dramatic work, the notice 
must also include the year in which the copy- 
right was secured by publication. In the case, 
however, of copies of works specified in para- 
graphs (f) to (k) inclusive (given above) the no- 
tice may consist of the letter C inclosed within 
a circle, accompanied by the initials, monogram, 
mark or symbol of the copyright proprietor, pro- 
vided his name appears elsewhere on the copies. 
In the case of a book or other printed publica- 
tion the notice shall be applied on the title page 
or on the page immediately following, or if a 
periodical either upon the title page or upon the 
first page of text of each separate number or un- 
der the title heading; or if a musical work upou 
its title page or the first page of music. 

Where the copyright proprietor has sought to 
comply with the law with respect to notice, the 
omission of such notice by mistake from a par- 
ticular copy or copies shall not invalidate the 
copyright or prevent recovery for infringement 
against any person who, after actual notice of 
the copyright, begins an undertaking to infringe 
it, but shall prevent the recovery of damages 
against an innocent infringer who has been mis- 
led by the omission of the notice. 

In the case of a book in English published 
abroad before publication in this country, the 
deposit in the copyright office within thirty days 
of one copy of the foreign edition, with a re- 
quest for the reservation of the copyright, se- 
cures for the author or owner an ad interim 
copyright for thirty days after such deposit is 
made. 

The copyright secured by the act endures for 
twenty-eight years from the date of the first 
publication. In the case of any posthumous 
work, periodical, encyclopedic or other composite 
work upon which the copyright was originally 
secured by the proprietor thereof, or of any work 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



61 



copyrighted by a corporate body, or by an em- 
ployer for whom such work is made for hire, the 
proprietor of such copyright shall be entitled to 

? renewal of the copyright in such work for the 
urther term of twenty-eight years when appli- 
cation for such renewal shall have been made 
within one year prior to the expiration of the 
original term. In the case of any other copy- 
righted work, including a contribution by an in- 
dividual author to a periodical or to a cyclopedic 
or other composite work when such contribution 
has been separately copyrighted, the author of 
such work, if living, or the heirs, executors or 
next of kin, if the author be dead, shall be en- 
titled to a renewal of the copyright for a fur- 
ther term of twenty-eight years. In default of 
such application for renewal the copyright in 
any work shall end at the expiration of twenty- 
eight years. 

If any person shall infringe the copyright in 
any work protected under the copyright laws of 
the United States, such person shall be liable: 

(a) To an injunction restraining such infringe- 
ment. 

(b) To pay to the copyright proprietor such 
damages as the copyright proprietor may have 
suffered due to the infringement, as well as all 
the profits which the infringer shall have made 
from such infringement, and in proving profits 
the plaintiff shall be required to prove sales only 
and the defendant shall be required to prove 
every element of cost which he claims, or in 
lieu "of actual damages or profits such damages 
as to the court shall appear to be just, and in 
assessing such damages the court may, in its 
discretion, allow the amounts as hereinafter 
stated (in numbered paragraphs), but in the case 
of a newspaper reproduction of a copyrighted 
photograph such damages shall not exceed the 
sum of $200 nor be less than $50, and such dam- 
ages shall in no other case exceed the sum of 
$250 and shall not be regarded as a penalty. In 
the case of the infringement of an undramatized 
or nondramatic work by means of motion pic- 
tures, where the infringer shows that he was 
not aware that he was infringing, the damages 
shall not exceed $100; in the case of the in- 
fringement under like circumstances of a copy- 
righted dramatic or dramatico-musical work the 
entire sum recoverable shall not exceed $5,000 
nor be less than $250. 

1. In the case of a painting, statue or sculp- 
ture, $10 for every infringing copy made or sold 
by or found in the possession of the infringer or 
his agents or employes. 

2. In the case of any work enumerated in the 
list (given above) of works for which copyright 
may be asked, except a painting, statue or sculp- 
ture, $1 for every infringing copy. 

3. In the case of a lecture, sermon or address, 
$50 for every infringing delivery. 

4. In the case of dramatic or dramatico-musi- 
eal or a choral or orchestral composition. $100 for 
the first and $50 for every subsequent infringing 
performance; in the case of other musical com- 
positions, $10 for every infringing performance. 

(c) To deliver up on oath all articles alleged 
to infringe a copyright. 

(d) To deliver up on oath for destruction all 
the infringing copies or devices, as well as all 
plates, molds, matrices or other means for mak- 
ing such infringing copies, as the court may 
order. 

(e) Whenever the owner of a musical copy- 
right has used or permitted the use of the copy- 
righted work upon the parts of musical instru- 
ments serving to reproduce mechanically the 
musical work, then in case of infringement by 
the unauthorized manufacture, use or sale of in- 
terchangeable parts, such as disks, rolls, bands 
or cylinders for use in mechanical music-produc- 
ing machines, no criminal action shall be 
brought, but in a civil action an injunction may 
be granted upon .such terms as the court may 
impose and the plaintiff shall be entitled to re- 
cover in lieu of profits and damages a royalty 
as provided in the act. 

Any person who shall willfully and for profit 
infringe any copyright, or willfully aid or abet 
such infringement, shall be deemed guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall 



bo punished by imprisonment for not exceeding 
one year or by a fine of not less than $100 nor 
more than $1,000, or both, in the discretion of 
the court. It is provided, however, that nothing 
in the act shall prevent the performance of re- 
ligious or secular works, such as oratorios, can- 
tatas, masses or octavo choruses by public 
schools, church choirs or vocal societies, pro- 
vided the performance is for charitable or edu- 
cational purposes and not for profit. 

Any person who shall fraudulently place a 
copyright notice upon any uncopyrighted article, 
or shall fraudulently remove or alter the notice 
upon any copyrighted article, shall be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be subject to 
a fine of not less than $100 nor more than $1.000. 
Any person who shall knowingly sell or issue any 
article bearing a notice of United States copy- 
right which has not been copyrighted in this 
country, or who shall knowinglv import any arti- 
cle bearing such notice, shall be liable to a fine 
of $100. 

. During the existence of the American copyright 
in any book the importation of any piratical 
copies thereof or of any copies not produced in 
accordance with the manufacturing provisions of 
the copyright law, or of any plates of the same 
not made from type set in this country, or any 
copies produced by lithographic or photo-engrav- 
ing process not performed within the United 
States, is prohibited. Except as to piratical 
copies this does not apply: 

(a) To works in raised characters for the 
blind ; 

(b) To a foreign newspaper or magazine, al- 
though containing matter copyrighted in the 
United States printed or reprinted by authority 
of the copyright owner, unless such newspaper or 
magazine contains also copyright matter printed 
without such authorization; 

(c) To the authorized edition of a book in a 
foreign language of which only a translation into 
English has been copyrighted in this country; 

(d) To any book published abroad with the au- 
thorization of the author or copyright proprietor 
under the following circumstances: 

1. When imported, not more than one copy at 
a time, for individual use and not for sale, but 
such privilege of importation shall not extend to 
a foreign reprint of a book by an American 
author copyrighted in the United States; 

2. When imported by or for the use of the 
United States; 

3. When imported for use and not for sale, 
not more than one copy of any such book in any 
one invoice, in good faith, by or for any society 
or institution incorporated for educational, lit- 
erary, philosophical, scientific or religious pur- 
poses, or for the encouragement of the fine arts, 
or for any college, academy, school or seminary 
of learning, or for any state school, college, uni- 
versity or free public library in the United 
States: 

4. When such books form parts of libraries or 
collections purchased en bloc for the use of so- 
cieties, institutions or libraries, or form parts of 
the library or -personal baggage belonging to per- 
sons or families arriving from foreign countries 
and are not intended for sale. 

No criminal actions shall be maintained under 
the copyright law unless the same be begun 
within three years after the cause of action 
arose. 

Copyright may be assigned, mortgaged or be- 
queathed by will. 

There shall be appointed by the librarian of 
congress a register of copyrights at a salary of 
$4,000 a year and an assistant register at $3,000 
a year. 

These with their subordinate assistants shall 
perform all the duties relating to the registration 
of copyrights. The register of copyrights shall 
keep such record books in the copyright office as 
are required to carry out the provisions of the 
law, and whenever deposit has been made in the 
copyright office of a copy of any work under the 
provisions of the act he shall make entry thereof. 

In the case of each entry the person recorded 
as the claimant of the copyright shall be en- 
titled to a certificate of registration under seal 
of the copyright office. 



62 



ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



The register of copyrights shall receive and the 
persons to whom the services designated are ren- 
dered shall pay the following fees: For the reg- 
istration of any work subject to copyright, $1, 
which sum is to include a certificate of registra- 
tion under seal: Provided, That in the case of 
photographs the fee shall be 50 cents where a 
certificate is not demanded. For every additional 
certificate of registration made, 50 cents. For 
recording and certifying any instrument of writ- 
ing for the assignment of copyright or license, 
or for any copy of such certificate or license, 
duly certified, if not over 300 words in length. 
$1; if more than 300 and less than 1,000, $2; if 
more than 1,000 words in length. $1 additional 
for each 1,000 words or fraction thereof over 300 
words. For recording the notice of user or ac- 
quiescence specified in the act, 25 cents for each 
notice of not over fifty words and an additional 



25 cents for each additional 100 words. For com- 
paring any copy of an assignment with the rec- 
ord of such document in the copyright office and 
certifying the same under seal, $1. For record- 
ing the extension or renewal of copyright, 50 
cents. For recording the transfer of the pro- 
prietorship of copyrighted articles. 10 cents for 
each title of a book or other article in addition 
to the fee for recording the instrument of as- 
signment. For any requested search of copyright 
office records, indexes or deposits, 50 cents for 
each full hour consumed in making such search. 
Only one registration at one fee shall be required 
in the case of several volumes of the same book 
deposited at the same time. 

For copyright blanks and additional informa- 
tion as to copyright regulations address the reg- 
ister of copyrights, library of congress, Wash- 
ington. D. C. 



PASTEURIZATION OF MILK, 



The term "pasteurization," as applied to milk, 
should mean a process of heating to 145 degrees 
Fahrenheit and holding at that temperature for 
30 minutes, but as applied under commercial 
conditions it is the process of heating for a 
short or long period, as the different methods 
demand, at temperatures usually between 140 
and 185 degrees. The process is followed by 
rapiJ cooling. The term originated from the 
experiments of Louis Pasteur in France with 
wine and beer when, by means of heating, he 
prevented abnormal fermentation and souring. 

When the process of pasteurization is properly 
performed it affords protection from disease 
breeding bacteria such as the tuberculosis, ty- 
phoid, diphtheria and dysentery bacillus. Such 
bacteria when heated at 140 degrees for 20 min- 
utes or more lose their ability to produce dis- 
ease. Pasteurization of milk is also reported 
to be a preventive of septic sore throat, scarlet 
fever and the foot and mouth disease. 

There are three processes of pasteurization of 
milk used in the United States. The first is known 
as the flash or continuous process ; the second as 
the holder or holding process, and the third as 
pasteurization in the bottle. The flash process 
consists in heating rapidly to the pasteurization 
temperature, then cooling quickly. The milk is 
heated from 30 seconds to 1 minute, usually at 
a temperature of 160 degrees or more. In the 
holder process the milk is heated rapidly to 
temperatures of 140 to 150 degrees and held for 
approximately 30 minutes, after which it is 
rapidly cooled. 

Pasteurization in bottles may be done in two 
ways. One method is to put the raw milk into 



bottles with water tight seal caps, then im- 
mersing them in hot water until heated to 145 
degrees and holding them at that temperaure 
for 20 or 30 minutes. The cooling is accomplished 
by lowering the temperature of the water until 
that of the milk reaches 50 degrees. The second 
method is the same except that instead of water 
tight caps devices are used which fit over the 
tops and necks of the bottles, thereby protecting 
the ordinary paper caps from the water which 
is sprayed on the bottles for the purpose of heat- 
ing or cooling. A modification of the present 
holder process is that of bottling hot pasteurized 
milk. The milk is heated to 145 degrees for 
30 minutes and put into bottles which have been 
steamed and heated for 2 minutes immediately 
before filling. After filling and capping with 
ordinary caps the bottles may be cooled at once 
by any of the systems in which the caps are 
protected. Low temperature pasteurization is 
declared to be the best from bacteriological, 
chemical and economical standpoints. 

The cost of pasteurizing milk has been found 
to average three-tenths of a cent ($0.00313) a 
gallon. Pasteurization is of value from a com- 
mercial standpoint, as it increases the keeping 
quality of milk and prevents financial loss by 
souring. It does not prevent the ultimate sour- 
ing of milk, but it does delay the process. 

The foregoing facts are taken from a profes- 
sional paper written by S. Henry Ayers, bacteriol- 
ogist, dairy division, United States department 
of agriculture. It is entitled "The Present 
Status of the Pasteurization of Milk" and was 
published as bulletin No. 342 of the department 
Jan. 8, 1916. 



DAYLIGHT SAVING SYSTEM ADOPTED. 



The so called daylight saving plan by which 
the clocks are set forward one hour during the 
long days of summer was adopted by most of the 
countries in the north of Europe in 1916. The 
nations in which the system was put into ef- 
fect included Britain, France, Germany, Italy, 
Holland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark. In 
England the law was operative from May 21 to 
Sept. 30; in France, from June 14 to Oct. 1; 
in Sweden, from May 15 to Sept. 30; Norway, 
from May 22 to Oct. 1 ; Germany, May 1 to 
Sept. 30, and in Italy from June 4 to Sept. 30. 

In general the laws provide that factories, 
banks, stores, trains, theaters, restaurants and 
other industrial, financial and trade establish- 



ments shall conform to the new schedule, be- 
ginning and closing their activities one hour 
earlier in the day than under the old system, 
though by the clock the time is the same. In 
the large cities in the united kingdom the parks 
were obliged to keep open one hour later than 
usual to give the people the benefit of more 
fresh air. 

In the United States the daylight saving plan 
was adopted in some oases by individual firms 
and by a few municipalities, but chiefly on ac- 
count of the great inconvenience it would cause 
to the railroads it was not generally favored. 
There was no national or state legislation on 
the subject. 



FUEL BRIQUET INDUSTRY IN 1915. 



More than $1,000,000 worth of briquets were 
made out of waste coal dust in 1915, the exact 
production being 221,537 short tons, valued at 
$1,035,716. This was the largest output in the 
United States for any year with the exception 
of 1914. The manufacture of this type of fuel is, 
however, still in its infancy, and, according to 
C. E. Lesher of the United States geological 



survey, a good many years will probably elapse 
before the briquet industry assumes very large 
proportions. The work of briquetting this low 
grade material and converting it into fuel suit- 
able for higher uses is, however, practicable con- 
servation and as such deserves far more atten- 
tion than it now receives in this country. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



APPLICATIONS FOR PATENTS. 
[Condensed from Rules of Practice in the United States patent office.] 



A patent may be obtained by any person who 
has invented or discovered any new and useful 
art, machine, manufacture or composition of mat- 
ter, or any new and useful improvement thereof 
not previously patented or described in this or 
any other country, for more than two years prior 
to his application, unless the same is proved to 
have been abandoned. A patent may also be ob- 
tained for any new design for a manufacture, 
bust, statue, alto-relievo or bas-relief; for the 
printing of woolen, silk or other fabrics; for any 
new impression, ornament, pattern, print or pic- 
ture to be placed on or woven into any article 
of manufacture; and for any new, useful and 
original shape or configuration of any article of 
manufacture, upon payment of fees and taking 
the other necessary steps. 

Applications for patents mnst be in writing, in 
the English language and signed by the inventor 
if alive. The application must include the first 
fee of $15, petition, specification and oath, and 
drawings, model or specimen when required. The 
petition must be addressed to the commissioner 
of patents and must give the name and full ad- 
dress of the applicant, must designate by -title 
the invention sought to be patented, must con- 
tain a reference to the specification for a full 
disclosure of such invention and must be signed 
by the applicant. 

The specification must contain the following in 
the order named: Name and residence of the ap- 
plicant with title of invention; a general state- 
ment of the object and nature of the invention- 
a brief description of the several views of the 
drawings (if the invention admits of such illus- 
tration) ; a detailed description; claim or claims; 
signature of inventor and signatures of two wit- 
nesses. Claims for a machine and its product 
and claims for a machine and the process in the 
performance of which the machine is used must 
be presented in separate applications, but claims 
for a process and its product may be presented 
in the same application. 

The applicant, if the inventor, must make oath 
or affirmation that he believes himself to be the 
first inventor or discoverer of that which he 
seeks to have patented. The oath or affirmation 
must also state of what country he is a citizen 
and where he resides. In every original applica- 
tion the applicant must swear or affirm that the 
invention has not been patented to himself or to 
others with his knowledge or consent in this or 
any foreign country for more than two years 
prior to his application, or on an application for 
a patent filed in any foreign country by himself 
or his legal representatives or assigns more than 
Beven months prior to his application. If appli- 



cation has been made in any foreign country, full 
and explicit details must be given. The oath or 
affirmation may be made before any one who is 
authorized by the laws of his country to admin- 
ister oaths. 

Drawings must be on white paper with india 
ink and the sheets must be exactly 10x15 inches 
in size, with a margin of one inch. They must 
show all details clearly and without the use of 
superfluous lines. 

Applications for reissues must state why the 
original patent is believed to be defective and 
tell precisely how the errors were made. These 
applications must be accompanied by the original 
patent and an offer to surrender the same; or. if 
the original be lost, by an affidavit to that effect 
and certified copy of the patent. Every appli- 
cant whose claims have been twice rejected for 
the same reasons may appeal from the primary 
examiners to the examiners in chief upon the 
payment of a fee of $10. 

The duration of patents is for seventeen years 
except in the case of design patents, which may 
be for three and a half, seven or fourteen years, 
as the inventor may elect. 

Schedule of fees and prices: 

Original application $15.00 

On issue of patent 20.00 

Design patent (Z l / 2 years) 10.00 

Design patent (7 years) 15.00 

Design patent (14 years) 30.00 

Caveat 10.00 

Reissue 30.00 

First appeal 10.00 

Second appeal 20.00 

For certified copies of printed patents: 

Specifications and drawing, per copy $0.05 

Certificate 25. 

Grant BO 

For manuscript copies of records, per 100 

words 1ft 

If certified, for certificate 25. 

Blue prints of drawings, 10x15, per copy... .25. 

Blue prints of drawings, 7x11. per copy 15. 

Blue prints of drawings. 5x8, per copy 05 

For searching records of titles, per hour... .50 
For the Official Gazette, per year, in United 

States 5.00 

PATENT OFFICE STATISTICS. 



Yr. Applications. Issues. 



1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 



52.143 
,. 54,971 
. 56,482 
. 57,679 
. 60,142 
. 64,408 



30,934 
30,399 
31,965 
36,620 
33,682 
37.42JL 



Yr. Applications. Issues. 



1910.. 

1911.... 

1912.... 

1913.... 

1914.... 

1915.... 



63,293 

67,370 

70,976 

. 70,367 

. 70,404 



35,930 
34,084 
37,731 
35,78* 
41,850 
44,934- 



REGISTRATION OF TRADE-MARKS. 



Under the law passed by congress Feb. 20, 1905, 
and effective April 1, 1905, citizens of the United 
States, or foreigners living in countries affording 
similar privileges to citizens of the United 
States, may obtain registration of trade-marks 
used in commerce with foreign nations, or among 
the several states, or with Indian tribes, by 
complying with the following requirements': 
First, by filing in the patent office an applica- 
tion therefor in writing, addressed to the com- 
missioner of patents, signed by the applicant, 
specifying his name, domicile, location and cit- 
izenship; the class of merchandise and the par- 
ticular description of goods comprised in such 
class to which the trade-mark is appropriated; 
a statement of the mode in which the same is 
applied and affixed to goods, and the length of 
time during which the trade-mark has been 
used. With this statement shall be filed a 
drawing of the trade-mark, signed by the appli- 
cant or his attorney, and such number of speci- 
mens of the trade-mark as may be required by 
the commissioner of patents. Second, by paying 
into the treasury of the United States the sum 
of $10 and otherwise complying with the require- 



ments of the law and such regulations as may 
be prescribed by the commissioner of patents. 

The application must be accompanied by a 
written declaration to the effect that the applicant 
believes himself to be the owner of the trade- 
mark sought to be registered and that no other- 
person or corporation has the right to use it; 
that such trade-mark is in use and that the de~ 
scription and drawing presented are correct. 
Trade-marks consisting of or comprising immoral 
or scandalous matter, the coat of arms, flag or 
other insignia of the United States or of any 
state or foreign nation cannot be registered. 
Fees for renewal of trade-marks and for filing 
opposition to registration are $10 each; for ap- 
peals from examiners to the commissioner of 
patents. $15 each. 



the 



Further information may be had by applying to 
commissioner of patents, Washington, D. O. 



TRADE-MARKS ISSUED. 

1910 4,239 I 1913 

1911 4,205 1914 

1912 5,020 I 1915 



5,065 
6,817 
6,292 



64 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



UNITED STATES CIVIL SERVICE. 
Civil service act approved Jan. 16, 1883. 

Officers Three commissioners are appointed by i limitations in the more important branches of 
the president to assist him in classifying the | the public service are: Postotfice, 18 to 45 years; 



government offices and positions, formulating 
rules and enforcing the law. Their office is in 
Washington, D. C. The chief examiner is ap- 
pointed by the commissioners to secure accuracy, 
uniformity and justice in the proceedings of the 
examining boards. The secretary to the com- 
mission is appointed by the president. 

General Rules The fundamental rules govern- 
ing appointments to government positions are 
found in the civil service act itself. Based upor> 
these are 'many other regulations formulated by 
the commission and promulgated by the president 
from time to time as new contingencies arise. 
The present rules were approved March 20, 1903, 
and went into effect April 15, 1903. In a general 
way they require that there must be free, open 
examinations of applicants for positions in the 
public service; that appointments shall be made 
from those graded highest in the examinations; 
that appointments to the service in Washington 
shall be apportioned among the states and terri- 
tories according to population; that there shall 
be a period (six months) of probation before any 
absolute appointment is made; that no person in 
the public service is for that reason obliged to 
contribute to any political fund or is subject to 
dismissal for refusing to so contribute; that no 
person in the public service has any right to use 
his official authority or influence to coerce the 
political action of any person. Applicants for 
positions shall not be questioned as to their 
political or religious beliefs and no discrimina- 
tion shall be exercised against or in favor of any 
applicant or employe on account of his religion 



oy< 

In 



or politics. The classified civil service 
elude all officers and employes in the executive 
civil service of the United States except laborers 
and persons whose appointments are subject to 
confirmation by the senate. 

Examinations These are conducted by boards 
of examiners chosen from among persons in gov- 
ernment employ and are held twice a year in all 
the states and territories at convenient places. 
In Illinois, for example, they are usually held 
at Cairo, Chicago and Peoria. The dates are an- 
nounced through the newspapers or by other 
means. They can always be learned by applying 
to the commission or to the nearest postoffice or 
custom house. Those who desire to take exami- 
nations are advised to write to the commission 
in Washington for the "Manual of Examina- 
tions," which is sent free to all applicants. It 
is revised semiannually to Jan. 1 and July 1. 
The January edition contains a schedule of the 
spring examinations and the July edition con- 
tains a schedule of the fall examinations. Full 
information is given as to the methods and rules 
governing examinations, manner of making appli- 
cation, qualifications required, regulations for 
rating examination papers, certification for and 



chances of appointment, and 



far as possible 



it outlines the scope of the different subjects of 
general and technical examinations. These are 
practical in character and are designed to test 
the relative capacity and fitness to discharge the 
duties to be performed. It is necessary to obtain 
an average percentage of 70 to be eligible for 
appointment, except that applicants entitled to 
preference because of honorable discharge from 
the military or naval service for disability re- 
sulting from wounds or sickness incurred in the 
line of duty need obtain but 65 per cent. The 
period of eligibility is one year. 

Qualifications of Applicants No person will be 
examined who is not a citizen of the United 
{States; who is not within the age limitations 
prescribed; who is physically disqualified for the 
service which he sreks; who has been guilty of 
criminal, infamous, dishonest or disgraceful con- 
duct; who has been dismissed from the public 
service for delinquency and misconduct or has 
failed to receive absolute appointment after pro- 
bation; who is addicted to the habitual use of 
intoxicating liquors to excess, or who has made 
a false statement in his application. The age 



rural letter carriers, 17 to 55; internal re,e iluc , 
21 years and over; railway mail, 18 to 35; light- 
house, 18 to 50; life saving, 18 to 45; general de- 
partmental, 20 and over. These age limitations 
are subject to change by the commission. They 
do not apply to applicants of the preferred class. 
Applicants for the position of railway mail clerk 
must be at least 5 feet 6 inches in height, ex- 
clusive of boots or shoes, and weigh not less than 
135 pounds in ordinary clothing and have no 
physical delects. Applicants for certain other 
positions have to come up to similar physical re- 
quirements. 

Method of Appointment Whenever a vacancy 
exists the appointing officer makes requisition 
upon the civil service commission for a certifica- 
tion of names to fill the vacancy, specifying the 
kind of position vacant, the sex desired and the 
salary. The commission thereupon takes from 
the proper register of eligibles the names of 
three persons standing highest of the sex called 
for and certifies them to the appointing officer, 
who is required to make the selection. He may 
choose any one of the three names, returning the 
other two to the register to await further certifi- 
cation. The time of examination is not consid- 
ered, as the highest in average percentage on the 
register must be certified first. If after a pro- 
bationary period of six months the name of the 
appointee is continued on the roll of the depart- 
ment in which he serves the appointment is con- 
sidered absolute. 

Removals No person can be removed from a 
competitive position except for such cause as will 
promote the efficiency of the 
for reasons given in writing. 



public service and 
No examination of 



witnesses nor any trial shall be required except 
in the discretion of the officer making the re- 
moval. 

Salaries Entrance to the department service is 
usually in the lowest grades, the higher grades 
being generally filled by promotion. The usual 
entrance grade is about $900, but the applicant 
may be appointed at $840, $760 or even $600. 

EMPLOYES IN THE FEDERAL CIVIL 

SERVICE. 
June 30, 1915. 

IN WASHINGTON. 



White house 37 

State department 280 

Treasury department 8.244 

W T ar department 2.264 

Navy department. 



1,176 

Postoffice department 1.538 

Interior department 5,879 

Department of justice 1.442 

Department of agriculture 4.480 

Department of commerce 2,8'" 

Department of labor 

Interstate commerce commission. 

Civil service commission 

Smithsonian institution. 



105 
883 
221 
792 
212 
154 
3,875 



Total 34,430 

OrTSIDE "WASHINGTON. 



State, war and navy department building.. 

Panama canal 

Government printing office 



Treasury department 



5,203 



Janitor service, etc. 
Mint and assay service.. 

Subtreasury service 409 

Public health service 3.424 

Customs service 6.735 

Internal revenue service 4,805 

Miscellaneous 432 

War department 

Quartermaster's corps 8,732 

Ordnance department 4,931 

Engineer department 15.832 

Miscellaneous 2,373 

Navy department 

Trade and labor positions 20,000 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



65 



Exclusive of trade and labor positions... 2,978 

Postofflce department 

Inspection service 520 

Postoffice service 182,367 

Fourth class postmasters 47,616 

Rural carrier service 43,721 

Railway mail service 21,769 

Interior department 

Land service 1,335 

Pension agency service 4,556 

Indian service 7,588 

Reclamation service 3,176 

Miscellaneous '.... 827 

Department of justice 2,595 



Department of agriculture 14,321 

Department of commerce 

'Lighthouse service 6,610 

Immigration service 1,773 

Steamboat inspection service 320 

Miscellaneous 3,079 

Interstate commerce commission 1,128 

Civil service commission 37 

Panama canal service 1,003 

Total . 421,259 

Grand total* 476,363 

*Includes 20,674 unclassified employes of isth- 
mian canal commission. 



EARTHQUAKES AND ERUPTIONS IN RECENT TIMES. 



ST. PIERRE, MARTINIQUE. 

(Eruption of Mont Pelee.) 
Date May 8, 1902. 
Lives lost 30,000. 

Property destroyed (uot estimated). 
MOUNT VESUVIUS. 

(Eruption.) 

Date April 8-11, 1906. 
Lives lost About 200. 

Towns suffering damage Torre del Greco, Torre 
Annunziata, Boscotrecase, Ottajano, San Giu- 
seppe, Portici, Caserta, Nola and San Giorgio. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

(Earthquake and fire.) 
Date April 18, 1906. 
Lives lost 452. 
Persons injured 1,500. 
Persons made homeless 265,000. 
Property loss $350,000,000 (estimated). 
Loss of insurance companies $132,823,067.21. 
Buildings destroyed 6,000. 
Blocks or squares burned 453. 
Area of burned district 3.96 square miles. 
Relief appropriation by congress $2,500,000. 
Relief subscription $11,000.000. 

VALPARAISO, CHILE. 

(Earthquake.) 
Date Aug. 16, 1906. 
Lives lost 1.500. 
Property loss $100,000,000. 

KINGSTON, JAMAICA. 

(Earthquake.) 
Date Jan. 14, 1907. 
Lives lost 1,100. 
Persons injured 2,000. 
Property loss $25,000,000. 
Buildings destroyed 6,000. 
Area of ruined district 50 acres. 
Area affected by earthquake 300 acres. 
Duration of first shock 38 seconds. 
Duration of fire after earthquake 40 hours. 
SICILY AND CALABRIA. 

(Earthquake.) 
Date Dec. 28, 1908. 
Day of week Monday. 



Hour 5:23 a. m. 

Duration of shock 35 seconds. 

Lives lost 76,483. 

Persons injured 95,470. 

Persons made homeless 1,100,000. 

Property destroyed (No estimate attempted). 

Region affected Northeastern Sicily and south- 
western Calabria. 

Chief cities and towns destroyed or damaged 
In Sicily: Messina. Faro, Santa Teresa, Scalleta. 
Iu Calabria: Reggio, Gallico, San Giovanni. San 
Eufemia, Pellaro, Palmi, Caunitello. 

CARTAGO. COSTA RICA. 

(Earthquake.) 
Date May 5, 1910. 
Hour 7 p. m. 
Lives lost 1,500. 

TURKEY. 
(Earthquake.) 
Date Aug. 9, 1912. 
Lives lost 3,000. 
Persons injured 6,000. 
Persons homeless 40,000. 

SAKURA, JAPAN. 
(Eruption and earthquakes.) 
Date-^Jan. 12, 1914. 
Lives lost 43. 
Houses destroyed 855. 
Persons made destitute 20,000. 
Property loss (not estimated). 

SICILY. 
(Earthquake.) 
Date May 8-9, 1914. 
Lives lost 200. 
Persons injured 1,000. 

CENTRAL ITALY. 

(Earthquake.) 
Date Jan. 13, 1915. 
Hour 7:55 a. m. 
Duration of shock 30 seconds. 
Lives lost 29,978. 

Provinces affected Aquila, Caserta and Rome. 
Communes damaged 372. 
Largest city destroyed Avezzano. 



HISTORY OF COLLAR AND SHIRT INDUSTRY. 
[From department of commerce report.] 

nection with the manufacture of shirts or as 
separate industry. The sewing machine was 



Separate collars for men's shirts are said to 
have been first made about 1825 by the wife of 



a blacksmith in Troy, N. Y. This woman did 
the family washing and ironing and realized that 
shirts with separate collars would not have to 
be washed as often as did shirts with collars 
attached. She applied the idea not only by mak- 
ing separate collars for her husband's shirts, but 



by making them 



for sale. This innovation 



attracted the attention of the Rev. Ebenezer 
Brown, a retired Methodist minister, who kept 
a small dry goods store in Troy. With the aid 
of the woman members of his own family, the 
Rev. Mr. Brown, about 1829, began offering 
"string collars" for Kale and soon developed 
a profitable new branch of his business. The 
demand for "store" collars increased and during 
the thirties and forties several companies were 
formed to carry on the manufacture of separate 
collars, cuffs and shirt bosoms, either in con- 



introduced into the collar industry in 1852 and 
steam power in 1855. Electric cutting machines 
were introduced about 1870, buttonholing ma- 
chines about 1880 and button sewing machines 
about ten years later. The collar and cuff in- 
dustry has been centered in Troy from the first. 
In 1909 80.46 per cent of the collars and cuffs 
manufactured in the whole country was manu- 
factured in that city. 

The manufacture of shirts was founded as a 
systematic industry in 1832 in New York, and in 
1909 that city manufactured 27.74 per cent of the 
total output of the country. Troy and Albany 



produced 8.85 per cent, Philadelphia 



per cent, 



Baltimore 8.53 per cent and St. Louis 4.07 per 
cent. New York state and Pennsylvania pro- 
duced more than half the shirts made in the 
country. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 191T. 



MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

[From report of federal census bureau.] 
MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE STATISTICS BY STATES. 



STATE OB TERRITORY. 


MARRIAGES. 


DIVORCES. 


Number, 

1887-1906. 


Annual average 
1898 to 1902. 


Annual average 

1888 to 1892. 


Number 

1887 
to 
1906. 


Annual averaget 
per 100.000 pop- 
ulation. 


Number 


Per 

10,000 
Pop. 


Number 


Per 

10,000 
Pop. 


1900. 


1890. 


1880. 


870 




372,525 
310.767 
189,539 
98.877 
136.984 
25,374 
50,244 
114,486 
401.266 
23,380 
861,717 
493.890 
67.412 
366.350 
275,062 
359,783 
243,881 
86.592 
195,875 
468,267 
424,096 
242,147 
313,500 
579,807 
36.3(52 
170,820 
7,073 
77.764 
335,809 
25,625 
1,205,615 
313.725 
44,022 
727,408 
45,415 
67,475 
89(5,533 
72,836 


20,227 
16.902 
9.561 
5.457 
7,034 
1.322 
3,114 
6,176 * 
21,640 
1,359 
44,858 
26,451 
4,847 
19.298 
14,112 
19,526 
13,421 
5,519 
10,740 
24.117 
23,008 
13.118 
17,574 
30,340 
2,188 

'527 
3,916 
15,042 
1,307 
63,082 
17,142 
2,454 
37,979 
3,326 
3.499 
48,088 
3,726 


Ill 
129 
64 
101 
77 
72 
112 
117 
98 

8 

105 
124 
86 
96 
91 
97 
79 
90 
86 
95 
75 
113 

88 

124 
95 
80 
67 
87 

P 

91 

as 

85 
76 

87 


15,727 
13,217 
7,167 
4.261 
6.216 
983 
1,512 
4.314 
16,541 
705 
38,421 
22,453 
736 
16,474 
12,795 

I0il50 
5,726 
7,916 
21,031 
18,726 
10.275 
11,778 
25,700 
1,294 
8.337 
238 
3.720 
15,740 
1,018 
49,584 
13,074 
1.339 
32.984 

2.801 
39,059 


104 
117 
59 
103 
83 
58 
66 
110 
90 
80 
100 
102 
41 
86 
90 
83 
91 
87 
76 
94 

fl 

91 
96 
91 
78 
50 
99 
109 
64 
83 
81 
70 
90 
44 
88 
74 
93 


22.807 
29,541 
25,170 
15,844 
9,224 
887 
2.325 
7,586 
10,401 
3.205 
82,209 
60.721 
6,751 
34,874 
28,904 
30.641 
9,785 
14,194 
7,920 
22.940 
42.371 
15,646 
19,993 
54,766 
6,454 
16.711 
1,045 
8,617 
7,441 
2,437 
29,125 
7,047 
4,317 
63,982 
7.669 
10,145 
39.686 
6,953 


69 
136 
108 
158 
50 
16 
58 
79 
26 

S 

142 
113 
93 
109 
84 
41 
117 
40 
47 
104 
55 
74 
103 
167 
82 
111 
112 
23 
73 
23 
24 
88 
91 
129 
134 
33 
47 


54 
90 
84 
197 
66 
18 
34 
57 
24 
93 
75 
104 
33 
67 
84 

88 
24 
32 
72 
41 
48 
71 
139 
71 
97 
100 
18 
46 

| 

47 
64 
46 
108 
21 
33 


27 
53 



61 
10 
31 
53 

g 

68 
70 


10 
24 

52 
60 
84 

10 
67 
51 
69 












District of Columbia 


Florida 




Idaho 


Illinois 




Indian Territory 


Iowa 


60 
44 

35 
10 
78 
12 
30 
72 
27 

9 

125 
43 
106 
85 
13 
12 

1 

46 

48 

"92" 
13 
30 
1 


8 

28 
6 
61 
12 
25 
47 
21 
12 
29 

1 

99 
53 
9 
1 
16 
3 

"sf 

"80 
8 
25 


Kansas 






Maine 


Maryland 


Massachusetts 


Michigan 


Minnesota 
Mississippi 






Nebraska 


Nevada 


New Hampshire 


New Jersey ... 


New Mexico . 


New York. 


North Carolina 


North Dakota.. . 


Ohio 


Oklahoma 






Rhode Island 




South Dakota 


54,782 
396.990 
620,445 
51,259 
58,472- 
295,377 
87,182 
170,810 
337,583 
13,509 


3.094 
20,975 
34,965 
2,789 
2,977 
16,386 
7,747 
9.532 

16 


77 
104 
115 
101 
87 
88 
92 
99 

8 


2,128 
17,432 
23.834 
2,127 
2,807 
12,818 
2,975 
6,692 
16,009 
426 


61 
99 
107 

V 

77 
83 
88 
95 
68 


7,108 
30,447 
62,655 
4,670 
4,740 
12.129 
16,219 
10,308 
22,867 
1,772 


95 

89 
131 
92 
75 
38 
184 
64 
65 
118 


65 
62 
82 
74 
49 
22 
109 
41 
51 
86 


48 
38 
49 
114 
47 
11 
75 
25 
41 
111 


21 
62 
50 
6 

S 

38 
99 


Tennessee 




Utah 




Virginia 


Washington 


West Virginia 


Wisconsin 


Wyoming 


Total 


12,832.044 










945.625 









*No record kept. tFor the five years of which the year stated is the median year. 
NOTE See also "Population by Marital Condition" this volume. 



FIRE AND EXPLOSION 

Fire resulting in the explosion of munitions 
caused the loss of six or more lives and the 
destruction of property valued at nearly $20,- 
000,000 in and near the National Dock and Stor- 
age company's plant on Black Tom island or 
peninsula, Jersey City, N. J., early on Sunday 
morning, July 30, 1916. How the fire originated 
could not be ascertained with any degree of cer- 
tainty. It seems to have started soon after 
midnight either among some freight cars of the 
Lehigh Valley railroad or on a barge contain- 
ing explosives to be shipped to the allies. It 
continued to burn until it got beyond the con- 
trol of the railroad employes and the Jersey City 
fire department was called upon for assistance. 
There followed a series of explosions, the first 
and most violent of which occurred at 2:08 a. m. 
It caused a shock felt all over the metropolitan 
district of New York and was even noticed as 
far away as Philadelphia. It shattered plate 
and other glass in Jersey City and New York 
to the value of approximately $1,000,000. 



AT JERSEY CITY, N. J. 

Black Tom island is really a peninsula which 
extends out from the Jersey shore toward Bed- 
loe's island, in New York bay. The peninsula 
was utilized for the warehouses of the National 
Dock and Storage company, for a grain elevator 
belonging to the Lehigh Valley line and for a 
number of piers reached by railroad tracks. 
There were many cars loaded with explosives 
on the peninsula and at the piers were a con- 
siderable number of barges loaded with the same 
kind of freight. 

In detail the losses occasioned by the fire and 
explosion were estimated as follows: 
National Dock and Storage company... $12,000,000 

Lehigh Valley railroad 1,000,000 

Central Railroad of New Jersey 50,000 

Ammunition in cars and barges 5,000,000 

Other barges 260,000 

Plate and other glass 1,000,000 

Damage to buildings, etc 335,000 

Total 19,645,000 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



67 



CAUSES FOR DIVORCE. 

Summary of the laws in effect in the various states. 



STATE OR TKRRI- 

TOKY. 


Residence 
required. 


Consan- 
guinity. 


tA 


| 


Drunken- 
ness. 


Fraud or 
force. 


Imprison- 
ment. 


>, 

A 


Insanity. 


1 


Wunt of 
Age. 


Adultery. 


Alabama 
Alaska 
Arizona 


ItoSy. 
2yrs... 
1 yr.. . . 


Void. 
Void. 
No... 
Void. 
Void. 
Void. 


Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 


2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
lyr- 
lyr.. 
lyr.. 
lyr. 
3 yrs. 
2 yrs. 


Hab'l- 

Yes:::: 

1 yr.... 

HE:::: 

Yes.... 

2 yrs... 


Yes 
Void... 
Yes.... 
Yes.... 
Void . . 
Yes.... 
Void . . 
Yes.... 


2 yrs 
Felony- 
felony. . 
Yes 
Felony.. 
Felony- 
Yes 
2 yrs 


fS::: 

Yes.... 
Yes 
Yes 
Yes.... 
No 
Void . . 
Yes.... 


No... No... 
No... lyr.. 
No... No... 
Yes.. No... 
Yes.. Yes- 
Yes.. I Yes- 
Void. No... 


Yes.... 
Void... 
Yes.... 
Yes.... 
Void . . 
No 
Yes.... 
Yes.... 


Yes'.' 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 


Arkansas 
California 
Colorado 
Connecticut 
Delaware 
District of Columbia. 
Florida 
Georgia 
Hawaii 
Idaho 
Illinois 
Indiana 
Iowa 


lyr.... 
[yr.... 
lyr.... 
3yrs... 
2yrs... 
3 yrs. 


2yrs... 
lyr.... 
2yrs... 
6mos- 
lyr.... 
2yrs... 


Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Void. 

Void. 
Void. 
No... 
No... 


Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 

Yes..' 

Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes . 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes. . 


lyr.. 
3 yrs. 
lyr.. 
lyr- 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
lyr.. 
lyr.. 
Yes- 
3 yrs. 
3 yrs. 
3 yrs. 
2 yrs. 
lyr.. 
2 yrs. 
1 yr. 


Hab'l.. 
Yes.... 
Yes- . 
lyr.... 
2 yrs... 
Yes.... 
Yes.... 
Yes.... 

fe.: 

Yes.... 

Yes'.::: 

Yes.... 
lyr.... 
Yes.... 
1 yr 


Yes..':: 
Yes.::: 

Yes.... 
No 
Yes.... 
Yes.... 
Yes- . 

NO.:::: 
void*:: 

Void . . 
Yes.... 


Yes'.::: 

7 yrs 
Felony. . 
Felony- 
Felony.. 
Felony. . 
Felony- 
Felony . 
Felony- 
Yes 

Felony 


Yes.... 
Yes.... 
Void . . 

Yes.::: 

Yes. .. 
Void . . 
Yes.... 
Yes.... 


Yes- 
Void. 
Yes.. 

NO'.:: 

Void. 
No... 
No... 


Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 

2yrs 
Yes.. 
No- 
Yes. 
Yes 


void : : 

Yes.... 

Void"' 
Void . . 
Void . . 
No 


"Yes." 
Yes. 
Yes. 

'Yes." 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 


Kansas 
Kentucky 

Louisiana . 


lyr.... 
lyr.... 


Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts 
Michigan 
Minnesota 
Mississippi 
Missouri 
Montana 
Nebraska 
Nevada 
New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New Mexico 
New York* 


lyr.... 
2yrs... 
3to5y. 
lyr.... 
lyr.... 
2 yrs... 
lyr.... 
lyr.... 
lyr.... 
bmos.. 
lyr.... 
lyr.... 
lyr.... 
Actual 


Yes.. 

Void. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Void. 

Yes! ! 
Yes.. 
Void. 
Void. 


Yes. .. 
Yes 


No... 
Yes- 


Yes. 
Yes. 


No 


Yes. 


3yrs 
Yes 
Felony- 
Yes 


Yes.... 
Yes.... 

Yes. 


Yes. . 
No... 
Yes- 


Yes. 
No- 


Yes.... 
Void . . 
No.... 


Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

"Yes" 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 


Yes.... 


No... 


Yes- No 


lyr.. 
2 yrs. 
1 yr.. 
3 yrs. 
Yes- 
Yes- 


iffi::: 

Yes.... 

3 yrs... 
Yes.... 
Hab'l.. 


Yes.... 
Void . . 
Yes.... 
Yes.... 
No 


Yes 
3 yrs 
Felony. . 
lyr 
Felony- 
Felony- 


Yes... 
Yes.... 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 


Yes- 


Yes- 
Yes. . 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes- 


Yes-.. 
Yes... 
Yes.... 
Yes.... 
Void. 


No... 
No... 
No... 


gorth Carolina 
orth Dakota 

Ohio 


2 yrs... 
lyr.... 
1 yr 


Void. 


Yes,. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 


io'y'rs 
lyr.. 
3 yrs. 
lyr- 
lyr.. 
2 yrs. 
5 yrs. 


No 


No. 


No 


Yes. 


No... 


Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes. . 


Void. 
Void. 
Yes... 
No 
Void. 
No.... 
Void. 


lyr.... 
3 yrs... 
Yes.... 
lyr-.. 
No 
Hab'L. 


Void . . 

Yes..':' 
Yes..: 
Yes... 
Yes... 


Felony- 
Yes 
Felony- 
Felon v- 
2 yrs.... 
Felony. . 


Void. 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 


No... 
No... 
NO... 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes- 


Oklahoma 
Oregon 
Pennsylvania 
fiode Island 


lyr.... 

iyr.::: 

2 yrs... 


No... 
No... 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 


nth Carolina! 


uth Dakota 
nnessee 
Texas 
Utah 
Vermont 
Virginia 
Washington 
West Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 


lyr.... 
2 yrs... 
6mos.. 
lyr.... 
2 yrs... 
lyr.... 
lyr... 
lyr.... 
2 yrs. . . 
lyr.... 


No... 

No.'!! 
Yes.. 
No... 

Yes'.'. 
No... 

Void. 


Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yea.. 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 


lyr.. 
2 yrs. 
lyr.. 
lyr.. 
3 yrs. 
3 yrs. 
lyr.. 
3 yrs. 
lyr.. 
lyr- 


lyr. .. 
Hab'l.. 
Hab'L. 
Yes.... 
No 
No 
Hab'L. 
Yes.... 
lyr...-. 
Hab'L. 


Void. 


Felony- 
Felony.. 
Felony- 
Felony.. 
3 yrs 
Felony- 
Felony. . 
Felony. . 
3 yrs 
Felony. . 


Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 
Yes... 
No.... 
Void. 
Yes... 


No... 


No... 
Yes- 


Void. 


Yes. 
Yes. 

'Yes'." 
Yes. 
Yes. 

'Yes." 
Yes. 


Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
No... 
No... 
Void 


Yes. . 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
No... 

Yes:.' 
Yes.. 

Yes.. 


NO'.::: 

Yes... 
Yes... 

Yes." 
No-.. 
Void. 


No.... 

Yes.:: 

No.... 
Void. 



Marriages may be annulled for causes making them void from the beginning. 
tNo divorce allowed, but marriages may be annulled. 
NOTE The above table presents only the princi- absolutely void for the cause named, that it may 



pal causes for divorce in the various states. 
The words "Yes" and "No" are not always to 
be taken without qualification, but as being 



be voidable or that it may be annulled by court 
proceedings. Bigamy, it may be added, is ft 
cause for divorce or annulment of marriage in 



applicable under certain conditions. The word I practically all of the states. 
"Void" may indicate that a marriage may be | 

NOTABLE NEW YORK BUILDINGS. 

Height in stories and feet. 

Stories. Ft. 

Hyde 20 288 

Maiden Lane ...25 315 
Manhattan Life.. 7 348 

Masonic 19 292 

Met'politan Life. 50 700 

Municipal 24 560 

Park Row 29 382 

Pulitzer 22 375 

FOREST FIRES IN ONTARIO, CANADA. 



Stories. Ft. 


Stories. Ft. 


American Surety. 23 306 


Clarendon 20 263 


American Tract.. 23 306 


Com'ercial Cable. 21 255 


Ashland 20 266 


Empire 20 293 


Atlantic Mutual.. 18 242 


Equitable 37 485 


Bankers' Trust.. 39 539 


Evening Post -32 385 


Bank of Com'ce..20 270 


Flatiron 20 286 


Bowling Green... 19 272 


Germania Life .20 281 


Broad Exchange. 20 276 


Heidelberg 30 410 
Hotel McAlpin. .25 307 



Singer 


Stories. 
41 


Ft. 

612 
308 
419 
280 
273 
388 


St. Paul 
Times 
Trinity 
U. S. Rubber Co 
Walker* 


.26 
.28 
.21 
.20 
.17 



Washington Life. 19 273 
Wool worth 51 785 



Forest fires in the northern part of the prov- 
ince of Ontario, Canada, caused the loss of about 
400 lives July 29-31, 1916. Several small towns 
were entirely destroyed and many of the in- 
habitants burned to death. Fifty-seven perished 
in Mushka, a French-Canadian settlement ; thir- 



ty-four at Matheson ; eighteen at Cochrane ; 
fifteen at Iroquois Falls, and fifteen at Ramore. 
The others were lost in various smaller places 
scattered through the forests. Hundreds of 
square miles of bush and farm lands were 
burned over. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



SUMMARY OF MARRIAGE LAWS. 



STATE OR TERRITORY. 


License re- 
quired. 


MARRIAGE PROHIBITED 
BETWEEN 


MINIMUM 
AGE. 


tPAR'NT'L 

CONSENT 


1. 

II 

s 


It 


02 


1 
"P. 
,2 
"S. 


J 

1~ 


5 

1 

No... 
No... 
No... 
No 


1 


c 

J_ 

H 
18 
14 

1 

is 

t 

14 
15 

J 
16 
16 
14 
15 
12 
12 
18 

16 
15 

18 
t 
16 
16 
16 
13 

* 5 

18- 
14 
15 
16 
15 
16 
21 

i, 

15 

i, 

14 
18 
12 


1 

5 

C 
o> 

21 

it 

21 

21 

1" 

21 

21 

1, 

18 
18 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 

is 

21 
21 
21 
21 
18 
18 
21 
21 

is 

21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
18 
21 
16 
21 
21 
21 
21 


11 


Alabama 
Alaska 
Arizona 
Arkansas 


Yes- 
No... 

?! 


No... 

Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes . 


Yes.. 

Yes- 


Yes- 
No... 
No... 
No... 


No... 

No... 
No... 
No... 


NO... 

No... 
No... 
No... 


11 

18 
17 
18 
21 

21 
16 

?r 

18 

is 

18 
16 
17 
14 
14 
21 

Is 

11 
i 8 

18 
18 
14 

is 

18 
16 
18 
18 
18 
18 
21 

is 

18 

5, 

16 
21 
14 


18 

1 



18 

21 
18 
18 
18 
16 
18 
18 
18 
18 
21 
18 
16 
18 
18 
15 
18 
18 

ii 

JI 
ii 

is 

18 
18 

a- 

18 
18 
16 
18 
18 
18 
21 


California 
Colorado 
Connecticut 
Delaware 
District of Columbia 
Florida 


IS: 
IS: 

Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes . 
Yes 


No... 
No... 
No... 
No... 
No,.. 
Yes.. 
No... 
No. 


Yes- 
Yes- 
No... 
Yes- 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
No 


Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes- 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
No 


Yes.. 
No... 
Yes.. 
..4.. 
No... 
No... 
No... 
t 


Yes- 
No... 
Yes.. 

NO*:: 

No... 
No... 

t 


Yes.. 

&.: 

Yet'. 
No... 

NO*:: 

Yes. 
Ye&. 

No... 

IS: 


Georgia 
Hawaii v 


Idaho 
Illinois 
Indiana 


Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes. . 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes. . 
Yes- 


No... 
Yes- 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No- 
Yes. 
No... 
Yes- 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes. . 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes- 
Yes- 
No... 
No- 
No- 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
No... 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
No... 
Yes- 
No... 
No... 


Yes.. 

No .. 
Yes- 
No... 
No... 
Yes.. 
Yes 


Yes.. 
No... 
No.. 
Fo... 
Yes- 
Yes. . 
No 


No-. 

NO... 

Yes- 
No... 
Yes- 
No... 


No-. 
No... 
Yes- 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes.. 



Iowa 
Kansas 


Kentucky 
Louisiana 


Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts 
Michigan 
Minnesota 
Mississippi 
Missouri . , 
Montana 
Nebraska 
Nev ada 
New Hampshire , 
New Jersey . 


No... 
Yes.. 
No... 

$::: 
f|: 

NO.:: 

No... 

Yes.. 

Yes- 
No... 
Yes.. 
Yes . 
No... 
No... 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
No... 
Yes- 


Yes- 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes.. 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes.'. 
No... 
No .. 
Yes- 
Yes- 
No.. 
No .. 
Yes.. 

No?".' 
No.. 
Yes- 
Yes. 
Yes- 
No... 
Yes.. 
No... 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 


Yes.. 

i: 

NO^:: 

No... 

Yet- 

No... 

Yes'.'. 
Yes- 
No... 
Yes- 
Yes- 
No... 
No... 
Yes. 


Ye!. 

i 

Yes- 
No... 
No... 

NO::: 

Ye*s.: 
No... 

vA: 

Yes- 
No... 
No... 
Yes. 
Yes- 
No... 
No. . . 
Yes 


wfc 

Yes. 

N 8:: 

Ye*, 
No- 

Ye*, 
No- 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes, 
Yes. 
Yes 


New Mexico 
New York 
North Carolina 


North Dakota 
Ohio 


Oklahoma 
Oregon 


Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina 
South Dakota 
Tennessee 


Texas 


No-': 
Yes- 


Ye*s:: 
No... 
Yes- 


Yel 
?fe 


Utah 
Vermont '. 
Virginia 
Wash ington 


West Virginia 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming :.".'.:"' 


Yea.. 
Yes- 
Yes.. 


Yes.. 
Yes.. 
Yes.. 


Yes.. 
No... 
No... 


Yes- 

No... 
Yes.. 


No... 
No... 
...t.. 


No... 
No-. 


NO- 


18 
18 
18 


16 
15 

16 


18 
21 
21 


16 
18 
21 


*At which marriage is legal. fAge below which 
parental consent is necessary. JNo specific provi- 
sion; common law usually applies. Prohibited 


when either of parties is incapable of entering 
into a civil contract. 



AMERICAN HALL OF FAME. 


"The Hall of Fame for Great Americans" is 


Eli Whitney. 


Edgar Allan Poe. 


the name of a building on University Heights in 
New York city, in which are inscribed on bronze 
tablets the names of famous American men ajid 
women. Nominations for the honor are made bv 
the public and are submitted to a committee of 


John J. Audubon. 
William E. Channing. 
Gilbert Stuart 
Asa Gray. 


Roger Williams.* 
James Fenimore Cooper 
Phillips Brooks. 
William Cullen Bryant. 
Frances E. Wiliard. 


100 eminent citizens. In the case of men fiftv- 


CHOSEN IN 1905. 


Andrew Jackson. 


one votes are required a 
forty-seven. The first 
October, 1900. when the 
George Washington. 
Abraham Lincoln. 
Daniel Webster. 
Benjamin Franklin. 
Ulysses S. Grant. 
John Marshall. 


nrt in the case of women 
balloting took place in 
following were chosen: 
James Kent. 
Joseph Story. 
John Adams. 
Washington Irving. 
Jonathan Edwards. 
Samuel F. B. Morse. 


John Quincy Adams. 
James Russell Lowell. 
William T. Sherman. 
James Madison. 
John G. Whittier. 
Alexander Hamilton. 
Louis Agasslz. 
John Paul Jones.* 


George Bancroft. 
John Lothrop Motley. 

CHOSEN IN 1915. 

Francis Parkman. 
Mark Hopkins. 
Elias Howe. 
Joseph Henry. 


Thomas Jefferson. 
Raloh W. Emerson. 
H. W. Longfellow. 


David G. Farragut. 
Henry Clay. 
Nathaniel Hawthorne. 


Emma Wiliard. 
Maria Mitchell. 


Rufus Choate. 
Daniel Boone. 


Robert Fulton. 


George Peabody. 


CHOSEN IN 1910. 


*Reconsidered under a 


Horace Mann. 


Robert E. Lee. 


Harriet Beecher Stowe. 


new rule and failed of 


Henry W. Beecher. 


Peter Cooper. 


Oliver Wendell Holmes. 


re-election. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



NATIONAL PARKS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

.Under supervision of the secretary of the interior. 

Name. Location. Created. Acres. 

Abraham Lincoln Homestead* Kentucky July 17, 1916 137 

Antietam Maryland Aug. 20, 1890 43 

Casa Grande Ruin Arizona June 2i', 1892 480 

Chickainauga and Chattanooga Georgia and Tennessee Aug. 18, 1890 6,195 

Crater Lake Oregon May 22, 1902 159,360 

General Grant California Oct. 1, 1890 2,560 

Gettysburg Pennsylvania Feb. 11, 1895 877 

Glacier Montana May 11, 1910 981,681 

Hawaii .Hawaii Aug. 1, 1916 74,935 

Hot Springs Reservation Arkansas June 16, 1880 912 

Lassen Volcanic California Aug. 9, 1916 82880 

Mesa Verde Colorado June 29, 1906 42,376 

Mount Rainier Washington May 22, 1899... . 207,360 

Platt Oklahoma June 29, 1906 848 

Rock Creek District of Columbia Sept. 27, 1890.... 1606 

Rocky Mountain Colorado Jan. 26, 1915 230,000 

Sequoia California Oct. 1, 1890 160,000 

Shiloh Tennessee Dec. 27, 1894 3000 

Sully's Hill North Dakota June 4, 1904 *960 



Vicksburg 
Wind Cai 
Yellowstone 



nrg Mississippi 

Cave ...South Dakota 



Feb. 21, 1899 



Jan. 
.Wyoming, Montana and Idaho Mar. 



9, 1903 , 

1. 1872 



Yosemite California Oct. 

Zoological District of Columbia Mar. 2, 1889 

*In charge of secretary of war. 

NOTES ON NATIONAL PARKS. 
Abraham Lincoln Homestead Farm near Hodg- 

enville, Ky., with log cabin in which Abraham 

Lincoln was born. 



1,233 

, . 10,522 

,.2,142,720 

.. 967,680 

170 



Antietam Battle field of the civil war in Wash- 
ington county, Maryland. 

Casa Grande Ruin Remains of a large prehis- 
toric building near Florence. Ariz. 

Chickamauga and Chattanooga Battle fields of 
the civil war in the vicinity of Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

Crater Lake Park contains remarkable moun- 
tain, lake and fine scenery in the Cascade 
range, Klamath county, Oregon; may be reached 
from Klamath Falls or from. Medford on the 
Southern Pacific road. 

General Grant In Fresno and Tulare counties, 
California: forest and mountain scenery; 
reached from Sanger on the Southern Pacific 
road. 

Gettysburg Battle field of the civil war in 
southeastern Pennsylvania. 

Glacier Tract of mountainous country in north- 
ern Montana with glaciers, lakes, forests and 
peaks. 

Hawaii Includes celebrated volcanoes Kilauea, 
Mauna Loa and Haleakala ; main feature is 
Lava lake at Kilauea. 

Hot Springs Reservation Tract of land in Gar- 
land county, Arkansas, noted for its springs 
of warm mineral waters. 

Lassen Volcanic Contains volcanic and other 
peaks, hot springs, mud geysers, ice caves, 
lakes of volcanic glass, canyons and forests. 

Mesa Verde In the extreme southwestern part 
of Colorado; contains pueblo and other ruins; 



reached from Mancc 
ern road. 



on the Rio Grande South- 



Mount Rainier Mountain district in southern 
Washington; reached from Ashford on the Ta- 
coma Eastern railroad and from Fairfax on 
the Northern Pacific road. 

Platt Tract of land containing sulphur springs 
in Murray count y, Oklahoma; reached by Santa 
Fe and St. Louis & San Francisco railroads. 

Rock Creek Park in outskirts of Washington, 
D. C. 

Rocky Mountain Tract of mountainous land of 
great scenic beauty in Grand, Boulder and 
Larimer counties, Colorado; contains forests, 
lakes and peaks; reached by Union Pacific and 
other roads. 

Sequoia Mountain tract in Tulare county, Cali- 
fornia, containing forest of big trees; reached 
from Visalia. 

Shiloh Battle field of civil war in Hardin coun- 
ty, southern Tennessee. 

Sully's Hill On the shore of Devil's lake. North 
Dakota; contains elevation on which Gen. 
Alfred Sully with a few men withstood a 



band of Indians for several days in 1863; 
reached from Devil's Lake, Narrows and Tokio 
stations on the Great Northern road. 



Vicksburg Battle field of civil war near city 
of same name in Mississippi. 

Wind Cave Canyon and extensive cave in Custer 
county, South Dakota, twelve miles from Hot 
Springs, on the Northwestern and Burlington 
roads; in Black Hills region. 

Yellowstone Famous park in Wyoming, Montana 
and Idaho, containing geysers and many other 
natural phenomena as well as beautiful moun- 
tain, lake and river scenery; reached from 
stations on the Northern Pacific, Burlington 
and Oregon Short Line roads. 

Yosemite Splendid valley in the Sierras in Mari- 
posa county, California; reached from Merced 
on the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific roads 
by way of the Yosemite Valley railroad. 

Zoological Park in Washington, D. C., devoted 
to the zoological collection of the government: 
adjoins Rock Creek park. 

PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUI- 
TIES. 

By law approved June 8, 1906, entitled "An 
act for the preservation of American antiqui- 
ties," the president of the United States is au- 
thorized, in bis discretion, to declare by procla- 
mation historic landmarks, historic and prehis- 
toric structures and other objects of historic or 
scientific interest that are situated upon lands 
owned or controlled by the United States, to be 
national monuments. Under such authority the 
following monuments have been created: 



Name and state, 



Big Hole battle field, Mont 1910 



Year. Acres. 



Cabrillo, Cal. 
Chaco canyon, N. M. 
Cinder cone,* Cal. ... 
Colorado, Col. 



Dev 



tower, Wyo. 



1913 

1907 

1907 

1911 

1906 



1.5 

20,629 
5.120 



Devil postpile,* Cal. 1911 

El Morro, N. M 1906 

Gila cliff dwellings.* N. M 1907 

Gran Quivira, N. M 1909 



Grand canyon,* Ariz. 
Jewel cave.* S. D. 



1,152 



160 
160 

.1908 806,400 
.1908 1,280 



Lassen peak,* Cal 1907 

Lewis and Clark cavern, Mont 1908 160- 

Montezuma castle, Ariz 1906 160 

Mount Olympus,* Wash 1909 608,640 



..1908 



Muir Woods, Cal. 

Mukuntuweap, Utah 

Natural bridges, Utah 1909 



Navajo. Ariz. 

Oregon caves,* Ore. 

Petrified forest, Ariz 1906 



.1909 
.1909 



295 

15,840 

2,740 

600 

480 

25,625^ 



70 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Name and state. Year. Acres. 

Shoshone cavern. Wyo 1909 210 

Sitka, Alaska 1910 57 

Tonto,* Ariz : 1907 640 

Tumacacori, Ariz 1908 10 

Wheeler.* Col 1908 300 

*Administered by department of agriculture; 
others by interior department, except the Big 
Hole battle field, which is under the war de- 
partment. 

NOTES ON NATIONAL MONUMENTS. 
Big Hole battle field Scene of fight at Big Hole 
pass on Big Hole or Wisdom river. Aug. 9. 
1877. between Nez Perce Indians under Chief 
Joseph and a small force of soldiers com- 
manded by Col. John Gibbon; in Silver Bow 
county, Montana; reached from Melrose. 
Cabrillo statue At Point Loma, Cal. ; land first 
sighted by Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo, discoverer 
of California, when he approached San Diego 
bay, Sept. 28, 1542; site of about 1% acres 
set aside for heroic statue of Cabrillo. 
Chaco canyon Located in San Juan and McKin- 
ley counties, New Mexico ; contains extensive 
prehistoric communal or pueblo ruins. 
Cinder cone An elevation in Lassen county in 
northern California; is of importance as illus- 
trating volcanic activity in the vicinity 200 
years ago. 

Colorado Extraordinary examples of erosion in 
Mesa county, western Colorado; reached from 
Grand Junction. 

Devil postpile Natural formations, including 
Rainbow waterfalls, within the Sierra national 
forest in California; area set aside is on 
middle fork of San Joaquin river. 
Devil's tower A lofty and isolated rock in 
Crook cotinty, Wyoming: is an extraordinary 
example of the effect of erosion in the higher 
mountains. 

El Morro An elevation near Wingate station on 
the Santa Fe railroad in New Mexico: con- 
tains prehistoric ruins and Interesting rock 
inscriptions. 

Gila cliff dwellings In the Mogollon mountains. 
New Mexico; known also as the Gila Hot 
Springs cliff houses: are among the best pre- 
served remains of the cliff dwellers of the 
southwest. 

Gran Quivira Ruined town not far from Manzano 
in the central part of New Mexico; remains 
of large cathedral and chapel and of many 
houses thought to date from prehistoric times. 
Grand canyon In northwestern Arizona; great- 
est eroded canyon within the United States. 
Jewel cave A natural formation of scientific 
interest within the Black Hills national for- 
est in Custer county. South Dakota. 
Lassen peak In natural forest of same name in 
Shasta county, northern California; marks the 
southern terminus of the long line of extinct 
volcanoes in the Cascade range, from which 
one of the greatest volcanic fields in the 
world extends. 



Lewis and Clark cavern An extraordinary lime- 
stone cavern near Limespur, Jefferson county, 
Montana. 

Montezuma castle Large prehistoric ruin or cliff 
dwelling on Beaver creek. Arizona. 

Mount Olympus Mountain in the state of Wash- 
ington; has extensive glaciers and on its slopes 
are the breeding grounds of the Olympic elk. 

Muir woods In Marin county, California: an ex- 

- tensive growth of redwood trees of great age 
and size; land presented to the government 
by William Kent of Chicago. 

Mukuntuweap Canyon in southwestern Utah 
through which flows the north fork of the Rio 
Virgin or Zion river; an extraordinary example 
of canyon, erosion. 

Natural bridges Rock formations in southeastern 
Utah extending over streams or chasms; have 
loftier heights and greater spans than any 
other similar formations known; reserved as 
extraordinary examples of stream erosion. 

Navajo^Within the Navajo Indian reservation 
in Arizona; includes a number of prehistoric 
cliff dwellings and pueblo ruins new to science. 

Oregon caves Within the Siskiyou national for- 
est in Oregon; caves are of natural formation 
and of unusual scientific interest and impor- 
tance. 

Petrified forest Deposits of fossilized or mineral- 
ized wood in Gila and Apache counties, Arizona. 

Pinnacles A series of natural formations of 
rock with a number of caves underlying them; 
located within Pinnacles national forest in 
California. 

Rainbow bridge An extraordinary natural bridge 
in southeastern Utah, having an arch which 
in form and appearance is much like a rain- 
bow; is 309 feet high and 278 feet span; of 
scientific interest as an example of eccentric 
stream erosion. 

Shoshone cavern A cave in Big Horn county, 
Wyoming, of unknown extent, but of many 
windings and ramifications and containing 
vaulted chambers of large size, magnificently 
decorated with sparkling crystals and beauti- 
ful stalactites, and containing pits of un- 
known depth. 

Sitka Tract of about fifty-seven acres within 
public park, near Sitka. Alaska; battle ground 
of Russian conquest of Alaska in 1804; site of 
former village of Kiki-Siti tribe, the most 
warlike of Alaska Indians ; contains numer- 
ous totem poles constructed by the Indians, 
recording the genealogical history of their sev- 
eral clans. 

Tonto Comprises two prehistoric ruins of ancient 
cliff dwellings in Gila county, Arizona. 

Tumacacori Ruin of an ancient Spanish mission 
of brick, cement and mortar in Santa Cruz 
county, Arizona. 

Wheeler Volcanic formations illustrating erratic 
erosion; in Rio Grande and Cochetopa national 
forests in southwestern Colorado. 



MEMBERS OF THE FRENCH ACADEMY. 



Name. Elected. 

Haussonville.Comtede.b. 1843. 1888 
Freycinet, Charles de.b.1828.1890 
Loti-Viaud, Pierre, b. 1850 

Lavisse, Ernest, b. 1842 

Bourget, Paul, b. 1852 

France, Anatole. b. 1844... 
Hanotaux. Gabriel, b. 1853 

Lavedan, Henri, b. 1859 

Deschanel, Paul. b. 1856... 

Hervieu, Paul. b. 1857 

Rostand, Edmond, b. 1868. 



Bazin. R 

Masson, Frederick, b. 1847... 



ene. b. 1853 



cieu. 

3.1888 


i^ame. nil 
Lamy. Etienne. b. 1845.... 


ecieu. 

..1905 


8.1890 


Ribot. Alexandre. b. 1842. 


..1905 


.1891 


Barres, Maurice, b. 1862.. 


..1906 


.1892 


Donnay, Maurice, b. 1866. 


..1907 


.1894 


Charmes* Francis, b. 1848 


..1908 


.1896 


Richepin, Jean, b. 1849.... 


..1908 


.1897 


Doumic, Rene, b. 1860 


..1909 


.1898 


Prevost, Marcel, b. 1862.. 


..1909 


.1899 


Aicard, Jean. b. 1848 


..1909 


.1899 


Brieux. Eugene, b. 1858... 


..1909 


.1901 


Poincare. Raymond, b. 18E 


0.1909 


.1903 


Duchesne, Mgr., 3). 1848.. 


..1910 


..1903 


Regnier, Henri de, b. 186 


..1911 



Name. Elected. 

Cochin, Denys. b. 1851 1911 

Lyautey. Louis, b. 1854.. -....1912 
Boutroux, Emile. b. 1845.... 1912 
Bergson, Henri L., b. 1859.. 1914 

Capus, Alfred, b. 1858 1914 

Gorce, Pierre de la. b. 1846.. 1914 

The Academic Francaise. or 
French academy, was instituted 
in 1635. It is a part of the In- 
stitute of France and its par- 
ticular function is to conserve 
the French language, foster lit- 
erature and encourage genius. 



HIGHEST MOUNTAINS IN THE WORLD. 



Mountain. Feet. 

Asia Mt. Everest. 29. 002 
Godwin-Austen ..28,280 
Kunchinginga ...28,156 
Gusherbrum . . . .26,378 
Dhawalagiri ....26,826 
Kutha Kangir ..24,740 



Mountain. Feet. 

Nanda Devi 25,600 

Mustaghata 24,400 

Chumalari 23,946 

South America- 
Aconcagua 23,080 

Mercedario 22.315 



Mountain. 
Huascaran 
Anconhuma 
Illampu ... 
Huandoy . . 
Illimani ... 
Pamiri .... 



Feet. 
...22.188 

21,490 

21,192 

20,847 

21,030 

20,735 



Mountain. Feet. . 

Chimborazo 20,498 

Tupungato 20,286 

Haina 20.171 

San Jose 20,020 

North America 
McKinley 20,300 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



71 



GOVERNMENT RECLAMATION PROJECTS. 

June 30, 1915. 
[Source: The reclamation service, department of the interior.] 



Location. Project. 

Arizona Salt River 

Arizona-California Yuma , 

California Orland 

Colorado Grand valley 

Colorado Uncompahgre valley.. 

Idaho Boise 

Idaho Minidoka 

Jackson la 



ike. 



Idaho 

Kansas Garden City 

Montana Blackfeet (Indian ) 

Montana Flathead (Indian) 

Montana Fort Peck (Indian) 

Montana Huntley 

Montana Milk river 

Montana Sun river 

Montana-North Dakota Lower Yellowstone 

Nebraska- Wyoming North Platte 

Nevada Truckee-Carson 

New Mexico Carlsbad 

New Mexico Hondo 

New Mexico-Texas Rio Grande 

North Dakota North Dakota pumping 

Oklahoma Lawton 

Oregon Umatilla 

Oregon-California Klamath 

South Dakota Belle Fourche 

Utah Strawberry valley 

Washington .... Yakiina 

Washington * . . Okanogan 

Wyoming Shpshone 

Total 

*The amounts in this column include the total 
amounts paid out for construction and operation 
and maintenance without deducting amounts that 
have been collected for services rendered, opera- 
tion and maintenance assessments, etc. tThe 
percentages noted in this column represent the 
approximate ratio which costs of construction to 
date bear to present estimate of total construc- 
tion cost. 

UNITED STATES IRRIGATION STATISTICS. 
[From census bureau report.! 

State. Farms. Acres. 

Arizona 4.841 

California 39.352 

Colorado 25.857 

Idaho 16.439 

Kansas 1.006 

Montana 8.970 

Nebraska 1,852 

Nevada 2,406 

New Mexico 12.795 

North Dakota 69 

Oklahoma 137 

Oregon 6.669 

South Dakota 500 

Texas 4.150 

Utah 19.709 

Washington 7.G64 

Wyoming 6,297 



Acres. 
191,754 
127,257 
20,320 
53,000 
140,000 
255,000 
120,100 



Expendi- fPer ct. 
tures. compl'd. 



10,677 
122,500 
152,000 
152,000 

32,877 
219,557 
174,025 

60,116 
229,684 
206,000 

24,796 

10,000 
155,000 

26,314 
2,500 

36,300 
144,430 

97,916 

50,000 
144,429 

10,099 
149,360 



114,150,000 
8,740,000 

965,000 

3,044,000 

6,445,000 

12,544,000 

6,498,000 

949,000 

386,700 
1,000,000 
1,930,000 

515,000 
1,641,000 
4,842,000 
3,246,000 
3,372,000 
8,080,000 
6,513,000 
1,242,500 

378,600 
7,562,000 
1,063,000 
47,900 
2,379,000 
9,437,000 
3,762,000 
3,202,000 
9,437,000 

949,000 



100 

70 
97 
68 
70 
95 
08 



40 
30 
10 
82 
60 
40 
97 
60 
70 
95 
100 
50 
50 
30 



95 

75 

100 

55 



320.051 

2.664.104 

2.792.032 

1.430.848 

37.479 

1.679.084 

255.950 

701.833 

461.718 

10.248 

4.38S 

686.129 

63.248 

164,283 

999.410 

334.378 

1.133.302 



Cost. 

$17.677.966 

72.580.030 

56.636.443 

40.977.688 

1.365.563 

22.970.958 

^.798.310 

6,721,924 

9.154.897 

836.482 

47.200 

12.760.214 

3.043.140 

7.346.708 

14.028.717 

16.219.149 

17.700.980 



Total 158.713 13.738.485 307.866.369 

NOTE The above figures are for arid land alone 
and do not include rice land. The statistics of 
number of farms and the acreage irrigated are 
for 1909; the cost is to July 1, 1910. 

The total length of ditches used for irrigation 
in 1910 was 125,591 miles and there were 6.812 
reservoirs having a combined capacity of 12,581.129 
acre-feet. The number of pumping plants re- 
ported was 13,906 and the acreage supplied by 
them 477,625. The relative importance of the 
several classes of irrigation enterprises is shown 
by the following percentages of acreage irrigated 
in 1909: Percent. 

United States reclamation service 2.9 

United States Indian service 1.3 

Carey act enterprises 2.1 

Irrigation districts 3.8 

Co-operative enterprises 33.8 

Individual and nartnership enterprises 45.5 

Commercial enterprises 10.6 



3,118,011 122,872,200 

Classified by source of water supply, the acre- 
age irrigated was as follows: From streams bv 
gravity. 12.763,797; by pumping. 157.775: from 
wells, by flowing. 144.400; by pumping. 307.496: 
from reservoirs. 98.193: from lakes, b.v gravity. 
58,284; by pumping, 12,354; from springs, 196,186. 
CEOPS ON IRKIGATED LAND (1909). 

State. Acreage. 

Arizona 171.302 

California 1.196.767 

Colorado 1.650.356 

Idaho 772.684 

Kansas 22.118 

Montana 909.342 

Nebraska 137.211 

Nevada 356.079 

New Mexico 230.034 

North Dakota 3.273 

Oklahoma 2.806 

Oregon 368.911 

South Dakota 38.438 

Texas 58.227 

Utah 579.744 

Washington 160.483 

Wyoming 583.786 



Value. 

$4.718.100 

52.057.007 

39.478.994 

16.582.213 

477.025 

14.535.960 

1.973.860 

5.339.475 

5.705.922 

56.215 

51.995 

7.489.255 

505.684 

2.645.385 

14.642.792 

7.994.531 

7.362.983 



acre. 

$27.54 
43.50 
23.92 
21.46 
21.57 
15.99 
14.39 
15.00 
24.80 
17.18 
18.53 
20.30 
13.16 
45.43 
25.26 



12.61 



Total 7,241,561 181,617,396 25.08 

The percentages of the total acreage devoted 
to important crops on irrigated lands were: Al- 
falfa, 30.6; wild grasses, 21.1; oats. 10.2; wheat. 
7.6; barley, 3.3; orchard fruits, 3.3; other tame 
or cultivated grasses, 3; grains cut green. 2.9: 
timothy alone, 2.8: sugar beets. 2.5; timothy and 
clover mixed, 2.5: potatoes. 2.3: corn. 1.8: trop- 
ical and subtropical fruits. 1.4. Crops grown on 
irrigated land show an excess yield of 28.6 per 
cent over those grown on unirrigated land. 

IRRIGATION FOR RICE GROWING. 

The total acreage irrigated for rice growing In 
Louisiana. Texas and Arkansas in 1909 was 694.- 
800, of which 54.7 per cent was in Louisiana. 41.3 
per cent in Texas and 4 per cent in Arkansas. 
The enterprises which were completed or under 
way in 1910 were reported as capable of irrigat- 
ing 950,706 acres in that year and of serving 
ultimately a total of 1.134.322 acres. The total 
cost of rice irrigation enterprises to July 1. 1910. 
was $13.587,639. 



72 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



NATIONAL DEBTS, REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES. 
[From report of bureau of statistics, Washington, D. C. I 



COUNTRY. 


0) 

k 


Total debt 
in United 
States 
currency. 


Rates! 
of 
inter- 
est. 
Per ct. 


Interest 
and other 
annual 
charges 
(budeet 
estimate). 


Revenue. 


Expendi- 
ture. 


PEH CAPITA OF 


J 

a 


i 

1 

S 
a 


6 

I 


11 

W 




1915 

1915 
1914 
1915 
1915 
1915 
1915 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1915 
1914 
1915 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1915 
1916 
19i4 
1914 
1914 
1913 
1911 
1915 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1914 
1915 
1915 
1916 
1916 


$761.284,000 
181,979.000 
1,142,564.1)00 
486,942.000 
1. 043.675,0;*) 
1,515.871.000 
1,338,348.000 
825,518.000 
54,741,000 
19,369.000 
1,026,312,000 
2-23,056,000 
240,830.000 
16,488.000 
16,336,000 
123,691.000 
13,787,000 
290,000 
11,157,000 
228,416.000 
969,189,000 
21,419.000 
69,204,000 
105.226.000 
20,508.000 
458.437.000 
6,347.540.000 
34,787,000 
68.936,000 
47,461.000 
59.?^ .000 
1,172.339,000 
3,854.795,000 
32.410,000 
258,219.000 
30.373.000 
1,479.361,000 
2,921,153,000 
1,248,173,000 


4 - 
3H-4 
3 -4 
3 -4 
3 -5 
3 -4 
3 -4K 
2J^-3 
3 -4 
3 -10 
4 -6 
4^-6 
2j|-4 
4 -5 
4 -8 
5 -10 
6 


$36,737.000 
3.089.000 
56.C91.000 
14,947.000 
47,960.000 
63.851.000 
64,263.000 
41,978.000 
1,490,000 
1.698,000 
40,121,000 
14,851,000 
14,493.000 
727,000 
208.000 
152,000 
1,115,000 


$136,947,000 
78,097,000 
230.035,000 
60,597,000 
160,487,000 
702.581,000 
459,624,000 
155.812,000 
5.8r7,000 
8,392,000 
189,375,000 
53.148,000 
163.174,000 
3.517.000 
2,987,000 
2.103.000 
3,822.000 
5.311,000 
4.970,000 
51,466.000 
97,163,000 
16.939,000 
41,829,000 
35,517,000 
10,161,000 
72,939.000 
1,001,511.000 
33,073.000 
12.228,000 
29,444,000 
26,413,000 
899,635.000 
1,551,493.000 
14,297,000 
50.451,000 
6.282,000 
890.081,000 
548.804,000 
309,253.000 
20,790,000 
29,163.000 
535,000 
4,004,000 
72,687.000 
1,900,000 
86,91.S,000 
124,806.000 
2,972,000 
45,831.000 
5,280,000 
19,105,000 
90,062.000 
17,186000 


$136,797,000 
154,191,000 
226.594,000 
60.240.000 
160.487,000 
70^.527,000 
459.612,000 
155.704,000 
12,174.000 
9,589.000 
131,057.000 
53,146,000 
127.384.000 
3,750,000 
1,835,000 
2,103,000 
3.286.000 
5,823,000 
6,034,000 
61,041,000 
97.163,000 
19.192,000 
40.263,000 
34,759,000 
10.161,000 
78,594,000 
1,001,987,000 
33.066.000 
12,157,000 
29,444,000 
25,313.000 
3,283,907.000 
1,532.714,000 
35.375,000 
81,612,000 
8, 127,1)00 
403,423,000 
552,600.000 
293,970,000 
20.790.000 
29.163,000 
535,000 
4,642,000 
75.798,000 
2,455,000 
101.744.000 
136.053,000 
3.496.000 
49.422,000 
5.348.000 
19.105,000 
WJ.021.0UO 
17.186.000 
91,877,000 
1,649,284.001 
33,342,001 
4,491,OOC 
41.364.001 
25.454. OU 
282,754.001 
103,133.00 
19,2H8.0U 
201,461,001 
89.155,001 
2,727.544.001 
) 137.156.00! 
) 1,065.088.001 
1 13.074,001 
J| 33.030,001 
1 10.000.001 
\ i~i\nmn(KL 


$r.79 

36.8o 


4.Y2 
.63 


17.59 
15.81 


F17.57 
31.21 


Australian Commonvr'th 




448.79 
20.26 
48.97 
63.64 
107.80 
2.74 
7.08 
42.22 
46.93 
67.42 
40.12 
7.71 
220 09 
22.98 
.86 
9.10 
61.31 
2.88 
4.22 
28.03 
37.92 
13.67 
40.62 
159.89 
6.25 
35.74 
2.79 
2.36 
17.29 
56.85 
2.64 
53.56 
12.15 
4.69 
82.06 
23.24 

"i.'93 
1.14 

8.04 
14.36 
2.80 

83.47 

'ssiao 

15.38 
7.61 
157.52 

"42. is 

26.0b 
9.75 
17.99 
27.31 
3.74 
89.23 
2'..59 
19. 2o 
) 39.6 
) 97.20 
) 122. 2 j 
) 5.61 
) 10.7 
J 1.3 
) 114.9 
J 12. 3t 


13.78 
.93 
2.06 
3.06 
5.48 
.07 
.67 
1.65 
3.12 
1.80 
L ,7 
10 
.27 
1.86 

i*2^ 

3^15 
.10 
.59 
1.81 
1.19 
1.87 
2.01 
6.35 
.75 
1.5J 

!OS 
.88 
2.50 
.2( 

l'.19 
.16 
3.54 
1.15 

".'is 

.I! 

i!a 

.14 
2.50 

"Ii93 
1.4 
.09 
5.1 

' 2.'34 

1.30 

.43 

2.50 
1.9 

.1 

4.0 
1.61 

3*J 

8.bC 

2. 

'.2 

M 

7.2t 
.6 


55.85 
3.12 

2>.6i 

21.86 
20.35 
.29 
3.33 
7.79 
11.18 
20.21 
8.56 
1.41 
3.74 
6.37 
15.76 
4.05 
14.49 
.29 
3.34 
16.94 
12.80 
6.77 
6.46 
25.23 
5.94 
6.34 

i:ol 

13.27 
22.88 
1.16 
10.46 
2.51 
1.24 
15.42 
5.76 
5.76 
1.88 
.36 

VR 

4.37 
13.99 
3.28 
19.8 
18.62 
6.60 
3.29 
15.12 
L8 
12.53 
19. 2S 
10. 2^ 
6. It) 
8.9 
3.1 
13.8 
18. 2< 

l& 

13. & 
23.7' 
3.7( 
>r 9.9( 
i 1.4 
3 26. 9 1 
L 3.6, 


55.53 
3.12 
22.69 
21.86 
20.33 
.61 
3.80 
5.39 
11.18 
15.78 
9.12 
.87 
3.74 
6.38 
17.28 

18!03 
.29 
3.78 
16.31 
12.53 
6.77 
6.96 
25.24 
6.94 
6.30 
1.73 
1.00 
48.43 
22.60 
2.88 
16. 93 
3.25 
1.28 
15.52 
5.47 
5.76 
1.88 

17!88 

5J64 
16.38 
3.58 
23.31 
20.07 
6.69 
3.29 
14.44 
1.85 
12.24 
9.47 
10.43 
6.19 
8.95 
3.12 
89.23 
18.29 
5.04 
9.47 
14.10 
58.77 
) 3.29 
) 10.47 
' 1.51 
) 26.94 
5 3.63 


Austria-Hungary 


Hungary 


Belgian Kongo 
Bolivia 


Brazil 


Bulgaria 




Central Amer.-CostaKica 








Salvador 


2 -6 
4*6-5 
4-5 
3 -6 
4?-6 
3 -4 
4 -10 
3 -4 
2^-3 
3X 
3 -3^2 

!*!* 

3 -4 

3 -4 

2H-5" 
2^-5 
3 -3V$ 

Si 


1,509,000 
11.175,000 
33,696,000 
2,975,000 
4.458,000 
3,315.000 
2.810,000 
22,730.000 
252,171,000 
4,004.000 
2,989,000 
2,153.000 
2.335,000 
59.360,000 
169,859.000 
2.506,000 
10.942,000 
2,984,000 
49,471.000 
126.028,000 
61,624,000 


Chile 


China 


Co'ombia 


Denmark 








Algeria 


Tunis 


Indo-China 


Colonies, other 
German empire 


States 


Colonies.... 


Haiti 


India, British 


Italy 


Japan 






191t 
1914 

1915 
1915 

1914 

1915 
1915 


29,888.666 
1,710,000 
2.091.000 
221,773.000 
1,218,000 
518,625,000 


6 1* 

3^ 
3 -5 

2^-3 


1,939,000 
198.000 
359.000 
15,531,000 
61.000 
15,515.000 


Liberia 




Mexico . . 


Montenegro 
Netherlands. 






191o 








Norway 


191o 
1914 
1915 
191o 
1914 


95.782,000 
12.30:1000 
44,112.000 
938,484,000 


13* 

1 -6 
3 -5 


4,747.000 
1,133.000 
542.000 
30,695,000 


Paraguay 
Peru 


Portugal 






i9!5 
191 
191 
191 

191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
191 
UH 
191 
191 
191 
191 


316,693.000 

4,536.'j:>i l .ittn 
31,288.000 
13,043,000 
126.^2,000 
30.4-52.000 
1,816,301.000 
166,846,000 
73,739.000 
843.28ti.00l 
614,621.001 
5,673.374. OOt 
213,828,001 
1,090.148,001 
I2.000.00l 
140,933. 00( 
34.1/57,001 

A.K RVJ 1 C-J (VI 


4 -5 
3 -6 

3f4 

2 -5 

<4* 

3 -4 

3 -3fc 

l*:j 
1*4* 

2 -4 

) 4 

!*! 

i 


17.582,000 
226.449,00*. 
1,452.00C 
1,810.001 
8,873,OOC 

1,411.001 

81,546.00t 
9,037.001 
1,941. OU 
71,913.001 
22,754,0(1 
110,318,001 
11,620.001 
22,903,00* 
713,001 
8,900.001 
1,685.00 

1 QTll 4S7 (4 i 


94,062.000 
1,617,962,000 
32,894.000 
4,485,000 
41,364.001 
25,454.00C 
247.143.00t 
103.133.00C 
14,763.001 
10,,311,0(X 
87.442,00! 
1, 103,207 .00! 
141,343.001 
1.007,646.001 
)! 12.736.OU 
J 33,OS6,00( 
J 10.000.00( 
ili9fKn 17.1 m 


Russia 


Finland I 


Santo Domingo.. . . 


Serbia 


Siam 


Spain 




Switzerland 


Turkey . 


Union of South Africa. . . 
United kingdom 
Colonies ( n. e. s.) 
United 8tates 


Philippines 




Venezuela 





ORDER OF PRESIDENTIAL SUCCESSION. 



In case of the removal, death, resignation or 
disability of both the president and vice-presi- 
dent, then the secretary of state shall act as 
president until the disability of the president or 
vice-president is removed or a president is elect- 
ed. The rest of the order of succession is: 
Secretary of the treasury, secretary of war, at- 



torney-general, postmaster-general, secretary of 
the navy, secretary of the interior, secretary of 
agriculture and secretary of commerce. The 
acting president, in case congress Is not in ses 
sion. must call a special session, giving twenty 
days' notice. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



73 



NATIONAL RAILWAY, TELEGRAPH AND POSTAL STATISTICS, 

[From report compiled by bureau of statistics, Washington, D. C.] 



COUNTRY. 


cS 
0> 

> 


Rail- 
ways. 


Tele- 
graphs. 


Post- 
offices. 


Postal 
routes. 


Postal 
service 
performed. 


Val. domes- 
tic money 
and postal 
orders sent. 


Value for- 
eign mon- 
ey orders 
sent. 




1915 

1914 
1915 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1913 
1915 
1914 
1914 
1915 
1915 
1915 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1913 


Miles.* 
21,150 
20.3S3 
2,945 
15.739 
13,589 
5,451 

16,194 
1.537 
30,795 
438 
613 
240 
200 
298 
264 
3.958 
6,123 
621 
2,331 
2.455 
652 
3,707 
31.958 
2,793 
1,173 
1,282 
1,948 
39.600 
2,866 
1.396 


Miles.* 
49,244 
51,969 
13.434 
30.616 
16,396 
5,206 
1,622 
3.811 
36,199 
3,201 
36.604 
tl.521 
t4,045 
t4.281 
t3,637 

"'2,409' 
22.384 
36,350 
11.721 
5.065 
2.995 
4,370 
9.603 
120,738 
9,665 
2.874 
8,915 
18,522 
148.192 
6.527 
6.748 
319 
124 
84.124 
35,033 
24.996 
615 
4.353 
441 
22.452 
t528 
5,032 
12.348 


No. 
3,300 
8.522 
2,396 
10.909 
6.610 
1,708 
50 
293 
3.857 
433 
14,178 
204 
380 
278 
161 
96 
117 
1,036 
6,816 
655 
574 
1,713 
151 
2.067 
15,391 
686 
445 
316 
699 
51,573 
220 
1,342 
30 
88 
19,848 
11,363 
7,983 
152 
515 
138 
2,911 
21 
1,537 
1.711 
17 
3,562 
385 
158 
774 
4,266 
855 
3.087 
18.050 
2.316 


Miles. 
50,107 
137,314 


Miles. 
26,634.686 
41.097.076 


$ 10,341 .944 

47.160,512 
13,723,251 
339.331.671 
263.780.-905 
93,924,457 
413.692 
60?,761 
45,013.437 
6.298,729 
52.568.433 
188,397 


$613.938 
4,677,232 
2,607 ,6?4 
76.981,340 
57.834,624 
12,333.540 
944,252 

2.2oY.696 
3,749.220 
31,497,459 


Austral ian Commonwealth 
New Zealand 




138,314 
50,921 
5.828 
13.919 
13,867 
92,312 
12,689 


91,344,H03 
57,768.029 
74,307,186 
961,764 
708.932 






Belgian Kongo 
Bolivia 


Brazil 




6,238,342 
52,065,274 




Central America Costa Rica.. 










321 


68,566 


1,085 


















Salvador... . 


1.848 
32.712 
133,000 


36,601 
8,861,979 




3,636 
274,603 


Chile ... 


7,749.679 
2,948.337 
281,010 


China . 






Cuba 


5,324 
6,539 


2,545,828 
10,606,187 






64,281,954 


3.826,141 




Egypt 


7,016 
81,792 
9.010 
6,675 
22,429 
45.928 
91,276 


6.353,067 
166,598.520 
8,465,563 
3,161,194 
7.098,283 
4,704,565 


27,185,662 
635.339.114 
106.254.0tif) 
6.010.396 
4.327.382 
7.870,456 
2,044.009.394 
26.299.106 
3.236.816 
652,613 


2,930,769 
24,082,140 
625.542 
3,128,093 
2.173.408 
3,106.990 
57,694,974 




Algeria 


Tunis. . .. 


Indo-China 


Colonies (n.e.s.) 


German empire 












453,198 
39,299 


Crete 






Haiti 


1913 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
19)5 
1914 
1913 
1909 
1914 
1914 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1913 
1915 
1913 
1915 
1915 
1913 
1913 
1914 


140 
34.656 
11,105 
6.594 
312 
993 
326 
16,088 
11 
2,054 
1,722 
117 
1,967 
255 
34 
1,719 
1,854 
1.069 
2,328 
46,586 
2,338 
400 
977 
895 
9,538 
8,933 
3.562 
4.576 
8,833 
23.701 
7,770 
263,547 
733 
340 
1,639 
588 




107,079 
112.239,942 

88.039,734 
83,315.845 


India, British 
Italy 


156.838 
47.570 
65.779 
7,746 
19.698 
709 
51.679 


147,108.552 
571.397,170 
136,626.551 
6.555.627 
9.418.797 
6,355.480 
24,218,667 


2,582.903 
8.435 015 
395,331 
12,578 
43,252 
9,074.885 
4,558,442 


Japan 


Formosa 




8,398,505 
1,037,185 
23.121.371 








Netherlands 
East Indies 
West Indies etc 


10.078 
9,287 


22,510.098 
6.045,809 


19,763.193 
14,494.536 
168.174 
17,882,496 


3,988,601 
1,260.078 
669,889 
2,876,552 


Norway 


-7,238 
2,485 
6,312 
9,321 
5,566 
6.657 
5,401 
143,090 


48,047 


15,464,636 


Paraguay.. . . 


Persia 


9,966 
17,984 
24,290 
60,391 
66.786 
223,546 


1.924,861 
2,045.692 
15.212,791 
3,143,430 
20,527,813 
99,652,579 




1,257 
122,098 
564,464 
401,518 
5,973.739 
12,920,147 
11,674,120 


Peru 


540,575 
13,800,970 
506,058 
410,482 
1,278.526,671 
10,397,266 


Portugal 


Colonies 


Roumania .... 


Russia 


Finland . 


Santo Domingo 


1.269 
2.729 
4,527 
27,680 
6,664 
2.179 
23,093 
14,517 
80.982 
30.165 
240,231 
4,773 
590 
5,344 
4,902 


105 
1,556 
243 
7,135 
4,187 
4.384 
850 
2.802 
24,589 
2,392 
56,380 
665 
89 
995 
284 






Serbia 


2.121 
4,954 
58.491 
42.804 
8.015 
24,195 
8,621 


869,707 

474.088 

''"'29,380,665 
23,395,531 
6.129,816 
16,406.960 


7,080,257 
369,716 
13.271 .652 
99.277,509 
129,657,470 
20.933.643 
9.02B.8K2 
488,592,392 


647.989 
44,124 

'" 4",345,8i3 

17,879.243 
172,313 
4,816,779 
19,449.007 


Siam 


Spain 


Sweden 


Switzerland 


Turkey 


Union of South Africa. . . . 


United kingdom 








United States 


433,334 


616,460,122 


656,139.135 
7,440,004 


60,772,074 
1,902,357 


Philippines..^ 


Porto Rico 






Uruguay 


24,448 


3,056.360 


2,587.242 


19,597 
Affr A-U\ 971 


Venezuela 






*Miles 


of line. 


tMUes 


of wire. 







The library of congress was established in 1800 
in the city of Washington, D. C. It was burned 
in 1814, and in 1851 lost 35,000 volumes by fire. 
The present library building, which cost $6.347,000. 
was opened to the public in November. 1897. It 
is located a short distance east of the capitol 
and is the largest and tinest building of its kind 
in the world. 

June 30, 1915, the library contained 2,363,873 
books .and pamphlets, 147,553 maps, 727,808 pieces 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 



of. music and 385,757 photographs, prints, engrav- 
ings and lithographs. The copyright office is a 
distinct division of the library with its own force 
of employes. The total number of employes in 
the library is 552 and the annual cost of main- 
tenance is now about $850,000, including $200,000 
for printing and binding. 

The librarian of congress is Herbert Putnam, 
salary, $6,500; chief assistant librarian, Appleton 
P. C. Griffin, $4,000. 



74 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



HOLIDAYS IN THE UNITED STATES, 



GENERALLY OR LOCALLY OBSERVED. 

Arbor Day Usually fixed by governor. 

Benuington Battle Day Aug. 16. 

Christmas Day Dec. 25. 

Columbus Day Oct. 12. 

Confederate Memorial Day See Decoration day. 

Davis, Jefferson, Birthday June 3. 

Decoration Day Federal, May 30; confederate. 
April 26 (Alabama, Georgia. Florida. Missis- 
sippi) and May 10 (North and South Carolina). 

Election Days See Election Calendar. 

Fire Prevention Day Oct. 9. 

Flag Day June 14; designated by governor. 

Georgia Day Feb. 12. 

Independence Day July 4. 

Jefferson's Birthday April 13. 

Labor Day First Monday In September. 

Landing Day July 25 (Porto Rico). 

Lee's Birthday Jan. 19. 

Lincoln's Birthday Feb. 12. 

Maine (Battle .Ship) Day Feb. 15. 

Mardi Gras February (New Orleans). 

McKinley Day Jan. 29. 

Mecklenburg Independence Declaration May 20. 

Memorial Day See Decoration day. 

Mothers' Day Second Sunday in May. 

New Orleans, Battle of Jan. 8. 

New Year's Day Jan. 1. 

Patriots' Day April 19 (Maine, Massachusetts). 

Pioneers' Day July 15 (Idaho), July 24 (Utah). 

Texas Independence Day March 2. 

Thanksgiving Day Last Thursday in November. 

Washington's Birthday Feb. 22. 

HOLIDAYS IN THE VARIOUS STATES. 

Alabama Jan. 1; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday); Feb. 
22; Mardi Gras (the day before Ash Wednes- 
day, first day of Lent) ; Good Friday (the Fri- 
day before Easter); April 26 (Confederate Me- 
morial day); June 3 (Jefferson Davis' birthday); 
July 4; Labor day (first Monday in September); 
Thanksgiving day (last Thursday in Novem- 
ber); Dec. 25. 

Alaska Jan. l; Feb. 22; May 30 (Memorial day); 
July 4; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Arizona Jan. 1; Arbor day (first Monday in Feb- 
ruary); Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; general elec- 
tion day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Arkansas Jan. 1; Feb. 22; July 4; Thanksgiving 
day; Oct. 12 (Columbus day); Dec. 25. 

California Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; 
Sept. 9 (Admission day); Labor day (first Mon- 
day in September); Oct. 12; general election 
day in November; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Colorado Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Arbor and School day 
(third Friday in April); May 30; July 4; first 
Monday in September; general election day; 
Oct. 12; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25; -every Sat- 
urday afternoon from June 1 to Aug. 31 in the 
city of Denver. 

Connecticut Jan. 1; Feb. 12 (Lincoln's birth- 
day); Feb. 22; Good Friday; May 30; July 4; 
Labor day (first Monday in September); 
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Delaware Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 30; 
July 4; first Monday in September; Oct. 12; 
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

District of Columbia Jan. 1; Feb. 22; March 4 
(Inauguration day) ; May 30; July 4; first Mon- 
day in September; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Florida Jan. l; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday); Arbor 
day (first Friday in February); Feb. 22; April 
26 (Confederate Memorial day); June 3 (Jeffer- 
son Davis' birthday); July 4; first Monday in 
September; Thanksgiving day; general election 
day; Dec. 25. 

Georgia Jan. 1; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday); Feb. 
22; April 26 (Confederate Memorial day); June 
3 (Jefferson Davis' birthday); July 4; first 
Monday in September; Thanksgiving day; Ar- 
bor day (first Friday in December); Dec. 25. 

Idaho Jan. 1 ; Feb. 22 ; Arbor day (first Friday 
after May 1); July 4; first Monday in Septem- 
ber; Oct. 12; general election day; Thanksgiv- 
ing day; Dec. 25. 

Illinois Jan. 1; Feb. 12 (Lincoln's birthday); 
Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; Labor day (first Mon- 
day in September); Oct. 12 (Columbus day); 
general, state, county and city election days; 



Saturday afternoons; Thanksgiving day; Dec.. 
25; Arbor, Bird, Flag and Mothers' days are 
appointed by the governor, but are not legal, 
holidays. Like McKiuley day (Jan. 29), "Re- 
member the Maine" day (Feb. 15), Douglas day 
(April 23). they are observed by special exer- 
cises, flag displays, etc. ; banks are not closed. 
Arbor and Bird days usually come on the third 
Friday of April in the northern part of the 
state and the fourth Friday of October in the 
southern part. Flag day is June 14 and Moth- 
ers' day the second Sunday in May. 

Indiana Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; first 
Monday in September; Oct. 12; general election 
day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Iowa Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; first 
Monday in September; general election day; 
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Kansas The only holidays by statute are Feb. 
12; Feb. 22; May 30; Labor day (first Mon- 
day in September) and Arbor day; Oct. 12; but 
the days commonly observed in other states 
are holidays by general consent. 

Kentucky Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; first Mon- 
day in September: Oct. 12; Thanksgiving day; 
general election day; Dec. 25. 

Louisiana Jan. 1; Jan. 8 (anniversary of the bat- 
tle of New Orleans); Feb. 22; Mardi Gras (day 
before Ash Wednesday); Good Friday (Friday 
before Easter); April 26 (Confederate Memorial 
day); July 4; Nov. 1 (All Saints' day); general 
election day; fourth Saturday in November (La- 
bor day, in the parish of New Orleans only) ;. 
Dec. 25; every Saturday afternoon in New Or- 
leans. 

Maine Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Good Friday; May 30; 
July 4; Labor day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Maryland Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 80; July 4; 
first Monday in September; Sept. 12 (Defend- 
ers' day); Oct. 12; general election day; Dec. 
25; every Saturday afternoon. 

Massachusetts Jan. 1; Feb. 22; April 19 (Pa* 
triots' day) ; May 30 ; July 4 ; first Monday in 
September; Oct. 12; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 

Michigan Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Oct. 12; general elec- 
tion day; May 30; July 4; first Monday in Sep- 
tember; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Minnesota Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; Good Fri- 
day (Friday before Easter); May 30; July 4; 
first Monday in September; Thanksgiving day; 
general election day; Dec. 25; Arbor day (as 
appointed by the governor). 

Mississippi First Monday in September; by com- 
mon consent July 4, Thanksgiving day and 
Dec. 25 are observed as holidays. 

Missouri-Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; La- 
bor day; Oct. 12; general election day; Thanks- 
giving day; Dec. 25; every Saturday afternoon 
in cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants. 

Montana Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Arbor day (third 
Tuesday in April); May 30; July 4; first Mon- 
day in September; Oct. 12; general election 
day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25; any day ap- 
pointed by the governor as a fast day. 

Nebraska Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Arbor day (April 
22); May 30; July 4; first Monday in Septem- 
ber; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 28. 

Nevada Jan. l; Feb. 22; July 4; Thanksgiving 
day; Dec. 25. 

New Hampshire Feb. 22; fast day appointed by 
the governor: May 30; July 4; first Monday in 
September; Thanksgiving .day; general election 
day; Dec. 25. 

New Jersey Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 30; 
July 4: first Monday in September; Oct. 12; 
general election day; Thanksgiving and fast 
days, and every Saturday afternoon. 

New Mexico Jan. 1; July 4; Thanksgiving and 
fast days; Dec. 25; Decoration, Labor and Ar- 
bor days appointed by the governor. 

New York Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22: May 30; 
July 4; first Monday in September; Oct. 12; 
general election day; Thanksgiving and fast 
days; Dec. 25; every Saturday afternoon. 

North Carolina-Jan. 1; Jan. 19 (Lee's birth- 
day): May 10 (Confederate Memorial day); May 
20 (anniversary of the signing of the Mecklen- 
burg declaration of independence): July 4; state- 
election day in August; first Thursday in Seo- 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



tember (Labor day); Thanksgiving day; Dec. 

25; every Saturday afternoon. 
North Dakota Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 

30; July 4; Arbor day (when appointed by the 

governor); general election day; Thanksgiving 

day; Dec. 25. 
Ohio Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30: July 4; first 

Monday in September; Oct. 12; general election 

day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25; every Satur- 

day afternoon in cities of 50,000 or more inhab- 

itants. 
Oklahoma Jan. 1: Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; 

Oct. 12; general election day; Thanksgiving 

day; Dec. 25. 
Oregon Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; first Saturday 

in June; July 4; first Monday in September; 

general election day; Thanksgiving day; public 

fast day; Dec. 25. 
Pennsylvania Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 30; 

Good Friday: July 4; first Monday in Septem- 

ber; Oct. 12; general election day; Thanksgiv- 

ing day; Dec. 25; every Saturday afternoon. 
Philippines Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Thursday and Fri- 

day of Holy week; July 4: Aug. 13; Thanks- 

giving day; Dec. 25; Dec. 30. 
Porto Rico Jan. 1; Feb. 22; Good Friday; May 

30; July 4; July 25 (Landing day); Thanks- 

giving day; Dec. 25. 
Rhode Island Jan. 1: Feb. 22; second Friday in 

May (Arbor day); May 30; July 4; first Monday 

in September; Oct. 12; general election day; 

Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 
South Carolina Jan. 1; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday); 

Feb. 22; May 10 (Confederate Memorial day); 

June 3 (Jefferson Davis' birthday): general 

election day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25, 26, 27. 
South Dakota Same as in North Dakota. 
Tennessee Jan. 1; Good Friday; May 30: July 4: 

first Monday in September; general election 

day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25; every Satur- 

day afternoon. 



Texas Jan. 1; Feb. 22 (Arbor day); March 2 
(anniversary of Texas independence): April 21 
(anniversary of battle of San Jacinto); July 4; 
first Monday in September; Oct. 12; general 
election day; appointed fast days; Thanksgiv- 
ing day; Dec. 25. 

Utah Jan. 1; Feb. 22; April 15 (Arbor day): 
May 30; July 4; July 24 (Pioneer day); first 
Monday in September: Thanksgiving day and 
appointed fast days; Dec. 25. 

Termont^Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; Ao*. 
16 (Bennington Battle day); Labor day; Oct. 
12; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Virginia Jan. 1; Jan. 19 (Lee's birthday): Feb. 
22; July 4; first Monday in September; Thanks- 
giving and appointed fast days; Dec. 25; every 
Saturday afternoon. 

Washington Jan. 1; Feb. 12 (Lincoln's birth- 
day): Feb. 22; May 30; July 4; first Monday 
in September; Oct. 12; general election day; 
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

West Virginia Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 
30; July 4; Labor day; general election day; 
Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Wisconsin Jan. 1; Feb. 22; May SO; July 4; 
first Monday in September; general election 
day; Thanksgiving day; Dec. 25. 

Wyoming Jan. 1; Feb. 12; Feb. 22; May 30; 
July 4; first Monday in September; general 
election day; Dec. 25. 

The national holidays, such as July 4, New 
Year's, etc., are such by general custom and ob- 
servance and not because of congressional legis- 
lation. Congress has passed no laws establishing 
holidays for the whole country. It has made La- 
bor day a holiday in the District of Columbia, 
but the law is of no effect elsewhere. It has 
also designated the second Sunday in May as 
Mothers' day. 



PRINTING AND PUBLISHING INDUSTRY. 

[From U. S. census bureau report.] 

Establishments. 1914. 

Book and job ................................................................ 12,115 



1909. Pet. Inc. 



Music 

Newspapers and periodicals. 

Total 



180 
19,317 



10,708 

178 

18,871 



31,612 

VALUE OF PRODUCTS. 

Publications Newspapers and periodicals $419,531,172 

Subscriptions and sales . 163,577,090 

Advertising 255,954,082 

Newspapers .' 283,588,966 

Subscriptions and sales 99,541,860 

Advertising 184,047,106 

Periodicals other than newspapers 135,942,206 

Subscriptions and sales 64,035,230 

Advertising 71,906,976 

Ready prints (patent insides and outsides) 1,965,210 

Books and pamphlets 

Published or printed and published 68,266,697 

Printed for publication by others 19,049,651 

Sheet music and books of music 

Published or printed and published 6,803,491 

Printed for publication by others 822,585 

Other products for sale and in execution of orders: 

Job printing 

Machine composition for others 

Bookbinding and blank books 

Electrotyping, engraving, lithographing, etc 

All other products 

Total 

A minus sign ( ) denotes decrease. *Not reported. 

NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS. 

Pet. 

Period of issue. 1914. 1909. inc. 

