(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Chicago : pre-eminently a Presbyterian city"

CHICAGO 

Pre-eminently 

A Presbyterian City 



ANDREW STEVENSON 



fj;::vtftsmr OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY 

AT URBANA-CHAMPAIG'I 




ILLINOIS HISTORICAL SURVEY 



46 






* 







-*-& 




ANDREW 
STEVENSON 

Leader of Young Men. 

President and founder of the 

Young Men's 

Presbyterian Union 

of Chicago 

Author of 

Chicago, Pre-eminently 
A Presbyterian City. 

An authoritative view of conditions and peo- 
ple showing the great, vital strength of Pres- 
byterianism in the Second City of the Union. 

"When Andrew Stevenson speaks we all 
stop to listen for he has been in such intimate 
touch with the Church, its history and its 
people, that none can exceed the value of his 
testimony, either in force or correctness." 
The Book is of unquestioned value to 
Presbyterians everywhere. 

15tli, 1OO7 



PRICE 60 CENTS NET 



TheWinona Publishing Company 

Publishers of "Winona Books" 
J95 State Street CHICAGO 



(OVER) 



T|HERE is perhaps no young layman in the 
I Presbyterian Church to-day, who is more 
zealous for the cause of Christ as represented 
in the church of his choice than is ANDREW 
STEVENSON. Himself a young man, his life has been 
and is devoted to the service of young men, and he 
has fortified himself with a knowledge of the church 
and its leaders as probably no man has ever done be- 
fore. This book, which is given to the public at the 
eftrnest request of a large number of friends, represents 
tfce untiring labor of years, and is invaluable as a 
record of achievement and glory for the church at 
large. 

No Christian man of any sect or creed could read 
the pages without having his own zeal and courage 
strengthened, and no Presbyterian can comprehend 
the situation as set forth by Mr. Stevenson without a 
feeling of pride in what has been accomplished in his 
own church, or without gaining a spirit of thanks- 
giving and its consequent inspiration, at the tremen- 
duous possibilities for the future of such power, 
properly directed. 

Says the Westminister: 

' ' If the time ever comes when a layman becomes 
a Moderator of our General Assembly here is a young 
man who will be one of the first so elected." 



SPECIAL 

For all advance orders, accompanied by cash, reach- 
ing us before February 15th, 1907, we will send the 
book post-paid for fifty cents. Please send remittan- 
ces in Money Order or Chicago Exchange. 

The Winona Publishing" Company 

Makers of " WINONA BOOKS" 
195 State Street - - CHICAGO* 

(OVER) 



Chicago 

Pre-eminently 

A Presbyterian City 



Andrew Stevenson 



CHICAGO 

PRE-EMINENTLY A 
PRESBYTERIAN CITY 



ANDREW STEVENSON 

President Young Men's Presbyterian Union of Chicago 
With Supplementary Sketches of 

McCormick Theological Seminary 

By The Rev. Jas. G. K. McClure. D. D., LL. D.. President 

Lake Forest University 

By Prof. John J. Halsey, LL. D., Acting President 

Presbyterian Hospital 

By Albert M. Day, President 



JANUARY. 1907 



The Winona Publishing Company 

Chicago Illinois 



COPYRIGHT 

BY THE WINONA PUBLISHING CO. 
PUBLISHED 190? 



PRESS OF 

MARSH, AITKEN & CURTIS COMPANY 
CHICAGO 



To the Memory 

Of my friend and closest associate in work 
for young men, 

Frank \VTiite 

A Christian gentleman, whose life was a constant 
inspiration to the young men of the City of 

Chicago, and whose unselfish devotion 

to the Preshyterian Church endeared him to 

the great host, for whose inspiration chiefly these 

facts have been prepared. 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Foreword 9 

Chicago Pre-eminently a Presbyterian City 

Introduction 15 

Six Key Men 22 

The Bankers 25 

Railroad Men 30 

Prominent Bible Class Teachers 31 

Lawyers and Politicians 33 

Packers 37 

Wholesale Grocers 38 

Lumbermen 39 

Varied Industries 41 

Wholesale Dry Goods Merchants 44 

Wholesale Merchants and Manufacturers 45 

Retail Merchants 49 

Newspaper Men 50 

Insurance Men 51 

Architects 54 

La Salle St. Financiers 54 

Educators 55 

Publishers, Printers, Etc 57 

Physicians, Surgeons, Dentists, Etc 59 

Engineering and Constructing Experts 63 

Retired Merchants 64 

Capitalists 65 

Some Deductions 68 

The Young Men's Presbyterian Union 69 

The Presbyterian Brotherhood 70 

Conclusion 71 

Sketch of McCormick Theological Seminary 72 

By Rev. James G. K. McClure, D.D., LL.D. Pres. 



CONTENTS 

PAM 

Sketch of Lake Forest University 76 

By John J. Halaey, Ph.D., LL.D., Acting-Pros. 

Sketch of Presbyterian Hospital 80 

By Albert M. Day, President 

Directory of Institutions and Organizations in and about 
Chicago having Presbyterian officers, directors or trus- 
tees and referred to in the Index of Presbyterians ... 85 

Index of Men identified with the Presbyterian Church in the 
Presbytery of Chicago and prominent in their lines of 
business or profession 88 

Directory of Presbyterian Churches and Missions (with their 

pastors) in the Presbytery of Chicago Ill 

Directory of the Executive Committee of Young Men's 

Presbyterian Union of Chicago 115 

Rank of Churches in Presbytery of Chicago in actual member- 
ship 119 

Real Growth of Churches in Presbytery of Chicago 120 

Presbytery of Chicago compared with leading Presbyteries of 

the United States 123 

Growth of Chicago Churches and Sunday Schools during the 

last thirty years 124 

Growth of the larger Presbyteries during the last thirty 

years 124 



<f Te are the salt of the earth; but if the salt has lost its 
savour, wherewith shall it be salted ? it is thenceforth good 
for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under 
foot of men. 

"Ye are the light of the world. A city that is set on a 
hill cannot be hid. Neither do men light a candle, and 
put it under a bushel, but on a candlestick; and it giveth 
light unto all that are in the house. 

*'Let your light so shine before men, that they may see 
your good works, and glorify your Father which is in 
Heaven." 

ST. MATTHEW, 5: 13-16. 



o r e w o r 



FOREWORD 

In the preparation and editing of an article for publi- 
cation no one could ever be happier than the writer of 
this paper has been during the past few weeks. No au- 
thor could be prouder of his subject than I am of mine. 
Nevertheless, it is doubtful if anyone ever experienced 
.quite the same feeling of anxiety in letting his document 
go to press for it is fully realized that risks are being as- 
sumed in the publication of an article of this character. 

First: There is the danger of glorifying man rather 
than God. Should anyone read these pages without 
feeling how great is the responsibility resting upon those 
who are mentioned herein because of the prominence of 
the places they occupy, that one has missed the key-note 
of the book. The hope which goes out with these words 
is that they may be used to show, after all, how insig- 
nificant man is and how great is the goodness of God, and 
how, without Him we can do nothing that is worth while. 
Oh ! that the Presbyterian men of Chicago might come to 
see how little their lives have really counted for all these 
years and how much may be accomplished if they will 
"Seek first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness" 
and trust Him for seeing that they are properly cared for 
in material prosperity. 

Second: There may be those who will interpret this 
as a boastful presentation of Presbyterian strength in the 

[9] 



Foreword 

city of Chicago. Certainly no such thing is intended. 
An effort is now being made to prevail upon the proper 
Congregationalist and the proper Episcopalian to under- 
take a similar investigation for their respective denomi- 
nations and it is hoped others will do the same. No one 
will welcome more than I their findings. Many of 
Chicago's strongest and ablest business men are to be 
found in the other denominations. 

Third: The risk of mentioning those whose lives, 
some may think, are far from being what they should be 
and whose influence in business as well as in church circles 
would retard rather than aid the progress of young men 
who may be seeking inspiration and encouragement in 
their every day lives. If there be those included herein 
who do not stand for the best and highest there is 
in life if there should happen to be those who, for ex- 
ample, own or control property which is rented or leased 
to saloons or for immoral purposes, no one will be quite 
so sorry as I yet possibly this very publicity may set 
them thinking and the result may be very gratifying after 
all. 

Fourth: The risk of including those, who though ap- 
parently well fo-unded now, may fall by the wayside in the 
near future and whose lives may be the subject of front 
page newspaper scandals any day. 

Fifth: The probability of having omitted the very 
names of the men who are entitled to first recognition but 
who, for some unaccountable reason, have been over- 

[IOJ 



Foreword 

looked. No claim is made for this booklet that it is 
anywhere nearly unabridged it is only a feeble attempt 
to start something in this general direction. 

All the possible risks and errors are realized; so it may 
be seen, very readily, how great is the responsibility of 
presenting such a list of facts and names. Yet over and 
above it all it is because of the lack of information on 
the part of most Presbyterians of the possible strength of 
the men of the church, if once united, that such a pub- 
lication is necessary and important at this time. There 
are hundreds of our most prominent business men who 
do not know that their closest associates are Christians, 
let alone the fact of their being Presbyterians. There are 
those who, if they knew of the influence which might be 
exerted along right lines by unity of action on various oc- 
casions, would do their best to bring these interests to- 
gether to accomplish something really worth while, where- 
as at the present time when a difficult problem presents 
itself, they lack the courage, the strength and the vision 
to accomplish or even attempt to bring about results 
which might be attained. There are still those who, if 
they had known all the while that a large percentage 
of their employes were in men's bible classes or clubs 
in the various churches and were doing their utmost, as 
employes, to carry their Christian principles into business, 
would doubtless have been a trifle more careful of their 
own conduct and their own personal influence as the 
heads of the institutions, remembering these employes 



Fo 



r e wo r 



have a right to expect a reasonable representation of the 
religion these so-called Captains of Industry and finan- 
ciers profess. Then there are employes who, if they only 
knew the real genuineness of the lives of their employers, 
would have an increased incentive to do their best and be 
something more than mere driftwood in business. 

Now it may be all this exposition of facts and names is 
going to help a little; it may be some of the Christian em- 
ployers and employes can carry their Christian profes- 
sions into business with less fear of one another here- 
after and thus be a little more helpful one to the other. 
That is my hope. 

It should be added that should anyone misuse this 
information it would be evident that that person has 
no desire to build up strong character in business and 
to add his own influence in the effort to make 
Chicago the Imperial Christian city of the world. 
It is hoped this booklet will always be used for the purpose 
for which it was originally intended namely to edu- 
cate, stimulate and inspire greater loyalty and devotion 
to the -first and greatest of all causes the Kingdom of God 
and the salvation of all mankind. 

Probably the most curious question that has confronted 
me throughout this work is that of the place the ministers 
should be given. My heart has yearned for the oppor- 
tunity to say a word of appreciation for the lives of 
those faithful leaders of men who have been so much to 
this Presbytery and who have helped so materially in 

[12] 



Fo 



r e w o r 



making the city what it is. I have so longed for the chance 
to tell of the encouragement and assistance given me when 
coming to the city as a boy, by my esteemed friend and 
former pastor Dr. Howard Agnew Johnston. How his 
influence and leadership were augmented by our beloved 
Secretary of the College Board at New York, Dr. E. C. 
Ray, who was then in Chicago and who made many of the 
accomplishments of the Young Men's Presbyterian Union 
possible. How I would like to tell of the inspiration 
received from that great leader of men Dr. William J. 
Chichester who while pastor of the Old First Church, was 
never too busy to help and inspire some of us younger 
men. And then, I would like to write a whole book on 
the ministry of my dear pastor Dr. Cleland B. McAfee, 
now of Brooklyn, under whose preaching and by whose 
life I was brought to see my Saviour in a clearer light and 
understand what it is to preach Christ and lead men 
to Him. 

Twelve years of life in Chicago have brought me 
into such a close relationship with the active pastors of 
the city that it would be quite impossible to say the word 
that is upon my heart for each one whose life has been a 
help and inspiration to me. Possibly some day an op- 
portunity will offer itself so that I can do it. In the mean- 
time I do want to testify to the unselfish devotion and 
self-sacrificing service of the pastors of some of the smaller 
and less favorably situated churches and missions. It 
is easy to serve the Master under some conditions but it 

[13] 



Fo 



r e w o r 



takes real genuine faith and work to keep things moving 
in the right direction in some sections of our city. These 
pastors need more encouragement than they ordinarily 
receive from us laymen, yes and even from some pastors. 
When we all become filled with unselfish love for the 
Master and our fellow-men there will be no more dis- 
couragements anywhere, and certainly there will be no 
need then for considering the question of discontinuing 
our work in some parts of the city because of the lack of 
workers and funds. 

ANDREW STEVENSON. 
Buena Park, Chicago, 

January 20, 1907. 



[14] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 




I HERE is much food for thought in the 
articles appearing almost daily in the 
newspapers, concerning men occupying 
positions of prominence. To a person 
who is inclined to be pessimistic there is 
much to justify his belief that there are 
some things in the business world that are all wrong; 
on the other hand, to a person who is at all optimistic 
there are facts upon facts to prompt him to believe 
that there never was a time when things were in 
quite such a fair way towards adjustment along proper 
lines. Over and above all this, to the Christian who is 
wide-awake and alive to the situation as it actually exists, 
there can be no question but that the present age offers 
many genuine facts upon which to base the claim that the 
cause of righteousness is making greater strides forward 
than in any previous period in history. To the stalwart 
Presbyterian Presbyterian, the "signs of the times" all 

laity indicate that the Presbyterian laity are 

awakening. . , . . . 

awakening to their opportunities and 

privileges and are making a steady advance in their 
efforts to do their full share and more to rectify things 
which have gone wrong, and to lead the forces for good 
with greater enthusiasm and zeal than ever. Just as they 
are taking the leading part in most sections of the land, 
they are doing so in Chicago, but it is almost amazing to 
witness the utter lack of knowledge on the part of the 

[15] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Presbyterians of this city, concerning the great men of 
finance, directors of corporations and leaders of religious 
and philanthropic work, who are, as a matter of fact, the 
bone and sinew of our own church here at home. Perhaps 

strength tm ' s * s P art i a lty due to the absence of a good 
apparently healthy Presbyterian Social Union to bring 
together these strong men of ability and 
influence; possibly it may be attributed to modesty on 
their part, but it appears to be due chiefly to the failure of 
those few who do understand the power and the possi- 
bilities of the men in the Presbyterian ranks to disseminate 
this information throughout the church at large, thus 
stimulating a desire on the part of the members to unite 
in a great effort to bring together all these different ele- 
ments and to mold them, so far as it is possible, into one 
great unit. It is almost inconceivable what would be ac- 
complished by this one great arm of the Christian Church 
were every member of it to seriously consider his duty, 
then declare himself and march forward with the pur- 
pose to do his very best in the service of the Master. We 
have seen evidences of the possibilities of this great 
army in our splendid Presbyterian history. We 
have just recently had demonstrations of what can 
be done in Chicago and other large cities on special 
occasions by bringing the men together in the interest 
of evangelistic work, cleaner Christian citizenship, 
and other important lines of effort, but never have 
we had the opportunity to really measure the strength 

[i6J 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

of the church as we should have, and as we will have, 
God willing. 

Chicago appears to have been blessed with a good start. 
Even back in the time of Old Fort Dearborn, Providence 
seems to have looked upon this part of the land as 

one peculiarly well located for the plant- 
gooefstart. i n g an d developing of this great church 

of ours. 

In the second story of a building erected at the corner 
of South Water and La Salle Streets by P. F. W. Peck in 
the spring of 1833 (reputed to have been the third frame 
building in the place) Chaplain Jeremiah Porter of Fort 

Dearborn organized the First Presbyterian 
First church. Church on June 26th, of that year. Nine 

citizens and twenty-five members of the 
garrison took part in the first service. Mr. Porter came 
here with the troops in 1833. I* is a matter of history 
that the first edifice of our denomination was erected on 
the west side of Clark Street, north of the alley, between 
Lake and Randolph Streets. While the Presbyterian church 
was the first religious society in Chicago, the Catholics 
completed their building a short time before. 

In the old First Church, we are told, many other de- 
nominations received their start, so that First Presby- 
terian Church may well be called the "mother church" of 
Chicago. One cannot help becoming very thoughtful 
when he stops to consider how large a factor this church 
has been, but more particularly the part some of its faith- 

[17] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

ful members have had, in the life of Chicago. The 
strength of the denomination lies in its strong, courageous 
and aggressive body of business men, backed up, and in 
many instances led, by one of the finest bodies of women 
a denomination, or a city for that matter, ever 
possessed. It is fitting here to refer to the 
helper"." remarkable zeal and splendid accomplish- 
ments of these faithful women who have, 
year by year, done more in the interest of both home and 
foreign missions in and around this section than it will 
ever be possible to tabulate here below. It is not making 
too broad an assertion to state that the success of the 
Presbyterian business men of this city is largely due to 
their home influences. 

What is true in most large cities, is true in Chicago, al- 
though perhaps to a greater degree. Practically every un- 
denominational movement for philanthropic 
Presbyterians, work, in fact any cause which has for its 
purpose the up-lifting of mankind, or the 
cleansing of a community, is largely dependent upon the 
generosity of the members of the Presbyterian church. But, 
better yet, these same movements are even more dependent 
upon Presbyterians for their volunteer workers and for their 
faithful supporters. A man who has for years been one 
of possibly a dozen to head every subscription list for such 
projects and undertakings, told me that out of the seventy- 
five names which could always be found upon such lists, 
three-fourths of them were those of men in the Presby- 

[18] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

terian church. He furthermore stated that were it not 
for the Presbyterians many of the great philanthropies and 
charities of the city, such as the libraries, museums, and 
hospitals, would not and could not exist. Whether this 
statement is exactly correct or not I am unable to say but I 
do know that it is true in a great many instances. Later on 
in this article an opportunity is given to judge of the part 
many of our Presbyterians are taking in these various 
enterprises which number over one hundred. It will 
be observed that in some cases the boards of directors or 
trustees are almost wholly composed of Presbyterians. 

It is not necessarily a sign of narrowness or of selfish 
pride when we speak of the part our church takes in such 
movements, nor do I believe that those of other denomina- 
tions, who are carrying on such splendid religious and 
educational work, feel the Presbyterians unduly proud or 
egotistical in occasionally recalling these facts. On the 
other hand, when a certain educational institution of an- 
other denomination recently received from a Presbyterian 
a very munificent sum toward its endowment fund, a 
man of that denomination remarked that even they, them- 
selves, felt that the members of the Presbyterian church 
generally displayed unusual virility and generosity in 
helping the brothers and sisters of other branches of the 
Christian church who were, perhaps, here and there, not 
quite so fortunately situated. 

One has but to casually look over the records of the 
Young Men's Christian Association in Chicago', or 

[19] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



throughout the state for that matter, to see that without 
a remarkable change in the attitude of the "Giver of all 
Young Men's Sd gifts" the Association work could not 

Christian exist on its present high standard without 
Association. ,, . . , ,, , , , 

the assistance of the Presbyterian church. 

The reports from different cities differ somewhat, 
although it is a very conservative estimate to say 
that fifty per cent of the income is derived from 
the one denomination. Departing for a moment from 
the financial standard, it has been a serious prob- 
lem at times when, by reason of certain constitu- 
tional clauses where not more than half of the 
membership of any committee can come from any one 
strong m denomination, it became necessary to find 
committee a man properly qualified (who was not a 
Presbyterian) to take the place of a commit- 
teeman who had just recently moved away or died. Fur- 
thermore, as an indication of the training of the Presby- 
terians, it has been an amusing observation on the part 
of the "faithful" to see, time and again, when committee 
meetings of the different sections of work are called, five 
out of six, six out of seven, or eight out of ten present, Pres- 
byterians, the others being absent for some reason or 
other. 

Another thing worth mentioning is the responsibility our 
Presbyterian men seem to feel in the undertakings of an 
undenominational sort with which they find themselves 
connected. It seems to fall to the lot of some 

[20] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Presbyterian with a startling regularity to have to 
act as chairmen of committees on finance or to lead 
some special activity, when men accustomed 
to undertaking some unusual or large task 
are required. This can be stated as a fact, 
not only in religious work or philanthropic work, but in 
the business world itself, where, surprising as it may 
seem, a Presbyterian seems to have a peculiar faculty of 
leadership and executive ability. 

Notwithstanding the surprise expressed by the editor 
of a certain paper recently when reading an announcement 
of a two weeks campaign of meetings of an undenomina- 
tional sort, he found that eleven out of 
speakers. twelve speakers were Presbyterians, it never- 
theless is true that the men of this church 
seem to possess, other things being equal, the ability to 
face their business associates fearlessly and consistently 
in a way that is most gratifying, although it should be 
stated very emphatically that some of the greatest leaders 
and most God-fearing men in this city to-day belong to 
the other denominations. For obvious reasons it would 
From not be well to go into detail here as to the 

generalities to practices and influence of the Presbyterian 
Individuals. f . , . . T , 

business men of this city. It may, however, 
help to substantiate the generalities of the pre- 
ceding paragraphs by giving some concrete examples 
of men who are, first of all, Christians; second, 
Presbyterians and third, the most successful men, in 

[21] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

the eyes of the world, that this city, and in fact this 
land, possesses. 

All the while it should be borne in mind that in this 
city of over 2,000,000 people there are but slightly over 
18,500 Presbyterians. 

It is difficult to decide who should have first place in 
this list of Presbyterians who are prominent in the affairs 
of the city at the present time. But when the previous 
Cyrus H generation is considered the choice logically 

Mccormick, falls upon Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick, the 
president of the International Harvester 
Co., and a director and trustee in many religious and 
philanthropic organizations. Few there are who do not 
know of his father, the late Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick, 
founder of the McCormick Theological Seminary and 
the inventor of the famous harvesting machine bearing 
his name. Mr. McCormick's membership is in the Fourth 
church although his time is almost equally divided be- 
tween this church and the one at Lake Forest. 
His untiring devotion to the interests of the semi- 
nary and the Young Men's Christian Association is 
well known to most Chicagoans. It is said that when 
the new Central Department of the Young Men's 
Christian Association was built, Mr. McCormick made 
a personal canvass of the city raising over $250,000 
of the building fund himself. It is indeed fitting 
that Mr. McCormick should have been chosen a 
member of the Council of Twenty-one in whose hands 

[22] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

the management of the new Presbyterian Brotherhood 
has been placed. 

Naturally the second to be mentioned is Mr. John V. 
Farwell, Sr., one of the city's first and foremost merchants, 
the head of the concern bearing his name in which the late 
Marshall Field received his start. Mr. Farwell is an 
elder in the Lake Forest Presbyterian church ; he was the 
chief instrument in establishing the Young Men's Chris- 
john v ^ an Association in old Farwell Hall, and, 



Farweii, subsequently, gave the present property 

on La Salle Street, on which stands 
the greatest single Young Men's Christian Association 
of the world. This lot was the former site of Mr. Far- 
well's residence, in which the present president of the 
Board of Trustees of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion of Chicago, Mr. John V. Farwell, Jr. (now a member 
of the Lake Forest Presbyterian church), was born. 
Mr. Farwell, Sr., is interested in many enterprises 
calculated to uplift men, chief among which are Chicago 
Tract Society, Citizens' League and The Gideons. Mr. 
Farwell, Jr., is also president of the Employers' Association 
of Chicago, vice-president of the Commercial Club and 
a trustee in Lake Forest University. 
Marvin No man in the railroad world, in the 

rauf oafd* opinion of young men, stands out as more 

president. o f a nero than Mr. Marvin Hughitt, presi- 
dent of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway and 
for many years an elder in the First Presbyterian 

[23] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

church, a trustee of the John Crerar Library, the Chicago 
Home for the Incurables, and the Chicago Home for the 
Friendless and a director in many different enterprises. 

No less a factor in all movements for the up-building of 
men, is Mr. Henry P. Crowell, the president of the Amer- 
ican Cereal Company, a member of the Fourth Presby- 
terian church, who has for some time been President of 
the Board of Trustees of the Moody Bible Institute. 
Henry p That, under Mr. CrowelFs direction, this 

croweii, institution has come out into a place of 

manufacturer. ,, . , * 

usefulness in the life of the city and 

the land, we must and do gladly recognize. No 
institution planned by man is perfect but it would do 
most of us good to get into the atmosphere of 
the Chicago Avenue church and the Institute where 
they are really planning and working to bring men to 
Christ. 

With him should be mentioned Mr. Henry S. Osborne, 
a fellow trustee of Moody Institute, a trustee of Beloit 
Henrys College, a lawyer of eminence and well 

Osborne, known for his active part in various business 

leader of men. . ,. , A1 , , ,, 

enterprises of the city. Although an elder 
in and one of the founders of the Buena Memorial church, 
Mr. Osborne's chief distinction comes from the almost 
unparalleled work for young men which he built up in 
the Forty-first Street church and the outgrowth of which 
was the Young Men's Presbyterian Union of Chicago. 
Perhaps no layman in Chicago has been used to a greater 

[24] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

extent in leading young men to the Master than has Mr. 
Osborne who is now leader of the young men's class in 
the Buena Memorial church. 

