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Full text of "Christian Century"

THE DISCIPLES DIVINITY HOUSE 

OF THE 

university of chicago 

herbert lockwood willett 
Library 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/christiancentury342unse 



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BLl 




Vol. XXXIV 



July 5, 1917 



Number 27 



Preaching to 

British 

Soldiers 

By Burris A. Jenkins 



{\'^ 




CHICAGO 



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THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 5, 1917 



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AND THERE ARE OTHERS. YOUR SCHOOL 
SHOULD HAVE THE BETHANY. SEND FOR RE- 
TURNABLE SAMPLES. ADDRESS 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 East 40th Street, Chicago 



July 5, 1917 



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Subseription Price — Two dollars and 
A half a year, payable strictly In 
advance. To ministers, two dollars 
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PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 
IN THE INTEREST OF THE KINGDOM OF GOD 



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which subscription is paid. List Is 
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Remittances — Should be sent by 
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If local check Is sent, add ten 
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EJntpred as Second-Class Matter 
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cago. Illinois, under Act of March 
3, 1.S79. 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, PROPRIETORS, 



700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO 



Disciples 

Publication 

Society 



The Disciples Publica- 
tion Society is an or- 
ganization through 
which churches of the 
Disciples of Christ 
seek to promote un- 
denominational and constructive 
Christianity. 

The relationship it sustains to Dis- 
ciples organizations is intimate and 
organic, though not official. The So- 
ciety is not a private institution. It 
has no capital stock. No individuals 
profit by its earnings. 

The charter under which the So- 
ciety exists determines that whatever 
profits are earned shall be applied to 
agencies which foster the cause of 
religious education, although it is 
dearly conceived that its main task 
is not to make profits but to produce 
literature for building up character 
and for advancing the cause of re- 
ligion. » • • 

The Disciples Publication Society 



regards itself as a thoroughly unde- 
nominational institution. It is organ- 
ized and constituted by individuals 
and churches who interpret the Dis- 
ciples' religious reformation as ideally 
an unsectarian and unecclesiastical 
fraternity, whose common tie and 
original impulse are fundamentally the 
desire to practice Christian unity with 
all Christians. 

The Society therefore claims fel- 
lowship with all who belong to the 
living Church of Christ, and desires to 
cooperate with the Christian people 
of all communions, as well as with the 
congregations of Disciples, and to 
serve all. * • * 

The Christian Century desires noth- 
ing so much as to be the worthy or- 



gan of the Disciples' movement. It 
has no ambition at all to be regarded 
as an organ of the Disciples' denom- 
ination. It is a free interpreter of the 
wider fellowship in religious faith and 
service which it believes every church 
of Disciples should embody. It 
strives to interpret all communions, as 
well as the Disciples, in such_ terms 
and with such sympathetic insight as 
may reveal to all their essential unity 
in spite of denominational isolation. 
The Christian Century, though pub- 
lished by the Disciples, is not pub- 
lished for the Disciples alone. It is 
published for the Christian world. It 
desires definitely to occupy a catholic 
point of view and it seeks readers in 
all communions. 



■^Ess: 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO. 

Dear Friends: — I believe in the spirit and purposes of The Christian Century and wish to be numbered among 
those who are supporting your worli io a substanfcisu way by their gifts. 



Enclosed please find 



Name 

Address. 



"The Training of Church Members 



99 



By ORVIS F. JORDAN and CHARLES CLAYTON MORRISON 

IS THE TEXT BOOK 
YOU ARE LOOKING FOR 

IF you have a Sunday- School class of young people or adults whom you wish to inform 

concerning the fundamental principles of our own movement. 
IF you are desirous of making your mid-week prayer meetings worth while. Don't let 

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helpful little book. 
IF your Christian Endeavor Society needs something definite to work at this year. Why 

not teach these impressionable young people the things they should know concerning 

the church? 
IF you are planning to organize a Pastor's class for special study. 
IF you are organizing a teacher-training class. 

Why not make a feature of your evening preaching service this summer a brief study from 

this important little book? 
Send for a sample copy of "The Training of Church Members," and see how perfectly it 

fits into your needs. 

Price, 15c per single copy; IZJ^^c in quantities 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



700 EAST 40th STREET 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 5, 1917 




A Group of Scholarship Girls at Missouri Christian College 

THE CULTURE OF CHRISTIAN 

WOMANHOOD 

In the general trend toward co-education all the colleges of the Disciples of Christ that began as men's schools 
have opened their doors to women, while none of the women's schools have become co-educational. We are 
naturally most conservative regarding the chief conservators of our most precious interests. Then, home-making 
is a special task and calls for special training, even if we should admit that woman is not so essentially different 
from man as to require peculiar education on her own account. It is perhaps natural that of the six colleges for 
girls controlled by the Disciples, three should be in Missouri, where our membership is greatest. 

The oldest of these is Missouri Christian College, of Camden Point, founded in 1848. The attendance, prop- 
erty valuation and cost of attendance are small, but the influence vital, extensive and perpetual. 

Christian College, of Columbia, "a city whose business is education and whose commerce is culture," dates 
from 1851, has superb property valued at .1^350,000, 28 teachers and 243 students. It is an officially standardized 
Junior College for young women. The thorough academic work which this represents is carefully co-ordinated 
with all the elements of happy, healthy, youthful life. 

William Woods College, at Fulton, was founded in 1890. Since 1900 it has borne the name of its chief 
benefactor, Dr. William S. Woods. Others have generously identified themselves with its material equipment 
which is now valued at $230,000, with .$96,000 additional of endowment. Last year 23 teachers looked after the 
166 students, with the same thoroughness and genial sympathy, the memory of which causes the first graduates 
to send their daughters there with the utmost gladness and confidence. It is a Junior College officially accredited 
by the University of Missouri. 

Since the appointed task of these colleges is simpler than that of the general colleges, they have seemed to 
require for the present smaller endowment, but no work could be more vital than their culture of Christian 
womanhood, and so, nowhere will the success of the Men and Millions Movement count more certainly for the 
perpetual advancement of the Kingdom of God. 



MEN AND MILLIONS MOVEMENT 

222 W. Fourth Street CINCINNATI, OHIO 



CHARTtKS CIiATTON' MOR&ISON, EDXTOa. 



BEBBEBT X.. WHABTT, COITTBZBUamTO ESXTOB. 



Volume XXXIV 



JULY 5. 1917 



Number 27 



England and the Fourth of July 



THIS YEAR WE HAVE A NEW KIND OF 
FOURTH OF JULY. 

Twice ill our history we have been at war with 
England. We fought through the long years of one 
war for our independence, and when this was achieved 
we fought another war for our rights upon the sea. 
These two contests left a root of bitterness in America 
for the mother country which is only now to be com- 
pletely eradicated as the blood of the two nations mingle 
as they flow into the soil of France. This Fourth of 
July we are allies of England and we are busy fighting 
in a war whicli concerns her even more vitally than it 
does us. 'The spiritual union of the Anglo-Saxon race 
may be one of the results of this war. 

There may be some who still fail to see how thor- 
oughly Americans share with England Anglo-Saxon 
rulture. We have a common language. In this coun- 
try we read Shakespeare and Milton as much as they 
do in Great Britain. In return for the writings of 
Shelley and Keats, we have given the poems of Long- 
fellow and Lowell. While Kipling is everywhere read 
in America, Mark Twain is everywhere read in Great 
Britain. There is no nation with which we have such 
close cultural relationships as with England. 

• • 

For a long time we were accustomed, on the Fourth 
of July, to stress the differences in government of Great 
Britain and America. There are, it is true, dift'erences 
of form, but not much difference in underlying concep- 
tions. The common law in the United States is the 
same as in England. Both nations have the guarantees 
of liberty. 

There was a time when it seemed that the two 
peoples were growing ever wider apart. England under 
the Georges was emphasizing the notion of authority. 
America under Jefferson and his democratic successors 
was emphasizing the notion of liberty. Had these two 
tendencies gone on unchecked, there would at last have 
developed a wide divergence of political sentiment. It 
is clear that in our day both nations are limiting the 
notion of an anarchistic liberty, and the need of the 
effective organization of modern life has driven both 
divisions of the Anglo-Saxon race to a great increase 
in democratic authority. Both here and across the 
water the government is invading new territory. Once 
it would have been no one's business if the coal barons 
robbed. Now the heavy hand of authority is laid upon 
them. There is a new solicitude with both governments 
for the welfare of all the people and there are develop- 
ing new methods of securing this welfare. 

In religious life, there was for awhile wide diverg- 
ence. Nearly all the denominations of Great Britain 
were transferred to our hospitable shores. Of the great 
evangelical bodies, the Disciples alone may call theirs 
an American movement, and even they can find the 
origin of their conceptions in the religious life of Scot- 
land and Ireland. 



As time went on, American churches became very 
free and unconventional. They had great energy and 
made many converts, but often lacked the stability and 
depth which is to be found in the British type of church. 
While on the other side the water there is still great 
insistence upon the standards of Puritanism, in this 
country the Puritan movement, whether for good or 
ill, is a waning one. 

Yet, in some respects, British churches ha\'e been 
more progressive than our own churches. They devel- 
oped the federation idea before we did. In Scotland, 
federation has brought union between the great non- 
conformist forces. In England, tlie same good result 
is about to be consummated. Great Britain is about 
twenty-five years ahead of us in the practical develop- 
ment of Christian union. 

In, the matter of the modernization of doctrine, 
we have also been slow. Preachers who come here 
from England wonder that we are now talking about 
higher criticism and evolution in the way they used to 
do twenty years ago. Some reactionaries are saying 
that modern theology is a German element in our life. 
Most of the modernizing literature our preachers have 
read has been British, though it is fair to admit the 
influence which German thought has had on all the 
Anglo-Saxons. 

The barrier of dift'erences in language has shut us, 
to a large degree, from the rest of Europe. No other 
nation could ever mean so much to us as that empire 
in which our own tongue is spoken. 

• • 

After the war is over, the necessities of world poli- 
tics may drive America and the British empire to a 
new understanding which will be in reality an alliance, 
even if not such in form. Politically, we will react upon 
each other in most significant ways. America may help 
toward the granting of larger liberty to Ireland. Eng- 
land may lead the way to better social activities on the 
part of our government. Lloyd George has much to 
teach us in the way of old age pensions, the handling 
of the problems of taxation and the curbing of land 
monopolies. 

This interaction in the field of politics will also be 
felt in religious matters. British church life might 
develop more of the motive power characteristic of our 
own church life. On the other hand, it is greatly to be 
desired that there should come into American religious 
life more of reverence and depth of religious experience. 

So upon this Fourth of July, we find ourselves re- 
united in the closest way with the motherland. We 
celebrate the day with much less noise and frothy ora- 
tory than in former days, but with a new and grateful 
sense that in the separation of the two peoples there 
has been opportunity for a growth of knowledge and 
of spiritual ideals. To the land of our political and 
religious origins, we give our hand in friendship. 



EDITORIAL 



.1 ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE series of articles by the editor on "Why I Am 
a Disciple," has already gone beyond the ten in- 
stallments at first contemplated, and having reached 
a convenient temporary stopping place, will be discon- 
tinued until the early fall. At that time the series will 
be resumed with a constructive consideration of the 
great task of Christian unity and the relation of the 
Disciples thereto. 

JOHN BARLEYCORN WAITS FOR THE 
VERDICT 



w 



ILL politics and special pleading be able to 
save John Barleycorn from the gallows? He 
is now on trial in the Congress of tlie United 
States and it looks like a conviction. 

His defenders have been most active. The wires 
to Washington have been blocked with messages from 
the interested men of the traffic who have threatened 
dire results from the war economy of ceasing to sup- 
port the criminal and ne'er-do-well of our economic 
system. Many have been scandalized to see a forward- 
looking newspaper like the Chicago Tribune champion- 
ing his cause. 

The liquor men have been trying to bolster up 
sentiment for the business by misrepresenting the sen- 
timent of the labor men of the country. Recently the 
Washington Post carried an advertisement stating that 
"2,082,637 workingmen petition the President and Con- 
gress against cutting off a habitual temperate bever- 
age." Rev. Charles Stelzle at once responded with a 
counter advertisement in which the falsity of this claim 
was shown up. Only a few laboring men of the country 
had participated in such a petition. 

New voices are being raised in behalf of prohibi- 
tion. Irving Fisher says : "With the submarine 
threatening England with starvation, with 20,000,000 
men taken from productive energies in Europe, and 
with a deficit in our own grain crop of 180,000,000 bush- 
els for this year, to waste one bushel, even for a harm- 
less luxury, would be criminal — and liquor is not harm- 
less." 

As we write, Congress is wavering and on the 
verge of action which would end the business during 
the war. The whole question with the national leaders 
is the question whether there is sentiment in the nation 
to support the measure. Concerning this there would 
be no doubt, if the millions of Christians who have a 
conscience on this matter should telegraph their con- 
gressmen and senators. It is a time for men who have 
convictions to speak up. If you do not send a telegram 
send a letter at once, and see that a hundred others of 
your church do the same. 

THE NATION CALLS ON THE CHURCHES 

ONE of the most interesting phenomena of this 
war-time is the way the administration is lean- 
ing upon the churches for support in govern- 
ment measures. This indicates that the President and 
his advisers have confidence in the loyalty and the 
efficiency of the churches. 

One of the most recent calls made upon the 
churches is for their co-operation with the nation in 
solving the food problem. Herbert C. Hoover, National 



Food Director, has written 200,000 religious organiza- 
tions asking their co-operation. 

"As a minister of God," writes Mr. Hoover, "a 
leader of the people and a lover of liberty and of your 
fellow men, your co-operation is earnestly desired and 
greatly needed. In such a time as this, the people nat- 
urally turn to the church. It will be a calamity to the 
nation, and to the churches, if their chosen ministers 
neglect to exercise their proper leadership in the great 
cause of feeding a world in need. For the world is in 
want of food." 

The church leaders are urged to preach against 
waste. They have a great text for this in the gospel 
story of the feeding of the multitudes. The fragments 
were gathered up in baskets. Careful saving of food 
in America would be worth fully $1,000,000,000 a year. 

There is also need of educating the people to use 
a wider range of food products. Certain magazines 
are now doing a most useful work in publishing menus 
and cooking recipes for food products but little known 
or used. 

The church can look at the matter from a some- 
what selfish point of view. Food conservation means a 
smaller burden of charity next winter. We ought to 
look on this call from our nation's leaders as an oppor- 
tunity to demonstrate our loyalty and our efficiency 
as a part of the social structure. Religious worship in 
the long ago made sacrifice of the typical food product. 
Shall not modern religion realize that it is not some- 
thing apart from the normal tasks of life, but a force 
to energize all the higher activities? 

THE HIRED ATTORNEY OF THE PULPIT 

4 i \7 OU do not preach like a hired attorney," was 

Y the compliment one of our ministers received 
lately. It set him thinking. Does the pulpit 
sound to many people like the biased pleading which 
goes on in the court of justice? 

A diplomatic school teacher, applying for a posi- 
tion in the mountain country, was asked whether he 
taught geography round or flat. He declared his will- 
ingness to teach it either way, as it might please the 
board of directors. Are there preachers who would 
mention baptism in every sermon, if they found a church 
under such reactionary influence as to ask for this sort 
of preaching? 

It is always easier for a little while to preach the 
things the people want. A minister left the Disciples 
some time ago and now justifies his change on the 
ground that he finds that he and the Congregationalists 
agree in everything! With all respect, we would sug- 
gest that he is a most unprofitable preacher for the 
Congregationalists. Many of their own preachers, born 
and bred among them, do not agree with many things 
in the common life of their churches. These are the 
preachers to help that denomination. 

There must be some big agreements, of course, or 
there could be no fellowship, but let no preacher think 
that he does his whole duty in concealing the things in 
which his thinking leads him into wider paths. The 
man who preaches the old sermons over again will be 
loudly applauded for a little while, but he will soon be 
packing his furniture. The most conservative church 



July 5, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



on earth loses respect for the hired attorney of the 
pulpit. 

Some of us can remember when it was our boast 
that our preachers everywhere preached alike. Thank 
God, that boast is no longer possible and we would no 
longer regard such an unhappy state as one to boast 
about. In all our differences of opinion is revealed an 
honesty in the search for truth that will greatly enrich 
the life of our people. 

A VACATION FOR THE MINISTER 

THE bow that is always bent loses its resiliency. 
These are days of very unusual tension for minis- 
ters. The personal problems they face are un- 
usually urgent. The coming of the vacation season will 
be welcomed by more than one tired worker. 

It is hardly necessary to exhort the churches con- 
cerning the wisdom of giving the minister a vacation. 
Most self-respecting churches have long since made 
definite provision for their minister's summer rest, 
granting them from three to six weeks away from their 
tasks. They have found it good business to let the 
minister go away for awhile. 

It is rather a violation of trust for the minister to 
leave his field and then do the same kind of work. He 
is sent away to rest, and he ought to rest. But when 
a church does not pay a living v/age, and the minister 
is offered a vacation, he is embarrassed. There seems 
nothing else to do but to pay his way as he goes. So 
in these days of the high cost of living it is well to in- 
quire whether the minister is provided with the funds 
he will need for his trip. 

The use of a vacation period is a fine art. It is 
possible to go away and come back worn out with one's 
"rest." A man should seek as much change as he can 
find. The city man will endeavor to get close to nature 
and the country minister might with profit spend part 
of his time in the city in the art museums, the parks 
and the libraries. 

Vacation time should give opportunity to recruit 
one's energies. Body, mind and soul will need exercise 
of some new sort. The minister who has been too busy 
to read can with profit take a few books away with him. 
It is no time, either, for spiritual slothfulness. The 
end of the vacation time should find a minister more 
religious and not less so. 

As the good days of boating and fishing and stroll- 
ing draw near, tired workers can thank God and take 
courage. They have a great year ahead of them, and 
now is the time to get ready for it. 

INDIVIDUALISM AND THE CITY PROGRAM 

THE history of the Disciples accounts for the indi- 
vidualism of our ministers and of our mem,bers. 
1 In the old days, the ministers were scattered 
and each man worked with no other direction than his 
[ conscience. In these times, after we have been made 
individualists by rural work, by congregational polity 
and by the relatively scattered character of much of 
the work in the past, we suddenly find that individual- 
ism does not work. 

Statistics show that the membership of the Dis- 
ciples is now predominantly in the cities, and that 
the percentage of city membership grows larger 
continually. City pastors find it embarrassing to live 
together in the old individualistic spirit. 



One minister of the old order complained bitterly 
when another church invaded his twenty square miles 
of city territory, but he declared in the same breath 
his right "to go anywhere and preach the gospel." The 
logic of his situation compels him to sacrifice either 
his independence or his efficiency as a city man. 

We have often failed in the cities by building up 
wrong standards of success. Men have been counted 
by their brethren as a success in the city because they 
have built up a local church, even though through the 
years they lived as anarchists, reckless of the interests 
of their brother pastors and indifferent to the common 
work of the Disciples. New standards must be erected. 
No man is a great city pastor who lacks interest in a 
city-wide program. 

The organization of a city for the propagation 
of our plea involves a central organization, such as a 
city missionary society or a combination of church 
boards, as in Kansas City. There should be an agree- 
ment that no new work shall be projected independ- 
ently. When new work is begun, it should be with 
the support of all the existing churches. By common 
counsel, methods and points of view must be worked 
out which fit the local community. A city program 
cannot arise theoretically in a far-away office of a sec- 
retary. It must be a result of trial, error and success. 

THE SPIRIT OF A SOLDIER 

1'^HE publication of the Letters and Diary of Alan 
Seeger calls attention again to the personality and 

career of the soldier-poet who, dying on the bloody 
field of Belloy-en-Santerre, in France, left behind him 
a fame which will perhaps be permanent. The way to 
fame for him was the writing of a remarkable poem, 
"I Have a Rendezvous With Death," which has been 
printed in thousands of papers throughout this and 
other countries. It was given to the readers of The 
Christian Century several weeks ago. 

A few days before the fatal charge of Belloy-en- 
Santerre, Seeger wrote to a friend : 

"We go up to the attack tomorrow. This will probably be 
the biggest thing yet. We are to have the honor of marching 
in the first wave. I will write you soon if I get through all 
right. If not, my only earthly care is my poems. Add the ode 
I sent you and the three sonnets to my last volume and you 
will have all my writings. 

"I am glad to be going in the first wave. If you are in 
this thing at all it is best to be in to the limit. And this is 
the supreme experience." 

The spirit of this young American patriot is des- 
tined to possess the hearts of America's millions before 
the great conflict is over. That the wisdom expressed 
in the last paragraph may be in the thought of all of our 
citizens is, without doubt, the hope of our national 
leaders, especially of the President of the United States : 
"If you are in this thing at all, it is best to be in to the 
limit." By the way of delay or half-heartedness we shall 
come to defeat or at least to a long extended conflict. 

THE SPLIT IN SOCIALISM 

THE greatly reduced vote of socialism last autumn 
indicated that something was happening to the 
movement in this country. Recently John Spargo 
resigned from the party without renouncing socialism. 
He declared that the greatest hindrance to socialism in 
this country is the socialist party. Thus at a time when 
the various governments of the world are showing 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 5, 1917_ 



more hospitality to socialistic devices than ever before, 
the official movement is meeting with ever less favor. 

John Spargo resigned from the party because of 
what he declared to be the pro-German activities of the 
leaders. It was strain enough on socialism when the 
socialists of Germany failed to protest the spoilation of 
J'elgium, but when an American political party becomes 
an agency favorable to Kaiserism, it is too much for 
the public to endure. There can be no future to the 
party in this country until it purges itself of such 
leaven. 

Many a man who is a socialist at heart has failed 
to vote with the party. These socialists who continue 
in the older parties are often offended by the anti- 
religious bias of the usual expounder of socialism. The 
most bitter and unfair interpretations of religion ha\e 
been given by the "soap-boxers" all over tlie country. 
While these attacks have turned some away from the 
church, they have turned many more away from so- 
cialism. 

The materialistic determinism that has gone witli 
much of the exposition of the Socialistic theory is also 
out of date and absurd in the light of modern pb.ilosophi- 
cal opinion. We cannot belie^'e that making a man 
prosperous in a socialistic state would ever make him 
good. The full dinner pail is no panacea for human ills. 

In the history of the church we have seen denom- 
inations destroyed through poor leaders. Political 
parties have been v.^recked by wrong-headed men. We 
would not like to see organized socialism disappear out 
of the world, for it has done good. But it must clean 
house or die. 

STUDYING THE CITY PROBLEM 

THE Methodist Episcopal church has much the 
same problem as the Disciples of Christ. In days 

gone by it has had a strong program in the coun- 
try but now its members are moving to the cities, and it 
realizes that it must follow them there and plant strong 
and effective churches. 

The Methodists are ahead of the Disciples in that 
they have organized for the study of the city problem. 
Here in Chicago, recently, was held a meeting of the De- 
partment of City Work of the Board of Home Missions 
and Church Extension. There were two delegates 
from each duly organized city society. This meeting 
is held annually for purposes of conference and discus- 
sion. 

Part of the time this year was devoted to a big 
drive in Chicago for a half million of endowment for city 
mission work in the cit3^ All of the visiting workers 
helped in the campaign. 

Among the speakers was Dr. D. L. Marsh of Pitts- 
burgh, who spoke on "The Relation of the City Society 
to Down-Town Churches and Suburban Communities." 
Dr. Elmer E. Pearce of Cleveland spoke on "The Mes- 
sage and Program of a Church in a Metropolitan Com- 
munity." The conference was alive with interest for 
those who are enlisted in the big job of making our 
great cities Christian. 

Though the Methodists are supposed to be a highly 
organized denomination, they have superintendents in 
the various cities like Chicago and others who are 
trusted with the local administration, under the advice 
of a local board. No Plome Mission functionary 
tries to make himself a pope in city administration. 
Each city has the opportunity to develop methods of 



work according to the experience in the local field, after 
it has been made aware of successful methods in other 
cities. 

In Disciple circles there is no such careful and sci- 
entific study of the city problem. Our city workers are 
not numerous, but they do not know each other very 
well. Are we not missing something we cannot afford 
to lose? 

ENCOURAGING THE CHURCH TRAMP 

MOST cities have adopted some device for dealing 
with the traveling mendicant whom we fa- 
miliarly call a tramp. We have found that our 
charities in the past served only the purpose of building 
up a class which is not desirable in our American life. 

The religious tramp is a phenomenon of a serious^ 
nature for the churches. He is not a foe to religion. 
He is indeed a believer, in a way, although he asserts 
with a pseudo-liberality that "one church is as good as 
another." Pie travels around to the "special services" 
which one church after another serves tip in order to 
secure a crowd. The churches often do not go behind 
the returns. There are crowds and there are crowds. 

The church tramp is a Christian who refuses to 
assume any responsibilities. Pie does not want to work 
regularly. He does not want to give regularly, though 
he drops a chance nickel into the plate. His attitude is 
one of unconcern with regard to the welfare of the 
churches. Pie gets his amusement and his sociability 
from the churches at the minimum of expense. He asks 
for no more. 

Just now, in many communities, the churches are 
actively competing for the presence of the church tramp. 
With concerts and secular lectures and moving pic- 
tures of doubtful religious value, they seek to bring the 
floaters to their places of worship. Their success is 
as transient as is the interest of the people who come. 

The cure for church tramps is a serious attitude 
on the part of the church. Smaller audiences may fol- 
low such an attitude, but they will be audiences yielding 
a more permanent harvest to religion. The serious- 
minded pastor may not be known just now as a crowd- 
getter, but he will be known in the end as a church- 
builder. 

Meanwhile, the honest doubter outside the church 
is not offended by flippancy in the face of problems 
which to him are of life and death importance. When 
the church makes her appeal to truth-seekers and not 
to the sensation-seekers, she will be a stronger church. 



WHAT RELIGION IS 

By religion I mean the power, whatever 
it may be, which makes a man choose what is 
hard rather than what is easy, what is lofty and 
noble rather than what is mean and selfish ; 
that puts courage into timorous hearts, and 
gladness into clouded spirits; that consoles 
men in grief, misfortune, and disappointment ; 
that makes them joyfully accept a heavy 
burden ; that, in a word, uplifts men out of the 
domain of material things, and sets their feet 
in a purer and simpler region. — A. C. Benson. 



Preaching to British Soldiers 

Graphic Story of Religious Meeting in England's War Camp 



i ( >^'^ OME on, boys, let's have a 

V J sing-song! What shall it 
^^ be?" 

"Arizona ! Tennessee ! At my home 
in Kentucky ! Pack up your troubles 
in your old kit bag !" There are a 
score of different suggestions. Then 
Jack selects what he pleases ; he meant 
to all along, anyway. He sits down 
to the piano ; he is the only song leader 
who doesn't look around for an ac- 
companist ; then he shouts : 

"Come on ! Let's go !" That's all 
that is necessary. The Tommies do 
the rest. The dust comes down off 
the rafters. 

After a half hour of uproarious 
choruses, varied by solos from Jack, 
and one or two hymns or home songs, 
to lead up to the spoken word, Jack 
turns the meeting over to me. By this 
time the hut is jammed, men are stand- 
ing crowded all around the windows. 
Sometimes they sit all over the plat- 
form and on the floor in the aisles. 

A TASK TO HOLD THE TOMMIES 

Now when a speaker has a slippery 
audience like this delivered into his 
hand, it is like manipulating an eel. 
Fancy giving out a text and saying: 
"Now. i3rethren " One might de- 
liver a moving sermon, it would move 
Tommy out of the door. No. no. all 
of our men have made a conscientious 
study of their opening sentences ; for 
they know that with Tommies the 
v/hole thing is won or lost in the first 
two minutes. Hold that audience for 
five minutes in any way, by hook or 
crook, and you can swing into a moral 
or religious drive and make it as 
strong as you like ; you couldn't shoo 
your audience away. They'll stay 
with you, glued to the benches, for an 
hour. 

One of our men. for I have seen 
them all in action, begins : 

"If there's a man here homesicker 
than I am. he'd better beat it ! I want 
to see my little kid at home !" Tommy 
yells with laughter and sympathy. 

Another throws out this, like a shot 
from a 6-inch gim : 

"Up till the other day you and I 
were cousins ; now we are brothers- 
in-the-blood !" 

B. A. JENKINS' OWN PLAN 

For myself, I have evolved out of 
old borrowed witticisms something 
like this : 

"Tell me, men, honor bright and on 
the square, if we hadn't been intro- 



By Burris A. Jenkins 

(Copyright, 1917, by Burris A. Jenkins.) 

duced as Americans you wouldn't have 
known it, would you?" 

Groans, yells, catcalls and "Oh, no ! 
Sure! G'wan!" 

Then I add : 

"A fellow said to me the other day : 
'You can always tell an American, but 
you can't tell him much !' " 

More groans, and an inquiring 
frame of mind. They don't know 
whether this is proverbial American 
boasting or not. Then : "I have heard, 
too. that the difference between an 
Englishman and an American is about 
this : An Englishman walks into a 
Iiouse as if he owned the whole damn 
place. An American walks in as if he 
didn't give a damn who owned the 
place." 

We are now getting on. Tommy 
feels sure there is no firstly, secondly 
and thirdly coming along. I usually 
consult the secretary or the chaplain 
before introducing this unexpurgated. 
old threadbare comparison which, I 
believe, was first made between a Har- 
vard man and a Yale man ; but I find 
it usually unnecessary to consult long 
at a time. 

"Anyway, I hope that some day 
Englishman and American may walk, 
each in his own way. into certain 
houses in Potsdam and Berlin " 

SOLDIERS ARE GOOD LISTENERS 

And the trick is done. I now have 
Tommy by the ear; and better audi- 
ence one need not desire on this earth, 
more appreciative, sensitive, quick to 
any appeal of humor, emotion, moral 
motive or spiritual idealism. You can 
talk about this war driving the people 
who are in it to atheism ; it does, a 
few, but the vast majority are driven 
to their knees. The huts do not 
gather in simply the religious ; they 
gather in, with their tea and cakes, old 
scarred veterans and soft-cheeked lads 
indiscriminately, all sorts and condi- 
tions, excellent cross-sections they are, 
of the entire British army. 

ALWAYS CHEER WILSON 

In the first five minutes I generally 
drag in a reference to "Teddy" Roose- 
velt. It always takes fire. Last night 
a man arose in the middle of the house 
and tossed a bronze insignia upon the 
platform at my feet. I have it before 
me now. It is the colonel's face sur- 
rounded with the words, "First Regi- 
ment, Chicago Rough Riders." I 
meet scores and scores of Americans, 
mostly in the Canadian battalions, but 
some in the other Imperials. 



Then shortly I refer to President 
Woodrow Wilson and there is a 
hearty, generous round of applause. 
The average Englishman now looks 
upon our President as a very wise, 
careful, conservative man. An officer 
told me the past week that Lloyd 
George had said to him sometime ago 
that America ought not to have come 
in any sooner than she did ; she was 
of more use as a neutral than as a 
belligerent until just now. 

\'^iewed from outside, a Red Tri- 
angle hut in the British camps rep- 
resents very much the appearance of 
a ranch house on our western plains. 
It is long, low, rectangular ; built of 
rough boards and stained brown. 
There is a counter at one end where 
are sold cigarettes, chocolate, coffee, 
stamps and the various necessities and 
luxuries of Tommy Atkins' life. There 
are tables where tea. coffee, malted 
milk and soft bottled drinks are dis- 
pensed, together with biscuits and 
cakes. In some huts there are billiard 
tables ; in all, checkers, chess and 
cards. At the other end of the room 
is a stage, with piano and an audi- 
torium. 

THEY SERVE TEA, OF COURSE 

In the late afternoon, when drill is 
done, and the Tommies are tired, hun- 
gry and thirsty, the huts fairly swarm, 
like bee hives ; and business is brisk. 
Your Englishman prizes his tea be- 
yond measure ; and the United King- 
dom consumes more sugar than any 
other nation in the world. Yesterday 
a Canadian Y. M. C. A. secretary was 
decorated by King George in Hyde 
Park with the Military Cross because, 
at Vimy Ridge, he kept up with the 
advancing line, and served chocolate 
and biscuits to the men, under shell 
fire. 

The Canadian secretaries who first 
came out were commissioned as cap- 
tains, later ones as lieutenants, and 
are under military orders ; but as the 
authorities are distinctly favorable to 
the organization, these officers have 
wide discretion. The English secre- 
taries are civilians, independent, for 
the most part are dressed in "civics," 
and consider that they have an ad- 
vantage in not being officers. The 
Canadians, too, prefer their own 
regime. In general, the Canadian 
huts are better manned and managed, 
and, so far as one can see, their secre- 
taries get as close to the men as do 
the civilian secretaries among the Eng- 
lish troops. Still it may be added, all 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 5, 1917 



Canadian officers are much more 
democratic with their men than are 
the English. 

Y. M. C. A. LOSES MONEY 

The huts furnish tons and tons of 
writing paper, free, to the men ; and, 
as a consequence, the tables are full 
in off hours of busy writers. The 
Y. M. C. A. makes money in some of 
its canteens and loses in others ; but, 
on the whole, does not pay expenses. 
Private subscriptions make up the de- 
ficit. Canadian secretaries are paid 
as officers; English are practically un- 
paid. 

The other day all the officers in a 
certain command having fallen, the 
Y. M. secretary took charge, led the 
men, and was killed ; he was blown to 
bits ; he was not even found. The 
English secretaries are undersized, or 
over thin, or crippled, or too old for 
service. Some men, fairly fit, have 
been taken from the huts and hurried 
to the trenches. I met a little thin 
rector in a hut at Aldershot the other 
day who has asked for and received 
an appointment in France to go right 
into the dugout huts in the trenches. 
He starts next week. 

TRAVELING MAN Y. M. LEADER 

One of our favorite song leaders in 
the huts is a Canadian, Captain Pe- 
c^uegnat, familiarly known everywhere 
here as "Captain Peg," who was 
gassed in the very first gas attack in 
France. Fie has never entirely re- 
covered, as the puffed look about the 
eyes indicates ; but his singing voice is 
unimpaired, also his jovial smile, that 
made him once a successful commer- 
cial traveler all over the American 
continent. He understands all the 
Tommies, and they, him ; he can make 
them roar like bulls of Bashan and 
render them wild with joy, like March 
hares, whatever they are. He "car- 
ries on" for half an hour before in- 
troducing a speaker. "Carry on" is a 



I The Student Goes to War | 

I SAW the spires of Oxford = 

As I was passing by, I 

= THE grey spires of Oxford | 

I Against a pearl grey sky; 1 

I My heart was with the Oxford men I 

I Who went abroad to die. | 

I They left the peaceful river, | 

I The cricket field, the quad, \ 

I The shaven lawns of Oxford \ 

I To seek a bloody sod. I 

I They gave their merry youth away I 

I For country and for God. | 

I God rest you, happy gentlemen, \ 

i Who laid your good lives down, I 

i Who took the khaki and the gun | 

I Instead of cap and gown. I 

I God bring you to a fairer place \ 

I Than even Oxford town. \ 
1 — From "Hallowe'en and Poems of I 

I the War," by W. M. Letts. | 



iiiiiiiniiiriniiiiiiiiiiii 



iiiiiiiiliiniititifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMfiiiiliiiiriiiiliiliilittiniiiitiiii 



favorite word here for "perform," 
and is constantly in use. 

My own steady sidepartner — for we 
usually travel in pairs, a singer and a 
speaker — is young Jack Barker, who 
hails from Girard, Kas., and who has 
been the last five years in Chicago. 
He has just been graduated from 
Northwestern, president of his class, 
leader of the glee club, an athlete of 
great success, runs 100 yards in 10 
seconds flat, has a barytone that gives 
him a steady job in a Chicago quartet 
choir, and a smile that draws young 
men to him like submarines to a net — 
blindly. He can play and sing more 
kinds of ragtime than even an Eng- 
lishman ever dreamed of. 

JACK BARKER PERFORMS 

We go into a hut at about 7 p. m., 
usually ; Jack goes to the piano, on the 
platform, beats out a storm of pseudo- 
negro melody that sets shoulders to 
wriggling, feet to shuffling, eyes to 
dancing ; and when he finishes with a 
bang like a bomb from a German air- 
craft, the Tommies yell. Then Jack 
just looks at them and grins, and they 
yell some more. 

At the close of our meetings we 
usually give the men a chance to sign 
pledge cards of religious confession 
and allegiance — a card indorsed by the 
archbishop of Canterbui^y as well as 
by Free Church leaders. Any man 
may conscientiously sign it, no matter 
what his Christian denomination or 
predilection ; and from thirty to a 
hundred and thirty usually sign every 
night. Some ask us to write and tell 
their wives or families what they have 
done. 

FINDS KANSAS CITY BOY 

The other night a Kansas City lad, 
in a Canadian battalion, whose par- 
ents did not know where he was, 
promised to write next day to his 
mother, while I wrote to his father. 

Then last thing of all comes the 
hand-shaking — Tommy loves to shake 
hands, and Jack usually announces, 
after we sing "The King," which 
closes every public meeting in the Brit- 
ish army, that we shall be glad to 
shake hands with every man in the 
room. "Please come down this side 
and go out that side." And they come ! 
It was hard on our muscles at first, 
but now we're used to it, for Tommy 
shakes hands as if he meant it. Then 
it's: "Thank you, Jack," "Glad you 
came, captain," "Come again," "God 
bless you." 

And we answer as they file by : 
"Thanks, old man," "Mighty glad to 
be here," "God keep you, my lad," 
"Good luck to you all the way," and 
so on. 

"may god TAKE CARE OF YOu" 

Sometimes one pauses and asks a 
question or presents a problem; then 



it is a word of quick answer and a 
hasty "God take care of you" ; for they 
know and we know they have need 
enough of God's care; tomorrow they 
may be in the trenches ; the day after, 
over the parapet ; maybe over the dark 
river. 

Then Jack stands by the piano and 
they gather around him like flies on a 
sugar lump ; and I take a chair on the 
auditorium floor, and there are several 
files deep all around me, their faces 
pressed almost against my own, eager 
eyes straining and tongues going. 
Questions and comments come quick 
and fast. The American navy, the 
submarines, the air craft, the merits 
and possibilities of cavalry, and the 
old, old question. "How long do you 
think it will last, captain?" pour forth 
in a torrent. 

SOME WOULD JOIN U. S. ARMY 

"Yes, sir, this wound came from 
'La Bassee.' " "I got mine at Vimy 
Ridge." "Yes, sir, wounded twice, 
and back to France next week." "How 
can I get a transfer to the American 
army?" "I got mine in the thigh. I 
can walk three miles as good as any 
man, but not thirty. I'm done. But 
I could teach bayonet work and bomb 
throwin', sir." 

Sometimes your throat is full and 
choked. 

Jack has been challenged by certain 
battalions in the Winchester district 
to run this week. Jack is very modest, 
but he said quietly : 

"Yes, I'll run. I'll run any man in 
the British army, win or lose." They 
like such sporting blood over here. 

I'll write about this race later on. 



"We must commune with Christ if 

we are to communicate Christ," — 

Doughty. 

* * 

"Poverty is comparative. In Cen- 
tral Africa few have enought to eat." 

— Lanibie. 



A LITANY FOR WARTIME | 

By Grant Weatherly | 

This is my country. _ | 

Hitherto I have lived in it; _ \ 

Henceforth I will live for it. \ 

For that it has freely ministered to me, | 

Now will I also cheerfully sacrifice for \ 

it. . I 

As in peace time it has made my life | 

secure, . | 

So will I nozv be of those who defend it. \ 

As it has before given me untrammeled \ 

liberty, . . I 

Now will I do or abstain as it shall di- | 

rect. I 

Because it has made real my best ideals | 

and purposes, . , i 

/ will give without reservation a patriot's | 

devotion, . I 

That unhampered it may go on to its | 

high mission, I 

And transmit to those who come after a \ 

stainless heritage. | 

uiiiiiiiMiMiMiii iiiiiimmiiui)ilniuniriinniiiiiiiiilliiiiiliMnniiuiiiiiiriiiiiiiiriiiiiiiininiiiiiii t 



"Ecclesiasticism" 

By Judge J. F. Holt 

President of the 1917 Convention of the Texas Christian Missionary Society 



A WORD has sprung up among 
us which many of us hold very 
dear. It is a big word. It is 
difficult to spell, but not to pronounce. 
It is the word "Ecclesiasticism." This 
word has come to have a very peculiar 
meaning to many. It is made to pre- 
vent every effort or is often used to 
prevent efforts to enlarge our work 
and meets us in almost every effort to 
co-operate. If one of our enthusiastic 
secretaries dares to apportion one of 
our congregations, the cry is often 
raised in the land and this is called by 
that big word and it is asked "who 
appointed him to lord it over us?" 



MISSIONARY ECCLESIASTICISM 

Had some of these brethren lived 
in Paul's day when he was so strongly 
urging the collection for the needy 
saints at Jerusalem, they would have 
asked of Paul the very same question. 
We are independent. We need the 
money at home anyway. We have the 
heathen at our very door and the poor 
at our door; why send it away off to 
Jerusalem. Who is paying the ex- 
penses anyway? 

If it is "ecclesiasticism" for our 
Foreign Society with all the eloquence 
of McLean, Rains, Wilson, Cory, 
Doan and others and with all the 
earnestness possible to ask and urge 
us to give more than half a million 
dollars in one year to take the word 
to the ends of the earth, if it is "ec- 
clesiasticism" when they ask for the 
means with which to send out this year 
fifteen new missionaries, when they 
ask that mission study classes be or- 
ganized in each Sunday School or 
congregation and that daily prayer be 
offered for the success of the plans, I 
say if that is "ecclesiasticism" let us 
have more of it. 

If it is "ecclesiasticism" for our C. 
W. B. M. sisters to strongly and per- 
sistently urge the banding together of 
200,000 women and to the raising of 
$800,000 per annum by 1921, that the 
gospel may be preached and the lost 
rescued, let us have more of that. We 
need it. Let that kind of "ecclesiasti- 
cism" have no fears for us. Our luke- 
warm congregations listening to the 
music from their beautiful pipe organ, 
reveling in luxuries, need it ; our 
brethren flying over the good roads 
in super-eights need it. Let it have 
no fears for us. 

THE QUESTION OF METHODS 

Some of us are very much con- 
cerned over the way the work is done. 
We admit it should be done. We ad- 
mit the world must be saved and that 
if we are to save any part of it we 
must do it now. All that is plain, but 



what is your plan and is it scriptural? 
Shall we work as individuals or shall 
we give and work as congregations ? 
Shall we assemble on the delegate plan 
or on the "mass meeting" plan? Shall 
we give as a congregation or shall each 
one give independently? These and 
similar questions rise up to haunt us. 
Some of us are sticklers for precedents 
and we want to know just how it was 
done in the early days — though we 
sometimes differ even as to this. Some 
of us want the authority for the or- 
ganization of a corporation to handle 
on a large scale the money given for 
a stated purpose. 

If the particular way in which we 
were to do our Lord's work had been 
very important, do you not think our 
Lord would have indicated it very 
plainly ? He did not point out the 
way our work is to be done through 
all the ages and changes of time. He 



endowed man with certain talents to 
keep against the day of His return 
and we must use these. He left us 
the Commission, our marching or- 
ders. 

ORGANIZATION OF CHURCH TO GROW 
WITH NEEDS 

Assuming that the way selected is 
honorable, is without reproach, is of 
good report, I register it as my can- 
did belief that the way is not im- 
portant at all. Whether we contribute 
as congregations, as individuals, as 
Bible schools, or as classes, what dif- 
ference does it make ? Whether we 
send it to a corporation to distribute, 
or to an individual, or to a committee 
of individuals, what does it matter? 
Let us select common sense, practical 
methods and if there be any virtue, if 
there be any praise, let us adopt and 
use them trusting the Lord for results. 



Christ's Call Today 

A BROKEN and shattered world needs 
Christ more than ever. The more men 
hate, the more must we love. The more 
men despair, the more must we hope and believe. 
The more men draw dividing lines, the more must 
we walk across them. The more men obey the 
law of the brute and the serpent, the more must 
we assert the law of Jesus and the kingdom of 
God. The more others rake over the ashes of 
the past, the more must we kindle the fires of 
the future. Happy are they who can combine 
the marching vigor of spirited youth with the 
trained intellect of educated men, and place all 
their powers at the command of him who is the 
Master because he was the Servant. They are 

alive ! 

Walter Rauschenbusch. 



God's Miracle Through the Church 



CAN we become serious enough 
in time? Away back in those 
Asiatic lands and in the Latin- 
American countries and in Africa, it 
is a time to press the claims of Christ 
as never before, for the very reason 
that so many people have missed the 
way, for the very reason that we have 
so few safe guides. 

HIDDEN RESOURCES OF YOUTH 

I do hope that, whatever we do, we 
will not diminish the number of new 
missionaries that we send out in these 
days. Missionaries will never go to 
these continents at any time like this 
present. A verse on which I would 
like some day to hear an adequate 
sermon is this: "When Thy judg- 
ments are in the world, the people 
shall learn righteousness." God's 
judgments are in the world today to 
an extent that the world has never 
before seen them, and the people are 
ready to learn righteousness if we 
have enough teachers. The summons 
of the Church is to put a call upon 
the people and vigorously apply the 
sickle in all the harvest fields, near 
and far. 

There is another summons, and that 
is for us to grant an outlet for these 
comparatively latent hidden resources 
among the young manhood and wo- 
manhood of the churches of America. 
We have had to learn this in a very 
painful way. The other day I re- 
ceived a book from a friend in Eng- 
land that gave the names of about 
11,000 graduates and under-graduates 
of Oxford, who had entered this war 
since it began, most of them as offi- 
cers. Cambridge could have made 
up and sent to me a book of about 
the same number, if I may judge by 
that supplement issued recently by one 
of the London papers. 

SOME ASTOUNDING FIGURES 

Some of you have heard of my 
advocating the watchword of the 
Student Volunteer Movement, which 
reads, "The evangelization of the 
world in this generation." I was criti- 
cised for advocating that in this word- 
ing, on the ground that I estimated it 
would require such an addition to the 
missionary forces that would necessi- 
tate about 20,000 of these young men 
and young women of American col- 
leges and the other colleges of 
Christendom devoting themselves to 
the missionary career. I said, "Why 
do you criticise that?" My critics 
answered, "We do not believe that the 
universities of Christendom could 
stand the strain of losing" — think of 
the word ! — "losing an average of 



By John R. Mott 

about 800 of their best men and 
women each year for thirty years." 
And yet in Oxford and Cambridge, 
in less than three years, go out to this 
sublime cause more than we wanted 
from all the universities of the world 
in thirty years. 

Not long before Christmas, I had a 
cablegram from Germany asking if I 
would give permission for the print- 
ing of a special edition of one of my 
books that had been translated years 
ago into German, in order that the 
book might be sent out as a Christmas 
present to 43,000 German students in 
the trenches. In other words, Ger- 
many fed into the trenches more than 
twice as many of their students and 
professors as we wanted from all the 
universities of the world in a genera- 
tion of thirty years for the world- 
wide spread of the Christian religion. 

DIFFICULT PROGRAM NEEDED 

You will never hear me make again 
such small demands upon the young 
men of this coimtry or of any other 
nation. I have come to see, as you 
have, in these fateful days, these suf- 
fering days, how latent, how compara- 
tively latent, among the young man- 
hood and the young womanhood of 
our nation, as well as these others, are 
activities for adventure, activities for 
sacrifice, activities for leadership, 
activities for statesmanship, for de- 
votion, the lack of which we 
had not dreamed existed in our 
generation. Let these capacities be 
called forth by the churches, by faith, 
by heroic appeal. Make the Gospel 
difficult, and you make it triumphant. 
We need to overcome the tendency to 
luxury and softness and ease in our 
generation, to summon the manhood 
and womanhood of our day to diffi- 
cult tasks. Christianity has the only 
program that is sufficiently difficult. 

The Church is summoned by this 
new world situation to strike with dis- 
tinctness and with great insistence the 
high note of love. It is an embit- 
tered world. 

A POEM BY AN UNBELIEVER 

I want to read you a poem that was 
written by an unbeliever. Remember 
that as I read it — an unbeliever. I 
am glad we have people who can 
answer it as only believers can ; but, 
remember, we have got to answer it ; 
we have got to answer it by the op- 
posite. This appeared in the Labor 
Leader. It it not an exaggeration 
from the point of view of the unbe- 
liever. It can only be answered by 
the opposite : 



"An unbeliever — oft I went 

Into church to find content. 

And waited that my soul might see 

Man's most Divine Humanity. 

Ah! Not for me the peace of prayer, 

Nor all the bliss of worship there. 

Though holy with antiquity, 

Scant comfort had the creed for me. 

Yet creed nor ritual scarce could hide 

The spirit of the Crucified. 

And from the church's inmost shrine 

Christ's very eyes looked into mine. 

"Within the church again I stood, 
When half the world was red with blood. 
And said — Here shall I find release 
From strife! Here reigns the Prince of 

Peace! 
That still, small voice I'll hear again, 
More potent than the rage of men! 
Here calm-eyed reason shall discourse. 
Proclaiming force no cure for force. 
And bidding men — as Peter's Lord 
Bade him of old — 'Put up the sword!' 
But in God's house I found dark Hate 
And Fury set in Love's estate. 
The songs of peace are put away, 
Christ's priests cry out, 'Go forth and 

slay!' 
And in the church, my soul unblest, 
I see my Christ in khaki drest." 

THE CFIURCHES IN THE WAR 

Before America and Roumania en- 
tered the war there were 46,000,000 
Protestants in the armies of one side 
and 45,000,000 Protestants on the 
other side; 62,000,000 Roman Catho- 
lics on one side and 63,000,000 Roman 
Catholics on the other side; 110,000 
Greek Catholics, at the lowest esti- 
mate, on one side and a much smal- 
ler number in the Greek Church 
colonies of the Turkish Empire and 
in Bulgaria on the other side. 

Listen to the unbeliever as he goes 
on: 

"Oh, sadder than the blood which rains 
Its fruitless showers on Europe's plains! 
Oh, sadder than the widow's moan 
Or Belgium's suffocated groan! 
Man's heavenliest Gospel is denied, 
His blackest crime is sanctified. 
And through great Europe's war-drunk 

lands 
Christ's Church for bloody violence 

stands. 

"For when the state unsheathed the sword 
The servile Church forgot her Lord. 
Among the nations had she stood 
For Europe's wider brotherhood. 
Had she recked less of earthly things 
And served alone the King of Kings, 
Her word had curbed in that wild hour 
The people's rage, the kinglet's power. 

"Though sect and schism-torn she be. 
She's one in her apostasy, 
For in that ancient Church of God, 
Where men acknowledge Peter's rod. 
Or where the lowly blood is blest 
By holy icons manifest; 
In cities where great Luther stood, 
Where men still pray to Luther's God, 
Alike where English belfries chime 
Their solemn note at worship time, 
Or in those homes of simple prayer 
Where bows the pious covenanter; 
Where Bunyan speaks, or Wesley sings. 
Or fervent hallelujah rings, — 



July 5, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



13 



The Church with one voice speaks today, 

'In Jesus' name, go forth and slay!' 

This is the Antichrist to be! 

This is the second Calvary! 

Lo! In the fanes of His renown 

The broken heart of Christ looks down." 

It is the unbeliever, but even he saw 
partly straight. He saw that all this 
was not due to Christ, but to the lack 
of Christ. He did not see all that 
you see in answer to this ; but he saw 
enough to make it plain that the 
Church is summoned today to provide 
the antidote — that is, to sound out the 
note of love which is the distinctive 
command of Christianity. 

THE NOTE OF FAITH 

The other no'te we must send with 
great distinctness and insistence is the 
note of faith. I was talking with a 
royal personage on my last journey to 
Europe, and she said to me, when I 
asked, "How is this war to be ended?" 
"Mr. Mott, God must work a mir- 
acle." I have heard no more pene- 
trating remark in all those interviews 
that I had in the war zone. God must 
work a miracle. The things that are 
impossible with man are easily pos- 
sible with God. Around us is an at- 
mosphere of divine or superhuman 
resources to meet this doubting. To 
answer these unanswered questions, 
the Church must sound a note of 
faith. We profess belief in a super- 
human religion. We rise on Sunday 
morning, and say, "I believe in God 
the Father Almighty" — all-mighty? 
Do our actions indicate that we be- 
lieve? Is that note being struck? Do 
our prayers give evidence that we 
clearly believe that this great struggle 



can only be ended in the right way, 
by God alone? Have we reached the 
limit ? Has this process got to be ex- 
tended further before we learn this 
deep lesson, that the only one who has 
ever worked miracles, to whom it is 
natural to do the supernatural, must 
be inquired of? 

THE NOTE OF PRAYER 

I say again : the Church is sum- 
moned to sound the note of faith, and, 
therefore, of prayer. We are sum- 
moned to sound the note of hope 
against this awful black background. 
In that gnawing hunger that may be 
coming toward us, all that wasting 
disease, all that piercing pain, all that 
moral collapse, all that zone of pes- 
simism that is deepening and widen- 
ing, all that increasing bitterness with- 
in the confines of the churches, I see 
the beauty that is in the world, and I 
maintain with you that it is the great 
function of Christians in the darkest 
hours to proclaim the coming dawn, to 
go out with the only Gospel that the 
world has ever known, which teaches 
that love shall conquer hate, that light 
shall dissipate the darkness, that good 
shall triumph over ill, that where sin 
did abound nationally and internation- 
ally as well as personally, grace shall 
yet much more abound. 

We are called upon to sound a note 
of reality. How incongruous and 
startling it would be that at the end 
of a time like this and in front of a 
new world situation, when whole na- 
tions and peoples are stretched on the 
Calvary cross, any Christian should 
go out and live a selfish life. Rather 



may we lose ourselves in the great 
cause we love, and with new meaning 
and new purpose of heart place our- 
selves at His disposal, henceforth to 
do His will and not our own, cost what 
it may ! 



CREEDS AND TRUTH 

It is in the interest of the perma- 
nence of creeds that they should be 
capable of growing and changing, put- 
ting ofif old forms and taking on new 
forms, receiving and casting off, get- 
ting rid of doubtful and disputable 
things, and simplifying into the things 
found to be reliable and vital. 

To this tendency all the churches 
are confessing; all are showing some 
signs of realization that Truth is the 
only foundation of a creed instead of 
a creed being the foundation of Truth, 
and that the oftener a creed puts it- 
self into line with Truth and shows 
that it can live with new and fewer 
words, and even without words, since 
our strongest religious constitutions 
are ever unwritten, the more people 
will trust in it and incline to believing 
instead of denying. 

Then we can all think alike in one 
creed at least, the creed of creeds, the 
belief in believing, and in making be- 
lief honest and deep, so that the love 
of God shall be with all the mind 
and all the heart and so with all the 
life. — The Christian Register. 



To love truth for truth's sake is the 
principal part of perfection in this 
world, and the seed plot of all other 
virtues. — John Locke. 



iiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiJiinitii 



iiiiiimmminiitiimi 



The Skeptics 

By Thomas Curtis Clark 

THEY tell me God is but a dream, 
A baseless fancy of the mind; 
That conscience is a fitful gleam, 
A passing whisper from the wind. 

They tell me there is only man, 
And he a breathing piece of clay ; 

They say all life is but a span, 
With nothing certain but today. 

They tell me only evil is. 

That good is but a thing of air; 

They say there are no mysteries. 
That all is plain — and all's despair; 

That faith is but desire to live. 

That hope is born of minds grown weak. 
That love is lust; that those who give 

Some better gain for self would seek. 



They say death ends life's little dream — 
And yet they fear what comes with death ; 

They say they wish no cheering gleam — 
And yet they cherish every breath ! 

Do they in truth prefer the night? 

Are they content in doubt to grope? 
As God is God, they seek the light; 

They crave a living, saving hope. 

Let them but open wide their eyes — 
And all about is God's great day ! 

Let them be willing to be wise — 

And there before them leads the way ! 

The One who walked in Galilee 

Still walks with men to guide them on, — 

The One whom we no longer see, 
Yet see more clearly — by His dawn. 

Their heart His every word approves. 
And yet they will not heed His voice. 

Whose message is, "God lives and loves," 
Whose spirit is, "Rejoice, rejoice!" 



niiininiiiiiiiiii 



iiniiiiimiiiiiitiiiiiinini 



iiniiinittiniuiiiinniMiiiMitMMiiiiniiiniMiMtiiiniiiiniHnnMMUiuMMUiuiiiiiiiniiiMiitinmiiiuiniimiMmmMiMMiMiMiimiiiniiiimmMiMiiiiniiiMiin 



14 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 5, 1917 




The Purple Land. By William 
H. Hudson. This is a new edition of 
that charming account of travels in the 
Banda Oriental, in South America, 
by the writer famous both for his 
imaginative power and the style of 
his composition. The work first ap- 
peared thirty years ago, but today 
has all the freshness of its first years. 
An introductory chapter by Theodore 
Roosevelt lends a background to Mr. 
Hudson's narrative. (E. P. Button, 
New York.) 

Poems. By Ralph Hodgson. This 
little sheaf of verse includes a num- 
ber of brief poems remarkable for 
their insight and freshness — among 
these such poems as "The Mystery," 
"The Beggar," "Babylon," etc. 
"Eve" is strange and fascinating. Mr. 
Hodgson is an English writer too lit- 
tle known in America. (Macmillan 
Company, New York. 75 cts.) 

* * * 

African Adventures. By Jean 
Kenyon Mackenzie. This interesting 
volume is published with view to its 
use in mission study classes and it is 
admirably fitted for such use; but it 
is a veritable mine of information for 
all religious workers as to conditions 
in what used to be "darkest Africa," 
but which, thanks to the missionaries, 
is being transformed into a region of 
light. (Central Committee on the 
United Study of Foreign Missions. 
West Medford, Mass. 30 cts, paper 
covered; boards, 50 cts.) 

* * * 

Matthew Arnold: How to Know 
Him. By Stuart P. Sherman. A 
fresh appraisal of Arnold, poet and 
critic of books, of men, of education 
and religion. Misunderstood in his 
own day, Matthew Arnold is found 
by this author to be an ever increasing 
force in today's life. This is the latest 
of the valuable "How to Know Him" 
series of studies edited by Professor 
W. D. Howe. (Bobbs Merrill Com- 
pany, Indianapolis. $1.50 net.) 



25,000 Words Frequently Mis- 
pronounced. By Frank H. Vizetelly. 
A desk-book of great value to pro- 
fessional people especially but also to 
every one who cares to speak good 
English and to pronounce correctly. 
The most complete consensus of Eng- 
lish pronunciation ever compiled. 
Funk & Wagnalls Co., New York. 

$1.60 net.) 

* * * 

Heroes of the Campus. By Jos. 
W. Cochran. "The records of those 
few knightly souls who, burning out 



for God, kindled unquenched fires in 
the lives of their fellow students." 
Thirteen studies, including those of 
Horace Tracy Pitkin, of Yale, Wil- 
liam W. Borden, of Yale, and Pitt G. 
Knowlton, of Oberlin. (Westminster 
Press, Philadelphia. 60 cts. net.) 

The Upper Room Bulletin, 1916- 
17. Contains the weekly publications 
prepared by Thos. M. Iden for the 
use of members of the famous Upper 
Room Bible Class, whose membership, 
active and associate, runs up into 
many hundreds. The class has its 
center at Ann Arbor, Mich. This vol- 
ume contains a wealth of good things 
gathered from the inspirational liter- 
ature of the world. (Ann Arbor 
Press, Ann Arbor, Mich.) 
* * * 

Soldiers' English and French 
Conversation Book. By Walter M. 
Gallichan. A handy little volume which 
is useful not only to the soldier but 
also to any one interested at all in 
the French language. Is a practical 
guide to the use of conversational 
French. (Lippincott, Philadelphia.) 

'^ -'fi ^ 

A Note to Ministers 

The Macmillan Company is con- 
ducting a questionnaire relating to 
the books that active men in the min- 
istry individually find most useful to 
them in their personal life and religi- 
ous work. The request is that a min- 
ister wiUing to co-operate jot down 
the names and authors of the ten books 
that stand up in his recollection as the 
most beneficial reading which he has 
done this current church year. 

A digest of ten thousand such re- 

The Sunrise Never Failed Us Yet 

Upon the sadness of the sea 
The sunset broods regretfully. 
From the far lonely spaces slow 
Withdraws the wistful after-glow. 

So out of life the splendor dies. 
So darken all the happy skies. 
So gathers twilight, cold and stern, 
But overhead the planets burn. 

And up the east another day, 
Shall chase the bitter dawn away. 
What though our eyes be wet with 

tears ! 
The sunrise never failed us yet: 

The blush of dawn may yet restore 
Our light, and hope, and joy once 

more. 
Sad soul, take comfort, nor forget 
That sunrise never failed us yet. 

— Celia Thaxter. 



spouses it is thought will yield some- 
thing more than merely curious re- 
sults. 

Such lists should be addressed to 
the Religious Books Department, The 
Macmillan Company, 64-66 Fifth 
Avenue, New York City, New York. 
The courtesy would be a real service 
to us. 

The Macmillan Company, 
Religious Books Department. 



I Parables of Safied the Sage I 

I By WILLIAM E. BARTON I 

The Potatoes 

NOW there came to the back door 
of the House wherein I dwell an 
Husbandman, and he said, I would 
fain sell to thee a Bushel of Potatoes. 

And I said unto him, Though I had 
the wealth of Dives might I purchase 
an Whole Bushel of Potatoes at one 
time at the Present Market Prices ? 

And he answered and said, Though 
a man were poor as Lazarus yet might 
he purchase a Bushel of Potatoes at 
the Price whereat I sell, for it is Much 
Below the Market. 

And he showed me the Potatoes, 
and behold they were very Large, and 
goodly to behold. 

And I called unto me Keturah, and 
she counted the Money in the Bag, 
and behold we had enough, and that 
was Just About All. 

And we bought a Bushel of Pota- 
toes. 

Then were we Proud in our hearts, 
and highly exalted in spirit ; neither 
had our neighbors Anything On Us 
though they ride in Automobiles. 

But when we removed the Top 
Row of Potatoes from the Basket, be- 
hold they that were below were so 
small we wist not whether they were 
Potatoes or Hickory Nuts ; but when 
we ate them then we knew that they 
were not Hickory Nuts ; but whether 
they were Potatoes we knew not ; for 
they were Too Small to leave any 
Taste in the Mouth. 

Then spake Keturah unto me, and 
she said. My lord. 

And I answered. Say on. 

And she said, Though we have lived 
long we learn slowly. 

And I answered, Thou speakest 
wisely At Times, and this is one of the 
Times. 

And she said. Hereafter will I learn 
that when the price is Small the Pota- 
toes are like to be Smaller. 

And I spake unto her and said, 
Keturah, thou hast uttered a Profound 
Truth ; for men may not obtain any 
Good Thing in this life that Costeth 
them Nothing, save only Sunshine and 
the Grace of God ; and as for all the 
rest, as is the Cost in Labor, so is the 
Price thereof. 



iiyiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

I The Larger Christian World | 

I A DEPARTMENT OF INTERDENOMINATIONAL ACQUAINTANCE By ORVIS F. JORDAN | 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiilii^ 



United Presbyterians Report 
Loss in Accessions 

The General Assembly of the 
United Presbyterian church met in 
Boston recently in the First United 
Presbyterian church, of which Rev. 
Kenneth M. Munro is jjastor. A 
depressing note was sounded at the 
opening of the conference by the 
chairman of the committee on evan- 
gelism, who reported that in spite 
of the four-year program adopted 
at the Cleveland 7\ssembly last year, 
calling for a net increase of 8 per 
cent in membership and a total 
membership by 1920 of 200,000, that 
the year's reports showed decreased 
accessions. There were 9,444 re- 
ceived on confession during the past 
year, this being more than 1,000 less 
than the preceding year, and nearly 
3,000 less than the year before that. 

Great Need of 
Medicines in Africa 

"Will the next steamer bring the 
necessary medicines?" is the daily 
question in Africa these days, says 
The Continent. Dr. II. L. Weber, 
writing from Efulen station, tells of 
a 14-year-old boy who brought his 
sick mother to the hospital. She 
w^as very ill, and they had walked 
100 miles to reach the medical aid 
she needed. But there was no 
medicine, and the missionary was 
forced to turn them away. The boy 
broke down and cried, for the 
mother will probably die before the 
needed drugs arrive. This is just 
one of the heartaches the mission- 
aries suffer in these troubled times. 

Wants to Combine 
National Anthems 

Dr. A. C. Dixon, of the Metro- 
politan Tabernacle in London, and 
formerly of Moody Institute, Chi- 
cago, has recently proposed that a 
combination of the national anthems 
of England and America be made. 
He would have Americans join in 
singing "God Save the King." 
Though there is great friendship for 
England in this country, some 
Americans have insisted that our 
tongues do not work well in praising 
royalty. 

Novelists Furnish 
Sermon Subjects 

Rev. Harold S. Rambo, pastor of 
Home St. Presbyterian churck, of 
New York, recently wrote a number 
of novelists for an answer to this 



question, "If you were a minister 
in New York City and wanted to put 
a good sign outside your church in- 
viting people to come in, how would 
you word it ?"' Among those re- 
sponding are Irvin S. Cobb, Rob- 
ert W. Chambers, Ellis Parker But- 
ler, Meredith Nicholson and George 
Ade. Mr. Rambo has found the re- 
plies so satisfactory that he has 
made them the subjects for a series 
of sc*rmons. 

Returns from the 
Episcopalians 

Change of denominational affilia- 
tions is becoming more common, 
and it is now even possible for a 
man to return to the fellowship he 
left. Rev. George Whitfield Meade 
some years ago was pastor of Wil- 
kinsburg (Pa.) Presbyterian church 
and withdrcAV to enter the priest- 
hood of the Protestant Episcopal 
church. After some years in that 
fellowshij) he Avishes to return to 
the church of his youth, and will be 
re-ordained in the Pittsburgh Pres- 
bytery this month. 

Chicago Women 
in Dry Campaign 

Mrs. Daisy Douglass Barr, the 
Avell-known Quaker evangelist, is 
chosen by the Chicago women as their 
special representative in a series of 
Dry-Chicago meetings to be held in 
various parts of the city. The church 
forces are being mobilized for the big 
drive next spring. 

Presbyterians Hold 
Tent Meetings 

The Church Extension Society of 
Chicago Presbyterians is going in for 
an experiment in summer evangelism. 
A large tent has been purchased and 
for the first three weeks of the sum- 
mer the meetings will be under the 
care of the Sixth Presbyterian 
Church. The pastor of the church is 
Rev. Robert R. Bigger and the evan- 
gelist is Rev. Frank McKeegan. The 
tent will be moved into various sec- 
tions of the city during the summer. 

Consolidation of Churches 
in Chicago 

The down-town situation continues 
to wipe out the churches of various 
denominations. On the west side the 
Union Congregational Church and the 
First Congregational Church formed 
the New First. Now there is a pro- 
ject on to form a union between the 
New First and Leavitt Street 



churches. Every denomination repre- 
sented has been experiencing this 
need of consolidation on the west 
side and in other districts adjacent 
to the loop. 

To Standardize 
Catholic Schools 

The Roman Catholics are facing 
their educational problem with more 
interest of late. A four days' conven- 
tion was recently held in Buffalo, N. 
Y., in the interest of the standardiza- 
tion of Catholic colleges. The gov- 
ernment department of education has 
made every kind of religious school 
feel the need of becoming worthy of 
a good report at the hands of the gov- 
ernment experts. 

Y. W. C. A. Raises 
War Money 

The war council of the national 
board of the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association of the United States 
has voted to appropriate a million dol- 
lars for war relief work. Most of the 
money will be spent in the United 
States, but a considerable amount of 
it will be used in the allied countries 
in Europe. The war work will be for 
the benefit of women and only indi- 
rectly for the benefit of soldiers. 

The Proposed 
World Conference 

Though vv^ar makes impossible the 
speedy realization of the "World Con- 
ference on Faith and Order'' being 
called by the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, yet interest in the project has 
not died out. The leaders of the 
movement have appointed a week of 
prayer in which the people of all com- 
munions should unite in prayer for 
the unity of the Christian world. This 
week will be Jan. 18-25. 1918. A 
Manual of Prayer for Unity has been 
prepared, which will be sent out to 
interested persons. 

Supply Ministers 
to Churches 

The problem of all denominations 
with congregational government is to 
bring preachers and churches together. 
The Congregationalists have a Board 
of Pastoral Supply which serves in 
this way. Last year 341 churches 
were served in some degree and in 117 
instances a pastor was located. This 
service was rendered in 27 states. The 
secretary has traveled constantly, 
meeting ministers, and attending as- 
sociational meetings, that he might 
have ample information for his 
service. 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 5, 1917 



For Methodist 
Unification 

The representatives of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church and the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
met at Traverse City, Mich., June 27, 
to consider further the problem of 
unification. While the problem is a 
very difficult one, it is not hopeless. 
The big question is the status of the 
negro in the united church. Southern 
representatives want the negro in a 
separate church. 

Protestant Leader 
Visits America 

Dr. Ernest W. Bysshe, who _ is 
superintendent of the France Mission 
Conference of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, is in this country seek- 
ing funds for the work of his church 
in France. He asserts that the Avar 
has lowered ethical standards in 
France and that the Catholic church 
there specializes on worship with but 
little ethical teaching. He declares 
that a vigorous Protestant movement 
which would bring ethical sermons to 
France and get them printed in the 
newspapers would be a great help to 
that people. 

Union Goes Forv^^ard 
in Australia 

A late issue of the Construct- 
ive Quarterly has an account of 
the progress of union sentiment be- 
tween Presbyterians and Episco- 
palians in Australia. Each side 
made a statement of the doctrines 
and practices which it regarded_ as 
fundamental. The result was, using 
the words of Archbishop Clarke, 
"to show everyone that on the whole 
we are witnesses to a common faith." 
The Apostles' Creed and the Nicene 
Creed were accepted as fundamen- 
tal ; and in regard to ordination the 
Prayer of Faith and the Laying on 
of Hands as a visible symbol of the 
bestowal by the Holy Spirit of au- 
thority and grace for the work of the 
ministry were recognized as essen- 
tials. Naturally there was no dififer- 
ence in regard to the two Sacraments 
ordained by Christ himself. In the 
matter of the form of ordination the 
conference accepted as a principle 
that all ordinations to the office of 
presbyter as ministers of the Word 
and Sacrament shall be by a bishop 
and two presbyters at least. In the 
consecration of the bishops it was 
agreed that three bishops at least 
should take part, and also that they 
are to act with such presbyters as 
may be appointed for the purpose. 
Here we find the Anglican conces- 
sion to the Presbyterian contention 
that the Episcopate is the extension 
of the priesthood. After securing 
the full canonical number of bishops 
the Church of England members 
were willing to make this concession. 



'illllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllll 




e!li!l!ll!ll!l!il!!;illl!ll!llll!!!ll!illl!lllll!ll!ll!llllil!!I!ll!llllllili^ 

Just to Be Faithful 

The Lesson in Today's Life* 
By E. F. DAUGHERTY 



PERHAPS the nations of earth 
today, Christian in the main in 
their attainments and program 
until the great war broke, are dupli- 
cating in a larger way the experiences 
of the tribes of Israel as God's chosen 
in the ancient past. Those tribes, 
whatever their changing alignment, 
sufifered in the measure of their alien- 
ation from God. Certainly nothing 
is more deeply the matter with the 
Christian nations of earth today than 
that when their present era of homi- 
cidal madness began they had for- 
gotten God ; better to say, perhaps, 
that they had repvidiated God ; for the 
statesmen and diplomats of Europe in 
their attitude toward Christ's ideals 
had practically said, "This dreamer 
shall not rule over us !" So — cata- 
clysmic sufifering pervades the earth. 
The Hague Tribunal "bade fair to 
bring, in a short time, the Federation 
of the World, but the chiefest irony 
of the present day is the discredited 
Peace Palace, up to whose doors the 
red tides of war surge. The dove of 
peace has been as sorely distressed as 
the first doves dispatched by Noah 
before the recession of the waters. 
But the waters fell — and the fires of 
battle will cool. 

* * * 

The follies of Israel under Ahaz in 
a measure ceased, and with Hezekiah 
the "faithful" came the summons to 
the old transiently discredited stand- 
ards. Unto all the people from "Dan 
to Beersheba," which is tantamount 
to saying the world of the Jews, went 
the proclamation and the call for a 
conference at the ancient sacred place 
for the Passover's celebration. It was 
heard by many and the old lines of 
loyalty to Jehovah were again taken 
up, whereby the moral and spiritual 
health of Israel had a restoration. 

Again from some "peace rendez- 
vous." again from some voice of win- 
some grace and authority, the call will 
go forth in the world for a coming 
together of the "peace advocates" of 
the nations. The ideals of the "Prince 
of Peace" will emerge from the ob- 
scuring distractions of the world war, 
and the dream that he entertained for 
the world of humanity will take newer 

*This article is based upon the Interna- 
tional Uniform Lesson for July 15, "Hez- 
ekiah the Faithful King." Scripture, 2 
Chronicles, 30. 



outlines and clearer, and the brains 
and resources of the Christian peoples 
of earth will be applied to the task of 
making the dream real. 

Failure has always had place in 
the establishment of any heaven-born 
purpose on earth, failure as judged by 
earth-set eyes ; but the heaven-born 
purposes for earth cannot be forever 
adjourned or defeated. The "chosen" 
peoples of this day, like those of the 
days in the wilderness, may turn back 
into their own ways, but the "way" 
called Christian has been revealed to 
prevail in the minds and lives of men 
— and it will! 

* * * 

Bitter had been the experiences of 
the "chosen" of old in their wilfulness 
under leaders like Ahaz ; more bitter 
is now the experience of .the nations 
at issue with Kaiserism. But the ex- 
haustion of folly will come, and the 
voice of wisdom will be heard above 
the roar of guns, and the old sacrifices 
of "contrite hearts and humble spirits" 
will again have their time and place 
toward bringing to better times and 
conditions a disordered world. 

Just to be faithful to the far-flung 
purposes and plans inaugurated of 
Christ and enshrined in the institu- 
tions of democracy ; just to serve, to 
plan, to fight — and if need be, die— 
for these as they are known to have 
blessed the world, is to have swelled 
the stream of the more abundant life 
for men. 

"The Captains and the Kings depart, 
The shouting and the tumult dies; 
Still stands thine ancient sacrifice, 
An humble and a contrite heart." 



The Peerless Communion Service 



Patented 
Aug. 10, 1910 




Send for our complete circular 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St. Chicago, III. 



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Social Interpretations 



By ALVA W. TAYLOR 



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Booze for Our Boozers or 
Bread for Our Allies 

The House has passed a "bone-dry" 
prohibition war measure. The issue 
is, at this writing, up to the Senate. 
Let us hope that by the time this is 
printed, it is up to the President. 
With all his remarkable insight into 
the marrow of war-time issues, it 
seems strange the President has had 
nothing to say 
upon this crit- 
ical issue. Why 
are men in even 
our highest of- 
fices afraid of 
this issue? Taft 
was against pro- 
hibition legisla- 
tion ; Roosevelt 
came out for it 
only after the 
Pro g r e s s i V e 
party had taken a stand and long after 
he had any official power ; Wilson has 
been silent. Prof. Irving Fisher says 
a high Washington official admitted 
the righteousness of the cause, but said 
he dared not speak because the liquor 
interests were so powerful that his 
ability to do anything in regard to 
other war-time measures would be 
nullified. 

According to the World Almanac 
our cereal crop was nearly a billion 
bushels short last year ; as a result, we 
exported only 173,000,000 bushels, not 
all of this even going to our allies. 
Yet we put 110,000.000 bushels into 
the manufacture of intoxicating 
drinks. This year we face a wheat 
shortage of 150,000,000 bushels, ac- 
cording to the national department of 
agriculture ; this means that cereal 
food must be made up from corn, rye 
and barley, the grains used for alcohol. 
Millions of our allies eat rye bread, 
the French peasantry use barley in 
large quantities, and even our own 
luxurious white flour will need to ac- 
cept a mixture of other grains if we 
are to supply the bread for which the 
people of Europe are crying. 

Professor Fisher, one of the first of 
living authorities, says we are turning 
11,000,000 loaves of good bread into 
booze every day, and that the food 
values used in liquor making, if trans- 
muted into a balanced ration, would 
feed 7,000,000 people daily; that 
means we could, out of this wasted 
food, feed all Belgium or Serbia or 
Armenia, or all the armies of France, 
or with it we could supply the deficit 
of food for all the people of either 
France or England. 

Why do we hesitate in the face of 



these facts? The "wets" plead for 
the revenue ; they propose, in these 
days of conservation and compulsory 
service, that the bar-toper shall be al- 
lowed to spend more than $3,000,000,- 
000 in order to give the government 
some $300,000,000 for the war budget ; 
and senators rest their case on this 
while planning to take less than one- 
fourth of the excess profits of the 
war "profiteers" ; in other words, we 
will allow the rich maker of munitions 
and war supplies to make a good aver- 
age profit and an enormous excess 
profit and only cut the fringe of it for 
the war-budget, but we will allow the 
booze-befuddled workingman to con- 
tribute ten dollars that we may add 
one to this same war budget. We will 
conscript the person of his son and put 
him in a "bone-dry" training camp 
and we will ask the total abstainer to 
work extra hours and speed up in 
every way possible to increase produc- 
tion, but we must not take beer away 
from the boozer though we know it 
decreases his working ability much 
more than the "dry" worker can com- 
pensate for with all his extra liours 
and speeding up. 

The plea is made that 'multitudes 
will be thrown out of work and great 
"industries" made idle. Liquor-mak- 
ing employs 289.000 men and we are 
talving out of industry more than a 
million men this first year and war 
"industries" are building tens of mil- 
lions of dollars worth of plants to 
meet the need; this plea is fictitious, 
for the demand for men ought itself 
to compel the closing of all breweries 
and distilleries in order that the nec- 
essary labor demand could be met. 
When we come down to brass tacks 
there is only one reason, and that is 
tlie vested interests of the liquor busi- 
ness ; in England they are yet more 
powerful than fear of food shortage, 
and our senate faces the same propo- 
sition this day. Can we draft men 
and fix prices and commandeer busi- 
ness enterprises and nullify labor laws 
and lay unprecedented taxes and yet 
fail to manage the brewer? 



The Academic 
Twist Again 

We have often noted the fact that 
the typical academic man is not a con- 
spicuous social and moral advocate, 
especially upon new issues. It is 
noted with much satisfaction that 
President Eliot, formerly of Harvard, 
has come out for war-time prohibition 
after having been against prohibition 
conspicuously for many years. Prof. 



Irving Fisher, who is making telling 
appeals for war-time prohibition, is 
quoted as one who "has not been con- 
spicuous as a prohibitionist and con- 
sequently is no fanatic" on the ques- 
tion. We note above that President 
Wilson, in all his academic and official 
career, has never been unec^uivocal on 
the temperance issue and that ex- 
President Taft, as judge, president 
and professor, has been consistently 
negative on the proposition. All these 
notable men and many others seem to 
be converts to war-time prohibition as 
an emergency measure ; yet not a 
single argument can be made for war- 
time prohibition that is not logically 
and undeniably an argument for pro- 
hibition at all times. 

The social and political science 
teachers and economists of the coun- 
try have registered an overwhelming 
vote for war-time prohibition, though 
they have never before gone on record 
in regard to the issue, and the whole 
issue is one of waste and efficiency 
and morals— just as logical for peace 
as for war-times. Now comes Prof. 
G. B. Foster of the University of Chi- 
cago — a man of singular philosophical 
and theological ability — not only con- 
senting to address a brewer's conven- 
tion, but boldly advocating their cause 
in the face of present agitation, basing 
the whole argument upon the phil- 
osophical fiction that a man has the 
right to drink if he wishes, acknowl- 
edging he does so himself and saying 
that he who drinks is no better than 
he who sells him the drink. Professor 
Foster acknowledged that in his more 
callow days he advocated prohibition, 
but said he was converted by a period 
of study in Germany and that phil- 
osophy had delivered him. He won 
great applause from the brewers by 
advocating the inherent right of a man 
to drink and contending that poverty 
caused drink rather than drink caus- 
ing poverty, and when he defended the 
liquor seller in politics by saying he 
was forced into it — "I have an idea 
that if politics will let you alone you 
will let politics alone" — the brewers 
no doubt felt they had found a de- 
fender indeed. 



O BOOKS 

By Professor W- S. Athearn 

Every Pastor, Superintendent and 

Teacher Should Have 

The Church School. $1.00 net. 
Organization and Adminis- 
tration of the Church School. 

30c net. 

Disciples Publication Society 

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18 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 5, 1917 



llllk'lllll 



iiiiiiniii 



Disciples Table Talk 



is 



Mrs. Laura D. Garst to 
Return to Foreign Field 

Laura D. Garst, who has been matron 
in the College of Missions, Indianapolis, 
Ind., for the past three years, has severed 
her connections with the college and 
will go back into the field for the For- 
eign Society. She is now at Fairfield, 
Iowa, visiting with her son and wife. 
Her daughter, Gretchen Garst, the liv- 
ing link of the church at Keokuk, Iowa, 
at Akita, Japan, will sail for home on 
furlough some time in July or August. 
She went out five years ago. 

Missionary Conference 
at Indianapolis 

On June 19-22, in the College of Mis- 
sions at Indianapolis, was held a joint 
conference of the missionaries of the 
Foreign Christian Missionary Society 
and the Christian Woman's Board of 
Missions. It was the largest conference 
of this kind which has yet been held by 
these two organizations. There were a 
number of items which make this the 
outstanding conference, from the stand- 
point of influence, of any yet held; (1) 
There were fifty-two missionaries pres- 
ent at the conference. Of these, thirty- 
five were missionaries home on furlough 
and seventeen were missionaries under 
appointment, who go to the various 
fields this fall. Of this group, twelve 
were medical missionaries. (2) The 
fields represented at the conference were 
as follows: India represented by six- 
teen missionaries, China by ten mission- 
aries, Japan by one missionary, Philip- 
pine Islands by six missionaries, Africa 
eight, Tibet two, Porto Rico one, Mexico 
six, South America two. (3) A num- 
ber of the members of the executive 
committees of both boards were pres- 
ent, either all or part of the time. 

Champ Clark Gets 
a Diploma 

Champ Clark, speaker of the House, 
was ofticially graduated last week from 
Transylvania University, Lexington, Ky. 
Although too far advanced in life to 
participate in commencement exercises, 
the speaker was overjoyed to get the 
diploma, which carried with it a degree 
of doctor of laws to compensate for half 
a century's delay in delivery. Mr. Clark 
said, upon receiving his diploma: "Away 
back in 1867, when I was a young, impetu- 
ous mountaineer, I went to this univer- 
sity. I was expelled from it for shootin' 
at a man, but I got a sort of a back 
door graduation from it and I've been 
waiting for this diploma ever since, won- 
dering whatever became of it. I'm glad 
to have it." 

Opening Week at Bethany 
Assembly 

The best program in the history of 
Bethany Assembly, held annually at 
Bethany Park, Ind., has been arranged 
for this year's session, which extends 
from July 25 to August 10. Opening 
week will have some unusual features. 
On the opening days, July 25-26, will be 
held the Forty-fifth Annual Reunion of 
the Seventieth Indiana Regimental As- 
sociation. In the evening of the 25th 
will be given a camp-fire program. The 
program for July 27 will be in charge 
of the Citizens' League of Indiana, with 



addresses by a number of the state's 
leaders, among these being President 
Stone of Purdue University and R. F. 
Lockridge, secretary of the Citizens' 
League of Indiana. On Saturday, the 
following day, among the speakers will 
be Governor Goodrich. In the afternoon 
and evening special concerts will be 
given by the famous Indianapolis News 
Newsboys' Band. On Sunday, G. P. 
Rutledge, of Cincinnati, will speak at 
the communion service in the morning 
and the Bethany Assembly choir will 
give a sacred concert in the evening. 
On the following evening E. Richard 
Edwards will speak, his subject being 
"Women and the Ballot Box." Tuesday 
will be W. C. T. L^ Day, and a number 
of able speakers have been arranged for. 
Wednesday, Purdue Day, will be fea- 
tured various kinds of "demonstrations" 
in the cooking line, with addresses and 
lectures. State Federation of Clubs Day 
will be Thursday, and the subjects of 
Better Moving Pictures, the Public 
Health Nurse, the Political Science 
Committee, etc., will be discussed by 
leaders in woman's work. Friday will 
be observed as C. W. B. M. Rally Day, 
with addresses and a symposium as fea- 
tures. Among the speakers scheduled 
are Emory Ross, Mrs. J. M. Stearns and 
R. A. Doan. A pageant has been ar- 
ranged for the evening. On Saturday 
the Dixie Jubilee Singers will give con- 
certs in afternoon and evening. 

Commencement at Christian 
College 

Christian College, located at Colum- 
bia, Mo., celebrated its annual com- 
mencement this year with a "manless" 
program. Martha Stout Trimble, an or- 
dained minister, gave the invocation. 
Miss Mary McDowell, of the faculty of 
the University of Chicago and for twenty 
years head resident of the University of 
Chicago Settlement, delivered the com- 
mencement address, and the sixty-six de- 
grees and diplomas were awarded by the 
president of the school, Mrs. L. W. St. 
Clair-Moss. L. J. Marshall, of Kansas 
City, Mo., preached the baccalaureate 
sermon. The two notable features of 
commencement week this year were the 
presentation of the opera, "The Mi- 
kado," by fifty students, and the giving 
of a patriotic pageant, "America." A 
Red Cross unit has been organized at 
the college for a course in first aid. 
Over $500 has been raised for the relief 
of Belgium's children. There has been 
an overflow enrollment at Christian Col- 
lege this year, and prospects are good 
for the coming session. 

• — J. J. Castleberry, pastor at First 
church, Mayfield, Ky., recently received 
the Bachelor of Divinity degree from 
Yale University. Mr. Castleberry has 
been minister at Mayfield for the past 
eight years and was given a year's leave 
of absence last autumn to pursue grad- 
uate studies. He and his family were 
given a cordial welcome upon their re- 
turn to resume work at Mayfield. A 
large delegation of officers and members 
met them at the railway station and a 
reception was tendered them the follow- 
ing evening. 

— The new Bible School building at 
Cropper, Ky., where R. L. Riddell has 



ministered for the last four years, will 
be dedicated the second Sunday in July 
by Roger T. Nooe, of Frankfort, Ky. 

— J. A. Stout, who has done a most 
substantial work at Bowling Green, Mo., 
has resigned the pastorate there to ac- 
cept the work at Nevada, Mo. A beau- 
tiful building has been erected at Bowl- 
ing Green under Mr. Stout's leadership 
and he has made a deep impression upon 
the community as a leader in religious 
and civic affairs. A local paper devoted 
an editorial to the fine qualities of Mr. 
Stout, mentioning especially his "dy- 
namic force and winning personality." 

— John P. .Sala, for several years the 
successful leader at Richmond avenue, 
Buffalo, N. Y., is seriously contemplat- 
ing accepting the state secretaryship of 
New York Discipledom, which position 
will carry with it the responsibility as 
the New England representative of the 
American Society, when plans are 
worked out. Mr. Sala has not yet re- 
signed at Buffalo, but the probability is 
that September or October will find him 
in his new and important field of service. 

— John Kendrick Ballou has asked the 
Payette, Idaho, church to release him 
at once, and he expects to return to 
California, but has not decided definitely 
on a future location. He came from 
California to Payette last autumn to 
dedicate the new building and assume 
the spiritual leadership of the church. 
The inability of the church to take care 
of financial obligations is one reason for 
the change decided upon. 

— Rockford, III., Central church re- 
ports two additions recently. The pas- 
tor, William B. Clemmer, is preaching 
morning sermons from the gospel of 
John during April to July, using the 
study as a point of contact with the 
church thought. Some sermon themes 
have been: "The Sovereignty of Love," 
"The First Battle," "The Battlefield of 
Prayer," "Jesus' Other Sheep," "The 
Christian Miracle," "The Romance of 
Faith." They have been very well re- 
ceived. The pastor has also spoken to 
the fraternal orders in a special address 
on "The Triumph of Love" and deliv- 
ered the annual address to the Rockford 
letter carriers, which was especially ap- 
preciated. A financial drive has been 
made during June to clear away all 
budget indebtedness for the fall work 
when the great army cantonment opens 
with 40,000 soldiers for training. 

— Kyle Brooks has resigned from the 
work at Henderson, Ky., where he has 



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July 5, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



19 



served for tv/o and one-half years. His 
plans for the future are not determined. 

— Byron Hester, of Chickasha, Okla., 
was the out of town speaker at a ban- 
quet of the Brotherhood of the church 
at Oklahoma City. He discussed the 
theme, "The Tithing Church." 

— LeRoy M. Anderson, who leads at 
Newport, Ky., reports that the mission- 
ary budget there has been doubled this 
year through the every member canvass. 
Twenty-one persons have recently been 
added to the church membership. 

— Since T. A. Boyer came to the work 
at Richmond, Cal., the membership has 
been doubled. The new $17,000 building 
was recently successfully dedicated by H. 
O. Breeden, of Fresno. 

— A. J. Bush, of Dallas, Tex., is now 
serving in the fiftieth year of his min- 
istry, forty-two of which have been spent 
in Texas. 

— A. E. Ewell, pastor at First church, 
Palestine, Tex., has been presented by 
the Ladies' Aid Society of his congrega- 
tion with a new auto. 

— H. A. Denton, who has resigned from 
the First church pastorate at Galesburg, 
111., has seen about 400 new members 
added to the congregation there since 
his coming five years ago. 

— J. W. Burns, for two years pastor 
at Ardmore, Okla., has accepted a call 
to First church, Muskogee. 

— By a recent financial campaign at 
First church, Canton, Ohio, under the 
leadership of P. H. Welshimer, provi- 
sion has been made for paying off a 
$50,000 debt on the church property. 

— T. J. Clark, who has ministered to 
the church at Albion, 111., for eight years, 
has given notice that he will not be an 
applicant for re-employment next year. 

— H. H. Harmon preached the bac- 
calaureate sermon at the .State Univer- 
sity of Nebraska this year. 

— J. B. Holmes, for some time pastor 
at Galveston, Tex., has accepted the po- 
sition of superintendent of Texas mis- 
sions. 

--The death is reported of Mrs. Alice 
Wickizer, wife of D. A. Wickizer, of the 
church at Norman, Okla. Her death 
followed a surgical operation undergone 
for the relief of an abdominal trouble. 

— G. W. Kemper, who leads at Han- 
over avenue, Richmond, Va., has been 
appointed to the chairmanship of the 
State Commission on Religious Forces 
by the governor of the state. 

— It is reported that B. H. Harmon, 

of Blanchard, Iowa, has been called to 

succeed Arthur Dillinger, at Altoona, 
Iowa. 

— H. D. C. Maclachlan. of Seveiitli 
Street church, Richmond, Va., is to be 
a member of the faculty of the ne^^ly 
organized Richmond School of Social 
Economy, which will begin its sessions 
in the autumn. 

— Freeport, 111., church is feeling en- 
couraged over the ministry William B. 
Clemmer, of Rockford, is giving it on 
Sunday afternoons, with occasional week 
day visits. The members have sub- 
scribed liberally for the local budget and 
have paid all interest on the church in- 
debtedness; the ladies' organization has 
paid $100 on the principal. 

— Illinois Disciples will meet in an- 
nual convention this year at Taylorville, 
September 10-13. Walter S. Rounds is 
pastor of the church there. H. E. Sala, 



THE SECOND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC. 

The Council of National Defense and the Secretary of War are urging 
college attendance upon youth under the selective draft age. 
While the khaki-clad army is driving the present issue of war to a suc- 
cessful conclusion, in our colleges the SECOND ARMY must be mak- 
ing ready to lead the forces of reconstruction after the war. 
The college is the training camp for the SECOND ARMY. 
Transylvania and the College of the Bible offer exceptional opportuni- 
ties for the largest training. 

Reasonable expenses, opportunities for self help, generous scholarships available for 
students preparing for public Christian service. Beautiful Home for Women. New 
Residential Hall for Men. Write for Application Blanks. 

THE PRESIDENT LEXINGTON, KY. 



of Peoria, is the state president. De- 
tails of the program will be published 
from time to time in the columns of 
The Christian Century. 

- — Austin Hunter, who leads at Jackson 
Boulevard, Chicago, reports that twenty- 
seven young men from this congrega- 
tion have already gone to the colors and 
others will follow. 

— W. J. Lhamon, dean of Drury Col- 
lege, Springfield, Mo., writes that capable 
young men in the school there have 
more calls to preach in churches of the 
vicinity than they can answer. 

— H. H. Peters, Illinois State Secre- 
tary, reports the rededication on June 
24 of the church at Martinton. Im- 
provements costing $2,700 have been 
made and paid for. 

— Byron Hester, of the Chickasha, 
Okla., church, wrote a Red Cross song 
which was sung by the "Red Cross 
Girls" of Chickasha. who received first 
prize in the recent Ozark Trails Parade 
at Amarillo, Tex. 

— Fargo, N. D., church will have its 
new building completed and ready for 
occupancy in a short time, according to 
reports from Norman Brighton, for- 
merly of Des Moines, but now leader at 
Fargo. 

— J. H. Mohorter, of the National Be- 
nevolent Association, writes that the as- 
sociation is enjoying its best annuity 
}'ear. Secretary Mohorter reports that 
S. O. Landis, the newly elected minister 
of the church at East Aurora, N. Y., will 
also serve as the agent of the benevo- 
lent society in the East, especially in the 
interests of the Havens Home, located 
at East Aurora. All of the Homes for 
the Aged of the society are feeling the 
pressure of applications for admission. 

— The second annual convention of 
the churches of eastern Oregon will be 
held at LaGrande, July 5-8. Among 
those on the program are: C. H. Hil- 
ton, Baker; E. C. Sanderson, Eugene; 
C. F. Swander, Portland, State Secre- 
tary; Albyn Esson, Albany; H. H. Hub- 
bell, Pendleton; E. S. Muckley, Port- 
land; O. P. Burris, The Dalles; Mr. and 
Mrs. Davis Errett, Athena; W. G. Men- 
zies, India, and Secretaries Roy K. 
Roadruck, Mrs. Clara G. Esson, W. R. 
Warren and Grant K. Lewis. 

— At the Missionary Education Move- 
ment Conference to be held at Seabeck, 
Wash., July 30-August 8, the Disciples 
are planning to have from twenty-five 
to forty delegates. At the conference 
last year there were but seven Disciples 
present. If you are going, you should 
write M. B. Madden, 1626 Hillyard 
street, Eugene, Ore. 

— An interdenominational farewell was 
given C. J. Armstrong, retiring Congre- 




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gational pastor at Superior, Wis., and 
formerly a Disciple minister. Mr. Arm- 
strong and family are spending a few 
days at his old family home in Ken- 
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new field at Gary, Ind. 



Century Subscribers! 

FORM THE HABIT 

Of Watching the Date Opposite 
Your Name on Your Wrapper ! 

IF the date is, for example, Jun 17 — 
that means that your subscription 
has been paid to June 1, 1917. 
Within two weeks from the time you 
send a remittance for renewal, your 
date should be set forward. This is 
all the receipt you require for subscrip- 
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changed by the third week, or if it is 
changed erroneously, notify us at once 

WATCH YOUR DATE! 

The Christian Century 

700 E. 40th Street, Chicago 



20 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 5, 1917 



■iriif wnn ■# ^ Church Home for You. 
NEW YORK ^rit« I>r- Fmis IdlejjiM, 



— F. M. Rains writes that he would 
like to have the names and addresses of 
those who knew Alexander Campbell 
personally, or of those who heard him 
lecture. Secretary Rains should be ad- 
dressed, Box 884, Cincinnati. 

— George W. Schroeder, of the Ru- 
dolph, Ohio, church, delivered a special 
address at a local township Sunday 
school convention, his theme being "A 
Necessity for Locomotives, Automobiles 
and Men." Mr. Schroeder delivered the 
annual memorial address for the Odd 
Fellows at Bowling Green, Ohio, on 
June 24. 

— Peter Ainslie, editor of the Chris- 
tian Union Quarterly, writes that the 
Quarterly is entering upon its seventh 
year, greatly improved and enlarged. 
Dr. Ainslie states that he is trying to 
make a magazine "for the whole church." 

— C. A. Burton, of the Ashland, 111., 
church, reports that James L. Schofield 
("Sunny Jim") has recently closed a 
week's campaign for church efficiency 
at this church and mentions the fact that 
in addition to the educational values of 
Mr. Schofield's lectures his service in a 
financial way was worth more than his 
charge for the week's campaign. 

— South Park church, Los Angeles, 
Cal., Bruce Brown, pastor, has had sixty- 
one additions to the membership in the 
last four months. The attendance at 
church services and Sunday school has 
been doubled. 

— Roy Rutherford, pastor at First 
Church, Paducah, Ky., writes that he 
has been preaching a series of evening 
sermons on "Paducah's Seven .Deadly 
Sins." There have been sermons on ma- 
terialism, intemperance, prostitution, etc. 
These followed the movie serial on seven 
deadly sins. There have been crowded 
houses at all these special services. 

— H. J. Loken, now connected with the 
Union Theological College, Chicago, re- 
ports that during the month of June 
three tentative applications have been 
made by Disciple students for courses 
at the college. The new institution has 
doubled its budget for next year. Of its 
$14,000 budget, $10,000 has already been 
provided. 

American Series of Five 



Maps 



These are lithographed in four colors on 
muslin of superior quality, and measure 36x58 
inches. Large lettering' of names of places is a 
special feature of all these maps. Each map 
has distinctive features, but all have large type, 
clear and bold outlines. 

The maps are as follows: 
Map of Palestine— Illustrating the Old Test- 
ament and the Land as Divided among the 
twelve tribes. 
Map of Palestine-Illustrating the New Test- 
ament. ^ 
Map of the Roman Empire— Illustrating the 

Journeys of the Apostle Paul. 
Map of Assyria and the Adjacent Lands— Illust- 
rating the Captivities of the Jews. 
Map of Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula — Illustrat- 
ing the Journeyings of the Israelites. 
Any of the above maps sold singly and un- 
mounted at 1.00 each, postpaid. 

These maps are also furnished in a set of 5 
that are mounted on one specially constructed 
wooden roller, which is arranged to rest securely 
on the top of the upright bar of the stand. The 
stand is collapsible and is made of steel, finished 
in black Japan. 

Entire Outfit, $6 50 Net. 
By Express or Freight at Purchaser s Exoeose. 

DZSCIPZiES FVBI^ICATION SOCIETY 
70e £. 40tli St., CUcag-0, ZU. 



AN APPEAL FOR MATTOON, ILL. 

Doubtless you have read an appeal 
to the Brotherhood over the signature 
of J. C. Mullins, pastor of the Chris- 
tian church of Mattoon. I have had 
a personal letter from Brother Mul- 
lins with regard to the situation and I 
want to add my word of appeal to 
his. He says sixty families of our 
church were made homeless by the 
cyclone and seventy-five others had 
their homes damaged more or less. I 
am almost ashamed to tell you the re- 
sult of the appeal Brother Mullins 
made. His report is that $5 has come 
from the Brotherhood in Illinois and 
that $9 has been sent in from another 
state. The M. E. church of AJattoon 
is strong; twenty of their families lost 
their homes. An appeal was made to 
their conference and $2,200 was re- 
ceived. 



I know the numerous calls that are 
being made upon us at this time and 
doubtless many members of the Chris- 
tian church have responded to the 
general appeal in behalf of Mattoon. 
But the church herself ought to re- 
spond. Brethren, take this matter up 
with the church. Write Brother Mul- 
lins a word of encouragement any- 
way. But the best sort of encour- 
agement at this time would undoubt- 
edly be a financial contribution. 

H. H. Peters, 
State Secretary. 



CHURCH 



SCHOOL 



Ask for Catalogue and Special Donation Plan No. 27 

(Established 1858) 
THE C. S. BELL CO., HELLSSORO, OHIO 



^lllllllllllllllillligiiilllilllllllllStillilStlSaSiiStieSSISIigiHnSiiHtiSiailliiii^iililliSHiilii^ii^l 

5 " . ' i 

I The Composition of Coca-Cola | 

I and its Relation to Tea | 

5 Prompted by the desire that the public shall S 

= be thoroughly informed as to the composi- '£ 

3 tion and dietetic character of Coca-Cola, the ~ 

= Company has issued a booklet giving a de- 5 

S tailed analysis of its recipe which is as follows : '£ 

S Water, sterilized ky boiling (carbonated); g 

E sugar, granulated, first quality; fruit :navoring s 

3 extracts with caramel; acid flavorings, citric s 

5 (lemon) and phosphoric; essence of tea — the s 

E refreshing principle, s 

E The following analysis, by the late Dr. John g 

S W. Mallet, Fellov/ of the Royal Society and B 

S for nearly forty years Professor of Chemistry s 

E in the University of Virginia, shows the com- s 

S parative stimulating or refreshing strength of s 

E tea and Coca-Cola, measured in terms of the s 

3 refreshing principle: s 

E Black tea — 1 cupful 1.54 s 

S (hot) (5 fl. oz.) S 

i Green tea— 1 glassful 2.02 | 

S (cold) (8 H. oz. exclusive of ice) SS 

E Coca-Cola— 1 drink, 8 fl. oz 1.21 | 

S (fountain) (prepared with 1 fl. oz. Syrup) S 

i Coca- Cola—1 drink, 8 fl. oz 1.12 | 

SS (bottlers) (prepared ft^ith 1 fl. oz. Syrup) S 

E From the above recipe and analysis, which arc S 

E confirmed by all chemists who have analyzed § 

E these beverages, it is apparent that Coca-Cola ~ 

E is a carbonated, fruit-flavored modification of s 

S tea of a little more than one-half its stimulat- s 

E ing strength. s 

5 A copy of the booklet referred to above will s 

S be mailed free on request, and The Coca-Cola E 

E Company especially invites inquiry from s 

E those who are interested in pure food and E 

E public health propaganda. Address S 

S The Coca-Cola Co., Dept. J., Atlanta, Ga., U. S. A. = 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiR 



July 5, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



21 



euivi on 8tMl Voldlntf Stand tOronly «9.W> V 




The Commonwealth Hotel, soon to be 
built in New York City, will be the larg- 
est hotel in the world, being twenty-eight 



stories in height and having twenty-five 
hundred rooms. It will cost fifteen mil- 
lion dollars. 



The special feature of this excellent set 
) of maps, are, their clearnesa. The names ^ 
of places in large print, feint mountains, 
various styles of lettering so as to be pleasing 
to the eye and the tone of the colors, which 
are both attraactive and harmonious. 
From the latest explorations and diacoveriea 

This grand set of six Maps consists of 
the following: 

New Testament Palestine — Old Test* 
ament Palestine — Bomcui £iupire 
Bbowing Pauls Travels — Bible l>aAds 
of the Old Testament — The flxodiis, 
Xigypt to Canaan — Ancient Jerosalem. 

Printed on linen finish cloth in 6 colors 
rize 19x27. Mounted on folding steel 
stand, can be raised, lowered or turned in 
any direction on tlie revolving frame so the 
largest classes can see them, being on a, 
line with tlie faces of Scholars when seated. 
Making them the most practical Helps in 
Student and Class Work. When not in 
use can be easily folded up Price $3.50 
net and for 30c extra will be sent i)repaid 
to any Express office. Single maps of the 
above sent prepaid on receipt of 60 cents. 

Ssntifer to abov on a larger Scale are 
5 Eilers Stinday School Maps on a very strong 
Revolving Adjustable Steel Stand about 
614 feet hiRh, 36x48 to 36x67 on linen 
finished loth. These Five thoroughly up 
to date Maps ''Jonsist of the following. 

New TestamentPalestine, — OW Testament 
PalestinCj— Roman empire and Bible Lands, 
showing Pauls Travels by Colored lines. — 
Lands of the Old Testament, from the 
Great Sea. to the Persian Gulf — The 
Exodus, Egypt, showing by Colored lines 
the wanderings of tlie Isrealites. Price of 
any siiisle Maps SI. 00 

On account of Us portability, this Stand 
and Maps are the most helpful aids in 
teaching Bible History. To avoid errors 
in ordering, specify Eilers Maps on Revolving 
Steel Stand Price S6.5Q will be sent 
prepaid to anv Express office for 60 centa 
additional. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 
700 E. 40th St., : Chicago, III. 



MR. BRITLING SPEAKS AGAIN 

Mr. H. G. Wells' New Book 

"God, the Invisible King" 

Mr. Wells, the author'of Mr. Britling, says : 

**r/ie time draws near when mankind will awake . . . 
and then there will be no nationality in all the world 
but humanity, and no king, no emperor, nor leader, 
but the one God of mankind,** 

AMERICA IS FIGHTING FOR THIS GOD! 

"God, the Invisible King'' 

"The Religion of Mr. Britling" 

Price, $1.25 

—FOR SALE BY— 

Disciples Publication Society, 700 E. 40tli St., Chicago 



THE BEST SCORE BOARD 

Framed in Solid Oak with durable one-piece back. All cards have a jet black 
background. The names of months, days of the week and dates 1 to 31 are printed 
in red. All other figures and wordings appear in white. All cards are 2-^ inches 
in height. 

THESE BOARDS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

PRICE IiIST, ITOT FKEFAXD 

ITo. 2 — Siz« 45x32 inclies; 12 strips, 20 sets of fig-nres, 94 words, eto., $12.50 

No. 3 — Size 45x48 inches; 18 strips, 30 sets of figures, 94 words, etc., 15.0O 

ITo. 1 — Size 30x31 Indies; 12 strips, 20 sets of figures, 30 words, etc., 10.00 

Send for complete description. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



700 E. 40th Street, CHICAGO 



SIX GREAT BOOKS 

EI Supremo. — White. A thrilling story of South America. $1.90net 

History of the Great War. — Conan Doyle. Vol. I. Every scholarly man will 

wish to possess this great history. Purchase Vol. I now $2.00 net 

Aspects of the Infinite Mystery. — Gordon. A profoundly spiritual volume, 

interestingly written $1.50 net 

What the War Is Teaching. — Jefferson. One of the greatest books the war 

has brought forth $1.00 net 

The Bible and Modern Life. — Cooper. A rich mine for ministers $1.00 

Applied Religion for Every Man. — Nolan Rice Best. For ministers who live 

in the today $1.00 net 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 E. 40lh Street, Chicago 



|(f*H*f*'-> 






Factory Rebuilt Like New $65.00 

The word "rebuilt" has been abused and misused until it has become a meaningless trade term 

When we rebuild a Fox Typewriter, we take it all to pieces, re-nickel the 
nickel parts, re-enamel the frame and replace all worn parts with new ones. 
The same men who originally buill the Typewriter do this rebuilding and do the work just as good. 

S0% NEW PARTS AND THREE YEARS' GUARANTEE 

We offer a rebuilt Fox Typewriter Model No. 24 ~ just like new— for $65.00. Theae have 
standard carriages taking paper 10}^ inches wide, any kind of keyboard, any kind of type, 
rubber covers, tabulators, back spacers, two-color ribbons, complete with instruction books 
and cleaning outfits, and are guaranteed for three years the same as new ones, and to have not 
less than fifty per cent of new parts. 
Send any amount you can spare, from $5.00 up, as a first payment, and pay the balance 
$5.00 monthly. 5 per cent discount for all cash. Purchaser must pay transportation. If $10.00 
or more is sent with order, we will include FREE a very fine Metal Case, in addition to the rubber 
cover, together with a high class brass padlock for locking case when typewriter is not in use. Please order 
direct from this offer and inchse any amount you can spare— and BE SURE and mention THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY FOR JULY' 






FOX TYPEWRITER CO.. 