Daily Number 2,580 2,600 0.8 



249.730,932 

5,682,098 

15.097,109 

9,698,641 

13,860.525 

810,508,111 



29,757 

$337,596,288 

135,063,043 

202,533,245 

232,993,094 

84,438,702 

148,554,392 

104,603,194 

50,624,341 

53,97^,853 

2,293,077 

62,930,394 
10,209,509 

5,510,698 
1,000,966 

204,154,096 

18,810,392 

8,201,398 

11.885,141 

662,591,959 



13.1 
1.1 

2.4 
^6.2 

24.3 
21.1 
26.4 
21.7 
17.9 
23.9 
30.0 
26.5 
33.2 
14.3 

8.5 



23.5 
17.8 

22.3 

19.'8 
18.3 
16.6 
22.3 



Aggregate circulation. .28,436,030 24,211,977 17.4 

Sunday Number 570 320 9.6 

Aggregate circulation. 16, 445,820 13,347,282 23.2 

Triweekly Number 84 73 15.1 

Aggregate circulation.. 549,495 335,389 63.8 

Semiweekly Number . . . 583 635 8.2 

Aggregate circulation. 2,483,629 2,312,919 7.4 

Weekly Number 15,166 15,097 0.5 



Period of issue. 1914. 

Aggregate circulation. 50, 454, 738 



Monthly Number 



2,820 



1909. 
3,822,965 
2,491 



Aggregate circulation. 79, 190, 838 63,280,535 

Quarterly Number 500 361 

Aggregate circulation.. 18,852,401 16,058,099 

All other Number 442 364 

Aggregate circulation.. 8,946,567 4,093,874 118.5 



Pet. 

inc. 
23.6 
13.2 
25.1 
38.5 
17.4 
21.4 



Total number 22,745 



22,141 2.7 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 3917. 



PRESIDENTS AND THEIR CABINETS. 



PRESIDENT AND V 


ICE-PRESIDENT. Secretary of state. Secy, of treasury. 


Secretary of war. 


*George W ashington . . 


1789 
. . 1789 


T. Jefferson 1789 Alex. Hamilton.. 17 
E. Randolph 174jOliver Wolcott . .1795 
T. Pickering 1795| 


Henry Knox...l789 
T. Pickering... 1795 
Jas. McHenry.,1796 






John Adams 


...1797 


T. Pickering 1797 
John Marshall.. .1800 


Oliver Wolcott.. .1797 
Samuel Dexter.. 1801 


Jas. McHenry.. 1797 
John Marshal 1.1800 
Sam'l Dexter.. 1800 
R. Griswold....l801 




.1797 






'Thomas Jefferson 


. .1801 
1801 


James Madison . . 1801 


Samuel Dexter.. 1801 
Albert Gallatin. .1801 


H. Dearborn... 1801 


'George Clinton 


1805 


'James Madison 


1809 
...1809 


Robert Smith.... 1809 
James Monroe... 1811 


Albert Gallatin. .1809 
G.W.Campbell.. 1814 
A.J.Dallas 1814 
W. H. Crawford. 1816 


Wm. Eustis....l809 
J. Armstrong. .1813 
Tames Monroe. 1814 
W.H.Crawford 1815 


Elbridge Gerry 


1813 






*James Monroe 
'Daniel D Tompkins 


1817 
1817 


J.Q. Adams 1817 


W.H. Crawford. 1817 


Isaac Shelby... 1817 
Geo. Graham.. 1817 
J. C. Calhoun.. 1817 








...1825 


Henry Clay 1825 


Richard Rush.... 1825 


Jas. Barbour... 1825 
Peter B.Porter.1828 


'John C'. Calhoun 


1825 


'Andrew Jackson 


...1829 
...1829 


M. Van Buren.... 1829 
E.Livingston.... 1831 
Louis McLane... .1833 
John Forsyth. . . .1834 


Sam.D. Ingham.1829 
Louis McLane 1831 
W. J.Duane 1833 
Roger B. Taney.,1833 
Levi Woodbury.,1834 


lohn H.Eaton. 1829 
Lewis Cass 1831 
B. F. Butler.... 1837 




1833 






Martin Van Buren 
Richard M. Johnson. . . 


1837 
1837 


John Forsyth... 1837 


Levi Woodbury.. 1837 


Joel R.Poinsettl83? 


t-William H. Harrison 
John Tyler 


1841 
1841 


Daniel Webster.. 1841 


Thos. Ewing 1841 


rohn Bell. 1841 


John Tyler 


1*41 


Daniel Webster.. 1841 
Hugh S. Legare.,1843 
AbelP.Upshur..l843 
John C. Calhoun.1844 


Thos. Ewing 1841 
Walter Forward. 1841 
John C. Spencer..l843 
Geo.M. Bibb 1844 


John Bell 1841 
John McLean.. 1841 
J.C. Spencer... 1841 
Jas.M. Porter.. 1843 
Wm. Wilkins..l844 


James K. Polk 
George M. Dallas 


1845 
1845 


James Buchananl845 


Robt. J. Walker. 1845 


Win. L.Marcy. 1845 


tZachary Taylor 
Millard Fillmore 


1849 
1849 


John M. Clayton.1849 


Wm.M.Meredithl849 


G.W.Crawford.1849 


Millard Fillmore 


1850 


Daniel Webster..l850 
Edward Everett..l852 


Thomas Corwin.,1850 


C. M. Conrad. . .1850 


Franklin Pierce 
tWiiliam R. King 


1853 
1853 


W. L.Marcy 1853 


James Guthrie. ..1853 


Jefferson Davis 1853 


James Buchanan 
jQfea C. Breckinridge.. . 


1857 
18o7 


Lewis Cass 1857 
J. S. Black 1860 


Howell Cobb 1857 
Philip F.Thomas.1860 
John A. Dix 1861 


John B.Floyd.. 1857 
Joseph Holt.... 1861 


*t Abraham Lincoln 


1861 
1861 


W.H. Seward....lSt>l 


Salmon P. Chase.1861 
W. P. Fessenden.1864 
Hugh McCulloch.1865 


S.Cameron... .1861 
E.M.Stanton..l862 


Andrew Johnson 


1865 


Andrew Johnson 


1865 


W. H.Se ward.... 1865 


HughMcCunoeh.1865 


E. M.Stan ton.. 1865 
U.S. Grant 1867 
L. Thomas 1868 
J. M.Schofleld.1868 


*Ulysses S. Grant 


1869 
1869 


E. B. Washburne.1869 
Hamilton Fish.. .1869 


Geo.S.Boutwell 1865} 
W.A.Richardson.1873 
Benj. H. Bristow.1874 
Lot M. Morrill. . .1876 


J. A. Rawlins..l869 
W.T.Sherman. 1869 
W.W. Belknap.1869 
Alphonso Taft. 1876 
T. D. Cameron. 1876 


fHenry Wilson 


1873 






Rutherlord B. Hayes.. 
William A. Wheeler... 


1877 
1877 


W. M. Evarts 1877 John Sherman. . .1877 


G.W. McCrary.1877 
Alex. Ramsey.. 1879 


tJames A Garfleld 


1881 


James G. Bla.me.lobl Wm. Windom....l881 


R. T. Lincoln. .1881 


Chester A. Arthur 


1881 


Chester A. Arthur 


1881 


F. T. Frelinghuy- 
sen 1881 


Chas. J. Folger...l881 
W. Q. Gresham . .1884 
HughMcCulloch.1884 


R.T.Lincoln... 1881 






1885 


!Thos. F. Bayard. 1SS5 Daniel Manning. 1885 
IChas.S.Fairchild 188" 


W.C. Endicott.1885 


tThos. A. Hendricks.. 


1885 


Benjamin Harrison... 
Levi P. Morton 


1889 James G.Blaine. 1889 Wm.Windom.... 188 
1889 John W.Foster.. 1892 Charles Foster... 1891 


R. Proctor 1889 
S. B. Blkins....LS91 


Grover Cleveland 
Adlai E. Stevenson. . . . 


1893 W. Q. Gresham.,1893 JohnG. Carlisle..l89; 
1893 Richard Olnev. ..l*95i 


D. S. Lamont...lS9S 


*tWilliam McKinley.. 


1897 
1897 


John Sherman. . . lyv 
Wm.R. Day 1897 
John Hay 1898 


Ly man J. Gage ..189" 


R. A. Alger Ibtf 
Elihu Root ISiXJ 


Theodore Roosevelt . . 


1901 


Theodore Roosevelt. . 
Charles W. Fairbanks 


1901 
1905 


|john Hayt 1901 
ElihuRoot 190= 
Robert Bacon 190J 


Ly man J. Gage.. 190 Elihu Root 1901 
Leslie M. Shaw. .1902 Wm. H. Taft.. . 1-J04 
G. B.Cortelyou.. 1907 Luke E.Wrightl908 


William H. Taft 
tJames 8. Sherman. . . 


190S 
1909 


P.C. Knox 190i 


F. MacVeagh 1909 


J.M. Dickinson. 1SO9 
H. L. Stimson..l911 


Woodrow Wilson 


lyii 1 


Wm. J. Bryan.... 19K 
! Robert Lansing.,191, 


J W. G. McAdoo...l91i 
> 


L. M. Garrison. 19i:-> 
N. D. Baker.... 191ti 


Thomas R. Marshall. . 


191; 



Elected two consecutive terms. fDied wkile in office. ^Resigned. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



77 



PRESIDENTS AND THEIR CABINETS. CONTINUED. 



Secretary of navy. 


Secretary of interior.* 


Postmaster-general .t 


Attorney-general . 


Sec. agriculture.* 






Samuel Osgood....l789 
Timothy Pickeringl791 
Jos. Habersham....l795 


E. Randolph 1789 
Wm. Brad ford... 1794 
Charles Lee 1795 




Benj. Stoddert 179s 




Jos. Habersham.... 1797 


Charles Lee 1797 
Theo. Parsons. . .1801 


Benj. 8tocldert....l801 
Robert Smith 180J 
J. Crowniushield...l80c 




Jos. Habersham.. .1801 
Gideon Granger... 1801 


Levi Lincoln 1801 
Robt. Smith .1805 
John Breck- 
inridge 1805 
C.A.Rodney 1807 


Paul Hamilton.... 18& 
William Jones 1812 
B.W.Crowninshield.'U 




Gideon Granger... 1809 
R.J.Meigs.Jr 1814 


C.A.Rodney 1809 
Wm. Pinckney...l811 
William Rush.. ..1814 


B.W.Crowninshield.'17 
Smith Thompson. .181 
S.L. Southard 182? 




R. J.Meigs, Jr 1817 
J ohn McLean 1823 


William Rush.... 1817 
William Wirt.... 1817 




S. L. Southard 182f 




John McLean 1825 


William Wirt.... 1825 


John Branch 12SJ 
LeviWoodburv....l831 
Mahlon Dickefson.1834 




Wm. T.Barry 1829 
Amos Kendall 1835 


John M.Berrien. 1829 
Roger B.Taney. .1831 
B.F.Butler 1833 


Mahlon Dickerson.1837 




Amos Kendall .... 1837 
JohnM.Niles 1840 


B. F. Butler 1837 
Felix Grundy....l838 
H. D. Gilpin 1840 


George E. Badger.. 1841 




Francis Granger. ..1841 


J. J. Crittendeu.1841 


George E. Badger.. 1841 
AbelP.Upshur.. .1841 
David Henshaw...l843 
Thomas W.Gilmer.1844 
John Y. Mason. ...1844 




Francis Granger.. .1841 
C. A. Wicklifle 1841 


J. J. Crittenden.1841 
Hugh S.Legare..l841 
John Nelson 1843 


George Bancroft... 1845 
John T. Mason 1846 




Cave Johnson 1845 


John Y. Mason.. 1845 
Nathan Clifford.. 184fi 
Isaac Toucey 1848 


William B.Preston. 1849 


Thomas Ewing 1849 


Jacob Collamer 1849 


Reverdy Johnson 1849 


William A.Graham.'SOThomae A.Pearce..l850 
John P. Kennedy.. 1852i T - M - T - McKernonl850 
A. H.H.Stuart.... 1850 


Nathan K. Hall.. ..1850 
Sain D.Hubbard... 1852 


J. J. Crittenden.,1850 


James C. Dobbin... 1853 Robt. McClelland.. 1853 


James Campbell. . .1853 


Caleb Cushing...l853i 


Isaac Toucey 1857 


Jacob Thompson.. 1857 


Aaron V. Brown. .1857 
Joseph Holt 1859 


J.S. Black 1857 
Edw. M. Stanton.1860 




Gideon Welles 1861 


Caleb B. Smith 1861 Montgomery Blair.1861 
John P. Usher 1863 William Dennison.1864 


Edward Bates... 1861 
Titian J. Cotfey. .186i 
James Speed 1864 


Gideon Welles 1865 


John P. Usher 1865 William Dennison.1865 
Jamea Harlan 1865 A. W. Randall 1866 
O. H. Browning. . . .1866 


James Speed 1865 
Henry Stanbery .1866 
Wm.M. Evarts...l868 


Adolph E. Borie.. .1869 1 Jacob D. Cox 1881) 
George M.Iiobesonl869;Columbus Delano..l870i 
Zach Chandler 1875 


J. A.J.Creswell...l869 
Jas. W.Marshall.. .1874 
MarshallJewell...l874 
James N. Tyner...l876 


E. R. Hoar 186J 


A. T. Ackerman.,1870 
Geo. H.Williams. 1871 
Edw. Pierrepont.1875 
Alphonso Taft...l876 


R. W. Thompson.. 1877 
Nathan Goff. Jr.... 1881 


Carl Schurz 1877 


David M. Key 1877 
Horace Maynard.,1880 


Chas.Devens 1877 


W. H. Hunt 1881 


S. J.Kirkwood 1881 


T.L. James 1881 


W. Mac Veagh.... 1881 


W.E. Chandler.... 1881 


Henry M.Teiler.... 188) 


T.O.Howe 1881 
W. Q. Gresham 1883 
Frank Hatton 1884 


B.H.Brewster...l881 


W. C. Whitney 1885 


L. Q. C. Lamar 1885 
Win. F. Vilas 1888 


Wm. F. Vilas 1885 
D.M.Dickinson 1888 


A.H. Gar land.... 1885 


N. J. Colman.1889 


Benj. F.Tracy 1889 


John W. Noble 1889 


J. Wanamaker 1889 


VV.H.H. Miller.. 1889 


J.M. Rusk ..1889 


Hilary A. Uerbertl893 


Hoke Smith 1893 
D.R.Francis 1896 


W. S. Bissell 1893 
W.L. Wilson 1895 


R.Olney 1898 
J. Harmon 1895 


J.S. Morton. 1893 


John D Long 1897 


C. N. Bliss 1897 
E.A.Hitchcock 1899 


James A.Gary 1897 
Chas.E. Smith 1898 


J. McKenna... . 1897 
J. W. Griggs 1897 
P.C. Knox 1901 


J. Wilson 1897 


John D. Loner 1901 
Wm. H. Moody 1902 
Paul Morton 1904 
C. J. Bonaparte. . . .1905 
Victor H. Metcalf.1907 
T.H. Newberry...l908 


E.A.Hitchcock 1901 
J. R. Garfield 1907 


Chas.E. Smith 1901 
Henry C.Payne. . . .1902 
Robt. J.Wynne 1904 
G.B.Cortelyou 1905 
G. v.L.Meyer 1907 


P.C. Knox 1901 
W.H. Moody.. ..1904 
C.J.Bonaparte ..1907 


J.Wilson 1901 


G. von L. Meyer. . .1909 


R. A. Ballinger. . . .1909 
W.L. Fisher 1911 


F. H. Hitchcock... .1909 


G.W.Wickersh'ml909 


J.Wilson 1909 


Josephus Daniels. 1913 


F.K.Lane 1913 


A. S.Burleson 1913 


J.C.McReynolds.1913 
Thos. W.Gregory. 1914 


D.F.Houston.1913 



Secretary of commerce and labor (department established Feb. 14, 1903) George B. Cortelyou. 
1903; Victor H. Metcalf , 1904-1906; Oscar 8. Straus, 1907-1909; Charles Nagel, 1909. Secretary of Commerce, 
Wm. C. Redfleld. 1913. Secretary of labor (dept. established March 4, 1913) William B. Wilson,_1913. 

*This department was established by an act of congress M 
1829. ^Established Feb. 11,1889. 



,Uiiut:u jncuVU * loio; TT ii.ii4ii.ia jj. VY iiovu, *VM*** 

congress March 3, 1849. fNot a cabinet officer until 



78 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE. 
Fiscal years ended June 30. 


Articles imported. Quantities. Values. Quantities. Values. Quantities. 
Aluminum, crude Ibs. 15,964042 $2,707,172 13,765,172 $2,346,287 8,200,o28 
Manufactures of 1.441.253 653,015 


1 - > 
Values. 
$1,826,632 
150,408 


Animals 

Antimony Ore Ibs. 


2.664.425 
9,633,639 


24,712,111 
145,917 
526,324 


"2, 123', 968 
13,968,513 


22,279,081 
83,435 
1,337,339 


"9", 012] 895 
23,611,206 


18,649,079 
948,769 
7.091.423 


Art works 




35,010,449 




18,475,577 







Asbestos, unmanufact'd, tons 


76*524 


1,678,736 


68,086 


1,513,630 


98,970 


2,625,003 


Asphaltum and bitumen.. tons 


180,689 


918,387 


83,123 


491,251 


130.234 




Beads and bead ornaments... 




2,185,941 




1,075,981 






Bones, etc., unmanufactured.. 




1,061,466 




911,473 







Brass for remanufacture, Ibs. 


7,241,670 


773,443 


7,172,637 


663,070 


34.705,604 




Breadstuffs 
Bristles Ibs. 


'3,437,'i55 


36,821,646 
3,196,469 


'4',662,"060 


20,256,791 
3,613,084 


"S. 613', 084 


3,627.042 


Bronze, manufactures of 




682 083 




456,178 






Brushes, dusters, hair pencils. 




2.180,853 




1,644,189 






Buttons and parts of 




2,082,029 




1,004,794 




788,902 


Cars. etc. Automobiles No. 


300 


620,493 


322 


525.303 


1,474 


801,911 


Parts of 




812,083 




847,109 






Cement 


364,141 


160,737 


347,334 


132,764 


19,997 


9,182 


Chemicals, drugs, dyes 




88,039.120 




79,249,970 




109,106,634 


Argols Ibs. 
Quinia, sulphate of oz. 


29,793,011 
2,879,460 


3,228,674 
624,125 


28,624,554 
1,829,732 


3,094,380 
452,348 


i;79l!738 


5,306,246 
1,118,056 


Colors or dyes 




7,241,406 




5,851,887 




3,340,592 


Creosote oil gals. 
Tanning extracts Ibs. 
Glycerin Ibs. 
Gums 


60,900,435 
102.139,127 
36.409,619 


3,839,062 
2.850,236 
4,486,415 
12,741,609 


87,828,646 
126.641,515 
17,620,509 


2,593,681 
3,879,424 
2,186,755 
11,842.654 


40,498,392 
86,973,203 
10,621,403 


3,206,780 
5,815,348 
2,232,494 
14.826,537 


Indigo Ibs. 
Nitrate of soda tons 


8.125,211 

564,019 


1,093,226 
17,950,786 


7,975,709 
577,122 


1,596,978 
16,355,701 


6.599,583 
1,071,728 


8,235,670 
32,129,397 


Clays or earth tons 


345,419 


2,246,807 


306,054 


1,983,812 


2SS.235 


l,70o,995 


Clocks and parts of 




905,421 




705,555 




234,796 


Watches and parts of 




3,386.738 




3,039,651 


^ 


3,362,728 


Coal, bituminous tons 


1,358,002 


3,685,008 


1.429.608 


4,150,785 


1,618,539 


4,841,157 


Cocoa or cacao (crude).... Ibs. 


176.267,646 


20,797.790 


192,306,634 


22,893,241 


243.231.9K9 


35,143,865 


Prepared : Ibs. 


3,096,445 


706,193 


2.427,561 


584.915 


2,347,162 


660,377 


Coffee Ibs. 


1,001,528,317 


110,725,392 1 


,118,690.524 


106,765,644 


1,201,104 


115,485,970 


Copper Ore tons 


444,907 


10,137,244 


339,564 


8,548.401 


448,211 


15,959,269 


Matte and regulus tons 
Pigs, ingots, bars, etc.. Ibs. 
Cork, unmanufactured 


33,772 
281,536,836 


3.559,740 
40,624,598 
3,851,794 


30,033 
152,443,247 


2,680,140 
20,358,174 

2,762,895 


75.237 
272,539,570 


3,304,674 
52,851,055 
3,134,884 


Manufactures of 




2,647,838 




2,024,059 




941,243 


Cotton, unmanufactured, Ibs. 


123.346,899 


19,456,588 


185,204,579 


23,208,960 


232,801,062 


40,150,342 


Manufactures of 




70,704,828 




46,205.123 


^ 


47,511,870 


Diamonds, uncut 




7.519,688 




3,358,180 




11.443,129 


Cut. but not set 




17,795,099 




8,452,117 




20,567,222 


Total diamonds, precious 














stones, etc 





33.375,181 




15,134,496 


/7. 


45,101,936 


Drewoods tons 


37,725 


486.992 


68,420 


939,356 


159,221 


3,906,367 


Earthen, stone and chinaware 




10,629.178 




8,681.472 




5,837,206 


Eggs doz. 


5,832,592 


1,059,592 


3,046,631 


438,760 


732,566 


110,638 


Electric lamps 




653,765 




585,995 




711,005 


Explosives 




857,337 




492,060 




1,320,738 


Feathers, natural and artificial. 




8.825,176 




5,566,276 





4,831,467 


Fertilizers 




23,150,146 




10,348,006 




6,327,495 


Fibers, unmanufact'd tons 


418.432 


54,349,995 


357,079 


40,420,017 


482.216 


59,460,062 


Manufactures of 




82,404,239 




61,567,669 




68,444,735 


Fish 




18,758,143 




18,398,249 





17,455,266 


Fruits and nuts 




i.3,421,258 




43,901,195 




44,446,307 


Furs, undressed 




8 840,321 




7,768,348 




16,891,699 


Manufactures of 




5,652,973 




2,758,140 




3,208,183 


Gelatin, unmanufactured, Ibs. 


2,441,317 


738,731 


2,714,229 


816,521 


1,600,235 


501,509 


Glass and glassware 




8.191,833 




4,592,359 




2,249,001 




22,714,877 


1,805,543 


8,705,147 


824,136 


3,008,485 


217,033 


Gold and silver, manuf's of.. 




1,541,980 




1,098,737 




1,746.585 


Grease and oils Ibs. 


22,422,492 


1,251,997 


30,293,657 


1,596,582 


25,118,033 


1.544,021 


Hair, unmanufactured Ibs. 


15,167,746 


3,369.978 


12,225,325 


2,550,937 


16.847,261 


3,451,058 


Hats, bonnets, and materials 














for 




12,102,245 




10,127,429 




11,175,490 


Hay tons 


170,786 


1,634,390 


20,187 


28,906 


43,184 


679,412 


Hides and skins Ibs. 


561,070,686 


120,289,781 


538,317,733 


104,177,106 


743,669,860 


158,861,376 


Hide cuttings, raw glue stock 




2,158,514 




1,510,608 




972,106 


Hops Ibs. 


5,382,025 


2.790,516 


11,651,332 


2,778,735 


675.704 


144,627 


Household goods, etc 




5,244,088 




6,956,376 




5,719,869 


India rubber, unmanufactured. 




76,162,220 




87,124,679 




159,858,096 


Manufactures of... 




1,559,812 




802,122 




455,895 


Iron Ore tons 


2,167,662 


6,984,577 


1,193,114 


3,823,843 


1,425,717 


4,618,601 


Iron and steel, manufs. of.. 




31,790,851 




22,712,660 




23,393,250 


Ivory, animal and vegetable.. 




2,221,998 




1,179,856 




2,130,136 


Lead and manufactures of, Ibs. 


60,423,419 


1,996,627 


83.269,140 


2,601,548 


86.832,575 


3,736,010 


Leather and manufactures of.. 




25,087,196 




20,171,196 




19,019,526 


Manganese ore and oxide, tons 


288,706 


1,841,451 


206,859 


1,494,985 


492,860 


5,358,093 


Matting and mats sq. yds. 


25,370,152 


2,097,009 


18,949,582 


1,574,404 


14,008,198 


- 1,326,571 


Meat and dairy products 




38,760,989 




43,046,850 




24,757,512 


Metals nnd manuf's of n. e. s. 




7,153,053 




3,965,471 




2,809,933 


Musical instruments 




2,076,734 





1,262,140 




566,315 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



79 



Articles imported. 
Nickel ore and matte tons 
Oilcloths . . sq vds 


, 1! 
Quantities. 

'4',e64,'37< 


)14 , , 1915 v 
Values. Quantities. Values. 
$6,109,547 $5,074,783 
I 1,829,596 2,648,148 1,199,662 
47.020,573 35,725,051 
2,325,222 1,959,108 
8,571,207 4,817,583 
27,563,840 25,818,920 
11,075,659 670,101,061 13,119,912 
$2,309,027 $2,473,144 
2,626,268 1,768,483 
1,472,871 1354397 


, 1916 N 
Quantities. Values. 
56.987 $9,520.705 
1.077,465 529,969 
48,091.993 
2,009.166 
4,954,566 
25.924.089 


Oils of all kinds 






Paper stock, crude 
Paper and manufactures of 

1'rintiu^ paper 'hs. 


562,858,717 


878,913,722 


16,794,159 
3,105,906 
1.420,310 
1,371,162 
3.686.348 
4.256,519 
4,298,530 
33,571.697 
2,229.842 
124,833,655 
31,911,856 
3,102,089 
614,1:03 
8,946,622 
1,456,893 
7,321.569 
7,996,894 
640,183 
1.500,283 
3.775,894 
208,769,399 
7,121,614 
2,849,553 
20,599,857 
50,876,901 
17,372,126 
4,950,667 
3,217,044 
10.811,393 
64.559,815 
16,867,850 
142,420,734 
15,657,537 
10,425,111 
522,709 


Photographic films and plates. 
Pipes and smokers' articles... 








Plants, trees and shrubs 
Platinum and manuf's of 





3,597,008 
3,975,572 




3,748,666 
1,630,602 






24,868 


1,846,126 
20,084.184 


17,068 


1,387,873 
23 084,820 


31,047 


Seeds . 


Shells, unmanufactured 





1,822,885 
100,930,025 





1,328,673 
83,130,557 




Manufactures of 




35,454,786 




25.042,670 








4 081 830 




3,587,170 
749,387 
5,926,972 
1.587,398 
5,570,322 
6,247,183 
720.316 
1 670 358 








820,613 
5,595,509 
2,967,029 
7,263,848 
10 116 669 






Spice . . . Ibs. 


56.574.499 
7,177,233 
4,160,843 


60,084,644 
3,35], 104 

3,289,737 


82,880,337 
2,612,735 
3,953,499 


Spirits Milted liquors. . .gals. 
Distili-vl spirits gals. 








1,000,005 




577,735 






2 303 789 






51,410,271 
5.066,S21,873 
832,134 


1,744,719 
101,649,373 
3,695,335 
1,566 001 


70.8S9.623 
5,420,981.867 
844,659 


1.963,505 
173,992.603 
4,107.249 
1 343 066 


85,716,673 
5.633,161,749 
1,375,041 




Sulphur ore tons 


Tanning materials 


Tea . . Ibs 


91,130,815 
100,177,962 
60,107.512 


16,735,302 
39,422.479 
35,029.055 
5,357,806 
9,084,019 


96,987,942 
94,864,623 
45,764,728 


17,512,619 
30,777,617 
27,156,665 
4,501,511 
8,085,363 


109,865,935 
143.984,269 
42,943,027 


Tin Ibs 


Tobacco Leaf Ibs. 


Manufactures of 
Tovs 


Vegetables 




15,133 535 
62,433,039 
17,023,338 
53,190,767 
34,294,204 
251.479 
364,472 




9 329 732 




Wood and manufactures of... 


Vos'.sVo 

247,648,869 
""l8, 280 


""587.9?2 
308,083,429 

"'79,'8i4 


60,734,755 
19.881,111 
68.242,568 
29,791,356 
1,818,140 
272,672 


'"507,645 
534,828,022 

'"29i,'2'6'4 


Wool, unmanufacttired Ibs. 
Manufactures of 
Zinc Ore and calamine, tons 
In blocks and manuf's of.... 


Total value mdse..|^^ 




1,127,502,699 
766,422,958 





1,033,526,675 
640,643,065 





1,492,663,786 
705,219,724 


Total value imports.* 1,893,925,657 1,674,169,740 
Including articles not specified In above table. 


2.197.883.510 


EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE. 
Fiscal years ended June 30. 

Articles exported. ^Quantities. Values. Quantities. Values. 
Abrasives $2,114,632 $1,802,248 
Agricultural implements 31,965,789 10,304,978 
Aluminum and manufa's of 1 101 990 3.245.799 


Quantities. Values. 

$3,333,338 
17,611,297 
5,644,349 
21,666 2,583,765 
22,048 238,718 
357,553 73.531,146 
111,915 22,946,312 
52.278 231.535 


Animals Cattle No 


18,376 
10,122 
22,776 
4,883 
152.000 


647,288 
133,751 
3,388,819 
690,974 
534,543 


5.484 
7,799 
289,340 
65,788 
47.213 


702,847 
93,037 
64,046,534 
12,726,143 

182.278 




Horses No. 


Mules ... No 


Sheep No. 


Total animals, including 
fowls 
Art works 




5,803,659 
1 415 302 





77,953,686 
298,321 
535,027 
616,240 
400,154 
576,442 
20,544,549 
18,184,079 
702,509 
39,339,064 
1,923,214 
2,406.068 
57,479,964 
14,733,409 
333,552,226 
94,869,343 





99,662,813 
404,529 
1,019,083 
830.946 
510,290 
720.728 
164.876.044 
20,663.532 
787,567 
30.780.887 
1,601.258 
1.885,622 
47,993.096 
15.374,499 
215,532.681 
87.347.805 

435,696,629 

7,002.005 
97.464.381 
22.536.485 
24,119,536 
2,541,479 
3.369.613 


Asbestos manufactures of 




687,073 
1,131,086 
362,347 
783,120 
7,472,476 
4,253,129 
728,447 
7,008,028 
1,185,891 
569.204 
757,527 
1,555,012 
87,953,456 
54.454,175 






Asphaltum, unmanufact'd, tons 


49,831 


28,553 


42,754 


Athletic and sporting goods 












26',754,'522 
11,687,452 
48,786,291 
470,503- 
68,034,978 
97,169,551 
12,544.888 
259,642,533 
16,182,765 


27',473,'i66 
11,433.410 
38,217,012 
419.979 
54,748,747 
95,921.620 
14.532.437 
173,274.015 
15.520.669 


BreadstufFs Barley . . . bu. 


6,644,747 
, 12.645,551 
9,380,855 
336,241 
15,998,286 
1,859,949 
2,222.734 
92,393,775 


Bread and biscuit Ibs.. 


Cornmeal brls. 


Oatmeal . . . lb?. 


Oats . . bu 


Rve bu 


Wheat bu. 


Wheat flour brls. 


11,821,461. 


Total breadstuffs (all 
kinds) . . 




165,302,385 

226,149 
26,574,574 
6,624,232 
7,409,558 
3.768,208 
1.234.194 




573,823,676 
1 541 446 




Cars, etc. Aeroplanes and 
parts of 








Automobiles No. 


29,090 


37,836 

'"s'.iee 


60,254,635 
7,853.183 
1,707,830 
1,705,965 
1.494.176 


77,496 
" " iV. 500 


Parts of 


Steam railroad cars 
Other railroad cars 





Motorcycles . ...No. 


6,410 



80 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Articles exported. 
Wagons No. 


, 1914 
Quantities. 

18,883 


Values. 
$1,121,389 


, 1915 
Quantities. 
9,056 


Values. < 
$1,118,868 


19K 
Quantities. 
11,153 


'> v 

Values. 
$1,018,290 


Total cars, etc. (all 








85 108 341 




167,742,608 


Celluloid and manuf's of 
Cement, hydraulic brls. 
Chemicals 


' 2',39i,'453 


1,387,541 
3,382,282 
27,079,092 


'^sei.'is'i 


722.830 
3,241,686 
46,380,986 


' 2',746,'596 


2,328,142 
3,780,564 
124.362,167 


Clocks and watches 
Coal tons 


19,664,080 


3,013,149 
59,921,013 


18,095,183 


55,906,140 


22,632,867 


65,958.275 


Coke tons 


742,476 


$2, 789, 814 


602,473 


$2,304,475 


976,398 


3,779.445 






336 940 




1,901.166 




1,668,657 


Coffee Green or raw Ibs. 
Roasted or prepared Ibs. 
Confectionery 


52,649,233 
1,815,835 

77 416 


8,850,642 
427,009 
1,329,147 
3 257 089 


49,177,146 
2,421,664 

'"16447 


6,841,575 
461.030 
1,222,794 
220,147 


35.421,530 
1,851,100 

'"91, '201 


5,369.753 
378,268 
1,904,101 
603.878 






1 3 9 7 037 




3 319 230 




173,946,226 


Cotton, unmanufactured, bales 


9,165,300 


610,475,301 
51 467 - '33 


8,426,297 


376,217,972 
71,973,497 


5,955,834 


374,186,247 
112,053,127 


Dental goods 
Earthen, stone and chinaware 


16",i48!849 


2,679,170 
4,353,241 
3,734,087 


20', 784 i 424 


1,382,928 
2,764,438 
5.003,764 


26,396! 206 


2.055,629 
3.607,824 
6.134,441 


Electrical machinery 
Explosives Cartridges 
Dvnamite Ibs. 


14.464,601 


25,060.844 
3,521,533 
1,587,184 


"7',7i2;999 


19,771,757 
17,714,205 
924,079 


20,104,864 


30,254.02ft 
37.083.488 
3.893.67S 


Gunpowder . . Ibs. 


989,385 


247,200 


7,686,480 


5,091.542 


212,821,076 


173.736.374 


All other 




916,280 




17,746,362 





252,368,391 


Total explosives 
Fertilizers tons 


1 539 472 


6,272,197 
11 978 738 


.. ..* 

358 588 


41.476,188 
3 870 887 


421,981 


467,081,928 
5.343,497 


Fibers 




12,575,470 




12,268,556 




21,377,276 


Fish 




12,842,173 
31 850 392 




12,870,790 
34 9''3 117 




36,965.328 


Furs and fur skins 
Glass and glassware 





14.969.371 
3 729 6 -) 3 




3.794,459 

5 558 717 





9,288,786 
12,321,338 


Glucose and grape sugar, Ibs. 
Jewelry 


199,530,874 


4,565,919 
1 005 9 85 


158,462,508 


3,885,233 
634 387 


186,386,182 


4,734,961 
329.818 


Grease, lubricating 
Soap stock and other 
Hair and manufactures of 
Hay tons 


50 isi 


2,394,918 
5,046,959 
1,429,794 

827 9 05 


"ios'do's 


2,384,395 
4,266,097 
1.579,041 


'" 178 336 


3,994,436 
3.156,568 
2.458.328 
3,267,028 


Hides and skins other than 
furs . . . Ibs 


19 S67 135 


2 807 253 


4 9 9 3 180 


4 685 724 


7 122 019 


3 875 251 




24 262 896 


6*953' 529 


16 210 443 


3 848 0''0 


22 409 818 


4 383 999 


Household and personal effects 
India rubber, manuf's of 




7,919,925 
12,441,220 
1 760 861 




4,292,504 
14,767,513 
2 431 088 




4.190,875 
35,180,096 
5 868 155 




1 004 547 


3 401 156 


407 057 


1 277 563 


94 9 


2 796 606 


Iron and steel and manufac- 
tures of 




251,480.677 
3 442 297 




225,888.358 
9 474 947 




621,209,453 
18 065 485 


Lamps, chandeliers, etc 




2,806,034 




2 222 747 




3 155.444 


Lead manufactures of 




2 610 207 




1 117 875 




13 787 774 


Leather and manufactures of 
Meat and dairy products 


3 464 733 


57,566,261 
461 901 


75 274 608 


120,727,156 
11 974 673 


50 416 690 


146,613,815 
9 353 450 


Beef fresh Ibs 


6 394 404 


788 793 


170 440 934 


21 731 633 


231 215 075 


28 886 115 


Beef' cured Ibs. 


23,265,974 


2 289*516 


31 874 743 


3 382 670 


38 060 68' 


4 034 195 


Oleo oil Ibs. 


97 017 065 


10 156 665 


80 481 946 


9 341 188 


10 9 645 914 


12 519 115 




2 532 821 


263 453 


5 252 183 


617 035 


5 4 9 6 221 


640 480 


Tallow Ibs. 


15,812,831 


1 002 Oil 


20 239 988 


1 386 445 


16 288 743 


1 326 472 


Bacon . .. Ibs. 


193 964 252 


25 879 056 


346 718 227 


47 305 129 


579 808 786 


78 615 616 




165 881 791 


23 767 447 


203 701 114 


29 049 931 


2go 208 611 


40 803 022 


Lard Ibs. 


481 457,792 


54,402 911 


475 531 908 


52 440 132 


427 Oil 338 


47,634,376 


Neutral lard Ibs. 


29,323 786 


3 270 236 


26 021 054 


3 0" 321 


34 426 590 


4 050,397 




3 074 303 


49'' 8 9 2 


4 644 418 


745*928 


9 610 732 


1 815 586 


Pork pickled Ibs 


45 543 085 


4 896*574 


45 655 574 


4 911*307 


63 460 713 


6 752 356 


Pork fresh Ibs. 


2,668,020 


359 181 


3 908 193 


473 801 


63 005 524 


7 5 9 3,408 




58 303 564 


5 489 139 


69 980 614 


6 045 752 


52 483 311 


5 147 434 


Mutton . Ibs 


4 685 498 


523 023 


3 877 413 


448 221 


5 552 918 


696 882 






913 63 9 








1 561 398 


Sausage canned Ibs. 


1 446 582 


202 120 


1 821 958 


307 726 


6 823 085 


1 269,866 


All other . Ibs 


4 562 983 


755 794 


5*183 525 


845 661 


8 590 236 


1 73 9 231 




30 092 206 


4 077 882 


30 818 551 


4 859 815 


14 708 893 


2 867 681 


Stearin 


2*724 181 


34 121 


12 750 907 


1 308 66* 


13 06 9 247 


1 461 661 


Butter Ibs. 


3,693 597 


877 453 


9 850 704 


2 39 9 480 


13,503 279 


3 592 415 


Cheese ... . . Ibs 


2 427 577 


414 124 


54 069 917 


8 247 174 


44 394 251 


7 430 089 


Milk, condensed Ibs. 


16,209,082 


1,341,140 


37,235,627 


3,066,642 


155,734,322 


12,404,384 


Total meat and dairy 
products 
Motor boats . . . . No. 


400 


146,227,780 
519 584 


164 


220,052,990 
273 516 


264 


291,057,602 
800 9 31 


Musical instruments 
Naval stores (rosin, tar, etc.). 




3,358,'631 
19,882,165 




2,048.715 
11,127,239 




3,454,064 
13 503 607 


Nickel, oxide and matte, Ibs. 
Oil cake and meal Ibs. 
Oils Animal .. gals. 


28,895,242 
1.530,358,450 
1 450 600 


9.403,709 
21,667,672 
822 233 


29,599,612 

2,057,786,452 
832 096 


11,110,699 
28,879,051 
547 074 


25,649,995 
1,746,710.630 
1 9 22 199 


9.876,403 
28,541.304 
871 017 




2 281 611 065 


152 174 056 


2 187 340 610 


133 G93 275 


2 443 478 083 


"166 4 9 3 230 


Vegetable 
Paints, pigments and colors.. 




16,251,486 
7,256,318 




25,831,745 
7,387.609 




27,167,220 
11,417,814 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



81 



Articles exported. 


19 


H ^ 


19 


15 ^ 


, 19 


16 x 


Papr stock (except wood ' 
pulp) Ibs. 


Quantities. 
40,646,323 


Values. < 

$740,294 


Quantities. 

26.398,801 


Values. 

$440,290 


Quantities. 
24.155,376 


Values. 
$454,113 


Paper and manufactures of... 
Paraffin and paraffin wax, Ibs. 


186,357,728 


20,663,634 
6,516,338 


330.374,056 


19,848.358 
10,589.843 


360,650,114 


29,111,004 

12.873,250 


Perfumeries, cosmetics, etc.. 




1,620,872 




1.715,059 





2,903,063 


Phonographs, etc 




2,512,320 




1,563,109 




2,138,437 


Photographic goods 


,..., 


9,431,800 




8,276,291 





15,986.066 






1,029,127 




880,944 




1,552.535 


gait Ibs. 


149,123,465 


542,783 


165,619,366 


616,132 


165,627,801 


600,648 






3,190,745 




3,861,064 




3.538,508 






2,307,605 




2,745,396 




5,204.813 






4,939,002 




4,858,299 




6,319,758 


Spirits Malt liquors 
Distilled gals. 


1,783,918 
941,357 


1,485,176 
2,275.832 
373,412 


1,592,798 
819,310 


1,082.112 
1,982,019 
332,369 


26,283,904 
1,133,274 


1,064,627 
11,062.386 
450,598 


Starch Iks. 


76,713,779 


1,825,230 


107,036,638 


2,939,453 


210,185,192 


5,576,914 


Stone, including marble 
Sugar, etc. Molasses gals. 
Sirup gal*. 
Su^ar refined Ibs. 


1,002,441 
11.630,258 
50,895,726 


2,146,758 
175,498 
1,491,639 
1,839,983 


1,148,741 
11,439,133 
549,007,405 


1,265.516 
145,274 
1,653,495 
25,615,016 


'V, 387', 369 
10,031,693 
1,630,150,863 


1,439,044 
524,861 
2,107,068 
79,390,147 


Surgical appliances 
Tin. manufactures of 
Tobacco, unmanufactured.. Ibs. 
Manufactures of 


449.749,982 


1,228.467 
1,477,584 
53,963,670 
7,489,811 
809,120 


348,346,091 


4,418,303 
1,786,038 
44,493,829 
6,468,688 
929,864 


441,569,581 


3,166.718 
3,088,873 
53,163,595 
6.944,147 
2.030,089 


Vegetables 
Wood and manufactures of.. 
Wool, manufactures of 




6,936,400 
103,179,640 
4,790,087 
406,208 





10,813 151 
49,943,537 
27,327,451 
21,243,935 





15,952,412 
60,707,229 
53,983,655 
45,867,156 


' Total value exports of 
domestic mdse.* 




2,329,684,025 




2,716,178,465 




4,272.397.774 


Total value exports of 
foreign mdrfe 




34.895,123 




52,410,875 




61,261,091 


Total value exports, ex- 














cept gold and silver... 




2,364,579,148^ 




2,768,589,340 




4,333,658,865 



SUMMARY Or IMPORTS ? . 

IMPORTS. 
Free of duty Crude materials for use in 


LND EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE, 
ars ended June 30. 
, 1914. . , 1915. x , 1916. v 
Per ct. Per ct. Per ct. 

$549,061,406 48.70 $506,611,830 49.02 $846,653,276 56.72 

201,868,045 17.90 196,762,824 19.04 217,246,847 14.56 
' 37,201,700 3.30 51,073,388 4.94 35,821,684 2.40 
200,925,040 17.82 161,780,841 15.65 258,096,935 17.29 
127,508,163 11.31 106,875,997 10.34 123,458,696 8.27 
10,938,345 .97 10,421,795 1.01 11,386,348 .76 


Foodstuffs in crude condition and food 


Foodstuffs partly or wholly manufactured. 


Manufactures ready for consumption 




1,127,502,699 100.00 
83.8W.454 10.93 

46,079,576 6.01 
190,442,629 24.85 
118,350,448 15.44 
321,810,051 41.99 
5,935,800 .78 


1,033,526,675 100.00 
68,745,314 10.73 

27,166,740 4,23 
234,651,703 36,63 
75,395.681 11.77 
229,000.631 35,75 
5,682,996 .89 


1,492,663.786 100.00 
97,451.952 13.82 

34,586,947 4.90 
273,887,033 38.84 
101,344.566 14.37 
191,894,938 27.21 
6,054,288 .88 


Dutiable Crude materials for use in rnanu- 


Foodstuffs in crude condition and food 


Foodstuffs partly or wholly manufactured 
Manufactures for further use in mfg 
Manufactures ready for consumption 




766,422,958 100.00 
632,865,860 33.42 

247,947,621 13.09 
227,644,329 12.02 
319,275,488 16.86 
449.318,214 23.72 
16,874,145 .89 


640,643,065 100.00 
575,357,144 34.38 

223,929.564 13.38 
285,725,091 17.07 
237,176,522 14.17 
335,876,628 20.04 
16,104,791 .96 


705,219,724 100.00 
944.105,228 42.96- 

251,833,794 11.46 
309.708,717 14.0 
359,441,501 16.35 
315,353,634 14.35 
17.440,636 .79 


Freeand dutiable Crude materials for use 


Foodstuffs in crude condition and food 


Foodstuffs partly or wholly manufactured 
Manufactures for further use in mfg 
Manufactures ready for consumption 




1,893,925,657 100.00 
59.53 


1,674,169,740 100.00 
61.70 


2,197,883,510 100.00 
67.91 




Duties collected from customs 
Average ad valorem rate of duty, based on 


292,128,528 
15 32 


209,268,109 
I 9 69 


211,866,222 
9.72 


Remaining in warehouse at the end or t 








mODth EXPORTS. 
Domestic Crude material for use in mfg.. 
Foodstuffs in crude condition and food 


792,716,109 34.03 

137.495,121 5.90 
293,218,336 12.59 
374,224,210 16.06 
724,908,000 31.11 
7,122,249 .31 


510,455,540 18.80 

507,003,179 18.66 
454,565,404 16.73 
355,862.329 13.10 
807,465,511 29.73 
80,826,502 2.98 


536,189,752 12.55 

380.799,902 8.91 
596,071,882 13.95 
662,549,838 15.51 
1,996,367,492 46.73: 
100,418,908 2.35. 


Foodstuffs partly or wholly manufactured 
Manufactures for further use in mfg 
Manufactures ready for consumption 




2,329,684,025 100.00 
34,895,123 
2,364,579.148 
470,653,491 
4,238,504,805 


2,716,178,465 100.00 
52,410,875 
2,768,589,340 
1,094,419.600 
4,442,759,080 


4,272.397,774 100.00 
61,261,091 
4,333, 6-"8.865 
2.135,775,355 
6.531,542,375 


Total foreign 
Total exports 
Excess of exports 
Total imports and exports 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



TOTAL VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS INTO AND FROM THE UNITED STATES. 
From Oct. 1, 1790, to June 30. 1915. 



FISCAL YEAR.* 


MERCHANDISE. 


SPECIE. 


IDSE. AND SPECIE COMBINED. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


'xcess of im- 
ports (rom.j 
or export* 

(italics). 


Imports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Exports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Total 
imports. 


Total 
exports. 


Excess of im- 
ports (roman) 
or export* 
(italics). 


1790 


$23,000.000 
29,200,000 
31,500,000 
31.100,000 
34.600,000 
69,756,268 
81.436,164 
75,379,406 
68.5?1.700 
79,069,148 
91,252,768 
111,363,511 
76,33*^33 
64,066,666 
85,000,000 
120.600,000 
129.410.000 
138.500,000 
56.990.000 
59,400,000 
85.400.000. 
53,400,000 
77.030.000 
22,005.000 
12,965.000 
113,041,274 
147.103.000 

99.250.ooo 

121.750,000 
87.125,000 
74.450.000 
54.520,834 
79,871.695 
7'* 481 371 


$20,205,156 
19.012.041 
20.753,098 
26.109,572 
33.043,725 
47,989.872 
53.574.625 
51.294,710 
61,327,411 
78,665,522 
70.971,780 
93.020.513 
71,957.144 
55.800.033 
77.699.074 
95.566.021 
101.536,963 
108.3i3.150 
22,430.960 
52.203,233 
66.757.970 
61.316.832 
38.5-27.2ii6 
27,856.017 
6,927.441 
52.557.7W 
81,920,052 
87,671.569 
93.281.133 
70.142,521 
69.691,669 
51,596.323 
61.350,101 
68.326.043 
68,972.105 
90.738.333 
72.890.789 
74,309.947 
64.021.210 
67.434.651 
71.670.735 
72,295.652 
81.520.603 
87.528.732 
102.260,215 
115,215,802 
124.338.704 
111.443,127 
104.978.570 
112.251.673 
123,668,932 
111.817.471 
99,877.995 
82.825,689 
105,745.832 
106.040,111 
109.583.248 
15ti.741.598 
138.190.515 
140,351.172 
144.375.72b 
188,915.259 
166.984 .231 
203,489,282 
237.043.764 
218.909,503 
281.219.423 
293.823.760 
272.011.274 
292.90J.051 
333.576.057 
219.553.833 
190.670.501 
203.9ti4.447 
158.837.988 
166,029,303 
348.859.52L 
294.506.141 
281. 952.891) 
28ti.117.697 
392.771,768 
442.820.178 
444.177.586 


$2,794.84 1 
10.187 ,95i; 
10.74ti.90-' 
4.990,428 
1,556,275 
21.766.396 
22.3til.539 
24.084.69t; 
7,224,289 
403.626 
20.280.988 
18.342.998 
4.376.189 
8.866.633 
7.300,921'. 
25.033.979 
27,873.037 
38.156,850 
34,559,041' 
7.193,767 
18.642.030 
7.916.832 
38.502.764 
5.851,017 
6.037,559 
60.483,521 
65.182.948 
11.578.431 
28.468,867 
16,982.479 
4,758,331 
75,489 
18.521.594 
4,155,328 
3,197,067 
649,023 
5.202.722 
2.977,009 
16,998,873 
345,736 
8.949,779 
23.589.527 
13.601.158 
13.519,211 
6.349,485 
21.548,493 
52.240.450 
19,029,676 
9.W/8.2K2 
44.245.285 
25.410,226 
11.140.073 
3.802.924 
40.392.225 
3.141,226 
7.144,211 
8,330,817 
34.317.249 
10,448.129 
855.027 
29.133.800 
21.856,170 
40,456.167 
60.287.983 
60.760.030 
38.899.205 
29.212,887 
54.604.582 
8,672,62(1 
38.431.29C 
20.040.062 
69.756.709 
1.313.284 
39.371.368 
L57.609.29i 
72.716.277 
85.952.544 
101.254.95c 
75,483.541 
131.388.685 
43,186.641 
77.403,50t 
182.417.491 






$23,000.000 
29,200.000 

31.500,000 
31100,090 

34,600,000 
69,756.268 
81,436.164 
75.379.406 
68,551,700 
79.069.148 
91.252.768 
111,363,611 
76.333,333 
64.666.606 
85.000.000 
120.600.000 
129,410000 
138.500.000 
66,990.000 
69,400.000 
85.400.000 
53.400.000 
77.030.000 
22.005.000 
12.965.000 
113,041.274 
147,103.000 
99.250.000 
121 750 000 


$20.205.156 
19.012.041 
20,7513,098 
26,109.572 
33.043.725 
47.989.872 
58,574.625 
51,294.710 
61.327,411 
78,665,022 
70.971.780 
93.020,513 
71.957,144 
55.800,033 
77.699.074 
95.566.021 
101.536,963 
108.343.150 
22.430,960 
52.203.233 
66.757.970 
61.316,832 
38.527.236 
27.856.017 
6,927.441 
62,557.763 
81.920.052 
87.671.569 
93.281.133 
70.142.521 
69.691.669 
65.074,382 
72,160.281 
74.699.030 
75.986,657 
99,535.388 
77,595.352 
82.324.827 
72,204,686 
72,358.671 
73.849.508 
81.310,583 
87,176.943 
90.140.433 
104,336.973 
121.693,577 
128,663,040 
117.419.376 
108.486,616 
121.028,416 
132.085.946 
121.851.803 
104.691.534 
84.346.480 
111.200.046 
114.646,606 
113,488.516 
158.648.622 
154.032,131 
145,755,820 
151.898.720 
218.388.011 
209,658.366 
230,976,157 
278,325.268 
275. 156.846 
326.964.908 
3ti2.960.68-- 
324.644.421 
356.789,462 
400.122.21H 
249.344,913 
227.558,14 
268.121.058 
264,234.529 
2:3.672.529 
434.903.593 
355.374.5W 
375.737.00 
343.256,07- 
450.927.434 
541.262.16t 
524,055.12C 


$2.794,844 
10,187,959 
10,746,902 
4,990,428 
1.556.275 
21.766,396 
22.861,539 
24,084,696 
7224.289 
403,626 
20,280.988 
18,342.998 
4.376,189 
8,866.633 
7,300.926 
25.033,979 
27.873,037 
30,156,850 
34.559.040 
7.196,767 
18.642,030 
7.916.832 
38.502,764 
5.851.017 
6.037,559 
60.483.521 
65,182.948 
11.578.431 
28.468.867 
16,982,479 
4,758.331 
2.488,658 
11.081.260 
2.880.237 
4,561.485 
3.195,3i3 
7,379,125 
2.840,759 
16.245,1:38 
2,133.858 
2,972,588 
21,880.541 
13.852,323 
17.977.878 
22,184,359 
28,202,165 
61.316.995 
23,569.841 
6.230,788 
41,063,716 
24.944,427 
6.094,374 
4,529.447 
19.592.681 
2,765.011 
2.607.958 
8.203.281 
12,102.984 
966.797 
2,101.619 
26.239,598 
2,163,079 
3.287,076 
37.002,490 
26.237.113 
13.6S8.326 
12.324,966 
2,070,541 
42.031,271 
In. 02 1,332 
37,956,042 
86.305.240 
21,786.412 
15.201,138 
65.328.368 
14.883.123 
10,608.565 
62.457.058 
4.112,193 
94.058.178 
11,450.153 
231.542 
116.283,646 


1791 






1792 






U93 ... 






1794 






1795 






1796 




1797 






1798 






1799 ... 




1800 
1801 
1802 


Specie inc 
mercnam 
to If 




uded "with 
Use prior 


1803 


1804 


1805 . 


1806 . . 


1807 ... 






1808.... 


1809 






1810 






1811 






1812 






1813 






1814..., 






1815.... 






1816 






1817 






1818 






1819 
1820 :.. . 






87.125.000 
74.450.000 
62.585,724 
83.241.541 
77.579.267 
80,548.142 
96.340.0,5 
84.974.477 
79,484.068 
88.509,824 
74.492.527 
70.876.920 
103,191,124 
101,029,266 
108,118,311 
126,521.332 
149,895.742 
189.980,035 
140.989.217 
113,717,404 
162.092.132 
107.141.519 
127.946.177 
100.162.087 
64,753.799 
108.435.035 
117.254.564 
121.691,797 
146,545.638 
154.998.928 
147,857.439 
178.138.318 
216.224.932 
212.945.442 
267,978,647 
304,562.381 
261,468.520 
314,639,942 
3t 50,890.141 
282,613.1.50 
338,768,130 
362.ltk5.254 
335,650,153 
205.771,729 
252.919,920 
329.5ti2.895 
248.555.652 
445,512,158 
417.831.571 
371,624,808 
437.314,255 
462.377,587 
541.4a3.708 
640.338.76fc 






1821... 


$8.064.890 
3,369.846 
5,097.896 
8,378,970 
6.150,765 
6,8804*6 
8.151,130 
7,489.741 
7.403,612 
8,155.964 
7,305,945 
5,907,504 
7,070,368 
17,911,632 
13.131,447 
13.400.881 
10.516.414 
17.747,116 
5,595,176 
8.882,813 
4.988.633 
4.087.016 
22.320.335 
5,830.429 
4.070.242 
3,777,732 
24,121.289 
6,360.284 
6,651.240 
4.628.792 
5.453,503 
5.505,044 
4,201,382 
6,758,587 
3,659.812 
4,207,632 
12.461.799 
19.274,496 
7,434.789 
8.550.135 
46.339.611 
16.415,052 
9,584,105 
13.115.612 
9,810,072 
10.700,092 
22.070,475 
14.188.368 
19,807.876 
26.419.179 
21,270,024 
13.743.689 


$10.478,059 
10,810.180 
6.372.187 
7.014.552 
8.797.055 
4,704,563 
8,014,880 
8.243,476 
4,924.020 
2,178.775 
9,014.981 
5,656.340 
2,611,701 
2,076,758 
6.477,775 
4,324.336 
5,976,249 
3.508,046 
8,776,743 
8.417,014 
10,034,332 
4.813.539 
1,520,791 
5,454.214 
8,606,495 
3.905.268 
1.907,024 
15,841,616 
5,404,648 
7.522,994 
29.472,752 
42,674.135 
27.486.875 
41.281,504 
56,247,343 
45,745,485 
69.136.922 
62.633.14- 
63,887.411 
66.546,239 
29.791.080 
36,887.640 
64,156,61 
105.396.54 
67.643.226 
86,044.07 
60.868,372 
93.784,10' 
57.138.3SC 
58,155,661 
98,441,986 
79,877,534 


1822 


1823 


1824 


72.169.172 
90,189,310 

78,093.511 
71.332.938 
81.020.083 
67,088.915 
62.720,956 
95.885.1TO 
95.121.762 
101,047,943 
108.609,700 
136.764.295 
176,579,154 
130.472.803 
95,970.288 
156.41)0,956 
98.258.706 
1?2,957.544 
96.075,071 
42,433,464 




182H 


1827 

1828 . . 


1829.... 


1830 


1831 


1832 


1833 


1834 
1835 
1836 ... 


1837 
1838 
1839 


1840 


1841 


1842 
1843.... 


1844 


102.604.606 
113,184,322 

117.914.065 
122,424.349 
148.638.644 
141,206.199 
173.509,526 
210,771.429 
207.440.398 
2-W.777.265 
297.803.794 
257,808,708 
310,432.310 
34S.428.342 
263^38,654 
331,333,341 
353.616.119 
289.310.542 
189,356.677 
243.335.815 
316.447.283 
238,745.580 
434.812.06b 
395,761,01)6 
357.436.440 
417,506,379 
435.958,408 
520^28,684 
626,595.077 


1845 


1846 


1847 


1848 


1849.... 


1850 ... 


1851 


1852 


1853 


1854 
1855 

185*5 .. 


1857 


1858 


1859 


I860 
1861 

1862.... 


1863 


1864 


1865 


1866.. . 


1867 "... 
1868 
1869 
1870 


1871.. 


1872 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



TOTAL VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.-CONTINUED. 



FISCAL YEAR. 


MERCHANDISE. 


SPECIE. 


MDSE. AND SPECIE COMBINED. 


Imports. 


Exports. 


Excess of im- 
potts (rom.) 
or exports 
(italics). 


Imports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Exports, 
gold and 
silver. 


Total 
imports. 


Total 
exports. 


Excess of im- 
ports (roman) 
or exports 
(italics). 


1873.. 


$642,136.210 
567,406.342 
533.005,436 
460,741,190 
451.323,126 
437.051.532 
445.777.775 
667.954,746 
642.664.628 
724.639,574 
723.180.914 
667.697.693 
577,527.329 
635.436,136 
692.319,768 
723,957,114 
745.131,652 
789.310,409 
844.916,196 
827,402,462 
866,400,822 
654.994,622 
731.969,965 
779,724,674 
764,730.412 
C.16,049.654 
697.148,489 
849,941,184 
823,172.165 
903,320,948 
1,023.719,237 
991.037.371 
1,117,513,071 
.226,563,843 
1,434,421,425 
,194,341,792 
1,311,920.224 
1.556.947.430 
1.527.226, 105 
.653,354.934 
.812.978,234 
.893,925.657 
.674.169,740 
2,197.883.510 


$522,479,922 
586,283.040 
513,442,711 
540,384.671 
602.475,220 
694,865,766 
710,439,441 
835,638,658 
902,377,346 
750.542,257 
823,839,402 
740,513,609 
742,189.755 
679.524,830 
716.183,211 
695,954.507 
742,401.375 
857,828,684 
884,480,810 
1,030.278,148 
847.665.194 
892,140.572 
807,538.165 
'882.606.938 
1,050,993.556 
1,231.482.330 
1,227,023.302 
1.394,483.082 
1,487,764.991 
1, 3-4.719.401 
1,420.141.679 
1,460.827.271 
1,518.561,666 
1.743,864.500 
1,880.853,078 
1.860,773,346 
1.663.011,104 
1.744.984,720 
2,049,320.199 
2,204,322,409 
2.465,884,149 
2.364.579,148 
2,768.589.340 
4.333.658,865 


$119.656.288 
18.876.698 
19.562.725 
79.643.481 
151.152.094 
257.814.234 
264.661.666 
167,683.912 
259.712.718 
25.902.683 
100.658.488 
72.815,916 
164.6G?.42C 
44.088.694 
23.863.443 
28.002.607 
2.730.277 
68,518.275 
39,564.614 
202.875.686 
18.735.728 
237.145.950 
75.568,200 
102.882.264 
286.263.144 
615.432.676 
529.874,813 
544,541,898 
664.592.826 
478,398.453 
394,422.442 
469,739,900 
401.048.595 
517,300.657 
446,429.653 
666.431,554 
351,090,880 
188.037.290 
522.094.094 
550,967,475 
652,905,915 
470.653,491 
1,094.419,6001 
2.135,775.355 


$21,480,937 
28.454,906 
2fl.900.717 
15.936.681 
40.774.414 
29.821,314 
20.296,000 
93.034,310 
110.575.497 
42,472.390 
28.489.391 
37,426,262 
242.323 
593.656 
170,792 
59.337,986 
28.963.073 
33.976,326 
36,259,447 
69,654.540 
44.367,633 
85.735,671 
56.595.939 
62,302.251 
115.548,007 
151.319.455 
119,629,659 
79.829.486 
102.437.708 
80,253.508 
69,145.518 
126,824,182 
81,133,826 
140.664,270 
157,456,873 
192.995,418 
87.958,799 
88,557.099 
119.544.262 
95.986,719 
110.462,541 
96.865,263 
200,679,078 
528.163,676 


$84,(W8.574 
66,630.405 
92,132.142 
56.5W5.302 
56,162.237 
33,740,125 
24.997,441 
17,142,919 
19,406,847 
49,417.479 
31,820,333 
67,133.383 
42.231.525 
72.463.41U 
35,991 ,691 
46,414,183 
96,641.533 
52.148,420 
108.953,642 
83,005,886 
149,418.163 
127,429,326 
113,763,767 
172,951.617 
102.308,218 
70.511,630 
93.841,141 
104.979.034 
117,470.357 
98,301.340 
91,340.854 
130,932,688 
141.442,836 
103,442,654 
108,138.249 
130,354,126 
147.214,610 
173.850,076 
87.259,611 
122,219,013 
149.376,933 
167,003.552 
197.166,335 
150,041.071 


$663,617,147 
595,861.248 
553,906.153 
476,677.871 
492.097,540 
466.872.846 
466,073,775 
760.989,056 
753,240.125 
767.111.964 
751,670.305 
705,123.955 
620.769.652 
674,029,792 
752,490.51)0 
783,295,100 
774,094,725 
823,286,735 
881,175,643 
897,057,002 
910,768.555 
740,730.293 
788,565.904 
842.026.925 
880.278.419 
767.369.109 
816,778,148 
929.770.670 
925,609.873 
983,574,456 
1,094,864.755 
1,117,911,553 
1.198,646,897 
1,367,228.113 
1,591,878.298 
1,387,337.210 
1,399,879,023 
1,645,504,529 
1.646,770.367 
1,749.341,653 
1,923.440,775 
1,990.790,920 
1.874.848,818 
2.726,047.186 


$607,088,496 
652,913,445 
605.574,853 
596.890,973 
658,637.457 
728,605,891 
735.436,882 
852,781,577 
921.784,193 
799,956,736 
855,659.735 
807.646.992 
784,421,280 
751,988,240 
752.180.902 
742.368.690 
839,042,908 
909.977,104 
993.434.452 
1,113.284.034 
997,083.357 
1.019.569.898 
921,301,932 
1.055.558.555 
1,153.301.774 
1.301.993.960 
1.320.864.443 
1,499.462,116 
1,605,235,348 
1,480.020,741 
1.520,482,533 
1.591.759.959 
1.660,004,502 
1,847.307,154 
1,988,989,327 
1,991,127,472 
1.810.225.714 
1.918.734,796 
2,136,579,810 
2.326,541.422 
2,615.261,082 
2.531,582,700 
2,965,755.675 
4,483,699,93b 


$56,528,651 
57,052.197 
51,668.700 
120.213,102 
166.539.9n 
261,733,049 
269,363,107 
91,792.521 
168.544.068 
32.847.772 
103,989.430 
102,523.037 
163,651,628 
77.958,448 
309.658 
40,926,410 
64.948.183 
86.690.369 
112.258,809 
216,227.032 
86,314.802 
278.839,605 
132,736.028 
213,531.630 
273,023.355 
534.624.851 
504,086,295 
669.691,446 
679,625,475 
496,436.285 
425,617,778 
473,848.406 
I461.357.60S 
520.079.041 
397,111.0*9 
603.790,662 
410,346,691 
273.230367 
489.809.443 
.377,199.769 
691.820.307 
540.791.780 
1.090.906.857 
1.757,652.750 


1874.... 


1875 
1876 


1877 


1878.. . 


1879 ... 


1880 
1881 




JQOQ 


1884 


1885 . . 


1886... 
1887 

1888.... 


1889 
1890 




1892 . . 




1894 


1895 
1896 


1897 ::. 


1898 
1899 


1900 


1901 .. 


1902. . . . 


1903.... 


1904... 


1905. . . . 


1906.... 


1907 :::. 

1908 


1909 
1910. 


1911... 


1912... 


1913.... 


1914 
1915 


1916 



Fiscal year ended Sept. 30 prior to 1843; since that date ended June 30. 

NOTE Merchandise and specie are combined in I showing the total inward and outward movement 
the columns at right of table for the purpose of I of values by years. 



GOLD AND SILVER. 

Metal. 1914. 1915. 19 
Gold Imports ..$66,538,659 $171,568,755 $494, 
Exports 112,038,529 146,224,148 90, 
Silver Imports.. 30,326,604 29.110,323 34, 
Exports 54,965,023 50,942,187 59, 

VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXI 

Fiscal - 


16. V 

009,301 Ent 
249,548 St 
154,375 i Clef 
791,523 ! St 

'ORTS OF 
years ended 


TONNA 

3ssels. 1914. 
ered Sailing ... 2,443,4 
earn 50 945 1 


GE. 

1915. 1916. 
77 2,348.851 2,906,647 
10 44,361,615 48,657,320 
45 2,486,440 3,053,218 
64 44,398,648 49,379,083 

COUNTRIES. 


ired Sailing 2,455,3 
earn 50,728,0 


MERCHANDISE BY 

June 30. 


Countries. 
Europe Austria-Hungary 
Azores and Madeira islands. 
Belgium 


1914. 
$20,110,834 
537,181 
41,035,532 
308,840 
3,269,735 
116,876 
141,446,252 
189,919,136 
15,110 
3,866,594 
86,813 
56,407,671 
18,813 
36,294,010 
9,197,265 
6,165,065 
489,620 
20,831,184 
1,949,835 
24,658,867 
11,590,107 
25,329,699 
8,296,525 


1915. 
$9,794.418 
531,538 
10,222,860 
280,845 
3,160,699 
143,491 
77,158,740 
91,372,710 
3,774 
4,226,003 
83,866 
54,973,726 
21,237 
32,518,890 
10,668,864 
5,121,939 
97,881 
2,512,381 
411,423 
18,027,492 
11,661,337 
19,335,483 
5,673,373 


1916. 
$1,431,570 
792,814 
1,478,579 
95,395 
3,421,921 
36,838 
102,077,620 
13,945,743 
7,045 
9,138,934 
56,273 
57,432,436 
64,695 
38,534,509 
6,851,714 
7,171,295 
20,079 
3,613,986 
50 
27,864,130 
11,846,881 
21,775,413 
151,606 


1914. 
$22,718,258 
240,723 
61,219,894 
326,734 
15,670,135 
3,902,940 
159,818,924 
344,794,276 
773,038 
1,123,511 
15,855 
74,235,012 
266,067 
112,215,673 
9,066,610 
5,223,048 
2,306,377 
30,088,643 
9,462 
30,387,569 
14,644,226 
1,019,602 
2,160,289 


1915. 
81,238,669 
91,812 
20,662,315 
12,490 
79,824,478 
329,030 
369,397,170 
28,863,354 
3,499,975 
23,499,646 
183,140 
184,819,688 
1,258,857 
143,267,019 
39,074,701 
5,080,037 
391,001 
37,474,380 
909,195 
38,112,969 
78,273,818 
2,735,788 
646,201 


1916. 
$152,929 
317,977 
21,844,638 
44,223 
55,662,411 
420,493 
630,672,504 
288,851 
4,333,292 
31,024,363 
251,447 
270,489,922 
1,335,647 
99,232,930 
53,678,126 
14,721,874 
111,537 
183,259,605 
385,995 
52,771,652 
51,939,182 
8,156,147 
41,421 


Bulgaria .. 






France 


Gibraltar .... 




Iceland and Faroe islands.. 
Italy 
Malta Gozo etc 




Norway 
Portugal 




Serbia, Montenegro, Albania 
Spain 






Turkey in Europe 



84 ALMANAC AND YEAR- 


BOOK FOR 1917. 


United kingdom England 
Scotland . . . 














1914. 
$218,089,913 
27,758,358 
17,813,033 


1915. 
$214,801,285 
23,214,941 
18,335,449 


1916. 
$261,883,661 
26,448,964 
20,110,598 


1914. 
$548,641,399 
33,950,947 
11,679,517 


1915. 1916. 
$835,588,279$1,409,199,584 
53,612,156 66,037,362 
22,594,519 42,809,317 


Ireland 


Total united kingdom 


293,661,304 


256,351,675 


308,443,223 


594,271,863 


911,794,954 


1,518,046,263 
2,999,183,429 


Total Europe 

North America Bermuda 
British Honduras 
Canada 
Central American states- 
Costa Rica 


895,602,868 

695,419 
2,099,275 
160,689,709 

3,570,364 
4,078,612 
3,130,328 
1,395,248 
4,509,719 
1.158.320 

17,842.591 
40,920 
92,690.566 

' i^3'i5i279 

259,715 
6,701.913 
6.875.104 
1,714,127 


614.354,645 

500,912 
1,343,300 
159,571,712 

3,545,167 
6,558.546 

2,593,524 
2,201,910 
4,388,136 
1,947,382 

21,234,665 

91,340 
77,612,691 
55 
1,391,668 

386,743 
5,561,585 
5,535,558 
1,768,476 


616,252,749 

708,680 
1,246,957 
204,018,227 

4,335,415 
8,724,728 
2,978,473 
2,394,824 
5,336,299 
2,129,868 


1.486,498,729 

1,613,816 
1,699,438 
344,716,981 

3,501,386 
3,601,813 
4,873,512 
2,629,034 
22,678,234 
2,155,138 


1,971,434,687 


1,485,950 
1,382,596 
300,686,812 

2,413,318 
2,789,270 
5,004,443 
2,087,678 
19,209,053 
2,101,966 


2,232,935 
1,486,450 
466,884,415 

3,512,849 
3,847,101 
4,607,423 
3,138,595 
23,602,598 
3,043,515 


Guatemala 
Honduras 


Nicaragua 


Panama 


Salvador 


Total Central American 
states 


25,899,607 
82,750 
97,676,544 


39,439,117 


33,585,728 


41,752,081 
2,203 
48,308,542 
125,255 
7,217,997 

1,645,592 
6,563,761 
4,407,108 
5,213,612 


Greenland 


Mexico ... 


38,748,793 
111,318 
5,735,026 

1,412,934 
5,254,124 
3,465,610 
3,224,342 
13,357,010 

68,884,428 
890,966 
4,917,201 
906,540 
2,083,623 
5,540,705 


34,164,447 
72,065 
5,352,628 

1,281,700 
4,564,703 
3,257,188 
2,776,000 


Miquelon, Langley, etc 


Newfoundland and Labrador.. 
British West Indies- 
Barbados 


1,866,688 

395,318 
4,767,025 
7,009,834 
2,232,577 




Trinidad and Tobago.... 


Other British 


Total British West Indies. 
Cuba 


15,550,859 

131,303.794 
29,374 
3,876,834 
512,959 
59,968 
691,807 


13,252,362 

185,706,901 
350,822 
9,826.397 
598.972 
55,163 
1,542,836 


14,404,754 

228,977,567 
63,496 
13,456,653 
844,784 
88,496 
2,560,340 


11,879,591 

75,530,382 
703,354 
5,680,299 
1,110,588 
2,256,669 
3,184,618 


17,830,068 

127,040,067 
898,541 
7,581,358 
1,594,055 
3,500,494 
6,435,567 


Danish West Indies 


Dominican Republic 


Dutch West Indies . ... 


French West Indies 


Haiti 


Total West Indies 


152,025,595 


211,333,453 


260,396,090 


96,580,473 
528,644,962 
45,179,089 
1,145,555 
29,963,914 
17,432,392 
6,786,153 
2,967,759 
776 
1,700,360 
711,482 
295,334 
173,191 
7,141,252 
5,641,266 
5,401,386 


100,345,501 


164,880,110 


Total North America 


427,399,354 
45,123,988 
70 
101,329,073 
25,722,128 
16,051,120 
3,595,456 


473,079,796 
73,776,258 
290 
99,178,728 
27,689,780 
18,953,023 
4,478,757 
1 
353,397 
686,509 
28,159 
28,126 
12.596,648 
10,492,649 
13,227,238 


591,895,543 
112,512,420 
204,904 
132,663,984 
64,154,859 
21,458,029 
5,848,290 
95 
261,290 
607.681 
52,514 
53,337 
24,326,689 
14,475,478 
14,942,448 


477,075,727 
32,549,606 
550,600 
25,629,555 
11,377,181 
6,675,564 
2,845,913 
668 
1,841,037 
583,092 
421,297 
40,205 
5,873,474 
5,171,323 
5,764,442 


732,890,028 
65,993,611 
1,367,891 
41,202,277 
24,289,652 
11,125,232 
3,462,040 
100 
2,183,535 
718,307 
493,584 
73,452 
10,173,176 
10,274,426 
8,999,272 


South America Argentina . . . 
Bolivia 


Brazil 


Chile . . . 








Guiina British 


110,603 
1,026,050 


Dutch 






64,651 
12,175,723 
7,715,144 
9,763,069 






Venezuela 


Total South America 


222,677,075 
1,747,810 
39,382,978 


261,489,563 
1,190,205 
40,156,139 


391,562.018 
2,600,559 
71,655,045 


124,539,909 
1,226,262 
24,698,734 

4,047 
166,114 
3,850 
1,473,339 


99,323,957 
1,587,676 
16,402,475 


180,356,555 
1,210,140 
25,120,896 

25,731 
375,420 
115,867 
720.337 


Asia Aden .... 


China 


China, leased territory 
British 




638,473 
229.889 






316,547 




221,685 
451,886 


41,187 
709.046 


Japanese 


821,776 


Total China 


40,311,340 
8,121 

73,630,880 
26,307,860 
11,964,787 


40,829,710 
8,753 

51,982,703 
24,989,878 
10.204.656 


72,405,278 
64,487 

71,745,626 
82,114,598 
23,563.122 


26,346,084 
1,266,263 

10,854,591 
4,184.674 
585,930 


17,540,798 
1,188,444 

11,606,094 
3,845.765 
438.875 
15,980,734 
2,771,779 
18,911 


26,358,251 
675,449 

19,298,150 
4,583,318 
814,567 




East Indies: 
British British India 


Straits Settlements 


Other British 


Total British 


111,903,527 
5,334,361 


87,177,237 
9,245,784 


177,423,346 

27,716,589 
60,030 


15,625,195 
3.676,895 
161,234 


24,696,035 
7,396.282 
16,904 
137 
12,005,610 
75,098,188 
13.495 
130,255.759 
741,430 
748 
1,800 


Dutch East Indies 


French East Indies 










3,085,840 
107,355.897 
1,948.038 
2,488.973 
146.545 
12,546,552 
75,482 


2.044,589 
98,882,638 
641,081 
881,659 
242,391 
6,555,334 
70,722 


5,401,174 
147.644,228 
583,456 
2,302,858 
237,250 
712,879 
29.330 


10,696,214 
51,265.520 
2,343 
1,214,506 
836,870 
1,168,230 


8,185,315 
41,517,780 
1,352,279 
23,353.151 
619.707 
353,919 




Persia . . 






Turkev in Asia 


Other Asia 


Total Asia 
Oceania: 
British Oceania Australia . . 
New Zealand 


286,952,486 

17,088,534 
5,125.036 
204,692 


247,770,103 

23,705,010 
3,539.029 
263,989 


437,181,464 

54,174,324 
10,379,117 
648,530 


113,425,616 

45,775,216 
8,950,124 
261.295 


114,470,493 

43,620.676 
8,365.973 
225,193 


278,470,228 

59,245,084 
15,219,024 
215,149 


Other British 


Total British... 


22.418.262 


27.508.028 


65.201.971 


54.986.635 


52.211.842 


74.679,257 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Conn tries. 














1914. 
$1 549 53 


or s 
mP 1915.' 

$938,968 
55,387 
24,020,169 


1916. 
$2,346,263 
445,508 
28,232,249 


1914. 
$1,057,303 
219.892 
27,304,587 


1915. 
$676,180 
121.383 
24,755,320 


1916. 
$996,586 
139,703 
23,426,009 


German Oceania 
Philippine islands 


14.301 
18,162,312 




42 144 398 


52,522,552 
157 
130,524 
394,751 
4,947,311 
748,795 


96,225,991 


83,568,417 


77,764,725 


99,241,555 
252 
41,625 
4,549,7-40 
21,186,891 
2.604,317 


Africa Abyssinia 
Belgian Kongo 


3 
34 666 


72,859 
6,439,412 
19,823.862 
496,696 


103,132 
3,607,869 
14,834,974 
517,927 


289,471 
2,924.575 
14,727,964 
618.546 


British Africa West 


633 111 


South 


2 469 849 


East 


...... 853,621 


Total British 


3 956 581 


6,090,857 
116,227 
17.371,992 
652,253 


26,759,970 
130,631 
33,254,943 
2,011,222 


18,960.770 
728,673 
1,930,016 
2,754,228 
593,935 
6,479 
110,171 
25,795 
89,256 
2,587,472 
11.588 


18,271,085 
985,411 
2,879.241 
2,490,264 
103,662 
121,344 
152,648 
57,269 
69.732 
3,089,460 
10,224 


28,340,948 
819,949 
7.791,421 
2,393,527 
44,340 
155,137 
84,677 
394,869 
348.980 
3,084,186 
17,159 

43,517,070 
,333,658,865 




177 356 


Bgvpt 


13 311 233 




844 808 


German Africa 


134 959 


Italian Africa . . 


. . . . " 80 9 90 


66,651 
37.178 
45,733 
60,674 
380,835 


169,192 
89,900 
104,566 
313,666 
1,856,341 
2,455 
64.765.745 


Liberia 


6 287 


Madagascar 


13 095 


Morocco ... 


149 776 




440 42? 


Spanish Africa 




Total Africa 


19,149,476 


24,953,081 " 


27.901.515 


28,519,751 


Grand total 


1,893,925,657 


1,674,169,740 2,197,883,510 2,364,579,148 2,768,589,340 4 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN MERCHANDISE BY CONTINENTS. 

Fiscal years ended June 30. 

EXPORTS. 
No 
Year. Europe. 

1910 $1,135,914,551 

1911 1,308,275,778 

1912 1,341,732,789 

1913 1,479,074,761 

1914 1,486,498:729 

1915 1.971.434,687 

1916 2,999,183,429 

1910... ...$806,270,280 

1911 768,167,760 

1912 819,585,326 

1913 892,866.384 

1914 895,602,868 

1915 614,354.645 

1916 ; 616,252,749 



North South 
America. America. 
$385,520,069 $93.246,820 
457,059,179 108.894,894 
516,837,597 132,310,451 
617,413,013 146,147,993 
528,644,962 124,539,909 
477,075,727 99,323.957 
752,890,028 180,356,555 
IMPORTS. 
$306,767,486 $196,164,786 
305,496.793 182,623,750 
334,072,039 215,089,316 
361,943.659 217,734,629 
427,399.354 222,677,075 
473,079.796 261,489,563 
591,895,543 391,562,018 


Asia and 
Oceania. 
$111,751,900 
151,483,241 
189,398,148 
194,159,465 
196,994,033 
192,235,218 
377.7U.783 

$230,255,139 
243,724,182 
261,932,365 
314,038,218 
329.096,884 
300,292.655 
533,407,455 


Africa. 
$18,551,380 
23,607,107 
24,043,424 
29,088,917 
27,901,515 
28,519,751 
43,517,070 

$17,489,739 
27,213,620 
22,585,888 


Total. 
$1,744,984,720 
2,049,320,199 
2,204,322,409 
2,465.884,149 
2,364,579,148 
2,768.589.340 
4,333,658.865 

$1,556.947,430 
1,527,226.105 
1,653,264,934 


26,425,344 
19.149,476 
24,953,081 
64,765,745 


1,813,008.234 
1,893,925.657 
1,674.169.740 
2,197,883,510 



On principal articles or 
Articles. 1913. 

Animals $1,892,993 

Breadstuffs 3,785,021 

Chemicals 7,542,728 

Cotton* 34,153,263 

Earthenware 9,827,837 

Fibers* 24,405,068 

Fish 2,254,880 

Fruits and nuts.... 7,867,730 

Furs* 2,024,801 

Glass* 3,051,764 

Iron and steel 10.067.527 

Leather* 4,993,795 

Malt liquors 2,07,961 

Meat, dairy products 3.326,772 
Oils 3,028,646 



DUTIES COLLECTED ON IMPORTS. 

groups of articles imported into the United States for consumption. 



1914. 
$766,693 
4,852,602 
7,839.974 
31,103,067 
5,564,859 
15,270,118 
1.390,412 
7,132,519 
1,599,229 
2,776,678 
6,001,111 
4.070,880 
1,915,609 
2,911,562 
2,675,827 


1915. 
$100,205 
1,861,528 
6.568,498 
19,946,728 
. 4,152,336 
10,454,561 
955,100 
5,569,199 
772,345 
1,360,753 
3,392,414 
2,743,541 
962,766 
1.943,066 
2,520,013 


Articles. 
Paints 


1913. 
$634 ?55 


1914. 
$397,159 
2,982,890 
16,703,693 


1915. 
$281,316 
1,992,959 
11 26"> 067 


Paper* 
Silk* 


... 3,784,696 
...13,988,110 


Spirts, distilled. 
Sugar 


...10,470,377 
.53 480 864 


10,780,058 7,637,196 
61,861.426 49.525,673 
26,892,273 24,875,246 
3,181,815 2,764,388 
2.577,982 1,551.902 
6,509^450 4,505,088 
1,793,378 729,318 
2,589,235 217,441 
14,387,241 9,701,772 

tUnmanufactured. 


Tobacco* 


...26.748,125 


Toys 


. . . 2 773 362 


Vegetables 
Wines 


... 3.159,681 
6 283 978 


Wood* . . 


4 750 715 


Woolt 


13 519 982 


Wool$ 


...15 031.313 


'Including manufactures of. 
^Manufactured. 



DESTRUCTIVE FIRE IN BERGEN, NORWAY. 



The most destructive fire that ever occurred in 
Bergen, Norway, broke out Jan. 15, 1916. Prac- 
tically the whole of the principal retail business 
district was burned, including stores of all kinds, 
business offices, hotels, telephone exchange, 
schools and dwelling houses. In all, 369 build- 
ings were destroyed. The total loss was esti- 
mated at $22,400,000. The insurance value of 
buildings burned, the value fixed by government 
authority beyond which buildings may not be 



insured, was $3,200,000. About 3,000 persons were 
made homeless by the fire. 



MOLDE PARTLY DESTROYED. 
Two days after the great fire in Bergen, 
another Norwegian city, Molde, was visited by 
a conflagration which swept away about 100 
business houses, manufactories and dwellings, 
causing a loss of approximately $1,000,000. 



ROMAN AND ARABIC NUMERALS. 



II 


3 


VI 


III 


3 


VII 


IV . 




VIII .. 



IX 



100 



D 

II 

MCMX ! 

MCMXVII 1917 



. 500 
.1000 
.1910 



86 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



UNITED STATI 
[United States censi 
Alabama 2.348,273 
Arizona 259.666 
Arkansas .. . 1.753,033 
California .. . 2.983,843 
Colorado .... 975.190 
Connecticut . 1.254.926 
Delaware .... 214.270 
Dist. of Col. 366.631 
Florida 904.839 


STATISTICS 01 
]S JAN. 1. 1917. 
is bureau estimate.] 
Nevada 108.736 
New Hampshire 443.467 
New Jersey... 2,981.105 
New Mexico... 416.966 
New York 10.366.778 
North Carolina 2.418.559 
North Dakota. 752.260 
Ohio 5,181,220 
Oklahoma 2,245,968 


' POPULATION. 

eluded in the above ta 
tion by Color or Race.". 

COLORED POPUU 

Estimated as < 
Atlanta. Ga 60,187 
Baltimore, Md.... 88,314 
Birmingham, Ala. 65,512 
Boston, Mass 16,293 
Chicago, 111 50,627 
Cincinnati, O 21,720 
Columbus. 14,428 
Indianapolis, Ind. 24,281 
Kansas City. Mo. 26,904 
Los Angeles, Cal. 19,101 
NOTE The foregoing 
largest cities having a 
ulation. The census bu 
for such cities as Alban: 
Cleveland, O., Omaha, N 
Milwaukee, Wis., and Si 
comparatively small negr 
population of all large < 
in this volume. 
METROPOLITAN DIST1 
STATE: 
Statistics have been cc 
the census showing the 
cities of the United St 
suburbs, comprising whal 
politan districts." A d 
is defined as consisting ( 
the urban portion of th 
ten miles of the city lim 
shows the metropolitan 
a population of 200.000 01 
Metr 
City. dif 
New York 6 


sle. (See also "Popula* 

LTION OP CITIES. 

>f July 1, 1.114. 
Memphis, Tenn... 57,372 
Nashville, Tenn.. 38,034 
New Orleans, La. 95,52 
New York, N. Y. 109,337 
Philadelphia, Pa. 91,652 
Pittsburgh, Pa... 27,39 
Richmond, Va.... 49,4ia 
St. Louis, Mo.... 47,029 
San Francisco, Cal. 18, ITS 
Washington, D.C.101,339- 
list includes only the 
considerable colored pop- 
reau made no estimates 
-, N. Y., Buffalo, N. Y. 
eb., Minneapolis, Minn.. 
. Paul, Minn., having a 
o population. The negro 
cities is given elsewhere 

UCTS IN THE UNITED 

s (1910). 
mpiled by the bureau of 
population of the chief 
ites together with their 
. may be termed "metro- 
strict of this character 
>f the city together with 
e territory lying within 
its. The following table- 
Jistricts of cities having- 
more in 1910: 
opolitan City 
strict, proper. Outside. 
474,568 4,766,883 1,707.685 
446,921 2,185,283 261,638 
972,342 1,549.008 423,334 
520,470 670,585 849,885. 
042.855 533.905 508,950 
828,733 687,029 141,704 
686.873 416,912 119.787 
150 174 


Georgia 2.875.953 
Idaho 436.881 
Illinois 6.193.626 
Indiana 2,826,1^4 


Oregon 848,866 
Pennsylvania.. 8,591,029 
Rhode Island.. 620.090 
South Carolina 1,634,340 
South Dakota.. 707.740 
Tennessee ... 2,296,316 
Texas . 4,472,494 


*Iowa . . 2 224 771 


Kansas 1,840,707 


Kentucky . 2 386,866 


Louisiana 1.843.042 
Maine .... 774.914 


Utah ... 438,974 
Vermont . 364,322 


Maryland 1,368.240 
Massachusetts. 3,747.564 
Michigan 3,074,560 
Minnesota .... 2.296.024 
Mississippi ... 1,964,122 
Missouri 3,420.143 
Montana 466.214 
Nebraska .... 1,277,750 
NOTE Estimates of po 
marily for use in the 
lating death rates and 
years other than the 
called arithmetical meth 
n";ng these estimates, 
as been shown by es 
in accuracy in the maj< 
other formula. It rests 
the increase in populati 
enumeration is equal to 1 
1900 to 1910. 

UNITED STATES A 
[United States census 
Jan. 1. 
Continental United Stat 
Alaska 


Virginia .. 2,202.522 


Washington .. 1.565,810 
West Virginia 1,399,320 
Wisconsin .... 2.513,758 
Wyoming 182.264 

Total 102.826.309 
April 15, 1910. 
.ulation are required pri- 
census bureau in calcu- 
per capita averages for 
census year. The so- 
od was adopted for corn- 
It is the simplest and 
perience to come nearer 
>rity of cases than any 
on the assumption that 
on each year since the 
he annual increase from 

,ND POSSESSIONS, 
bureau estimate as of 
1917.] 
es... 102.826,309 


Chicago . 


Philadelphia 1 


Boston 1 


Pittsburgh 1 


Sc Louis 


San Francisco-Oakland 
Oakland 


Baltimore 


658.715 558.485 100,230 
613,270 560,663 52,607 
563,804 363,591 200,213 
526,256 301,408 10.104 
214,744 
500,982 465,766 35,216 
488,661 ' 423,715 64,946 
438,226 319,198 119.028 
427,175 373,857 53.31& 
395,972 224,326 171.646 
367,869 331.069 36.800 
348.109 339,075 9,034 

340,446 248,381 9,374 
82 331 


64.873 


Cleveland 


Guam 


12 866 


Cincinnati 


Hawaii 


217 660 


Minneapolis-St. Paul... 
St. Paul 
Detroit . 


Panama Canal Zone 


31 048 


Philippine islands 


8 879 999 


Porto Rico 


1 223 981 


Buffalo 


Samoa 


7 426 


Los Angeles 


Total 




113 3<1Q 9SZ 


Providence 


WHITE AND COLORED POPULATION. 
[Estimated as of July 1, 1914.] 
State. White. Colored. 
Alabama 1.304.612 965.333 
Arizona . ... 20ft ssa ss 4?n 


Washington . . 


New Orleans 


Kansas City (Mo. and 
Kas.) 


Kansas Citv, Kas 


Louisville 
Rochester 


286.158 223,928 62.230 
248,512 218,149 30,363: 
239,269 237.194 2.075 
237,783 233,650 4,133 
219,314 213,"-S1 5,933 
215.048 207.314 7.834 

RICAN CITIES. 
1 as of July 1, 1915. 
Washington, D. 
C 358 67& 


Arkansas 

California 


1,211,505 474,975 
. 2 621 161 136 734 


Indianapolis 
Denver 
Portland. Ore 


Delaware 


177,440 32.377 


Georgia . 


499,922 348,189 
1,523.661 1,201,834 


LARGEST AME 
Population estirnate< 
New York, N.Y.. 5,468,190 
Chicago, 111 2,447,045 
Philadelp'a, Pa.1,683,664 
St. Louis, Mo... 745,983 
Boston, Mass... 745,139 
Cleveland, O.... 656,975 
Baltimore, Md.. 584,605 
Pittsburgh, Pa.. 571.984 
Detroit, Mich... 554,717 
Los Ang'l's, Cal. 465,367 
San Francisco, 
Cal *44S,502 


Illinois 


5,868 259 118,522 


Indiana 


2,716,779 62 688 


Kansas 


1,725,156 59 741 


Kentucky 
Louisiana 


2,081,819 268,912 
1,007,614 765,868 


Minneapolis, 
Minn 353.460 
Seattle. Wash.. 330,834 
Jersey City, 
N. J 300,133 
Kansas City, 
Mo 289 879 


Maryland 


1,100,153 240,922 


Mississippi 


831,940 1,069,942 


Missouri 


3.210,657 162,229 


New Jersey 


2,714,371 101.292 




9 740 332 159 4'9 




1 591 077 748 375 


Ohio 


4 908 559 118 333 


Portland, Ore... 272,83* 
Indianapolis, 
Ind 265,57* 




1 766 516 260 018 


Pennsylvania 


8,033.610 212,357 


South Carolina 


712,601 877.414 
1 766 238 488 516 


Milwaukee. Wis. 428,062 
Cincinnati, O.... 406.706 
Newark, N. J... 399,000 
New Orleins, 
La 366 484 


Denver, Colo.... 253,161 
Rochester, N.Y. 250,747 
Providence, R.I. 250.025 
St. Paul, Minn. 241,99* 
Louisville, Ky.. 237.012 
Columbus, O.... 209,722. 
estimate made. 




3 502 022 755 SS 9 


Virginia 


...1.449.401 700.60S 


West Virginia 1,262,721 70,189 
Only states having 50,000 or more, or at least 
10 per cent of their population colored, are in- 


Muly 1, 1914; no later 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR* 1917. 



87 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES AT EACH CENSUS (1850-1910). 
[From the reports of the superintendents of the census.] 



STATE OR 
TEHRITOKY. 


1910. 


1900. 


1890. 1880. 


1870. 


1860. 


1850. 


Alabama 
Arkansas 
California 


18 
25 
12 

i 

44 

S 

1 

9 
15 
22 
14 
24 
34 
27 
6 

1 

7 

40 
29 
4t> 
39 
11 
1 
16 
37 
4 


2.138 -93 
1,574,449 
2,377.549 
799.024 
1,114.756 
202.322 
752.619 
2,609.121 
325.594 
5,638.591 
2.700.876 
2.224.771 
1.690,949 
2.289.1)05 
1,656388 
742.371 
1,295.346 
3.366.416 
2.810.173 
2.075,708 
1.797.114 
3.293.335 
376,053 
1,192.214 
81.875 
430.572 
2.537.167 
9.113.614 
2.206.287 
577,056 
4 767 121 


18 
25 
21 
31 
29 
42 
32 
11 
43 

10 
22 
12 
23 
30 
26 
7 
9 
19 
20 
5 
41 

S 

3(5 

it; 
i 

15 

39 
4 


1.828.6-97 

i.:m,54 

1,485.053 
639,700 
908.420 
184,735 
528,542 
2.216,331 
161.772 
4,821,550 
2.516.462 
2.231.853 
1,470,495 
2.147,174 
1,381.625 
694,466 
1.188.044 
2.805.346 
2.420,982 
1,751.394 
1,551.270 
3.106,665 
243.329 
1,066.300 
4-^.335 
411,588 
1,883,669 
7.268.894 
1,893.810 
319,146 
4,157.545 


ir 

24 

22 
31 
29 
41 
32 
12 
43 

10 
19 
11 
25 
30 
27 
6 
9 
20 
21 
5 
42 
20 
45 
33 

'? 

16 
39 
4 


1,513.017 
1,128.179 
1,208,130 
412,198 
746,258 
168.493 
391,422 
1,337.353 
84,385 
3.826.351 
2,192.404 
1.911,896 
1.427.096 
1,858.635 
1,118.587 
661.086 
1.042,390 
2,238.943 
2.093.889 
1.301.826 
1,289.600 
2,679,184 
132.159 
1,058.910 
45,761 
376,530 
1,444,933 
5.997,853 
1,617,947 
182,719 
3,672,316 


17 
25 

1 

28 
37 
34 
13 


1.22.505 
802,525 
864,694 
194,327 
622,700 
146.608 
269.493 
1,542,180 


16 

2; 

24 

25' 
34 
13 

12 


996,992 
484,471 
560,247 
39,864 
537,454 
125.0151 
187.748 
1,184,109 


13 

2(5 

24' 

32 
31 
11 


964.201 
435.450 
379.9941 
34.277! 
460.147 
112,216 
140,424 
1.057.286 


12 

2<; 

29 

}i' 

3<J 
31 
9 


771.623 
209.897 
92,597 

"370,792 
91,532 

87.445 
906,186 




Connecticut 
Delaware 
Florida .... 




Idaho 




4 
6 
10 
20 
8 
22 
27 
23 
7 
9 
26 
18 
5 

30' 
38 
31 
19 
1 
15 

'3' 


3.077,871 
1,978.301 
1.624.615 
996.096 
I,648.'i90 
939.946 
648.936 
934,943 
1,783.085 
1,636,937 
780.773 
1.131.597 
2,168,380 


4 

6 
11 
29 
8 
21 
23 
20 

13 

28 
18 
5 


2,539.89^ 
1.680.637i 
1,194.020 
364.399 ( 
1,321,011 
726,915 
626.915 
780.894 
1,457,351 
1,184.059 

ss 

1,721,295 


4 
6 

20 
33 

i? 

22 
IS 

16 
30 
14 
8 


1.711.951 
1,350.428 
674.913 
107,206 
1,155.684 
708,002 
628.279 
687.049 
1,231.066 
749.113 
172,023 
791,305 
1.182,012 


11 

7 

'8 
18 
1(5 
IT 
6 
20 
38 
15 
13 


851.470 
988,416 
192,214 










982.405 
517.762 
583,169 
533.034 
994.514 
397.654 
6,077 
606,526 
682,044 


Louisiana 
Maine 


Maryland 
Massachusetts... 
Michigan . .. 


Minnesota 
Mississippi 


Montana 


452.402 
62.266 
346,991 
1,131.116 
5.082.871 
1,399,750 


35 
37 
31 

'i 

14 


122,993 
42,491 
318.300 
906,096 
4.382.759 
1,671,361 


35 
36 
27 
21 
1 
12 


28,841 
6.857 
326,073 
672.035 
3,880.735 
992,622 


22' 
19 
1 
10 


"317,976 

489,556 
3,097,394 
869,039 


Nevada 
New Hampshire. 
New Jersey 
New York 
North Carolina... 
North Dakota.... 
Ohio 


3,198,062 


3 


2,665,260 


3 


2,339.511 


3 


1,980,329 







1657 155 




1 

38 
26 
3*5 
17 

i 

20 
30 
28 
13 
45 

T 


'672,765 
7,665.111 
542,610 
1.515,400 

583,888 
2,184,78i 

'373!351 
355,956 
2061 612 


3 1 

34 
24 
37 
13 
6 
40 
38 
17 
33 
28 
14 
44 


413,536 
6.302,115 
428.556 
1,340,316 
401,570 
2.020.616 
3.048,710 
276,749 
343,641 
1,854,184 
518,103 
958,800 
2,069,042 
92,53 


38 
2 
35 
23 
37 

f 

40 
36 

15 
34 
28 
14 
44 


313,767 
5,258.014 
345.506 
1,151,149 
328.808 
1,767.518 
2,235.523 
207.905 
332.422 
1,655,980 
349.3!*) 
762,794 
1,636,880 
60.705 


36 

1 

12 
11 

32 
14 


174,768 
4,282.891 
276.531 
995.577 

1.542.359 
1,591,749 


3(5 

I 

22 

'9 
19 


90.923 
3,521,951 
217,353 
705,606 


34 
2 
29 

18 


52,465 
2,90*5.215 
174,620 
703,708 


32 
2 
28 
14 


13.294 
2,311,786 
147,545 
668,507 


Pennsylvania.. 
Rhode Island 
South Carolina.. 
South Dakota.... 
Tennessee 


1,258.520 
818,579 


10 
23 


1,109.801 
604,215 


5 

25 


1,002.717 
212,593 




Utah.. 




332,286 
1,512,565 


so 

10 


330.551 
1.225.163 


28 
5 


315.098 
1,59(5,318 


23 
4 


314,120 
1,421,661 


Virginia 


Washington 
West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 

The states 
Alaska 


1,141.990 
1.221,119 
2,333,860 
145,965 

9U09.542 

64,35 
204,354 


29 
16 


618.45" 
1,315,49" 


27 
15 


442,014 
1,054,670 










15 


775,881 


24 


305,391 















23,067,262 


7 
6 


74,610,523 

63.592 
122,93 


62.116,811 


49.371,340 




38.155,505 


31,218,021 


... 


















4 


59,620 


6 

3 

1 


40,440 
135,177 
177,624 


8 
7 
1 


9.658 
14,181 
131,700 










Dakota 


1 


4,837 
75,080 


- 2 


'"5i',687 


Dist. of Columbia 
Hawaii 


i 

4 


331,06 
191,901 


I 


278,71 
154,00 


1 


230,392 


Idaho 






8 


32,610 














Indian Territory 
Montana 






2 


392.06C 






6 

"5 
2 


14,999 


















7 
4 


39.159 
119,565 








New Mexico 1 2 
Oklahoma 


327,30 


4 

1 


19:>.31 
398,33 

91,71 


2 
3 


153.593 
61.834 


20.595 
91,874 


1 


93.516 


1 


61,547 


Inaerv. U.S. sta- 
tioned abroad 


55,60* 










Utah 
Washington 
Wyoming '... 












2 
5 



143.iH5d 
75.116 
2078SJ 


3 
4 

(> 


86,7* 
23,955 
9 118 


3 
4 


40.273 
11,594 


3 


11,380 


Porto Rfco 


- 


1 118 015 


























The territories 
United States. 
Percent of gain 




2,292,60 t 




1,604,94 




505.439 




784,44 




402,866 


.. 


225,301 




124,614 


1 


93,402,15 




76,303,38 




62,622,250 




50.155,78, 




38.588,371 


....131,443,32 


... 23,191,876 


20.9 21 


24.9 30.08 


22.C.5 


35.58 35.86 



NOTE The narrow column under each census I tories when arranged according to magnitude of 
year shows the order of the states and terri- I population. 



CENSUS OF 1910 AND 1900. 
The thirteenth census of the United States was ) 



taken by the bureau of the census as of April 
15, 1910. It included continental United States, 
the territories of Alaska and Hawaii and Porto 
Rico; also persons in the military and naval 
service who were stationed abroad. The popu- 
lation according to this division, compared with 
that in 1900, was: 

1910. 1900. 

Alaska 64.356 63.592 

Hawaii 191,909 154,001 



1910. 



Porto Rico 1,118,012 

Soldiers and sailors abroad.... 55,608 



1900. 
'953.243 
91.219 



Noncontiguous territory 1,429,885 1,262,055 

Continental United States 91.972.266 75.994.575 

United States (area of enu- 
meration) 93.402,151 t77,256.630 

*Census of 1899. tlncludes 953,243 persons enu- 
merated in Porto Rico in 1899. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES AT EACH CENSUS (1790-1840). 
[From the reports of the superintendents of the census.] 



STATE OR TERRITORY. 


1840. 1830. 


1820. 


1810. 


1800. 


1790. 


Alabama 


12 

25 


59u,7o6 

97,574 


g 


buy,OZ7 
30;3S8 


19 

25 


127,9U1 
14,273 
























































Connecticut 


20 
88 

27 
9 


309,978 
78,085 
54,477 
691,392 


16 

I! 

10 


297,675 
76,748 
34,730 
516,823 


y 


275.248 

72,749 


9 

n 


261,942 

72,674 


8 
17 


251,002 
64,273 


8 
11 


237,964 
59,096 


Delaware 


Florida 


Georgia 


11 


340,989 


11 


252,433 


12 


162,686 


13 


82,548 


Idaho 


Illinois 


14 

10 
28 


476,183 
685,866 
43,112 


20 
13 


157.445 
343,031 


24 

18 


55,211 
147,178 


23 

n 


12,282 
24;520 


' 










5.641 












Kansas 
























Kentucky 


is 

13 
15 
8 
23 


779,828 
352,411 
501,793 
470,019 
737.699 
212,267 


6 

19 
12 
11 

2! 


687,917 
215,739 
399,455 
447,040 
610,408 
31,639 


1? 
10 
26 


564,317 
153,407 
298,335 
407.350 
523,287 
8,765 


7 
IS 
14 
8 
5 
24 


406,511 
76,556 
228.705 
380,546 
472,040 
4,762 


9 


220,955 


14 


73,677 




Maine 


14 
7 
5 


151,719 
341,548 
422,845 


11 
6 
4 


319]728 
378,787 




















17 
16 


375.651 
383,702 


22 
21 


136,621 
140,455 


21 
23 


75,448 
66,586 


20 
22 


40,352 
20345 


19 


8,850 
















































Nevada 




























22 

18 
1 
7 


284,574 
373,306 
2,428,921 
753,419 


18 
14 
1 
5 


269,328 
320.82J 

ttS 


15 
13 

1 
4 


244,161 

277,575 
1,372,812 
; 638,829 


H 
U 

2 
4 


214,460 
245,562 
959,049 
555,500 


11 
10 
3 

4 


183,858 
211,149 
589,051 
478,103 


10 
9 
5 
3 


141.885 
184.139 
340,120 
393,751 




New York 


North Carolina 






3 


1,519,467 


4 


937,903 


5 


581,434 


13 


230,760 


18 


45,366 












Pennsylvania.. .. 


2 
24 
11 


1,724.033 
108,830 
594,398 


2 
23 
9 


1,348,233 
97,199 
581,185 


3 
20 
8 


1,049,458 
83,059 
502,741 


3 
17 
6 


810,091 
76,931 
415,115 


3 

16 
6 


602,365 
69,122 
345,591 


2 
15 

7 


434,373 

68,825 
249,073 


Rhode Island 


South Carolina 




Tennessee 


5 


829,210 


7 


681,904 


9 


422,823 


10 


261,727 


15 


105,602 


17 


35,691 


Texas 


Vermont .... 


21 
4 


,sss 


17 
3 


280,652 
1,211,405 


16 
2 


235,966 
1,065,366 


15 


235,981 
974,600 


13 

1 


154,465 
880,200 


'! 


85,425 
747,610 


Virginia.. . . 




West Virginia 




























29 


30,945 












































The states 
Alaska 





























17,019,641 


12,820.868 




9,600,783 





7,215,858 





5,294,390 




























Arizona 


























Dakota 


























District of Columbia 


1 


43,712 


1 


39,834 


1 


33,039 


1 


24,023 


1 


14,093 






Idaho 


























































New Mexico 


























Oklahoma 


























Utah 














































































The territories 




























43,712 




39.834 




33,039 




24,023 




14,093 






On public ships in service of 
United States 








6,100 




5,318,'.... 
















United States... 




17.069,453].... 


I2,866,02o|.... 


9,638,453 




7,239,881 


... . 


5,308,483 




3,929,214 


Per cent of gain 




3267 


33.55 | 3306 


36 38 


&5.10 





NOTE The narrow column under each census I tories when arranged according to magnitude of 
year shows the order of the states and terri- I population. 

DISTRIBUTION BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS. 

Per cent of total population of continental United States in each of the nine geographic divisions: 

Including the population of the Philippines and 
other possessions, the population living under the 
American flag in 1910 was as follows: 

United States 93,402.151 

Philippines (1903) 7,635.426 

Guam, estimated 9,000 

Samoa, estimated 6,100 

Panama Canal Zone, estimated 50.00* 



Division. 
New England 
Middle Atlantic 


1910. 
.... 7.4 
.... 21.0 


1900. 
7.4 
20.3 


1890. 
7.5 

20 2 


1850. 
11.8 
25 4 


East North Central.. 
West North Central 


.... 19.8 
1' 7 


21.0 
13 6 


21.4 
14 9 


19.5 
3 8 


South Atlantic 


13 3 


13 7 


14 1 


20 2 


East South Central.. 
West South Central.. 
Mountain 


.. . 9.1 
9.6 

i 2 9 


9.9 
8.6 
2 2 


10.2 
7.5 
1 9 


14.5 
4.1 
3 


Pacific 


... . 4.6 


3.2 


3.0 


0.5 


United States 


....100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



Total 101,102,677 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



GROWTH OF POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES. 



States and territories. 1910. 

Alabama 2,138,093 

Arizona 204,354 

Arkansas 1,574,449 

California .. 2,377,549 

Colorado 799,024 

Connecticut 1,114,756 

Delaware 202,322 

District of Columbia 321.069 

Florida 752,619 

Georgia 2,609,121 

Idaho 325,594 

Illinois .....5,638,591 

Indiana 2,700,876 

Iowa 2,224,771 

Kansas 7,600,949 

Kentucky 2,289,905 

Louisiana 1,656,388 

Maine 742,371 

Maryland 1,295,346 

Massachusetts 3,366,416 

Michigan ;. 2,810,173 

Minnesota 2,075,708 

Mississippi 1,797,114 

Missouri 3,293,335 

Montana 376,053 

Nebraska 1,192,214 

Nevada 81.875 

New Hampshire 430,572 

New Jerses- 2,537,167 

New Mexico 327,301 

New York 9,113,614 

North Carolina 2,206,287 

North Dakota 577,056 

Ohio 4,767,121 

Oklahoma 1,657,155 

Oregon 672,765 

Pennsylvania 7,665,111 

Rhode Island 542,610 

South Carolina 1,515,400 

South Dakota 583,888 

Tennessee 2.184,789 

Texas .... 3.896,542 

Utah ;.. 373,351 

Vermont 355.956 

Virginia 2.061,612 

Washington 1,141,990 

West Virginia 1,221.119 

Wisconsin 2,333.860 

Wyominsr 145.965 

Continental U. S 91,972,266 

Alaska 64,356 

Hawaii 191,909 

Porto Rico 1.118.012 

JTotal United States.... 93,346,543 



, Increase ,. 
1900 to 1910. 1890 to 1900. ^ 


-Rank 


1800. 


