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Full text of "Chilhowean 1920"

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Lamar Memorial Lfbrary 

Maryvilie CoDoge 

^aryvilie, Tennassea 37801 



3EMSONJ 





CHILHOWEAN 



VOLUME 
FOURTEEN 

1 9 2 




Published by the Class of '21 
Maryoille College 
Maryville, Tennessee 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

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http://www.archive.org/details/chilhowean192014mary 




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yy E have striven to mal(c 
the 1920 Chilhowean a faith- 
ful and interesting memor]) 
book of the pear's Tvork and 
play. If, rvhen pou lool( at 
it in future pears, pour heart is 
Tvarmed at the sight of famil- 
iar scenes and faces, and if 
pou again feel the thrill of the 
Marpville spirit, we will feel 
that rve have suc- 
ceeded. 



MELMMMMMMl 



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To 
REV. WILLIAM PATTON STEVENSON. D.D. 

Our College Pastor 
ana 

MRS. WILLIAM PATTON STEVENSON 

Our Foster Mother 

who, coming to Maryville tuJien vue were 
Freshmen, have made 'The House in the 
woods a ventahle home, our Sunday 
Classes a pleasure, our V es^er services an 
ins'^iration, and every ^hase of college life 
doubly interesting and helpful, we, the 
Junior Class of 1920, lovingly dedicate 
this, the fourteenth volume of the 
Chilhoivean. 



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CONTENTS 



Book One 
Book Two 
Book Three 
Book Four 
Book Five 



The College 

The College Classes 

The Departments 

Athletics 

Organizations 



Book Six . Plain Tales From the Hill 



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Book I 

The 
College 





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(13) 




ANDERSON HALL 
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ON THE WAY 
(15) 




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(21) 




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(22) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(23) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 

=_ ^ 



The Directors 



Class of 1920 

Rev. Robert Lucky Bachman, D.D Joncsboro 

Rev. Joseph McClellan Broady, D.D Birmingham, Ala. 

Rev. Henry Seymour Butler, D.D Washingion, D. C. 

Rev. Elcar Alo.mzo Elmore, D.D., LL.D Challanooga 

Hon. Moses Houston Gamble, M.A Maryville 

Rev. Robert Isaacs Gamon, D.D Knoxville 

Mr. Morgan Llewellyn Chattanooga 

Hon. William Alexander Lyle Dandridge 

Hon. William Anderson McTeer Maryville 

William Edwin Minnis, Esq New Market 

Rev. John Grant Newman, D.D Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Samuel Tyndale Wilson, D.D., LL.D Maryville 

Class of 1921 

Hon. William Leonidas Brown Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Newton Wadsworth Caldwell, D.D Ailaniic City, N. Y. 

James Moses Crawford, Esq Fountain City, R. D. I 

Rev. John Baxter Cresswell, B.A Bearden 

Rev. William Robert Dawson, D.D South Knoxville 

Rev. Calvin Alexander Duncan, D.D Harriman 

Rev. John Samuel Eakin, D.D Knoxville 

Rev. Woodward Edmund Finley, D.D Marshall, N. C. 

Samuel O'Crady Houston, B.A Knoxville 

John Riley Lowry, B.S Knoxville 

Rev. William L. McEwan, D.D., LL.D Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CoL. John Beaman Minnis Knoxville 

Class of 1922 

Rev. John McKnitt Alexander, D.D Maryville 

James Addison Anderson, Esq Founiain Ciiy, R. D. 1 

Hon. Thomas Nelson Brown, M.A Maryville 

Hon. John Calvin Crawford, B.A., LL.D Maryville 

Rev. Thomas Judson Miles, M.A Sweetwater 

Fred Lowry Proffitt, B.A Maryville 

Rev. John C. Ritter, B.A Knoxville 

Lewis Hopkins Spillman, Esq Knoxville 

Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, D.D., LL.D Piinceion, N. J. 

James Martin Trimble, Esq Chattanooga 

Rev. Roy Ewing Vale, D.D Knoxville 

Rev. David Gourley Wylie, D.D., LL.D New York, N. Y. 



(2 ) 



THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 




REN'EREND SAMUEL TYNDALE WILSON, D.D., LL.D. 
PRESIDENT 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




The College Faculty 



Jasper Converse Barnes, Ph.D. 

Dean anil Professor of Psychology^ anJ EJucalion 



Henry Jewell Bassett, M.A. 

Professor of Lalin and Cree]^ 



Lena Aiken, B.A. 

Associate Professor of Biology 



Mrs. Jane B. S. Alexander, M.A. 

Professor of English Liieralure 



(26) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



Faculty 



Mme. Adele Marie Denee 

(Brevet Superieur, The Sorbonne) 
Professor of French and Spanish 



PIthel Fanson, B.A. 

Professor of Chemistry 



Rev. Clinton H. Gillingham, D.D. 

Registrar; Professor of the English Bible and Head 
of the Bible Training Department 



Edwin Ray Hunter, M.A. 

Professor of the English Language 




(27) 



THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 



-P 




Faculty 



George Alan Knapp, M.A. 

Profesior of Mathematics and Pb\}sics 



Rev. Horace E. Orr, B.A. 

Professor of English and Bible 



Clara Siever^j, B.S. 

Head of the Department of Home Economics 



Arthur F. Southwick, B.S. 

Professor of Social Science and History 



(28) 



THE CHILHOWEAK, 1920 



The Preparatory Faculty 



Horace Lee Ellis, M.A. 

Principal and Professor of Education 



David Joseph Brittain, B.A. 

History 



Alice Isabella Clemens, B.A. 

English and Bible 



Jessie S. Heron, B.A. 

Latin 



Almira Elizabeth Jewell, B.A. 

Mathematics 



Robert C. Jones, B.A. 

Mathematics 




(29) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Faculty 



Carmen Park, B.A. 

Rnglish and Bible 



Annie L. Pleasants, B.A. 

Gio/ogll 



Jason G. Purdy, B.A. 

English and Hisloj^ 



Ecgar Roy Walker, B.A. 

Malhemalics and Ph})slcs 



Lela Agnes Ware 

Home Economics 



Catherine Wilkinson, B.A. 

Mathematics and French 



(30) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



q= 



Departmental Faculty 



Mrs. Nita West, B.A., B.O. 

Head of Deparlmenl of Expression and Public 
Speal^ing 



Hope Buxton 

Expression 



Mrs. Edwin L. Ellis 

Expression 



Laura Belle Hale 

Head of Deparlmenl of Music 



Charles A. Garratt 

Violin 




(31) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Faculty 



Edna Elizabeth Dawson 

Piano 



Harriet L. Gregg 

Voice 



Harry Feeman 

Athletic Director 



James V. Hopkins, B.S. 

Agriculture 



William H. Pleasants 

Manual Training 



(32) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





Assistants in Music 



Mary Emma Armentrout 
Piano 

Ada Howard B.A. 
Piano 



Edith Caldwell 
Piano 

Winston Newton 
Voice 



Harriet Hayes 

Piano 

Marguerite Sullincer 
Piano 



(33) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



M 




Officers 

Mary Louise McLean, R.N Nurse 

Fred L. Proffitt Treasurer 

Clemmie Henry Associate Scholarship Secretary 

H. Frances Postalwaite, R.N Nurse 

Charles L. Edgemon Assistant to Treasurer 

Anna Jones Assistant Registrar 

Ceua Rough Secretary to Treasurer 

Elizabeth Smith Librarian 

(34) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Officers 

Emma A. Jackson Matron of DalJain Hall 

Ernest C, Brown Engineer 

M;ry E. Caldweli Dean of Women 

Sara F. Coulter . Manager Co-operalive Boarding Club 

Mrs. Cora H. Lowrv Matron of Hospital 

Mrs. Lida P. Snodcrass Matron of Memorial Hall 

Lula Darby Auistant Manager Co-operative Boarding Club 



(35) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(36) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




College Faculty Assistants 

Homer Weisbecker, Elsie Dawson 

Assislant Physical Directors 

Ethel Doctor 

Assistant in Bible 

Moss Farmer, Frank Minarik, Chester Osborne, Oscar Stanton, 
Martha Robison, Carolyn Nelson 

Assistants in Chemistry 

Cerena Polk, Irma Schwab, Grace Sydenstricker 

Assistants in English 

Addie Fine 

Assistant in French 

Mattie Hamilton 

Assistant in hi athematics 

Lamar Wilson 

Assistant in Physics 

Lee Roy Middleton, Daniel Severs Arellano 

Assistants in Spanish 

Preparatory Assistants 

Mary Kate Lewis 

French 

James Martin 

Assistant in Biology 

Helen Lewis, James Deyton 

Assistants in English 

Ethel Swindler 

:• - Assistant in History 

Louise Duncum 

Assistant in Heme Economics 

Jessie Creswell, Grace Blank, Emma Logan 

Assistants in Mathematics 

Leslie Jones, Jarms Cotton 

Assistants in Physics 

Myrtle Rendon 

Assistant in Spanish 

(37) 




THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 




(38) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(39) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(40) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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<r^jf jy^ED 



Flotver: Marechal Niel Rose Colors: Green and Cold 

Motto: Our Ideal is a Square Deal 

Ruth and Sylvia Bryan Holmes 

Senior Mascots 





(43) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Senior Class 



Fred Hobart Cagle, B.A. 

Alpha Sigma 
ENGLEWOOD, TENNESSEE 

Our president came lo us from the centennial class, 
but we have never held it against him and have 
respected him enough to give him the highest office 
in our class. "Good-natured," always ready to 
"bite" at a joke, as well as have the "wind to blow 
from the East," who could help but like him? 

"Nothing humbler than ambition Jvhen it's about 
to climb.'' 

Kntered Air Service November 17, 1917; M. T. O. 
T. C. October, 191S, at JacKsonville. Fla.: Class 
Basketball and Baseball, 16; Class Football, '17; 
Class President, '20. 



Robert Lerov Belt, B.A. 

Athenian 
WELLSVILLE, TENNESSEE 

And as for Bob — he goes peacefully on his way, 
moonshming whenever possible, wmnmg all the ten- 
nis games he plays, and smiling always. He is 
studying medicine and has the distinction of a sum- 
mer course at the University of Chicago. He also 
has the distinction of being the best-dressed man in 
the class. 

"Laugh ami the rvorld laughs Tvdh Ijou." 

Tennis Team. 'is. '] !i ; Manager Tennis Team, '19 ; 
Class Basketball. 'IS. '19; Advertising Manager of 
Chi 1 ho wean, "19 ; Member Pre-Medical Club. 



(44) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



«t 



Clc 



senior ^lass 



Horace Earl Brown, B.A. 

Alpha Sigma 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Business — that's Brownie all over. As in school he 
has managed much, so in life we know he shall. 
Forever busthng about and busy, enterprismg and 
efficient, he is always useful. At moonshming, even, 
he is industrious and effective. 

" Tis bctler io wear out than rusl out." 

President of Class. '].S-'16 ; Winner Cross-Country 
Run, '1S-'19; MembiT V. M. C. A. Cabinet, '18-'lfl; 
College Debater ae:ainst Tusculum, '19; Manager 
Highland Echo, '19-'20; Advertising Manager Chil- 
li o wean, "19 ; Boys" Glee Club : Trt- asurer Class, 
'1S-'19; Varsity Basketball. ■1S-'19, •19-'20: Man- 
ager Basketball. '19-"2 ; President Pre-Medicai 
Association, '19-'20 ; Graduate Public Speaking; 
Member of "M" Club. 



George Brandle Callahan, B.A. 

Alpha Sigma 
ERWIN. TENNESSEE 

Not by sudden, startling spurts, but by capable, 
manly, faithful plugging, George has climbed to the 
very peak of the estimation of all. Women are 
good judges of men. And where is she who will 
not praise him high ? He is likewise popular with 
the fellows. 

"/ dare do all thai ma\} become a man. 
Who dares do more is none." 

Cross-Country. "16, '19; Class Athletics. '17. 'IS. 
'19; Manager Tennis, 'IS; Member Y. M. C. A. 
Advisory Committee, 'IS, '19; Social Chairman Y. 
M. C. A., Fall. 'IS: Vice-President Class. 'IS and 
'19; Manager Basketball, '1S-'19; Business Manager 
Centennial Chilhowean. '19 ; President Adelphic 
ITnion, '19 ; Business Manager Highland Echo. '19- 
':;0; Secretary Y. M. C. A.. '19-"20; President Alpha 
Sigma, Winter, '20. 




(45) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




5enior 



CI 



ass 



Mildred Lucile Campbell, B.A. 

Bainonian 
SPRING CITY, TENNESSEE 

When it comes to walking to Look Rock and back 
in one day, taking part in midwinters, delighting the 
hearts of all the teachers, and taking part in every 
college activity, Mildred is on the dot. We feel 
that she will make a wonderful success in anything 
she undertakes, and expect to hear great things of 
her next year from Leland-Powers. 

" There Tvas none li^e her — none." 

Associate Editor f'hilhowean, '19; T. W. C. A. 
Delegate to Blue Ridge. '1!>; Vice-President Equal 
Suffrage League. '19 ; Graduate in Expression, '20; 
President Bainonian, Fall Term, "20; Girls' Foren- 
sic League, '20. 



Tien Ze Chang, B.A. 

BEE Z ST., HANGCHOW, CHINA 

In this day of advertisement, he declines to adver- 
tise himself or be advertised. This gentleman came 
to us from old Cathay. We used to love his sweet 
disposition, celestial smile and wilty remarks ; but 
now we admire his dynamic temperament, phleg- 
matic altitude and his firm grasp of his own con- 
victions. Ordinarily, although he is a quiet pusher 
and gives his best advice and energy (o his immedi- 
ate associates, yet occasionally he is a loud knocker; 
but nay, indeed he is a man of justice and princi- 
ple. During the war he helped his adopted Uncle 
Sam as assistant treasury clerk and studied law and 
politics at the capital, and has come back to steal 
a little of the arts from us. He has never told us 
of his future career, but we all hope thai there is a 
little cabinet in Peking waiting for him. He comes 
to us as a child, but we give him back to China as 
a man. Chang, old boy, good luck! 

"Live honorahl]}, treat people squarely, pay my 

debts, and TAKE ALL CHANCESr 

Nationalist of the C. N. L. of A.; Secretary-Treas- 
urer of Law Club, 'IS. 



(46) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



<^— 



Senior Class 



Irrovia Corry, B.A. 

Bainonian 
SILOAM, GEORGIA 

Rodie Is too big a girl to have justice done her by 
any classmate. She quietly assumes the responsibil- 
ity of any task, no matter how large, and when it 
is finished the class always says "Well done." Her 
poise is one of her chief characteristics, but her 
greatest talent lies in reading. She attempts big 
things and at the same time enters whole-heartedly 
into every phase of college activity. 

"Grace in all her steps. 
In ever}) gesture dignity." 

Vice-President Bainonian. Fall Term. '19 ; Chair- 
man Bainonian Midwinter Committee. '20; Senior 
Annual Committee. '20; Graduate in Expres- 
sion. '^O. 



Dexter Clayton Cox, B.A. 

Bainonian 
PARKERSBURG. WEST VIRGINIA 

"Dec ' IS voted unanimously the lucky girl of the 
class. She says, "A bird in the hand is worth two 
in the bush. ' On June 23. 1918. the degree of 
A.M. was conferred upon this fair lassie. "Dec" 
is a good old girl, loved by everyone who knows her 
sterling worth. We expect her to shine as "mistress 
of the manse." 

"Better to be lorn luc}(\f than rich." 

Secretary of Y. W. C. A.. '16-'17: Secretary of 
Bainonian. Winter Term. 'IS; Class Basketball 
Teams. '16-' 17. 'IS. '19. '20; Varsity Basketball 
Squad. ■19-'20: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '17-'1S: Presi- 
dent of Virginians. '15-'16 ; Treasurer Virginians. 
'16-'17; Vesper Choir. 