The next name on the list the name of the man who, in 
the opinion of the great throng present at the First Presby- 
terian Brotherhood convention held in Indianapolis, is 
one of the ablest presiding officers and leaders the church 
possesses is that of Mr. Charles S. Holt. As he 
Charles s. proved a leader at Indianapolis so has he 
andmaiTot* always stood in Chicago. Few men have 
affairs. been more to their own local church, their 

presbytery and their city than has Mr. Holt. Aside 
from being the senior member of the law firm of Holt, 
Wheeler & Sidley he is a director in many different enter- 
prises, an elder and leader of the Young Men's Bible 
Class in the Second church, a director of McCormick 
Seminary, and treasurer of the Presbyterian league. Mr. 
Holt, with Mr. Cyrus H. McCormick, is a member of the 
Council of Twenty-one of the new Presbyterian Brother- 
hood of which he is vice-president. 

It may be that the opportunity will offer itself at some 
future time to speak more definitely of the power and 
influence of these men in Chicago's life, but here we must 
simply let what has gone before, coupled with what the 
term "true, sincere, earnest, Christian business men" 
means, classify these and the others we are mentioning as 
being men upon whom in reality the present and the fu- 
ture of this city largely depends. It must be remembered, 

[25] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

however, that some of those included are not members of 
Chicago churches, although they are supporters thereof. 

Presbyterians seem to be especially good bankers and 
bankers prove to be entirely acceptable to the Presbyterian 
church. 

Of the long list of bank presidents there are three who 
stand out prominently because of their unusual interest 
in religious and philanthropic movements. First, Mr. 
Ernest A. Hamill, president of the Corn Exchange 
National Bank, trustee in the First Presbyterian church, 
ex-president the Presbyterian Hospital, treas- 
Bankers. urer The Art Institute of Chicago, treasurer 

Commercial Club of Chicago, treasurer 
Chicago Relief and Aid Society and director of many 
other institutions. Second, Mr. James H. Eckels, presi- 
dent The Commercial National Bank, ex-comptroller of 
the currency, former president of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association of Chicago, a member of the Fourth Pres- 
byterian church. (Formerly superintendent of the Sunday 
school in the church at Ottawa, 111.) Among the many 
outside interests of Mr. Eckels may be counted the re- 
ceivership of the Union Traction Co., the treasurership of 
the Religious Educational Association, the Chicago Tuber- 
culosis Institute and the Woman's Temple and the presi- 
dency of the Home for Destitute and Crippled Children. 
Third, Mr. Byron L. Smith, president The Northern 
Trust Co., for many years identified with both the First 
and the Lake Forest churches. Mr. Smith is president 

[26] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

of the Chicago Clearing House, treasurer The Field Mu- 
seum of Natural History, treasurer The Chicago Home 
for Incurables, honorary life member of the Chicago His- 
torical Society, trustee of the Chicago Orphan Asylum 
and many other philanthropies. 

Mr. James B. Forgan of the Fourth Presbyterian 
church, president of The First National Bank and the 
First Trust & Savings Bank, is treasurer of the Lincoln 
Park Commissioners, a member of the Advisory Com- 
mittee of the Chicago Home for the Friendless, and is 
connected with many other of the city's charities. Mr. 
David R. Forgan, his brother, for some years the vice- 
president of both the First National and the First Trust & 
Savings Banks, now president of the new National City 
Bank, a trustee in the First church of Evanston, has made 
an indelible impression upon the lives of many young 
men in the city by his practical and helpful talks on re- 
ligious topics. Mr. Forgan is president of the Chicago 
Commercial Association, vice-president of the Deep 
Waterways Association and treasurer of the Citizens 
Street Cleaning Bureau. 

Mr. George M. Reynolds, the president of the Conti- 
nental National Bank comes from one of the oldest Pres- 
byterian families in the state of Iowa, formerly being 
treasurer of the Central church at Des Moines, and Mr. 
W. H. Reid, the vice-president of the Illinois Trust and 
Savings Bank, is a member of the Second Presbyterian 
church of Chicago. Mr. T. P. Phillips, president of the 

[27] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

former Federal Trust and Savings Bank, and now vice- 
president of the American Trust and Savings Bank, is also 
from Second church. Mr. Solomon A. Smith, the second 
vice-president of the Northern Trust Company, treasurer 
of the Children's Hospital Society, is in the Lake Forest 
church. Mr. W. H. Brintnell, the president of the Drov- 
ers' Deposit National Bank, was for years an elder in the 
Third Presbyterian church. Mr. Charles B. Pike, the presi- 
dent of the Hamilton National Bank comes from one of 
the oldest families of the Second Presbyterian church and 
is a member there himself. Mr. John C. Craft, vice-presi- 
dent, Bankers National Bank, is a trustee in the Hyde 
Park Presbyterian church. Mr. J. Elliott Jennings, 
president Jennings Real Estate Loan and Trust Co., is a 
member of the First church of Evanston, as is also Mr. 
David R. Lewis, vice-president of the Hibernian Banking 
Association. Mr. Nathaniel R. Losch, cashier of the 
Commercial National Bank is in the Fourth church while 
Mr. Robert M. McKinney cashier of the National Bank of 
the Republic is another Presbyterian. Mr. John G. 
Orchard, cashier of the Merchants Loan and Trust Co., 
is a member of the First church of Evanston. Mr. Ralph 
C. Otis, vice-president of the Chicago Savings Bank 
and Trust Co., is a member of the First Church, while 
Mr. Leverett Thompson, secretary of the same bank is a 
member of the Second church. Mr. F. H. Gansbergen, 
secretary of the Mutual Bank, is a trustee in Fullerton Ave- 
nue church. Mr. Charles B. Rice, vice-president of the 

[28] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Highland Park State Bank is in the Highland Park church. 
Another Presbyterian prominent at the Union Stock Yards 
is Mr. Robert B. Thomson, president of the Calumet Trust 
and Savings Bank. Mr. Louis Boisot, Trust officer of the 
First Trust and Savings Bank is an elder and trustee in the 
La Grange church. Mr. Arnold J. Lethen of the Illinois 
Trust and Savings Bank is an elder in the Campbell Park 
church. Mr. Benjamin M. Hair in addition to his other 
interests is president of the Cook County State Savings 
Bank, and is in the Second church of Evanston. Mr. 
Lucius Teter, cashier of the Chicago Savings Bank is in 
the Hyde Park church. Mr. Alexander Robertson, vice- 
president of the Continental National Bank is another 
Presbyterian banker. Mr. Robert M. Wells, the newly 
elected vice-president of the Bankers National Bank, 
has been in First church for years. Mr. Alfred L. 
Baker, vice-president of the National City Bank, is in 
the Lake Forest church, while Mr. Frank R. Elliott, 
cashier of the Harris Trust and Savings Bank, the other 
new bank, is in Fourth church. 

On a recent count it was found that all but three of the 
forty-eight state and national banks in Chicago have 
Christian directors, while all but seven of 
directors them have Presbyterian directors. The 
first fourteen in size had Presbyterian offi- 
cers while the foregoing paragraphs show exactly how 
many of these have Presbyterian presidents. 

Leaving the bankers, we will pass on to the Railroads. 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Mr. Marvin Hughitt, president of the Chicago & North- 
Western Ry. has been mentioned previously, so in this 
list the first will be Mr. B. L. Winchell, president of the 

Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway, 
official*. f r years active in the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. H. D. Judson, general superintendent 
of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railway, is a 
Presbyterian of long standing. Mr. H. R. McCullough, 
vice-president of the Chicago & North-Western Ry., 
is in the Lake Forest church. Mr. A. C. Bird, vice- 
president of the Gould System of Railways, has for many 
years been an active member of the First Presbyterian 
church of Evanston. In this same church may be found 
a number of other railroad men, for instance, Mr. John 
Sebastian, passenger traffic manager of the Rock Island 
and Frisco Systems, and Mr. M. Cochrane Armour who 
in addition to being president of the Iroquois Iron Co., 
and the resident partner of the pig iron firm of Rogers, 
Brown & Co., is president of the Chicago Short Line 
R. R. Mr. John A. Spoor, president of the Chicago 
Junction Railway, and the Union Stock Yards and Transit 
Co., Mr. Lloyd W. Bowers, general counsel of the Chi- 
cago and North-Western Railway, Mr. Sidney F. An- 
drews, general attorney of the Illinois Central Railroad 
and Mr. J. M. Dickinson, general counsel for the Illinois 
Central Railroad are all in the Fourth church. Mr. A. 
F. Banks, president of the Elgin, Joliet & Eastern R. R. 
is in the First church of Evanston. Mr. R. B. Campbell, 

[30] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

general manager of the road is in the Joliet Central church, 
while Mr. F. W. Sutton, the auditor is in the Forty-first 
Street church. Mr. Ashbel B. Newell, vice-president and 
general manager of the White Pass and Yukon Rail- 
road is in the Fourth church and Mr. George W. Ristine, 
the former president of the Colorado Midland Railroad 
and the now well known railroad expert is in the Second 
church. In the traffic department there are many Presby- 
terians, one of the most prominent being Samuel P. 
Shane, freight traffic manager of the Erie R. R. Mr. J. 
F. Titus, the new fourth vice-president of the Illinois 
Central R. R. is a member of Second church and treasurer 
of the Presbyterian Hospital. Mr. William L. Tarbet, 
tax commissioner of the same railroad is an elder in Wood- 
lawn Park church. 

Were we to include in this list of railroad men the Chi- 
cago directors of the various western railroads we would 
have to mention some fifteen or twenty names which appear 
elsewhere as bank presidents and corporation directors. 

In addition to Messrs Osborne and Holt, whose bible 
classes have been referred to above, many notable ex- 
prominent amples of prominent business and profes- 

Bibie-ciass sional men leading bible classes can be 
teachers. .. . . . _ . . , , 

found in the Presbyterian church. Few 

men are more respected and have greater influence upon 
the lives of men under their leadership than Mr. Arthur 
D. Wheeler, president of the Chicago Telephone Com- 
pany, a trustee in the Fourth church, leader of the Young 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Men's Bible Class of that church and a member of the 
firm of Holt, Wheeler & Sidley. Mr. William A. Peter- 
son owner of the Peterson Nurseries, one of the largest 
and best known in the world, a director of the State Bank 
of Chicago, a man whose interests are unusually extensive, 
is an elder in and teacher of the Young Men's Bible Class 
of the Edgewater Presbyterian church. Mr. Thomas A. 
Hall, president of Thos. A. Hall & Co., and president of 
the Office Building Manager's Association of Chicago, is 
teacher of the Young Men's Bible Class of the Woodlawn 
Park Presbyterian church. Prof. John M. Coulter, head 
master of the School of Botany of the University of Chicago 
ex-president of the Lake Forest University, is an elder in 
and teacher of the Young Men's Bible Class of the Hyde 
Park Presbyterian church. Prof. Walter D. Scott, profes- 
sor of pedagogy of the Northwestern University, is an elder 
in and teacher of the Young Men's Bible Class of the 
First Presbyterian church of Evanston. Mr. James W. 
Janney, manager of the Provident Life and Trust Com- 
pany, is an elder in and teacher of the Young Men's Bible 
Class of the First Presbyterian church. Mr. Nolan R. 
Best, editor of the Interior, is an elder in and teacher of 
the Young Men's Bible class of the La Grange Presby- 
terian church. Honorable Charles G. Neely, ex-judge 
of the circuit court, is a teacher of the adult Bible Class 
in the First Presbyterian church of Evanston. Judge 
Judson F. Going is teacher of the Young Women's Bible 
Class of the Fullerton Avenue Presbyterian church. Mr. 

[32] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Charles A. Heath of the firm of Albert Dickinson & Co., 
leads the Young Men's Class of Forty-First Street church, 
while Mr. William Francis, president of the Francis & 
Nygren Foundry Co., shares the leadership of one of the 
bible classes in the First church of Evanston. Mr. John 
S. Ford, president of the furniture manufacturing con- 
cern of Ford & Johnson Co., is teacher of the Young 
Women's Class in the Sixth Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Nelson Willard, assistant to the president of the A. T. & 
S. F. Ry., is leader of the Young Men's Class in the River- 
side Presbyterian church. Mr. Frederick P. Vose, a prom- 
inent corporation lawyer, leads the Vose Bible Class in 
the Second church of Evanston. 

In addition to those referred to above who are identified 
with the bar or whose lives are counting in the adminis- 
tration of the city government there are many who should 
Lawyers, De mentioned although the space for them 

Judges, alder- 
men and is limited : Justice Henry V. Freeman, of 

government . . _ . , , 

officials. the Appellate Court, is an elder in 

the Hyde Park church. Mr. Charles Ailing, Jr., presi- 
dent of the Chicago Business Law School, a 
deacon and for many years superintendent of the 
Sunday school of the First church, did much to 
bring about the present very gratifying condition 
of the city council while he was alderman of the 
Second Ward. With him should be mentioned Mr. 
Wm. S. Jackson, president of the board of trustees 
of Sixth church, who although being president of 

[33] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

the Board of Trade and the head of the grain firm of 
Jackson Bros. & Co., found time to wield a mighty in- 
fluence for good while representing the Sixth Ward in the 
council. Mr. Walter C. Nelson, an elder in Hyde Park 
church, served the Seventh Ward as alderman, at the same 
time. Few members of the council have stood out more 
conspicuously of late years than alderman Winfield P. 
Dunn of the Twenty-fifth Ward. Under his leadership 
the committee on license, assisted by the city press and 
the great host of Christian people, carried through safely 
the ordinance increasing the saloon license from $500 to 
$1000. Mr. Dunn is an elder in the Fullerton Avenue 
church and is head of the W. P. Dunn, Printing & Pub- 
lishing Co. Alderman Frank I. Bennett of the Seventh 
Ward, a member of the Hyde Park church who is chairman 
of the committee on finance, is the man who provided for 
the increasing of the police by some eleven hundred men. 
Alderman Linn H. Young, of the Sixth Ward, secretary 
and treasurer of the Gregg School is another of the long 
list of Presbyterians taking a prominent part in the city 
council. 

Mr. John R. Thompson, the man whose restaurants 
are more familiar to Chicagoans than any others, recently 
elected county treasurer, is a trustee in the Forty-first 
Street church. Judge McKenzie Cleland, of the new 
Municipal Courts, a prominent lawyer for years, al- 
though an elder and superintendent of the Sunday School 
of the Second United church, is treasurer of the Young 

[34] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Men's Presbyterian Union. Judge Cleland has long 
been the recognized head of the Adult Bible Class move- 
ment of Cook county. Mr. William C. Lawson, clerk of 
the Criminal Court, president of the Marlboro Portland 
Cement Co., is in the Hyde Park church. Mr. Francis 
T. Simmons, president of the Lincoln Park Board of Com- 
missioners, secretary and treasurer of the wholesale glove 
firm bearing his name, is a member of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. F. H. Gansbergen, another member of the 
Lincoln Park Board is a trustee in the Fullerton Avenue 
church, while still a third of the Park Commissioners, Mr. 
Amos Pettibone, vice-president of P. F. Pettibone & Co., 
Stationers, is a trustee in the church of the Covenant. 
Mr. James B. Forgan, previously referred to, is treasurer 
of the Board. 

Few men have had a larger part in the making of genuine 
progress and real manhood in our city than the Honorable 
Luther Laflin Mills, lawyer, orator and civic reformer. 
Mr. Mills, in addition to being a member of the Board of 
trustees of Lake View church, is president of the Chicago 
Boy's Club and the Chicago Tract Society and as indi- 
cated elsewhere is interested in many of the city's chari- 
table movements. His son, Mr. Matthew Mills has long 
since made a prominent place for himself in the hearts of 
the people. As president of the Young Men's Republican 
Club he proved himself of such value that the north shore 
district has elected him as their representative in legisla- 
ture this fall. Mr. Matthew Mills is teacher of the Young 

[351 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Men's Bible Class in the Lake View church. Mr. Nathan 
G. Moore, an elder in the First church of Oak Park, vice- 
president of the former Federal Trust and Savings Bank, 
is one of the three Presbyterians making up the corpora- 
tion law firm of Wilson, Moore & Mcllvaine. Mr. Eph- 
raim Banning, a member of one of the best known patent 
law firms in the city, Banning & Banning, is an elder in the 
Eighth church, and one of the most active men in the 
Presbytery. Another representative in the state legisla- 
ture is Mr. W. H. McSurely, a member and deacon in the 
Hyde Park church. Ex-judge Thomas Dent, of the firm 
of Dent & Whitman, vice-president of the Chicago His- 
torical Society is an elder in Second church. Mr. Conrad 
H. Poppenhusen, of the First church of Evanston and 
treasurer of Association House is secretary and chief ex- 
aminer of the Civil Service Commission. General John 

C. Black, commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the 
Republic and president of the United States Civil Service 
Commission is in the Fourth church. In the same church 
will also be found Mr. Frederic W. Crosby, a prominent 
lawyer, a director in many different institutions and a 
trustee of Lake Forest College. Fourth church is con- 
spicuous for the counsel it furnishes the large corporations 
of the city and country as the foregoing would indicate. 
But there are many others who must be mentioned to 
make the list anywhere near complete. Judge Benjamin 

D. Magruder, associate justice of the supreme court of 
Illinois; Mr. W. W. Gurley, general counsel for the Union 

[36] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Traction Co., and many other corporations; Mr. Cyrus H. 
Bentley, general counsel of the International Harvester 
. Co., are all identified with this church. So is Mr. John 
Maynard Harlan, of the firm of Harlan & Harlan son 
of Justice John Marshall Harlan of the United States 
Supreme Court. Mr. William Penn Nixon collector of 
the Port of Chicago and a journalist of prominence is a 
pew holder also. Mr. Rudolph Matz, a member of the 
firm of Matz, Fisher & Boyden, a director of the United 
States Shoe Machinery Company and the Chicago Sav- 
ings Bank, is in Second church. Mr. Melvin Elmore 
Patterson, chief deputy, U. S. marshal, Northern District 
of Illinois, who is vice-president of the Brown Company 
and secretary and treasurer of the Columbia Conservatory 
of Music and Art, is in Third church. Another west side 
Presbyterian is congressman Charles McGavin. Mr. 
Thos. E. D. Bradley, a lawyer of prominence, an elder 
in and superintendent of the Sunday school of Third 
church for years, is president of the Cook County 
Sunday School Association. 

Presbyterians have large interests at the Stock Yards. 
First of all the president of the Union Stock Yards and 
Transit Co., Mr. John A. Spoor, as previously recalled, is 

in the Fourth church. Mr. Louis F. Swift, 
Packers. president of the great packing firm of Swift 

& Co., and a trustee of Lake Forest 
College, is in the Lake Forest church. Mr P. A. Valentine, 
vice-president of Armour & Co., is a member of the Sec- 

[37] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

ond church. Mr. A. I. Valentine, president of the Armour 
Grain Co., is also in the Second church. Mr. Arthur 
Meeker, general manager of the Armour interests is a 
pew holder in the same church. Mr. Thomas E. Wells, 
formerly president of the Continental Packing Co., vice- 
president of the American Cereal Co., and president of 
the grain firm of T. E. Wells & Co., is a trustee in the 
Forty-first Street church. Many of the most prominent 
commission firms at the yards such as Wood Bros., and 
Byers Bros. & Co., are made up wholly of Presbyterians. 

The wholesale grocery interests are peculiarly Presby- 
terian. For instance Sprague, Warner & Co.; Mr. A. 
A. Sprague, who is in the Second church, is the head of the 
concern. Incidentally Mr. Sprague has a large part in 
the philanthropies of the city. Mr. Ezra Warner of the 
same firm is in the Lake Forest church, 
wholesale Mr Charles H. Bolster of this company 
is a trustee in the Buena Memorial church. 
Mr. Thomas Murdoch, President of Reid, Murdoch & Co., 
is in Second church. Mr. Frank H. Armstrong, secre- 
tary of the concern is one of the most active men in the 
First church of Evanston. Mr. E. J. Learned, treasurer, 
is in the Lake Forest church. Of the Durand & Kasper 
Company, Mr. Calvin Durand, the president, and Mr. 
Henry C. Durand, the second vice-president, are in the 
Lake Forest church, while Mr. W. B. Downs, the secretary, 
is in the River Forest church. Mr. Calvin Durand's gener- 
ous gift of a Commons to Lake Forest College is noted 

[38] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

in Professor Halsey's sketch which follows. Mr. Henry 
Durand, in addition to being superintendent of the 
Sunday school at Lake Forest, is president of Associa- 
tion House the settlement work which most Christian 
people consider the ideal enterprise of its kind to be 
found anywhere. He is also vice-president of the 
Commercial Exchange; a trustee of the Presbyterian 
Hospital and one of the leaders in the Young Men's 
Presbyterian Union a rare man in the service of the 
Kingdom. Mr. Walter T. Chandler, of the firm of Frank- 
lin MacVeagh & Co., is a trustee in the Sixth church. 
And many other grocers are Presbyterians as will be seen 
by a glance at the index. 

Prominent lumber interests are well represented in the 
church. First, Mr. James E. Defebaugh, owner and 
editor of the American Lumberman, the great trade journal 

of this branch of commerce, is an elder and 
Lumbermen, trustee of the Forty-first Street church. 

Mr. Defebaugh has for some years been 
the head of the religious work of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association of Chicago and is also one of the board of 
managers. He has been a willing and generous supporter 
of the Young Men's Presbyterian Union from its inception 
and stands as a notable example of a young man's friend 
in business. Mr. George H. Holt, of Lake Forest, presi- 
dent of the Holt Lumber Company, the American Lumber 
Company of Wisconsin and the Policy Holders Union of 
Chicago, is also vice-president of the Columbian National 

[39] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Life Insurance Company of Boston, senior member of 
the real estate firm of Holt, MacChesney & Cheney, and 
owner of the Manhattan Building. Mr. Moses F. Kitten- 
house, president of the Rittenhouse & Embree Lumber 
Co., and the Arkansas Lumber Company and vice-presi- 
dent of the Chandler Lumber Company, comes next. 
Mr. William E. Kelley, a trustee in First church, is presi- 
dent of the lumber firm of William E. Kelley & Co. Mr. 
John B. Lord, president of the Ayer & Lord Tie Co., 
a Presbyterian of long standing, is in the Kenwood church. 
Mr. Jacob Mortenson, a lumber dealer of prominence, is an 
elder in the First church of Oak Park. Mr. S. O. Knud- 
son, president of the Knudson & Mercer Lumber Co., is in 
Forty-first St. church, and is superintendent of the Sun- 
day school at Bethlehem Chapel. Mr. Edward Browne, 
president of the Edward Browne Lumber Co., is an 
elder in the Second church. Mr. Benjamin F. Richard- 
son of the firm of Crandall & Richardson is still 
another Presbyterian lumberman. Mr. William L. 
Sharp, vice-president of E. L. Roberts & Co., whole- 
sale dealers in sash, doors and blinds could very 
properly be included here. He is also president of the 
window glass concern of Sharp, Partridge & Co. Mr. 
I. R. Krum (an elder in Third church), is president 
of Krum, Griffith & Co., lumber merchants. Mr. 
Thomas R. Lyon, president of the Lyon Cypress Lumber 
Company, and Mr. James P. Soper, vice-president of 
the Soper Lumber Company and vice-president of the 

[40] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Menominee Bay Shore Lumber Company concludes 
this section. 

The heads of the varied industries which center in 
Chicago, who are generally called in present-day language 
"Captains of Industry" are large supporters of and workers 
in the church. Reference has been made 
industries. already to many of them under other sub- 
jects. Mr. Samuel M. Hastings, president 
of the Computing Scale Company of America and a di- 
rector of many other corporations as shown in the index 
is a trustee in the Buena Memorial church. Mr. Hugh 
McBirney, president of the National Lead Company is 
a trustee and one of the most faithful supporters of the 
Second church. Mr. David B. Jones, president of the 
Mineral Point Zinc Company divides his time between 
the Fourth and Lake Forest churches. He is a trustee 
of both Lake Forest College and the Presbyterian Hospi- 
tal. Mr. Turlington W. Harvey, president the Acme Gas 
Co. (an elder), Mr. J. Harley Bradley, president of the 
Bradley Manufacturing Co., Mr. Charles L. Bartlett, 
president of the Orangeine Chemical Company (a trustee) 
and Mr. Lucius G. Fisher, president of the United States 
Bag and Paper Company, owner of the Fisher Building 
are all in the Fourth church. Mr. Benjamin M. Hair, 
president of the Northwestern Yeast Company is in the 
Second church of Evanston. Mr. William G. Holbrook, 
president of the Union Drop Forge Company, Mr. Archi- 
bald W. Houston, vice-president Republic Iron & Steel 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Company, Mr. Otho H. Morgan, president Chicago Var- 
nish Company, Mr. Anson C. Morgan, secretary, (a 
trustee in Highland Park church), Mr. W. S. Potwin, 
treasurer of this company (an elder in Fourth church), 
Mr. Augustus R. Richardson, vice-president of the Richard 
son & Boynton Co., furnace and stove manufacturers, 
Mr. C. Alfred Smith, president Mclntosh Battery & 
Optical Company, Mr. Frederick M. Steele, president 
and treasurer of the Chicago Forge and Bolt Company 
(an elder in Highland Park church), Mr. Towner K. 
Webster, president of the Webster Manufacturing Com- 
pany, elevating and conveying machinery, and Mr. Robert 
J. Zorge, president of the American Corn Milling Com- 
pany all have their part in their own local churches. 