1890. 


Number. ] 


Per ct. 


Number. P 


er ct.l 


910. li 


JOO. 


1,828,697 


1,513,401 


309.398 


16.9 


315,290 


20.8 


18 


18 


122,931 


88,243 


81,423 


66.2 


34,688 


39.8 


46 


47 


1,311,564 


1,128,211 


262,*85 


20.0 


1S3.353 


16.3 


25 


25 


1,485,053 


1,213,398 


892,496 


60.1 


271,655 


22.4 


12 


21 


539,700 


413.249 


259 324 


48.0 


126,451 


30.6 


32 


32 


908,420 


746,25s 


206,336 


22.7 


162,162 


21.7 


31 


29 


184,735 


168,493 


17,587 


9.5 


16,242 


9.6 


47 


45 


273,718 


230,392 


1.2,351 


18.8 


48,326 


21.0 


43 


41 


528,542 


391,422 


224,077 


42.4 


137,120 


35.0 


33 


33 


2,216,331 


1,837,353 


392,790 


17.7 


378,978 


20.6 


10 


11 


161,772 


. 88,548 


163,822 


101.3 


73,224 


82.7 


45 


46 


4,821.550 


3,826,352 


817,041 


16.9 


995,198 


26.0 


3 


3 


2,516,462 


2,192,404 


184,414 


7.3 


324,058 


14.8 


9 


8 


2,231,853 


], 912,297 


7,082 


*0.3 


319,556 


16.7 


15 


10 


1,470,495 


1,428,108 


220,454 


15.0 


42,387 


3.0 


22 


22 


2,147,174 


1,858,635 


142,731 


6.6 


288,539 


15.5 


14 


12 


1,381,625 


1,118,5.'S 


274,763 


19.9 


203,037 


23.5 


24 


23 


694,466 


661,086 


47,905 


6.9 


33,380 


5.0 


34 


31 


1,188,044 


1,042,390 


107,302 


9.0 


145,654 


14.0 


27 


26 


2,805,346 


2,238,947 


561,070 


20.0 


566,399 


25.3 


6 


7 


2,420,982 


2,093,890 


389,191 


le'.i 


327,092 


15.6 


8 


9 


1,751,394 


1,310,283 


324.U4 


18.5 


441,111 


33.7 


19 


19 


1,551,270 


1,289,600 


245,844 


15.8 


261,670 


20.3 


21 


20 


3,106,665 


2,679,185 


186,670 


6.0 


427,480 


16.0 


7 


5 


243,329 


142.924 


132,724 


54.5 


100,405 


70.3 


40 


43 


1,066,300 


1,062,656 


125,914 


11.8 


3,644 


0.3 


29 


27 


42,335 


47,355 


39,540 


93.4 


f5,020 


flO.6 


49 


49 


411,588 


376,530 


18.984 


4.fi 


35,058 


9.3 


39 


37 


1,883,669 


1,144.933 


653,498 


34.7 


438,736 


30.4 


11 


16 


195,310 


160,282 


131,991 


67.6 


35,028 


21.9 


44 


44 


7,268,894 


6,003,174 


1,844,720 


25.4 


1,265,720 


21.1 


1 


1 


1,893,810 


1,617,949 


312,477 


16.5 


275,861 


17.1 


16 


15 


319,146 


190,983 


257,910 


80.8 


128,163 


67.1 


37 


40 


4.157,545 


3,672,329 


609.576 


14.7 


485,216 


13.2 


4 


4 


790,391 


258,657 


866,764 


109.7 


531,734 


205.6 


23 


30 


413,536 


317,704 


259,229 


62.7 


95.832 


30.2 


35 


36 


6,302,115 


5.258,113 


1,362,996 


21.6 


1,044,002 


19.9 


2 


2 


428,556 


345,506 


114,054 


26.6 


83.050 


24.0 


38 


35 


1,340,316 


1,151,149 


175,084 


13.1 


189,167 


16.4 


26 


24 


401.570 


348,600 


182.318 


45.4 


52,970 


15.2 


36 


33 


2,020,616 


1,767,518 


164,173 


8.1 


253.098 


14.3 


17 


14 


3.048.710 


2,225,527 


847,832 


27.8 


813,183 


3fi.4 


5 


6 


276,749 


210,779 


96,602 


34.9 


65,970 


31.3 


41 


42 


343,641 


332,422 


12,315 


3.6 


11.219 


3.4 


42 


39 


1,854,184 


1,655,980 


207,428 


11.2 


198,204 


12.0 


20 


17 


518,103 


357.232 


GL3.887 


120.4 


160,871 


45.0 


30 


34 


958,800 


762.794 


262.319 


27.4 


196,006 


25.7 


28 


28 


2,069.042 


1,693,330 


264,818 


12.8 


375,712 


22.2 


13 


13 


92.531 


62,553 


53,434 


57.7 


29,976 


47.9 


48 


48 


75,994,576 


62,947,714 


15,917,691 


21,0 


13,046,861 


20.7 


.. 




63,592 


32,052 


764 


1.2 


31.540 


98.4 






154,001 


89,990 


37.908 


24.6 


64.011 


71.1 




J 


t953,769 




164,769 


17.3 










77,165,937 


63.069,756 


16,151,132 


20.9 


13,142,412 


22.7 


.. 





*Decrease. \\u 1899. JDoes not include .soldiers and sailors stationed abroad. 



DECENNIAL INCREASE OF POPULATION. 

Continental United States. 
Census. Population. Increase. Percent. 

1910 91,972,266 15,977,691 21.0 

1900 75.994575 13,046,861 20.7 

1890 62,947.714 12,791,931 25.5 

1880 50,155,783 11,597,412 30.1 

1870 38,558.371 7,115,050 22.6 

I860 31,443,321 8,251,445 35.6 

1850 23,191,876 6,122.423 35.9 

1S40 17.069.453 4.203,433 32.7 

1830 12.866.020 3,227.567 33.5 

1820 9.638,453 2.398,572 33.1 

181C 7,239,881 1,931,398 36.4 



Census. Population. Increase. Percent. 

1800 5,308.483 1,379,269 35.1 

1790 3,929,214 

Division. INCREASE (1900-1910). No. Perct. 

New England 960,664 17.2 

Middle Atlantic 3,861,214 25.0 

East North Central 2,265.040 14.2 

West North Central 1,290,498 12.5 

South Atlantic 1,751,415 16.8 

East South Central 862,144 11.4 

Wost South Central 2.252.244 34.5 

Mountain 9-8.860 57.3 

Pacific 1,775,612 73.5 



CENTER OF POPULATION AND MEDIAN LINES. 



The center of population, according to the 
bnreau of the census, may be said to represent 
the center of the gravity of the population. If 
the surface of the United States be considered as 
a rigid plane without weight, capable of sustain- 
ing the population distributed thereon, individu- 
als being assumed to be of equal weight, and 
each, therefore, to exert a pressure on any sup- 
porting pivotal point directly proportional to his 



distance from the point, the pivotal point on 
which the plane balances would, of course, be 
its center of gravity, and this is the point re- 
ferred to by the term "center of population" as 
used by the census bureau in its reports. 

The median point, which may be described as 
the numerical center of population, is in no 
sense a center of gravity. .In determining the 
median point distance is not taken into account, 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



CENTER OF POPULATION 

AT EACH CENSUS 

1790 TO 1910 
MEDIAN POINT 

1880 TO 1910 




and the location of the units of population is 
considered only in relation to the intersecting 
median lines as being north or south of the me- 
dian parallel and east and west of the meridian. 



The position of the center of population and its 
movement during each decade since 1790 are 
shown in the following table: 



Censi 
year. 
1790. 
1800. 
1810. 
1820. 
1830. 
1840. 
1850. 
1860. 
1870. 

issg. 

1890. 
1900. 
1910. 


North 
is latitude. 
D. M. 8. 
.39 16 30 
.39 16 6 
.39 11 30 
.39 5 42 
.38 57 54 
.39 2 
.38 59 
.39 24 
.39 12 
.39 4 8 
.39 11 56 
.39 9 36 
.39 10 12 


West 
longitude. 
D. M. 8. 
76 11 12 
76 56 30 
77 37 12 
78 33 
79 16 54 
80 18 
81 19 
82 48 48 
83 35 42 
84 39 40 
85 32 53 
85 48 54 
86 32 20 
*West 


Approximate location by important towns. 
.23 miles east of Baltimore, Md 


Movement in miles duricg 
, preceding decade. , 
Direct West- North- South- 
line. ward. ward, ward. 


.18 miles west of Baltimore Md . ... 


40.6 40.6 ., 0.5 
36.9 36.5 .... 5.3 
50.5 50.1 .... 6.7 
40.4 39.4 .... 9.0 
55.0 54.8 4.7 .... 
54.8 54.7 .... 3.5 
80.6 80.6 1.6 .... 
44.1 42.1 13.3 .... 
58.1 57.4 .... 9.1 
48 6 47 7 90 


.40 miles northwest by west of Washington, D. C. 
.16 miles north of Woodstock, Va 
.19 miles west-southwest of Moorefield, W. Va.*. 
.16 miles south of Clarksburg, W. Va.* 
.23 miles southeast of Parkersburg, W. Va.* 
.20 miles south of CMllicothe O 


.48 miles east by north of Cincinnati, O 
.8 miles west by south of Cincinnati, O 
.20 miles east of Columbus, Ind 


..6 miles southeast of Columbus, Ind 
In the city of Bloomington. Ind 


14.6 34.4 .... 2.8 
39.0 38.9 0.8 .... 


Virginia formed part of Virginia until 1863. 



MEDIAN LINES. 

In connection with the definition of the median 
point another method of presenting facts with 
regard to the geographical distribution of the 
population has been noted, involving the location 
of median lines. A parallel of latitude is deter- 
mined which evenly divides tee population so 
that the population north of that parallel is the 
same as that south. Similarly, a meridian of 
longitude is determined which divides the popu- 
lation evenly as between east and west. In cal- 
culating these median lines it is necessary, in 
the case of the square degrees of latitude and 
longitude which are traversed by the lines them- 
selves, to assume tnat tne population is evenly 
aistributed througb these square degrees or to 
make an estimated adjustment where this is ob- 
viously not the case. 

The eastern terminus of the median parallel, 
according to the census of 1910. is on the New 
jersey coast near Seagirt, in its course west 
this line passes through central New Jersey, 
leaving the state near Burlington and entering 
Pennsylvania a few miles north of Philadelphia, 
toence passing tnrough .Norristown and continu- 



ing through southern Pennsylvania and across 
the northern extremity of West Virginia, leaving 
the latter state at a point a few miles north of 
Wheeling. It nearly bisects Ohio. Indiana and 
Illinois, crossing about ten miles north of Colum- 
bus, O. ; twenty-five miles north of Indianapolis, 
ind., and about twenty miles north of Spring- 
field, 111. Through Missouri it runs about thirty 
miles south of the Iowa and Missouri line, 
tnence passing through Nebraska about ten miles 
north of its southern boundary, and across the 
northern part of Colorado, passing about five 
miles north of Boulder City. Its location in Utah 
is about forty-five miles south of Salt Lake City. 
There are no large towns near its course across 
the northern part of Nevada and California. The 
western terminus of the median parallel is on 
tne Pacific coast, in Humboldt county. California, 
about five miles north of Point Delgada and 
twenty miles south of Cape Mendocino. the point 
of continental United States extending farthest 
west. 

The median meridian starts at Whitefish point, 
on the northern peninsula of Michigan, near the 
eastern end of Lake Superior, thence passing 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



91 



south about twenty-five miles west of Lansing 
and through Indiana about ten miles west of the 
Indiana-Ohio boundary and twenty-five miles west 
of Cincinnati. South of the Ohio river it bisects 
Kentucky, crosses eastern Tennessee and leaves 
that state twenty miles east of Chattanooga. 
Through Georgia it passes close to the Georgia- 
Alabama line, about two miles west of Colum- 
bus, Ga., leaving the state near the intersection 
of the Alabama, Georgia and Florida boundary 
lines. It tnen crosses tne northwestern part of 
Florida and terminates in the Gulf of Mexico at 
the city of Apalachicola. The following table 
snows the movement of the median lines from 
1880 to 1910, inclusive: 

Median me- MoTemeBt , n mile8- 

ndian.WeSt Median Median 

longitude, parallel, meridian, 
Tear D- M. S. D. M. S. north'rU. westward 

1880.. ' 39 57 00 84 7 12 

1890 40 2 51 84 40 1 6.6 27.0 

1900.!..'! 40 4 22 84 51 29 2.4 10.8 

1910 40 6 24 84 59 59 2.3 7.5 

MEDIAN POINT. 

The exact location of the median point is In- 
dicated by the median lines already shown: in 
the following table its approximate location with 
reference to certain towns is described: 

APPBOXIMATE LOCATION BY IMPORTANT TOWNS. 

1880 16 miles nearly due west of Springfield, O. 

1890 5 miles southwest of Greenville, 0. 

1900.... In Spartanburg, Ind. 

1910.... 3 miles south of Winchester. Ind. 



Median par- 
allel, 
Census north latitude. 



POPULATION BY COLOE OR RACE. 
GENERAL SUMMARY. 

Color or race. 1910. 1900. 

White .. 81,731,957 66,809,196 

Negro 9,827,763 8,833,994 

Indipn 265,683 237,196 

Chinese 71,531 89,863 

Japanese 72,157 24,326 

All other 3,175 



Total 91,972,266 75,994,575 



BY STATES (1910) 
State. White. 

Alabama 1,228,832 

Arizona 171,468 

Arkansas 1,131.026 

California 2,259,672 

Colorado 783,415 

Connecticut 1,098,897 

Delaware 171,102 

District of Columbia 236,128 

Florida 443,634 

Georgia 1,431, 802 

Idaho 319,221 

Illinois 5,526,962 

Indiana 2.639,961 

Iowa 2,209,191 

Kansas .1,634,352 

Kentucky 2,027,951 

Louisiana 941,086 

Maine 739,995 

Maryland 1,062,639 

Massachusetts 3,324.926 

Michigan 2,785,247 

Minnesota 2,059,227 

Mississippi 786,111 

Missouri 3,134,932 

Montana 360,580 

Nebraska :i,180.293 

Nevada 74,276 

New Hampshire 429,906 

New Jersey 2,445.894 

New Mexico 304,594 

New York 8. 966, 845 

North Carolina 1,500,511 

North Dakota 569,865 

Ohio 4,654,867 

Oklahoma 1,444,131 

Oregon 655,090 



Negro. Indian. 



908,282 
2,009 

442,891 
21,645 
11,453 
15,174 
31,181 
94,446 



1,176,987 
651 

109,049 
60,320 
14,973 
54,030 



713,874 

1,363 

232,250 

38,055 

17,115 

7,084 

1,009,487 

157,452 

1,834 

7,689 

513 

564 

89,760 

1,628 

134,191 

697,843 

617 

111,452 

137.612 

1,492 



909 
29,201 
460 
16,371 
1,482 
152 
5 

68 
74 
95 

3,483 

188 

279 

471 

2,444 

234 

780 

892 

55 

688 

7,519 

9,053 

1,253 

313 

10,745 

3,502 

5,240 

34 

168 

20,573 

6,046 

7,851 

6,846 

127 

74,825 



State. White. 

Pennsylvania 7,467,713 

Khode Island 532,492 

South Carolina 679,161 

South Dakota 563771 

Tennessee 1,711,432 

Texas 3,204,848 

Ltah 366,583 

Vermont 354,298 

Virginia 1,389,809 

Washington 1,109,111 

West Virginia 1,156,817 

Wisconsin 2,320,555 

Wyoming 140,318 



Negro. 

193,919 
9,529 

835,843 
817 

473,088 

690.049 
1,144 
1,621 

671,096 
6,058 
64,173 
2,900 
2,235 



Total 81,731,957 9,827,763 



Indian. 

1,503 

284 

331 

19,137 

216 

702 

3,123 

26 

539 

10,997 

36 

10,142 
1,486 



265,683 
Chinese. Japanese. Other. 



Alabama 62 4 

Arizona 1,305 371 

Arkansas 62 9 1 

California 36,248 41,356 2,257 

Colorado 373 2,300 1 

Connecticut 462 71 

Delaware 30 4 

District of Columbia 369 47 11 

Florida 191 50 1 

Georgia 233 4 

Idaho 859 1,363 12 

Illinois 2,103 285 4 

Indiana 276 38 2 

Iowa 97 36 3 

Kansas 16 107 

Kentucky 52 . 12 

Louisiana 507 31 110 

Maine 108 13 ..... 

Maryland 378 24 

Massachusetts 2,582 151 14 

Michigan 241 49 

Minnesota 275 67 

Mississippi 257 2 4 

Missouri 535 99 4 

Montana 1,285 1,585 24 

Nebraska 112 590 28 

Nevada 927 864 55 

New Hampshire 67 1 

New Jersey 1.139 206 

New Mexico 248 258 19 

New York 5,266 1,247 19 

North Carolina 80 2 

North Dakota 39 59 

Ohio 569 76 

Oklahoma 139 48 

Oregon 7,363 3,418 312 

Pennsylvania 1,784 190 2 

Rnode Island 272 33 

South Carolina 57 8 

South Dakota 121 42 

Tennessee 43 8 2 

Texas 595 340 8 

Utah 371 2,110 20 

Vermont 8 3 

Virginia X 154 14 

Washington 2,709 12,929 186 

West Virginia 90 3 

Wisconsin 226 34 3 

Wyoming 246 1,596 84 

Total 71,531 72,157 3,175 



NEGROES IN LARGE CITIES. Pct . 

City. 1910. 1900. 1910*. 

Albany, N. Y 1,037 1,178 1.0 

Atlanta, Ga 51,902 35,727 33.3 

Baltimore, Md 84,749 79.258 15.2 

Birmingham, Ala 52305 16,575 39.4 

Boston, Mass 13,564 11.591 2.0 

Bridgeport, Conn 1,332 1,149 1.3 

Buffalo, N. Y 1,773 1,698 0.4 

Cambridge. Mass 4,707 3,888 4.5 

Chicago, 111 44,103 30,150 2.0 

Cincinnati, 19,639 14,482 5.4 

Cleveland, 8,448 5,988 1.5 

Columbus, 12,739 8,201 7.0 

Dayton, 4,842 3,387 4.2 

Denver, Col 5,426 3,923 2.5 

Detroit, Mich 6,741 4,111 1.2 

Fall River, Mass 355 324 0.3 



92 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



City. 1910. 1900. 

Grand Rapids, Mich 665 604 

Indianapolis, Ind 21,816 15.931 

Jersey City, N. J 5,960 3.704 

Kansas City, Mo 23,566 17,567 

Los Angeles, Ctal 7,599 2,131 

Louisville, Ky 40,522 39.139 

Lowell, Mass 133 136 

Memphis, Tenn 52,441 49,910 

Milwaukee. Wis 980 862 

Minneapolis, Miiiu 2.592 1,548 

Nashville, Tenn 36,523 30,044 

New Haven, Conn 3,561 2,887 

New Orleans, La 89,262 77,714 

New York, N. Y.. 91,709 60,666 

Newark, N. J 9,475 6,694 

Oakland, Gal 3,055 1,026 

Omah-a, Neb'. 4,426 3,443 

Paterson, N. J 1,539 1,182 

Philadelphia, Pa 84,459 62,613 

Pittsburgh, Pa 25,623 20,355 

Portland, Ore 1,045 775 

Providence, R. 1 5,316 4,817 

Richmond, Va 46,733 32,230 

Rochester, N. Y 879 601 

St. Louis, Mo 43,960 35,516 

St. Paul, Minn 3,144 2,263 

San Francisco, Cal 1,642 1.654 

Scranton, Pa 567 521 

Seattle, Wash 2,296 406 

Spokane, W T ash 723 376 

Syracuse, N. Y 1,241 1,104 



Pet. 

1910. 
0.6 
9.3 

9.'5 
2.4 

18.1 
0.1 

40.0 
0.3 
0.9 

33.1 
2.7 

26.3 
1.9 
2.7 
2.0 
3.6 
1.2 
5.5 
4.8 
0.5 
2.4 

36.6 
0.4 
6.4 
1.5 
0.1 
0.4 
1.0 
0.7 
0.9 



Pet. 

City. 1910. 1900. 1910. 

Toledo, O , 1,124 1.034 0.8 

Washington, D. C 94,446 86.702 28.5 

Worcester, Mass 1,877 1,710 1.1 

NEGRO POPULATION BY CENSUS YEARS. 



1840 2,873,648 

1830 2,328,642 

1820 1,771,656 

1810 1,377,808 

1800 1,002,037 

1790 757,206 



1910 9,828,294 

1900 8,840,789 

1890 7,488,788 

1880 6,580,793 

1870 4,880,009 

1860 4,441,830 

1850 .^,638.808 



PER CENT INCREASE BY COLOR OR RACE 

(1900-1910). 
Division. White.Negro.*Other. 

New England 17.3 12.2 t 0.5 

Middle Atlantic , 24.9 28.2 -1.8 

East North Central 14.1 16.7 25.3 

West North Central 12.8 2.0 0.1 

South Atlantic 20.4 10.3 28.5 

East South Central 14.1 6.1 1.3 

West South Central 40.9 17.1 17.1 

Mountain 59. 5 37.7 15.6 

Pacific 75.4 99.1 28.4 

United States 22.3 11.2 17.4 

"Includes Indian, Chinese, . Japanese and all 
other, f^liuus sign ( ) denotes decrease. 



CLASSIFICATION OF POPULATION BY SEX. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 
Class. Male. 
White 42,178,245 3 


1910. 
Female. *Ratio. 
9,553,712 106.6 
4,941,882 98.9 
130,550 103.5 
4,675 1,430.1 
9,087 694.1 
83 
3,731,955 102.7 
4,255,357 104.0 
6,459.518 100.0 
3,013,080 98.5 
5,821,757 129.2 
4,639,989 106.0 
BY STA1 
State. 
Minnesota 1 
Mississippi ... 
Missouri 1 
Montana 
Nebraska 
Nevada 
NewHampshire 
New Jersey... 1 
New Mexico.. 
New York ' 
North Carolina 1 
North Dakota. 
Ohio 2 
Oklahoma 
Oregon 
Pennsylvania. . J 
Rhode Island.. 
South Carolina 
South Dakota. 
Tennessee .... " 
Texas 2 

BY PRINCIPAL 
City. 
Denver, Col 
Detroit, Mich... 
Fall River, Mass 
Gr. Rapids, Mich 
Indianapolis, Ind 
Jersey City, N.J 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Los Angeles, Cal 
Louisville, Ky. 
Lowell, Mass... 
Memphis, Tenn 
Milwaukee, Wis 
Minneap's.Minu 


BY CENSUS YEARS. 
Year. Male. Female. *Ratio. 
1910 . 47.332 277 44 639 989 106 


Negro 4 885 881 


1900 38 SIR 448 37178197 1044 


Indian 135,133 


1890 


.... 32,237,101 30,710,613 105.0 
.... 25,518,820 24,636,963 103.6 
19 493 s5 iq nfu sn ins 9. 


Chinese 66,856 


1880. 




1870 


All other 3,092 


1860 16,085.204 15,358,117 104.7 
1850 11,837,660 11,354,216 104.3 
1840 . 8 688 532 8 380 921 103 7 


Native white 34654,457 3 


Native parentage... 25,229, 218 2 
Foreign parentage. 6,456,793 
Mixed parentage... 2,968,446 
Foreign born 7 523 788 


1830 6,532,489 6,333,531 103.1 


1820 4.896.605 4.741.848 103 9. 


*Males to 100 

ES (1910). 
Male. Female. 
,108,511 967.197 
905,761 891.353 
,687,838 1.605,497 
226,866 149,187 
627,782 564,432 
52,551 29,324 
216,290 214. 2S2 
,286,463 1,250.704 
175.245 152.056 
,584,581 4,529.033 
,098,471 1,107,816 
317,554 259,502 
,434.765 2,332,356 
881.573 775,582 
384.255 288.510 
,942,137 3.722.974 
270.251 272. 25L 
751,842 763.558 
317,101 266,787 
,103,491 1,081.298 
,017,612 1,878,930 

, CITIES (1910). 
Male. Female. 
107,395 105,986 
240,354 225.412 
57,627 61.668 
55,539 57.032 
116,069 117.581 
137,457 130.322 
126,414 121,967 
162,669 156.529 
108,548 115,380 
51,525 54,769 
66,270 64.835 
189,488 184.369 
157,345 144.063 


females. 

State. Male. Female. 
Utah 196,857 176.494 
Vermont 182,568 173,388 
Virginia 1,035.348 1,026.264 
Washington .. 658,650 483.340 
West Virginia 644,044 577.075 
Wisconsin .... 1,208,541 1,125,319 
Wyoming 91,666 54.299 


Total population 47,332,277 4 

State. Male. Female. 
Alabama 1,074.209 1,063.884 
Arizona 1.8.5&2 85.772 
Arkansas 810,025 764,424 
California 1,322,973 1,054,576 
Colorado 430,697 368.327 
Connecticut .. 563,641 551.115 
Delaware 103,435 98,887 
Dist. Columbia 158,050 173,019 
Florida 394,166 358,453 
Georgia 1,305,019 1,304,102 


Total 47,332,122 44,640.144 
BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS. 

New England... 3,265.137 S.2&7.544 
Middle Atlantic.9,813,181 9,502.711 
East North Cent. 9,393, 792 8,857.829 
West North Cent. 6, 092,869 5,545,052 
South Atlantic.. 6,134,600 6,060,295 
East South Cent. 4, 245, 170 4,164,731 
WestSouthCent.,4,544,485 4,2,40,049 
Mountain 1,478,010 1,155.507 
Pacific 2 365 878 1 826 426 


Idaho 185 546 140 048 


Illinois 2,911.653 2,726,938 
Indiana 1,383,299 1,317,577 
Iowa 1.148,171 1.076.600 
Kansas 885 912 805 037 


Kentucky .. .. 1,161.709 1,128.196 
Louisiana 835,275 821,113 
Maine 377,053 365.318 
Maryland 644.225 651.121 
Massachusetts. 1.655.226 1.711.190 
Michigan 1,454.534 1.355.639 

Citv. Male. Female. 
Albany, N. Y... 48,270 51.983 
Atlanta, Ga 74,501 80.338 
Baltimore, Md.. 268,195 290.290 
Birmingham, Ala. 67,268 65,417 
Boston, Mass... 329,703 340.882 
Bridgeport, Conn. 52,549 49,505 
Buif-ilo, N. Y... 212,502 211,213 
Cambridge, Mass. 50,161 54.678 
Chicago, 111 1,125.764 1,059.519 
Cincinnati, O... 177.511 186,080 
Cleveland, O.... 289,262 271,401 
Columbus, O 91,4r,2 90,059 
Dayton, 58,848 57,729 


City. Male. Female. 
Nashville, Tenn. 52,155 58.209 
NewHa\'n,Conn. 66,695 66.910 
Now Orleans, La. 163,239 175,836 
New York, N.Y. 2,382,482 2.384.401 
Newark, N. J.. 173.389 174.080 
Oakland, Cal... 78,222 71,952 
Omaha, Neb 64.802 59,294 
Paterson, N. J. 62,439 63,161 
Philartelphia.Pa. 760,463 788,545 
Pittsburgh, Pa.. 273,589 260,316 
Portland, Ore... 118.868 88.346 
Providence, R.I. 110,288 114.038 
Richmond, Va... 60,905 66,723 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



City. 
Rochester, N.Y. 
St. Louie, Mo.. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
S.Francisco, Cal. 


Male. Female. 
108,352 109.797 
346,068 340.961 
111,809 102,935 
236,901 180.011 


City. 
Scran ton. Pa 
Seattle, Wash.. 
Spokane, Wash. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 


Male. Female. 
65,591 64.27R 
136,773 100.421 
57,513 46.889 
68.806 68.443 


City. 
Toledo, O 
Washingt'n.D.C. 
Worcester, Mass. 


Male. Female. 
84,691 83.800 
158,050 173,019 
73.424 72.562 



BY 



STATES. 

State. 'Total. White. 

Alabama 513,111 298,943 

Arizona 74,051 65,097 

Arkansas 395,824 284,301 

California 920,397 846,207 

Colorado 271,648 264,603 

Connecticut 347,692 342,392 

Delaware 61,887 52,804 

District of Columbia. 103,761 75,765 

Florida 214,195 124,311 

Georgia 620,616 353,569 

Idaho 110,863 107,469 

Illinois 1,743,182 1,701,042 

Indiana 822,434 801,431 

Iowa 663,672 657,914 

Kansas 508,529 490,225 

Kentucky 603,454 527,661 

Louisiana 414,919 240,001 

Maine 235,727 234,855 

Maryland 367,908 303,561 

Massachusetts 1,021,669 1,006.431 

Michigan 870,876 862,222 

Minnesota 642,669 636,903 

Mississippi 426,953 192,741 

Missouri 973,062 919,480 

Montana 155,017 148,733 

Nebraska 353.626 348,915 

New Hampshire 136,668 136,393 

Nevada 40,026 36,632 

New Jersey 774,702 744,843 

New Mexico 94,637 88,733 

New York 2,836,773 2,783,371 

North Carolina 506,134 357,611 

North Dakota 173,890 171,941 

Ohio 1,484.265 1,444,477 

Oklahoma 447,266 395,377 

Oregon 257,188 245,343 

Pennsylvania 2,309,026 2,242,597 

Rhode Island 163,834 160,412 

South Carolina 335,046 165,769 

South Dakota 178,189 172,722 

Tennessee 552,668 433.431 

Texas 1,003.357 835,962 

Utah 104,115 100,436 

Vermont 113,506 112,513 

Virginia 523.532 363.659 

Washington 441,294 422,679 

West Virginia 338.349 315,498 

Wisconsin 683,743 679,841 

Wyoming 63,201 59,698 



MEN OF VOTING AGE 21 YEAES AND OVER. 



Negro. 

213.923 

764 

111,365 
8,143 
4,283 
4,765 
9,050 
27,621 



266,814 

328 

39,983 

20,651 

5,443 

17,588 

75,694 

174,211 

476 

63,963 

12,591 

6,266 

3,390 

233,701 

52,921 

851 

3,225 

200 

229 

28,601 

644 

45,877 

146,752 

311 



36,841 

766 

64,272 

3.067 

169,155 

341 



White. Negro. 



City. 'Total. 

Milwaukee, Wis 113,106 

Minneapolis, Minn 105,305 

Nashville, Tenn 30,774 

New Haven, Conn 40,510 

New Orleans, La 96,997 

New York, N. Y 1,433,749 

Newark, N. J 103,234 

Oakland, Cal 53,967 

Omaha, Neb 43,216 

Patersou, N. J 36,873 

Philadelphia, Pa 468,813 

Pittsburgh, Pa 166,424 

Portland, Ore 88,908 

Providence, R. 1 68,983 

Richmond, Va 37,204 

Rochester, N. Y 69.564 

St. Louis, Mo 221,913 

St. Paul, Minn 72,073 

San Francisco, Cal 175,951 

Scranton, Pa 37,059 

Seattle, Wash 101,685 

Spokane, Wash 40,254 

Syracuse, N. Y: 44,713 

Toledo. 52,748 

Washington, D. C 103,761 

Worcester, Mass 45,601 

'Includes Indian. Chinese, etc. 

NOTE Of the native white males 21 years of 
age and over in 1910, 13,211.731. or 48.9 per cent, 
were of native parentage, and 4,498,966. or 16.7 
per cent, were of foreign or mixed parentage 
The foreign born whites 21 years of age and over 
numbered 6,646,817. or 24.6 per cent. 

CITIZENSHIP OF FOREIGN BORN WHITE 

MALKS (1910). 
Twenty-one years of age and over. 

BY STATES. 

State. Naturalized. 1st papers. 



112,651 


,396 


103.961 


1,227 


28,023 


9,713 


39,233 


1,191 


71.387 


25,269 


1,397,766 


30,855 


99,998 


3,015 


49,163 


1,238 


41,263 


1,885 


36,343 


453 


439,654 


28.120 


156,818 


9,362 


81,921 


525 


66,948 


1,765 


23,911 


13,279 


69,217 


305 


205,065 


16,381 


70,439 


1,573 


164,127 


831 


36,837 


216 


85,052 


1,204 


39,439 


305 


44,261 


437 


51,990 


719 


75,765 


27,621 


45,147 


384 



568 
975 

159.593 
3,170 
22,757 
1.082 
1,325 



United States 26,999,151 24,357,514 2,458,873 

Includes 62.967 Indians, 60,421 Chinese and 
66,638 Japanese. 

BY PRINCIPAL CITIES. 

City. "Total. White. Negro. 

Albany, N. Y 32,000 31,586 

Atlanta, Ga 44.510 30,577 

Baltimore, Md 163.554 137,025 

Birmingham, Ala 40,699 24,248 

Boston, Mass 208,321 202,105 

Bridgeport, Conn 32.991 32,461 

Buffalo, N. Y 128,133 127,300 

Cambridge, Mass 30.262 28,777 

Chicago, 111 700,590 680,950 

Cincinnati, 113,919 106,508 

Cleveland, 177,386 173,847 

Columbus. 60,892 55,821 

Dayton, 38,236 36,432 

Denver, Col 71.990 69,256 

Detroit, Mich 150,017 147,737 

Fall River. Mass 31,647 31,441 

Grand Ranirls, Mich 34,295 34,008 

Indianapolis, Ind 76,743 69,141 

Jersey City, N. J 80,866 78,617 

Kansas City, Mo 87,457 78,269 

Los Angeles. Cal 114,889 107.633 

Louisville, Ky 67,676 53,980 

Lowell. Mass 31,300 31.206 

Memphis, Tenn 44,309 27,031 



Alabama 4,841 

Arizona 5,912 

e ! Arkansas 5,284 

California 137,274 

Colorado 35,245 

Connecticut 60,608 

Delaware : 3,707 

District of Columbia.. 6,474 

Florida 5,959 

Georgia 4,023 

Idaho 12,817 

Illinois 317,339 

Indiana 42,533 

Iowa 90,573 

Kansas 39,145 

Kentucky 13,225 

Louisiana 10,024 

379 Maine 14,994 

13,865 I Maryland 24,256 

26,214 I Massachusetts 189,126 

16,441 Michigan 167,304 

5,070 Minnesota 179,187 

471 Mississippi 2,445 

740 Missouri 65,612 

1,384 I Montana 27,635 

17,845 I Nebraska 57,270 



T.,387 Nevada 5.606 

3,298 i New Hampshire 16,415 

5.028 [ New Jersey , 128,438 

1.7S1 New Mexico. 4,267 

1,199 New York 502,083 

2,224 North Carolina 1,439 

133 North Dakota 46.686 

264 Ohio 142,465 

7.556 I Oklahoma 12,074 

2,104 i Oregon 29,675 

9,101 I Pennsylvania 248,827 

2.571 i Rhode Island 32,040 

13,687 South Carolina 1,602 

44 South Dakota 32,495 

17,238 "-Tennessee 5,444 



684 
1,113 
595 
27,768 
6,536 
9,103 
658 
1,058 
783 
625 
2,478 
43,482 
13,320 
6,654 
6.173 
815 
1,166 
1,490 
3,278 
30,016 
26,235 
26,222 
257 
10,117 
6,749 
9,924 
1,282 
1,421 
24,511 
709 

131,085 

194 

9,824 

17,509 

1.477 

7,591 

46,416 

5,314 

184 

8,020 

464 



Alien. 
2,793 
14,574 
1,388 
99,940 
19,615 
69,431 
3.1S9 
2.304 
7,411 
1,846 
6.215 
174,581 
18.354 
20,275 
12,247 
2,754 
9,151 
23,672 
13,573 
212,033 
76.550 
58,132 
1,233 
25,835 
16,937 
12,347 
4.479 
19,377 
122.076 
6,048 
475,259 
827 

10,965 
113.856 
4,449 
17.430 
367.766 



739 
4,376 
1,867 



ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



State. Naturalized. 1st papers 
Texas 43 383 6 833 


. Alien. 
37,865 
9,626 
9,652 
4,693 
43,202 
22,545 
42,937 
8,125 

2,266.535 
34.1 
11.7 per 
s of age 

. Alien. 
1,661 
565 
9,559 
839 
40,516 
8,136 
16,255 
5,866 
124.553 
6,250 
40,221 
2.349 
2,964 
3,801 
28,733 
10,594 
3,301 
1,795 
14,404 
2,564 
8,662 
1,152 
9,897 
808 
14,435 
10,305 
170 
7,693 
3,703 
339,473 
19,204 
5.968 
2,868 
6,029 


City. Natui 
Philadelphia Pa 


alized. 1st papers. Alien. 
69,415 15,533 63,156 
28,797 5,355 28,439 
11,251 3,058 7,097 
12,988 2,815 14,910 
943 123 503 
13,003 2,947 8,361 
33,081 7,049 15,918 
17,071 2,586 5,576 
36,375 10,681 21,872 
7,930 964 6,801 
16,438 3,068 11,474 
5,495 1,374 3,451 
7,036 862 4,715 
8,752 724 4,308 
6,474 1,058 2,304 
9,126 1,514 11,184 

AGE AND OVER (1910). 
State. Number. 
New York 2,757,521 
North Carolina 519,575 
North Dakota.. 122,406 
Ohio 1,398,341 


Utah .. . 15351 2415 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


Vermont . 10 811 1 t64 


Portland, Ore 


Virginia 6,411 859 


Providence, R. I 

Richmond Va 


Washington 68 895 15 258 


West Virginia 7,263 1,353 
Wisconsin 142 848 47 708 


Rochester, N. Y 


St. Louis Mo 


Wyoming 6 837 1 937 


St Paul Minn 




San Francisco, Cal 
Scranton, Pa 

Seattle Wash 


Total 3 034 117 570 772 


Per cent 45.6 8.6 
NOTE The citizenship of 775,393, or 
cent, of the foreign born males 21 year 
and over was not reported. 

BY PRINCIPAL CITIES. 

City. Naturalized. 1st papers 
Albany NY 4 827 462 


Spokane, Wash 


Syracuse, N. Y 
Toledo 


Washington, D. C 
Worcester, Mass 


WOMEN 21 YEARS OF 
State. Number. 
Alabama 501,959 
Arizona 43,891 
Arkansas 351,994 
California 671,386 


Atlanta Ga. ... .... 1011 193 


Baltimore Md 16 643 2 664 


Birmingham, Ala 1,179 186 
Boston Mass . . . . 47 791 10 438 


Bridgeport Conn . 6563 1038 


Buffalo, N. Y 29,409 4,413 
Cambridge Mass 7162 ' 1189 


Chicago, 111 190,693 31,585 
Cincinnati O 17 253 1 733 


Colorado 213,425 
Connecticut ... 335,131 
Delaware 58,442 
Dist. Columbia. 116,148 
Florida 178,685 


Oklahoma 356, 194 
Oregon 168,323 
Pennsylvania... 2,114,008 
Rhode Island.. 166.391 
South Carolina 343,958 
South Dakota.. 134,187 
Tennessee 542,408 


Cleveland 'o 40*482 7 8 6 


Columbus O . 4 453 414 


Dayton, O 3*451 396 


Denver, Col 10,959 2,102 


Idaho 69,818 


Fall River, Mass 8,368 732 
Grand Rapids, Mich 7,758 1,016 
Indianapolis Ind .. 6 088 1 189 


Illinois 1,567,491 
Indiana 770,658 
Iowa 603.644 
Kansas 438,934 
Kentucky ..... 579,756 
Louisiana 395,354 
Maine 225 73-i 


Texas 884,218 
Utah 85,729 


Vermont 1P6.S83 
Virginia 518,473 
Washington ... 277,727 
West Virginia. 284,969 
Wisconsin 611,157 


Jersey City N J 16*556 3 067 


Kansas City, Mo '. 6,953 890 
Los Angeles, Oal 14,097 2,730 
Louisville Ky 5704 380 


Maryland 373,819 
Massachusetts.. 1,074.485 
Michigan 786,033 
Minnesota .*.... 512,411 
Mississippi .... 412,941 
Missouri 896,152 
Montana 81,741 
Nebraska 298,040 
Nevada 18,140 
New Hampshire 135,372 
New Jersey 736,659 
New Mexico 73,152 
Foreign or mixed pa 


Lowell Mass . . 7 028 427 


Unit'd States. 24,555,754 
White 22 059 236 


Memphis, Tenn 1,664 197 
Milwaukee Wis 26155 9887 


Minneapolis Minn . . 23 462 5 427 


Native par- 
entage 12,484,481 
Foreign par- 
entage* ... 4,567,647 
Foreign born.. 5,007,108 
Negro 2,427,742 
Indian 60,169 
Other 8,607 


Nashville, Tenn 951 80 
New Haven Conn 8628 1426 


New Orleans La 6 138 595 


New York N Y 318 091 106 525 


Newark N J 21427 4982 


Oakland Cal 10237 2004 


Omaha Neb 7 079 2 103 


Paterson N J 9,817 1387 


rentage. 





MALES OF MILITIA AGE 18 TO 44 YEARS (1910). 



State. 


Number. 
401,145 
58,962 
311,792 
665,522 
203,982 
257,996 
44,634 
78,349 
171,688 
497,095 
86,384 
1,330,556 
580,557 
475.829 


State. 


Number. 
370,227 
457,493 
338,343 
151,325 
271.373 
760,324 
616,729 
491,113 
345,745 
721,166 
123,232 
267,497 
29,383 
90.357 


State. 
New Jersey 
New Mexico 
New York 
North Carolina 
North Dakota.. 
Ohio 


Number. 
. 597,513 
73,097 
. 2,156,361 
. 392,192 
. 145,628 
. 1,076,928 
. 357,933 
190 553 


State. Number. 
Texas 804 980 


Arizona 


Kentucky 
Louisiana 
Maine . . . 


Utah 84 449 


Arkansas 


Vermont . 73 685 


California 
Colorado 
Connecticut 
Delaware 
Dist. Columbia. 
Florida 


Virginia 398 728 


Maryland 
Massachusetts... 
Michigan 
Minnesota 
Mississippi 
Missouri 
Montana 
Nebraska 
Nevada 
New Hampshire 


Washington .... 340,872 
West Virginia.. 275,048 
Wisconsin 497,922 
Wyoming 54,654 

United States. 20,473,684 
Total in 1900.. 16,182,702 
Per cent 1910* 22.3 
Per cent 1900* 21.3 
ulation. 


Oklahoma 
Oregon 


Pennsylvania, .. 
Rhode Island.. 
South Carolina. 
South Dakota.. 
Tennessee 
*Per cent of 


. 1,788,619 
. 125,213 
. 276,788 
. 140,635 
. 423,088 
total POD 


Georgia 
Idaho 
Illinois 


Indiana 
Iowa .. 



POPULATION BY AGE PERIODS. 



Age period. Total. 

Under 5 years 10,631,364 

Under 1 year 2,217,342 

5 to 9 years 9,760,632 

10 to 14 years 9,107,140 

15 to 19 years 9,063,603 

20 to 24 years 9,056,984 

25 to 29 years 8,180.003 

30 to 34 years 6,972,185 

35 to 39 years 6,396,100 

40 to 44 years 5,261,587 

45 to 48 years 4,469,197 

50 to 54 years 3,900,791 



Male. 
5,380,596 
1,123,409 
4,924,123 
4,601,753 
4,527,282 
4,580,290 


Female. 

5,250,768 
1,093,933 
4,836,509 
4,505,387 
4,536,321 
4 476,694 


Age period. 
55 to 59 years 
60 to 64 years 
65 to 69 years 
70 to 74 years 
75 to 79 years 
80 to 84 years 


Total. 
.. 2,786,951 
.. 2,267,150 
.. 1,679.503 
.. 1,113,728 
.. 667,3v,2 
.. 321,754 
. 122 818 


Male. 
1,488,437 
1,185,966 
863,994 
561,644 
331,286 
153,745 
56 335 


Female. 
1.298,514 

1,081,184 
815,509 
552,084 
336,022 
168,009 
66 483 


4,244,348 
3,656,768 
3,367,016 
2 786 350 


3,935,655 
3,315.417 
3,029,084 
2 475 237 


90 to 94 years 
95 to 99 years 
100 years and over. 


33,473 
7,391 
3,555 
169 055 


14,553 
3,045 
1,380 
114 443 


18,920 
4,346 
2,175 
54 612 


2 378 916 












2,110,013 


1,790,718 


All ages... 


.91.972,266 


47.332.277 


44.639.989 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



URBAN AND RURAL, POPULATION BY AGE 

U910). 
Population. Pet. of total. 
Age period. Urban. Rural. Urban. Rural. 
Under 5 years. . 4.200,291 6,431,073 9.9 13,0 
5 to 9 years... . 3,773,917 5,986,715 8.9 12.1 
10 to 14 years. . 3,627,408 5,479,732 8.5 11.1 
15 to 19 years. . 4,003,271 5,060,332 9.4 10.3 
20 to 24 years. . 4,570,558 4,486,426 10.7 9.1 
25 to 29 years. . 4,338,392 3,841,611 10.2 7.8 
30 to 34 years. . 3,697,202 3,274,983 8.7 6.6 
35 to 44 years. , 6,133,259 5,524,428 14.4 11.2 
45 to 54 years. . 4,185,722 4,184,266 9.8 8.5 
55 to 64 years. . 2,302,142 2,751,959 5.4 5.C 
65 years ando\er. 1,693,010 2,256,514 4.0 4.6 
T to 14 years.. . 7,401,325 11,466,447 1T~A 28.2 
15 to 24 years. . 8,573,829 9,546,758 20.1 19.3 
25 to 44 years. .14,168,853 12,641,022 33.2 25.6 
45 to 64 years. . 6,487,864 6,936,225 15.2 14.1 

All ages 42 623 383 49 348 883 46 3 53 7 


Age period. White. Negro. Indian. 
Under 5 years 9,322,914 ,263,288 40,384 
5 to 9 years 8,475,173 ,246,553 36,541 
10 to 14 years 7,918,408 ,155,266 31,39i 
15 to 19 years 7,968,391 ,060,416 28,486- 
20 to 24 years 7,986,411 ,030,795 21,844 
25 to 29 years 7,257,136 881,227 18,137 
30 to 34 years 6267276 668089 15,24$ 


35 to 39 years 5 731 845 633 449 14 834 


40 to 44 years 4,780,272 455,413 11,961 
45 to 49 years 4,061,062 385,909 9,887 
50 to 54 years 3.555,313 326,070 9,345 
55 to 59 years 2 564 206 209 622 7 171 


60 to 64 years 2 069 323 186 502 6 524 


65 to 69 years 1,549,954 123,550 4,482 
70 to 74 years 1,030,884 78,839 3,382 


75 to 79 years 620,992 44,018 2,105 
80 to 84 years.. .. 294555 25579 1 56S 


85 to 89 years 110,936 11,166 691 


90 to 94 years 27,161 5,850 45S 
95 to 99 years 4 757 2 447 187 


AGE'PERIODS BY COLOR (1910). 

Age period. White. Negro. Indian. 
Under 1 year 1,955605 252386 8216 


100 years and over.. 764 2,675 116- 
Age unknown . . 134 224 31 040 949< 


All ages 81 731 957 9 827 763 265 68& 






POPULATION BY MARI 
UNITED STATES AS A WHOLE ALL AGES. 
Male. Female. 
Condition. Number. Pet. Number. Pet. 


TAL CONDITION (1910). 
Di- 

Single. Married. Widowed, vorced. 
45 to 64 Male... 722,701 5,771,630 598,642 58.177 
Female 499,564 4,383,497 1,324,838 47,134 


Single 27,455,607 58.0 23,522,121 52.7 


65 and over Male 123,322 1,303,768 539,058 13,075 


Married 18,093,498 38.2 17,688,169 39.6 


MARITAL CONDITION BY NATIVITY AND 
COLOR. 

POPULATION 15 YEARS OF AGE AND OVEB. 

Wid- Di- 
State and sex. Single. Married, owed. vorced. 
Native white Nat. 
par'ntage Male.6,185,324 9,144,099 728,883 87,456 
Female 4 644 1 9 2 9 219 385 1 523 560 100 053 


Widowed 1471472 31 3176426 71 


Divorced 156,176 0.3 185,101 0.4 
Not reported 155 524 03 68 172 2 


POPULATION 15 YEARS OF AGE AND OVER. 
Male. Female. 
Condition. Number. Pet. Number. Pet. 
Single 12550,129 387 8,933,170 29.7 


Married . . . . 18 092 600 55 8 17 684 687 58 9 


Widowed 1 471 390 45 3 176 228 10 6 


Native white For- 
eign or mixed par- 
entageMale ..2.906,042 2,677,706 160,779 24.688 
Female 2 453 017 3 008 623 382 318 30 206 


Divorced 156,162 05 185068 0.6 


Not reported 155 524 05 68 172 2 


MARITAL CONDITION BY AGE PERIODS. 
Di- 

Age period. Single. Married. Widowed. vorced. 
15 to 19 Male... 4, 448,067 51,877 1,110 347 
Female 3,985,764 513,239 10,261 3,650 
20 to 24 Male... 3,432,161 1,100,093 18,815 6,732 
Female 2,163683 2225362 55354 20370 


Foreign born white 
Male 2 268 916 4 432 135 384 726 23 059 


Female 994*110 3 624 003 800 112 20 542 


Negro Male 1 083*472 1,749*228 189,970 20,146 


Female 823,996 1,775,949 459,831 33.286 


Indian Male 27,391 46,154 5,319 679 
Female 16324 49,095 10,071 959 


25 to 34 Male... 2,767,957 4,964,769 110,431 34,571 
Female 1 516 726 5 443 894 224 327 57 262 


Chinese Male ... 34,330 26,449 1,139 45 
Female 680 2,016 229 5 


35 to 44 Male... 1,026,502 4,873,153 198*701 42,688 
Female . . 628 516 4 410 310 411 896 49 269 


Japanese Male .. 42,688 15,918 495 86 
Fpmalp 908 5.581 96 17 




FOREIGN BORN POPULATIO 

TOTAL FOREIGN BORN. *Pct. in- 
Country of birth. 1910. 1900. crease. 
Northwestern Europe.... 6,740,400 7,016,311 3.9 
Great Britain 1,221,283 1,167,623 4.6 
England 877 719 840 513 4 4 


N OF THE UNITED STATES, 
Pet. In- 
Country of birth. 1910. 1900. crease. 
Balkan peninsula 220,946 
Roumania 65,923 15,032 338.6 
Bulgaria 11498 


Scotland 261 076 233 524 11 8 




Wales 82 488 93 586 11 9 




Ireland 1 352*251 1 615*459 16 3 


Greece 101,282 8,515 1089.5 


Germany 2.501,333 2,813,628 11.1 


Turkey in Europe 32,230 9,910 


Scandinavian countries.. 1,250.733 1,072,092 16.7 
Norwav 403,877 336,388 20.1 


Europe 11,791,841 8,871,780 32.9 
China .... 56,756 81,534 30.4 


Sweden 665,207 582,014 14.3 
Denmark 181,649 153,690 18.2 


Japan 67,744 24,788 173.3 
India 4,664 2,031 12*.6 


Belgium 49,400 29,757 66.0 
Luxemburg 3,071 3,031 1.3 


Turkey in Asia 59,729 
Other Asiatic 2,591 11,895 78.2 


France 117,418 104,197 12.7 
Switzerland . . 124.848 115 593 8 


Asia 191,484 120,248 69.2 
Canada Newfoundland . 1,209,717 1,179,922 2.5 
Canada French 385,083 395,126 2.5 


Southern and Eastern Eu- 
rope 5048583 1,832894 175.4 


Canada Other 819 554 784 796 4 4 


Portugal 59 360 30 608 93 9 


West Indies 47 635 25 435 87 3 


Spain . 22 108 7 050 213 6 


Cuba 15 133 11 081 36 6 


Italy 1343125 484,027 177.5 


Other West Indies 32,502 14,354 126.4 
Mexico 221,915 108,393 114.6 


Russia and Finland 1,732,462 640,743 170.4 


Finland 129,680 67,039 107.0 
Austria-Hungary 1 670 582 637 009 162.3 


Central America 1,736 3,897 55.5 
South America 8,228 4,733 73.8 


Austria 1,174,973 491,295 139.2 
Hungary .. . 495.609 145.714 240.1 


America 1,489,231 1,317,380 13.0 
Africa 3,992 2,538 ff7.3 



1)6 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



*Pct. in- 
Oountry of birth. 1910. 1900. crease. 
Australia 9,035 6807 32.7 


POPULATION OF FOREIGN BIRTH OR PAR- 
ENTAGE BY STATES (1910). 
Parentage. 
Foreign t -Mixed 
State. born. *Foreign. foreign. 
Alabama . 19 286 32 417 2 8 9 9 


Atlantic islands.... 18274 9768 871 


Pacific islands.... 2 415 2 013 20 


Country not specified.... 2,687 2,546 5.5 
Born at sea 6,927 8,196 15.5 


Arizona 48*765 42*176 2,*206 


Total foreign born 13,515,886 10,341,276 30.7 
*Minus sign ( ) denotes decrease. 
NOTE Tlie figures for Europe include 2,858 
from countries not specified in 1910 and 22,575 in 
1900. Bulgaria, Serbia and Montenegro were in- 
cluded under "country not specified" in 1900. 
Turkey in Europe and Turkey in Asia were com- 
bined in the 1900 census. Newfoundland was in- 
cluded with Canada in 1900 census. 

POPULATION OF FOREIGN BIRTH OR PAR- 
ENTAGE (1910). Bo th One 
Foreign parents parent 
Country of origin. born. foreign, foreign. 
Austria 1 174 924 709 070 117 565 


Arkansas 17,046 36,608 2,414 
California 586 432 635 889 61 244 


Colorado 129*587 181*428 14*683 


Connecticut 329 574 374 489 20 720 


Delaware 17 492 25*873 1*666 


District of Columbia. 24J902 45*066 3*031 
Florida 40 633 35 825 2 861 


Georgia . . 15 477 25*672 1*698 




Illinois 1205*314 1723*847 99*659 


Indiana . 159 663 350*551 14*293 




Kansas 135*450 292*105 17*433 


Kentucky 40 162 124*704 5*597 


Louisiana 52*766 112^717 8*146 


Maine 110562 134955 6*101 


Belgium ... ' 49*397 26*448 13*419 


Maryland 104944 191*838 7*994 


Bulgaria* 21*451 948 286 


Massachusetts 1,059,245 1,170,447 80,901 
Michigan 597 550 964 882 69 997 


Canada French 385*083 330,976 216,179 
Canada Other 810,987 859,204 704,099 
Denmark . .. 181 621 147 648 70 795 




Missouri 229*799 518*.20l 27*483 
Montana 94 713 106 809 9 137 


England 876*455 592*285 853*702 


France . 117*236 78*937 96*216 


Nebraska 176*662 362*353 19*177 


Germany . . 2 501*181 3 911 847 1 869 590 


Nevada 19 691 20 951 2 256 


Greece '101*264 ' 5*524 ' 2877 


New Hampshire 96,667 103,117 4*328 
New Jersey 660,788 777,797 52,982 
New Mexico ... 23 146 26 331 1 351 


Hungary 495 600 191 059 13 568 


Ireland 1 352*155 2 141 577 1 010 628 




New York 2 748 Oil 3 007*248 204*767 


Mexico . '219*802 107*866 54*333 


North Carolina ,... ' e'o92 ' 8*851 *416 
North Dakota 156654 251236 16429 


Netherlands 120 053 116 331 57 190 




Ohio . .. 598374 1024*393 53*139 


Portugal 57 623 41 680 11 819 


Oklahoma 40*442 ' 94*044 5* 9 93 


Roumania 65*920 20*707 1 094 


Oregon . ... ... 113 136 135 238 12*323 


Russia Finland ... 1 732 421 949 1516 70 938 


Pennsylvania 1,442*,374 l,80e!267 104*,223 
Rhode Island 179141 194646 12688 


Scotland 261 034 175 391 223 238 


Spain 21977 4387 6770 


South Carolina , 6,179 11,137 *592 
South Dakota 100790 217491 12577 


Sweden 665183 546788 152244 


Switzerland 124 834 90 669 86 147 


Tennessee 18607 38367 2456 


Turkey in Asia 59,702 17,480 1,449 
Turkey in Europe 32,221 2,560 533 
Wales S 9 479 84 934 81 534 


Texas . 241938 361*914 13*143 


Utah 65 822 131*527 16*675 


Vermont 49*921 75*055 3*235 


Other for. countries.. 88,014 31,362 40,919 


Virginia . .. 27657 37*943 2*262 








Total 13 345 545 12 916 311 5 981 526 


Wisconsin 512*.865 1,044*761 50*297 


*Includes Serbia and Montenegro, 
f Parents born in different foreign countries. 
NOTE The above table includes white residents 
of the United States born abroad (foreign born), 
those having both parents born in the country 
specified (both parents foreign) and those having 
one parent born in the country specified and the 
other in the United States (one parent foreign). 

FOREIGN BORN POPUlI 

CLASSIFIED BY CO1 

Cana 
State. Austria. Belgium. 'Bulgaria. French. 
Alabama 904 45 106 96 
Arizona . 1 483 50 371 177 






Total 13 515 886 18 897 837 1 177 092 


*Native white persons having both parents 
born in same country, or one parent born in 
foreign country and the other in the United 
States. fNative whites whose parents were born 
in different foreign countries. 

[riON BY STATES (1910). 
JNTRY OF ORIGIN. 

da. 1 
Other. China. tCuba.Denm'rk.Engrnd.Finl'nd. 
737 44 230 197 2,365 38 
1,650 1,016 37 884 3,500 560 
955 44 27 178 1,519 15 
41,568 27,764 854 14,209 48.703 6,159 
8,792 320 99 2,756 12,928 1,239 
7,868 385 341 2,724 22,463 776 
441 29 34 52 1,558 9 
1.052 270 243 176 3,638 21 
1,577 156 17,050 295 3,078 89 
731 174 226 112 1,671 49 
4,575 773 13 2,254 4,983 652 
3S.311 1,560 551 17,369 60.363 2,390 
5,049 196 82 900 9,783 215 
10,675 76 76 17,961 16,788 140 
6,101 16 74 2,760 11,262 49 
972 34 42 78 2,619 18 
941 346 630 239 2,086 118 
41,210 65 80 929 5,651 831 
1,320 299 453 237 5,211 47 
162.710 1,873 2,287 3,405 92,658 10,744 
144,780 187 150 6,315 42,737 31,144 
30,059 249 112 16,137 12,139 26,637 
7,290 452 272 1,729 13,760 120 
10,968 1,098 39 1,943 8,981 4,111 


Arkansas 1,268 111 17 119 
California 17,165 1,464 880 3,109 
Colorado 13.043 375 609 789 
Connecticut .... 23.642 330 59 18,889 
Delaware 992 8 1 63 
Dist. Columbia. 459 41 10 - 109 
Florida 228 50 14 151 
Georgia 349 27 6 70 


Idaho 1,561 94 576 796 
Illinois 163,025 9,399 1,875 7,440. 
Indiana .... 11 831 2 298 576 789 


Iowa 15,967 929 63i 944 
Kansas 12,094 1,703 118 1,087 
Kentucky 1,032 73 77 98 
Louisiana . 1 597 292 25 250 


Maine 831 30 32 35,013 
Maryland v 8 254 59 31 110 


Massachusetts . 35,455 1,745 169 134.659 
Michigan 31,034 5,683 375 28,083 
Minnesota 37.121 1,557 2,421 11,062 
Missouri 16,222 1,000 451 779 
Montana 8,350 235 2,155 2,874 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



State. 



Nebraska 24,362 

Nevada 822 

New Hampshire 2,438 

New Jersey 56,779 

New Mexico 1,233 

New York 245,004 

North Carolina.. 139 
North Dakota... 5,149 

Ohio 72,887 

Oklahoma 3,889 

Oregon 5,241 

Pennsylvania ..251,774 
Rhode Island.... 6,130 
South Carolina. 
South Dakota... 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 1,870 

Vermont 1,087 

Virginia 1,281 

Washington .... 12,745 
West Virginia.. 8,360 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 



Austria. Belgium. 



222 

5,372 

637 

20,570 



.... 38,692 



491 
26 
175 
1,867 
44 

3,484 
5 

229 
1,525 
191 
573 
5,250 
959 
97 
237 
27 
328 
74 
25 
48 

1,228 

800 

4,020 



, Canada. 

'Bulgaria. French. Other. 



183 

178 

21 

122 

167 

1,033 

2 



115 

1,095 

1,407 

50 

1 

501 

11 

240 

346 

2 

10 

1,647 
100 
393 
331 



674 

272 

40,865 

1,203 

111 

24,563 

29 

2,376 

2,310 

320 

1.146 

l,24n 

34,087 

39 

998 

91 

356 

114 

14,643 

104 

3,711 

88 

7,992 
143 



China. fCuba.Denm'rk.Engl'nd.Flnl'nd. 




State. 

Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut .... 

Delaware 

Dist. Columbia. 
Florida 



Iucluding Serbia and Montenegro. fAnd other West Indies. 



13,674 

616 

131 

5.059 

116 

12,544 

36 

5,355 

1,837 

550 

3,215 

3,034 

328 

51 

6,294 

163 

1,289 

8,300 

172 

240 

7,804 

67 

16,454 
962 



France. Germany. Greece. Hungary. Ireland. 



592 



17,407 

1,374 

2,619 

170 

511 

285 



Georgia 224 

Idaho 333 

Illinois 7,972 

Indiana 2,388 

Iowa 1,618 

Kansas 2,657 

Kentucky 645 

Louisiana 5,345 

Maine 290 

Maryland 552 

Massachusetts.. 5,926 

Michigan 2,421 

Minnesota 1,460 

Missouri 2,794 

Montana 639 

Nebraska 639 

Nevada 653 

New Hampshire 169 

New Jersey 6,240 

New Mexico 326 

New York 23,472 

North Carolina. 114 

North Dakota... ' 265 

Ohio 4,838 

Oklahoma 749 

Oregon 1,159 

Pennsylvania .. 10,003 

Rhode Island.... 1,711 

South Carolina.. 70 

South Dakota... 252 

Tennessee 305 

Texas 1,821 



Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 
Washington ... 
West Virginia.. 
Wisconsin 
Wyoming 



303 
219 
300 

2,340 
535 

1,396 
316 



3,603 

1,846 

5,815 

76,307 

17,071 

31,127 

2,573 

5,179 

2,446 

3,029 

5,049 

319,199 

62,179 

98,759 

34,508 

19,351 

8,926 

1,282 

36,657 

30,555 

131,586 

109,628 

88,226 

8,669 

57,302 

1,916 

2,046 

122,880 

1,746 

436,911 

1,074 

16,572 

175,095 

10,090 

17,958 

195,202 

4,459 

1,744 

21.544 

3,903 

44,929 

3.963 

798 

4,228 

29,388 

6,327 

233,384 

2,638 



633 

10 

179 

372 

2,272 

1,074 

34 

342 

886 

941 

1,843 

10,031 

1,370 

3,356 

1,410 

273 

237 

579 

463 

11,413 

1,196 

1,660 

2,790 

1,905 

3,459 

1,051 

2,634 

1,575 

167 

10,097 

174 

1,083 

2,555 

590 

3,555 

4,221 

951 

282 

231 

374 

756 

4,039 

113 

721 

4,187 

787 

2,764 

1,915 



22 

285 

799 

1,632 

13,855 

247 

155 

79 

230 

202 

39,859 

14,370 

1,178 

1,078 

725 

397 

157 

2,089 

1,996 

11,597 

5,582 

11,532 

1,486 

1.453 

44 

66 

47,610 
209 



37 

2,855 

85,881 

348 

1,160 

123.498 

294 

40 

594 

376 

926 

171 

539 

1,784 

1,160 

5,939 

10,554 

437 



State. Portugal.] 
Alabama 4 
Arizona 29 
Arkansas 1 
California 22,539 
Colorado 43 


Joumnni 
108 
16 
38 
1,120 
334 
718 
39 
41 
323 
85 
19 
4,306 


a. Russia. 
1,531 
311 
760 
16,610 
13,618 
54,121 
3,429 
3,393 
547 
3,224 
743 
149,016 


Scotland. 
1,120 
576 
442 
13,695 
4.269 
6,750 
344 
705 
606 
527 
1,282 
20,755 


Connecticut . . . 
Delaware 
Dist. Columbia. 
Florida 


707 
1 
2 
30 
23 
49 
291 


Georgia 
Idaho .. 


Illinois 



1,167 
1,159 
1,079 
44,476 
8,710 
58,458 
3,985 
5,347 
1.069 
1,655 
1,782 
93,455 
11,266 
17,756 
8,100 
5,914 
3,757 
7,890 
9,705 
222,867 
20,434 
15,859 
23,297 
9,469 
8,124 
1,702 
10,613 
82,758 
644 

367,889 

306 

2,498 

40,062 

1,801 

4,995 

165,109 

29,718 

676 

2,980 

2.296 

5,357 

1,657 

4,940 

2,450 

10,180 

2,292 

14,049 

1,359 



Italy. 

2,696 

699 

1,699 

22,777 

14,375 

56.954 

2,893 

2,761 

4,538 

545 

2,067 

72,163 

6,911 

5,845 

3,520 

1,316 

20,333 

3,468 

6,969 

85,056 

16,861 

9,669 

12,984 

6,592 

3,799 

2.831 

2,071 

115,446 

1.959 

472,201 

521 

1,262 

41,620 

2,564 

5,538 

196,122 

27,287 

316 

1,158 

2,034 

7,190 

3,117 

4,594 

2,449 

13,121 

17.292 

9,273 

1,961 



Japan. 

284 
9 

10,264 

2,245 

65 

4 

44 
46 
5 

1,330 
274 
41 
33 
111 
11 
30 
12 
23 
150 
56 
67 
100 
1,566 
583 



254 

1,163 

2 

58 
70 
47 

3,277 
181 
30 
7 
38 
8 

316 

2,050 

3 

14 

12,177 
4 

34 
1,575 



Mexico. 

81 

14,172 

132 

8.086 

2,602 

19 

2 

26 
145 
25 
133 
672 
47 



28 
10 
71 
86 
52 

1,413 

67 

290 

732 

6 

97 

11,918 
555 
10 



2,744 

199 

153 

8 

2 

15 
45 

125,016 

166 

6 

12 
145 
10 
39 
188 



8,009 
1,793 
4,862 
50,375 
1,101 
146,870 
940 
3.070 
43,347 
2.981 
7,998 
109,115 
27,834 
517 
4,024 
2,045 
8,498 
18,083 
2,464 
3.687 
19,430 
3,511 
13,959 
2,985 
Nether- 
lands. 
127 
23 
145 
1,015 
710 



64 

85 

52 

261 

14,402 

2,131 

11,337 

906 

140 

113 

27 

203 

1,597 

33,471 

3,542 

988 

1,054 

872 

44 

48 

12,698 
86 

12,652 

28 

709 

2,278 

230 

618 

1,231 

143 

19 

2,656 
78 
424 
1,392 
25 
99 

2,157 
60 

7,379 
79 



79 
174 
1,198 
1,640 

26 
8,760 

18 

1,186 
3,988 

18 

4,734 

2,413 

297 

42 
1,38} 

160 

1,012 

293 

50 

8,709 
127 
5,705 
1,380 
Nor- 
way. 
266 
123 
76 

5,060 

1,787 

1,265 

38 

149 

304 

145 

2,566 

32,913 

531 

21,924 

1,294 

53 

295 

580 

363 

5,432 

7,638 

105,303 

660 

7,170 

2,750 

255 

491 

5,351 

151 

25,013 

39 

45,937 

1,110 

351 

6,843 

2,320 

578 

82 

20,918 
89 

1,785 

2,305 

102 

311 

12,177 

38 

57,000 
623 



Turkey Turkey 
Spain. Sweden. Switzerland. (Asia). (Europe). Wales. 



74 

857 

9 

4,229 

177 

92 

5 

51 

4,199 
91 

1,647 
364 



753 
845 
385 
26,212 
12,446 
18,208 
332 
359 
729 
289 
4,985 
115,424 



213 

314 

804 

14,521 

1,767 

1,806 

78 

281 

146 

169 

1,319 

8,661 



389 
128 
169 

3,709 
333 

1,738 

. 10 
139 
291 
376 
73 

2,690 



128 
44 
45 
812 
217 
696 
9 

41 

744 

99 

129 

2,453 



230 

210 

148 

2,416 

1 989 

6 

34 

87 

63 

89 

722 

4,091 



98 


ALMANAC 


AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 


1917. 








State. Portugal 


.Roumania. Russia. Scotland. Spain. Sweden.! 
709 9,599 3,419 40 5,081 
384 6,310 5,162 40 26,763 
67 15,311 3,591 282 13,309 
100 3,222 641 24 190 
111 1,805 455 719 344 
20 4,752 2,389 111 2,203 
220 27,537 1,955 84 421 
858 117,261 28,416 549 39,562 
510 37,978 9,952 53 26,374 
2,008 17,541 4,373 53 122,428 
1,522 21,402 3,651 266 6,654 
266 2,228 3,373 49 6,412 
295 13,020 2,242 21 23,219 
8 135 469 778 708 
26 4,345 1,979 17 2,068 
2,208 93,567 17,512 495 10,547 
6 228 509 100 365 
34,443 558,956 39,437 3,766 53,705 
7 711 435 8 112 
1,070 31,910 1,696 13 12,160 
3,974 48,756 10,705 . -, 123 5,522 
27 5,807 1,218" '~ 47 1,028 
258 5,321 3,387 462 10,099 
7,752 240,985 32,046 354 23,467 
415 9,765 6,272 40 7,405 
9 786 239 14 95 
55 13,189 1,102 5 9,998 
77 2,484 561 26 363 
259 6,739 2,038 848 4,706 
18 568 2,853 24 7,227 
17 2,455 2,615 351 1,331 
' 72 4,379 1,246 69 368 
211 10,961 7,101 385 32,199 
259 5,143 1,088 464 279 
446 29,644 3,885 34 25,739 
57 763 1,812 120 2,497 

BOEN IN CITIES OF 250,000 OE MORE 
Gin- Cleve- 
>. Boston. Buffalo. Chicago, clnnati. land. 
2,413 9,284 132,063 1,638 42,059 
682 37 2,665 24 90 
36 10 515 184 46 
3,098 566 4,633 73 571 
47,802 16,868 26,688 887 8,794 
819 57 1,335 16 155 
1,070 45 393 40 71 
1,031 200 11,484 79 448 
13,671 7,070 27,912 1,872 11,420 
455 58 1,191 10 499 
1,081 684 3,036 665 494 
8,701 43,815 182,289 28,426 41,408 
1,497 220 6,564 180 275 
426 2,742 28,938 6,344 31,503 
66,041 9.423 65,965 6,224 11,316 
31,380 11,399 45,169 2,245 10,836 
61 12 220 6 15 
24 20 188 15 18 
486 314 9,632 322 1,076 
1,914 253 24,186 37 512 
1,296 12 50 83 
373 106 3,344 454 761 
41,892 11,349 121,786 4,999 25,477 
5,062 1,978 10,308 458 2,880 
268 24 243 20 28 
7,123 1,021 63,035 114 1,657 
415 639 3,494 696 1.373 
2,088 207 1,175 245 497 
623 97 711 280 251 
315 217 1,818 177 1,298 
1,222 262 2,400 121 339 


Turkey Turkey 
Switzerland. (Asia) . (Europe) 
2,765 809 2,274 
3,675 600 479 
2,853 287 287 
1,653 369 55 
421 949 196 
56 744 721 
452 80 44 
1,341 12,546 3,592 
2,780 1,567 342 
2,992 698 528 
6,141 1,084 1,000 
988 201 491 
2,150 572 247 
468 25 15 
78 891 1,965 
7,549 2,396 389 
172 123 17 
16,315 9,478 5,004 
68 402 107 
560 392 270 
10,988 2,031 1,935 
770 376 135 
3,853 197 553 
7,484 4,486 2,754 
221 3,132 658 
36 263 43 
800 246 238 
800 159 20 
1,773 1,125 237 
1,691 215 146 
214 189 31 
246 484 144 
3,447 423 728 
600 726 420 
8,036 791 397 
251 151 262 

INHABITANTS (1910). 
Jersey Los 
Detroit. City. Angeles 
14,160 4,978 2,510 
2,237 173 213 
65 7 116 
4,166 107 592 
38,648 1,010 7,686 
24 132 1,481 
58 212 119 
411 346 1,096 
9,038 4,632 7,581 
59 681 261 
636 596 1,916 
44,675 16,131 9,684 
585 179 361 
5,935 1,084 820 
5,584 16,124 3,878 
5,724 12,060 3,802 
28 5 3,931 
27 14 5,632 
584 243 408 
225 1,360 1,003 
5 25 128 
313 196 297 
16,644 13,667 4,758 
3,320 1,668 1,589 
18 72 384 
601 1,280 3,414 
595 553 828 
561 103 385 
125 38 120 
170 139 414 
311 172 726 


.Wales. 
1,498 
2,434 
1,615 
222 
82 
204 
583 
1,513 
786 
1,023 
1,219 
884 
824 
168 
68 
1,202 
93 
7,464 
35 
222 
9,377 
365 
585 
29,255 
268 
11 
503 
252 
301 
1,672 
1,043 
225 
1,976 
880 
2,507 
419 

Milwau- 
. kee. 
11,553 
86 
64 
218 
1,671 
39 
31 
619 
2,086 
110 
251 
64,816 
1,104 
5,571 
1,966 
3,374 


Iowa 8 


Kansas .... 9 




Louisiana 73 
Maine 82 


Maryland 37 


Massachusetts.. 26,437 
Michigan .... 20 


Minnesota 16 
Missouri 44 


Montana 31 


Nevada 305 


New Hampshire 110 
New Jersey 145 
New Mexico 10 
New York 660 
North Carolina. 20 
North Dakota.. 3 
Ohio 182 


Oklahoma . 19 


Oregon 174 


Pennsylvania .. 225 
Rhode Island.... 6,501 
South Carolina.. 3 
South Dakota... 2 
Tennessee 2 
Texas 89 


Utah . . 8 




Virginia 85 


Washington .... 179 
West Virginia. 3 
Wisconsin 9 
Wyoming 50 

FOREIGN 
Balti 
Country of birth. mor< 
Austria . 6 540 


Belgium 28 


Bulgaria* 14 
Canada French 45 
Canada Other 752 
China 245 


Cubaf 355 


Denmark 132 
England 2,698 
Finland 36 


France 357 
Germany 26 024 


Greece 347 


Hungary 1 358 


Ireland 6,806 
Italy 5 043 


Japan 12 


Mexico . 6 


12 

615 
2,144 
1 
267 
11,992 
647 
21 
787 

ssa 

78 
147 

231 
195 


Netherlands .... 106 
Norway 199 


Portugal 26 


Roumania 216 
Russia 24,803 


Scotland 518 


Spain 49 


Sweden . . . . 237 


Switzerland .... 228 
Turkey (Asia)... 50 
Turkey (Europe) 24 
Wales . . 99 


All other 309 


Total 77,662 

Country of birth. 
Austria .. 


243,365 
Minne- 
apolis. 
6,075 


118,689 
New 
Orleans. 
645 
91 
5 
101 
387 
219 
468 
117 
1,356 
34 
3.671 
6.122 


783,428 
New 
York. 
190,246 
2,260 
540 
2,844 
23,476 
3,936 
16,415 
7,997 
78,483 
7,410 
18,293 
278.137 


56,859 

Newark. 
12,963 
70 
10 
199 
1,126 
194 
183 
360 
6,698 
69 
697 
22.177 


196,170 
Phila- 
delphia. 
19,860 
478 
100 
301 
3,735 

1.529 
1,119 
36,564 
226 
2,659 
61,480 


157,534 
Pitts- 
burgh. 
21,400 
100 
71 

1.741 
197 
124 
110 
9,528 
70 
885 
29,438 


77,987 
St. 
Louis. 
11,171 
353 
165 
260 
2,256 
351 
141 
441 
5,226 
46 
1.218 
47,766 


66,133 
S. Fran- 
cisco. 
9,641 
448 
160 
474 
5,701 
6,914 
291 
3,119 
9,821 
1,846 
6,252 
24,137 


111,529 
Wash., 
D. C. 
459 
41 
10 
109 
1,052 
270 
243 
176 
2,638 
21 
611 
6,179 


Belgium 


63 


Bulgaria* 


.. 235 
. 1,637 
.. 5,905 
92 
24 
. 2 030 


Canada French 
Canada Other 


China 


Cubaf 


Denmark 




2 799 


Finland 


.. 875 
293 


France 


Germany .. 


.. 8.650 



including Serbia and Montenegro. tAnd other West Indies. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Minne- 
Couutry of birth. apolis. 
Greece 4fi9 


New 
Orleans. 
175 
90 
2,996 
8,066 
20 
289 
43 
181 
36 
93 
1,254 
257 
453 
160 
247 
192 
46 
20 
499 


New 
York. 

8,038 
76,627 
252,672 
340,770 
957 
426 
4,193 
22,281 
431 
33,586 
484,193 
23,123 
3,359 
34,952 
10,452 
6,160 
3.69J 
1,779 
6,626 


Newark. 
297 
6,029 
11,225 
20,494 
10 
10 
202 
190 
8 
1,160 
21,912 
2,547 
54 
782 
779 
127 
48 
106 
281 


Phila- 
delphia. 
589 
12.495 
83.196 
45,308 
87 
59 
349 
1,144 
54 
4,413 
90,697 
9,177 
200 
2,429 
2,013 
973 
525 
1,033 
1,049 


Pitts- 
burgh. 
773 
6,576 
18,873 
14,120 
27 
17 
109 
117 
2 
1,521 
26,391 
3,283 
23 
1,355 
1,007 
452 
79 
2,159 
290 


St. S. Fran 
Louis. Cisco. 
1,312 2,275 
8,759 1,247 
14,272 23,153 
7,594. 16,919 
43 4,191 
180 1,792 
422 500 
204 3,769 
14 593 
1,055 583 
15,481 4,643 
1,313 3,669 
227 1,177 
1,129 6,970 
2,653 2,587 
730 320 
838 402 
197 402 
406 3,302 


- Wash.. 
D. C. 
342 
155 
5,347 
2,761 
44 
2ft 
64 
145 
2 
41 
3,393 
705 
51 
359 
281 
139 
41 
87 
206 


Hungary 




. 1,176 
. 2,867 
. 653 
33 
14 
209 
16,402 


Ireland 




Italy 








Mexico 








Norway 




Portugal . . 








1,412 
5,654 
. 1,060 
21 
, 26,478 
299 
219 
61 
, 213 
187 


Russia 




Scotland 








Sweden 




Switzerland 




Turkey ( \sia) 




Turkey (Europe) 






All other 




Total 

FOREIGN 
City. 
Albany, N. Y... 
Atlanta, Ga 
Birming'm,Ala. 
Bridgep't.Conn. 
Camb'ge.Mass.. 
Columbus, O 
Dayton, O 


BORN 
Total. 
18,218 
4,501 
5,730 
36,264 
35,328 
16,363 
13,892 
39,749 
50.95& 
28,387 
19,842 
25,466 
17.473 
43,494 
6,520 
3,017 
42,989 
40,846 
27,179 
45,485 
50,312 
76.999 
4,136 
59,076 
56,657 
35,122 
67,456 
21.820 
30,848 
32,144 
48,597 


. 86,099 28,333 1,944,357 111,007 384,707 140,924 

IN CITIES OF 100,000 TO 250,000 INHABITANTS 
Austria.Canada.*England.Germany.Hungary.Ireland. 
5S6 959 1,682 4,620 67 4,545 
113 256 595 729 92 302 
134 239 1,343 706 78 309 
3,858 1,277 3,901 2,811 6,975 5,085 
156 10,172 2,851 728 102 10,637 
818 696 1,935 5,722 970 1,809 
660 407 620 5,817 2,761 976 
1,698 3,492 5,920 6,636 465 3,965 
2,614 16,260 11,964 234 3 5,194 
549 3,221 1,148 4,546 209 871 
1,227 848 1,628 7,518 852 3,255 
571 1,760 2,927 5,354 332 3,267 
316 371 938 8,471 441 2,700 
1,948 16,342 5,751 205 24 9,983 
261 337 691 1,429 71 803 
91 135 366 554 177 572 
1,109 1,335 2,663 4,115 473 9,004 
1.267 3,150 5,304 5,546 248 4.160 
3,414 1,218 1,989 4,861 554 1,849 
883 487 7,791 5,741" 483 4,971 
2,548 5,211 5,363 7,490 584 2,267 
1,574 8,835 12.676 2,076 126 15,801 
118 122 652 892 36 405 
1,688 9,718 5,979 14,624 415 5,230 
3,900 4,435 2,879 14,025 1,989 4,184 
3,184 301 7.716 4,325 1,214 5,302 
2,025 10,708 8,553 6,176 345 3,177 
712 4,450 2,898 2,755 126 1,021 
1,265 3,257 2,942 6,903 212 4,877 
879 3,180 2,052 15,308 2,927 1,971 
362 8,415 4,012 580 20 10,535 


126,223 

(1910). 
Italy. 
2,205 
95 
1,360 
5,022 
1,545 
1,619 
356 
2,664 
1,025 
319 
658 
2,579 
654 
259 
1,140 
91 
13,159 
3,800 
2.361 
9,317 
2,557 
17,305 
511 
10,638 
1,995 
3,549 
3,547 
1,545 
4,756 
270 
2,889 


142,298 24,902 

tScandi- 
havia. ^Russia. 
188 2,460 
102 1,342 
183 592 
2,200 4,142 
2,131 3,735 
168 1,534 
80 1,527 
6,029 5,627 
189 2,182 
1,366 3,622 
436 1,255 
2,666 3,431 
137 2,014 
772 1,886 
205 956 
46 596 
1,919 8,049 
4,794 1,118 
6,860 2,614 
243 6,867 
8,723 4,892 
4,058 7,518 
67 829 
607 7,187 
16,810 4,432 
142 8,571 
17,749 3,877 
5,786 877 
200 5,278 
323 3,345 
8,599 10,219 


Denver, Col 
FallRiver.Mass. 
G.Rapids.Mich.. 
Indianap's.Ind.. 
Kansasdty.Mo. 
Louisville, Ky.. 
Lowell, Mass... 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
N. Haven, Conn.. 
Oakland, Cal... 
Omaha, Neb 
Paterson, N. J. 
Portland, Ore.. 
Providence, R.I. 
Richmond, Va.. 
Rochester, N.Y. 
St. Paul, Minn.. 
Scranton, Pa... 
Seattle, Wash.. 
Spokane, Wash. 
Syracuse, N.Y'... 
Toledo, O 
Worces'r.Mass. . 



Includes Scotland and Wales. tCornprises Norway, Sweden and Denmark. ^Includes Finland. 



PERCENTAGES OF 

Total 
State. population 

Alabama 2,138,093 

Arizona 204,354 

Arkansas 1,574,449 

California 2,377,549 

Colorado 799,024 

Connecticut 1,114,756 

Delaware . 202,322 

District of Columbia 331,069 

Florida 752,619 

Georgia 2,609.121 

Idaho 325,594 

Illinois 5,638,591 

Indiana 2,700,876 

Iowa 2,224,771 

Kansas 1,690.949 

Kentucky 2,289,905 

Louisiana 1,656,388 

Maine 742,371 

Maryland 1.295,346 

Massachusetts 3,366,416 

Michigan 2,810,173 

Minnesota 2,075,708 

Mississippi 1,797.114 

Missouri 3,293,335 

Montana 376.053 

Nebraska 1,192,214 

Nevada 81,875 

New Hampshire 430,572 



NATIVE AND FOREIGN BORN (1910). Born Bornin For- 

Total in other eign 

State. population, state, states, born. 

New Jersey 2,537,167 53.0 20.7 26.0 

New Mexico 327,301 56.4 36.0 7.1 

New York 9,113,614 62.0 7.5 30.2 

North Carolina 2,206,237 94.7 4.9 0.3 

North Dakota 577,056 34.3 37.6 27.1 

Ohio 4,767,121 74.4 12.7 12.6 

Oklahoma 1,657,155 81.1 65.9 2.4 

Oregon 672,765 33.5 49.0 16.8 

Pennsylvania 7,665,111 73.6 7.4 18.8 

Rhode Island 542,610 49.2 17.5 33.0 

South Carolina 1,515,400 94.4 5.1 0.4 

South Dakota 583,888 38.6 43.6 17.3 

Tennessee 2,184,789 85.7 13.1 0.9 

Texas 3,896,542 70.1 23.3 6.2 

Utah 373,351 65.1 16.2 17.6 

Vermont 255,956 70.4 14.7 140 

Virginia 2,061,612 89.4 9.2 1.3 

Washington 1,141,990 23.0 53.3 22.4 

West Virginia 1,221,119 76.2 18.8 4.7 

Wisconsin 2,333,860 66.8 11.0 22.0 

Wyoming 145.965 21.8 57.7 19.9 

United States 91,972.266 66.5 18.4 'l4~7if 

NOTK The total population includes persons 
born in the United States, state of birth not re- 
ported, persons born in outlying possessions, or 
at seji under the United States flag, and Ameri- 
can citizens born abroad. Their combined num- 
ber was only 360,961, or 0.4 per cent of the total 
population. 



torn 


Bornin 


For- 


in 


other 


eign 


bate. 


states. 


born. 


86.9 


12.0 


0.9 


38.6 


36.6 


23.9 


67.1 


31.4 


1.1 


38.0 


36.3 


24.7 


29.2 


53.8 


16.2 


54.5 


15.7 


29.6 


67.8 


23.4 


8.6 


42.1 


49.7 


7.5 


61.5 


32.5 


5.4 


90.6 


8.5 


0.1 


27.7 


58.4 


13.1 


60.4 


17.7 


21.4 


75.2 


18.6 


5.9 


63.7 


23.6 


12.3 


48.7 


42.8 


8.0 


88.7 


9.4 


1.8 


84.9 


11.5 


3.2 


78.0 


6.7 


14.9 


79.2 


12.5 


8.1 


55.3 


12.9 


31.5 


62.7 


15.5 


21.3 


54.0 


19.4 


26.2 


87.0 


12.2 


0.5 


67.5 


25.0 


7.0 


26.4 


47.3 


25.2 


50.0 


34.7 


14.8 


26.4 


48.5 


24.1 


57.7 


19.2 


22.5 



100 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



MOTHER TONGUE OF FOREIGN WHITE STOCK (1910). 



In the following tables, prepared by the federal 
census bureau, the foreign white stock referred 
to is the aggregate white population of the 
United States which is foreign either by birth 
or by parentage. It embraces all foreign born 
whites and all native whites having one or both 
parents foreign born. It must be remembered 
that the foreign stock as here defined only in- 
cludes the first and second generations immi- 
grants and native children of immigrants and 
does not include the grandchildren or great- 
grandchildren of immigrants. In other words, 
the figures do not include the exact relative im- 
portance of the several ethnic stocks in the 
total population. 

The eight major mother-tongue stocks in the 
United States, arranged in the order of their 
importance, are shown in the following table: 



Mother tongue. 

English and Celtic* 10,037,420 

German 8,817,271 



Number. tPer cent. 
31.1 
27.3 



Italian 2,151,422 

P9lish i, 707,640 

Yiddish and Hebrew 1,676,762 

Swedish 1,445,869 

French 1.357,169 

Norwegian 1,009,854 



6.7 
5.3 
5.2 
4.5 
4.2 
3.1 

87.5 
12.5 



Total eight mother tongues. ..28,203,407 
Other mother tongues 4,039,975 

All mother tongues ..32,243,382 100.0 

*Includes persons reporting Irish, Scotch or 
Welsh. tPer cent of distribution. 



(Millions.) 
4 



-English-Celtic... 

German 

Italian 

Polish 

Yiddish-Hebrew. 

Swedish 

French 

Norwegian 




Diagram showing foreign white stock in the 
United States in 1910, by principal native or 
mother tongues. 



FOREIGN STOCK IN DETAIL. 



Mother tongue. Total. 

English and Celtic.... 10,037,420 

Germanic 9,187,007 

German 8,817,271 

Dutch 324,930 

Flemish 44,806 

Scandinavian 2,902,196 

Swedish 1,445,869 

Norwegian 1,009,854 

Danish 446,473 

Latin and Greek 4,279,560 

Italian 2,151,422 

French 1,357,169 

Spanish 448,198 

Portuguese 141,268 

Roumanian 51,124 

Greek 130,379 

Slavic and Lettic 3,240,467 

Polish 1,707,640 

Bohemian 539,392 

Slovak 284,444 

Russian 95,137 

Ruthenian 35,359 

Slovenian 183, 431 



BT7ILDING AND 

State. Number. Members, 

Arkansas 40 21,635 

California 93 39,485 

Connecticut 16 7,111 

District of Columbia... 20 36,165 

Illinois 608 203,669 

Indiana 341 164,620 

Iowa 49 26,233 

Kansas 61 51,654 

Kentucky 116 56,278 

Louisiana 66 45,492 

Maine 37 12,113 

Massachusetts 174 204,249 

Michigan 64 58,655 

Minnesota 65 16,629 

Missouri 145 37,464 

Montana 13 1,963 

Nebraska 72 75,354 

New Hampshire 19 9,169 



Foreign 
born. 
3 363 792 


Native 
born. 
6 673 628 


Foreign Native 
Mother tongue. Total. born. born. 
Croatian 93 036 74 036 19 000 


2,910,857 


6,276,150 


Dalmatian 5,505 4,344 1,161 


2,759,032 


6,058,239 


Serbian ... 26 752 23 403 3 349 


126,045 
25,780 
1,272,150 
683,218 


198,885 
10.026 
1,630,046 
762,651 


Montenegrin 3,961 3,886 75 
Bulgarian ....,- 19,380 18,341 1,039 
Slavic, other 35,195 21,012 14,183 
Lithuanian 211,235 140963 70272 


402,587 
186 345 


607,267 
260 128 


Yiddish and Hebrew.. 1,676,762 1,051,767 624,995 
Magyar 320 893 229 094 91 799 


2,385,388 
1 365 110 


1,894,172 
786 312 


Finnish 200,688 120,086 80,602 
Armenian 30 021 23 938 6 083 


528,842 
258 131 


828,327 
190 067 


Syrian and Arabic.... 46,727 32",868 13^859 
Turkish 5 441 4 709 732 


72 649 


68 619 


Albanian 2 366 2 312 54 


42 277 


8 847 


AH other 790 646 144 


118 379 


12 000 


Unknown 313 044 116 272 196 772 








943,781 
228,738 
166,474 
57,926 
25,131 
123,631 


763,859 
310,654 
117,970 
37,211 
10,228 
59,800 


All mother tongues. 32,243,382 13.345,545 18,897,837 
NOTE In the above table Celtic includes Irish, 
Scotch and Welsh; Dutch includes Frisian; Bo- 
hemian includes Moravian; Lithuanian includes 
Lettish; Serbo-Croatian includes Dalmatian and 
Montenegrin, and Syrian includes Arabic. 



LOAN ASSOCIATIONS (JAN. 1, 1915.) 
State. 



Assets. 

$9,627,893 

29,519,763 

3,581,778 
20,130,152 
90,572,343 
56,427,549 

7,367,345 
18,525,023 
21,799,935 
21,062,792 

5,558,269 
90,781,470 
25,739,835 

7,176,472 
18,055,859 

1,332,450 
37,138,413 

2,505,085 



New Jersey 707 

New Mexico 13 

New York ~ 245 

North Carolina 138 

North Dakota 9 



Ohio 656 

Oklahoma 33 

Pennsylvania 1,765 

Rhode Island 6 



Tennessee 14 

Texas 19 

Vermont 4 

Washington 22 

... 41 

... 70 

Other states 875 



Total 6,616 3,103,935 1,357,707,900 



West Virginia 
Wisconsin 



[embers. 


Assets. 


265,509 


$132,605,897 


3,828 


1,585,513 


172,247 


68,476,499 


33,375 


12,703,354 


5,700 


2,807,475 


611,467 


240,930,785 


6,233 


1,940,571 


545,624 


255,106,280 


9,112 


4,786,746 


4,412 


3,108,081 


3,222 


974,852 


456 


186,161 


24,617 


7,877,567 


16,000 


6,738,369 


31,554 


12,290,882 


302,641 


138,690,542 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



101 



URBAN AND RU3 

The census bureau classifies as urban popula- 
tion that residing in cities and other incorpo- 
rated places of 2,500 inhabitants or more. The 
proportion of the total population of continental 
United States living in urban and rural territory 


iAL POPULATION. 
Per cent. 
State. Urban. Rural. Urban. Rural. 
South Dakota 76,673 507,215 13.1 86.9 
Nebraska 310,852 881,362 26.1 73.9 
Kansas 493 790 1 197 159 29 2 70 & 


at the censuses of 1910 and 1900 was as follows: 
, 1910. -^ , 1900. ^ 


Delaware 97*085 105,'237 48.0 52.0 
Maryland . . 658 192 637 154 50 8 49 2 


Population. Pr.ct. Population. Pr.ct. 
Urban 42,623,383 46.3 30,797,185 40.5 


Dist. of Columbia.. 331,069 100.0 .... 
Virginia 476 529 1 585 083 23 1 76 9 


Rural 49 348 883 53.7 45,197,390 59.5 








Total 91,972,266 100.0 75,994,575 100.0 
In 1890 the per cent of urban population was 
86.1 and of the rural 63.9; in 1880 the urban was 


North Carolina 318,474 1,887.813 14.4 85.6 
South Carolina 224,832 1,290;568 14.8 85.2 
Georgia 538,650 2,070,471 20.6 79.4 
Florida 219 080 533 539 29 1 70 9 


29.5 and the rural 70.5. 


Kentucky 555*442 1 734*463 24 3 75 7 


By geographic divisions the per cent of urban 
and rural population in 1910 was as follows: 


Tennessee 441*, 045 l'.743*,744 20.2 79.8 
Alabama 370 431 1 767 662 17 3 82 7 


Division. Total. Urban. Rural. 
Kew England 7 1 12.8 2.2 


Mississippi 207,311 1*589*803 llis Ssis 


Middle \tlantic 21.0 32.2 11.3 


Louisiana 496*516 1*159*872 3o'o 7o'o 


East \orth Central .. 19.8 22.6 17.5 


Oklahoma 320*155 1*337*000 19 3 80 7 


West \orth Central 12 7 91 15.7 




South Atlantic 13.3 7.3 18.4 


Montana .. 133*420 *242*633 3s's 64*5 


East South Central . 9.1 3.7 13.9 


Idaho 69*898 255*696 21 5 78*5 


\yo^t South Central 96 46 13.8 




Mountain 2.9 2.2 3.4 


Colorado 408*840 394*184 5o'? 49*3 


pacific ... 4 6 5.6 3.7 






Arizona 63*260 141*094 310 69*0 


Total 100.0 100.0 100.0 


Utah 172 934 200*417 46*3 53*7 


By states the urban and rural population in 
1910 was as follows: Percent. 
State Urban. Rural. Urban. Rural. 


Nevada 13*367 68*508 16.3 83.'7 
Washington 605,530 536,460 53.0 47.0 
Oregon . 307 060 365 705 45 6 54 4 


Maine 381 443 360 928 51.4 48.6 




New Hampshire 255 099 175 473 59.2 40 8 




Vermont 168*943 187,013 47.5 52.5 


United States 42 623 383 49 348 883 46 3 53 7 


Massachusetts 3,125,367 241,049 92.8 7.2 
Rhode Island 524,654 17,956 96.7 3.3 
Connecticut 999,839 114,917 89.7 10.3 
New York 7,185,494 1,928,120 78.8 21.2 
New Jersey 1,907,210 629,957 75.2 24.8 
Pennsylvania 4,630,669 3,034,442 60.4 39.C 
Ohio 2,665,143 2,101,978 55.9 44.1 


INCBEASE IN URBAN AND BUBAL POPULATION. 

Comparing the rate of growth in urban and 
rural communities, it is shown by the census 
bureau that during the period between the cen- 
sus of 1900 and that of 1910 the increase in urban 
population in continental United States was 11.- 


Indiana . 1 143 835 1,557,041 42.4 57.6 


uo, < oo, \JL d-t.o pei ceii L, vv iintj me increase in 


Illinois 3,476,929 2,161,662 61.7 38.3 




Michigan 1,327,044 1,483,129 47.2 52.8 




Wisconsin 1,004,320 1,329,540 43.0 57.0 
Minnesota 850,294 1,225,414 41.0 59.0 
j owa 680,054 1,544,717 30.6 69.4 


been an actual decrease in rural population 
These states were: New Hampshire. 5.4 per 
cent' Vermont 4 2 per cent' Ohio 1 3 per cent* 


Missouri 1 398 817 1 894 518 42.5 57 5 




North Dakota 63,236 513,820 11.0 89.0 

POPULATION 01 
BY RECORDER'S DISTRICTS. 


souri, 5.1 per cent. 

ALASKA (1910). 
District. Population. District. Population. 
Nulato .- . . 785 St. Lawrence island 295 


District. Population. District. Population. 


Ophir 562 St. Michael 2.255 




Otter 1 234 Tanana . . 43ft 


Bristol bay 4 502 Hiamna . . . 271 


Port Clarence 1.001 Unga peninsula.... 1.302 


Cape Nome. 3.9il< Juneau 5.854 


Prince William Valdez 4.815 
sound 210 Wrangell l 652 








Sitka 2.210 Total, 1910 64,356 




Skagway 1 980 i Total, 1900 63,592 


Cordova 1.779 Kodiak ' 2J4S 




Council City 686 Kougarok 308 
Ea^le 543 Kuskokwirn 2 71 1 


Cordova 1,152 Nome 2,600 


Pair hanks 7675 Kovukuk 455 


Douglas 1,722 Treadwell 1,222 


Fairhaven 643 Mount McKinlev.. 232 


Fairbanks 3.541 Valdez 810 




Juneau 1 644 Wrangell 743 


Fortvmile 341 Noatak-Kobtik .... 2.262 


Ketchikan 1,613 


POPULATION 

1910. 1S99. 


F PORTO RICO. 

1910. 1899. 
Caguas city 10 354 5 450 


Sin Juan city 48 716 3 9 048 


Arecibo city 9,612 8,003 


Ponce city 35 027 27 952 


Guayama city 8 321 5 334 


Mayauez citv 16591 15187 




POPULATION OF 

County. Population. 
Hawiii ST 382 


HAWAII (1910). 
Population. 


Honolulu 82 9 8 




Kalawao 785 
Kauai . 23 952 


CITIES 


Maui 29.762 


Hilo 6 745 


Total, 1910... ...191,909 


Honolulu . .. 52.183 



102 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



POPULATION OF THE WORLD, 



[Based upon the Statesman's Year-Book for 1916 and publications of the bureau of the census.] 

United States! (1916) ..102,638,251 
Windward islands (1914) 170,000 



BY GRAND DIVISIONS. 
Africa ............... 129,726,122 

Asia .................... 934,940,135 

Europe ................. 497,583,669 

North America ......... 140, 491, 337 

Oceania ................ 65,073,428 

South America ......... 55,511,236 

Total ............... 1,823,325,927 

AFRICA. 

Abyssinia (est. 1916)... 8,000,000 
Angl^Egyptian 



French Africa (1914) .. .25,681.243 
German Africa (est.l913)ll,406,024 
Italian Africa (est. 1913) 1,378,176 
Belgian Kongo (est.l913)15,000,000 
Liberia (1913) ........... 2,100,000 

Morocco (1913) .......... 5,000,000 

Portuguese Africa (1916) 8,248.897 
Spanish Africa (1913) . 444,629 



Total 129,726,122 

ASIA. 
Afghanistan (est. 1915) 6,000,000 

Bhutan (1915) 250,000 

British colonies, etc. 

/1916) 8,866,000 

China (1914) 441,983,000 

French Indo-China* 

(1913) 14,773,000 

India, British (1914) . . -315,156,000 

Japan (1914) 75 - 8 % 9 

Kiaochow (1913) 168,900 

Nepal (1914) 5,000.000 

Oman (1914) 500,000 

Persia (1916) 9,500,000 

Portuguese Asia (1916.) 895,789 
Russia in Asia (1914).. 28,451,200 

Siam (1910) 8,149,487 

Turkey in Asia (1911). 19.382.900 

Total 934,940,135 

including French India. 
EUROPE. 

Albania (1914) 1,000.000 

Andorra (1913) 5,231 



Austria-Hungary (1910) 49,211,427 

Belgium (1912) 7.571,387 

Bulgaria (1914) 4.752.997 

Denmark (1911) 2.775.076 

France (1911) 39.601.509 

Germany (1914) 67,812,000 

Greece (1914) 4,821,300 

Iceland (1911) 85,188 

Italy (1915) 36,120,118 

Luxemburg (1910) 259,891 

Monaco (1913) 22.956 

Montenegro (1914) 516.000 

Netherlands (1914) 6,339,705 

Norway (1910) 2,391,782 

Portugal (1911) 5,957,985 

Roumania (1914) 7,508.009 

Russia ( 1914 ) 178, 378, 800 

San Marino (1915) 11,513 

Serbia (1914) 4,547,992 

Spain (1913) 20,355,986 

Sweden (1914) 5,679,607 

Switzerland (1913) 3,877,210 

Turkey (1914) 1,891.000 

United kingdom (1915) . 46,089,000 

Total 497,583,669 

NORTH AMERICA. 

Bahamas (1915) 56.000 

Bermuda (1915) 20,000 

Canada (1915) 8,075,000 

Costa Rica (1914) 420,179 

Cuba (1914) 2,471,531 

Curacao (1914) 56,725 

Danish West Indies 

(1911) 27,086 

French islands (1913).. 450,900 

Greenland (1911) 13,517 

Guatemala (1914) 2,003,579 

Haiti (1914) 2,500.000 

Honduras (1914) 662,000 

Honduras, British (1915) 42,000 

Jamaica (1915) 883,000 

Leeward islands (1915) 128,000 

Mexico (1912) 15,501,684 

Newfoundland* (1915) . 252,000 

Nicaragua (1910) 703,540 

Panama (1912) 398,021 

Porto Rico ( 1914 ) 1, 184,489 

Salvador (1914) 1,225.835 

Santo Domingo (1913).. 708,000 



Total 140,491,337 

including Labrador, tlnclud- 
ing Alaska (1915). 

OCEANIA. 

Australian Federation 

(1915) 4,951,000 

Borneo and Sarawak, 

British (1915) 740,000 

Dutch East Indies (1913) 48,000,000 

Fiji islands (1914) 155,000 

Guam (1914) 12,240 

Hawaii (1913) 211,582 

New Caledonia* (1914) . 81,100 
New Guinea, Germanf 

(1913) 634,579 

New Zealand (1915)... 1,096,000 

Papua (1914) 252,000 

Philippine islands (1915) 8,734.927 

Solomon islands* (1914) 205,000 

Total 65,073,428 

including other French de- 
pendencies, tlncluding Samoan 
and other former German 
islands in the Pacific. Jlnclud- 
ing Gilbert and Tonga island*. 

SOUTH AMERICA. 



Argentine Republic 

(est. 1914; 

Bolivia (1915) 

Brazil (1913) 

Chile (1914) 

Colombia (1912) 

Ecuador (1910) 

Falkland islands (1912) 
Guiana, British (191o). 
Guiana, French (1913). 
Guiana, Dutch (1915).. 

Paraguay (1912) 

Peru (1908) 

Trinidad (1914) 

Uruguay (1915) 

Venezuela (1915) 



Total 55,511,236 




AREA OF THE UNITED STATES IIT SQUARE MILES (1910). 
Arranged according to rank in gross area. 



State. 


Rank. 


Gross. 


Land. Water.* 


Texas 


.... 1 


265,896 


262,398 


3,498 


California 


.... 2 


158,297 


155,652 


2,645 


Montana 


.... 3 


146,997 


146,201 


796 


New Mexico 


4 


122,634 


122,503 


131 


Arizona 


5 


113,956 


113,810 


146 


Nevada 


.. 6 


110,690 


109,821 


869 


Colorado 


7 


103,948 


103,658 


290 


Wyoming 


.... 8 


97,914 


97,594 


320 


Oregon 


.... 9 


96,699 


95,607 


1,092 


Utah 


10 


84,990 


82,184 


2,806 


Minnesota 


...11 


84,682 


80,858 


3,824 


Idaho 


....12 


83,888 


83,354 


534 


Kansas 


..13 


82,158 


81,774 


384 


South Dakota 


14 


77,615 


76,868 


747 


Nebraska 


15 


77,520 


76,808 


712 


North Dakota 




70,837 


70,183 


654 


Oklahoma 


"*17 


70,057 


69,414 


643 


Missouri 


18 


69,420 


68,727 


693 


Washington 


....19 


69,127 


66,836 


2,291 


Florida 


20 
,...21 


59,265 
58,666 


58,725 
54,861 


540 

3,805 


Michigan 


....22 


57,980 


57,480 


500 


Illinois 


....23 


56,665 


56,043 


622 


Iowa 


..24 


56,147 


55,586 


561 


Wisconsin 


25 


56,066 


55,256 


810 


Arkansas 


, 26 


53,335 


52,525 


810. 


North Carolina 


27 


52,426 


48,740 


3,686 



Rank. 

Alabama 28 

New York 29 

Louisiana 30 

Mississippi 31 

Pennsylvania 32 

Virginia 33 

Tennessee 34 

Ohio 35 

Kentucky 36 

Indiana 37 

Maine 38 

South Carolina 39 

West Virginia 40 

Maryland 41 

Vermont 42 

New Hampshire 43 

Massachusetts 44 

New Jersey 45 

Connecticut 46 

Delaware 47 

Rhode Island 48 

District of Columbia. 49 

Total 3,026,789 2,973,890 52,899 

*Does not include water surface of oceans, the 
Gulf of Mexico or the great lakes lying within 
the jurisdiction of the United States. 



Gross. 


Land. Water.* 


51,998 


51,279 


719 


49,204 


47,654 


1,550 


48,506 


45,409 


3,097 


46,865 


46,362 


503 


45,126 


44,832 


294 


42,627 


40,262 


2,365 


42,022 


41,687 


335 


41,040 


40,740 


300 


40,598 


40,181 


417 


36,354 


36,045 


309 


33,040 


29,895 


3,145 


30,989 


30,495 


494 


24,170 


24.022 


148 


12,327 


9,941 


2,386 


9,564 


9,124 


440 


9,341 


9,031 


310 


8,266 


8,039 


227 


8.224 


7.514 


710 


4,965 


4,820 


145 


2,370 


1,965 


405 


1,248 


1,067 


180 


70 


60 


10 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOE 1917. 



103 



AREA (SQUARE MILES) BY CENSUS YEARS. 
Continental United States. 
Year. Gross. Land. Water. 
1910 3,026,789 2,973,890 52,899 


State. 1 

Washington ] 


310. 1900. 1890. 1880. 
7.1 7.8 5.3 1.1 
0.8 39.9 31.8 25.7 
12.2 37.4 30.6 23.8 
1.5 0.9 0.6 0.2 

!0.9 25.6 21.2 1O 

area of 590.884 square 
f 0.1 per square mile; 
s, 29.8 per square mile, 
quare miles, 325.5 per 

>pulation is obtained by 
each state and of con- 
its total laud area in 
sus. 

r. 0.9. tOklahoma and 
. JLess than one-tenth. 

JUARE MILE LAND 
A. 

Inited States. persq. 
ulation. Land area. mile. 
972,266 *2,973,890 30.9 
994,575 2,974,159 25.6 
947,714 2,973,965 21.2 
155,783 2,973,965 16.9 
558,371 2,973,965 13.0 
443,321 2,973,965 10.6 
191,876 2,944,337 7.9 
069,453 1,753,588 9.7 
866,020 1,753,588 7.3 
638,453 1,753,588 5.5 
239,881 1,685,865 4.3 
308,483 867,980 6.1 
929,214 867.980 4.5 

quare miles of land due 
swamps in Illinois and 
3 of land), the building 
guna reservoirs and the 
> river into the Salton 
lare miles of water sur- 

INHABITANT. 

nited States. Perinhab- 
cion. Acres land, itant. 
266 1.903.289.600 20.7 
575 1.903.461,760 25.0 
714 1.903.337.600 30.2 

DIVISIONS (1910). 

State and div. Acres. 
West Virginia 12.6 
North Carolina 14.1 
South Carolina 12.9 
Gooreia 14.4 


West Virginia E 


Wisconsin 


1890 3,026,789 2,973965 52,824 


United States ; 


1880 3 026 789 2 973 965 52 824 


1870 . 3 026 789 2 973 965 5 9 824 


Alaska with a gross 
miles has a population o 
Hawaii, 6,449 square mile 
and Porto Rico, 3,435 s 
square mile. 
NOTE The density of p< 
dividing the population of 
tinental United States bj 
square miles at ea^h cen 

*North Dakota territor 
Indian territory combined 

POPULATION PER S( 
ARE 

Census Continental t 
year. Pop 
1910 91 


1860 3,026,789 2,973,965 52,824 
1850 ; 2 997 119 2 944 337 52 78 


1840 1,792223 1,753,588 3S 633 


1830 1 792 223 1 753 588 38 635 


1820 . 1 792 223 1 753 588 38 635 


1810 . 1 720 122 1 685 865 34 257 


1800 . 892 135 867 980 24 155 




The water area does not include the surface 
of the oceans, the Gulf of Mexico or the great 
lakes lying within the jurisdiction of the United 
States. 