(47) 




THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 



3 




Senior Class 



Mary Davis Creswell, B.A. 

M^'RYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

To see Mary walk sedately over the campus one 
would imagine that she is the best girl in school. 
However, matrons search her room for visitors dur- 
ing study hours quite often. She is jolly and in her 
mind are made all kinds of schemes for good times. 
Cooking (at all hours) is her specialty. 

"5/je could roasie and sethe and broile and frye, 
Mal^e a good soupe and tdcU bal^e a pye.' 

Vice-President of Bainonians. "Winter Term, '20; 
Graduate in Home Economics. '20. 



Jessie Creswell, B.A. 

Bainonian 
BLUEFIELD, WEST VIRGINIA 

In the activities of the class and college Jessie could 
always be counted on to do her part and more. As 
president of our class as Juniors, and as editor- in - 
chief of the Chilhowean. she opened our eyes to 
her "stick-to-i(-ive-ness." And now for her, with 
all her good traits, we see a great future, we are 
glad to relate. 

"Capable, dependable, and zealous !n every 
phase of our college existence." 

Secretary Suffrage Club, '17; Secretary of Soplio- 
more Class. '17-'18; Secretary Y. W. C. A.. 'IT-'IS; 
Devotional Chairman. '1S-'19; Delegate to T. W. 
Cabinet Convention at Lebanon, Tenn., 'IS ; Presi- 
dent of Virginians, 'l£i-'20 ; Editor-in-Chief Cen- 
tennial Chilhowean, '19 ; President Junior Class, 
'1S-'19; President Y. W. C. A.. '19-'20; Assistant in 
Preparatory, 'IS, '19, '20; Graduate in Expres- 
sion, '20. 



(48) 



THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 



Q= 



Senior Class 



Jason Basil Deyton, B.A. 

Alhenian 
FORBES, NORTH CAROLINA 

We can safely predict for Deyton a brilliant future. 
He is a quiet man, but one wbose intelligence is 
far superior to the average. We feel that he will 
be much in the public eye in the future as Judge 
of the Supreme Court of the United Stales. 

"The value of a man's life is measured in terms 
of action and idealism." 

President of L,aw Club. *1G-'17; Editor of Athenian. 
'17; President of Athenian. Winter Term. "20; 
Winne.r in Oratorical Contest. '17 ; Treasurer of 
Y. M. C. A.. 'l!)-'20; Debating Team. '20; Writer 
of Class Will, '20. 



Helen Rebecca Gamble, B.A. 

Bainonian 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Although Helen finishes at an age when most peo- 
ple are just entering college, she is one of the most 
brilliant students in the class. Luckily for the Class 
of 20, she lives close to the hill, and no matter 
how great the number of visitors she has, she aWays 
feeds them, and most of us have fond memories of 
"hot pie and milk' at Helen s. She can always 
furnish origmal ideas for stunts, and is a fine, good 
sport. 

"Her future is agloiv with possibilities." 

Vice-President Bainonian. Spring, "lit ; Bainonian 
Midwintrr Committee, '20. 




(49) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 
p 




Clc 



>enior L.lass 



Joel Samuel Georges. B.A. 

Alpha Sigma 
CLAREMONT, NORTH CAROLINA 

To know and know, and still not know enough; !o 
learn and learn, and still not learn enough — that's 
Joel. A keen, sharp mind and an ambition to use 
it to its uttermost have made Joel the smartest man 
of his class, its orator. Knowledge is his specially. 

''Experience, joined 'D>ilh common sense, 
To mortals is a providence." 

Class Orator; Class President. 'IT ; Class Football 
and Basketball, '17; Class Debate Coach. '17; 
School of Military Aeronautics. 'IS ; Aerial Observ- 
ers' School. 'IS ; Intercollegiate Debates. '16-' 17, 
'20; Mathematical Association of America, '19-'20. 



Mattie Hamilton, B.A. 

Bainonian 
MC KENZIE, TENNESSEE 

Maltie is one of those girls who is always on the 
job, working for the sake of work, yet knowing 
how to quit and go to play. Her favorite pastime 

is an occasional cup of coffee on evenings. 

She is large of heart and mind, and there is nothing 
she will not do for a friend. The problems of life 
will have few terrors for this mathematical maid. 

"IVhose inborn ivorlb her ads commend. 
Of gentle soul, to human race a friend." 

Secretary of Bainonian. Fall Term, 'IS; T. W. C. 
A. Cabinet. '1S-'19 ; Chairman of Junior Annual 
Committee. '19 ; Assistant in Physics. '1S-'19 ; As- 
sistant Instructor in Trigonometry, '19; Graduate 
in Expression, '20 ; Program Secretary of Bain- 
onian. Spring Term, '20. 



(50) 



THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 



Senior Class 



Hattie Irene Hayes. B.A. 

Bainonian 
WOODSTOCK, ALABAMA 

"Hat" IS a regular ray of sunshine — the kind of 
person that makes you feel belter when you meet 
her. She is always aglow with enthusiasm — the 
kind that kmdles the flame in others. Shine on, 
"Mascot," and brighten up your corner of the big 
wide world as you have our own college campus. 

"She gladdens our hearts TvUh music from her 
skillful fingers, and with the sunshine that ever 
lights her wa^." 

Vice-President of Alabama Club, '18 ; Bainonian 
Midwinter Committee. '19; Chilhowean Staff, '19; 
Secretary of Bainonian, Fall Term. '2 ; Vice- 
President of Equal Suffrage League, "20 ; Assistant 
in Piano, '20. 



Mary Louise Hayes. B.A. 

Bainonian 
WOODSTOCK, ALABAMA 

Of the "stalwart" Seniors, "Little Un" is the most 
enthusiastic over athletics. A ball game finds her 
on the spot. She is the smallest member of the 
class, but her size is not to be taken as an index to 
her capabilities. She is one of the most popular 
girls on the campus. "Little Un" says, "No spin- 
ster's life for me; I'll finish with an A.M. degree." 

"Small in stature, with a mind supreme, that 
l^noweth not the meaning of the Word impos- 
sible." 

Y. "W. C. A. Cabinet, '1S-'19; President Alabama 
Club. '1S-'19: Class Basketball. •1"-'19; Chilhowean 
Staff. '19: Editor Bainonian, Fall Term. "IS; Treas- 
urer Equal Suffrage League, '19-*20 ; Class Editor. 
'19-'20; Girls' Forensic League, '20; Chairman 
Senior Annual Committee ; Graduate in Expression, 
'20; Class Poet, '20. 




(51) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



3 




Senior Class 



Bessie Lee Henry, B.A. 

Theta Epsilon 
MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

If smiling brought riches, Bessie would be wealthy: 
but it brings dimples instead. She can do a host 
of things in excellent fashion, such as drive autos, 
act superbly, entertain, and make friends, lots of 
them. Always sunny and sensible, who can help 
loving her! Clouds often shade the brightest stars, 
but Bessie never. 

"She is as clear as morning roses, ncDj/p 

washed TDith deji>." 

Clulliowean Staff, '19; Secretary of Ctass, '1S-'19. 



Maude Clemence Hite, B.A. 

Theta Epsilon 
FAIRFIELD, VIRGINIA 



Be il what it may, Maude can and will do it. 
Always alert and ready to help others, she fills a 
useful place on College Hill. And with each task 
performed new friendships, too, are formed. She 
IS a real cosmopolitan. 



vhose keen ambition is to 



"Coot/, the more communicated. 
The more abundant gron>5. ' 

Vice-President of Y. W. C. A., 'IB-'IT; Secretary 
and Treasurer of International Prohibition Asso- 
ciation. 'lli-'17; Glee Club, '16-'17: Delegate to 
Blue Ridge Y. W. C. A. Conference. 'IS; Super- 
intendent nt Mission Extension, 'IT-'IS; Editor of 
Student Volunteer Band, 'IS-'ia: Theta Midwinter 
Committee 'I.S-'IH; Secretary-Treasurer of Student 
Volunteer Band. 'IT-'IS, '19-':0. 



(32) 



THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 



Q= 



Senior Class 



William Bryan Holmes, Jr., B.A. 

Athenian 
SPRINGVILLE, ALABAMA 

The "father" of the class has been vvilh us one 
year, and has done his best to make us laugh al 
all times. And though he is as solemn as a judge 
and seems grouchy, we know that underneath it all 
is an irrepressible sense of humor. We are sure 
that as a minister of the gospel he will accomplish 
much. 

"/f 15 not good thai man should live alone." 

Intercollegiate Debater "16. '17 (Captainf. IS. '20 
(Captain); Secretary Y. M. C. A.. "le-'lT: Presi- 
dent Athenian. Fall Term. '16; Winter Term, '17; 
Secretary Ministerial Association, '16-* 17. 



Stagey F. Howell, B.A. 

Alpha Sigma 
SNOW SHOE. PENNSYLVANIA 

"Slace" learns Chemistry as fast as he can talk, 
which is going some. He delights to tell of fierce 
snow storms, and laughs at the amount of snow that 
falls in Tennessee. His words and thoughts are set 
forth every week in the editorial column of the 
Echo. 

"I jvould rather maJ^e lelramethyl diamidobin- 
zophenone chloride than eat.' 

Class Basketball Team, '17. 'IS. '19; Vice-Presi- 
dent Alpha Sigma. Fall. 'IS ; Assistant in Chemis- 
try, '17-'18. '1S-'19; Editor-in-Chief of Highland 
Echo. ■19-'20. 




(53) 



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Minnie Anne Hunter. B.A. 

Theia Epsilon 
PINE KNOB, WEST VIRGINIA 

Minnie is the kind of girl who puis a lol of "pep" 
into everything she goes into. She is jolly, happy 
and enthusiastic, and is one of the most prominent 
figures in our lilerary, social and dramatic activities. 
She has a vast store of knowledge on every con- 
ceivable subject. 

''As Tvclcome as sunshine in everij place. 
So the beaming approach of a good-natured face." 

Secretary of Theta Epsilon. Winter, '17; Program 
Secretary Volunteer Band. '17-'1S; Vice-President 
Y. W. C. A., 'IS-'Uf; Delegate to Blue Ridge, 'IS; 
Chilhowean Staff, "19; (4) M. M. (4), 'IS; President 
Equal Suffrage League, Fall Term. '20; President 
Theta Epsilon, Fall. "20; Chairman Theta Epsilon, 
Midwinter, '20 ; Vice-President Class, '20 ; Assist- 
ant in Preparatory Mathematics, '19 ; Graduate in 
Expression, '20. 



Ernest Kelly James, B.A. 

Alpha Sigma 

MAPLE HILL, NORTH CAROLINA 

He does many things and was never known to fail 
in one. He would honor any profession, and we 
are expecting to hear big things from him some day. 
He was an aviator a year and got used to rising 
high. As in his aeroplane so in his profession, we 
know he will go up. 

''And tho' I hope nol hence unscathed to go. 
Who conquers me shall find a stubborn foe." 

Intereollegiate Debater and Captain of Teams, '15, 
■m. '17, 'IS. '19. '20; Varsity Football. '17-' 18, 
'19-'20; Captain of Team. '19-'2 0; President of 
Forensic League, '17-'1S; Secretary and Treasurer, 
'lii-'20; Class Treasurer, 'ItJ-'lT; Vice-President Y. 
M. C. A., '17-'1S; President Tarheel Club, '19-'20; 
Alpha Sigma President '19-' 2 0. Treasurer '17-' IS; 
Program Secretary and Critic, '16-'17; Assistant in 
Physics, '15-'16, '16-'17; Assistant Librarian, '17- 
'IS; Member of "M" club; Served in Air Service 
U. S. Army, Dec, "17, to Sept., '19. 



(54) 



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LiciA Johnson, B.A. 

Theta Epsilon 
GRAYSVILLE, TENNESSEE 

When things are dull on College Hill, "Jack" is 
always ready lo stir up something. In spite of the 
fact that she was voted the biggest vamp nmong the 
Seniors, she is a shark at mathematics and psychol- 
ogy. Enthusiasm — that's Jack all over! 

"Nothing great ivas ever achieved n>ithout 
enthusiasm." 

Secretary of Tlieta Epsilon. Winter. 'IS; A'ice- 
President Ecfual Suffrage League. '19; President 
Theta Epsilon. Fall Tt-rm. 'lIi-'20; Tlieta Epsilon 
Midwinter Committee. '19-'2 0; Vice-President Girls' 
Forensic League, '2 ; Assistant Psychology In- 
structor, '19-'20 : Intercollegiate Debater and Cap- 
tain of Team, '20. 



Tracy Fitch Knapp, B.A. 

Alpha Si§ma 
MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Although Tracy was originally a member of the 
Class of T6, and only joined us at the beginning 
of the winter term of our Senior year, he has be- 
come a live wire in the activities of the class. We 
are glad "Uncle Sam" kept him for us. "His sud- 
den coming here has doubled all our mirth and 
cheer." He is a man who does his part and more 
in any job he undertakes. 

"The elements are so mixed in him that Nature 
might stand up and say to all the ivorld, 'This 
was a man" 

Secretary of Alpha Sigma, 'l-J-'lo ; Collegia Orches- 
tra. •14-'15; U. S. Army. '17. 'IS. '19; Class Bas- 
ketball Team. '14-'15 ; Class Tennis, •14-"15; Senior 
Annual Committee. "20: Class Prophet. "2 0. (Two 
years, "13 and '14. at Olivet College. Olivet, Jlich. ) 




(55) 




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Helen Lewis, B.A. 

Bainonian 

CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

"Sonny" is rarely ever seen merely walking — unless 
she's moonshining — for she is an energetic, practical 
girl with a fixed purpose. She is quite capable of 
taking care of herself, and is always ready to help 
when called upon. 

"The purest treasure mortal times afford is a 
5po(/ess reputation." 



"IT; 
of 



Class 
Class, 
Chairman 
Assistant 



Member of Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '16- 
Debating: Team, "HI-'IT; Vice-President 
'17-*1S; Graduate in Expression. 'IS; 
Bainonian Midwinter Committee, *1S-'19 
Loan Library. "IS-'ig; Clerk in College Postoffice, 
'IS-'lft; Intercollegiate Debating Team. '1S-*19: As- 
sistant Instructor in Preparatory Eng-lish. '19-"20; 
President of Bainonian, Winter Term, '19-' 20. 



Mary Kate Lewis, B.A. 

Theta Epsilon 
CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 

When Mary Kate came to us from the Class of 
'19 her gentle dignity gained as Professor of Pre- 
paratory French filled us with awe; but we wel- 
comed her to our class, for we knew something or 
her worth. It would be useless for us to try to 
describe Mary Kate's many-sided personality. She 
can teach French, but she also displays great skill 



as matron, at volleyball, and in the art of moon- 
shining. 

"Rare compound of qualit}^ nohle and true. 
With plenty of sense and good humor, too. 

Class Editor, 'IS-'IG; Vice-President Sophomore 
Class, '16-'17: Secretary Theta Epsilon. '17; Theta 
Epsilon Midwinter Committee. '17-"1S, '18-'19; 
President Theta Epsilon, Spring and Fall. "IS; 
Assistant in Loan Library and Book Room. '16- 
■17 '17-' IS; Clerk in College Postoffice. '17-' 18; 
Vice-President Y. W. C. A.. '19-'20; Instructor in 
Preparatory French, '1S-"19, '20. 



(56) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Senior Class 



Rosa Emma Logan, B.A. 

Theta Epsilon 
PERSIA. TENNESSEE 

As every student should have a firm foundation, so 
every student body must have a founda'ion of solid 
folks who know the meaning of work. To this class 
Emma belongs. She is quiet, but still water runs 
deep. We can say of her that she is one of the 
most conscientious and consecrated members of the 
class. 

"Beauty of characier includes ever'^ good of 
Tvhicb the human heart can ^noiu. and maizes 
the iDoman who possesses it a princess in 
Israel.'' 

Freshman, Greensboro College for Women, Greens- 
boro. N. C. ; Instructor in Preparatory Mathemat- 
ics, '19-'20. 



