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Full text of "A choice fragment of what mother-in-law knows about cooking; or, Many a dime saved"




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MANY A DIME SAVED. 



Price, 25 Cents. 



DETROIT : 

WM. A. SCRIPPS, BOOK AND JOB PRINTER. 



/ 

A CHOICE FRAGMENT 



WHAT MOTHER-IN-LAW KNOWS 



COOKING: 



OR, 



MANY A DIME SAVED. 



COMPILED BY TWO LADIES OF MUCH EXPERIENCE BOTH IN COOKING 

AND ECONOMY. 



"A poor Cook tuastes where a good Cook saves money 1 



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DETROIT : 

WM. A. SCRIPPS, BOOK AND JOB PRINTER, 
1875. 

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Entered according to act of Congress in the year 1875, 
BY D. R. SMITH, l-^- -^ 
In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



CONTENTS. 



Puddings, 5 

Pies, 8 

Cakes, lo 

Bread, • . 17 

Pickles, Catsups, Etc., 19 

Miscellaneous 21 



mhnt Mpthtr-*m-Tjtiiw fi^natirs Ji^liaut Cj'^^^'^ittOf 



PUDDINGS. 

Baked Corn Meal Pudding. 

Boil two quarts of sweet milk ; scald In It 
seven table-spoons of corn meal. When a little 
cool add salt, three eggs and a half tea-cup sugar 
or syrup ; season with nutmeg. Bake In mod- 
erate oven three hours. 

Mrs. P.'s Pudding. 

One tea-cup of molasses, one tea-cup of sour 
cream, two tea-spoons of soda and flour to the 
consistency of stirred cake. Steam until done. 
Serve with a sauce of butter and sugar flavored 
with lemon. 

Miss P„'s Pudding. 

Butter a deep dish ; cover the bottom with a 
layer of bread crumbs ; add a layer of sour 
apples ; sprinkle over a little sugar and spice ; 
add a little butter, continue with alternate lay- 



ers until the dish Is filled ; add a little water ; 
cover It tight and bake two hours. 

Make a sauce of melted butter and suear 
with some water. Let It come to a boll, then 
take It off and add one egg well beaten. 

Amherst Pudding. 

Three and a half cups of flour, one cup of 
molasses, half cup of butter, one cup of raisins, 
one and a half cups of milk, one tea-spoon 
soda and a little salt. Steam two hours and 
eat with hot or cold sauce. 

Cottage Pudding. 

Three cups of flour, one cup of sugar, half 
cup of butter, three eggs, one cup of sweet 
milk and two tea-spoons of baking powder. 
Serve with wine sauce or cream flavored with 
vanilla. 

Queen of Puddings. 

One pint of bread crumbs, one quart of 
milk, one cup of sugar, yolks of four eggs, 
grated rind of one lemon and butter the size of 
an Qgg. When baked beat the white of four 
eggs to a stiff froth ; add one cup of sugar and 
the juice of a lemon. Spread on the pudding 
currant jelly or raspberry jam, then the icing 



— 7 — 

and bake to a delicate brown. Serve with a 
sweet cream. 

Black Pudding. 

One coffee-cup of chopped suet, one coffee- 
cup of molasses, one coffee-cup of raisins or 
currants and two tea-spoons of soda. Flavor 
to suit taste. Steam three hours. 

Half of the above will make a very fair sized 
pudding. 

Sponge Pudding. 

Three eggs, one cup of white sugar, one cup 
of flour, one tea-spoon of cream tartar, half 
tea-spoon of soda, one table-spoon of sweet 
milk and a little yeast. Steam twenty minutes. 
Serve while hot, with sweetened cream flavored 
with peach. 

Indian Pudding. 

Put two quarts of milk on the stove and let 
it boil, stir corn meal enough into it to make 
it thick; into half a pan of milk stir three eggs 
and a cup of sugar, stir in the pudding and 
bake an hour. 

A Quick Pudding. 

Stir well together one guart of milk, four 
table-spoons of flour and five eggs. Bake in a 
quick oven. 



Farmers' Pudding. 

Half a cup of butter, two cups of sugar, two 
eggs, two cups of flour, one tea-spoon of soda 
and three cups of buttermilk. Mix the soda 
and the flour while dry and stir in the flour 
gently. Bake an hour in a greased pan. 

Sauce for all kinds of Puddings. 