INCREASE IN AREA OF THE UNITED 
STATES. 
Gross area in square miles. 

Accession. Area. Accession. Area 
Area in 1790 892.135 Alaska. 1867 590.884 
Louisiana pur- Hawaii, 1898 6.449 
chase, 1803.... 827.987 Philippines. 1899 115.026 
Florida. 1819.... 58.663 Porto Rico. 1899 3,435 
Treaty with Guam, 1899 210 


1900 75, 


1890 62, 


1880 50, 


Spain. 1819.... 13.433 Samoa, 1900 77 


L870 38, 
I860 31, 


Oregon. 1846 286.541 zone, 1904 436 


1850 . . 23 


1840 17 


sion. 1848 529.18D Total outlying 716.517 
Gadsden pur- 
chase. 1853.... 29,670 Grand total Unit- 
ed States 3 713 30fi 


1S30 12, 


1820 9 


1810 7 


1800 5 


Total cont'l... 3.026,789 

POPULATION PER SQUARE MILE BY 
STATES. 

State. 1910. 1900. 1890. 1880. 
Alabama .. 41 7 35 7 29 5 24.6 


1790 3 


*Net reduction of 269 s 
to drainage of lakes and 
Indiana (201 square mile 
of the Roosevelt and La 
overflow of the Colorad( 
sea in California (470 sqi 
face). 

ACRES PER 

Census Continental U 
year. Popula 
1910 91.972 
1900 75,994 


Arizona 18 11 08 04 


Arkansas 30.0 25.0 21.5 15.3 
California .153 9.5 7.8 5.5 


Colorado 77 52 40 19 


Connecticut 231.3 188.5 154.8 129.2 


Delaware 103.0 .94.0 85.7 74.6 
District of Columbia.... 5517.8 4645.3 3972.3.3062.5 


Georgia 44 4 37 7 31 3 26 3 


1890 62.947 


Idaho 39 19 11 04 


BY STATES AND 

State and div. Acres. 
Maine 25.3 


Illinois 100 6 86 1 68 3 55 


Indiana 749 701 611 55.1 


Iowa -. 40.0 40.2 34.4 29.2 


Kansas 20.7 18.0 17.5 12.2 
Kentucky 57.0 53.4 46.3 41.0 


New Hampshire 13.4 


Louisiana 36.5 30.4 24.6 20.7 
Maine 24 8 23 2 22 1 21 7 


Massachusetts 1.5 


Maryland 130.3 119.5 104.9 94.0 
Massachusetts . 418 8 349 278 5 221 8 


Connecticut 2.8 

New England 6.1 
New York 3.3 
New .Tersev 1.9 


South Atlantic... 14.1 
Kentucky 11 2 


Michigan 48 9 4 9 1 36 4 28 5 


Minnesota 25.7 21.7 16.2 9.7 
Mississippi 38 8 33 5 27 8 24 4 


Tennessee 12.2 




Missouri 47 9 45 2 39 31 6 


Pennsylvania 3.7 


Mississippi 16.5 

East South Central 13.7 
Arkansas 21.4 
Louisiana 17.5 


Montana 26 1.7 1.0 0.3 


Middle Atlantic.. 3.3 
Ohio 5.5 
Indiana 8.5 


Nebraska 15.5 13.9 13.8 5.9 
Nevada 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.6 
New Hampshire 47.7 45.6 41.7 38.4 


New Jersey 337.7 250.7 192.3 150.5 
New Mexico 2.7 1.6 1.3 1.0 
New York 191.2 152.5 126.0 106.7 
North Carolina 45.3 38.9 32.2 28.7 
North Dakota 8.2 4.5 2.7 * 


Illinois 6.4 
Michisan 13.1 
Wisconsin 15.2 

East North Central 8.6 
Minnesota 24 9 


Texas 43.1 
WestSouthCentral 31.3 
Montana 248.8 
Idaho 163.8 


Ohio 117.0 102.1 90.1 78.5 
Oklahoma 23.9 fH-4 t3.7 i 
Oregon 7.0 4.3 3.3 1.8 
Pennsylvania 171.0 140.6 117.3 95.5 


Iowa 16.9 
Missouri 13.4 
North Dakota 77.8 
South Dakota 84.3 


Colorado 83.0 
New Mexico 239.5 
Arizona 356.4 
Utah 140 3 


Rhode Island 508.5 401.6 328.8 259.2 
South Carolina 49.7 44.0 37.7 32.6 


NohrasV.a 41.? 
Kansas 31.0 

WestNorthCentral 28.1 


Nevada 858.4 
Mountain 208.8 


Tennessee 52.4 48.5 42.4 37.0 


Washington 37.5 


Utah .45 34 26 18 


Delaware 6.2 
Maryland 4 9 


California 41.9 
Pacific 48 6 


Vermont 39 37 7 36 4 36 4 


Dist. of Columbia. 0.1 
Virginia .. .. 12.5 


Vinrinia .. . 51.2 46.1 41.1 37.6 


Continental U.S.. 20.7 



104 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



AMERICA 

[Estimate 

ALABAMA. 

Birmingham ... lJ 4 .l,f 
Mobile ...' 56,536 
Montgomery . . . *6,o6i 

ARKANSAS. 

Fort Smith 27,887 
Little Rock 55,158 

CALIFORNIA. 

Alameda 27,031 


LN CITIES WITH 25, 
ARRANGED 
d by the United States 
Davenport .. 47,127 
Des Moines 99,144 


500 OR MORE INHAB 
BY STATES, 
census bureau as of July 

NEBRASKA. 

Lincoln 46,028 


ITANTS. 
1, 1915.] 

PENNSYLVANIA. 
Allen town .. 61,901 
Altoona 57,606 
Butler (borough) 26,587 
Chester 40,935 
Easton . 30 '>06 


Sioux City 55,588 


South Omaha... 26.394 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Manchester 76,959 
Nashua 27,114 


Waterloo 34 131 


KANSAS. 

Kansas City 96,854 


Erie 73 798 


Harrisburg 70,754 
Hazleton 28,001 


Wichita 67 847 


NEW JERSEY. 

Atlantic City... 55,806 
Bavonne 67,582 
Camden 104,349 


KENTUCKY. 

Covington 56,520 


Johnstown 66,585 
Lancaster 50,269 
McKeesport 46,743 
New Castle 40,351 
Norristown (bor- 
ough) 30 833 


Rprkelev 54,879 


Fresno 30,978 
Long Beach 26,012 
Los Angeles 465,367 


Louisville 237,012 


East Orange.... 41,155 
Elizabeth 84,550 


Newport 31,722 


Pasadena 43,859 


LOUISIANA. 

New Orleans.... 366,484 
Shreveport 34,068 


Hoboken 76,104 
Jersey City 300,133 
Montclair (town) 25,550 
Newark 399 000 


Philadelphia ...1,683.664 
Pittsburgh 571,984 
Reading 107,594 


Sacramento 64,806 
San Diego 51,115 


San Francisco... *448,502 
San Jose 37,994 


MAINE. 

Bangor 26,360 
Lewiston 27 557 


New Brunswick 25,169 
Orange 32,524 
Passaic 69.010 


Scranton 144,081 
Shenandoah (bor- 
ough) 28.649 
Wilkesbarre ... 75.21S 
Williamsport .. 33,495 
York 50 543 


Stockton 34,508 
*July 1, 1914. 

COLORADO. 

Colorado Springs 32.344 


Portland 63 014 


Paterson 136,374 


MARYLAND. 

Baltimore 584,605 


Perth Amboy... 39.725 
Trenton 109.212 
W. Hoboken (town)41,893 

NEW YORK. 
Albany 103,580 
Amsterdam 36,163 
Auburn 36,947 
Binghamton 53,082 
Buffalo 461 335 


RHODE ISLAND. 
Central Falls... 25,171 
Cranston 25,201 


Pueblo .. 52.840 


Cumberland 25,564 
Hagerstown .... 25,223 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

Boston 745,139 


CONNECTICUT. 

Bridgeport 118,434 


Newport 29 631 


Pawtucket .... 58,156 
Providence 250,025 
Warwick (town) 29,431 
Woonsocket 43.355 

SOUTH CAKOLINA. 

Charleston 60,427 
Columbia 34,058 

TENNESSEE. 

Chattanooga . . . 58,576 


Hartford 108,969 
Meriden 28,829 
New Britain.... 52,203 
New Haven 147,095 


Brockton 65,746 
Brookline (town) 31,934 
Cambridge 111,669 
Chelsea *32,452 


Cohoes 25,130 


Norwalk 26,466 
Stamford 29,958 
Waterbury 84,745 

DELAWARE. 

Wilmington .... 93,161 

DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA. 

Washington 358.679 

FLORIDA. 

Jacksonville .... 73,137 
Pensacola 25,742 


Chicopee 28,688 
p:verett 38,307 


Jamestown 35,729 
Kingston 26 632 


Fall River 126,904 
Fitchburg 41,144 
Haverhill 47,774 
Holyoke . 64 069 


Mount Vernon.. 36,028 
New Rochelle... 36,326 
New York 5,468.190 


Lawrence 98,197 
Lowell 112,124 


Bronx (b'r'gh) 552,537 
Br'klvn <b'gh)l,881,065 
M'hat'n (b'gh)2,585,470 
Queens (bor'gh) 353,156 
Richmond (b'gh) 95.962 
Newburgh 29,313 
Niagara Falls.. 36.240 
Poughkeepsie .. 29,994 
Rochester 250,747 


Memphis 146,113 
Nashville 115,978 


Maiden 50 067 


TEXAS. 

Austin 34,016 
Beaumont 26,572 


Medford 25.737 
New Bedford. 114 694 


Tampa 51,521 

GEORGIA. 


Newton 43,085 
Pittsfield 37,580 


Dallas 118,482 
El Paso 51,936 


Augusta 49,848 


Quincy 37,251 
Salem 47,778 
Somerville 85,460 
Springfield 103,216 


Schenectady ... 95,265 


Galveston 41,076 
Houston 108,172 
San Antonio.... 119,447 
Waco 32.756 

UTAH. 

Ogden 30,466 


Macon 45,415 
Savannah 68,361 

IDAHO. 

Boise 31,741 


Trov 77,738 


Utica 83,876 


Waltham 30,129 


Watertown 29,384 


ILLINOIS. 
Aurora 33,613 


Worcester 160,523 
*In 1910. Decrease 
since then. 

MICHIGAN. 
Battle Creek... 28,801 
Bay City 47,494 
Detroit 554,717 
Flint 52.159 
Grand Rapids. 125,759 
Jackson 34,730 


NORTH CAROLINA. 
Charlotte 38,887 


Salt Lake City. 113,567 

VIRGINIA. 

Lynchburg 32,385 
Norfolk 88,076 
Petersburg 25,347 
Portsmouth 38,610 
Richmond 154,674 
Roanoke 41,929 


Bloomington 27,054 
Chicago 2,447,045 
Danville 31 554 


Wilmington .... 29,384 

OHIO. 


Decatur 38,526 


East St. Louis. 72,105 
Elgin 27,844 
Evanstoii 28,312 
Joliet 37 472 


Canton 59,139 
Cleveland 656.975 
Cincinnati .... 406,706 


Moline 26.927 
Oak Park (village) 25.492 
Peoria 70,732 
Quincv 36 764 


Kalamazoo .... 47.364 Davton .. . 125!S09 
*f nsm S 39.005 Hamilton 39,655 
sSaw D ^ Lima 34 ' 644 


WASHINGTON. 

Bellingham .... 31,609 
Everett 33,767 


Rockford 53,761 
Rook Island 27.961 
Springfield 59 468 


MINNESOTA. 

Duluth 91 913 


Loram 35,662 
Newark 28.953 
Portsmouth 28,126 
Springfield 50,801 
Steubenville ... 26,631 
Toledo 187.840 
Youmrstown 104.-1S9 
Zanesville 30,406 

OKLAHOMA. 

Muskosree 41,263 
Oklahoma City. 88,158 
Tulsa *28.240 
Exclusive of 1,985 on 
Indian lands. 

OREGON. 

Portland .. ,. 272.833 


Spokane 112,990 
Tacoma 108 094 


WEST VIRGINIA. 

Charleston 28,822 
Huntington .... 43,572 
Wheeling 43,097 


INDIANA. 

East Chicago.... 27,200 
Evansville 72.125 
Fort Wayne 74,352 
Hammond 25 326 


Minneapolis 353,460 
St. Paul 241999 


MISSOURI. 
Joplin 33,032 
Kansas Citv.... 289,879 
St. Joseph 83,974 
St Louis 745 9S8 


WISCONSIN. 

Green Bav 28,689 
Kenosha 30,319 
La Crosse 31,522 
Madison 30,084 


Indianapolis .... 265,578 
Munoie 25,195 


South Bend ... 67.030 
Terre Haute 64,806 

IOWA. 

Cedar Rapids... 36.583 
Clinton 27.094 
Council Bluffs... 31,131 


Springfield 39,513 

MISSISSIPPI. 

Jackson .... 28 372 


Milwaukee .... 428.062 
Oshkosh 35.581 
Racine 45.507 
Sheboygan .... 28,211 
Superior 45.285 


MONTANA. 
Butte ., . 42.918 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



101 



POPTTLATIC 
PLACES WITH MORE THAN 10 

City. 1910. 
New York N . . . . .' 4 TBB RR s 


)N OF / 

0,000 INH 
1900. 
,437,202 
,698,575 
,293,697 
575,238 
560,892 
381,768 
508,957 
451,512 
285,704 
352,387 
342,7*2 
285,315 
325,902 
246.07C 
287,104 
278,718 
102,479 
202.718 
206,433 
163,752 
80,671 
169,164 
175.597 
204,731 
162,608 
163.065 
133,859 
90,426 - 
125,560 
131,822 
89,672 
66,960 
118,421 
108,374 
108,027 
38,415 
102,320 
102,026 
85,050 
105,171 
102,555 
104,863 
85,333 
87,565 
80,865 
94,969 
91,886 
36,848 
70.996 
94,151 

NEW Y 

1890. 
1,441,216 

88.908 
838,547 

P CITIES 
3 


iMEBJCAN CITIES. 
ABITANTS IN 1910 BY CENSUS 
1890. 1880. 1870. 
1,515,301 1,206,299 942,292 
1,099,850 503,298 298,977 
1,046,964 847,170 674,022 
451,770 350,518 310,864 
448,477 362,839 250,526 
261,353 160,146 92,829 
434,439 332,313 267,354 
343,904 156,389 86,076 
205,876 116,340 79,577 
255,664 155,134 117,714 
298,997 233,959 149,473 
20-1,463 115,587 71,440 
296,908 255,139 216,239 
181,83) 136,508 105,059 
242,039 216,090 191,418 
230,392 147,293 109,199 
50,395 11,183 5,728 
164,738 46,887 13,066 
163,003 120,722 82,546 
132,716 55,785 32,260 
42,837 3,533 1,107 
105,436 75,056 48,244 
132,146 104,857 68,904 . 
161,129 123,758 100,753 
133,890 89,366 62,386 
133.155 41,473 20,030 
106 713 35 639 4 759 . 


YEARS. 

1860. 1850. 
805,651 515,547 
108,206 29,963 
565,529 121,376 
160,773 77,860 
177,812 136,881 
43,417 17,034 
212,418 169,054 
49,217 46,601 
45,619 21,019 
81,129 42,261 
56,802 34,776 
45,246 20,061 
161,044 115,435 
71,914 38,894 
168,675 116,375 
61,120 40.001 
4,385 1,610 
2 564 


Chicago, 111 


2,185,283 1 


Philadelphia, Pa.... 


1,549,008 1 




687 029 


Boston Mass 


C70 585 


Cleveland O 


560 663 


Baltimore Md 


558 485 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


533 905 


Detroit MicU . 


465 766 


Buffalo N Y.. 


423 715 


San Francisco, Cal-. 


416 912 


Milwaukee Wis 


373 857 


Cincinnati O 


363 591 


Newark N J 


347 469 


New Orleans, La.... 


339 075 


Washington D C.. 


331 069 


Los Angeles Cal 


. . ' . . 319 li>8 




301 408 


Jersey City, N J... 


267 779 


29,226 6,856 
4 418 


Kansas City Mo 


248 381 


Seattle, Wash 
Indianapolis, Iii.l 
Providence R. I.... 


237,194 
233,650 
224 326 




18,611 8,091 
50,666 41,513 
68,033 43,194 
48,204 36,403 
10,401 1,112 


Louisville Ky 


223 928 


Rochester N Y 


218 149 


St Paul Minn 


214 744 


Denver Col 


213 381 


Portland Ore 


207*214 


46,385 17,577 8,293 
88,150 51,647 31,274 
81,434 50.137 30,972 
66,533 37,409 21,789 
48,682 34,555 10,500 
84,655 58.291 41,105 
83,143 51,792 43,051 
81,294 62.882 50,840 
26 178 3 086 


2,874 821 
18,554 17,882 
13,768 3.829 
9,554 2,572 
1,543 
24,960 17,049 
28,119 22,271 
39,267 20,345 


Columbus, O 
Toledo, O 


........ 181,511 
168 497 


Atlanta Ga 


154 839 


Oakland Cal 


150 174 


Worcester, Mass.... 


145 986 


Syracuse N Y .... 


137 249 


New Haven, Conn.. 
Birmingham 41a 


133,605 
132 683 


Memphis, Tenu 


131 105 


64,495 33,592 40,226 
75,215 45,850 Ji5,092 
81,383 63,600 51,038 
78,347 51,031 33,579 
140,452 30,518 16,083 
74,393 48,961 26,766 
61.223 38,678 30,473 
60,278 32,016 16,507 
76,163 43,350 25,865 
77,696 59,475 40,298 
70,028 52,669 18,547 
19,922 350 


22,623 8,841 
9,223 
37,910 27,570 
19,586 11,334 
1 883 


Scranton Pa . . 


.... 129 867 


Richmond Va 


127 628 


Paterson, N J 


125 600 


Omaha, Neb 


124 096 


Fall River Mass 


119 295 


14,026 11,524 

20,081 10,977 
8,085 2,686 
16,948 10,165 
36,827 33,383 
26,060 15,215 


Dayton O 


116 577 


Grand Rapids, Mich 
Nashville Tenn 


112 571 


... 110364 


Lowell, Mass 


106 294 


Cambridge Mass.... 


104 839 


Spokane Wash . 


104 402 




102 054 


48,866 27,643 18,969 
94,923 90,758 69,658 

ORK CITY BY BOROUGHS. 
1910. 
Richmond borough 85,969 
Queens borough 284,041 


13,299 7,560 
62,367 50,763 

1900. 1890. 
67,021 51,693 
152,999 87,050 


Albany N Y 


100 253 


Manhattan borough. 
Bronx borough 


POPULATION OF 

1910. 1900. 
...2,331,542 1,850,093 
. . . 430,980 200,507 


Brooklyn borough . . . 

DECENJ 

City. 
New York, N. Y... 
Chicago 111 


. 1,634,351 1,166,582 
HAL INCREASE O] 


Total New York city. 4,766,883 

WITH MORE THAN 100,000 IN 

1900 to 1910 1890 to 1900 
\~umber.Pr.ct. Number.Pr.ct. 
,329,681 38.7 1,921.901 126.8 
486,708 28.7 598,725 54.4 
255,?.ll 19.7 246,733 23.6 
IH, 791 19.4 123,468 27.3 
109,693 19.6 112,415 25.1 
178.895 46.9 120,415 46.1 
49,528 9.7 74.518 17.2 
82.393 18.2 82,999 34.8 
180,062 63.0 79,828 38.8 
71,328 20.2 96,723 37.8 
74,130 21.6 43,785 14.6 
88.542 31.0 80,847 39.5 
37.CS9 11.8 28.994 9.8 
101.399 41.2 64.240 35.3 
51.971 18.1 45,065 18.6 
53,351 18.8 48,326 21.0 
216,719 211.5 52,084 103.4 
98,690 48.6 37.980 23.1 
61.346 29.7 43.430 26.6 
84,752 51.7 31.036 23.4 
156.523 194.0 37.834 88.3 
64.486 .38.1 63.728 60.4 


3,437,202 2,507,414 

1910. 

1880 to 1890 
Number.Pr.ct. 
309,002 25.6 
596.665 118.6 
199,794 23.6 
101,252 28.9 
85,638 23.6 
101,207 63.2 
102,126 30.7 
82,228 52.6 
89,536 77.0 
100,530 64.8 
65,038 27.8 
88,881 76.9 
41.769 16.4 
45.322 33.2 
25,949 12.0 
52,768 29.7 
39.212 350.6 
117.851 251.4 
42,281 35.0 
76.931 137.9 
39.304 1112.5 
30.380 40.5 






Philadelphia Pa 






St Louis Mo 






Boston, Mass 






Cleveland O 






Baltimore Md 






Pittsburgh Pi 






Detroit, Mich 
Buffalo, N. Y 
San Francisco, Cnl.. 
Milwaukee Wis 











Cincinnati, O 






Newark. N. J 
New Orleans La 






Washington P C 






Los Angeles Cal.... 






Minneapolis, Minn... 
Jersev Cirv N" J 










Kansas CItv Mo 






Seattle Wash 






Indiananolis. Ind. .. 







106 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



1900 to 1910. 1890 to 1900. 1880 to 1890. 


City. 


Number.. 


L'r.ct. 


Number. 


Pr.ct. 


Number. 1 


J r.ct. 


Providence, R. I 


48,729 


27.8 


43,451 


39.9 


27,289 


26.0 


Louisville, Ky 


19,197 


9.4 


43,602 


27.1 


37,371 


30.2 


Rochester, N. Y 


55,541 


34.2 


28,712 


21.4 


44,530 


49.8 


St. Paul, Minn 


51,679 


31.7 


29,909 


22.5 


91,683 


221.1 


Denver, Col 


79,522 


59.4 


27,146 


25.4 


71,084 


199.5 


Portland, Ore 


116,788 


140.2 


44,041 


94.9 


28,808 


163.9 


Columbus, 


55,951 


44.6 


37,410 


42.4 


36,503 


70.7 


Toledo, O 


36,675 


27.8 


50,388 


61.9 


31,297 


62.4 


Atlanta, Ga 


64,967 


72.3 


24,339 


37.1 


28,124 


75.2 


Oakland, Cal 


83,214 


124.3 


18,278 


37.5 


14,127 


40.9 


Worcester, Mass 


27,565 


23.3 


33.766 


39.9 


26,364 


45.2 


Syracuse, N. Y 


., 28,875 


26.6 


20,231 


23.0 


36,351 


70.2 


New Haven, Conn 


' 25,578 


23.6 


26,729 


32.9 


18,416 


29.3 


Birmingham, Ala 


94,270 


245.4 


12,237 


46.7 


23,092 


748.3 


Memphis, Tenn 


28,785 


28.1 


37,825 


58.6 


30,903 


92.0 


Scranton, Pa 
Richmond, Va 


27,841 
85,050 


27.3 
50.1 


26,811 
3,662 


35.6 
4.5 


29,365 

17,788 


64.0 
28.0 


Paterson, N. J 


20,429 


19.4 


26,824 


34.2 


27,316 


53.5 


Omaha, Neb 


21,541 


21.0 


37,897 


27.0 


109,934 


360.2 


Fall River, Mass 


14,432 


13.8 


26,824 


34.2 


27,316 


53.5 


Dayton, O 


31,244 


36.6 


24,113 


39.4 


22,542 


58.3 


Grand Rapids, Mich 


25,006 


28.5 


27,287 


45.3 


28,262 


88.3 


Nashville, Tern: 


29,499 


36.5 


4,697 


6.2 


32,818 


75.7 


Lowell, Mass 


11,325 


11.9 


17,273 


22.2 


18,221 


30.6 


Cambridge, Mass 


12,953 


14.1 


21,858 


31.2 


17,359 


33.0 


Spokane, Wash 


67 554 


183 3 


19 572 


530 6 






Bridgeport, Conn 
Albany, N. Y 


31,058 
6,102 


43.7 
6.5 


22,130 

*772 


45.3 
0.8 


21,223 
4,165 


76.8 
4.6 




Decrease. 













AMERICAN CITIES WITH POPULATION OF 25,000 TO 



Pr. ct. 

Population. 1900- 

City. 1910. 1900. 1890. 1910. 

Akron, 69,067 42,728 27,601 61.6 

Allentown, Pa 51913 35,416 25,228 46.6 

Altoona, Pa 52^127 38,973 30,337 33.8 

Amsterdam, N. Y... 31,267 20,929 17,336 49.4 

Atlantic City, N. J. 46,150 27.838 13,055 65.8 

Auburn, N. Y 34,668 30,345 25,858 14.2 

Augusta, Ga 41,040 39,441 33,300 4.1 

Aurora, 111 29,807 24,147 19,688 23.4 

Austin, Tex 29,860 22,258 14,575 34.2 

Battle Creek, Mich. 25.267 18,563 33,197 36.1 

Bay City, Mich 45,166 27,628 27,839 63.5 

Bayonne, N. J 55,545 32,722 19,033 69.7 

Berkeley, Cal 40,434 13,214 5,101206.0 

Binghamton, N. Y.. 48,443 39,647 35,005 22.2 

Bloomington, 111.... 25,768 23,286 20,484 10.7 

Brockton, Mass 56,878 40,063 27,294 42.0 

Brookline, Mass-... 27,792 19,935 12,103 39.4 

Butte, Mont 39,165 30,470 10,723 28.5 

Camdeu, N. J 94,538 75,935 58,313 24.5 

Canton, 50,217 30,667 26,189 63.7 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 32,811 25,656 18,020 27.9 

Charleston, S. C.... 58,833 55,807 4,955 5.4 

Charlotte, N. C 34,014 18,091 11,557 88.0 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 44,604 30,154 29,100 47.9 

Chelsea, Mass 32,452 34,072 27,909 *4.8 

Chester, Pa 38,537 33,988 20,226 13.4 

Chicopee, Mass 25,401 19,167 14,050 32.5 

Clinton, Iowa 25,577 22,698 13,619 12.7 

Colorado Sprgs..Col. 29,078 21,085 11,140 37.9 

Columbia. S. C 26,319 21,108 15,353 24.7 

Council Bluffs. Iowa 29,292 25,802 21,474 13.5 

Covington, Ky 53,270 42,938 37,371 24.1 

Dallas, Tex 92,104 42,638 38,067 116.0 

Danville, 111 27,871 16,354 11,491 70.4 

Davenport, Iowa.... 43,028 35,254 26,872 22.1 

31,140 20,754 16,841 50.0 



Decatiir, 111 

Des Moines, Iowa.. 



50,093 39.0 



Dubuque, Iowa 38,494 36,297 30,311 6.1 

Duluth, Minn 78,466 52,969 33,115 48.1 

Easlon, P:\ 28,523 ?5,238 14,481 13.0 

East Orange. N. J.. 31.371 21,506 13,282 53.8 

East St. Louis, 111. 58. r ,47 29,655 15,169 97.4 

El Paso, Tex 39.279 15,006 10,338146.9 

Elarin, 111 25,976 22,433 17,823 15.8 

Elizabeth, N. J 73.409 52,130 37,764 40.8 

Elmira, N. Y 37.176 35,672 30,893 4.2 

Erie, Pa 66,525 52,733 40,634 26.2 

Evansville. Ind 69.647 59,007 50,756 18.0 

Everett, Mass 33.484 24,336 11.068 37.6 

Fitchburg, Mass 37,826 31,531 22,037 20.0 

' " ' 38,550 13,103 



Flint, Mich 

Fort Wayne, Ir.d., 
Fort Worth, Tex. 



9.803 194.2 
63 933 -15,115 35,393 41,7 
73,312 26,688 23,076 174.7 



inc. 

1890- 

1900. 
54.8 
40.4 
28.5 
20.7 

11.3.2 
17.4 
18.4 
22.6 
52. 7 
40.7 
*0.8 
71.9 

159.0 
13.3 
13.7 
46.8 
64.7 

184.2 
30.2 
17.1 
42.4 
1.6 
56.5 
3.6 
22.1 
68.0 
36.4 
66.7 
89.3 
37.5 
20.2 
14.9 
12.0 
42.3 
31.2 
23.2 
24.0 
19.7 
60.0 
74.3 
61.9 
95.5 
53.9 
25.9 
38.0 
15.5 
29.8 
16.3 

119.9 
43.1 
33.7 
27.5 
15.7 



City. 

Galveston, Tex 

Green Bay, Wis.... 

Hamilton, O 

Harrisburg, Pa 

Hartford, Conn 

Haverhill, Mass.... 

Hazleton, Pa 

Hoboken, N. J 

Hoiyoke, Mass 

Houston, Tex 

Huntington. W. Va. 

Jackson, Mich 

Jacksonville, Fla... 
Jamestown, N. Y... 

Johnstown, Pa 

Joliet, 111 

Joplin, Mo 

Kalamazoo, Mich . . . 
Kansas City, Kas... 

Kingston, N. Y 

Knoxville, Tenn .... 

LaCrosse. Wis 

Lancaster, Pa 

Lansirig, Mich 

Lawrence, Mass 

Lewis ton, Me 

Lexington, Ky 

Lima, O 

Lincoln, Neb 

Little Rock, Ark.... 

Lorain, O ... 

Lynchburg, Va 

Lynn, Mass 

Macon, Ga 

McKeespcrt, Pa.... 

Madison, Wis 

Maiden, Mass 

Manchester, N. H.. 

Meriden, Conn 

Mobile. Ala 

Montgomery, Aln 
Mount Vernon, N.Y. 

Muskogee, OUla 

Nashua, N. H 

Newark. O . 

New Bedford, Mass. 
New Britain, Conn. 
Newburgh, N. Y.... 

Newcastle. Pa 

Newport, Ky 

Newport, R. I 

Now Rochelle, N.Y. 
Newton, Mass 



100,000 IN 1910. 

Pr. ct. inc. 

Population. 1900- 1890- 

1910. 1900. 1890. 1910. 1900. 

36,981 37,789 29,084 *2.1 29.9 

25,236 18,684 9,069 35.1 106.0 

35,279 23,914 17,565 47.5 36.1 

64,186 50,167 39,385 27.9 27.4 

98,915 79,850 53,230 23.9 50.0 

44,115 37,175 27,412 18.7 35.6 

25,452 14,230 11,872 78.9 19.9 

70,324 59,364 43,648 18.5 36.0 

57,730 45,712 35,637 26.3 28.3 

78.800 44,633 27,557 76.6 62.0 

31,161 11,923 10,108 161.4 18.0 

31, 433 25,180 20,798 24.8 21.1 

57,699 28,429 17,201 103.0 65.3 

31,297 22,892 16,038 36.7 42.7 

55,482 35,936 21,805 54.4 64.8 

34,670 29,353 23,264 18.1 26.2 

32,073 26,023 9,943 23.2 161.7 

39,437 24,404 17,853 61.6 36.7 

82,331 51,418 38,316 

25,908 24,535 21,261 

36,346 32,637 2,535 11.4 44.8 

30,417 28,895 25,090 5.3 15.2 

47,227 41,459 32,011 13.9 29.5 

31,229 16,485 13,102 89.4 25.8 

85,892 62,559 44,654 37.3 40.1 

26.247 23.761 21,701 10.5 9.5 

35,099 26.369 21.567 33.1 22.3 

30.508 21,723 15,981 40.4 35.9 

43,973 40,169 55,154 9.5 *27.2 

45,941 38,307 25,874 19.9 48.1 

28,883 16.C28 4.S63 80.2 229.0 

29,494 18,891 19,709 56.1 *4.2 

89.336 68,513 55,727 30.4 22.9 

40,665 23,272 22.746 74.7 2.3 

42,694 34,227 20,741 24-7 65.0 

25. [-31 19.164 13.426 3b.2 42.7 

44,404 33,664 23,031 31.9 46.2 

70,063 56,987 44.126 22.9 29.1 



3.1 34.2 
5.6 15.4 



27.265 24,296 21.C52 

51,521 38,469 31,076 339 23.8 

38,136 30,346 21,883 25.7 38.7 

30,919 21,i'28 10,830 45.7 96.0 

25,278 4,254 f 494.2 .... 

26,005 23,898 19,311 8.8 23.8 

25,404 18.157 14,270 39.9 27.2 

96.652 62,442 40,733 54.8 53.3 

43,916 25,998 16,519 68.9 57.4 

27,805 24.943 23.0S7 11.5 8.9 

36,280 28,33i> 11,600 28.0 144.3 

30,509 28.301. 24,918 7.1 13.6 

27,149 22,441 19.457 21.0 15.3 

28,867 14,720 9,057 96.1 62.5 

39-SOA 32,587 24,379 18.5 37.8 



ALMANAC AMD YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



107 



City. 
Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

Norfolk, Va 

Norristown, Pa 

Ogdeu, Utah 

Oklahoma City.Okla. 

Orange, N. J 

Oshkosh, Wis 

Pasadena, Cal 

Passaic, N. J 

Pawtucket, R. I.... 

Pooria, 111 

Perth Ainboy, N. J. 

Pittsfield, Mass 

Portlaud, Me 

Portsmouth, Va 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 

Pueblo, Col 

Quincy, 111 

Quincy, Mass 

Racine, Wis 

Reading, Pa 

Roanoko, Va 

Kockfnrd, 111 

Sacramento, Cal 

Saginaw, Mich 

t. Joseph, Mo 
alem, Mass 

Salt Lake City. Utah 
San Antonio, Tex . . 

isnn Die^o, Cal 

San Jose", Cal 

Savannah, Ga 

Scheuectady, N. Y.. 

Sheboygan, Wis 

Shenandoah, Pa 

Shreveport, La 

Sioux City, Iowa.... 
Somerville, Mass... 
South Bond, Ind 
South Omaha, Neb. 

Springfield, 111 

Springfield, Mass.... 

Springfield, Mo 

Springfield, O 

Stamford, Conn. ... 

Superior, Wis 

Tacoraa, Wash 

Tampa, Fla 

Taunton, Mass 

Terre Haute, In<l .. 



Pr. ct. inc. 

Population. 1900- 1890- 

1910. 1900. 1890. 1910. 1900. 

30,445 19,457 t 56.5 .... 

67,452 46,624 34,871 44.7 33.7 

27,8'.5 22,265 19,791 25.2 12.5 

25,580 16,313 14,889 56.8 9.6 

64,205 10,037 4,151 539.7 141.8 

29,630 24,141 18,844 22.7 28.1 

33,062 28.284 22,836 16.9 23.9 

30,291 9,117 4,882 232.2 8C.7 

54.773 27,777 13,028 97.2 113.2 
51,622 39,231 27,633 31.5 42.0 
66,950 56,100 41,024 19.3 36.7 
32,121 17,699 9,512 81.5 86.1 
32,121 21,766 17,281 47.6 26.0 
58,571 50,145 36,425 16.8 37.7 
33,190 17,427 13,268 90.5 31.3 
27,93u 24,029 22,206 16.3 8.2 
44.395 28.157 24,558 57.7 14.7 
36,587 36,252 31,494 0.9 15.1 
32,642 23,899 16,723 36.6 42.9 
38,002 29.102 21,014 30.6 38.5 
96.071 78.961 58.661 21.7 34.6 
34,874 21,495 16,159 G2.2 33.0 
45 401 31,051 23.584 46.2 31.7 
44.690 29.282 26,386 52.6 11.0 
50.510 42,345 46,322 19.3 *8.6 
77,403 102,979 52,324 *24.8 96.8 
43,697 35.956 30,801 21.5 16.7 
92.777 53,5?1 44,843 73.3 19.4 
96,614 53,?21 37,673 SI. 2 41.5 
39,578 17,700 16,159 123.6 9.5 
28,946 21.500 18,060 34.6 19.0 
65,064 54,244 43,189 19.9 25.6 
72.S26 31,682 19,902 129.9 59.2 
26,398 22,f-62 16,359 15.0 40.4 

25.774 20,321 15,944 26.8 27.5 
8.015 16,013 11,979 75.0 33.7 
47,828 33,111 37,806 44.4 *12.4 
77,2r,6 61,643 40,152 25.3 53.5 
53,684 35,999 21,819 49.1 65.0 
26,259 26.001 8,062 1.0 222.5 
51,678 34,159 24,963 51.3 36.8 
88.926 62,059 44,179 43.3 40.5 
35,201 23.267 21,850 51.3 6.5 
46,f>21 38,253 31,895 22.7 19.9 
25,138 15,997 t 67.1 .... 
40,384 31,091 11,983 29.9 159.5 
83,743 37,714 36,006 122.0 4.7 
37,782 15,839 5,532 138.5 186.3 
34,259 31,036 25,448 10.4 22.0 
58,157 36,673 30,217 52.6 21.4 



Pr. ct. inc. 

Population. 1900- 1890- 

Clty. 1910. 1900. 1890. 1910. 1900. 

Topeka, Kas 43,684 33,608 31,007 30.0 8.4 

Trenton, N. J 96,815 73,307 57,458 32.1 27.6 

Troy, N. Y 76,813 60.G51 60,956 26.6 *O.B 

Utica, N. Y 74,419 56,383 44,007 32.0 28.1 

Waco, Tex 26,425 20,686 14,445 27.7 43.2 

Waltham, Mass 27,834 23,481 18.707 18.5 25.5 

Warwick. R, 1 26,629 21,316 17,761 24.9 20.0 

Watcrbury, Conn... 73,141 45,859 28,646 69.5 60.1 

Waterloo, Iowa 26,693 12,580 6,674112.2 88. r . 

Watertown. N. Y... 26,730 21,696 14,725 23.2 47.3 

West Hoboken, N.J. 35,403 23,094 11,665 53.3 98.0 

Wheeling. W. Va... 41,641 38,878 34,522 7.1 12.4 

Wichita, Kas 52,450 24,671 23,853 112.6 3.6 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa... 67,105 51,721 37,718 29.7 37.1 

Williamsport, Pa... 31.860 28,757 27,132 10.8 6.0 

Wilmington, Del 87,411 76,508 61,431 14.3 24.5 

Wilmington, N. C.. 25,748 20,976 20,056 2.7 4.6 

Woonsocket, R. I... 38,125 28,204 20,830 38.7 35.4 

Yonkers, N. Y 79,803 47,931 32,033 66.5 49.6 

York, Pa 44,750 33.708 20,793 32.8 62.1 

Youngstown, 79,066 44,885 33.220 76.2 35.1 

ZanesYille, 28,026 22,238 21,009 19.1 12.0 

Decrease, tlncorporated since 1890. 

CITIES OF FASTEST GROWTH, 1900 TO 1910. 

Pop.. Pet. inc. 
Rank. City. 1910. 1900-1910, 

1. Oklahoma City, Okla 64,205 539.7 

2. Mr.skogee, Oklu 25,278 494.2 

3. Birmingham, Ala 132,685 245.4 

4. Pasadena, Cal 30.291 232.2 

5. Los Angeles, Cal 319,198 211.5 

6. Berkeley, Cal 40,434 206.0 

7. Flint, Mich 38,550 194.2 

8. Seattle, Wash 237.194 194.0 

9. Spokane, Wash 104.402 183.8 

10. Fort Worth, Tex 73,312 174.7 

11. Huntington, W. Va 31.161 161.4 

12. El Paso, Tex 39,279 146.9 

13. Tampa, Fla 37,782 138.5 

14. Scheuectady, N. Y 72,826 129.9 

15. Portland, Ore 207,214 129.2 

16. Oakland, Cal 150,174 T24.3 

17. San Diego, Cal 39,578 123-ft 

18. Tacoma, Wash 83,743 122.0 

19. Dallas, Tex 92,104 116.0 

20. Wichita, Kas 52,450 112.6 

21. Waterloo, Iowa 26,693 112.2 

22. Jacksonville, Fla 57,699 103.0 



DWELLINGS AND FAMILIES IN THE UNITED STATES (1910). 



In census usage a "dwelling" is any building 
in which one or more persons reside. A mere 
cabin, or room in a warehouse, occupied by a 
single person, is a census dwelling, while, on the 
other hand, an apartment house containing many 
families constitutes only one dwelling. Only oc- 
cupied dwellings are included in the following 
tables. The term "family" as used in census 
reports means a household or group of persons, 
whether related by blood or not, who share a 
common abode, usually also sharing the same 
table. If one person lives alone he constitutes a 
family, while, on the other hand, those who dwell 
in a hotel or institution in which many people 
live are also treated as forming a single family. 
There is, however, no considerable difference be- 
tween the average size of all families under the , 
census usage and the average size of what are i 
commonly termed families or households in popu- 
lar speech. In 1900 the difference for the United 
States as a whole was only 0.1 per cent. 

At ach census from 1850 to 1910 a decrease 
was shown in the average number of persons per 
dwelling and the average number per family. 
The decrease in the average number per dwell- 
ing has been due to the decrease in the average 
per family, the influence of which has been 
partly offset by the increased construction of 
tenements and other dwellings containing more 
than one family. 

In 1910 there were 7,254,242 dwellings and 9,499,- 
765 families in urban communities, while there 
were 10,551,603 dwellings and 10,755,790 families 



in rural communities. For urban communities the 
number of persons to a dwelling averaged 5.9- 
and to a family 4.5; for rural communities the 
number of persons to a dwelling averaged 4.7 
and to a family 4.6. 



BY STATES. 




Dwell- 


* Per- 


Fam- f 


Per- 


State. 


ings. 


sons. 


ilies. s 


ons. 


Alabama 


441,249 


5.0 


454,767 


4.7 


Arizona 


45,386 


4.5 


47,927 


4.3 


Arkansas 


327,625 


4.8 


333.368 


4.7 


California 


513,481 


4.6 


563,636 


4.2 


Colorado 


183,874 


4.3 


194,467 


4.1 


Connecticut 


181,911 


6.1 


246,659 


4.5 


Delaware 


43,183 


4.7 


44,951 


4.5 


District of Columbia 


58,513 


5.7 


71,339 


4.6 


Florida '. 


165,818 


4.5 


171,422 


4.4 


Georgia 


530,631 


4.9 


553.264 


4.7 


Idaho 


71,830 


4.5 


73,669 


4.4 


Illinois 


1,006,848 


5.6 


1,264,717 


4.5 


Indiana 


631,554 


4.3 


654,891 


4.1 


Iowa 


498,943 


4.5 


512,515 


4.3 


Kansas 


385,672 


4.4 


395,771 


4.3 


Kentucky 


469,669 


4.9 


494.788 


4.6 


Louisiana 


331,220 


5.0 


344,144 


4.8 


Maine 


159,437 


4.7 


177,960 


4.2 


Maryland 


253,805 


5.1 


274,824 


4.7 


Massachusetts 


511,926 


6.6 


734,013 


4.6 


Michigan 


618,222 


4.5 


657,418 


4.3 


Minnesota 


380,809 


5.5 


416.452 


5.0 


Mississippi 


376,420 


4.8 


384,724 


4.7 



108 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Dwell- *Per- Fam- tPer- 

State. ings. sons. ilies. sons. 
Missouri 677196 4.9 749,812 4.4 


Dwell- *Per- Fam- fPer- 
City. ings. sons. ilies. sons. 
Chicago, 111 246744 89 473141 46 


Montana 82811 45 86,602 4.3 


Cincinnati O . 49 525 7 3 87 541 4 2 


Nebraska 258 967 4 6 265 549 4 5 


Cleveland O 90 465 6 2 124 822 4 5 


Nevada 23 044 36 23 677 35 


Columbus O 39*580 4 6 42*645 4 3 


New Hampshire 88,871 4.8 103,156 4.2 
New Jersey 407295 6.2 558,202 4.5 


Dayton, 26*692 44 28370 41 


Denver Col 44 736 48 51 339 4 2 


New Mexico 75,888 4.3 78,883 4.1 
New York 1 178 686 77 2 046 845 4 5 


Detroit Mich 83 124 5 6 100 356 4 6 


Fall River. Mass 10*,962 10.9 24*,378 4.9 
Grand Rapids, Mich... 23,432 4.8 26,925 4.2 
Indianapolis, Ind 53,359 4.3 58,645 4.0 
Jersey City, N. J 27,805 9.6 56,790 4.7 
Los Angeles, Cal 69,061 4.6 78,678 4.1 
Louisville Ky . . . . 41 686 54 52 155 4 3 


North Carolina '430,570 5.1 440,334 5.0 
North Dakota 118,757 4.9 120,910 4.8 
Ohio 1 024 800 47 1 138 165 4.2 


Oklahoma 342 488 4 8 351 167 4 7 


Oregon 144.832 4.6 151,858 4.4 
Pennsylvania 1,507,483 5.1 1,630,628 4.7 
Rhode Island 79 725 6 8 117 976 4 6 


Lowell. Mass 15,056 7.1 21*932 4.8 


Memphis, Tenn 26,710 4.9 31,154 4.2 
Milwaukee, Wis 60,724 6.2 80,566 4.6 
Minneapolis, Minn 46,903 6.4 63,241 4.8 
Nashville Tenn 22 118 50 26 077 4 2 


South Carolina 302,842 5.0 315,204 4.8 
South Dakota 127739 46 131,060 4.5 


Tennessee . . . 444 814 4 9 462 553 4.7 


Texas 779 177 5 798 426 4 9 


New Haven, Conn 17*466 7.6 29*271 4.6 
New Orleans, La 67,192 5.0 73,377 4.6 
New York, N. Y 305,698 15.6 1,020,827 4.7 
Newark N J 38 693 90 77 039 4 5 


Utah 72649 51 77,339 4.8 


Vermont 77466 46 85,178 4.2 


Virginia . 400 445 5 1 419 452 4 9 


Washington ." 238,822 4.8 254,692 4.5 


Oakland Cal 31*740 4 7 36*723 41 


West Virginia 239128 5.1 248,840 4.9 


Omaha Neb 23 657 52 26 359 4 7 


Wisconsin 462,355 5.0 499,629 4.7 


Paterson N. J 15812 79 27978 45 


Wvoming 30 969 47 32 092 4 5 




United States . ...17805842 5.2 20255555 4.5 


Pittsburgh, Pa 86,942 6.1 110*457 4.8 
Portland, Ore 37.436 5.5 42,029 4.9 
Providence, R. 1 28,705 7.8 49,129 4.6 
Richmond Va 22 205 57 26 914 4 7 


*n 1900 14.430,145 5.3 16,187,715 4.7 
In 1890 11,483,318 5.5 12,690,152 4.9 


*Persons to a dwelling. fPersons to a family. 
BY PRINCIPAL CITIES. 
Dwell- *Per- Fam- fPer- 
City. ings. sons. ilies. sons. 
Albany, N. Y 15,437 6.5 24,069 4.2 
Atlanta Ga 30 308 51 35 813 4 3 


Rochester, N. Y 38,860 5.6 46,787 4.7 
St Louis Mo 105 650 6 5 155 555 4 4 


St. Paul, Minn 32,616 6.6 41548 52 


San Francisco, Cal.... 65,025 6.4 86,414 4.8 
Scranton Pa 22 143 59 26 312 4 9 


Seattle, Wash 43,559 5.4 51 ', 042 4.6 


Baltimore, Mrt 101^905 5.5 118*851 4.7 
Birmingham, Ala 26,989 4.9 31,050 4.3 


Spokane, Wash 20.282 5.1 22,676 4.6 
Syracuse, N. Y 23,200 5.9 31,551 4.4 
Toledo O . 35 888 47 39 677 4 2 


Boston, Mass 73,919 9.1 139,700 4.8 
Bridgeport. Conn 14,934 6.8 21,689 4.7 


Washington, D. C 58,513 5.7 71.339 4.6 
Worcester Mass. . 15 109 97 30 743 4 7 


Cambridge, Mass 14,577 7.2 22,765 4.6 


*Persons to a dwelling. fPersons to a family. 


STATE NICKNAMES I 
State. Nickname. Flower. 
Alabama Cotton state Goldenrod 


LND STATE FLOWERS. 

State. Nickname. Flower. 
New Jersey Jersey Blue state.Sugar maple(tree) 
New York . ..Empire state. Rose 


Arizona . . . Sequoia cactus 


Arkansas Bear state Apple blossom 
California Golden state Poppy 
Colorado Centennial state.. Columbine 
Connecticut Nutmeg state Mountain laurel 
Delaware Blue Hen state Peach blossom 


North Carolina .Old North state. 
North Dakota. . . Flickertai 1 state Goldenrod 
Ohio Buckeye state. 


Oregon Beaver state Oregon grape 
Pennsylvania... Keystone state. 
Rhode Island Little Rhody.. . Violet 


Florida Peninsula state. 
Georgia Cracker state Cherokee rose 


Idaho Syringa 


South Carolina.. Palmetto state. 
South Dakota... Sunshine state. .Pasqueflower (ane- 
mone patens) with 
motto "I Lead." 
Tennessee Big Bend state 


Illinoi s* . Sucker state Violet 


Indianat Hoosierstate . .. Carnation 


Iowa. . . '. Hawkeye state Wild rose 


Kansas Sunflower state Sunflower 
Kentucky Blue Grass state Blue grass 
Louisiana Pelican state Magnolia 
Maine Pine Tree state Pine cone 


Texas . ... Lone Star state Bluebonnet 


Utah Seto Illy 


Vermont Green Mountain state. ..lied clover 


Maryland Old Line state. 
Massachusetts.. Buy state. 
Michigan Wolverine state Apple blossom 
Minnesota Gopher state Moccasin 
Mississippi Bavou state Magnolia 


Virginia The Old Dominion. 


Washington Evergreen state Rhododendron 
West Virginia... The Panhandle Rhododendron 
Wisconsin Badger state Violet 
NOTE Only nicknames that are well known 
and "state flowers" officially adopted or com- 
monly accepted are given in the foregoing list. 
*Native state tree, the native oak. tOfficial 
state song, "On the Banks of the Wabash." 


Montana Stub Toe state Bitter root 
Missouri... Goldenrod 


Nebraska Goldenrod 


Nevada Silver state 
NewHampshireGranite state. 



BURIAL PLACES OF 

George Washington Mount Vernon, Va. 

John Adams Quincy, Mass. 

Thomas Jefferson Monticello, Va. 

James Madison Montpelier, Va. 

James Monroe Richmond, Va. 

John Quincy Adams Quincy, Mass. 

Andrew Jackson Hermitage, Nashville, Tenn. 

Martin Van Buren Kinderhook, N. Y. 

William Henry Harrison North Bend, O. 

John Tyler Richmond, Va. 

James Knox Polk Nashville, Tenn. 

Zachary Taylor Springfield, Ky. 



AMERICAN PRESIDENTS. 

.Millard Fillmbre Buffalo, N. Y. 
Franklin Pierce Concord, N. H. 
James Buchanan Lancaster, Pa. 
Abraham Lincoln Springfield, 111. 
Ulysses S. Grant New York, N. Y. 
Rutherford B. Hayes Fremont, O. 
James A. Garfield Cleveland, O. 
Chester A. Arthur Albany, N. Y. 
Benjamin Harrison Indianapolis, Ind. 
William McKinley Canton, O. 
Grover Cleveland Princeton, N. J. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



109 



PAUPERS ENUMERATED IN 
[United States 
State. Total. Male.Female 
Alabama 739 365 374 


ALMSHOUSES JAN, 1, 1910. 
census report.] 
PAUPERS ADMITTED TO ALMSHOUSES IN 
1910. 
Total 88 313 NPSTA R Km 


Arizona 271 247 24 


Arkansas 534 284 250 


Male 67 195 


Male 4 612 


California 4646 3952 694 


Female 21,118 
White 81,185 
Male 62 262 


Female 2 195 


Colorado 510 434 76 


Indian 130 
Other colored 241 

ERS IN ALMSHOUSES. 

ADMITTED IN 1910. 

Born in No. 
Austria-Hungary . 1,666 
Canada (English) . 1.837 
Canada (French). . 505 
England and Walts 2,945 
France 402 
Germany 5,531 
Ireland 11, 90S 
Italy 1.139 
Poland 979 


Connecticut 2 ?44 1571 673 


Delaware 366 227 139 


Female 18^873 
FOREIGN-BORN PAUP 

ENUMERATED JAN. 1, 1910. 

Born in No. 
Austria-Hungary.. 1,052 
Canada (English).. 1,300 
Canada (French)... 528 
England and Wales 2,922 
France 458 
Germany 7.373 
Ireland 14.177 
Italy 427 
Poland . 613 


District of Columbia . . 276 163 113 


Florida 207 161 46 


Georgia 813 351 462 


Idaho 97 85 12 


Illinois 5421 4021 1400 


Indiana 3*114 2*122 *992 


Iowa 1*779 1*198 581 


Kansas '735 '502 233 


Kentucky . 1 522 871 651 


Louisiana *187 112 75 
Maine 945 529 416 
Maryland 1,681 1,149 532 
Massachusetts 6,555 4,418 2.137 
Michigan 2,970 2,157 813 


Minnesota 687 550 137 
Mississippi 436 182 254 
Missouri 2,388 1,533 855 
Montana 415 383 32 
Nebraska 551 449 102 
Nevada 159 145 14 


Russia 431 
Scandinavia .. 1.891 
Scotland 817 
Switzerland 513 
Other countries... 623 
Of the foreign-born 
almshouses in 1910 26,470 
States twenty-six years 
three had been in the co 

DEFECTIVE PAUPEE 

ENUMERATED JAN. 1, 1910. 

Total number 53.619 
Male 34 650 


Russia 1.315 
Scandinavia 1.947 
Scotland 995 
Switzerland 430 
Other countries... 1.755 
paupers enumerated in 
had lived in the United 
or more. Only thirty- 
untry less than one year. 

>S IN ALMSHOUSES. 

ADMITTED IN 1910. 

Total number.. ..32,519 
Male 24 098 


New Hampshire 991 557 434 


New Jersey 2135 1407 728 


New York 12031 8035 3996 


North Carolina 1389 596 793 


North Dakota ... 81 59 22 


Ohio 8078 5638 2440 


Oklahoma 48 39 9 


Oregon 352 328 24 


Pennsylvania .... ... 9606 6623 2983 


Rhode Island 768 401 *367 


South Carolina 478 219 259 


Female 18,969 
Insane 2,857 
Feeble-minded ... 9,813 


Female 8,421 
Insane 1,681 
Feeble-minded .. 3,601 
Epileptic 646 


South Dakota 145 109 36 


Tennessee ... 1 569 776 793 


Texas ' 861 560 301 


Utah 181 121 60 






Vermont 383 222 161 


Blind 2 427 


Blind 835 


Virginia 1,688 883 805 


Crippled 10 823 


Crippled 9 033 


Washington 564 493 71 


Old and infirm.... 14. 066 


Old and infirm 9*772 
Bedridden 4 960 


West Virginia 808 462 346 


Wisconsin 1,775 1343 432 




Two or more de- 
fects 1 839 


Wyoming 19 17 2 


Two or more de- 
fects 6,811 




IN ALMSHOUSES. 

ADMITTED IN 1910. 

Under 5 years.. 3,459 
5 to 14 years... 2,651 
15 to 24 years. . 7.350 
25 to 28 years. . 4.835 
30 to 34 years. . 4,850 
35 to 39 years. . 5.656 
40 to 44 years. . 5,883 
45 to 49 years. . 6.579 
50 to" 54 years. . 7.953 
55 to 59 years. 7.691 
60 to 64 years. 8.484 
65 to 69 years. 7.446 
70 to 74 years. 6.202 
75 to 79 years. 3,986 
80 years or more 3.365 
Age unknown... 1.923 

garnet; February, am- 
April, sapphire ; May. 
r agate; June, emerald; 
lelian; September, chrys- 
ine or beryl; November, 

zed by the American Jew- 
January, garnet ; Febru- 
aquamarine, bloodstone ; 
emerald ; June, pearl, 
August, moonstone, peri- 
re ; October, opal, tour- 
z ; December, turquoise, 


PAUPERS BY COLOR AND SEX. 

White Total 77,734 Male 3,763 
Male 53149 Female 2518 


AGE OF PAUPERS 

ENUMERATED JAN. 1, 1910. 

Under 5 years . 1,186 
5 to 14 years. . 1.184 
15 to 24 years. . 2,514 
25 to 29 years. . 2,058 
30 to 34 years. . 2,396 
35 to 39 years. . 3,337 
40 to 44 years. . 4.203 
45 to 49 years. . 5.188 
50 to 54 years. . 7,113 
55 to 59 years. .. 8,312 
60 to 64 years. ..10,089 
65 to 69 years. ..10.357 
70 to 74 years. ... 9,743 
75 to 79 years. ... 7.720 
80 or more years.. 8,123 
Age unknown 675 

YMBOLS OF MONTHS 

months are: January, 
ethyst; March, jasper; 
chalcedony, carnelian o 
July, onyx; August, can 
olite; October, aquamar 
topaz; December, ruby. 
The birth stones author] 
elers' association are: 
ary, amethyst; March, 
April, diamond ; May, 
moonstone ; July, ruby ; 
dot ; September, sapphi 
maline; November, topa 
lapis lazuli. 


Female 24585 Indian 74 


Negro Total 6281 Other colored 109 


WHITE PAUPERS BY NATIVITY AND PAR- 
ENTAGE. 
Native Total 44 254 Male 7 512 


Male 28,321 Female 2,565 


Female 15933 Par'tage unknown 1,719 


Native parentage. 32. 458 Foreign born 33,125 
Male 19.817 Male 24 6U5 


Female 12 641 Female 8 520 


Foreign parentage. 10, 077 Nativity unknown *355 

FLOWER AND GEM S 

Month. Flower. Gem. 


February. . . .Primrose. Amethyst 


March Violet Bloodstone. 
April Daisy Diamond. 
Mav. . . Hawthorn Emerald 




July Water lily ^. . . Rnbv 


August Poppy Sardonyx. 


October Hops Aquamarine. 
November. . . Chrysanthemum Topaz 


December Holly Turquoise. 
The above gem symbols are those of Polish 
tradition. The Jewish gem symbols of the 



110 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



INSANE ENUMERATED II 
[From United Sta 

State. ' Total. Male.Female 
Alabama 9 rwa aci i nuo 


r HOSPITALS JAN, 1, 
tes census report.] 

ADMITTEl 

Born in Number. 
Austria-Hungary... 1,402 
Canada (English).. 1.030 
Canada (French)... 266 
England and Wales 1,148 
France 146 


1910. 

) IN 1910. 
Born in Number. 
Italy 863 


Arizona ... 




Arkansas 




i Poland 429 


California 


6,652 4,115 2,537 
1,199 687 512 


Russia 1.518 
Scandinavia 1,587 
Scotland 297 


Colorado 


Connecticut 


Delaware 


441 237 204 


Germany 3.105 
Ireland 2,833 

INSANE IN HOSI 

ENUMERATED JAN. 1, 1910. 

Under 15 years.... 341 
15 to 19 years 2.312 
20 to 24 years 7.801 
25 to 29 years 14,083 
30 to 34 years 19,091 
35 to 39 years 22,856 
40 to 44 years 23,321 
45 to 49 years 22.874 
50 to 54 jears 20.885 
55 to 59 years 16.383 
60 to 64 years 12.729 
65 years or more.. 21, 881 


Switzerland 1H6 
Other countries... 703 

ITALS BY AGES. 
20 to 24 years 21,432 
25 to 29 years 27,195 
30 to 34 years 26.655 
35 to 39 years 24,225 
40 to 44 years 1.TC4 
45 to 49 years 14,784 
50 to 54 years 11.167 
bo to 59 years 6.922 
60 to 64 years 5.239 
65 years or more.. 8.316 
Age oiiknovni 13911 
*Age of insane enu- 
merated in hospitals 
Jan. 1, 1910, when first- 
admitted to any hospi- 
tal. 

RESIDENCE PRIOR TO 
ADMISSION^. 

In places having a pop- 
ulation of 
Lss than 2. 500.. 20,442 
2,500 to 10,000.. 5,942 
10,000 to 25,000.. 4,239 
25,000 to 50,000.. 3,515 
50,000 to 100,000.. 3,228 
100,000 to 500,000.. 7,901 
500,000 or more.... 11,829 
NOTE These figures re- 
fer to residence prior 
to admission of insane 
In hospitals enumerated 
Jan. 1. 1910. 

ITAL, CONDITION. 

JAN. 1, 1910. 

Female Total 89,096 
Sinule 3" 115 


District of Columbia 


Florida 


... . 849 446 403 


Georgia 




Idaho 


388 256 132 


Illinois 


12 839 6 846 5 993 


Indiana 


4 527 2 35 2 292 


Iowa 




Kansas 




Kentucky ... 




Louisiana 


2 158 1 070 1 088 


Maine 


1 258 693 565 


Maryland 


3 220 1 569 1 651 


Massachusetts . 




Michigan .... 




Minnesota .... 


4,744 2,755 1,989 


Mississippi 


Missouri 


6 168 3 231 2 937 


Montana 


697 531 166 


ADMITTED IN 1910. 

Under 15 years.... 327 
15 to 19 years 2,539 
20 to 24 years 5,701 
25 to 29 years 7.027 
30 to 34 years 7.295 
35 to 39 years 7.495 
40 to 44 years 6,469 
45 to 49 years 5,681 
50 to 64 years 4,877 
55 to 59 vears 3,368 
60 to 64 years 2.872 
65 years or more.. 6,161 
Age unknown 957 


Nebraska 




Nevada 




New Hampshire 


. . . . 909 463 446 


New Jersey 




New Mexico 


........ 219 128 91 

31 280 14 955 16 3 9 5 


New York 


North Carolina 


2 522 1 032 1 490 


North Dakota . 


628 407 22 1 


Ohio 


10 594 5 615 4 979 


Oklahoma 




Oregon 


1 565 1 088 477 


Pennsylvania 


15 058 7 919 7 139 


Rhode Island : 


1,243 '650 '593 


South Carolina 
South Dakota 


1,541 708 833 


WHEN FIRST ADMITTED.* 

Under 15 years.... 1,079 
15 to 19 years 8 10 9 


Tennessee 


2,204 1,057 1,147 


Utah 


4,053 2,087 1,966 
342 171 171 


INSANE BY MAlT 

ENUMERATED 

Male Total 98,695 
Single 62,68.", 
Married 26 047 


Vermont 


990 528 46 9 


Virginia .... 


3 635 1 779 1 816 


Washington 


1 987 1 325 66 9 


West Virginia 


1,722 900 822 


Wisconsin 




Married 35.975 
Widowed 12.672 
Divorced ... 1 368 


Wyoming 


162 105 67 


Widowed 5.405 
Divorced 1,040 
Unknown 3.520 

INSANE BY 
Insane at least 10 year 1 
hospitals, J 
Literate Total ..142,315 
-Male 75.642 
Female 66.673 


United States .. 




187 7Q1 QS fiQS BQ AQC 


Unknown 1,966 

"LITERACY. 

3 of age enumerated in 
an. 1. 1910. 
Native Literate.. 94,896 
Illiterate 16.669 
Foreign *Literate 40,452 
Illiterate 10 224 


INSANE BY RACE, NATIVITY AND SEX. 

ENUMERATED IN HOSPITALS, JAN. 1. 1910. 

Total. Male.Female 

White 174994 O1 C17 B9 Cft7 


Native 
Native parentage 


115,402 60,644 54,758 
67 531 35 238 32 ?93 


Foreign parentage 


... 28 186 15 415 12 771 


Illiterate Total.. 35,959 
Male 17 896 


Foreign-born 


54 096 28 415 25 681 


*Foreign-born. 

DEATHS IN 1910. 
DIED. 
White Total 16.868 
Male 9.939 


Nativity unknown 


4 726 2 558 2 168 


Female 18,063 


Negro 


12 910 6 536 6 374 


DISCHARGES ANE 

DISCHABGED. 
White Total 27,614 
Male 15.261 
Female 12.3n2 
Colored Total 1,690 
Male 932 


Indian 


166 90 76 


Other colored. 


4Q1 459 QQ 


INSANE ADMITTED TO HOSPITALS IN 1910. 


White Total 




Female 6.929 


Native 


39 629 22 190 17 439 


Colored Total ... 2,056 
Male 1 106 










Female 758 


Female /. ... 950 

INSTITUTIONS JAN. 1. 

0. 
es census report.! 
Total. Male.Female. 

8=14 47tt 284 


Foreign-born 


15,523 8 838 6 685 


FEEBLE MINDED IN 
191 
[From United Stal 
State. 
California 


Nativity unknown 


1 030 618 412 


Negro 


4 384 2 304 2 OSO 


Indian 


51 32 19 


Other colored 


152 134 18 


FOREIGN-BORN IXsI 

ENUMKRATEI 

Born in Number. 
Austria-Hungary... 3.477 
Canada (English). 2,777 
Canada (French). 972 
England and Wales 3.706 


INE IN HOSPITALS. 

> JAN. 1, 1910. 

Born in Number. 
Italy 1 829 


Colorado 64 39 25 


Connecticut 294 156 138 
Illinois 1 2fiS 71 s 547 




... 1,135 518 617 
... 1,189 619 570 
... 420 237 183 
983 IK? ite 


Poland l 312 


Iowa 


Russia 3,121 
Scandinavia 6.442 
Scotland 849 
Switzerland 752 
Other countries... 1,554 


Kansas 


Maine 62 49 13 




Maryland 310 151 159 


Ireland .. ...13.174 


Massachusetts 1,464 879 585 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Ill 



State. 
Michigan 


Total. 
986 


Male.! 
518 
628 
233 
30 
235 
70 
296 
1,685 
79 
810 
1,598 
48 


emile 
468 
566 
279 
21 
211 
74 
344 
1,736 
66 
716 
1,107 


State. 


Total. 
47 
19 


Male. Female 
25 22 
9 10 
45 
29 31 
116 98 
468 561 


Minnesota 


1 194 


Texas ... 


Missouri 


512 


Utah 


45 


Montana 


51 


Virginia 


60 


Nebraska 


446 


West Virginia 


214 


New Hampshire 


144 




. 1 029 




640 


United States 




New York 


3 421 


20 731 


11,015 
10,849 
162 
4 
2,227 


9,716 
9,592 
118 
6 
1.598 


North Dakota 


145 


White 


20 441 


Ohio 


1 526 




280 




2 705 




10 


Rhode Island 


. .. 48 


\dmitted in 1910 


3 825 











PRISONERS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Enumerated Jan. 1, 1910. [From report of United States census bureau.] 
Total. 



.State. 

Alabama ..................... . 

Arizona ....................... 692 

Arkansas ..................... 1,361 

California .................... 4,900 

Colorado ...................... 1,662 

Connecticut .................. 2,218 

Delaware ..................... 391 

District of Columbia ........ 1,196 

Florida ....................... 1,934 

Georgia ....................... 5,078 

Idaho ......................... 287 

Illinois ....................... 7,025 

Indiana ....................... 3,969 

Iowa .......................... 1,920 

Kansas ........................ 1,971 

Kentucky .................... 3,564 

Louisiana .................... 2,514 

Maine ........................ 1,073 

Maryland ..................... 3,328 

Massachusetts ............... 8,212 

Michigan ..................... 3,747 

Minnesota .................... 2,005 

Mississippi ................... 2,283 

Montana ...................... 1,050 

Nebraska ..................... 789 

Nevada ........... . ........... 289 

New Hampshire ............. 707 

New Jersey .................. 3,837 

New Mexico ................... 425 

New York .................... 16,082 

North Carolina .............. 1,420 

North Dakota ................ 419 

Ohio ......................... 5,979 

Oklahoma ................... 1,668 

Oregon ........................ 737 

Pennsylvania ................. 10,313 

Rhode Island ................. 1,088 

South Carolina ................ 1,691 

South Dakota ................. 382 

Tennessee .................... 2,713 

Texas ......................... 4,412 

Utah .......................... 692 

Vermont ...................... 568 

Virginia ...................... 3,619 

Washington .................. 1,884 

West Virginia ................ 1,816 

Wisconsin .................... 2,281 



Male. Female 
3,674 184 
682 10 
1,308 53 
4,740 160 
1,513 149 
1,844 374 
344 47 
1,014 182 
1,850 84 
4,854 224 
286 1 
6,173 852 
3,465 504 
1,687 233 
1,725 246 
3,299 265 
2,401 113 
878 195 
2,946 382 
7,193 1,019 
3,308 439 
1,858 147 
2,194 89 
1,032 18 
720 69 
285 4 
612 95 
3,444 393 
415 10 
14,254 1,828 
1,331 89 
410 9 
5,190 789 
1,630 38 
729 8 
9,315 998 
962 126 
1,613 78 
343 39 
2,581 132 
4,312 100 
682 10 
499 69 
3,385 234 
1,796 88 
1,689 127 
1.982 299 


State. Total. Male.Female 
Wyoming . . . 287 286 1 


United States prisons 1,904 1,904 


United States 


...136,472 124,424 12.048 


NOTE Prisoners in abc 
delinquents. 
PRISONERS BY RACE, 
WHITE. 
Total 93 841 


ve table include juvenile 

NATIVITY AND SEX. 
Male IS. 450 


Female . . 1 520 


Male 85,218 


Nativity unknown. 1,030 

NEGHO. 
Total 41 729 


Female 8 623 


Native Total 71, 841 
Male 64 807 


Male 38 346 


Female 7,034 
Foreign Total . . .20,970 
JUVENILE Dl 
Total 24 974 


Female 2.383 
Other colored 902 


ELJNQUENTS. 

White . 21 044 


Male 19,062 
Female 5 912 


Negro 3,853 
Other colored 75 
[FIED BY CRIMES. 
Larceny 27 817 


PRISONERS CLASS 
Grave homicide .. 6,904 
Lesser homicide .. 7,412 
Major assaults. .. 7,172 
Minor assaults. .. 2,870 
Robbery 4 937 


Fraud 1 518 


Forgery 3 3 1 7 


Drunk, disorderly. 13, 914 
Vagrancy . 6 956 


Burglary 18,307 
NOTE Prisoners inclm 
only principal offenses a 
PRISONERS CLASSiF 
Sentenced to 
Death 143 


le juvenile delinquents; 
re given. 
IED BY SENTENCES. 
Sentenced to 
6 years 1.408 


Life imprisonment 6.444 
20 years or more.. 3,841 
15 to 19 years 2.593 
10 to 14 years 5,752 
9 years 471 


5 years 6.460 


4 years 3.054 


3 years 5,606 


2 years 8 240 


1 year 8,783 
Less than 1 year.. 23. 449 
Indeterminate ....27,487 
MITTED IN 1910. 
White 381,498 


8 yars 1,274 


7 years 1 909 


PRISONERS COM 
Total 493 934 


Male 445 431 


Colored 112,436 

PAROLED IN 1910. 
White 365 010 


Female 48.503 
DISCHARGED OR 

Totil 46S 277 


Male 422 258 


Colored . . .103 267 


Female .. .. 46.019 





STATE 

Alabama Wetumpka. 

Alaska Sitka (U. S. jail). 

Arizona Florence. 

Arkansas Little Rock. 

California Folsom. 
San Quentin. 

Colorado Canon City. 

Connecticut Weathersfleld. 

Delaware Wilm'srton(w'khouse). 

District of Columbia U. S. jail. 

Florida Tallahassee (commis- 
sion). 

Georgia Atlanta (commission). 

Illinois Joliet, Chester. 

Idaho Boise. 

Indiana Michigan City. 
Indianapolis (women). 

Icwa Fort Madison, Anamosa. 

Kansas Lansing. 

Kentucky Frankfort. 
Eddyv'ille (branch). 

Louisiana Baton Rouge. 

Maine Thomaston. 

Maryland Baltimore. 



PRISONS IN THE UNITED 

Massachusetts Charlestown. 

Bridgewater. 

South Framingham (women). 
Michigan Jackson. 

Marquette (branch). 
Minnesota Stillwater. 
Mississippi Jackson(comm'sion). 
Missouri Jefferson City. 
Montana Deer Lodge. 
Nebraska Lincoln. 
Nevada Carson City. 
New Hampshire Concord. 
New Mexico Santa Fe. 
New Jc rsey Trenton. 
New York Auburn. 

Dannemora (Clinton). 

Sing Sing (Ossining). 
North Carolina Raleigh. 
North Dakota Bismarck. 
Ohio Columbus. 
Oklahoma McAlester. 
Oregon Salem. 
Pennsylvania Philadelphia. 

Allegheny (Pittsburgh). 



STATES. 

Rhode Island Howard. 
South Carolina Columbia. 
South Dakota Sioux Falls. 
Tennessee Nashville. 

Petros (branch). 
Texas Huntsville. . 

Rusk. 

Utah Salt Lake City. 
Ver mon t Wi n d sor. 
Virginia Richmond. 
Washington Walla Walla. 
West Virginia Moundsville. 
Wisconsin Waupun. 
Wyoming Rawlins. 

TTKITED STATES PEISONS. 

Atlanta, Ga. Penitentiary. 
Fort Leavenworth, Kas. Peni- 
tentiary. 

McNeil's Island. Wash. Peni- 
tentiary. 

Mare Island, Cal. Naval prison. 
Boston, Mass. Naval prison. 
Portsmouth, N.H. Naval prison. 



112 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



ILLITERACY IN THE T 

The following statistics, except where other- 
wise specified, relate only to persons 10 years of 
age or over. The bureau of the census classifies 
as illiterate all persons 10 years of age or over 
who are unable to write, regardless of their 
ability to read. 
PERCENTAGE OF ILLITERACY. 
The following table shows the total population 
10 years of age and over and the number and 
percentage of Illiterate by color or race, nativity 
and parentage: 
Class. Population. Illiterate. Pet. 
White 63933870 3,184,633 5.0 


7NITED STATES 

State. 
Idaho 


(1910). 

, 1910. 
Number. 
5,453 
. 168 294 


Pet. Number. Pet. 
2.2 5,505 4.6 
3.7 157,958 4.2 
3.1 90,539 4.6 
1.7 40,172 2.3 
2.2 32,513 2.9 
12.1 262,954 16.5 
29.0 381,145 38.5 
4.1 29.060 5.1 
7.2 101,947 11.1 
5.2 134,043 5.9 
3.3 80,482 4.2 
3.0 52,946 4.1 
22.4 251,461 32.0 
4.3 152.844 6.4 
4.8 11,075 6.1 
1.9 17,997 2.3 
6.7 4,645 13.3 
4.6 21,075 6.2 
5.6 86,658 5.9 
20.2 46,971 33.2 
5.5 318,100 5.5 
18.5 386,251 28.7 
3.1 12.719 5.6 
3.2 131,541 4.0 
5.6 67,826 12.1 
1.9 10,686 3.3 
5.9 299,376 6.1 
7.7 29,004 8.4 
25.7 338,659 35.9 
2.9 14,832 5.0 
13.6 306,930 20.7 
9.9 314,018 14.5 
2.5 6,141 3.1 
3.7 16,247 5.8 
15.2 312,120 22.9 
2.0 12,740 3.1 
8.3 80.105 11.4 
3.2 73,779 4.7 
3.3 2,878 4.0 

7.7 6,180,069 10.7 

? CITIES. 

population in 1910. 

Pet. Number. Pet. 
3.2 2,181 2.8 
8.6 11,406 15.8 
4.4 29.148 7.2 
10.4 5,986 19.1 
4.4 23,320 5.1 
5.4 2,999 5.3 
3.7 13,152 4.8 
3.0 3,388 4.6 
4.5 51,142 3.9 
3.1 8,848 3.4 
4.6 14,091 4.7 
2.9 3.290 3.2 
2.3 1,797 2.6 
2.1 1,979 1.3 
5.0 9,062 4.1 
13.2 12,110 14.9 
2.5 2,136 3.1 
3.0 6,004 4.3 
5.6 7,171 4.5 
2.3 5,258 3.9 
1.9 1,956 2.3 
5.3 14,567 .8.3 
6.0 6,843 8.8 
8.0 14,989 18.3 
3.6 8,243 3.8 
2.4 2.977 1.8 
8.8 9,460 14.4 
7.0 4,875 5.6 
6.9 30,820 13.6 
6.7 181,835 6.8 
6.0 11,715 6.1 
3.0 1,614 2.9 
2.7 1,662 2.0 
6.9 5,191 6.3 
4.6 45.546 4.4 
6.2 20,402 5.8 
1.2 3,925 5.1 
7.7 10.029 7.0 
8.2 9.501 13.7 


Illinois . . . 


Indiana 


66 213 


Iowa 


29 889 


Kansas 


.. 28,968 
.. 208,084 
352 179 


Kentucky 


Maine 


24 554 


Maryland 


73 397 


Massachusetts 


.. 141,541 


Michigan 
Minnesota 
Mississippi 
Missouri 
Montana 


.. 74,800 
.. 49.336 
.. 290,235 
.. 111,116 
14 457 


Native 50 989 341 1 534 272 3.0 


Native parentage.... 37, 081,278 1,378,884 3.7 
Foreign or mixed par- 
entage 13,908,063 155,388 1.1 


Nebraska 




Foreign born 12,944,529 1,650,361 12.7 




4 702 


Negro 7 317 922 2 227 731 30 4 


New Hampshire 
New Jersey 
New Mexico 


.. 16,386 
.. 113,502 
.. 48,697 
.. 406,020 


Indian 188 758 85 445 45 3 


Chinese 68*924 10,891 15.8 


Japanese 67661 6213 9.2 


New York 
North Carolina 


All other 3,135 1,250 39.9 


United States 71,580,270 5,516,163 7.7 


North Dakota .... 


13 070 


Ohio 




The corresponding percentages of illiterates at 
three previous censuses were: 1880, 17.0; 1890, 
13.3; 1900, 10.7. 
ILLITERACY BY SEX. 
, Male. x f Female. \ 
Class. Illiterate. Pet. Illiterate. Pet. 
White 1,662,505 5.0 1,522,128 4.9 


Oklahoma 


67,567 


Oregon 


10 504 


Pennsylvania 
Rhode Island 


.. 354,290 
33 854 


South Carolina.... 
South Dakota 


.. 276.980 
12 750 


Tennessee 


.. 221,071 
. 282 904 


Native 796.055 3.1 738,217 2.9 
Native parentage 715,926 3.8 662,958 3.7 
Foreign or mixed 
parentage 80,129 1.2 75,259 1.1 
Foreign born 866,450 11.8 783,911 13.9 
Negro 1,096,000 30.1 1,131,731 30.7 


Utah 
Vermont 


6,821 
10,806 


Virginia 


.. 232,911 
18 416 


Washington 


West Virginia.. , 
Wisconsin 


, 74,866 
, 57.769 


Chinese 9,849 15.0 1,042 30.2 
Japanese 5 247 86 966 14 1 


Wyoming 3,874 
United States 5,516,163 

ILLITERATES B" 
Cities of 100.000 or more 
f 1910 
City. Number. 
Albany NY.. - 2 7fi5 


All other . 1 245 40 5 5 


United States.... 2,814,950 7.6 2,701,213 7.8 

URBAN AND RURAL ILLITERACY 
(PER CENT). 
Class. Total. Urban. Rural. 
White 5.0 4.2 5.8 


Atlanta, Ga 


.. 10,813 


Native 30 08 48 


Baltimore, Md 


.. 20,325 


Native parentage 3.7 0.9 5.4 


Birmingham, Ala. 
Boston, Mass 
Bridgeport, Conn.. 
Buffalo, N Y 


.. 11,026 
.. 24,468 
4,440 
12,745 


For. or mixed parentage.. 1.1 0.7 1.9 
Foreign born. .. . 127 126 13.2 


Negro .... 30 4 17 6 36 1 


All other 31 6 11 40 1 


Cambridge, Mass.. 
Chicago, III 
Cincinnati, O 


2,540 
.. 79,911 
9,576 




PERCENTAGE ILLITERATES BY SECTIONS. 

Section. 1910. 1900. 
New England 53 60 


Cleveland O 


.. 20,676 
4 442 


Columbus, O 


Middle Atlantic 57 58 


Davton, O 


2,224 
3,841 


East North Central '34 43 


Denver, Col 


West North Central 29 41 


Detroit, Mich 


18.731 


South Atlantic 16 23 9 


Fall River. Mass.... 12,276 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 2,271 
Indianapolis, Ind 5,874 
Jersey City, N. J.... 11,797 
Kansas City, Mo 4,937 
Los Angeles, Cal 5,258 
Louisville. Ky 9,866 
Lowell. Mass 5,172 
Memphis, Tenn 8,855 


East South Central 174 249 


West South Central . 13 2 20 5 


Mountain 69 9.6 


Pacific ... 30 42 


Northern states 43 50 


Southern states 15 6 23 3 


Western states 4.4 6.3 
United States 7.7 10.7 

ILLITERATES BY STATES. 

, 1910. N , 1900. x 
State. Number. Pet. Number. Pet. 
Alabama 352,710 229 443590 340 


Milwaukee, Wis 10,765 
Minneapolis, Minn.. ' 6,139 
Nashville, Tenn 7,947 
New Haven. Conn... 7,502 
New Orleans, La. ... 18,987 
New York, N. Y 254,208 
Newark N J i SR3 


Arizona 32 953 20 9 27 304 29 


Arkansas 142,954 12.6 190,655 20.4 
California . 74 902 37 58 959 4 8 


Oakland, Cal 
Omaha, Neb 
Paterson, N. J.... 


3,863 

2,798 
6,927 


Colorado 23,780 3.7 17,779 4.2 


Connecticut 53,665 6.0 42,973 5.9 
Delaware 13 240 81 17 531 12 


Philadelphia, Pa.. 
Pittsburgh Pa 


.. 57,700 
26 627 


District of Columbia 13,812 4.9 20,028 8.6 
Florida 77,816 13.8 84,285 21.9 
Georgia .. ,. 389.775 20.7 480.420 30.5 


Portland. Ore 
Providence, R. I.. 
Richmond. Va... 


2,145 
.. 14,236 
8.641 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR J917. 



113 



City. 



1910. N , 1900. v 

Number. Pet. Number. Pet. 



Rochester, N. Y 

St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

San Francisco, Cal... 

Scranton, Pa < 

Seattle, Wash 



6,916 
21.123 

3.7nl 

7,697 
8,933 
2,217 



3.8 
3.7 
2.1 
2.1 
8.9 
1.1 



20,359 
3.956 



6,814 
901 



City. 
Spokane, Wash 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Toledo. O 

Washington, D. C... 
Worcester, Mass.... 



, - 1910. - v - 1900. - ^ 
Number. Pet. Number. Pet. 



1,123 
5,629 
3.809 
13.812 
5,977 



1.3 

4.9 
2.8 
4.9 
5.0 



554 
2,800 
3,865 
20,028 
4,580 



1.8 
3.2 
3.7 
8.6 
4.9 



BLIND POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES (1910). 



Per 

State. Number. 100,000 

Alabama 1,572 73.5 

Arizona 196 95.9 

Arkansas 1,201 76.3 

California 1,329 55.9 

Colorado 378 47.3 

Connecticut 553 49.6 

Delaware 131 64.7 

District of Columbia 223 67.4 

Florida 402 53.4 

Georgia 1,701 65.2 

Idaho 158 48.5 

Illinois 2,975 52.8 

Indiana 2.121 78.5 

Iowa 1,388 62.4 

Kansas 1.069 63.2 

Kentucky 2,153 94.0 

Louisiana 1,107 66.8 

Maine 585 78.8 

Maryland 802 61.9 

Massachusetts 2,016 60.8 

Michigan 1,574 56.0 



State. Number. 

Minnesota 881 

Mississippi 1,338 

Missouri 2,442 

Montana 168 

Nebraska 464 

Nevada 97 

New Hampshire 291 

New Jersey 1,127 

New Mexico 554 

New York 4,692 

North Carolina 1,563 

North Dakota 167 

Ohio 3,740 

Oklahoma 874 

Oregon 297 

Pennsylvania 4,182 

Rhode Island 314 

South Carolina 1.011 

South Dakota 268 

Tennessee 1,956 



*Per 




Per 


100,000 


State. Number. 


100,000 


42.4 


Texas 2 439 


62.6 


74.5 


Utah 188 


50.4 


74.1 


Vermont . . 301 


84.6 


44.7 


Virginia 1,649 


80.0 


38.9 


Washington . . .. 439 


38.4 


118.5 


West Virginia 797 


65.3 


67.6 


Wisconsin 1,321 


56.6 


44.4 


Wyoming 48 


32.9 


169.3 






51.5 
70.8 


United States 57,272 


62.3 


28.9 


*Per 100,000 of general 


popu- 


78.5 


lation. 




52.7 


Number of blind per 


100.000 


44.1 


general population of th 


B same 


54.6 


race and nativitv in 1900: 


White, 


57.9 


58.2; native white, 55; 


foreign 


66.7 


born white. 74.5; colorer 


. 94.6; 


45.9 


negro, 90; Indian, 302.6; C 


hinese, 


89.5 


Japanese, etc., 23.2. 





Some of the foreign countries 
in which the number of blind 
per 100,000 of general popula- 
tion is high are: 

Bahamas (1901) 251.2 

Danish Antilles (1901) 278.4 

Jamaica (1911) 209.3 

St. Lucia (1901) 244.6 

Cyprus (1901) 730.3 

Malta and Gozo 201.2 

Russia (European, 1897).... 201.6 

Formosa (1905) 515.7 

Philippines (1903) 226.3 



BLIND IN OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Egypt (1907) 1,325.1 

Uganda (1911) 317.7 

Number of blind in the lead- 
ing countries of Europe per 
100,000 of general population: 

Austria (1910) 69.4 

Belgium (1910) 43.5 

Bulgaria (1905) 132.4 

Denmark (1911) 52.7 

England-Wales (1911) 73.0 

Finland (1900) 119.0 

France (1901) 70.6 

Germany (1900) 60.9 



Hungary (1900) 100.6 

Ireland (1911) 98.2 

Italy (1901) 117.5 

Netherlands (1909) 46.3 

Norway (1910) 92.6 

Portugal (1911) 132.8 

Roumania (1899) 83.4 

Russia (1897) 201.6 

Scotland (1911) 69.7 

Serbia (1900) 94.1 

Sweden (1900) 66.4 

Switzerland (1896) 72.2 



DEAF AND DUMB IN THE UNITED STATES (1910). 

[From census bureau report, 1915.] 



Total. 
317 
16 
336 

299 



State. 
Alabama 
Arizona 
Arkansas 
California 

Colorado ..................... 109 

Connecticut .................. 181 

Delaware .................... 19 

District of Columbia ....... 56 

Florida ...................... 86 

Georgia ...................... 348 

Idaho ........................ 41 

[llinois ....................... 1,310 

[ndiana ...................... 634 

Iowa ......................... 436 

Kansas ...................... 470 

Kentucky .................... 664 



Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 
Michigan 
Minnesota . . . 
Mississippi 



254 
166 



499 

296 

Missouri" 872 

Montana 48 

Nebraska 280 

Nevada 7 

New Hampshire 99 

New Jersey 324 

New Mexico 59 



Male. Female. 
172 

10 
168 
161 

68 
102 

10 

31 



22 
720 
351 
249 
264 
350 
143 

95 
209 
306 
358 
273 
167 
478 

25 

155 

4 

53 



le. 
145 
6 
168 
138 
41 
79 
9 
25 
38 
163 
19 
590 
283 
187 
206 
314 
111 
71 
179 
260 
302 
226 
129 
394 
23 
125 
3 
46 
136 
23 


State. 
New York . . 


Total. Male.Female. 
.... 2,348 1,346 1,002 




504 278 226 


North Dakota 


101 54 47 


Ohio . . 


. . 1 154 601 553 




304 166 138 


Oregon 


. . . 130 66 64 




1 461 795 666 


Rhode Island 


113 58 55 


South Carolina 


245 129 116 


South Dakota 


109 59 50 


Tennessee 


588 315 273 




719 372 347 


Utah 


58 31 27 




62 40 22 


Vircinia 


376 205 171 




152 87 65 


West Virginia 


304 162 142 


Wisconsin 


572 332 240 




14 7 7 


United States 




19 154 1ft 5ft4 S fiSfl 


Of the deaf and dumb population 18,017 were 
white and 1,137 colored. Of the white 16,179 were 
native born and 1,838 foreign born. 
NOTE The total number of deaf and dumb 
reported in 1910 was 44,708, but satisfactory 
schedules giving details were returned by only 
19,154. The figures relate only to those who are 
botlj deaf and dumb. 



114 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



DISTANCES BETWEEN AMERICAN CITIES. 

By the shortest usually traveled railroad routes. Compiled from the war department's official table 

of distances. 



FROM 23T" 


New York. 


Chicago. 


Phila- 
delphia. 


St. Louis. 


Boston. 


Baltimore 


Cleveland 


Buffalo. 


k 

?! 

i 


a 

' tf 

u 3 

?' Q 


l! 

g 


Milwau- 
kee. 


s 

II 


Washing- 
ton. 


Minneap- 
oils. || 


To 
Albany. 


Mis. 
145 


Mis. 
832 


"& 


Mis. 
1 028 


Mis. 
202 


Mis. 
333 


Mis. 
480 


Mis. 
297 


Mis. 
3 106 


Mis. 
567 


Mis. 
724 


Mis. 


Mis. 
1 r >17 


Mis. 
1 14 9 


Mis. 
1 252 


Atlanta 


87(5 


733 


785 


611 


1 106 


688 


736 


919 


2 805 


805 


492 


010 


*446 


648 


1 158 


Baltimore 
Boston 


188 
211 


802 
1,034 


97 
321 


934 
1230 


418 


"'ii8 


474 

682 


398 
499 


3.076 
3,308 


334 
674 


593 
926 


887 
1 119 


1.184 
1 602 


40 
458 


i;#2 

1 454 


Buffalo 


44~> 


T5 


416 


731 


499 


398 


183 




2 799 


270 


497 




1 256 


438 


945 


Chicago 


912 




8?1 


284 


1,034 


802 




525 


2,274 


468 


298 


85 


'912 


790 


420 


Cincinnati 
Cleveland 
Columbus. O 
Denver. 
Detroit 


757 
584 
637 
1,934 

693 


298 
357 
314 

SP 


666 
493 
546^ 

1,843 
669 


341 

548 
428 
916 
488 


926 
682 
820 
2,05b 
750 


593 
474 
511 
1,850 
649 


""138 
1,379 
173 


427 

183 
321 
1.537 
251 


2.572 
2.631 
2,588 
1371 
2,546 


313 
135 
193 
1,490 


""244 
116 
1,257 
263 


383 
442 

399 
1,107 
357 


829 
1,073 
9o5 
1,347 
1 092 


553 
437 
471 

1.810 
655 


718 
777 
734 
884 
692 


Duluth 


1 391 


479 


1 30C 


7^ 


1 513 


1 281 


701 


1 004 


2 238 


947 


777 


422 


1 447 


1 2K9 


163 


El Paso 
talveston 


2.310 
1 792 


1.4(55 
1 144 


2.219 
1 691 


1,245 
800 


2.414 
2012 


2J79 
1 f>94 


1,703 
1,408 


1.915 
1 591 


1.287 
2 157 


1,866 
1 481 


1,586 
1 157 


1,550 
1 229 


1,1 

410 


2.139 
1 554 


1.521 
1 340 


rand Rapids.Mich 
elena 
Indianapolis 
Jacksonville, Fla... 
Kansas City 
Los Angeles 


821 
2.452 
825 
983 
1,342 
3 149 


178 
1,540 
188 
1,097 
458 
2 265 


815 
2,361 
734 
892 
1,251 
3 058 


462 

'58 
8? 

2084 


878 
2,574 
965 
1,213 
1.466 
3273 


796 
2,342 
704 
795 
1.211 
3018 


332 
1,897 
283 
1,085 

755 
2 "62 


379 
2.065 
466 
1,193 
967 
2 774 


2.452 
1.250 
2.457 
3.098 
1,981 
475 


462 
2,008 
381 
1,057 
898 
o 705 


308 
1,838 
111 
841 
618 
245 


'203 
1,455 
268 
1,182 
543 
2 350 


1.090 
2,15:.' 
888 
616 
880 
2 (HI? 


764 
2.320 
664 
755 
1.171 
2 978 


'5H8 
1.119 
(03 
1.517 
573 
2 301 


Louisville .... 


871 


304 


780 


274 


1 040 


'703 


358 


541 


2 468 


'427 


114 


'389 




663 


724 


Memphis 


1,157 


527 


1 066 


311 


1 387 


969 


738 


921 


2 439 


807 


494 


612 


3% 


929 


897 


Milwaukee 
Minneapolis 


997 
1.332 


85 
420 


90t 
1.241 


369 

58C 


1,119 
1 454 


887 
1,222 


442 

777 


610 
945 


2,359 
2 096 


553 

888 


383 

718 


*335 


997 
1 285 


875 
1,210 


335 


Mobile 


1.231 


3 


1,140 


647 


1 461 


1,043 


1,029 


1,212 


2,623 


1 098 


785 


1 014 


141 


1,003 


1 233 


Montreal 


386 


841 


477 


1 051 


330 


574 


623 


434 


3 115 


704 


826 


'926 


1 655 


614 


1125 


Newark, N. J 
New Haven 
New Orleans 
New York 


9 
76 
1,372 

2 4'Vi 


903 
980 

lil 

1444 


82 

>f 

2 315 


1.056 
1.141 
699 
1,065 
1 414 


226 
140 
1,602 
217 
2528 


179 
264 

1,184 
188 
2 296 


575 
628 
1,073 
584 
1 851 


405 
445 
1,256 
442 
20'9 


3J77 
3,254 
2,482 
3,186 
780 


435 
520 
1,142 
444 
1 %"2 


748 
833 
829 
757 
1 792 


988 
1,065 
997 
997 
1 574 


1,363 
1,448 

T.372 
1 841 


219 
304 
1,144 
228 
2284 


L323 
1,400 
1,285 
1,333 
1 316 


Omaha 
Philadelphia 


1.405 
91 


493 
8?1 


U14 


413 
974 


1,527 
Vl 


1,295 


1,750 
493 


1^018 
416 


1,781 
3,095 


961 
353 


791 
666 


'578 
906 


1,080 
1 281 


1,283 
137 


381 
1,241 


Pittsburgh 
Portland, Me . 


444 


468 
1 149 


353 
436 


621 

1 345 


674 
115 


W 


135 

797 


270 
614 


2.. 42 
3 423 


"789 


313 
1041 


553 
1 234 


1.142 
1 717 


302 
573 


888 
1 56 


Portland, Ore 
Providence 
Quebec 


3,204 
190 
530 


2,292 
1,034 
1,013 


S 'M? 

621 


2,212 
1,230 
1343 


3,326 
402 


3,094 

378 
718 


2,649 
682 
795 


2,817 
499 
612 


772 
3,308 

3 287 


2,760 
634 
876 


2,590 
926 
1039 


2',378 

?'S8 


2 1746 
1.5t;2 
1 827 


3,082 

418 
786 


2,04* 
1,454 
1 438 


Richmond, Va 
Rochester, N. Y 
St. Joseph, Mo 
St. Louis 


343 
373 
1.3H2 
1 0*io 


879 
603 
47( 
284 


252 
361 
1,301 
974 


918 
799 
327 


573 
430 
1,474 
1 230 


155 
354 
1,261 
934 


553 
251 
875 
548 


553 
68 
1,058 
731 


3,153 

2.877 
1,867 
2 194 


417 

338 
948 
621 


681 
495 
668 
341 


964 
688 
555 


1,046 
1.324 
941 
699 


115 
894 
1,221 
844 


1.298 
1,023 
485 
580 


St. Paul 


1 322 


410 


1 231 


576 


1 444 


1,212 


767 


935 


2 086 


878 


708 


SOP 


1 275 


1 200 


10 


San Antonio 
San Francisco 
Seattle 


1.943 
3,186 
3 151 


1,204 
2,274 
2 '?34 


1.852 
3.095 
3 060 


920 

2,194 

., .,.,. 


2.150 
3,308 
3273 


1,755 
3.076 
2941 


1,468 
2.631 
2 596 


1,651 

2,799 
2 7t>4 


1,911 

'457 


1.541 
2.742 
2 707 


1.217 
2,572 
2 537 


1,289 
2,359 
2 154 


571 

2.482 
2 Wl 


1.715 
3.064 
3 Q3H 


1.320 
2,09tt 
1 818 


Spokane 
Springfield. Mass... 
Tampa. Fla 


2,812 
139 
1,195 


1,900 
935 
1,309 


2,721 
230 
1.104 


uses 

1,131 
1,187 


B 

1,425 


2.702 
327 
1,007 


2,257 
583 
1,297 


2^25 
400 
1,405 


1,205 
3,209 
3,310 


2,368 
583 
1,269 


2,198 

827 
1,053 


1,815 
1,020 
1 394 


2.535 
1,511 
828 


2,690 
367 
967 


479 

1,355 
1,725) 


Toledo. 


705 


244 


615 


437 


795 


595 


113 


296 


2 518 


261 


203 


of*) 


1 032; 


695 


1 664 


Washington 


2281 


TM 


137 


894 


458 


40 


437 


438 


3.064 


302 


553 


875 


I.'l44l 




1,31 



DISTANCES BETWEEN GREAT SEAPORTS. 



TO PRINCIPAL EUROPEAN PORTS. 

Distances in nautical miles traversed by full 
powered steamships in traveling from Boston, 
New York, Philadelphia 'and Baltimore to Lon- 
don, Liverpool, Glasgow, Antwerp, Hamburg and 
Havre by northern and southern routes. Com- 
puted by United States hydrographic office. 

From North- South- 

Boston (Boston lightship) to ern. ern. 

London 3,139 3.258 

Liverpool 2,896 3,033 

Glasgow 2,815 2,987 

Antwerp 3,184 3,303 

Hamburg 3,446 3,565 

Havre 2,990 3,109 

New York (the Battery) to London 3,313 3,423 

Liverpool 3,070 3,198 

Glasgow 2.989 3,152 

Antwerp 3,358 3,468 

Hamburg 3,620 3,730 

Havre 3.164 3.274 

Philadelphia (Market street wharf) to 

London 3,456 8,566 

Liverpool 3,213 3,341 

Glasgow 3,132 3,295 

Antwerp 3,501 3,611 

Hamburg 3,763 3.S73 

Havre 3,307 8,417 



North- 



From 
Baltimore (the basin) to ern. 

London 3,606 

Liverpool 3,363 

Glasgow 3,282 

Antwerp 3,651 

Hamburg 3,913 

Havre 3,457 

TBOM OTHEB EUROPEAN PORTS. 
North- 
Glasgow (Greenock) to ern. 

Montreal by south of Cape Race 2,864 

St. John, New Brunswick 2,673 

Boston (navy yard) 2,776 

New York (the Battery) 2,951 

Philadelphia 3,104 

Baltimore 3,258 

Newport Xews 3,135 

N'ew Orleans 4.486 

Galveston 4,662 

Southampton to Montreal 3,059 

St. John, New Brunswick 2,817 

Boston (navy yard) 2,920 

New York (the Battery) 3.095 

Philadelphia 3,248 

Baltimore 3,402 



South- 
ern. 
3,716 
3,491 
3,445 
3,7.31 
4,023 
3,567 

South 
ern. 
2,864 
2,830 
2,934 
3,099 
3,252 
3,406 
3,283 
4,532 
4.70S 
3,059 
2,923 
3.027 
3,192 
3,345 
3 ; 499 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 19r 



115 



From North- 
Southampton to era. 
Newport News . ... 3 279 


South- 
ern. 
3,376 
4,625 
4,801 

3,534 
3,398 
3,502 
3,667 
3,820 
3,974 
3,851 
5,100 
5,276 

3.293 
3,157 
3,261 
3,426 
3,579 
3,733 
3,610 
4,859 
5,035 

3,834 
3,698 
3,802 
3,967 
4,120 
4,274 
4,151 
5,400 
5,576 

3,873 
3,620 
3,724 
3,889 
4,042 
4,040 
3,787 
3,891 
4,056 

leans, 
ortest 


all -water routes. [Fr 
and Systems of the V 
the bureau of statist! 
New 
Port. York. 
Aden . . - R32 


om "Trai 
Forld," b 
cs, Wash 
New 
Orleans. 
7,870 
4,853 
11,598 
9,536 
4,458 
6,318 
11,239 
10,142 
7,374 
10.146 
1,380 
4.576 
5,243 
ti97 
4,760 
12,892 
13.719 
4,553 
12,946 
5,266 
12.933 
5,562 

'i.741 
16,249 
6.760 
3,969 
6,509 
14,298 
7,340 
1,427 
5,218 
13.539 
6.223 
1,539 
11.560 
14,841 
13.750 
J812 
8.733 
17.445 
11,773 

fApprox 
rn end. 


isportation 
y O. P. Au 
ington, D. ( 
San Pt 
Francisco. 
11.500 
13,671 
7,800 
9,780 
13,209 
7,511 
8,990 
4,012 
10.454 
8,900 
3,324 
12.734 
13,998 
12.800 
13,307 
6,086 
2.097 
13,503 
6,289 
13,324 
7.040 
13,699 
13.539 
13,089 
2.705 
14.897 
9,439 
12,810 
775 
6,199 
3,277 
8,339 


Routea 
itin of 
3.] 
Town- 
send. 
11,300 
14,446 
7,600 
9,580 
13,984 
8,286 
8,896 
4,769 
11,229 
8,700 
*4,090 
13,509 
14,773 
13,675 
14,082 
5,886 
2,370 
14,278 
5,993 
14,099 
7,311 
14,474 
14,298 
13.849 
2,351 
15,672 
10,214 
12,610 

~6'958 
4,052 
9,114 

775 

tlS.TSO 
12,974 
7,206 
732 
5,290 
12.964 
5,902 
4,357 
6.415 
4.240 
astern 


New Orleans 


.4,620 




.4,796 


Bremen to 
Montreal 


.3,534 


Antwerp 


.. 3,358 


St. John, New Brunswick 


3,292 
.3,395 
3,570 
.3,723 
.3,877 
.3,754 
.5,095 
.5,271 

.3,293 
3,051 
.3,154 
3,329 


Batavia 
Bombay 


..10,182 
.. 8.120 


New York (the Battery) 


Brest 
Buenos Aires. 
Calcutta 


. 2.954 
.. 5.868 
.. 9.830 


Philadelphia 
Baltimore .. ... 


Newport News 


Callao 
Cape Town 
Colombo 
Colon 
Gibraltar 


9.603 
.. 6.815 
. . 8.610 
. 1.981 
. 3.207 




Rotterdam to 


St. John, New Brunswick 


Hamburg 


.. 3,620 
.< 1,227 


Boston (navv yard) 




New York (the Battery) 


Hongkong 


. 11.610 




3,636 
3,513 
4,854 
5,030 

3,834 
3,592 
3,695 
3,870 
4.023 
4,177 
4,054 
5.395 
5,571 

3,873 
3,605 
3.708 
3,883 
4,036 


Honolulu 
Liverpool 
Manila 
Marseilles ... 


..13.269 
.. 3,070 
..11,556 
.. 3,876 


Newport News 




Galveston 


Copenhagen (via English channel) to 
Montreal . 


Naples 
New Orleans . . 
New York 


. 4.172 
.. 1.741 


St. John, New Brunswick 




Nome 


15 840 


New York (the Batterv) 


Odessa 
Pernambuco .. 
Port Said... . 


. . 5.370 
.. 3.696 
. . K 1 22 


Philadelphia .. . 






Port Townsend. 13. 848 
Punta Arenas... 6.890 
Panama *2,028 
Rio de Janeiro. 4,778 
San Francisco.. 13. 089 
St. Petersburg.. 4.632 
San Juan, P. R 1.428 
Singapore 10,170 
Sitka 14,391 






Marseilles to 


St John New Brunswick 


t!4.960 
12,199 
7,502 
1,302 
5.550 
H2.189 
5.140 
4.706 
5,909 
4.536 
mately. $E 




New York (the Battery) 
Philadelphia 


Genoa to Montreal 
St John New Brunswick 


4,040 
3,772 
3,875 
4,050 

ew Or 
by sh 


Shanghai 
Tehuantepec . 
Valparaiso . . . 
Vladivostok .. 
Wellington ... 
Yokohama .... 


12.360 
42,036 
. 8,460 
..17.036 
.11.500 

IJWest'e 




New York (the Battery) 


GENERAL TABLE. 

Nautical miles from New York, N 
San Francisco and Port Townsend 



HIGHEST POINT IN EACH STATE. 

[From table compiled by the United States geological survey.] 



State and place. Elevation. 

Alabama. Che-aw-ha mountain 2,4u7 

Alaska, Mount McKinley 20,300 

Arizona, San Francisco peak 12.611 

Arkansas, Magazine and Blue mount'ns 2,800 

California. Mount Whitney 14.501 

Colorado, Mounts Elbert and Massive 14,402 

Connecticut. Bear mountain 2,3o 

Delaware, Centerville 440 

District of Columbia, Tenley 420 

Florida, Mount Pleasant \ 

Georgia, Brasstown Bald mountain 4.ib3 

Idaho. Hyndman peak 12.078 

Illinois, Charles mound, Jo Daviess county. 1,241 

Indiana, Carlos, Randolph county 1,210 

Iowa, five miles southeast of Sibley 1.6.0 

Kansas, west boundary no. of Arkansas river 4,135 
Kentucky, Big Black m't'n, Hurlan county. 4,100 

Louisiana, summits In western parishes 

Maine, Mount Katahdin (west) 5,273 

Maryland, Backbone mountain o,340 

Massachusetts, Mount Greylqck 3.50*1 

Michigan, Porcupine mountain 2,023 

Minnesota, Mosabi range, St. Louis Co 1,920 

Mississippi, Holly Springs 600 

Missouri, Tom Sauk mountain 1,750 

Montana, Granite peak 12,850 

Nebraska, Banner county 5,350 

Nevada, Wheeler peak 13,058 

New Hampshire, Mount Washington 6,293 

New Jersey, High Point 1.TO9 

New Mexico, North Tmchas peak 13,306 

New York, Mount Marcy 5.344 

North Carolina, Mount Mitchell 6.711 



. State and place. Elevation. 

North Dakota, south part of Bowman county 3,500 

Ohio, Campbell's hill, Logan county 1,550 

Oklahoma, West End Cimarron county 4,750 

Oregon, Mount Hood 11,225 

Pennsylvania. Blue Knob 3,136 

Rhode Island. Durfee hill 805 

South Carolina. Sassafras mountain 3,548 

South Dakota, Harney peak 7,242 

Tennessee, Mount Guyot 6,636 

Texas, El Capitan, Guadaloupe mountain.... 9,020 

Utah, King's peak 12,493 

Vermont, Mount Mansfield 4,364 

Virginia. Mount Rogers 5,719 

Washington, Mount Rainier 14,408 

West Virginia. Spruce Knob 4.860 

Wisconsin, Rib hill, Marathon county 1,940 

Wyoming. Mount Gannett 13,785 

Guam, Mt. Jummulong Mangloc 1,274 

Hawaii, Manna Kea 13.823 

Philippines, Mount Apo 9,610 

Porto Rico, Luquillo mountains 3.532 

LONGEST RIVERS IN THE WORLD. 



River. Miles. 

Mississippi-Mo 4,194 

Nile 3.670 

Amazon 3,300 

Ob 3,235 

Yangtze 3.000 

La Plata 2,950 

Lena 2,860 

Kongo 2,800 

Amur 2,700 



River. Miles. 

Mekong 2,600 

Niger 2,600 

Yenesei 2,500 

Volga 2.325 

Hwangho 2,30n 

Yukon 2.050 

Colorado 2,000 

Indus 2,000 



116 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



[Populat 

City. Year 
Aachen . -iio 


LA 

on accon 

Pop. 
156.143 
153,503 
192,429 
185,449 
215,835 
103,580 
250,000 
332,246 
172,397 
171,697 
172,628 
114,000 
152,756 
609,084 
161.000 
312,884 
162,482 
167.479 
184,873 
102,487 
225.000 
290.000 
584,605 
189,485 
628,675 
587,411 
129.462 
109,218 
169,214 
137,000 
138,551 
150,000 
200,000 
386.449 
203,804 
3,709,000 
525,833 
174,108 
136,931 
121.257 
189,770 
180,851 
745,139 
979,445 
261,678 
288,458 
247.437 
512,105 
118.434 
131,237 
143,514 
357. 04$ 
131,800 
143.552 
110,000 
663.647 
345.628 
880,371 
1,598,571 
454,112 
654.476 
1,122,313 
111,669 
104,349 
900.000 
182.259 
134.331 
102,542 
153.196 
217,389 
178.557 
250.000 
305,978 
287.807 
2,550,000 
184.000 
241,834 
598,000 
191.655 
406.706 
656,975 
516.527 i 
213,396 
209,722 
1.200.000 i 


RGEST CITIES OF TI 
[ing to latest census rep 

City. Year. 
Copenhagen* 1911 


IE WOI 

orts or 

Pop. 