Mr. Henry M. Ralston, president of the North American 
Iron Company is the faithful clerk of the session at the 
Second church, Mr. Harold F. McCormick, vice-presi- 
dent of the International Harvester Company, a trustee 
of the University of Chicago and the Theodore Thomas 
Orchestra and Mr. Stanley McCormick, comptroller of 
the International Harvester Company both reflect credit 
on the names they bear in the Fourth church. Mr. 
Robert Stuart, secretary and a very large factor in the 
American Cereal Company, is a trustee of the Hyde Park 
Presbyterian church. Mr. Frank P. Sawyer, vice-presi- 
dent of the Great Western Cereal Company is a member 
of the same church. Mr. Albert B. Dick, president of 
the concern bearing his name which manufactures the 

[42] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Edison Mimeograph, is in the Lake Forest church and 
and is a trustee of both the college and hospital. Mr. 
Edward P. Baird, president of the Telephone Equipment 
concern, called the Baird Manufacturing Co., is in the 
First church of Evanston. Mr. Samuel E. Barrett, chair- 
man of the board of the Barrett Manufacturing Co., roofers, 
is in the Fourth church. Mr. Thomas Kane, president 
of Thomas Kane & Co., school and church furniture, 
president of the American Spiral Pipe Works, presi- 
dent of the Winona Assembly and Summer School in- 
terests and vice-president of the Lewis Institute, is an 
elder and trustee in the Third church. Mr. Thomas 
G. McCulloh, vice-president and treasurer of the 
National Linseed Oil Company, president of the Fed- 
eral Manufacturing Company, is an elder in the Hyde 
Park church. Mr. Charles H. Fitzhugh, president of the 
Fitzhugh, Luther Locomotive Co., is a deacon in the Lake 
Forest church. Mr. John McKinnon, president of the 
Illinois Straw Products Company is prominent in many 
interests throughout the city. Mr. Mark Morton, treas- 
urer of the International Salt Company, treasurer of the 
United States Sugar Refinery and director in many other 
interests is a trustee in the Lake Forest church. Mr. 
Frederick F. Peabody, vice-president of the shirt and 
collar concern of Cluett, Peabody & Co., is in the First 
church of Evanston, in which church is also one of the 
best known elders in the presbytery, Mr. Frank S. Shaw, 
president of the Cable Piano Co. Mr. E. P. McPherson, 

[43] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

second vice-president of the Cable Co., is an elder in 
Third church. It is impossible to include in this section 
all the heads of the varied industries who are identified 
with the Presbyterian church but their names together 
with other information appear in the index. 

The Wholesale Merchants and Manufacturers, who 
are Presbyterians, would fill a volume themselves, so only 
a few will be referred to here. The first two houses to be 
wholesale mentioned are Marshall Field & Co., and 
dry goods Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., because they 
have both wholesale and retail branches. 
Although Mr. Field himself never joined the church, he 
was for years a trustee in and one of the most regular at- 
tendants at the First church. He seemed especially 
inclined toward Presbyterians in his selection of partners 
from the beginning Mr. John V. Farwell, Mr. Henry J. 
Willing, Mr. Lafayette McWilliams and Mr. Thomas 
Templeton, four of them being Presbyterian elders. So 
down to the present time men of this type manage the 
affairs of this, the greatest institution of its kind in the 
world. Mr. John G. Shedd, president of the company, 
is in the Kenwood church. Mr. Arthur B. Jones, one of 
the trustees of the estate, is in the First church of Evanston. 
Mr. Stanley Field and Mr. Philip L. James, nephews of 
Mr. Marshall Field, are in the First church. Mr. James 
Simpson, vice-president of the company is from the oldest 
and staunchest type of Scotch Presbyterianism. Mr. 
Lindsay T. Woodcock, general manager of the retail end 

[44] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

of the business is an elder in the First church of Oak Park 
while Mr. W. F. Hypes of the wholesale section is in the 
First church of Evanston. There are many other prom- 
inent department managers and officers to be found 
in the various churches throughout the city. 

Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., is much the same in its 
make up. Of the founders of the concern but one or two 
are left. Mr. Samuel S. Scott, long an elder in the church, 
although spending most of his time in the south now, at- 
tends the Buena Memorial church. Mr. John W. Scott 
of the younger generation, but one of the leaders now is 
in the First church of Evanston. Mr. John T. Pirie, Jr. is 
in the Lake Forest Church. 

It is interesting to observe in both the wholesale and 
retail sections of the city, the buildings, the signs and the 
advertisements of concerns headed by, owned or con- 
trolled by Presbyterians. First we will con- 
^ ne ourselves to the wholesale district 
including some of the manufacturers. 

The John V. Farwell Co. The founder, Mr. John V. 
Farwell, Sr., and the present treasurer and general 
manager, Mr. John V. Farwell, Jr., have been referred 
to before. Mr. Arthur L. Farwell, second vice-presi- 
whoiesaie president, and Mr. Francis C. Farwell, 
merchants and secretary, of the company, are in the Lake 

manufacturers. _, , , , .. T , , T7 

Forest church. Mr. John W. Sweet, presi- 
dent of Sweet Dempster & Co., wholesale hats, is in 
Evanston First church. Mr. Moses D. Wells, president 

[45] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

of the wholesale shoe firm of M. D. Wells & Co., is in 
the First church. Mr. Charles Smith, president of the 
wholesale paper concern of Bradner Smith & Co., is in 
Fourth church. Mr. Walter L. Parrotte, president of the 
wholesale hat concern of Parrotte, Beals & Co., is in Hyde 
Park church. 

Mr. William H. Bush, president of Wm. H. Bush & Co., 
wholesale hats and caps, and president of Francis T. 
Simmons & Co., wholesale gloves, is a member of Fourth 
church. Mr. A. C. Becken, president and Mr. Walter 
Frazer Brown, vice-president and treasurer, of the whole- 
sale jewelry house of A. C. Becken & Co., are both in 
Evanston First church. Mr. Hamilton Borden, president 
of the Borden & Selleck Co., Howe Scales, is an elder in 
First church. Mr. Henry W. Dudley, president of the 
H. W. Dudley Coffee Co., is also an elder in First church, 
while Mr. E. A. Downs, the vice-president of the com- 
pany, is an old-time Presbyterian. Mr. W. D. Messenger, 
president of the wholesale paper firm of W. D. Messenger 
& Co., is an elder in the Highland Park church. Mr. 
Arthur B. Cotton, president of the Brydon Trimmed Hat 
Co., is an elder in Eighth church. Mr. John S. Ford, 
president of the great chair and furniture manufacturing 
concern of Ford & Johnson Co., is an elder and Bible 
class teacher in the Sixth church. Mr. Melancthon 
Smith, president of the Star Gelatine Company, and of 
M. Smith & Co., wholesale grocers and packers supplies; 
Mr. J. D. Haggard, president of Haggard & Marcusson 

[46] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Company, manufacturers of spring beds and mattresses; 
Mr. L. W. Flershem, vice-president of the jewelry concern 
of Lapp & Flershem ; Mr. John F. Jelke, president of the 
butterine concern of Braun & Fitts; Mr. James B. Clow, 
president and William E. Clow (for years a trustee in the 
Lake View church), vice-president of Jas. B. Clow & Co., 
wholesale plumbers and plumbers' supplies; Mr. E. B. 
Moore, president of the wood carpet concern of E. B. 
Moore & Co.; Mr. James L. Mead, president of the 
Mead Cycle Co. ; William H. Warren, president of W. H. 
Warren & Co., bank and office furniture; Mr. J. H. Whit- 
ing, president, Whiting Foundry & Equipment Co. ; Mr. 
Robert Vierling, president and Mr. Louis Vierling, sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Vierling, McDowell Iron 
Works; Messrs. J. W., a trustee, and H. W. Allen, an 
elder, in the Campbell Park church, of the J. W. Allen 
Co., bakers and confectioners supplies; Mr. Clyde M. 
Carr, vice-president and secretary of Joseph T. Ryerson 
& Co., heavy iron and steel merchants and Mr. Robert 
F. Carr, vice-president and general manager of the Dear- 
born Drug and Chemical Works; Mr. Robert Russell, 
president of the Russell Carpet Co.; Mr. William D. 
Collyer, president of W. D. Collyer & Co., butter and egg 
merchants United States inspector of dairy exports all 
these are Presbyterians. Both Messrs. John C. Crofts 
and Corydon A. Reed, of the soap manufacturing concern 
bearing their name, are active in the church. The former 
in the Austin First church and the latter an elder in 

[47] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Oak Park First church. The present beautiful edifice of 
the Eighth church is no doubt due to Mr. Reed's gen- 
erosity and untiring efforts. Mr. L. P. Moore, secretary 
and treasurer of the varnish concern of Benj. Moore & 
Co., is in Evanston Second church. Mr. A. E. Coleman, 
president Chicago Ornamental Iron Co., is an elder and 
a trustee in the Hyde Park church. Mr. Geo. M. Bard, 
president of the Norwall Mfg. Co. (steam supplies), is a 
trustee in the same church. 

Mr. Charles B. Ford, president of the Ford & Howard 
Company, produce merchants, is in Oak Park First 
church. Mr. Edward H. Smith, treasurer of the Oliver 
Typewriter Company is a trustee in the Fourth church. 
Mr. John E. Wilder, of the firm of Wilder & Co., tanners 
and leather merchants, and ex-state president of the Young 
Men's Christian Association is in Evanston First church. 
Mr. Carlton Moseley (a trustee), a partner in the great 
coffee firm of Chase & Sanborn, and Mr. Samuel Parlia- 
ment, a wholesale cheese merchant are both in the High- 
land Park church. Mr. Jonathan W. Brooks, Jr., vice- 
president of the china and glassware house of Pitkin & 
Brooks; Mr. C. M. Trowbridge, vice-president of Burley 
& Co., china and glassware (a trustee in Lake Forest 
church), Mr. Henry Faurot, vice-president and treasurer 
of the Western Felt Works; Mr. John D. Hibbard, presi- 
dent of John Davis Co., plumbers' supplies, and president 
of the Davis Construction Co. ; Mr. L. M. Bushnell, of the 
firm of Vaughan & Bushnell, hardware manufacturers; 

[48] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Mr. W. T. Bussey, president of the Chicago Stove Works, 
Mr. E. G. Clark (an elder in Fourth church and presi- 
dent of the Chicago Foundlings Home), treasurer of Hib- 
bard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co., wholesale hardware, and 
Mr. Robert M. Wells, of the wholesale hardware concern 
of Wells & Nellegar, for years an elder in First church, 
conclude this list. 

The retail merchants contain such names as Mr. F. M. 
Atwood, the clothier, a trustee in the Hyde Park church. 
Mr. N. B. Holden, the shoe dealer, who is a trustee in the 
Third church. Mr. Alexander H. Revell, and Mr. W. K. 

Cowan, prominent furniture dealers, are both 
merchant!. m ^ Fourth church. Mr. C. E. Graves, 

the jeweler, is in the First church of Evans- 
ton, and at the time of his death another prominent 
jeweler, Mr. C. D. Peacock, was a member of First 
church. Mr. William L. Campbell, vice-president 
of the Economical Drug Co., Mr. F. W. Gerould, the 
resident partner of A. G. Spalding & Co., sporting 
goods, a trustee in First church of Evanston, Mr. Platt 
P. Gibbs, president of the Chicago Music Co., and Mr. 
A. H. Abbott, of A. H. Abbott & Co., artists' supplies, 
are all Presbyterians. 

It is a somewhat delicate matter to classify the newspaper 
men of Chicago so far as their religious affiliations are 
concerned. There are, however, notable examples of 
Christian manhood connected with the press. Mr. Fred- 
erick Driscoll, commissioner The American Newspaper 

['49l 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Publishers Association, is in the Lake View church. 
Mr. Victor F. Lawson, owner and publisher of the 
Chicago Daily News, was for years in the Fullerton 
Avenue Presbyterian church, but has since his removal to 
LaSalle Avenue been in the New England Congregational 
church. Mr. Robert W. Patterson, the editor and pub- 
Newspaper lisher of the Chicago Tribune, makes 
editors and his church home while in Chicago in the 
Fourth church. Many will remember the 
strong and abiding impression his father Dr. Robert 
W. Patterson, made upon this city of ours while he 
was pastor of Second church, during which time 
he was instrumental in establishing Lake Forest 
College. Mr. John C. Eastman, publisher of the 
Chicago Daily Journal and Mr. George W. Hinman, 
publisher of the Inter-Ocean are both identified 
with the church. Mr. Samuel R. Wells, business 
manager of the Daily News is a deacon in Second church. 
Mr. Everett Sisson, publisher of the Interior, the great 
Presbyterian paper of this section, is in the Oak Park 
First church. Mr. Harry Wilkinson, publisher of the 
Chicago Banker, is a Presbyterian, very appropriately. 
Mr. Samuel Eberly Kiser, whose inspiring columns in the 
Chicago Record-Herald we read daily, is in the Evanston 
First church. Mr. James E. Defebaugh, of the American 
Lumberman and Mr. Nolan R. Best of the Interior are 
referred to elsewhere. Mr. S. E. Gruenstein of the Chi- 
cago Evening Post, has for years been organist in the Lake 

[So] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Forest church. Many of the leading editors of and con- 
tributors to the Chicago daily papers are in the church. 
Perhaps this accounts for the attitude of the press towards 
the various movements for civic righteousness. 

The Insurance business fire, life, marine, accident 
and casualty is well cared for by our denomination 
in fact Presbyterians are away in the lead so far as the 
number of companies represented is con- 
men'* cerned. To begin with, the president of 
the Chicago (Fire) Underwriters Associa- 
tion is Mr. Edward M. Teall, an elder and trustee in the 
Third church. He is also president of the underwriting 
firm of Edw. M. Teall & Co., president of the Chicago 
Relief and Aid Society and president of the board of 
trustees of the McCormick Theological Seminary. The 
secretary of the same association, Mr. Ralph N. Trim- 
mingham another fire underwriter is in the Oak Park 
church. Mr. Fred S. James, president of Fred S. James 
& Co., one of the oldest and largest fire insurance agencies 
in the city, is in the First church of Evanston. Mr. 
Francis C. Waller a prominent fire underwriter; Mr. 
Horatio N. Kelsey, western manager of the Sun Fire In- 
surance Company; Mr. Thomas S. Chard, manager of the 
Firemen's Fund and Union Fire Insurance Companies, 
are all Presbyterians. Mr. W. F. Cameron, of the con- 
cern of P. F. Cameron & Co., is a trustee in the Hyde 
Park church. 

Mr. F. M. Steele, president of the American Guaranty 

[Si] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Co.; Mr. E. C. Waller, president of the North American 
Accident Insurance Co.; Mr. Franklin H. Head, vice- 
president, Continental Casualty Co., and W. J. Aiken, 
general manager of the Preferred Accident Insurance Co., 
are a quartette of Presbyterians interested in other 
branches of the insurance business. Mr. George L. 
McCurdy, of the Forty-first Street church, president of Geo. 
L. McCurdy & Co., and Capt. Chas. W. Elphicke, of 
the Evanston First church, president of Chas. W. El- 
phicke & Co., and a large vessel owner, are largely in 
control of the marine insurance business of the great lakes. 
The president of the Life Underwriters Association of 
Chicago Mr. L. Brackett Bishop, is a member of the 
Edgewater church. He is manager of the Massachusetts 
Mutual Life Insurance Co., is largely interested in 
the Chicago Young Men's Christian Association, and is 
one of the most highly respected men in the life insurance 
business. Mr. George H. Holt, the vice-president of the 
Columbian National Life Insurance Co., of Boston, has 
already been mentioned. This company has, as its active 
leader of its western agencies, one of the most capable 
and best-known directors of men in the entire country, 
Mr. Howard H. Hoyt, of the First church of Evanston. 
Mr. Hoyt's title is assistant director of agencies. Mr. 
Raymond W. Stevens, vice-president of the Illinois 
Life Insurance Company is a trustee in the Forty- 
first Street church. Mr. Walter Z. Brown, treasurer 
of the same company is a deacon in the church 

[52] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

of the Covenant. Mr. Isaac B. Snow, superintendent of 
agencies of the Massachusetts Mutual Life, is a trustee in 
Forty-first Street church. Mr. Charles D. Norton, gen- 
eral agent of the North- Western Mutual Life Insurance 
Company of Milwaukee, is in the Lake Forest church. 
Mr. James W. Janney, general agent of the Provident 
Life and Trust Company of Philadelphia, is also men- 
tioned earlier. Mr. E. H. Elwell, general agent of the 
Michigan Mutual Life, is another trustee in the Forty- 
first Street church. Mr. William T. Van Arsdale, general 
agent of the Mutual Benefit of New Jersey, and Mr. Elihu 
D. Watt, general manager of the National Life Insurance 
Company, U. S. A., are also Presbyterians. There should 
follow here naturally reference to Mr. Thomas R. Wed- 
dell, assistant editor of the Insurance Post and insurance 
editor of the Chicago Record-Herald, who is a member of 
the Hinsdale church. 

Many of Chicago's most prominent architects are 

Presbyterians. Mr. Charles S. Frost, of the firm of 

Frost & Granger, is an elder in the Lake Forest church. 

Mr. H. B. Wheelock is an elder in the Evanston First 

church. Mr. Howard Van Doren Shaw is a 

Architects. trustee and treasurer in the Second church. 

Mr. James Gamble Rogers, Mr. Robert 

Thorne Newberry and Mr. George W. Maher three of 

the leading architects of Chicago are also in the church. 

La Salle Street has always been aware of the strength 
of the Presbyterian church from the Stock Exchange 

[53] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

and Chamber of Commerce down to the Board of Trade. 
Many of the leaders of the financial and insurance 
community have been included under other 
captions. Mr. Granger Farwell, president 
of the stock and bond house of Granger, 
Farwell & Co.; ex-president of the Stock Exchange, 
and president of the Chicago Bureau of Charities, is a 
trustee in Lake Forest church. Mr. Alfred L. Baker, 
president of the financial institution bearing his name is 
also in Lake Forest and is the faithful and efficient presi- 
dent of the board of trustees of Lake Forest University. 
Mr. Baker's interests, so far as outside charities and phil- 
anthropies are concerned, are doubtless as numerous as 
any Presbyterian in the city, as the index will indicate. 
Mr. Ferry W. Leach, of the firm of A. B. Leach & Co. 
is in the First church of Oak Park. Others active in the 
church and of great influence in stocks and bonds are 
Charles M. Howe, an elder in Evanston First church, 
Samuel M. Meek, president of the Fidelity Trust Co., 
and Mr. Martin A. Devitt, of the firm of Devitt, Tremble 
& Co. Mr. William A. Douglass, manager of the Mer- 
cantile Agency of R. G. Dun & Co., is a trustee of Oak 
Park First church and has been a trustee of the Presby- 
terian Hospital from its inception. Mr. Israel P. Rumsay, 
head of the firm of Rumsay & Co., is an elder in the Lake 
Forest church. Aside from being a man of untiring ef- 
forts in behalf of the church he has ever been devoted to 
the cause of the Citizen's League, for the suppression of 

[54] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

the sale of liquor to minors and drunkards, which move- 
ment he originated and was its president for some twenty- 
five years. Mr. Albert M. Day, for years in the firm of 
Counselman & Day, like many others divides his time 
between the Fourth and Lake Forest churches. Since 
assuming the presidency of the Presbyterian Hospital he 
has devoted almost all his time thereto, bringing the in- 
stitution up to its present high standard of efficiency 
the best in its history. Mr. Day's sketch of the hospital 
appears elsewhere. 

The Educational Institutions in and around Chicago 
owe much to the Presbyterian church. McCormick 
Theological Seminary, is, of course, denominational in 
character. Dr. McClure's sketch which 
Educator. follows later on will show, however, the 
wide influence of the institution. Doctor 
McClure's long pastorate at Lake Forest seemed to 
peculiarly fit him for the presidency of the seminary 
which, under his leadership, is destined to be one of the 
greatest training schools for the ministry the whole nation 
possesses. If it were not for the rule adopted at the be- 
ginning whereby reference was not to be made to the in- 
dividual ministers in this particular book certainly an 
opportunity would here be taken to pay the tribute to 
president McClure which the writer, in common with 
every one in the country who knows him, would like to 
have recorded. 

Lake Forest University the College, the Academy and 

[55] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Ferry Hall are Presbyterian too, although not narrowly 
so. There could be no more logical person to write the 
sketch about that institution than Prof. John J. Halsey, 
the acting president. When it is read, one should bear 
in mind the life behind it, that of a man who through all 
the years, under various administrations and conditions 
has striven to make Lake Forest worth almost everything 
to the young people who have come under its influence. 
Professor Halsey, is an elder of the Lake Forest church 
and active in the life thereof. Lake Forest is the home 
of Dr. Clifford W. Barnes, one of the foremost educators 
of the present time. His training while president of 
Illinois college and more recently as general secretary 
of the Religious Educational Association very naturally 
led up to the special research work he is engaged in at 
this time, both at home and abroad. 

The North- Western Military Academy at Highland 
Park has at its head, Col. H. P. Davidson, a member of 
the Highland Park church and a manly man. 

The University of Chicago (Baptist) has one Presby- 
terian trustee and many Presbyterians in its faculty. 
Among them, Prof. John M. Coulter, dean of the School 
of Botany, an elder in Hyde Park, who has been men- 
tioned. Prof. Henry H. Belfield, also an elder in the 
same church is dean of the University High School 
formerly the Chicago Manual Training School. 

North- Western University (Methodist) although more 
denominational in character than the University of Chi- 

[56] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

cago, finds room for Presbyterians here and there, three 
being on the board of trustees. 

Mr. Orville M. Powers, founder and president of the 
Metropolitan Business College, is a trustee and treasurer 
of the Hyde Park church. Prof. John C. Grant, principal 
of the Harvard school, is an elder in the Second church. 
Prof. Charles D. Lowry, assistant superintendent of 
schools, is an elder in the Third church and active at 
Foster Mission. Mr. William M. Roberts, another as- 
sistant superintendent of schools, is a Presbyterian, al- 
though beyond one member of the school board (Mrs. 
Emmons Elaine) Presbyterians do not claim much of 
the glory coming to the present public school system in 
Chicago. 

Presbyterians prove to be especially successful as pub- 
lishers, printers, stationers, lithographers and engravers. 
Mr. Fleming H. Revell, president and Mr. George H. 
Doran, vice-president of the Fleming H. Revell Co., are 
in the First church of Evanston. Mr. Joel C. Lininger, 
president The Winona Publishing Company, is in the 
Buena Memorial church. Mr. Wentworth W. Tewksbury, 
Publishers secretary and treasurer of the same corn- 
printers, pany, is leader of the Fellowship Class for 

stationers, etc. __ ' ,, , ~ , . , __ 

Young Men m the Second church. Mr. 

Hugh A. Foresman, vice-president of Scott, Foresman & 
Co., is in the Hyde Park church. Mr. John S. Goodman, 
president of J. S. Goodman & Co. (an elder in Third 
church), Mr. George W. Ogilvie, president of George W. 

[57] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Ogilvie & Co. and Mr. John W. Wilcox, secretary and 
treasurer of C. M. Barnes Co., are three prominent pub- 
lishers in the Presbyterian church. Mr. R. Scott Miner, 
manager of the Educational Book Department of the 
American Book Co. and vice-president of the Young Men's 
Presbyterian Union, is in the Woodlawn Park church. 
Mr. Jerome A. Smith, president of the S. D. Childs Print- 
ing and Stationery Co., is an elder in the First church of 
Evanston. Mr. J. Harry Jones, secretary of the Marshall- 
Jackson Stationery Co., is a trustee in the La Grange 
church. Mr. Amos Pettibone, one of the vice-presidents 
of P. F. Pettibone & Co., printers and stationers, is a 
trustee in the church of the Covenant (previously men- 
tioned). Mr. R. S. Pettibone, another vice-president of 
this company is an elder in the First church of Austin. 
Mr. Carroll H. Sudler, vice-president of the Ketterlinus 
Lithographic Manufacturing Co., a vice-president of the 
Young Men's Presbyterian Union and actively interested 
in the Young Men's Christian Association, is an elder in 
the Fourth church. Mr. J. H. Barnett, president of J. H. 
Barnett & Co., engravers, is in the First church of Austin, 
and Mr. A. R. Barnes, president of A. R. Barnes & Co., 
is in the First church of Evanston. 

It is even more difficult to determine who of the medical, 
surgical and dental professions shall receive recognition 
in this book. It may be safely said that the majority 
of the leaders in these vocations are in the Presbyterian 
church; and more interesting still is the fact that men of 

[58] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

this type are generally picked for membership in the 
session and on the boards of trustees. Because of the 
peculiarly conspicuous place he occupies in the life of 
Physicians, Chicago we will mention first the blind 
dentists'and heart specialist, Dr. Robert Hall Babcock, of 
opticians. the Fourth church. Aside from being a spe- 
cialist in unusual demand, Doctor Babcock has found time 
to publish an exhaustive work on "Diseases of the Heart 
and Arterial System." He was one of the founders of the 
Post- Graduate Medical School of Chicago, is a professor 
in the college of Physicians and Surgeons, and on the staff 
of the Cook County Hospital. Dr. Alexander H. Fergu- 
son, a member of the First church, a surgeon and author 
of rare ability, is the president of the Chicago Hospital. 
Dr. Daniel A. K. Steele, also a member of First church, 
one of the founders of, president of and professor in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, president and profes- 
sor the Chicago Clinical School, president the West Side 
Hospital, professor Post Graduate Medical School, is also 
vice-president of the Chicago Surgical Society. Dr. Wil- 
liam T. Montgomery of Evanston, president of the board 
of trustees of the Illinois Charitable Eye and Ear In- 
firmary, oculist and aurist to Cook County Hospital and 
professor in the Woman's Medical College, is also oculist 
to the Presbyterian Hospital. Dr. Theodore J. Knudson, 
a deacon in the Forty-first Street church, is the chief sur- 
geon of the South Side Elevated Railroad. Dr. John 
Leeming, president of the Men's club of the same church 

[59] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

is chief surgeon of the Chicago City Railway. Dr. Robert 
D. Mac Arthur is vice-president of the Chicago Clinical 
Hospital. Dr. Frank S. Johnson, an elder and trustee 
in Second church, is emeritus dean and professor of 
Medicine in North-Western University and is con- 
sulting physician of the Woman's Hospital and Mercy 
Hospital. Dr. Arthur D. Bevan, a member of the 
Second church and for some time president of the 
Presbyterian Hospital, is a professor in Rush Medical 
college and professorial lecturer on surgery, University 
of Chicago. 