One cup of sugar, half cup of butter ; stir to 
a cream, boil one cup of milk and thicken with 
one tea-spoon of corn starch ; while boiling 
turn it over the butter and sugar, add wine, 
brandy or vinegar, if desired, but if not, flavor 
with extracts. 

PIES. 

Custard for Lemon Pies. 

Grate the outside rind of one lemon, take 
out the white skin and chop fine ; add one cup 
of sugar, the yolks of two eggs, one table- 
spoon of corn starch or flour and one and one 
half cups of boiling water. Frost the top. 

Cocoanut Pie. 

One grated cocoanut, three eggs, two cups 
of sugar, three cups of milk and a piece of 



butter the size of an egg. Bake without a top 
crust. 

This quantity will make three pies. 

Marlborough Pie. 

Four ozs. of melted butter, one half cup of 
sweet milk, four eggs well beaten and sugar to 
taste ; mix all well together, line the dish with 
paste, then put in a layer of fruit or grated 
lemon. Pour the mixture of butter, sugar, etc., 
over the fruit and bake half an hour. 

A Nice Custard Pie, 

Nice custard pies are made by mixing in one 
quart of milk, two table-spoons of corn starch 
and beating in this two eggs. Then thin with 
more milk ; sweeten and season to taste ; pour 
into pans lined with paste and grate nutmeg 
over the top. 

Cream Pie Without Cream. 

For one pie, take two eggs, half cup of 
sugar, three table-spoons of flour, one pint of 
sweet milk ; heat the milk, beat sugar, eggs 
and flour together ; add the scalded milk, and 
cook to a thick custard ; flavor with lemon. 
Bake your crust, and when cold fill with 
custard. 



lO — 

« 

Apple Custard Pie. 

Peel sour apples, stew until tender and not 
much water left on them, then rub them through 
a colander ; for each pie beat three eggs, add. 
one-third cup of butter and one-third cup of 
sugar; season with nutmeg and lemon. When 
done frost and put into the oven a few mo- 
ments. 

CAKES. 

Cake Making. 

To make a good cake one must be accurate 
in the proportions and should have fresh eggs, 
good sweet butter, and crushed sugar. It is 
also best to have an egg-beater, as you can 
beat the eggs much better in very little time. 
Never beat your eggs or butter and sugar in a 
tin pan, as the coldness of the tin is apt to 
prevent them from becoming light, but always 
use an earthen or wooden vessel. On mixing, 
beat well together butter and sugar, beat sepa- 
rately the yolks and the whites of the eggs, then 
with the yolks, first stir the butter and sugar, 
next the flour and milk, if any is used, and 
lastly, the whites of the eggs and flavoring. If 
you desire to try your cake before baking, add 



1 1 



about one-third of a tea-spoon of baking 
powder to a large spoon of batter, then bake. 
It Is not best to put baking powder Into the 
cake and let it stand lonor before bakine. 

One Egg Tea Cake. 

One Ggg, four table-spoons of white sugar, 
one table-spoon of butter, one gill of milk, one 
tea-spoon of yeast powder, enough flour to 
make as stiff as pound cake, flavor with lemon 
and bake in patty-pans. 

Snowdrift Cake. 

Three cups of flour, two cups of sugar, half 
cup of butter, one cup sweet milk, whites of 
five eggs and two and one-half tea-spoons of 
baking powder. 

Bread Cake. 

Two cups of light dough, one cup of sugar, 
half cup of butter, one Ggg, half tea-spoon of 
soda and one cup of fruit. Let it rise three- 
fourths of an hour, then bake. 

Hester's White Cake. 

White of six eggs, one and one-half cups of 
sugar, half cup of butter, half cup of milk, two 
cups of flour and three tea-spoons of baking 
powder. 



12 

Delicate Cake. 

One cup of sugar, half cup of sweet milk, 
half cup of butter, one and one-half cups of 
flour, two eggs and two tea-spoons of baking 
powder. 

Spice Cake. 

Four eggs, one cup of sugar, one cup of 
molasses, one cup of buttermilk, one-half cup 
of butter, one tea-spoon of soda, one table- 
spoon of cloves, one table-spoon of cinnamon, 
one nutmeg and two cups of currants or raisins. 
Do not make very stifl. 

Hickory-nut Cake. 

One cup of the meats of hickory nuts broken 
fine ; one and one-half cups of sugar, one- 
third cup of butter, two cups of flour, three- 
fourths cup of sweet milk and two tea-spoons 
of baking powder. 