1101-1151 Front Ave., 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 





22 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 5, 1917 



BETHANY ASSEMBLY 

The National Assembly and Chautauqua of the Disciples of Christ 
35th Annual Session July 25 to August 19, 1917 

W. E. M. HACKLEMAN, President 



BROOKLYN, IND. 



20 MILES FROM INDIANAPOLIS, ON PENNA. 
LINES AND MARTINSVILLE INTERURBAN. 



SEASON TICKET, $1.00 

OVER 100 Lectures, Concerts, 

Entertainments, and Chautauqua 

Attractions. 

Lodging, 25c and up. 

Meals per week, $6.00. 



FOUR WEEKS 

Patriotic Woman's Social Service 

and Bible Conference. 

TRAINING SCHOOLS for Bible 

School Workers, Endeavorers and 

Evangelistic Singers 



26 DAYS RECREATION 

Fellowship and 

Instruction. 

Swimming, Boating, 

Fishing, Games, Hikes, 

Etc., Etc. 



Send for beautiful 64 page with cover Program. For further particulars, address Bethany Assembly, 

Irvington Station, Indianapolis, Indiana 



BOOKS ON EVANGELISM 

Recruiting for Christ — John Timothy Stone. Hand-to-Hand Methods 

with Men. $1.00 net. 
The Real Billy Sunday— "Ram's Horn" Brown. $1.00 net. 
The Soul- Winning Church — Len G. Broughton. 50c net. 
The How Book — ^Hudson. Methods of Winning Men. 50c net. 
Thirty-One Revival Sermons — Banks. $1.00 net. 
Pastoral and Personal Evangelism — Goodell. $1.00 net. 
Revival Sermons — Chapman. $1.00. 

As Jesus Passed By — Addresses by Gipsy Smith. $1.00 net. 
Saved and Kept — F. B. Meyer. Counsels to Young Believers. 50c net. 



THE 

Standard Birthday Bank 

Attractive and Durable. Made of 

G-lass and Alnmlnum. All 

the Money In Siffht. 

The top and bottom plates are 
made of highly polished aluminum. 
These are held together by 4 oxi- 
dized rods, with nickel-plated balls. 
The bank is opened by unscrewing 
one of the bottom balls that is 
marked with a Cross. 

Price, $1.25; or $1.40 postpaid 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 
700 E. 40th St., Chicatro, HI. 



The Life of Jesus 

By Dr. LOA E. SCOTT 

A fine course for summer study. Send 
for a copy and consider it for your class. 
There are several reasons for the popu- 
larity of this course: (1) It is a treatment 
of the ever-popular subject of study, the 
life of the Master; (2) It is a question and 
answer study; (3) It requires constant 
use of the Bible itself. 

Many classes have been transformed 
into real study-classes by the use of this 
book. Why not try it in your class? 

Price per copy, 50 cents ; in lots of 10 or 
more, 40 cents each. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 East 40th Street, Chicago, 111. 



Parables of Safed the Sage 

By WILLIAM E. BARTON 

What are the Parables of Safed the Sage? 
They are little narrative discourses in the first 
person by a genial philosopher who talks most 
interestingly of all sorts of things. But they are 
all related to life. Whether the writer picks up 
his story on a trolley car or in his garden or 
out of the visit of a crank or book agent, he 
always says something that relates to some 
practical experience. You will agree to that, 
if you are reading the Parables as published 
in The Christian Century. 

Some readers say the Parables are the best 
bits of humor now appearing in any magazine in 
America. They poke fun at all sorts of follies 
and foibles, but they have a strong element of 
good sense, and their laugh is always on the 
right side. They have been copied into many 
papers ; have served as themes for sermons and 
addresses; have pointed many morals and 
adorned many tales. 

The Parables of Safed the Sage is a handsome 

volume of nearly 200 pages, and the Parables 

are printed in large, clear type on excellent 

paper. More than fifty parables are included. 

Price per copy, $1.25 

Order today. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 East 40th Street, Chicago, 111. 



July 5, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



23 



The Bethany System 



OF 



Sunday School Literature 



Some Typical Graded Courses 

THE BIBLE AND SOCIAL LIVING. Prepared by Harry F. Ward, who probably 
stands first in the list of social service authorities within the church. 

THE WORLD A FIELD FOR CHRISTIAN SERVICE. This course of study has as 
its purpose to train youth for genuine service in the world of today. Inspirational, 
educational, practical. 

CHRISTIAN LIVING. What it means to be a Christian; problems of Christian living; 
the Christian and the church ; the Word of God in life. An ideal course for Inter- 
mediates. 

HISTORY OF NEW TESTAMENT TIMES. Teaches the young people how the 
church started, with vivid pictures of the backgrounds of its history. 

HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE HEBREW PEOPLE. Before the life of 
Christ can be understood, there must be a knowledge of the history of the Hebrews. 
In this course the story is told in an attractive way, but thoroughly. 



Special Courses 



For Young People and Adults 

THE TRAINING OF CHURCH MEMBERS. A manual of Christian service intended 
for classes of new converts, adult or young people's Sunday school classes, pastor's 
classes, midweek services, etc. This little book has made a deep impression upon 
the church life of the Disciples. Send for free sample copy. 

THE LIFE OF JESUS. By Dr. Loa E. Scott. A question and answer review of the 
life of the Master, requiring close study of the Scriptures themselves. Many large 
classes have been built up by interest in this course. Send 50 cents for copy. Sells 
at 40 cents in lots. 

MORAL LEADERS OF ISRAEL. By Dr. H. L. Willett. An ideal course for adult 
classes which have a serious desire to master the facts of Old Testament life. Price 
per copy, $1.00. 

THE GOSPEL OF THE KINGDOM. A monthly magazine of social service founded 
by Dr. Josiah Strong. Treats present day problems in most attractive fashion. A 
fine course for men's classes. 75 cents single subscription ; 50 cents per year in clubs, 
if ordered by the year. Send for free sample copy. 

These are only a few of the excellent study courses afiforded by 
the Bethany Graded System. Send for returnable samples of the 
Bethany Graded Lessons, and for copies of any of the special courses 
which interest you . 

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL MUST TAKE ITSELF SERIOUSLY IN THIS CRIT- 
ICAL ERA OF OUR COUNTRY'S HISTORY. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION IS THE 
ONLY "WAY OUT." YOU ARE CRIMINALLY NEGLIGENT IF YOU DO NOT 
SEE THAT YOUR SCHOOL HAS THE VERY BEST EQUIPMENT POSSIBLE 
FOR ITS IMPORTANT WORK. 

Disciples Publication Society 



700 East 40th Street 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



m 



m-n ji-niTiifm itiirar WTtfrai^vi'iri 



HAVE YOU READ 




A NEW NOVEL 
BY EDGAR DEWITT JONES 



lllllinillllllllli: 



Fairhope folks are mighty human, but you 
will like them all the better for that. 

Major Menifee may remind you of Colonel 
Carter of Cartersville. You will love Jacob 
Boardman, the modern Enoch. And even 
Giles Shockley will not repel you, "Hound 
of the Lord" though he was. 

Everyone knows that the old style of 
country church is passing forever. But 
what type of church will take its place? 
Read the chapter entitled "The Old Order 
Changeth" and meet the Reverend Roger 
Edgecomb, Prophet of the new order. 

Do you like birds and stretches of meadows, 
glimpses of lordly river, and the glory of 
high hills? Do you like young preachers and 
old time country folks, their humors, their 
foibles and their loyalties? If you do, then 
you should read 

"Fairhope, the Annals 
of a Country Church" 

Price, $1.25 

Order NOW, enclosing} remittance 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th Street, Chicago, 111. 

1£ 





9 


1 


^ 





THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 12, 1917 



Great Books 
of Today 

ON RELIGION 

Psychology of Religion 
By George A. Coe 

$1.50 net 
Aspects of the Infinite 

By George A. Gordon 

$1.50 net 
Applied Religion for Everyman 
By Nolan R. Best 

$1.00 net 
The Spiritual Interpretation of 
History 

By Shailer Mathews 

$1.50 net 
The Manhood of the Master 
By H. E. Fosdick 

50c net 
The Bible and Modern Life 
By Clayton S. Cooper 

$1.00 net 
The Man in the Street and 
Religion 

By Burris A. Jenkins 

$1.25 net 
The Wisdom of God's Fools 
By Edgar D. Jones 

$1.00 net 
The Social Principles of Jesus 
By Walter Rauschenbusch 

50c net 
The Syrian Christ 

By A. M. Rihbany 

$1.50 
ON THE WAR 
What the War is Teaching 
By Charles E. Jefferson 

$1.00 net 
The Christian Ethic of War 
By Principal P. T. Forsyth 

$2.00 net 
New Wars for Old 

By John H. Holmes 

$1.25 
The Challenge of the Future 
By Roland G. Usher 

$1.75 
Preparedness: The American 
versus the Military Program 
By W. I. Hull 

$1.25 net 
History of the Great War. Vol. I 
By A. Conan Doyle 

$2.00 net 
Poems of the Great War g^ 

$1.50 
FICTION 
Mr. Britling Sees It Through 
By H. G. Wells 

$1.60 
El Supremo 

By E.L. White 

$1.90 
MISCELLANEOUS 
Life of Booker T. Washington 
By E. J. Scott 

$2.00 postpaid 
A Handy Guide for Beggars 
By Vachel Lindsay 

$1.25 
Fruit Gathering 

By Rabindranath Tagore 

$1.25 
Rhymes of a Red Cross Man 
By Robt. W. Service 

$1.00 net 

For Sale by 

Disciples Publication 
Society 

700 E. 40th St., CHICAGO 



The Bethany 

Graded Lessons 



Afford the very best study material for the work of the mod- 
ern Sunday school. Their growing popularity is notable. 
Some of our leading schools have used them for years; others 
are coming to use them as they learn of their merits. Here is 
what some of the leaders of the church say of this unsur- 
passed body of literature: 

Rev. G. W. Knepper, Ann Arbor, Mich.: *'We sought the 
BEST, and we use the BETHANY GRADED." 

Rev. P. L. Schuler, Cedar Rapids, la.: "No course so satis- 
factory for Primaries and Juniors." 

Rev. J. J. Tisdall, Toledo, O.: "Especially fine for Interme- 
diates." 

Rev. I. S. Chenoweth, Philadelphia: "Superior to anything 
we have seen; have used it for years." 

Rev. E. H. Wray, Steubenville, O.: "None better." 

Rev. L. O. Bricker, Atlanta, Ga. : "Absolutely satisfactory; 
a triumph of religious educational enterprise." 

Rev. Frank Waller Allen, Springfield, 111.: "Without a 
peer." 

Rev. Chas. M. Watson, Norfolk, Va. : "The best published." 

Rev. Edgar D. Jones, Bloomington, 111.: "Gives entire satis- 
faction." 

Rev. Finis Idleman, New York: "Means a new day in re- 
ligious education." 

Rev. E. B. Shively, Paris, Mo.: "Produces character in the 
Sunday-school." 

Rev. H. H. Harmon, Lincoln, Neb.: "Makes the teacher's 
work a real joy." 

Rev. Graham Frank, Liberty, Mo.: "School is delighted 
with it." 

Rev. H. D. C. Maclachlan, Richmond, Va.: "Makes teach- 
ing and learning easy." 

Rev. L. J. Marshall, Kansas City, Mo.: "Thoroughly 
edited." 

Rev. P. J. Rice, El Paso, Texas: "Nothing that compares 
with it." 

Rev. E. M. Waits, Ft. Worth, Texas: "The best published 
anywhere." 

Rev. T. E. Winter, Philadelphia: "A delight to all." 

AND THERE ARE OTHERS. YOUR SCHOOL 
SHOULD HAVE THE BETHANY. SEND FOR RE- 
TURNABLE SAMPLES. ADDRESS 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 East 40th Street, Chicago 



July 12, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



Bnbseriirtloa nice>~Two AoIIats and 
a hSLif a Tear, payable strictly la 
advance. To mlnlrters, two dollars 
when paid in advance. Canadian 
■ubscriptlone, 69 cents additional for 
postagre. Foreign, 11.00 additional. 
Ptocoatlonancee— la order that sub- 
scribers may not be annoyed by 
failure to receive the paper, it Is 
not discontinued at expiration ot 
time paid In advance (unless so 
ordered), but continued pending- In- 
struction from the subscriher. If 
discontinuance is desired, prompt 
notice should be sent and all ar- 
rearages paid. 

CtaanKO ot address— In ordering 
change of address give the old as 
well as the new. 




PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 
IN THE INTEREST OF THE KINGDOM OF GOD 



Bxplratlons — The date on the rrritjh 
per shows the month and year to 
which subscription is paid. LIM li 
revised monthly. Change mt dat* 
on wrapper la a receipt for r«mtt« 
tance on subscription account. 

Remittances — Should bo sent by 
draft or money order, payable to 
The Disciples Publication Society. 
If local check is sfint. add ten 
cents for exchange charged us by 
Chicago banks. 

EJntered as Second-Class Matter 
Feb. 28, 1902, at the Postofflce, Chi- 
cago. Illinois, under Act of March 
3, 1879. 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, PROPRIETORS, 



700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO 



Disciples 

Publication 

Society 



The Disciples Publica- 
tion Society is an or- 
ganization through 
which churches of the 
Disciples of Christ 
seek to promote un- 
denominational and constructive 
Christianity. 

The relationship it sustains to Dis- 
ciples organizations is intimate and 
organic, though not oiBcial, The So- 
ciety is not a private institution. It 
has no capital stock. No individuals 
profit by Its earnings. 

The charter under which the So- 
ciety exists determines that whatever 
profits are earned shall be applied to 
agencies which foster the cause of 
religious education, although it is 
clearly conceived that its main task 
is not to make profits but to produce 
literature for building up character 
and for advancing the cause of re- 
ligion. * • * 

The Disciples Publication Society 



regards itself as a thoroughly unde- 
nominational institution. It is organ- 
ized and constituted by individuals 
and churches who interpret the Dis- 
ciples' religious reformation as ideally 
an unsectarian and unecclesiastical 
fraternity, whose common tie and 
original impulse are fundamentally the 
desire to practice Christian unity with 
all Christians. 

The Society therefore claims fel- 
lowship with all who belong to the 
living Church of Christ, and desires to 
cooperate with the Christian people 
of all communions, as well as with the 
congregations of Disciples, and to 
serve all. « • ♦ 

The Christian Century desires noth- 
ing so much as to be the worthy or- 



gan of the Disciples' movement. It 
has no ambition at all to be regarded 
as an organ of the Disciples' denom- 
ination. It is a free interpreter of the 
wider fellowship in religious faith and 
service which it believes every church 
of Disciples should embody. It 
strives to interpret all communions, as 
well as the Disciples, in such^ terms 
and with such sympathetic insight as 
may reveal to all their essential unity 
in spite of denominational isolation. 
The Christian Century, though pub- 
lished by the Disciples, is not pub- 
lished for the Disciples alone. It is 
published for the Christian world. It 
desires definitely to occupy a catholic 
point of view and it seeks readers in 
all communions. 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO. 

Dear Friends: — ^I believe in the spirit and purposes of The Christian Century and wish to be numbered among 
those who are supporting your work in a substantial way by their gifts. 



Enclosed please find 
$ 



Name..,. 
Address. 



saa 



■■immii'iiiliiiiaBlii 



"The Training of Church Members" 

By ORVIS F. JORDAN and CHARLES CLAYTON MORRISON 

IS THE TEXT BOOK 
YOU ARE LOOKING FOR 

IF you have a Sunday-School class of young people or adults whom you wish to inform 

concerning the fundamental principles of our own movement. 
IF you are desirous of making your mid-week prayer meetings worth while. Don't let 

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helpful little book. 
IF your Christian Endeavor Society needs something definite to work at this year. Why 

not teach these impressionable young people the things they should know concerning 

the church? 
IF you are planning to organize a Pastor's class for special study. 
IF you are organizing a teacher-training class. 

Why not make a feature of your evening preaching service this summer a brief study from 

this important little book? 
Send for a sample copy of "The Training of Church Members," and see how perfectly it 

fits into your needs. 

Price, 15c per single copy; 12J^c in quantities 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



700 EAST 40th STREET 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 12, 1917 



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D 








DRAKE BIBLE COLLEGE, TOKIO, JAPAN 

SO GOES THE EAST 

D D D 

If we were indifferent as to what should become of the 70,000,000 people of Japan, including Formosa, Saghalien, 
Chosen (Korea) and its myriad of small islands, we should have to give it earnest consideration on account of its para- 
mount influence in Asia. China especially, and to a smaller degree the other Oriental peoples, even including India, are 
profoundly affected by what Japan does, especially in its educational, social and religious life. This is true not only 
because Japan has become one of the world-powers, but especially because there is so much in common, in religion, 
language and life, among the Orientals. For a thousand years Japan was the pupil of China, and through her of 
India. Now the relation is reversed. But the current flows the other way just as freely. 

But even without their age-long sympathy, Japan would become a carrier and purveyor of ideas by the fact that 
she is compelled to become a carrier and purveyor of goods, as well as a manufacturer, by the narrow limits of her soil 
and the multiplication of her people. She has 25 per cent more people than France, with 25 per cent less land, of which 
only 14 per cent can be cultivated, whereas France tills 55 per cent of her soil. Her ships and her products go into all 
the ports of the world, but her mercantile marine dominates the Pacific Ocean, on whose shores are half the people 
of the world and on whose waters must center the world's interests of the future, as those of the ancient world did on 
the Mediterranean and the nineteenth century on the Atlantic. 

This is a short day of supreme opportunity in Japan. Fifty years ago her gates were barred against us. Ten years 

ago she was arrogant and self-sufficient. Today, having failed to find satisfaction in scientific investigation or military 

achievement, taxed to half her people's income and groping for the true Light, Japan is ready to learn of Christ and 
bring all Asia into His school. 

The success of the Men and Millions Movement will enable the Disciples to do their share toward letting Japan 
realize her destiny in the leadership of the East, to the fulfillment of the prophecy, "As goes Japan, so goes the East." 

MEN AND MILLIONS MOVEMENT 



222 WEST FOURTH STREET 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



D. 



n 




OaABJiES ClkATTOZr UOBAZSON, SDZTOB. 



HEBBEBT I^. VnOUCiEafT, OONTBIB1TTI2TO EOZTOB. 



'olume XXXIV 



JULY 12. 1917 



Number 28 



Solving the Race Problem by Murder 



IS AMERICA A NATION OF HYPOCRITES? 

To ask such a question may smack of disloyalty. 
Ve have but recently listened to the Fourth of July 
irations and we think very well of ourselves. Even 
s we were in the midst of our celebrations the smoke 
vas rising from the ruined homes and murdered corpses 
if two hundred negroes slaughtered in East St. Louis, 
llinois. We have found vigorous words to protest the 
langing of a single black man by a mob somewhere in 
he south. How shall any citizen find adequate ex- 
)ression for his feelings upon learning that the great 
:ommonwealth of Illinois was disgraced by the carnage 
eported by our press last week? 

VVe are aware of the various pretexts for the action 
)f the Avhite mob. Thousands of southern negroes had 
)een brought to town by the factories to meet the 
Icmand for labor. This labor demand would have been 
net by immigration in the pre-bellum days, but no 
mmigrants are available now. It has actually been 
ound by some worthless white men that negroes do 
heir work better. Inflamed by liquor, such men have 
"elt that they had a great grievance against the blacks. 

Nor are we unmindful of the fact that negro high- 
kvaymen had terrorized certain sections of the city, 
rhe negroes of a great city may be expected to furnish 
IS much crime as the whites. It is a great wonder that 
these relatively undeveloped people do not furnish a 
"■reat deal more. It has never been shown that in any 
:ommunity the negroes were so peculiarly cunning and 
dangerous that they must be dealt with in an extra- 
legal way. They violate the law just as other folks do, , 
and respond to the legal methods of handling crime 
iust like other people. 

As for the question. What would happen to the city 
if the negro population were allowed to increase with- 
3Ut mob interference, it may safely be asserted that 
East St. Louis, with a reputation for justice and law 
and order, would be a far more attractive place for white 
:itizens, even with many negroes in it, than it is now 
with the negroes gone and a story abroad which will 
?hame the inhabitants of that city for a whole 
[generation. 
I • • 

But we must not conclude that the people of East 
5t. Louis are sinners above others. The negroes went 
lO that city and this terrible catastrophe resulted. The 
murder of these negroes might have taken place in other 
:ities, for back of the crime lies the racial prejudice 
which was its chief motive. It is a lamentable fact that 
A.merica, north and south, has a racial prejudice which 
-hreatens us with no end of trouble as the days go on. 

We have heard of the murder of Armenians by 
Lurks and our scorn for such proceedings has led us 
':o give large sums of money for Armenian relief ; this 
^Teat wrong has been with some men a spur for enter- 
ing the present war. The Armenian massacres have 
3een carried out on a larger scale, but they are no uglier 



than negro murders in America. We hear of the pog- 
roms against Jews in Russia. These violent reactions 
against a subject race made the former government of 
that country most unpopular with us, for it seemed to 
wink at these abuses. We have even developed a kind 
of sentimental sympathy for Ireland, but what the 
Emerald Isle suffers at the hands of absentee landlords 
is a small matter as compared with the effort of many 
in America to subjugate a whole race and hold them 
in a bondage which in some ways is meaner than slavery. 

That our pet racial hatred in this country makes 
us no end of trouble may be seen on every hand. Of 
course the great fraternal orders refuse to have any 
sort of fellowship with negroes. The labor unions, 
though not organized for a social purpose fundamen- 
tally, have nevertheless made the same discrimination. 
The result of their refusing to admit the negro to the 
union is that the negro, left without organization, and 
with but little genius to create a union of his own, 
becomes an unfair competitor in the labor market. 

Even in the church of God, there are still the 
remnants of this ugly and unreasoning hatred. The 
bishops of northern and southern Methodism were con- 
ferring recently in Michigan over the problem of the 
reunion of their denomination. A long list of matters 
were amicably disposed of, but the negro question pre- 
vented the union being consummated. Men called 
bishops in the church of God voted against having any 
fellowship in the church with black men. In this they 
must have felt that they were supported by a large part 
of their constituency. 

• • 

To the solution of the negro problem there must 
come first of all unprejudiced minds and a scientific 
spirit. The anthropologist knows pretty well where the 
negro is, so far as his development is concerned. He 
is but a little more than a hundred years removed from 
cannibalism. That he should travel so far in so brief 
a space of time is one of the great marvels of history. 
The work of the public school is contributing much 
to the elevation of the race. A generation of education ^ 
will work wonders in the redemption of the black people. 
There should be a public sentiment that would compel 
the giving of equal educational opportunities to them. 

The negro needs a more ethical religion. He has :■■ 
fallen an easy victim to the more emotional religious 
practices. He is gradually outgrowing camp-meeting 
religion. Young negro preachers are being educated 
in the universities. They have a great opportunity to 
save a naturally religious race from irreligion. 

The problem of the white man is about as big as 
the negro problem. Proud, imperious, quarrelsome, the 
white man is a very over-bearing citizen. If he once 
becomes a true follower of the meek and lowly Man 
of Nazareth, we shall come much nearer racial peace 
in America. 



EDITORIAL 



CHURCHES AND TRAINING CAMPS 

TRAINING camps are now being established in vari- 
ous cities of the country. In some of these camps 

will be gathered as many as forty or fifty thousand 
men. The cities in which the camps are being located 
will bear a great responsibility for the moral and spirit- 
ual welfare of the men thus assembled. 

What can the churches of these cities do in the 
way of service? They will find that many soldier boys 
will often wish to attend church with civilians and to 
escape for one day their military surroundings. The 
churches should organize services that will appeal to 
the soldiers. 

The chaplains of the regiments will be grateful for 
the loan of church choirs for the army religious service. 
This service is often poorly attended because it is so 
bare. If the churches will help, this reproach can be 
removed. 

There will be opportunity in some regiments to 
arrange for Bible classes for men. These will require 
the most alert teachers, but with right leadership they 
can be made most helpful. 

In Great Britain the women of the communities 
have helped serve chocolate and other delicacies in the 
Y. M. C. A. huts. These men were glad to look again 
upon the faces of good women and the influence of this 
service proved most helpful. 

The bringing of fifty thousand men into the environ- 
ment of a city will attract the harpies and evil characters 
of every sort to prey upon the men. The city govern- 
ment in each community will need to have strong sup- 
port from the churches as the vicious element will make 
every efifort to entrench itself in the local political sys- 
tem. A conscience in the community will prevent the 
city from becoming a plague spot to young enlisted 
men. 

We should be developing new means of service, 
for the church has not in a long time faced such an 
opportunity as this. After the war is over, there should 
be a new respect for organized religion. 

MISSIONARY "MOVIES" 

THE motion picture as the delineator of impossible 
romances will have its day. The ingenuity of man 

cannot keep up with the demand for ever more 
exciting dramas which are capable of presentation on 
the screen. 

The motion picture as an opportunity for educa- 
tion, however, will remain one of the chief avenues of 
film development. Missionary leaders are very alert 
and they have already made use of missionary films of 
happenings in mission lands. These are expensive, for 
in their production is needed not only a high-grade 
photographer who must work in unwonted circum- 
stances, but also a missionary enthusiast who will know 
just what there is in the missionary program which 
can tell its story through pictures. 

Among the motion pictures now available is one 
showing the work of an idol maker. Another film 
pictures a baptismal scene in a river of Burmah. A 
missionary's day's work can be judged of by film pic- 
tures and thus for the first time the people at home 
can visualize the activities of the consecrated men and 
women who have been sent to the front by the churches. 



Eventually it will be possible to witness the daily 
activities of the natives of mission lands, to understand 
their religious practices and to appreciate their social 
needs. When this good time comes, there will be need 
for more lenient laws regarding the use of films in 
churches. The introduction of the Tungsten lamp and 
the slow-burning film has done away with most of the 
dangers of the motion picture. The educational film 
should be brought generally to the people in churches 
and school houses. When the possibilities of films have 
become thoroughly appreciated, the melodrama of the 
playhouses will gradually pass away on account of the 
abundance of non-commercialized entertainment to be 
had in the community. By that time conservative 
criticism of "movies" in the churches will have van- 
ished. 

WHY ISLAM IS HARD TO REACH 

MOHAMMEDAN countries are notoriously diffi- 
cult to reach with the Christian propaganda. 
After a century of efifort in these lands, results 
in the way of converts have been much less than among 
people of other faiths. 

When the religion of the Prophet swept over west- 
ern Asia and northern Africa, it was really superior to 
the low-grade Christianity it replaced. The Moham- 
medan was a strict monotheist. He was outraged by 
the saint worship and the mariolatry which he found 
everywhere prevalent in the churches. Even to this 
day it is difficult to explain the doctrine of the Trinity 
to a Mohammedan in a way to win his sympathetic 
hearing, for he regards even this as a violation of the 
strict monotheism for which Mohammedanism has con- 
tended through the centuries. 

The Mohammedan is also offended at certain loose 
ethical practices among Christians. While we speak 
of the man of Islam as a polygamist, he speaks of us as 
a wine-drinker and despises us for the indulgence which 
the alcoholism of the western world betokens. Gradu- 
ally Christianity's higher view of women is winning 
its way in the Mohammedan world, but we may well 
hope that the Christian section of the world will abolish 
the use of alcohol before the sons of the Prophet are 
converted to Christ. 

With the manifest defects of Mohammedanism we 
are familiar, but with its elements of strength we are 
not so well-acquainted. The repetition of prayers five 
times daily keeps the religion of the man of Islam ever 
in mind. He lives much closer to the institutions and 
practices of his faith than the Christian who practices 
his religion on occasional Sundays. 

We believe it our duty to persuade the people liv- 
ing under the crescent to accept Christ. Before we 
can do so, we must make the religion of Jesus live in 
our own lives. 

REACTION IN CHINA 

THE cables are busy giving us varying reports con- 
cerning political conditions in China. Since we 
have lost the illusion that China is not important 
to us, we wait for the latest news with the deepest 
interest. 

China stands to us as the outstanding opportunity 
in the way of world trade. An enterprising chewing 



July 12, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



gnm manufacturer has hired prominent ladies of China 
to chew gum and the American habit is said to be 
growing- rapidly among the people. There will be an 
enormous market for every kind of American goods, 
unless some hostile power should close that market 
to us. 

China has enormous significance for the political 
life of the world. We hailed the new republic formed 
:here after the model of the United States. Had that 
-epublic succeeded in maintaining order, at least a 
imited success of the democratic principle would have 
3een assured. With the old Manchu ruler coming back 
nto power, if, indeed, it is a permanent return to power, 
there will be a decline in the world's faith in democracy. 

The religious significance of China is of outstand- 
ing importance. During the days of the republic, when 
:he study of the classics was replaced by western learn- 
ing, there was an open door for Christianity. The 
student class gave earnest heed to it. If the old dyn- 
isty returns to power, the effect upon the growing 
C^hristian sentiment of the country is problematical. 

If the church of Christ should be able to take 
China in this generation, convert her leaders, and make 
the religion of Christ come into recognition as a power 
In Chinese life, the effect of this achievement on the 
rest of Asia would be enormous and might in the end 
36 the big event which foretokened the winning of the 
tvhole world to Jesus Christ. 

The old dynasty cannot re-establish the discarded 
religious beliefs, but it may mean a beginning for a 
3;odless materialism. This makes the events of the 
lOur of supreme importance. 

THE INTOLERANCE OF WELLS' NEW 
RELIGION 

A PROFESSED atheist writes in a literary journal 
complaining of the intolerance of H. G. Wells' 
new religion which he has set forth in his books 
Df the past year and which is even now receiving further 
elaboration in the story running in the pages of 
Collier's Weekly. The critic of the popular novelist 
says that Wells professes to be a disciple of William 
[ames but apostatizes from his master in a most im- 
portant matter — that of tolerance. 

William James in his "Varieties of Religious Expe- 
rience" examines many religious facts and always with 
1 fine sympathy. There is no denunciation, no rant, 
but a scientific effort to understand by sympathy. It 
is in no such spirit that H. G. Wells examines the 
:urrent orthodoxy. The bishop in the Wells story now 
being published in Colliefs is a most unconvincing fig- 
ure, for he renounces the religion to which he has 
devoted his life with no regret and with no feeling that 
it had value. It is evidently the point of view of Mr. 
Wells that orthodox people have no such feeling for 
their religion as the novelist has for his newly discov- 
ered one. 

It takes a catholic mind to be able to attend Holi- 
ness camp meetings, high mass, Christian Science 
prayer meetings, spiritualistic seances, theosophical lec- 
tures and protestant meetings and always find some- 
thing of spiritual value. The railer who can see nothing 
in the varying expressions of religious interest in the 
race except the ludicrous and the superstitious is barred 
from ever proceeding far with the scientific study of 
religion. 

H. G. Wells has but lately returned to an interest 



in religion. Religiously, he is a big, overgrown boy 
studying grammer in the grades, as it were. Such is 
his present enthusiasm over the subject of religion, that 
we can not doubt that he will keep making progress. 
He must learn first of all, however, that the religious 
history of mankind is not a record of just so much 
wasted time. The strength of established religion is 
not in the magistrate. It has come from centuries of 
prayer and aspiration in the search for a closer walk 
with God. 



.Jai- ..X 



WAR ON WOMEN AND CHILDREN 

THE United Free church in Scotland in its recent 
General Assembly threshed out some important 

questions. Among these was the question. Should 
the British retaliate upon the Germans for the air 
raids? The Allies now possess a strength in the air that 
would enable them to deal death and destruction to 
German cities just as Germans have been doing in 
Great Britain. It is the glory of the Scottish Christians 
that they decided that it was not right to retaliate in 
this way. After the war is over, the Germans will have 
something on their consciences which will not burden 
the British conscience. 

The same question will soon be up to America as 
well. We will have a great air fleet in France one of 
these days. Those who believe in vengeance will clamor 
for victims to repay the loss of the Lusitania passengers. 
It will be right to destroy war factories and military 
establishments, but America also is too highly civil- 
ized to make war on women and children. 

The pernicious doctrine that all is fair in war and 
that the victory will come to the most ruthless will be 
shown to be a fallacious doctrine. It is Germany's 
ruthlessness that brought in the United States against 
her. For the small advantage of the submarine cam- 
paign, she has gained a foe powerful in money and 
men who will be able to turn the tide of battle against 
the Teutons. Even from the standpoint of military 
effectiveness, it will be shown that when a nation out- 
rages the conscience of the world, she will find new foes 
at a most inconvenient time. 

Some may say that all deeds of violence in war 
are wrong. The history of ethics shows an advancing 
ideal of what is right and wrong. We have not yet 
established in the racial conscience the fact that war 
itself is wrong, though we may hope yet to do so. But 
ever since the days of Amos, it has been considered 
wrong to kill women and children in war. To return 
in our ethical standards to the dark period before the 
prophets is to sin against progress and against the God 
who gives us progress. 

THE HAZARD OF BEING A BABY 

SINCE the war began, the baby has taken on a new 
value. The first year after the war, babies in the 
East End of London died in larger numbers than 
usual, but the government soon cut down the number 
of deaths among infants due to ignorance and there 
are now found in England well-directed efforts toward 
saving the lives of children. 

The pathos of the baby's life is that he is most 
often killed by the one who loves him most — his mother. 
And this mother who brings her own offspring to an 
untimely end is the victim of a wrong system of educa- 
tion. We teach girls many impractical things, but 



m. 



8 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 12, 1917 



seldom tell them anything about the care of a baby, 
though many of the girls in the higher grades of the 
public schools are already "little mothers," taking care 
of younger brothers and sisters a considerable part of 
the time. 

We are now approaching the season of the year 
when cholera infantum and dysentery will begin their 
ravages. The little white hearse will soon be going 
through the streets and by autumn many a home will 
be desolate, nursing a sorrow where before there had 
been a pride and a joy. 

Can the church help at all in this situation? It 
seems practical to suggest that the Ladies' Aid society 
provide a place where a local physician or nurse might 
lecture occasionally on the care of babies in the summer 
time. In many societies the usual work is sewing and 
the women would gladly welcome a diversion in the 
way of such a reading or talk. Since the death of 
babies occurs often in good homes as well as in those 
of the slums, there is no reason to doubt that a study 
of the science of child-rearing would prove useful in 
most of the families in any parish. 

Roman Catholic priests have worked actively for 
large families, as a kind of biological evangelism. The 
Protestant minister might well find an equal interest in 
child-saving, for half the number of children born now 
could give the same population for the future, if the 
saving of the lives of infants were vigorously carried on. 

A SANE VACATION 

IN the midst of our plans for war economies, it will 
be no part of good policy for us to try to omit a 
vacation. The highest efficiency of an individual 
requires that a reasonable amount of rest and change 
be included in the annual program. The needs of the 
time, however, do demand that we shall adopt a rea- 
sonable and economical schedule. 

It would be hard to think of a more admirable 
vacation than is to be found at Lake Geneva in connec- 
tion with the summer conference of the Missionary 
Education Movement, July 27 to August 5. The ex- 
pense of living in the delightful environment of Lake 
Geneva is very low as compared with most places of 
resort in the summer time. The program of each day 
has a generous allotment of recreation and social life, 
but the mornings are given over to inspiring confer- 
ences on the subject of the world's redemption. 

The Disciples of Christ have been slow in discov- 
ering the value of these summer conferences. We are 
given recognition every year by having our leaders 
placed on the programs, and a number of our leading 
people attend, but not at all in proportion to our 
strength in this section of the country. 

The two missionary text-books which will be given 
special study this summer will be "Sons of Italy," by 
Professor Antonio Mangano, and "The Lure of Africa," 
by Rev. Cornelius H. Patton. There will also be a 
juvenile group studying "The Servants of the King." 
Many leaders of next year's mission study classes will 
be prepared during the ten days at Lake Geneva to do 
their work with skill and eft'ectiveness. 

The greatest thing to be said about such a vacation 
is that it is a spiritually enriching experience. Our 
nation demands nothing more in these days than the 
support of people with spiritual poise and power. An 
increase in these spiritual values is to be found at such 
a missionary conference as that at Lake Geneva. 



FAMILY LOYALTY AND RELIGIOUS 
LOYALTY 

ONE of the marks of the culture of a family is its 
attitude toward its traditions. Life is dis- 
tinctly poorer in a group which has no care about 
its past or its future. 

Modern life has made family loyalty more diffi- 
cult. Families are no longer anchored to a spot. A 
boy nowadays points to a hospital as his dear birth- 
place and to an apartment building as a place "where 
we once lived for a year." These same families scatter, 
going north in the summer and south in the winter. 
The children often are put into boarding school and 
forsaken by their parents, except for the checks that 
are sent them. Such families grow up with but little 
sense of group feeling. 

How different is the feeling of some of the great 
old families of our country ! To be a Lee in the south- 
land is a sure passport into the friendship of any com- 
munity. In New England there were the Abbotts with 
their long line of brilliant ministers, and the Beechers, 
who were ,also noted for their great talents. These 
families generation after generation have figured in the 
life of our nation. We read the other day with a little > 
thrill that a grandson of General Grant is an officer in 
the United States army. 

In such families as these the qualities that have 
given prominence as well as usefulness to the group are 
continually extolled. Virtues and talents are handed 
on from generation to generation. The families with no 
such sense of family pride are the poorer for the lack 
of it. 

In the early family, the father was the priest. We 
know now that religion arises in a social situation 
Strong families are the pillars of great churches. A 
family that looks hopefully and ambitiously into the 
future is good material from which to build a church 
with a long-time program and a great work to do 
Family and church are institutions which strengthen 
each other mightily. 



LEARNING FROM OLD SERMONS 

INISTERS are supposed to keep a sermon barrel 
In the old days all the minister needed to do was 
to turn it over and preach back through it again 
Perhaps it is worth while to look over your old sermonsj 
Mr. Preacher, to see if you could perform that feat. I 
you could preach all your old sermons again this year 
you are a dead man and everything is over with you 
professional career except the funeral. You havi 
ceased to make progress in religious thought. 

The sermon barrel of Henry Ward Beecher i 
fortunately in print. We can follow the curves of hi 
thought from the days in Indianapolis Avhen he railec 
against card playing and dancing, until we find hin 
later in Plymouth church preaching against slaver}^ 
and later still drawing the outlines of a liberal theology 
We once heard a preacher say that he liked Beecher' 
earlier sermons better than he did the later ones. The 
we knew just where that preacher was. 

Your sermon barrel is the record of your inte] 
lectual progress, if you have made any. No man ough 
to throw away his sermons, for they are the record c 
his development. On the other hand, a man ought t 
go back to these statements of religious belief once i 
awhile to see where he is headed for. 




July 12, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



Some men will find, if they look over the sermon 
topics of their past, that they have had a one-sided min- 
istry. They have tried to play their music on a single 
string. They will note points of emphasis which need 
strengthening. The sermon barrel is a humbling kind 
of thing in every way and full of exhortation to the 
man who will heed. ' 

Could some one else take the sermons in your 
barrel and formulate a consistent attitude toward the 
Christian religion, or are these utterances haphazard 
and sometimes contradictory? It is not so bad for a 
man to change his attitude as he grows in religion, but 
in any given year there ought to be a unifying view- 
point which speaks every Sunday a consistent message. 
The sermon barrel will reveal whether a man has such 
a viewpoint. 

TRANSPLANTING CHURCH MEMBERS 

IN our spring work some of us have been transferring 
delicate plants from the sheltered nook in the south 
window to the open air and larger freedom of the 
front yard. This is an operation that is attended with 
some hazard, especially if the plant is kept out of the 
ground too long. At its worst, it does not seem so 
hazardous as the transplanting of church members. 

A certain young woman of a small church was 
president of the local Christian Endeavor Society, a 
teacher in the Sunday school, a "twicer" at church 
services and a great friend of the mid-week prayer meet- 
ing. After ten years of such habits she moved into 
the parish of a large Disciple church in a southern city. 
Although she has been there for three years, she has 
not yet enlisted with that congregation. 

Writing to her former pastor, she says : "The min- 
ister does not stand at the door like you used to do. 
An office girl sends out the mail so that the parish 
paper does not come from the pastor like yours does. 
Although I have met the pastor here three times, I am 
sure he does not know me." 

This young woman does not understand the prob- 
lem of the pastor in that southern city. His church 
has several exits. He meets more people by staying 
near his pulpit. He knows hundreds and possibly thou- 
sands of people, but his memory of names and faces is 
not infallible. 

People often fail to transfer their membership be- 
cause it was not the doctrinal bond that held them 
in the home church. The experiences of friendship, of 
Christian activity, of forms of worship, gave the old 
church a character which the new congregation does 
not possess. Many people fall away from religion be- 



cause they never find a second congregation that means 
the same for their religious experience. 

Meanwhile, pastors and church workers must study 
cases like that of the young woman given above. New 
people must be put to work ; they must be taught to 
find the old values in the new congregation. It should 
also be gently suggested to them that a second great 
loyalty to a Christian congregation means a further 
enrichment of character for them. 

HABIT-FORMING DRUGS 

THE fact that there were in New York last year 
over seven hundred successful suits against people 

for selling illegally habit-forming drugs, is an indi- 
cation that a new evil is taking hold in this country. 
Liquor men have insisted that if the saloons are all 
closed habit-forming drugs will be used much more 
widely. This is probably correct. The race has found 
an artificial support from drugs for a long time. We 
will probably not return to normal living at a single 
bound. 

We do not need to despair, however, at the pros- 
pect. The drug habitue practices a solitary vice. Under 
present conditions drugs are difficult to secure and the 
drug addict is not so likely to lead others into his habit 
as is the alcohol victim. 

The growth of the drug habit is to be charged 
partly to the careless use of the drugs by physicians. 
It would be better if patients were not given the names 
of these dangerous medicines when their vise is found 
necessary. 

The church has a fvmction to perform in warning 
people against the sin of these solitary vices. We have 
all known church people who would have been ashamed 
to be known as alcohol victims, but who have with no 
feeling of impropriety become addicted, for instance, 
to the morphine habit. 

The government has very wisely put restrictions 
upon the use of drugs, but these restrictions need ex- 
tension. Not all the dangerous drugs are on the list 
of forbidden drugs. 

There is also work for every good citizen in watch- 
ing out for sources of supply of illicit drugs. These 
places are not by any means always drug stores. "Boot- 
legging" in drugs is much easier than the illicit sale of 
whiskey, for one man can carry on his person a supply 
that will sell for a large sum of money. There is real 
danger of the establishment of an under-ground railroad 
for the distribution of these drugs that have power to 
destroy both body and soul. 



IIIIIIIIIIMIIHinillJIM 



He called for a city beautiful ; 

He shouted it day by day; 
He wanted a city where noise was not. 

Where the spirit of art should sway ; 
He wanted a city that should be fair. 

Where filth might never be seen, 
And forgot, in spite of the zeal he had, 

To keep his back yard clean. 

— The Congregationalist. 



(iiiiiniiiiitiiliiiliii! 



iiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiitliitlliiii 



.iiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiriiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



iiiiiiiitiiiiiniiiir 






The War and the Nation's Larger 
Call to World Evangelism 



WHEN the war began we saw 
in the nations immediately in- 
volved, and in some smaller 
measure in our own land, an illustra- 
tion of the fact that in time of emer- 
gency or strain man instinctively con- 
tracts and conserves his resources, 
while God releases and enlarges his. 
That is a fact of no little significance 
in its bearing upon our thought with 
regard both to the being and to the 
character of God. And now that we 
ourselves also have been drawn into 
this great struggle, we are seeing 
among ourselves the illustration of this 
same fact in a far more vivid way. 

SACRIFICING THE GREATER THINGS 

Questions have been at once raised 
on every side as to whether some of 
our activities must not be abridged, 
whether, in the interest of achieving 
the great task that is now clearly para- 
mount, other things must not be sacri- 
ficed. Very naturally these questions 
will arise most insistently with regard 
to those interests that seem most re- 
mote — our activities and relationships 
among distant peoples. Are we to 
acquiesce in the idea that these must 
be held now in abeyance for a while, 
that the immediate purposes of the na- 
tion will require every energy and 
resource, and that the Christian 
church, for the time being at least, 
must postpone her work of larger 
world evangelization? 

The attitude which the churches 
will take on this question will be 
largely determined by the attitude 
which we take, and which other 
gatherings of men like ours also will 
be taking, across our land, within the 
next few weeks. If our position is 
weak and faltering, if our own convic- 
tion is not clear and solidly grounded, 
we shall see within the next few 
months the collapse of some of our 
most important Christian activities, 
and shall have in subsequent years 
slowly to recover ground that in these 
days, in our negligence and careless- 
ness, we had surrendered. 

NO REASON FOR FEAR 

We have no need to be affrighted in 
such a situation as this. It is such an 
easy thing to lose the right perspect- 
ive, to be intimidated by what is con- 
temporary, not to see things in their 
large proportions, and not to draw, 
as we ought clearly to draw in this 
hour, the true lessons of the past. 
Great national crises have not been 
deemed sufficient in the past to justify 
the extinction of the church's mission- 



By Robet E. Speer 

ary activities. The great missionary 
organizations of Europe grew up in 
times of national strain, greater and 
more critical even than those we face 
today. 

I made a study not long ago of the 
reports of one of the foreign mission 
boards for the four years of the Civil 
war, to find out whether our fathers 
had felt that they were justified in 
those days of crisis in curtailing the 
church's work of world evangeliza- 
tion. Not SO- This deliverance of one 
church would be found, I think, char- 
acteristic of all: "New missions are 
needed. Shall they be established? 
Is it inquired, where are the means? 
We answer, they are in the hands of 
the Christians, who are God's stew- 
ards. Let a proper demand be made. 
Let this assembly call on the churches, 
and that call will be answered. The 
response will come in the spirit of that 
consecration in which all God's peo- 
ple have laid themselves and their all 
upon his altar." It would be found 
in the case of many of our denomina- 
tional missionary agencies that they 
emerged from the Civil war with 
enlarged contributions from the 
churches. One representative board 
testified that it had to withdraw not 
a single missionary, to close not a sin- 
gle mission field, to withhold not a 
single foreign missionary who had 
been prepared to go out. And, though 
during those last days, when our ex- 
change was worth only fifty cents 
abroad, dark clouds overhung our 
missionary operations, not one of our 
American churches felt that it was 
justified in drawing back from its 
world task. 

WHAT THE EUROPEAN NATIONS ARE 
DOING 

The great churches in the nations 
that have been at war the last three 
years, though they have borne heavy 
burdens, heavier burdens, God grant. 



This address, with others, by 
John R. Mott, Henry Churchill 
King and a nimiher of other re- 
ligious leaders, may be obtained 
ill book form from the Federal 
Council of the Churches of 
Christ in America, Neiu York. 
These addresses are the great 
utterances spoken at the recent 
conference of the nation's reli- 
gious organisations under the 
auspices of the Federal Council, 
in the City of Washington. 



Miiiiiiliiititiiniiiiiniiiiilliiiiltiirtiiitiiliiiiiiiiitillil 



itiiitDiiiiiiiitnii 



than we may be called upon to carry, 
have, with few exceptions, not cur- 
tailed, and without exception, have 
not withdrawn their foreign mission- 
ary undertakings. The London Mis- 
sionary Society last year cleared off a 
large indebtedness and carried for- 
ward its work without diminution. 
The Wesleyan Society received the 
largest income that it has ever received 
in its entire history. The Methodist 
Church in Canada had a larger income 
than it had ever had in any year of 
peace. Adding all together the mis- 
sionary activities of Great Britain, the 
income of the missionary societies for i 
the year ending March 31, 1916, ex- 
ceeded considerably the income of the 
year before the war. 

When we turn to think of what we 
have been doing, of what it is that 
some are proposing that we shall need 
now to abridge, is it possible for us 
to maintain an attitude of timidity? 
One hundred and thirty American 
missionary societies last year gave 
$24,688,000— an average of less than 
one dollar per capita for the Protest- 
ant membership of the churches in 
the United States. Is it contended by 
any one that we are to be so reduced 
that our Protestant church-member- 
ship cannot contribute one dollar per 
annum per capita to maintain these 
undertakings abroad? We can pay 
all our taxes and do all our other 
duties and perform this one also with 
no mentionable sacrifice. 

THE OFFERING OF LIFE 

Have the principles changed on 
which the undertaking rests, or have 
the world facts that we face been al- 
tered by new conditions that have now 
arisen, except to be made more urgent? 
The great commission was not given 
in any time of ease, nor was it condi- 
tioned upon the softness of obedience 
and accomplishment. It was given in 
far more strenuous and difficult days 
even than those that we confront now. 
Nothing in spiritual principle — or in 
the facts of the world, as we look out 
upon them at home or abroad — justi- 
fies us for one moment in considering 
that it will be necessary for us to 
abridge our work of world evangeliza- 
tion. 

Precisely the same principles hold 
with regard to the offering of life. 
I went very recently to see off the 
French steamer Espagne, with several 
hundred young men from our colleges 
and universities — Williams, Dart- 
mouth, Princeton, Northwestern, and 
others scattered all over the land, 



July 12, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



11 



young men going off for service in the 
hospitals or with the Red Cross, for 
ambulance work in France, for moral 
and religious service with the British 
armies — several hundred of these lads, 
happy in their faces, sober, but glad 
of heart, eager to be off about a great 
unselfish ministry. Do we mean to 
say we cannot find them with the same 
will to render a yet farther service, a 
will to go yet more broadly out across 
the world than Belgium and England 
and France and Mesopotamia? 

RECORDS OF CIVIL WAR TIMES 

During the days of the Civil war, 
with men as with money, our churches 
were able to find those whom they re- 
quired. Boards reported, the second 
year of the war, that they had the larg- 
est number of missionary candidates 
they had ever had in their history, and, 
in the very height of the war, they 
made their appeal for fresh supplies 
of candidates on the ground that young 
men were offering themselves for the 
service of the two causes, North and 
South, and must be not less zealous to 
offer themselves for the cause that was 
greater than all, the cause that would 
make all war and conflict impossible 
when once it was successfully carried 
through. 

Not only must there be no contrac- 
tion in this undertaking, but we are 
called now in these days more vividly 
than ever before to aim, distinctly and 
unhesitatingly, at enlargement. We 
are called to this by the fact that the 
war has transferred a larger measure 
of the missionary obligation to Amer- 
ica. It may be that the European 
churches, barring a few of them, the 
Moravians and the French Evangel- 
ical churches, will not be largely de- 
pendent upon us for financial assist- 
ance, but for many a day they will 
need the life that America can give 
and that America alone will have to 
spare. In the face of that larger ob- 
ligation, dare we talk of standing still, 
still less of drawing back ? 

NEW SYMPATHIES WITH THE NATIONS 

The war has brought us into new 
relations of understanding and of 
sympathy. Both southward and west- 
ward we have heavily increased our 
missionary duty. It would seem to 
be something in the providence of God 
that the new relations into which we 
have been drawn with France might 
be the bridge over the chasm that has 
opened between us and Latin America, 
and that our common kinship and asso- 
ciation with France today might re- 
unite us who had been so rapidly and 
bitterly drifting apart here in these 
Western lands. Between ourselves 
and Japan and China also new under- 
standings and confidences have grown 
up on account of the war. Our mis- 
sionary duty southward and westward 



has been multiplied twofold at least 
by the developments of the war abroad. 
The war has increased our mission- 
ary obligations by more deeply reveal- 
ing the world's need of the gospel to 
heal its sin and make it one. I had 
with me in my home the other day 
a Japanese friend. He had been a 
few days before to hear Dr. Jefferson 
preach, and he said : "Mr. Speer, I 
see clearly that if there is any solu- 
tion at all to this great problem, there 
is only one solution. That is Christ. 
Christ alone can meet the need of the 
world and unite the hearts of men." 

CHRIST THE ONLY SOLUTION 

We see today the futility of every 
other device with which men have 
dreamed of binding the nations to- 
gether. There is no peace of Dives. 
N,o standards of political or diplomatic 
understanding can relate the nations 
inseparably. We see now that war will 
be done away in Christ or it will never 
be done away at all, and, seeing this 
so clearly today, our duty to act upon 
this conviction is deepened and intens- 
ified, and our missionary obligation 
many-fold enlarged. 

It is enlarged, oh! how mightily it 
is enlarged, by the visible and tragic 
need of the world for an incarnation 
of a universal brotherly love. It will 
not do to talk and emotionalize over 
it. It will not do to pass resolutions 
regarding it, nor to send communica- 
tions describing its glory, from one 
nation to another. The thing never 
will be made a reality except by in- 
carnation, by such actual functionings 
of the Christian church across the 
world as will utter visibly and tangibly 
to men the spirit of a universal trust 
and love. To abate any of our duty of 
missionary activity, to call in the for- 
eign missionaries, to reduce the work 
they are doing, is to stultify our dec- 
laration that we believe in a world 
brotherhood, or that we would pene- 
trate mankind with a spirit of univer- 
sal good-will and friendship. 

RISING ABOVE NATIONALITY 

We need the missionary enterprise 
today for these great purposes more 
than it has ever been needed in the 
history of the world before. We need 
it as an expression in flesh of our con- 
viction that humanity is one. We 
need it because it alone embodies a 
true doctrine of race function and 
race relationship. We need it because 
it appears to be about the only in- 
strumentality of Christianity that 
utters a clear uncompromised super- 
nationalistic principle. How hard is 
our problem today in all these lands 
in dealing with the question of the 
relationship of Christianity and the 
spirit of nationalism ! Has the prob- 
lem been solved in any of these na- 
tions? While we work at it let us not 
abandon those great elements in Chris- 



tianity which rise above even national- 
ity. Whatever else we may surrender, 
let us not surrender the missionary 
enterprise. We can hold this fast to- 
day with no betrayal of our own na- 
tionalistic loyalty. And we need it. 
The new world that is coming needs it. 
Not only do the conditions of this 
present hour forbid our considering 
for one moment the proposal that we 
should stop our missionary task. We 
face conditions that issue to us, in the 
language of this theme, a larger call. 
And it is not only a larger call to world 
love, uttered actually and tangibly in 
human lives, to which we are called 
now. We need the missionary under- 
taking undiminished because of the 
hope that it embodies and to which it 
steadfastly adheres. These are dark 
and doubtful days for many of us, 
when many a man whose Christian 
faith has not wavered begins to won- 
der whether after all the dream ever 
can come true. All around us these 
coming months, as the shadows darken 
and those come not back to us who 
went out from us — all the more in 
those days will the heavy doubts arise. 
We need to hold fast to an under- 
taking that tenaciously grasps the 
world hope, the confidence that the 
kingdom of God is to be in all the 
world, that can sing as some of the 
lads on the Espagne were singing as 
they sailed : "My anchor holds. It 
holds. My anchor holds." 

FUNCTIONS OF THE CHURCH 

The function of the Christian 
church is a double one. The church 
is a witness to possibilities that lie be- 
yond the facts. The church never was 
meant to be the mere guaranty of what 
has become established. That has 
been its shame in past days. It has 
been thought of only as a religious 
sanction of the status quo. The real 
business of the Christian church has 
been to witness to the possibilities that 
were not yet seen, that lay invisible far 
beyond, that were themselves a con- 
tradiction of the existing facts. The 
Christian church is also the power by 
which these possibilities are to be made 
facts, and all facts contradictory to 
them to be denied and overridden and 
done away. Both as witness and as 
power the church needs the breadth 
and boldness of the missionary hopes. 
We need to hold fast on the world 
plane to an undertaking that will not 
let go the idea of a world brotherhood, 
that will work for that, and even in 
these days when mankind is rent 
asunder, will ignore the chasm and 
will send out its representatives across 
the whole world, speaking its message 
of a world love and holding fast to its 
dream of a world hope. 

Let us not yield to any influences 
that would make us smaller men today 
than we were five years ago, nor yield 
to any ideals or pressures that would 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 12, 1917 



contract our vision or narrow the field 
or strangle the forces of our ministry. 
This is the day for men to look out 
more widely over the world and to be 
more daring and courageous in their 
hopes and faiths, for men to make 
t-acrifices broader and more courage- 
ous, more ample than they ever have 
made before, for them to think not in 
terms of one nation's relationship to 
another nation only, but in the wide 
terms of the interrelations of all men. 
It is a day when world measurements 



should be laid down upon all our 
thoughts. 

THE LARGER CALL 

We need the larger outlook today 
to give us world thoughts of penitence 
and forgiveness. We need it, because 
it must be a world scale of sacrifice 
that shall dominate our life and the 
life of the church now. We betray our 
mission and fail God if we shrink 
into a nationalistic sect that can con- 
ceive only of our own national func- 
tions, unless those national functions 



include for us the whole human 
brotherhood and the duty of speaking 
and thinking and living by the law of 
a world love. We need to write that 
word "wider" on all our prayer and 
service, shrinking back, as from the 
voice of antichrist, from whatever 
shall suggest to us any abridgment or 
curtailment or withholding of the liv- 
ing, saving, creating ministries of 
Christ at home and abroad. To the 
larger thing, the world and God's 
voice in the world are calling us today. 



Palestine, the Jews and the World 

War 



By Edgar DeWitt Jones 



THE great war that now involves 
more than half the population of 
the globe is a many-sided war. 
Upon its issue there impends much 
that is for weal or woe. The whole 
world is at this moment in a state of 
flux. Nothing is stable. Everything 
is fluid. And there are a vast number 
of people who are watching with bated 
breath the outcome of the colossal con- 
flict as it may affect Palestine and the 
Jew. With the British army now 
within a few miles of Jerusalem, and 
the probabilities of the allies conquer- 
ing the Turk, the situation is in every 
way big with promise and possibili- 
ties. 

THE HOLY LAND 

The Palestinian country is the most 
historic and memorable area in the 
world. That most interesting little 
portion of the earth's surface has been 
known by several names. It is spoken 
of oftenest in the Old Testament as 
"Canaan," and to this day the use of 
that name signifies some prosperous 
and ideal state or community. "The 
Land of Promise" is another term for 
Palestine. "The Land of the Bible" 
still another. And perhaps the most 
acceptable name of all for this sacred 
country is "The Holy Land." 

In area Palestine is about the size 
of little Wales. It is about one hun- 
dred and fifty miles in length and 
varies in width from twenty miles in 
the extreme north to one hundred and 
ten miles in the south. It has been 
the battleground where numerous peo- 
ples and races have striven for su- 
premacy ; but that which has given the 
country a sure immortality is the fact 
that it is the land of the Jewish people, 
the scene of their national life, the 
theater where their heroes have lived, 
and loved, and died. It is the famed 
country of which Jerusalem, the city 
of the great king, is the capitol and 
the .onetime site of the marvelous Jew- 



iiiiiiiiiiiitiiriiiii 



"A land flowing with milk and 
honey." — ^Exodus 3:8. 

"Wars and rumors of wars." — 
Luke 24:6. 

"He that scattered Israel will 
gather him, and keep him as a 
shepherd doth his flock." — Jere- 
miah 31:10. 



ish temple. But Palestine has its 
place in the sun above all else, because 
Jesus was born there, and because its 
mountains and valleys are the scenes 
of his life and ministry. Land of the 
dreamer, land of promise, land of 
shepherds ; land of flowers and vine- 
yards ; land overrun by soldiery and 
scene of many a battle ; land of the 
Jew : in all verity the "promised land." 
Will this land be restored to the 
Jew? Is it yet to be the home of that 
homeless people of whom Byron sings : 

"Tribes of the wandering foot and weary 

breast, 
How shall ye flee away, and be at rest! 
The wild dove hath her nest, the fox 

his cave, 
Mankind their country — Israel but the 

grave." 

THE JEW : THE WORLD WONDER AND 
TRAGEDY 

What a world wonder is the Jew 
and what a world tragedy is his ! Like 
sheep without a shepherd, the Jewish 
people have been scattered through- 
out the world, persecuted bitterly, 
driven from pillar to post. The Jew 
has been at once the shame and the 
glory of humanity. The Jew's part 
and place in the present world war is 
both notable and exceedingly large. 
He is represented in every army now 
in battle array. A conservative esti- 
mate given in the Jewish chronicle 
states that five hundred and fifty thou- 
sand Jews are engaged in the present 
conflict. This means that while the 
nations of the earth are contributing 
to the war about twenty-six per cent. 



the Jew is contributing over double 
that, or about fifty-five percent. In 
Great Britain sixteen thousand Jews 
have gone into the ranks, displaying 
great heroism ; the Victoria Cross hav- 
ing been awarded to three of their 
number. Five Jews are in the British 
cabinet and one holds the position of 
lord chief justice. 

In France more than ten thousand 
Jews are in the ranks and five of their 
race hold important positions in the 
cabinet. In Belgium, suffering unto 
death, are fifteen thousand Jews; while 
the ambassador to the court of St. 
James from Belgium is a Jew. In 
Italy one ,of King Victor Immanuel's 
most conspicuous cabinet ministers is 
a Jew; while sixteen members of par- 
liament and fourteen senators are of 
the same race. 

JEWS IN GERMAN ARMIES 

In Germany three thousand one hun- 
dred and sixty-seven Iron Crosses 
have been won by German-Jewish 
soldiers. The only man who dared 
to defy the kaiser in the Reichstag and 
vote openly against the German war 
loan was Herr Liebknecht, a Jew. In 
Austria-Hungary it is estimated that 
one hundred and eighty thousand 
Jews are in the ranks; six generals, 
seventeen colonels, fifteen lieutenant- 
colonels, forty-eight majors, and two 
hundred and eleven other officers are 
Jews. It is likewise interesting to re- 
member that the American ambas- 
sador to Turkey, during what has been 
perhaps the most critical of all situa- 
tions there, was the Hon. Henry Mor- 
ganthau, a Jew who came to the 
United States when but three years of 
age. In Russia, that country where 
the Jew has suffered unspeakably, 
three hundred and fifty thousand Rus- 
sian Jewish soldiers are fighting hero- 
ically. Literally hundreds have been 
awarded for bravery the highly prized 
cross of St. George. 



July 12, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



13 



Not only is the Jew fighting in every 
army of the world at this present 
hour, but the woes and sorrows of 
Jewry have been magnified and in- 
tensified by the awful conflict. So 
good an authority as the Honorable 
Louis B. Brandeis of Washington 
says that no less than five hundred 
thousand Jews have lost their lives 
since the war began, either by the at- 
tacks of invading armies or on the 
battlefield. The sufifering of the Jews 
in Poland beggars description. 

Out of this world conflict what is 
the Jew to gain? What of Pales- 
tine ? What of the Zionist movement ? 
What of the prophecies that have not 
yet been filled? 

RETURN OF THE JEWS TO PALESTINE 

The movement known as Zionism 
has for its object the restoration of 
the Holy Land to the chosen people. 
Under its inspiration colonies sprang 
up, waste places were rebuilt, a new 
national hope established. But the 
present war has greatly afifected this 
enterprise. Jewish philanthropists 
have invested millions in the rejuve- 
nation of Palestine ; and the world 
war has played havoc with the Jewish 
colonies thus established. It is esti- 
mated that three million Jews have 
been made beggars and five hundred 
thousand slain. And what is to be 
the reward of this race without a na- 
tion, which has been fighting the bat- 
tles of every nation ? Palestine seems 
doomed for the terrible Turk. Great 
Britain and her allies are pressing 
hard the Turkish troops in the Holy 
Land. One may expect to hear at any 
time of the complete conquest of the 
Palestinian country by the allies. What 
does this promise for the Jew? The 
Jewish people themselves are divided 
in their opinion. Some believe it 
promises everything that is desirable. 
Others are doubtful. The question is 



complex. In the settlement of it the 
Greek Orthodox Church, the Roman 
Catholic Church, the Jews, the Mos- 
lems, and non-Catholic Christians are 
all interested. 

This is a question for statesmen to 
settle after deep deliberation. It 
would seem to be possible now to open 
up this historic country for its settle- 
ment on the part of Jewish people, as 
has hitherto been impossible. There 
would seem to be a promise of coloni- 
zation on a large and prosperous scale. 
But for the present the solution is any- 
thing but clear. 

THE PROPHECIES 

In this matter, as others, man pro- 
poses, but God disposes. Greater than 
Zionism is God's plan for the Jew. 
The Holy Scriptures declare that the 
Jew is to return to his own country, 
in Jeremiah 3:8-10 are these words: 
"Behold, I will bring them from the 
north country, and gather them from 
the uttermost parts of the earth. . . . 
A great company shall they return 
hither. They shall come with weep- 
ing : and with supplications will I lead 
them ; I will cause them to walk by 
rivers of water, in a straight way 
wherein they shall not stumble ; for I 
am a father to Israel, and Ephraim is 
my first-born. Hear the word of Je- 
hovah, O ye nations, and declare it 
in the isles afar ofif and say, He that 
scattered Israel will gather him, and 
keep him, as a shepherd doth his 
flock." 

I have been reading a most fasci- 
nating little volume entitled "The War 
and the Jew," to which I am indebted 
for many facts and figures in this ar- 
ticle. The book was written by the 
Reverend S. B. Rohold, R. F. G. S., 
pastor of the Christian Synagogue, 
Toronto, and president of the Hebrew 
Christian Alliance in America. This 



man was born in Jerusalem, the son of 
a Jewish rabbi, and he has become an 
eminent and useful Christian minis- 
ter. In the latter part of his book 
Mr. Rohold expresses the view that 
Israel's restoration can only take place 
after a reconciliation and by recon- 
cilation he means the acceptance of 
the long-lopked-for and rejected Mes- 
siah. He likens the Jewish race to 
Jacob who, left alone that momentous 
night, wrestled with a mysterious Per- 
son, and not until the recognition on 
the part of the patriarch of that Per- 
son did reconciliation and peace come. 

ZECHARIAH QUOTED 

Mr. Rohold quotes in this con- 
nection the prophecy of Zechariah, 
twelfth chapter and tenth verse : "And 
I will pour upon the house of David, 
and upon the inhabitants of Jeru- 
salem, the spirit of grace and suppli- 
cations. They shall look upon Me 
whom they have pierced, and they 
shall mourn for him, as one mourneth 
for his only son, and shall be in bit- 
terness for him, as one that is in bitter- 
ness for his first-born." 

The last words of this interesting 
volume are as follows: "Then, and 
then only, when Israel will be recon- 
ciled to the long-looked-for and re- 
jected Messiah, the sun will begin to 
shine upon them, and the voice of 
singing and complete rejoicing will be 
again heard throughout Jerusalem and 
her light will shine in all its purity. 
At this momentous time in Israel's 
history, the voice of God speaks 
audibly to His waiting people in the 
words of the Prophet Isaiah, sixty- 
second chapter, sixth and seventh 
verses : "Ye that are the Lord's re- 
membrancers, take ye no rest, and give 
him no rest, till he establish and till 
he make Jerusalem a praise in the 
earth." 

First Church, Bloomington, III. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiniiriiiiiiiriiiitMiiiniitiiiiiiMiiiittitniiriiiiiNiiiiMtMii 



To the First Gun 



SPEAK, silent, patient gun ! 
And let thy mighty voice 
Proclaim the deed is done — 
Made is the nobler choice; 
To every waiting people run 
And bid the world rejoice. 



By Robert Underwood Johnson 

Thine shall the glory be 

To mark the sacred hour 
That testifies the free 

Will neither cringe nor cower. 
God give thy voice divinity, 

That Right be armed with Power. 



Tell them our heaving heart Thou art not lifeless steel 

Has found its smiting hand, With but a number given, 

That craves to be a part But messenger of weal 

Of the divine command. Hot with the wrath of Heaven. 

Speak, prove us more than ease or mart, Go earn the right to Honor's seal — 
And vindicate the land. To have for Honor striven. 



Lead us in holy ire 

The path our fathers trod; 
The music of thy fire 

Shall thrill them through the sod. 
The smoke of all thy righteous choir 

Is incense unto God. 

And when long Peace is found 
And thou hast earned thy rest, 

And in thy cave of sound 
The sparrow builds her nest, 

By Liberty shalt thou be crowned 
Of all thy comrades, best. 



The Church in the Leopard Village 

By Herbert Smith 



WE arrived at 7 o'clock in the 
morning, after one hour's 
march through the forest. 
Our day's program was to eat our 
breakfast in this village named after 
the leopard, and then push on to the 
next town. But our purpose had 
leaked out. Even before we were in 
the village proper the evangelist met 
us with this greeting, "We will never 
have any more strength if you don't 
sleep in our village tonight." How ex- 
travagant these people can be with 
words, and yet this extravagance 
seems very real to them. I had only 
been out of bed a little over an hour, 
and sleeping again did not appeal very 
much to me. So I smiled and did not 
reply. 

AN INVITATION WITH A PUNCH 

But I soon found that a very strong 
opposition was in progress against our 
passing through that town without 
spending the night. First came a 
grayheaded elder. He said that they 
would sit ever afterwards in eternal 
shame if the white man did not spend 
the day and night with them. Then 
came the chief. He is not a Chris- 
tian. In fact, his wife is a Catholic. 
He, too, could not live unless we 
stayed the night there, and as to the 
work of Ifomi, their evangelist, he 



said : "He has very sharp eyes ; he 
keeps the people straight. He helps 
me in my work as chief and I help 
him as I am able." Then pulling off 
his hat, he bowed over and continued : 
"We want him to stay here until his 
hair grows white, and to teach us from 
the Book of God." 

I had not yet expressed my opinion 
about staying or going, so everybody 
now crowded around to get that point 
settled. It looked as if breakfast was 
a long way off if I did not soon give 
in, and the hour's walk through the 
silent forest had whetted my appetite. 
The chief and the evangelists now 
began to bring the usual presents — 
great bunches of plantain, dried meat, 
chicken and eggs. It would have been 
impossible to carry all these things 
with us, and to have refused them 
would have been the worst kind of in- 
sult, so I called the cook and gave 
orders for the day's camping. Every- 
body caught the significance of this 
and began to call out, "They will sit 
down all day long!" 

A CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR MEETING 

But it was not possible to sit down 
all day long. There must have been 
five or six meetings. The elders 
wanted advice in local matters, the 
evangelists wanted certain palavers 



settled. There were preaching ser- 
vices in which the native preachers 
who were making the trip took part. 
All day long, a tap on the drum and 
the house was full. The last meeting 
at night was a Christian Endeavor 
service. There was not an idle mo- 
ment in that meeting. Prayers, 
speeches and songs followed in rapid 
succession until the very close of the 
service. At the conclusion of the 
meeting eight persons who had been-, 
inquiring about the gospel made the 
good confession. 

During the day the Lord's Table 
was spread. Probably there were one 
hundred and fifty of us in this simple 
service. How much does such a ser- 
vice mean to the Congo Christian, do 
you ask? A very great deal. One 
man who lives in a village where he 
has little opportunity to meet around 
the table expressed this when he saw 
the table once more, "Oh, my cour- 
age again revives !" 

Next morning before sunrise there 
were happy faces to bid us good-bye. 
Those who had made the confession 
walked with us to Tumba, where Mr. 
Eldred lies buried, and later went 
down into the cold, black waters of 
the Lokolo River with their Lord in 
Baptism. 

Lotumbe, Africa. 



Our President 

By Secretary Franklin K. Lane 

Of the Department of the Interior 



THE power that the president 
exercises in war time is the great- 
est power that can be vested in 
any one man under a democracy, for 
the president has been the commander 
in chief of the army and navy. 

The constitution impresses him 
with this duty and this responsibility. 
This was the outgrowth of Gen. 
Washington's experience. He had 
seen the disadvantages and the em- 
barrassments of confused councils. 

A WAR LEADER 

And so when it came to the draft- 
ing of the constitution a departure 
was made from the general scheme of 
things and the president was made 
solely responsible for the conduct of 
a war. He is necessarily subjected to 
criticism, and properly should be so 
subjected if he makes willful mistakes. 

We are a nation of 100,000,000 
people. All of us have been raised 



in a school of intense individualism. 
Democracy makes individuals, men 
who regard themselves seriously and 
regard their opinion seriously. 

We have been taught to think for 
ourselves, not to follow a leader. We 
have been trained in the idea that each 
of us is capable of performing some 
real function in government. 

MAY BE CRITICIZED 

It is this development of the in- 
dividual, this realization of the possi- 
bility of the individual, that makes a 
democracy great. The first step in the 
making of a good democrat is giving 
him the basis on which to criticize 
what is done. 

The theory of our constitution is 
that the largest possible executive 
power is to be lodged in the president 
in time of war, because it was 
realized by the constitution makers 
that some man must be responsible for 



the job, and that this man could be 
only the president. 

So, while mistakes may be made 
during this war and honest criticism 
may be evoked which is justifiable, it 
must be remembered that a democracy 
does not live in anticipation of war; 
that the programs which a democracy 
makes are programs of peace. 

WILSON HAS COURAGE 

We must now look to the qualities 
of the commander in chief, who is our 
president in the present war, and the! 
first of those qualities is an unflinching 
courage. 

I have watched him for four years 
with the greatest interest and have 
never seen him hesitate a second to 
do a thing that he believed to be right 
because either of political influence 
or of any effect it might have uponj 
his own personal destinies. { 

Sometimes he is too patient tc 



July 12, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



15 



satisfy those who are impetuous, but, 
once he has reached a conckision, that 
conckision becomes a part of his na- 
ture. He is inflexible. 

Those who are our allies and those 
who are opposed to us should by this 
time realize that the commander in 
chief of the United States is a man 
who sees a thing through always, 
without hesitation, without com- 
promising, without fear. He has in 
his nature no consciousness whatever 
of what it is to fear man, which in 
itself is not a bad characteristic of a 
soldier. 

CONSCIENCE AS GUIDE 

And he has a direct objective. He 
knows where he is going. It takes 
time for him to reach his conclusion 
as to what is the right objective, but 
when he has determined that for him- 
self he follows that line, and he fol- 
lows it through. 

His guide is his conscience, and the 
one word that most nearly summarizes 
his nature and expresses his career is 
the word "duty." Tell him what his 
duty is and he does it. 

Mr. Wilson meets situations by 
asking very concretely, "What is the 
thing that I can do in this situation 
that will make for the perpetuation of 
real democracy?" 

PURPOSE IN THE WAR 

That is his interest in this war. 
When he said in his remarkable mes- 
sage that he wanted this w^orld made 
safe for democracy he expressed the 
very deepest feeling of his nature. 

So, then, we have a commander in 
chief who has these quahties: Cour- 
age, patience, steadfastness, far- 
sightedness. These are the qualities 
of a great commander. He knows 
now what he wishes to secure for 
democracy out of this war, and he is 
not thinking of the war in terms of 
personality or of personal triumph or 
of national triumphs, but of the world 
future, a freer opportunity for the 
spirit of man. 



The hours will come, and come to 
every man, when task-work quivers 
and palpitates with life; but perhaps 
they only come because we have been 
faithful, with a certain grimness, 
through the days of gloom. Let a man 
hold to his life-work through mood 
and melancholy. Let him hold to it 
through headache and through heart- 
ache. For "He that observeth the 
wind will never sow; and he that re- 
gardeth the clouds will never reap."— 
G. H. Morrison. 

* * * 

"It is impossible to rightly govern 
the world without God and the Bible." 
— George Washington. 

♦ * * ■ 

"The great need of the world is a 
fresh discovery of God." — Innes. 



llillillllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 

I The Sunday School | 

ei!l!llllillll!lllllllllll!llillll!lllllllllllllllllll!llllll!llllllllllli^ 

The Doom of Arrogance 

The Lesson in Today's Life* 
By E. F. DAUGHERTY 



ARROGANCE may strut and 
pout and prevail for a season — 
as in the case of Sennacherib 
anciently and Wilhelm II modernly — 
but the laws of life conspire for their 
discomfiture in time ; and "God, the 
Invisible King" operates the laws. 
Like replicas of Mr. Britling, the 
masses of men may, for a time, over- 
look the fact that God is, but when 
the complications of disaster and re- 
verse and perplexity mount to their 
worst, the human heart being incur- 
ably religious swings into the central 
Truth for human comfort, as stated 
in the golden text for today: "God is 
our refuge and strength; a very pres- 
ent help in trouble." 

Mr. Britling so found him, and 
they are rather small mentalities which 
quarrel about the "type" of God which 
Mr. Britling found. He steadied and 
gave buoyancy to the nonplussed and 
despairing Englishman created by Mr. 
Wells, and a like service he will do for 
any human soul which in extremity 
reaches out in confession of need 
which God takes as opportunity. 



"He shall not come unto this city," 
said Jehovah through the prophet, re- 
specting Sennacherib in his surge to- 
ward Jerusalem. "They shall not 
pass," said the Hero of the Marne, re- 
specting the German hordes in their 
surge toward Paris, after the devasta- 
tion of Belgium. It does no violence 
to piety to say that the voice of God 
came through the throat of the mod- 
ern Frenchman as through the lips 
of the ancient Jew. For God has not 
abdicated His sovereignty in favor of 
the Kaiser's ruthlessness any more 
than He had retired in favor of the 
barbarism of the old time Assyrian! 

* * * 

And so — on a certain night "the 
angel of the Lord went forth and 
smote in the camp of the Assyrians." 
By night and day the planes and Zep- 
pelins of the modern Huns have been 
smiting England — and the British 
Royal Flying Corps perceives how 
the modern issue hangs in the air 
and beneath the sea. The stategists 
of Democracy hope, pray and plan to 

*This article is based upon the Inter- 
national Uniform Sunday School lesson 
for July 22, "Sennacherib's Invasion of 
Judah." Scripture, 2 Kings 18:13-19:37. 



make a "smiting" on the German base 
back of Helgoland and if, in the night, 
it should come from a flock of dom- 
inating airplanes, capitulation of the 
militarist nation would forthwith fol- 
low. How like the very bolts of God 
would these bombs from an invisible 
foe above and these torpedoes from 
leviathan submarines have impressed 
the warriors of ancient days ! 

In those days of Hezekiah God sent 
forth his Angel. In these days, when 
men have come to larger self-help, 
God sends forth an aroused nation, 
committed to the ideals of democracy 
and liberty which His patronage has 
established in the earth, equipping it 
with the sacrificial devotion of earth's 
freest. Where the "spirit of the Lord 
is, there is Liberty," and it is the hosts 
of liberty that are assembling from 
earth's far quarters today to be in at 
the death of autocracy that the world 
may be made safe. 

"With head erect and a look of con- 
tempt for all foes," says autocracy's 
spokesman, we will not hesitate at 
new straws in our way ! That atti- 
tude toward the twenty odd nations 
aligned against Germany ! Like Sen- 
nacherib saying, "I will put a hook 
in thy nose," etc. ! Prussianism hoped 
to "hook" the earth's free peoples, but 
if world arousement ever could or can 
mean anything, it means that this 
spirit will be "hoist on its own petard." 
Speed the hour! 

American Series of Five 
Maps 

These are lithographed fn four colors on 
muslin of superior quality, and measure 36x58 
inches. Large lettering of names of places is a 
special feature of all these maps. Each map 
has distinctive features, but all have large type, 
clear and bold outlines. 

The maps are" as follows: 
Map of Palestine— Illustrating the Old Test- 
ament and the Land as Divided among the 
twelve tribes. 
Map of Palestine— Illustrating the New Test- 
ament. # 
Map of the Roman Empire— Illustrating the 

Journeys of the Apostle Paul. 
Map of Assyria and the Adjacent Lands— Illust- 
rating the Captivities of the Jews. 
Map of Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula— Illustrat- 
ing the Journeyings of the Israelites. 
Any of the above maps sold singly and un- 
mounted at 1.00 each, postpaid. 

These maps are also furnished in a set of 5 
that are mounted on one specially constructed 
wooden roller, which is arranged to rest securely 
on the top of the upright bar of the stand. The 
stand is collapsible and is made of steel, finished 
in black Japan. 

Entire Outfit, $6. 50 Net. 
By Express or Freight at Purchaser's Exneose. 

DXSCIF^IiS FUBX^XCATION SOCZETT 
709 E. 40th Sti, Cbicaffo, ZU. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy 

The Larger Christian World 



A DEPARTMENT OF INTERDENOMINATIONAL ACQUAINTANCE 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^^ 



By ORVIS F. JORDAN 

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Would Canonize 
King Charles 

The lower House of the Canterbury 
convocation in England has recently 
passed a resolution asking that the 
Commemoration of King Charles, the 
Martyr, be restored to the ecclesias- 
tical calendar. An English church- 
man, writing in the London Outlook, 
recently protested this action. While 
holding that King Charles was not 
the silly tyrant he was represented to 
be by evangelical writers, he held that 
this king had never done anything to 
deserve special honor at the hands 
of the church except getting himself 
killed unjustly. It is asserted by a 
church historian that King Charles 
might have saved his life by going 
over to the evangelicals and his re- 
fusal to do this is the reason he is 
now remembered so kindly among 
those who cherish the doctrines of the 
Oxford Movement. 

Dr. Manning 
Declines Bishopric 

As was announced on this page 
some weeks ago, Dr. William T. Man- 
ning, rector of Trinity parish, New 
York, was elected bishop of Western 
New York. This diocese has a num- 
ber of important cities in it, among 
them Buffalo. It is in this diocese 
that Bishop Hobart once labored. Dr. 
Manning wrote to the committee of 
notification: "In the light of the facts 
on each side of the question, and giv- 
ing them the fullest consideration in 
my power, I have been led to believe 
that it is my duty to continue at my 
post in the ancient parish with which 
it is my privilege and responsibility to 
be connected." Dr. Manning has by 
far the largest church in his denom- 
ination in the United States. 

Good Work of 
Scotch Presbyterians 

The General Assembly of the 
Church of Scotland was greatly en- 
couraged by the report made on their 
foreign missionary work for the past 
year. A year ago the board was $25,- 
000 in debt but this year the debt is 
entirely cleared away. There were 
two missionary collections, in place 
of one as in the past, which resulted 
in a twenty per cent increase in the 
income. The United Free Assembly 
debated the question of retaliation 
against the Germans for outrages and 
decided it was not right to attempt 
to match the war against women and 
children carried on by the Teuton na- 



tion. There was also a resolution de- 
claring it contrary to Christ's princi- 
ples to carry on industry for private 
gain. This resolution was set aside 
for one declaring the principle of 
stewardship. 

Letter from 
Cardinal Mercier 

Last January a committee of the 
New York Churchman's Association 
wrote to Cardinal Mercier of Bel- 
gium. They have received a reply 
from that brave defender of his peo- 
ple. In this reply he says : "And in- 
deed a stream of constant gratitude 
flows from our hearts in recognition 
both of the moral support which you 
all in America hold out to us in our 
trial, and the no less lavish material 
aid so generously extended to us by 
the commission for the relief of Bel- 
gium, and all those, whether exalted 
or humble, who help in that great 
work." 

Would Replace the 
Liquor Revenue 

One of the favorite arguments of 
the "wets" just now is that the gov- 
ernment cannot afford to do without 
the liquor revenue. The temperance 
board of the Methodist Episcopal 
church represented by its officers, the 
Presbyterian Board of Temperance, 
the Protestant Episcopal Temperance 
Society, the Northern Baptists and 
the Temperance Board of the Dis- 
ciples of Christ have joined in a state- 
ment to President Wilson pledging 
these communions to buy $500,000 of 
Liberty Bonds annually to make up 
the deficit from the loss of liquor rev- 
enue by the government during the 
war. 

Protestant Meeting 
in Paris 

The assistance given France in the 
war is strengthening the hands of 
French Protestants. There was an 
important meeting in Paris on June 3 
under the patronage of the Federa- 
tion of Protestant churches. The meet- 
ing was held in the famous Temple 
of the Oratoire and was addressed by 
the President of the Council of the 
Federation, by Rev. Chancey W. 
Goodrich, pastor of the American 
church in Paris, by Rev. Dr. Samuel 
N. Watson, rector of the American 
Episcopal church in Paris, and by 
Rev. Dr. Ernest W. Shurtleff, repre- 
senting the students in Paris. Pastor 
Charles Wagner spoke and he is re- 



ported to have surpassed himself in 
an unusually eloquent address on the 
union of France and America. 

Christian Endeavorers 
Are Enlisting 

About twenty-five of the state, dis- 
trict and local Christian Endeavor 
Union leaders in the South have en- 
listed and are in uniform. Two Vir- 
ginia Endeavorers in the ambulance 
corps expected to be in France by the 
20th of June. 

Christian Endeavorers 
Want Union 

The Christian Endeavor Movement 
has taken on new life in the south 
and three state conventions held re- 
cently report large crowds. The con- 
vention in Texas had 1,075 delegates. 
The Presbyterians belonging to the 
northern communion went to a meet- 
ing of the Southern Presbyterians and 
asked for union. The young people 
of both bodies voted for the resolu- 
tion. 

Thinks We Need Definition 
of the Church 

Dr. Forsythe of England has been 
working on a theory of the church 
which he regards as fundamental to 
the whole movement for the reunion 
of the church. In a recent book he 
sets forth a tentative position which 
may be summarized as follows: 1. 
The unity of the church rests on a 
basis not subjective, but objective. It 
does not stand on Christian sympa- 
thies and affinities, but on divine deed 
and purpose. It rests upon God's 
grace and gospel, not on fraternal 
love. II. The great church is pri- 
marily the result of an act of God. It 
is a divine creation, and not a volun- 
tary association. It is not of man nor 
of the will of man. III. The act of 
God's grace provokes in us a response 
in kind. Our answer to it is also an 
act which covers and draws on the 
whole life — the whole man in action 
answering the whole Christ in action, 
the whole God. It is an act of final 
self-committal to Christ. 
Therefore, the same act which sets us 
in Christ sets us also in the society of 
Christ. . . . The soul's act of com- 
munion with Christ is also an act of 
committal to Flis community ; so that 
churchless faith is but partial faith. 
. . . IV. Historically, the church 
was one before it was many. . . . 



iim 



Social Interpretations 



By ALVA W. TAYLOR 



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A. JV. Taylor 



Emergency Giving 
in the Churches 

WHAT part are the churches 
as churches having in the 
emergency needs of suffering 
humanity in this crisis? It is not 
enough to leave giving to Christian 
folk through non-church enterprises ; 
the church as a church must use her 
powerful machinery to help humani- 
ty's needs or 
stift'er herself 
from her failure 
to do so. To do 
less is to fail to 
keep the spirit 
of the Master 
and to brand 
the church as 
an institution 
that has become 
so convention- 
alized and bur- 
dened with self 
support that it 
cannot keep the spirit of the Gospel. 
The people are ready to give. Six 
rural Disciple churches in Boone 
County, Mo., have given $800 to the 
Red Cross, and most of them regis- 
tered many pledges for monthly 
sums for the period of the war; the 
Columbia church gave a like sum. 
The churches of this one county will 
give more than $2,000 as churches, 
and many of their members make 
outside subscriptions besides. 

The Belgian Commission has been 
loaned $75,000,000 by the U. S. gov- 
ernment, and the funds that would 
have gone to them may now be given 
to relief in Armenia and Syria, where 
the want is even greater and the sup- 
ply much more meager. In Tiflis 
alone there are 40,000 orphans ; the 
sufferers run into millions ; no less 
than $5,000,000 per month is required 
to keep them from starving. The 
Jews have raised $10,000,000 already 
for their suft'ering coreligionists ; 
what will the Christians do? So far 
they have sent less than the Jews, 
though they outnumber them by sev- 
eral times and their suft'ering coreli- 
gionists are vastly greater. They 
enlist no less a man than Henry Mor- 
genthau as a sort of special ambassa- 
dor of mercy to go to Cairo and 
administer funds for all sections of 
Biblical and other Near-Eastern 
lands ; we have the missionary staff 
at our disposal. The most generous 
single giver is perhaps Julius Rosen- 
wald, who pledged $20,000 per month 
for the period of the war and $1,000,- 



000 to their special funds ; what are 
our Christian millionaires doing 
more than others? 

These terrible times call for re- 
trenchment at home, but for greater 
generosity for others — more saving 
and greater giving. Luxury becomes 
a crime when millions suffer and die. 



Can We Conquer 
Kaiser Booze? 

Lloyd George is doubtless realiz- 
ing keenly just how true was his 
diagnosis of the situation when he 
said England had three enemies — 
viz., Germany, Austria and drink — 
and that the greatest of these was 
drink. Now that he is Prime Minis- 
ter he has been able to change the 
unbroken tradition of England and 
conscript the last able bodied man ; 
he has been able to conscript the 
profits and conquer the profiteers 
and take over whole vast industries 
and in every way, but one, comman- 
deer every resource of the Kingdom 
for the mastering of the first two of 
these three enemies, and every prom- 
ise is of ultimate success ; but he has 
not been able to master the brewer. 

Uncle Sam is apparently up 
against the same unconquerable foe. 
Every logic that argues against 
waste argues for war-time prohibi- 
tion. We are able to lay untold 
taxes, draft a million youth for 
wounds and death, interfere with the 
"personal liberty" of every citizen in 
so far as taxation and conscription 
applies to him, fix prices and take 
over whole vast business enterprises, 
but we cannot master the brewer as 
yet. So vast is his power that the 
President has been compelled to im- 
plore his enemies to drop their fight 
against him in relation to food con- 
trol for fear of defeat or a delay that 
is near defeat. Up to the present the 
President has not had the moral 
courage of Lloyd George in denounc- 
ing the business — he has been singu- 
larly silent, but his silence is, we 
trust, that of prudence only. Let us 
remember that he has never declared 
himself, as the wet newspapers 
would have the public think. They 
say he thinks it an undue interfer- 
ence with personal liberty, an incon- 
sequential issue, that it affects food 
supplies to so small a degree that it 
is not worth the fuss, would disrupt 
industry by throwing vast numbers 
of men out of jobs, etc. There is not 
one scintilla of evidence that he 
thinks a single one of these things ; 



these are the booze defender's argu- 
ments and he is attempting to put 
them into the President's mouth. 
We are not defending the President ; 
his silence on this commanding issue 
does not warrant one rushing to his 
defense ; we still believe he will speak 
in time, but his prudence tries pa- 
tience. The striking thing to note 
is that the brewer is powerful 
enough to demand such policy when 
such revolutionary and heroic meas- 
ures as those noted above can be put 
through boldly. The same coura- 
geous stand on this issue that the 
President has taken on other drastic 
and revolutionary measures would 
have, no doubt, put war-time prohi- 
bition over as eff'ectively as it did the 
declaration of war or conscription. 

"Fairhope." 

Edgar DeWitt Jones has given us 
a delightful story in his annals of a 
rural church. It is redolent of the 
open country's wholesome out-of- 
door's nature and keen in its por- 
trayal of characters that make every 
rural and village neighborhood inter- 
esting to the serene student of hu- 
man nature and lover of men. Its 
charm, as a story, is in its touch of 
out-of-doors and its warm, sympa- 
thetic delineation of folks. The in- 
terplay of these well limned charac- 
ters in their relations to their church 
furnishes the dramatic interest and a 
vein of humor and pathos runs 
through the story in a very natural 
and delightful manner. As a series 
of sketches of Fairhope church it is 
an excellent study of the inner life of 
a rural congregation of the day just 
passing and furnishes the rural 
church specialist and leader a sort of 
human psychology for the inner side 
of his objective problem. We are 
prone to treat the rural church and 
all churches, and indeed all institu- 
tions, too exclusively in an objective 
manner in these days of sociological 
propaganda. Mr. Jones helps follow 
some of the deep running roots of 
things in the natures of men and 
their loyalties. 

"Pray with the map of the world 
before yon."— limes. 

"Christ sits in the citadel of all men- 
tality." — Innes. 

* * 

"The Creed of Creeds is wrought 
With human hands in loveliness of 
perfect deeds." 



18 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 12, 1917 



illHIill 



I Disciples Table Talk I 

Millllilllll^^ 



Eureka to Send Forth 
Missionaries 

Eureka College reports that during this 
summer several of the alumni of the col- 
lege will take up mission work. Miss 
Bertha Merrill of the class of '15 has 
already begun work under the Home So- 
ciety among the Russian immigrants of 
Chicago. For the last two years Miss 
Merrill has been doing graduate work in 
Chicago University. In August, Elmer 
and Idella Higdon will sail for the Phil- 
ippine Islands. They will be stationed 
at Vigan. They have been doing gradu- 
ate work at Yale. Miss Madge Campbell 
who has been at Eureka the past two 
years as a teacher in the preparatory 
department sails this summer for China. 
During the summer also Dr. Ernest Pear- 
son and Mr. and Mrs. Emory Ross are 
hoping to be able to sail for Africa. 

Church Extension 
Figures 

At the last meeting of the Board of 
Church Extension, the following churches 
were granted help to build: Carpenter, 
Wyo., First Church, $750; Stuart, Va., 
$300; St. Louis, Mo., First Church, 
$8,000; Humble, Tex., First Church, 
$600; Waco, Tex., Clay Street Church, 
$675; Wichita, Kan., South Lawrence 
Church, $8,000; Morris, Okla., First 
Church, $3,000; Bigheart, Okla., First 
Church, $300; Medford, Ore., First 
Church, $4,000; Harper, Kan., First 
Church, $4,000, and Wichita, Kans., West 
Wichita Church, $2,000. In June, 1917, 
the Individual Receipts were $6,072.54. 
In June, 1917, the receipts from churches 
were $1,321.79. This is a gain of nearly 
$500 from the churches over 1916. The 
Board received an Annuity of $200 from 
a friend in Indiana; one of $5,000 from 
a friend in Tennessee; one of $800 from 
a friend in Kentucky; $1,000 from a 
friend in Ohio, and $2,000 from a friend 
in Iowa. Two hundred and fifty-six 
churches have applied for help since the 
1st of last October. 

* * * 

— Indiana is to adopt a new constitu- 
tion in September next. Extensive prep- 
arations are being made for a great 
constitutional convention, and the selec- 
tion of the 115 delegates is arousing un- 
usual interest. One whole day will be 
given at Bethany Assembly to the Citi- 
zens League of Indiana, and the great 
issues that are to be embodied in the 
constitution will be discussed by the 
most prominent educators and political 
economists of the state. 

— Franklin Circle church, Cleveland, 
O., W. F. Rothenburger minister, after 
raising $617 for Belgian Relief May 27th, 
raised for the Red Cross $1,704, four 
weeks later. The Red Cross gift was 
larger than that of any other church in 
Cleveland. 

— Mrs. Jessie Brown Pounds, Hiram, 
Ohio, will speak to the women folk at 
Bethany Assembly during Bible Confer- 
ence Week, August 13-17. Her themes 
are "Woman and Education," "The New 
House Keeping," "Vocational Oppor- 
tunities," "Woman and the War," and 
"Looking Forward." 

— The young men's class, the Philo- 
Christos of El Reno, Okla., presented 
their departing minister, Frank H. Lash, 
with a silver loving cup as a token of their 



love and respect. Mr. Lash has recently 
become a chaplain in the United States 
navy. 

— The church at Canton, Ohio, P. H. 
Welshimer minister, outstripped all the 
Protestant churches of that city in gifts 
to the Red Cross. This church's offer- 
ing was $1,1G2. 

— The Boy Scouts of the Euclid Ave- 
nue church, Cleveland, for which J. H. 
Goldner ministers, sold more than $291,- 
000 worth of Liberty Bonds. This troop 
sold more than all the other Boy Scout 
troops of the city together. 

— I. J. Spencer, of Central Church, 
Lexington, Ky., has an article in the 
July issue of the Christian Union Quar- 
terly, edited by Peter Ainslie, on the sub- 
ject, "The Basis, Method and Assurance 
of Christian Union." There is also an 
interesting contribution by Hubert C. 
Herring, Congregationalist leader, and 
Henry C. Armstrong, of Harlem Avenue 
Church of Christ, Baltimore, on "Con- 
gregationalists and Disciples." Dr. Ains- 
lie has an editorial on "The LTntrodden 
Paths of LTnity." Every Disciple minister 
should be a subscriber to this magazine. 

— E. C. Craven, former Baptist min- 
ister who recently came into the Disciples 
fellowship and undertook the work at 
Princeton, Ky., has left his wife and his 
church, leaving word that he has gone to 
Europe. Mr. Craven has been accused of 
obtaining goods under false pretenses in 
Louisville. 

— Roy K. Roadruck, who leads in the 
Northwest Department of the A. C. M. 
S., has brought out the first issue of "The 
Northwester," an attractive monthly pub- 
lication. 

— The Fourth Annual Rural Church 
Institute of Kentucky will be held this 
year at Elizaville, September 3-7. 

— University Heights church, San Di- 
ego, Cal., is completing a building to 
care for the primary department of the 
school. The need for this addition has 
come as the result of the fifty per cent 
increase of the school during the past 
year. There have been 101 added to 
the church during the past fourteen 
months. P. S. Handsaker is the min- 
ister. 

— The eighth annual session of the 
Bethany Park Training school will be 
held August 7-17. The courses that have 
been arranged for the students this year 
are comprehensive and complete. Garry 
L. Cook, the dean of the school and state 
Bible school superintendent for Indiana, 
is assured of a splendid attendance and 
one of the very strongest programs ever 
presented at Bethany. 

— H. H. Peters, Illinois state man, re- 
cently lead in a debt-raising at Mowea- 
qua. 111., church and as a result of his 
work an obligation of $1,500 was cleared. 
W. W. Vose will make a canvass of the 
congregation soon for current expenses, 
and then a minister will be called. 

— The Sixth Annual Summer School of 
Methods of Kentucky, held at Lexing- 
ton, June 14-22, proved to be the best 
yet. The attendance was about 200, 
nearly all of whom were regular students 
of this school. 

— Hamilton Avenue Christian Bible 
school, St. Louis, celebrated the first 



anniversary of breaking ground for the 
new addition to their building, on June 
17, by raising a large American flag over 
the building. 

— The Texas State Adult Superinten- 
dent is P. F. Herndon, pastor at Tyler. 
During his ministry of less than two 
years in Tyler he has built up an Adult 
Bible class of men from a handful to an 
enrollment of 250. 

— Judge C. S. Lobingier, of the LTnited 
States Court for China, presided at a me- 
morial service held at Shanghai, on the 
day preceding Decoration day. The large 
congregation present consisted mainly 
of American residents of the city and 
their friends. "The Battle Hymn of the 
Republic," "The Star Spangled Banner" 
and "America" were sung at the service. 

— F. F. Walters, of Hopkinsville, Ky., 
but formerly of Wichita Falls, Texas, has 
resigned and closed his work, to become 
the minister of the church at Okmulgee, 
Okla. He, his wife and children drove 
in their auto to Mrs. Walters' parents' 
home on a farm near Coffeyville, Kans., 
on the way to their new field of labor. 

— On the last night of the Nebraska 
State Sunday School Convention, June 
21, the Pageant of Religious Education, 
given by 800 people of Omaha, was pre- 
sented to a large audience. This great 
spectacle was under the general direction 
of Mrs. Charles A. Musselman, teacher 
of the Philatheas of First Christian 
Church, Omaha. 

— Nelson H. Trimble, of Columbia, Mo., 
who is engaged in a seventeen week 
Chautauqua tour through the western 
states, lecturing on social service, finds 
time to preach nearly every Sunday. In 
addition to his appearances in our own 
pulpits he has been invited to address 
Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian and 
Lutheran congregations. Mrs. Trimble 
will continue her ministry for Missouri 
churches and will hold two meetings this 
summer. She recently graduated at the 



Baptismal Suits 

We can make prompt shipmeats. 
Order Now. Finest quality and most 
atisfactory in every way. Order by 
ize of boot. 

Disciples Publication Society 
700 E. 40th St. Chicago, 111. 



Century Subscribers! 

FORM THE HABIT 

Of Watching the Date Opposite 
Your Name on Your Wrapper I 

IF the date is, for example, Jun 17 — 
that means that your subscription 
has been paid to June 1, 1917. 
Within two weeks from the time you 
send a remittance for renewal, your 
date should be set forward. This is 
all the receipt you require for subscrip- 
tion remittances. If the date is not 
changed by the third week, or if it is 
changed erroneously, notify us at once 

WATCH YOUR DATE! 

The Christian Century 

700 E. 40th Street, Chicago 



July 12, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



19 



University of Missouri and her high rank 
brought her election to the Phi Beta 
Kappa. 

— The new building of the church at 
Clarion, la., was dedicated on June 17th 
by G. L. Snively and the pastor, A. O. 
Wright. The entire property is valued 
at $33,000. Over $34,000 was subscribed 
at the two services. 

— It is reported that Gretchen and 
Rachel Garst, daughters of Mrs. Laura 
DeLany Garst, will enter Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York, next year. Miss 
Gretchen is soon expected home from 
Japan, whither she went five years ago 
as the living link of the church at Keo- 
kuk, la., and where she has been teach- 
ing in a kindergarten school in Akita. 

— The Jasper County (Mo.) Assembly, 
to be held by Disciple ministers and 
other leaders of the county, July 24-Au- 
gust 2, at Lakeside, promises to be a 
success. Features are a rural church in- 
stitute, elders' and deacons' conferences, 
evangelistic services and various forms 
of recreation. C. H. Swift, pastor at 
Carthage, Mo., and W. P. Shamhart, of 
Joplin, Mo., have the affair in charge. 
A school of methods will be held from 
July 24 to 28. 

— H. A. Denton, of Galesburg, 111., 
church, is considering a call to the work 
at Valparaiso, Ind. 

— The semi-annual report of First 
Church, Richmond, Ind., shows 45 new 
members added at regular services. 
There is a present membership of 567. 
Contributed for missions and benevo- 
lences, $846.87. L. E. Murray leads in 
this field. 

— During the first seven months of the 
ministry of Henry Pearce Atkins, at 
First church, Mexico, Mo., there have 
been 41 new members added to the con- 
gregation. 

— Austin Hunter led Jackson Boule- 
vard congregation, Chicago, in a patri- 
otic meeting on last Sunday evening. 
Major Farrell, of Chicago, gave the spe- 
cial address, and representatives of vari- 
ous patriotic orders were in attendance. 

— George F. Hall, preacher and evan- 
gelist, spoke last Sunday at the Christian 
Church Club, which meets at Terminal 
Hall, on the north side of Chicago. This 
club has been organized for the purpose 
of affording attractive evening services 
of a popular character for the benefit of 
residents of the neighborhood. On the 
preceding Sunday talks were made by 
William Thurman, John A. Lee and D. 
Roy Mathews, Mr. Mathews being pastor 
of the North Shore Disciples church. 

— Dr. Paul Wakefield, living link of 
the Liberty, Mo., church, was present 
at this church on last Sunday and gave 
an address. Dr. Wakefield has just re- 
turned on furlough from his field in 
China. 

— Fort Worth, Tex., is planning to send 
a train-load of delegates to the national 
convention at Kansas City, in October, 
with the purpose of securing the 1918 
convention for the Texas city. 

— Judge Scofield's Bible class, at First 
church, Hannibal, Mo., has recently 
closed a contest with a class of one 
of the local Methodist churches, and 
on the last Sunday there were 102 per- 
sons present at the First Church class. 
The victory came to the Scofield class. 

— W. C. MacDougall, who is complet- 
ing his work at the University of Chi- 
cago, will soon return to India as a mis- 
sionary and has resigned his pastorate 
at Waukegan, III. 



THE SECOND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC. 

The Council of National Defense and the Secretary of War are urging 
college attendance upon youth under the selective draft age. 
While the khaki-clad army is driving the present issue of war to a suc- 
cessful conclusion, in our colleges the SECOND ARMY must be mak- 
ing ready to lead the forces of reconstruction after the war. 
The college is the training camp for the SECOND ARMY. 
Transylvania and the College of the Bible offer exceptional opportuni- 
ties for the largest training. 

Reasonable expenses, opportunities for self help, generous scholarships available for 
students preparing for public Christian service. Beautiful Home for Women. New 
Residential Hall for Men. Write for Application Blanks. 

THE PRESIDENT LEXINGTON, KY. 



— The death is reported of Dr. W. S. 
Woods, the well-known banker and the 
benefactor of William Woods College 
at Fulton, Mo. Dr. Woods died in his 
apartments at the Elms Hotel in Ex- 



celsior Springs, Mo. While he had been 
in feeble health for several months, he 
was seriously ill for only one day. The 
burial was at Paris, Mo., Graham Frank 
of Liberty, Mo., being in charge. 



They Appreciate the "Century" 



"You are giving us a splendid paper. I 
hope it may win its way to a great place 
among the Disciples." — E. M. Todd, Can- 
ton, Mo. 

"I wish to say that we appreciate very 
much the liberal space recently given 
in the Century to the alcohol situation. 
Such broadsides ought to awaken the 
nation to the tremendous situation which 
confronts the fathers and mothers of 
today." — E. J. Davis, of the Anti-Saloon 
League. 

"A great paper." — W. A. Lyle, Green- 
ville, Tex. 

"We ministers as a class need thought 
stimulus. The fact that a deep spiritual 
responsibility seems to be back of every 
Century editorial and every special arti- 
cle selected for publication makes its 
pages valuable to us. Its originality be- 
gets originality in us." — Arthur Dillin- 
ger, Salina, Kan. 

"I enjoy reading the Century. I be- 
lieve it manifests the true spirit of Christ 
and the true spirit of Christian union." — 
J. M. Hedges, Des Moines, la. 

"I believe there is a unique place for 
the Christian Century. I believe our 
Lord himself would have been glad of 
the support of such an organ in his own 
conflict with religious intolerance and 
spiritual blindness. We need the Cen- 
tury." — Grover C. Schurman, Redwood 
Falls, Minn. 

"I have been a reader of the Christian 
Century for the past six years. Its 
timely editorials, its thought-provoking 
articles, as well as its keen analysis of 
social and religious conditions, have 
proved most helpful." — R. H. Heicke, 
Kansas City, Kan. 

"I believe that I can do nothing that 
will do more to supplement my purpose 
to open the minds of my people and 



make them sensitive to the truth than 
to give them access to the Century." — 
Carl Agee, Lexmgton, Ky. 

"I am always interested in the suc- 
cess of the Century. Its truly Christian 
spirit, its high quality of editorship, 
make it a magazine which I can most 
earnestly recommend to my congrega- 
tion." — M. A. Cossaboom, Corydon, Ind. 

"A fine paper. Now, in my Judgment, 
the best in its history." — J. H. Garrison. 

"I have been a strong advocate of the 
Century in the last few months and con- 
sider it a paper that should be in the 
hands of every Disciple leader." — Seth 
W. Slaughter, Des Moines, la. 

"The Century is one of the greatest 
inspirational journals coming to me. I 
have eight such publications coming into 
my home. The Century will always have 
a large place in my reading." — Fred W. 
Hughes, Bondurant, la. 

"The Century is clean, helpful, vital." 
— Geo. W. Buckner, Mokane, Mo. 

"I find the Century one of the greatest 
papers I take. I could not get along 
without it. It has a fine Christian spirit, 
and it gives me what I need. It is com- 
ing into its day." — B. H. Smith, Horton, 
Kan. 



TWO BOOKS 

By Professor W- S. Athearn 

Every Pastor, Superintendent and 

Teacher Should Have 

The Church School. $1 .00 net. 
Organization and Adminis- 
tration of the Church School. 

30c net. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St., CHICAGO 



Don^t Let Your School Slump! 

Send 75c for 100 assorted "Attendance Builder" post cards, 
and try them on your class. They will build up and keep up 
your attendance. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



20 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 12, 1917 



A Church Hojse for You. 



NEW YORK Write ©r. fMs mtmm. 



— R. M. Talbert, the new leader at 
Chillicothe, Mo., church, began his work 
there this week. 

— Hon. W. J. Bryan will speak at 
Bethany Assembly at 2 p. m., August 
9, on ''The Conservation of Democracy." 
Delegations are being organized at In- 
dianapolis and nearby county seat 
towns to meet at Brooklyn, Ind., at 1 
p. m. Secretary of State Ed. Jackson 
is chairman of the committee on delega- 
tions. 