Dr. E. Wyllis Andrews, another Second church member, 
has been a professor in surgery in North-Western Uni- 
versity since 1883, and United States Surgeon, Bureau of 
Pensions, since 1889, is author of "Surgery of the Stomach" 
as well as other important works and is president of the 
Chicago Surgical Society. Dr. Walter H. Allport of the 
Fourth church, is assistant chief surgeon of the Illinois 
Central Railroad and surgeon St. Luke's Hospital. Dr. 
Frank Allport, one of the leading Eye and Ear surgeons in 
Chicago, is a professor in North-Western University, 
Eye and Ear surgeon in St. Luke's and Wesley Hospitals 
and consulting Eye and Ear surgeon to Chicago Board of 
Education, C. & N. W. Ry. and C. & E. I. Ry. Dr. 
William M. Harsha of the Forty-first Street church, is 
professor of operative and clinical surgery in the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. Dr. Henry W. Gentles of 
Hyde Park is professor of general medicine in the Post- 

[60] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Graduate Medical School and trustee of the Chicago 
Hospital. Dr. Philip P. S. Doane, attending surgeon 
Cook County Hospital, assistant in surgery, Rush Medical 
College, an author on surgical subjects, is another north 
side Presbyterian surgeon. Dr. William Cuthbertson 
of the Forty-first Street church has been attending gyne- 
cologist of St. Luke's Hospital for years, and is chief ex- 
aminer of the Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
Dr. Samuel P. Hedges, perhaps the leading Homeopath 
in Chicago, captain in the ii2th Regiment New York 
Volunteer Infantry and a practitioner in Chicago since 1867, 
professor in the Chicago Homeo. Medical College, attend- 
ing and consulting physician of Chicago Nursery and 
Half Orphan Asylum, has been an elder in the church 
since 1868 and is now in the Buena Memorial church. 
Dr. E. lies Kerlin, another elder of the Buena church, 
and for years one of the pillars in the church of the Cove- 
nant, is one of the most highly esteemed physicians and 
surgeons on the north side. Dr. Arthur H. Reading, of 
the Woodlawn Park church, is district county physician, is 
professor of diseases of chest, throat and nose in the 
American College of Medicine and Surgery, and is presi- 
dent of Chicago Eclectic Medical and Surgical Society. 
Dr. L. N. Barlow, one of the founders and directors of the 
People's Hospital Training School for Nurses is in 
the Forty-first Street church. Dr. R. N. Isham is in the 
Fourth church. Dr. G. P. Head, director and professor 
of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases in Chicago Post-Gradu- 

[61] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

ate Medical College, an editor of the year book on the 
Nose, Throat and Ear, is a west side physician of promi- 
nence. Dr. John C. Warbrick, instructor in Medicine, 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Naturalist, Orni- 
thologist, is also a contributor to various medical and 
literary journals. Dr. John A. Robison, secretary of the 
Medical Board of the Presbyterian Hospital and on 
the staff from its inception, is consulting physician of the 
Mary Thompson Hospital. Dr. Nathan P. Colwell, as- 
sistant in Diseases of Chest, Nose and Throat, Rush 
Medical College, and assistant to the deans of the same 
institution the past few years, is a'specialist of prominence 
in this particular line. Dr. William L. Copeland, another 
west side Presbyterian, is the professor of Anatomy in the 
College of Dental Surgery. Dr. Stephen W. Cox of the 
Third church, has been connected prominently with many 
Chicago institutions and is now surgeon-in-chief of St. 
Stephen's Sanitarium. Dr. Charles H. Grain, an elder 
in the Woodlawn Park church and teacher of the Young 
Women's Bible Class there, is assistant in Ophthalmology, 
Chicago Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat College. He is also 
a member of the firm of Grain Bros., wholesale dealers 
in drugs, chemicals, paints and oils. Dr. Truman W. 
Brophy, one of the best known men in the dental profes- 
sion, is in the Third Presbyterian church, while Dr. James 
O. Ely, another dentist of equal prominence, is a North 
Shore Presbyterian. There are three prominent Presby- 
terian opticians who should be mentioned here, First, 

[62] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Mr. Aimer Coe, president and treasurer of the concern 
bearing his name, manufacturers and retailers of optical 
goods. Mr. Ernest S. Fowler of the firm E. S. & W. S. 
Fowler is in the First church of Oak Park while Mr. 
Arthur R. MacDougall, president of the optical firm of 
A. R. MacDougall & Co., is in the Forty- first Street 
church. 

Many of the great engineering and constructing feats 
in Chicago have been and are daily being accomplished 
by Presbyterians. 

Mr. John M. Ewan, president the John M. Ewan 
Construction Company; Mr. Van Wagenen Ailing, presi- 
Engineering dent ^ t ^ ie Ailing Construction Company; 
and construct- Mr. Frederick C. Austin, president The 

Ing experts. ,. .. . . , . . _ 

Municipal Engineering and Constructing 

Company; Mr. William E. Dorwin, vice-president and 
general manager the United States Engineering & Con- 
structing Company; Mr. David Sloan (a trustee in Wood- 
lawn Park church), chief engineer McArthur Bros. 
Constructing Company; Mr. Paul Albert Poppenhusen, 
president the Green Engineering Company; Mr. William 
Goldie, president Goldie Bros., general contractors; Mr. 
Onward Bates (an elder and trustee in the Church of the 
Covenant), president the Bates & Rogers Construction 
Co. ; Mr. George A. Yuille, president Chicago Engineering 
& Construction Company; Mr. Thomas Rankin, president 
and Mr. Dixon C. Williams, vice-president Chicago 
Building and Manufacturing Company; Mr. John W, 

[63] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

Alvord, Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineer; Mr. George 
Welsby Scott (a trustee in Buena Memorial church), 
consulting engineer, and Mr. Samuel G. McMeen, 
electrical engineer, are all identified with the church. 

As aids in making some of the engineering and con- 
structing feats possible, Messrs Thomas P. Phillips, 
president and William E. Phillips, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager, of the Dolese & Shepard Company, 
quarrymen and- stone contractors, and Mr. Burton H. 
Atwood, president of the Atwood- Davis Sand Company, 
should be mentioned. 

Of those Presbyterians who have retired from business 
or their professional life there are some who are still the 
active leaders and supporters of their local 
me'SSnts. churches. Mr. Watts De Gollyer, a re- 
tired varnish manufacturer, is an elder in the 
Riverside church. Mr. Lucien G. Yoe, a retired syrup 
manufacturer, is an elder in the Fourth church, although 
he resides in Highland Park, Mr. Caryl Young, founder 
of the once indispensable C. Y. Transfer Company (now 
the Arthur Dixon Transfer Company), is a trustee in First 
church. Mr. George E. Purington, a retired ship chand- 
ler, is an elder in Fourth church. Mr. Orrin W. Potter, 
for years president of the Chicago Rolling Mill Company, 
and Mr. W. J. Chalmers, formerly vice-president of the 
Allis-Chalmers Company, are also in this church. Dr. 
Henry P. Merriman, although now in California, has been 
one of the chief supporters of the Second church for years. 

[64] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

The capitalists very fittingly conclude this brief classi- 
fication. Practically every one mentioned is a director 
in one or more of our Chicago banks; many of them di- 
rectors in numerous corporations; some 
Capitalists. have had much to do with the shaping of 
Chicago's earlier history, and to them is due 
a large share of the credit of Chicago's present condition. 
It is interesting here to note that of the twenty-eight to be 
mentioned, eight of them are in the First church, five of 
them in the Second, one in the Third church, Eight in 
the Fourth, one in Lake Forest, one in Evanston First, 
one in Sixth church, two in Forty-first St. church and 
one in Buena Memorial. 

The First church men are Mr. John B. Drake, Jr., Mr. 
Tracy Drake, a deacon, Mr. Ebenezer Buckingham, Mr. 
Charles T. Otis, a trustee, Mr. Philo A. Otis, an elder, 
director of the music in the church for twenty-five years 
and secretary of the Theodore Thomas Orchestra, Mr. 
George H. Laflin, Mr. Louis E. Laflin and Mr. Charles 
B. Shedd. 

In the Second church we find Mr. Eugene S. Pike (a 
trustee), who is now erecting the new Mentor Building 
at the corner of State and Monroe Streets, Mr. Albert 
Keep, formerly president of the Lake Shore and Michigan 
Southern Railway, Mr. Norman B. Ream, said to be a 
director in more corporations and varied industries than 
any other Chicago man, Mr. Charles W. ReQua, and 
Mr. James R. Walker, a trustee. Mr. Thomas Templeton, 

[65] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

formerly a partner in Marshall Field & Co., is an elder 
in Third church. The Fourth church is represented by 
Mr. Albert M. Day, Mr. Abram Poole, Mr. Charles B. 
King, president of the Commercial Safe Deposit 
Company, Mr. James C. Peasley, Mr. Mark S. Willing, 
Mr. H. H. Forsyth, an elder, Mr. D. Mark Cummings, 
and Mr. Moses J. Wentworth, one of the trustees 
of the church. Mr. Delevan Smith, owner of the 
Indianapolis News and a number of other newspapers, 
one of the controlling factors in the Oliver Typewriter 
Co., and formerly president of the board of trustees of 
Lake Forest University, is in the Lake Forest church. 
Mr. James A. Patten a trustee and president of the 
Men's Club of the First church of Evanston, still a mem- 
ber of the firm of Bartlett, Frazier & Carrington, has built 
perhaps more of the large manufacturing buildings in the 
southern portion of the business district than all others 
put together. Mr. Lafayette McWilliams, an elder in 
the Sixth church, was for years one of the leading part- 
ners of Marshall Field & Co. Messrs. Lincoln M. Coy, 
and Alfred C. Tyler, both prominent in financial circles, 
are in the Forty-first St. church. The concluding name 
is that of Mr. James B. Waller, one of the founders of the 
Buena Memorial church. Mr. Waller's father whose 
name he bears, was one of the strongest factors in 
Chicago's earlier Presbyterianism. It is only natural 
therefore that Mrs. Waller should have wished 
that her memorial for her husband should take 

[66] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

the shape of a Presbyterian church in the heart 
of Buena Park, which community the elder Mr. 
Waller founded. 

This section just concluded was originally intended to 
be merely a short sketch of some of the more prominent 
men in the city's activities who are identified in some way 
with the Presbyterian church. The plan of classifying 
them in any respect at all developed as the facts were 
written. It is obvious the interior of the book could not 
go into detail as to the church connection and the outside 
interests of all of the 540 Captains of Industry and profes- 
sional men shown in the index. But for convenience it 
may be said here that of the 374 men mentioned in 
the preceding twenty sub-divisions of the story, 61 are 
manufacturers and wholesale merchants; 30 are bankers; 
19 are railroad officials; 40 are lawyers, judges, aldermen 
and government officials; 10 are packers; 10 are wholesale 
grocers; 14 are lumbermen; 37 heads of varied industries; 

10 well known retail merchants; 12 newspapermen; 24 in- 
surance men; 6 architects; 10 La Salle Street financiers; 

11 educators; 16 publishers, printers, stationers, engravers, 
etc.; 34 physicians, surgeons, dentists and opticians; 13 
engineering and constructing experts; 7 retired mer- 
chants and 28 are those ordinarily classified as capitalists.' 
This can only mean something to those who know for 
what the men, whose names are mentioned, stand. To 
any real Chicagoan it means much. 

A study of the index reveals even more interesting facts: 

[67] 



Chicago: A Presbyter ian City 

of the 540 included, 190 are presidents of the institu- 
tions named; 53 are vice-presidents; 47 are secretaries 
and treasurers; 60 are directors and 70 are owners 
thereof. But it should be remembered these presidents, 
directors, owners, etc, may represent five times as 
many enterprises as these figures would indicate. Some 
are interested in only the one line of business re- 
ferred to. Many are owners, directors or leaders in from 
five to ten, while several are in as many as twenty-five 
different concerns or corporations. Of these, 

deductions 2I ^ are omcers i n tne church 115 being 
elders, 88 trustees and 15 deacons. About 
185 (over, I think) of these men are officers, directors 
or trustees in the various charities, philanthropies and 
outside agencies calculated to up-lift manhood, which are 
mentioned on pages 85, 86 and 87 ; 106 are in only one; 45 
in two; 15 in three; 12 in four; 5 in five and 2 in six. From 
the figures and the fact that these 540 of Chicago's 
most representative citizens are identified with the 
church, does it not bear out the statement recently made, 
by my friend, Mr. Lloyd E. Harter, president of the 
Young Men's Congregational Union of Chicago, one 
of the most vital agencies for good the city possesses, 
to the effect that, "with rare exceptions, no man who 
amounts to anything in the way of real business success; 
who has really built up a business and a reputation that 
will endure throughout the coming years; who holds the 
genuine respect and confidence of his fellowmen, is with- 

[68] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

out some outside interest which has for its purpose the 
up-lifting of manhood and the bettering of the condition 
of the suffering in our city." Is this so? Are we all un- 
selfishly interested in something outside our fearful race 
for money, for social standing and a big name in the 
community ? 

Although comparatively a young organization, it is con- 
fidently believed the Young Men's Presbyterian Union of 
Chicago has done and is doing much to develop and 
Young Men's strengthen the Presbyterian forces of this 

Presbyterian great ^ Qf QU ^ ^ how ^ .^ ^ M 

of Chicago. filled its mission just how much good it has 
really done, remains to be seen. This much may be said 
in its favor, however, it has gradually brought the men of 
the various local churches together in such a natural and 
friendly manner that they are looking at the larger prob- 
lems of the church in the city in a way that forecasts bright 
things for the future. The broad Christian fellowship 
that now exists between some 1 200 of the nearly 5000 men 
enrolled in the men's organizations within the Presbytery 
of Chicago is a direct outgrowth of the steady and per- 
sistent determination on the part of the Union to help the 
church see its great opportunity and make the most of it. 
The condition of the work for men in many of the churches 
is far from ideal but most of them are doing something 
and it will be recalled there were only two strong 
organizations for men in the Presbytery less than ten 
years ago. 

[69] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

How large a factor the Chicago Union has been in the 
newly organized Presbyterian Brotherhood can only be 
imagined. Chicago lays no claim to the introduction at 

the General Assembly of 1905 of the overture 
Brotherhood. ^ or ^ e l ar g er movement for men throughout 

the church. That came by way of Ohio 
from Rev. R. R. Bigger, Ph.D., pastor of the First church 
of Massillon, to be definite. But Chicago men are 
mightily interested in the Brotherhood and mean to 
make it something worth while if they can. Already 
the plans provide for a re-organization of the Young Men's 
Union so that a place will be made for all Presbyterian 
men in its various activities. There is every reason to 
believe that, in due time, they will largely come in and 
then the fondest expectations of the Pioneer Presbyterians 
and the foundation layers of Chicago may come to pass. 
other With the Presbyterian men lined up in ear- 

denominations nest; with the Congregationalists already 

organizing. 3 e. *. r 

close up to us in denmteness of purpose 
and organization; with the Episcopalians in march- 
ing order; the Baptists planning; the Lutherans 
even beyond that point and the Methodists surely 
thinking well, why isn't Chicago ready for the 
final conflict with the forces of evil that have so 
long hampered us, so tarnished our otherwise clean 
name, and given us the reputation we have in other 
parts of the land? 
This incoherent and incomplete presentation of some 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

of the real facts of Chicago life may not appeal to many. 
They ought to set most people thinking. It is very certain 
the people of the world who make no professions what- 
ever, who do not rent pews in the church and thus consider 
their religious duties discharged, or who do not even care 
whether their wives are in the church and their children 
in the Sunday school, will have reason to ask some ques- 
tions trying to reconcile some everyday occurrences with 
the Christian professions and wondering whether Chris- 
tians are really in earnest or not. They will see there are 
many mentioned with whom they associate daily who 
differ in no way from those who make no professions at 
all. But the saddest thing will be the absolute denial 
of Christ by many of our leading business men when some 
unbelieving man or some shallow society woman jeers 
at the Christian religion, or when some doubter raises a 
question about the Bible and the divinity of Christ. 
Surely above all, this should make professing Christians 
deeply thoughtful when we realize that we may be stand- 
ing as a positive barrier in the Christianizing and 
purifying of our city because of our inconsistency or 
apathy. 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



McCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
BY PRESIDENT JAMES G. K. MCCLURE, D.D., LL.D. 

McCormick Theological Seminary is situated at the 
very heart of the human needs of a great city. Its history 
has kept pace with the recognition of the social conditions 
of mankind. The seminary originated in the purpose of 
the nine ministers who constituted the Presbytery of 
Salem (that Presbytery embraced almost the entire state 
of Indiana and much of Illinois) to establish in their 
territory a collegiate and theological school. It was in 
January, 1827, in a log loom-house at Hanover, Indiana, 
that a grammar school was opened with six boys in at- 
tendance. This little school, solemnly dedicated to Al- 
mighty God as a nursery for the ministry, was the nucleus 
both of Hanover College and of the Indiana Theological 
Seminary, as McCormick Theological Seminary was then 
called. 

In due time the seminary department passed from the 
village of Hanover to the city of New Albany, Indiana, 
where by reason of the greater population, there was 
larger opportunity for acquaintance with the experiences 
of humanity. Still later, through the offer of Mr. Cyrus 
H. McCormick to donate an endowment fund the semi- 
nary was removed from the comparatively small city to 
the thickly settled city of Chicago. 

[72] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

In entering upon its connection with the multitudes of 
this rapidly growing city the seminary saw fit to place it- 
self near the outskirts, and on what was then open prairie 
erected its first buildings. But the seminary was not to 
dwell apart from the lives of a populous community, for 
little by little the city planted its dwellings and homes 
close to the seminary until now the students who reside 
within its halls find themselves, not in reclused retirement, 
but in actual contact with the joys and sorrows, the weal 
and woe of humanity. 

Earnestness of spiritual life has characterized the work 
of the seminary from its inception. While it has always 
sought, and to-day continues to seek, scholastic develop- 
ment, that scholastic development is sought, not as an end, 
but as a means. Those who constitute its faculty desire 
its student body to be composed of as bright minds as 
they can find; and they desire to inculcate in such minds 
the clearest possible thinking and to impart to such minds 
the most accurate information. They believe that the 
Gospel can only be preached worthily as men bring to it 
trained intellects, but they never intend that the training 
of the intellect shall interfere with, but rather stimulate, 
spirituality of life, ardor of purpose, and adaptation of ef- 
fort. The seminary holds that there is no greater need in the 
world to-day than the need for consecrated men who lay all 
their talents at the feet of Christ, and then go forth with lov- 
ing devotion to the hearts of men, to be the unselfish friends 
of their fellows and to be persuasive prophets of God. 

[73] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

The seminary stands for profound convictions. It 
holds to the infallibility of the Bible as the teacher of life's 
meaning and the interpreter of God to man. It intends 
to keep abreast of all the discussions of the age and it 
places at the disposal of its instructors the latest literature 
and places also at their disposal opportunities for travel 
upon the continent and in the lands of the Bible. 

In this union of earnestness and scholarship lies the 
hope of the seminary. It exalts every sphere of evan- 
gelistic effort. Its students are connected with missionary 
operations in the Churches and Institutional Associations 
of Chicago. They respond, as fully as faithful attendance 
to their studies will allow, to the opportunities for help- 
fulness that confront them in their environment. It is 
intended that when they graduate and pass out to their 
respective spheres of labor each man of them shall carry 
with him acquaintance with humanity as it is, as well as 
carry with him the heart of love and abiding confidence 
in the Gospel. 

The graduates of the seminary are scattered every- 
where throughout America. They occupy influential 
pulpits both along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. 
In village, town and city between these coasts they 
are doing a work that helps and blesses and 
glorifies humanity. And beyond the seas, in all 
the mission stations of our church, China, Japan, 
Africa, India, Korea, Chile, and other countries they 
are living lives of exemplary piety, are contributing 

[74] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



to the succor of mankind and are glorifying their Lord 
and Redeemer, Jesus Christ. 

(NOTE: The Seminary is located on North Halsted Street, 
Belden to Fullerton Avenues. It may be reached by the North- 
Western Elevated Railroad to Fullerton Avenue Station, or by 
the North Halsted or Lincoln Avenue surface cars.) 



[75] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



LAKE FOREST COLLEGE 
BY ACTING PRESIDENT JOHN J. HALSEY, LL.D. 

In 1855 the Rev. Dr. Robert W. Patterson, Enos Ayers, 
Amzi Benedict, William Blair, William Bross, S. L. 
Brown, T. B. Carter, Thomas R. Clarke, Rev. Dr. Harvey 
Curtis, Calvin DeWolf, C. B. Farwell, Peter Gage, John 
High, Jr., D. R. Holt, S. J. Learned, Sylvester Lind, 
Hiram F. Mather, Claudius B. Nelson, Dr. Charles H. 
Quinlan, Benjamin W. Raymond, Franklin Ripley, Jr., 
Horatio G. Shumway, Mark Skinner, C. R. Starkweather, 
S. D. Ward, Rev. Ira M. Weed, Jesse C. Williams, 
and Peter L. Yoe, prominent citizens of Chicago 
and vicinity, conceived the idea of establishing an 
educational institution that should be near to Chicago 
and yet retain always the great advantages of a situation 
in the country. 

In February, 1856, they organized the "Lake Forest As- 
sociation," and purchased thirteen hundred acres of land 
twenty-eight miles from Chicago on the bluffs of Lake 
Michigan. Half of this land was permanently set 
apart as association property, and the plat of the 
town of Lake Forest was recorded July 23rd, 1857, 
every alternate lot being assigned for a university 
endowment, and sixty-two acres were set apart as an 
inalienable campus. 

[76] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

The State Legislature on February I3th, 1857, granted 
a charter for the proposed institution under the title of 
Lind University. In 1865 an act of the legislature changed 
the name to Lake Forest University. 

In the fall of 1858 the first step was taken, under the 
charter, in the establishment of Lake Forest Academy as 
a preparatory school for boys. A similar school for girls 
was established in 1869, by means of a $35,000 legacy 
from the Rev. William Montague Ferry of Grand Haven, 
Michigan, and it was named, in his honor, Ferry Hall. 

On September 7th, 1876, instruction began with the 
first class entered in Lake Forest college, containing eight 
young men and four young women. At that time there 
was no collegiate institution of high grade, not under 
state control, in which a woman could obtain an educa- 
tion such as men were offered. Lake Forest college 
was intended to supply this lack, through co-education, 
accepting a condition of things already created by nature, 
and looking forward to better results for both men and 
women in an education pursued together. 

The college campus consists of nearly fifty acres of 
beautiful forest land in the center of Lake Forest, and is 
intersected by a large ravine, and bounded on two sides 
by others. The larger area contains two dormitories for 
men, a thoroughly equipped gymnasium, a college com- 
mons and the beautiful memorial buildings of the Reid 
family the Lily Reid Holt Chapel, and the Arthur 
Somerville Reid Library. The smaller section of the 

[77] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

campus contains the fine dormitory for women Lois 
Durand Hall the H. C. Durand auditorium, and the most 
useful Alice Home Hospital. Farwell Field, at some 
little distance, is devoted to athletics. The academy 
and Ferry hall each has its own group of commodious 
buildings on its own reservation of the original campus. 
A new dormitory for men, costing $30,000, is in process of 
erection, and a large college commons, costing nearly as 
much, has been provided for, while $30,000 toward a 
science hall has been secured. The college library con- 
tains 21,000 volumes. 

The presidents of Lake Forest have been : 

Rev. Robert W. Patterson, D.D., 1875-1878. 

John H. Hewitt, LL.D. acting president, 1878. 

Rev. Daniel S. Gregory, D.D., 1878-1886. 

Rev. William C. Roberts, D.D., LL.D., 1886-1892. 

Rev. James G. K. McClure, D.D., LL.D., (pro tempore) 
1892-1893. 

John M. Coulter, Ph.D., 1893-1896. 

John J. Halsey, LL.D. (acting-president), 1896-1897. 

Rev. James G. K. McClure, D.D., LL.D., 1897-1901. 

Rev. Richard D. Harlan, D.D., LL.D., 1901-1906. 