Piccolomine Cake. 

One cup of butter, three cups of sugar, rub 
them to a cream ; five eggs beaten very lightly, 
whites and yolks separately ; four cups of 
flour, one cup of sweet milk and three tea- 
spoons of baking powder. Bake in a moderate 
oven fifteen minutes. 



— 13 — 

Orange Cake. 

One cup of sugar, three eggs, one table- 
spoon of butter, three table-spoons of water, 
one cup of flour, two tea-spoons of baking 
powder and the rind of one orange grated in 
the cake. Bake in three thin cakes, slice the 
orange and place between them. 

French Cake. 

One cup of sweet milk, three eggs, two cups 
of white sugar, half cup of butter, three cups 
of flour and two tea-spoons of baking powder. 
Beat the eggs well, whites and yolks separate- 
ly, and add the whites the last thing. 

Mrs W.'s Fruit Cake. 

Ten eggs, one pound of sugar, one pound of 
butter, one pound of flour, two pounds of 
seeded raisins, chopped ; two pounds of cur- 
rants, half pound of citron, one cup of molasses, 
two tea-spoons of soda ; two tea-spoons 
each of cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg and one 
gill of wine or brandy. Bake moderately four 
hours. 

Gold Cake. 

Yolks of six eggs and one whole Ggg, half 
cup of sugar, half cup of butter, half cup of 



— 14 — 

milk, two cups of flour and three tea-spoons of 
baking powder. 

Jenny Lind Cake. 

Four cups of flour, two cups of sugar, one 
cup of butter, one cup of milk, five eggs and 
two tea-spoons of baking powder. 

Miss Lizzie's Sponge Cake. 

Ten eoro-s. weio-ht of the same in suo-ar, half 

oo Jo O ' 

their weight in flour and one lemon ; beat 
whites and yolks separately, add the grated rind 
and juice of the lemon to the sugar, then add 
the yolks and beat five minutes. Stir in grad- 
ually the whites of the eggs and the flour. 
Bake in a quick oven. 

Cocoanut Cake. 

Two cups of sugar, three cups of sifted flour, 
half cup of butter, three-fourths cup of milk, 
two tea-spoons of baking powder and the 
whites of five eggs. 

Frosting for the above — The whites of five 
eggs, half a paper of cocoanut and sugar to 
suit taste. Bake in the manner of jelly cake. 

Corn Starch Cake. 

Whites of eight eggs, one-fourth pound of 
corn starch, one-fourth pound of flour, one- 



fourth pound of butter, half pound ot sugar 
and two tea-spoons of baking powder. Flavor 
to suit taste. 

Shrewsbury Cake. 

One pound of flour, half pound of butter, 

three-fourths pound of sugar and five eggs. 

Portugal Cake. 

One pound of sugar, half pound butter, one 

pound of flour and eight eggs. Fruit if 

desired. 

Cider Fruit Cake. 

Two pounds of raisins, two pounds sugar, 

one pound of butter, seven eggs, one pint of 

cider, nine cups of flour, two table-spoons of 

cinnamon, one table-spoon of saleratus and two 

nutmegs. 

Custard Cake. 

The whites of three eggs, one cup of sugar, 
half cup of milk, one table-spoon of butter, two 
tea-spoons of cream tartar and one tea-spoon 
of soda or baking powder and one large cup 
of flour. 

Custard for the the above — Half a cup of 
milk, three-fourths cup of sugar, yolks of three 
eggs, three tea-spoons of corn starch, and a 
small piece of butter. Bake the cake in three 
layers, and spread while hot. 



— i6 — 

This cake is very nice, especially when eaten 
with strawberries. 

Lemon Cake- 

One pound of flour, three-fourths of a pound 
of butter, one pound of sugar, one egg, grate 
the yellow of one lemon with the cake, then add 
the juice. 

Wedding Cake. 

One pound of sugar, one pound of flour, 
three-fourths of a pound of butter, twelve -eggs, 
five pounds of raisins, three pounds of currants, 
one pound of citron, half a pound of figs, and 
then the spices to suit taste. 

Dover Cake. 

Six eggs, one pound of sugar, one half pound 
of butter, one pound of flour, one cup of milk, 
one tea-spoon of soda, and two of cream tartar, 
or use baking powder. 

Fried Cakes. 

One Qgg, one table-spoon of sugar. Mix it 
stifl and roll thin. 