— G. W. Schroeder, of the Rudolph, 
Ohio, church, gave an address at a Sun- 
day school convention held by several 
townships at the fair grounds at Bowling 
Green, Ohio. He also delivered the an- 
nual Knights of Pythias Memorial ad- 
dress at Hoytville, Ohio, on July 1. The 
Rudolph church has contributed $25 to 
Red Cross work. 

— The Berean Bible Class of First 
Church, Palestine, Tex., held a most 
successful "Patriotic Service" at the 
church on July 1. Some features were 
the following: Statement of the pur- 
pose of Patriotic Sunday, by class presi- 
dent; reading of President Wilson's let- 
ter on Red Cross work, by the teacher, 
Bonner Frizzell; patriotic songs and 
recitations; pledge to Christian flag by 
all in concert; pledge to American flag 
by all in concert; offering for Red Cross 
work. The Berean Class is a mixed 
class for young adults and is thoroughly 
equipped for effective work and up to 
date in its methods. 

— Harry Foster Burns, who has re- 
cently accepted the pastorate of the Con- 
gregational church of Gary, Ind., is in 
residence at Lincoln Center, Chicago, 



and will serve as summer preacher there. 
Mr. Burns was formerly pastor at one of 
the Peoria, 111., Disciple churches. 

— The Ushers' Association of Central 
church, Newark, Ohio, has arranged a 
series of lectures by former pastors of 
the church. There are four ex-pastors 
living and all have consented to partici- 
pate. Miner Lee Bates, of Hiram Col- 
lege, will lecture on "Moral and Social 
Integration"; _ J. N. Scholes, of Johns- 
town, Pa., will speak on "Uncle Sam's 
Trouble"; and H. Newton Miller, of 
Bethany College and VV. D. Ward of 
New Philadelphia, have also sent word 
that they can be counted upon to aid 
in the plans. 

— The Piqua, Ohio, congregation re- 
cently observed "Food Preservation 
Day" and addresses on that theme were 
delivered with a view to encouraging the 
church members to come to the aid of 
the nation in the saving of food products. 

— J. Lem Keevil has resigned at Fifth 
Avenue church. North Knoxville, Tenn., 
to take the work at Forest Avenue, West 
Knoxville, on October 1st. 



Between Campaigns 

The field work of the Men and Mil- 
lions Movement was suspended after the 
close of the splendidly successful North 
Carolina campaign, to give the members 
of the team a chance to attend Com- 
mencements and Conventions, in which 
most of them are active participants. 

The last year has been the best of 
the three since the Movement began and 
assures the completion of the work 
within the next year. 

After September first the team will as- 
semble in Nebraska. Following the Na- 
tional Convention it will probably go to 
California. These and the several other 



lllllllllllllllllllll' 



Our Readers' Opinions 



"OPINIONS" 

Editor The Christian Century : I have 
thought much and for a long time of 
this tendency to "opinionism" of which 
the Century complains in issue of June 
21. 

I have an "opinion" that it is a ten- 
dency inseparable from the Disciple po- 
sition that God furnished mankind with 
a complete, perfect and authoritative 
revelation in the Apostolic age and since 
then does not come into spiritual con- 
tact with believers, as with the apostolic 
company, but limits them to a contact 
mediated through the word. The con- 
sequence is that Disciples and all 
Protestants for that matter scrutinize 
the word to know the will of God in- 
stead of trusting also to the free work- 
ing of the spirit in their own experi- 
ence. 

It is my "opinion" that H. G. Wells, 
in "God, the Invisible King," has a glim- 
mering of a great truth in the coming 
reliance on the spiritual guidance of the 
Living God. 

Yours sincerely, 

I. M. Cummings. 

Harrison, Ark. 

* * * 

HUNTING WITH HERESY GAS 

(From the Christian Courier, Dallas, 
Tex.) 
An evangelist from another state is 
now down in Texas holding some meet- 



ings; but instead of directing all his ef- 
forts against the devil, he has taken 
some of his valuable time to write the 
Courier confidentially, as follows: "Has 
the Courier become an echo or an 
abridged edition of the Century? If our 
papers do not stand for the old funda- 
mentals of the Christian faith, they have 
served their day of usefulness and ought 
to be suspended. I am ashamed and 
grieved at some of the things appearing 
in the Courier." 

No doubt this watchman on Zion's 
walls thought that when he had so va- 
liantly fired that first shot classing the 
Courier with the Century he would 
thereby terrorize this timid journal with 
mortal fear of being so classed, on ac- 
count of the prejudice that he and his 
bunch of heresy gas dispensers have 
created in the minds of the public against 
one of the church papers. But, in pass- 
ing, for the benefit of the aforesaid 
evangelist and all others concerned, let 
it be said once and for all that the Cour- 
ier regards it as a compliment to be 
classed with the Christian Century; for 
while the Chicago journal contains some 
things for which we cannot stand, the 
great body of its material is high grade 
and "sound," too. And the Courier prizes 
it as highly as any exchange that comes 
to this office, because it courageously 
seeks the truth and fearlessly attacks 
what it conceives to be wrong wherever 
found, defying the would-be popes. 



states that have not yet been visited, 
with those that have been only par- 
tially covered, will make the final year 
of the Movement the most intensely ac- 
tive of the four. 

Men and Millions Movement 
222 W. Fourth St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 



SOCIAL SERVICE WEEK AT 
BETHANY ASSEMBLY 

Social Service Week at Bethany, Aug. 
0-11, begins with an address on Lord's 
Day morning by Judge Orbison on "The 
Church and Social Service." There will 
be meetings for men and for women to 
be addressed by some of the nation's 
most noted sociologists, among them 
Hon. Amos Butler, Dr. William King, 
Dr. Ada Schweitzer, Dr. Kenosha Ses- 
sions, Prof. Alva Taylor, Dr. Geo. Bliss, 
Prof. J. W. Putman and others. Ad- 
dresses will also be given by Secretary 
H. H. Peters, Prof. E. E. Snoddy, Orvis 
F. Jordan, O. E. Kelly and other min- 
isters interested in city and rural church. 



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July 12, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



21 



j The Bethany Training School will be- 

i gin on Aug. 7th. There will be ses- 

i sions held in the Endeavor Auditorium 

for Bible School Workers and Christian 

I Endeavorers, under the direction of 

i Dean Garry L. Cook and Dean C. E. 

I Hill, ably assisted by a fine corps of 

' teachers. Paralleling these sessions the 

I Singers' School will be held in Singers 

j building, with President C. H. Hohgatt, 

I Chicago; Prof. Alvin Roper, Winona 

Lake, and Dean Hackleman in charge. 

Prof. J. E. Sturgis, Mansfield, Ohio, will 

organize a large assembly chorus. Prof. 

Sturgis will give lessons on orchestral 

instruments and organize an orchestra. 

Prof. Roper will give lessons in piano 

and teach two hours per day in the 

Singers' School. 

Great Chautauqua attractions are 
booked for the evening sessions, among 
them the Dixie Jubilee Singers, Charles 
Crawford Gorst, famous whistler, and 
Louis Williams, the electrical wizard of 
the world. Stereopticon lectures by Dr. 
Geo. Bliss, Prof. Alva Taylor, and Orvis 
F. Jordan will be given. 



TEXAS EDUCATIONAL NOTES 

The Disciples have three educational 
institutions in the great empire of Texas. 
These are the main university at Fort 
Worth, Texas Christian University, and 
the two affiliated colleges of junior rank. 
Midland College at Midland, and Carr 
Burdette at Sherman, the latter being a 
school for girls only. To those breth- 
ren in states of less magnitude than 
Texas this might seem like too many 
schools and yet Midland College serves 
a territory a little larger than the state 
of Nebraska, and the attendance last ses- 
sion was near the two hundred mark. 
The attendance at Fort Worth was 
nearly seven hundred, there being sixty- 
seven graduates on June 8th. 

While each one has its separate board 
of trustees these schools are operated 
under one board of education, who have 
undertaken to represent the whole edu- 
cational program as a unit before the 
Texas churches. All the money secured 
is paid to the schools on a pro rata basis 
and the schools in turn bear their pro- 
portional part of the expense. More 
money is thus secured and there is no 
competitive effort to get each individual 
school before the churches as a separate 
factor in the growth of our work. The 
"Men and Millions" have taught us this 
lesson and we are trying to be apt 
pupils. 

This board of education is composed 
Df nine members and each school is rep- 
resented. Stated meetings are held and 
progress noted and new plans formu- 
lated. At the state convention each 
fear three members retire and three new 
Dues are elected. Mr. S. J. McFarland, 
I Dallas banker, and a full fledged citi- 
zen of the Kingdom of God, is chairman, 
md Mr. Dan D. Rogers of the same 
)ank and the same kingdom is treas- 
irer. Both these men are members of 
he great East Dallas church, where 
rohn G. Slayter is pastor. The board's 
rtav extends from one state convention 
o the next. Clifford S. Weaver serves 
is educational secretary and is con- 
itantly engaged in putting the educa- 
ional task on the hearts of Texas Dis- 
iples. Under Mr. Weaver's leadership 
he total amount realized from the 
;hurches and individuals for the year 
losing with the Austin convention May, 
917, was a little above $84,000. Unless 
his was specifically designated it was 
livided among the participating schools 
ccording to the basis of division de- 
ided upon by the Board of Education. 



The slogan for the new convention 
year closing with the Sherman gather- 
ing May, 1918, is $25,000 from the 
churches, as churches for our educa- 
tional work. This has been distributed 
over the churches by means of an ap- 
portionment and Mr. Weaver is now al- 



ready one month upon the new year in 
the realization of the aims. If the 
churches already visited are an indica- 
tion of what may be expected the suc- 
cess of the educational program for 
Texas Disciples will be fully realized. 

* * * 



The Most Beautiful Hymnal Ever Produced. by the American Church 

HYMNS OF THE 
UNITED CHURCH 

The Disciples Hymnal 

Charles Clayton Morrison and Herbert L. Willetl 

Editors 




Contains all the great hymns which 
have become fixed in the affections 
of the Church and adds thereto three 
distinctive features: 

HYMNS OF SOCIAL SERVICE 
HYMNS OF CHRISTIAN UNITY 
HYMNS OF THE INNER LIFE 

These three features give this new 
hymnal a modernness of character 
and a vitality not found in any other 
book. This hymnal is alivel 

It tings the same gospel that is 
being preached in modern evan- 
gelical pulpits. 

Price, per single copy, in cloth. $1.15 
In half leather, $1.40. Elxtraordinary 
discount made to churches adopting 
this book in the early days of the first 
edition. 

Write to-day for further information as 
to sample copies, etc. 



Th? Christian Century Press 



700 East 40th Street, Chicago 



MR. BRITLING SPEAKS AGAIN 

Mr. H. G. Wells' New Book 

"God, the Invisible King" 

Mr. Wells, the author!|of Mr. Britling, says : 

**The time draws near when mankind will awake , . . 
and then there will be no nationality in all the world 
but humanity^ and no kingy no emperor , nor leader, 
but the one God of mankind/* 

AMERICA IS FIGHTING FOR THIS GOD ! 

"God, the Invisible King^^ 

"The Religion of Mr. Britling" 

Price, $1.25 

—FOR SALE BY— 

Disciples Publication Society, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



THE BEST SCORE BOARD 

Framed in Solid Oak with durable one-piece back. All cards have a Jet black 
background. The names of months, days of the week and dates 1 to 31 ar© printed 
in red. All other figures and wordings appear in white. All cards are 2^ inches 
in height. 

THESE BOARDS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

PRicz: I.IST, TsroT prepaid 

no. 2 — Size 45x32 imches; 12 strips, 20 sets of figures, 94 words, ©to., $12.50 
No. 3 — Size 45x48 iHches; IS strips, 30 sets of figrnres, 94 words, etc., 15.0O 
Ho. 1 — Size 30x31 inclies; 12 strips, 20 sets of flgriires, 30 words, etc., 10.00 

Send for complete description. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 700 E. 40th Street, CHICAGO 



22 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 12, 1917 



The Life of Jesus 

By Dr. LOA E. SCOTT 

A fine course for summer study. Send 
for a copy and consider it for your class. 
There are several reasons for the popu- 
larity of this course: (1) It is a treatment 
of the ever-popular subject of study, the 
life of the Master; (2) It is a question and 
answer study; (3) It requires constant 
use of the Bible itself. 

Many classes have been transformed 
into real study-classes by the use of this 
book. Why not try it in your class? 

Price per copy, 50 cents ; in lots of 10 or 
more, 40 cents each. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 East 40th Street, Chicago, III. 



Parables of Safed the Sage 

By WILLIAM E. BARTON 

What are the Parables of Safed the Sage? 
They are little narrative discourses in the first 
person by a genial philosopher who talks most 
interestingly of all sorts of things. But they are 
all related to life. Whether the writer picks up 
his story on a trolley car or in his garden or 
out of the visit of a crank or book agent, he 
always says something that relates to some 
practical experience. You will agree to that, 
if you are reading the Parables as published 
in The Christian Century. 

Some readers say the Parables are the best 
bits of humor now appearing in any magazine in 
America. They poke fun at all sorts of follies 
and foibles, but they have a strong element of 
good sense, and their laugh is always on the 
right side. They have been copied into many 
papers; have served as themes for sermons and 
addresses ; have pointed many morals and 
adorned many tales. 

The Parables of Safed the Sage is a handsome 

volume of nearly 200 pages, and the Parables 

are printed in large, clear type on excellent 

paper. More than fifty parables are included. 

Price per copy, $1.25 

Order today. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 East 40th Street, Chicago, 111. 



"Kraoplate'' Blackboards and Material 




REVERSIBLE STYLE 



BLACKBOARDS 



"Kraoplate" Blackboards are made of 4-ply wood pulp, ce- 
mented under a heavy pressure and are uniform in thickness, 
solid throughout. The surface can be easily cleaned and will 
not warp or crack if washed. It is the most complete and 
perfectly portable Blackboard made, and has an oak frame, 
finished both sides. Can be taken apart in a moment and 
conveniently transported or set aside. 
PRICES: 

2Kx3Mft ach 

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July 12, 1917 THECHRISTIANCENTURY 23 

~S\ 

HAVE YOU READ 

FAIRHOPE 

A NEW NOVEL 
BY EDGAR DEWITT JONES 



niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Fairhope folks are mighty human, but you 
will like them all the better for that. 

Major Menifee may remind you of Colonel 
Carter of Cartersville. You will love Jacob 
Boardman, the modern Enoch. And even 
Giles Shockley will not repel you, "Hound 
of the Lord" though he was. 

Everyone knows that the old style of 
country church is passing forever. But 
what type of church will take its place? 
Read the chapter entitled "The Old Order 
Changeth" and meet the Reverend Roger 
Edgecomb, Prophet of the new order. 

Do you like birds and stretches of meadows, 
glimpses of lordly river, and the glory of 
high hills? Do you like young preachers and 
old time country folks, their humors, their 
foibles and their loyalties? If you do, then 
you should read 

"Fairhope, the Annals 
of a Country Church" 

Price, $1.25 

Order NOW, enclosing remittance 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th Street, Chicago, 111. 



The Bethany System 

OF 

Sunday School Literature 

Some Typical Graded Courses 

THE BIBLE AND SOCIAL LIVING. Prepared by Harry F. Ward, who probably 
stands first in the list of social service authorities within the church. 

THE WORLD A FIELD FOR CHRISTIAN SERVICE. This course of study has as 
its purpose to train youth for genuine service in the world of today. Inspirational, 
educational, practical. 

CHRISTIAN LIVING. What it means to be a Christian; problems of Christian living; 
the Christian and the church ; the Word of God in life. An ideal course for Inter- 
mediates. 

HISTORY OF NEW TESTAMENT TIMES. Teaches the young people how the 
church started, with vivid pictures of the backgrounds of its history. 

HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE HEBREW PEOPLE. Before the life of 
Christ can be understood, there must be a knowledge of the history of the Hebrews. 
In this course the story is told in an attractive way, but thoroughly. 

Special Courses 

For Young People and Adults 

THE TRAINING OF CHURCH MEMBERS. A manual of Christian service intended 
for classes of new converts, adult or young people's Sunday school classes, pastor's 
classes, midweek services, etc. This little book has made a deep impression upon 
the church life of the Disciples. Send for free sample copy. 

THE LIFE OF JESUS. By Dr. Loa E. Scott. A question and answer review of the 
life of the Master, requiring close study of the Scriptures themselves. Many large 
classes have been built up by interest in this course. Send 50 cents for copy. Sells 
at 40 cents in lots. 

MORAL LEADERS OF ISRAEL. By Dr. H. L. Willett. An ideal course for adult 
classes which have a serious desire to master the facts of Old Testament life. Price 
per copy, $1.00. 

THE GOSPEL OF THE KINGDOM. A monthly magazine of social service founded 
by Dr. Josiah Strong. Treats present day problems in most attractive fashion. A 
fine course for men's classes. 75 cents single subscription ; 50 cents per year in clubs, 
if ordered by the year. Send for free sample copy. 

These are only a few of the excellent study courses afforded by 
the Bethany Graded System. Send for returnable samples of the 
Bethany Graded Lessons, and for copies of any of the special courses 
which interest you . , 

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL MUST TAKE ITSELF SERIOUSLY IN THIS CRIT- 
ICAL ERA OF OUR COUNTRY'S HISTORY. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION IS THE 
ONLY "WAY OUT." YOU ARE CRIMINALLY NEGLIGENT IF YOU DO NOT 
SEE THAT YOUR SCHOOL HAS THE VERY BEST EQUIPMENT POSSIBLE 
FOR ITS IMPORTANT WORK. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 East 40th Street CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



\m 



r 





9 


1 


1 




mmmm»mminmtmmtm0tmamimimmmm'^''mitl>^mmi^atmmtmm 




The Spirit 

of Our 
Intercession 

By James I. Vance 




CMIQ^GD 





THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 19, 1917 







July 19, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



■;^^^^^' 



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SBbsorlptloa PWce— Two dollars and 
a lualf & year, payable strictly la 
advance. To ministers, two dollara 
when paid In advance. Canadian 
subscriptions, 60 cents additional for 
postage. Forelcm, $1.00 additional. 
Dls«ontUnisiice8 — In order that sub- 
■crlbers may not be annoyed by 
failnre to receive the paper. It is 
not discontinued at expiration of 
time paid In advance (unless so 
ordered), but continued pendingr In- 
■tructlon from the eubscrlber. If 
discontinuance is desired, prompt 
notice should be sent and all ar- 
rearages paid. 

Change at address — In ordering 
change of address give the old as 
well as the new. 




PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 
IN THE INTEREST OF THE KINGDOM OF GOD 



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per shows the month and year to 
which subscription is paid. List Is 
revised raonthly. Change ef date 
on wrapper is a receipt for remit- 
tance on Eubscription account. 

Remittances— Should be sent by 
draft or money order, payable to 
The Disciples Publication Society. 
If local check Is eont, add ten 
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EJntered as Second-Class Matter 
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DISCIPLES PUBLICATION S OCIETY. PROPRIETORS, 



700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO 



Disciples 
Publication 



The Disciples Publica- 
tion Society is an or- 
ganization through 
Cnrlafv which churches of the 

aOCieiy Disciples of Christ 

seek to promote un- 
denominational and constructive 
Christianity. 

The relationship it sustains to Dis- 
ciples organizations is intimate and 
organic, though not official. The So- 
ciety is not a private institution. It 
has no capital stock. No individuals 
profit by its earnings. 

The charter under which the So- 
ciety exists determines that whatever 
profits are earned shall be applied to 
agencies which foster the cause of 
religious education, although it is 
clearly conceived that its main task 
is not to make profits but to produce 
literature for building up character 
and for advancing the cause of re- 
ligion. • • ♦ 

The Disciples Publication Society 



regards itself as a thoroughly unde- 
nominational institution. It is organ- 
ized and constituted by individuals 
and churches who interpret the Dis- 
ciples' religious reformation as ideally 
an unsectarian and unecclesiastical 
fraternity, whose common tie and 
original impulse are fundamentally the 
desire to practice Christian unity with 
all Christians. 

The Society therefore claims fel- 
loAvship with all who belong to the 
living Church of Christ, and desires to 
cooperate with the Christian people 
of all communions, as well as with the 
congregations of Disciples, and to 
serve all. * • * 

The Christian Century desires noth- 
ing so much as to be the worthy or- 



gan of the Disciples' movement. It 
has no ambition at all to be regarded 
as an organ of the Disciples' denom- 
ination. It is a free interpreter of the 
wider fellowship in religious faith and 
service which it believes every church 
of Disciples should embody. It 
strives to interpret all communions, as 
well as the Disciples, in such terms 
and with such sympathetic insight as 
may reveal to all their essential unity 
in spite of denominational isolation. 
The Christian Century, though pub- 
lished by the Disciples, is not pub- 
lished for the Disciples alone. It is 
published for the Christian world. It 
desires definitelj' to occupy a catholic 
point of view and it seeks readers in 
all communions. 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO. 

Dear Friends: — I believe in the spirit and purposes of The Christian Century snd wish to be numbered ameng 
those who are supporting your work in a substantial way by their gifts. 

Enclosed please find 



Name.... 
Address. 



"The Training of Church Members" 

By ORVIS F. JORDAN and CHARLES CLAYTON MORRISON 

IS THE TEXT BOOK 
YOU ARE LOOKING FOR 

IF you have a Sunday-School class of young people or adults whom you wish to inform 

concerning the fundamental principles of our own movement. 
IF you are desirous of making your mid-week prayer meetings worth while. Don't let 

your prayer meetings languish. Give your people something to really study. Try this 

helpful little book. 
IF your Christian Endeavor Society needs something definite to work at this year. Why 

not teach these impressionable young people the things they should know concerning 

the church? 
IF you are planning to organize a Pastor's class for special study. 
IF you are organizing a teacher-training class. 

Why not make a feature of your evening preaching service this summer a brief study from 

this important little book? 
Send for a sample copy of "The Training of Church Members," and see how perfectly it 

fits into your needs. 

Price, 15c per single copy; 123^c in quantities 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



700 EAST 40th STREET 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 19, 1917 



1 i 
' I; 




CENTRAL CHURCH, TOLEDO 

This property was saved from sale for a $10,000 debt, and the cause in Northwestern Ohio from defeat by a 
Church Extension loan of $6,000. There are now 1,100 members, with Bible school attendance of 600 and 
missionary gifts of $1,630.95. It has helped to establish three other churches in Toledo. The total member- 
ship of the four is 2,237, with 2,099 in the Bible schools. 

WHAT AND WHY IS CHURCH EXTENSION? 

Church Extension is a perpetual fund that is loaned to churches to assist them in building. The loan is 
repaid in five annual installments, beginning two years after it is made. The interest rate on the regular fund, 
about two-thirds of the whole $1,348,190.01, is 4 per cent, on the $480,546.82 of Annuity money it is 6 per cent. 
Since it was started in 1888 the fund has helped 1,885 churches in 44 states, 5 provinces of Canada, Hawaii 
and Alaska, to build. Of these, 1,237 have paid back their loans in full, and the money has gone out to help 
others. Only 14 have failed. The total of money repaid is $2,080,419.92. This, with the original principal, 
makes $3,428,609.93 of aid extended to the churches. 

The fund was organized to help sixteen hundred churches that were homeless. It has been found that 
from $250 to $1,500 will enable most of these struggling mission churches to build and start on a career of 
growth and prosperity. 

Until recently all that was required for a church building was four walls and a floor and a roof. Now the 
Bible school must be graded and organized by departments and the building must be more like a college than 
a "meeting house." The congregation that would serve its generation, and be supported by its generation, 
must adjust itself to the new day, just as certainly as farmers must have modern harvesting machinery 
instead of reaping hooks, and undertakers "burial cars" instead of horse-drawn hearses. 

The modern city with its high ground-values presents a most difficult problem and a most colossal 
task, especially for people that have neglected it as long as we have. Loans of $10,000, and even $20,000, 
must be made to secure and improve strategic locations. This has been done so often and with such outstanding 
success that we no longer count it a hazardous venture, but the sanest, safest and most necessary sort of 
Christian enterprise. 

If the Men and Millions Movement were giving to this fund ten times the $200,000 which has been as- 
signed to it, every penny could be loaned to the very highest advantage. So the success of the Movement 
is of the utmost importance to the vigorous extension of the Kingdom in the homeland. 



MEN AND MILLIONS MOVEMENT 

222 West Fourth Street, CINCINNATI, OHIO 




Christian Century 



CHABIiBS 0I.AYTON MOBKXSON, EDITOS. 



KERBEBT Ih WIUUSTT, OOXTTSXEUTXira ESXTOB. 



'olume XXXIV 



JULY 19. 1917 



Number 29 



Christ and the Soul 



CHRIST IS AT WORK TODAY IN THE SOULS 
)F MEN. 

We follow no dead Christ, but one who lives among 
IS. We are looking for no absentee Christ to appear 
in the clouds of heaven, but we have a Christ who 
ven now dwells with His people. There is no more 
)owerful force in the world today than the Living 
Christ. People of today, as in Jerusalem of old, are 
livided concerning Him. Some in our modern world 
vould have Him crucified afresh as a false prophet. 
)thers see in Him the one who will redeem His people. 

It has ever been difficult for believers to explain 
low an unbelieving world could turn away from Him, 
esus of Nazareth told his disciples that the human 
leart is like a field and the Gospel worker like a sower, 
vfot every kind of ground will receive the seed and 
)ring forth thirty, sixty and a hundred fold. 

Paul declared that Israel did not turn to Christ 
)ecause there was a veil before its face. Whenever 
he law was read, this veil was present. For the be- 
iever, the veil was rent in twain and he could see Christ, 
;ven though as in a glass darkly. 

The law as a stumbling block to ancient Israel 
vas not different from the worship of the past that is 
o be found in men's hearts today. There are many 
vho worship dead law-givers instead of following the 
living Christ. 

• • 

There are some men who revere a denominational 
eader more than Christ. Whether it be the worship 
)f Luther or Calvin or Wesley or Campbell, such de- 
motion to dead prophets is not to be justified. We may 
)e grateful to these independent spirits who followed 
he Living Christ in their day, but if we tarry by their 
ombs instead of following on with our Lord, we have 
t veil before our face. 

But there are other veils before the faces of men. 
some have a devotion to a remote and less helpful 
)ast. Those who live for the things of the body have 
jjone back to the times of man's animal origins. Glut- 
ens and drunkards and debauchees shall never enter 
he kingdom of Christ, for these have a veil before 
heir faces and so never see the Christ in his beauty. 

Nor are men kept away from Christ only by physi- 
al sin. A more subtle, and sometimes incurable, dis- 
ease is that of spiritual pride and selfishness. Jesus was 
ender with outrageous sinners but let loose an awful 
lenunciation on the religious aristocracy of the Jews 
)f his day. Selfishness, hardness of heart, spiritual pride, 
ill of these obscure one's spiritual vision. The unfor- 
unate souls possessed by these sins will never find 
heir way to the great salvation which is shared by 
he true friends of Christ. 

We are not to suppose that true believers are born 
n a moment into the new life. The new birth is fol- 



lowed by a long period of growth before maturity is 
reached. The Christian world rests under few handi- 
caps today worse than the belief that men come easily 
into a complete possession of the divine life. 

In the old camp meeting religion, men tried to pray 
themselves through in one awful night of spiritual 
agony. Burdened souls practiced an auto-suggestion 
which gave them the emotions they sought, but it 
was soon revealed by their walk in the community 
that they had not found the full life in Christ. Only 
a life-long quest could bring that to them. 

The sacramentarian sought to impart the divine 
grace by the laying on of hands. "Have you received 
the Holy Ghost? Have you been confirmed?'' asks a 
divine of the Oxford Movement persuasion. The man 
who is confirmed under such a theology will not, in 
all probability, live like a hero in the church in his 
after life. 

Paul took pains to establish the notion of a growth 
in the divine life. He said we must work out our salva- 
tion with fear and trembling. He was concerned lest 
he, after having preached to others, should become a 
castaway. He confessed toward the close of his life 
that he had not apprehended but that he still pressed 
forward to the prize. He defined the Christian's growth 
as being "from glory to glory." Now we see in a glass 
darkly but at last we shall see face to face. 

It is this principle of growth that makes every kind 
of spiritual exercise of such surpassing importance. 
Since Paul himself could not regard his salvation as a 
matter thoroughly settled, it is a blind or a spiritually 
proud man today who rests comfortably in a belief 
that his soul is well provided for. 

The most astonishing part of Paul's doctrine of 
Christ and the soul is to be found in his idea that 
Christ himself grows from glory to glory. For those 
who still seek a dead Christ, or one living somewhere in 
the skies, such a conception is shocking. For the man 
who knows the meaning of life, it is quite essential. The 
proof of life is in the power to change. A static Christ 
would be a dead Christ. 

• • 

Many of us hunted the pot of gold at the foot of 
the rainbow. We never came up to the rainbow, but 
that was not because the rainbow was not there. It 
went on before us. It is in some such way that our 
Christ lures us on to ever loftier heights of spiritual 
achievement. Religious men today probably under- 
stand the mind of Christ better than the average church 
man of the first century did, or else two thousand years 
of history have been wasted. There are so many of the 
dark sayings of Jesus that have been repeated and won- 
dered at until now at last the wonderful truth dawns 
upon our souls. The Living Christ is leading us into 
all truth and toward the perfection of his wonderful 
life. 



DITORIAL 



CHRIST OR BARABBAS? 

WHILE some men are proclaiming that Chris- 
tianity is dead, others are asking that it be given 
a trial. For some, George Bernard Shaw ap- 
pears today in the light of a defender of the faith. He 
says that for two thousand years we have been follow- 
ing Barabbas the robber, asserting that the big men 
in the church today live by profits which are only to 
be compared with the ill-gotten gains of the man who 
was released by Pilate. 

If such a view is overstated by the well-known 
dramatist, it does contain an element of truth. The 
church has never yet made a complete experiment in 
following Jesus Christ. We have set up thinly dis- 
guised Greek philosophies as theology and we have 
organized a veiled Roman empire as the true Catholi- 
cism. Scholasticism has stood in Protestant pulpits 
and substituted its speculations for the Gospel of Christ. 
We have tried many things which have been called 
Christian but which have not been essentially so. It 
is now time to try Jesus Christ and Plis Gospel. 

The Anti-Christ is in the world. He is the spirit 
of conscienceless power as embodied in Germany's pres- 
ent leaders, but this spirit is to be found in the hearts 
of some on the other side of the battle line as well. 
Whoever would win in war or business or anywhere 
else by the abandonment of conscience and the right, 
belongs to the company of the Anti-Christ. 

The Barabbas spirit in the world will likely meet 
a check, for it has over-reached itself in its robberies. 
It is the greed of the liquor interests rather than the 
skill of the "dry" leaders which has hastened the coming 
of national prohibition. Had coal dealers been satisfied 
with reasonable profits they would not now rest under 
the displeasure of the Government. 

Under the leadership of Christ men will have no 
less interest in business and industry than we have 
had under Barabbas, but they v^ill find a new motive 
for success. They will prize power for the opportunity 
it gives to make our world better. 

COMMISSION ON RELIGIOUS PREJUDICE 

THE Knights of Columbus, an order of Roman 
Catholic laymen, have had a Commission at work 

during the past year studying the reasons for reli- 
gious prejudices against the Catholics. This Commis- 
sion in making its report stresses fovtr different ideas. 

It invites all good citizens of every faith to help in 
maintaining freedom of worship. Anti-Catholic agita- 
tors have insisted that religious toleration is the last 
thing the Catholic wants. They should rejoice to have 
this great organization committed to the American 
principle. 

Furthermore, the Commission asserts that Roman 
Catholics are not opposed to the American school sys- 
tem, but that they desire to see these schools perpet- 
uated and made free to all children who wish to use 
them. 

In the strongest terms, the Knights of Columbus 
assert that they owe no political allegiance to the Pope. 
We have been told that the Catholic cannot be a good 
citizen since he does not in reality renounce his alle- 
giance to a foreign potentate. In a public and specific 



way the members of this society deny any foreign politi- 
cal bondage. The Pope for them is only the spiritual 
father in the church. 

The Commission further reports itself in favor oi 
union efforts with all sorts of religionists in matters 
of community uplift where credal questions and methods 
of religious work are not involved. The Catholic atti- 
tude has often been thought to be contrary to this. 

Many Protestants will assert at once that this pro 
nunciamento may represent some Roman Catholics, bu' 
not all. The same thing is true when we undertake t( 
set forth a Disciple attitude or a Methodist attitude 
Doubtless the Knights of Columbus are no more read} 
to be judged by the position taken by some priests thai 
all Disciples are willing to stand for the declaration: 
of a reactionary evangelist. Even if it should prove tha 
these laymen are at variance with all priests, it will a 
least be of advantage to take them at their word anc 
live at peace with these who also confess that Jesuij 
Christ is Lord. 

THE REAL HERESY OF OUR TIME 

THE heresy-hunter with his ludicrous ideas of wha 
heresy is has almost turned a bad word into a goo 

one. There are yovmg men who call themselve 
"heretics," meaning thereby that they choose to thinl 
independently rather than to allow others to think fo 
them. In this sense all men of real intelligence ar 
heretics. 

But the word has a rather unpleasant meaning i 
many of the New Testament references. Signifyin 
division, it has all the connotations of wrong-headednes 
and wilful sectarianism in spirit. When we ask in thi 
darker meaning of the term who the real heretics c 
the day are, we are apt to discover that they are th 
people who are wrong with reference to Christia 
ethics. 

The quarrel with the historic creeds of the churc 
is not that they say too much about Christ, but thj 
they say too little. Christian theology today give 
Christ a more fundamental place in human history tha 
he was given in any of the earlier creeds of Christendon; 

But there are many who say, Lord, Lord, and dj 
not the things that our Lord told them to do. The 
often speak of the Golden Rule as an excellent thin 
for a Utopia. The New Testament standards for tli 
treatment of an enemy are set to one side as impra* 
tical and visionary. We are not concerned so much 1 
reject some doctrine about God or Christ as some of t\\ 
teachings of Jesus Christ in the field of Christian ethic 

In order to use the teachings of Jesus, we must fin 
get His point of view. He did not come to give ne 
statutes. The letter killeth but the spirit maketh aliv 
This does not mean, however, that we may go so f; 
with interpretative processes that we shall at last arri^l 
at convictions opposite to those of Jesus and yet ca 
ourselves Christian. 

A good deal of the so-called difiiculty in practicir 
the Christian ethics lies in our own hardness of heart 
Sometimes the man of the older orthodoxy accepts s 
orthodox creed but rejects the ethics of Christianit; 
He has thrown away one of the important elements < 
the Gospel. 



July 19, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



GOING TO AN UNKNOWN COUNTRY 

THERE is no way to make living safe and it is 
well that this is so. The most obscure life is 

lived in the presence of a thousand dangers. The 
great souls of history have welcomed danger in the 
quest of the big things of life. Abraham went out, not 
knowing whither he went. Not as an idle and irre- 
sponsible nomad but as a man of spiritual vision he 
dared that he might have a country for himself and his 
seed. 

Martin Luther dared. When he hurled his defiance 
at Rome he could not foresee the end. Having put his 
feet in the path, he had to walk in it. When he first 
denounced the selling of indulgences, he had no idea 
of ever living outside the communion of the Roman 
church. 

The Pilgrim fathers went out to a land they knew 
not. They paid dearly for their faith and courage. 
They did not foresee the great nation, with its thou- 
sands of factories, that would develop in the wilder- 
ness to the west of them. 

The whole world at this time is on a great adven- 
ture. We have dared to break up the established cus- 
toms of the past. Such innovations as universal service 
and food control, two of the most revolutionary ideas 
that have ever been considered in this country, have 
come in with only a ripple of excitement. 

On beyond lie events and experiences that no man 
can foresee. Yet we must not believe that the devel- 
opment of our world is not in accordance with our char- 
acter and our ideals. Israel was already in the soul 
of Abraham in Chaldea. Our own future is already 
latent in the ideals of our time. 

It is for this reason that America must fall upon 
her knees. The character of our coming century is 
being determined in these critical times. A wonderful 
opportunity is ours to stamp upon the future the cpiality 
of our most solemn purposes. 

A NEW DEPARTURE IN CHURCH EXTENSION 

THE Board of Church Extension is taking a radically 
new step this year in devoting the offering of the 

year to the building of a mission house for an 
immigrant church in either New York or Chicago. Pre- 
viously, the board has used all of its funds as loan 
funds. They have been repaid by the churches secur- 
ing them. The plan is an excellent one for American 
churches operating under normal conditions. Under 
the conditions prevailing in Home Mission work among 
immigrant groups, it would not house new congrega- 
tions. 

The idea of devoting" an annual offering to the 
building of a mission house is a way of taking a refer- 
endum. If the churches approve this sort of policy 
they will come up with an unusually strong offering, 
[f, on the other hand, they disapprove, they will bring 
in a small offering. The significance of the offering this 
^ear should be made plain to all the churches so that 
:here may be no failure for lack of information. 

The Board of Church Extension is managed by 
:ompetent business men and there is an evident pur- 
pose of making progress in method as well as in ac- 
1 emulating ever larger sums of money to be used for 
-he building of church houses. This board needs only 
:he assurance that the brotherhood is willing to move 
A^ith them. 



The matter of a building for immigrant groups is 
of pressing importance. Many of these people have for- 
saken the churches of their fathers. They are not will- 
ing, however, to seek a new religion at a meeting held 
in an old grocery store. Quite as much as the native 
American demands proper environment for worship, 
the newly arrived immigrant longs for artistic expres- 
sion for religion. 

The immigrant is today sadly neglected at our 
hands in every way. It will be of no use, however, for 
mission boards to go ahead spending money in other 
ways unless the Board of Church Extension is able to 
back up the vv'ork with generous appropriations for 
modern and adequate mission houses of approved 
design. 

LOSS OF AN EDUCATIONAL LEADER 

THE unexpected death of Professor Charles E. Un- 
derwood, professor of Old Testament Language 

and Literature at Butler college, brings a sense of 
loss to us all. He has been active in so many ways 
outside his teaching profession that his place will 1)e 
hard to fill. 

In educational work, he has served as president 
of Eureka college and as teacher in Butler. When he 
left Eureka, it was to escape the burden of adminis- 
trative duties, l)ut he was soon in the midst of new 
ones. As secretary of the Board of Education, he has 
acted with efficiency, expecting to be relieved by a 
full-time secretary. The time did not seem ripe for the 
latter development and he worked on under this heavy 
duty. 

Lie was also active in tlie city mission program of 
the city of Indianapolis and in the local federation 
work. His willingness to work made him assume ever 
larger duties in his local community which cost him 
much. His growing social sympathies made him a 
valua1)le counsellor in a city program. 

The men of the Campbell Institute also mourn his 
loss. Lie has served two years as vice-president and 
it was his boast that he had never missed a meeting 
since he had joined. At the approaching meeting this 
summer, his vacant chair will symbolize to his friends 
a great sorrow. 

Professor Underwood was born in rural environ- 
ment and was a self-made man. From a village in 
Indiana he climbed laboriously to the eminence he 
reached and at the time of his death he was still 
a young man. Had he been satisfied to work shorter 
hours and had his brethren Ijeen more thoughtful to 
relieve him at times, he might have gone on to many 
other exploits of the greatest significance. 

His spirit was kindly. Even toward those who 
were occasionally his critics, he had a tolerance that 
was beautiful. Lie loved the company of his brethren 
and never fell into the seclusion that sometimes delights 
the scholar. Above all, he was religious and claimed 
in his inner life the deeper joys of a daily companion- 
ship with Christ. 

VAIN REPETITION 

AMONG the teachings of our Lord on the subject 
of prayer is the exhortation that we shall not 
make vain repetitions as the heathen do. This is 
really a teaching against verbal and thoughtless prayer. 
A ritualistic prayer is vain repetition if it is thought- 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 19, 1917 



less. The evangelical believer may also be guilty of 
vain repetition. Who has not gone to prayer-meeting 
and heard the elder utter the same prayer week after 
week? Who has not listened to the minister's ex-tem- 
pore pulpit prayer and learned to recognize the fre- 
quently recurring phrases? 

Phillips Brooks believed that posture and words 
were a part of efifective, thoughtful praying. He said : 
"And pray distinctly. Pray upon your knees. One 
grows tired sometimes of the free thought, which is yet 
perfectly true, that a man can pray anywhere and any- 
how. But men have found it good to make the whole 
system pray. Kneel down, and the bending of those 
obstinate and unused knees of yours will make the soul 
kneel down in the humility in which it can be exalted 
in the sight of God." 

Formal and thoughtless praying makes a life more 
evil than it was before. The exhortation at the com- 
munion table, where we are warned that thoughtless 
participation but brings damnation to our souls, is true 
likewise of thoughtless praying. We take our most 
serious religious exercise and drag it down to the level 
of our social conventionalities. 

There is a certain sense in which we need to study 
prayer. The books of liturgy of the historic churches 
are not useless for this purpose. The great devotional 
books, such as St. Augustine's "Confessions," and 
Thomas A. Kempis' "Imitation of Christ," are of value. 
Many still read the pulpit prayers of Henry Ward 
Beecher with edification. The prayer spirit is best com- 
municated by the great souls who have prayed. We 
will best learn to pray by hearing others pray. The 
world's devotional books take us as silent listeners into 
the inner lives of some of the greatest souls who have 
ever lived. 

THE FINE ART OF GROWING OLD 

THE old men of the Bible were specially honored 
men with peculiar authority in their communities. 

Their length of years and richness of experience 
were supposed to give them some peculiar authority. It 
is not surprising that in America, the young man's land, 
where the population is continually recruited from the 
youth of other lands, we should ever be in the attitude 
of regarding the young man as of pre-eminent value to 
the community. We are all moving on, howeverl, 
to old age, and time will recruit us for the army of the 
gray-beards. 

The dread of old age is a fear of lessened power in 
the world. The woman who has ruled by her beauty 
fears it as the plague. The man who has lived by his 
muscles sees the day swiftly coming on when he will be 
a dependent, unless he learns some new way to serve 
the community. We all know old people who live in 
the past. There are crabbed people of the seventies 
who have lost their human afifections and doddering 
old people who through disuse have lost their memories. 

We should all be grateful for the people who pioneer 
the way to an efhcient old age. Lyman Abbott has a 
larger ministry than perhaps any other preacher of the 
Gospel in America, though he speaks mostly from the 
pages of his weekly paper. Joseph G. Cannon is still 
loved and feared in American politics. 

Some old people who have retired from more active 
duties are having the best time of their lives. They 
have time to reflect upon the meaning of life before 



taking the last great journey. It is no accident that ok 
age brings to most people a new interest in the religious 
life. God has given us old age as a time in which tc 
make our souls ready for eternity. 

The Christian may, therefore, welcome the days 
when the body grows weaker and the soul grow; 
stronger. There is still labor fitted to our strength 
and there are the deeper spiritual experiences which 
can come only at the close of a life well lived. 

WHAT SHALL WE DO FOR OUR DEAD? 

MAINTAINING fellowship with the sacred dea( 
seems to be one of the urgent religious problem. 
of the time. The flower of humanity has beei 
passing out of earthly existence upon the field of battle 
Shall we be satisfied to forget these friends and rela 
tives? We have never been willing to let death con 
quer in this way. 

The Roman Catholics have long had the practic 
of masses said for the dead. This rests upon a doctrin 
of purgatory, a most depressing form of belief in 
future life. They have also encouraged the practic 
of prayers for the dead. In the English church prayer 
for the dead have come to be in common use sine- 
the beginning of the war. Even the American Uni 
tarian Association seems to inculcate prayers for th 
dead in its Communion service : 

We remember those who have fallen asleep in Christ, in th 
joyful hope of resurrection unto life eternal. O Lord, refres 
their spirits with the light of thy countenance. 

We remember the fathers from the beginning of the worli 
and all who have wrought righteousness, even down to th 
present day. Refresh their spirits and give them abundai 
entrance into the joy of our Lord. And grant unto us, O Go 
that we may have our part and lot with all Thy saints. 

The Psychic Researchers propose a form of con 
munion with the dead by communications from the othe 
world. That the interest in this sort of inquiry h 
increased of late is not to be denied. However, larg 
numbers of people have yet to be convinced of th 
genuineness of these phenomena. 

There remains for us the simple faith of the Apost 
Paul, who was so sure of the life beyond that he wf 
in a "strait betwixt two," whether to depart and t 
with Christ or to remain and comfort his brethren 
There was for him but a thin veil between this worl 
and the great spiritual country of those who had gor 
on before. He indulged in no efforts to create a geoj 
raphy for immortality. He rested firmly upon a fe 
great posits of faith. 

THE SCOLDING PREACHER 

EXHORTATION in the pulpit has sometimes d 
generated into common scolding. The .minist' 
is disappointed in his audience and the sins < 
the absent members are visited on the faithful who a; 
present. Pie begins his ministry under high pressur 
and when the inevitable reaction comes he undertake 
to galvanize the situation into new activities by harsi 
and radical speech. This man is at last defeate 
Sometimes he leaves the ministry convinced of the utt 
lack of spirituality in the church. 

There is need sometimes for plain speech with r 
gard to the sins of a people. This, however, shou 
take the form of an appeal to conscience and a sen 
of right. Such appeals have spiritual beauty and a 
never marred by bad temper and complaining. There 



i 



July 19, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



a great difference between a prophet and a common 
scold. 

The scolding preacher is often in too big a hurry 
to secure results. The leaven hid in the meal works 
faster in reasonable warmth, but if it is put into the 
oven too soon its leavening work ceases. There are 
great spiritual processes in the souls of people which 
require time for their completion. It will not do to 
be impatient with these larger processes any more than 
one can afford to be impatient with the growth of the 
trees and the flowers. 

The scolding preacher is often more concerned 
for the credit of his own ministry than for the glory 
of God. Absence from church, failure to contribute, 
and similar failures in duty, seem to him an affront 
to the dignity of his ministry. He resents these failures 
from a personal viewpoint. In all of this he has taken 
a lower view of Christian duty than he should. The 
loyalty of the people is first of all to God and not to 
a ministry. 

Elijah was succeeded by the more loving Elisha. 
Amos was succeeded by Hosea, who preached the di- 
vine forbearance. The whole prophetic history teaches 
the greater effectiveness of a patient and loving leader- 
ship of the people toward the great ideals of the king- 
dom of God. 

THE DULL SERMON 

THE failure of the preacher is one of the reasons 
for small attendance in churches. The newspaper 
man regards as the chief sin of a newspaper that of 
dullness, since it defeats any good the paper might do. 
There is some reason for applying such a point of view 
to the work of the ministry. 



Sermons are often dull because of their length. An 
instructor in Yale once replied to a query as to how 
long a sermon should be by saying, "We have observed 
that there are no souls saved after the first twenty min- 
utes." A more recent utterance suggests that a sermon 
should be like a cube — the length, breadth and depth 
should be equal. A poor sermon must needs be short. 

The teacher must know the art of holding atten- 
tion for relatively long periods and he has studied 
modern psychology partly with this purpose in mind. 
The preacher, however, often ignores the various de- 
vices for securing attention. Establishing a point of 
contact at the start is of prime importance. The art of 
illustration which does not divert but which elucidates 
and carries the hearer easily on to succeeding points 
is of the greatest importance. 

The dull sermon is often dull because the subject 
condemns the preacher to deal with trivialities. No 
amount of shouting can interest us deeply in some 
of the sermon subjects that we see announced in the 
daily papers. The preacher by his very subject some- 
times reveals the fact that he has nothing of serious 
import to say. It is often true that people go through 
a weary hour of preaching out of loyalty to the church, 
rather than because of any real interest in the message 
of its minister. 

The interesting sermon is organized around a great 
subject. It begins with the hearers on the plane of their 
every-day living and leads them to the mountain peak 
of some great theme. The true preacher is a flame of 
fire, for he has convictions about important matters 
that concern us all. The sermon of such a man will 
inevitably hold his audience tense with interest. 



A Prayer 



"Lord, to zvhoiii shall ive go? Thou hast the 
words of eternal life; and zve have believed and 
knozvn that thou art the Holy One of God." 

OSUN of life, O wondrous shining Light, 
How pale our candles, flickering in the night! 
And yet we boast the splendor of their rays ! 
O make us humble, Lightener of our days. 

O Source of truth, O Wisdom past compare. 
Speak unto us, that we Thy truth may share. 
May some small portion of Thy heavenly lore 
Leaven our minds. Instruct us evermore. 

O Heart of God, O great unselfish Love, 
That came to earth, a Father's care to prove, 
We have but Thee ; there is no other way 
To truth, to life, to God's eternal Day. 

— Thomas Curtis Clark. 



HiirinitMiiniiiininniiii 



iiuimtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



The Spirit of Our Intercession 



By James I. Vance 



THESE disciples were seeking 
greatness. It was a laudable am- 
bition, but they had the wrong 
conception of greatness and a mis- 
taken idea as to how it was to be 
achieved. They had an idea that 
greatness consisted in position, in the 
acquisition of some outward sign of 
dignity and power. Christ is saying 
to them, it is not won that way. 
Greatness is not in position, but in 
character. The great thing is not 
where you are, but what you do. It 
is not what you have, it is what you 
are. 

COVETING PREEMINENCE 

Sometimes we make the same mis- 
take those disciples made. We want 
greatness in his Kingdom and in his 
work. Our ambition is to sit, the one 
on his right hand and the other on 
his left, in his glory. We covet a pre- 
eminence in his work. Sometimes our 
organizations fall into a kind of gen- 
erous rivalry for the first place of 
leadership in Christian work, imagin- 
ing that position and preeminence and 
some outward sign or mark of advanc- 
ing the cause of Christ is the great 
thing, and Jesus comes to us and says 
over again the old words : "It is not 
where you are. It is what you do. It 
is not your place. It is the amount of 
service and sacrifice that you put into 
my work." 

"Can ye drink of my cup. Can ye 
be baptized with my baptism?" He 
is saying that to his people in these 
days with a new emphasis, but with 
the old yearning in his heart. He is 
saying it to us across the battle-fields 
of the world. 

THREE GREAT WORDS 

We have been sobered by the 
thought that our nation is at war. We 
have done our best to keep out of it, 
but we are in it and I fancy that at last 
we are glad that our flag is floating 
alongside the tricolor of France and 
all the other flags that stand for free- 
dom and for humanity. We have 
tried to keep out of this war, but we 
are in it because we believe the cause 
is right, and because we feel somehow 
or other that in it we can serve Christ. 
Already we are seeing that, in the 
providence of God, some good is com- 
ing out of the struggle. France has 
gotten a new birth. She has been 
regenerated. Russia has been demo- 
cratized. Great Britain has been uni- 
fied. Belgium has been glorified. And 
now our country is being international- 
ized as it enters the struggle in which 
it is not after one foot of territory, 
nor one ounce of temporal power, nor 



"And there come near unto him 
James and John, the sons of Zebedee, 
saying unto hint. Teacher, we would 
that thou shouldest do for us what- 
soever we shall ask of thee. 

"And he said unto them. What 
would ye that I should do for you? 

"They said unto him. Grant unto 
us that we may sit, one on thy right 
hand, and the other on thy left hand, 
in thy glory. 

"But Jesus said unto them, Ye 
know not what ye ask. Are ye able 
to drink of the cup that I drink? or 
to be baptized with the baptism' that 
I am baptized with? 

"And they said unto him. We are 
able. 

"And Jesus said unto them, The 
cup that I drink of ye shall drink, 
and w'ith the baptism that I am bap- 
tized zuithal shall ye be baptized; 

"But to sit on my right hand or on 
my left hand is not mine to give ; but 
it is for them for whom it hath been 
prepared." 



any nation's money, but simply after 
the chance to serve humanity. 

Across those drenched battle-fields 
the great Captain of our salvation is 
saying to us as a nation and to our 
churches : "Can you drink of the cup 
that I drink? or be baptized with the 
baptism that I am baptized with?" 

It seems to me that there are three 
great words which speak to us out of 
this struggle. The first is service. 
That is the thing that is flaming along 
the battle front, and that is why we 
have shouldered our share of this 
burden. 

When King George was crowned in 
Westminster Abbey, the text of the 
sermon by the Archbishop was this : 
"I am in the midst of you as he that 
serveth." Little did they dream then 
of the significance of that coronation 
text, for that is the thought that lives 
in this struggle. Some one from Aus- 
tralia who had gone to witness the 
coronation exercises tells how one 
night, going home from a function, he 
wandered into an alley, having lost his 
way, and there in the heart of London 
about midnight he found an English 
lad sitting on a doorstep with his little 
sister in his lap. He had taken off his 
coat and wrapped it around the child 
to keep her warm. That, he said, he 
saw in the heart of the empire at mid- 
night. 

LEARNING THE MEANING OF THE 
ATONEMENT 

Ah! That is a great thing in this 
war. If we interpret it aright, it 
seems to me, that is what we are trying 
to do. That is what America's en- 
trance means. Our church must catch 
that note. We are simply unclothing 
ourselves that the needy may be 



clothed. It is the old theme of service, 
and we shall miss the significance of 
these days if we do not hear Christ 
putting a fresh emphasis on the glory 
of service. Service is the way to 
greatness. 

The second thing is sacrifice. I do 
not think there will be any trouble 
about understanding the atonement 
after the war is over. I do not think 
men will discuss this or that or the 
other view of the atonement after this 
war is over, for it is aflame all along 
that battle-line. It is sacrifice, and it 
is sacrifice for others. They are liv- 
ing the atonement over there. It is 
not only service, but it is sacrificial 
service. It is not only getting a new 
interpretation, it is getting a new em-i 
phasis. The very soul of the thing is 
in this world struggle. As these men 
come back from that war and we 
preach over to them the old story of. 
the cross, they will know what it 
means, because they have themselves 
all the while been putting that glorious 
truth into practice, even though it cost 
life. As Christ laid down his life for 
us, so we ought to lay down our lives 
for the brethren. 

THE LESSON OF UNITY 

The third thing is that which comes 
out of these two, out of sacrifice and 
out of service. It is unity. It is not 
necessarily union. It is something 
bigger than union. It is unity. It is 
co-operation. It is the laying aside of 
little things to do the big things. It is 
seeing the big things face to face. 
How cheap and poor and tawdry some 
of the things which divide us seem as 
we pause to view the issue ! 

Somebody was telling me recently 
of a communion service on the battle- 
line. All kinds of people were there 
partaking of the sacrament. It was a 
Presbyterian minister who was con- 
ducting the service, but Presbyterian 
leaders were not the only ones helping 
him to distribute the sacred emblems 
of the Savior's crucified body. Metho- 
dists and Baptists and Protestants and 
Catholics, and probably Jews, were all 
there. They were all reverent before 
the great significance of the life that 
had been laid down for humanity, and 
the symbolism of that holy sacrament 
swept aside all small lines of difference 
and division, as they faced the glory 
of that passion. That is coming to us 
in these days. 

The Bishop of Montreal said that 
even if the Archbishop of Canterbury 
were to com.e to him and forbid him 
doing certain things, in a line with 
Christian unity, that even if the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury were to come 
to him and say: "This must not be 



July 19, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



11 



done," he would say : "I cannot recog- 
nize any authority short of that of the 
great Head of the church." 

DRINKING OF THE CUP 

Is not Christ speaking to us today 
as perhaps we have not heard him 
speak in the years gone by, of the 
greatness of the things which unite us, 
of the smallness of the things which 
divide us, of the greatness of those 
elements which go to make up the 
spiritual ? 

Can ye drink of the cup, the cup 
that brims to the lip with service, the 
cup that is blood-red with sacrifice ? 
the old communion cup, the old loving 
cup of our faith — can ye drink of my 
cup and be baptized with my baptism ? 
God grant that we may be able ! 

As we approach the God of nations, 
and seek the leadership of the great 
Captain of our salvation for ourselves 
and for his blood-bought church in 
these days of world need and strug- 
gle, let us pray, first, for vision that 
we may see him who is nail-scarred 
and thorn-pierced, and who shall see 
of the travail of his soul and shall be 
satisfied, and who in these days still 
Cometh from Edom, with dyed gar- 
ments from Bozrah, trailing the glory 
of his apparel. 

Let us seek a vision of the crucified 
Christ, that we may be willing to drink 
the cup and share the fellowship of his 
sufiferings, and then let us seek a vision 
of the compassionate Christ, that we 
may have pity in our hearts and be 
fitted to minister with Christ in shep- 
herding a suffering world. 

Let us pray next that we may see 



ourselves and the revealing presence 
of our Lord, our need, our shortcom- 
ings, our sins, our duty, our possi- 
bilities in him, whose word says: "It 
doth not yet appear what we shall be, 
but we know that when he shall ap- 
pear we shall be like him." 

Let us pray also that we may see 
the open door which fronts and invites 
the church to its supreme opportunity, 
that we may see our chance for service, 
for making Christ known, for letting 
him live through as well as in us until 
the world shall know that God has 
sent him. 

With this three-fold vision of our 
Lord, ourselves, and our opportunity, 
let us pray for faith in the mighty God, 
for a faith that will steady us during 
these times of tumult, for a faith that 
finds God on the throne and that has 
no doubt that because he is on the 
throne, good will be the final goal of 
ill, for a faith that sees ever around 
the mount in which God's servants 



This address, zvith others, by 
John R. Mott, Henry Churchill 
King and a mmiber of other re- 
ligious leaders, may be obtained 
in book form from the Federal 
Council of the Churches of 
Christ in America, New York. 
These addresses are the great 
utterances spoken at the recent 
conference of the nation's reli- 
gious organisations under the 
auspices of the Federal Council, 
in the City of Washington. 



dwell the army of celestial allies, and 
that in every condition can see all 
things work together for good to them 
that love God, to them who are the 
called according to his purpose. 

Let us pray for hope, since we are 
saved by hope. Let us pray God for 
hope to see how things are going to 
be when he has his way with this 
world, and to live as though things 
were that way now. 

HATING NOT PEOrLE BUT SIN 

Let us pray also for love, love to 
him and love to one another, for love 
for our enemies, that these days of 
strife may not engender either per- 
manent or temporary hatred, that we 
may never hate people, but that we 
may ever hate sin, injustice, un- 
brotherliness, and ill will, and that for 
our present task of world leadership 
we may be able to comprehend with 
all saints what is the length and 
breadth, and height and depth, and to 
know the love of God which passeth 
knowledge. 

Let us seek God's continuing bless- 
ing and guidance for the President of 
these United States and for all who 
have the leadership of the nation in 
this world crisis. 

Let us pray for our army and our 
navy, for those who are enlisting, for 
our sons and our daughters, and for 
all who serve the flag with arms and 
tools, on the battle-line, in the training 
camps, in shops, and in the furrows. 

Let us pray for our allies, that no 
division may arise among us, but that 
we may fight as one man until free- 
dom wins. 



"He That Hath Ears to Hear" 



By Charles O. Lee 



THE world in which we live is a 
world of change. Things disinte- 
grate and new things are formed 
before our very eyes. The flower that 
today is, tomorrow is cut down and 
Avithereth. The giant oak of today 
lies a rotting ruin tomorrow. The 
geologists tell us that the shaggy 
mountains are under process of change 
and that the seemingly imperishable 
rocks are crumbling. The historians 
tell us that not only do the inanimate 
things of nature change, but the or- 
ganizations of men as well. Govern- 
ments are not stable, for kingdoms 
rise and wane. Customs flourish and 
pass away, and the ways of hfe are 
continually in a state of flux. The 
anthropologists tell us that even man 
in his vital structure is ever changing ; 
that old organs are ceasing to function 
and newer organs are becoming more 
and more developed. 



"If any man hath ears to hear, 
let him hear." 



There are just two ways of viewing 
all this change and transformation 
about us. One is to see in it only 
chance ; the accidents of forces inter- 
playing upon other forces ; out of bil- 
lions of possibilities the eye just hap- 
pened to be in the front of the head, 
hair just happened to be on the ani- 
mal's back and the elephant just hap- 
pened to have a trunk. The other way 
is to see a designing hand in it all and 
through it all. 

CHANCE OR PURPOSE.^ 

A careful student of history must 
come to this second conclusion. Life 
is not a happen-so ; not the mere inter- 
play of the blind forces of nature; not 
the caprice of fate. Life is upheld by 



a designing mind ; life is shot through 
and through with purpose. Life is not 
mere growth and decay, but progres- 
sion ; and every age is nearer the goal 
than the preceding one. This old 
world is like a giant orchestra with a 
multitude of instruments. God the 
Master is trying to get it tuned up. It 
has been builded for harmony and har- 
mony must be the end gained. The 
jangles and jars are but discords made 
by improperly adjusted instruments. 
The noise of life is not its soul, but 
is an accident of its progress. Beneath 
and within life there dwells the domi- 
nant purpose of God who will see it 
through. 

From out of this multitude of 
sounds, men will hear largely what 
they have trained their ears to hear. 
The botanist will see tremendously 
more in walking through a forest than 
the man who has never studied botany. 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 19, 1917 



The musician will hear in music what 
the untrained ear will be entirely ob- 
livious to. The owner of an automo- 
bile can detect sounds and harmonies 
coming from the motor that are 
entirely beyond the man who rides in 
a machine for the first time. The real 
vital life of these things lies just in 
these finer aspects. Men do not under- 
stand things by viewing or hearing 
them en masse, but by learning their 
soul. Every one can see trees and 
flowers and grass, but it is only the 
trained eye that can detect the species 
and appreciate the real order and har- 
mony in the plant world. Anyone can 
hear sound when the orchestra is play- 
ing, but it is only the trained ear that 
can appreciate the harmony, detect the 
fine points of execution, discern the 
real soul of the music. 

Life in general is like that. So 
many see life only en masse ; so many 
hear but the noise of this giant or- 
chestra; hear only the roar of this 
mighty engine. But just as sure as 
there is a soul in the forest, just as 
sure as there is a soul in music, just as 
sure as there is a soul in the automo- 
bile motor, so there is a soul in life 
generally — and that soul is God, God 
who is in and through and back of 
life. Men must train their ears to de- 
tect the sound of his voice, or they will 
hear only the noise and the roar of 
the things about them and will fail to 
catch the thing that is really essential. 

SEEING GOD IN HISTORY 

When the twelve spies were sent 
into Canaan, they all saw giants and 
mighty walled cities. Ten saw noth- 
ing more. Only Joshua and Caleb 
saw God, and they saw him as the 
biggest factor in the enterprise. Elijah 
heard the terrific winds of Horeb, 
listened to the rumblings of mighty 
earthquakes and stood in wonder as 
the sounds of roaring flames beat in 
upon his ears. But Elijah was quick 
to discern that God was not in these 
forces of destruction. He heard an- 



other thing and it saved his soul ; he 
heard the "still small voice," and it 
was the voice of God. King Ahaz 
heard only the clamor of the kings of 
the north as they were knocking at his 
front gate ; heard only the rumblings 
of the approaching chariots of Assyria. 
But Isaiah heard God, and God was 
to him the mightiest factor in the 
whole situation. The kings of the 
north where but "two tails of smoking 
firebrands," and Assyria would be 
blown before God's power like chaff 
before the wind. 

The apostles of Jesus heard only the 
murmurings of hate and saw only the 
approaching destruction of the life of 
their master by his enemies. When 
that hate had spent its fury and Jesus 
seemed to lie helpless in the shackles 
of death, the apostles felt that all their 
hopes were gone and returned to their 
old vocations. But Jesus, while he 
plainly heard these noises of destruc- 
tion, heard the voice of God above 
them all, and in hearing and doing 
conquered. 

UNDERTONES OF HARMONY 

Ole Bull, the violinist, was one day 
found standing far out upon a great 
projection over the sea. Below him 
the waves were dashing their fury 
against the clefts of rock. Ole Bull 
had his violin to his chin and was 
playing. He was trying to catch the 
undertone of the sea. The average 
ear would only hear the lashing of the 
waves ; only a soul trained to detect 
harmony would ever think that these 
roaring waves had a soul, and that 
within and beneath the clash of the 
sea there was an undertone of har- 
mony speaking its message to men. 

Today great sounds are abroad in 
the world, more than ever before in 
the history of men. The wars of 
former times were but the morning's 
play in comparison w^ith the one now 
raging. Alexander conquering the 
world, Caesar marching through Gaul, 
Jerusalem bathed in blood, Napoleon 
upon his nefarious conquests, all these 



pale into insignificance when compared 
with the world war of today. The 
jar and jangle that fills the world is 
awful. To the casual ear the world 
is more like a giant boiler factory in 
action than a magnificent orchestra at 
play. It is the sound of uproar rather 
than the harmony of music. It seems 
like the clanging of millions of cym- 
bals instead of the grandioso of a 
glorious symphony. There never was 
a day when the world needed trained 
ears as today, ears trained to detect 
the voice of God and to hear the tramp 
of his feet. There is a need for men 
and women to live close to him, to 
catch the harmony of a progressive 
accomplishment. 

THE HEARING EAR NEEDED TODAY 

Wonderful possibilities lie before 
the pathway of men in these terrible 
days, yet awful consequences are in 
store if we do not see God. The 
Israelites believed the ten spies rather 
than Joshua and Caleb and as a result 
were compelled to travel the wilder- 
ness for forty years as wanderers. De- 
tecting the "still small voice" saved 
Elijah and sent him back to the tasks 
from which he had fled. Ahaz did not 
heed Isaiah and the forfeiture of a 
kingdom was the result. The Jews 
failed to heed the warning of Jesus, 
who tried to get them to listen to the 
voice of God in their hour of need, 
and the destruction of Jerusalem and 
the passing of a nation forever was 
the result. The men who have made 
the world to advance have been the 
men who could hear the voice of God 
above the clamor. 

God lives today more vitally than 
he has ever lived before and he is 
seeking to be the real guide to men. 
He is not in this war — this war is a 
war of selfishness, of hate and of 
greed. Yet God is working great 
things out of these situations and men 
need to live close to him during this 
awful crisis. "If any man hath ears 
to hear, let him hear." 

Danville, Indiana. 



The Church and the War 



By Shailer Mathews 

In the Biblical World 



WE are in war. That is now a 
determining fact in American 
life. Whether we regret it 
and bemoan it, or welcome it and re- 
joice in it, the situation is one of war. 
We must do business while at war, 
study while at war, pray and serve our 
world while at war. To act, think, 
worship, on any other assumption is 
madness. 

The church must do its work in the 



midst of a nation at war. There is no 
alternative that does not smack of 
treason. 

What then is the duty of the 
church ? 

First of all it is to remember that 
it is a church and not a military in- 
stitution. Its pastors must remain 
spiritual leaders. Its members must 
be champions of the spiritual life. 

To forget this fundamental duty is 



poor patriotism and poorer religion. 

* * * 

It is the duty of the church to fill 
men's hearts with confidence in spirit- 
ual things. Ministers are not medi- 
cine men of civilization, beating the 
tom-toms of selfish nationalism, her- 
alding an American God and an Amer- 
ican gospel. The nation must be 
heartened in its sacrifices by inter- 



July 19, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



13 



pretations of the divine will. We are 
on God's side so long as we fight to 
preserve the precious heritage of the 
spiritual forces in history, liberty, 
democracy, and human rights. 

We dare not pray for victory were 
we fighting for land, or booty, or con- 
quest, or national supremacy, or the 
enforcement of our political ideals 
upon unwilling people. 
* * * 

We fight to make the world safe for 
democracy, not for the subjugation of 
a world to democracy. 

The church must see to it that 
hatred is not allowed to dim the nobil- 
ity of our present purposes. 

The church must resolutely refuse 
to class its expenditures for missions 
at home and abroad, for the welfare 
of society, and for the preservation of 



public morals with the luxuries in 
which we economize. 

Its work must be increased, not cur- 
tailed. The times are too exigent for 
retrenchment. If the gospel was 
needed in times of peace, it is doubly 
needed in the time of war. 

We must expand in ministering to 
the souls of men. 

We must redouble our efforts to 
protect the soldier. Moral deteriora- 
tion always waits upon war. The 
church must mobilize its forces to 
make soldiering safe for character. 

So, too, must the church stimulate 
men to a larger sense of obligation to 
those whom the war will make its vic- 
tims. This is the time to give money, 
not to make money. Beyond the 
cheerful submission to taxes and loans, 
there must be also the contributions to 



the Red Cross Society and to other 
agencies of helpfulness. 

The church must teach repentance 
and prayer. Death is closer than ever' 
before. Life is more serious. Why 
obscure these solemn facts? 

And, if we are to face them as we 
should, the Christian leader must talk 
about something more vital than the 
fulfilment of prophecy in "tanks," 
aeroplanes and Armageddon. He must 
bring men's souls to God. Sin and 
death call for a deliverer. 

Let the church preach the good 
news of a God who works his loving 
will even through the hatreds of men 
and who fills with new courage and 
faith the hearts of those who through 
personal sacrifice and national repen- 
tance present themselves to him in 
service to their world. 



What Is Christianity? 



DOES the word "Christianity" 
any longer bear a definite mean- 
ing? Men are debating what 
Christianity really is. Auguste Saba- 
tier makes it out to be just altruism; 
Josiah Royce identifies it with the 
sentiment of loyalty ; D. C. Macintosh 
explains it as nothing but morality. 
We hear of Christianity without 
dogma, Christianity without miracle, 
Christianity without Christ. Since, 
however, Christianity is a historical re- 
ligion, an undogmatic Christianity 
would be an absurdity; since it is 
through and through a supernatural 
religion, a non-miraculous Christianity 
would be a contradiction ; since it is 
Christianity, a Christless Christianity 
would be — well, let us say lamely (but 
with a lameness which has perhaps its 
own emphasis), a misnomer. People 
set upon calling unchristian things 
Christian are simply washing all mean- 
ing out of the name. If everything 
that is called Christianity in these days 
is Christianity, then there is no such 
thing as Christianity. A name applied 
indiscriminately to everything, desig- 
nates nothing. 

WHAT OF "redemption?" 

The words "Redeem," "Redemp- 
tion," "Redeemer" are going the same 
way. When we use these terms in so 
comprehensive a sense — we are fol- 
lowing Kaftan's phraseology — that we 
understand by "Redemption" what- 
ever benefit we suppose ourselves to 
receive through Christ — no matter 
what we happen to think that benefit 
is — and call him "Redeemer" merely 
in order to express the fact that we 
somehow or other relate this benefit to 



By Benjamin B. Warfield 

In Princeton Theological Review 

him — no matter how loosely or un- 
essentially — we have simply evacuated 
the terms of all meaning, and would do 
better to wipe them out of our vocabu- 
lary. Yet this is precisely how modern 
Liberalism uses these terms. Sabatier, 
who reduces Christianity to mere altru- 
ism, Royce, who explains it in terms, 
of loyalty, Macintosh, who sees in it 
only morality — all still speak of it as 
a "Redemptive Religion," and all are 
perfectly willing to call Jesus still by 
the title of "Redeemer" — although 



some of them at least are quite free 
to allow that he seems to them quite 
unessential to Christianity, and Chris- 
tianity would remain all that it is, and 
just as truly a "Redemptive Religion," 
even though he had never existed. 

I think you will agree with me that 
it is a sad thing to see words liks these 
die like this. And I hope you will de- 
termine that, God helping you, you will 
not let them die thus, if any care on 
your part can preserve them in life and 
vigor. 






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The Larger Christian World 



A DEPARTMENT OF INTERDENOMINATIONAL ACQUAINTANCE 

IllllllllllllllllllllllUillllll 



By ORVIS F. JORDAN 



N. D. Hillis Works 
for the Liberty Loan 

Among the leading workers for the 
Liberty Loan in this country was Rev. 
Newell Dwight Hillis of New York. 
On May 21, he left his church in 
Brooklyn and went on a tour with 
other leading men through the south 
and southwest to the Pacific coast. He 
spoke thirty-two times in twenty-two 
cities and covered a distance of nine 
thousand miles in twenty-two days. 
The General Committee of the Ameri- 
can Bankers' Association speaks in 
the highest terms of his service. 

New York Will 
Remember Luther 

The citizens of New York wiH pay 
honor to Martin Luther in the Grand 
Central Palace in October, remember- 
ing four hundred years of history 
since the posting of the theses on the 
church door at Wittenberg. Local 
churches will exhibit the work they 
are doing and the great interdenom- 
inational agencies will also make an 
exhibit of their activities. The his- 
tory and achievements of Protestant- 
ism will be graphically set forth. 

Presid.ent's Son-in-law 
for France 

Mr. Francis B. Sayre, son-in-law of 
President Wilson, has been appointed 
by the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation as a representative of the As- 
sociation during the present war. He 
will go with the American troops and 
will sail with twenty-five other men 
chosen for this work. 

City Missions and 
Philanthropy 

The City Missionary Society of the 
Boston Congregationalists attends to 
philanthropy as well as the more con- 
ventional activities of city mission 
work. One of their special activities 
is the sending of mothers and chil- 
dren to the country for a week of rest. 
Last year 4,170 were given such a va- 
cation. This kind of service has been 
carried on for thirty-eight years. 

Bohemians Honor 
John Huss 

The Bohemians of Chicago cherish 
the memory of John Huss who is not 
only a symbol of Protestantism for 
many but also a symbol of the lib- 
erties of their people, won by such a 
price as martyrdom. The anniversary 
of the burning of the reformer was 
held this year in the Carter H. Harri- 



son school building and Rev. Vaclav 
Vanek was in charge of the program. 
Mr. Vanek is a city missionary work- 
ing under the Presbyterian board. 

Organize Missionary 
Society for. Russia 

The Presbyterians of New York 
have organized a missionary society 
to do work in Russia. It is thought 
that the new political conditions will 
bring a change in religious attitude 
favorable to Protestantism. 

Congregational 
Roof Garden 

The First Congregational church of 
Canton, Ohio, has opened a new 
building with a spacious roof garden 
which will hold more than a thousand 
people. An interesting feature of the 
opening was the presentation of a 
large United States flag by Betsy Ross 
Tent of the Daughters of Veterans. 
This flag will fly from the top of the 
church. The roof garden will be a 
community center for moral, social 
and civic uplift. 

Protestants of 
Indianapolis Speak 

Rev. M. C. Pearson is secretary of 
the Church Federation in Indianapolis 
and he writes a short sermon for the 
press every week. Since the war 
broke out he has been emphasizing 
the slogan, "Keep Indianapolis Mor- 
ally Clean." 

Federal Church 
Executive for Duluth 

The leading cities of the country 
are being organized for local federa- 
tion work and one of the latest cities 
to fall into line with modern meth- 
ods is Duluth. The Inter-Church 
Council of Duluth has employed Mr. 
W. L. Smithies as executive secretary. 
The newspapers of the city gave very 
favorable notice to this advance step. 

Towaird Church 
Union 

At the meeting of the Michigan 
Conference of the Congregational 
churches held in Jackson, May 15-17, 
a statement was presented from the 
Genesee Association, as reported by 
the Congregationalist. It included: 1. 
A United Church made up of denom- 
inations already dominated by the 
democratic spirit is both desirable and 
possible. 2. The action last January 
of the Commissions on Christian 
Unity of the Disciple and Congrega- 
tional churches, looking toward the 



organic union of these two denomina- 
tions, is commended. 3. The Con- 
gregational Commission on Christian 
Unity is requested to resume negotia- 
tions with the Methodist Protestant 
and United Brethren churches. 4. 
The request is made that the Baptist 
denomination be invited to join these 
four denominations in working out 
and putting into effect a mutually sat- 
isfactory plan of union. This was in- 
dorsed by the Michigan Congrega- 
tional Conference and ordered for- 
warded to the next meeting of the Na- 
tional Council of Congregational 
Churches. 

More "Quiet 
Hour" Talks 

S. D. Gordon, the author of the 
"Quiet Talks" books, is conducting a 
daily morning meeting, 10 to 10:45 
o'clock, from July 2 to September 4, 
at a prominent board walk theater at ' 
Atlantic City this summer. These 
meetings are supported by a commit- 
tee of the city's laymen, with the 
hearty co-operation of the ministers. 

President Wilson Places 
Tablet in Old Church 

The old Presbyterian church at 
Staunton, Va., was the one in which 
President Wilson's father was pastor 
at the time the future president was 
born. The building is being remod- 
eled and the president has asked the 
permission of the church to place a 
tablet in the remodeled building to 
the memory of his father. 

Bishop Oldham 
In America 

Bishop Oldham is the Methodist 
authority for Latin America and he 
is now in this country conferring with 
the secretaries of the Board of For- 
eign Missions of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. He will visit some 
camp meetings during the summer 
and will sail for Buenos Ayres in the 
fall. Mrs. Oldham is now in Buenos 
Ayres entertaining the bishop's call- 
ers. Bishop Oldham speaks as fol- 
lows with regard to the South Amer- 
ican situation: "The Republics of 
South America are greatly moved by 
the entrance of the United States into 
the war. Brazil and Bolivia immedi- 
ately joined hands with us. Argen- 
tina, which has suffered much from 
drought and locust and is very hard 
hit financially by the difficulty in ob- 
taining loans, is nevertheless steadily 
moving towards alignment with the 
Northern Republic." 



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Social Interpretations 



By ALVA W. TAYLOR 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



i/Vhat Is "Practical" 
Politics ? 

When an issue like that of prohi- 
)ition is mentioned we hear much 
alk about "practical politics." The 
)oliticians have always called it poor 
)ractical politics to tackle the booze 
ssue. Is it practical politics or mere 
;onventional statesmanship? Every 
)ractical consideration demands the 
elimination of booze as a war meas- 
ire. If it is logical to make army 
:amps and naval vessels bone-dry, 
,vhy is it not just as practical to 
nake the industrial army dry? Con- 
scription is based upon the theory 
;hat we are organizing a nation for 
ivar and the draft is only to enable us 
;o make scientific selection of those 
who can fight best and to enable us 
;o select those who can be spared 
from the quite as important business 
3f supplying the army and feeding 
the Allies ; thus, if efficiency requires 
a dry fighting force at the front, it 
also demands a dry fighting force 
behind the lines. The liquor indus- 
try employs something less than 
BOO.OOO men ; logic demands that 
they be released to take the places of 
the million and a quarter who are 
taken out of industry for the fighting 
lines. We must save all waste and 
economize until it hurts to feed the 
Allied armies and the nations behind 
them ; logic demands that we save 
the 11,000,000 loaves of bread and the 
vast amount of other food values 
that goes into booze, as well as make 
its army of employes and purveyors 
iproductive factors in the national 
iwartime economy. The housewife is 
jisked to save $700,000 from the gar- 
ijage can for the sake of national 
pconomy, yet we allow the booze 
lousiness to spend more than $3,000,- 
iX)0,000'per year over the booze pur- 
1/eyors' bar. 

I Practical politics, in terms of far- 
lieeing statesmanship, would have 
jibolished the booze business in peace 
jimes. But conventional statesman- 
j.hip never proceeds beyond certain 
)recedents, and the prohibition issue 
s too revolutionary for it. Russia's 
xample is furnishing powerful sane- 
ions to these conventional states- 
aen ; if Russia did it, we might do it, 
hey say. England has been able to 
urtail beer manufacture by some 
ixty per cent ; conventional states- 
lanship has been able to go thus far 
ecause the precedents were estab- 
shed in relation to other products, 
ut it has not dared to declare liquor 
ot a legitimate industry. Prudence 



doth make afraid. Liquor interests 
are interwoven into politics as the 
warp into the woof; thus "practical 
politics" stands in awe and fear. 



Not Pensions 
but Insurance 

The Carnegie Foundation has deter- 
mined to give up its pension scheme 
and substitute for it a scheme of in- 
surance for teachers. The motives 
behind the pension system were good, 
but time and the trying have demon- 
strated its errancy. It put all institu- 
tions not on the list at a discount in 
securing teachers and made it diffi- 
cult for a teacher to change from one 
school to another freely ; it left the 
great majority of teachers unprovided 
for and those with the poorest salaries 
at that. It is to be hoped that church 
funds now in process of accumulation 
will ultimately be administered in the 
same manner, i. e., as insurance funds 
rather than as pensions. The Carnegie 
Foundation's study and experience will 
no doubt be invaluable to their trustees 
and would seem to come in the nick of 
time — for these funds are as yet 
largely uncollected. The foundation 
will use its funds to lessen the cost of 
insurance but put the initiative up to 
the insurant and his school, and it will 
enable every school and every teacher 
to benefit by its plan. 

Life insurance is the greatest single 
co-operative enterprise in the land to- 
day. There are 40,411,979 policies in 
force, carrying insurance to the 
amount of $21,589,172,000. The Pres- 
byterian Minister's Fund, now open 
to pastors of all communions, ofl:ers 
the safest and most liberal insurance 
in existence for ministers, but it is 
able to do this only because it is con- 
fined to ministers and they, as a body, 
constitute a favored risk because of 
their clean living and an occupation 
that does not involve great risks of 
accident or disease. But there are 
many whose salaries are too meager to 
take advantage of it and few are able 
to carry enough insurance to guar- 
antee a subsistence income for old 
age. Here the church funds now be- 
ing raised could supplement and make 
assurance possible through their con- 
tributions and the supplementary 
sums given yearly by the churches. 

* * * 

The Minimum Cost of Living. By 
Winifred Stuart Gibbs. (93 pages. 
$1.00. Macmillans.) 
This is the latest of the several 

scientific books on the subject. Its 



subtitle is "A Study of Families of 
Limited Income in New York City." 
It is an intensive and protracted study 
of the budgets of seventy-five New 
York families with incomes ranging 
from $200 to $300 up to $1,100 to 
$1,200, the major portion of them 
running from $500 to $800. They 
were found to produce much more 
than the average of sickness and death 
and to end the average year with a 
deficit. By the application of scientific 
rationing health, mortality and deficit 
conditions were all greatly improved. 
The study is replete with tables show- 
ing conditions and improvements and 
the means adopted to secure them. It 
shows that much can be done to im- 
prove the conditions of the poor 
through education in regard to food 
and other expenditures. Much more 
could be done through a living wage. 

PROrERTY AND SOCIETY. By JudgC 

Andrew Alexander Bruce, of Su- 
preme Court of North Dakota. (150 
pages. 50c. McClurg & Co.) 
This little book is a weighty argu- 
ment for the constitutionality of 
modern social and industrial legisla- 
tion. It reviews the history of prop- 
erty and personal right and shows 
how modern conditions demand the 
steady delimitation of personal in 
favor of society's rights. In the de- 
velopment of American law and liberty 
there has never been any division on 
the question of the rights of human 
life as against that of property. In 
the construction of the law the courts 
have often been dependent upon prece- 
dent more than upon social welfare 
and thus, in many cases, failed for the 
time being to justify social legislation. 
Even in such cases as that of child 
labor they have upheld the law under 
the ancient theory that the child is 
the ward of the state, but Judge Bruce 
contends the right of the child to his 
own health and life and society's 
right in them for him should be 
the basis for upholding such laws ; 
thus the law could be made to 
apply to men as well as women and 
children. He reasons also in favor of 
conservation of natural resources, of 
national health, of the logic of liquor 
legislation and compensation for in- 
juries in industry, etc. This little 
book is a ringing brief for social legis- 
lation. 



Memorial L^nited Brethren Church 
of Dayton, O., has trained two Junior 
Endeavorers who have become mis- 
sionaries, one at home and the other 
abroad. 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 19, 1917 




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Sunday School 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



disappointed, weather-beaten, heart- 
H broken pilgrims He cries out: 
B "Come unto me, all ye that labor 
B and are heavy laden, and I will give 
p you rest." 



Soul - Satisfaction 

The Lesson in Today's Life* 
By CHARLES H. SWIFT 



GOD does not mock the nat- 
ural longings of man's soul. 
For every noble ambition He 
provides a way of satisfaction. He 
does not place in man's soul a deep 
yearning after the higher things of 
life only to disappoint him. Every 
necessity of nature has been pro- 
vided for. The great fountain of 
God sends forth perennial streams 
to which the thirsting soul may go 
and find satisfaction in the quench- 
ing water of life. God's gracious in- 
vitation is the expression of the di- 
vine desire to bless the human 
family in satisfying the hungry 
souls of men. 

The prophet's fertile figure be- 
comes impressive as one vividly 
imagines the hungering and thirst- 
ing body for those physical wants 
which alone can satisfy. These per- 
sistent and sometimes painful wants, 
which so readily find the means of 
satisfaction in God's well-ordered 
world, give us assurance that the 
deep-seated longings of the soul for 
spiritual things will not be in vain. 

* * >!: 

After all is said, man's deepest 
yearning is for God. He may de- 
ceive himself for a time in believing 
that he wants the things which be- 
long to this world; but the time 
comes when this becomes a mock- 
ery to him, for the cravings of his 
soul are for things more substan- 
tial, things which are eternal. Men 
spend a life-time in attaining that 
which, in the end, proves a curse. 

God's gracious invitation is given 
to a people who attempted to find 
happiness and satisfaction away 
from the eternal springs. Their so- 
cial, economic and religious life was 
all shot through with the rapidly 
growing selfishness of the day. 
Greed for gain and desire for promi- 
nence were shackling the hands of 
justice and drying up the springs 
of sympathy. The people were 
spending their money for bread 
which was no bread at all. What a 
tragedy in the perversion of human 
nature, when men will run them- 
selves to death in chasing soap bub- 
bles, allured only by the beautiful 

•This article is based on the Interna- 
tional Uniform Lesson for July 29, 
"God's Gracious Invitation." Scripture, 
Isaiah 55. 



colors reflected in the pearl-like sur- 
face. 

* * * 

This gracious invitation finds its 
counterpart in the teachings of Jesus 
relative to what is fundamental to 
life's happiness. That the soul 
which hungers and thirsts after 
righteousness will find happiness, is 
the divine conception of the great 
Teacher. Jesus is saying what God's 
invitation embodies, driving home 
the truth that only the adjustment 
of one's life to his whole environ- 
ment so as to experience no harsh 
and harrowing relationships with 
one's fellowmen will bring perma- 
nent happiness. How many actually 
experience a tugging at their hearts, 
a ceaseless gnawing of the soul, for 
a right relationship with God and 
fellowmen? 

Jesus knew the psychology of the 
soul and no doubt came in contact 
with men and women who could 
not find that peace and satisfaction 
which their souls craved. To these 



The world of today needs this di- 
vine invitation. The great soul of 
humanity is tossed upon the high 
seas of fearful foreboding and sneer- 
ing skepticism. Science, philosophy, 
art, literature, education, commerce, 
yea, all the substitutes which the 
soul of man has been feeding upon 
have come to nought, while the eter- 
nal hunger for God grows more in- 
tense. Greedy selfishness, malig- 
nant militarism and tyrannical autoc- 
racy are proving to be false gods. 
The sin-cursed heart and the sor- 
row-tossed soul of the world are 
pleading for that which can give 
permanent satisfaction. 

It is an opportunity for the proph- 
et's voice to be heard from our pul- 
pits : "Seek ye Jehovah while He 
may be found ; call ye upon Him i 
while He is near." It is an opportu- 
nity for the program of Jesus to be 
heralded forth as fundamental to the 
great need of world reconstruction. 
It is an opportunity for the dynamic 
spirit of the saving Christ to trans- 
form the lives of countless multi- 
tudes who are seeking rest from 
weariness of soul. It is an opportu- 
nity for the church to extend anew 
God's gracious invitation to a lost 
world. 

Christian Church, Carthage, Mo. 



Some Recent Books 



His Family. By Ernest Poole. 
When "The Harbor" appeared a year 
or two ago the author was greeted in 
many quarters as a writer of a "great 
American novel," even if this did not 
prove to be the "Great American 
novel" long looked for. In his second 
book, "His Family," is pictured a New 
York home in the rapidly changing 
environment of that cosmopolitan city. 
Some of the most vital problems of 
our present day city life are con- 
sidered — the home, motherhood, chil- 
dren, the school. Roger Gale is vividly 
drawn, with his sadness at the chang- 
ing circumstances of life and his final 
partial satisfaction in realizing his 
"immortality" in the lives of his three 
children. (Macmillan Company, New 
York. $1.50.) 

Six Major Prophets. By Edwin 
E. Slosson. "Comprehensive and il- 
luminating analyses" of six of the 
prophets of the modern age — Shaw, 
Wells, Chesterton, Eucken, F. C. S. 
Schiller and John Dewey. A compan- 
ion volume to Dr. Slosson's earlier 
work, "Major Prophets of Today." 



The author gives such treatment of 
these masters that the reader may, 
readily choose for himself which is 
best adapted to serve him as "guide, 
philosopher and friend." (Little, 
Brown & Company, Boston. $1.50 
net.) 

The Land of the Golden Man. 
By Anita B. Ferris. A volume of true 
stories about the people of South 
America. Thrilling stories of Indians 
which have more than a thrill. Some 
suggestions are offered for the use oi 
the book in Sunday school classes 
mission bands, etc. (Missionary Edu^ 
cation Movement of the United States' 
New York.) 

Ann of Ava. By Ethel D. Hubl 
bard. A charmingly written story ol 
the life of Ann Hasseltine Judson 
with pictures of early missionary worl 
in China as carried on by Adoniran 
Judson and his helpers. A valuabli 
book for use with young people' 
classes. (Missionary Education Move 
ment of the United States, Nev 
York.) 






July 19, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



17 



Disciples Table Talk 



Nebraska State 
Convention 

The Nebraska Christian Missionary 
Society will hold its fiftieth annual state 
convention July 30 to August 5 at Beth- 
any, Neb. This convention being the 
fiftieth in the history of the organized 
work of the Disciples in Nebraska, it 
has been designated as the Jubilee Con- 
vention. The last year has been one 
of the best in the history of the society. 
The year was begun with an indebted- 
ness of $1,600. The close of the year 
will find more than $1,000 in the treas- 
ury. A very aggressive program has been 
carried out during the year. Evangelists 
have been kept in the field constantly, 
pastors in strategic places have been 
given generous assistance, and persist- 
ent work has been done to increase the 
efficiency of the church work in all its 
departments. D. R. Dungan, of Glen- 
dale, Cal., will be present at the conven- 
tion. Mr. Dungan was the pioneer mis- 
sionary sent by the American Christian 
Missionary Society to do missionary 
work in Nebraska. He preached in Ne- 
braska as early as 1860. All Disciples in 
Nebraska and adjoining states are given 
an urgent invitation to attend this Jubi- 
lee Convention. 

* * * 

— Dr. H. L. Willett is spending three 
weeks at Chautauqua Lake, N. Y., and 
is delivering courses of lectures on the 
Bible. Dr. Willett is much improved 
in health in the past few weeks. 

— Mart Gary Smith of Ada, O., re- 
ports 32 accessions to the church there 
since his coming, 24 of these being 
by confession of faith. 

— Chester A. Snyder, pastor at Cen- 
tral Church, Salt Lake City, Utah, writes 
that several young men from Fort Doug- 
las have attended services there re- 
cently. Some have placed their member- 
ship with Central Church. Mr. Snyder 
would like to have names of soldiers 
located at the camp. He should be 
addressed at 618 Wilson avenue, Salt 
Lake City. 

— R. W. Wallace, who for the past 
two years has served as pastor at Lex- 
ington, Mo., has resigned this work and 
accepted the pastorate at Winder, Ga. 
The change is made chiefly in the inter- 
est of health. Mr. Wallace will remain 
in Lexington until October 1. 

— S. G. Fisher of the church at Min- 
neapolis recently visited Liberty, Mo., 
church, with a view to considering a 
call to the pastorate there. Mr. Fisher 
is a Missourian. 

— Dr. Paul Wakefield and family, of 
Lu Chow Fu, China, are now at Spring- 
field, III., and will remain in this country 
for a year's furlough. 

— The twenty-first annual meeting of 
the Campbell Institute will be held at 
the Hyde Park Church, Chicago, July 
25-27. As accommodations are limited, 
reservations should be sent to Edward 
A. Henry, University of Chicago. 

— E. C. Lacy, of the work at Walton, 
Ky., reports that the cornerstone of the 
new building was laid on July 14. There 
have been 10 additions to the church 
membership at recent services at the 
Walton church. 



— The Christian churches and Sunday 
schools of McLean county. 111., held a 
picnic at Miller Park, Bloomington, on 
June 28. The address of welcome was 
given by S. H. Zendt, Bloomington, and 
the reply by H. H. Peters, state secre- 
tary. President H. O. Pritchard of Eu- 
reka and R. E. Hieronymus of the 
University of Illinois were also present 
and delivered addresses. Both addresses 
were of a high order and were chal- 
lenges to the church to render a more 
vital and effective service during this 
time of crisis. L. B. Conrad, singing 
evangelist of Bloomington, had charge 
of the music. The fellowship was de- 
lightful and the day was enjoyable 
throughout. A committee was appointed 
to effect a permanent organization and 
to select officers for the ensuing year. 
There was a large number of persons 
present at the picnic. 

— The Men's Class of the Hamilton 
Avenue school, St. Louis, has been co- 
operating with all of the other depart- 
ments of that school in an advance 
movement which was started at the be- 
ginning of the year, shortly before the 
dedication of the new Sunday school 
building. Prior to the first of January, 
1917, the class had a regular attend- 
ance of about 20. They have more than 
doubled their attendance and now have 
an enrollment of almost 100. Their aim 
is a regular attendance of 100 men. 

— Word has been received, of the 
death of Thomas J. Randall, one of the 
oldest settlers of the Yakima Valley, and 
probably the first minister to come to 
Ellensburg, Wash. Mr. Randall died 
Tuesday at the home of his daughter, 
Mrs. Ida M. Craig, in White Bluff, 
Wash. He had been ill with pneumonia 
for two months. Mr. Randall was 
known in the valley as a Bible student 
and speaker of great charm. Old-timers 
say that he had preached more funeral 
sermons than any other minister who 
was ever in the valley. 

— The Board of Ministerial Relief of 
Indianapolis, Ind., reports a splendid 
gain in receipts for the nine months 
ending July 1. The total is $41,356, a 
gain of $15,054 over the same period 
last year. While there has been a fine 
advance in all sources of income, the 
chief gain is in Annuities, that must go 
into the Permanent Fund, and even so 
will yield no immediate net return. 
The Pension Roll has grown to 151, 
requiring $2,513 for the July payment 
and leaving only $168 in the treasury. 
Church treasurers and individual friends 
can save the day by prompt remittances. 

— George L. Anderson, Drake student- 
preacher, has accepted the work at Wa- 
pello, la. 

^The Loyal Bereans Class of the 
church at Indianapolis, la., has provided 
a five-years' scholarship in Drake for 
Miss Mona Reed, a graduate of the 
West Des Moines high school and a 
member of the Drake Volunteer Band. 

— George L. Snively had charge of 
the dedication of the Guthrie Center, 
la., church on July 8, and raised over 
$15,000 in cash and pledges, although 
but $12,000 was needed to clear the in- 
debtedness on the new $20,000 building. 
■W. F. Hurst is pastor at Guthrie Center. 

— J. L. Garvin is with the American 
Church Bureau as Director of Religious 



Forces. He conducts campaigns during 
which he organizes the work of a church 
and trains a manager to continue the 
methods permanently. He and his fam- 
ily are now located at Lakewood, O. 
This will be their home, though Mr. 
Garvin will be much on the road. 

— Jasper T. Moses, though a teacher 
in the high school at Pueblo, Colo., 
has been supplying the pulpit of Central 
Church, Pueblo, since March 1, when 
the pastor left. 

— Schools of Methods have been con- 
ducted at Bellefontaine, Mansfield and 
Columbus, O., in which more than 600 
people were enrolled and in which more 
than 80 local churches were represented. 

— At the Jasper County (Mo.) Assem- 
bly of Christian Churches, to be held 
at Lakeside July 24 to August 2, there 
will be a School of Methods in which 
lectures will be given by D. W. Moore, 
of Webb City; C. C. Garrigues, of Jop- 
lin; C. H. Swift, of Carthage; J. H. 
Jones, of Springfield; W. P. Shamhart, 
of Joplin, and others. C. H. Swift has 
charge of the sessions of the school. 
C. C. Garrigues has charge of the elders' 
and deacons' conference, in which Mr. 
Garrigues, Mr. Shamhart, Mr. Swift, Mr. 
Moore and Mr. Jones will have part 
on the program, and also R. W. Hoff- 
man, J. B. Briney and Dr. John Clark. 
A. W. Taylor of Columbia, Mo., will 
give a series of addresses at the rural 
church institute, also Professor A. C. 
Ragsdale, of the State University, and 
C. T. Patterson, of the State Poultry 
Station. There will be various attract- 
ive forms of recreation provided, in- 
cluding baseball, tennis, boating and 
swimming. W. P. Shamhart, of 1507 
Connor street, Joplin, Mo., should be 
written concerning the renting of tents 
for the assembly. 

— An adult class of the church at Fay- 
etteville. Ark., has been practically elim- 
inated by enlistments for the war. The 
superintendent of the school, W. B. 
Stelzner, states that on the first call 
of the President for defenders of the 



Baptisieal Suits 

We can make prompt shipments. 
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atisfactory in every way. Order by 
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Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St. Chicago, 111. 



Century Sebscribers! 

FORM THE HABIT 

Of Watching the Date Opposite 
Your Name on Your Wrapper 1 

IF the date is, for example, Jun 17 — 
that means that your subscription 
has been paid to June 1, 1917. 
Within two weeks from the time you 
send a remittance for renewal, your 
date should be set forward. This is 
all the receipt you require for subscrip- 
tion remittances. If the date is not 
changed by the third week, or if it is 
changed erroneously, notify us at once 

WATCH YOUR DATE! 

The Christian Century 

700 E. 40th Street, Chicago 



18 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 19, 1917 



nation, practically every man in the class 
responded. Just two are left. 

— The Montana State Convention held 
in Bozeman, June 18-21, was pronounced 
among the best, if not the very best, 
ever held by the Disciples in the state. 
There were eighty-three delegates and 
visitors from points outside of Boze- 
man in attendance. Chief among the 
speakers were Mrs. Terry King of 
Texas, Walter Menzies of India, Roy 
Roadruck of Spokane, Wash.; W. J. 
Clarke and Grant K. Lewis of Cincin- 
nati, O. The reports of the superintend- 
ent of missions, J. E. Parker, indicated 
good work done. A fine body of young 
men have recently come into the min- 
istry of the Montana churches. 

— Vaughan Dabney, of Durham, N. H., 
came to Chicago recently to read the 
marriage service for his sister. While 
here he supplied Dr. Ames' pulpit at 
Hyde Park on June 17. 

—Dean F. O. Norton, of Drake, is 
teaching New Testament Greek and 
Septuagint Greek in the University of 
Chicago this summer. 

^ — The churches and the Y. M. C. A. of 
Keokuk have put up a tent at the camp 
of "Co. L." supplying it with piano,. 
Edison machine and records, writing 
material, tables, chairs, etc. They also 
furnish a program each Tuesday and 
Friday. Wallace R. Bacon, pastor at 
Keokuk, is taking an active part in these 
camp activities. 

— S. G. Buckner, of Somerset, Pa., 
was called to succeed J. H. MacCartney 
at Modesto, Cal., and accepted. Then 
the Somerset church roused itself and 
after some correspondence persuaded 
the Modesto church to release Mr. Buck- 
ner from his acceptance so that he 
might continue at Somerset, Pa. He 
continues at Somerset with an increase 
in salary. 



A Church Home f©r You. 
Write Dr. Finis Idleman, 
142 West 81st St., N. Y. 



— D. W. Moore, pastor at Webb City, 
Mo., reports a patriotic service at the 
church there on July 1. In the morn- 
ing there was a flag-raising, two national 
flags and a Christian Conquest flag be- 
ing raised to position with impressive 
exercises. Judge Frank Forlow, of 
Webb City, delivered an address on 
"The Flag," and the pastor followed 
with a brief address on the history and 
meaning of the Christian Conquest flag. 
Mr. Moore believes that the two flags 
should be made to wave side by side, 
on the ground that "no nation has yet 
survived the loss of its religion." The 
Webb City church has recently made 
an offering of $55 for Red Cross work, 
and passed its apportionment for both 
bejievolences and the foreign work. 

— E. A. Cole, pastor at Knoxville, 
Pittsburg, reports that the congregation 
there is contemplating some needed im- 
provements on the building for August. 
There were seven additions to the mem- 
bership at Knoxville recently. In a fine 
exchange meeting held by E. N. Duty, 
of Charleroi, Pa., there were nine con- 
fessions of faith and eleven accessions 
by letters as results of the efifort. 

— A. W. Taylor, of Columbia, Mo., is 
delivering a series of lectures at Phil- 
lips University, Enid, Okla., this week 
on social service themes. 

— In the death of Dr. William S. 
Woods the college at Fulton, Mo., which 
bears his name, comes into prominence 



THE BIBLE COLLEGE OF MISSOURI 

A biblical school of high grade. At Columbia, Mo. Adjacent to the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, and affiliated with it. Interchange of credits. No 
tuition. Non-Missourians $20 per year in University. Fine student preaching 
opportunities. For catalogue or information, write 

G. D. EDWARDS, Dean, •.• *.• *.• COLUMBIA, MO. 



with the largest bequest ever left by 
a member of the Christian church to the 
cause of education. He left one-half 
million for its permanent endowment 
fund in addition to the quarter of a 
million or more he has given through 
the years to this college. William 
Woods College will be the best endowed 
woman's college of any church west of 
Philadelphia, only seven schools in the 
country possessing a larger fund. It 
will enable this school to do a larger 
work than even its most ardent friends 
have ever wished for it. 

— H. W. Flunter, of the Wellington, 
Kan., church, was secretary and pub- 
licity man for the Red Cross War Fund 
campaign for all Sumner county. The 
work *was well done, for with an as- 
signment of $38,000 for the county, $55,- 
000 was reached. Many complimentary 
things were said about the work of Mr. 
Plunter, both as to secretarial and pub- 
licity work. Wellington raised $18,000 of 
the above amount. During this campaign 
Mr. Hunter moved his desk to Red 
Cross headquarters. 

— W. F. Turner has just completed 
five years of service at North Yakima, 
Wash. During this period 897 new 
members have been received into the 
congregation, 404 of these last year; 87 
since January 1 at regular services. 
Over 300 were received during the Kel- 
lems evangelistic meetings. Assisted by 
J. W. Tapp, Mr. Turner has conducted 
three home force meetings in four years. 
The Sunday school at North Yakima, 
which Mr. Turner superintends, has the 
largest attendance of any school in 
Washington, Idaho or Montana. The 
C. W. B. M. organization has 101 mem- 
bers, the largest in Washington; this 
supports a "living link." There are two 
Christian Endeavor societies. This 
church was organized 37 years ago at 
Yakima City and later was moved to 
North Yakima. There are now nearly 
1,500 names on the membership list, all 
being resident. Mr. Turner was re- 
cently given the degree of D. D. by 
Eugene Bible University. The school 
had conferred this degree but four times 
in twenty years. 

■ — The V/ellington, Kans., church sup- 
ports the vv^ork of V. C. Carpenter in 
Porto Rico. In a letter that the church 
received lately he states that there was 
every indication that the Island would 
go "Dry" when it voted on this prop- 
osition on July 16th. Mr. Carpenter 



says that the work of the church in 
Porto Rico is doing well. The church 
at Wellington is happy in being able to 
keep up his salary. 

— O. F. Jordan, of the church at Evans- 
ton, 111., has been appointed by the 
local mayor a director of the Evanston 
Public Library, and will give his efforts 
to the work of the book and library 
extension committee. 

— Bethany Assembly has secured for 
the opening Lord's Day evening, July 
29, an illustrated lecture by Prof. W. 
E. Michelon, of Paris, on "How We 
Live in the Trenches in France." Over 
100 views taken on the field will be 
presented. Prof. Michelon speaks En- 
glish fluently, and comes to this country 
as a special lecturer for the French gov- 
ernment in the interest of the Red 
Cross. 




A School 



of which the Christian Church 

13 owner. Property vested in the 
Christian Missionary Society of 
Missouri. 

Comprehensive courses, wonderful equip- 
ment. Individual attenLicn to every student. 
Send for Catalog. 

Jos. A. Serena, President, 

Box 100. Fiiltsin, Mo. 




TWO BOOKS 

By Professor W- S. Athearn 

Every Pastor, Superintendent and 

Teacher Should Have 

The Church School. $1 .00 net. 
Organization and Adminis- 
tration of the Church School. 

30c net. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St., CHICAGO 



SIX GREAT BOOKS 

El Supremo. — White. A thrilling story of South America $1.90 net 

History of the Great War. — Conan Doyle. Vol. I. Every scholarly man will 

wish to possess this great history. Purchase Vol. I now $2.00 net 

Aspects of the Infinite Mystery. — Gordon. A profoundly spiritual volume, 

interestingly written $1,50 net 

What the War Is Teaching. — Jefferson. One of the greatest books the war 

has brought forth $1.00 net 

The Bible and Modern Life. — Cooper. A rich mine for ministers $1.00 

Applied Religion for Every Man. — Nolan Rice Best. For ministers who live 

in the today $1.00 net 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 E. 40lh Street, Chicago 



July 19, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



19 



REJOICING IN ANXIETY 

Comparative Statement of Ministerial 
Relief Receipts, Oct. 1st to July 1st 



1916 

Churches $11,983 

Bible schools... 1,992 
Individuals, Men 

and Millions 

Movement . . . 1,700 
Interest and rent 2,813 

Estates 1,560 

Annuities 6,200 

Conventions, etc. 55 



1917 
$13,667 
3,762 



3,221 
2,880 
1,250 
15,500 
1,076 



Gain 
$1,685 
1,770 



1,521 
67 
*310 
9,300 
1,031 



Totals $26,302 $41,356 $15,054 

*Loss. 

Over against the encouragement that 
comes from such a fine showing is the 
grim fact that, when the pension checks, 
151 of them, went out last week, carry- 
ing $2,513, they reduced our bank bal- 
ance to $168. You see over $16,000 of 
this year's splendid receipts had to go 
into the Permanent Fund, only the in- 
terest on which can be used. 

The July quarterly remittances of the 
churches that follow the budget system 
faithfully are helping us to meet the 
season that formerly brought in very 
little money. If individual friends will 
also rally promptly we can get through 
the summer without borrowing. Of 
course, we cannot stop or reduce pay- 
ments to the Veterans of our Lord in 
such times as these. 

Board of Ministerial Relief 
W. R. Warren, Sec. 

120 E. Market St., Indianapolis, Ind. 



BIBLE CONFERENCE WEEK AT 
BETHANY ASSEMBLY 

This week, the last of the Assembly, 
will be the climax of_ the 1917 session. 
Large numbers of ministers are expected 
to be in attendance to hear the series 
of lectures: C. C. Morrison, editor The 
Christian Century, upon the subject, 
"The Disciples and Christian Union"; 
the two series of addresses by Mr. and 
Mrs. John E. Pounds, Hiram, Ohio; 
the continuation of the two series of 
lectures by Prof. E. E. Snoddy on "The 
Apostolic Church," and "The Psychol- 
ogy of Human Behavior"; the illustrated 
lecture by Orvis F. Jordan, Chicago, on 
"The History and Achievements of the 
Disciples of Christ"; the lecture recital 
by Julius Caesar Nayphe, an interpreta- 
tion of the Twenty-third Psalm, and 
other lectures which, for lack of space, 
we do not mention. Mr. Morrison will 
deliver the Commencement address for 
the Bible Training School on Friday 
evening, August 17. There will be a 
pageant, "Kanjunda," under the direc- 
tion of Miss Lucy King De Moss, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, on the evening of August 
15. Prof. Alvin Roper, Winona Lake, 
who is to teach for ten days in the Sing- 
ers' School, will give a concert on the 
evening of August 13. 

The National Evangelistic Congress 
will also meet during this week at Beth- 
any. The program, which is a strong- 
one, will begin on Tuesday, August 14, 
and close Thursday afternoon, Au- 
gust 15. 