John J. Halsey, LL.D. (acting- president), 1906- 

Lake Forest is admirably located under its trees and 
along its ravines between the great prairie and the great 
lake. It is sufficiently removed from the neighboring 
city to avoid its temptations and near enough to enjoy its 
advantages. It lies in the midst of a community of re- 

[78] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

finement and culture whose influence for social education * 
is felt, through mere residence in such a place. The 
charter of the town, granted nearly half a century ago, has 
eliminated the open saloon from the place, and in many 
ways the environment is an ideal one for the education of 
young men and young women. The college is satisfied 
to remain a small one, through the recognition of the op- 
portunity that comes, in such an institution, for personal 
work and personal influence, resulting in the building of 
character as well as of brain the making of men as well 
as of thinkers. 

Lake Forest is broadly and generously Presbyterian, 
in so far as that denomination stands for the working out 
of Christianity in broad culture and noble conduct. It is 
in no sense a sectarian institution. Its graduates, nearly 
four hundred in number, have been drawn from the white, 
the black and the yellow races. Every evangelical de- 
nomination has given its quota, and the Church of Rome, 
and the race of Israel have helped to swell the numbers. 
Not a few distinguished men and women are on this roll 
of honor, but, while Lake Forest is proud of these, she takes 
deep satisfaction in the knowledge that in nearly every 
profession and occupation that calls for skill and energy, 
her sons and her daughters are nearly every one contribut- 
ing to the progress of the communities in which they live. 

(NOTE: Lake Forest College is located at Lake Forest, 111., twenty- 
eight miles north of Chicago on the Chicago & North- Western Ry. It 
may also be reached by the trolley cars of the Chicago & Milwaukee 
Electric Ry.) 

[79] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



THE PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL OF THE 

CITY OF CHICAGO 
Bv ALBERT M. DAY, PRESIDENT 

The Presbyterian Hospital was organized December 
1 3th, 1883. The following gentlemen were present at 
the meeting: 

Henry W. King, William Blair, Henry Waller, Joseph 
P. Ross, R. C. Hamill, D. K. Pearsons, H. M. Lyman, 
Willis G. Craig, George W. Hale, James M. Horton and 
W. A. Douglass. The following officers were elected: 

President, Daniel K. Pearsons; vice-president, Charles 
M. Henderson; treasurer, George W. Hale; corresponding 
secretary, C. H. McCormick, Jr. ; recording secretary, W. 
A. Douglass. 

At that time there were but 1,749 beds in all hospitals 
in this city. The first hospital erected is now known as 
the Ross-Hamill Building, and had a capacity of eighty 
beds. 

Although inaugurated and still conducted as a Presby- 
terian Hospital, it is denominational only in name. Its 
doors have always been wide open to people of every 
name, race and religion. 

At present the hospital has a capacity of two hundred 
and thirty-five beds. During a great portion of the year 
every bed is full. For eight months in the year there is 

[80] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

hardly a day that many patients are not turned away for 
lack of room to care for them. 

There is in connection with the hospital a training 
school for nurses, which has been in existence over three 
years, the first class from which graduated last April. The 
course of this training school is three and one-half years, 
which is the longest course given by any school in the 
country conducted by a general hospital. The require- 
ments for applicants are of the highest standard, and the 
course is as thorough as that of any training school in the 
country. Its pupils have the advantage of lectures from 
the very strong staff of the Rush Medical College. Every 
effort is made to educate and train the pupils so that when 
they graduate, they shall be equipped in the best possible 
manner in every branch of their profession. This train- 
ing school is a great educational institution, and as such 
is entitled to the hearty support of all who are interested 
in educational matters. 

For something over a year past, a subscription commit- 
tee from the board of managers has been engaged in an 
effort to raise a sufficient amount of money to erect a 
private pavilion, to rebuild the first building known as 
the Ross-Hamill Building, and to thoroughly repair the 
Jones Building. $400,000.00 has been raised. From 
this amount $25,000.00 has been given to thoroughly 
equip the Jones Building. It is now in perfect order. 

The hospital revenues have been insufficient for its 
maintenance for a number of years past, and the result 

[81] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

has been a slowly increasing debt from year to year. A 
part of this has been occasioned by the cost of the Training 
School, which must always require a considerable out- 
lay. It is an educational institution; it has no means of 
revenue; and there will always be a deficit in its manage- 
ment. The debt arising from these different sources, 
and running for some years, amounted to $65,00.000, 
which debt has now been paid. There remains $3 10,000.00. 
With this, a private pavilion will be commenced at an 
early date, which is expected to cost in the neighbor- 
hood of $250,000.00. We expect a revenue from this 
building of not less than $15,000.00 a year, which amount 
will go to the general revenues of the hospital, and enable 
us to increase our free work. 

The entire income from endowment funds and all do- 
nations last year was $32,823.31. Charity work, free and 
partly paid, cost the hospital $52,609.54. Every dollar 
that the hospital received from the public and $20,000.00 
additional was given away in charity work. Our endow- 
ment has never been commensurate with our work. But 
year by year the revenue from it has declined with the de- 
crease in interest return. The operating expenses have 
in the same time steadily increased with the enhanced 
cost of labor, food and all materials required and used. 
The opportunity for usefulness was never greater. There 
is a constantly increasing demand on us for the care of 
the sick and disabled. The needs and claims of such 
people appeal to us strongly. The Presbyterians of this city 

[82] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



and vicinity, should feel greatly increased interest, and 
manifest it by a more generous financial response, to enable 
us to care for those who are so eager to come to us for help. 

The utmost care is used in every expense, and our funds 
are administered with every regard for economy that is 
consistent with a proper service. The expenses during 
our present fiscal year, commencing April ist, are within 
our income, and the hospital is being run without debt, 
including the cost of maintaining the Training School. 

It is imperative that the Ross-Hamill Building should 
be torn down and rebuilt, and to do this we need to in- 
crease the building fund already mentioned by at least 
$100,000.00. If this amount can be obtained, the hos- 
pital will be thoroughly equipped and capable of doing 
the best grade of work and caring for a large number of 
charity patients. 

Outside of private rooms, there is not a bed in our hos- 
pital which does not cost more to maintain than the rev- 
enues received from it. Our ward price is $8.75 per week; 
in small wards of three or four beds, $12.25 P er week. 
We take patients who are properly vouched for on what 
they can afford to pay, as low as $2.50 per week in rare 
cases. This, in addition to that part of our work which 
is absolutely free. The cost to us is something in excess 
of $14.00 per week. 

During the past year the number of patients admitted 
was 3,063. The hospital is always open for visitors, and 
nothing would please the management better than to have 

[83] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

examinations made at any and all times of the work which 
is being done here. 

We are sadly cramped for funds. It is impossible to do 
the charity work which is pressing upon us, and which we 
are anxious to do, unless our income is largely increased. 
This Presbyterian hospital is a direct responsibility of the 
Presbyterians of this city and it is a responsibility which 
has not been fully met in the past, and which we hope will 
receive more generous attention in the future. The fol- 
lowing are the names of the Board of Managers at the 
present time : 

Edward T. Blair. John B. Lord. 

F. H. Rawson. Albert A. Sprague. 

Thomas Templeton. William A. Douglass. 

Edward A. Halsey. Charles L. Hutchinson. 

Thomas Kane. Eugene S. Pike. 

Joseph F. Titus. Thomas Dent. 

Albert B. Dick. Henry C. Durand. 

N. B. Holden. Everett Sisson. 

Albert M. Day. James B. Forgan. 

Ernest A. Hamill. David B. Jones. 

Byron L. Smith. Arthur D. Wheeler. 

Managers Ex-Officio: 

Rev. William J. McCaughan, D.D. 
Rev. William Robson Notman, D.D. 
Rev. John A. Morison, Ph.D. 
Rev. John Balcom Shaw, D.D. 

(NOTE: The Presbyterian Hospital is located on the West Side at 
the corner of Congress and Wood Streets. It is most convenient to the 
Harrison Street trolley cars and may be reached by the Metropolitan 
Elevated Railroad to Marshfield Avenue Station.) 

[84] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



ORGANIZATIONS, INSTITUTIONS, 
SOCIETIES, ETC. 

HAVING PRESBYTERIAN OFFICERS, TRUSTEES OR DIRECTORS, OR 

WHICH ARE IN WHOLE OR IN PART SUPPORTED 

BY PRESBYTERIANS. 

0. American Bible League. 

1. American Bible Society. 

1J. American Home Finding Association. 

2. American National Red Cross Illinois Branch. 
2J. American Sunday School Union. 

3. American Tract Society. 
3$. Amateur Musical Club. 

4. Anti-Cruelty Societies. 

5. Apollo Musical Club. 

6. Armour Institute of Technology. 

7. Art Institute of Chicago. 

8. Association House. 

9. Bereans. (Christian Printers Association.) 

10. Chicago Academy of Sciences. 

11. Chicago Anti-Cigarette League. 

12. Chicago Bible Society. 

13. Chicago Boy's Club. 

14. Chicago Bureau of Charities. 

15. Chicago Charity Hospital. 

16. Chicago Commons Association. 

17. Chicago Flower Mission. 

17J. Chicago Free Kindergarten Training School. 

18. Chicago Historical Society. 

19. Chicago Home for Convalescent Women and Children. 

20. Chicago Home for the Friendless. 

21. Chicago Home for Incurables. 

21 $. Chicago Institute of Social Science. 

22. Chicago Law and Order League. 

23. Chicago Lying-in Hospital and Dispensary. 

24. Chicago Nursery and Half -Orphan Asylum. 

25. Chicago Orphan Asylum. 

26. Chicago Polyclinic Hospital. 

27. Chicago Refuge for Girls. 

28. Chicago Relief and Aid Society. 

[8 5 ] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



29. Chicago Tract Society. 

30. Chicago Union Hospital. 

31. Children's Hospital Society. 

31 J. Citizens' Association of Chicago. 

32. Citizen's League of Chicago. 

33. Citizens Street Cleaning Bureau. 
33J. City Club. 

34. Civic Federation of Chicago. 

35. Cook County Sunday School Association. 

36. Commercial Association of Chicago. 

37. Chicago Christian Endeavor Union. 

38. Commercial Exchange. 

39. Chicago Manual Training School. 

40. Chicago Hospital. 

41. Chicago Clinical School. 

42. Chicago Tuberculosis Institute. 

43. Commercial Club. 

44. Chicago Foundling's Home. 
44J. Deep Waterways Association. 

45. Englewood Law and Order League. 

46. Employers Association of Chicago. 

48. Francis E. Clark Settlement. 

49. Field Museum of Natural History. 

50. Florence Crittendon Anchorage. 

51. Forward Movement Settlement. 

52. Gideons. (Christian Traveling Men's Association.) 

53. Garfield Park Protective Association. 

54. Home for Aged and Infirm Colored People. 

55. Hyde Park Improvement Association. 

56. Hyde Park Protective Association. 

57. Home for Destitute Crippled Children. 

58. Hull House. 

59. Illinois Anti-Saloon League. 

61. Illinois Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary. 

62. Illinois Humane Society. 

63. Illinois Children's Home and Aid Society. 

64. Illinois Manual Training School Farm. 

65. John Crerar Library. 

70. Lake Forest University. 

71. Legal Aid Society. 

72. Lewis Institute. 

73. Lincoln Park Commissioners. 

75. Merchant's Club. 

76. Margaret Etter Cre"che. 

77. Mary Thompson Hospital. 

78. McCormick Theological Seminary. 

[86] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



79. Memorial Institute for Infectious Diseases. 
79 J. Metropolitan Business College. 

80. Moody Bible Institute. 

81. Municipal Art League of Chicago. 

82. Municipal Museum of Chicago. 

83. Municipal Voters League. 

84. Musical Arts Society. 

85. National Temperance Hospital. 

86. Newberry Library. 

87. North- Western University. 

88. North Side Law and Order League. 

89. Olivet Institute. 

90. Old People's Home. 

91. Orchestral Association. (Theodore Thomas Orchestra.) 

92. Presbyterian League. 

93. Pacific Garden Mission. 

94. People's Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

95. Passavant Memorial Hospital. 

96. Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital. 

97. Presbyterian Hospital. 

98. Provident Hospital and Training School. 

99. Presbyterian Social Union. 

100. Religious Educational Association. 

104. Secretarial Training School Young Men's Christian Assn. 

105. South Park Improvement Association. .. 

106. South Park Commissioners. 

107. University of Chicago. 

108. Visiting Nurse Association of Chicago. 

110. Washingtonian Home. 

111. West Side Civic League. 

112. Woodlawn Improvement Association. 

113. Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

114. West Side Hospital. 

115. West Park Commissioners. 

116. Woman's Hospital. 

120. Young Men's Christian Association. 

121. Young Men's Presbyterian Union. 

122. Young Women's Christian Association. 

123. Young Peoples' Christian Temperance Union. 



[8 7 ] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



INDEX OF PRESBYTERIANS 

This list, lengthy though it may be, does not commence to 
give all of the information of this character which is necessary to 
make this article complete. The records obtainable in the short 
period of time allotted were of great assistance, but not by any 
means exhaustive, consequently there will be many of those 
prominent in the city's activities, and who are perhaps bearing 
largely the responsibilities of their own local churches, omitted, 
and there may be some included who have left Chicago or 
who have changed their church home. It is therefore hoped that 
the list will be accepted in the spirit in which it was compiled 
and it must be understood that the writer will welcome sug- 
gestions and corrections which would enable him in a future 
edition to send out complete and authentic information. It is 
just possible some name may have been handed in which should 
not be here. If such is the case the compiler is extremely sorry, 
especially if any inconvenience or embarrassment is caused thereby. 
It should be explained that there are those included herein 
whose membership is not in churches of this city, while there 
are others who are closely identified with the church in various 
ways who are not members of it. 

* Indicates person named is an ordained elder in the church. 

X Indicates person named is a deacon. 

t Indicates person named is a trustee. 

The numbers refer to the outside institutions and organizations in which 
the person named is a director, trustee or officer. The list of such organiza- 
tions will be found on pp. 85, 86 and 87. 
ABBOTT, A. H. Artists' Materials, etc. 

ADAMS, CYRUS H. Retired Merchant. 

(78) 

ADAMS, EDWARD S. Commission Merchant. 

fADAMS, JOHN B. Grain Merchant. 

AIKEN, WM. J. Genl. Manager Preferred Accident Insur- 

ance Co. 
*ALDRICH, WM. A. President, The Bereans. Printer. 

(9) 

[88] 



Chicago: A 


Presbyterian City 


X ALLING, CHARLES, JR. 


President, Chicago Business Law School. 


(35, 71) 


Ex-Alderman, 2nd Ward. 


ALLINQ, VAN WAGENEN 


President, Ailing Construction Co. Build- 




ing Contractors. 


* ALLEN, HARHY W. 


Vice-President, J. W. Allen Co. Manufac- 




turers of Bakers' Supplies. 


tALLEN, JOHN W. 


President, J. W. Allen Co. Mfgs. of Bakers' 




Supplies. 


ALLPORT, FRANK, M.D. 


Eye and Ear Specialist. 


ALLPORT, WALTER H., M.D. 


Physician and Surgeon. 


ALVORD, JOHN W. 


Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineer. 


ANDREWS, E. WYLLIS, M.D 


Surgeon. 


(98) 




ANDREWS, SIDNEY F. 


General Attorney, Illinois Central R. R. 


t ARMOUR, M. COCHRANE 


Resident Partner, Rogers, Brown & Co. 


(78) 


Pig Iron Merchants. 



ARMSTRONG, FRANK H. 

(14, 23) 
ATWOOD, BURTON H. 

(89) 
fATWOOD, F. M. 

(93) 

AUSTIN, CHARLES O. 
AUSTIN, FREDERICK C. 

BABCOCK, ROBERT H., M.D. 

(19) 
BAIRD, EDWARD P. 

BAKER, ALFRED L. 

(33*. 64, 70, 82, 83, 98) 

BAKER, LUTHER E. 



* BAKER, SAMUEL 

(92) 

*BAKER, WM. M. 
XBALLOU, A. PERCY 

(121) 
BANKS, A. F. 

* BANNING, EPHRAIM 

(92) 



President, Iroquois Iron Co. 
President, Chicago Short Line R. R. 
Secretary, Reid, Murdoch & Co. 

President, Atwood, Davis Sand Co. 
Clothing Merchant. 

Banker. Director, Railway Exchange Bank. 
President, Municipal Engineering & Con- 
structing Co. 
Physician Heart Specialist. 

President, Baird Mfg. Co. Telephone Equip- 
ment. 

President, A. L. Baker <fe Co., Stocks and 
Bonds. 

Vice- President, National City Bank. 

Vice-President, Macdonell, Baker, Collendar 
Co. 

Vice-President, Ross Constructing Co. 

Spaulding & Merrick Co. 

Real Estate. 

Vice-President, International Copper A 

Gold Mining Co. 

President, Elgin, Joliet & Eastern R. R. 
Banning & Banning. Patent Attorneys. 



[89] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



tBAHD, Geo. M. 
BARLOW, L. N., M. D. 

(94) 
BARNES, A. R. 

tBARNETT, J. H. 

BARRETT, SAMUEL E. 

(7) 
*tBATE8, ONWARD 

fBARTLETT, CHARLES L. 

(83) 
BECKEN, ALBERT C. 

XBELFIELD, A. MILLER 

(8, 120) 
*BELFIELD, HENRT H. 

(39) 

fBENTLEY, CHARLES S. 
BENTLEY, CYRUS H. 

(24) 
BENNETT, FRANK I. 

(56) 

BENTLEY, FRANK T. 
BELSHE, EDWIN L. 
*BEST, NOLAN R. 

(33^, 100, 120, 121) 
tBEST, WILLIAM 

(106) 

BEVAN, ARTHUR D., M.D. 
*BINGHAM, CHARLES L. 

(92) 
BIRD, A. C. 



xBiRD, CHAS. W. 

(120) 
BIRKHOFF, GEO., JR. 



BISHOP, L. BRACKETT 
(120) 



President, NorwallMfg. Co., Steam Supplies. 
Physician and Surgeon. 

President A. R. Barnes & Co., Printers and 
Publishers. 

President, J. H. Barnett & Co. Engravers. 

Chairman of Board, Barrett Mfg. Co. Roof- 
ing Materials. 

President, Bates & Rogers Construction Co. 

President, Orangeine Chemical Co. 

Director, Hamilton National Bank. 

President, A. C. Becken & Co., Wholesale 
Jewelers. 

Patent Attorney. 

Dean, The University High School Chicago 

Manual Training School. 
Grain Merchant. 

Director, International Harvester Co. 
Lawyer. 
Lawyer Alderman 7th Ward. 

Traffic Manager, Illinois Steel Company. 
Secy, and Manager, Chicago Portrait Co. 
Editor, The Interior. 

President, Best & Russell Co. 



Physician. 

Manager, S. S. White, 



Dental Supply Co. 



Vice-President, Wabash R. R. 

Vice-President, Missouri Pacific Ry. 

Vice-President, St. Louis, Iron Mt. & South- 
ern Ry. 

Vice-President, Texas & Pacific Ry. 

Vice-President, Denver & Rio Grande R. R. 
(Gould System) 

President, Chas. W. Bird & Co., Mfrs. of 
Druggists' Sundries. 

W. D. Kerfoot & Co. Real Estate. 

Counsel of The Netherlands in Chicago. 

Director, Chicago Title & Trust Co. 

Manager, Massachusetts Mutual Life Ins. Co. 

President, Life Underwriters Association of 
Chicago. 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



BLACK, GBNL. JOHN C. 
BLEB, JOSEPU Mc.H. 

BLAIR, EDWARD T. 

(97) 
fBoDMAN, LUTHER W. 

(24) 

*tBO!8OT, LOUIS 

*fBoLSTER, CHARLES H. 
*BORDEN, HAMILTON 

XBoswoRTH, FRANK F. 
BOWERS, LLOYD, W. 
(24) 

*BOWMAN, LOUIS A. 

(0, 120, 121) 
BOWMAN, WILLIAM H. 
*tBoYCE, S. LEONARD 

(90) 

BRADLEY, J. HARLEY 
*BRADLEY, THOS. E. D. 

(35, 44) 

BRIGHT, MATTHEW M. 
*BRINTNALL WILLIAM H. 

(56, 120) 
BROPHY, TRUMAN W., D.D.S. 

(85, 120) 
BROOKS, JONATHAN W., JR. 

*BROWN, WALTER FRAZER 

(121) 

X BROWN, WALTER Z. 
*BROWNE, EDWARD 
BUCKINGHAM, EBENEZER 
BUTLER, John S. 

BUSENBARK, WM. R. 

BUSH, WILLIAM H. 
(81) 



BUSHNELL, LEMUEL M. 
BUSSEY, WILLIAM T. 
BYERS, JOHN W. 



President, U. S. Civil Service Commission. 
Commander-in-Chief, G. A. R. 
Auditor and Treasurer, Whitebreast Fuel Co. 
Treas. and Asst. Sec., Cardiff Coal Co 

Capitalist. 

Milmine, Bodman & Co., Grain Merchants. 

Trust Officer, First Trust and Savings Bank. 
Manager, Sprague Warner & Co., Wholesale 

Grocers. 
President, Borden & Selleck Co.. The Howe 

Standard Scales. 

President, Chicago Printing & Embossing Co. 
General Counsel, Chicago & North-Western 

Ry. 
Lawyer. Jones & Bowman. 

Real Estate. 
Lawyer. 

President, David Bradley Mfg. Co., Plows. 
Lawyei, Foster, Bradley & Stetson. 

President, International Gas and Fuel Co. 
President, Drovers' Deposit National Bank. 

Dentist. 

Vice-President, Pitkin & Brooks Co., China 

and Glassware. 
Vice-President and Treas., A. C. Becken & 

Co., Wholesale Jewelers. 
Treasurer, Illinois Life Insurance Company. 
President, Edward Browne Lumber Co. 
Capitalist and Corporation Director. 
Lawyer and Corporation Director. 
Grain Merchant. 

President, Wm. H. Bush & Co., Wholesale 
Hats and Caps. 

President, Francis T. Simmons & Co. 
Wholesale Gloves. 

Vaughan & Bushnell Mfg. Co., Hardware. 
President, Chicago Stove Works. 
President, Byers Bros. & Co., Com. Merchants 

U. S. Yards. 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



tCAMERON, W. F. 

CAMPBELL, R. B. 
CAMPBELL, WILLIAM L. 
CARR, CLYDE M. 

(14) 
CARE, ROBERT F. 

X CARPENTER, HARRY L. 

CARTER, DONALD M. 

(121) 
CHALMERS, WILLIAM J. 

(49) 

tCHANDLER, WALTER T. 

CHARD, THOMAS S. 

CHURCH, WILLIAM E. 

(56) 
*CLARK, EDWARD G. 

(44) 
CLARK, JOHN M. 

(25, 65) 
*CLELAND, McKENziE 

(35, 121) 

CLOUGH, HARRY S. 
CLOW| HARRY B. 
CLOW. JAMES B. 



, WILLIAM E. 
(46, 75) 
COE, ALMER 
COFFIN. CHARLES P. 

*fCOLEMAN, A. E. 

COLLYER, WILLIAM D. 

COLLINS, LORIN C. 

(87) 

*COLVIN, WM. G. 
COLWELL, NATHAN P., M.D. 
COOPER, CHARLES B. 
COPELAND, WILLIAM L., M.D. 
fCoRMACK, JOSEPH 
"COTTON, ARTHUR B. 

"COULTER, JOHN M. 
(8, 100, 120) 



P. F. Cameron & Co., Insurance. 
General Manager, Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Ry. 
Vice-President, Economical Drug Co. 
Vice-Pres. & Secy., Joseph T. Ryerson A Son. 

Heavy Iron and Steel Merchants. 
Vice-Pres. and Genl. Mgr., Dearborn Drug 

& Chemical Association. 
Byers Bros. & Co., Commission Merchants, 

U. S. Yards. 
Parker & Carter, [Lawyers. 

Corporation Director. 

Firm of Franklin MacVeagh & Co. Whole- 
sale Grocers. 

Manager, Firemen's Fund & Union Insur- 
ance Companies. 

Lawyer, Church, McMurdy & Sherman. 

Treasurer, Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co. 

Wholesale Hardware. 
Merchant and Capitalist. 

Judge, The Municipal Court. 

Rounds & Clough. Real Estate. 

Secy., Jas. B. Clow & Sons. Mfg. Plumbers. 

President, Jas. B. Clow & Sons. Mfg. Plum- 
bers. 

Vice-President, Jas. B. Clow & Sons. Mfg. 
Plumbers. 

Optician. 

Director and Credit Man. Illinois Steel Co. 

President, Chicago Ornamental Iron Co. 

Collyer & Co. Butter & Eggs. 

U. S. Inspector of Dairy Exports. 

Lawyer. 

Treasurer, Continent Shoe Co. 

Chest, Nose and Throat Specialist. 

Genl. Agent, Nor. Pac. and Nat. Express Co. 

Physician. 

Contractor and Builder. 

President and Treasurer, Brydon Trimmed 

Hat Co. 
Dean, School of Botany. University of 

Chicago. 



[92] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



COT, LINCOLN M. 
COWAN, WILLIAM K. 

Cox, STEPHEN W., M.D. 
, JOHN C. 
, CLAYTON E. 



*CROFTS, JOHN C. 
CRAQIN, H. B. 

*CRAIN, CHARLES H., M.D. 
CRAMER, AMBROSE 

CRANE, EDWARD C. 
CRANE, SIMEON H. 
CROSBY, FREDERICK W. 

(70, 78) 
CHOWELL, HENRY P. 