Vera Cleo McCampbelu B.A. 

Bainonian 
KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Vera is quiet, but she is always bright and happy. 
System is Vera. She believes in having a place for 
everything and everything in its place. The neat- 
ness of her person and her room is a revelation. 
Her steadiness and helpfulness have been an exam- 
ple to us, and we expect for her a bright future. 

"She comes to us a seeder of l^nowledge ; 
She goes as a lover of duty. 
An honor to her Alma Maler.'* 




(57) 




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Addie M. McCurry, B.A. 

Bainonian 
MOSHEIM, TENNESSEE 

When "Mac" was counling her honors she said the 
greatest one was a passing grade in trig. She never 
lets her studies interfere with her education and 
cuts more classes than anybody m school. In fact, 
she's out for a good lime and feels it her duly to 
share her good limes with others. We are glad she 
Ukes Maryville College better than Berea. 

"Addie is herself — Ti>hai more could n»e desire?' 

Berea. 'lf]-'17; Greene County Club; K. K. Club; 
Appalachian Club. 



WiLLODINE McIVER, B.A. 

Bainonian 
CORDELE, GEORGIA 

Yes, Georgia, spelled in capital letters, is "Billie's" 
home. She came to us from Cox College in the fall 
of 18, and we can't imagine how we ever did with- 
out her when we were Freshies. Who wants to 
start an argument on "keeping the niggers in their 
place"? Just go to Billie. She's also famed for 
those "boxes from home," and we believe that next 
year Georgia will be glad to have a good cook 
return from Tennessee — and not only Georgia, but 
someone else will be glad. 

"Happiness is cheaper than n}orr}}, so wh\) pa\f 
the higher price?" 

Cox College, '16-'17; Class Basketball. '1S-'19; 
Secretary, Editor of Georgia Club, '19; Class Poet. 
'18-'19; President of K. K., '19; Editor of Bain- 
onian. Fall Term, '19; Society Reporter for High- 
land Echo, '19-'20. 



(58) 



THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 



CL 



Senior Class 



James Martin, B.A. 

Athenian 
MANSFIELD, OHIO 

Jimmie is a diligent, hard-working student. He is 
always on time and is the cause of others being on 
time. He will make a great ladies' man when his 
latent powers of moonshining are developed. 

"Some people thinly that hccause I Tvear specs I 
on/i; care for learning; 
Yet all the time ml; ardent heart Tvilh seniimeni is 
yearning." 



Winston Cordelia Newton. B.A. 

Bainonian 
HARRIMAN, TENNESSEE 

Music hath charms to please, and Winston is full 
of It. In each are nameless graces in which no 
methods teach. There is music wherever harmony 
is, and Winston is m charming harmony with all 
the world. Her every grace, her features, and her 
ways form a truly tuneful melody. 

"Cod sent his singers upon earth 
With songs of sadness and of mirth. 
Thai they might touch the hearts of men, 
And bring them bacf^ to heaven again." 

y, W. C. A. Cabinet. '16-'17; Class Basketliall 
Team, '17, '18, '19; Member of Girls' Quartette. 
'IS, '19. '20; Certificate in Red Cross First Aid, 
'17; Vice-President Bainonians. Fall. *19: Vice- 
President Suffrage League. Fall, '19; Graduate in 
Voice. Fall, '19; Chilhowean Staff. '19; Secretary 
Equal Suffrage League, Fall. '20; President Equal 
Suffrage League, Winter, '20; Assistant in Voice, 
'20; President of Bainonian. Spring Term. '20. 




(59) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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>enior ^^lass 



Cerena Polk, B.A. 

Bainonian 
MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Cerena is a girl who can do anything^an asset to 
any group. She reads well, plays v/cU, studies well 
— oh, everything! She brings joy to the hearts of 
all the faculty, and as a result has been made class 
orator. No one ever deserved an honor more than 
she deserves this. The whole class is proud of you, 
Cerena. Co on to still higher things! 

"She's a sharl( — enojgh said." 



Elma Aletha Purdy, B,A. 

Theta Epsilon 
MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Among Aletha's many accomplishments her ability 
lo make pies and doughnuts excels. One thing is 
sure— she has the key to some man's heart. She 
leads a rather calm and retired life, but we are 
sure that with her sunny disposition she will make 
a host of friends wherever she goes. 

"She thinl(s without confusion, clearly. 
Loves her felloivmen sincerely. 
Ads from honest motives purely" 



(60) 



THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 



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Senior Class 



Madrith Jeanette Purdy, B.A. 

Thela Epsilon 

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

Purdy has a force of character such as Js seldom 
seen. She knows how to get things done, and is a 
dandy member of the cats commillee. She has en- 
deared herself to all her classmates and is just a 
treasure. 

"Almost to all things she coulJ turn her hand." 
Class Basltetball, 'lit; Member of Ohio Club. 



Frances Catherine Ridgwav, B.A. 

Theta Epsilon 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

Katie is a native of Alabama, Florida and Georgia, 
and seems to like Tennessee just as well as any 
place. From her fertile brain come a large number 
of class stunts which she thinks of in psychology 
class. She look the course of psychology and philos- 
ophy, and is seldom seen in class. She is one of 
the most important members of the Alligator Family 
and has great fame in the way of feeds. 

"Her coming here has doubled all out mirlh and 
cheer." 

Stetson University. '16-' 17; Class Basketball. 'IS. 
"19; Captain Class Basketball. '19; Varsity Squad. 
'IS, "19. '20; Secretary Theta Epsilon. Fall Term. 
'18; Secretary Florida Club. '20; Secretary Class. 
'20; Member Athletic Board of Control. '20; Man- 
ager Girls' Basketball Team, '20; Theta Epsilon 
Midwinter Committee. '20; President of Theta Ep- 
silon, Spring^ Term. '20. 




(61) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Senior Class 



Thomas Philip Sheffey, B.A. 

Alpha Sigma 
MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE 

"Oh, yes, I 11 be glad lo do anything I can to help," 
is Phil's most frequent expression. A truer, steadier 
man you'll never find. 'Tis a pleasure to meet him, 
although you meet him twenty times a day. 

"To J^noTV him is lo Irusl him." 



Ugee Stump, B.A. 

Bainonian 
FLATWOODS, WEST VIRGINIA 

Ugee is just a fine, grand old girl. She's always 
ready to take part in anything from a midnight feed 
to a Y. W. C. A. meeting. Expression is her long 
suit, and we only wish we had dis-.overed her talent 
before we did. Most people think Ugee extremely 
quiet, but she is an ideal listener. 

"Those ivho paint her truest praise her most." 
Vice-President Bainonian, Spring Tfim, '20. 



(62) 



THE CHILHOWEAN^ 1920 




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senior L^iass 



Helen Bond Tedford, B.A. 

Bainonian 

CONCORD, TENNESSEE 

We were afraid we had lost Helen for a while, 
for she left us with the idea of training for the 
profession of nursing; but she says the guy that first 
called sick folks "patients made a mistake, so she 
decided to come back to M. C, where there is 
more health and less storm. We were glad, for her 
ready wil and good humor are a source of constant 
enjoyment. 

"A cheerful disposilion is a fund of reacl^ capital." 



Genevieve A. Tetedoux, B.A. 

Theta Epsilon 
NORWOOD, OHIO 

Gen has joined us quite recently, and we are 
glad to have her. She is an A-No. 1 stenographer 
and makes use of her talent wherever possible. Her 
opinions are not scattered lavishly and, therefore, 
are prized greatly. She is lovable, earnest and 
conscientious — a joy to us all. 

"To l^norv her is lo love her." 

Vice-President Tiieta Epsilon, Winter Term. '19; 
Treasurer Ohio Club. 'IS-'IS. 




(63) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Mary Estelle Thompson, B.A. 

Bainonian 
SALEM. INDIANA 

'Tis strange how so small a girl can have so big a 
heart. Mary is just a little, sweet, unaffected, un- 
pretentious girl, grown sensible and splendidly seri- 
ous. All who know her love her, and she is very 
well known. 

"To be good is lo he happ]) ; angels 
Are happier than manl^ini] because ihe^ are heller." 



Team. 



■ri- y. w. ( 
'IG, 'IT, 'ly. 



■1G-'17; Class Basketball 



Homer George Weisbecker, B.A. 

Alpha Sigma 
FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 

"Weisie" is the kind of fellow it does you good to 
meet. His smile is just about as broad as any you 
ever saw. He is an all-around athlete — football, 
basketball and baseball ; Weisie stars in them all. 
His popularity is attested by his many friends. He 
has borne the responsibility of Senior treasurer ad- 
mirably, and just ask anyone who has collected odd 
cents from forty-five more or less "broke" Seniors if 
there is any fun in it. 

"The cheerful grin ivill let you in 
Where the ^nocl^er is never J^noivn." 

Prize Essay, 'If; ; President of Indiana Club, '16- 
'17 : Intercollegiate Debating Team, '19 ; "Winner in 
M. B. Hunter Gold Medal Oratorical Contest, '19; 
Prtsident of Yanlvee Club. '19 ; Vesper Choir, '17- 
'19; College Male Quartette. '19; All Class Teams 
frnm 'IC to "20; Varsity Baseball, '19; Varsity 
Football, '19; Varsity Basketball, *17, 'IS. '19; Ten- 
nis, '19 ; Coach of Girls' Varsity Basketball and 
Tennis. '16. '17. '19, '20; Coach of Boys' Basket- 
ball. '19; Physical Director, '15-'20; Class Treas- 
urer. '19-'20; U. S. Navy, '1S-"19; Debate. ■19-'20; 
Piesident Alpha Sigma, Fall '19; Y. M. C. A. Cabi- 
net, '17-'1S. 



(64) 



THE CHILHOWEAN 



Q. 





MONG the number who came to us from the 
Centennial Class were two who could remain in 
the Class of '20 for the fall term alone — Andrew 
Thomas Norgan, of Drunmore, Pa., and Thomas Lamar 
McConnell, of Maryville, Tenn. We were sorry to lose 
them and have missed them frequently since they left. To 
these men the Class of '20 says: We were glad to have 
you one short term, and while we know it would not be 
fair to expect you to love our class as you loved your own, 
still we hope you do not regret having been with us. In 
future years, when you have climbed to great heights of 
fame, every member of the M. C. Class of '20 will be 
sending you thoughts of good will and be able to say: "We 
wish you bon voyage. Go on to higher things." 



(65) 




THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 



senior r oem 



Seems all dark, O Class of Twenty? 

Light is just ahead; 
Life and light all is not night, 

Wisdom light will shed. 
Nobly you've been fighting 

Battles not forgot; 
Prepare still to fight, with a goal in sight, 

No matter what your lot. 

Morning breaks, O Class of Twenty! 

Early wake and strive 
In life's hard race, where'er your place, 

Be first at the goal to arrive. 
Make that goal, O Senior, 

One that's worth your while; 
And work with your might, from morning till night, 

Though you must run many a mile. 

Some things wait. O Class of Twenty, 

For you alone to do ; 
Do all with great zest; you'll be a success 

If you keep steadfast and true. 
To you your Alma Mater 

Has given her very best 
Ideals noble and pure, and you may be sure 

She expects you to do the rest. 




(66) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




'^' 




Senior Statistics 



Favorite Teacher Dr. Barnes 

Favorite Study English 

Smoke 12 Per Cent 

Swear 20 Per Cent 

Chew 20 Per Cent 

Average Age 22 

Average Height 5 Feet 5 Inches 

Average Weight 124 

Average Yearly Expense $385.00 

Favorite Type of Person BRUNETfE 

Chief Amusement Movies 

Most Useful to M. C Helen Lewis 

Favorite Game Tennis 

Heaviest Eater Bill Holmes 

Best Football Player E. K. JaMES 

Best Basketball Player Horace BrOWN 

Best Baseball Player WeiSBECKER 

Best-Dressed Girl .... Aletha Purdy or Mattie Hamilton 

Handsomest Man Fred Cagle 

Best All 'Round Winston Newton 

Most Dignified IrrOVIA CorrY 

Most Eccentric EmMA LoCAN 

Luckiest Dexter Cox 

Best Business Man George Callahan 

Best Chinese Athlete T. Z. Chang 

Best-Dressed Man Bob Belt 

Man with Biggest Head Bill Holmes 



(67) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



Man wilh Biggest Feet E. K. James 

^'"'^*' Tracy Knapp or Hattie Hayes 

Biggest Brag Horace Brown 

Sw«'es' Irrovia Corry 

Most Intellectual MiLDRED CaMPBELL 

Most Influential £ ]< j^mes 

Biggest Vamp L,c,a Johnson 

Most Practical Mary Kate Lewis 

Neatest Madrith Purdy 

Most Timid UcEE Stump 

Prettiest HELiN Tedford 

Most Unassuming .... Vera McCampbell 

Most Accomplished Theist James Martin 

Most Optimistic Mary Thompson 

Strongest Convictions . . Genevieve Tetedoux 

Best Girl Athlete Catherine Ridcway 

Biggest Tightwad George Callahan 

Quietest Mary Creswell 

Most Modest Helen Gamble 

Most Popular Mary Louise Hayes 

Laziest BiLL HoLMES 

Best Writer Stacy HowelL 

Best Morally Jessie Creswell 

Strongest Suffragette ...... MlNNlE HuNTER 

Biggest Talker Maude Hite 

Most Original WiLLODINE McIvER 




(68) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




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THE CHILHOWEAH, 1920 



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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Junior Class Officers 



Martha Robison 

President 

Birmingham, Alabama 



Jarvis Cotton 

Vice-Presidenl 

Birminoham, Alabama 



Lamar S. Wilson 

Treasurer 

Maryville, Tennessee 



Marguerite Sullinger 

Secrelar}) 

Maiyville, Tennessee 



Frances Hickey 

Ediior 

Jonesboro, Tennessee 



(72) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Junior Class 



Blanche Bailey 
Baileyton, Tenn. 

Lola Frances Beeler 
Powder Springs, Tenn. 



Delemo Beard 
Slanlon. Va. 

Jessie Brown 
Cleveland. Tenn. 



LuciLE Carter 
Philadelphia, Tenn. 

Ruth Clayton 
West Union, Ohio 



(73) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Junior Class 



Hazel Frances Cleveland 
Salem, N. Y. 

Marian Krespach 
Princeton, N. J. 



Leslie E. Davidson 
Harriman, Tenn. 

Elsie Dawson 
Knoxviile, Tenn. 



Ethel Doctor 
Lonsdale, R. L 

Carl Domiano 
Binghampton, N. Y. 



(74) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





unior v^iass 



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Louise Duncum 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

Moss Farmer 
McKee, Ky. 



Apdie Fine 
Dandndge, Tenn. 

Troy Haddox 
Maryville, Tenn. 



X'lviAN Hall 
Lynnville, Tenn. 

\'ouNC Hayes 
Woodstock, Ala. 



(75) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




unior v^iass 



Clc 



JeaNNETTE HlBBERT 

Maryville, Tenn. 

Helen Horton 
Harnman, Tenn. 



Jessie Johnson 
Athens, Tenn. 

Meade M. Johnson 
Maryville, Tenn. 



Marjorie Llovd 
Fredonla, Ky. 

Ernest E. Loft 
London, England 



(76) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 19W 





Junior Class 



RoLLiN Marquis 
Wycliff, Ohio 

Margaret McSpadden 
Concord, Tenn. 



LeRoY MlDDLETON 

San Angelo, Texas 

Carolyn Nelson 
Assumption, 111. 



Sue Nuchols 
Cleburne, Texas 

Mary Mason 
Woodstock, Ala. 



(77) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



=P 




Junior Class 



George Hillary Parks 
Culleoka, Tenn. 

George Puch 
Asheville, N. C. 



Myrtle G. Rendon 
Las Vegas, N. Mex. 

Anna Sharpe 
Knoxville, Tenn. 