THE ILLINOIS DISCIPLES 
FOUNDATION 

The board of directors of the Illinois 
Disciples' Foundation met at the Uni- 
versity Place Church of Christ, Cham- 
paign, Monday, July 9. The report of 
Luceba E. Miner, field secretary for 
the Foundation, was quite encouraging. 
It showed for the past ten months $2,346 
m cash and $10,343 in pledges. The 



aiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiugtegiiiiiiiiiiiiieiieuiiesiseiiiiiHiiiiiiiisniasH^^ 

3 I 

I The Composition of Coca-Cola | 

I and its Relation to Tea | 

S Prompted by the desire that the public shall S 

5 be thoroughly informed as to the composi- B 

S tion and dietetic character of Coca-Cola, the ^ 

E Company has issued a booklet giving a de- S 

S tailed analysis of its recipe which is as follows : § 

5 Water, sterilized by boiling (carbonated); S 

S sugar, granulated, first quality; fruit flavoring S 

3 extracts with caramel; acid flavorings, citric ^ 

5 (lemon) and phosphoric; essence of tea — the S 

S refreshing principle, S 

= The following analysis, by the late Dr. John S 

5 W. Mallet, Fellov/ of the Royal Society and S 

E for nearly forty years Professor of Chemistry S 

s in the University of Virginia, shov/s the com- S 

S parative stimulating or refreshing strength of ™ 

E tea and Coca-Cola, measured in terms of the S 

s refreshing principle: § 

i Black tea— 1 cupful 1.54 I 

= (hot) (5 iJ. oz.) S 

S Green tea — 1 glassful __ 2.02 i 

S icold) (.8 f!. oz. exclusive of ice) n 

S Coca-Cola— 1 drink, 8 fi. oz 1.21 1 

■■ (.fountain) (prepared with 1 fl. oz. Syrup) ™ 

I Coca- Cola—1 drink, 8 fi. oz 1.12 s 

S {.bottleist) (prepared with 1 i?. oz. Syrup) ^ 

E From the above recipe and analysis, which arc ~ 

E confirmed by all chemists who have analyzed E 

E these beverages, it is apparent that Coca-Cola § 

E is a carbonated, fruit-flavored modification of s 

= tea of a little more than one-half its stimulat- S 

E ing strength. s 

S A copy of the booklet referred to above will s 

E be mailed free on request, and The Coca-Cola s 

s Company especially invites inquiry from E 

E those who are interested in pure food and E 

E public health propaganda. Address E 

I The Coca-Cola Co., Dept. J., Atlanta, Ga., U. S. A. | 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiR 



Foundation has employed two student 
helpers for part-time for the past few 
years, but with the opening of the new 
year at the university a young woman 
will be employed full time to work 
among the women of the university. 
The feeling was quite general among the 
members of the board that the funds 
would justify the employment of a stu- 
dent pastor in co-operation with Uni- 
versity Place Church. This may not 
be done this year, but a committee was 



appointed to take the question up with 
University Place Church. 

The Foundation does not concern it- 
self with securing students for the uni- 
versity. If a vote were taken, every 



CHURCH iitillM SCHOOL 



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THE C. S. BELL CO., HILLSBORO, OHIO 



Don't Let Your School Slump! 

Send 75c for 100 assorted "Attendance Builder" post cards, 
and try them on your class. They will build up and keep up 
your attendance. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



20 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 19, 1917 



member of the board would vote en- 
thusiastically that all our young people 
should attend Eureka College. But in 
spite of our vote, a large number of 
them would go to the university. Among 



Chairs, Tables, etc. 
for Sunday School 



U ij ' i M 




Send for Our Catalog. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY. 

700 E. 40th Street, Chicago. 



the more than five thousand students 
at the University of Illinois at least five 
hundred are connected in some way 
with our homes. Last year there were 
four hundred members of the Christian 
Church attending the University of Illi- 
nois. It was the desire to help make 
religion effective in the lives of these 
young people that brought the Founda- 
tion into existence and that inspires its 
every activity. We feel that we are 
at the beginning of a great movement 
in behalf of religious education in uni- 
versity circles in Illinois. 

Publicity Committee 



The Peerless Communion Service 



Patented 
Aug. 10, 1910 




Send for our complete circular 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St. Chicago, 111. 



FRIENDLY TOWN 

By Thomas Curtis Clark. 

"Real heart-music." — Chicago Herald. 

"Breathes a spirit of joyous living." — 
Chicago Examiner. 

"Every line makes for love and kindli- 
ness and better living." — The Advance. 

"Has an elusive charm." — St. Louis 
Times. 

"Full of good things." — Christian En- 
deavor World. 

"Breathes a spirit of content." — Sara 
Teasdale. 

"Full of inspiration". — Charles G. 
Blanden, Editor of "The Chicago Authology 
of Verse." 

"Charming." — People's Home Journal. 

Of the author of "Friendly Town," J. H. 
Garrison, Editor- Emeritus of the Christian- 
Evangelist, says: 

"Now and then God raises up a singer 
among the people vifho is endowed with a 
rare gift of poetic _ vision, poetic feeling 
and poetic expression. Thomas Curtis 
Clark is finely endowed in all these re- 
spects." 

"Friendly Town," printed in art type 
and bound in attractive green, makes an 
ideal gift. If you have a friend^ who 
needs cheering up, send her "Friendly 
Town." 

Price of the booklet, 35 Cents. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40lh Street, Chicago 



Acme S. S. Register Board 






\L:mmtmM 



t.jaaki a aatikWJW.tj^iasH-T^.tit'WJWBMHiHriga 






wm§ 



ifti 




A practical and mcxpensivc board 
with which comparative records may 
be made. Is of ash. Size, 30 inches high, 
21 inches wide, 3-4 inch thick. The fol- 
lowing cards and figures make up the 
outfit: Register of Attendance and 
Collection, Eegister of Attendance and 
Offering, Number on the Roll, Atten- 
dance Today, Attendance a Year Ago 
Today, Collection Today, OfTering To- 
day, Collection a Year Ago Today, 
Offering a Year Ago Today, Collection 
Last Sunday, Offering Last Sunday, 
Attendance Last Sunday, Hymns, 
Record Collection, Record Offering, 
Record Attendance, Psalm. Also six ' 
each, of figures 1 to 0, inclusive. Let- 
ters and figures are white on black 
background, 3 5-8 inches high. 
<S f Price, $3.00. Delivery Extra. 
DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 
700 East 40th St. : Chicago, 111. 



Wall Charts 
For Elementary Grades 

In Bible Literature no more im- 
portant compositions have been written 
which are absolutely necessary to be in- 
grafted in the heart than the follow- 
ing: The Lord's Prayer. The Ten Com- 
mandments. The Beatitudes. The 
Books of the Bible. The 23d Psalm. 

The Eilers editions are printed on the 
best material, with the largest, clearest 
letters that can be read the greatest 
distance, making them superior to any 
other. In ordering specify Eilers edi- 
tions sent prepaid on receipt of price. 

The lord's Prayer 37x37, Red border, 
large letters^ that can be read from 40 
to ,60 feet. Map Paper Cloth back on 
Boilers, $1.50: on Linen Finish, $1.00. 

The Ten Commsisdinents and Sum- 
mary. Eilers largo Type Edition, 37x60, 
beautifvd, clear letters. Red line border 
and headings. Paper, cloth back with 
rollers, $2.00. On Linen Finish Cloth, 
$1.25. Eilers Large Edition, 60x85. 
Mounted, $5.00; on I\Iuslin, $2.50. 

The Books of the Bible. Size, 37x60. 
Arranged in regular order, yet divided 
so as to show the Pentateuch, the His- 
torical Poetical and Prophetical Books, 
etc. Map Paper Cloth Back, on Rollers, 
$2.00; on Linen Finish Cloth, $1.00. 

The Beatitudes 37x60. Eilers Large 
Type Edition. P'aragrnphs Alternating 
in red and black print, for responsive 
service. Mounted like map, $2.00. Lin- 
en Finish Cloth, $1.00. 

The 23rd Psalm. 37x57 large, black 
letters. Map Paper, Mounted like Map, 
$1.50. Oln Linen Finish Cloth, $1.00. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 E /joth St., Chicago. 



Collection Plates 




WOODEN COLLECTION PLATES 
IMITATION BLACK WALNUT. 

Imitation walnut, velvet lined; 10 
inches in diameter, Pi'ice, $1.25 each. 
12 inches in diameter, $1.50 each. Ex- 
pressage extra. 

OAK, HOLLOW RIM, COLLECTION 
PLATES, 

Oak, hollow rim, velvet lined; 10 
inches in diameter, a handsome plate. 
Price, $2.00 each. 12 inches in 
diameter, $2.50 each. Expressage ex- 
tra. 

QUARTERED OAK AND BLACK WAL- 
NUT HOLLOW RIM COLLEC- 
TION PLATES. 
A finer gi-ade plate, made of light, 
quartered oak, or solid black walnut, 
plush lined. The rim is hollow, giving a 
rich appearance. Two sizes, 10 inches 
in diameter, $2.50 each; expressage ex- 
tra. 12 inches in diameter, $3.00 each; 
expressage extra. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION 
SOCIETY 

700 East 40th St. : 



Chicago 



July 19, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



21 



''Kraoplate" Blackboards and Material 






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"Kraoplate" Blackboards are made ol 4-pIy wood pulp, ce- 
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3 x4 ft " 8.00 

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Disciples Publication Society, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



BOOKS ON EVANGELISM 

Recruiting for Christ — John Timothy Stone. Hand-to-Hand^ Methods 

with Men. $1.00 net. 
The Real Billy Sunday— "Ram's Horn" Brown. $1.00 net. 
The Soul- Winning Church — Len G. Broughton. 50c net. 
The How Book — Hudson. Methods of Winning Men. 50c net. 
Thirty-One Revival Sermons — Banks. $1.00 net. 
Pastoral and Personal Evangelism — Goodell. $1.00 net. 
Revival Sermons — Chapman. $1.00. 

As Jesus Passed By — Addresses by Gipsy Smith. $1.00 net. 
Saved and Kept — F. B. Meyer. Counsels to Young Believers. |50c net. 



THE 

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Attractl7e and Dnrable. Mada of 

Glass and Alnmlnam. All 

the Money In Slfflit. 

The top and bottom plates are 
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These are held together by 4 oxi- 
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The bank is opened by unscrewing 
one of the bottom balls that is 
marked with a Cross. 

Price, 91.25; or $1.40 postpaid 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 
700 i:. 40tli St., Chicasro, zu. 



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The lame men who originally huill Ihe Typewriter in this lebnilding and do tlie work just as good. 

50% NEW PARTS AND THREE YEARS' GUARANTEE 

We offer a rebuilt Fox Typewriter Model No. 24 — just like new — for $65.00. These have 
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and cleaning outfits, and are guaranteed for three years the same as new ones, and to have not 
less than fifty per cent of new parts. 
Send any amount you can spare, from $5.00 up, as a first payment, and pay tlie balance 
$5.00 monthly. 5 per cent discount for all cash. Purchaser must pay transportation. If $10.00 ^ 
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22 . " THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY * July 19, 1917 



HYMNS OF THE 
UNITED CHURCH 

The Disciples Hymnal 



A Pronounced Success 

THE publishers regard this Hymnal as the most importani 
single contribution they have ever made to the Disciplei 
of Christ and the general Church. The widespread and cage 
interest in the appearance of this notable work and the alread; 
large sale of the book to churches and individuals mark th 
new hymnal not only as a present success, but also as a perma 
nent and much appreciated possession of the Disciples of Chrisi 

HYMNS OF THE UNITED CHURCH contains all the great hymn 
which have become fixed in the habits and affections of the Disciples, and add 
thereto the great catholic hymns whose use by our churches has not been er 
couraged by previous compilers. 

In addition, the new book is distinguished by three outstanding features 

Hymns of Christian Unity 
Hymns of Social Service 
Hymns of the Inner Life 

These three features give Hymns of the United Church a modernness ( 
character and a vitality not found in any other book. This hymnal is alive! 

Great care has been bestowed on the "make-up" of the pages. They ai 
attractive to the eye. The hymns seem almost to sing themselves when th 
book is opened! The notes are larger than are usually employed in hymnal 
The hymns are not crowded together on the page. No hymn is smothered i 
a corner. The words are set in bold and legible type, and all the stanzc 
are in the staves. Everything has been done to make a beautiful hymnal. 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 



July 19, 1917 THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 23 

4n Epoch-Making Forward Step 

for the 



Disciples of Christ! 



Aids to Worship 

Supplementing the hymns are 100 pages of responsive 
Jcripture Readings and other aids to Worship. The Readings 
ire topically selected, and so arranged as to give naturalness 
o the responses. The American Standard Version is used. 
Orders of Worship, special forms for the communion service, 
md many prayers, responses and sentences topically arranged 
ire in this department. 

The Construction of the Book 

The Disciples Hymnal is a delight to the eye and to the hand. A half- 
lozen of the best hymnals in existence were taken to one of the best printing 
louses in the United States with instructions to make a better book than any 
)ne of them. No expense was spared. The plates were cast from new type 
pecially purchased for this hymnal. The paper is the best and of good color, 
rhe binding is most attractive. Every device known to the binder's art has 
)een used for the strengthening of the back. Old fashioned tapes have been 
eplaced by cloth running the entire length of the back, and by reinforcements 
)f the first and last signatures. The book is made to last a long time! 

Price, per single copy, in cloth, $1,15; in half -leather, $1.40. 

Especially attractive introductory terms to churches purchasing in quan- 
ities are being made in the early days of the first edition. Returnable samples 
ent to ministers and music committees on request. Write us today. 



700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO, ILL. 



The Bethany System 

OF 

Sunday School Literature 

Some Typical Graded Courses 

THE BIBLE AND SOCIAL LIVING. Prepared by Harry F. Ward, who probably 
stands first in the list of social service authorities within the church. 

THE WORLD A FIELD FOR CHRISTIAN SERVICE. This course of study has as 
its purpose to train youth for genuine service in the world of today. Inspirational, 
educational, practical. 

CHRISTIAN LIVING. What it means to be a Christian; problems of Christian living; 
the Christian and the church ; the Word of God in life. An ideal course for Inter- 
mediates. 

HISTORY OF NEW TESTAMENT TIMES. Teaches the young people how the 
church started, with vivid pictures of the backgrounds of its history. 

HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE HEBREW PEOPLE. Before the life of 
Christ can be understood, there must be a knowledge of the history of the Hebrews. 
In this course the story is told in an attractive way, but thoroughly. 

Special Courses 

For Young People and Adults 

THE TRAINING OF CHURCH MEMBERS. A manual of Christian service intended 
for classes of new converts, adult or young people's Sunday school classes, pastor's 
classes, midweek services, etc. This little book has made a deep impression upon 
the church life of the Disciples. Send for free sample copy. 

THE LIFE OF JESUS. By Dr. Loa E. Scott. A question and answer review of the 
life of the Master, requiring close study of the Scriptures themselves. Many large 
classes have been built up by interest in this course. Send 50 cents for copy. Sells 
at 40 cents in lots. 

MORAL LEADERS OF ISRAEL. By Dr. H. L. Willett. An ideal course for adult 
classes which have a serious desire to master the facts of Old Testament life. Price 
per copy, $1.00. 

THE GOSPEL OF THE KINGDOM. A monthly magazine of social service founded 
by Dr. Josiah Strong. Treats present day problems in most ■attractive fashion. A 
fine course for men's classes. 75 cents single subscription; 50 cents per year in clubs, 
if ordered by the year. Send for free sample copy. 

These are only a few of the excellent study courses afiforded by 
the Bethany Graded System. Send for returnable samples of the 
Bethany Graded Lessons, and for copies of any of the special courses 
which interest you . 

THE SUNDAY SCHOOL MUST TAKE ITSELF SERIOUSLY IN THIS CRIT- 
ICAL ERA OF OUR COUNTRY'S HISTORY. RELIGIOUS EDUCATION IS THE 
ONLY "WAY OUT." YOU ARE CRIMINALLY NEGLIGENT IF YOU DO NOT 
SEE THAT YOUR SCHOOL HAS THE VERY BEST EQUIPMENT POSSIBLE 
FOR ITS IMPORTANT WORK. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 East 40th Street CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



I 



II Hill II lllllllllll II III I 




•aiMaeiiiMHMaaiaiiiliBMBaiaMaMiaaaHBMiMaMMka 



■ 



Vol. XXXIV 



July 26, 1917 



Number 30 



The Church 

and the 

New Democracy 

By Raymond Robins 




THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY July 26, 1917 

FB m 

HAVE YOU READ 

FAIRHOPE 

A NEW NOVEL 
BY EDGAR DEWITT JONES 



iiritiiiiiiJiiiiiuiiiniiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiuuiniiiniiiuiiii 



Fairhope folks are mighty human, but you 
will like them all the better for that. 

Major Menifee may remind you of Colonel 
Carter of Cartersville. You will love Jacob 
Boardman, the modern Enoch. And even 
Giles Shockley will not repel you, "Hound 
of the Lord" though he was. 

Everyone knows that the old style of 
country church is passing forever. But 
what type of church will take its place? 
Read the chapter entitled **The Old Order 
Changeth" and meet the Reverend Roger 
Edgecomb, Prophet of the new order. 

Do you like birds and stretches of meadows, 
glimpses of lordly river, and the glory of 
high hills? Do you like young preachers and 
old time country folks, their humors, their 
foibles and their loyalties? If you do, then 
you should read 

"Fairhope, the Annals 
of a Country Church" 

Price, $1.25 

Order NOW, enclosing remittance 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th Street, Chicago, 111. 

IE a 



July 26, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



anbtmt ptl itm Prtoe~Two Aoilan and 
• kaU a {Mr, payabl* etrlGtlr la 
Bdvaoce. To minlaterg, two dollars 
wh«B paid In advance. Canadian 
BUbacrlptlons, CO cents additional for 
poatare. Forelrn, 11.00 additional. 
DtMontlaimiioea — In order that aub- 
■orlbera may not ba annoyed by 
(ailnre to receive the paper. It la 
not dlBcontlnued at expiration of 
time paid In adranoe (vnleaa ao 
ordered), but continued pendins In- 
atruetlon from the snbscrtber. If 
discontinuance la desired, prompt 
notice abould be aent and all ar- 
rearagea paid. 

OhaBffo •( addres*— In ordering 
chance of addreas give the old as 
well as the new. 




PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 
IN THE INTEREST OF THE KINGDOM OF GOD 



Exptratloiis— Tha date an the wrap* 
per ahowa the month mxk€ year te 
which Bubsorlption la paid. Llift U 
revised monthly. Chanr* •t Cat* 
on wrapper is a receipt far ramlt- 
tanoe on aubscrlptlon account. 

Remittances — Should be aent by 
draft or money order, payable to 
The DIsciplea Publication Society. 
If local check ia sent, add ten 
cents for exchange charged ua by 
Chicago banka 

Bntered as Second-Class Matter 
Feb. 28, 1902, at the Postofflce, Chi- 
cago, Illinois, under Act of March 
3, 1879. 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY. PROPRIETORS, 



700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO 



Disciples 
Publication 



The Disciples Publica- 
tion Society is an or- 
ganization through 
Cnrlafv ^¥^\^ churches of the 

aOCieiy Disciples of Christ 

seek to promote un- 
denominational and constructive 
Christianity. 

The relationship it sustains to Dis- 
ciples organizations is intimate and 
organic, though not official. The So- 
ciety is not a private institution. It 
has no capital stock. No individuals 
profit by its earnings. 

The charter under which the So- 
ciety exists determines that whatever 
profits are earned shall be applied to 
agencies which foster the cause of 
religious education, although it is 
clearly conceived that its main task 
is not to make profits but to produce 
literature for building up character 
and for advancing the cause of re- 
ligion. • o • 

The Disciples Publication Society 



regards itself as a thoroughly unde- 
nominational institution. It is organ- 
ized and constituted by individuals 
and churches who interpret the Dis- 
ciples' religious reformation as ideally 
an unsectarian and unecclesiastical 
fraternity, whose common tie and 
original impulse are fundamentally the 
desire to practice Christian unity with 
all Christians. 

The Society therefore claims fel- 
lowship with all who belong to the 
living Church of Christ, and desires to 
cooperate with the Christian people 
of all communions, as well as with the 
congregations of Disciples, and to 
serve all. « • ♦ 

The Christian Century desires noth- 
ing so much as to be the worthy or- 



gan of the Disciples* movement. It 
has no ambition at all to be regarded 
as an organ of the Disciples' denom- 
ination. It is a free interpreter of the 
wider fellowship in religious faith and 
service which it believes every church 
of DisciiJles should embody. It 
strives to interpret all communions, as 
well as the Disciples, in such terms 
and with such sympathetic insight as 
may reveal to all their essential unity 
in spite of denominational isolation. 
The Christian Century, though pub- 
lished by the Disciples, is not pob- 
lished for the Disciples alone. It is 
published for the Christian world. It 
desires definitely to occupy a catholic 
point of view and it seeks readers in 
all communions. 



3ac 



'■ !■"- ' 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 7M EAST 40th STRBET. CHICAGO. 

Dear Frhinda: — I beHere in the spirit and purposes of The Christian Ceafury and wbk to b« nuabered snsag 
thioee who are supporting your work ia a subataatiai way by their gifts. 



Enclosed please fiad 
$ 



Name..., 
Address. 



sac 



3BSSSSSSB& 



Great Books by Disciple Authors 

HISTORY OF THE DLSCIPLES OF CHRIST. By W. T. Moore. A comprehelisive etory 
of the Disciples' movement from the early days to the present. A sumptuous volume 
of 700 pages, beautifully printed and bound, and sold by the original publishers, 
Revell's, at $4, $5, and $6 for cloth, half morocco and full morroco respectively. We 
now offer this great work for $2.50, $3.50 and $4.00. The pictures in the book are 
alone worth the price of the volume. Only a limited number in hand. Order today. 

THE MEANING OF BAPTISM. By Charles Clayton Morrison. The Now York Christian 
Advocate says of this book: '"The Meaning of Baptism' is probably the most im- 
portant book in English on the place of baptism in Christianity written since Mozley 
published his 'Baptismal Regeneration' in 1856." Says The Homiletic Review: "The 
spirit of the book is delightful and raises new hopes Avhere none had seemed possible " 
Price of the book, $1.25, 

THE MORAL LEADERS OF ISRAEL. By Herbert L. Willett. A thrilling and luminous 
interpretation of the Old Testam.ent prophets, setting forth the historical situation 
within which each prophet lived and toward which his message was directed. Each of 
the great leaders is made to live anew. In Two Volumes, Each, $1. 

THE DIVINITY OF CHRIST. By Edward Scribner Ames. Professor Geo. A. Coe says of 
the book: "These sermons display a remarkable union of intellectual boldness and 
spiritual warmth. Such a book serves to clear the air and to focus the attention at 
the right point." Price of book, 75 cents. 

HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS ADVOCATING CHRISTIAN UNION. Charles A. Young, 
Editor. Contains Thos. Campbell's "Declaration and Address," Alex. Campbell's "Ser- 
mon on the Law," Stone's "Last Will and Testament of the Springfield Presbytery," 
Errett's "Our Position," and Garrison's 'The World's Need of Our Plea." Beautifully 
illustrated. Price, $1. 

THE EARLY RELATION AND SEPARATION OF BAPTISTS AND DISCIPLES.. By Er- 
rett Gates. Of this book The Congregationalist says: "A valuable contribution to 
the history of the American churches." Price, 75 cents. 

Disciples Publication Society, 700 E. 40th St., Qicago 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 26, 1917 




Administration Building, Virginia Christian College, Lynchburg, Va. 

Where the Impossible Comes to Pass 

Long enough ago that their first students, men like B. A. Abbott of St. Louis and Geo. P. Rutledge of 
Cincinnati, feel complimented when addressed by octogenarians as "young man," Josephus Hopwood and hi's 
like-minded wife went into the mountains of Eastern Tennessee and established Milligan College, with noth- 
ing but a vast necessity and a vaster faith in God and humanity as resources. With such business men as 
Geo. W. Hardin fully committed to the proposition, and such another man of faith as Henry J. Derthick 
leading the venture, it is easy for the rest of us to begin to believe. 

For the ordinary extraordinary man one plunge like that would last a lifetime, but not for Josephus Hop- 
wood! Fourteen years ago he transferred the heartaches and impossibilities of Milligan College to other saints 
and started Virginia Christian College at Lynchburg. Here again were found two groups of self-sacrificing 
spirits, a teaching group and a giving group. With the indigenous and indefatigable John T. T. Hundley at 
the head, a noble staff of teachers, full recognition as one of Virginia's twelve Senior Colleges, three superb 
buildings (one given by Andrew Carnegie) on a beautiful campus of eighty-six acres, all debts paid and a host 
of loyal friends like Cary and Snidow, the McWanes and the Easts, hope has ripened into confidence. 

About the same time, 1901, to be exact, the brethren in North Carolina, and especially the Harpers and the 
Hackneys, realized that without preachers the churches must fail, and without a college the supply of preachers 
must stop. So faith answered necessity again and Atlantic Christian College was launched at Wilson. The 
long and fruitful administration of President Jesse C. Caldwell is being ably and faithfully followed by President 
Raymond A. Smith and an efficient and devoted faculty. 

All three of these colleges are of the New South. They are open to men and women on equal terms, 
and under the most Christian and homelike care. The Men and Millions Movement is beginning their endow- 
ment and its success will doubly assure their future usefulness. 

MEN AND MILLIONS MOVEMENT 



222 West Fourth Street 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



mkATTON MOSBISON, ESXTOK. 



VT Ik 



re BVXTOK. 



V«lume XXXIV 



JULY 26. 1917 



Number 30 



What Is a Church? 



CHRISTIAN UNION WAITS ON A DOC- 
TRINE OF THE CHURCH. 

If a Chinaman visiting our country should seek to 
get our conception of religious institutions he would 
receive a variety of answers to the question, "What is a 
church?" He would be puzzled to find so powerful a 
religious movement as Christianity quite unable to 
account for its social structure. 

As one looks about in current denominations, it is 
clear that most of the denominations have been named 
for types of church government. Roman Catholics in- 
sist upon a Pope as the fundamental mark of the church. 
Episcopalians say, "Where the bishop is, there is the 
church." Presbyterians wish the church to be organ- 
ized with elders, presbytery, synod and general as- 
sembly. Congregationalists refuse to speak of "The 
Church," but always of "the churches." Baptists have 
a firm testimony that church and state should be com- 
pletely separated. Methodists were given their name 
for methodical prayer habits, but today they regard a 
highly organized ecclesiastical system as one of the 
great secrets of their power. They do not claim an- 
tiquity for their system, but they do claim efficiency 
in modern life. Disciples once sought to reproduce 
the new testament church in the form of its organiza- 
tion, until it became apparent that the new testament 
church was not always and everywhere organized in 
the same way. While these Christian bodies look at the 
church in these different ways, it will be most difficult 
to discuss Christian union. Fundamental to a common 
social structure must be a generally accepted social 
theory. Our thirteen states did not become a nation 
until they had a constitution. 

• • 

Where shall we go for a church theory? Men have 
nearly always insisted that we should go to the past. 
Roman Catholics take us back to the middle ages and 
rest fundamentally — though they do not admit it — upon 
the churchly theory of Augustine and Gregory. 

Episcopalians have insisted we should go farther 

back. They would take us back to Romanism, to the 

early church fathers. In this period there were bishops 

in national churches. Sacramentarianism and ritualism 

j had already developed in the church. Presbyterians, 

I Congregationalists and Disciples have sought a new 

t testament model for the church. These have not agreed 

• on the question as to what the early church was like. 

[ We greatly need a critical study of church history, 

I independent of dogmatic bias. The beginnings of such a 

study have been made by such students as Harnack. 

I There is yet much to be done, especially in the history 

of the apostolic age. 

The church had its analogies in other religions. On 
Palestinian soil, it was natural for it to borrow from 
the synagogue. Its weekly meeting, its order of wor- 
ship in considerable part, its elders, all came from the 



old synagogue worship. In Greece, the mystery relig- 
ions gave suggestions. These had initiatory rites and a 
doctrine of redemption in a future world. In the big 
Roman world, another eastern religion, Mithraism, had 
great vogue at this time. It had analogies of the Lord's 
Supper, baptism and other common practices of the 
church. If the ordinances and customs of the church 
did not arise in these competing religions, the popular 
religious standards and habits tended to fix in the 
church certain of its Palestinian traditions and eliminate 
others. 

The church in Paul's day did not gather the people 
from the higher ranks of society and Jesus reached 
mostly the lost sheep of the house of Israel, the out- 
casts. When the church reached Greece, it soon be- 
came a debating society of Christian doctrine and the 
great creeds were produced. Under Roman influence 
the church became interested in government, and 
quickly superseded the decadent Roman state, claiming 
the temporal power which is still the theory of the 
modern Roman church. 

• • 

Back of the question, "What is the church?" is the 
deeper question, "What is Christianity?" Each man 
has been answering that question in a different sense. 
Harnack answers it in his well known book in terms of 
his Lutheranism and his idealism. Another man would 
answer after his own bias and religious tradition. The 
church is the social structure of Christianity. 

The old creed demands that the church should be 
holy, catholic and apostolic. With these demands most 
of us would assent. We want a church made up of 
people who are holy, who have set themselves apart 
for divine service. We want a church with more sanc- 
tity than attaches to a club. We want a catholic church, 
which only means that we want a united church. It 
must not be broken up into denominations. The church 
must be apostolic. This need not mean a slavish imi- 
tation of early Christianity, but there must be no in- 
difference toward our spiritual origins. 

We are not to forget, however, the principle of 
progress which our Lord Himself put into the church. 
The Comforter is to lead us into all truth. The blessed 
ministry of the Holy Spirit is not to be confined to 
any one age. 

The church's great Leader does not sleep in a 
lonely grave under an eastern sky, but goes on before us. 

We must define Christianity in terms of all the 
legitimate out-growths of the Master's teaching and 
then we must define the church in harmony with our 
Christianity. Then we shall have a church theory upon 
which we can unite. 

Not by ever looking backwards, to Augustine, or 
to the church fathers or even to the apostles, but by 
being led forward by the Holy Spirit shall the Church 
of Christ find peace and unity. 



EDITORIAL 



LEARNING FROM THE COUNTRIES AT WAR 

THE United States is not traveling on an uncharted 
sea in this present war as did our Allies. Three 
years of the war have brought perfectly definite 
reactions in England and France and these results can 
be tabulated and used either by way of warning or ex- 
ample in our own country. 

It has been for this reason that we have so quickly 
adopted universal service, and are putting enormous 
powers into the hands of one man for the conservation 
of the food supplies of our country. Having learned 
many things on land and sea, we shall doubtless pro- 
duce fewer of the useless war machines than did the 
countries across the sea. We shall have no useless 
Zeppelin factories on our hands. 

While we are learning so many things in a military 
and economic way, we must not fail to learn from the 
religious programs of the Allies across the sea. Great 
Britain has religious conditions most analogous to ours 
and it is to her that we must turn at this time for guid- 
ance. 

In the midst of grinding war economies, offerings 
to missions have been kept up. These offerings are but 
an insignificant part of the nation's budget, and the spir- 
itual uplift coming from this Christ-like service is one 
of the nation's sources of strength in its time of need. 

In some metropolitan situations, so many men have 
gone to war that churches have combined their services 
and so reduced the budgets of local congregations. This 
has never been done, however, where there are the peo- 
ple left to serve. Religion is not one of the luxuries, but 
one of the prime necessities and only by keeping it alive 
can our nation keep up to its fullest strength and power. 

PERIL FOR MISSION BOARDS AND COLLEGES 

THE Senate finance committee is at this time con- 
sidering the War Revenue Bill and one feature of 
this bill brings a great danger to the work of mis- 
sion boards and colleges. There is no exemption made 
in the bill for incomes used for charitable, educational 
or religious purposes. An admendment is proposed 
giving such exemption but it is not being considered 
favorably by the committee. The government is at this 
time very much driven for war revenue, but there are 
some methods of raising this revenue which are alto- 
gether too expensive in their* ultimate effects upon the 
country. 

Taxation of philanthropic incomes would discour- 
age people of means in the making of gifts. Since the 
dedication of large fortunes to community good is one 
of the significant means by which progress is made, it 
will be a distinct loss for the government if it should 
adopt this unwise form of taxation. 

Furthermore, the colleges and mission boards have 
made their budget appropriations on the basis of exist- 
ing conditions. If they are compelled to pay a heavy 
tax out of their income, these agencies of public good 
will be greatly restricted in their activities. 

We believe that nearly every member of the church 
will agree with the resolution passed by the Federal 
Council of the Churches of Christ in America at the May 
meeting in Washington: "We believe it to be just, 
whenever necessary, that incomes and profits should be 



taxed to the furthest possible point without checking 
production. We also believe it to be just and neces- 
sary to exempt that surplus income which is now dedi- 
cated to the maintenance of religious and social agen- 
cies in order that the higher activities of civilization 
may not be impoverished." 

OUR DEBT TO MARTIN LUTHER 

IT will be unfortunate if any of the churches of the 
Disciples of Christ fail to pay honor this year to the 
memory of the great reformer whose name justly 
stands in the forefront of the Protestant movement. 
We who have spoken of our own movement as "the 
ultimate protestantism" should not fail to recognize our 
indebtedness to the brave monk who dared the princes 
of this world in church and state in behalf of religious 
liberty. 

Other great leaders had prepared the way for his 
work. The mystics had turned attention away from a 
sacramentarian Christianity to the religion of the inner 
life. Peter Waldo and the other "Poor Men of Lyons" 
as early as 1117 had kindled among the people of France 
the desire to read the Bible. John Wycliffe, in Eng- 
land, and John Huss, in Bohemia, had in these countries 
made beginnings of the very greatest significance. It 
remained for the brave monk who marched on, even 
though there were "as many devils as tiles on the roof," 
to bring to a triumphant conclusion a movement which 
had its origin in the corruption and irreligion of the 
established church of that time. 

Protestantism needs at times a new infusion of loy- 
alty and devotion to its cause. Whatever changes are 
coming into religion by reason of modern thought, these 
changes are not taking the foundations from under 
Protestantism. The principle of Martin Luther was to 
make the source of authority the inner life, justification 
by faith. There is a familiarity with a great spiritual 
heritage which sometimes dulls the appreciation of it. 
The subjective element in religion needs new empha- 
sis in our day. 

By means of sermons and union meetings and a 
tractarian [iterature, and by other modes of expression, 
there should ring throughout our discipledom this year 
the message of a free religion in which we shall be 
united by a great faith in Christ and in all other mat- 
ters have the greatest tolerance for religious opinion. 
The upstanding loyalty of a Luther is needed in these 
days to assert the dignity and worth of our great Prot- 
estant heritage. 

THE AUTOMOBILE AND THE GOSPEL 

FEW modern inventions are destined to make great- 
er changes in religious methods than the automo- 
bile. Hailed at first as a menace, preached against 
by one denomination as "the tool of the devil," this form 
of transportation has come to make the way of the gos- 
pel preacher easier. 

While we have today a movement for the consolida- 
tion of all the country schools in a township — made 
possible by good roads and the automobile — we shall 
next hear of township consolidation of churches. Why 
not? There are many rural sections where nearly 
everyone drives a car, and these people would find it a 



July 26, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



delight to travel a few miles to some central point where 
they could mingle in larger audiences and where they 
could hear better music and preaching. Where there 
are bad roads, and where the population is too poor to 
own machines, this development will, of course, not 
come. 

With the carrying out of this program it will be 
possible for sparsely settled sections of the country to 
have the service of a minister. Rev. William T. Rus- 
sell, of the Presbyterian denomination, is the only resi- 
dent minister in two northeastern counties of Colorado. 
He now has three out-stations and other places are 
calling for his services. The automobile owned by the 
minister is making this service possible. 

In the city, people now maintain connection with 
the old family church, even after they move away. And 
that fact is going to compel the churches to provide 
their ministers with automobiles with which to keep in 
touch with these scattered members. 

The automobile will bring about much more of 
reconstruction in church programs than we have hith- 
erto been willing to believe. When its possibilities are 
fully developed we shall have parishes more scattered 
in miles but in matters of co-operation more united 
than ever before. 

DEMOCRACY IN THE RUSSIAN CHURCH 

RUSSIAN life has often been represented to us as 
under the domination of the autocratic idea. It is 
clear, however, that this judgment could not be 
well founded or the recent revolution would not have 
been possible. There have been revealed the very strong- 
est of democratic tendencies which had been repressed 
with a firm hand until at last the explosion had to come. 
The Russian church has not been least among the 
forces to be reckoned for democracy. While the monk 
Rasputin has prejudiced the minds of many with regard 
to Russian Orthodoxy, the fact remains that the Ortho- 
dox church has shown up well in connection with the 
revolution. There was practically no opposition to the 
democratic movement on the part of the bishops or the 
rank and file of the clergy. The church is itself now 
undergoing a process of reorganization analogous to the 
changes which are taking place in the state. The bish- 
ops will be elected and the church will some more and 
more into the control of the people. A national assem- 
bly of the church is to be created in which lay and cleri- 
cal delegates will have equal representation. 

With democracy in the Russian church, the process 
of making the church modern in doctrine and practice 
will go on much more rapidly than would ever be possi- 
ble in a country under the rule of the pope. 

Just now the English church has an unusual inter- 
est in establishing a fellowship with the Russian church. 
Were this consummated, Romanism would be faced by 
a Christian organization larger than itself and its claims 
to Catholicity in anything other than a technical sense 
of the term would lose standing in the modern world. 

ABSURDITIES IN THE STATE CHURCH SYSTEM 

EVERY day furnishes some new evidence of the 
absurdity of enforcing a system of religious belief 
by means of state authority. The contention of 
the free churches for an untrammeled religion is now 
being supported by many within the communion of 
the Episcopal church in England. 



Churchmen of England are just now protesting the 
action of the government in sustaining the rights of the 
Secular Society (Limited). This society had for its 
express purpose to forward the principle that human 
conduct should be based upon natural knowledge and 
not upon supernatural belief. The Law Lords decided 
that such a society could inherit property under the law, 
although many churchmen opposed this ruling, which 
they said made the state a protector of an anti-Christian 
society. 

Appointments to important ecclesiastical positions 
are now made by the crown on the suggestion of the 
Prime Minister, Mr. Lloyd-George, who is a Dissenter. 
The ruling powers of the church lean toward the high- 
church tendency but the appointments are said to be 
predominantly of the Broad church type. The recent 
appointment of Dr. Hastings Rashdall to the Carlisle 
deanery has proved very unpopular with a certain sec- 
tion of the English clergy. 

While there is this ferment in England which will 
finally bring the church to seek disestablishment on 
her own account, there is also a big movement on in 
Russia. Russia has been scandalized by the court in- 
trigues of certain monks and the time draws near when 
churches will be disestablished in all but Roman Catho- 
lic countries. In these countries, not by motion of the 
church, but by the action of the state, the church is 
being set apart, as in France. Religion must be freed 
from the trammels of secularism. 



MORE ABOUT CONDITIONS IN THE SOCIALIST 

PARTY 

ONE of our readers sends us a contribution much 
too lengthy for publication concerning a recent 
utterance of The Christian Century regarding an 
alleged split in the Socialist party. While considerable 
space is used to say things favorable to socialism which 
we have ourselves said, there are some suggestions 
which may be briefly noted, and which are significant. 

The older parties have often been "materialistic." 
While the republican party started out with a wonder- 
fully human issue, the limiting of slavery and the ulti- 
mate abolition of it, this party came at last to be com- 
pletely engrossed in tariffs and such financial questions. 
The split in this party came as a rebuke to its material- 
ism. Its future must be worked out by the infusion 
into its program of an interest in big human issues of 
the day. The recent success of the democratic party 
has come by an adroit avoidance of old-time and out- 
grown democratic contentions which had to do with 
tariff and money. The party won last autumn by an 
appeal to the labor people and to the pacifists. The 
human issue was dominant. 

We have not tried to argue that socialism is neces- 
sarily materialistic, but the contrary. We have asserted 
that a Christian can be a Socialist as well as a member 
of any other political party. That there has been much 
human feeling in the Socialist propaganda was finely 
illustrated in "The Bitter Cry of the Children," written 
by John Spargo, who recently left the party. 

What we have asserted was that there was a seri- 
ous defection in the Socialist party. We made mention 
of the statistics of the election last autumn and spoke 
of the resignation of John Spargo. Since then the 
public press announces that J. G. Phelps Stokes has also 
resigned and issued a call for the formation of another 



8 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 26, 1917 



party. Our correspondent holds that the new members 
more than equal the defections. The truth or falsity 
of this will be revealed at the next election. 

The old-time profane, bitter, cynical expounder in 
every party is doomed to take a back seat. We have 
reason to believe that the Socialists will share the new 
uplift coming to American politics. 

CONDITIONS IMPROVING IN MEXICO 

THE new constitution in Mexico has been a source 
of unrest and uncertainty for all of the evangelical 
missionaries in that country. Its provisions, if en- 
forced strictly by officers hostile to Protestantism, would 
have resulted in almost eliminating the educational 
religious work of Protestants from Mexico. 

Missionaries are asserting, however, that the new 
constitution was aimed at the Jesuits and not at the 
evangelicals primarily. The Jesuit order is very pow- 
erful among the educational forces of Mexico and is held 
guilty of intriguing in politics. For this reason, the 
leaders of the revolution brought in changes of the con- 
stitution which would eliminate the order from any 
place of leadership in the republic. 

At the present time Mexican missionaries are not 
doing much preaching, but are waiting until the new 
constitution is interpreted. There are native pastors 
for the evangelical churches and only occasionally do 
the missionaries preach in these pulpits. Nor can the 
schools any longer be used for religious teaching. 

In spite of the handicaps which have been put on 
the work, it is said that evangelical religion is unusually 
popular in Mexico. The churches are crowded and 
great interest is being shown in the message. There is 
a friendly attitude among the people at large to the work 
which is being done. 

It is of the greatest importance to Mexico that she 
shall not wall herself up against the influence of free 
religion and free education. There can be no true de- 
mocracy in that unhappy country until there is educa- 
tion and a type of religion better adapted to the people's 
needs than Roman Catholicism has shown itself to be. 

CUTTING THE SALARY 

A CERTAIN district superintendent of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church has been asking the churches 
in his district if they are willing to pay their 
minister as much as in previous years. They always 
accede to this principle. Then he takes out a pencil 
and paper and begins to inquire what things cost 
in the vicinity of a given church as compared with last 
year. From these figures he easily reaches the con- 
clusion that the same salary as last year for the min- 
istry in terms of flour and shoes and other things is 
from twenty-five to fifty per cent more. Any church 
that does not pay that much more has in reality cut 
the minister's salary. 

We have called attention to the remarkable ten- 
dency among our ministers to go into business in middle 
life, at the very time when they ought to be the most 
useful. In a large nvimber of these cases economic pres- 
sure is responsible for the decision. The men are not 
desirous of becoming rich, but they do not feel that it 
is either right or Christian to sacrifice wife and children 
in the interests of churches whose members ride in 
automobiles and tread on Persian rugs. We ought not 
to lose any more men. There is only one remedy and 



that is to enable the minister with self-respect to pro- 
vide for the legitimate needs of his family. 

The Roman Catholics argue for a celibate ministry. 
The Protestant faith has advocated quite the contrary. 
We have insisted that the married man is better able 
to help people. It is possible, however, that we may 
have, after a while, something like a celibate ministry 
of a low order through the operation of economic causes. 

It has been a long time since the minister was as 
valuable a man as he is today. Religion is the strongest 
pillar of our national life. The man of God should be 
freed from temporal cares that his whole strength may 
be given to ideal ends. 

POETRY AND PIFFLE 

A FEW weeks ago at a writers' banquet in Chicago 
one of the city's most able literary critics an- 
nounced with a meaningful twist of a smile that 
Miss Amy Lowell, prophet of Imagism in poetry, had 
returned to Boston after a tour of the middle west 
reporting that she had jammed her theories of poetry 
down the throats of the American people and that they 
had been compelled to swallow them ! 

Miss Lowell is a sister of President Lowell of Har- 
vard, a grand-niece of James Russell Lowell — blood re- 
lation only — and has money — so it is reported. With 
money one can have books published ; and a number 
of volumes of imagistic verse and polyphonic prose — 
whatever that may be — from Miss Lowell's pen have 
been thrust upon the world by an eastern publisher. 
All these facts, with Miss Lowell's unquestioned force- 
ful personality, have put Imagism and its sisters into 
the magazines and books. Now that the reader's curios- 
ity has been duly excited, let this sample of Miss 
Lowell's verse be given due consideration : 

"I want to be a carpenter. 
To work all day long in clean wood, 
Shaving it up into little thin slivers. 
I want to shingle a house, 
Sitting on the ridgepole, in a bright breeze; 
I want to put the shingles on neatly, 
Taking great care that each is directly 
between two others. 
¥ , ' I want to draw a line on a board 

With a flat pencil. 
Heigh-ho! 
It is much easier than to write this poem." 

Now. the wonder of this composition grows upon 
one when he considers that the Boston lady weighs 
fully two hundred. Think of her sitting on a ridge- 1 
pole! By the way, did you ever see a "bright breeze"?! 

The inevitable yearning that comes to the average! 
reader after perusing this work of something less than 
art may be voiced about like this : If Miss Amy truly 
did want to be a carpenter, why didn't she apply for 
a job at the employment agency and abstain from tell- 
ing us about her youthful ambition? It is doubtful,! 
however, whether she could have earned her $5 perj 
day; for even in carpentry something of an artistic sense 
is required. 

But — it must be confessed that the modern Imag-: 
ism, with its insistence upon definite image and con- 
creteness, has done a real service in freeing us from the; 
highly polished nothings that a few years ago filled| 
our magazines. For this, much credit be to the Imagistsj 
and their brothers. Not without truth does a con-j 
tributor to the New York Nation write: "The modernj 
imagism and vers libre were sent us as a bitter medi- 



July 26, 1917 

cine to cleanse our poetic systems from the highly or- 
nate twaddle which was a few years ago being given 
us as poetry." But, this writer pointedly asks, who 
loves a bitter medicine after it has done its work? This 
enlightening statement properly places Miss Lowell at 
the present time. 

As for poetry, we confess to a preference for bits 
of star-dust like this, from William H. Davies, an Eng- 
lish poet in perfectly good standing, even with the 
modern cults : 

"Good morning, Life — and all 
Things glad and beautiful. 
My pockets nothing hold, 
But He that owns the gold, 
The Sun, is my great friend — 
His spending has no end. 

"Hail to the morning sky. 
Which bright clouds measure high; 
Hail to you birds whose throats 
Would number leaves by notes; 
Hail to you shady bowers. 
And you green fields of flowers. 

"Good morning, Life — and all 
Things glad and beautiful." 

PAPER COMPANY ASKS SEVEN DAY WEEK 

FOR MEN 

THE elimination of the seven-hour day is nearly a 
complete process in American industry, but every 
now and then some one under a specious pretext 
undertakes to bring back the old order of things. Re- 
cently the International Paper Company, which operates 
mills in New York state at Glens Falls, Fort Edwards 
and other points petitioned the Industrial Commission 
of the state of New York for exemption from the law 
which gives every workman one day's rest in seven. 

The law in New York has been well framed. It is 
possible to run plants seven days in a week, but not to 
work men that many days. If men are used on Sun- 
day to repair necessary machinery, they must be given 
some other day in the week as a rest day. The com- 
pany declared that the men themselves objected to a 
holiday in the middle of the week when other men are 
working. This might be true of some men. There 
would be other men who on account of low wages or 
low ideals would seek for themselves the higher remun- 
eration of a seven day week. These men would not 
at first realize the harm that would come to them 
I through such a schedule. 

When the Industrial Commission was considering 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



the request of the paper company, the churches were 
represented by Rev. Charles Stelzle who appeared be- 
fore the commission to file his protest. 

In the long run, a seven-day week is not as efficient 
as a six-day week, as England has learned in her war 
struggle. The six-day week rests upon sound physio- 
logical and humanitarian considerations. The churches 
will do well to continue to aid in safe-guarding the 
workingman's rest day. In this program, the church 
and the labor union ought to be able to strike hands. 

THE CHURCH PROGRAM 

THERE are ministers and churches with but one 
program. They have been working it for years 
and although it has not succeeded very well, they 
do not have originality to criticise the program and 
work out another. 

The summer time means a natural break for many 
churches. In most urban communities, people go away 
for a season in the summer and while they are gone some 
of them attend other churches. This interchange in 
church life ought to prove enriching for all the churches 
if they are of a spirit to learn by the successes and fail- 
ures in other congregations. 

There are some broad distinctions that are to be 
made in the work of the local church. In many com- 
munities, the educational program is of first importance. 
There is in England a great lessening of the popularity 
of the Sunday School. It is to be hoped that we shall 
have a different history, owing to the inauguration of 
new and vastly superior methods for training children 
in the religious life. The church that will seek to se- 
cure teachers of the very highest grade culturally and 
spiritually will make a good move for the autumn cam- 
paign. More Sunday School pupils are lost because of 
improper teachers than by reason of inadequate 
methods. 

The church's program for its young people must be 
given a fresh examination. There are many communi- 
ties where the young people are almost completely 
divorced from the church. The young people's socie- 
ties must revise their methods, in the light of a modern 
study of the problems that go with the teen age period. 

In the stress of the mid-winter campaign, these and 
many other problems of administration are neglected 
for the sake of the thing that is near at hand from day 
to day. It is just as necessary, however, for the church 
to have a policy and a program as for any other large 
enterprise to be well planned. 



A Living Faith 

By Charles Manford Sharpe 



THE creeds of dead men can no longer serve, 
O Lord, the clamant passion of our life. 
They seem compact more of the craven fears 
Than of the lusty faiths of human kind. 
For us denial never can be faith; 
We must affirm the things that are; 
And trust ourselves upon the living stream. 



In Youth we trust, with all its wilful craving- 
Its blind instinctive groping after good; 
In Joy we do believe, and its creative power ; 
In Lover's plightings, clingings, singing blood: 



In battle-shock and stress of holy war 
The good to throne, — the evil to destroy. 
We hazard all on that which lives; and naught 
Will disallow save Death and Lies. 

We stagger not at Pain, since oft its hammer-stroke 

But serves to free the stunted rock-bound soul, 

And to its stature adds one cubit more. 

Our Faith supreme takes hold on Thee — 

Thou tireless Love that sufferest not 

Our barque to drift in darkness far from home; 

But from Thyself the gales dost send 

At last to drive us to Thy Light and Peace. 



The Church and the Ne^v Democracy 



I FEEL a profound sense of rejoic- 
ing and a solemn need for conse- 
cration for ourselves and for the 
churches of Christ in America. 

I rejoice, despite all the terror and 
suffering and cost that is before us, 
that this great hour in the life of the 
world could not be fulfilled without 
the share of America in the common 
sacrifice of the free peoples of the 
earth for the liberties of mankind. We 
were in danger of becoming too rich 
and soft and comfortable. The refin- 
ing of this world conflagration is 
needed to burn out the dross of selfish 
ease, and the sectional, racial, and 
class antagonisms from the heart of 
our national life. 

HOW THE WAR WILL BE WON. 

Then I rejoice in the testimony of 
this world war to the value of every 
class and group of the people in pre- 
serving the integrity of the national 
fife. Never again can the laborer in 
field or mine or shop be despised or 
neglected by the builders of empire. 
The nation is the whole people, and 
not a sex nor class. The world war 
will be won in the homes and fields 
and mines and shops as well as upon 
the battle lines of flaming steel. Men 
in overalls and women in aprons are 
as necessary for victory in modern 
warfare as an army with banners. 
There is now being witnessed the co- 
operation of men and women, labor 
and capital, science and art, politics 
and religion, in the common service 
for the whole people as never before 
in the history of the human race. 

Again I rejoice in the unity of the 
free peoples of the world in the com- 
mon cause of the rights of nations and 
of men. Never again can any person 
deny the supreme truth of the words 
of the great apostle: "None of us 
liveth to himself, and none dieth to 
himself." From the crucifixion of 
Belgium comes forth the resurrection 
of the liberties of Europe. The com- 
munity of interest, yea, of life itself, 
among individuals, classes and nations, 
has been established for all time. 

CONSCIENCE OF THE RACE TOUCHED. 

Finally, I rejoice that at last the 
hideousness of social and political sin 
has been made clear to the conscience 
of the race. False political and social 
theories are now revealed to all man- 
kind as having the direst effects upon 
the life of man. The church in Ger- 
many was so concerned with indi- 
vidual sin that it took no effective 
issue with the advocates of welt-po- 
litik and with the doctrine that "might 
makes right" as a theory of statecraft. 



By Raymond Robins 

It has been demonstrated that, while 
individual sin may rape one woman, 
social sin in the form of military 
aggression may rape a nation. Indi- 
vidual lust may lose a soul, but politi- 
cal lust in the guise of military neces- 
sity may destroy civilization. Perhaps 
in years to come when we plead for 
the Christian conscience to declare it- 
self against political and economic in- 
stitutions that are anti-social, we shall 
not plead in vain. Perhaps with this 
awful revelation, a blameless family 
life will no longer excuse the sweating 
of the daughters of the poor, nor large 
sums for charitable uses justify the 
support of a corrupt political ring that 
fosters drunkenness and vice in the 
play places of the people. When we 
see social sin dramatized in the mar- 
tyrdom of a nation, we get new values 
in the social teachings of Jesus. 

I am among those who believe that 
the church of Jesus Christ carries the 
obligation for the world's leadership, 
temporal as well as spiritual. From 
the pews should go forth men and 
women inspired to lead in the pro- 
gram of a decent human life, political, 
economic, and social, as well as the 
maintenance of virtue and personal 
righteousness in the individual soul. 

WHAT CAN THE CHURCH DO? 

What are some of the immediate 
obligations of this leadership in this 
supreme hour in the life of the nation 
and the world? 



iiiniiiiiiitiititiiii 



iiriminitnmtiiHiiini 



A Prayer 

By Lauchlan MacLean Watt, C. F., 
France 

I thought to give Thee pride, 
And strength and fire of youth 

As being what was best 

For Thee and life and truth. 

And lo ! I sank in shame ; 

And what I deemed was most 
To me, became as naught. 

And hush'd my proudest boast. 

And so I bring Thee tears, 
A vexed heart, full of care. 

Sorrow for empty years, 
A half-believing prayer. 

Vows broken like cheap toys, 
Words fickle as the day . . . 

O Love, show grace to me, 
A beggar, by Life's way. 



iiiiiiiiiiiriiiiniiiii 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii: 



I wish there might go forth a rea- 
soned statement that would justify the 
Christian manhood and womanhood of 
America in giving a whole-hearted, 
courageous, and undivided support to 
the government in the prosecution of 
this war to victory. This, I believe, is 
wholly possible. Personally I count 
militarism and wars of aggression as 
of the devil utterly. Against both the 
church should wage unremitting pro- 
test. But the man who cannot dis- 
tinguish between autocratic war for 
conquest and war in defense of 
democracy and the rights of nations 
and of men is unworthy of citizenship 
in a free community. 

AUTOCRACY IN AMERICA. 

While we whole-heartedly support 
the government in winning this just 
war, let us stand firm against the 
growth of militarism and autocracy in 
our own land. Let us fortify and 
maintain the ancient bulwarks of free 
speech, free press, and free assem- 
blage. We cannot too often declare 
the social values of free discussion and 
the gains for democracy that lie in 
free co-operation of the people 
through education and sympathy 
rather than force. Only incompetent 
and dishonest public officials need fear 
the light of publicity. We should ever 
remember that, but for the fearless 
criticism of the English press, the 
British Empire would now be beaten 
and autocracy triumphant over 
Europe. 

Let us help in enforcing the whole 
rigor of the law upon those who 
abuse the right of freedom of speech 
and press, but let us set our faces as a 
flint against any curtailment of the 
right itself. 

CONSCRIPTION OF MONEY AS WELL AS 
OF MEN 

Let us stand for the conscription of 
money as well as of men. I hope it 
will not be alone millionaries who do 
not name the name of Christ who 
appear before Congress asking for the 
conscription of wealth. Christian 
manhood is accepting the call for life 
on the firing line. Will not Chris- 
tian property be willing to enlist as 
well ? Let us advocate graduated, pro- 
gressive taxation upon incomes, in- 
heritances, land values, and excess 
war profits. Shall we not help Con- 
gress to discriminate between earned 
and unearned incomes, between homes 
with many children and homes with 
none? 

ECONOMIC INTEGRITY 

Let us help vindicate the truth that 



July 26, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



11 



there is in this universe an economic 
integrity just as there is a moral in- 
tegrity, and that what is socially just 
is finally industrially productive. This 
great truth has been mightily revealed 
in this war. Just as slave labor was 
not only moral and social wrong, but 
economic weakness, so also are long 
hours and low wages, sweated women 
and child labor. Slave labor did not 
more surely palsy the fingers of in- 
vention and paralyze the heart of in- 
dustrial progress, than will sweated 
women and overworked and under- 
fed workers reduce production and 
weaken the national life. Let the con- 
gregations of Christ know these facts. 
Let the laymen of America present 
them to legislatures and councils of 
defense in support of an enlightened 
industrial patriotism. 

Let us accept the whole responsi- 
bility of Christian leadership in a 
democracy, a leadership that under- 
stands and a leadership that will dare 
to serve. The whole problem of 
democratic society is leadership. 

AN ILLUSTRATION FROM BUSINESS 
LIFE 

Let me make this concrete. How 
hard it is for even the most honest, 
able and worthy leader of labor who 
has all his life looked out from that 
window and magnified the virtues of 
his class and been suspicious of capital 
to be wholly fair with the just rights 
of property in times of industrial con- 
flict. And by the same rule how sel- 
dom we find the secretary of a man- 
ufacturers' or employers' association 
who has all his life considered divi- 
dends and liveri in the atmosphere of 
profits and dealt with labor as a 
necessary evil who can be wholly fair 
with the just rights of the workers 
in times of economic struggle. 

Again, here is a young man with 
drive and power above his fellows. 
Let him enter business life geared up 
to selfishness and you find him a few 
years later trying to control price and 
manipulate markets for the quick 
money of monopoly rather than the 
slow, difficult achievements that are 
won in the solution of the problems of 
production. He is a business pawn- 
broker instead of a creator of wealth. 
Or, let this sarne man enter politics 
geared up to selfishness and you have 
a vital, competent master of conven- 
tions and primaries who uses the ma- 
chinery and power of the people's gov- 
ernment for the selfish advantage of 
himself or of a clique, and helps to 
betray the institutions of democracy. 

Christ's program for social order 

This question of range and motive 
' in leadership is at the heart of the suc- 
cess of free institutions. Somehow 
we must have more men and women 
who can see the whole community 



from the bottom to the top, willing to 
be fair with both capital and labor, 
dominated by the serving principle, 
giving their lives without cant or hum- 
bug for the life of the people in time 
of peace as soldiers give their lives in 
time of war, finding in the growing 
good of mankind rather than in selfish 
gain for oneself the ultimate justifica- 
tion for having lived. 

Christ is the Supreme Exemplar of 
the serving life. Christ alone has 
dared the adventure of the complete 
integrity of the social order. 

The honesty and efficiency of our 
institutions, our constitutions, and our 
laws from precinct up to White House 
is a problem of the leadership of living 
men. Christianity alone can furnish 
this leadership. Autocracy cannot 
live with Christianity and democracy 
cannot live without it. Just what do 
I mean? Autocracy is built upon the 
control of the many by the selfish 
force of the few. Democracy is built 
upon the consent of the many and the 
common service of all. There are just 
two master ideals of nations and of 
men : the one, dominion over others by 
force for the selfish gain of a few — 
the ideal of Caesar ; the other, service 
to others for the common good of all 
— the ideal of Christ. Between these 
two ideals there is an irreconcilable 
conflict, for the one issues in the 
dominion of a despotic class and the 
other in the dominion of a free people. 
Underneath all the confusion of cross 
ideals and conflicting purposes this is 
the central issue now being fought out 
along four lines of flaming steel in 
Europe. 

THE future of HUMANITY 

The same conflict goes on in the life 
of every nation and of every soul — 
selfishness versus service, Caesar ver- 
sus Christ. This nation cannot be 
saved by sectarian or class-minded 
leadership, however sincere, able, or 
personally worthy. The leadership 
that will save America must be as 
large as the community, the state, the 
nation, and the world, the leadership 
that regards every soul as of priceless 
worth, that respects the dignity of per- 
sonality in rich and poor and old and 



This address, ivith others, by 
John R. Mott, Henry Churchill 
King and a number of other re- 
ligious leaders, may be obtained 
in book form from the Federal 
Council of the Churches of 
Christ in America, Nezv York. 
These addresses are the great 
utterances spoken at the recent 
conference of the nation's reli- 
gious organisations under the 
auspices of the Federal Council, 
in the City of Washington. 



young of every class and creed and 
tongue. 

Finally, let us interpret to the brain 
and heart of Christendom the meaning 
of this mighty war for the future of 
the human race. Let us declare its 
central significance as the triumph of 
democracy, the vindication of the 
worth of all productive labor for the 
integrity of the national life, and the 
essential unity of the free peoples of 
the earth. Let us proclaim Christ as 
the Founder of this democracy, the 
Exemplar of this integrity, the Incar- 
nation of this unity. Let the spirit of 
the risen Christ lift us above the big- 
otry of sect, the arrogance of class, the 
curse of self, and the prejudice of race 
and tongue. 

the gospel ALONE CAN SAVE 

Let us be consecrated to the whole 
program of the Master, individual and 
social. How this hour vindicates the 
necessity of his gospel if civilization is 
to survive! How it brings into judg- 
ment half-way living by the gospel, 
half-way teaching of the gospel, and 
half-way faith in the gospel ! The only 
one who needs to look upon this hour 
with sorrow is that man or woman 
who has never been willing to see the 
whole gospel lived out in the world. 
They may well say: "Caesar has tri- 
umphed, Christ is dead." But those 
who know that Christ has never yet 
been accepted in any city, or state, or 
nation, and that the reason the world 
sufifers as it does today is because of 
this denial of him, may well proclaim 
that at last, after nineteen hundred 
years, it is made manifest that noth- 
ing can save individuals, homes, com- 
munities, nations, and the world, ex- 
cept Christ — Christ, a living reality in 
the whole life of the people through- 
out the world ! 

Let the churches of Christ enlist for 
this great adventure of the soul. Then 
shall we see the fulfillment of the 
promise of the fathers, a great, free 
people, with the opportunity for a de- 
cent human life guaranteed to every 
child born under the starry flag. And 
then shall abide with us efficiency, hon- 
esty and discipline, the products of the 
deliberate will of free citizens in a 
Christian democracy. And at last, 
through the blood and suffering of the 
free peoples of the earth, shall be won 
for individuals and nations freedom 
and peace throughout the world. 



IIIMItlllllllltlllttllllllllll 



iiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



iiiriiiiitniiiiiinriiitiiitiiiMiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiT 



The age of the warring tribes and 
kingdoms and empires that began a 
hundred centuries or so ago draws to 
its close. The kingdom of God on 
earth is not a metaphor, not a mere 
spiritual state, not a dream, not an 
uncertain project; it is the thing be- 
fore us, it is the close and inevitable 
destiny of mankind. — H. G. Wells, in 
"The Invisible King." 



Our Religious Progenitors 

By George A. Campbell 

An Appreciation of Dr. Edgar DeWitt^Jones' New Book 



THE foundation builders of our 
churches have received scant 
justice at our hands. Pioneer life 
has not been comprehensively and 
happily interpreted. We are still 
not far from the beginnings. Surely 
v^e ought to honor those whose suc- 
cessors we are. We are building on 
the foundation laid by earnest and 
able men only a generation or two 
removed. Our ministry probably 
would not have been, had it not 
been for those pathfinders. Cer- 
tainly the churches we now minis- 
ter to would not have been waiting 
for us had it not been for the stal- 
wart ministry of the pioneers. 

* * * 

I presume almost every pastor 
seeks to honor the early ministers of 
the church he serves. Jacob Creath's 
picture is on the walls of our Hanni- 
bal church, and these words of his 
accompany it : 

I planted our churches in Hannibal, 
New London and St. Louis. I com- 
menced my labors in Hannibal in the 
month of January, 1842. The weather 
was intensely cold; our place of wor- 
ship was an old log outhouse with no 
seats, no fireplace, and a loose puncheon 
floor. My hearers were all men; and yet 
while standing and hearing "the word" 
they trembled like aspen leaves. 

At that time we had but one member 
in the town. That was Sister Bowen, 
the daughter of Barton W. Stone, who 
inherited a large portion of her father's 
loveliness. On one occasion I preached 
in Hannibal in the lower story of a house, 
while in the upper part they were 
dancing and fiddling. 

I like to do honor to that noble _ 
pioneer, typical of the men of the ' 
creative period of our history, and to 
all those of yesterday who made 
this church of today possible. 

Let us not think of these men as 
crude. Let us not think of them 
as mere debaters. They were men 
of heart, of compelling spiritual vis- 
ion, of fierce earnestness, of sacrifi- 
cial sincerity, of a clear, forceful and 
convicting message. They were 

creators. 

* * * 

Most of our churches were 
founded by these prophetic souls. 
The laymen of the early days were 
of the same type. A church in those 
times was scriptural in the sense 
that it was composed of those "called 
out," the separated. 

There seems to be a gulf between 
them and us. We think of ourselves 
as modern. We admire them in a 
sense, but we do not love them. We 
may or may not accept their doc- 
trines, but we do not know their 



innermost souls. Some would 
bridge the gulf by demanding that 
we should in all things agree with 
these foundation builders. Others, 
repelled by their supposedly out- 
worn doctrines, do not seek to know 
them at all in their emotional life. 

The gulf will not be bridged by 
the strict student of doctrine. His 
approach will be prejudiced. Let 
me illustrate : 

Two boys reared on the farm were 
scattered for many years. They 
gathered at the old home again when 
the farmer-father died. The boys 
had become sophisticated by city 
life and world travel. The father 
had clung to his provincial language, 
dress and customs. How did the 
boys talk about the father? They 
talked the language of love. Love 
revealed the deep and simple hu- 
manity of the father. It was a story 
now, and then an incident, that 
helped to disclose his true character. 

If the gulf between us and the 
pioneers is to be closed, it will be 
closed by the writers who can in- 
terpret our predecessors with great 
sympathy and sincere appreciation. 
^ ^ ^ 

Here is a wonderful field for the 
right men to enter. It is a new 
field and it is a large one. To in- 
terpret adequately the soul life of 
the foundation days of an enterprise 
now involving a million and a half 
of people would be to make a worth 
while contribution to the world. 

The writers who will accomplish 
this task must have poise. Heat 
alone will not make literature. Par- 
tisanship will produce ephemeral 
tracts, but not lasting writing. 

"Fairhope," by Edgar DeWitt 
Jones, is one of the first, if not the 
first, efifort to interpret our early 
days in a literary way. 

Mr. Jones feels with his charac- 
ters. He understands them intel- 
lectually. But more, he sincerely 
appreciates their work and aim. He 
has spiritual fellowship with them 
and loves them, everyone. Conse- 
quently he reveals to the reader, not 
the combatant, not the formalist, not 
the legalist, not the sinner, but the 
whole soul of each. He sees with 
the eyes of a novelist. 

He wisely treats of one church, 
a country congregation. I take it 
that he assumes names. Indeed he 
most likely takes the license of the 
story teller and creates composite 
characters. 

Mr. Jones is now one of our pro- 
lific writers. Several of our good 



men have been recently drawn 
away from the ministry by their suc- 
cess in writing. Our author will 
not be lured away. 

Mr. Jones in all his writing re- 
mains the minister. His whole soul 
is that of his calling. This fact 
does not weaken him as a writer, 
but limits him. Indeed it stamps 
with a peculiar grace and distin- 
guished charm all his output. Mr. 
Jones' pen, like his voice, will ever 
be dedicated to the church. His 
hand has been ordained to the min- 
istry. 

It is good to have such a one in- 
terpret the days just past. An out- 
sider attempting it would be sure to , 
betray by a squint his lack of sym- | 
pathy. 

The author adopts the device of 
writing as a layman of the "Fair- 
hope" church. He always identifies 
himself with those whose practice 
it is to immerse and partake of the 
Lord's Supper every Sunday. 

I wonder if the Macmillan Com- 
pany ever before published a book 
treating of our Disciple debates, re- 
vival meetings, vociferous doctrinal 
preaching on baptism and such 
things. I think not. 

I am glad their first book was 
written by so deft a hand. 
* * * 

"Fairhope" church is typical of 
every church among us. It changes. 
It is played upon by the procession 
without. Death visits it. Hearts 
are torn by partings and sorrows 
that cannot be stayed. Some come 
to walk quietly. God's Acre in- 
creaseth. It has a variety of mem- 
bers. There is the severely critical. 
"The Hound of the Lord." There 
is the "Modern Enoch," the kindly 
elder whose soul is typical of a kind 
without which not many churches 
could prosper. There is the minis- 
ter who was the outstanding bishop 
of the church. There is the trouble- 
some singer. There is a procession 
of student preachers in the making. 
There are some marked conversions, 
tokens of Christ's power and the 
hope of the church. And there is 
vision of adjustment on the part of 
the church to meet the needs of the 
new day. It is a gracious book. It 
breathes the atmosphere of another 
day. 

I have not gone into details, have 
not given the name of a single char- 
acter. Will anyone think I may 
not have read the book? Permit me 
to say I have read it twice, plus. 

Hannibal, Mo, 



Letters From the Trenches 

Written by English Soldiers to a Preacher in England — Some Inside Information as to the Germans 



IT IS very pleasant to feel that the 
church meets every week for the 
express purpose of praying for the 
safety and welfare of its absent mem- 
bers. The general atmosphere of army 
life is bad, both morally and spiritu- 
ally, and we need quite as much pray- 
ing for us as the church can manage 
and greatly appreciate it. 

We have a new commanding officer 
now. He was at the battle of Loos 
and won the D. S. O. for conspicuous 
gallantry there. Some of the things 
he has related have been blood-curd- 
ling. The sometimes discredited re- 
ports of German inhumanity and 
atrocities he absolutely confirms. The 
strange part is that the German au- 
thorities are quite as inhuman toward 
their own men as toward enemy 
wounded and prisoners. We know for 
certain now that at Verdun fresh and 
untrained German reserves were 
drugged with ether and driven up en 
masse toward the French trenches 
in order to cover the attacks of the 
trained and experienced German 
troops ; and those of the drugged men 
who did not reach the French trenches 
were so stupified that they actually 
passed over the trenches as if dazed 
and were shot down from behind. 
♦ ♦ * 

Food Supplies for Prisoners 
Are Liberal 

What shall we say of the enormous 
sacrifice of humanity, those thousands 
who have fallen and will fall, friends 
and enemies in war? God knows them 



all and, in my opinion, have fallen do- 
ing their duty. 

It is marvelous that so much should 
be done for comfort of troops. Here 
we have no mud and huts for sleeping 
accommodation. Food supplies consist 
of roast and boiled beef, vegetables 
and by appearance one would say 
bread pudding, but there is promotion 
waiting for him who can fathom how 
it is made, but as we have not some 
of mother's goodies at hand we just 
eat it and say no more. 

I happen to be a bootmaker and 
have fixed punctures and am repairing 
the troopers' boots. It does not sound 
heroic, iDUt you should see the Tom- 
mies after me. 

♦ ♦ * 

Loathes War and 
Prays for Peace 

I little thought in the past that I 
should one day become a soldier, but 
when duty calls, fancies must vanish. 
If we only performed the work that 
appeals to us, I am afraid we wouldn't 
accomplish much. And so in great re- 
pulsion to my natural propensities I 
find myself in military service. I and 
all the boys at the front much appre- 
ciate the encouraging messages which 
you have sent from time to time. If 
ever I meet one of the boys out here, 
the first question I am asked is, "Have 
you heard from Twynholm lately?" 

Despite the fact that I have been a 
soldier for nearly eighteen months, my 
views on war have not been trans- 
formed. I loathe it and daily pray and 



yearn for peace. And let us hope that 
this year will crown with a glorious 
victory the side which is striving to 
maintain the honor and justice of the 
world and may the day soon dawn 
when national disputes shall be arbi- 
trated and all the countries of the 
earth be too proud to fight. 
-.-- * * 

Says Germans Are Fighting 
to Lose 

To give you any idea what it is like 
here is impossible. At times it is diffi- 
cult to realize that we are at war, when 
suddenly you are brought to your 
senses by the whistle of a shell (the 
small ones whistle, while the big ones 
Roar). They are coming over at this 
moment, but are not intended for us, 
for they are bursting in the town. 
Since my last letter I regret to tell 
you that we have lost one poor fellow. 
He was struck by a piece of shell that 
burst quite a quarter of a mile away. 
He lived about half an hour. I will 
not weary you with further details. 

I thought it was my duty to offer 
my services, as they were needed, with 
thousands of others, for the defense 
of our homes and families. Also, we 
are not fighting for a lost cause, but 
for right against might. I have seen 
plenty of German prisoners at various 
times and have not seen a defiant look 
on a single face. The reason is plain : 
they know they are fighting to lose. In 
spite of all the discomforts we have 
to endure it is all taken as a part of the 
routine and the spirits of all are good. 



The Symphony of the Flag 



I AM your flag. 
I am dedicated to life, liberty 
and the pursuit of happiness. 
My stars are your ideals, my blue 
the open, smiling skies, my red the 
blood of heroes, and my zvhite the em- 
blem of character incorruptible. 

I am a divine gift to the human race 
and all the ages have felt the thrill of 
wy coming. 

* * * 

/ grew toward the light in every 
'magnanimous deed of lowly or great, 
mt my coming was mightily quick- 
ened at the Red Sea, on Calvary, in 
I Roman prison, by the Christian 
nartyrs, by scaffold and pyre in Flor- 
mce, by chains and flames at Con- 
'tance, in a dungeon in Prague, by 
he ^ fires of Smithfield and the suf- 
-erings of Bedford Jail, in the con- 
est at Runnymede — and I was tin- 



By B. A. Abbott 

furled, full-grown and invincible at 
Yorktown. 

I have always led in the long march 
of human progress and have never 
broken faith with any nation or indi- 
vidual. 

I wave over tzvo billions of earth's 
fairest acres and more than a hun- 
dred millions of free, happy, prosper- 
ous people salute me in thirty-six dif- 
ferent tongues. 

* * * 

/ am the foe of ignorance and the 
friend of enlightenment. I float above 
the schoolhouse and college, and 
tiventy millions of pupils look up to 
me with the light of morning in their 
faces. 

I have been through eighteen wars 
and no tyrant has ever touched me nor 
coward carried me. 

From half a thousand ironclads I 
signal all the world the glory of a 



united, serene, busy, unafraid, friendly 
people. 

I am not dreaded anywhere, for I 
am fair; and noivhere am I disre- 
garded, for I am strong. 

I am the sign of the promised land 
to the needy and oppressed of all 
earth's nations. 

I sail the seven seas, and winds and 
sun kiss me with gladness, and shim- 
mering ivaves sing me welcome every- 
where. 

* * * 

Wherever I go I give an open Bible, 
an unforced altar, an inviolate home, 
a fair tribunal, an honest market, and 
a safe highzvay. 

I am your flag — / have zvaved over 
you and your fathers and your fore- 
fathers for generations, and your chil- 
dren and children's children shall hail 
me with joy and follow me with con- 
fidence to the end of time. 




ililllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllUIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItllllllllllillllllllllll 

The Larger Christian World 



A DEPARTMENT OF INTERDENOMINATIONAL ACQUAINTANCE 



Churches Suffer 
From the War 

Rev, R. S. MacArthur is president 
of the World's Baptist Alliance, and 
through correspondence he is in 
touch with the conditions among free 
churches throughout the world. He 
says there is greatest distress among 
European churches, especially in 
France, Germany, Austria, Italy and 
Russia. Ministers have gone to the 
army and the doors of the churches 
have been closed for lack of funds. 
Dr. MacArthur declares that after 
the war America Avill be asked for 
fifty millions of dollars to help rebuild 
churches alone. Plans are under way 
to bring to America large numbers of 
orphan children to be educated. 

Woman in 
English Pulpit 

When the American preacher, Rev. 
Joseph Fort Newton, was installed in 
the leading Protestant pulpit of Lon- 
don, the City Temple, he was not long 
in smashing an English tradition. He 
invited into the pulpit Miss Maude 
Royden, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Royden and she delivered an address. 
The number of people that came to 
hear her was so great that a special 
detail of police was necessary to pre- 
vent a dangerous overcrowding of the 
building. It is said that war condi- 
tions have led several English 
churches to consider the calling of 
women pastors. 

Food Controller 
a Quaker 

Few public characters are more 
noticed now than the prospective food 
controller, Mr. Herbert C. Hoover. 
He is a Quaker by birth and is today a 
faithful member of that religious de- 
nomination. Mr. Hoover's life has 
been full of thrills. He was in China 
at the time of the Boxer rebellion and 
was instrumental in getting people 
away from the war zone when war 
broke out. His service in Belgium 
has been significant. He does not be- 
lieve in war, but his relation to the 
government in this time of crisis is by 
no means that of a slacker. 

Bishops Turned Out 
in Russia 

After the revolution in Russia, a 
bishop could not hold his position un- 
less he stood for election in his dio- 
cese. Twelve bishops have been re- 
jected and new bishops installed by the 
vote of the congregations. Among 
thbse rejected was the bishop of 



Petrograd. Every priest must have 
his position confirmed by a vote of the 
people of the parish. The property of 
the parishes has been transferred 
from the state and will henceforth be 
administered by the congregations. A 
Sobor or national assembly of the 
church has been held recently at 
which John R. Mott, president of the 
Y. M. C. A., was invited to speak. 
The address of Mr. Mott was received 
with the greatest feeling and he was 
consulted on many matters dealing 
with the reorganization of the 
church. Mr. Mott spent a whole aft- 
ernoon consulting with Prince Lyov 
on the future of the Russian church. 

Boston Remembers 
Luther 

The churches of Boston will not al- 
low the quadricentennial of Luther to 
pass without notice. They have a par- 
ticularly ambitious program for the 
celebration in the autumn. The 
various churches will each mark the 
occasion with appropriate exercises 
and large interdenominational meet- 
ings are being arranged. The Con- 
gregational Club and the Methodist 
Social Union will each have its own 
special program. 

Death of 
President Hyde 

One of the prominent figures in 
American Christianity has been that 
of President William DeWitt Hyde 
of Bowdoin College. His literary 
labors have made him well known 
among ministers and intelligent lay- 
men. Especially useful have been his 
books "God's Education of Man," 
"Jesus' Way," "Sin and Its Forgive- 
ness," and "Five Great Philosophies." 
President Hyde was fifty-nine years 
old and had served thirty-two years as 
a college head. For a long time he 
was known as the "boy president." 

Lutherans 
Plan Union 

Three great branches of the Luth- 
eran church recently sent representa- 
tives to a meeting at Atlantic City. 
The committee on constitutional re- 
vision recommended the formation of 
the United Lutheran Church in Amer- 
ica, which would include three great 
branches of the churches. The Mis- 
souri Synod Lutherans resist all fel- 
lowship with other Lutherans and it 
will doubtless be a long time before 
they come into the union. The mem- 
bership in the Missouri Synod is 
mostly German. 



By ORVIS F. JORDAN 



Postpone Union Until 
After the Watr, 

The action of the Presbyteriai 
General Assembly in Canada, takei 
recently, postpones union until afte 
the war. The Methodists and Con 
gregationalists have been ready fo 
some time to proceed with th 
amalgamation of the three leadin 
evangelical denominations in the Do 
minion. This action may be inter 
preted as a victory for the conserva 
tives. There has come a generj 
spirit of weariness after the contrc 
versies over the union question. Th 
General Assembly is to take up th 
matter again at its second sessio 
after the war. The committee o 
union is to be continued. 

Rural Church Conference 
in Evanston 

The Methodists of the middle wes 
are holding a Rural Church Conferenc 
at Garrett Biblical Institute, Evans 
ton, Illinois, July 23-28. This is hel 
under the auspices of the Departmer 
of Rural Work of Board of Horn 
Missions and Church Extension o 
the denomination. Among those ar 
nounced to speak is Prof. Paul I 
Vogt, superintendent of the Deparl 
ment of Rural Work. 

Religious Work 
in the Army 

The Federal Council of Churche 
and the American Y. M. C. A. hav 
formed a strong advisory corrtmitte 
to do work in the army in the way c 
furnishing special speakers. They wi 
secure places for these speakers an 
pay their expenses. Rev. J. R. Ste^j 
enson, D. D., is chairman of the con 
mittee. 

An Essay Contest 
for Children 

With the idea of stimulating intei 
est among the children in the life ( 
Jesus, the Chicago Church Feder; 
tion Council, of which Dr. W. 1 
Millard is secretary, will conduct 
prize essay contest among the childre 
of the Chicago Sunday schools. T\ 
theme considered will be the story t 
Christ's life. The essays are to be or 
hundred and fifty words in lengtl 
The children are to be divided in! 
four classes according to age, ar 
prizes will be awarded according! 
In each age group a gold medallion, 
silver medallion and fifty bron: 
medallions will be awarded to the wii 
ners. The contest is to be conducte 
in the autumn. 



Ililllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllll 



Social Interpretations 



By ALVA W. TAYLOR 



illlillllllllilllllltllllllillllllllllltllillllllllUlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinilllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIM^ 



Banditti of the 
Sea Lanes 

WE ARE justly horrified at the 
submarine pirates and assas- 
sins; they break all the recog- 
nized rules of the seas. What shall 
we think of the great English trans- 
portation companies upon whose ships 
depends the bread and butter of Brit- 
ain and much of the munition supply 
of her armies? They are taking ad- 
vantage of the stressful situation to 
enrich themselves to the extent of tens 
of millions over and above all their 
large average dividends ; war dividends 
as high as 70 per cent in a single 
year have been declared and many a 
ship has been taken out of the discard 
and made to pay for itself in a single 
round trip from America. 

True, there is no law against this ; 
it is on the good old commercial prin- 
ciple of "all the traffic will bear." 
When the surgeon saves your life you 
are willing to pay his most exorbitant 
charge ; thus, it may be argued, should 
England be glad to pay the shipping 
companies. But the great surgeons 
are surrendering their tens of thou- 
sands per year to save wounded sol- 
diers, and every family in England 
is giving of its best manhood to save 
the nation and civilization, and it is, 
besides, economizing on food, elimi- 
nating all luxur-ies and sacrificing for 
the national cause. But the big ship- 
ping offices stand like the medieval 
I'gentlemen" of the roads at the sea 
ilanes taking millions from the national 
pocket by adding it to the cost of ra- 
j:ions and munitions shipped from 
America. If a submarine sinks a ves- 
j>el or it strikes a mine and is lost, 
;he government pays full recompense 
—no risks are taken ; the people take 
jdl the risks, the rich corporations 
ake the profits. 



The Conscientious 
pbjector 

One of the biggest problems before 
tJncle Sam is that of the conscientious 
bjector. There are such, without 
oubt, with emphasis upon the consci- 
entious; there will be many also with 
jmphasis upon the other word. There 
re those who would refuse to recog- 
ize any man's right to make a consci- 
titious objection; this is the attitude 
) both Germany and France. Eng- 
;nd theoretically made place for con- 
:ience, but in practice found the diffi- 
Jlties so great both in weeding out 
le slackers from the really conscien- 
ous and also in meeting the demands 
f an intolerant military spirit that 



thousands were brought before tri- 
bunals and sent both to the front and 
to prison. 

It will be difficult to discern the 
really conscientious objector from the 
coward and slacker when the exemp- 
tion boards meet; it might help to 
put the burden of proof on the ob- 
jector and compel him to prove that 
his convictions had not been acquired 
since war was declared by bringing 
ample witness to his stand in years 
agone ; it could perhaps be better han- 
dled by compelling every objector to 
do some work of reconstruction, but 
making it impossible for him to escape 
service. To put him at war tasks out- 
side the fighting lines does not meet 
the issue at stake in his convictions, 
because he is only absolved from dan- 
ger and his conscience is not respected 
in its objection to war; but even the 
most radical of pacifists cannot plead 
any excuse against those works of 
humanity that war entails and the 
work of ambulance corps, stretcher 
bearers, hospital helpers and that of 
reconstructing the devastated war 
areas is not war, but a work of hu- 
manity in which he who hates war 
most can give to his best. If his ob- 
jection is really conscientious the same 
conscientiousness will demand that he 
do something to bind up humanity's 
wounds and that he be willing to suf- 
fer vicariously for the sins of war- 
making. 

It will, of course, fail to save the 
idealist host of conscientious objectors 
from the coward and slacker who be- 
came "conscientious" when he faced 
the danger of conscription, but it will 
save our civilization from failure to 
respect the honest objector and save 
the slacker himself from the worst re- 
sults of his cowardice and lying — that 
of total escape from duty. It is much 
better to allow some slackers through 
than it is to lose respect for honest 
convictions and to sacrifice funda- 
mental respect and toleration of 
conscience, for here is where the 
deepest cleavage between democ- 
racy and autocracy runs. 



Some By-Products of Missions. 
By Isaac Taylor Headland. (323 
pages. $1.50. Methodist Book Con- 
cern.) 

Dr. Headland was for many years 
a missionary in Pekin and was one of 
the educational leaders and founders 
of the new China. He furnished the 
young emperor with many of those 
modern inventions and books that 
aroused him to attempt to modernize 



China. This volume is one of several 
from his pen and is one of the most 
readable books on missions that has 
ever been written. Much of the ma- 
terial is put into narrative and col- 
loquial form and is thus made as "in- 
teresting as fiction." The "by-prod- 
ucts" of missions are shown to be 
quite as valuable as its direct prod- 
ucts ; indeed, the reader is convinced 
that they are really the big things be- 
cause they are the results of evangel- 
ism in terms of a new civilization. The 
contributions the missionary has made 
to government, art, trade, science, 
civic life, intellectual and moral de- 
velopment, world peace and individ- 
ual development are set forth in a 
graphic manner. Then to these re- 
markable narratives are added some 
stories of direct products that are 
marvelous to read. One lays the book 
down wondering why more mission- 
ary literature is not read for the sheer 
fascination in it and he doubly won- 
ders why a rich church does not really 
get into this "biggest business on the 
earth" as if it reaHzed what the re- 
turns are. 

* * * 

The Lord's Day. By D. M. Can- 
right. (260 pages. $1.00. Revells.) 

Mr. Canright was for many years 
one of the leading ministers of the 
Seventh Day Adventists. As a conse- 
quence, his refutation of the sabbatical 
doctrines of that church is based upon 
a thorough going knowledge of their 
viewpoint and interpretation of his- 
tory and the Scriptures. He mani- 
fests not only the "inside" knowledge 
this relationship gave him but all the 
enthusiasm usually manifested by one 
who has been converted from such a 
viewpoint. His argument is complete 
and convincing. Those who have to 
meet the teachings of this peculiar 
legalism will doubtless find this vol- 
ume the best help available. 



He who so realizes the presence of 
the Creator as to feel himself filled 
with a peace which no discord can 
mar, and a filial confidence which rests 
in the trust of its own immortality — 
that man has attained the divine life 
in all its earthly fullness. — William 
Alger. 

* * * 

God send us a real religious life, 
which shall pluck blindness out of 
the heart, and make us better fathers, 
mothers, and children — a religious life 
that shall go with us where we go, 
and make every house the house of 
God, every act acceptable as a prayer ! 
— Theodore Parker. 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 26, 1917 



The Sunday School | 

jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy^^ 

"Out of the Depths" 

The Lesson in Today's Life* 
By CHARLES H. SWIFT 



IT IS evident that in life trying ex- 
periences play a large part in 
humbling the soul and melting the 
human heart. True religion is based 
on a sense of dependence upon some 
divine power and a desire to be so re- 
lated to that divine power as to be- 
come free from a sense of guilt. 
Wealth, prosperity, exalted position, 
fame and success often develop a 
sense of independence which is de- 
structive to religious experience. It 
was not until Manasseh found himself 
a captive in a foreign city that he be- 
gan to think seriously about an omni- 
potent God. 

Like the Prodigal of the New 
Testament, who came to himself only 
when he had sunk into the very 
depths of abject poverty and despair, 
this immoral and vicious profaner, 
suddenly checked in his ungodly ca- 
reer, passes through that experience 
of soul examination and will determi- 
nation as to repent most prayerfully 
of his awful wickedness. As evidence 
of the genuineness of a transformed 
life, he is found zealously reforming 
his people and building up the relig- 
ion of his father. 

* * * 

The act of conversion itself may 
not be logically analyzed. No doubt 
earlier experiences of his home life 
and experiences with the prophets of 
God played a large part in this sud- 
den change. No doubt the humility 
of the present hour while in the cap- 
tivity, the pleading voice of the 
prophets still ringing in his ears, the 
soul yearnings for the sacred city afar 
off, and the religious activities of the 
city life wherein he is a captive, had a 
wonderful influence in hastening this 
change. No doubt the instinctive im- 
pulse of having been extremely selfish 
in defiance to Jehovah's eternal good- 
ness and the distress of mind because 
of divine disapproval caused the peni- 
tent to come to himself. 

At all events, his conversion is gen- 
uine, for he finds himself by creating 
a new self embodied in Manasseh the 
reformer. 

While it is a noble thing to become 
penitent and thereby partake of God's 
great mercy, yet it is nobler to live in 



continual fellowship with God. 
Wasted time and energy while living 
in sin might be used in some great 
constructive program. The evil influ- 
ences set in motion by the life of sin 
can never be wholly recalled. The 
experience of sin has no value what- 
ever in comparison to the harm it 
does. Sowing wild oats is the con- 
coction of the devil and has long since 
been exploded. The strongest and 
most useful life is one surrendered to 
God's will in childhood and ever kept 
busy on the job. The natural develop- 
ment of the unfolding life will be 
godly and righteous from the begin- 
ning. 

* * * 

Such theological questions as orig- 
inal sin, death-bed repentance and the 
like arise because of our mistaken no- 
tion about conversion. While God 
will save the worst battered hulk on 
the turbulent seas of sin, still he pur- 
poses that righteousness from infancy 
should be the natural force in life. 

It may be well to note where 
Manasseh found God. While in a 
far-off heathen city, thronged with 
strange people, amid the excitement 
and buzz of business and social activ- 



ity and surrounded with heathen prac- 
tices, he looked into his own soul, saw 
the great need therein and immedi- 
ately responded to the surging impulse 
which seized him. God was not in the 
beautiful ceremony of the temple at 
Jerusalem. He was not found in any 
offerings made according to the 
Levitical law. Like in Henry van 
Dyke's story, "The Lost Word:" at 
just that moment when he could speak 
the word "Jehovah" in its fullest and 
richest meaning, he found God. Con- 
scious of his sins as a great leader, 
remorseful because of his selfish in- 
dependence and widespread wicked- 
ness, and sensitive to the appeal of hij 
better self, this soul-awakened peni-i 
tent experienced God's loving forgive-; 
ness at just the moment that he 
humbled himself in subordinating his 
will to the divine will. 

Religious ceremonies and ritualistic 
formality may have their psycholog- 
ical value in conversion, but God is! 
found only in the deep experiencees oil 
the human soul. It is there he takes 
hold of the penitent and raises hin 
out of the deadly depths of sin anc 
despair. "Let the wicked forsake hi;' 
way, and the unrighteous man hi; 
thoughts ; and let him return unto Je 
hovah, and he will have mercy upor 
him ; and to our God, for he wil 
abundantly pardon." 



Baptismal Suits 

We can make prompt shipmeats. 
Order Now. Fiaest quality and most 
atisfactory in every way. Order 6y 
ize of boot. 

Disciples Publication Socictv 

700 E. 40th St. Ckica^.lll. 



SIX GREAT BOOKS 

El Supremo. — White. A thrilling story of South America $1.90net 

History of the Great War. — Conan Doyle. Vol. I. Every scholarly man will 

wish to possess this great history. Purchase Vol. I now $2.00neti 

Aspects of the Infinite Mystery. — Gordon. A profoundly spiritual volume, 

interestingly written $1.50 net 

What the War Is Teaching. — Jefferson. One of the greatest books the war 

has brought forth $1.00 net 

The Bible and Modern Life. — Cooper. A rich mine for ministers $1.00 

Applied Religion for Every Man. — Nolan Rice Best. For ministers who live 

in the today $1.00 net 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 E. 40th Street, Chicago 



*This article is based on the Interna- 
tional Uniform Lesson for August 5, 
"Manasseh's Sins and Repentance." 
Scripture, 2 Chronicles 33:1-20. 



Recruiting 

with Men. 



BOOKS ON EVANGELISM 

John Timothy Stone. Hand-to-Hand] Methods 



for Christ 

$1.00 net. 

The Real Billy Sunday — "Ram's Horn" Brown. $1.00 net. 
The Soul-Winning Church — Len G. Broughton. 50c net. 
The How Book — Hudson. Methods of Winning Men. 50c net. 
Thirty-One Revival Sermons — Banks. $1.00 net. 
Pastoral and Personal Evangelism — Goodell. $1.00 net. 
Revival Sermons — Chapman. $1.00. 

As Jesus Passed By — Addresses by Gipsy Smith. $1.00 net. 
Saved and Kept — F. B. Meyer. Counsels to Young Believers. j50c net. 



i 



July 26, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



17 



Disciples Table Talk 



California Disciples Meet 
at Long Beach This Week 

The annual convention of the Disci- 
ples of Southern California is being held 
at Long Beach this week and next. The 
date is July 26-August 5. In addition to 
local talent the following named leaders 
will participate in the proceedings of the 
convention: Peter Ainslie, Baltimore, 
Md.; R. H. Miller, of the Men and Mil- 
lions Team; Secretaries Grant K. Lewis, 
Robert M. Hopkins, and W. R. Warren; 
E. S. Muckley, Portland, Ore., repre- 
senting the N. B. A.; George W. Brew- 
ster, Jr., Secretary California North; H. 
O. Breeden, pastor Fresno church; W. 
S. Buchanan, pastor Phoenix, Arizona; 
A. C. Smither and W. H. Hanna, Ma- 
nila, P. L, representing the F. C. M. S. 

Oregon Disciples in 
Annual Meeting 

Turner, Oregon, is the meeting place 
of the annual convention of the Disci- 
ples of Oregon this year, the date being 
July 28-August 5. Among those having 
part on the program are: H. H. Grifiis, 
Portland; A. L. Crim, Eugene; E. C. 
Sanderson, Eugene; Albyn Esson, Al- 
bany; C. H. Hilton, Baker; W. E. Ram- 
bo, Klamath Falls; D. C. Kellems, 
Eugene; F. T. Porter, W. G. Menzies, 
India; Mrs. Terry King, Texas; Roy K. 
Roadruck, Spokane, Wash.; Mrs. Clara 
G. Esson, State Bible school superin- 
tendent, and E. S. Muckley, Portland. 
C. F. Swander is the Oregon State Sec- 
:ary. 

H. H, Harmon May Go 
Into War Service 

At a recent called meeting of the offi- 
:ial board of First church, Lincoln, Neb., 
t was agreed to grant the pastor, H. H. 
Harmon, leave of absence for the dura- 
ion of the war if he should find oppor- 
unity to serve as chaplain with one of 
he regiments going to the front. There 
las been some discussion of the possi- 
bility of his being appointed chaplain 
!)f the Sixth Nebraska. 



— On July 1 the completed structure 

it Fargo, N. D., was formally opened 

)y an all day service and about $6,500 

vas raised in cash and pledges, including 

bout $4,000 formerly subscribed — the 

lid pledges having been absorbed in the 

lew. Norman Brighton, the minister, 

iroved a worthy host and John H. 

I^ooth was at his best in his dedication 

jddresses. In the evening F. B. Sapp, 

itate Secretary, spoke. This building is 

eported to be the best in the State, 

jmong the Disciples. 

j —On Lord's day, July 8, the Willis- 
hn, N. D., church held a picnic and out 
|oor meeting in the country at which 
1 • B. Sapp was speaker. Three persons 
'ere baptized and one received by letter. 

.— H. W. Hunter, of Wellington, Kan., 
'ill summer at Higginsville, Mo., where 
e ministered for five years. 

—The Mokane, Mo., church, Geo. W. 
uckner, Jr., pastor, made its every 
lember canvass July 15. The budget 
as oversubscribed by $150. The church 
ives to all the missionary and benevo- 
nt agencies of the Disciples. The 
lurch register shows a net gain of 40 



members for the past year. Mr. Buck- 
ner is to remain with the church another 
year at an increased salary. The Mokane 
church entertains the Callaway county 
convention August 28 and 29. 

— President Thos. C. Howe, of Butler 
College, Indianapolis, has been asked to 
serve as treasurer of the Board of Edu- 
cation until the next regular meeting of 
the Board of Education of the Disciples 
of Christ. He succeeds Professor Un- 
derwood, recently deceased. 

— R. H. Crossfield, President of Tran- 
sylvania and College of the Bible, Lex- 
ington, Ky., spent a recent prayer meet- 
ing night with the Bowling Green, O., 
church and gave an address on "Chris- 
tian Education." 

_-^S. W. Hutton, Southwestern Dis- 
trict Bible school superintendent, re- 
ports 46 new Bible schools organized in 
his district during the past year. 

— The annual Kentucky School of 
Methods, held at Lexington, had a total 
registration of 209, representing 101 
churches. There were 104 graduates. 

— Frank Lowe, Jr., national Christian 
Endeavor field secretary of the Disciples 
of Christ, was one of the leading speak- 
ers during the recent Illinois State con- 
vention. A conference of the Disciple 
Endeavorers was called by him and sixty 
young people responded. 

— A. B. Houze, who closed a five years' 
pastorate with Central church, Lima, O., 
to accept a call to First church, Bowl- 
ing Green, Ky., an important college 
center of Western Kentucky, is busy 
in his new field, with increased audi- 
ences in mid-summer. He recently 
made the following special addresses: 
"What is Christian Endeavor?" before 
the Christian Endeavor Union of the 
city; "The Man Who Wins," before five 
hundred students of the Bowling Green 



Make the 



Business University; "What Is the 
Bible?" before two hundred school teach- 
ers of Warren county, Ky. He is also 
doing his part in making Red Cross 
addresses. The church recently pre- 
sented him with an electric fan for his 
study, with this note appended: "Just a 
small appreciation of the fine beginning 
of your pastorate with us." 

■ — C. E. Pickett, Georgia Bible school 
superintendent, lost all his possessions 
in the recent Atlanta fire. His new per- 
manent address is 141 Peeples St., At- 
lanta, Ga. 

— The Homes of the National Benev- 
olent Association are full to running 
over. Scores and scores are clamoring 
for admission, writes Secretary Mohor- 
ter. The cost of living is soaring to 
the clouds. The problem of the widow 
and the orphan and of those who are 
devoted to their care Is a serious one. 
In the last twelve months, the National 
Benevolent Association has been com- 
pelled to write across the face of sixty 
applications from aged, indigent mem- 
bers of the church "rejected because 
there is no room." A good man in Illi- 
nois has just sent the Association a 
check for $600 to start the building fund 
for the enlargement of the Home at 
Jacksonville, Illinois. 

— C. K. Marshall, well known to the 
older generation of Disciples as an elo- 
quent preacher of the Gospel, died at 
the home of his daughter, Mrs. Jake Col- 
lins, Richmond, Ky., on July 11, 1917, at 
the age of 81 years. Mr. Marshall was 
for sixty years a faithful preacher, hold- 
ing pastorates in many of the leading 
churches of the Disciples, notably the 
old Main Street Church in Lexington, 
Ky. He is remembered by a host of 
friends as parishioners. He was laid to 
rest in the Richmond cemetery with sim- 
ple services on Friday, July 1.3. 

— George W. Schroeder, of the church 
at Rudolph, O., recently delivered an 
address at a Red Cross community meet- 
ing at Portage, O. 

— Mrs. Laura Delany Garst calls at- 
tention to the address delivered by Mr. 




ount! 



Every minister and religious leader should see that when the summer 
is over he has not gone backward, but rather made a real advance in 
his thought life. One must read, and read widely, in these days to 
keep up with the world's progress. In order to encourage ministers 
and other religious workers to "make the summer count" for their 
mental and spiritual development, we are making a special 10 per 
cent discount for cash on $5.00 (or more) orders for books ad- 
vertised in this issue of The Christian Century. Lay in your 
"summer reading" now and take advantage of this special ofifer. En- 
close check with order, including 10 cents postage for each volume 
ordered. 



Disciples Publication Society 



700 E. 40th St. 



Chicago 



18 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 26, 191/ 



Y. M. Chen, of Nanking University, at 
the College of Missions commencement 
this year. The address has been pub- 
lished in the July issue of the Mission- 
ary Tidings. 

— The church, Bible school, C. W. 
B. M. and other organizations of Sha- 
ron, Pa., have decided to raise $600 in 
the year beginning October 1 to sup- 
port a missionary in Africa. The church 
will thus become a living link church. 

— J. D. Hunter has resigned from the 
pastorate at Anacortes, Wash., to take 
charge of the religious work of the Navy 
Y. M. C. A. at Bremerton, Wash. 

— The marriage is reported at Bridge- 
port, 111., of Mr. Roderick A. MacLeod 
and Miss Esther E. Martin, both of In- 
dianapolis, Ind. The ceremony was in 
charge of H. Clay Trusty, of Seventh 
Street Church, Indianapolis. Mr. and 
Mrs. MacLeod are now in that city com- 
pleting their work preparatory to leav- 
ing in August for Tibet, where they will 
devote their lives to missionary service. 

— F. M. Cummings, of the church at 
Harri.sonville, Ark., reports that he has 
sold his residence there and purposes re- 
turning to Ohio, his native state. 

—Herbert L. Willett, Jr., has been 
supplying his father's pulpit at Memorial 
Church, Chicago, during the absence of 
Dr. Willett at Chautauqua, N. Y. 

— \yilliam Woods College at Eulton,. 
Mo., is to have an additional dormitory, 
made necessary by the unprecedented 
enrollment of students for next year. 
The new dormitory will be used as a 
Senior hall and will furnish accommo- 
dations for thirty more girls. It is to 
be finished in the latest style and will 
contain every modern convenience. 



THE BIBLE COLLEGE OF MISSOURI 

A biblical school of high grade. At Columbia, Mo. Adjacent to the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, and affiliated with it. Interchange of credits. No 
tuition. Non-Missourians $20 per year in University. Fine student preaching 
opportunities. For catalogue or information, write 

G. D. EDWARDS, Dean, •.' •.• '.• COLUMBIA, MO. 



work of the church. The elders are 
F. M. Rains, J. H. Fillmore, N. F. Dean, 
R. A. Doan, S. J. Corey and C. R. 
Staufifer, the minister, who is just clos- 
ing the fifth year of his pastorate with 
the Norwood church. During the fifth 
year 233 were added to the church, mak- 
ing a total of 751 added during the five 
years. A Bible school plant was erected 
and the second living link to the for- 
eign field and one of the home field 
were sent out during the five years. 



Iirill Vnn 1/ ^.^^"^^^ Hom« f©r You. 
NbW YDRK Write Dr. Fiais Idleman. 
Ilk II I uim j^2 West 81st St, N. ^. 



— The elders of the church at Nor- 
wood, O., a suburb of Cincinnati, re- 
cently motored to the summer home of 
S. J. Corey, near Milford, O., and spent 
an afternoon talking over the spiritual 



North Dakota's Convention 

The North Dakota Convention, held 
in Minot, June 22-24 was in every way 
a success both in point of attendance 
and interest throughout. Notable ad- 
dresses and sermons were delivered by 
Frederick W. Burnham and John H. 
Booth. Miss Ada L. Forster was the 
worthy representative of the C. W. B. M. 
These speakers covered the whole field 
of our missionary interests, including the 
Men and Millions Movement, Every 
Member Canvass, etc. 

The convention sermon was delivered 
by Norman Brighton, the pastor at 
Fargo. His message was received heart- 
ily. 

Dr. K. H. Mallarian, M. D., spoke 
twice and in his address on "Some Hard 
Problems," gave preachers as well as 
others food for thought. On the last 
day of the convention, Sunday, the 24th, 
the new basement was dedicated at 3 
p. m. Mr. Burnham spoke in the morn- 
ing and afternoon and Mr. Booth gave 
the closing address at night. It is nota- 
ble that the Sabin brothers and their 
families drove by auto some 350 miles to 
attend the convention. 

The sixth convention in North Dakota 



An Appreciation of Charles E. Underwood 



The following is a portion of a testi- 
mony of appreciation of the late Charles 
E. Underwood, whose death was re- 
ported in last week's issue of the "Cen- 
tury." We glean it from the Indiana 
Worker, from the pen of Thos. C. Howe: 

"The life of Charles Eugene Under- 
wood was in all essential respects a 
completed life. His tasks are left un- 
finished. His desk in the college office, 
the announcement in the catalog of his 
courses, and a son of tender years bear 
striking testimony to this fact. But a 
man's tasks and his life are not the 
same. As a man's life consists not in 
the abundance of the things which he 
possesses, so does it not consist in the 
multitude of his achievements. No 
worthy man ever dies without leaving 
tasks for other hands. But a life may 
be finished, rounded out, perfected at 
each stage of its progress, at the close 
of each day. Such a finishing depends 
not upon the completing of external 
tasks, but upon certain oualities of the 
soul. These endowments of the spirit 
are the very essence of life. 

"Such qualities Professor Underwood 
possessed in the highest degree. He had 
poise and self control; he was kind and 
generous; he was faithful and one to 



whom the most intimate confidences 
might be intrusted and was in all things 
and in every respect dependable. He was 
both wise and sympathetic in counsel 
and many a student came to him with 
his problems in a state of anxiety and 
perplexity and departed with vision clear 
and soul in tranquility. His Christian 
faith and character were of the quiet, 
unobtrusive order and yet were deep, 
confident and dynamic. His faith was 
the very warp and woof of his character. 

"There were two qualities which he 
possessed and which, blending together, 
made his character and life of great 
force. They were a quiet, determined 
perseverence and heroic courage." 

Mr. Underwood's death occurred on 
July 3 at his home in Indianapolis. He 
had been in poor health for some time, 
due to cancer of the stomach. The 
funeral services were held at the Downey 
Avenue church. Rev. C. H. Winders, 
pastor of the church, was in charge, as- 
sisted by the following: W. C. Morro, 
David H. Shields, pastor of the church 
at Kokomo, Ind.; President T. C. Howe, 
Dr. Jabez Hall, W. H. Book, pastor of 
Tabernacle church, Columbus, Ind., and 
A. L. Orcutt. The burial was at the 
Crown Hill Cemetery. 



passed as have all the rest without a 
single discordant note in the business 
or any other proceedings. 

On the last day there was one bap- 
tism and eight persons were received b} 
letter. Finley B. Sapp, 

Secretary 



^ ^ ^ 



Last Call for Lake Geneva 

The Lake Geneva Conference of The 
Missionary Education Movement is t( 
be held July 27-August 5. This is th( 
last announcement that can be mad( 
before that conference begins. If yoi 
are planning to go to Lake Geneva, for 
ward your name at once to S. J. Corey 
Box 884, Cincinnati, or buy a ticket t( 
Chicago and from Chicago buy a ticke 
over the Northwestern to Williams Bay 
Lake Geneva. You will then be taken t( 
the Y. M. C. A. camp and assigned ; 
room. It will be a great conference 
Five or six hundred delegates will bi 
there from the Central West. 