559.398 
135,000 
106,349 
171,000 
129,406 
169,551 
108,551 
111,986 
250,000 
170,337 
125,509 
232,837 
245,523 
123.410 
554,717 
214,226 
548,308 
403,030 
229,483 
165,004 
358.728 
110,912 
320,318 
170.195 
111,463 
294,653 
126,904 
102,550 
242,147 
414,576 
624,000 
169,513 
136,700 
300,139 
167.477 
784,496 
104,582 
181,500 
125,759 
156,500 
118,799 
101.553 
180,843 
101,703 
931.035 
350,000 
826,000 
302,375 
108.969 
355.870 
136.159 
153,672 
159,000 
366,145 
107,821 
277,991 
500,623 
265,578 
168.498 
137.098 
300,133 
237,220 
100.651 
127,267 
289,879 
151,903 
194,246 
249,698 
211.627 
626,313 
128,209 
440,766 
245,994 
119,060 
508.068 
228,687 
100,097 
106,382 
445,550 
227.222 
589,850 
212,000 
170,634 
217,807 
143.500 


ILD. 

official estimates.] 

City. 
Lisbon 


Year. 


Pop. 

435,359 
746.421 
108,585 
7,251.258 
465,367 
235.114 
112,124 
259,798 
523,796 
518,660 
599,807 
134,130 
279.629 
110.634 
136,265 
108,004 
714.333 
138,299 
234.409 
193,902 
550,619 
116,227 
600.160 
146,113 
150,000 
470,659 
663.059 
428,062 
353,460 
116.700 
378,446 
470,480 
1,817,100 
158,132 
112.5SO 
596.467 
125.057 
160,450 
447,951 
101,415 
119.949 
267.000 
170.535 
697,917 
115.978 
237.289 
399,000 
114.694 
266.603 
147,095 
366,484 
5,468.190 
142.940 
103,491 
350,000 
111,600 
121.478 
259.904 
333,142 
190.803 
631.040 
147.483 
135.455 
194.009 
123, D86 
100.130 
1,3S7.36& 
105.135 
345.891 
2.888,110 
136,374 
136.153 
692,500 
150.000 
2,133.000 
1,683,664 
146.000 
571.984 
121.272 
112.030 
158.856 
100.000 
100.000 
156.691 
272.833 


Aberdeen 


..1911 


Cordoba, Arg. Rep.tl915 
Coventry 1911 


Liverpool 


1911 


Adelaide* 


..1911 




1915 


Agra 


..1911 


Cracowf 


...1914 


London. Greater. 
Los Angeles 
Louisville 


..1911 
..1915 
..1914 


Ahmedabad 
Albany . 


..1911 
..1915 


Crefeld ... 


1910 


Croydon 


1911 




1912 




1911 


Lowell 


Alexandria 
Alger 


..1907 
..1911 


Dallas 


...1914 
...1912 


Lucknow 


..1911 
..1911 


Damascusf .. .. 


Allahabad 
Altoua 


..1911 
1910 


Danzig 


1910 




Dayton . 


1915 


Madrid 






..1912 


Delhi 


...1911 


Madura 






..1911 


Denver .... 


1914 






Amsterdam 


..1914 


Derby, England 
Detroit 


...1911 
1915 


Mainz 


1910 




1911 








..1912 


Dortmund 


...1910 


Malmo 


1914 




. .1913 


Dresden 


1910 


Manchester, Eng.. 
Mandalay 
Manila 


..1911 
..1911 
..1910 
1910 




1907 


Dublin 


191f 




1915 




1910 




..1910 


Dundee 


...1911 
...1910 


Mannheim 




..1912 
1911 


Dusseldorf 


Marseilles 


1911 


Bahiat 


Dvinsk 


...1910 


Meerut 


1911 




1915 


Edinburgh 


..1911 
1910 


Melbourne 


1911 




1911 


Elberf eld . . . 


Memphis 


..1915 


Bangkok 


.1910 
1910 


Erfurt 


. 1910 




.1915 




Essen .. 


1910 


Mexico City 


1910 






Fall River 


1915 


Milan 


1915 


Bari 


1915 


Ferrara 


...1915 


Milwaukee 


1915 




1910 


Florence 


.. 1915 


Minneapolis . 


1915 


Basel 


1913 


Frankfort 


1910 


Minsk 


1913 




1905 


Fuchowt 


..1912 


Montevideo 


. 1916 


Beirutt 


.1912 
1911 


Gelsenkirchen . . 
Geneva . . 


...1910 
1913 


Montreal 


1911 




Moscow . . 


.1915 
1911 


Belfast 


1911 




. 1915 


Mukden .. 




1911 


Ghent 


1912 


Mulheim 
Munich .. 


.1910 
.1910 
1910 


Berlin 


1913 




1911 


Birmingham, Eng 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Bochurn 


.1911 
.1915 
.1910 




1913 


Murcia . . 


Goteborg 


1914 




1913 


Grand Rapids .... 


..1915 


Nagova . . 


1913 




.1912 


Grazf 


. .1914 




1911 




.1915 


Guadalajara 


..1910 


Vancv 


1911 


Bolton 


.1911 
.1915 


Halifax, England 
3alle ...... 
Harnborn Germa 


..1911 
..1910 
ay!910 
1910 


Nankingf 


.1912 
.1911 
.1915 
1915 


Boston 


Vantes 




1911 


Naples 




1911 




Nashville 


Bradford 


.1911 
1910 


Hangchowt 


..1912 


Neukolln 
Newark N J 


.1910 
1915 


Hankowf 


. 1912 




1910 


Hanover 


1910 




1915 


Bridgeport, Conn.. 
Brighton, England 
Brisbane* 


.1915 
.1911 
.1911 




1915 




1911 


Havana 


..1914 


s'ew Haven 


1915 


Havre 


1911 




.1915 
1915 


Bristol. England.. 
Brunnf 


.1911 
.1914 




1911 


New York 


Hiroshima 


..1913 


Nice 


1911 




.1910 
1912 


Hongkong 
Huddersfield 
Hull 


..1911 

..1911 
1911 


s'ikalaveo 


1911 




Vingpof 


.1912 
.1913 
.1911 
.1911 
.1910 
1915 




1912 


Nislmi-Novgorod .. 
Norwich, England. 
Nottingham 


Bucharest 


.1914 


Hvderabad 


1911 


Budapest 


.1910 
1916 


ndianapolis 


..1915 
1910 




Buffalo 


1914 


aipur 
Jersey Citv. . . 


..1911 
1915 


Oakland 


Cairo, Egypt 
Calcutta* 
Cambridge, Mass.. 


.1907 
1911 
.1915 
1915 


Odessa . . 


1912 


r ohannesburg .... 


..1911 
1911 


Oldham 


1911 




1915 


Kanazawa 


..1913 
..1915 

..1911 


Oporto 


1911 
1911 




1912 
1911 


vansas City 
Karachi 


Oran 


Cardiff 


Orenburg 


.1913 


Carlsruhe 


.1910 
1910 


Kazan 


..1913 
..1913 


Osaka 


.1913 


Kharkov 


Padua ... 


1915 






Kiel 


1910 


:*alermo 


.1915 
1911 




1915 


Kiev 


1913 




.1911 
.1912 
.1910 
.1910 
.1916 
1912 


Kishinev 


1913 


Paterson . . 


1915 


Changshaf 
Charlottenburg ... 
Chemnitz 




1913 




1911 
.1912 
.1911 
.1914 
.1915 
1912 


vonigsberg 
Kure 


..1910 
..1913 


Pekin 
'ernambucof 




1913 


Chinklangf 


Lahore 
La Pazt .. 


..1911 
1915 


Philadelphia 


Christiania 


.1910 
1912 


Pinsrvangt 


La Plata 


1912 


Pittsburgh 


1915 
1910 
.1911 
1911 
1912 
1911 
1910 
1915 




1911 


Leeds 


..1911 


Plauen 


Cincinnati 


.1915 
.1915 




1911 


'lymouth. England 
oon 
3 ort au Prince... 
'or to Alegret 
Posen 


Cleveland 


Leipsic 


..1910 




1910 


Lembergt 


..1914 


Colombo 


.1911 


Liege 
Lille 


..1912 
1911 


Columbus 
Constantinople! . . 


.1915 

.1912 


Lima . 


..1913 


Portland, Ore 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1:*17. 



117 



City. 
Portsmouth. Eng 
Praguef 


Year. 

...1911 
. ..1914 


Pop. 
231.141 

541,500 
117.088 
250.025 
101,214 
179,600 
293.316 
107,594 
115.178 
154.674 
558.000 
128.637 
250,747 
590,960 
234,009 
204,725 
472,520 
122,723 
124.987 
105.089 
148.656 
745,988 
241,999 
231,357 
160,000 
113.567 
143,800 
119,447 
448,502 
397,941 
450,000 
235,300 
172,823 
144.081 
330.834 
278.958 
155.366 
651.000 
454.632 
303.321 
fEstin 


City. 


Year. 
. 1912 


Pop. 
375.000 
150.198 
118.378 
102.812 
119,012 
108,647 
142,990 
103.216 
126,344 
236.113 
386,270 
108,682 
234,534 
178,891 
286,218 
500,000 
151.159 
114.863 
114,663 
636,353 
149,353 
118,328 
200,000 
108.094 
280,000 
312,430 
800,000 
2,033,320 
187.840 
376,538 
104,582 
149.576 
109,212 
122.028 
246,500 
100,817 
139,700 
277,083 
451,994 
103.485 
name offic 


City. 
Utrecht 


Year. 
. .. .1914 


Pop. 
127,086 
233.348 
187,240 
100,401 
168,038 
2.031.498 
203,940 
108,234 
358,679 
100.000 
289,030 
109,002 
109.716 
136,035 
160.523 
122,000 
119,167 
220,446 
396,101 
111.704 
205,000 

ARGEST 

pulation. 
7.251,358 
5,468,190 
3.709.000 
2.888.110 
2.550.QQQ 

2,i3s;ooo~ 

2,033,320 
2 031 498 


Soerabaya 


..1905 
1905 




1910 




1911 




1914 




1915 


Sofia 


1910 




1911 


Puebla 
Puket 


...1910 
1910 


Southampton 
South Shields.. . 


..1911 
. 1911 




1915 


Vienna 


1910 


Rangoon 


..1911 


Spokane 
Springfield, Mass. 
Srinagar 


..1915 
..1915 
..1911 


Vilna . 


1913 


Reading, Pa 




Vitebsk 


1913 


Reims 


. . 1911 




1915 




1915 


Stettin 


..1910 




1912 


Riga 


...1913 


Stockholm 
Stockport 


..1914 
..1911 


West Ham ... 
Wiesbaden 


....1911 
1910 


Rio de Janeiro . 
Rochester. N. Y. 


...1911 I 
...1915 
1915 


Stoke-on-Trent ... 
Strassburg 


..1911 
..1910 


Wilmersdorf . . 


1910 


Winnipeg 
Worcester, Mas 
Wuhuf 


1911 
s.... 1915 

1912 




...1915 


Stuttgart 
Suchowf 


..1910 
..1912 


Rostov-on-Don .. 
Rotterdam 


...1913 
...1914 


Sunderland 
Surat 


..1911 
..1911 
1911 


Yaroslav 


1913 




1911 


Yekaterinoslav 


....1912 
1913 




1911 


Swansea 


Saarbrucken 
St. Etienne 
St Louis 


...1910 
...1911 
1915 


Sydney. N. S. W. 
Syracuse 


.'.1914 
. .1910 
1913 


Zaragoza 


1910 


Zurich 


1913 


Szeged 

Tabrizf 






St Paul 


1915 


RANK OF FIFTEEN L 
CITIES. 
City. Rank.Po 
London - - 1 


Sal ford 


1911 


Tacoma 


..1915 


Salonikif 
Salt Lake City.. 
Samara 


...1912 
...1915 
...1913 
1915 


Teheranf 


..1913 


The Hague 
Tientsin! 
Tokvo 


..1913 
..1912 
..1913 


New York 
Berlin 


2 
3 




1914 


Toledo 


..1915 


Paris 


4 


Santiago, Chile. 


...1914 
1911 


Toronto 


..1911 




5 


Toulon 


..1911 


Petrogradt . . . 
Tokyo 


6 

7 




...1913 
1910 


Toulouse 


..1911 




Trenton 


..1915 

..1911 


Vienna 


g 




1915 


Trichinopoly 


Moscow 


9 


1,817,100 
1.683,664 
1,598,571 
1,387,366 
1,200,000 
1.128.637 
1.122.313 


Seattle 


1915 


Triestef 


..1914 


Philadelphia .. 
Buenos Aires. 
Osaka 


10 
11 

19! 


Seoul 


1912 


Tsaritsyn 


..1910 


Seville 


1910 


Tula 


..1913 




...1912 
. .1911 


Tunisf 


..1911 


Constantinople 13 
Rio de Janeiro 14 
Calcutta 15 
ially changed in 1914. 


Sheffield 


Turin 
Ufa . 


..1915 

191ft 




1911 


*With 


suburbs. 


lated. JSt. Petersburg: 



DEATHS PER 1,000 OF POPULATION IN THE 
REGISTRATION AREA. 



UNITED STATES MORTALITY STATISTICS. 
[Bureau of the census report.] 

State. 1908.1909.1910.1911.1912.1913.1914.1915. 

Pennsylvania ...15.1 14.7 15.6 14.2 14.0 14.6 13.9 13.8 
Rhode Island.... 15.9 15.6 17.1 15.5 15.2 15.0 14.7 14.8 

Utah 10.810.3 9.911.010.1 9.9 

Vermont 15.9 15.7 16.0 15.8 15.2 15.8 15.0 14.7 

Virginia 13.9 14.0 14.2 

Washington 9.3 9.8 10.0 8.9 7.9 8.5 8.1 8.1 

Wisconsin 11.7 11.8 12.0 11.5 11.3 11.5 11.1 10.8 



Annual average. 

1906-10.1911.1912.1913.1914.1915. 

Registration area 15.1 14.2 13.9 14.1 13.6 13.5 

Registration states 15.0 13.9 13.6 13.9 13.4 .... 

Cities in registration 

states 16.3 15.1 14.7 15.0 14.5 .... 

Rural part of registra- 
tion states 13.4 12.7 12.4 12.7 12.3 .... 

The registration area includes twenty-five 
states, the District of Columbia and thirty-two 
cities in nonregistration states, containing 66.8 
per cent of the total estimated population of con- 
tinental United States. The total number of 
deaths reported in this area in 1915 was 823,938. 
The estimated population of the area was 67,- 
336,992 and the death rate was consequently 13.5 
per 1,000 of population. 

IN REGISTRATION STATES. 

Death rates per 1,000 population. 
State. 1908.1909.1910.1911.1912.1913.1914.1915. 

California 14.1 13.4 13.5 13.7 14.2 14.5 13.6 13.7 

Colorado 14.5 14.2 13.8 12.9 11.6 11.5 11.2 11.3 

Connecticut 14.8 15.0 15.6 15.4 14.9 15.0 15.1 14.9 

Dist. of Col 19 1 19.0 19.6 18.7 18.3 17.3 16.6 .... 

Indiana 12.8 ^2.9 13.5 12.9 13.0 13.3 12.9 12.7 

Kansas 9.810.1 

Kentucky 13.2 12.9 13.1 12.9 12.3 

Maine 15.7 15.6 17.1 16.1 15.5 15.3 15.1 15.6 

Maryland 15.8 15.5 16.0 15.8 15.5 16.2 15.9 15.8 

Massachusetts .15.9 15.4 16.1 15.3 15.0 15.0 14.7 14.5 

Michigan 13.4 13.1 14.1 13.2 13.4 13.9 13.4 13.4 

Minnesota 10.9 10.5 9.5 10.4 10.6 10.1 

Missouri 13.1 12.6 12.4 12.3 12.1 

Montana 10.6 10.2 10.1 12.0 11.2 11.4 

New Hampshire.16.8 16.9 17.3 17.1 16.4 17.1 16.3 16.1 

New Jersey 14.8 14.7 15.5 14.7 14.1 14.3 14.2 13.8 

New York 15.9 15.7 16.1 15.5 15.0 15.0 14.7 14.6 

North Carolina 18.7 18.3 17.3 16.8 19.0 17.3 

Ohio 12.9 13.7 13.1 13.4 13.8 13.0 13.1 



All reg. states.14.7 14.2 14.7 13.9 14.6 14.7 13.4 13.3 
Blanks indicate that the states concerned were 
not registration states in the years specified. 

DEATH RATES IN AMERICAN CITIES. 

Annual average per 1,000 of population. 
City. 1906-10. 1911. 1912. 1913. 1914.1915. 

Albany, N. Y 18.6 20.4 20.1 19.8 19.4 20.0 

Atlanta, Ga.* 19.4 19.8 18.0 17.4 16.5 15.1 

Baltimore, Md.* 19.5 18.4 18.2 18.5 18.1 17.1 

Birmingham, Ala.* 18.2 17.4 17.4 17.5 15.6 

Boston, Mass 17.9 17.1 16.4 16.4 16.1 16.1 

Bridgeport. Conn 15.5 13.9 13.9 14.9 15.0 15.4 

Buffalo. N. Y 16.014.514.815.815.514.9 

Cambridge, Mass 15.1 15.2 13.0 13.5 13.2 13.1 

Chicago, 111 14.9 14.5 14.8 15.1 14.2 14.3 

Cincinnati, 18.1 16.5 16.6 16.9 16.0 15.6 

Cleveland, 14.1 13.8 13.7 14.2 12.8 13.4 

Columbus, 15.1 14.3 14.4 15.3 14.8 14.0 

Dayton, 15.5 13.7 15.1 16.0 13.8 13.6 

Denver, Col 17.5 15.5 14.2 13.7 13.2 13.3 

Detroit, Mich 14.8 14.4 15.5 17.3 15.6 15.7 

Fall River, Mass 19.717.416.217.217.315.9 

Grand Rapids, Mich 13.313.613.013.312.912.5 

Indianapolis, Ind 15.2 14.7 15.0 15.7 15.9 14.7 

Jersey City, N. J 17.715.814.014.613.814.5 

Kansas City, Mo 14.615.415.214.814.014.7 

Los Angeles, Cal 14.814.514.715.012.912.3 

Louisville, Ky.* 17.4 16.1 16.4 16.2 16.5 15.0 

Lowell, Mass 19.4 17.7 17.4 15.9 15.9 16.2 

Memphis, Tenn.* 20.6 21.3 21.7 20.8 20.7 19.8 

Milwaukee. Wis 13.7 11.9 13.0 12.7 11.8 11.4 

Minneapolis, Minn 11.0 11.5 10.4 11.6 12.0 11.5 



118 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



City. 1906-10. 1911. 1912. 1913.1914. 1915. 

Nashville, Tenn.* 19.3 20.5 19.3 17.8 18.4 17.2 

Newark, N. J 17.2 14.8 14.3 14.4 14.5 13.1 

New Haven, Conn 17.3 16.7 16.5 15.9 16.1 15.7 

New Orleans. La.* 21.7 20.4 20.1 19.9 20.5 21.2 

New York, N. Y 16.915.214.514.314.113.9 

Oakland, Gal 15.4 12.7 12.8 12.5 11.6 11.4 

Omaha, Neb 13.8 14.3 13.2 13.9 13.8 12.2 

Paterson. N. J 15.7 14.6 14.0 13.5 13.5 13.2 

Philadelphia, Pa 17.7 16.8 15.3 15.7 16.1 15.6 

Pittsburgh, Pa 18.0 14.9 15.9 17.1 15.7 15.3 

Portland, Ore 10.310.9 9.5 9.5 9.1 8.4 

Providence, R. 1 17.6 15.6 15.8 15.2 15.2 14.6 

Richmond, Va.* 22.5 21.0 20.7 20.4 19.7 18.9 



DEATHS FROM CERTAIN 

CAUSES (1914) 
Number in registration area and 


Propor- 
Age. Number, tion. 
25 to 29 years 35 707 39 8 


rate per 100,000 population. 
Cause. Number. Rate. 
Typhoid fever 10185 15.4 


30 to 34 years 36,090 40.2 
35 to 39 years 40,309 44.9 
40 to 44 years 40 919 45 6 


Malaria 1 477 2 2 


45 to 49 years 43 062 48 


Smallpox 212 .3 


50 to 54 years 49,103 54.7 


Mgasles 4 461 6.8 


55 to 59 years 49 902 55.6 


Scarlet fever 4,340 6.6 


60 to 64 years 55,530 61.8 


Whooping cough 6,816 10.3 
Diphtheria croup 11 786 17 9 


65 to 69 years 59,803 66.6 
70 to 74 years . . 61 869 68 9 


Influenza 6 014 9 1 


75 to 79 years 53,775 59.9 


Epidemic diseases... 6,128 9.3 
Tuberculosis, lungs. .84,366 127.8 
Tuberculosis, other. 12,537 19.0 
Cancer 52,420 79.4 


80 to 84 years 39,669 44.2 
85 to 89 years 21,047 23.4 
90 to 94 years 7,294 8.1 
95 to 99 years 1,711 1.9 


Diabetes 10.666 16.2 


100 years and more 467 .5 


Nervous diseases... 87.614 132.8 


Unknown 1,327 1.5 


Respiratory dise's.. 104,086 157.7 
Digestive diseases.. 99,673 151.1 
Genito-urinary dis. 78,023 118.2 
Suicide .... 10 933 16 6 


Aggregate 890,848 1,000 
DEATHS BY COLOR AND 


Accident 51 770 78 5 




Homicide 4,847 7.3 


Number and proportion per 1,000. 


Other causes 125804 190.6 


Proper- 


All causes 898 059 1 360 9 


Number, tion. 
White ' 824 319 917 9 




Colored 73 740 82 1 


DEATHS BY SEX (1914). 
Number and proportion per 1,000. 


Native white 605,349 674.1 
Foreign white 205,104 230.8 
Unknown 11 698 13 




Negro 70 429 78.4 


Male 491 416 547 


Indian 1,369 1.5 


Female .406643 4528 


Chinese, Japanese. 1,942 2.2 






DEATHS BY AGE (1914). 
Number and proportion per 1,000. 
Propor- 
Age. Number, tion. 
Under 1 year 155,075 172.7 


DEATH RATES IN FOREIGN 
COUNTRIES. 
Per 1,000 inhabitants. 
Country. Rate. 
Australia 10.5 


1 year 30 619 34 1 


Austria 21.9 


2 years 13 527 15 1 


Belgium 15 2 




Bulgaria 26 4 


t years 6359 7.1 


Chile 311 


Under 5 vears . 214 120 238 4 


Costa Rica 261 


5 to 9 years 19 302 21 5 


Cuba . 11 2 


10 to 14 years 12 873 14 3 




15 to 19 years 21.256 23.7 
20 to 24 years 32.924 36.7 


England and Wales (1912) ...14.2 
France .. ...19.6 



City. 1906-10.1911.1912.1913.1914.1915. 

Rochester, N. Y 14.714.414.614.614.313.9 

St. Louis, Mo 15.6 15.4 14.9 14.9 15.0 13.8 

St. Paul, Minn 11.0 10.9 10.2 11.0 11.4 10.7 

San Francisco, Cal 16.1 15.2 15.6 15.9 15.5 15.9 

Scranton, Pa 16.3 14.8 14.6 14.8 15.8 14.7 

Seattle, Wash 9.8 8.8 8.1 8.4 8.1 7.4 

Spokane, Wash 12.811.6 8.4 8.9 8.6 8.1 

Syracuse, N. Y 15.2 14.3 15.2 15.7 14. 13.2 

Toledo, 14.9 14.9 15.8 16.2 15.5 15.4 

Washington, D. C.* 19.6 18.7 18.3 17.3 16.6 18.1 

Worcester, Mass 17.1 15.7 16.2 16.4 15.7 15.4 

*Cities in which 10 per cent or more of the 
population in 1910 were colored. 

Country. Rate. 

Germany 16.2 

Hungary 24.9 

Italy 21.4 

Japan 21.9 

Netherlands (1912) 14.5 

New Zealand (1912) 9.5 

Norway 13.2 

Russia, Europe 29.8 

Serbia 22.4 

Spain 23.7 

Sweden 13.8 

Switzerland 15.1 



DEATH RATES IN FOREIGN 

CITIES. 

City. Per 1,000 1912. 1911. 

Amsterdam 11.2 12.4 

Belfast 18.1 17.2 

Berlin 14.4 15.6 

Breslau 18.4 19.5 

Brussels 13.5 13.9 

Budapest 18.5 19.4 

Christiauia 13.4 13.5 

Copenhagen 14.1 14.8 

Dresden 13.1 14.6 

Dublin 20.5 21.4 

Edinburgh 15.7 16.0 

Glasgow 17.6 17.7 

Hamburg 13.6 14.7 

London 13.6 15.0 

Melbourne 14.0 12.$ 

Milan 15.8 20.1 

Montreal 20.0 21.4 

Moscow 24.3 27.2 

Munich 14.7 15.8 

Paris 16.3 17.2 

Petrograd 21.9 20.8 

Prague 15.8 16.3 

Rio de Janeiro 21.3 20.4 

Rotterdam 11.3 12.1 

Stockholm 14.2 12.7 

Sydney 11.4 10.9 

The Hague 10.9 12.7 

Toronto 12.6 

Trieste 21.1 24.0 

Turin ... 12.9 14.2 

Venice 20.9 22.8 

Vienna 15.4 16.4 



DEATH OF JAMES J. HILL. 



James J. Hill, builder of the Great Northern 
railroad, capitalist and one of the most widely 
known men in the United States, died at his 
home in St. Paul, Minn., May 29, 1916. Born 
near Guelph, Ont., Sept. 16, 1838, he was not 
quite 78 at the time of his death. He estab- 
lished himself in St. Paul in 1856 and engaged 
in the fuel and transportation business. Mr. Hill 
secured control of the St. Paul & Pacific railroad, 
reorganized it as the St. Paul, Minneapolis & 
Manitoba line and became its general manager 
and subsequently its president. The road became 
part of the Great Northern system which Mr. 



Hill built up until it reached Puget sound, with 
branches extending into Canada and steamers 
running to Japan and China. It was in large 
part due to his efforts that the northern part 
of the United States from Lake Superior to the 
Pacific coast was quickly settled and made pro- 
ductive. Mr. Hill was an able speaker and 
writer and on subjects dealing with finance, 
agriculture and industry in general he was re- 
garded as an authority. His fortune at the time 
of his death was estimated at well above $10C,- 
000,000. 



John Dryden, 1670-1689. 
Thomas 'Shadwell, 1689-1692. 
Nahum Tate, 1692-1715. 
Nicholas Rowe, 1715-1718. 
Laurence Eusden, 1718-1730. 



POETS LAUREATE OF ENGLAND. 

Colley Cibber. 1730-1757. William Wordsworth, 1843-1850. 

William Whitohead, 1758-1785. Alfred Tennyson. 1850-1892. 
Thomas Warton, 1785-1790. Alfred Austin, 1896-1913. 

Henry James Pye. 1790-1813. Robert Bridges, 1913. 

Robert Southey, 1813-1843. 



ALMANAC AND TEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



119 



NATIONAL WEALTH OF THE UNITED STATES. 



The national wealth of the United States Is 
estimated by the United States census bureau at 
$187,739.000,000, or $1.965 for each man, woman 
and child in the country. The total includes 
the value of all kinds of real, personal and other 
property, taxable and exempt, in the United 
States exclusive of Alaska, Hawaii, Porto Rico 
and the Philippines. Omitting the value of 
property exempt from taxation for the reason 
that it was not included in the figures for 1850, 
1860 and 1870, the wealth for the several census 
years is as follows: Total. Per cap. 

1912 $175,426,000,000 $1.836 

1904 100,273,000,000 1.234 

1900 82,305,000,000 1,083 



Year. Total. Per cap, 

1890 '. $61,204,000,000 $971 

1880 41,642,000,000 830 

1870 24,055,000,000 624 

I860 16,160,000,000 514 

1850 7,136,000,000 308 

Including exempt and all other classes of prop- 
erty the estimated national wealth in each of the 
census years, 1880 to 1912, was: 

Year. Total. Per cap. 

1912 $187,739,000,000 $1,965 

1904 107,104,000,000 1,318 

1900 88,517,000,000 1,165 

1890 65,037,000,000 1,036 

18SO 43,642.000,000 870 



VALUE OF SPECIFIED CLASSES OF PROPERTY (1912). 



Geographic divi- 
sion and state. 


Real prop- 
erty and 
improve- 
ments. 


Live 
stock. 


Farm im- 
plements 
and ma- 
chinery. 


Manufac. 
machin'y, 
tools and 
implmts. 


Gold and 
silver coin 
and 
bullion. 


Railroads 
and their 
equipment. 


Street rail- 
ways, ship- 
ping, water- 
works, etc. 


New England 
Maine 
New Hampshire 


$7,24S.043,478 


$53.648.227 


$766.480.256 


$168.386,104 


$501.391.191 


$667.812,193 
77.912.060 
31,072.620 
20,642.085 
348.842,372 
53,771.682 
135,571,374 
2,792.249,523 


485,858.919 
335.212,237 
255.994.278 
4,118,215,738 
600,747,009 
1,452,015,297 
30.315,701,320 


32,745,172 
16.015.159 
30.651,098 
43,148,947 
6,874,870 
22,976,457 
519,253.198 


15.fi28.09fi 
6,020.570 
10.694.726 
12,110,883 
1,883,634 
7,310,318 
177,725,806 


69.941.215 
38,5(51,611 
19.089.082 
377,873,043 
93.8fW.055 
167,155,250 
1,994,416.371 


14.779.215 

8,023,193 
6,499 412 
101.876,063 
13.603,256 
23,604,965 
899.203.161 


149.19(5.850 
76,619.613 
66.338,921 
135,123,384 
12,483,737 
61.628,686 
1,500.820.231 


Massachusetts 
Rhode Island 
Connecticut 
Middle Atlantic 


16,910.262,952 
3.856,914,601 
9,548,523,767 
23.748.446.047 


263.577,707 
45.847,959 
209,827,532 
1,301,591,448 


89.172.586 
13.865,402 
74,687,818 
289,229,016 


813.601.441 
303,596,418 
877,218,512 
1,415.243,372 


632.554,526 
54.897,349 
211,751,286 
488,763.883 


553.314.487 
165.778.631 
781.727,113 
3.079,251.197 


1,787.201.570 
302.215,110 
702,832,843 
2,035,016.810 


New Jersey 
Pennsylvania 
East North Central... 


Ohio 


5.173708,410 

2.957,867.352 
10.046.319.512 
3.067,378,894 
2,503,171,879 
18,690.288.308 


273,611,491 

227,006.381 
386,701.265 
184,782,900 
229,489,411 
1,838,987,471 


54,181.255 
43,733,375 
79,473,427 
54.140,466 
57,700,493 
403,249,087 


423,068,286 
178,384,997 
451.299.068 
199.266,379 
163,224.642 
363,455,087 


112,275,002 
57,444,477 

205,185,274 
63.658.411 
50,200,719 
285,898,127 


607.038,239 
480,251 .3(52 
926.403.787 
5S4.8H4 .648 
480,673,161 
3.313.505,472 


584,792,833 
286.5(56,614 
748,713,023 
268.201.502 
146,742,838 
843,052,977 


Illinois 


Michigan 


West North Central.. 


3,391.615,408 
5,111,230,343 
3.264,058,859 
1,261,388,140 
639,<K1.792 
2,316^,464 
2,705,483,302 
7.536.324,781 


217.832,281 
491,613,546 
808,100,681 

125,614,381 
145.815,404 
265,473.943. 
284,537,235 
485,664,137 


56.775,152 
102.981.406 
55,328,257 
49.878,002 
38.100,632 
48,111.560 
52,074,078 
107,212.399 


83,647.680 
58,520,370 
125.037.985 
5,244.543 
6,043.576 
5,084,497 
49,876,436 
545,733.504 


51,531,987 
49,56(5.432 
93,140,304 
12.453.723 
12,334,760 
30,453,382 
36,417.539 
226.711.255 


564,652,082 

635.6'...-). 172 
613.54';.4C.'.i 
277,870.640 
258.641.210 
884.4S2.I ri;> 
578,665,874 
1.976.695.855 


231.846.178 
133.831,854 
267.556,780 
17,051.547 
25,801,674 
79,476.484 
87,488,460 
680,270.319 






North Dakota 


South Dakota 




South Atlantic ... 


Delaware 
Maryland 
District of Columbia 
Virginia 


172.148,377 
1,345.4^.'.'-.'-:! 
902.023.891 
1,176.103.685 
1.399.1S9.713 
700.300,022 
50t5.607.276 
904,983.602 
429,484,293 
3,381.631,974 


8.794.481 
45.903,766 
1.794,926 
85.954.360 
55.993.204 
85.068,318 
61,304,088 
106.429,447 
34.421.547 
439.418.056 


3.417,202 
12,509,481 
83.608 
19.756,852 
7,405,732 
20.315,423 
15,604,670 
21^,176.865 
4,942,566 
80.653.752 


16,693,931 
85,042,692 
13,785,676 
66,657,021 
60,271,939 
85,119,631 
98,942,660 
90,428,881 
28,791,073 
222,238,538 


3,936,059 
28,722.913 
8.778,789 
37.836,727 
23,590,424 
37,626.636 
25.507.035 
45.6-J3.056 
15,089,626 
149,234,864 


20,908,048 
91,591.546 
19,468.338 
296,128,318 
232,878.472 
326,771,879 
220.932,828 
4(55,990.385 
302,026.041 
1,137.275,275 


20,411.455 
165.625,265 
64.167,592 
103.841,555 
67,305,992 
44,410.575 
55,766.258 
129,508.626 
29,233.001 
304,130.933 


West Virginia 


North Carolina 


South Carolina 


Florida 


East South Central. . . 


1,139,433,836 
831.914.027 
933.601.266 
476,622,845 
8,666,784.508 


136,524,104 
126,175.142 
8(5.921,130 
89,797,680 
722.172.650 


21,961.843 
22.504,071 
17,812.825 
18,375,013 
128.079,443 


41.218.821 
50,649.681 
85,250,311 
35,119.725 
250,665.542 


41.650.223 

39,068,353 
38.211,885 
30.304,403 
175.407.024 


247.266.327 
253.394.762 
352,614.162 
284,000,024 
2.107.781,380 


91.799,742 
118,787,097 
65.2<i8.571 
28,275,523 
346.620,452 

93,'342J72 
48.415.760 
171,954:298 
564.515,334 




Alabama 
Mississippi 


West South Central.. 
Arkansas 


890,976.538 

l,028,Hv\ '.;." 
3,138.7.V,.^ 
3;60S,063,739 
2,799,845.3% 


88,301,395 
64.772.977 
174.193.995 
394,904,283 
460.554,283 


18,487,026 
17,065.106 
30.404,140 
62.123,171 
55.554,446 


30,524.632 
88,307.350 
21,965.234 
109,868,326 
163,747,325 


27.064,086 
32,739070 
34,258.132 
81,345,736 
69.651.582 


333.824,378 
390.186,948 
383,688,745 
1,000,081,309 
1.499.071,030 


Louisiana 
Oklahoma 


Texas 


Mountain 


Montana 
Idaho 


450,271.730 
143,201,061 
90.280.515 
1,223.51 i. 598 
147.056.630 
183.408.911 
376,008.261 
186,106,640 
8,289.267,259 


91.707.546 
58.398,555 
54,434.914 
88,059.546 
65,003.870 
43,997,536 
39.301.735 
29,650,581 
318.336.039 


11,913.204 
11.912.252 
4,128,753 
14,400.570 
4,716,452 
1,992.308 
4.777.304 
1,713.603 
72.872,372 


6,199,272 
18.598,415 
3,043.914 
91.353.941 
3.664,788 
12.609.832 
24,491,'45 
3,786,018 
369,471,279 


11.119,466 

7,757.979 
3,593.443 
23,696,056 
6.644.604 
4.729.163 
9.580.423 
2,530.448 
153.386,734 


275.535,572 
159,755,166 
103.078.595 
360,238,739 
187,646.905 
130,657,476 
329,582,931 
143,575,646 
1.032,742,871 


106,010.526 
95,201.419 
26,723,620 
197,641.592 
18,070,248 
37.982,596 
57,963,901 
24,921,432 
1,339,186,922 
227,341,952 
145.746,770 
966,098,200 




Colorado 
New Mexico 


Arizona 


Utah 


Nevada 


Pacific 


Washington 


1,888.850.453 
1.163.584,445 

5,236.82-2.361 


68.242.8li5 
74.363,095 
175.731.579 


18,797.487 
14.545,429 
89.529,456 


111,048,892 
38,107,957 
220,314,430 


35.7W.788 
25.139,773 
92,447,173 


351,546,678 
179,916.887 
501,279.308 




California 


United States 


110,676.333,071 


6.238.388,985 


1.368224.548 


6.091.451.274 


2.616.642,734 


16,148.532,502 


10,265.207.321 


NOTE Total for street railways, shipping, water- 1 000,000, value of privately owned water supply 
works, etc., includes $402.351,858, value of ships systems, not distributed by states, 
belonging to the United States navy, and $290,- ' 



120 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



WEALTH BY GEOGRAPHIC E 

Geographic divi- 
sion and state. Total. Taxable. 
New England $11 805 422 012 $10 922 179 117 


IVISIONS AND STATES (1912). 
r- Per capita 1912-^,-Per capita 1904-^ 
Tax- Ex- Tax- Ex- 
Exempt. Total, able. empt.Total. able.empt. 
$883,242,895 $1,744 $1,614 $131 $1,498 $1,389 $110 




Maine 1,069,594,027 1,030,366,547 


39,227,480 1,420 1,368 52 1,096 1,058 38 
35,878,897 1,493 1,411 83 1,214 1,159 55 
30,325,811 1,470 1,385 85 1,035 981 54 
567,758,277 1,805 1,642 163 1,672 1,529 143 
78,109,215 1,709 1,571 137 1,702 1,585 117 
131,943,215 1,969 1,855 114 1,453 1,353 101 

4,799,847,938 2,290 2,052 238 1,763 1,631 132 


New Hampshire.... 649,320,469 613,441,572 
Vermont 527,261,775 496,935,964 
Massachusetts 6,302,988,392 5,735,230,115 
Rhode Island 970 802 690 892 693 475 


Connecticut 2,285,454,659 2,153,511,444 
Middle Atlantic 46,211,667,778 41,411,819,840 
New York f 25 Oil 105 223 21 91** 629 507 


3,098,475,716 2,626 2,300 325 1,868 1,700 168 
381,114,856 2,140 1,998 142 1,547 1,445 102 
1,320,257,366 1,939 1,774 166 1,707 1.609 98 

1,951,177,219 2 106 2 002 104 1 416 1 363 52 


New Jersev 5,743,032.278 5,361,917,422 
Pennsylvania 15,457,530,277 14,137,272,911 

East North Central. 39 502 313 584 37,551,136 3455 






Ohio 8 908 432 943 8 552 130 667 


356,302,276 1,817 1,744 73 1,367 1.308 58 
243,621,010 1.894 1,806 89 1,174 1,131 43 
887,983,145 2,660 2,507 153 1,689 1,635 54 
258.000,069 1,873 1,784 89 1,297 1,245 53 
205,270,719 1,875 1,790 86 1,292 1,244 , 48 

1,590,581,739 2,617 2,483 133 1,546 1,490 55 


Indiana 5,194,682.500 4,951,061,490 
Illinois ... 15484450,232 14,596,467,087 


Michigan 5,427,022,651 5,169,022,582 
Wisconsin 4 487 725 258 4 282 454 539 


West North Central. 31,208,417,942 29.617,836,203 


Minnesota .. 5,547,327,017 5,266,950,787 


280,376,230 2,582 2,452 131 1,729 1,665 64 
431,359,377 3,539 3,345 194 1,828 1,781 48 
295,523,906 1,752 1,663 89 1,147 1.098 49 
104,000,937 3,374 3,210 164 1,771 1,692 79 
67.880,008 2,239 2,130 109 1,530 1,414 115 
189,852.951 3.110 2.954 156 1,882 1,825 57 
221,588,330 2,652 2,525 127 1,468 1,424 44 

1,066,071,383 1,179 1,094 85 716 654 62 


Iowa . 7 868 454 211 7 437 094 834 


Missouri 5 842 017 009 5 546 493 103 


North Dakota 2,141,626,961 2,037,626.024 
South Dakota 1398573425 1330693,417 


Nebraska .... 3 794 986 781 3 605 133 830 


Kansas 4 615 432 538 4 393 844 208 


Sooth Atlantic....... 14,843,963,211 13,777,891,828 


Delaware 307948613 293,721,979 


14,226,634 1,493 1,424 69 1,204 1,157 47 
175,742,144 1,651 1,518 133 1,213 1,137 76 
406,540,161 3,425 2,239 1,186 3,491 2.165 1,325 
115,228,594 1,086 1,032 55 666 639 21 
124,043,570 1,800 1,703 97 810 785 25 
62,340,084 794 767 27 420 405 15 
49,993,768 869 837 32 414 400 14 
83,403,276 883 853 31 493 474 19 
34,553,152 1,307 1,264 43 729 697 32 

317,188,517 890 854 37 536 515 21 


Maryland . 2 177 958 864 2 002 216 720 


Dist. of Columbia. 1,173,857,112 767,316,951 
Virginia 2289913,786 2,174,685,192 


West Virginia .... 2,303,571,209 2,179,527,639 
North Carolina.... 1,807,573,780 1,745,233,696 
South Carolina.... 1,351,400,753 1,301,406,985 
Georgia 2,382600866 2299,197,590 


Florida 1049138228 1014585,076 


East South Central. 7,660,040,736 7,342,852,219 


Kentucky 2 267 777 525 2 152 097 565 


115,679,960 977 927 50 675 641 34 
85,993,334 864 826 39 520 499 22 
77,040,163 964 929 35 494 478 15 
38,475,060 726 705 21 416 407 8 

747,461,944 1,662 1,581 80 796 718 78 


Tennessee 1,920348,261 1,834,354,927 


Alabama 2127054930 2050014767 


Mississippi 1,344,860,020 1.306,384,960 
West South Central. 15,434,960,541 14,687,498,597 


Arkansas 1,829,521,736 1,757,533,669 


71,988,067 1,120 1,076 44 580 564 17 
107,865.400 1,260 1,197 63 694 6o9 35 
259,941,500 2,475 2,335 140 *1,092 *706 *386 
307,666,977 1,679 1,604 75 841 811 29 

252,696,992 2,371 2,282 89 2,228 1,989 239 


Louisiana 2,164,437,746 2,056,572,346 
Oklahoma 4,581,091,918 4,321,150,418 
Texas 6 859 909 141 6 55 9 242 164 


Mountain 6 753 014 065 6 500 317 073 




Montana . 1 149 732 986 1 113 008 146 


36,724,840 2,834 2,743 91 2,633 2,244 388 
17,231,315 1,680 1,632 48 1,795 1,449 346 
9,010.015 2,241 2,184 57 3,297 2,559 738 
100,444,806 2,785 2,668 117 2,046 1,865 181 
12,105,602 1,440 1,406 34 1,587 1,170 417 
14,752,821 2,255 2.189 66 2,239 1,649 590 
46,801,510 1,979 1,860 119 1,609 1,342 267 
15,626,083 5,038 4,865 172 5,214 3,299 1,915 

705,250,875 2,969 2,816 154 2,290 2,143 147 


Idaho 608 305 157 591 073 842 


Wyoming 353,844,827 344,834.812 
Colorado 2,386 923,583 2 286 478,777 


New Mexico 513,733,026 501,627,424 
Arizona 501 852 186 487 099 365 


Utah 781 613 390 734 811 880 


Nevada 457,008,910 441 382 827 


Pacific 13 626 919 363 12 921 668 488 




Washington 3,218,360,623 3,054,690,780 
Oregon . 1 944 354 463 1 843 542 127 


163,669.843 2,511 2,384 128 1,806 1.693 112 
100,812,336 2,661 2,523 138 1,886 1,695 191 
440,768,696 3,284 3.113 171 2,582 2,435 147 


California 8 464 204 277 8 023 435 581 




The United States.. 187,739,071,090 175,425,551,588 

NOTE The totals at the head of the first two 
columns include $402,351,858, value of ships be- 
longing to the United States navy, and $290,000,- 
000, value of privately owned water supply sys- 
tems, not distributed by states. 
*Includes Indian territory. 
CLASSIFICATION OF WEALTH (1912). 
Real property and improvements 
taxed . .. $98,362,813,569 


12,313,519,502 1,965 1,836 129 1,318 1,234 84 

Real property and improvements 
exempt 12 313 519 502 


Live stock. 6^38388985 


Farm implements and machinery.. 1,368,224,548 
Manufacturing machinery, tools and 
implements 6 091 451 274 


Gold and silver coin and bullion.. 2,616,642,734 
Railroads and their equipment... . 16.148.532.502 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



121 



Street railways, etc: 


and published in the New Dictionary of Statistics 


Street railways 4,596,563,292 


for 1911: 


Telegraph systems 223,252,516 


Country. Amount. 


Telephone systems 1,081,433,227 
Pullman and cars not owned by 


United States (1904) *$107,104,192,410 
British empire (190,1) * 108, 279, 625, 000 


railroads 123,362,701 


United kingdom *72,997,500,000 


Shipping and canals 1,491,117,193 


Canada '6,569,775,000 


Irrigation enterprises , . . 360,865,270 


Australasia *5,353,150,000 


Privately owned waterworks 290,000,000 


India *14,599,500,000 


Privately owned central electric 


South Africa '2,919,900,000 


light and power stations 2,098,613,122 


Rest of empire '5,839,800,000 


All other: 


France ("recently") t46,798,500,000 


Agricultural products 5,240,019,651 
Manufactured products 14,693,861,489 


Denmark (1900.) '1,946.600,000 
Germany (1908) '77,864,000,000 


Imported merchandise 826,632,467 


Australia (1903) t4,5. 8,903,000 


Mining products 815,552,233 


New Zealand (1905) '1.605,945,000 


Clothing and personal adorn- 


Cape of Good Hope (1907) 428,939,492 


ments 4,295,008,593 
Furniture, carriages and kindred 


*Total wealth. fPrivate wealth. JFixed prop- 


property 8,463,216,222 


erty. 
The census bureau also quotes the following 


Total 187,739,071,090 


figures from Dr. Karl Helfferich's "Germany's 
Economic Progress and Economic Wealth": 


COMPARATIVE WEALTH OF NATIONS. 


Country. Total wealth. 


In its report on the national wealth of the 


German empire (1910-1911) $68,020,000,000 


United States in 1912 the census bureau quotes 


to 76,160,000,000 


the following statement concerning the wealth 


France (1308) 55,391,000,000 


of the principal nations as given by Augustus D. 


England (not stated) 54,740,000,000 


Webb, fellow of the Royal Statistical society, 


United States (not stated) 119,000,000,000 


VALUE OF PUBLIC PROP! 


:RTIES OF STATES (ms). 


[Bureau of the 


census report.] 


States.* Total. Statehouses.f 


Armories. Hospitals.* Homes.lt Schools. Prisons. 


Alabama $9,791,182 $1,500,000 


$330,000 $1,000,000 $5,505,182 $1,406,000 


Arizona 2,147,200 180,000 


340,000 933,200 500,000 


Arkansas 7,041,571 2,850,000 


1,600,000 $200,000 1,837,500 554,071 


California 53,829,469 5,102,712 


165,121 8,274,762 16,159,781 3.829,844 


Colorado 12,716,500 2,572,000 


17,500 1,515,000 5,515,000 2,830,000 


Connecticut 12,826,612 5,297,103 


1,514,000 2,766,770 134,120 1,150,175 1,239,444 


Delaware 465,000 380,000 


25,000 60,000 


Florida 2,471,769 575,000 


741,050 1,112,719 


Georgia 4,719,900 1,000,000 


150,000 3,429,900 40,000 


Idaho 4,691,680 1,800,500 


661,615 1,571,974 553,764 


Illinois 44,215,230 6,570,000 


177,700 290,748 12,982,812 5,787,377 5,828,252 


Indiana 23,157,960 4,425,000 


8,137,077 1,221,486 5,012,096 2,697,466 


Iowa 20,545,223 3,618,000 


4,976,895 1,421,307 6,781,307 2,467,621 


Kansas 18,242,808 5,350,589 


3,500,000 4,692,219 4,100,000 


Kentucky 9,848,583 2,665,000 


25,000 1,997,583 1,526,000 3,635,000 


Louisiana 5,701,698 500,000 


1,540,000 2,081,198 1,350,000 


Maine 4,762,076 1,523,905 


82,562 1,933,043 770,145 390,472 


Maryland 8,867,296 1,240,000 


580,000 2,698,000 '1,941,000 2,024,000 


Massachusetts 51,358,057 7,906,507 


3,864,638 12,689,881 4,295,907 3,950,978 ?,479,949 


Michigan 20,732,097 2,500,000 


123,757 5,537,601 8,930,989 5,540,030 


Minnesota 22,454,023 4,993,443 


198,345 6,521,585 6,195,820 3,964,830 


Mississippi 12,543,528 2,972,662 


600,000 1,301,338 4,732,521 2,377,000 


Missouri 11,750,515 125,000 


3,750,000 5,500,000 2,375,515 


Montana 4,859,461 1,454,856 


573,000 273,243 2,035,780 497,582 


Nebraska 8,786.615 844,514 


250,000 2,448,695 4,111,406 832,000 


Nevada 1,755,250 534,250 


14,000 235,000 85,000 626,000 185,000 


New Hampshire 3,879,000 1,200,000 


133,000 115,000 1,050,000 892,000 375,000 


New Jersey 16,872,594 2,500,000 


1,442,806 6,896,096 505,551 1,704,784 3,740,857 


New Mexico 2,148,450 270,000 


120,000 311,000 :00,000 70,000 224,000 


New York 105,959,252 24,575,477 


7,379,979 33,961,556 9,061,399 7,099.665 14,826,618 


North Carolina 11,648,163 3,390,000 


7,500 53,000 2,597,000 3,575,663 2,025,000 


North Dakota 4,818,492 538,156 


42,994 1,084,793 2,446,067 690,432 


Ohio 48,606,806 2,860,000 


438,500 12,208,025 2,533,972 9,752,843 5,331,466 


Oklahoma ' 10,890,371 3,156,761 


458,000 5,585,000 1,690,000 


Oregon 7,670,633 420.000 


160,000 715,397 2,160,000 3,131,554 843,682 


Rhode Island 7,173,995 3,959,400 


265,850 643,235 67,000 732,500 1,464,210 


South Carolina 9,659.000 2,500,000 


15,000 1,713,000 5,006,000 375,000 


South Dakota 8,544,802 1,045,872 


864,715 1,427,987 206,228 


Tennessee 4,635,246 1,500,000 


1,272,411 80,000 779.160 963,675 


Texas 13,675,000 7,500,000 


50,000 2,500,000 400,000 1.800,000 1,000.000 


Utah 3,659,375 


620,272 2,198,714 774,089 


Vermont 2,200,934 894.243 


82,300 478,810 58,820 74,821 555,655 


Virginia 12,342,862 5,000,000 


413,000 1,594,537 4,565,325 725,000 


Wffehinirton 16.739,943 550,794 


739,580 1,693,889 114,554 11.920,100 1,376,235 


West Virginia 9,227,000 1,517,000 


15,000 320,000 2,525,000 3,150,000 1,700.000 


Wisconsin 18,968,466 4,682,300 


43,293 1,876.528 1,079,458 6,916,184 2,010,717 


Wyoming 897,500 325,000 


190,000 75,000 250,000 57,500 


Total 695,499,187 136,866,051 


17,688,329 106,097,687 83,302,218 175,953,734 93,654,114 


*Pennsylvanla was omitted from table as no 


NOTE Included in the totals are the following: 


figures were available. tStatehouses include de- 


Art galleries and museums, $3,462,909: fair 


partmental libraries. JGeneral, insane and con- 


f rounds, parks and monuments, 312,720,076: lands, 


tagious. liSoldiers', orphans' and other charitable 
institutions. Educational institutions. 


uildlngs and equipment of public service nter- 
prises, $52,919,057; miscellaneous, $12,835,012. 



122 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Occupation. Total. 

Actors 28,297 

Agents, general 50,785 

Agents, insurance 88,463 

Agents, railway station 24,138 

Agents, real estate 125,862 

Architects 16.613 

Artists 34.104 

Authors 4,368 

Baggagemen i. 12,273 

Bakers 89.531 

Bankers 56,059 

Barbers, hairdressers... 195,275 

Bartenders 101,234 

Blacksmiths 240.519 

Boarding house keepers 165,452 

Boilermakers 44.761 

Bookkeepers 486,700 

Brakemen 92.572 

Brokers, commercial.... 24.009 

Brokers, stock 13,729 

Builders 174,422 

Butchers 124,048 

Cabinetmakers 41.892 

Candymakers 30,943 

Canvassers 18.595 

Carpenters 817,120 

Carriage drivers 35.375 

Chambermaids 39,789 

Chauffeurs 45,785 

Chemists 16.273 

Cigarmakers 151.519 

Clay, stone, workers.... 88.628 

Clergymen 118.018 

Clerks, store 387.183 

Other 720.498 

Collectors 35.747 

Cooks 450.440 

Commercial travelers... 163.620 

Compositors 127.589 

Conductors, steam rys. 65,604 

Conductors, street rys. 56.932 

Coopers 25.299 

Dairy farmers 61,816 

Delivery men 229.619 

Dentists 39,997 

Designers 11.788 

Detectives, m'rsh'ls.etc. 23,599 

Domestics, general 1,038.000 

Draftsmen 33,314 

Dressmakers 449,342 

Druggists 67,575 

Dyers 14.050 

Electricians 135.519 

Electrotprs.. stereotprs. 4.368 

Elevator tendors 25.035 

Engineers, civil 52,033 

Locomotive 96,229 

Mining 6,930 

Stationary 231,041 

Engravers 13.967 

Express messengers 6,781 

Farmers 5,865.003 

Filers, grinders 49.525 

Firemen, fire dept 35,606 

Locomotive 76,381 

Stationary 111,248 

Fishermen 68,275 

Foremen, mfg 175,098 

Foresters 4,332 

Furnacemen 36.251 

Gardeners, florists 139.255 

Glassblowers 15,564 

Hatmakers (felt) 26.575 

Hostlers 63.388 

Hotelkeepers 64.504 

Housekeepers, stewards 189.273 

Janitors 113.081 

Jewelers 32,574 

Laborers, domestic 53,480 

Farm 5.975,057 

Garden 133,927 

General 934.909 

Public service 67,234 

Railroad 570,975 

Store 102,333 

Launderers (not in laun- 
dry) 533,697 

Laundry operatives 111.879 



PRINCIPAL OCCUPATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

[From census report for 1910.1 



Men. 

16.305 


Women. 
11.992 


Occupation. Total. Men. Women. 
Lawyers, judges 114704 114146 558 


48,495 


2,290 


Lithographers 8138 7661 477 


85,926 


2,537 


Longshoremen 62857 62813 44 


22.930 


1.208 


Lumbermen 161 268 161 191 77 


122.935 


2,927 


Machinists 488*049 487*955 93 


16.311 


302 


Mail carriers 80678 79667 1011 


18,675 
2.310 
12.273 
84,752 
54.387 
172,977 


15.429 
2.058 

""4.'779 
1.672 
22,298 


Mail clerks, railway... 15,240 15.240 
Managers, mfg 104.210 102,748 1462 
Manufacturers 255,591 251.892 4,609 
Masons, brick, stone... 169.402 169.387 15 
Merchants, retail 1.195,029 1.127.926 67.103 
Wholesale 51 048 50 123 925 


100.984 
240.488 
23.052 


250 
31 

142.400 


Millers, grain, etc 23.152 23.093 59 
Milliners 127,906 5,459 122,447 
Miners 964 824 963 730 1 094 


44.761 




Molders. founders 120 900 120 783 117 


299,545 


187.155 


Motormen 59 005 59 005 


92 572 




Musicians 139 310 54 832 84 478 


23.690 
13.522 
173.573 
122.757 


319 
207 
849 
1.291 


Nurses, not trained.... 125.838 15.926 110.912 
Trained 82327 5,819 76.508 
Office boys and girls... 97.169 92.474 4.695 
Officials, city 52254 49668 2586 


41.884 


8 


State and US 52 926 43 389 9 537 


13.608 


17.335 


Painters glaziers . 337 355 334 814 2 541 


13.980 
817.082 
35.339 
187 
45.752 


4,615 
38 
37 
39.602 
33 


Paperhangers 25,577 24,780 '797 
Patternmakers 23.559 23.006 553 
Photographers 31,775 26.811 4.964 
Physicians, surgeons... 151.132 142,117 9.015 
Plasterers 47682 47676 6 


15.694 


579 


Plumbers 148,304 148304 


79.947 


71.572 


Policemen 61980 61980 . 


79.167 
117.333 
275,589 
597.833 
33,850 
117.004 


9.461 
685 
111.594 
122.665 
1.897 
333.436 


Porters (not store) 84.128 84.055 73 
Pressmen, printing 20,084 19.892 102 
Professors, college 15.668 12.710 2,958 
Reporters, editors 34.382 30.201 4.181 
Restaurant keepers 60.382 50316 10.516 
Roofers 14 078 14 078 


161.027 
113.538 
65 604 


2,593 
14.051 


Sailors 46.510 46.498 12 
Sales men and women. 921,130 663.410 257,720 


56 932 




Sawyers 43 276 43 257 19 


22.292 


7 


Sewers factory 291 209 60 003 231 206 


59.240 
229.469 


2.576 
150 


Shoemakers (not factory) 69,570 68.788 782 
Showmen 20 096 18 988 1 10S 


38.743 
9.211 
23 219 


1.254 
2.577 
380 


Soldiers, sailors 77,153 77.153 
Stenographers 316,693 53.378 263.315 
Stock herders 62 975 62 090 885 


102 151 


935 849 


Stonecutters 35 731 35 726 5 


32 923 


391 




1.582 
65.414 


447.760 
2,161 


Switchmen, yardmen... 85.147 85.095 52 
Tailors 204, 608 163,795 40. 813 


13 396 


654 


Teachers 599 237 121 210 478 027 


135 427 


92 


Teamsters 408,469 408.396 73 


4.268 
25.010 
52 028 


100 
25 
5 


Telegraph operators.... 69.953 61.734 8,219 
Telephone operators 97.893 9.631 88.262 
Tinsmiths 59,833 59.809 24 


96.229 
6 930 




Undertakers 20.734 19.921 813 
Upholsterers 20221 18928 1293 


231 031 


io 


Waiters 188 293 102 495 85 798 


13.429 
6.778 
5.607.297 
46,679 
35 606 


538 
3 

257.706 
2,846 


BY GRAND DIVISIONS. 
In 1910 there were 38,167.336 persons 10 years of 
age and over engaged in gainful occupations in 
continental' United States. Of these 30,091,564 


76.381 
111 248 
67.799 
155,358 
4.332 
36.226 
131.421 
15.474 
22,377 
63,382 
50.269 
15.940 
91,629 
30,037 
13.693 
4.460.634 
126.453 
919.031 
66.505 
567,522 
98.169 

13.693 
35.899 


""476 
19.740 

25 

7,834 
90 
4,198 
6 
14,235 
173.333 
21.452 
2.537 
520.004 
1,514.423 
7.474 
15.878 
729 
3.453 
4.164 

520.004 
73.980 


by grand divisions were as follows: 
Agriculture, forestry and animal husbandry 
Total. 12.659.203: men, 10.851.702; women. 1,807.501. 
Extraction of minerals Total. 964.824; men. 
963.730: women. 1.094. 
Manufacturing and mechanical industries To- 
tal. 10.658.881: men. 8.837.901; women. 1.820.980. 
Transportation Total, 2,63-7,671: men. 2,531.075: 
women. 106.596. 
Trade Total, 3,614,670; men, 3,146,582; women, 
468.088. 
Public service Total. 459.291: men. 445,733: 
women. 13,558. 
Professional service Total. 1.663.569: men. 929.- 
684; women, 733.885. 
Domestic and personal service Total. 3,772.174: 
men. 1,241.328: women, 2.530.846. 
GAINFUL WORKERS BY AGE AND SEX (1910). 
Age. Male. Per cent. Female. Pet. 
10 to 13 years... 609.030 16.6 286.946 8.0 
14 to 15 ve.irs... 744.109 41.4 350.140 19.8 
16 to 20 years... 3.615,623 72.2 1,847,600 39.9 
21 to 44 years... 17, 262.209 96.7 4.302.969 26.3 
45 and over 7.860.593 85.9 1.288.117 15.7 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



123 



OCCUPATIONAL STATUS BY LEADING INDUSTRIES (1909). 

Industry. Total. 

Agricultural implements 60,229 

Automobiles 85,359 

Boots and shoes 215,923 

Brass and bronze products 45,441 

Bread, bakery products 144,322 

Butter, cheese, condensed milk 31,506 

Canning and preserving 71,972 

Carriages and wagons 82,944 

Cars, shop construction, etc 301.273 

Cars, steam railroad ; 47,094 

Chemicals '.. . 27,791 

Clothing, men's 271,437 

Clothing, women's 179,021 

Confectionery 54,854 

Copper, tin, sheet iron.' 86,934 

Cotton goods 387,771 

Electrical machinery 105,600 

Flour and grist mill products 66,054 

Foundry, machine shop products 615,485 

Furniture, refrigerators 144,140 

Gas. illuminating, heating 51,007 

Hosiery, knit goods 136,130 

Iron and steel, blast furnaces 43,061 

Steel works and rolling mills 260,762 

Leather goods 43,525 

Leather, tanned, curried, etc .' 67,100 

Liquors, distilled 8,328 

Liquors, malt 66,725 

Lumber, timber .. 784,989 

Marble and stone 77,275 

Oil, cotton seed, cake 21,273 

Paint and varnish 21,896 

Paper and wood pulp 81,473 

Patent medicines, etc 41,101 

Petroleum, refining 16,640 

Printing, publishing 388,466 

Silk and silk goods 105,238 

Slaughtering, packing 108,716 

Smelting, refining, copper 16,832 

Smelting, refining, lead 8,059 

Sugar, molasses 15.658 

Tobacco manufactures 197,637 

Woolen, worsted, felt goods 175,176 

All other industries 1,916,361 

Total 7,678,578 

includes salaried officers of corporations, superintendents and managers. 

PERSONS ENGAGED IN MANUFACTURING (1909). 
[Summary prepared by census bureau, 1912, showing distribution by class, 

Class. Total. 

Proprietors and firm members 273,265 

Salaried officers of corporations 80,735 

Superintendents and managers 133,173 

Total proprietors and officials 487,173 

Clerks 576,359 

Wage earners (average number) .6.615,046 

Total all classes .7,678,578 

Sixteen years of age and over 6,452,800 

Under 16 years of age 162,246 



J (1909). 




Wage 


wners.* 


Clerks. 


earners. 


2,489 


7,189 


50,551 


2,564 


7,074 


75,721 


5,752 


11,874 


198,297 


2,160 


2,663 


40,618 


29,136 


14,970 


100,216 


10.480 


2,595 


18,431 


6,920 


5,084 


59,968 


8,844 


4,172 


69,928 


6,974 


12,125 


282,174 


1,041 


2,967 


43,086 


1,086 


2,991 


23,714 


12,041 


19,700 


239,696 


9,281 


15,997 


153,743 


3,362 


6,854 


44,638 


7,269 


6,050 


73,615 


4,461 


4,430 


378,880 


4,121 


14,223 


87,256 


18,763 


7,838 


39,453 


31,605 


52,869 


531,011 


7,281 


8,407 


128,452 


2,986 


10,806 


37,215 


3,308 


3,547 


129,275 


1,119 


3,513 


38,429 


4,286 


16,400 


240,076 


4,209 


4,409 


34,907 


2,331 


2,567 


62,202 


1,111 


787 


6,430 


4,362 


7,784 


54,579 


68,165 


21,805 


695,019 


8,453 


3,219 


65,603 


2,167 


2.035 


17,071 


2,016 


5,640 


14,240 


2,298 


3,197 


75,978 


5,647 


12,559 


22,895 


671 


2,040 


13,929 


49,332 


80,700 


258,434 


2,236 


3,965 


99,037 


3,514 


15,474 


89,728 


275 


929 


15,628 


132 


503 


7,424 


789 


1,343 


13,526 


21,012 


9,815 




3,192 


3,262 


16',<22 


117,932 


149,988 


1.648,441 


487,173 


576,359 


6,615,046 



sex and 
Male. 

263,265 
78,937 
130,304 


age.] 
Female. 
9,592 

1,798 
2,869 


472,914 
437,056 
5,252,293 


14,259 
139,303 
1,362,753 


6,162,263 
5,162,547 
89,746 


1,516,315 
1,290,258 
72,500 



WEIGHTS OF DIAMONDS 

The weight of diamonds and other precious 
stones is expressed in metric cara-ts. The unit 
is the international carat of 200 milligrams, 
which has been officially adopted by the United 
States and most of the countries in Europe. 
Until July 1, 1913, there were three different 
standards in use in the United States, although 
the one generally accepted was 205.3 milligrams. 
This was usually subdivided on the binary sys- 
tem, the smallest subdivision being 1-64 of the 
carat. The new carat is subdivided on the deci- 
mal system. 

Equivalents of old carats in new metric carats: 



AND FINENESS OF GOLD. 

New metric. 

410.60 

513.25 

Equivalents of new metric carats in old carats : 



Old carat. New metric. 

1-64 0.02 

1-32 0.03 

1-16 0.06 

% 0.13 

14 0.26 

% 0.51 

1 1.03 

2 2.05 

3 3.08 

4 4.11 

5 5.13 



Old carat. New metric. 

6 6.16 

7 7.19 

8 8.21 

9 9.24 

10 10.26 

25 25.66 

50 51.32 

75 76.99 

100 102.65 

200 205.30 

300 307.95 



Old carat. 
400 



Old carat. New metric. 
1,000 ............... 1,026.50 



New carat. Old carat. 



62-64 
1 61-64 

i3 

4 56-64 

5 54-64 

6 52-64 

7 51-64 

8 49-64 

9 47-64 
15 1439-64 

The fineness of gold is also expressed in car- 
ats. Pure gold is said to be twentv-four carats 
fine. If it contains eight parts of a baser metal 
or alloy it is only sixteen carats fine. The 
carats therefore indicate the proportion of pure 
gold to alloy. Most of the gold used by jewel- 
ers is about fourteen carats fine, having ten 
parts of alloy. 



New carat. Old carat. 

20 1931-64 

25 2423-64 

50 4845-64 

75 73 4-64 

100 9727-64 

200 19454-64 

300 29216-64 

400 38943-64 

500 487 6-64 

1,000 974 12-64 



124 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



IMMIGRATION INTO THE UNITED STATES. 
Fiscal years ended June 30. 



1907. 
5,235 
2,644 
13,554 
27,174 
770 



1908. 
4,626 
3,299 

10,164 

18,246 
1,263 

20,472 
3,323 
3,747 
9,526 
1,710 

49,056 
6,746 



African (black).. 

Armenian 

Bohemian* 

Bulgarian! 

Chinese 

Croatian}: 47,826 

Cuban 5,475 

Dalmatian 7,393 

Dutch and Flem.. 12,467 

East Indian 1,072 

English 51,126 

Finnish 14,860 

French 9,392 12,881 

German 92,936 73,038 

Greek 46,283 

Hebrew 149,182 

Irish 38,706 

Italian (north).. 51,564 

Italian (south).. 242,497 

Japanese 30,824 

Korean 39 

Lithuanian 25,884 

Magyar 60,071 

Mexican 91 

Pacific Islander.. 3 

Polish 138,033 

Portuguese 9,648 

Roumanian 19,200 

Russian 16,807 

Ruthenian 24,081 

Scandinavian 53,425 

Scotch 20,516 

Slovak 42,041 

Spanish 9,495 

Spanish-Am 1,060 

Syrian 5,880 

Turkish 1,902 

Welsh 2,754 

West Indianll.... 1,381 

Other peoples .... 2,058 

Total 1,285,349 782,870 751,786 

Includes Moravian. flncludes Serbian and 

Montenegrin. Jlncludes Slovenian. Includes 

Bosnian and Herzegovinian. HExcept Cuban. 

IMMIGRATION BY MONTHS. 
Fiscal year 1916. 

February 24,740 

March 27,586 



18,784 
12 

71,446 
7,469 
5,311 
18,721 
17,724 
45,859 
25,625 
21,415 




1,153 

5,444 

918 

,248 

1,141 

3,323 

878,587 



8,329 
22,558 
21,965 
31,601 
20,293 
25,281 
9,070 
1,342 
5,525 
1,336 
2,239 
1,132 
3,660 



1913. 

6,634 

9,353 

11,091 

9,087 

2,022 

42,499 

3,099 

4,520 

14,507 

188 

55,522 

12,756 

20,652 

80,865 

38,644 

101,330 

37,023 

42,534 

231,613 

8,302 

64 

24,647 

30,610 

10,954 

11 

174,365 
13,566 
13,451 
51,472 
30,588 
38,737 
21,293 
27,234 
9,042 
1,363 
9,210 
2,015 
2,820 
1,171 
3,038 



1914. 

8,447 

7,785 

9,928 

15,084 

2,354 

37,284 

3,539 

5,149 

12,566 

172 

51,746 

12,805 

18,166 

79,871 

45,881 

138,051 



44,802 

251,612 

8,941 

152 

21,584 

44,538 

13,089 

1 

122,657 

9,647 

24,070 

44,957 

36,727 

36,053 

18,997 

25,819 

11,064 

1,544 

9,023 

2,693 

2,558 

1,396 

3.830 



1915. 



1,651 

3,506 

2,469 

1,942 

3,402 

305 

6,675 

82 

38,746 
12,805 
12,636 
20,729 
15,187 
26,497 
23,503 
10,660 
46,557 
8,609 
146 
2,638 
3,604 



1916. 

4,576 

964 

642 

3,146 

2,239 

791 

3,442 

114 

6,443 

80 

36,168 
5,649 
19,518 
11,555 
26,792 
15,108 



6 

9,065 
4,376 
1,200 
4,459 
2,933 
24,263 
14,310 
2,069 
5,705 
1,667 
1,767 
273 
1,390 
823 
1,877 

326,700 



4,905 

33,909 

8,711 

154 

599 

981 

17,198 

5 

4,502 

12,208 

953 

4,858 

1,365 

19.172 

13,515 

577 

9,259 

1,881 

676 

216 

983 

948 



July .............. 21,504 

August ........... 21,940 



September ....... 24,513 

October .......... 25,450 

November ........ 24,545 

December ........ 18,901 

January .......... 17,293 Total 

DEPORTATION OF ALIENS. 
The following table shows the deportation of 
aliens from the United States after entry by 
fiscal years: 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 ...... ..2.069 

1909 ........ 2.124 



238 
263 
199 
269 

1900 356 

1901 363 



1897. 
1898. 



1902. 



1878. 
1879. 



1881. 
1882. 



1884. 
1885. 



1890. 



465 



April 30,560 

May 31,021 

June 30,764 



547 
779 
845 
676 
995 



1910 2.695 

1911 2.788 

1912 2.450 

1913 3.461 

1914 4,737 

1915 2,670 

1916 2,781 



IMMIGRATION SINCE 187! 
Years ended June 30. 



138.469 
177.826 
457,257 



788.992 
603.322 
518.592 
395.346 
334.203 
490.109 



444.42? 
455.302 



1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903... 



560.319 
623.084 
502.917 
285.631 
258.536 
343.267 
230.832 
229.299 
311.715 
448.572 
487.918 
648.743 
857.046 



1904.... 
1905.... 
1906.... 
1907.... 
1908.... 
1909.... 
1910.... 
1911.... 
1912.... 
1913.... 
1914.... 
1915.... 
1916... 



815.361 
1.026.499 
1,100.735 
1,285.349 
782.870 
751.786 
1,041.570 
878.587 
838.172 
1.1.)7,892 
1.218.480 
326,700 
298.826 



The total recorded immigration into the United 
States since the organization of the government 
is 32,652,950 persons. 



838,172 1,197,892 1,218, 
DESTINATION OF IMMIGRANTS (1916). 



Alabama 235 

Alaska 550 

Arizona 3,501 

Arkansas 110 

California 17,101 

Colorado 1,119 

Connecticut 6,788 

Delaware 182 

Dist. of Columbia 728 

Florida 3,634 

Georgia 225 

Hawaii 3,194 

Idaho 1,012 

Illinois 12,104 

Indiana 1,866 

Iowa 2,264 

Kansas 696 

Kentucky 129 

Louisiana 913 

Maine 6,766 

Maryland 790 

Massachusetts ... 30,814 

Michigan 26,591 

Minnesota 7,619 

Mississippi 103 

Missouri 1,746 

Montana 4,123 

Nebraska 921 



Nevada ........... 

New Hampshire.. 
New Jersey ....... 

New Mexico ....... 

New York ........ 

North Carolina... 
North Dakota ..... 

Ohio .............. 

Oklahoma ........ 

Oregon ........... 

Pennsylvania ____ 

Philippine Islands 
Porto Rico ........ 

Rhode Island ..... 

South Carolina... 
South Dakota ..... 

Tennessee ........ 

Texas ............ 

Utah ............. 



402 
3,737 
8,369 
418 
79,968 
175 
2,413 
8,796 
281 
1,882 
17,369 
20 
763 
4,589 
73 
786 
146 
13,288 
1,168 



Vermont ......... 2,247 

Virginia .......... 1,003 

Washington ...... 9,978 

West Virginia.... 2,168 

Wisconsin ....... 2,592 

Wyoming ......... 371 



Total 298,826 



INWARD PASSENGER MOVEMENT (1916). 

Nonimmigrant Immigrant U.S. 



Sex. 

Male 182,229 

Female 116,597 

Total 298,826 



alie 
44,338 

23.584 



debarred. Total. 

78,481 12,689 317,737 
43,449 6,178 



67,922 121,930 18,867 507,545 
OUTWARD PASSENGER MOVEMENT (1916). 

Emigrant Noncmigrant U. 



Male 106,625 

Female 23,140 



aii. ns. citizens. Total. 

74,350 69,553 250,528 
36,692 41,180 101,012 



Total 129,765 111,042 110,733 351,540 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



123 



GOVERNMENT OF LAR 
[From U. S. cer 
* , Mayor N , Aldermen ., 
City. Term.* Pay.f No. Term.* Pay.t 
Albany NY 2 $4 000 20 2 $500 


GE AMERICAN CITIES. 

sus report, 1916.] 

City. No. Term.* Pay.t 
Trenton N. J 5 4 3,000-3500 


Washington DC 33 5 000 


Atlanta, Ga 2 4,000 10 2 300 


*Term in years. fWhere two amounts are given 
the larger is the pay of the presiding officer. 
Note The commissioners in Washington, D. O., 
and Nashville, Tenn., are appointed; all the 
others are elected. The term of the presiding 
officer in San Diego is two years. The term 
of the presiding officer in Reading, Pa., is four 
years. Denver abandoned the commission form 
of government in 1916. 


Baltimore Md 4 6 000 94 1 000 


Boston, Mass 4 10,000 9 3 1,500 
Bridgeport, Conn 2 3.000 24 2 % 
Buffalo, N. Y 4 5,000 9 4 1,000 
Cambridge, Mass 1 3,500 11 1 t 
Camden, N. J 3 4,000 26 2 500 
Charleston, S. C 4 3,500 24 4 % 
Chicago 111 4 18,000 70 2 3,000 


Cincinnati O 2 10 000 32 2 1 150 


Cleveland" 2 10^000 26 2 1,200 


POLICE DEPARTMENTS OF LARGE CITIES 
(1915). 
[From U. S. census report.] 
Patrol- Detec- 
City. Total.* Officers, men. tives. 
Albany, N. Y 211 33 137 8 


Columbus, 2 5,000 19 2 650 


Detroit, Mich 2 5,000 42 2 1,200 
Fall River, Mass 2 3,000 27 2 200 
Fort Wayne, Ind 4 3,000 15 4 200 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 2 2,000 24 2 350 
Hartford, Conn 2 3,500 24 2 % 
Indianapolis, Ind 4 7,500 9 4 600 
Kansas City, Mo 2 5,000 16 4 5 
Los Angeles, Cal 2 4,500 9 2 4,500 
Louisville, Ky 4 5,000 12 2 * 
Milwaukee, Wis 2 4,000 37 || 1,000 
Minneapolis, Minn... 2 6,000 26 4 1,500 
Newark N J 2 10 000 32 2 500 


Atlanta Ga 280 33 182 32 


Baltimore, Md 1,126 190 753 29 
Birmingham, Ala ... 186 16 139 22 
Boston, Mass 1,709 161 1,308 46 
Bridgeport, Conn. ... 177 27 123 _ 6 
Buffalo NY .. 830 112 614 53 


Cambridge, Mass ... 166 20 112 6 
Camden, N. J 162 18 113 9 
Charleston, S. C.... 127 15 91 7 
Chicago, 111 4676 419 2109 612 


New Bedford, Mass.. 1 5,000 6 1 100 
New Haven, Conn... 2 3,500 62 t 
New York, N. Y 4 15,000 73 2 2,000 
Paterson, N. J 2 2,000 11 2 400 


Cincinnati, 709 74 528 37 
Cleveland O 803 86 504 54 


Peoria 111 . 23 500 16 2 3 


Columbus, 234 12 159 28 
Dallas, Tex 164 8 127 16 


Philadelphia, Pa 4 12,000 48 4 $ 
Pittsburgh, Pa 4 10,000 9 4 6,500 


Dayton O 145 14 100 12 


Providence, R. 1 2 5,000 10 2 750 
Richmond, Va 4 5,000 12 4 % 


Denver, Col 253 15 191 22 


Detroit Mich 1 163 101 829 80 


Rochester NY 2 5 000 13 2 500 


Duluth, Minn 87 12 55 5 
Fall River, Mass... 164 20 115 7 
Fort Wayne, Ind 63 6 35 6 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 157 8 120 8 
Hartford, Conn 182 19 142 5 
Houston, Tex 138 11 91 19 
Indianapolis, Ind.... 386 36 276 32 
Jersey City, N. J... 542 80 401 15 
Kansas City, Mo... 445 57 257 37 
Lincoln, Neb 28 4 20 2 


St Louis Mo.. . . 4 10,000 29 4 1,800 


San Antonio, Tex.... 2 5,000 12 2 10 
San Francisco, Cal... 4 6,000 18 4 2,400 
Schenectady, N. Y... 2 3,500 14 2 500 
Scranton, Pa 4 5,000 5 4 2,000 
Seattle, Wash 2 7,500 9 3 3,000 


Springfield, Mass 2 4,000 82 % 
Syracuse, N. Y 2 4,000 20 2 750 
Toledo O 24 000 19 2 550 


Troy NY 2 4000 18 2 500 


Los Angeles, Cal... 549 64 341 43 
Louisville, Ky 435 44 296 23 
Lowell, Mass 154 12 113 6 
Memphis, Tenn 180 14 140 13 


Wilmington, Del 2 2,000 13 2 240 
Worcester, Mass 1 4,000 11 1 t 
Youngstown, 2 4,500 13 2 250 
*Years. fPer year unless otherwise specified. 
JNone. Per meeting. HTwelve elected for four 
years ; twenty-five for two years. 

LARGE CITIES GOVERNED BY COMMIS- 
SIONS (1915). 
[From U. S. census report.] 
City. No. Term.* Pay.f 
Birmingham, Ala 3 3 $7,000 


Milwaukee, Wis 581 41 528 36 
Minneapolis, Minn... 331 49 204 30 
Nashville, Tenn 150 14 101 19 
Newark N. J 740 105 503 43 


New Bedford, Mass.. 160 22 121 3 
New Haven, Conn... 215 29 146 13 
New Orleans, La.... 402 48 215 28 
New York, N. Y.... 10,912 1,233 8,004 649 
Oakland, Cal 219 32 138 18 


Omaha Neb . . . 154 13 91 16 


Paterson N J 165 ''O 99 13 


Dallas, Tex 5 2 $3,000-4,000 




Dayton O 541 200- 1 800 


Philadelphia, Pa.... 3,844 369 2,834 30 
Pittsburgh, Pa 901 97 594 57 
Portland, Ore 301 22 194 32 
Providence, R. I .... 421 43 320 18 


Denver Col 5 4 5000 


Des Moines, la 5 2 3,000-3,500 


Duluth Minn . ... 5 4 4,000 


Galveston, Tex 5 2 1,200-2,000 


Houston, Tex 5 2 2,400-4,000 




Jersey City, N. J 5 4 5,000-5,500 
Lincoln, Neb 5 2 2,000-2,500 


Rochester, N. Y 409 36 265 33 


Memphis, Tenn 5 4 3,000-6,000 
Mobile Ala 33 5 000 


St. Paul, Minn 306 27 198 
Salt Lake City, Utah 98 10 63 5 
San Antonio, Tex.... 172 8 130 14 
San Francisco, Cal.. 972 143 614 26 
Schenectady, N. Y... 101 15 70 5 
Scranton Pa 130 130 91 7 


Nashville, Tenn 5 2 5,000-6,000 


New Orleans La 546 000-10 000 


Oakland, Cal 5 4 3,600-4,200 


Omaha, Neb 7 3 4,500-5,000 


Portland, Ore 5 4 5000-6,000 


Seattle Wash 414 43 235 36 


Reading Pa 523 000 


Spokane, Wash 107 13 63 10 

Springfield 111 55 4 42 


Sacramento Cal 5 5 3 600 


St Paul Minn 7 24 500- 5 000 


Springfield, Mass.... 209 36 159 11 
Syracuse, N. Y 211 15 148 13 
Tacoma, Wash 94 10 56 2 
Toledo O 9 22 21 91 28 


Salt Lake City, IKah 5 4 3,600-4,200 
San Diego, Cal 6 4 2,000-2,400 
Spokane, Wash 5 4 5,000 


Springfield 111 543 500- 4 000 


Trenton, N. J 141 15 110 5 
Troy. N. Y... 149 30 104 5 


Tacoma, Wash... .5 4 3,600-4,000 



126 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



Police- Detec- 
City. Total.* Officers, men. tives. 
Washington, D. C.... 796 73 520 36 
Wilmington, Del 118 19 84 
Worcester, Mass.... 256 18 195 9 
Youngstown, 117 12 


License City 
City. Saloons.* paid.f license.* 
Denver Col . 495 625 600 


Detroit Mich 1 377 500 250 


Duluth.' Minn 170 1,000 9SO 
Fall River, Mass 78 1,500 1,125 
Fort Wayne, Ind 192 500 300 
Grand Rapids, Mich 161 500 250 
Hartford, Conn 175 450 405 
Houston Tex 135 750 


*A11 employes. 

POLICEWOMEN IN AMERICAN CITIES (1915). 
[From U. S. census report.] 
City. Number. Pay. 
Chicago 111 . 21 $900 


Indianapolis, Ind... , 645 700 500 


Jersey City N J .. . . 917 500 500 - 




Baltimore Md 5 1,000 




Pittsburgh Pa . 4 900 




San Francisco, Cal. 3 1,200 




Los Angeles, Cal 1 1,080 


Lowell Mass 63 1 300 975 


Los Angeles, Cal 4 900 


Alilwaukee Wis 2 018 200 200 


Minneapolis, Minn 2 900 




Seattle, Wash 1 1,200 


Newark N J 1 386 500 500 


Seattle Wash 4 1,080 


New Bedford, Mass 73 1,100 825 


Portland Ore 1 1,860 


Portland Ore 1 1,320 


[ 500 200 


Portland, Ore 1 960 


Denver Col.. .. I 1,080 


LI, 600 1,600 
\ 150 150 
New York NY 10 357 \ to to 


Rochester, N. Y * ' 1,080 


St. Paul, Minn 3 *900 


Syracuse NY I 780 


1 1,200 1,200 


Omaha, Neb 1 900 


Dayton, 2 900 




San Antonio, Tex , I 780 




Tacoma Wash . 1 900 




Youngstown, 1 960 




South Bend, Ind 1 900 




Wichita Kas ... 1 900 


Providence, R. 1 350 800 600 


San Diego, Cal 1 1,020 


Topeka, Kas 2' 900 




Racine Wis I 840 


Rochester* N. Y 537 *750 375 
St. Louis, Mo 2,300 800 500 


Jamestown, N. Y 1 780 


Aurora, 111 1 900 


Colorado Springs, Col 1 960 


Salt Lake City, Utah.... 136 1,500 1,500 


Bellingham Wash 1 900 


*Not paid from police appropriation. 

LIQUOR TRAFFIC IN AMERICAN CITIES 
(1915). 
[From U. S. census report.] 
License City 
City. Saloons.* paid.f license.* 
Albany, N. Y 329 $750 $375 


San Francisco, Cal 2073 500 500 


Schenectady, N. Y. 256 750 375 


Scranton Pa 278 1 100 900 


Seattle, Wash 329 1*000 900 


Spokane Wash 183 1*000 900 


Springfield, 111 220 '500 500 


Springfield Mass 43 1 500 1 125 


Syracuse N Y 377 '750 


Baltimore, Md 1,203 1,000 750 




Birmingham, Ala 58 3,000 1,950 
Boston, Mass 573 1,200 900 


Toledo O 390 1*000 




Bridgeport, Conn 175 450 405 




Buffalo, N. Y 1,653 750 375 




Chicago, 111 7 152 1 000 1 000 




Cincinnati, 1,880 1,000 700 




Cleveland, 1,258 1000 700 


*Retail liquor. tTot'ai of city, state and coun- 
ty. Jin a few cases the rate is that of the 
state or county. 

AND POPULATION (1915.) 

State. Acres. Pop. 
Oregon i 208 804 6 481 


Columbus O 382 1 000 500 


Dayton O . 244 1 000 500 


INDIAN RESERVATIONS 

State. Acres. Pop. 
Arizona 16343,588 42,336 


California 430,136 15,034 


South Dakota '630*895 2l'o8 <) 


Colorado 396,143 890 


Texas '702 


Florida 23,542 578 


Utah 1 506 960 1 794 


Idaho 54 841 4 200 




Iowa 3,251 364 




Kansas 1,375 


Wvomin op 608*637 1*705 


Michigan 803 7.514 


Miscellaneous '. ... 7*612 


Minnesota 546,932 11,723 
Montana 4,312,452 11,329 


Total, 1915 33,324,261 *324,878 


Nebraska 6,159 3,917 
Nevada 686,219 7,819 
New Mexico 3 870 517 2? 007 


Total, 1900 77,865,373 270,544 
Total, 1890 104,314.349 243,524 


New York 87,677 5,825 
North Carolina 63 211 2 211 


Total, 1880 154,741,554 256,127 
*Does not include states in which the Indian 
office has no representative and which in 1910 
had an Indian population of 8,132. 

AMOUS STRUCTURES. 
Structure. Feet. I Structure. Feet. 
J Milan cathedral 360 St. Peter's, Rome.... 433 


North Dakota 100.000 8.710 
Oklahoma 6 206 118 358 


HEIGHT OF SOME F 
Structure. Feet. Structure. Feet 
Amiens cathedral 383 Cologne cathedral 51 



Bunker Hill mon't....221 
Capitol , Washington . . 288 
City hall, Phila 535 



Eiffel tower 984 Pyramid, Great 451 Strassburg cathedral.. 465 

Florence cathedral.... 387 Rouen cathedral 464 St. Stephen's, Vienna.470 

Fribourg cathedral.... 386! St. Paul's, London... 404lWashington mon'm't.B5 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



127 



The government of the United States of 
America and the government of Nicaragua, 
being animated by the desire to strengthen their 
ancient and cordial friendship by the most sin- 
cere co-operation for all purposes of mutual 
advantage and interest and to provide for the 
possible future construction of an interoceanic 
ship canal by way of the San Juan river and 
the Great Lake of Nicaragua, or by any route 
over Nicaraguan territory whenever the con- 
struction of such canal shall be deemed by the 
government of the United States conducive to 
the interests of both countries, and the govern- 
ment of Nicaragua wishing to facilitate in 
every way possible the successful maintenance 
and operation of the Panama canal, the two 
governments have resolved to conclude a con- 
vention to these ends and have accordingly ap- 
pointed as their plenipotentiaries: 

The president of the United States, the Hon. 
William Jennings Bryan, secretary of state, and 

The president of Nicaragua, Senor Gen. Don 
Emiliano Chamorro, envoy extraordinary and 
minister plenipotentiary of Nicaragua to the 
United States. 

Whereas, Having exhibited to each other their 
respective full powers, found to be in good and 
due form, have agreed upon' and concluded the 
following articles: 

Article I. The government of Nicaragua grants 
in perpetuity to the government of the United 
States, forever free from all taxation or other 
public charge, the uucumbered exclusive rights 
necessary and convenient to the construction, 
operation and maintenance of an interoceanic 
canal by way of the San Juan river and the 
Great Lake of Nicaragua or by way of any 
other route over Nicaraguan territory, the de- 
tails of the terms upon which such canal shall 
be constructed, operated and maintained to be 
fixed by mutual consultation between the two 
governments whenever the construction of such 
canal shall be decided upon. 

Art. II. To enable the government of the 
United States to protect the Panama canal and 
the proprietary rights granted to the govern- 
ment of the United States by the foregoing arti- 
cle, and also to enable the government of the 
United States to take any measure necessary to 
the ends contemplated herein, the government 
of Nicaragua hereby leases for a term of ninety- 
nine years to the government of the United 
States the islands in the Caribbean sea known 
as Great Corn island and Little Corn island ; 
and the government of Nicaragua further grants 
to the government of the United States for a 
like period of ninety-nine years the right to 
establish, operate and maintain a naval base 
at such place on the territory of Nicaragua bor- 
dering on the Gulf of Fonseca as the govern- 
ment of the United States may select. The 
government of the United States may have the 
option of renewing for a further term of ninety- 



NICARAGUA CANAL TREATY. 
Ratified by United States senate Feb. 18, 1916. 



nine years the above leases and grants upon 
the expiration of their respective terms, it being 
expressly agreed that the territory hereby leased 
and the naval base which may be maintained 
under the grant aforesaid shall be subject ex- 
clusively to the laws and sovereign authority of 
the United States during the terms of such 
lease and grant and of any renewal or renewals 
thereof. 

Art. III. In consideration of the foregoing 
stipulations and for the purposes contemplated 
by this convention and for the purposes of re- 
ducing the present indebtedness of Nicaragua, 
the government of the United States shall, on 
the date of the exchange of ratification of this 
convention, pay for the benefit of the republic 
of Nicaragua the sum of $3,000,000 United States 
gold coin, of the present weight and fineness, 
to be deposited to the order of the government 
of Nicaragua in such bank or banks or with 
such banking corporation as the government 
of the United States may determine, to be ap- 
plied by Nicaragua upon its indebtedness or 
other public purposes for the advancement of 
the welfare of Nicaragua in a manner to be 
determined by the two high contracting parties, 
all such disbursements to be made by orders 
drawn by the minister of finance of the republic 
of Nicaragua and approved by the secretary of 
state of the United States or by such person 
as he may designate. 

Art. IV. This convention shall be ratified by 
the high contracting parties in accordance with 
their respective laws and the ratifications 
thereof shall be exchanged at Washington as 
soon as possible. 

In witness whereof the respective plenipoten- 
tiaries have signed the present treaty and have 
affixed thereunto their seals. 

Done at Washington, in duplicate, in the 
English and the Spanish languages, on the 5th 
day of August, in the year 1914. 

WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN (seal). 
EMILIANO CHAMORRO (seal). 
AMERICAN SENATE AMENDMENT. 

That, whereas Costa Rica, Salvador and Hon- 
duras have protested against the ratification 
of said convention in the fear or belief that 
said convention might in some respect impair 
existing rights of said states; therefore, it is 
declared by the senate that in advising and 
consenting to the ratification of the said con- 
vention, as amended, such advice and consent 
are given with the understanding, to be ex- 
pressed as a part of the instrument of ratifica- 
tion, that nothing in said convention is intended 
to affect any existing right of any of the said 
named states. 

RATIFIED BY NICARAGUA. 

The state department in Washington was noti- 
fied April 8 that the treaty had been unanimous-* 
ly ratified by the Nicaraguan senate. 



FASTEST VOYAGES ACEOSS THE ATLANTIC, 



Queenstown to New York, Raunt's Rock to 
Ambrose channel lightship (short course), 4 days 
10 hours 48 minutes, by the Mauretania, Sept. 11- 
15, 1910; long course (2,891 miles), 4 days 17 hours 
6 minutes, Mauretania, Feb. 13-18, 1909. 

New York to Queenstown, 4 days 13 hours 41 
minutes, by the Mauretania. Sept. 15-20, 1909. 

Hamburg to New York, 5 days 11 hours 54 
minutes, by the Deutschland. Sept. 2-8. 1903. 

Cherbourg to New York, 5 days 11 hours 9 
minutes, by the Kronprinzessin Cecilie, Aug. 19- 
25 1908 

New York to Cherbourg, 5 days 16 hours, by 

the T vaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, Jan. 4-10. 1900. 

hampton to New York. 5 days 20 hours, by 

'iser Wilhelm der Grosse. March 30- April 

^vre to New York. 6 days 1 hour 12 minutes, 
.,v- La Provence. Sept. 6-13. 1907. 
New York to Southampton. 5 days 17 hours 8 



minutes, by the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, 
Nov. 23-29, 1897. 

New York to Havre. 6 days 2 hours 48 min- 
utes, by La Provence. May 31-Juue 6. 1906. 

New York to Plymouth (short course), 2,962 
miles. 5 days 7 hours 28 minutes, by the Deutsch- 
land, Sept. 5-10, 1900: (long course). 3,080 miles. 
5 days 9 hours 55 minutes. Kaiser Wilhelm II.. 
Aug. 18-24. 1908. 

Plymouth to New York, 5 days 15 hours 46 
minutes, by the Deutschland, July 7-12, 1900. 

Moville. Ireland, to Cape Race. N. F., 4 days 
10 hours, by the Virginian (turbine). June 9-13. 

The best day's run by any steamer was 676 
knots, made by the Mauretania, January, 1911. 

Distances: New York to Southampton, 3,100 
miles: to Plymouth, 2,962 miles: to Queenstown, 
2,800 miles; to Cherbourg. 3,047 miles: to Havre. 
3,170 miles; to Hamburg. 3,820 miles. 



128 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOJl 1017. 



AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 
WHEAT CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED (1909-1915). 



COUNTRT. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


1915. 


United States 


Bushels. 
683,350,000 

395,000 
16,26->.000 
52;706.000 
85,197,000 
9.579.000 
2.05,000 


Bushels. 
635,121,000 

371.000 
17.805.000 
41,159.000 
81.139.000 
6,593,000 
2,923,000 


Bushels. 
621,338,000 

283,000 
19,787.000 
62,689,000 
109,075.000 
36/>02,OUO 
2,488,000 


Bushels. 
730,267.000 

236,000 
17,421.000 
63,017.000 
106.960,000 
34,803.000 
2,222.000 


Bushels. 

763,380,000 

269.000 
19,851.000; 
63,8S1.000j 
121,559,000! 
34.372,000! 
2,335,000 


Bushels. 
891,017,000 

234.000 
17,658.000 
38,605.000 
73.494.000 
28.859,000 
2.430,01 K) 


Bushels. 
,011,505,000 

301,000 

28,797,000 
84,282.000 
171,146.000 
48.772.000 
2.960,000 


Canada: 
New Brunswick 


Ontario 






Alberta .. 


Other 


Total Canada 


166,744,000 
10.000.000 


149,990,000 
11,976,000 


230,924,000 
12,000,000 


224,159,000 
12.000.000 


231,717,000 161,280,000 
4,000,000 4.389,000 


336,258,000 
4.000,000 


Mexico 


Total North America 
Argentina 


8(30,094,000 

156.162 000 
17.743,000 
8,595,000 


797,087,000 

131.010,000 

19,743,0)0 
7,750,000 


864,262,000 

145,981,000 
18.184,000 
6.009,000 


966,426.000 

166,190,000 

22,468.000 
8,757,000 


999,097,0001,056,686.000 

187,391,000 113,904,000 
23.575.000 lti.403,000 
5.461.000 5,887,000 


,351,763,000 

178,221,000 
19.002.000 
3.417.000 


Chile 


Uruguay 


Total South America 
Austria-Hungary : 
Austria 


182,500,000 

58,468,000 
113,352,000 

11,61.2,000 

2.594.000 


158,503,000 

57,589,000 
169,700,000 
11,434,000 
2,671,000 


170,174,000 

58,865,000 
174.889.000 
15,188.000 
2,941,000 


197,415,000 

69,712,000 
173.328.0UO 
11,314,000 
2,993.000 


216,427,000 

60,109.000 
151.348.000 

16,899.000 
3,837,000 


136.194,000 

55,000,000 
105,237.000 
7,716:000 
2,500,000 


200,640,000 

60.000.000 
152.934.000 
15.000.000 
3,000.000 






Bosnia-Herzegovina 
Total Austria-Hungary.. 

Belgium 


186,076,000 

14.603,000 
32.071,000 

3 

356,193,000 
138.000.000 
7,000,000 
189,959,000 
200,000 
4,158,000 
313,000 
8,000,000 
56,751,000 

586,819,000 
21,194,000 
103.465.000 


241,394,000 

12,449,000 
42,217,000 
4,547.000 
125.000 
257,667,000 
141,884,000 
7,000.000 
153.168.000 
200.000 
4,371,000 
294.UOO 
9,000.(XK 
110,761,000 

552.067,000 
22,757.000 
124,589.000 


251,883.000 

15.745,000 
48,295,000 
4,466,000 
125.000 
315,126.000 
149.411.000 
8,000.000 
192,395.000 
200,000 
5,511,000 
271,000 
11,850,00( 
93,724,000 

346,372,000 
24.129.000 
76,537,000 


257,047,000 

15,348,000 
45,000.000 
3,604.000 
130,000 
336.284.000 
160,224.000 
7,000,000 
165,720.000 
200,000 
5,604,000 
332.000 
7,500.000 
88,924,000 

472,390.000 
24,626000 
126,746.000 


232.193.000 

14,769.000 
40,000,000 
6,692,000 
130,000 
821.000,000 
171,075,000 
7,000.000 
214,405.000 
200,000 
5.164,000 
325.000 
9,186,000 
83,236,000 


170,453,000 

13,973,000 
29,654,000 
5,785,000 
130.000 
282.689,000 
145.944.010 
7,000,000 
169,442.000 
200.000 
5,779.000 
269,000 
10,000.000 
49,270,000 


230.934,000 

8,000.000 
46,212,000 
7,975.000 
130.000 
258.102.000 
160,000.000 
6.000,000 
170,541,000 
200.000 
6,143,000 

9BJUHJKU 


Bulgaria 




Finland 








Italy 


Montenegro 


Netherlands 


Norway 


Portugal 


Ron mania 


Russia: 


Poland 








Northern Caucasia 
Total Russia (European) 

Serbia . . . .' 








711,478,000 

13,392,000 
144,105.000 
6,978,000 
3,568,000 
20,000,000 

60.121,000 
2,111.001 
1,147,000 
1 ,809,000 


699,413,000 

12,000,000 
137,448,000 
7,450.000 
2,756,000 
19,462,000 

53,464,000 
2,020.000 
1,122.000 
1,716,000 


447,038,000 

15,312,000 

148,495.000 
7,945,(XX 
3,524,000 
20,000,000 

60,729,000 
1,118,000 
2,786.000 
1,655,000 


623,762,000 

16.351.0CO 

109,783.000 
7.832.000 
3.178,000 
18,000,OOC 

54,004,000 
1,123.00(1 
2.471,000 
1,564,000 


838,776,000 

10.524,000 
112,401 .000 
9.330,<H>0 
3,546,000 
18,000,000 

63,736.000 
1.075.000 
2,335,000 
1.295.000 


746,873,000 

9,000.000 
116,089,000 
8,472,000 
3,277.000 
18,000,000 

59.217.000 
1,082.000 
2,642,000 
1,415,000 


833,965,000 

10.000.000 
139.2iW.000 
9,000.000 
3.880.000 
18,000,000 

68,652.000 
1,415.000 
3,053,000 
3.238.000 

2,080,819,000 

383.376.000 
2,000.000 

23,669,000 
200.000 


Spain 


Sweden 






United kingdom 


England . 


Scotland 


Wales 


Ireland 


Total united kingdom 


65,188,000 
1,962,566,000 

284,361,000 
1,912,000 

22,966.000 
200,000 


58,322,000 
1,927,106,000 

358,049,000 
2,238,000 

24,487,000 
200,000 


66,289,000 
1,805,605,000 

375,629.000 
2,394,000 

25,645.000 
138.000 


59,162,000 
1,931,285,000 

370,515,000 
2,071,000 

26.514,000 
140.00C 


58,441,000 
2,156,393,000 

362.693,000 
2,100,000 

26,757,000 
160,000 


64,356,000 
1,856,655,000 

312.032,000 
2,500,000 

22,975,000 
195.000 


British India 


Cyprus. 




Formosa 


Total Japanese empire... . 
Persia 


23,166,000 
16,000,000 

26,429,000 
45,269,000 
94,000 


24,687,000 
16,000,000 

24,009,000 
52,140,000 
133,000 


25,783,000 
16,000,000 

19,830,000 
41,783,000 
102,000 


26,654,000 
16,000,000 

36,977.000 
59,198,000 
105,000 


26,917,000 
16,000,000 


23,170,000 
14,000,000 


23,869.000 
16,000,000 


Russia: 
Central Asia 


Siberia 








Tran scaucasia 








Total Russia (Asiatic) 
Turkey (Asia Minor) 


71,792,000 
35,000.000 


76,282,000 
35.000,000 


61,715,000 
35,000.000 


96,280,000 
35,000.000 


*121,042,000 
35.000,000 


179,960,000 
35,000,000 


35,000.000 
460,245,000 

34,654,000 
39,148,000 
11.023,000 
6,034.000 
90.859.000 


Total Asia 
Algeria 


432,231,000 

34.769,000 
30.000.000 
6,430.000 
2,500,000 


513,792,000 

35,722.000 
32,623,000 
5,512,000 
2.500,000 


516,521,001 

35.874,000 
38.046,000 
8,635,000 
6.034,000 


546,521,000 

27.172,000 
30.903.00C 
4,225,OOC 
6,034,001 


563,752,000 

36,848,000 
38,426.000 
5,511,000 
6,034,000 


386,702,000 

30,000,000 
32,831.000 
2,205.000 
6,034,OOC 


Egypt 


Tunis... 


Onion of South Africa 
Total Africa 


73.699,000 


76.357.000 


88.589,000 


68.334,001 


86,819.0001 71,070,001 



'Includes 10 governments of Asiatic Russia. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



WHEAT CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED (1909-1915) -CONTINUED. 



COUNTRY. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


1915. 


Australia: 
Queensland 


Bushels. 

1.241,000 
15,971,000 
24,081.000 
20.009,000 
2,538.000 
723.000 


Bushels. 

1,621,000 
29,431,000 
29.087.000 
25,926.000 
5.779.000 
819,000 


Bushels. 

1,055,000 
28.793,000 
35.910,000 
25.112.000 
6.0S3.000 
. 1,156.000 


Bushels. 

294.000 
25.879.000 
21.550.000 
20,994,000 
4.49*>,000 
681,000 


Bushels. 

2,038.000 
35,511,000 
27,050,000 
22,174.000 
9,457,000 
(550.000 


Bushels. 

1,825,000 
39,219,000 
33,974.000 
17.470.000 
13.751,000 

3t; 1,000 


Bushels. 

1,635,000 
13,187,000 
4,065,000 
3,639.000 
2,704,000 
39(5,000 
25.ti26.000 
6,864.000 


New South Wales 


Victoria... 


South Australia 


Western Australia 
Tasmania 


Total commonwealth 
New Zealand 


64,563,000 
9.049.000 


93.263,000 
9.008.000 


98,109.000 
8,335,000 


73.894.000 
8.000.000 


94.880.000 
5.343.000 


106,600,000 
5.559,000 


Total Australasia 
Grand total 


73,012,0001 102,271,000) 106,644.000 
1581,519,00013,575,055,00013.551.795,000 


81,894,000 
3.791,875.000 


100.223,000 
1,128.711.000 


112,159,000 
3,619,466,000 


32,480,000 
4,216.806,000 



CORN CROP OF COUNTRIES NAMED (1909-1915). 



COUNTRY. 


1909. 


1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1913. 


1914. 


1915. 


United States 


Bushels. 
,552.190.000 

19,258,000 
170.000.000 


Bushels. 
,886,260.000 
18,913.000 
190,766,000 


Bushels. 
,531,488.000 
19.185,000 
190.000,000 


Bushels. 
,124,746.000 
16,950.000 
190,000.000 


Bushels. 
2,446,998,000 
16,773,000 
190,000,000 
2,653,761,000 

196,642,000 
1,647,000 
5,343,000 


Bushels. 

,672,804,000 
13,924.000 
78.443.0110 


Bushels. 
3,054,535,000 
14,594,000 
60,000.000 


Canada.. 


Mexico 


Total North America 
Argentina 


,741,448.000 

177,155.000 
1,178,000 
6,671,000 


,095,739,000 

175,187,000 
1,878,000 
6,509,000 


,740,673,000 

27,675,000 
1.221,000 
3,643.000 


3,331,696,000 

295,849,000 
1,527.000 
8,000,000 


,765,171,000 

263,135,000 
1,505.000 
7,142,000 


3.129,129,000 

338,235,000 
1,822,000 
11,495,000 


Chile 


Uruguay 


Total South America 
Austri a- Hungary : 
Austria 


185,004,000 

16,102,000 
161,858,000 
21,752,000 
10,972,000 


183,565,000 

17,388,000 
187.733,000 
25,589.000 
10,051,000 


32,539,000 

11,856,000 

137,423.000 
24.006,000 
8,416,000 


305,376,000 

15,053,000 

176,694.000 
24,166,000 
8,555.000 


203,632,000 

13,286.000 

182,069,000 
28,955.000 
7.559,000 


271,782,000 

12,000,000 

172,308,000 
25,000,000 
7,000.000 


351,552,000 

12.000,000 
^ 180,550,000 




Croatia-Slavonia 


Bosnia-Herzegovina 


* 


Total Austria-Hungary. . . . 
Bulgaria 


210,684,000 

20.472.000 
26,075.000 
99.239.000 
15,000,000 
70,138.000 
29.223.000 
10,375,000 


240,761,000 

28,360,000 
23.399,000 
101,722,000 
15,000,000 
103,665,000 
63,089.000 
14,093,000 


181,701,000 

30,589,000 

Iti.S'iO.OOO 
93,680.000 
15.000.000 
110,712,000 
67.842,000 
14.087,000 


224,468,000 

30,000,000 

23,733,000 
98.668,000 
15,000.000 
103,921,000 
62.904,000 
16,704,000 


231,869,000 

32,000,000 

21,455,000 
108.388.000 
15.000.000 
114.662.000 
59,798.000 
12,995,000 


216,308,000 

30.901.000 
22.SiO.000 
105,006.000 
15,000,000 
105,552,000 


* 


35,000,000 
14.000,000 
118,103.000 
15.000.000 
110,230,000 


France 


Italy 


Portugal 


Roumania 


Russia Russia proper 
Northern Caucasia 






Total Russia 
Servia. 


39,598,000 

34,453,000 

26.433.000 


77,182,000 

33,204.000 
27.366,000 


81,929,000 

26,531,000 

28,730,000 


79,608,000 

22,833,000 

25,069,000 


72,793,000 

23,621.000 
25,140.000 


80,608,000 

20.000,000 
30,325,000 


74,806,000 
"25,327,666 


Spain.. 


Total Europe 
India 


541,699,000 


650,094,000 


585,732,000 


623,300,000 


644,928,000 

87.240,000 
3,559,000 
9,235,000 


626,230,000 

64,800.000 
3,753.000 
13.336,000 




y 3,749,666 


japan 










Philippines 






5.293.000 


7,810.000 


Total Asia 










100,034.000 

394,000 
57,044.000 
t30.830,OOC 


81,889,000 

350,000 

78,253,000 
t30.830,000 





Algeria 


807.00C 
65,000.000 
20,000.00(] 


556,000 
70,294,000 
20.000.000 


554,000 
67,903,000 

so.amco 


374.000 
60,857,000 
t30.830.00;) 


Egypt .. 


t30,830,665 


Union of South Africa 
Total Africa 


85,807,000 

8,908,000 
736,000 


90,850,000 

11,113,000 
750,000 


99,287,000 

13,455,000 
478,000 


92.061,000 

9,221.000 

278,000 
9,199.000 
1.369.742.000 


88,268,000 

8,619.000 

222.00U 


109,433,000 

9,462,000 
312,000 




Australian commonwealth.... 
New Zealand 






Total Australasia 
Grand total 


9,644,000 
3.557,150.000 


11,863.000 
4,026.967.000 


13,933,00( 
3,481.700.000 


8.841 ,OOC 
3,613.213,00( 


9,774,000 
3,864,279.(XX 





*No official estimates. tCensus of 1911. 




OATS (1915). 