Ginger Snaps. 

One cup of butter, one cup of sugar, one cup 
of molasses, four table-spoons of water, and 



— 17 — 

two tea-spoons of saleratus. Spice to suit 
taste. 

Ginger Cookies. 

Two cups of butter milk, two cups of 
molasses, half cup of shortning and four tea- 
spoons of saleratus. Spice to suit taste. 

Allie's Cookies. 

Three cups of sugar, one cup of butter, four 
eggs and two-thirds cup of milk. Beat the 
eggs lightly, mix sugar and butter together and 
roll as thin as possible. Bake in a quick oven. 

Nellie's Cookies. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one 
egg, one cup of milk and two tea-spoons of 
baking powder. 

' BREAD. 

Mary's Brown Bread. 

Six cups of butter-milk, five cups of meal, 
three cups of flour, one cup of molasses, one 
tea-spoon of soda and a little salt. 

Modern Frencli Bolls. 

One pint of sweet milk, two table-spoons of 
white sugar, one heaping table-spoon of butter 
or lard ; put these together, let them just come 
to a boil, then cool, make a sponge with two 
quarts of sifted flour, add three table-spoons of 



— i8 — 

yeast and a little salt. If for breakfast, make 
them at noon of the previous day, at tea time 
knead them ten minutes, knead again about 
nine o'clock. In the morning roll and cut out 
as biscuit, have some melted butter, and with a 
piece of cloth or feather, rub them over; double 
them in the shape of a half moon, set to raise, 
and when lieht bake in a moderate oven. If 
for tea, start them in the morning. They make 
good rusks when sweeter and made in the 
proper shape. 

Biscuits. 

Six cups of flour, two cups of sour milk, one 

table-spoon of lard, and two tea-spoons of 

saleratus. 

Rusk. 

One quart of sweet milk, heated scalding hot, 
one pint of sugar, one tea-cup of yeast, stir 
into a batter and let it rise over nieht. Then 
add half pound of butter and one teaspoon of 
saleratus ; mix into dough same as bread and 
let it rise, after which, make into small cakes, 
let rise again and bake. 

Love Rolls. 

Use paste as for pies or tarts, roll thin, and 
cut in sheets or rolls the size of your hand, 
sprinkle with white sugar thickly, and strong 



— 19 — 

ground cinnamon ; roll up and bake in a quick 
oven. 

PICKLES, CATSUPS, ETC. 

Pickled Peaches. 

Rub the peaches widi a flannel cloth, pack in 
a jar, add four pounds of sugar to one gallon of 
good vinegar, spice to suit the taste, heat boil- 
ing hot and pour it over the peaches. Repeat 
the operation of boiling the vinegar and pour- 
ing it over the pickles three times about one 
week apart. 

Pickled Pears and Sweet Apples. 

Take four pounds of sugar to one gallon of 

good vinegar, spiced to suit taste. Boil the fruit 

in the vinegar until tender, then put all into a jar. 

Tomato Pickles. 

For four gallons of pickles, heat half a pail 
of water, add one tea-cup of salt ; when boiling 
drop in the sliced tomatoes and skim them out 
again as soon as they have boil a few moments, 
then place them in a jar and cover them with 
vinegar. The next day pour off the vinegar 
and cover them with heated vinegar spiced with 
cinnamon, cloves and pepper and sweetened to 
to suit taste. A good proportion is three 
quarts of vinegar, two pounds of sugar, two 



20 

table-spoons of cloves and the same of cin- 
namon. 

Pickalily. 

Chop one peck of green tomatoes, add one 
tea-cup of salt, strain through a colander over 
night ; add to it six green peppers chopped 
fine, one tea-cup grated horse-radish, two 
quarts of vinegar, one tea-cup of sugar, let it 
boil gently, stirring it occasionally until the 
tomatoes are cooked, then add one spoonful of 
each, cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg. 

Chili Sauce. 

Eighteen good-sized ripe tomatoes, six 

medium-sized onions, three red peppers, two 
and a half cups of vinegar, one cup of sugar 
and one-third cup of salt. Chop onions and 
peppers fine, peel the tomatoes and squeeze out 
the juice ; take the juice with all the other in- 
gredients except the tomatoes and boil together 
for a few minutes, then add the tomatoes 
chopped fine and boil about twenty minutes, 
when it is ready to be bottled for use. 

Tomato Catsup. 