The delegation going to Lake Genev; 

from Chicago is planning to hold a re 

ception at the Metropolitan Church o 

Christ, Van Buren and Leavitt streets 

on the evening of Thursday, July 2f 

All delegates are asked to send thei 

names to Miss Elva L. Abbott, 437 Soutl 

Oakley Blvd., Chicago. 
* * * 

$5.00 Prize for Best Tithing Articles 

I am ofifering five prizes of $5 eac 
for the best five terse, brief article 
descriptive of the methods used by mir 
isters who have inaugurated and niair 
tained successful tithing bands in the: 
churches. Thos. Kane, 

143 N. Wabash Ave., Chicago. 



Union Theological Collet 

Offers high-grade academic and theological instruction 
men and women unable to complete a college course b 
who have the ability and desire to enter the MINISTR 
or to become EVANGELI.STS, PASTORS. ASSISTAN' 
or DIRECTORS OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 

TUITION FREE — OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF HEl 

Annual Catalogue now ready. Address H. J. Loken, E 
tension Lecturer, 20 North Ashland Blvd., Chicago, I 



CHURCH |;t<||:| SCHOOL 



A£k for CataUgue lad Special DonatUn Plan Na. 

(Established 1868) 
THE C. S. BELL CO., HILLSBSRO, OHi 



VJfk RAafI and clip for you daily everythin(i 
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For You Send Stamp for Booklet 

The Consolidated Press Clipping Companj^ 

MANHATTAN BUILDING, CHICAGO 



July 26, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



19 



\ Successful Summer School of Missions 

The Interdenominational Summer 
school of Missions for Women, at Wil- 
son College, Chambersburg, Pa., June 28 
:o July 6, 1917, was in every way a suc- 
;ess. This school is an outgrowth of 
he wonderfully successful school at 
STorthfield, Mass., where for thirteen 
^ears the attendance has increased to 
such an extent that it was finally de- 
eded to establish a new center, so that 
iocieties at distant points could receive 
he same inspiration as at Northfield, 
inder practically the same leaders and 
:eachers. After a careful canvass of the 
:ountry, Wilson College, Chambersburg, 
Pa., was selected as the most desirable 
ocation, convenient for Pennsylvania, 
ind the South, beautifully situated in 
he Cumberland Valley, and with all the 
equipment of a modern college for young 
vomen, it is an ideal spot for a summer 
school of missions. 

At this first session, there was an en- 
ollment of 524, with several late reg- 
strations returned for lack of accom- 
modations. Eighteen denominations 
Ntre. represented. Missionaries were 
present from India, Africa, Japan, China, 
Persia, Mexico, Egypt, Philippines and 
Yucatan. Ten Disciples of Christ were 
n attendance, including our Dr. Gordon, 
)f India. The school for next year will 
nclude both home and foreign missions, 
mder present leadership, with the addi- 
ion of leaders from home missions 
)oards. Registrations for 1918 are lim- 
ted to 700 women, which are carefully 
ipportioned among the different church 
)odies. 

Mrs. Allen A. Moats, 244 E. Walnut 
^ane, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa., of 
he Disciples, was made Secretary and 
freasurer for 1918. It is to be hoped 
hat the Disciples will meet their full 
pportionment next year. 

Allen A. Moms. 
* * * 

The New Illinois Plan of State and 
District Work 

At the State Convention last year a 
pecial committee was appointed to con- 
ider a new plan of state and district 
vork. That committee consisted of the 
president and secretary of the state 
>oard, three district secretaries and the 
tate secretary. The committee made 
:|uite a thorough investigation of the pro- 
,:ram of state missions in Ohio, Indiana, 
jCentucky, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and 
Nebraska. After giving consideration to 
ill the information secured the commit- 
|ee drew up a plan and recommended it 
jo the state board. This was approved 
jy the board and has just been ratified 
jy the eight district conventions in the 
,tate. Since the matter has gone this 
!ir and has been so enthusiastically re- 
jeived, we feel that it will be in order 
!5 emphasize the main features of the 
lew plan. 

I We shall not go into detail at present, 
jut the state office will be glad to fur- 
ish information on any points that may 
3t be clear. The state is to be divided 
to six districts, the territory of the Chi- 
igo Christian Missionary Society being 
le district, which will have full control 
; its own missionary program. Each 
: the five districts will have its own 
'angelist and they will be employed by 
e state board and paid out of one com- 
on treasury. The state board will be 
ade up of nine men, three elected each 
:ar and each district convention will 
ect a secretary annually who shall also 
■ a member of the state board. 
The plan of unifying the Bible School 
d Christian Endeavor work with the 
gular state program is to be continued 
d the evangelists employed will repre- 




Transylvania and the College of the Bible 

In the Heart of the Blue Grass 

Courses leading to A. B., B. S., M. A., P. Th. B., and B. D. 
degrees. Degrees recognized in leading American universities. 
Pre-vocational courses in Law, Medicine, Agriculture and 
Business Al'fairs. Special course for preparation of Teachers. 
Rooms in Men's Dormitory, ,$30 per year. Board, $3.3.5 per 
week. Rooms in Girls' House, $33.50 per semester. Board 
from $3 to $4 per week. Both buildings new and modern in 
every way. All regular fees for the year, $50. 
Abundant opportunities for self help; 100 churches served 
by ministerial students. Scholarships for honor graduates of 
accredited high schools. Scholarships, including all fees and 
two-thirds room rent, for ministerial and missionary students. 
Students last year from 38 states and 5 foreign countries. 
Write to 

THE PRESIDENT, Lexington, Kentucky 



sent all these interests in the field. The 
Christian Endeavor societies will be 
asked for an annual offering toward the 
support of the work among our colored 
people in the state. The Sunday schools 
will continue to cooperate in the Thanks- 
giving ofifering through the American 
Christian Missionary Society and the 
Illinois Christian Missionary Society 
jointly. The matter of living link 
churches is to be left with the state 
secretary and a special effort will be 
made to secure living links for all mis- 
sion churches established. 

The proposed work of the district 
evangelists shall be to aid weak churches, 
restore dead churches, bring together 
groups of churches for ministerial sup- 
port, enlist churches for missionary giv- 
ing, and in general to aid the churches in 
achieving greater usefulness. 

There can be but one cause for failure 
with the new plan. It will take money 
to run a campaign of this kind and more 
money than we have ever thought of 
giving to the cause of Illinois missions. 
But with our permanent fund now $100,- 
000 and the program for living link 
churches outlined we ought to be able 



to finance the enterprise by a vigorous 
prosecution of Illinois Day. 

H. H. Peters, State Secretary. 



Bible College of Missouri, Columbia, 
Missouri 

The Bible College of Missouri has just 
closed the best year in its history — 255 
students were enrolled. Following is a 
comparison of the enrollment for the 
last six years: 

1911- 1913- 1913- 1914- 1915- 1916- 

13 13 14 15 16 17 

Ministry 26 33 21 26 23 25 

Mission Field 2 4 11 10 7 6 
Religious. Wk. 8 9 11 6 13 13 
M. S. U. Stu- 
dents 68 91 104 120 126 123 

Christian Col- 
lege Girls. . 35 40 23 30 43 60 
Others 3 . . . . 13 28 28 



Totals 



.142 



166 



TWO BOOKS 

By Professor W- S. Athearn 

Every Pastor, Superintendent and 

Teacher Should Have 

The Church School. $1 .00 net. 
Organization and Adminis- 
tration of the Church School. 

30c net. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St., CHICAGO 



ITO 195 239 255 

Aside from the 44 enrolled last year 
under the first three headings above 
there were 82 preparing to teach, thir- 
teen to enter journalism, etc., etc. There 
were 66 freshmen, 34 sophomores, 40 
juniors, 53 seniors, 23 graduates and 39 
special students. Of these last 13 were 
below collegiate grade. 

During the past year another course 
has been approved for credit towards 
the A. B. degree in the University of 
Missouri. The Dean of the Bible Col- 
lege has been added to the University 
Committee on Junior Colleges. He will 
examine the religious studies in junior 
colleges when such are offered for credit 
in the University of Missouri. 

The Bible College now offers five 
correspondence courses for such per- 
sons as cannot get away from home to 
attend college. 



THE BEST SCORE BOARD 

Framed in Solid Oak with durable one-piece back. All cards have a Jet black 
background. The names of months, days of the week and dates 1 to 31 are printed 
in red. All other figures and wordings appear in white. All cards are 2^ inches 
in height. 

THESE BOARDS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

PRICE I^IST, NOT PREPAID 

Ko. 2 — Size 45x32 iHcbes; 12 strips, 20 sets of figures, 94 words, etc., $12.50 

No. 3 — Siz* 45x48 Inches; 18 strips, 30 sets of flgmres, 94 words, etc., 15.00 

No. 1 — Size 30x31 lncli«B; 12 strips, 20 sets of flgtires, 30 words, etc., 10.00 

Send for complete description. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 700 E. 40th Street, CHICAGO 



Don't Let Your School Slump! 

Send 75c for 100 assorted "Attendance Builder" post cards, 
and try them on your class. They will build up and keep up 
your attendance. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



20 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



July 26, 1917 



1 ,200 COPIES SOLD 

IN KANSAS CITY ALONE 

Dr. Burris A. Jenkins' Popular Volume 

"The Man in the Street 
and Religion" 

A book containing the Kansas City preacher's message and his 
personal philosophy of life. 

One of the livest and most readable 
statements of modern faith which the pres- 
ent year has brought forth. The following 
extract from the first chapter suggests the 
point of view and atmosphere of this 
fascinating book: 

"To look upon the seething mass of men in the 
city streets, or on the country side, the navvy in 
the ditch or on the right-of-way, the chauffeur 
and the engine man, the plumber and the pluto- 
crat, the man with the hoe and the man with the 
quirt, the clerk and the architect, the child of the 
silver spoon and the child of the rookery, and to 
declare that all alike are religious, naturally re- 
ligious, seems a daring stand to take. But that 
is the precise position to which we are beginning 
to come." 

Price $1.25 (plus postage) 

Order now, inclosing remittance, and book will be sent immediately. 




The Christian Century Press 

700 E. 40th Street .*. Chicago 



July 26, 1917 THECHRISTIANCENTURY 21 



THE PSYCHOLOGY 
OF RELIGION 

By GEORGE ALBERT COE 

Professor of Religious Education, Union Theological Seminary, Author of 
"The Religion of a Mature Mind," The Spiritual Life," etc. 



For the Minister's Library 

For the Theological Seminary Student 
For College and Seminary Classes 
For the Psychologist and Educator 
For Young People's and Adult Bible Classes 



Of nineteen chapters, the first four are devoted to aspects of 
psychological study and investigation. The remaining fifteen 
present the author's keen analysis of religion in its individual 
and social processes. The most authoritative and interesting 
book in this fascinating field of study that has yet appeared. 

$ 1 .50, postage extra (weight 1 lb. 1 oz.) 

THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY PRESS 

' 700 East 40th Street, CHICAGO 



mmmm 



22 ^ ~ THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY July 26, 1917 



HYMNS OF THE 
UNITED CHURCH 

The Disciples Hymnal 



A Pronounced Success 

THE publishers regard this Hymnal as the most importan 
single contribution they have ever made to the Disciple! 
of Christ and the general Church. The widespread and cage 
interest in the appearance of this notable work and the alread; 
large sale of the book to churches and individuals mark th 
new hymnal not only as a present success, but also as a perma 
nent and much appreciated possession of the Disciples of Chrisi 

HYMNS OF THE UNITED CHURCH contains all the great hymr 
which have become fixed in the habits and affections of the Disciples, and adc 
thereto the great catholic hymns whose use by our churches has not been eij 
couraged by previous compilers. 

In addition, the new book is distinguished by three outstanding featurci 

Hymns of Christian Unity 
Hymns of Social Service 
Hymns of the Inner Life 

These three features give Hymns of the United Church a modernness < 
character and a vitality not found in any other book. This hymnal is alive! 

Great care has been bestowed on the "make-up" of the pages. They ai 
attractive to the eye. The hymns seem almost to sing themselves when tl 
book is opened! The notes are larger than are usually employed in hymnal 
The hymns are not crowded together on the page. No hymn is smothered 
a corner. The words are set in bold and legible type, and all the stanza 
are in the staves. Everything has been done to make a beautiful hymnal. 



July 26, 1917 THECHRISTIANCENTURY 23 

\n Epoch-Making Forward Step 

for the 



Disciples of Christ! 



Aids to Worship 

Supplementing the hymns are 100 pages of responsive 
cripture Readings and other aids to Worship. The Readings 
re topically selected, and so arranged as to give naturalness 
) the responses. The American Standard Version is used. 
)rders of Worship, special forms for the communion service, 
nd many prayers, responses and sentences topically arranged 
re in this department. 

I The Construction of the Book 

I The Disciples Hymnal is a delight to the eye and to the hand. A half- 
Dzen of the best hymnals in existence were taken to one of the best printing 
puses in the United States with instructions to make a better book than any 
le of them. No expense was spared. The plates were cast from new type 
)ecially purchased for this hymnal. The paper is the best and of good color, 
'he binding is most attractive. Every device known to the binder's art has 
j^en used for the strengthening of the back. Old fashioned tapes have been 
iplaced by cloth running the entire length of the back, and by reinforcements 
the first and last signatures. The book is made to last a long time! 

Price, per single copy, in cloth, $1,15; in half 'leather, $1.40. 

Especially attractive introductory terms to churches purchasing in quan- 
ies are being made in the early days of the first edition. Returnable samples 
ilnt to ministers and music committees on request. Write us today. 




IS THE WORLD 
GROWING BETTER 



or more materialistic? A study of actual 
events leads Professor Shailer Mathews to be- 
lieve that history does shovv^ spiritual forces at 
work w^hich may renews our threatened ideal- 
ism and our confidence in the might of right. 
He sums up his views in his new volume 



"THE SPIRITUAL 

INTERPRETATION OF 

HISTORY" 



Professor Mathews is Dean of the Divinity 
School in the University of Chicago and is one 
of the most brilliant writers in the field of re- 
ligion today. He is also the Editor of the 
Biblical World. 

Every minister and every alert churchman 
should possess this book. It is esssentially a 
book for the times. 

Price of the Book, $1.50 



iimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
FOR SALE BY 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION 

SOCIETY 

700 E. 40th STREET, :: :: CHICAGO, ILL. 



r 









i> 





Supplementing the 

Sufferings of 

Christ 

By J. H. Jowett 



CmCAGO 




THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY August 2, 1917 



THE PSYCHOLOGY 
OF RELIGION 

By GEORGE ALBERT COE 

Professor of Religious Education, Union Theological Seminary, Author of 
"The Religion of a Mature Mind," The Spiritual Life," etc. 



For 


the 


Minister's 


Library 






For 


the 


1 heolc 


>gical Seminary 


Student 






For 


Collegi 


^ and Seminary 


Classes 








For the 


Psychologist and Educator 


For 


Young 


People's and Adult Bible Classes 



Of nineteen chapters, the first four are devoted to aspects of 
psychological study and investigation. The remaining fifteen 
present the author's keen analysis of religion in its individual 
and social processes. The most authoritative and interesting 
book in this fascinating field of study that has yet appeared. 

$1.50, postage extra (weight 1 lb. 10 oz.) 

THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY PRESS 

700 East 40th Street. CHICAGO 



August 2, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



BnlMCrlptlea Flrlc«<~Two Aolleni mtiA 
a, half A year, payable atrlctly la 
advance. To mlnlBters, two dollar* 
when paid in adrance. Canadian 
subscriptions, SO cents additional for 
postace. Forelcn, f 1.90 additional. 
DlscioiitliniftaoeM — In order that sub- 
scribers may not be annoyed by 
failure to receive the paper, it is 
not discontinued at expiration of 
time paid in adranoe (unless so 
ordered), but continued pending In- 
struction from the subscriber. If 
diicontlnnance Is desired, prompt 
notice should be sent and all ar- 
rearages paid. 

ChMiffO of addre0»— In ordering 
change of address give the old as 
well as the new. 




PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 
IN THE INTEREST OF THE KINGDOM OF GOD 



ExplrHtlons — The date o^ the wran- 
per shows the tbontb Mid tear tA 
which subscription lA paldL List Is 
revlaed mottthly. Chanft mt Oat* 
on wrapper la a receipt tor ramll- 
tanco on subscription account. 

Remittances^ — Should be sent by 
draft or m^oney order, payable to 
The Disciples Publication Society. 
If local check is sent, add ten 
cents for exchange charged us by 
Chicago banlts. 

Entered as Second-Class Matter 
Feb. 2S, 1902, at the Fostofflce, Chi- 
cago, Illinois, under Act of March 
S, 187». 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, PROPRIETORS, 



700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO 



Disciples 
Publication 



The Disciples Publica- 
tion Society is an or- 
ganization through 
CArfAfv ^^**^1* churches of the 

society Disciples of Christ 

seek to promote un- 
denominational and constructive 
Christianity. 

The relationship it sustains to Dis- 
ciples organizations is intimate and 
organic, though not official. The So- 
ciety is not a private institution. It 
has no capital stock. No individuals 
profit by Its earnings. 

The charter under which the So- 
ciety exists determines that whatever 
profits are earned shall be applied to 
agencies which foster the cause of 
religious education, although it is 
clearly conceived that its main task 
is not to make profits but to produce 
literature for building up character 
and for advancing the cause of re- 
ligion. * • * 

The Disciples Publication Society 



regards itself as a thoroughly unde- 
nominational institution. It is organ- 
ized and constituted by individuals 
and churches who interpret the Dis- 
ciples' religious reformation as ideally 
an unsectarian and unecclesiastical 
fraternity, whose common tie and 
original impulse are fundamentally the 
desire to practice Christian unity with 
all Christians. 

The Society therefore claims fel- 
lowship with all who belong to the 
living Church of Christ, and desires to 
cooperate with the Christian people 
of all communions, as well as with the 
congregations of Disciples, and to 
serve all. * • ♦ 

The Christian Century desires noth- 
ing so much as to be the worthy or- 



gan of the Disciples' movement. It 
has no ambition at all to be regarded 
as art organ of the Disciples' denom- 
ination. It is a free interpreter of the 
wider fellowship in religious faith and 
service which it believes every church 
of Disciples should embody. It 
strives to interpret all communions, as 
well as the Disciples, in such terms 
and with such sympathetic insight as 
may reveal to all thejr essential unity 
in spite of denominational isolation. 
The Christian Century, though pub- 
lished by the Disciples, is not pub- 
lished for the Disciples^ alone. It is 
published for the Christian world. It 
desires definitely to occupy a catholic 
point of view and it seeks readers in 
all communions. 



"jr.'.r 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO. 

Dear Friends: — I believe in the spirit and purposes of The Cliristian Century and ivisk to be nuHbered ameig 
those who are supporting your work in » substantial way by their gifts. 



Enclosed please find 
$ 



Name..., 
A ddress. 



BSE 



IMLX 



SSB^BEB&BSC 



Great Books by Disciple Authors 

HISTORY OF THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST. By W. T. Moore. A comprehe'nsive story 
of the Disciples' movement from the early days to the present. A sumptuous volume 
of 700 pages, beautifully printed and bound, and sold by the original publishers, 
Revell's, at $4, $5, and $6 for cloth, half morocco and full morroco respectively. We 
now offer this great work for $2.50, $3.50 and $4.00, The pictures in the book are 
alone worth the price of the volume. Only a limited number in hand. Order today. 

THE MEANING OF BAPTISM. By Charles Clayton Morrison. The New York Christian 
Advocate says of tliis book: " 'The Meaning of Baptism' is probably the most im- 
portant book in English on the place of baptism in Christianity written since Mozley 
published his 'Baptismal Regeneration' in 1856." Says The Homiletic Review: "The 
spirit of the book is delightful and raises new hopes where none had seemed possible." 
Price of the book, $1.25, 

THE MORAL LEADERS OF ISRAEL. By Herbert L. WUlett. A thrilling and luminous 
interpretation of the Old Testament prophets, setting forth the historical situation 
within which each prophet lived and toward which his message was directed. Each of 
the great leaders is made to live anew. In Two Volumes, Each, $1. 

THE DIVINITY OF CHRIST, By Edward Scribaer Ames. Professor Geo. A. Coe says of 
the book: "These sermons display a remarkable union of intellectual boldness and 
spiritual warmth. Such a book serves to clear the air and to focus the attention at 
the right point." Price of book, 75 cents. 

HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS ADVOCATING CHRISTIAN UNION. Charles A. Young, 
Editor. Contains Thos. Campbell's "Declaration and Address," Alex. Campbell's "Ser- 
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Errett'3 "Our Position," and Garrison's 'The World's Need of Our Plea." Beautifully 
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THE EARLY RELATION AND SEPARATION OP BAPTISTS AND DISCIPLES.. By Er- 
rett Gates. Of this book The Congregationalist says: "A valuable contribution to 
the history of the American churches." Price, 75 cents. 

Disciples Publication Society, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 2, 1917. 



EQUATOR 




MONDOMBE 



IKELA 



Map of Field Occupied by the Disciples of Christ 
in the Center of the Congo Basin 

Good News But For The Hunger 

A circular bowl, 1,200 miles across and tilted to the west, is the region drained by the Congo River 
in Africa. The rim is composed of mountain barriers which nowhere attain a great height. The larger central 
part of the basin was formerly an enormous lake, whose waters finally cut a channel through to the 
Atlantic Ocean. The general elevation is twice that of the Mississippi Valley, beginning with 930 feet at 
Stanley Pool, 200 miles from the coast, and rising gradually to 1,285 feet at the foot of Stanley Falls, 
1,000 miles to the northeast. 

The celery beds of Michigan and corn fields of Illinois afford a suggestion of the richness of the land, 
and yet there is such destitution among the people that in one section the conventional greetings are "What 
is the News?" "Good News, but for the Hunger." In mental hunger the 50,000,000 of the Congo are eager 
children, while their spiritual hunger is starvation. Our missionaries at Bolenge had to reduce to writing 
the language of the 4,000,000 people of that section, whose speech is closely akin to that of all the great 
Bantu race which inhabits, not only the Congo, but the region east, west and south of it. 

Fertile as the fields were found for every tropical fruit and vegetable, the minds and hearts of the 
people are not less responsive, and as the lands, once reduced to cultivation continued to produce increas- 
ing harvests, so the people, freed from cannibalism and witchcraft, and the innumerable and unspeakable 
vices and crimes which they denote, have become a marvel in the Christian world for the devotedness and 
steadfastness of their lives and characters. 

Beyond the four stations with their 5,000 loyal members and 120 out-stations are a thousand towns that 
will just as eagerly accept and as vigorously propagate the Gospel. Twenty other languages are waiting 
to be written and to have translated into their liquid accents the message of salvation. 

The success of the Men and Millions Movement will hasten the response to this mighty challenge 
before the Congo is overrun by Mohammedanism. 

Men and Millions Movement 



222 W. Fourth St. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



CKAKbXS OIiAT'TOir MOSSISOST, EDZTOB. 



ESS J,, ymLustr, oo/arvMsnuTssa bbxtos. 



Volume XXXIV 



AUGUST 2. 1917 



Number 31 



More Than Conquerors 



YOU CAN BE GREATER THAN NAPOLEON! 

This may seem like an extravagant promise. Paul 
insists, as he looks out on his Roman world with its 
great military figures, that we may be more than 
conquerors. In saying that we may be greater than 
the men who lead their enemies by a chain through 
the streets and beneath the triumphal arch is to ex- 
press with most powerful rhetoric Paul's sense of the 
spiritual values that pertain to the Christian life. 

In these days life is full of contrasts. We behold 
with amazement a man relatively unknown mount 
to the place of power held by the Czar of Russia but a 
few months ago. On the other hand, in every town 
is the man we call a failure. What makes the dififer- 
ence between the masterful man and the man who 
proclaims his incompetency with every word he 
speaks? It is to be found in the dynamic of some 
great ideal which possesses some men and not others. 
The college alumni list has its percentage of fail- 
ures. There are men whom we once envied who have 
turned out to be nobodies. Their erratic genius was 
never hitched to any well-defined ambition. They were 
satisfied to sparkle at a college banquet or to win an 
oratorical contest. This was glory enough for a whole 
life. 

Every family has its failures. Sometimes the dis- 
appointing individual is simply harmless. Sometimes 
he is actively bad. We often feel that the former is 
more hopeless than the latter. 

The conquerors of the world have arisen from 
every station in life. Alexander the Great was the 
son of a king; Julius Caesar was of patrician rank; but 
Napoleon was of humble origin. George Washington 
was the son of a rich man. Abraham Lincoln came 
from the cabin of the poor. All of these men, no mat- 
ter what their origin, had this common characteristic : 
they saw things in a big way. Lloyd George has been 
called a man of one idea, but that idea is a big one. 

• • 

I The Christian conqueror is great in that he is 

I able to conquer his enemies. Paul described the spirit- 

■ ual enemies of man as demons. They were powers and 

i principalities and over them was the prince of the 

( power of the air. From the standpoint of our experi- 

I ence we mean something similar when we talk of the 

spiritual enemies against which we fight today. 

j We fight against a racial heritage which would 

i ever pull us down to lower levels. The beast speaks 

I at times in everyone of us. Who would dare reveal to 

his mother or wife or best friend the stray thoughts 

and impulses that come to him? We whip the beast 

back to his kennel, but few of us can say that he is 

dead. 

We fight against the habits which in the days of 
our ignorance we fastened upon ourselves. There are 
certain outstanding drug habits which symbolize this 
thing, but let no man say, "I have no bad habits." To 



say this is to declare that we are spiritually blind. We 
have habits of thought and habits of speech and modes 
of behavior which must be broken up to make place for 
new ones. Not until we can truly say that we have 
organized our spiritual ideals in our very tissues, can 
we say that we are conquerors in the spiritual realm. 

We fight against a social order in which we find 
much that is inimical to the kingdom of God. It is 
very easy for a man to say, "When in Rome, do as 
Rome does." Paul tells us, however, to "be not con- 
formed to this world." He bids us to "come out" and 
become a "peculiar people." Sometimes a man's 
speech and deeds may seem as old-fashioned as a Quak- 
er's hat, or as radical and ill-timed as a Salvation Army 
drum does to the mob, but the man who would be con- 
queror must never let the community drag him down 
after he has seen a great spiritual vision. 

The conqueror, however, is no lone defender of a 
fortress. His attitude toward life is active and not pas- 
sive. There is the need of a resolute will for the man 
who would attain to big things. 

John B. GoughTevealed the right spirit when hav- 
ing freed himself from drink, he spent the remainder 
of his life to free thousands of other men. He would 
not have been much of a conqueror had he not carried 
the warfare into the enemy's trenches. He left for him- 
self an immortal fame in the annals of reform. 

• • 

The significant thing, however, about the Christian 
notion of conquest is that we are not without a Great 
Helper. It is Christ who makes conquerors of us. 
More than one man has tried to become great by burn- 
ing midnight oil in solitude. In the things of the spirit, 
we must have a Helper who not only embodies our 
ideals but who actively helps us to realize them. 

Legend tells us that to Constantine were revealed 
in letters of fire the words, "In this sign conquer." In 
a deeper sense than we have ever understood that 
legend, the cross becomes the sign of our victory. 

No man is worthy of Christ who has not learned 
to give up. Men have forsaken houses and lands and 
families and fame and power, all for Christ's sake. The 
conquerors have been recompensed for every sacrifice 
they have made and will yet be recompensed. 

It is promised that Christ shall be for us three 
things, the Way, the Truth and the Life. As the Way 
he shows us the path in which our feet should walk 
ethically. Not by commandment and statute, but by 
living principles he has thrown a great light upon the 
ethical problems of every man. 

As the Truth, he helps us to find the underlying 
reality. He is Truth embodied, expressed in personal- 
ity. Only truth worked out in experience can help us. 
Christ is himself the doctrine we are to receive. 

As the Life, our Lord gives us life. His spiritual 
life and power make us conquerors. 



EDITORIAL 



WHAT CAN WE DO FOR PEACE? 

THERE is a certain kind of organized interest ap- 
pealing today for the support of the churches 

which would break down loyalty to the govern- 
ment at a time when the American people should be 
united.. It will be a sorry thing if any church should 
be befooled into playing Germany's game while there 
is such need of loyalty and clear-headed understanding 
of world problems. 

There is work to do for peace, however. We can 
cement the bonds of peace with the nations which are 
now friendly. With Japan an ally in the present war, 
we should silence the jingoes of the country who would 
have it otherwise. Our racial prejudice against orien- 
tals should not go far enough to drive us eventually 
into a foolish and inconsiderate war with a nation 
which might easily be made one of our strong friends. 

With Mexico, too, there seems to be a way of get- 
ting on. It continues to be rumored that a great deal 
of our trouble with Mexico was made in the United 
States by interested capitalists. That country, with its 
illiteracy and peonage, has a long way to travel before 
it becomes a real republic, but so long as it is on the 
road, we need not have too much concern. 

It is not inappropriate, either, for us to back up 
the idea of President Wilson of forming an interna- 
tional court which after the war will enforce inter- 
national law. This war has as one of its prime motives 
the unwillingness of democratic nations to suffer the 
recognized laws of international relationships to be 
broken down by the iron heel of a ruthless power. 

By keeping a human point of view, by praying 
daily for enemies that they may see the light, and by 
seeking the coming of Christ's kingdom of peace, we 
may bring nearer the blessed time when men shall beat 
their swords into plowshares. 

GERMANY SACRIFICES THE "CHRISTUS" 

TRUSTWORTHY advices from Germany shows 
that Anton Lang, the celebrated "Christus" of 

the Passion Play at Oberammergau, has been 
drafted for the German army. This probably means 
death for a character whose friends are to be found 
throughout the Christian world. 

Anton Lang is a potter and in recent years has 
been tubercular. His good wife has had the greatest 
concern about his condition and has desired to pro- 
vide him with every facility for recovery from his 
disease. 

The fact that he should be chosen for army ser- 
vice would indicate that things have come to such a 
pass in Germany that almost any kind of a man will 
be taken. Probably in no other country in this war 
would a tubercular patient be asked to serve his coun- 
try in arms. 

The loss to Germany eventually from the sacrifice 
of Anton Lang will be great. It is not in every genera- 
tion that a man can be found who is an accomplished 
actor and who also has the physical features to make 
him a passable likeness to the traditional Christ. In 
addition to these strong points, Anton Lang has lived 
a life of simple and beautiful piety which has further 
given him the ability to interpret the great part that 
he takes in the drama. 



The Christus in the trenches : It is rather a grue- 
some thought that the mad militarism of the world 
should come to demand such a sacrifice. It is only in 
a country mad with military power that such a para- 
dox would be permitted. 

While this present war seems necessary from our 
viewpoint — for we are unwilling that our world should 
relapse into a military paganism — we must continue 
to pray that humanity may find a better means to end 
its disputes. There is more than one Christus in the 
trenches on either side in this dreary struggle. It 
would seem that humanity is just now engaged in 
crucifying the son of God afresh and putting him to an 
open shame. 

METHODIST REUNION 

THE meeting of the commissioners of the Metho- 
dist churches at Traverse City, Mich., was not 

well reported, and we are happy to receive later 
news that the cause of reunion is proceeding in a sat- 
isfactory manner. The negro question, which is con- 
sidered by many to be one of the most difificult to solve, 
of all the questions involved in the reunion of the 
churches, is to be considered by the commissioners in a 
meeting at Savannah, Georgia, in January. It was not 
considered at Traverse City. It is stated by one of 
the bishops that the committee having this matter in 
charge is expected to report next winter. 

The negro question is no more a question with 
Methodists than with any other kind of Christians who 
divided on sectional lines. If they succeed first in 
solving the problem of racial prejudice in the church 
of God, they will be deserving of great credit and will 
have set far forward the cause of union in several other 
divided denominations. If they fail, they will only 
share the failure of many others. 

We need not say that we watch the progress of 
the negotiations looking toward Methodist unity with 
the deepest interest and it will bring joy to all good 
Disciples to see their Methodist brethren bring nearer 
the union of all Christ's believers. 

A MAN'S RELIGION 

THE assumption of some men that women are to 
cultivate the spiritual side of life means more 

than these men could ever imagine. While they 
haggle about giving women the vote, they turn over 
to the women of the race elements of power and leader- 
ship that far outweigh the relatively small advantages 
of equal sufifrage. If the time ever comes when the 
women exclusively control music, literature, art and 
religion, then the men will be only the Morlocks of H. 
G. Wells' imagination, engaged in the weary business 
of spinning the silks for these superior creatures. 

There are men who are today challenging their 
brothers to take their right share in the better heritage 
of man. Edward Earle Purinton asks, "Is your religion 
as good as you expect your women to have?" He be- 
lieves in an equality of the sexes in spiritual things and 
does not believe in any sorry order in which men will 
be the robber barons of business and women the heirs 
of all the refinements of life. 

It is not possible for the race to go forward in any 



August 2, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



lop-sided fashion. In India they have tried to make 
progress with women shut up in zenanas. An ignorant 
and unspiritual womanhood has held back the men in 
whatever progress they might have made. Men and 
women are joined by the Creator in the most intimate 
of spiritual fellowship and they must together work 
out the problems of the higher life of humanity. For 
one or the other to shirk is treachery to civilization and 
sin against God. 

There are great and noble men in all callings who 
see that this is true. We have Christian merchants, 
and Christian railroad men. There are men who have 
given up business for Christ's sake and there are men 
who have gone on with it for the same great reason. 
There is a new religious note in literature. These are 
no times for men to settle back in a contemptuous and 
worldly attitude toward the church and the appoint- 
ments of divine worship. 

THE OPPORTUNITIES OF DEMOCRACY 

1'^HE new dictator of Russia, Kerensky, has had a 
sensational rise in the world. Last year he was 
not of enough importance to be found in the 
"Who's Who" book. Now he is the successor of the 
Czar in power and a man who, as much as any, holds 
the fate of the world in his hands. 

He was born in a most unlikely place, back in Asi- 
atic Russia. From such origins we have not been 
accustomed to look for world leaders. He first became 
known to the world as a brilliant young attorney who 
in connection with the Kiev massacres successfully 
combatted the superstition that the Jews committed 
ritual murder. 

As a member of the revolutionary group and a con- 
vinced socialist he was evidently among the leaders of 
the revolution long before it was actually consummated. 
Out of the turmoil and excitement of the time, he 
seems the strong man, the Napoleon of his people. 

He faces at this hour the temptation which always 
comes with sudden power. Compelled to assume the 
dictatorship, promising liberty and a new regime for 
Russia, he must subdue the lawless elements in society 
by blood and iron. Whether he will learn to use these 
tools of the autocrat sparingly, or whether he will be 
lured on to further exercise of autocratic power, re- 
mains yet to be seen. 

There is danger that this man who has dealt with 
ideas may prove a doctrinaire in the face of the most 
dangerous situation that ever confronted a new ruler. 
If he shall be able to keep from a renunciation of his 
ideals, and from an undue insistence upon realizing 
them all at once, he will no doubt have opportunity to 
j contribute to universal history. 

j A congressmen — these gentlemen are not known 
I usually for outstanding piety — stated the other day 
I that all Christian people should pray for Kerensky, that 
I his life might be spared for the work he has to do. 
I With this sentiment patriotic Americans will agree. 

LEADERS AND LAGGARDS 

WE find more laggards than leaders in our social 
order. Professor Ross says there are the men 
I who produce faith and there are the men who 

j eat it up. Big firms are watching the office boys who 
show initiative and a sense of responsibility. These 
two qualities are regarded by commercial firms as two 



qualities which are necessary in men who would lead 
their fellows. 

Initiative involves the constructive imagination. 
Most men cannot see the bridge before the thing is 
built in steel and concrete. Few church members can 
see the new church until it actually rises stone upon 
stone to bear its testimony in the community. 

The sense of responsibility is something which 
must pertain to all real leaders. The man of leadership 
woi-ild scorn to undertake any good enterprise and 
leave it half finished. When difficulties appear, when 
scofifers mock, when friends prove false, the big enter- 
prise must go on in spite of all. The man who always 
delivers the goods he promises, soon develops the repu- 
tation which makes men choose him as leader. 

With leadership of the highest type must go en- 
thusiasm. For the present moment the task in hand 
must be exalted. We may criticize it before we start 
in with it, we may criticize the finished product,,,, but 
in the execution a great leader must go to the daily 
drudgery sustained by a great joy in the thing he is 
called to do. This enthusiasm he must impart to all 
around him. President Harper succeeded in making 
the study of Hebrew popular! 

Faith is one of the marks of the truly great leader. 
The man of outstanding genius in the handling of large 
forces of men must see lofty and divine significance in 
the events of his day. We note that Lloyd George 
does not always talk of the war in terms of cannon 
and ships. He is careful to speak of it in terms of its 
ideal significance. He asks, "What will the winning or 
losing of the war mean to the world and to the spirit- 
ual future of man?" 

All of these marks of leadership must belong to 
the man who would lead forward the Lord's army. 

SEEING CHURCH FOLKS AS THEY ARE 

THE ability to see and appreciate the real characters 
of the people associated with us in the life of 

the church is a spiritual gift that contributes 
much to the joy of life. Edgar DeWitt Jones has set 
us a model for this kind of spiritual exercise in "Fair- 
hope." Ian Maclaren wrote a highly entertaining book 
on "Church Folks" and his references to this kind of 
personality in his novels are always highly interesting 
and profitable. 

The thing that is needed is a sense of fairness 
that will enable us to judge people rightly. We once 
knew a village blacksmith who would argue one Sun- 
day against evolution and progress, and by the fol- 
lowing Sunday he had fallen into deep doubt so that 
he was uncertain whether there was a God. His Sun- 
day school class was always sure of a surprise. His 
spiritual moods were like the iron with which he worked 
all week long, now at white heat of enthusiasm but 
soon cold and gray and dead. He dealt heavy anvil 
strokes in theology, one was tempted to believe, by 
reason of his daily habits. One day he stood up in 
the church and proudly renounced his membership in 
an apostate church. Not long afterwards he humbly 
confessed his sins in prayer-meeting. He was a means 
of grace to all the members of that church, for the 
brethren loved him very much for it all. 

Churches grow hard and cold and divide for lack 
of the human insight that should enable them to make 
just assessments of the value of personality. The 
apostolic company had room for the Doubting Thomas 



8 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 2, 1917 



and the Impetuous Peter and the Sons of Thunder. 
The modern congregation must Be so human and 
kindly that it shall with true catholicity put its arms 
around every lonely and struggling soul, that none 
may feel themselves to be strangers in the house of 
God. Then our hunger and thirst for true spiritual 
fellowship will be satisfied. 

THE WAR AND THE JAPANESE 

ONE of the favorable results of the world war is 
the improved feeling between Americans and the 
Japanese. There has been a pernicious propa- 
ganda in this country and in Japan which has been seek- 
ing to embroil the two countries in war. Now that the 
Japanese are allies it is with poor grace that the jingoes 
can proceed in their nefarious task of arousing race 
feeling. 

The Japanese agricultural associations on the coast 
have promised assistance to the country and have vowed 
among themselves never to take advantage of the situ- 
ation to raise the price of vegetables. Since the war 
began, they have been supporting the American Red 
Cross. Santa Barbara, a city having only a few hun- 
dred Japanese, enlisted seventy as Red Cross mem- 
bers, while several hundred are reported to have 
joined at Long Beach. In Los Angeles, a city of 600,- 
000, there are 2,500 members and 1,256 of these are 
Japanese. In San Francisco the Japanese have sub- 
scribed for $150,000 in Liberty Bonds. 

Some Americans in San Diego have started a league 
to agitate the question of American citizenship for Japa- 
nese. At the present time it is not possible for a Japa- 
nese to become a citizen. Many of these Japanese 
inhabitants have been in this country a considerable 
time and have no desire to go back to Japan. It is 
thought that much of the misunderstanding between 
the Americans and Japanese would be obviated if these 
discriminations against the Japanese were once re- 
moved. 

There is no reason why American and Japanese 
affairs should not be conducted on the high plane of 
reason. This is no time for the increase of national 
hatreds. While the war is going on, we should be 



planning, not for another war, but to see in what ways 
we can lay the foundations for a permanent peace with 
all nations. 

THE SUBSTANCE OF PROTESTANT 
MODERNISM 

IT was a reproach which the orthodox put upon the 
modernist movement in the Roman Catholic 
church that it had ceased to have any likeness to 
the thing it claimed to be. It was like the Cheshire 
cat, with only the smile left. One critic declared the 
creed of Roman Catholic Modernism to be, "There is 
no God and Mary is his Mother." This was, of course, 
a base caricature of what the modernist really believed. 
Some have insisted that Protestant modernism was 
equally at sea for convictions. The Protestant move- 
ment began with denials and modernism is thought by 
some to have carried the spirit of denial on up to the i 
nth power. Just as it is fallacious for Catholics to sayj 
that Protestantism is denial, so it is absurd for those j 
with the eighteenth century doctrine to declare thatj 
twentieth century ideas are loose and flabby. 

Evangelical modernism has dared to face doctrinal | 
problems and to hold convictions about many mat- 
ters in which the obscurantist can offer nothing. The 
eighteenth century man talked about God as though 
the chief problem was, "Is there a God?" The modern 
man asserts that the chief matter in theology is, "What 
is God like?" Concerning this, he has convictions. 

How the earthly Jesus was transfigured into the 
eternal Christ, how the Bible could be written by men 
and still reveal the will of God, how salvation could 
operate in other than magical and fanciful ways, how 
religion, indeed, could be the central and organizing 
thing of life, these are convictions that give the lie to 
any charge of latitudinarianism. 

Many modern men believe in the central impor- 
tance of the will in the religious life, but none would 
excuse an absence of intellectual content. There isj 
but little thinking about religion in these days that is 
not done by the modernist categories. What is left] 
is an effort to plow the fields of truth with a crooked 
stick. 



To My Son 

An anonymous poem by an American whose 
boy has recently left Chicago with his regiment 



MY son, at last the fateful day has come 
For us to part. The hours have nearly run. 
May God return you safe to land and home; 
Yet, what God wills, so may His will be done. 

Draw tight the belt about your slender frame ; 

Flash blue your eyes ! Hold high your proud young 
head ! 
Today you march in Liberty's fair name 

To save the line enriched by France's dead ! 



I would not it were otherwise ! And yet 

'Tis hard to speed your marching forth, my son ! 

'Tis doubly hard to live without regret 
For love unsaid, and kindnesses undone. 

But would the chance were mine with you to stand 
Upon those shores and see our flag unfurled ! 

To fight on France's brave, unconquered land 
With Liberty's great sword for all the world ! 



Oh son ! my son ! God keep you safe and free — 
Our flag and you! But if the hour must come 

To choose at last 'twixt self and liberty — 

We'll close our eyes ! So let God's will be done ! 



August 2, 1917 THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



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Supplementing the Sufferings 

of Christ 



By J. H. Jowett 



THE great apostle here makes 
a very startling claim. There 
is an apparent audacity about 
it which almost takes away one's 
breath. "I fill up . . . that which 
is lacking of the afflictions of Christ." 
But was there something lacking in 
Jesus which had to be supplied by 
Paul? Was there a defect in the 
sacrificial ministry of our Lord? 
Was there some fatal gap in the 
sacred securites of the cross? Was 
the green hill, outside the city wall, 
the site of an unfinished redemp- 
tion? Was Paul needed to perfect 
the efficacy of atoning grace? 

CAN ONE ADD TO THE CROSS? 

This was surely not the meaning 
of the apostle's claim. More than 
any other man he continually glor- 
ied in the perfected wonders of the 
reconciling sacrifice of Christ. There 
was no deficit in Christ's account 
for Paul to pay. There was no ad- 
verse balance to be liquidated. 
Grace abounded in all the majestic 
fulness of an unfathomable sea. 
Love's redeeming work was done. 
Paul could add nothing to the cross. 
There was not a single crevice of 
emptiness left for him to fill. 

Nothing in my hands I bring, 
Simply to Thy cross I cling. 

And yet, here stands the strange 
assertion : "I fill up on my part 
that which is lacking of the afflic- 
tions of Christ." The apostle evi- 
dently brings some suffering of his 
own and adds it to the sufferings of 
his Lord. For it is possible for us 
to supplement the miracle we can- 
not perform. When the Savior has 
multiplied the loaves, we can dis- 
tribute the bread. When the Savior 
has raised the dead, we can "loose 
him and let him go." 

SACRIFICIAL DISCIPLES NEEDED 

Our filling up of the sufferings of 
Christ is not done on the hill called 
Calvary. It is done on that long 
road which begins at the empty 
tomb, and which stretches through 
Jerusalem, and Samaria, and reaches 
the uttermost parts of the earth. In 
the Christian redemption our suffer- 
ings are not elemental nor funda- 
mental. They are supplemental. 
Sacrificial disciples are needed to 
proclaim the unique sacrifice of our 
Lord. *T fill up on my part that 
which is lacking of the afflictions of 
Christ." 



/ fill lip on my part that which is 
lacking of the afflictions of Christ. 
— Colossians i. 24. 



Now, wherever we touch the life 
of the Savior, we touch the spirit 
of sacrifice. His life is like the Al- 
pine rope, with the red thread run- 
ning through from end to end. 
Break it where you will, you find 
the crimson strand. In Christ's life 
there is an unfailing continuousness 
of sacrificial passion. Nothing is 
cheap. Nothing is done as a mere 
incident. Nothing is a bloodless 
fragment which has no relationship 
to the eternal purpose. In the life 
of Jesus everything is the gift of 
blood. Nothing seems to be born 
without travail. Every event bears 
the seal of holy sacrifice. We can- 
not break into the life anywhere 
without finding the scarlet thread. 
Try it here and there, and we shall 
see how, in every place, the sacred 
passion is revealed. 

NOTHING GLORIOUS WITHOUT A PANG 

And so has it been all through 
the history of the Christian church. 
The great births of the Christian 
centuries have been great travails. 
Nothing glorious has been born 
without pang. Agony and dawn 
have always kissed each other. God's 
tremendous things have never been 
given to an apathetic church. The 
cross has won no victory by the 
hands of sluggish and unbleeding 
heralds, and Calvary has never told 
its convincing story through the 
ministry of frozen hearts. The 
blood of the martyrs has been the 
seed of the church. Yes, and the 
sacrificial sufferings of the church 
have been the life of the world. In 
all the great days the disciples of 
the cross have, by their own suffer- 
ings, filled up that which was lack- 
ing of the afflictions of Christ. 

Well, here we are, at the end of 
the ages, and we are set in a big 
and momentous time. How is it 
with us, and with all our fellow- 
believers in the church? Can we 
say with Rupert Brooke: 

Now, God be thanked who has matched 
us with his hour, 
And caught our youth, and wakened 
us from sleeping. 
With hand made sure, clear eye, and 
sharpened power, 
To turn, as swimmers into cleanness 
leaping. 



Such is the mood in which millions 
of the soldiers of the nations are 
facing the demands of our day. In 
what spirit and temper is it being 
faced by the church of the living 
God? Is she the kinsman of the 
apostolic church, and the kinsman 
of the church of the great travails? 
If we break into the church's life, 
any time, or anywhere, shall we find 
the crimson strand? Can she truth- 
fully say with the apostle Paul: "I 
fill up on my part that which is 
lacking of the sufferings of Christ?" 

WAR NOT ALWAYS ENNOBLING 

It is imperative that we remem- 
ber that war is not necessarily an 
ennobling experience, even if it bd 
fought in a sacred cause and for 
righteous ends. War is by no means' 
an inevitable ennoblement for the 
soldiers who engage in the struggle. 
There are deadly moral perils in 
camp and field. There is the deadly 
moral blight which has its favorite 
haunt where multitudes of men are 
swarmed together. Some of our 
young fellows come back smitten 
with something worse than leprosy. 
Some men return from the front 
with their faith shattered and de- 
stroyed. Others return with theii 
lives radiant with the light thai 
never was on sea or land, and "by 
the vision splendid are on their way 
attended." Some men find in the 
trenches only profanity and ob- 
scenity, and they clothe themselves 
in the immoral mire of their sur- 
roundings. Others are like Sher- 
wood Eddy's soldier friend, who 
said that in the direst surrounding? 
he felt as if he were "in some great 
cathedral with the presence of Goc 
all about him." 

And as it is with soldiers, so it ii 
with peoples. War will not neces 
sarily crown a people with a diaden 
of spiritual grace and moral nobility 
Great changes will be affected b} 
this war. The transformation if 
taking place before our eyes. Then 
will be social and economic adjust 
ments of an incredible range and or 
der. There will be changes in lit 
erature. There will be changes ii 
the standard of life. And yet, ami( 
all these changes, and in spite o 
them, there may be among the grea 
masses of the people a deadlie 
moral apathy, and a benumbmen 
of the nerves of spiritual corre 
spondence, and a consequent les 
sening of our communion with God 



August 2, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



11 



THE CHURCH MUST AGONIZE 

How is this fatal issue to be 
avoided? I believe it is largely to be 
avoided by the saving ministry of 
the church of Christ and by her 
eager willingness to fill up on her 
part that which is lacking of the af- 
flictions of Christ. I would repeat 
the word I spoke a few moments 
ago: for great spiritual births there 
must be great travail. The church 
must be like her Lord and like the 
Lord's apostles in the early church. 
She must agonize for the moral and 
spiritual redemption of men. "Agon- 
ize" — it is a great New Testament 
word, and it was borrowed from 
the athlete. It was taken from the 
mighty wrestlings in the arena. 

The church is to agonize in the 
tremendous exercise of spiritual 
wrestling. She is to wrestle with 
God as the patriarch wrestled with 
the angel unto the coming of the 
dawn. She is to wrestle with her- 
self, treading upon the lion and the 
adder within her own life and tram- 
pling the young lion and the dragon 
under her feet. And she is to wres- 
tle for the redemption of the world, 
generously and bountifully spending 
her blood that she may win the 
world for Christ. 

Well, do you see many signs of 
this wrestling? Would you say that 
the church of Christ has intimacy 
with the apostolic agony and is en- 
tering into the fellowship of her 
Savior's sufferings? 

CHURCH MUST REMAIN SENSITIVE 

How shall the church agonize, and 
"fill up on her part that which is 
i lacking of the afflictions of Christ ?" 
I Well, first of all the church of Christ 
\must agonize in the guarding of her 
[own sensitiveness. In times like these 
I the realm of the insensitive is con- 
jtinually enlarging its kingdom. One 
I nerve after another is benumbed 
land ceases to have any correspond- 
|ence with the naked reality of things. 
.Our range of feeling is reduced. 
iSome of our elemental instincts go 
Ito sleep. The fine perception of vital 
differences is blunted. Love and 
hatred mingle in strange confusion. 
jSilver becomes dross, and the fine 
jwine is mixed with water. We lose 
jthe glaring contrast of right and 
I wrong. We are robbed of the 
{Christian sense of sin. And there- 
fore do I say that the church must 
I agonize to preserve her own sensi- 
tiveness, for if her moral and spir- 
itual intuitions become dull and dim, 
3ne of the greatest hopes of the 
world is gone. 

And secondly, the church must 
igonise in the labor of intercession. 
i^ou remember the word of the apos- 
le Paul: "I would have you know 
low grtatly I agonize for you !" It 



is a glimpse into the strong inter- 
cessory wrestlings of the great apos- 
tle. It is a glimpse of the crimson 
strand. His prayers were like the 
muscular contention of an athlete in 
grips with his antagonist. 

Fellow-believers in Christ Jesus, 
it is in agonizing intercession that 
the real conflict in our time is to be 
won. Rivers of vitality have their 
rise in souls that are on their knees 
before God. The deep and mighty 
prayers of the church are the real 
birth-pangs of the race. 

"the RED strand" 

Well, how is it with the interces- 
sions of the church? If we could 
look into them should we find the 
red strand? Is there anything in 
our prayers in these momentous 
days which can in any way be re- 
garded as supplemental to the tre- 
mendous work of Calvary? Is there 
anything of wrestling? Is there 
anything of the athlete's agony of 
contention for the prize? Let me 
ask a very challenging question, a 
question which smites me to the 
very ground as I ask it, and let me 
ask it in great reverence: "If you 
were God, would you answer pray- 
ers such as we toss so lightly and 
easily into the sacred presence?" 
How our Master prayed in Geth- 
semane in the birth-hour and birth- 
throes of the world's redemption ! 
"And being in an agony he prayed 
more earnestly, and his sweat was 
as it were great drops of blood fall- 
ing down to the ground." 

Such was the Savior's suffering 
intercession. And his own church 
is called to supplement those suffer- 
ings. She is called to agonize in our 
own day, and to wrestle with the 
angel until the break of day. We 
are to "fill up on our part that which 
is lacking of the afflictions of 
Christ." 

GOSPEL MUST BE PROCLAIMED 

And in the third place the church 
must agonise in the proclamation of 
the gospel. Nothing, even in these 
exciting days, must supplant the 
preaching of the gospel, and it must 



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I This address, ivith others, by I 

I John R. Mott, Henry Churchill \ 

I King and a number of other re- \ 

I ligioiis leaders, may be obtained | 

f in book form from the Federal \ 

I Council of the Churches of 1 

I Christ in America, Neiv York. \ 

1 These addresses are the great j 

I utterances spoken at the recent | 

I conference of the nation's reli- | 

I gious organisations under the I 

I auspices of the Federal Council, | 

I in the City of Washington. f 

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be the apostolic gospel, not trimmed 
to meet the superficial fashion of the 
passing hour. We must not play 
with the gospel. We must not trifle 
with it. We must not toy with it 
daintily like effeminate loiterers 
who have no great business in im- 
mediate hand. We must hand it out 
to the world with the very blood of 
men and women who have been glor- 
iously redeemed by the precious 
blood of Christ. 

And that, too, must be the pri- 
mary work of the church at home, 
to preach the gospel, to proclaim 
the marvelous realities of redemp- 
tion, and to do it with the very 
blood of lives which are eagerly sur- 
rendered to the Lord who bought 
us. The world is being populated 
with broken men, and with sorrow- 
ing, broken-hearted women, and 
they are yearning for something as 
real as their sorrow and as elemen- 
tal as their need. If they do not find 
it in the church, they will turn away 
from our doors. 

IS THE CHURCH A FAILURE? 

One of the leaders of the English 
aristocracy, a woman who has felt 
the iron in her own soul, and is deep- 
ly sharing the sorrows of her sex, 
has recently written these words: 
"I have turned to the church and 
turned in vain. A church-goer all 
through the seasons, when only a 
still small voice summoned me, now 
that the call for what religion should 
afford has 'waxed exceedingly loud,' I 
find that the church has nothing for 
me. ... At the moment when the 
spirit of mankind was chastened, 
when humility had taken the place 
of pride, and there was an actual 
quest for the haven of spiritual re- 
pose, the church has nothing to offer. 
Its bankruptcy, long suspected, was 
tacitly avowed. Those who went 
empty returned as they came. Heal- 
ing there was none, foresight there 
was none, outlook there was none. 
... It is a tragedy that with the 
vast increase of our spiritual needs, 
there should be this failure of spir- 
itual solace." 

The world is aching for a gospel 
and it is the labor of the church to 
present a gospel that can reach the 
world's most awful need, that can 
get down to its deepest depravity, 
and bring cordials and balms to its 
most appalling sorrow. And the old 
gospel can do it ! Yes, the old gos- 
pel, in working attire, proclaimed by 
a church which believes it, is glor- 
iously efficient to meet the most tre- 
mendous needs of this most tremen- 
dous day. "God so loved the world 
that he gave his only begotten Son 
that whosoever believeth on him 
should not perish but have everlast- 
ing life." 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 2, 1917 



SACRED JOY OF SACRIFICE 

So must the church supplement 
the sufferings of Christ in all the 
ways I have named by guarding 
her own moral and spiritual sensi- 
tiveness, by the wrestling ministry of 
intercession, by a lavish proclama- 
tion of the gospel, and by every 
form of holy and sacrificial service. 
In everything she does the church 
must reveal the crimson strand. She 
must shed her blood for her Savior. 
And she must do it all with sacred 
joy. She must rejoice that she is 
counted worthy to suffer for his 
name. 



Some of you may have seen the 
little book entitled "A Young Sol- 
dier of France," and I want to quote 
from one of his letters, "I shall 
fight,' he says, "with a good con- 
science and without fear, I hope, 
certainly without hate. I feel my- 
self filled with an illimitable hope. 
You have no idea of the peace in 
which I live. On the march I sing 
inwardly. I listen to the music that 
is slumbering inside me. The Mas- 
ter's call is always ringing louder in 
my ears." Such was the spirit of a 
young soldier of France, and such 



must be the spirit of the church of 
Christ. "On the march I sing!" 
"The music inside me!" "Verily," 
says ApoUodorus in one of Ibsen's 
plays, "so long as song rises above 
our sorrows, Satan can never con- 
quer!" 

And indeed we have something 
and everything to make us sing. We 
have our risen and present Lord, 
and we have the boundless resources 
of redeeming grace. 

Were the whole realm of nature mine, 
That were an ofifering far too small; 

Love so amazing, so divine, 

Demands my life, my soul, my all. 



Lantern Evangelism in Korea 



IN Pyeng Yang, Korea, there is 
great rejoicing over the fact that 
two thousand new believers have 
been brought into the churches of 
the city through a series of revival 
meetings which have just closed. 
The efficient way in which this evan- 
gelistic program has been planned 
and carried out, as described by Rev. 
J. G. Holdcroft, representing the 
World's Sunday School Association 
in Korea, is worthy of special atten- 
tion. 

The men and women who were to 
participate in this work were first 
prepared through special Bible study 
classes. Over eleven hundred Kor- 
ean men have been enrolled in these 
classes in Pyeng Yang since January 
1st. Following this preparation, a 
week of union prayer services were 
held in the churches of the city. 

At 2:00 p. m. every day during the 
week of revival meetings, a workers' 
prayer meeting was held, and the 
workers were then divided into 
eleven bands and sent to every sec- 
tion of the city for house to house 



preaching, and to distribute specially 
prepared tracts. Of these, ten thou- 
sand were used daily, and one thou- 
sand big red posters in prominent 
places all over the city helped give 
the invitation to come and believe. 
There are one thousand Christian 
homes and shops among the ten 
thousand houses of Pyeng Yang, 
and nearly every one of these dis- 
played a paper lantern at night with 
invitations to "believe in Jesus " 
written upon it, so' that the *J^us 
doctrine" for the time being was 
thrust into even more prominent 
notice than the cigarette advertising 
which usually holds the field in that 
city. 

Huge parades of Christian men 
and boys with bands and banners, 
songs and shouted invitations to 
"Yei-su mit-oo-si-o" (believe in 
Jesus) marched through the city on 
two separate days. Every morning 
at 6:30 the church bells pealed forth 
their invitation to rise and join in 
prayer for the city. Every praying 
home sang "Hover O'er Me, Holy 



Spirit" so that thousands of non- 
christians roused themselves for the 
day's work to the notes of this hymn, 
and in one way or another all day 
long were persistently invited to do 
what even in that heathen city the 
great majority of people deep down 
in their hearts feel they ought to 
do — give their hearts to Jesus. 

And many did. At night scores of 
willing workers brought to church 
those who during the day had prom- 
ised to attend the meetings, and by 
the close of the week two thousand 
people had signified their desire to 
become Christians. These new in- 
quirers are immediately enrolled in 
Bible classes, so' that they may later, 
in their turn, join in the effort to lead 
others to Christ. This particular re- 
vival is but a part of the evangelistic 
movement which has been sweeping 
over the Orient during the past twc 
years, and which is enlisting among 
its workers every member of the 
Christian church in the different 
communities. 



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iiriiiniiitiiirimiiii 



The Need 

The Cry of the World's Wretched Ones 
By Thomas Curtis Clark 



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THE touch of human hands — 
That is the boon we ask; 
For groping, day by day, 
Along the stony way. 
We need the comrade heart 
That understands. 
And the warmth, the living warmth 
Of human hands. 



The touch of human hands; 

Not vain, unthinking words, 

Nor that cold charity 

Which shuns our misery; 

We seek a loyal friend 

Who understands. 

And the warmth, the pulsing warmth 

Of human hands. 

The touch of human hands — 

Such care as was in Him 

Who walked in Galilee 

Beside the silver sea; 

We need a patient guide 

Who understands, 

And the warmth, the loving warmth 

Of human hands. 



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iiiMniiiiiiiiitiitiiiitiiriiriiiitritiiiitiitiiiiiti,„„„„„„„„ 



iiiiniiitriiritiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiitiitiiiiiiiiiiiiitirrtirririiiiir 



The Larger Christian World 



A DEPARTMENT OF INTERDENOMINATIONAL ACQUAINTANCE 



By ORVIS F. JORDAN 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii 



Hungarians to 
Get Bibles 

There are 100,000 Hungarian pris- 
oners in Russia and Siberia and the 
Bible society plans to print and circu- 
late illustrated copies of the gospels 
for these prisoners. This work will 
be done in connection with the work 
of the National Bible Society of Scot- 
land. The Red Cross Society will as- 
sist in the distribution. The Hun- 
garian prisoners are almost without 
exception members of the Roman 
Catholic church. 

Protest a 
Mormon Bible 

The Oxford University Press has 
in recent years been issuing an edition 
of the Bible for Mormons, with the 
Book of Mormon bound up with the 
St. James version of the scriptures. 
The Brooklyn Presbytery of the Pres- 
byterian Church in the U. S. A. has 
recently passed a motion protesting 
against this action on the part of the 
University Press. The Brooklyn 
Presbytery is so much in earnest that 
it is seeking to influence other Chris- 
tian bodies to pass similar protests. 

The Retired 
Minister's Claim 

The standard set for the claim of 
the retired minister in the Methodist 
Episcopal church is one-seventieth of 
the average salary paid in the con- 
ference of which the man is a member 
multiplied by the number of years he 
has given to the work of the ministry. 
I, A conference with an average salary 
' of nine hundred dollars would give a 
man who had labored forty years in 
1 the ministry a pension of $480. His 
' widow would be entitled to three- 
j fourths of this amount. The paying 
of this money is conditioned on the 
I state of funds in the conference, but 
I since the endowment funds run above 
ten millions of dollars these pensions 
will be dependable. 

Old Ministers in Favor 
in Philadelphia 

The old minister is neither shot nor 
laid on the shelf in Philadelphia, espe- 
cially in the Presbyterian denomina- 
tion, which is very strong in that city. 
Dr. John H. Boggs, pastor of Lawn- 
dale church, is in his eightieth year 
and has spent thirty-five of his fifty- 
three years as pastor of two Phila- 
delphia churches. Of four pastors, 
two are over seventy and two are very 
near to this mark. Two of them have 
been Philadelphia pastors for forty 



years and one for thirty years. 
Twelve pastors are sixty or over and 
four more are near this line. Phila- 
delphia Presbyterianism is none the 
less vigorous for the leadership of 
these ripened men. 

War Makes 
Chuirch Combine 

The losses from the Broadway 
Baptist church of Cambridge, Mass., 
by enlistments have compelled it to 
form a merger with the First Baptist 
church of that city, and the pastor of 
the latter church has taken over the 
duties of the Broadway church. This 
is probably the first of many such 
mergers made necessary by the war. 

Trinity Church, 
New York, Grows 

The largest parish of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church in America is 
Trinity Church, New York. This is 
probably the richest church on the 
western continent. The member- 
ship in this church increased two 
hundred last year. It now numbers 
9,087. The free-will offerings of the 
various congregations amounted to 
$104,450. The parish gave for the 
maintenance of its chapels and day 
schools $362,343 and $37,027 to 
churches and charities outside the 
parish. 

Tried for 
Emanuel Methods 

Six months ago. Rev. Thomas 
Parker Boyd, head of the Emanuel 
Institute of Healing of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church, acting under 
the informal auspices of the diocese, 
was arrested for practicing medicine 
without a license. A man and wo- 
man were sent by the state board of 
health and the minister advised 
these people, supposedly genuine pa- 
tients, to give up coffee and eat less. 
This was done after a blood pressure 
test was made. The case was tried 
before a jury and with the bishop 



and a number of clergymen present. 
The jury in five minutes reached a 
verdict of not guilty. It is thought 
that this establishes the methods of 
the Emanuel movement on the coast 
legally. The Rev. Thomas Parker 
Boyd is now rector of St. Paul's 
Church in San Francisco. 

War Prayers 
Are Furnished 

In many dioceses of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church special prayers 
and collects are being furnished now 
for war purposes. In the high 
church sections of the denomination 
there will be prayers for the dead. 
Bishop Rhinelander of Pennsyl- 
vania has sent to each clergyman in 
his diocese a little booklet of prayers 
for use in this present war. 

Methodists Care for 
Street Waifs 

Scores of children are being 
picked up on the streets of Buenos 
Aires by the mission workers of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and are 
being cared for. Their mission is in 
the neediest section of the city. The 
police records show that there are 
5,000 abandoned children on the 
streets of the city and an influential 
magazine "Munde Argentino" is do- 
ing its best to stir up popular inter- 
est in the welfare of these children. 



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i 



Social Interpretations 



By ALVA W. TAYLOR 



lllllllllllllllll 



iiHiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii 



The Bible and Modern 
Social Questions 

The rereading of the Sacred Scrip- 
tures in the Hght of modern sociology 
and social interest makes them a new 
book; it rescues the prophets from 
millenarianism and mere proleptic 
functions and rediscovers for us 
Jesus' magnificent ideal of the King- 
dom of God. The prophets are found 
to be great preachers and poets who 
dealt with the most vital political, 
social and moral issues of their own 
time and the good tidings of Jesus are 
found to be for the liberation of so- 
ciety from tyrannies and oppressions 
as well as of the individual from this 
untoward generation. Two of the 
very best of numerous works treating 
of Biblical social teachings have re- 
cently been issued. 

Professor Kent of Yale is a pro- 
lific and commanding writer on the 
Bible, both from the critical and popu- 
lar viewpoint. His latest volume is 
entitled "The Social Teachings of the 
Prophets and Jesus" (364 pages. 
$1.50. Scribners). A new author in 
the field is President William Bennett 
Bizzell of the Agricultural and Me- 
chanical College of Texas. His work 
is entitled "The Social Teachings of 
the Jewish Prophets" (237 pages. 
$1.25. Sherman, French and Com- 
pany). 

Prof. Kent's work is an admirable 
outline and popular study of the entire 
social teaching of the Scriptures. In 
covering all the Biblical material he 
necessarily coiild not give as ample 
treatment to each of the prophets as 
does President Bizzell. It is gratify- 
ing to note that Professor Kent finds 
the social teachings of the New Testa- 
ment demanding as much space and 
attention as that of the Old Testament. 
The social content of the prophetic 
material is so striking and voluminous 
and that of the Gospels and Paul so 
fragmentary that one is tempted to 
gauge his treatment by the volume of 
material more than by its imminence. 
Jesus was the lineal successor of the 
prophets and gave both spiritual depth 
and universal breadth to their more 
contemporaneous messages. Profes- 
sor Kent's treatment of the whole of 
the social material of the Bible makes 
this relationship apparent and makes 
the Gospel thus the climacteric expan- 
sion of the prophetic, social and ethical 
elements in the Old Testament. His 
style is luminous and the language 
simple and he himself manifests much 
of the spirit of the clear headed, 
courageous social reformers of whom 
he writes. His ripe scholarship and 
authoritative position among Biblical 



scholars gives assurance to the lay 
reader of the worthfulness and ac- 
curacy of his interpretations. 

President Bizzell writes manifestly 
for the popular reader and Bible 
student. He avoids critical issues, but 
states his problems in the light of 
moderate constructive historical and 
literary findings. He gives his reader 
very good historical perspective and 
local coloring and does not err in 
championing the prophets as social re- 
formers merely, but finds their social 
and political messages intimate parts 
of their religious teachings. Profes- 
sor Kent frankly uses the accepted 
viewpoint of the modern Biblical 
scholar though not intruding critical 
discussions upon the reader. President 
Bizzell quotes quite widely from other 
authors, as if writing for an audience 
requiring the weight of authority, 
while Professor Kent takes his discus- 
sion through on the merits of his own 
studious authorship. Yet the latter is 
much more the advocate than the 
former ; the style of the one is that of 
a social evangelist and that of the 
other that of a class room teacher who 
needs to fortify his students. 
* * * 

Marxian Socialism and Religion. 
By John Spargo. 187 pages. $1.00. 
Huebsch, New York. 

How some socialists philosophize 
about religion and what relations or 
contradictions there may be logi- 
cally between socialism and relig- 
ion are different things. Mr. Spargo 
makes here the most discriminating 
and intelligent defense of both so- 
cialism and religion we have seen 
put together. He stoutly defends 
the Marxian theory of economic de- 
terminism and the class struggle, 
but does not hesitate to say that it 
does not follow that what Marx 
said about religion was true. Schol- 
ars in both the scientific and relig- 
ious fields once contended that the 
theory of evolution was incompatible 
with religion, but now find them 
quite harmonious because evolution 
only attempts to describe how 
things came to pass and neither de- 
nies nor affirms God's part in the 
process. So Marx's theory of eco- 
nomic determinism simply relates 
how society evolves and has noth- 
ing to say about what part God has 
in its evolution. Therefore there is 
no conflict. So too with the class 
struggle theory — it is simply his- 
torical and socialism teaches that 
the only way to end it is for the 
proletariat, the largest of all classes, 



to take charge and put an end to 
class lines by compelling everyone 
to become a producer. The author 
refuses to define religion in merely 
ethical terms, but explains that so- 
cialistic theory has to do with eco- 
nomics and social conditions and not 
with theology or metaphysics. He 
acknowledges that Marx shared the 
current Darwinian skepticism but 
contends that that has nothing to 
do with the relation of socialism to 
religion any more than Darwin's or 
Huxley's religious skepticism have 
to do with the modern relation of 
evolution to religion. The fact that 
most socialists are antagonistic to 
religion is bracketed with the fact 
that most religious leaders are hos- 
tile to socialism and both are con- 
demned as illogical and unnecessary 
by the premises of either socialism 
or religion. That economic condi- 
tions do powerfully influence re- 
ligious ideas and moral conduct and 
social institutions the author pro- 
foundly believes but he denies ex- 
plicitly that economic forces are all 
powerful ; indeed he says that as 
man increasingly frees himself and 
society from blind economic forces 
will ideas be powerful to control his 
destiny. His faith is that socialism 
will bring that freedom and that in 
its teachings of brotherhood it is, 
indeed, the most powerful real in- 
fluence extant among the ideals of 
the times to make a realization of 
Christianity possible. In order to 
be fair, if for no other reason, all 
Christians who feel an aversion to 
socialism or have been opponents to 
it on account of the anti-religious 
expressions of socialists should read 
this book. 



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A School for Girls as good ^ 
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t Christian Influences. Property 
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Send for Catalog 

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August 2, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



15 



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I The Sunday School f 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Contagious Religion 

The Lesson in Today's Life* 
By CHARLES H. SWIFT 



HOW the beauty of Josiah's re- 
ligious life and activities off- 
sets the harshness of Manas- 
seh's atrocious wickedness and 
Amon's idolatrous corruption ! The 
splendor of his youth in all its 
strength of character stands out in 
bold relief over against the weak- 
hng of last Sunday's lesson. While 
Josiah's father was casting a most 
ungodly influence about the young 
Hfe, the more powerful influence of 
a righteous and godly mother con- 
tributed largely to the making of a 
strong religious character. In the 
home, the child absorbs religion by 
suggestion and imitation, though 
few parents recognize this all-im- 
portant fact in religious training. 

Josiah also absorbed much of his 
religious fervor from the great 
prophets of the day, among whom 
were Jeremiah and Zephaniah. In 
his rapid development from child- 
hood to maturity, that most critical 
period in the life of every boy, he 
must have come under the direct 
leadership of the prophets. They 
must have been his religious teach- 
ers for, at the age of sixteen, he 
willingly accepts their leadership. 
Perhaps little was known in those 
days about the natural development 
of religion or the unfolding life, but 
we do have in Josiah a splendid 
example of how life responds to the 
religious impulse as it first appears 
so faintly in the young child, and 
then develops so strongly in the 
teen age period. 

As Josiah caught the spirit of his 
mother and of his religious teach- 
ers and leaders, the impression was 
not lacking the rightful expression, 
without which no religion is firmly 
lixed in life. "He did that which 
was right in the sight of the Lord," 
s the comment on his life. Further 
cnowledge of the young king's life 
jvill reveal the rich content of this 
statement. His religion becomes 
•ontagious. So thoroughly infected 
las his life become through the 
leepening of the religious channels 
hat the least contact with his fel- 
owmen imparts a spiritual and 

. *This article is based on the Interna- 
lonal Uniform lesson for August 12, 
Josiah's Good Reign." Scripture, 2 
hron. 34:1-13. 



moral impression which, in turn, 
finds an expression. Definitely com- 
mitting himself to the great ideals 
of the prophets at the age of natural 
response, he immediately seeks to 
apply those ideals to the life of the 
people about him. The immediate 
repairing of the temple, the destruc- 
tion of idol worship, the cleansing 
of the temple, and numerous other 
reforms which follow later, give evi- 
dence of the influence of a young life 
dominated by high ideals and sur- 
charged with religious zeal. 

Religion is contagious, if it is 
worth anything at all. It will be 
contagious in spite of ourselves, if 
we are really religious. In the fam- 
ily life it is contagious. How little 
religious impression or suggestion 
the child of the average American 
home gets today! How little in- 
struction is given to the older boy 
or girl ! Religion does not take well 
with most parents. Children can 
rub up against them from day to day 
for years and never so much as get 
one germ. Yet the first institution 
to make a lasting contribution to 
the building of character is the 

home. 

5k ^ ^ 

Contagious religion is the need 
of the age. Men whose Christian 
ideals are the predominate force in 
the individual life are needed in the 
business world to permeate all bus- 
iness activities with those ideals. 
Men whose lofty aspiration of serv- 



ice is the dynamic of the soul are 
needed in the great political life, to 
exalt statesmanship above petty pol- 
itics and to tear down the bulwarks 
of corruption. Men whose love for 
their fellowmen is as tender and 
compassionate as that of the Mas- 
ter's are needed in the great indus- 
trial world, to soften the hearts of 
the capitalists and make more sym- 
pathetic the souls of the laborers. 
Men whose ethics are as clear-cut 
and whose morals are as rigid as 
those of the Man of Galilee are 
needed in our over-crowded social 
life to regain the lost chivalrous 
spirit of manhood and to exalt and 
protect the divine purity of woman- 
hood. 

Oh, the need of religion that is so 
contagious as to impart its spirit and 
power to a world sick with sin. The 
teacher in the school room, the man 
behind the counter, the clerk in the 
office, the manager in the factory, 
the boss in the mines, the drummer 
on the road, the buyer in the market, 
the tourist in foreign land, yea, all 
could raise this world out of its 
present condition of idolatrous wor- 
ship if our religion were only 
"catching." 

The soul whose religion is not 
contagious needs conversion. The 
church of today is handicapped be- 
cause of multitudes whose religious 
experience is merely a scratch quick- 
ly healed and forgotten. Sin is ram- 
pant in all phases of our complex 
life because church members are like 
patients with measles when the fever 
has left them. Sin is contagious. In- 
difference is contagious. Infidelity 
to God is contagious. Hypocrisy is 
contagious. All soul diseases are 
contagious. They are "catching." 
But it is hard to catch religion from 
the average church member. The 
best way to secure contagious relig- 
ion is to train the child from birth 
in religion and morals. 



Don^t Let Your School Slump! 

Send 75c for 100 assorted "Attendance Builder" post cards, 
and try them on your class. They will build up and keep up 
your attendance. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



THE BEST SCORE BOARD 

Framed in Solid Oali with durable one-piece back. All cards have a Jet black 
background. The names of months, days of the week and dates 1 to 31 are printed 
In red. All other figures and wordings appear in white. All cards are 2-pg inches 
in height. 

THESE BOARDS SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. 

PRicz: usT, iroT pbepaxd 
Ko. 2 — Slz« 45x32 laches; 12 strips, 20 sets of figrures, 94 words, etc., $12.50 
No. 3 — Size 45x48 inches; 18 strips, 30 sets of flgrnres, 94 words, etc., 15.0O 
ITo. 1 — Size 30x31 inches; 12 strips, 20 sets of fl^nres, 30 words, etc., 10.00 

Send for complete description. 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



700 E. 40th Street, CHICAGO 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 2, 1917 



Some Recent Books 



The Battle of the Somme. By 
John Buchan. A vivid description of 
the great and prolonged battle of last 
year by stage-s, with numerous helpful 
illustrations. There are included also 
some valuable appendices, which are 
of interest from the viewpoint of mili- 
tary technique. Several maps aid the 
reader in forming clear ideas of the 
various movements of the battle. Geo. 
H. Doran, New York. $1.50 net.) 

* ♦ * 

Masoud the Bedouin. By Alfreda 
P. Carhart. Though the stories in- 
cluded in this volume are presented as 
fiction, the author states that almost 
all the incidents portrayed have actu- 
ally occurred in various parts of Syria. 
The fascinating life of the East is here 
pictured, and the interesting Syrian 
character is revealed in its many 
phases. Some excellent photographs 
add to the attractiveness of the book. 
(Missionary Education Association of 
the United States, New York.) 

* * * 

Letters and Diary of Alan 
Seeger. In this unusual volume is 
afforded a view of war life from the 
standpoint of a soldier, and much 
more than a soldier ; for Alan Seeger 
was a man of unusually sensitive na- 
ture and alert to many things which 
the average soldier would not perceive. 
Alan Seeger viewed war as an oppor- 
tunity for one more experience in a 
life which was avowedly given oyer 
to the garnering of sensations and im- 
pressions. Many of his letters are writ- 
ten to his mother; his diary was 
originally published in the New York 
Sun. (Charles Scribners Sons, New 
York. $1.) 

;}< ^ sj; 

SuBE Cane. By Edward Bellamy 
Partridge. "He's all boy," declare the 
publishers. And he is that, and yet 
not another Peck's Bad Boy. The 
stories of his antics will rest tired 
brains and bring back some of the 
emotions of youth. "Sube" is a sure 
cure for the blues. (Penn Publishing 
Company, Philadelphia, Pa. $1.35 
net.) 

Our Flag and Its Message. In- 
cludes the President's message at the 
entrance of the United States into the 
Great War, with an interesting history 
also of the American flag. A neat 
souvenir. (J. B. Lippincott, Phila- 
delphia, Pa.) 

* * * 

The New Archeological Discov- 
eries. By Camden M. Cobern, Alle- 
gheny College, Meadville, Pa. In this 
work the author, who is a member of 
the executive committee of the Egypt 
Exploration Fund, discusses the bear- 



ing of the new finds in Oriental fields 

upon the New Testament and upon 

the life and times of the early church. 

It presents an interesting picture, 

drawn from original sources, of the 

life, social and religious customs, art, 

literature, family relations, etc., of the 

early Christian centuries. Illustrated. 

(Funk & Wagnalls, New York. $3.00 

net.) 

* * * 

His Own Country. By Paul 
Kester. A story of tide-water Vir- 
ginia, embodying the convictions of 
the author upon the question of the 
American negro. The arguments for 
the negro are here, but in the attract- 
ive form of story rather than that of 
exposition. Mr. Kester is also a 
writer of dramas, and his dramatic 
instinct is revealed throughout this 
work. (Bobbs Merrill, Indianapolis. 

$1.50 net.) 

■■■ * * 

The Life of Martin Luther. 
By Elsie Singmaster. A popular 
treatment of the life story of the great 
German, the publication of which be- 
ing timed to aid in the proper celebra- 
tion throughout the world by the 
Lutheran Church of the 400th anni- 
versary of the Reformation. Brief, 
interesting, helpful. (Houghton Mif- 
flin Company, Boston. $1.00 net.) 

Laugh and Live. By Douglas 
Fairbanks. Good sense, good cheer, 
good advice as to building a life and a 
character from one of the kings of the 



movies of today. Valuable reading 
for young people. (Britton Publish- 
ing Co., New York. $1.00 net.) 

* * * 

How TO Make the Garden Pay. 
By Edward Morrison and Charles 
Thomas Brues. Those who are trying 
to "Do their bit" by having a garden 
will find this manual indispensable. 
Unlike many books on such subjects, 
it is thorough and practical and at the 
same time interesting. (Houghton 
Mifflin Company, Boston. 75 cents 

net.) 

* * * 

The Practical Home Doctor. By 
A. F. Voak. A condensed manual .of 
valuable information concerning thej 
more common diseases and their treat- 
ment. Special attention is given the 
modern terror, infantile paralysis. 
(Britton Publishing Company, New 
York. 50 cents net.) 

Tfie Oxford Book of English 
Mystical Verse. Chosen by D. HJ 
S. Nicholson and A. H. E. Lee. 
Mysticism is coming again to be a 
key-note in poetry. Of great interest, 
therefore, for students of poetry as 
well as for all persons who desire tc 
keep in touch with the age, will be 
this collection of mystical verse fr.orr 
the earliest days in England down tc 
the present year in England anc 
America. John Donne and Willian 
Blake are here represented, as alsc 
John Masefield and Alfred Noyes. A 
literary gold-mine for those who lovf 
the beautiful in thought and form 
(Oxford University Press, Americar 
Branch, New York, N. Y. $2.50.) 



Make the Summer Count! 



Every minister and religious leader should see that when the summer 
is over he has not gone backward, but rather made a real advance in 
his thought life. One must read, and read widely, in these days to 
keep up with the world's progress. In order to encourage ministers 
and other religious workers to "make the summer count" for their 
mental and spiritual development, we are making a special 10 per 
cent discount for cash on $5.00 (or more) orders for books ad- 
vertised in this issue of The Christian Century. Lay in your 
"summer reading" now and take advantage of this special ofifer. En- 
close check with order, including 10 cents postage for each volume 
ordered. 



Disciples Publication Society 



700 E. 40th St. 



Chicago 



August 2, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



17 



Disciples Table Talk I 

MIUinHilllillillilllillUillllllllP^^ 



f. J. Tisdall to Return 
:o Columbus, Ohio 

J. J. Tisdall, for the last eighteen 
nonths pastor at Norwood church, 
rdedo, Ohio, will leave this field and re- 
;urn to his former pulpit at Wilson ave- 
lue, Columbus, Ohio. The present in- 
:umbent there, Frank M. Moore, has 
leclared his intention of enlisting in the 
irmy. 

-I* ^ H^ 

— H. E. Stafford, who leads at Mas- 
jillon, Ohio, has delivered Red Cross 
iddresses at Brewster, Canal Fulton and 
salem, Ohio, under the direction of the 
;tate superintendent of Red Cross. Mr. 
Stafford was also chosen as the speaker 
it a local meeting of the movement, be- 
ng the only representative of the Mas- 
jillon ministers on the program. He 
dso represented the churches of the city 
it a "send-off" given the departing sol- 
iiers, and last week he addressed the 
R-Otary Club of the city. 

— George L. Peters closed on last Sun- 
lay a successful three years' ministry at 
^orth Side, Omaha, Neb. It is not yet 
nade public as to Mr. Peters' future 
)lans. He is spoken of in terms of 
)raise by R. C. Harding, superintendent 
)f city missions, for his interest in gen- 
:ral philanthropic and missionary work 
n the city. 

—Secretary J. H. Mohorter, of the 
National Benevolent Association, re- 
)orts that the children of the Colorado 



Christian Home, located at Denver, were 
the guests of the Denver Post at a circus 
which recently visited the city. He also 
writes that Mrs. N. M. Self, who for the 
last three years has served the Colorado 
Home as chairman of the Board of Man- 
agers, has by the choice of her asso- 
ciates been elected superintendent and 
is now in direct charge of the home. 
Mr. Mohorter is rejoicing in the fact 
that nearly 1,GOO Sunday schools reached 
the honor goal for contributions to be- 
nevolence this year. 

— H. H. Peters, Illinois state superin- 
tendent, writes that he spent Sunday, 
July 22, with W. D. Endres and First 
church, Quincy, 111. Mr. Peters says 
that First church is probably doing the 
most effective work in its history; "not 
work of a spectacular kind, but of the 
substantial sort, that counts." Mr. 
Endres has served at Quincy less than 
three years, but the Sunday school is 
now thoroughly organized and graded, 
the budget system and every member 
canvass are firmly established, and there 
is a church membership of 650, 301 new 
members having been received into the 
church during the period of Mr. Endres' 
ministry; 100 of these came as a result 
of the Bob Jones meeting. Mr. Endres 
is a meinber of the Third District of the 
Illinois Christian Missionary Society 
and a member of the Board of Trustees 
of the Culver-Stockton College, at Can- 
ton, Mo. Secretary Peters states that 
the East End church at Quincy, under 



the leadership of L. C. Mauck, is doing 
a fruitful work. 

■ — The fourth annual rural church in- 
stitute of Kentucky will be held at Eliza- 
ville, September 3-7, 1917. L. A. Warren 
is the pastor of this church. Two years 
ago Kentucky adopted a rural church 
standard, concerning which Prof. A. W. 
Taylor writes: "The Kentucky rural 
church standard is a very adequate plan 
to meet the rural church situation as it 
is, with the forces at hand." 

• — The Christian Endeavor Society of 
Central church, San Diego, Cal., which 
has always been most active in work 
among soldiers and sailors, recently en- 
tertained at an "at home" 550 enlisted 
men. This is 10 per cent of the soldiers 
now at San Diego, there being about 
5,000 in all. 

— The Christian Endeavor Society at 
Stanhope, la., brought Wm. J. Bryan to 
that city July 11. He spoke under a 
large tent, erected for the occasion. The 
organization got one-half of the gross 
receipts. 

— After August 1 the address of the 
Board of Ministerial Relief will be 106 
instead of 120 East Market street, In- 
dianapolis, Ind., where it has been ever 
since its organization. The change is 
from the Union Trust building to the 
Lemcke building, which stands next to 
it, and is necessitated by the need of 
more space and the desire to have fire- 
proof protection for important records. 
Those who have old addressed envel- 
opes, however, may use them without 
change. 

—The Panhandle District School of 
Methods held in Amarillo, Tex., July 
2-6, enrolled forty-one students, repre- 



A Great Year Ahead 

Our original instructions to the printer called for an 
increase of 1 per cent in the Bethany Graded Literature 
for the quarter beginning October 1 . Two weeks ago we 
revised the instructions by adding 20 per cent more. Our 
confidence now indicates that we will have to add yet 
another 1 per cent if not 20 per cent in order to meet 
the increase in orders now coming in from the Sunday 
Schools. In five years every quarter has shown a positive 
increase over the previous quarter in the volume of our 
patronage. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO 



18 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 2, 1917 



SEPTEMBER 



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T 


r 


3 


i 

9 
16 
23 
.30 


■3 

10 
17 
24 


A 
11 
18 
25 


*6 
12 
19 
26 


1 

6 7 8 
13 14 15 
202122 
272829 



rr 



SEPTEMBER 



V, 



IS CHURCH EXTENSION MONTH 

GIVE WAY FOR CHURCH EXTENSION 

EVERY CHURCH— EVERY PREACHER — EVERY MISSIONARY COMMITTEE 
AND SUPERINTENDENT SHOULD HAVE SUPPLIES AND POSTER NOW. 

G. W. MUCKLEY, Secretary - 603 New England Bldg., KANSAS CITY, MO. 



senting fifteen schools, and a graduation 
class of eight. Among the students were 
eleven ministers, three superintendents, 
four other officers, eleven teachers and 
twelve pupils. 

— The Christian Endeavor Society of 
First church, Larned, Kan., entertained 
the militia boys of this town a few 
weeks ago. There were about fifty pres- 
ent. 

— The church at Mt. Carmel, Fleming 
county, Ky., has just closed its record 
revival for many years. J. L. Finnell has 
reorganized this work and some needed 
improvements were dedicated to service 
on July 8. Funds were raised to pay 
for the improvements and also to pro- 
vide for the expenses of the rest of the 
year. During the recent twelve-day 
meeting twenty-two members were 
added by confession of faith and nine 
otherwise. 

— C. E. Chambers, who recently re- 
signed from the work at Oelwein, la., 
began his new task at Perry, la., on 
July 15. Paul E. Becker succeeds Mr. 
Chambers at Oelwein. 

— Robert M. Dungan, who is now lo- 
cated at University Place, Des Moines, 
as financial secretary of the Benedict 
Home of that city, reports that his 
father, D. R. Dungan, is recovering from 
the injury received on board ship bound 
for the Hawaiian Islands, last October. 

— Henry P. Atkins, of First church, 
Mexico, Mo., is spending his vacation at 
Lake Geneva, Wis., his family accom- 
panying him. 

— S. W. Hutton, Texas State Bible 
School Superintendent ; Clififord S. Weaver, 
Educational Secretary; Mr. Colby D. 
Hall, representing the C. W. B. M., ^nd 
J. B. Holmes, Superintendent of Mis- 
sions for Texas, met in Fort Worth on 
July 11 and agreed to establish a "Cen- 
tral Office," from which the work of 
their various departments should be car- 
ried forward. Texas Christian Univer- 
sity offered, free of charge, a large room 
in Brite College for "headquarters." 

— First church, Mexico, Mo., has an 
Honor Roll of forty-seven enlisted sol- 
diers. 

— Kyle Brooks, recently resigned from 
the pastorate at Henderson, Ky., has 
been called to Hickman, Ky., and has 
accepted. 

— The death is reported of Mrs. A. R. 
Spicer, wife of the former Oklahoma 
state secretary. Mrs. Spicer died at 
Oklahoma City on July 6. 

— Guy L. Zerby of St. Joseph, 111., has 
accepted the pastorate at Webber Street 
church, Urbana, 111., and began his new 
work this week. 



iiriii wnni/ A.Church Hom« f*r You. 
NFW YlInK ^rite Dr. Finis Idleman, 
nun I Ulll\ ^^2 West 8l8t St., N. Y. 



— A farewell reception was recently" 
given for Frank Waller Allen and fam- 
ily, at First church, Springfield, 111. Mr. 
Allen, with his wife and daughter, is now 
on a camping trip in Empire, Colo. Dr. 
and Mrs. V. T. Lindsay of Springfield 
are also with the party. 

— Among the recruits for war service 
from the Disciples' ministry are Edgar 
C. Lucas, of Havana, 111., who will serve 
as Chaplain, and Ralph V. Austin, of 
Dean Street church, Terre Haute, Ind., 
who has enlisted in the medical corps. 

— Claude E. Hill, of First church, 
Chattanooga, Tenn., recently gave his 
congregation a review of H. G. Wells' 
"God the Invisible King." 

— T. W. Bellingham, pastor at Benton 



Harbor, Mich., is recovering from a 
serious injury sustained by him from 
an automobile during a parade of the 
Home Guards of Benton Harbor, of 
which Mr. Bellingham is a member. 

— The first Sunday night of July was 
celebrated in a patriotic service at First 
Church, Norfolk, Va. Over 150 sailors 
and marines were in attendance. After 
the service a social hour was spent in 
the social hall of the church when light 
refreshments were served, furnished by 
the adult department of the school. 
The members of the church generally 
availed themselves of this opportunity 
for personal touch, which seemed to be 
appreciated by the men of the navy. 
Charles M. Watson leads in the Norfolk 
work. 



Disciples for Food Conservation 



— Woodland Street congregation, Nash- 
ville, Tenn., is now enjoying the use of 
its new auditorium. J. E. Stuart, the 
~ pastor, has been busy at the building 
task since the burning of the old build- 
ing in March, 1916. 



At the call of Mr. Herbert Hoover, 
the Commission on Food Conservation 
to represent the Churches of Christ, se- 
lected from a list submitted to him, met 
in Washington, D. C, at the offices of 
the National Food Administration on 
Friday, July 20, at 10 o'clock. Those 
present were: Judge F. A. Henry, 
Cleveland, Ohio; President R. H. Cross- 
field, Lexington, Ky.; George P. Rut- 
ledge, editor Christian Standard, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; A. C. Smither, managing ed- 
itor Christian Evangelist, St. Louis, Mo.; 
E. L. Powell, Louisville, Ky. ; George B. 
Peak, president Central Life Assurance 
Society of the United States, Des 
Moines, Iowa, and Earle Wilfley, Wash- 
ington, D. C. Judge Henry was made 
temporary chairman. 

Mr. Herbert Hoover, Dr. Ray Lyman 
Wilbur and Mr. George A. Cullen were 
present and addressed the meeting, pre- 
senting in concise and impressive man- 
ner the necessity, meaning and scope 
of Food Administration. 

A permanent organization of the com- 
mission was then effected by the elec- 
tion of President R. H. Crossfield, 
chairman, and Earle Wiliiey, executive 
secretary. 

The commission was profoundly im- 
pressed with the necessity of immediate 
and energetic action on the suggestions 
of Mr. Hoover and his associates, and 
to this end the secretary was instructed 
to endeavor to give efifect to the follow- 
ing recommendations: 

First: That our brotherhood be urged 
to observe Food Conservation Day in 
all of the churches on Sunday, Septem- 
ber 16, the Bible schools and Christian 
Endeavor Societies co-operating. 

Second: That the Christian Woman's 
Board of Missions Auxiliaries, the La- 
dies' Aid Societies, and all other wo- 
men's organizations in the churches, be 
urged to devote a part of the program 
of their first meeting in September to 
the subject of food conservation. 

Third: That the chairman of this com- 
mission arrange, if possible, for a place 
for an address by the secretary on Food 
Conservation, not to exceed thirty min- 
utes, on our national convention pro- 
gram. 

Fourth: That, notwithstanding any 
special instructions included in the above. 



the executive secretary be given the wid-; 
est possible latitude in meeting the 
emergency and in conforming his instruc- 
tions and future actions to the purposes 
of Mr. Hoover and the Food Adminis- 
tration. 

At an adjourned meeting held in the 
afternoon the following formal resolu- 
tions were adopted; 

1. Resolved, That we heartily and en 
thusiastically endorse the United State; 
Food Administration, under the direc 
tion of Mr. Herbert Hoover, appointee 
by President Wilson, and affirm our ear 
nest desire to lend all possible co-opera 
tion in the matter of food conservatioi 
during the existence of the present wa 
and throughout the period of recon 
struction which will follow. 

2. We recommend that our womei 
accept membership in the United State 
Food Administration, thereby organiz 
ing the home for effective saving ani 
substitution of food. 

3. Also, we particularly recommen 
that the various congregations of ou 
people secure weekly reports from thei 
constituent families of food saving, i 
harmony with the recommendation c 
the Food Administration as set forth b 
Mr. Hoover. 

4. That our farmers throughout th 
country be urged to plant the large; 
possible acreage of wlieat for the hai 
vest of 1918. 

5. Finally, we ask for the co-open 
tion and active support of all the pul 
lications of our people in an effort 1 
secure the widest possible circulation « 
the program of food conservation unde 
taken by the national government. 

Earle Wilfley, 
Executive Secretary, Commission c 
Food Conservation of Churches 
Christ, 1483 Harvard St., N. W. 



Baptismal Snits 

We can make prompt shipments 
Order Now. Finest quality and mos 
fatisfactory in every way. Order b 
size of boot. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 B. 40th St. Chicago, II 



LJ 



ugust 2, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



19 



oreign Mission Notes 

It will be recalled quite generally by 
e friends of the Foreign Society that 
1 account of lack of funds the salaries 

■ the missionaries suffered a reduction 

■ 10 per cent in the past. At the last 
eeting of the executive committee a 
;solution was passed to restore the 
I per cent. This will be gratifying, not 
ily to the missionaries on the field, 
it to many friends in America who felt 
lat a great hardship had been laid upon 
lose who are on the rim of the world, 
3ing the Lord's work in our behalf, 
his step was taken in faith and in full 
)nfidence in the Brotherhood, that they 
ould endorse the action by increased 
jerality. 

The Foreign Society is sending forth 
velve new missionaries to the fields 
id they will all sail between this and 



THE BIBLE COLLEGE OF MISSOURI 

A biblical school of high grade. At Columbia, Mo. Adjacent to the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, and affiliated with it. Interchange of credits. No 
tuition. Non-Missourians $20 per year in University. Fine student preaching 
opportunities. For catalogue or information, write 

G. D. EDWARDS, Dean, •.' •.• '.• COLUMBIA, MO. 



November 1. These will be a source 
of great encouragement to the workers 
at the various stations. The work is 
being constantly enlarged in every di- 
rection. It is hoped that all the friends 
will redouble their diligence to make it 
possible to meet the growing demands. 
The total receipts of the Foreign So- 
ciety for the first twenty-five days of 
July amounted to $74,878, a gain of $33,- 
935. These figures cheer us on the way. 
The churches, as churches, show a gain 
for the twenty-five days of $2,143; the 



Sunday schools gained $6,980; the indi- 
vidual gifts show an advance of $9,043. 
We must all be ready for a big "drive" 
during the months of August and Sep- 
tember, if we reach the $600,000 pro- 
posed. We must not fall down on the 
$600,000 proposition. 

Please let the churches be very prompt 
during the months of August and Sep- 
tember in sending their gifts. There is 
no time to be lost. 

F. M. Rains, 

Secretary. 



[nion Theological College 

'ers high-grade academic and theological instniction to 
n and women unable to complete a college course but 
have the ability and desire to enter the MINISTRY, 
to become EVANGELISTS, PASTOKS, ASSISTANTS 
DIRECTORS OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 

imON FREE — OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF HELP 

inual Catalogue now ready. Address H. J. Loken, Ex- 
ision Lecturer, 20 North Ashland Blvd., Chicago, 111. 



WANTED — Position as organist and 
assistant pastor in or near Chicago by 
high grade musician and practical church 
woman. Reference: The editor of The 
Christian Century. 

WANTED— Position in Christian school 
as director of music by experienced and 
competent musician. Refer to the edi- 
tor of The Christian Century. 



MR. BRITLING SPEAKS AGAIN 

Mr. H. G. Wells' New Book 

"God, the Invisible King" 

Mr. Wells, the author^of Mr. Britling, says : 

**The time draws near when mankind will awake , . . 
and then there will be no nationality in all the world 
but humanity, and no king, no emperor, nor leader, 
but the one Cod of mankind.'* 

AMERICA IS FIGHTING FOR THIS GOD ! 

"God, the Invisible King'' 

"The Religion of Mr. Britling" 

Price, $1.25 

—FOR SALE BY— 

Disciples Publication Society, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



CHURCH I ;} an M SCHOOL 



Ask for Catalcgue lad Special Donation Plan No. 27 

(Established 1868) 
THE C. S. BELL CO., HILLSBORO, OHIO 



THE 

Standard Birthday Bank 

AttractlTo and Durable. Made of 

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THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 2, 1917 



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I The Composition of Coca-Cola | 

I and its Relation to Tea | 

S Prompted by the desire that the public shall S 

= be thoroughly informed as to the composi- s 

5 tion and dietetic character o£ Coca-Cola, the s 

= Company has issued a booklet giving a de- s 

S tailed analysis of its recipe which is as follows : s 

S Water, sterilized by boiling (carbonated); § 

E sugar, granulated, first quality; fruit flavoring ~ 

S extracts with caramel; acid flavorings, citric s 

S (lemon) and phosphoric; essence of tea — the s 

S refreshing principle. s 

E The following analysis, by the late Dr. John 5 

E W. Mallet, Fellow of the Royal Society and I 

S for nearly forty years Professor of Chemistry s 

^ in the University of Virginia, shows the com- s 

E parative stimulating or refreshing strength of s 

E tea and Coca-Cola, measured in terms of the S 

E refreshing principle: s 

E Black tea — 1 cupful 1.54 E 

S (.hot) {5 a. oz.) s 

S Green tea — 1 glassful 2.02 I 

S (cold) (8 ff. oz. exclusive of ice) S 

S Coca-Cola— 1 drink, 8 fJ. oz 1.21 i 

S (fountain) (prepared with 1 U. oz. Syrup) S 

a Coca-Cola — 1 drink, 8 fJ. oz 1.12 = 

S (bottlers) (prepared with 1 H. oz. Syrup) mm 

S From the above recipe and analysis, which arc S 

E confirmed by all chemists who have analyzed E 

S these beverages, it is apparent that Coca-Cola s 

E is a carbonated, fruit-flavored modification of E 

E tea of a little more than one-half its stimulat- 5 

E ing strength. 5 

E A copy of the booklet referred to above will E 

E be mailed free on request, and The Coca-Cola E 

S Company especially invites inquiry from E 

E those who are interested in pure food and E 

S public health propaganda. Address S 

S The Coca-Cola Co., Dept. J., Atlanta, Ga., U.S. A. | 
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22 - THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY August 2, 1917 

m iH 

HAVE YOU READ 

FAIRHOPE 

ANEWNOVEL 
BY EDGAR DEWITT JONES 



(nimiiiMiMiiiininiMMiMii 



Fairhope folks are mighty human, but you 
will like them all the better for that. 

Major Menifee may remind you of Colonel 
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Boardman, the modern Enoch. And even 
Giles Shockley will not repel you, "Hound 
of the Lord" though he was. 

Everyone knows that the old style of 
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what type of church will take its place? 
Read the chapter entitled *'The Old Order 
Changeth" and meet the Reverend Roger 
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Do you like birds and stretches of meadows, 
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"The Man in the Street 
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to come." 




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"THE SPIRITUAL 

INTERPRETATION OF 

HISTORY" 



Professor Mathews is Dean of the Divinity 
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Every minister and every alert churchman 
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Vol. XXXIV August 9, 1917 Number 32 



■ 



Christ All and 
In All 

By Joseph Fort Newton 



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CHICAGO 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY August 9, 1917 



THE PSYCHOLOGY 
OF RELIGION 

By GEORGE ALBERT COE 

Professor of Religious Education, Union Theological Seminary, Author of 
"The Religion of a Mature Mind," The Spiritual Life," etc. 



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and social processes. The most authoritative and interesting 
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DISCIPLES PUBLICATIO N SOCIETY, PROPRIETORS, 



700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO 



Disciples 

Publication 

Society 



The Disciples Publica- 
tion Society is an or- 
ganization through 
which churches of the 
Disciples of Christ 
seek to promote un- 
denominational and constructive 
Christianity. 

The relationship it sustains to Dis- 
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organic, though not official. The So- 
ciety is not a private institution. It 
has no capital stock. No individuals 
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The charter under which the So- 
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profits are earned shall be applied to 
agencies which foster the cause of 
religious education, although it is 
clearly conceived that its main task 
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literature for building up character 
and for advancing the cause of re- 
ligion. ♦ • « 

The Disciples Publication Society 



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and churches who interpret the Dis- 
ciples' religious reformation as ideally 
an unsectarian and unecclesiastical 
fraternity, whose common tie and 
original impulse are fundamentally the 
desire to practice Christian unity with 
all Christians. 

The Society therefore claims fel- 
lowship with all who belong to the 
living Church of Christ, and desires to 
cooperate with the Christian people 
of all communions, as well as with the 
congregations of Disciples, and to 
serve all. * • * 

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service which it believes every church 
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well as the Disciples, in such terms 
and with such sympathetic insight as 
may reveal to all their essential unity 
in spite of denominational isolation. 
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THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 9, 1917 



What is Home Missions? 



It is the common sense of the church seizing the opportunity of the 
continent. 

It is the patriotism of religion, the religion of patriotism. 

It is the father's provision for a child's eternal welfare. 

It is the gifts of a million souls upHfted like vapor from well watered fields 
to descend like showers upon the places that are athirst for the Word. 

It is the united effort of the strong to bear the crushing burdens of 
the weak. 

It is the strategy of the hosts of 
righteousness for overcoming the 
powers of evil. 

It is the parable of the sower 
translated into present day deeds. 

It is the seed-bed of the gospel in 
God's most favored land, whose trans- 
planting will redeem the nations. 

It is the remembrance of the saints 
that they were once pilgrims and 
strangers and should show kindness to 
those who are so today. 

It is the miracle of the five loaves 
and two fishes repeated on a thousand 
hillsides. 

It is a winter of discontent turned into glorious summer by the Sun of 
Righteousness. 

It is the fifteenth chapter of Luke, with a hundred cities for the swept 
floor, a thousand country-sides for the lost sheep, and a million souls perish- 
ing as prodigals. 

That Home Missions may, in fact, be all of this and more, the Men and 
Millions Movement must be brought to speedy and complete success. 



MEN AND MILLIONS MOVEMENT 




222 W. Fourth Street 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 




HRiSTiAN Century 



CHARI^ES CI^AYTON MORRISOIT, EDITOR. 



HERBERT I^. WII^I^ETT, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR. 



olume XXXIV 



AUGUST 9. 1917 



Number 32 



Mobilizing Our Spiritual Resources 



THE CHURCH ALONE CAN OVERCOME 
^HE ENEMIES OF OUR COUNTRY. 

Even though we are in the midst of a great strug- 
le, the most colossal in the history of the United 
itates, we do not need to apologize for war as a method 
f settling international disputes. Our President is a 
Christian man and he sought in every way to induce 
tiose against whom we are now at war to listen to 
he counsels of reason and conscience. The govern- 
lent of Germany refused to do this and by its out- 
ageous acts against non-combatants put itself beyond 
le operation of any reasonable patience and forbear- 
nce. 

We know the horrors of war and we shall know 
till more. No war has ever called forth such deeds of 
eroism as those which are now performed on land 
nd in the air and on the sea. The lists of dead, the 
ripples, the invalids will soon reinforce our sense of 
error at a belated method of settling international 
roblems. 

While we live in this era of blood and iron the 
hurch and the Christian conscience must do the best 
t can. We can either weaken our own nation or weaken 
he enemy nation. We can find little time to consider 
he first alternative. It is clear to nearly every Chris- 
ian in this country that we would prefer that the mild 
nd democratic rule of an American president be ex- 
ended over us rather than that German Junkers should 
ake their toll from our weakness and inefficiency. We 
v^ant our nation to come to victory and this is only 
»ossible by mobilizing our spiritual resources. 

Our chief enemies are those at home. America 
vill never subdue the brutal will of the German Junkers 
inless we first find a way of dealing with those domestic 
nemies who rob us of our spiritual efificiency. 

• • 

j Our nation needs a spiritual balance wheel. Early 

1 the war we were so optimistic as to believe that the 

jiermans would be frightened at the declaration of war 

!y the United States into an early peace. The Germans 

inswered us by calling out more of their reserves. Now 

lat we are hearing daily of reverses on the Russian 

|ne we are in danger of going to the other extreme of 

bntiment and falling into an unwarranted pessimism. 

Is the war goes on its weary way, the latter hazard will 

jiore often be present than the former. The church 

m stabilize the sentiment of the people, preaching 

lution in times of exultation and creating the spirit of 

ith and good cheer in times of national depression. 

is our function to build up a faith that God makes 

jie wrath of men to praise him, and that no enemy of 

■ogress and civilization may ever hope for a perma- 

int victory. 

The fundamental attitude of loyalty, on which fam- 

/ and church and state live, is a religious product, and 

finds the church its chief source of supply. Before 



the war our stock of loyalties had run very low. We 
had been living vain and foolish lives, and were occu- 
pied much of the time with unspiritual pursuits. We 
need now a patriotism which shall be deeper than flag- 
raising and shouting, a patriotism which shall call forth 
sacrifice arid consecration. One of our great spiritual 
enemies is an individualistic attitude toward present 
emergencies. The salvation of our country depends 
upon our arousing a great passion of loyalty through- 
out the nation. 

Another source of weakness to a country in a time 
of war is dishonesty. The stories of graft in the conduct 
of Russian military affairs before the downfall of the 
autocracy may not all be well founded, but some of 
them doubtless are. German agents are said to have 
purchased generals and other military leaders. There 
is the hazard of graft and other abuses in the purchase 
of military supplies. The church is the best equipped 
of all our institutions to create a stalwart sense of hon- 
esty which will scourge out such abominable perver- 
sions of power. It is a source of pride to us that our 
administration has so clean a record to date. Our gov- 
ernment, however, must depend upon the moral and 
spiritual leaders of the country for help. 