Country. Bushels. 
U't'd States 1,540,362,000 
Canada ... 481,035,000 
Mexico .... 17,000 


OTHER CROPS ] 

Country. Bushels. 
Roumania .. 29,054,000 
Russia 1,006,983,000 
Serbia 4,000,000 
Spain 36,949,000 


3Y COUNTRIES. 

Country. Bushels. 
Aus. -Him 136,186,000 
Belgium .... 4,000,000 
Bulgaria 17,670,000 
Denmark ... 25,898,000 


Country. Bushels. 
Cyprus 2,000,000 
Japan 93,4-17,000 
Africa 52,707,000 
Australasia.. 1,816,000 


Argentina 63,392,000 




Finland ...- 5000,000 




Chile .. .. 7*105000 


Sweden 70,000,000 

T^ni- IHnfrrlrtm 1 Q^ IRQ Aflfi 


France . 36*248', 000 


Total 1,542,972,000 


Uruguay . 1,040,000 
Aus.-Hun . 234,925,000 


unc. Kingdom iyo,iby,uuu 
Cyprus 400,000 
Africa 28,188,000 


Germany ... 15oioOO,'oOO 
Italy 11,050,000 


RYE (1915). 


Belgium .. 40,000,000 
Bulgaria .. 9,545,000 


Australasia . . 16,' 797*, 000 


Netherlands. 3,233,000 
Norway .... 2,591,000 


U't'd States. 49,190,000 
Canada 2,478,000 


Denmark . 42,874,000 
Finland ... 22,000,000 
France ... 243,531,000 
Germany . 650,000,000 
Italy 31,443,000 
Netherlands. 19,644,000 
Norway 9,325,000 


Total 4,783,778,000 

BARLEY (1915). 
U't'd States. 237,009,000 
Canada 50,868.000 
Mexico 10,000,000 
S. America.. 11,787,000 


Roumania .. 28,688,000 
Russia 475,109,000 
Serbia 2,250,000 
Spain 82,763,000 
Sweden 14,000,000 
Utd. kingdom 48,682,000 
India 40,000,000 


Mexico .... ' 70,000 
S. America.. 1,962,000 
Aus.-Hun.... 154,075,000 
Belgium .... 18,000,000 
Bulgaria ... 7,622,000 
Denmark ... 12,939,000 
Finland 10,000,000 



130 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Country . Bushels. 


Country. Pounds. 
Java t!34,143,000 


HOPS (1914). 

Country. Pounds. 
U't'd States 43,415,352 
Canada .... 1,208,000 
Aus.-Hun... 23,314,733 
Belgium ... 7,560,000 
France .... 7,034,000 
Germany .. 55,227,408 
Russia 14,083,992 
England .... 56,812,896 
Australasia.. 2,109,932 
BEANS (1914).* 
Bushels. 
U. States (1911) 11,145,000 
Canada 797,000 
Chile 1,377.000 
Austria *8,725,000 
Denmark ... 250,000 
France 9,354,000 
Italy 16,997,000 
Netherlands 1,946,000 
Roumania . 5,783,000 
Spain 12,527,000 
Sweden .... 75,000 
Utd kingdom 8,961,000 
*In 1913. 
PEAS (1914-).* 
U. States (1912)7,111,000 
Canada 3,362,000 
Chile 373,000 


Country. *Tons. 
Java tl 541 000 


Snany .... 475000,000 

NetLrlands.. 13,727,000 
Norway 1,045,000 

Serbia .".'.'.".' 'sOoioOO 
, 28,664,000 


Sumatra ... *45,024,000 
Formosa *959,477 
Japan 115,741 500 


Philippines ... 1408,000 
Africa 590 000 


Oceania .... 353" 000 


Philippines.. 103,024,183 
Russia (Asia).*31,462,230 
Africa *40,727,680 


*Long tons, fin 1913-14. 
Beet. *Tons. 
United States.. 722,054 
Canada 13,773 
Austria-Hung.. 1,766,232 
Belgium '>?4 437 


Total A 
In 1913. tin 1912. 

FLAXSEED (1914). 

Bushels. 
U't'd States. 13,749,000 
Canada 7,175,000 
Mexico 150,000 
Argentina .. 39,171,000 
Uruguay . . . 963,000 
Aus.-Hun.... *801,000 
Belgium ... *387,000 
Bulgaria . . . *8,000 
France 336,000 
Italy 323,000 
Netherlands.. 212,000 
Roumania .. 165,000 
Russia (Eu.) *24,447,000 
British India 15,440,000 
Russia (Asia) *1,927,000 
Algeria 15,000 


ISen"::::. 25:000,000 

Utd. kingdom 1,700,000 
Australasia.. 120,000 

Total 1,711,158^000 

POTATOES (1914) . 

U't'd States 409,921,000 
Canada 85672000 
Chile 9,169,000 
Aus.-Hun.... 195.266,000 
Denmark ... 37,335.000 
France 440,652,000 
Germany ,..1,674,377,000 
Itily 61,104,000 


Denmark 168*652 
France 333.953 
Germany 2,755,750 
Italy 183 753 


Netherlands ... 263^852 
Roumania 36 ?97 
Russia 1,681,247 
Spain 110,946 
Sweden 169,644 
Switzerland ... 3,208 
*Short tons, tin 1913-14. 

COTTON (1914).* 

t Bales. 

United States.. 16,134,930 
Porto Rico 693 
West Indies 4,883 
Brazil 385 000 


Luxemburg.. 5,288,000 
Netherlands. 120,780,000 
Norway 27,548,000 
Roumania .. 2,634,000 
Russia 965,310,000 
Spain 76,657,000 
Sweden .... 63,209,000 
Switzerland.. 22,046,000 
Utd. kingdom 279,121,000 
Japan 25,002,000 
Australasia... 21,549,000 


Peru 105 617 


Malta 411 
British India.. 4,238,494 
Russia (Asia). 1,177,595 
British Africa. 39,859 
Egypt 1,450508 


Total *131,549,000 
*In 1913. 

BICE (1914). 

Pounds. 
U't'd States 656,917,000 
Hawaii *25, 820,000 
Guatemala . . t3,501, 000 
Salvador ... 12,344,000 
Mexico .... 33,921,000 
Brazil 116,416,000 
Dut. Guiana t5,463,000 
Peru t!08,869,000 
Bulgaria . . t7,716,000 
France .... *1.257,000 
Italy .. . 741,263,000 


France 1.116,000 
Italy 3,638,000 


Netherlands ... 1,871,000 
Roumauia 869.000 
Russia 18,326,000 


*Data incomplete. 
fBales. of 500 pounds 
gross or 478 pounds net. 

HAW SILK (1914). 

Pounds. 
Italy 8 995 000 


Spain 11,016,000 
Sweden .. .. 717,000 


Total ,...,... 

TOBACCO (1914) . 

Pounds. 
U't'd States.1,034,679,000 
Canada U, 000,000 
Cuba ... 72,585,000 


Utd. kingdom.. 2,993,000 
New Zealand... 453,000 
*Incomplete returns. 

SUGAR (1914-1915). 
Cane. *Tons. 
United States.. 247,000 
Hawaii t612,000 
Porto Rico t364,000 
Mexico 121,000 


France . 893 000 


Spain 154,000 


Austria-Hung.. 672,000 
Anatolia 794,000 
Syria-Cyprus .. 926.000 
Turkey (Eu.).. 132,000 
Turkey (other) 242,000 
Balkan states. 231,000 
Greece . . 331 000 


Mexico 34,711,000 
Brazil 59,481,096 


Chile 6,282,228 


Uruguay .... 1,737,805 
Aus.-Hun... *173,349,242 
Belgium *19,702,290 
Bulgaria ... "13,227,600 
France *35,763,021 
Germany ... *56,962,951 


Spain 336,925,000 
Brit. India.62,638,912,000 


Jamaica 17.000 
Trinidad 62,000 
Cuba 2 980 000 


Caucasus 772,000 


Chos'n(Kor.) 3,678,878,000 
Formosa ..tl,610,461,000 
Japan 17,827,240,000 
Java-Mad'a t7,951,049.000 
Philippines. 1,403,516,000 
Russia (A.) f512,3S3,000 
Egypt 81,229,000 
*In 1912. tin 1913. 


Dan. W. Indies 5,000 
Fr. W. Indies. 88,000 
Dom. rep 119,000 


Persia *463,000 
Turkestan *496,000 
China 12,489,000 


Italy 20,943,700 
Roumania .. 16,970,129 
Russia (Eu.) *201, 988,930 
Sweden *1,646,836 
Switzerland . . 815,702 


South America. 965,000 
Spain ... 8,000 


British India.. 66,000 
Indo-China ... 22,000 


British India.. 2,651,000 
Formosa 222,000 
Japan 60.000 


Total 48 214,000 


*In 1913. 



GRAIN CROPS OF THE CANADIAN NORTHWEST. 
Bushels produced in 1914 and 1915. 



PROVINCE. 


WHEAT. 


OATS. 


BARLEY. 


Manitoba 


1914. 
38.605,000 
73.494.0^0 
28.859.000 


s^ 

171,146.000 
48.772.000 


1914. 
31,951,000 
61,816,000 
57.076.000 


1915. 
65,263,000 
142.121,000 
98,296,000 


1914. 
9.828.000 

4.901TOOO 
4,806,000 


1915. 
16.543.000 
9,948.000 
6.542.000 


Saskatchewan 


Alberta 


Total 


140.958.000 


304.200.000 


150.843.000 


305.080.000 


19,535.000 


33.030.000 



PRINCIPAL FAKM CROPS OF THE UNITED STATES BY YEARS. 



YEAR 




CORN. 






WHEAT. 






Acres. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Value. 


1905 .. 


94 Oil 369 


2 707 993 540 


$1,116,696.738 


47.854.079 


6St2.979.489 


1518.372,727 


1906. . 


96 737 581 


2 927 416 091 


1,166.626,479 


47.305.829 


735.260.970 


490.332,760 


1907..., 


99 9;il 000 


2592 320 OuO 


1.336,901,000 


45,211.000 


634.087.000 


554.437.000 


1908.... 


101 7SS 000 


2 668 651,000 


1,616.145,000 


47.557.000 


664.602.000 


616,826,000 


1909 


98 383 000 


2 552 1% 000 




44.261.000 


683,350,000 




1910. . . . 


104.035.000 


2.8-^.260.000 


1 ,384,817.COO 


45.631.000 


635,121.000 


56"i,051 .000 


1911 


105 825 000 


2 531 4$8 000 


1 565 258.000 


49.543,000 


621,338.000 


543.063.000 


1912 


10 r 083 ooo 


3 124 746000 


1 520,454.000 


45.814.000 


730,267,000 


555.280.000 


1913 


105 g-?o 000 


2 446 9^8 000 


1.692.092.000 


50,184.000 


763.380.000 


610.122.000 


1914 .. 


103 435000 


2 672 804 000 


1.722.070.000 


t 54 1.000 


891.017.000 


878.680.000 


1915 


108.321.000 


3.054.535.000 


1,755.859.000 


898,000 


1.011.505,000 


930.302,000 



ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1917. 



131 



YEAH. 




OATS. 






RYE. 




1905 


Acres. 
2S.046.T 46 


Bushels. 
953.216.197 


Value. 

$277.047,537 


Acres. 

1.662.508 


Bushels. 
27,61':.045 


Value. 
$16.754.657 


1906.... 


30.5158,768 


964.904.522 


306.292.973 


2.001.904 


3!) 374.833 


19.671.24S 


1907.... 


31.837.000 


754,443.000 


334.568.000 


1.926,000 


31.W.6.000 


23.063,000 


1908 


32 344 000 


807 156.000 


381,171.000 


1,948.000 


31,851 000 


23 455,000 


1909 


35 157000 


1 007 129.000 




2.196,000 


29520 000 




1910 


37 548 000 


1.186,341.000 


403.388.000 


2,185.000 


34 897.000 


24.il53.000 


191 1 . 


37.763.000 


922.29S.OOO 


414.ti63.000 


2.127.000 


33.119.000 


27.557.000 


1912 


37,917.000 


1.418.337,000 


452,469.000 


2,117.000 


35.664.000 


23.63:.000 


1913.... 


38.399.000 


1,121.768.000 


439.59ti.000 


2.557.000 


41.381.000 


22.220.000 


1914.... 


38.442.000 


1,141.060.000 


499.431.000 


2.541.000 


42.779,000 


37.018.000 


1915 


40.780.000 


1.540.362.000 


555.569.00U 


2.856.000 


49,190.000 


41.295.000 






BARLEY. 




1 


3UCKWHEA1 




1905 


5 095 528 


136.651.020 


J5o.047.16t> 


760.118 


14.585.1 >S2 


$3.565.499 


1906 


6.323,757 


178.916.484 


74.2:55.997 


789.208 


14.641.937 


8.727.443 


1907 


6 448.000 


153.597.000 


102.290.000 


800.000 


14.290.000 


".975.000 


1908... 


6.646.000 


166.756.000 


92.442,000 


803.000 


15.874.000 


12,004,000 


1MB 


7 6% 000 


173 321 0(iO 




878000 


14849 000 




1910.... 


7.743.000 


173.832.000 


100,426,666 


860. (XX) 


17.598,000 


11.636.000 


1911... 


7.627.000 


160.240.000 


139.182.000 


833.000 


17.549.000 


12.735.000 


1912 


7 530 000 


223 824 000 


112.957.000 


841.000 


19.249 000 


12,720 000 


1913 


7 499000 


178 189 000 


95.731.000 


805.000 


13.833.000 


10 445 000 


1914 


7 565000 


194 953,000 


105.903.000 


792.000 


16.881.000 


12 892.000 


1915 


7.395.000 


237.009.000 


122.4W.OOO 


806.000 


15.769.000 


12.408.000 






POTATOES 






HAY. 




1905... 


Acres. 
2 496 757 


Bushels. 
260 741 294 


Value. 

$160 821 080 


Acres. 
39361 960 


Tons. 
60531 611 


Value. 

$519 9o9 784 


1906 


3 013 150 


308038382 


157,547 392 


42 476 224 


57 145 959 


592 539 671 


1907.... 


3 424 00(1 


297942000 


183.880000 


44028000 


63677 000 


743 507 000 


1908. . . . 


3 257 000 


278 985 000 


197,039,000 


46.486.000 


70 798 000 


fi35 423 000 


1909 


3 66') 000 


389 1 ( *5 000 




4T 744 000 


64 938 000 


689 '345 000 


1910 


3 - 72o'oOO 


349032000 


104566000 


45 091 000 


60478 000 


747 769 000 


1911 


3 619 000 


292*737 000 


233778 000 


43 017 000 


47 444 000 


641 570 000 


1912 


3711 000 


420647 000 


212 550000 


49530000 


72 391 000 


836 695 Ol)0 


1913 ... 


3 668 000 


331 525000 


227 403 000 


48 454 0(X) 


64 116 000 


797 (fi7 OflO 


1914.... 


3711 000 


409921 000 


499 460 (XX. 


49 145 000 


70 071 000 


779068000 


1915 


3.761.000 


359.103.000 


221.104,001. 


50.872.000 


85.225.000 


912.S20.000 






TOBACCO. 






COTTON. 




1905. . . . 


Acres. 
776 112 


Pounds. 
633033719 


Value. 

$48 674 118 


Acres. 
30 053 739 


Bales. 
13 438 012 


Value. 

$561 100 386 


1906 


796099 


682 428 530 


68,232 647 


32 049,000 


13 273 809 


640 311 538 


1907 


820800 


698.12tj.000 


71.411.000 


31,311.000 


11 107 179 


613 630436 


1908 


875 4''5 


718 061 380 


74 130 185 


32 444 000 


13 241 799 


588 814 828 


1909 


1 9 < r > 000 


1 055 765 000 




30938000 


10 0J4 449 


688 350 000 


1910. 


I 366 000 


1 103 415 000 


102 142 000 


y 403 000 


11 608 616 


g->|) '.J')Q Q00 


1911... 


1 013 0<JO 


905 109000 


85210 000 


36 045 000 


16 -) 50 9 7t> 


859 840 000 


1912.... 


i y } n ooo 


462 855000 


104 063 OJO 


34 283 000 


13 703 000 


742'240'(KX) 


1913 


1 216000 


953 734 000 


122481 000 


37 081* 000 


14 116 000 


887 160 (XX) 


1914 


1 9 ''4 000 


1 034 679 000 


101 411 000 


36 832 000 


16 134 980 


541 130 000 


l'J15 


i.mo4C 


1.060.000.000 


96.041,000 


30.957.000 


11.161.000 


602.393.000 



AVERAGE FARM VALUE OF CROPS. 



DEC. 
l. 

1904.. 
1905.. 
1906.. 
1907.. 
1908.. 
1909.. 


Wh't 

Cts. 
92.4 
74.8 
66.7 

87.4 
92.4 
^9.0 


Oats. 


Corn 

"OtT 
44.1 
41.2 
39.9 
51.6 
60.6 
59.6 


Rye. 

Cts. 
68.8 
61.1 
59 
73.1 
73.6 
73.9 


Bar- 
ley. 

Cts. 
42.0 
40.3 
41.5 
66.6 
55.4 
55.2 


B'k- 
wh't. 


Pota 
toes. 

-CTT 

45.3 
61.7 
51.1 
61.7 
70.6 
54. U 


Hay, 
ton. 


T- 


Wh't 


Oats. 


Corn 


Rye. 


Bar- 
ley. 

-cTT 

57.8 
86.9 
50.4 
53.7 
54.3 
51.7 


B'k 
Wh't 

"ctsT 

65.7 
72.6 
66.1 
75.5 
76.4 
78.7 


Pota- 
toes. 


Hay. 
ton. 

DolsT 
12.26 
14.64 
11.79 
12.43 
11.12 
10.70 


Cts. 
31.3 
29.1 
31.7 
44.3 
47.2 
40.5 


Cta. 
6-2.2 
58.7 
59.6 
69.8 
75.6 
69.9 


Dais. 
8.72 
8.52 
10.37 
11.08 
8.98 
10.62 


1910.. 
1911.. 
1912. 
1913. . 
1914.. 
1915. . 


Cts. 
88.3 
87.4 
76.0 
79.9 
9S.6 
92.0 


Cts. 
34.1 
45.0 
31.9 
39.2 
43.8 
36.1 


Cts. 
48.0 
61.8 
48.7 
69.1 
84.4 
57.5 


Cts. 
72.2 
83.2 
66.3 
63.4 
86.5 
83.9 


Cts. 
55.7 
79.9 
50.5 
68.7 
48.7 
61.6 



BEET AND CANE SUGAR AND MOLASSES 



*PERIOD. 


CANE SUGAR. 


Beet 

sugar. 


*MOLASSES. 


Louisiana 


Other | 
southern I Total, 
states. ! 


1 

Louisiana 


Other 
southern 
states. 


Total. 


r907 


Pounds. 
515,200,000 
761,600,000 
795,200.000 

728.000.000 
685,440.000 
705,747,840 
307,146,560 

585,394.880 


Pounds. 
29.120,000 
26,880.000 
33.600.000 
22,400,000 
24,640,000 
16,000.320 
18,000.640 
15.680.000 
*7.840,000 
*2,240.000 


Pounds. 
544,320.000 
788.460.000 
828.800.000 
750.400.000 
710.080.000 
721.748.160 
325. 147.200 
601.074.880 
493,239.040 
275,240,000 


Pounds. 


Gallons. 
17,579.877 
22,532,774 
31,111,650 
32,082.050 
33.842,600 
26,120.100 
20,297,500 
24,194,750 
13,630,343 


Gallons, 
3,628,860 
4.717,518 
7,360,000 
9.568.000 
10.716.160 
8.000,000 
9.200.000 
12.107,000 
14,000,000 


Gallons. 
21.208,737 
27.250.292 
38.471.650 
41.650,050 
44,558,600 
34,120,100 
29,497,500 
37.301.750 
27,630,000 


1908 


9t57.224.000 
927,256:430 
851,768,000 
1,024,938,000 
1.020.344.000 
1.199.000.000 

1.385. 112.000 

1.444,108,000 


1909.- 


1910 


1911. 


I'.Hv: . 


1913-. . .... 


l'.H4. . 


1915. . 


1916 



'Louisiana only. 



132 



ALMANAC AND YEAR BOOK FOR 1937. 



BEET SUGAR PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES. 
[From reports to U. S. department of agriculture.] 



STATE, AND YEAR OP 
BEET CROP. 


Fac- 
tor- 
ies. 
No. 


Av. 
length 
of 
cam- 
paign. 
Days. 


Sugar 
made. 
Tons.* 


BEETS USED FOR SUGAR. 


ANALYSIS OF 
BEETS. 


Per- 
c'tage 
av. ex- 
tract'n 
of 
sugar. 


Area. 
Acres. 


Quantity worked. 


Av. 

price 
per 
ton. 


Per- 
c'tage 
su- 
crose .+ 


Per ct 
purity 
coeffi- 
cient.:}: 


Tons.* 


Av. 

yield 
per ac. 


California 
Colorado 


11 
14 
4 
15 

4 
8 
11 


97 
104 
100 
78 
80 
96 
84 


195,343 
273,780 
51.225 
129,997 
33,472 
85,014 
105.389 


122,737 
171.222 
35,068 
122,000 
25,684 
56.226 
78,364 


1,249,111 
1.888,860 

339,859 
997,972 
279,427 
629.204 
765.860 


10.2 
11.0 

9.r 

8.2 
10.9 
11.2 

9.8 


$5.86 
5.88 
5.08 
5.91 
5.29 
4.91 
5.67 


H.82 
16.53 
17.85 
15.45 
14.19 
16.43 
16.38 


82.65 
84.84 
87.14 
84.08 
81.99 
85.06 
84.24 


15.64 
14.49 
15.07 
13.03 
11.98 
13.51 
13.76 


Idaho 
Michigan 


Ohio 


Utah 


Other states 


United States, 1915 
Total, 1914 ... 


67 
60 
71 
73 
66 


92 
85 
85 
86 
94 


874,220 
722,054 
733.401 
692.55fi 
599.500 


611,301 
483,400 
580.006 
5.55,300 

473.877 


6,150,293 
5.288,500 
5,f)59,462 
5.224.377 
5.062,333 


10.1 
10.9 
9.76 
9.41 
10. (.8 


5.67 
5.45 
5.69 

5.82 
5.50 


16.49 
16.38 
15.78 
16.31 
15.89 


84.38 
83.89 
83.22 
84.49 


14.21 
13.65 
12.96 
13.26 
11.84 


Total 1913 


Total 1912 


Total, 1911 



*Tons of 2.000 pounds, 
.solids of the beets. 



tBased upon weight of beets. ^Percentage of pure sugar in the total soluble 



CENSUS REPORT OF BEET SUGAR MANU- 
FACTURED. 

1914. 1909. 
Total acreage of beets planted 532,421 415,964 
Total quantity of beets 
treated (tons of 2,000 Ibs.) 5,639,103 3.965,356 
Sugar Quantity (tons of 
2,000 pounds) 743,473 501,682 


State. Acres.Yield.bu.Bushels. Value. 
Iowa ....... 10,100,000 30.0 303,000,000 $154,530,000 
Missouri... 7,100,000 29.5 209,450,000 119,386,000 
N. Dakota. 700.000 14.0 9,800,000 6,566,000 
S. Dakota. 3,250,000 29.0 94,250,000 46,182,000 
Nebraska.. 7,100,000 30.0 213,000,000 100,110,000 
Kansas.... 5,550,000 31.0 172,050,000 87746000 
Kentucky.. 3,800,000 30.O 114,000,000 63'840'000 


Valu^ . . . $58 590 465 $45 937 6 9 9 


Tennessee. 3,500,000 27.0 94 500 000 54 810 000 


Granulated Quantity (tons 
of 2,000 pounds) 739,233 496,807 
Value $58,351,323 $45,645810 


Alabama... 3.900,000 17.0 66,800,000 45,747*,000 
Mississippi. 3,650,000 19.0 69,350,000 45,078,000 
.Louisiana.. 2,200,000 20.5 45,100,000 28,864,000 


Raw Quantity (tons of 
2,000 pounds) 4,240 4,875 
Value $239 142 $291 819 


Texas 7,450,000 23.5 175,075,000 101,544,000 
Oklahoma. 4,200,000 29.5 123,900,000 56 991 000 
Arkansas.. 2,700,000 23.0 62,100,000 39)744*000 


Molasses Quantity (gallons 
of 12 2 pounds) 26 461 291 20 812 747 


Montana.. 70000 28.0 1,960,000 1,352,000 
Wyoming.. 25,000 25.0 625,000 419,000 


Value . $1,536,192 $1,129,905 


Colorado... 470,000 24.0 11,280,000 6204000 


Pulp . $2 094 863 $795 900 


N. Mexico 105,000 26.0 2,730,000 1,993,000 


All other products $383689 $58 949 


Arizona.... 20,000 30.0 600,000 690,000 




Utah 13000 34.0 442,000 354000 


Total value of products... $62,605,209 $48,122,383 

MAPLE SUGAR AND SIRUP MADE IN VER- 
MONT. 
[Figures for 1909 are from the thirteenth 


Nevada.... 1,000 35.0 35,000 33,000 
Idaho 22,000 35.0 770,000 500000 
Washington 39,000 27.0 1,053,000 811,000 
Oregon 33,000 35.0 1,155,000 947,000 
California... 64,000 41.0 2,624.000 2,309,000 


United States census; those for 1912, 1914 and 
1915 are reported by the Vermont state com- 
missioner of agriculture.] 
Trees Pounds Gallons 
Year. tapped. sugar. sirup. 
1909 5 585 632 7 726 817 409 953 


U. S 108,321,000 28.23,054,535,0001.755,859,000 

WINTER WHEAT. 

New York 390,000 25.0 9,750,000 $9,848,000 
New Jersey.. 78,000 20.0 1,560,000 1.654,000 


1912 5 076 375 6 682 063 455 403 




1914 5190461 7117671 433750 




1915 5 294 933 7 311 334 605 373 




CROPS OF 1915 BY STATES. 

CORN. 

State. Acres. Yield, bu. Bushels. Value. 
Maine 16,000 41.0 656,000 $558000 


W. Virginia.. 300 000 15.0 4,500,000 4,860,000 
N. Carolina.. 950,000 10.9 10,355,000 12.426,000 
S. Carolina.. 225,000 10.8 2,430,000 3,353000 
Georgia 325,000 11.0 3,575,000 4,612)000 
Ohio 1 980 000 20.3 40 194 000 41 802 000 


N. Hamp.. 22,000 45.0 990,000 752)000 
Vermont .. 47,000 46.0 2,256,000 1,895,000 
Massachu'ts 48,000 47.0 2,304,000 1,843,000 
R. Island.. 12,000 43.0 516,000 516,000 
Connecticut. 65 000 50.0 3,250,000 2,762,000 
New York. 605)000 40.0 24,200,000 18 876,000 


Indiana 2,750,000 17.2 47,300,000 48,246,000 
Illinois 2,800,000 19.0 53,200,000 53,200,000 
Michigan .... 960,000 21.3 20.448.000 20.652,000 
Wisconsin.... 100,000 23.0 2,300,000 2,185,000 
Minnesota 60000 19.5 1,170,000 1,053,000 
Iowa . . CIO 000 21 5 10 965 000 9 540 000 


New Jersey 285 000 38.0 10,830,000 8,122,000 
Pennsvlv'ia 1,520'.000 38.5 58,520,000 40,964,000 
Delaware... 210,000 31.5 6,615,000 4,101,000 
Maryland... 710,000 35.0 23,850,000 15,158,000 
Virginia .. 2,125,000 28.5 60,562,000 42,999,000 
W. Virginia 800.000 31.5 25,200,000 18,648,000 
N. Carolina 3,050.000 21.0 64.050,000 49,318000 
S. Carolina 2,155,000 16.5 35,558,000 30,9351000 
Georgia 4 330 000 15 64 950 000 50 661 000 


Missouri .... 2,773,000 12.3 34,108,000 33,426,000 
S. Dakota... 125,000 20.5 2,562,000 2,203,000 
Nebraska .... 3,601,000 18.5 66,618,000 55,959,000 
Kansas 8,475,000 12.5 105,938,000 94,285.000 
Kentucky ... 900000 11.0 9,900.000 10,395,000 
Tennessee ... 860,'000 10.5 9,030,000 9,752,000 
Alabama .... 100,000 12.0 1,200,000 1,500,000 
Mississippi .. 5,000 20.0 100,000 105,000 
Texas 1 475 000 15 5 2 9 862 000 24 462 000 


Florida.... 800.000 15.0 12,000,000 8,760.000 
Ohio .. 3760000 41.5 156040,000 87382,000 


Oklahoma .. 3,150,000 11.6 36.540,000 32',521.000 
Arkansas ... 2 9 000 12.5 2750.000 2778,000 


Indiana.... 5.025,000 38.0 190,950,000 97)384,000 
Illinois.... 10,449.000 36.0 376,164,000 203.129,000 
Michigan .. 1,750,000 32.0 56,000,000 38,080,000 
Wisconsin.. 1,775,000 23.0 40,825,000 27.761,000 
Minnes-ota.. 2,700,000 23.0 62,100,000 38,502,000 


Montana .... 675,000 27.0 18,225,000 14,216,000 
Wyoming ... 60.000 26.0 1,560,000 1,217,000 
Colorado .... 310,000 26.0 8,060.000 6.448000 
N. Mexico... 52,000 22.0 1,144,000 1,030,000 
Arizona 39,000 28.0 1,092,000 1,256,000 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



133 



State. 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington.. 

Oregon 

California 



Acres. Yield, bu. Bushels. 



245,000 25.0 



22,000 

390,000 

1,110,000 

G75 000 



26.0 
29.0 
27.6 
24.0 



440,000 16.0 



6,125,000 
572,000 
11,310,000 
30,636,000 
16,200,000 

7,040,000 



Value. 

$5,268,000 
543,000 
9,048,000 
25,122,000 
13,608.000 



U. States... 40, 453,000 16.2 655,045,000 622,012,000 



SPRING WHEAT. 



Maine 

Vermont 
Wisconsin . . . 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

N. Dakota.. 
S. Dakota... 
Nebraska ... 

Kansas 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

N. Mexico... 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington... 
Oregon 



4,000 

1,000 

105,000 

4,250,000 

. 275,000 

8,350,000 

3,600,000 

346,000 

50,000 



28.0 



65,000 

250,000 

45000 

75,000 

34,000 

280,000 

890,000 

225,000 



112,000 
30,000 
2,362,000 
72,250,000 
4,592,000 
18.2 151,970,000 
17.0 61.200,000 
16.0 5,536 000 
600,'000 
15,600,000 
1,755,000 
5,250,000 
1,012,000 
2,100,000 
1,088,000 
7,420,000 
19 758,000 
3,"825,000 



22.5 
17.0 
16.7 



12.0 
26.0 
27.0 
21.0 
22.5 
28.0 
32.0 
26.5 
22.2 
17.0 




U. States.. 19,445,000 18.3 356,460", 000 308,290,000 



Maine" 

N. Hamps're 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

R. Island 

Connecticut.. 
New York.... 
New Jersey . . 
Pennsylvania. 
Delaware . . . 

Maryland 

Virginia 

W. Virginia.. 
N. Carolina... 
S. Carolina.. 

Georgia 

Florida 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

N. Dakota... 
S. Dakota... 
Nebraska . . . 

Kansas 

Kentucky .... 
Tennessee . . . 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

Louisiana . . . 

Texas 

Oklahoma . . . 
Arkansas ...". 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colvrado 

N. Mexico... 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington... 

Oregon 

California . . . 



152,000 

12,000 

81000 

9,000 

2,000 

13,000 

1,340,000 

70,000 

1,140,000 

4,000 

45,000 

225,000 

120,000 

350,000 

525,000 

905,000 

61,000 

1,683,000 

1,638,000 

4,343,000 

1,530,000 

2,150,000 

3,125,000 

4,950,000 

1,225,000 

2,450,OCO 

1,725,000 

2,200,000 

1,650,000 

210,000 

357,000 

000.000 

250,000 

120,000 

1,250,000 

1,400,000 

375,000 



227,000 



60,000 

9,000 

100,000 

13,000 
335,000 
275,000 



211,000 



40.0 
38.0 
43.0 
36.0 
33.0 
32.5 
40.5 
32.5 
38.0 
33.5 
34.0 
25.0 
29.0 
23.0 
19.0 
19.5 
20.0 
41.0 
40.0 
45.0 
42.0 
46.5 
43.0 
40.0 
26.0 
40.0 
42.0 
32.0 
26.5 
26.0 
24.5 
19.0 
21.5 
25.0 
35.5 
27.0 
27.0 
52.0 
42.0 
39.0 
36.0 
37.0 
47.0 
45.0 
47.0 
50.0 
44.0 
33.0 



456,000 

3,483,000 

324,000 

66,000 

422,000 

54,270,000 

2 275,000 

43,"320,000 

134,000 

1,530,000 

5,625,000 

3,480,000 

8,050,000 

9.975,000 

17,648,000 

1,220,000 



$2,736,000 

246,000 

1,846,000 

165,000 

33,000 

232,000 

24,422,000 

1,092,000 

19,061,000 

68,000 

750,000 



65,520,000 

195,435,000 

64,260,000 

99,975,000 

134,375,000 

198,000,000 

31,850,000 

98,000,000 

72,450,000 

70,400,000 

43,725,000 

5,460,000 

8,746,000 
11,400,000 

5,375,000 

3,000,000 
44,375,000 
37,800,000 
10,125,000 
31,200,000 

9,534,000 
11,700,000 

2,160,000 
333,000 

4,700,000 
585,000 
15,745,000 
13,750,000 
16,060.000 

6.963,000 



1,775,000 

4,991,000 

6,683 000 

11,6481000 

854,000 

24.841,000 

22.277,000 

68,402,000 

22.491,000 

35,991,000 

43,000,000 

63,360,000 

12,103,000 

26,460,000 

20,286,000 

21,824,000 

16,178.000 

2,621,000 

4,373,000 

7,182,000 

3,225,000 

1,650,000 

18,638,000 

13,230,000 

5,265,000 

9,984,000 

4,100,000 

4,797,000 

1,080,000 

213,000 

2,115,000 

322,000 

5,353,000 



U. States.. 40,780,000 37.81540,362,000 555,569,000 



Vermont 

Massachusetts... 
Connecticut 



1,000 17.0 
3,000 20.0 
7,000 21.5 



17,000 

60,000 

150,000 



$14,000 
61,000 
153,000 



State. 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania . 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

W. Virginia.... 
N. Carolina.... 

S. Carolina 

Georgia 

Ohio 

Indiana , 

Illinois 

Michigan , 

Wisconsin 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

N. Dakota..... 

S. Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Texas 

Oklahoma 

Arkansas 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

Utah 

Idaho 

Washington . . , 

Oregon 

California . 



Acres. Yield, bu 

150,000 18.7 

, 71.000 20.0 

274,000 18.0 

1,000 15.5 

, 24,000 16.5 

, 70,000 14.5 

, 16,000 14.0 

50,000 11.5 

3,000 10.0 

, 13,000 9.2 

, 100,000 17 r 5 

. 150,000 16.0 

49,000 18.5 

. 390,000 15.5 

, 420,000 18.5 

. 300,000 19.5 

60,000 18.5 

. 25,000 13.5 

, 180,000 15.0 

. 90,000 19.5 

. 200,000 17.5 

. 50,000 16.0 
12.0 





United States. 2,856.000 17.2 49,190,000 41,295,000 



Maine 

N. Hampshire 

Vermont 

New York 

Pennsylvania... 

Maryland 

Virginia 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin ... 
Minnesota ...1 

Iowa 

Missouri 

N. Dakota 1 

S. Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Oklahoma .... 

Montana 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico... 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Idaho 

Washington ... 

Oregon 

California ....1 



26.5 
30.0 



5.000 
1,000 

12,000 ?5.0 

85,000 32.0 

8,000 34.0 

5,000 34.0 

12,000 29.0 

30,000 31.0 

8,000 28.0 

54,000 34.0 

85,000 29.5 

656,000 35.5 

,350,000 30.5 

353,000 31.0- 

5,000 25.0 

,400,000 32.0 

750,000 32.0 

105,000 31.0 

270,000 31.0 

6,000 30.0 

6,000 24.0 

9,000 28.0 

8,000 26.5 

80,000 34.0 

17,000 36.0 

130,000 36.0 

8,000 33.0 

35,000 37.0 

34,000 42.5 

12,000 48.0 

191,000 40.5 

175,000 41.5 

130,000 36.0 

.360,000 29.0 



132,000 

30,000 

420,000 

2,720,000 

170,000 

170,000 

348,000 

930,000 

224,000 

1,836,000 

2,508,000 

23,288,000 

41,175,000 

10,943,000 

125,000 

44,800,000 

24,000,000 

3,255,000 

8,370,000 

180,000 

144,000 

252,000 

212,000 

2,720,000 

612,000 

4,680,000 

264,000 

1,295,000 

1,445,000 

576,000 

7,736,000 

7,263,000 

4,680,000 

39,440,000 



U. States.... 7,395,000 32.0 237,009,000 

BUCKWHEAT. 

Maine 13,000 26.0 338,000 

N. Hampshire.... 1,000 30,0 30,000 

Vermont 8,000 27.0 216,000 

Massachusetts 2,000 16.0 32,000 

Connecticut 3,000 20.0 60,000 

New York 280.000 19.0 5,320,000 

New Jersey 10,000 21.0 210,000 

5,754,000 



21.0 
Pennsylvania ....274,000 21.0 



$99,000 

24,000 

315,000 

2,040,00i) 

119,000- 

119,000 

261,000 

502,000 

146,000 

1,047,000 

1,555,000 

13,041,000 

20,176,000 

5,362,000 

79,003 

19,712,000 

11,040,000 

1,367,000 

3,515,000 

139,000 

108,000 

171,000 

106,000 

1,306,000 

337,000 

2,246,000 

185,000 

725,000 

751,000 

403,000 

4,023,000 

4,067,000 

2,902,000 

24.453,000 

122,499,000 

$237,000 
24,000 
177,000 
30,000 
58,000 
4,256,000 
174,000 
4,488,000 



134 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



State. Acres. Yield.bu. Bushels. Value. 
Delaware 3,000 18.5 56,000 42,000 
Maryland 11,000 20.0 220,000 158,000 


State. 
Vermont 


Yield, 
Acres bu. 
24,000 108 
26,000 120 
5,000 110 
24,000 95 
355,000 62 
93.000 130 
280,000 72 
11,000 95 
44,000 97 
140,000 125 
50,000 117 
35,000 90 
11,000 80 
16,000 65 
12,000 80 
153,000 82 
75,000 95 
126,000 110 
355,000 59 
298,000 87 
285,000 106 
148,000 105 
90,000 98 
80,000 90 
68,000 115 
110,000 105 
71,000 83 
51,000 126 
36,000 88 
20,000 80 
13,000 90 
28,000 51 
42,000 65 
35,000 85 
28,000 90 
39,000 155 
16,000 150 
53.000 135 
8,000 100 
1,000 95 
20,000 125 
13,000 172 
28.000 125 
61,000 135 
48,000 115 
78,000 130 


Bushels. 
2,592,000 
3,120,000 
550.000 
2.280,000 
22,010,000 
12,090,000 
20,160,000 
1,045,000 
4,268,000 
17,500,000 
5,850,000 
3,150,000 
880,000 
1,040,000 
960,000 
12,546,000 
7,125.000 
13,860,000 
20,945,000 
25,926.000 
30,210,000 
15.540,000 
8,820,000 
7,200,000 
7,820,000 
11.550,000 
5,893,000 
6,426,000 
3,168,000 
1.660,000 
1,170,000 
1,428,000 
2,730,000 
2,975,000 
2,520,000 
6,045,000 
2,400,000 
7,155,000 
800,000 
95,000 
2,500,000 
2,236,000 
3,500,000 
8,235,000 
5,520,000 
10,140,000 


Value. 

$2,100,000 
2,933.000 
506,000 
2,189,000 
18,048,000 
9.06S..OOO 
15,120,000 
784,000 
2,646,000 
10,675,000 
3,802,000 
2,300,000 
1,012,000 
1,030,000 
1,104,000 
8,872,000 
3,990,000 
8,177,000 
11,729,000 
11,667,000 
11.782.000 
8.392.000 
5,292,000 
2,952.000 
2.737,000 
4,851,000 
4,361,000 
3,534,000 
1,996,000 
1,440,000 
983,000 
1,357,000 
2,866,000 
2,499.000 
1.915,000 
3.022,000 
1.440,000 
3,935,000 
760,000 
95,000 
1,575,000 
1,565,000 
1,960,000 
4,365,000 
3,312,000 
7,605,000 


Virginia 26,000 20.0 520,000 416,000 
W Virginia ... 38,000 22.0 836,000 669,000 


Massachusetts 
Rhode Island.. 
Connecticut . 
New York 
New Jersey.. 
Pennsylvania.. 
Delaware 
Maryland . . . 
Virginia 
W. Virginia. 
N. Carolina.. 
S. Carolina.. 
Georgia 
Florida 
Ohio 
Indiana 


N Carolina 10 000 17.5 175,000 144 000 


Ohio 18.000 23.0 414,000 319,000 
Indiana 5 000 14.0 70,000 56,000 


Illinois 4,00 17.0 68,000 61,000 
Michigan 6.000 14.5 870,000 626,000 
Wisconsin .. 18,000 13.0 234,000 194,000 


Minnesota 7,000 17.5 122,000 92,000 


Iowa 7,000 13.0 91,000 73,000 


Missouri 3 000 15.0 45 000 40,000 


Nebraska 1,000 20.0 20,000 19,000 
Kansas 1 000 14.0 14,000 14,000 


Tennessee 3,000 18.0 54,000 41,000 


U. States 806,000 19.6 15,769,000 12,408,000 
HAY. 

State. Acres. Yield.tons. Tons. Value. 
Maine .. 1,215,000 1.15 1,397,000 $20,815,000 


Illinois 
Michigan "... 
Wisconsin . . . 
Minnesota . . . 


N Hampshire 504,000 1.00 504,000 8,770,000 
Vermont .... 970000 1.35 1,310,000 20,305,000 
Massachusetts. 470,'000 1.50 705,000 15,510,000 
R. Island 57,000 1.24 71,000 1,598,000 
Connecticut ., 365,000 1.35 493,000 9,860,000 
New York 4,500,000 1.30 5,850,000 91,845,000 
New Jersey... 361,000 1.45 523,000 9,937,000 
Pennsylvania.. 3,100,000 1.40 4,340.000 67,704,000 
Delaware .... 70,000 1.20 84,000 1,428,000 
Maryland .... 390,000 1.20 468,000 7,582,000 
Virginia 700,000 1.35 945,000 14,836,000 
W. Virginia... 730,000 1.50 1,095,000 16,425,000 
N. Carolina... 350.000 1.85 648,000 10,692,000 
S." Carolina.... 220,000 1.30 286,000 4462,000 
Georgia 300,000 1.15 345,000 5,210,000 
Florida 51 000 1.20 61,000 976.000 


Missouri 
N. Dakota... 
S. Dakota 
Nebraska 
Kansas 
Kentucky . . . 
Tennessee . . . 
Alabama 
Mississippi . . 
Louisiana ... 
Texas 
Oklahoma . . . 
Arkansas 
Montana 
Wyoming 
Colorado 
New Mexico... 
Arizona 
Utah 
Nevada . . 


Ohio 2,812,000 1.44 4,049,000 51,422,000 


Indiana 2,020000 1.50 3,030,000 33,330,000 
Illinois 2 400,' 000 1.54 3,696,000 39,917,000 


Michigan 2,470,000 1.40 3,458,000 42,188,000 
Wisconsin ....2,576,000 1.75 4,508000 44,629,000 
Minnesota .... 1.680,000 1.91 3.209,'000 20,538,000 
Iowa . ... 3,098,000 l.SO 5,576,000 48.511,000 




Missouri .. .. 3,050,000 1.52 4,636,000 39,406,000 
N Dakota 440.000 1.50 660,000 3,762,000 
S. Dakota 610,000 2.00 1,220,000 6,466,000 
Nebraska .. 1,650.000 2.60 4,290,000 24,882.000 
Kansas . 1 766 000 2.30 4,062.000 22.747,000 


Washington . 
Oregon 
California . . . 


U. States.... 

New Jersey... 
Pennsylvania 
Delaware 


3,761,000 95.5 
SWEET POTAT 
.... 23,000 155 
.... 1,000 105 
.... 5,000 135 


559,103,000 
OES. 

3,565,000 
105,000 
675,000 
1,040,000 
2.740.000 
220,000 
8,925,000 
6,825,000 
8,075.000 
2,576,000 
95,000 
104,000 
880,000 
285,000 
700,000 
440,000 
1,050,000 
2,835,000 
7,200.000 
7,700,000 
5,980,000 
5,880,000 
690.000 
3,900,000 
810,000 


221,104,000 

$2,496,000 
79,000 
418,000 
728,000 
2,431,000 
202,000 
4,998,000 
4.436,000 
4.926.000 
1,752.000 
93,000 
94,000 
722.000 
308,000 
574,000 
440,000 
735,000 
1,673,000 
4,104,000 
4,235,000 
2,990,000 
4,116,000 
504,000 
2,379,000 
648,000 


Kentucky .... 875,000 1.40 1,225,000 15,312,000 
Tennessee ., , 950,000 1.47 1,396,000 19,404,000 
Alabama 250,000 1.45 362,000 4,489,000 
Mississippi ... 250,000 1.40 350,000 3,850,000 
Louisiana 250,000 1.75 438,000 4,511.000 
Texas 450 000 1.70 765,000 6,044,000 


Maryland 
Virginia 
W. Virginia .. 
N. Carolina... 
S. Carolina... 
Georgia 
Florida 
Ohio 


.... 8,000 130 
.... 34.000 110 
.... 2,000 110 
.... 85,000 105 
. ... 65,000 105 
.... 95,000 85 
. ... 23.000 112 
.... 1,000 95 


Oklahoma . . 460,000 2.30 1,058.000 5,925,000 
Arkansas .... boO.OOO 1.60 560.000 5,768,000 
Montana . . 775,000 2.00 1,550,000 11,625,000 
Wyoming . . E50,000 2.20 1.210.000 9,438,000 
Colorado 970.000 2.20 2,134,000 16,218,000 
N. Mexico.... 210.000 2.20 442.000 3,890,000 


Utah ...V 394'.000 2.50 985.000 7,880,000 


Indiana 


.... 1,000 104 


Nevada 225,000 3.00 675,000 5,062,000 
Idaho 677 000 2 70 1 8 9 8 000 14 076 000 


Illinois 
Iowa 


, . , , 8,000 110 
.... 3.000 95 
.... 7,000 100 


Washington .. 812.000 2.30 1,868,000 20,174,000 
Oregon 850.000 2.20 1.870.000 17,765,000 
California .-. .. 2.511.000 1.80 4.520.000 50.624.000 


Missouri 


Kansas 
Kentucky 


.... 4,000 110 
.... 10,000 105 


U. States... 50,872, 000 1.68 85,225,000 912,320,000 
HAY CROP BY KINDS IN 1915. 

Tons. Per ct. 
Timothy 19 054 000 22.3 


Alabama 


.... 80,000 90 
70 000 110 


Louisiana 
Texas 


.... 65,000 92 
60 000 98 


Timothy and clover mixed 18,713,000 21.9 
Clovor alone 12527,000 14.7 


Oklahoma 
Arkansas 


.... 6.000 115 
. ... 30,000 130 


Alfnlfi 18 562 000 21.8 


California .... 
United Stat 

State. 
Virginia 


.... 6,000 135 


Millet and Hungarian grass 3.230,000 3.8 
Grains cut greon for hay 6,962,000 8.2 


es.. 719,000 103. 

COTTON. 

Yield 
Acres, bales 
36,000 212 
1,250,000 270 
.2,400,000 231 
4,700,000 193 
198,000 121 


5 74,295,000 

Bales. 

16.000 
708,000 
1,160,000 
1,900,000 
50,000 


46,081,000 

Value. 

$870.000 
37,800,000 
62,578,000 
103,513.000 
3,559,000 


Other tame Inv 6 205 000 7 3 


Total tame hay 85,225,000 100.0 


Wild, salt and prairie hay 21,491,000 

POTATOES. 

Yield, 
State. Acres. bu. Bushels. Value. 
Maine 142,000 155 22,010.000 $15,407,000 
N. Hampshire 16,000 95 1,520,000 1.444.000 


N. Carolina... 
S. Carolina.. 
Georgia 
Florida 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR J917. 



135 



State. 
Alabama . . . 
Mississippi 
Louisiana . . 
Vexas 


Yield, 
Acres. bali-s. Bales. Value. 
.. 3,400,000 148 1,050,000 $55,734,000 
6uO 000 170 940 000 51 758 000 


State. Acrrs. Yield, bu. Bushels. Value. 
Wisconsin ^ 000 IS 36 000 220 000 




Total 17,700 25.8 457,000 2,845,000 


.. 1,090,000 158 360,000 19,289,000 
..10,^00,000 14-J 5,175,000 168,812,000 


SHEEP (1916) AND WOOL (1915). 
Sheep. Fleeces. Raw wool. 
State. Jan. 1. Number. Pounds. 
Maine 162 000 148 000 93 9 000 


Arkansas .. 
Tennessee . . 
Missouri ... 
Oklahoma .. 
California . 
All other.... 


.. 2,150,000 175 785,000 43,590,000 
.. 780,000 181 295,000 15,957,000 
, 102,000 244 52,000 2,740,000 
.. 1,950,000 155 630,000 34,050,000 
34 000 479 34,000 1.822,000 
17,000 ... 6.000 321,000 


New Hampshire.... 37.000 31,000 195,000 
Vermont 100,000 83,000 589,000 
Massachusetts 28.000 20,000 128,000 
Rhode Island 6,000 5,000 25,000 


U. States... 30,957,000 172.5 11,161,000 602,393,000 
TOBACCO. 

State. Acres. Yield,lbs. Pounds. Value. 
N. Hamp... 100,0001,400 140,000 $17,000 
Vermont ... 100.0001,300 130,000 14.000 
Massachusetts 7,300.000 1,100 8,030,000 1,164,000 
Connecticut 22,200,000 1,350 29,970.000 5,095,000 
New York.. 4.400,0001,200 5,280,000 502,000 
Pennsylvania 31,400,000 1,350 42.390,000 3,900,000 
Maryland .. 22.000,000 740 16,280,000 1,384,000 
Virginia ... 192,500,000 750 144,375,00013,571,000 
W. Virginia 11.300.000 870 9,?31,000 983,000 
N. Carolina. 320,000.000 620 198,400,000 22,221,000 
S. Carolina. 65,000,000 580 37,700,000 2,639,000 
Georgia .... 1,700,000 880 1.496,'OOft 344.000 
Florida 3,900,000 910 3,549,000 816,000 
Ohio 93,700,000 900 84,330,000 7,590,000 


Connecticut 18,000 15,000 82,000 
New York 849 000 535 000 3 47S 000 


New Jersey 29,000 17,000 95,000 
Pennsylvania 856,000 650,000 4,030,000 
Delaware 8,000 5,000 28,000 
Maryland 223 000 127 000 749 000 


Virginia 734,000 439,000 2,063,000 
West Virginia 796,000 681,000 3,405,000 


North Carolina 170.000 145,000 566,000 
South Carolina 30,000 29,000 116,000 
Georgia 161,000 200,000 520,000 
Florida 119 000 107 000 332 000 


Ohio 3 067 000 2 110 000 14 350 000 


Indiana 1 058 000 725 000 4 920 000 


Illinois 907 000 530 000 3 975 000 


Michigan 1,931,000 1,170,000 8073,000 


Wisconsin 664 000 550 000 3 960 000 


Minnesota 536,000 420,000 2,940,000 


Indiana 
Illinois .... 
Wisconsin .. 
Missouri ... 
Kentucky .. 
Tennessee . . 
Alabama ... 
Louisiana .. 
Texas 
Arkansas ... 

U. States. 

State. 
N. Carolina 
S. Carolina 
Georgia ...... 
Florida 


13,500,000 840 11.340,000 828,000 
700,000 850 595,000 54,000 
41,000,000 900 36,900,000 2,214,000 
3,500.000 900 3,150,000 378,000 
'440,000.000 810 356,400,000 27,799,000 
92,900,000 750 69,675,000 4,390,000 
200,000 500 100,000 22.000 
300,000 420 126,000 38,000 
200,000 500 100,000 27,000 
500.000 600 300,000 51,000 


Missouri 1,416,000 1,050,000 7,035,000 


North Dakota 250 000 225 000 1 620 000 


South Dakota 604,000 500,000 3.500,000 
\ebraska 374 000 240 000 1 776 000 


Kansas 341000 205000 1456003 


Kentucky 1 155 000 725 000 3 552 009 


Tennessee 6G1 000 435 000 1 914 000 


\labama 119 000 106 000 * 403*000 


Mississippi 208,000 155,000 527,000 
Louisiana 185,000 145,000 536 000 


1,368,400,000 775.1 1,060,587,000 96.041,000 
RICE. 

Acres. Yield. bu. Bushels. Value. 
200,000 21.0 4,000 $3 000 
.. 3,700,000 24.3 90,000 81,000 
900,000 29.3 26,000 23,000 


Texas . . 2 156 000 1 600 000 9 280 000 


Oklahoma 95,000 70,000 490,000 
Arkansas 1 9 4 000 90 000 406 000 


Montana 3,941,000 3,725,000 28,682,000 
Wvoming 4,338000 3,630,000 29,010000 


Colorado 1,839,000 1,250,000 7,500,000 
New Mexico 3,410,00) 3,325,000 18,620,000 
Arizona 1,849,000 950,000 5,985000 


Missouri . . 
Alabama . . 
Mississippi 
Louisiana . 
Texas 


200,000 50.0 10,000 10,000 
300,000 25.0 8,000 6,000 
.. 1,800,000 25.0 45,000 40,000 
..401,000,000 34.2 13,714,000 12,343,000 
..260,000,000 30.5 7,930,000 7,058,000 


Utah 2,08^ 000 1800000 13320000 


Nevada . 1 532 000 765 000 5 890 000 


Idaho 3102000 1935000 15,286,'GOO 


Washington 5-38000 *460 O'X) 3818000 


Oregon 2,563,000 1,950.000 15,600,000 


Arkansas . 
California .. 

U. States. 

State. 
Wisconsin . . 


..100,000.000 48.4 4,840,000 4,598,000 
.. 34,000,000 66.7 2,268,000 2,041,000 


California 2,450,000 1,900,000 11,590,000 


United States 49 16? 000 36 698 000 288 777 000 


..802,600,000 36.1 28,947,000 26,212,000 
FLAXSEED. 

Acres. Yield, bu. Bushels. Value. 
7,000 13.5 108000 $169000 


In 1915 .. .49956000 296175000 


APPLE PRODUCTION IN 1915. 
State. *Barrels. State. *Barrels. 
Maine 720,000 South Dakota.. 100,000 
New Hampshire 353,000 Nebraska 1,267,000 
Vermont 324,000 Kansas 2,125,000 


Minnesota . 
Iowa 


.... 300,000 10.5 2,930,000 5,544,000 
.... 18,000 9.0 190,000 243,000 


N. Dakota.. 
S. Dakota.. 
Nebraska ... 
Kansas .... 


660,000 9.9 6,972,000 11,531,003 
.... 150.000 11.0 2,400,000 2,756,000 
7,000 11.0 49,000 113,000 
.... 36,000 5.7 270,000 297,000 


Massachusetts. 885,000 Kentucky 4,170,000 
Rhode Island.. 59.000 Tennessee 2,025,000 
Connecticut 511,000 Alabama 532000 


New York 8,528,000 Mississippi ... 141,000 


Montana . . . 
Wyoming . . . 
Colorado . . . 


.... 180,000 10.5 2,560,000 3,213.000 
2,000 130 38000 


Pennsylvania ..5,085,000 Texas 187,000 
Delaware 122,000 Oklahoma ..... 780.000 
Marvland ... 800,000 Arkansas 1,183,000 
Virginia 4,393,000 Montana 347,000 
West Virginia. 2,513,000 Wyoming 
North Carolina 1,972,000 Colorado 693,000 
South Carolina 221,000 New Mexico.... 273,000 
Georgia 6*>5 000 Arizona 40,000 


1,000 9.4 16.000 11,000 


United States. 1,367,000 10.1 15,559,000 24,080,000 

DRY BEANS. 

State. Acres. Yield, bu. Bushels. Value. 
New York.... 130, 000 9.6 1,250,000 $4,362,000 
Michigan ....506,000 8.4 4,250,000 12,792,000 
California ...225,000 17.0 3,825,000 10,404,000 


Ohio 5984000 Utah 142,000 


Indiana 3,883,000 Nevada 40,000 


Total 861.000 10.8 9,325,000 27,558,000 
CRANBERRIES. 

State. Acres. Yield, bu. Bushels. Value. 
Massachusetts ...10.000 25 250,000 $1,625,000 
JJew Jersey 5,700 30 171,000 1,000,000 


Illinois 4,716,000 Idaho 57,5,000 
Michigan 3,150,000 Washington ... 2,433,000 
Wisconsin .... 1473,000 Oregon 1,043,000 


Minnesota .... 412.000 California 1.563.000 


Iowa 3 220,000 fj States 76 670 000 


Missouri 6,287,000 *6f three bushels. ' 



136 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1!)17. 



PERCENTAGE 

Kind. 



AND PRICE OP 



VARIETIES. 

Pet. *Price. 



Ben Davis ............................... 14.5 

Baldwin ................................ 10.9 

Winesap ................... , ............ 7.3 

Jonathan ............................... 5.9 

Greenings .............................. 4.7 

Rome Beauty ........................... 4.6 

Wealthy ................................ 4.3 

Grimes Golden .......................... 3.8 

Northern Spy ........................... 3.8 

York Imperial .......................... 3.2 

Oldenburg ........................... ... 2.9 

Cano .................................... 2.4 

Stayman Winesap ...................... 2.3 

Limbertwig ............................ 2.0 

Yellow Newtown (Pippin) ............ 1.7 

Fameuse (Snow) ....................... 1.3 

Tompkins King ......................... 1.3 

Yellow Bellflower ....................... 1.2 

Golden Russet .......................... 1.2 



Wagener 



1.1 



Mclntosh .............................. 1.0 

Gravenstein ............ -. ................ 9 

Others ................................ 17.7 

Total ................................. 100.0 

*F. o. b. harvest price per barrel. 



1.78 



COTTON STATISTICS OF UNITED STATES. 

Production. Consumption. Exports. 

Year. Bales.* Bales.* Bales.* 

1790 3,138 11.000 379 

1800 73.222 18.829 41.822 

1810 177.824 35.656 124,116 

1820 334.728 100,000 249.787 

1830 732,218 129,938 553960 

1840 1,347.640 245.045 1.060i408 

1850 2.136,083 422,626 1,854.474 

1860 3,841.416 841,975 615.032 

1870 4,024.527 1,026,583 2922.757 

1880 6,356,998 1,865,922 4,453495 

1890 8.562.089 2.604.491 5.850.'219 

1900 10,266,527 3,603,516 6,806,572 

1910 12,005,688 4,516,779 8,025.991 

1911 16.250,276 5,181,826 11,081,332 

1912 13,703,421 5,630,835 9,199.093 

1913 14.156,486 5,702.639 9,256.028 

1914 16,134,930 5,832,592 8,931,253 

1915 11,161,000 



Equivalent 500 pound bales. 



CROPS OF 1916. 
[Department of agriculture, Sept. 8.] 



1916. 
13.8 



12.0 
24.9 



Yield per acre. 
1915. 
16.2 
18.3 
16.9 
28.2 
37.8 
32.0 
17.2 
19.6 
95.5 
103.3 
775.1 
10.1 



Crop. Bushels. 

Winter wheat 455,000.000 

Spring wheat 156.000.000 

All wheat 611.000,000 

Corn 2,710.000,000 

Oats 1,231,000.000 

Barley 184,000,000 

Rye 41,900.000 

Buckwheat 15.800.000 

Potatoes, white 318.000.000 

Potatoes, sweet 69,300,000 

Tobacco, Ibs ...1,224.000.000 

Flax 14,900,000 

Rice 32.800.000 

Hay, tame, tons 86,200.000 1.6 1.6 

Cotton, bales 11,800,000 158.5 170.3 

Apples, brls 67.700.000 

Peaches 36,900,000 

ESTIMATES BY STATES. 

Corn. *Wheat. Oats. 

State. Bushejs. Bushels. Bushels. 

Alabama 52,703,000 

Arkansas 43.474,000 

Georgia 64.680,000 

Illinois 336.740,000 169,258,000 

Indiana 185,784,000 55,412.000 

Iowa 372,690,000 184,036,000 



23.8 
15.3 
19.3 
87.7 
94.2 

875.0 
9.4 
36.0 
1.6 

158.5 



29.180.000 



Corn. * Wheat. 
State. Bushels. Bushels. 

Kansas 56,002,000 

Kentucky 114.345,000 

Louisiana 45,710,000 

Michigan 47.838,000 

Minnesota 78.994,000 

Mississippi 52.38J.OOO 

Missouri 149.085.000 

Nebraska 198,601,000 

New York 

North Caiolina... 55,418,000 

North Dakota 

..120.221.000 
.. 61.104,000 
57,908.000 
9.M46.000 



Oats. 
Bushels. 
42,223,000 



41,494.000 
89,504,000 

So'. 891 1666 
77,216,000 
31,621.000 



Ohio 

Oklahoma . . . 
Pennsylvania 
South Dakota 

Tennessee 89,158,000 

Texas 145.049,000 

Virginia 58,808,000 

Washington 18,443,000 

Wisconsin 59,108,000 

*Spring wheat. 



58,039.000 
51,201,000 



22,183,000 54,276,000 



74,628,000 



NUMBER AND VALUE OF LIVE STOCK (1916). 

Farm animals. Number. Av.price. Total value. 

Horses ...-......* 21,166,000 $101.60 $2,150,468,000 

Mules 4,565,000 113.87 519,824,000 

Milch cows 21,988,000 53.90 1,185.119,000 

Other cattle 39,453,000 33.49 1,321,135,000 

Sheep 49,162,000 5.17 254,348,000 

Swine 68,047,000 8.40 571,890,000 

The states having the largest number of farm 
animals of each of the above kinds Jan. 1, 
1916, were : 

Horses Iowa, 1,584,000: Illinois, 1,452,000; Texas, 
1,180,000; Kansas. 1,109.000; Missouri, 1.094.000; 
Nebraska, 1,028,000; Ohio, 901,000; Minnesota, 
872,000; Indiana. 854,000; North Dakota, 801.000; 
South Dakota. 759.000; Oklahoma, 743,000; Wis- 
consin, 712,000; Michigan, 680,000; New York, 
609,000; Pennsylvania, 602,000. 

Mules Texas, 768.000; Missouri. 329,000; Georgia, 
315,000; Mississippi, 292.000; Oklahoma, 282,000; 
Alabama, 281,000 ; Tennessee. 272,000 ; Kansas, 
245,000; Arkansas, 240,000; Kentucky, 229,000. 

Milch cows Wisconsin, 1,675,000; New York, 
1,530,000; Iowa, 1,391,000; Minnesota, 1,210,000; 
Texas, 1,119,000; Illinois, 1,047,000; Pennsylvania, 
971,000; Ohio, 922.000; Michigan, 847.000; Mis- 
souri. 837,000; Kansas, 762,000; Indiana, 672,000; 
Nebraska, 650,000; California, 568,000. 

Cattle (other than milch cows) Texas, 5,121,000; 
Iowa, 2,737,000; Nebraska. 2,237,000; Kansas, 
1,945,000 ; Missouri, 1,555,000 ; California, 1,554,- 
000; Wisconsin. 1,313,000; Illinois, 1,239,000; Min- 
nesota, 1,232.000; Oklahoma, 1.186.000; Colorado, 
1,096,000; New Mexico, 1.090,000; South Dakota, 
1.064,000: New York, 939.000 \ Montana, 894,000: 
Ohio, 872.000; Arizona, 838.000: Florida, 772,000; 
Indiana, 723,000; Georgia, 686,000; Pennsylvania, 
657,000. 

Sheep Wyoming, 4,338,000: Montana. 3,941,000; 
New Mexico, 3,440.000; Idaho. 3,102,000; Ohio, 
3.067.000; Oregon. 2,563,000; California, 2,450.000; 
Texas. 2,156.000; Utah, 2,089.000; Arizona, 1,849,. 
000; Colorado. 1.839,000; Nevada, 1,532,000; Mis- 
souri, 1,416,000: Iowa, 1,274,000; Indiana, 1,058,- 
000: Illinois. 907.000: Pennsylvania, 856,000; New 
York. 849.000; West Virginia, 796,000; Virginia, 
734,000; Wisconsin, 664,000. 

Swine Iowa, 9.069.000; Missouri, 4,505,000; Illi- 
nois. 4.489.000; Nebraska. 4.266.000; Indiana, 
4,167,000; Ohio, 3,713,000; Texas, 3,197,000; Kan- 
sas, 2.815.000: Georgia, 2.348,000: Wisconsin, 
2.142,000; Minnesota, 1,716,000; Alabama, 1.715,- 
000; Kentucky, 1,709.000; Mississippi. 1,615.000; 
North Carolina. 1,601.000; Arkansas, 1,589.000; 
Louisiana. 1.553.000; Tennessee, 1,531.000; Okla- 
homa, 1.491.000; Michigan, 1,462,000; South Da- 
kota, 1,314,000 : Pennsylvania, 1,210,000 ; West 
Virginia, 1,027,000. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



131 



PROPORTION OF IMPORTANT CROPS PRODUCED IN THE LEADING FIVE STATES, 1915. 
[From department of agriculture report, 1916.] 

caw* maieasm^^^^mMf^^smitm^=^r^ j 



vfff, s- ^^^ ^ /we*. ^^|^Q 



"'" 



*"* 



*"" 



""* "" '"*' 






corro/v 



&.C-. **.*. 



*" 






AVERAGE VALUE PER HEAD OF FARM ANIMALS. 



1916. 



On Jan. 1 of years indicated. 



1915. 1914. 1913. 



1911. 1910. 1900-9. 1890-9. 1880-9. 1870-9. 



Horses $101.60 $103.33 $109.32 $110.77 $105.94 $111.67 $108.19 $71.99' $48.24 $67.78 $62.07 



Mules 113.87 

Milch cows 53.90 

Other cattle 33.49 

Sheep 5.00 

Swine 8.40 



112.36 

53.33 

33.38 

4.50 

9.87 



123.85 

53.94 

31.13 

4.04 

10.40 



124.31 
45.02 



3.94 

9.85 



120.51 
39.39 
21.20 

3.46 



125.62 

40.49 

20.85 

3.73 

9.35 



119.84 

35.79 

19.41 

4.08 

9.14 



30.12 

1809 

3.13 

6.46 



58.79 76.63 75.65 

23.35 26.65 27.27 

16.53 1977 17.54 

2.23 2.21 2.32 

4.81 5.18 4.76 



January Australia. New Zealand, Chile. Argen- 
tine Republic. 

February and March Upper Egypt. India. 

A^ril Lower Egypt. India. "Syria, Cyprus. 
Persia, Asia Minor, Mexico. Cuba 

May Texas, Algeria, Central ' Asia, China, 
Japan. Morocco. 

June California. Oregon. Mississippi, Alabama, 
Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennes- 
see. Virginia. Kentucky. Kansas. Arkansas. Utah. 
Colorado. Missouri, Turkey, Greece, Italy, Spain, 
Portugal, south of France. 

July New England, New York, Pennsylvania. 



WHEAT HARVEST CALENDAR. 



Ohio. Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, Iowa, Wiscon- 
sin, southern Minnesota. Nebraska, upper Can- 
ada. Roumania. Bulgaria. Austria. Hungary, 
south of Russia, Germany, Switzerland, south of 
England. 

August Central and northern Minnesota, Da- 
kotas. Manitoba, lower Canada. British Colum- 
bia, Belgium, Holland, Great Britain, Denmark, 
Poland, central Russia. 

September and October Scotland, Sweden, Nor- 
way, north of Russia. 

November Peru, South Africa. 

December Burma. New South Wales. 



INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS. 



WHEAT. 

Exports Bushels. 
Argentina .... 36,028,000 
Australia .... 52,878.000 
British India. 26,130 000 

Canada 70.302,000 

Chile 149.000 

Netherlands... 37,433.000 

Russia 88,533,000 

United States. 173,862,000 

Imports 

Brazil 14.047.000 

Brit. S. Africa 3.7S2.000 
Denmark .... 2.942,000 

France 60,882,000 

Italy 37.327,000 

Netherlands... 51.366.000 

Spain 15.52S.OCO 

Sweden 4,432.000 

Switzerland., lfi.200.000 
Utd. kingdom. 192, 725.000 

WHEAT FLOUR. 

Exports Barrels. 

Argentina 757.000 

Australia 1.778.000 

British India.. 683.000 

Canada 4.671.000 

Chile ."4.000 

Netherlands.... 115,000 



Figures are chiefly for calendar year 1914. 



Exports Barrels. 
Russia 947,000 
United States.12,768,000 
Imports 
Brazil 1,503 000 


Imports Bushels. 
'Netherlands ..25,512,000 
Norway 1,609,000 
Russia 413,000 
Spain 7 960 000 


Imports Gallons. 
Brazil 383,000 
Canada 4,079,000 
Egypt 74,000 
Ita'ly 702,000 


Brit. S. Africa 706,000 
Denmark 552,000 
France 1 047 000 


Sweden 2,173,000 
Switzerland .. 3,068,000 
Utd. kingdom..75, 499.000 

COTTON. 
Exports Biles. 
Brazil 140 000 


Norway 1,881,000 
Utd. kingdom. 6,193,000 

OIL CAKE AND MEAL. 

Exports Pounds. 
Argentina . 38.967.000 
Brit. India . 334.141.000 
Canada .... 35,567,000 
China 190.672.000 
Egypt 176.3S9.000 
Italy 120.607.000 
Russia .... 935,683.000 
Un. kingdom 73.295.000 
tin. States.. 1,579,171,000 
Imports Pounds. 
Canada 15.625.000 
Italy 2.471,000 
Norwav 83.044.000 
Un. kingdom.. 731. 264.000 

rXMAXUFACTrRED 
TOBACCO. 

Exports 
Brazil . . 59 481 000 


^talv 17 000 


Netherlands.... 1,598,000 
Spain 10000 


Sweden 102.000 
Utd. kingdom. 5,622,000 

COBN. 
Exports Bushels. 
Argentina ....139,461.000 
Brit. S. Africa 4,778,000 
Netherlands... 4,337,000 
Russia 11.251.000 
United States 17,022,000 
Uruguay 3,000 
Imports 
Brit. S. Africa 6.000 
Canada 8,347000 


1 British India.. 2,791,000 
China 184,000 
Egypt 1,225.000 
Peru 79 000 


United States. 6,873,000 
Imports Bales 
/Canada 152000 


Italv 879 000 


Russia 647.000 
Spain . 389 000 


Utd. kingdom. 3,447.003 
United States. 332,000 

COTTON SEED OIL. 
Exports Gallons. 
Egypt ... 491 000 


Cuba 2.890,000 
Denmark 10,346.000 
Egypt 687,000 
France 16,321,000 
Italy . .. 3.308.000 


Utd. kingdom. 8.213.000 
United States. 28.841. 000 


British India. 23.349,000 



138 



ALMANAC AND YEAH-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Exports Pounds. 
Cuba 36,868,000 


Imports Pounds. 
Br. S. Africa 48,883.000 
Canada .... 691,166,000 
Chile 185,425,000 
China 810,731,000 
Egypt 27,964,000 
Italy 10.774,000 
Norway .... 129.582,000 
Un. tcingd'm3,761,740,000 
Un. States.. 5,417, 995, 000 

TEA. 

Exports- 
British Imlia.292,607,000 
China 199 440 000 


Imports Pounds. 


Exports Pounds. 
Italy 9,310,000 
Norway 2,152,000 
Russia 116,139,000 
United States. 3,688,000 
Imports 
Brazil . . . 2 364 000 


Philippines .. 28,848,000 
Russia 9,678,000 
Un. States.... 347, 295, 000 
Imoorts 
Argentina .... 2.221,000 
British India. 5,914.000 
Canada 16,934,000 
China ... 15 781 000 


Norway 5', 709^000 
Russia 62,728,000 
Spain 645,000 
Un. kingdom 154,655,000 

TURPENTINE. 

Exports Gallons. 
Russia 1,439,000 
Spain 1,052,000 
United States. 11,118,000 
Imports 
Argentina .... 488,000 
Canada 1,152,000 
Chile 140,000 


Brit. S. Africa 3,924,000 
Canada 7,250,000 
Egypt 1,945,000 
Russia 2,095,000 


Egypt 17,'077,'000 


Italy 41,425,000 
Norway 4,639,000 
Spain 35,677,000 
Un. kingdom.. 154,437.000 
Un. States... 57,407,000 

RICH. 
Exports 
Brit. India.. 4,520,152,000 
France 59,389000 


Un. kingdom.. 436,019,000 

CHEESE. 

Exports 


Formosa 22,936,000 
Imports 
Argentina ... 3,103,000 
British India. 8,816,000 
Brit. S. Africa 6,374,000 
Canada 39 035 000 


igg_ && Italy 65.409.000 


Un. kingdom.. 5,031,000 

RUBBER. 

Exports 
Bolivia 9,887,000 
Brazil 73,924,000 
Peru 5 009 000 


United States. 3,797,000 
Imports 
Argentina .... 8,453,000 
Brazil 3,288,000 


Netherlands. 501,507,000 
Imports- 
Brazil 14,407,000 


Chile 2 787 000 


China 22,684,000 
Russia 159,992,000 


Brit. S. Africa 5,300,000 
Cuba 4,229,000 


British India. 331, 065, 000 
China . . 903 235 000 


Utd. kingdom. 317. 664,000 
United States. 97,816,000 

COFFEE 
Exports Pounds. 
Brazil .-. 1,490,715,000 
British India 39,973,000 
Colombia ... 136.500,000 
Costa Rica.. 39,059,000 
Nicaragua .. 22,817,000 
Salvador ... 76,425,000 
Un. 'States.. 48,179,000 
Venezuela .. 121,000,000 
Imports 
Argentina .. 30,925,000 
B. S. Africa. 25,820,000 
Cuba 17,672,000 


Venezuela ' 252^000 
Imports 
Canada 5,108,000 


Egypt 5,953,000 
Italy 9,836,000 
Russia 4,048,000 
Spain 5,150,000 


Cuba 254*150000 


Egypt 110,9331000 
France 591,380,000 
Netherlands. . .774,456,000 
Philippines ..213,673,000 
Un . k i ngdom . . 756 , 144 , 000 
Un. States.... 225.064, 000 

HOPS 

Exports 
Russia 253,000 
Utd. kingdom.. 1,117,000 
United States.11,056,000 
Imports 
British India.. 118,000 
Brit. S. Africa 442,000 
Canada 1,613,000 
Russia 228,000 
Utd. kingdom.. 9,362,000 
United States. 7,483,000 

SUGAR. 

Exports 
Argentina .. 142.616,000 
Brazil 70.239,000 
Brit. India . 43,207,000 
China 19.040.000 
Cuba 5,574.683,000 
Egypt 29,398,000 
Peru 389,488.000 1 
Philippines . 521,385,000 
Russia 257,484.000 
Un. kingd'm 33,975,000 
Imports 
Argentina .. 14,468,000 
Brit. India.. 1,211,769,000! 

I 

Year. 

1897 


Russia 25,026,000 
Un. kingdom.. 41,596,000 
United States.143,065,000 

WOOD PULP. 

Exports 
Canada 849,766,000 
Norway 1,390,451,000 
Russia 6 500 000 


Un. kingdom.. 266,591,000 
United States. 55,477,000 
WOOL. 
Exports 
Argentina ....258,533,000 
Australia 414,286,000 
Brit. India.... 44,705,000 
Br. S. Africa.152,851,000 
Chile 27 043 000 


Un. States.. 24,674,000 
Imports 
Argentina .. 51,441,000 
Italy 193,943,000 
Russia 62,800,000 
Spain 87,233,000 
Un. kingdom2,201, 302,000 
Un. States.. 1,351,130, 000 

BUTTER. 

Exports 
Argentina .... 7,676,000 
Australia 56,163000 


China 44,821,000 


Peru 10 665 000 


Russia 16,431,000 


Egypt 13,116,000 
Italy 62,176,000 
Norway 25,665,000 
Russia 18,214,000 
Spain 30,280,000 
Un. kingdom 28,846,000 
Un. States.. 1,011,072,000 
ROSIN. 

Exports- 
Russia 41,494,000 
Spain 19,148,000 


Un. kingdom.. 38,848,000 
Uruguay 98 298 000 


Imports 
Brit. India.... 22,749,000 
Canada 9,51f,000 
Russia 64,172,000 
Un. kingdom.. 498,192,000 
United States. 260,193,000 

[PORTS BY YEARS. 

1910 $871 158 425 


Canada . . . . 2 500 000 


"AGRICULTURAL EJ 
1901 $951 628 331 


United States.489,580,000 
Imports 
Argentina .... 35,463,000 


1902 857,113.533 
1903 878,480,557 
1904 859,160.264 


1911 . 1,030,794.402 


1912 1.050,627.131 
1913 1,123.021.469 


British India. 3,535,000 
Canada 22,883,000 
Chile 4,515,000 


1906 976,047.104 
1907 1,054,405,416 
1908 1 017 396 404 


1915 1,470,000,000- 


'Domestic, from the 
United States. 

f Animals and % 
animal products. 
Value. JPct. 
$1,441,739,093 36.4 
1,579,376,282 36.4 
1,718,365,561 36.4 
1,817,653,243 36.3 
1,916,940,925 36.2 
2,016,228,607 36.0 
2,115,516,288 35.9 
2,140,102,135 35.0 
2,261,344,604 36.0 
2,501,076,070 37.0 
2,726,876,783 36.4 
2,792,332,973 35.4 
3,071,000,000 35.9 
3,551,017,194 39.3 
3,257,116,809 36.9 
3,500,569,700 37.5 
3,716,753,549 37.7 
3,783,276,511 38.2 
3,849,397,741 36.7 


Cuba 4,239,000 


1909 $903.238.122 


STIMATED VALUE C 

Total. 

.. $3.960.821.685 


IF FARM PRODUCTS. 

, Crops. N 

Value. JPct. 
$2,519,082,592 63.6 
2,759,569,547 63.6 
2,998,704,412 63.6 
3,191,941,763 63.7 
3,385,179,114 63.8 
3,578,416,465 64.0 
3,771,653,816 64.1 
3,981.675,866 65.0 
4,012,652,758 64.0 
4,263,134,353 63.0 
4,761,111,839 63.6 
5,098,292,549 64.6 
5,487,161,223 64.1 
5,486,373,550 60.7 
5,562,058,150 63.1 
5,842,220,449 62.5 
6,132,758,962 62.3 
6,111,684,020 61.8 
6,652,288,634 63.3 
. ^Percentage of whole. 


1898. 4 338 945 829 


1899* . .. .. 4,717,069,973 


1900. . 5 009 595 006 


1901 5,302,120,039 
190'' K M4 R45 (\79. 


1903 


5.887,170,104 
fi 121 778 001 


1904 


1905 6,273,997,362 
1906 . .. fi 7fi4 ?10 4?2 


19Q7 
190S 
1909 5 


7,487,988,622 
7,890,625,522 
8,558,161,223 
, 9.037.390.744 


1910 


19 1 ! 8 819 174 9^9 


191i> 9,342,790,149 
19:3 9,849,512,511 


1914 9 894 960 531 


1915-f .. 10501686375 


*Census. fPreliminary 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



139 



ESTIMATED VALUE PER 

, Plow lands, 1916 x 
Av.for Av.for Av.for 
State and division. poor. good. all. 
Maine . *21 nn $4^ nn $99 nn 


ACRE OF FARM LAND. 


Without improvements. With improvements. 
1916. 1915. 1912. 1916. 1915. 1912 
$17.00 $15.00 $15.00 $37.00 $36.00 $36.00- 
18.00 15.00 15.00 38.00 37.00 34.00 
23.00 21.00 15.00 40.00 37.00 34.00- 
36.00 32.00 26.00 75.00 72.00 66.00 
50.00 50.00 39.00 100.00 95.00 60.00- 
33.00 31.00 28.00 62.00 60.00 55.00 
42.00 39.00 36.00 67.00 63.00 65.00 
55.00 50.00 E6..DO 100.00 90.00 93.00 
41.00 37.00 35.00 65.00 64.00 53.00 


New Hampshire . . . 


... 24.00 50 00 37 00 


Vermont . 


9g 00 57 00 41 00 


Massachusetts 


34.00 91 00 6** 00 


Rhode Island 


41 00 80 00 60 00 


Connecticut 


34.00 70.00 49.00 


New York 


. ... 34.00 68.00 53.00 
.... 43.00 89.00 65.00 
.... 32.00 66.00 50.00 


Pennsylvania 
North Atlantic .... 


.. 32.12 66.41 50.17 
.... 33.00 68.00 50.00 
. . . 28.00 57.00' 46.00 
22 00 46 00 34 00 


36.71 33.48 31.25 64.30 61.41 57.97 
43.00 38.00 37.00 64.00 63.00 60.00 
40.00 35.00 27.00 60.00 56.00 42.00 
28.00 23.00 22.00 42.00 34.00 34.00 
27.00 22.00 21.00 39.00 34.00 32.00 
23.00 20.00 17.00 37.00 33.00 28.00 
21.00 18.00 20.00 32.00 30.00 34.00 
18.00 15.00 16.00 28.00 24.00 26.00 
23.00 18.00 21.00 52.00 40.00 45.00 


Maryland 
Virginia 


West Virginia 
North Carolina 


. ... 22.00 49.00 36.00 
21 00 42 00 31 00 


South Carolina 
Georgia 


. ... 20.00 42.00 31.00 
16 00 32 00 24 00 


Florida 


.. . 19.00 35.00 26.00 


South Atlantic .. 




. ... 19.95 40.81 30.52 


23.79 30.00 19.36 38.02 33.06 32.16 
67.00 63.00 56.00 91.00 86.00 77.00 
78.00 72.00 64.00 98.00 90.00 82.00 
106.00 100.00 96.00 130.00 126.00 119.00 
42.00 35.00 31.00 65.00 61.00 54.00 
62.00 52.00 43.00 90-00 80.00 63.00 


Ohio 


52.00 95 00 75 00 




.... 57.00 106.00 84.00 
. ... 80.00 139.00 115.00 
32 00 64 00 51 00 


Illinois 


Wisconsin 

N. C. E. Miss. R.., 
Minnesota 


. ... 51.00 92.00 74.00 


.. 59.56 107.33 86.84 
45 00 73 00 61 00 


74.95 68.48 62.27 100.67 94.89 85.92 
54.00 50.00 41.00 75.00 70.00 56.00 
125.00 108.00 83.00 153.00 134,00 106.00 
50.00 43.00 37.00 65.00 59.00 54.00 
29.00 26.00 24.00 37.00 34.00 30.00 
47.00 45.00 37.00 60.00 58.00 48.00 
62.00 56..00 58.00 76.00 71.00 74.00 
45.00 40.00 39.00 58.00 53.00 53.00 




....101.00 156.00 135.00 
42 00 74 00 59 00 




North Dakota 


. .. 22.00 36.00 30.00 


South Dakota 


. ... 40.00 61.00 53.00 




49 00 85 00 72 00 




36 00 6 00 51 00 


N. C. W Miss R.. 




. 49 91 81 38 68 68 


59.68 53.14 46.54 78.21 71.12 62.67 
29.00 26.00 23.00 41.00 38.00 33.00 
29.00 25.00 20.00 42.00 38.00 33.00 
13.00 12.00 12.00 20.00 20.00 19.00 
14.00 11.00 12.00 23.00 20.00 20.00 
19.00 19.00 20.00 27.00 30.00 35.00 
28.00 26.00 22.00 39.00 39.00 36.00 
23.00 20.00 20.00 31.00 29.00 29.00 
16.00 12.00 12.00 27.00 24.00 24.00 


Kentucky 


22 00 47 00 35 00 


Tennessee 


... 22 00 53.00 ' 37 00 


Alabama 


12 00 21 00 16 00 


Mississippi 


. . . 12.00 26.00 18.00 
15 00 31 00 24 00 


Louisiana 


Texas 


2'* 00 45 00 34 00 


Oklahoma . . 


17 00 36 00 27 00 


Arkansas 


... 14.00 31.00 22 00 


S. Central 




. .. 17.92 37.93 28 04 


24.09 21.68 19.34 33.38 31.83 29.96 
24.00 22.00 21.00 34.00 35.00 36.00 
22.00 20.00 18.00 33.00 35.00 32.00 
42.00 35.00 40.00 60.00 65.00 66.00 
30.00 27.00 23.00 45.00 50.00 48.00 
60.00 55.00 50.00 80.00 90.00 80.00 
65.00 60.00 45.00 90.00 85.00 80.00 
55.00 40.00 31.00 85.00 85.00 70.00 
49.00 44.00 45.00 64.00 66.00 66.00 
64.00 58.00 50.00 102.00 99.00 100.00 
48.00 45.00 46.00 70.00 75.00 75.00 
110.00 100.00 70.00 180.00 175.00 107.00 

58.40 52.55 43.61 102.58 102.00 80.92 
45.55 40.85 36.23 69.45 64.82 57.89 

[TIES OF THE UNITED STATES. 

report for 1910.] 

Per Per 

Counties. acre, capita. 
LaSalle Co., 111. . . . $17 $113 


Montana i 


17 00 40 00 29 00 


Wyoming 


.... 18.00 34.00 27.00 


Colorado 


27.00 68 00 50 00 




20 00 42 00 31 00 


Arizona 
Utah 


... 50.00 100.00 80.00 
38 00 80 00 60 00 


Nevada 
Idaho 


. ... 32.00 80.00 60.00 
34 00 68 00 53 00 


Washington 


. . . 45.00 110.00 75.00 
36 00 80 00 60 00 




California 
Far Western 


... 50.00 135.00 95.00 
. . . 36.78 89.72 64 44 


United States '..... 
BANNER 

Counties. 
Los Angeles Co., Cal.. 


... 40.08 72.79 58.39 

AGRICULTURAL COUL 

[From government 

Rank. Val. products. 
1 $14,720.900 


Lancaster Co., Pa 


.. 2 13,059,600 


McLean Co., til 


3 12 811 500 


Aroostook Co., Me '. 23 138 
*City of Los Angeles with population of 320.- 
000 accounts for low per capita rate. 
PRINCIPAL CROPS RAISED. 
Los Angeles Co.. Cal. Fruits, hay, live stock, 
dairy products, vegetables. 
Lancaster Co., Pa. Corn, wheat, oats, live 
stock, dairy products. 
McLean Co., 111. Corn, wheat, oats, cereals. 
Whitman Co., Wash. Corn, wheat, oats, cereals. 
Livingston Co., 111. Corn, wheat, oats, cereals. 
Iroquois Co., 111. Corn, wheat, oats, cereals. 
LaSalle Co., 111. Corn, wheat, oats, cerpnls. 
Arcostook Co., Me. Potatoes and other vege- 
tables. 


Whitman Co Wash 


4 12 540 700 


Livingston Co.. 111. .. 
Iroquois Co., Ill 
LaSalle Co.. Ill 
Aroostook Co. , Me 


5 11.377.300 
6 10,607,800 
7 10.222.200 
8 10 151 000 


VALUE PER ACRE 

Counties. 
Los Angeles Co Cal 


AND PER CAPITA. 
Per Per 
acre, capita. 

$35 *$9 


Lancaster Co.. Pa 
McLean Co 111 


28 78 

18 188 


Whitman Co., Wash. . 
Livingston Co., Ill 


14 377 


18 188 


Iroquois Co., 111. 


. 16 293 



140 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 



FARMS AND FARM PROPERTY IN THE UNITED 

[From census bureau report.] 
SUMMARY I 

Population 

Urban population! 

Rural population:! 

Number of all farms 

Land area of the country, acres 

Land in farms, acres 

Improved laud in farms, acres 

Average icreage per farm 

Average improved acreage per farm 

Per cent of total land area in farms 

Per cent of land in farms improved 

Per cent of total land area improved 

Value of farm property, total 

Land 28,475,674,169 

Buildings 

Implements and machinery 

Domestic animals, poultry- and bees 

Average value of all property per farm 

Av. value of all property per acre of laud in farms 
Average value of laud per acre 



STATES. 



R 1910 AND 


1900. 


Increase, 


* 


1910 (Apr. 15). 


1900 (June 1). 


Amount. 


i'r. ct. 


91,972,266 


75,994,575 


15,977,691 


21.0 


42,623,383 


31,609,645 


11.013,738 


34.8 


49,348,883 


44,384,930 


4,963.953 


11.2 


6,361,502 


5,737,372 


624,130 


10.9 


1,903,289,600 


1,903,461,760 


172.160 




878,798,325 


838,591,774 


40,206,551 


' 4!s 


478,451,750 


414,498,487 


63,953,263 


15.4 


138.1 


146.2 


8.1 


5.5 


75.2 


72.2 


3.0 


4.2 


46.2 


44.1 






54.4 


49.4 






25 1 


21.8 






$40,991,449,090 


$20,439,901,164 


$20,551,547,926 


100.5 


28,475,674,169 


13,058,007,995 


15,417,666,174 


118.1 


6,325,451,528 


3,556,639,496 


2,768,812,032 


77.8 


1,265,149,783 


749,775,970 


515,373,813 


68.7 


4,925,173,610 


3,075,477,703 


1,849,695,907 


60.1 


6,444 


3,563 


2,881 


80.9 


46.64 


24.37 


22.27 


91.4 


32.40 


15.57 


16.83 


108.1 



*A minus sign ( ) denotes decrease. fPopula- 
tion of incorporated places having, in 1910, 2,500 
or more inhabitants. The figure for 1900 does not 
represent the urban population according to that 

FARMS, FARM LAND AND FARM PROPERTY (1870 

1910. 1900. 1890. 

Population 91,972,266 75,994,575 62,947,714 

Number of all farms 6,361,502 5,737,372 4,564,641 

Land area of the country, acres 1,903,289,600 1,903,461,760 1,903,337,600 

Laud in farms, acres 878,798,325 838,591,774 623,218,619 

Improved land in farms, acres 478,451,750 414,498,487 357,616,755 

Average acreage per farm 138.1 146.2 136.5 

Average improved acreage per farm 75.2 72.2 78.3 

Fer cent of total land area in farms 46.2 44.1 32.7 

Per cent of land in farms improved. 54.4 49.4 57.4 

Per cent of total land area improved 25.1 21.8 18.8 

Value of farm property, total $40,991,449,090 $20,439, 901, 164$16, 082,267,689 

Land and buildings , 34,801,125,69* 16,614,647,49113,279,252,649 

Implements and machinery 1,265,149,783 749,775,970 494,247,467 

Domestic animals.poultry and bees 4,925.173,610 3,075,477,703 2,308,767,573 

A v. value of all property per farm... 6,444 3,563 3,523 
Average value of all property per acre 

of land in farms 46.64 24.37 25.81 

Average value of land and buildings 

per acre 39.60 19.81 21.31 

AGRICULTURAL INCREASE SINCE 1850. 



census, but is the population in that year of the 
territory classified as urban in 1910. JTotal, ex- 
clusive of urban. 



TO 1900). 

1880. 

50,155,783 

4,008,907 

1,903,337,600 

536,081,835 

284,771,042 

133.7 

71.0 

28.2 

E3.1 

15.0 

$12,180,501,538 

10,157,096,776 

406,526,055 

1,576,884,707 

3,038 

22.72 
19.02 



1870. 

38,558,371 

2,659,985 

1,903,337,600 

407,735,041 

188,921,099 

153.3 

71.0 

21.4 

46.3 

9.9 

$8,944,857,749 

7,444,054,462 

270,913,678 

1,229,889,609 

3,363 

21.94 
18.26 



Period. Population. 

1900-1910 15,977.691 

1890-1900 13,046,861 

1880-1890 12,791,931 

1870-1880 11,597,412 

1860-1870 7,115,050 

1850-1860 8,251,445 



1880-1910 Amount 41,816,483 

Per cent 83.4 

1850-1880 Amount 26,963,907 

Per cent 116.3 



1850-1910 Amount 
Per cent 



Farms. 

624,130 
1,172,731 

555,734 
1,248,922 

615,908 

595,004 

2,352,595 

58.7 

2,559,834 
176.6 



Acres.* 
40,206,551 

215,373.155 
87,136,784 

128,346,794 
522,503 

113,651,924 

342,716,490 
63.9 

242,521,221 
82.6 



Improved. f 
63,953,263 
56,881,732 
72,845,713 
95,849,943 
25,810,379 
50,078,106 


Value.t 

$20,551,547,926 
4,357,633,475 
3,901,766,151 
3,235,643,789 
964,364.686 
4,013,149,483 


193,680,708 
68.0 
171,738,428 
151.9 


28,810,947,552 
236.5 
8,213,157,958 
207.0 



4,912,429 585,237,711 365,419,136 

296.6 339.0 199.4 323.3 

'In farms, t Improved land in farms. JOf farm property. 



Division. 
New England 


NUMBER OF FARM 
Total. Owners. 
188,802 168,408 


OPERATORS (1910). 
Total number farm 
managers, 58.104; negro 
owners, 678,118 tenants E 

WHITE FARMER 
Born in Number. 
United States.. 4.763.25C 
Austria 33.336 
Hungary 3.827 
England 39.72.S 
Ireland 33.180 
Scotland 10.220 
Wales 4.110 
France 5.832 
Germany 221 800 


tenants, 2.354,676; farm 
farmers, 920,883 (241,221 
ud 1,544 managers). 

S BY NATIVITY. 
Born in Number. 
Poland 7 228 


Middle Atlantic 


. .. 468 379 355, Oo6 


East North Control 


1 123 489 809.044 


West North Central 
South Atlantic 


1,109,948 758.946 
1 111 881 593 154 


East South Central 


1 042 480 510 452 


West South Central 


943,186 440,905 


Denmark 28 375 


Mountain 


183,446 160,844 


Norway 59.742 
Sweden 67.543 
Switzerland .... 14.333 
Other European 17.689 
Canada 61.873 


Pacific 


189,891 151,933 


United States 




6 361 502 3,948,722 


The North 


. 2 890 618 2 091,434 


The South 


3 097 547 1 544 511 


All other 10.333 
Not reported 7.807 

Total 5.440.619 


The West 


373 337 312 777 


East of Mississippi river.. 
West of MississlDDl rivor. 


3,935,031 2,436,094 
...2.426.471 1,512.628 


Holland 13.790 
Italy .. 10.614 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR J917. 



141 



State. 
Alabama 
Arizona 
Arkansas 
California 


White. Colored. 
. 152,458 110.443 
6.024 3.203 
. 151.085 63.593 
72,542 3,078 


FARMERS BY 

State. 
Maine 
Maryland 
Massachusetts . 
Michigan 
Minnesota 


STATES (1910). 
White. Colored. 
. 59,987 29 
. 42,551 6,372 
. 36.793 12-1 
. 206,014 946 

Inn 844 293 


State. 
Oklahoma 
Oregon 
Pennsylvania . 
Rhode Island.. 
South Carolina. 
South Dakota.. 
Tennessee 


White. Colored. 
. 169,521 20,671 
. 44,875 627 
. 218,749 546 
5,251 41 
. 70,636 96,798 
. 74,836 2.808 
. 207,704 33.308 


Colorado 
Connecticut . . . 
Delaware 
Dist. Columbia 
Florida 


. 45.596 574 
26.702 113 
9.914 U22 
205 12 
. 35.295 14,721 
168 468 122 559 


Mississippi 109,645 164,737 
Missouri 273,578 3,666 
Montana 25,018 1,196 
Nebraska 129.216 462 
Nevada 2,528 161 
New "Hampshire 27,038 15 
New Jersey 33,011 476 
New Mexico 33,528 2,148 
New York 214 ?; Q?Q 


Texas 
Utah 


. 347.852 69.918 
21 400 276 


Vermont 


. 32,689 20 


Idaho . 


. 30,402 405 


Virginia 
Washington . . 
West Virginia. 


. 135.904 48,114 
. 55,067 1,125 
. 95,977 708 
176 536 591 


Illinois 
Indiana 
Iowa 
Kansas 


. 250,447 1,425 
. 214,680 805 
. 216,843 201 
. 176,150 1.691 


North Carolina. 
North Dakota.. 
Ohio 


. 188,069 65,656 
. 73,617 743 
270 095 1 950 


Wyoming 

Tntnl 


. 10,922 65 


Louisiana 65.667 54.879 
NOTE Colored farmers include 
760 Chinese and 2,502 Japanese. 1 
her of Indian farmers were fou 
(7.459). Arizona (3.159). South Dal 


K 440 R19 99(1 882 


24,251 Indians, 
"he largest ntim- 
id in Oklahoma 
wta (2.740). New 


Mexico (2.087). North Carolina (1.987) Montana 
(1.146), New York (635) Washington (673). Cali- 
fornia (628) and Wisconsin (541). There were 512 
Chinese and 1,816 Japanese farmers in California. 



CROPS OF THE UNITED STATES IN 1909. 
[Officially reported by the bureau of the census.] 



179,733 
7,129,294 
19,415,816 
19,512,765 

6,671,348 



Later and detailed figures on the principal 
crops are given elsewhere in this volume. 

Crop. Production. Value. 

Cereals, bu 4,512,564,465 $2,665,539,714 

1,438,553,919 
414,697,422 
657,656,801 
92,458,571 
9,330,592 
20,421,812 
10,816,940 
5,584,050 
16,019,607 
97,536,085 
21,771,482 
241,060 
10,963,739 
18,271,515 
28,970,554 
768,625 
15,137,683 
1,411,013 
824,004,877 
104,302,856 
703,619,303 
121,076,984 
61,648,942 
19,880,724 
10,174,457 
26,415,952 
5.177,809 
18,068,658 
5,134,434 
412,699 
7,844.745 
4,676,780 
418,110.154 
166,423,910 
35,429,176 
216,257,068 
222,024,216 
29,974,431 
17,913,926 
3,909,831 
5,132,277 
1,755,613 



Corn, bu 2,552,189,630 

Oats, bu 1,007,142,980 

Wheat, bu 683,379,259 

Barley, bu 173,344,212 

Buckwheat, bu 14,849,332 

Rye, bu 29,520,457 

Kafir corn, bu 17,597,305 

Emmer, spelt, bu 12,702,710 

Rough rice, bu 21,838,580 

Other grains, seeds 

Dry edible beans, bu... 11,251,160 

Other beans, bu 

Dry peas, bu 

Peanuts, bu 

Flaxseed, bu 

Miscellaneous seeds 

Grass seed, bu 

Flower, vegetable seeds 

Hay and forage, tons 97,453,735 

Tobacco, Ibs 1,055,764,806 

Cotton, bales 10,649,268 

Cotton seed, tons 5,324,634 

Sugar crops 

Sugar beets, tons 3,392,857 

Sorghum cane, tons 1,647,262 

Sugar cane, tons 6,240,260 

Maple sugar and sirup 

Minor crops 

Broom corn, Ibs 78,959,958 

Hemp, Ibs 7,483,295 

Hops, Ibs 40,718,748 

All other 

Vegetables 

Potatoes, bu 389,194.965 

Sweet potatoes, bu 59,232,070 

Other vegetables 

Fruits and nuts 

Small fruits, qts 426,565,863 

Strawberries, qts 255,702,035 

Blackberries, qts 55,343,570 

Raspberries, qts 60,918,196 

Cranberries, qts 38,243.060 

All other, qts 16,359,002 

Apples, bu 147,522.318 

Peaches, bu 35,470,276 

Pears, bu 8,840,733 

Plums, prunes, bu 15,480,170 

Cherries, bu 4,126.099 

Apricots, bu 4,150,263 

All other, bu 493,836 

Grapes, Ibs 2,571,065,205 

Tropical fruits. 



Crop. Production. Value. 

Pineapples, crates 778,651 $734,090 

Olives. Ibs 16,405,493 404.574 

All other 143,467 

Nuts, Ibs 62,328,010 4,447,674 

Almonds, Ibs 6,673,539 711,970 

Pecans, Ibs 9,890,769 971,596 

Walnuts, Ibs 22,026,524 2,297,336 

All other, Ibs 23,617,178 466,772 

Flowers, plants 34,872,329 

Nursery products 21,050,822 

Forest farm products 195,306.283 

Total all crops 5,487,161,223 

Total, 1899 2,998,704,412 



KAFIR CORN AND MILO MAIZE 

State. Acres. Bushels. 

Arkansas 1.294 

California 44, 



Colorado 11.971 

Kansas 388,495 

Missouri 15,543 

Nebraska 2,016 

New Mexico 63,570 

Oklahoma 532,515 

Texas 573,384 



15,284 
938,049 
139,234 
5,115,415 
228,386 
20,212 
543.350 
4,658,752 
__5, 860, 444 
177597,305 
5,169,113 



Value. 

$12,074 

725,704 

94,486 

3,046,799 

152,246 
15,712 

392,393 
2,531,036 
3.785,453 

10,816,940 
1,367,040 



United States 1,635,153 

Total, 1899 266,513 

"Kafir corn and milo maize are cereals belong- 
ing to the millet family and used in this country 
mainly as feed for live stock. They are making 



headway as dry 
light rainfall. 



farming crops in sections of 



LARGEST YIELD PER ACRE OF VARIOUS 

CROPS. 
[Reported by United States department of 

agriculture. ] 

(The figures are for 1915 and are in each case 
only for areas of from one to fifty acres.) 
Wheat 117 bushels, Island county, Wash. ; sec- 
ond largest, 108 bushels, Twin Falls county, 

Oats 183.7 bushels, Skagit county, Wash. ; sec- 
ond, 166 bushels, Logan county, Col. 

Barley 122.5 bushels. Twin Falls county, Idaho; 
second. 116 bushels, same county. 



Oranges, boxes 

Lemons, lx>xes 

Grapefruit, boxes. 
Figs, Ibs. 



19.487,481 
2,770,313 
1,189,250 

35.060.395 

Orchard fruits, bu 216,083,695 



1,262,834 ' Flaxseed 30 bushels, Fergus and Teton counties, 

83.231,492 Mont. ; second, 29 bushels, Potter county, S. D., 

28,781,078 and Ottertail county, Minn. 

7,910,600 White potatoes 790 bushels, Eldorado county, 

10,299,495 Cal. ; second, 743 bushels, Yakima county, 

7,231,160 Wash. 

2,884,119 'Sweet potatoes 600 bushels, Roane county, 

529,403 Tenn. ; second, 575 bushels, Williamsburg coun- 

22,027,961 ty, S. C. 

24,706,753 Tobacco 3,000 pounds, Effingham county, Ga. ; 

17,566,464 second 2,500 pounds, Jefferson county, Ind. 

2,993,738 Cotton 6.000 pounds, Toombs county, Ga. ; sec- 

2,060,610 ond, 5,000 pounds, Fannin county, Tex. 

803.810 Rye 54 bushels, Lincoln county, Neb. ; second, 

$140,867,347 47 bushels, Roseau county, Minn. 



142 



ALM1NAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 3917. 



HISTORY OF THE COMMISSION FORM OF GOVERNMENT. 

[From census bureau report.] 



Washington, D. C., which came under the com- 
mission plan on June 11, 1878, by act of con- 
gress, was the first city in the United States to 
adopt permanently this form of government. The 
application of the commission plan to the capi- 
tal of the United States grew out of the relation 
of the national government to the federal city, 
and the capital was not at that time considered 
an example to other municipalities. The real 
beginning of the movement toward commission 
government in American cities was made in Gal- 
veston, Tex., in 1901. A destructive storm hav- 
ing overwhelmed the city in 1900, leaving it 
prostrate financially, the government was placed 
in the hands of a commission in the following 
year. The experience of Galveston under the 
commission plan was such that in 1905 it was 
adopted by Houston, Tex. Three more cities 
adopted the commission form in the calendar 



year 1907, two in 



eight in 1909, seven in 



1910. fourteen in 1911, fourteen in 1912, twenty 
in 1913. seven in 1914 and three in the early part 
of 1915. According to the latest information 
available six more such cities recently have 
adopted the plan by popular vote, and in four 
it alrea 



of them 



Iready has gone into effect. Thus 



there are eighty-five cities of more than 30,000 in- 
lia"bitants which are governed by commissions at 
this time (Feb. 1, 1916). These cities vary 
in population from 32,800 inhabitants in Boise, 
Idaho, to 465,000 in Buffalo, N. Y., and are 
scattered throughout twenty-seven states, in ad- 
dition to the District of Columbia, ranging from 
Massachusetts to Washington and from South 
Carolina to California. Five of them are in New 
England, thirty in other northern states east 
of the Mississippi, sixteen in northern states 
between the Mississippi river and the Pacific 
coast states, nine in the Pacific coast states and 
twenty-five in the south. 

The total population of the eighty-five com- 
mission cities on Feb. 1, 1916, is estimated at 
7,677,000, or 41 per cent of the aggregate popu- 
lation of the 195 cities of 30,000 to 500,000 inhabi- 
tants which were covered by the bureau's latest 
inquiry. Confining the figures to cities of 30,000 
to 300,000 inhabitants, there are now operating 
under the commission form eighty-two such 
cities, with a total population of 6,480,000, or 45 
per cent of the aggregate population of the 184 
cities within these size limits. During the last 
ten years the commission plan also has been 
adopted by many cities of fewer than 30,000 in- 
habitants. 

COMMISSION-MANAGER CITIES. 
Corrected to April 1, 1916. 

Popu- Date in. 

City. . iation. operation. 

nmter, S. C 8,109 Jan., 1913 

Hickory, N. C 3,706 May, 1913 

Morganton, N. C 2,712 May, 1913 

Dayton, 116,577 Jan., 1914 

Springfield, 46,921 Jan., 1914 

Phoenix, Ariz 11,134 Jan., 1914 

La Grande. Ore 4,843 Jan., 1914 

Amarillo, Tex 9.957 Jan., 1914 

Cadillac, Mich 8,375 Jan., 1914 

Manistee, Mich 12,381 April, 1914 

Montrose, Col 3,252 Jan., 1914 

Taylor, Tex 5,314 April, 1914 

Denton, Tex 4,732 May, 1914 

Collinsville, Okla 1,324 Sept., 1914 

Lakeland, Fla 3,719 May, 1914 

Big Rapids. Mich 4,519 1914 

Jackson, Mich 31,433 Jan., 1915 

Sherman, Tex 12,412 April, 1915 

Bakersfield, Cal 12,727 April, 1915 

Beaufort, S. C 2,486 April, 1915 

Tyler. Tex 10,400 April, 1915 

Newburgh, N. Y 27,805 Jan., 1916 

Sandusky, 19,989 Jan., 1916 

AshtrJmla, 18,266 Jan. 1. 1916 

Niagara Fails, N. Y 30.445 Jan., 1916 

Wheeling, W. Va 41,641 Jan., 1917 

Alpena, Mich 12,706 April, 1916 



Popu- Date in 

Iation. operation. 

Santa Barbara, Cal 11,659 Jan. 1, 1916 

10,321 April, 1916 

5,494 April, 1915 

.,vom,,i t , v 1,903 Jan. 1, 1916 

Elizabeth City, N. C 8,412 1915 

Webster City, Iowa 5,208 Jan. 1, 1916 

San Jose, Cal 28,946 July 1, 1916 

26,730 Jan. 1, 1917 

33,190 
5,1 



City. 



San Angelo, Tex 

St. Augustine, Fla 

Westerville, 



Watertown, N. Y. 
Portsmouth, Va. 



Jan. 1. 1916 
Jan. 1, 1916 



Albion, Mich 

Brownsville, Tex 10,517 

In addition there are officers called managers 
in the following towns, which do not have com- 
mission-manager charters or lack some of the 
fundamental features of the plan ; Staunton and 
Fredericksburg, Va. ; Norwood, Mass. ; Inglewood 
and San Diego, Cal. ; Glencoe and River Forest, 
111. ; Grove City and Titusville, Pa. ; Morris, 
Minn. ; Clarinda and Iowa Falls, Iowa ; Clark, 
R. D. ; Tucson, Ariz.; Roswell, N. M. ; Terrell, 
Tex. ; Grand Haven, Mich. ; Alhambra, Cal. In 
Canada: Port Arthur, Ont., and Mailsonneuve, 
P. Q. 

There are statewide laws permitting cities to 
adopt this plan in Massachusetts, New York, 
Virginia, Ohio and Iowa. 

Salaries of city managers range from $1,500 to 
$12,500 a year, H. M. Waite of Dayton, O., re- 
ceiving the latter sum. 