Samuel Peters 
Friendsviile, Tenn. 

Oscar Stanton 
Marshall, N. C. 



(78) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





Harry Wagner 
Portsmouth, Ohio 



Mildred Striplin 
Huntsville, Ala. 



Floyd Watt 
Loudon, Tenn 



(With Apologies to Thomas Gray) 

The curfew lolls the knell of parting day; 

The tired Junior Class says, "How can it be 
Thai we have no time taken for play. 

Should have yet so much to do? Dear me!" 

Now fades from out iheir grasp ball games 
galore ; 

Moonshine for them no strong attraction holds. 
And all the pleasures that they loved before 

Are swept aside when they their task behold. 

Save the fun that they can so well evoke 
From photos gay and solemn m their turn. 

Of such as ne'er before were put in book. 
And not again shall some that merit earn. 

Beneath these various facts they can see. 

With all exterior laid aside. 
The Impulses noble of the souls so free. 

That from the world their talenis cannot hide. 

Thus with new strength the class takes up its 
work. 

And, all inspired, this task they do complete. 
Record the deeds of those who never shirk; 

Success foretell, that shall them ever greet. 

A. L. F., -21. 



(79) 




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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Oh, it's great to be a Senior, 

With your head a-towering high! 

And that a Juniors dignified 
There's no one will deny. 

The Freshie, too, is nice and sweet. 

And green as woods in May; 
But the jolly "Soph,' he has em beat 

On any summer's day. 

He laughs and the world laughs with him. 

She never weeps at all; 
They're out for fun and they get it, 

Whichever way things may fall. 

Not even Seniors daunt "em. 

And Juniors never try; 
While moonshine laws, 'tho like the Medes', 

They manage to get by. 

All hail the dear old Sophies! 

The bunch that's out for fun. 
Where things are doing, work or play. 

You'll find 'em everyone. 



(84) 



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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





Freshmen! Freshmen! 

^1 ERE we are! See us! Hear us! Look at us! Did you ever see such a clas-; 
as the Class of '23 with its 223 members? We have come from all over these 
United States of ours — from the seashores of Florida; from the cotton fields of 
Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia; from the bluegrass reg;ons of Kentucky; from the 
historic Carolines and Virginia; from Maryland and across the dashmg Ohio; from the 
rich oil fields of Pennsylvania; from conservative New Jersey; from busy, bustling New 
Yoivk ; from the boisterous Atlantic, on beyond the rolling waters of the Mississippi far 
into the prairies of the West; from the grassy plains of Texas; from mountainous Colo- 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 ^ 

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rado; from blizzardy Missouri; from the great corn belts of Illinois and Iowa; even from 
the sun-kissed plains of New Mexico; and from all parts of our own dear Tennessee. 

'We are proud of our large class, but we are even prouder of the fact that our class 
is such a good all-'round one. "i'ou will find us on the football field, on the basketball 
court, on the baseball d:amond — in fact, the Freshmen are sure to be found where there 
is any kind of athletics. Then, too, you will find us among the debaters, in the choir. 
in the crchesira ; yea, you will find us even among the moonshiners. 

We know that the next three years hold much in store for us, and it is with glad 
hearts that we look toward the future. 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



£> 






Class Officers 



Leslie Jones 
President 



Elizabeth Bassel 
Vice-President 



Florence Oats 
Secretary 



Howard McGrath 



Treasurer 



Porter Turner 
Assistant Treasurer 



^Alice Andes 
Editor 

*Deceased 







(92) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Freshman Class Roll 



BuNNiE Abbott 

LUTRELLA AhLER 

Ruth Allen 
Ann Alred 
Alice Andes 
Barriel Arellano 
Elijah Armstrong 
Ralph Armstrong 
J. Carr Arnett 
Herrick Arnold 
Amarine Atkins 
Nelle Baker 
Mabel Baker 
Ruth Baker 
Paul Barker 
Elizabeth Bassel 
Emma R. Beauchamp 
Florence Beecham 
Richard Bechk 
James J. Bevan 
Mary Bicelow 
Hunter Bills 
Grace Blank 
Mary Broady 
Leota Brown 
Cora Burchfiel 
Francis Bush 
Lenna Bowers 
Edith Brocklehurst 
Roy Buffat 
Mable Burns 
LuciLE Campbell 
Lennie Carter 
Emert Caton 
Bessie Carden 
Edgar Cathey 
Robbye Cheshier 
Boyd Chitwcod 
Conley Clark 
Mack Clark 
Emma Christmas 
Mary E. Clemonts 
Stella Combs 
Mildred Copenhaver 
Henry Cox 
William Cox 
Nell Collins 
Imogene Copeland 
Hattie Cox 
Ida Cox 

Lawrence Crawford 
woodworth cullis 
Sam Cross 
Robert Deadmon 



Mary Denney 
Llcretia Dorsey 
Ethel M. DeHaven 
Anne Dorsey 
Chas. Ellis 
Ernest Eddincton 
May Fisher 
Louise Farrar 
Mary Flenniken 
Ruth Gamble 
Irma Gamble 
John Garner 
Mable Gentry 
Travis Gibson 
George Gillespie 
Elizabeth Gouffon 
Ray Griffits 
Reuel Gorham 
Freeman Greene 
Gaynell Griffits 
Lowell L. Hackler 
Samuel Hall 
Mary Hamilton 
Josephine Hamilton 
Lilah Hembrey 
Johnnie Henry 
Lee Roy Herndon 
Una Haggard 
Anna B. Hamilton 
Beulah Hatchett 
Owen Henderson 
John Hendrick 
Pedro Hernandez 
Mamie Sue Hicks 
Comer Hoskins 
Erma Jean Hicks 
LiNA Hodges 
Ben Houston 
Mary Howard 
LiLLis Huffman 
Harrv Howard 
Vance Hudgens 
Grace Huffstetter 
Margaret Huston 
Abbie Hutsell 
Nell Hunter 
Gladys Hutcheson 
Themis Hutsell 
Cora Ingle 
Elizabeth Irwin 
James |ackson 
Nell Johnson 
Grace Johnston 
August L. Johnston 
Andrew Janovi^zky 
Mary Jones 
Leslie Jones 
Rex King 



Sibyl King 
Bernice Kimble 
James King 
Robert King 
Allie Kjrby 
Etoyle Lackey 
Melvin Lawson 
Acnes Lewis 
Wallace Legc 
Lloyd Llewellyn 
Blanche Lowry 
Marie Lowry 
Vergil McClung 
J. Lynn McClung 
Roy McCall 
John McConkey 
Carl McCollouch 
Aline McCullough 
Howard McGrath 
Charles McMillan 
LuciLE McLain 
Margaret McMillan 
Robert McNutt 
Grace McNutt 
Mary McSpadden 
Gertrude March 
Edgar Martin 
Esther Miller 
Arthur Milling 
Helen Morrow 
Ruel Murphy 
T. J. Marler 
Alverrene Matlock 
H. S. Montgomery 
Jennie Montgomery 
John Moss, Jr. 
William Montgomery 
Herbert Nace 
Margaret Newell 
Ruth Newton 
Greer Nichols 
Nellie Neel 
Virginia Nicely 
Florence Oates 
Frank Gates 
Anita Odell 
Geraldine Odell 
Gladys Ogle 
Ralph Ogan 
H. L. Owens 
LuciLE Phelps 
Leslie Poe 
Charles Poe 
Robert Phillips 
Sina B. Parrott 
Ruth Parham 
Nina Parks 
Lela Post 



Ruth K. Quinn 
Reva Rankin 
Helen Rankin 
Lauf.a Reed 
Mary Ridgway 
Fount Robinson 
Geraldine Rousseau 
Reba Roberts 
Vivian Rochester 
Lynne Russel 
Charles Sharp 

FloBART Sh.ELDS 

Margerite Staley 
L\uRA Stevens 
Clyde Stevenson 
Claude Stokes 
Sue Sugg 
Julian Sullivan 
Anne Samsel 
Ethel Sharp 
Ruth Sloan 
Clara Bell Smith 
Eugene Stanberry 
Jewel Stevens 
Ruth E. Still 
Virginia D. Striblinc 
Howard Sullinger 
Ethel Swindler 
Donald Taylor 
Carrie Taylor 
Stella Taylor 
Craig Tedford 
Ruth Tedford 
loNNiE Trotter 
Porter Turner 
DeWitt Tucker 
Mildred Tillery 
Mary Underwood 
Elsie Van Ness 
Mary Boyd Walker 
Oma Walker 
Myrle Walker 
Ruth White 
Mable Williams 
Louisa Winn 
Decatur Waddell 
Clyde Watkins 
Elizabeth Whitlock 
Clyde Wilson 
Helen Wood 
Mary Ross Watson 
Ro^coE Watkins 
Mabel Zimmerman 



(93) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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FRESHMAN GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM 




FRESHMAN BOYS' BASKETBALL TEAM 
(94) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





(95) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(96) 



Book III 

The 

Depart 

ments 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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"PREPS" 




(99) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Senior Preps 



Colors: White and Gold 



Moilo; Nllor in Adversum 



Flower: Lily 



Officers 

Sam Franklin President 

Emily Fowler Vlce-PresiJer,! 

Horace Moore Secretary, 

David King Treasurer 

Lawrence Kennedy Editor 



Palmam Qui Meruit Ferat 



Sam Franklin 
David King, Alternate 



Bertha Russel 
Mattie Hodges, Alternate 



Burr Bassel 
Hazel Bevan 
Beatrice Brown 
Clyde Capps 
Shell Clevenger 
Harry Collier 
Susie Copeland 
Floyd Corry 
Emmett Cortner 
Hugh Coulter 
Rosa Lee Crews 
Lillian Dunlap 
Blanche Fowler 
Emily Fowler 
Vernon Fowler 
Sam Franklin 
Ella Fudge 
George Hamby 
Nell Hamilton 
Lillian Hodges 



Members 

Mattie Hodges 
Gladys Jackson 
Bert Jody 
Alice Johnson 
Lawrence Kennedy 
David King 
Bessie Lee Kirby 
Beulah Kitrell 
Elizabeth Lingle 
Margaret Drake 
Isabelle Lowe 
Reba McCollum 
Ruby McCollum 
Mary McGahhey 
Susie McGikley 
Elizabeth McGinley 
Mabel McKelvey 

JOHNNYE McMuRRAY 

Malcolm Miles 
Robert Milling 
Blanche Moore 



Horace Moore 
Lawrence Moore 
Eva Morelock 
John Nuckols 
Christine Painter 
Elizabeth Preston 
Ruth Reagan 
Bertha Russell 
Annie Lee Roberson 
Cora Saville 
Leo Seaton 
Harry Simpson 
zolton szilagyi 
Eunice Taylor 

EULA TiLLERY 

Mary Tippet 
Charles Walthen 
Alene Watson 
Matilda Williams 
Alice Wheeler 



(101) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



Class History of 1920 




N the year 1916, early in September, there set sail over the Sea of Knowledge 
a magnificent fleet proudly bearing the floatmg banners of Orange and Garnet. 
This fleet was headed for a far and distant country called the Land of Grad- 
uation, which could be reached only after a long voyage of four years. 

Some of the voyage was understood to be very hard and difficult, and under some 
very cross and saucy commanders. Other parts of the voyage would be pleasant and 
smooth sailing. This route was much traveled, but was to them unknown sea. There 
were the four isles — First Prep and Second Prep, or the land of wise fools ; Third Prep 
and Seniors, or the habitation of owls — to be thoroughly explored before reaching their 
destination. 

The crew on board the vessel was composed of sixty-one hopeful boys and girls from 
eight states, each firmly resolved to succeed or go down with the ship. 

Here we first became aware of our existence as a potential factor in life at Maryville 
College. We now began to realize that we had duties and responsibilities as well as 
privileges. We early decided to be peaceful and friendly toward one another. 

Our class has put out some of the most efficient athletes on the hill, and is represented 
in the Junior Forensic League by three of our most distinguished members — Franklin, 
King, and Corry. 

We have always had the spirit for the upbuilding of Maryville College, the finisher 
of our preparatory career. As Senior Preps, we do not claim any honors, of course, 
notwithstanding the fact that we are the most brilliant class ever graduated by our esteemed 
faculty. 

"Not enjoyment and not sorrow 
Is our destined end and way, 
, ■ But to act that each tomorrow 

Fmds us farther than today." 



(102) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





(103) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




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(103) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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SECOND PREPARATORY CLASS 

- Second Year Preparatory 

Officers 

Clay Leguire President 

Joseph Gamble Vice-President 

Ruth Ellis Editor 

Verne Benfield Treasurer 



(106) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




WHERE WE LIVE 
(108) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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OTHER 

DEPART 

MENTS 




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(103) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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GIRL5' gUAKTETTE 




BOYS QUARTETTE 
(115) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(116) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 








The Department of Expression and Public Speaking 
Graduate Recitals 

•The Land of Heart's Desire" . . . Yeals MlLDRED Campbell 

"The Servant of the House" .... Kennedy Irrovia Corry 

"Happiness" /. HarlU^ Manners Jessie Cresswell 

"Experience" Hobart Mattie Hamilton 

"Peg o' My Heart" J- Hartley Manners Mary Louise Hayes 

"Sherwood," Act I Car^ford Minnie Hunter 

"Mary Rose of Miflin" R"TH QuiNN 

Oration Horace Brown 



(117) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(118) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 

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Graduates in Home Economics 



Blanche Baily 

Mary Cresswell 



Leola Davis 
Helen Deal 



Louise Duncum 
Margaret Graham 



Idella Hemphill 
Oramantor Striplin 



Margaret McSpadden 



(120) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





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(121) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(122) 



Book IV 

Athletics 




THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 





(125) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



3 




Jarvis Cotton 

Halfback 

He rings the beil at 
150. Smiles good- 
naturedly and has a 
regular different 
laugh. After work- 
ing hard severa 
years, Jarvis became 
a varsity man this 
year and put forth 
the pluck of the 
American boy agamst 
odds. He plays 
half, and specializes 
in diving through in- 
terference for tackles. 
We are expecting big 
things next year. 
Cotton. 



"Woodward Cullis 

End 

We will venture lo 
say he is even now 
ringing the moon- 
shine bell. Cotton 
and Cullis room to- 
gether — that's why 
we put them on the 
same page. His given 
weight is 155. "Ad" 
came to us from the 
University of Chat- 
tanooga, and was a 
brilliant performer at 
end the whole year 
through. He works 
hard, is gritty, and 
enjoys running down 
the field with recov- 
ered fumbles. He 
will shine — - some 
more. 



Edward Cullis 

Halfback 

This lad. with the other one above, "Ad," completes the Cullis 
brothers' combination. This is Maryville's first brolher combination 
in a good many years, and we are wishing it more successful seasons. 
Ed ploughs through tackle and takes them low like the back he is. 



(126) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Leslie Davidson 

Halfback 

Have you ever seen 
a pacer travel ? 
when Davy 
gets those white an- 
kle bandages on and 
gets a-going, he ful- 
fills the travel part, 
if not the pacer. 
Davy tips the beam 
at 150. He was a 
little late getting 
started this year, but 
we know he's getting 
ready even now for 
next. 



"Watch that boy." 
We want to call 
someone good, so we 
are gomg to call 
Hobart. He was a 
power in the line, 
and could be elected 
to the peerage. 

Weight. 165. Sec- 
ond year on varsity. 
Good news: There 
are more to come. 



Edward Jellicorse 

Fullback 

We can say that "Jelly" is the man of the bunch, and we are going 
to petition the juvenile court to have that name changed to "horse. ' 
Many a one has said, "He has more natural football ability than 
anyone I've seen in a long lime." Heavyweight No. 1 — 200 pounds. 
Second year on varsity. Caplain for next year. 



(127) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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F. McLaughlin 

Center 

Behold our playing 
manager. Mac has 
tossed that ball back 
from center for sev- 
eral years and he's 
perfectly at home at 
it. Mac was an ac- 
curate passer, an ag- 
gressive charger, and 
broke through the 
opposition for manv 
tackles. Weight. 180. 
His last year for the 
Orange and Garnet 
he has served so 
long. 