(78, 80) 

*CRIQHTON, JAMES 

(44) 
CUMMINOS, D. MARK 



CUTHBERTSON, WlLLIAM, M.D, 

DAVIDSON, H. P. 
DAVIS, Louis H. 
DAWES, RUFUS C. 

DAY, ALBERT M. 
(62, 97) 

*tDEFEBAUQH, JAMES E. 

(56, 99. 120) 
*DENT, THOMAS 

(18, 78, 97) 
DUELL, HARRY W. 
DEVITT, MARTIN A. 

*DEGOLLYER, WATTS 
DICK, ALBERT B. 
(70, 97) 



Lawyer and Capitalist. 

Pres. & Ganl. Mgr. W. K. Cowan Co. Furni- 
ture. 

Physician. 

Vice-President Bankers National Bank. 

Ex-Speaker, House of Representatives. 

Lawyer. 

Crofts & Reed, Soap Manufacturers. 

Broker. 

Vice-President, Legal Aid Society. 

President, Easton Oil Co. 

Crain Bros., Wholesale Drugs & Chemicals. 

Mining Machinery. Trustee of the Estate of 
Henry J. Willing. 

Real Estate and Investments. 

Secy, and Treas., Moffatt Bearing Co. 

Lawyer and Corporation Director. 

President, American Cereal Co. 

President, Quaker Oats Co. 

Vice-President, Cleveland Foundry Co. 

President, Jas. Crighton & Co., Commission 
Merchants. 

Bank Director. 

President, New Pittsburgh Coal & Coke Co. 

Vica-Pres., South Chgo. City Railway and 
Hammond, Whiting & East Chicago Ry. 

Physician. 

President, North- Western Military Academy. 

Lawyer and Underwriter. 

President, Union Gas and Electric Co. 

Director of Corporations. 

Capitalist. 

President, Presbyterian Hospital. 

Owner and Editor, The American Lumber- 
man. 

Lawyer Ex-Judge. 

President, Federal Shirt and Collar Co. 
Banker and Director, Devitt, Tremble & Co. 

Bankers. 

Retired Varnish Manufacturer. 
President, A. B. Dick Co., Manufacturers of 

Mimeographing Machine. 
Director, Royal Trust Co. Bank. 



[93] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



DICKINSON, JOHN McG. 
DICKSON, JAMES T. 

DOANE, PHILIP P. S., M.D. 
DORAN, GEO. H. 

DOHKANCE, CHARLES A. 
DORWIN, WILLIAM E. 



*tDouGLASs, WILLIAM A. 

(2*. 97) 

DOWNS, EBENEZER A. 
*DOWNS, Walter B. 

*DOWNS, JAMES E. 

(77, 92) 

DRAKE, JOHN B., JR. 
X DRAKE, TRACY 
DRISCOLL, FREDERICK 



DUDLEY, HENRY W. 
(1, 12, 92) 

*DtTNN, WlNFIELD P. 



DURAND, CALVIN 



*DURAND, HENRY C. 

(8, 38, 97, 121) 
EASTMAN, JOHN C. 
*ECKELS, JAMES H. 

(42,57,95, 100, 113, 120) 



ECKHART, BERNARD A. 
(3H, 77, 81, 115) 
EIKEN, CHAS. F. 

ELLIOTT, FRANK R. 
ELPHICKE, CHAS. W. 



General Counsel, Illinois Central R. R. 

Treas. and Manager, Confectioners and 
Bakers Supply Co. 

Physician and Surgeon. 

Vice-President, Fleming H. Revell Co., Pub- 
lishers. 

President, The Dorrance Co., Smokeless 
Furnaces. 

W. E. Dorwin & Co., Railway Contractors. 

Vice-Pres. & Genl. Mgr., U. S. Engineering & 
Constructing Co. 

Manager, R. G. Dun & Co., Mercantile 
Agency. 

Vice-President, H. W. Dudley Copper Co. 

Secretary, Durand & Kasper Co., Wholesale 
Grocers. 

Retired Merchant. 

Capitalist. 
Capitalist. 

Commissioner, American Newspaper Pub- 
lishers Association. 
Corporation Director. 
President, H. W. Dudley Coffee Co. 

President, W. P. Dunn Co., Printers & 
Publishers. 

Alderman, 25th Ward. 

President, Durand & Kasper Co. Wholesale 
Grocers. 

Director, State Bank of Chicago. 

Vice-President, Durand & Kasper Co. 

Director, State Bank of Lake Forest. 

Publisher, Chicago Daily Journal. 

President, Commercial National Bank. 

Vice-Pres., Hewitt Manufacturing Co. 

Receiver, Chicago Union Traction Co. 

Treasurer, Featherstone Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co. 

President, Eckhart & Swan Milling Co. 

President, West Park Commissioners. 

President and Genl. Mgr., Pioneer Fire Roof- 
ing Co. 

Cashier, Harris Trust and Savings Bank. 

Vessel Owner and Marine Insurance. 



[94] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



ELMORE, WILLIAM E. 



, EDWABD H. 
ELY, JAMES O., D. D. S. 
* EMERY, COL. J. M. 

(11) 
EWAN, JOHN M. 

(19) 
*FALES, DAVID 

(2*. 16) 
FARWELL, ARTHUR L. 

(14, 95) 
FARWELL, FRANCIS C. 

(24) 
tFARWELL, GRANGER 

(14) 
*FARWELL, JOHN V. 

(li, 18, 29, 32, 52) 
FARWELL, JOHN V., JR. 

(43, 46, 70, 83, 120) 
FAUHOT, HENRY 
FENTRESS, JAMES 
FERGUSON, ALEX. H., M.D. 

(40) 
FIELD, STANLEY 

(23, 49) 
fFiNDLEY, GEORGE 

tFisHBURN, EUGENE H. 

(18, 78) 
FISHER, Lucius G. 

FISK. D. MILTON 
XFiTZHUGH, CHAS. H. 
FLERSHEM, LEMUEL W 
FORD, CHARLES B. 
*FORD, JOHN S. 



tFoRGAN, DAVID R. 
(33, 36, 44V4, 100) 



Vice-President, Durant & Elmore Co. Grain 

Merchant. 

Vice-President, Oconto Milling Co. 
Manager, Michigan Mutual Life Ins. Co. 
Dentist. 
Publisher. 

President, John M. Ewan Construction Co. 

Lawyer. 

2nd Vice-President, J. V. Farwell Co. 

Secretary, J. V. Farwell Co. 

President, Granger Farwell & Co. Bankers A 

Brokers. 
Founder, John V. Farwell Co. Wholesale 

Dry Goods. 

Treas. & Genl. Mgr., John V. Farwell Co. 
President, First State Fawners Society. 
Vice-Pres. & Treas., Western Felt Works. 
President, Chicago Tubing and Braiding Co. 
President, Chicago Hospital. 

Vice-President, Marshall Field & Co. 

Genl. Manager, Capitol Freelock Land and 

Investment Co. 
Ogden, Sheldon & Co., Real Estate. 

President, U. S. Bag & Paper Co. 

Owner Fisher Building. 

Capitalist. 

Pres., Fitzhugh- Luther Co., Locomotives. 

Lapp & Flershem, Wholesale Jewelers. 

Pres., Ford & Howard, Produce Merchants. 

President, Ford & Johnson Chair Co., Fur- 
niture Manufacturers. 

President, Western Cane Seating Co. 

President, National Chair Mfrs. Assn. 

President, Chicago Furniture Mfrs. Assn. 

President, National City Bank. 

Author, Orator and Western Golf Champion 
of United States, 



[95] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



FORGAN, JAMES B. 
(20, 73, 97) 



FORESMAN, HUGH A. 
*FOHSYTH, HENRY H. 

(92) 

*FORSYTH, W. HOLMES 
*FRANCIS, WILLIAM 

(8, 35) 

tFowLER, ERNEST S. 
FREEMAN, CHAS. YOE 

*FREEMAN, HENRY V. 

(78) 
*FROST, CHARLES S. 

(92) 

FULLER, CHARLES H. 
FULLER, Lucius C. 

(5) 



GALT, AZARIAH T. 

tGANSBERGEN, F. H. 

(73) 

GARRETT, MYERS A. 
tGEER, IRA J. 

(10, 24, 78) 
GENTLES, HENRY W., M.D. 

(40) 
tGEROULD, FRANK W. 

(104) 
GIBBS, PLATT P. 

GLESSNER, J. G. M. 
*GOING, JUDSON F. 

(13, 30) 

GOLDIE, WILLIAM 
*GOODMAN, JOHN S. 
* GRANT, JOHN C. 
GRAVES, CHAS. E. 
GROSS, HOWARD H. 



President, First National Bank. 
President, First Trust & Savings Bank. 
President, National Safe Deposit Co. 
Corporation and Railroad Director. 
Vice-Pres., Scott, Foresman & Co., Publishers. 
Retired Capitalist. 

Secretary, Curtain Supply Co. 
President, Francis & Nygren Foundry Co. 

Optician. 

Secy, and Asst. Treas., 111. Car. & Equipment 

Co. 
Justice of Appellate Court. 

Frost & Granger, Architects. 

President, C. H. Fuller Advertising Agency. 

Treasurer, C. H. Fuller Advertising Agency. 

Director, Colonial Trust & Savings Bank. 

2nd Vice-Pres., Northern Liquidation Co. 

President, Union Electrotype Foundry. 

President, Advertisers Printing Co. 

President, The Tribune Co. 

Director, Nor. Chgo. S. R. R. Co. 

Lawyer. 

Secretary, The Mutual Bank: 

Lincoln Park Commissioner. 

Vice-Pres., Farlow Draft Gear Co. 

Lawyer, 

Physician and Surgeon. 

Western Genl. Mgr., A. G. Spalding A Bros. 

Sporting Goods. 

Pres. and Mgr., Chicago Music Co. 
Pres., Chicago Piano & Organ Assn. 
Mgr. Utility Div. International Harv. Co. 
Judge, The Municipal Court. 

Goldie Bros., General Contractors. 

Pres. J. S. Goodman & Co., Book Publishers. 

Headmaster, The Harvard School. 

Pres. C. E. Graves A Co., Jewelers. 

Paving Materials. Corporation Organizer. 



[96] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



GRUENSTEIN, S. E. 

GtTRLEY, W. W. 

(57) 
HAGGARD, JOHN D. 

HAIR, BENJ. M. 

*HALSEY, EDWARD A. 
(97, 120) 

*HALSEY, PROF. JOHN J., L.L.D, 

(70) 

fHALL, ROBERT W. 
*HALL, THOMAS A. 

(56, 99) 



, ERNEST A. 
(7, 28, 43, 97) 

HARLAN, JOHN MAYNARD 
(23) 

fHARRINGTON, STEPHEN H. 

HARSHA, WILLIAM M., M.D. 

(40, 120) 

HARVEY, ALBERT A. 
HARVEY, PAUL S. 
*HARVEY, TURLINGTON W. 

HASTINGS, SAMUEL M. 



HEAD, FRANKLIN H. 

(18, 71, 86) 
HEAD, G. P., M.D. 

(96) 

, EUGENE K. 



* HEATH, CHAS. A. 

(10) 

"HEDGES, SAMUEL P., M.D. 
tHESTER, ALBERT W. 
HIGH, GEORGE HENRY 

HINMAN, GEO. W. 



Editorial Staff, Chicago Evening Post : 

Corporation Director. 

Lawyer. 

President, Haggard & Marcusson Co., Spring 

Bed Manufacturers. 
President, North- Western Yeast Co. 
President, Cook Co. State Savings Bank. 
Ex-Comptroller City of Chicago. 
Expert Appraiser Real Estate. 
Pres. Illinois Young Men's Christian Assn. 
Acting President, Lake Forest University. 

Carson, Pirie Scott & Co. 
Pres. Thos. A. Hall & Co., Real Estate. 
Pres. Office Building Managers Assn. 
Manager, Dearborn Power Co. 
President, Corn Exchange National Bank. 
Vice-President, Elgin National Watch Co. 
Treasurer, Chicago Board of Trade. 
Lawyer. 

Pres., Harrington & King Perforating Co. 
Physician and Surgeon. 

Treas. and Genl. Mgr. Acme Gas Co. 
Vice-Pres. and Secy., Acme Gas Co. 
President, Acme Gas Co. Corporation Di- 
rector. 

President, Computing Scale Co. of America. 
Secy, and Treas., Moneyweight Scale Co. 
Vice-Pres., Computing Scale Co. of Canada. 
President, Moneyweight Scale Co. of Europe. 
Director of Corporations. 
President, Bush Temple Conservatory. 
Vice-Pres., Continental Casualty Co. 
Physician and Surgeon. 

Pres., Herrick, Son & Co., Com. Merchants, 

U. S. Yards. 
Albert Dickinson & Co., Seed Merchants. 

Physician and Surgeon. 
Real Estate and Investments. 
Geo. H. High & Co., Real Estate. 
Pres. Masonic Temple Association. 
Publisher, Chicago Inter-Ocean. 



[97] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



HOLBROOK, WILLIAM G. 
HOLDEN, JOSEPH S. 
tHoLDEN, NELSON B. 

(97) 
*HOLLOWAY, HORACE G. 

*HOLT, CHARLES S. 

(25, 78, 92, 100) 
HOLT, GEORGE H. 



HOUSTON, ARCHIBALD W. 
*HOWE, CHAS. M. 

(71, 78) 

*HOWELL, C. D. B. 
HOYT, HOWARD H. 

*HUBBARD, JOHN S. 

(57) 
*HUGHITT, MARVIN 

(2*. 20, 21, 65) 



*HUNTER, WM. C. 



HURD, HARRY B. 
HYPES, WILLIAM F. 
IRWIN, CHAS. P. 
ISHAM, RALPH 



ISHAM, R. N., M.D. 
t JACKSON, WILLIAM S. 



JAMES, FRED S. 
X JAMES, PHILIP L. 



Pres. and Treas., Union Drop Forge Co. 
Secy, and Treas. Middleby Oven Mfg. Co. 
Pres., N. B. Holden, Inc. Shoe Dealers. 

President, H. G. Holloway & Bro., Whole- 
sale Boots and Shoes. 

Lawyer, Holt, Wheeler & Sidley. 
Corporation Director 

President, Holt Lumber Co. 

President, Amer. Lumber Co. of Wisconsin. 

President, Policy Holders Union. 

Vice-Pres., Columbian National Life Ins. Co. 

Owner Manhattan Bldg. 

Senior Member, Holt, MacChesney & Cheney, 
Real Estate & Bonds. 

Vice-Pres., Republic Iron & Steel Co. 

Banker. 

President, Illinois Brick Co. 

Assistant Director of Agencies Columbian 
National Life Ins. Co. 

Moore, Jones, Lyman & Herrick, Fire Under- 
writers. 

President, Chicago & North- Western Ry. 

President, Chicago, St. Paul, Minn. <fe 
Omaha Ry. 

Railroad & Corporation Director. 

Secy., W. D. Boyce Co., Newspaper Pub- 
lishers. 

Secy., W. D. Boyce Paper Mills Co. 

President, Hunter Publishing Co. 

Lawyer., Pam & Hurd. 

Manager, Marshall Field & Co. Wholesale. 

Irwin, Green & Co., Genl. Grain Merchants. 

Treasurer, Chicago Union Transfer Co. 

Secy, and Treas., Chgo. Transfer <fe Clearing 
Co. 

Physician. 

Senior Mem., Jackson Bros. & Co. Com- 
mission Merchants. 

Ex-Alderman, 6th Ward. 

Ex-President, Chicago Board of Trade. 

President, F. S. James & Co. Fire Under- 
writers. 

Marshall Field & Co. 



[98] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



*JANNET, JAMES W. 

(92) 

"JEFFREY, JOHN 
JELKE, JOHN F. 
JENKINS, JOHN E. 

JENNINGS, J. ELLIOTT 

""(JOHNSON, FRANK S. t M.D. 

(65) 
JOHNSON, WM. FORD 

JOHNSTON, ROBERT S. 
JONES, ARTHUR B. 

(49, 120) 
JONES, DAVID B. 

(70, 86, 97) 
tJoNES, J. HARRY 

(121) 
JONES, THOMAS D. 

(65) 

JUDSON, HALE D. 
*fKANE, THOMAS 

(72, 78, 92, 97) 



KEEP, ALBERT 

(21, 65) 
fKELLEY, WILLIAM E. 

(17*) 

tKELSEY, HORATIO N. 
KENLY, D. B. 
*KERLIN E. ILES, M.D. 
KETCHAM, IRA C. 

KINO, CHARLES B. 
*KIMBALL, CHARLES L. 

(120) 

KISER, SAMUEL EBERLY 
*KNAPP, FRED H. 

*KNUDSON, SAMUEL O. 
XKNUDSON, THEODORE J. 
M. D. 



Genl. Agent, Provident Life and Trust Co. 

Contractor and Builder. 

President, Braun & Fitts, Butterine Mfrs. 

Jenkins, Kreer & Co. 

Secy, Great Western Tin Plate Co. 

President, Jennings Real Estate Loan and 

Trust Company. 
Physician and Surgeon. 

Secy. & Treas., J. S. Ford, Johnson & Co. 

Furniture Mfrs. 

President, Star & Crescent Milling Co. 
Marshall Field & Co. 

President, Mineral Point Zinc Co. 
Secretary, Marshall Jackson Stationery Co. 
Lawyer and Capitalist. 

Genl. Supt., Chgo, Burlington & Quincy Ry. 

President, Thos. Kane & Co., School and 
Church Furniture. 

President, American Spiral Pipe Works. 

President, Winona Assembly and Summer 
School. 

President, Winona Electric Light & Water Co. 

Corporation Director. 

Capitalist. 

President, William E. Kelley & Co., Whole- 
sale Lumber. 

Western Manager, Sun Fire Insurance Co. 

Capitalist. 

Physician and Surgeon. 

President, Ketcham & Rothschild, Furniture 
Manufacturers. 

President, Commercial Safe Deposit Co. 

Asst. Genl. Passenger Agent, Pennsylvania 
Lines. 

Author and Editor. 

President, Fred H. Knapp Co., Labeling Ma- 
chines. 

President, Knudson & Mercer Lumber Co. 

Physician and Surgeon. 

Chief Surgeon, South Side Elevated R. R. 



[99] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



KBEBS, WILLIAM S. 
KNOTT, HENRY A. 

*KBUM, I. R. 

LAFLIX, GEO. H. 
LAFLIN, Louis E. 

(10) 
LAWSON, WILLIAM C. 

*LAZEAB, GEO. C. 
LEACH, FEHKY W. 
LEARNED, E. J. 
LEEMINQ, JOHN, M.D. 

*LETHEN, ABNOLD J. 
LEWIS, DAVID R. 
"fLEWis, WALKER O. 
*LININQER, JOEL C. 
*LORD, JOHN B. 

(56, 97) 

LOSCH, NATHANIEL R. 
LOWE, JOHN M. 

*LOWRY, CHAS. D. 
(5) 

fLuDLOW, GEO. MCMURTRY 

(8) 

LUNDY, AYERS P. 
LUNHAM, ROBERT T. 
LYON, THOMAS R. 

MACCHESNEY, NATHAN W. 
(121) 



MAcDouoALL, ARTHUR R 
MACKAY, JAMES 

XMAoiE, WM. A. 
MAQRUDER, BENJ. D. 
MAKER, GEO. W. 
MARTIN, JOHN D. 



Manager, McCormick Estates & Properties. 

President, Knott, Chandler & Co., Real Es- 
tate and Loans. 

President, Krum, Griffith <fe Co., Lumber 
Merchants. 

Capitalist. 

Capitalist. Bank and Corporation Director 

President, Marlboro Portland Cement Co. 
Clerk of the Criminal Court. 
Fire Insurance. 

A. B. Leach & Co., Bankers & Brokers. 
Treasurer, Reid, Murdoch & Co. 
Physician and Surgeon. 
Chief Surgeon, Chicago City Railway. 
Illinois Trust & Savings Bank. 
Vice-President, Hibernian Banking Assn. 
Asst. Treasurer, Sears, Roebuck & Co. 
President, The Winona Publishing Co. 
President, Ayer & Lord Tie Co. 

Cashier, Commercial National Bank. 
Vice-President, Corwin Coal Co., Smith 

Lowe Coal Co. 
Asst. Supt., Schools. 

President, Money weight Scale Co. 

Vice-President, Computing Scale Co. of 
America. 

Sargent & Lundy. Mechanical and Elec- 
trical Engineers. 

Secy. & Treas., Boyd-Lunham Co., Packers 
U. S. Yards. 

President, Lyon Cypress Lumber Co. 

Lawyer, Holt, MacChesney & Cheney, Real 
Estate and Loans. 

Secretary, Office Building Managers Assn. 

Secretary, Excelsior Printing Co. 

Pres., A. R. MacDougall & Co., Opticians. 

Secy., Kellogg, Mackay, Cameron Co., Boilers 
and Radiators. 

President, Magie Bros., Lubricating Oils. 

Asso. Justice, Supreme Court of Illinois 

Architect. 

Holmes, Martin & Co., Fire & Plate Glass 
Underwriters, 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



MARSHALL, FIELDING 
*MATHXSON. GKO. W. 
tMxTz, RUDOLPH 

(71) 
McARTHUR, ROBERT D., M.D. 

(26) 

fMcBiRNEY, HUGH 
McCoRMicK, CYRUS H. 

(18, 49, 70, 78, 120) 
McCoRMicK, HAROLD F. 

(78, 91, 107) 
MCCORMICK, R. HALL, 

(7) 
McCoRMicK, STANLEY 

(7, 14, 79, 81) 
*McCuLLOH, THOS. G. 

(5, 99) 



McCuLLOuGH, HIRAM R. 
McCuRDY, GEO. L. 

McGAViN, CHARLES 
McKiNNEY, ROBERT M. 

(13, 32) 
McKiNNON, JOHN W. 



MCLAREN, JOHN 
McMEEN, SAMUEL G. 

*McPHER80N, E. P. 
MCSUHELY, WM. H. 

*McWiLLiAM8, LAFAYETTE 

(2*. 92) 

MEAD, JAMES L. 
MEEK, SAMUEL L. 

*MERRIMAN, HENRY P., M.D. 

(1, 12) 
*MESSINGER, WILLIAM D. 

*MILLER, BRYCE A. 
(110) 



Lawyer. 

Capitalist. 

Corporation Director, Lawyer. 

Director, Chicago Savings Bank. 

Physician and Surgeon. 

President, National Lead Co. 

President, International Harvester Co. 

Railroad and Bank Director. 

Vice-President, International Harvester Co. 

Corporation Director. 

Capitalist, Trustee, Leander J. McCormick 

Estate. 

Comptroller, International Harvester Co. 
Corporation Director. 
Vice-Pres. and Treas., National Linseed Oil 

Co. 

President, Conf. and Bakers' Supply Co. 
President, Federal Manufacturing Co. 
Vice-President, Chicago & North-Western 

Ry. 
President, Geo. L. McCurdy & Co., Marine 

Insurance. 
Congressman. 
Cashier, National Bank of the Republic. 

President, Illinois Straw Products Co. 
Director, Chicago Title & Trust Co. 
Vice-President, Central Storage Warehouse 

Co. 

President, International Audit Co. 
Electrical Engineer. Telephony Expert. 
2nd Vice-President, Cable Piano Co. 
Congressman. 
Oil Merchant and Capitalist. 

President, Mead Cycle Co. 
President, Fidelity Trust Co. 
General Counsel for Corporations. 
Retired Capitalist. 

President, W. D. Messinger Co., Wholesale 

Paper Dealers. 
Retired Ship-builder. 
President, Washingtonian Home Association. 



[101] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



tMn.Ls, LUTHER LAFLIN 

(13, 30, 62, 29, 32) 
MILLS, MATTHEW 
MINER, R. SCOTT, 

(121) 

MITCHELL, JOHN H. 
MONTGOMERY, WM. T., M.D. 

(61) 

MOORE, E. B. 
MOORE, L. P. 

(120) 
*tMooRE, NATHAN G. 



, ANSON C. 
MORGAN, OTHO H. 

*MORTEN8ON, JACOB 

tMoRTON, MARK 
(15) 



fMosELEY, CARLTON 

"Moss, WILLIAM L. 
X MOVER, ELA B. 
MULLIKEN, ALFRED H. 

*MULLIKEN, CHARLES H. 

(1, 12) 

XMuNOER, CHAS. L. 
*MUNGER, HENRY H. 
MURDOCH, THOS. 

(2*) 

NEELY, CHARLES G. 
NELSON, ROBERT 
*NELSON, WALTER C. 

(56, 55) 

NEWBERRY, ROBERT T. 
NEWELL, ASHBEL B. 

tNicHOLS, GEO. R. 

NlTCHIE, JOSEPH H. 

NIXON, WM. P. 

(62) 
NORTON, CHAS. D. 

(23, 70, 75) 



Lawyer, Orator and Ciric Reformer. 

Congressman. 

Manager, Educational Book Dept., American 

Book Company. 

Manager, Pressed Steel Car Company. 
Oculist. 

President, E. B. Moore & Co., Wood Carpet. 

Secy, and Treas., Benj. Moore & Co., Paints 
and Varnishes. 

Lawyer, Bank and Corporation Director. 

Wilson, Moore & Mcllvaine. 

Secretary Chicago Varnish Co. 

President, Chicago Vanish Co. 

Wholesale Lumber Merchant. 