FOTJRTH OF JULY CASUALTIES. 
[Journal of the American Medical Association. 1 
1911. 1912. 1913. 1914. 1915. 1916. 
Deaths Tetanus ... 10 6 3 3 1 
Other causes 47 35 29 37 29 30 



Total 

One eye lost 

Loss of legs, arms 

and hands 

Loss of fingers 



Other injuries 1,339 

Total injured 1.546 



852 1,051 1.367 1,081 777 
947 1,131 1,466 1,135 820 



Total casualties.. 1.603 988 1,163 1,506 1,165 850 
Total casualties in 1903. 4,449: in 1904, 4.169: in 

1905, 5.176; in 1906. 5.466: in 1907, 4,412; in 1908, 

5,623; in 1909, 5,307; in 1910, 2,923. 

THE PUBLIC DOMAIN. 

Acreage of unreserved and unappropriated lands 
remaining in the public domain of the United 
States in 1916. Approximately 92,000,000 acres are 
unsurveyed. 

State. Acres. 

Montana 16,649.725 

146.256 



Acres. 



42.680 



State. 

Alabama . . . 
Arizona ... 
Arkansas . 
California . 
Colorado 14,908.12 



23,597,219 

402.219 



Florida 

Idaho 

Kansas 

Louisiana 

Michigan 

.Minnesota 
Mississippi ... 
Missouri 



135,237 

15,510,561 

56.018 

44.804 

90.540 

793.804 

30.374 

952 



Nebraska 
Nevada 



55.375.077 



New Mexico... 26,338.379 
North Dakota. 381,199 
Oklahoma .... 55,250 

Oregon 15,337.809 

South Dakota. 2.382.588 

Utah 32.968.837 

Washington .. 1.132.571 
Wisconsin .... 5.872 

Wyoming 28.528.492 

Total .254,945,589 



MICHIGAN COPPER PRODUCTION IN 1915. 

[From U. S. geological survey report.] 
The total refined copper produced amounted to 
238, 9.16, 410 pounds, as compared with 158,009,748 
pounds in 1914 and with 231,112.228 pounds in 
1912, the record production previous to 1915. At 
an average price of 17.5 cents per pound the 
copper output of Michigan had a value of about 
$41. 800,000 for 1915. The copper mines produced 
5S:>,933 ounces of silver in 1915, valued at $297,068. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



143 



STATISTICS OF EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. 

[From bureau of education reports.] 
STATE COMMON SCHOOLS (1913-1914). 







-Children. 


-, / Teachers. s 


State. 


*Number.] 


Enrolled, t^ 


Attendance. 


$Days 


.Men. ' 


Women. 


Total. 


Salaries. 1 


Dotal cost. 


Alabama 


720,707 


473,150 


292,540 


124.7 


3,007 


7,205 


10,212 


$3,451,183 


$4,840,614 


Arizona 


57,491 


44,303 


29,912 


156.0 


154 


942 


1,096 


7G5.662 


2,135,5-19 


Arkansas 


529,386 


439,624 


298,597 


129.7 


4,560 


5,801 


10,361 


3,287,793 


4,360,985 


California 


536,135 


480,002 


374,493 


174.1 


2,368 


13,250 


15,618 


16,314,791 


26,579,804 


Colorado 


212,842 


178,392 


118,972 


171.0 


944 


5,127 


6,071 


4,105,927 


6,602,130 


Connecticut 


275.975 


211,975 


168,060 


184.7 


333 


5,434 


5,867 


4,180,269 


8,108,003 


Delaware 


51,888 


35,950 


22,560 


170.0 


115 


830 


945 


" 415,000 


610,000 


Dist. of Columbia 


70,322 


56,563 


46,591 


174.0 


222 


1,520 


1,742 


1,863,716 


2,695,035 


Florida 


234,493 


177,154 


126,565 


122.9 


1,074 


3,808 


4,882 


1,644,481 


2,769,335 


Georgia 


886,818 


615,044 


401,713 


140.0 


2,969 


10,958 


13,927 


4,161,256 


5,505,295 


Idaho 


113,348 


92,437 


69,398 


152,0 


665 


2,479 


3,144 


2,067,943 


3,821,138 


Illinois 


1,473,347 


1,043,227 


908,906 


161.0 


5,889 


26,064 


31,953 


21,476,465 


39,007,314 


Indiana 


694,311 


548,497 


441,168 


156.2 


5,811 


12,638 


18,449 


11,137,478 


19,946,938 


Iowa 


583,655 


517,559 


384,000 


174.0 


2,704 


24,378 


27,082 


10,508,556 


16,442,528 


Kansas 


471,927 


392,662 


310,803 


172.0 


2,782 


12,062 


14,844 


7,933,519 


12,210,174 


Kentucky 


690,880 


532,196 


294,550 


139.5 


4,084 


7,752 


11,836 


3,994,745 


6,746,302 


Louisiana 


555,455 


284,136 


195,670 


130.2 


1,362 


5,466 


6,828 


3,157,094 


4,829,234 


Mains 


163,602 


144,620 


113,056 


167.5 


743 


6,328 


7,071 


2,197,244 


3,874,858 


Maryland 


351,760 


245,258 


160,281 


178.0 


905 


5,091 


5,996 


3,271,251 


5,522,609 


Massachusetts 


801,752 


576,510 


486,869 


184.0 


1,773 


15,607 


17,380 


14,400,001 


25,492,292 


Michigan 


732,103 


572,201 


440,595 


172.0 


2,857 


1C, 643 


19,500 


10,541,129 


18,782,138 


Minnesota 


599,529 


457,041 


354,339 


160.0 


1,901 


15,019 


16,920 


9,795,093 


18,452,425 


Mississippi 


619,062 


492,756 


301.922 


123.0 


2,924 


8,029 


10,953 


2,173,717 


2,806,562 


Missouri 


880,323 


706,364 


515,233 


162.9 


4,441 


14,207 


18,648 


11,251,295 


17,501,867 


Montana 


99,099 


85,782 


63,686 


163.3 


526 


3,252 


3,778 


1,647,574 


4,110,417 


Nebraska 


338,130 


287,566 


214,152 


170.0 


1,449 


10,565 


12,018 


5,916,259 


10,095,680 


Nevada 


16,201 


11,710 


8,552 


160.0 


96 


48ft 


576 


417,272 


659,660 


New Hampshire . . . 


97,339 


63,004 


50,000 


171.7 


207 


2,716 


2,923 


1,070,830 


1,853,160 


New Jersey 


675,477 


496,899 


382,218 


183.0 


2,082 


13.003 


15,085 


11,430,720 


23,284,096 


New Mexico 


111,191 


67,147 


49,823 


135.0 


581 


1,222 


1,803' 


825,640 


1,336,764 


New York 


2,251,206 


1,532,151 


1,233,074 


189.9 


5,236 


43,817 


49,143 


44,359,192 


65,936,380 


North Carolina 


761,900 


599,647 


408,464 


122.0 


3,059 


10,196 


13,255 


3,191,726 


5,069,351 


North Dakota 


193,312 


148,021 


102,490 


159.0 


1,300 


6,611 


7,911 


3,443,060 


6,605,653 


Ohio 


1,188,359 


895,167 


720,442 


169.0 


8,18i 


22,173 


30,358 


17,833,325 


35,172,950 


Oklahoma 


622,741 


496,908 


322,117 


136.0 


3,771 


8,105 


11,876 


5,257,046 


7,879,906 


Oregon 


171,921 


133,819 


129,869 


155.3 


1,101 


4,650 


5,751 


3,631,211 


5,954,405 


Pennsylvania 


2,054,894 


1,401,325 


1,124,951 


172.0 


8,350 


31,246 


39,596 


23,834,408 


52,544,036 


Rhode Island 


136,807 


86,505 


68,183 


193.6 


-217 


2,369 


2,586 


1,307,051 


2,868,854 


South Carolina 


520,747 


378,669 


250,163 


104.3 


1,554 


6,119 


7,673 


2,095,789 


2,914,638 


South Dakota.... 


183,192 


130,078 


99,078 


150.0 


1,048 


5,813 


6,861 


2,795,862 


4,538,026 


Tennessee 


677.102 


593,437 


431,053 


121.5 


4,076 


8,502 


12,578 


4,035,068 


5,867,450 


Texas 


1,334,411 


830,642 


560,173 


132.0 


6,455 


15,588 


22,043 


9,815,018 


14,497,750 


Utah 


120,376 


96,678 


70,173 


162.5 


719 


2,040 


2,759 


1,845,271 


4,174,781 


Vermont 


84,089 


65,137 


51,324 


173.2 


224 


3,122 


3,346 


1,089,027 


1,964,529 


Virginia 


652,958 


427,937 


281,976 


136.3 


1,953 


9,383 


11,336 


3,474,692 


5,577,874 


Washington 


308,463 


238,663 


180,225 


176.5 


1,711 


6,928 


8,639 


7,077,754 


12,515,225 


West Virginia 


385,744 


299,135 


208,004 


137.0 


4,180 


5,640 


9,820 


3,431,873 


5,399,382 


Wisconsin 


671,634 


440,103 


323,471 


168.0 


1,692 


13,839 


15,531 


8,517,866 


13,829,203 


Wyoming 


34,827 


29,301 


24,000 


139.4 


213 


1,275 


1,488 


748,773 


1,153,847 


Total 


20,002,153 


19,153,786 


14,216,459 


158.7 


114,662 


465,396 


580,058 


323,610,915 


555,077,146 


Divisions. 




















North Atlantic.... 


6,544,063 


4,578,126 


3,677,735 


181.6 


19,255 


123,742 


142,997 


104,291,742 


185,926.208 


North Central 


8,009,822 


6,139,220 


4,814,682 


165.6 


40,059 


180,016 


220,075 


121,149,907 


212,584,896 


South Atlantic... 


3,916,630 


2,835,357 


1,906,317 


133.8 


16,031 


53,545 


69,576 


23,549,784 


36,053,519 


South Central.... 


5,749,744 


4,142,849 


2,696,622 


129.4 


30,239 


66,448 


96,687 


35,171,664 


51,468,803 


Western 


1,751,894 


1,458,234 


1,121,103 


166.2 


9,078 


41,645 


50,723 


39.447,818 


69,043,720 


*School year 1913-1914; children 5 to 18 years 


number of 


days the schools were kept in the 


of age. tAveragi 


daily attendance. 


JAverage 


year. 













COMMON SCHOOL STATISTICS BY YEARS. 



Year. . 
1870 




, Children. N 
*Number. Enrolled, t Attendance. 
12 055 443 6 871 522 4 077 347 


, Teachers. ^ 
Men. Women. Total. ^Salaries. Total cost. 
77,529 122,926 200,515 $37,832,566 $63,393,666 
122,795 163,798 286,593 55,942,972 78,094,687 
125,525 238,397 363,922 91,836,484 140,506,715 
126,588 296,474 423,062 137,687,746 214,964,618 
110,481 412,729 523,210 253,915,470 426,250,434 
110,328 423,278 533,606 266,678,471 446,726,929 
114,559 432,730 547,289 284,945,162 482,886,793 
113,342 451,118 564.460 303,537,849 534,058,580 
114,662 465,396 580,058 323,610,915 555,077,146 
y attendance. JOf superintendents and teachers. 


1880 
1890 
1900... . 




.... 15,065,767 9,867,505 6,144,143 
.... 18,543,201 12,722,581 8,153.635 
. ... 21,404,322 15,503,110 10632772 


1910 




24 360 888 17 813 852 12 8^7 307 


1911 

igi^ 




.... 24,745,562 18,035,118 12,871,980 
25 167 445 18 18 937 13 30 303 


1913 
1914 
*Ch 

Year. 

1900.... 
1901... 


Iclreu 5 

Per 
capita. 

. . .$2.82 
.. 2 93 


.... 2.". 499.928 18,523,558 13,510,643 
.... 26,002,153 19,153,786 14,216.459 
to 18 years of age. tAverage dail 


COST PER CAPITA 
Per Per Per 
pupil. Year. capita. pupil. 
$20.29 1904 $3.36 $24.14 
''1 23 1905 3 53 25 40 


AND PER PUPIL. 
Per Per 
Year. capita. pupil. 
1908 $4.27 $30.55 
1909 -.. 4.45 31.65 
1910 4.64 33.33 
1911 4.76 34.71 


Per Per 
Year. capita. pupil. 
1912 $5.05 $36.30 
1913 5.37 38.31 


1902.... 
1903.... 


... 3.03 
... 3.15 


21.53 1906 3.66 26.27 
' 22.75 1907 3.90 28.25 


1914 5.62 29.04 



144 



ALMANAC AND YEARBOOK FOR 1917. 



PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS (1915). 

Schools 11,6741 Students Boys.. ..601, 44! 

Teachers Men.... 26.950 Students Girls. ...727,540 
Teachers Women 35,569 I 



PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOLS (1915). 

Schools 2,248 I Students Boys ...73.20R 

Teachers Men ... 5,776 Students Girls .. .51,836 
Teachers Women. 8,250 I 



NORMAL SCHOOLS (1915). 



PUBLIC. 

Schools 2.2 

Teachers Men ... 1,573 
Teachers Women. 2,916 
Students Men ...18,358 
Students Women 75,942 



PRIVATE. 

Schools 

Teachers Men . . . 
Teachers Women . 
Students Men . . . 
Students Women. 



41 

165 

249 

1,620 

4,405 



UNIVERSITIES, COLLEGES AND TECHNO- 
LOGICAL SCHOOLS (1915). 

Institutions 563 

Instructors Men 26,636 

Instructors Women 5,931 

Preparatory students Men 31,596 

Preparatory students Women 16,444 

Collegiate students Men 14 1 , 679 

Collegiate students Women 79,763 

Colleges for men 145 

Undergraduate students 40,905 

Colleges for women 84 

Undergraduate students 19,179 

Coeducational colleges 334 

Undergraduate students Men 100,774 

Undergraduate students Women 60.584 

Total students 161,358 



PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS (1915). 
Theology Schools 164 

Students 10,r>88 

Law Schools 120 

Students 21,885 

Medicine Schools. 93 

Students 13,083 



Dentistry Schools. 50 
Students 9 647 

Pharmacy Schools 76 
Students 6,191 

Veterinary Schools 21 
Students 2,266 



SCHOOLS FOR BT.IND DEAF FEEBLE 

MINDED (1915). 
Public schools for blind . R9 

Pupils ".."'.'. ' o2.'3 

State schools for deaf. . ' 6S 

Pupils !..."." '.'11459 

Public schools for -deaf. 64 

Pupils '.'..'.'.'.'. '. 2,109 

Private schools for deaf is 

Pupils 512 

Schools for feeble minded: 

State Number . 37 

Pupils 

Private Number 

Pupils 

Public Day 

Pupils 



72 
12,795 



OTHER SCHOOLS (1915). 



Training nurses.. 1,509 
Students 46,147 

Commercial 843 

Students 183.286 

Manual 240 

Students 61,244 



Reform 112 

Students 56,857 

Agricultural (1914^ 69 
Students 115,044 

Summer (1914)... 704 
Students 218,794 



PERSONS OF SCHOOL AGE AND SCHOOL ATTENDANCE (1910). 

6 to 20 years inclusive. [From census bureau report.] 
BY STATES AND DIVISIONS. 

Attend'g school. 

New England Total. Number. 

Maine 195,197 132,082 

New Hampshire 111,634 73,487 

Vermont 94,701 66,845 

Massachusetts 881,024 588,029 

Rhode Island 148.102 90,328 

Connecticut 298,454 192,497 

Middle Atlantic- 
New York 2,454.428 1,563,374 

New Jersey 708,525 440,903 

East North Central- 
Pennsylvania 2,194.303 1,366,542 

Ohio 1,313,809 868.578 

Indiana 777.889 513.623 

Illinois 1,615,914 1.025,053 

Michigan 796,887 539.739 

Wisconsin 732,544 484,629 

West North Central- 
Minnesota 648.775 443.761 

Iowa 675,222 469.778 

Missouri 993,998 646.866 

North Dakota 183.336 117.453 

South Dakota 183.979 122,640 

Nebraska 373,868 261.219 

Kansas 515,156 363,695 

South Atlantic- 
Delaware 57,932 35,304 

Maryland 388,456 227,024 

District of Columbia... 79,249 50,859 

Virginia 697,649 392.498 

West Virginia 396. 813 259,971 

North Carolina 785,583 481.450 

South Carolina 564.260 291.307 

Georgia 925.865 480.378 

Florida 243,917 128,659 

East South Central 

Kentucky 755,709 461,195 

Tennessee 738,478 438,547 

Alabama 750.357 385,449 

Mississippi 644,805 388,072 

West South Central- 
Arkansas 551,672 324,035 

Louisiana 575,866 248,420 

Oklahoma 566.323 383,816 

Texas 1,363,713 790,736 



lool. 
Pet. 

67.7 
65.8 
70.6 
66.7 
61.0 
64.5 

63.7 
62.2 

62.3 
66.1 
66.0 
63.4 
67.7 
66.2 

68.4 
69.6 
65.1 
64.1 
66.7 
69.9 
70.6 

60.9 
58.4 
64.2 
56.3 
65.5 
61.3 
51.6 
51.9 
52.7 

61.0 
59.4 
51.4 
60.2 

58.7 
43.1 
67.8 
58.0 


Mountain- 
Montana 


Attend'g school. 
Total. Number. Pet. 
93,771 60,678 .7 
96 819 66 779 69 


Idaho 


Wyoming 
Colorado 
New Mexico 
Arizona .... 


35,776 23,020 64.3 
.. 215,940 147,626 68.4 
.. 105,403 64,342 61.0 
56 897 30 355 5a 4 


Utah 


121 016 85 006 70 2 


Nevada. ...... 


16 132 10 141 62 9 


Pacific- 
Washington 


293,478 195,259 66 5 


Oregon 


175 386 117 078 66 8 


California 


555 554 361 077 65 


Geographic Division 
New England 
Middle Atlantic 


s 
.. 1,729,112 1,143,268 66.1 
5 357 256 3 370 819 62 9 


East North Central.. 
West North Central.. 
South Atlantic 
East South Central.. 
West South Central.. 
Mountain 


.. 5,237,043 3,431,622 65.5 
.. 3,574,334 2,425,412 67.9 
.. 4,139,759 2,347,450 56.7 
.. 2.889,349 1,673,263 57. 
.. 3,057,574 1,747,007 57.1 
.. 741,754 487,947 65.8 
1 024 418 673 414 65 7 


Pacific 


Total United States 




. 27.750,599 17,300,202 62.3 


BY PRINCIPAL CITIES. 
Attend'g school. 
City. Total. Number. Pet. 
Albany, N Y 93 794 14 si RV i- 


Atlanta, Ga 


42,981 23,981 54.3 
153,586 79,933 52.0' 
36 939 20 135 54 5 


lialtimore, Md 
Birmingham, Ala . . 


Boston, Mass. 


169 116 115 210 68 1 


Bridgeport, Conn 
Buffalo, N. Y 
Cambridge, Mass.... 
Chicago, 111 
Hncinnati O ... 


26,938 16,262 60.4 
120,366 73,412 61.0 
27,426 19,152 69.8 
594,012 349.037 58.8 
93 gig 55 474 59 3 


Cleveland O 


150 887 9 9 094 61 ^0- 


Columbus, O 


44 354 27 631 62 3 


Dayton O 


28 726 17 624 61 4 




51 958 34 537 66 5 


Detroit, Mich 
Fall River. Mass 
Grand Rapids, Mich.. 


122,979 69,808 56.8 
36,235 /22,819 63.0- 
30,138 19.141 63.& 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR W17. 



145 



Attend'g school. 
City. Total. Number. Pet. 
Indianapolis Ind 56 997 35 014 61 4 


Attend'g school. 
City. Total. Number. Pet. 
Philadelphia, Pa 410,243 237,333 57.9 
Pittsburgh, Pa 146,609 85,777 58.5 
Portland, Ore 43,272 26,146 60.4 
Providence, R. 1 57,559 35,309 61.3 
Richmond, Va 35,271 17,986 51.0 
Rochester, N. Y 54998 33752 614 


Jersey Citv N J 78 300 47 198 60 3 


Kansas City, Mo 57,467 34,220 59.5 
Los Angeles, Cul. . 69036 44995 652 


Louisville Ky Rft fi<f ^ 7K9 ^s' 


Lowell, Mass 
Memphis, Tenn 
Milwaukee, Wi.s 
Minneapolis, Mini, 
Nashville, Tenn 
New Haven, Conn 


.. 28,570 17,603 61.6 
.. 32,462 17,169 52.9 
. 109,078 63,228 58.0 
. 75,611 48,655 . 64.3 
. 31,803 18,191 57.2 
. 36,263 24,252 66.9 
98,468 52,799 53.6 
.1,334,357 828,720 62.1 
97 544 61 916 63 5 


St. Louis, Mo 181,402 101.320 55.9 
St. Paul, Mini* 58,946 37,187 63.1 
San Francisco, Cal 85.3G8 50.128 58.7 


Scranton, Pa 


... 39,397 22,964 58.3 
... 49.294 31,099 63.1 
24 150 15 259 63 2 


Seattle, Wash 
Spokane Wash 


New Orleans, La 
New York, N. Y 


Syracuse, N. Y 
Toledo O 


... 34,171 21.131 61.8 
... 45,314 28,198 62.2 
.. 79,249 50,859 64.2 


Newark N J 


Oakland Cal 


.. 34,153 22,253 65.2 

31 9.81 9n ns^ RA 9 


Washington, D. C 


Omaha, Neb 


Patersou, N J a 4^7 91*770 ^0*7 






STU 
Paris 17,556 


, , ^ * 


DENTS IN LEADING FOREIGN UNIVERSITIES. 
[From Minerva for 1913-1914.] 

Halle 2 982 Mqrhnr 9 (V79 Oonnn 41S 


Berlin 14,178 
Moscow 9 760 


Cracow 2,960 
Toulouse 2 869 


Prague (German).. 2.053 
Sendai 1,915 
Jena 1 993 


Aberdeen ,300 




Cairo 9 540 


Dorpat 2.684 
Luttich 2 778 


Poitiers 318 
Erlangen 295 


Vienna 8,784 


Durham 1 64 


Budapest 7 814 


Athens 2 800 


Lille 1 828 


Brussels ,250 
Melbourne 1,319 
Lund 1 347 




Glasgow 2 800 


Bern . 2 015 


St. Petersburg .. 7,455 
Naples 6,600 
Leipzig ' 6,143 
Toronto . 5 903 


Breslau 2 684 


Konigsborg 744 
Kiel 876 


Louvain . . 2 630 


Czerhowitz 1,194 
Liverpool 1,312 
Ghent 1,253 


Freiburg 2,766 
Strassburg 2,485 
Bordeaux 2.548 
Gottingen 2,668 


Valencia 700 


Manchester 691 
Wales, Univ. of.. ,389 
Padua 648 


Madrid . 5 675 


Grief swald 1 387 


Lemberg 5,567 
Tokyo (Imperial).. 5,354 
Buenos Aires 5,054 
Valladolid 4,600 
Bonn 4,478 
Prague (Bohemian) 4,406 
London 4,047 
Oxford . 4 025 


Salamanca 1.200 
Leiden . . 1 212 


McGill (Montreal 2.213 
Barcelona 2, 430 
Heidelberg 2,466 
Klausenburg 2,124 
Odessa 2 0?3 


Pa via 600 
Palermo 669 
Rennes 570 
Wurzburg 456 


Leeds 1,320 
Pisa . . . 150 


Amsterdam 215 
Seville 100 


Kingston (Canada) .548 
Christiania ,500 


Muenster (Germ'y) 2,368 
Sofia 2 11G 


Utrecht 096 


Algiers . . 440 




Copenhagen 4,000 
Rome 3 919 


Warsaw 2,257 
Upsala 2 419 


Giessen 426 
Grenoble 746 


Belgrade 167 
Dijon 000 


Cambridge 3.748 
Helslngfors 3.532 
Edinburgh 3,352 


Turin 2 199 


Zurich 481 


Dublin 000 
Granada 000 
Rome ,070 
Agram 045 
Santiago (Chile).. ,000 
Birmingham (Eng.) 1,000 


Nancy 2 248 


Gothenburg 021 
Sydney 496 
Montreal (Laval).. .624 
Coimbra 1 350 


Graz 2,151 


Charkow 3, 342 


Geneva 1,858 
Bologna 2.000 
Kasan 2,122 


Bukharest 3,283 


Lyons 3 084 


Innsbruck 1 365 


Kiev 3 000 


Tubingen 2 016 


l^aiisnnnp 1 9n4 


[Fro 
Institutions. 
Universities and college 
Schools of theology 




GIFTS AND DEQUES 
01 report of United Stat 
1913. 1914. 
=;.... $24,651.958 $26.670,017 
. 2.33B 510 1.558 2S1 


TS TO EDUCATION. 

es commission of education.] 
18S4 . $11 270 286 1901 $21 .155?. 400 


1885 9,314,081 
1886 5 976 168 


1902 20,348,739 
1903... 17 915 075 


Schools of law 189,453 203,067 


1887 7,512.910 


1904 17261375 


Schools of medicine 1,203096 1,495773 


18S8 6 646 368 


1905 21 S 9 ? 875 


Public normal schools 413,580 607,431 
Private normal schols -- 199 899 11fi 283 


1889 6,942,058 
1890 8,011,019 
1891 8.519233 


1906 23.347.070 


1907 28 585 780 


Private high schools 
Total 

GIFTS BT 

1871 $8 593 740 


657,383 706,546 


1908 . 19 763 421 


1892 8 71 90 9 


1909 21 19 9 450 


29,651,879 31,357,398 

* YEARS. 

1877 $3.015.256 
1878 3,103,289 


1893... . 8,207,690 
1894 10,855.365 


1910 24 755 663 


1911 27.634,029 
1912 30.061,310 
1913 29.651,310 
1914 31,357,398 


1895 8.240.876 
1896 11.677.048 
1897 10.049.141 


1872 10072540 


1873 11,225,977 
1874 6,053.804 
1875 4 1 9 6 562 


1879 . 5 9 49 810 


1880 5 518 501 


1898" 10 981 ?09 


1881. 7 440 9 24 


1899 25.332.792 
1900 . . 15.066.561 


Total 584,418,082 


1876 4,691,845 


1883 7 141 363 


' 



TIN PLATE AND TERNE PLATE PRODUCTION, 1914. 

[From U. S. census report.] 



Returns were received from thirty-one estab- 
lishments engaged in the industry in 1914, whose 
output of coated plates amounted to 2,039,566,144 
pounds, valued at $66,270,345, comprising 1,901,- 
331,895 pounds of tin plate, valued at $60,258,024, 
and 138,234,249 pounds of terne plate (steel or 
iron plates or sheets coated with an alloy of 
tin and lead, known as terne mixture), valued 
at $6.012.321. The tin plate product comprised 
1,855,892,526 pounds of coke plate, valued at $58,- 
450,853, and 45,439,369 pounds of charcoal plate 
(steel and iron), valued at $1,807,171. The value 



of all other products was $2,072,617, making a 
total of $68,342,962 for the value of all products 
in 1914. 

Of the thirty-one establishments reported for 
1914, thirteen were located in Pennsylvania, eight 
in West Virginia, seven in Ohio and one each 
in Illinois, Indiana and Maryland. 

PRODUCTION BY CENSUS YEARS. 



Tear. 

1914 

1909 



Pounds. 
2,039,566,144 
1,343,103,266 



Year. Pounds. 

1904 1,032,940,706- 

1899 850,004,495 



146 



AL:.IANAU AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. 
Nonsectarian and undenominational schools marked with an asterisk (*). 

Instruc- Stu- 
School, location and date of founding. President. tors. dents. 

Adelphi college,* Brooklyn, N. Y. (1896) Frank D. Blodgett, A. M 39 515 

Adrian college, Adrian, Mich. (1859) Aubrey F. Hess, Ph. D 18 215 

Agnes Scott college, Decatur, Ga F. H. Gaines, D. D., LL. D 32 302 

Ag. and Mech. Col. of Tex.,* Col. S., Tex. (1876). W. B. Bizzell, A. M., D. C. L. 

Alabama Polytechnic Inst.,* Auburn, Ala. (1872). C. C. Thach, M. A., LL. D 76 

Albany college, Albany, Ore. (lS&6) Wallace H. Lee, A. M., LL. D 17 

Alcorn Ag. and Mech. Col.,* Alcorn, Miss. (1871). Levi J. Rowan 25 

Albion college, Albion, Mich. (1861) Hon. Samuel Dickie, M. S., LL. D 26 

Alfred university,* Alfred, N. Y. (1836) Boothe C. Davis, Ph. D., D. D 44 

Allegheny college, Meadville, Pa. (1815) W. H. Crawford, D. D., LL. D 24 



Alltrgllell^' CUUcgCj AVltfUU Vlllt:, JTo.. \JLQXStJ VV . JLI. V^la WjLUIU, JLJ. J-'.i AJAJ. J-/ ** 

Alma college, Alma, Mich. (1887) Harry Mears Crooks 20 



American Inter. Col.,* Springfield, Mass. (1885).. C. Stowe McGowan (chancellor) 

American university, Washington, D. C. (1913).. John W. Hamilton, LL. D., L. H. D. 

Amherst college,* Amherst, Mass. (1825) Alexander Meikeljolm, A. M., Ph. D.. 

Antioch college,* Yellow Springs, O. (1852) S. D. Fess, LL. D 

Arkansas college, Bateville, Ark. (1872) W. S. Lacy 

Arkansas Cumberland col., Cumberl'd, Ark. (1891) J. L^ Spence, A. B. 
Armour Inst. of Technology,* Chicagi 
Asbury college, Wilmbre, Ky. (1890) 

Atlanta university,* Atlanta, Ga. (1869) 

Auburn Theological sem., Auburn, N. Y. (1819) 
Augsburg seminary, Minneapolis, Minn. (1869) . 

Augustana college, Rock Island, 111. (1860) 

Austin college, Sherman, Tex. (1849) 

Baker university, Baldwin. Kas. (1858) 

Baldwin Wallace college, Berea, O. (1845) 

Barnard college,* New York, N. Y. (1889) 

Bates college,* Lewiston, Me. (1864) 



100 1,485 
820 
128 

541! 
5:;5 
442 
406 

2-24 
172 
41 
429 



250 
84 

258 



Armour Inst. of Technology,* Chicago, 111. (1893) F. W. Gunsaulus, D. D., LL. D 62 1,285 

Asbury college. Wilmbre. Ky. (1890) H. C. Morrison, D. D 20 350 

Edward T. Ware, A. B , D. D 25 437 

G. B. Stewart, D. D., LL. D 12 66 

George Sverdrup, Jr., D. D 18 154 

Gustav Andreen, Ph. D 40 647 

T. S. Clyce, D. D., LL. D 10 147 

Wilbur N. Mason, A. M., D. D 31 555 

Arthur L. Breslich, A. B.. D. D., Ph. D. 53 790 

N. M. Butler, LL. D., Litt. D .106 758 

George C. Chase, A. M., D. D.. LL. D. 27 472 

Baylor university, Waco, Tex. (1845) Samuel P. Brooks, A. M., LL. D 53 1,606 

Bellevue college, Bellevue, Neb. (1880) Wm. E. Nicholl 14 142 

Beloit college,* Beloit, Wis. (1846) E. D. Eaton, D. D., LL. D 37 388 

Benedict college, Columbia, S. C. (1871) B. W. Valentine, A. M., D. D 35 700 

Berea college,* Berea, Ky. (1855) W. Goodell Frost, Ph. D., D. D., LL. D. 96 1,811 

Bethany college, Bethany, W. Va. (1840) T. E. Cramblet. A. M., LL. D 26 416 

Bethany college, Lindsborg, Kas. (1881) Ernest P. Pihlblad, A. M 40 794 

Bethel college, Russellville, Ky Harry G. Brownell, B. S., M. E 10 125 

Bissell Col. of Photo-Engraving, Efflngham, 111.. L. H. Bissell 3 95 

Blackburn college, Carlinville, 111. (1857) William M. Hudson, Ph. D., D. D 11 130 

Boston college, Boston, Mass. (1863).... Very Rev. Charles W. Lyons, S. J 26 525 

Boston university, Boston, Mass. (1869) Lemuel H. Murlin, D. D., LL. D 176 2,616 

Bowdoin college, Brunswick, Me. (1794) William DeWitt Hyde, D. D., LL. D... 29 400 

Bradley Polytechnic institute, Peoria, 111 Theodore C. Burgess, Ph. D 42 1,026 

Bridgewater college, Bridgewater, Va. (1880).... John S. Flory, Ph. D., A. M 20 200 

Brigham Young college, Logan, Utah (1877) C. N. Jensen, Ph. D 34 941 

Brown university,* Providence, R. I. (1764) William H. P. Faunce, D. D., LL. D... 86 1,033 

Bryn Mawr college,* Bryn Mawr, Pa. (1885) Miss M. C. Thomas, Ph. D., LL. D.... 64 445 

Bucknell university, Lewisburg, Pa. (1846) John Howard Harris, LL. D 31 781 

Butler college,* Indianapolis, Ind. (1850) Thomas C. Howe, Ph. D 20 622 

Campion college, Prairie du Chien, Wis. (1880).. Rev. George R. Kister, S. J 32 385 

Canisius college, Buffalo, N. Y. (1870) Rev. George J. Krim, S. J 25 493 

Carleton college,* Northfield, Minn. (1866) Donald G. Cowling. D. D.. Ph. D 37 476 

Carlisle Indian school,* Carlisle, Pa. (1879) Oscar H. Lipps (superintendent) 80 750 

Carnegie Inst. Technology,* Pittsburgh, Pa. (1905) Arthur A. Hammerschlag, Sc. D.. LL. D.205 3,223 

Carroll college, Waukesha, Wis. (1846) Wilbur O. Carrier, M. A., D. D 21 298 

Carson & Neman col., Jefferson City, Tenn.(1851) J. M. Burnett, D. D 18 309 

Carthage college, Carthage, 111. (1870) Henry D. Hoover, A. M., B. D., Ph. D. 20 200 

Case Sch. Applied Science,* Cleveland, O. (1881) Charles S. Howe, Ph. D., D. Sc., LL. D. 54 550 

Catawba college, Newton, N. C. (1851) J. D. Andrew, A. M 1? 146 

Cathedral college, New York, N. Y. (1903) Wm. F. Hughes, D. D 27 450 

Cath. Univ. of Am.. Washington, D. C (1889).. Thomas J. Shahan, D. D 83 1,619 



Cedarville college, Cedarville, O. (1887) W. R. McChesney, Ph. D 13 

Center college, Danville, Ky. (1819) W. A. Ganfleld, A. M., D. D 10 

Central college, Fayette, Mo. (1857) Paul H. Linn, LL. B., D. D 12 

Central Wesleyan college, Warrenton, Mo. (18S4) Otto E. Kriege, D. D., A. B 26 

Chicago Theological seminary, Chicago, HI. (1854) Ozora S. Davis, Ph. D., D. D 8 

Christian university, Canton, Mo. (1853) Earl M. Todd, LL. D 33 

Claflin university, Orangeburg, S. C. (1869) Lewis M. Dunton, A. M., D. D 37 



209 
100 
252 



Clark college,* Worcester, Mass. (1902) 

Clark university, Atlanta, Ga. (1870) 

Clark university,* Worcester, Mass. (1889) 

Clarkson College Tech.,* Potsdam, N. Y. (1896). 
Clemson Ag. col.,* Clemson College, S. C. (1896) 

Coe college, Cedar Rapids, Iowa (1881) 

Colby college, Waterville, Me. (1820) 

Colgate university,* Hamilton, N. Y. (1819) 

College of Emporia, Emporia, Kas. (1882) 

College of the Pacific, San Jose, Cal. (1851) 

College of Wooster, Wooster, O. (1868) 

Colorado Agr. college,* Ft. Collins, Col. (1871). 
Colorado college,* Colorado Springs, Col. (1874). 
Colorado School of Mines,* Golden, Col. (1874)... 
Columbia university,* New York, N. Y. (1754)... 



Edmund C. Sanford, Ph. D., LL. D.... 28 

Henry A. King, D. D 10 

G. Stanley Hall, Ph. D., LL. D 23 

John P. Brooks. M. S 14 

W. M. Riggs, E. M. E.. LL. D 116 

John A. Marquis, D. D., LL. D 55 

Arthur J. Roberts, A. M 30 

Elmer B. Bryan, LL. D., L. H. D 52 601 

Henry C. Culbertson, D. D 19 192 

John L. Seaton, LL. D., Ph. D 32 411 

J. Campbell White, M. A., LL. D 47 737 

Charles A. Lory, LL. D 76 1,100 

William F. Slocum, D. D., LL. D 75 776 

Wm. B. Phillips, Ph. D 25 171 

Nicholas M. Butler, Ph.D.,LL.D.,Litt.D.981 7,652 



AI-MANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 147 

Instruc- Stu- 

School. location and date of founding:. President. tors. dents. 

Concordia college, Bronxviile, X. Y. (1881) H. Feth. D. D 7 115 

Concordia college, Fort Wayne, Ind. (1839) Rev. Martin Luecke 12 260 

Concordia college, Milwaukee, Wis. (1881) M. .1. F. Albrecht, D. D 10 201 

Concordia college, St. Paul, Minn. (1893) Theodore Buenger 8 137 

Connecticut Agr. college,* Storrs. Conn. (1881 )... Charles L. Beachy, B. S 34 200 

Connecticut college. New London, Conn. (1915).. Frederick H. Sykes, Ph. D 25 150 

Converse college,* Spartanburg, S. C. (IS'JO) Robert P. Pell, Litt. D 25 289 

Cooper college, Sterling. Kas. (1887) R. T. Campbell, D. D 17 216 

Cornell college, Mount Vernon, Iowa (18:,3i Charles Wesley Flint. D. D 43 888 

Cornell university,* Ithaca, N. Y. (1868) Jacob G. Schurman, D. Sc., LL. D 750 5,650 

Cotner university. Bethany, Neb. (18S9) William Oeschger, LL. D 25 257 

Creighton university. Omaha, Neb. (1879) F. X. McMenamy, S. J 148 1,200 

Cumberland university, Lebanon. Tenn. (1842).... Homer A. Hill, A. M. (acting) 24 416 

Dakota Wesleyan univ., Mitchell, S. D. (1883)... William G. Seaman 29 369 

Dartmouth college,* Hanover, N. H. (1769) Ernest M. Hopkins 95 1,470 

Davidson college, Davidson, N. C. (1837) William J. Martin. M. A.. M. D.. Ph.D. 13 357 

Decatur college, Decatur, 111. (1901) George E. Fellows, Ph. D.. LL. D 63 970 

Defiance college, Defiance, O. (1902) P. W. McReynolds, A. M 26 660 

Delaware college,* Newark, Del. (1833) S. C. Mitchell, Ph. D 40 226 

Denison university, Granville, O. (1831) Clark W. Chamberlain. Ph. D 51 843 

De Paul university, Chicago, 111..'. Very Rev. F. X. McCabe, C. M., LL. D.120 1,125 

De Pauw university, Greencastle, Ind. (1837).... George R. Grose 40 1,038 

Des Moines college, Des Moines, Iowa (1865) John A. Earl, D. D 30 500 

Dickinson college, Carlisle, Pa. (1783) James H. Morgan, LL. D 18 350 

Doane college. Crete, Neb. (1872) William O. Allen, Ph. D 21 178 

Drake university, Des Moines. Iowa (1881) Hill M. Bell, A. M 100 1,531 

Drew Theological seminary, Madison. N. J. (1866) Ezra S. Tipple, D. D., LL. D 16 176 

Drury college, Springfield, Mo. (1873) Jas. G. McMnrtry. A. M.. Ph. D 20 350 

Dubuque college, Dubuque, la. (1873) Daniel M. Gorman, LL. D 36 501 

Earlham college. Richmond, Ind. (1847) Robert L. Kelly, LL. D 33 400 

Eastern college,* Manassas, Va. (1900) Hervin U. Roop, Ph. D., LL. D 21 200 

Elrnira college, Elmira, N. Y. (1855) John B. Shaw, D. D., S. T. D., LL. D.32 276 

Elon college, Elon College, N. C. (1890) W. A. Harper, M. A., Litt. D 26 400 

Emory and Henry college, Emory, Va. (1838).... Charles C. Weaver, A. M., Ph. D 13 238 

Emory college, Oxford, Ga. (1836) Edgar H. Johnson (dean) 16 244 

Erskine college, Due West. S. C. (1839) James S. Moffat, D. D 9 126 

Eureka college, Eureka, 111. (1855) H. O. Pritchard, A. M., B. D., LL. D.. 20 256 

Fairmount college, Wichita, Kas. (1895) W. H. Rollins. D. D 22 422 

Fargo college, Fargo, N. D. (1888) John W. Hanzel 35 563 

Findlay college, Findlay, O. (1882) William Harris Guyer, A. M., D. D... 19 446 

Fisk university, Nashville. Tenn. (1866) Fayette A. McKenzie, Ph. D 52 519 

Fordham university, New York, N. Y. (1841) Rev. Joseph A. Mulry, S. J 151 1,733 

Frances Shinier school, Mt. Carroll, 111. (1853).. Wm. P. McKee, A. M., B. D. (dean).. 19 130 

Franklin & Marshall college, Lancaster. Pa.(1887) Henry H. Apple, D. D., LL. D 17 291 

Franklin college, Franklin, Ind. (1834). Elijah A. Hanley, A. M., D. D 15 262 

Franklin college.* New Athens, O. (1825) G. E. Henderson, D. D. (acting) 8 86 

Friends university, Wichita. Kas. (1898) Edmund Stanley. A. M.. LL. D 20 300 

Furman university, Greenville, S. C. (1851) Edwin McNeil Poteat, LL. D 11 284 

Gallaudet college, Washington, D. C. (1864) Percival Hall, M. A., Litt. D 17 119 

General Theological sera., New York, N. Y. (1817) Herbert M. Denslow, D. D. (dean) 14 143 

George Peabody college, Nashville, Tenn Bruce B. Payne, A. M., Ph. D 25 110 

Georgetown college, Georgetown, Ky. (1829) M. B. Adams, D. D 27 372 

Georgetown university, Washington, D. C. (1789) Rev. Alphonsus J. Donlon, S. J 210 1.325 

Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. (1888) Kenneth G. Matheson, A. M., LL. D.... 83 1,117 

Goucher college, Baltimore, Md. (1888) William W. Guth 42 510 

Graceland college,* Lainoni, la. (1895).... T George N. Briggs 12 160 

Grand Island college, Grand Island, Neb. (1892).. George W. Taft 19 424 

Greenville college, Greenville, 111. (1892) Eldon G. Burritt, A. M 20 325 

Grinnell college, Grinnell, Iowa (1847) J. H. T. Main, Ph. D., LL. D .-.50 756 

Grove City college,* Grove City, Pa. (1876) Weir C. Kettler 27 400 

Guilford college, Guilford College, N. C. (1888).. Thomas Newlin, D. D., LL. D 15 235 

Gustavus Adolphus college, St. Peter. Minu.(18G2) O. J. Johnson, B. D 24 371 

Hamilton college,* Clinton, N. Y. (1812) M. W T oolsey Stryker, D. D., LL. D 21 185 

Hamline university, St. Paul, Minn. (1854) Samuel F. Kerfoot, D. D 26 420 

Hampden-Sidney col., Hampden-Sidney. Va. (1776) Harry T. Graham, A. B., D. D 10 118 

Hampton institute,* Hampton, Va. (lS68i Hollis B. Frissell, D. D., LL. D 138 1,839 

Hanover college, Hanover, Ind. (1832)....! William A. Millis, LL. D 25 S04 

Harvard university,* Cambridge, Mass. (1636).... Abbott L. Lowell, M. A., LL.D., Ph.D.. 892 6,306 

Hastings college, Hastings, Neb. (1882) R. B. Crone 20 296 

Haverford college, Haverford, Pa. (1833) Isaac Sharpless. Sc. D., LL. D 23 186 

Hedding college, Abingdon. 111. (1856) Walter D. Agnew, D. D 15 200 

Heidelberg university, Tiffin, O. (1850) Charles E. Miller, D. D.. LL. I) 32 685 

Henderson-Brown col., Arkadelphia. Ark. (1890). J. M. Workman, A. B., LL. D 17 206 

Hendrix college, Conway, Ark. (18S4) J. H. Reynolds 12 267 

Henry Kendall college, Tulsa, Okla. (1895) Charles Evans, LL. D 20 344 

Highland college, Highland, Kas. (1857)....: W. Gilbert James 8 95 

Highland Park college, Des Moines, Iowa (1889).. George P. Magill, A. M., D. D 77 1,800 

Hillsdale college, Hillsdale, Mich. (1855) Joseph W. Mauck, A. M., LL. D 24 326 

Hiram college, Hiram, O. (1850) Miner Lee Bates, A. M., LL. D 23 280 

Hiwasse college,* Sweetwater. Tenn. (1849) J. E. Lowry, A. M 8 178 

Hobart college,* Geneva, N. Y. (1822) Lyman P. Powell, D. D., LL. D 22 138 

Holy Cross college, Worcester, Mass. (1843) Rev. Joseph N. Dinand, S. J 34 590 

Hope college, Holland, Mich. (1866) Arne Vennema, D. D * 22 450 

Howard college, Birmingham, Ala. (1S89) James M. Shelburne 13 277 

Howard Payne college, Brownwood, Tex. (1890).. A. E. Baten, D. D 18 394 



14 g ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 

Instrue- Stu- 

School. location and date of founding. President. tors.deuts. 

Howard university,* Washington, D. C. (1867)... Stephen M. Newman. A. M., D. D 120 1.500 

Hunter college,* New York, N. Y. (1870) George S. Davis, LL. D 110 1.500 

Huron college, Huron, S. D. (1883) Henry Morehouse Gage 23 472 

Illinois college, Jacksonville, 111. (1829) C. H. Rammelkamp, Ph. D 25 421 

Illinois College of Photography, Effingham, 111... L. H. Bissell 7 188 

Illinois State Normal univ., Normal (1857) David Felmley, LL. D 78 2,132 

Illinois Wesleyan univ., Bloomington, 111. (1850). Theodore Kemp. D. D., LL. D 40 542 

Indiana university,* Bloomington, Ind. (1820) William Lowe Bryan, Ph. D., LL. D....186 2.672 

Iowa State Col. of Ag. & Mech. Arts, Ames ('69) Raymond A. Pearson, LL. D 432 5,502 

Iowa Wesleyan college, Mt. Pleasant, la. (1842).. Edwin A. Schell, A. M., D. I)., Ph. D. 31 436 

Jamestown 'college, Jamestown, N. D. (1909) Barend H. Kroeze. A. M.. D. D 21 249 

Jajies Milliken univ., Decatur, 111. (1901) George Emory Fellows, Ph. D., LL. D.. 58 970 

John B. Stetson university,* DeLand, Fla. (1883) Lincoln Hulley. Ph. D., Litt. D., LL. D. 40 487 

Johns Hopkins university,* Baltimore, Md. (1876). Frank J. Goodnow, LL. D 274 1,668 

Judson college, Marion, Ala. (1838) Paul V. Bomar, A. B., D. D 27 223 

Juniata college, Huntingdon, Pa. (1876) I. H. Brumbaugh, A. M 22 38T 

Kalamazoo college, Kalamazoo, Mich. (1833) H. L. Stetson 15 253- 

Kansas City university, Kansas City, Kas. (1886) J. H. Lucas, D. D., LL. D. (chancellor) 24 371 

Kansas Wesleyan university, Salina, Kas. (1886) John F. Harmon, D. D 53 862 

Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wis. (1871) Mother superior. 21 125 

Kentucky Wesleyan col., Winchester, Ky. (1866) J. L. Clark, D. D., LL. D 7 100 

Kenyon college, Gambier, O. (1824) William F. Peirce, L. H. D., D. D 14 151 

Keuka college,* Keuka Park, N. Y. (1892) Joseph A. Serena 16 104 

Knox college, Galesburg, 111. (1837) Thomas McClelland, D. D., LL. D 38 668 

Knoxville college, Knoxville, Tenn. (1875) R. W. McGranahan, D. D 29 474 

Lafayette college, Easton. Pa. (1832) J. H. McCracken, Ph. D., LL. D 56 615 

LaGrange college, LaGrange, Mo Daniel J. Scott 10 170 

Lake Erie college,* Painesville, O. (1837) Miss Vivian Small, M. A..Litt.D.,LL.D. 25 136 

Lake Forest college,* Lake Forest, 111. (1876} John S. Nollen, Ph. D., LL. D 19 200 

Lander college, Greenwood, S. C. (1872) John O. Willson, D. D 23 247 

Lane college, Jackson, Tenn J. F. Lane, A. M,. Ph. D 17 351 

Lane Theological seminary, Cincinnati, O. (1832) William McKibbin, D. D., LL. D 6 60 

LaSalle college, Philadelphia, Pa. (1867) Rev. Brother Edward, F. S. C 28 360 

Lawrence university,* Appleton, Wis. (1847) Samuel Plantz, Ph. D., LL. D 46 799 

Leander Clark college, Toledo, O. (1856) Marion R. Drury, A. M., D. D 21 243 

Lebanon university,* Lebanon. O. (1855) H. O. Cunningham, M. A 38 548: 

Lebanon Valley college, Annville, Pa. (1866).... G. O. Gossard, D. D 35 443 

Lehigh university* Soxiih Bethlehem, Pa. (1866).. Henry S. Drinker, E. M.. LL. D 79 775 

Leland Stanford, Jr., U.,* Stanford U., Cal.(1891) Ray L. Wilbur, A. M., M. D 291 2.212 

Lenox college, Hopkinton, Iowa (1856) (Vacancy) 12 102 

Lewis institute, Chicago, 111. (1865) George N. Carman (director) 150 3,500 

Lincoln univ., Lincoln Univ., Pa. (1857) John B. Rendall, D. D 15 216 

Lincoln college, Lincoln. 111. (1865) James H. McMurray, Ph. D 20 254 

Livingstone college, Salisbury, N. C W. H. Goler, A. M., D. D 20 265 

Lombard college,* Galesburg, 111. (1851) Joseph M. Tilden 19 204 

Louisiana college, Pineville, Ala. (1906) C. Cottingham, M. A 19 197 

Louisiana State univ.,* Baton Rouge. La. (I860).. Thomas D. Boyd, A. M., LL. D 98 1.312 

Loyola university, Chicago, 111. (1869) John B. Furay, S. J 127 1,640 

18 207 
40 365 

19 252 
255 



Luther college, Decorah, Iowa (1861) Rev. C. K. Preus 

Macalester college, St. Paul. Minn. (18S4) T. Morey Hodgman. M. A., LL. D 

Manhattan college, New York, N. Y. (1863) Rev. Brother Edward, F. S. C 

Marietta college,* Marietta, O. (1835) George W. Hinman, Ph. D 

Marquette university, Milwaukee, Wis. (1864)... Rev. Herbert C. Noonan, S. J 



..246 
36 



Maryland State Col. of Agr., Col. Park, Md..(18;6) H. J. Patterson, D. Sc..., 

Maryville college, Maryville, Tenn. (1819) Samuel T. Wilson, D. D 62 805 

Massachusetts Agr. col.,* Amherst, Mass. (1863).. Kenyon L. Butterfield, A. M., LL. D.... 70 665 

Mass. Inst. of Technology, Boston, Mass. (1861).. R. C. Maclaurin, A. M., LL. D., D. Sc..228 1,900 

Meredith college, Raleigh, N. C. (1899) Charles E. Brewer, LL. D 18 274 

Methodist Univ. of Okla., Guthrie, Okla. (1881).. Edward Hislop, D. D., S. T. B 15 210 

Miami university. Oxford, O. (1809) R. M. Hughes, M. Sc 55 789 

Michigan Agr. college. East Lansing, Mich. (1857) Frank S. Kedzie 180 1.993 

Michigan Col. of Mines,* Houghton. Mich. (1884) F. W. McNair, B. S., D. Sc 25 108 

Middlebury college,* Middlebury, Vt. (1800) John M. Thomas, D. D., LL. D 31 343 

Midland college, Atchison, Kas. (1887) Rev. Rufus B. Peery, Ph. D., D. D 18 310 

Milligan college, Milligan College. Tenn. (1882 .. Josephus Hopwood, A. M 14 150 

Mills college,* Oakland, Cal. (1885) Aurelia H. Reinhardt, LL. D 31 153 

Millsaps college, Jackson. Miss. (1892) A. F. Watkins, A. B., D. D 13 249 

Milton college, Milton, Wis. (1867) Rev. W. C. Daland. M. A., D. D 15 135 

Milton university,* Baltimore, Md. (1847) Wm. J. Heaps, Ph. D., LL. D 17 250 

Milwaukee-Downer college, Milwaukee, Wis Miss Ellen C. Sabin, M. A., LL. D 33 337 

Milwaukee-Downer seminary, Milwaukee, Wis Macy D. Rodman (dean) 12 161 

Miss. A. & M. college, Agricultural College, Miss. George R. Hightower 83 1.218 

Mississippi college, Clinton, Miss. (1826) J. W. Provine, D. D., LL. D 14 390 

Missouri Valley college, Marshall, Mo. (1SS9).... W. H. Black, D. D.. LL. D 13 235 

Missouri Wesleyan college, Cameron. Mo. (1SS7).. H. R. DeBra, A. M., D. D 26 314 

Monmouth college, Monmouth, 111. (1857) T. H. McMichael, A. M., D. D 27 480 

Montana State college.* Bozeman (1893) James M. Hamilton, M. S 66 979 

Montana Wesleyan college, Helena (1889) Chas. L. Bovard, D. D 9 100 

Moores Hill college. Moores Hill, Ind. (1807) Andrew J. Bigner (acting) 19 300 

Morgan college, Baltimore, Md. (1867) John O. Spencer, Ph. D 24 260 

Morningside college, Sioux City, Iowa (1894) Alfred E. Craig, D. D 31 886 

Morris Brown university, Atlanta, Ga. (1885).... W. A. Fountain, D. D.. Ph. D 31 865 

Mount Angel college, Mount Angel, Ore. (1887)... Basil Schieber. O. S. B 21 130 

Mount Holyoke col.,* South Hadley. Mass. (1837) Miss M. E. Woolley.M.A.,Litt.D..L.H.D. 85 783 

Mount St. Mary's college, Emmitsburg, Md. (1808) Very Rev. B. J. Bradley, A. M., LL. D. 40 402 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1017. 149 

School, location and date of founding. President. tors. dents. 

Mount Union college, Alliance, O. (1858) W. H. McMaster, A. M 37 626 

Muhlenburg college, Allentown, Pa. (1867) John A. W. Haas. D. D., LL D .14 214 

Municipal University of Akron, Akron, O. (1870) Parke R. Kolbe, Ph. D 26 305 

Muskingum college, New Concord, O. (1837) J. K. Montgomery, D. D . . . . 30 760 

McCormick Theological sem., Chicago, 111. (1829) James G. K. McClure, D. D., LL. D... 16 198 

McKendree college, Lebanon, 111. (1828) Huber W. Hurt LL D . . ..22 300 

JMcMinville college, McMinville, Ore. (1807 i Leonard W. Riley, D. D 15 223 

Nebraska Christian univ., Bethany, Neb. (1888).. William Oeschger, LL. D 22 LT.7 

Neb. Wesleyan univ., Univ. Place, Neb. (1888 1.. Clark A. Fulmer (chancellor) 38 900 

Newberry college, New'^erry, S. C. (1856) J. Henry Harms, D. D 14 231 

N. H. Col. of Agr. & Mech. Arts,* Durham (1S66) Kdward T. Fairchild, A. M.. LL. D.... 55 653 

New Orleans university, New Orleans, La. (1873) Charles M. Melden, D. D., Ph. D 20 507 

New Rochelle college, New Rochelle, N. Y M. C. O'Favrell, D. D 21 198 

Newton Theo. inst., Newton Center, Mass. (1825) George F. Horr, D. D., LL. D 12 83 

New York university,* New York, N. Y. (1830).. Elmer E. Brown, Ph. D., LL. D (c-han.)571 7,857 

Niagara university, Niagara Falls, N. Y. (1806 1.. Very Rev. M. A. Drennan, C. M 20 250 

N. C. Col. of Ag. &Me.Arts,*W.Raleisu,X.C.(18S9 D. H. Hill., LL. D., Litt. D 65 800 

N. C. State Nor.& Ind.Col.,* Greensboro,N.C.(1892) Julius L. Foust, LL. D 77 702 

N. Dakota Agricultural college.* Fargo (1890) Edwin F. Ladd, B. S., LL. D 46 1,105 

Northwestern college, Naperville, 111. (1861) .Edward E. Rail, Ph. D 25 415 

Northwestern Mil. & Nav.acad., Lake Geneva. Wis. Col. R. P. Davidson, A. M 14 120 

Northwestern university, Evanston, 111. (1865) Thomas F. Holgate (dean) 452 5,293 

Norwich university, Northfield, Vt. (1819) Charles H. Spooner, A. M., LL. D 16 145 

Oberlin college,* Oberlin, O. (1833) Henry C. King, D. D., LL. D 113 1,749 

Occidental college, Los Angeles, Cal. (1887) John Willis Baer, Litt. D., LL. D 24 333 

Ohio Northern university, Ada, O. (1871t Albert E. Smith, D. D., Ph. D 42 1.763 

Ohio State university,* Columbus, O. (1870) William O. Thompson, D. D., LL. D...481 5,822 

Ohio university,* Athens, O. (1804) Alston Ellis, Ph. D., LL. D 95 4,962 

Ohio Wesleyan university,* Delaware, O. (1842).. Helbert Welch, D. D., LL. D 73 1,256 

Oklahoma Agr. & Mech. col.,* Stillwater (1891) J. W. Cantwell 1C9 1,690 

Olivet college,* Olivet, Mich (1839) Thos. F. Kane, Ph. D 20 200 

Oregon Agricultural college.* Corvallis, Ore.(1885) William J. Kerr, D. Sc 122 3.259 

Oriental university,* Washington, D. C. (1903)... H. P. Holler, Ph. D., S. T. D 68 260 

Ottawa university, Ottawa, Kas. (1865) Silas Eber Price, D. D 19 388 

Otterbeiu university, Westerville, O. (1847) W. G. Clippinger, A. B.. D. D 28 385 

Ouachlta college, Arkadelphia, Ark. (1886) Charles E. Dicken, D. D 48 300 

Pacific university, Forest Grove. Ore. (1849 ) C. J. Bushnell 22 208 

Paine college. Augusta. Ga. (18S2) Daniel E. Atkins, A. B 15 225 

Park college,* Parkville, Mo. (1875).'. Frederick W. Hawley 22 444 

Parker college, Winnebago, Minn. (1889) J. D. McCormick, A. M., B. D 14 136 

Parsons college, Fairfield, Iowa (1875) Lowell M. McAfee, LL. D 18 318 

Penn college, Oskaloosa, Iowa (1873) David M. Edwards. Ph. D 31 536 

Pennsylvania college, Gettysburg, Pa. (18321 W. A. Granville, Ph. D., LL. D 35 450 

Pennsylvania Col. for Women.* Pitts., Pa. (1869). John C. Acheson 19 185 

Pennsylvania Military col.,* Chester, Pa. (1858). Col. C. E. Hyatt, C. E., LL. D 16 100 

Philander Smith college. Little Rock, Ark. (1887) Rev. James M. Cox, D. D 21 428 

Polytechnic institute.* Brooklyn, N. Y. (1854) Fred W. Atkinson, Ph. D 43 758 

Pomona college,* Claremont, Cal. (1887) James A. Blaisdell, D. D 45 567 

Potomac university,* Washington, D. C. (1904).. Ernest W. Porter, Ph. D 15 350 

Pratt institute.* Brooklyn, N. Y. (1887) Charles M. Pratt, A. M 201 3,671 

Presbyterian Col. of S. C., Clinton. S. C. (1900).. Davison McD. Douglas, M. A., D. D... 11 150 

Princeton Theological sem., Princeton, N.J. (1812) J. Ross Stevenson, D. D., LL. D 14 188 

Princeton university.* Princeton, N. J. (1710)... John Grier Hibben. Ph. D., LL. D 213 1,615 

Pritchett college,* Glasgow, Mo. (1868) U. S. Hall. A. B 9 80 

Proseminar college, Elmhurst, 111. (1871) Rev. D. Irion, D. D 8 170 

Purdue university,* Lafayette, Ind. (1874) W. E. Stone, Ph. D., LL. D 206 2,473 

Radcliffe college,* Cambridge, Mass. (1879) LeBaron R. Briggs, A. M. LL.L).,Litt.D.131 683 

Randolph-Macon Col. for Hen. Ashland, Va. (1830) Robert E. Blackwell, A. M., LL. D 17 184 

Randolph-Macon Woman's col., Lynchburg,Va.(lS93) William A. Webb, Litt. D 50 624 

Redneld college. Redfleld, S. D. (1887) Edward A. Fath, Ph. D 6 65 

Rensselaer Polytechnic inst..* Troy, N. Y. (1824) Palmer C. Ricketts, C. S., E. D.. LL.D. 60 625 

Rhode Island State col.,* Kingston. R. I. (1892i Howard Edwards, LL. D 35 313 

Rice institute, Houston. Tex. (1912) Dr. Edgar O. Lovett, Ph. D., LL. D.... 41 386 

Richmond college, Richmond. Va. (1S32) F. W. Boatright, M. A., LL. D 35 420 

Rio Grande college, Rio Grande, O. (1876) Simeon II. Bing, A. M 12 408 

Ripon college,* Ripon, Wis. (1800) Silas Evans, D. D., LL. D 24 306 

Roanoke college, Salem, Va. (1853) J. A. Morehead, D. D 20 200 

Rochester Mechanics inst., Rochester, N. Y.US85) T. E. Woodland, A. M. (acting) 75 2.150 

Rochester Theological sem., Rochester, N. Y.(1S50) Clarence A. Barbour, D. D 14 152 

Rockford College for Women.* Rockford, Ill.(1847) Julia H. Gulliver, Ph. D., LL. D 31 250 

Rock Hill college. Ellicott City, Md. (1857) .Brother Dorotheus, F. S. C 12 120 

Rollins college,* Winter Park, Fla. (1885) Geo. M. Ward, D. D., LL. D. (acting).. 20 100 

Rose Polytechnic inst..* Terre Haute, Ind. (1883) Carl L. Mees, Ph. D 23 183 

Rust college, Holly Springs, Miss. (1868) George Evans 16 262 

Rutgers college, New Brunswick, N. J. (I766i W. H. S. Demarest, D. D., LL. D 55 1,210 

St. Anselm's college, Manchester, N. H. (1899).. E. Helmsetter, D. D., O. S. B 23 145 

St. Benedict's college, Atchison, Kas. (1858) Rt.-Rev. Innocent Wolf. O. S. B 24 265 

St. Charles college, Catonsville. Md. (1848) Very Rev. M. F. Diuneon, D. D 15 175 

St. John's college, Annapolis, Md. (17S4) Thomas Fell, Ph. D., LL. D.. D. C. L.. 13 165 

St. John's college, Brooklyn, N. Y. (1870i Very Rev. John W. Moore, C. M 32 700 

St. John's college, Washington, D. C. (1866) B. E. Alfred, F. S. C 17 200 

St. John's college, Winfield, Kas A. W. Meyer 8 142 

St. John's Military academy, Delafleld. Wis Sidney T. Smythe, Ph. D., D. D 17 225 

St. John's university, Collegeville. Minn. (1857).. Rt.-Rev. Peter Engel, O. S. B., Ph. D.. 57 437 

St. Joseph's college, Rensselaer, Ind. (1891) Rev. Hugh Lear, C. P., P. S 26 300 



150 ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Instruc- Stu- 

School. location and date of founding. President. tors.dents. 

St. Joseph's seminary, Dunwoodie. N. Y. (1895).. John P. C. Chidwick. D. D., LL. D 13 246 

St. Lawrence university, Canton, N. Y. (1858) E. L. Hulett (acting) 14 268 

St. Louis university, St. Louis. Mo. (1818)...- Very Rev. Bernard J. Otting, S. J 231 1,544 

St. Mary college, Dayton, O. (1878) Rev. Bernard P. O'Reilly, S. M 43 460 

St. Mary's college, Oakland. Cal. (1863) Brother Vellesian 43 468 

St. Mary's college, St. Mary's, Has. (1848) Rev. Wm. J. Wallace, S. J 20 410 

St. Mary's college, St. Mary's, Ky. (1821) Rev. M. Jaglowicz, C. R 10 104 

St. Meinrad col. & sem.. St. Meinrad. Ind. (1857) Rt.-Rev. A. Schmitt, O. S. B 20 180 

St. Olaf college, Northfield, Minn. (1874) Rev. L. A. Vigness 37 600 

St. Paul's college, Concorrlia, Mo J. H. C. Kaeppel 8 163 

St. Stanislaus college, Chicago, 111. (1890) Rev. L. G. Zapala, C. R., A. M 16 250 

St. Stephen's col., Annandale on Hud'n,N.Y.(1860) Rev. W. C. Rodgers, M. A., S. T. D.... 9 60 

St. Viator college, Kankakee, 111. (1868) Rev. J. P. O'Mahoney 35 400 

Scarritt Morrisville col., Morrisville. Mo. (1846).. C. A. Haskew 14 81 

Scotia seminary, Concord, N. C. (1870) A. W. Verner, D. D 20 280 

Seton Hall college, South Orange, N. J. (1856).... James F. Mooney, D. D., LL. D 18 287 

Shaw university, Raleigh, N. C. (1865) Charles F. Meserve, LL. D 27 366 

Shorter college, Rome, Ga. (1877) A. W. Van Hoose, A. M., LL. D 30 260 

Shurtleff college, Alton, 111. (1827) George M. Potter, A. M 14 126 

Simmons college,* Boston, Mass. (1899) Henry Lefavour, Ph. D., LL. D 117 1,083 

Simpson college. Indianola, Iowa (1860) Jas. W. Campbell, Ph. D 33 639 

Sioux Falls college, Sioux Falls, S. D Rolvix Harlan, Ph. D 12 201 

Smith college,* Northampton, Mass. (1872) Marion Le Roy Burton, Ph. D., LL. D.146 1,725 

S. Dakota State college,* Brookings (1871) E. C. Perisho 72 1,105 

Southern Baptist Theo. sem., Louisville, Ky.(1859) Edgar Y. Mullins, D. D., LL. D 12 445 

Southern Female college, LaGrange. Ga. (1874).. M. W. Hatton 13 125 

Southern university, Greensboro, Ala. (1856) C. A. Rush. A. B., D. D 14 161 

Southwestern college, Winfield, Kas. (1885) Frank E. Mossman, A. M 22 378 

Southwestern Pres. univ., Clarksville, Tenn. (1875) J. R. Dobyns, M. A., LL. D. (chancellor) 9 151 

Southwestern univ., Georgetown, Tex. (1873) Chas. McT. Bishop, A. M., D. D 26 719 

Spelman seminary, Atlanta, Ga Miss Lucy Hale Tapley 50 738 

Springhill college, Mobile, Ala. (1830) E. Cummings, S. J 29 233 

State Col. of Washington,* Pullman, Wash. (1892) E. A. Bryan, A. M., LL. D 150 1,647 

State University of Iowa,* Iowa City, la. (1847) Thomas H. Macbride, Ph. D.. LL. D....300 3,285 

State university, Louisville, Ky William T. Amiger, A.M., D.D., LL. D. 15 225 

State University of Montana,* Missoula (1895)... Frederick C. Schenck 60 1,023 

Stevens Institute of Technology,* Hoboken, N. J. A. C. Humphreys, M. E., Sc. D., LL.D. 39 452 

Suomi college, Hancock, Mich. (1896) J. K. Nikander, D. D 11 125 

Susquehanna university, Sellinsgrove, Pa. (1869). Charles T. Aikens, D. D 22 365 

Swarthmore college, Swarthmore, Pa. (1869) Joseph Swain, B. L., M. S., LL. D 48 451 

Syracuse university,* Syracuse, N. Y. (1870) James R. Day, LL. D. (chancellor) 225 4,020 

Tabor college. Tabor, Iowa (1866) . Nelson W. Wehrhan. Ph.B.. B.D. (acting) 12 66 

Talladega college,* Talladega, Ala. (1867) John M. P. Metcalf, M. A 39 615 

Tarkio college, Tarkio, Mo. (1883) Joseph A. Thompson, D. D 22 253 

Taylor university, Upland, Ind. (1848) Monroe Vayhinger. D. D 25 342 

Teachers college,* New York, N. Y. (1888) Jas. E. Russell, Ph. D., LL. D 202 3.941 

Temple university.* Philadelphia, Pa. (1884) Russell H. Conwell, D. D., LL. D 290 3,696 

Texas Christian univ., Fort Worth, Tex. (1873).. Frederick D. Kershner, M. A., LL. D.. 34 661 

The Bonebrake Theo. Sem., Dayton, O. (1871) J. P. Landis, D. D., Ph. D 6 70 

The Col. of the City of New York.* N. Y. (1*47) Sidney E. Mezes, LL. D 132 2.229 

The Geo. Washington univ.,* Wash., D. C. (1821) Charles H. Stockton, LL. D 234 1,973 

The Pennsylvania State Col.,* State Col.. Pa. (1855) Edwin Erie Sparks, Ph. D., LL. D 275 3,551 

The Teachers' Col. of Indpls.,* Indpls., Ind.(1882) Mrs. Eliza A. Baker 42 800 

The Tome School,* Port Deposit, Md Thomas S. Baker. Ph. D 24 225 

The Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y. (1850). Rush Rhees, D. D., LL. D 45 530 

The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. (1794). Brown Ayres, Ph. D., LL. D., D. C. L.200 4.535 

Throop Col. of Technology,* Pasadena. Cal. (1S91) James A. B. Scherer, Ph. D., LL. D.... 22 129 

Transylvania university, Lexington. Ky. (1798).. R. H. Crossfield, Ph. D., LL. D 26 258 

Trinity college, Durham, N. C. (1838) William P. Few, A. M., Ph. D 55 539 

Trinity college,* Hartford, Conn. (1823) Flavel S. Luther, Ph. D., LL. D 25 237 

Trinity college, Washington, D. C. (1900) Sister Catherine Aloysius 32 224 

Trinity university, Waxahachie, Tex. (1869) S. L. Hornbeak, LL. D 20 412 

Tufts college, Tufts College, Mass. (1832) Hermon C. Bumpus, LL. D 249 1,541 

Tulane university,* New Orleans, La. (1834) Robert Sharp, A. M., Ph. D 310 2.733 

Tusculum college, Tusculum, Tenn. (1794) C. O. Gray. D. D 22 212 

Tuskogee institute.* Tuskegee, Ala. 0881) Robert Russa Moton 194 1,564 

Union Christian college. Merom, Ind. (I860).., C. B. Hershey 13 110 

Union college, Barbourville, Ky Ezra T. Franklin, A. M 15 220 

Union college, College View, Neb. (1891) Harry A. Morrison 26 350 

Union college,* Schenectady, N. Y. (1795) Charles A. Richmond. D. D., LL. D... 40 494 

Union Theological sem.. New York, N. Y. (1836).. -Francis Brown, Ph. D., D. D., LL. D. 33 301 

Union university, Jackson, Tenn. (1848) G. M. Savage 16 268 

U. S. Military academy,* West Point. N. Y.U802) Col. John Biddle, U. S. A. (supt.) 130 589 

United States Naval acad..* Annapolis. Md.(lS45) Capt. E. W. Eberle, U. S.- N. (supt.).. ..131 918 

University of Alabama,* Tuscaloosa (1831) George H. Denny. LL. D., D. C. L 105 1,509 

University of Arizona," Tucson (1891) R. B. van Kleinsmid, LL. D 55 623 

University of Arkansas,* Fayetteville (1871) John C. Futrall, M. A 80 814 

University of Buffalo,* Buffalo, N. Y. (1846) Chas. P. Norton (chancellor) 205 950 

University of California,* Berkeley (I860) Benjamin Ide Wheeler, LL. D 98811,650 

Univ. of Chattanoofcl, Chattanoga, Tenn. (1867). Frederick W. Ilixson 22 431 

University of Chicago.* Chicago, 111. (1892) Harry Pratt Judson, LL. D 401 8.510 

University of Cincinnati.* Cincinnati. O. (1870).. Charles M. Dabney, Ph. D., LL. D 167 2.53$ 

University of Colorado,* Boulder (1877) Livingston Farrand, M.A.. M.D., LL.D. .126 2.453 

University of Denver, Denver, Col. (1864) Henry A. Buchtel, D. D., LL. D 100 2,155 

University of Detroit, Detroit, Mich. (1879) Wm. T. Doran, S. J 49 568 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 151 

School, location and date of founding. President. "lor^dents 

University of Florida, Gainesville (1905) A. H. Murphree, LL. D ..69 818 

University of Georgia,* Athens (1785) David C. Barrow (chancellor) 57 701 

University of Idaho,* Moscow (1892). Melvin A. Brannon, Ph. D 73 864 

University of Illinois,* Urbana (1867) Edmund J. James, Ph. D., LL. D 821 6427 

University of Kansas,* Lawrence (1866) Frank Strong, Ph. D., LL.D. (chancellories 2*959 

University of Kentucky,* Lexington (1865) Henry S. Baker, LL. D 98 1*445 

University of Maine,* Orono (1865) Robert J. Aley, Ph. D., LL b"! '"l54 1*269 

University of Maryland,* Baltimore (1784) Thos. Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L.<provost)293 1^324 

University of Michigan,* Ann Arbor (1837) H. B. Hutchins, LL. D 589 7214 

University of Minnesota,* Minneapolis (1868i George E. Vincent, LL. D !."600 4,500 

University of Mississippi,* University (1848) J. X. Powers, LL. D. (chancellor) 47 626 

University of Missouri,* Columbia (1839) Albert Ross Hill, LL. D '. ">72 4349 

University of Nebraska,* Lincoln (1869) Samuel Avery, Ph.D., LL.D. (chancellor) 361 4826 

University of Nevada, Reno (1886) Archer M. Hendrick, M. A... . 47 '441 

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (1892).... David Ross Boyd, Ph. D... 

University of North Carolina,* Chapel Hill (1789) Edward K. Graham, M. A Ph D "98 1695 

University of North Dakota, Grand Forks (1883).. Frank L. McVey, Ph. D., LL. D. .' .'. 84 1330 

Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Ind. (1849).. John Cavanaugh, C. S. C., D. D 75 1158 

University of Oklahoma,* Norman (1892) Stratton D. Brooks, Ph. D., LL. D . .146 1987 

University of Oregon,* Eugene (1878) Prince L. Campbell, A. B., LL. D.. ..146 1685 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (1740).. Edgar F. Smith, Ph.D., LL.D. (provost) 606 8,'o69 

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa. (1787).. S. B. McCormick, LL. D. (chancellor) ..336 3418 

University of Porto Rico, Rio Piedras (1903) Paul G. Miller, LL. D 52 1 054 

Univ. of Santa Clara, Santa Clara, Cal. (1851 1... Walter F. Thornton, S. J 47 400 

Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (1879). George F. Bovard, A. M., D. D LL D 281 3106 

University of Southern Minnesota,* Austin (1896) Wm. W. Meiners, Ph. D., LL. D 36 1,047 

University of South Carolina,* Columbia (1805)... W. S. Carrell 41 578 

University of South Dakota,* Vermilion (1882)... Robert L. Slagle, M. A., Ph. D . ! 55 750 

University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. (1868).. Albion W. Knight, D. D. (chancellor)... 35 257 

University of Tennessee,* Knoxville (1794) Brown Ayres, Ph. D., LL. D... ...201 3,189 

University of Texas,* Austin (1883) Robert E. Vinson, D. D., LL. D . .. 201 4210 

University of Utah,* Salt Lake City (1850) John A. Widtsoe, A. M., Ph. D 80 1,722 

University of Vermont,* Burlington (1791) Guy P. Benton, D. D., Ph. D., LL. D..100 600 

University of Virginia,* Charlottesville (1819).... Edwin A. Alderman, D. C. L., LL. D.. 78 1,056 

University of Washington,* Seattle (1862) Henry Suzzalo, Ph. D 205 4055 

University of Wisconsin,* Madison (1848) Charles R. Van Hise, Ph. D 727 7,624 

University of Wyoming,* Lararnie (1886) C. A. Duniway, Ph. D., LL. D 50 600 

Upper Iowa university, Fayette, Iowa (1858) R. Watson Cooper 17 458 

Upsala college, Kenilworth, N. J. (1893) Rev. Peter Froeberg, B. D., Ph. D 12 100 

Ursinus college, Collegeville, Pa. (1869) George L. Omwake, Ph. D 17 202 

Utah Agricultural college,* Logan, Utah (1890).. E. G. Peterson, M. A., Ph. D 91 1,200 

Valparaiso university, Valparaiso, Ind. (1873) He'nry P. Brown, A. M 220 5,000 

Vauderbilt university, Nashville, Tenn. (1873).... J. H. Kirkland, LL. D. (chancellor) .. ..145 938 

Vassar college,* Poughkeepsie, N. Y. (1861) Henry N. MacCracken, Ph. D., LL. D..135 1,125 

Villanova college, Villanova, Pa Edward G. Dohau, A. M., O. S. A 42 400 

Vincennes university,* Vincennes, Ind. (1806) Wm. Halnow, A. M., Ph. D 22 335 

Virginia Christian college, Lynchburg, Va. (1903). J. T. T. Hundley 14 105 

Virginia Military institute,* Lexington, Va.(l839) Gen. E. W. Nichols (superintendent)... 25 400 

Virginia Polytechnic inst.,* Blackburg, Va. (1872) J. D. Eggleston, A. M 53 508 

Virginia Union university, Richmond, Va George Rice Hovey, D. D 19 577 

Wabash college,* Crawfordsville, Ind. (1832) George L. Mackintosh, D. D., LL. D 21 336 

Wake Forest college, Wake Forest, N. C. (1834) Wm. L. Poteat 26 503 

Walden university, Nashville, Tenn. (1866) (Vacancy) 14 145 

Washburn college, Topeka, Kas. (1865) Parley P. Worner, D. D 68 850 

Washington & Jefferson col.,* Wash., I'a. (1802). F. W. Hinitt, D. D., LL. D 20 440 

Washington and Lee univ.,* Lexington, Va. (1749) Henry Louis Smith, M. A., Ph. D., LL. D. 33 513 

Washington college, CUestertown, Md. (1782) James W. Cain, A. M., Ph. D., LL. D.. 10 114 

Washington col.,* Washington College, Tenn. (1795) James T. Cooter 10 135 

Washington university, St. Louis, Mo. (1853) D. F. Houston (chancellor) 218 1,871 

Waynesburg college,* Waynesburg, Pa. (1850).... Herbert P. Houghton, Ph. D 23 258 

Wellesley college,* Wellesley, Mass. (1875) Ellen F. Pendleton, M. A.. Litt. D....134 1,512 

Wells college,* Aurora, N. Y. (1868) Kerr D. Macmillnn, S. T. D 33 202 

Wesleyan university, Middletown, Conn. (1831).. William A. Shanklin, D. D., LL. D.... 41 504 

Western College for Women,* Oxford, O. (1854).. W. M. Boyd, Ph. D 31 255 

Western Maryland coK, Westminster, Md. (1867). Thos. H. Lewis, D. D., LL. D 24 230 

Western Reserve university,* Cleveland, O. (1826) Charles F. Thwing, D. D., LL. D 259 1,970 

Western Theological sem., Pittsburgh, Pa. (1825). James A. Kelso, Ph. D., D. D 10 76 

Westminster college, New Wilmington, Pa. (1852) Robert McW. Russell, D. D., LL. D 25 250 

West Virginia university, Morgantown (1867) Frank B. Trotter, LL. D 93 1,651 

Wheaton college,* Norton, Mass. (1834) S. V. Cole, D. D., LL. D 25 200 

Wheaton college, Wheaton, 111. (1860) Charles A. Blanchard, A. M., D. D.... 33 250 

Whitman college,* Walla Walla, Wash. (1882).... S. B. L. Penrose, D. D 33 472 

Whittier college, Whittier, Cal. (1901) A. Rosenberger, A. B., LL. D 14 134 

Whitworth college, Spokane, Wash. (1883) Donald D. McKay, A. M., Ph. D 16 53 

Wilberforce university, Wilberforce, O. (1856).... William S. Scarborough, Ph. D., LL. D. 38 455 

Wiley university, Marshall, Tex. (1873) M. W. Dogan, A. M., Ph. D 25 450 

Willamette university, Salem. Ore. (1844) Carl G. Doney, LL. D 32 378 

William and Mary col.,* Williamsburg, Va. (1693) L. G. Tyler, M. A., LL. D 17 242 

William and Vashti college, Aledo, 111. (1908) Ward L. Ray, A. M 14 200 

William Jewell college, Liberty r Mo. (1849) John P. Greene, D. D., LL. D 40 469 

Williams college,* Williamstown, Mass. (1793).... Harry A. Garfield, LL. D 56 508 

William Smith college,* Geneva, N. Y. (1908).... Lyman P. Powell, D. D., LL. D 24 107 

Wilson college, Chambersbnrsr, Pa. (18701 Anna Jane McKeag, Ph. D., 4 LL. D 22 198 

Winthrop college,* Rook Hill, S. C. (1886) David B. Johnson, LL. D 100 976 

Wittenberg college, Springfield. O. (1845) Charles G. Heckert, D. D 37 1,120 

Wofford college, Spartanburg, S. C. (1854) Henry N. Snyder, M. A., Litt. D., LL. D. 13 328 



152 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



School, location and c 
Women's College of De 
Worcester Poly, inst.,* A 
Yale university,* New I 
Yankton college, Yankto 
York college, York, Neb. 

LIQUORS 

Barrels. 
Fermented liq. 59.808,210 
Dist. spirits. Gallons. 
Whisky 44,552,490 


!ate of founding, 
laware,* Newark (1914).. 
Vorcester, Mass.- (1865).. 
laven Conn. (1701). 


Instruc- Stu- 
President. tors.deuts. 


Ira N. Hollis 56 543 


Arthur Twining Hadley, Ph. D., LL. D..494 3,267 
Henry K. Warren, M. A., LL. D 27 458 
M. O. McLaughlin, M. A., D. D 21 375 


n S D (1881) 


(1890) 




AND SPIRITS PRODU 
Year ended 

Spirits, 
State. gallons. 
Kentucky .... 13,941,412 
Louisiana .... 12.974.076 
Maryland .... 2,602.767 
Dist. Columbia 620,729 
Massachusetts. 7,910,430 
Michigan .... 1,902,013 
Missouri 289 881 


CED IN THE UNITEI 
June 30, 1915. 
Liquors, 
State. barrels. 
Ala. &Miss... 35,659 
Alaska 5 912 


) STATES. 

Liquors, 
State. barrels. 
Missouri 3,567,763 
Montana 241,642 
Nebraska .... 425,919 
Nevada 17,558 
N. Hampshire 282.027 
New Jersey... 3.219.685 
New Mexico.. 9,168 
New York 13.1S0.111 
Ohio 4 6 9 2 581 


Rum 2,844,313 
Gin 3,636,285 


Arizona 8,535 
Arkansas 10.827 
California .... 1,281,951 
Colorado 326,138 
Connecticut . . 760,502 
Dist. Columbia 169.973 
Delaware ..:. 125,599 
Florida 29 983 


Highwines ... 33,854 
Alcohol 38.325,049 
Coincl. alcohol 42,742,161 
Fruit brandy.. 8,521,951 


Mont., Id., Ut. 19, 191 
Nebraska 1.659.946 
N.H., Me.,~Vt. 4,693 
New Jersey... 95,779 
N. M. & Ariz. 555 
New York.. . 10,717.299 
N. Carolina. . 1,114 
Ohio 7 487 799 


Total 140,656,103 


Oklahoma .... 13 
Oregon 181 27^ 


BY STATES. 

Spirits, 
State. gallons. 
Ala. & Miss. 81,891 
Arkansas ... 31,348 
Cal. and Nev 14,735,978 
Col. & Wyo. 57 
Connecticut . . 142, 8- r >3 
Florida 142,389 
Hawaii 18,666 
Illinois 33,265,472 
Indiana . . 19,073,089 


Georgia 110 07"? 


Hawaii 35.194 
Idaho . . 9 3 796 


Pennsylvania.. 7,166.300 
Rhode Island. 621.977 
S. Carolina... 3.767 
South Dakota. 43,052 
Tennessee ... 89,573 
Texas 661.867 
Utah 130.121 
Virginia 164,517 
Washington .. 876.962 
Wisconsin .... 4,718,431 
Wyoming .... 14.872 


Illinois 6.269.757 
Indiana 1,568.028 
Iowa 472 764 


Pennsylvania . 8,954,580 
Rhode Island. 944 
S. Carolina. . 836.259 
Virginia .... 1,010,556 
Wash. & Alas. 270 
Wisconsin ... 2,133,977 


Kentucky .... 763,112 
Louisiana .... 502,811 
Maine 590 
Maryland .... 1,116,811 
Massachusetts. 2,378,437 
Michigan .... 1.929.472 
Minnesota .. . 1.643.108 


Total 140.656.103 



WINES AND LIQUORS CONSUMED IN THE UNITED STATES. 



YEAR. 


WINES. 


MALT LIQUORS. 


DISTILLED SPIRITS 


Total wines 
and liquors. 


Per 
capita ot 
all wines 
and 
liquors. 


Consump- 
tion. 


Per 
capita 


Consumption 


Per 

capita 


Consump- 
tion. 


Pei- 
capita. 

Pf . gls. 
2.52 
2.23 
2.86 
2.07 
.27 

5 

.47 
.58 
.39 
.32 
.42 
.46 
.44 
.50 
.43 
.25 


1840.... 
1850 
1860 

1870 


Gallons. 

4,873.096 
6,315,871 
11,059,141 
12 225 067 


Gals. 
.29 
.27 
.35 
.32 
.56 
.46 

.'53 
.65 
.58 
.67 
.65 
.67 
.58 
.56 
.52 
.32 


Gallons. 
23.310.843 
36.563,009 
101,346.669 
204,756,156 
414.220,165 
855,792.335 
1,221,500.160 
1.699.985,642 
1,821,867.627 
1,828.732,448 
1.752,634.426 
1,851.340.256 
1,966.911.744 
1,932,531.184 
2.030,347.372 
2.0^.407,108 
1.855.524.284 


Gals. 
1.36 
1.58 
3.22 
5.31 
8.26 
13.67 
16.01 
19.54 
20.56 
20.26 
19.07 
19.79 
20.66 
19.96 
20.62 
20.54 
18.24 


Pf . gallons. 
43.OtW.884 
51,833.473 

89.968.651 
79,895,708 
63,526.694 
87.82iU>W 
97,248.382 
127,754,544 
140.0S4.436 
125.379.314 
121.130.036 
133,538.684 
138.585,989 
139,496.331 
147,745,628 
143.447,227 
127.1 59.098 


Gallons. 

71,244,823 
94,712,353 
202.374.461 
296,876,931 
506.076,400 
972.57F.878 
1,349. 176, 033 
1.874.225.409 
2.019.690,911 
2.006.233,403 
1.935.544,011 
2,045.427,018 
2.169.356,695 
2.128.452.22H 
2.233,420,461 
2,25:3,27:2,760 
2,015.595.291 


Gallons, 
4.17 
4. OS 
6.43 
7.70 
10.08 
15.53 
' 17.79 
21.55 
22.79 
22.22 
21.06 
-32.19 
22.79 
21.98 
22.63 
22.50 
19.80 


1880 


28.098,179 
28.915,993 
29,988,467 
46,485.223 
57.738.848 
52,121,646 
61,779,549 
60.548.078 
63,859,232 
56,424,711 
55,327,461 
52,418,430 
32.911.909 


1890 


1900 


1906..., 


1907 
1908 
1909 


1910 


1911 


1912" 


1913 
1914. . 


1915 



COFFEE AND TEA CONSUMED IN THE UNITED STATES. 



YEAR ENDED 
JUNE 30. 


* COFFEE. 


TEA. 


Imports. 


Price* 


Per 
capitat 


Imports. 


Price* 


Per 

capital 


1830 


Pounds. 
51,488.248 
94,996.095 
145,272.657 
202,144.738 
2H5.256.574 
446,850,727 
499.159,120 
787.99 1.911 
873.983,689 
878,322,468 
887.747,747 
866.053.699 
1,006,362.294 
1,120,041.691 


Value. 
$4.227,021 
8.546,222 
11,234,835 
21.883,797 
24.234.879 
60.360,769 
78,267.432 
52.467,943 
69.504.647 
90.949,963 
118,233.958 
119.449,045 
111,454,240 
107,794.377 


Cents. 
8.3 
8.8 
7.6 
10.8 
10.3 
13.5 
16.0 
7.5 
7.9 
10.3 
13.3 
13.8 
11.1 
9.6 


Lbs. 
2.98 
5.06 
5.60 
5.79 
6.00 
8.78 
7.83 
9.81 
9.33 
9.27 
9.23 
8.85 
10.06 
10.52 


Pounds. 
8.609.415 
20,006,886 

29.872.654 
31,696,657 
47,408.481 
72,162,936 
83386,829 
84,845,107 
85.6-26.370 
102,653,942 
101,406,816 
94,812,800 
91,130,815 
96.987,942 


Value. 
$2,425.018 
5,427,010 
4.719.232 
8.915,327 
13,863,273 
19,782,931 
12,317.493 
10.558,110 
13.671,946 
17,613,569 
18,207,141 
17,433.688 
16,735,302 
17,512,619 


Cents. 
23.3 
24.1 
14.1 
26.3 
2-J.4 
27.4 
15.0 
12.4 
16.0 
17.2 
18.0 
18.4 
18.4 
18.1 


Lbs. 
.53 
.99 
1.32 
.84 
.10 
.39 
.33 
.09 
.89 
.04 
1.05 
.95 
.1)0 
.91 


1840.... 


1850 


1860 


1870 


1880 . 


1890 
1900 


1910 


1911.. 


1912... 


1913.... 


1914.... 


1915 



* Average import price per pound. tConsumption per capita based on net imports. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



153 



THE SHERMAN ANTITRUST LAW. 

Passed by the 51st congress and approved July 2, 1890. 



Section 1. Every contract, combination in the 
form of trust or otherwise or conspiracy in re- 
straint of trade or commerce among the several 
states or with foreign nations is hereby declared 
to be illegal. Every person who shall make any 
such contract or engage in any such combination 
or conspiracy shall be deemed guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and on conviction thereot shall be pun- 
ished by tine not exceeding $5,000 or by imprison- 
ment not exceeding one year, or by both said 
punishments? in the discretion of the court. 

Sec. 2. Every person who shall monopolize or 
attempt to monopolize or combine or conspire 
with any person or persons to monopolize any 
part of the trade or commerce among the 
several states or with foreign nations shall be 
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and on con- 
viction thereof shall be punished by fine not ex- 
ceeding $5,000 or by imprisonment not exceed- 
ing one year, or by both said punishments, in 
the discretion of the court. 



Sec. 



Every contract, combination in form of 



trust or otherwise or conspiracy in restraint of 
trade or commerce in any territory of the United 
States or of the District of Columbia, or in re- 
straint of trade or commerce between any such 
territory and another, or between any such 
territory or territories and any state or states 
or the District of Columbia or with foreign 
nations, or between the District of Columbia 
and any state or states or foreign nations, is 
hereby declared illegal. Every person who shall 
make any such contract or engage in any such 
combination or conspiracy shall be deemed 
guilty of a misdemeanor, and on conviction 
tnereof shall be punished by n'ne not exceeding 
$5,000 or by imprisonment not exceeding one 
year, or by both said punishments, in the dis- 
cretion of "the court. 

Sec. 4. The several Circuit courts of the 
United States are hereby invested with juris- 
diction to prevent or restrain violations of this 
act: and it shall be the duty of the several 
district attorneys of the United States, in their 
respective districts, under the direction of the 
attorney-general, to institute proceedings in 
equity to prevent and restrain such violations. 
Such proceedings may be by way of petition 

THE MONROE AND 

The "Monroe doctrine" was enunciated by 
President Monroe in his message to congress 
Dec. 2. 1823. Referring to steps taken to arrange 
the respective rights of Russia, Great Britain 
and the United States on the northwest coast 
of this continent, the president went on to eay: 

"In the discussions to which this interest has 
given rise, and in the arrangements by which 
they may terminate, the occasion has been 
deemed proper for asserting, as a principle in 
which the rights and interests of the United 
States are involved, that the American conti- 
nents, by the free and independent condition 
which they have assumed and maintain, are 
henceforth not to be considered as subjects for 
future colonization by any European power. 
* * * We owe it, therefore, to candor and to 
the amicable relations existing between the 
United States and those powers to declare that 
we should consider any attempt on their part 
to extend their system to any portion of this 
hemisphere as dangerous to our peace and safety. 
With the existing colonies or dependencies of 
any European power we have not interfered 
and shall not interfere. But with the govern- 
ments who have declared their independence 
and maintain it, and whose independence we 
have, on great consideration and on just prin- 
ciples, acknowledged, we could not view any 
interposition for the purpose of oppressing them 
or controlling in any other manner their destiny 
by any European power in any other light than 
as the manifestation of an unfriendly disposi- 
tion toward the United States." 
DRAGO DOCTRINE. 

When in the winter of 1902-03 Germany, 
Britain and Italy blockaded the ports of Yen- 



setting forth the case and praying that such 
violation shall be enjoined or otherwise pro- 
hibited. When the parties complained of shall 
have been duly notified of such petition the 
court shall proceed as soon as may be to the 
hearing and determination of the case; and 
pending such petition and before final decree 
the court may at any time make such temporary 
restraining order or prohibition as shall be 
deemed just in the premises. 

Sec. 5. Whenever it shall appear to the court 
before which any proceeding under section 4 of 
this act may be pending that the ends of justice 
require that other parties should be brought be- 
fore the court, the court may cause them to be 
summoned, whether they reside in the district 
in which the court is held or not; and subpoenas 
to that end may be served in any district by 
the marshal thereof. 

Any property owned under any con- 



Sec. 



tract or by any combination or pursuant to any 
conspiracy (and being the subject thereof) men- 
tioned in section 1 of this act and being in the 
course of transportation from one state to an- 
other or to a foreign country shall be forfeited 
to the United States and may be seized and con- 
demned by like proceedings as those provided 
by law for the forfeiture, seizure and condem- 
nation of property imported into the United 
States contrary to law. 

Sec. 7. Any person who shall be injured in 
his business or property by any other person or 
corporation by reason of anything forbidden or 
declared unlawful by this act may sue therefor 
in any Circuit court of the United States in 
the district in which the defendant resides or 
is found, without respect to the amount in con- 
troversy, and shall recover threefold the damages 
by him sustained and the cost of suit, including 
a reasonable attorney's fee. 

Sec. 8. That the word "person" or "persons" 
wherever used in this act be deemed to include 
corporations and associations existing under or 
authorized by the laws of either the United 
States, the lawa of any of the territories, the 
laws of any state or the laws of any foreign 
country. 



DRAGO DOCTRINES. 

ezuela in attempt to make the latter country 
settle up its debts Dr. L. F. Drago. a noted 
jurist of Argentina, maintained that force cannot 
be used by one power to collect "money owing 
to its citizens by another power. Prominence 
was given to the contention by the fact that 
it was officially upheld by Argentina and fa- 
vored by other South American republics. The 
principle embodied has become generally known 
as the "Drago doctrine." 

LODGE RESOLUTION. 

In connection with the reported attempt of 
Japan to obtain land for the establishment of a 
naval base in Mngdalena bay, on the western 
coast of Mexico, the senate of the United States 
adopted the following resolution Aug. 2, 1912: 

"Resolved, That when any harbor or other 
place in the American continents is so situated 
that the occupation thereof for naval or mili- 
tary purposes might threaten the communica- 
tions or the safety of the United States, the 
government of the United States could not 
sec without grave concern the possession of 
such harbor or other place by any corporation 
or association which has such relation to an- 
other government, not American, as to give 
that government practical power of control for 
national purposes." 

THE PTJLSE AT DIFFERENT AGES. 

Now born infants, per minute 130 to 140 

First year, per minute 115 to 130 

Second year, per minute 95 to 110 

Third year, per minute 85 to 95 

Seventh to fourteenth year, per minute. 80 to 90 

In adult age, per minute 70 to 75 

In old age, per minute 60 to 75 



154 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 11)17. 



jForctgn obcrnments. 



Rulers and cabinets of the leading countries, with the latest statistics of their area, population, 
exports and imports. Revised to Dec. 11, 1916. 



GREAT BRITAIN. 

Government King. George V. ; heir-apparent. Ed- 
ward Albert, prince of Wales. 

Prime Minister *David Lloyd George. 

Minister Without Portfolio * Arthur Henderson. 

Lord Higb Chancellor Sir Robert B. Finlay. 

Minister Without Portfolio *Lord Milner. 

Lord President of the Council *Earl Curzon. 

Chancellor of the Exchequer * Andrew Bonar 
Law. 

Foreign Affairs Secretary Arthur J. Balfour. 

Home Affairs Secretary Sir George Cave. 

Colonial Secretary Walter Hume Long. 

Secretary for India Joseph Austen Chamberlain. 

Secretary for War Earl of Derby. 

Minister of Munitions Dr. Christopher Addison. 

First Lord of the Admiralty Sir Edward Carson. 

President of the Board of Trade Sir Albert 
Stanley. 

President of the Local Government Board Lord 
Rhondda. 

Postmaster-General Albert Illingworth. 

Chief Secretary for Ireland Henry E. Duke. 

Secretary for Scotland R. Munro. 

President Board of Agriculture Rowland Proth- 
ero. 

First Commissioner of Works Sir Alfred M. 
Mond. 

Minister of Blockade Lord Robert Cecil. 

Attorney-General Sir Frederick E. Smith. 

Minister of Pensions George N. Barnes. 

Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster Sir Fred- 
erick Lawley. 

Solicitor-GeneralGordon Hewart. 

Lord Lieutenant of Ireland Lord Wimborne. 

Lord Advocate James A. Clyde. 

Minister of Labor John Hodge. 

Food Controller Lord Devonport. 

Shipping Controller Sir Joseph P. Maclay. 

President Board of Education Herbert A. L. 
Fisher. 



I are within the metropolitan police district, the 
population of "Greater London" April 3, 1911. 
I was- 7.251.358. 

Population of the chief cities in Scotland in 1911: 

Glasgow 784,455 Greenock 68.911 

Edinburgh 320,315 Perth 36,995 

Aberdeen 133.084 Kilmarnock 34.729 

Dundee 165,006 Govan 89,725 

Paisley 84.477 Partick 66.848 

Leith 80,489 Coatbridge 43.287 

The total population of Ireland in 1911 was 
4.390.219. against a total of 4.458.775 in 1901. 
Population of the chief cities of Ireland in 1911: 



Dublin 309.272 

Belfast 385.492 



Cork 
Limerick .... 
Londonderry 
Waterford .. 
Galway . 



76.632 
38.403 
40,799 
27,430 



Dundalk 13.128 



Lurgan 12,135 

Lisburn 12.172 

Wexford 11.455 

Sligo 11.163 

Kilkenny 13,112 

Kingstown 17,227 

Portadown 11.727 

Bally mena 11.376 

Clonmel 10,277 



Drogheda 12.425 

Newry 12,456 

Exports and Imports The total imports of the 
British empire in 1915 were $6,893,360,500 ; of the 
united kingdom, $4,372,724,000. Total exports of 
the empire, $5,051,696,600; of the united king- 
dom, $2,647,115,700. The total exports of the 
united kingdom to the United States in 1916 
were $308,443,223; imports, $1,518,046,203. 
INDIA. 

Government Governor-general, Baron Frederic 
Chelmsford. Legislative authority vested in a 
council of sixty-eight members, thirty-six being 
official and thirty-two nonofficial. 

Area and Population The total area of British 
India is 1.773.088 square miles. The total popu- 
lation according to the census of March 10, 
1911. is 315.132.527. divided among the provinces 
as follows: 



'Members war cabinet 

The British parliamen 
legislative authority is 
house of lords and the ] 

Area and Population Tfr 
Scotland, Ireland, Wai 
the Channel islands is 
total for the British e 
miles. The total popu 
1911 was 421.178,965. 
united kingdom April 
census was taken, w 
Wales. 2.025.202; Scot 
4.390.219: Isle of Man. 
96.900. Total. 45.369.09C 
The cities of England 
than 100.000 population e 
London 4 522 961 


or council. 

t, in which the 
vested, consists 
louse of commons. 

e total area of Ei 
es. the Isle of M 
121,391 square mil 
npire Is 11,498.825 
lation of the emi 
The population 
3, 1911. when th 
as: England. 34.( 
land. 4,759.445; I 
52.034; Channel i 
. 

and Wales bavin) 
ach were in 1911: 
Sunderland 
Oldham 


highest 
of the 

igland. 
an and 
3 s ; the 
square 
lire in 
of the 
e last 
)45.290; 
reland. 
slands, 

? more 

151.162 
147.495 
133,064 
131.250 
116.928 
123.433 
119,039 
112.042 
121.493 
130.832 
117.113 
101,556 
106.337 
104,787 
108,693 
108.649 
106.377 
107.825 
114.673 

London 
alone, 
which 


Liverpool 746,566 
Manchester . .. 714,427 
Birmingham .. 525.960 
Leeds 445,568 
Sheffield 454.653 
Bristol 357.059 
West Ham.. .. 289.102 
Bradford 288.505 
Newcastle .. .. 266.671 
Kingston-upon- 
Hllll 278 024 


Blackburn. 
Brighton 
Gateshead 
Derby 


Southampton.... 
Plymouth 
Norwich 
Birkenhead 
Preston 


Halifax 
Burnlev 


Nottingham . 
Leicester .... 


... 259.942 
. 227.242 


Middlesbrough. . . 
Stockport 
South Shields... 
Coventry 


Salford 231,380 
Portsmouth 231.165 
Stoke-on-Trent... 234.553 
Cardiff 182 280 


Huddersfield .... 
Swansea 


Bolton 


... 180 885 


Croydon 


... 169.559 


e above table for ] 
listration district 
of suburban towns 


The figures 
are for the i 
Including the 


given in th 
nner or rej 
outer belt 



Ajmer-Marwara 501,395 

Assam 34.018,527 

Bengal 52,668,269 

Bombay presi- 
dency 19.672,642 

Burma 12.115.217 

Central prov- 
inces 13.916.308 

Coorg 174,976 

Population of the large cities In 1911: 



Madras 41.405.404 

Northwest prov- 
inces 2.196,933 

United p r o v - 

inces 47.182.044 

Punjab 19.974.956 

Baluchistan ... 414.412 
Andamans 26,459 



Calcutta 1.222,313 

Bombay 979,445 

Madras 518,660 

Haidarabad 500.623 

Lucknow 259.788 

Rangoon 293.316 

Benares 203.804 



Delhi 232.837 

Lahore 228,687 

Cawnpore 178.557 

Agra 185.449 

Ahmedabad 215,835 

Allahabad 171,697 

Poona 158.856 

Imports and Exports Imports in 1915, $589,368,- 
700; exports, $653,278,900. Imports from the 
United States, $19,298,150; exports, $71,745,626. 

DOMINION OF CANADA. 

Government The Canadian parliament consists of 
eighty-seven life senators and a house of com- 
mons of 221 members, there being one repre- 
sentative for every 25,367 of population, based 
upon the census of 1901. The governor-general 
is the duke of Devonshire, appointed in 1916 ; 
and the council is made up of the following: 
Premier, Robert L. Borden ; minister of agri- 
culture, Martin Burrell ; customs, John D. 
Reid; finance, T. White; inland revenue. E. 
L. Patewaud; interior, William J. Roche; 
justice, C. J. Doherty; labor, T. W. Crothers; 
marine, fisheries and naval service, J. D. Ha- 
zen; militia (vacancy); postmaster-general (va- 
cancy); public works, Robert Rogers; rail 
ways and canals, Francis Cochrane; secretary 
of state and minister of mines, Pierre 
Blondin ; trade and commerce, George E. Fos- 
ter ; ministers without portfolio, A. E. Kemp, 



iXMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



J. A. Lougheed, Georj 
ernor-general gets a & 
the premier $12,000 a 
$7,000 each. 
Area and Population Tl 
is 3.729,665 square mil 
land area. 
Area of provinces:' 
Province. Sq. miles. 
Alberta 255,285.00 
Brit. Columbia 355,855.00 
Nova Scotia.. 21,427.77 
Ontariot 260.862.00 
Prince Edward 
island 2,184.36 
QuebecJ 351.873.00 
Manitoba* ... 73.731.72 
*Area increased in 191$ 
flncreased in 1912 to 40 
creased in 1912 to 706,834 f 
in 1912 to 1.242,224 squar 
The census taken June 
lowing population by pr 
Province. 1911. 
Alberta 374.663 
B'tish Columbia 392.480 
Manitoba 455,614 
New Brunswick 351,889 
Nova Scotia.... 492,338 
Ontario 2.523.274 
Prince Edw.Isl. 93.728 
Quebec 2.003,232 
Saskatchewan... 492,432 
Yukon 8,512 
No'west territ's 18,481 


je H. Perley. The gov- 
alary of $50,000 a year, 
nd the other ministers 

ic total area of Canada 
es, of which 3,603.910 is 

Province. Sq. miles. 
N. Brunswick 27,985.11 
Saskatchewan 251,700 00 
Yukon 207,076.00 
Northwest ter- 
ritories ...1,921.685.00 


Nelson. B. C 4,476 
New Glasgow. N.S. 6,383 
New Westminster. 
B C ... . 13 199 


St. Thomas. Ont.. 14.054 
Saruia, Out 9,947 
Saskatoon, Sas 12,004 
Sault Ste. Marie, 
Ont 10 984 


Niagara Falls. Out. 9,248 
North Bay. Ont... 7.737 
N'rthToronto.Ont. 5,362 
North Sydney. N.S. 5.418 
North Vancouver. 
B C 8 306 


Shawinigan Falls, 
Out 4 265 


Sherbrooke, Que.. 16,405 
Smith's Falls, Ont. 6,370 
Sorel Que 8 4?0 


Orillia. Ont 6,828 
Oshawa. Ont 7.436 
Ottawa. Ont 87.062 
Outremont. Que.. 4,820 
Owen Sound. Ont. 12,558 
Paris. Ont 4.098 
Pembroke. Out... 5,626 
Peterborough, Ont. 18,360 
Portage La Prairie. 
Man 5.892 


Snriiighill. N. S.. 5.713 
Stratford, Ont.... 12.946 
Strathcona, Alb.. 5,579 
Sudbury, Ont 4,150 
Sydney. N. S 17.723 


Total ... 3,729,664.96 


Sydney Mines, N.S. 7,470 
Thetford Mines. 
Que 7 '61 


to 251,832 square miles. 
7,262 square miles. Jln- 
quare miles. Decreased 
e miles. 
1. 1911, showed the fol- 
>vinces: Pr. ct. 
1901. Increase, incr. 
73,022 301.641 413.08 
178,657 213.823 119.68 
255.211 200.403 78.52 
331.120 20.769 6.27 
459,574 32,764 7.13 
2,182,947 340.261 15.58 
103.259 *9,531 *9.23 
1,648 898 354.434 21.46 
91.279 401.153 439.48 
27,219 *18,707 *68.73 
20,129 *1.648 *8.19 


Toronto Ont 376 53S 


Trois-Rivieres. 
Que 13.691 


Port Arthur. Ont. 11,220 
Port Hope, Ont... 5.092 
Prince Albert. Sas. 6.254 
Prince Rupert. 
B C 4 184 


Truro. N. S 6,107 


Valley Field. Que. 9,449 
Vancouver. B. C.. 100. 401 
Verdun. Que 11.629 


Quebec Que 78 190 


Victoria. B. C.... 31.660 
Waterloo On* 4.359 
Welland, Out 5.318 
Westmount. Que.. 14.579 
Westville. N. B.. 4.417 
Windsor. Ont 17.829 
Winnipeg. Man. ..136,035 
Woodstock. Ont.. 9.320 
Yarmouth, N. S.. 6.609 


Regina Sas. 30213 


Revelstoke, B. C. 3.017 
St. Boniface. Man. 7.483 
St.Catherines.Ont. 12.484 
St.Hvacinthe.Que. 9.797 
St. Jean. Que 5.903 
St. John, N. B... 42.511 
Population by origin (1 
British total 3,896,985 
English 1,823.150 


911): 
Dutch 54,986 


Total 7,206.643 


5.371.315 1.833.212 34.13 

per square mile in 1911: 
Persq. 
Female. Total. mile. 
150,674 374,663 1.47 
140.861 392.480 1.09 
205.558 455,614 6.18 
172.022 351.889 12.61 
241.319 492.338 22.98 
1.223.984 2.523.274 9.67 
46,659 93,728 42.91 
991.465 2.002.712 5.69 
200,702 492.432 1.95 
2,004 8,512 


Finnish 15,497 


'Decrease. 
Population by sex and 

Province. Male. 
Alberta 223,989 
B'tish Columbia 251,619 
Manitoba 250,056 


Scotch 997 880 


Hindu 2.342 


Welsh 24 848 


Indian 105 492 


Other 723 


Italian 45 411 


French 2.054.890 


Japanese 9.021 


German 393,320 
Austro-Hung 129.103 
Austrian 42,535 
Bukovinian ... 9,960 
Galician 35,158 


Jewish 75.681 
Negro 16.877 
Polish 33 365 


New Brunswick 179,867 
Nova Scotia.... 251,019 
Ontario 1.299.290 
Prince Edw.Isl. 47,069 
Quebec 1.011.247 
Saskatchewan... 291.730 
Yukon 6 508 


Russian 43,142 
Scandinavian ... 107.535 
Swiss 6.625 
Turkish 3 880 


Hungarian 11,605 
Ruthenian 29,845 
Belgian 9 593 


Various 18 310 


Bulgarian-Rou- 
manian 5.875 
Chinese 27.774 
Manufactures [From cei 
for year 1910.1 

Establishments 


Unspecified 147,345 

Total pop 7,206,643 
isus taken in June. 1911. 