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Meade Johnson 

Tacl^le 

\X^e present for your 
approval, men of the 
hall, smiling Meade 
Johnson. Meade was 
a valuable asset at 
left tackle, for all 
hke the fellows who 
have fight and more 
fight. Heavyweight 
No. 2—190 pounds. 
Next year, as man- 
ager, he expects to 
complete his third 
year for M. C. 



Edward Moore 

End 

Above you will find a picture of the tall boy of our squad, Mr. Ed 
Moore. He's a good fellow — we'll all say — and what more can be 
asked for on this hill that we call college home? We will add, though, 
that he's a good football player and just delights in hauling in long 
passes. Weight 155 pounds. This is Ed's first year, he having been 
across the waters, but there's much in store for him. 



(128) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





From ihe way ihis 
fellow plays (he 
game you would 
think he came from 
the largest Cleveland 
m the country. Sully 
was great, and he 
finished several games 
when it took sand to 
keep going. This 
picture has been ap- 
proved, so we will 
write below the 
weight — 175 pounds. 
What a line M. C. 
will have next year 

with men like this lo 

build on! 



1 Iakhv Wagner 

Halfback 

Being generous in 
your time, pause here 
for the last of a 
quartet of halfbacks. 
This IS "Wags'* 
second enlist- 
ment, and his game 
was open-field run- 
ning. Weight. 160. 
Characteristic, laugh- 
ter. An old-timer 
we a-'c counting on 
to help agam. 



Homer Weisbecker 

Quarterback 

We have sized off, and "Shorty" comes last, 
"outfit." but even now it is being replaced by 
at the game, but a trained gymnast, he took h' 
the team well. "S" stands for "Shorty ' and 
We are with you Seniors of the squad. 



This is a good-looking 

cap and gown. New 

old at quarter and ran 

Speed." Weight, 145. 



(129) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(130) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Football Scores 

Maryville 2; University of Tennessee .... 32 

Maiyville 32; Cumberland University 3 

Maryville 14; Oglethorpe University 7 

Maryville 7; Georgetown 13 

Maryville 49; Emory and Henry 12 

Maryville 0; Tusculum 



103 



67 



The Season of 1919 




HE central part of iKe front page of the first Echo of ihe year was filled with an article 
headed, "Prospects for a Champion Football Team Are Good." 

Coach H. W. Feeman came to Maryville as athletic director, and with "Doc " at the 
lead enthusiasm ran high. "Jimmy" James was elected to the captaincy to pilot the team 
through, and he did, and the seaeon was under way. 

1 he openmg practice found perhaps the largest and ablest squad out on the athle'ic field working 
for the team that had ever been there. With James, Jellicorse, Johnson, Norgan, McLaughlin, David- 
son, Fulloch. Foid. Wagner, and Hayes returning from the service after experience on former varsity 
ele\ens; and McCall. Hicks, and Cotton from the S. A. T. C. team. Coach Feeman had a wealth of 
material in experienced football men. New men in the squad fought hard for places, while injuries, 
especially to Tulloch, Hayes, and Hicks, eliminated some of the old men. New ones were the Cullis 
brothers. Moore, and Sullivan, as worthy actors for the Orange and Garnet. 

Every person on the "hill" squared away for the University of Tennessee game. A half-holiday was 
declaied, and a trainload of students journeyed to Knoxville and Walt Field. Tennessee won. 32 to 2. 
Superior weight and practice gave them a decided advantage. Maryville played hard and Maryville 
rooters completely outyelled the Stale's supporters. But still Tennessee won. 

The first home game was with Cumberland University. Completely outmatching the visitors, Mary- 
ville won, 32 to 3. Cumberland's score will long be remembered by the almost perfect dropkick by 
their fullback from beyond the 35-yard line. It was in this game that the strong points of the team 
showed to advantage — Jellicorse with his end runs, Ed Cullis and Cotton with off-tackle plays, and 
Ford and Ad Cultis m the Ime. Weisbecker. new at the game, here worked well at qua-ter. 

The next week found Maryville facing the University of Oglethorpe. The Petrels had been going 
strong, and the Atlanta papers were boosting them as a great team. They were, and a great game fol- 
lowed. Maryville outclassed them throughout and won, 14 to 7. It was splendid football, with not a 
fumble on either side; not a substitution for Maryville, and but one for Oglethorpe. We can slill see 
Cullis receiving that pass and carrying It across, and Weisbecker, with a tie score, running the ball back 
on a punl some sixty-five yards to the goal and to victory, and Knox, Oglethorpe full, racing through the 
entire team on a kick-off for a touchdown. The game was indeed a thriller, and the bonfire and snake 
dance that occurred that night on the "hill " was a complete one in celebration of victory. 

Maryville faced Georgetown the next Saturday — Georgetown, next in Kentucky after Centre Col- 
lege; Georsetown. with its wonderful interference. A hard struggle followed, with Georgetown win- 
ning, 13 to 7. 

Emory and Henry came from Virginia the next week, but being considerably outweighed, they were 
snowed under, 49 to 12. During this game the best open field running of the year was shown by 
Maryville backs- — Jellicorse. Wagner, and Davidson. 

And then Tusculum. Well, it was at Tusculum, and the score, 0-0, shows the kind of a game it 
was. The fight was there, as "Ignatz" would say. Tusculum, with many old-timers back from the 
service, was reputed to have its best team. Too much cannot be said for the old reliables in this game— 
Jellicorse, with his punting and running that made him feared by every team he faced; Cotton, with his 
playing that marks him a real halfback; Ford and Sullivan, for that old fight In the line; Cullis, for the 
splendid way he finished the season on end. 

And there 5 a host of other good ones, all good fellows, and they gave Maryville a good team and 
a successful season. 



(131) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(132) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Wearers of "M" Sweaters 



"Jimmy" James, Captain 
"Sully" Sullivan 

"Weisy" Weisbecker 
"Jelly" Jellicorse 
"Ad" Cullis 

"Ed" Cullis 

"Mac" McLaughlin 

"Slim" Moore 

"Wag" Wagner 

"Jarvis" Cotton 

"Meade" Johnson 

"Davy" Davidson 
"Ford" Ford 



(133) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(134) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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'lilar,cK,& Bade)) Capt. 
forward 




Mafjory Lloyi 
Center 



Elsieliawsoii 
Forwari 




Goralrvgle 

Guard' 




(136) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Girls' Basketball 



cOili ^ ^^^ beginning of the basketball season this year there was more real enthusiasm 
than had ever been shown before at Maryville. The new material, with a few- 
old players, enabled Maryville to put cut one of the strongest teams in her 
history. This success can in a large measure be credited to the untiring loyalty and efforts 
of the girls of the squad. The team was able to beat all opponents from "Sunny Ten- 
nessee," and lost but ons game, t'lat to Martha Washington College, a Virginia girls' 
school. Our antagonist and bitter opponent, the University of Tennessee, suffered two 
overwhelming defeats. Two trips were taken during the season, one to Kentucky and 
the other to Virginia. 

All credit and honor is due to the girls of the team, who were recognized as in a 
class by themselves when the whistle started the ball in play. Els:e Dawson and Blanche 
Bailey, as forwards, showed speed and steadiness and scored heavily in all of the gam;s. 
Marjorie Lloyd, at center, was a power of aggressiveness and always outplayed her 
opposing center. When the ball changed to the opposition's territory the hearts of the 
Maryville bleacherites held steady, for with strength and skillful passwork, Cora Ingls 
and Anne Samsel, as guards, made it d fficult for the opposing forward to score. 



Scores 

Maryland 22; Young High School 3 

Maryville 19; Cumberland College 6 

Maryville 12; Cumberland College 7 

Maryville 18; Union College 11 

Maryville 34; University of Tennessee 6 

Mary\ille 23; University of Tennessee 9 

Maryville 9; Martha Washington 13 

Maryville 26; Tusculum 3 

Maryville 8; Marlha Washington 7 



Wearers of the "M" 

Ho.MtR Weisbecker Coach 



Catherine Ridceway Manager 

Blanche B/iley, Caplain .... FormarJ 
Elsie Dawson Forward 



Marjorie Lloyd Cenfer 

Anne Samsel Guard 

Cora Ingle Guard 



(137) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(138) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(140) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Basketball 




AR^'VILLE can well be proud of the record of her team in 1920. During 

the first week of varsity practice it was noticed that some ten or twelve men 

seemed evenly matched in ability. From these the team was gradually shaped 

by Coach Feeman, and Maryville began what was undoubtedly its best season 

with its best team. 

At one time the Southern Intercollegiate Championship was at stake in the Vander- 
bilt gam;, and perhaps if that game had been played the next n'ght in that large gym, 
when the Highlanders defeated the Ramblers, who had beaten Vanderbilt, maybe the 
championship flag would have floated over College Hill. Nuf sed! 

Prominent among victories were those over Centre College, University of Tennessee, 
and the Ramblers of Nashville Y. M. C. A. 

Manager Horace Brown arranged a trip to Kentucky, playing there Berea, Centre, 
University of Kentucky, and Union; and another trip to Middle Tennessee, playing 
there Vanderbilt, Nashville Y. M. C. A., and Middle Tennesses Normal. On each 
trip but one game was lost. 

In Carter, center, Maryville found its first really great center. Tall, consistent, 
aggressive, a splendid basket-shooter, he proved the cog long needed for a topnotch team. 
Maryville has long been favored with forwards. At this position was Captain Wagner, 
a veteran and a general of passing and floor work; Cotton, another veteran and steady 
goal-thrower and all-around man; and Hendricks, a Nashville High School star, whose 
strongest point was ringing them m. For guards, Cullis and Montgomery worked to 
bring comment in nearly every game on every court. It has been claimed they have been 
unequaled here in many seasons. Cullis comes from the University of Chattanooga; 
Montgomery was a guard for three years on one of Ohio's best high school teams. 

It was a great season. Coach Feeman can be complimented on the success of the 
team. The men will all likely return next year, and with the old fellowship, pep and 
basketball we look to I 92 1 . 

Basketball Scores 

Maryville 45; Carson and Newman 22 

Maryville 40; Johnson Colleg; 26 

Maryville 23 : University of Tennessee .... 43 

Maryville 22; Berea 12 

Maryville 28; Centre 25 

Maryville 16; Kentucky Slate 27 



Maryville 32; Union 

Maryville 24; Tusculum 



26 
30 



M 



aryviile 



10; Vanderbilt 22 



Maryville 26; Nashville Y. M. C. A. . . 

Maryville 37; Knoxville Y. M. C. A. . 

Maryville 33; Tusculum 

Maryville 41; Middle Tennessee Normal 

Maryville 24; University of Tennessee 



20 
19 

15 
26 
11 



Carter 



Cotton 



406 326 

Won 10; Lost 4. 

Wearers of the "M" 

Cullis Hendricks Montgomery \^'agner 

(141) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




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(142) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Baseball in 1 9 I 9 




I 1 H die winter season here at the time of this writing, we can only lo^k back- 
WErd to last year's team, and then again forward to this year's. Maryvijle had 
a succes.'^ul season last year, even though Lincoln Memorial came here and won 
the Eastern Tennessee Championship. A splendid winning streak was developed in the 
middle of the season and eight straight games were won. Prospects were splendid for a 
complete victory over University of Tennessee, but the "dope" was upset when they won 
bo;h games played. 

Weisbecker and McLaughlin proved the mainstays in t'.ie box, bcth men turning in 
for Maryville some pretty victories. 

Even now, at the close of the February meetmgs, the fans are talking baseball. Of 
the old men, Lowry, Ruble, Davidson, Weisbecker, and Wagner are on the "hill " 
again, and there are many accounts of new men who are past masters at the gam;. After 
such successful football and basketball seasons, we arc confident that Comnsncement 
Day will find Coach Feeman with a winning club. 



Season of 1919 

Maryville 9; Hiwassee 

Maryville 13; Tennessee Military Institute ... 9 

Maryville 0; Lincoln Memorial University ... 19 

0; Lincoln Memorial University ... 6 



Maryville 
Maryville 
Maryville 



12; Milligan 6 

3; Milligan 1 

Maryville 5; Emory and Henry 4 

Maryville 0; Emory and Henry 7 

Maryville 12; Georgetown 1 

Maryville I ; Emory and Henry 2 

Maryville 7; Tusculum 4 

Maryville 4; Tusculum 

Maryville 7; Milligan 4 

Maryville 1 ; Milligan 

Maryville 6; Lincoln Memorial University ... 3 

Maryville 3; Lincoln Memorial University ... 12 

Maryville 5; University of Tennessee .... 6 

Maryville 4; University of Tennessee .... 9 



Letter Men 

LowRY. Captain Weisbecker Davipson King Cortn'er Ruble 

McLaughlin Pucn Flowe Wagner 



(MB) 



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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(l-H) 



BookV 

Organi- 
zations 




THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 





\ Organizations 



(147) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




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Y.W^.C.A 





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Senior Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 

Jessie Cresswell PresiJcnl 

Mary Kate Lewis Vice-President 

Mary Bigelow Secretary 

Grace Sydenstricker Treasurer 

Helen Horton Eiiior 

Martha Robinson Program Secretary 

Ruth Newton Music Chairman 

Mary Mason Social Chairman 

Florence Oates Bible S(uJj) Chairman 

Ethel Doctor Mission SluJ^ Chairman 

Bernice Jones Librarian 

Bernice K.IMBLE Association Nems Chairman 

(l-t8) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





Junior Y. W. Cabinet 

Rebecca Calderwood . . President 

Nina Belle Caldwell Vice-Presidenl 

Marjorie Llovd Secretary 

Christine Copeland Treasurer 

Imocene Copeland Devotional Chairman 

Agnes Lewis Mission StuJv Chairman 

Hazel Bevan ... Editor 

Mary Eroady Bible Study Chairman 

Nannette Walker Music Study Chairman 

Eunice Taylor Social Chairman 



(149) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



M 



Y. W. C. A. 




HE year '19-'20 marks the beginning of a new century of 
M. C. It also marks the growth and the division of the 
Y. W. C. A. into a Junior and Senior organization. 

The reason for separating this great Chns'.ian association was to 
give the younger girls a chance to participate in weekly meetings. 

But this does not tend to sever their bond of fellowship. Each 
night both Senior and Junior girls meet in groups for Scriplure reading 
and prayer. This is an entirely new movement, and it is the hope of 
the girls that it will be mac'e permanent. Each morning they meet in 
one group for thanksgiving and to ask for guidance through the 
coming day. 

The Mission Study Class meets weekly, and is led by Miss Ethel 
Fanson. This meeting draws the girls closer to the great Teacher and 
creates in them a desire to follow His example by helping others, for 
"God had an only Son, and He was a missionary and teacher." 

As for the social life, the Y. W. affords for the girls various kinds 
of entertainments, such as hikes and "know-your-ne ghbor" parties. 
Other than this, the association furnishes the students with at least one 
recital of outside talent, besides the ones given by the Expression and 
Music Departments. This year Miss Hortense Neilson entertained us 
in her highly dramatic fashion, while the Expression Department pre- 
sented 'Prunella," directed by Mrs. West. 



(150) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(151) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 

Officers 

Harry W. Wagner PresiJenl 

Forrest D. Brown Vicc-PresiJenl 

George B. Callahan Secrelarp 

Jason B. Deyton Treasurer 

Committee Chairmen 

Oscar Stanton Membership 

E. Frank Cody Devotional 

Frank S. Minarik Evangelical 

George D. Howell Bible SluJy 

A. Woodward Cullis Social 

Percy W. Buchanan Music 

Lee R. Herndon EJilorial 



(152) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 

q — _— __ 



Young Men's Christian Association 

Much of the Christian wcrk on College Hill is carried on under the auspices of the 
Y. M. C. A. This year many religious movements have been earned on for the advance- 
ment of the Kingdom of God and for the strengthening and upbuilding of Christian 
character. Several different kinds of Christian activities have been promoted by the Y. M. 
C. A. in order to enlist as many young men as possible in active Christian work and to 
create a Christian atmosphere, by which the entire hill has been benefited. It is the aim 
of the organization to make Christianity really mean something to those who are conscien- 
tiously endeavoring to do something for those about them and for Christ, and to cultivate 
habits of usefulness which will be of service in future life. 