• • 

It is the church which is best able to formulate the 
ideal significance of the issues of this war. There are 
people who are saying that this is a commercial war. 
Some see in it a struggle of dynasties. There are a few 
unconvinced people who, without being doctrinaire 
pacifists, hold that "this is not America's war." We 
have the business of showing our citizenship that it is 
not possible in this emergency to surrender to a pagan 
force. If we should be conquered by Germany, it would 
not be by the Germany of the universities and of Ober- 
ammergau and of the great cathedrals. We should be 
conquered by a Germany which stands today as the 
chief menace to the spiritually minded Teutons and to 
-all the rest of the world. A carping cynicism in 
America is one of our great enemies and the church 
must set up in its place a conception of the progress of 
religious idealism even through such a terrible means 
as this war. 

We can imagine that we hear the voice of the ob- 
jector saying: "You are preaching another holy war." 
Odious as a holy war may seem to our minds, there is 
one thing worse, and that is an unholy war. We are 
now in war and there seems no way to get out, other 
than by victory. It is better for the church even in war 
to continue to witness for the mind of Christ. Some 
would tell us that the mind of Christ demands our lay- 
ing down our arms at the feet of a pagan force. We 
have not so understood our Great Leader. It seems to 
us that the religious spirit leads us to combine true 
patriotism and true religion in an effort to conquer the 
spiritual enemies of the race. 



DITORIAL 



"LIBERTY TO DIFFER BUT NOT TO DIVIDE" 

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL proposed a great slo- 
gan when he suggested to his friends the motto : 
"Liberty to differ but not to divide." A differ- 
ence of opinion is one thing, but a severance of fellow- 
ship is another. It is inevitable that we should think 
things differently, for we all approach reality from ex- 
periences that are so radically different. 

"Bob" Burdette, the popular lecturer, used to tell 
the story of the blind men seeing the elephant. One 
of them seized his tail and declared that an elephant 
was like a rope. Another felt of his trunk and declared 
that an elephant was like a tree. Still another felt over 
his broad side and declared than an elephant was like 
a wall. They were all correct, but each of these blind 
men saw the truth only partially. 

Exery student of philosophy knows Plato's classic 
illustration of the man sitting bound in the cave with 
his back to the light and seeing on the wall before him 
the shadows of men and animals passing before the door 
of his cave. With this illustration the great philosopher 
sought to show the limitations of human knowledge. 

Breaking fellowship over opinion, therefore, is a 
great folly. When we understand better the quest for 
divine truth, we shall see that it is only from the man 
that differs with us that we may learn much. In order 
to discuss at all we must have some agreements, but 
the disagreements bring the shock and challenge com- 
pelling more thorough investigation of religious reality. 

APPROACHES AND NOT REPROACHES 

A POPULAR EVANGELIST once entered a new 
town to present the Disciple plea for the first 
time. When doubt was expressed whether he 
would be able to secure an audience he laid down as his 
program, "I will abuse the sects until they hear me." 
Fortunately, he failed in that town. A church born of 
such preaching would have misrepresented the great 
plea of the Disciples of Christ. 

The attitude of Alexander Campbell was much 
wiser. He spent much of the year of 1837, in the pages 
of the Millennial Harbinger, in taming down the nascent 
sectarianism of his followers and throughout all his 
life he was pursued by the danger of a dogmatic ex- 
clusiveness in his movement. His great word for deal- 
ing with his divided brethren of the Protestant sects 
was, "Approaches and not reproaches." This spirit is 
the one needed, today and all the time, for solving the 
problem of reuniting Christ's divided followers. 

Reproaches are, of course, possible. A critical ex- 
amination of any religious system will always reveal 
weaknesses. A Methodist or a Presbyterian or a Dis- 
ciple, when he is not on guard to defend the honor of 
his people, will speak frankly of the error and weakness 
to be found in his system. He will not allow others to 
do this work of criticism for him. 

Approaches are always made in the spirit of sincere 
appreciation of the people we would cultivate. We can 
find good everywhere. A godly old woman of kindly 
soul was once reproved by a friend in these words "I 
believe you would find something good to say about 
everybody. You would speak good of the devil." Where- 



upon this old saint replied, "If we were all as indus- 
trious as the devil, we would be better off." 

Our religious neighbors have been blessed at the 
hands of God. Each has a truth to tell and a work tc 
do. When we appreciate both their testimony and their 
service we shall serve best the Christ who prayed thai 
all his disciples might be one. 

SPIRITUALIZING RURAL LIFE 



MANY of the prophets came from the open country 
or the small village and we are accustomed tc 
believe that this environment is more favorable! 
to reflection and the walk with God than is life in thei 
city. Elijah and Amos and Jeremiah bear testimony tc 
the opportunities of a free life spent close to nature^ 
John the Baptist and Jesus found solace again and agairj 
in the vast solitudes of the big world apart from men| 
But Isaiah was a city man and Paul, the most successfuj 
missionary of the early church, was "a citizen of nq 
mean city." j 

It is clear on a little reflection that rural life hai 
no magic in it which automatically transforms a mar 
into a saint or a mystic. A "pagan" was originally ; 
man of the country. A study of the peasantry o 
Europe will indicate how brutish life may become wherl 
it fights rude nature and has no motive save those o 
food and sex and shelter. Great changes are now com 
ing to pass in this country. Old American families hav 
in many cases made their money and moved to town 
Behind the former hired man is now a renter strugglin| 
with limited capital to get on. 

Under such conditions new improvements for rura 
life come slowly. In up-to-date communities the mai 
delivery, the telephone, the rural delivery, the con 
solidated school and the unionized and socialized churcl 
make life wonderfully worth while. Such improve 
ments depend upon a stable population. 

Often the rural community waits upon leadership 
We must teach the people who move away from the soi| 
that they cannot be absolved entirely from forme 
duties. The new preacher who goes into the com 
munity must be trained to recognize its needs. In thi 
way the leadership which is necessary to bring ruraj 
life to its best will be at work. The men and wome: 
who labor in the great biological laboratory of th 
farm, surrounded by the daily miracles of life, may b 
led to an attitude of reverence and devotion to God. 

MORE TRAINED LEADERS 

THE time has come for the young people who ar 
considering going away to college to make up thei, 

minds. They will be weighing the chances of lif 
for the educated and the uneducated. Just now there i! 
an anti-intellectualistic wave of sentiment going ove| 
the country and it may be that some will be deluded intj 
thinking that it will not matter so much whether the' 
go to the higher schools or not. 

These young people should be made to know ju.'| 
what opportunities for leadership there are in the worl 
for those who are not trained in the best way. In tli 
latest issue of "Who's Who in America," there ai 
sketches of 9,643 of the more prominent people of thi 



August 9, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



lountry. Of this number 6,711 have had a college edu- 
;ation or its equivalent ; 965 of the remainder attended 
ollege for a time ; 889 graduated from the academies or 
lormal schools ; 239 stopped with a high school train- 
ng; 808 attended only the common schools, while 
hirty-one were self-educated. It is easily seen from 
hese figures that the leadership of America is in the 
lands of trained people. 

The Financial Red-Book of the United States shows 
hat the opportunities of becoming rich are three hun- 
Ired times greater for college-bred men than for those 
vithout education. 

The country needs now, and will need after the war, 
I vastly increased force of trained leaders. Only by 
ncreasing the student bodies in our colleges and uni- 
versities will it be possible for the country to call to its 
ervice the people that will be needed. 

Our own Disciple colleges have been losing con- 
liderable numbers of young men and women for war 
lervice. These should be replaced by thousands of 
)right young people from the high schools. There is 
low one automobile for every twenty-seven people in 
he United States. Will it be possible for anyone to say 
hat there is not the money with which to educate the 
^oung people who wish to be educated? 

THE CHURCH AND THE MILITARY CAMP 

BUSINESS is already sensitive to the advantages of 
having a big military camp near the cities. It is 
this consideration, perhaps, which has led to a 
vigorous protest in the north against sending all our 
soldiers south to spend their money in southern cities. 

The church must not be less interested than busi- 
less in the presence of thousands of men in the military 
:raining camps. These men are of the age least often 
seen in our churches. Many of them are nominal mem- 
bers ; they lack that vital interest in religious work and 
kvorship which is needful for their own spiritual de- 
i^elopment and for the salvation of the world. They 
ire at once a challenge and an opportunity. 

The churches ought to be interested in seeing that 
the moral environment of these men is what it should 
be. The authorities in Washington have a well-defined 
program of protecting the men morally, but in this good 
work they will need the support of the moral elements 
in society. 

The Y. M. C. A., with commendable enterprise, is 
arranging to supplement the work of the army chap- 
ilains. While the chaplains who are being selected 
iander the new law are a superior lot, there is always 
inore to be done than one man can take care of. Many 
pf these chaplains are not members of evangelical 
phurches. The Y. M. C. A. will want to furnish special 
speakers and special music. In this work the evangeli-, 
:al churches should lend a hand with a hearty good 
ivill. Churches should be especially ready to lend their 
i:hoirs for service in the military camps. 
! It is possible that the young soldiers will return to 
'heir homes more religious than when they left. If 
hey do this will be a notable victory for the religious 
orces of this generation. 

ON THE FIRING LINE IN THE GHETTO 

T would be hard to find anywhere in the world keener 
social antagonisms than those in the ghetto in Chi- 
cago. Here a colony of fifty thousand Jews are 



surrounded by various nationalities, mostly Slavic. The 
Russians hate the Jews cordially, but must live near 
the Russian Jews, for these alone conduct stores and 
banks in which the Russian language is used. 

Not only are the racial antagonisms of the strongest 
sort, but social antagonisms as well. Here are to be 
found some of the most conservative people in the world 
defending conservative religion and a conservative so- 
cial order. By their side are to be found the exponents 
of the various revolutionary economic and religious 
faiths. The socialist is here, both the evolutionary so- 
cialist and the "direct action" advocate, the member of 
the I. W. W. y\narchists of the simon-pure Russian 
brand pour out their doctrines on the street in com- 
petition with missioners of the evangelical faith. These 
future Americans, who are now in the making, take 
their doctrines seriously and some of them read more 
good books in a year than we do. 

It is in such an environment that Basil S. Keussefif 
works. He preaches in the street to working people 
and gathers children for the telling of Bible stories. It 
is difficult to imagine a method that would not arouse 
a certain measure of resentment in such a neighborhood. 
Recently a member of the I. W. W. gave Mr. Keussefif 
a stinging blow on the head while he was preaching, 
but the meeting was not broken up. 

The ghetto in free America ceases to be a place 
where people are walled in. Jews live apart for their 
own convenience. We must not be indifferent to this 
melting pot, where doctrines and opinions are given the 
closest scrutiny by a proletariat which one day may 
produce some leaders of thought. 

A SIGNIFICANT SUMMER ASSEMBLY 

BETHANY ASSEMBLY, which is now in session 
at Bethany Park, is a national institution for the 
Disciples of Christ. The program brings men 
from various parts of the country and the board of 
directors of the institution is being rapidly extended 
beyond the state lines of Indiana. 

Catholicity seems to be the note in the program 
this summer. Men of widely variant views are appear- 
ing upon the same platform, not to speak platitudes on 
which all good men agree, but to bear testimony con- 
cerning their fundamental convictions. This kind of 
program will not promote unanimity but it will send 
hundreds of Disciples home to think things through for 
themselves during the coming year. This is the end of 
all true education. 

There is a breadth of intellectual outlook in the 
program which is being offered. Religious education is 
properly given a good share of the time. The Social 
Service Commission has generously donated a liberal 
share of eft'ort on the part of its members for the pur- 
pose of expounding the social ideals of the church. The 
religious note will be sounded by some of the great 
preachers among us. Thus the spiritual ration at Beth- 
any will have the balance which is necessary to health. 

Such an assembly, which is so close to the people, 
and which cannot possibly have any hint of legislative 
function, ought to be a great safety valve for our peo- 
ple. In our newspapers relatively few of our men talk, 
and in our national conventions there is a nervous 
avoidance of anything that would look like a divisive 
issue. In a summer assembly, where we may see the 
thinker smile when he scores a point, we may have a 



8 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 9, 1917 



different point of view presented without bitterness. 
Bethany this year is rendering a real service to the 
Disciples of Christ. 

THE CHURCH AND THE FAMILY 

THAT religion is the greatest bulwark of the family 
is an acknowledged fact with close observers of 
community problems. Judge John Rooney, of the 
Court of Domestic Relations in Chicago, said recently 
that three out of every four of the cases of domestic 
trouble coming before him are the result of the neglect 
of either husband or wife, or both, to attend any church 
service. He says: "I do not care what church a man 
or woman attends, but I do think that any man or wo- 
man could spare one hour each week to pay reverence 
to the Omnipotent. Every day I have parents before 
me, neither of whom attend church. How can they ex- 
pect to have any influence on their children's moral 
training if they themselves do not set the example of 
attending church services?'' 

It is possible for family life to degenerate into a 
mere biological relationship of a very low order. There 
are human families which lack the constancies of some 
of the lower animals. H. G. Wells in his story "In the 
Days of the Comet" suggests that the time is coming 
when sex jealousies and low thinking about family life 
will be replaced by nobler attitudes in which purity and 
broad-mindedness will together work the redemption of 
married people. We do not suggest that he has seen 
the highest vision of the love upon which the home is to 
rest, but it is certain that the family can live only by 
the inspiration of high religious principle. 

In the family circle, there must be found the Golden 
Rule, the practice of patience and sympathy and the love 
that thinketh no evil. It is in the church that the finer 
spiritual principles are kept alive which furnish the 
family with its vision and power. A part of the apolo- 



getic of the church in any community should be its in- 
fluence upon the family. 

GIVING UP OUR BOYS 

VERY soon we shall see train-loads of our boys 
riding through the country to the training camps, 
where they will take up their active duties looking 
toward preparation for service in France. It will be a 
pathetic sight to see the young men, the flower of the 
land, going forward to an uncertain fate. 

In the homes there will be weeping mothers and 
proud mothers and fearful mothers. There will be sullen 
and resentful fathers, and also men who give up their 
sons with a proud devotion to a great cause. Never in 
our nation's history has there been such giving as we 
witness now. Why do not these same parents more 
willingly devote their sons and daughters to the causes 
that mean the uplift of the world? 

When a boy wishes to become a minister or a girl 
a missionary, there must usually be encountered the 
steady and resourceful opposition of the family group. | 
Various influences are brought to bear to discourage 
the young people in what seems to be a futile and fool- 
ish idealism. We have thought this opposition due to 
the small financial rewards to be found in the service of 
religion. But the pay of a soldier is also ridiculously 
small. Is it possible that religion has seemed a poorer 
cause in the eyes of fathers and mothers than the cause 
of patriotism? 

When the war is over we shall have need of the 
heroism of our young people and the consecrated giving 
of their parents. The world is to be made over. In 
the constructive work following the coming of peace 
there will be the same clamorous need of men. We 
trust that in these war times we shall have learned 
something of the beauty of giving our sons and daugh- 
ters for the community good and for the service of God. 



ininniMiJiniiiiJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiKiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiitiiii 



Angelic Service 



[In one of Murillo's pictures in the Louvre he 
shows us the interior of a convent kitchen ; but doing 
the work there are, not mortals in old dresses, but beau- 
tiful white winged angels. * * * j^ jg ^hg angel aim 
and standard in an act that consecrates it.] 

No angel is so high 

But serveth clowns and kings, 

And doeth lowly things. 

He in this serviceable love can see 

The symbol of a heavenly mystery — 

So labor grows white wings. 

No angel bravely drest 

In larkspur colored gown 

But he will kneel him down 

And sweep with careful art the meanest floor, 

Singing the while he sweeps and toiling more 

Because he wears a crown. 



Set water on to boil, 

An angel helps thee straight, 

Kneeling beside the grate 

With pursed mouth he bloweth up the flame, 

Chiding the tardy kettle that for shame 

It makes an angel wait. 

Make thou conserves, the while 

Two little cherubs stand 

Tiptoe at either hand ; 

And one would help thee stir, and one would skim 

The golden juice that foams about the brim, 

So serveth thy command. 

Lady, thou art a queen, 

Thy kitchen an estate, 

Within its wall be great, 

Rule prudently. With faces kind and bland. 

Crowned heads and folded wings, for thy command 

And service angels wait. 

— W. M. Letts in the London Month. 



August 9, 1917 THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



Just Issued from the Christian Century Press 








ESS 



A New Book That Marks 
the Dawn of a New Day! 

"PROGRESS" is the title of a brave and brilliant vol- 
ume prepared by 

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in commemoration of the completion of twenty years of 
Institute history. Twenty of the leading Disciple writers 
participate in a treatment of the various aspects of progress 
in religious thought and practice during the past generation. 
The chapters bear directly upon the problems of the Disci- 
ples of Christ, but these problems are treated not from any 
provincial or sectarian point of view, but in the light of 
that modern learning common to all Christian scholarship. 
The volume is an admirable interpretation of both 

CATHOLICITY AND LOYALTY 

Without doubt, it will make a profound impression upon 
all thoughtful Disciples and will succeed as no book in re- 
cent times has succeeded in conveying to the general 
Christian world the ideals and spirit of the Disciples. 

IT IS INTENSELY INTERESTING 

Send for it today. Price, $1.50. 

The Christian Century Press, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



Christ All and In All 



By Joseph Fort Newton 



WHAT kind of a nation would 
this be if every man in it 
were such a man as Lincohi, 
true of heart, clear of mind, living 
with malice toward none and char- 
ity for all, seeking the sanctity and 
safety of the republic? Social slav- 
ery and industrial brutality would 
cease to exist. Laws would be wise 
and just and merciful, giving to each 
his right and leaving every one free 
to stretch his arms and his soul. No 
woman would be made desolate, no 
little child forlorn, by grasping 
greed or grinding cruelty. 

It would indeed be the nation it 
was meant to be, conceived in lib- 
erty and dedicated to the ideal that 
al-l men are created equal, entitled 
to equal justice and opportunity for 
life and happiness. 

Lincoln's lif'e a prophecy 

Because this mighty and tender 
spirit took form in Lincoln, his life 
was a revelation of the genius and 
purpose of the republic, its reason 
for being, and its prophecy for times 
to come. Nor will its mission be' ful- 
filled till all men under its flag are 
such men as he, if not in genius, 
at least in spirit and ideal. 

Just so, looking out over the far 
horizons of time, St. Paul saw all 
the groaning aeons of nature, all the 
groping ages of history, moving to- 
ward one point of light, one "far off 
Divine event." Through all the dim 
dreams of centuries, he saw the soul 
of man pointing, like the needle of a 
compass, to the Life of Christ as the 
Divine ideal, which is at once the 
reason for the universe and the rev- 
elation of its purpose. 

THE VISION OF ARISTOTLE 

Like Aristotle, he saw that nature 
is a realm of ends, and that "it is the 
Perfect Man, in whom the thought 
of God is clear, who is the measure 
of all things." Hence his vision of 
Christ as the crown, the climax, the 
consummation of all things, the 
whole finding focus in a single lum- 
inous life ; as we may find infinity 
in a grain of sand and eternity in an 
hour. 

Much else there may be in the 
majestic infinitudes of God which 
can have no likeness in man, how- 
ever exalted; but of that we can 
never know, since we have in us no 
key to it. But the quality of God, 
as distinguished from His quantity; 
His spirit, His purpose. His pity, 
and most of all. His character, with- 
out which His power is mere force 



"Christ is all and in all." — Col. 



— these are revealed in the Life of 
Jesus ! 

THE LIGHT OF LIFE 

Christ, then, is all that we really 
know of God, as He is all that we 
need for nobility of life and hope in 
death ; and if we lay it to heart that 
the Divine Ideal, as St. Paul held, is 
that all shall at last be like Him, 
life lights up like an aurora. For 
this nature exists; for this suns rise 
and set, and flowers grow, and seas 
drift and sing — that man may real- 
ize the divine dream revealed in 
Christ! Such is the ultimate pur- 
pose of God and the immortal hope 
of humanity, but it could never 
come true in any life, much less in 
all, unless the second part of the 
text were as true as the first. 

What the theologians have taught 
of the uniqueness and supremacy of 
Christ is true, profoundly and glor- 
iously true. 'Tis well that we sing 
it, and rest in it, rejoicing in the 
measureless promise of it. Only, to 
the vision of Athanasius and Augus- 
tine we must add the insight of 
Channing and Emerson. Christ is 
all, but He is also in all — his image 
and superscription upon every hu- 
man soul, something in the very na- 
ture of man which will not let him 
rest till the ideal in which he was 
created is realized. It must be so, 
else Christ were not truly all: 

"Held our eyes no sunny sheen. 
How could God's own light be seen? 
Dwelt no power Divine within us, 
How could God's divineness win us?" 

PAUL A DEMOCRAT 

St. Paul was a fundamental demo- 
crat. He held that if we dig deep 
enough into the nature of man, 
down below race, rank, sex and so- 
cial condition, below the debris of 
sin and the sediments of sensuality, 
we find that the foundation element 
of humanity is the image of Christ 
in the soul. Dim it may be, blurred 
by evil, and overlaid by many a foul 
and slimy thing, but it is there as 
the deepest reality. Hence his say- 
ing that the profoundest fact about 
humanity is not that it is Jew or 
Gentile, bond or free, male or fe- 
male, but that Christ is all and in all. 

For St. Paul, a Jew, this truth 
was the sovereign mystery, hidden 
from the foundation of the world, 
and at last made manifest in Christ. 
Hitherto he had thought the He- 



brews the only people for whom 
God had any purpose, and when he 
saw that purpose, as it unfolded, ex- 
tending to all races and clans, it 
filled him with inextinguishable 
wonder. Yet he followed the truth 
as it is in Jesus, even against all his 
old prejudices, and against the nar- 
row teachers of his day who tried to 
limit the Gospel, in many keys and 
tones making plea for a universal 
Christ as the savior of a universal 
hu- lanity. 

THE PROCESSION OF LIFE 

All humanity! Who is not smit- 
ten dumb by a vision of all who 
live now, all who have ever lived, all 
who are yet to live in the unknown 
future ! One generation goes and 
another generation comes, myriad 
following myriad until we grow 
faint and dizzy at thought of a host 
no man can number. Still they pour 
upon the earth, pass across it, and 
vanish — as if they had stepped ofT| 
the edge of the earth into an abyss 

Some walk lightly and gladly 
along the old-worn way ; others 
trudge slowly and sadly, stooping 
under heavy burdens of care. For 
all life is brief, and for all it seems 
to end in the grave. Whence do they 
come, and why? Whither do they 
go? What is their fate? What is 
the meaning of it all? Has it a 
meaning? Or did the Great Spirit 
when He took clay and made man 
play with it? 

Only as we see that endless pro- 
cession in the light of the Gospe! 
of Christ, do we find a clue. If all 
were created by God for sonship tc 
Himself, and each for an inheri-i 
tance in His eternal life, then therfj 
is light and hope. Such was thf| 
vision which filled the heart of St 
Paul with joy, sending him to thf 
ends of the earth with its good news 

ALL LIFE LINKED WITH THE INFINITI 



Wonderful it is, towering above th( 
vague Cosmic Mysticism of our da^ 
like a Gothic cathedral above a doll 
house. But how can the Infinit<| 
dwell in the finite? Ask, rather, hovi 
it can be otherwise, since if we live a[ 
all it is God who lives in us, even a: 
we live in him? Every soul is like ; 
tiny inlet of the sea. Looking land 
ward, it is finite. Looking seaward 
it is linked with the Infinite. Tim< 
was when men drew two circles; on' 
was God, the other Man, and they di( 
not touch. If Christ was placed ii 
one. He could not be in the other. 

Today we are beginning to see tha 
those two circles not only touch, bu 



August 9, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



11 



)verlap. That is why, when we read 
he story of Jesus, we are touched to 
vistfulness, as if it were a history of 
he hfe we have dreamed. No ro- 
nance, no tale of old heroism stirs us 
ike that biography of Love, that me- 
noir of Mercy, and as we read ere 
ong we are praying softly. 

'And ah for a man to rise in me, 
That the man I am may cease to be." 

Evermore He haunts v:s, hovers 
»ver us, because there is in each of us 
. hidden, unformed, possible Christ, 
in image of Him to reveal which is 
he destiny of all. 

'the life of god in the soul of 
man" 

Three centuries ago there was born 
ti Aberdeen, Scotland, a lad named 
lenry Scrougall, the son of a Bishop, 
kfho entered the University at fifteen 
nd was made Professor of Philoso- 
ihy at the age of twenty. He died in 
678, when twenty-eight years old, 
saving only a tiny book entitled, "The 
Aie of God in the Soul of Man." 
■"or years I looked for that little book, 
ut was never able to find it until I 
isited the British museum, where I 
aw the first edition and also an 
American reprint of 1868. 

The last edition contained a letter, 
ot found in the first, in which he la- 
aented that among so many pretend- 
rs to religion, so few understand 
/hat it means. Some place it, he said, 
1 the understanding, in orthodox 
otions and opinions — he might have 
aid liberal notions as well — and all 



the account they can give of their re- 
ligion is that they belong to this or the 
other sect into which Christendom is 
unhappily divided. Others place it in 
outward rites and duties. If they live 
peaceably with their neighbors, keep a 
temperate diet, observe the returns of 
worship, and occasionally extend their 
hands to the relief of the poor, they 
think they have sufficiently acquitted 
themselves. Others, again, put all re- 
ligion in the affections, in rapturous 
heats and ecstatic devotion ; and all 
they aim at, is to pray with passion, 
and think of heaven with pleasure, and 
to be affected with those kind and 
melting expressions wherewith they 
court their Savior. But he had a 
deeper insight. 

"True religion is the union of the soul 
with God, a real participation of the di- 
vine nature, the very image of God 
drawn upon the soul; or, in the Apos- 
tle's phrase, it is Christ formed within 
us. Briefly I know not how the nature 
of religion can be more fully expressed 
than by calling it a Divine Life — the life 
of God in the soul of man." 

SEEKING THINGS ABOVE 

Because this is so, because in each 
of us there is a dim image of Him 
whom we follow, no one need be long 
unaware of what is required of him. 
Linking the highest truth with the 
humblest duties, the Apostle urges us 
to put off the things that obscure or 
mar the Christ-ideal within us, and 
to seek the things that are above, for- 
bearing one another, forgiving one an- 
other ; and above all to "put on charity 



which is the bond of completeness." 

There remains the great prophetic 
hope. If Christ is indeed all and in 
all; if His image is impressed upon 
every soul, however marred it may be, 
then let us not fear to follow where 
this faith points. If this be so, some- 
time, somewhere, somehow, by the 
love of God which hath in it the secret 
of unknown redemptions, that ideal 
will be realized. 

god's dream will come true 

Ages of imperfection He behind, 
and other ages may lie ahead, but the 
dream of God will come true at last. 
He who purposed through Christ to 
reconcile the race unto Himself, will 
not fail, cannot fail. If God be God 
his dream will not end in defeat. The 
infinite is His realm, eternity His 
work-day, and stronger is His love 
than earth or hell. Tennyson touch- 
ed the deep springs of this forward- 
looking faith when he wrote : 

"The wish that of the living whole 
No life may fail beyond the grave, 
Derives it not from what we have, 
The likest God within the soul?" 

Even so, Christ in us is the basis of 
our faith for today, not less than of 
our hope for "tomorrow, tomorrow, 
and tomorrow." Finally, after aeons 
of effort, by the wise strategy of the 
love that will not let us go, humanity 
will be brought, not blindly, not by 
force impelled, but freely, gladly, sure- 
ly to the ideal of Him who created it 
in love and holiness ; and God will be 
all and in all. 



Shall We Shoot the Old Minister? 



W. J. C. in the Detroit News 



A FEW years ago a noted author 
t\ raised the question, "Shall We 
• *• Shoot the Old Minister?" What 
lused him to make so startling an in- 
jUiry was the tendency — which has 
[Dt been changed — to demand young 
Ji.en for the pulpits of the churches, 
I hen it must have been obvious to all 
|,oughtful persons that old saints 

ere best equipped to deal with the 
j'eat questions of life and destiny to 
ihich religion so profoundly applies 
;ielf. 

the "dead line" 

The "dead line" in the ministry, be- 
nd which a man's "usefulness" had 
nded," was back of the question. 
It back yet farther is a still more 
estionable attitude, that of the 
liurch as a "going concern," as an 
i ;titution that must show results that 
( 1 be embodied in statistics and of 
irse this attitude is able to dispense 



with saints and is bound to exalt the 
"good mixer," the "organizer," the 
"social leader" and other types which, 
however useful, are less than the 
saintly and teaching race who made 
the pulpit what it is. Ministers must 
begin young, of course ; but until they 
have lived close to the realities of life 
for many years they are not ripened 
teachers. 

Anyway, it is pretty well settled that 
whether the old minister shall be shot 
or not, he shall not be carried along 
in the pulpit. And then what? That 
is the question which is now chal- 
lenging the earnest consideration of 
two great branches of the church, the 
Episcopal and Methodist Episcopal, 
and which is being reflected in the ac- 
tivities of the two dioceses of which 
Detroit is the center. Grant that the 
old minister ought to retire, what 
then? Unlike the worldly man who 
has something to retire on but may 



have nothing to retire to, the old min- 
ister has much to retire to, but very 
rarely anything to retire on. 

MINISTERS USUALLY POOR 

The poverty of the ministry is very 
real. Ministers are not paid even 
what they are worth to their neighbor- 
hoods. They are the most poorly paid 
of all laborers. In one sense, this is 
not to be lamented. It is well that the 
ministry is not an attractively lucra- 
tive work, because the absence of 
large pecuniary inducements insures 
that only called men will enter it. 
Whatever other motive a man may 
have in entering the ministry, we 
know it cannot be money. If the min- 
istry paid proportionately with the 
other professions perhaps we could 
not be so sure of that. 

Moreover, the minister is estopped 
by his very relations to men from en- 
tering business for private gain. His 



12 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 9, 1917 



ambitions all head in another direc- 
tion ; his chief desire is to be of spir- 
itual service to men. His highest re- 
ward and happiness is to see his serv- 
ice honored by the response of men's 
souls to his urgent presentation of the 
truth. There is no pay can equal that 
— to see men visibly change under the 
influence of the spirit of truth. That 
is the lure to the ministry; that is the 
stipend chosen above much gold ; "give 
me souls for my hire, or I die." 

NEVER OVERPAID 

So that the minister's poverty after 
his day of service is done is a per- 
fectly natural condition. He was 
never overpaid at any time ; he was 
always subject to calls upon his char- 
ity; he could never save much, and 
what he saved might do for a rainy 
"day," certainly not for the long even- 
ing of old age. What then to do with 
him? 

Well, the churches named above are 
answering the question in a sensible 
way; they are saying: "We will pen- 
sion the old minister." They are wise 
in this. They are not only doing a 
Christian and brotherly duty to an 



aged servant; they are als.o keeping 
the door open for new lecruits for the 
ministry. In these days, when men 
stand so much on their own feet and 
when Cash becomes more and more the 
sign of sufficiency, it takes a strong call 
to cause a man to enter a church that 
turns its old ministers out to poverty. 
Who would enter an army whose 
scarred and broken veterans were 
turned out to starve, or to suffer the 
thousand pangs of genteel poverty, to 
be beholden to others after having put 
in a lifetime of service? 

god's veterans 

These men are God's veterans. I 
haven't the slightest doubt that, re- 
gardless of the action of any church, 
they would be taken care of. But I 
doubt if the church that neglected 
them would be so well taken care of. 
The program to pension and provide 
for old ministers is not an act neces- 
sary to salvation, but it is an act neces- 
sary to decency. It is not specifically 
religious ; it is merely human. It is 
not a duty to be pressed on the world, 
it is a duty to be pressed within the 
church herself. The world, taking 



note of it, will see in it another illus- 
tration of applied Christianity. 

I ought to say, to prevent a wrong 
impression, that the churches referred 
to have always recognized this duty, 
but now they are applying themselves I 
to its fulfillment in a modern way, by! 
raising great funds — the Episcopal! 
Church $5,000,000, the Methodist 
Episcopal Church $10,000,000— the 
earnings of which will be sufficient to 
provide every claim of this nature. 
The Episcopal Churches of this dio- 
cese aim at $200,000 as the portion 
they should raise of the whole amount 
and the Methodist Churches of this 
diocese aim at $700,000 as their con 
tribution to their old age endowment 
fund. 

money's big chance I 

These sums are to be gifts. The}! 
are not to be withdrawn from th(j 
work of the world ; they are to bd 
left at work, not to increase privatf 
fortunes, but to sustain men who it 
their virile years sacrificed all worldb 
preferment and in their latter year 
are fortuneless. That is about tb 
greatest thing money can do — to hel] 
those who never worked for money 



Christian Friendship After War 



As a source of possible comfort 
to the timorous souls who be- 
lieve that the people of the 
world are permanently rent in twain 
by "the greatest war of history," may 
I relate an incident that occurred in 
Cape Town at the close of the Boer 
War? 

It was my fortune to be in South 
Africa shortly before the war began, 
and to see something of the officials of 
both sides, who soon afterwards were 
engaged in one of the bitterest, if not 
one of the greatest, of wars. Feeling 
ran high among both Boers and Brit- 
ish. The Boers felt that they were 
being pushed to the wall and that there 
was nothing left for them but to fight. 
Old President Kruger was so incensed 
that though (I was told) he knew 
English perfectly, he would not speak 
it in the interview with me, but de- 
manded an interpreter to translate 
what he said into English. This 
was only an example of the bitter- 
ness of feeling on the part of the 
Boers at that time, which was not 
to be wondered at. 

after the boer war 

Within a very few months after 
the war closed, I was again in South 
Africa, and attended a meeting of 
the Dutch and English Christian 



By Francis E. Clark 

Endeavor Unions in the Adderly 
Street Dutch Church in Cape Town. 
I was surprised and greatly pleased 
to see mottoes of welcome and good 
cheer on the walls, in both the Eng- 
lish and Dutch languages. The 
president of the Dutch Union gave 
the address of welcome and the pres- 
ident of the English Union presided 
over the joint meeting. 

In the audience were many young 
Boers who had been imprisoned in 
St. Helena and Ceylon, where they 
had formed many Christian Endea- 
vor societies. They had been re- 
leased from their island prisons but 
a few weeks before. In the same 
audience were many young British 
soldiers who had also belonged to 
Christian Endeavor societies, in 
Great Britain or in South Africa. 
But the utmost good feeling pre- 
vailed. The young men of both 
races and of both languages took 
part in the meeting and they united 
in repeating, each in his own lan- 
guage, the Twenty-third Psalm and 
the Lord's Prayer, and in singing, 
before the meeting was over, the 
familiar hymn, "Blest be the tie that 
binds our hearts in Christian love." 

This was the first meeting of the 
sort which took place in South Af- 
rica after the war when both races 



met together, and, though the gun 
were hardly cool and the memori^ 
of the war still rankled in man 
hearts, yet reconciliation had alread 
begun, and it came about throug 
the common principles and commc 
religious aims and methods of tl 
young men in both armies. 

This experience and one or tw 
others that are not dissimilar, ha^ 
given me reason to believe that tl 
enmities of this present war, bitt 
as they are, and accompanied I 
nameless cruelties, will not last fo 
ever. The average human heart do 
not cherish grudges so long as v 
sometimes think. 

how organizations can help 

There are many organizatio 
common to the Allies and to t 
Teutonic forces which will make f 
friendship, and not the least of the 
will be the interdenominational i 
ligious organizations which ha 
bound together the hearts of 
many younger people and older pt 
pie in the past, and whose ties s 
not readily broken. These organic 
tions will have a great work to 
when the war is over, and I belie 
that they are preparing to do it 
the very best of their ability. 



I The Larger Christian World 

I A DEPARTMENT OF INTERDENOMINATIONAL ACQUAINTANCE By ORVIS F. JORDAN 

Iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiio^ 



A Cuban Veteran 
Retires 

Dr. J. Milton Greene has been one 
of the veterans in the Presbyterian 
service in Latin-speaking countries. 
He labored honorably in Mexico for 
many years and more recently has 
been superintendent of Home Mis- 
sions of the Presbyterian church in 
Cuba. He retires this summer to his 
home in Oconomowoc, Wis., where 
he will spend his declining years. 

Dr. Sheldon Will 
Visit England 

Dr. Sheldon, who is well known in 
this country as the author of the wide- 
ly-circulated book, "In His Steps," 
has heard the call of the British to 
come to England and assist in the pro- 
hibition fight in that country. He will 
go in the early autumn. He has 
served valiantly in this cause in Amer- 
ica and will doubtless prove useful in 
the more difficult fight in England. 

Chicago Sunday Evening 
Club Reports 

The Chicago Sunday Evening Club 
rents a theatre for Sunday evening 
services for strangers. The season 
just ended has been peculiarly suc- 
cessful, the attendance having been 
12,000 above that of any other year, 
and averaging 2,700 for each service. 
The speakers have included twenty 
ministers, six public men, five edu- 
cators, two business men, a physician, 
a woman and a newspaper editor. 

Russian Priest Mobbed, 
in Missouri 

There was an outbreak of violence 
in the Flat River country in Missouri 
recently and it is reported that a Rus- 
sian priest living at Deslodge, Mo., 
the Rev Vasili Kolessnikoff, together 
with his wife, were mistreated and 
robbed, as was also Rev. Platon Luk- 
ianowiff, his assistant. It has been 
suggested that the incident was in- 
spired by enemies of the United States 
in order to embroil our country with 
the new government in Petrograd. 

Episcopal Church 
Congress 

The Protestant Episcopal Church 
still holds annual sessions of its 
Church Congress. The session this 
year will be held in Cincinnati, Octo- 
ber 23-26. The topics appointed for 
discussion are as follows : ( 1 ) The 
American Home as Endangered by 
Modern Conditions and Agitations; 
(2) The Essentials for Continuity 



in the Ministry; (3) Compulsory 
Arbitration in Labor Troubles; (4) 
Should Christian Marriage ever be 
Dissoluble? (5) Are Moral Values 
in the United States Deteriorating? 
(6) The Debt of the Anglican 
Church to Luther; (7) Religious 
Conditions in the Middle West. The 
Rt. Rev. Frank Du Moulin, D. D., 
will preach the opening sermon. 

Philadelphia Is Leading 
Presbyterian City 

Each denomination in this country 
has some central stronghold. Cur- 
iously enough, the Congregationalists 
count Chicago as their leading city and 
the Episcopalians regard New York 
as their Mecca. The Disciples con- 
sider Kansas City as the place where 
their churches have recruited the 
most members. Perhaps none of these 
denominations have as many members 
in one city as the Presbyterians have 
in Philadelphia. There are 61,387 
names on the church rolls in that city 
and the increase during the past year 
has been 496, which by the way is not 
a very large percentage. This vast 
membership is cared for in about a 
hundred churches, which means an 
average membership to the church of 
six hundred, a size of congregation 
well adapted to do vigorous work in 
a metropolitan city. 

Cincinnati Church Cares 
for Soldiers 

The Presbyterian Church of the 
Covenant in Cincinnati recently enter- 
tained in a body the First Regiment, 



Ohio National Guard, in honor of the 
thirty-one members of that organiza- 
tion who were members of the Sun- 
day School there. The church will 
provide the company with a weekly 
news letter which will serve to keep 
the soldiers in touch with this church 
during the war. 

Pray for. Russian 
Republic 

Throughout the diocese of New 
York and Pennsylvania of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal church, prayers were 
offered two weeks ago asking the 
guidance of Almighty God for the 
newly organized Russian government. 
As the peril in Russia is not over, 
doubtless such prayers will be offered 
in other sections of the church as 
well. 

Will Have a 
Colored Bishop 

The relation of the negro to the 
southern churches is one that is re- 
ceiving much study today at the hands 
of church leaders. The Colored 
Council of the diocese of South Caro- 
lina, of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, at its recent meeting in Cal- 
vary church, Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, passed a resolution to the effect 
that, provided it met with the approval 
of the ecclesiastical authority of the 
diocese, they favored the plan sug- 
gested by Bishop Cheshire of North 
Carolina, to elect a colored suffragan 
bishop who would serve in both the 
Carolinas. It seems likely that this 
plan will become effective. 



MR. BRITLING SPEAKS AGAIN 

Mr. H. G. Wells' New Book 

"God, the Invisible King" 

Mr. Wells, the author of Mr. Britling, says : 

**The time draws near when mankind will awake . . . 
and then there will be no nationality in all the world 
but humanity^ and no king, no emperor^ nor leader^ 
but the one God of mankind,** 

AMERICA IS FIGHTING FOR THIS GOD ! 

"God, the Invisible King^^ 

" The Religion of Mr. Britling " 

Price, $1.25 

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Disciples Publication Society, 700 £. 40th St., Chicago 



Social Interpretations 



■iiiiiiiiiiiiii: 



By ALVA W. TAYLOR 



Dare We State 
Terms of Peace? 

THE new German Chancellor de- 
clares proof is positive that Eng- 
land plans conquest of German 
territory and the utter humiliation 
of the Fatherland. Whatever fab- 
rications he may impose upon the 
German people, such as his account 
of a secret French and Russian pact, 
etc., he can truthfully tell them that 
members of the British cabinet have 
declared individually for retention 
of German colonies and for penal in- 
demnities. More effective than even 
these is the failure of the Entente 
Allies to state any terms of peace 
that can be called specific or definit- 
ive. This, together with the gen- 
eral talk about "bleeding Germany 
white" and "putting an end to the 
Kaiser" gives ample room to fire the 
most determined resistance in the 
ranks of the enemy and enables the 
military rulers to arouse the most 
bitter fanaticism among the people. 
The greatest single victory that 
could now be won would be for the 
Allies to clearly state specific condi- 
tions of peace, providing the princi- 
ples laid down by Russia and im- 
plied in President Wilson's utter- 
ances were made the basis of those 
conditions. There is little doubt 
that Germany would make the status 
quo ante her first statement — in 
other words, she would today be 
willing to drop arms and begin 
where she left ofif. This President 
Wilson has said was impossible be- 
cause of her effective conquest of 
her own allies and her wanton ruin 
of Belgium, Northern France and 
other territories. Russia defines 
her peace demands as no conquest 
or forcible annexations and no penal 
indemnities; this does not forbid the 
imposition of reparation charges 
against Germany. France has never 
asked for penal indemnities and 
would no doubt be glad to lay down 
arms with restoration of French ter- 
ritory and reparation ; the only ques- 
tion with her is that of forcible pos- 
session of all of Alsace-Lorraine or 
a plebiscite among the people of 
these two provinces. 

The Allies are depending upon us 
to furnish the balance of forces 
necessary to win ; this means we are 
in a position to say upon what terms 
we will fight and to become the de- 
cisive power in stating terms of pos- 
sible peace. If we should concretely 
state today, either by utterance of 
the administration or resolution of 
Congress, that we will not fight 



longer than until Germany agrees to 
give ample reparation for ruin 
wrought in the occupied areas and 
consents to a plebiscite of the bor- 
der territories under question, to- 
gether with guarantees regarding 
Turkey and the Balkans that would 
effectually destroy the middle Euro- 
pean scheme and then, most im- 
portant of all, demand the effective 
formation of a League to Enforce 
Peace, it would at least give con- 
creteness to the issue and make 
peace dependent upon negotiation 
instead of upon dictation and con- 
quest. 

Again we say the biggest single 
victory that could be won right now 
would be that of an agreement be- 
tween the Allied governments to ac- 
cept peace upon the basis of the 
Russian and American principles. 
When it is demanded that we say 
nothing critical of British war aims 
it is simply demanded that we stand 
ready to allow England the deci- 
sive word in regard to peace instead 
of saying it ourselves, and the long 
history of British imperialism and 
conquest does not warrant us in any 
such stand. We are not fighting 
for the British Empire, but with it 
for democracy and an end of war 

forever. 

* * * 

Y. M. C. A. Work 
Widens 

The way is opening for the estab- 
lishment of Y. M. C. A. camps 
among French soldiers. British, Ca- 
nadian and American camps are all 
fitted out with Y. M. C. A. centers 
and have direct governmental recog- 
nition and support to the extent of 
having their equipment transported 
as a part of the army equipment, 
etc. Now comes the call from 
France, hitherto not open doubtless 
on account of Catholic influences 
and a lack of understanding of the 
real work of the Association. When 
John R. Mott returns from Russia 
it is understood the way will be 
open for the establishment of the 
work in the vast Russian armies 
also. 

Three great dangers menace camp 
life back of the fighting lines. They 
are camp disease, alcoholism and 
venereal diseases. The usual camp 
diseases have been more effectively 
handled in this war than in any 
other in history, but tuberculosis is 
making great inroads on account of 
trench life and among the French 
especially on account of insufficient 
preventive measures and the high 



average of time each soldier has 
spent in the trenches. Alcoholism 
has been effectively dealt with 
through the prohibition of spirits. 
The most terrible evil is the "black 
plague" — that hitherto unspeakable 
disease that infests army camps. 
War brings a coarsening of passions 
and the crowding together of great 
numbers of young men at an age 
when moral control is most desper- 
ately tried makes the army camp a 
place of moral danger. Then if 
there is added to these conditions 
the gathering of the harpies and 
the easy complaisance of officers 
who think of war and not morals it 
easily follows that this dread plague 
undoes more soldiers than enemy 
bullets or camp diseases. 

Our government has made the 
most radical provision for camp de- 
fense on this question that has ever 
been made. It is here the Y. M. C. 
A. does its chief work; it furnishes 
moral stimulus and a place for the 
boys to meet under righteous influ- 
ences — in other words, it supplies a 
moral prophylactic. The French 
army needs this work quite as much 
as that of the Red Cross and the 
supplies so generously furnished by 
the women who send creature com- 
forts. General Pershing was not fa- 
vorable to Y. M. C. A. work when he 
went to the border; he doubtless 
thought of it in terms of the usual 
camp evangelism, but his experi- 
ence has made him an ardent advo- 
cate of it and his influence is back 
of the call for the addition of the 
French camps to Y. M. C. A. work. 



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August 9, 1917 THECHRISTIANCENTURY 15 





1^ aA JL 



iterature 



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stands first in the Hst of social service authorities within the church. 

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the Christian and the church ; the Word of God in life. An ideal course for Inter- 
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16 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 9, 1917 




The Great Dynamic 

The Lesson in Today's Life* 
By CHARLES H. SWIFT 



THE finding of the book of the 
law in that interesting piece of 
work of repairing the temple 
had no little effect upon the national 
life of the remaining tribes. The 
portions of the Deuteronomic law con- 
tained in that roll challenged the ser- 
ious attention of King Josiah, who 
immediately, upon its reading before 
the people of all classes, began a far- 
reaching work of reform. Already 
Josiah's religious training had fitted 
him for Israel's spiritual leader. The 
idealism of his young manhood as 
gathered from the prophets of his 
day made it easy for him to enlist a 
great following. 

The finding of this seemingly for- 
gotten roll which had evidently be- 
come neglected through the heathen- 
ish practices which had crept into the 
religious life made it easier for the 
courageous King to carry out more 
fully his reforms. Beyond that, the 
great effect which the reading of the 
law had upon the King would in- 
dicate that he had not been familiar 
with the serious legalistic aspects of 
the law and had quite forgotten or 
even been ignorant of the great cove- 
nant of his forefathers. For this rea- 
son, he was very anxious to have that 
sacred covenant renewed and to free 
the people, if possible, from impend- 
ing doom as expressed in the awful 
denunciations of the law. This was no 
easy task, for a people habituated in 
the ways of heathen worship for any 
length of time are not easily moved to 
reform. 

Perhaps the dynamic which com- 
pelled the people to accept the sweep- 
ing reform of the ambitious King may 
partially account for the short life of 
the reformation. It was the fear of 
the punishment so plainly taught by 
this new and strange law which com- 
pelled the people to humble them- 
selves before Jehovah. The fact that 
they had broken their covenant with 
their own God may have moved them 
to bitter regret as they thought of 
their own disloyalty to Jehovah, who 
had always proved kind and merciful. 

Yet the element of fear seems to 
have been the driving power in their 



lives. They heard the reading of 
those terrible sentences concerning 
idolatry with souls filled with horror. 
They saw the wrath of God being 
poured out upon them. They already 
began to feel the sting of their for- 
getfulness of Jehovah in going after 
strange gods. Such a fear, struck in 
the hearts of a people moved almost 
wholly by fear in all their religious 
experiences, would cause just such a 
sweeping reform as Josiah was able 
to carry on. 

^ ^ ^ 

It is well for us to note that the 
finding of our present Bible in all its 
beauty and matchless worth yields an 
analogous lesson. Lost amid the tra- 
ditionalism of mediaeval days and the 
denominationalism of more modern 
days, the Bible has been discovered by 
consecrated Christian scholars who 
have placed it into the hands of all 
classes of people as a book of vital 
value to every individual life. 
Wrested from the conventionalities 
of by-gone days, it has been brought 
from its place of seclusion into the 
light of literary and historic revela- 
tion until it speaks forth a mighty 
message from God to a lost world. 
Its great dynamic has been discovered 
to be the very personality of Jesus 
Christ who is the embodiment of di- 
vine love. 

>k * >!« 

This is the great driving power of 
this newly discovered Book, reveal- 
ing a Father heart of love, speaking 
through His own Son in words of 
tenderest love. It was this compell- 
ing force which developed and 
strengthened the rapid growth of 
Christianity in the first century. It 
is this mighty power which is mov- 



ing so mysteriously over the darkened 
stretches of heathen lands. It will be 
this vitalizing energy which will ulti- 
mately conquer the modern world and 
save it from sensuous selfishness and 

greed. 

* * * 

The legalistic attitude in religious 
experiences demands the element of 
fear as its driving power. Now that 
we are no longer under law, but under 
grace, the higher motive of love 
prompts us to live in complete har- 
mony with the best revealed laws of 
righteousness. The old Book, with 
its new interpretation of the divine 
message, no longer strikes terror 
within our souls, but floods them with 
the noblest impulses for living sac- 
rificial lives through loving service. 
The horrors of legalistic penalties be- 
come swallowed up in the more 
pleasant feelings of satisfaction aris- 
ing from the consciousness of re- 
sponding to the Divine love by ser- 
ving our fellowmen. Such a dynamic 
is embodied in the teachings of Jesus. 

* * * 

Just as the Deuteronomic law was 
only found after having been lost, so 
the modern message of the old Book 
is merely the finding of the actual 
message contained in Biblical narra 
tive. Stripped of all the entangle 
ments gathered during the past cen- 
turies, the story stands out in all its 
simplicity and beauty, whether it be 
a prophetic message or a beautiful 
parable of the Master's. 

It does not take much to lose the 
Bible. As easy as it is sometimes tc 
place it off in the parlor until it is 
completely lost in absolute forgetful 
ness or negligence, so easy is it t( 
place that sacred Book beneath th( 
rubbish of some particular ecclesiasti 
cal, legalistic or apocalyptical inter 
pretation until the unity and contin 
uity of the message is so destroyed a.j 
to lose completely the whole Bibl<l 
story. To find the Book in all itj 
beauty and freshness, one must stud;j 
it sacredly in the light of modenj 
thoughts and facts. Then and thei 
alone will it become a mighty dy 
namic, through its propelling love ii| 
transforming human society. I 



*This article is based on the Interna- 
tional Uniform lesson for August 19, 
"Finding the Book of the Law." Scrip- 
ture, 2 Chron. 34: 14-33. 



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August 9, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



17 



iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Disciples Table Talk 



George W. Brown to Succeed 
H. L, Calhoun at Transylvania 

George W. Brown, of Jubbulpore, In- 
dia, has been unanimously chosen by the 
Board of Trustees of Transylvania Col- 
lege of the Bible to succeed H. L. Cal- 
houn as professor of Hebrew and the 
Old Testament. Dr. Brown is at present 
on a furlough from liis duties as president 
of Jubbulpore Bible College, and was 
in Baltimore when he was invited by 
the Board of Trustees to come to Lex- 
ington. The new Transylvania teacher 
is a Baltimorean. He received both the 
A. B. and M. A. degrees from Hiram 
College and won the Ph. D. in Johns 
Hopkins University. After teaching for 
three years in America, he was appointed 
a missionary to India in 1900 by the For- 
eign Society. In 190'3 he established 
the Jubbulpore Bible College and has 
served as president of that institution 
to the present time. He is a member of 
the American Oriental Society, editor of 
the "Christian Sahayak," secretary of the 
Mid-India Missionary Council, secretary 
of the Joint Language Examination 
Board, and a member of the National 
Missionary Council. He has translated 
a number of important works in Hindu, 
and is the author of several books. He 
is regarded as one of the greatest lin- 
guists of the Orient and a scholar of 
rare attainments. In 1914 he served as 
chief reviser of the Hindi Old Testa- 
ment. The trustees of the College of 
the Bible feel that the institution is to 
be congratulated upon the accession of 
Dr. Brown to its faculty, and their selec- 
tion for the chair recently occupied by 
Professor Calhoun was made with unan- 
imity and enthusiasm. It is expected 
that the coming of Dr. Brown to Transyl- 
vania will give the school larger prestige 
than ever before. 

Charles E. Cobbey, of Omaha, 
Goes to Army Camp 

Charles E. Cobbey, pastor of First 
Church, Omaha, Neb., has resigned from 
this field to take up Y. M. C. A. secre- 
tarial work in an army camp in New 
Mexico, where will be assembled about 
25,000 men, including the guard regi- 
ments of Nebraska and Iowa and North 
and South Dakota. E. F. Denison, gen- 
eral secretary of the Omaha Y. M. C. A., 
will have full charge of the association's 
work in the camp, and Mr. Cobbey will 
head the religious work under him. 

Charles O. Lee Leaves 
Danville, Ind., Field 

Charles O. Lee has resigned his work 

!as pastor of the Danville, Ind., church, 

to accept the superintendency of the So- 

fcial Service Department of the Christian 

Woman's Board of Missions, in India- 

aapolis. He will begin his new duties 

September 1st. Mr. Lee has been pastor 

bf the Danville church two years. Dur- 

; ng that time 197 members have been 

idded to the church, the Bible School 

graded, with both the graded lessons and 

graded worship instituted. The county 

lias also been raised to living link stand- 

ng in the Foreign Society. The most 

I'ignificant part of his work with the Dan- 

,'ille church has been the development of 

he Community Center work under the 

lirection of the congregation. A director 

vas called for this work, gymnasium 

nstruction given and an extensive recrea- 



tional program was worked out in con- 
nection with the club rooms. This work 
has been carried through the experimen- 
tal stage and placed on a stable founda- 
tion. 

Walter E. Frazee Resigns as 
Kentucky Bible School Leader 

After nine years of faithful and fruit- 
ful service as State Bible School Super- 
intendent of Kentucky Discipledom, Wal- 
ter E. Frazee has been forced by a 
nervous breakdown to tender his resigna- 
tion from that important office. Mr. Fra- 
zee's physician has advised him to live an 
open-air life for at least a year. He 
will spend several months on his father's 
farm. W. J. Clarke, who leads in the 
Adult Division of the Bible School 
department of the A. C. M. S., has been 
asked to add to his duties those of the 
Kentucky leadership at least during the 
remainder of the fiscal year. 

Walter M. White to Do 
War Work 

Walter M. White, pastor at Linden 
Avenue Church, Memphis, Tenn., has 
been given an indefinite leave of absence 
by his congregation, and will enter upon 
Y. M. C. A. war work at one of the 
national cantonments. The Y. M. C. 
A. State Secretary of Nashville, con- 
ferred with Mr. White and urged 
him to accept this service, which Mr. 
White agreed to do on condition that 
his congregation would release him for 
the term of service. The Memphis pastor 
has previously been urged to go to France 
under Christian Association direction. 

Jesse P. McKnight, Los Angeles, 
Pastor, Victim of Auto 

Jesse P. McKnight, pastor at Wilshire 
Boulevard Church, Los Angeles, Cal., 
with his wife, were killed in an auto 



accident, the details of which have not 
been received. Several other members 
of the party also met with death. Mr. 
McKnight formerly served the Magnolia 
Avenue Church, Los Angeles, and in 
other years was pastor at Central Church, 
Peoria, and at Oskaloosa, Iowa. Mrs. 
McKnight was well known in Los An- 
geles as a pianist of rare ability, be- 
sides possessing a charming personality 
that won her many friends. The accident 
occurred about July 25th, the funeral 
service of the deceased minister and wife 
being held at Wilshire Boulevard Church 
on Saturday, July 28th. 

Patriotism at Bethany 
Assembly, in Indiana 

Patriotism is the keynote of the thirty- 
fifth annual session of Bethany Assembly, 
near Brooklyn, Ind., which began its 
program on July 25th. The war entered 
extensively into the plans for the pro- 
gram this year and various phases of 
the international situation are under con- 
sideration in the course of the season 
of twenty-six days. W. E. M. Hackle- 
man of Indianapolis, president of the 
assembly, says that the war has not in- 
terfered with the regular assembly sea- 
son, but rather that it has assisted it, 
because speakers and leaders of note who 
previously have refused to appear upon 
the assembly platforms have offered their 
services to lay the needs of the hour 
before the American people. The four 
opening days of the assembly closed with 
a patriotic celebration with Governor 
Goodrich and others speaking at a flag 
raising on the assembly grounds. Wil- 
liam Jennings Bryan will deliver an ad- 
dress on August 9th. The eighth annual 
session of the Bethany Park training 
school for ministers, church, Bible school, 
missionary and young peoples' society 
workers will be held from August 7th to 
17th. The Bethany Bible Conference will 
be held from August 12th to 19th and the 



A Church Home for You. 
Write Dr. Finis Idleman, 
142 West 81st St., N. Y. 




e Summer Count! 



Every minister and religious leader should see that when the summer 
is over he has not gone backward, but rather made a real advance in 
his thought life. One must read, and read widely, in these days to 
keep up with the world's progress. In order to encourage ministers 
and other religious workers to "make the summer count" for their 
mental and- spiritual development, we are making a special 10 per 
cent discount for cash on $5.00 (or more) orders for books ad- 
vertised in this issue of The Christian Century. Lay in your 
"summer reading" now and take advantage of this special offer. En- 
close check with order, including 10 cents postage for each volume 
ordered. 

Disciples Publication Society 



700 E. 40th St. 



Chicago 



18 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 9, 1917 



Congress of the National Evangelistic 
Missionary Society will "be in session 
from August 14th to 16th. 

Discuss "Allies of the 
Church" at Prayer Meeting 

On the evening of Wednesday, July 
18th, First Church, Bloomington, 111., 
Disciples, enjoyed a most inspiring 
prayer meeting service. The topic for 
the evening was '"Allies of the Church," 
and was most thoroughly discussed with 
regard to such allies as the public school 
the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. the 
Salvation Army, etc. Professor Albert 
Jones of Normal, 111., was in charge of 
the service, and read a portion of a paper 
given before a literary club of Normal 
about a year ago. He said in part: "The 
first step toward reformation is to face 
the facts in the institution as well as in 
the individual. There are people in every 
place who ought to be elsewhere. With 
the right kind of teachers— God-fearing 
teachers— the schools will not be Godless. 
Schools do not counteract the work of 
the church, but correlate that work. The 
churches and homes are responsible for 
the miserable failures they have made in 
the past and they must redeem them- 
selves." The fact that the public schools 
are a very close ally of the church, was 
the point Professor Jones attempted to 
bring out. He said that 55 per cent of 
all the teachers are believers in the 
Christian religion. The new secretary 
of the local Y. M. C. A. was present and 
spoke at length upon the work of that 
institution. He spoke of the association 
as not an ally unless it be a part of 
the church as the arm is a part of the 
human body, and declared that the asso- 
ciation cannot do what it should do for 
young men without the assistance of the 
church. 

* * * 

— J- L- Kohler, State Endeavor Super- 
intendent of Nebraska, gave an address 
at the recent Nebraska state convention 
on "Christian Endeavor Goals." 

— F. A. Wight, who leads at St. James 
Church, Boston, Mass. will deliver an 
address on "The Victorious Life" be- 
fore a union meeting of the Roxbury 
Christian Endeavor Union on August 
14th. 

— Under the leadership of Homer E. 
Sala, Central Church pastor at Peoria, 
111., and president of the Peoria Minis- 
terial Association, the churches and good 
citizens of the city are petitioning Gov- 
ernor Lowden to lend his aid in an effort 
to rid the city of the Sunday saloon, the 
gambling house and other evil resorts. 
Mr. Sala recently preached a sermon on 
"God's Plumb Line on Peoria." 

—Fred M. Goff, of Enid, Okla., has 
been called to succeed F. M. Warren, at 
Vinton, Iowa. Mr. Warren is now lead- 
ing in the work at Keota, Iowa. 

— H. A. Denton, who recently resigned 
at First Church, Galesburg, III., has ac- 
cepted a call to the church at Valparaiso, 
Ind., and will assume his new task about 
September 1st. 

— The new $12,000 building at New 
Sharon, Iowa, was dedicated on July 15th 
by A. C. Smither,_ of St. Louis. W. M. 
Rodney serves this church as pastor. 

— R. H. Lampkin, of DeLand, Fla., has 
accepted the pastorate at First Church, 
Birmingham, Ala. 

— Basil S. Keussef, of the Russian 
Mission, Chicago, reports that he had 
great meetings with hundreds hearing 
the Gospel, on Saturday arid Sunday eve- 
nings, July 28th and 29th. Meetings were 
held both indoors and on the streets. 



— E. P. Wise, of East Market Street 
Church, Akron, Ohio, writes that in his 
summer meetings he is having about 
twice as many men in attendance as 
women. Large crowds have heard him 
in the recent summer weeks. The Loyal 
Sons class of the East Market Bible 
School recently promoted a contest with 
the Loyal Sons of Anderson, Ind., and 
won in the point of offerings. Two 
young men were baptized last week. 

— Wm. B. Clemmer, pastor of Central 
Church, Rockford, 111., enjoyed the 
change of a vacation in the Southland 
during two weeks in July, when he was 
delegate to the biennial convention of 
the Sovereign Camp of the Woodmen 
of the World, held at Atlanta. He was 
appointed chaplain and served also on 
two important committees. En route he 
had the pleasure of worshiping with his 
old friend, W. A. Moore, at Central, 
Cincinnati, and also one Sunday in At- 
lanta with L. O. Bricker and the First 
Church, Atlanta. 



CHURCH |;l5H|:| SCHOOL 



Encouraging Receipts During Month 
of July 

The total receipts of the Foreign So- 
ciety during the month of July amounted 
to $80,789, a gain of $32,874. 

The churches, as churches, gave $14,- 
315, a gain over the corresponding month 
of 1916 of $2,966. 

The Sunday schools gave $32,966, a 
gain of $6,794. 

The individual gifts ran up to $12,001, 
a gain of $8,281. 

The annuity gifts ran to $20,803, a 
gain of $17,867. It was indeed a great 
month. 

The total receipts for ten months of 
the current missionary year amount to 
$354,418 a gain of $92,194. 

The churches have gained in ten 
months $7,330, the Sunday schools $8,- 
793, individual gifts $30,842, and annuity 
gifts $41,192. 

The $600,000 is in sight! It must be 
reached! There is too much at stake 
now to fail. 

Only twenty years ago we reached 
$100,000 and there was great rejoicing. 
There will be far more joy over passing 
the $600,000, and if we do we are not 
likely to ever raise less again. Send 
all offerings to the undersigned, 

F. M. Rains, Secretary. 



Ask for Catalogue aod Special Donation Plan No. 27 

(Established 1858) 
THE C. S. BELL CO., HILLSBORO, OHIO 



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or DIRECTORS OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. 

TUITION FREE — OPPORTUNITIES FOR SELF HELP 

Annual Catalogue now ready. Address H. J. Loken. Ex- 
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Wp RpaH and clip for you daily everything 
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NAWcnanAfe contam many items daily 
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MANHATTAN BUILDING, CHICAGO 



THE BIBLE COLLEGE OF MISSOURI 

A biblical school of high grade. At Columbia, Mo. Adjacent to the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, and affiliated with it. Interchange of credits. No 
tuition. Non-Missourians $20 per year in University. Fine student preaching 
opportunities. For catalogue or information, write 

G. D. EDWARDS, Dean, '.• •.• •.* COLUMBIA, MO. 




WAITING FOR THE SEPTEMBER 

OFFERING ,^ 

This is a picture of one of the uncompleted church 
buildings in a splendid college town in the west, await- 
ing money from the Board of Church Extension. 

$50,000 IS URGENTLY NEEDED 

To meet the needs of these churches 

To provide for foreign work in New York and Chicago 

To erect buildings in Alaska 

To care for growing work in every section 

To enable crowded churches to rebuild adequately 

SLOGAN: "EXCEED YOUR APPORTIONMENT" 
Poster and supplies are now ready 

G. W. MUCKLEY, Secretary 
603 New England Building Kansas City, Mo. 



August 9, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



19 



Church Extension and Foreign Missions 

The Board of Church Extension is 
doing a work that is beyond all praise. 
Nearly two thousand congregations 
have been aided by it in securing suit- 
able and permanent houses of worship. 
That in itself is a monumental achieve- 
ment. Every church building is a wit- 
ness for Jesus Christ. Every day of 
the week its message is heard and felt 
by all who pass by it. Those who never 
enter it are better because of its pres- 
ence. 

These two thousand churches that 
were helped in the day of their need 
are ready to assist every department of 
our organized work. They do not re- 
peat or believe the popular objections 
to missionary societies. They do not 
believe that most of the money given 
is used in defraying expenses. They 
know that these objections are not true. 
They have first-hand knowledge of the 
way in which the money is handled, and 
they are abundantly satisfied that the 
management is both honest and econom- 
ical. Because of the knowledge gained 
these churches are among the most lib- 
eral contributors to missions of all kinds 
and to benevolences. 

As one considers all that the Board 
of Church Extension has done, the only 
ground for regret is that it was not or- 
ganized in the Brush Run Church in 
1809. Had it been started at the begin- 
ning of our Movement instead of eighty 
years later, it is safe to say that we 
would be fifty per cent stronger numer- 
ically than we are, and that the offer- 




Transylvania and the College of the Bible 

In the Heart of the Blue Grass 

Courses leading to A. B., B. S., M. A., P. Th. B., and B. D. 
degrees. Degrees recognized in leading American universities. 
Pre-vocational courses in Law, Medicine, Agriculture and 
Business Affairs. Special course for preparation of Teachers. 
Rooms in Men's Dormitory, $30 per year. Board, $3.25 per 
week. Rooms in Girls' House, $23.50 per semester. Board 
from $3 to $4 per week. Both buildings new and modern in 
every way. All regular fees for the year, $50. 
Abundfint opportunities for self help; 100 churches served 
by ministerial students. Scholarships for honor graduates of 
accredited high schools. SchoIarshii)s, including all fees and 
two-thirds room rent, for ministerial and missionary students. 
Students last year from 28 states and 5 foreign countries. 
Write to 

THE PRESIDENT, Lexington, Kentucky 



ings to foreign missions would be two 
or three times as great as they are at 
present. It is a fact that cannot be too 
much dwelt upon, that as soon as a 
church is helped, and before it has paid 
its loan to the Board of Church Exten- 
sion, it begins to give to world-wide 
missions. Here and there one may find 
an exception, but this is the rule. 

This year the board is asking the 
churches for $50,000 in the September 
offering. This amount should be re- 
ceived. And if the offering should real- 
ize twice fifty thousand dollars, the 
money received would be wisely in- 
vested. The brotherhood should know 
that in helping church extension we are 
helping the cause of foreign missions 
and every other good work among us. 
Archibald McLean. 



The Kansas City Convention 

A Model of Efficiency 



Overworked as is the word "effi- 
ciency," there is no word that more prop- 
erly expresses the character of handling 
of the forthcoming convention at Kan- 
sas City. To begin with, the general 
chairman is an efficient layman, schooled 
in the college of experience, a business 
man of the largest calibre, a man who 
was able to muster, arouse, and enthuse 
the Red Cross organization of the city 
to exceeding their apportionment by sev- 
eral thousands of dollars. He knows all 
the ins and outs of the art of organiza- 
tion. Handling big propositions is sec- 
ond nature to him. He does not rest 
well at night if he has not turned some 
big deed of organizing ability during the 
day. He is one of our greatest church 
men, little known abroad and unsung, 
but Fred W. Fleming is on the job as 
chairman, and his committees are unlim- 
bering their guns and getting ready for 
action. 

The chairman of the reception com- 
mittee is none other than our genial 
friend and elder brother George Hamil- 
ton Combs, the one living man who re- 
sembles the late Alexander Campbell, 
and is fully as great and eloquent a 
preacher as was Mr. Campbell in his 
palmiest preaching days. Dr. Combs 
will have his horde of receptors in the 
waiting line at the massive Union Sta- 
tion when you disembark. You will be 
tagged and ribboned at the station, and 
taken in charge by courteous pages who 
will show you to your assignment. 

\yANTED — Position as organist and 
assistant pastor in or near Chicago by 
"ligh grade musician and practical church 
TOman. Reference: The editor of The 
Christian Century. 

WANTED— Position in Christian school 
ts director of music by experienced and 
•ompetent musician. Refer to the edi- 
or of The Christian Century. 



Every known facility for the information 
and guidance of strangers will be em- 
ployed to see that you do not get lost 
in our great city. 

Everybody attending the convention 
is supposed to register. The fee is fifty 
cents. It has been arranged to donate 
the badge and program to those who ob- 
ject to paying the fee, but all are asked 
to register. In line with the Germanic 
system of registering all strangers, our 
convention will register all comers, but 
for an entirely different purpose. There 
are many reasons for having everybody 
register. It is for the purpose of ascer- 
taining what states and churches are rep- 
resented, and gives the convention man- 
agement information that is not to be 
secured in any other fashion. The trans- 
portation secretary needs the informa- 
tion in his work with the railroads, and 
keeps the record from year to year. 
Furthermore, the convention needs the 
money to pay for printing and badges, 
and the incidental expenses of the con- 
vention. The local committee raises the 
money necessary for the hire of the con- 
vention hall, decorations, registration 
cards and blanks for other use, building 



the exhibits, and other necessary ex- 
penses. 

The attendants upon the convention 
will be seated by states. Small stand- 
ards bearing the names of the various 
states will be placed about the lower 
floor, and some sgmblance of a dignified 
and orderly and business-like conven- 
tion will be assured. The ushering will 
be in charge of A. E. Cory, secretary 
of the Men and Millions Movement, who 
is a past master at securing order and 
decorum in assemblies. He will be in 
full charge of the seating arrangements. 
There will be no applause during the 
sessions excepting the waving of small 
Christian flags. These flags will be car- 
ried about the same as canes or um- 
brellas would be, and used during the 
sessions for voicing your sentiments re- 
garding the character of the programs 
being presented. Once in your seat, it 
will be most difficult for you to leave 
before the session is over. Likewise, 
should you arrive at the hall after the 
beginning of a session, you will be com- 
pelled to wait until that number on the 
program has been concluded before you 
will be admitted. 

The exhibits of the missionary so- 
cieties and publishing houses will be 
adjacent to the auditorium and on the 
same floor, separated only by a single 
partition. The balconies are reached by 
inclined planes, instead of stairways. 
The convention hall itself is a study in 
efficiency, and will seat twenty thousand 
people when used to its largest capacity. 
For our convention,' only half of the 
hall will be utilized. E. E. Elliott, 
Chairman Press Committee, 

Kansas City, Mo. 



TWO BOOKS 

By Professor W- S. Athearn 

Every Pastor, Superintendent and 

Teacher Should Have 

The Church School. $ 1 .00 net. 
Organization and Adminis- 
tration of the Church School. 

30c net. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St., CHICAGO 



SIX GREAT BOOKS 

El Supremo.— White. A thrilling story of South America $1.90net 

History of the Great War. — Conan Doyle. Vol. I. Every scholarly man will 

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Aspects of the Infiriite Mystery. — Gordon. A profoundly spiritual volume, 

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The Bible and Modern Life.— Cooper. A rich mine for ministers $1.00 

Applied Religion for Every Man. — Nolan Rice Best. For ministers who live 

in the today $1,00 net 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 E. 40th Street, Chicago 



20 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 9, 1917 



ailllllillllllllllllllllllllllliiiillllllllllllPlliBnHllilBIBiilllllllllllllllllilllllllllllillillSIIISilU 



I The Composition of Coca-Cola | 

I and its Relation to Tea | 

5 Prompted by the desire that the public shall s 

= be thoroughly informed as to the composi- s 

S tion and dietetic character of Coca-Cola, the « 

E Company has issued a booklet giving a de- s 

s tailed analysis of its recipe which is as follows : s 

S Water, sterilized by boiling (carbonated); s 

S sugar, granulated, first quality; fruit flavoring s 

3 extracts with caramel; acid flavorings, citric s 

5 {lemon) and phosphoric; essence of tea — the s 

5 refreshing principle, s 

= The following analysis, by the late Dr. John s 

S W. Mallet, Fellow of the Royal Society and 1 

E for nearly forty years Professor of Chemistry s 

E in the University of Virginia, shows the com- E 

S parative stimulating or refreshing strength of E 

E tea and Coca-Cola, measured in terms of the E 

S refreshing principle: s 

E Black tea — 1 cupful 1.54 E 

S {hot) (5 ff. oz.) S 

E Green tea—1 glassful 2.02 s 

S (.cold) (S fl. oz. exclusive of ice) S 

i Coca-Cola— 1 drink, 8 fl. oz 1.21 I 

S (fountain) (prepared with 1 ft. oz. Syrup) S 

3 Coca- Cola—1 drink, 8 fl. oz. 1.12 I 

S {.bottlera) (prepared with 1 fJ. oz. Syrup) S 

S From the above recipe and analysis, which arc s 

E confirmed by all chemists who have analyzed E 

E these beverages, it is apparent that Coca-Cola s 

E is a carbonated, fruit-flavored modification of E 

S tea of a little more than one-half its stimulat- E 

E ing strength. E 

E A copy of the booklet referred to above will E 

S be mailed free on request, and The Coca-Cola E 

S Company especially invites inquiry from E 

E those who are interested in pure food and E 

E public health propaganda. Address S 

s The Coca-Cola Co., Dept. J., Atlanta, Ga., U.S. A. | 
EliiiliilllllillllllllllllllliilllllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiilliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiililllllllllliiiiiilillllH 



The Peerless Communion Service 



Patented 
Aug. 10, 1910 




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Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St. Chicago, 111. 



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ing hurt who always gets hit." 



Century Subscribers! 

FORM THE HABIT 

Of Watching the Date Opposite 
Your Name on Your Wrapper ! 



IF the date is, for example, Jun 17 — 
that means that your subscription 
has been paid to June 1, 1917. 
Within two weeks from the time you 
send a remittance for renewal, your 
date should be set forward. This is 
all the receipt you require for subscrip- 
tion remittances. If the date is not 
changed by the third week, or if it is 
changed erroneously, notify us at once 

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Here is the only book that tells the story of the 
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22 THECHRISTIANCENTURY August 9, 1917 

fB 91 

HAVE YOU READ 




HOPE 



A NEW NOVEL 
BY EDGAR DEIVITT JONES 



Fairhope folks are mighty human, but you 
will like them all the better for that. 

Major Menifee may remind you of Colonel 
Carter of Cartersville. You will love Jacob 
Boardman, the modern Enoch. And even 
Giles Shockley will not repel you, "Hound 
of the Lord" though he was. 

Everyone knows that the old style of 
country church is passing forever. But 
what type of church will take its place? 
Read the chapter entitled "The Old Order 
Changeth" and meet the Reverend Roger 
Edgecomb, Prophet of the new order. 

Do you like birds and stretches of meadows, 
glimpses of lordly river, and the glory of 
high hills? Do you like young preachers and 
old time country folks, their humors, their 
foibles and their loyalties? If you do, then 
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"Fairhope, the Annals 
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Price, $1.25 

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"The Man in the Street 

igion 



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A book containing the Kansas City preacher's message and his 
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One of the livest and most readable 
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"To look upon the seething mass of men in the 
city streets, or on the country side, the navvy in 
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crat, the man with the hoe and the man with the 
quirt, the clerk and the architect, the child of the 
silver spoon and the child of the rookery, and to 
declare that all alike are religious, naturally re- 
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is the precise position to which we are beginning 
to come." 



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IS THE WORLD 
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or more materialistic? A study of actual 
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work which may renew our threatened ideal- 
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He sums up his views in his new volume 



"THE SPIRITUAL 

INTERPRETATION OF 

HISTORY" 



Professor Mathews is Dean of the Divinity 
School in the University of Chicago and is one 
of the most brilliant writers in the field of re- 
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Biblical World. 

Every minister and every alert churchman 
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August 16, 1917 



THE PSYCHOLOGY 
OF RELIGION 

By GEORGE ALBERT COE 

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"The Religion of a Mature Mind," The Spiritual Life," etc. 



For the Minister's Library 

For the Theological Seminary Student 
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Of nineteen chapters, the first four are devoted to aspects of 
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and social processes. The most authoritative and interesting 
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The relationship it sustains to Dis- 
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The charter under which the So- 
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The Society therefore claims fel- 
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In this day of tremendous issues in national and international life, of the 
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Here are some of the qualities of Dr. Willett's book as seen by well-known publications: 
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Boston). "Definite" (Christian Work, New York). "Brilliant", "Clear and sane", "Win- 
some and sincere" (Heidelberg Teacher, Philadelphia). "Vivid", "Simple and clear", 
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Culver-Stockton College, formerly Christian University, Canton, Mo. 

^Xhristian Education the Hope of the World'' 

The sincere desire of most Christian parents is to put first things first, but they find it almost impos- 
sible. Custom and fashion are largely contrary to them. They feel incompetent to teach the Bible, or any- 
thing else. If there were no public schools, children would grow up as ignorant of spelling as they are now 
of God. With only one hour per week and such unpaid teachers as it can enlist, the Sunday School has wrought 
wonders, but its efiforts must be greatly reinforced. 

Herein lies the opportunity and the necessity of the Christian College. 

It takes the young man and young woman into an institution whose atmosphere is Christianity, whose 
breath is prayer, whose life is faith, whose rule is love. Two years, four years, six years of such training ful- 
fills for that soul the purpose of the Master, "I came that they may have life, and may have it abundantly." 

But, of course, the emancipation and enrichment of the individual is only the beginning of many multiply- 
ing blessings. He becomes a leader in the church, either locally or as a minister or missionary. Every Sun- 
day school he touches becomes more efficient in its divine mission and every home he enters is henceforth a 
fitter place for children to get their growth. 

Indeed, the abiding fruitage of the days when family worship was the daily rule in Christian homes and 
higher learning was wholly under Christian auspices, has saved our American civilization from utter ruin. The 
times have changed and the old order has passed, but somehow the eternal necessities must still be met. 

That the thirty colleges of the Disciples of Christ may be so strong, so true and so large that they shall 
not only save their own students, but help mightily toward putting an essential Christian quality into all the 
education, and so into all the life, of America and of the world, is the end to which the Men and Millions 
Movement is giving more than half of its funds and its attention to "Christian Education, the Hope of the 
World." 

MEN AND MILLIONS MOVEMENT 



222 West Fourth Street 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



The Christian Century 



CHABIiES CIiAYTON MOKBISON, EDITOR. 



HERBERT Ii. WIIiIiETT, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR. 



Volume XXXIV 



AUGUST 16, 1917 



Number 33 



Finding Life's True Way 



WE NEED MORE THAN A SIGN-BOARD FOR 
LIFE; WE NEED A GUIDE. 

Every soul born into the world comes with a sense of 
wonder and strangeness. Each looks out upon a world 
which is full of surprises and problems. There is the 
instinctive appreciation of what it means to be alone. The 
baby's cry is a social demand. For awhile he must be al- 
most completely dependent upon her who gave him birth. 
Soon he finds a teacher and friends and comrades. None 
of these walks very far with him along the road of life. 

• • 

Life has its sign-boards. In the few thousands of 
years during which humanity has written down its im- 
pressions, there has accumulated a vast literature which is 
chiefly concerned with man's walk through the world. 
These books are the sign-boards of life. They have great 
value for the lonely traveler, but since no man can take 
quite the same road as another man, and since these sign- 
boards give such a variant testimony about the true road 
of life, the traveler is much perplexed. After reading all 
their directions he still feels that he must seek the true 
way of life for himself. 

Christ is the true guide of the human soul. It is his 
work not only to take every traveler along the way he 
should go, but also to bring him safely through to the 
great goal of life. 

• • 

Many have misapprehended the true dignity and worth 
of the religion of Christ by seeking to interpret it as some- 
thing without the significance of such a large program. 
Salvation has been interpreted in magical terms and in 
doctrinal formulas. People are to be saved by ordinances, 
or they are to be saved by beliefs. The true salvation is 
by neither, but is by faith in a Divine Lord who is the guide 
of the soul seeking to find the true road of life. 

How strangely misled are some of our fellow-travelers ! 
Some are walking in the road of rebellion. There is a 
literature of protest, sometimes served up in the most 
aesthetic form, and charged with the brilliancy of great 
minds, whose only message is to reject the experience of the 
Irace and its religion. There is no substitute, except the 
glittering generalities of the anarchistic thinker who talks 
about "returning to Mother Earth." 

• • 

Some of our scientists have tarried long in museums 
comparing the skeletons of monkeys and men. The dif- 
ference in bony structure is not significant. They have 
been led to think of their fellow-men as animals ; they do 
not see that man has a mind which is worlds apart from 
the attributes of the highest animal. We may learn some- 
thing about human life by knowing its animal origins, but 



none are more misled today than those who find these 
things completely determinative of the life of the civilized 
man of the twentieth century. A more perfect animality 
is not the complete goal of human progress and achieve- 
ment. This is the fallacy of origins. 

• • ^ 

Christ is still the great guide for men of the modern 
world. He saw the dignity and worth of personality. His 
conception of a free personality is not that of a rebellious 
personality such as has deluded the mind of the anarchist. 
"Ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free." 
Not in struggle with our fellowmen, but in co-operation 
with them, is the highest destiny of life to be worked out. 

Differing from the naturalist, Christ insists upon the 
spiritual nature of man: "Seek ye first the kingdom of 
God and his righteousness and all things else shall be 
added unto you." Food and raiment must wait on faith 
and purpose. We are not earth-worms, but children of 
the light ! 

• • 

Under the leadership of our great Guide the noblest 
souls of history have come into their glory. Some have 
grown up in the Christian church, in a Christian family 
and a Christian community and never realized that their 
spiritual heritage is from Christ. Giving the praise to 
schools, or to philosophies or to other influences of a super- 
ficial character, even some who are faithless to the faith 
yet shine in the glory of Christ all unconsciously. 

The. Christian knows the Guide of his life and avails 
himself in largest measure of the help of this Guide. He 
knows not only the Christ of the gospels, but the Christ 
of every-day life. He walks with one whose word is not 
entombed in a document, but who keeps daily the promise 
that the Comforter is to lead into all truth. 

• • 

Of whom shall it be said that his life was a success? 
We have many false standards. Neither money, nor fame, 
nor talent, nor power can be other than one of the tools 
of life. None of these is to be regarded as the infallible 
token of a successful life. 

Our great Guide in his earthly life found life's deep- 
est meaning. His life was filled with both work and play ; 
it knew both companionship and solitude ; it was spent at 
the wedding feast and at the funeral. His life shirked none 
of the big human experiences. In the shadow of the cross 
it was full of a holy joy. In sacrifice there was gladness. 
Our Lord had a great wealth of wonderful experiences, 
but greatest of them all was the Love that united him 
with men and with God. 

As he guides us, our walk may not be through Galilee 
and Perea, but it shall be to the richest of all life's values. 
Truly he is the Way. 



DITORIAL 



THE REVIVAL OF HEROISM 

IN the sordid pre-bellum days we used to question 
whether the spirit of heroism had left the earth. 
Indeed, we were reminded by foreign missionaries 
and slum workers that a few might live sacrificially, 
but it was today doubted whether anyone would de- 
liberately die for a cause. The war has brought the 
convincing answer. As the enlistments go on from 
day to day, we find young men taking their lives in 
their hands in behalf of their native land. The spiritual 
gain of this unselfish attitude is most pronounced. We 
shall hope for a day when this fine spirit shall be dedi- 
cated to a higher cause than war ; but better even the 
horrors of war than the spiritual deadness of a com- 
munity where men are found cold and selfish. 

Heroism is a kind of surplus energy in the soul of 
man. The late Professor James showed us that even 
after a man is tired, there is a sort of second wind 
which can still carry him a long way. Heroism is the 
revelation of new reaches of courage and will-power 
that lie out beyond the ordinary every-day experience. 

Heroism implies a recognition of the ideal inter- 
ests of man. The reckless daring of man who holds 
life cheaply is not called heroism. It is only the devo- 
tion of a life to a great cause which can be given that 
name. 

It will be seen, therefore, that heroism takes on a 
decidedly religious quality. It was a glory to the early 
church that its martyrs knew how to give up life in 
devotion to their great cause. 

After the war, there should be available for every 
kind of ideal cause this new force of heroism that has 
been let loose and which will seek new worlds to con- 
quer when once the militarists of Germany have been 
tamed. 

It is the heroic note that the church has needed in 
recent years. People have not been ready to work. 
They have sought the easy pews and the comfortable 
service. It will be a great opportunity for religion if 
we can succeed in enlisting for Christ the heroes of 
these war years. 

PAGANIZING THE CHRISTIAN WORLD 

THE legalism that has dogged the steps of the Dis- 
ciples has set up a plan of salvation from the scrip- 
tures and has made every item of this program an 
absolute essential to Christian status. Especially has 
baptism been insisted upon by our legalists. 

Alexander Campbell brought this folly to naught 
in 1837 by a reductio ad absurdum : "In reply to this 
conscientious sister, I observe that if there be no Chris- 
tians in the Protestant sects, there are certainly none 
among the Romanists ; none among the Jews, Turks, 
Pagans, and, therefore, no Christians in the world except 
ourselves, or such of us as keep, or strive to keep, all 
the commandments of Jesus. Therefore, for many cen- 
turies there has been no church of Christ, no Christians 
in the world, and the promises concerning the everlast- 
ing kingdom of the Messiah have failed, and the gates of 
hell have prevailed against the church. This cannot be, 
and therefore there are Christians among the sects." 

Alexander Campbell insisted that all Christians 
were imperfect, some in the matter of an ordinance and 



others in the deeper matters of the spiritual- life. It is 
to the credit of the great reformer that he insists that if 
he were to choose among imperfect people, he would 
choose those whom he found imperfect in the matter of 
formal exactness in an ordinance rather than those lack- 
ing in the graces of the inner life. 

METHODIST HOME MISSION PLANS 

THE Methodist Episcopal church has recently held 
in the city of New York a conference on Italian 
work. The meetings were conducted under the 
auspices of the Board of Home Missions and Church 
Extension. A policy was there formulated which has 
significance for all evangelical bodies. While the par- 
ticular problem considered was that of" Italian work, in 
which Methodists have a special interest, the conclu- 
sions reached are in a broad way applicable to the work 
among all sorts of immigrant groups. 

The first item in the proposed program is the edu- 
cation of American young men for home mission service 
among the Italians. It is not assumed that the candi- 
dates for home mission service may have an indififerent 
sort of training. They are to have full college and semi- 
nary training, and during the period of this training 
they are to have "clinic" work in an Italian parish. This 
assumes, of course, a progress in immigrant work with 
this race which has not been achieved with some other 
races, such as the Poles. These young men are to be 
given a year in Italy at the close of their training in this 
country in order that they may understand the old- 
world origins of the people they propose to serve. 

A further important element in the program is the 
training of native Italians for work among Italians in 
this country. These men are not to be given short 
course education, but full college and seminary courses. 
They also are to keep in touch, week by week, with an 
Italian parish during their training. They are to receive 
lectures on Italian culture in the language and in every 
way are to be inspired to an intelligent sympathy with 
what is best in Italian life. These Italian young men 
will work side by side with American young men. 

There is to be founded an Italian Methodist weekly 
which will carry to the different Italian Methodist 
groups news of their work. It is understood, of course, 
that such a paper would lose money. For this reason it 
will be subsidized by the Book Concern of the church. 

Many other important decisions were reached at the 
conference. These give evidence of the epoch-making 
changes coming in home mission policy. Disciple home 
mission work will continue to accumulate deficits from 
year to year until there is evidence of a firm and intelli- 
gent gripping of big policies for our work. 

PREACHING IN THE NEWSPAPER 

THE lack of the publicity consciousness in the aver- 
age minister is astonishing. The Sunday notices 
provided by the newspapers for the churches of 
Chicago are printed free, and yet in some denomina- 
tions less than 10 per cent of the ministers use this 
free space. Every church that does make use of it | 
finds some new people every year. 

A certain city in the middle west has seventy min- 
isters, and the daily newspapers of the city offered to 



August 16, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



carry sermon material every week free if this material 
was prepared for use. It was possible to interest only 
twelve men in this appeal and that for only part of the 
time. If the manufacturers of breakfast food were asked 
to fill free space on like terms, there would be no hesi- 
tation. Yet the church needs the publicity quite as 
much as do the breakfast food people. 

More than half of the people in the average com- 
munity have membership in the church. Many of the 
remainder are interested in churches. There are rela- 
tively more people interested in churches than in base- 
ball. If religion knew how to talk in newspaper lan- 
guage, there is no reason why the religious matter in a 
secular paper should not exceed the amount devoted to 
sporting interests. 

Paul, who was all things to men, would never 
have neglected such an opportunity. He rejoiced in 
every kind of preaching of the gospel. Jesus, who sent 
messengers before His face (for lack of newspapers) 
would perhaps announce His coming in another way 
were He at work today in one of our cities. 

There are sermons, of course, so much out of touch 
with the daily life of the people that the best-inten- 
tion ed editor would prevent their going into print, for 
the sake of religion itself. The sermon subjects an- 
nounced these days, however, show that neither the 
sensational nor the obscurantist themes rule, but they 
indicate that an intelligent modern interpretation of 
religion is coming into new favor. For this reason, 
newspapers would print many sermons, at least in part, 
if religious leaders showed appreciation of such service. 

THE PUBLICITY INSTINCT 

NOT every movement in the world has the publicity 
instinct. There are sometimes men and move- 
ments of worth which seem to live quietly and 
unostentatiously and therefore ineffectively. On the 
other hand, there are other movements which know 
how to get into the newspapers and get themselves 
talked about. 

The I. W. W. is not really such a big and powerful 
organization of working men. In most communities, 
the majority of hand toilers are on the outside of this 
strange unionized socialism that is always talking about 
"direct action." But this organization does have the 
pubhcity instinct. It burns down haystacks, and over- 
crowds jails and does such unusual things as to compel 
the newspapers to notice it. There was an enormous 
difference in the news instincts of Roosevelt and of 
Taft, which once wrote itself unto American history. 

The two attitudes are to be found in the Bible 
among religious leaders. Elijah was always retiring 
somewhere. Elisha lived in a school of the prophets 
and frequented the haunts of men. Isaiah named his 
boys for his favorite doctrines, so as to get these doc- 
trines preached every day. At one time he went 
through the city half naked in a captive's garb that he 
jmight impress people with his message. John the 
jBaptist waited in the wilderness for people to come out 
to him. His was a great triumph, but the publicity 
:onsciousness led Jesus to send disciples before his face 
:o announce his coming. 

Nearly any one could think out ways to get into the 
lewspaper. One could marry a couple on roller skates 
>r in a balloon. He could preach in a bathing suit, or 
stage a boxing match in a parish house. This crude 



press-agenting has been well called "sensationalism" 
and is to be condemned by all right-thinking people. 

The ideal attitude, however, is not to wait around 
proudly until some enterprising editor finds our church 
or minister good copy. The live church learns to feel 
the human interest in certain phases of religious work 
and play these up. Paul was all things to all men 
tliat he might win some. 

CONSERVATISM AND HERESY-HUNTING 

THERE is a difi^erence between a "hound of the 
Lord" with a great jealousy for the reputation of 

the church and the alley dog who runs out for his 
own amusement or profit to bark at the heels of any 
doctrinally strange-looking gentleman. We all know 
very conservative people who have dignity and re- 
spectability. We may not share their opinions, but 
we can love them for their loyalty. 

The heresy-hunter has often been the man who 
cried "stop thief" to conceal his own doctrinal pecu- 
lations. A man who has written much against his 
brethren, naming them by name, once said to a select 
few, "I have had the good sense not to talk about 
my heresies." With a flash of revelation he showed 
himself in the sorry status of a man who had driven 
other men out of positions without having any real 
sense of difi^erence with many of them. Their sin had 
been that they had talked, and his virtue had been that 
he had concealed his inner light. The old age of that 
man will be a lonely one. 

The Pharisees hounded Christ for alleged here- 
sies. They accused him of blasphemy and of pervert- 
ing the law. Christ boldly stated the antithesis be- 
tween his doctrine and what had gone before, but he 
claimed freedom in the truth. The heresy-hunters of 
his day were concerned about temple profits and many 
another worldly thing. 

The Judiazers were the heresy-hunters who dogged 
the steps of Paul all his life. The great apostle 
lost patience with them in his Galatian letter and 
cried out, "Let them be anathema." Usually, how- 
ever, he was satisfied to set forth his faith and to 
defend it, though his enemies were always raising per- 
sonal issues and trying to impeach his apostleship. 

In all the history of the church, there is no more 
sorry figure than that of the man who has dogged the 
steps of his fellowman, seeking his undoing because 
of a difiference of opinion. It is not by such devices 
that older views of religion and life shall be made to 
stand. 

BE RIGHT AND DO RIGHT 

THROUGHOUT the medieval period of church 
history, the emphasis in religion was more on ac- 
tivity than on inner ethical principles. The ac- 
tivity demanded by the church was in the matter of 
prayers, making pilgrimages, going through forms of 
penance and similar things. 

When the Protestant reformation came, the center 
of interest was changed from religious observances to a 
big spiritual principle, that of justification by faith. 
Luther shared the conviction of Paul that one could 
never be rid of his ethical struggles without a change 
of spiritual viewpoint. While religious activities have 
their place in life, they flow naturally from the inner 
principle which gives them meaning. 



8 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 16, 1917 



After Luther's day, Protestant preachers began to 
set up new substitutes for the gospel. A new asceticism 
was preached of "renouncing the world." Games, thea- 
ters and amusements were denounced as being of the 
world and all who shared in these things were disci- 
plined for walking disorderly. A Protestant rule of life 
succeeded the Catholic rule of life, and both neglected 
the inner principle. 

We cannot too strongly insist that we must first be 
right if we would do right. Conduct proceeds out of 
the secret things of the heart. Long before a man does 
a dishonest thing, he has in reality renounced his code 
of honesty. Impurity is preceded by lascivious thinking. 
The moral security of any man can be assured only by 
keeping his heart right, for then and only then may he 
be certain that the tempter will not come upon him 
unawares. 

DEVELOPMENT OF ARCHITECTURAL TASTE 

THE old church at Bethany stands there as a wit- 
ness of the architectural ideas of early Disciples. 

There are two front doors and the pulpit is in the 
center. It is said that Alexander Campbell insisted 
upon the church being built in that way so that people 
could not go out from a two hour sermon without 
making themselves conspicuous to the whole congrega- 
tion. 

There were hundreds of those rectangular churches 
built over the country and many abide to this day. 
Then came the craze for churches with a pulpit in the 
corner built after the Methodist style. The Disciples 
were able with little difficulty to introduce a baptistry 
into this kind of auditorium, just behind the pulpit. 
This corner-wise auditorium usually had a "lecture 
room" to one side to take care of the audience on great 
occasions. 

It is only in recent years that we have found an 



occasional city congregation with the courage to erect 
a Gothic church. This type of architecture, so wor- 
shipful, so eloquent of all the Christian values, has been 
appreciated by only a few. The First Church of Spring- 
field, 111., has a beautiful building of this type. 

There is need among us of an expert in church 
architecture. He ought to be a minister, a man of re- 
fined religious feelings. He ought to be a man who had 
nothing to sell and whose authority would rest in his 
unselfish service to the churches. 

The Disciples ought to be able to express their 
great catholic and evangelical message in stone to be 
read by every passer-by. They will only be able to do 
this when they understand what church architecture 
has meant in the past. 

LOCAL CHURCHES AND PATRIOTIC SERVICE 

THE local churches in many sections of the country 
face unique opportunities of Christian work in con- 
nection with the war. At Rockford, Illinois, it is esti- 
mated that there will be fifty thousand soldiers camping 
near the city ; this will be an added population equal to 
that of the city itself. 

In many sections of the country the churches have 
been providing Sunday dinners in the homes of members 
for the soldiers who attend church. This gives home-sick 
men a touch of home life. 

In other sections the soldiers are being utilized in 
church work. At Leavenworth, Kansas, they attend 
services in the Presbyterian church and help with the music. 
In other sections they are active in Christian Endeavor 
work. Thus they are not regarded altogether as a field, 
but also as a force. 

Some congregations are erecting new buildings and 
reorganizing their program in order to meet the new needs. 
Pastors whose fields happen to be near the camps must 
now certainly learn the art of preaching efifectively to men. 



The Photographer 

I have known love and hate and work and fight ; 
I have lived largely, I have dreamed and planned, 
And Time, the Sculptor, with a master hand 

Has graven on my face for all men's sight 

Deep lines of joy and sorrow, growth and blight 
Of labor and of service and command — 
And now you show me this, this waxen, bland 

And placid face, unlined, unwrinkled, white. 

This is not I — this fatuous thing you show. 

Retouched and smoothed and prettified to please ; 

Put back the wrinkles and the lines I know; 
I have spent blood and tears achieving these ; 

Out of the pain, the struggle and the wrack 
These are my scars of battle — put them back ! 

— Author Unknozvn. 



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iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiF 



August 16, 1917 ; THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



Just Issued J rom the Christian Century Press 






GP C Q C 



A New Book That Marks 
the Dawn of a New Day! 

"PROGRESS" is the title of a brave and brilliant vol- 
ume prepared by 

THE CAMPBELL INSTITUTE 

in commemoration of the completion of twenty years of 
Institute history. Twenty of the leading Disciple writers 
participate in a treatment of the various aspects of progress 
in religious thought and practice during the past generation. 
The chapters bear directly upon the problems of the Disci- 
ples of Christ, but these problems are treated not from any 
provincial or sectarian point of view, but in the light of 
that modern learning common to all Christian scholarship. 
The volume is an admirable interpretation of both 

CATHOLICITY AND LOYALTY 

Without doubt, it will make a profound impression upon 
all thoughtful Disciples and will succeed as no book in re- 
cent times has succeeded in conveying to the general 
Christian world the ideals and spirit of the Disciples. 

IT IS INTENSELY INTERESTING 

Send for it today. Price, $1.50. 

The Christian Century Press, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



A Letter to the Church 



My Dearly Beloved: 

SHALL I tell you how I like best 
of all to think of you ? Well, you 
are to me a very real person, se- 
date enough, but capable, on occasion, 
of gaiety and wit. If one only sees you 
on Sunday morning, quietly seated 
with folded hands, relaxed and lis- 
tening ; or at most rising decorously to 
sing a hymn, one cannot imagine what 
you are like at the annual dinner, at 
a party, or even at your regular Sun- 
day afternoon tea. I like to think of 
you in all these ways at once. I feel 
at home with you in many various 
moods. 

Some complacent people who do not 
know you so well, seeing you only in 
repose on Sunday morning, think you 
are rather drab and prosaic enough 
through and through. Others, meet- 
ing you at no other time than at your 
parties, believe you to be worldly and 
not genuinely religious. Sometimes 
they criticise you severely, and then I 
am deeply grateful that I know you 
so well. If T have opportunity it is a 
great pleasure to tell them how many- 
sided and varied your interests are. 
* * * 

You are to me a very wonderful be- 
ing, a kind of fusion of all the per- 
sons who are members of you. A 
composite photograph hardly describes 
you. It is more as if your face were 
made up of many faces, not blended 
into one, but each distinct, and yet 
so wrought together as to form the 
outline of a beautiful countenance. I 
have seen pictures of Uncle Sam 
which were also maps of the United 
States, New England being the fore- 
head, the eyes New York, the other 
features appropriately distributed 
along the eastern coast, ending with 
Florida as the characteristic beard. 

Now, if all the states could, at the 
same time, be represented by masses 
of faces, every one clear cut as a 
cameo, pressed together within the one 
great inclusive head, we should have 
the symbol of our great national per- 
sonality, constituted of the individuals 
who make up our total population. 
Some people contend that Uncle Sam 
is not a real person, but I think he is, 
although he is not real apart from the 
individuals who are wrought together 
in our common national life. 



And you have that kind of a per- 
sonality. Your mind is the mind of us 



*Dr. Ames printed this letter origi- 
nally in the "Disciple Messenger," the 
monthly publication of the Hyde Park 
(Chicago) Church of the Disciples. 



By Edward Scribner Ames* 

all, and it is not identical with any one 
of us. When we have an important 
work to do we do not expect one 
officer or representative to plan it and 
carry it through. We appoint a com- 
mittee of three, or five, and then try 
to find out not what one or two think, 
but what all together think about it. 
The committee, in turn, presents it to 
the whole board of officers and they 
discuss and consider the matter and 
may bring it before the church to 
learn what is the mind of the entire 
organization. 

By conference, and conversation, 
we ascertain what all of us think and 
feel, and we achieve a new mind 
through that experience — a mind 
which did not exist before, but which 
is actually created by our interaction 
and common endeavor to get some re 
suit we seek. 



This mind of you as it exists and 
grows, is one of the most interesting 
and wonderful things in all the world. 
I wish I could tell more clearly how it 
impresses me. It cannot be under- 
stood just by taking the address list of 
your names and counting them up. 
Each individual of you is a kind of 
composite, a sort of projection into 
this moment of a long line of ances- 
tors, of teachers, playmates, authors, 
of books read, actors seen, singers 
heard, friends loved, and ideal per- 
sons, fairies, angels, saints and saviors 
cherished. 

And there is a peculiar, dominant 
quality imparted by the fact that all 
these complex, sensitive minds are 
fused together in a church. The com- 
mon mind of the same number of peo- 
ple would be dififerent if they were 
welded together as a club or a political 
union, or as a business corporation. 
As a church we are united in a spe- 
cial way. We have a different feeling 
for each other in this association than 
we have for any other group in the 
world. 

It is partly expressed by saying that 
in this relation we are aware of certain 
great personalities which envelop and 
invade us all. This is true in a special 
degree of Jesus, whose spirit is a kind 
of common denominator for the 
specific experiences of all. He is a 
point of general reference for every 
individual, as Shakespeare may be for 
poets and playwrights, or as Abraham 
Lincoln may be for patriotic Amer- 
icans. In the same way the prophets, 
apostles, martyrs, reformers and mis- 
sionaries, theologians and hymn- 
writers contribute to this uniqueness 
of our religious group mind. 



Because of these deep streams from 
the far summits of many mountain 
ranges of the spirit you are not, O my 
Beloved, just the being which a door- 
keeper might count. The persons 
present on any Sunday are part of 
you, and a kind of symbol of you ; 
they give you voice, and presence to 
the ear and eye, but they suggest to 
the imagination your larger self ; your 
deeper and vaster personality. When 
I think of your truer self I see also 
faces from other days ; faces of the 
dead ; faces of absent members ; faces 
of a great company of noble souls who 
encompass and pervade us today like 
a mighty brooding presence. 

It is through such facts as this that 
the historic continuity and the social 
solidarity of the church becomes ap- 
parent. These are not matters of offi- 
cial regulation. Genuine apostolic 
succession is not dependent upon the 
laying on of hands. It is a living ex- 
perience and is handed on from gen- 
eration to generation, just as our 
language is. Our mother tongue does 
not need a line of priests to perpetu- 
ate it. It might be an interesting 
ceremonial to have the great teachers 
of the English language gather in 
their academic gowns and charge 
young teachers of literature to keep 
the language pure and to pass it on 
to others in turn, in order that it 
might be widely extended to serve the 
race, and to bless mankind. But 
everyone knows that the real vitality 
of speech is in its use, as it is whis 
pered from mother to babe and from 
friend to friend, in the natural and 
irresistible companionship of life. 

It is the same with our spiritual in- 
heritance. Its transfer from parents 
to children may be represented by the 
ordination of priests and by solemn 
vows, but the genuine, living faith of 
the hearts of men is conveyed through 
less dramatic methods : by personal 
example and by many forms of social 
communication and radiation. His- 
toric apostolic succession by a definite 
line of prelates and functionaries is a 
myth, but the natural transfusion of 
Christian faith and worship in a 
growing stream of practical servicej 
and devoted wills is the most magnifi- 
cent fact of human history. 



In this inheritance you share. 
Yours is the true catholic faith. Yot 
not only receive through your living 
members the treasures of all the great 
modern apostles, but you may claim as 
direct an inheritance from the early 
centuries as any other. 

Above all the claims of pretenders,. 



y 



August 16, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



11 



to the exclusive possession of divine 
grace and spiritual authority, may be 
heard the simple words of Jesus, 
"Where two or three are met together 
in my name, there am I in the midst 
of them," and over against the spec- 
tacular and formal priesthoods of 
religion are the true priesthoods of 
genuine faith and service. "You also, 
as lively stones, are built up a spiritual 
house, an h.oly priesthood, to offer up 
spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God 
by Jesus Christ." 



There are certain moments when I 
am particularly conscious of this vast 
inclusiveness of your corporate na- 
ture, gathering into itself all the 
wealth of personal relationships which 
we have inherited. Then you are like 
a mighty being, made visible in part 
here in this little space, having a 
name, some slight records of a few 
years, but in reality embedded in 
countless souls, extending into an im- 
measurable past, with hopes and as- 
pirations which stretch forth and 
anchor you by faith in the infinite 
forms you shall enter in the future. 

The communion service makes this 
real to me. I love the sense of 
handling the body and blood of God 
with my plain, unpriestly hands. I 
exult in the simplicity of my relation- 
ship with the divine. I never forget 
that any other member of you might 
dispense these emblems with as much 
authority as any Bishop or the Pope 
himself. For the meaning and value 
of it all is not what is brought to us 
from without, but in what transpires 
within us. And when we sit together 
and silently commemorate our great 
spiritual friend and leader, there 
gather 'round us in imagination that 
host of kindred souls who followed in 
His way. Then we are brothers with 
all who loved Him. We are com- 
panions in labor with those in all ages 
who have wrought at the building of 
His kingdom of love in the world. 
The sins and follies of our life fall 
away and we are cleansed of our 
selfishness and made conscious of 
participation in a larger and purer 
life. 



The greater and more ideal the 
journey or the task the profounder 
are the sentiments which spring out 
of the association. Therefore, relig- 
ion fuses its devotees into the closest 
and most enduring comradeships. 
They regard themselves as brothers, 
as fellow-soldiers, as compatriots in a 
spiritual kingdom, as citizens of the 
heavenly w.orld. In order to exper- 
ience this comradeship more com- 
pletely they have often withdrawn 
from the present world to be with one 
another in conquering the evils of life 
and attaining its highest goods. Every 



monastery and convent has the charm 
of a house party and a sea voyage, 
plus the fascination of a spiritual and 
mystic quest. 

You are experiencing in a measure 
that same fusion of individual wills 
into a common purpose. As you be- 
come more and more conscious ,of 
your opportunity and of the meaning 
of your common task, you will discover 
with surprise and satisfaction the 
value and beauty of every soul 
blended into your corporate life. 
Every step forward in your practical 
enterprises has brought new values 
into all your personal relations. 