1900. 1910. 
14 fiSO 19 218 


No'west territ's 8,530 

Total 3.820.8S7 
The rural population I 
the urban population 3.2 
population was 3,369,018 i 
2.002.297. The increase o 
ten years was therefore 
1.278.147. or 16.48 per -cen 
per cent for the urban. 
The population of the 
in 1911 was: 
Amherst. N. S.... 8.973 
Arn prior. Out 4,405 
Barrie. Out 6.420 
Belleville. Out.... 9.876 
Berlin. Out 15.196 
Brandon. Man.... 13.839 
Brantford. Out.... 23.132 
Brockville, Out... 9,374- 
Calgary. Alb 43.704 


8,421 16.951 ...... 

3,383.640 7.204.527 1.93 
n 1911 was 3.924.083 and 
80.444. In 1901 the rural 
ind the urban population 
f rural population in the 
555,065 and of the urban 
t for the rural and 63.83 

jriucipal cities and towns 

Glace Bay. N. S.. 12.562 
Goderich, Ont 4,552 
Granby, Que 4.750 
Grand 'Mere. Que. 4,783 
Guelph. Ont 15,175 
Halifax, N. S 46.619 
Hamilton. Out.... 81,969 
Hawkesburv. Ont. 4,400 
Hull. Que 18.222 
Ingersoll. Ont 4.763 
.Toilette. Que 6,346 
Kamloops, B. C.. 3,772 
Kaslo. B. C 3,146 
Kenora, Ont 6,158 
Kingston, Out.... 18.874 
Lachine. Que 10.699 
Leathbridge. Alb. 8.050 
Levis. Que 7.452 


Capital $446916487 $1247583609 


Employes on salaries 30.691 44,077 
Salaries *23 fi? 14 $43 77<t 71 s 


Employes on wages 
Wa ges 


308.482 471.126 
. $89.573.204 $197,228,701 
.$266,527.858 $601.509.018 
.$481,053,375 $1.165.975.639 
groups (1910). 
Wage Value 
)ital. earners, products. 
044,523 52,730 J245.669.321 
787,407 72.672 135.902,441 
561,319 48.558 113.640.610 
889.715 110.049 .184,630.376 

788.803 22,742 62,850,412 
677,612 22,894 46,458.053 
237,757 4,688 28.936,782 
926,124 5,274 27.798,833 

859.507 17,699 25.781.860 

133.540 17.502 73.241.796 
659.935 8,763 25.329.323 
397,096 35,778 89.712,114 
351,765 4,414 6.575.417 
148.103 38,537 i04, 618,560 
120.403 8,826 14.829,741 


Raw materials 


Value products 
Industries by principal 

Establish- 
Groups. ments Caj 
Food products 6,985 $133, 
Textiles 1,444 108, 
Iron and steel 824 123, 
Timber, lumb'r 4.999 259, 
Leather prod- 


Charlottetown, 
P. E 1 11.198 
Chatham. N. B... 4,6(56 
Chatham. Ont 10.770 
Cobalt, Ont 5.638 
Chi-contimi. Que.. 5.880 
Coborg. Ont 5,074 
Collingwood. Ont. 7.090 
Cornwall, Ont.... 6.598 
Dartmouth. N. S.. 5.058 
Dawson, Yukon... 3.013 
Dundas Ont 4 299 


Paper.printing 773 62 
Liquors 260 43. 
Chemicals .... 178 26 
Clay, ghiss. 
stone prod'tn 771 45, 
Metals other 
than steel... 341 67, 
Tobacco 173 21. 


Lindsay, Ont 6,964 
London. Ont 46.300 
Mai.sonneuve. Que. 18.6S4 
Medicine Hat, Alb. 5,608 
Midland. Ont 4.663 
Moncton. N B.... 11.345 
Montreal. Que 470.480 
Mooseiaw. Sas.... 13.823 
Nanaimo. C... 8.306 


Vessels 172 10 


Miscellaneous 1,011 235, 
Hand trades.. 423 11 


Edmonton. Alb... 24,900 
Fernie, B. C 3,146 
Ft. William. Ont. 16.499 
Fraserville. Que.. 6.774 
Fredericton. N. B. 7.208 
Gait. Ont 10.299 


Total 19,218 1,247,583,609 471,126 1.165.975.639 
Religions of Canada in 1911. Figures here 
given are only for denominations having more 
than 10,000 members: 



156 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Ldventists 



10,406 



k-nglicans 1,043,017 

382.666 



10,012 
16.773 
14.562 



11.329 
10.493 
10.595 



Greek church... 88,507 
Jews 74,564 



Lutherans 



Mennonites 



229.864 
44.611 



Methodists 1,079.892 

Mormons 15.971 

Presbyterians ..1.115.324 
Protestants .... 30.265 
Roman Catholics2,833,041 
Salvation Army 18.834 



Baptists 

Buddhists 

Christians 

Confucian 

Congregati'alists 34.054 

Discioles ... 

Doukhobors 

Evangelicals ... . ^ ~.. ., 

Imports and Exports The total value of the im- 
ports for the year endrd March 31, 1915, was 
$629,444,894 ; exports, $490,808.877. Imports from 
the United States (1916), $466,884,415; exports 
to the United States, $204,018,227. 

COMMONWEALTH OP AUSTRALIA. 
July 9, 1900, the British parliament passed an 
act empowering the six provinces of Australia to 
form a federal union and Jan. 1, 1901. the new 
commonwealth was proclaimed at Sydney, N. S. 
W. Its first parliament was opened May 9. 1901, 
by the prince of Wales (now George V.), heir- 
apparent to the British throne, acting for his 
father. King Edward VII. The capital at pres- 
ent is in Melbourne. 

Government The federal parliament is made up 
of a senate of thirty-six members, six from 
each original state, and a house of representa- 
tives of seventy-five members, apportioned as 
follows: New South Wales, 27; Victoria. 21; 
Queensland. 10; South Australia, 7: Western 
Australia, 5; Tasmania, 5. The king is repre- 
sented by the governor-general. He and the 
council of seven ministers exercise the execu- 
tive power. The governor-general is paid a 
salary of $50,000 a year. The governor-general 
is Ronald C. Munro-Ferguson. The ministers 
are: W. M. Hughes, prime minister and treas- 
urer; F. G. Tudor, trade and customs; G. F. 
Pearce, defense ; W. Webster, postmaster-gen- 
eral ; Hugh Mahon, external affairs ; King 
O'Malley, home affairs ; W. G. Higgs, treas- 
urer ; J. A. Jensen, navy. 

Area and Population The commonwealth has a 
total area of 2,974.581 square miles, divided 
among the states as follows: 



New South Wales.310.372 

Victoria 87.884 

Queensland 670,500 



North'rn Territ'y.523.620 
West'n Australia 975.920 
Tasmania 26,215 



South Australia... 380.070 . 

The total population of the commonwealth as 
enumerated April 2. 1911. was 4,455.005. divided 
among the states as follows: 



Western Austra- 
lia ............. 

Tasmania ...... 



282.114 
191.211 



New South Walesl. 648,448 

Victoria 1,315.551 

Queensland 605,813 

South Australia. 408.558 

North'n Terrify 3.310 Total 4.455.005 

The population of Melbourne in 1911 was 600.160; 
Sydney (1911). 636,353: Adelaide (1911). 192.429; 
Wellington (1911). 70.729: Brisbane (1911), 143.514. 
Exports and Imports The total exports of the 
states in the commonwealth in 1915 were $333,- 
001,500; total imports, $321,903,700. Australia 
in 1916 exported merchandise valued at $54,174,- 
324 to the United States and imported mer- 
chandise worth $59,245,084. 

UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA. 
Sept. 29. 1909. the British parliament passed an 
act empowering the four serf-governing colonies 
of South Africa Cape of Good Hope. Natal. 
Transvaal and Orange Free State to form a 
federal government to be known as the Union of 
South Africa. This v,-as proclaimed May 31, 1910. 
at Pretoria, the seat of government, other serv- 
ices taking place at Cape Town, the seat of the 
legislature. 

The executive government is vested in the king, 
represented by a governor-general, and an ex- 
ecutive council and in ten ministers of state. 
Legislative power is vested in a parliament con- 
sisting of a senate and a house of assembly. 
The senate contains forty members, eight of 
whom are nominated by the governor-general in 
council and thirty-two elected by the four prov- 
inces, each of which is entitled to eight senators. 
The assembly consists of 121 members, chosen in 
electoral divisions as follows: The Cape of Good 
Hope. 51: Natal. 17: Transvaal, 36: Orange Free 
State. 17. Senators are elected for ten years and 



assemblymen for five. The English and Dutch 

languages are both official. 

Imports and Exports The total imports of the 
four states in 1915 were valued at $159,053,500 
and the exports at $314,871,000. Exports to the 
United States in 1915, $4,947,311; imports, $14,- 

Gove'rnor-General Viscount Buxton of Newtini- 
ber. Cabinet: Premier and minister of native 
affairs. Gen. Louis Botha ; nuance, railways 
and harbors, Henry Burton ; defense, J. C. 
Smuts ; railways, Henry Burton ; justice, N. J. 
de Wet ; education and mines, F. S. Malan ; 
interior and public works, Sir T. Watt ; agri- 
culture, H. C. Van Heerden ; lands, H. Mentz ; 
posts and telegraphs, Sir Mairing Beck ; with- 
out portfolio, J. A. C. Graaf. 
Area in square miles and population in 1911: 
Province. Area. Population. 

Cape of Good Hope 276,995 2.564,965 

Natal 35.290 1.194.043 

Transvaal 110.426 1.686.212 

Orange Free State 50.389 528.174 

Total 473.100 5.973.394 

ALBANIA. 

Albania is an autonomous kingdom created at a 
conference of ambassadors in London May 30, 
1913. as a result of the Balkan wars. Its terri- 
tory formerly comprised the Turkish provinces of 
Scutari and Yanina. It has an area of 11.317 
square miles and a population of nearly 1.000.000. 
Until the outbreak of the European war in Au- 
gust, 1914, it was governed by a king (mpret) 
and an international commission. William I.. 
prince of Wied, was the first king, but he was 
on the throne only half a year, an insurrection 
compelling him to leave the capital. Durazzo. 
Sept. 2, 1914. Since then the country has been 
in a state of disorder. The Austrians captured 
the greater part of it in the winter of 1915-1916. 

AUSTRIA-HUNGARY. 

Government Emperor of Austria and king of 

Hungary, Charles I. (Charles Franc-is Joseph); 
. heir-apparent, Archduke Francis Joseph Otto. 

Joint or common ministry: 

Foreign Affairs Count Czernin von Chudenitz. 
War Gen. Krobatin. 
Finance Baron Stefihan Burian. 

Cabinet for Austria: 
Premier Count Clarm-Martiniz. 
Interior Ilerr von Handel. 
Commerce Dr. Urban. 
Finance Alexander Spitzmueller. 
Railways Dr. Z. von Forstcr. 
Instruct ion Baron Hussarek. 
Agriculture Count Clarm-Martiniz. 
Justice Herr von Schenck. 

National Defense Gen. Friedrich Baron Georgl. 
Labor Ilerr von Trnka. 

Cabinet for Hungary: 
Premier Count Stephan Tisza. 
Interior Johann Sandor. 
Finance Johann Teleszky. 
Defense Samuel Hazay. 
Justice Dr. Engen Balogh. 
Commerce Baron John Harkanyi. 
Agriculture Baron Emeric Ghillanyi. 
Education Dr. Adalbert -Yaukovich. 
Minister for Croatia and Slavonia Emmerich 

von Hideghety. 

The empire of Austria and the kingdom of 
Hungary are sovereign states, each with its own 
constitution, legislative bodies and system of 
administration, co-ordinate in rank and mutually 
independent within the domain of home affairs. 
Foreign representation (embassies and consu- 
lates), the army and navy, customs (import and 
export duties) and the administration of the an- 
nexed provinces (Bosnia and Herzegovina) are. 
however, conducted in common. Legislation on 
matters affecting the interests of the dual mon- 
archy as a whole is intrusted to the delegations 
two bodies of sixty members ench. chosen from 
among members of the two legislative chambers 
of Austria and Hungary respectively. 
Area and Population Area of Austria. 115.903 

square miles: of Hungary, 125.395 square miles. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1U17. 



157 



The population of Austria in 1910 was 28,324,940. 

The population of Hungary in 1910 was 20.886,787. 

Total population for both countries in 1910 was 

49.211.727. 

Largest cities of Austria in 1910: 



Trieste 


229 475 
223.741 
206.113 
151.886 
151.781 
of Hung 
880 371 


Czernowitz 
Pilseu 
Liuz 
Poia 

ary in 1910: 


87.128 
80.343 
67.817 
58,081 

78,223 
72.555 
66.834 
63.166 
62 445 


Prague 


Lemberg 
Cracow (1909) . . . 
Gratz 


Largest cities 
Budapest . .. . 


Szeged 
Szabadka . 


..118.328 
94 610 


Temesvar 


Debreczen .... 


.. 92.729 


Arad 


Zagrab .. 


.. 79.038 


HodrnezoVas'rholv 



Imports and Exports The value of the imports 
into the Austro-Hungarian -customs territory in 
1914 was $573,580,000; exports, $419,980,000. Chief 
imports are cotton, coal, wool, maize, tobacco, 
coffee and wines: principal exports lumber and 
wool manufactures, sugar, eggs, barley, lignite, 
malt, leather, gloves and shoes. Imports from 
the United States in 1916, $152,929; exports to 
United States, $1,431,570. 

BELGIUM. 

Government King, Albert I. Cabinet: 

Premier and Minister of War Ch. de Broqueville. 

Foreign Affairs Baron Beyens. 

Interior Paul Berryer. 

Finance M. Levie. 

Justice H. Carton de Wiart. 

Agriculture and Public Works G. Helleputte. 

Industry and Labor M. A. Hubert. 

Science and Arts E\ Poulet. 

Colonies J. Reukin. 

Railways A. Van de Vyvere. 

Marine, Posts and Telegraphs P. Segers. 
The legislative power is vested in the king, 

senate and chamber of representatives. The sen- 
ate has 120 members and the chamber 186, or one 

for every 40,000 inhabitants. 

Area and Population Total area, 11,373 square 
miles. Total population, 1910, 7,423,784; estimated 
population, 1912, 7,571,387. Population of the 
largest cities Dec. 31. 1912: 

Antwerp 312.884 i Liege 170,634 

Brussels (capital). 663, 647 J Ghent 167.477 

Imports and Exports The imports in the first 
six months of 1914 amounted to $460,630,000 and 
the exports to $370,795.000. The trade with the 
United States in 1916 was: Imports, $21,844,- 
638 ; exports, $1,478,579. Chief imports in normal 
times are cereals, textiles and metal goods ; 
chief exports, cereals, raw textiles, tissues, 
iron, glass, hides, chemicals and machinery. 

BULGARIA. 

Government-King. Ferdinand. Legislation is en- 
acted by the sobranje. a single chamber of 209 
members elected for five years. Bulgaria in 
1908 declared itself independent of Turkey, un- 
der the suzerainty of which country it had 
been an autonomous principality. 

Premier M. Kadoslavoff. 

Area and Population Area. 43,310 square miles. 
Population in 1914. 4,752,997. Population of ! 
Sofia, the capital. 102.769 

Imports and Exports Exports in 1914, $28,812,300 ; 
imports, $44.58&,800. Exports to the United 
States in 1916, $95,395 ; imports, $44,223. The 
exports are mainly cereals and the imports 
textiles. 

DENMARK. 

Government King. Christian X.: heir-apparent. 
Prince Christian Frederick. Cabinet: 

Premier and Minister of Justice Carl Theodor. 

Finance Christopher Hage. 

Foreign Affairs Erik Seavenius. 

Home Affairs Ove Rode. 

Agriculture Kr. Pederson. 

Instruction Rev. K. Nielsen. 

Commerce J. H. Juergensen. 

Defense P. Munch. 

Legislative authority is vested in the lands- 
thing and folkething. The former, which is the 

upper house, has 66 members, twelve of whom 



are appointed for life, the remainder being 

elected for terms of eight years. The folkethiug. 

or lower house, has 114 niemuers, each elected 

for three years. 

Area aud Population Denmark's area is 15,582 
square miles and total population in 1911, 
2,775,076. Copenhagen, the capital, has a popu- 
lation of 462,161 ; with suburbs, 637,453. 

Imports and Exports Total exports in 1914, $240,- 
957,200; imports, $220,913,300. The imports from 
the United States in 1916 were $55,662,411; ex- 
ports, $3,421,921. Leading articles of export are 
butter, pork, eggs and lard ; of import, textiles, 
cereals, wood, iron manufactures and coal. 

FRANCE. 

Government President. Raymond Poincare; term 

expires 1920. 
Premier and Minister of Foreign Affairs 

*Aristide Briand. 
Justice Rene Viviani. 
Public Instruction Prof. Paul Painleve. 
Colonies Gaston Doumergue. 
Finance *Alexandre Ribot. 
War *Gen. Hubert L. Yautey. 
Marine *Rear-Admiral Lacaze. 
Munitions *Albert Thomas. 
Interior Louis J. Malvy. 
Public Works Marcel Sembat. 
Commerce and Agriculture Etienne Clementel. 
Labor and National Subsistence M. Herriot. 
Without Portfolio Jules Guesde, Emil Combes, 

Leon Bourgeois, Denys Cochin, M. de Frey- 

cinet. 

*Council of national defense. 

Legislative authority is vested In the chamber 
of deputies and the senate. The former has 602 
members, each of whom is elected for four years. 
The senate has aoo members, elected for nine 
years. The presidential term is seven years. 
Area and Population France has a total area of 

207,054 square miles. The area of the French 

colonies and dependencies throughout the world 

is 4.367.746 square miles. Total population 

(1911) of France proper. 39.601.509. Population 

of the principal cities in 1911: 



Paris 2,888,110 

Marseilles 550,619 

Lyons 523.796 

Bordeaux 261.678 

Lille 217,807 



Nantes 170.535 

Toulouse 149.576 

St. Etienne 148,656 

Nice 142,940 

Havre 136.159 



Imports and Exports The total imports in 1915 
amounted to $1,614,905,000; exports, $604,460,000. 
Exports to the United States in 1916, $102,077,- 
620; imports from, $630,672,504. The chief ex- 
ports are textiles, wine, raw silk, wool, small 
wares and leather ; imports, wine, raw wool, 
raw silk, timber and wood, leather, skins and 
linen. 

GERMANY. 

Government Emperor and king of Prussia. Wil- 
helin II.; heir-apparent. Prince Friedrich Wil- 
helm. Cabinet officers: 
Imperial Chancellor Dr. Theobald von Bethmaun- 

Hollweg. 

Foreign Affairs Dr. Alfred Zimmermann. 
Interior Herr Dr. Carl Helfforich. 
Navy Admiral Eduard von Capelle. 
Justice Herr Dr. Lisco. 
Colonies Herr Dr. Solf. 
Treasury Count Siegfried von Roedcrn. 
Postal Affairs Dr. Reinhold Kraetke. 
Commerce Herr Reinhold Sydow. 
President of Imperial Railway Administration 

Herr von Breitenbach. 
Railways Herr Wackerzapn. 
Imperial Exchequer Herr von Magdeburg. 
Imperial Bank Herr Havenstein. 

The Prussian minister of war, Lieut.-Gen. 
von Stein, while nominally having jurisdic- 
tion over Prussian army affairs only, represents 
the imperial government in the reichstag in mili- 
tary matters and is, for all practical purposes, 
German secretary of war. Of the various inde- 
pendent states of Germany only the kingdoms of 
Prussia. Saxony. Bavaria and Wurttemberg have 
their own ministers of war. 

Legislative authority is vested in a bundesrath. 
or senate, of 61 members, and a reichstag. or 



158 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



house, of 397 members. The latter are elected 

for five year terms on a popular franchise and 

the senators are appointed from the state gov- 
ernments for each session. 

Area and Population The area of the states in 
the empire is 208,780 square miles: area of de- 
pendencies about 1,027,820 square miles; grand 
total. 1.236.600 square miles. 
The last federal census was taken Dec. 1. 1910. 

According to this the population of the empire 

was 64.925,993. The estimated population of the 

foreign dependencies is 13.946.200. State popula- 
tion in 1910: 

Prussia 40.165.219 

Bavaria 6,887,291 

Wurttemberg... 2,437,574 

Baden 2,142.833 

Saxony 4.806,661 

Hesse 1,282.219 

Mecklenburg- 
Schwerin .... 639.958 

Oldenburg 483.042 

Brunswick 494.339 

Saxony 417,149 

Mecklenburg- 
Strelitz 106,442 

Hamburg 1,014,664 

Reuss, elder 
branch 72,769 

Lubeck 116,599 

Bremen 295,715 

German cities having 

itants in 1910 incl"d '1 

Berlin 2,071,257 

Hamburg 931,035 

Munich 596.467 

Leipzig 589,850 

Dresden 548,308 

Cologne 516,527 

Breslau 512,105 

Frankfort am.M. 414,576 



Marine Admiral Danrianos. 

War Gen. Drakos. 

Interior M. Tselos 

Communications M. Argyropoulos. 

Finance M. Tf;anetculas. 

Justice M. Hatzakos. 
Legislative authority is vested in one chamber 

the boule. consisting of 235 members, each of 

whom is elected for four years. 

Area and Population Total area. 41.923 square 
miles. Population in 1914, 4,821,300. Athens in 
1907 had 167,479 inhabitants ; Piraeu 



Duesseldorf 



358,728 



Saxe-Meiningen 278,762 
Anhalt 331 128 


Patras, 37,724; Saloniki (1913), 160,000.' 
Exports and Imports The total exports in 1914 


Saxe-Coburg- 
Gotha 257 177 


amounted in value to $23,427,300 ; imports, $35 - 
026,900. Exports to the United States in 1916 


Saxe-Altenburg 216,128 
Lippe 150,937 
Schwarzburg- 
Rud . 100 702 


$9,138,934 ; imports from the United States, $31 - 
024.363. The leading exports are currants, ores, 
olive oil and figs; imports, foodstuffs, textiles, 
coal and timber - 


Schwarzburg- 
Sond 89,917 
Reuss, junior 
branch 152 752 


ITALY. 
Government King. Victor Emmanuel III.: heir 
to the crown, his son Humbert prince of 


Schaumburg- 
Lippe 46,652 
Waldeck 61,707 
Alsace-Lorraine 1,874,014 

Total 64,925,293 
more than 150,000 inuau- 
the following: 
Rixdorf 237,289 


Piedmont, born Sept. 16, 1904. 
President of Council, Sig. Paolo Boselli. 
Foreign Affairs Baron Sonnino. 
Grace and Justice Sig. Sacchi. 
Treasury Sig. P. Carcano. 
Finance Sig. Meda. 
War Gen. Paolo Morrone. 
Public Instruction Sig. Francesco Ruflini. 
Public Works Sig Ciuffelli. 


Stettin 236,113 


Agriculture Sig. M. Raineri. 


Duisburg 229.483 
Dortmund 214.226 


Posts and Telegraphs Sig. Fera. 
( 'olonios Sig. Colosimo. 


Kiel 211.627 


Interior Affairs Sig. Vittorio Orlando 


Mannheim 193,902 
Halle-ou-Saale.. 180,843 
Strassburg 17S.S01 
Schoeneberg 172,823 
Altona 172,628 
Danzig 170,337 
Elberfeld 170.195 
Gelsenkirchen... 169.513 
Barmen 169.214 
Posen 156 691 


Marino Vice-Admiral Camillo Corsi. 
Industry and Commerce Sig. de Nava. 
Legislative authority vests in the king and par 
liii:::i :it. The latter consists of a senate of 410 
members (in 1916) and a chamber of deputies of 
508 members. 
Area and Population The area of Italy is 110,632 
square miles. According to the census of Jan. 
1, 1915, the total population was 36,120,118. 


Aachen 156 143 


Population of the principal cities: 


Cassel 153 196 


Naples 697,917 Florence 242147 




Milan 663,039 Catania 217389 




Rome . . 590 960 Bologna 189 770 


16 240 000 total imports, 


Turin 451,994 Venice 168038 




Palermo 345891 Messina 130000 


began have been made 


Genoa 300.139 Livorno 108.585 



Nurnberg 333,142 

Charlottenburg.. 305,978 

Hanover 302,375 

Essen 294,653 

Chemnitz 287,807 

Stuttgart 286,218 

Magdeburg 279,629 

Bremen 247,437 

Koenigsberg ... 245,994 
Exports and Imports' 

months of 1914), $1,2 

$1,346,570.000. No det 

merce since the war 

public. 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1916, Ger- 
many exported $13,945,743 worth of merchandise 
to the United States and imported merchandise 
valued at $288.851. 

SOVEREIGNS OF STATES. 

Anhalt Duke, Friedrich II. 

Baden Grand duke. Friedrich II. 

Bavaria King, Ludwig III. 

Brunswick Duke. Ernst Augustus. 

Hesse Grand duke. Ernst Ludwig. 

Lippe Count. Leopold IV. 

Mecklenburg-Schwerin Grand duke. Friedrich 
Franz IV. 

Mecklenburg-Strelitz Grand duke, Adolph Fried- 
rich VI. 

Oldenburg- Grand duke, Friedrich August. 

Prussia King. Wilhelm II. 

Reuss. Elder Branch Prince. Heinrich XXIV. 

Reuss. Younger Branch Prince. Heinrich XXVII. 

Saxe-Altenburg Duke. Ernst II. 

Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Duke, Charles Edward. 

Saxe-Meiningen Duke, Bernhard. 

Saxony (grand duchy) Grand duke. Wilhelm Ernst. 

Saxony King, Friedrich August III. 

Schaumburg-Lippe Prince. Adolf. 

Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt Prince, Gunther. 

Waldeck Prince. Friedrich. 

Wurttemberg King. Wilhelm II. 

GREECE. 

Government King. Constantine I.; heir-apparent. 
Prince George, duke of Sparta. Cabinet: 

President of the Council and Minister of Educa- 
tion Prof. Spyridon Lambros. 

Foreign Affairs M. Zalocostas. 



Exports and Imports The value of merchandise 
exported in 1914 was $443,580,000; imported, $576,- 
410,000. The total value of exports to the United 
States in 1916 was $57,432,436 : imports from the 
United States, $270,489,922. Chief imports are 
coal, cotton, grain, silk, wool, timber, ma- 
chinery, sugar and oil: chief exports, silk, wine, 
oil. coral, sulphur, hemp and flax. 



MONTENEGRO. 

King. Nicholas I. Area, 5,603 square miles: 
population, 516.000: of the capital. Cetinje. 4.500. 
Total exports in 1910, $498.200; imports. $1,701,300. 
Montenegro has practically no trade with the 
United States. Chief exports are sumac, smoked 
sardines, cattle, sheep, goats, cheese, olive oil, 
wine and tobacco. Imports include petroleum, 
salt, maize, cottons, hardware, sugar, coffee and 
rice. 

NORWAY. 
Government King, Haakon VII.: crown prince, 

President of Council and Minister of Agriculture 

Gunnar Knudsen. 
Foreign Affairs M. Ihlen. 
Justice Lars Abrahamsen. 
Commerce C. Friis-Peterson. 
Labor M. Omholt. 
Finance M. Blehr. 
Education and Worship M. Lovland. 
Defense Gen. Holtfodt. 

Legislative authority is vested in the storthing, 
consisting of 123 members elected for three years 
through universal suffrage by men and women. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



The storthing: consists of two houses, the odels- 
thiug and the lagthing. The former is made up 
of three-fourths of the members of the storthing 
and the latter of one-fourth. 

Area and Population The total area of Norway 
is 124.130 square miles. Total population in De- 
cember. 1910. 2.391.782. Christiania in 1910 had 
a population of 241,834 and Bergen 76,867. 
Imports and Exports The value of the imports in 
1914 was 5141,819,175; exports, $98,597,500. Ex- 
ports to the United States in 1916, $6,851,714; 
imports, $53,678,126. The chief exports are tim- 
ber and wood manufactures, wood pulp, malty 
food, paper and minerals; imports, breadstuff's, 
groceries, yarn, textiles, vessels and machinery. 

PORTUGAL. . 

Government President, Bernardina Machada. 
Cabinet: 

Premier and Minister of Colonies Dr. Almeida. 

Foreign Affairs Senhor Auguste Scares. 

Justice Seuhor M. de Curvalho. 

Public Works Senhor Antonio M. Silva. 

War Gen. Nortom de Mattos. 

Marine Senhor Victor H. A. Coutinho. 

Finance Dr. Affonso Costa. 

Instruction Senhor Joaquim P. Martins. 
Legislative authority is vested in a national 

council of 164 members and an upper house of 

71 members. The first elections were held May 

28. 1911. and the assembly opened June 19. 

Area and Population Total area, including Azores 
and Madeira, 35,490 square miles. Area of pos- 
sessions in Africa and Asia, 801,060 square 
miles. The population of the home country 
with the Azores and Madeira in 1911 was 
5,957.985; of the colonies in Africa and Asia. 
9.139,444. In 1910 Lisbon had a population of 
356.009 and Oporto 167.955. 

Imports and Exports Total imports in 1913, $89,- 
939,590; total exports, $36,683,210. Imports from 
the United States in 1916, $14,721,874 ; exports to 
the United States, $7,171,295. The chief imports 
are foodstuffs, cotton, sugar, fish, wool, leather, 
coal and coffee; chief exports, wine, sardines, 
copper ore. olives and figs. 

ROTIMANIA. 

Government King, Ferdinand. 

Legislative authority- is vested In a senate of 
120 members elected for eight years and a cham- 
ber of deputies of 183 members elected for four 
years. 

Area and Population The total area is 53.689 
square miles The population in 1899 was 5, 956. 690; 
in 1914, 7,508.009. Population of the principal 
towns (in 1912): Bukharest, 338,109; Jassy, 
75.882; Galatz. 71.719: Braila, 64.730. 
Exports and Imports The value of the exports In 
1913 was $134,141,000 ; of the imports, $118,002,500. 
The chief exports are cereals and the leading 
imports are textiles. Exports to the United 
States in 1916, $20,079; imports from, $111,537. 

RUSSIA. 

Government Czar. Nicholas II.: heir-apparent. 

Grand Duke Alexis. 
Premier Alexander Trepoff. 
Minister of Foreign Affairs M. Pokrovsky. 
Finance M. Bark. 
Interim M. Piotopoff. . 
Instruction Count Ignatieff. 
Imperial House and Domains Gen. W. Free- 

dericksz. 

Justic M. Makaroff. 
Agriculture M. Naumoff. 
Commerce Prince Chakhovsky. 
Railways (Vacancy.) 
Controller M. Kharitonoff. 

Procurator of the Holy Synod Alexander Volzin. 
War Gen. Shuvayeff. 
Navy Vice-Admiral Grigorovich. 

Legislative authority is vested in the czar, 
duma and council of the empire. 
Area and Population Area, 8,764,586 square miles. 



Total population in 1914, 178,378,800. 
tion of the principal cities: 



Petrograd (1914)2,133,100 



Moscow (1915) 
Warsaw (1915).. 
Odessa (1912)... 

Lodz (1910) 

Riga (1913) 

Kiev (1913) 



1,817,100 
789,289 
631,040 
415,604 
558,000 
626.313 



Kharkov (1913). 
Yekaterinoslav 

(1912) 

Saratov (1913).. 
Vilna (1913).... 
Kazan (1913).... 



Popula- 
249,698 

220,446 
235,300 
203,940 
194,246 



Imports and Exports The total value of the im- 
ports in 1915 was $557,000,000 ; of the -exports, 
$198,600,000. The exports to the United States 
in 1916 amounted in value to $3,613,986 ; imports 
from the United States, $183,259,605. The chief 
exports are foodstuffs, timber, oil, furs and 
flax; imports, raw cotton, wool, metals, leather, 
hides, skins and machinery. 
FINLAND. 
Grand Duke The emperor of Russia. 

The grand duchy of Finland, though nominally 
autonomous, is now practically a province of Rus- 
sia. It has a parliament of 200 members chosen 
by direct election. The right to vote is possessed 
by men and women alike after they reach their 
24th year. The area of Finland is 125,689 square 
miles and the population Jan. 1, 1914, was 3,231,995. 

SERBIA. 

Government King, Peter I. (Karageorgevitch) ; 
heir-apparent, Prince Alexander (second son) ; 
premier, N. P. Pashitch. Legislative authority 
is vested in a single chamber, called "skupsh- 
tina," of 160 elected members. 

Area and Population Area, 33,891 square miles. 
Population in 1910, 2,911,701; in 1914, 4.547.990. 
The capital, Belgrade, had 90,890 inhabitants 
before the war with Austria. Nisu, the war 
capital, had 24,949 inhabitants in 1911. 

Exports and Imports Total value of exports in 
1912, $18.595,000; imports, $14.705,000. Exports to 
the United States in 1916, $50; imports, $385,- 
995. The exports are mainly agricultural prod- 
ucts and animals and the imports cotton and 
woolen goods and metals. 

SPAIN. 

Government King, Alfonso XIII. ; heir-apparent, 
Prince Alfonso. Cabinet: 

Premier Conde de Romanones. 

Foreign Affairs Don Amalio Gimeno. 

Interior Senor Don Ruiz Jimenez. 

Finance Don Santiago Alba. 

War Gen. Augustin Luque. 

Marine Admiral Miranda. 

Public Works Don Rafael Gasset. 

Public Instruction Don Julio Burell. 

Justice Don Antonio Barroso. 

Area and Population Total area. 194.783 square 
miles. Total population of Spain Jan. 1, 1914, 
20,355,986. Population of large cities (1910) : 



Saragossa 105,788 

Carthagena 96.983 

Bilbao 92.514 



Granada 77,425 

Valladolid 67.742 

Cadiz 67.174 



Madrid 599,807 

Barcelona 587,411 

Valencia 233.348 

Seville 155,366 

Malaga 133.045 

Murcia 124.985 

Imports and Exports The exports of Spain in 
1915 amounted to $252,736,000; imports, $241,- 
863,675. Total exports to the United States in 
1916, $27,864,130; imports, $52,771,652. Chief ex- 
ports are wine, sugar, timber, animals, glass- 
ware and pottery; imports, cotton and cotton 
manufactures, machinery, drugs and chemical 
products. 

SWEDEN. 

Government King. Gustaf V. ; crown prince, Gus- 
taf Adolf 

Minister of State and Minister of War Dr. K. 
Hammarskjold. 

Foreign Affairs K. A. Wallenberg. 

Finance M. Vennersten. \ 

Marine M. Brostrom. 

Education Dr. K. G. Westman. 

Interior O. F. von Sydow. 

Agriculture Baron Beck-Friis. 

Justice B. F. Hasselrot. 
Legislative authority is vested in a parliament 



160 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 117. 



of two chambers, the first of which has a mem- 
bership of 150 and the second 230. Members of 
the upper house are elected for nine years and 
those of the lower for three years. The first 
chamber is elected by municipal representatives. 
To be eligible one must own real estate worth 
at least 80.000 crowns or pay taxes on an income 
of at least 4.UOO crowns. The second chamber 
constituents must have an income of at least 800 
crowns or own real estate worth at least 1.000 
crowns. 

Area and Population The total area of Sweden 
is 172. S76 square miles. The population Dec. 31. 
1913, was 5,522,403. The population of the prin- 
cipal cities at the same time was: 



Norkoping 

Gaefle 35,736 

llelsingborg 34,742 



Stockholm 382,085 

Gothenburg 178,030 

Malmo 98,821 _ ., 

Imports and Exports The total imports in 1914 
were valued at $200.124,850 ; exports, $212,652,830. 
Exports to the United States in 1916, $11,846,881 ; 
imports, $51,939,182. The leading articles of ex- 
port are timber and machinery ; of import, tex- 
tile goods and foodstuffs. 

SWITZERLAND. 

Government President of federal council (1917) 

Edmund Schultheiss. 
Vice-President Herr Calender of Trina. 

Legislative authority is vested in a state and 
a national council, the former having 44 and 
the latter 167 members. The national councilors 
are elected directly by the people: the state 
councilors are elected in some cantons by the 
people and in others by the cantonal legislature. 
The chief executive authority is vested in the 
bundesrath. or federal council, one member of 
which is the chief of one of the federal depart- 
ments. Its decrees are enacted as a body. Its 
members are elected president in rotation. 

Switzerland owns its main railroads, its tele- 
graph and telephone system and monopolizes the 
manufacture and sale of alcohol. 
Area and Population Total area. 15.976 square 
miles. The population, according to the censiis 
of July 1, 1913, was 3,877,210. Population of the 
largest cities (1913): 

Zurich 205,000 \ Bern 94,700 

Basel 137,000 Lausanne 74,000 

Geneva 136.700 I St. Gallen 40,000 

Exports and Imports Total exports in 1914, 
$227,374,000; imports, $292,327,700. Exports to the 
United States in 1916, $21,775,413; imports, 
$8,156,147. The articles chiefly exported are cot- 
tons, silks, clocks and watches; imported, food- 
stuffs, silk, minerals and metals, clothing and 
animals. 

THE NETHERLANDS. 

Government Queen. Wilhelmina; prince consort. 
Henry of Mecklenburg-Schwerin ; heir, Princess 
Juliana. Cabinet: 

Prime Minister and Minister of the Interior- 
Mr. P. W. A. Cort van der Linden. 
Foreign Affairs Jonkheer Dr. J. Loudon. 
Agriculture, Commerce. Industry and Labor Mr. 

F. E. Posthuma. 
War Maj.-Gen. N. Bosboom. 
Navy Mr. J. J. Rambonne. 
Justice Dr. B. Ort. 
Finance Dr. Anton van Gijn. 
Colonies Mr. Th. B. Pleyte. 
Public Works Dr. C. Lely. 

Legislative authority is vested in the states 
general, composed of two chambers, the first hav- 
ing 50 members and the second 100. The latter 
are elected directly and the former by the pro- 
vincial states. 

Area and Population The area of Holland, or the 
Netherlands, is 12.648 square miles. The total 
population Dec. 31, 1914, was 6,339,705. That of 
the chief cities Dec. 31, 1914, was: 



Amsterdam 609,084 

Rotterdam 472, 520 

The Hague 312,430 

Utrecht 127,086 



Groningen 82,809 

Haarlem 71,883 

Arnhem 66,129 

Leiden 59,560 



Imports and Exports In 1913 Holland imported 
$1,567,700,000 worth of merchandise and ex- 
ported $1,233,200,000. In 1916 the exports to the 



United States amounted to $32,518,800 and the 
imports from the same country to $99,232,930. 
Chief imports are iron and steel and their 
manufactures, textiles, coal, cereals and flour; 
exports, butter, sugar and cheese. 

TURKEY. 

Government Sultan, Mehmed V. Cabinet: 

Grant! Vizier and Minister for Foreign Affairs- 
Prince Said Halim Pasha. 

President Council of State Ibrahim Bey. 

Sheik-ul-Islam Mussa Kiazirn Effendi. 

Minister of the Interior Talaat Bey. 

Marine Mahmut Pasha. 

Finance Djaved Bey. 

Public Instruction Achmed Bey. 

Public Works Abbas Halim Pasha. 

War Gen. Enver Pasha. 

Posts and Telegraphs Shukri Bey. 

Commerce Ahmed Nessimi Bey. 
A constitutional form of government was adopt- 

ed July 24, 1908, with legislative authority vested 

in a parliament. 

Area and Population The area of Turkey in 
Europe is 8,644; of whole empire, 710,224 square 
miles. The total population of all parts of 
the empire is 21,273.000. Constantinople has 
about 1.203.000 inhabitants. 

Exports and Imports The total exports in 1912 
amounted in value to $172,871,605 and the im- 
ports to $129.907.759. The exports to the United 
States in 1916 amounted to $151,606 in value 
and the imports to $41,221. The principal arti- 
cles imported are cloth and clothing, sugar, 
coffee, flour, rice and manufactures of iron; 
exports, grapes, silk, grain, cocoons, wool, cot- 
ton, carpets, hides and skins. 

ASIA. 

AFGHANISTAN. 

Ameer, Habibullah Khan: population, about 
6,000,000; area, 250.000 square miles. No statis- 
tics as to imports and exports of Afghanistan 
are available. The chief productions are pre- 
served fruits, spices, wool. silk, cattle and to- 
bacco. 

BOKHARA. 

Ameer, Sayid Mir Alim Khan; heir, Sayid Mir 
Ibrahim. The area of Bokhara is about 83.000 
square miles and the population 1,250,000. The 
products are corn, tobacco, fruit, silk and hemp. 
Since 1873 Bokhara has been a dependency of 
Russia. 

CHINA. 

Government President, Li Yuan-hung; premier. 
Tuan Chi-jui. The president and vice-presi- 
dent are each elected for a term of five years. 
Legislative power is nominally vested in a 
single house assembly, but it is practically 
only an advisory body. The president possesses 
autocratic powers and China is a republic in 
name only. 

Area and Population Total area of China, with 
dependencies. 3,913,560 square miles: estimated 
population. 320.050.000. 

Exports and Imports The total exports in 1914 
amounted to $235,582,200 and the imports to 
$372,821,400. During the fiscal year 1916 goods 
to the value of $26,358,251 were imported from 
the United States. The total exports in the 
same period to the United States amounted to 
$72,405,278. The articles imported from Amer- 
ica consist mainly of flour, kerosene, sago. 
india rubber, shoes, ginseng, quicksilver, white 
shirting, drills and broad-cloth. Among the 
leading exports are tea, furs, wool, mats. fans. 
essential oils, straw braid, silks, hair, hides 
and hemp. 



Government Emperor. Yoshihito; crown prince. 

Hirohito. Cabinet: 
Premier and Minister of Finance Lieut. -Gen. 

Count Seiki Terauchi. 
Foreign Affairs Viscount Ichiro Motono. 
Interior Baron Shimpei Goto. 
Finance (Vacancy.) 
War Lieut-Gen. Kenichi Oshima. 
Navy Vice-Admiral Tomasaburo Kato. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



161 



Justice Itasu Matsumuro. 

Education Ryohei Okada. 

Agriculture and Commerce Ren Nakashoji. 

Communications Baron Kenjiro Den. 
Legislative authority is vested in the emperor 

and the imperial diet. This consists of the 

house of peers and the house of representatives. 

the former having about 375 and the latter 381 

members. 

Area and Population The total area of Japan 
is 260,738 square miles. The population accord- 
ing to the census of Dec. 31, 1915, was 54,282,898 
exclusive of Formosa, the Pescadores and the 
south half of Sakhalin. The total population, 
including Korea, Formosa and Sakhalin, was 
74,990,190 in 1915. Cities having more than 
100,000 inhabitants are (1915) : 



Tokyo 2,056,126 

Osaka 1,395,823 

Kyoto 509,380 

397,574 



Kobe 
Nagasaki 
Hiroshima 
Kanazawa 



442,167 
161.174 
167,130 
129,804 
128,141 



Yokohama 

Nagoya 452,043 Kure 

Imports and Exports The total imports in 1915 
amounted in value to $265,160,069 ; exports, 
$352,736,884. In 1916 the imports from the United 
States were valued at $75,098,188 and the ex- 
ports to the same country at $147,644,228. The 
chief exports are raw silk, cotton, yarn, cop- 
per, coal and tea; imports, sugar, cotton, iron 
and steel, machinery, petroleum and wool. 

CHOSEN (KOREA). 

Formerly an empire, but now a Japanese col- 
ony. Estimated area, 86,000 square miles. Pop- 
ulation in 1915, 17,405,645. Seoul, the capital, 
has 302,686 inhabitants. 

KHIVA. 

Khan, Seyid Asfendiar Khan; heir-apparent, 
Nasyr Tycuara: area. 24,000 square miles; popula- 
tion. 646,000. Products are cotton and silk. Khiva 
is a Russian vassal state. 

PERSIA. 

Shah or emperor. Sultan Ahmad Shah. Under 
the constitution granted in 1906 legislative au- 
thority was vested in a national council of 156 
members and a senate of 60 members. The area 
of Persia is about 628,000 square miles and the 
population 9,500,000. Imports in 1915, $41,610,150; 
exports, $33,004,800. Imports from the United 
States in 1916, $13,495 ; exports to, $583,456. 
Teheran, the capital, has a population of about 
280,000. Chief among the products are silk, fruits, 
wheat, barley and rice. 

SIAM. 

King. Chowfa Maha Vajirvudh. Area. 195.000 
square miles; population (1910), 8,149,487. Bang- 
kok, the capital, has 628,675 inhabitants. The im- 
ports in 1915 were $30,044,850, and the exports 
$38,914,950. Imports from the United States in 
1916, $741,430 ; exports to, $237,250. Chief among 
the exports are rice, teak and marine products; 
imports, cotton goods and opium. 

AFRICA. 
ABYSSINIA. 

Empress, Uizero Zeodita. Total area of Abys- 
sinia 432,432 square miles; populations, 8,000,000. 
The exports are coffee, hides and skins, gum, 
wax, gold and ivory. 

ALGERIA. 

Algeria is a colony of France. Governor-gen- 
eral. M. Lutaud. Area, 343,500 square miles: pop- 
ulation in 1911, 5,563,828. Chief imports are cot- 
ton, skins and furs and woodwork ; exports, 
wine, sheep and cereals. 

EGYPT. 

Sultan, Hussein Kamil Pasha. Total area of 
Egypt, 350.000 square miles; area of the Anglo- 
Egyptian Sudan. 984,520 square miles. The pop- 
ulation of Egypt proper in 1907 was 11.189.978; of 
the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, 3.000,000. Population 
of Cairo. 654.476; Alexandria, 332.246. Great 
Britain formally declared Egypt a protectorate 
of the empire Dec. 17, 1914. The total exports in 
1915 were valued at $135,234,300 and the imports 
at $96,644,965. Imports from the United States 
in 1916, $7,791,421 ; exports to, $33,254,943. The ex- 
ports consist chiefly of cereals, raw cotton and 
provisions ; imports, wool, coal, textiles and 
metal manufactures. 



BELGIAN KONGO. 

Kongo was made a Belgian colony in 1908. The 
estimated area is 909,654 square miles and the 
negro population about 15,000,000. Europeans num- 
bered 5,465 in January, 1912. Among the leading 
articles of export are ivory, rubber, cocoa, palm 
nuts, palm oil, copal gum and coffee. Total im- 
ports in 1913, $11,523,700 ; exports, $16,692,950. Ex- 
ports to the United States (1916), $72,859; im- 
ports, $41,625. LIBERIA. 

President. Daniel E. Howard: vice-president. 
S. G. Harmon. Legislative power is vested in a 
senate of nine members and a house of represent- 
atives of fourteen Tnembers. The total area of 
the republic is about 40,000 square miles and the 
population 2,120,000. The exports in 1913 were 
valued at $1,112,187 and the imports at $1,411,237. 
Imports from the United States in 1916, $84,677 ; 
exports to, $89,900. 

MOROCCO. 

Sultan. Mulai Youssef. Morocco is a French 
protectorate. Area about 219,000 square miles; 
population, 5,000,000. Total imports in 1914, $55,- 
619,600; exports, $9.677,200. Imports from the 
United States in 1916, $348,980; exports to, $313,- 

MADAGASCAR. 

Governor-general, Albert Picqie. Madagascar is 
a French colony governed by a council of ad- 
ministration. The area is 228,000 square mile." 
and the population (1911) 3,153,511. The capital is 
Antananarivo with a population of 63,115. Im- 
ports in 1914, $9,471,300; exports, $9,286,600. Ex- 
ports to United States (1916), $313,666; imports 
from, $348,980. TUNIS 

Bey, Sidi Mohammed Ben Nasr Bey; heir-pre- 
sumptive. Sidi Mohammed Ben Mamoun Bey. 
Tunis is under the protectorate of France and 
that country is represented "by" a resident-gen- 
eral. Total area, 50,000 square miles; population 
in 1911, 1,780.527. Imports in 1914, $26,497,500; ex- 
ports, $21,324,600. 

MEXICO. 

Government The republic of Mexico is divided 
into twenty-seven states, three territories and 
one federal district, each with a local govern- 
ment, but all subject to the federal constitu- 
tion. Representatives are elected for two years 
each and are apportioned at the rate of one 
for each 40.000 inhabitants: the senators, of 
whom there are fifty-six, are elected "by the 
people in the same manner as representatives. 
The president holds office four years and may 
be elected for several consecutive terms. (See 
"Revolutions in Mexico" in this volume.) 
Area and Population The total area, including 
islands, is 785,881 square miles. The popula- 
tion, according to the federal census of 1910. 
is 15,063,207. The population of leading cities 
of the republic follows: City of Mexico (capi- 
tal). 470.659; Guadalajara, 118,799: Puebla. 
101,214 ; Monterey, 81,006 ; San Luis Potosi, 82,946 ; 
Pachuca, 38.620; Aguascalientes, 44.800; Zaca- 
tecas, 25,905; Durango. 34.085: Toluca. 31,247; 
Leon, 63.263: Merida, 61,999; Queretaro, 35.011; 
Morelia, 39.116; Oaxaca. 37.469; Orizaba. 32,894; 
Chihuahua. 39,061; Vera Cruz. 29.164. 
Commerce The chief exports of Mexico are pre- 
cious metals, coffee, tobacco, hemp, sisal, sugar, 
dyewoods and cabinet woods, cattle and hides 
and skins. In 1914 the total exports amounted 
to 592.833,000; total imports for the same year 
were $60,831,070. The trade of Mexico is chiefly 
with the United States, Great Britain. France, 
Germany and Spain. In 1916 the imports from 
the United States were $48,308,542; exports to, 
$97,676,544. 

SOUTH AMERICAN REPUBLICS. 

ARGENTINE REPUBLIC. 

President, Hipolito Irogoyen ; capital, Buenos 
Aires. Area, 1,153,119 square miles. Population 
(1912), 7,467,878; Buenos Aires, 1,560,163 (Jan. 1, 
1914). Total exports in 1915, $558,280,600; im- 
ports, $226,892,700. Exports to the United States 
in 1916, $112,512,420 ; imports, $65,993,611. Chief ex- 
ports, sheeb. wool, cattle, hides, frozen meats 
and wheat; imports, machinery, agricultural im- 
plements, railway cars, engines and supplies and 
manufactures of iron and steel. 



162 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



BOLIVIA. 

President, Gen. Ismael Monies; capital. Sucre. 
Area, 514,155 square miles. Population (1915), 
2,889,970. LaPaz, 100,097; Chocachamba, 31,014; 
Sucre, 29,686. Total exports * in 1915, $33,951,300; 
imports, $7,893,200; exports to the United States 
in 1916, $204,904; imports, $1*367,891. Chief ex- 
ports, silver, tin, copper, coffee, rubber ; imports, 
provisions, clothing, hardware, spirits, silks and 
woolens. 

BRAZIL. 

President. Wenceslau Braz; capital, Rio de Ja- 
neiro. Area. 3.218.991 square miles. Population 
(estimated 1913), 24,308.219: Rio de Janeiro (1911), 
1.128,637: Sao Paulo (1911). 450,000; Bahia, 290,000; 
Pernambuco, 150,000. Exports (1915), $264,850,000; 
imports, $150,444,000. Exports to the United States 
in 1916, $132,663.984 ; imports, $41,202,277. Chief ex- 
ports, coffee, sugar, tobacco, cotton and rubber: 
imports, cotton Roods, manufactures 'of iron and 
steel, furniture, mineral oils, breadstuffs and pro- 
visions. CHILE. 

President, Juan Luis Sanfuente ; capital, Santi- 
ago. Area, 292,580 square miles. Population in 
1914, 3,596,541 ; Santiago, 397,941 ; Valparaiso, 187,- 
240; Concepcion, 69,776. Total exports in 1914, 
$112,378,250 ; imports, $101-,158,7oO. Exports to the 
United States in 1916, $64,154,859; imports, $24,- 
289,652. Chief exports, nitrate, wool, hides and 
leather; imports, sugar, coal, cotton goods, cash- 
meres, oil. galvanized iron. 

COLOMBIA. 

President, Dr. Jose Vicente Concha ; capital, 
Bogota. Area, 440,846 square miles. Population 
in 1912. 5.472,604; Bogota, 121.257. Total exports 
(1914), $32,632,550; total imports, $20,979,230. Ex- 
ports to the United States in 1916, $21,458,029; 
imports, $11,125,232. Chief exports, gold, silver and 
other minerals, coffee, cocoa, cattle, sugar, to- 
bacco and rubber; imports, manufactures of iron 
and steel, cotton goods. 

ECUADOR. 

President, Alfredo B. Moreno ; capital, Quito. 
Area, 116,000 square miles. Population, 1.500.000; 
Quito, 70,000; Guayaquil, 80,000 Total exports in 

1914, $12,952,120; imports, $8,762,587. Exports to 
the United States in 1916, $5,848,290; imports, 
$3,462,040. Chief exports, coffee, cocoa, rice, su- 
gar, rubber, cabinet woods, chemicals and min- 
erals; imports, cotton, provisions, manufactures 
of iron and steel, clothing and mineral oil. 

PARAGUAY. 

President, Dr. Emanuel Franco ; capital, Asun- 
cion. Area, 171,770 square miles. Population (es- 
timated 1912). 800.000: Asuncion (1912). 80,000. To- 
tal exports in .1915, $5,409,950; imports, $2,340,500. 
Exports to the United States in 1916, $53,337 ; im- 
ports, $73,452. Chief exports, mate (or Paraguay 
tea), tobacco, hides, timber, oranges; imports, 
cotton goods, machinery and provisions. 
PERU. 

President, Don Jose Pardo; capital, Lima. Area, 
722,461 square miles. Population estimated (1912) 
at 4,500,000; Lima, 143,500; Callao, 34,346. Total 
exports in 1914, $43,838,925; imports, $24,139,625. 
Exports to the United States in 1916, $24,326,689; 
imports, $10,173,176. Chief exports, cotton, coffee, 
sugar, cinchona, imlia rubber, dyes and medicinal 
plants: imports, woolens, cotton, machinery and 
manufactures of iron. 

URUGUAY. 

President, Dr. Feliciano Viera; capital, Monte- 
video. Area, 72,153 square miles. Population 
(1914), 1,315,714; Montivideo (1916), 378,446. Total 
exports in 1915, $83,290,900; imports, $34,979,600. 
Exports to the United States in 1916, $14,475,478; 
imports, $10,274,426. Chief exports, animal and 
agricultural products ; imports, manufactured ar- 
ticles. VENEZUELA. 

President, Gen. Juan Vicente Gomez; capital, 
Caracas. Area, 393,976 square miles. Population 
(1915), 2,816,484; Caracas, 75,000. Total exports in 

1915, $20,519,940; imports, $11,685,300. Exports to 
the United States in 1916, $14,942,448; imports, 
$8,999,272. Chief exports, coffee, hides, cabinet 
woods, rubber and chemicals; imports, machin- 
ery, manufactures of iron and steel, provisions, 
furniture and mineral wools. 



CENTRAL AMERICAN STATES. 

COSTA RICA. 

President, Don Alfredo Gonzalez; capital, San 
Jose. Area, 23,000 square miles. Population 
(1914), 420,179; San Jose, 34,784. Total exports 
(1914), $11,176.350; imports, $7,770,465. Exports to 
the United States in 1916, $4,335,415 ; imports, 
$3,512,840. Chief exports, coffee and bnnanas ; im- 
ports, cotton, machinery, iron and steel manufac- 
tures, woolens and worsteds. 

GUATEMALA. 

President, Manuel E. Cabrera: capital, Guate- 
mala de Nueva. Area. 48,290 square miles. Pop- 
ulation (1914), 2,003,579; of the capital, 90,000. 
Total exports (1915), $11,566,550; imports, $5,072,- 
450. Exports to the United States in 1916, $8,724,- 
728; imports, $3,847,101. Chief exports, coffee and 
bananas ; imports, cotton and cereals. 

HONDURAS. 

President, Dr. Francisco Bertrand; capital. Te- 
gucigalpa. Area, 44,275 square miles. Population 
(1910). 553,446; Tegucigalpa. 22.137. Total exports 
(1915), $3,858,000; imports, $5,875,000. Exports to 
the United States in 1916, $2,978,473 ; imports, 
$4,607,423. Chief exports, bananas, coffee, cattle, 
cocoanuts and wood; chief import, cotton. 

NICARAGUA. 

President. Senor Adolfo Diaz; capital, Managua. 
Area, 49,200 square miles. Population, (1914), 
703,540; Managua, 34,872; Leon, 62,569. Total ex- 
ports (1913), $7,712,000; imports, $5,770,000. Ex- 
ports to the United States in 1916, $2,394,824 ; im- 
ports, $3,138,595. Chief exports, cattle and coffee ; 
imports, flour, wine, beer, barbed ivire, cotton 
goods, sewing machines, kerosene, calico and tal- 
low. 

PANAMA. 

President, Ramon Valdoz. Independence of 
Panama declared Nov. 3, 1903; constitution 
adopted Feb. 13, 1904. Legislative power is 
vested in a national assembly composed of depu- 
ties elected by the people. The ratio of repre- 
sentation is one deputy for each 10,000 inhabi- 
tants. The term of office is four years. The 
area of the republic is 32,380 square miles and 
the population (1912), 336,742; city of Panama 
(1915), 60,028; Colon, 26,000. The exports to the 
United States in the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1916, amounted to $5,336,299, and the imports to 
$23,602,598. The chief articles of export are 
bananas, rubber, coffee and pearls. 

SALVADOR. 

President, Carlos Melendoz; capital, San Salva- 
dor. Area, 7,225 square miles. Population (1914), 
1,225,835; San Salvador, 66,800. Total exports 
(1914), $9,716.945; imports, $4,958,614. Exports to 
the United States in 1916, $2,129,868; imports, 
$3,043,515. Chief exports, coffee, indigo, sugar, to- 
bacco and balsams: imports, cotton, spirits, flour, 
iron goods, silk and yarn. 

CUBA. 

Government President. Gen. Mario Menocal: 
vice-president. Enrique Jose Varona: terms ex- 
pire May 20. 1917. 

Under the constitution the legislative power is 
exercised by two elective bodies the house of 
representatives and the senate, conjointly called 
congress. The senate is composed of four senators 
from each of the six provinces, elected for eight 
years by the provincial councilmen, and by a 
double number of electors, constituting together 
an electoral board. 

The house of representatives is composed of one 
representative for each 25.000 inhabitants or 
fraction thereof over 12,500. elected for four years 
by direct vote. One-half of the members of the 
house are elected every two years. The salary of 
members of congress is $3.600 a year. 
Organization of the Republic The organization of 
the republic of Cuba, begun in 1900, was prac- 
tically completed on the 20th of May, 1902, v/hen 
the military occupation of the island by the 
United .States came to an end and Gen. Tomas 
Estrada Palma was inaugurated as first presi- 
dent. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



163 



Area and Population The total area of Cuba is 

44,164 square miles. The population in 1914 was 

2,471,531. 

Population of provinces (1914): 

Havana 651,266 i Matanzas 270,483 

Santa Clara 507,277 I Pinar del Rio.. 257,893 

Oriente 567,639 I Cumaguey 154,567 

Population of principal cities in 1914: 



Havana 350,906 

Cienfuegos 80,305 



Camaguey 



76,581 



Halyguin 
Pinar del Rio.. 
Santa Clara . . . 



85.232 

51,915- 

54,885 
51,036 
55,407 



Matanzas 53.931 Guantanamo 

Manzanillo 59,544 Saneti Spiritus. 

.intiago 61,531 

About 70 per cent of the population is white. 

Imports and Exports The total imports in 1915 
amounted to $138,132.000 and the exports to 
$219,447,000. The imports from the United States 
in 1916 were valued at $127,040,067 and the ex- 
ports at $228,977,567. The principal articles of 
export are sugar, tobacco and cigars, iron and 
manganese ore, fruit, coffee, cocoa, molasses 



and sponges: of import, animals, breadstuffs. 
coal and coke, iron and steel, wood, liquor, 
cotton, chemicals and vegetables. 

HAITI. 

President, Sudre Dartiguenave. The area of 
Haiti is 10,204 square miles and the population 
about 2,500,000. Coffee, cocoa and logwood are 
the leading articles sold. Total exports (1912), 
$17,285,485; imports (1914), $7,612,792. Exports 
to the United States in 1916, $2,560,340 ; imports, 
$6,435,567. 

SANTO DOMINGO. 

President, Federico H. Carvajal. The republic 
has an area of 19,325 square miles and a popula- 
tion (1913) of 708,000. Santo Domingo, the capital, 
has 22,000 inhabitants. In 1913 the exports 
amounted to $10,470,900 and the chief articles 
shipped were coffee, cocoa and mahogany; im- 
ports. $9,272,000. Exports to the United 'States 
in 1916, $13,456,653; imports, $7,581,358. 



TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND HAITI. 



The following treaty, giving the United States 
a large measure of control over the affairs of 
the republic of Haiti, was negotiated in Septem- 
ber, 3915, but was not made public until Febru- 
ary, 1916, when it was ratified by the senate of 
the United States: 

ARTICLE 1. - 

The government of the United States will, by 
its good offices, aid the Haitian government in 
the proper and efficient development of its agri- 
cultural, mineral and commercial resources and 
in the establishment of the finances of Haiti on 
a firm and solid basis. 

ARTICLE 2. 

The president of Haiti shall appoint, upon 
nomination by the president of the United States, 
a general receiver and such aids and employes 
as may be necessary, who shall collect, receive 
and apply all customs duties on imports and 
exports accruing at the several custom houses 
and ports of entry of the republic of Haiti. 

The president of Haiti shall appoint, upon 
nomination by the president of the United States, 
a financial adviser, who shall be an officer at- 
tached to the ministry of finance, to give effect 
to whose proposals and labors the minister will 
lend efficient aid. The financial adviser shall 
devise an adequate system of public accounting, 
aid in increasing the revenues and adjusting 
them to the expenses, inquire into the validity 
of the debts of the republic, enlighten both gov- 
ernments with reference to all eventual debts, 
recommend improved methods of collecting .and 
applying the revenues and make such other 
recommendations to the minister of finance as 
may be deemed necessary for the welfare and 
prosperity of Haiti. 

ARTICLE 3. 

The government of the republic of Haiti will 
provide by law or appropriate decrees for the 
payment of all customs duties to the general 
receiver and will extend to the receivership and 
to the financial adviser all needful aid and full 
protection in the execution, of the powers con- 
ferred and duties imposed herein; and the United 
States on its part will extend like aid and protec- 
tion. 

ARTICLE 4. 

Upon the appointment of the financial adviser 
the government of the republic of Haiti, in co- 
operation with the financial adviser, shall collate, 
classify, arrange and make full statement of all 
the debts of the republic, the amounts, character, 
maturity and condition thereof and the interest 
accruing and the sinking fund requisite to their 
final discharge. 

ARTICLE 5. 

All sums collected and received by the general 
receiver shall be applied, first, to the payment 
of the salaries and allowances of the general 



receiver, his assistants and employes and ex- 
penses of the receivership, including the salary 
and expenses of the financial adviser, which sal- 
aries will be determined by previous agreement ; 
second, to the interest and sinking fund of the 
public debt of the republic of Hajti ; and,, third, 
to the maintenance of the constabulary referred 
to in article 10, and then the remainder to the 
Haitian government for purposes of current ex- 
penses. 

In making these applications the general re- 
ceiver will proceed to pay salaries and allow- 
ances monthly and expenses as they arise, and 
on the 1st of each calendar month will set 
aside in a separate fund the quantum of the 
collection and receipts of the previous month. 

ARTICLE 6. 

The expenses of the receivership, including 
salaries and allowances of the general receiver, 
his assistants and employes and the salary and 
expenses of the financial adviser shall not ex- 
ceed 5 per centum of the collections and receipts 
from customs duties, unless by agreement by 
the two governments. 

ARTICLE 7- 

The general receiver shall make monthly- re- 
ports of all collections, receipts and disburse- 
ments to the appropriate officer of the republic 
of Haiti and to the department of state of the 
United States, which reports shall be open to 
inspection and verification at all times by the 
appropriate authorities of each of the said gov- 
ernments. 

ARTICLE 8. 

The republic of Haiti shall not increase its 
public debt except by previous agreement with 
the president of the United States and shall 
not contract any debt or assume any financial 
obligation unless the ordinary revenues of the 
republic available for that purpose, after de- 
fraying the expenses of the government, shall be 
adequate to pay the interest and provide a sink- 
ing fund for the final discharge of such debt. 
ARTICLE 9. 

The republic of Haiti will not without a pre- 
vious agreement with the president of the United 
States modify the customs duties in a manner to 
reduce the revenues therefrom ; and in order that 
the revenues of the republic may be adequate 
to meet the public debt and the expenses of the. 
government, to preserve tranquillity and to pro- 
mote material prosperity, the republic of Haiti 
will co-operate "with the financial adviser in his 
recommendations for improvement in the method 
of collecting and disbursing the revenues and 
for new sources of needed income. 
ARTICLE 10. 

The Haitian government obligates itself, for 
the preservation of domestic peace, the security 
of individual rights and full observance of the 



164 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



provisions of this treaty, to create without 
delay an efficient constabulary, urban and rural, 
composed of native Haitians. This constabulary 
shall be organized and officered by Americans 
appointed by the president of Haiti upon nomina- 
tion by the president of the United States. The 
Haitian government shall clothe these officers 
with the proper and necessary authority and up- 
hold them in the performance of their functions. 
These officers will be replaced by Haitians as 
they, by examination conducted under direction 
of a board to be selected by the senior Ameri- 
can officer of this constabulary and in the pres- 
ence of a representative of the Haitian govern- 
ment, are found to be qualified to assume such 
duties. The constabulary herein provided for 
shall, under the direction of the Haitian gov- 
ernment, have supervision and control of arms 
and ammunition, military supplies and traffic 
therein throughout the country. The high con- 
tracting parties agree that the stipulations in 
this article are necessary to prevent factional 
strife and disturbances. 

ARTICLE 11. 

The government of Haiti agrees not to sur- 
render any of the territory of the republic of 
Haiti, by sale, lease or otherwise, or jurisdic- 
tion over such territory to any foreign govern- 
ment or power, nor to enter into any treaty or 
contract with any foreign power or powers that 
will impair or tend to impair the independence 
of Haiti. 

ARTICLE 12. 

The Haitian government agrees to execute with 
the United States a protocol for the settle- 
ment, by arbitration or otherwise, of all pend- 
ing pecuniary claims of foreign corporations, 
companies, citizens or subjects against Haiti. 

ARTICLE 13. 

The republic of Haiti, being desirous to fur- 
ther the development of its natural resources, 
agrees to undertake and execute such measures 
as in the opinion of the high contracting parties 



DISTURBANCES IN 

Factional differences led the senate of Santo 
Domingo to begin impeachment proceedings 
against Gen. Juan Jimenes, president of the 
republic, May 2. The opposition party was led 
"by Gen. Arias, who wished to overthrow the 
government on the pretext that it had vio- 
lated the constitution in drafting the budget. 
To prevent disorder the American authorities 
in Washington intervened and sent Rear-Admiral 
Caperton to the scene with the cruiser Prairie. 
May 5 fighting began in Santo Domingo city 
and marines were landed from the Prairie to 
protect the American legation. William W. Rus- 
sell, the American minister, warned the factions 
that armed intervention would result if hostili- 



may be necessary for the sanitation and public 
improvement of the republic, under the super- 
vision and direction of an engineer or engi- 
neers to be appointed by the president of Haiti 
upon nomination by the president of the United 
States and authorised for that purpose by the 
government of Haiti. 

ARTICLE 14. 

The high contracting parties shall have author- 
ity to take such steps as may be necessary to 
insure the complete attainment of any of tin- 
objects comprehended in this treaty ; and. should 
the necessity occur, the United States will lend 
an efficient aid for the preservation of Haitian 
independence and the maintenance of a govern- 
ment adequate for the protection of life, prop- 
erty and individual liberty. 

ARTICLE 15. 

The present treaty shall be approved and rat- 
ified by the high contracting parties in con- 
formity with their respective laws and the ratifi- 
cations thereof shall be exchanged in the city of 
Washington as soon as may be possible. 

ARTICLE 16. 

The present treaty shall remain in full force 
and virtue for the term of ten years, to be 
counted from the day of exchange of ratifications, 
and further for another term of ten years if, 
for specific reasons presented by either of the 
high contracting parties, the purpose of this 
treaty has not been fully accomplished. 

In faith whereof the respective plenipotentia- 
ries have signed the present convention in dupli- 
cate, in the English and French languages, and 
have thereunto affixed their seals. 

Done at Port au Prince, Haiti, the 16th day 
of September in the year of our Lord one thou- 
sand-nine hundred and fifteen. 

ROBERT BE ALE DAVIS, JR., 
Charge d'Affaires of the United States. 

LOUIS BORNO, 

Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs and Pub- 
lic Instruction. 



SANTO DOMINGO. 

ties did not cease. On May 7 President Jimenes 
resigned and Gen. Arias a few days later was 
compelled to resign as secretary of war. May 
15 American marines took possession of the city 
to guarantee the free election by congress of a 
provisional president. Subsequently Jacinto de 
Castro was elected to that position. 

In the latter part of May and in June some 
clashes occurred between the marines under Ad- 
miral Caperton and the rebels, in one of which 
Capt. Herbert L. Hirshinger was killed. July 1 
there was another encounter, in which twenty- 
seven rebels were killed, the Americans having 
one killed and eight wounded. After that the 
situation was improved. 



FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE ERADICATED. 



The campaign against the foot and mouth dis- 
ease came to an end in March, 1916. On the 
31st of that moath the secretary of agriculture 
issued an order removing all quarantines and 
restrictions against the shipment and movement 
of live stock. The order signed specifically re- 
moved the quarantine from a small territory in 
Christian county, Illinois, the last area which 
was under suspicion. Along with the removal 
of this local quarantine the various federal or- 
ders restricting shipment of cattle were re- 
.scinded. Upon notification that the United States 



was free from the disease all foreign govern- 
ments which placed embargoes on American 
cattle removed those embargoes. 

The magnitude of the work of eradication and 
control carried on by farmers, shippers and the 
state and federal governments is shown by the 
fact that, before controlled, the disease had 
gained a temporary footing in twenty-two states 
and the District of Columbia. The disease ap- 
peared and was controlled in 269 different coun- 
ties. 



AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. 



Detroit In Belle Isle park. 
Chicago In Lincoln park. 
Cincinnati Zoological park. 
Milwaukee In West park. 
New York In Bronx park. 
New York In Central park. 
Philadelphia Zoological park. 



Pittsburgh In Schenley park. 
San Francisco In Golden Gate 

park. 
Washington National Zoological 

park. 

EUROPEAN. 

Amsterdam ' ' Artis. ' ' 
Antwerp Dierentuin. 



Berlin Zoologischer garten. 
Cologne Zoologischer garten. 
Copenhagen Dyrehave. 
Dublin Pho?nix park. 
Hamburg Zoologischer garten. 
Hamburg Hagenbeck collection. 
Hanover Zoologischer garten. 
London In Regent's park. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



165 



REPUBLIC MAINTAINED IN CHINA. 



The movement begun in August, 1915, to restore 
the monarchical form of government in China 
was defeated by the southern republicans in 
1916 and President Yuan Shih-kai was compelled 
to renounce his aspirations to become emperor. 
Elections were held in October and November, 
1815, to decide upon the proposed change and 
the vote was unanimous in favor of a monarchy 
but the suspicion was then entertained that the 
whole proceeding was engineered by the president 
and his friends, who organized the chou an hui, 
or "peace party," and that no one dared to op- 
pose them. Japan, supported by Great Britain, 
informed China that the time for a change in 
the form of ~ government was inopportune and 
President Yuan Shih-kai and his cabinet an- 
nounced that the formal restoration of the mon- 
archy would be postponed. 

Toward the close of December a revolution 
was begun in Yunnan province under the lead- 
ership of Tsai Ao, a former governor with mili- 
tary training. The province declared its inde- 
pendence and formed a republic. The govern- 
ment sent an army of 30,000 men to quell the 
uprising, but the force was defeated Jan. 16, 
1916, in Szechwan province. Later many of 
Yuan Shih-kai's troops joined the rebels. Jan. 
21 it was announced in Pekin that the corona- 
tion of Yuan Shih-kai as emperor had been post- 
poned indefinitely on account of the rebellion in 
southern China. Tung Chih-yao, military gov- 
ernor, and Jen Kao-tseng, civil governor of the 
"Republic of Yunnan," sent letters to the foreign 
legations in Pekin Jan. 23 that the new republic 
would respect all Chinese treaties, agreements 
and obligations antedating the monarchical move- 
ment but would repudiate all others. They re- 
quested the powers to remain neutral and prom- 
ised protection for foreigners. This promise was 
kept. 

Kweichow province joined in the rebellion and 
its governor was forced to flee. The rebels 
suffered some temporary checks in January and 
February, especially in Szechwan province, where 
most of the fighting took place. March 17 it was 
announced that the province of Kwangsi had 
declared its independence and joined in the 
rebellion. The continued and rapid spread of 
the revolt, which extended to six provinces, to- 
gether with the failure of the government troops 
to make any headway against the rebels, led 
Yuan Shih-kai and his cabinet to issue a man- 
date March 22 announcing the abandonment of 
the monarchy and the resumption of the republic. 
The document recited that the revolution proved 
that the demand for a monarchy was not unan- 



imous and therefore Yuan Shih-kai rejected the 
emperorship and resumed the presidency. March 
28 the state council rescinded all monarchical 
legislation, restored all the laws affected by the 
monarchical movement and then adjourned per- 
manently. 

While fighting continued in some places pend- 
ing a settlement between the rebels and the 
government, the action taken by the state coun- 
cil tended to restore peace. Kwangsi province 
canceled its declaration of independence early in 
April. On the other hand the important Kwang- 
tung province, of which Canton is the capital, 
declared its independence April 6, after a con- 
ference of military and naval oflicers and citi- 
zens with the provincial governor, Lung CM- 
kuang. The example of Kwangtung was fol- 
lowed April 12 by the province of Chekiang, 
which declared its independence at its capital, 
Hangchow. April 13 the governor of Kiangsi 
province announced his independence of the ad- 
ministration of President Yuan Shih-kai. 



DEATH OF YUAN SHIH-KAI. 

Conditions in the republic failed to improve, 
the government at Pekin being unable to subdue 
the rebels. This was the situation when at 1 
o'clock on the morning of June 6 it was an- 
nounced that President Yuan Shih-kai was dead. 
He passed away in his palace in Pekin after a 
brief illness from stomach trouble, followed by 
a nervous breakdown. There were rumors of 
poisoning and also of suicide, but these were 
denied. Yuan Shih-kai was provisional president 
for eighteen months and was elected the first 
president of the Chinese republic Oct. 13, 1913. 
He was 57 years of age at the time of his death. 

Li Yuan-hung, vice-president of the republic, 
succeeded to the presidency immediately and 
without any formality except taking the oath. 
No disturbances followed the change of admin- 
istration and on June 9 the provinces of 
Szechwan, Hunan, Chekiang and Shensi rescind- 
ed their declarations of independence and re- 
asserted their loyalty to the Pekin government. 
It was taken for granted that this was the end 
of the revolution and that the movement for 
the restoration of the monarchy had been def- 
initely crushed. 

In a mandate issued June 30 President Li Yuan- 
hung proclaimed the restoration of the Nanki* 
provisional constitution as demanded by the revo- 
lutionists, and ordered the parliament disbanded 1 
by Yuan Shih-kai in 1913 to be reconvened Aug-. 
1. Tuan Chi-jui was appointed premier. 



HIGH MOUNTAINS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



State & mountain. Feet. 
Alaska 
Mt McKinley. .20 300 


State & mountain. Feet. 
Colorado 
Mt. Elbert. ...14436 


State & mountain. Feet. 
Idaho 
Hyndman peak . . 12; 078 


State & mountain. Feet. 
Gilbert peak.... 13,422 
Mt. Lovenia 13,250 


St. Elias 18,026 
California 


Blanca peak 14,390 
Mt. Harvard.... 14,375 
Gray's peak 14,341 


Montana 
Granite peak 12,850 
Mt Wood 12 750 


Toke wanna peak. 13, 200 
Wilson peak 13,095 


Mt. Whitney.... 14,501 
M t. Williamson . . 14, 384 
Mt. Shasta 14,380 


Mt. Lincoln 14,297 
Uncompahgre pk.14,289 
Long's peak 14,271 


Cold Mountain... 12,610 
Mt. Villa 12,200 
Mt. Hague 1,100 


Mt. Rainier 14,363 
Mt. Adams 12,470 


Mt. Russell.. ..14,190 
Mt. Langley.. ..14,042 


Mt. Princeton ...14,196 
Mt. Yale 14,187 


Snobank Mt 12,000 


Wyoming 
Gannett peak 13,785 


Mt. Muir 14,025 
Mt. Tyndall 14,025 
Mt. Barnard.. ..14,003 


Pike's peak 14,108 
Mt. of Holy Cross. 14, 006 
Spanish peaks. ..13,620 


Oregon Mt. Hood. 11, 225 
Utah King's pk... 13,498 
Mt. Ernmons 13,428 


Grand Teton 13,747 
Fremont peak. . .13,730 
Cloud peak 13,165 



EXPLOSION ON AMERICAN SUBMARINE E-2, 



Four men were killed and ten others injured 
by an explosion of gas on the United States 
submarine E-2, Jan. 15, 1916, while the craft 
was undergoing repairs in the drydock of the 
Brooklyn navy yard. One of the men who lost 
their lives was an enlisted electrician, while 
the other three were civilian workmen. The 
men were busy in the battery compartment 
when the explosion occurred. Though the hull 
Was not damaged all the delicate machinery of 



the interior was completely wrecked. A board 
of inquiry investigated the accident and sub- 
mitted its findings to the navy department Jan. 
18. The conclusion was that the explosion was 
due to an excessive amount of gas, chiefly hy- 
drogen, generated from the new Edison storage 
batteries, forming with the air a highly explo- 
sive mixture. Ignition was caused by a spark, 
the origin of which was not determined. 



166 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



ARCTIC AND ANTARCTIC EXPLORATION. 



THE SHACKLETON EXPEDITION. 

Sir Ernest Shackleton's antarctic expedition, 
the object of which was to cross the entire 
south polar area from the Weddell sea to Ross 
sea, proved a failure owing to a series of mis- 
fortunes, the most serious of which was the 
wrecking of the explorer's own ship, the Endur- 
ance (formerly the Polaris). The plan in brief 
was this: Shackletou was to enter the antarctic 
regions by way of South Georgia and make a 
landing on the coast of the Weddell sea. Then 
with a limited number of men he was to aim 
for the south pole and thence proceed over the 
Scott or the Amundsen route or possibly by a new 
route to Ross sea. In the meantime his ship, 
the Endurance, was to return to the north. An- 
other ship, the Aurora, was to start from Aus- 
tralia and go to the great ice barrier in Ross 
sea, where it was to land men and provisions 
for the purpose of laying down depots to await 
the coming of Shackleton and his men. 

In Mar<ph, 1916, word was received by radio 
from the Aurora that the ship had been damaged 
by the ice and owing to the bad season was un- 
able to accomplish its mission. It returned to 
Port Chalmers, New Zealand, April 3. The 
Aurora had made several attempts to find secure 
winter quarters, but blizzards and ice conditions 
prevented. In January, 1915, it passed Cape 
Crozier and proceeded east along the barrier. 
Jan. 24 a party of three men with dogs succeeded 
in getting ashore and set out for the Bluff to lay 
a depot, taking some stores with them for the 
purpose. The next day Capt. Mackintosh and 
two other members of the party left the ship 
for a sledge trip with dogs. Jan. 31 six men 
started on a journey to the south, but returned 
safely in a few days and went aboard the ship. 
Others also went ashore to do scientific work. 
The ship was moored off Cape Evans, but could 
find no safe place to remain in during the win- 
ter and on May 6 a violent blizzard drove the 
Aurora out into the ice pack, which carried her 
north along the coast to Cape Adare and west 
of the Balleny islands. When the ship was 
ninety miles south of Coulman island she lost 
her rudder and her hull was severely strained 
by the ice pressure. This obliged her to make 
her way back to the north as best she could. 

When the Aurora was driven away by the 
storm there were ten men ashore, including 
Capt. A. E. Mackintosh, H. E. Wild, Ernest 
Joyce, J. Cope, A. Stevens, A. Spencer Smith, 
Victor Hayward and three others known as 
Gaze. Richards and Jack. They were fairly well 
provided with stores, but had insufficient cloth- 
ing and fuel. 

Having left South Georgia in December, 1914, 
the Endurance proceeded south for about 1,000 
miles through the waters obstructed by icebergs 
until Jan. 10, 1915, Coats Land was sighted. A 
little later a new land with 200 miles of coast 
was discovered and vvas named Caird Coast by 
Sir Ernest Shackleton, after one of the patrons 
of the expedition. The weather turned very cold 
and the ship became so tightly wedged into the 
ice that she never got free. No lauding could 
be made and those on board had to be content to 
remain on the drifting vessel, doing such scien- 
tific work as was possible. They discovered that 
where New South Greenland was reputed to 
be there was 1,900 fathoms of water. On Oct. 
16 heavy pressure forced the ship right up on 
the ice and Oct. 27 icebergs pierced the sides, 
and in a few seconds the vessel was practically 
destroyed, although it continued to float until 
Nov. 20, when it sank. 

Everybody on board the Endurance was com- 
pelled to take to the ice and make a precarious 
camp near the wreck. By cutting holes in the 
sides of the ship before it sank the members 
of the expedition got out about 100 cases of 
food. Shackleton found that the expedition was 
346 miles from Paulet island, and an effort was 
made to reach it, but high pressure ridges and 



the drift of the ice prevented. Some of the dog 
teams had to be killed for food. April 12 the 
party escaped to the open sea and in three open 
boats finally reached Elephant island on the 
15th after suffering severe privations. A cave 
was hollowed out of the ice and this became the 
temporary home of the shipwrecked men. 

Shackleton decided that the only way to save 
the lives of the party was to "go to South 
Georgia, 750 miles away, and organize a relief 
expedition. With five volunteers he set out 
in an open boat, leaving the main party on 
Elephant island, to await his return. The jour- 
ney across the stormy sea was an extremely peril- 
ous one. Starting April 24, the leader and his 
comrades were out fourteen days before they 
sighted, the shores of South Georgia. On May 
9 and 10 they encountered snowstorms and winds 
of hurricane force which prevented them from 
approaching the land, but on the 18th Shackleton 
and two men started across the island and on 
May 20, after thirty-six hours of continuous 
marching over glaciers, mountain ridges and 
snowfields, they reached Stromness, a Norwegian 
whaling station. Here a small whaler was ob- 
tained and it started south May 26, but bad ice 
conditions compelled it to return. 

Sir Ernest then went to Port Stanley, Falk- 
land islands, where he got into communication 
with the Uruguayan government, which on June 
8 sent the steamship Insituto Pesca to Port 
Stanley, where it took Shackleton on board. This 
effort also proved abortive on account of the 
heavy ice conditions /and the ship returned to 
Port Stanley June 27. The undaunted explorer 
then went to Punta Arenas, Chile, where the 
British resident provided and equipped for him- 
the seventy-ton schooner Emma. On this he 
started July 12 for Elephant island, but again 
he failed to reach the marooned men owing to 
gales and ice fields and was forced to return to 
Port Stanley, where he arrived Aug. 4. 

On Aug. 26 Shackleton left Punta Arenas on 
the steamship Yelcho on his fourth attempt at 
a rescue. This time he succeeded in reaching 
and ^.rescuing the twenty-two men left by him 
on Elephant island in charge of Frank Wild, 
the second in command. He brought them all 
safely back to Punta Arenas Sept. 3. The men 
had suffered severely from exposure and insuf- 
ficient rations, but they were all well when the 
Yelcho took them off the island Aug. 30. 

STEFANSSON EXPEDITION. 
Tillijalmar Stefansson, commander of the Cana- 
dian government expedition formed to explore 
the arctic regions north of Alaska and British 
Columbia, continued at work throughout 1916 
without returning to civilization. It was his 
purpose further to explore the new land dis- 
covered by him in 1915 to the north of Prince 
Patrick island, details of which were given in 
the Almanac and Year-Book for 1916. The south- 
ern party under Rudolph Anderson, Stefansson's 
chief subordinate, who had been exploring and 
charting the coast line bordering on the Union 
and Dolphin straits and the Coronation gulf re- 
gion, east of the Mackenzie river mouth, re- 
turned to Nome, Alaska, Aug. 15, 1916, on the 
power schooner Alaska. Daniel Blue, engineer, 
died at Bailey island in May, 1915, but with 
this exception all of the little party which left 
611 the Alaska in July, 1913, returned in safety. 
The working base of the southern party was in 
Bernard harbor, Coronation gulf. The Alaska 
brought about thirty tons of specimens gathered 
in the arctic regions. 

AMUNDSEN NORTH POLE EXPEDITION. 

Capt. Roald Amundsen, discoverer of the north- 
west passage and the first man to reach the 
south pole, is planning an expedition to the 
north pole. If the European war is ended in 
1917 he will start for the arctic regions about 
midsummer and enter the ice at the beginning of 






ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



167 



September east of Bennett's land, north of Si- 
beria and some 240 miles farther east than the 
point where Nansen began his drift in the Fram. 
Amundsen will use a smaller vessel than the 
Fram, but specially constructed and of shallow 
draft. He will not, according to his plans as 
formulated in 1916, carry an aeroplane or a 
wireless outfit. The expedition will have pro- 
visions for six years, but the leader expects that 
the return will be made in from throe to five 
years. The vessel which is being constructed 
for the voyage will be a schooner of about 300 
tons with three masts and equipped with a motor 
capable of driving it nine miles an hour without 
the help of sails. The crew will be limited to 
eight. Twelve dogs will be taken along to be 
used for the return trip in case the schooner 
is wrecked. 

BORDEN-LANE EXPEDITION. 
The Great Bear, a large gasoline schooner, 
owned jointly by Capt. Louis L. Lane and John 
Borden of Chicago, sailed from Seattle July 26, 
1916, with the owners and a crew of thirty men 
to hunt whale and big game in the arctic 
regions and also, if possible, to take supplies 
to Vilhjalmar Stefansson, the explorer. All went 
well until Aug. 10, when the vessel, which had 
been sailed by dead reckoning owing to fog, ran 
on Pinnacle rock, twenty-five miles northwest of 
Nome, Alaska, aud was wrecked. All on board 
were able to get into boats and escape to St. Mat- 
thew's island, about seven miles away. They 
saved a considerable amount of provisions from 
the wreck and suffered little hardship. They 
were rescued by the United States coast guard 
cutter McCulloch on the morning of Aug. 2o 
and brought to Nome. 

CROCKER LAND EXPEDITION. 
Prof. Maurice C. Tanquary, zoologist of the 
Crocker Land expedition under Dr. Donald Mac- 
Millan, arrived in Copenhagen, Denmark, in the 
latter part of May, 1916, and Ensign Fitzhugh 
Green, U. S. N., another member of the party, 
followed him a few weeks later. Both con- 



firmed the news made known in 1915 that the 
land which members of the Peary expedition 
supposed they saw in 1906 and called Crocker 
Land had no existence in fact, and that what 
the explorers actually saw was merely a mirage. 
The members of the expedition were all well 
when Tanquary and Green left them at Parker 
Snow bay, east of Etah. They reported having 
received valuable assistance from the Danish ex- 
plorer, Knud Rasmusseu, Peter Freuchen and 
others. The Grenfell mission schooner George B. 
Cluett, which went to the relief of the expedi- 
tion in July, 1915, returned to Battle Harbor, 
Labrador, Sept. 7, 1916, but did not bring Dr. 
MacMillan, Dr. E. O. Hovey or other scientists 
back, as they had decided to continue their ex- 
plorations in northern Greenland and to return 
later on by way Of Denmark. 



THE POLAR RECORD. 
Tear. Explorer. ARCTIC. 



Deg. 

80 



1854 E. K. Kane. 

1871 Capt. Hall ............ 

1876 Capt. Nares .......................... 83 

1879 Lieut. De Long ....................... 77 

1882 Lieut. Greely ......................... 83 

1890 Lieut. Peary ......................... 83 



1S91 Lieut. Peary 
1895 Fridtjof Nansen 
1900 Duke d'Abruzzi 
1902 Lieut. Peary 
1904 Anthony Fiala 
1906 Commander Peary 
1909 Commander Peary 

ANTARCTIC. 

1774 Capt. Cook ............................ 71 

1823 Capt. Weddell ........................ 74 

1S42 Capt. Ross ........................... 77 

1895 Borchgrevink ........................ 74 

1898 De Gerlache .......................... 71 

1900 Borchgrevink ........................ 78 

1902 Capt. Robert F. Scott .............. 82 

1909 Lieut. Shackleton ................... 88 

1911 Roald Amundsen .................... 90 

1912 Capt. Robert F. Scott .............. 90 



Min. 
56 
16 
10 
15 
24 
50 
24 
14 
33 
17 
13 

(Pole) 

15 
15 
49 
10 
36 
50 
17 
23 

(Pole: 
(Pole) 



FLAG OF THE UNITED STATES. 



EXECUTIVE ORDER. 

The executive order of Oct. 29, 1912, is hereby 
revoked and for it is substituted the following: 

Whereas, "An act to establish the flag of the 
United States," approved on the 4th of April, 
1818, reading as follows: 

"Section 1. Be it enacted, etc., That from 
and after the 4th day of July next, the flag of 
the United States be thirteen horizontal stripes, 
alternate red and white; that the union be 
twenty stars, white in a blue field. 

"Section 2. And be it further enacted, That 
on the admission of every new state into the 
union, one star be added to the union of the 
flag ; and that such addition shall take effect on 
the 4th of July then next succeeding such admis- 
sion," fails to establish proportions; and 

Whereas, investigation shows some sixty-six 
different sizes of national flags, and of varying 
proportions, in use in the executive departments ; 

It is hereby ordered that national flags and 
union jacks for all departments of the govern- 
ment, with the exception noted under (a), shall 
conform to the following proportions: 

Hoist (width) of flag, 1. 

Fly (length) of flag, 1.9. 

Hoist (width) of union, 7-13. 

Fly (length) of union .76. 

Width of each stripe, 1-13. 

(a). Exception: The colors carried by troops 
and camp colors shall be the sizes prescribed for 
the military service (army and navy). 

Limitation of the number of sizes: With the 
exception of colors under note (a) the sizes of 
flags manufactured or purchased for the govern- 
ment departments will be limited to those with 
the following hoists: 

(1), 20 feet; (2), 19 feet (standard); (3), 



14.35 feet; (4), 12.19 feet; (5), 10 feet; (6), 8.94 
feet; (7), 5.14 feet; (8), 5 feet; (9), 3.52 feet; 
(10), 2.90 feet; (11), 2.37 feet; (12), 1.31 feet. 

Union jacks: The size of the jack shall be the 
size of the union of the national flag with which 
it is flown. 

Position and size of stars: The position and 
size of each star for the union of the flag shall 
be as indicated on a plan which will be fur- 
nished to the departments by the navy depart- 
ment. From this plan can be determined the 
location and size of stars for flags of any dimen- 
sions. Extra blue prints of this plan will be 
furnished upon application to the navy depart- 
ment. 

Order effective: All national flags and union 
jacks now on hand or for which contracts have 
been awarded shall be continued in use until un- 
serviceable, but all those manufactured or pur- 
chased for government use after the date of this 
order shall conform strictly to the dimensions 
and proportions herein prescribed. 

WOODROW WILSON. 

The White House, May 29, 1916. 
The national flag of the United States now 
consists of thirteen alternate red and white 
stripes, representing the original thirteen states, 
and a blue field on which are forty-eight white 
stars arranged in six rows of eight stars each, 
representing the forty-eight states now consti- 
tuting the union. The last two stars were 
added in 1912 when New Mexico and Arizona 
were officially admitted as stites. June 14 is 
generally observed as flag display day. 

Laws are in force in some of the states for- 
bidding the desecration or mutilation of the flag 
or its use in any way for advertising purposes. 
A federal law forbids the use of the national 
flag on trade marks. 



168 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



RAILROADS OF THE UNITED STATES. 

OPERATING STATISTICS OF PRINCIPAL SYSTEMS. 

Fiscal year ended June 30, 1916. 

Mileage Operating Operating Operating 

Railroad. operated. revenues. expenses. Taxes. income. 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 8,648 $112,625,273 $67,553,414 $5,327,652 $39,711,168 

Atlantic Coast line 4,706 34,445,110 22,797,008 1,793,831 9,838,827 

Baltimore & Ohio (system) 4,539 111,668,680 79,319,804 3,674,248 28,639,064 

Boston & Maine 2,298 52,075,428 36,197,958 1,986,267 13,888,578 

Central of Georgia 1,924 12.567/18 8,845,067 639,520 3,067,289 

Central of New Jersey 684 33,462,929 21,129,895 1,826,514 10,505,758 

Chesapeake & Ohio lines 2,386 48,239,012 31,789,179 1,587,407 14,842,218 

Chicago '& Alton 1.052 16,325,288 11,601,794 566,839 4,147,140 

Chicago & Eastern Illinois 1,136 16.698.404 12,680,319 703,457 3,309,647 

Chicago & Northwestern 8,108 91,313,866 61,952,329 4,741,527 24,606,707 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 9,368 102,358,893 61,713,161 4,449,291 36,186,894 

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 10,216 105,646,484 69,120,958 5,264,331 31,222,860 

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 7,622 72,189,277 52,308,871 3,450,278 16,399,678 

Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha... 1,753 19,522,563 12,958,838 1,022,053 5,535,335 

Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton 622 10,561,749 8,113,865 378,857 2,066,038 

Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis. 2,384 43,478,002 29,195,230 1,556,131 12,717,953 

Delaware & Hudson 886 25,922,671 16,370,167 6o8,458 8,891,854 

Delaware, Lacka wanna & Western 955 49,335,739 29,511,905 2,210,734 17,609,604 

Denver & Rio Grande 2,577 24,890,084 14,739,410 1,091,461 9,057,705 

Duluth, Messabe & Northern....- 411 11,470,003 4,824,084 629,565 6,016,954 

Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic 628 3,506,792 2,482,149 251,683 772,711 

El Paso & Southwestern 1,027 10,671,627 5,924,268 471,367 4,275,680 

Elgin, Joliet & Eastern 800 13,353,457 7,620,248 458,783 5,273,556 

Erie 1,988 65,115,459 42,638,484 2,104,882 20,333,154 

Florida East Coast 745 7,204,482 3,995,586 326,855 2,881,418 

Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio 1,351 12,831,389 9,315,071 596,447 2,912,587 

Grand Rapids & Indiana 575 5,632,005 4,149,903 272,628 1,207,572 

Grnd Trunk Western* 347 8,818,662 5,717,700 439,641 2,660,339 

Great Northern 8,101 81,233,092 43,862,972 5,130,379 32,234,834 

Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe 1,938 15,425,934 12,672,696 724,838 2,027,730 

Houston & Texas Central 895 6,484,167 4,665,365 361,905 1,454,398 

Illinois Central 4,767 69,077,343 51,173,728 3,724,021 14,155,087 

International & Great Northern.... 1,159 9,420,291 7,339,224 418,677 1,660,408 

Kansas City Southern 837 10,583,630 6,361,722 561,990 3,655,260 

Lake Erie & Western 900 6.941,354 4,607,786 283,803 2,048,803 

Lehigh Valley 1,444 47,382,569 33,092,978 1,706,093 12,574,714 

Long Island 397 14,208,120 9,463,675 900,208 3,838,450 

Louisville & Nashville 5,038 60,317,993 39,790,481 2,237,583 18,265,906 

Maine Central 1,220 12,001,673 8,192,578 636,423 3,171.505 

Michigan Central 1,803 41,884,593 27,845,935 1,633,936 12,398,101 

Minneapolis & St. Louis 1,646 10,721,513 7,022,098 458,679 3,237,062 

Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste Mariet- 4,228 35,010,064 19,081,068 1,537,712 14,391,284 

Missouri, Kansas & Texas system 3,865 32,485,508 25,794,345 1,650,167 5,029,973 

Missouri Pacific 3,931 31,589,056 28,844,131 1,293,988 5,422,237 

Mobile & Ohio 1.122 11,868,028 8,553,737 406,384 2,925,200 

Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis 1,231 12,670,688 9.439,033 325.251 2,903,144 

New York Central 6,093 209.303,754 132,949,171 8,823,200 67,509,927 

New York, Chicago & St. Louis 570 14.378.P.14 9,904,100 501,376 3,967,070 

New York, New Haven & Hartford 2,005 76,311,567 25,233,295 2,856,255 22,371,280 

New York, Ontario & Western 568 8,942,252 6,202,922 259,923 2,477,863 

Norfolk & Western 2,086 57,304,586 32,181,346 2,065,000 23,054,786 

Northern Pacific 6,508 75,939,231 40,366,412 5,073,415 30,493,190 

Northwestern Pacific 507 4,319,598 2,752,955 204,818 1,361,361 

Oregon Short line 2,259 24.982.959 12,810,594 1,615,864 10,551,561 

Oregon-Washington R. R. & Navigation Co. 2,053 17,447,346 11,846,448 1,192,503 4,406,384 

Pennsylvania company 1,758 71,255,665 46,447,373 3,403,105 21,402,493 

Pennsylvania railroad 4,541 220,113,358 155,278,979 7,839,321 56,949,999 

Pere Marquette 2,249 21,210,053 14,530,425 626,275 6,045,026 

Philadelphia. Baltimore & Washington 717 23,680,869 17,192,213 668,780 5,816,899 

Pittsburgh & Lake Erie 225 22,635,156 10,371,814 649,122 11,614,177 

Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 1,489 47,370,153 33,827,895 2,038,313 11,501,395 

St. Louis & San Francisco 4,752 46,358,626 30,811,370 2,093,945 13,434,112 

St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern 3,555 32,783,246 23,439,885 1,558,492 7,754,523 

St. Louis Southwestern 943 8,040,227 4,624,543 387,775 3,025,405 

St. Louis Southwestern of Texas 810 4,184,222 3,782,242 211,301 189,849 

San Antonio & Aransas Pass 724 3,862,745 3,404,594 183,932 273,392 

San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake 1,154 11,244,355 6,678,177 578,886 3,986,282 

Seaboard 3.449 15,321,018 9,974,891 689,297 4,650,887 

Southern 7,027 69,997,675 46,041,116 2,916,427 21,004,005 

Southern Pacific 6,950 115,942,991 71,678,820 5,068,111 39,176,237 

Texas & Pacific 1,944 19.156,856 13,815,976 920,438 4,410,636 

Union Pacific 3,622 62,286,701 33,925,738 2,502,331 25,846,692 

Vandalia 917 12,486,643 9,370,575 449,587 2,665,024 

Wabash 2,519 34,704,887 23,749,880 1,027,943 9,920,396 

Western Maryland 689 10,930,369 7,039,608 348,740 3,541,823 

Westorn Pacific 941 7,466,004 4,787,892 349,174 2,327,406 

Wheeling & Lake Erio 512 9.984.516 5,580.840 452,393 3,151,175 

Yazoo & Mississippi Valley 1,382 13,552,431 8,928,039 629,588 3,992,186 

*Total mileage of Grand Trunk rnilwny system, Canadian Pacific railway, 12,994; gross earn- 
7,538; gross receipts year ended Dec. 31, 1915, ings year ende,d June 30, 1916, $129,481,885.74; 
$40,136,620; working expenses, $31,914,484; net working expenses, $80,255,965; net earnings, $49,- 
traflSc receipts, $8,222,136. tTotal mileage of 225,920.46. 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



RAILROAD STATISTICS TO JUNE 30, 1915. 

[From interstate commerce commission report.] 



The statistics given herewith cover the fiscal 
year ended June 30, 1915, and are summarized 
from the annual reports of railroad companies 
having operating revenues of more than $100,000 
for the year and also of companies owning prop- 
erty operated under lease or other agreement 
by those carriers: 

Miles of line operated 257,569 

Miles of track operated 391,141 

Second track 28,645 

Third track 2,714 

Fourth track 1,925 

Yard track 99,910 

Other track 378 

Locomotives in service 65,099 

Steam 64,835 

Other 264 

Cars in service 2,507.977 

Passenger 55,705 

Freight -. 2,356.338 

Company service 95.934 

Freight capacity, tons 92,225,541 

Employes (class 1 and 2 roads) 1,409,342 

Compensation for year $1,164,844.430 

Capital outstanding $21,127,959,078 

Dividends declared $328,477,938 



Dividends, average per cent. 

Passengers carried. 

Passengers carried one mile 



6.29 
976,303,602 
32,247,563 



Tons freight carried 1,802,018,177 

Tons carried one mile 276,830,302,723 

OPERATING REVENUES. 

Freight revenue $2,037,925,560 

Passenger 646,475,045 

Excess baggage 6,442,869 

Sleeping car 2,552,405 

Parlor and chair car 1,304.538 

Mail 58,359,095 

Express 70,124,795 

Milk 14,436,319 

Other passenger revenue 4,247,867 

Switching 31,274,203 

Special service train 1,673,958 

Other freight trains 536,317 

Water transfers Freight 547,800 

"Water transfers Passenger 1,704,531 

Water transfers Vehicle, etc 1,909,463 

Water transfers Other 915,331 

Water line transportation 13,867,737 

Operations other than transportation 59,820,281 

Joint facilities Dr 1,417,403 

Joint facilities Cr 3,492,491 



Total operating revenues 2,956,193,202 

OPERATING EXPENSES. 
Maintenance of way and structures.. $381,532,488 

Maintenance of equipment 509,818,744 

Traffic 60,92,687 

Transportation Rail 1,032,442,821 

Water line 8,688,803 

Miscellaneous operations 23,157,637 

Transportation for investment Cr.... 6,982,898 

General 79,043,173 



Total operating expenses ............ 2,088.682,956 

INCOME AND PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNTS. 

OPERATING BOADS. 

Income Account. 
Railway operating revenues ........... $2,956,193,202 

Railway operating expenses .......... 2,088,682,956 

Net revenue railway operations ...... 867,510,246 



Railway tax accruals 

Uncollectible railway revenues ....... 

Railway operating income ............. 

Revenues from miscellaneous opera- 

tions .................................. 

Expenses of miscellaneous operations 
Net revenue from miscellaneous op- 

erations .............................. 

Taxes on miscellaneous operating 

property .............................. 

Miscellaneous operating income ...... 



137,775,259 



38,527,886 
33,678,467 

4,849,419 

1,940,221 
2,909,198 



Total operating income 731.978.207 



Nonoperating Income. 
Hire of freight cars Cr. balance.. 
Rent from locomotives 
Rent from passenger train cars 
Rent from floating equipment 
Rent from work equipment 



Joint facility rent income 

Income from lease of road ............ 

Miscellaneous rent income ......... . ---- 

Miscellaneous nonoperating physical 
property .............................. 

Separately operated properties Profit 
Dividend income ........... . .......... 

Income from funded securities ........ 

Income from unfunded securities and 



Income from sinking and other re- 
serve funds .......................... 

Release of premiums on funded debt 
Contributions from other companies.. 
Miscellaneous income .................. 



12.862,659 
6,935,794 

10,782,478 

157,857 

2,037,699 

24,681,299 
6,590,955 
8,179,816 

2,683,584 
1,707,867 
87,974,397 
40,469,176 

28,521,399 

2,704,186 

101,370 

4,376,560 

3,081,850 



Total nonoperating income 243,848,946 

Gross income 975,827,153 

Deductions from Gross Income. 

Hire of freight cars Dr. balance... 33,850,289 

Rent for locomotives 6,875,247 

Rent for passenger train cars 11,735,925 

Rent for floating equipment 714,917 

Rent for work equipment 461,496 

Joint facility rents 38,612,810 

Rent for leased roads 123,247,457 

Miscellaneous rents 5,667,136 

Miscellaneous tax accruals 2,033,249 

Separately operated properties Loss. 3,056,046 

Interest on funded debt 403,923,247 

Interest on unfunded debt 31,022,495 

Amortization of discount on funded 

debt 3,226,145 

Maintenance of investment organiza- 
tion 283,831 

Income transferred to other com- 
panies 886,242 

Miscellaneous income charges 1,852,054 



Total deductions from gross income 667,448,586 

Net income ........................... 308,378,567 

Disposition of Net Income. 
Income applied to sinking and re- 

serve funds ............................ 

Dividend appropriations of income... 
Income appropriated for investment.. 
Stock discount extinguished through 

income 



11,118,856 

170,007,718 

21,172,690 



Miscellaneous appropriations of in- 



22,608 



come .................................. 3,697,491 



Total appropriations of income... 
Income balance transferred to profit 

and loss 

Profit and Loss Account. 
Credit balance transferred from in- 
come 

Profit on road and equipment sold... 

Delayed income credits 

Unrefundable overcharges 

Donations 



Miscellaneous credits 

Total credits 

Debit balance transferred from in- 
come 

Surplus applied to sinking and re- 
serve funds 

Dividend appropriations of surplus... 

Surplus for investment in physical 
property 



206,019,361 
102,359,206 

156,144,195 

2,287,221 

2,139,933 

457,726 

1,280,322 

40.481.781 
202,791,178 

53,784,989 

945,681 
94,259,391 

8,413,306 



Stock discount extinguished through 
surplus 

Debt discount extinguished through 
surplus 12,667,813 

Miscellaneous appropriations of sur- 
plus 1,808,425 



170 



ALMANAC AND YEAR-BOOK FOR 1917. 



Loss on retired road and equipment. $24,563,044 

Delayed income debits 4,010,829 

Miscellaneous debits 64,894.771 

Total debits during year 265,750,233 



Net decrease during year $62,959,055 

Balance at beginning of year 939,949,318 

Balance at end of year 876,990,263 



PULLMAN COMPANY STATISTICS. 



118,248 



[From interstate commerce commission's abstract 

June 30, 

Average mileage (single track) over 
which operations were conducted 

(miles) 

BALANCE SHEET. 

Cost of property and equipment $146,268,380 

Securities owned 6,963,027 

Lands owned 6,651 

Cash 13,605,346 

Bills receivable 513,320 

Due from agents and conductors 320,752 

Due from solvent companies aud in- 
dividuals 1,911,041 

Materials and supplies 3,963,802 

Sinking, insurance and other funds 345,644 

Sundries 75,248 



Total 173,973,211 

Capital stock 120,000,000 

Audited vouchers and accounts 2,888,595 

Wages and salaries 617,637 

Dividends not called for 16,832 

Miscellaneous ". 4,531,438 

Dividends accrued on capital stock 1,583,123 

Reserve accounts 38,543,970 

Profit and loss 5,791,616 

INCOME ACCOUNT. 

Car operating revenues 38,722,660 

Car operating expenses 



Net car operating revenue 12,089,921 

Auxiliary operations Revenues 649,532 

Expenses 



Net revenue from auxiliary operat's *2,328 

Total net revenue from operation... 12,087,593 

Taxes accrued 1,271,320 



Operating income 10,816,273 

Dividends declared on stocks owned or 

controlled 96,431 

Interest accrued on funded debt owned 

or controlled 93,714 

Interest on other securities, loans and 

accounts 348,533 



Total nonoperating income 538, 678 

Gross income 11,354,951 

Hire of equipment Debit balance 5,701 

Interest 105.229 



Total deductions from gross income. 110,993 

Net corporate income 11,243,958 

Dividends on stock declared from in- 
come 9,493,967 



Balance for year carried forward to 

credit of profit and loss 1,749,991 

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT. 

Balance for year brought forward from 
income 1,749,991 

Miscellaneous credits during the year.. 2,216,544 



Total credits during the year ,1, 966,535 

Miscellaneous charges during the year. 3,474,736 



Net increase in surplus during the 

year 491,799 

Credit balance at beginning of year 5,299,817 



of statistics of common carriers for year ended 
1915.] 

OPERATING REVENUES. 

Berth revenue $33,376,399 

Seat revenue 6,595,991 

Charter of cars 434,685 

Miscellaneous revenue 72,281 

Car mileage revenue 664,189 

Association and contract revenue Dr.. 2,420,885 



Total operating r