INNER CIRCLES 

Small prayer circles have been organized on all the floors of Carnegie Hall. Each 
night when the lights flash the young men from three or four rooms get together for a short 
time to pray and to read and study a portion of God's Word. Each group has its own 
leader, and the Leader to whom all look for strength and guidance is Jesus Christ. The 
purpose of the inner circles is to become better acquainted with each other, with our Bible 
and with Jesus, and to draw each member nearer to God. 

BIBLE DISCUSSION GROUPS 

Each flocr in Carnegie Hall constitutes a group, and another group is made up of 
young men rooming in town. The latter group has its meetings in the reading room of 
Bartlett Hall, while the other groups have their meetings in some room on their respective 
floors in Carnegie Hall. These groups meet each Sunday morning for Bible reading, 
prayer, and a short discussion of some phase of Christian life. 

LEADERS TRAINING CONFERENCE 

In connection with the Bible discussion groups, the leaders and the assistants of all 
the groups mset on Friday nights for a short conference. The purpose of the conference 
is to prepare for the discussion which takes place in each of the groups on the followng 
Sunday morning. Dr. Stevenson, the college pastor, leads the conference and offers 
practical suggestions and helpful hints which encourage, stimulate and promote a closer 
relationship among the leaders, which in turn is passed on to those attending the discus- 
sions on Sunday morning. Also, any puzzling problems which arise during the group 
discussions and are not settled are brought to this conference for settlement and for 
further discussion. 

(153) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



=P 



SUNDAY AFTERNOON MEETINGS 

These meetings have been unusually good this year because of the many varied and 
very interesting topics discussed by the best whose service we could secure. That the 
meetings have been good is evident from the large number who have attended these meet- 
ings each Sunday afternoon. These meetings are made entertainmg and attractive, as 
well as instructive and helpful, by the musical numbers rendered, by the variety of sub- 
jects handled, and by the complete change of program and leader each week. 

Y. M. C. A. STORE 

In addition to the reading room, in which are placed several current magazines, papers 
and books, a special inducement has been introduced in the Y. M. C. A. building in 
order to draw the young men to the Y. M. C. A., instead of going to town to loaf. This 
special attraction is the Y. M. C. A. store, which is operated under the auspices of the 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. The purpose of the store is to supply the young men with the 
things which they would otherwise go to town to secure. 




(154) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(155) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Standing (Left to Riohi) : Mr. Cole, Second Tenor; Mr. Obermever, First Tenor; Mr. Hinken, 

Second Bass. 
Sitting: Rev. Melvin Trottfr, the Leader of Meetings, and HoMER HamMONTREE, Song Leader 

and Soloist. 



The February Meeting 




HE February meeting is the one thing in which all the religious organizations of the hill unite 
each year. This year, when everything else is unusual in that it is exceptionally good — the 
enrollment the largest yet, athletics the most successful — it is no surprise that the February 
meetings should be the best in many a year. Early in the term Dr. Wilson asked Mr. 
Hammontree if he could come and lead (he singing during the meetings, and lo! he not only came, but 
biought with him Mel Trotter, the noted evangelist; the American Quartette, and Dick Oliver, pianist. 
With such a corps of enthusiastic and efficient Christian workers, all of whom are deeply consecrated 
and in close communion with God, the college and even the town was mightily moved. The old chapel 
was packed as it had never been before, extra seals were placed in every concer.able place, and yet by 
the time the services began at night there was not even standing room for the eager throng. 

The music was one noteworthy feature of the meetings. "Dick ' is a skillful musician, trained as a 
concert pianist, who has dedicated his talent to the service of God. To hear him play "Rock of Ages" 



(156) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



0= 




or "Jesus, Savior, Pilot Me" was a sermon In llsclf. His accompanimtn's made bolli ihc special music 
and the congregational singing full of life and spirit. Homer Hammonlree is a graduate of the college 
and closely in touch with it yet, and knew exactly what songs were needed and how to make us sing 
them. He had boys and girls who had not sung this year singing heartily "Brig'iten the Corner Where 
You Are," "Saved by His Hand," and "Sweeter as the Years Go By." His solo work was especially 
enjoyed, loo. The "American Four" sang the gospel story into our hearts. We could have listened for 

hours while they sang, "Still With Thee." or 
"Jesus, Lover of My Soul." And as Mr. Trotter 
s.iid, "They were shaik; for personal work, every 
one of them." They w-nt about it in a sensible, 
ma:tcr-of-fact way t'lat opened our eyes and made 
many of us wlio had never dared do such a thing 
before learn the joy of helping bring a soul to 
Christ. 

"Mel" Trotter won ihe hearts of the students 
the first night — his strong, earnest personality won 
their admiration; his message, burning with denunc:a- 
tion of all sin and love for God, caused many to 
slop and take slock of lh:lr lives and find ojt 
exactly where they stood. He put old truths in 
original ways which opened up tSeir true meaning 
to us. Some of his savings keep ring ng in our ears: 
"You can't go far unless you have the real stuff. 
"It is as divine to laugH as to cry." 
"Why halt ye between two opinions? A halting 
man has no opinion." 

"The gospel is ahead of every new moveaient; 
it always leads; it never drags." 

"God is the source of all revivals; revivals can t 
be v/orked up." 

"There is no short cut to righteousness. 
"There will be no good people. Heaven is made 
up of redeemed sinners. 
"The gospel I preach is not a flabby gospel; it is not a ch<ap gospel. It costs to live right. But 
how much more it costs to live wrong! 

"God has no terms to offer; you cannot compromise with Him; you must make an unconditional 
surrender." 

"Do you know that God is lonely for real fellowship? Just love Him sometimes. He is hungry 
for love.' 

"God is an addition, not a subtraction. ' 

Just as nations use the year of Christ's birth from which to dale their records, so many people will 
date events in their lives from the February meetings of 1920, for there they met Jesus face to face and 
became intimately acquainted with Him, whom to know aright is life everlasting. The cards showed 
that over four hundred made decisions during the meetings, over two hundred of which were deciding 
for Christ for the first time. The others were reconsecrating their lives to Him who came to give them 
abundant life. The increased importance that ihe student body as a whole places on prayer and Bible 
study, and the eagerness with which it attends Dr. Stevenson's classes on how to live the Christian life, 
shows how deeply it has been moved. None of us can ever tell just how great has been the influence 
of this year's February meetings. 




"Dicic" Oliver, Accompanist 



(157) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(158) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(159) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Molto: Malthew 20:28 



Ministerial Association 



Slogan: College Hill for Christ 



True Grealness Lies in Service 



Floyd Watt . . 
Harry W. Wagner 
George D. Howell . 

Armstrong 

Barker 

Beard 

BUFFAT 

Chilton 
Cox 



Reverend S. T. 
Reverend C. H. 
Reverend W. P 
Reverend W. E 



Officers 

PrcsiJt-nl Thomas B. Vance .... Vke-Presidenl 

. Secreiar\)-Treasurer James L. Jackson Editor 

. . Program SecrclarX) Reuel H. GorhaM . . . Supl. of A/i'ssion.s 

Members 

Cody King Montgomery 

Friedman Loft Rowan 

Hoch McCurry Waddell 

Holmes McGrath Weisbecker 

Howard McMahon Wilson 

Janoviczky Martin, E. Winters 

Johnstone Martin, J. 

Honorary Members 

Wilson, D.D. 



Gillingham, D.D. 
Stevenson, D.D. 
Graham, D.D. 



Professor Jason G. Purdy 
Professor Robert C. Jones 
Professor Horace E. Orr 



(16C) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





(161) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 






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(162) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 ^ 



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Alpha Sigma 




IS this year, 1919-'20, the one hundred and first year of Maryville College, has 
ly been in many respects the greatest in its history, so, too, it has been one of the 
^ ^ greatest years of the Alpha Sigma Literary Society. S.nce its organization in 
I ttbi the influence of the society has steadily increased in college affairs, and the climax 
has been reached this year. In every phase of college activity the spirit of the Alpha 
Sigmas has been felt. 

In its every undertaking the society has brought more honor on itself. The yearly 
midwinters are the most conspicuous criteria that show publicly the progress and efficiency 
of work of literary societies. The Alpha Sigma midwinter, "The Man Without a 
Country," set a high mark in the history of the college for such occasions. And in other 
phases of college work the Alpha Sigmas have shown their worth. On all athletic teams, 
in the religious and literary work of the college we have had our full share of repre- 
sentatives. They all have added to the reputation of the society. 

There is a deep spirit of union and comradeship existing among the members of the 
society. We have been jealous of our choice of new men; and we older ones who are 
soon to leave the society know surely that its traditions are in the hands of a splendid 
sort of vigorous, zealous, clean, active men, who will bear its standard still higher in the 
years to come. We would not forget our sister society, the Theta Epsilons. Their 
co-operation made possible the success of our midwinter; it is to them we are indebted 
for new furnishings in our hall ; and the feeling of relationship to them has made us more 
eager to keep our society at the very peak. 

Then forward, Alpha Sigma! Your traditions are rich with the deeds of those ^^•ho 
have gone before; you stand now at the highest step so far attained; and there are still 
higher steps beyond that await you. Strive to ascend and you will ascend in your striving. 



(163) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(164) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Athenian Literary Society 




Officers 

Fall Term Winter 1 erm 
F. S. MlNARlK President J, Deyton 

M. Farmer Vice-PresiJent L. Herndon 

p. Buchanan Secretar\) A. Johnston 

F. Watt Treasurer F. Watt 

HROUGHOUT i's long histcry the Athenian Literary Society stands second 
to none. In every activity for the last fifty-two years the Ath:nians have played 
an honorable part. Among its graduates are the most honored of Maryville's 
men. Among its present members are leaders of merit in many college activities. 

The year of accomplishment has been followed by the year of progress. At the 
beginning of the year there were only a few members back on the "Hill," but due to the 
energy and enthusiasm of these the membership of the society more than doubled. At 
the annual camp fire, held at "Uncle Joe Mcllvain's," a never-to-be-forgotten scene was 
witnessed when six'y-five acknowledged their allegiance to the Athenian Literary Society. 
Remarkable progress was evidenced as the annual midwinter placed these men in the 
limelight. With practically all new men, the society staged Drinkwater's stupendous 
production, "Abraham Lincoln," in a manner that will be remembered by all who saw 
the simplicity, the impartiality and the magnanimity of "Abe" as drawn by the great 
English playwright. Such a midwinter could not help but be a success, and it was from 
every point of view. The play was presented without a flaw; the audience was held in 
breathless suspense from the first word to the last. When the curtain fell on the last 
tragic scene — the aesassinaticn of Lincoln — the audience knew that they had seen a 
masterpiece. 

Progress, too, has been made in the annual oratorical contest. At the close of the 
Centennial year, Mr. C. T. French, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, donated a gold medal 
as a prize in the field of oratory. The first contest is to be held this year. The Junior 
Athenians were also recipients of a prize — "The Parks Prize" — donated by H. Parks, 
of Harriman, Tennessee. Thus a new stimulus was given to both societies. The success 
of the year's work is due in no small measure to the co-operation of the Juniors. 

The remarkable progress of the Athenian this year is due to the democratic spirit and 
the good-fellowship pursued by its officers and members. The society has striven con- 
sistently to overcome petty, selfish politics that makes college activities close activities. 
The society stands for freedom in every activity. This policy has produced the man 
invaluable in Maryville College ideals; it has taught the conditions of real world prob- 
lems, and how the Maryville man must meet them. The society has interwoven the inter- 



ests of its members with the interests of the college, and there has been created 



the 



mind of everyone the need of honoring Alma Mater. The members of the Athenian 
stand shoulder to shoulder to uphold the college's traditions; they stand ready to defend 
its honor on the forensic platform. The society goes forward, never to let the intellectual 
light kindled by its honored members grow dim, never to let the glory of our Alma Mater 
sink into oblivion. 



(165) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Bainonian Literary Society 

In this year, the first year of a new century of the college, Bain- 
onian has kept pace with the unusual growth of the college. 

Her membership has increased greatly. With new life comes new 
interest and new inspiration ; this has been manifested in the interesting 
programs which have been rendered weekly. 

Bainonian has a complex aim. She seeks to promote the love of 
literary work, an ability to appear in public, and good fellowship 
among her members. 

Her spirit, which upholds only that which is noble, embodies itself 
in the hearts of her members and points out to them the way for better 
and higher service in the world. 



(166) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 











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THE CHILHOWEAK 1920 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 



Theta Epsilon 




HETA EPSILON, the society of "eloquent sitters," is indeed worthy of its 
name. One of the virtues of the ancient Greeks was their eloquence. A'thou^h 
centuries separate the ancient Greeks from our society of today, yel the old 
Greek ideals still linger with us and are epitomized in our name. 

The enrollment this year of one hundred and fifty-six members far exceeds any pre- 
vious year. Not only has the society grown in number, but in strength, knowledge and 
fellowship with one another. Every Theta is ready and willing to help a sister Theta 
over some difficult path. Loyalty is indeed our motto. Each year brings added strength, 
new ideals and nobler work. 

One important feature which cannot be overlooked is the excellent co-operation of 
the members. This is shown by the weekly meeting. The programs have been wide- 
awake and helpful. Every girl has felt it her duty to see that at least her part of the 
prog.am was carried out successfully. 

The annual midwinter this year was a presentation of "Armageddon." This play 
dealt with one of the biggest issues of the recent war — with one of the many questions 
ih^ war propounded — that had to be answered: Had we the right to take revenge for 
admitted atrocities? The chief aim of the play was to show the emotions and powers 
t'-at \veve behind the war. Each player showed an unusual amount of dramatic power. 

What can claunt our efforts with such prospects before us? Think you that we, 
with a membership composed cf a goodly number of accomplished musicians and readers, 
to say nothing of the artists and writers, have any cause to doubt our future strength? 

The question of every girl is: "What have I done for Theta?" First, I have attended 
regularly. I have responded to every call of Theta for help. "What has Theta done 
for me?" Increased my general knowledge and understanding; given me a deeper insight 
into the lives of those around me, and has given me a lasting fellowship with my sister 
Thetps. 



fl70) 



THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 « 




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(171) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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r orensic League 



Officers of Boys' Forensic League 

Oscar Stanton PraiJenl E. K.. James .... Secretary and Treasurer 

Jas. B. Devton Vice-PresiJenl Prof. E. R. Hunter , Facuh\) Represenlalive 



HE Forensic League, organized to stimulate a deeper interest in debate and to 
effect a response to this interest, is a leading factor in the discovery and develop- 
ment of forensic talent on the "Hill." This year, Prof. Hunter, representing 
the league, effected an Intercollegiate Forensic League, composed of several colleges and 
universities of Virginia and Tennessee, which guarantees as many contests as the college 
can afford. In accordance with this arrangement, a triangular debate was arranged with 
Tusculum and Emory and Henry, and a dual debate with Lincoln Memsrial University. 
For these debates sixteen men were chosen from upwards of fifty candidates who debated 
in the preliminaries. 

The subject for the triangular debate was the immigration question, Maryville win- 
ning both decisions. The affirmative team, composed of W. B. Holmes (captain), 
Herrick Arnold, Ralph Ogan, and Homer Weisbecker (alternate), debated Tusculum 
on the home floor. The negative team, composed of E. K. James (captain), Oscar 
Stanton, Frank Minarik, Morgan Cox (clternate), debated Emory and Henry at Emory. 