At times you seem to me like a 
sleeping giant, like a great being still 
unconscious of your powers. The 
scientists have found that very few 
individuals work to their full capacity 
in ordinary occupations. There are 
unused brain cells; there are latent re- 
sources ; there are dormant powers. I 
am sure that is true of you. What 
would wake you into full conscious- 
ness ? In the past, persecutions have 
sometimes stirred and roused the 
churches to intense action. Now and 
then the piercing cry of a Joan of Arc 
has reached the sanctuary and mar- 
shaled the worshippers. I wonder 
whether it is possible, by making clear 
the needs and the possibilities of your 
work, to enlist all your energies and 
prevail upon you to direct your powers 
to the great things of which you are 
capable. 



If your whole soul was stirred to it 
you could bring to bear upon all the 
problems of our modern religious life 
resources of knowledge of the most 
expert kind, for there lies back in 
your sub-conscious mind, expert 
knowledge of history, of literature, of 
economics, of chemistry, of medicine, 
of art, of society, and of the vast 
practical world in which we live. 

What would it be if you gathered 
yourself into one great holy purpose 
to fuse these things into definite ex- 
pression, into facile symbols, and into 
eft'ective working agencies ! Then 
every member would feel new tides of 
life, people would seek a share in such 
a potent spiritual atmosphere, and as 
by magic, buildings and money and 
men would be available for the fulfill- 
ment of your dreams. In such an ex- 
perience the presence of the divine life 
would be nothing remote or vague, 
but the encircling and pervading spirit 
of your pulsing, fruitful corporate 
soul. 

Edward Scriber Ames. 



We who profess the worship and 
fellowship of the living God deny that 
religion is a matter of ineffable 
things. The way of God is plain and 
simple and easy to understand. — H. 
G. Wells, hi "The Invisible King." 



God is ever ready, but we are very 
unready ; God is nigh unto us, but we 
are far from him ; God is within, but 
we are without ; God is at home, we 
are strangers. — John Tauler. 



Dream the Great Dream 

DREAM the Great Dream, though you should dream 
—you, only. 
And friendless follow in the lofty quest. 
Though the dream lead you to a desert lonely. 
Or drive you like the tempest, without rest, 
Yet, toiling upward to the highest altar. 

There lay before the gods your gift supreme — 
A human heart whose courage did not falter 
Though distant as Arcturus shone the gleam. 

The Gleam? — Ah, question not if others see it. 

Who, nor the yearning, nor the passion share ; 
Grieve not if children of the earth decree it — 

The earth, itself — their goddess, only fair ! 
The soul has need of prophet and redeemer : 

Her outstretched wings against her prisoning bars. 
She waits for truth ; and truth is with the dreamer — 

Persistent as the myriad light of stars ! 

— M. B. P. in Unity. 



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Was Jesus a Pacifist? 

William E. Barton in the Advance 



A GREAT many good people are 
disturbed when they think of 
Christians as going to war. 
How, they ask, can disciples of the 
meek and gentle Jesus engage in armed 
conflict? It is, indeed, a distressing 
question, and it shames us that it 
should need to be asked. 

But who told you that Jesus was 
gentle and meek? Where did you get 
that impression? Was it the manner 
in which He addressed the scribes 
and Pharisees? Was it the way in 
which He sent the swine of Gadara 
down hill, heels over head into the 
water? Was it the stern word of 
malediction addressed to the fruitless 
fig-trees ? 

The farther back we carry our 
critical study of the synoptic Gospels, 
the clearer it becomes that the original 
picture of Jesus preserved in apostolic 
tradition and the earliest Christian 
literature was that pi a much sterner 
person than our mild modern imagina- 
tion has pictured. 

But, it is remembered, Jesus suf- 
fered without resistance, when He 
could have had ten legions of angels 
sent out in wrath against the cruel city 
and its apostatized hierarchy. 

He had them. The ten legions 
came, and more than ten. That gen- 
eration did not pass till all the terrible 
things came to pass, and they were the 
very things He had declared would 
come, and for the reason He declared. 
The destruction of Jerusalem stands, 
not as an isolated event, but as an in- 
tegral part of the messianic plan ; it 
was the type and essential feature of 
His Parousia, His coming. 



Jesus was a belligerent. The tri- 
umphal entry was a war measure. It 
was an act of invasion. As Scipio 
carried the war into Africa, so did 
Jesus, at the zenith of His campaign 
of preparedness, carry the war into 
the temple. He went armed. He 
carried a whip. It was made of "small 
cords," that is, cords smaller than tent- 
ropes, but cords that had been used 



in fastening up bales of merchandise 
for transportation on the backs of 
camels and mules, cords that had a 
sting in them. 

"But He did not strike anybody." 

How do you know that He did not? 

"Because He was too gentle to have 
struck anyone." 

He was not too gentle to have done 
it if He did it. 

It is not definitely stated that He 
struck anyone, nor is it denied that 
He did. The whip was no bluff, no 
lie. It was a weapon, a thing to be 
feared. If He did not strike anyone, 
it was not because He was either 
physically or morally incapable of 
having done so. It was because of- 
fenders recognized their danger and 
got out of the way. 

Jesus came as the Prince of Peace. 
But He came to bring both peace and 
a sword. Pray God the time may 
come when all the swords of earth 
shall be sheathed forever. But be 
not too sure that Jesus was too gentle 
to oppose the wrong. A part of His 
gentleness was tremendously militant. 



The writer of this article once 
had occasion to advise two respectable 
families, in one of which a son and 
in the other of which a daughter had 
been wayward. They were both very 
young, and while their course of con- 
duct for some time had given their 
respective families anxiety, none of 
their friends was in the least prepared 
for the very unpleasant truth which 
one day it became necessary to face. 

It happened t;hat the only older 
people in those two families who were 
sufficiently calm and available for dis- 
cussion were two elderly maiden 
aunts, one on each side. And they 
were both women of years and discre- 
tion, Bostonian virgins, who had car- 
ried cold snow in their own bosoms 
through all the years of their single 
blessedness. With these two women 
it became the writer's duty to consider 
what should be done in view of a very 
distressing situation that had brought 



simultaneous disgrace upon two irre- 
proachable families. 

The alternatives were few, and it 
did not take long to enumerate the 
various possibilities. No one of them 
was a pleasant one, and there were 
objections, reasonable objections, that 
could be offered against any of the 
tentative plans proposed. As each 
possible plan came up for discussion, 
and the objections to it were stated, 
the two women short-circuited the 
matter by this httle dialogue : 

"It seems to me it was a great mis- 
take ever to have allowed those two 
young people to associate with each 
other as they did." 

"I think so, too. I often said to 
sister — " 

And so on. 

And each time the writer had to 
recall to them the necessity for some 
concrete action by saying: 

"No doubt you are correct. But 
what shall we do with the baby?" 

* * * 

Now, there are millions of minds 
on this planet that are formed on the 
model of those of the two maiden 
ladies. Brought face to face with an 
unpleasant situation, they are ready to 
give their opinions as to what ought 
to have been done a year ago. All 
of which would have had a possible 
value a year ago. But on this present 
day of grace, A. D., 1917, what shall 
we do with the baby? 

We are at war. 

Some good people think we ought 
not to be at war. They think they 
know just what ought to have been 
done to keep us out of war. 

It is unfortunate for the world that 
their wisdom was not sooner made 
available to the country and the world. 
But now, here we are, and no one of 
us can stop the war. We have a stern 
necessity to face. It is a most un- 
pleasant one, and it cannot be settled 
by those maiden aunts who know just 
how their married sisters ought to 
have restrained their children a year 
ago. 



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Knowledge 

By Thomas Curtis Clark 

THIS is all I know of God: 
That the Christ, whose feet once trod 
This poor earth, through shadows dim 
Leads a lost world back to Him. 



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The Larger Christian World 

A DEPARTMENT OF INTERDENOMINATIONAL ACQUAINTANCE By ORVIS F. JORDAN | 

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Union of Episcopalians 
md Wesleyans 

There is considerable excitement 
among church people in England 
Dver the simultaneous announce- 
nent by the Church Family Nezvs- 
baper and the Guardian that negotia- 
;ions were about to begin concern- 
ng the union of the Wesleyans with 
he Church of England. The Guar- 
iian prints a letter from a Wesleyan 
ninister, Rev. H. T. Hooper. This 
ninister says the time is near at 
land when tire Wesleyans will have 
o choose between union with the 
Zhurch and union with the dissent- 
;rs. For himself he chooses the for- 
ner alternative. He says absorp- 
ion of the Wesleyan movement is 
egally impossible and suggests that 
he Wesleyan ministers accept con- 
litional ordination at the hands of 
he bishops of the established 
:hurch and continue their work in 
he way Wesley designed it, as a 
ociety within the church of Eng- 
and. The Episcopalian newspapers 
lail this solution as one that is fair 
nd practical. 

\tv. R. J. Campbell Will 
/isit the United States 

The British religious papers an- 
iQunce that Rev. R. J. Campbell, the 
ecent convert to the established 
;hurch from the City Temple pulpit, 
vill visit the United States shortly, 
rhe bishops of Ohio and southern 
Dhio have invited him to deliver the 
3edell lectures at Kenyon college, 
ie is also invited into the diocese 
)f California and he will be univer- 
lity preacher at Leland Stanford 
miversity. 

sectarian Issue in 
^assacliusetts 

_ There is a constitutional conven- 
ioii in session in Massachusetts, and 
)ne of the live issues is the so-called 
'sectarian issue." Professor Ander- 
son, of Newton, has been particu- 
arly active in opposition to state aid 
sectarian schools. The Roman 
-^atholic members of the convention 
lave parried by opposing state aid 
ven to the private institutions. 

'rofessor Repudiates an 
Episcopal Theory 

The Rev. H. M. Gwatkin, who 
ied recently, was the Dixie profes- 
or^ of ecclesiastical history in the 
Jniversity of Cambridge. He has 
een a strong evangelical, and just 



prior to his death he shocked some 
church leaders in the state church by 
these words: "If, then, we are told 
that the guidance of the Spirit or- 
dained it for the churches of the 
second centurry, we cannot but 
heartily agree. But if it be said that 
it is, therefore, binding on all 
churches to the end of time, we are 
compelled to demur. As there is 
confessedly no direct command of 
Christ or His apostles to make it a 
permanent and universal law, we 
must refer ourselves to the guidance 
of the Spirit in after ages. If the 
Spirit spoke the word Episcopacy to 
the churches of the second century, 
it does not follow that He speaks the 
same word to churches of distant 
lands in other ages under other cir- 
cumstances." 

Rev. G. Campbell Morgan 
Remains in England 

It was announced some weeks ago 
that Rev. G. Campbell Morgan was to 
go to Melbourne, Australia, to preach 
for a year, beginning this fall. Mr. 
Morgan has changed his mind, the 
health of his family and the need of 
his services in England being given 
as the reasons. 

Death of New 
Testament Scholar 

The submarine was responsible 
for the untimely death of Dr. James 
Hope Moulton. His loss will be 
keenly felt throughout the Christian 
world. In Germany Dr. Adolph 



Deissmann, apologist for the kaiser, 
will realize the meaning of the death 
of Dr. Moulton. Dr. Moulton is 
known as the author of a grammar 
of New Testament Greek. The Ox- 
ford press will bring out posthu- 
mously his work called "The Treas- 
ure of the Magi." 

Methodists Endow 
Lectureship 

The trustees of the Wesley foun- 
dation of the University of Illinois 
announce that they have received 
property valued at $15,000 from the 
late Rev. M. P. Wilkin with which 
to endow a lectureship at the uni- 
versity. The attendance at the uni- 
versity is now about 6,500, of which 
about one-fifth are Methodists. The 
Methodists plan to bring some of 
their most eminent men to the uni- 
versity. 

Priests Do Good 
Work in Army 

It was an act of reprisal against 
the church when, in 1889, it became 
a law in France that priests and 
other "religious" men should be sub- 
ject to draft for army service. There 
are now in the French armies 20,000 
young priests and these have ac- 
quitted themselves with credit in the 
eyes of their comrades. These men 
hear confessions and perform other 
duties when they are not active in 
the trenches. The result of their 
work will be that a number of sol- 
diers will return from the war more 
religious than when they went. 



MR.BRITLING SPEAKS AGAIN 

Mr. H. G. Wells' New Book 

"God, the Invisible King" 

Mr. Wells, the author of Mr. Britling, says : 

** The time draws near when mankind will awake . . . 
and then there will he no nationality in all the world 
hut humanity^ and no king, no emperor^ nor leader, 
hut the one God of mankind/' 

AMERICA IS FIGHTING FOR THIS GOD! 

^^God, the Invisible King^^ 

"The Religion of Mr. Britling" 

Price, $1.25 

—FOR SALE BY— 

Disciples Publication Society, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



Social Interpretations 



By ALVA W. TAYLOR 



iillllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIillllllllllllllJIIIIIIIIIIIIIlii 



illlllli: 



Mammon Taking Advantage 
of Opportunity 

MAMMON is taking advantage 
of its opportunity. The big 
coal companies have become 
so notorious that several governors 
are preparing to try to take over 
the mines. In Illinois such shrewd 
corporation lawyers as Levy Mayer 
have assured the governor that he 
has the power to do so and he pro- 
poses to act unless there is promise 
of fair prices soon. Action in Illi- 
nois and other states will probably 
be held up pending action by Mr. 
Hoover and the President under the 
new food control law. Germany is 
today able to coerce Holland, Swit- 
zerland and Scandinavia into send- 
ing her both food and money because 
England and France cannot supply 
them with coal to sustain life. We 
must supply the deficit and our coal 
operators answer with a curtailment 
of output and a kiting of prices that 
are unheard of. 

The railroads have been almost 
frantically petitioning for the privi- 
lege of increasing rates and thus add- 
ing to the increased cost of coal and 
wheat and all else by which human- 
ity lives and the nation fights. If 
actual operation demanded it, no one 
would doubt their right to it; but 
what do the balance sheets say? The 
Interstate Commerce Commission 
reports that for June railroad profits 
were $8,000,000 more than for the 
same month of last year. Profits last 
year were the largest in the history of 
railroads. The plea is that operat- 
ing expenses are increasing and thus 
rates must be increased to meet fu- 
ture contingencies. This report 
shows that operating expenses did 
increase by $30,000,000 and income 
by $38,000,000. 

Some time ago a trade journal ad- 
vised its patrons to kite prices and 
said that "the public is being edu- 
cated to pay high prices and mer- 
chants should take advantage of 
their opportunity." The President's 
plea will be in vain so far as big 
business as a whole is concerned. 
There are thousands of loyal busi- 
ness men who would act patriotic- 
ally, but there are others who will 
take advantage of the opportunity, 
and these have the laws of trade un- 
der war conditions on their side. 
There is only one remedy. Just as 
we conscript men, we must control 
prices as a means of fighting the 
war. 



Steel or 
Steal? 

When some scores of Oklahomans 
from the Indian borders refused to 
serve their country, the law sur- 
rounded them and they are now in 
prison. The slackers are being gath- 
ered in, and even the conscientious 
objector will have trouble in prov- 
ing his case and getting exemption. 
Now comes news that there is a 
hitch at the Bethlehem steel works. 
Bethlehem has outrun Essen since 
the war began and Schwab is 
mightier than Krupp today. In 1913 
the steel trust paid 7 per cent on 
preferred stock and 5 per cent on 
common (and steel common is wa- 
ter) and still had an undivided sur- 
plus of $30,000,000. Last year the 
profits were considerably more than 
three times as great as in 1913. In 
1913 billets sold for less than $27, 
last year for $42 and since we en- 
tered war they have gone up to $100. 
Wages have gone up 27 cents on the 
dollar and the entire wage fund of 
the trust is actually less than its 
profits. In other words, wages re- 
quire only a small percentage of the 
gross income of the companies and 
could be much more than doubled 
without disturbing average profits. 
The government reported some time 
ago that the trust could raise wages 
one-half in ordinary years after pay- 
ing large dividends on watered stock 
and all, and that of late it could dou- 
ble them. Yet the average wage of 
200,000 steel workers is yet around 
20 cents per hour. 

No element in war-making is more 
necessary than steel. The President 
has appealed to business to be pa- 
triotic and not ask extraordinary 
profits. Steel and the steel barons 
are rich beyond the dreams of avar- 
ice, yet they ask Uncle Sam to dou- 
ble the prices they have been charg- 
ing the Allies; and the Allies were 
paying almost double peace-time 
prices and peace-time prices were 
paying enormous profits on the ac- 
tual investment. Colonel Goethals 
stood ready, so Mr. Denman 
charged, to pay them $95 for a prod- 
uct that had sold all last year for 
less than one-half that sum. The 
Defense Council agreed to recom- 
mend a price equal to that charged 
England, but Secretary Baker re- 
fused to O. K. it and fixes the price 
at around $40. It is over this price 
that the trouble has come, if reports 
are correct. We must have steel; 
must we submit to a steal? 



Strikes in 

War Time i 

Labor has shown an admirablel 
spirit of loyalty since war was de-| 
clared. The I. W. W. represents a! 
revolutionary and largely irresponsi-j 
ble element of radicals, many ofj 
whom do not work regularly and 
most of whom are foreigners. Theirj 
numbers are inconsiderable as com-: 
pared with the noise they make — or,, 
rather, that the newspapers and offi-| 
cials make over them because ofi 
their sensational doings, and theyi 
are an almost negligible quantity so; 
far as numbers are concerned in the! 
great world of labor. The American! 
Federation entered into an agree-| 
ment with the government to nego- 
tiate over all differences on govern- 
ment work, and the leaders have 
been giving time without stint tc 
help the big commissions that are 
pushing war munitions. 

There was an attempt made, wher 
war was first declared, to suspenc 
all labor laws and to make striking 
a crime. The President was empow 
ered to suspend industrial laws thai 
had been slowly and painfully buil 
up through years of contest in Con 
gress and courts. To his credit, h( 
has declared that to use such power; 
would be a calamity. England anc 
France made such suspensions wher 
war broke out, but are now trying t( 
restore them and repair the damagt 
done. Emergencies may demand 
temporary suspension of laws limit 
ing hours, but in the long run of th 
war it has been found that mor 
strict rather than less severe regula 
tions are needed. 

Fifty thousand carpenters on gov 
ernment work are threatening i 
strike. The American Federatioi 
has declared that it would be 
breach of faith to do so. This is no 
always the case in private works en 
gaged even on government con 
tracts. When profits mount beyon 
all bounds the men are justified i 
feeling they should share them ; the 
wages have advanced less than one 
half as much as the cost of living 
and if the facts were known the 
have advanced, no doubt, much les 
than half as much as the average c 
profits in most of the greater indus 
tries. Shall men be forbidden t 
strike under such circumstances, c 
should the government enforce 
wage scale consistent with the prol 
its made by the employer? In thes 
days of government control, th 
wage needs consideration as well a 
food and munitions. 



August 16, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



15 



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of Today 

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Aspects of the Infinite 

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The Spiritual Interpretation of 
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The Bible and Modern Life 
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The Social Principles of Jesus 
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The Syrian Christ 

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ON THE WAR 
What the War is Teaching 
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The Christian Ethic of War 
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New Wars for Old 

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History of the Great War. Vol. I 
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Poems of the Great War 

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Mr. Britling Sees It Through 
By H. G. Wells 

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Disciples Publication 
Society 

700 E. 40th St., CHICAGO 



The Bethany 

Graded Lessons 



Afford the very best study material for the work of the mod- 
ern Sunday school. Their growing popularity is notable. 
Some of our leading schools have used them for years ; others 
are coming to use them as they learn of their merits. Here is 
what some of the leaders of the church say of this unsur- 
passed body of literature: 

Rev. G. W. Knepper, Ann Arbor, Mich.: "We sought the 
BEST, and we use the BETHANY GRADED." 

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factory for Primaries and Juniors." 

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diates." 

Rev. I. S. Chenoweth, Philadelphia: "Superior to anything 
we have seen; have used it for years." 

Rev. E. H. Wray, Steubenville, O.: "None better." 

Rev. L. O. Bricker, Atlanta, Ga. : "Absolutely satisfactory; 
a triumph of religious educational enterprise." 

Rev. Frank Waller Allen, Springfield, 111.: "Without a 
peer." 

Rev. Chas. M. Watson, Norfolk, Va.: "The best published." 

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faction." 

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ligious education." 

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Sunday-school." 

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work a real joy." 

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ing and learning easy." 

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edited." 

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with it." 

Rev. E. M. Waits, Ft. Worth, Texas : "The best published 
anywhere." 

Rev. T. E. Winter, Philadelphia: "A delight to all." 

AND THERE ARE OTHERS. YOUR SCHOOL 
SHOULD HAVE THE BETHANY. SEND FOR RE- 
TURNABLE SAMPLES. ADDRESS 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 East 40th Street, Chicago 



16 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 16, 1917 



liiliiiiiiiiiiiiiillliiillliilllilillilllliillllllllllllllllllllllllilllllillllil^^ 

I The Sunday School | 

Mlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!llllllllillllllllll!lll!lll»^ 

Modern Idolatry 

The Lesson in Today's Life* 
By CHARLES H. SWIFT 



THE reign of Zedekiah marks the 
end of a long period of gradual 
decline and the final overthrow 
of the Hebrews as a separate and 
independent nation. Since the days 
of Solomon's glorious reign, the life 
of the people was being attracted 
and influenced by the surrounding 
heathen religions. They had crept 
into the court life as a deadly and 
destructive force to the ideal Jeho- 
vah worship fostered by the mighty 
prophets. Israel had already paid 
the penalty of her lost idealism. 
Judah struggled bravely against the 
corrupting influence of this idola- 
trous worship. Mighty kings, as 
Jehoshaphat, Hezekiah and Josiah, 
had inaugurated far-reaching re- 
forms to counteract this influence 
and to reestablish the true mono- 
theistic form of religion. Their ef- 
forts were only temporarily success- 
ful, for the heathen princes of the 
idolatrous class at court again se- 
cured control of the government and 
reinstated all the atrocious abomi- 
nations characteristic of heathenism. 



Jer-emiah saw the trend of things. 
He fully understood Judah's posi- 
tion as a weak nation lying between 
the two powerful kingdoms of As- 
syria and Egypt. This prophet of God 
cried in vain for national repentance. 
In fact, impending doom was at hand 
and soon Judah would be carried 
away into captivity, to live seventy 
years amid a people she knew not. 
Jehoiachin, the last king, is now in 
prison in Babylon. Zedekiah, the 
appointee of Nebuchadnezzar, breaks 
faith with the foreign despot and 
attempts a rebellion. He pays the 
price of his perfidy. Having his 
eyes put out, he is carried away in 
fetters as a prisoner to Babylon. All 
the inhabitants, save a few left as 
vine dressers and husbandmen, ac- 
companied him. 

Thus a glorious nation gradually 
became corrupted and diseased 
through the loss of her high national 
idealism and finally crumbled into a 
weak, vacillating dependency, fol- 
lowed quickly by a long period of 
sorrowful captivity. In spite of the 



repeated warnings of the prophets of 
God embodied in their passionate 
messages for national reformation, a 
mighty people became captives of 
the same gods with whom they had 
compromised. This retributive pun- 
ishment is the prophetic conception 
of God's anger kindled against a sin- 
ful people ; while back of it is divine 
mercy waiting an opportunity to re- 
deem. The doctrine of the remnant 
is the doctrine of national hope. 



With the training and develop- 
ment of the centuries, idolatry has 
not been fully uprooted. As the ma- 
terial pressed so heavily upon the 
sensitive mind of the Hebrew as to 
make nature worship, animal wor- 
ship, star worship and man worship 
a deadly allurement, so in modern 
life man struggles against the strong 
temptation of material philosophy in 
his search for the invisible God. The 
industrial order presses hard against 
the mind until machinery and or- 
ganization become a god to be wor- 
shiped. The polluting profit system 
is so alluring as to claim millions 



who daily worship at her shrine. 
The golden calf is in our midst. Her 
devotees are numberless. The arti- 
san, the farmer, the merchant, the 
banker, the drummer, the lawyer, the 
doctor, the politician, yea, the 
preacher, are among the vast throng 
which crowd her courts. Her tem- 
ple is ever filled to overflowing. 
"Count your money blessings" has 
become her sacred anthem. Her 
creed is, Grab all you can, but be 
careful that you do not get grabbed. 
Her test of fellowship is the bank 
account. Her heaven is the city of 
gold. 

Various forms of this modern 
idolatry are in evidence. It may be 
the imperialism of an aggressive na- 
tion. It may be the militarism of 
an autocracy. It may be the com- 
mercialism of an industrial people. 
It may be the science of ambitious 
minds. It often finds expression in 
economic terms, in Nietszchean phil- 
osophy, in social distinction, in po- 
litical preferment, in educational 
achievement and in professional at- 
tainment. It creeps into every sa- 
cred institvition of our modern com- 
plex life, with its blighting and 
corrupting influence. It perverts hu- 
man nature and leads to atrocious 
sins. Courts become corrupted, leg- 
islative bodies become contaminated, 
civic life becomes tainted, educa- 
tional institutions become debased, 
social life becomes corrupted, 
churches become polluted and homes 
become defiled. The sin of modern 
idolatry is far-reaching in its dead- 
ening, destructive power. 



*This article is based on the Interna- 
tional Uniform lesson for August 26, 
"The Captivity of Judah." Scripture 2 
Kings, 25:1-21. 



The. Most Beautiful Hymnal Ever Produced by the American Church 

HYMNS OF THE 
UNITED CHURCH 

The Disciples Hymnal 

Charles Claylon Morrison and Herbert L. Willell 

Editors 

Contains all the great hymns which' 
have become fixed in the affections 
of the Church and adds thereto three 
distinctive features: 

HYMNS OF SOCIAL SERVICE 
HYMNS OF CHRISTIAN UNITY 
HYMNS OF THE INNER LIFE 

These three features give this new 
hymnal a modernness of character 
and a vitality not found in any other 
book. This hymnal is alivel 

It sings the same gospel that is 
being preached in modern evan- 
gelical pulpits. 

Price, per single copy, in cloth, $1.15 
In half leather, $1.40. Extraordinary 
discount made to churches adopting 
this book in the early days of the first 
edition. 

Write to-day for further information as 
to sample copies, etc. 

Christian Century Press 

700 East 40th Street, Chicago 




August 16, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



17 



Disciples Table Talk 



^iHI 



Getting Ready for the Soldiers at Rock- 
ford, 111. 

Central Church, Rockford, 111., is mak- 
ing careful arrangements to look after 
the welfare of all soldier boys from the 
Christian churches of Ilinois who will 
be encamped at Camp Grant Canton- 
ment there for training in the new army. 
The pastor, Wm. B. Clemmer, desires 
that every minister of our churches in 
the state will advise him by early mail 
the names of all who come to the can- 
tonment from their congregations. Spe- 
cial effort will be made to make the boys 
feel welcome to the church fellowship 
and surround them with such influences 
as will make their new life as satisfac- 
tory as possible. It would be well also 
for all who plan to visit Rockford in 
the coming days to advise Pastor Clem- 
mer that they may not be disappointed 
in securing satisfactory lodgings while 
there. The church and the city feel the 
opportunity for a peculiar service and 
to give helpful and wholesome surround- 
ings to a new population of 40,000 in 
a day is no slight matter. Address Wm. 
B. Clemmer, 1229 N. Court St., Rock- 
ford, III. 

Wabash Avenue, Kansas City, Church 
Completes Present Pastor's Seventh Year 

L. J. Marshall closed his seventh year 
at Wabash Avenue church, Kansas City, 
August 1, with an enthusiastic service, in 
which there were eleven accessions to the 
church, all adults. Mr. Marshall preached 
on the text, "I Have Fought a Good 
Fight," taking it, however, in Weymouth's 
rendering, "I Have Waged a Glorious 
Contest." He declared that it was pos- 
sible for a church or a minister to wage 
an inglorious contest, one that, when it 
is looked back upon, is seen to have been 
unavailing and insignificant. He told of 
an aged minister who recently came to 
his study to discuss the living issues which 
Disciples of today are facing. After an 
hour together, this minister voiced the 
regret with tears in his eyes that he had 
spent the years of his ministry in making 
a false emphasis, in contending for legal- 
istic points that had no abiding value. 
He had waged an inglorious contest. In 
his sermon Mr. Marshall reviewed the 
record of Wabash Avenue church and 
said that the things for which the church 
had stood and was now standing were the 
abiding things, the glorious things. Tkey 
were able to look back upon the seven 
years and, when many more years shall 
have passed, would still be able to look 
back and say, "We have waged a glorious 
contest." Mr. Marshall is spending Au- 
! gust in vacation in the country near Kan- 
jSas City. 

[Laymen's Symposium at 
[Illinois Convention 

I The Illinois State Convention will be 
;held at Taylorville, 111., this year, the 
!date being September 10-13. The Disci- 
ples oi Christ have about 700 churches 
in this state, with a membership of over 
115,000. A most interesting feature of 
the program of the meeting this year will 
3e a laymen's symposium, which will be 
Participated in by the following men: 
Herbert F. Wilson, Advertising Manager 
)f the Decatur Herald, on "Church Pub- 
icity"; H. L. Fowkes, County Superin- 
endent of Public Schools at Taylorville, 
m "The Church School"; C. M. Thomp- 



son, Dean of Department of Economics 
at State University, on "Financing the 
Churcli"; Matthew Bollan, Postmaster at 
Havana, on "The Men of the Church"; 
W. K. Whitfield, Judge of the Circuit 
Court, Decatur, on "An Efficient Elder- 
sliip"; J. W. Ross, of Walnut, on "The 
District Building Syndicate." Other in- 
teresting features iiave also been ar- 
ranged which will be presented each 
week in these pages. 

St. Louisans To Go To 
China as Missionaries 

Dr. Paul H. Stevenson and wife, of 
Union Avenue Church, St. Louis, Mo., 
have been appointed tQ« service in China 
by the Foreign Society. They will sail 
from San Francisco on the Siberia, Sep- 
tember 1st. Dr. Stevenson is a son of 
Marion Stevenson, of the Christian Board 
of Publication, and a graduate of Hiram 
College and of the Medical College of 
Washington University, St. Louis. 

F. Lewis Starbuck as 
Labor Arbitrator 

It is not often that a preacher, who 
has been in a city the size of Peoria, 111., 
less than two years, and is pastor of a 
church whose members boast of very 
little wealth and influence, is chosen for 
the responsible position of chairman of 
an arbitration committee to settle labor 
disputes involving contracts running into 
huge sums of money. Yet, this is pre- 
cisely the enviable position that F. Lewis 
Starbuck, pastor of Howett Street 
Church, Peoria, has been called upon to 
assume. Mr. Starbuck organized his 
committee and got into communication 
with the contesting parties after tliey 
had spent several weeks in futile discus- 
sion, and bitter feeling had been devel- 
oped on both sides. By his tactful 
direction, the committee called in first 
one side and then the other, listening to 



the statements and propositions of settle- 
ment, and finally arranged a joint con- 
ference; after hours of discussion, and 
heated arguments, Mr. Starbuck boldly 
stepped forth and stated the terms that 
he believed would be a fair adjustment 
of dii^culties, and demanded that both 
parties comply with them. This resulted 
in a speedy settlement, both parties sign- 
ing a contract which released Peoria of 
her worst affliction — labor troubles in 
time of war. Mr. Starbuck arrived in 
Peoria July ], 191.5, and found the Howett 
Street congregation meeting in a dilapi- 
dated frame building sadly deficient in 
supplying the needs of the progressive 
people who constituted the church mem- 
bership. He immediately laid his plans 
for a new building, and this structure, 
complete and ready for service, was dedi- 
cated this year. 

Dr. Combs Given Year's Absence by 
Independence Boulevard Church 

Dr. George H. Combs, pastor at Inde- 
pendence Boulevard church, Kansas City, 
has been accorded a year's leave of ab- 
sence on full salary, beginning January 1, 
1918. This date marks the con*pletion of 
a twenty-five years' pastorate. Dr. 
Combs has not been up to normal health 
in the past year, and it is believed that 
a year's rest will tone up his nervous 
condition. It is said that the war has 
weighed heavily upon his heart. Dr. 
Combs was — and no doubt is — a radical 
pacifist, and feels the problem of adjust- 
ment to the new attitude of the United 
States with real seriousness. Evangelist 
E. E. Violett is supplying the pulpit at 
Independence Boulevard during Dr. 
Combs' summer vacation, and will prob- 
ably be asked to do likewise for the year 

1918. 

* * * 

— Maxwell Hall, who leads at Broad 
street, Columbus, Ohio, recently preached 
a sermon on "America's Joseph," in which 
he discussed the new food controller of 
the nation, Herbert C. Hoover, compar- 
ing him with the great food conserver 
of the Hebrews of old. 

— Harry D. Sinith, who is under con- 
tract to accept a chair in Phillips Uni- 




Summer Count! 



Every minister and religious leader should see that when the summer 
is over he has not gone backward, but rather made a real advance in 
his thought life. One must read, and read widely, in these days to 
keep up with the world's progress. In order to encourage ministers 
and other religious workers to "make the summer count" for their 
mental and spiritual development, we are making a special 10 per 
cent discount for cash on $5.00 (or more) orders for books ad- 
vertised in this issue of The Christian Century. Lay in your 
"summer reading" now and take advantage of this special offer. En- 
close check with order, including 10 cents postage for each volume 
ordered. 

Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St. - - - Chicago 



18 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 16, 1917 



versity, Enid, Okla., in the autumn, and 
who is now resting from active service in 
preparation for his new task, is being- 
urged by his former congregation at 
Hopkinsville, Ky., to return to that city 
as pastor. Mr. Smith served this church 
for about eighteen years. 

— F. H. Vernon has resigned his charge 
at Stuart street, Springfield, III., and will 
leave the capital city about September 
1st. 

— Thomas A. Maxwell, pastor-evangel- 
ist of Lincoln, Neb., has received ap- 
pointment as chaplain of the State 
Penitentiary, located in Lincoln. Mr. 
Maxwell had on several occasions talked 
tp the inmates of the prison and was well 
iiked by them. 

— The two Christian Endeavor Socie- 
ties of the North Yakima, Wash., 
church, have seven young people attend- 
ing Christian universities and colleges. 

— H. H. Williams has resigned from 
the pastorate, at Girard, 111., and will 
leave this field September 1st. 

—-It has become a tradition at Transyl- 
vania College, Lexington, Ky., that fac- 
ulty members must keep in the finest 
training for their work. As a result, 
every summer a large number of them 
spend_ the vacation period in leading 
American universities. Dr. A. F. Hem- 
enway, of the Science department, Prof. 
E. W. Delcamp of the department of 
Latin, Prof. Karl Mueller of the depart- 
ment of German, Prof. R. E. Monroe of 
the department of Modern Languages, 
Mrs. Charles F. Norton, Librarian and 
Prof. W. C. Bower are all doing univer- 
city work in better preparation for their 
own departments. 

— E. F. Leake, of Independence, Mo., 
supplied two Sundays recently at Lin- 
wood Boulevard church, Kansas City, 
when C. C. Morrison was absent. 

_ — News from Dr. Burris A. Jenkins ad- 
vises us that he is at the British front in 
France and may return to this country 
early in October. 

— The midweek service at Linwood 
church, Kansas City, is attended by from 
100 to 150 people, even in these summer 
rnonths. A light supper served at 6:30 
o'clock makes it convenient for some to 
come vi'ho otherwise would not, and the 
discussion of the previous Sunday morn- 
ing's sermon provides a subject upon 
which the attendants like to express their 
opinions, both pro and con. 

— James Small, pastor of Hyde Park 
church, Kansas City, has been appointed 
chaplain of Missouri's Third regiment, 
and will go to the front when the regi- 
ment goes. Mr. Small did not apply for 
the position, but was asked by the colonel 
in charge to accept the task. 



liriif unni/ ^ Church Home for You. 

NbW YUKK W"te Dr. Finis Idleman, 
null I uiiix j^^2 ^^^^ Qj^^ g^^^ ^^ yI 



— H. W. Hunter, pastor at Wellington, 
Kan., writes letters regularly to the 
young men of his congregation who have 
enlisted and gone to the training camps 
over the country. Mr. Hunter is sum- 
mering at his former home, Higginsville, 
Mo. 

— Clark W. Comstock has resigned his 
pastorate at Charles, Iowa, and will as- 
sume the duties of superintendent of 
missions of the Northwest district, Iowa. 
His headquarters will be at Waterloo. 

— S. R. Hawkins, one of the Indiana 
district secretaries, has recently brought 



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UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

The Disciples' School for the Graduate Training of Ministers, Missionaries and Teacher . 
Organically related to the Divinity School of the University of Chicago, and offering 

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Charles M. Sharpe, Ph. D., Executive Head Herbert L. Willett, Ph. D., Dean 



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A biblical school of high grade. At Columbia, Mo. Adjacent to the Uni- 
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GOOD-BYE, AUGUST— HELLO! SEPTEMBER 
AND CHURCH EXTENSION 

Mark a Big "X" On Your Calendar NOW 

Many churches wanting loans are compelled to 
1 wait for the September offering. 60 Churches were 
8 built last year with the aid of Church Extension. 

2I $50,000 IS URGENTLY NEEDED AT ONCE 

New York, Chicago, Canada, Alaska, and 
churches at your very door are seeking aid from this 
board. 

THE SERVANT OF THE CHURCHES 

Since 1888, 1,838 churches have been built by the aid of this fund. 
The Church Extension fund is the financial friend of the churches 
who have no other financial friend. Money is loaned, not given away. 
Interest pays all expense of administration, leaving a substantial bal- 
ance, which goes into the permanent fund. 

A CHIEF SOURCE OF INCOME 

Offerings from churches is a chief source of income. September 
is the month of all months for this fund. 

MISSIONS WAIT ON CHURCH EXTENSION 

Home missionaries agree that it is useless to establish congrega- 
tions without promise of a permanent Church home. Church Exten- 
sion is the handmaid of the home missionary. 60 per cent of all new- 
missions need the help of Church Extension to build. FOREIGN 
WORK— ALASKA— CANADA— all are waiting. This is the work 
of your own church. 

What Will Your Answer Be? Slogan "Exceed Your Apportionment" 



G. W. MUCKLEY, Secretary 



603 New England Building 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 



August 16, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



19 



harmony in the church at Warsaw, Ind., 
where there has been continual strife for 
two years, according to a newspaper 
report. 

— F. M. Tinder, who recently left the 
work at Lancaster, Ky., visited the 
church at North Middletown with view 
to taking the pastorate there. John 
Christopherson, the present pastor, has 
resigned. 

— H. H. Peters, Illinois State Secretary, 
recently spent a Sunday with the church 
at Dallas City, 111., and led in raising 
$1,800 in cash and pledges to cover an 
indebtedness on the building. Mr. Peters 
speaks in praise of the work of the pas- 
tor there, W. H. Hampton, who, he says, 
"has the confidence of the community." 

— Richard W. Wallace has resigned the 
pastorate of the Lexington, Mo., church 
and has accepted a call to the church at 
Winder, Georgia. Mr. Wallace will take 
up his new duties the first of October 
and the family will leave Lexington the 
later part of August. They will drive 
through to Kentucky in Mr. Wallace's 
Buick car and spend the month of Sep- 
tember with relatives, later going on to 
Winder. Mr. Wallace came to his Mis- 
souri work from Lexington, Kentucky, in 
November, 1915, where he was pastor of 
the Woodland church for five years. 
During his pastorate at Lexington, Mr. 
Wallace has had the satisfaction of see- 
ing about sixty members added to the 
congregation. He leaves Missouri for 
the southland primarily in the interest 
of his health. Winder is a town of about 
5,000 people located a short distance from 
Atlanta, and only about 20 miles from 
Athens, the seat of the state university. 

— Secretary H. H. Peters of Illinois 
reports an unusually strong program at 
the annual meeting of the churches of 
Edwards county, 111., which was held at 
Albion late in July. There are ten 
churches in the county. Mr. Peters 
writes: "The Albion church is looked 
upon as the leader in all our cooperative 
work in the country and T. J. Clark, pas- 
tor there, is a tower of strength in di- 
recting the forces." The program was 
unusually strong, dealing with the vital 
problems of community life. This meet- 
ing was another evidence of the fact, 
that our people are facing the real prob- 
lems of their communities." 

— Prof. George W. Hemry, lately of 
the College of the Bible, Lexington, Ky., 
has recently completed a two weeks' 
meeting for the East Union Church, in 
Nicholas county, Ky. There were 15 
accessions to the membership. Paul M. 



Trout, pastor at East Union, speaks of — M. A. Thompson, a former Iowa 

Professor Hemry's "exceptionally help- preacher and a graduate of Drake, was 
ful messages." killed recently by an autocycle at Puy- 

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The Composition 
and its Relation 



of Coca-Cola 



Prompted by the desire that the public shall 
be thoroughly informed as to the composi- 
tion and dietetic character of Coca-Cola, the 
Company has issued a booklet giving a de- 
tailed analysis of its recipe which is as follows : 

Water, sterilized by boiling (carbonated); 
sugar, granulated, ftrst quality; fruit favoring 
extracts with caramel; acid flavorings, citric 
{lemon) and phosphoric; essence of tea — the 
refreshing principle. 

The following analysis, by the late Dr. John 
W. Mallet, Fellow of the Royal Society and 
for nearly forty years Professor of Chemistry 
in the University of Virginia, shows the com- 
parative stimulating or refreshing strength of 
tea and Coca-Cola, measured in terms of the 
refreshing principle: 

Black tea — 1 cupful 1.54 

(hot) {5 fJ. oz.) 

Green tea — 1 glassful 2.02 

{cold) (S A oz. exclusive of ice) 

Coca- Cola—1 drink, 8 H. oz 1.21 

{fountain) {prepared with 1 fl. oz. Syrup) 

Coca-Cola— 1 drink, 8 fl. oz. 1.12 

{bottlers) {prepared with 1 fl. oz. Syrup) 

From the above recipe and analysis, which arc 
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tea of a little more than one-half its stimulat- 
ing strength. 

A copy of the booklet referred to above will 
be mailed free on request, and The Coca-Cola 
Company especially invites inquiry from 
those who are interested in pure food and 
public health propaganda. Address 

The Coca-Cola Co., Dept. J., Atlanta, Ga., U.S.A. 



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THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY - 



August 16, 1917 



allup, Wash. Mr. Thompson was pas- 
tor of McKinley Park church in the 
Washington town. 

— Sheldon Medbury, son of C. S. 
Medbury, of Des Moines, is now at Fort 
Houston, Tex., where he is training in 
the aviation camp, preparatory to going 
to France. 

— Walter S. Athearn, of Boston Uni- 
versity, is spending the summer on Cape 
Cod, in Massachusetts. He will return 
to the Boston school in the autumn to 
resume his work there in the field of 
religious education. 

— S. J. Burgess, of Eureka College 
and the Yale School of Religion, is the 
new pastor at Barry, 111. 

— B. F. Hagelbarger, of the Kent, O., 
church, writes that his people have been 
trying an unusual order of services on 
Sunday evenings of July. The hour was 
divided into three periods: twenty min- 
utes for song and devotions, twenty for 
sacred music on the Edison phonograph, 
and twenty minutes for a practical ser- 
mon on Christian living. Life was dis- 
cussed from the standpoints of value, 
viewpoint, measure, possibilities and 
goal. 

— J. C. McArthur, of Salina, Kan., 
writes that Dr. Arthur Braden, of Law- 
rence, Kan., is preaching some fine ser- 
mons as supply for the regular pastor, 
Arthur Dillinger, who is in summer 
Chautauqua work in Iowa, Nebraska and 
other states. 

— July was a good month for the 
American Temperance Board, writes 
Secretary L. E. Sellers of Indianapolis. 
The receipts were $746.36 and came 
from 149 churches and Bible schools. 
One gentleman after hearing Secretary 
Sellers in one of his addresses handed 
him an unsolicited check for $100. Mr. 
Sellers thinks that he should hear from 
at least one thousand churches and 
many individuals during the remaining 
two months of this missionary year. He 
spent the most of July in Kentucky. The 
nomination of men for the state legisla- 
ture made his visit very important. His 
meetings were well attended and en- 
thusiastic. The secretary is planning an 
automobile trip in Ohio. He will have 
a singer with him and will hold five or six 
street and park meetings each day. It 
looks now like Ohio would vote dry in 
the election November 6, according to 
Mr. Sellers. All correspondence should 
be addressed to the American Temper- 
ance Board, 821 Occidental building, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 



Mount Hermon Federate School of 
Missions 

The Federate School of Missions, 
held July 16-31, at Mount Hermon, Cal., 
had an enrollment of 110. The free 
stereopticon missionary lectures drew 
many who were not enrolled. A num- 
ber of missionaries of the various de- 
nominations were present from Cuba, 
China, Africa and from the Mexican 
work at Los Angeles, the work among 
the Jews, the work among California 
Mono Indians and the Arizona Indians. 
We had daily text-book lessons in "An 
African Trail" (by Jean Mackenzie) 
and "Missionary Milestones," (by Mar- 
garet Seebach), the classes being taught 
by Mrs. Hallie Linn Hill of New York 
City, that brilliant and informing leader. 
We had also a normal class, a children's 
story hour, and a young ladies' class. 

Inasmuch as we were studying "An 
African Trail," it seemed providential 
that we had as speakers two African 



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DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

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missionaries of many years' experience, 
Dr. Joseph Clark, pioneer Baptist mis- 
sionary from the Congo, who spoke for 
us twice, and Dr. Silas Johnson, for 33 
years Presbyterian inedical missionary 
in the Cameroun district, West Africa. 
Inasmuch as Dr. Silas Johnson comes 
from the station in the Cameroun district, 
where the author of our text-book, "An 
African Trail," works, it might be well 
to pass on here, for the benefit of other 
students of that delightful book, some of 
the things Dr. Johnson told us. He 
expects soon to return to Africa. 



Dr. Johnson's work lies in the great 
forest belt, where people are as much 
shut in "as meat within an egg," as one 
black man expressed it. Dr. Johnson's 
wife went with him 23 years ago. 

Dr. Johnson began his first little 
school with 17 small black boys, in a 
little bark house, using letters that had 
been cut out of wood. Boys began to 



crowd in. They slept in a saw bin 
sometimes and gathered wild sweet po- 
tatoes to eat. The longing for schools 
spread like wild fire. When Dr. John- 
son left there the last time, there were 
300 schools, all self-supporting, with 
nearly 17,000 pupils enrolled. On Sun- 
days those little school houses are used 
as churches. From actual count the 
average number of people hearing the 
gospel is 77,000. 

Fetishism was prevalent. Now, in 
some places, the people are throwing 
away their fetishes by the armful. One 
man, after becoming a Christian brought ! 
Dr. Johnson a box, saying "I want you 
to take it away. My father had it. It 
has been my great fetish." 

On opening the box, Dr. Johnson 
found in it the bones of six skulls of the 
man's ancestors. The black man had 
been accustomed to keep the box close 
to his bed, to rub the skulls with oil and 
powder, and to offer them food. When 



Help the Armenians! 



Americans have for over two years 
heard and seen reports of the sufferings 
of Armenians, Syrians, Greeks and even 
Turks themselves, under the barbaric 
misrule of the Turkish officials. Lord 
Bryce reported on the Armenian atroci- 
ties in words almost too terrible for 
print. Yet I doubt if many of us can 
even yet picture what is actually hap- 
pening in the Bible Lands. 

Orphans counted by the tens of thou- 
sands; women hounded to fates of un- 
speakable horror; whole villages wiped 
out by absolute starvation; bodies of 
those whom starvation has killed, lying 
unburied in the streets; a whole people, 
once a strong nation, eating grass and 
rubbish: — these are facts almost too 
frightful to be conceived of. Yet they 
are facts and America must face them 
or be accused, and justly, of aiding the 
Turkish Government, by not hastening 
to remedy its evil work. 
* * * 

The American committee for Armenian 
and Syrian relief is doing its utmost to 
send to the suffering millions the money 
that will keep them alive and re-estab- 
lish them in homes or other places of 
safety. We are often asked whether 
money given really reaches its destina- 
tion. It does, and quickly. Do the au- 
thorities get a chance to seize part of 
it? No, every cent, as we know from the 
missionaries and consuls who are dis- 
tributors, goes to the people. Is it not 
probable that the money may be wasted 
in expenses or lost in transmission? No, 
for all expenses are privately met, and 
the telegrams which order payment in 
Asia have, without a single exception, 
been safely received and honored. The 
auditors' reports show that nearly three 
millions of dollars have been given for 
this work and that every cent has been 
safely put into the hands of those who 
needed it most. 



That seems tremendous, and still tele- 
grams come in: 

"Require 100,000 this month." — Tabriz, 
Persia. 

"Urge committee to assume responsi- 
bility for ten thousand fatherless chil- 
dren at rate of two dollars per month 
per child." — Erivan, Caucasus. 

"200,000 have starved to death in Le- 
banon." 

Such reports, and worse ones, come in 
every day, and more money must con- 
stantly be gathered to answer the ap- 
peals. 

In order to increase the effectiveness 
of the campaign for funds, new offices 
have been opened in several cities, to or- 
ganize the state in which they are situ- 
ated. This relieves the New York office 
and permits of wider areas of continu- 
ous giving. Monthly gifts are needed 
to meet the continuing need. Volun- 
teers to organize local committees and 
get pledges are imperative. Christians 
should not wait to be solicited. The 
real Christian, knowing the need, will 
send his gift or volunteer his services 
to the nearest local treasurer and thus 
aid the work of saving lives. 

Such a need does not require appeals 
to givers. It presents a challenge to 
Christian America to practice toward 
helpless peoples what it has been en- 
deavoring to teach those peoples. Other 
needs are many and pressing. Our coun- 
try demands our best. But our patriot- 
ism demands likewise that we care for 
those for whose liberty our sons and 
brothers are fighting. 

Herbert L. Willett, Jr. 

Note. — Funds intended for this very im- 
portant cause may be sent through The 
Christian Century or direct to Herbert L. 
Willett, Jr., Field Secretary, Chicago Com- 
mittee for Armenian and Syrian Relief, 
iijQ Association Building, Chicago. \ 



August 16, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



21 



he gave up those fetishes, he showed 
his sincerity. He said: "Now I have the 
white man's God." 

* * * 

The members of the Christian de- 
loniination representing it on the execu- 



tive committee of the Mount Hernion 
Federate School of Missions are Mrs. 
N. E. Galloway, Mrs. J. N. Lester, Mrs. 
H. C. Ingram, and Mrs. Chas. Titus. 

Mary E. Bamford, 
Press Secretary. 



Facts Regarding Our Kansas City Churches 



Jackson county, in which is situated 
K^ansas City, Missouri, and Wyandotte 
;ounty, the home of Kansas City, Kan- 
;as, are the "boss" Christian church 
:ounties of the brotherhood. There are 
l7,128 members of Churches of Christ 
n these two counties. This is more 
nembers than we have in many whole 
itates; in fact, there are only seventeen 
itates in which we have a membership 
jxceeding 17,000. The states of Ala- 
bama, Arizona, District of Columbia, 
Maryland, Delaware and Florida coni- 
)ined have barely as many members as 
hese counties at the mouth of the Kaw. 
\11 the members in Idaho, North and 
50Uth Dakota, Louisiana, Minnesota, 
Mississippi and Montana barely equal 
he number of our host for our next 
;onvention. There are more members 
n the Independence Boulevard Church 
han in all of New England, New Jer- 
;ey and North Dakota combined. There 
ire more members in the Central 
Ihurch, Kansas City, Kansas, than in 
ill of Manitoba and British Columbia, 
rhe Jackson Avenue Church, only re- 
:ently a mission, has as many members 
IS all the churches of North Idaho, 
vhich number twenty-four churches, ac- 
:ording to the year book. If all the 
:hurches of Kansas City were one 
:hurch, their area would be in the neigh- 
)orhood of twenty acres. If the floor 
pace of these churches were cut one 
cot wide and laid end to end it would 
tretch for one hundred miles. If all 
he pulpits were one pulpit, it would be 
s high as the Bunker Hill monument. 
f the organs of our Kansas City 
hurches were one grand organ, it would 
lave a keyboard a hundred feet from 
nd to end, and pipes as high as the 
rower of Babel. If all the preachers in 
jreater Kansas City were one preacher, 
le could place one foot in Kansas City, 
"Cansas, and the other in Kansas City, 
vlissouri, and with one hand greet all 
he people coming from the east, 
he other hand grasping the out- 
tretched palm of those from the west 
ind welcome them to the convention. 
f all the members in the two counties 
narched three feet apart, single file, at 
he rate of three miles per hour, it would 
ake them four hours to pass a given 
'oint. 
The Kansas City churches believe in 
:etting good preachers for their pulpits, 
nd appreciating and holding them 
jhereafter. For long pastorates, we be- 
I ye Kansas City has a very fine record. 
I'he late T. P. Haley was pastor in Kan- 
jas City more than thirty years, at the 
jld First Church more than twenty 
jears, and later at Linwood Boulevard 
j hurch, of which he was Pastor Emer- 
us at the time of his death. W. F. 
.ichardson, now of California, was pas- 
)r in Kansas City more than twenty 
ears. George H. Combs is rounding 
ut a quarter of a century at the Inde- 
sndence Boulevard Church. Frank L. 
owen has been City Missionary in Kan- 
is City for twenty years. C. C. Sinclair 
IS been pastor of the Central Church, 
ansas City, Kansas, for a dozen years, 
id has good prospects of staying an- 
her twelve years. Burris A. Jenkins, 



J. B. Hunley, Elmore Sinclair, William 
Maytield, L. J. Marshall, R. B. Briney, 
and James Small have all been here long 
enough to be considered permanent in 
their pastorates. 

In the matter of missionary offerings, 
Kansas City stands well in the limelight. 
Last year the combined missionary of- 
ferings of the two churches in the two 
counties was $23,469.61, being more than 
ten per cent of the offerings of the 
States of Kansas and Missouri. The 
fourth, seventh and eighth largest con- 
tributing churches of the brotherhood 
are in Kansas City. The combined local 
expenses of the churches in these coun- 
ties in 1916 was $122,220. The estimated 
value of church property in Greater 
Kansas City is $1,000,000. Most of the 
present modern structures have been 
erected during the past ten years. 
E. E. Elliott^ 
Chairman Press Committee. 

Kansas City, Mo. 



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THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



FE 



HA VE YOU READ 



FAT 




A NEW NOVEL 
BY EDGAR DE WITT JONES 

Fairhope folks are mighty human, but you 
will like them all the better for that. 

Major Menifee may remind you of Colonel 
Carter of Cartersville. You will love Jacob 
Boardman, the modern Enoch. And even 
Giles Shockley will not repel you, "Hound 
of the Lord" though he was. 

Everyone knows that the old style of 
country church is passing forever. But 
what type of church will take its place? 
Read the chapter entitled "The Old Order 
Changeth" and meet the Reverend Roger 
Edgecomb, Prophet of the new order. 

Do you like birds and stretches of meadows, 
glimpses of lordly river, and the glory of 
high hills? Do you like young preachers and 
old time country folks, their humors, their 
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ugust 16, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



23 




OLD 

ITY ALONE 




Dr. Burris A. Jenkins' Popular Volume 

"The Man in the Street 
and Religion' 

A book containing the Kansas City preacher's message and his 
personal philosophy of life. 

One of the livest and most readable 
statements of modern faith which the pres- 
ent year has brought forth. The following 
extract from the first chapter suggests the 
point of view and atmosphere of this 
fascinating book: 

"To look upon the seething mass of men in the 
city streets, or on the country side, the navvy in 
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THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY August 23, 1917 



IS THE WORLD 
GROWING BETTER 



or more materialistic? A study of actual 
events leads Professor Shailer Mathews to be- 
lieve that history does show^ spiritual forces at 
work which may renew our threatened ideal- 
ism and our confidence in the might of right. 
He sums up his views in his new volume 



"THE SPIRITUAL 

INTERPRETATION OF 

HISTORY" 



Professor Mathews is Dean of the Divinity 
School in the University of Chicago and is one 
of the most brilliant writers in the field of re- 
ligion today. He is also the Editor of the 
Biblical World. 

Every minister and every alert churchman 
should possess this book. It is esssentially a 
book for the times. 

Price of the Book, $1,50 



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4 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 23, 1917 



mtm 




A Squad in Physical Culture, Morehead Normal School, Morehead, Kentucky, 1917 

Man Power in the Alleghany Mountains 

To the people of America, prior to the Civil War, the mountain regions south of Pennsylvania were as 
unknown as the interior of Africa, and even when the history of that conflict was written, few noticed that 
thousands of the bravest and the most effective soldiers in the Union Army came from the highlands south of 
Mason and Dixon's line. 

Only in the last decade of the nineteenth century was the real discovery made through which it is now 
becoming generally known that four millions of pure blooded Anglo-Saxons live in the two hundred counties 
of the mountains and foothills of Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North and South Carolina and 
Georgia. 

Just after the Revolutionary War their ancestors, in the great tide of migration that crossed the Alle- 
ghanies, stopped off and made their homes in fertile valleys and coves. Each family had an ample domain, 
but with the development of railroads their highways were abandoned and communication with the outside 
world all but ceased, leaving them with the simple industries and handicrafts of their fathers. They multi- 
plied until every possible foothold on the mountain side had to be taken up for human habitation and the 
poverty of the people kept them on the verge of starvation. 

To the outside world they were unknown, except for their "moonshine" whiskey and their implacable feuds. 
While the men drank and fought and the women toiled and suffered, the children grew up to an inheritance of 
ignorance, poverty and hatred. But "every vice is the wrong side of a virtue," and now we are beginning to see 
a new race of mountain people coming forth clean as their waterfalls, dependable as the steel from their hills, 
sturdy as the oak of their forests and with loyalty to the ideals which they have espoused as intense as are 
the furnace fires kindled of their coal. 

While industry and trade have invested millions to develop the physical resources of this newly discovered 
land, the church must expend thousands to bring forth the man power, not only for the sake of the people 
themselves, but for the sake of America and the world, in this time when such virtues as the mountain people 
possess are infinitely needed. 

The success of the Men and Millions Movement will enable the Disciples of Christ, through the Christian 
Woman's Board of Missions, to largely increase the work that is now being done. 



Men and Millions Movement 

222 W. Fourth Street, Cincinnati, O. 



mtim 



loim 



m^^0^ 



■»># 




CHARI.Z:S diAYTON MORBZSOIT, EDITOR. 



TiAN Century 

HEBBEBT i;. WIIiIiBTT, CONTBIBUTING BDITOB. 



Volume XXXIV 



AUGUST 23, 1917 



Number 34 



A Call to Arms 



the days of lukewarmness in reli- 
jION are over. 

In recent years we have seen the community settle 
lown to a half-hearted assent to Christian truth. In 
;he new days we shall have either a vigorous faith or 
ui up-standing rebellion against the whole Christian 
system. We are examining our spiritual foundations, 
ivery rotten sill will be thrown out and only the sound 
imber will be allowed to remain. 

That so many have been lukewarm in religion the 
)ast ten years may not be altogether the fault of re- 
igion. We have had many new toys to play with. We 
:onstructed a fool's paradise and tried to live in it. 
rhe events of a few months have toppled over our doll's 
lOuse and left us face to face with new realities. There 
ivas enough substance to our religion in these years 
;o deserve better treatment. Those days of partly 
;mpty pews and sleepy worshipers have been the result 
Df an over-fed nation which has lived too much for 
naterial things. When we become poor, when we face 
jncertainty and great hazards, we shall be compelled 
igain to think. Then we had too much food and too 
little oxygen. Now we may have too little food some- 
times, but 4;here will be a chance for the higher life. 

• • 

But it will not do for us to assume that religion 
will need no reconstruction for the new times. Religion 
is always in need of reformation, but more particularly 
lifter periods of great material prosperity. Amos and 
Hosea spoke to a nation that had learned to recline 
pn beds of ivory and to drink wine from big bowls, 
in America we must purge Baal worship from the 
■eHgion of Jehovah. 

j It is a time to produce a more thoughtful formula- 
ion of religion. We can no more hope to take a camp- 
ineeting theology over into the new age than we can 
p take hand reapers. Our great universities liave done 
l great service in formulating a more systematic and 
(irderly statement of religious faith. Because a few 
jioisy and factious spirits have opposed the preaching 
If these modern conceptions of religion, our pulpits 
'lave often been devoted to ethics and sociology and 
[indred matters, while the people have been perishing 
Dr a knowledge of God. 

We want no superficial liberalism for the new day. 
'he man who has only learned to deny is a freshman 
1 the study of the newer conceptions of religion, 
here has been a liberalism quite as superficial and 
mpty of spiritual power as the belated orthodoxy 
'hich it has sought to supersede. 

In formulating the message for these days, we 
lUst have something to believe and teach about God. 
he old works of Christian evidence were concerned 
liefly with proving that there is some kind of a God. 



They did not tell us much about Him. We now know 
that it is a work of supererogation to prove that there 
is a God. Why prove what nearly everyljody believes? 
But believing there is a God doesn't change any 
man until he discovers who God is and what He wants to 
do in His world. When one looks at recent books 
he is surprised to see how many of them are concerned 
with the subject of God. Balfour, the great English 
statesman, has written a book about God. Dr. Gor- 
don, of the Old South church, Boston, near the close 
of a great ministry has written about God. Saul among 
the prophets was no more astonishing figure than H. G. 
W^ells among the theologians. None of the books of 
these men attempts a proof of the existence of God. All 
of them seek to know Him better. 



The Christian faith and life faces no longer so 
easy a foe as the infidelity of a Robert Ingersoll. The 
old infidelity was negative. Its chief weapon was a 
sneer. It oi^ere'd no formulation for the problems of 
life. It is no wonder that the church found it so easy 
to triumph over so mean a foe. Christianity never grew 
faster in this country than in the days when it faced 
that sickly antagonist. 

But in these days the alternative to Christianity 
is well formulated and is thought through in some 
adequate way. It is Christ against Nietsche. The days 
of the anti-Christ are now here. We are either to 
have the superman lording it over his serfs, or the 
Kingdom of Christ in which our Elder Brother will 
help the feeblest with the most tender care. Under 
the one system we should no longer see any reason 
for preserving the lives of our aged or our cripples. 
Ruthlessness would sacrifice everything which could 
not take care of itself. We should reproduce the jungle, 
made ten times more hellish by reason of modern 
knowledge. Under the rule of Christ we should go on 
to a sense of the infinite value of human life in the 
eyes of God until our dream of brotherhood would at 
last be realized. 

Faced by such alternative, how can religion fail 
to recognize at this hour its need of the apostolic spirit? 
These are no times for an easy conscience nor for a 
half-hearted service. The enemies of Christ have risen 
against Him in power. Armed with the sword of the 
spirit, we must fight with the vigor and courage and 
sacrifice of Paul. In the churches there should now 
sound forth the battle-cry of a more militant Chris- 
tianity. The cowards and slackers are to be shamed 
and the valiant knights of our holy faith are to be sent 
forth with conquering power. It is to be Christ or 
the superman. As for us and our household, we pledge 
ourselves to Christ. 



DITORIAL 



HOW LONG WILL AMERICA BE AMERICAN? 

IT is a matter of observation that the immigrants in 
this country have a much higher birth rate than do 
the native Americans. The investigations of the 
census bureau reveal to what extent this observation is 
founded in fact. This bureau has recently published a 
bulletin showing the birth rate of the various elements 
in the population in certain of the populous eastern 
states. People of divers occupations and walks in life 
have been studied. 

In Massachusetts the 31 per cent of the population 
which was foreign born produced 58 per cent of the chil- 
dren born during the year. In Maine 15 per cent of 
foreign born had 28 per cent of the children ; in Con- 
necticut 30 per cent of foreign born had nearly 63 
per cent of the children. As the ratio is studied for 
the various states, it would seem that the birth rate is 
nearly twice as high among the foreigners. 

There is, of course, some offset to this. Among 
these people less intelligence is used in the rearing of 
children and the infantile death rate is also higher. It 
is not enough higher, however, to make up the differ- 
ence, so there can be no doubt that at the present time 
the foreign population is increasing much more rapidly 
than is the native population. 

In days to come, the birth rate among these alien 
peoples will decline, if we may judge by the analogies 
of older immigrant groups. They will lose their group 
formation in our population and eventually be ab- 
sorbed in the American life, as doubtless the ten tribes 
of the Israelites were absorbed in the east. Mean- 
while, no religious worker can blink the fact that the 
character of our population is being fundamentally 
changed, nor can it be ignored that the birth rate is 
far higher among Roman Catholic peoples than it is 
among the Protestants. 

THE RELIGIOUS PROBLEM IN IRELAND 

IN present-day Ireland we are nearest to the religious 
wars of the past. The problem there is not economic 
or political so much as it is religious. A witty 
Scotch writer has shown that the Irish have more lib- 
erty than the much abused English. They have free- 
dom in religion, with no establishment. They have 
forty members in a parliament of Scotch and Welsh 
and English members which rules England. The gov- 
ernment has arranged more favorable terms for the 
Irish peasantry to buy land than are to be had in Eng- 
land. The Irish still suffer under absentee landlordism, 
but it is hard to see how even independence would reme- 
dy that. 

The bitter fact in Ireland is that Ulster is Protes- 
tant and the remainder of the island is predominantly 
Catholic, and more under the heel of the parish priest 
than in most sections of the world. There has been 
too much disposition for Irish religionists to impose 
their religion on each other by force rather than by the 
gracious arts of persuasion. 

The very same sort of division is to be found in 
Canada. French Canadians might have been expected 
to rally to the support of France when she was in danger 
from the Teuton invader. But it did not so happen. 
The French priest persuaded the populace that France 



was being punished for her sin of disestablishing the 
church. The French Catholics are now seeking to be 
set apart under a separate government. 

Both of these situations result from the grind of 
age-long controversy. It is well for religious people 
to bear witness to the truth but they should always re- 
member to speak the truth in love. 

We have developing in this country, an incipi- 
ent religious situation that is similar. Protestants and 
' Catholics are being set apart from each other by sec- 
taries in either camp. Unhappy Ireland and divided 
Canada should serve to reveal to us how unchristian 
and how unprofitable in every way such party feeling is. 

WORKING OUT A MORE ADEQUATE COM- 
MUNITY PROGRAM 

THE federation of the churches nationally has gone on 
well and the Federal Council of the Churches of 
Christ in America is a much appreciated symbol of 
such unity as we have achieved in our Protestant life. 
The carrying of federation to the cities and towns has 
been attended with more difficulty. An examination of 
the reports of various city federations over the country 
will indicate that much good work has been done, but 
there has not been a well-rounded program for any of 
them. 

The first week in October there will be held in Pitts- 
burg a meeting in which will be studied in a more sys- 
tematic way just what forms of community cooperation 
there may be in the work of the churches in any city 
The advance announcement mentions "the standardization 
of Christian cooperation." This is rather a misleading 
phrase to apply to the objects of the meeting, for com- 
munity programs may not be standardized in the same 
way as the bolts are in a Ford automobile. Yet a con 
ference devoted to this matter should arouse interest all 
over the country. 

The subjects to be treated are suggestive of what the 
proposed community program in religion is to be. They 
are : Community Evangelism, World Evangelism, Social 
Service, Religious Education, Comity, Religious Publicity. 
International Justice and Goodwill. We are not sure we 
would include all of these as matters demanding the at- 
tention of a local federation. There are probably othei 
matters which need to be included. We shall, however 
never have a community program for religion unless w( 
shall have some study of the problem. The Pittsburglj 
meeting should have the support of representative lead-j 
ers among the Disciples of Christ. 

STOKER OR PREACHER? 

THE Lutheran has rendered a real service in print i 
ing in parallel columns the ministerial salaries oj 
the leading denominations in this country and th<j 
salaries of various workers in other kinds of employ 
ment. It is rather shocking to find the Disciples tabu 
lated among those who reward their ministers least 
only the southern Baptists treating the ministers of th' 
gospel with less generosity. The average salary amonj 
Disciples is given as $526. The highest salaries ar 
paid Unitarians and Episcopalians. Of the evangelica 
bodies, the Presbyterians are most generous. The aver 
age salary of ministers among the Unitarians is $1,221 



August 23, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



while soap-makers receive $1,107 and furniture makers 
$1,194. 

The point of this comparison is not to complain of 
salaries as being too high for other workers but to in- 
dicate that the ministers of the gospel are not taken 
care of in accordance with their needs. A Presbyterian 
newspaper declares that the stokers of engines on the 
trains are far better paid than the men who preach the 
gospel. 

In Illinois the presbyteries of the Presbyterian 
church are calling on the sessions to estimate the in- 
creased cost of living in each commvinity and to raise 
the salary accordingly. In this way it is hoped may be 
carried out the provision of that church, as given in the 
confession of faith, that the minister "may be free from 
worldly cares and avocations." 

Our ministry will continue to leak at the top unless 
this question is taken hold of quite seriously. We will 
see an increasing number of our men going into other 
v^ocations, not because they are worldly, but because 
they demand an education for their children and a com- 
petence for their old age. There are many ministers 
among us with no new books and no contacts with the 
brotherhood in the conventions, all for lack of the neces- 
sary funds. This is a sin and a shame. 

FEEDING THE STARVING MILLIONS 
OF EARTH 

WE may well be grateful for the favorable crop 
reports that are now coming in. The corn and 
potato crops, which are fundamental in our food 
supply, seem to be of most unusual size. We must not 
be deluded by these figures, however. The United 
States is now the food granary for a large part of the 
western world. Our bumper crops will be bought up 
at high prices and before spring we shall wish we might 
have had more supplies, both for our allies and for our- 
selves. 

The war has already brought the world to the place 
where people are literally dying of starvation. What 
is going on in Germany and Austria is in considerable 
measure a matter of conjecture. Cut ofif from the mar- 
kets of the world, they must be having a most miserable 
sort of existence. We do know that in Belgium and 
Poland and Serbia and Armenia there is terrible need. 

Most American families on the old scale of liv- 
ing wasted enough to keep another person or two alive. 
The garbage pails of our country have borne daily tes- 
timony to our extravagance and wastefulness. This has 
jalways been wrong, but waste in these days takes on 
la sinister significance. 

Certain Christian organizations are taking up the 
jquestion of our responsibility to the world in this time 
pf its need. A pledge is being provided which demands 
3f its signers that they help during the war in increas- 
ing the food supply of the world and in conserving it. 
Such a pledge if taken by every Christian in the country 
jind conscientiously kept would be of great service to 
suffering humanity. 

WHAT WE DO WITH OUR MONEY 

IT is something of a commentary on the standards of 
our modern world that the world's highest salaried 
man is Charles Chaplin. It is said that during the 
:oming year his total earnings will be more than a 
nillion dollars. This man who is clown to the whole 



western world has a straight salary of $670,000. When 
we compare this with the seventy-five thousand dol- 
lars a year received by the president of the United 
States or with the salary of the men who head our 
biggest corporations, we reach the astonishing conclu- 
sion that we in America prize a funny man above all 
others. 

The unprecedented wealth that has rolled in upon 
us in recent years has taxed our ingenuity. We have 
bought automobiles until the factories of most of the 
companies have been taxed to their capacity. One 
person in eleven in Iowa owns a car. If we count five 
to a family, that would mean that every other family 
has one. One person in twenty-seven for the whole 
country now has a car and the percentage is rapidly 
increasing. 

While these facts stare us in the face, we may ex- 
amine our missionary and benevolent reports and see 
that the gain there has been only slight. Our Home 
Missionary Society continues to report a loss and the 
Foreign Missionary Society reports no more gain than 
has been customary. The facts would seem to indict 
the stewardship of the American people. They have 
been prodigal in their luxuries and stingy in the things 
that are most pleasing to God. 

The war will reduce our enormous resources. We 
have daily expenses several times the income of the 
government, and taxes continue to mount up. When 
the people begin to talk about retrenchments, will they 
ask to have the missionary salaries cut ten per cent, 
or will they slice a little off of the incomes of movie 
actors and automobile magnates? -~ 

THE VALUE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT 

DISCIPLES have not, as a rule, been very zealous 
students of the Old Testament. We used to go 
there for types and shadows, but with the down- 
fall of the covenant theology among us, we no longer 
study the tabernacle as carefully as we used to do. We 
once used the Messianic prophecies in presenting Chris- 
tian evidences, but in these latter days there are more 
convincing arguments for the genuineness of the Chris- 
tian religion. 

Our neglect of the Old Testament arose in part, no 
doubt, from a misunderstanding of the position of Alex- 
ander Campbell. The first smell of heresy attaching to 
the garments of the great reformer came from his Ser- 
mon on the Law delivered in the Redstone Baptist Asso- 
ciation.' In this sermon, Campbell showed that the Old 
Testament had no statutory authority over Christians. 
His followers have completed his job by showing that 
the New Testament has no statutory authority either, 
but has an authority and a value of another sort. 

Because the Old Testament is not a law book is 
no reason for rejecting it as a useful book for religious 
purposes. We may there trace the early development of 
religion. The patriarchs made mistakes and acted on 
partial knowledge. They lived in the starlight while we 
have the sunlight of the Christian truth. 

There would be a poverty of material for the reli- 
gious education of our children, were it not for the Old 
Testament. The stories of the early books of the Bible 
are a deathless literature for the religious training of 
the young; for the development of the child mind in 
some measure parallels the development of the race, and 
the childhood of the people of God is able to instruct 
the childhood of our own day. 



8 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 23, 1917 



It is not only to the young and immature, however, 
that the Old Testament brings a message. Our so- 
cial reformers have gleaned some of their most power- 
ful epigrams from the prophets. There is no more beau- 
tiful and significant lyric poetry in the world than the 
psalms. The philosophy of the Old Testament in the 
writings of the Sages is not systematic, but it probes 
the fundamental problems of human life. With the new 
method of literary criticism and evaluation at work, the 
Old Testament is revealed as a great and ever valuable 
literature. 

MAKING GOOD WITH STRANGERS 

A DISCIPLE boy was asked by his pastor the other 
day to which Disciple church he would transfer 
his membership in the town to which he had 
moved two years ago. "To neither one," this boy re- 
plied. Then he told of the "glad hand" he had receiv- 
ed in a church of another fellowship and how he was 
attending that church, though he had not taken his 
letter from the old Disciple church at home. 

This is rather unusual, of course, for our churches 
have the reputation of hospitality the country over. It 
is possible, however, that with our growing strength 
and numbers we may be developing stifif and aristocratic 
churches where the stranger has but little chance. 

The church ought not to wait for strangers to show 
up at the church service but should find them as soon as 
they move to town. In most communities this is a 
matter that can be taken care of through proper or- 
ganization. When the new-comer first appears at the 
church services, he should have attention that is spon- 
taneous and full of genuine interest. 

It is a curious thing that an up-to-date business 
house invariably has a mailing list of prospects to be 
followed relentlessly through the mail, while many 
churches fail to secure any record at all of the people 
that come to its services. One suburban church em- 
ploys both ministers and ushers to get the names of 
strangers. These are followed through letters, cards, 
etc., for two years, besides being remembered in the 
calling work of the parish. All the visitors are studied 



Any Soldier Son to His Mother 

IF I am taken from this patchwork life 
By some swift outthrust of an unseen arm — 
The death that strikes my comrades day and night — ■" 
I pray you make of it no cause of tears, 
I beg you grieve not for me overmuch. 
And for your comfort I would pen this thought : 
The joy you had of me in childhood's days 
When in your arms I played or cried or prayed 
(Those soft, warm arms! Can you or I forget?) 
Will still remain with you when I am gone. 
It is so real now, that memory ; 
Not death itself can rob you of your child. 
The boy I was, the man I grew to be, 
Despite the mother's tender hopes and fears, 
How distant, how detached and cold they seem. 
And so, sweet mother, here I stand to meet 
My fate, this night and any night ; but still 
Your child, imperishable whilst you breathe ; 
As in the cradle, so until the end. 

— N. G. H., in London Spectator. 



to see why they had interest enough to come to church. 
The impressions of these new-comers with regard to 
the church are of great value in formulating the church 
program for the year. 

It is not possible for a church to adopt a clublike 
attitude toward its parish, with narrowness and ex- 
clusiveness, and yet call itself Christian. The true 
church of Christ has an open door and a glad hand. 

HOME MISSIONS AND THE SOLDIERS 

IT is easy to judge the leadership of home mission 
agencies by the alertness with which they have re- 
sponded to the unusual conditions created by the 
war. The Y. M. C. A. must be given the palm for 
prompt action. This organization in the first month of 
the war successfully conducted its campaign for mil- 
lions of dollars and is already at work building its huts 
in the fifty or more training camps where the soldiers 
will be gathered for the next few months. 

The Roman Catholics were not far behind when 
through their Knights of Columbus organization they 
provided a million dollars to organize for the social and 
recreational needs of all the enlisted men of that faith. 

The bishops of the Protestant Episcopal church 
in the United States of America at its May meeting 
organized the National Service Commission consisting 
of one hundred and fifty leading laymen and ministers, 
and they now have a full time executive officer. They 
will soon be ready to take care of the spiritual needs of 
Presbyterian soldiers. 

The Methodist Horrie mission board is asking for 
special funds to be used in work with the soldiers. 
Some of this money may be spent in strengthening the 
program of the local churches near the training camps, 
which seems a very wise way in which to use the funds. 

Congregationalists and Baptists have not been less 
alert, but have programs formulated and are buying 
the property they will need for their work. 

Meanwhile, Disciple activities in behalf of the sol- 
dier seems to be altogether of a private sort in local 
congregations. Is it possible that none of our home 
mission agencies have seen this opportunity? 



High Summer 

PINKS and syringa in the garden closes. 
And the sweet privet hedge and golden roses. 
The pines hot in the sun, the drone of the bee; 
Thev die in Flanders to keep these for me. 

The long sunny days and the still weather, 
The cuckoo and the blackbird shouting together, 
The lambs calling their mothers out on the lea; 
They die in Flanders to keep these for me. 

The doors and windows open: south wind blowing 
Warm through the clean, sweet rooms, on tip-toe going, 
Where many sanctities, dear and delightsome be — 
They die in Flanders to keep these for me. 

Daisies leaping in foam on the green grasses, 

The dappled sky and the stream that sings as it passes— 

These are bought with a price, a bitter fee — 

They die in Flanders to keep these for me. 

— Katherine Tynan. 



The Tyranny of Trifles in Religion 



By Edgar DeWitt Jones 



THE twenty-third chapter of Mat- 
thew contains the most caustic of 
Christ's recorded utterances. The 
indictment is of the formal reHgion- 
ists: the scribes and Pharisees who 
were in the audience that day. Jesus' 
attack of their hypocritical character 
is terrible and of withering intensity. 
The charges are direct, specific, and 
concrete. The words fall from the 
great Prophet's lips like a shower of 
shrapnel upon a battlefield. There are 
seven woes pronounced in this chapter 
against a peculiarly vicious type of 
religious leaders. These woes resem- 
ble as many peals of thunder in their 
unanswerable severity and unsparing 
exposure. 

LOVE CAPABLE OF INDIGNATION 

Be sure such plainness of speech is 
not inconsistent with Jesus' love. It 
is in perfect harmony with the protest 
of His ministry against the substitu- 
tion of forms for spirit, ceremony for 
service. Love is not love at all unless 
it be capable of indignation against 
wrong. Yet, if the speaking of this 
vehement indictment is like a storm, 
the end of it resembles the gentle rain 
that sometimes follows a terrific gale. 
Christ lifts His voice in strain of ten- 
derest utterance and exclaims, "O 
Jerusalem, Jerusalem, that killeth the 
prophets, and stoneth them that are 
sent unto her! How often would I 
have gathered thy children together, 
even as a hen gathereth her chickens 
under her wings, and ye would not !" 

It is from this vigorous chapter that 
one of Jesus' seven indictments is se- 
lected for consideration. "Woe unto 
you, scribes and Pharisees, for ye tithe 
mint and anise and cummin, and have 
left undone the weightier matters of 
the law, justice, and mercy, and faith." 

"mint, anise and cummin'' 

"Mint, anise and cummin" — these 
herbs specified by Jesus were the com- 
monest and least valuable of that day. 
Mint was a garden herb of an agree- 
able odor, similar to the plant known 
to us by the same name. Anise, known 
also as "dill," was used by confection- 
ers and perfumers. Cummin was a 
plant of the same genus as fennel. 
Under the law, tithes had to be paid 
jLipon all the increase of the seed. The 
ipoint of Jesus' criticism was that these 
religious leaders were very careful to 
tithe even of the smallest plants, but 
jwere indifferent to common honesty 
jind simple justice. Jesus accuses 
them of straining at a gnat and swal- 
lowing a camel. A startling and ludi- 
crous figure this ! The Hindus phrase 
it, "swallowing an elephant and being 



"Woe unto you, scribes and 
Pharisees, hypocrites! For ye 
tithe mint and anise and cummin, 
and have left undone the zveight- 
ier matters of the law, justice, 
and mercy, and faith: but these 
ye ought to have done and not 
to have left the others undone. 
Ye blind guides that strain out 
the gnat, and szvallozu the camel!" 
—Matthew 23 : 23-24. 



choked with a flea." The meaning of 
so sensational a statement is obvious. 
Long before the modern crusade 
against germs was born, the scribes 
and Pharisees were accustomed to 
strain wine through linen or gauze, 
lest they should unawares drink some 
little insect that would render them 
ceremonially unclean. Yet these same 
men were not at all averse to dishon- 
esty and avarice. 

It was this punctilious regard of the 
religionists of Jesus' day for minute 
interpretations of the law, and a pla- 
cidly indifferent attitude toward the 
weightier matters, that aroused His 
indignation and brought about the de- 
nunciation recorded in Matthew twen- 
ty-three. 

a cause of division - 

Trifles still tyrannize our race. 
Multitudes are yet in bondage to mint, 
anise and cummin. The tendency to 
excess in trifles is nowhere seen at 
such a disadvantage as in the conduct 
of religion. Divisions in Christendom 
have occurred over the most trivial 
causes. The manner of wearing the 
beard, of dressing the hair, of fasten- 
ing wearing apparel — these and other 
apparently trifling reasons have di- 
vided Christendom into competitive 
camps and rival communions. 

Trifling differences in theology have 
separated brethren in the Lord. Thus, 
two members "of different communions 
engaged in a heated argument as to 
"the order of faith and repentance in 
conversion." The one contended 
stoutly that faith precedes repentance; 
the other as vigorously argued that 
repentance comes first. The upshot of 
the controversy was that the disputants 
fell out with each other and estrange- 
ment followed. Another manifested a 
martyr spirit in defense of his convic- 
tion that the act of immersion was 
invalidated if by chance so much as 
"a single hair of the head escaped 
submersion." Still another contended 
that the Lord's Supper could not be 



Scripturally observed if more than one 
cup was used. 

It would be easy to multiply exam- 
ples of this type of mind in religion. 
Such persons have a passion for 
stressing trifles and magnifying the 
inconsequential. They forget that 
"God has called us to build temples, 
not to whittle sticks." 

WHITEFIELD and ERASMUS 

George Whitefield once engaged in 
a controversy with a religionist who 
affirmed with much warmth that 
"every pin in the tabernacle was pre- 
cious." Whitefield calmly answered, 
"Yes, and to those that hold that view 
the pin is apt to be more precious than 
the whole tabernacle." Erasmus, in 
an indictment of the monks of his age, 
said : "The same men who think the 
devil will have them if they change 
tlie shape of their frocks are not afraid 
to intrigue and lie. They shudder if 
they have left out a verse in a psalm, 
and they tell each other questionable 
stories longer than their prayers." 

" 'Tis not the wide phylactery, 

Nor stubborn fasts, nor stated prayers, 
That makes us saints; 

We judge the tree by what it bears. 
And Vi'hen a man can live apart 

From works on theological trusts, 
I know the blood about his heart 

Is dry as dust." 

Trifles often clog the wheels of or- 
ganized Christianity. Passing strange 
it is that men and women who mani- 
fest in business and society a large and 
liberal spirit, sometimes exhibit a par- 
simonious nature in the conduct of 
Christian affairs. Especially is this 
true in church finance. Men who sit 
on directors' boards in big business 
and coolly give their vote in transac- 
tions where tens of thousands of dol- 
lars are at stake, have been known to 
perspire freely and appear much crest- 
fallen in the presenting of a small 
deficit at a church officiary meeting. 
Obstacles that are regarded as mole 
hills in running a grocery, a dry goods 
store, or a bank, become veritable 
mountains in the conduct of financing 
many a church. 

"traditions of the elders'' 

The tyranny of trifles in religion is 
to be seen also in the tenacity with 
which we cling to certain forms of 
service. In no other realm is one so 
likely to become a slave to outworn 
methods as in that of religion. The 
"traditions of the elders" are nowhere 
so strong and authoritative as in eccle- 
siastical circles. Church members have 
often become so wedded to a method 
of contributing to the expense budget 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 23, 1917 



that they will fervidly oppose another 
method, even when assured that it will 
make for spiritual culture and in- 
creased ofiferings. Innovations here 
are often met with stubborn opposi- 
tion. If a weekly method of contribu- 
tion will greatly increase the efficiency 
of a congregation in systematic finan- 
cial support, it is difficult to understand 
the reluctance of some to change from 
monthly or quarterly methods. Are 
not all members of one body, and have 
not all severally to work together 
toward a common goal? 

How great is the need for a practice 
of the noble sentiment, "In faith unity, 
in opinions and methods liberty, in all 
things charity.'' 

JOHN Wesley's test 

It is a subtle test of a Christian's 
mettle when his pet plan is ruthlessly 
set aside for a better one. Well it is 
for the world and for us that occasion- 
ally our favorite schemes are torpedoed 
and sunk. John Wesley brought to 
his great field of activity the outlook 
and spirit of a high churchman, and 
the consequent love of form and 
ritual. God only knows what he suf- 
fered when he threw to the winds his 
opinions and preferences, only to give 
the masses the word of God by mouth 
of spiritually-minded laymen. Edu- 
cated to believe that no one had the 
right to preach unless ordained and 
set apart by the established church. 



he was horrified when first his brethren 
of the laity began to evangelize the 
commoners. Nevertheless, when he 
saw that their work was blessed of 
God, he accommodated his own opin- 
ion to the practical demonstration of 
the value of lay-preaching. 

Wisely, then, he trained the laymen 
for this fruitful kind of evangelism 
and the result was that Methodism 
shook all England. 

THE MIND OF THE MASTER 

There is only one cure for the mint, 
anise and cummin type of mind, and 
that is the mind of the Master. Jesus 
came protesting against the tyranny 
of trifles in religion. He threw His 
magnificent manhood full and free 
athwart the cold, calculating formal- 
ists who were in seats of authority in 
the Jewish church. He was an Ampli- 
fier, an Emancipator, a mighty Deliv- 
erer ! There was amplitude in His 
views of God and man. The God He 
revealed was a God of justice, of 
mercy, and of truth. The mankind 
He revealed was a large and munifi- 
cent humanity. He created a spiritual 
atmosphere that was wholesome to 
breathe, so sweet it was, so full of 
tonic purity. His vision was vast, and 
His sympathy boundless. His vocabu- 
lary was characterized by catholic 
terms, and words of oceanlike wide- 
ness. He loved the word "all," and 
"whosoever" was often on His lips. 



The scribes and Pharisees regarded 
Him with suspicion and opposed Him 
at every turn. With splendid disre- 
gard of the man-made rules for the 
Sabbath, He exemplified the Golden 
Rule by doing good on the holy day. 
He exalted man above ritual, love 
above the letter, and justice abov5 
punctilious concern for the peccadillos 
of religion. 

''the AMPLE Christ" 

The Ample Christ challenges our 
standards as He did the scribes and 
Pharisees of His day. He observes 
the smallness of our spiritual concepts, 
the littleness of our creedal systems, 
the meagerness of our ministries, the 
misplaced emphasis of much of our 
teaching; and He calls us to larger 
views of God and man. Our deep- j 
rooted prejudices give Him pain. Our j 
provincial views disappoint Him. Our 
supreme selfishness pierces His great 
heart like a sword. The very great- 
ness of His presence, the vastness of 
His spirit, the boundlessness of His 
love, rebuke us. Surveying Him in 
all His loveliness, the tyranny of the 
trivial becomes insufferable, and unto 
Christ we cry : 

"On my heart j^our mighty charm renew; 
Still, still let me as I gaze upon you 
Feel my soul becoming vast like you." 

First Church, Bloomington, 111. 



"God of the Human Heart 



jy 



HG. WELLS' "God, the Invis- 
ible King," to quote the author, 
• is a "religious book written by, 
a believer." The reviewers in Great 
Britain and America have given it very 
liberal attention. Their criticism is 
not unmixed praise. 

The author has an impetuous tem- 
perament. He does not ponder a 
thought long before rushing into print 
with it. He thinks as his pen 
writes. He approaches the profoimd- 
est thought that has ever engaged the 
human mind, that of God, with the 
conceit — pardonable, perhaps — and the 
catchy, though not too reverent style, 
of the popular novelist. The book is 
full of contradictions. He slashes 
orthodox Christianity. He has not 
taken time to understand the thought 
and message of the church of today. 
The confidence with which he asserts 
the universal coming of his "renascent 
religion" is amusing and naive. If 
he had meditated longer and not writ- 
ten on the run, his book would have 
been freer from intellectual inconsis- 
tencies and more acceptable to the 



By George A. Campbell 

mind of Christendom, and more true 
to the spiritualties. 

AN author who thinks 

Yet I am not sorry that the book 
was written. There are many fine 
things in it. Mr. Wells thinks; he 
does not merely quote, and he is al- 
ways interesting. Whatever he writes 
is worth reading. It is of the good 
in the book I wish to touch upon. 
What, think you, would be the effect 
upon their readers if religious jour- 
nals should publish only those things 
which would receive praise? Think 
you, that at the end of a year of such 
a program, all their readers "would be 
following false gods, because the 
editors for the time being had laid 
aside the unenviable art of defaming? 
I, for one, would like to risk the ex- 
periment. 

Here is Mr. Wells' thesis in "God, 
the Invisible King" : "The reality of 
religion deals wholly and exclusively 
with the God of the heart." 

We know God alone by experience. 
We cannot grasp Him by logic. Na- 



ture's God cannot be demonstrated as 
wholly good. The stars do not reveal 
the God we know. 

God is not the force we call life. 
This vital, renascent religion gives us 
no cosmogony, but it gives us a per- 
sonal God who supports us for all the 
experiences of life. "Modern religion 
bases its knowledge of God and its 
account of God entirely upon experi- 
ence. It has encountered God. It 
does not argue about God ; it relates!" 
This is good. But the book would 
have been very much stronger if the 
author had taken into consideration 
the supporting experience and rectify- 
ing testimony of others. Christianity 
is the accumulated experiences of all 
saints. Mr. Wells has recently found 
God. He did not receive Him in the 
conventional churchly way. He is, 
therefore, inclined to depreciate the 
typical Christian experience. It is 
good to know, however, that out of 
the welter of this age one of the 
popular, hitherto agnostic writers has 
found God to be vital in and necessary 
to his life. 



August 2Z, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



11 



MR. WELLS IS A BELIEVER 

Here follows a passage which indi- 
cates that Mr. Wells has come into 
the inner circle of believers : 

"Suddenly, in a little while, in his own 
time, God comes. This cardinal experi- 
ence is an undoubting, immediate sense 
of God. It is the attainment of an ab- 
solute certainty that one is not alone in 
the world. It is as if one was touched 
at every point by a being akin to one's 
self, sympathetic, beyond measure wider, 
steadfast and pure in aim. It is com- 
pleter and more intimate, but is it like 
standing side by side with and touching 
some one that we love very dearly and 
trust completely? It is as if this being 
bridged a thousand misunderstandings 
and brought us into fellowship with a 
great multitude of other people. 
The moment may come while we are 
alone in the darkness, under the stars, 
or while we walk by ourselves or in a 
crowd, or while we sit and muse. It 
may come upon the sinking ship or in 
the tumult of battle. There is no saying 
when it may come. But after it has 
come, our lives are changed. God is 
with us, and there is no more doubt of 
God. Thereafter one goes about the 
world like one who is perplexed and has 
found a solution. One is assured that 
there is a Power that fights with us 
against the confusion and evil within us 
and without. There comes into the 
heart an essential and enduring happi- 
ness and courage." 

One who writes thus has had some 
such an experience as the mystics, 
who in true apostolic succession bind 
our day with that of Paul and John. 
When the soul has such contact with 
God, it carries within itself an evi- 
dence that no shifting intellectual can 
destroy. 

Mr. Wells' God, as he explains him, 
is not satisfactory to my intellect. The 
Creator-Father of Paul suits me bet- 
ter. But I doubt not that a man may 
have a vital faith with faulty views. 
Who of us have not faulty views? 
The soul that thinks at all knows that 
his mind can easily become dizzy with 
the unsolved and, perhaps, the unsolv- 
able problems of the religious life. 

Most of the positions taken in Mr. 
Wells' books in his positive presenta- 
lion of God could be supported by 



scriptural passages from the New 
Testament. What he attacks is a 
caricature of Christianity. 

It is too early to know the effect 
of the war upon the deeper things 
of life. Some have lost their faith 
in God. They hold that if the Chris- 
tian view of God were true He would 
not be so silent ; indeed. He would 
have used some of His almightiness 
and prevented this awful war. Suf- 
fering thus robs some of God and dis- 
covers Him to others. Wells is among 
the latter. "Our sons (they had been 
killed in the war) who have taught us 
God," he wrote in "Mr. Britling." I 
hope that at the end of the war his 
experience will be that of, the most. 
It is heartening to read these words 
from so unconventional a religionist : 
"God comes, we know not whence, 
into the conflict of life. . . . He is 
our friend and brother and the light 
of the world." 

THE WAR AND RELIGION 

Mr. Wells uses the term loosely 
when he says God is not Providence. 
He cannot see that God interferes 
with the laws of Nature. But is not 
this fine? "But God will be with you 
nevertheless. In the reeling aeroplane 
or the dark ice-cave, God will be your 
courage. Though you suffer or are 
killed, it is not an end. Tie will be 
with you as you face death 
and the present death will be swal- 
lowed up in victory." 

Mr. Wells is not satisfied with the 
good man who is not a believer : 

"The benevolent atheist stands alone 
upon his good will, without a reference, 
without a standard, trusting to his own 
impulse to goodness, relying upon his 
own moral strength. * * * 

"He has no one to whom he can give 
himself. He is still a masterless man. 
His exaltation is self-centered, is prig- 
gishness; his fall is unrestrained by an 
exterior obligation. His devotion is to 
the will within himself. At any moment 
his mood may change. 

How like much Christian preaching 
that sounds ! 



"The difference between the uncon- 
verted and the unbeliever is this: it is 
that the latter has experienced a com- 
plete turning away from self. 
I have come under a divine imperative, 
I am obeying an irresistible call, I am 
an humble and willing servant of the 
righteousness of God." 

WHERE WELLS HAS ADVANCED 

Mr. Wells, in his former writings, 
has had a passion for the social recon- 
struction of the world. He now comes 
to have a great, purposeful basis for 
his social kingdom. It is no longer 
a kingdom merely of men and women ; 
it is, above all, the kingdom of God. 
No longer does he plead primarily for 
a brotherhood, but for a theocracy. 
God calls to service. "What am I 
in the kingdom of God?" becomes the 
controlling question to every quick- 
ened conscience. 

"The spirit of God will not let the 
believer rest until his life is readjusted 
and as far as possible freed from the 
waste of these base diversions." 

Is not this as uncompromising as 
Jesus : 

"The servant of God has no business 
with wealth or power except to use them 
immediately in the service of God. 
God takes all. He takes you, 
t)lood and bones, and houses and acres'; 
he takes skill and influence and expecta- 
tions. For all the rest of your life you 
are nothing but God's agent. If you are 
not prepared for so complete a surren- 
der, then you are infinitely remote from 
God." 

I wish Mr. Wells would go to 
church and hear some modern preach- 
ing, and become better acquainted with 
current Christian thought. I believe 
he would be less critical of the church. 
His own experience would be richer 
and more satisfactory. Christ would 
open up to him vistas of spiritual truth 
yet closed to him. Still I am glad he 
has found God. The kingdom is very 
big. In its inclusiveness I doubt not 
that it embraces many that our nar- 
rowness has excluded. 



The Bible for the Soldiers 



iP 



RESIDENT WILSON has writ- 
ten a personal message to the 
soldiers and sailors of the Amer- 
|:an army and navy, commending to 
jaem the daily reading of the Bible. 
j he message was written at the re- 
uest of Robert B. Haines, Jr., secre- 
iry of the American branch of the 
Icripture Gift Mission of Philadelphia, 
jid it will appear on the front fly leaf 
jf an edition of 75,000 copies of the 
ew Testament, illustrated in colors, 
id especially prepared for the men 
: the American army and navy. The 
resident's message follows : 



'J^HE Bible is the zvord of life. I 
■*■ beg that you zvill read it and find 
this out f or yours elves^-read, not little 
snatches here and there, but long pass- 
ages that will really be the road to the 
heart of it." You zvill Hud it full of 
real men and zvomen not only, but 
also of the things you have zvon- 
dered about and been troubled about 
all your life, as men have been al- 
zvays; and the more you read the more 
it zvill become plain to you zvhat things 
are zvorth zvhile and zvhat are not, 
zvhat things make men happy — loyalty 
right dealing, speaking the truth, read- 



iness to give everything for zvhat they 
think their duty, and, most of all, the 
zvish that they may have the real ap- 
proval of the Christ, zvho gave every- 
thing for them — and the things that 
are guaranteed to make men unhappy 
—selfishness, cozvardice, greed and 
everything that is lozv and mean. 
When you have read the Bible you 
zvill knozv that it is the zvord of God, 
because you zvill have found it the 
key to yoit^r ozvn heart, your ozvn hap- 
piness and your ozvn duty. 

WooDRow Wilson. 



An International Experiment 



THE greatest thing North America 
has done, the thing which puts 
into visible and concrete form the 
spirit and purpose of this Interna- 
tional Congress, is the joint achieve- 
ment of these two nations, the United 
States and Canada. From the At- 
lantic to the Pacific, and from the 
Pacific across to the Arctic, there 
stretches an international boundary 
line of 4,000 miles, where territory 
touches territory, where sovereignty 
meets sovereignty, where nation sa- 
lutes nation, but for a hundred years 
the international waters of those Great 
Lakes have been un fretted by any ship 
of war, those rolling prairies have been 
unmarked by any hostile fort, those 
majestic mountains have never echoed 
to the roar of any alien gun. 

A BOUNDARY THAT IS FREE 

Four thousand miles ! For one hun- 
dred years! Tell me, you men from 
other continents, where in all the 
world is there a match for this that 
North America has done? Where is 
there a civilization so undishonored ? 
Where is there a boundary so free? 
Where is there a history so worthy of 
record? Let Europe answer. 

Europe ! from whom we inherited 
our civilization, whose two thousand 
years is our background, whose 
achievements were our inspiration. 
Europe! whose Christianity is in our 
creeds, whose culture is in our col- 
leges, whose heart's-blood is in our 
veins! Europe! bristling with guns 
from the Hebrides to the Dardanelles, 
bleeding at every boundary with 
death-wound none can stanch — O 
Europe ! how often would America 
have come to you with the gospel of 
international good-will, teaching you 
the secret of Anglo-American peace, 
proving to you the power of interna- 
tional disarmament, and helping to 
gather your shattered nationalities into 
a United States of Europe! How 
often! But ye would not. Now, no 
matter who among you is to blame, 
we, too, must suffer in your agony. 

COMMON DEMOCRACIES 

But when this world-storm of Eur- 
ope is past, when this red rain has 
enriched the roots of Europe's next 
verdure, the United States and Can- 
ada, their common democracy made 
stronger by their common experiences, 
shall come again into the council 



*Dr. MacDonald delivered this pro- 
phetic address before the Fifth American 
Peace Congress, held at San Francisco 
late last year. 



By J. A. MacDonald* 

Editor of the Toronto Globe 

chamber of the nations, and, with the 
released democracies of the warring 
peoples of Europe, shall speak the 
doom of the autocrats and the despots 
and the war lords and all that damn- 
ing system of militarism that has 
cursed Europe for two thousand years. 
Before this world-war is over these 
two free democracies of North Amer- 
ica shall have paid the price of war; 
it may be they shall have paid it in 
full. And then, not the United States 
and Canada alone, but all the 
democratic nations the world over, 
shall have something to say to the war 
lords. And they will insist that the 
world is too small for war lords or 
for war; that in the world neighbor- 
hood of civilized nations there shall 
be no longer any room for the wild 
beasts of Europe's war jungle, and 
that the broken-down war-national- 
isms of Europe shall give place to 
North America's international experi- 
ment. 

A PROPHETIC VOCATION 

And this is North America's pro- 
phetic vocation ; this is the high calling 
wherewith North America is called ; 



not any proud boasting that America 
is better than Europe, that "I am 
holier than thou," that our hand- 
breadth of political history has nothing 
to learn from Europe's struggle 
through the ages. Not that. 

North America at best is only 
Europe's second chance. The seeds 
of our harvests of liberty and peace 
were carried to our shores from the 
historic fields of Britain, from France, 
too, and the Netherlands, from the 
stmny slopes of Italy and the Alpine 
glens, from the shadows of Bohemia 
and the valley of the Rhine. We are 
the heirs of all the ages. 

North America's international ex- 
periment had not been possible but 
for the age-long heroisms of Europe 
that seemed to fail. And our great 
experiment in civilized international- 
ism would even yet fail of its full 
achievement were there in Europe to- 
day no heroes ready to suffer, no mil- 
lion martyrs ready to die, that law 
shall reign among all the nations, that 
justice shall come to all the world, and 
that any people anywhere who desire 
to be free and are fit to be free shall 
be given freedom's unfettered chance. 




Changing Winds. By St. John 
G. Ervine. Another story of the 
war, and one which will take its 
place with "Mr. Britling" as a true 
record of the reaction of the great 
conflict upon individual life. The 
picture is here given of four young 
men of Britain as affected by the 
war's outbreak and progress. Ulster, 
Devonshire, Dublin, and London are 
the scenes of the story. The central 
theme of the book seems to be that 
"old men make war and leave young 
men to pay the price of it." The vol- 
ume is dedicated to Rupert Brooke, 
the poet-soldier who gave his life in 
the early months of the war. (Mac- 
millan Company, New York. $1.60.) 

* * * 

Soldier Songs. By Patrick Mac- 
Gill. This little volume contains some 
of the favorite songs of the soldier on 
active service, as gathered together by 
Mr. MacGill, an active soldier, but also 
a poet of a vital quality and of wide 
fame. An interesting dedicatory letter 
addressed to a friend is a feature. 
(E. P. Dutton & Company, New York. 

$1 net.) 

* * * 

Amarilly in Love. By Belle K. 
Maniates. A further joyous record 



of "Amarilly of Clothes-Line Alley," 
which book brought fame to this very 
human writer. Cheery and filled with 
genuine humor. (Little, Brown & Co., 
Boston. $1.25 net.) 

Evenings with Great Authors. 
By Sherman Cody. Vols. I and II. 
In these days of freakishness in Hter- j 
ature, it is well often to go to the j 
fountain-heads of our literature, the t 
masters who have been proved true by j 
the centuries. In this series of little 
books Mr. Cody is doing a real service 
to the world in presenting most attract- 
ively the work of the great authors of 
the world of modern times. In Vol. 
I of the series the author contributes! 
twelve essays on such themes as "What 
Constitutes a Good Poem?" "How to! 
Study Shakespeare," "Landmarks inj 
American Literature," etc. Then fol-j 
low sections discussing the works of: 
Shakespeare and Abraham Lincoln, , 
with selections from their writings. 
In Vol. II, Scott, Dickens and Thack- 
eray are treated in the same manner. 
To one who wishes to become better 
acquainted with the fundamentals of 
literature these volumes will prove 
invaluable. (A. C. McClurg & Com- 
pany, Chicago.) 



The Larger Christian World 



A DEPARTMENT OF INTERDENOMINATIONAL ACQUAINTANCE 



By ORV%. JORDAN 



An American Hut 
in London 

The Y. M. C. A. is making prompt 
use of the funds that were raised in 
America at the beginning of the war 
for work among the soldiers. The 
hut which was begun at Aldwych in 
London on the Strand will be fin- 
ished by the American organization 
and dedicated to the use of our sold- 
iers. When it is completed, it will 
provide sleeping accommodations for 
350 men and will be fully equipped 
with games, writing and reading 
rooms. There will even be facilities 
for serving the American ice cream 
soda. Our soldiers passing through 
London either to or from the battle 
front will find the Y. M. C. A. head- 
quarters a very homelike place to be. 

Methodist Bishops Stand 
by President 

At the semi-annual meeting of the 
bishops of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, they passed a strong resolu- 
tion on the war situation in which 
they endorsed the stand taken in this 
war by President Wilson. They said 
in part : "Your bishops assembled 
in their regular mid-year session 
summon you to a solemn and pray- 
erful consideration of the position 
and duty of our church in this our 
greatest war for human liberty. As 
followers of Jesus Christ we labor 
and pray for the reign of peace. But 
God himself makes peace 'the work 
of righteousness.' There can be no 
peace, and there ought to be no 
peace, until it stands squarely based 
upon righteousness. We stand with 
the President in his message to Con- 
gress where he said : 'The right is 
more precious than peace.' " 

Work Among the 
Moslems Prospers 

S. M. Zwemer is an acknowledged 
authority on matters connected with 
the Moslem world. He reports that 
there is an unusual interest among 
the followers of the Prophet in our 
Scriptures and he is demanding that 
strong reinforcements be sent to all 
the Moslem mission work imme- 
diately at the close of the war. 

New Editor for 
Laymen's Movement 

The Laymen's Missionary Move- 
ment has chosen a new editor for their 
journal, Men and Missions, in the per- 
son of Dr. F. P. Haggard of the Bap- 
tist fellowship. He will assume the 



duties of his new position about Sep- 
tember I. 

Fourth Member in 
Union Church 

There is a unique union church in 
Waupun, Wisconsin, which was first 
formed by the union of a Free Bap- 
tist church with a regular Baptist 
Church. Later the Disciple Church 
of the town united with the union 
church. Among well-known minis- 
ters which served this union church 
was Professor Hoben of the Univer- 
sity of Chicago. Last fall the beau- 
tiful church building of the Union 
Church burned and as it was some- 
what depleted in its membership, it 
voted to unite with the Congrega- 
tional Church. The new organiza- 
tion will be called the Union 
Congregational Church. It will be 
operated in full affiliation with the 
Congregational denomination but 
will keep alive its tradition of a com- 
munity fellowship. 

England Loses 
Preachers 

Death has taken its toll from Eng- 
land's ministry the past few months. 
Rev. Stopford Augustus Brooke, 
Rev. William E. Addis and Rev. 



Ill 

William E. Freeman^^^ now all sleep 
with their fathers. \ev. Stopford 
Brooke was noted foi/his literary 
interpretations. 

Methodist Expansion \ 
Among Slavs \ 

The Methodists had a go^ work 
in Petrograd before the wir^ but 
they are now preparing for rap<5 ex- 
pansion of their work among the 
Slavs. The late Mrs. Franct^ca 
Nast Gamble, of the Methodist F*s^- 
eign Board, has left provision for\ 
hundred thousands dollars to be ex\ 
pended in headquarters buildings in\ 
Petrograd and in Bucharest. 

Catholicism Not 
Gaining in England 

It has been a common impression 
with Protestants that Catholicism is 
on the increase in England. This 
impression is not shared, however, 
by Hilaire Belloc, a famous English- 
man of letters and a devoted Roman- 
ist, who spoke recently to the Catho- 
lic Truth Society and declared sor- 
rowfully that the Roman Catholic 
movement in England is not mak- 
ing any progress. He promised 
to continue his loyalty to the Truth 
Society, but suggested it would be 
"with increasing gloom." 