Joy Morton & Co. 

Treasurer, International Salt Co. 

Treasurer, U. S. Sugar Refining Co. 

Vice-President, Morton, Gregson Co., Packers. 

Vice-President, Western Cold Storage Co. 

Firm of Chase & Sanborn. Importers of 
Teas and Coffees. 

Executor of Estates. 

Asst. Secy., National Life Ins. Co. of U. S. A. 

President, Pettibone, Mulliken & Co., Rail- 
way Supplies. 

C. H. Mulliken & Co., Real Estate. 

Hardware. 

Hardware Specialties. 

President, Reid, Murdoch & Co., Wholesale 

Grocers. 

Ex-Judge, Cook County Circuit Court. 
Vice-President & Manager, In't'l. Audit Co. 
Lawyer, Ex-Alderman 7th Ward. 

Architect. 

Vice-President and Gen'l Manager, White 

Pass and Yukon Ry. 
Young & Nichols, Grain Merchants. 
Secy., Columbus Safe Deposit Co. 
Collector, Port of Chicago. 
Journalist. 
Genl. Agent, North-Western Mutual Life 

Insurance Go, 



[102] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



OOILVIB, Gao. W. 

ORCHARD, JOHN G. 
*OSBORNE, HENRY SL 

(80) 

tOris, CHARLES T. 
*OTIS. PHILO. A. 

(91) 
OTIS, RALPH C. 



PAGE, CHARLES T. 

PARLIAMENT, SAMUEL 
PARROTTE, WALTER L. 

t PATTEN, JAS. A. 
(87) 

PATTERSON, MELVIN E. 



PATTERSON, ROBERT 



PEABODT, FREDERICK F. 
PEASLET, JAMES C. 
PETERS, HOMER H. 



*PETEHSON, WILLIAM A. 
(121) 

fPETTIBONE, AMOS 

(51, 73) 

*PETTIBONE, ROBERT S. 

PHILLIPS, THOS. P. 



PHILLIPS, WILLIAM E. 
PIKE, CHARLES B. 



Pres. and Trees., G. W. Ogilvie ft Co. Pub- 
lishers. 

Cashier, Merchants Loan and Trust Co. 
Lawyer and Corporation Director. 



Capitalist. 
Real Estate. 



Capitalist. 



Vice-President, Chicago Savings Bank & 
Trust Co. 

President, Madison Building Co. 

Real Estate Operator and Director of Corpo- 
rations. 

Cheese Merchant, Parliament & Esper. 

President, Parrotte, Beals & Co., Wholesale 
Hats. 

Bartlett, Frazier & Carrington, Grain Mer- 
chants. 

Capitalist and Loft Building Owner. 

Chief Deputy, U. S. Marshall, N. W. Dist. of 
Illinois. 

Vice-President, The Brown Co. 

Secy, and Treas., Columbia Conservatory of 
Music Co. 

President, The Tribune Co. 

Editor-in-Chief, The Chicago Tribune. 

President, City Press Association of Chicago. 

Vice-President, Cluett, Peabody & Co. 

Capitalist. 

President, Crescent Oil, Asphalt & Gas Co. 

President, Buffalo, Dunkirk & West R. R. 

Corporation Director. 

President, The Peterson Nursery. 

Director, State Bank of Chicago. 

Vice-President, P. F. Pettibone & Co. Sta- 
tioners. 

Vice-President, P. F. Pettibone & Co. Sta- 
tioners. 

Vice-President, American Trust & Savings 
Bank. 

President, Dolese & Shepard Co., Quarry- 
men and Stone Contractors. 

Vice-President and Genl. Manager, Dolese & 
Shepard Co. 

President, Hamilton National Bank. 

President. Merchants Safe Deposit Co. 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



tPiKE, EUGENE 8. 

(21,92,97) 
PIRIE, JOHN T., JR. 

(33. 83) 
POOLE, ABRAM 
POPPENHUSEN, CONRAD H. 

(8) 



POPPENHTJSEN, PAUL A. 
POTTER, OHHIN W. 
*POTWIN, W. S. 

(44, 78) 
fPowERS, ORVILLE M. 

(79k) 

, RALPH, E. 



PRICE, CHAS. R. 
PRIDE, JOSEPH F. 
PRINQLE, ROBERT 

*PURINQTON, GEO. E. 
* RALSTON, HENRY M. 
(2*) 

, THOS: 



RAUCHFUSS, CHAS. F. 

READING, ARTHUR H., M D. 
REAM, NORMAN B. 

(49) 

*REED, CORYDON A. 
REID, WM. H. 
REQUA, CHAS. W. 

REVELL, ALEXANDER H. 

(19, 34, 87) 
REVELL, FLEMING H. 
REYNOLDS, GEO. M. 
RICE, CHAS. B. 

RICHARDSON, AUGUSTUS P. 



Capitalist and Bank Director. 

Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co. Dry Goods Mer- 
chants. 

Capitalist. 

Lawyer. 

Secretary and Chief Examiner, Civil Servic* 
Commission. 

Alderman of Evanston. 

President, Green Engineering Company. 

Retired Manufacturer. 

Treasurer, Chicago Varnish Co. 

President, Metropolitan Business College. 

President and Treas., Pratt Cereal Oil Co. 
Vice-Pres. American Hominy Co. 
Wholesale Coal Merchant. 
President & Treasurer, Junction Coal Co. 
Secy. & Treas., The Platt Co., Baltimore 

Oysters and Canned Goods. 
Pringle, Fitch & Rankin, Stock and Grain 

Merchants. 
Retired Merchant. 
President, North American Iron Co. 

President, Chicago Building and Manufactur- 
ing Co. 

Secy., Liquid Carbonic Co. 
Secy.,C. L. Bastian Mfg. Co., Brass Founders. 
Physician and Surgeon. 
Capitalist and Corporation Director. 

Crofts and Reed, Soap Manufacturers. 

Vice-Pjesident, 111. Trust & Savings Bank. 

Capitalist. 

Director, Amer. Trust <fe Savings Bank. 

President, Alex. H. Revell & Co. Furniture. 

President, Fleming H. Revell Co., Publishers 
President, Continental National Bank. 
Vice-President, Highland Park State Bank. 
Real Estate. 

Vice-President, Richardson & Boynton Co., 
Mfrs. of Furnaces, Ranges and Stoves. 



[104] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



RICHARDSON, BENJ. F. 
RICKCORDS, GEORGE E. 
RISTINE, GEORGE W. 

RlTTENHOUSE, MOSES F. 



ROBBINS, HENRY S. 
ROBERTS, WM. M. 
ROBERTSON, ALEXANDER 
ROBISON, JOHN A., M.D. 

JROCKWELL, F. W. 

(55) 

ROGERS, JAS. GAMBLE 
Ross, HUGH R. 
*RUMSAY, ISRAEL P. 

(32) 
RUSH, G. FRED 

(105) 

RUSSELL, ROBERT 
SANDERSON, GEO. A. 

(27) 

SAWYER, FRANK P. 
SCOTT, JOHN W. 
*SCOTT, SAMUEL S. 
fScoTT, GEORGE W. 

(121) 

*SCOTT, WALTER, D. 
fSEARLE, GIDEON D. 

SEBASTIAN, JOHN, 

SHANE, SAMUEL P. 
SHARP, WILLIAM L. 



*SHAW, FRANK S. 

(44) 
tSHAw HOWARD VAN DOREN 

(7, 82) 
SHAW, THEO. A., JR. 



Crandall & Richardson, Wholesale Lumber 

Merchants. 
Bank Director. 

President, Lake Co. Title & Trust Co. 
Consulting Railway Expert. 
Ex-Pres., Colo. Midland R. R. 
President, Rittenhouse & Embree Lumber Co. 
President, Arkansas Lumber Co. 
Vice-President, Chandler Lumber Co. 
Director, Drovers' Deposit National Bank. 
Lawyer. 

Asst. Supt. Schools. 

Vice-President, Continental National Bank. 
Physician. 
Manager, National Lead Co. 

Architect. 

President, Chicago Wood Finishing Co. 

President, Rumsay & Co., Grain Merchants. 

Lawyer. 

President, Russell Carpet Co. 
Investments. 

Vice-President, Great Western Cereal Co. 

Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co. 

Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co. 

President, Stewart Food Co. 

Civil Engineer. 

Professor in Pedagogy, North- Western Univ. 

President, G. D. Searle & Co., Importers A 
Com. Merchants. Heavy Chemicals. 

Passenger Traffic' Manager, Rock Island- 
Frisco System. 

Freight Traffic Manager, Erie R. R. 

Vice-Pres. and Treas., L. E. Roberts <fe Co., 
Wholesale Sash, Doors and Blinds. 

President, Sharp, Partridge & Co., Plate & 
Window Glass. 

President, Cable Piano Co. 

Director, Mason <fe Hamlin Co. 

Architect. 

T. A. Shaw A Co., Wholesale Dry Goods 
Jobbers. 



[I0 5 ] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



SHEDD, CHAS. B. 

tSHIELDS, WM. S. 

SILK, EDWARD E. 

SI880N, EVEBETT 

(97) 

SIMMONS, FRANCIS T. 
(73) 



SIMPSON, JAMES, 

(33) 

tSLOAN, DAVID 
SMITH, BYRON L. 

(18, 21, 25, 49, 97) 



SMITH, C. ALFRED 
SMITH, CHARLES 

SMITH, DELEVAN 
(70) 



, EDWARD H. 
(78) 

SMITH, FRANKLIN P. 
*SMITH, JEROME A. 

fSMITH, J. R. 

SMITH, MELANCTHON 



SMITH, SOLOMON A. 

(31) 
*SMITH, WM. M. 

EDGAR M. 

ISAAC B. 
SNOW, TAYLOR A. 

SUPER, JAMES P. 



SPOOR, JOHN A. 
(2, 14, 62, 86) 



Capitalist and Bank Director. 

Civil Engineer. 

Secy, and Genl. Mgr., The Holland Co., 

Railway Supplies. 
Publisher, The Interior. 

Secy, and Treas., F. T. Simmons & Co., Im- 
porters and Jobbers of Kid Gloves. 
Secy., Wm. H. Bush & Co. 
President, Lincoln Park Commissioners. 
Vice- President, Marshall Field & Co. 

Chief Engineer, McArthur Bros. Co. 
President, Northern Trust Co. 
1st Vice-Pres., Chicago Telephone Co. 
Director, C. & N.-W., A. T. & S. F., and C.- 

M. & St. P. Rys. 

President, Mclntosh Battery & Optical Co. 
President, Bradner Smith & Co., Wholesale 

Paper Merchants. 
Capitalist. Owner Indianapolis News and 

other Dailies. 

Director, Oliver Typewriter Co. 
Treasurer, Oliver Typewriter Co. 

President, F. P. Smith"Wire and Iron Works. 

President, S. D. Childs & Co., Stationers 
Engravers & Printers. 

Franklin MacVeagh & Co., Wholesale Gro- 
cers. 

President, Star Gelatine Company. 

President, M. Smith & Co., Wholesale Gro- 
cers' and Packers' Supplies. 

Vice-President, Northern Trust Co. 

Merchant. 

President, Edgar M. Snow & Co., Real Estate. 
Supt. of Agencies, Mass. Mutual Life Ins. Co. 
President, Taylor A. Snow Co., Real Estate. 
Director, Austin State Bank. 
Vice-President, Soper Lumber Co. 
Vice-President, Menominee Bay Shore Lum- 
ber Co. 

President, Chicago Junction Ry. 
President, Union Stock Yards and Transit Co. 
Director of Corporations. 



[106] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



SPHAGUE, ALBERT A. 
(7. 35, 97) 

STEARNS. EDGAR G. 



STEABNS, WILLIAM P. 

STEELE, D. A. K., M.D. 
(41, 114) 

*STEELE, FREDERICK M. 
tSTEVENS, RAYMOND W. 

STOCKTON, WILLIAM E. 
fSTONE, GEORGE W. 
STONE, HORACE G. 
fSTUAHT, ROBERT 
*SUDLER, CARROLL H. 

(120, 121) 
BUTTON, FREDERIC W. 

SWEET, JOHN W. 

SWIFT, Louis F. 

(70) 

*TARBET, WILLIAM L. 
Taylor, J. Hall 
*tTEALL, EDWARD M. 

(19, 28, 78) 

*TEMPLETON, THOMAS 

(2i, 29, 97, 120) 
TETER, Lucius, 
TEWKSBURY, WENTWORTH W. 
, JOHN R. 



THOMPSON, WILLIAM C. 



THOMPSON, LEVERETT 

(28, 83, 120) 
THOMSON, ROBERT B. 



President, Sprague, Warner A Co., Whole- 
sale Grocers. 

Bank and Corporation Director. 

President, & Treas., Chgo. Rubber Shoe Co., 
Wholesale Rubber Boots, Shoes and Cloth- 
ing. 

President and Treasurer, Stearns & White 
Co., Manufacturing Chemists. 

Physician and Surgeon. 

President, West Side Hospital. 

President, Chicago Clinical School. 

President and Treas., Chgo. Forge & Bolt Co. 

President, American Guaranty Co. 

Vice-President, Illinois Life Insurance Co. 

Director, Western Trust & Savings Bank. 

Iron and Steel Merchant. 

Grain Merchant. 

Lawyer. 

Treasurer, American Cereal Co. 

Vice-President, Ketterlinus Lithographic 
Manufacturing Co. 

Auditor, Chgo. Lake Shore & Eastern Ry. 

Auditor, Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Ry. 

President, Sweet, Dempster & Co., Whole- 
sale Hats. 

President, Swift & Co., Packers. 

Corporation and Bank Director. 

Tax Commissioner, Illinois Central R. R. 

Vice-President American Spiral Pipe Works. 

President, E. M. Teall & Co., Fire Under- 
writers. 

President, Chicago Underwriters Assn. 

Capitalist. 

Cashier, Chicago Savings Bank. 

Secy, and Treas., The Winona Publishing Co. 

Owner of Thompson's Restaurants, Grocer. 

County Treasurer. 

President, Wm. C. Thompson & Co., Bond 

Dealers. 

Vice-Pres. <fe Treas., Kellogg Harvester Co. 
Secy, and Treas., American Grain Shocker Co. 
Secy., Chgo. Savings Bank & Trust Co. 

President, Calumet Trust A Savings Bank. 
Secy, and Treas., U. S. Yards & Transit Co. 
Secy, and Treas., Chicago Junction Ry. 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



Trros, JOSEPH F. 

(97) 
THIMMINOHAM, RALPH N. 

fTROWBRIDGE, C. M. 

TWEEDY, OSBORNE S. 
(TYLER, ALFRED C. 
UPHAM, FRED W. 
(14. 95) 



VALENTINE, ALASTER I. 
VALENTINE, P. ANDERSON 

(6) 

tVAN ALEN, BENJ. T. 
VAN ARSDALE, WM. T. 

VlERLING, LOUIS 

VIERLING, ROBERT 
fVosE, FREDERIC P. 
(120) 

, JAMES R. 



WALLER, EDWARD C. 



WALLER, FRANCIS C. 
WALLER, JAMES B. 
WALLER, WILLIAM 

WARBRICK, JOHN C., M.D. 
*WARE, LYMAN, M.D. 
WARNER, EZRA J. 
(2*. 38) 

WARNER, EZRA J., JR. 

(21i, 63) 
WARREN, WM. H. 
tWATT, ELIHU D. 
WEBSTER, TOWNER K. 

(33*) 
WEDDELL, THOMAS R. 



Vice-President, Illinois Central R. R. 

Fire Underwriter. 

Secretary, Chicago Underwriters Assn. 

Vice-President, Burley & Co., China and 

Glassware. 

Chicago Manager, Diamond Rubber Co, 
Capitalist. 

President, F. W. Upham Lumber Co. 
President, Busse- Reynolds Coal Co. 
Vice-President, Peabody Coal Co. 
President, Cook County Board of Review. 
President, Armour Grain Co. 
Vice-President, Armour & Co., Packers. 
Corporation and Bank Director. 
C. F. Boehringer & Loehne, Chemicals. 
Genl. Agent, Mutual Benefit Life Ins. Co. 
Secy, and Treas., Vierling, McDowell Iron 

Works. 

President, Vierling, McDowell Iron Works. 
Corporation Lawyer. 

Capitalist. 

Treasurer, Tacoma Safe Deposit Co. 

Real Estate. 

President, North American Accident In- 
surance Co. 

Secy. -Treas., Central Safety Deposit Co. 

Coal Merchant. Fire Underwriter. 

Capitalist. 

President, Waller Coal Co. 

Corporation Director. 

Physician and Surgeon. 

Physician and Surgeon. 

Vice-President, Sprague, Warner & Co. 
Wholesale Grocers. 

Bank and Corporation Director. 

Treasurer, Sprague, Warner & Co., Whole- 
sale Grocers. 

President, Wm. H. Warren Mfg. Co. 

Genl-Mgr. Natl. Life Ins. Co. of U. 8. A. 

President, Webster Mfg. Co., Elevating and 

Conveying Machinery. 

Asso. Editor, The Insurance Post. 

Insurance Editor, The Chgo. Record-Herald. 



[108] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



WELLS, MOSES D. 

(62) 
*WILL, ROBERT M. 



X WELLS, SAMUEL R. 
S, THOMAS E. 



tWENTWORTH, MOSES J. 

(86) 

t WHEELER, ARTHUR D. 
(75, 92, 97, 104) 



*WHEELOCK, HENRY B. 

(92) 

*WHITE, FRANK B. 
WHITEHEAD, H. C. 
WHITING, JOHN H. 

(19) 
WILCOX, JOHN W. 

WILDER, HENRY W. 
WILDER, JOHN E. 
(36) 



WILKINSON, HARRY 
WILLARD, NELSON 

*tWlLLIAMS, DlXON C. 

WILLIAMS, LAWRENCE 
WILLIAMS, NORMAN, JR. 

(2J) 
WILLIAMS, THEO. H. 



WILLING, MARK S. 
WILSON, JOHN P. 

(86) 
*WINCHELL, BENJ. L. 



President, M. D. Wells & Co., Wholesale 
Shoes. 

Vice- President and Treas., Wells <fe Nellegar 
Co., Wholesale Hardware. 

Vice-President, Bankers National Bank. 

Business Manager, Chicago Daily News. 

President, T. E. Wells & Co., Grain Mer- 
chants. 

Corporation Director. 

Capitalist. 

Director, Merchants Loan & Trust Co. 

Director, State Bank of Chicago. 

President, Chicago Telephone Co. 

Chairman of Board, Central Union Telephone 
Co. - 

Director, Western Electric Co. 

Director, Fay-Sholes Co. 

Architect. 

President, F. B. White Advertising Co. 
Consulting Auditor, A. T. & S. F. Ry. 
President, Whiting Foundry Equipment Co. 

Secy, and Treas., C. M. Barnes Co., School 
and Text Books. 

Secy., Chicago Bridge and Iron Works. 

Wilder & Co., Tanners and Leather Mer- 
chants. 

Secy, and Treas., Wilder-Manning Tanning 
Co. 

Pres. Editor and Publisher, The Chicago 
Banker. 

President's Office, A. T. &. S. F. Ry. 

Vice-Pres., Chgo. Bldg. & Mfg. Co. 

Director of Corporations. 

President, Oliver Typewriter Co. 

Chalmers & Williams, Railway and Mining 
Machinery. 

Secy, and Genl. Mgr., International Gas and 
Fuel Co. 

Pres. Southern Development & Realty Co. 

Capitalist. 

Lawyer. Wilson, Moore & Mcllvaine. 

President, Chicago, Rock Island <fe Pacific Ry. 
Director Corporations. 



[I0 9 ] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



*WISHARD, LUTHER D. 

(104) 
WOLFE, ADOLPHUS 

WOOD, JAMES 

(56, 92) 

*WOODCOCK, LINDSAY T. 
*YOE, LUCIEN G. 
tYouNO, CARYL. 

(25) 

YOUNQ.'LlNN H. 

(56) 
YUILLE, GEO. ALLEN 

ZlEOFELD, WM. K. 

ZOROE, ROBERT J. 



President, Wishard, Langan Co., Land and 

Lumber Dealers. 
President, Kehoe Co. 
Vice-President, Coke Dandruff Cure Co. 
Wood Bros. & Co., Com'n. Merchants, U. S. 

Yards. 

Genl. Manager, Marshall Field & Co., Retail. 
Retired Syrup Manufacturer. 
Capitalist. 

Secy.-Treas., The GregglSchool. 
Alderman, 6th Ward. 

Pres., Chgo. Engineering ^'Construction Co. 
Manager, Chicago Musical College. 
President, American Corn Milling Co. 



[HO] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



ROLL OF CHURCHES 
THE PRESBYTERY OF CHICAGO 

NOTE: The Presbytery of Chicago includes, in addition to the 
whole of Cook County, approximately the counties of Lake, Du- 
Page, Will and Kankakee, with a church or two in Grundy and 
Ford Counties. The membership is shown for both the Churches 
and the Sunday Schools as reported to the General Assembly of 
1906. The addresses given are the locations of the churches not 
the addresses of the pastors. 
P. indicates Pastor. 
S. S. indicates Stated Supply. 

THE CHURCHES AND PASTORS Memberehip Membership 

Arlington Heights (Rev. James T. Ford, P.) . . Ill 190 

Austin (Rev. Robert H. Beattie, P.) 589 449 

Avondale (Rev. John A. Gallaher, P.), N. Al- 
bany Ave. and School St 167 378 

Belden Ave (Rev. Wm. E. McLennan, P.), 

Belden and Seminary Aves 422 743 

Berwyn (Rev. B. Scott Bates, P.) " 124 225 

Bethany (Rev. Charles A. Wilson, P.), Hum- 

boldt Boulevard, near Cortland St 215 350 

Braidwood 76 83 

Brighton Park (Rev. James Maclaughlan, S. S.), 

38th St., near Sacramento Ave 80 113 

Brookline (Rev. Earl B. Hubbell, P.), Jackson 

Ave. and 73rd St 432 441 

Buckingham (Rev. Geo. E. Young, P.) 35 64 

Buena Memorial (Rev. Robert J. Young, P.), 

Evanston Ave. and Sheridan Road 153 115 

Cabery (Rev. Hiram A. Stinson, S. S.) 55 65 

Calvary (Rev. William I. Stewart, P.), Congress 

St. and 42nd Ave 280 421 

Campbell Park (Rev. Philip F. Matzinger, P.), 

Leavitt St. south of Harrison 538 385 

[ill] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



THE CHUBCHES AKD P AST O. 

Central Park (Rev. Frank A. Hosmer, P.), 

Warren and Sacramento Aves 450 495 

Chicago, First (Rev. John A. Morison, P.), In- 
diana Ave. and 21st St 724 403 

(b) Chicago, Second (Rev. John Balcom Shaw, 

P.), Michigan Ave. and 20th St 1200 1224 

(c) Chicago, Third (Rev. Wm. J. McCaughan, 

P.), Ashland Boul. and Ogden Ave 1371 2025 

Chicago, Fourth (Rev. William Robson Not- 

man, P.), Rush and Superior Sts 552 317 

Chicago, Sixth (Rev. William P. Merrill, P.), 

Vincennes Ave. and 36th St 638 492 

Chicago, Seventh (Rev. Howell Isaac, S. <S.), 

86th and Sangamon Sts 120 200 

Chicago, Eighth (Rev. Wm. T. Wilcox, P.), 

Washington Boul. and Robey St 420 329 

Chicago, Ninth, S. Ashland Ave. and Hastings St. 87 125 

Chicago, Tenth (Rev. Frank N. Riale, P.), 

Emerald Ave. and 46th St 283 221 

Chicago, Eleventh (Rev. Alexander C. Manson, 

P.), Washtenaw Ave. and Crystal St 178 375 

(a) Chicago, Forty-First St. (Rev. Wm. C. 

Covert, P.), Grand Boul. and 41st St 1270 1294 

Chicago Fifty-Second Ave (Rev. George B. 