The subject for the dual debate is governmsnt ownerih.p and operation of coal mines. 
The affirmative will be upheld on the home floor by Jascn B. Deyton (captain), James 
Martin, Thomas Vance, and R. A. Armstrong (alternate), while Joel S. Georges 
(captain), F. Cody, Charles McClure, and Forrest Brown (alternate), will uphold the 
negative at Harrogate. We are warranted in feeling confident that two more decisions 
will be added to the long list of victories won since the organization of the league. 

In the fall of 1919 a movement was started among the girls to organize for work in 
debating. From this developed the Girls' Forensic League. Arrangements have been 
made by the coach. Prof. Hunter, for a double debate with Tusculum on April 26. A 
subject of international interest has been agreed uprn: "Resolved, That England Should 
Recognize Ireland as an Independent Nation." 

The affirmative team is composed of Licia Johnson (csptain), Ruth McCall, Edith 
Moore, and Janet Ensign (alternate); the negati\e, Mildred CampbsU (captain), Mary 
Louise Hayes, Bernice Kimball, and Josephine Hamilton (alternate). 

Much enthusiasm has been aroused, as is shown by the number of contestants in the 
preliminary and from the fact that the members of the league represent every college class. 

The officers of the Junior Forensic League are: Edward Hargraves, president; 
Verton Queener, vice-president; Sam Franklin, Jr., secretary; Cazwell Johnstone, editor. 
This league was organized for the promotion of oratory and debate in the Preparatory 
Department. A dual debate has been arranged with the Preparatory Department of 
Tusculum College. The teams for this debate are as follows: Affirmative — Sam 
Franklin, Jr. (captain), Verton Queener, Charles Maye, Floyd Corry (alternate). 
Negative — Cazwell Johnstone (captain), David King, David Friedman, Edward Har- 
graves (alternate). 

(172) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 








TRIANGULAR DEBATES, AFFIRMATIVE TEAM 




TRIANGULAR DEBATES, NEGATIN'E TEAM 
(173) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




DUAL DEBATERS, AFFIRMATIVE TEAM 




DUAL DEBATERS, NEGATIVE TEAM 

(174) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





GIRLS FORENSIC LEAGUE, AFFIRMATIVE TEAM 




GIRLS FORENSIC LEAGUE, NEGATIVE TEAM 
(175) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




PREPARATORY FORENSIC LEAGUE, AFFIRMATIVE TEAM 




PREPARATORY FORENSIC LEAGUE, NEGATIVE TEAM 
(176) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




l\EhOklERS 



LESLIE JONES 

General 
LEE HERNDON 
Y. M. C. A. 
HELEN HORTON 
V. W. C. A. 
WILLODINE McIVBlt 
Society 
JANET ENSIGN 
Society 
PORTER TURNER 
Alphia Sigma 
RUTH QUINN 
Ttieta Epsiloii 
ELIZABETH WHIT- 
LOCK 
Bainonian 
JAMES MARTIN 
Athenian 
MART LOUISE HAYES 
Senior 
FRANCIS HICKEY 
Junior 
JANET ENSIGN 

Sopliomore 

ALY'CE ANDES 

Freshman 



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ATHENIANS PRf- 

SENI MIOWINIfR 




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(NiLISH AND BIBU IIS IN BA>Ktl6AU t.i)INl. lu VOU: t-SiliSI AP«U 2 tOMIS PREPIEAltlfS 



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]77) 




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(178) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



^W' "' ^^ 




Chilhowean Staff 

Martha Elizabeth Robison 
EJitor-in-Cblcf 



Helen Horton Oscar Stanton 

Associate Editors 

Lamar S. Wilson 
Business Manager 

Jarvis Cotton Ray Foster 

Advertising Managers 

Francis Hickey 
Art Editor 

Harry Wagner 
Athletic Editor 

Louise Duncum 
Department Editor 



Elsie Dawson 



Young Hayes 
Organization Editors 



Mary Mason 



Jeannette Hibbert Marguerite Sullinger 

Photographic Editors 



(179) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(180) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





*^LUBS»* 



(181) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




"at the polls at last" 



Equal Suffrage League 

Countersign: Se;ame Cherchez la Femme Emblem: Lilies 

Officers 

Winston Newton President 

Hattie Hayes Vice-PresiJcnl 

LiciA Johnson Secretary 

Mary Louise Hayes Treasurer 

Josephine Hamilton Editor 

Members 

Mildred Campbell Frances Hickey Margaret Newell 

LuciLE Carter Mildred Hoffman Winston Newton 

Ethel Doctor Helen Horton Florence Oates 

Vivian Hall Minnie Hunter - Helen Park 

Anna Blanche Hamilton Margaret Huston Martha Robison 

Josephine Hamilton Licia Johnson Myrtle Rendon 

Hattie Hayes Bernice Jones Elizabeth Whitlock 

Mary Louise Hayes Mary Mason Manie Witherspoon 

(182) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Law Club 

FIoTvcr : Knowledge Motto: Honesty Is the Best Policy 

Simultaneous with the organization of school, the future Supreme Justices met and reorganized the 
Law Club. Whereas, we had the following officers the fall term: 

Oscar Stanton President 

Harry Pearson Vice-PreiiJent 

Frank. Minarik Secreiary-Treaiurer 

Hammond Fowler Editor 

Charles Edgemon Program Secretary 

After the holidays the Law Club began another successful term with the following officers: 

Charles Poe President 

Harry Pearson Vice-President 

Frank Minarik 5ccrc(arj)- Treasurer 

Verton Queener Editor 

Edward Hargraves Program Sccretar]) 

Members 

Harry Pearson T. Z. Chang Charles Poe Eugene Stanberry 

Verton Queener Jason Deyton Ernest James Charles Nace 

Karl Kirkpatrick Oscar Stanton Mason Mann Isaac Husky 

Lynn Ryburn Frank Minarik Charles Edgemon Edward Harcr.4Ves 

Moss Farmer Verne Benfield 

(183) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 






Agricultural Club 

Flower: Ragweed Motto: "Get the Rag Out" 

Officers 

F. A. Greene President 

E. D. Armstrong Vice-President 

Lee Herndon Secretary-Treasurer 

Samuel L. Peters Editor 

Members 

E. D. Armstrong Lowell Hackler 

Fred Cagle Owen Henderson 

C. E. Cathey Lee Roy Hernton 

Hunter Bills C. S. McCullough 

Charles Ellis Samuel E. Peters 

Pascal Fields Robert Phllipps 

F. A. Greene Cr.Aic Te:ford 

Prof. James Vincent Hopkins 

(184) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




i^j 




The Chemistry Club 

Officers 

Ray Foster PresiJent 

George H. Park Vice-PresiJenl 

Chester A. Osborn Secretary-Treasurer 

Frank Minarick Program Secretary 

Oscar Stanton EJilor 

Members 

Robert Belt Moss Farmer Carrie Nelson 

George B. Callahan Stacey F. Howell Martha E. Robison 

Jarvis Cotton Charlotte Messler Catherine Ridgway 

Associate Members 

Herrick Arnold 
Leslie Jones 

(185) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Alabama Club 



Colors: Red and While 
Sorg : "DreaiTiing 



Alaba 



James Jackson . . . 
Mildred Stripun . . 

Le^ia Ware 
Donald Jones 
LuciLE Hodges 
Clyde Counts 
LiDA Carroll 
Ruby Carroll 
Lennie Carter 
Young Hayes 
Nelle Gray 



Officers 

. . President Geraldine Odell . 

Vice-President J. Lynn McClunc 

Members 



Molio: "Here We Rest" 
Flontir: Goldenrod 



. Treasurer 
Secretary) and Editor 



Etna Harris 
LuciLE Harris 
Hattie Hayes 
Guy Counts 

LlNA HOLGES 

Daisy Keys 

Mae Keys 
Mary Blackwell 
Lenard Cooper 



RusKiN Hall 
Mary Louise Haves 
Susie Whillock 
Idella Hemphill 
Alverene Matlock 
Addie Roberscn 
Mary Mason 
Annie Roberson 
Geraldine Rou.-.seau 



Nello Austin 
M:TrvE Stovall 
Martha Robison 
Teuton Selman 
Oramantor Striplin 
Donald Taylor 
Alice Gerber 

LOREL WhITWORTH 

Gertrude Counts 



(186) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



Q= 







Arkansas Club 
Officers 

Laura Stevens PresiJenl 

Mary Hamilton Vke-PreslJenl 

Greer Nichols Sccreiar\) and Treasurer 

Jewell Stevens Editor 

Members 

Nell Hamilton Maynard Dunn Emma Gram 

Ada Roberts Sallfe Huffaker Robbye Cheshier 

(187) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



Motto: 

Look Out 



S Flower: 
/HouatainLduret 




Chattanooga Club 



=0 



Officers 

WooDWORTH CuLLIs PresiJenI 

Margaret Huston Vice-PrcslJcnl 

Margaret Newell Secretary-Editor 

Janet Ensign Treasurer 

Members 

Julia Anderson Charles Poe Agnes Lewis 

Edward Cullis Leslie Poe Mabel McKelvey 

Edward Hartcraves Mary Kate Lewis Louise McKelvey 

Helen Lewis 
(18S) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





Cleveland Club 

Colors: Orange and Black Flower: Moonbeam 

Motto: Never Let ^'our Studies Intel fere With Your College Education 

Officers 

Forrest Brown President 

DENNts Blevins Secretary-Treasurer 

Nina Parks Editor 



Members 

Herrick Arncld "You old tweet thing! 

Ruth Sloan "Aw, I can't; I gotta go practice 

August Johnston "Say, how'd you gel that way? 

Ruth Still "Oh. boy! 

Julian Sullivan . "Johnny 

Jessie Brown "Law, more biscuits! 

Dennis Blevins "Now you're talkin'! 

Forrest Brown "I don't know which's the sweetest' 

Florence Woodward "1 wish I was home 

Nina Parks • "Why worry? Things'll happen anyway 

T. J. Marler "I am gonna quit moonshining 



(189) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




The Erwin Club 

A litlle to^vn largely represented at Maryvilie. Size judged by number present and their feet. 

Members of Our Gang 

George Callahan So-called president of club 

"Ignatz" McLaughlin Acclaimed vice-president of club 

JARVIS Cotton Termed editor of club 

Anne Allred Housekeeper (because her dad furnishes our homes) 

Mabel Burleson She's an Erwin "Moonshiner" 

"Skinner" RybURN Our industrious (?) salesman of sweets at Unaka 

Oliver Beck Lives on one of our hills 

"D." Tucker Our silent partner 

Isabel Beck Our newest member 



(190) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 








4^ 



(191) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(192) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





Junior Order of United American Moonshiners 



Motlo: Keep Kool 

Flomer: Touch-Me-Nol 
Colors : Everything But Yallar 

Song: Hail, Hail, the Gang's All Here 



Location: In the Moonlig'it 
Occupation : Taming Rattlesnakes 

Habit: Blowing BubLl-s 
Amusement : Moonshining 



■Red" Clevencer 
'Puntang" Lowry 
'Specks" Cortner 



J, 1. Walker, "Proctor" 
"Red-Eye" Simpson 
"Jack" Moss 
"Joggles" Jarrett 
"Little Willie" Sneed 
"Suck," Janitor 



"Slowfoot" Denton 
"Whiskers" Pricmore 
"Preacher" Edincton 



(193) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



=0 




FloTcer : Wild Rose 



Mollo : Keep On Climbing 



Colors : Pink and Green 



Officers 

MlDDLETON PrcsiJe. 

Carter Vice-PresiJent 

HoDCES Treasurer 

McLaIN Editor 





Members 




Bullock 


Harris 


McLain 


Campbell 


Hodges 


McMillan 


Carter 


MlDDLETON 


Phelps 


Hamilton 




Waddell 



(194) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 
ft 




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New York Club 



From New York hails this aggregation. 
We're taking four years* vacation; 

In looks and classes 

Our club surpasses; 
Mo nshining is our recreation. 



Officers 

Frank S. Minerik President 

Helen E. Eitner Secrelan-Tieasurer 

Allen Wyncoop Social Chairman 

Andrew Janoviczky Editor 



Howard D. McGrath 
Hazel Cleveland 
Charles G. E. C'HtLTO.N 
Helen Eitner 



MEiMBERS 

ANorEw Janoviczky 
Frank S. Minarik 
Dr. W. p. Stevenson 



Mrs. \V. p. Stevenson 
Allen Wyncoop 
Rebecca Young 

Zoi TAN SzlLACi I 



(193) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Roane County Club 

Officers 

Leslie Davidson President 

Ruth Newton Vice-President 

Grace Johnson Secretary 

Members - • 

Helen Horton Emily Fowler Mabel Baker 

Winnie Newton Mary Patton Ruth Parham 

Sam Cross Ray Griffiths 



(196) 



THE CHILHOWEAH, 1920 





Tarheel Club 

Officers 

E. K. James President 

James Deyton Vicc-PresiJenl 

Oscar Stanton Secretary and Treasurer 

Ruth Greenlee Editor 

(197) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





Middle Tennessee Club 

Molto: Lcyaily 
Colors: Orange and White Flower: Golden. od 

Officers 

Hillary Park President 

LiLLis Huffman yke-Presidem 

Elizabeth McCord Secretary: and Treasurer 

Allene Watson Editor 

Members 

Nell Baker Beulah Hatchet Milton Park 

Hunter Bills Lillis Huffman Helen Park 

Lillian Brandon Gladys Hutchinson Wayne Paty 

Allen Campbell Elizabeth McCord Charles Partee 

Edgar Cathey Aline McCullouch Guy Sneed 

CoEN Cloyd Carl McCullouch Augusta Tippitt 

Rosa Lee Crews Robert Phillips Mary Tippitt 

Emmett Cortner Hillary Park Allene Watson 

Vivian Hall Louisa Winn 

(198) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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Texas Club 



Our Dream 

My heart tonight is in Texas, 
Tho' she is far away from me; 

In the distant Lone Star Slate, 
That's where I long to be. 



Rippely, rippety, rippely-zack ! 

We're off the prairie and don't stand back! 

We're wild, we're woolly, we're rough like a sa%v! 

Texans! Texans! 

Rah! Rah! Rah! 



Nellie Neil 
Sue Nuckols 
Mary McKenzie 
Josephine Welch 
Lois Bullock 

LuCILE MlDDLETON 



Meivibers 

Henry Etta Ludeman 
Emma Ruth Beauchamp 
Flossy Kerr 
Irma Schwab 
Mary Jones 

(199) 



Clyde Watkins 
Vance Hudgens 

LeROY MlDDLETON 

Mayme Carol Ludeman 
Nina Belle Caldwell 
Mary Louise McLane 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(200) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





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(201) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




VESCIMUR CLUB 
WATCHWORD, "OVER ! WHO's IT OVERp' 




(202) 



Book VI 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Outline of Course 



Leading to Degree of Bachelor Girl fiom Pearson's, Baldwin, or Memorial Halls 
Courses Crcjils 

1 . Altend the f acully reception Lots 

2. Attend Miss Molly's lecture on Maryville etiquette More 

3. Get caught at the picture show without a chaperon Little 

4. Go to town four times a week Less 

5. Be campused and moonshmed None 

6. Be found out of your room during study hours Still less 

7. Be called down for talking after the lights go out Small 

8. Be invited to the Dean's office to explain grades and unexcused absences . . . Zero 

9. Casually carry some bread from the dining room . . . Much (in wrong d rection) 

10. Bathe after 8:30 a. m. on the Sabbath More (in same direction) 

I I . Cook during study hours Still more 

12. Sleep in another girl's room (two in a bed) Tres petite 

1 3. Bcrrow some clothes Slight 

14. Moonshine on Monday afternoon Infinite 

1 5. Name in Highland Echo Pitiful 

1 6. Get new spring hat Minus 

1 7. Gymnastics (staying out of your room without getting caught) Enormous 

Candidates must take entire course; no electives. 