The Most Beautiful Hymnal Ever Produced by the American Church 

HYMNS OF THE 
UNITED CHURCH 

The Disciples Hymnal 

Charles Claylon Morrison and Herbert L. Willetl 

Editors 




Contains all the great hymns which 
have become fixed in the affections 
of the Church and adds thereto three 
distinctive features: 

HYMNS OF SOCIAL SERVICE 
HYMNS OF CHRISTIAN UNITY 
HYMNS OF THE INNER LIFE 

These three features give this new 
hymnal a modernness of character 
and a vitality not found in any other 
book. This hymnal is alive! 

It sings the same gospel that ia 
being preached in ntodern evan- 
gelical pulpits. 

Price, per single copy, in cloth, $1.15 
In half leather, $1.40. Extraordinary 
discount made to churches adopting 
this book in the early days of the first 
edition. 

Write to-day for further information as 
to sample copies, etc. 

T!;^ Christian Century Press 

700 East 40th Street, Chicago 



WBIIIIHIIIIH^^^^^^ 



Soaal Interpretations 



WHERE TJ^ PEACE TERMS 
HANG 

JS it treasfi^ble to talk about stat- 
ing" ter»s of peace? The rabid 
militapts would have us believe 
so, but t'e rabid militarists believe 
in a dic^^ted peace at any cost; they 
have r-> faith in reason ; force is 
to th^n the only law. At the op- 
posit- extremity are the pacifists ; 
the react so utterly against the 
tiirii-burdened theory of force that 
th-y would have the lamb lie down 
iiside the lion ; it is quite as diffi- 
:ult to understand the mental work- 
ings of those who would allow the 
Prussian to sit astride the world 
rather than fight as it is to com- 
prehend how the barbaric mind can 
still run rampant in the modern 
militarist. The saviors of the world 
today are true lovers of peace — not 
a peace of death to liberty and de- 
mocracy, but a peace for liberty and 
democracy through reason enforced 
by the arm of law and order when 
a nation runs amuck in its military 
obsessions-. Our danger is that, 
with our minds occupied and our 
passions inflamed with the dreadful 
necessity of war, we will uncon- 
sciously take on more of the mili- 
tary mind and tend more and more 
to demand the peace of sheer force 
and a dictated peace instead of the 
peace of reason through negotiation. 
Germany trampled on the canons of 
reason and made them "scraps of 
paper" ; now shall we yield to the 
canons of force in defence of that 
which she attacked? The world 
cannot be saved from Prussianism 
by turning Prussian. 

The Pope's proposal sounds sus- 
piciously Austrian. Austria is the 
fairest jewel in his political diadem. 
But the time has come for use of 
reason, and reason demands a state- 
ment of concrete terms by the Al- 
lies. It is not enough to say "when 
democracy is made safe" ; democ- 
racy will be made safe by the kind 
of a peace we make, and that peace 
will be on specific terms ; it is high 
time that we outline, in some more 
specific terms, what kind of a peace 
we deem it necessary to demand to 
insure the safety of democracy. The 
status quo ante is a German peace ; 
the retaining of German colonies is 
a peace of conquest ; penal indem- 
nities is a peace of force, belies our 
desire to free the German peoples 
and leaves a rancor; it is moreover 
a peace on ancient war terms and 
not on terms that make for future 
peace. We must all sufifer vicari- 
iously for the sins of past war-mak- 



of His life, as He pursued steadily 
the idea of bringing to His people 
and to humanity a realization of the 
Messianic hope and that Kingdom 
the dreams of which had so deeply 
penetrated the hearts of many in His 
day. The treatment is so thorough- 
ly in the light of psychology and of 
a historical and literary apprecia- 
tion of the records that it forms one 
of the most suggestive studies of 
the life of Christ in modern relig- 
ious literature. 



By ALVA W. TAYLOR 

llllllllillllllllllllllllllllllll^lilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllliy^ 

ing and imperialism ; the peace of 
the world can be assured only by 
making it without reference to an- 
cient quarrels or military methods, 
but solely with reference to future 
security and by epoch-making prin- 
ciples with the established institu- 
tions of reason as international 
media. Reparation is reasonable 
and the autonomy of small peoples 
is democratic, and disarmament, 
plus international courts and police 
forces alone, will secure the future 
against autocracies. 

The German people are ready to 
talk terms of peace ; the Prussian 
military machine sees the handwrit- 
ing on the wall, but still has faith 
in its power to hold out until their 
enemies are worn down. A definite 
statement of reasonable terms of 
peace and a bid for negotiation upon 
those terms would do more to put 
power in the people's hands in Ger- 
many than can any type of victory 
by arms ; and we feel assured there 
will be no safety for the world until 
Germany is in the people's hands. 
The conditions to be named need 
show no lack of sternness, and they 
can be so stated that they cannot 
be mistaken as signs of weakness ; 
they can be emblazoned upon the 
very banners of the Allied cause and 
become a crusader's war cry. So 
long as the Prussian war party can 
convince their people that we de- 
mand a conqueror's peace and the 
destruction of Germany they can 
rally them to their program and in- 
still into them the martyr spirit of 
patriotic fanaticism. 
* * * 

Christ and the Kingdom or God. 
By S. PI. Hooke, of Jesus College, 
Oxford and Victoria College, To- 
ronto. 144 pages. 60c. Geo. H. 
Doran Co., New York. 

This little volume is a compact 
series of studies on the development 
of the experiences of Jesus in rela- 
tion to the idea of the Kingdom of 
God. It does not treat of the social 
teachings of the Gospels, but of 
those dramatic experiences of the 
Master, both within His own mind 
and soul and in the passing events 



The Armenian 

The Armenian is not only an indus- 
trious peasant, he has a talent for 
handicraft and intellectual pursuits. 
The most harassed village in the 
mountains would never despair of its 
village school, and these schools were 
avenues to a wider world. He has 
also that talent for commerce which 
the Jew displays in Eastern Europe 
and the Greek in the Levant, and he 
plays a similar role himself, as the 
skilled workman and the man of busi- 
ness, in the interior of Asiatic Turkey. 
Every town in Northern Syria and 
Anatolia had, eight months ago, its 
populous, prosperous Armenian quar- 
ter — the focus of local skill, intelli- 
gence and trade, as well as of the 
town's commercial relations with Con- 
stantinople and Europe. 

During the recent massacres bands 
of women and children were driven 
forth from their homes in an agoniz- 
ing state of apprehension. There was 
a heroism about their exodus, for there 
was still a loophole of escape from 
apostasy. And in their case, apostasy 
brought the certainty of life, because 
it meant their immediate entrance into 
the harem of a Turk. Life at the price 
of honor — most of them rejected it; 
and yet, if they had known all that 
lay before them, they might have 
judged it the better part. As it was, 
they clutched at the desperate chance 
of immunity, and presented them- 
selves for the march. But the gaol- 
bred gendarmes had no intention of 
conducting the caravan intact to its 
destination. Many girls were sold 
into shame before the march began. 



Don^t Let Your School Slump! 



f 



'Attendance Builder" post cards, 
They will build up and keep up 



Send 75c for 100 assorted 
and try them on your class, 
your attendance. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



August 23, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



15 



fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillliilllilliillllliiillilllliilllllllllilllliilliilllilllllli 

I The Sunday School | 

iliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

The Larger Hope 

The Lesson in Today's Life* 
By CHARLES H. SWIFT 



TO the Oriental mind, the imagery 
of the shepherd and the sheep was 
rich in meaning. The pastoral 
life of the Hebrews quickened their 
minds to a ready understanding of the 
figure used so frequently by their 
prophets and teachers. The skilful 
Teacher of Nazareth found it to be a 
very valuable vehicle in conveying to 
the minds of his hearers some of the 
richest spiritual truths he wished to 
teach. As much as we prize the shep- 
herd psalm, so rich in spiritual truths 
experienced by Israel's poet, much 
richer in content and inspiration must 
it have been to the heart of every true 
descendant of Abraham. Ezekiel like- 
wise finds it very fertile in seed 
thought, as he attempts to inspire his 
captive countrymen with the larger 
hope of national restoration. 



The prophet so develops the figure 
as to include a variety of lessons 
which he wishes to drive home. 
Oriental despotism came under the 
fire of his daring denunciation. Je- 
hovah will reckon with those rulers 
who, like selfish shepherds, fleeced the 
people in order to satisfy their own 
selfish lust. The wealthy class, whose 
luxurious idleness and extravagant 
ease creates a downtrodden poor class, 
falls under the prophet's condemna- 
tion of injustice. Because of misrule 
and oppression, Jehovah, as a good 
shepherd, will break the shackles and 
will bring His people back to the fer- 
tile valleys and rich plains of their 
native land. 

This note of hope, so frequently 
struck by the prophets, must have 
cheered the hearts of the Hebrew cap- 
I tives. It was easy for the average 
i mind to have depressing thoughts. 
\ Surrounded by a strong people against 
I whom they dared not rebel, their souls 
I became filled with despondency. The 
! cynical taunts against their God were 
painful stabs at their pride. Their 
hearts became sick as a morose pes- 
simism sprung up in their midst. The 
glory of their kingdom had evidently 
gone down to defeat. Material pros- 
perity as an evidence of their right- 
eousness had failed them. It de- 



*This article is based on the inter- 
national Uniform lesson for September 
2, "The Shepherd of Captive Israel." 
Scripture, Ezekiel 34: 11-16, 23-27. 



manded the vision of a prophet to see 
beyond the clouds. A vital faith in 
the justice and final triumph of Je- 
hovah inspired them with a message 
of a larger hope. A better day is to 
dawn when the remnant shall be saved 
and the throne of David restored. 



Jesus enlarged upon this larger hope 
when He launched His program for 
the establishment of the Kingdom of 
God. Its idealism was beyond the 
grasp of the average mind. To dare 
dream of a new civilization which 
would embrace the powerful Roman 
civilization seemed an impossibility. 
To build up a world order wherein 
God's righteousness would be supreme 
was hardly compatible with the selfish 
nationalism of the day. It demanded 
the faith of a prophet, like Paul, to 
dare believe in the ultimate triumph 
of such a civilization and to throw his 
life energies into the new scheme. 

The history of the church has re- 
vealed the growth of the doctrine of 
other-worldliness. The absence of any 
scheme to justify the corruption of 
the governing bodies, the growth of 
a wealthy class which necessitated the 
formation of an oppressed class, made 
it necessary to build up hope on the 
doctrine of a heavenly reward for the 
faithful endurance of wrongs and in- 
justice in this life. For centuries this 
heavenly hope satisfied the minds of 
the masses held in ignorance. Moral 
and political corruption continued to 
grow rapidly. Rulers continued to be 
despots. The masses were held in 
slavery. The shepherds continued to 
fleece the sheep. Abused and uncared 
for, hope, was lost in misery and faith 
destroyed, by despair. The prophetic 
soul which dared dream of a new 
order brought about the reformation 
which aided materially in breaking the 
shackles. 

Not until recent years, when the real 
content of the Kingdom of God was 
rediscovered, has this larger hope be- 
come a vital force in purifying society. 
Not a doctrinal hope due to the 
triumph of some theological specula- 
tion or ecclesiastical controversy, but 
a social hope which dares have faith 
in a new world order. This larger 
hope is finding expression in the new 
world democracy for which the nations 
of the earth are struggling. It is a 



prevalent note of confidence that mili- 
tarism will pass away. No less cer- 
tain is it that autocracy is on its death- 
bed. But the larger hope has a richer 
content. It lays hold of a new world 
civilization in which every individual 
is of value. All government shall exist 
for him. Industrial injustices, political 
corruption, civic wrongs and all other 
forms of undemocratic life will have 
no place in the new order. The world 
is agonizing in blood to bring about 
this change. 

The prophetic voice of the pulpit 
must be heard in inspiring the world 
with this larger hope. It will ulti- 
mately come through the evangeliza- 
tion of the world. It must come. 
There is no place for the pessimist in 
the pulpit. This faith must be intensi- 
fied. The church must press on in its 
efiforts for the realization of this new 
order. The altar fires of prayer must 
be kept burning. Ultimately God's will 
must prevail and He shall become the 
world's shepherd. This is the larger 
hope. 



An Introduction to The Old 
^Test.\ment. By Harlan Creelman, 
of Auburn Theological Seminarji, 
with a Foreword by Frank K. San- 
ders, of Yale University. This work 
is the product of a practical Biblical 
teacher of many years' experience. 
The old testament history is treated 
chronologically, and the basis for the 
treatment is the findings of reverent 
modern scholarship. Dr. Sanders 
commends the work for its helpful ar- 
rangement, its clearness and sanity of 
treatment and the maintenance ^ 
throughout of the religious point of 
view along with the scholarly process 
of analysis and interpretation. (Mac- 
millan Company, New York. $2.75.) 



Chairs, Tables, etc. 

for Sunday School 

Departments 




Send for Our Catalog. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY. 

700 E. 4otIi Street, Chicago. 



16 . THECHRISTIANCENTURY August 23, 1917 




A NOTABLY SUCCESSFUL ATTEMPT 
TO PRESENT RELIGIOUS TRUTH IN 
A REASONABLE, ATTRACTIVE AND 
EFFECTIVE WAY TO YOUNG AND 
OLD. IT RESULTS IN AN ACCURATE 
KNOWLEDGE OF BIBLICAL FACTS, 
AND IN A VITAL APPRECIATION 
OF SPIRITUAL TRUTH. 



Spiritual: The great purpose of religious education — the training of 

mind and heart and will to "see God" and feel God in the world of nature, history, 
and especially in the revelation of His will in the life of the Savior of men^ — is not 
made subservient to the presentation of mere historical facts. The study of the 
Bethany Graded Lessons grows Christian character; it does not simply produce 
scholars. 

Thorough l Not a hop-skip-and-jump compromise scheme of study, 

made as easy as possible. Thoroughness is not sacrificed to the minor end of 
easiness. Each year of th:' life of child and youth is provided with a Bible course 
perfectly adapted to that year. The Bethany Graded Lessons are psychologically 
correct. 

Practical : An interesting fact relative to the Bethany Graded Lessons 

is that they are fully as popular with small schools as with large. The system 
is thoroughly adaptable to all conditions. The fact that a school is small does not 
mean that it is easy-going and careless in its choice of a system of study. We 
can truthfully say that many of the finest schools using the Bethany Lessons do 
not number more than 75 members. No matter what the conditions of your 
school, the Bethany Graded Lessons will fill your need. 

If your school is ambitious, if it is thorough- going, 

if it is willing to take religious education 

seriously, you must have the 

BETHANY GRADED LESSONS 

Thoroughly approved and more popular than ever after 
nine years of useful service. 

Send for returnable samples today and prepare for a year 
of genuine study of religion. 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 

700 East 40th Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



August 23, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



17 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii': 



Disciples Table Talk 



lyiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiitiiiiiiiii^^ 



Chicago Disciple Ministers 
Are "Stayers" 

Six of the Disciple Ministers of Chi- 
cago have been with their churches 
twelve years or more. These ministers 
and churches are: Austin Hunter, who 
has just completed twelve years at Jack- 
son boulevard; E. S. Ames, at Hyde 
Park; C. G. Kindred, at Englewood; W. 
F. Shaw, at Sheffield avenue, and J. F. 
Futcher, at Ashland Avenue. Dr. Wil- 
lett, also, has had a long period of serv- 
ice, although his pastorate has not been 
a continuous one. Mr. Hunter believes 
that these facts have significance, and 
holds that they are ample evidence of 
the stability and fruitfulness of our Chi- 
cago work. He states that when he 
was a pastor of seven years' service at 
Indianapolis there was but one other 
minister of the Disciples there who had 
to his record that long a pastorate; this 
was, of course, A. B. Philputt, who has 
been a tower of strength in the Hoosier 
city for many years, and still leads the 
forces at the great Central church. Dur- 
ing the twelve years' ministry of Mr. 
Hunter at Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, 
there have been about 1,100 additions to 
the church membership. Mr. Hunter 
has conducted over 300 funerals and offi- 
ciated at 300 weddings. 

Kansas Disciple Leader 
Enters War Service 

Earl A. Blackman, pastor of the First 
church, Chanute, Kan., enjoys the dis- 
tinction of being the only Kansas Dis- 
ciple pastor appointed to a chaplaincy in 
the new national army. Mr. Blackman 
is eminently endowed with those quali- 
ties which make for leadership among 
men in either army or civil life. He has 
in three years' time made his church the 
most powerful expression of the social 
conscience of a city of ten thousand per- 
sons, and through the part which he 
has taken in shaping every constructive 
social program, he has impressed his 
personality upon the entire community. 
He was serving, at the time of his com- 
mission, as president of the local lyceum 
and of the Community Chorus, secre- 
tary of the Chautauqua, chairman of the 
Neosho County Red Cross Association, 
president and manager of the Child Wel- 
fare Association, and directing genius of 
the Associated Charities. The Chanute 
church has refused to consider Mr. 
Blackman's resignation. It has granted 
him leave of absence for the duration of 
the war, and has prevailed upon his 
wife, Eva Morgan Blackman, to remain 
on the field to represent the pastor in 
his absence and to give continuity to the 
work by assisting the acting pastor and 
the heads of departments to shape the 
present_ activities of the church in ac- 
cord with Mr. Blackman's past policies 
and future plans. Pastors' wives are 
proverbially loyal, and so are soldiers, 
:but here is a double loyalty willingly 
[displayed, though it cost a double sac- 
rifice. Howard E. Jensen is serving as 
acting pastor at Chanute until October 1. 
at which time he will return to the Uni- 
versity of Chicago for further study. 

I Progress at First Church, 
iSteubenville, O. 

First church of Steubenville, O., has 
5een enjoying- the most prosperous year 
31 her history. In additions to the 



church, in attendance at the regular 
services, in ofiferings for current ex- 
pense and for missions, the record of this 
year surpasses any previous year. Dur- 
ing the summer months the attendance 
at the regular services has been larger 
than usual. Instead of closing the church 
for the summer, the pastor, Ernest H. 
VVray, decided to put forth special ef- 
fort. During July he preached a series 
of four sermons in the evening on "Life's 
Four Cardinal Values": 1. Home; 2, 
Character; 3, Friendship; 4, A Saviour. 
The church, at the suggestion of the 
pastor, has adopted a five-year develop- 
ment program, which involves all the 
material, intellectual and spiritual needs 
of the church. This program is also 
comprehensive and takes into its grasp 
the interests of the world need. The 
program for this fall and winter will 
consist of courses in teacher training, 
beginners and advanced classes in mis- 
sion study and high class lecture 
courses. Instead of following the usual 
prayer-meeting methods, the pastor will 
give a series of lectures on the books 
of the New Testament. The ministry of 
First church and its pastor has recently 
been augmented by securing the serv- 
ices of Mr. Hugh Dwight Darsie, who 
graduated from Bethany last June with 
high honors. He will have charge of 
the religious education while with Steu- 
benville. During the past year 160 have 
been added to the church. The church 
has given the pastor a leave of absence 
for three months to go with the Ohio 
Guards to Montgomery, Ala,, to act as 
religious director of the War Council 
Association of the Y. M. C. A. In the 
absence of the pastor the pulpit will be 
filled by Mr. Darsie. 



— Further details have come in of the 
automobile accident which resulted in 
the death of Jesse P. McKnight and 



wife, leaders at Wilshire Boulevard 
church, Los Angeles, Cal. The accident 
occurred at a grade crossing near Long 
Beach, and on a spur track which is sel- 
dom in use, and is said to be without 
a safety device of any kind. The car, 
which was struck by a Southern Pacific 
switch engine, was carried 150 feet down 
the track. Trainmen rushed to the aid 
of the party, but found Mrs. McKnight 
and her sister. Miss Smyser, already 
dead; Mr. McKnight and a Mr. Duncan, 
who was in the party, were fatally in- 
jured and did not survive long. Mr. 
McKnight is survived by two children 
by his first marriage. It is reported 
that steps have been taken to investigate 
the cause of the accident. 

— Robert N. Simpson, who has recently 
resigned at Harrodsburg, Ky., will as- 
sume liis new task at First church, Bir- 
mingham, Ala., on September 1. Mr. 
Simpson visited Birmingham several 
weeks ago and was overwhelmed with 
the magnitude of the opportunities there 
for service in the field of religion. 

— During the month of August the 
River Street Church of Christ, Troy, 
N. Y., is undergoing extensive repairs. 
The Brotherhood Bible Class of this 
church recently entertained the entire 
Bible school at a picnic. The Troy pas- 
tor, J. H. Craig, expects to spend a part 
of his vacation at Washington, D. C. 

— Carroll W. Flewelling, pastor at 
Ashtabula, O., for over four years, has 
resigned from the pastorate there to ac- 
cept the work at Collinwood church, 
Cleveland, O. Mr. Flewelling is a Hiram 
man and leaves a fine record of service 
at Ashtabula. He begins at Collinwood 
September 1. 

— Roud Shaw, evangelist, reports that 
his party closed their campaign at Frank- 
fort, Ky., July 29. On the closing day 
a service was held at the State Reform- 
atory, the greatest for fruitfulness he 
has ever experienced. The warden of 
the prison declares the efifort the most 
remarkable ever attempted there. Hun- 
dreds came forward and in other ways 
declared for the new life. Mr. Shaw 
and his singer, A. L. Flaley, are in Al- 



ake the Summer Count! 



Every minister and religious leader should see that when the summer 
is over he has not gone backward, but rather made a real advance in 
his thought life. One must read, and read widely, in these days to 
keep up with the world's progress. In order to encourage ministers 
antl other religious workers to "make the summer count" for their 
mental and spiritual development, we are making a special 10 per 
cent discount for cash on $5.00 (or more) orders for books ad- 
vertised in this issue of The Chrlstian Century. Lay in your 
"summer reading" now and take advantage of this special ofifer. En- 
close check with order, including 10 cents postage for each volume 
ordered. 



Disciples Publication Society 



700 E. 40th St. 



Chicago 



18 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 23, 1917 



bany, Ky., for a brief meeting, and will 
go from there to Winona Lake for the 
conference program. 

— Old Union church, out twelve miles 
from Lexington, Ky., was established by 
Barton W. Stone in 1823. It is now 
coming to be one of the most flourish- 
ing rural churches in the state. M. W. 
Bottom, minister there, was recently as- 
sisted in a protracted meeting by J. L. 
Finnell, of Lexington, and it is reported 
as the most successful series in the his- 
tory of the church. Mr. Bottom reports 
126 additions to the membership during 
the meetings. 

— James Small, of Hyde Park church, 
Kansas City, Mo., who has been com- 
missioned by Governor Gardner as 
chaplain of the 120th infantry, will have 
over 3,000 men under his spiritual care. 
The regiment is soon to mobilize to 
cross over to Europe. Mr. Small's posi- 
tion is equal to that of a captain. The 
Kansas City Journal recently published 
an extended editorial in praise of Mr. 
Small's ability and special fitness for this 
latest responsibility. 

— Report comes of the death of R. B. 
Chapman, who has ministered to the 
congregation at Ionia, Mich., for three 
years. His death followed an attack of 
diabetes. Mrs. Chapman and the three 
children were visiting in Ohio at the 
time of his decease. 

— Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Higdon, who 
have been studying in Yale in prepara- 
tion for missionary work, will leave in a 
few days for the Philippines, where they 
will begin their service. 

— J. P. Rowlison, who served as a 
district superintendent in Missouri for 
a number of years, with headquarters at 
Vandalia, has accepted a call to the pas- 
torate at Minier, 111. 

— Stuart Street church, Springfield, 
111., is planning a series of meetings to 
begin late in September and to be under 
the leadership of C. C. Sinclair, of Kan- 
sas City, Kan., a former pastor of the 
Springfield church. 

— C. V. Allison has begun his pastorate 
at Second church. Cedar Rapids, la., 
succeeding P. L. Schuler there. Mr. Al- 
lison has been a resident of Cedar Rap- 
ids for the past year, and an honorary 
elder of the congregation. 

— S. B. Moore, pastor at Manhattan, 
Kan., has resigned from this work to 
accept the pastorate at Butler, Mo., on 
September 1. The Butler congregation 
will soon erect a new house of worship. 

— Word has been received of the death 
of Samuel Fowler, at one time pastor of 
the Tabernacle church, Columbus, Ind., 
but more recently a resident of Erwin, 
Tenn. 

— Peter Ainslie, of Baltimore, declared 
in an address delivered by him at the 
recent convention of the Disciple 
churches of Southern California, held at 
Long Beach, that "modern education is 
defective in that it develops and trains 
the intellect without regard to the heart 
and the will." Dr. Ainslie was the chief 
speaker of the meetings. 

— L. O. Newcomer, Ohio pastor for 
many years, has recently been called to 
the work at Lorain, O., and has accepted 
the call. 

— First church, Covington, Ky., did a 
part of its "bit" by conducting a special 
service in honor of its young men of 
conscription age. The auditorium was 
beautifully decorated, an appropriate 
sermon was delivered, and a roll call was 
conducted. The young men were pre- 



DOING THREE IMPOSSIBLE 
THINGS 

In three sorts of fields it has been 
counted hnpossible for the Disciples of 
Christ to build up churches: Old com- 
munities, the Atlantic Coast and large 
cities, but Baltimore is all three of these 
and the Calhoun Street Church, with the 
encouragement of the American Christian 
Missionary Society, has come to self-sup- 
porting strength. 

That Home Missions may continue to 
work such miracles, the Men and Millions 
Move^nent must be brought to speedy and 
complete success. 

Men and Millions Movement, 
222 W 4th St., Cincinnati, O. 



sented with white carnations as they 
stood saluting the flag. Several of these 
young soldiers rededicated their lives to 
the church and seven of them made the 
good confession and were baptized. On 
the Monday evening following, a fare- 
well reception was held for the enlisted 
men, and a banquet given them. Homer 
W. Carpenter, of Transylvania College, 
gave an address. 

— H. H. Harmon, of First church, Lin- 
coln, Neb., recently came to Chicago at 
the solicitation of the Y. M. C. A. War 
Council to meet some of their repre- 
sentatives in a conference regarding his 
proposed work under the association in 
the war countries. 

— Finis Idleman, of Central church, 
New York, with his family, is spending 
the summer on an old-time New Eng- 
land farm, situated in the valley of the 
Connecticut, near Rutland, Vt. Spring- 
field is his post office address. W. A. 
Shullenberger, who succeeded Mr. Idle- 
man at Central, Des Moines, recently 
had a visit with the New York minister 
at his home in New York. Mr. Shul- 
lenberger had been sent East as a mem- 
ber of a committee from Des Moines 
to secure the location of the army can- 
tonment at Des Moines. 

— It is being planned to exchange the 
property of Second Christian church. 
Savannah, Ga., for that of the Seventh 
Day Adventists of the city. D. C. Myers 
is pastor at Second church. The deal 
will give this congregation more room 
for its work and be of advantage also 
in other ways. 

— R. H. Crossfield, president of Tran- 
sylvania, recently gave his address on 
"The Great War and the Church" at 
Central church, Lexington, Ky. 

— J. J. Langston, of Harvard, Neb., has 
accepted a call to the work at Sidney, 
Neb. 

— H. W. Schwan, of Huntington, W. 
Va., is the new pastor at Central church, 
Richmond, Ind. 

— The arrangements for luncheons and 
banquets at the Kansas City convention 
have been placed in the hands of a com- 
petent banquet committee, which is in 



TWO BOOKS 

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Disciples Publication Society 

700 E. 40th St., Chicago, 111. 



August 23, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



19 



touch with the facilities available, and 
will be able to secure the best sort of 
iccommodations at lowest cost com- 
mensurate with good service. Those 
having banquets and luncheons to ar- 
range during the course of the conven- 
tion, October 24th to 31st, are requested 
to communicate with E. E. Elliott, chair- 
man Banquet Committee, 123 South 
Kensington avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 

—The Pension Roll of the Board of 
Ministerial Relief of Indianapolis, Ind., 
has just been increased by the addition 
of six names, making the total 156. The 
receipts show like gain, though it was 
necessary to borrow $1,200 for the Au- 
gust payment, until the September re- 
mittances, always the largest of the year, 
are received. 

— Last April the state missonary board 
of southern California and the members 
of the South Park church, Los Angeles, 
asked Bruce Brown, who had been for 
nearly four years serving as state 
evangelist, to go to the aid of that con- 
gregation. The former minister had 
driven nearly 200 members away by his 
false teachings and had finally led 100 
more into Russellism and had organized 
a congregation across the street. Only 
86 names could be secured to a petition 
to keep the church in existence. The 
first Sunday of the new ministry there 
were 62 at Bible school and 74 at church. 
The services were held in the basement 
of the unfinished church, with an in- 
debtedness of $4,750. With the help of 
C. C. Chapman, J. G. Warren and the 
state missionary society, $750 of this has 
been raised and paid. There have been 
171 additions in four months. One-half 
of this number are heads of families. 
There were 141 present at Bible school 
two weeks ago. The money has been 
raised to pay for all improvements made 
on the property. 



— Charles M. Fillmore, pastor of the 
Hillside Christian church, ol Indianap- 
olis, spent the months of July and Au- 
gust in western Pennsylvania, in doing 
field work for the National Prohibition 
Committee. He spent a week in each of 
the following counties: Lawrence, But- 
ler, Beaver, Westmoreland, Fayette and 
Washington. The last week of August 
he will be in Allegheny county. He also 
gave two weeks to Ohio. The National 
Committee was highly gratified at the 
success of his work. 

— Within the past thirty days the 
Christian Woman's National Benevolent 
Association of St. Louis has, by a gift 
of $30,000, been enabled to purchase a 
good brick building of more than three 
hundred rooms, near Forest Park, and 
in one of the best sections of St. Louis. 
Into the three wings of this large build- 
ing they will move the Christian Old 
People's Home, the Mothers' and Babies' 
Home and the association's office, giving 
additional room, additional facilities, and 
a more desirable location and arrange- 
ment for all three departments. 



— F. W. Lynch, minister at Sharon, 
Kans., has organized a troop of Boy 
Scouts and is now busily engaged in 
getting the Camp Fire girls lined up. 
Mr. Lynch is to hold his own meeting 
this autumn and also a meeting at Hazle- 
ton, Kans., where he ministers on Sun- 
day afternoons. 

— The receipts of the National Benevo- 
lent Association for the present fiscal 
year are showing a very substantial gain, 
writes Secretary J. H. Mohorter. At the 
July Board meeting the gain was shown 
to be $42,000 over last year. A part of 
this gain, however, is in the annuity fund. 
Since these funds are not available for 
immediate use they do not help to solve 
the problem of the immediate need, Mr. 
Mohorter warns. 

— On Sunday, July 29, George L. Peters 
closed a fruitful pastorate of three years 
and three months with the church at 
North Side, Omaha. During this time 
there have been 349 new members added 
to the church, the missionary ofiferings 
have more than doubled, and more than 
$4,000 has been paid on debts. The con- 



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History of the Great War. — Conan Doy le. Vol. I. Every scholarly man will 

wish to possess this great history. Purchase Vol. I now $2.00 net 

Aspects of the Infinite Mystery. — Gordon. A profoundly spiritual volume, 

interestingly written $1.50 net 

What the War Is Teaching. — Jefferson. One of the greatest books the war 

has brought forth $1.00 net 

The Bible and Modern Life. — Cooper. A rich mine for ministers $1.00 

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in the today $1.00 net 

DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 E. 40th Street, Chicago 




CHURCH EXTENSION PLAN 

PROVES 

PERPETUAL MOTION THEORY 



Last year 60 churches were erected with $152,150, 
Church Extension mone}^ and borrowing 
churches returned $150,976, to be reloaned to 
other churches. In 28 years 1,838 churches have 
been built with loans from this fund, and $2,089,419 returned to be reloaned. 

$50,000 is Urgently Needed to Perpetuate Perpetual Motion as 
a Feature of Church Extension Plan. 

1 — Self-supportino- churches must contribute to start perpetual motion in church ex- 
tension, and must keep ofiferings coming each year to increase the ability of the plan. 

2 — Borrowing churches begin to return their loans the second year and each year 
thereafter until the loan is repaid in full. 

3 — This money is immediately reloaned to waiting churches to assist in erecting build- 
ings. 

4 — Borrowing churches repay this money (one-fifth each year after first year) and it 
goes out to build other churches. 

5 — Small buildings are being outgrown. Modern buildings are replacing obsolete 
structures. The amount of loans to individual churches is constantlv increasing. 

SEPTEMBER IS CHURCH EXTENSION MONTH. 
Literature and poster are now ready. Slogan, "Exceed your apportionment." 

G. W. MUCKLEY, Secretary, 603 New England Building, Kansas City, Mo. 



20 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



Aug-ust 23, 1917 



gregation gave the pastor and his family 
a farewell reception and presented them 
with a chest of silver, as a token of their 
esteem. Mr. Peters has not determined 
upon his new field of labor. He will as- 
sist First Church, Omaha, during the 
absence of the pastor, C. E. Cobbey, at 
Deming, N. M., in the Y. M. C. A. war 
work. 

— Paul Moore, formerly of the Chris- 
tian-Evangelist, St. Louis, but now in 
Washington, D. C, writes that on August 
27th his father, the venerable W. T. 
Moore, will celebrate his 85th birthday. 
Congratulations and felicitations. 

— J. K. Hansbrough, husband of Mrs. 
J. K. Hansbrough, Corresponding Finan- 
cial Secretary of the National Benevolent 
Association, continues critically ill. Mr. 
Hansbrough has always heartily sec- 
onded his wife in her devotion to the 
Association's work. The sympathies of 
a host of friends will go out to them 
both. 

* * * 

THE NEBRASKA JUBILEE CON- 
VENTION 

The Nebraska Jubilee Convention is now 
a thing of history. It was a great con- 
vention in every respect. The attend- 
ance was good. 

The program was, by common con- 
sent, one of the strongest ever given in 
Nebraska. The presence of D. R. Dun- 
gan, pioneer missionary in Nebraska, 
was the crowning glory of the conven- 
tion. Though eighty years old, his mind 
was like it was in the days of yore. To 
the writer, who sat at his feet as a stu- 
dent for four years, it was like sitting 
in heavenly places to be with this great 
man of God again. Mr. Dungan returned 
to his California home bearing w^ith him 
the love and esteem of a great host of 
Nebraska disciples. 

All of the National Secretaries seemed 
to be at their best in their addresses 
before the convention. Our local men 
all came up to our high expectations. 
The music, under the leadership of J. 
W. Hilton, was one of the delightful 
features of the convention. 

The reports of the work done by the 
Nebraska Christian Missionary Society 
were a source of joy to the Nebraska 
brethren. While the year began with an 
indebtedness of nearly $1,600, it was 
closed with all obligations met and a bal- 
ance in the treasury of $1,459.39. This 
made us all glad. The work done by 
our state evangelist and pastors em- 
ployed by the state board was very grat- 
ifying. Every department of the so- 
ciety's work had a prosperous year. The 
total receipts for the year were $8,522.77. 
The total expenditure was $7,063.38. 

The following officers were elected for 
this coming year: President, R. C. 
Harding, Omaha; vice-president, H. C. 
Williams, Lincoln; recording secretary, 
Ira E. Carney, Hebron; treasurer, Man- 
sen E. Miller, Kearney; superintendent 
of Bible schools, Dan C. Troxel, Falls 
City; pulpit supply, R. E. Deadman, Au- 
burn; corresponding secretary, William 
Oeschger, Bethany. 

The convention next year will be held 
in Omaha. The convention adopted a 
five-year program, as follows: 

1. That we raise $5,000 a year for five 
years for evangelization. 

2. That we have $125,000 in the per- 
manent trust fund at the end of five 
years. 

3. That twenty-five churches be added 
to our present number in five years. 

There is at present a fine spirit of co- 
operation in our Nebraska churches. We 
have 162 churches in the state. Of this 



Disciples' Divinity House 

of the UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 



Devoted to the work of MINIS- 
TERIAL GRADUATE TRAINING 
among the DISCIPLES OF CHRIST. 
Organically related to the Divinity 
School of the UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, but administered by a board of trustees composed of 
leading business men, teachers and ministers of the Disciples' Brotherhood. 

Herbert L. Willett, Ph. D., Dean Charles M. Sharpe, Ph. D., Executive Head 




Transylvania and the College of the Bible 

In the Heart of the Blue Grass 

Courses leading to A. B., B. S., M. A., P. Th. B., and B. D. 
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Rooms in Men's Dormitory, $30 per year. Board, $3.25 per 
week. Rooms in Girls' House, $23.50 per semester. Board 
from $3 to $4 per week. Both buildings new and modern in 
every way. All regular fees for the year, $50. 
Abundant opportunities for self help; 100 churches served 
by ministerial students. Scholarships for honor graduates of 
accredited high schools. Scholarships, including all fees and 
two-thirds room rent, for ministerial and missionary students. 
Students last year from 28 states and 5 foreign countries. 
Write to 

THE PRESIDENT, Lexington, Kentucky 



THE BIBLE COLLEGE OF MISSOURI 

A biblical school of high grade. At Columbia, Mo. Adjacent to the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, and affiliated with it. Interchange of credits. No 
tuition. Non-Missourians $20 per year in University. Fine student preaching 
opportunities. For catalogue or information, write 

G. D. EDWARDS, Dean, '.• •.' •.• COLUMBIA, MO. 



number, 128 made offerings to our state 
work. Of that number, 104 reached their 
full apportionment. We hope to make 
a better record this year. 

William Oeschger, 
Corresponding Secretary. 

ijl ^ ^ 

NOTES FROM THE FOREIGN 
SOCIETY 

A general call has gone forth in Japan 
urging village work. It is well known 
that about 90 per cent of the population 
of the Empire dwell in villages. Thomas 
A. Young and wife of Fukushima entered 
a new village last year and every child 
in that village is enrolled in the Sunday 
school. This is really remarkable. 
These splendid missionaries are planning 



reached America. She will receive a 
glad welcome on every hand. She left 
Shanghai July 3. She says in her last 
letter before sailing: "Last Sunday we 




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to enter two or three more villages this 
year, in addition to the work they are al- 
ready doing. The villages are near 
enough together for the workers to hold 
a Bible school every day in the week in 
a different village. This, of course, re- 
quires workers and some expense. 

Our Tibetan missionaries have been 
experiencing much trouble with their 
mail on account of robbers in the moun- 
tains. Two mail carriers have recently 
been slain and robbed. A letter sent 
March 4 reached this office August 13. 
This shows the isolation of our workers 
and the difficulty they sometimes have 
in keeping in touch with the outside 
world. The mail carriers go five hundred 
miles over the mountains on foot before 
they reach the first post office east of 
Batang. Let it be remembered that it is 
about two thousand miles from Shang- 
hai, China, to where our missionaries 
are holding forth the word of life. They 
need and deserve our earnest prayers 
every day. 

Miss Mary Kelly, one of our most 
useful missionaries in all China, has 



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MANHATTAN BUILDING, CHICAGO 



I 



August 2Z, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



21 



had seventeen baptisms; five women and 
girls and twelve men and boys. Mr. 
Sarvis baptized the men and I baptized 
the women." 

Leslie Wolfe, of Manila, P. I., reports 
fifty-seven baptisms in his district dur- 
ing the past month. He reports 349 
added by confession and baptism during 
the year ending April 30, 1917. During 
the month of April the Manila Sunday 
schools had an average attendance of 
686. A new church has been organized 
at Pila, where 24 were baptized last 
month. This little church is very anx- 
ious to have a pastor locate at that point. 

C. E. Robinson of Japan says that two 
young, men who were asking the way of 
life at Kizugawa were baptized June 17. 
One of them is a student in the night 
school. Both oflfered prayer soon after 
Lhey were baptized — a good sign they 
will grow. 

Mr. G. Nagayama, who graduated 
from the Drake Bible College, Tokyo, 
Japan, went to Osaka on June 20, to 
issist in the work there. 

Mr. C. E. Robinson says that there 
ire 1,000 Koreans in the city of Osaka, 
Japan. Most of them are employed in 
the factories and some of them attend 
3ur services. He believes that if we had 
1 native Korean evangelist we could 
probably win many of them to the Chris- 
tian life. 

Dr. A. L. Shelton, of Batang, Thibet, 
writes that the small irrigation system 
recently put in by the mission has been 
a remarkable help, both in furnishing 
Food for the poor people and in giving 
the mission a strong recognition in that 
whole section. Through Philip Gray of 
Detroit, who furnished the money neces- 
sary for the windmill, pump and piping, 
1 small system has been put in, which 
Furnishes well-watered land for 20 fam- 
ilies. Needy people have been put on 
:his tract and the work is superintended 
by the mission. The social help and 
medical service of our Tibetan workers 
ire warming the hearts of the people 
toward Christianity. 

Stephen J. Corey, Secretary. 



JASPER COUNTY (MO.) ANNUAL 
ASSEMBLY 

This county is the center of the lead 
ind zinc mining in Missouri, Kansas and 
Oklahoma. Some of the leading towns 
of the state — Carthage, Joplin, Carter- 
ville and Webb City — are located within 
it. In addition to its mining interest, it 
includes some of the best farming and 
fruit-growing sections in southwestern 
Missouri. It leads the state in building 
stone. As a religious body, we number 
20 congregations, with over 4,000 Dis- 
ciples and over 3,000 enrolled in the 
Bible schools. Some of our best minis- 
ters in Missouri serve the churches in 
this county, viz.: C. H. Swift, Carthage; 
C. C. Garrigues, Joplin, First; D. W. 



Moore, Webb City; W. P. Shamhart, 
Joplin, South; Dr. John Clark, Villa 
Heights; W. E. Couch, Joplin, Central; 
R. W. Hoffman, Alba; W. W. Wharton, 
Carterville; R. W. Salts, Duenweg; W. 
H. Watson, Avilla; W. H. Flippin, Oak- 
land. One of the special features of 
their wonderful program of county work 
is an annual camp meeting or assembly. 
This assembly was held this year at 
beautiful Lakeside Park. Tents for 
speaking, eating and sleeping purposes 
were pitched. The meeting continued 
ten days, including one Lord's day. 

The first week the "Ozark Team" con- 
ducted a "School of Methods," with 76 
enrolled and 20 graduates. H. G. 
Knowles of Nebraska conducted evan- 
gelistic services each evening through- 
out the assembly and brought us some 
fine sermons and exemplified to us a 
very high type of New Testament 
evangelism. Our second week's pro- 
gram consists of an Elders' and Dea- 
cons' Conference and a Rural Church 
Institute. J. B. Briney, of Kentucky, 
and Prof. Alva W. Taylor, of the Bible 
College of Columbia, AIo., were our spe- 
cial guests. Professor Taylor delivered 
two lectures each day and gave to our 
people a deeper and a more comprehen- 
sive vision of rural life and the church. 
His addresses alternated with special 
addresses on farm life by specialists from 
our state institutions. The first day was 
"Poultry Day," and to the delight of at 
least all the preachers present Prof. C. T. 
Patterson, of the State Poultry Experi- 
ment Station, told how we might raise 
more and better poultry. The second 
day was "Home Economics Day" and 
Miss Bab Bell, of the State Agricultural 
College, gave chart talks and demon- 



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L 



22 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 23, 1917 



strations. The third day was "Milk and 
Butter Day" and Professor Ragsdale, of 
Agricultural College, brought us some 
new things on dairying. 

But a Rural Church Institute would 
not be complete without some old-fash- 
ioned gospel preaching. The veteran J. 
B. Briney gave us such sermons as some 
of our folks had never before heard. 
Sermons on the "Transfiguration of 
Christ" and the "Foundation of Hope" 
were masterpieces and gave us all a 
mountain top vision of our faith in 
Christ. 

This feast of good things still would not 
be complete without some rich dessert, 
such as the C. W. B. M. can give us. 
Mrs. O. W. Lawrence, our State Cor- 
responding Secretary, held each day con- 
ferences and a Mission Study class un- 
der the trees. 



The management and execution of this 
great meeting was largely in the hands 
of the capable chairman of Jasper county 
and the much beloved pastor of the Jop- 
lin First church, C. C. Garrigues. Its 
success was largely due to his prayers 
and earnest, untiring work. He was, of 
course, given every assistance possible 
by the fine coterie of preachers in the 
county. Through his management the 
daily papers of the county gave much 
prominent space to our people and to 
their work. 

I understand it is the idea to make 
this gathering a permanent annual meet- 
ing and, if possible, to extend its circle 
until it includes all our churches in the 
great Joplin mining district. 

J. H. Jones, 
Supt. Missions and Bible Schools, 
Third District of Missouri. 



A New Order of Things at Kansas City 

Convention 



Dame Rumor is authority for this 
preachment. We have heard that the 
Sweeney Committee is to make an 
astounding report, recommending changes 
in articles of the constitution that are 
radical, to say the least. It is also stated 
by this much-famed lady that the Chris- 
tian Standard is to father, mother and 
brother the new order of affairs, and the 
lion and the lamb will lie down with one 
another? This will be fine. We also heard 
it whispered that the Christian Cen- 
tury and the Christian Evangelist, and 
the rank and file of persons who favored 
the General Convention, have agreed to 
the program, and that the brethren are 
coming to Kansas City to lay the plans 
and program face up on the convention 
platform, and let the company do with 
it what they will. There are those who 
do not favor the mingling of our jour- 
nals in the management of our assem- 
blies. There are others who believe that 
the independent press is the salvation of 
every democratic movement, and our 
movement, so far as the local church is 
concerned, is democratic in principle, if 
not in practice. Our missionary organ- 
izations are not so. They are separate 
organizations, composed largely of indi- 
viduals, but supported largely by the 
churches, or the members of the 
churches, which amounts to the same 
thing. The missionary societies have 
been compelled to take control of our 
general afifairs heretofore, because we 
had not attempted in any serious fashion, 
until the General Convention was 
brought forth, to form any sort of an 
agency which was competent to manage 
our larger afifairs for us. It is promised 
that the new order is to actually do what 
it has been thought our General Con- 
.vention would do, but has not been able 
to do for reasons that are well known 
to those who have labored at the task. 
There is promised at Kansas City a rec- 
ommendation which, if it holds water 
with the brethren and is not riddled 
with their critical bullets, is to change 
the old order. 

* * * 

Dame Rumor also says that the char- 
acter of the programs is to be changed. 
It is going to be more of a conference 
than a convention. Reports are to be 
made by the various organizations, and 
these reports are going to be discussed. 
If they are faulty, the faults can be 
pointed out and the pitfalls avoided in 
the future. If the reports are commend- 



able, opportunity will be had to laud 
those workers who have borne the re- 
sponsibility of the work and made pos- 
sible such reports. There is to be less 
speech-making at the Kansas City con- 
vention than for some years back; in- 
deed, it is said that we have never yet 
had a convention exactly of the character 
of that we are to have in Kansas City 
in October. 

* * * 

Dame Rumor also says that the at- 
tendants at the convention are to be 
seated by states or groups of states, with 
standards bearing the names of the 
states distributed about the hall. This 
is hoped to have a good eflfect upon the 
attendants by keeping them in their 
seats during the sessions of the conven- 
tion. The ushering is to be handled ef- 
fectively by A. E. Cory and assistants. 
The doors are to be closed at certain 
hours and remain closed until that num- 
ber is concluded before being opened 
again. Once inside, you will have diffi- 
culty in getting out, and outside, it will 
be impossible for you to gain admittance 
until the doors are again opened. 

Dame Rumor also says that most of 



the societies will report great gains in 
their receipts for the year, some as high 
as $50,000 increase over the best pre- 
vious year. That the Men and Millions 
Movement is getting ready for the final 
drive, and will complete this campaign 
in June, 1918, and start immediately 
upon another campaign of larger mag- 
nitude. 

Dame Rumor says large delegations 
are coming to the convention from far 
and near, special trains and cars, motor 
loads, etc., being the rule. She says that 
transportation managers appointed in 
diflferent sections are already quite ac- 
tive sending out letters urging attend- 
ance, and the returns on their work is 
very promising. e. E. Elliott, 

Chairman Press Committee. 



Century Subscribers! 

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Of Watching the Date Opposite 
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IF the date is, for example, Jun 17 — 
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has been paid to June 1, 1917. 
Within two weeks from the time you 
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MR. BRITLING SPEAKS AGAIN 

Mr. H. G. Wells' New Book 

"God, the Invisible King" 

Mr. Wells, the author of Mr. Britling, says : 

** The time draws near when mankind will awake . . . 
and then there will he no nationality in all the world 
hut humanity^ and no king, no emperor, nor leader, 
but the one God of mankind,** 

AMERICA IS FIGHTING FOR THIS GOD ! 

"God, the Invisible King^' 

"The Religion of Mr. Britling" 

Price, $1.25 

—FOR SALE BY— 

Disciples Publication Society, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



// 

August 23, 1917 THECHRISTIANCENTURY' 23 

IB m 

HAVE YOU READ 




OPE 



A NEW NOVEL 

BY EDGAR DEWITT JONES 

tniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitii'iiiiuiiiiiiiii ii......,.»ii iiiiiiiniiiiiiii iMiiiiiiii iiiiiitiimiii iiiiiiuniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiinifiiiii 

Fairhope folks are mighty human, but you 

will like them all the better for that. r* 

Major Menifee may remind you of Colonel 
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Boardman, the modern Enoch. And even 
Giles Shockley will not repel you, "Hound 
of the Lord" though he was. 

Everyone knows that the old style of 
country church is passing forever. But 
what type of church will take its place? 
Read the chapter entitled **The Old Order 
Changeth" and meet the Reverend Roger 
Edgecomb, Prophet of the new order. 

Do you like birds and stretches of meadows, 
glimpses of lordly river, and the glory of 
high hills? Do you like young preachers and 
old time country folks, their humors, their 
foibles and their loyalties? If you do, then 
you should read 

"Fairhope, the Annals 
of a Country Church" 

Price, $1.25 

Order NOW, enclosing remittance 

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700 E. 40th Street, Chicago, 111. 
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^^H^B^ea 



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Just Issued jwm the Christian Century Press 



PR 








A New Book That Marks 
the Dawn of a New Day! 

"PROGRESS" is the title of a brave and brilliant vol- 
ume prepared by 

THE CAMPBELL INSTITUTE 

in commemoration of the completion of twenty years of 
Institute history. Twenty of the leading Disciple writers 
participate in a treatment of the various aspects of progress 
in religious thought and practice during the past generation. 
The chapters bear directly upon the problems of the Disci- 
ples of Christ, but these problems are treated not from any 
provincial or sectarian point of view, but in the light of 
that modern learning common to all Christian scholarship. 
The volume is an admirable interpretation of both 

CATHOLICITY AND LOYALTY 

Without doubt, it will make a profound impression upon 
all thoughtful Disciples and will succeed as no book in re- 
cent times has succeeded in conveying to the general 
Christian world the ideals and spirit of the Disciples. 

IT IS INTENSELY INTERESTING 

Send for it today. Price, $1.50. 

The Christian Century Press, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 





9 


1 


^ 





Vol. XXXIV August 30, 1917 Number 35 



The Church's 
Responsibility an< 
Opportunity 

By Henry Churchill King 



CHICAGO 




THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 30, 19i; 



Just Issued from the Christian Century Press 











A New Book That Marks 
the Dawn of a New Day! 

"PROGRESS" is the title of a brave and brilliant vol- 
ume prepared by 

THE CAMPBELL INSTITUTE 

in commemoration of the completion of twenty years of 
Institute history. Twenty of the leading Disciple writers 
participate in a treatment of the various aspects of progress 
in religious thought and practice during the past generation. 
The chapters bear directly upon the problems of the Disci- 
ples of Christ, but these problems are treated not from any 
provincial or sectarian point of view, but in the light of 
that modern learning common to all Christian scholarship. 
The volume is an admirable interpretation of both 

CATHOLICITY AND LOYALTY 

Without doubt, it will make a profound impression upon 
all thoughtful Disciples and will succeed as no book in re- 
cent times has succeeded in conveying to the general 
Christian world the ideals and spirit of the Disciples. 

IT IS INTENSELY INTERESTING 

Send for it today. Price, $1.50. 



The Christian Century Press, 700 E. 40th St., Chicago 



ugust 30, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



Subscription Price— Two dollars and 
a half a year, payable strictly In 
advance. To ministers, two dollars 
when paid In advance. Canadian 
subscriptions, BO cents additional for 
postage. Foreign, $l.e«additional. 
rHscontinuancea — In order that sub- 
scribers may not be annoyed by 
failure to receive the paper, It is 
not discontinued at expiration of 
time paid In advance (unless so 
ordered), but continued pending in- 
stiuction from the subscriber. If 
discontinuance is desired, prompt 
notice should be sent and all ar- 
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change of address give the old as 
well as the new. 




PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY THE DISCIPLES OF CHRIST 
IN THE INTEREST OF THE KINGDOM OF GOD 



Expirations — The date on the wrap- 
per shows the month and year to 
which subscription is paid. List Is 
revised monthly. Change of *at« 
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DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, PROPRIETORS, : 700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO 



Disciples 
Publication 



The Disciples Publica- 
tion Society is an or- 
ganization through 
^nrfpfv which churches of the 

iOCieiy Disciples of Christ 

seek to promote un- 
denominational and constructive 
Christianity. 

The relationship it sustains to Dis- 
ciples organizations is intimate and 
organic, though not official. The So- 
ciety is not a private institution. It 
has no capital stock. No individuals 
profit by its earnings. 

The charter under which the So- 
ciety exists determines that whatever 
profits are earned shall be applied to 
agencies which foster the cause of 
religious education, although it is 
clearly conceived that its main task 
is not to make profits but to produce 
literature for building up character 
and for advancing the cause of re- 
hgion. ♦ • * 

The Disciples Publication Society 



regards itself as a thoroughly unde- 
nominational institution. It is organ- 
ized and constituted by individuals 
and churches who interpret the Dis- 
ciples' religious reformation as ideally 
an unsectarian and unecclesiastical 
fraternity, whose common tie and 
original impulse are fundamentally the 
desire to practice Christian unity with 
all Christians. 

The Society therefore claims fel- 
lowsliip with all who belong to the 
living Church of Christ, and desires to 
cooperate with the Christian people 
of all communions, as well as with the 
congregations of Disciples, and to 
serve all. * • * 

The Christian Century desires noth- 
ing so much as to be the worthy or- 



gan of the Disciples' movement. It 
has no ambition at all to be regarded 
as an organ of the Disciples' denom- 
ination. It is a free interpreter of the 
wider fellowship in religious faith and 
service which it believes every church 
of Disciples should embody. It 
strives to interpret all communions, as 
well as the Disciples, in such terms 
and with such sympathetic insight as 
may reveal to all their essential unity 
in spite of denominational isolation. 
The Christian Century, though pub- 
lished by the Disciples, is not pub- 
lished for the Disciples alone. It is 
published for the Christian world. It 
desires definitely to occupy a catholic 
point of view and it seeks readers in 
all communions. 



DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY, 700 EAST 40th STREET, CHICAGO. 

Dear Friends: — I believe in the spirit and purposes of The Christian Century and wish to be numbered among 
those who are supporting your work in a substaatial way by their gifts. 



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"The Training of Church Members" 

By ORVIS F. JORDAN and CHARLES CLAYTON MORRISON 

IS THE TEXT BOOK 
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DISCIPLES PUBLICATION SOCIETY 



700 EAST 40th STREET 



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THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 30, 191 




Students' Quarters, Jubbulpore, India 

The Gospel's Multiplication Table 

No nation lias yet become Christian witliout missionaries from tlie outside, but in every instance the 
missionary has been multiplied by native preachers whom he has trained. 

In a population as numerous as India's three hundred millions the necessity of such a gospel multipli- 
cation table is all the more apparent. But before we can begin to train preachers we must find suitable 
young men who wish to become ministers. Twenty years passed in the development of our work in India 
before we had either the material or the equipment for the Bible College. 

Since its establishment at Jubbulpore in 1904, seventy-six young men and sixty-one young women have 
been enrolled in its classes. The children standing in the doorways above show that some of these quarters are 
family apartments. Both husband and wife receive special instruction and the success of their labors demon- 
strates the wisdom of the plan. 

While receiving instruction the students are engaged in practical work. A hint of their success is found 
in the fact that while the Jubbulpore church numbers eighty-five there are six hundred in the Sunday 
School. 

A typical graduate of the Jubbulpore School is Hansa Scott. At the Orphanage in Damoh Hansa devel- 
oped marked business ability and was given a place of responsibility as assistant on the farm and in the 
dairy. After a course in the Harda School he went to Jubbulpore for four years. His wife, Gyannani, was 
one of the favorites of the sainted Miss Ella Maddock, in the Orphanage at Deoghur. Now Hansa, who took 
the name of Scott from the American who supported him in his school days, is one of the main helpers of 
Mr. Alexander in Damoh, and Gyannani is equally efficient in Bible work under Miss Griffith. Of like char- 
acter and value are the 135 others who have been educated in Jubbulpore and the thousands that yet await 
the chance. 

The awakening of the masses in India requires not scores but hundreds of native preachers at our hands, 
and the success of the Men and Millions Movement will enable us to meet the demand. 



MEN AND MILLIONS MOVEMENT 



222 West Fourth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 



CHARIiES CXiAYTON MOBBISOIT, ESITOIt. 



HEBBEKT I.. WIIiI^STT, CONTBIBUTING BDITOB. 



Dlume XXXIV 



AUGUST 30. 1917 



Number 35 



Add to Your Faith Courage 



WE MUST FIRST WIN THE WAR AT HOME. 

The world has come to a new appreciation of the 
[ace of morale in the military program. We know now 
lat military supplies are not everything, and that the so- 
al psychology of a war situation must be given careful 
udy. Whoever begets pessimism or cowardice or panic 
as truly an enemy as he who runs a submarine with 
hich to torpedo our ships. While the church has many 
ther tasks to accomplish now, its largest service to our 
ation during the war will be in the direction of inspiring 
right spirit. 

It is said that every new recruit is fearful during the 
rst battle. When the bullets whistle around him he 
iffers acutely from a terrible fear that grips his heart and 
'hich may for a time completely unman him. The civilian 
'ho stays at home and who has lived softly all his life 
'atches the daily newspaper with dread and apprehension. 
Itch men are the soil in which may be sown the seeds of 
anic and disloyalty. 

It has been sneeringly declared by the enemy that 
'hristianity is a slave's religion, preaching submission and 
ssignation. How perverted a view this is may be known 
y a single glance at Christian history. It has not been 
le genius of Christianity to breed nations of cowards. 

Jesus has been pictured as a meek man, which indeed 
le was. But He had a sublime courage as well. He 
/as not afraid in the presence of King Herod. When He 
et out on His last journey to Jerusalem, the peril was 
learly recognized, and Thomas proposed that the disciples 
hould go and dine with Him. His conduct in the temple, 
nd His bearing all through the terrible experiences that 
id to His death was that of the most wonderful courage, 
courage which rested upon faith. 

Nor can we forget the wonderful life of Paul. Our 
oldiers will undergo fewer thrills than Paul had. 

He enumerated some of his adventures in a single 
reat passage, and we wish we might have had all the 
letails of his experiences. If any tell vis that the religion 
f Jesus is a religion of slaves, we point to Paul and the 
martyrs. They are our apologetic. 

• • 

We want no false or insecure courage for these times. 
]t must not be the courage of the half-intoxicated man. 
t must not be the recklessness of a boy who has yet to 
ain a proper sense of the perils he faces. In the begin- 
ing of the war there was a courage which rested upon a 
alse and inadequate optimism. Many had thought to 
orner our enemy by a mere show of force. Just now we 
re becoming aware that we are in the midst of a situation 
'orthy of the best in us. The war will not be won by 
lufif. 

The true courage must rest upon secure foundations. 
V has one of its pillars in knowledge. As our covmtry 
oes forward in its great enterprise of relieving the demo- 
ratic countries of the world of their dangers, we must 



take a right account of all the facts which stand in the 
way of victory. If we can count up the submarines and 
tlie forts and strength of reactionary governments on the 
other side of the battle-line, and still have courage, we are 
indeed true men of valor. 

The sense of a righteous cause is one of the great 
supports of a courageous heart. It will not be possible for 
our people to go bravely forward if there is any doubt that 
the thing they do is right. The courage of a life-guard on 
a bathing beach is dififerent from the daring of some porch 
climber who enters a house seeking booty. The life-guard 
will be found more dependable because there is not a 
conscience making a coward of him while he faces danger. 

• • 

The spiritual vision of the man of faith is also needed 
for the danger of this hour. Courage is to be added to 
faith. The greatest armies of history have gone forth 
singing hymns and were consecrated in their service by a 
great conviction that they fought God's battles. The man 
who cannot go forward with the sense of a great cause 
will have no true valor. It is for this reason that mer- 
cenary soldiers and soldiers of nations bent on robbery 
have failed in the crucial hour. The hope of booty will 
never beget the sort of courage which comes from spiritual 
vision. 

The church then ought to build up the spiritual for- 
tress of the nation. We must not talk over-much of 
wounded men and wasted fortunes. The time for this talk- 
is when we are arguing in times of peace for a method of 
settling international disputes more rational than war. We 
must not tarry so long with the present horrors of our 
world that we shall be unnerved for the work which we 
are called to do. 

We need courage in these days, when fathers and 
mothers are parting with their stalwart sons, the best in 
the land. These young men should not be sent away with 
tears and regrets, but with a feeling that they are fulfilling 
the hopes and dreams of those who send them forth. 

We need courage to face the uncertain economic situa- 
tion of the coming winter, when for the first time in the 
lives of many of us we shall actually lack things that are 
needful for a right standard of living. 

Our courage must be sufficient to guard us from an 
insufficient or unjust peace. It must be a peace which 
shall insure future freedom, not only from war, but from 
the spirit of militarism. 

When the war is over the development of a cour- 
ageous outlook on life will be one of the great permanent 
gains. Alany of us have lived apart from the sorrow of 
the world. The war has shown us sickness and poverty 
and wounds and death. If we can learn to live in the 
presence of such grim adversaries unafraid, it will be a 
spiritual achievement which will in itself be victory, what- 
ever the council of nations may do in the realm of world 
politics. In this hour let us know that trust in God casts 
out every fear. 



EDITORIAL 



CONSCRIPTION AND HATRED 

ONE of the by-products of war most to be dreaded 
is an unreasoning hatred, which is sure to prove 
an obstacle to peace and good-will for half a 
century. The recruiting methods of England were of 
such sort as to develop this antagonism. Meetings were 
held in which orators inflamed the populace to the point 
of enlistment. Posters and slides in the movies and 
articles in the newspapers all contributed to this process. 

The method of raising an army by conscription, on 
the other hand, proceeds on a quite different basis. A 
man enters the army to do his part in the same way that 
he pays his taxes. It is a part of the burden of citizen- 
ship. He has convictions about the war, but they are 
less radical and have more balance than the convictions 
of the heated volunteer. 

It is for this reason that we are able to pronounce 
against Germany's barbarisms in a spirit which will 
not make it impossible for us to live in the same world 
with the German people during the coming century. 
The German government has been as a mad man run- 
ning amuck in our world, but if we are not blinded with 
hatred, we must admit that there are many Germans of 
a right mind who may be able to build a government 
with which we can live. 

These are days when we must strike sturdy blows, 
but with all the fighting, there must not come the deep, 
unreasoning hatred that will make an enduring peace 
impossible. We have gone into this war in sorrow and 
not in anger. The conscription plan makes anger un- 
necessary. We will bear our right part of the burden, 
but we will never lose sight of the great goal so worthily 
expressed by our president of a great confederation of 
nations which shall employ their moral and material 
forces to keep the world in order. 

OUR PHILANTHROPIC PRESIDENT 

NO single act of President Wilson will meet with 
such wide-spread approval as his firm handling of 
the shameless coal trust which undertook to use 
the world war as a cloak to become rich this winter on 
the miseries of the people. The President has cut down 
the wholesale price of coal a dollar a ton and by this 
single act has abrogated a tax levied on every individual 
of the United States amounting to two or three dollars, 
which tax would have lined the pockets of men already 
rich enough to have every need supplied. 

The coal corporation has been the most shameless 
of greedy trusts and must have depended upon political 
influence to carry through its unpatriotic program. 
Its defeat and public humiliation will serve as a 
wholesome example for every other kind of corporation 
that undertakes to capitalize the sorrow of the nation. 

The street corner orators have been making a slow 
job of turning our nation in the direction of socialism. 
What these orators have failed to do, the corporation 
magnates are accomplishing with startling celerity. 
Government price-fixing will not end with the war. 
Competition has disappeared from many other indus- 
tries besides the coal industry and these must be given 
the same kind of medicine. The corporation creates a 
monopoly for private gain which the government is 
compelled to control and turn into a public service cor- 



poration. The evolution is taking place swiftly in many 
industries. 

The President has acted with becoming exactness. 
His experts have investigated the cost of production. 
The operators of the mines were allowed a generous 
profit, but their big robbery was prevented by govern- 
ment action. Powers are now lodged in the President 
which would be extremely dangerous in a man not so 
honest and not a Christian. When we remember the 
human misery that the President has prevented for the 
coming winter, the cold and cheerless homes that now 
will be given warmth, we must be grateful that for this 
emergency we have been given so wise and good a 
leader. 

RECRUITING FOR OUR COLLEGES 

THERE are two questions agitating the minds of 
parents of the young people who left high school 
last spring. One of these is, shall I send my young 
people to college? The other, where shall I send them? 
Each of these questions is of great importance. 

At the close of the world war we shall be short of 
expert leadership in every department of industry. We 
shall lose men in battle, and, moreover, the complex 
conditions in the coming period of organization of our 
industries will create a demand for bright, inventive 
minds to solve the problems that will arise. 

For this reason we should be encouraging promis- 
ing young people to go away to school. We shall have 
a larger supply of manual labor than of leadership to 
direct it. The demand of the hour will be for brains. 
We shall be recreant to our duty if our young people 
do not enter educational institutions in large numbers 

Where shall these young people go? Much as we 
believe in our colleges, we may admit that for certain 
specialized callings, our young students may be obligee 
to seek schools outside the brotherhood. For most oi 
life's pursuits, however, the Disciple schools are wel 
prepared to train our young people. 

In these schools their fundamental religious ideal 
will not sufifer. The convictions of the inner life will 
not be taken away but rather strengthened. Our young 
people can be transplanted into almost any sort of soi 
during their impressionable years, but they will grow 
best in the spiritual soil in which they have spent theii 
early life. 

We know now that education is not simply a pro 
cess of storing the mind with facts. Other considera- 
tions besides the size of buildings and the abundanc( 
of apparatus enter into the scale of educational values 
Education is a business of forming useful life habits 
In the broad sense, the habits of greatest value may b( 
cultivated on the campus of one of our schools. 

MECHANISM IN RELIGION 

THE age in which we live is a mechanical age. I 
may well be doubted whether succeeding ages wil 
discover any really new mechanical principle. Late 
generations may build new machines for new needs, bu 
they will be built from the elements which are now ii 
common use in our mechanical world. The burdens o 
the world have been lifted from human backs and ar 
now carried by great machines. It is not to be wonderec 



\ugust 30, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



it that we have come to think in terms of cogs and belts 
ind levers. 

In this age, some have all too easily put forth a 
nechanical interpretation of religion. In this age of 
nachinery, we have a revival of the notion that no 
ninistry can be valid without the imposition of the 
lands of a bishop. The ministry may have a great 
;piritual vision, it may busy itself with a great task, but 
he hand of the ordaining of^cer alone can give this 
;ervice validity. There is a way of looking upon ordi- 
lation as being useful in the church and conducive to 
jood order. There is also a way of considering it which 
s purely mechanical. Belt up the pulleys and the result 
ollows. 

It cannot be denied that the ordinances have been 
'egarded by some in a mechanical way. Submit to bap- 
:ism, and at once you are morally cleansed. Go to mass, 
md you accumulate so much merit. The ordinances 
lave unquestionably contributed their part to the spirit- 
lal well-being of the church, but their real value is ob- 
;cured by a mechanical conception of their operation 
n human life. 

The analogies of life and growth are more con- 
genial to the nature of Christianity than the analogies 
)f machines. In dealing with personalities we have no 
iuch cause and effect relationship as is involved in run- 
ling a drill press with an electric motor. The spiritual 
iplift of the race cannot come like the rushing elevator 
n a sky-scraper, but must come like the slow growing 
)rocess of the oak which rears its head high enough 

survey the surrounding landscape. We can accept 
10 creed or ordinance or organization by any other 
standard of value than its contribution to the vital pro- 
:ess. 

THE PUBLIC SCHOOL AND CONSERVATISM 

A VISIT to the country districts suggests how great 
has been the progress among our rural churches, 
as indeed with the churches of most religious 
Dodies. There is now found an open mind for opinions 
that are new. There is evidenced much less of the dog- 
matic temper than a few years ago and a great hunger 
[or new knowledge is revealed. 

The rural public school has been doing a great work. 
Each little school house has become a library and a 
social center, and the liberalizing influences of modern 
ife have now been brought to isolated communities, 
rhrough the "Schoolma'am" the best magazines and the 
lew books are now introduced in country districts. 

This means that the point of view of modern science 
[las come to be well established among the intelligent 
j'oung farmers of today. In the atmosphere of this 
licientific interest, it is impossible for dogmatism to dwell. 
The spirit of the laboratory is humility and not dogmatism, 
irhe point of view of evolution involves no static concep- 
jion of life. 

1 Meanwhile, certain obscurantist preachers continue 
o make themselves ridiculous by denouncing the new 
ight. If they do not find a real message for their 
learers, they must move soon and keep moving every 
IX months. These belated preachers of static religion 
an find no abiding place in communities where the pub- 
ic school has done its perfect work. 

There is now going into the country district the 
oung man who does not preach against learning, but 
/ho spreads it. He knows science and criticism and 



j_ 



enriches his message with material from these fields. 
In communities blessed with such ministry, the rural 
people are not turning away from the church, but to- 
ward it. The new preacher in a certain rural community 
was greeted at the close of his sermon with this compli- 
ment : "This is new, but I like it." Thus he epitomized 
the judgment of the whole community toward a modern 
view of religion. Old things are passing away and all 
shall be new. 

A NEW ERA IN ILLINOIS MISSIONS 

AN examination of the program arranged for the 
next Illinois state convention indicates the 
changes which are coming into the methods of 
Illinois Disciples. The meeting which will be held at 
Taylorville September 10-13, will be full of interest from 
first to last. 

Such great speakers as W. E. Gordon of India, Her- 
bert L. Willett, Jr., of Beirut, and Professor W. C. Bow- 
er, will make the evening sessions memorable. The 
day-time programs will furnish little opportunity for 
oratory and will be in the nature of conferences. An un- \ 
usual number of laymen will be heard and an examina- 
tion of the program shows that these men have been 
chosen with great care. The men who will speak are < 
prominent in the social and business life of their com- 
munities and devoted to the cause of religion. 

One of the features of the meeting will be an ad- 
dress by State Secretary Harry H. Peters in which he 
will expound the new methods of missionary co-opera- 
tion in Illinois. The state has been re-districted and in 
each district one man will now spend his entire time in 
the service of the churches. The leakage that has been 
going on in recent years is to be stopped and provisions 
made for a really constructive program in state mis- 
sions. 

Life in Illinois is changing rapidly. The sudden 
emergence of a great city like Chicago in a single gen- 
eration drawing the young people to the cities, the re- 
placing of the older American farmer with immigrant 
tenants upon the land, and the great increase of wealth 
through the earnings of the mines and the corn belt 
country have brought nothing less than a revolution in 
the life of the commonwealth. 

Illinois is the richest and the most populous of the 
states in the Mississippi valley but she has not always 
been the most progressive. Her school system has been 
behind that of some other states in important regards 
and the roads are still a disgrace. No state can be con- 
sidered truly progressive in these days if its population 
is mud-bound for part of the year. The Disciples of 
Christ are a great force in the state and should be doing 
their utmost in helping forward the progress of this 
great commonwealth. 

BETHANY ASSEMBLY 

A SEASON of more conspicuous success has not 
been known in the history of Bethany Assembly 
than the one which closed August 19. In at- 
tendance, in earnestness of purpose, in richness of pro- 
gram, in all-around friendliness of spirit on the part of 
those who were there and, we are told, in financial 
profit, the Assembly of this summer exceeded all its 
predecessors. 

There are great possibilities in Bethany Assembly 
under the right leadership and ideals. It could be made 



8 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 30, 1917 



a constructive force in the life of the Disciples if the 
spirit and policy of this summer's gathering were ad- 
hered to and developed. It is well located at the center 
of our brotherhood's population, and could be made to 
draw large attendances if the timidity and reactionism 
that have found embodiment too often in its programs 
were decisively abandoned. 

Another year like this one should see this Disciples' 
Chautauqua well established, not only as to its financial 
performance, but in its function as a liberalizing force 
in our. communion. 

PROFESSOR SNODDY 

PROFESSOR E. E. SNODDY of Transylvania Col- 
lege, Lexington, Ky., was for two weeks the chief 

speaker at Bethany Assembly, tie made twenty 
addresses. In the mornings he spoke on some phase 
of the New Testament Church, concluding the morning 
series with four lectures on the "Background of the 
Disciples' History." In the afternoon he spoke on 
some theme of psychology, having in mind the large 
class of young people on the grounds taking instruction 
in religious education. 

After hearing a number of these addresses we are 
quite ready to characterize Professor Snoddy as noth- 
ing short of a genius in the fine art of popularizing 
technical knowledge. He can really make psychology 
easy — and he does not sacrifice scientific precision by 
doing so. Day after day his audiences grew in num- 
bers and their interest was most intense at the close. 

Probably the enthusiasm of the Assembly reached 
its highest in response to Professor Snoddy's lectures 
on the Disciples. He did what we believe no man 
among us has ever before undertaken systematically to 
do — to relate the historic character and development 
of the Disciples' movement to the economic and social 
conditions in which the movement was implicit. In this 
contribution Professor Snoddy is a real originator. His 
interpretation of the Disciples' movement as a response 
to the needs of the great, free and virile frontier is one 
of the most fascinating stories his audience at Bethany 
ever heard. Again and again he was petitioned to put 
it into a book, and there is some hope of his doing so. 

The Christian Century believes the enthusiasm 
of his Bethany hearers is an indication of the kind of 
response the larger public would give to his thesis in 
book form. It is our opinion that his thesis would work 
a reconstruction in the thought life of the Disciples of 
Christ. 

THE PUNISHMENT OF SIN 

THE argument of some is that we need a doctrine 
of a future hell to even up the inequalities of the 
present. Such an attitude would seem to concede 
that the sinner just now has the best end of it. Are 
there not many who secretly envy the sinner his sin? 
It is a very insecure foundation for the spiritual life 
to make the concession that the sinner has the best of it 
in the here and now. Whatever the fact be about the 
future punishment of sin, and this seems a part, of a 
proper doctrine of immortality, we would deny that the 
sinner has the advantage of the saint. 

The older religions held that sin need not wait for 
another world for its punishment. The Furies of the 
Greek religion had for their business the following of 
men to the uttermost part of the earth to carry the retri- 




bution that was due them. John believed in a present 
judgment and declared that the unbeliever was con- 
demned already, because he had chosen darkness for 
light. 

When we admit that the sinner has the advantage 
in this world, we are still living according to the sinner's 
scale of values. 

It turns out, however, that Ave have made no sac- 
rifices. The choice of the Christian life is pure gain. 
The spiritually-minded man may be in poverty without 
being poor. He may be beset with enemies, but be at 
peace. He can look into the face of imminent death 
and yet know a great joy. In all these things the Christ 
led the way. 

The sinner, on the other hand, has the seeds of 
death within him. It takes no law-court to bring the 
debauchee to disgust and ennui. The fruit of Sodom is 
at last bitter in his mouth. His punishment is ever with 
him. 

ADMITTING MEN TO OUR MINISTRY 

E Disciples are so ultra-individualistic that we 
have no council of the brethren to pass upon tht 
fitness of a man to enter the Christian ministry. 
In Congregational and Baptist churches, this work is 
done by the association, but among the Disciples the 
minister is self-appointed. 

This loose practice of the Disciples of admitting 
men to the ministry with no counsel or advice is offen- 
sive to the Christian world and will constitute a dis- 
tinct disadvantage when the time comes for the disap- 
pearance of the denominational order. From the days 
of the apostles preachers were set apart by some more 
careful method than the one we have. 

With no machinery for examining candidates for the 
ministry, it would be a most valuable service for some 
agency such as the Board of Education to draw up some 
minimum requirements for men who are considering the 
ministry. These could be made known to the churches. 
With some such form, a congregation might decide more 
intelligently whether it should encourage a man to 
preach by offering him a pastorate. 

The interpretation of Christian truth for the new 
generation must be made by men who have dignified 
the Bible by spending years in the scientific study oi 
its contents and by considering zealously the great 
sciences that relate to human life. Only men with thi 
sort of training can hope to be in the first rank of use- 
fulness in the service of the church. 



The Two Voices 

By Thomas Curtis Clark, 



LOVE has vanished from the earth ; 
Hate has raised her flag on high ; 
Pride and Greed and Lust for blood 
Growl and shriek above the flood 
And truth is left to die." 

II. 
"Hate is vanishing from earth ; 

Love is being born again ; 
Pride and Greed and Lust for blood 
All shall perish in the flood — 

For God and Truth must reign !" 



The Church's Responsibihty and 

Opportunity 



By Henry Churchill King 



rHE crisis today is to be seen in 
the greatness of the issues in- 
volved. For they cut, I verily 
elieve, to the very bone of any decent 
ivilization and of all ideal interests, 
lough this we have been slow to see. 
The real issue at bottom, indeed, 
think may be said to be the issue of 
ur being Christians through and 
irough. There is probably a growing 
onviction on the part of thoughtful 
Christian men the world over that 
he incomparably terrible war through 
/hich we are passing and the world 
risis it involves themselves suggest 
tiat the race's real trouble is that 
here has been no consistent and rad- 
:al trial of the spirit and principles 
f Christ in the whole realm of hu- 
lan life. We are learning that we 
annot be half-way Christians suc- 
essfully. 

CARRYING THE WHOLE CROSS. 

Here, too. Drummond's contention 
lolds, that "the whole cross is more 
asily carried than the half." "The 
hurch cannot go on," another has 
aid, "preaching Jesus to individuals 
.nd Machiavelli to states. At last 
he high gods weary of such stupidity 
md send the deluge." 

The church certainly must make 
ure that it does not subject itself to a 
iriticism leveled by a recent writer 
igainst certain humanitarians. There 
las been some danger, I fear, upon 
hat point. "It is just those," this 
vriter says, "who seek to serve hu- 
nanity, who, in this supreme human 
:risis, affect an aristocratic aloofness 
md snobbish neutrality toward its 
ssues. Only colossal conceit, crooked 
hinking, or dazed sensibilities enables 
ivowed humanitarians to believe 
hat a majority of civilized mankind 
s fighting and sacrificing all without 
eason and significance for human 
Togress. * "^ * Whatever greedy 
iivalries lay concealed in the darkness 
jif antecedent diplomacy, the war is 
iteadily becoming a conflict between 
jirogress and reaction, humanity and 
javagery, freedom and tyranny." 

A NEW EPOCH AT HAND. 

The church needs, too, a new sense 
f the greatness of its opportunity in 
^is hour. That opportunity is hardly 
iss than the possibility of a new civ- 
ization, a new epoch for the king- 
cm of God on earth. 



First of all, the church as trustee 
of that great Christian conviction of 
the priceless value and inviolable 
sacredness of every human soul, has 
a great obligation in these times. 

For that great conviction is the 
root, the absolutely indispensable root, 
of all liberal principles and of every 
form of liberty, political, economic, 
social. 

UNSELFISH LEADERSHIP NEEDED. 

That trust the church cannot lay 
down, nor be indifferent as to whether 
its fruits abide, for Christianity is 
democratic to the core. In it there 
is neither Greek nor Jew, circumcision 
nor uncircumcision, bond nor free, 
male nor female. Peace is not the 
sole Christian interest in time of war. 
The church must hand that trust 
down, not weakened, but strength- 
ened, more clearly comprehended, 
more ideally embodied. 

As trustee of this deep conviction 
of the essential sacredness of human- 
ity, the church should furnish, too, in 
a special degree that unselfish leader- 
ship which democracy particularly re- 
quires. 

There is evidence in the various 
government advisory councils and 
commissions, in the principles of tax- 
ation that are being urged, and in the 
fact that the nation is probably more 
united in this war, the most unselfish 
of all our wars, than in any preceding 
war — in all this there is evidence that 
the country is to have unselfish serv- 
ice of a high order, and probably 
greater freedom from corruption and 
graft, than ever before in its history. 
But all this should mean, with more 
reason, that the church is not to lag 
behind in unselfish leadership here in 
defense of its great liberal heritage. 

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS. 

We shall be sympathetic with loyal 
German-Americans, and have some 
sense of the difficult position in which 
they find themselves. One German 
paper in my own region said a little 
while ago: "Terrible days of con- 
flict between duty toward our country 
and natural sympathy for the land of 
our fathers are before us. But if it 
should break our hearts, America 
shall not find us wanting." 

We need sympathy with conscien- 
tious objectors to war. There must 
be no Bertrand Russell cases in the 
United States, no harrying of gen- 



uine, conscientious objectors, no un- 
due censorship. 

We may far better imitate France's 
democratic conduct of the war than 
Prussia's autocracy. We are always 
seriously exposed to the danger that 
comes in fighting error, of approxi- 
mating that error. "Heaven save us," 
as Lord Bryce says, "from imitating 
Prussia," in the interests of a short- 
sighted efficiency that forgets half the 
moral law, blunts freedom of initi- 
ative, and fails utterly in the most 
vital concerns. We want no Kaiser- 
dom in America. And if there is to 
be no Kaiserdom in America it will be 
the responsibility of the church above 
all to make sure that that is so. The 
church is bound here to bear no un- 
certain testimony, bound scrupulously 
to guard our Protestant inheritance of 
freedom of conscience, freedom of 
thought, freedom of speech, freedom 
of investigation. 

H. G. WELLS' NEW FAITH. 

The church is the trustee also, in 
peculiar degree, of faith in God, and 
she has in this world crisis a rare ob- 
ligation and opportunity to bring to 
men this vision and faith, a new con- 
viction of our absolute need of God, so 
vigorously voiced by Mr. Wells. He 
has not been much of a religious 
prophet until these recent months, and 
it is all the more significant, I think, 
tliat it should be he who writes in this 
fashion : 

"Men will have to look to another 
power, that is at once above them and 
within, to assert those eternal standards 
of jnstice which alone can give peace. 
. . . And nntil they do look up and 
see him, this world is no better than 
a rat-pit, a place slippery and disgusting 
and wearisome with the tormented stuff 
of furious and aimless lives." 

How greatly has there been dem- 
onstrated in these days our need of 
God, our absolute dependence upon 
God for guidance where we cannot 
see, for help in a world crisis which 
we cannot ourselves solve, for a God 
not tribal nor national in a war that 
becomes ever more and more devilish, 
in a crisis when machinery and organ- 
ization and wealth and science are 
plainly not enough. Truly, if any man 
believes in prayer, this is the time to 
pray. 

The churches, surely, are trustees 
of faith in God, and they have such 
an opportunity as has, perhaps, never 



10 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



August 30, 1917 



before come, to bring home to men 
their need, their absolute need of God. 

FROM OLD TESTAMENT TO NEW 

Once more, the church is trustee 
of Christianity, of the spirit and 
teaching of Jesus. We have been hav- 
ing a demonstration on a world-wide 
scale of humanity's absolute need of 
the Christianity of Christ. 

What has been happening, I sup- 
pose, is that little by little men have 
been sloughing off all un-Christ like 
types of Christianity. An Old Testa- 
ment type of Christianity has not 
borne the test. The Christianity that 
we must preserve is not to be shallow 
and it is not to be sentimental. It is 
not primarily emotional. It is not 
primarily theological. It is not pri- 
marily ceremonial. All these types of 
Christianity have been proved want- 
ing. With all of them it has been 
found possible to harmonize at the 
same time a hatred and bitterness ut- 
terly un-Christlike. All these have 
failed. The only Christianity that can 
be said to have come out of this con- 
flict unscathed is the Christianity of 
Christ himself, ethical through and 
through, applicable to all men and to 
all classes, and to nations as well as 
to individuals, free, utterly free from 
hatred and bitterness and from all ar- 
rogance. 

IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITIES. 

I have said that the church needs 
a keen sense of the greatness of the 
crisis and of its involved opportunity, 
and that it must read its obligations 
and opportunities in the fact that it 
is a trustee of great spiritual inter- 
ests, of the value and sacredness of 
the person, of freedom of conscience, 
of faith in God, and of the Christian- 
ity of Christ. 

Out of all this, now, grow certain 
further obligations and opportunities, 
which the church must face. 

First of all, this world crisis calls 
for cooperation among all the forces 
of righteousness to a degree so far 
hardly imagined. Is this generation 
to prove wise enough and great 
enough not only to check these de- 
structive agencies, but positively to re- 
place them with agencies of construc- 
tive good-will? Against such terrible 
possibilities as the war has disclosed 
there is no adequate defense but a 
moral and religious one. This is no 
time, therefore, for the forces of 
righteousness to indulge in divisive 
differences. They must get together 
and work together. 

The churches need to sweep away 
cobwebs and subtleties, and to see the 
great issue of this war with clearness. 
Ultimately that issue is, as I have al- 
ready implied, whether nations as well 
as individuals are to be held to moral 
and Christian standards. In that 



issue the kingdom of God is vitally 
concerned, and the churches may not 
be indifferent to it. For Germany's 
philosophy of the state, as a law to 
itself and as above the claims of all 
morality, is paganism pure and simple. 
There can be, as I have said, no 
conceivable peace between that phil- 
osophy and Christianity. 

CHRIST MUST RULE NATIONS. 

What does progress in morals 
mean? In general, it means progress 
in the application of the moral law, 
from the individual to the class, and 
from the class to the nation. The 
cause of morals, and the cause of 
Christ, go forward in the propor- 



churches, to make sure that our con- 
duct of the war shall match our or- 
iginal aims. If that is to be true, we 
must set our faces like a flint against 
all war madness. 

CHRISTIANS SHOULD NOT BE STAND- 
PATTERS. 

The churches may be expected, 
above all to believe in the possibilities 
of a new civilization. No disciple of 
Christ has any right, certainly, to be a 
cynic or a standpatter. Let him read 
Christ's parables of the marvelous 
growth of the good. Let him remem- 
ber the prayer that his Lord has taught 
him to offer, that the will of God may 



Dedicated to Miss Alice L. F. Fitzgerald, Edith Cavell memorial 
nurse, going to the front 

BY 

VACHEL LINDSAY 
(of the Vigilantes) 

YOUR fine white hand is Heaven's gift 
To cure the wide world, stricken sore, 
Bleeding at the breast and head, 
Tearing at its wounds once more. 

Your white hand is a prophecy, 

A living hope that Christ shall come 
And make the nations merciful. 

Hating the bayonet and drum. 

Each desperate burning brain you soothe. 

Or ghastly broken frame you bind. 
Brings one day nearer our bright goal. 

The love-alliance of mankind. 

— From The Red Cross Magazine. 



tion in which we succeed in getting 
the principles of Christ, already recog- 
nized as obligatory upon individuals, 
acknowledged as holding also between 
class and class, and between nation 
and nation. The standards and ideals 
of Christ must prevail in our entire 
civilization. Is it no concern of the 
churches that this greatest triumph of 
Christianity should be accomplished? 
Once more, it is peculiarly incum- 
bent upon the churches, I think, that 
they help to keep the ideals of the 
nation high in the midst of war. No 
nation, perhaps, ever came into a 
great war with cleaner hands, after 
more patience — two years and a little 
over — or in- more disinterested 
fashion, than ours into this war. It 
peculiarly concerns us all, therefore, 
and especially the membership of the 



be done on earth even as in heaven. 
Let him be sure that Christianity is 
intended to permeate all the life of 
men. And let him believe, therefore, 
in the possibilities of a new civiliza- 
tion. 

Let the Christian man remind him- 
self of some of the things that make 
it seem as though that new civilization 
had indeed begun to dawn: the great 
Russian revolution, the progress of 
the prohibition of the liquor traffic 
among the belligerent nations, the fact 
that America has herself come into 
this war in such disinterested fashion, 
and what that may mean for surer 
triumph of the liberal interests and of 
the disinterested aims of the Allies at 
the end. Let him remember, too, the! 
extent to which a League of Nations 
to Enforce Peace already exists. 



gust 30, 1917 



THE CHRISTIAN CENTURY 



11 



EXPERIMENT IN INTERNATION- 
ALISM. 

;.et the Christian, too, remember 
; enormous degree to which co- 
^ration in multipHed fields is al- 
.dy going on between these nations. 
Iiat is the greatly significant thing 
ich has been occurring in these last 
V days here in Washington ? "What 

being arranged in Washington 
:se days," one of our great editors 
'S, "is really a gigantic experiment 

internationalism. For the first 
le in history the food supply, the 
pping, the credit, and the man- 
ner of the nations are to be put un- 
- something like joint administra- 
n. We are witnessing the creation 

a super-national control of the 
irld's necessities. The men who 
; charged with conducting this war 
; now compelled to think as inter- 
tional statesmen. The old notions 

sovereignty no longer govern the 
:ts. Three of the unifying forces 

mankind are at work — hunger, 
nger, and a great hope. They are 
eeping into the scrap-heap the sep- 
itist theories that nations should be 
f-sufficing economically and abso- 
ely independent politically * * * 
new and more powerful machinery 

internationalism is being created, 
is a true internationalism, because 
deals, not with dynastic and diplo- 
itic alliances, but with the cooper- 
ve control of those vital supplies on 



which human life depends. * * * 
This is the birth of the League of Na- 
tions." That is a thing to make any 
thoughtful man hopeful. 

The membership of the churches 
must be intelligent, thoughtful, un- 
selfish world citizens, with world vis- 
ion, educated for world living, 
ashamed not to think in world terms, 
in terms of humanity, and so lifted 
above a selfish exclusive patriotism, 
while at the same time genuinely loyal 
to their nation. It is muddy thinking 
which supposes that a true national- 
ism demands national conceit and sel- 
fish national exclusiveness. 

A SOCIAL PROGRAM AFTER THE WAR. 

The churches are bound, finally, to 
maintain and press a true social pro- 
gram, by and through the war, as 
well as after it, to make certain that 
this world cataclysm shall bear its 
full fruit in a better civilization than 
the world has yet seen, a civilization 
that shall be worthy in some measure 
of the enormous sacrifices which have 
gone into this war, and more worthy 
of the name which we give to our 
civilization — Christian. 

And the end is not to come with- 
out sacrifice, as I have tried elsewhere 
to say. "He was shot, my last boy," 
(said a French officer to Mr. Frank 
H. Simonds) "up near Verdun, in the 
beginning of the war. He did not 
die at once and I went to him. For 
twenty days I sat beside him in a 



cellar waiting for him to die. I bought 
the last coffin in the village that he 
might be buried in it, and kept it un- 
der my bed. We talked many times 
before he died, and he told me all he 
knew of the fight, of the men about 
him, and how they fell. My name is 
finished, but I say to you now that 
in all that experience there was noth- 
ing that was not beautiful." 

THE BEAUTY OF SACRIFICE. 

Its beauty was the awful, the sanct- 
ifying, the consecrating beauty of self- 
sacrifice. Its terrible price, the fath- 
ers and sons, the mothers and daugh- 
ters, the age and youth of more than 
half the nations of the world are still 
steadily paying, in the name, they be- 
lieve, of something more than a selfish 
patriotism. That sifting, searching, 
world crisis is now to bring to us, too, 
a like sacrificial baptism. God grant 
the opportunity may not come to us 
in vain ! 

When one thinks of what God has 
already wrought in these last months, 
of the magnitude of the sacrifices the 
race has already made, and of the 
great ends for which the liberal na- 
tions are now united he can only catch 
up the words of the "Battle Hymn of 
the Republic:" 

"Mine eyes have seen the glory of the 
coming of the Lord; 

Oh, be swift, my soul, to answer him! 
be jubilant my feet! 

Our God is marching on." 




ion in the Labor Movement 



~^HERE is SO much religion in 
the labor movement, and so 
much of the social spirit in the 
urch, that, with the inevitable de- 
lopment of each in these respects, 
will some day become a question 

to whether the church will cap- 
re the labor movement, or whether 
2 labor movement will capture the 
jurch. 

|[t is becoming cjuite clear to most 
jus that neither side can afford to 
jiore the other. While there are 
pd and sufficient reasons for the 
Urch to discuss the problem of 

w it may save the people, there 
also most excellent reasons 

ich prove that the people must 

'e the church. 

WORKINGMEN HONOR JESUS 

Vorkingmen almost universally 
lor Jesus as a Great Friend and 
ider. A recent writer said : "In 
t fortress of progress which the 
ialist workingmen of Belgium 
e built in Brussels, the Maison 
Peuple, as you pass from one 
t to another of that hive of many 



By Charles Stelzle 

activities, you may happen to go 
into an upper lecture hall, and note 
across the end of the platform a 
great curtain hanging. It is drawn 
reverently aside, and behind it one 
sees a fresco of the form of Jesus, 
with hand uplifted pointing the way 
above. It is surely deeply signifi- 
cant of the vital power of His mes- 
sage, and of the way He wins men 
still to follow Him." 

Almost every mention of the name 
of Jesus in workingmen's meetings 
brings forth the most hearty ap- 
plause. 

The average workingman is nat- 
urally religious. His religion may 
not always be expressed in the or- 
thodox manner, but it is there, nev- 
ertheless. Infidelity scarcely exists 
among workingmen. As a matter of 
fact, they respond most readily to 
the religious appeal. It is the testi- 
mony of nearly every preacher that 
engages in shop meetings that they 
are never listened to with greater 
respect and with greater interest by 
any other kind of an audience. 

The social cj[uestion is fundamen- 



tally a moral and a religious prob- 
lem. In the end, there will be not 
one answer to the social question, 
but many. But all will agree in this 
— all will be religious. It will never 
be settled upon any other basis. 
History has prophesied it. The best 
labor leaders are coming to recog- 
nize it. 

RELIGION THE KEY 

These things prove that the work- 
ingman, in his devotion to Jesus and 
in his natural religious disposition, 
is in an attitude of mind which 
makes him peculiarly ready for the 
introduction of a great moral mo- 
tive. In so far as he responds to this 
principle, will he be given power in 
the industrial world. Agitation, ed- 
ucation and legislation there will 
continue to be, but they must be al- 
ways upon a moral basis. And that 
organization will survive among 
workingmen — be it the church or the 
labor movement — which has the 
greatest genius to transmute these 
high ideals into practical, every-day 
living, meeting all their needs. 



Tying a Church Building in Congo 



Now, there are church build- 
ings and church buildings. 
The ancients built for a hun- 
dred years. In Congo we cannot 
build for a hundred months, when 
we employ only native methods. 
Until now we have not been able 
at Lotumbe to use any other style. 
The title of this article suggests 
the method of building a house. It 
is tied together. The bark of cer- 
tain vines is used as string, and 
when these vines rot out, as they 
usually do in four or five years, the 
house is ready to fall. 

FOUR BUILDINGS IN SEVEN YEARS 

The new church building at Lo- 
tumbe is the fourth following the 
native style. There was the first lit- 
tle church which we found here 
when we came seven years ago. It 
was soon too small and another had 
to be built. This second one had to 
be enlarged before many months 
passed and then the third still larger 
and now the fourth the largest yet. 

It will be seen that these tem- 
porary styles have some advantages. 
If we had constructed a permanent 
building at first it would never have 
accommodated the growing numbers 
who came to us. But we hope the 
time is coming when we shall build 
a permanent house. 

It is a good deal of work to as- 
semble the material for one of these 
native-built houses. The roof is 
made of palm leaf mats, more than 
four thousand of them. For rafters 
we use bamboo poles, more than a 
thousand. The leaves for the mats 
grow on bamboo poles and these are 
found on the palm trees in the 
swamps. These swamps are from 
two to three miles from the station, 
and are reached partly by canoe and 
then by a journey through the for- 
est. 

HOW CONGO HOUSES ARE ERECTED 

We lacked a certain number of 
bamboo poles, so we organized a 
raiding party into those swampy 
depths. We took all the canoes 
available and all the men and boys 
from the school and started out. 
The ladies went part of the way and 
we landed them in a palm grove, 
leaving a few boys with them to 
see that elephants and leopards and 
snakes did not disturb them, and 
also to help get dinner in the shade 
of the palms. Our canoes cannot 
reach the swamps as they are barred 
by fallen trees and shallow water. 
So overboard goes everybody except 
the writer, wading waist-deep part 



By Herbert Smith 

of the way and sinking in mud at 
every step. 

SOME DIFFICULTIES ENCOUNTERED 

Mr. Hobgood had stated that he 
was going to cut bamboo with the 
rest. He went overboard with a 
shout and was soon lost from sight. 
It was two hours before I saw him 
again. I did not know whether he 
was a white man or a red man when 
he came bringing in his ten bamboo. 
Part of the men had been back an 
hour and we had plenty of time to 
load all the canoes well before the 
last arrived. If Mr. Hobgood had 
kept his council I should have 
thought he had brought his bamboo 
all the way, but he spoiled it by 
telling what happened. He had cut 
ten of the largest bamboo he could 
find, great long poles. He tied these 
all together and started back, but 
very few of those ten reached the 
canoe, for they were wet and heavy 
as lead. Moreover, wading in mud 
and water added to the difficulty. 
Some of the men helped him with his 
load and finally gave him another 
bunch, while they gathered smaller 
ones. 



The Christians helped to gather 
the material and to "tie" the house. 
It is a building 50 ft. by 100 ft. It 
has rooms partitioned off in each 
corner, as we will use it for our 
school as well as for church serv- 
ices. 

WORK AND SONG 

Now, the house which Solomon 
built for the Lord was built with- 
out noise. Not so the one built at 
Lotumbe. They sang as they 
worked and when the women came 
to mud up the walls one would have 
thought a whole city was under con-l 
struction so great was the confu-j 
sion. But the house was finished 
and Mr. Hobgood, who had been thf| 
leader of the movement, dedicatec| 
the building free of debt on Apri 
9th. 

The total cost of this building 
was about one hundred dollars, in 
eluding the labor, most of which wa 
given free. You now can see wb 
it will not last a hundred years. Per 
haps by the time we need anothe 
house our friends will give th 
where-with-all for this needy ant 
worthy work. 



Some Recent Books 



§^ 



The Definite Object. By Jeffery 
Farnol. The author of this story 
won fame through his "The Broad 
Highway" which was published a 
few years ago. The present story 
has its setting in New York City's 
darker regions, "Hell's Kitchen" be- 
ing the scene of much of the narra- 
tive. The hero is a young Ameri- 
can millionaire, Geoffry Ravenslee, 
weary of living without an object in 
life. He finally finds an "object" in 
the form of a certain "Hermione," 
good angel of the dark New York 
community. Plenty of adventure 
and clean romance, as described in 
the attractive style of Mr. Farnol, 
make this an ideal volume for sum- 
mer reading. (Little, Brown & Co., 
Boston. $1.50 net.) 

The Lookout Man. By B. M. 
Bower. The atmosphere of a Cali- 
fornia mountain-top is sufficient to 
make this an agreeable volume. The 
story is told of a man who sought 
solitude in the west, on the moun- 
tain, but who, after many adven- 
tures, found Marion Rose necessary 
to his happiness. This story has 
never been published serially, which 
is certainly not saying anything 
against it. (Little, Brown & Co., 
Boston. $1.35 net.) 



TJie Bird Study Book. By T. Gi 
bert Pearson. The author of thi 
attractive volume of bird studies 
the secretary of the National Assc 
ciation of Audoboii Societies, whic 
is proof sufficient that he knoA\ 
whereof he speaks in this volum 
The purpose in the book is to en 
ate among the people a keener ii| 
terest in the wonders of nature ;| 
revealed in the lives of the featfl 
ered friends of man. The illustrj 
tions are very fine and exceeding' 
helpful in teaching one to "placii 
the birds. (Doubleday, Page i 
Company, Garden City, N. Y. $1.| 
net.) I 

To Mother. An anthology 
"Mother" verse with an introdd 
tion by Kate Douglas Wiggin. Hei 
are gathered together the best thinl' 
that have been written aboj: 
"Mother," the taste of Mrs. Wiggj 
serving to exclude commonpla| 
verses, and presenting the work 
such writers as William Blake, Rv 
yard Kipl-ing, Longfellow, Alfr 
Austin, John Bannister Tablr ( 
entry Patmore, William Cowper a| 
a hundred others. An ideal gift be 
for "Mother." (Houghton Mifi 
Company, Boston. $1 net.) 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii 



The Larger Christian World 



A DEPARTMENT OF INTERDENOMINATIONAL ACQUAINTANCE 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiim^ 



By ORVIS F. JORDAN 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIOIIIIIII 



A Flag in Every 
Church 

The Presbyterian churches in Cin- 
cinnati, O., have accomplished some- 
thing which should appeal to Pro- 
testant churches everywhere. They 
now have an American flag' in every 
Presbyterian building in the city. 

Methodists Spending 
War Money 

The Methodists have already be- 
gun the expenditure of the $50,000 
war fund appropriated by the Board 
of Home Missions. In Chicago, 
Bishop Nicholson has appointed a 
committee of fifty strong men to 
plan the work in this district. Part 
of the money will be used to secure 
the services of stronger pastors in 
the churches near the cantonments 
and camps. Methodist chaplains 
will also be provided with equip- 
ment for their work. 

Congregationalists Successful 
In Home Missions 

Although the Congregationalists 
are not a large denomination numer- 
ically, being outnumbered by the 
Disciples nearly two to one, they are 
among the foremost leaders of this 
country in mission work. The Con- 
gregational Home Missionary So- 
ciety reports for 1916-1917 that it 
helped 2,413 churches and 469 for- 
eign missions Avhich did work in 
23 languages. There were organ- 
ized 75 new churches and 14,546 ac- 
cessions to the missionary churches 
are reported. The total expendi- 
tures of the society for the year were 
$681,498.74. The society does a 
kind of work that moves Congrega- 
tionalists to entrust large sums of 
money to its care. 

Will Try Union 
For One Year 

The Congregational and Method- 
ist churches in Leicester, Mass., will 
try union for one year. They are 
forming provisionally the "Associ- 
ate Church of Leicester." The two 
pastors will remain, but most of the 
services will be of a union character, 
the two Sunday schools being com- 
bined. 

Fight Booze 
with Ad3 

The Federal Council of the Church 
of Christ in America plans to hit 
John Barleycorn some body blows 
with a million dollars worth of dis- 



play advertising to be placed 
throughout the country. Rev. Chas. 
Stelzle has been placed in charge 
of the campaign. They are offering 
the religious press cuts for the pur- 
pose of reaching their constituency. 
Prohibition as a war emergency 
measure will be emphasized. 

United Presbyterians 
Urge Morning Watch 

The address of Dr. John R. Mott 
on the "Morning Watch" has been 
so well thought of by leaders of the 
United Presbyterian church that 
they have arranged to have the ad- 
dress printed and distributed free 
to every member of their organiza- 
tion who may desire it. The ad- 
dress urges the use of an early morn- 
ing hour for devotional purposes. 

Cornerstone Laid for Christian 
Endeavor Building 

The Christian Endeavor move- 
ment is to have a building as a na- 
tional headquarters. The corner- 
stone of the new building was laid 
on Beacon Hill, Boston, July 19. 
The ceremony was presided over 
by Mr. Daniel A. Poling. 

Sunday Schools Honor 
John Wanamaker 

Mr. John Wanamaker is known all 
over this country as an ardent Sun- 
day school worker. On his 79th 
birthday recently, he was honored 
by a letter from the World Associa- 
tion. In his reply he declared that 
the Sunday school had kept him 
young. 

War Plans for the 
Home Folks 

Rev. Roy B. Guild, who this year 
leads the movement of the Federal 
Council for the more effective organ- 
ization of local communities in relig- 
ious work insists that the war pro- 
gram of the church is not all to be 
for the soldiers and sailors, but for 
the folks at home as well. He urges 
especially community socials in 
which the new soldier songs shall 
be sung. 

Methodist Preacher 
Mobbed in Chicago 

Methodism is considerably agi- 
tated by the mobbing of a gospel 
wagon and its workers in "Little 
Italy." Chicago. It is charged by 
the Methodist workers that the mob 
was moved to its work by the priest 



of a near-by Roman Catholic church. 
Both the priest and the Protestant 
preachers were brought into court, 
the former for disturbing a religious 
meeting and the latter for obstruct- 
ing the street. All were dismissed 
but the Roman Catholic judge 
threatened the preachers with a fine 
of $200 if they ventured into this 
district again. Another name com- 
monly given to the neighborhood 
is "Hell's Corner." The Methodists 
insist they are going back. 

Religious Speakers 
on Conservation 

The government is going to enlist 
the services of many volunteer re- 
ligious workers who will interpret 
the conservation movement to Amer- 
ica. A school will be held in Wash- 
ington, August 28-31, in which in- 
struction will be given these speak- 
ers by the now nationally famous 
Mr. Hoover and a number of other 
able leaders. It is hoped that a large 
corps of these speakers will spread 
throughout the country the informa- 
tion which will prevent poverty and 
distress during the remainder of the 
war period. 

Y. M. C. A. Uses 
Moving Pictures 

The Y. M. C. A. is rapidly mobil- 
izing its forces to spend wisely the 
millions that were entrusted to its 
care at the beginning of the war. 
Among its recreational plans will be 
the use of moving pictures. In 343 
cantonments, camps and posts, 1,126 
programs will be rendered weekly. 
In the south two motor trucks will 
be used to carry entertainment to 
troops in out of the way places. It 
is said that Mary Pickford is the 
most popular movie actress with the 
soldiers, who do not care much for 
war pictures or for moralizing. 

Dr. Clark Calls Millions 
Campaign a Success 

Dr. Francis E. Clark declares that 
the Million Campaign for the Chris- 
tian Endeavor societies has been a 
success. Reports cannot be secured 
from the whole world but it is be- 
lieved all the goals of the movement 
were realized. The number of new 
societies formed in the United States 
was 8,206 and the number of new 
members more than 718,435. A set 
of "Biennial Plans" for the next two 
years are being formulated. There 
is every evidence of a healthy activ- 
ity in the movement. 



■ 



'Illlllllllll 



Social Interpretations 



By ALVA W. TAYLOR 



The Next Step in Democracy. By 
R. W. Sellars, Ph. D., Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy in the Uni- 
versity of Michip[an. 275 passes. 
$1.50. ^ "^ 

It has not been many years since a 
man favorable to socialism could not 
have held a university chair. It bodes 
well for scholastic freedom that it is 
no longer so. Professor Sellars is 
more an apologist than an advocate in 
this book. He refuses to define so- 
cialism, reminding us that even Marx 
himself never did it. Socialism, he 
contends, is not a doctrinaire system, 
but a movement, a prophecy rather 
than a program, a manifestation of the 
Zeitgeist wherein an unrest precedes 
reform and better times — a groaning 
of creation awaiting the redemption 
that is to come. There are those who 
make it a creed and dogmatize it, but 
the formulas follow instead of pre- 
cede great social and thought move- 
ments. Like democracy, socialism 
must proceed by the trial and error 
method ; it will be an evolution with 
revolutionary episodes perhaps. The 
democracy of today is not that of 
Rousseau's or even Jefferson's defin- 
itions ; neither will the social system 
of a century hence be that of Marx' 
and Engel's definitions. It is founded 
essentially, he argues, upon a faith in 
man and a desire to free the least of 
men from his economic handicap ; it is 
a sort of "will to believe" in humanity^ 
and the possibility of equalizing oppor- 
tunity in a better manner. Of course, 
it challenges present-day institutions 
and would