One and one-half gallons of ripe tomatoes, 
one table-spoon of salt,, two table-spoons of 
cracked black pepper, three table-spoons of 



21 

ground mustard, one-half table-spoon of all- 
spice, one-half table-spoon of cloves and a red 
pepper. Simmer the whole three or four hours, 
add one pint of vinegar, strain through a sieve, 
sweeten a little, bottle and cork tight. 

Currant Catsup. 

Five pounds of currants, three pounds of 
brown sugar, one pint of vinegar, two table- 
spoons of ground cinnamon and one table- 
spoon of cloves. Boil fast one hour ; when cold, 
strain and bottle for use. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Grape Wine. 

Take twenty pounds of ripe, freshly picked 
grapes, put them into a stone jar and pour over 
them six quarts of boiling soft water ; when 
sufficiently cool to allow it, squeeze them thor- 
oughly with the hand, after which allow them to 
stand three days with a cloth over the jar, then 
squeeze out the juice and add ten pounds of 
crushed sugar and let it remain a week longer 
in the jar, take off the scum, strain and bottle 
leaving a vent until done fermenting, then 
strain again, bottle tight and lay the bottles on 
the side in a cool place. 



Wine from White Currants. 

Take any quantity of ripe white currants, 
squeeze out the juice, put as much water on the 
pomace as there is of the juice, that you may 
get the remaining juice from the currants, then 
mix the juice and water and to each gallon of 
the mixture put three and one-half pounds of 
sugar. Let it work, without boiling or skim- 
ming, for two or three months, then rack and 
bottle. 

Scrapple. 

Take hogs' heads or any part will do, put in 
a kettle with as much water as you want, have 
the meat half fat and half lean, boil it until very 
tender, skim out the meat and chop very fine, 
put it back in the same water, add salt, pepper, 
summer-savory to suit the taste, boil it all 
together, then thicken it with corn meal. When 
cooked enough, cool it in a deep dish, cut in 
slices rather thick and fry as mush, in butter. 

Corned Beef. 

Ten pounds of salt, three ounces of saltpetre, 
one and one-half pounds of sugar, one quart of 
molasses, one ounce of saleratus and six gallons 
of water. Dissolve the salt and saltpetre in 
some of the water while hot and add it to the 



— 23 — 

rest, boil and skim, when cool pour it over the 
beef. 

Yeast. 

Boil one pint of hops in two gallons of water, 
strain, then add one tea-cup of flour, one tea- 
cup of sugar, a tea-spoon of salt (no yeast is 
required to raise it.) Let it stand three days 
in a warm place when it will begin to foam. 
Boil three pounds of potatoes, mash fine and 
add to the yeast and stir the whole well together. 
Put it in a jug corked tight and set it in a cool 
place. It should be made two weeks before 
using. A small tea-cup is sufficient for six 
loaves of bread. 

To Prevent the Odor of Boiling. 

Put a piece of red pepper the size of a five 
cent piece with meat or vegetables when first 
beginning to cook, it will aid greatly in killing 
the unpleasant odor arising therefrom. Re- 
member this for boiling cabbage, green beans, 
onions, mutton and the like. 

Cabbage Salad. 

Shave a hard, white cabbage into small 
strips ; take the well beaten yolks of three 
eggs, a cup-and-a-half of good cider vinegar, 
two tea-spoons of white sugar, three table- 



— 24 — 

• 

spoons of thick cream, one tea-spoon of mus- 
tard mixed in a little boiling water ; salt and 
pepper to suit taste. Mix all together except 
the eggs and cabbage, let it boil, stir in the 
eggs rapidly, then turn the cabbage into the 
mixture and stir well. It is well to make 
enough for two days at once, as it keeps per- 
fectly and is an excellent relish to all kinds of 
meat. 

To Keep Honey all the Year. 

Let it runt hrough a sieve to separate it from 
the particles of wax, then boil it gently in an 
earthen vessel, skim off the foam as it gathers 
on top and cool it in jars. After covering these 
tightly, set them away in a cool cellar. 

Nut Taffy. 

Three pounds of sugar, two cups of water, 
two table-spoons of vinegar, a piece of butter 
the size of an Ggg, with nuts as desired. Do 
not stir while cooking, pour into a dish to cool. 

Caramels. 

Half a cake of chocolate, two and one-half 
pounds of sugar, one cup of molasses, one 
table-spoon of butter and two cups of milk. 
Stir continually while cooking. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




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