(205) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



-(^-<. S^ 



PRESERVE THIS RECEIPT AND SHOW IT WHEN REQUESTED 



.'JA y. CLASS 



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I INCIDENTAL FEE $ 2 
S ! ATHLETIC FEE % 1 



MUSIC 



_L_/ijr5_ 



•^ EXPRESSION iy c. 



d LABO RATORY ^ ^ — 

a BREAKAGE S / — 



ROOM RENT 



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KEY DEPOSIT S 1 




MATHEMATICS 



.iiigva?.-^ 



LATIN 



FRENCH '_ 

JPANISH 
PREP. SCIENCF 

^oLoGY chemistry" 
history" _" 



^jj^i/^i^^r^ 



PHILOSOPHY 



^Wllim^ DUCATt ON _ 
SOCIAL science" 



HOME EC, MANUAL"^ 
BOOK KEEPIN G 

BIBLE^ 

MUS IP 
E"' 



MARYVILLE COLLEGE 




GRADE REPORT f^' 




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(206) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Fiction 



Classic Modern 

Much Ado About Nolhing Niglil Before Exams 

Pilgrim's Progress Malnculat.on 

The High Cost of Living Block's Best 

Innocents Abroad Freshman 

The Man m Lonely Land •' I'f°f- Southwick 

The Hand-Made Gentleman Forest Brown 

The Winnmg Lady All of 'Em 

Wonder Book The ChILHOWEAN 

The Long Shadow Edgemans 

Representative Men M, C. Men 

Consequences Moonshined and Campused 

The Street Called Straight Court Street 

Where Laborers Are Few Any Class (except Junior) 

The Tempest "PfP Meeting' in Chapel 



To cram, or not to cram, that's the question. 
Whether 'tis nobler for the soul to suffer 
The pain and anguish of a "C, 
Or cram until the birds of morning twitter 
And get an "A." 1 ask thee which is fittei. 

Full many a gem of purest ray serene 

The dark and unfathomed caves of ocean btai ; 
Full many a shrimpish Freshman green 

May raise a lofty pompadour with care. 

Oh, where can a man get a cap for his knee. 

Or a key for the lock of his hair? 
Can his eyes be called an assembly 

Because there are pupils there? 
In the crown of his head what gems are found? 

Who travels the bridge of his nose? 
Can he use, when shingling the roof of his mouth. 

The nails on the end of his toes? 
Can the crook of his elbow be sent lo jail? 

If so, what could he do? 
How does he sharpen his shoulder blades? 

I'll be hanged if I know; do you? 
Can he sit in the shade of the palms of his hands. 

Or beat on the drum of his ear? 
Does the calf on his leg eat the corn on his toes? 

If so, why not grow corn on his ear? 



(207) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



''^'i> 




(208) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




We Know Everything, But We Ain't Going to Tell 



We know how they got the Centennial Chilhowean out so cheap. ' 

We know why the rent didn't go up. | 

We know how the Seniors won the game. 

We know why Mary went to see Carmen. 

We know who wrote the Black Hand letter on fourth floor Pearsons. 

We know who put Blanche Bailey under her bed. 

We know why Red Stanton stands in front of the postoffice every day. 

We know what Jimmie James made in Chemistry. 

We know who sang in the Barnyard chorus over in Memorial. 

We know why Clarabel and Mary take Home-Ec. 

We know how many cuts Mildred Campbell ought to have. 

We know who dropped the chafing dish on first floor Baldwin at 2 a. m. 

We know how much Helen Park studies. 

We know why Lamar goes to Montvale. 

We know who said, "Hamlet, Hamlet, where art thou?" 

We know why baseball games always end in a tie. 

We know why Professor Bassett carries an umbrella. 

We know everybody who will really like the Chilhowean. 

We know why Minarik says, "Make 'em big." 

We know how many girls Weisie has gone with this year. 

We know why Tracey Knapp always has a supply of mints. 

We know why Ruth Newton likes "canned" goods. 

We know why Jarvis and Elsie quit. 

We know how many flunked in Theism. 

We know how Hattie signs her honor report. 

We know why we have chocolate pie on Wednesday. 

We know every date Jimm'.e Mart n has had this year. 

We know why Frances Hickey and Mary Mason take history; also why they leave 
the dining room early. 

We know how many times Margaret McSpac'den and Idclla Hempill have been 
campused. 

We know why it always rains on holidays. 

We know why Madame made the second hour French class change seals. 

We know why the green seat appeared under the cedar tree by the chapel. 

We know what member of the faculty always sticks chewing gum under his plate. 

Don't you wish you did? 

(209) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



==p 




(210) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Faculty Delinquency Report 



FOR TERM ENDING JUNE 2. 1920 

AlKlN. Lena — Foi intruding on the privacy of the amoeba and for loo close attendance at chapel (two 

demerit:) . For excessive moonshm:ng (three dt merits). 
Alexander, Jane — For having too good health (five dements). For causing pupils to be loo closely 

confined to the library (four dements). 
Barnes, Jasper — For forcing pupils to laugh at last year's jokes (five demerits). 
Bassett, Henry — For assigning lecsons while absent (three demerits). For saying, "We have two 

minutes yet, so let s do some sight reading ' (t'lree demerits) . For dividing sentences m assign- 
ments (two demerits). For looking around during the singing in chapel (iwo demerit;). 
Caldwell, Ma^RY — For disturbance after the lights are out (three demerits). For saying. "You can 

remain on the campus this week" (four demerits). 
Denee, Adele — For extravagant use of red ink on French papers (five demerits). For flirting with 

Jarvis Cotton (three dements). 
Fan SON, Fthel — For writing m hieroglyphics (six dements). For leachmg her a£s:stants to scorn 

Pearson's bill of fare (four dements). 
GlLLIxcHAlvi, Clinton— For granting holidays to Seniors without the pei mission of the faculty and 

thereby establishing a precedent (six dements). 
CrECG, HARRIET-^For appropriating carrpus walnuts (six demerits). For disturbing the air with a baton 

(three demerits). 
Hale. Laura Belle — For wearmg her hat on the ba:k of her head (two demerits). For being loo 

sweet to her pupils (six dements). 
Hunter, Fdwin — For oveiworking the English 1, 2 and 3 classes (three demerits). For leaching 

Seniors how to proe nothing is somethmg (three demerit:). For never failing to meet classes 

(three demerits). 
Jackson, Emivia — For being out of her room during study hours (five demerits). 
Knapp, George — For encouraging boys and girls to be slar-gazers (six demerits). For having too 

great a curiosity to know (iwo demerits). 
Pleasants, William — For worrying Senior and Junior girls for dates (six demerits). 
SlWITH, Elizabeth — For causing the girls to break the Tenth Commandment (eight demerits). 
SoUTHWICK, Arthur — For sland'ng while lecturing, so that infoimation goes above the head of his 

pupils (five demerits). For "popping the question" to so many girls (four demerits). 
Walker, Eddie Roy — For getting a haircut (three demerits). For making cute announcements in the 

dinmg room (three demerits). For forcing students to call at his office once each month (three 

demerits). 



(211) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




(212) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 ^ 



^ 







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(213) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 
O 




(214) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



Q= 




The Joys of Getting Out the Chilhowean 



1 . Sleepless nights. 

2. Lessonless days. 

3. Cut classes. 

4. Terrible grades. 
- 5. Lost copy. 

6. Ditto temper. 

7. Impatient publishers. 

8. Awful weather. 

9. Sick photographer. 

10. Impossible to get material turned m. 

1 1. General "blessings-out" by everybody. 

Maybe you do not like this section. If so, write your jokes and place your pictures 
in the space below. Then you can laugh. 



(215) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 

= : P 




(216) 



THE CHILHOWEAN. 1920 




Examination Questions as Answered by Pre-Med 

Students 



Write a paragrapli on the frog. 

What a funny bird the frog are! 

When he sit he almost lie, 

When he jump he almost fly. 

He has no sense at all hardly. 

How extremely interesting an amphibia is the animura! 

He habitates almost universally on aqua pura. 

His loes are webbed on his hind feet, 

His legs are also good lo eat. 

What a wonderful creature is the frog! 

When he stand he sit almost, 

When he sit he lie almost. 

He is greatly lacking in imagmation. 

The frog is seldom ambidexterous. 

This characteristic is especially in and by the tree frog. 

Give four characteristics of the frog. 

1. Right front foot webbed. 

2. Left front foot webbed. 

3. Right hind foot webbed. 

4. Left hind foot webbed. 

Give the properties of sulphur. 

Sicily is three-fourths sulphur. 

Oscar Stanton (collecting pictures) : "Well, Dean Barnes, how about your pictui 
for the annual?" 

The Dean: "All right now, Mr. Stanton; I'm telephoning Mr. Webb every day." 

Madame (translating to the French class) : "The eyes shine as a headlight." 

Leslie Jones (repeating) : "The eyes shine from a light head." 

^ ^ ^ 

August Johnson — "Are you taking gym?" 

T. J. Marler (another Freshman) — "No, I think it is smallpox." 

Senior (gleefully) — "Dr. Gilhngham says he enjoyed teaching our theism class more 
than any class he has ever taught." 

Junior (disgustedly) — "Huh! he says that to every class; but just wait till next year 
when he gets us." 

Senior — "Yes, he enjoys teaching ignorant people." 

Junior — "No wonder he enjoyed your class!" 

(217) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 





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(218) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Mary — "Percy, what you say is too much hke a root." 

Percy— "Why?" 

Mary — "It is always modified." 

* V * 

Prof. Southwick (noticmg that Mary and Ash, on the back seat, were not paying 

attention to him), asked: "Miss Clayton, where is the seat of reason?" 

To which she rephed: "On the back seat." 

¥ ¥ V 

Miss Jackson — "^'es, dear; these week-ends that are so nice for you girls are mighty 
hard on me. Why, when Tuesday comes there is nothing left of me." 

Mrs. Alexander — "What is the theme of Thanatopsis?" 

Addie Fine — "The conservation of matter." 

•^ *^ •^ 

Carrie Nelson was adding up chemistry grades, and after adding about twenty she 

sighed and said: "I do wish people would make mistakes in round numbers." 

V ^ ^ 

Frank Minarik was leading the yells at a basketball game and happened to look up 

in the balcony, where he saw his friend Stacy moonsKining with Flora. So. instead of 

saying, "Make 'em big," as he usually does, he said, "Howell — Strong." 

^ V ^ 

Chester Osborn (writing French exercises) — "I say, 'Red.' what is salt in French?" 
Oscar Stanton — "Same that it is in English, isn't it?" 

¥ ¥ ^ 

Mildred Striplin — "Say, Patton, how many subjects are you carrying?" 
Patton — "Well, I'm carrying one and dragging four." 

"The world is old, yet likes to laugh; 
New jokes are hard to find. 
And an entire editorial staff 
Can't tickle every mind." 



(219) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



jp 



Who's Who At Maryville 



Most popular college professor Prof. K.NAPP 

Most popular prep, professor Prof. Brittain 

Most popular college assistant Moss FARMER 

Most popular prep, assistant LESLIE JONES 

Most popular student teacher Leila Ware 

Most popular athletes Jarvis Cotton and Elsie Dawson 

Most popular waitress Helen Lewis 

Most popular student Harry Wagner 

Most popular matron Mrs. Snodgrass 

Wittiest bey Red Haves 

Wittiest girl FLORENCE Oates 

Handsomest man E. B. Hanson 

Cutest girl Grace Johnson 

Sweetest girl Jessie Cresswell 

Most practical man ; E. K. James 

Most practical girl Edith Moore 

Biggest bluff . LiciA Johnson 

Laziest MiKE Parks 

Biggest sleeper Manie Witherspoon 

Smartest boy Sam Franklin 

Smartest girl Martha Robison 

Best dressed man Henry Jones 

Best dressed girl EUNICE Taylor 

Best dressed teacher MiSS Seivers 

Biggest spendthrift AsK Your Dad 

Biggest booster Frank Minarik 

Most ignorant Myself 

Most popular with faculty Francis HickeY 

Biggest promise of a succcrs'^ul future JiMMIE James 

Quietest Mabel Baker 

Best sport Tex Middleton 

Best all 'round Harry Wagner 



(220) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




Maryville College Dictionary 

Apples — A fruit served three times a day, twenty-one limes a week, eighty-four times a month, and 
756 limes a year at Pearson's. It may be baked, boiled, slewed or fried, served as a butter, or raw. 

Bells — What each phase of college life is controlled by — eatmg, sleepmg, waking, moonshinmg. study- 
ing, n* everything. 

Campused — The privilege and pleasure of drawing apart from the weary strife of the outside world lo 
rest for a week or two in the peaceful grounds of the college campus. 

Canning — A method invented by M. C. sociology experts for the removal of unruly members. 

Cuts — Never given by a good sport. 

Don't — A term frequently used by the Dean of Women. 

Egoism — Two-thirds of a man. 

Engagement — What you have wilh the doctor, tSe dentist, or the dean, lo use as an excuse for unavoid- 
able absence. 

Faculty — A group of people whose adherence to set rules surpasses that of the Medes and Persians. 

Flu — You're out of style unless you have it. . • < 

Gossip — The chief pastime in Carnegie Hall. 

House in the Woods — A house that is a home lo man. 

Ideas — Something all the members of the annual staff would like to have. 

Joke — See the other pages of this pari of the book; also the Highland Echo, 

Knowledge — What we are supposed to go to school for. 

Love — That which drives students to moonshine. 

Moonshine — The name of a course in which no one ever cuts. For further information see Percy, 
John Hendricks, or Wilbur Templin. 

Never — A word synonymous with don't. Used, especially by matrons, as a preface lo rules. 

Obey — Every model boy does it. 

Precedent — That which must be neither established nor broken. 

Picture Show^A place where you must never go. 

Questions — Something never asked by polite people, even though they be teachers. 

Rats — A race of creatures which obey no rules of etiquette or even of matrons. 

Staff — A bunch of blooming idiots. 

System — What there must be to everything. (Ask the Dean.) 

Test- -An unfair method of finding out what we do not know. 

Utilization — The use of scraps of meat, potatoes and onions to make hash. 

Vigilance — A quality you must have if you throw bread without being caught. 

Work — Getting out a Chilhowean. 

XanthogenaN'IDE — Greek to Freshman (and even to most Seniors). 

Yankee Doodle — A march played in chapel on special occasions, but always preceded by Dixie. 

Zero— That which preceded by another zero and a one would bring joy instead of sorrow. 



(221) 




THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




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THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 




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In Appreciation 



OW that the last copy has been sent to the printer, and after 

r.'l-^lJI niuch persuasion organization has turned in its 

I-,^^^TI| material, Dean Barnes has had his picture made, the clubs 
have paid up, and the two questions, "When is the Chilhowean 
coming out?" and "How much will the annual cost?" have been 
answered cheerfully for the nth time, the staff has begun to breathe 
freely once more. Its members have done prodigious things, made up 
whole terms of note-books, read months of outside reading, learned 
hundreds of lines of poetry, and, in short, made up for the time they 
spent checking up pictures, counting lines, and requesting people to 
please turn in their copy. 

Now that the 1920 annual is a reality, we wonder how it was 
ever accomplished. Indeed, it could not have been without the kind 
help of many who were not on the staff — the help of those who turned 
in kodak pictures, of those who did typewriting so carefully, of those 
faithful club, society and class editors who worked cheerfully that their 
part of the annual might be as attractive as possible; of Prof. Bassett, 
who patiently censored every word and every picture; and especially 
of Mr. Eugene Webb, whose interest and enthusiasm even equaled that 
of the members of the staff, and who made the pictures all that could 
be desired. To all these, and to all others who helped in any way, 
the staff is very grateful. Without them this book would have been 
impossible. 

The St.-^ff. 









(223) 



THE CHILHOWEAN, 1920 



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(224) 



Archives 



37a. 768885 n393c 
1920 
c. 2 

Maryville College. Junior 
^ 1 ass. 
The Chilhowean. 





MARVVILLE COLLEGE LIBRARY 



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