Safford, P.), 52nd Ave. and Fulton St. ... 230 478 

Chicago Heights (Rev. Jacob B. Fleming, P.) . 186 144 

Christ, Orchard and Center Sts 271 751 

Covenant (Rev. W. S. Plumer Bryan, P.), Bel- 
den Ave. and N. Halsted St 480 380 

Deerfield (Rev. J. C. Engel, S. S.) 45 85 

Douglas Park, 1725 12th St 40 

DuPage (Rev. Matthew B. McNutt, P.) 141 150 

Edgewater (Rev. Louis Perkins Cain, P.), Ken- 
more and Bryn Mawr Aves 230 504 

Elwood (Rev. Ralph H. Nye, P.) 65 90 

[112] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



Church Sunday School 
THE CHURCHES AND PASTORS Membwship Ifomberihip 

Emerald Ave. (Rev. James M. Eakins, P.), 

Emerald Ave. and W. 67th St 273 475 

Endeavor (Rev. Edward N. Ware, P.), Cornelia 

Ave. and Paulina St 124 332 

Englewood (Rev. Willard H. Robinson, P.), 

Yale and 64th Sts 836 495 

Evanston, First (Rev. John H. Boyd, P.), Chi- 
cago Ave. and Lake St 952 594 

Evanston, Second (Rev. Stuart M. Campbell, 

P.), Main St. and Hinman Ave 262 243 

Faith (Rev. Emil L. Winterberger, P.), Cornelia 

St., near Willow Ave., Austin 86 232 

Fullerton Ave (Rev. George Dugan, P.) , Fuller- 
ton Ave. and Hamilton Court 394 358 

Gardner (Rev. Henry W. Burger, P.) 78 252 

Garfield Boulevard (Rev. R. Keene Ryan, P.), 

5505 S. Halsted St 130 275 

Grace (Rev. Moses H. Jackson, P.), 3407 Dear- 
born St 152 274 

Harvey (Rev. Clyde L. Lucas, P.) 159 145 

Herscher (Rev. George E. Young, P.) 69 101 

Highland Park (Rev. Albert A. Pfanstiehl, P.) 208 237 

Hinsdale (Rev. T. D. Wallace, P.) 79 151 

Homewood 38 91 

Hyde Park (Rev. Joseph A. Vance, P.), Wash- 
ington Ave. and 53rd St 871 566 

Immanuel (Rev. Ernest W. Symonds, P.), Bon- 
field and 31st Sts 174 -292 

Italian (Rev. Filippo Grilli, S. S.), 71 W. Ohio St 134 120 

Itasca 17 52 

Jefferson Park, Adams and Throop Sts 252 216 

Joliet, Central (Rev. Robert Yost, P.) 564 337 

Joliet, First (Rev. Clarence G. Reynolds, P.) . . 472 330 

Joliet, Second 93 168 

Joliet, Willow Ave. (Rev. Alexander Lewis.'P.) 88 143 

Kankakee (Rev. David Creighton, P.) 440 347 

["3] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



Church Sunday School 
THE CHUBCHES AND PASTORS Mtmbenhip Membenhip 

LaGrange (Rev. Frank H. Hays, P.) 187 132 

Lake Forest (Rev. W. H. W. Boyle, P.) 450 193 

Lake View (Rev. Frank M. Carson, P.), Evan- 

ston Ave. and Addison St 437 425 

Libertyville 79 150 

Logan Square (Rev. Duncan C. Milner, P.), 1088 

Hayes St 51 128 

Manteno (Rev. Warren F. Goff, P.) 120 131 

Maywood (Rev. Edgar Beckwith, P.) 153 180 

Millard Avenue (Rev. Abram J. Van Page, P.), 

Millard Ave., near Ogden 137 190 

Morgan Park (Rev. Alexander Patterson, P.) . 147 210 

New Hope (Coal City) 107 176 

Normal Park (Rev. J. A. Rondt baler, P.), Yale 

Ave. and 71st St 402 483 

Oak Park, First, (Rev. George N. Luccock, P.), 

Lake St. and Kenilworth Ave 765 892 

Oak Park, Second (Rev. James T. Marshall, P.), 

Washington Boul. and 64th Ave., Oak 

Park 117 137 

Olivet Memorial (Rev. Norman B. Barr, P.), 

Penn and Vedder Sts 316 887 

Onward (Rev. Wm. M. Eaton, P.), Leavitt and 

W. Ohio Sts 92 407 

Peotone 150 130 

Pullman (Rev. Henry S. Jenkinson, S. S.) 127 175 

Ravenswood (Rev. Frederick L. Selden, P.), 

Montrose and Hermitage Aves 317 285 

Ridgeway Ave. (Rev. T. Walker Malcolm, P.), 

233 Ridgeway Ave., near Huron St 224 260 

River Forest (Rev. W. W. Johnstone, P.) 153 174 

Riverside (Rev. Hermon D. Jenkins, P.) 180 135 

Roseland, State and 112th Sts 97 102 

Roseland, Central (Rev. Maurice Grigsby, P.) 106 143 
Scotch ' Westminster, (Rev. James MacLagan, 

S. /S.), Adams and Sangamon Sts 72 40 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



THE CHURCHES AND PASTORS Membership 

South Chicago (Rev. A. Golden Work, S. S.), 

Exchange Ave. and 91st St 86 120 

South Park (Rev. C. Harmon Johnson, P.), 4817 

Michigan Ave 185 192 

South Waukegan (Rev. J. Homer Kerr, S. S.), 

N. Chicago, Lake County 18 90 

St. Anne 274 150 

Waukegan (Rev. Samuel W. Chidester, P.) ... 167 202 

West Division St., W. Division St. and Marion 

Court 101 529 

Windsor Park (Rev. Charles N. Wilder, S. S.), 

7621 Bond Ave 70 80 

Wilmington (Rev. J. Wallace MacGowan, P.) . . 77 100 

Woodlawn Park (Rev. Edward H. Curtis, P.), 

Kimbark Ave. and 64th St 827 978 

Zion (Rev. Henry J. Wiegand, P.), Wheeling. . 77 54 

Total 26,071 29,690 

Of this number the following are within the Chicago City 
Limits: 

Church Sunday School 
Membership Membership 

Churches 54 18.513 22,202 

Missions 19 

FORMER CUMBERLAND CHURCHES 

Church of Providence (Rev. A. H. Stephens, P.), 

1193 Sheffield Ave 280 225 

Drexel Park (Rev. A. G. Bergen, P.), W .64th 

St., N. E. corner S. Marshfield Ave 150 325 

Hope Church, ( P.) S. 

Peoria near W. 62nd St 35 75 

Marlboro Church (Rev. Light, P.), W. 68th St. 

corner S. Oakley Ave 60 125 

Grand Ridge (Rev. C. J. Wilson, P.) 150 200 

Total 675 950 

["Si 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



ROLL OF MISSIONS 

Belden, 819 Clybourn Ave. 

Belmont Ave. Chapel, Belmont Ave., near Clybourn. 
a Bethlehem Chapel, Fifth Ave. and 52nd St. 

Bohemian, 461 W. 18th St. 

Chinese, Michigan Ave. and 21st St. 

Chinese, Warren Ave. and Robey St. 

Chinese, Halsted St. and Belden Ave. 

Chinese, 122 E. Lake St. 
b Crerar Chapel, 5831 Indiana Ave. 

Edgewater Branch, Granville and Perry Aves. 
c Erie Ckapel, 312 W. Erie St. 

Emerson Street, Evanston. 

Foster, Jackson Blvd. and Peoria St. 

Grant, Grant Locomotive Works. 

Gunn Chapel, Joliet. 

Italian, Grand and Western Aves. 

Italian, Taylor St., near S. Desplaines. 

Lake Forest, Lake Forest, West Side. 

Mosely, 2529 Calumet Ave. 

Mt. Greenwood, Mt. Greenwood. 

North Kankakee, Kankakee. 

Pioneer, Harlem. 

Railroad Chapel, 3825 Dearborn St. 

State Street, 6552 State St. 

West Hinsdale, Hinsdale. 

Woodlawn Branch, 60th St., near Madison Ave. 

a Bethlehem Chapel membership included in 41st St. Church 
figures. 

b Crerar Chapel membership included in 2nd Church figures' 
c Erie Chapel membership included in 3rd Church figures. 

NOTE: In order that the same basis be used in showing the 
membership of all the organizations, the three larger Chapels re- 
ferred to above, which ordinarily are reported separately, as 
churches, are included with the churches with which they are 
affiliated. 

[116] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 

YOUNG MEN'S PRESBYTERIAN UNION OF 

CHICAGO 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

PRESIDENT 

ANDREW STEVENSON, 1937 Kenmore Avenue, (Buena Memorial 
Church.) 

GENERAL VICE-PRESIDENTS 

NOLAN R. BEST, 69 Dearborn Street (La Grange Church). 
P. F. AHRENS, 738 West Adams Street (Eighth Church). 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Devotion CARROLL H. SUDLER, 423 Monadnock Building (Fourth 
Church). 

Education A. PERCY BALLOTJ, 922 Merchants Loan and Trust 
Building (Forty-first Street Church). 

Fealty Louis A. BOWMAN, 814 Tacoma Building (Oak Park 
Church). 

Citizenship DONALD M. CARTER, 1410 Marquette Building 
(Hyde Park Church). 

Organization R. SCOTT MINER, 521 Wabash Avenue (Woodlawn 
Park Church). 

Fellowship ARTHUR B. HALL, 1675 Old Colony Building (Wood- 
lawn Park Church). 

SECRETARY 

LEON M. BETTS, 42 Dearborn Station (Englewood Church). 

TREASURER 

McKENZiE CLELAND, 934 Stock Exchange Building (Second 
United Presbyterian Church). 
AND 

REV. GEORGE L. ROBINSON, 4 Chalmers Place (McCormick Theo- 
logical Seminary). 

REV. WILLIAM C. COVERT, 367 Oakwood Boulevard (Forty-first 
Street Church). 

REV. GEORGE DUGAN, 746 Fullerton Avenue (Fullerton Avenue 
Church). 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



REV. J. A. GALLAHER (Avondale Church). 

WILLIAM A. PETERSON, 1301 Stock Exchange Building (Edge- 
water Church). 

J. HARRY JONES, 142 Monroe Street (La Grange Church). 

WALTER F. BROWN, 156 Wabash Ave. (Evanston First Church). 

HENRY C. DURAND, 22 North Union Street (Lake Forest Church.) 

HARRY P. COFFIN, 240 Wabash Ave. (Third Church). 

FRANCIS L. BOGGS, 69 Dearborn Street (Calvary Church). 

NATHAN W. MACCHESNEY, Stock Exchange Building( Hyde Park 
Church). Chairman Finance Committee. 

W. H. ROBERTSON, 210 Western Union Bldg. (Austin Faith 
Church). Chairman Publication Committee. 

REV. HOWARD W. JOHNSON, 108 East 20th Street (Second Church). 
Chairman Committee on Homes for Young Men. 



[118] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



RANK OF CHURCHES IN THE PRESBYTERY OF 
CHICAGO IN ACTUAL MEMBERSHIP 



1. Third (inc. Erie Chapel) . . .1371 33. 

2. Forty-first Street 1029 34. 

3. Evanston, First 952 35. 

4. Second 884 36. 

5. Hyde Park 871 37. 

6. Englewood 836 38. 

7. Woodlawn 827 39. 

8. Oak Park, First 765 40. 

9. First 724 41. 

10. Sixth 638 42. 

11. Austin 589 43. 

12. Joliet, Central 564 44. 

13. Fourth 552 45. 

14. Campbell Park 538 46. 

15. Covenant 480 47. 

16. Joliet, First 472 48. 

17. Lake Forest 450 49. 

18. Central Park 450 50. 

19. Kankakee 440 51. 

20. Lake View 437 52. 

21. Brookline 432 53. 

22. Belden Avenue 422 54. 

23. Eighth 420 55. 

24. Normal Park 402 56. 

25. Fullerton Avenue 394 57. 

26. Ravenswood 317 58. 

27. Olivet Memorial 316 59. 

28. Crerar Chapel 316 60. 

29. Tenth 283 61. 

30. Calvary 280 62. 

31. St. Anne 274 63. 

32. Emerald Avenue 273 64. 

65. Seventh 120 83. 

66. Oak Park, Second 117 84. 

67. Arlington Heights Ill 85. 

68. New Hope (Coal City) 107 86. 

69. Roseland Central 106 87. 

70. West Division Street 101 88. 

71. Roseland 97 89. 

72. Joliet, Second 93 90. 

73. Onward 92 91. 

74. Joliet, Willow Avenue 88 92. 

75. Ninth 87 93. 

76. Faith 86 94. 

77. South Chicago 86 95. 

78. Libertyville 79 

79. Hinsdale 79 

80. Gardner 78 

81. Zion (Wheeling) 77 

82. Wilmington 77 



Christ 271 

Evanston, Second 262 

Jefferson Park 252 

Bethlehem Chapel 241 

Fifty-second Avenue 230 

Edgewater 230 

Ridgeway Avenue 224 

Bethany 215 

Highland Park 208 

La Grange 187 

Chicago Heights 186 

South Park 185 

Riverside 180 

Eleventh 178 

Immanuel 174 

Avondale 167 

Waukegan 167 

Harvey 169 

River Forest 153 

Maywood 153 

Buena Memorial 163 

Grace 152 

Peotone 150 

Morgan Park 147 

Du Page 141 

Millard Avenue 137 

Italian 134 

Garfleld Boulevard 130 

Pullman 127 

Endeavor 124 

Berwyn 124 

Manteno 120 

Braidwood 76 

Scotch Westminster 72 

Windsor Park 70 

Herscher 69 

Elwood 65 

Cabery 55 

Logan Square 51 

Deerfield 45 

Douglas Park 40 

Homewood 38 

Buckingham 35 

South Waukegan 18 

Itasca 17 

Average size of Church . .274.4 
No. above the average ... 30 . 
No. below the average ... 66 . 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



REAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF CHURCHES 

IN THE PRESBYTERY OF CHICAGO 

YEAR ENDING APRIL, 1906 

This table shows the development of the churches 
during the last year on the basis of additions to member- 
ship on confession of faith the standard generally ac- 
cepted as the one indicating the spiritual life and growth 
of the church. 



Number added 

on confession of 

Rank Church faith 

1. Olivet Memorial 66 

2. Third (inc. Erie Chapel) ... 62 

3. Oak Park, First 58 

4. Second 54 

5. Tenth 53 

6. Forty-First Street 44 

7. Crerar Chapel 41 

8. First (inc. R. R. Mission) . . 40 

Normal Park 40 

Fifty-Second Avenue 40 

11. Ravenswood 37 

12. Evanston, First 36 

13. Brookline 35 

14. Millard Avenue 31 

Central Park 31 

16. Lake View 30 

17. Austin 28 

18. Belden Avenue 27 

Campbell Park 27 

Lake Forest 27 

21. Oak Park, Second 25 

Berwyn 25 

Eleventh 25 

24. Joliet, Central 24 

25. Woodlawn Park 23 

Italian 23 

Ninth 23 

West Division Street 23 

29. Englewood 22 

Bethlehem Chapel 22 

Grace 22 

32. Kankakee 21 

Sixth 21 

34 Avondale 20 

Christ 20 

36. Hinsdale ... 16 



Number added 

on confession of 

Rank Church faith 

36. Covenant 19 

Joliet, First 19 

39. Immanuel 17 

Emerald Avenue 17 

41. Harvey 16 

Ridgeway Avenue 16 

43. Fourth 15 

44. Morgan Park 14 

Joliet, WiDow Avenue 14 

South Park 14 

47. Hyde Park 13 

48. Manteno 12 

Seventh 12 

50. Edgewater 11 

Bethany 11 

Scotch Westminster 11 

53. Calvary 10 

Endeavor 10 

Du Page 10 

56. Eighth 9 

Buena Memorial 9 

Waukegan 8 



58. 

Highland Park 

Herscher 

Garfield Boulevard 

Libertyville 

63. Arlington Heights 

Maywqod 

65. Riverside 

Chicago Heights . . 

St. Anne 

68. Logan Square 

Evanston, Second , 

Fullerton Avenue . 

Faith 

72. Onward 



[120] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



Number added 
on confession of 

Rank Church faith 

72. Joliet, Second 4 

Jefferson Park 4 

Braidwood 4 

Roseland 4 

77. Windsor Park 3 

Cabery 3 

Wilmington 3 

Buckingham 3 

South Chicago 3 

Itasca 3 

La Grange 3 

84. Roseland Central 2 

Deerfield 2 

86. New Hope (Coal City) 1 



Number added 

on confession of 

Rank Church faith 

86. Peotone 1 

88-95 South Waukegan none 

Elwood none 

Pullman none 

River Forest none 

Gardner . . . .' none 

Zion (Wheeling) none 

Homewood none 

Douglas Park none 

Average additions on confession 

of faith, per church 16.6 

No. churches above average ... 40 
No. churches below average ... 55 



PERCENTAGE ADDITIONS ON CONFESSION OF FAITH 
BEARS TO ENTIRE CHURCH MEMBERSHIP 

Table giving the percentage of additions on confession 
of faith to the present church membership which is 
perhaps the most accurate way of determining the con- 
dition of the churches' spiritual life. 



Rank Church Per cent. 

1. Ninth 26.4 

2. Hinsdale 24 . 

3. West Division Street 22 .7 

4. Millard Avenue 22 . 6 

5. Oak Park, Second 21 .3 

6. Olivet Memorial 20 .6 

7. Berwyn 20 .1 

8. Tenth 18.7 

9. Itasca 17.6 

10. Fifty-Second Avenue 17 .3 

11. Italian 17.1 

12. Joliet, Willow Avenue 15.9 

13. Scotch Westminster 15.2 

14. Grace 14.4 

15. Eleventh 14 .0 

16. Crerar Chapel 12 .9 

17. Avondale 11.9 

18. Ravenswood . . . r-. 11.6 

19. Herscher 11.5 

20. Libertyville 10.1 

21. Harvey 10.0 

22. Manteno 10 .0 

23. Seventh 10 .0 

24. Normal Park 9.9 

25. Logan Square 9.8 

26. Immanuel 9.7 



Rank 



Church 



Per cent 



27. Morgan Park 9.5 

28. Bethlehem Chapel 9.1 

29. Buckingham 8.5 

30. Brookline 8.1 

31. Endeavor 8.0 

32. Oak Park, First 7.5 

33. South Park 7.5 

34. Christ 7.3 

35. Ridgeway Avenue 7.1 

36. Du Page 7.0 

37. Central Park 6.8 

38. Lake View 6.8 

39. Belden Avenue 6.3 

40. Arlington Heights 6.3 

41. Emerald Avenue 6.2 

42. Second 6.1 

43. Garfield Boulevard 6.1 

44. Lake Forest 6.0 

45. Buena Memorial 5.8 

46. Faith 5.8 

47. First 5.5 

48. Cabery 5.4 

49. Braidwood 5.2 

50. Bethany 5.1 

51. Campbell Park 5.0 

52. Austin 4.8 



[121] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



Rank Church Per cent. 

53. Waukegan 4.7 

54. Edgewater 4.7 

65. Kankakee 4.6 

56. Maywood 4.5 

67. Third 4.5 

68. Joliet, Central 4.4 

59. Deerfield 4.4 

60. Onward 4.3 

61. Joliet, Second 4.3 

62. Forty-First Street 4.2 

63. Windsor Park 4.2 

64. Roseland 4.1 

65. Joliet, First 4.0 

66. Covenant 3.9 

67. Wilmington 3.8 

68. Highland Park 3.8 

69. Chicago Heights 3.7 

70. Calvary 3.5 

71. Evanston, First 3.5 

72. Sou+h Chicago 3.4 

73. Riverside 3.2 

74. Sixth 3.2 

75. Woodlawn Park 2.7 

76. Fourth 2.7 

77. Enslewood 2.6 



Rank Church Per cent. 

78. St. Anne 2.1 

79. Eighth 2.1 

80. Evanston, Second 1 .9 

81. Roseland Central 1 .8 

82. La Grange 1 .7 

83. Jefferson Park 1.5 

84. Hyde Park 1.4 

85. Fullerton Avenue 1.2 

86. New Hope 0.8 

87. Peotone 0.6 

88. South Waukegan 0.0 

89. E'wood 0.0 

90. Pullman 0.0 

91. River Forest 0.0 

92. Gardner 0.0 

93. Zion (Wheeling) 0.0 

94. Homewood 0.0 

95. Douglas Park 0.0 

Average percentage new addi- 
tions on confession of faith 

is of entire membership .... 6.0 

No. churches above average ... 44 

No. churches below average ... 61 



[122] 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



PRESBYTERY OF CHICAGO COMPARED WITH LEAD- 
ING PRESBYTERIES 

(Those having over 10,000 members.) 





Churches 


_c. 


Average size 
of Church 


Additions on 
Confession of 
Faith 


Average addi- 
tions per 
Church 


ftjlt 
llj! 1 


Presbyterian Church in U. S. A. 


8,118 
95 


1,158.662 
26.071 


142.7 
274 4 


79,589 
1,585 


9.0 
16 6 


6.8 
6 


Chicago above the average by 






131 7 




7 6 




Chicago below the average by 












8 
















Presbytery of 
1. Philadelphia 


79 


40,751 


515 8 


2,561 


32 4 


6 2 


2. Pittsburgh 


83 


29,415 


354 4 


2,050 


24 2 


6 9 


3. New York 


54 


28,996 


536.9 


1,627 


30 1 


5 6 


4, Chicago ,.,,,., 


95 


26,071 


274 4 


1,585 


16 6 


6 




43 


17,301 


402 3 


1264 


29 4 


7 3 


6. Lackawanna 


100 


17,254 


172 5 


983 


98 


5 7 


7. Philadelphia. North 
8. Newark 


64 
39 


16,526 
13,960 


258.2 
357 9 


812 
908 


12.7 
23 2 


4.9 
6 5 


9. Rochester 


49 


13,336 


272 1 


583 


11 9 


4 3 


10. Huntington 


78 


12,264 


157 2 


826 


10 6 


6 7 


ll. Erie .T 


66 


12,169 


184 3 


615 


9 3 


5 


12. Detroit 


49 


11,845 


241 6 


619 


12 6 


5 2 


13. Allegheny 


49 


11,621 


237 1 


698 


14 2 


6 


14. Cincinnati 


66 


11,529 


174 6 


684 


10 3 


5.9 


15. Buffalo 


53 


11,521 


217 3 


791 


14 9 


6 8 


16. Chester 


55 


11,181 


203 2 


907 


16 4 


8 1 


17. Los Angeles 


65 


11,119 


171 


852 


13 1 


7 6 


18. Morris and Orange 


44 


11020 


250 4 


432 


9 8 


3 9 


19. Blairsville 


51 


10,948 


214 6 


692 


13 - 5 


6 3 


20. Cleveland 


41 


10,949 


267 


688 


16 7 


6 7 


21. Elizabeth 


33 


10,659 


323 


735 


22 2 


6 8 


22. Albany 


51 


10,657 


209 


423 


8 2 


3 


23. Steubenville 


62 


10,124 


163 2 


496 


8 


4 9 
















Total 23 leading Presbyteries 


1.369 
59 


361,216 
15,705 


263 i 


12,841 
558 


6's 


4 i 


Chicago above average by ... 


36 


10,366 


11.1 


1,027 


7!a 


1.0 



Chicago: A Presbyterian City 



For convenience the following table showing the growth 
of the larger churches and Sunday Schools from 1876 to 
1906 is included. Only those having a membership of 
over 500 in 1906 are given. 

GROWTH OF THE CHURCHES AND SUNDAY SCHOOLS 





19 


06 


18 1 


)6 


18! 


56 


IK 


'6 


Church. 


2 

6 


02 

02 


,a 
J 


02 
02 



1 


02 
02 


i 
1 


00 
OS 


1. Third . 


1371 


2025 


1200 


2941 


2300 


2100 


1093 


625 


2. Forty-First Street 


1270 


1294 


982 


1124 


151 


227 


32 


250 


3. Second 


1200 


1224 


797 


696 


720 


641 


562 


960 




952 


594 


701 


542 


445 


314 


226 


290 


b. Hyde Park 


871 


566 


572 


547 


414 


514 


201 


360 


6. Englewood 


836 


495 


475 


535 


310 


482 


202 


450 


7. Woodlawn Park 
8 Oak Park, 1st 


827 
765 


978 
892 


326 
271 


260 
233 


54 

138 


110 
113 






9. First 


724 


403 


721 


200 


1062 


842 


710 


800 


10. Sixth 


638 


492 


531 


529 


576 


643 


191 


424 




589 


449 


368 


675 


111 


165 


63 


125 


12. Joliet Central 


564 


337 


646 


318 


410 


465 


203 


230 


13 Fourth 


552 


317 


579 


400 


435 


1145 


260 


600 


14. Campbell Park 


538 


385 


270 


350 


135 


270 






Total . . .... 


11 697 




8439 




7261 




3743 




Average membership 


835 




602 




515 




340 





GROWTH OF THE LARGER PRESBYTERIES DURING 
THE LAST THIRTY YEARS 





1 


m 


U 


96 


1 


386 


18 


76 




Rank 


Mem. 


Rank 


Mem. 


Rank 


Mem. 


Rank 


Mem. 


Philadelphia 


1 


40751 


1 


32792 


1 


27 444 


1 


22048 


Pittsburgh 


2 


29415 


4 


18804 


5 


10 734 


5 


8719 


New York 


3 


28996 


2 


24872 


2 


19590 


2 


16 881 


Chicago 


4 


26071 


3 


19455 


4 


12489 


7 


7235 


Brooklyn 


5 


17,301 


6 


13588 


3 


14250 


4 


9 406 


Lackawanna 


6 


17254 


5 


14645 


7 


9 110 


g 


5932 


Philadelphia, North .... 
Newark 


7 
8 


16,526 
13960 


7 
8 


11,478 
11 437 


10 
9 


7,204 
7 555 


9 

g 


5,932 
6 157 


Huntington 


9 


12264 


10 


11038 


6 


9585 


3 


10 125 


Erie 


10 


12,169 


9 


11 158 


g 


8 141 


6 


7236 


Detroit 


11 


11,845 


11 


9,707 


12 


6294 


11 


4830 


Allegheny 


12 


11,621 


12 


9,480 


Jl 


6,530 


10 


5,168 



UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY 

The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its renewal or its return to 
the library from which it was borrowed 
on or before the Latest Date stamped 
below. You may be charged a minimum 
fee of $75.00 for each lost book. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books or* reasons 
for disciplinary action and may result in dismissal from 
fho University. 

TO RENEW CALL TELEPHONE CENTER, 333-84OO 
UNIVERSITY OP ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



JUL 61999 



When renewing by phone, write new due date below 
previous due date. L162